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Full text of "Sundry Civil Bill, 1916, Hearings . . . 63rd Congress, 3d Session"

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10 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for House Committee on Appropriations relative to amount. 

BUILDINGS IN COURSE OP CON 



Location. 



Buildings. 



Class of work. 



™«^*SS£U 



Amount 
expended for 
site and land. 



Johnstown, N. Y... 
Johnstown, Pa , 

Jonesboro, Ark , 

Kansas City, Kans. 

Kearney, Nebr , 

Kingfisher, Okla... 

Lafayette, La 

Lake City, Minn... 

Lancaster, Ohio 

Lander, Wyo 

Lansing, Mich , 

Laporte, Ind 

Laurens, S. C 

Lawrenceburg, Ky. 

Lead, 8. Dak 

Lebanon, Tenn 

Le Mars, Iowa 

Lewes, Del 

Lewiston, Idaho. . . 

Lexington, Ky 

Lexington, N. C... 

Lexington, Va 

Lima, Ohio 

Litchfield, m 

Little Falls, N. Y.. 
Little Rock, Ark... 

Livingston, Mont. . 
London, Ky 



Post office., 
....do 

....do 

....do 

— do 

....do 



Building 

Site and building, 

....do 



....do.... 
....do.... 
....do.... 
do.... 



..do 

..do 

..do.. 



.do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

.do 



Extension 

Site and building, 

Building 

Site and: building, 

do 

....do 

Building , 

Extension 

Site and building 
do. 



....do.. 
....do.. 
....do., 
.do.. 



Building 

Site and building 

Building 

do , 

do..., , 



.do., 
.do., 
.do.. 



do 

Extension 

Site and building, 
do. 



Long Branch, N. J. 

Lorain, Ohio 

Los Angeles, Cal... 



Lynchburg, Va 

Macomb, 111 

Macon, Mo 

Malone,N. Y 

Manhattan, Kans . . 
Mansfield, Ohio.... 

Marietta, Ohio 

Marinette, Wis..... 

Marlon, Ohio 

Marlboro, Mass 

Marshall, Mo 

Marshall, Tex 

MaryviUe,Mo 

Massillon, Ohio.... 

Mattoon, 111 

McAlester, Okla.... 



Post oii.ee and 

courthouse. 

Postoflce , 

Post ofl ce and 

courthouse. 

PostofLce 

....do 

Post ofl'ce and 

courthouse. 

....do 

PostofKce , 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 



Extension 

Building 

Site and building. 
Extension 



Building 

Site and building. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



McKinney, Tex.... 
McPherson, Kans.. 
Menomonie, Wis. . . 

Mexico, Mo 

Miami, Fla 



Middletown, N. Y. 

Mitford, Mass 

Milledgeville, Ga... 
Milwaukee, Wis.... 
Mineral Wells, Tex. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Minot, N. Dak 



....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post ofTce and 
courthouse. 

Post oil.ce 

do 

do 

do 

Post office, court- 
house and cus- 
tom house. 

Post office 

do 

do 

Appraisers' stores 

Post office 

do. 



Extension 

Site and building., 

Building 

do 

Site and building. 

do 

do 

Building 

Site and building. 

Building 

do 

....do 

Site and building. 

do 

do 

Building 



Site and building. 

do 

Building 

Site and building 
do 



Mishawaka, Ind. 

Missoula, Mont 

Mobile, Ala 

Monroe, Mich 

Monroe, N. C 

Moorhead, Minn 

Morgantown, W. Va, 
Morristown, Tenn.., 
Moscow, Idaho 



Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do. 



....do 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 



Building 

Site and building 

.....do ™, 

Building 

Site and building. 

Building 

Site and building. 



do.... 

Building, 
.do.. 



Site and building 

Building 

do 

Site and building 

Building 

Site and building 



175,000.00 
210,000.00 

80,000.00 

156,000.00 

110,000.00 
45,000.00 
65,000.00 
65,000.00 
75,000.00 

115,000.00 
75,000.00 
70,000.00 
60,000.00 
50,000.00 

100,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
40,000.00 
85,000.00 
80,000.00 
65,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
85,000.00 

125,000.00 

75,000.00 
105,000.00 

125,000.00 

150,000.00 

1,213,367.25 

205,000.00 
70,000.00 
63,500.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 

100.000.00 

100,000.00 
80,000.00 
95,000.00 
70,000.00 
60,000.00 
65,000.00 
75.Q00.00 
90,000.00 
90,000.00 

135,000.00 

60,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
80,000.00 
175,000.00 



75,000.00 
95,000.00 
60,000.00 
115,000.00 
60,000.00 
900,000.00 
150,000.00 

75,000.00 
180,000.00 
300,000.00 
60,000.00 
53,000.00 
63,500.00 
135,000.00 
70,000.00 
100,000.00 



975,000.00 
210,000.00 

80,000.00 

156,000.00 
110,000.00 
• 45,000.00 
55,000.00 
26,000.00 
75,000.00 
115,000.00 
75,000.00 
70,000.00 
60,000.00 

50,000. oa 

100,000.00 
60,000.00 
50,000.00 
40,000.00 
85,000.00 
80,000.00 
65,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
85,000.00 

125,000.00 

75,000.00 
105,000.00 

125,000.00 

150,000.00 

1,213,367.25 

180,000.00 
70,000.00 
63,500.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 
80,000.00 
95,000.00 
70.000.00 
60,000.00 
65,000.00 
75,000.00 
90,000.00 
90,000.00 

135,000.00 

60,000.00 
30,000.00 
50.000.00 
80,000.00 
175,000.00 



75,000.00 
95,000.00 
60,000.00 
75,000.00 
60,000.00 
900.000.00 
130,000.00 

75,000.00 
180,000.00 
230,000.00 
60,000.00 
53,000.00 
63.500.00 
135,000.00 
70,000.00 
100,000.00 



180,833.75 
10,500.00 



5,028.83 



15,000.00 
2,650.00 
15,067.05 



13,000.00 
10,000.00 



21,104.25 



15,000.00 
7,500.00 



16,047.47 



7,520.96 

19,000.00 

41,250.00 

97.19 



4,000.00 



2,419.85 

20,000.00 

15.39 



18,093.48 



6,800.00 
20,000.00 
9,000.00 



3,000.00 
4,100.00 



10,000.00 
15,000.00 



17,000.00 
10,000.00 



1.00 
"9,866.66 
15,000.00 



8,000.00 



36,000.00 
i2,'674.44 



BUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1016. 



11 



upended and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc. — Continued. 
BTRUCTION DEC. l f 1914-Contlnued. 



I expended far 
bn&dJngL 



Outst an di ng 
liabilities. 



Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 



Available 
balances. 



Amount 
to be ap- 
propriated. 



Deficiency. 



Date of act 



171,979.60 
LM, 418.41 

69,484.95 

154,618.21 
104,784.19 
44, Ml. 23 

8,894.18 
906.00 
58,619.64 
107.849.16 
73,886.14 
56,393.00 
48,560.89 
43,451.34 
75.901.69 
30,303.94 

3,111.00 
25,367.18 
82,063.37 
78,102.52 
48,790.66 
50,861.18 
58,926.35 
59,268.74 
68,208.89 
122,370.18 

73,729.14 
87,597.71 

48,836.16 

84,512.83 

1,209,402.83 

177,871.22 
11,492.23 
63,200.60 
49,182.57 
47,416.36 
70,592.03 
99,608.99 
75,311.96 
75,356.15 
67,809.35 
56,882.72 
44,383.15 
66,821.03 
64,400.49 
78,513.40 

107,534.67 

55,040.44 
4,887.44 
28,755.01 
68.850. 33 
140.547.37 



69,382.54 

66,433.48 
45.691.06 
403.00 
57,714.78 
732,099.15 
63, in. 83 

34,940.73 
172.893.53 
15.816.47 
51.853,45 
8,038. 54 
42,495.57 
87.180.22 
31.609.83 
85,534.59 



81,020.00 

12.76 

400.00 

104.70 

110.00 

38,201.65 

48,005.00 

1,083.00 

149.00 

164.76 

648.00 

400.00 

6,391.41 

141.67 

19,136.65 

44,289.00 

12,437.00 

10.30 

400.00 

15.00 

9.75 

142.70 

400.00 

743.00 

1,697.50 

1,076.00 
1,030.00 

50,511.54 
14,957.97 
3,867.00 

685.91 
51,767.00 



447.89 



8,943.29 



400.00 

400.00 

2.50 

677.50 

18,755.87 

400.00 

861.33 

1,090.50 

25,587.03 

473.75 
30,593.30 
18,294.05 



17,995.28 



9,841.51 

25.00 

06,032.00 

150.00 

140,089.98 

67.233.10 

20,775.25 

2,990.00 

266,255.63 



23,629.68 
18.016.23 
10,583.61 
31,676.30 
1,767.05 



571,979.60 
208,272.26 

79,997.71 

155,018.21 

109,917.72 
44,651.23 
62,095.78 
51,740.00 
74,760.69 

107,498.16 
74,050.90 
70,000.00 
58,950.89 
49,842.75 
97,147.61 
49,440.59 
47,400.00 
37,804.18 
82,073.67 
78,502.52 
63,805.66 
58,370.93 
59,068.05 
59,668.74 
84,999.36 

124,067.68 

74,805.14 
96,138.67 

118,347.70 

140,720.80 

1,213,367.02 

178,557.13 
67,259.23 
63,209.69 
49,630.46 
49,836.21 
99,535.32 
99,714.38 
75,711.95 
93,849.63 
67,811.85 
57,560.22 
63,139.02 
74,021.93 
85,351.82 
88,543.99 

133,121.70 

58,523.19 
48,580.74 
47,049.06 
78,850.33 
173,542.65 



69,392.54 
93,274.99 
55,716.06 
96,435.00 
57,865.78 
872,189.13 
140,134.93 

70,715.98 
175,883.53 
282,072.10 
59,853.45 
52,698.32 
60.471.80 
133,763.83 
63,286.13 
99,876.08 



83,020.40 
1,727.74 



812.76 



981.79 

82.28 

348.77 



812.76 
* 15.05 



230.31 

7,501.84 

949.10 



10,000.00 
29,000.00 



7,095.78 
25,740.00 



1,049.11 

157.25 

2,852.39 

559.41 

2,600.00 

2,195.82 

2,926.33 

1,497.48 

1,194.34 

1,629.07 

931.95 

331.26 

.64 

932.32 

194.86 
8,861.33 

6,652.30 

9,279.20 

.23 

1,442.87 

2.740.77 

290.31 

369.54 

163.79 

464.68 

285.62 

4,288.05 

1,150.37 

2,188.15 

2,439. /8 

1,860.98 

978.07 

4,648.18 

1,456.01 

1,878.30 

1,476.81 



2,950.94 
1,149.67 
1,457.35 



5,607.46 
1,725.01 
4,283.94 



2,134.22 
27,810.87 



4,284.02 
4,116.47 



146.55 

301,68 

3,028.20 

1,236.17 

6.713.87 

123.92 

1 Surplus fund. 



25,000.00 



20,000.00 



18,580.74 



40,000.00 



21,435.00 



20,000.00 



10,134.93 



70,000.00 



52,072.10 



June 25,1910 
June 30,1906 

[May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 

Do. 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,1910 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 

Do. 

Do. 
May 30,1908 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
June 6, 1902 
May 30,1908 

June 25,1910 
June 30,1906 

June 25,1910 

Do. 
June 6, 1902 

June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
May 30,1908 
June 30,1906 

Do. 

Do. 
May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 

Do. 
May 30,1908 

Do, 

Do. 
June 25,1910 

May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 

Do. 
May 30,1908 

Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 

Do. 

June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 

Do. 
May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 
June 30.1906 



12 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for House Committee on Appropriations relative to amounts 

BUILDINGS IN COURSE OF CON 



Location. 



Buildings. 



Class of work. 



Limit of cost. 



Amount 
appropriated, 



.Amount 
expanded to 
site and land. 



Moundsville, 
W. Va. 
Mount Clemens, 

Mich. 
Mount Sterling, Ky. 
Mount Vernon, 111... 
Murfroesboro. Tenn. 
Muskogee, Okla 



Post office.. 
....do 



Site and building. 
....do 



Narragansett Pier, 

Newark, N. Y 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Newberry, S.C 

New Brunswick,N.J. 
New Haven, Conn . . 
New London, Conn. 
New Orleans, La 



Newport, Ark 

NewTlochelK N. Y. 
New York, N.Y.... 

Do 

Do 

Do 



do 

....do 

....do. 

Port office and 

courthouse. 
Post office 



Do 

Do 

North Adams, Mass 
North Tonawanda, 

N. Y. 
NorthYakima, 

Wash. 

Oil City, Pa 

Oldtown. Me , 

01ean,N. Y 

Olympia, Wash 

Oneonta.N. Y 

Orargp.N. J 

Orangnmrg, S. C..., 
Osage Citv, Kans . . . 

Ottawa, Kans 

Owatonna, Minn... 
Owensboro, Ky 



.'..do 

...do. 

...do 

...do 

...do 

do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

Appraisers' stores. 

Assay office 

Bargi office 

Old courthouse 

and post office. 

Marine Hospital... 

Post office 

....do 

....do 



Oxford, N. C 

Palestine, Tex 

Pana.IH 

Paragould, Ark 

Paris, 111 

Paris, Tex 

Parsons, Kans 

Pasadena, Cal 

Pawtucket, R. I... 
PennYan,N. Y... 
Pensacola, Fla 



Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do. 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do. 



....do... 
....do.. 
....do.., 
....do., 
.do., 



Perry, Iowa 

Peru, Ind 

Petoskev.Mich.... 

Piqua, Ohio 

Plattsmouth, Nebr. 
Plymouth, Mass. . . 
Pocatello, Idaho.... 



Point Pleasant, 

W.Va. 
Poplar Bluff. Mo... 
PortJervis, N.Y... 

Portland, Ind , 

Portsmouth, Ohio... 



Princeton, 111 

Princeton. Ind 

Pulaski, Tenn 

Punxsutawney, Pa. 



Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do , 

do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 
Post office , 



....do 

do 

do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

do 



..do 

..do 

..do 

..do....... 

..do 



....do 

Butlding 

Site and building. 

Ext'nsion 

Sit? and building. 

Extension 

Building 



Site and building. 

do 

Repairs 

Ext'nsion 

Reconstruction... 
Repairs, etc 



Extension 

Building 

Site and building. 
Building 



.do. 



Extension 

Building 

Site and building. 

Building 

do 

....do 

Site and building. 

do 

Building 

Site and building. 
do 



Building 

do 

Site and building. 

do 

....do 

Extension 

Site and building. 

Building 

Extension 

Site and building.. 
Extension 



Site and building 

Building 

do 

Site and building. 

Building 

Site and building. 
Building. 



Site and building. 



Building 

Site and building. 

— do 

Extension 



Site and building. 

do 

Building 

dol? 



190,000.00 

65,000.00 

65,000.00 

90,000.00 

67.000.00 

560,000.00 

69, 000. 00 

50,000.00 
350.000.00 

60,000.00 

45,000.00 
1,200,000.00 

50,000.00 
1,657,000.00 

59,500.00 
125,000.00 

75,000.00 
334,692.00 
589,935.00 
200,000.00 

250,000.00 

4,700,000.00 

115,000.00 

80,000.00 

200,000.00 

25,000.00 
60, OCX). 00 
80,000.00 

130,000.00 
75,000.00 

100,000.00 
60,000.00 
57,000.00 
65,000.00 
58,000.00 

175,000.00 

60,000.00 
70,000.00 
70,000.00 
50,000.00 

105,000.00 

100,000.00 
75,000.00 

200,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 

130,000.00 

60,000.00 
75,000.00 
65,000.00 
175,000.00 
50,000.00 
117,000.00 
100,000.00 

75,000.00 

65,000.00 
80,000.00 
60,000.00 
65,000.00 

70,000.00 
65,000.00 
50,000.00 
60,000.00 



180,000.00 

65,000.00 

65,000.00 

82.000.00 

67,000.00 

560,000.00 

30,000.00 

50.000.00 
350.000.00 

60,000.00 

45,000.00 
800,000.00 

50,000.00 
1,657,000.00; 

59,500.00 
110,000.00 

75,000.00 
334,592.00 
689,935.00 
200,000.00 

250,000.00 

4,700,000.00 

115,000.00 

80,000.00 

200,000.00 

25,000.00 
60,000.00 
80,000.00 

130,000.00 
75,000.00 
80,000.00 
60,000.00 
45,000.00 
65,000.00 
58,000.00 

175,000.00 

50,000.00 
70,000.00 
70,000.00 
50,000.00 

105,000.00 

100,000.00 
75,000.00 

200,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 
75,000.00 
65,000.00 
175,000.00 
50,000.00 
117,000.00 
100,000.00 

75,000.00 

65,000.00 
70,000.00 
42,000.00 
65,000.00 

20,000.00 
65,000.00 
50,000.00 
60,000.00 



$13,501.00 

6,000.00 

10,750.00 
17,000.00 
7,026.93 
66,000.00 

19,000.00 

10,000.00 

"**6,"5o6."66' 



350,000.00 



9,000.00 
45,000.00 



30,792.61 



20,920.84 



10,000.00 
9,250.00 



6,000.00 
16,037.35 



6,000.00 
6,750.00 
11,034.83 



14,700.00 

"i3,*o66."66 



7,000.00 



42,600.00 
29,'626*i9 



7,600.00 



15,500.00 
9,000.00 



10,500.00 
11,137.50 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 



13 



expended and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc, — Continued. 
8TBUCTION DEC. 1, 1914—Con tinned. 



Outstanding 
liabilities. 



Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 



Available 
balances. 



Amount 
to be ap- 
propriated. 



Deficiency. 



Date of act. 



110,485.23 

58,010.70 

53.228.79 

3.149.00 

59.606.99 

331,490.76 

235.00 

39,987.04 
183.955.98 

51,945.96 

30.275.05 
288,996.63 

37,528.77 
1,512,422.21 

819.00 
9. 27a 40 
26,125.20 
333,12448 
449.033.08 
89,636.53 

217,309.35 

4,507,181.67 

78,612.37 

71,081.39 

195,336.45 



21, 
53, 
58, 
10 i, 
33, 

49] 
15, 
40. 
37. 

41. 
69. 
60. 
40. 
85. 
9k 
59. 
CI. 
4«. 

y. 

89. 



556.60 
OJ3.91 
423.59 
931.40 
968-78 
836.00 
597.78 
523.56 
lft".75 
142.55 
82*. 22 

7r8.52 
833.42 
CA\.9{ 
0P8.21 
798.02 
413.13 
147.66 
729.59 
40*».80 
C08.40 
847.23 



39,<H9.97 
71.274,36 
32. 07a 93 
43. 83a 35 
44.853,53 
34.721.02 
15.264.03 

60,98189 

50,295.78 



49,664.25 

184.00 

52,085.62 

9,779.82 

53,226,45 



850,829.70 
424.00 



60,298.96 

306.00 

161,045.90 

48,161.00 



136,723.87 
886.00 



326,483.86 

'i38,'8i8.'39 

44,180.68 
65,850.05 
28,008.43 



103,737.55 
46,018.23 

30,983.37 
12,632.60 



8,450.80 

400.00 

35.80 

6,729.10 

193.00 

19,423.70 

38,001.90 

76,305.50 

400.00 

30.847.C4 

IP. 556. 91 

13.308.00 

2,010.31 

5,441.05 

105.00 

478.00 

234.85 

478.00 

11, f 88. 53 

391'. 00 

129,024.01 

27.00 



10,085.42 

8,103.16 

834.50 

29.844.71 

83.001. 15 



49,758.55 
80,224.50 



12,527.40 

52,216.00 

46.036.00 

8,061.05 

57,007.00 



$74,815.93 

63,464.70 

63,978.79 

80,447.96 

66,999.92 

547,536.66 

67,396.00 

49,987.04 
326,679.85 

68,331.96 

30,275.05 
965,480.49 

37,528.77 
1,651,240.60 

53,999.68 
110,120.45 

54,133.63 
333,124.48 
552,770.63 
135,654.76 

248,292.72 

4,519,814.27 

109,401.98 

79,535.19 

195,726.45 

21,592.40 
59,793.01 
79,537.43 

126,355.10 
71,970.68 
81,171.50 
59,997.78 
65,621.20 
59,753.06 
55.450.55 

170,809.88 



38.447.90 
6.023.65 



68,480.89 

62,818.t8 
67.716.00 
55.036.00 
57,715.30 

67.691.00 
63.2?3. 12 
47,727.72 
59,250.10 



15,184.07 

1,535.30 

1,021.21 

1,552.04 

.08 

12,463.34 



12.96 

23,320.15 

1,668.04 

14,724.95 



12,471.23 
5,759.40 

5,500.32 



20,866.37 

1,467.52 

37,164.37 

64,345.24 

1,707.28 

180,185.73 

5,595.02 

464.81 

4,273.55 

3,407.60 

203.99 

462.57 

3,644.90 

3,029.32 



2.22 



5.246.34 
2,549.45 
4,130.12 



47,214.57 


2,785.43 


69.938.42 


61.58 


67.084.91 


2.915.09 


47,083.06 


2.916.94 


97.310.85 


7, f 89. 15 


98.001.66 


1,998. 34 


•74.238.66 


761. 34 


190.753.fC 


9,246.40 


49.433.80 


566.20 


49. f 08. 40 


391. 60 


99,932.65 


67.35 


65,053.13 


4,946.87 


72, 058. ft". 


2,941.14 


61.970. ('4 


3,079.36 


169.331.50 


5, 60S. 50 


49.853.53 


14<i. 47 


113.599.70 


3.460.24 


95,488.53 


4,511.47 



6,519.11 

2,181.82 
2,284.00 



7,284.70 



1.776.R8 

2,277.28 

749.90 



$10,000.00 



8,000.00 



39,000.00 



$37,396.00 



400,000.00 



165,480.49 



15,000.00 



120.45 



20,000.00 



4,171.50 



12,000.00 



10,621.20 



30,000.00 



10.000.00 
18,000.00 



13,036.00 



50,000.00 



47,691.00 



June 25,1910 

May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,1910 
June 30,1906 
May 30,1908 

June 25,1910 

May 30.1908 
June 25, 1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,1910 
May 30.1908 
June 30,1906 

June 25,1910 

Do. 
Aug. 24,1912 
June 30,1906 
May 27,1908 
Apr. 6,1914 

May 27,1906 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
Jura 25,1910 

May 30,1908 

June 25,1910 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 

Do. 

Do. 
May 30,190$ 
June 25,1910 

Do. 

Do. 
June 30,190^ 

June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1608 
June 25.1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,1910 

Do. 

Mav 30,1908 
June 25.1910 

Do. 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,1910 

May 30,1908 

June 25,1910 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Mav 30,1908 

June 25,1910 

Do. 



14 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for Hotue Committee on Appropriations relative to amounts 

BUILDINGS IN COURSE OF CON 



Location. 



Buddings. 



Glass of work. 



Limit of oost. 



Amount 
appropriated. 



Amount 
expended for 
site and land. 



Quincy,Mass. 
Raleigh, N.C. 



Rapid City, 8. Dak. 



i Oak, Iowa. 

Reidsville,N.C. 



Rlchford,Vt... 
Richmond, Va. 



Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

.do. 



Building.. 
Extension. 



Riverside, CaL 

Rochelle,Dl . 

Rochester, N. H.... 
Rock Springs, Wyo. 
Rocky Mount, N.C. 

Rolll,Mo 

Roswell,N.Mex... 

St. Louis. Mo . 

Salem, Ohio 

Salina, Kans 



Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office, court- 
house, and cus- 
tomhouse. 

Post office 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 

...do 

do 



Post office and 

courthouse. 
Post office... 
.do 



San Diego, Cal 

San Francisco, Cal. . 

Do 

San Jose, Cal 

8an Juan, P. R.... 



San Juan, P. R 

San Marcos, <Tex... 
Santa Barbra, CaL. 
Savannah, Ga. , 



Post office and 

courthouse. 
Post office and 

customhouse. 

Customhouse 

Sub treasury 

Post office 

Post office and 

courthouse. 
Quarantine station 

Post office 

....do 

....do 



Building 

do 

Additional land 

and extension. 
Site and building. 

Additional land 
and building. 

Site and building., 

Building 

do 

Site and building., 

do 

Building 

Site and building.. 

.....do 

do 

Additional land 

and extension. 
Site and building. 



Building 

do 

Extension, etc. 
Building 



Searcy, Ark , 

Sewiokley, Pa..... 
Bhamokm, Pa..... 
Shelbyville, Tenn. 
Shreveport, La.... 



SistersvOle, W. Va. 

Somerset, Ky 

South Chicago, 111. . 
Springfield, Mo 



Springfield, Tenn 

Steelton, Pa 

Stevens Point, Wis 

Suffolk, Va 

Sulphur 8prings,Tex. 
8umpter,S. C... 
Sycamore, 111 — 
Tacoma, wash... 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do...: 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do, 



Building, etc 

Building 

Site and buildine . 
Lookouts, extend- 
ing of. 

Building 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



....do 

Site and building. 

Building 

tnsion 



Exten 



Building 

Site and building. 



TaDadega. Ala , 

Tarboro.N.C. , 

Temple, Tex , 

Terrell, Tex , 

Texarkana, Tex.... 
Three Rivers, . Mich , 

Tifton,Ga 

Topeka, Kans , 



Traverse City, Mich. 
Trenton, N.J 



Troy, Ala , 

Tupelo, Miss 

Union, S. C 

Union City. Tenn. , 
Urbana,m 



Post office, court- 
house, and cus- 
tomhouse. 

Post office 

....do ;.... 

....do 

....do 

Courthouse 

Post office... 

....do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



.do. 
....do.... 
....do.... 
....do.... 

do.... 

Building . 



Site and building.. 

do 

Building 

8ite and building. 

....do 

'Building 

Extension , 



....do 



do.... 



Building 

Site and building 

do 

....do 

....do 



180,000.00 

225,000.00 

100,000.00 
75,000.00 
35,000.00 

74,000.00 

1,250,000.00 



110,000.00 
55,000.00 
75,000.00 
90,000.00 
86,000.00 
50,000.00 

125,000.00 

1,522,550.00 
85,000.00 
70,000.00 

235,000.00 

1,750,000.00 
500,000.00 
41,000.00 
457,000.00 

49,700.00 

50,000.00 

130,000.00 

2,500.00 

45,000.00 
60,000.00 
75,000.00 
60,000.00 
200,000.00 

70,000.00 
65,000.00 
150,000.00 
100,000.00 

45,000.00 
75,000.00 
65,000.00 
87,000.00 
50, TO). 00 
70,000.00 
60,000.00 
500,000.00 



80,000.00 
75,000.00 
70,000.00 
50,000.00 

120.000.00 
60, 000.60 
50,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 

175,000.00 

40,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
80,000.00 



180,000.00 

225,000.00 

100,000.00 
75,000.00 

35,00a 00 

74,000.00 
800,000.00 



110,000.00 
55,000.00 
75,000.00 
90,000.00 
56,000.00 
50,000.00 

125,000.00 

1,522,550.00 
85,000.00 
70,000.00 

235,000.00 

1,750,000.00 

500,000.00 

41,000.00 

457,000.00 

49,700.00 

50,000.00 

130,000.00 

2,500.00 

45,000.00 
60,000.00 
75,000.00 
65,000.00 
200,000.00 

70,000.00 
65,000.00 
150,000.00 
100,000.00 

46,000.00 
75,000.00 
65,000.00 
87,000.00 
50,000.00 
70,000.00 
45,000.00 
500,000.00 



80,000.00 
60,000.00 
70,000.00 
60,000.00 

120,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 

100,000.00 

50,000.00 

175,000.00 

40,000.00 
20,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
70,000.00 



$500.00 
7,000.00 



12,500.00 



10,500.00 
11,000.00 



LOO 

356,748.39 
17,000.00 
8,500.00 

15,207.30 



1.00 



8,000.00 



18,300.00 
9,750.00 

12,000.00 
2,600.00 
6,034.23 

10,000.00 



15,000.00 
12,000.00 



2,500.00 
9,397.25 
12,000.00 



10,000.00 
11,000.00 
6,460.00 
12,000.00 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

expended and condition of appropriation* for public buildings, etc. — Continued. 
BTRUCTION DECX 1, 1914— Continued. 



15 



expended far 
bofldingi. 



Outstanding 
Utilities. 



Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 



Available 
balances. 



Amount 
to be ap- 
propriated. 



Deficiency. 



Date of act 



S79.31fi.50 

183,488.20 

97,755.76 
50. 862. 38 
33,380.90 

49,783.53 

782,998.44 



93.817.89 
48,704.66 
49,903.05 
74, 80S. 39 
118.00 
28,145.14 
122,123.47 

.162,919.40 
29.419.27 
41,375,58 

216, 



1,592,817.53 
369,901.35 
37,592.57 
439,614.01 

46,348.61 

49,677.99 

110,279.10 

983.61 

16,477.63 
56,561.02 
71,210.97 
170.00 
198,214.90 

55,471.39 
53,529.80 
128,891.47 
71,99a 18 

29,135.53 
56,177.66 
52,402.27 
67,166.72 
42,113.81 
56,850.23 
24,809.80 
499,240.81 



64,512,45 
13,375.50 
67,683.36 
45.518.55 
109,641.61 
1,303,38 
49,928.11 
9,335.91 

37,835.45 

174.33L75 

39,654.33 



48,667.88 
43.051.43 
34,882.65 



833,137.04 

683.00 

12,614.30 

631.00 

17,216.47 

994.00 



1,37a 00 

6,067.47 

21,200.30 

497.00 

64,654.00 

18,303.62 



1,935.50 
35,875.24 
20,124.42 

1,282,40 

8,105.00 
75,192.65 

soaoo 

7,934.06 

345.00 

4.40 

17,077.91 



26.892.80 
466.40 
450.00 

56,262.00 
1,724.00 

11,243.21 

380.00 

15,514.50 

26,129.10 

15,503.65 

150.00 

400.00 

186.85 

5,105.74 



23,147.00 



44,613.61 
870.70 
154.34 
675.00 

45,182.70 
21.00 

25,441.08 



47,007.75 
5.00 

4oaoo 

40,408.00 



$79,316.50 

216, 62a 24 

98,438.76 
69,376.68 
34,511.90 

74,000.00 

783,992.44 



107,687.89 
54,762.13 
71,163.35 
85,802,39 
75,772.00 
46,448.76 

122,124.47 

1,521,603.29 
82,294.51 
70,000.00 

233,172.98 

1,600,922.53 
445,094.00 
38,092.67 
447,648.07 

46,693.61 

49,682.39 

127,358.01 

083.61 

43,370.43 
57,027.42 
71,660.97 
56,432.00 
197,938.00 

66,714.60 
61,919.89 
144,405.97 
98,119.28 

44,729.18 
74,627.86 
62,642.27 
79,353.57 
49,809.55 
62,874.46 
57,057.79 
499,240.81 



79,512.45 
69,989.11 
68,554.06 
48,172.89 
119,713.86 
58,486.08 
49,949.11 
98,777.89 

87,835.46 

174,331.75 

30,654.32 
57,007.75 
50,672.88 
1,901.43 
,88a 66 



77,1 



8683.50 

9,373.76 

1,561.24 

6,623.32 

488.10 



16,007.56 



2,312.11 

237.87 

3, 83a 65 

4,197.61 



$450,00a00 



3,551.24 
2,875.53 

946.71 
2,705.49 



1,827.02 

3,482.21 

64,90a00 

2,684.00 

9,451.93 

3,006.39 

317.61 

2,641.99 

1,516.39 

1,629.57 
2,972.58 
3,339.03 



2,061.10 

3,285.40 
3,080.11 
6,594.03 
1,880.72 

270.82 

372.34 

2,357.73 

7,64a 43 

190.45 

7,125.54 



759.19 



487.55 



1,445.94 

1,827.11 

28a 14 



5a 80 
1,222.11 

12,164.55 

668.25 

34& 68 



327.12 
1,008.57 



30,000.00 



$19,772.00 



1145,595.26 



1223.43 



5,000.00 



1,432.00 



15,000.00 



12,957.79 



25,000.00 

*id,'66o.*6o 



19,989.11 



8, 48a 08 



40,000.00 

"i6iooo.*66 



87,007.75 
* "7,180." 65 



June 30,1906 

June 25,1910 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

May 30,1908 

June 30,1906 



May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 

Do. 
May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 

Do. 
May 30,1908 

June 6, 1902 

June 25,1910 

Do. 

June 30,1906 

June 6, 1902 

June 25,1910 

June 30,1906 

Do. 

Apr. 28,1904 
May 30,1908 

Aug. 24,1912 

June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

June 25,1910 

May 30,1908 

June 25,1910 

Do. 

Do. ' 
May 30,1908 

Do. 

Do. 

Do- 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 
Mar. 3,1903 



May 30,1908 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 

Do. 
Mar. 4,1911 

June 25,1910 

June 30,1006 

May 80,1008 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1008 

Do. 
June 25,1910 



1 Surplus fund* 



16 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for House Committee on Appropriations relative to aumMi 

BUILDINGS IN COURSE OF COfl 



Location. 



Valdosta, Ga 

Versailles, Kv.... 
Vicksburg, Miss.. 



Victoria, Tex 

Wabash, Ind.. .... 

Wahpeton, N. Dak. 
Walla Walla, Wash. 

Wallingford, Conn. . 
Warrensburg, Mo.. 
Washington, D. C... 



Do. 



Do. 



Do. 



Do 

Washington, N. C... 

Watertown, S.D.... 
Watertown, Wis.... 

Waterville, Me 

Waukegan.IU 

Waukesha, Wis 

Waxahaohi ,Tex.... 

Waycros8, Ga 

Weathcrfor.i.Tex... 
Wellington, Kans... 

Westely.R. I 

Westllt'I J, Mass 

West Point, Miss.... 
Wi.liraanti ,Ccnn... 
Williston,N. Dak... 

Winchester, Ky 

Winchester, Tenn... 

Winchester, Va 

Winfteli, Kans 

Winston-Salem, N.c 

Woburn, Mass 

Woonsocket, R.I. • 

Wooster,Ohio 

WythsvI:ie,Va..... 

Xenia,Ohio 

Yazoo i ity, Miss. . . 
York, Pa 



Total.. 



Buildings. 



Post office 

....do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

....do 

Post office 

do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 
Post office 



.do. 



Bureau Engraving 
and Printing 
(new). 
Bureau Engraving 
and Printing 
power plant. 
Bureau Engraving 
and Printing 
(old). 
Hygienic Labora- 
tory. 

Post office 

Post office and 

courthouse. 
Post office... 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

..,do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 



...do. 
...do. 
...dd. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 



Class of work. 



Building 

Site ancf building. 
Extension 



Site and building. 

do 

....do 

....do 



do 

Building 

Site and building. 

Enlargement 



Conduit and wir- 
ing, etc. 

Additional build- 

ing. 
Site and building, 
do 



....do 

Building 

Site anJbuilding 

do 

Building 

Site and building 

do 

Building 

Site and build ing 

do 

.....do 

Building 

Site and build ing 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Additional land 

and extension. 

Builling 

Site and building. 

Building 

do 

....do 

Site and building. 
Additicnal land 

and building. 



Limit of cost. 



$125,000.00 
50,000.00 
110,000.00 

95,000.00 
80,000.00 
50,000.00 
140,000.00 

95,000.00 

65,000.00 

2,880,000.00 

50,000.00 

29,500.00 

25,000.00 

3,485,000.00 
140,000.00 

90.000.00 
65,000.00 

120,000.00 
95,000.00 
75,000.00 
60,000.00 
82.500.00 
65,000.00 
65,000.00 

100,000.00 
75,000.00 
50,000.00 
75.000.00 

100,000.00 

100.000.00 
57.300.00 
65,000.00 
75,000.00 

250,000.00 

60,000.00 
120,000.00 
65,000.00 
60,000.00 
' 65,000.00 
60,000.00 
300,000.00 



66,617,449.81 



A«« min f Amount 
appropriated, sitiandlacd 



$125,000.00 
50,000.00 
110,000.00 

95,000.00 
80,000.00 
50,000.00 
140,000.00 

95,000.00 

65.000.00 

2,880,000.00 



50,000.00 



29,500.00 



25,000.00 

3,485,000.00 
140,000.00 

90.000.00 
65,000 00 

120.000.00 
95.000.00 
75,000.00 
60,000.00 
82.500.00 
65,000.00 
65,000.00 

100,000.00 
75,000.00 
50,000.00 
<u,uu0.00 
95,000.00 

100,000.00 
42,300.00 
65,000.00 
31,000.00 

250,000.00 

60,000.00 
120,000.00 
65,000.00 
35,000.00 
65,000.00 
60.000.00 
300,000.00 



63,846,437.05 



15,144.76 



6,000 M 
9,000.01 
6,000.« 
6,000.01 

24,000. 



16,512.41 



450.189.1 
15,020. 



3,050 



34. GOO 
20,007 



3,000 

12,478 



6,£0C 
20.00( 
17,50C 



10,041 
10.001 
14.02 
8.80 
16.02 
11.00 
48,25 



as,oc 



8.2* 

83.0J 



9,76! 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

expended and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc. — Continued. 
STRUCTION DEC. 1, 1914— Continued. 



17 



Amount 

expended for 

buildings. 



$114,666.48 
41,124.03 
83,619.19 

80,948.33 
69,164.76 
5,387.19 | 
133,365.41 

68,393.87 

61,345.63 

2, 466,38a 53 



32,649.44 



19,984.77 



13,144.81 

3,000,300.65 
I!y f i74.01 

S2.9*85 
6i.ai3.31 
•« 1,353. 83 
74.37L05 
tf.492.76 
>4,697.52 
>*\914.40 
47,730.*S 
>7,7K54 
:\HK39 
-ST. 2fta 05 
l9.56S.tf 
■3.*70.36 
.'•0,567.52 
^,771.72 
7.735.** 
17,57^95 
52.15 
•M.MB.74 



57.106.S7 
*\*77.31 
• r 2,iiO«.5S 

75.00 
H.f8i55 
« \ 7%i. 22 



•*'*.391.37 



liabilities. 01 }Jstanding. 



815,617.36 
5,000.00 



36,906.68 
5.25 

449.00 

734.35 

16,448.00 



16,106.36 



9,508.85 



U, 701. 23 

34,268.43 

4,993.00 

* 10. 75 



4SS.00 

8,269.88 

1,107.00 

440,00 

16,06.-. 53 

375.00 

400.00 

247.00 

287.00 

*37;9i3."i9 

570. 00 
37,P93.V7 

406.50 
54.03S.00 
103, 7-13. 64 

16.00 

400. 00 

151. CO 

54,421.00 

15,761.09 



9,419,622,43 



$114,666*48 
46,268.79 
99,236.55 

91,946.33 

78,164.76 

48,293.77 

138,370.66 

92,842.87 

62,079.98 

2,879,340.93 



48,755.80 



29,490.62 



24,846.04 

3,484,658.08 
139,587.84 

86,047.61 
41,383.31 

115,952.83 
94,926.60 
73,762.64 
58,804.52 
78,832.88 
63,796.41 
64,623.54 
98,503.39 
74,997.05 
49,855.85 
73.916.71 
98,4*0.71 
€5,367.03 
54,229.85 
64,0'3.95 
65,09a 45 

243,889.38 

57 r '22.87 
119,713.07 
62,756.18 
54,506.00 
60,743.64 
58,058.10 
• 299,954.69 



63.665,775.55 



Available 
balances. 



$10,333.52 
3,731.21 
10,763.45 

3,053.67 
1,835.24 
1,708.23 
1,629.34 

2,157.13 

2,920.02 

669.07 



1,244.20 



6.38 



163.96 

341.92 
412. 16 

3,952.39 
3,616.69 
4*047. J 7 
73.40 
1,237.36 
1,196.48 
3,&5.60 
1,203.59 

376. 46 

1,491.61 

2.95 

144. 16 
i, 083. 29 

4,'632.*97 

986.05 

6, in. 62 

2,577. 13 

256.93 

2,243.82 



4,256,36 

1,941.90 

45.31 



1,585,629.86 



Amount 
to be ap- 
propriated. 



Deficiency. 



$5,000.00 



15,000.00 

44,666.66 



25,000.00 



2,771,012.76 



i $21. 52 



3,480.71 
"ii,*929.*85 



34,090.45 



19,506.00 



/ 1,558,407 02 
\ i 153,438.66 



Date of act. 



June 30,190$ 

Do. 
June 25,191$ 

May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,191$ 
May 30,190$ 

Do. 

Do. 

May 27,190$ 



Aug. 24,191$ 



May 25,1914 



June 23,191$ 

June 25,191$ 
June 30,1906 

Do. 
Mav 30,1908 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 
June 25,1910 
May 30,1908 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 
June 30,4906 
June 2*, 1910 
June 30,1906 
June 25,1910 

Do. 



May 30,1908 
June 30.1W6 
June 25, i910 

Do. 

Do. 
June 30,1906 
May 30,1908 



1 Surplus fundi 



72785— IS 



18 SUNDRY CHVm AWPBOPHtATION filLL, WWW. 

BBCAPITULATION OP PUBLIC TCnUMMOBlN OOUROC OP CONSTRUCTION DTO. 1, MH. 

Limit of cost of sites and buildings $88fc0l7»44*\8l 

Kxpsnded for property (sHss-oBdiMfeft}....... 8fc280f1*Jt: 79n 

Expended for buildings 49,088,801.87 

Qntolandtng MabUities on account oTtaifldings, 
etc :.~..Z. t<41f?*2.4S 

Total expended and outstanding ~a^fllV^K 

Amount carried to surplus fund 181*438.86 

Total M»»81%«4.« 

nee available on ap pr o pri a ti ons . tj 06,620. 86 

Lees deficits, to wit: 

Albany, Oreg 

Amarfllo, Tex. 1 

Arkansas City, Kans 

Aueusta, Oa 

Bambridge, Ga 

Bangor. Me 

Bedford, Pa 

Berkley, Cal 

Cadillac, fcich 

Camden, 8. C 

Carnegie, Pa 

Chlco, Cal 

CoUinsville.ni 

DeIavan,Wis 

Denver, Colo 1 

De Soto, Mo 

Excelsior Springs, Mo. 

Fulton, Ky 

Garden City, Kans. 

0*stonia,N.C 

Georgetown, Ky 

Oram Valley, Cal 

Greeley, Colo 

Grenada, Miss 

Hampton, Va 

Hanford, Cal 

Hllo, Hawaii 

Holland, Mich 

Huntingdon, Pa 

Jackson, Ky 

Jellico, Tenn 

Jennings, La 

Jonesboro, Ark -...* 

Lafayette, La 7,008.78 

* Lake tHy, Minn 26,740.00 

•McPherson, Kans 1*807.71 

Milwaukee, Wis. 24,43.V08 

Mfnot,N. Dak tft,l*«.8ft 

Mobile, Ala 68,07x10 

Nerragansett Pier, R. I 87,388.00 

New Haven. Conn 166,48a 40 

New Rocbelle, N. Y WX4* 

Orange. N.J 

Osage City, Kans J 

Portland, bid 1 

Princeton, 111 < 

Rocky Mount, N. C I 

•helbyville. Tenn 

Sycamore. Ill ] 

l^arboro. N. C 1 

Three Riven, Mien 

Tupeto,Mlss J 

Urhana,ni 

Williston. N. Dak 

Winchester. Tenn ] 

Wlnfleld. Kans J 

Wytheville, Va 1 

: 1,658,407.01 

femes of available balance over deficits 97,222.84 

Total amount appropriated $88,848,487.06 

Total amount to be appropriated. 2,771.012.78 

88,817,488.8 



20 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for House Committee on Appropriations relative to amounts 

BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORIZED BUT 



Location. 



Aberdeen. Wash.. 

Akron, Ohio 

Albertville.Ala... 

Albia, Iowa 

Albion, Mich 

Aledo,IU 

Alexandria, La — 



Alliance, Nebr 

Alliance, Ohio 

Altus, Okla 

Amherst. Mass 

Andalusia. Ala.... 

Anoka, Minn 

Antigo. Wis 

Apalachicola, Fla. 

Ardmore, Okla 



Argenta, Ark 

Arkadelphia, Ark . 

Ashland, Ky 

Ashland. Ohio 

Athens, Tenn 

Atlanta, Tex 

Attalla, Ala 

Attleboro, Mass... 

Aurora, Mo 

Aurora, Nebr 

Bad Axe, Mich 

Bakersfleld.Cal... 

Baltimore. Md 

Barbourville, Ky.. 
Barnesville, Ga... 

Bartow, Fla 

Basin, Wyo 

Batavia, 111 

Bafavia, N. Y 

Bath, N. Y 

Bay City, Tex 

Bayonne, N. J.... 
Beardslown, 111... 
Beaufort, 8. C 



PeaverDam, Wis... 
Beaver Falls, Pa.... 

Beeville, Tex 

Bellefourche, S. Dak 

Belton, Tex 

Bemidji, Minn 

Benton Harbor, 
Mich. 

Berlin, N. H 

Berwick, Pa 

Bethlehem, Pa 

Birmingham, Ala. . . 



Black well, Okla.. 

Bluflfton.tnd 

Boise, Idaho 



Buildings. 



Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office , 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Post office and 

customhouse. 
Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do 

.....do 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Immigrant station. 

Post office 

do 

....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Bonne Terre, Mo. . 

Boston, Mass 

Do 



Boyne City, Mich... 

Bo"/.enjan,Mont 

Bran ford, Conn 
Brattleboro, Vt 



Brenham, Tex 

BrinkW.Ark 

Bronx (S\Y.),N.Y. 
Brooklyn <N. Y.), 



irooklyn 
N.V. 



Bryan, Tex.... 

Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Buena Vista, Va..., 



Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 



do. 

do. 

do. 



do 

Appraisers' stores. 
Immigration sta- 
tion. 

Post office 

....do 

do 



Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 



.do.... 
.do.... 
.do.... 



Class of work. 



Building 

Site and building. 

Site 

....do 

Site and building. 

do 

Extension 



Building 

Site and building. 

do 

do 

do 

Building 

do 

Site and building. 



.do. 



Site 

Building 

do 

Site and building. 

do 

Site 

....do 

Building 

Site 

Building 
Siteanc 

Building 

Site and building. 

Site 

Building 

do 

....do 

Site and building. 

Building 

Site 

Building 

do 

Site and building. 
do 



....do 

Extension 

Building 

Site and building.. 

Building 

Site and building.. 
Site 



Building 

Site and building.. 

Site 

Additional land 

and build inc. 
Site and building.. 

....do .. 

Additional land 

and extension. 

Buildine 

Site and building. 
Building 



Site 

Site and building.. 

do 

.do 



Building 

Site 

....do 

Additional land, 
repair and re- 
model building. 

Site and building.. 

Building 

Site 



Limit of 
cost. 



$112,500.00 

400,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

70,000.00 

65,000.00 

65,000.00 

75,000.00 
135,000.00 
82,500.00 
80,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
70,000.00 
75,000.00 

150,000.00 

10,000.00 

55,000.00 

■ 100,000.00 

125,000.00 
50,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

100,000.00 
10,000.00 
50,000.00 
55,000.00 

135,025.00 

550,000.00 
5,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
60,000.00 
95,000.00 
85,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 

100,000.00 
55,000.00 
50,000.00 

80,000.00 
5,000.00 
50,000 00 
75,000.00 
55,000.00 
75,000.00 
25,000.00 

65,000.00 

80,000.00 

20,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

50,000 00 
70,000.00 
125,000.00 

50,000.00 

1,2,-0,000.00 

310, 178. 98 

10,000.00 
75,000.00 
55,000.00 
140,000.00 

60,000.00 

5.000.00 

285.000.00 

350,000.00 



60,000.00 

60,000.00 

5,000.00 



Amount 
appropriated. 



Amount ex- 
pended for 
site and land. 



160. 000.00 
5,000.00 
6,000.00 
14,000.00 
12,250.00 



115,000.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
5,000.00 



7,500.00 
65,000.00 
10,000.00 



160,000.00 



11,000,00 



28,000.00 



8,000.00 



25,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 



10,000.00 



4,800.00 

25.00 

110,000.00 

4,300.00 



23,950.00 
6,000.00 
13,000.00 



18,000.00 
5,000.00 

15,000.00 
5,000.00 



4,500.00 



9,000.00 ' 
25,000.00 , 



11,000 00 
20,000.00 
185,000.00 

15,000.00 

*i25," 666." 66 



900,000.00 
310, 178. 98 

10,000.00 
45,000.00 
11,000.00 
90,000.00 

5,000.00 

4,000 00 

285,000.00 

350,000.00 



46,000.00 



13,000.00 

"1,666.* 66" 



6,975.00 



13,250.00 



13,000.00 



10,001.00 



19,001.00 
185,000.00 

7,5OO.'0O 

"*86,"666."66" 



444,052.88 



8,000.00 
7,500.00 



25,000.00 



275,989.25 
6,750.00 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



21 



expended and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc. 
.VOT IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION, DEC. 1, 1914. 



Amount 

expended for 

buildings. 


Outstanding 
liabilities. 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 

$112.50a00 
340,00000 


Surplus fund. 


Date of act. 










Mar. 4, 1913 






$60,000.00 






Do. 






$5,ooaoo 
5.00a 00 
3,ooaoo 




Do. 












Do. 






11.000.00 
12, 25tt 00 


56,000.00 
52. 750 00 
65,000.00 

75.000.00 
20,000.00 
67,500.00 
65.000.00 
45.000.00 
50,000.00 
70,000.00 
67,500.00 

95,000.00 




June 25,1910 




813. 25a 00 




Mar. 4, 1913 








Do. 












Do. 






28,ooaoo 


87,ooaoo 

15,000.00 

15,000.00 

25.00 




May 30,1908 








Mar. 4,1913 










Do. 




4,975.00 


4,975.00 




Do. 






Do. 












Do. 








7,5oaoo 

46,88a00 

10, 00a 00 




Do. 


f 120. 00 




8, 12a 00 




June 25,1910 








Do. 




72.00 


72.00 


55,000.00 

100.000.00 

100,000.00 
45,000.00 


i$72.00 


Mar. 4,1913 






Do. 






M.ooaoo 

5,000.00 
4,000.00 


10,00a 00 


2,00a 00 


June 25.1910 




5,000.00 


Mar. 4,1913 






1,000.00 


June 25,1910 






5,000.00 




Mar. 4, 1913 






100,000.00 




Do. 










3,025.00 


May 30,1908 








50,000.00 
50,200.00 
135,000.00 
440,000.00 
700.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
71,050.00 
80.000.00 
2,000.00 
60,000.00 
100,000.00 
37,000.00 
45,000.00 

65,000.00 


Mar. 4,1913 








4,800.00 




Do. 


25.00 




25.00 




Do. 


75.00 


445.00 


96,230.00 
4,300.00 




June 25,1910 






Mar. 4,1013 










Do. 












Do. 












Do. 








23,950.00 
5,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 






13,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 












Do. 


198.00 




10,199.00 
5,000.00 


7,801.00 




June 25,1910 




5,000.00 




Mar. 4,1913 




15,000.00 
5,000.00 




Do. 










June 25,1910 








50,000.00 
70,500.00 
55,000.00 
66,000.00 




Mar. 4,1913 








4,500.00 




Do. 










Do. 








9,000.00 
25,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 








65,000.00 
69,000.00 




Do. 












Do. 






19,001.00 


999.00 


June 25,1910 








815,000.00 

35,000.00 
70,000.00 


Mar. 4,1913 






7,50000 




June 25,1910 








Mar. 4,1913 


1,618.00 




81,618.00 


43,382.00 




May 30,1908 




50,000.00 
350,000.00 




Mar. 4,1918 


877 36 


3,411.22 


448,341.46 


451,658.54 
310,178.98 




June 30,1908 






Oct. 22,1913 




* 


7, 59a 00 




2,000.00 


June 25,1910 


90.00 




37,410.00 
11,000.00 
64,978.92 

5,000.00 
4,000.00 
9,010.75 

aso.ooaoo 
40,ioaoo 


30,000.00 
44.000.00 

50,ooaoo 

55,000.00 
1,000.00 


Do. 








Mar. 4,1913 


21.08 




25,021.08 




Mav 30,1908 








Mar. 4,1913 










Do. 






275,989.25 




May 30,1908 










Mar. 4,1913 


150.00 




5,9oaoo 


4,000.00 
60,000.00 

6,00a 00 




June 25,1910 








Mar. 4,1913 












Do. 








• Deficiency. 







22 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared far House Committee on Appropriations relative to amount* 
BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORISED BUT 



Location. 



Buildings. 



Class of work. 



Limit of 
cost. 



Amount 
appropriated, 



Amount ex- 
pended for 
site and land. 



Buffalo, N.Y.... 

Buffalo, Wyo 

Burlington, N. C. 

Burlington, Wis 

Butler, Mo 

Caldwell, Idaho.. 
Calumet, Mich... 

Cambridge, Md 

Cameron, Tex 

Canon City, Colo 

Canton, Oa 

Canton. Ill 

Canton. Miss 

Cape Qhartes, Va 

Cape Fear, N.C 

Caribou, Me 

Carlinville, HI 

CarroU, Iowa 

Carrollton, 111 

Caruthersville, Mo. . 
Cedar Falls, Iowa . . . 
Central City, Ky.... 
Central City, Nebr. . 

Centralis, Mo 

Chadron, Nebr 

Chamberlain, S.Dak, 

Chandler, Okla 

Chanute. Kens 

Chapel Itill, N.C... 

Chariton, Iowa 

Charles City, Iowa. . . 

Charleston. Ill 

Charles Town, W.Va 
Charlotte, Mich... 
Charlotte, N.C... 



Chattanooga, Tenn . 
Cheboygan, Mich. . . 

Cherokee, Iowa 

Cherryvale, Kans. . . 

Chicago, 111 

Do 

Chillicothe,Ho 



CilHTO.IH.... 

Clinton, Ind.. 

Clinton, 8. C. 



Post office 

....do 

....do.... 

....do 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

Quarantine station 

Post office, 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do.... 

....do 

....do L 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do i 

....do 

....do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

....do 

Post office 

.....do 

do 



Vautt 

Building 

....do.? 

Site and building. 

«o n?. 



Slte. 

....do 

Bite and building. 

....do 

Site 

....do 

Site and building. 

....do TTr. 

Site 

Wharf 

Building 

Site 

Site and building. 

Site 

....do 

Site and building. 

Site 

Site and building. 
Site 



Site and 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Building 

Site and building. 

....do 

Building 

....do 



Cody,tfyo 

Coeur d' Alene,Idaho 



Cohoes,N.Y 

Coleman, Tex 

Colfax, Wash 

Columbia, S.C 

Commanche, Tex. . . 

Commerce, Tex 

Concord, N.H 

Conneaut,Ohio 

Conway. Ark 

Cookevilla, Tenn . . . 

Cordova, Alaska. 



....do 

....do 

Post office i 

courthouse. 

Post office 

..-.do 

....do 

....do 

Post office i 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do. 



Extension. 

Slteandbuildlng. 

....do 

do 



site. 

do..., 

Building. 



Cordova, Alaska. 
Corpus Christi, Tex. , 



Coshocton, Ohio 

Covington, Tenn. . . 

Crookett, Tex 

Cuero, Tex 

Dallas, Tex 

Danbiiry, Conn.... 

Dawson, Ga 

Decatur, A la . 

Decatur, Ind 

De Fnnlak Springs, 
Fta. 

DeLand, Fla, 

Delphos, Ohio , 

Denton. Tex 

Des Moines, Iowa.. 



Post office 
courthouse. 

....do 

Post office 
custom 2_ 

Post office. 

....do 

do. 

do. 
do. 



Site 

Site and building. 

do 

Building 

Site and building. 



....do 

Site 

....do 

Bufldmg. 

Site and building. 

Extension.'.!.!..! 

Site. 

....do 

Site and building. 



.do. 
.do. 



....do.. 
....do.. 
....do.. 
....do.. 
....do.. 



....do 

....do 

Site 

Building 

Site..... 

Site and building 

do 

do 

Site 



do 

do 

...do 

Courthouse.. 



Building 

Site 

Slteand building. 
do 



18,000.00 
68,500.00 
06,000.00 
70,000.00 
00,000.00 
10,000.00 
20,000.00 
80,000.00 

55,000.00 

15,000.00 
5,000.00 

85,000.00 

50,000,00 
7,500.00 

25,000.00 

5o,ooaoo 

10,000.00 
70,000.00 
7,000.00 

6,ooaoo 
95,000.00 

7,500.00 

55,000.00 

7,500.00 

110,000.00 

eo.ooaoo 
•55,000.00 

75,000.00 
60,000.00 
70,000.00 
70,000.00 
75,000.00 
75,000.00 
65,000.00 
250,000.00 

65,000.00 
70,000.00 
70,000.00 
60,000.00 
50,000.00 
1,750,000.00 
130,000.00 

7,000. 00 
60,000.00 
65,000.00 
50,000.00 
100,000.00 

100,000.00 

5,000.00 

7,000.00 

265,000.00 

60,000.00 

60,000.00 

60,000.00 

15,000.00 

5,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 
140,000.00 

115,000.00 

45,000.00 

6,000.00 

a%000.no 

300,000.00 
115,000.00 

eo.ooaoo 

65,000.00 
10,000.00 
6,000.00 

W, 000. 00 

7,000.00 

75,000.00 

360,000.00 



•8,000.00 



9,000.00 
6,500.00 
10,000.00 
12,000.00 

ie,ooaoo 
2,ooaoo 

13,500.00 

5,ooaoo 

65,000.00 

20,000.00 

3,700.00 

26,000.00 



'8,000.00 

8,000.00 

6,000.00 
3, 26a 00 
10,000.00 
7,500.00 
6,000.00 
6,000.00 



8,600.00 

4,7oaoo 

33,ooaoo 

8,5oaoo 

5,800.00 



9,000.00 
7,500.00 



226,000.00 



8,600.00 
10,600.00 

4,000.00 

50,000.00 

1,760,000.00 

30,000.00 

7,000.00 
14,000.00 
5,600.00 



30,000.00 

40,000.00 

1.00 

7,000.00 



5,000.00 



32,000.00 

16,000.00 

2,000.00 

00,000.00 



70,000.00 

16,000.00 

39,000.00 

0,0110.00 

35,ooaoo 

250,000.00 
00,000.00 
5,000.00 
6.500.00 

9,900.00 

6,000.00 



6.000.00 
4,600.00 

76,ooaoo 



$2,000.00 



12,000.00 
5,300.00 



6,000.00 



13,000.00 

**5,*86aoo 



13,200.00 



16,000.00 



7,000.00 



0,000.00 

16,000.00 
7,000.00 



250,000.00 

an, ooo. oo 



sukdby anoL *n«araa«xio» bill, <m». 



U 



NOT IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION, BBC. yi9M-~Conttauad. 



I Amount 

TwIIIUII^K. 


Outstanding 
Uabflitte/ 


Total 
expended aod 
outstanding. 


Available 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Surplus fond. 


Date of sot 


' 




• 


•8,008.00 






Aug. 1,1914 

Mar. 4,8*8 

Do. 


1 






•62,600.00 
66,000.00 

ei.ooa 90 

68,600.00 
















•8,000.00 

6,6oaoo 


t8.8D0.QD 

o.soaoo 


1 




Do. 




x 

i^ooi'oiy 

12,00fr00: 




Do. 






Do. 






, 


8,000.00 
84,000.00 
63,000.00 

1,600.00 




Dp. 




16,000.00 


16,000.00 
2,000.00 




Do. 




i 




Do. 






iS, 600.66 




Do. 


i 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 
12,066.00 
0,880.00 




Do. 


•88.00 


•42,886.00 
14,640:00 
8,700.00 

26,ooaoo i 


30,000.00 

30,000.00 

3,800.00 




June 26,1818 
Do. 


•0.00 












Mar. 4, 1818 

Aug. 1,1914 

Mar. 4, 1981 

Do. 










■ 




. 


60,000.00 
2,000.00 

82,000.00 
2,000.00 
1,780.00 

85,000.00 










8.090:00, 
0;858.80 : 
6,000.00, 
8,260.00* 
10,000:00 












Do. 










Do. 










Do. 






» 




Do. 




7,800.00 


7,600.00 




Do. 




-0;080.00 


49,000.00 
1,000.00 
110,000.00 
66,600.00 
60,300.00 
42,000.00 
61,000.00 
64,200.00 
70,000.00 
66.000.00 
67,600.00 

oe/ooo.oo 

25;000.00 

66,600.00 
61,600.00 
89,400,80 
66,000.00 




Do. 






6,000.00' 




Do 










Do. 








M00;80 f 
4,700.00 
19,808.00 




Do. 










Do 


ttl.68 




13,181.00 
8,600.00 




June 26, 1881 

Mar. 4,1018 

Do. 




8,600.00 














j 




Do. 












Do. 




7,60040,. 




Do. 










Do. 


280.40 




280.40' 


•224,789.86* 




June 26,1989 

Mar. 4,19* 
Do. 














18,600.00 
1,600.00 

jp.ooo.oo 

J; 780,060480 
29,976.00, 

1,O00jO0' 

14,800:00 

6,600*00 












Do. 










Do. 






Do. 












May 30,I88| 

June 26,8989 


36,00 




26.0JD; 
6,000.80 


180,000.00 






6,000.00 




Do. 




48,060.00 
49,600.00 
60,000.00 
70,000.00 

"80,000.00 
4,999.00 




Mar. 4,19*3 
Da 














• 




Do. 


1 




13,200.00; 

t 


Wj 800*00 ' 
40,090:00 




June 25,1818 

Mar. 4,1823 
Do. 


i. 








1.00 


i.ojd; 




• 


t^ooovoo 4 




Do. 








266,000.00 
46,000.00 
60,000.00 

3;ooo. oo 




Do. 








8,800.00; 




Do. 










Do. 








32,000*00 




June 26 1 1989 
Do. 














3,88*80: 
D9, 915*0^ 


3,000.00 
40,030:00 

100,000.00 
70,000.00 

99,000.00 
6,000.00 




Mar. 4,1981 
June 26,1989 


88.10 














Mar. 4,190 
May 30,1808 

Mar. 4,1928 
June 26, 1928 
Mar. 4,1918 
June 25,1910 


188.10 




. 9,180.0 
16,000. 80- 


30,811.80, 

1,800.00 
81,838.80, 
3800.1©: 
*34,884;00 










; «:» 












> o&'ob 




250,000.00' 
86,160.00 


30,000.00 
60,000.00 
68 000.00 
68,000.00 
88,680.00 
100.00 
1;000.00 

60,000.00 

1,860.(8 

78,060.00 

276,880.00 








Mar. 4,1811 


| BBvOD* 




84,830;00 
6,000. CD, 




May 30,1888 

Mar. 4,1888 

Do. 








i * 








i 


8,950/66' 
5,0QOJ)0 




Do. 










Do. 


i 




* 




Do. 








: «;666;o6 1 

1,80040 
-78,000.09 f 




Do. 










Do. 






Do. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for House Committee on Appropriations relative to amounts 
BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORIZED BUT 



Location. 



Des Moines, Iowa . . . 

Dickinson, N. Dak. 

Dillon, S.r 

Donora, Pa 

Douglas, ^riz 

Douglas, Ga 

Dowagiac, Mich 

Ihibois, Ta 

Dunkirk, N. Y 

Purango, Colo 

Durant, Okla 

Kast Las Ve^as, 

N. Mex. 
East Orange, N.J... 
East Pittsburgh. Pa. 
East St Louis, 111... 



Eaton ton, Oa 

Eden ton, N. C 

El Dorado .Ark 

Eldorado, Kans 

Elizabeth ton, Tenn. 
Elizabethtown, Ky. 
Elkins.W.Va...... 

EUensburg, Wash... 

El Paso, Tex 

El Reno, Okla 

Elyria, Ohio 

Eminence, Ky 

Ennis, Tex 

Eureka, Utah 

Eureka Springs, Ark. 
Evansville, Ind 



Everett, Wash 

Fairbanks, Alaska. 



Fairfield, Iowa... 
Fairmont, Minn.. 

Fallon. Nev 

Falls Citv, Nebr.. 
Falmouth, Ky... 
Fargo, N. Dak... 



Farmington, Mo 

Farmville, Va , 

Fayette, Mo 

Fayette ville. Tenn. . 

Fitzgerald, CJa 

Fordvce, Ark 

Forrest City, Ark... 

Forsyth, Ga 

Fort Atkinson. Wis. 
Fort Fairfield, Me.. 

Fort Morgan, Colo.. 
Fort Plain, N. Y.... 

Franklin, N.H 

Franklin, Pa 

Franklin, Tenn 

Frankliu, Va 

Fredrick, Md 

Frederick, Okla 

Fremont, Ohio 

Front : oyal, Va 

Fulton, Mo 

Oallipolis, Ohio 

Gallatin, Tenn 

Galveston, Tox 

Do 



Do. 



Gardiner, Me 

Gary, Ind 

Geneseo, 111 

Georgetown. Tex. 



BuildingB. 



Tost office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

do 

....do 

do 

do 



..do 

..do 

do.. 

.do- 



Post oflice and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

.-..do 

do 

do ,. 

do 

....do 

do 

Customhouse and 
post office. 

Post office and cus- 
tomhouse. 

Courthouse and 
Jail. 

Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do. 



Post office and 

courthouse. 
Past otlice. 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Post office rind 

customhouse. 
Post office. 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do... 
Courthouse. 
Post office and 

customhouse. 
Quarantine sta- 
tion. 

Past office 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Class of work. 



Kxtension... 



Building 

bite 

Site and building. 

Building 

Siteandlmilding. 

Building '.. 

do 



Site. 

Building.., 

Site and buildiug. 
do 



Building.... 
nd buile 



Site and building. 
Extension 



Site 

do 

.....do 

Site and building. 

Site „.. 

....do 

Building.: 

do 

do 

Site and building. 

Building „.. 

Site 

Site and building. 

do 

...do 

Extension 



Site and building. 
Additional land.. 



Site 

Site and building. 

do ;. 

Building 

Site 

....do... 



do 

Site and building 

do , 

do 

do..: 

Building. 

Site 

do.... 

Site and building. 
do , 



Building*.. 

Site and building, 

do 

do 

do 

Building 

do.. 

Site....... 

Building.. ... 

Site and building. 

do 

....do.....; 

....do 

r emodeling 

Third story 



Riprap 

Site and building. 

do-.. 

....do. .......... 

Site 



Limit of 
cost. 



$30,000.00 

90,000,00 

7,500. IX) 

75,000.00 

100,000.00 
55,000.00 
65.0(10.00 
85,000.00 
20,000.00 

100,000.00 
80,000.00 

125,000.00 

126,000.00 
100,000.00 
240,000.00 

6,000.00 

7,600.00 

6,000.00 

60,000.00 

2,600.00 

7,500.00 

86,000.00 

75,000.00 

300.000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 

8,000.00 

60,000.00 

50,000.00 

57,500.00 

150,000.00 

180,000.00 

15,000.00 

10,000.00 
65,000.00 
65,000.00 
65.000.00 
5,000.00 
25.000.00 

5.000.00 
80,000.00 
55.000.00 
50,000.00 
75,000.00 
50.000.00 
6.000.00 
6.000.00 
60.000.00 
80.000.00 

60,000.00 
65.000.00 
90.000.00 

100.000.00 
65,000.00 
45.000.00 
90.000.00 
10,000.00 

100.000.00 
50.000.00 
60,000.00 
75.000.00 
60,000.00 
60.000.00 
16,000.00 

60,000.00 

105,000.00 

125.000.00 

60,000.00 

6,000.00 



Amount 
appropriated, 



$60,000.00 



7,500.00 
13,300.00 



5,000.00 



20,000.00 



10.000.03 
18,000.00 



40,000.00 



3,760.00 
7,500.00 
5,000.00 
5,250.00 
2,600.00 
5,000.00 
85,000.00 



26,000.00 



7,500.00 
17,000.00 

5,000.00 
31,600.00 



96,000.00 

15,000.00 

9,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 



5.000.00 
23.500.00 



5, oca oo 



35,000.00 
10,000.00 



Amount ex- 
pended for 
site and land. 



4,500.00 
5.000.00 
15.000.00 
18,000.00 



8.000.00 
24,500.00 
19,000.00 

7,45a 00 



10,000.00 



8.000.00 
15.000.00 
12.500.00 

6,000.00 
50.000.00 
15,000.00 

50,000.00 

25,000.00 
75,000.00 
10,000.00 
6,000.00 



$7,5oaoo 



2C,O00.O) 



10, 000.00 



39,ooaoo 



5,900.00 



8,000.00 

7*6o6.66 



12,000.00 



5,000.00 



8.500.00 
10,000.00 



n,5oaoo 



8,000.00 
8,810.00 



22,000.00 
1.00 



5,000.00 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916* 25 

upended and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc. — Continued . 
it OT IK dOfTHSR OF CONSTRUCTION, DEC. 1, 1914— Continued. 



1 Amount 
1 expended tor 
| batldtags. 

1 


1 Outstanding 
liabilities. 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Surplus fund. 


Date of act. 


1 

i 






860,000.00 






June 25,1910 

liar. 4,1913 
Do. 








890,000.00 




1 




97,500.00 






■ 




13,300.00 


61,700.00 
100,000.00 
50,000.00 
55,000.00 
85,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 








5,000.00 




Do. 


i 








Do. 


( 










Do. 






20,000.00 






June 25,1910 

Mar. 4,1918 

Do. 








100,000.00 
70,000.00 
107,000.00 

125,000.00 
60,000.00 
210,000.00 

1,250.00 








10,000.00 






• 




18,000.00 




Do. 


1 








Do. 


•15*. 00 




39,158.00 


842. 00. 




June 25,1910 
Mar. 4,1913 


1 












3,750.00 
7,500.00 
5,000.00 
5,250.00 
2,500.00 
5,000.00 
84,700.00 




.. Do. 










Do. 












Do. 








54, 75a 00 




Do. 










Do. 








2,500.00 




Do. 


.moo 




300.00 




June 25,1910 

Mar. 4, 1913 

Do. 






75,000.00 
300,000.00 
75,000.00 
100,000.00 
500.00 
43,000.00 
45,000.00 
26,000.00 
150,000.00 

85,000.00 














12ft. 00 






18,972.00 




June 25,1910 








Mar. 4, 1918 
Do. 








7,500.00 
14,000.00 

24,000.00 








3,000.00 




June 25,1910 








Mar. 4, 1913 






7,600.00 




June 25,1910 
Mar. 4,1913 

May 30,1908 

Aug. 1,1914 

Mar. 4, 1913 














82,951.00 

200.00 
5,000.00 














1,000.00 
60,000.00 
50,000.00 
65,000.00 








Do. 










Do 










Do. 






5.000.00 
23,500.00 






Do. 




23,500.00 




1,500.00 

5,000.00 
55,000.00 
55,000.00 
15,000.00 
65,000.00 
50,000.00 
500.00 




Do. 








Do. 






5,000.00 






Do. 








Do. 


98.30 




8,598.30 
10,000.00 


26,401.70 




June 25,1910 








Mar. 4,1918 
Do. 
















4,500.00 
5,000.00 
3,375.00 




Do. 










Do. 




125.00 
18,000.00 


11,625.00 
18,000.00 


45,000.00 
62,000.00 

60,000.00 
57,000.00 
65,500.00 
81,000.00 
47,550.00 
45,000.00 
90,000.00 




June 25,1910 
Mar. 4,1918 

Do. 


















8,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 




19,000.00 


19,000.00 




Do. 




7,450.00 




Do. 










Do. 












Do. 








10,000.00 




Do. 








100,000.00 
42,000.00 
45,000.00 
62,500.00 
44,000.00 




Do. 






8,00a 00 

8,810.00 






Do. 






6,190.00 
12,500.00 

6,00a 00 

50,000.00 
15,000.00 

50,000.00 

3,000.00 
74,999.00 




June 25,1910 

Mar. 4,1913 

Do. 
























Do. 








! 


Do. 


• 






i 


Oct. 22,1913 

June 25,1910 
Do. 






22,000.00 
1.00 


80,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
















Mar. 4, 1913 






5,000.00 




Do. 



28 



BUKD&Y /CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



preptmedjor House Comimittm an Appropriations rtlatws to amowUt 

BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OB AUTHORIZED BUT 



Buildings. 



Class of work. 



Limit of 
cost. 



appropriated. 



Amount ex 

pendedte 

sfteaadland. 



gflmer, Vex.,....., 

Girard, Kans 

Glasgow, Ky 

Glens Falls, N.Y... 
Glenwood, Iowa.,.., 
Glenwood 8prmgs, 

Colo. 
Globe, Ariz........ 



Post office . 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Oeld0eld,Nev.... 
Gouveraeur, N. Y 
Grand Junctlon,Colo 
Greenfield, Mass.... 
Green River, Wyo.. 
Gipensburg, Ind... 

Greenville, Ala 

Greenwich, Conn... 

Qrinnell, Iowa 

Hackensack, N. J.. 
Ha^erstown, Md . .. 

Hallowell,Me 

Hammond. La 

Harrison vflle, Mo.. 
Harrodsburg, Ky.. 

Hastings, Mich 

Havana, 111 

Hiawatha, Kans. . . 
Highland,m 

ginton f W.Va 
obart, Okla 

Hod ran vflle, Ky... 
Bollidaysburg, Pa. . 

golly Sprrngs/Mias. 
olton, Kans 

Honey Grove, "ex. 
Honomlu,Hawaii. . 



Post ofilce and 
courthouse. 

Postoffloe 

....do 

....do 

.....do 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 

do.. 

do 



Biteaad building. 

do 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 



Building. 



...do.... 
...do.... 



.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 



Hoopeston, IU... 
HoosickJUIs.N.Y. 

Hornell, N. V. 

Houghton, Mich.... 
Humboldt, 'ienn.... 
Huntingdon, ' enn. , 
Huntington, Ind. . . . 
Huntington, HT. Va, 



Huntsvflle, Tax 

Indiana, Pa , 

ishpammg,Mich... 

Jackson, Ohio 

Jamestown, N. Dak 
Jasper, Ala 



Post office, court- 
house, and cus- 
tomhouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



....do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

.do. 



lsrseyvUle,m... 
Juneau, Alaska. 



KalispelLMont.... 
Kansas City, If o... 

KendaHville.Ind.. 

Kenton, Ohio 

Key West, Fla 

Do 



Kinston.N.C... 
KJrksvllle,Mo... 
Kissimmce, Fla.. 
Kittanning, Pa... 
Laconia, N. H... 
La Junto, Colo... 
Lake City, FU... 
Lakeland. Fla.... 

Lamar, Mo 

Lancaster, Ky... 
Lancaster, Pa.... 
Lancaster. S. C... 
Lanett,Aia 



Post office 

do 

do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

Marine Hospital... 

Post office, court- 
house, and cus- 
tomhouse. 

Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Site and building. 

do 

Building ,. 

Siteandbuilding. 

Site 

....do 

.,..do 

Building 

do 

....do 

Extension 

Site. 



Building , 

Site and building. 

Site -T7TT.. 

Site and building . 

Site 7Tr.. 

Building 

Site 

Building 

Site 

do. 



Site and building. 
Building.... 7T~T. 

Site 

Site and building. 
....do 7!T. 



....do 

....do.... 

Building 

Siteandbuilding. 
Building 



Site 

Site and building. 
Siteandbuilding. 

Site 

Building 

do 

Siteandbuilding. 
do 



Building... 
Extension.. 



Siteandbuilding. 

....do 

Breakwater 

Site 



Siteandbuilding., 

Extension , 

Site 

....do 

Building 

Siteandbuilding. 

Site 

Siteandbuilding. 

Site 

Building 

Site 

Site and building. 
....do 



$55,000*00 
75,000.00 
60,000.00 

100,000.00 
50,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 

76,000.00 

70,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 

6,000.00 

12,000.00 

6,000.00 

90,000.00 

90,000.00 

100,000.00 

30,000.00 

20.000.00 

50,000.00 

52,500.00 

10,000.00 

81,000.00 

10,000.00 

60,000.00 

7,000.00 

50,000.00 

10,000.00 

6,000.00 

80,000.00 

42,500.00 

7,500.00 

60,000.00 

1,826,000.00 



70,000.00 
80,000.00 
86,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 

2,500.00 

06,000.00 

225,000.00 

5,000.00 
90,000.00 
76,000.00 
10,000.00 
75,00000 
100,000.00 

65,000.00 
200,000.00 

100,000.00 
500,000.00 

75,000.00 
80,000.00 
40,000.00 
80,000.00 



90,000.00 
40,000.00 
6,000.00 
15,000.00 
75,000.00 
85,000.00 
7,500.00 
75,000.00 
10,000.00 
66,000.00 
138,278.78 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 



86,000.00 
6,000.00 . 
7,600.00 

65,000.00 
5,000.00 
9,600.00 



318,500.00 



16,000.00 
20,000.00 
100,000.00 
26,000.00 
6,000.00 



9,500.00 



16,500.00 
6,000.00 



6,000.00 



20,000.00 



6,600.00 



3,000.00 
7,600.00 
6,750.00 
9,000.00 



4,000.00 
60,000.00 
10,000.00 

4,850.00 
12,000.00 



4,000.00 



7,600.00 

300.00 

600,000.00 



10,000.00 



4,600.00 

'ioMsi'io 



26,000.00 

" 2,666*66 



6,000.00 
25,000.00 
45,000.00 
10,000.00 



6, 000.00! 



42,000.00 
10,000.00. 



8,900.00 
80,000.00 



22,6flp.OO 



18,000.00 
14,000.00 
40,000.00 
70,000.00 



70,000.00 



20,018.20. 



6,000.00 
16,000.00 



6,000.00. 
16,0 00 OC 



65,000.00 
6,000.00 

10,000.00 
7,000.00, 



1.00' 
6,000.00 



7,000.00 



138,278.78 
8,000.00 
10,000.00 



SD*DP¥ CIVIL AfPBOPRIATION BILL, MM. 



«f 







appropriattonifor public buildings, *te.^eatUMNd. 
STRUCTION, DEC. 1, 1914-Continued. 


HOT IK COUBflE OT CON 


expendMlfsr 


OntataaAiog 
liafilffllm 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Surplus, fund. 


Dafeofaot. 








'•5,000.00 
6,000.00 
7,500.00 

36,600.00 


•50,000.00 
60,000.00 
52,500.00 
46,000.00 
46,000.60 
90,500.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 
60,000.00 




Mar. 4,M* 
Do. 


















Do. 






•18,600.00 
5,000.00 
9,600.00 




lone 26,1610 
Mar. 4,1910 

Do. 




•6,000.00 
9,500.00 








........ r 






Do. 


1 


1.00 


1.00 

9,620.00 

201.12 

16,714.00 

6,000.00 


14,999.00 
10,380.00 
99,798.88 
8,286.00 




May 30, I960 
June 25,1916 


•120. 00 




20L12 






Do. 


214.00 




75,000.00 




Do. 








Do. 








12,000.00 




Mar. 4,1918 
Do. 








5,000.00 








90,000; 00 
90,000.00 
100,000.00 
30,000.00 




Do. 












Do. 












Do. 












Do. 






6,600.00 


13,500.00 




June 25,1910 j 
Mar. 4,1918 ' 
Do: 






60,000.00 
49,500.00 

2,600.00 
74,25a 00 

1,000.00 
60,000.00 

3,000.00 










3,000.00 
7,500.00 
6 750.00 
9,000.00 












Do. 










Do. 










Do. 










Do. 


..*::.v.vr:::: 




4,ooaoo 

10,000.00 






Do. 




10,000.00 


49,877.35 




May 4O,180J 

Mar. 4,1913 

Do. 










4,850.00 
12,000.00 


isa oo 
68,ooaoo 

42,500.00 












Do. 










Do. 






4,500.00 

300.00 

104,631.29 




•3,000.00 


June 25,1910 








49,70a00 

745,00a 00 

60,000.00 

80,ooaoo 

85,000.00 
75,000.00 

5o,ooaoo 


Mar. 4. 1018 




475,468.71 
10,000.00 




May 30, I960 
Mar. 4,1918 
















Do. 












Do. 




•• 




25,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 




3,600.4/0 


2,600.00 






Do. 






95,000.00 
225,000.00 




Do. 












Do. 






5,000.00 






June 25, W16 






25,000.00 
32,900.00 


65,000.00 
30,000.00 




Mar. 4,1910 


160.00 




12,100.00 
10,000.00 




June 25,1910 








Do. 








75,ooaoo 

100,000.00 

56,100.00 
120,000.00 

100,000.00 
500,000.00 

57,ooaoo 

66,000.00 




Mar. 4,1918 












Do.' 








8,900.00 
66,971.70 




Do. 


698.30 




23,028.30 




June 26,1910 








Mar. 4,1918 












Do. 


1 






14,000.00 
70,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 


•LOO 








Mar. 4, 1911 






10,000.00 

20,000.00 
40,000.00 




Mar. 4, 1910 


100.09 








June 30,1900 








Mar. 4,1910 
Do. 


1 




5,000.00 
15,600.00 


1,000.00 












May 30,1908 
Mar. 4,1910 
June 25,19*0 
Mar. 4, 1913 








75,666.66 

30,000.00 

1,500.00 

66,O0a0D 

3,ooaoo 

55,000.00 




121.60 




122.50 
6,000.00 


64,877.60 










t 




10(000.00 




Do. 


1 




7,000.00 




Do. 










Do. 








138,278.78 




Do. 


| 


8,000.00 


8,000.00 


42,000.00 
40,000.00 




Da 




4,000.00 




Da 



28 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPEOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared/or House Committee on Appropriations relative to amounts 
BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORIZED BUT 



Location. 



Buildings. 



Class of work. 



Limit of 
cost. 



Amount 
appropriated. 



Amount ez- 

S ended for 
e and land. 



La Salle, 111 

Las Graces, N. Hex 



Laurel, Miss.... 
Law ton, Okla. . 



Lebanon, Ind 

Lebanon, Mo 

Leesburg, Va 

Lenoir, N. C 

Leominister, Mass.. 

Lewis town, Pa 

Liberty, Mo 

Lincoln, Nebr 



Linton, Ind 

Little Falls, Minn.. 

Live Oak, Fla. 

Lock Haven, Pa..., 

Logan, Ohio , 

Long Beach, Cal 

Loner Island City, 
N.Y. 

Long view, Tex 

Lumberton, N. C . . . 

Lyons, N. Y . 

Madison, Ga 

Madison, S. Dak.... 
Madison, Wis 



Post office 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Postofi:ce 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Postofllce 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post olice and 

courthouse. 

PostoIIice 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Site and building 
Building.... 



Building 

Site and building 



Site 

....do 

S<te and building. 

Site 

Site and building. 

do 

...do 

Extension 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Madlsonvilie, Ky... 

Maiden, Mass 

Manassas, Va , 

Manchester, Conn. . 
Mandan, N. Dak... 
Maquoketa, Iowa.., 

Marenpo, Iowa 

Marianna, Ark 

Marianna, Fla 



....do. 
Post oTce and 
courthouse. 

Posto.lice 

....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

.do. 



Site 

Building 

do 

Site and building. 

Building 

Site 

Site and building. 



....do.... 

Site 

...do.... 
....do.... 
Building. 
do.... 



Marion, 111 

Marion, Ky 

Marion, S. C 

Martin, Tex 

Martin, Tenn 

Martinsbur?, W. Va. 
Martins Ferrv, Ohio. 

Mar vville, Tenn 

McComb, Miss 

McCook, Nebr 



Post office and 
courthouse. 

Postofllce 

.do. 



....do.... 
.do.... 
.do.... 



Site 

Building 

Site 

do 

Site and building 

Building 

Site 

Site and building. 
do.... 



....do.... 
....do.... 
Building. 
....do.... 



McKees Rocks, Pa. 
Med ford, Oreg 



Media. Pa 

Memphis, Tenn 

Memphis. Tex 

Mena, Ark 

Mendota, 111 

Merrill, Wis 

Metropolis, 111 

Middlesboro, Ky. . . 
Mlddletown, Conn. . 
Middletown.Ohio.. 

Midland, Mich 

Milbank. S Dak... 
Miles City, Mont... 
Mil lersbure, Ohio.. 

Millvllle. N. J 

Milwaukee, Wis.... 

M In den, La 

Mineral Point, Wis. 

Missoula, Mont 



Moberly, Mo. 
Modesto, Cal. 



....do. 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

Sub-post office 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post office and 

customhouse. 
Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 



do.. 

Extension 

Site and building. 

Building 

do.. 

....do 

Site and building. 
do 



Building 

Sire and building. 

Site 

Building 

Site 

Building 

Site and bulldln«r. 
Site and building. 

Building 

....do.. 

Site and building. 

Site 

Site and building. 

Site 

Site and building. 

Site 

Building 

Site and building. 

Extension 



Site. 



.do. 



$100,000.00 
125,000.00 

80,000.00 
215,096.28 

10,000.00 

7,500.00 

55,000.00 

8,000.00 

90,000.00 

75,000.00 

60,000.00 

275,000.00 

8,000.00 
65,000.00 
60.0C0.00 

100,000.00 
60,000.00 
40.000.00 

200,000.00 

50,000.00 
10,000.00 
15.000.00 
5,000.00 
60,000.00 
550,000.00 

10,000.00 
150,000.00 

5,000.00 
15,000.00 
66.000.00 
50,000.03 

5,000.00 
50,000.00 
70,000.00 

70,000.00 
70,000.00 
50,000.00 
45,000.00 
50,000.00 
20,000.00 
85,000.00 
60,000.00 
50.000.00 
120,000.00 

80,000.00 
110,000.00 



60, 

210, 

7, 

50, 

10, 

75, 

50, 

85, 

140, 

100, 

60, 

7 

150, 

7, 

55, 

100, 

50, 

60, 



000. 
000. 
500. 
000. 
000. 
000. 
000. 
000. 
000. 
000. 
000. 
.500. 
000. 
500. 
000. 
000. 
000. 
000. 



125,000.00 

35,000.00 
20,000.00 



$65,000.00 



3! 



9,800.00 
7,500.00 
8,750.00 
7,000.00 



16,000.00 

7,500.00 

65,000.00 

4,500.00 



30,000.00 
22,500.00 



40,000.00 
100,000.00 

30,000.00 
10,000.00 



5,000.00 



3,750.00 
15,000.00 
55,000.00 



3,500.00 
6,500.00 
4,000.00 

15,000.00 
5,250.00 



45,000.00 



15,000.00 

£26,066.66' 

15,000.00 
90,000.00 



90,000.00 
4,100.00 



10,000.00 



10,000.00 
20,000.00 



4,300.00 
4,000.00 

31,500.00 
7,000.00 

20,000.00 



4,500.00 



$14,000.00 



8,002.00 



40,000.00 



6,500.00 
10,000.00 



12,000.00 
12,000.00 



5,250.00 



1.00 



6,000.00 



14,500.00 
"14,766.66' 



20,000.00 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



29 



expended and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc. — Continued. 
NOT IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION, DEC. 1, 1914— Continued. 



1 Amount 
expended for 

1 buildings. 


Outstanding 
liabilities. 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Surplus fund. 


Date of act. 


1174.25 




914,174.25 


$50,825.75 


$35,000.00 
125,000.00 

50,000.00 
152,300.00 

200.00 




May 30,1908 
Mar. 4,1918 

June 25,1910 
Do. 


t 






23.50 




23.50 
8,098.00 


29,976.50 
54,698.28 

9,800.00 

700.00 

8,750.00 

2,500.00 




I 98.00 






1 

i 






Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 


| 


S6,80a00 


6,8oaoo 




1 


46,250.00 
1,000.00 
90,000.00 
59,000.00 
52,500.00 
210,000.00 

3,500.00 
65,000.00 
30,000.00 
77,500.00 
60,000.00 




Da 




4,500.00 


4,600.00 




Da 


■ 




• Da 








16,000.00 

7,500.00 

64,333.00 




Do. 










Do. 


607.00 




667.00 
5,500.00 




June 25,1910 

Mar. 4,1913 
Da 




5,600.00 


» $1,000.00 


! 




145.00 




145.00 


29,855.00 
22,500.00 




June 25,1910 

Mar. 4,1913 

Do. 




















40,000.00 






June 26,1910 
Mar. 4,1913 

June 28,1910 
Do. 


1 




100,000.00 
23,500.00 


100,000.00 
20,000.00 








6,500.00 
10,000.00 
















15,000.00 




Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 




5,000.00 


5,000.00 










60,000.00 
550,000.00 

10,000.00 

150,000.00 

1,250.00 




Do. 












Do. 












Do. 












Do. 








3,750.00 




Do. 






12,000.00 
12,082.50 


3,000.00 


June 25,1910 
Do. 


82.50' 




42,917.50 


11,000.00 
50,000.00 
1,500.00 
43,500.00 
66,000.00 

55,000.00 
64,750.00 
50,000.00 








Mar. 4, 1918 
Do. 








3,500.00 
6,500.00 
4,000.00 

15,000.00 












Do. 










Do. 










Do. 






5,250.00 




Do. 










DO. 


126.60 




126.60 


44,873.40 




June 25,1910 






50,000.00 
20,000.00 
70,000.00 
60,000.00 
50,000.00 




Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 






















Do. 










Do. 












Do. 


3a 00 




30.00 


ii9,970.66 

15,000.00 
89,999.00 




June 25,1910 






65,000.00 
20,000.00 

60.000.00 

120,000.00 

3.400.00 

50,000.00 




Mar. 4, 1913 
June 25,1910 






1.00 










Mar. 4,1918 
Do. 








90,000.00 
4,100.00 












Do. 










Do. 












Do. 








75,000.00 
40,000.00 
65,000.00 

140,000.00 

100,000.00 
65,700.00 
3,500.00 

118,500.00 

500.00 

35,000.00 

100,000.00 
60,000.00 
.55,500.00 

125,000.00 

35,000.00 




Do. 








10,000.00 
13,950.00 




Do. 


sa oo 




6,050.00 




June 25,1910 








Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 


















4,000.00 
12, 4'*. 00 
7,000.00 
5,300.00 




Do. 










Do. 


75.00 




19,075.00 




June 25,1910 






Mar. 4,1913 
Juno 26,1910 
















Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 


















1.500.00 




Do. 










Do. . 








i 




Do. < 












Do. 



i Deficiency. 



80 



SmSTDBY CIVIL APPBOPHIATION BILL, 19M. 



Atatantftt prepared far Hmim ChmrnUUfon Appropriati&m riMe to 4 

BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOB OR AUTHORIZED BDT 



Buildings. 



Class of work. 



Limit of 
cost. 



appropriated. 



o, Pa.... 
_. „iheia,Pa.... 

Monroe. Oa 

Monroe, Wis...... 

Montclair,N.J.... 

Montevideo. Minn. 
Monte Vista, Colo. 
Montrose, Colo 



Post office. 
do 

do. 

do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Site and bnfldlng. 

do 

Site 

do. 



Morgan City, La.. 
Morrlstown, N. J.. 

Moultrie, Qa 

Mountain Grove, Mo 
Mount Airy, N. C.. . 
Mount Carmel, 111. . . 
Mount Olive, N. C 
Mount Pleasant r 



Post office and 
courthouse. 

Poet office. 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Site and building. 

Building 

Site, 

....do 



....do 

Building 

Site and building. 

Site 

Bite; .-. 

Site and building. 

Site 

Site and building. 



Mount Pleasant r 

Tex. 
Mount Vernon, Ind. 
Mount Vernon; N.Y. 

Murray, Ky 

Muskegon, Mich..., 



Mystic. Conn 

Nacogdoches, Tex.. 

Nampa, Idaho 

Napoleon, Ohio 

Nashville, Tenn.... 



.do. 



.do. 



....do 

....do 

....do 

Post ofllce and 
customhouse. 

Post office 

do 

....do 

do 



Naugatuck, Conn. . . 

Navasota, Tex 

Neenah.Wis 

Nephi, Utah 

New Albany, Ind... 

Newarlr,Del 

Newark, N.J 

Newark, Ohio 

New Braunfels, 

Tex. 
Newbnryport, Mass. 

Newcastle, Ind 

Newcastle, Wyo... 
Mew Martinsville, 

W.Va, 
New Orleans, La... 
Do 



Post o^ce and 
customhouse 

Post o Bee 

....do 

do 



Site 

Building 

Site 

Additional land 

a nfl extension. 
Site and building. 

do 

Site 

do 



Extension. 



.do. 



...do... 
...do... 
...do... 
...do... 
...do... 



Building 

do.... 

....do 

Site 

Extension 

Site 

Site and building.. 

u .do 

Building 



....do.. 
....do.. 
....do.. 
....do.. 



do 

Site and building. 

Site 

....do 



. Do 

tfew Philadelphia, 

Ohio. 
Newport, R. L 



Customhouse..... 
Quarantine see* 
tion. 

Subtreasury. 

Post office. 



Remolding. 



Site and building 



Mswton, Iowa* . . . . 
New York, N.Y. . 

Niles,Ohio 

Noblesville,lnd..... 

Nogalos,Aris 

Do 

North Attlebcro, 

Maes. 
North Tope*a.Kans. 
North Vernon, Ind.. 

Norton, Va. 

Nyack,N. Y., 

Oakland, Oa) 



(Jean to, Wis. 

OWwein. Iowa 

Oklahoma City, 
Okla, 



Olney, m. 
Olypnem. 
Oneida, N. Y 



PBi. 



Opoltaa.Ala., 
Orange, Tax.. 
Orlando, Fla. 



Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office 

Assay office 

Post office. 

do 

Customhouse. 

Post office. 

do 



Branehperto 
Post office.... 

.....do 

do 

Post office an d 



Post office. 

....do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office. 

do. 

do. 

.....do 



Additional land 
and building. 

She \7.... 

Building. 

Site....! 

....do ., 

Site end boildint 

Site 

Site and building 

....do 

.....do 

....do. 

Site 

Additional land 

and extension.' 

Site and bulldingt 

Site .« 

Extension 



.do.. 



Site and building. 

....do 7r.. 

Site 

Building 

8ite and building. 
Building. , 



190,000.00 
80,000.00 
5,000.00 
7,500.00 
130,000.00 
50,000.00 
10,000.00 
15,000.00 

6,000.00 
125,000.00 
65,000.00 

7,500.00 

5,000.00 
75,000.00 

5,000.00 
75,000.00 

65,000.00 

7,500.00 

100,000.00 

5,000.00 

75,000.00 

55,000.00 
60,000.00 
10,000.00 
7,500.00 
400,000.00 

80,000.00 

. 60,000.00 

80,000.00 

5,000.00 

73,000.00 

5,000.00 

1,800,000.00 

190,000.00 

50,000.00 

70,000.00 

90,000.00 

5,000.00 

12,500.00 

350.000.00 
12,000.00 

250,000.00 
12,500.00 

400,000.00 

10,000.00 
607,408.00 
15,000.00 
10,000.00 
110,000.00 
10,000.00 
70,000.00 

71,000.00 
60,000.00 
76,000.00 
15,500.00 
115,000.00 

60,000.00 

8,000.00 

. 260,000,00 

70,000.00 
66,000.00 
20,000.00 
106,000.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 



$21,476.00 

47,000.00 

6,000.00 

7,600,00 

30,000.00 



5,000.00 
16,000.00 

4,300.00 
45,060.00 
7,000.00 
6,500.00 
5,000.00 
20,000.00 
2,000.00 
7,500.00 

5,000.00 

7,500.00 
70,000.00 



10,000.00 

4,000.00 
5,000.00 
9,500.00 
7,500.00 



5,000.00 

73,000.00 

4 006.00 



90,000.00 



75,000.00 
3,000.00 
12,500.00 

100,000.00 
12,000.00 



12,500.00 

100,000.00 

10,000.00 
836,406.00 

15,00a 00 

10,000.00 
16,000.00 



821,788.00 



20,000.00 

U,00a00 
13,500.00 
60,000.00 
15,500.00 
110,000.00 

3,000.00 
6,000.00 



6,500.00 
18,600.00 



60,000,00 
6,000,00 



7,500.00 
80,000.00 



7,000.00 



20,000.00 



7,500.00 



18,519.50 

"n.ooacw 



84,000.00 



15,000.00 



14,000.00 



15,500,00 



8UJTDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 10111. 



u 



k tfmppnpriali*n*Jbr public butidbig*, #l*\— Oantianiod. 
NOT IN COURSE OP CONSTRUCTION, DBC. 1, 1914-Coathraed. 



■ 1.1 |mi 

apCMHanr 
kofldtap. 


Outstanding 
lfaMlft*fff 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Surplus fund. 


Date of act. 




331,476.00 


301,475.00 
31,878.00 




368,525.00 
33,000.00 


...A.... ....... 


Mar? 4,1013 
June 26,1013 
Mar. 4 l«| 


MX 00 


325,122.00 
5,000.00 










7,600.00 

30,000.00 






June 2«; itij 

Mar. 4,l«3 

Do. 








ioo,ooaoo 

5o,ooaoo 

5,ooaoo 




i 












5,000.00 




Do. 




15,000.00 


15,000.00 




D01 




4,200.00 
44,900.00 


1,800.00 
80,000.00 

58,ooaoo 

1,000.00 




Do. 


Ma oo 




ioaoo 
s,2oaoo 


'■"Vjtajaoo' 


June 25*1918 

Mar. «4,1913 

Do. 


1,200.00 


. 


6,600.00 
5,000.00 










Da. 


t 




30,000.00 


55,000 00 
3,000.00 
67,600.00 

50,000.00 




Do! 


i • 




2,000.00 
7,600.00 

5,000.00 




Dai 


1 








Do! 


1 








Da^ 


1 




7,100.00 
3*0.00 


>< 


JuaesMoM 
Do* 


30.00 




00,760.00 


30,000.00 
5,000.00 
66,000.40 

51,000.00 

65,000 00 

600.00 










0o» 








10,000.00 

4,000.00 
6,000 00 
0,600.00 
7,600.00 










Do. 


















Da* 










Dov 


1 






400,000.00 

80,000 00 
50,000.00 
80,000.00 




Do. 


1 

i. ... 








• 


Db* 










*** * 


Da? 


i 










Da. 






, 


5,000.00 
72,906.60 


Do. 


3.60 




3.60 
4,000.00 






June 25,1310 
liar. 4,1318 

Do,. 




4,000.00 


1.000 00 

1^800,000 00 

100,000 00 

60,000.00 

70,000 00 
15,000.00 
3,000.00 










35.00 




13*644.60 


71,456.60 




June 30,1330 








MaA 4,1913 












Dai 


300.00 




17,300.00 


69,800.00 
3,000.00 
13,600.00 

103,000.00 
12,000.00 




June 26,1910 








Mar. 4,1313 
Do, 
















260,000.00 




Aug. 1,10M 

Do. 















260,000.00 




June 26,1910 








12,600.00 

16,000.00 

10,000.00 
830,000.00 




Mar. 4,1310 






84V000.00 


300,000.00 




Da; 


.......... 






Do. 


3.031.60 




14,408.00 
16.600,00 


272.000.00 




Oct. 20,19*4 
June 26 v 19Ky 






10,000.00 
16,000.00 






Mar. 4,1010 








94,000.66 
10,000.00 
60.000.00 

60,000.00 
46,600.00 
26,000.00 




Do.-' 










Do. 


130.00 




14s 180. 00 


5,820.00 

11,000.00 
13,600.00 
44,280.00 




June 25, MHO 








Mar. 4.1940 










Do. 




4,760.00 


4,760.00 
> 1*600.00 




Do. 






Jona 26,1910 






116,000.00 

3,000.00 
8,000.00 






Mar* 4,1910 








67,000.00 




Do. 










Do! 








260,666.66 

63,500.00 
51,500.00 
26,000.00 
66,000.00 

56,ooaoo 

60,000.00 




Do. 






•: 


6,600.00 
13,600.00 




Do. 










Do. 










Do/ 


130% 00 


' w """*6,*ooaoa" 


138.00 

Moo.no 


40,863*00 




June* 25, UftO 
Mar* 4,10*0 












bo.' 



* Deficiency. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 
Statement prepared for House Committee on Appropriations relative to amounts 

BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORIZED BUT 



Location. 



Owego, N. Y 

Paintsville.Ky... 

Palatka, Fla 

Park City, Utah.. 

Pasoo. Wash 

Passaic, N.J 

Paxton.Ill 

Pendleton, Oreg.. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

PhiliDpi,W.Va.. 

Phoenixville, Pa. 
Pikeville,Ky.... 



Pittsburgh, Pa., 



Pittsburgh,Pa.i 
Pittsburg, Tex.. 

Pittston, Pa 

Plainfleld, N. J.. 
Plymouth. Ind.. 
Portland, Bid 



Portland, Oreg. 



Pottstown, Pa 

Poughkeapsie, N. Y 



Pratt, Kans 

Prescott, Arias 

Prescott, Ark 

Prostonsburg, Ky 
Provinoetown, Me 



Pulaski, Va 

Putnam, Conn.... 

Quitman, Oa 

Raton, N.Mex.... 

Reading, Mass 

Reading, Pa 



Red Bank, N.J 

Red Bluff, Ca! 

Red field, S.Dak... 
Reedy Island, Del. . 

Rhinelander, Wis. . 

Richfield, Utah 

Ridgway, Pa 

Ripon, Wis 

Robinson, III , 

Rochester, Ind 

Rochester, Pa 

Rockingham, N.C.. 

Rockville, Conn 

Rogers, \rk 

Rogorsville, Tenn... 

Roseburg, Oreg 

ftossville, Ga 

Rum ford. Me 

Russell ville, Ark.... 
Rutherfordton.N.C. 

Saco, Me 

St. Johns, Oreg 

St. Johnsburv.Vt... 

St. Louis, Mo 

Do 

St. Marys, Ohio 

St. Peter, Minn 

St. Petersburg, Fla.. 
Salamanca, N. Y.... 

Salem, Ind 

Salem, N. J 

Salem, Va 

SalNbury.Md 



Buildings. 



Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

United States 

Mint. 
Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

Post office and 

courthouse. 
Laboratory, 

Bureau of 

Mines. 

Post office 

do? 

do 



.do 

.....do 

Qua ra n tine 

station. 
Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 



...do.. 

...do.. 

...do.. 

.do.. 



Post office and 
customhouse. 

Post office 

....do 

do. 



....do 

....do 

....do 



....do 

....do 

.do.. 



Quarantine sta- 
tion. 

Post office 

....do 

do. 



....do... 
.do... 



.do.. 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do.. 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Customhouse.. 
SubtreaMiry.. 

Post oifice 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

...do 



Class of work. 



Site and building.. 

Site 

Site and building.. 

do !. 

Site 

do 

Site and building.. 

do 

Coal bunkers. . . 



Site. 



Site and building.. 
Site 

Building 



Limit of 
cost. 



$75,000.00 
6,000.00 
60,000.00 
30,000.00 
10,000.00 
25,000.00 
60,000.00 

130,000.00 
20,000.00 

8,000.00 

80,000.00 
7,500.00 

500,000.00 



Site I 1,000,000.00 

Site and building. . 55, 000. 00 

do | 100,000.00 

do ! 150,000.00 

Site | 10,000.00 

Quarantine 67,500.00 

facilities. 
Building 



....do 

Additional land 

and extension. 
Site and building.. 

Site 

Site and building. 

Site 

....do 



Building 

Site and building. 

do 

do 

Building 

Additional land 

and extension. 

Site 

Site and building.. 

Building 

Laboratory and 

crematory. 
Site and building. . 

Building 

do 

Site and building.. 

do 

....do 

Site 

....do 

Building 

Site and building.. 

Site 

Building 

Site 

Building 

Site and building. . 

Site 

Site and building.. 

Site 

Site and building.. 

Extension 

Building 

Site 

Site and building.. 

Building 

do 

Site 

....do 

Site and building.. 
do 



1,000,000.00 

90,000.00 
68,000.00 

60,000.00 
7,500.00 

60,000.00 
5,000.00 
8,000.00 

50,000.00 
65,000.00 
50,000.00 
75,000.00 
55,000.00 
135,000.00 

25,000.00 
60,000.00 
65,000.00 
33,500.00 

91,000.00 
55,000.00 
80,000.00 
75,000.00 
70,000.00 
70,000.00 
30,000.00 

5,000.00 
55,000.00 
70,000.00 

3,000.00 
100,000.00 

5,000.00 
60,000.00 
50,000.00 

5,000.00 
60,000.00 

5,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

7,500.00 
60,000.00 
80,000.00 
75,000.00 

5,000.00 
10,000.00 
65,000.00 
90,000.00 



Amount 
appropriated, 



$16,000.00 



27,000.00 
30,000.00 
10,000.00 
25,000.00 
12,000.00 
57,000.00 
20,000.00 

8,000.00 

16,000.00 



160,000.00 



1,000,000.00 
5,000.00 
20,000.00 
70,000.00 
10,000.00 
43,880.00 

160,000.00 



28,000.00 

7,400.00 
7,500.00 



5,000.00 
8,000.00 



45,000.00 
16,000.00 
7,200.00 



95,000.00 

25,000.00 
12,000.00 



33,500.00 
5,500.00 



10,400.00 

25,000.00 

8,200.00 

30,000.00 



4,000.00 
2,000.00 



5,000.00 

6,666.66' 



100,000.00 



2,000.00 
55,000.00 



5,000.00 
9,500.00 
10,250.00 



Amount ex- 
tended for 
site and land. 



$4,000.00 
7,000.00 



26,000.00 

"8,666.66' 



8,000.00 



942,343.91 



30,000.00 
200.35 



8,500.00 
5,000.00 



35,000.00 
25,000.00 



20,000.00 

26,666.66' 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

apaided and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc. — Continued. 
V>7 IN' COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION, DEC. 1, 1914— Continued. 



33 



Amount 

•upended tor 

bu.ldings. 


Outstanding 
liabilities. 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Surplus fund. 


Date of act. 




$14,S75.00 


$14,375.00 


$125.00 


$60,000.00 
5,000.00 
33,000.00 




Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 










4,000.00 

7,000.00 

10,009.00 

2-5,000.00 


23,000.00 
23,U»J0.00 




June 25,1910 








Mav 30,1908 
Mar. 4,19x3 




10,000.00 














June 25,1910 






12,000.00 
48,877.50 
-9,834.58 


48,000.00 
73,000.00 




Mar. 4,1913 


$72.50 


50.00 


8.122.00 
115.42 

8,000.00 

.50 




May 30,1908 


U5.42 




June 30,1906 










June 25,1910 




.50 


15,909.50 


6J.000.00 





Mar. 4,1913 




7,500.00 
350,000.00 




Do. 


1,032.50 




1,032.50 


148,967.50 




Do. 






942,343.9! 


$57,656.09 


June 30,1906 




5,000.00 


5,000.00 




50, (XX). 00 




Mar. 4, 19i3 






20, Of X). no 
39,793.00 
10,000.00 
43,870.00 

159,799.65 


8<;,000.00 
80,000.00 




Do. 


207 CO 




30,207.00 




Mov 30,1908 








Mar. 4,1913 


10.00 




10.00 


23,620.66 

840, .100. 00 

90,000.% 
40,000.00 

o2,f00.G0 




Aug. 24,1912 






200. 35 


Mar. 4,1913 










Do. 








28,000.00 
7,-100.00 




Do. 










Do. 




7,500.00 


7,500.00 




Do. 






50,000.00 




Do. 








5,000.00 
8,000.00 




Do. 












Do. 








60,000.00 
20,000.00 
35,000.00 
67,800.00 
55,000.00 
40,000.00 





Do. 


156.00 




8.656.00 
5; 055. 00 
7,200.00 


36,344.00 
9,945.00 


June 25,1910 
Do. 


55.00 








7,200.00 




Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 












35,000.00 
25,000.00 


60,000.00 




May ?0, 190ft 








June 25,1910 






12,000.00 


48,000.00 
65,000.00 




Mar. 4, 1913 
Do. 
















33,500.00 
5,500.p0 




June 23,1913 








85,500.00 
55,000.00 
80,000.00 
64,600.00 
45,000.00 
61,800.00 




Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 




















Do. 








10,400.00 
4,890.00 




Do. 


naoo 




20,110.00 




June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 












26,000.00 


4,000.00 


June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 








5,000.00 
55,000.00 
66,000.00 

1,000.00 
100,000.00 












Do. 









4,000.00 




Da 








2,000.00 




Da 










Do. 




5,000.00 


5.000.00 






Do. 






60,000.00 
44,000.00 

6,000.00 
60,000.00 

5,000.00 
100,000.00 




Da 









6,000.00 




Da 










Do. 


i 


i 




Do. 












Do. v 












Do. 


is. 66 




15.00 


99,985.00 




June 25,1910 

Mar. 4,1913 

Do. 






1,000,000.00 

7,500.00 

58,000.00 

25,000.00 

75,000.00 




















2,000.00 
54.975.00 




Do. 


25*00 




25.00 




June 25,1910 


i 








Mar. 4,191$ 
Do. 






5,000.00 
9,500.00 








500.00 
54,750.00 
90,000.00 




Do. 


■ 


10, 26a 00 


10,250.00 




Do. 








Do. 



7278&—15 8 



» To be sold. 



34 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for House Committee on Appropriations relative to amounti 
BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORIZED BUT 



Location. 



San Bernardino, Cal. 

Sanders ville, Ga 

Sandpoint, Idaho. . . 

Sandusky, Ohio 

Sanlord, Fla 

San Francisco, Cal. . 



,Cal 



San Luis Ob: 
San Pedro, 



Santa Fe, N. Mex.. 



Do. 



Saranac Lake, N. Y 

Savanna, 111 

Sayre, Pa 

8eattle, Wash 

Seguin, Tex 

Seymour, Conn 

Seymour, Ind 

Shawnee, Okla 

Shelby, N. C 

Shelbyville,Ind.... 
Shelby ville, Ky.... 
Sherman, Tex 



Sidney, Ohio 

Sikeston, Mo 

Sioux City, Iowa... 



Skowhegan, Me.. 

Smyrna, Del 

Somers worth, N. H . 
8outh Bethlehem, 

Pa. 
South Boston. Va... 
Southbridge. Mass. . 
South Framingham, 

Mass. 
Spanish Fork, Utah. 

Sparta, Wis 

Spring Valley, 111... 

Stamford, Conn 

Stamford, Tex 

State College, Pa.... 

Statesboro, Ga 

Sterling, Colo 

Steuben ville. Ohio.. 

Stuggart, Ark 

Sunbury, Pa 

Sweetwater, Tex. . . . 

Sylacauga, Ala 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Tamaqua, Pa 

Tampa Bay, Fla... 



Tarentum, Pa 

Taylor, Tex 

Tavlorville, 111 

The Dalles, Oreg — 

Thlbodaux, La 

Thomas ville, Ga 

Thomasville, N. C. 

Thomson, Oa 

Tiffin, Ohio 

Titusvillc, Pa 

Toccoa, Oa 

Toledo, Ohio 

Tomah, Wis 

Trenton, Mo 

Tucson, Ariz 



Buildings. 



Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Quarantine station 



Post office 

Post office and 

customhouse. 
Courthouse, etc.. 



Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

Post office, court- 
house, and cus- 
tomhouse. 

Post office 

do 

do 

do 



do... 

do... 

do... 



Tullahoma, Tenn. . . 
Tulsa, Okla 



sta- 



....do 

....do.:.... 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Quarantine 

tion. 

Post office 

....do 

.....do 

.....do 

....do 

do 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

Post office and 

courthouse. 



Class of work. 



Site 

....do 

Site and building.. 

Building 

Site and building. 
Wharf, buildings, 

Site and building. 
do 



Additional vault 

facilities. 
Site and building. 



....do 

Building 

Site and building. 

do 

Site 

Building 

Site and building. 

do 

Building 

Site and building. 

Building 

Additional land.. 



Limit of J Amount 
cost. : appropriated. 



Building.. 

Site 

Lookouts. 



Building 

Site and building. 

Site 

Building 



....do 

Site and building. 
Site 



Site and building. 

do 

Site 

Site and building. 

Building 

Site and building. 

Building 

SUA. 

Site and building. 

Site 

Building 

Site 

do 

Building 

Site and building. 
Attendants 1 quar- 
ters, etc. 

Building 

Site 

Building 

Site and building. 

do 

do 

do 

Site 

Site and building. 

Building 

Site 

Remodeling 

Site and building. 

Site 

...do 



Site and building. 
Building 



$20,000.00 

5,000.00 ; 

70,000.00 '., 

130,000.00 '., 

70,000.00 ; 

55,000.00 [ 

80,000.00 
60,000.00 

1,100.00 

205,000.00 

90,000.00 
50,000.00 
80,000.00 
500,000.00 

7,500.00 
60,000.00 
60,000.00 
125,000.00 
55,000.00 
80,000.00 
50,000.00 

5,000.00 

70,000.00 
7,500.00 
1,500.00 



65,000.00 

35,000.00 

7,500.00 

100,000.00 

50,000.00 
80,000.00 
25,000.00 

50,000.00 
60,000.00 
10,000.00 

150,000.00 
50,000.00 
75,000.00 
50,000.00 
15,000.00 

120,000.00 
5,000.00 

100,000.00 
7,500.00 
5,000.00 

550,000.00 
75,000.00 
65,000.00 

60,000.00 

5,000.00 

60,000.00 

101,000.00 

50,000.00 

70,000.00 

55,000.00 > 

5,000.00 

97,500.00 

75,000.00 

5,000.00 

25,000.00 

55,000.00 

10,000.00 

15,000.00 

50,000.00 
310,000.00 



920,000.00 
5,000.00 



7,500.00 
55,000.00 

9,000.00 



Amount ex- 
pended for , 
site and land. 



$16,500. 00 



o,uuu.uu 
1,100.00 
















8,000.00 
200,000.00 




169,500.00 


. 




* 32,000.00 
21,000.00 


12,000.00 


1 




| 




1 


5,000.00 




i 


7,500.00 




1,500.00 


i 


! 




25,666.06 


5,000.00 










I 


1 


20,000.00 




I 




37,000.00 

6,000.00 

50,000.00 


10,000.00 


Donated 


15,685.00 






15,000.00 

65,000.00 
4,000.00 

65,000.00 
6,500.00 
5,000.00 

10,000.00 




35,000.00 




6,500.00 
5,000.00 





65,000.00 






5,000.00 


5,000.00 


44,000.00 
5.000.00 


14,000.00 


24,000.00 
> 8,000.00 


9,000.00 


5,000.00 
27,500.00 




20,000.00 


5,000.00 

25,000.00 

i 5,000.00 








10,000.00 
i 15,000.00 

I 7,000.00 


3,000.00 
15,000.00 


135,000.00 







SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1810. 



35 



i ^mded and condition of appropriations Jor public buildings, etc.- Continued. 
Nor IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION, DEC. 1, 1914— Continued. 



v^SS'to, Outstanding 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Su plus fund. 


Date of act. 






$16,500.00 
5,000.00 


$3,500.00 






June 25,1910 

Mar. 4,1913 

Do 




$5,000.00 










$70, 000. 00 












130, 000. 00 




Do 




7,500.00 


7,500.00 




62,500.00 




Do 




55,000.00 
9,000.00 




June 23,1913 

Mar. 4,1913 
Do 








71,000.00 
54,000.00 











6,000.00 
1,100.00 












Aug. 26,1912 

Mar. 4, 1913 

Do. 
Do. 
Do 








295,000.00 

90,000.00 
50,000.00 
72,000.00 

300,000.00 

7,500.00 

60,000.00 

28,000.00 

104.000.00 
55.000.00 
80,000.00 
50,000.00 








i 
I 








*"". 1 










8,000.00' 








169,500.00 


30,500.00 




Do 








Do 












Do. 
June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Aug. 1,1914 

Mar. 4, 1913 
June 25,1910 


135.00 




12,035.00 ! I9.9fi5.nn 











21,000.00 


::::::::::::::: 






































5,000.00 










70,000.00 











7,500.00 
1,500.00 





















65,000.00 

10,000.00 

7,500.00 

100,000.00 

50,000.00 
80,000.00 
5,000.00 

50,000.00 
23,000.00 
4,000.00 
100,000.00 
50,000.00 
59,315.00 
50,000.00 








5,000.00 


20,000.00 










Mar. 4,1913 
Do. 






















Do. 












Do. 








20,000.00 




Do 










Do. 
June 25.1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 
June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 

Do. 






io.i66.66 

6,000.00 
139.00 


27,000.00 






6,000.00 




139.00 


49,861.00 












14,400.00 


14,400.00 


1,285.00 








Do. 








15,000.00 
30,000.00 
4,000.00 
64,960.00 




Do. 






35,000.00 


55,000.00 
1,000.00 

35,000.00 
1,000.00 




June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 
June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 
Do. 








40.00 




40.00 
6,500.00 
5,000.00 






















10,000.00 


540,000.00 
75,000.00 




Do. 




27,000.00 


37,000.00 


» $27,666.66 


Do. 




65,000.00 


Oct. 22,1912 

Mar. 4,1913 

Do. 

Do. 
June 35,191C 

XTnr d 1Q13 


1 




60,000.00 







5,000.00 






1 




60,000.00 
60,000.00 
45 000 00 




S7.a6 | 




14,087.20 29.912.80 








5,000.00 
14,800.00 
8,000.00 
5,000.00 

7_43X.Sn 




moo 




9,200.00 


46^000.00 \'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. June 25,1910 

47,000.00 !... Mar 4 1Q13 










Do. 
June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 

Do. 
Apr. 6, 1914 
Mar. 4, 1913 
Mav 30,1908 
June 25,1910 

"Mat 4.1913 


«i.50 | 




20,061.50 


76,666 66 

75,000.00 










« 5,000.00 


5,000.00 










25,000.00 

5,000.00 


• 






50,000.00 




1 


3,000.00 


7,000.00 












7,000.00 J 43,000.00 




JO.UO , 




30.00 


134,970.00 175.000.00 ; ■ June 25,191<> 

1 1 1 



* Deficiency. 



36 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



Statement prepared for Souse Committee on Appropriations relative to amountt 
BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORIZED BUT 



Location. 



Twin Falls, Idaho... 

Tyrone, Pa 

Union Springs, Ala. , 

Unionville. Mo 

Urbana, Ohio 

Utica,N.Y 

Do 



Uvalde, "ex 

Valley City, N. Dak. 

Valparaiso, Ind 

Vancouver, Wash. . . 



Van Wert, Ohio.... 
Vermillion, S. Dak. 

Vernal, Utah 

Vernon, ' ex 

Vineland, N.J 

Vinton, Iowa 

Wadesboro.N.C... 

Wahoo, Nebr 

Walden, N. Y 

Waltkam.Mass 

Warren. R.I 

Warrenton, Va 

Warsaw, Ind 

Washington, D.C.. 

Do 

Do 



Do. 
Do. 



Washington, Ga 

Washington, Ind.... 
Washington, Iowa.. 

Washington, Mo 

Washington Court 
House, Ohio. 

Waterloo, N.Y 

Water Valley, Miss. 

Waupun, Wis 

Waynesboro, Ga 

Waynesboro, Va — 
Waynesburg, Pa... 
Waynesville.N.C 

Webb City, Mo 

Weilsburg,W.Va.. 
Wenatchee, Wash.. 

Westplains, Mo 

West Point, Va.... 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 

Williamson, W. Va. 

Willow, Cal 

Wilmington, N.C.. 



Do. 



Wilmington. Ohio.. 

Wilson, N. C 

Winchester, Ky.... 
Winchester, Mass. . 
Winnemucca, Nev. 
Woodbury, N.J... 

Woodstock, III 

Woodstock, Va 

Woodward. Okla... 

Wyandotte, Mich.. 

Yoakum, Tex 

Yonkers.N. Y 

Ypsllanti,Mich.... 



Buildings. 



Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do. 



Class of work. 



Limit of Amount 

cost. appropriated. 



Post office .custom , 
house,and court- I 
house. 

Post office , 

....do ' 

do 



Post office and 

land office. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Butler Building... 

Heating plant 

Building, Interior, 

Department of- 

floes. 
State, Justice, etc.. 
National Archives 

Building. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Building 

Site | 

do i 

do I 

do 

do 

Additional land 
and extension. 

Site and building. . 

Building 

Site and building. . 
Building 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

do 

do 

....do 

Post office and 

courthouse. 

Post office 

do 

Customhouse and 

appraiser's stores. 
Marine hospital... 



Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

.do, 



Post office and 
courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 



....do 

Site 

Site and building. 

do 

do 

....do 

Site 

Building 

Site and building. 

do 

Site 

Building 

Site 

I : levator 

Building 

do 



Site 

Building 

Site and building. 

Building 

do 

Site and building. 
do 



Building 

Site and building., 

Site 

Site 

Site and building. , 

do , 

Building 

Site and building., 

do 

Building 

Site 

do 

Site and building. 



Building 

Site and building.. 
Additional land 

and building. 
Medical officers' 

quarters. 
Site and building.. 

do 

Second story , 

Site and building. . 

do 

Building 

Site 

do 

Site and building.. 



do 

Building 

Site and building, 
.....do !. 



185,000.00 

25,000.00 

5,000.00 

7,500.00 

15,000.00 

100,000.00 

405,000.00 



50,000.00 
75,000.00 
95,000.00 
140,000.00 

70,000.00 

7,500.00 

50,000.00 

50,000.00 

70,000.00 

70,000.00 

5,000.00 

50,000.00 

05,000.00 

115,000.00 

10,000.00 

50,000.00 

10,000.00 

7,000.00 

1.494,104.00 

2,596,000.00 



200,000.00 
1,500,000.00 

55,000.00 
60,000.00 
80,000.00 
60,000.00 
80,000.00 

55,000.00 

50,000.00 

5.000.00 

5,000.00 

57,500.00 

75,000.00 

65,000.00 

70,000.00 

60,000.00 

85,000.00 

7,500.00 

5,000.00 

60,000.00 

50,000.00 

75,000.00 

600,000.00 

5,000.00 

75,000.00 
60,000.00 
30,000.00 
75,000.00 
60,000.00 
55,000.00 
17,000.00 
5,000.00 
110,000.00 

75,000.00 

65,000.00 

500,000.00 

75,000.00 



58,676,191.04 



824,000.00 
4,500.00 
5,000.00 
15,000.00 
100.000.00 
35,000.00 



15,000.00 

" 8,'moo' 



4,500.00 
4,750.00 
1.00 
12,000.00 
9,000.00 



7,500.00 
85,000.00 
10,000.00 



10,000.00 

7,000.00 

150,000.00 

40,000.00 



160,000.00 
5,000.00 



6,500.00 
18,000.00 



7,000.00 
5.000.00 
5,000.00 
7,500.00 
15,500.00 



34,000.00 
15,000.00 



5,000.00 

5,000.00 

22.000.00 



180,000.00 

5,000.00 

12,500.00 
45,000.00 



20,000.00 
5,000.00 



4,250.00 
8,000.00 

15,950.00 



250,000.00 
20,000.00 



16,262,379.04 



Amount ex- 

p.'nded for 

site and land. 



84,500.011 



13, 000.(Ki 
99,500.00 
35,000.00 , 



1,000. 0U 



7.500.00 
46,051.20 



3.40O.CK 



7,500.0 
13,950.0 



6,000.0 
2,666.0 



67, 750. C 



10, OOO. < 



103. 
7 f 70O. 



4, 270, S40. 



1 Surplus fund. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1816. 



37 



expended and condition of appropriations for public buildings, etc. — Continued. 
NOT IX COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION, DEC. 1, 1914— Continued. 



Amount 
f Tpended for 

buildings. 


' Outstanding 
liabilities. 


Total 
expended and 
outstanding. 


Available 
balances. 


Amount to be 
appropriated. 


Surplus fund. 


Date of act. 




1 






$85,000.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

2,500.00 




Mar. 4, 1913 
Do. 


j 




$24,000.00 






14,600.00 




Do. 




5,000.00 




Do. 


i 


13,000.00 
99,50000 
35,000.00 

1,035.00 


$2,000.00 
500.00 


June 25,1910 
Do. 


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


i 


i 




370,000.00 

35,000.00 
75,000.00 
86,800.00 
140,000.00 

70,000.00 
3,000.00 
45,250.00 
49,999.00 
58,000.00 
61,000.00 
5,000.00 
50,000.00 
57,600.00 
30,000.00 


Mar. 4, 1913 


$35.00 


1 


13,965.00 




June 25,1910 

Mar. 4, 1913 

Do. 








• 




8,200.00 










Do. 


1 








Do. 






4,500.00 
4,750.00 




Do. 


i * 






Do. 




•1.00 


1.00 




Do. 




12,000.00 
9,000.00 




Do. 








Do. 








Do. 




i 






Do. 






7,600.00 
46,061.20 
10,000.00 






Do. 






38,948.80 




June 25,1910 

Mar. 4,1913 

Do. 




10,000.00 










50,000.00 











10,000.00 

7,000.00 

136, 148. 47 

37,741.23 




Do. 








■ 


Aug. 1,1914 
June 23,1913 


14,851.63 




14,851.63 
2,268.77 

200,000.00 


i,344,i04.06 
2,666,000.00 

40,000.00 
1,495,000.00 

55,000.00 
60,000.00 
80,000.00 
53,500.00 
62,000.00 

55,000.00 
43,000.00 




1,833.77 
81,077.96 


425.00 
113,922.04 




Mar. 4,1913 

June 25,1910 
Mar. 4, 1913 


140,000.00 


5,000.00 




4,000.00 


4,000.00 


14,000.00 


Do. 






Do. 












Do. 








6,500.00 
3,000.00 




Do. 




15,000.00 


15,000.00 




Do. 






Do. 








7,000.00 




Do. 






3,400.00 
4,093.75 
7,500.00 


1,600.00 


June 25,1910 




4,093.75 
7,600.00 


906.25 




Mar. 4, 1913 




56,666.66 

59,500.00 
65,000.00 
36,000.00 
45, 000. 00 




Do. 




15,500.00 




Do. 










Do. 


116.60 




7,616.50 
13,950.00 


26,383.50 
1,050.00 




June 25,1910 






Do. 




85,000.00 
2,500.00 





Mar. 4,1913 




5,000.00 
5,000.00 
2,000.00 






Do. 




5,000.00 






Do. 




20,000.00 


38,000.00 

50,000.00 
75,000.00 
420,000.00 




June 25,1910 






Mar. 4,1913 










Do. 


688.53 




68,438.63 


111,561.47 

5,000.00 

12,500.00 
34,990.00 




May 30,1908 








June 23,1913 






62,500.00 
15,000.00 
30,000.00 
55,000.00 
55,000.00 
55,000.00 
17,000.00 
750.00 
102,000.00 

59,050.00 

65,000.00 

250,000.00 

55,000.00 




Mar. 4,1913 




10.00 


10,010.00 




May 30,1908 






Mar. 4,1913 


.,. 




20,000.00 




Do. 


i 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 




Do. 


' 






Do. 


: 








Do. 






8,000.00 
15,950.00 




Do. 








Do. 








Do. 


...„..,....••• • 






Do. 


8.91 | 




112.47 
7,799.40 


249,887.53 
12,200.60 




June 30,1906 


99.40 ! 






June 25,1910 








13.208.73 ' 


611,380.56 






42,413,812.00' » 87,780.09 
2 73,272.00 

! 





8 Deficiency. 



38 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS APPROPRIATED FOR OR AUTHORIZED, 
BJT NOT IN COJRSE OF CONSTRUCTION DEC. 1, 1914. 

Limit of cost of sites and buildings $58,676,19104 

Expended for property (sites and land) S4, 270, 840. 14 

Expended for buildings 113,208.73 

Outstanding liabilities on account of sites and 
buildings 611,380.56 

Total 14, 995, 429. 43 

Amount carried to surplus fund 87, 780. 09 

Balance available on appropriations 11, 252, 441. 52 

Less deficits, to wit: 

Arkadelphia, Ark $72.00 

Linton.Ind 1,000.00 

Moultrie, Oa 1,200.00 ■ 

Tamaqua, Pa 27,000.00 

Washington, D. C, buildings: 
Departments of State, Justice, 

and Commerce and Labor 40, 000. 00 

Washington, Oa 4,000.00 

73,272.00 

Excess of available balance over deficit 11, 179, 169. 52 

Total amount appropriated $16,262,379.04 

Total amount to be appropriated 42,413,812.00 

58,676,191.04 

INFORMATION AS TO STATUS OF THE SEVERAL PUBLIC BUILD- 
INGS IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION OR AUTHORIZED FOB 
WHICH ESTIMATES HAVE BEEN SUBMITTED IN THE REGULAR 
ANNUAL BOOK OF ESTIMATES FOR APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR 1916 AND IN HOUSE DOCUMENT NO. 1430, FUBr 
NISHED BY THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT, AS INDICATED IN 
THE FOREGOING LETTER FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE 
TREASURY AND IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE REQUEST OF THE 
COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS AT A HEARING HELD DECEM- 
BER 16, 1914. 

ABERDEEN (WASH.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $112,500 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 112.500 

Estimate for 1910 1,000 

It is believed that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and surveying of the site. 
The amount estimated for will therefore be required. 

ALBANY (OREG.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date 65.000 

Amount to be appropriated 10, 000 

Estimate for 1916 10. 000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916, and the amount estimated for will therefore be required. 

ALBION (MICH.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $70. 00C 

Appropriations to date 14. 00C 

Amount to be appropriated 56, 00C 

Estimate for 1916 40. 00C 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 39 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. The amount esti- 
mated for will therefore be required. 

ALEXANDRIA (LA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost 1 . $65,000 

Appropriations to date 1 

Amount to be appropriated 65, 000 

Estimated for 1916 40,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. The amount estimated for 
will therefore be required. 

ALEXANDRIA, LA., RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

[See p. 114.] 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $4,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 4, 00C 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post- 
office and courthouse building will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore be 
necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation of 
the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

ALLIANCE (NEBR.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date - 

Anioumt to be appropriated 75,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and surveying the site. 
The amount estimated for will therefore be required. 

ALLIANCE (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $135,000 

Appropriations to date 115,000 

Amount to be appropriated 20,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the close of the present calendar year and completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. The amount estimated for will therefore be required. 

AMARELLO (TEX.) POST OFFICE AND COURTIIOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Omit of cost $200, 000 

Appropriations to date 67.000 

Amount to be appropriated 133,000 

Estimate for 1916 133,000 



40 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

This building is under contract and is to be completed during the 
fiscal year 1916. The amount estimated for will therefore be 
required. 

ANOKA (MINN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost # . $50, (KH) 

Appropriation's to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50.000 

Estimate for 1916 1. 10, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. The amount estimated for 
will therefore be required. 

ANTIGO (WIS.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $70,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 70. 000 

Estimate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

ARDMORE (OKLA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $150, 000 

Appropriations to date 55.000 

Amount to be appropriated 95,000 

Estimate for 1916 95.00T 

It is expected that this work will soon be placed under contract 
and completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

4 

ARKADELPHIA (ARK.) POST OFFICE. 

[See pp. 119, 128.] 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $55,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 55.000 

Estimate for 1916 55,000 

The drawings for this building are to be donated to the Govern- 
ment, and it is expected that the building will be completed before 
the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

ARKANSAS .CITY (KANS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $75, 000 

Appropriations to date 40,000 

Amount to be appropriated 35,000 

Estimate for 1916 35, 000 

This work is under contract to be completed early in the fiscal year 
1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 41 

ASHLAND (KY.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 100,000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

ATTLEBORO (MASS.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 100.000 

Estimated for 1916 30, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

AUGUSTA (GA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (NEW). 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $325,000 

Appropriations to date 275,000 

Amount to be appropriated „ 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 50,000 

It is expected that this work will be completed during the third 
quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

AURORA (NEBR.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 «. 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

BAINBRIDGE (GA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 35,000 

Amonnt to be appropriated . 15,000 

Estimate for 1916 15,000 

It is expected that this work will be completed early in the fiscal 
year 1916. 

BAKERSFIELD (CAL.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $135, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amonnt to be appropriated 135,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 



42 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

BALTIMORE (MD.) IMMIGRANT STATION. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $550,000 

Appropriations to date 110,000 

Amount to be appropriated 440.000 

Estimate for 1916 300,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the beginning of the fiscal year 1916. 

BANGOR (ME.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $440, 000 

Appropriations to date 400,000 

Amount to be appropriated 40, 000 

Estimate for 1916 40, 000 

This work will be completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

BARNESVILLE (OA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

BARTOW (FLA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

BATAVIA (N. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $85,000 

Appropriations to date 5, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 80,000 

Estimate for 1916 40,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded dur- 
ing the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 43 

BEARDSTOWN (lLL.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $55,000 

.\pl>ropriations to datt 18, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 37,000 

Estimate for 1916 27,000 

It is expected that this work will be under contract soon after the 
commencement of the fiscal year 1916 and well on the way toward 
completion before its close. 

BEDFORD (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Lim'f of cost $80,000 

Appropriations to date 30,000 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 50,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the Second 
miarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

BELTON (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $55,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 55.000 

Estimate for 1916 1 10, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the last quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

BERKELEY (CAL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $180,000 

Appropriations to date 160.000 

Anintmt to be appropriated 20,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

This work will be completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

BLACKWELL (OKLA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

i :init of cost $50, 000 

» Impropriations to date 15.000 

Arrount to be appropriated 35,000 

Estimate for 1916 , 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916 and well under way toward 
completion before its close. 



44 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

BOSTON (MASS.) APPRAISERS' STORES. 

For completion of building unden present limit : 

Limit of cost $1, 250 000 

Appropriations to date 900.000 

Amount to be appropriated 350. 000 

Estimate for 1916 350,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed on the market in a short 
time and it may be possible to award the contract and complete the 
building during the fiscal year 1916. 

BOZEMAN (MONT.) P08T OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date 45.000 

Amount to be appropriated 30, 000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It il expected that this work will be placed under contract soon and 
completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

BRATTLEBORO (VT.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $140, 000 

Appropriations to date 90,000 

Amount to be appropriated 50.000 

Estimate for 1916 • 50,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract soon 
after the beginning of the next calendar year and completed before 
the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

BRENHAM (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date 5.000 

Amount to be appropriated 55.000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

BRYAN (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date . . 46.000 

Amount to be appropriated 4,000 

Estimate for 1916 4,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract soon 
after the beginning of the next calendar year and completed during 
fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 45 

BUFFALO (WYO.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $62, 500 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 62, 500 

Estimate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required before. the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for sinking of test pits and the surveying of the site. 

BURLINGTON (n. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $65,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 65.000 

Estimate for 1916 , 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal year 
of 1916 for sinking of test pits and the surveying of the site. 

CADILLAC (MICH.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

limit of cost 1 $105,000 

Appropriations to date 62.000 

Amount to be appropriated 43, 000 

Estimate for 1916 43,000 

This work is now under contract to be completed before the close 
of the fiscal year 1916. 

CAMDEN (S. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost * $50,000 

Appropriations to date 43, 500 

Amount to be appropriated 6, 500 

Estimate for 1916 . 6,500 

This work is now under contract to be completed early in the fiscal 
year 1916. 

CANTON (ILL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $85, 000 

Appropriations to date 55,000 

Acjonnt to be appropriated 30, 000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract very 
*xro, and will be completed during the fiscal year 1916. 



A 



46 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910. 

CANTON (MISS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 20.000 

Amount to be appropriated * 30,000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract soon, 
and completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

CARIBOU (ME.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50, OUO 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal year 
1916 for sinking of test pits and the surveying of the site. 

CARNEGIE (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $80,000 

Appropriations to date ^ 45,000 

Amount to be appropriated 35. 000 

Estimate for 1916 35. 00* 

This w r ork is now under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

CARTERSVILLE (ga.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $51, 250 

Appropriations to date 46, 2150 

Amount to be appropriated 5,000 

Estimate for 1916 5,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

CHADRON (NEBR.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $110, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated — 1 110.000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal year 
1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the site. 

CIIANUTE (KANS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $75. 000 

Appropriations to date 33, CMK) 

Amount to be appropriated 42,000 

Estimate for 1916 42. 000 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 47 

It is expected that this work will be under contract before the be- 
ginning of the fiscal year 1916, and completed during that year. 

CHARLES CITY (iOWA) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $70,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 70.000 

Kstimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal year 
1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying or the site. 

CHATTANOOGA (TENN.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $55, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 55,000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

CHXCO (CAL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 65,000 

.t mount to be appropriated 35,000 

Estimate for 1016 35,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 

1 CHIIXICOTHE (MO.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $130, 000 

vHTiipriations to date 30,000 

Amount to be appropriated 100,000 

Hsrimate for 1916 80,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well under way toward 
completion before its close. 

COEUR D'ALENE (IDAHO) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

limit of cost $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 30,000 

Amount to be appropriated 70,000 

Primate for 1916 55,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be let soon after 
the beginning of the fiscal year 1916, and that the building will be 
•*ell under way toward completion before its close. 



48 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

COLLINSVILLE (iLL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $70, 000 

Appropriations to date 34.000 

Amount to be appropriated - 36.000 

Estimate for 1916 36,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

COLUMBIA (S. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost , $265, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 265,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal year 
1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the site. 

CONCORD (N. H.) POST OFFICE (BXTEN8ION). 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50. <•(.«> 

Appropriations to date 32, n<)0 

Amount to be appropriated 18,000 

Estimate for 1916 18,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early in 
the coming calendar year and completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

COOKEVILLE (TENN.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 60, OOO 

Amount to be appropriated 40, 000 

Estimate for 1916 40,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded very 
shortly, and that the building will be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

CORPUS CHRI8TI (TEX.) POST OFFICE AND CUSTOMHOUSE. 

\ 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $140. OOO 

Appropriations to date 70,000 

Amount to be appropriated 70. OOO 

Estimate for 1916 70,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded early 
in the coming calendar year and the building nearly or quite com- 
pleted during the fiscal year 1916. 



BUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 49 

COVINGTON (TBNN.) POST OFFICE. \ 

For completion of building under present limit : 

limit of cost $45, 00O 

Appropriations to date i. 39,000 

Amount to be appropriated 6, 000 

Estimate for 1916 6, 000 

It is hoped to be able to award the contract for this work soon after 
the beginning of the coming calendar year and that the building will 
be completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

CUERO (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $65,000 

Appropriations to date 35, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 30,000 

Estimate for 1916 20, 000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be let near the 
close of the present fiscal year and that the work will be well under 
way toward completion before the end of the fiscal year 1916. 

DANBURY (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Umit of cost $115, 000 

Appropriations to date 60,000 

Amount to be appropriated 1 55,000 ' 

Estimate for 1916 55, 000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded very 
shortly and that the building will be completed before the close cTf 
the fiscal year 1916. 

DANVILLE (VA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of tower and installation of clock therein under 
present limit: 

Limit of cost $2, 500 

Appropriations to date 

Amount .to be appropriated 2, GOO 

Estimate for 1916 __— 2,500 

This work will be completed early in the fiscal year 1916. 

DELAVAN (WIS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $02. 500 

A; :>ropriiitions to date 52. 500 

Amount to be appropriated 10, 000 

fciMmate for 1916 10,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
/ear 1916. 

72785—15 4 



50 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

DENVER (COLO.) POST OFTIOE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $2,000,000 

Appropriations to date 1, 800, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 200,000 

Estimate for 1916 j 200,000 

It is expected that this building will be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

DE SOTO (MO.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $60, 000 

Appropriations to date 55, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 5,000 

Estimate for 1916 5, 000 

This work is- under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

DETROIT (MICH.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

[See p. 118.] 
For mail-handling devices: 

limit of cost (submitted) $25,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 25,000 

It is recommended in the interest of economy, and in order to 
facilitate work, that funds be provided for the installation of mail- 
handling devices at this building, 

EAST ORANGE (n. J.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $125, O0C 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 125, 00( 

Estimate for 1916 l,O0( 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal yeai 
1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the site. 

EAST PITTSBURGH (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $100, 00 

Appropriations to date 40, OO 

Amount to be appropriated 00,00 

Estimate for 1016 40,00 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract earl; 
in the fiscal year 1916 and well under way toward completion bef or 
its close. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 51 

EAST 8T. LOUIS (iLL.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For comencement of building under present limit : 

limit of cost 1 $240,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 240,000 

Estimate for 1916 95,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

EAST 8T. LOUIS, ILL. — RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

[See p. 119.] 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $12,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated z 

Estimate for 1916 12,000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the 
post-office and courthouse building will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore 
be necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation 
of the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

ELLENSBURG (WASH.) POST OFFICE. 

For comencement of building under present limit: 

limit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 75,000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
ihe last quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

EL RENO (OKLA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date 25.000 

Amonnt to be appropriated 1 75, 000 

Estimate for 1916 75,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded 
v erj shortly, and that the building will be completed during the 
fiscal year 1916. 

ELYRIA (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

■-mit of cost $100,000 

'•MTopriarlons to date 

Axotmt to be appropriated 100,000 

Climate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
Ae last quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



52 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

ENNIS (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date .. . 17,000 

Amount to be appropriated 43,000 

Estimate for 1016 43,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be let soon, and 
that the building will be completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

EUREKA SPRINGS (ARK.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $57,500 

Appropriations to date 33,500 

Amount to be appropriated— 26.000 

Estimate for 1916 16,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded soon 
after the beginning of the fiscal year 1916, and well under way toward 
completion before its close. 

EVANSVILLE (iND.) CUSTOMHOUSE AND POST OFFICE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $150,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated — 1 130, 000 

Estimate for 1916 75,000 

It is expected that this work will bo placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

EVANSVILLE, IND. — RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

[See p. 131.] 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Gov- 
ernment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $8, (XX 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 8, OX 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post 
office and courthouse building will be placed under contract durinj 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore hi 
necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation o 
the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

EVERETT (WASH.) POST OFFICE AND CUSTOMHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $180,00 

Appropriations to date 95, <:i! 

Amount to be appropriated 85, in 

Estimate for 1916 85, OH 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract earl 
in the coming calendar year and that the building will be nearly c 
quite completed before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 



STJNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916, - ' 63 

EXCELSIOR SPRINGS (MO.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost „ $60,000 

Appropriations to date 40, 00$ 

Amount to be appropriated . „_., 20,000 

Estimate for 1016 „ ,_-,_,-, 20,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 

1916. 

FALLS CITY (NBBR,) POST OFFICE, 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

limit of cost $65,000 

Appropriations to date_ „„ ,„_„ ^„, 

Amount to be appropriated , 65,000 

Estimate for 1916— ,__ 10, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract near 
the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

FAYETTEV1LLE (TENN.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 35,000 

Amount to be appropriated „-„-.„.,.„ 15, 000 

Estimate for 1916 15,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract very 
shortly, and that the building will be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

FORDTCE (ARK.) POST OFFICE. 
[See pp. 119, 128.] 
For completion of building under present limit : 

limit of cost . $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated - ,--.,. ,-, «*---, 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 1 50,000 

The drawings for this building are to be donated to the Govern- 
ment, and it is expected that the building will be completed during 
the fiscal year 1916. 

FORT ATKINSON (WI8.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

limit of cost , , $60,000 

Appropriations to date ^ 15,000 

Amount to be appropriated 45,000 

Estimate for 1916 . 30, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early 
in the fiscal year 1916, and well under way toward completion before 
its close. 

FULTON (KT.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 15,000 

Amount to be appropriated 35, 000 

Estimate for 1916 3fc 0p0 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 



54 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

FULTON (MO.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriation to date 15,000 

Amount to be appropriated 45,000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the first quarter .of the fiscal year 1916, and well under way toward 
completion before its close. 

gabden crry (kans.) post office. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $60, 000 

Appropriations to date 15,000 

Amount to be appropriated — * 45,000 

Estimate for 1816 45,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

GARDINER (ME.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $105,000 

Appropriations to date 25, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 80,000 

Estimate for 1916 65, 000 

It is expected that this work will be awarded early in the fiscal 
year 1916, and well under way toward completion before its dose. 

GARY (iND.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $125, 000 

# Appropriations to date 75, 000 

' Amount to be appropriated 50, 000 

Estimate for 1916 50, 000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be let very 
shortly, and the building nearly or quite completed before the close 
of the fiscal year 1916. 

GASTONIA (N. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $85,000 

Appropriations to date 70, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 15, 000 

Estimate for 1916 15,000 

' This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 



STJNDBY CIVIL APPB0PKIATI0N BIIX, .1916. 55 

GEORGETOWN (KY.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

limit of cost $90,000 

Appropriations to date 45,000 

Amount to be appropriated 46, 000 

Estimate for 1916 45,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 

1916. 

GLENS FALLS (n. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Umit of cost 1 $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 55,000 

Amount to be appropriated 45,000 

Estimate for 1916 45,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be let very 
shortly, and that the building will be nearly or quite completed be- 
fore the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

GLOBE (ARIZ.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 100,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

GOLDFIELD (NEV.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

limit of cost , $75, 000 

Appropriations to date 15,000 

Amount to be appropriated 60,000 

Ertimate for 1916 60,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded early 
in the coming calendar year and that the building will be completed 
before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

GOUVERNEUR (n. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $70,000 

Appropriations to date 20,000 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 •--- 85, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early in 
the fiscal year 1916, and well under way toward completion before its 
close. 



5© STJNDBY CIVIL; APPROPfelATIOK BILL, 1916. 

GRASS VALLEY (CAL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion ot building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $55,000 

Appropriations to date 45,000 

Amount to be appropriated • 10, 000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

GREELEY (COLO.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost i - $110, 000 

Appropriations to date 85,000 

Amount to be appropriated 25,000 

Estimate for 1916 25, 000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

GREENFIELD (MASS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date 25» 000 

Amount to be appropriated 75, 000 

Estimate for 1916 75,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded 
shortly, and that the building will be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

GREENWICH (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost ( |90, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 90,000 

Estimate for 1916 50, 000 

It is expected that a contract for this work will be awarded during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

GRENADA (MISS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost 150, OOO 

Appropriations to date 25, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 25,000 

Estimate for 1916 25,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

GRIN NELL (iOWA) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $90, OOO 

Appropriations to date - * «, 

Amount to be appropriated 90, OOO 

Estimate for 1916 1, OOG 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal yea* 
1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying or the site. 



ST7XDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 57. 

HAGKEN8ACK (N, J.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building' under present limit: 

Umll of coat »00, 00ft 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated - . 100,000 

Hstlmate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be. required during the fiscal year 
1916 for the sinking of tee* .pits and. the surveying of the site. 

HAOKRSTOWN (MD.) POST OFFICE (EXTENSION). 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost .. 1180,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 80,000 

Estimate for 1916 SO, 000 

It is expected that the work of extending this building will be 
completed toward the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

HAGER8TOWN (MD.) SENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Gov- 
ernment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $2,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated — 

Estimate for 1916 2,000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the 
post-office and courthouse building will be placed under contract 
during the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will there- 
fore be necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommoda- 
tion of the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

HAMPTON (VA.> PO» OFttCB. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $80,000 

Appropriations to date 00, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 20, 000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

HANFORD (CAL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Umlt of cost - $75, 000 

Appropriations to date 60, 000 

Amount to be appropriated ' 15, 000 

fttimate for 1916 ^ 15,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 



68 SUNDRY CIVIL APPB0PBIATI0N BILL, 1916. 

HARRISBURG (PA.) POST OFFICE AKD COUBTHOU8E (EXTENSION). 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost |200, €00 

Appropriations to date 125,000 

Amount to be appropriated 76, 000 

Estimate lor 1916 76,000 

The extension work as originally authorized will be completed 
early in the fiscal year 1916, and the additional work under the in- 
crease in the limit of cost authorized June 15, 1914, will be con- 
tracted for at an early date, and probably completed during the 
fiscal year 1916. 

HILO (HAWAII) POST OFFICE, CUSTOMHOUSE, AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost |200, O00 

Appropriations to date ^ 150,000 

Amount to be appropriated 60,000 

Estimate for 1016 ' 50,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

HOLLAND (MICH.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost i $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 45, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 55, 000 

Estimate for 1916 55,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

HORNELL (N. T.) POST OFFICE 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $85,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 85,000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

HUMBOLDT (TENN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost ^ $60,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 1 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal year 
1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the site. 



BT7NDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1910. 59 

HUNTINGDON (PA.) P08T OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

limit of coat $80, 000 

Appropriations to date 65,000 

Amount to be appropriated 15,000 

Estimate for 1016 15, 000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

HUNTINGTON (iND.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

limit of cost $95, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 95,000 

Estimate for 1916 10, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

HUN T IN GTON (w. VA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

limit of cost $225,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 225,000 

Estimate for 1916 100,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be let early in 
the coming calendar year, and the .work well under way toward 
completion before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

HUNTINGTON (w. VA.) RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Gov- 
ernment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

limit of cost (submitted) . $6,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 6,000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post 
office and courthouse building will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore 
be necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation 
of the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

ISHPEMING (MICH.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

limit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date 45,000 

Amount to be appropriated 30, 000 

Estimate for 1916 80,000 

It is expected that a contract for this work will be awarded early 
in the coining calendar year, and that the work will be completed 
during the fiscal year 1916. 



60 8CND&Y CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, lUfc 

JACKSON (KT.) POST OFFICE AND OOttti'HuUSE. 

For completion. of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost KOQiOM 

Appropriations to date _. 'Q5>00ft 

Amount to be appropriated 35, 000 

Estimate for 1916 35,000 

This work is under contract >to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

JASPER (ALA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost 1100,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated '. : . „ 100,000 

Estimate for 1916 1 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

jeujco (tenn.) post office. 

For completion of building under present limit; 

Limit of cost $70,000 

Appropriations to date 40,000 

Amount to be appropriated 30,000 

Estimate for 1916 J- 30, 000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

JENNINGS (LA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $80,000 

Appropriations to date . 25, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 25, 000 

Estimate for 1916 26,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

JUNEAU (ALASKA) POST OFFICE AND CUSTOMHOUSE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $200,000 

-Appropriations to date 80,000 

Amount to be appropriated 120,000 

Estimate for 1916._: 75 : <*)0 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract about 
the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well underway toward com- 
pletion before its close. 

KALISPELL (MONT.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

14mit of cost IW 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 100, 000 

Estimate for 1916 15.006 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 61 

KANSAS CITT (MO.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Umit of cost 1600,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 600, 000 

Estimate for 1916 260,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916, and well under way to- 
ward completion before its close. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. — BENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $16,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 1 16,000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post- 
office and courthouse building will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore 
be necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation 
of the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

KINSTON (N. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost 190,000 

Appropriations to date 70,000 

Amount to be appropriated 20,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is exj>ected that a contract for this work will be awarded early 
in the coming calendar year and that the work will be completed 
before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

KIRKSVILLE (MO.) POST OFFICE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost 540, 000 

A ppropria tions to dnte 

Amount to be appropriated 40,000 

RKininte for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded 
during the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916 and the work well 
under way toward completion before its close. 

KIRKSVILLE, MO. — RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials, and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Unitt of cost (submitted) $2,000 

Ai'propria tions to date 

Ainonnt to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 2,000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post- 
office and courthouse building will be placed under contract during 



62 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore be 
necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation of 
the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

LAFAYETTE (LA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $65,000 

Appropriations to date 55, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 10,000 

Estimate for 1916 10.000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. / 

LA JUNTA (COLO.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $85,000 

Appropriations to date 55, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 30, 000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected that this work will be awarded shortly prior to the 
beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well under way toward com- 
pletion before its close. 

LAKE CITY (MINN.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $55, 000 

Appropriations to date 26, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 29, 000 

Estimate for 1916 29,000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

LA SALLE (ILL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date 65,000 

Amount to be appropriated 85,000 

Estimate for 1916 85,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early 
in the coming calendar year and completed before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916. 

LAUBEL (MISS.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $80,000 

Appropriations to date 80, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 40, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
shortly before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well under 
way toward completion before its close. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 68 

LA WTO N (OKLA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $215,096.28 

Appropriations to date 62, 796. 28 

Amount to be appropriated 152,300.00 

Estimate for 1916 ^ 152, 300. 00 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
before the close of the present calendar year and completed before 
the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

LINCOLN (NEBR.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $275, 000 

Appropriations to date 65, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 210,000 

Estimate for 1916 135,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early 
in the coming calendar year and under construction throughout the 
fiscal year 1916. 

LINTON (iND.) POST OFFICE. 

Additional for site under present limit : 

Limit of cost . $8,000 

Appropriations to date 4,500 

Amount to be appropriated 3, 500 

Estimate for 1916 - 1, 000 

A proposal of $5,500 for the sale of land for a site has been 
accepted, and it is expected that the necessary papers will be executed 
so that funds will be required to pay for the property during the 
fiscal year 1916. 

LITTLE FALLS (MINN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $65, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 65,000 

Estimate for 1916 10, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract shortly 
before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well under way 
toward completion before its close. 

LIVE OAK (FLA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost $60, 000 

Appropriations to date 30,000 

Amount to be appropriated - 30, 000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract shortly 
before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well under way 
toward completion before its close. 



64 SUNDRY CITIL AP^aOFKIATION BILL, 1916. 

LOGAN (OfflO) POST OFFIGR. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost |60,00O 

Appropriations to date 

-Amount to be appropriated. 60.000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

LONGVIEW (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost ^ $50. 000 

Appropriations to date 30,000 

Amount to be appropriated 2u,000 

Estimate for 1916 . 20,000 

Bids received for this work were in excess of the amount available, 
and steps were taken to revise the drawings and again place the 
work on the market, but the department has been requested to sus- 
pend action in the matter fienaing efforts to secure an additional 
appropriation. 

LYNCHBURG (VA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $205, 000 

Appropriations to date 180, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 25,000 

Estimate for 1916 25. 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

MADISON (WIS.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $550,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 550, 000 

Estimate for 1916 200, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

MANDAN (N. DAK.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $66. O00 

Appropriations to date 55, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 11,000 

Estimate for 1916 11,000 

It is expected that this work will be under contract before the close 
of the present calendar year and completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 



8UKDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 05 
MAQUOKETA (IOWA), POST OH' M K. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit Of cost $50,009 

Vppropriations to date _._ 

Amount to be appropriated . 50.000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
iiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

MARION (8. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost ~ $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Kstimate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 
site. 

MABTIN8BURG (w. VA.) POST OFFICE (EXTEN8ION). 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $20,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 20,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916 and completed before its 
close. 

MARTVILLE (tENN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : • 

Limit of cost—- $60,000 

Appropriations to date _. 

Amount to be appropriated 60,000 

fttimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

M'COMB (MISS.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
present fiscal year for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of the 

=ite. 

72786—14 6 



86 SUNDBY CI?IL APPHOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

m'phersgn (kans.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 30,000 

Amount to be appropriated 20,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

MEDFORD (OREO.)POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $110, 000 

Appropriations to date . 90, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 20.000 

Estimate for 1916 20, 000 

It is expected that this work will be under contract before the close 
of the present calendar year, and completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

MERRILL (WIS.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost |75, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 75.000 

Estimate for 1910 35,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

MIDDLESBORO (KY.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $85. 000 

Appropriations to date 20, 000 

Amount to be appropriated (55, uOO 

Estimate for 1910 65,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract soon 
after the beginning of the next calendar year, and completed during 
the fiscal year 1916. 

MIDDLETOWN (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement -of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost |140, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 140. 000 

Estimate for 1910 1,000 

It is expected that fund* will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and for the surveying of 
the site. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 67 

MIDDLETOWN (OHIO) POST 0FFIC1?. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 100.000 

Estimate for 1916 50, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

MILES CITY (MONT.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $150,000 

Appropriations to date 31.800 

Amount to be appropriated 118 500 

Estimate for 1916 118, 500 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early 
in the next calendar year, and that the work will be completed before 
the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

MILLVILLE (N. J.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $55,000 

Appropriations to date 20.WX) 

Amount to be appropriated 35.000 

Estimate for 1916 25, OOg 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded 
during the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916, and that it will be 
well under way toward completion before its close. 

MILWAUKEE (WIS.) APPRAISERS' STORES. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $115,000 

Appropriations to date 75, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 40.000 

Estimate for 1916 40,000 

The contract for this work has been awarded, and it is expected 
that it will be completed before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

MINDEN (LA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost - $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50.000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



68 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

MINOT (N. DAK.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $150, OUu 

Appropriations to date 130,000 

Amount to be appropriated 20,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 

MISSOULA (MONT.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $125,000 

Appropriated to date 

Amount to be appropriated 1 125,000 

Estimate for 1916 50,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

MISSOULA, MONT. — RENT OP BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $3,000 

Appropriations to date — 

Appropriations to date 

Estimate for 1916 3,000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post- 
office and courthouse building will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore be 
necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation of 
the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

MOBERLY (MO.) POST OFFICE (EXTENSipN). 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $35,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 35,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

MOBERLY (MO.) RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto. 

Limit of cost (submitted) $2,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated ,— -, — 

Estimate for 1916 2.000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post- 
office and courthouse building will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore be 
necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation of 
the Government officials and to move them thereto. 



STJNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 69 

MOBILE (ALA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $300,000 

Appropriations to date 230,000 

Amount to be appropriated 70,000 

Estimate for 1916 70, 000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1016. 

MONONGAHELA (PA.) POST. OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost - $80, 000 

Appropriations to date 47, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 33,000 

Estimate for 1916 - 23, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

MONTEVIDEO (MINN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 60, 000 

Estimate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916 for the sinking of test pits and the surveying of 
the site. 

MORRISTOWN (n.J.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $125,000 

Appropriations to date 45, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 80,000 

Estimate for 1916 80, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the close of the present calendar year, and completed before the close 
<rf the fiscal year 1916. 

MOULTRIE (OA.) POST OFFICE. 

Additional for site and commencement of building under present 

limit : 

Limit of cost $65,000 

Appropriations to date 7,000 

Amount to be appropriated 58,000 

Estimate for 1916 1, 200 

Since the acceptance of land offered for site under the authoriza- 
tion for "site and building," it has been considered advisable to 
acquire additional and adjoining land on the principal street, and 
additional funds will therefore be required to pay for same before 
the close of the fiscal year 1916. 



70 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

MOUNDSVILLE (w. VA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

tymit of cost $90,000 

Appropriations to date 80,000 

4inouiit to be appropriated 10,000 

Estimate for 1916 10, 000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

MOUNT VERNON (DLL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $90,000 

Appropriations to date 82, 000 

Amount to be appropriated ,. 8,000 

Estimate for 1916 8, 000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. . 

MOUNT VERNON (n. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date 70, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 30,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract shortly 
before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916, and well under way 
toward completion before its close. 

MUSKEGON (MICH.) POST OFFICE AND CUSTOMHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Jjiniit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date 10,000 

Amount to be appropriated 65,000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916, and well under way toward 
completion before its close. 

MUSKEGON (MICH.), RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

IJmlt of cost submitted 13.000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated — 

Estimate for 1916 3, 000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the post- 
office and customhouse building will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore be 
necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation of 
the Government officials and to move them thereto. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPStiPMfcfflfQS BILL, 1916. 71 

NACOGDOCHES (TO**,) FOOT OFFICE. 

For commencement of building wader pmmmt limit : 

Limit of cost $55,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 56.000 

Estimate for 1916 20, OOfc 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

NARRAGANSETT PIER (r. I.) PQST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost— $69, 00O 

Appropriations to date 30,000 

Amount to be appropriated 39,000 

KFtimate for 1916 39,009 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

NASHVILLE (TENN.) POST OFFICE AND CUSTOMHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost |400, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 400, 00<l 

Estimate for 1916 200,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal yearlS16. 

NASHVILLE (TENN.) RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

[See p. 131.] 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses iaeicfea* thereto: 

Limit of cost (submitted) $20, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated — -~ 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that <the work of extending and remodeling the post 
office and customhouse building will bo placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 19X6. Funds will therefore be 
necessary to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation of 
the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

NAUGATUCK (CO"NN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $80, 000 

Appropriations to date . 

Amount to be appropriated 

IXimate for 1916 25. OOP 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



72 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

NAVA8OTA (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Omit of cost *5O,OO0 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 r _ 15,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

NEENAH (WI8.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: . 

Limit of cost $80, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated :_— 80,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will* be required for the sinking of test 
pits and the surveying of the site before the close of the fiscal year 
1916. 

NEWARK (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $190,000 

Appropriations to date 90,000 

Amount to be appropriated 100,000 

Estimate for 1916 50,000 

It is expected that the pending question relative to the site will 
soon be settled and that bids will be obtained and the construction 
of the building resumed. 

NEW BRAUNFELS (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be 'appropriated 50, 000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that the contract for this work will be awarded dur- 
ing the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

NEWCASTLE (iND.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $90, 000 

Appropriations to date 75.000 

Amount to be appropriated 15,000 

Estimate for 1916 r 15,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract^ shortly 
before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and nearly or quite com- 
pleted before its close. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910. 78 

NEW HAVEN (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost *$1,200,000 

Appropriations to date 800,000 

Amount to be appropriated 400,000 

Estimate for 1916 400,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 

1916. 

NEW ORLEANS (l*A.) CUSTOMHOUSE ( REMODELING). 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $350,000 

Appropriations to date -. 100. 000 

Amount to be appropriated 250,000 

Estimate for 1916 250, 000 

It is expected that this work will J>e placed under contract soon 
after the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and completed before its 
close, 

NEW ORLEANS (LA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

[See p. 132.] 

For mail-handling devices : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $25,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 - 25, 000 

It is recommended, in the interest of economy and in order to 
facilitate work, that funds be provided for the installation of mail- 
handling devices at this building. 

NEWPORT (R. I.) POST OFFICE AND CUSTOMHOUSE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $400,000 

Appropriations to date 100,000 

Amount to be appropriated 300,000 

Estimate for 1916 150, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
th* second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

NEW ROCHELLE (n. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $125, 000 

Appropriations to date 110,000 

Amount to be appropriated 15.000 

Estimate for 1916 • 15,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

1 Subject to change, dependent upon amount received from sale of old building and site. 



T4 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

NORTH ATTLEBORO (MASS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of coat „ $70, 000 

Appropriations to date _-_ 20, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 50, 000 

Estimate for 1916 - 50,000 

It is probable that this work will be placed under contract in time 
to complete the same during the fiscal year 1916. 

NORTON (VA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date 50, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 1 . 25, 000 

Estimate for 1916 25, 000 

It is probable that this work will be placed under contract so as to 
be completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

OKLAHOMA CITY (OKLA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $250, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 250, 000 

Estimate for 1916 111, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

OPELIKA (ALA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $105, 000 

Appropriations to date 50, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 55. 000 

Estimate for 1916 40,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract shortly 
before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916, and well under way 
toward completion before its close. 

ORANGE (N. J.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $100, 000 

Appropriations to date 80,000 

Amount to be appropriated 20. 000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

OSAGE CITY (KAN8.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $57, 000 

Appropriations to date 45,000 

Amount to be appropriated 12, 000 

Estimate for 1916 12,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 75 

PALATXA (FLA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost 1 $60, 000 

Appropriations to date ., 27,000 

Amount to be appropriated 33,000 

Estimate for 1916 18,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

PENDLETON (OREO.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $180, 000 

Appropriations to date 57. 000 

Amount to be appropriated 73,000 

Estimate for 1916 73,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early in 
the coming calendar year and nearly or quite completed before its 
close. 

PBN8ACOLA (FLA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE (EXTENSION). 

For completion of building under present limit : c 

Limit of cost $130, 000 

Appropriations to date 100,000 

Amount to be appropriated 30,000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

In order to complete the extension of the building the additional 
amount authorized by the act of May 12, 1914, will be required during 
the fiscal year 1916., 

PITTSBURGH (PA.) LABORATORIES, BUREAU OF MINES. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $500,000 

Appropriations to date 150,000 

Amount to be appropriated 350,000 

Estimate for 1916 350,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early 
in the coming calendar year and nearly or quite completed before the 
close of the fecal year 1916. 

FLAINFTELD (n. J.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $150, 000 

Appropriations to date 70,000 

Amount to be appropriated 80,000 

Brtimate for 1916 80,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract early 
m the coming calendar year and nearly or quite completed before the 
close of the fiscal year 1916. 



76 SUNDRY CIVIL APPKOPBIAHON BILL, 1916. 

PORT HURON (MICH.) POST OFFICE. 

[Seep. 133.] -:-;.V -';>•(<. 

For lookout gallery, including the incidental remodeling of the 
first floor by the addition of a storage room and toilet room: 

Limit of cost (submitted) $3,500 

Appropriations to date 

Estimates for 1916 3,500 

This building was erected in the early seventies when the installa- 
tion of lookouts to be used as a means of protection to the mails were 
not installed. 

The postmaster General recommends the construction of a lookout 
system and the incidental remodeling of the building, and the amount 
estimated for will therefore be required to carry out these recom- 
mendations. 

PORT JERVIS (n. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost. $80,000 

Appropriations to date . 70,000 

Amount to be appropriated *. 10,000 

Estimate for 1916 i 10,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. * 

PORTLAND (ME.) QUARANTINE STATION. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $23,620 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 23, 620 

Estimate for 1916 23,620 

Funds will be required during the fiscal year 1916 to provide for 
increased quarantine facilities, as authorized in the act approved 
April 3, 1914. 

POUGHKEEPSIE (N. Y.) POST OFFICE (EXTENSION). 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost. $68,000 

Appropriations to date 28,000 

Amount to be appropriated 40,000 

Estimate for 1916 40,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916 and nearly or quite com- 
pleted before its close. 

PRINCETON (ILL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost. $70,000 

Appropriations to date 20,000 

Amount to be appropriated 60.000 

Estimate for 1916 50,000 

This work is under contract to be completed during the fiscal year 
1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 77 

PULASKI (VA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required for sinking of test pits 
and the surveying of the site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

PUTNAM (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $65, 000 

Appropriations to date 45, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 20,000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract shortly 
before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well under way 
toward completion before its close. 

QUITMAN (GA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50, 000 

Appropriations to date 15, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 35,000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

READING (PA.) POST OFFICE (EXTENSION). 

For completion of building under present limit: 

limit of cost $135, 000 

Appropriations to date 95, 000 

Amount to be appropriated! 40,000 

Estimate for 1916 40, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract early 
m the coming calendar year and completed before the close of the 
fiscal year 1916. 

REDFIELD (s. DAK.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $65,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 65,000 

Estimate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and the surveying of the site before the close of the fiscal year 
1016. 



78 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

RIDGWAY (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limft of cost 180,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 80.000 

Estimate for 1916 25,000 

It is expected this building will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

ROBINSON (ILL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $70, 000 

Appropriations to date 25, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 45. 000 

Estimate for 1916 45,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract very 
early in the coming calendar year, and completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

ROCKVILLE (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $55, 000 

Appropriations to date __ _- 

Amount to be appropriated 55, 000 

Estimate for 1910 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying of the site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

ROCKY MOUNT (n. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $86, 000 

Appropriations to date 56, 000 

Amount to be appropriated ♦_ 30.000 

Estimate for 1916 30,000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

ROSEBBURO (OREG.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost • $100,000 

Appropriations to dnte 

Amount to be appropriated 100.000 

Estimate for 1016 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test pits 
and surveying of the site before close of the fiscal year 1916. 

RUMFORD (ME.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost 160, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 60,000 

Estimate for 1016 1*000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test pits 
and surveying of the site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 



SUHDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 79 

RUTHERFORDTON (N. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For site under present limit : 

Limit of cost : |5, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated ^ 5,000 

Estimate for 1916 5,000 

It is expected that funds will be required for payment of the site 
during the fiscal year 1916. 

ST. LOUIS (MO.) SUBTREASURT. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $1, 000, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 1, 000. 000 

Estimate for 1916 50, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

ST. PETERSBURG (FLA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $80, 000 

Appropriations to date 55,000 

Amount to be appropriated 25,000 

Estimate for 1916 25, 000 

It is believed that this work will be placed under contract early in 
the coming calendar year and nearly or entirely completed before the 
close of the fiscal year 1916. 

SALAMANCA (n. T.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $75, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 75.000 

Estimate for 1916 20, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

SANDUSKY (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $130, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 180,000 

Estimate for 1916 80,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



80 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO (CAL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost i $80,000 

Appropriations to date 9.000 

Amount to be appropriated 71,000 

Estimate for 1916 71,000 

The drawings for this building are being donated to the Govern- 
ment, and it is expected that the work will be placed under contract 
at an early date and completed during the fiscal year 1916. 

SARANAC LAKE (N. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For site and commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost , 190,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 90,000 

Estimate for 1916 25,000 

Funds will be required to make payment for land selected for site 
before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

SAVANNA (ILL.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying the site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

SEYMOUR (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated CO, 000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

SEYMOUR (iND.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date 32,000 

Amount to be appropriated 28,000 

Estimate for 1910 28,000 

Drawings have been prepared for this building, but the work has 
not been placed on the market as yet, the department having been 
requested to hold the letting of a contract, pending efforts which are 
being made to secure additional appropriation. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BUX, ttlfc 81 

SHELBY (N. C.) FOOT OFFICS. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Umlt of cost |56, OOfr 

Appropriations to date _• 

Amount to be appropriated '55,000 

Ertimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

SHELBYVHJiE (kY.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50,000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

SHELBYVILLE (TENN.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date 55, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 5,000 

Estimate for 1916 •__. 5, 000 

It is believed that this work will be under contract before the begin- 
ning of the coming calendar year and that the building will be com- 
pleted during^he fiscal year 1916. 

SIDNEY (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $70, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 70. 000 

K*timate for 1916 10, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

SMYRNA (DEL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost $35,000 

Appropriation to date 25.000 

Amount to be appropriated 10. 000 

Estimate for 1916 10, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract be- 
fore the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and completed before it3 
close. 

72785—14 6 



83 SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 10M; 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost (100,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 100, 000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying the site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

SPAKTA (WIS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date 37, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 23, 000 

Estimate for 1916 23,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the beginning of the next calendar year and completed before the 
close of the fiscal year 1916. 

STAMFORD (CONN.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $150,000 

Appropriations to date 50, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 100, 000 

Estimate for 1916 ^ 100,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the beginning of the next calendar year and completed before the 
close of the fecal year 1916* 

STAMFORD (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

fiimit of cost 150, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50, 000 

Estimate for 1016 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying the site before the close of the fecal year 1916. 

8TEUBENVILLE (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

limit of cost *120, 000 

Appropriations to date 65, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 55,000 

Estimate for 1910 40, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
-during the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1816. 88 

BU flBUK I (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date 65.000 

Amount to be appropriated ; 35, 000 

Estimate for 1916 20,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
shortly before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916. 

SYCAMORE (ILL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost 1 - $60,000 

Appropriations to date 45, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 15, 000 

Estimate for 1916 15,000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

SYRACUSE (N. Y.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $550,000 

Appropriations to date , 10,000 

Amount to be appropriated 540,000 

Estimate for 1916 ISO, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

TAMAQUA (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For site and commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost . $75,000 

Appropriations to date •» 

Amount to be appropriated 75, 000 

Estimate for 1916 27,000 

It is expected that funds will be required during the fiscal year 
1916 for payment for land selected for site. 

TARBORO (N. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date 50. 000 

Amount" to be appropriated 25,000 

Estimate for 1916 25, 000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

TARENTUM (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For comencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 60,000 

Estimate for 1916 1.000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 



SI SUNDRY GIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1MB. 

TAYLORVILfcE (iLL.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building li&dfer present limit: 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date *__ 

Amount to be appropriated 00,000 

fcstimate for 1916 10, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

THE DALLES (OBEO.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $104,000 

Appropriations to date 44,000 

Amount to be appropriated 60,000 

Estimate for 1916 60,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the beginning of the next calendar year and completed before the 
close of the fecal year 1916. 

f THOMASVILLE (OA.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $70,000 

Appropriations to date 24,000 

Amount to be appropriated 46.000 

Estimate for 1916 46,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the beginning of the next calendar year and completed before the 
close of the next fiscal year. 

THREE RIVERS (MICH.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date ^ 50.000 

Amount to be appropriated '. 10,000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

TIFFIN (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of buildipg under present limit : 

Limit of cost $97,600 

Appropriations to date 27.500 

Amount to be appropriated 70.000 

Estimate for 1916 70,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
early in the coming year and completed during the fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 85 

TITU8VILLE (PA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Umlt of cost T — , |7fi, 00? 

Appropriations to date -— -r 

Amount to be appropriated l-.l- 75.000 

Estimate for 1916 r .. : l T - 15,006 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

TULSA (OKLA.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

v 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost t $310,000 

Appropriations to date ^— __^^^_— .. ------ 135.000 

Amount to be appropriated 1 -11- 175.000 

Estimate for 1916 - , 45,009 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
shortly before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916. 

TUPELO (MISS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost 999,000 

Appropriations to date , -_ 20,000 

Amonnt to be appropriated -- 40.000 

Estimate for 1916 - 40,0($ 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiseal 
year 1916. 

URBANA (ILL.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost — $90, 000 

Appropriations to date 70,60$ 

Amount to be appropriated 10,000 

Kstimate for 1916 10,00* 

This building is under contract and will be completed early in the 
fiscal year 1916. 

trncA (n. y.) post office, customhouse, and courthouse 

(extension ). 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost $406,000 

Appropriations to date 80,000 

Amount to be appropriated 370.006 

Bstinat* for 1916 T .-^- 180,609 

< It is expected that this building will be placed under contract dup- 
ing die second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



86 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

UTICA (N. Y.) RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) _ $15,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 15,000 

It is expected that the work of extending and remodeling the 
post-office, customhouse, and courthouse building will be placed 
under contract during the second quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 
Funds will therefore be necessary to provide temporary quarters foi 
the accommodation of the Government officials and to move them 
thereto. 

UVALDE (TEX.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost , j $50,000 

Appropriations to date 15, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 35,000 

Estimate for 1916 35,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract before 
the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and completed before its close. 

VALLEY CITY (N. DAK.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

limit of cost $75,000 

Appropriations to date _ 

Amount to be appropriated 75,000 

Estimate for 1916 15,000 

It is expected that this buliding will be placed under contract dur- 
ing the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

VALPARAISO (iND.) POST OFFICE. 

, Additional for site and commencement of building under present 
limit: 

Limit of cost $95,000 

Appropriations to date 8,200 

Amount to be appropriated 86,800 

Estimate for 1916 5, 800 

It is not now believed that a site can be secured for the amount pre- 
viously estimated for and appropriated in the act of July 29, 1914, 
and additional funds will be required to pay for land selected for 
site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

VANCOUVER (WASH.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost $140,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated — 140,000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDBY CIVIX- APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 87 

VAN WORT (OHIO) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $70,000 

Appropriations to date - 

Amount to be appropriated 70, 000 

Estimate for 1916 25,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

WALTHAM (MA8S.) P08T OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $115,000 

Appropriations to date 85,000 

Amoont to be appropriated 80,000 

Estimate for 1916 20, 00O 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
shortly before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916. 

WASHINGTON, D. 0., BUBEAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING (NEW). 

[See pp. 137, 426.] 

For sidewalk, curbs, etc. : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $9,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amoont to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 1 9,000 

This item has been submitted to Congress before. Reference is 
made to the letter addressed to the Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives under date of April 13, 1914 (H. Doc. 904). The atten- 
tion of the department has again been called to the deplorable condi- 
tion of the sidewalks by the director of the bureau and it is stated 
they are absolutely unfit for the us$ of the employees and others 
bating the building. The amount estimated therefor is required 
in order that this work may receive attention during the fiscal year 

WASHINGTON, D. C-, BUELDING, INTERIOR DEPARTMENT OFFICES. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $2,596,000 

Appropriations to date _— _ 40,000 

Amoont to be appropriated 2,556,000 

Estimate for 1916 1, 500, 00O 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract prior 
fo the beginning of the fiscal year 1916 and well under way before 
its close. 

WASHINGTON, D. C, BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING (OLD). 

[See p. 173.] 

For increasing the boiler capacity of the power plant in the old 
building for the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, including neces- 



88 SOHDBY CIVIL APPROPBIATIOlf BILL, 1016. 

Barv piping, changes in breeching, the extension of coal bunkers, 
and other changes incident thereto: 

Limit of cost (submitted) $25, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

JBstimate for 1916 25, 000 

It appears that the power capacity of the present boiler plant is not 
sufficient for present needs and the amount estimated for is there- 
fore required for the installation of an additional 500-horsepower 
boiler and accessories. 

WASHINGTON (d. C.), BUTLER BUILDING. 
[See p. 137.J 

For additional story to the one-story annex to the Butter Building, 
including special repairs : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $7,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated. „ „ 

Estimate for 1916 7,000 

This matter, together with the elevator for the Butler Building, 
was submitted in the estimates for 1915, and the installation of the 
elevator was provided for. The crowded conditions in this building 
occasion the necessity for the additional story and the' repairs re- 
ferred to, and in order to do the work the amount estimated for will 
be required. 

WASHINGTON (GA.) POST OFFICE. 

For site and commencement of building under present limit : 

limit of cost - $55, ooo 

Appropriations to date ^ 

Amount to be appropriated 55,000 

Estimate for 1ML6 6,500 

It is expected that funds will be required to pay for land selected 
for site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

WASHINGTON (iND.) POST OF*t€B. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 60,000 

Estimate for 1916 1.000 

It is expected funds will be required for the sinking of test pits 
and surveying the site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

WASHINGTON (iOWA) P08T OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost 180,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 80,000 

Estimate for 1916 10,000 

It is expected the contract for this building will be awarded during 
the fourth quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 80 

WATERIiOO (N. T.) F08T OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under, present limit : 

Limit of cost 156,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 56.000 

Estimate for 1916 - 20,000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 191ft. 

WATNBSVn-LE (x. C.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $06,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 06,000 

Estimate for 1016 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying of site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

webb crrr (mo.) post office. 

For continuation of building under pnesent limit: 

Limit of cost $70, 000 

Appropriations to date . 84.000 

Amount to be appropriated.-' 80.000 

Estimate for 1916 20, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
daring the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

WELLSBURO (w. VA.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Umlt of cost 160.000 

Appropriations to date .. .. 16,000 

Amount to be appropriated 45, 000 

Estimate for 1916 80,000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

WENATCHEE (WASH.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost 1 986,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 85,000 

Estimate for 1916 1,000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying the site before the etaae of the fiscal year 1916. 

WILLISTON (N. DAK.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Umit of cost $100,000 

Appropriations to date _ 95,000 

Amount to be appropriated J" 5.009 

Estimate for 1916 5,000 

This building is under contract and will be completed shortly after 
the beginning of the fiscal year 1916. 



90 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

WILLOW (CAL.) POST OFFICE. 

[See pp. 119, 128.] 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $75, 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 75,000 

Estimate for 1916 r 75, 000 

The drawings for this building are to be donated to the Govern- 
ment, and it is expected that the building will be completed during 
the fiscal year 1916. 

WILKESBORO (N. G.) POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. 

For continuation of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost $60,000 

Appropriations to date T _ 22,000 

Amount to be appropriated 38,000 

Estimate for 1916 80, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
shortly before the beginning of the fiscal year 1916. 

WILLIAMSON (w. VA.) POST OFFICE. 

For commencement of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $50,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 50, 000 

Estimate for 1916 1, 000 

It is expected that funds will be required for the sinking of test 
pits and surveying the site before the close of the fiscal year 1916. 

WILMINGTON (n. C.) CUSTOMHOUSE AND APPRAISERS 9 STORES. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost $600,000 

Appropriations to date 180.000 

Amount to be appropriated 420,000 

Estimate for 1916 220, 000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract early 
in the coming calendar year. 

WILMINGTON, N. C, RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto : 

Limit of cost (submitted) $2,500 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated ^ 

Estimate for 1916 2,500 

It is expected that the work of removing the old building and con- 
structing the new one will be placed under contract prior to the 
beginning of the fiscal year 1916. Funds will therefore oe necessary 
to provide temporary quarters for the accommodation of the Gov- 
ernment officials and to move them thereto. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 9iJ 

WILSON (n/C.) P08T OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost . a |60 v 000 

Appropriations to date . 45. 000 

Amount to be appropriated 15,006 

Estimate for 1916 15, (XX) 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
early in the coming calendar year and completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

WINCHESTER (*Y.) POST OFFICE — ERECTING SECOND STORY, CHANGES, ETC. 

For commencement of building under present limit: 

Limit of cost |90 f 000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 30,000 

Estimate for 1916 *. 20, 000 

It is expected that this work will be placed under contract during 
the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 

WINCHESTER, KY., RENT OF BUILDINGS. 

For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Gov- 
ernment officials and moving expenses incident thereto: 

Limit of cost (submitted) ' $2,000 

Appropriations to date 

Amount to be appropriated 

Estimate for 1916 2, 000 

It is expected that the work of erecting a second story to the build- 
ing and making necessary changes in the same will be placed under 
contract during the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916. Funds 
will therefore be necessary to provide temporary quarters for the 
accommodation of the Government officials and to move them thereto. 

WINCHESTER (TENN.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Umlt of cost $57, 800 

Appropriations to date 42, 800 

Amount to be appropriated 15, 000 

Brtlmate for 1916 15,000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

W INFIEL D (XANS.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

Umlt of cost $75, 000 

Appropriations to date 81, 000 

Amount to be appropriated 44, 000 

fctlmate for 1016 44, 000 

This building is under contract to be completed during the fiscal 



#8 8UNDBY OIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 

WXTHJSV1LLB (VA.)" POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit: 

fcimlt of cost |00, 88* 

Appropriations to date 85. 008 

Amount to be appropriated 25,00* 

Estimate for 1916 85,006 

This building ia under contract to be completed during the fiscal 
year 1916. 

YOXKEBS (N. T.) POST OFFICE. 

For completion of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost „„— .. ,. ^ „ „-_ $500,000 

Appropriations to date 200.000 

Amount to be appropriated , 959.006 

Estimate for 1916 „ 230,006 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
Shortly after the beginning of the coming calendar year and nearly 
0>r quite completed before tne close of the fiscal year 1916. 

TPSILANTI (MICH.) POST OFFICE. 

For continuation of building under present limit : 

Limit of cost — ,. „-, , fT5, 000 

Appropriations to date 85, 008 

Amount to be appropriated ,. 55,006 

Estimate for 1916 . ^--^ 35.000 

It is expected that this building will be placed under contract 
during the first quarter of the fiscal year 1916. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 98 

Wednesday, December 16, 191k- 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS— CONTINUED. 

STATEMENTS OF KB. BYBON B. NEWTON, ASSISTANT SECBETABT 
OF THE TBEASUBY, AND MB. JAMES A. WETMOBE, EXECUTIVE 
OPHCEE, SUPERVISING ARCHITECT'S OFFICE. 

USE OF ALL UNEXPENDED BALANCES OF APPROPRIATIONS HERETOFORE 

SPECIFICALLY MADE. 

The Chairman. Mr. Secretary, in the estimates for public build- 
ings, instead of submitting detailed estimates for the specific build- 
ings, the department requests the following provision : 

The unexpended balances of all appropriations heretofore specifically made 
and remaining available, under the Treasury Department, for the construction, 
enlargement, extension, remodeling, rebuilding, or improvement of any and all 
public buildings, and for the acquisition of sites or the enlargement of sites, be, 
and the same are hereby, reappropriated, to constitute a lump-sum appropria- 
tion, to be immediately available and to remain available until expended, as 
follows: (a) For the acquisition of sites and the enlargement of sites within 
the authorised limits of cost fixed by prior legislation; (b) for the continua- 
tion of the construction, enlargement, extension, remodeling, rebuilding, or 
improvement of public buildings within the authorized limits of cost fixed by 
prior legislation, work upon which may have commenced prior to the passage 
of this act; (o) and for the commencement of the construction, enlargement^ 
extension, remodeling, rebuilding, or improvement of the following public 
buildings within the authorized limits of cost fixed by prior legislation, to wit: 

Will you explain just what the proposal of the department is? 

Mr. Newton. Mr. Chairman, Judge Wetmore, the executive officer 
of the Supervising Architect's Office, is more familiar with all the 
details than I am. . 

The Chairman. Then we will ask Mr. Wetmore to explain what 
the department's proposal is. 

Mr. Wetmore. Mr. Chairman, in brief, we have on our books at 
the present time in available balances of the public-building appro- 
priations over $21,000,000. The activities of trie Supervising Archi- 
tects Office use about $12,000,000 a year. If we use the $12,000,000 
for the present year we will still have on hand $8,000,000 or so which 
we can not use for any of the buildings that we could take up in 
the regular program, nor for the buildings for which the money has 
t*en specifically appropriated, the conditions regarding which have 
put them in such shape that we can carry on the work. We have 
ruses, for example, where buildings are tied up for want of further 
appropriations, for need of a change in legislation, or because of 
difficulties that have been encountered in carrying on the work on 
the building, by reason of which they have not made the normal rate 
of progress, and if we ask for appropriations to carry on the build- 
ings we can handle, then we must pile up our balances by about 
$12,000,000 additional. It looks as though we ought not to have 
balances on our books so far in excess of our needs. The idea waa 
to clean up those balances, so that we could start another year and 
estimate specifically on what we will need from time to time. 

The Chairman. These balances, aggregating $21,000,000, consist 
of specific appropriations for specific imildingsl 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. 



$4 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. Which were made upon the recommendation of 
the Treasury Department? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. 

The Chairman. Based upon their statements that those sums 
would be required 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; they were our estimates. 

The Chairman (continuing). During the various fiscal years for 
which they were made? 

Mr. Wetmore. Of course, those estimates have been made in good 
faith. 

The Chairman. How does it happen that the department has 
missed by $21,000,000 the amount of money you can spend? 

Mr. Wetmore. We have not missed bv $21,000,000 the amount of 
money we can spend. The $21,000,000 includes $12,000,000 that we 
will use during the next year; but in addition to that we have 
$8,000,000 more that we can not use. 

The Chairman. That money is money which you expected to use 
during this year? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. 

The Chairman. There are only six months left of this year, and 
that would be only $6,000,000, so that you have $15,000,000 in excess 
of whatyou say you could use? 

Mr. Wetmore. We make our estimates, as you know, many months 
in advance of the time when the^ appropriation is available, so that 
we are obliged to forecast conditions sometimes 15, 16, or 18 months 
in advance of the time when the appropriation may be used. In 
making our estimates we take up a building and conclude what should 
be the normal rate of progress. With that in our mind we ask for an 
appropriation sufficient to carry us at that normal rate of progress 
until the next appropriation will become available — in other words, 
so we shall not run out of money in the meantime. We have run out 
of money in the meantime, for instance, in 1912, when the sundry 
civil bill was delayed until August 24, I think it was, before it was 
passed. Now, we have calculated that the appropriation would 
probably be passed in July at the latest, and we did not have money 
enough to pay certain of our contractors between July and August 
in a number of cases. 

The Chairman. But not in all cases? 

Mr. Wetmore. Not in all cases, but it happened in some cases. 

The Chairman. There were not many such cases, because we ex- 
tended the appropriations. 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; but that did not help us out in the case of 
public-building appropriations, as they were specific. The appro- 
priations were extended on the annuals all right, but in the case of 
the public buildings we had so much appropriated, and the exten- 
sion resolution did not give us another dollar. If you will recall, 
we ran out of money, for instance, on the post office in New York 
City. The Fuller Construction Co. had to wait several months for 
$200,000. They carried on the work and it is understood put their 
vouchers in bank, and borrowed money and went ahead with the 
work. 

The Chairman. That was an unusual and extraordinary situation? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; and I am using that as one illustration. We 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 95 

would know, as a matter of experience, if we had 100 buildings ap- 
propriated for that there would be a fair percentage of those build- 
ings in connection with which the work could not be carried on 
and others in connection with which the contractors will not keep 
up with the normal rate of progress. If we knew in connection with 
which particular buildings that would happen, we could estimate 
accordingly. We must estimate for every building at the normal 
rate of progress that an ordinary contractor will make from the 
time he starts until the next appropriation act is available. Now, 
it happens that certain buildings get tied up. We may encounter 
difficulties in foundations and have to tie up work on the buildings, 
while we redesign the foundations. In the meantime the appropria- 
tion has been made and can not be used. We sometimes strike a case 
like we had at Elkins, W. Va., where, after the building was author- 
ized, Congress authorized courts to be established and work on the 
building was held up. 

The Chairman. Take the case of the Chicago post office — in 1908 
§1.250,000 was appropriated for a site. 

Mr. Wetmore. And since then $500,000 more has been appropri- 
ated. 

The Chairman. That was four years ago. 

Mr. Wetmore. And no site has been bought. 

The Chairman. And the Secretary says it will still be a couple of 
years before the money can be used. 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; it may be that long. 

The Chairman. Why is that ? 

Mr. Newton. We are waiting on the Post Office Department to 
determine just what the postal facilities require there. 

Mr. Wetmore. And previous to that, delay was occasioned because 
it was desired to locate the building near tne Union Station, and it 
is only within a few months, or in fact within a 3few weeks, that the 
railroads and the city have come together on the question of where 
the station is to be located. This post office must be located near that 
station. That was a delay that neither the office nor Congress was 
at all responsible for. It is a local situation that had to work itself 
out: but, nevertheless, during all that time there has been $1,750,000 
on our books that could not be expended, and if we had had legisla- 
tion of the character proposed we could have put forward our pro- 
gram to the extent of $1,750,000. There is no question about that. 

Mr. Gillett. Are appropriations for public buildings good until 
used? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes, sir; the purpose of this provision, as I say, is 
simply to clean up all these balances. If we could use the $12,000,000 
in this estimate, it would carry on the activities of the office for 
another year. 

Mr. Sherlet. How far are you behind? 

Mr. Wetmore. We are not behind at all in the sense of being 
t*hind with our program. We have ahead of us about six years' 
work, I should say, between five and six years' work; but we are not 
behind, because we are turning out 70 or 80 buildings annually, which 
is the normal output of our present force. When we are working 
along at this rate and Congress authorizes 300 or more buildings 
at one time, that does not put us behind in the sense that we are not 
keeping up with our work. 



96 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910, 

Mr. Sherley. I am not using the word in any sense of odium one 
way or the other. I want to film out 

Mr. Wbtmore (interposing). It will be about six years or more 
before we can clean up the buildings on our books with our present 
force. 

Mr. Sherley. Have you any recommendation to make as to in- 
creasing your capacity to complete this work at an earlier date? 

Mr. Wetmore. That is a departmental matter which I would 
prefer Mr. Newton to answer. 

Mr. Newton. Yes, Mr. Sherley ; it must rest largely with Congress 
as to whether or not this work is brought up to date. By increasing 
the force in the architect's office we could complete within two years 
what will take six years otherwise. 

Mr. Sherley. With what increased cost? 

Mr. Newton. In 1911, I believe, 80 men were taken out of the 
architect's office, and I am informed that the salaries of those men 
amounted to about $150,000. Even with that diminished force, by 
extra pressure we have been keeping the output up to where it was 
before. We are placing under contract about six buildings per 
month, and by strengthening the force in certain sections of the 
architect's office this output could be proportionately increased. 

Mr. Sherley. Do you charge to each building a proportion of the 
overhead charge of your office ? 

Mr. Wetmore. No, sir. 

Mr. Sherley. You do not? 

Mr. Wetmore. No, sir. There was a time when that was done, 
but that legislation has been changed and the office is now on a 
salary basis. Special appropriations are provided outside of the 
building appropriations. 

Mr. Sherley. In order to increase your facilities for turning out 
work, it would mean a direct increase in the salaries paid your office 
force through additional appropriations? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes ; for Hboth the office force and the field force. 
Of course, if we turn out more buildings in the office we will need 
more superintendents in the field, and there would be an increase in 
numbers both in the office and in the field. 

Mr. Sherley. Your present proposal does not look to a change in 
the quantiy of work which you will put out, but simply to con- 
venience in having available funds without having them tied to a 
particular project. 

Mr. Wetmore. The purpose is not that so much as it is to get 
these balances off the books, which can not be used for the specific 
buildings for which appropriated and which could be used for other 
buildings which can be reached at this time. It does not necessarily 
contemplate anv increase in the output. It is on the same basis of 
about $12,000,000 of expenditure a year that we are now making. 

Mr. Sherley. It is to make liquid the appropriations which have 
heretofore been made ? 

Mr. Wetmore. It will have that effect; yes, sir. 

Mr. Sherley. In point of fact, would it not result in your chang- 
ing the order in which otherwise buildings would be constructed and 
completed ? 

Mr. Wetmore. No ; not at all. 

Mr. Sherley. Why not? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1&16. 97 

Mr. Wetmore. Because we are proposing to use the balances that 
can not be used on the buildings for which thev were specifically ap- 
propriated to carry on work on buildings which we will take up 
either under this lump sum or under specific appropriations whicn 
we will have to submit. We will be obliged to submit estimates for 
specific appropriations instead of using balances of the appropria- 
tions we now have. It is simply proposing to take money that can 
not be spent on certain buildings that have been appropriated for 
and expending it on other buildings on which the work can be prose- 
cuted. 

Mr. Sherley. That would make subsequent need for appropria- 
tion. 

Mr. Wetmore. Undoubtedly we would have to ask for an appro- 
priation for any building whose balance was used up in that way. 

Mr. Newton. These items illustrate it. The amounts are left 
Wank but that does not affect the situation fundamentally. It is 
still the program and these projects will be taken up in regular order. 

Mr. Wetmore. Here is a specific instance, Mr. Sherley. The last 
session of Congress authorized $30,000 on account of Pensacola, Fla. 
Pensacola. Fla., was a case where Congress had authorized an exten- 
sion of the building. We had carried the work through to comple- 
tion and had extended the building, when ^Congress authorized 
>30.000 more for betterments. The purpose of that was to better the 
old portion of the building and make it correspond in appearance 
with the new portion. We had the authorization but no appropria- 
tion. If we had had this lump sum we could have gone right ahead 
with the work. As it was we had to move the officials who were 
then in rented quarters back into the building, and when we get 
our appropriation we will have to move most of them outside again. 

Mr. Sherley. Suppose you had done that particular work, would 
you not to a certain extent have been prevented from doing other 
work? 

Mr. Wetmore. No; we would have done it at the expense of the 
appropriation for some building on which no work could have been 
done. 

Mr. Sherlfy. I am not talking about the money side, but about 
the phvsical side. 

Mr. Wetmore. No. 

Mr. Shepl^y. If I understand you right, vou have a certain ca- 
pacity for doing a given amount of work, and you do not propose to 
f-hange that bv increase of your force, either your office or your field 
force. Now, if bv virtue of lumping these appropriations vou are 
enabled to take up a situation like the one you speak of in Florida, 
are you not. to the extent of the work you do there, unable to do work 
somewhere else, assuming you are now doing all the work you 
<*an do? 

Mr. Wftmore. No: what we would take up would be the regular 
order of things on the program and for which we would otherwise 
h'Vc to ask for money. 

Mr. Shefl,fy. But you do not catch mv point. Assuming you 
i"e now doing all the work it is possible for you to do in any given 
war with your present force, then, if bv making the appropriations 
li'juid vou take up some particular work that otherwise you could 

7'JTVr— 15 7 



98 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

not take up, will you not to that extent have to foi*ego some work 
that you would otherwise do! 

Mr. Wetmore. No; I should say not. 

Mr. Sherley. That looks to me like a mathematical proposition 
and I would like your explanation. 

Mr. Wetmore. It is not proposed to vary the program at all. 
It is not proposed to take things up not provided in the program, 
but to simply provide the money for taking up those things in 
their order without having to ask specifically for appropriations 
on that account, and in this way to clean up these old balances. 
The Pensacola item is in our program. 

Mr. Sherley. If I understand you, then, what you are proposing 
to do is simply to not change the character of the work which you 
are going to do for a year, but simply to not ask appropriations in 
order to do that work, but depend upon these balances to pay for 
the work? 

Mr. Wetmore. That is the idea, and use money that could not be 
used for the buildings for which they are appropriated. 

Mr. Sherley. So that from your standpoint the total effect of the 
proposed change would be to dispense with the need of an appro- 
priation of, say, approximately $12,000,000? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. 

Mr. Sherley. Without in any particular changing or helping or 
hurting the activities of the department? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Newton. Exactly so. 

Mr. Rauch. I would like to know how much of a balance is in- 
volved in the Pensacola proposition. 

Mr. Wetmore. It would require an entire appropriation of the 
amount of the authorization. The work has been authorized but 
no appropriation has been made. The amount of the authorization 
is $30,000. 

Mr. Rauch. How much was involved in the Chicago proposition i 

• Mr. Wetmore. In the Chicago case the site has been appropriated 

for in full, $1,750,000— first $1,250,000, and then $500,000. Those 

appropriations have been on the books of the department for a long 

time. 

Mr. Rauch. Have j r ou any other case that comes anywhere near 
equaling the Chicago proposition in amount? 

Mr. Wetmore. Not in amount; no, sir. We have over $13,000,000 
of unincumbered balances on buildings running back as far as 1906. 

Mr. Rauch. What I want to get at is the largest item. 

Mr. Wetmore. There is a case that has been on the books for a 
long time — the appraisers' stores at Boston. We are just getting to 
work on it now. That has been tied up indefinitely. We had our 
first appropriation in 1906 and we have now $805,437.12, but that 
is getting to the point now where we are going to take that work up. 
For many years we have had all these balances in our hands which 
we could not use. 

Mr. Sherley. Would not this have a tendency to make you relax 
somewhat your efforts to so bring about conditions as to make usable 
the particular appropriation for particular places? 

Mr. Wetmore. I do not think so, because the difficulty is not in 
the office, as a rule, in connection with these things. I do not want 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 99 

the committee to understand that the whole of an appropriation is 
always tied up. We may have a case where we have an appropria- 
tion which we think should be used up in 12 months, and the con- 
tractor's rate of progress is such that he takes 14 months or 16 months 
to use it up. We have therefore estimated in that case too much. In 
such a case we could have used that unexpended balance in carrying 
forward some other work on our program under this provision. 

The Chairman. How much of the $21,000,000 would you say was 
money that will be used up in the immediate future, and how much of 
it is money appropriated for buildings or sites where the site has 
l>een acquired and the balance does not go into the building, or the 
building has been finished and the balance has not been turned into- 
the Treasury ? 

Mr. Wetmore. I have not any figures here, Mr. Chairman, which 
>how the amounts in such shape as to segregate the buildings and the 
sites. 

The Chairman. Well, put them together. 

Mr. Wetmore. Together, $11,252,441.52 on December 1. 

The Chairman. What does that represent? 

Mr. Wetmore. Balances of appropriations on account of buildings 
that have not been commenced. 

The Chairman. That have not been commenced ? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. 

The Chairman. Have you any statement which would show the 
amount of money on hand, balances from completed buildings? 

Mr. Wetmore. There are at this time 86 buildings which are prac- 
tically completed, in connection with which there are unexpended 
balances aggregating $301,696.06. The Supervising Architect's Office 
is not yet advised whether everything in connection with these build- 

Xhas been done which should fall as a charge against these 
ces. 

Mr. Sherley. Do }'ou always spend every dollar you get? 

Mr. Wetmore. No, sir. We have not turned in all of the balances 
••n all of the buildings. Where we are holding out the balance it is 
to do something further on the building. As soon as the building is 
'ompleted we turn in the balance. 

The Chairman. In this $21,000,000 there is practically no money 
which would represent a balance of an appropriation for some build- 
•ns which has been completed? 

Jlr. Wetmore. Practically none. 

Mr. Sherley. What did you turn in in the way of balances from 
•ompleted buildings recently ? 

Mr. Wetmore. $421,161.03, being balances of appropriations on 
"1 buildings. 

Mr. Xewtox. Of the sites authorized in the 1913 bill we have ac- 
cepted between 60 and 70 of about 300, and there has been a saving 
lj f a little more than $300,000 on the authorizations. 

Mr. Sherley. What do you do with that money; just use it to 
"lake a more expensive building? 

Mr. Wetmore. No: we turn it back. It is not available. 

Mr. Sherley. But in a case where you have an appropriation of a 
'*rtain sum. of which not exceeding another lesser sum can be ex- 
pended for a site and you actually buy the site for less than the 



lOO SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

maximum winch is put in the authorization, what do you do with 
the surplus — just use it on the building? 

Mr. Wetmore. The effect of that would be to leave more of the 
appropriation for use on the building. 

Mr. Sherley. Do .you feel obligated to use it on the building? 

Mr. Wetmore. No, sir. 

Mr. Newton. If the authorization is for a site alone, the money 
goes into the Treasury. 

Mr. Sherley. But where it is for a site and building with a maxi- 
mum amount which can be expended for the site and you actually 
buy the site for less than that, do you just cover that into the Treas- 
ury or simply increase the cost of the building to that extent? 

Mr. Newtox. Usually there is no maximum for a site where the 
authorization is for a site and building. 

Mr. Sherley. Sometimes there is. 

The Chairman. There is a limit, for instance $100,000, of which 
not to exceed $20,000 shall be expended for a site. 

Mr. Sherley. In point of fact you frequently estimate a building 
at $65,000 and the site at $15,000. If you buy the site for $10,000 
do you then feel compelled to Spend $5,000 more on the building 
just because you have it? 

Mr. Wetmore. No, sir. 

Mr. Sherley. What is the fact; what do you do? 

Mr. Wetmore. The Secretary of the Treasury has instructed us 
that we should not spend a balance simply because we have it, but to 
build buildings that are suitable for the locality and purpose. 

Mr. Sherley. You are six years behind in your work; at least you 
have authorizations (5 years old without the Avork done, and you do 
not make any recommendation to increase your output. Do you not 
think that a situation of that kind needs remedying somewhere? 

Mr. Newton. There is a recommendation in the report of the 
Public Buildings Commission which was submitted to Congress last 
"session. That has not been acted upon. 

Mr. Sherley. Briefly, what is that recommendation? 

Mr. Newton. The recommendation is for a general reorganization 
of the architect's office and for such changes as will give us an in- 
creased output. 

Mr. Sherley. Without going back to my proposition of a while 
ago, that giving the liquid lump sum might have a tendency to cause 
you to hurry up the delayed cases that exist now, is it not true that 
there are a lot of instances where there have been delays that are not 
delays that could not be prevented such as you speak of in case of 
Chicago, where the action of the railroad company was prerequisite 
to action by your office, are there not a lot or cases where matters 
have been delayed, sometimes because some Congressman or Senator 
insisted on holding up the matter until he could satisfy himself about 
matters that the law did not have anything to do with or cases where 
for one reason or another the matter grew slack? 

Mr. Wetmore. I do not know of any cases where the matters have 
grown slack, but there are cases where buildings have been held up 
at the request of Senators and Members of Congress. 

Mr. Sherley. What is your policy in that regard? 

Mr. Newton. We do the best we can. Generally it is a matter of 
a great deal of argument downstairs and sawing wood upstairs. Wo 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 101 

get along as best we can. It depends altogether on what the condi- 
tions are. Sometimes it is a matter of the northwest wind and 
where the door should be. Sometimes it is a matter as to where the 
routing cases should be. Sometimes a question of two doors or one 
door, but those matters do not ordinarily, as my experience reaches, 
cause any great delay. It is a thing that we usually take up and 
thrash out and go on. Sometimes — not in very many cases — the 
plans have been changed and there has been a considerable delay. 

Mr. Wetmore. As I understood the question, it would be a case, 
for instance, where the appropriation will not build a building or 
the size that ought to be built, and the Congressman, rather thai} 
have the building built too small, wants to see if he can get the limit 
of cost increased. 

Mr. Sheruey. I would state it the other way. Usually it is a case 
where a building can be built perfectly adequate for the needs of the 
service but not of the ornate style or dimensions that the pride of 
the particular locality makes the Congressman think necessary. 
What do you do then? Do you yield to the pressure or go ahead 
and go to work? For instance, I have in mind one instance that 
arose in my State where there was a building authorized for $100,000, 
I think, of which $15,000 should be expended for a site. It was to 
be a one-story building, 60 by 80 feet, and was to be built of bronze 
snd marble. It was discovered subsequently that the Federal court 
might at some time hold sessions there, and therefore it was desirable 
that it should be a two-story building instead of a one-story building. 
Manifestly a very adequatebuilding two stories high could have been 
built, by eliminating some of the bronze and some of the marble, 
for the authorization, but instead of that an additional appropria- 
tion was asked. I am not sure but that it was finally obtained. What 
do you do with regard to those cases ? 

Mr. Newton. It is the policy of the Secretary and of the depart- 
ment to erect these buildings as inexpensively as is possible, con- 
sistent with the requirements of the service and the locality, regard- 
less of the authorization, and we work to that end. There are such 
<*ases as you cite, and the kind of stone to be used in a building also 
is often the cause of considerable controversy. It is a phase of 
human nature that Congressmen and Senators want the native mar- 
ble in their State put into the building. We have very many of those 
^ses. We insist, so far as we can, that the building shall be erected 
within a reasonable limit. It is often necessary to contend with local 
sentiment for too expensive buildings. 

Mr. Shekley. As to your specifications touching building mate- 
rial there are constant complaints made, which may or may not be 
*ell founded — I know nothing as to the facts — that the specifications 
are of such a character as to eliminate as suitable stone that can be 
obtained in the locality of an equal or superior quality to those which 
ire used, and that when inquiry is made of the department the state- 
ment is made that the specifications in general are so prepared, and 
it is then up to the contractor to determine what particular stones 
rome within those specifications. What is the fact touching the mat- 
ter of the specifications? Are they of such a character as to particu- 
larly benefit certain stones? For instance, we frequently hear the 
complaint that Bedford (Ind.) stone is used to the exclusion of other 



102 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

stone because of the character of the specifications that the archi- 
tect's office prepares. 

Mr. Newton. The specifications are very largely regulated by the 
limit of cost of the building. For instance, we would not specify 
marble where the limit of cost clearly indicated that nothing but a 
brick structure was to be erected. 

Mr. Sherley. I understand; but atssuming that a structure is 
going to be built of good limestone or some hard, durable building 
stone, are your specifications of such a character, by putting in some 
little requirement, as to exclude certain stones and to benefit certain 
otberg? 

Mr. Newton. No, sir. 

Mr. Wetmore. The specifications are drawn with a view to get- 
ting the widest possible competition for material. In the first place, 
the department regulations absolutely prohibit specifying the name 
of any particular material or material from any particular locality 
or any particular device or anything of that kind, the purpose being 
to enable bidders to come in and bid generally. In a case of the kind 
you mention, where we propose to build of stone, the specifications 
would probably be for sandstone or limestone, and bidders can bid on 
either sandstone or limestone. That is a generic term, and they can 
bid on any kind of limestone or sandstone. It does not make any 
difference whether it is produced in the locality or a thousand miles 
away. 

Mr. Sherley. Do you put in any qualifications as to the degree of 
hardness or anything else that would serve to eliminate any particu- 
lar stone? 

Mr. Wetmore. We simply specify the quality of stone that will be 
acceptable. The stone produced in a locality may be soft or of un- 
suitable color and would not be acceptable. We call for a standard 
material. We simply specify brick, terra cotta, sandstone, limestone, 
or marble. Sometimes we specify a light-colored stone, but not fre- 
quently. That is not customary. There is a reason from an archi- 
tectural standpoint when we do that. 

Mr. Sherley. When the bids are submitted, do they carry with 
them specifications of the exact stone that is to be used? 

Mr. Wetmore. Sometimes they do and sometimes they do not. If 
they do not, the specifications require the bidders to submit an ac- 
ceptable material and they send m the samples of the stone which 
they propose to furnish. 

Mr. Sherley. Suppose there are two bids of equal amount and 
one specifies the use of a given limestone and another the use of 
another limestone, does the department then undertake to determine 
which bidder shall be awarded the contract by exercising a judgment 
as to which stone is the more desirable? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Sherley. Suppose there is a difference in the bids, do you still 
exercise your judgment and exclude the lower bid because of the 
fact that the other bidder has specified a stone which you like better? 
In other words, is there anything which warrants the impression 
which has gone out to the contractors that if they want to get favor- 
able consideration for a bid they must use a certain character of 
stone? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 108 

Mr. Wetmorb. None whatever. 

Mr. Newton. It does not make any difference to the department, so 
long as it is a suitable stone. 

Mr. Wetmore. If there is a local material, there is usually a great 
deal of pressure brought to bear on the department to use that par- 
ticular material. Simply expressing a view based on some years' 
experience, I will say that the cost of local material is nearly always 
in excess, if it is limestone, of the Bedford limestone. The reason 
for that is that the Bedford quarries are well equipped to get out 
stone in large quantities. The stone is so soft when it is first quarried 
that it can be cut with tools and sawed, and the producers can com- 
pete with sandstone that is a harder material and can not be as read- 
ily cut in the same way. The price of the Bedford limestone is 
usually very much below the sandstone. For instance, limestone from 
Indiana can be sent down to Texas and compete with the local stone. 
Senators and Congressmen in such cases sometimes urge, notwith- 
standing the cheaper material is acceptable, that we spend a little 
more money and use the local material. 

Mr. Mondell. I am anxious to know just what the effect of this 
provision which you have submitted would be. You ask that certain 
unexpended balances shall constitute a lump sum to be available and 
to remain available until expended for certain purposes in connec- 
tion with certain buildings. That is, in effect, the transfer of the 
appropriations heretofore made from the bjrildings for which the 
specific appropriations have been made to these buildings, and the 
result of it would be that it would be necessary to use all of this 
unexpended balance on the buildings enumerated in the bill, and it 
would be necessary hereafter to make appropriations either in lump 
sum or specific which you could use for the buildings for which ap- 
propriations have heretofore been made, which appropriations you 
are now putting in the lump sum. This might occur : Some of the 
buildings for which specific appropriations have been made and 
which are not enumerated in this list — practically none of them is 
enumerated in the list, as I understand it — some of these buildings 
might be ready for construction during the. coming fiscal year and 
some of the sites might be ready for purchase during the coming fiscal 
year, but you have transferred or would have transferred under this 
language the sums heretofore appropriated for those buildings to 
these other buildings and you could not use them for the buildings, 
even though conditions arose under which you were ready to use 
them. To illustrate, I have in mind an appropriation for a site not 
expended. The probablity is that within the year you will be able 
to buy that site — you will be in a position to buy it— but as that site 
is not included in this list you could not buy it if we adopt this 
language, even though all the conditions were ripe and ready for the 
purchase. 

Mr. Newton. Probably there has been an appropriation made for 
the site which you have in mind. 

Mr. Mondell. I understand; but you are taking that appropria- 
tion and putting it in the lump sum for certain other buildings and 
sites, and therefore you could not use it for that site even though 
under this language the time arrived within the fiscal year^ when 
you were ready to make that expenditure, for you have by this lan- 
guage transferred that sum. In fact, you can only use the sums 



104 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

heretofore appropriated for specific buildings for those buildings, if 
this language was adopted, because you take it from those buildings 
and transfer it to these buildings to be utilized only for these pur- 
poses until expended. 

Mr. Newton. I do not think that is the case. 

Mr. Mondell. That is a fair interpretation of the language. You 
construe this language, then, not as a permanent transfer for the 
purposes for which appropriated but a conditional transfer? 

Mr. Newton. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. Providing you want to use it or find that it is con- 
venient to use it for other purposes? 

Mr. Newton. Precisely so. 

Mr. Mondell. Of course, if you did use it for other purposes, then 
another specific appropriation in the future would be required ?' 

Mr. Newton. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. Unless in the future Congress continued the plan 
which this seems to contemplate of making lump-sum appropriations 
to be expended in the judgment of the Supervising Architect's Office? 

Mr. Newton. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. But how are you going to keep books on that? 
For instance, you have so many hundred thousand dollars available 
for specific sites and a certain sum available for buildings, if you use 
a certain part of it, does that take from certain specific buildings, or 
does it simply reduce the lump sum by a certain amount? 

Mr. Wetmore. It would reduce the lump sum, but the books would 
have to be kept with reference to the limits of cost fixed by Congress 
in each case. 

Mr. Mondell. Then you would not know until after you used this 
lump sum just what buildings specifically appropriated for hereto- 
fore have been deprived of their appropriation by the fact that you 
have used the appropriation for other buildings? 

Mr. Wetmore. Oh, yes, we would; we would know the balances 
we took from each appropriation to make up this lump sum. 

Mr. Mondell. But, finally, there would come a time, when, having 
used this lump sum for certain other purposes, there would not be 
enough to provide for the buildings which have been specifically 
appropriated for? 

Mr. Wetmore. In that case we would have to ask for a specific 
appropriation to take the place of the money that had been taken 
away. 

The Chairman. Would you do that or would you continue to ask 
for lump-sum appropriations? Is not the idea to wipe out all spe- 
cific appropriations and have a general appropriation out of which 
you would pay for the work to be done on the buildings under way 
as it became necessary to use the appropriations within the limits of 
cost? 

Mr. Wetmore. No: the idea was not to do anything more than 
to clear up these balances so we can start again and get rid of having 
such a large amount of unexpended balances on our books. It would 
be advantageous from a business standpoint, and perhaps from the 
standpoint of the Appropriation Committee itself, but not, perhaps, 
to the interests of tne members, if we could ask for lump-sum 
appropriations on account of public buildings, because, as I said a 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 1*0$ 

while ago, we know that when we ask for appropriations on account 
of 100 buildings that there are going to be a number of them for 
which we will not need that amount of money, but we can not tell 
which ones- But if you provided a lump-sum appropriation we 
could discount that ourselves, and you could say, "Is it not your 
experience that you do not finish more than a certain percentage of 
your buildings within the contract time," and by going over our 
books we could tell you what that percentage has been. 

The Chairman. If you ever asked for lump-sum appropriations 
and you were four or five years behind in your work, Congress 
would not only give you all you asked for but probably more. 

Mr. Newton. We "frequently ask for, say, $1,000 for the survey- 
ing and test pits and maybe it will not cost more than $50, and there 
would be another advantage. Of course, that is a very small mat- 
ter, but it all counts up in the end. 

The Chairman. Now, take the instance to which I called atten- 
tion, and there may be some other cases similar to this one where the 
appropriation is for the site, and any balance to be used in putting 
up the building; for the enlargement of . the present site, and any 
unexpended balance of the appropriation may be used for the altera- 
tion or remodeling and repairing of the buildings on the plan re- 
quired for temporary use pending extension of present buildings. 
Xow, unless the site was paid for and the work of remodeling or re- 
pairing commenced before this bill became a law, if there were any 
balance there you could not possibly use it under this language 

Mr. Wetmore (interposing). That is true. 

The Chairman. And that would be a disadvantage as far as that 
particular project is concerned. 

Mr. Wetmore. But in your Brooklyn case, condemnation has been 
had and the award is ready to be confirmed. 

The Chairman. You say you have about $11,000,000 that you 
expect to use within a reasonable time? 

Afr. Wetmore. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And the balance of about $10,000,000 is tied up 
for some reason or other ? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Could you give us a statement of the buildings in 
which those balances are tied up and the reasons ? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes ; I think so. 

STATEMENT OF BALANCES OF APPROPRIATIONS REMAINING VN EX FENDED FOR VARIOUS 

PROJECTS. 

• 

Referring to the balance of approximately $21,000,000 available on the books 
of the Office of the Sui>ervisliig Architect December 1. 1914, the following 
explanation is made: 

At oar present rate of output and expenditure it is anticipated that we will 
expend between December 1, 1914, and June 30, 1915, the sum of $7,000,000. 
This amount deducted from the $21,000,000 leaves a balance to account for of 
H4,000 f 000, which under the lump-sum arrangement would carry us through 
the fiscal year 1916. 

If the lump sum is not appropriated and appropriations are made specifically 
for each item, certain of the appropriations now on the books will not be 
touched, except possibly in part, until after the fiscal year 1916. In addition 
certain of the amounts estimated for in the revised or supplemental estimates 
will not be used during 1916 and will naturally add to such sum. T v 
carrying-over process is what brings about the big balance above refe 



106 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

In specific response to the inquiry of the committee as to what projects have 
been and are held up, so to speak, the folowlng lists and statements are given. 

The list immediately following indicates the name of the project, the .amount 
of the appropriation therefor, and the reasons for the same being held up. 
It shows a total appropriation of $1,373,854.52 : 

Argenta, Ark., balance of appropriation $10,000.00 

This project is held up on request of Senator, etc. 

Cicero, 111., balance of appropriation 7, 000.00 

This project is held up on account of suit incident to securing 
title. 

Couer d'Alene, Idaho, balance of appropriation 16,800.00 

On October 28, 1914, communications were addressed to 
Senator James H. Brady and Hon. Burton L. French advising 
them that the amount available is not adequate to provide a 
building in accordance with the present requirements. The 
amount available for the construction of the building is $86,800. 
The original authorization was for a building for iwst office 
purposes only. Subsequent legislation authorized accommoda- 
tions for the courts. 

To provide reasonable accommodations for all branches of the 
service desiring space, including the Department of Justice, it is 
estimated that $110,000 will be necessary, or $24,000 more than 
is available under the present limit. 

Since the date of the above-mentioned communications a bill 
(H. R. 19908) has been introduced in the House of Representa- 
tives by Mr. French providing for an increase of $25,000. 

Eureka Springs. Ark., balance of appropriation . 24,000.00 

The limit of cost for site and building at this place is $57,500, 
of which amount $7,500 has been exj>ended for a site, leaving 
$50,000 available for a building. 

It has been estimated that a two-story building of 4,000 
square feet ground area will be required to provide accommoda- 
tions for the Government officials. To construct such a building 
fireproof throughout, $70,000 will be required, or $20,000 more 
than is available under the present limit. 

This matter was called to the attention of Representative 
tfloyd on October 21, 1914. As no reply was received to this 
letter, the attention of the Congressman was again called to the 
matter on December 22, 1914. 

Goldfleld, New, balance of appropriation * 15.000.00 

No proposal for the sale of land for a site has been accepted, 
and it seems that it will be necessary to make a further investi- 
gation of available properties before a site is selected. 

In view of the above, It would appear that funds will not 
be required for use on this building. • 

Honolulu, Hawaii, balance of appropriation 475,468.71 

Action hns been deferred in this case pending litigation, etc. 

Juneau, Alaska, balance of appropriation 56.071.70 

The work ou drawings for this building has been suspended 
for the following reasons: 

There is available for the construction of the building 
$177,500. Sketches have been commenced for a two-story-and- 
hasement building of about 10,500 square feet ground area, to 
accommodate the Post Office, Customs Service. General Land 
Office, Bureau of Mines, and Steamboat and Inspection Bureau. 
It is proposed to make the walls of such size as will be suffi- 
cient to carry an additional story. The experience of the de- 
partment In constructing the executive mansion at Juneau Indi- 
cates that the present funds are not sufficient to erect a build- 
ing as described above, and that an increase of $150,000 will 
be necessary for the work, Including a cost of $15,000 in connec- 
tion with the approaches, due to the natural contour of the site. 
Congress was memorialized in May, 1913, by the Territorial 
legislature to increase the amount authorized for the building, 
In order to provide accommodations for the Territorial legis- 
lature and a library and museum. Should this receive favor- 
able consideration, an increase of $300,000 will be necessary. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 107 

The above conditions were called to the attention of Hon. 
James Wickersham on March 17, 1914, and on March 24 he 
introduced a bill (H. R. 14993) proposing to Increase the limit 
of cost for the building by the sum of $450,000. 
Lancaster, Pa. t balance of appropriation $138, 278. 78 

Work on this project was held pending legislation providing 
for additional land and for further legislation making avail- 
able for a new site the unexpended balance from the above, 
liontfriew, Tex., balance of appropriation 23, 500. 00 

Work here was held up at the request of the Senator pending 
efforts to obtain an increased appropriation tpr which a bill was 
introduced in the Senate (S. 6637) on October 13. On October 
fli, however, the Senator requested the department to proceed 
with the work on the basis of the funds available, and this ac- 
tion has been taken. 
MiJlTille, N. J., balance of appropriation 5, 300. 00 

The work at this place is held up pending the result of steps 
which have been taken to secure an increase in the limit of cost. 
A bill (H. R. 15S02) was introduced in Congress April 18, 1914, 
providing for an increase in the limit of cost from $55,000 to 
$105,000. Upon this bill the department submitted a report to 
the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, October 3, 
1914, in which it was estimated that a one-story-and-basement 
building of 6,000 feet ground area is required, and that such a 
building, fireproof throughout and with brick facing, of very 
simple design, would cost $75,000, necessitating an increase in 
the present limit cost of $35,000. , 
Newark, Ohio, balance of appropriation 71, 455. 60 

The question relative to the retention of the present site or 
its sale or exchange is still under considei ation, and it can not 
now be stated when the construction of the building will be 
resumed. 
Putnam, Conn., balance of appropriation 36, 344. Oft 

This project has been held up because of proposed change in 
site. Some opposition to the present site apparently exists, and 
considerable investigation of the matter has been made. One 
inspector sent out by the Post Office Department favored the 
present site, while another inspector thought a change should 
be made, which would, of course, involve legislation authorizing 
th*> sale of the present site and the securing of a new one. 

A bill (fi. R. 15436) providing for this course is now pending 
in Congress. A further investigation of the site matter was 
made by an agent of this department on October 23, 1914, who 
does not consider the present site a desirable location for the 
post-office building, although he suggests an arrangement by 
which it might be possible to utilize it to advantage. He con- 
siders that a better location would be at some points on Elm 
Street between Front and Bridge Streets. The acquired site is 
situated at South Main, Grove, and School Streets. If there 
should be a change in site determined upon by Congress the 
erection of the building will, of course, be greatly delayed, and 
the amount estimated for will not be required. 
Kr. Petersburg, Fla., balance of appropriation 54,975.00 

This work has been held up pending result of proposed legis- 
lation increasing the limit of cost for the building and site. A 
bill (H. R. 18783) was introduced in Congress providing for an 
increase from $80,000 to $115,000, of which amount not exceed- 
ing $15,000 was to be expended for additional land. This bill 
has been reported upon favorably by the Committee on Public 
Koildings and Grounds, with the exception that they recommend 
that not exceeding $12,500 of the increaee be expended for the 
additional land, 
^ymonr, Ind. t balance of appropriation 19,965.00 

The additional legislation referred to in the hearings is pro- 
vided for in H. K. 18172, and. as stated therein, is a proposed 
increaie of $15,000. of so much thereof as may be necessary to 



108 SUtfDKY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

meet the additional cost of substituting stone instead of brick 
with stone trimmings in the construction of the building. 

The deparment has reported on this bill under date of August 
7, 1914, to the effect that the sum named ($15,000) will be re- 
quired to substitute stone for brick facings above the level of 
the first floor and stone for wood cornice. 
8teubenville, Ohio, balance of appropriation $80,000.00 

This project was held up at the request of the Congressman in 
October, 1913, pending efforts looking to the establishment of 
courts in Steubenvllle, Ohio. 

There is a bill (H. R. 8426) pending in Congress providing for 
an increased appropriation of $100,000 to provide for additional 
land and enlargement of building. Unless the suspension is re- 
moved it will not be possible to proceed with the work as con- 
templated, and the amount asked for will not be required, 
fironbury, Pa., balance of appropriation 04,960.00 

This work has been held pending efforts to obtain an increased 
appropriation to provide for the accommodation of courts at this 
place, the holding of which was authorized in bill approved 
June 6, 1914. The pending bill in Congress which provides for 
an increase in the limit of cost of $250,000 is H. R. 15532. This 
bill was reported on by the department in letter to the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings and Grounds of the House of Rep- 
resentatives on August 4, 1914. 

There is also a bill (S. 1706) pending in the Senate upon 
which a similar report was sent to the Committee on Public 
Buildings and Grounds of that body on September 11 last. In 
both these reports the department declined to make a recom- 
mendation relative to the proposed increase, for the reason that 
it is understood that the court will be held in Sunbury but once 
a year. 
Waltham, Mass., balance of appropriation 38,948.30 

The work on this building has been held because of insuffi- 
cient funds and pending result of effort to secure an increase in 
the limit of cost as provided for in H. R. 13489. 

The department reported on this bill under date of July 28, 
1914, in which it is stated that to provide a building necessary 
to accommodate the various branches of the public service will 
require $145000. The present limit of cost for site and build- 
ing is $115,000, of which there remains available for the con- 
struction of the building $68,948.80. 
Wilson, N. C, balance of appropriation 35,000.00 

The work on this project has been held pending efforts look- 
ing to the establishment of courts to be held at Wilson, N. C. 
If this legislation is enacted a larger building than as at pres- 
ent provided for will be required, and to meet this contingency 
a bill (S. 6918) has been introduced which provides for an In- 
crease of cost from $50000 to $125,000. 
Yonkers, N. Y., balance of appropriation.- 249,887.63 

Condemnation proceedings have been instituted for the ac- 
quisition of the site at this place, and while the award has not 
been made, it is considered doubtful whether it will be possible 
to secure the land under condemnation for an amount within 
the amount available, i. e., $250,000. In any event, it Is not 
probable that it will be possible to secure the site prior to the 
beginning of the fiscal year 1916, and it is therefore unlikely 
that the amount estimated for will be required. 



Total 1,873,854.52 

In addition to the foregoing there are certain other classes of projects which 
were incidentally referred to in the hearings. The balances of appropriation 
made in account thereof constitute a part of the proposed lump-sum appropria- 
tion. These projects are shown In the following schedules : 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPBIATION BILL, 1916. 109 

PROJECTS HELD FOB ADDITIONAL FUNDS, AMENDMENT OF LEGISLATION INVOLVING 
CHANGES IN BUILDING, ETC., EITHER BY BEQUEST OF MEMBEBS OF CONGBE88 OB 
BECAUSE OF THE NECESSITY OF CONDITIONS APPABENT TO THE DEPARTMENT. 

Alliance, Ohio $87, 000. 00 

Baltimore, Md., immigration station.* 96,230.00 

Bearer Falls, Pa 5, 000. 00 

Boise, Idaho 43, 382. 00 

Boston, Mass., immigration station 310,178.98 

Boston, Mass., appraisers* stores 451,658.54 

Brattleboro, Vt 64, 978. 92 

Charlotte, N. C ' 224, 709. 60 

Chillicothe. Mo 39, 975. 00 

Concord, N. H 32, 000. 00 

Corpus Chiisti, Tex 66.811.00 

Danville. 111. 6, 866. 46 

Des Moines, Iowa 60,000.00 

Elkins, W. Va 84,700.00 

Everett, Wash 82, 951. 00 

Fairbanks, Alaska 15, 000. 00 

Fayetteville, Tenn 26, 401. 70 

Galveston, Tex., post office and customhouse 15, 000. 00 

Galveston, Tex., courthouse 50,000.00 

Hanover, Pa 7, 000. 00 

Hinton, W. Va 49,877.35 

Key West, Fla., marine hospital 39, 909. 00 

Kinston. N. C 49, 791. 80 

La Junta, Colo 54, 877. 50 

La Salle, 111 50,825.75 

Las Vegas, N. Mex 18,000.00 

Laurel, Miss 29, 976. 50 

Lincoln, Nebr 64,330.00 

Live Oak, Fla , 29, 855. 00 

McCook, Nebr ' 119, 970. 00 

Mandan, N. Dak 42,917.50 

Marlin, Tex 1 44, 873. 40 

Middlesbcro, Ky 13, 950. 00 

Morristown, N. J 44, 900. 00 

New Albany, Ind 1 72, 996. 50 

New Caetle, Ind 1 — 57,800.00 

New York, X. Y., assay office 320, 000. 00 

Oprtlka, Ala 49, 862. 00 

Pendleton, Oreg 48, 877. 50 

Philadelphia, Pa., Mint (coal bunkers) 19,884.58 

?) infield, X. J 39, 793. 00 

Portland, Me., quarantine station 43, 870. 00 

Readin?, Pa 60, 000. 00 

Red Bluff, Cal 12,000.00 

Srtuta re, X. Mex 1,100.00 

Smyrna Del__._' 20, 000. 00 

The Dalles, Oreg 29,912.80 

Tulsn. Okln 134, 970. 00 

Tvalde, Tex 13, 965. 00 

WVshipfcton, D. C, Interior Department offices 37,741.23 

Wrketforo, N. C 20,000.00 

Wilmington, N. C, customhouse 111,561.47 

Total — 8, 518, 231. 08 

PBOJECT8 HELD BECAUSE OF SITE COMPLICATIONS. 

Mhion. Mich $3, 000. 00 

Ardmore, Okla 142, 000. 00 

ni«ckwe!l, Okla 7, 500. 00 

Oanton, Miss _ 14.040.00 



110 SUNDRV CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Chanute, Kans $19, 869. 00 

Chicago, 111., post-offlce site 1,750,000.00 

Elreno, Okla 18, 972. 00 

Fulton, Mo 6,190.00 

Glens Falls, N. Y 36,500.00 

Greenfield, Mass « 8, 28a 00 

Ishpeming, Mich 32, 900.00 

Mount Vernon, N. Y 69,760.00 

Muskegon, Mich 10, 000. 00 

Palatka, Fla 23, 000. 00 

Quitman, Ga 9, 945. 00 

Robinson, 111 4, 890. 00 

Sparta, Wis 27, 000. 00 

Tiffin, Ohio 7, 438. 50 

Total 2, 191, 89a 50 

PROJECT8 ON WHICH UNEXPENDED BALANCES REMAIN BECAUSE OF CHANGES IN 
SCHEDULE OF WORK, AS SET FORTH IN SECRETARY'S LETTER TO SPEAKER OF 
HOUSE OF MAT 6, 1914 (H. DOO. NO. 967). 

Beardstown, 111 $7, 801.00 

Cuero, Tex 34, 854.00 

East Pittsburgh, Pa 842.00 

Fort Atkinson, Wis 3, 375. 00 

Gardiner, Me 3, 000. 00 

Gouverneur, N. Y 10,380.00 

Lawton, Okla 54, 698. 28 

Monongahela, Pa 25, 122. 00 

Park City, Utah 23,000.00 

Webb City, Mo 28, 383. 50 

Wellsburg, W. Va 1, 060. 00 

Ypsilanti, Mich 12, 200.00 

Total A 202, 705. 78 

PROJECTS HELD BECAUSE BIDS EXCEEDED AMOUNT AVAILABLE AND IT WAS NECESSARY 
TO REVISE DRAWINGS AND AGAIN PLACE WORK ON MARKET, RESULTING IN DELAY 
IN USE OF FUNDS ESTIMATED FOR BEYOND THE TIME EXPECTED. 

Bozeman, Mont $37, 410. 00 

Bryant, Tex 40, 100. 00 

Cookevllle, Tenn 52. 015.00 

Covington, Tenn 31,938.00 

Danbury, Conn 24, 850.00 

St. Louis, Mo., customhouse 99,985.00 

Total 287.19S.00 

The following projects were estimated for with the expectation that they 
would be reached at an earlier date than has been the case : 

Canton, 111 1 $42, 935. 00 

Medford, Oreg 98,999.00 

Stamford, tfonn .-- 49, 861.00 

Total__.. - 191,795.00 

MISCELLANEOUS ITEM8. 

Miles City, Mont $12,425.00 

This project was held pending settlement of the question an 
to the main frontage on the building. 

North Attleboro, Mass 5.820.00 

This project was held up because of a desired change in the 
type of building, etc. 

GaryTlnd 74,999.00 

This project held for revision of drawings on account of addi- 
tional accommodations requested. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. Ill 

Bonis, Tax $14,000.00 

This project held on account of local agitation" refative tothe 
position of the structure on the site. 



Total 107, 244. 00 

*ITF8 IX THE UU3 BILK FOR WHICH* MONKY HAS BERN APPROPRIATED BUT NOT 
EXPENDED TO DEC. 1, 1914. 

Albertville, Ala $5, 000. 00 

Albia. Iowa 5, 000. 00 

Attalla. Ala 5,000.00 

RarbourviUe. Ky 4. 300. 00 

Renton Harbor, Mich , 25,000.00 

Brinkley, Ark 4, 000. 00 

Caldwell, Idaho 10, 000. 00 

Calumet. Mich 12,000.00 

canon City. Colo 13.500.00 

Cane Charles. Va 3.700.00 

Carlinville, III 8,000.00 

Carrollton, 111 5, 000. 00 

Caruthersville, Mo * .__ 3, 250. 00 

Chicago. Ill 50,000.00 

Colfax, Wash 7, 000. 00 

Conway. Ark 2, 000. 00 

Crockett, Tex 6, 000. 00 

Decatur. Ind 9, 900. 00 

De Funiak Springs, Fla 5,000.00 

Delphos, Ohio 0.000. 00 

Katonton. Ga 3, 750. 00 

Gdenton, N. C 7,500.00 

Kl Dorado. Ark 5,000.00 

Klizabethton. Tenn 2, 500. 00 

Eliiabethtown, Ky ^ 5, 000. 00 

Eminence. Ky 7. 500. 00 

Forest City, Ark 4,500.00 

Forsvth, Ga 5, 000. 00 

Frederick. Okla 10, 000. 00 

<;reenvilJe. Ala 5. 000. 00 

llarroddsburg, Ky 7, 500. 00 

Havana. Ill 0, 000. 00 

HfMlgernvllle. Ky 1 4, 850. 00 

Key Wert, Fla.. post office 70.000.00 

Mianon. Ind 9. SOO.OO 

Manasm*. Va 3, 750. 00 

Marengo. Iowa 3, 500. 00 

Memphis. Tenn 4, 100. 00 

Mendota. Ill 30, 000. 00 

Milbank. S. I>ak 4,000.00 

Millersbiirg. Ohio 7. 000. 00 

Modesto. Oil 20.000.00 

Monroe, Ga 5, 000. 00 

Monte Vista. Colo 5.000.00 

Morgan City, La 4, 200. 00 

Mountain Grove. Mo 6,500.00 

Mount Olive, N. C 2,000.00 

Nampa. Idaho 9,500.00 

Napoleon. Ohio . 7,500.00 

Xephi. Ttah 5, 000. 00 

Vewrartle, Wyo 3, 000. 00 

Xew Martinsville. W. Va 12.500.00 

New Philadelphia, Ohio 12,500.00 

Newton, Iowa 10,000.00 

VoblesvJHe, Ind 10,000.00 

«>elweln. Iowa 8.000. 00 

Plymouth, Ind 10, 000. 00 

!>r«tti»nsbiirg. Ky 5.000.00 



112 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Provincetown, Mass _» $8, 000. 00 

Rogersville, Tenn 2, 000. 00 

Salem, Ind 5,000.00 

Salem, N. J 9, 500.00 

Sherman, Tex 5,000.00 

Sikeston, Mo 7,500.00 

South Frainingham, Mass 20,000.00 

Sterling, Colo T 15, 000. 00 

Stuttgart, Ark 4, 000. 00 

Thomas, Ga 5, 000. 00 

Tyrone, Pa < 24, 000. 00 

Unionville, Mo 5, 000.00 

Vermilion,. S. Dak 4, 500. 00 

Warsaw, Ind 10, 000. 00 

Woodstock, Va 4, 250. 00 

Total 643,350.00 

SITE AND BUILDING OB BUILDINGS, 1913 BILL, FOR WHICH MONEY HAS BEEN APPBO- 
PRIATED BUT NOT EXPENDED TO DEC. 1, 1914. 

Altus, Okla 1 $15, 000. 00 

Amherst, Mass 15, 000. 00 

Andalusia, Ala 25. UO 

Apalachicola. Fla 7, 500.00 

Bad Axe, Mich 4,800.00 

Batavia, 111 23, 950. 00 

Batavia, N. Y 5,000.00 

Beaver Dam, Wis 15,000.00 

Bellefourche. S. Dak 4,500.00 

Bemidji, Minn 9. 000. 00 

Berwick, Pa 11, 000. 00 

Branford. Conn 11, 000. 00 

Brenham, Tex 5, 000. 00 

Brooklyn, N. Y 350.000.00 

Buffalo. X. Y 8,000.00 

Cape Fear. N. C, quarantine station ^— 25,000.00 

Carroll, Iowa 8, 000. 00 

Cedar Falls, Iowa 10,000.00 

Central City, Nebr ^ 6,000.00 

Chamberlain. S. Dak 3.5OO.00 

Chandler, Okla_ ... ._L 4, 700. 00 

Charlestown, W. Va 7,500.00 

Cheboygan, Mich 8, 500.00 

Cherokee, Iowa 10, COO. 00 

Cherrwale, Kans__ 1, 500. 00 

Clinton, Ind 14, 000. 00 

Clinton, S. C 5,500.00 

Cohoes, N. Y 1 40,000.00 

Comanche, Tex 5, 000. 00 

Coshocton, Ohio 1, 000. 00 

Dawson, Ga 5. 000. 00 

Denton, Tex . 1, 500. 00 

Des Moines. Iowa, courthouse 75,000.00 

Donora. Pa 13, 300. 00 

Douglas, Ga 5,000.00 

Eldorado. Kans .. . 5,250.00 

Eureka, Utah 5, 000. 00 

Fairmont, Minn 5, 000. 00 

Fallon, Nev 5. 000. 00 

Fort Plain, N. Y 8.000.00 

Franklin, N. H 24.500.00 

Franklin, Tenn 7, 450. 00 

Gallipolis, Ohio , 12, 500. 00 

Gallatin. Tenn 0. OOO. 00 

Geneseo. Ill 10,000.00 

Gilmer, Tex r», 000. 00 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 118 

Giranl, KanB $6, 000. 00 

Glasgow, Ky 7, 500. 00 

Gtenwood Springs, Colo 9,500.00 

Harrison ville, Mo 3, 000. 00 

Hastings, Mich 6, 750. 00 

Hollidaysburg, Pa 12, 000. 00 

Hoopeston, 111 10, 000. 00 

Hooghton, Mich 25, 000. 00 

Indiana, Pa 25,000.00 

Jerseyville. Ill 8,900. 00 

Kendlevllle, Ind 18, 000. 00 

Kenton, Ohio 14,000.00 

Lakeland, Fla _ 10, 000. 00 

Lanett, Ala 4, 000. 00 

Leesbc**, Va 8,750.00 

Lewistown, Pa 16, 000. 00 

Liberty, Mo 7, 500. 00 

Lockhaven. Pa 22, 500. 00 

Long Island City, N. Y 100,000.00 

Marinnna, Ark 6, 500. 00 

Marianna, Fla 4,000. 00 

Marion, 111 15, 000. 00 

Martins Ferry, Ohio 15,000.00 

McKees Rocks, Pa 15,000.00 

Memphis. Tenn., subpost office, site and building 90,000.00 

Metropolis, 111 „ 10, 000. 00 

Midland, Mich 4, 300. 00 

Mineral Point, Wis 4, 500. 00 

Mount Pleasant, Mich 7,500.00 

Mont Pleasant, Tex 5,000.00 

Mystic, Conn 4, 000. 00 

New Orleans, L*., customhouse 100,000.00 

New Orleans. La , quarantine station wharf 12,000.00 

Newport, U. I., post office and customhouse '. 16,000.00 

Nogales. Ariz., customhouse 16,000.00 

North Topeka, Kans 11,000.00 

North Vernon, Ind 1 13, 500. 00 

Norton, Va 45, 250. 00 

Oakland, Cal 115, 000. 00 

«>©nto. Wis 3,000. 00 

Olney, III 6, 500. 00 

Olynhant, Pa 13, 500. 00 

Paxton, III 12, 000. 00 

Phoenixvllle, Pa 15, 999. 50 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Bureau of Mines 148,967.50 

Pittston, Pa., post office 20, 000. 00 

Portland. Oreg 159, 700. 65 

Ponghkeepsle, N. Y 28,000.00 

Pratt Kans 7, 400. 00 

Reedy Island. Del 33, 500. 00 

Rbinelander, Wis 5, 500. 00 

Rlpon, Wis 10, 400. 00 

Rochester, Ind '8, 200, 00 

Rogers, Ark 4, 000. 00 

Rosselrflle, Ark 6, 000. 00 

st Peter, Minn 2, 000. 00 

*an Francisco, Cal., quarantine station 55,000.00 

San Lois Obispo, Cal 9,000.00 

San Pedro, Cal 6,000.00 

Sajrre, Pa 8, 000. 00 

Seattle, Wash., post office 30,500.00 

Shawnee. Okla 21, 000. 00 

Sloax City, Iowa, lookouts ,___ 1,500.00 

»>•>!'. roue**. p,i 1,2S5.00 

Syracuse, N. Y„ building 10,000.00 

Tjinipa Bay, Fla., quarantine station _._ 65,000.00 

f2785— 15 8 



£14 SUNDRY Qim. APPROPRIATION BILL, lfll*. 

Tlilbodaux, Fla $5,000.01 

Thomasville, N. C 8,000.00 

Toledo, Ohio, customhouse and courthouse 25,000.00 

Tomah, Wis 5,000.01 

Tullahoma, Tenn 7.O00. 00 

Valpariso, Ind 8, 200. 00 

Vernal, Utah 4, 750. 00 

Vineland, N. J IS, 000. 00 

Vinton, Iowa 9, 000. 00 

Washington, D. C, Butler Building 7,000.00 

.Washington, D. C, National Archives Building 5,000.00 

Washington, Mo . 6, 500. 00 

Washington Court House, Ohio 3,000.00 

Water Valley, Miss 7,000.00 

Waynesburg, Pa », 900.00 

tSFllmington, N. C, marine hospital 6, 000. 00 

Wilmington, Ohio 12, 500. 00 

Winchester, Mass 20, 000. 00 

Woodward, Okla 8, 000. 00 

Wyandotte, Mich 15,050.00 

Total . 2, 534, 877. 05 

' SITE BALANCES. 

The following amounts were left on hand after the purchase of sites, and will 
be turned back into the surplus fund if no additional -land is purchased: 

The Bronx, New York City $9,010.75 

Cicero, 111 - 1, 000. 00 

Fairfield, Iowa 200. 00 

Hallowell, Me • 13,500.00 

Kisslmmee. Fla 1, 000. 00 

San Bernardino, Cal 3,500.00 

Waynesboro, Ga 006. 75 

2»,117.50 

Grand total of the 10 foregoing statements, $11,079,704.03. 

The Chairman. Mr. Secretary, did we appropriate for all the sites 
authorized up to date? 

Mr. Newton. Appropriations were made in the last sundry civil 
bill and the deficiency bill for nearly all of them. I think there were 
possibly a few that were omitted. 

The Chairman. In addition to the buildings you have some items 
here which we can probably* go through now : . The Supervising 
Architect's Office, by the direction of the Secretary and at our request, 
furnished the committee the usual information relative to the build- 
ings in course of construction, condition of the appropriation — with 
la statement showing the sums required for the particular buildings 
iset forth in the bill. This is up to what date ? 
. Mr. Newton. Up to December 1. 

The Chairman. That information commences on page 38 of the 
hearings, and in addition there are certain items like the following: 

ALEXANDRIA, LA., RENT OF QUARTERS. 

[See p. 39.1 

Alexandria, La., reut of buildings: For rent of temporary quarters for accom- 
modation of Government officials and moving expenses incident thereto, $4,000. 

Why is this? 

Mr. Wetmore. That is an extension of the building, and we have 
to take the officials out of the building while the work is being done. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. lU> 

The Chairman. How do you figure on the amount of rent $x>u 
will require? Do you ask for the amount necessary for on* yGatx 
or just a lump sum. to cover rent and moving? Just how is that 
done? 

Mr. Wetmore. In some cases we have asked it in one way and in 
other cases in the other way. This covers a period of one year. 

The Chairman. And includes in addition the moving expenses? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How is that sum arrived at? 

Mr. Wetmore. Usually we have some difficulty in finding tem- 
porary quarters. We take bids locally for suitable buildings. We 
state the amount of space we require and have our custodian oh thft 
ground look about and see where he can find sufficient space, if 
possible, in one building, to accommodate all the activities of thfe 
services. If not, he has to split them up according to the branches *6i 
the service to be accommodated, and get the best bids he possibly can. 
It costs us really a little more to rent than it does a private indi- 
vidual who is renting, for this reason, that quarters which would be 
suitable for a store or business purposes are not suitable for a pdsi 
office. There have to be some rearrangements made and certain 
spaces fitted up to suit the postal authorities. We can not take a rent 
appropriation and use it to make repairs and alterations. We ttill 
the owner what we want in the way of layout of the office rooms and 
then ask for his rental. His rental is usually large enough to include 
the outlay he has to make in arranging his "building for the Govern- 
ment's use, because when we vafcate he has to tear out practically all 
that he has put in. 

The Chairman. Does he make the alterations and arrangements? 

Mr. Wetmore. His price is for the rental of a building suitably 
arranged for the prosecution of the public business. We cut dotra 
the cost as much as we can by allowing the owner, in fitting up the 
building, to take from the Federal building the counters anascrefcns, 
vault doors, and things of that sort and use them with the under- 
standing that they are to be returned. In other words, we get ou£ 
rent in that way cut down as much as we can so that the owner will 
not have to be put to the expense of duplicating something that wfi 
have which he can use. Usually the second year's rental is very much 
less because owners have made their expenditures for alterations, etc., 
and then they will reduce the rent. 

Mr. Mokdell. What public officials are to be accommodated at 
Alexandria ? 

Mr. Wetmore. This print reads '" post office and customhouse." As 
a matter of fact, it is a post office and courthouse. I do not know 
*hat other officials are to be accommodated, but there is a post office 
in the building and the usual court officials, and there may be in* 
ternal-revenue officers or others. I could supply that information, 
hut I can not say now what other officials are accommodated. 

Mr.MoxDELL. Has the post office heretofore been in a rented 
building! 

Mr. Wetmore. Oh, no. This building is a post office and court- 
house which is to be remodeled. The appropriation for refnodelirig 
that bniMmg is $65,000. 



lltt SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Mondell. The appropriation is for remodeling the present 
building and it is necessary to move the Goverment officials from the 
Government building? 

Mr. Wbtmore. Yes, sir. 

AMOUNT TO BE APPROPRIATED FOR 1916 FOR BUILDINGS PREVIOUSLY AU- 
THORIZED BUT NOT IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION. 

(See p. 124.] 

... Mr. Gillett. Before we take up the details, I would like to ask 
one general question. Can you tell me about how much this class C 
work will cost? 1 understand that is new extensions and new build- 
ings; in other words, class C is for new improvements or new con- 
struction? 

Mr. Wetmore. Our estimate of appropriation has that in detaiL 

Mr. Gillett. I thought you could tell me offhand. 

Mr. Wetmore. Two nundred and some thousand dollars is stated 
there. 

Mr. Gillett. It must be more than that. 

Mr. Wetmore. You are asking for class C under this lump-sum 
appropriation ? 

Mr. Gillett. It must be more than that. 

The Chairman. Yes; it is $12,000,000. 

Mr. Mondell. What Mr. Gillett wants to know, as I understand it, 
is what would be your estimates on all these enumerated projects if 
you were to submit new estimates for them? 

Mr. Wetmore. About $12,000,000. 

Mr. Gillett. In other words, if we did not begpn any new work 
this year you could cut out $12,000,000 of appropriations? 

The Chairman. Or they could utilize all their balances. 

Mr. Gillett. That would take just as much money ? 

Mr. Wetmore. That would take just as much money but not a new 
appropriation. 

Mr. Gillett. I mean to save the money and not the appropriation. 
I suppose the only damage that would be done would be in causing 
delay, because this is all new work ? 

Mr. Wetmore. It is work that has not been commenced at all. 

Mr. Gillett. I understand you either did not understand me or 
your answer was not exactly to the point, and that it would not cost 
$12,000,000 to do the new work? 

Mr. Wetmore. Not for the new buildings alone. 

Mr. Gillett. I thought we misunderstood each other. 
„ The Chairman. They are the new ones upon which work has not 
been commenced, but which it is proposed to put under construction. 

Mr. Newton. The new construction program for 1916. 

Mr. Gillett. I have this in mind, that in this time of economy we 
ought to put off everything we can, and I understand this is new 
work which could be postponed, and I wanted to know, if we did 
that, how much saving there would be, and as I understand it, it 
would not be $12,000,000. 

Mr. Newton. It would be less than that, because the $12,000,000 in- 
cludes the whole program of extensions and everything. 

Mr. Gillett. "i ou can put that information in the record later. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 117 

Mr. Mondkll. In other words, what we want, as I understand it, 
is the amount which these enumerated buildings would total after 
you estimated for each one of them the amount you desired to expend 
the coming fiscal year. 

Mr. GhXett. Yes ; that is it, provided this list contains all the new 
work. 

Mr. Newton. As I said a few moments ago, this list is the list of 
new buildings on sites already acquired, in 1908 and 1910, chiefly, 
and we will probably reach this list, I should say, some time next 
August; that is, the deferred projects and work now in hand will 
occupy the architect's office up until the 1st of July, 1915, before the 
new construction in this list can begin. 

Mr. Gillett. Do you mean that in 1916 your work will be all on 
new projects? 

Mr. Newton. Not all. There are always some uncompleted 
projects lapping over, but largely the work will be upon these items. 

Mr. Gillett. Then, in general terms, the amount would be 
$12,000,000, 1 suppose ; pretty much all the year's work would be new 
work? 

The Chairman. This list is of buildings upon which no work has 
been commenced and for which appropriations are now asked so that 
work may be commenced on them in the next fiscal year. What you 
wish to know, Mr. Gillett, is how much is asked for work which has 
not yet been commenced, but which it is proposed to commence in the 
next year? 

Mr. Gillett. Exactly ; either new buildings or new additions. 

The Chairman. You have furnished that information, but it is 
not totaled. 

Mr. Gillett. Mr. Wetmore, I understand that you have added up 
these figures and that you find the new buildings and improvements 
will cost about $4,000,000? 

Mr. Wetmore. $4,055,000. 

Mr. Gillett. In addition to that, will there not be some other 
buildings which you would take up under the lump-sum appropria- 
tion, but which are not already commenced? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; there are probably other buildings which we 
have authority to commence and for which we have appropriations, 
but upon which we have not yet started work. 

Mr. Gillett. Will you also give me a statement of those build- 
ings! I do not mean now, but at your leisure. 

Mr. Wetmore. I can furnish it to you. 

Mr. Gillett. In other words, I would like to have a statement 
of what you expect to spend for either new buildings or new exten- 
sions in 1916. 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. 

Analysis of amount estimated to be expended for 1916. 

For sites contracted for ,. $1,000 

For sites not contracted for 5,000 

For sites and commencement of buildings : 

8ites contracted for 84, 700 

Sites not contracted for 80, 800 

Continuing buildings, extensions, and special repairs, actually under 
eontmct Dec. 1. 1014— 2,800,600 



}18 SUNDRY GIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Cppuneaceuient of above i*ot under contract Dec. 1, lj&14, but for 

* ^fbich money was appropriated ta part in prior acta $0,987,300 

Buildings only, where nothing has been previously ap- 
propriated $1,329,6QG~ 

Extensions only, where nothing has been previously ap- ** 

Mopriated 1, 281,006 

% 2,610^000 

Submitted items not previously authorized (Including $96,500 for 
" Bents of temporary quarters ")— 23,6.000 

Total . 12, 184. 809 

DETROIT, MICH., POST OFFICE MAIL-HANDLING DEVICES. 

[See p. 60.] 

The Chairman. The next item is u Detroit, Mich., post office and 
courthouse : For mail-handling devices, $25,000." This is requested 
by the. Post Office Department? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; we have their request for that. 

The Chairman. Did we not make some provision for the enlarge- 
ment of this building? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; $70,000 was the appropriation for the exten- 
sion of the building. 

* The Chairman. Is that work under way ? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes ; we have taken bids for that work. 

The Chairman. We have appropriated the money ? 

Mr. Wetmore. The appropriation has been made and we are ready 
to let the contract. 

The Chairman. And now we are asked to appropriate $25,000 to 
install maii-han<Uing devices? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; which the Post Office Department has re- 
quested us to ask for. 

The Chairman. Why are they asking for these mail-handling de- 
vices ? 

Mr. Wetmore. The extension of the building will make it a very 
long building and it would be a very desirable thing to have these 
devices. 

The Chairman. These are automatic carriers? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes; and would be in the interest of expediting the 
Ipiidling of the mail. 

The Chairman. Does the installation of these devices result in 
any economy either of time or labor in the handling of the mails at 
these buildings? 

Mr. Wetmore. They undoubtedly do, but our office has not had 
pauch experience in these matters, because we have not had author- 
ity to put them in except in a few buildings, not more than four or 
five. 

The Chairman. In the past we have always installed these mail- 
handling devices upon the request of the department? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. 

The Chairman. And it is usual to install them only in a very large 
IfliUding? 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes. We have had not to exceed five buildings in 
which, these devices have been, installed. 

The Chairman. Is Detroit a large office? 
, Mi;. Wetmore. That is a large office and it is a quite good-sized 
building, and the building is arranged so that the mail can only be 
taken in at one end. 



SUFDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, »16. lt£ 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL., RENT OF QtUBTfcRS. 

[See p. 59.] 

The Chairman. The next item is "East St. Louis, 111., rent of 
buildings: For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation 
of Government officials and moving expenses incident thereto, 
$12,000." 

Mr. Wetmore. That is the same sort of situation as Alexandria, 
and this is to take care of the employees while the building is being 
remodeled. 

The Chairman. The limit of cost of the extension is $240,0001 

Mr. Wetmore. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And it is expected that that work will be com- 
menced in the third quarter of the fiscal year 1916, yet you do not 
ask any money on that account? 

Mr. Wetmore. Not on this sheet, because that is one of the build- 
ings included in this lump sum. Ninety-five thousand dollars would 
be used out of this lump-sum appropriation. 

The Chairman. We will have to have a statement showing each 
building, with the limit of cost, the amount appropriated, the bal- 
ance unappropriated, and what it is estimated will be required dur- 
ing the next fiscal year. We can not make any headway without that 
information. 



Monday, December 28, 19H. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS— CONTINUED. 

STATEMENT OF ME. BYRON R. NEWTON, ASSISTANT SECRETARY 
OF THE TREA SURY, AND MR. OSCAR WENDEROTH, SUPERVIS- 
ING ARCHITECT. 

SUPPLEMENTAL AN1> REVISED ESTIMATES. 

[See p. 130.] 

The Chairman. We have a supplemental estimate which contains 
a statement of the amounts required for the acquisition of sites, com- 
mencement, continuation, and completion of each of the several pub- 
lic buildings upon* which work is contemplated to be done up to 
June 30, 1916? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, Mr. Chairman ; in other words, from March 
4, 1915, to June 30, 1916. This is a 16-month estimate. 

The Chairman. It aggregates $12,184,800? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 

ormr or construction — arxadblphia, ark.; fordycb, ark.; ah© 

WILLOW, CAL. — DONATION 1 OF PLAlNB: 

The Chairman. Has there been any change in the policy of the 
department of taking these buildings up according to the method' 
heretofore pursued ? 

Mr. a Wenderoth. There has not only been no change, but we are 
adhering to the former method more strictly than in the past 



180 SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATIOtf BILL, 1916. 

STATUS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS CONSTRUCTION. 

(Circular letter No. lti.] 

Tbeasuby Department, 
Office of the Supervising Architect, 

Washington, D. C, July 1, 1914. 

Many requests are received for the immediate preparation of plans, etc., for 
particular Federal buildings which have been authorized by existing legislation, 
irrespective of the date of such authorization. The following statement of 
the present status of public-building work is issued for the information of all 
concerned : 

Beginning with 1902, it has been the policy of Congress to authorize public 
buildings by what are known as omnibus acts, each act including a great 
many separate projects. In addition, special acts are passed from time to time 
providing for individual projects, increases in the limits of cost of projects 
previously authorized, etc. The omnibus act of 1902 was followed by similar 
acts in 1903, 1906, 1908, 1910, and 1913. 

It is the present policy to place under contract for construction all buildings, 
or extensions to buildings, authorized in any one omnibus act before begin- 
ning plans for projects authorized by a subsequent act. It is also the present 
practice to prepare the plans for all buildings, or projects, authorized in any 
given act in the order of the dates upon which the titles to the sites therefor 
were vested in the United States. 

To determine the precise order in which the plans for the various buildings 
shall receive attention the following procedure is followed: The buildings 
authorized in any one act are first divided into groups according to the priority 
of the acts in which their sites were authorized. All buildings in each such act- 
group are further arranged in the order of the dates of the acquisition of their 
sites, the earliest date first. For Instance, the 1913 act authorizes buildings 
upon sites which had been authorized in the act of 1908, in the act of 1910, and 
in the act of 1913. It is intended that the buildings so authorized in 1913 to 
be erected ufcon sites authorized in 1908 shall first be placed under contract 
These will be followed by buildings authorized in 1913 to be constructed upon 
sites authorized in 1910. Then the buildings authorized in 1913 to be built 
upon sites also authorized in 1913 will take their respective turns for atten- 
tion. 

Extensions are usually authorized to be erected upon land already owned by 
the United States. While extension projects are included with the buildings 
authorized in a particular act, discretion is exercised in determinng the order 
in which extensions shall be placed under contract for construction, dei>endinj: 
upon the urgency of the need for the improvement. 

The output of plans by the Supervising Architect's Office is governed by the 
extent of the technical force (designers, draftsmen, computers, superintendents, 
etc.) which the appropriations given by Congress permit the department to 
employ. 

At this date the Office of the Supervising Architect has on its books, waiting 
to be placed under contract, approximately $38.500000 worth of authorization** 
for new buildings and extensions, exclusive of the value of the land. This 
includes the new buildings and extensions in the act of 1913. This office is 
placing buildings and extensions under contract at the rate of about $7,000,000 
annually, so that at the present rate of progress the last of the buildings 
authorized in the act of 1913 will not have been placed under contract until 
about the beginning of the calendar year 1920. It will not be until after the 
latter date that it will be possible for the Supervising Architect to place under 
contract any buildings contained in any act or acts which may be passed in the 
meantime. 

The current program, made up of the remaining projects which were author- 
ized prior to the 1913 act, includes about one year's work from this date. Work 
upon the plans for buildings authorized in the act of 1013 will therefore not com- 
mence until about July 1, 1915. The 1913 act contains the following authorisa- 
tions: 

New buildings 304 

Extensions to existing buildings 28 

Total projects 82T 



8X7NDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 121 

The program of work contained in the act of 1913 has not been laid out as 
jet Therefore it is impossible to state even approximately the time when any 
bonding authorized in that act will be either advertised for bids or placed 
under contract 

If a subsequent act increases the limit of cost or otherwise modifies prior 
legislation for a building or extension before that project is reached in turn, 
the position of the project in the program of work is not affected thereby. If 
a project is set aside when its turn is reached in order to await action upon 
a proposed increase in the limit of cost or for any other reason, it is taken up 
whenever "released" In as near its original position as the condition of the 
work generally may render possible. 

No consideration can be given to suggestions that any one project is entitled 
to any more consideration than another, and requests that buildings be advanced 
out of their order must be uniformly declined. 

For the information of those not familiar with legislative terminology, it 
may be stated that an "authorization" is, as it implies, merely authority to 
acquire a site, erect a building, etc., within the limit of cost stated, and is not 
an actual " appropriation " of money out of the Treasury. Appropriations are 
made by Congress on the basis of estimates submitted by the Secretary of the 
Treasury. These appropriations are carried in one or the other of the annual 
supply acts and are intended to be only sufficient to carry forward the build- 
ing program for the fiscal year to which the acts apply. "Appropriations " are 
made on account of the limits of cost fixed by the " authorization " and are 
not extensions of these limits. All appropriations for sites, buildings, exten- 
sions, etc, are available until expended, unless repealed by act of Congress, 
;;nd are not automatically returned to the Treasury if not extended before the 
expiration of the fiscal year. 

The public buildings act of 1913 authorized the Treasury Department to 
acquire sites, erect buildings, construct extensions, etc., aggregating a total 
cost of nearly $42,000,000, but did not actually appropriate one cent toward 
rbe consummation of any of these projects. 

O. Wendekoth, 
Supervising Architect. 

Approved. 

Byron R. Newton, 
Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. 

The Chairman. Are there in these estimates any buildings for 
which appropriations have not yet been made which are taken out of 
their order! 

Mr. Wenderoth. There are, I think, three, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Please tell us about those three. I mean build- 
ings proposed to be advanced at this time — not previously advanced. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Three, Mr. Chairman. Arkadelphia, Ark. ; For- 
dyce, Ark. ; and Willow, Cal. 

The Chairman. Take the first one; the limit of cost is $55,000 
and nothing has been appropriated. 

Mr. Wenderoth. In these three cases suggestions have been made 
to the department that the citizens or others will employ architects 
at their own expense, have the plans prepared, and donate them to 
the Treasury Department so there will be no cost to the Treasury 
Department or the Office of the Supervising Architect in their 
preparation. 

Mr. Newton. And in the case of Willow, Cal., the site also was 
donated? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; the site also was donated. 

The Chairman. Can you accept those plans without specific 
authority? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; it has been done in two cases. 

The Chairman. When? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I can say three cases. The first was Canan- 
daigua, N. Y. 



122 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. When was that? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That was before I was appointed supervising 
architect — in 1911 or early in 1912. 

The Chairman. That was under the Tarsney Act? 

Mr. Wbndbroth. No, sir; it was a donation of plans. The second 
was Bristol, ^Pa., and the third case is the Bureau of Mines, in 
Pittsburgh. 

The Chairman. That was by authority. 

Mr. Wenderoth. You are doubtless correct That was probably 
in accordance with the supplemental act which gave the Secretary 
of the Treasury authority to accept donations. 

The Chairman. There is a statute which prohibits that — prohibits 
the acceptance of voluntary services? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How do you avoid that? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We do not recognize the ^ architect ; we have 
nothing to do with him. He furnishes the services to whoever pays 
him, and we accept the result of the services. The matter was sub- 
mitted to the Solicitor of the Treasury. I have not his opinion here, 
but I can obtain it. He went into it very thoroughly and cited pre- 
cedents. He said, for instance, that the Secretary of the Treasury 
oould accept a donation of a painting. I believe 1 recall his making 
<4iat point. In the same manner, the Secretary of the Treasury 
could accept a gift of drawings if the Supervising Architect certified 
that those drawings were competent and satisfactory drawings and 
could be used for the erection of the building. However, we do not 
recognize the architect, his name does not appear, we have no rela- 
tions whatever with him, and merely accept the donation of the plans. 

Mr. Newton. In other words, the citizens of the locality employ 
the architect and they submit plans for the approval of the Super- 
vising Architect. 

The Chairman. "Nor shall any department or any officer of the 
Government accept voluntary service for the Government or employ 
personal service m excess of that authorized by law, except in case 
of sudden emergency," etc. 

It has been held that acceptance of plans under these circumstances 
would not come within that inhibition? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. We were very careful to obtain the 
opinion of the Solicitor of the Treasury. 

A copy of an opinion of the solicitor relating to donations follows and bears 
date of October 17, 1013. It refers to the plans for the laboratories of the 
Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, as well as to certain plans for furniture which 
the architects of the New York post office desired to donate. The inquiry re- 
garding the Bureau of Mines was made before the supplemental legislation 
regarding that project, which gave the Secretory of the Treasury authority to 
accept certain donations, was approved. 

Dkpartmknt of Justice, 
Office of the Solicitor of the Treasury, 

Washington. D. C, October H< 7.9/.?. 
The Secretary of the Treasury. 

Sir : It appears from a letter to this office from Assistant Secretary Newton, 
dated the 15th instant, that the State of Pennsylvania contemplates donating to 
the United Slates the plans and specifications for the erection of the Bureau 
of Mines building in the city of Pittsburgh, Pa., appropriated for in the omnibus 
public buildings act of March 4, 1913, and that the architects who furnished 
the plans for the new post-office building in the city of New York desire to 
donate to the Government drawings and specifications for the furniture of 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 1J3 

certain portions of that building, such drawings and specifications not being 
luelnded In their contract as architects for the building. My opinion Is desired 
upon the question whether or not the proposed donations are to be regarded as, 
"voluntary services" which Government officers are prohibited from accepting 
^y section 3679 of the Revised Statutes as amended by the act of February 27. 
19<W (34 Stats., 48), which reads as follows: 

*• Sec. 3679. No executive department or other Government establishment shall 
expend In any one fiscal year any sum In excess of appropriations made by 
Congress for that fiscal year, or involve the Government in any contract or 
other obligation for the future payment of money in excess of such appropria- 
tions, unless such contract or obligation is authorized by law. Nor shall any 
department or any officer of the Government accept voluntary service for the 
Government or employ personal service in excess of that authorized by law, 
except in cases of sudden emergency involving the loss of human life or destruc* 
Uon of property." 

It is settled law that the United States may take property by devise or gift, 
139 Cyclopedia of Law, 729; Dickson v. United States, 125 Mass.. 311; United 
States t>. Fox, 94 U. S., 315; United States v. Perkins, 163 U. S.. 625.) 

I do not think that the statute above cited was intended to interfere with 
this rule, or was founded upon any idea that it is incompatible with the dignity 
of the Government or with public policy that the United States should accept 
srifts of property. The object of the act was to break up any tendency on the 
l«art of executive officers to have work done in excess of appropriations by 
holding out to employees or contractors the prospect of their being compensated 
therefor in the future by the Government, or to discourage any tendency on 
the part of persons to render services in the absence of any or an in sufficient 
appropriation therefor, in the hope or expectation of obtaining an allowance for 
such services, or of making such services the basis of a claim against the 
Government in the future. No one, I think, would contend that the above 
statute would make it unlawful for the department to accept from the State 
<rf Pennsylvania or the city of Pittsburgh a gift of the site of the proposed 
building were any such gift contemplated by them. I can see no difference, so 
far as the application of the statute is concerned, between such a gift and a 
?ift of the plans and specifications for the erection of the building. 

And If the architects for the New York post office should desire to present to 
the Government a painting to be hung in some one of the rooms or halls of that 
building. I do not think that the right of the department to accept the painting 
oould be questioned on the ground that such act would be within the meaning 
of the prohibition of the statute as the acceptance of a " voluntary service.** 
If their donation of a painting could be lawfully accepted by the department, 
I see no reason why It would be unlawful for the department to accept their 
donation of plans and drawings for the furniture. All the beneficial purposes 
of the statute will, in my opinion, be accomplished without applying It to 
• iises of the kind now under consideration. 

For the foregoing reasons I have to advise you that the acceptance of the 
plans, specifications, and drawings in the two instances mentioned would not 
io my opinion, be within the prohibition of the statute mentioned, provided 
that the delivery of the plans, etc., to the Government be accompanied by a 
letter or other writing, signed by the donors, in which the fact of the donation 
i« clearly and unequivocally expressed. 

The views herein expressed are in consonance with opinions furnished you 
fay this offlce under date of January 14, 1911, and May 26, 1913. 
Respectfully, 

W. T. Thompson, Solicitor. 

The Chairman. Because of the fact that the plans will be do- 
nated and the Supervising Architect's Office for that reason will not 
be engaged on those plans it is proposed to advance these buildings? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; for that reason. I might add that if 
the plans are not forthcoming, or, when they are submitted, if the 
Supervising Architect is not able to certify to the Secretary, that 
they are satisfactory plans, these buildings must then drop back 
to whatever their place is on the program, any appropriation being 
made to be held until they are reached, in their regular order. 

The Chairman. These are the only three buildings, and they ara 
ill in the same category ? 



124 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In every other case they are taken in the order 
of the number assigned when the site is actually acquired? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; we have the program very carefully 
laid out. 

' AMOUNT TO BE APPROPRIATED FOR 1916 FOR BUILDINGS PREVIOUSLY AU- 
THORIZED BUT NOT IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION. 

[See p. 116.] 

The Chairman. There are a number of buildings authorized for 
which no estimate is submitted? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. If appropriations were made for those buildings, 
would it be possible to utilize them during that period ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Not without disrupting our program and making 
a good deal of trouble for us. 

The Chairman. You have asked for all the money you could pos- 
sibly use on the buildings during that period? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. The estimates include projects on 
which we intend to actually commence work and other small amounts 
for the projects in the second year from now, for which we require 
money to provide for surveys and test pits. 

The Chairman. How many buildings are there in this list upon 
which no work has been commenced and no contract let? 

Mr. Wenderoth. It would be necessary for me to count the num- 
ber. I have a statement of the amount involved. 

The Chairman. In what? 

Mr. Wenderoth. In this estimate. For buildings only where 
nothing has been previously appropriated and on which we intend 
to commence work there is included $1,329,000 out of the total of 
$12,184,800. 

The Chairman. Has there been any suggestion of work being sus- 
pended on those buildings because of the condition of the Treasury? 

Mr. Newton. No; nothing beyond what was said here at the hear- 
ing the other day. There has been no definite move in that direction 
that I am aware of. There has not been any suggestion of that sort 
at the department. 

The Chairman. That was mere bookkeeping? 

Mr. Newton. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And the same amount of money would be ex- 
pended under either program? 

Mr. Wenderoth. In addition to the $1,329,000 there is an item of 
$1,281,000 for extensions, so that of the total of a little over $12,- 
000,000, $2,610,000 is for commencing work on extensions and new 
buildings on account of which nothing has been previously appro- 
priated, while the balance of $9,500,000 is for continuing on other 
projects, for the acquisition of sites, for rents, etc. 

The Chairman. Continuing work which is now under construc- 
tion? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; or additional appropriations for proj- 
ects to be placed under contract for which we nave already had only 
a small amount. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



125 



The Chairman. Please prepare a list of the items involved in these 
two sums and send it to us. 
Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The following lists show the projects on account of which the first estimates 
for appropriations are submitted for consideration in connection with the 
sundry civil bill for the fiscal year 1916. Item No. 7 refers to new buildings 
and lists 79 projects. Item No. 8 refers to extensions and lists 16 projects. 

Whenever the first estimate of an appropriation on account of a special au* 
thonation is submitted it is contemplated that a portion of the expenditure 
will be made for the survey of the site, any test borings which might be found 
necessary, and similar preliminary expenses that are incidental to the execution 
of the project and are properly chargeable to its limit of cost In this list the 
amounts submitted run from $1,000 up. The estimate of $1,000 is intended to 
cover the cost of the survey, etc., for projects, the preparation of the sketches 
for which will not be reached until near the close of the fiscal year 1916. For 
the projects for which larger amounts are submitted the preparation of the 
sketches will be commenced at various times following the passage of the 
•ondry civil act Therefore the amounts are needed not only for the preparation 
of the surveys, for test pits and borings, but also toward the commencement of 
the construction. 

These two items represent the program upon which the Office of the Super* 
vising Architect will commence the preparation of working drawings about 
July l. 1915. The preparation of the sketches, however, will be commenced 
several months before that date. If these appropriations are not made, then 
the Office of the Supervising Architect will be occupied solely with the continua- 
tion and completion of projects now under way or for which appropriations 
have already been made. If it will be impossible to commence any new work, 
then it will be necessary to commence cutting down the force in the Office of the 
8operviBing Architect shortly after the passage of the sundry civil act for the 
focal year 1916. 

Analysis of estimates for 1916. 



1. Fbr sites contracted for 

2. For sites not contracted for— 

8. For sites and commencement of buildings, sites contracted for 

4. For sites and commencement of buildings, sites not contracted for. 

5. Continuing buildings, extensions and special repairs, actually un- 

der contract Dec. 1, 1914 

I Continuing of above, not under contract Dec. 1, 1914, but for 

which money was appropriated in part in prior acts 

7. Buildings only, where nothing has been previously 

appropriated $1,329,000 

I Extensions only, where nothing has been previously 

appropriated 1, 281, 000 



9. Submitted items not previously authorized (Including $96,500 for 
"rents of temporary quarters") 



$1,000 

5,000 

84,700 

80,900 

2,300,500 

6, 987, 300 



2,610,000 
216,000 



Total 12, 184, 800 

Analysis of item No. 7. 



Location. 



Atwrfan Wash.. 
iDiMttLNabr.... 

*»k*. Minn. 

tatiw.WfaL 

Art*Mohia,Ark. 

•*bnd, Ky 

•ttVhoro.lUii... 

i-zor^Xtbr 

"tfanfeld.Cal... 



Title. 



Post office and courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

...do 



Limit of 

cost for 

building. 



$112,500 
75,000 
50,000 
70,000 
55,000 
100,000 
100,000 
50,000 
135.000 



Amount 
available 
for build- 
ine, joint 
authoriza- 
tion. 


Estimate 
for 1916. 




91,000 




1,000 




10,000 




1,000 




55,000 




30,000 




30,000 




1,000 




1.000 



lie 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1W6. 
Analytic «/ Oft* No. 7— Continued. 



Location. 



Barnesville, Oa 

Bartow, Fla 

Belton, Tex 

Buffalo, Wyo 

Burlington, N.C... 

Caribou, Me 

Chadron, Nebr 

Charles City, Iowa. 

Columbia, S. C 

East Orange, N. J.. 
Ellensburg.Wash.. 

Elyria.Ohfo 

falls City. Nebr... 

Fordyce, Ark 

Globe, Ariz 

Greenwich, Conn. . . 

Grinnell, Iowa 

Hackensack.N. J.. 

HornelLN.Y 

Humboldt, Tenn... 
Huntington, Ind. . . 

Jasper,Ala.. 

KaUspelL Mont. . .. 
Little Falls, Minn.. 

Logan, Ohio 

Madison, Wis 



Maquoketa, Iowa 

Marlon, 8. C 

Maryville, Tenn , 

McComb.Miss 

Merrill, Wis 

Mid die town, Conn . . . 
Middletown,Ohio.... 

Minden. La 

Montevideo, Minn... 
Nacogdoches, Tex. . . . 

Naugatuck, Conn 

Navasota.Tex 

Neenah, Wis 

New Braunfels, Tex., 
Newport, R. I 



Pulaski, Va 

Redfleld, 8. Dak.. 

Ridgway, Pa 

Rockville,Conn... 
Roseburg, Oreg... 

Rumford, Me 

St. Louis, Mo 

Salamanca, N. Y.. 



Sandusky, Ohio... 
Savanna, 111 



Seymour, Conn. 

Shelby, N.C 

Shelby vflle. Ky 

Silney, Ohio 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 

8 tarn ford, Tex 

Tarentum, Pa 

Taybrville.Ill 

Titus ville, Pa. 



Valley City, N. Oak. 
Vancouver. Wash.. . 

Van Wert, Ohio 

Washington, lnd 

Washington, Iowa. . . 

Waterloo, N.Y 

Waynesville. N. C... 
Wena tehee , Wash. . . . 
Williamson, W. Va.. 
Wfltow.Cal 



Total.. 



Title. 



Post office _, 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....db 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post office and courthouse. 

Post office 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Post office and court 
house. 

Post office. 

do 



.do. 

.*: 

.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Post office and custom- 
house. 

Post office 

do 

do 

do 

do 

.....do 

Bubtreasury 

Post office 

do. 



.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do.. 
.do- 



Limit of 

cost for 

building. 



$50,000 
50,000 
55,000 
62,500 
65,000 
50,000 

110,000 
70,000 

265,000 

125,000 
75,000 

100,000 
65,000 
50,000 

100,000 
90,000 
90,000 

100,000 
85,000 
50,000 
05,000 

100,000 

100,000 
65,000 
60,000 

550,000 

60,000 
50,000 
60,000 
50,000 
75,000 
140,000 
100,000 
50,000 
50,000 
55,000 
80,000 
50,000 
80,000 
50,000 



Amount 
available 
for build- 
ing, joint 
authorisa- 
tion. 



50,000 
65,000 
80,000 
55,000 

100,060 

60,000 

1,000,000 

75,000 

130.000 
50,000 
60,000 
55.000 
50.000 
70,000 

130,000 
50,000 
60,000 
60,000 
75,000 
75,000 

140,000 
70,000 k 
60.000 
80,000 
55,000 
65,000 
85,000 
50.000 



1300,000 



Estimate 
tor 1916. 



75,000 I 



1,329,0 



Total number of items, 79. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



167 



Location. 



Analysis Qf item No. 8. 

EXTENSIONS. 
Title. 



Merandria, La 

Chattanooga, Terai.. 
East St. Louis. IU... 
Rvaawvflle, Ind 



Ra9entown v Md 

Hontinrton, W. Va. . 

Kaasos Citv, Mo 

KirksdUt.Mo 

tfartinshor*, W. Va. 

Missoula, Mont 

Utterly, Mo 

Muskepon, Mich 



Post office and courthouse. 

do 

do 

Customhouse and post 
office. 

Post office 

Post office and courthouse. 
do 

Post office 

.do. 



Nashville, Tenn 

Oklahoma Cltv, Okla. 
I'tiea,*. Y..I 



Winchester, Ky.. 



Total. 



Post office and courthouse. 

Post office 

Post office and custom- 
house. 

....do 

Post office and courthouse. 

Post office, customhouse, 
and courthouse. 

Post office 



Limit of 

cost for 

building. 



165,000 
55.000 
240,000 
150,000 

30,000 
225,000 
500,000 

40,000 

20,000 
125,000 

35,000 



Amount 
available 
for build- 
tag, joint 
authoriza- 
tion. 



400,000 
250,000 
370,000 

20,000 



945,000 



Estimate 
for 1916. 



38 

(15,000 
75,000 

30,090 
100,0% 

250,ode 

30,000 
20,000 

30,00B 

200,011b 
111,009 

iso, nob 

20,00u 



1,281,000 



TMal number of items, 18. 

Mr. Mondell. I notice that the three buildings which you hay© 
taken otft of their order, Arkadelphia, Ark., Fordyce, Ark., and Wil- 
low, Cal., are none of them included in the original estimate which 
was presented? 

Mr. Wexderoth. No, sir; that was an oversight We addressed 
a letter to the chairman of the Appropriations Committee regarding 
it That was another error. He returned it to us with instructions 
to address it to the Speaker of the House, which we did. 

Mr. Mondeia. Those three buildings were not included in the 
original estimate? 

Mr. Wexderoth. For the reason that the original estimate was 
made up according to the current program and they were overlooked 
until the supplemental estimates were prepared. Under date of the 
11th we addressed a letter to the chairman of this committee call- 
ing his attention to these three buildings. When we prepared the 
supplemental estimate we included them in their proper places. 

Mr. Mondeix. These estimates of $1,000 which you make for the 
purpose of enabling you to make the survey and examinations pre- 
liminary to the preparations of plans, if those items were not pro- 
vided for you could not go on with the preparation of the plans for 
those buildings? 

Mr. Wexderoth. No. sir. It would virtually wind up the office 
in the fiscal year 1917. 

Mr. Moxdell- And if they were left out you would not have any- 
thing to do ? 

Mr. Wexderoth. That is correct. We would not have anything 
to work on. We could not make the cabinet board sketches on which 
the working drawings are based without the surveys. 

Mr. Mondeix. As to the new construction where you have gotten 
heyond that period and are asking for sums for construction, the 
plans are already prepared, as I understand? 



128 SUNI>RY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; they will be prepared during the period 
for which the estimate is submitted. 

Mr. Mondell. Are you asking for sums to be expended within the 
next fiscal year for the actual construction of buildings where you 
have not the plans now prepared ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. This estimate is for a 16 months' 
period. 

Mr. Mondell. You have made some progress on the plans in those 
cases? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Of course, we are working on a continuous pro- 
gram. We have an output of, say, 70 buildings a year. In 16 months 
we will place under contract, say, about 100 buildings. For some of 
these the sketches are now in the course of preparation; for others 
the plans are being developed ; for others the plans are approaching 
completion, but for a great many the plans, nor even the sketches, will 
not lie commenced until after this appropriation is available. This 
is for 16 months, and during that time we will commence and 
complete the plans for quite a number of buildings, place them under 
contract, ana make expenditures. Certain of these items which 
are for more than a thousand dollars also include the cost of the 
surveys and the test pits, because they are projects which will shortly 
be taken up. During the 16-month period we can complete the en- 
tire project, or virtually complete it. This includes the surveys, the 
preparation of sketches, plans, and specifications, placing the work 
under contract, and the expenditure of a considerable portion of the 
appropriation. All of these appropriations for public building work 
are on the basis of being available on the 4th day of March next, and 
a 16-month period means that we will turn out more work than dur- 
ing the alternate period of eight months. 

Mr. Mondell. The small items are necessary to enable you to do 
anything beyond the acquisition of the sites? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. For the new projects that are reached 
so near the end of the 16-month period we only need the $1,000 for 
the survey, etc. If we do not obtain at least that amount in each case 
we will have nothing to work on during the fiscal year 1917. 

ARKADELPHIA, ARK., PUBLIC BUILDING. 
[See pp. 40, 119.] 
The Chairman. Take the case of Arkadelphia, Ark. In 1910 a site 
for $5,000 was authorized, and in 1913 the building at $55,000? 
Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 
The Chairman. In 1910 the population was 2,745, and in 1913 the 

Soss postal receipts were $12,322.19; the money-order receipts, 
3,137.27; and postal savings receipts, $658. 

FORDYCE, ARK., PUBLIC BUILDING. 
[See pp. 53, 119.] 
In the case of Fordyce, Ark., the site was authorized in 1910. 
$5,000, and the building in 1913, $:>0,000. The population in 1910 
was 2,794. The gross postal receipts in 1913 were $9,205.59; money- 
order receipts, $29,483.12; and postal savings receipts, $104. 

WILLOW, CAL., PUBLIC BUILDING. 
[See pp. 90, 110.] 
The Chairman. The next is for Willow, Oil., for site and build- 
ing, authorized in 1913 at cost of $75,000. The population in 1910 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPBJATIOH 0IL1-, 1«16. 12ft 

was 1,139; the gross postal receipts for 19ia were $18,113.47; the 
money-order receipts for 1913 were $58,097.70; and the postal wr- 
ings receipts for 1913 were $1,224. 

At what do you figure the cost of the upkeep and operation oi a 
*75,000 building? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I can not state that offhand, but I have looked 
into that matter somewhat on the basis of $50,000 buildings. I 
recall the figures quite distinctly. Assuming an interest on the 
total investment, allowing for depreciation on the building and on 
the equipment, and adding the annual cost of janitor service, janitor 
supplies, and repairs, the annual carrying charge is about 10 per 
cent 

The Chairman. Do you know what we are paying for facilities, 
rent, heat, and light, at these three different towns? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We probably had it at the time we made the 
estimate for the committee several years ago. 

The Chairman. Can you furnish that information for 1913 and 
?end it to us for use in this connection? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. We can obtain a statement of the 
rents, but, of course, we know nothing of the character of the facil- 
ities obtained for those rentals, as that is under another department* 
Do you want that information for 1913? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Newton. Rent, heat, water, and light? i 

The Chairman. Yes; all the facilities, 1 

Mr. Mondell. The part that the Government pays for. * 

The Chairman. You caD get that information for us? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

An inquiry develops the fact that at Arkadelphia and Fordyce, Ark., only 
the Post Office Department Is occupying rented quarters. At Willow, Cal., both 
the Post .Office Department nnd the Agricultural Department occupy sucfr 
quarters. The departments referred to state that at these places, for the fiscal 
year 1913, the rents given were paid, the amounts including heat, light, and 
janitor service: 

Arkadelphia, Ark. (post office only) #46* 

Fordyce, Ark. (post office only) T36 

Willow. CaL (post office) . $609 

Forest Service 000 

1,2* 

The Chairman. What does that 10 per cent include? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I allow 3 per cent interest on the total invest- 
ment in land, building, and equipment, and 5 per cent deprecia- 
tion 

The Chairman (interposing). That is interest? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The 3 per cent is interest. I also allow 5 per cent 
•lepreciation on the building, 5 per. cent depreciation on the equip- 
ment, and then add the cost of the janitor service, heat, light, and 
water, janitors 9 supplies and repairs. 

The Chairman. At 2 per cent? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; the actual annual cost of the latter items 
a* the books show and not a percentage. I investigated these costs 
for five buildings in different sections of the country and averaged 
tlie cost for one year, assuming that as the permanent charge. The 

72786—16 © 



130 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

average maintenance charge was $1,700, of which $960 was for the 
janitor service, while the other things made up the balance. I 
allowed $350 lor annual repairs and the physical upkeep of the 
property 

The Chairman (interposing). How much do you get for that? 
You get a good deal more than $350 from us. 

Mr. Wenderoth. We do not average more than that on a $50,000 
building, and it only includes the physical upkeep of the property. 
It does not allow for changes in partitions, storm doors, etc. Eight 
hundred buildings, at $350 each, would be about $300,000. The 
balance goes into the larger buildings, for changes in partitions, 
additional facilities, for the Parcels Post Service, etc. 
f 

REVISED ESTIMATES. 

[Seep. 119.] 

The Chairman. You have in here some special items. Are there 
any buildings included in this revised estimate, aggregating $12,- 
000,000, which were not contemplated or included in the modified 
method of doing the work? 

Mr. Wenderoth. There were five, Mr. Chairman, that were over- 
looked, concerning which we addressed a letter tQ you under date 
of December 11. You returned it to us calling our attention to the 
fact that such communications must be addressed to the Speaker. 
Instead of doing that, however, we included these five items in the 
revised estimates. 

The Chairman. If these revised estimates had not been sub- 
mitted, they would have come in the regular way ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. They include Arkadelphia, Fordyce, 
Willow, and two extensions that we overlooked — one at Hagerstown, 
Md., and the other at Martinsburg, W. Va. 

The Chairman. Have you included in these estimates all exten- 
sions, regardless of the time when they were authorized? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; because we have placed all of our ex- 
tensions at the head of the program of the 1913 act, on which we 
will commence next year. We can not list the extensions according 
to the date of the acquisition of the original sites. We assume that 
these extensions are authorized because they are urgently needed, 
and we place them near the head of the list. 

RENT OF TEMPORARY QUARTERS. 

[See p. 131. ] 

The Chairman. In addition, there are special items running all 
through the estimates. 

Mr. Wenderoth. They appear more clearly in the committee 
proof of the original estimate, because they are printed in italics. 
They are difficult to locate in the proof of the revised estimates. 

The Chairman. They are largely rental items? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 131 

EVANSVILLE, IND., RENT Or QUARTERS. 

[See p. 52.] 

The Chairman. The first is: "Evansville, Ind., rent of buildings: 
For rent of temporary quarters for the accommodation of Govern- 
ment officials and moving expenses incident thereto, $8,000." 

One of the things that it is difficult to explain is how you arrive 
at $8,000, for instance, as the sum required for moving expenses 
and rent of temporary quarters. What period does that cover? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We do not know. It is purely a gjuess. We 
communicate with the local postmaster and ask him to give us any 
information he can obtain regarding the cost of possible rented 
quarters. Then we add to that an arbitrary sum for the changes. 
We do not know when we will actually place the work under con- 
tract, where we will obtain the quarters, or how extensive the changes 
in them must be. We pay for such changes in the temporary rented 
quarters as are necessary for carrying on the public business during 
the time we occupy them. We pay for everything that is done to 
adapt the building to our special needs. 

The Chairman. Is that found to be cheaper than to rent the 
quarters and have the owner to make the changes? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The owner does actually make the changes, re- 
ducing their cost to a rental basis. What I mean is this : The first 
year's rent we pay includes the cost of making all of these changes 
for us. We really agree on the second year's rent and add to that 
for the firstyear whatever is the cost of the changes that will be 
necessary. The cost of these changes, therefore, are included in the 
first year's rent. When we submit the estimates we do not know 
where we will obtain the temporary quarters and we do not know 
what the changes will cost as a part of the first year's rent. If it in 
a small town we allow a smaller sum, and if it is a larger town we 
allow a larger sum. 

The Chairman. Is this an extension at Evansville? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

NASHVILLE, TENN., RENT OF QUARTERS. 

[See p. 71.] 

The Chairman. The next is Nashville, Tenn.. $20,000. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is the same thing. 

The Chairman. There you run up to $20,000. Is that for an 
extension? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is an extension which will be of such a 
character that it will move out of the building the courts on the 
•ipper floor, and with them a number of offices, requiring a great deal 
of space. It will probably affect the post office as well. 

rent or temporary quarters. 

[See p. 130.] 

Mr. Mondell. Before you go to that, in submitting these estimates 
for moving expenses you take into consideration, of course, the 
extent to which the punlic officers accommodated must be moved ? 



182 SUNDRY CIVIL APPBWMATION BILL, UM. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. You are not required in every case of extension to 
move all of the public officers? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Not all of them. Sometimes we can keep them 
in rooms in the building by boarding up the rear wall, for instance, 
while we are tearing it out 

Mr. Mondell. In submitting estimates, you take into considera- 
tion the extent of the removals necessary? 

Mr. Wenderoth. As near as we can. Of course the estimates are 
submitted before the contracts are let, so we really do not know. 
For the first year it is entirely a guess, and I can not possibly sub* 
stantiate any of these figures. They are based on our previous ex- 
perience, and we guess that about that much will be necessary. The 
comptroller has told us that he would consider these rental items in 
the same class with building appropriations, and, therefore, any 
balance that we are able to save in the first vear out of the appro- 
priation is available toward the second year's rent, although these 
estimates are assumed to be only sufficient to take us through the 
fiscal year 1916. If we need the rented quarters beyond that time, 
we must submit further estimates. There is nothing that we can 
prove about these figures. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA., POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE — MAIL- HAN DUNG 

DEVICES. 

[See p. 73.] 

The Chairman. Mail-handling devices, $25,000. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Under date of November 4 the Postmaster Gen- 
eral addressed a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury inclosing a 
copy of a report, by a post-office inspector, together with a tracing 
of the workroom, describing and indicating the location of the 
conveyers. He requested that the matter be taken up with your 
committee and an appropriation obtained, if possible, for the con- 
veyers. We examined the plan and the report of the inspector. 
On the basis of our previous .experience with mail-handling devices 
we reached the conclusion that the outfit which the Post Office De- 
partment desired would cost $25,000. 

The Chairman. Is there any information as to whether it is an 
advantageous expenditure, or whether the advantages to be ob- 
tained would justify it? 

Mr. Wenderoth. There is, to the extent that after having had 
two or three years' experience with mail-handling devices and ap- 
pearing to be unable to arrive at any policy with regard to them we 
submitted the entire matter to the Post Office Department. We 
asked for a statement and recommendations concerning the build- 
ings in which the Post Office Department believed that the installa- 
tion of mail-handling devices would operate toward economy and 
the efficient conduct of the post-office business. Our estimates are 
based on the recommendations of the Post Office Department. As 
to any definite figures on the saving in dollars and cents, I can not 
give you that. The Post Office Department, in the larger build- 
ings, "though, is very anxious to obtain mail-handling devices. We 
have never had any general authority for them, and, of course, we 



SUNMY CIVIL AWBOMOATION BILL, 1WJ. 188 

hare no annual appropriation available for their installation. Occa- 
rionally an authorization by the House Committee on Public Build- 
ings and Grounds will make the limit of cost available in a specific 
ease. Now that the Post Office Department is strongly in favor of 
mechanical devices for handling mail, we try te took ahead and 
obtain a limit of cost sufficient to cover them. We have also asked 
for supplemental authority for installing the devices without any 
increase if the limit of cost appeared sufficient. We obtained that 
authority recently in the cases of the Denver, Colo., and the New 
Raven, Conn., buildings. In the New Orleans case all of the con- 
tracts were let for the completion of the building before the Post 
Office Department submitted its recommendation regarding the mail- 
handling devices, so that a special appropriation becomes necessary. 
I have a letter here, dated June 17, from the Post Office Department 

The Chairman. What do they say? 

Mr. Wenderoth. They say: 

Receipt Is acknowledged of your letter of June 10, relative to securing proper 
legislation to enable the Post Office Department to install mail-handling devices 
In Federal buildings. It Is believed thnt this legislation should apply to post 
rfflce* having annual receipts of $500 000 or more located in Federal bulldiugs, 
and In any Federal building where two or more floors are to be used In the 
receipt and dispatch of mall. It is probable that interior pneumatic-tube 
service would be used only in a few cases, but it is believed that when legis- 
lation on this subject Is secured it bad might as well be included therein, so that 
if such service Is desirable it will be possible to install it 

Mr. Mohdell. When was that building completed) 
Mr. Wenderoth. It is being completed now. We expect to have 
it ready for occupancy within a very few months. 

PORT OT7BON, MICH., POST OFFICE, LOOKOUTS AND 8TORAOE AND TOILET 

ROOMS. 

[flee p. 76.) 

The Chairman. The next item is ; " Port Huron, Mich., post office: 
For lookout gallery, including the incidental remodeling of the first 
floor by the addition of a storage room and toilet room, $8,500." 
How modi does a lookout gallery cost? 

Mr. WsKDERom. I have not that information in detail. I have 
the report of the post-office inspector, which was forwarded to us 
by the Post Office Department, asking us to recommend the appro- 
priation. 

The following Is an Itemization of tbe estimate of $3,500 for lookout gallery, 
Including the Incidental remodeling of the first floor by the addition of a storage 
xmb and toilet : 

toritout gallery, Including wort incident thereto ffi.OOi 

TV>Uet room for postmaster — . ~-.~*— 900 

Storage room ..— — , ••• — . 600 

Total — 8. ©00 

Tt* Chajhmak. The toilet room and storage room ought to be 
paid for out of the general repairs items, ought they not? 

Mr. Wkndkboth. They are available. Of course, it becomes com- 
plicated for us to have two or three, or, in this case, maybe four, 
appropriations involved in an expenditure of less than $4,000. It is 
on that account that we need the special appropriation. The remod- 



1234 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

eling could be paid from the appropriation for repairs and preserva- 
tion, but that appropriation is not available for installing the look- 
out gallery, although it is available for other items of new construc- 
tion. The Comptroller of the Treasury will allow certain of the lat- 
ter. Theoretically, the appropriation for repairs and preservation is 
only available for repairing and restoring things that already exist 
However, we have paid for certain new items out of that appropria- 
tion. The comptroller ruled that as that had been the custom he 
would approve such expenditures, but we may not increase the range 
of the expenditures. It so happens that lookouts are not in that list 
of things. This building had no lookout system. 

The Chairman. Are these lookouts installed upon the recom- 
mendation of the Post Office Department? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I do not know how it happened that this build- 
ing had no lookout. 

The Chairman. This post office has no lookout at all ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. In tnis case there has been no lookout provided. 
The estimate includes a lookout gallery over the workroom, with a 
branch to the basement. There is no lookout there at all. If you 
approve a special appropriation for a lookout, then certain of tht 
other changes would involve charges against the appropriation foi 
repairs and preservation of public buildings. The additional plumb 
ing required would be a charge against the appropriation for me- 
chanical equipment, and if extra light fixtures were required they 
would be a charge against the appropriation for furniture. It would 
involve charges against four appropriations. We have the greatest 
difficulty in persuading contractors to bid under such conditions. 
We take a lump-sum bid, but we ask the contractors to state how 
much -they include for these things separately. They do not know 
our reasons for it or our methods. We have great trouble in ob- 
taining the submission of these segregated bids in proper form. 
Therefore, if we could obtain this as one appropriation it would 
simplify matters for us, but we have no other argument to submit 
for it. 

Mr. Mondell. Was this building erected before you were install- 
ing lookouts? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; this building was erected before the 
days of using lookouts universally. The building was occupied in 
the year 1877. 

ST. LOUIS, MO., POST OFFICE — MAIL-HANDLING DEVICES. 

The Chairman. You ask $25,000 for installing additional mail- 
handling devices in the St. Louis, Mo., post office. You have 
$100,000 now for mail lifts, elevator, additions to the mailing appa- 
ratus, and other improvements, and $47,550 for mailing devices. 
Now you ask for $25,000 more. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. I have a long report here from our 
superintendent whom we sent there to make the inspection. 

The Chairman. You have doubled up on it. You have $147,550 
already. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Can I make a r6sum£ of this and place it in the 
record? It is somewhat involved. 



SXJNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 135 

The Chairman. I want to ask you something about it. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I fear I can not answer. I asked for a memo- 
randum from the office, and this is what I have: "There has been 
considerable correspondence relative to this matter between the de- 
partment and the Postmaster General. This correspondence can not 
be found without a more thorough search than has been possible up 
to this time." So I am not in a position, Mr. Chairman, to ex- 
plain that 

Mr. Mondell. Is that a new building? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. It has been in commission, I think, 
about two years. 

The Chairman. The St. Louis post office? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. It has been in commission about two 
years, I think, Mr. Chairman. 

The item refers to additional mail-handling devices for the new post-office 
building. 

Cost of bnilding $1, 117, 391. 44 

Completed and occupied Oct. 26, 1912; cost per cubic foot .547 

Mail-handling apparatus consists of a system of chutes, belt, bucket, and 
pick-up conveyors, lifts, platform motors, etc., in sub-basement, basement, and 
first story, and was paid for out of funds authorized March 4, 1911 ($100,000), 
and March 4, 1913 ($47,550). 

March 25, 1912, the Postmaster General was advised that the balance of the 
appropriations for changes in the post-office building would not exceed $4,000, 
and he was asked to indicate which of certain additions to the mail-handling 
apparatus suggested by the- postmaster and custodian in a joint report would 
appear to be most desirable. Under date of April 12, 1912, the Acting Post- 
master General recommended that the balance be expended for an addition to 
belt conveyor No. 10-O, at the outside of the mailing platform. This was done 

The authorization of $47,550, contained in the act of March 4, 1013, was 
available for a mail lift, elevator, additions to mail apparatus, and other im- 
provements. This amount was expended as follows : 

Mall-handling apparatus $14, 090. 00 

Elevator 9, 383. 00 

Mailing-platform entrance, etc 4, 099. 15 

Air washers 3, 9S7. 00 

Pointing stonework, etc 1,935.50 

Extensions to plumbing and heating systems, wire partitions, bronze 

gates, floodgates, pump, etc 13, 108. 04 

Balance unexpended, as shown by books on Jan. 4, 1915 46. 71 

47,550.00 

The new post office in SL Louis is connected with the adjoining terminal rail- 
road station by a tunnel, the cost of which was paid out of the limit of cost 
for the building. At present the mail is trucked through this tunnel at a cost 
of $12,000 a year, as stated by the Post Office Department. The proposed con- 
veying apparatus will run through this tunnel and, therefore, is not a further 
extension to the existing mall-handling apparatus in the building proper. Its 
Installation, at an estimated cost of $25000, will save a considerable portion 
of the present expenditure of $12,000 for trucking the mail, and it is estimated 
that it will pay for itself in three years. 

Because of the fact that most of the proposed conveyor is outside the actual 
walls of the building, it is suggested that the wording of the estimate be slightly 
changed, should the committee give favorable consideration to the same. The 
following alternate wording Is submitted : 

St Louis, Mo., post office : For mail-conveyer system connecting the new 
I*ost-office building with the adjacent railroad station, including any 
necessary extension of the system into the railroad building and the 
post-office building, together with all work incidental thereto $25,000 



136 scirwtY cmL aj^kopriation bill, 1916. 

Mr. Monmll. The installation of these devices on an extensive 
scale, such as is proposed in a case of this kind, involves considerable 
tearing out and remodeling of the interior, does it not? 

Mr. Wenderoth. It sometimes does. The previous method has 
been for the Supervising Architect to complete the building and then 
the Post Office Department would obtain an appropriation for the 
devices. That method of installing the devices after the building 
was completed involved a great deal of tearing out. 

Mr. Mondell. Are you handling your new buildings by building 
the devices in, or constructing your interiors so that the devices can 
be put in without making changes? 

Mr. Wendbroth. We intend to do that. It happens that we have 
not taken up the plans for any of these larger buildings since the 
Post Office Department has adopted the policy of recommending 
mail-handling devices for them, but we certainly should do that. 

The Chairman. These devices have been perfected recently, have 
they not? 

Mr. Wenderoth. They are very much more effective now, Mr. 
Chairman; yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. I suppose they are still more or less experimental, 
are they not? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. I mean as to the form of the device. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I think not. I thought you meant perhaps it 
was more or less experimental as to their efficiency in the Postal 
Service, and I think their usefulness has been demonstrated. They 
are a combination of these little cash carriers you see in department 
stores for the light matter and ore conveyors or freight conveyors 
that are used in warehouses, for the heavy matter. 

Mr. Mondell. If the department has pretty clearly demonstrated 
the character of the device they desire, shouid not those devices in 
the future be installed in connection with construction? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Absolutely. We intend to make a general rec- 
ommendation to the House Committee on Public Buildings and 
Grounds that mail-handling devices should be installed in the build- 
ing and paid for out of the limit of cost This could be subject to 
whatever restriction the committee might care to place. For in- 
stance, the authority could be limited to buildings in which the re- 
ceipts are $500,000 or over, or it could be left to the discretion of the 
Secretary, whichever should be preferred. These devices should cer- 
tainly be designed into the building and the building should be 
Slanned to fit mem. If a girder hangs down and the apparatus must 
ip below it, there is that much more complication. Sometimes in a 
completed building it is virtually impossible to cut out the girder 
without vast expense. These devices should be classed as fixtures 
the same as post-office screens or anything else that is built in, such 
as elevators or other conveying apparatus. 

Mr. Mondell. And you are now planning your new buildings to 
that end? 

Mr. Wendbroth. We will in connection with the larger new build- 
ings we take up, if we are given the necessary authority. There 
seems to be no question as to the efficiency of the mechanical handling 
of mail. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION MIX, 1916. 137 

BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING (NSW), SIDEWALKS AND CURBS. 

[See pp. 87, 42ft. 1 

Tile Chairman. " Washington, D. C, Bureau of Engraving and 
Printing (new) : For sidewalks, curbs, etc., $9,000." 

Mr. Wenderoth. * That is an item we have submitted three or four 
times, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Where is this to go? 

Mr. Wendroth. It is on the side of the bureau toward the White 
Lot, on the west side. 

The Chairman. Between the new building and the old building! 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; toward the west; in front of die long 
colonnade of the new building. 

Mr. Mondeix. What have tney there now? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The contract included patching up what side- 
walks were there. Mr. Ralph believes that a new sidewalk should 
be laid. We have submitted the item several times. 

The Chairman. No one ever goes down that side of the building! 

Mr. Wenderoth. I do not know, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Do they not all go in and out of the. other side? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I think there is some patching on the other side, 
too. 

The Chairman. What are you to do with this $9,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I find here this memorandum, Mr. Chairman: 

This item was originally submitted (in amount, $3,159) to Congress npon 
recommendation by the Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing 
In department letter of February 2, 1914 (H. Doc. No. 692). 

Reference thereto is made in the hearings of the deficiency bill on pages 76 
and 123. It was taken up w'th the Seriate as a regular estimate on account of 
the public building service in department letter of March 4, 1914, but did not 
receive consideration. 

In letter to Speaker of April 13, 1914 (H. Doc. No. 904), it was stated that 
die amount of the estimate previously made was not believed to be sufficient 
and that $8,000 was therefore recommended. 

The commissioners proposed to lay the sidewalks and curb on Fourteenth 
Street from old bureau to D Street as follows : 
1.648 linear feet sidewalk, at $1 per foot; 690 feet new curbing, at fl.50 

per foot; reset balance of curbing to D Street* at 30 cents per foot; 

total bid including 5 per cent profit $3,159 

The Department of Public Buildings and Grounds offer lump sum bid 

for sidewalk on Fifteenth Street and on D Street of— _ 5,000 

Total of the two bids 8,159 

These estimates are not guaranteed; they are subject to revision 
when the work is completed and the cost checked. We therefore 
submitted the amount in the sum of $9,000. Part of it is new side- 
walk; part of it is patching and eking out the existing sidewalk; 
and part of it is new curbing. 

BUTLER BUILDING, ADDITIONAL STORY AND SPECIAL REPAIRS. 

(See p. 88.] 

The Chairman. " Washington, D. C, Butler Building: For addi- 
tional story to the one-story annex to the Butler Building, including 
special repairs, $7,000." 



138 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 



Is that the place where they want to build a library? 

Mr. Wendehoth. I think so. 

The Chairman. Out of the old storehouse? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The red brick extension toward Mr. Woods's 
laboratory. The Public Health Service desires a second story on it 

The Chairman. Which is the place to be utilized, the first story 
or the second story? 

Mr. Wenderoth. They desire a second story, new floors in the first 
story, and whatever other small repairing is necessary so they mav 
use the entire building for library and other purposes. 

The Chairman. My recollection of that place is that there is only 
one little window. 

Mr. Wenderoth. In the first story there are three half-round win- 
dows on B Street. 

Mr. Mondell. My recollection is they wanted to use the first floor 
as a board room or meeting room and put on an additional story to 
use for offices. If that building is going to be utilized to any good 
purpose eventually it will be necessary to do something to it and 
make some changes. They use it now iargely for a storehouse. 

The Chairman. Have you ever been inside of that building? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Who made this estimate? 

Mr. Wenderoth. An estimator from the office. 

The Chairman. He went and looked at it? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. They want to put in a new stairway also, do they 
not ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes sir. 

repairs and preservation. 

The Chairman. The next item is repairs, equipment, and general 
expenses of public buildings. The appropriation for the current 
year is $725,000 and your estimate for next year is $775,000. For 
1914 you had all told $725,000. What is your unexpended balance? 

Mr. Wenderoth. For 1914 the unexpended balance corrected to 
December 15 was $3,476.10. 

The Chairman. And 'for 1913? 

Mr. Wenderoth. For 1913 the unexpended balance was $6,357.08. 
Mr. Chairman, the record of expenditures and liabilities I think is 
perhaps a clearer indication of the growth of the appropriation than 
the record of balances. The record I have here of all the annual 
appropriations shows that the expenditures increase regularly, but if 
a verv large appropriation is given us there would be a large balance. 
In other words, we are not actually expending appropriations merely 
because they are given us. The expenditures, especially in the last 
four years since we have been perhaps estimating more carefully, are 
increasing at an almost regular rate. For instance, fiscal years 1911 
and 1912 for repairs and preservation the appropriation was the 
same, $600,000: the increase to 1913 was $25,000; the increase to 1914 
was $100,000, but our expenditures are not jumping in that way. 
They are increasing steadily because each year we are placing in 
operation about the same number of additional buildings, and unless 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 189 

there is an extraordinary condition such as might perhaps be im- 
posed by a change in the postal service, the expenses increase stead- 
ily and more or less regularly. 

(Note. — At the end of the hearing on the annual appropriations 
will be found a statement of estimates, appropriations, expenditures, 
and balances for all these " annuals " for several years.) 

The Chairman. How do you figure you will need $50,000 more 
next year? 

Mr. Wenderoth. For 1916, Mr. Chairman ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is about the difference we had in our ex- 
penditures between 1913 and 1914. I can not give you an analytical 
statement, Mr. Chairman, this year, as I tried to last year. I found 
that at the end of the fiscal year 1914, when I called for a statement 
of buildings completed, etc., that it did not appear to tally with the 
preceding year. I therefore had the entire property under the charge 
of the Treasury Department checked from the beginning. We found 
some very serious errors in the list of completed buildings; in fact, 
it is only now that we know how many buildings we have. The 
number is stated correctly for the first time in the report for the 
fiscal year 1914. That was done so near the end of the year and so 
near the time for preparing these estimates that we could not divide 
it into classes of buildings or ascertain very accurately what we were 
spending on each class. We merely know our expenditures must in- 
crease with the increase in the number of buildings. 

The increase in the expenditure from 1913 to 1914 was $102,880.98. 
We are asking an increase of $50,000 in the appropriation from 1915 
to 1916, and we believe we will need that amount. We have had one 
particular item of expense which appears also in the appropriation 
for mechanical equipment. This is due to changes which make it 
possible for the Post Office Department to use the basement of build- 
ings in the handling of parcel-post matter. You have probably 
noted in the report of the Postmaster General that his department 
handled 800,000,000 pieces of parcel-post matter without any increase 
in the size of buildings. That was because we bent every effort 
to use every inch of available space. We placed a number of short- 
lift elevator, as we call them, between the first floors and basement 
floors for handling the parcel-post matter. That reacted on this 
appropriation because it is available for cutting holes in floor and 
doing the work incident to installing the lift. In addition, we have 
given the Post Office Department a number of chutes for sliding 
stuff down into the basement, not classing that as mail-handling 
apparatus, and have built in a great deal of shelving and things ot 
that sort. 

RKPAIK OF BVIUHNGS RENTED FROM THE GOVERNMENT. 

The Chairman. You are asking for some changes and modifica- 
tions in the wording of the provision? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That refers to the rental. 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Wenderoth. In operation we found that phraseology a little 
ambiguous. For instance, for the previous year it stated the ex* 
I*nditures on this account for the fiscal year could not exceed 15 



140 SUKDEY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 

Ser cent of the annual rentals of these buildings. It was not quite 
efinite as to which year it referred. It could not be for the year 
during which we made the expenditures, because we do not mow 
what the rentals are until the end of the year. So we thought if 
it could be changed to read "not to exceed 15 per cent of the total 
rental for the preceding fiscal year/' it would be more definite. The 
other point was that it was not clear whether the restriction applied 
to the expenditure which could be made on the individual building 
or whether it referred to a percentage of the total rents. 

The Chairman. I thought we thrashed that all out and it was well 
understood) 

Mr. Wenderoth. I believe not, Mr. Chairman. The chief clerk 
rents the property in the city of Washington that is under the con- 
trol of the Treasury Department, although the Supervising Archi- 
tect looks after the repairs. The question arose about the property 
at the back of the old Post Office Building at Eleventh Street and 
Pennsylvania Avenue known as the post-office annex site. The 
chief clerk wanted to have certain repairs made by the Supervising 
Architect, and the question arose whether the limitation applied to 
the rental of the individual building or to all the rentals obtained 
from the site. The matter was submitted to the comptroller and 
on August 29 he rendered an opinion. The last paragraph reads as 
follows : 

I am of the opinion that the 15 per cent limitation in the above-quoted 
provision of the act of August 1, 1914, applies to the aggregate annual rentals 
received from the buildings on a particular site and not to the rental from any 
one building alone. 

What we understood, Mr. Chairman, or rather what I understood, 
was that out of any one year's appropriation for repairs and preser- 
vation we were not to be permitted to expend in fitting up buildings 
we rented more than 15 per cent of the total rentals collected. Of 
course, the object of the expenditure is to obtain a better income from 
the property. 

Tne Chairman. I thing the understanding was, that if you had 
IB per cent of the rent of any building to keep it in repair that you 
could handle it better. Before you had no authority to repair build- 
ings. Of course, you would not want to spend 50 per cent of the 
rent you received on one building. 

Mr. Wenderoth. No; Mr. Chairman. Of course, it is as you wiah 
to have it managed. There are cases where we spend nothing at all 
on one building during a year t but in order to rent another building 
advantageously, we might desire to spend 25 per cent of the rental 
of that particular building. The restriction would be that in the 
year we did not spend, all told, more than 15 per cent of, say, the 

Srevious year's total income. I do not know that it makes a great 
eal of difference. We are willing to manage it in whatever way 
you direct. We would like to have it stated definitely. 

BSPAIB8-— AV0rfOK8' BUILDING. 

The Chairman. You are asking «a to increase the allowance for 
the Treasury, Butler, Winder, and Auditors' Buildings. We ta- 
ereased that last year. 



8UNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. HI 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; from $12,000 to $14,000. We had 
|12,000 when he had three buildings — an average of $4,000 a build- 
ing—and we are now asking for $18,000 for four buildings— an 
average of $4,500 a building. 

The Chairman. You completely overhauled the Auditors* Build- 
ing, and there is nothing to do on that. We gave you a lot of money, 
and you fixed that building up in complete shape. How much did 
we giveyou for that purpose — $75,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. $69,500. There was one appropriation of $40,000 
and another appropriation of $29,500. 

Mr. Chairman, out of the allotment of $14,000 for the present 
fiscal year, the portion set aside to January 1, 1915 (the firet half 
of the year), was $8,500, which has practicallv been expended, leav- 
ing $5,500 lor the last half. There has recently been <juite a number 
of authorizations for alterations in the Treasury Building, such aa 
moving partitions, new floors, painting, vault under the lawn, eta 
A matter which has been held up for a long time for lack of funds 
and which can not be delayed much longer without detriment to the 
building[ is the painting and repairing of the windows, frames, and 
railing m the courts of the building, which would cost approxi- 
mately $2,000. 

The Chairman. Why do you not do that work? 

Mr. Wenderoth. This amount can not be taken from the current 
appropriation on account of the usual matters of upkeep. The exter 
nor ironwork of the fourth floor in these courts should be painted 
and is included in the estimate. Interior and exterior painting 
should be done at these buildings, which would cost in the neigh- 
borhood of $3,000, and can not be authorized from the current ap- 
propriation. 

UNEXPENDED BALANCES OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR BUILDINGS COMPLETED 

AND OCCUPIED. 

The Chairman. Can you state the balance to the credit of public 
buildings which have been completed and occupied more than one 
year? Is there any way we can get that statement? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I returned to Mr. Courts this morning the manu- 
script of the hearing when Mr. Newton and Mr. Wetmore were here> 
and that contains a detailed explanation of how we happen to have 
$11,000,000 more than we believe we will expend. That hearing con- 
tains a statement of the balances that have not as yet been turned 
into the surplus fund. On page 18 of the hearings is a statement of 
amounts that have been carried to the surplus fund since the last 
similar statement was made for the sundry civil bill. That is a 
statement as of December 1, 1914. 

The Chairman. That aggregates $153,438.66. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I think I have a memorandum about that> 
although it does not give the number of the buildings or the name* 

The Chairman. You have, on page 18, a statement headed "Re- 
capitulation of public buildings in course of construction December 
I. 1914," and under that "Limit of cost of sites and buildings, $66,- 
«1 7.440.81." Is that right? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is the limit of cost, Mr. Chairman. This 
statement includes buildings that are completed and occupied but are 



142 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

still open accounts, because the balances have not gone to the surplus 
fund. 

The Chairman. For land there was spent $5,209,761.75 and for 
buildings $49,036,391.37 ; outstanding liabilities on account of build- 
ings, etc., $9,419,622.43 ; balance available on appropriations, $1,585,- 
629.86. Are those buildings practically completed f 

Mr. Wenderoth. They are in all stages of completion, Mr. Chair- 
man. You will note that the total expended and outstanding is $63,- 
819,214.21. Most of that is expended. 

The Chairman. In your annual report, on page 404, the number 
of buildings is given as 1,682. Is that the number of public build- 
ings? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Mr. Chairman, that is the number of separate 
authorizations or separate appropriations. In certain localities there 
are several items. For instance, on page 414 is York, Pa., the new 
and the old post office. The old building is lying idle waiting au- 
thority to sell it. This list includes many cases of that kind. 

The Chairman. Would that show the number of public buildings ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. There is a statement in the front of my 
annual report for the fiscal year 1914 which is the first correct state- 
ment that has been made. On page 4, the total buildings completed, 
in course of erection, or authorized (not including extensions) is 
given as 1,429. That, of course, is only the work under the control 
of the Treasury Department. It is not the total count of all build- 
ings that have been authorized or purchased since the commencement 
of the public building work sixty-odd years ago. We cross off a 
building that is transferred to another department, such as the new 
Washington post office, or a building that is sold or demolished. 
This is the corrected list to date. You desire a statement of the 
unexpended balances on buildings that are completed? 

The Chairman. Yes; and which have been in commission one year 
or more. 

The following is a list of buildings occupied prior to January 1, 1014, on 
account of which the unencumbered balances will be turned in to the surplus 
fund: 

Albuquerque, N. Mex.. post office $5.00 

Americus, Ga., post office. 158. 57 

.Vines, Iowa, post office, 347.07 

Baker City, Oreg., post office 4.45 

Bradford, Pa., post office „_. 13.54 

Brookhaven, Miss., post office 2,225.24 

Butler, Pa., post office J 119.24 

Chester, Pa., post office 112.29 

Demopolis, Ala., post office 249.54 

Dothan. Ala., post office 1,792.32 

Kaston. Pa., i*>st office 2, 96a 60 

Enid, Okla., post office and courthouse 3.18 

Estherville, Iowa, post office 10.38 

Eugene. Oreg., post office 209.90 

Fayetteville, N\ C, post office 1&32 

Gaffney, S. C. post office 67.53 

Great Falls, Mont., post office and courthouse 1,947.11 

Hattiesburg. Misa, post office 145.30 

Kearney, Nebr., post office 82.28 

Knoxville, Tenn., post office and courthouse 15.79 

Lancaster, Ohio, post office 230.31 

Little Falls, N. Y., post office .« 

Los Angeles. Cal., post office and courthouse .23 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 143 

Manhattan, Kan&, post office $103.79 

Marietta, Ohio, post office 286.62 

Moscow, Idaho, post office and courthouse 123.92 

Mount Sterling, Ky. t post office 1,021.21 

Morfreesboro, Tenn., post office .08 

Morphysboro, 111., post office 21.00 

Newark, X. Y., post office 12.96 

Palestine, Tex., post office 61.58 

Phoenix, Ariz., post office and courthouse 34.00 

Plnttsmouth, Nebr., post office 146.47 

Pontiac III., post office 22.68 

San Angelo, Tex., post office and courthouse 2.05 

Kan Francisco, Cal., post office, courthouse, etc 4,232.27 

San Marcos, Tex., post office 317.61 

Schenectady, N. Y„ post office 50.00 

Sewickley, I*a., post office 2,972.58 

Ten-ill. Tex., post office ¥ 1,427.11 

Texarkana, Tex., courthouse 286.14 

Versailles, Ky., post office , 3,731.21 

Wabash, Ind., post office 1,835.24 

Westpoint, Miss., post office _ 149.15 

Wichita Falls, Tex., post office 7.00 

Willianiantic, Conn., post office 1,083.29 

Woousocket, R. I., post office 256.93 

York. Pa., post office 45.31 

Total . 29,014.03 

Total number of appropriations involved, 48. 

The .above list includes only buildings occupied prior to January 1, 1914. on 
.Mfount of which the unencumbered balances have not as yet been turned into 
'he surplus fund. It also includes only those buildings for which it has been 
definitely determined that the time has arrived for turning in the balances, 
construction contracts for buildings do not include various small items which 
•ire necessary for the completion of the structure and for which the limit of 
<t*t is available. Among these are such matters as door and window screens, 
vault shelving, occasionally the completion of the approaches, occasionally the 
nterior painting, etc. Generally the building is occupied as soon as possible 
aud these matters are taken up at such later times as they may be reached. 
It is the practice to check up all of these accounts toward the end of the fiscal 
year, arrange for all work properly chargeable to the construction appropriation 
'hat is found to be necessary to entirely complete the building, and then turn in 
'be balances. For the buildings in the preceding list it has been definitely deter- 
mined that there are no further charges to be made and these balances may be 
•unied in. For other buildings, specifications have either been issued or are In 
■onrse of preparation for the small matters which will complete the structures. 
When this is done, any balances remaining will be turned In. There are other 
buildings, occupied since January 1, 1914. for which the small subsequent con* 
tracts will be let during the fiscal year 1915, and those balances will then be 
turned in. Although the list given above shows balances amounting to but 
120.014.03, it is expected that at the end of the fiscal year 1915 this sum will be 
Increased to several hundred thousand dollars on account of balances remaining 
•»n other buildings, which at that date It will be definitely determined may be 
«*nt to the surplus fund. 

M*ECIAL REPORT OF SUPERVISING ARCHITECT ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

QUESTIONS. 

[See p. 936.] 

The Chairman. In your annual report you say that you have 
i undertaken, in connection with your report, to prepare a somewhat 
comprehensive summary of the public building work, but because 
of the magnitude of the subject and the many important phases to 
discuss, it is impossible to have it completed within the time set in 



144 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

section 9 of the sundry civil appropriation act approved August 1, 
1914. That is the provision requiring manuscript to be transmitted 
to the Public Printer by a certain time? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. I was uncertain, from the wording of 
the provision, whether it referred only to reports of heads of execu- 
tive departments and independent establishments or the reports of the 
subordinates as well. 

The Chairman. That report is not included in this report? 

Mr. Wendeboth. No, sir. 

The Chairman. What is it about? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I thought, after having studied the public-build- 
ing work for something over two years, that it might not be a bad 
idea to submit a general statement of the whole matter. I found 
from talking with Members of Congress who called at the office, 
talking with members of the House Committee on Public Buildings 
and Grounds, and from my experience before this committee that 
there seemed to be a considerable dearth of information regarding 
the extent and character of the public-building work, the activities 
of the Office of the Supervising Architect, its organization, etc 
After discussing it generally with Mr. Newton I undertook the 
preparation of a comprehensive statement of the whole matter. It 
became so extensive, however, because it is such a large subject, that 
I did not have it ready at the date referred to. Fearing that the 
portion of the report which has been printed might not be available 
at the convening of Congress, we sent do^n that much. 

The Chairman. Have you that report? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I have the manuscript about completed. 

The Chairman. Please send it to us. [See p. 936.] 

Mr. Newton. It is about 1,000 pages. 

Mr. Wenderoth. It is a thousand pages of typewriting, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Newton. And covers every phase of all the activities of the 
office. 

mechanical equipment. 

[See p. 148.] 

The Chairman. The next item is "Mechanical equipment," and 
the appropriation is $445,000, and you are asking tor $566,525. 
What was your unexpended balance in 1914? 

Mr. Wenderoth. $2,269.86, corrected to December 15. 

The Chairman. And 1913? 

Mr. Wenderoth. $6,570.83. 

The Chairman. How much have you on hand now? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The appropriation for 1915 is $445,000. We are 
required to allot each appropriation by months, as you know. The 
expenditures and liabilities to December 15, 1914, were $221,356.91, 
leaving at that date an unencumbered balance of $223,643.09 for the 
remaining six and one-half months of the fiscal year. In other 
words, we have about cut it in two. I might say, Mr. Chairman, 
that the expenditures from this appropriation show a steady increase 
from the fiscal year 1910 to the fiscal year 1914, although the appro- 
priations do not increase as uniformly. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 145 

i 

The Chairman. You made that statement before? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The truth of the matter is we discovered that you 
were getting 25 per cent more than you could expend in any one year, 
an dhaving these big unexpended balances, we cut the appropriations 
down to where they were about the same as your justifiable expendi- 
tures. 

Mr. Wenderoth. You may be right, Mr. Chairman, as to earlier 
estimates and appropriations. The only point we wish to make is 
that, inasmuch as 70 to 80 buildings are being completed each year, 
the cost of the upkeep of the property and the maintenance of these 
buildings must also increase. It is not that these 70 or 80 build- 
ings necessarily reauire any attention the first year they are in com- 
mission; it is merely that we have that much more property to look 
after. In other words, we have now, I think, about 850 completed 
buildings in commission. Necessarily the cost of maintaining that 
physical property must be more than when we had 425 buildings in 
commission, and so while we may not in each year expend anything 
at all upon the buildings placed in commission the previous year, 
the mere fact that we have an increasing number of buildings results 
in an increasing cost of maintenance and operation. The whole 
question is, What is an equitable increase in the appropriation ? We 
are not in a position to prove these figures as to what we need the 
succeeding year, because our analyses have been more or less amateur 
and we have not the kind of figures that we should have to present to 
you. 

The Chairman. As a matter of fact, last year, although your esti- 
mate was $536,500 and your appropriation $445,000, we gave you all 
vou asked? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; we asked for authority 

The Chairman (interposing). You asked for $86,525 for the cen- 
tral electric alarm system? 

Mr. Wenderoth. You gave us everything except that. 

The Chairman. And $4,000 increase for the Treasury, Winder, 
and Butler Buildings? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is within the total. 

The Chairman. Taking out those items we gave you $445,000, just 
about what you asked ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. Taking out of this estimate for 1916 
the sum of $86,525, leaves a difference of $480,000, which is $35,000 
nore than the 1915 appropriation. The increase of $35,000 is ac- 
'>unted for in this manner : We .allow $10,000 for what we consider 
the normal increase. In fact, we have all the time more buildings 
regardless of whether the buildings were completed last year or the 
year before. The difference of $25,000 is allowed for the installa- 
tion of short-lift elevators for the convenience of the Post Office 
Department in order that we may use basements of buildings for 
parrel-post service. 

The Chairman. And you now contemplate expending $10,000 for 
pneumatic-tube service? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Those are the tubes we own that connect the 
customhouses and the appraisers' stores in New York City. We 

72785—16 10 



146 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

have authority to expend up to $10,000 if we need it. If not, it is 
available for anything else. 

The Chairman. As a matter of fact, you do not expend that 
amount? 
' Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir ; it is a matter of protection. 

The Chairman. For an emergency? 

JUx. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

ELKCTR1CAL PROTECTION TO VAULTS. 

Mr. Chairman, the Secretary has sent a letter to the Speaker re- 

?;arding tjiis item of central electric burglar alarm devices, on page 
9, suggesting, if you care to give that any consideration at all, it 
might be well to take it out of this appropriation, reducing the 
amount to $480,000 and re-creating the electric protection appropria- 
tion somewhat in its former form. The House being in recess, we 
could not deliver the letter to the Speaker, and so I handed it to 
Jf r. Courts this morning. We feel conscientious about this matter, 
because a number of custodians of buildings, the Director of the 
Mint, and the Post Office Department, have been worried about the 
funds in their care. 

(Note. — The letter to the Speaker is printed as House Document 
No. 1450, Sixty- third Congress, third session.) 

The Chairman. The type of buildings in which it is proposed to 
install this device have never been burglarized and all the burglaries 
have been in the smaller places where nobody ever dreams of putting 
(he device in? • 

Mr. Wenderoth. In the buildings rented by the Post Office De- 
partment. 

The Chairman. Or the other buildings? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I do not know. Mr. Chairman, we have, for 
instance, an old mint in New Orleans which formerly was protected 
vith the electric burglar-alarm system. 

The Chairman. What is it used for now? 

Mr. Wenderoth. It is used as an assay office, but there is a vault 
hi the basement of the building which contains $22,475,000 ; a storage 
vault. 

The Chairman. In coin? 

Mr. Wenderoth. In coin. It is in an ell of the building on the 
ground level. The door opens into a courtyard which is accessible 
from the street. It is in a very unfrequented part of the city. Of 
course, in order to make a "haul" that would be worth while, it 
would be necessary to take away a wagon load. We appreciate that. 
JJevertheless, the custodians of all of this property, not only in New 
Orleans but the cashiers in post offices and other officials, are very 
jnuch disturbed about the matter. Because the Treasury Department 
Js the custodian of these buildings, the department can do nothing 
less than submit the matter again to your consideration. If a second 
time you refuse it, we will feel that we have no more responsibility. 

The Chairman. The department has not yet decided whether it is 
going to deposit all that money in the Federal reserve banks. If it 
does, the whole Independent Treasury system will be changed. 

Mr. Newton. In the case of the subtreasury in Chicago the As- 
sistant Treasurer declines to be responsible under his bond unless he 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 147 

can get some protection. He has come along with several proposals, 
his last one suggesting an arrangement with the Pinkertons at $25 
a month for a night watchman. 

The Chairman. How many watchmen have we there now T ? 

Mr. Xewton. We have none available for that service. 

Mr. Wenderoth. The Treasury Department watchmen are not 
used to watch funds. 

The Chairman. What do they watch ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. They watch the buildings. The other depart- 
ments would be glad to have us watch the contents of the vaults. 

The Chairman. At night? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We do not furnish watchmen to safeguard the 
funds of the other departments. 

Mr. Mondell. Does not the Treasury Department have such 
watchmen i 

Mr. Wenderoth. We have such watchmen as we employ to take 
rare of the building, as a building, but one of our watchmen will 
patrol the entire structure. Our watchmen are generally employed 
only when the buildings are open to the public. 

The Chairman. The question is still undecided whether all these 
funds are to be turned over to the Federal reserve banks? 

Mr. Newton. So far as the subtreasuries are concerned, I think; 
jes. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Here is a latter from the Assistant Treasurer 
at Chicago. Referring to the vault protection, writing under date 
of September 23, 1914, he states : 

This matter is of the greatest importance, not only to me but to the depart- 
ment as well. The amount of funds carried in this office is such that every 
precaution should be taken to safeguard it. I am informed that every bank 
<>f any importance in the city of Chicago, none of which carries an amount. of 
currency so large as does this office, is provided with this electrical service and 
relies to a very great extent on its efficiency. 

The system we recommend installing is our own system, and after 
the initial cost of installation has been met the annual cost of main- 
tenance is almost negligible. 

The Chairman. After we get them all in we might have a lot of 
vaults without anything in them. 

Mr. Wenderoth. There will be the funds of the post-office cash- 
iers and the internal-revenue collectors. 

The Chairman. We went into the electrical system last year 
pretty thoroughly? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. At any rate, the Secretary has written 
this letter to the Speaker, suggesting that if you give the system 
favorable consideration it be done in a separate apprapriation, and 
that authority for the same be taken out of the estimate for me- 
chanical equipment. 

The Chairman. The $86,000 is merely for installation? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much have you included for operation? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Further on, in the estimate for operating sup- 
plies, is the sum of $500. The cost of operation is negligible, be- 
cause it is merely a matter of renewing dry batteries, etc. It does 
not call for personal services. If the $86,000 is in a separate appro- 
priation and not all of it is expended the balance returns to the 



148 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Treasury and is not available for anything else. Of course, as to 
storage vaults filled with silver dollars, etc., the bulk of the mat- 
ter would be its own protection, but a great many of these other 
vaults have paper money and valuable stocks. In a good many of 
the post offices the vaults have a great deal of very valuable stock, 
stamps, etc. 

TREASURY, BUTLER, WINDER, AND AUDITORS' BUILDINGS. 

The Chairman. For the Treasury, Butler, Winder, and Audi- 
tors' Buildings you ask for $12,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. When we had the Treasury, Butler, and Winder 
Buildings only the allotment was $9,000, which was an average of 
$3,000 a building. We are asking, now that we have four buildings, 
that the allotment remain at the rate of $3,000 a building, or $12,000. 

The Chairman. You exclude the most important thing, that is the 
generating plant. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That would largely increase the allotment. 

The Chairman. It is excluded? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. It was excluded before. 

The Chairman. And the whole thing is taken care of by the 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We have the elevators, the extending of the con- 
duits, making incidental adjustments in the sanitary work, etc. 

The Chairman. We gave you $69,500. 

Mr. Wenderoth. But the operation of the building entails a con- 
tinuing expense for the same reason that you give us several mil- 
lion dollars for the 800 buildings. 

The Chairman. We increased that last year? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The increase was $1,000. 

The Chairman. How many buildings did you have in commission 
on the 1st of July, 1913, the 1st of July, 1914, and what number do 
you expect to have the 1st of July, 1915 ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I will insert a correct statement. 

Buildings completed and in operation July 1, 1913 757 

Buildings completed during fiscal year 1914 67 

Buildings completed and in operation July 1, 1914 824 

Besides the 67 buildings completed during the fiscal year 1914, there were 
completed 9 extensions. These are not included, because as soon as an exten- 
sion is completed it merges into the original building. 

MARINE HOSPITAL STATIONS. 

Stations completed and in operation July 1, 1913, 28. 
No additional buildings built during fiscal year 1914. 

QUARANTINE STATIONS. 

Stations completed and in operation July 1, 1913, 26. 

During the fiscal year 1914 additional buildings were erected to increase the 
facilities of quarantine stations (San Juan, P. R., and Honolulu, Hawaii), but 
these are not counted, inasmuch as they do not increase the number of stations. 

During the first half of the present fiscal year there have been completed 30 
new buildings and 3 extensions. This is apparently below normal, but in 
reality there are 9 buildings ready, the occupancy of which has been delayed 
owing to the fact that the postmasters did not want to move in until after the 
holidays. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 149 

In addition to these, it is expected that 40 buildings and 5 extensions will be 
completed daring the remainder of the fiscal year, making a total of 79 build- 
ings and 8 extensions during the fiscal year 1915. 

It would therefore appear that July 1, 1915, there would be completed and 
In operation not less than 90S buildings under the control of the Treasury 
Department This does not include any extensions, any Jbuildings which on 
completion will be turned over to other departments, any extensions to the 
facilities at the 54 marine hospitals and quarantine stations, or any miscel- 
laneous buildings, such as the animal house at the Hygienic Laboratory, or 
any special repairs. 

VAULTS AND SAFES. . 

The Chairman. The next item is " Vaults and safes," and the ap- 
propriation is $100,000 and you are asking for $110,000. Have we 
not supplied all the buildings in the United States with vaults and 
safes? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, Mr. Chairman; and we never will. The 
construction appropriation for a building is availably for the built- 
in vaults; they are a part of the structure. The movable safes in 
the new buildings, which we term the safe equipment, are chargeable 
to this appropriation. All increases in the safe equipment in com- 
pleted buildings are chargeable to this appropriation. After the 
building is completed if an additional vault is needed it is chargeable 
to this appropriation. When we move officials to a completed build- 
ing this appropriation pays for moving the safes. Then we have 
the post-omce lock boxes. If the postmaster finds that he has an in- 
creased demand for lock boxes, the appropriation for repairs and 
preservation will make the change in the post-office screen so as to 
accommodate an additional number of lock boxes. This appropria- 
tion, however, pays for the lock boxes, although when we are erect- 
ing the building the lock boxes are paid for out of the construction 
appropriation. This appropriation is, as it were, always active, and 
as the number of completed buildings increases the expenditures 
must increase, the same as with repairs and preservation. 

The Chairman. You contemplate expending 50 per cent as much 
to repair safes in old buildings and change their combinations as 
you do to buy new safes. Is not that a very high percentage? The 
changing of the combination does not take long. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Seventy thousand dollars is the additional equip- 
ment of safes in new buildings. 

The Chairman. That is the safes? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Buying new safes. Thirty-five thousand dollars 
is made up of additional safes in old buildings, repairing existing 
safes and changing combinations. The phrase " safes in old build- 
ings " means extra safes ; it is not entirely for repairing safes. We 
spend quite a considerable sum in additional safe equipment. 

The Chairman. That includes, besides repairing, new safes? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir : extending the safe equipment in the old 
buildings. 

The Chairman. These safes are for new buildings, buildings not 
vet in commission ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. A portion of the appropriation is for safes in 
new buildings. They cost us about $1,000 per building. 

The Chairman. Does anybody know how many safes we own? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; because the Treasury Department owns 
t great many, the Post Office Department owns a great many, and 



150 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

various other departments own safes. When we erect a building 
that accommodates other branches of the service we find that some- 
times they have safes in their custody which they have bought. Then 
we use this appropriation to move the safes into the new building. 
I do not believe anybody knows how many safes we own, and I do 
not know that it would be possible to ascertain it. The Post Office 
Department sells its old saies, and the proceeds are included in the 
gross postal receipts. Mr. Chairman, the additional safe equipment 
in each of the 70 or 80 buildings that we complete each vear costs 
about $1,000. 

The Chairman. You buy various sized safes? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; money-order safe, postal-savings safe 
cabinets, the safe for the postmaster — there are several types of safes 
according to the requirements. 

The Chairman. And it averages about $1,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Are those supposed to be burglar proof, or only 
fireproof? 

Mr. Wenderoth. They are fireproof safes and reasonably burglar 
proof, but an acetylene name would go through one of the safe doors 
in a very few moments. They really protect the contents of the safe 
from petty pilfering within the building. 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

The Chairman. The next item is "General expenses," and your 
appropriation is $563,560, and your estimate for the next year is the 
same. This is the active organization of the department f 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. It is now gauged to turn out how much work ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I have only one year's figures. While I hope 
to keep up to that, and hope that it will set a standard, I would not 
care to promise it until we approach the end of this year. As near 
as I can figure, the organization provided for in " General expenses " 
and the clerical organization provided for in the legislative bill 
enables us to place under contract about $7,000,000 worth of what 
we call new construction a year. Of course, our total annual expen- 
ditures for all our activities are now about $18,000,000 a year. We 
are placing under contract about $7,000,000 a year in new buildings, 
extensions, and special repairs from our own plans. That does not 
include anything from plans of private architects or the work of any 
special organizations. 

The Chairman. In addition to this $563,560 you have additional 
employees provided for in the legislative bill, aggregating how 
much? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The appropriation for clerical employees, as I 
recall, aggregates $220,800. The Secretary decided that the estimate 
for the support of the office for the year 1916 should remain the same 
as the appropriations for the present year. 

SITE AGENT8 AND SITES. 

The Chairman. Last year we initiated a new method of selecting 
sites, and provided funds especially for the compensation of men 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 19i6. 15l 

to be employed and for their traveling expenses. Have the sites 
been all selected? 

Mr. Xewton. Not all selected, but all inspected once, some of them 
twice, and some of them three or four times. There is a small bal- 
ance out of that special appropriation that we are holding back to 
pay for reinspection work. 

The Chairman. What was the result of that scheme? 

Mr. Newton. It was generally very satisfactory. We drew some 
good ones and some who were not so good. You recall, of course, 
that the purpose of the act was to enable us to take, outside of the 
architects force, special men for the inspection of sites. We have 
employed altogether, I think, 10. The majority of these men did 
very good work. In some cases it has been necessary to put on 
experts for reinspection. We have retained the best of the 10 fot 
that purpose. 

The Chairman. Is it working out in a manner that justifies your 
expectation that you would save money on the purchasing of the 
sites? 

Mr. Newton. Yes, sir; we have saved upward of $300,000 now on 
the authorizations of about 90 sites that have been selected. There 
have been only that number actually acquired out of the 300 au- 
thorizations. By very careful scrutiny and investigation by the 
department and through these agents we have made that saving. 

The Chairman. How do you reach the conclusion that you have 
saved about $300,000? • 

Mr. Newton. It is not a conclusion ; it is an actual fact. 

The Chairman. $300,000 from the authorizations! 

Mr. Newton. Yes, sir. I will give you an illustration. At Dallas* 
Tex., there was an authorization of $300,000 for a site. We obtained 
that site after four or five months of negotiation for $250,000, al- 
though the assessors of the city had sworn that it was worth $305,000. 

The Chairman. Was not that due to some competition between 
several sites? 

Mr. Newton. Usually there is more or less competition in all these 
cases. 

The Chairman. How do you determine that you mad$ this saving 
as a result of this new system? 

Mr. Newton. We use the inspectors in this way : The first Inspec- 
tion will be made. The agent reports his first, second, and third 
choices. We will say that the appropriation is $10,000 for a site* 
It usually follows that all sites offered in that town are placed at 
$10,000 or more. Then if we are not satisfied that we are getting a 
site for a reasonable figure we send another inspector there and, per* 
haps, he will get a reduction. When the time comes for making the 
^election I usually send t>vo or three telegrams, about like this : 

Your site, among others, is being considered. What is your lowest figure? 

In that way we usually get a reduction. We get from the post* 
master, from the assessors, from the mayor, from the city clerk, ana 
from anyone who is competent to know, statements as to the actual 
value of the property. 

The Chairman. You sav that these 90 sites have been purchased 
at n saving of about $800,000? 



152 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Newton. Considerably more than that. The last figures I had 
were about $285,000, and that amount is much larger now. 

The Chairman. Less than the authorizations? 

Mr. Newton. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Please put in the record a statement showing the 
total authorizations for those 90 sites. 

Mr. Newton. Yes, sir. 

Summary of Savings Effected in Purchases of Land Authorized in the 1913 

Public-Building Bill. 

cases where site only was authorized. 

Total amount authorized in the 40 cases which have been settled to 

date $591, 500. 00 

Actual amount spent under these authorizations 496,394.7?* 

Saving effected 95,105.25 

cases involving purchases of additional land. 

Amount saved in negotiating with the vendors in the 7 cases set- 
tled : The difference between the price first asked by the vendor 
and the price agreed upon by the department represents a 
saving of ^ 44. 900. 00 

OASES INVOLVING PUBCHA8E8 OF LAND WHERE BOTH SITE AND BUILDING 
WERE AUTHORIZED IN THE SAID ACT. 

Total amount authorized in 52 cases settled, $3,912,500. 

20 per cent of the above is $782,500.00 

Actual amount spent under authorization 544, S26. 00 

Saving effected 237,(574.00 

(Note. — Twenty per cent of the total authorization is taken for 
the reason that this is the average percentage reserved for site 
where site and building are authorized in the same act. In these 
cases the difference between the price first asked by the vendor 
and the price finnlly agreed upon by the department represents a 
saving of $70,974.) 

Total grand saving effected 377,679.25 

In a great many of the above cases the department was able, by negotiation 
with the vendors, to obtain, without Increase in price, a larger parcel of land, 
which is the converse of obtaining the same land for less money. The figures 
given naturally do not show this important advantage accruing to the Govern- 
ment. 

The Chairman. The agents cost — their compensation and travel- 
ing expenses— $30,000? 

Mr. Newton. Yes, sir; $15,000 for salaries and $15,000 for ex- 
penses. 

Mr. Mondell. You say that in the past ordinarily the site has cost 
approximately the amount authorized ? 

Mr. Newton. So far as I can discover there has never been any 
particular effort made to secure a reduction from the authorization 
or the original proposal. I can not discover that men were ever 
sent out for that purpose, that there was ever any general reinspec- 
tion, or that any particular effort was made by the department to 
secure reduction in price. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 158 

Mr. Wendeboth. Of course, there are some cases where there were 
savings. I recall the site at Portland, Oreg., where the limit of cost 
was $500,000 and the site cost $340,000. This statement will shew 
the authorization and amount expended for each site already 
acquired. 

ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITIONS. 

The Chairman. The' next item is "Architectural competitions. 1 ' 
This is a reappropriation ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, Mr. Chairman. The original appropria- 
tion of $175,000, which was reappropriated from time to time, is 
now about used up. We are not asking for any reappropriation of 
the balance, but asking for a further appropriation of $65,000. We 
had $175,000 in 1913. The balance was reappropriated in 1914 and 
the balance of that in 1915. Now we are asking for $65,000 addi- 
tional. 

The Chairman. You are asking for $65,000. Why? This appro- 
priation was to enable the Secretary of the Treasury to make pay- 
ments for architectural services on contracts entered into prior to 
the repeal of the Tarsney Act? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. There were certain contracts then in existence ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many contracts are there now ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. There appear to be seven. We have in the em- 
ploy of the department seven architects whose services have not been 
completed. Then there may be small balances due others whose serv- 
ices have meen completed but the accounts not as yet closed. The 
seven are Denver, Colo.; Hilo, Hawaii; Honolulu, Hawaii; New 
Haven, Conn. ; New Orleans, La. ; Orange, X. J. ; and the San Fran- 
cisco subtreasury. 

The Chairman. And Boston, Mass.? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is paid from the building appropriation. 

The Chairman. That is not paid out of this appropriation? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Hilo was not under the Tarsney Act? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; it was placed in this appropriation spe- 
cifically. 

The Chairman. Authorized specifically in the act itself? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. That was because the Hilo architect 
was previously paid from the appropriation for " General expenses." 
When that appropriation was made entirely for the support of the 
Office of the Supervising Architect it was necessary to provide else- 
where for further payments to the Hilo architect. 

The Chairman. You have spent all of the $175,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You ask that this appropriation be available dur- 
ing the current fiscal year as well as during the next fiscal year. Do 
you expect to meet some payments out of it ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The reason for that is that each time you reap- 
propriated the balance it read : "To be immediately available/' and tne 
Division of Bookkeeping and Warrants digested it to cover two 
years, such as 1913-14, 1914-15, etc. In this case the appro* 



154 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

will be in a bill which presumably will be passed by the 4th of March, 
and there will be four months of the fiscal year 1915 still to run. 
Therefore, we inserted the necessary wording so that any accounts 
falling due after March 4 could be paid without waiting until July 1. 

The Chairman. What is the balance of your $175,000 appro- 
priation ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. This statement I have is of December 23, 1914, 
and of course it changes from month to month. On that date, for 
the fiscal year 1915 we had unexpended $18,327.14 and we had $38,- 
731.14 estimated as outstanding. When the latter amount will fall 
due, we can not tell. 

The Chairman. How much money do you have now? 

Mr. Wbnderoth. That uses up the entire original appropriation. 

The Chairman. You have that $38,731.14? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We have $38,731.14 on December 23, but it will 
not complete the payments on all the contracts. 

The Chairman. And you are asking for $65,000 more? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Does that cover all the commissions which you 
anticipate will be earned under these outstanding contracts? 

Mr. Wenderoth. In so far as we are able to estimate them. Of 
course, we do not know until the buildings are completed and we 
can ascertain the final cost of the work upon which the architect is 
entitled to fees. 

Mr. Mondeli*. Do you anticipate that this amount will be due be- 
fore the close of the coming fiscal year ? 

Mr. Wendeworth. Before the close of the fiscal year 1916? 

Mr. Mondell. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Wenderoth. They will all be due except at Honolulu, which 
has not been commenced. The payments are really to cover exist- 
ing contract liabilities rather than actual payments which may fall 
due during the fiscal year 1916. The estimate of $65,000 might, 
perhaps, be reduced in so far as actual payments are concerned. 

The existing balance of the original appropriation of $175,000 
for "Architectural competitions," which is being reduced con- 
stantly as payment on account are made to architects, will be en- 
tirely expended before very long. It will then be necessary, as 
stated, to appropriate the sum of $65,000 to meet outstanding obli- 

fations existing at this time, in so far as that may be determined, 
'or one contract — that for the services on the building at Honolulu- 
no payments whatever. have been made since the first payment fol- 
lowing the award of the competition. The architects have not been 
enabled to- commence the preparation of their actual scale working 
drawings because of a difficulty over the site, which apparently can 
not be straightened out without legislation. At the present time 
contract liabilities exist with the architects for the Honolulu build- 
ing in thesum of $35,320, on which no payments will be made until 
after the scale working drawings have been prepared and approved. 
It would be desirable to obtain a portion of this sum in the event that 
amendatory legislation is passed and work on the plans may be com- 
pleted. It is estimated that about $15,000 would be sufficient to meet 
this contingency, should it arise before the expiration of the fiscal 
year 1916. The estimate of $65,000 could, therefore, be reduced to 
$45,000, with the understanding, of course, that the difference of 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 155 

$20,000 would be submitted in a subsequent estimate, presumably that 
for the fiscal year 1917. 

The Chairman. Why is it that you want $65,000 more? 

Mr. Wenderoth. There are three reasons, Mr. Chairman. In the 
first place the estimate of $175,000 was an estimate of the amount 
which would be due to meet all further payments to the architects 
then in the employ of the department under the Tarsney Act, in- 
cluding the field architect, on the basis of existing contracts. When 
we eiiwi into a contract with an architect we agree that until the final 
cost of the building has been actually ascertained his payments on 
account will be based on an estimated cost, which is a certain per- 
centage of the limit of cost that we fix. He is not entitled to per- 
centages on any expenditures that the Supervising Architect man- 
ages. After several years certain of those contracts were closed out, 
and we ascertained definitely the amount on which the architect was 
entitled to payments. In several cases it was more than the esti- 
mated amount. In addition to that, the limits of cost of several of 
the buildings have been increased and the contracts with the archi- 
tects amended to cover those increases. This means, of course, an 
increase in the fees. 

PORTLAND, OREO., PUBLIC BUILDING, ARCHITECTS FOR. 

In addition to that, we have a little account on the Portland, 
Oreg., building that we would very much like to settle in order to 
be equitable to the competitors. The act of March 4, 1913, authorized 
the Secretary of the Treasury to hold a competition — it made it 
mandatory on him — among no less than five architects for the com- 
mission to design the building in Portland, Oreg., as a post office. 
Senator Lane then became interested in the matter, and in October 
of the same year, after the competitors were at work on their draw- 
ings, had the legislation amended so that the building should be 
constructed for the post office and such other governmental offices as 
could be accommodated in it. That required a material change in 
the program for the competition. The architects were then working 
on their drawings, and they were compelled to throw away what they 
had done and begin over again. Because that was not their fault 
we thought it would be fair to reimburse those of the architects who 
did not win the competition. There were five^ architects, and four of 
them had expenses which they tell us totaled $2,074.44 up to the time 
when we required them to start anew. We would like to reimburse 
them for that. 

The Chairman. This does not say that. This is to pay the second 
group. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; this is the second group. We really 
had two sets of competitors for that building. 

The Chairman. But this is the first group. 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. The first group will not be paid any- 
thing. 

The Chairman. Why? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Because the Secretary withdrew his invitation 
to them, and any expense to which they had subjected themselves up 
to the time the invitation was withdrawn was their own loss. 

The Chairman. I do not Understand that. You invited five archi- 
tects to prepare drawings — is that right? 



166 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Wenderoth. We invited seven originally* 

The Chairman. And they went on untu'the law was changed? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; there was an intermediate stage. 

The Chairman. Then you had three groups? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; two groups. First, the Secretary in- 
vited seven architects, and each accepted the invitation. Then they 
read the program and thought they would like to have it changed 
in certain particulars, but as they had already accepted the invita- 
tion the Secretary felt that they were not in a position to ask to have 
the program changed, and he withdrew his invitation. To be exact, 
he withdrew the invitation to six of the seven, because one of the 
competitors offered no protest. Those men have no claim and we are 
not asking that they be reimbursed for any expenses. They con- 
stitute the first group. The Secretary then selected a second group 
of five architects, one of whom was in the first competition, but had 
made no protest. Out of the five in the second group a selection was 
made of an architect in San Francisco. We do not feel that he is 
entitled to any consideration because of the extra work, as he won 
the commission and that should sufficiently reimburse him for any 
additional labor. The other four, however, lost out, and they were 
compelled to undergo expenses for drawings which the department 
required them to throw away because of the change in the legislation. 

The Chairman. How much does that amount to? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The claims that have been submitted amount tc 
$2,074.44. 

The Chairman. Are they to be paid anything for participating in 
a competition, although unsuccessful 

Mr. Wenderoth (interposing). That is what we are trying to do 
up to the point 

The Chairman (interposing). I do not mean that 

Mr. Wenderoth. After that? 

The Chairman. For instance, they participated in a competition 
and incurred certain expenses; will they get any reimbursement on 
that account? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. This is what they lost up to the time 
that we changed the program. Whatever they lost up to the time 
we made the change, we are asking to be reimbursed. We are only 
asking that they be reimbursed up to that point. 

The Chairman. You say that in certain of these buildings the con- 
tracts were modified because of increases in the limits of cost : which 
buildings were those? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The Denver, Colo., building, for which the limit 
of cost was increased $400,000; the Honolulu building, for which 
the limit of cost was increased $225,000, and the New Haven, Conn., 
building, for which the limit of cost was increased $400,000. 

The Chairman. Are those all? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

BOSTON, MASS., CUSTOMHOUSE, PAYMENT TO PEABODY & STEABNS. 

The Chairman. There were three of them. Now, does that cover 
the Boston case? 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Mr. Peabody was the architect of the Boston 
customhouse, was he not? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 157 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. He has written me a letter requesting that the law 
be changed so as to permit the payment to him of about $18,000 addi- 
tional, or the sum that he would have earned on the $300,000 that 
Congress authorized to be expended in excess of $1,500,000, regard- 
less of the provision in that act prohibiting the payment of any addi- 
tional amount for architects' services for that excess cost. I want to 
ask you about Peabody & Stearns, because Mr. Peabody has written 
to me, and I want to know whether the department has any recom- 
mendation to make in regard to the matter. 

Mr. Newton. No, sir. I am not entirely familiar with it, except 
that Mr. Peabody has called upon me ana discussed the matter. I 
only know his contention. He claims, I believe, that on the basic 
contract he is entitled to a commission on the full amount expended. 

The Chairman. That is what he contends. 

Mr. Newton. Yes, sir. His contention is that that was his con- 
tract. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I am quite sure that the limit of cost was fixed 
by Congress at $1,800,000, and that Peabody & Stearns had a con- 
tract in accordance with that limit ; that afterwards we were given 
authority to pay for the moving expenses and the rent of temporary 
quarters out of the limit of cost, which reduced it about $300,000. 
Then the limit was restored. I know that the Treasury Department 
entered into a contract with Peabody & Stearns on the basis of an 
ultimate limit of cost of $1,800,000, or whatever proportion of that 
might be finally expended from their plans and specifications. Such 
a contract exists, and at that time the limit of cost fixed by Congress 
was $1,800,000. Of course, the Treasury Department would not enter 
into a contract for expenditures in excess of any authorized limit. 

The Chairman. Hi$ contract calls for 6 per cent? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Those are trust prices. 

Mr. Wenderoth. The ultimate expenditure has not been deter- 
mined. I imagine it will be, so far as their plans are concerned, 
about $1,725,000. They receive no commission on their own com- 
mission and no commission on anything that the Supervising 
Architect attends to. For instance, there is a very large clock for 
which the architects designed the stone face and hands, but they did 
not design the clock machinery. We excluded that from their 
work and we are looking after it. There are, also, a great manv 
counters in the building, and we are attending to them. They will 
obtain no commission on those counters. 

The Chairman. The original act provided also for the expenses 
incidental to the rental of temporary quarters to house the force 
during the enlargement of the building, and it was estimated that 
that rental and other expense would be $300,000. Their original 
estimate was, if I recall it correctly, that it would take about 
$2,000,000 to put up the kind of building that ought to be put up 
there, and they claimed that they could not design a building that 
would cost $1,500,000. They prepared plans for a building that 
would cost about $1,800,000. Then, we modified the law by elimi- 
nating the cost of removal and housing so as to bring it to $1,800,000, 
but on the condition that the architects should not be paid in excess 



158 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

of 6 per cent upon the original authorization. They had submitted, 
I think, a tentative proposition on a building to cost $2,000,000. 

Mr. Newton. What is he asking a commission on now ? 

The Chairman. He asks for a commission on the amount above 
$1,500,000. 

Mr. Wenderoth. He is asking a commission on the difference be- 
tween $1,500,000 and the actual expenditure. The latter will amount 
to about $1,725,000. 

The Chairman. Have you any recommendation to make? 

Mr. Wenderoth*. I think it should be paid. You do not desire us 
to accept gratuitous personal services, but you are forcing us to do 
it in this case. 

The Chairman. That was the condition on which he went ahead 
with the work. They contracted to do the work for a commission of 
6 per cent on $1,500,000. 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. The legislation requires that the archi- 
tects shall be paid a fee on $1,500,000, but they are required to 
furnish drawings on all of the work up to the ultimate limit of 
expenditure, with certain exceptions. There is no manner of re- 
stricting their work tb an expenditure of $1,500,000 out of a total 
of $1,800,000. 

Statement of legislation for the Boston customhouse. 

LEGISLATION. 

Act of M»»y 30, 1908. site $500,000.00 

Act of Mar. 4, 1900, enlargement, etc., previous act amended and 
limit set at $1,800,000 1,300,000.00 

1,800,000.00 
Amount expended for rent of temporary quarters as per act of 

July 10, 1912 '- 270, 324.60 

1,529,675.40 
Act of Aug. 1, 1914, reimburses appropriation for expenditures on 
account of temporary quarters 270, 324. 60 

1,800,000.00 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

May 30, 1908 ^ZZ 

An* 24 1912 250,000.00 

jun g e t X:::::::::::::::::.:--: ^^°° 

1,800,000.00 

Total encumbrances to date 1,776,001.14 

The act of March 4, 1909, provides, among other things : 

***** That the total fost of said enlargement, remodeling, or exten- 
sion of said customhouse building shall not exceed one million eight hundred 
thousand dollars, including expenses incident to the temporary removal of the 
force employed in the customhouse during the enlargement, remodeling, or 

^Thl contract with the architects, Messrs. Peabody & Stearns, was dated 
December 24, 1909, and provides for a commission of 6 per cent on an estimated 
amount of $1,415,094.34 until the actual construction cost is a^^ 1 ** 1 - ,.. n . 
The act approved July 10, 1912, amends the act of March 4 1909, by striking 
out the woVds "• • • including expenses Incident to the temporary re- 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 159 

moval of the force employed in the customhouse during the enlargement, re- 
modeling, or extension/* and provides as follows: 

"That such amounts as the Secretary of the Treasury has charged against 
the appropriation for customhouse, Boston, Massachusetts, for expenses incident 
to the temporary removal of the force employed in the customhouse during the 
enlargement, remodeling.' or extension of said customhouse shall be repaid to said 
appropriation from moneys in the Treasury to be hereafter appropriated) : Pro- 
vided. That no compensation shall be paid to architects additional to the 
amounts now due or payable under the original limit of cost of said building, 
to wit, one million five hundred thousand dollars, or because of the increased 
limit of cost provided by this act." 

Department letter dated August 7, 1912, advises the architects of the fact 
that their commissions are to be based on a limit of $1,500,000. 

it will be noted from the above that the contract with the architects of 
December 24. 1909. was based on an estimated expenditure of less than 
11,500.000. When, however, the act of July 10, 1912, amended the act of March 
4, 1909, by providiug for the repayment of the expenses incident to the tem- 
porary removal of the force employed in the customhouse, the Treasury De- 
partment approved drawings prepared by the architects which represented an 
ultimate expenditure of $1,800,000, less the architects* commissions and certain 
items which would be taken care of by the Supervising Architect. In view of 
this action by the Treasury Department, it would appear that the architects 
are equitably entitled to a commission on the cost of all work executed from 
their plans and specifications within the limit of $1,800,000. notwithstanding 
the limitation contained in the. act approved July 10, 1912. 

OPERATING FORCE. 

The Chairman. The next item is for operating force of public 
buildings. The current appropriation is $2,650,000, and your esti- 
mate is $2,850,000. What was the unexpended balance of that ap- 
propriation in 19131 

Mr. Wenderoth. In 1913 the unexpended balance was $93,653.84; 
in 1914 the unexpended balance was $88,391.27; and on December 
15, 1914, for the 1915 appropriation, we had a book deficit of $374.72. 

The Chairman. What do you mean by a book deficit? 

Mr. Wenderoth. At the beginning oi each fiscal year we charge 
up as a liability the salaries for the entire year for the members of 
the operating iorce at that time on the roll, although, of course, the 
money is expended in installments during the year. As each addi- 
tional building is placed in commission, we charge up the salaries 
of the force for the balance of that particular fiscal year. We con- 
sider all of these as liabilities, and on that basis, on December 15, 
1914, the appropriation was more than mortgaged and showed a 
deficit of $374.72. Therefore, in order to come out whole at the end 
of this year we must depend absolutely upon what we call lapses, 
because of employees who are absent 

The Chairman (interposing). How do you figure that you will 
require $200,000 more next year? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I can not give you the detailed figures. I can 
only say that it is due to the increase in the force due to new build- 
ings to be placed in commission. 

The Chairman. Tou guess and we guess. We have guessed pretty 
well so far. 

Mr. Wenderoth. At the present time that is about the status of 
it We have no analytical or cost-keeping system, and it is largely 
a guess. In 1913 we actually expended $2,406,346.16. Two years 
later the expenses had gone up $250,000, or at the rate of $125,000 a 



160 , SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

year. At that rate it would be about $2,775,000. The forces in 
many buildings are restricted and the salaries are low. The Post 
Office Department is paying in our own buildings for its own work 
of this same character salaries averaging $780 per year. We have 
the same sort of people, working side by side with the Post Office 
employees, at an average compensation of $610.50 a year. There is 
a great deal of dissatisfaction, and it is becoming a more and more 
difficult problem to handle. This statement shows that for the first 
six months of the fiscal year 1915 we have an apparent deficit of 
$374.72, and we still have, perhaps, 35 or 40 new buildings to be 
placed in commission. We must depend entirely upon lapses to see 
our way through this year. That shows that the appropriation is 
running very close. 

The Chairman. Anyone can administer the public service with 
lavish appropriations and unlimited means, but it takes a competent 
man to do it when the appropriations are restricted to the actual 
needs of the service. 

Mr. Newton. I would like to say in connection with that that it is 
a very great problem, and it is all the time becoming more acute. 
It is a matter of great difficulty, because there is not only this differ- 
ence in the salaries, but in almost every section where there is a large 
building there is a constant demand for additional services. Our 
custodian force is very small in some buildings, and the pressure is 
very intense on the department all the time, both for more men and 
for better salaries. The difference in the salaries, of course, accen- 
tuates that demand. 

The Chairman. In eight years the cost of operating these build- 
ings has increased 100 per cent. That is a serious problem. That is 
just $1,300,000. 

Mr. Wenderoth. If all of the buildings now under construction 
are completed during the fiscal year 1915, we will have 1,000 build- 
ings in operation, and our total operating cost will be about $7,- 
500,000 a year. When all of the buildings now authorized are com- 
pleted there will be about 1,500 buildings, and we will then have an 
annual maintenance and operating cost of about $10,500,000. 

The Chairman. As against what now ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. As against about $6,000,000 now. That, however, 
does not raise any salaries. It will mean continuing at the present 
rate. 

ASSISTANT CUSTODIANS. 

The Chairman. I notice in the detailed statement you have an 
assistant custodian at $2,250. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I think he is in Philadelphia. 

The Chairman. The custodian of a building is designated by the 
Secretary of the Treasury from one of the public officials occupying 
the building, is he not ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And he is usually some one in the Treasury Serv- 
ice if there is any such person in the building? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. However, out of over 800 custodians 
more than 700 are postmasters. 

The Chairman. You have four at $2550 and five at $2,000. Where 
are they located? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



161 



Mr. Wendbupth. I do not know where they are. 

Mr. Newton. One of them is at New York and one at Philadelphia. 

The Chairman. Why do you have assistant custodians like that? 

Mr. Newton. They are in the larger cities. Just how many there 
are I do not know. 

The Chairman. You have four assistant custodians at $2,250 each, 
five at $2,000 each, one at $1,800, eight at $1,600 each, eight at $1,400 
each, and nine at $1,200 each. Do you contemplate continuing that 
many? In 1914 you had 38. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Those others are assistant custodian-janitors. 

The Chairman. You have assistant custodian-janitors, assistant 
custodian-engineers, and assistant janitor-watchmen. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is because they are required to perform 
janitor service. 

ASSISTANT CUSTODIANS. 



Employed 1914. 
S2250: 

Chicago, 111., post office. 

New York courthouse. 

New York customhouse. 

New York post office. 
.^2000: 

Boston, Mass., post office. 

Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Philadelphia, Pa., post office. 

St Louis, Mo., customhouse. 

$1800: 

San Francisco post office. 

*1GOO: 

Baltimore, Md., post office. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., post office. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

New Orleans, La., customhouse. 

New York City appraisers. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., old post office. 

St Louis, Mo., post office. 
*1400: 

Atlanta, Ga., post office. 

Buffalo, N. Y., post office. 

Detroit, Mich., post office. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Louisville, Ky. 

Portland, Ore., post office. 
Providence, R. I. 
S1200: 

Boston, Mass.. customhouse. 

Indianapolis. Ind. 

Minneapolis. Minn., old post office. 



St. Paul. Minn., post office. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Spokane. Wash. 
Tacoma, Wash. 



Contemplated, 1916. 
$2250 : 

Chicago, 111., post office. 

New York courthouse. 

New York customhouse. 

New York pose office. 
$2000: 

Boston, Mass., post office. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Philadelphia, Pa., post office. 

St. Louis, Mo., customhouse. 

Denver, Colo., new post office. 
$1800: 

San Francisco post office. 

San Francisco appraisers. 
$1600: 

Baltimore, Md., post office. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., post office. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

New Orleans, La., customhouse. 

New York City appraisers. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., old post office 

St. Louis, Mo., post office. 
$1400: 

Atlanta, Ga., post office. 

Buffalo, N. Y., post office. 

Boston, Mass., customhouse, 

Detroit, Mich., post office. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Louisville, Ky. 

New Orleans, La., new post office. 

Portland, Ore., post office. 

Providence, R. I. 
$1200: 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Minneapolis, Minn., old post office. 

Minneapolis, Minn., new post office. 

Muskogee, Okla. 

New Haven, Conn., new post office. 

St. Paul, Minn., post office. 

Seattle, Wash. 

Spokane, Wash. 

Tacoma, Wash. 



72785— 1C 



162 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



$1800: 

Sun Francisco appraisers. 
S1500: 

Kansas City, Mo. 
$1400: 

Milwaukee, Wis., post office. 
•51200: 

Brooklyn, N. Y., post office. 
S1000: 

Albany, N. Y. 

Columbus, Ohio. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Toledo, Ohio. 
*900: 

Austin, Tex. 

Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Richmond. Va. 



ASSISTANT CUSTODIAN- JANITOR. 

#1S00: 



$1500: 

Kansas City, Mo. 
$3400: 

Milwaukee, Wis., post office 
$1200: 

Brooklyn, N. Y., post office. 
$1000: 

Albany, N. Y. 

('olumbus, Ohio. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Toledo, Ohio. 
JfaKH) : 

Austin, Tex. 

Richmond, Va. 



ASS18TANT CUSTODIAN-ENGINEEB. 



S1400: 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



$1400: 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



The Chairman. Are the applicants examined? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We have a labor register in New York City that 
includes all of the New York districts — New York, Brooklyn, and 
Jersey City — and those near-by towns. 

The Chairman. Are they in the classified service? 

Mr. Wenderoth. It is a sort of semiclassified service. The exami- 
nation is only physical, and they are rated according to that. This 
refers to laborers and charwomen. All others are in the classified 
service. 

The Chairman. They are appointed according to civil-service 
regulations? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. Wherever the labor regulations are in 
force they are rated according to a physical examination, and the 
custodian may only nominate those who are on the eligible list. 

The Chairman. I notice that you have an assistant chief engineer 
at $2,500, and you have a chief engineer at $2,500. How is that? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I can not say, Mr. Chairman. That chief engi- 
neer may be in a building with other engineers under him. I can 
not say offhand. Those titles have been very much simplified dur- 
ing the last two years. Formerly we sometimes had employees with 
triple designations. 

The Chairman. What do you do with a marble polisher? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We employ a marble polisher in the New York 
customhouse, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Do they do different work from the ordinary 
laborer? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. We have 13 of them. 



NEW YOBK — SUPERVISING CHIKF ENGINEER. 

The Chairman. Over in New York you have a supervising chief 
engineer at $2,900.; he has charge of all the public buildings in the 
district around New York, has he not? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 163 

Mr. Newton.^ Yes, sir. I do not know just how large his district 
is, but it takes in everything in that vicinity. 

The Chairman. Is that all he gets? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is all we pay him. 

The Chairman. Does he get anything else? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I believe he is paid a sum by the Department of 
Labor for assisting it in the supervision of the repairs, etc., at Ellis 
Island. He is a skillful engineer. 

The Chairman. There is a provision of the Revised Statutes which 
prohibits any person who is receiving as much as $2,500 a year from 
receiving more than one salary. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Mr. Fry has supervision of these buildings 

The Chairman (interposing). Section 1763 of the Revised Stat- 
utes provides that " any person who holds an office the salary or any 
compensation attached to which amounts to the sum of $2,500 shall 
not receive compensation for discharging the duties of any other 
office unless expressly authorized by law." 

Mr. Wenderoth. I do not know about that. Mr. I£ry not only 
looks after the repairs and upkeep of those buildings but he super- 
intended the remodeling of the New York courthouse, for' which 
there was an appropriation of $200,000. He was also the superin- 
tendent of construction for the barge office, which cost $500,000, and 
the marine hospital at Stapleton. In addition, we had him to make 
the plans for the ferry slips at the barge office, instead of having 
them made here. He is one of the lowest-priced men in the service 
for the class of work he performs. 

The Chairman. He superintends the construction work at Ellis 
Island? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I believe so. He looks after the engineering 
personnel in all of the Government buildings in New York City and 
he looks after all of the repairs. 

The Chairman. I wondered how it was possible to pay him any 
other sum, as he receives $2,900 under this appropriation. 

Mr. Wenderoth. All we know is what we pay him. He is one of 
«>ur most skillful men. 

FURNITURE AND REPAIRS TO FURNITURE. 

The Chairman. The next item is for furniture and repairs to fur- 
niture. The current appropriation is $850,000 and your estimate is 
^1,100,000. What was the unexpended balance in 1913? 

Mr. Wenderoth. For furniture and repairs of furniture, the un- 
expended balance for 1913 was $6,936.20. 

The Chairman. Out of $800,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. For the next year, 1914 — that is, cor- 
ected to December i5, 1914 — the unexpended balance was $53,355.88. 

The Chairman. Then you had $900,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. During that year you also had the New York 
post office, where you spent $150,0008 

Mr. Wenderoth. You gave us a special appropriation of $50,000. 
The comptroller construea the law so that certain fittings could not 
i* paid out of this appropriation. 



164 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. You asked for a special appropriation of 
$200,000? 

Mr. Wbnderoth. Yes, sir; and you gave us $50,000. I think we 
finally spent about $120,000 out of this appropriation — a total of 
$170,000. 

The Chairman. What other big building did you have? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Outside of the New York post office, I do not 
think we had any other large building. The Washington post office 
was not chargeable to this appropriation, nor was the Bureau of 
Engraving and Printing. I do not recall that we had any others. 
For 1916 we have the buildings at New Orleans, at Denver, and the 
San Francisco Subtreasury Building. Of course in 1915 you re- 
duced our estimate by $50,000. 

The Chairman. We did not, because you used only $847,000 in 
1914, and $100,000 of that was for that special big building in New 
York. So you really used $730,000 for 1914, excluding that one big 
building. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. In 1913 we expended $793,000. For 
1914 we expended $846,000. In 1914 we expended, altogether, as 
much as this year's appropriation, although this year we have more 
buildings. 

The Chairman. But $120,000 ill the 1914 appropriation was a 
special item. 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir; it was a special expenditure. 

The Chairman. You expended $120,000 on the New York 
building? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And in your estimate you did not contemplate 
that at all. You had asked for $950,000 and $250,000 additional, 
and we gave you $50,000 of the $250,000. So you spent $200,000 
more than you thought you would, and still had $30,000 left. 

Mr. Wenderoth. We were helped by the comptroller's ruling. 
This appropriation has been relieved very much, because we now 
charge to the buildings proper everything that is built in or that 
can possibly be classed as a fixture, but which formerly was charge- 
able to this appropriation. Because of that ruling, repairs to these 
fixtures are now chargeable to the repair appropriation. That 
enabled us during the fiscal year 1914 to take care of the New York 
post office. We will have an increased number of buildings in the 
fiscal year 1916. We have these three very large buildings, which 
altogether will more than eaual the New York buildinff. 

The Chairman. My recollection is that you had other big build- 
ings besides the one at New York. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I can not think of any others that were con- 
spicuously large. 

The Chairman. You asked an appropriation for New York sepa- 
rately ; but you had some others, I think. 

Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. The Washington new post office and 
the Bureau of Engraving and Printing furnishings were special 
appropriations, because this appropriation was not available in the 
District of Columbia. 

The Chairman. Since you have standardized furniture it does 
not cost so much to furnish the buildings, does it ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We now obtain low prices. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPBIATION BILL, 1916. 165 

The Chairman, You do not have the same extravagant expense 
for furniture. 

Mr. Wenderoth. We do not build New York customhouses every 
day, and we keep our expenditures down. We will furnish out of 
this appropriation this year the Boston customhouse. Those con- 
tracts are being let now. That will probably be our largest single 
expenditure this year. 

The Chairman. What other big buildings will you have? 

Mr. Wenderoth. This year — 1915 ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I do not think we will have any large buildings, 
or not any as large as the New York post office. We will have tne 
buildings at Minneapolis, Minn. ; MusKogee, Okla. j and New Bed- 
ford, Mass.; but they are not as large as the ones to be furnished 
in 1916. We will th$n have the New Orleans building, the Denver 
building, and the San Francisco subtreasury. I do not believe the 
New Haven building will be completed in time to be furnished 
in 1916. 

The Chairman. In 1914 you spent for furniture in new buildings 
$371,499.98, and that included $120,000 for the New York post office. 
Now, that is the amount you estimate you will expend in 1916, or 
practically the same, the estimate being $372,500. 

Mr. Wenderoth. It is practically the same. 

The Chairman. Your big item of increase is for furniture for old 
buildings. How does it happen that you will spend $365,000 for fur- 
niture for old buildings? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Was this after the expiration of two years 

The Chairman (interposing). In 1915 you expended for that 
purpose $183,736.58. How much will be expended for that purpose 
this year? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I will have to go back to the hearings of last 
year for that. 

The Chairman. What is the necessity for purchasing $365,000 
worth of furniture for those buildings that are fully furnished now ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Our renewal charge in the old buildings is very 
heavy. 

The Chairman. That is an increase of 100 per cent? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Just about. That appropriation is available for 
all furniture that is required by the Post Office Department in its old 
buildings, and we are carrying on a continual campaign, or, rather, a 
policy, of replacing all worn out post-office furniture, as recom- 
mended by the Post Office Department. 

The Chairman. For this year vou have estimated on expending 
£365.000, and in 1913 you expended for that purpose $271,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. In fitting up the basements of buildings for 
Parcel Post Service there is a great deal of expenditure. As I was 
saying, we are continually replacing these old distributing cases, old 
worn-out tables, old desks 

The Chairman (interposing). You did not estimate on expending 
anything for lighting fixtures in 1915, did you? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is the time we asked for a separate ap- 
propriation of $300,000. 

The Chairman. But you did not get it. 

5f r. Wenderoth. No, sir. 



166 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. For this year you estimate $372,500 for furniture 
in new buildings, so that this new building furniture runs along 
about the same, regardless of the size of the buildings or the number. 

Mr. Wenderotii. It runs along about the same. One year we may 
have one conspicuously large building and the next year we may have 
a half a dozen smaller buildings. Then, in the following year we 
may have 25 buildings that are somewhat smaller. But taking it 
year by year, the equipment of new buildings averages nearly the 
same. We are placing under contract $7,000,000 worth of buildings 
each year. This means a more or less fixed bulk of buildings to be 
furnished. 

The Chairman. It is not possible that we ought to need an ex- 
penditure of a third of a million dollars a year for replacing fur- 
niture in those buildings. 

Mr. Wenderoth. We are replacing w T orn-out equipment. The ex- 
penditures on old buildings include the new furniture in extensions. 

The Chairman. That does not include repairs, nor carpets, nor 
linoleum, but that is for furniture alone. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. It covers filing cases; wooden and 
metal filing cases for clerks of courts and various other branches of 
the service. We have in these buildings a great many offices that 
require additional filing equipment and the replacing of worn-out 
furniture. There is a great deal of worn-out furniture to be re- 
placed in the post-office workrooms, and we must give the Post Office 
Department additional furniture as they spread out. 

The Chairman. The great bulk of the public buildings were put 
up in the last few years? 

Mr. Wenderoth. In the last 30 years. 

The Chairman. In the last 10 years we put up as many as in all 
the rest of the Government's history. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Since the public buildings act of 1902? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That may be. 

The Chairman. And we made lavish expenditures to furnish 
them. It ought not to cost $370,000 a year to keep that furniture up. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Mr. Chairman, the older buildings are becoming 
crowded as more and more officials of the various branches of the 
public service are assigned to them. This means a constant ex- 
penditure for additional equipment. Not only that, but when we 
fJace a new building in commission, if the Government owns any 
urniture in the city that can be repaired and fixed up and trans- 
ferred, we do that. We think we manage that appropriation with 
very great economy. Of course, everything is subjected to extremely 
hard usage, especially the post-office furniture. 

The Chairman. The lighting fixtures in the buildings cost about 
40 per cent of the furniture. Is not that pretty high — $148,000 
for lighting fixtures? Does that cover fixtures like these [indi- 
cating] ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. From the ceiling down. 

The Chairman. Do they have fixtures like those in the new Wash- 
ington post office? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We have not been fortunate enough to obtain 
that class of fixtures everywhere. I think the inside fixtures in that 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 167 

building are very handsome, but I would not say as much for the 
outside ones. 

The Chairman. We have purchased over $7,000,000 worth of fur- 
niture in 10 years. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I should not wonder at all. 

The Chairman. I would. 

Mr. Wenderoth. If you erect buildings, you must furnish them 
and place them in operation. Our post-office furniture,' while it is 
all standardized, is very heavy furniture, and must stand hard usage. 
We do not buy flimsy stock stuff, and we do not authorize a cus- 
todian to drop a piece of furniture until we are convinced that it is 
beyond repair. Everything is used as long as it will possibly give 
us any service. 

OPERATING SUPPLIES. 

The Chairman. For operating supplies your estimate is $1,750,000, 
and the current appropriation is $1,625,000. What was the un- 
expended balance in 1913? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The appropriation in 1913 was $1,550,000, and 
the unexpended balance was $99,200. In 1914 the appropriation 
was $1,600,000, and the unexpended balance was $112,000. In 1915, 
the appropriation is $1,625,000, and our expenditures and liabilities 
up to December 15, 1914, amount to $1,524,469.56, leaving us an un- 
incumbered balance for the remaining six months of $100,530.44. 

The Chairman. That is over and above everything you can figure 
out to expend 

Mr. Wenderoth (interposing). No, sir; but, of course, in that 
*1 ,500,000 is probably included all of the contracts for this winter's 
supply of coal. By December 15 that will be taken care of, and 
the balance is for things that we order monthly, for light bills, etc. 
We expect to have in the fiscal year 1916 a rather heavy laundry bill. 

The Chairman. Not $100,000, though? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Oh, no. It is because of an order of the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury dated October 11, 1913, based on an Executive 
order of September 30, 1913 : 

It Ig hereby ordered in the interest of the public health that the use of roller 
towels and other towels Intended for use by more than one person be discon- 
tinued in the public buildings of the United States. 

We wash all of the towels in these 850 Treasury Department build- 
ings. Instead of washing a roller towel used by several employees 
we will now wash all the hand towels. We only burnish the towels to 
our own custodian force, but as rapidly as the Post Office Depart- 
ment and the Agricultural Department and the other departments 
having space in our buildings supply their employees with an allow- 
ance of hand towels, we must wash them as well, no matter how many 
there are. 

The Chairman. You expended in 1914 $52,000 more than you ex- 
pended in 1913, and you had a balance of $112,000 in 1914, and for 
1915 von have $137,000 more than you expended in 1914, and if 
we gave you $125,000 you would have $262,000 for 1916 more than 
you expended in 1914." It would take a good many hand towels to 
make up that difference. 



168 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is only one element t>f it, Mr. Chairman. 
This shows the statement of expenditures for 1913 to 1914, an in- 
crease of about $30,000. In an appropriation of this kind we never 
really know and can never really tell what our expenditures may be. 
Take the matter of coal. I found, for instance, that we were buying 
coal by the ton and having it delivered by the ton, and frequently 
we could not get coal when we wanted it. We would buy it prob- 
ably in the winter when the price was perhaps at the highest. We 
have arranged now to make our purchase of coal for the bulk of 
the year's supply during the summer or fall in the off season and 
store as much as we think it safe. 

If we use bituminous coal, the amount we may store is limited, 
because there is danger of spontaneous combustion. We do that and 
that carries us for a certain number of months. If it is an open 
winter it may happen that we will not need any more coal. If it is 
a % hard winter, we may be called on suddenly for a large supply of 
coal all over the United States, and we mlist hold out enough to take 
care of that. In all these appropriations, as I have said, Mr. Chair- 
man, it is not the balance that remains which indicates our needs so 
much as the increase in expenditures from year to year and the ne- 
cessity of having some leeway. I can not prove to vou that for 
operating supplies for 1916 we will need $1,750,000. It represents 
our best judgment. 

FUEL. 

The Chairman. You spend about a half a million dollars a year 
for fuel? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you buy coal on the British termal unit? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes. 

The Chairman. Do vou buy it that way all over the United 
States? 

Mr. Wenderoth. All over the United States. The contractor 
must submit a certified check which we hold and he offers us coal 
at so much a ton which will develop so many British thermal units, 
and there is also something about the ashes, etc. Samples are taken 
out and tested, and if it does not come up to the requirements we 
penalize him and take it out of his certified check. ' When his con- 
tract expires we return to him what is left of his deposit. That is 
all done very carefully. We purchase anthracite coal, bituminous 
coal, fuel oil, and lignite for heating purposes, and I believe some 
natural gas, but I am not quite sure about that. 

LAXTNDBY BILLS. 

The Chairman. You said you expected your laundry bills to be 
very excessive next year! 

Mr. Wenderoth. This statement shows between 1914 "and 1916 a 
difference of $10,000. 

The Chairman. When does that Executive order go into effect? 

Mr. Wenderoth. It went into effect in 1913. It was signed at the 
White House September 30, and transmitted by the Secretary of 
the Treasury October 11, 1913, with this order: 

In accordance with the foregoing the use of roller towels In the public build- 
ings of the United States under the Treasury Department will be discontinued 
immediately. W. O. McAdoo, Secretary. 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 169 

The Chairman. In your estimate for next year you contemplate 
spending $30,000? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is a guess, Mr. Chairman. We do not 
know. 

The Chairman. You estimate for the current year you will spend 
$32,000, so you are not expecting a very large increase in that item 
over the current year. 

Mr. Wenderoth. We do not know what we will spend this year. 

The Chairman. That is what your estimate shows and would in- 
dicate you are not figuring on a very large increase. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir; these operating costs of ours are not 
analyzed the way they should be. There never has been any attempt 
to do it and adequate records do not exist. We operate in a territory 
of over 3,000,000 square miles and conditions fluctuate. We have 
buildings of all kinds, and unless we could — and I think we should — 
inaugurate a very careful cost-keeping system, it is extremely diffi- 
cult to justify any of these estimates. We may merely state, on the 
basis of the experience of previous years and the number of buildings 
to be placed in commission, that we believe we should have so much. 
I am not in position to prove any of the estimates. 

ELECTRIC CURRENT FOR LIGHT AND POWER. 

The Chairman. You spent about $500,000 for electric current, 
light, and power purposes. Do we generate or purchase our own 
electric current? 

Mr. Wenderoth. We purchase the bulk of it. We have a few 
generating plants, but in the bulk of our buildings, Mr. Chairman, 
we do not consume enough current to make it pay to generate it. 

Generating plants are now in operation in the following buildings : 

Boston, Ma 88., post office and subtrensury. 

Philadelphia, Pa., post office and courthouse. 

Philadelphia. Pa., Mint Building. 

Baltimore, Md.. post office and courthouse. 

New Orleans. La., customhouse. 

Kansas City. Mo., post office and courthouse. 

St. Louis, Mo., post office and courthouse. 

Chicago, 111., post office and courthouse. 

San Francisco, Cal., post office and courthouse. 

Pittsburgh, Pn.. post office. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, post office and courthouse. 

Washington, D. C, Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 

The installation of generating plants in other buildings is not 
under contemplation. 

BROOKLYN, N. V., ELECTRIC CUKRENT. 

The Chairman. For instance, take a building like the one in Brook- 
lyn. We used to generate it there and now we buy it. Have you 
U'flde any saving? 

Mr, Wenderoth. Yes, sir. I do not know what the saving is, but 
I know that we make a saving. I remember that Mr. Thompson 
f< ught it to the last ditch and finally threw up his hands and said, 
" I can not figure against them any more." 

The Chairman. Wh*+ do we pay, 2 cents or 2£ cents per kilowatt 
hour! 



170 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Wenderoth. I could not tell you without looking it up. 

The Chairman. I wish you would put the exact figures in the 
record. My recollection is that a proceeding has been commenced 
before the public service commission of the first district of New 
York on behalf of a private consumer who is charged 10 cents a 
kilowatt hour, and his complaint is that this is an undue discrimina- 
tion in favor of the Government. I do not know whether the matter 
was ever determined or not. I know that the Electric Light Co. wa< 
compelled to produce its contract with the Government. Suppose 
the public service commission determines you have to pay the same 
as any private consumer? 

RE CONTRACT WITH Ur60KLYN EDISON CO. FOR SUPPLY OF STEAM AND ELECTRIC 

CURRENT. 

The full data on this subject are set forth in the hearings on suudry civi! 
bill for 1915. Memoranda in regard to the matter dated July 18, 1013. 

Steam is supplied by the Brooklyn Edison Co. from a boiler house across the 
street The current is supplied from the company's large central station. 

The arrangement is working out satisfactorily for both parties to the contract. 

The total cost of operating the plant for eight months under the system of 
purchasing steam and electricity from the Brooklyn Edison Co. is $1S,239.62; 
and for a corresponding period of eight months when the building plant was 
operated by the Government the cost was $23,106.93; a difference of $4,867, 
which, prorated for 12 months, gives an annual saving of $7,296. 

The Government sold steam to the Pneumatic Service Co. when the building 
plant was operated and now furnishes said company with stenm. This 
amounted in the eight months' period, in each case, to $4,225, making the net 
cost of operating the plant under the system of purchasing service from the 
Brooklyn Edison Co.. for eight months, $13,984.62. This sum includes labor, 
supplies, cost of electric current, and all steam used. 
. No information indicates that the Public Service Commission of New York 
has objected to the rates for current and steam offered by the Brooklyn 
Edison Co. 

Mr. Wenderoth. The public-service commission of the first dis- 
trict of New York has no more jurisdiction over what the Govern- 
ment pays 

The Chairman (interposing). It has, though, over what the elec 
trie-light company shall sell for. It can prevent them selling to you 
at less than it will sell to any private consumer. If they hold that is 
a reasonable rate, they can not sell to you at less than they can sel! 
to a private consumer, and they must equalize their rates. 

Mr. Newton. Is not their rate to the city different from their rati 
to private consumers? 

The Chairman. I do not know. I know this particular questioi 
was raised. 

Mr. Wenderoth. They have no more control than if we were ii 
Connecticut 

The Chairman (interposing). Yes; they have. 

Mr. Wenderoth (continuing). And the Edison company ran a lim 
across the border. We asked the New York Edison Co. to grouj 
together all our buildings in New York City — the customhouse, th 
barge office, the appraisers' store, subtreasury, and the assay office — t 
consider us as one customer and give us a rate on the total. The; 
stated that they feared the action of the public-service commission 
We pointed out to them that the property of the United States wa 
extraterritorial, and the public-service commission had no authority 
to scrutinize the rates. 

The Chairman. You are mistaken about that. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



171 



Mr. Wenderoth. No, sir. They took it up with their attorneys— 1 — 
The Chairman (interposing). I do not care about that. They 
declined to furnish the information, and the public service com- 
mission directed them to produce the contract. They are a public 
utilities company, under the jurisdiction of that commission, and they 
have the right to inquire into their rates. They can not sell to the 
United States at such a rate as to compel them to charge the ordi- 
nary consumer more in order to justify the rate they sell to the Gov- 
ernment. There is not any doubt about that. They have no con- 
trol over the Government, but they have over the electric-light 
companv. 

Mr. \Venderoth. That may be. When we made our argument 
they came back and said that their attorneys told them it would be 
a rather poor precedent; that other consumers whose plants were 
scattered over the city would ask for the same grouping together 
of the various buildings, and each would want to be considered as 
a single customer. That is what they told us they were afraid of, 
and not the other proposition. 

SALE OF STEAM FOR PNEUMATIC TUBES, 

The Chairman. During the fiscal year 1915 you requested this 
same authority to furnish steam for the operation of pneumatic 
tubes of the Postal Service and to reimburse your appropriation? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is a permanent need, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Do you keep any account of that? How much, 
for instance, did you get in 1914 ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I would have to find out. 

The Chairman. Give us the figures for several years — 1912, 1913, 
and 1914 — together with the places. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there any other place except New York where 
that is done? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I can not say offhand. 

The Chairman. If there are any other places, give us that infor- 
mation also. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

>tatement showing the amount of repayments to various appropriations for the 
fiscal years 1912, 1918, and 1914 on account of steam furnished the American 
Pneumatic Service Co. by the public buildings listed. 



Building. 



Norton, Ifass.. subtreasury 

Arookiyn, S. V., courthouse and post 

affire. 

*ew York, N. Y., courthouse and 

post office 

tairazo, I1L, courthouse and post 

office. 

*t Louis, Vo. ( customhouse 

Total 



Fiscal year 1012. 



Fuel. 

lights, 
and water 
for public 
buildings. 



$3,661.42 

4,563.36 

6,555.66 

5,416.00 
2,096.56 



22,293.00 



Pay of 
assistant 
custodians 
and jani- 
tors for 
public 
buildings. 



$1,749.98 

2,508.00 

2,640.00 

2,256.00 
1,596.00 



10,749.98 



Fiscal year 1913. 



Operating 
supplies 
for public 
buildings. 



$3,923.54 

4,446.24 

2,531.59 

4,548.84 
2,208.34 



17,658.55 



Operating 

force for 

public 

buildings. 



$1,750.06 

2,508.00 

2,640.00 

2,256.00 
1,596.00 



10,750.06 



Fiscal year 1914. 



Operating 
supplies 
forjmblic 
buildings. 



Operating 

force for 

public 

buildings. 



$3,893.52 
3,789.28 
2,981.94 
4,433.76 



$1,750.08 
2,508.00 
2,640.00 
2,256.00 



1,964. 08 I 1,596.00 



17,062.58 I 10, 750. OH 



172 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



The amount of steam sold is determined by means of accurate steam-flow me- 
ters, which are checked by condensation weights in the pneumatic-tube engines. 

The cost of steam is worked out for each building, and it includes labor, coal, 
repairs, and interest and depreciation on that part of boiler plant used to 
supply steam to the tube engines. 



SALAMANCA, X. Y., GROUND RENT. 

The Chairman. " For annual ground rent of the Federal building 
site at Salamanca, N. Y." on account of Indian leases, $7.50." That 
is an annual rental? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That we will submit every year until 1$91, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Mondell. Was that a 100-year lease? 

Mr. Wenderoth. It commenced February, 1915, and expires Jan- 
uary, 1991. It commenced when we took title to the site, in so far as 
we are concerned. 

Mr. Mondell. The acquisition of the site was subject to this 
ground rent? 

Statement of amounts estimated and appropriated on account of the annual 
appropriations under the control of the Supervising Architect, together with 
the amount of encumbrances and balances available thereunder. 

repairs and preservation. 



Fiscal year. 


Estimates.^ 


Al &- 


Expenditures 
andliabilities.t 


Balances 
(unencum- 
bered).' 


1910 


$600,000.00 
700,000.00 
600,000.00 
650,000.00 
725,000.00 
745,000.00 


9550,000.00 
600,000.00 
600,000.00 
625,000.00 
725,000.00 
725,000.00 


$5*3,652.83 
589,816.28 
584,172.05 
618,642.92 
721,523.90 
363,114.92 


$6,347.17 
10,183.72 
15,827.95 
6,357.08 
3 476.10 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


361,885.08 





MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT. 



1910 
1911 
1912. 
1913 
1914 
1915. 



$450,000.00 
465,000.00 
425,000.00 
465,000.00 
450,000.00 
536,500.00 



$400,000.00 
425,000.00 
425,000.00 
440,000.00 
440,000.00 
445,000.00 



$392,097.72 
404,325.36 
421,455.56 
433,429.17 
437,730.14 
221,356.91 



$7,902.28 
20,67164 
3,544.44 
6, 57a 83 
2,269.86 
223,643.09 



VAULTS AND SAFES. 



1910 ! $105,000.00 

1911 ' 85,000.00 

1912 j 90,000.00 

1913 ; 90,000.00 

1914 110,000.00 

1915 110,000.00 



$100,000.00 
85,000.00 
90,000.00 
90,000.00 
100,000.00 
100,000.00 



$96,946.71 
84,044.53 
88,401.04 
89,695.46 
99,762.83 
31,778.45 



$3,053.29 

955.47 

1,598.96 

304.54 

237.17 

68,221.55 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



1910 


$1,100,000.00 
950,578.00 
800,000.00 
514,000.00 
576,450.00 
563,560.00 


$1,100,000.00 

950,578.00 

800,000.00 

•673,561.93 

< 550, 132. 37 

* 572, 927. 63 


$1,061,844.54 
950,066.33 
786,958.30 
648,579.31 
542,163.00 
208,034.47 


$38,155.46 
511.67 


1911 


1912 


13,041.70 

24,982.62 

7,969.37 

364,893.16 


1113 


1914 


1915 





i Includes deficiencies. 

* The amounts stated in this column for 1910, 1911, 1912, repres?nts the amounts sent to surplus fund; 
for 1913, 1914, and 1915 represent the amounts taken from the records as of December 1, 1914, 

» Amount actually appropriated, $656,920, the difference, $16,641.93, due to amounts expanded under 
"continuing resolutions'* on the basis of the prior year's appropriations. 

« This amount is decreased by $9,367.63, being the balance of the $30,000 appropriated for site agents, 
and transferred to the subsequent year. 

* This amount increased by $9,367.63, which is accounted for under («). 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



173 



Statement of amounts estimated and appropriated on account of the annual 
appropriation* under the control of the Supervising Architect, etc. — Contd. 

ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITIONS. 



Fiscal year. 


Estimates. 


Appropria- 
tions. 


Expenditures 
andliabillties. 


Balances 
(unencum- 
. bered). 


1M3 


$175,000.00 
Reappropriated. 


$175,000.00 
106,883.64 
57,058.28 


$68,116.36 
40,825.36 
11,133.53 


$106,883.64 
57,058.28 


1914 


1915 


45,924.76 









OPERATING FORCE. 



1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 



$1,902,388.00 
2,400,000.00 
2,500,000.00 
2,570,000.00 
2,650,000.00 
2,700,000.00 



$1,902,000.00 
2,400,000.00 
2,500,000.00 
2,500,000.00 
2,575,000.00 
2,650,000.00 



$1,746,817.90 
1,927,121.89 
2,124,748.88 
2,406,346.16 
2,486,608.73 
2,650,374.72 



$156,182.10 

472,878.11 

375,251.12 

93,653.84 

88.391.27 

J 374. 72 



FURNITURE AND REPAIRS. 



1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 



$1,117,500.00 
880,000.00 
700,000.00 
900,000.00 
950,000.00 
1,000,000.00 



$993,000.00 
880,000.00 
700,000.00 
800,000.00 
900,000.00 
850,000.00 



$973,345.91 
856,464.91 
697,415.76 
793,063.80 
846,644.12 
384,110.81 



$17,654.09 

23,535.09 

2,584.24 

6,936.20 

53,355.88 

465,889.19 



OPERATING SUPPLIES. 



1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913, 
1914. 
1915. 



$1,450,000.00 
1,550,000.00 
1,600,000.00 
1,600,000.00 
1,700,000.00 
1,750,000.00 



$1,450,000.00 
1,550,000.00 
1,600,000.00 
1,550,000.00 
1,600,000.00 
1,625,000.00 



$1,413,703.62 
1,414,759.12 
1,539,449.79 
1,450,800.00 
1,488,000.00 
1,524,469.56 



$36,295.38 
135,240.88 
60,550.21 
99,200.00 
112,000.00 
100,530.44 



1 On Dec. 1, on the basis of an estimate sufficient to carry the current force at the buildings for the 
balance of the fiscal year, an apparent deficiency appears in this amount. ' his appropriation, as well as 
Operating Supplies, receives tne benefit of repayments on account of Pneumatic '. ube 8ervice. This 
appropriation 6 solely foi salaries on account of which there are considerable lapses, due to loss of time, 
etc, on the part of the employees. 

Monday, December 28, 1914. 

increasing boiler capacity, auditors' building (old bureau of 
engraving and printing). 

(See p. 87.) 

STATEMENTS OF ME. JOSEPH E. RALPH, DIRECTOR OF THE 
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING; MR. FRANK E. 
FERGUSON, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR; MR. NELSON S. THOMP- 
SON, SUPERINTENDENT MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DIVI- 
SION; AND MR. OSCAR WENDEROTH, SUPERVISING ARCHI- 
TECT. 



The Chairman. Mr. Ralph, you have an estimate for the Bureau 
of Engraving and Printing, for increasing the boiler capacity of the 
boiler plant in the old building for the Bureau of Engraving and 
Printing, including necessary piping, changes in breeching, the in- 



174 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL/1916. 

stallation of coal bunkers, and other changes incident thereto. 
$25,000. 

Mr. Wbnderoth. Mr. Chairman, I have asked Director Ralph and 
Mr. Thompson to come down about that item. They can explain it 
very much better than I can. 

The Chairman. Why do you need any more bunkers or boilers or 
anything else in this old building? 

Mr. Ralph. It was anticipated that the central power plant would 
be in operation by this time. All I can say is that we are purchas- 
ing power from tne Potomac Power & Light Co. which is costing us 
considerable money because of the inadequacy of our plant. 

The Chairman. How much a year are you paying? 

Mr. Ralph. From July to November, 1914, 180,170 kilowatts, at 
practically 3 cents per kilowatt, $6,030.80. 

The Chairman. Covering what period? 

Mr. Ralph. From July to November, a little over four months. 
The cost of manufacturing electric current at the bureau power plant 
during the fiscal year was 0.0108 cent per kilowatt. 

The Chairman. What do you include in your cost? 

Mr. Ralph. We include the labor, coal, depreciation, and over- 
head charges. At this rate the quantity of current purchased would 
have cost the Government $1,945.84, whereas we paid $6,030.80. 

The Chairman. What do you propose to put in that old building? 

Mr. Ralph. Previous to the installation of the two new 500-horse- 
power boilers we had seven boilers in all, with a rated normal ca- 
pacity of 1,250 horsepower. The two new 500-horsepower boilers 
replaced four old ones aggregating 500 horsepower, so that the plant 
was increased to 1,750 horsepower, or a net increase over the old 
plant of 500 horsepower. The two generators have a rating of 1,304 
amperes each, or 2,608 amperes total. By forcing we can get 40 to 
50 per cent more than this, with everything on and working rigtfit. 

On December 17, during the recent cold spell, we were carrying a 
steam load of 2,000 horsepower on the boilers, with one of them out 
of service, being repaired, and at the same time we had an electric 
load of 2,840 amperes, 840 amperes of which we were taking from 
the Potomac Co., for the reason that we could not furnish any more 
steam. We burned upward of 58 tons of coal this day, and the out- 
door temperature was, I should judge, around 20° F. This was a 
bright day out of doors, and we required little light in the building. 

On October 5, a dark day, our lighting load at times was a total 
of 3,550 amperes, 1,350 amperes of which we got from the Potomar 
Co. (Their service is only good for about 1,700 amperes continually.) 

Had the conditions of heat and light both been bad on the same 
day, any trouble in our plant by breaking grates, etc., would have 
been serious and would have caused a partial shutdown. 

By careful watching and hard work we can get through this winter 
all right without something unforeseen occurs. The natural increase 
in power required will make it inadvisable to attempt to get througb 
another winter without more boiler power. 

When the present 500 horsepower increase in boilers was planned 
it was contemplated that the new central heating, light, and power 
plant authorized by Congress would be in operation by the fall of 
1915. Also the new building was not yet contemplated, and we 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 176 

<ould only approximate the power that would be required. (These 
estimates have proved to be very accurate.) 

The best information we had at that time was that the old bureau 
imilding was to be torn down, hence that we would not be called upon 
to furnish heat for it. 

At the time the estimates were made the Separate Recovery Co. 
was cleansing our printer's wiping cloths. Due to the fact that this 
company went into the hands of a receiver this work was thrown 
tack on us, which greatly increased the consumption of steam in the 
.rag laundry. 

More presses are being installed right along, and this natural 
increase between now and next October will, added to what we now 
have, be more than we can carry with safety on our present plant. 

The three old boilers have been in service many years. A few days 
ago a Hawley drum on boiler No. 2 cracked. A new drum was 
installed and the old one was found to be crystalized, due to the 
long-continued action of heat. The others have been in service the 
>ame length of time as this one and no doubt sooner or later more of 
these will have to be replaced. The laying off of one boiler to do this 
work would at a critical time seriously cripple us. 

It is therefore very advisable that another boiler be added to our 
present plant, in order to tide us over until such time as the new 
plant is in operation. 

The Chairman. In the first place, it was never proposed, either by 
you or by this committee, that the old Bureau of Engraving Build- 
ing would be torn down, because you had taken a big portion of it 
for yourself. 

Mr. Ralph. It was the plan of the so-called 

The Chairman (interposing). It was the plan of some art com- 
mission, but you contemplated using a part of it and w r e ousted you 
from it. 

Mr. Ralph. No ; I gave up all the old building, Mr. Fitzgerald. 

The Chairman. You had a whole lot of it, and we put you out and 
put in the Treasury Department auditors and other officials. In the 
second place, from the 1st of July, you were working night and day 
up until what time? 

Mr. Ralph. From the 3d of August until the 15th of November. 

The Chairman. How many hours were you working each day? 

Mr. Ralph. Twenty-four hours a day. 

The Chairman. So that you were working three shifts instead of 
"tie and supplying light, heat, and power? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes. 

The Chairman. Therefore your coal bill ran up very high for 
t ; .os?e three months? 

Mr. Ralph. That was a necessity. 

The Chairman. You have a lot of boilers that will have to be 
replaced in a short time, too, have you not? 

Mr. Ralph. I would say two of them. 

The Chairman. So far as I am concerned, they will never put a 

iler in any of those buildings until they build this central power 
r «l heating plant. That is my attitude.' 

Mr. Ralph. Do not lose sight of the fact that while we worked 
■■ iy and night all the pow r er used at night was purchased from the 



176 SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

Potomac Light & Power Co., and it was very fortunate for the Gov- 
ernment that we cotild operate the plant at that time. 

The Chaibman. How long is it since we authorized the central 
heating and power plant? 

Mr. Wendeboth. It was authorized in June, 1913. 

The Chaibman. Have the plans been prepared yet? 

Mr. Wenderoth. They are approaching completion now. 

The Chairman. The necessity will hasten them. 

Mr. Ealph. If you have that plant by one year hence I will be 
satisfied, but if you do not, I am very confident you are going to be 
embarrassed. 

Mr. Mondell. What is your plan — to put in one new boiler in 
place of the old ones? 

Mr. Thompson. No ; to put in one entirely new boiler. 

The Chairman. How many have you? 

Mr. Thompson. We have six boilers now, aggregating 1,750 horse- 
power. 

Mr. Mondell. Have you room for the new boiler? 

Mr. Thompson. Yes, sir. We will have to encroach upon the 

Elumbing shop to put this boiler in. It was brought about mainly 
rom the fact that in making up this estimate for the two new boilers 
which you gave us we thought the contract with this company which 
cleans the printers' rags would continue in force ; but they went into 
the hands of a receiver, and now that work has to be done down 
there, and the additional laundry load is about 400 horsepower. 

The Chairman. You put in two new boilers to take care of them 
until the new plant was put in? 

Mr. Thompson. We fell down on that, on account of these laundrj 
people going back on their contract. You gave us everything w« 
asked for. 

The Chairman. And now you want two more boilers? 

Mr. Thompson. One more. 

The Chairman. Are you going to pay $25,000 for one boiler? 

Mr. Thompson. For one 500-horsepower boiler. 

The Chaibman. And then when the new plant is finished thej 
will all be scrapped? 

Mr. Thompson. Yes; when the new plant gets to going. 

Mr. Mondell. You anticipate no use for these boilers after tto 
new plant is in operation? 

Mr. Thompson. No; they are figuring on 1,000 horsepower unit* 
in the new plant, and these boilers would not be suitable at all 
Thev would not fit in. 

Mr. Mondell. They would not fit in as auxiliaries? 

Mr. Thompson. No, sir; they would be scrapped. 

Mr. Mondell. You do not anticipate as large a volume of worl 
the coming year as you had last year, do you ? 

Mr. Ralph. The current work will be a little larger than last year 
Of course, we had emergency currency and the Federal reserve notei 
to print. If this war continues, we can not foresee what might or 
cur, in the way of additional printing of Federal reserve notes par 
ticularly. 

The Chairman . Of course, that will be paid by the reserve bank* 

Mr. Mondell. You might have to print some bonds? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 177 

Mr. Ralph. Yes; the war- revenue tax, the documentary, proprie- 
tary, and wine stamps is quite a job in itself. If it takes two years 
to complete this power plant you will have expended $25,000 for 
power to the Potomac Light & Power Co. 

The Chairman. If it takes as long to put in this boiler in propor- 
tion as it has to build a central power and heating plant your central 
power and heating plant will be finished before they get the boiler in. 

Mr. Thompson. This boiler will not help you out on buying power 
from the Potomac Co. 

Mr. Ralph. We will have to buy that much more. 

Mr. Thompson. I do not see that, because you will have to buy 
from them anyhow. 

Mr. Mondell. Assuming that you are. compelled to expend as 
much as you would expend for this new boiler in the next two years, 
and at the end of that period the boiler is scrapped, we gain nothing. 

Mr. Wenderoth. You would be safeguarded in case one of the 
present boilers broke down. 

Mr. Thompson. This is a question of getting steam for industrial 
purposes and heating the building. It is entirely independent of 
power. We do not want to increase that much. 



Monday, December 28, 1914. 

hygienic laboratory reappropriation for buildings, fittings, 

and grounds. 

STATEMENTS OF STTRG. JOHN F. ANDERSON, DIRECTOR HYGIENIC 
LABORATORY, AND MR. OSCAR WENDEROTH, SUPERVISING 
ARCHITECT. 

The Chairman. " The unexpended balances of the appropriations 
for hygienic laboratory, Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service 
(grading and retaining wall), and building Hygienic Laboratory 
i additional building for research work, disinfection, experiments, 
and housing animals), aggregating $6,426.19, are hereby reappropri- 
ated and made available for buildings, fittings, and grounds." 

What is this? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Mr. Chairman, we had two appropriations, one 
was $15,000, in the act of June 25, 1910, for grading and retaining 
wall at the Hygienic Laboratory; the other was $25,000, in the act 
<>f June 23, 1913, for an additional building for research work at the 
Hygienic Laboratory. We were able to take care of the grading and 
the retaining wall within the appropriation, but found the limit of 
• ost for the building not as large as it should have been, and there 
iias been no appropriation for certain fittings and equipment that are 
needed. We find, if you approve and wifl reappropriate that bal- 
ance 

The Chairman (interposing). Where is that balance? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The balance is $6,426.19. 

The Chairman. In what appropriation? 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is the balance in both. 

The Chairman. What is the balance in each appropriation? 

72785—15 12 



178 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Wekderoth. I could not tell you the exact figures. 

Dr. Anderson. $153.96 is the balance in the appropriation for the 
building. 

Mr. Wenderoth. And the rest is from the other appropriation. 

The Chairman. $6,272 is the balance in the appropriation for the 
grading and the retaining wall, and you want us to give you the bal- 
ance in that appropriation for the building? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That would make the building cost $31,200. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Including the equipment; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Why? Thfi estimate of $25,000 for the animal 
hotel was here for four or five years, and in that time they ought 
to have been able to have gotten the estimate correct. 

Mr. Wenderoth. Mr. Chairman, there has been nothing wasted 
on that building ; and within that limit of cost we can put on a flat 
roof, which would be more or less of a temporary roof. 

The Chairman. Why should it be temporary? There has been a 
flat roof on every house I ever lived in. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is not the character of roof we would like 
to have on it. 

The Chairman. Why can you not put a flat roof on thi$ building? 

Mr. Wenderoth. Of course, we can put a flat roof on the building. 

The Chairman. I mean one that will be permanent. Why is a 
flat roof temporary ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I did not fciean that. 

The Chairman. You said that. You said it would be more or less 
temporary. 

Mr. Wenderoth. The character of the construction would be more 
or less temporary. 

The Chairman. Why? 

Mr. Wenderoth. The balance is not sufficient. The building 
would be complete, of course. 

The Chairman. It will not be complete if there is a temporary 
roof on it or if it is temporary construction. 

Dr. Anderson. May I say a word, Mr. Chairman? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Dr. Anderson. When the architect's office drew the plans for the 
building I suggested to them that in view of the possibility of the 
increased growth of the laboratory that would come in the future 
it would be well to arrange the building so that at any time an ad- 
ditional story could be placed on the building without any serious 
structural changes being involved. That was done. What con- 
stitutes the roof of the building as originally planned is a flat roof 
with a cement slab at the top. We found by the time the building 
would be/occupied that the work of the laboratory has increased, as 
you know from the other estimates that have come before you, very 
much. 

The Chairman. This building is to house animals? 

Dr. Anderson. It is to house animals and for research work in 
addition. It has certain laboratory space in it. There are a number 
of rooms put aside for the study of certain diseases that it certainly 
would not be safe to have in the same building where we have 75 or 
80 people working constantly right next to these animals affected 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 179 

with various infectious diseases. The appropriation for the build- 
ing did not provide anything for fittings, and the bid that was ac- 
cepted for the construction of the building left out of consideration 
the electric-light fittings, the screens for the building, the work- 
benches necessary, the animal cages, and they are things which, of 
course, will be necessary when the building is once occupied. 

The Chairman: This money was appropriated for the building 
and the building was to be completed for this amount ? 

Dr. Anderson. For the $25,000. 

The Chairman. Certainly. 

Dr. Anderson. I think there were some 16 bids, were there not, 
Mr. Wenderoth? 

Mr. Wenderoth. I do not recall. 

Dr. Anderson. Quite a large number, and this was the lowest bid 
of all. 

The Chairman. You should have designed a building that could 
have been fitted up for that amount. 

Dr. Anderson. I quite agree with you that it would have been 
desirable to have done that. 

The Chairman. If Congress decides a building shall be erected at 
a certain cost, it is somebody's business to see that that is done. 

Mr. Mondell. Do I understand that if this money is reappropri- 
ated it will be used for the changing of the roof or for the fittings 
and furnishings, etc. ? 

Mr. Wenderoth. For both. 

Dr. Anderson. I think, as a matter of fact, something like $600 is 
io be used for the change in the roof and the remainder will go into 
the fittings and equipment of the building. 

Mr. Mondell. And I" assume you must have that in order to use the 
I'uilding? 

Dr. Anderson. That is my understanding of it. 

The Chairman. You must have what? 

Dr. Anderson. The fittings and furnishings and equipment of the 
i'uilding. 

The Chairman. What do you propose to put in the building with 
this money and how much is it going to cost? 

Dr. Anderson. We will have to have screens. 

The Chairman. Have you estimated for them? 

Dr. Anderson. Yes, sir ; $800. 

Mr. Mondell. How much for your electrical fittings? 

Dr. Anderson. About $900 is the estimate of the superintendent of 
• 'instruction. 

Mr. Wenderoth. That is for the fixtures and not for the conduits 
'».' wiring. The latter are already in and are a part of the building. 

Dr. Anderson. And $1,200 for the animal cages in which are kept 
tiie animals. 

The Chairman. What are you going to do with the cages you now 
nve? 

Dr. Anderson. The cages in the old building are wooden cages 
that can not be taken out. They are built into the building. 

The Chairman. What kind of cages are you going to put in? 

Dr. Anderson. Cages with galvanized-iron uprights with wooden 
*l«»ors in them: and then comes the question of the feed bins to keep 



180 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1918. 

the food for the animals in, the workbenches necessary in the build- 
ing, certain equipment in the carpenter shop which is necessary, and 
I estimate that all of that will cost about $3,560. 

The Chairman. Have you a carpenter shop ? 

Dr. Anderson. We have a carpenter at the present time, and he 
works in the old animal house. 

The Chairman. What equipment does he need that he has not 
got now ? 

Dr. Anderson. At the present time he has to do everything by 
hand labor; and he needs a saw and lathe, which costs about $500. 
This will be money well expended, because it is a labor-saving device. 

The Chairman. What does this carpenter do? 

Dr. Anderson. He makes a great deal of apparatus. He makes 
all of our cases. There is not a workbench in the present building 
that was not made by this carpenter. He also makes our cabinets 
to keep apparatus in, and any special apparatus required is made by 
him. All those things are made by the carpenter without going out 
and getting bids for them, and they are made more economically and 
made just to suit our needs. 

Mr. Mondell. I understand, then, it will be necessary for you to 
have about $3,500 in order to use the building? 

Dr. Anderson. That is my understanding. Of course, Mr. Chair- 
man, as you know, you can have makeshifts and can get along, but 
that is very unsatisfactory. The laboratory is the only research in- 
stitution of its kind maintained by the Government, and it certainly 
seems to me they should be given the facilities that the committee 
has given them in the past. The estimate for those things is $3,500. 
We have had to get out bids for the grading on two different occa- 
sions. The first bid for the grading was gotten out about a year 
and a half ago, and they were all over the appropriation of $1,500. 
They were rearranged, and in view of the shortage of work, I sup- 
pose, that is now prevalent here in Washington, the bids then re- 
ceived were very much reduced. 



Monday, December 28, 1914. 

LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

STATEMENTS OF MB. S. I. KIMBALL, GENEBAL STJPEBINTENDEHT; 
MB. H. L. GOSLING, FBINCIFAL CLEBK; AND MB. E. H. BOPES, 
CIVIL ENGINEEB. 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

The Chairman. For pay of district superintendents the appro- 
priation is $27,900 ; and your estimate is $27,900. That is for 13 
superintendents already provided by law and whose compensation 
is fixed by law ? 

Mr. Kimball. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And all the places are filled? 

Mr. Kimball. Yes, sir. 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BELL, 1916. 181 

KEEPERS. 

The Chairman. " For salaries of 293 keepers of life-saving and 
lifeboat stations and of houses of refuge, $278,800." How many of 
these keepers are there? 

Mr. Kimball. Two hundred and eighty-three, and 10 keepership* 
for which salary is not estimated. 

The Chairman. What was your unexpended balance in 1913? 

Mr. Gosling. $2,149. 

The Chairman. And for 1914? 

Mr. Gosling. $2,075. 

The Chairman. Since then you have had some new stations estab- 
lished, have you not? 

Mr. Gosling. We are establishing one now, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. How did we happen to give you $2,000 more for 
this year? 

Mr. Gosling. You have not given us any more. The estimate is 
just the same as last year. 

The Chairman. But for the current year we gave you $2,000 more. 

Mr. Gosling. Yes, sir; we asked for salaries for four additional 
keepers on account of the new stations. 

The Chairman. Were they not established? 

Mr. Gosling. One of them is being established at Mackinac 
Island, Mich. 

The Chairman. How many keepers have you altogether? ' 

Mr. Gosling. Two hundred and eighty-three. 

The Chairman. Ten not estimated for? 

Mr. Gosling. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kimball. That is simply to provide places for disabled keep- 
ers in order that payment can be made to them under the law. 

The Chairman. How many of those do you take care of? 

Mr. Gosling. We estimate for 10. 

The Chairman. How much are they paid? 

Mr. Gosling. They are paid at the regular rate of keepers on ac- 
count of disability, under the provisions of section 7, act of May 4, 
1582, for a period not exceeding two years. That is the reason we 
have a balance under keepers. 

current expenses, crews, etc. 

The Chairman. For pay of crews of surf men, rations, or com- 
mutation thereof, etc., the appropriation for the current year is 
*U0O.0OO, and you are asking for $2,219,410. What did you spend 
in 1913? 

Mr. Gosling. $1,928,300. 

The Chairman. What was your unexpended balance in 1914? 

Mr. Gosling. $33,000 so far, out of which we will spend some 
S13.000. 

The Chairman. How do you figure you will need $119,000 more 
next year than you had this year ? 

Mr. Kimball. The increases are made up as follows: For surf men, 
£21.235; rations, $3,575; apparatus, $23,000; construction work, 



182 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

$62,800; furniture, $4,000; other items, $4,600. The last named are 
small items for various purposes. 

The Chairman. You estimate $21,235 more for surfmen? 

Mr. Gosling. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You estimated you would spend in 1915 $1,294^3."> 
for surfmen, and that is your exact estimate for 1916. 

Mr. Gosling. We did not ask for any increase. 

The Chairman. But you say you are going to spend $21,000 more, 
in accounting for this increase of $119,000? 

Mr. Gosling. But we did not get all the money we estimated for 
1915 and included in that estimate were the surfmen for these four 
new stations. 

The Chairman. You got the stations? 

Mr. Gosling. We have not manned any of them yet. 

The Chairman. You only have one of the stations? 

Mr. Gosling. Only one; yes, sir. That is at Mackinac Island. 
We are building that station now. 

The Chairman. You have not the others ? 

Mr.. Kimball. We have not even the titles yet. 

The Chairman. For apparatus you estimated for 1915, $135,000? 

Mr. Gosling. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And for 1916 you estimate only $123,000? 

Mr. Gosling. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Instead of expending $23,000 more you are figur- 
ing on spending $12,000 less? 

Mr. Gosling. Yes, sir; $12,000 less than the estimate for 1915. 
As we did not get the full amount of our estimate for 1915 we set 
aside $100,000 out of the 1915 appropriation for apparatus, and 
therefore we will need $23,000 additional if we carry out the plan 
of constructing the number of boats we desire to build. 

The Chairman. By "construction" do you mean buildings? 

Mr. Gosling. No. sir; these are boats. 

The Chairman, tinder the term "construction work"? 

Mr. Gosling. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You estimated that you would spend $220,000 
in 1915 and $234,000 for 1916. That is not $62,000 more? 

Mr. Gosling. We found that we did not have the amount of 
money necessary for construction work out of the appropriation for 
1915. We set aside only $172,000 for this purpose. Sixty-two 
thousand dollars is the increase over $172,000 and not over the esti- 
mate of $220,000 for 1915. 

The Chairman. Your buildings are all in pretty good repair? 

Mr. Kopes. Of the total $234,000, $26,0(X) is for regular repair 
and maintenance of the buildings; for rebuilding and improvement 
of stations, where the activities of the service have outgrown the 
present accommodations and where old buildings have passed beyond 
repair, $94,000; marine construction — that is, launchways, break- 
waters, bulkheads, and work of that description — $106,000; and 
storm protection, about $8,000. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 183 

Monday, December 28, 1914. 

REVENUE-CUTTER SERVICE. 

STATEMENTS OF CAPT. E. P. BERTHOLF, CAPTAIN COMMANDANT, 
AND CAPT. CHARLES A. McALUSTER, ENGINEER IN CHIEF. 

PAY AND ALLOWANCES. 

The Chairman. " For pay and allowances," Revenue-Cutter Serv- 
ice, the appropriation for 1915 is $2,350,000, and you are asking 
$2,385,000. What was vour unexpended balance in 1914 when vou 
had $2,300,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. $3,665.50. 

The Chairman. Where does your increase of $85,000 occur? 

Capt. Bertholf. There is an increase of $35,000 over the present 
appropriation. That includes three times — first, pay of officers; 
second, pay of crews ; and, third, contingent. 

The Chairman. Pay of officers, that is how much? 

Capt. Bertholf. That will be $25,500. 

The Chairman. How do you figure that? 

Capt. Bertholf. There will be four third lieutenants of engineers 
in 1916, who are now cadets. That means an increase of $2,762. In 
1916 we should have six line cadets and four engineer cadets which 
we do not now have, because we are asking for 21. That is an addi- 
tional expense of $7,695. There will be one retirement in 1916 which 
will cost $1,675, the difference between the pay of a third lieutenant 
and the pay of the retired officer. In addition, there is $13,370.50 for 
longevity pay and promotions which will accrue in 1916. Every 
five years there is a 10 per cent increase, called longevity pay. Quite 
a number of these increases will be due in 1916 and they amount 
to over $13,000. The whole increase in pay of officers totals $25,- 
302.50, exactly. 

The Chairman. Over the current year? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How is it in preparing your estimates you only 
estimated for $10,000 ? 

Capt. Bertholf. $35,000. 

The Chairman. No ; $10,000. Last year you estimated for pay of 
officers (active, retired, and retired waiting-orders list) $836,286? 

Capt. Bertholf. This is the increase in the estimate for 1916 over 
the cost of the current year. 

The Chairman. I know. That is what you estimated it would cost 
for this year? 

Capt Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And for next year you estimate that it will cost 
§846,051.50, a little under $10,000. 

Capt. Bertholf. It is only going to cost this year $820,549. That 
is the figure now. 

The Chairman. You submitted an estimate for $836,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. Because in making estimates we have to allow 
for all contingencies, and that estimate for 1915 was made some time 



184 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

ago. We now know better what is going to happen this year, with 
the knowledge of the first six months' actual expenses to guide us. 

The Chairman. And you estimate for next year 

Capt. Bbrtholf. $846,051.50. 

The Chairman. That is only a difference of $10,000? 

Capt. Bbrtholf. No, sir. $820,549 is what we now estimate it 
will cost us this year. 

The Chairman. That was the statement last year ? 

Capt. Bertholf. No, sir ; but we are now figuring on what it will 
actually cost this year, having the expense of the past six months to 
guide us. It is rather difficult to figure sometimes for two years in 
advance. 

The Chairman. That is the whole increase? 

Capt. Bbrtholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What is the next increase ? 

Capt. Bertholf. The next increase is in the pay of crews. We 
have an increase there of $7,000. 

The Chairman. Why? 

Capt. Bbrtholf. Because our crews are running more complete 
than last year. In submitting an estimate we always figure on how 
the crews have been running. They have usually been short three or 
four men on a ship. Now, we find that the complements of the ships 
are keeping more nearly filled all the time — about 1 per cent more 
men than last year. 

The Chairman. How much will that cost ? 

Capt. Bertholf. $7,000. That is $25,500 and $7,000, and then we 
have contingent, $5,500. 

The Chairman. You figured that for this year the enlisted men 
and crews would cost $892,473.44. 

Capt. Bertholf. Yast year we made that estimate. 

The Chairman. No, sir; the current year. In submitting your 
estimate for next year you estimate that it will cost $925,215 ? 

Capt. Bertholf. That is the gross estimate for the individual 
item of crews' pay. That is figuring on the very maximum. That 
is not the estimate of which I have been speaking. 

The Chairman. You can not shift your basis of calculation? 

Capt. Beutholf. We have to. That is what we call the gross 
estimate. If these appropriations are made in separate items we 
must estimate on the maximum for each item, but the appropriation 
asked for is a lump sum for all the items. 

The Chairman. There is an increase of $33,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. That is what we call the gross estimate. In 
figuring on the gross we must estimate on the maximum require- 
ments. We do not estimate on the maximum in this lump sum — we 
estimate only on probabilities. We need only $863,000 to meet our 
probable expenses for pay of crews. If we had every man for every 
day for the whole year we would need $1)25,000. But we know we 
are not going to have all the men all the time. 

The Chairman. You figure on $35,000. Where is the other item? 

CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Capt. Bertholf. $25,500, $7,000, and another item of $5,500 for 
eontingent. For many years past the rental of wharves for use of 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 186 

tugs and harbor launches detailed for customs duty, particularly 
at Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pensacola, Mobile, and San 
Francisco, have been paid from the appropriation for the customs 
service. It has now been arranged that the sum necessary for this 
expense be added to our appropriation, and the appropriation for 
the customs service be reduced by that sum. That amounts to $5,500. 
That makes altogether $38,000. ' 

The Chairman. Why did you add $9,000 to the contingent fund? 

Capt Bertholf. We did not. The gross contingent for 1916 is 
$33,000, and for 1915 the gross contingent was $24,000. 

The Chairman. I am talking about what yoti estimated last year. 
For this year you estimated in your contingent fund $24,000? 

Capt Bertholf. For the present year. That was not enough. We 
are going to spend more than that. 

The Chairman. How much more? 

Capt. Bebtholf. It will probably cost us this year for contingent 
expenses $27,000. That is what we think it will cost us, figuring 
now with six months' expenses behind us. 

The Chairman. You estimated $24,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. We did not estimate enough. 

The Chairman. You estimated a great deal more on the other 
items? 

Capt. Bertholf. No, sir; we estimated what we thought we 
needed. 

The Chairman. The contingent expenses run about the same every 
year/ 

Capt. Bertholf. Let us see. 

The Chairman. What did you expend in 1914? 

Capt Bertholf. $29,757, and in 1913, $26,369. This year we esti- 
mate that it will cost us $27,000. It cost us $29,000 in 1914 because 
we had to repair several wharves — notably at Wilmington, which 
cost over $1,000. We are eliminating from this current year those 
expenditures made last year which will not be necessary this year. 

The Chairman. $24,000 plus $5,000 would be $29,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You add $4,000 more? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes; but you see when I estimated $24,000 last 
year it was not enough. Now, I am estimating that it is going to 
cost us $27,000 for the current year. 

The Chairman. How much do you figure the three items? 

Capt. Bertholf. $38,000. From this must be subtracted $3,000, 
because we are not including in the estimate this year $3,000 for im- 
proving the depot at Baltimore. 

The Chairman. $5,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. It used to be $5,000; we spent $3,000 last year. 

The Chairman. That makes $35,000 altogether? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. We are going to save $17,000 on ship chandlery 
and engineers' stores and supplies and outfits? 

Capt. Bertholf. How do you make that? 

The Chairman. You estimated that for the current year you 
would expend $173,000. 

Capt. Bertholf. We will spend this year only $148,000. 



186 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. You will not spend any more next year J 

Capt. Bertholf. I am figuring on the same amount. 

The Chairman. The estimate is $156,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. That is the gross. 

The Chairman. I am talking about the lump sum. 

Capt. Bertholf. That is what I am figuring on in asking for 
$2,385,000. That is the lump sum asked for, which is $35,000 more 
than the current appropriation, and I am explaining why we need 
that increase. 

The Chairman. $5,000 for rent? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And how much for the other items? 

Capt. Bertholf. $7,000 for the men and $25,500 for the officers. 

The Chairman. $7,000 for the men? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The men cost about the same every year? 

Capt. Bertholf. No, sir; the cost increases. 

The Chairan. Because of longevity? 

Capt. Bertholf. To some extent, longevity. The cost is increas- 
ing just now because, as I have said, the crews are running more 
nearly filled all the time. We are now getting about 95 per cent of 
the total number of men authorized. There are so many sailors idle 
because so many merchant ships are tied up. 

The Chairman. How much for the officers? 

Capt. Bertholf. $25,500. That, added to increase for crew, is 
$32,500, and $5,500 for wharf rentals makes altogether $38,000, and 
deducting $3,000 which we are not going to include for the depot 
leaves $35,000 as the total increase. 

* The Chairman. That is all you are going to expend in excess of 
this year? Where are you going to save next year over this year? 

Capt. Bertholf. We are not going to save anything, unless we do 
not get any more money, and in that case we will have to defer pur- 
chasing necessary equipment until the next year. It costs more each 
year to run the service because of the increase in the cost of supplies, 
the necessary increase in the men's wages, etc., but there have been 
a great many economies in the last three or four years. 

The Chairman. Where? 

Capt. Bertholf. For instance, in 1911 it cost $190,000 for ship 
chandlery, etc.; in 1912, $162,000; in 1913, $149,000; and in 1914, 
$144,000. That is a pretty good showing. 

The Chairman. You lost a couple of boats, and so you did not 
need so many supplies? 

Capt. Bertholf. We did not lose any ships last fiscal year. 

The Chairman. What other explanation can you give? 

Capt. Bertholf. We have a different method of buying. We pur- 
chase a lot of supplies from the navy yards when we get better prices 
than if we bought outside. We make the merchants compete with 
the navy-yard prices. 

COAL. 

The Chairman. What other item? 

Capt. Bertholf. It cost us in 1912, $239,000 for coal, just the same 
in 1913, but only $230,000 for 1914. We estimate that it is going to 
cost us $237,000 this vear. This is where we have saved: in 1912 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 187 

we cruised 406,000 miles, and that made the cost of coal 59 cents per 
knot. In 1913 we cruised 408,000 miles — 2,000 miles more — and it 
cost us 58.4 cents per knot. Last year we cruised 404,000 miles, and 
it cost us only 56.8 cents per knot. The price of coal has increased, 
and yet the cost per knot has gone down, showing a better expendi- 
ture of the fuel. 

The Chairman. You spent more money and cruised less miles and 
still the cost is reduced ? 

Capt. Bertholf. It cost $239,000 in 1913 and $9,000 less in 1914. 
We made 4,000 miles less, and it cost $9,000 less. 

The Chairman. How do you buy the coal? 
Capt. Bertholf. Under contract. 

The Chairman. According to the thermal units? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

Capt. McAllister. According to the method of the Geological 
Surrey. 

Capt. Bertholf. They analyze the coal. 

The Chairman. The Bureau of Mines — Dr. Holmes examines it? 

Capt. McAllister. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. It is all bought under his supervision? 

Capt. McAllister. He tests it if there is any question about its 
coming up to the standard. 

Capt Bertholf. We do not have the coal tested when we are satis* 
fied with the coal furnished during the preceding year, but when 
we have a new contractor or a new kind of coal, we have it tested, 
and if there is any complaint from the ships as to the coal furnished 
we have samples sent on and tested. 

The Chairman. Does he have anything to do with your specifica- 
tions on which the coal is bought ? 

Capt. McAllister. Yes, sir; we get the specifications from him. 
He sent a man up to see us and we went over the matter with him 
and got up our specifications in accordance with his system. 

The Chairman. As a matter of fact, your coal is purchased actu- 
ally in accordance with his suggestions as to method, and he makes 
an examination of the coal and tests the coal when the contract is 
made, and makes tests if there should be any complaint or if the coal 
does not seem to produce the results it should ? 

Capt. McAllister. Yes, sir. 

Capt. Bertholf. There is another saving in the fuel. We have 
installed oil on three ships on the west coast. That saves money. 

The Chairman. You are burning oil on the Pacific coast? 

Capt. Bertholf. On thre$ ships. 

The Chairman. Have you any more ships now than last year? 
You have one less? 

Capt Bertholf. One less. 

The Chairman. Do you expect any additional ones next year? 

Capt. Bertholf. Two are building now. 

The Chairman. Will they be finished next year? 

Capt. Bertholf. They will be finished in June. 

The Chairman. Of this year? 

Capt Bertholf. Yes, sir; June, 1915. 

The Chairman. This estimate includes them? 

Capt. Bertholf. There is another estimate providing for that 
money. 



188 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1W.6. 

The Chairman. You will have next year two ships more than you 
have this year! 

Capt. Bertholf. No; the two we are building will replace two 
now in existence. The latter are worthless and not costing much for 
outfits. It will cost more to run these new ships. 

The Chairman. Than the two in commission now ? 

Capt. Bertholf. They are just about paddling around. 

The Chairman. They must be very expensive — just paddling 
around! 

Capt. Bertholf. No, sir. We do not give them any supplies if 
We can help it, and do not make any repairs. 

The Chairman. Next year will your fleet be larger or smaller or 
the same as this year! 

Capt. Bertholf. Next year the fleet will be just one vessel short, 
unless they pass the bill now pending in Congress to replace the one 
lost in 1910 on the west coast. The fleet will be about the same size 
in 1916. We lost a vessel this year. We are now two short on the 
west coast. 

cadets. 

The Chairman. You are asking for an increase of seven cadets! 

Capt. Bertholf. There are 14 authorized now. We are asking 
for the 21 that we ought to have regularly from now on. 

The Chairman. What is the present situation with regard to 
the officers! 

Capt. Bertholf. We have now 19 vacancies for officers, leaving 
223 officers on the active list. We have 11 padets to fill those 19 
vacancies, and we will have 2 more vacancies in 1916, or before 
those cadets will have graduated, so that we should appoint 10 cadets 
next year. 

The Chairman. How many vacancies have you? 

Capt. Bertholf. We have 19 vacancies for officers. 

The Chairman. You always average at least 10? 

Capt. Bertholf. Seven is the average. 

The Chairman. I thought you figured on having 10. 

Capt. Bertholf. No, sir; 7 is the average for a number of years, 
and the academic course for the cadets is 3 years, so that we should 
have 21 cadets always in training, an average of 7 coming in and 7 
graduating into the service each year. This number — 21 — will give 
us the quota of cadets we should have in training all the time. It will 
not be any more than-21, and sometimes we would have less than 21. 

The Chairman. You will never have less than 21 if we keep au- 
thorizing them. 

Capt. Bertholf. There may not be that many vacancies, and then 
we would not appoint the full number. 

The Chairman. You have now 14. 

Capt. Bertholf. We have now 11. 

The Chairman. You are authorized to have 14. 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you expect to appoint all of them? 

Capt. Bertholf. We expect to appoint 10 next year. 

The Chairman. Then you would want only 21 ? 

Capt. Bertholf. That will be 21—10 and il. 

Mr. Mondell. You spoke of the increase in the pay of the officers? 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 189 

Capt Bebtholp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Ten per cent every five years? 

Capt Bertholf. Yes, sir; up to 40 per cent, but not over 40 per 
cent. 

Mr. Mondell. There is no such increase in the pay of enlisted 
men and warrant officers for longevity. 

Capt. Bertholf. There is the same increase for warrant officers 
and petty officers, but not for the other enlisted men. The former 
get 10 per cent every five years up to 40 per cent, but not such a 
large proportion of them remain in the service, as in the case of the 
commissioned officers. 

Mr. Mondell. You say that your crews are nearer filled than they 
have been in the past? 

Capt Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Is that due to any unusual effort that you have 
made to increase the crews or is it because the men have offered their 
services more freely than heretofore? 

Capt. Bertholf. I do not know exactly. We have made no special 
effort, so far as that is concerned, except that we are always making 
an effort to keep the complement of the ships full. A man enlists 
for a year, and under ordinary circumstances when his time expires 
we may not be able to fill his vacancy for several days, because there 
may not be a sufficient number of applicants, but now there is no 
lack of applicants. 

Mr. Mondell. As I recollect, it was stated in the hearings last 
year that you had some difficulty in getting and keeping men ; evi- 
dently you do not have that same difficulty to the same extent now. 

Capt. Bertholf. At what hearing? On the hearings of the Reve- 
nue-Cutter Service? 

Mr. Mondell. Yes, sir. 

Capt. Bertholf. I do not remember that, but we have not that 
difficulty. 

Mr. Mondell. I may be mistaken about that, but it runs through 
my mind that some one made that statement in reference to the 
Revenue-Cutter Service. 

Capt. Bertholf. Here are some statistics that will explain the 
matter: In 1913 there were 922 original enlistments and 584 reen- 
listments, showing that the latter number of men desired to continue 
in the service. In 1914 there 942 original enlistments and 710 re- 
enlistments, indicating that a greater number of men desired to stay 
in the service. Now, it may be that they desired to stay in the 
service this year more than they did last year because positions on 
vessels are more difficult to obtain, for the reason that so many 
merchant vessels are laid up. In certain of our ports, like Wilming- 
ton, Key West, or Galveston, we do have difficulty in getting men, 
because there is a lack of supply, but in New York we never have 
difficulty in securing them. In some of the small ports we are now 
setting men without any trouble. 

Mr. Mondell. In the questions which the chairman propounded 
to you with regard to some discrepancies in the estimates, it de- 
veloped that in making up your detailed estimates you estimated 
the maximum needs of the service and then cut them down a certain 
sum in presenting your lump-sum estimates. 



190 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Capt. Bertholf. The lump-sum estimate is the probable total cost 
based on past expenditures. An old law requires us to estimate for 
certain items in detail, just as you see it in the Book of Estimates. 
Of course, as each item is estimated for separately, we must figure on 
the maximum and also a factor of safety for each item. But in the 
lump-sum estimate we figure on the probable cost for each item based 
on our cost for the last year and for six months of the present year. 
With a lump-sum appropriation, if one item costs more than was 
expected, some other item of expense can be reduced to meet the con- 
tingency. 

REPAIRS TO REVENUE CUTTERS. 

The Chairman. The next item is for repairs to revenue cutters, 
$175,000. The current appropriation is $175,000. You are not sav- 
ing anything there, are you? 

Capt. Bertholf. I do not know that we are saving anything. 

The Chairman. You will have fewer ships to repair, because you 
will discontinue a couple of old hulks. 

Capt. Bertholf. We have not estimated on repairing them for a 
couple of years. 

The Chairman. Don't you think you could cut this down $60,000 or 
$75,000? 

Capt. Bertholf. No, sir. We need boilers on a great many of our 
ships. Our ships are old. 

Mr. Mondell. Did I understand you to say that when the new 
ships are placed in commission two of your present ships would be 
retired ? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. You will not use them at all? 

Capt. Bertholf. No, sir; they will be sold and the two new ones 
will take their places. 

Mr. Mondell. The new ships are larger? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir ; larger and better ships. 

Mr. Mondell. They will, of course, give more service than you have 
been able to get from the old ships? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. At the present time we are not getting 
any service at all from those old ships, except now and then. 

Mr. Mondell. So that, as a matter of fact, you are practically get- 
ting at least one new ship ? 

Capt. Bertholf. I think that is the way it could be figured. The 
two old ships we have now are not worth one good ship. 

Capt. McAllister. One of those ships is 52 years old. 

Mr. Mondell. That is the age of retirement, I believe. 

The Chairman. How many ships have you? 

Capt. McAllister. Forty-three, including launches and everything. 

The Chairman. I mean real ships. 

Capt. Bertholf. There are 25 ships of the first and second classes. 

The Chairman. The average is $7,000 a year for repairs. 

Capt. Bertholf. You see, there are 11 good-sized tugboats that 
have to be repaired, and in those repairs we are making renewals. 
We have to put in new boilers out of that appropriation for repairs. 

The Chairman. How much did you have left in 1914? 

Capt. Bertholf. Of the appropriation for repairs? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 191 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Capt. Bertholf. We had a deficiency. 

The Chairman. How much did you have left? 

Capt. Bertholf. We had $3,096.04. 

The Chairman. Almost as much as the deficiency? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much did you have left in 1913? 

Capt. Bertholf. We had $2,494.03. 

The Chairman. Now, in 1911 we consolidated two items here, and 
you told us that the vessels would be put in first-class shape and that 
we could then reduce the appropriation. When will that be done? 
We gave you $75,000 for repairs and then gave $100,000 for extraordi- 
nary repairs. In five years you have had $500,000 for extraordinary 
repairs. 

Capt Bertholf. We have not asked for any extraordinary appro- 
priation for several years past, as we are making all repairs, current 
and extraordinary, out of the regular appropriation. 

The Chairman. You stated that if we gave you this $175,000 for 
a couple of years you would have the fleet in such fine shape that 
we could reduce this sum. 

Capt. Bertholf. I did not say in a couple of years. 

The Chairman. Yes; and you have had it for five years. 

Capt. Bertholf. And we will keep on needing that for a good 
many years, because that is only about 5 per cent of the value of the 
j-hips. No steamship company keeps its ships in repair for that small 
amount of money. 

The Chairman. You have a lot of ships you do not use? 

Capt. Bertholf. We have those two old ships, but we do not put 
any extraordinary repairs on them. We have had to renew boilers 
on other ships. We have put in boilers in two ships this year out of 
this appropriation, and we expect to put boilers in two ships next 
vear. 

2*EW SHIPS. 

The Chairman. The next item is, "For the completion of two 
revenue cutters authorized by the act approved June 24, 1914 : Rev- 
enue cutter for the coast of Maine, $160,000 ; revenue cutter for the 
<rulf of •Mexico, $150,000; in all, $310,000." 

Capt. Bertholf. Those ships will be finished by June, 1915. 

The Chairman. You are asking for $160,000 for one of the cutters. 
Why do you ask for them separately like this? We gave you $165,000 

nut of 

Capt. Bertholf (interposing). Out of $475,000. 

The Chairman. Yes; out of $475,000. 

Capt. Bertholf. There were two ships, and we expect to pay 
^:>0,000 for one and $225,000 for the other. 

The Chairman. Does the law authorizing these vessels assign them 
ivrmanently to those stations, one for the coast of Maine and the 
"ti.er for the Gulf of Mexico? 

Capt. Bertholf. The law expressly says for service on the coast 
•"Maine and for service in the Gulf. 

The Chairman. These ships are under construction and will be 
4 rushed when? 

Capt, Bertholf. By June — this coming June. 



19$ SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. June of 1915? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Then, you will want this money before the 1st 
of July? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. We will need it about that time, any- 
way. 

The Chairman. You expect the ships to go into commission 
around the 1st of this coming July? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir; this coming July. 

Mr. Mondell. Where are they being built? 

Capt. Bertholf. By the Newport News Shipbuilding Co., of Vir- 
ginia. 

The Chairman. You want this money available during the current 
fiscal year? 

Capt. Bertholf. Yes, sir. 

Capt. McAllister. It ought to be available from the passage of 
the bill, because the payments will be due then. 



Tuesday, December 29, 1914. 

ENGRAVING AND PRINTING. 

[See p. 939.] 

STATEMENTS OF MB. WILLIAM P. MALBTTEN, ASSISTANT SECRE- 
TARY OF THE TREASURY; MB. JOSEPH E. RALPH, DIBECTOB, 
AND MB. FRANK E. FERGUSON, ASSISTANT DIBECTOB, BUBEAU 
OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING; MB. W. E. BTTELL, CHIEF, FED- 
EBAL BESEBVE DIVISION, OFFICE OF COMPTBOLLEB OF THE 
CURRENCY; MB. JOHN BURKE, TREASURER OF THE UNITED 
STATES; MB. WILLIAM S. BROUGHTON, CHIEF, DIVISION OF 
LOANS AND CURRENCY; AND MB. W. N. THOMPSON, PBIVATE 
SECBETABY TO ASSISTANT SECRETARY MALBUBN. 

salaries of employees other than plate printers and plate 
printers' assistants. 

[See p. 939.] # 

The Chairman. For salaries of all necessary employees other than 
plate printers and plate-printers' assistants your estimate is $1,447,- 
946, and the appropriation for the current fiscal year is $1,300,000. 

Mr. Ralph. Since submitting the estimates to the Committee on 
Appropriations by the Secretary of the Treasury, in reviewing the 
requirements of the department, Mr. Malburn, the Treasurer of the 
United States, and myself reached the conclusion that the Treasurer 
would be justified in making a reduction of his estimate by 10,000,000 
sheets for the next fiscal year. Now, as my estimates for the work 
of operating the bureau are based upon the estimated requirements 
of the department for whom we do the work, I am going to expect 
those departments to defend their estimates rather than place the 
responsibility upon me, as they have done in the past. I have been 
fighting for a number of years in order to deliver them a certain 
quanity of work, just as I did yesterday in the case of the boilers, 
when that was purely an estimate of the Supervising Architect's 
Office and did not emanate from me at all. 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPB0PBIATI0N BILL, 1D16. , 198 

In connection with the item for the salaries of employees other 
than plate printers and assistants, the appropriation for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1914, was $1,301,828, including a deficiency of 
$64,048> and the unexpended balance was $10,187.72. 

The Chairman. Was that for 1914? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. The unexpended balance was $10,187.72. 
These employees, on account of lack of funds, had to be f urloughed 
without pay in April and May, 1914, six days each. The unexpended 
balances of compensation and of plate printing could not be used 
to reduce the number of days of furlough for the reason that the 
orders for postage stamps and for other reimbursable work could 
not be accurately anticipated and all the funds therefor could not 
be received in time for payment to our employees on June 30, 1914. 

The estimate now is $1,447,505, only $441 less than in the Book of 
Estimates. 

The Chairman. The estimate here is $1,447,946. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; that is the revised estimate on the reduction 
of 10,000,000 sheets. As I have said, the estimate now is $1,447,505, 
or only $441 less than in the Book of Estimates. 

The reduction under this head is small for the reason that the 
added revenue stamps are printed on offset presses, which cost, to- 
gether with the cost of gumming and perforating, is payable from 
this appropriation, whereas the cost of printing the notes eliminated 
is payable from the item of " Wages of plate printers and their as- 
sistants," and the latter item shows a larger reduction. A reduction 
for the 10,000,000 sheets will be made from the item for plate print- 
ing. The printing of the war-tax stamps is now paid out of Jthe 
appropriation for salaries of employees other than plate printers. 
1 am printing the war-tax stamps by a different process from that 
nsed heretofore by the Government, and I believe I am effecting 
an economy in the printing of them by that process of $100,000. I 
am printing the war-tax stamps at a cost ox a little over 2J cents 
per thousand, whereas the postage stamps cost practically 5 cents 
per thousand. 

The appropriation for 1915 is $1,300,000; the estimate now is 
$147,505 more, or an increase of 11.35 per cent. 

The estimate includes $8,400 for "custody of dies, rolls ? and 
plates," which has been omitted from the estimate of the Chief of 
the Division of Loans and Currency. 

The Chairman. We are not going to transfer that, and we need 
not go into it. That transfers a specific appropriation to a lump- 
sum appropriation? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. We will not do that. 

Mr. Rai*ph. You know a year ago you suggested that you thought 
the director should be the custodian of those plates. The Secretary 
has appointed me custodian, and we save $3,000 a year by eliminat- 
ing the custodian of dies, rolls, and plates. 

The Chairman. We might take it up if you will do that. 

Mr. Balph. The number of impressions now estimated to be 
printed in 1916 is 333,576,025 

The Chairman (interposing). Now, you are talking about im- 
r 'lesions and we were talking about sheets. 

727s.>—ir* is 



194 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Ralph. This refers to impressions. 

The Chairman. Either stick to impressions or to sheets. 

Mr. Ralph. I will refer to both. I have it in sheets and impres- 
sions. As I said, the number of impressions now estimated to be 
printed in 1916 is 333,576,025, and in 1915, as provided in the appro- 
priations, 308,355,864, an increase of 1916 over 1915 of 25,220,161, 
or 8.18 per cent, as compared with 11.35 per cent increase in the 
estimate. The reason of the greater increase in cost as compared 
with the work is due to the increased quantity of revenue stamps 
and the decreased quantity of United States notes, the cost under 
this head of the former being much greater than that of the latter, 
as heretofore explained. 

The Chairman. How many sheets did vou print in 1914? 

Mr. Ralph. We printed 280,272,828 sheets. 

The Chairman. That number of sheets? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; of securities. 

The Chairman. Divide them up. 

Mr. Ralph. I have not the statistics here necessary to enable me 
to do that. I have only three classes here. Of United States notes 
there were 73,609,000 sheets; of national-bank notes there were 
12,523,164 sheets; of internal-revenue stamps there were 80,195.136 
sheets; of customs stamps there were 200,500 sheets 

The Chairman. All of that is repaid work? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir; it is estimated for. 

The Chairman. In here? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many sheets of postage stamps? 

Mr. Ralph. Of postage stamps there were 107,488,047 sheets; of 
parcel-post stamps there were 2,808,654 sheets; and of checks, drafts, 
and miscellaneous work there were 3,448,327 sheets, making the total 
number of sheets delivered 280,272,828. 

The Chairman. Now, for 1915 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). And you can add to that 2 per cent 
for defective work and mutilated sheets. That represents the num- 
ber of sheets actuallv printed and delivered. 

The Chairman. Now, for 1915? 

Mr. Ralph. That is the present year. The number of impressions 
now estimated to be printed in 1916 is 333.596,025. 

The Chairman. That is in 1915? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir: that is for 1916. 

The Chairman. I am talking about 1915. 

Mr. Ralph. That is 308,355,864. 

The Chairman. Give us the statement for United States note* 
now. 

Mr. Ralph. During the present year we expect to deliver 74.000 .0<X 
sheets of United States notes. 

The Chairman. And of national-bank notes. 

Mr. Ralph. Fourteen million sheets. 

The Chairman. Of internal-revenue stamps. 

Mr. Ralph. I have not got that data for the present fiscal yem 
other than for the items that I thought would interest the committer 
T have the total number of sheets, but I have not the interna 1 -re ven in 
stamps and postage stamps. 

The Chairman. Then, give the others and subtract for tin 
internal-revenue stamps. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPHIATION BILL, 1916. 195 

Mr. Balph. I have nothing but the United States notes for the 
present vear. 

The Chairman. Then I want you to find out those things. What 
we want is one basis of comparison here. 
How much money have you had altogether in 1915 ? 
Mr. Ralph. Do you want the tctal under these items ? 
The Chairman. I want to know the amount of money that you 
j«re using under this particular item. 
Mr. Ralph. That is $1,301,82.5. 
The Chairman. That is for this year? 
Mr. Ralph. Not including the deficiency. 
The Chairman. Xow I want the statement for 1915. 
Mr. Ralph. The appropriation for 1915 under this heading is 
$1,625,000. 

the Chairman. What does that include? It includes $1,300,000 
and what else ? 
Mr. Ralph. The appropriation for 1915 was $1,300,000. 
The Chairman. You get certain money under the war-revenue 
act, did you net? 

Mr. Ralph. I got certain money for printing emergency currency 
?nd for the Federal-reserve nctes. 
The Chairman. And for war-revenue stamps? 
Mr. Ralph. No, sir; there was no appropriation made for them 
in the act itself; but I am printing those stamps, and I have deliv- 
ered up to the present time something like five billion war-revenue 
stamps. While I expect to come in under the general deficiency 
bill for an appropriation to reimburse me for that work, yet I am 
striving to get along without it until about the latter part of Janu- 
ary or until I can get some line on it that will enable me to determine 
how much will be required. 
The Chairman. Didn't they carry an appropriation in the act? 
Mr. Ralph. They carried an appropriation of $30,000 for paper, 
hut no money for printing; and I feel a business pride in the fact 
that I am printing those stamps at about one-half of what it cost 
to print them in 1808. I am printing them by a new process and 
sun saving the Government money on them. I am trying to get 
along without asking for a deficiency, but I will not be able to deter- 
mine that until a month hence. 

Xow. this is the estimate of the quantity of work for 1915, We 
estimate that for the present fiscal year we will deliver 74.00Q,000 
sheets of securities to the Treasurer of the United States, comprising 
14.000,000 sheets of national-bank notes, 86.705,459 sheets of internal- 
revenue stamps, and 129.00-2,457 sheets of postage stamps. Then for 
nistoms stamps and miscellaneous work we estimate 1,98(>.15C> sheets. 
The Chairman. How much for checks and drafts? 
Mr. Ralph. Checks and drafts are included with the customs 
>tamps and miscellaneous. 
The Chairman. How much for parcel post ( 

Mr. Ralph. There are no parcel-post stamps for the present year. 
We are not using them. *We have discontinued their use and are 
using the ordinary postage stamps. The Postmaster General has 
effected an economy of $50,000 in that. 

The Chairman. But nobody is able to figure out whether or not 
parcel post pays? 



196 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir ; there is no check on the stamps. 

The Chairman. Well, you will have for United States notes in 
1916 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). Eighty million sheets. 

The Chairman. And you reduce that by 10,000,000 sheets? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; under the Book of Estimates. The Book of 
Estimates provided for 90,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. As against 74,000,000 sheets for 1915? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And for national-bank notes? 

Mr. Ralph. Thirteen million five hundred thousand sheets as 
against 14,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. And for internal-revenue stamps? 

Mr. Ralph. Eighty-nine million nine hundred and forty-nine 
thousand six hundred and twenty-three. This does not include war- 
tax stamps. 

The Chairman. This other includes war-tax stamps 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir; none of them do. We have no appropriation 
for war-tax stamps. I have here a supplemental statement which I 
will read to you. 

The Chairman. I want a statement including all of these things. 

Mr. Ralph. Then let me read this statement to you. 

The Chairman. We were discussing sheets, and you called them 
impressions 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). It is necessary to use the word M im- 
pressions" to define 

The Chairman (interposing). I want it in a different way. 

Mr. Ralph. I have it in both ways. Our work is different from 
that which you ordinarily handle. We have thrte subheadings. 

The Chairman. The trouble is that we find out that you do not 
need all that you ask for. I do not think that you need the money 
that you ask for every time, and we do not think that you ought to 
print all of the notes that are asked for. 

Mr. Ralph. But I have no discretion in that matter. In the past 
I have agreed with you in many instances that we did not need the 
money, and I have so stated to this committee, but that is a question 
for tne Treasurer to defend. 

The Chairman. But we want these things in a form which will 
enable us to make comparisons with previous years. All this is 
worthless. 

Mr. Ralph. I have the same data that I have brought each year, 
and I am bringing in a supplemental report here reducing the esti- 
mate 10,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. But it does not reduce it in money. 

Mr. Ralph. I do reduce it in money, and I will explain that when 
we come to the items for plate printing. I think if you will let me 
read this 

The Chairman. You may read what you have to read. 
Mr. Ralph. The appropriation for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1914, was $1,624,625, including a deficiency of $187,150, and the xm 
ex^nded balance was $14,387.37. 

These employees, on account of lack of funds, had to be fur 
loughed without pay in April and May, 1914, the plate printers each 
12 days and their assistants each 10 days. The unexpended balances 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 197 

of compensation and of plate printing could not be used to reduce 
the number of days of furlough for the reason that the orders for 
postage stamps and for the reimbursable work could not be ac- 
curately anticipated, and all the funds therefor could not be re- 
ceived in time for payment to our employees on June 30, 1914. 

The estimate now is $1,652,045, which is $149,014 less than in the 
Book of Estimates. 

The Chairman. Yes; but it is more than this gear's appropriation. 

Mr. Ralph. It is more than the appropriation for the present 
year, and we have to do 8.18 per cent, or 25,220,161, more work next 
rear. If this committee decides that we do not need to print that 
25,220,161 sheets of work our estimate will be less than the appro- 
priation for the present year. 

The Chairman. With all of the improvements and all of the in- 
ventions and everything else which would operate to reduce the cost 
of running that bureau, you ask for more money every year. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; and we have to do more work. I think if 
vou will investigate that carefully you will be satisfied on that score. 
I am not responsible for the estimates. 

The Chairman. You finish your statement and I will ask you the 
questions which I wish answered. Then we can form some opinion. 

Mr. Ralph. Let me complete this reading, because I have incorpo- 
rated something in here that I hope may be explanatory of some of 
the things you have in mind. The appropriation for 1915 is 
$1,625,000; the estimate is $27,045 more, equal to a 1.66 per cent in- 
crease, as compared with a 5.27 per cent increase in the plate-printed 
impressions to be printed. I am asking less than 2 per cent to print 
practically 6 per cent more work. The plate-printed impressions for 
1915 are 245,119,006, and for 1916 they now are 258,038,352, an in- 
crease of 12,919,346, or 5.27 per cent over 1915. The saving in the 
year ended June 30, 1914, due to the introduction of power plate- 
printing presses in printing backs of paper money and of offset 
presses in printing checks amounted to $210,000, and in the years 
1915 and 1916 it will be $390,000 for each year. Under a decision 
of the Comptroller of the Treasury all the backs of the emergency 
currency and of the Federal reserve notes were in 1915 printed on 
power presses, resulting in a much larger saving in that year as 
compared with the previous year. A summary would be: Impres- 
sions in estimate submitted for 1916, 346,066,025 ; reduction, 10,000,000 
sheets United States notes and certificates, 20,650,000, a total of 
325,416,025. Add 8,000,000 sheets new internal revenue stamps, 
under act of October 22, 1914, 8,160,000; amended total impressions 
for 1916, 333,576,025; impressions for 1915, as per appropriations, 
308555,864, making the increase of 1916 over 1915 8.18 per cent or 
25520,161. 

The Chairman. Does that finish your statement? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

TOTAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The Chairman. How much were your total appropriations for 
19141 
Mr. Ralph. $8,868,927 in 1914. 



198 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 

The Chairman. No; $3,362,927 plus $30,000 for paper. 

Mr. Ralph. $9,000 was left out. 
- The Chairman. You leave out that $9,000? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I make it $3,388,927, and you make it $3,353,927. 
You were given $30,000 for paper? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much did you actually spend? 

Mr. Ralph. No; we did not get that paper. That is purchased 
by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. I had nothing to do 
with that. He purchased all of that for the Internal Revenue De- 
partment, but this year I am asking that that money be transferred 
to the bureau and that we be permitted to purchase it. 

The Chairman. How much did you actually spend? 

Mr. Ralph. $1,404,937.48. 

The Chairman. That is your money? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; that was the available money appropriated 
and reimbursed for all work, and the actual expenditures were 
$4,372,922.81, leaving a total 

The Chairman (interposing). How do you account for the differ- 
ence of $82,000? 

Mr. Ralph. That was money for which I was reimbursed for 
postage stamps some time in August. 

The Chairman. For the last year? 

Mr. Ralph. That is the unexpended balance, $32,014.67; that is 
the amount expended out of the three items under which we are 
operating the bureau. 

The Chairman. I do hot understand that. I want to know what 
you actually spent. 

Mr. Ralph. I actually spent altogether $4,372,922.81. 

The Chairman. That is $918,000 more than the appropriation. 

Mr. Ralph. $828,930.48, which is work for which I was reim- 
bursed. 

The Chairman. $1,018,995.81 is the difference between $4,372,- 
922.81 and $3,353,927. 

Mr. Ralph. You have made a mistake there; I can not prove 
those figures. 

The Chairman. You gave me $4,372,922.81 as the amount that 
you had actuallv spent? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And $3,353,927 as the amount of your appro- 
priations? 

Mr. Ralph. Xo; $3,576,000. 

The Chairman. Xo; $3,353,927 are the figures you gave. 

Mr. Ralph. The amount appropriated for the operation of the 
bureau was $3,576,007. 

The Chairman. $3,353,927 are the figures that you read to me, and 
those are the figures I have here. 

Mr. Ralph. Well, the difference between the amount appropriated 
and the amount expended 

The Chairman (interposing). I have the total amount appro- 
priated for your bureau as $3,353,927. 

Mr. Ralph. Well, if I read any other figures I was confusing my 
figures. The amount appropriated by Congress was $3,576,007, 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 199 

The Chairman. We appropriated $3,068,777 in the sundry civil act 
and $285,150 in the deficiency act. Now, where did you get the other 
amount? 

Mr. Ralph. I have included the legislative roll in my figures- 
Mr. Courts. He has carried the legislative salary roll into his 
figures, which you do not want here. 

The Chairman. Leave those figures in. 

Mr. Courts. $216,380 is the amount of the salaries under the 
legislative act. 

The Chairman. Making $3,570,307. 

Mr. Ralph. No; $3,576,007. 

The Chairman. You actually spent $4,372,922 — leaving out the 
cents — which makes $802,615 which you spent in excess of your 
annual appropriations? 

Mr. Ralph. I make it $828,930.48. 

The Chairman. $4,372,922.81, and you take from that $3,576,007, 
do you ? 

Mr. Ralph. There is an unexpended balance of $32,014.67. 

The Chairman. You did not spend that? 

Mr. Ralph. That was converted into the Treasury, and is the 
amount which we did not spend. 

The Chairman. That would be a credit? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir ; that would represent part of the profits.* 

The Chairman. There is about $800,000 expended in excess of the 
annual appropriations. Now, where did you get that money? 

Mr. Ralph. That represents repayments Tor the postage-stamp 
contracts. 

The Chairman. How much? 

Mr. Ralph. From the Post Office Department for United States 
postage stamps, including engraving, $742,778.53. 

The Chairman. That, repay work does not make much difference, 
because you spend it for something else ; so you need not count in the 
repay work. Where do you get this other money ? 

Mr. Ralph. Which other monev? 

The Chairman. This $800,000/ 

Mr. Ralph. That was reimbursed for work executed. 

The Chairman. But you spent it again. 

Mr. Ralph. I was paid for work which I executed. 

The Chairman. Where did you get this other money that you 
spent? 

Mr. Ralph. Well, I have explained that by stating that I was 
repaid for work which I executed for other departments. Now, 
. Mr. Fitzgerald, there seems to be something running through your 
mind that we do not connect on and which I do not understand, but 
I will be very glad to go back and give you any information you 
*ant. I take special pride in the work of that bureau 

The Chairman (interposing). I am not criticizing you; I am 
trying to get certain informati6n in my way, and you are giving it 
in ycur wav. I want to get mvself straightened out on this matter. 
You get $742,778.53 from the Post Office Department? 

Mr. Ralph. For certain work, which is the regular and ordinary 
work. Now, in addition to that I received from the Post Office 
Oepartment for parcel-post stamps. $14.534.81 : then I received in 



200 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1918. 

addition from the Post Office Department for money-order drafts, 
including engraving, $960; I received from the Philippine govern- 
ment for postage stamps, $2,345.28 ; I received from the Philippine 
government for postal cards, $17.74 ; I received from the Philippine 
government for silver certificates, $16,393.19; I received from the 
Canal Zone government for United States postage stamps, sur- 
charged " Canal Zone," $36.90. 

The Chairman. Are these in addition to that first sum? 

Mr. Ralph. No ; this first sum is the total receipts. 

Mr. Malburn. These are in addition to the $742,778.53? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes; but the total will aggregate $828,930.48. I 
received from the government of Porto Kico for bonds, excise 
revenue stamps, and interim certificates for bonds, exclusive of 
engraving, $413.26; I received for repayments from the several 
departments of the Government for services and materials furnished 
and not estimated for, $149.60; I received from the Postal Savings 
System for certificates of deposit, $13,806.61 : I received from the 
Postal Savings System for bonds, exclusive oi engraving, $1,757.57; 
I received from the Postal Savings System for checks, $280; I re- 
ceived from the Department of State for consular fee stamps, 
$332.89; I received from the Department of State for consular and 
diplomatic drafts, $62.52; I received from the War Department 
for certificates of proficiency Coast Artillery School and certificates 
of merit, exclusive of engraving, $138.03; I received from the De- 
partment of Agriculture for United States veterinary licenses and 
permits, exclusive of engraving, $10.96 ; I received from the Isthmian 
Canal Commission for bills of exchange, exclusive of engraving, 
$7.15; I received from the Public Printer for portraits of WUiam B. 
Allison, $35.54 ; I received from the Treasurer of the United States 
for money straps, $26.25 ; and I received from various other sources 
and appropriations, as shown in statement No. 14, page 27, $34,843.45, 
making the total repayments $828,930.48. 

The Chairman. That makes 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). The actual available sum of money to 
be expended by the bureau, $4,404,937.48. 

The Chairman. How much, if anything, did you get for the print- 
ing of the emergency currency? 

Mr. Ralph. My total repayments for emergency currency — well, 
that comes in 1915. 

The Chairman. There is nothing in 1914? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. 

The Chairman. That makes your total for 1914? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you keep the legislative items in the 1915 ap- 
propriations, too? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes. 

The Chairman. For 1915 there was appropriated $3,395,000. 

Mr. Ralph. I find I have not the legislative salaries in the 1915 
appropriations. Three million three hundred and ninety-five thou- 
sand dollars was the amount appropriated in the sundry civil bill. 

The Chairman. You leave out the salaries because, after all, the 
statutory roll is not changed in any way? 

Mr. Ralph. That is right. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910. 201 

The Chairman. In addition to that you did certain repay work. 
What is that, ifyou have it? 

Mr. Ralph. Tnat is the present year in which we are operating 
and will probably aggregate about the same amount of money. 

The Chairman. Would it not be more? 

Mr. Ralph. Well, we estimate lo be received for 1915, or at least 
to have available, $4,349,969, but that is only an estimate. 

EMERGENCY CURRENCY AND FEDERAL RESERVE NOTES. 
[See pp. 209, 214, 227.] 

The Chairman. Have you finished the emergency currency work? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much does that amount to? 

Mr. Ralph. $422,911.13. 

The Chairman. Is that work completed? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; it is completed. 

The Chairman. What other emergency work is there? 

Mr. Ralph. We are now engaged in completing $250,000,000 of 
Federal reserve notes, for which we will be reimbursed by the United 
States later on. 

The Chairman. How much will that be in round figures, and you 
can insert the exact figures later? 

Mr. Ralph. That willbe about $200,000. The banks, of course, will 
reimburse the Government for that. There is a provision in the bill 
which permits the Secretary of the Treasury to reimburse the Bureau 
out of any funds in the Treasury. 

The Chairman. Do you make a profit on either of these jobs? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. 

The Chairman. This is the actual cost? 

Mr. Ralph. The actual cost. On the net result I should say we 
have a slight profit, as I figure in such a way as to be on the safe side. 
But in the aggregate, if there was a profit, it would not be more than 
$1,000. 

The Chairman. You figure to do this work for what it actually 
costs? 

Mr. Ralph. For what it actually costs plus 15 per cent for overhead 
charges, and I make sure that we put in such figures as to protect our 
appropriations as made by Congress. 

The Chairman. I want to get this in the record. When you figure 
on this repay work, for instance, for the emergency currency work, 
which was being paid for out of a permanent appropriation, and the 
Federal reserve notes, ypu figured on charging 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). The actual cost plus 15 per cent for 
overhead charges. 

The Chairman. You make a profit, then? 

Mr. Ralph. A slight profit. 

Mt.Malbxtrn. That 15 per cent, Mr. Fitzgerald, is for overhead 
charges. 

The Chairman. Of course, it depends a great deal on the manner 
in which they fix their charges. If you are only paying out for 
labor and material, everything you charge in there is a supplemental 
appropriation f 



202 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Ralph. On emergency currency we saved some money. As 
we printed all of the backs on power presses, hence it costs us less 
to print the emergency currency than the national bank currency, 
somewhere around $35,000, otherwise we would have added $35,000 
for repayment from the Treasury. I gave the Treasury the benefit 
of that saving and actually charged less than I would under ordinary 
circumstances, but in computing those things I always make sure 
that there is a little money to our credit on this repayment work. I 
do not hesitate to say that we have a substantial profit on the postal- 
stamp work. 

The Chairman. You have over there $500,000,000 in emergency 
currency ? 

Mr. Ralph. In round numbers at the time we began we had about 
$500,000,000 in money. 

The Chairman. How much more did vou print? 

Mr. Ralph. We printed $540,000,000. 

The Chairman. More? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much have you on hand now? 

Mr.MALBURN. About $686,000,000. 

The Chairman. It never will be used? 

Mr. Malbtjrn. Yes, sir. In fact, they have commenced to reduce 
it now. It is just the same as the ordinary national-bank notes, and 
will be used in sending the new money out to the national banks. 

The Chairman. It will not be discarded because of the new 
system ? 

Mr. Malbtjrn. No, sir. 

Mr. Burke. It is just the same as the national-bank notes. 

The Chairman. You have about $500,000,000 of that? 

Mr. Malbtjrn. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Why should you increase the number of sheets 
of national-bank notes next year over this year? 

Mr. Ralph. We have undelivered to the Comptroller of the Cur- 
rency 6,500,000 sheets of national-bank notes. Practically, I am 
printing very few bank notes now, but I expect within 30 days to be- 
gin the delivery of the Federal reserve bank currency. It will use the 
unexpended money to print that. It is printed under the same 
regulations of law. The banks are not chargeable with the money 
other than they reimburse the Government for the actual cost of 
preparing the plates. The Comptroller of the Currency to-day gave 
me orders to expedite the completion of the dies, rolls, and plates 
necessary to print the Federal reserve bank currency, which will re- 
place the national-bank currency, as estimated for in the Book of 
Estimates, of 13,500,000 sheets. I think in the legislation that there 
ought to be a provision for national currency and Federal reserve 
bank currency, so much money. We are going to print two forms 
of currencv under that appropriation. At the present time I have 
under the estimate for 1915 practically 6,500,000 sheets of national- 
bank notes. 

Mr. Mondell. Printed? 

Mr. Ralph. Undelivered for this year; and six months have ex- 
pired — practically half — but in order to effect a reduction in the 
reserve that yoii speak of, under the Aldrich-Vreeland Act the 
Comptroller of the Currency is not giving me any orders to print 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPB0PHIATI0N BILL; 1916. 20S 

money to deposit there to replace the money drawn out by the banks. 
It is expected that in the next six months we will reduce that at 
least 25 per cent. That would be a- safe estimate, Governor? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ralph. In consequence, I am not getting the regular amount 
of orders to print the national-bank notes that I would expect. 

The Chairman. We had $500,000,000 of emergency currency in 
reserve? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much did they issue? 

Mr. Burke. Practically $384,000,000. 

The Chairman. That will be reduced, as next monthi they com- 
mence to pay 4 per cent interest? 

Mr. M alburn. Some of them are paying it now. 

Mr. Burke. This is December, and it is coming in quite rapidly; 

The Chairman. It will not be necessary to retire those notes be- 
cause they are worn? 

Mr. Burke. No, sir; they will be kept in circulation. We have 
received $104,000,000 so far this month. 

The Chairman. You had $500,000,000 and you printed $540 r 
000,000? 

Mr. Ralph. They have reduced it now to $210,000,000. 

The Chairman. You are going to have a tremendous reserve. 
Whv should you increase from 12,000,000 to 14,000.000 sheets? 

Mr. Ralph*. Our estimate for this year, 1915, is 14,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. In 1914 there were delivered 12,525,000 sheets, and 
the estimate for 1915 is 14,000,000? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And for 1916, 13,500,000 sheets. Why should it be 
so high'? 

Mr. RALPn. Take the present conditions, the Comptroller of the 
Currency ordinarily gives me a daily average of 45,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. That is all right about the orders. 

Mr. Ralph. I want to lead up and explain the whole matter. I 
have on my books orders for about 200,000 sheets of national-bank 
notes. If I were to print them and liquidate the orders of the Comp- 
troller of the Currency, I would have undelivered for this year about 
$.500,000 sheets of national-bank notes which you appropriate money 
for me to print. I do not expect to deliver to the Comptroller of the 
Currency more than 2,000,000 sheets additional of national-bank 
notes during the remainder of this year, but I expect to print and 
deliver 4,000,000 sheets of Federal reserve bank currency. 

The Chairman. You ought to have a big surplus? 

Mr. Ralph. The surplus is being eaten up by the substitution of 
the Federal reserve bank currency. 

The Chairman. For which you get repay? 

Mr. Ralph. No. 

The Chairman. Why not? 

Mr. Ralph. We get repay for the Federal reserve note, which is an 
obligation of the United States Government issued to the bank. The 
Federal reserve bank currency is to replace national-bank currency 
which we are now speaking of. There are two forms of money issueq 
by the Federal reserve banks. 

The Chairman. Not under this appropriation? 



204 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPHIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Thompson. The authority for the Federal reserve notes is 
contained in the Federal reserve act. 

The Chairman. Not out of this appropriation? 

Mr. Thompson. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You are only going to print 2,000,000 sheets in- 
stead of 14,000,000 sheets? 

Mr. Ralph. At present I owe them about 6,500,000 sheets on the 
14,000,000 estimate, and I do not expect, according to the forecast of 
the orders that I see now, to print for the remainder of this fiscal year 
over 2,000,000 sheets of national-bank notes. That will leave about 
4,500,000 sheets of national currencv provided for in the appropria- 
tion that would not be expended unless the money would be available 
for the printing of other securities, but inasmuch as the act itself 

The Chairman (interposing). It is not available for printing the 
Federal reserve money? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; it is available for that 

The Chairman. Only under repay work? 

Mr. Ralph. No; the appropriation allotted to printing 

The Chairman (interposing). We discussed that before. You can 
not print the Federal reserve money without some specific authority. 

Mr. Ralph. I agree with you. 1 think there should be in the act 
something to permit us to use the appropriation. 

The Chairman. As a matter of tact, all of the Federal reserve 
money has not been paid for out of this appropriation ? 

Mr. Ralph. The Federal reserve notes; no, sir. 

The Chairman. How do you propose to do it now ; by repay ? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You can not use this money that will not be spent 
on printing national-bank notes for Federal reserve notes unless it is 
repay work ? 

Mr. Ralph. I think so. I think the Comptroller of the Currency 
has the right under the law to order the money printed. 

The Chairman. You can not do it? 

Mr. Ralph. In the appropriation you generally specify so much 
money for the printing. 

The Chairman. But under the Federal reserve act itself it makes 
an indefinite appropriation for that. You have been printing tho 
Federal reserve notes out of the appropriation and getting repaid 
for them? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You are not going to have two appropriations? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. 

federal reserve bank currency. 

[See p. 227.] " 

Mr. Broughton. There is another currency, known as the Federal 
reserve bank note, for which no appropriation is made. 

The Chairman. There is no authority here. Any appropriation 
made prior to the passage of the act was available. 

Any appropriation heretofore made out of the general funds of the Treasury 
for engraving plates and dies, the purchase of distinctive paper, or to cover any 
other expense in connection with the printing of national-bank notes or notes 
provided for by the act of May 30, 1908. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910. 208 

Mr. Ralph. That refers to Federal reserve .notes only. There is 
another form of money that is going to replace the national-bank 
notes, for which you give me an appropriation to print 14,000,000 
sheets. 

The Chairman. This does not refer to Federal reserve notes? 

Mr. Bkoughton. We were of the same opinion, but the Comp* 
troller of the Treasury in a decision rendered a month or two ago, 
after the estimates were submitted, said that referred only to Fed- 
eral reserve notes and that Federal reserve bank notes must be pre- 
pared in the same manner as national-bank currency. 

The Chairman. Please send us a copy of that decision. 

Mr. Broughton. We will be glad to send it to the committee. 

Mr. Ralph. After treating upon the Federal reserve notes the aet 
reads: 

Upon the deposit with the Treasurer of the United States of bonds so pur* 
chased, or any bonds with the circulating privilege acquired under section four 
of this act any Federal reserve bank making such deposit in the manner pro- 
Tided by existing law, shall be entitled to receive from the Comptroller of the 
Currency circulating notes in blank, registered and countersigned as provided 
by law, equal in amount to the par value of the bonds so deposited. Such notes 
shall be the- obligations of the Federal reserve bank procuring the same, and 
•hall be in form prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, and to the same 
tenor and effect as national-bank notes now provided by law. They shall be 
Issued and redeemed under the same terms and conditions as national-bank 
notes, except that they shall not be limited to the amount of the capital stock 
of the Federal reserve bank issuing them. 

The Chairman. You say you have the opinion of the Comptroller? 
Mr. Broughton. Yes, sir ; and we will send it up. It is as follows : 

Treasury Department, 
Washington, October 12, 1914. 
The Secretary of the Treasury. - 

Sib: I have your letter of the 8th instaut stating that it is necessary for the 
department to proceed with the preparation of Federal reserve notes for the 
nse of the Federal reserve banks, and requesting my decision of the following 
questions : 

1. Does the provision in section 16 of the Federal reserve act of December 23, 
1913, hereinafter quoted, authorize the use of " any funds In the Treasury not 
otherwise appropriated" to purchase equipment distinctive paper, and other 
materials and to reimburse the bureau appropriations for cost of the work 
involved in the preparation of said Federal reserve notes? 

2. When such notes are issued to the Federal reserve banks, should said 
banks be required to reimburse the Treasury in full for the cost of producing 
them? 

3. Is the department authorized to proceed with the preparation of Federal 
reserve bank notes in the same manner as is permitted for the preparation of 
Federal reserve notes? 

The Federal reserve notes referred to in the first question, supra, are pro- 
vided for in section 16 of the Federal reserve act. which reads in part as 
follows : 

"Federal reserve notes, to be issued at the discretion of the Federal Reserve 
Board for the purpose of making advances to Federal reserve banks through 
the Federal reserve agents, as hereinafter set forth and for no other purpose, 
are hereby authorized. The said notes shall be obligations of the United 
States and shall be receivable by all national and member banks and Federal 
reserve banks and for all taxes, customs, and other public dues. They shall 
be redeemed in gold on demand at the Treasury Department of the United 
States, in the city of Washington, District of Columbia, or in gold or lawful 
money at any Federal reserve bank. * * * " 

In order to furnish suitable notes for circulation as Federal reserve notes 
the Comptroller of the Currency shall, under the direction of the Secretary of 
the Treasury, cause plates and dies to be engraved in the best manner to guard 
aeainst counterfeits and fraudulent alterations, and shall have printed there- 



206 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

from and numbered such, quantities of such notes of the denominations of $f>. 
$10, $20, $50, $100 as may be required to supply the Federal reserve banks. 
Such notes shall be in form and tenor as directed by the Secretary of the 
Treasury under the provisions of this act. and shall bear the distinctive num- 
bers of the several Federal reserve banks through which they are issue J. 

When such notes have been prepared they shall be deposited in the Treasury 
or in the subtreasury or mint of the United States ueaiest the place of business 
of each Federal reserve bank, and shall be held for the use of such bank, 
subject to the order of the Comptroller of the Currency for their delhery. 
as provided by this act. 

The plates "and dies to be procured by the Comptroller of the Currency for 
the printing of such circulating notes shall remain under his control " and 
direction, and the expenses necessarily incurred in executing the laws relating 
to the procuring of such notes, and all other expenses incidental to their issue 
and retirement, shall be paid by the Federal reserve banks, and the Federal 
Reserve Board shall include in its estimate of expenses levied against the Fed- 
eral reserve banks a sufficient amount to cover the expenses herein provide.! 
for." 

"Any appropriation heretofore made out of the general funds of the Treasury 
for engraving plates and dies, the purchase of distinctive paper, or to coxer 
any other expense in connection with the printing of uational-bauk notes or 
notes t provided for by the act of .May thirtieth, nineteen hundre I and eight, 
and any distinctive paper that may be on hand at the time of the passage 
of this act, may be used, in the discretion of the Secretary, for the purpose 
of this act; and should the appropiia lions heretofore nw.de be insuliicient t«> 
meet the requirements of this act. in addition to circulating notes provided for 
by existing law. the Secretaiy is hereby authorized to use so much of any fund* 
in the Treasury not otheiwise appropiia led for the purpose of furnishing the 
notes aforesi id : Prcrided, however. That nothing in this section contained shall 
be construed as exempting national banks or Federal reserve banks from their 
liability to reimburse the United States for any expenses incurred in printing 
and issuing circulating notes. * * * " 

It will be observed that the last paragraph of the above quotation provides 
that— 

" * * * should the appropriations heretofore made be insufficient to meet the 
requirements of this act in addition to circulating notes provided for by exist- 
ing law. the Secretary is hereby authorized to use so much of any funds in the 
Treasury not otherwise appropriated for the purpose of furnishing the notes 
aforesaid." 

I understand from your submission that there is no available balance of any 
of the appropriations referred to — that is to say, appropriations made prior to 
December 'J3. 1U13, for engraving plates and dies, the purchase of* distinctive 
pai>er, or to cover any other expense in connection with the printing of national- 
bank notes or notes provided for by the act of May 30, UM)S — from which the 
expense of preparing these Federal reserve notes can be paid. If such be the 
case, the provision above quoted clearly appropriates, and authorizes you to 
expend, so much of any funds in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated a* 
may be necessary to furnish these Federal reserve notes. 

You are advised, therefore, that in the absence of any other fund, the indefi- 
nite appropriation thus made in section 16 of the Federal reserve act is available 
for the purchase of any equipment, distinctive paper, and other materials actu- 
ally necessary in the preparation of these notes and for the reimbursement of 
the bureau appropriations for the cost of the necessary work incident thereto. 

That the Federal reserve banks should be required to reimburse the Treasury 
in full for the cost of producing these Federal reserve notes there would appear 
to be no room for reasonable doubt, in view of that provision in the above- 
quoted section which reads: 

" * * * and the expenses necessarily incurred in executing the laws re- 
lating to the procuring of such notes, and all other expenses incidental to their 
issue and retirement, shall be paid by the Federal reserve banks and the Federal 
Reserve Board shall include in its estimate of expenses levied against the Fed- 
eral reserve banks a sufficient amount to cover the expenses herein provided for." 

The "estimate" referred to in this provision is provided for In section 10 
of the act, as follows: , 

41 The Federal Reserve Board shall have power to levy semiannually upon 
the Federal reserve banks, in proportion to their capital stock and surplus, an 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 207 

assessment sufficient to pay its estimated expenses and the salaries of its 
members and employees for the half year succeeding the levying of such assess- 
ment, together with any deficit carried forward from the preceding half year 
* * V' (Sec. 10, p. 11.) 

As this provision authorizes the hoard to levy semiannually an assessment 
sufficient to pay its estimated expenses for the half year succeeding the levying 
"f such assessment, and specifies how such assessments are to be apportioned 
among the several reserve banks, there would appear to be no occasion for 
waiting until the notes are actually issued to the banks before requiring them 
in i«y for the expense of preparing and issuing said notes. Such expenses 
>hoald be estimated for and levied in advance the game as salaries, etc., and 
if this be done and assessments be collected promptly the regular appropria- 
tions of your department could be reimbursed from this fund direct, and there 
would be little or no necessity for using the appropriation made in section 16, 
supra. But in any event, I think this law clearly contemplates that the re- 
serve banks shall bear the entire expense of producing and issuing these Federal 
reserve notes, and your second question is answered accordingly. 

Your third question is answered in the negative. These Federal reserve-bank 
note* are obligations, not of the United States, but of the Federal reserve banks 
procuring them. The act does not provide in specific terms for the preparation 
and furnishing of these notes as it does with reference to the Federal reserve 
notes, and the indefinite appropriation made in section 10 is not available for 
<he purpose of furnishing these notes. 

The same procedure should be followed in the preparation of these notes as 
is authorized by law in the case of national-bank notes, and the reserve banks 
should be required to pay the expense of producing these notes in the saine man- 
rvr and to the same extent as national banks are required by law to pay the 
♦•speuse of procuring national-bank notes. 

This is clearly shown by a provision in section 18 of the act as follows: 

"Vpon the deposit with the Treasurer of the United States of bonds so pur- 
chased, or any bonds with the circulating privilege acquired under section 4 of 
this act, any Federal reserve bank making such deposit in the manner provided 
for by existing law, shall be entitled to receive from the Comptroller of the 
Currency circulating notes in blank, registered and countersigned as provided 
by law, equal in amount to the par value of the bonds so deposited. Such notes 
shall be the obligations of the Federal reserve bank procuring the same, and 
shall be in form prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury and to the same 
tenor and effect as national-bank notes now provided by law. They shall be 
i«sred and redeemed under the same terms and conditions as national-bank 
notes except that they, shall not be limited to the amount of the capital stock 
••f the Federal reserve bank issuing them." 

See also the provision in section 4 to the effect that a -Federal] reserve bank, 
is a l>ody corporate, shall have power: 

" Kighth. Upon deposit with the Treasurer of the United States of any bonds 
•»f the United States in the manner provided by existing law relating to na 
tional banks, to receive from the Comptroller of the Currency circulating notes 
in blank, registered and countersigned as provided by law, equal in amount to 
Mie par value of the bonds so deposited, such notes to be issued under the same 
■■■•mlitiop.s and provisions of law as relate to the issue of circulating notes of 
national banks secured by bonds of the United States bearing the circulating 
••rivilege. except that the issue of such notes shall not be limited to the capital 
*t<K*k of such Federal reserve bank." (Sec. 4, p. 5.) 
Respectfully. 

(Jeo. K. Downky, CoitifitrolUr. 

The Chairman. You say you expect to deliver Federal reserve 
•>ank notes? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How do you differentiate between the two classes 
"f notes? 

Mr. Ralph. The Federal reserve note is an obligation of the 
f'nited States Government issued through Federal reserve banks, 
while Federal reserve bank currency is an obligation of the banks. 

The Chairman. You distinguish them how ? 



208 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Kalph. As Federal reserve notes and Federal reserve bank 
currency. 

The Chairman. Why do you want as much as 13,500,000 sheets? 

Mr. Kalph. In 1916? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Ralph. Well, by careful analysis we can only formulate an 
opinion based on past experience. We find that it requires practi- 
cally 13,500,000 sheets or 14,000,000 sheets to meet the current re- 
demptions in the Comptroller of the Currency's Office and for the 
issue of currency to new banks chartered during the year. 

RESERVE OF BANK NOTES. 
[Seep. 222.] 

The Chairman. But now you have $500,000,000 of reserve that 
you never had before. 

Mr. Ralph. But it is being curtailed every day, and by the 1st of 
July it will be curtailed to about $250,000,000. 

The Chairman. And vou had a reserve of bank notes outside of 
that. 

Mr. Ralph. Those are not bank notes. 

The Chairman. You had that outside of the 14,000,000 sheets 
this year. You had $500,000,000 outside of that. How many 
sheets was that? 

Mr. Ralph. Twelve million sheets. That is, about 12,000,000 

QnPPTQ 

The Chairman. Then, you have $500,000,000 additional 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). I see what you mean. We have an 
appropriation for the present fiscal year for 14,000,000 sheets of 
national bank currency. Now, I printed practically 12,000,000 sheets 
of Federal reserve notes and about 7,000,000 sheets of currency, so 
that, eliminating the Federal reserve notes, we have a balance of 
6,500,000. 

The Chairman. In addition to that, you had set aside $500,000,000 
under the Aldrich-Vreeland Act that you could not use before 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). Yes, sir; that was available for use. 

The Chairman. You could not use it at all until you started to 
issue emergency currency. That was a reserve, and you have a sit- 
uation where all of that becomes available, as well as your reserve. 
You printed $500,000,000 more, and you issued only $564,000,000 out 
of $1,064,000,000. 

Mr. Ralph. We have a reserve of about $620,000,000. That is 
the reserve to-day. 

The Chairman. You must have an enormous reserve. ^ You had 
12.000,000 sheets more than you ever had at any other time, and I 
do not think vou want anvttiing now. 

Mr. Malburn. That $650,000,000 reserve will be exhausted by the 
1st of July, and the reserve will be brought down to the normal 
amount required to be issued in the place of unfit national-bank 
notes that are sent in for redemption. New notes must be sent out 
in their place, and that will practically wipe out that reserve. 

The Chairman. As soon as that emenrenev currencv was released, 
the situation was that you had 12,000.000 sheets available in excess 
of anything vou had ever had before. 

Mr. Ralph. We have had that $500,000,000 for several years. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 209 

The Chairman. But it was not issued until recently. 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You had $500,000,000, and when you started to 
issue it you had 12,000,000 sheets more. You issued $384,000,000 
out of $1,064,000,000, and therefore you must have a tremendous 
reserve. What could you do with it all ? That money has not been 
out long enough to be worn. 

Mr. Kalph. The governor testified that they retire that money 
now. 

The Chairman. They are retiring it, not because it is worn out 
and has to be replaced. 

Mr. Burke. It will not be destroyed. 

The Chairman. Then you will have a tremendous reserve. This 
is not a case of retiring money and issuing money in its place, but 
you have this in excess of anything that you ever had available be- 
fore. That is, 24,000,000 sheets, or practically a two years' supply. 

Mr. Ralph. But that is not available. There are only $620,000,000, 
or practically 13,500,000 sheets, available at the present time, and it 
is estimated that between now and the 1st of July they will draw 
upon that reserve and reduce it to about $250,000,000. 

The Chairman. How? 

Mr. Ralph. To meet current redemptions. 

The Chairman. You will have to explain that very satisfactorily 
before you get 14,000,000 sheets. 

Mr. JIalburn. We are redeeming all the time a substantial volume 
of bank circulation. 

The Chairman. You could do that without any trouble and not 
touch this reserve at all. * 

Mr. Malburn. That is where it comes from. 

The Chairman. You are going to deliver 4,000,000 sheets less, 
but you had 24,000,000 sheets more. 

Mr. Ralph. Twelve million sheets of that has gone into circula- 
tion. 

The Chairman. Not all of it. 

Mr. Kalph. Now, analyzing the conditions confronting me, if I 
am not called upon to print the estimated quantity of national-bank 
currency for the Comptroller of the Currency, it looks to me as 
though I would have the money equivalent to the value and cost of 
printing 4,000,000 sheets unexpended. 

The Chairman. What reserve did you have on the 1st of July, 
1914, in national-bank notes? 

Mr. Ralph. On July 1, 1914, we had practically $500,000,000. 

The Chairman. I do not mean in emergency currency. 

Mr. Ralph. It is all the same money. 

The Chairman. But we had that segregated and put aside in 
effect. The law required it to be done, and it was printed and put 
there and never drawn on. 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir 

emergency currency. 

[See p. 201.] 

The Chairman (interposing). I know what I am speaking of, 
and I can prove that by your own statements. You had $500,000,000 

72785—15 14 



$10 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

of money under the Aldrich-Vreeland Act that was put aside. Now, 
what reserve did you have outside of that in national-bank notes on 
the 1st of July, 1914? 

Mr. Ralph. That is the very question that came up 

The Chairman (interposing). Can't you tell me that? 

Ifir. Kalph. You discussed that 

The Chairman (interposing). Give it to me in my own way: 
How much, outside of that $500,000,000, did you have on the 1st of 
July, 1914? 

Mr, Ralph. We did not have any of this emergency currency in 
our working balance. I am speaking for the Comptroller of the 
Currency's office here. Two years ago this committee anticipated 
that we then had $500,000,000 of emergency currency, and that on 
the expiration of the Aldrich-Vreeland Act that currency would be 
available to replace money, or available to be issued for redemption. 
It was anticipated that there would be effected an economy in the 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing in issuing that money. The 
act was extended for another year, and, due to the inquiries made 
by Mr. Fitzgerald, the Secretary of the Treasury tried to curtail 
on the reserve called for by the Aldrich-Vreeland Act; so he issued 
an order to the Comptroller of the Currency that in order to comply 
with the law any orders to print in the possession of the Bureau of 
Engraving and Printing might be considered as a part of the reserve 
under the act. So that we cut that reserve down from $600,000,- 
000 — you see, we had $150,000,000 that we had carried as a working 
balance — we cut the comptroller's balance from $650,000,000 to prac- 
tically $500,000,000 

The Chairman (interposing). Then you have an increase of 
2,000,000 sheets over 1914 in national-bank notes. In 1914 you had 
^2,000,000 sheets and in 1915, 14,000,000 sheets. So that you started 

out this year with an ample supply of national-bank notes 

Jtr, Ralph (interposing). You were talking about the Treasurer's 
reserve. At the close of the fiscal year 1914 on last 1st of July the 
Comptroller c f the Currency had issued to me orders in excess of 
the estimated 12,000,000 sheets to the amount of 3,000,000 sheets, so 
that when the fiscal year closed I had orders for 3,000,000 sheets 
undelivered in excess of the estimated quantity. So that, taking 
those orders that were unfilled for the year 1914 and applying them 
to the present year, I started on July 1 of this fiscal year with orders 
<or 3,000,000 sheets on my books undelivered, brought over from the 
previous year. That is the reason we got that increase of 2,000,000 
sheets. 

The Chairman. Starting on the 1st of July, you still had $500,- 
©00.000 under the Aldrich-Vreeland Act. 

Mr. Ralph. I want to call attention to the fact that in 1914, while 
we had estimated for 12,000,000 sheets, we delivered 13,500,000 
sheets. 

The Chairman. Commencing on July 1, 1914, you had $500,000,- 
800 of emergency currency set aside, and it was not touched. You 

have printed since then $564,000,000 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You have printed $384,000,000, so that you have 
yearly $900,000,000. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 211 

Mr. Buell. The current issues to replace redemptions were taken 
out of that same amount, and they run pretty heavy — $1,500,000 
a day. 

The Chairman. The current issues of what? 

Mr. Buell. The current issues to national banks to replace worn- 
out notes. 

The Chairman. You issued 8,000,000 sheets under the current ap- 
propriation in addition to that. 

Mr. Ralph. That is for new notes and to meet current redemp- 
tions. 

The Chairman. You started off this year with this $500,000,000 
thrown into your reserve that you never had before, and, in addi- 
tion to that, you got out of the permanent appropriation $564,- 
000,000, and now you are asking for practically the same amount 
for next year. 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. The redemptions next year will be at least 
15 or 20 per cent in excess of the redemptions this year because of 
the greater volume of money in circulation. 

The Chairman. But when you redeem these national-bank notes 
you are not reissuing notes in their place? 

Mr. Ralph. To the extent of about $1,500,000 a day. 

The Chairman. They are not like Treasury notes. When you 
take a Treasury note in and destroy it you issue another one in its 
place, but you do not issue notes in place of these national-bank 
notes. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; we do. When they retire this emergency 
currency it goes out of circulation. 

Mr. Bttell. There are about six or seven hundred millions of na- 
tional-bank notes outstanding over and above the amount issued as 
emergency currency. 

The Chairman. And you have all of this emergency currency that 
you can use in that way? 

Mr. Bttell. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Therefore you have over $600,000,000 of reserve 
that you never had before. 

Mr. Bttell. That is about the balance we have been carrying since 
the passage of the Aldrich-Vreeland Act. 

The Chairman. And that is in your currency reserve 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). Not until the 1st of next July. 

The Chairman. You can not persuade me that I am wrong about 
it, because I know I am right. That $500,000,000 was never avail- 
able for current redemptions, but as soon as you put it into circula- 
tion as emergency currency it gave you that great volume of reserve 
that you never had before. You printed in addition $564,000,000, 
and that currency when retired does not require the reissue of notes 
in its place unless it is tafcen out again. You use it interchangeably 
with some of your other notes. Is that so? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. Under normal conditions the Camptroller 
of the Currency's office handles about $550,000,000 every year for 
current redemptions, and, while they will retire that emergency cur- 
rency, it is my judgment that the comptroller will reduce that sur- 
plus" from six hundred and some odd million dollars to practically 
$300,000,000 by July 1 in current redemptions of money sent in by 



A 



212 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION .BILL, 1916. 

the banks for redemption. National banks have to deposit 5 per 
cent of their capital with the Comptroller of the Currency 

The Chairman (interposing). You are running away from the 
whole thing. You do not get at it at all. I said they have over 
$600,000,000 of notes now on hand that are available that they never 
had before and in excess of everything they ever had before. 

Mr. Kalph. Not in excess. 

The Chairman. In excess of everything they ever had before. 

Mr. Kalph. They have had a working balance of $150,000,000. 

The Chairman. And you reduced that because you did not need it. 

Mr. Kalph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You still have $600,000,000 that you never had 
before. 

Mr. Ralph. $500,000,000 under the Aldrich-Vreeland Act is avail- 
able to June 30, but the Secretary of the Treasury, in response to 
financial conditions, may be called upon to issue that. 

The Chairman. By that time the Federal reserve system will be 
in force. 

Mr. Ralph. The Aldrich-Vreeland Act will expire on June 30, 
and they expect to reduce that reserve by $200,000,000 by that time. 
They can use that to a large extent next year, but under the Federal 
reserve act, which replaces the Aldrich-Vreeland Act, the Comp- 
troller of the Currencv must have a working balance to meet any 
exigencies that he might be called upon to meet by the Federal re- 
serve banks. The Federal reserve banks might want to issue Fed- 
eral reserve currency and not emergency currency 

The Chairman (interposing). It is my judgment that with that 
additional volume of money that you never had before you can not 
possibly need practically the same number of sheets for this national- 
bank currency that you had this year, which is the highest you ever 
had in your history. You gentlemen can work out any explanation 
that you can 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). With your permission, I will prepare 
a full history of it and put it in the record. 

[Memorandum regarding " Emergency currency.") 

Washington, January 2, 1915. 

The act of May 30, 1908 (the so-called Aldrich-Vreeland Act) provided In 
section 11 for changing the form of national-bank notes so they shall state upon 
their face that they are secured by United States bonds or other securities, and 
directed the Comptroller of the Currency, as soon as practicable, to prepare 
circulating notes to an amount equal to 50 per cent of the capital stock of 
each national banking association; and in section 5 provided that the total 
amount of circulating notes outstanding of any national banking association, 
including notes secured by United States bonds and notes secured otherwise 
than by the deposit of such bonds shall not at any time exceed the amount of 
;t» unimpaired capital and surplus, and a further restriction that there shall not 
be outstanding at any one time more than $500,000,000 of additional circulation 
was imposed. 

Accordingly a reserve stock of national-bank notes was established, which 
amounted to something over $500,000,000. No differentiation was made in the 
reserve stock between notes that might be issued upon the security of United 
States bonds and those that might be issued upon other security. 

The act of August 4, 1914, authorized circulation for each national bank to 
an amount of 125 per cent of its unimpaired capital and surplus, which circula- 
tion was to include bond-secured circulation. Accordingly the department im- 
mediately took steps to increase the reserve stock of national-bank notes so as 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910. 213 

to be in a position promptly to 'meet any demands that might be made upon it. 
Consequently since the 1st of August something over $600,000,000 lias been 
added to the reserve, which, together with the reserve on hand on August 1 of 
about the same amount, brought the total up to about $1,200,000,000. However, 
since the 1st of August approximately $514,000,000 have been issued, and the 
reserve to-day amounts to approximately $686,000,000. This reserve is drawn 
upon whenever any issues of national-bank notes are made, and as unfit notes 
are redeemed and fit notes are issued in their places in so far as the fit notes are 
available in the reserve they are issued. The department contemplates gradu- 
ally reducing this reserve until it reaches a normal basis, estimated for the 
7,500 national banks at about $250,000,000. This should be reached by the end 
of the current fiscal year, and thereafter the normal demands only will need 
be met 

During the fiscal year 1914 something over $706,000,000 in national-bank notes 
were presented for redemption. This represented approximately 72,000,000 
notes, or 18,000,000 sheets. Four hundred and ninety million dollars of these 
notes, or 50,000,000 notes, or 12,500,000 sheets, were unfit for circulation and 
were destroyed, being replaced by new notes. This was the normal demand 
for new notes during the fiscal year last closed, and does not include any new 
notes issued for new circulation. 

Mr. Ralph. In the present fiscal year I am going to deliver to the 
Comptroller of the Currency 4,000,000 sheets less than is provided 
for in the appropriation for the present fiscal year. The Comp- 
troller of the Currency is going to issue Federal reserve currency 
notes, and he has got to have a working stock. I say that 4,000,000 
sheets would be a small balance for him, because he can not wait to 
deliver the currency to the Federal reserve banks, and he has got to 
have a working stock. Now, I will take the money representing that, 
if there are no legal objections to it, and print for him 4,000,000 
sheets of Federal reserve bank currency. We will have that on the 
1st of July, and in addition to that we*will have about $300,000,000 
<>f emergency currency. The question resolves itself next into this : 
How much Federal reserve currency will you issue? That, I can 
not say. It is problematical, but I believe we can draw upon the 
Federal reserve for three million additional. It is quite problemati- 
cal, but the Federal reserve act will be of no value to tnis country 
unless we have a reserve stock of Federal reserve currency in the 
comptroller's office. When the banks call for the money they ought 
to have it. 

The Chairman. Are the Aldrich-Vreeland notes to be discarded 

•fterJuneSO? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir; they will be issued to take the place of current 
redemptions to a large extent. 

national-bank notes. 

The Chairman. Are those notes to be interchangeable with ordi- 
nary national-bank notes? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Therefore, vou will have that volume of national- 
bank notes in excess of anything you ever had before. You will 
have $200,000,000 in national-bank notes. 

Mr. Ralph. You are speaking about the Federal reserve notes? 

The Chairman. No, sir: I am talking about national-bank notes. 
On the 1st of next July you will have $200,000,000 of natioanl-bank 
notes. 

Mr. Bfell. We plan to carry a working balance of $150,000,000. 



214 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. On the 1st of next July, you will have $200,000,000 
of national-bank notes — is that so? 

Mr. Buell. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And your estimate was for a reserve of no more 
than forty or fifty million dollars, and the reason given why the re- 
serve was reduced from $150,000,000 was because it was absurd to 
carry over forty or fifty million dollars in reservi. That statement 
was made here, that it was absured to carry such a balance. 

Mr. Buell. There is a larger number of banks. There are 7,500 
banks. 

The Chairman. I understand, but that was the reserve. Now, 
you are going to have over $200,000,000 or an amount largely in ex- 
cess of that, But with all of that additional volume of notes you still 
say that you need just the same amount next year that you had this 
year, although you have practically available this year what was 
the output of 24,000,000 sheets that you never had at any other time. 

FEDERAL RESERVE NOTES. 
[See pp. 201, 227.] 

Mr. Kalph. The Federal reserve banks are asking for $250,000,000 
of Federal reserve notes. They are asking for that many out of us 
and are paying for the printing of them, and at the present time we 
have only issued four million. We must issue that $250,000,000 

The Chairman. You will have it on hand. You do not need that 
many sheets. • 

Mr. Ralph. We will not need that many sheets. 

The Chairman. Have you estimated how many they will require? 

Mr. Ralph (interposing) . With my experience I can not say what 
they will need next year, because of the issuing of Federal reserve 
bank currency, but I believe that for the balance of this fiscal year 
we ought to print a substantial stock to have on hand. That is a 
question the comptroller can best determine. I call attention to 
tnis fact, that whatever money is appropriated, it ought to be stated 
in the act itself that it is for one or both of these notes — that is, 
Federal reserve bank currency and. national-bank currency. 

The Chairman. You can not have both ; you must have it for one 
or the other. You must have some system by which we can have 
some knowledge of what is being done. 

Mr. Ralph. The act does not specify any class of work. 

The Chairman. You say your estimate includes 80,000,000 sheets 
for Treasury notes? 

Mr. Ralph. For the present year 74,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. What was the supply on hand on the 1st of July? 

Mr. Burke. Of United States notes on the 15th of December this 
year we had $63,740,000 

The Chairman. Is that money? 

Mr. Burke. That is money in the reserve vault. We had $63,740,- 
000 as against $49,230,000 in. United States notes on December 15 
of last year. Of gold certificates, on the 15th of December of this 
year we had $263,030,000, as against $148,620,000 on December 15 a 
year ago. Of silver certificates we had on hand on the 15th of 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 216 

December of this year $73,332,000, as against $30,700,000 on the same 
date a year ago. That makes a total of $400,102,000 on December 
15 of this year, as against $228,550,000 last year. 

The Chairman. You have increased very largely? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. That is, of course, on account of the addi* 
tional currency that we put out. 

The Chairman. For Treasury notes, your estimate last year was 
for seventy or eighty million sheets? 

Mr. Ralph. Eighty million sheets. 

The Chairman. And we appropriated on the basis of 70,000,000 
sheets? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; and you gave us a deficiency. 

The Chairman. For what? 

Mr. Ralph. For practically 4,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. We did not give you all you asked? 

Mr. Ralph. No. sir. 

The Chairman. How much was jt? 

Mr. Ralph. The sum you gave us represented about 4,000,000 
sheets, and we asked a deficiency of 10,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. Why is not 75,000,000 sheets enough next year> 
considering the large increase you have in your reserve? You nave 
an unusual reserve of United States notes. 

Mr. Burke. It is an unusually large reserve. 

The Chairman. Then why should you ask for 80,000,000 sheets? 

Mr. Burke. I have stated that I thought there might be a reduo* 
tion of 10,000,000 sheets. If we do not need it, we do not want it* 
I think perhaps that you ought to consult the Reserve Board ill 
reference to the amount of money that will be issued by them next 
year. All of those things should be taken into consideration, because 
when the Federal reserve currency comes out it will be placed in 
circulation. 

The Chairman. Has anybody been to see the Federal Reserve 
Board about that? 

Mr. Ralph. Mr. Malburn and I have been in close touch with 
them. 

The Chairman. What is their status? 

Mr. Malburn. They wanted $250,000,000 in Federal reserve notes> 
and I presume they will want $250,000,000 in Federal reserve bank 
notes. 

Mr. Ralph. They have the Federal reserve notes 

Mr. Malburn (interposing). They have about $16,000,000 of 
Federal reserve notes in circulation. That has already been printed. 
1 think what the governor means is they will have to know what 
amount they will have in circulation in order to tell what amount 
of monev ttiev will need for next year. 

The Chairman. They have $250,000,000 in Federal reserve notes; 
do they make any statement as to the amount of Federal reserve 
bank notes they want ? 

Mr. Malburn. They have not yet. 

Mr. Ralph. They are working on that now, and mv judgment id 
that they will ask for about $250,000,000 of Federal reserve bank 
notes, which will require about 6,000,000 sheets. 



216 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

PAPER FOR INTERNAL-REVENUE STAMPS WAR REVENUE' STAMPS. 

[See pp. 232, 241.] . 

The Chairman. Have you included internal-revenue stamps in 
here? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You are estimating on an increase of over 
3,000,000 sheets? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Why is that? 

Mr. Ralph. This estimate was made by the Internal Revenue 
Bureau. 

The Chairman. Does that include war tax stamps? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir. When I revised the estimates or curtailed 
the estimates, 10,000,000 sheets of United States notes and certificates, 
I included the war tax stamps, and I made a net reduction of 
$143,441. ' 

The Chairman. That includes the war revenue stamps? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; it is estimated that they will want about 
9,000,000,000 stamps. 

The Chairman. For when? 

Mr. Ralph. For the next fiscal year. 

The Chairman. How many will they want for this fiscal year? 

Mr. Ralph. They will have six or seven billion stamps this year. 
That is only estimated. 

The Chairman. Next year they will want only about 5,000,000,000 
stamps, because the law runs for only half a year. We do not ap- 
propriate beyond the period of the law, and you can not ask us to 
flo that. 

Mr. Ralph. I want to say that the war tax measure will bring in 
considerably over $100,000,000. 

The Chairman. You do not want stamps for use after the law 
ceases. You have included in your estimate stamps for the entire 
fiscal year 1916. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And the law expires by its own terms on the 31st 
of December. How much is your estimate for war revenue stamps? 
Suppose you separate that. 

Mr. Ralph. In 1915 we estimated for 74,000,000 United States 
notes and certificates, while in 1916 we estimate for 80,000,000; in 
1915 we estimated for 14,000,000 national-bank notes, while in 1916 we 
are asking an appropriation for 13,500,000 ; in 1915 we estimated for 
internal-revenue stamps 86,765,459, while for 1916 we estimate 89,- 
919,628 ; of internal-revenue stamps, under the act of October 22, 1914, 
no appropriation was made for 1915, but we estimate for 8,000,000 for 
1916 ; for checks, drafts, and miscellaneous we had 1,986,156 in 1915, 
while the estimate for 1916 is 2,405,180 ; for postage stamps the esti- 
mate for 1915 was 129,261,811, while the estimate for 1916 is 131 r 
502,401. The total appropriation for 1915 was for 306,013,426, as 
against our estimate of 325,357,204 for 1916. 

The bureau, in the current fiscal year, 1915, has been called on to 
deliver work not appropriated for, as follows : Emergency national- 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 217 

bank notes, Federal reserve notes, and internal-revenue stamps under 
the act of October 22, 1914. 

Eleven million three hundred and forty-four thousand four hun- 
dred and twenty-nine sheets of emergency bank notes were printed 
and delivered in August, September, and October, and the printing 
and delivering of the order for 6,587,50Q sheets of Federal reserve 
notes will be completed in this month of December, 1914. 

Two million six hundred and ninety-eight thousand two hundred 
and eighteen sheets of the new revenue stamps have been printed and 
delivered up to and including December 12, 1914, and it is probable 
that this bureau will be required to furaiish a total for the current 
year of 7,000,000 sheets and a total of 8,000,000 sheets for the fiscal 
year 1916/ 

The Chairman. That is for the whole year? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. We have estimated for 1916 an item of 
$95,000 for the printing of those stamps, and the quantity of paper 
that we estimate to print this year is rather uncertain, but I feel sure 
it will run to 7,000,000 sheets. 

I will give this committee and the Government my best endeavors 
to try and get along this year without a deficiency, having in mind 
that possibly I will not use all of the money for national-bank cur- 
rency. I am giving my best and most honest endeavors to bring 
that about. 

The Chairman. You are printing the war-revenue stamps without 
anv increase in the appropriation this year ? 

\lr. Ralph. Yes, sir; and without any authority in law. Mr. 
Mondell spoke about the printing of the Federal reserve bank notes 
without authority of law, and I have no authority in law to print the 
war-tax stamps. After months and months of deliberation Congress 
passed that bill, and it included an item of $30,000 for the purchase 
of the paper. It gave the Commissioner of Internal Revenue author- 
ity, in the event the Bureau of Engraving and Printing could not 
print those stamps, to make contracts with outside firms. When the 
House passed that bill, anticipating that there would be a demand 
for those stamps, I prepared dies, and I had some of the stamps 
delivered and in the possession of collectors of internal revenue 25 
days before the law became effective. If every citizen in the United 
States did not get what documentary, proprietary, and wine stamps 
he needed on the day that law became operative, it was not the fault 
of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Furthermore, I want it 
to be made a matter of record for this committee that I am printing 
these internal-revenue stamps for one-half of what was required for 
printing them in 1898. I am printing the internal-revenue stamps 
without the purchase of any additional machinery and without any 
opportunity for equipping ourselves. We are working 24 hours a 
day on them, and I am printing them for a little over 2£ cents per 
thousand, when, as I told you, postage stamps cost us 5 cents per 
thousand. 

The Chairman. You are printing these internal- re venue stamps 
out of the appropriation made for this current fiscal year without 
having contemplated that you would do that work? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 



218 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. And you have included in your estimates for next 
year an item of $95,000 required to print the 9,000,000 sheets for the 
entire fiscal year? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. I will explain that: I had no idea when I 
prepared this estimate — because the first information I got, that came 
from the comptroller's office, was that they would not want any 
Federal reserve bank notes for at least a year — that I would require 
anything for printing those notes, and I anticipated using the money 
that represented the 4,000,000 sheets for printing the war tax stamps 

The Chairman. You printed 4,000,000 sheets of bank notes 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Will you use up your appropriation? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; and then I will have to have a deficiency. 

The Chairman. But for next year you have that taken care of? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

Treasury Department, 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 

January 4, 1915. 
Hon. John J. Fitzgerald, 

Chairman Committee on Appropriations, 

House of Representatives, 
Sir: Referring to the sundry civil estimates for this bureau now under con- 
sideration by your committee, I desire to call your attention to the economy that 
has been effected in the operation of this bureau since the fiscal year 1910 by 
reduction in the sizes of certain revenue stamps and the increased number of 
stamps to the plates. , 

The deliveries of internal-revenue stamps in the fiscal year 1914 aggregated 
only 80,195,136 sheets, as compared with the 86,713,262 sheets delivered in 1910. 
This would seem to indicate a decrease in the use of these stamps, but as a 
matter of fact the lesser number of sheets delivered in 1914 contained 850,000,000 
more stamps than were contained in the sheets delivered in 1910. 

The cost of printing the number of revenue stamps estimated to be required 
in the fiscal year 1916 would be $130,000 more than the amount included in the 
estimates now before your committee if they were printed with the same 
number of stamps to the plates as they were prior to 1910. 

The following list of stamps shows the number of stamps printed to each plate 
now and prior to 1910: 



Stab tobacco 

Sheet tobacco 

Strip cigar, 12s to 50s 

Strip cigar, 100s 

Strip cisar, 200s to 500s 

Sheet cigar 

Small cigarette 

Playing card 

Sheet beer 

Wholesale liquor dealer 

Distillery warehouse 

Customs wine and malt liquor. 



1 

Now. 


Prior to 
1910. 


16 


J 


25 


U 


1 *> 


1C 


15 


1C 


15 


i 


200 


M 


200 


a 


400 


ax 


30 


% 


4 


X 


8 


\ 


8 


i 



Resjieotfully. • 

J. B. Ralph, Director. 

CUSTOMS STAMPS, CHECKS, AND DRAFTS. 

The Chairman. In customs stamps there is a falling off in yom 
estimate. You estimate the number required 

Mr. Rai^ph (interposing). I thought it was increased consider 
ably. In the matter of the customs stamps, I want the committer 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 219 

to know that a year ago there was a provision of law enacted which 
permitted manufacturers of cigars to paste on their boxes a stamp 
which would indicate that the contents of the box were manufac- 
tured from tobacco that was in bond. There was no provision made 
for an appropriation, and the Government Printing Office would 
not print those stamps. They came down to the bureau, and I printed 
those stamps by the offset process. That offset process is the one 
that you and I discussed three years ago, Mr. Chairman, when you 
were talking about putting it in the Hydrographic Office and the 
Weather Bureau. We have three of those presses working on the 
war-tax stamps, customs stamps, and checks. Now, it costs me about 
10 cents per thousand to produce those stamps, and I find that the 
customs department is charging the manufacturers about $1.50 per 
thousand. That same thing is true with regard to internal-revenue 
stamps. I estimate that of the internal-revenue receipts turned in 
last year about $260,000 represented repayments by the distillers and 
bottlers of whisky in bond for stamps that I printed. Those bottles 
have that little strip over the top indicating the year in which the 
whisky was bottled and the proof. The customs department charges 
them 10 cents a case for those stamps. I am printing them as in- 
ternal-revenue stamps, and they have that return of about $260,000 
a year from them. I merely mention that because I believe that 
as a matter of business practice and policy that money ought to be 
repaid just the same as any other money paid to the bureau for its 
operations. 

The Chairman. You want to demonstrate that your bureau is a 
revenue producer? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir ; I claim that. 

The Chairman. For customs stamps, checks, and drafts you esti- 
mated for the last fiscal year 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). In 1915 we had for checks, drafts, and 
miscellaneous 1^86,000, and in 1916 I am asking 2,405,180. There 
is an increase tnere. 

The Chairman. In 1914 you had 3,648,000. 

Mr. Ralph. We have been effecting an economy this year in the 
printing of checks. I am printing checks now with a greater number 
on a sheet than we did before. We used to have two or three or 
four checks on a sheet. I am now printing 30 stamps on a sheet 
where heretofore we printed only 20. So that we effect an economy 
there of practically 25 or 30 per cent. 

chiefs of divisions. 

The Chairman. You propose four new chiefs of divisions under 
this item? 

Mr. Ralph. I drop out a superintendent there of four divisions, 
and I appoint chiefs, respectively, for each division, and I effect an 
economy there of something like $2,000. 

CUSTODY OF DIE8, ROLLS, AND PLATES. 

The Chairman. You are asking to transfer to this appropriation 
from " Miscellaneous objects " $8,400. 
Mr. Ralph. That is for the custody of dies, rolls, and plates. 



220 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION RILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. Why is that? 

Mr. Ralph. The Secretary of the Treasury believes that it will 
afford better administrative efficiency to have him transferred and 
placed under the direction of the director of the bureau rather than 
have him as he is how, under the direction of the Chief of the Loans 
and Currency Division, whose office is in the Treasury Building. 

The Chairman. That simply transfers them, but it does not abolish 
them? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir; it does not abolish them. We have the divi- 
sion there. 

The Chairman. I thought you said there was an economy effected 
by it. 

Mr. Ralph. We do away with the custodian, who formerly got 
$3,000. 

The Chairman. You have two at $2,000? 

Mr. Ralph. I will not pay that $2,000 to those two men. If you 
transfer it I will probably reduce the force by one man. Congress 
increased the pay of one of these men last year by $200. 

The Chairman. How much would that $8,400 worth of service 
cost you? 

Mr. Ralph. Well, I will probably effect an economy of $1,200 or 
more. There are men in other divisions that I would detail to help 
them in busy times, and I would reduce the force. 

printing of notes of larger denominations than notes retired. 

The Chairman. You ask again to drop out that proviso. 

Mr. Ralph. I can not see any wisdom in continuing that proviso 
on the statute books. It does not prevent the Treasurer or the Bu- 
reau of Engraving and Printing from printing money of large de- 
nominations. 

The Chairman. There had always been a tendency to print the 
larger denominations until that proviso was put in. 

Mr. Ralph. Has the Treasurer made a recommendation for a $5 
gold certificate? 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Ralph. As to the question of that provision preventing the 
issuing of large denominations 

Mr. Burke (interposing). What is the proviso? 

The Chairman. The proviso reads : 

Provided, That no portion of this sum shall be expended for printing United 
States notes or Treasury notes of larger denomination than those that may be 
canceled or retired, except in so far as such printing may be necessary Id 
executing the requiiements of the act "To define and fix the standard of value, 
to maintain the parity of all forms of money issued or coined by the United 
States, to refund the public debt, and for other purposes," approved March 
14, 1900. 

Mr. Burke. There is a great demand for bills of small denomina- 
tion, especially in crop-moving times 

The Chairman. This does not affect that. This prevents the 
printing of notes of large denominations in place of notes of small 
denominations. 

Mr. Burke. Has there been any objection urged to issuing a $5 
gold certificate? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 221 

The Chairman. There was a tendency when notes of small de- 
nominations came in for redemption to issue in their place notes of 
larger denominations. 

Mr. Burke. I think the $2 silver certificate might be abolished, as 
it is verv unpopular. 

The Chairman. That is merely a matter of administration, of 
course. 

Mr. Ralph. I strongly urged the retirement of the $2 certificate. 

The Chairman. That is a matter of administration, is it not? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; the Secretary of the Treasury can do that. 

WITNESS OF DESTRUCTION OF SECURITIES. 

The Chairman. We have a. committee to witness the destruction of 
notes and securities; is one appointed in your bureau? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much does he get? 

Mr. Ralph. $1,800, 1 think. 

The Chairman. How much are they paid in the Treasury De- 
partment ? 

Mr. Courts. $5 per day. You will find that on page 68. 

Mr. Burke. On the days they work. 

The Chairman. What is the necessity for that committee? 

Mr. Ralph. That comes within the Secretary's office, and the Direc- 
tor of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing has nothing to do with 
that committee. Mr. Broughton perhaps has more to do with that 
than anyone else present. 

Mr. Broughton. That committee receives all redeemed currency 
after it is finally counted and proceeds to destroy it. 

The Chairman. They actually receive it? 

Mr. Broughton. They actually receive it and put it in the mascera- 
tor and see it destroyed. 

The Chairman. How long does it take them every day? 

Mr. Broughton. It takes them from three to six hours a day. 

The Chairman. I never saw one of them within 100 feet of a 
mascerator. 

Mr. Broughton. The committee goes to the mascerators. They 
go to the comptroller's office for the destruction of the national- 
bank notes and to the bureau for the destruction of United States 
currency, and to the navy yard once a week to witness the destruction 
of stamps. 

The Chairman. There was a request made that that item be trans- 
ferred to the legislative bill, but it was not done. Is there any law 
authorizing this? 

Mr. Broughton. None that I know of. There is a committee pro- 
vided by law for the destruction of national-bank notes, but this 
representative of the public is not required by law to appear on that 
committee, though, as a matter of department practice, this special 
witness is a member of the committee witnessing the destruction of 
national-bank notes. 

Mr. Mondell. Did I understand you to say that this representative 
does not actually appear? 

Mr. Broughton. This representative appears on the committee wit- 
nessing the destruction of all securities handled by the Secretary. 



222 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

PRINTING OF NOTES FOR RESERVE SUPPLY. 

[See p. 208.] 

Mr. Mondell. I am not entirely clear with regard to the use to 
which you propose to put all of the sheets that vou estimate for. 
I notice that you estimate for 80,000,000 sheets for United States 
notes and certificates, and I understand that those are to be used for 
printing United States notes, otherwise known as greenbacks, and 
silver and gold certificates. Now, there are no United States notes 
issued except as notes are destroyed and jiotes are issued to take the 
place of the notes destroyed ; is that true ? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir ; we only issue United States notes to replace 
those sent in for redemption when those notes are canceled or de- 
stroyed. 

Mr. Mondell. What kind of stock do you keep on hand,, or do you 
keep any stock on hand to take the place of those United States notes 
that are destroyed? What is your mode of operation? 

Mr. Ralph. The Treasurer of the United States will have in his 
reserve vault United States notes, or these legal-tender notes referred 
to as greenbacks. The denominations are fives and tens, and when 
they send in notes for redemption they may send in one hundred $10 
notes and ask for two hundred $5 notes in place of them, and the 
Treasurer would make that exchange. 

Mr. Mondell. He takes out of his reserve enough notes to take the 
place of those destroyed? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. And he thereupon calls on you for an equal number 
of notes to take the place of them? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir ; that is the procedure. 

Mr. Mondell. And you print from day to day a sufficient quantity 
of notes to supply the demand on his reserve? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Now, in the case of gold and silver certificates, they 
are issued for two reasons 

Mr. Burke. As you are asking about that, here is the way that is 
done — here is our order sheet [indicating]. 

Mr. Mondell. I have not reached that point yet. I asked him 
about the facts. Now, as to your silver and gold certificates, they are 
issued, as I understand, for two reasons: First, they are issued 
to pay for bullion deposited. That is true, is it not, Governor? 

Mr. Burke. That is one purpose; yes. 

Mr. Mondell. That is one purposes for which you issue notes? 

Mr. Burke. And we redeem 

Mr. Mondell (interposing). I understand, but do not anticipate. 
When bullion is deposited you issue gold certificates; that is, when 
gold bullion is deposited? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. And you take the notes out of your reserve to make 
that payment? 

Mr. Burke. The bullion is paid for with money that is in circula- 
tion. The money in reserve vault 'is to replace money redeemed. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 223 

Mr. Mondell. Now, in that case you must call for an equal amount 
of certificates to make good the certificates you have taken out of 
your reserve? 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. And you do that on the form that you handed me ? 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. In case these gold or silver certificates are sent in. 
to be destroyed, because they are no longer fit for circulation, you 
pay out of your reserve in the same way! 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. And then call for enough new notes to take the 
place of those paid out? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. In other words, your reserve is simply a reservoir 
from which you make these payments temporarily and then you 
refill in exactly the same amount as you took out? 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. As a matter of fact, then, it does not make a particle 
of difference, so far as the number of silver or gold certificates, or 
national-bank notes that may be needed to be printed in the year are 
concerned, whether your reserve of each or all of them is 5,000,000 
or 500,000,000, because the amount of your reserve has nothing 
whatever to do with the amount of those notes that will be needed 
other than it might affect the amount of wear? Of course, if you 
had all the gold certificates and all the silver certificates and all the 
greenbacks in the Treasury they would not be worn out. 

Mr. Burke. Those amounts in circulation 

Mr. Mondell (interposing). But the amount that you have in 
reserve has no relation whatever to the amount that may be needed 
to be printed in the year? 

Mr. Burke. No. Well, it has in a way, too, because the larger the 
reserve the less it will be necessary to print. 

Mr. Mondell. Oh, no. The amount of your reserve has not any- 
thing to do with the amount that you have to print. 

Mr. Burke. That reserve money, of course, is not in circulation. 

Mr. Mondell. I understand; but you would not print new gold 
certificates except for two purposes— either to pay somebody for 
bullion or to take the place of certificates you have destroyed. 

Mr. Burke. But we must have a large reserve, because we may 
have to pay out more for bullion. 

Mr. Mondell. I understand ; but you must put it right back. 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. Every gold certificate you have is simply the de- 
nominator of some gold bullion somewhere? 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. You can not have a single one of those out; you 
can not destroy it or use it for some other purpose ; you have got to 
put it back again. 

Mr. Burke. Well, the reserve is not always the same. 

Mr. Mondell. I understand; and this is why your reserve is not 
always the same : Because there is a great demand for the gold, and 
you have paid out the gold and you have got the certificates. Now, 



224 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

when there is not any considerable demand for the gold, the gold 
will come back to you and you will have the gold and the certificates 
will be out. That is the only difference ; you either have the gold or 
the certificates. 

Mr. Burke. I do not think it is altogether on account of there 
being a demand for gold; there is not much of a demand for gold 
coin except in the weSbern part of the country. 

Mr. Mondell. So far as this token money is concerned, you have 
it in one form or another all the time, do you nor « 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. You either have the gold or the certificates? 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. And all you have to do is to switch it ; if you have 
less certificates you have more gold? 

The Chairman. No. 

Mr. Mondell. In the reserve fund, certainly. 

Mr. Burke. While it is in the reserve vault it is not money at all; 
it is not money until we put it out for some purpose. 

Mr. Mondell. You say you have $63,740,000 in United States 
notes? • 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. Is that $63,740,000 worth of United States notes in 
excess of the authorized issue? 

Mr. Burke. That is the reserve in our reserve vault, and it will 
not be money until it is taken out of that reserve vault and put in 
the pay vault. It is to be kept on hand there to be used when it is 
necessary. 

Mr. Mondell. Please answer my question. I asked you if that was 
the amount of greenbacks that you are holding in excess of the 
authorized amount of greenbacks out? 

Mr. Burke. I think it is; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Because they have not been issued. 

Mr. Burke. No ; and will not be until there is a demand for them. 

Mr. Mondell. They are not issued at all? 

Mr. Burke. No: they are lying there in reserve in the reserve 
vaults. 

The Chairman. It is stock? 

Mr. Burke. Yes ; arid the same is true of all money, whatever it is. 

Mr. Mondell. That is not money at all? 

Mr. Burke. That is stock; it is reserve stock. 

Mr. Mondell. You are sure about that? 

Mr. Burke. Yes; it is reserve stock. 

Mr. Mondell. It is no part of the greenback circulation of the 
United States? 

Mr. Burke. No ; it is not. 

Mr. Mondell. Well, coming to the gold certificates, you have 
$263,030,000 worth of gold certificates from tens to ten thousands. 
Are those gold certificates that have never been paid out for bullion? 

Mr. Burke. They have never been paid out; they are simply re- 
serve stock, just the same as the greenbacks. 

Mr. Mondell. That is stock? 

Mr. Burke. Yes; it is just the same as it was when it came from 
the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, never opened, but still in the 
packages, and the packages are just the same as when they came there. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 22% 

Mr. Mondell. I understand, although you might have bought 
bullion ? 

Mr. Burke. No ; those certificates have never been used at all. 

Mr. Mondell. You have never bought any bullion with that 
money? 

Mr. Burke. No, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. And that is really so much dead paper ? 

Mr. Burke. Yes; until it is used. 

Mr. Mondell. This $263,030,000 worth of stamped paper— that is* 
paper stamped in denominations that total that sum — has not been 
used ( 

Mr. Burke. That is right. 

Mr. Mondell. And that is true of the silver certificates? 

Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. Now, how do you come to accumulate 

Mr. Burke (interposing). That amount of money? 

Mr. Mondell. That amount in a period of one year ; that is, from 
h total of $228,550,000 in these three classes to a total of $400,102,000. 

Mr. Burke. The reason is because there is so much of a delivery 
from the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, and there has not beeri 
as wide a field for this money in the past year on account of the 
immense amount of money put out in different ways — first, by the 
additional currency of $384,000,000 put out in circulation — emer- 
gency currency, if you will — and then there is $16,000,000 of reserve- 
bank notes. That is now out in circulation ; and then we used na- 
tional-bank notes this year as they have never been used before. 

Mr. Mondell. I understand that. Now, let us get back to the 
greenbacks. You say there has not been as great a demand for 
greenbacks this year as last. Now, the only demand that there could 
He for new greenbacks would be when the greenbacks are sent in, or 
National Treasury notes are sent in, to be destroyed. 

Mr. Burke. No; there are often demands in other ways. We re- 
deem the national-bank notes 

Mr. Mondell. No; I am not talking about national-bank notes; I 
am talking about greenbacks — United States notes. 

Mr. Burke. I am answering your question. We pay greenbacks 
very frequently in the redemption of national-bank notes, United 
States notes. 

Mr. Mondell. Just a moment. This $63,740,000 of notes that we 
pre talking about are not national-bank notes but simply pieces of 
paper, and under the national-banking act you can not add to the 
volume of national-bank notes outstanding, the volume being lim- 
ited by law. The only way you can issue one of these new notes in 
when you issue one to take the place of an old one. 

Mr." Burke. You are asking me about what demand there is fof 
greenbacks, and I say that we redeem national-bank notes in green* 
Ucks. 

Mr. Mondell. But not out of this? 

Mr. Burke. No; not out of that reserve. 

Mr. Mondell. It is this reserve, this paper, that we are talking 
about: we are not talking about questions of finance but about 
the question of printing. I want to get my mind clear on this 
printing proposition if I can. The only way you can use any of thisf 

72785—15 15 



426 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

$(fe.?40,000 to print United States notes held in reserve is to take 
the place of notes sent in tod destroyed. 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Well, now, have not notes been worn just as much 
in the past year as in years past? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Is there any reduction in the use of the notes and 
the wear of the notes by reason of the issuance of other kinds of 
currency ? 

Mr. Burke. There is a reduction in the use of them because the 
$884,000,000 that went out has taken their place in circulation. 

Mr. Mondell. But they are out somewhere; they are being used? 

Jlr. Burke. Yes ; and they are being used. 

Mi\ Mondell. Are they being hoarded, and therefore not worn 
as much ? Would that account for it ? 

Mr. Burke. I do not know. 

Mr. Mondell. Is it not true that you estimated rather high as to 
the demand, and that for the whole year they have been coming in 
and you have not checked those you have been getting in? 

Mr. Burke. I do not think so. 

The Chairman. Do these United States notes go in as reserves in 
the banks? 
* Mr. Burke. Yes. 

The Chairman. Instead of being in circulation? 

Mr. Ralph. Almost all of that is reserve. 

The Chairman. Instead of being used in circulation it has been 
held as a reserve against this larger emergency currency? 

Mr. Malburn. No; not against it, but against deposits. 

Mr. Burke. A great deal has been used in that way. 

The Chairman. Instead of being circulated they have been held 
in banks? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And the circulating medium has been these other 
*otes ? 

Mr. Burke. They are payable in gold, the same as gold certificates, 
and they have been held in reserve m that way. 

Mr. Mondell. Coming to the mater of gold certificates, you had a 
reserve of $148,620,000 last year and $263,030,000 on December 15, 
J914. Now, one demand on those certificates is the purchase of gold? 
" Mr. Burke. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. Has there been a reduction in the amount of bullion 
purchased, or do you not know? 

Mr. Burke. I do not know as to that; they can tell you at the 
flint. 

Mr. Mondell. Otherwise why should there be a reduction in the 
amount that you issue? 

Mr. Burke. There has been a great demand for gold certificates 
to be placed in reserve in these different banks. 

Mr. Mondell. And being placed in reserve and not kept in cir- 
culation, they do not become soiled, and therefore it is not necessary 
to redeem them? 

Mr. Burke. Well, they have not been in circulation so much, be- 
cause thev have been held in reserve in the banks; the reserve banks 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 227 

have a large supply of gold certificates and also a large supply of 
United States notes. 

Mr. Mondell. To what extent have the new washing machines 
reduced the demand for new notes, and how much effect has that 
had on this growing surplus? 

Mr. Burke. I do not think that the washing machine has mate- 
rially reduced the number. I have not any report with me, but I 
could send in a re po rt as to that. . 

Mr. Mondell. Why do you think they have not reduced the num- 
ber required to be destroyed or cancelled ? 

Mr. Burke. They have reduced them to some extent. A washing 
machine will wash about 30,000 notes a day. 

Mr. Mondell. And every day that you wash 30,000 notes instead 
of destroying them, you save the cost of manufacturing that num- 
ber of notes ? 

Mr. Burke. Yes ; that number of notes. 

Mr. Mondell. So that the number of notes that you wash is saved 
to that extent ; that is, you save in the printing of new notes? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. And by that method you reduce the demand on 
these reserve supplies? 

Mr. Burke. Yes, sir. 

federal reserve notes and federal reserve currency. 
[See pp. 201, 204, 214, 227.] 

Mr. Mondell. The national bank notes item is 13,500,000 as 
against 14,000,000 for the current year. Now, as I understand you, 
Mr. Ralph, any reduction in the demand for national bank notes will 
be equalled, you assume, by the demand for Federal reserve' notes? 

Mr. Ralph. Federal reserve bank notes. 

Mr. Mondell. Federal reserve currency, I understood you to say? 

Mr. Ralph. There are two classes. 

Mr. Mondell. Why not call one notes and the other currency? 

Mr. Ralph. I think that ought to define it. 

Mr. Mondell. The law says "a Federal reserve note," and it 
speaks of Federal reserve currency. You could cut out the word 
"bank " and call one a note and the other currency. 

Mr. Ralph. I think that would be a good idea. The Federal 
ieserve currency, I think, will replace any deficit in the national 
currency for the remainder of this fiscal year. 

Mr. Mondell. The Federal reserve currency being the currency 
issued under the Federal reserve law that is intended to take the 
place of the national bank currency ? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. I believe that the Federal Reserve Board 
will call upon the Comptroller of the Currency to print a sub- 
stantial stock for issue to the banks. Now, the act itself would 
not be of any great advantage to the banking world unless the 
Comptroller of the Currency had a substantial stock on hand to fill 
orders when called for. 

Mr. Mondell. But the demand for that particular class of notes 
is not likely to exceed the amount of national bank notes that are 
redeemed? " 



228 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir; I am confident it will not exceed that, and 
it is very doubtful whether it will equal that. It is problematical 
what the future will show. 

Mr. Mondell. Then, if it would equal it and the national bank 
act was to continue, your, estimate is a fair one under the new 
system? 

Mr. Balph. It is a good guess. 

Mr. Mondell. Of course, there is a possibility of a demand for 
more of those notes if some one purchases new bonds, but that is not 
likely to be done, I suppose? 

Mr. Ralph. No. 

Mr. Mondell. How about the issue of the Federal reserve notes! 
Have you made any provision for that? 

Mr/BAi^pH. The banks have paid for those; we were reimbursed 
out of funds of the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and the 
banks will, by assessment, reimburse the Treasury for the money 
drawn bv the bureau. 

Mr. Mondell. And any that you print hereafter will be printed in 
that reimbursable way? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes. It is a question whether or not the Committee 
on Appropriations will find it necessary to specify in the appropria- 
tion bill something specific that will permit us to do that in the 
future, inasmuch as the Federal reserve act itself only specifies such 
moneys as were heretofore appropriated. 

Mr. Mondell. As a matter of fact, is it not necessary for you to 
have specific authorization for the printing of anything you print, 
whether it is to be paid for finally out of the appropriation or 
whether you are to be reimbursed for it? 

Mr. Ral^h. Well, that is implied in our acts. 

Mr. Mondell. You say you have gone on and printed the stamps 
without any authorization ? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. But, of course, there is a question whether you 
have any authority to do it ? 

Mr. Ralph. Well, I do not think there is any question about au- 
thority. 

Mr. Mondell. And unless we give you specific authority to print 
these Federal reserve notes the only authority you will have will be 
this back-handed authority carried in the Federal reserve law ? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes; that gives the Secretary of the Treasury au- 
thority to do that. 

Mr. Mondell. Which is not a very good way to have legislative 
authority. 

WAGES OF PLATE PRINTERS. 

[See p. 939.] 

The Chairman. The next item is for wages of plate printers. This 
item depends entirely upon the other item — the two go together. 

Mr. Ralph. Not in the same ratio or relationship. My constant 
endeavor is to displace plate printing and 

The Chairman (interposing). The amount in this item has been 
changed. What is your revised estimate on this item ? 

Mr. Ralph. In connection with that item I would like to call the 
committee's attention to 

The Chairman (interposing). Give me the amount. 



SUNDRY OIVIL APPROPHIATIOK BILL, 1916. 249 

Mr. Ralph. $1,652,045, which is $149,000- 



The Chairman (interposing). That is your revised estimate? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, this depends entirely upon the amount of 
work you are going to be authorized to do? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir ; that is fixed more accurately than anything 
else. 

The Chairman. Except that you ought to do it more cheaply next 
year because you will be printing four-fifths of the backs, or will you 
be printing all of the backs? 

Mr. Ralph. No ; four-fifths of them. That is allowed for in this 
estimate. 

The Chairman. That is taken into consideration in your revised 
estimate? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I can not understand how it is you take on an ad- 
ditional number of those backs any yet spend more money. 

Mr. Ralph. It is because we do additional work. If we estimated 
for the same work each year there would be a net saving of $135,000 
each year, or approximately that amount. 

MONEY-LAUNDRY MACHINES. 
[See p. 254.] 

The Chairman. The next item is for money-laundry machines. 
The appropriation was $9,000, and vou are asking for $9,000 in 
1916. You expended in 1914 $895.19.' 

Mr. Burke. I have no additional statement to make in regard to 
those machines than I have already made, but. as I said, I can send 
in a statement as to those machines. 

The Chairman. You send to the committee a statement about them? 

Mr. Burke. Yes; I will send in a report showing what those 
machines are doing. 

Mr.MALBURN. Perhaps the statement I hand you will answer your 
question. 

The Chairman. According to this statement there is about $352,000 
that we ought to pick up some place. 

Mr.MALBURN. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. During the fiscal year they laundered 35,438,713 
notes of various denominations. It appears that the cost of printing 
new notes and putting them in circulation is $13,125 per thousand, 
while the cost of laundering and returning to circulation is approxi- 
mately $3,191 per thousand notes, or a saving of $9,934 per thousand. 
You have not yet reached the conclusion that the life of these laun- 
dered notes is equal to the life of the new notes? 

Mr. Burke. No ; we have not reached that conclusion yet. 

(The statement referred to follows:) 

OPEBATION8 OF MONEY LAUNDRY MACHINES. 

During the fiscal year money laundry machines were in operation in the Treas- 
ury and in the snbtreasuries at Boston, Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia. 
Based on figures furnished by the Government actuary, the cost of printing 
tew notes and putting them into circulation is $13,125 per thousand, while the 



A 



280 STTNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

cost of laundering and returning to circulation is but approximately $3,191 per 
thousand notes, or a saving of $9,934 per thousand. 

During the fiscal year 35,438,712 notes of various denominations were laun- 
dered and returned to circulation. Under the former practice of the depart- 
ment, before the installation of the laundry machines, these notes would have 
been destroyed and new ones issued in their place. The saving to the depart- 
ment, therefore, on the above basis, is $352,048.06 if the life of the laundered 
notes is figured as equal to that of new notes. This fact the actuary has not 
been able definitely to determine, although it is his opinion that there is very 
little difference between the life of the washed and new notes. 

(The following statement was also submitted with reference to 
laundry machines:) 

October 27, 1914. 

Report of laundry, Office of Treasurer of United States. 

Number of notes returned to circulation : 
Fiscal year ending June 30, 1914 — 

July, 1913 1, 178, 000 

August, 1913 : 652, 000 

September, 1913 790, 000 

October, 1913 1,327,000 

November, 1913 1,176,000 

December, 1913 (10 days) 436,000 

January, 1914 1,002,000 

February, 1914 _ - 970, 000 

March, 1914 1, 112, 000 

April, 1914 1,084,000 

May, 1914 1, 023, 000 

June, 1914 777, 000 

11,527,000 

July-December, 1914 — 

July 1, 088, 000 

August 552, 000 

September - 580, 000 

October 710, 000 

November 664, 000 

December 648, 000 

4,242,000 
ENGRAVERS' AND PRINTERS 9 MATERIALS, ETC. 

[See p. 939.] 

The Chairman. The next item is for engravers' and printers' mate- 
rials and other materials except distinctive paper. Your appropria- 
tion was $470,000 and you are asking for $770,936, including $93,295, 
for paper for internal-revenue stamps, proposed to be transferred 
from miscellaneous objects, Treasury Department. That is an in- 
crease of $206,741. What is that for? 

Mr. Rai*ph. I have prepared an analysis of that and would like 
to read it and then discuss it. The appropriation for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1914, was $424,174, including a deficiency of $33,952, 
and the unexpended balance was $2,238.29. 

The estimate now is $776,950, which is $6,014 more than shown in 
the Book of Estimates. The appropriation for 1915 is $470,000; 
the estimate is $289,350 more. The increase is due to the following 
items: 

Eleven additional new power plate-printing presses, $48,070 ; pur- 
chase of internal-revenue paper by this bureau instead of by the 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 28l 

Internal- Revenue Bureau, $93,295 in the Book of Estimates; and 
$17,600 for the new stamps required under the act of October 23* 
1914, equal to a total of $110,895 ; and an estimated 20 per cent in- 
crease in cost of supplies due to the European war, $145,800. With* 
out these items, the estimate would be only $2,185 more than the 
1915 appropriation, or 0.46 per cent more. 

Now, in connection with the war, you remember that shortly after, 
the war broke out Mr. Malburn and I had a conference with vou f 
and then I left at midnight for Philadelphia, because I receivea in* 
formation that there was a scarcity of colors and aniline pigments 
used by the bureau in its manufacture of ink. I got in Philadel* 
phia the next morning and visited all the chemical manufacturer! 
there and purchased all of the colors that they had in stock at a 
price equal to or not to exceed 5 per cent in excess of the contract 
price which we had at that time. I immediately went to New York 
and bought all available materials there at a very slight increase in 
price. I bought all the Prussian blues and Lake reds that were in 
America. As a result of that I have been able to print the postage 
stamps the same as usual, using those colors that were very scarce* 
The materials that I purchased for 29 and 30 cents are now selling for 
95 cents and $1 a pound, and I figure that I not only saved the Gov* 
eminent the embarrassment of being compelled to discontinue cer* 
tain colors, but that I saved it the increased cost. I do not knovfr 
what we are going to do next year if this war continues. I have got 
about three or four months' stock on hand of certain colors. I think 
that the blacks that we use, the vegetable blacks, can be successfully 
manufactured in America. I have a contract with a firm that 18 
giving us fairly satisfactory results, but on the reds and the Chinese 
blues and Prussian blues there is some question. I could have sold 
the colors that I bought five days after I purchased them at an in- 
creased price of $125,000. 

The Chairman. How do you get this increase of $6,000? Yoti 
know you can not increase the estimates except in the regular way, 

Mr. Ralph. The $6,014 is due to the fact that we purchased addi- 
tional paper for war-tax stamps, and the other items referred to there 
are incident 

The Chairman (interposing). But you estimated for $770,000, and 
now you are trying to say you are estimating $776,000. 

Mr. Ralph. When I made the estimate I did not include the war* 
tax stamps. 

The Chairman. That bill passed afterwards? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much is that? 

Mr. Ralph. $6,014. 

The Chairman. You allow in this estimate $145,000 to cover the 
increased cost of inks? 

Mr. Ralph. Inks,papers, and chemicals that we purchase. 

The Chairman. Well, if this war continues and you can not get 
these at all 

Mr. Ralph (interposing). Then I will turn the money back into 
the Treasury. 

The Chairman. You will have to use something else, will you nott 



982 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes; I am experimenting now in an endeavor to get 
substitutes for those colors. The dextrine that we use on our postage 
(Btamps for the purpose of gumming them is made out of the cassava 
flower, which is grown in Java by the Dutch Government; that is, 
Holland. Some manufacturing chemist who is out of a job during 
the war is spending his time down in Florida, and he finds that there 
ure hundreds of acres of cassava roots growing wild there, and they 
$re experimenting now to make this dextrine out of them. The 
blacks that we imported from Germany I think hereafter can be 
manufactured here, and that we will be independent of Germany; 
J feel confident that we will manufacture all of our Prussian blues 
in the future, but our American manufacturing chemists could not 
compete a year or two ago with German manufacturers because they 
bad the market. 

paper for internal-revenue stamps. 

[See pp. 216, 241.] 

The Chairman. You are asking for $93,000 for paper for internal- 
revenue stamps ? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes; I want to use that $93,295. 

The Chairman. The amount was $90,000 in 1915. 

Mr. Ralph. They asked for $90,000 for internal-revenue paper, 
and that is what they got. 

The Chairman. But this year they ask an increase? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes; and the increase in the number of internal- 
revenue stamps would justify $93,295. 

The Chairman. How do you arrive at that? 

Mr. Ralph. The increase in 1916 over 1915 in the quantity of 
stamps will be quite large, and I would not be surprised if we had 
to pay a quarter of a cent per pound for the paper in 1916 ; that is, 
more than we are now paying. 

Mr. Mondell. But your papers are all of American manufacture, 
are they not ? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir; but the sulphite, or a large percentage of it 
which is used in the manufacture of that paper is imported, and 
this is blue paper and we use Prussian blue to color the paper, and 
the Prussian blue is probably worth 75 cents a poiyid now. 

The Chairman. Why is this transferred from miscellaneous ob- 
jects? 

Mr. Ralph. I believe we can handle that more economically and 
buy it to better advantage; I believe we can order the sizes more 
economically than the internal-revenue people, who do not see the 
paper or handle it. 

The Chairman. You have already purchased all the paper you 
want for your war-revenue stamps? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir; not all of that which we want. I am pur- 
chasing that each month. 

The Chairman. You did not buy that all at once? 

Mr. Ralph. No. The Commissioner of Internal Revenue is han- 
dling that appropriation this year. He had an appropriation of 
$80,000, which he expended for the purchase of internal-revenue 
paper for the printing of the war-tax stamps, but I do not believe 
they will have any unexpended balance there. 



SUtfDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1106. 248 

The Chairman. You have included jour war-revenue stamps in 
here? 
Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 
The Chairman. Everything? 
Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. * 

POSTAGE STAMPS. 

The Chairman. Are you responsible for the provision in the Post 
Office appropriation bill to permit this money to be paid to you in 
advance? 

Mr. Ralph. No, sir; T am responsible for the provision in the 
Post Office appropriation bill that if the contract is let to the bureau 
it shall not be printed for less than actual cost. When I took charge 
of the bureau I found that we were losing $40,000 in post-office stamp 
contracts, and I immediately got busy and put in improved methods. 

The Chairman. As a matter of fact, you made $32,000 last year 
on that contract, did you not? 

Mr. Ralph. You mean dividends on our contract ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes ; double that. 

The Chairman. More than that? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes. 

The Chairman. If you got it in advance you would spend it ? 

Mr. Ralph. I anticipate using, in 1916, $60,000 from the profits on 
the Post Office Department contract, an amount for which I have not 
asked an appropriation; but if you eliminate that, you will have to 
give me $60,000 more. What I would like to do is to have the appro- 
priation for the postage stamps transferred to the Bureau of Engrav- 
ing and Printing. I am going to bid on that contract next month, 
the contract expiring the 1st of February. 

CONVERSION OF UNITED STATES li PEK CENT BONDS INTO 3 PER CENT BONDS 

OR NOTES. 

The Chairman. Under date of December 18, 1914, we have a letter 
from the Secretary of the Treasury asking for a permanent indefinite 
appropriation of not to exceed one-tenth of 1 per cent of the amount 
of conversions of notes and bonds under the Federal reserve act the 
first year, and one twenty-fifth of 1 per cent thereafter during the 
time that these conversions are authorized. 

Mr. Malburn. The Federal reserve act provides that Federal 
reserve banks may take over from national banks 2 per cent bonds 
with circulation privilege to the extent of $25,000,000 a year, and 
may issue on the security of those bonds 50 per cent of their value 
in 1-year 3 per cent notes and in 30-year 3 per cent bonds. Those 
bonds can be sold by the national banks beginning two years from 
the date of the Federal reserve act and continuing 20 years there- 
after. That would be December 23, 1915. This is to provide an 
appropriation which is not made in the Federal reserve act for the 
engraving of those notes and bonds. 

The Chairman. That will give you the first year $25,000? 

Mr. Malburn. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And after that $10,000 a year? 



254 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Malburn. Yes, sir. That is for two issues — one of bonds and 
one of notes. 

The Chairman. That would be, all told, $215,000? 

Mr. Malburn. For an issue of $500,000,000 of bonds and notes. 

Mr. Ralph. Those notes will be more expensive than money, inas- 
much as they will have coupons attached. 

The Chairman. It is not a circulating note? 

Mr. Malburn. No, sir. There will be probably four issues a year, 
because the act provides that four times these bonds may be taken 
pver by the Federal reserve banks. 

The Chairman. The first year, what would you propose, to make 
the dies and plates? 

Mr. Malburn. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And once you have them? 

Mr. Ealph. We will have to change the dates in the coupons and 
the notes. 

The Chairman. And after that it would be 

Mr. Ralph (interposing) . The cost of printing and paper and 
material 

The Chairman. Would it take $25,000 to start? 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. We will use more than half of that amount 
for the dies and plates. 

The Chairman. This is, to prepare the dies and plates and to do 
any work that is necessary? 
, Mr. Malburn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Broughton. And to do any work necessary in connection with 
the first year's issues. It will cost a great deal more the first year; 
after that the cost will be inconsiderable. 

Treasury Department, 
Office of Assistant Secretary, 

Washington, December 29, 1914* 
Dear Mr. Fitzgerald : Complying with the request you made at the hearings 
this afternoon with reference to the Secretary's letter of the 18th instant re- 
queuing an appropriation for the expenses of converting United States 2 per 
cent bonds into United States 3 per cent notes or bonds, as authorized by sec- 
tion 18 of the Federal reserve act, I have the honor to suggest the following a* 
appropriate to be enacted for a specific appropriation covering the initial ex- 
penses and the first year's conversions : 

Expenses refunding United States bonds under section 18 of Federal reserve ad. 

To enable the Secretary of the Treasury to prepare for the refunding pro- 
vided by section 18 of the Federal reserve act of 2 per cent bonds of the 
United States into 1-year 8 per cent Treasury notes or 80-year 8 per cent United 
States bonds, and to make such conversions as may be authorized during the 
fiscal year 1916, $25,000. 
Very sincerely, 

Wm. P. Malburn, 
Assistant Secretary. 
Hon. John J. Fitzgerald, 

Chairman Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives. 

DISTINCTIVE PAPER. 

[See pp. 240, 939.] 

The Chairman. The next item is on page 67: "Distinctive paper 
for United States securities," and the appropriation is $400,000, and 
you are asking for $526,072.50. This is a combination of the appro- 



STJNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 23£ 

priation of $400,000 for United States securities and $70,000 for 
national bank currency, is it? 

Mr. Broughton. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you revised this estimate? 

Mr. Broughton. We are ready to revise it. 

The Chairman. How much? 

Mr. Broughton. We purpose to reduce the total amount of paper 
by 10,000,000 sheets, which would make the total asked for $480,- 
247.50. That is reducing it 10,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. You estimated on 94,500,000 sheets and you should 
reduce it to 80,000,000 sheets? 

Mr. Broughton. The Treasurer estimated for 90,000,000 sheets 
originally this year. It is cut to 80,000,000 sheets. 

The Chairman. You have 94,500,000? 

Mr. Broughton. We are asking you to reduce it 10,000,000 sheets. 

Mr. Ralph. There is an allowance for mutilation ana defective 
sheets, which they always make. 

Mr. Broughton. An allowance of 5 per cent. The estimate for 
national bank currency we should like to have amended by putting 
in the words " and Federal reserve bank currency " after the words 
"national bank currency." 

The estimate for paper is in the amount submitted by the comp- 
troller and approved by the Secretary. 

The Chairman. There is going to be no increase in the cost of the 
paper, your estimates on both are for less than the current year, and 
so your estimate in money instead of being over $10,000 more should 
be less. The total appropriation was $470,000 last year. You are 
estimating on the same number of sheets for United States securities 
and less probably for national bank notes, and yet the money you 
ask is in excess? 

Mr. Broughton. We are estimating on an increase of bank notes. 
I was asked to submit the estimate for 15,000,000 sheets for the use 
of the comptroller next year. 

The Chairman. That has been reduced? 

Mr. Broughton. I had no knowledge of that until this hearing 
to-day. 

The Chairman. That will revise this still further? 

Mr. Broughton. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you that figure? 

Mr. Broughton. No, sir ; but I will give it to you. 

Treasury Department. 
Office of Assistant Secretary, 

Washington^ December 29, 1914- 
Dear Mr. Fitzgerald : Complying with the request you made at the hearings 
thi* afternoon, I have the honor of submitting the following revised figures for 
estimates of appropriations for " Distinctive Paper for United States Securities 
and National Bank and Federal Reserve Bank Currency " : 

(1) On the basis of the purchase of 84,000,000 sheets in order to supply the 
Treasurer with 80,000,000 sheets perfect, and the purchase of 14,700,000 sheets 
in order to supply the Comptroller of the Currency with 14,000,000 sheets per- 
fect the amount to be appropriated for paper will be $458,955, to which is to be 
added the usual items for services at the mill, amounting to $13,410, so that the 
total amount to be appropriated will be $472,365. 

(2) On the basis of the purchase of 84,000,000 sheets in order to supply the 
Treasurer with 80,000,000 sheets perfect, and the purchase of 13,650,000 sheets 
in order to supply the Comptroller of the Currency with 13.000,000 sheets per- 



936 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

feet, the amount to be appropriated for paper will be $454,072.50, to which Is to 
be added the usual items for services at the mill, amounting to $13,410, so that 
the total amount to be appropriated will be $467,482.50. 
Very sincerely, 

Wm. P. Malbtjbn, 
Assistant Secretary. 
Hon. John J. Fitzgerald, 

Chairman, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives. 

The Chairman. I notice that yon strike out the word " laundry " 
and insert the word " mill "f 

Mr. Brottghton. Yes, sir; it is the same paper, the same mill, and 
the law directs that the Secretary shall contract for all the paper 
and shall use the same paper. 

The Chairman. You agk to modify the language so that it will 
read instead of actual expenses, $50 per month when actually on 
duty. Why is that? 

Mr. Brouohton. The superintendent of the mill is an employee of 
the Treasury Department detailed there. 

The Chairman. Is that the man who lives there? 

Mr. Brouohton. The employee has his family there, and this is 
simply to give him his expenses. 

The Chairman. Is this the same request that has been made on 
numerous occasions? 

Mr. Broughton. Yes, sir. There is no other change at all, except 
the combining of the two items. 

ESTIMATES BEVI0ED. 

[See p. 930.] 

Mr. Chairman, I suggest that in the event that the committee 
should decide to make any reductions in the estimates that I be given 
an opportunity to apportion the reduction over those three items. 

The Chairman. If we do anything we will have the items bal- 
anced. I think that if we can arrange some system by which we set 
out specifically the number of sheets of these different things we will 
avoid a lot of confusion. 

Mr. Ralph. I will give you a complete statement of the full num- 
ber of sheets that I expect to print next year under those estimates 
in the various classes of work. 

Treasury Department, 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 

January 2. *7.0/.>. 
Hon. John J. Fitzgerald, 

Chairman Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives. 

Sir : In compliance with your request expressed at the recent hearing before 
your committee on the estimates of this bureau for the fiscal year 1916, I desire 
to state that the estimated deliveries in sheets in the fiscal year 1915, with the 
appropriations for that year, and in the fiscal year 1916, with the revised esti- 
mates for the fiscal year 1916, are as follows : 



United States notes and certificates 

National-bank notes and Federal reserve bank currency. 

Internal-revenue stamps 

Emergency revenue stamps, "war tax" 

Customs stamps , 

Checks, drafts, and miscellaneous (nonreimbursable) 



Total. 



74,000,000 
14,000,000 
86,766,469 



180,000 
1,366,795 



176,321,254 



1916 



80,000,000 
13,500,000 
90,949,623 

8,000,000 
239,000 

1,600,570 



193,289,193 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPEOPKIATION BILL, 1916. 237 

The amounts appropriated for 1915 to execute the various quantities of 
work as above stated, and the revised estimates for 1916 to execute the work 
as above stated, are as follows : 



1916 



Compensation of employees. 

Plate printing 

Material'; and miscellaneous expanses - 



$1,300,000 

1,025,000 

470,000 



$1,447,505 

1,052,045 

776,950 



3,395,000 



3,876,500 



The increase in sheets to be delivered in 1916 over 1915 is 9.6 per cent. 

The estimates for compensation show an increase of 11.3 per cent They in- 
clude |8,400 for " Custody of dies, rolls, and plates," which has been omitted 
from the estimates of the Chief of the Division of Loans and Currency. The 
percentage of increase in the estimates under this item is greater than in the 
number of sheets to be printed and delivered, for the reason that the added 
emergency revenue (war tax) stamps are printed on offset presses, which cost, 
together with the cost of gumming and perforating them, is payable from this 
appropriation, instead of being plate printed and the cost thereof paid from the 
appropriation for " Wages of plate printers and their assistants." 

The estimates for " Plate printing " are f27,045, or 1.6 per cent more than the 
appropriation for 1915. The increase in sheets of all kinds over 1915 is 9.6 per 
cent, and in plate-printed sheets only the increase is 5.2 per cent The extension 
of the use of the power press accounts for the lower cost in 1916. 

The estimate for " Materials and miscellaneous expenses " was $776,950, an 
increase of $306,950 over the appropriation for 1915, equal to 65.3 per cent. The 
increase is largely due to the following items : 

11 additional new power plate-printing presses $48, 070 

The purchase of internal-revenue paper by this bureau instead of by the 
Bureau of Internal Revenue, as shown in the Book of Estimates 93, 295 

The purchase of paper for the emergency revenue (war tax) stamps re- 
quired under the act of Oct 22, 1914 17, 600 

An estimate of 20 per cent increase in cost of supplies, due to the Euro- 
pean war 145, 800 

304,765 

Without these items, the estimates will be only $2,185 more than the 1915 
appropriation, or 0.46 per cent 

At the present time this bureau is printing and delivering emergency-revenue 
•war-tax) stamps authorized by the act of October 22, 1914, after the estimates 
for the fiscal year 1916 were prepared and submitted, and when it developed 
that this work would have to be executed it seemed that, due to the large issue 
of emergency currency and Federal reserve bank notes, the Comptroller of the 
Oirrency would require about 4,000,000 sheets less of national-bank notes than 
were anticipated for the current fiscal year, and it was expected that the money 
that would have been used for these 4,000,000 sheets could be used for the print- 
ing of the emergency revenue stamps during the remainder of this fiscal year. 
Recently, however, the comptroller has advised me that he will probably require 
a supply of Federal reserve bank currency, and in that even the funds remaining 
from the appropriation for national-bank notes will have to be used to produce 
Weral reserve bank currency, and there will be no funds to cover the cost of 
emergency-revenue stamps, and I will be compelled to submit a deficiency esti- 
mate to cover their cost. 

In the art authorizing the Issue of these emergency-revenue stamps Congress 
''Hnded an item of $30,000 for the purchase of paper, but omitted entirely any 
• Impropriation for the printing of the stamps, and as the act authorizing them 
wan jiasned after the estimates for 1916 were submitted, I have provided for 
'hem for the next fiscal year in the revised estimate which 1 presented to your 
•"nmiittee on the 29th instant, reducing the number of sheets for the United 
states Treasurer from 90.000,000, as stated in the Book of Estimates, to 
'<>.i*)0.000. 



238 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Since the hearing was held I have been informed by the Bureau of Internal 
Revenue that under the act of December 17, 1914, this bureau will be called 
upon to print and deliver a large number of opium special tax stamps and 
opium orders. This act provides funds for the purpose of carrying into effect 
its provisions in the current year, but a supplemental estimate will, when full 
data is available, be presented in the regular way for the printing of the 
stamps and orders that will be required in the fiscal year 1916. 

I am advised informally by the Bureau df Internal Revenue that there will 
probably be required under this act annually 500,000 stamps and 25,000,000 
original and 25,000,000 duplicate order forms, and based upon this estimate it 
would appear that their cost would be somewhere around $250,000 yearly. I 
expect to go into ihis matter very carefully with the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue, with a view to reducing the size of the stamps and orders to the low- 
est possible minimum, and hope that the estimate may be much less than this 
tentative figure. 

Attention is called to the fact that while' the cost of producing these forms !* 
placed on this bureau, the Commissioner of Internal Revenue is authorized to 
charge not to exceed $1 per hundred, so that the income derived from the sale 
of the forms will probably more than offset the cost of production. 

I am attaching hereto a sheet taken out of the annual report of this bureau 
for the fiscal year 1914 which shows the annual deliveries from 1878 to 1914 
of the various classes of securities and the expenditures by this bureau, and 
upon which has been inscribed the estimate of deliveries for the fiscal years 
1915 and 1916. The figures under the heading "National bank notes" for 
1915 include 11,344,429 sheets of emergency national bank notes and 6,587,500 
sheets of Federal reserve notes, and those under " Internal-revenue stamps " 
include 7,000,000 and 8,000,000 sheets for emergency-revenue (war tax) stamps 
for 1915 and 1916, respectively: 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 



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$40 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

An analysis of this statement will probably give you the information you 
desired as to deliveries and expenditures. It shows a gradual reduction in the 
average expenditure per thousand sheets delivered. 
Respectfully, 

J. E. Ralph, Director. 

The Chairman. Give it to us on the basis of the estimates and on 
the basis of the current appropriations. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Both ways. 

Mr. Ralph. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Broughton. I have a memorandum which was prepared for 
Mr. Malburn regarding the estimate for distinctive paper. 

The Chairman. Insert it in the record. 

(The memorandum referred to by Mr. Broughton follows:) 

Treasury Department, 
Division of Loans and Currency, 

Office of the Secretary. 
Washington, December 9, IIP J 4. 

(Memorandum for Mr. Malburn regarding estimates for distinctive paper.) 

Heretofore separate estimates have been submitted for distinctive paper 
for " United States securities " and for " national-bank currency," including 
salaries of the employees at the mill for 10 months under the former and two 
months under the latter appropriation. As the operating expenses of the mill 
are constant and the positions are statutory, the current estimates were sub- 
mitted combining the two appropriations so that the overhead charges for the 
operation of the mill would be made one item as well as the appropriation for 
paper, a restriction, however, appearing in the amount of paper that may be 
purchased for the Treasurer and the amount that may be purchased for the 
comptroller. If Congress accepts the department's view in this respect it will 
greatly simplify the accounting at the mill and in various Treasury offices. 

In submitting his estimates to this office, the Comptroller of the Currency 
estimated for 15.750,000 sheets of distinctive paper for national-bank notes, 
Federal reserve bank notes, and Federal reserve notes. At that time it was 
believed the Federal reserve banks would reimburse the department in full 
for all ex]>enses incident to the preparation and issue of both Federal reserve 
bank notes and Federal reserve notes, and, accordingly, in making up the esti- 
mates for Congress the items for these notes were omitted. The Comptroller of 
the Treasury has since decided that the Government must stand the expense of 
preparing and issuing Federal reserve bank notes in the same manner as it 
stands the expense of preparing and issuing national-bank notes. Accordingly, 
the estimate should be amended by inserting after "national-bank currency" 
the words " and Federal reserve bank currency/' so that the item will read : 

" Distinctice paper for United States securities 94,500,000 sheets, and for 
natoinal-bank currency and Federal reserve bank currency 15,750,000 sheets, 
etc." (See p. 699 of Estimates of Appropriations for 1916.) 

The esti in ate for next year were based on the contract price of paper for the 
current year; that is, $0.36* per pound, plus $0.02* per pound for miscellaneous 
expenses, including transportation. This makes the estimated cost of a million 
sheets $4,650. However, if the estimates for distinctive paper for United States 
securities are reduced 10.000,000 sheets, the proper reduction should be at the 
rate of $4,582.50 per million sheets, which is the cost of the paper plus express- 
age, as the general miscellaneous expenses in connection with the production 
of paper will not necessarily be reduced through a reduction of 10,000.000 sheets 
in the amount of paper manufactured. Accordingly, the proper reduction for 
10,000,000 sheets is $45,825, which would make the amount estimated for paper, 
including transportation and miscellaneous expenses, $466,837.50, and the total 
estimated appropriation will be $480,247.50, including salaries, etc., at the mill. 

W. S. BROrOHTON. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 24i 

Wednesday, December 30, 1914. 

INTERNAL REVENUE. 

S TATEM ENTS OF MB. WILLIAM H. QSBOEN, COMMISSIONER 0* 
INTERNAL EE VENUE; MB. E. A. FORBES, CHIEF DIVISION Ofl 
ACCOUNTS AND STATISTICS; AND MB. J. W. McOINNIS, CHEE* 
REVENUE AGENT. 

PAPER FOR INTERNAL-REVENUE STAMPS. 

« [See pp. 216, 232.] 

The Chairman. The item for paper for internal-revenue stamp* 
has been transferred to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing? 

Mr. Forbes. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you believe that is a better arrangement, to 
let the bureau purchase the paper? 

Mr. Forbes. Personally, I heard nothing about it until after it 
was done. 

Mr. Osborn. That was done in the Secretary's office. I do not 
know about it myself. They just sent an order over to have it done* 

REFUNDS OF COLLECTIONS. 

The Chairman. The next item is, "To enable the Secretary or 
the Treasury to refund money covered into the Treasury as internal- 
revenue collections, under the provisions of the act approved May 
27, 1908," and the appropriation is $50,000 and your estimate is 
$50,000. This is the refund of deposits put up as compromises ? 

Mr. Forbes. Rejected offers in compromise and overpayments, 
overplus of distraint sales, net proceeds of seizure sales when proper 
to be returned to the owners, and offers for real estate not accepted, 

The Chairman. It is always an uncertain amount? 

Mr. Forbes. It is uncertain; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In 1914 you expended $16,132.71? 

Mr. Forbes. Yes, sir. During the first five months this year we 
have expended about $40,000 and we will have to ask for a deficiency 
appropriation, but we can not tell how much; it will be anywhere 
from $30,000 to $75,000 this year. 

The Chairman. What are they, mostly. 

Mr. Forbes. Rejected offers in compromise or overpayments 
The commissioner will tell you about that. 

Mr. Osborn. We started at $50 for a corporation and $20 for aji 
individual. 

The Chairman. That is the income tax? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir; we reduced it to $20 and $5. All those who 
paid will be entitled to a refund of the difference, except where th* 
offers in compromise have been accepted. 

The Chairman. These are merely technical violations? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Failures to make returns? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir; returns on time. 

72785—16—16 



242 SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Mondell. Carelessness and neglect? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Forbes. We do not know how many of those people and cor- 
porations will make application. They will not be repaid unless 
they make application. 

The Chairman. Is there any limit upon the period within which 
tHey must file their application? 

Mr. Forbes. Under section 3228 they must make application within 
two years. 

PUNISHMENT FOR VIOLATION OF INTERNAL-REVENUE LAWS. 

The Chairman. The next item is "Punishment for violation of 
internal-revenue laws," and the appropriation is $175,000, and your 
estimate is $175,000? 

Mr. Osborn. That is another fund that it is impossible almost for 
us to tell until the eiid of the year how much we have to pay out. 
Another thing, there is a fine of $100, expulsion from office, and, I 
think, imprisonment for not less than one month if we overspend 
the fiuxd. We do not spend as much of the appropriation in the 
early part of the year as in the latter part, because we are afraid to 
do.it. To give you some idea what those people are doing, we seized 
and destroyed 2,677 illicit distilleries and 1,593 stills in 1914. In 
North Carolina alone there were 535 illicit distilleries and 312 stills. 
It is not only that work, but by using a good many of these men on 
the oleomargarine business we have uncovered $16,000,000 of frauds, 
and we got from one concern about $227,000, and I should say easily 
over $300,000 has been collected in cash in the last 10 months. That 
is a fund, Mr. Chairman, that we really need as much as any other 
fund we have. It is the most important one to us. It is a temporary 
fund. We can not employ a man more than six months at one time, 
unless by special agreement with the Civil Service Commission. We 
find, for instance, a lot of illicit distilleries in the western part of 
North Carolina, and we find a couple of men who can show our men 
where they are. We employ those men for 60 days or 90 days, and 
when we get through we let them go. We are not using nearly as 
many as we ought to to prevent the frauds on the Government. 

The Chairman. Is this business of illicit distilling on the increase 
or decrease ? 

Mr. Osborn. There were 2,600 last year as against 2,400 the year 
before. 

The Chairman. That is not exactly an indication that it is increas- 
ing; that is an indication that you got more stills. There is no way 
to tell whether it is extending or not? 

Mr. Osborn. There is no question but that illicit distilling is in- 
creasing wherever there is prohibition. I do not mean to say thai 
prohibition is not a good thing, but what I mean to say is that when- 
ever you stop the sale of liquor in a State, then they commence illicit 
distilling. 

The Chairman. Is it your experience that the bulk of these stilh 
are in States where the sale of liquor is prohibited? * 

Mr. Osborn. North Carolina is a dry State; South Carolina is t 
■ort of semidry State; Tennessee, I believe, is now dry; Virginia it 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 243 

not now dry ; and West Virginia is now dry. Those are the States 
where we find most of the illicit distilleries. 

Mr. Mondell. Does North Carolina have a prohibition law ? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Moxdell. That is where the largest number of illicit stills are 
located? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. McGinnis. Last year, up to June 30, 1914, we caught 535 
illicit distilleries in North Carolina and 312 illicit stills. 

Mr. Mondfxl. You mean outside of the distilleries? 

Mr. McGinnis. Some of the 312 stills were caught in the 535 
illicit distilleries. We may catch a distillery without a still; they 
may drag the still out and run it away. 

The Chairman. Please put in the record a statement as to these 
operations. 

Mr. McGinnis. Yes, sir. 

(The statement referred to follows:) 



244 



STTNDET CIVIL APPROPBIATION BILL, 1916. 



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SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 



IlUcit distilleries seized, casualties to officers and employees, and persons 
arrested during the last seven years. 





1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


Total 


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1,743 
1 


1,911 

1 

3 

470 


2,471 


2,466 


2,375 


2, en 


14,771 


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2 

529 


1 
494 


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U 
504 


9 


Persons arrested 


328 


470 


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i Posseman C. E. McRight wounded in raid on distillery near Allsboro, Ala., Jan. 5, 1914. 

The Chairman. You pay out of this appropriation for the services 
of the men you employ? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir; the informers and what we call the Form 10 
men. 

The Chairman. The informers get the rewards? 

Mr. Osborn. They are the men who inform us where the distil- 
leries are. There is a considerable amount of money that has to be 
paid to those men. For instance, wherever it is a 50-gallon still or 
more we have to pay $50 upon conviction. We never know how much 
is going to turn up. In North Carolina, where there were 535 illicit 
distilleries, we may have to pay $40 additional to the $10 fee, making 
$50 in each case of minimum still capacity. We paid the day before 
yesterday $240. 

The Chairman. It depends on the conviction? 
# Mr. Forbes. Of the owner or operator and the capacity of the stilL 
*The Chairman. Does he get paid if there is not a conviction? 

Mr. Forbes. $10 is the maximum fee if there is no conviction. 

Mr. Osborn. He may be paid all the way from $5 to $50. 

Mr. Forbes. The more prominent cases are exploited. 

Mr. Osborn. Another thing; I came here in April, and for the 
year ended June 30 following we collected more than $344,000,000. 
The next year we collected $380,000,000, and this year we expect to 
collect $439,000,000. You see how it is increasing all the time. The 
work is increasing, and we have complaints from all over the country 
and from the revenue agents that they can not collect the taxes be- 
cause they have not the men to do it. I am getting letters from the 
collectors saying that they are compelled to take their field men and 
put them in the office. 

The Chairman. That includes all sources? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir. These Form 10 men are a great help to the 
revenue agents. 

The Chairman. Are the returns from the taxes on spirits in 
creasing? 

Mr. Osborn. No 2 sir; decreasing. 

Mr. Forbes. It is a little ahead for the year up to October 31 
because the distillers anticipated an increased tax. It is falling of 
now. It fell off more than $5,000,000 in the month of October 
The report of collections for November has not been compiled. 

The Chairman. They took a lot of spirits out of bond? 

Mr. Forbes. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Osborn. The tax on distilled spirits fell off last year $4,500,000 

The Chairman. How much will be collected this year? 

Mr. Forbes. The estimate is $439,000,000, of which amount $305- 
000,000 is ordinary, as against $808,000,000 last year. 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPEOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 247 . 

The Chairman. This includes what? 

Air. Forbes. The ordinary receipts are exclusive of the emergency 
revenue tax and the income tax. 
The Chairman. Spirits and oleomargarine! 
Mr. Forbes. Yes, sir. On account of the emergency revenue tax 
it is estimated that $54,000,000 will be collected this year, a little more 
than half a year. The income tax, $80,000,000, of which the corpora- 
tions will pay $40,000,000 and individuals $40,000,000. 

Mr. Mondell. Is any part of this appropriation paid for the sala- 
ries of permanent employees ? 

Mr. Osborn. No, sir. On account of the presidential or/ier they 
can only be employed for six months, except, for instance, if we 
have a man who has been useful in the seizure of a lot of oleo all 
over the country and who is a special employee we get the Civil 
Service Commission to agree to extend his time two months, be- 
cause we have to use him as a witness ; never beyond that. 

Mr. Mondell. Do you find men who are specially valuable to you 
in connection with this appropriation whom you can employ from 
time to time for a limited time? 
Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. McGinnis. We employed a man in the city of New York who 
gave us some inforamtion with reference to oils that were being 
rurnished to some oleomargarine factories at Providence, R. I., and 
through his information we traced out this concern at Columbus, 
Ohio. We employed that man at $9 a day and as a result of his 
work for less than 40 days we collected $262,000 from that one con- 
cern in Columbus. 
Mr. Osborn. We did not get all the information from him. 
Mr. McGinnis. No; but we secured from him the information that 
led to the discovery of the oils going to Providence, R. I., and Colum- 
bus. Ohio. 

Mr. Mondell. Do these special employees work under the col- 
lector I 

Mr. Osborn. Xo, sir; under the revenue agents. A gentleman 
came to me some time ago and said that he had a hotel in a certain 
part of the country that was being completely destroyed by blockade 
distilleries, men coming in drunk, etc. I authorized the employment 
of two men to go and stay at the hotel just as guests, and they went 
fishing down the stream* There were six or seven of these illicit 
distilleries. They located the distilleries and gave me the informa- 
tion, and I sent my men in there and got every one of them. 

Mr. Mondell. Sometimes these men are employed through the 
office here under your direction, and sometimes they are employed 
under the direction of the men in the field ? 

Mr. Osborn. They are always employed under the direction of 
the revenue agents. 
Mr. Mondell. And the revenue agents know what they are doing! 
Mr. Osborn. Exactly what they are doing. 

The Chairman. Have you made an estimate as to how much will 
he received from the war revenue act? 

Mr. Forbes. $54,000,000 for the balance of this fiscal year, and 
$44,000,000 for the first six months of the next year, when the law 
expires by limitation. 
The Chairman. About $08,000,000? 



&48 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Forbes. Yes, sir ; approximately. 

The Chairman. Your office has done a great deal of estimating; do 
your estimates prove pretty accurate? 

Mr. Forbes. We have been under for a number of years. Last 
year we overestimated. We were governed by facts and the esti- 
mates are based thereon, but the ordinary receipts were not normal. 
They have fallen off; instead of $312,000,000 estimated for 1914 we 
secured from ordinary sources $308,000,000. There was thus a falling 
off of $4,000,000 instead of an increase as estimated. 

Mr. Osborn. That was in distilled spirits, mostly. 

The Chairman. That is a little over 1 per cent? 

Mr. Forbes. Yes, sir; about 1£ per cent. 

The Chairman. You expect to spend the $175,000, as near as you 
can figure? 

Mr. Osborn. We ought to spend more than that. We have not 
spent much of it thus far because we have been holding back to see 
how much we would have to pay out for these stills. January, 
February, and March are good months for the illicit distilleries to 
run on account of the cold weather ; they can make the whisky better. 

The Chairman. There is greater activity at that time? 

Mr. Osborn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. And greater difficulty in discovering them at that 
time of the year? 

Mr. Osborn. In the winter? 

Mr. Mondell. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Osborn. That is a better time to discover them because the 
leaves are off the trees. 

Mr. McGinnis. It is harder to get to them. 



Wednesday, December, 30, 1914. 

CONTINGENT EXPENSES, INDEPENDENT TREASURY. 

STATEMENTS OF MB. WILLIAM F. MALBURN, ASSISTANT SECRE- 
TARY OF THE TREASURY; MR. W. N. THOMPSON, CONFIDEN- 
TIAL CLERK; AND MR. E. B. DASKAM, CHIEF OF THE DIVISION 
OF PUBLIC MONEYS. 

The Chairman. Contingent expenses, Independent Treasury, the 
appropriation is $185,000 and you are asking for $185,000. These 
are the funds out of which you are paying the expenses largely of 
transferring coin, gold, notes, etc., from one part of the country to 
another. 

Mr. Malburn. Yes, sir; you will find that itemized on page 64. 

The Chairman. In 1914 you expended a very large amount, due 
to what? 

Mr. Daskam. Due to the transfer of money to the different Sub- 
treasury offices. 

The Chairman. Will the establishment of the Federal Reserve 
Board affect this appropriation? 

Mr. Malburn. I do not think for 1916 it will make very much 
difference one way or the other. Probably after that it will, and it 



SUKDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 24ft 

may possibly in 1916. It is too early to tell. The banks have just 
opened, and they are not holding any money themselves. I think 
there are only one or two banks that have any vaults, and we are 
carrying the actual money in the vaults of the different Subtreasuries 
now. 

The Chairman. So that as far as can be seen now that can not 
affect the existing situation? 

Mr. Malburn. No, sir; it will not affect the estimates. 

The Chairman. You ask to include in this item authority for in- 
surance on shipments of money by registered mail when necessary? 

Mr. Malburn. And in that connection I would like to call your 
attention to a decision of the Comptroller of the Treasury, in which 
he holds that as insurance is a part of the contract of an express 
company, and is included in its charges, insurance may be considered 
as part of the transportation charge. If we can carry this money 
by mail, or a great part of it, we can make quite a considerable sav- 
ing, and we are working on that now, but it will take some time to 
get that perfected. We make large shipments now by mail to a 
considerable extent. The comptroller's decision is as follows: 

IX8TOANCE ON SHIPMENTS OF GOVERNMENT MONEYS AND SECURITIES. 

The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized in connection with shipments of 
Government moneys and securities to incur necessary expenses for insurance. 

Comptroller Downey to the Secretary of the Treasury. November 13, 1914 : 

I am in receipt of your letter of November 9. in which you request my deci- 
sion as to whether you are authorized to incur certain expenses in connection 
with the insurance of moneys and securities of the Government which you 
propose to ship by mail through the medium of the Parcel Post Service, and in 
which yon state: 

" Shipments of moneys and seourties of the Government have been made for 
the past 25 years under a contract with the United States Express Co.. dated 
March 31. 18S9. as modified and amended November 1, 1894, and June 1. 1912. 
and terminated, if in fact still in force, under date of October 5. 1914. by depart- 
ment letter, a copy of which is inclosed herewith. 

"There is now no contract for this service. When bids were invited not long 
«ince, with a view to the letting of a new contract, they were all so high that 
I felt it my duty not to accept them, and I have not and do not now regnrd it as 
practicable to provide for such shipments by contract. 

"Payments for this transportation service have been made from the appro- 
priations 'Contingent expenses. Independent Treasury.' and 'Contingent ex- 
penses national currency, reimbursable.' Tn the fiscal year 1914 the former 
appronrlatlon was in the amount of $265,000 (including $115,000 deficiency), 
and the latter in the nature of an indefinite Appropriation of $240,000. Pay- 
ments to the express compnnv from the former appropriation amounted to 
*179.ni8.«2. and from the reimbursable appropriation to $203,509.21. It is esti- 
mated that the expenditures for express chnrges. if all shipments are so made. 
dnring the current fiscal year will be increased over the amounts paid in the 
ftoral year 1914, owing to the increased shipments of coin and currency. 

" I have under consideration the advisability of making shipments of moneys 
and securities in the immediate future by mail, through the use of the Parcel 
Post Service of the Post Office Department, the rates on which will be con- 
siderably reduced below the rates formerly paid under the express company 
«mtract. For instance, in a recent shipment of $50,000,000 from the Philadel- 
phia Mint to the New York Subtreasury. the total transportation and other 
charges amounted to only $3,376.1*. while the charges would have been $25,000 
had the shipment been made under, the old express company con t met. 

"In handling these shipments at the higher rates, the express company has 
assumed all risks and has insured the delivery of the money, but since the 
Pftst Office Department does not insure it will be necessary to further safeguard 
the shipments by a reasonable amount of insurance. T consider the cost of 
toanranee (which 1s relatively nominal) and that of postage as transportation 



250 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPKIATION BILL, 1916. 

charges, both included in payments made to an express company, and call your 
attention to the fact that both together, except in case of very long hauls, are 
much less than express charges would be. 

" I request your decision as to whether charges for insurance, as an essential 
element of the cost of transportation, in such reasonable amounts as may be 
deemed necessary, and authorized by me, may not be paid from the appropria- 
tions 'Contingent expenses, Independent Treasury,' and 'Contingent expenses, 
national currency, reimbursable,' in cases where it may be deemed advisable to 
make shipments by parcel post instead of by express." 

The appropriation "Contingent expenses. Independent Treasury" provides 
as follows: 

"For contingent expenses under the requirements of section 3653 of the 
Revised Statutes of the United States, for the collection, safe-keeping, transfer, 
and disbursement of the public money, for transportation of notes, bonds, and 
other securities of the United States * * *." 

Section 3653, Revised Statutes, provides as follows : 

"The officers, respectively, whose duty it is made by this title to receive, 
keep, or disburse the public moneys, as the fiscal agents of the Government, 
may be allowed any necessary additional expenses for clerks, fireproof chests 
or vaults, or other necessary expenses of safe-keeping, transferring, or dis- 
bursing the moneys; but all such expenses of every character shall be first 
expressly authorized by the Secretary of the Treasury, whose directions upon 
all the above subjects, by way of regulation and otherwise, so far as authorized 
by law, shall be strictly followed by all the officers." 

The question of insurance of Government property is by no means a new 
one, having been the subject of numerous decisions heretofore, and most, if not 
all, of these decisions have held against the propriety of Government officers 
incurring expenses for the insurance of Government property both upon the 
ground that the appropriations sought to be charged with the expense were 
not available and because it was held to lie against the policy of the Govern- 
ment to insure its property. 

As applicable to ordinary fire insurance, these decisions were right and must 
be adhered to. Congress has not only to some extent indicated its policy as 
to insurance of Government property, but it must be assumed that if it had 
intended that such a policy should prevail specific appropriations therefor would 
have been made. The declared policy of the Government against insurance is 
found more in Comptrollers* Decisions than in specific declaration by Congress, 
but it has its foundation as stated and is a policy which should be adhered to 
until Congress indicates a contrary intention. But it does not necessarily follow 
that adherence to that policy must prevent you from handling the transportation 
of moneys as good judgment and the interests of the Government dictate. 

The only statute of which I am aware attempting in any degree to prescribe 
how money, bullion, coin, etc., shall be transported is found in the act of July 7, 
1884, 23 Statutes at Large, page 204, where it is provided as follows: 

" * * * and hereafter, whenever it is practicable, contracts for the trans- 
portation of moneys, bullion, coin, notes, bonds, and other securities of the 
United States, and paper shall be let to the lowest responsible bidder therefor, 
after notice to all parties having means of transportation." 

This statute clearly indicates the intention of Congress at the time, but the use 
of the words " whenever it is practicable " is significant, indicating an anticipa- 
tion that such a method might at times be impracticable and vesting a discretion 
In such event to follow some other course, and the discretion is for your exercise. 
You have indicated in your submission that you do not now regard the contract 
method as practicable, and such conclusion on your part disposes, for the time, 
at least, of the statute cited. 

And I have already suggested that the frequently cited governmental policy 
as to insurance should not prevent the exercise of your judgment in the public 
Interest. No merely constructive policy should be invoked to prevent the appli- 
cation of sound business principles and entail largely increased expenditure. 
The fact that you may safely transport money in the proposed way at a very 
considerable saving in expense to the Government speaks strongly in its favor. 
Having determined that the proposed method is the best method available and 
that you deem transportation by contract impracticable, I think it clearly fol- 
lows that until such time as a contract may be found practicable it is within 
your right to follow the suggested course if there be an appropriation available 
for the purpose. 

The appropriations out of which expense of transportation of moneys and 
securities have been paid have provided generally for their safe-keeping and 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 251 

transportation. Under heretofore prevalent methods the expense of transporta- 
tion paid to an express company has undoubtedly included a guaranty of the 
safe delivery of the shipments, an insurance against loss, and the charge has 
no doubt been predicated more largely upon the responsibility assumed for safe 
delivery than upon the mere expense of transportation. It would seem to be 
obstruction rather than promotion of the methods you might regard as most 
advantageous to hold that you might pay an express company for guaranteeing 
the safety of a shipment of money, but might not pay some other corporation 
for doing the same thing, a holding that you might do indirectly and under 
another name what you could not do directly and by its true name. 

Section 3653, Revised Statutes, quoted above, and referred to in the appro- 
priation act also quoted, authorizes in broad terms the payment of the neces- 
sary expenses both of safe-keeping and transferring moneys. Safe-keeping in 
transit is as necessary as under any other condition and as much a duty. 

I am of the opinion that any appropriations available for the transportation of 
money by express under contract are equally available when not limited in 
terms to that method for its actual transportation by any other adopted method,, 
and if, in your judgment, insurance in transit is a necessary incident to its 
transportation and safe-keeping such appropriations are also available therefor, 
provided that such expense is first authorized by you as required by the section 
referred to. 

I call particular attention to the fact that such expense should be first author- 
teed by you and not simply approved by you after being incurred, and suggest 
that in the event you do not wish to specifically authorize ' insurance in each 
case you provide by some adequate order the cases in which insurance is author- 
teed by you and the amount thereof. 

The Chairman. The insurance charge of an express company is 
quite different from the insurance charge of an independent 
company ? 

Mr. Malburn. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. When you ship by an express company they 
charge a certain rate, under which they guarantee safe delivery? 

Mr. Malburn. Yes; they insure the delivery of it. If we ship by 
mail, in order to get the same protection it is necessary for us to 
get some outside insurance. 

The Chairman. They can not give any guarantee? 

Mr. Malburn. The post office can not. 

The Chairman. I mean the outside insurance company can not 
give any guarantee. They are just gambling on the risk? 

Mr. Malburn. They pay us if we lose it. 

The Chairman. Have you taken out any of that kind of insurance? 

Mr. Malburn. Yes. 

The Chairman. How much has it cost so far? 

Mr. Malburn. I will furnish that information and give you the 
exact rate. Some of these large shipments we made from Philadel- 
phia to New York we insured, but we only insured 10 per cent; 
that is, for every $1,000,000 we would insure $100,000. 

The Chairman. And they went in $10,000,000 lots and one 
$20,000,000 lot? 

Mr. Malburn. Yes. So that we had practically the greater part 
of every individual shipment insured. I think the rate the insurance 
companies made us was something like one-tenth of 1 per cent, but 
I will find that out and give you the exact information. 

The Chairman. I would like to have that. If you had to insure 
all of the entire $60,000,000 it would have cost you $250,000? 

Mr. Malburn. It did not cost us anything lite that. On this par- 
ticular shipment of $50,000,000 we insured one-tenth, or $5,000,000. 
The insurance charge was $1,000, or at the rate of one-fiftieth of 
1 per cent. The total charges on this shipment by mail, including 



252 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

insurance, amounted to $3,376.18, or at the rate of about 6£ cents per 
$1,000, as against the old express contract rate of 50 cents per $1,000. 
The saving on this one shipment amounted to approximately $22,000. 

The Chairman. What is the use of insuring when you ship under 
conditions like those under which you shipped this money from 
Philadelphia to New York? 

Mr. Malburn. It is just an additional precaution. 

The Chairman. There was not any possible chance of losing that 
money the way it was shipped? 

Mr. Malburn. There was a possible chance, although there was 
not very much of a chance. The additional expense was so little, 
together with the parcel-post stamps, and it was so much less than 
the express rate that we felt under the circumstances we were 
justified in taking out this insurance on it. If at the end of that 
trip we had found one bag containing $5,000 lost, we would have felt 
rather chagrined if we had not insured it, because it would not have 
cost us over $10,000 to have insured the whole thing, and that is the 
way it is shipped, in $5,000 bags, and it is just put into the cars in 
that way. 

The Chairman. Will you let us know just how much you spent 
all told? 

Mr. Malburn. The total payments for insurance to date amount to 
$1,825 on shipments aggregating $85,150,000, as follows: 

$50,000,000, Philadelphia to New York, of which $5,000,000 was insured 

at rate of one-fiftieth of 1 per cent $1,000 

$30,000,000, Philadelphia to New York, of which $3,000,000 was insured 

at rate of one-fiftieth of 1 per cent 600 

$5,000,000, Philadelphia to Boston, of which $500,000 was insured at rate 

of one-thirty-third of 1 per cent 150 

$50,000, San Francisco to Hawaii, of which the full amount was insured 

at rate of one-twentieth of 1 per cent 25 

$100,000, San Francisco to Hawaii, of which the full amount was insured 

at rate of one-twentieth of 1 per cent 50 

1,825 

The savings to the Government on the above shipments by mail 
instead of by express as formerly, including the cost of insurance, 
amount to approximately $35,000. 

The Chairman. The whole policy of the Government has been 
against insurance. 

Mr. Malburn. If we did not have the right to insure this, I do 
not thitik we would care to try to make these shipments by mail. In 
the case of gold it may be all right, but when it comes to shipping 
paper money, suppose it burns up or is destroyed in any way. 

The Chairman. You would want to insure the Treasury notes? 

Mr. Malburn. Yes, sir; everything we shipped out, when we get 
so we can ship by mail. 

The Chairman. Is this parcel post stuff registered mail ? 

Mr. Malburn. No; the parcel post and registered mail are two 
different ways of shipping. 

The Chairman. This language only refers to shipments of money 
by registered mail. 

' Mr. Malburn. I think the word " registered *' should be cut out 
and it should read u shipments of money by mail," because there is 
really less need of insurance when shipped by registered mail than 
by parcel post. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 25S 

RECOINAGE OF GOLD COIN8. 

The Chairman. The next item is : " For recoinage of light-weight 
gold coins in the Treasury." The appropriation is $3,000 and your 
estimate is $7,000. This is the amount of money required to make 
up the loss in weight between the standard coin and the coin that 
is recoined? How do you anticipate you will need so much more 
next year? 

Mr. Daskam. It runs along about that amount — $7,000. 

The Chairman. This year you only ask for $3,000. 

Mr. Malburn. In 1914 we had $7,789 — an appropriation of $5,000 
and a deficiency of $2,789. 

The Chairman. How much are you spending this year? 

Mr. Daskam. I think we are asking for $7,000. We have not 
spent anything yet. 

Mr. Malburn. We have been waiting until we got through the 
examination of the subtreasuries. 

Mr. Daskam. As we examine a subtreasury office we take in all the 
ligty weight that is in the office and send it to the mint for re- 
coinage. 

The Chairman. This is a good deal of a guess in advance? You 
can never tell what the amount will be? 

Mr. Malburn. No. 

Mr. Daskam. The light-weight coin is in the subtreasury office, 
and if we do not have any appropriation we do not transfer it to 
the mint and it accumulates. 

Mr. Malburn. We have $575,000 on hand now that we know is 
light-weight gold. 

The Chairman. Is that a large sum or a small sum? 

Mr. Daskam. That is quite a good deal. 

The Chairman. I mean considering the way it averages up; is 
that high or low ? 

Mr. Daskam. For a number of years it has run along about that 
amount. 

Mr. Malburn. That is about the usual amount. 

Mr. Daskam. Yes. 

RECOINAGE OF MINOR COINS. 

The Chairman. The next item is: "For recoinage of minor 
coins.'' The appropriation is $10,000, and you are asking for 
$10,000 for next year? 

Mr. Daskam. If we have the appropriation we will send the 
money, to the mint for recoinage, and if we do not have it it simply 
accumulates in the subtreasuries. 

The Chairman. How much have you spent so far this year? 

Mr. Daskam. Not a cent. 

The Chairman. You are not only asking for $10,000 next year, but 
for all that you have left over this year? Is this handled in the 
same way, and you do not recoin until the subtreasuries are ex- 
amined? 

Mr. Daskam. We have only made one examination this year. 

Mr. Malburn. That money is in the subtreasury just the same as 
the gold coins. 



254 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Thompson. There are on hand approximately one million 
and a half pieces so far. 

Mr. Daskam. We are obliged to redeem it when it comes in. We 
can not pay it out after we redeem it, because it is not good stuff. 

Mr. Malburn. There will have to be some appropriation made 
some time, because this money just accumulates from year to year, 
and if it is not made this year it will have to be made later. 

The Chairman. You ask us to reappropriate the unexpended bal- 
ance? 

Mr. Daskam. It is only a very small amount, about $86. 

Mr. Mondell. You sav vou have spent no part of the appropria- 
tion for 1913? 

Mr. Malburn. No. I explained before you came in, in reference 
to the recoinage of gold coins and minor coins, we are not going to 
do anything until after we examine the subtreasuries and find out 
how much each one of them has. The light coins will then be 
weighed and sent to the mint at Philadelphia, and then the re- 
coinage takes place. That will be done between now and the 1st of 
July. 

The Chairman. You have 1,500,000 pieces now? • 

Mr. Malburn. Of minor coins, yes; and $575,085 worth of gold 
coins. I do not know how many pieces of gold coins. 

Mr. Daskam. We have more than that now. That statement was 
made up in November, and it is gradually increasing every day. 

Mr. Malburn. The principal expense in the gold coin I imagine 
would be in the short weight, and in the other coins it is in the 
coinage itself. 

Mr. Daskam. The minor coins get rusty and get out of shape, but 
nothing is taken from the value of them. 

The Chairman. And in the case of the gold coins it is merely 
the difference in value? 

Mr. Daskam. Yes ; the gold coin is legal tender in proportion to 
its weight, but minor coins are not. 

MONEY LAUNDRY MACHINES. 

[See p. 229.] 

The Chairman. The next item is " For money laundry machines." 
You are asking for $9,000, and in 1914 you only spent $895. 

Mr. Thompson. When the laundry machines were first installed 
we had a lump-sum appropriation of $60,000 to purchase the ma- 
chines and also to purchase supplies. We purchased sufficient sup- 
plies for two years, 1913 and 1914, and therefore in 1914 we only 
had $1,300 appropriated for the upkeep of the machines. 

The Chairman. How much did you spend this year? 

Mr. Thompson. We have spent about $3,000 up until the 1st of 
December, and we estimate that on the requisitions coming in it will 
take the balance of the appropriation of $6,000 between now and the 
1st of July. 

The Chairman. Are all the machines used? 

Mr. Malburn. No; not all of them. 

Mr. Thompson. There were 12 machines set up, but not more than 
8 or 9 of them are actively in use all the time. In the Treasurer's 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPK0PBIATI0N BILL, 1916. 255 

office there are 4 machines, and they keep 2 or 3 of those going all 
the time. In the New York office there are 4 machines, and most of 
them are going regularly. 

The Chairman. Do you wash as many notes as was anticipated? 

Mr. Thompson. I think so. Last year we washed 35,000,000 notes, 
and that is pretty close to what was estimated. 

Mr. Mondell. What was the estimated saving by the use of the 
laundry machines? 

Mr. Thompson. If the life of a laundered note is the same as the 
life of a new note it would be about $9 a thousand, and on the 
35,000,000 notes washed last year it would be about $350,000; but 
the actuary has been unable to determine up to this time whether 
the life of a laundered note is equal to the life of a new note or not. 

The Chairman. Do you find the same objection now as formerly 
to these washed notes? 

Mr. Thompson. We now receive no complaints at all, to my 
knowledge. 

The Chaibman. That has all died oi*t? 

Mr. Thompson. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Malburn. I do not think the average man would know the 
difference. f 

Mr. Mondell. Do you ever wash a note the second time? 

Mr. Thompson. Yes; in fact, we do not know. 

Mr. Mondell. You do not know when a note copes back whether 
it has been laundered or not? 

Mr. Thompson. Sometimes we find notes that we can tell have 
been laundered. The employees who are familiar with the laundry 
work can tell better than others. They find sometimes that laun- 
dered notes come back, and thdy run them through again and put 
them out, and I imagine there are a good many notes that have 
been laundered and come in and gone out a second time. 

Mr. Mondell. Do you use all of your machines at one time or 
another? 

Mr. Thompson. Yes. 

The Chairman. What has been the average cost of supplies? Does 
it take all the $9,000? 

Mr. Thompson. Yes. It has been pretty close to that amount each 
year. 

Mr. Malburn. That is largely for soap chips? 

Mr. Thompson. Yes; that is the largest item. 



Wednesday, December 30, 1914. 

SUPPRESSION OF COUNTERFEITING. 

STATEMENT 07 MB. WILLIAM J. ELYHH, CHIEF 07 THE SECEET- 

SEBVICE DIVISION. 

The Chairman. "Suppressing counterfeiting and other crimes," 
the appropriation is $145,000, and you are asking $145,000 for 
next year. I thought you had your force in such efficient shape that 
all counterfeiting had stopped. 



256 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Flynn. We have it at a minimum, but if we stopped getting 
after counterfeiters they would soon get it up to the maximum. 

The Chairman. What has been the situation this last year in 
reference to counterfeiting? 

Mr. Flynn. About the same as the year previous. The number 
of arrests increased somewhat; the amount of counterfeit money 
captured was about the same. 

The Chairman. Can you give us a statement of your activities? 

Mr. Flynn. The number of arrests throughout the country was 
368. It is safe to figure that about 85 per cent of those arrests re- 
sulted in convictions, because that is about an average. The amount 
of counterfeit money captured was, United States notes, $12,397; 
gold certificates, $5,630; silver certificates, $13,334: national-bank 
notes, $5,693; altered, $4,057; fractional currency, $148; Treasury 
notes, $539. There was $22,319.42 in counterfeit coin captured and 
put out of circulation. We captured 154 plates for the manufacture 
of different notes, 36 dies, metal dies, 152 molds for the manufacture 
of counterfeit money. Then there was a large amount of miscella- 
neous contraband property, consisting of tools, presses, and stuff of 
that kind, captured in different raids. 

The Chairman. Have there any new counterfeits of a particularly 
dangerous character been put in circulation ? 

Mr. Flynn. Not of a dangerous character, not since two and a half 
years ago. We still have a dangerous $5 note, which is practically 
stopped. 

The Chairman. That Indian head note? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes: that note is still in circulation. We have been 
hammering away at it, but unfortunately no one who receives those 
notes can give us a description of the passer, but they have prac- 
tically stopped! 

The Chairman. You never located the maker of that note? 

Mr. Flynn. We are now going through a process of elimination 
of the men who are capable of doing that kind of work and that is 
a long, tedious job. We take up a man capable of doing that kind 
of work, investigate his habits and cover him, and then go from 
one to another in that way, but we have not as yet come across any- 
one whom we can connect up with this note, lou understand, our 
force is so limited that we can only do it in a small way. 

The Chairman. Were many of those notes put in circulation? 

Mr. Flynn. I think, altogether, perhaps 1,000 or a little more 
have been put in circulation in the last two years and a half, mostly 
in the Eastern States. We have not found them west of Cleveland 
as yet. 

The Chairman. When they start to passing counterfeit notes do 
they pass them as new notes or do they make them look as if they 
were worn a little? 

Mr. Flynn. That all depends; some counterfeiters will take a 
counterfeit note and steep it in a solution of weak coffee to give it 
an old appearance, and some will saturate it with glycerin to give 
it an old greasy appearance; but where the workmanship is fine 
they do not as a rule do that. They depend upon their skill to get 
by with the counterfeit note. 

The Chairman. Is it easier to detect them when they are new or 
when thev are worn a little ? 



Mr. Fly^n. Of course, a shopkeeper Would be more apt to scfuti- 
uize a new note that appeared to be a little off color than an old : 
greasy note which had been greased witli glycerin or discolored with 
coffee. We have practically wiped out the manufacture of counter- 
feit coin from sterling silver. We were troubled some years ago by . 
men who were making counterfeit silver coin out of coin about 9317 
fine, whereas the Government coin is onlv $00 fine. Of course, they 
can do that and make 100 per cent profit, but we have practically 
wiped that out. There is no more of th^t going on at tne present 
time. That was mostly in and around New York. We got about 25 
convictions of makers of such coin. 

Mr. Mondell. Did they make a pretty g6od looking coin? 

Mr. Flynn. They used practically tne same process the Govern- 
ment uses — steel dies, hydraulic press — and would buy an ounce of 
silver for 50 cents, out of which they could strike off five 25-cent 
coins. 

Mr. Mondell. They issued quarters principally? 

Mr. Flynn. The 50-cent coin is the most popular coin that is 
counterfeited. 

The Chairman. Did you have any money left in this appropria- 
tion in 1914? 

Mr. Flynn. I think about $600 or $700. 

The Chairman. You are asking for some additional authority to 
rent and operate or purchase motor^propeilled or horse-drawn ' 
vehicles? 

Mr. Flynn. We simply want to continue the rental of an auto- 
mobile at $500 a year, such as we have had in the last two years for . 
the protection of the person of the President. That $500 rental 
includes repairs and the tires, and in the course of a year I believe 
the tires cost more than $500. 

The Chairman. Do you have any trouble about renting these auto- 
mobiles? 

Mr. Flynn. We rent that machine from the same concern that 
leases the White House machines. 

The Chairman. Have you any trouble about your authority to do' ■ 
that. 

Mr. Flynn. We are asking for that authority now. 

The Chairman. You have had the machine for two years? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes; but you passed a law recently which compels us 
to ask for this authority. 

The Chairman. You rent the machine? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes, sir. We simply pay for the gasoline and pro- 
vide the chauffeur. 

The Chairman. You also ask for authority to allow a per diem 
<>f $4 in lieu of subsistence to persons employed under this appro- 
priation while engaged in field work or traveling on official business 
outside the District of Columbia and away from their designated 
|>osts of duty. Why is this? 

Mr. Flynn. As I understand it, the law provides that a Govern- 
ment officer nan not charge more than $5 a day for actual subsistence, 
and must furnish vouchers, and so on. We ask that this amount be 
fixed in lieu of that. 

72785—15 17 



258 . SUNDBY OIVIL APPBOPKIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. This merely continues the present policy of the 
service? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes, sir; exactly. 

The Chairman. If a man is assigned to duty outside the District 
of Columbia and away from his designated post, then he is allowed 
the subsistence? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes, sir; not to exceed $4 a day. 

The Chairman. But he is not allowed subsistence when he is 
working at the place where his headquarters are? 

Mr. Flynn. He is not. He has to be away from his designated 
headquarters before he can charge the subsistence. 

Mr. Mondell. Has it been your practice to grant a flat allowance 
of $4 a day to your men? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes, sir; that has been the custom for the last seven 
or eight years. 

Mr. Mondell. They are not required to present vouchers covering 
those expenditures? 

Mr. Flynn. Not when we can fix it in this manner. 

Mr. Mondell. You fix it at $4 a day for all the men? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. You think that is a reasonable amount considering 
the work they have to do and the expenses? 

Iflv. Flynn. No; I do not think it is, because it costs $4 a day to 
live at a $2.50 or $3 a day hotel. A man has a hard time getting by 
on $4 a day. When I travel I am only allowed $4 a day, and I some- 
times pay that amount for a room and pay the rest out of my own 
pocket. 

Mr. Mondell. Under the law you could allow yourself $5? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. On vouchers? 

Mr. Flynn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. But you prefer the other way ? 

Mr. Flynn. The men in the service prefer it that way. 

Mr. Mondell. You prefer to go on the same basis that the men do. 
at $4 a day? 

Mr. Flynn. Since the maximum is $5 a day I prefer it that way; 
yes, sir. 

Thursday, December 31, 1914. 

CUSTOMS SERVICE. 

STATEMENTS 07 HON. ANDREW J. PETERS, ASSISTANT SECRE- 
TARY 07 THE TREASURY, AND MR. 7. M. HAISTEAD, CHIE7 OF 
THE DIVISION 07 CUSTOMS. 

EXPENSES OF COLLECTION. 
[Sec p. 262.] 

The Chairman. For collecting the revenue from customs the cur- 
rent appropriation is $10,150,000, and your estimate for 1916 is 
$10,150,000. Why do you need so much each year, with the imports 
falling off so greatly f 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 259 

Mr. Peters. Well, the principal expenses keep right on independ- 
ently of imports. We are obliged to maintain the customhouses with 
practically the same force that we have now. 

The Chairman. Is the customs force a permanent force. 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir; it is a permanent force. Very few of the 
expenses depend on fluctuations of imports. Only the cartage and 
some of the smaller expenses are affected by the present falling off. 

The Chairman. How much was expended in 1914? 

Mr. Peters. There was expended in 1914 $10,446,000. 

The Chairman. That was within $4,000 of the appropriation? 

Mr. Halstead. We had a deficiency of $300,000. 

The Chairman. The other day I saw a statement in the annual 
report of a collector of customs in which he pointed out the fact that 
he had saved $93,000 by the efficient methods that he had installed ; 
do you take that off from this appropriation? 

Mr. Peters. The appropriation that we are asking for this year is 
$300,000 less than the expenses of last year. 

DECREASE IN REVENUES. 

The Chairman. The customs revenues have fallen off? 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir; very considerably. 

The Chairman. How much? 

Mr. Peters. For the last six months, or since the last of June, 
as compared with the same six-months period of a year ago, they 
have fallen t>ff about $47,000,000. 

The Chairman. Is there any estimate of what the customs rev- 
enues will be for this fiscal year? 

Mr. Peters. We estimate $220,000,000. 

The Chairman. Do you estimate that they will be that or would 
be that? 

Mr. Peters. That they will be that under present conditions — that 
is, having in view the international conditions existing to-day ; but, 
of course, that must necessarily be more or less of a rough estimate, 
because it is impossible to tell what complications may come in 
which would further affect it. 

The Chairman. Have nondurable imports fallen off in proportion 
with dutiable imports? 

Mr. Peters, i es; about the same; and ; of course, Mr. Chairman, 
the figures which I gave you compare with last year, three months 
of which period was under the Payne law. 

The Chairman. So that it is very difficult to make a comparison? 

Mr. Peters. We estimated a difference of about $60,000,000 a year 
between the Payne law and the Underwood law, and that would be 
*.">.000,000 a month. That would account for, roughly, $15,000,000, 
which would bring t*he falling off due to the war up to about 
§35,000,000. 

The Chairman. I thought you stated that this was for six months? 

Mr. Peters. I did; but that is for the three-months period. How- 
ever, the Underwood bill was running much better as a producer of 
revenue than our estimates indicated. Tt was running over the esti- 
mate right along. 

The Chairman. Have you a statement showing what that was? 

Mr. Peters. Yes; I have prepared a statement showing that. 



2Q0 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1W.6. 



The Chairman. Bead it and let it go in the record. 
(The statement referred to is as follows :) 

Duty collected monthly for the fiscal year 1914, compared with the correspond- 
ing months of 1918. 



1912. 



1913. 



Deficit. 



Increase. 



July 

August 

Septembsr. 
Octob r. . . . 
November. 
December. . 



January.. 
February . 
MarchT. 
An 



Ap-fl.. 
Kay.. 



*ay. 
June. 



July 

August 

Bept mb.r. 

October 

No ember. 
December. . 



$28,138,502 
30,205,232 
27,475,128 
30,210,824 
25,666,353 
24,248,161 

1913. 
29,334,124 
27,605,116 
27,457,489 
23,693,967 
20,434,749 
23,668,599 

1914. 
27,806,654 
30,934,952 
26,794,494 
30,138,049 
21,173,628 
21,510,140 



327,806,656 
30,934,952 
26,794,494 
30,138,049 
21,173,628 
21,510,140 

1914. 
23,528,080 
17,609,604 
25,927,213 
22,232,767 
20,800,573 
23,553,448 

1915. 
22,988,465 
19,431,363 
17,225,887 
16,271,829 
16,924,408 
14,890,982 



$329,847 



680,634 

78,775 

4,492,725 

2,738,021 



5,806,044 
9,995,512 
1,530,276 
1,461,200 



$729,720 



115,151 



4,818,189 
11,503,589 

9,568,607 
13,866,220 

4,249,220 

6,619,158 



365,824 



Mr. Peters. We had estimated that the revenues from customs 
under the Underwood bill would run about $5,000,000 per month 
behind those of the Payne Act, but, as a matter of fact, tor the last 
four months of the last fiscal year they ran at most only from a mil- 
lion to a million and a half dollars behind — that is. the revenues 
under the Underwood law ran three or four million dollars per 
month greater than we had estimated it would run. 4 

The Chairman. When you refer to years in that statement you 
mean fiscal years J 

Mr. Peters. Yes; and I refer to this current fiscal year as 1915. 

I also submit a table showing the value of imports and duty col- 
lected monthly for the fiscal year 1914 compared with the corre- 
sponding months of 1913. 

(The table referred to is as follows:) 

Value of imports and duty collected monthly for the fiscal year 1914 compared 
' with the corresponding months of 1913. 





1913 


1914 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


1912. 
Jury: 


177,130,205 
71,636,633 

84,068,025 
70,688,745 

76,523,920 
68,295,573 

102,711,717 
75,276,269 

89,688,024 
63,406,874 

90,051,367 
64,044,077 


$28,136,602 


371,806,166 
67,478,416 

69,069,960 
67,727,770 

91,940,627 
79,063,216 

81,551,001 
51,327,805 

91,477,872 
56,738,664 

118,087,218 
66,500,363 


1127,806,655 


Dutiable 


August: 

Free 


"*36," 205," 232* 




Dutiable 


"" »,"«4,9ii 


September: 

Free 


Dutiable 


27,475,128 
""30,216,* 824" 


26,794,4M 


October: 

Free 


Dutiable 


'*"*30*i38,6"A 


November: 

J-'ree 


Dutiable 

December: 

Free 


25,666,353 


"*"2i f "m,M8 


Dutiable 


24.248*161 


"'"ii.MO.uo 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



'861 



Value of imports and duly collected monthly for the fiscal year 1914 compared 
with the corresponding months of 1918 — Continued. 





1913 


1914 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


1913. 
January: 

Free 


$90,418,716 
72,649,720 

80,101,323 
69,812,595 

84,216,033. 
71,229,465 

76,826,345 
69,368,116 

69,008,928 
64,716,785 

66,786,567 
64,459,320 




$94,190,460 
60,227,787 

92,400,668 
55,572,808 

111,853,628 
70,909,326 

107,913,514 
65,982,962 

103,076,377 
61,133,138 

93,446,162 
64,083,388 




Dutiable 


$29,334,124 
*"*27,605Jli6" 


$23,528,080 


February: 

Free. 


Dutiable 


17,609,604 


Jtarch; 

Free 


Dutiable , 


' 27,457,489 
"*'23,*69S,"967* 
*" 20," 434,749* 

"*23l,"553"448" 


25,'627,2U 


April: 

Free. 


Dutiable 


"*23 # 2i2*767 


Free 


Dutiable 


20,800,573 


Jane: 

Free 


Dutiable 


23,6j6R,599 


Total free 


987,524,162 
825,484,072 




1,127,703,432 
768,733,722 




Total dutiable 














1,813,008,234 


318,027,194 


1,894,437,154 


292,124,764 



Mr. Mondell. Mr. Secretary, reference has been made to the fall- 
ing off in imports. Of course, that is only a figure of speech, and, 
as a matter of fact, there has been no falling off in imports, but, 
rather, there has been an increase in imports; is not that true? 

Mr. Peters. The imports were increased in October of this year, 
but the imports for the last few months are less. 

Mr. Mondell. I have a table here of imports for the 13 months 
beginning with October, 1913, down to and including October, 1914. 

(The table referred to is as follows:) 

Comparative statement of imports and duty collected during the 13 month* 
from October, 1913, to October, 1914, inclusive, and during the preceding 13 
months, September, 1912, to September, 1913, inclusive, 

(Compiled from tables of imports of merchandise by months, Monthly Summary of Finance and Commerce, 

Department of Commerce.) 





Imports. 


Fevenue. 




Imports. 


Revenue. 


1913. 
October 


$132,878,896 
148.216.536 
184.587,571 

154,418,247 
147,973,376 
182,762,954 
173,696,476 
164.209,515 
157,529,450 
159,677,291 
129,767,890 
140,089,611 
138,080,520 


$30,138,049 
21,173,628 


1912. 
September 


$144,819,493 
177,987.986 
153, 094, 8£ 8 
154.095.444 

163,063.438 
149,913.918 
155,445,498 
146,194,461 
133.723,713 
131,245,877 
139,061,770 
137,651.553 
171,084.843 


$27,475,127 




October 


30.216,824 


December. 


21,610.140 


November 


25.666,363 




December 


24.248,161 


1914. 
Januarv 


23,528,080 
17,609,604 1 
25,927.213 
22,232,766 \ 
20,800,573 j 
23,533.448 ! 
22,988,465 
19,431,363 
17,225.887 
16,271.829 


1913. 
January 


PfbruaW 


29,334,124 


jorchT:.. ::::::.. 


February 


27,605,116 
27,457,489 


April 


March 


ifiy...;;...:; 


.April 


23,693,967 


J«me. 


'May....: 


20,434,749 
23,698.599 


July 


June 


AugDJt.^ 


July , 


27,806,616 




August 


30,934,962 


October 


September 


26,794,494 




Total 




Total 


2,014,088.333 
1,957,382,892 


282,571,045 


1.957,382,892 


345,276,610 


1912-13 , 


1913-14 


282,571,046 






Decrease in revenue, 
1913-44 






Emms imports, 
im-U... 


56,705,441 






62,705,566 













Non.— Imports for September, 1913, include approximately $13,665,000 entered during the first 3 days 
of October under the tariff law of 1909. 



262 SUNDEY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 

Mr. Mondell. This table shows a total importation of $2,014,088,- 
333 for the period beginning with October, 1913, and ending with 
October. 1914. 

Mr. Meters. They were very considerably increased all through 
last winter and spring. 

Mr. Mondell. That is for 13 months. Then, taking the 13 months 
immediately preceding— that is, from September, 1912, to and in- 
cluding September, 1913 — the total of importations was $1,957,382,- 
892. The imports for the 13 months' period of 1912-13. under 
the Payne Act, were less than the iniports for the 13 months' period 
of 1913-14, under the Underwood Act, by $56,705,441, but in the 
same period there was a reduction in revenues of $62,705,565. So 
that you have had an increase of imports, but a decrease of revenues! 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir. We have free wool and a change in the 
rates on sugar. Both of those things make a considerable difference. 

Mr. Mondell. Have you the complete figures for the month of 
November showing the imports and revenues? 

Mr. Peters. Yes; they are. 

(The statement is as follows : ) 



November. 
1013. 



November. 
1914. 



Value ol imports. 
Duties 



1153,094,808 
21,173,627 



SI*, 4*7,081 
16,931,407 



EXPENSES OF COLLECTION. 

[See p. 258.] 

The Chairman. Regardless of what the imports and revenues are, 
is it necessary to maintain the existing customs organization? 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir. For instance, the imports come intermit- 
tently, and at times we need as large a force to handle the incoming 
vessels at New York and other large ports as we ever did. There is 
also a tendency toward the resumption of normal conditions in 
trade, which is indicated by the increase in the revenues, and, of 
course, we must be prepared to meet normal conditions when tney 
arise. 

The Chairman. Because of the war, was your customs force en- 
gaged on work that ordinarily is not necessary to have done? 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir. We have the enforcement of the neutrality 
laws, and it has been necessary to detail quite a large number of 
men in New York and a considerable number in Boston, also, on 
work particularly connected with the inspection of various steam- 
ships there to be sure that they do nothing in the way of loading, 
etc., which would amount to a breach of the neutrality laws. 

The Chairman. So that any falling off in the work because of 
the slackening of imports is made up by reason of those unusual 
duties? 

Mr. Peters. To a very considerable extent. 

Mr. Mondell. There has been a larger volume of imports in the 
last year than in the year previous, but there has been a smaller 
amount of revenue collected. Now, to what extent is your force 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 263 

relieved by reason of the reduction of thfe amount of duty that you 
collect? In other words, to what extent is your force relieved by 
reason of the reduction of the amount collected, and to what extent 
is that made up by other work connected with imports that do not 
bring any revenues? 

Mr. Patters. They are not greatly affected by that. Of course, 
wool, which is a very large staple that has gone on the free list, 
does not require as much attention as before, but there is still a duty 
on sugar which makes it necessary to weigh and test all of the sugar. 

Mr. Mondell. So that you have as much work in connection with 
sugar importations as you would have if you obtained a larger 
revenue from them? 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. In the matter of wool and other articles of that 
sort, vour duties in connection with their importation are consider- 
ably lessened? 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Halstead. 1 would say that while wool does not have to 
be weighed, because it is on the free list, still it has to be examined, 
because Angora goat hair, which resembles it, is dutiable. In other 
words, examinations must be made in order to be sure that it is 
wool that is being imported. 

Mr. Mondell. In the case of other articles where there is a small 
reduction, as in the case of sugar, the increased importations make 
for you additional work, while the revenue collected is less? 

ftfr. Halstead. Yes, sir. 

DETECTION OF FRAUDS— SPECIAL AGENTS. 

The Chairman. You are asking permission to expend again $200,- 
000 of this appropriation for the detection and prevention of frauds 
npon the customs revenue. This is for the special agents' force, is it 
not? 

Mr. Peters. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Halstead. That is for the fraud roll of the special agents 9 
force. 

The Chairman. Do you expend the entire $200,000 every year? 

Mr. Peters. No, sir. 

The Chairman. I thought we would save this $200,000. 

Mr. Peters. We saved $300,000— we have saved $§00,000. 

Mr. MoKdell. I understood from the hearings last year that this 
was really only a matter of bookkeeping. 

Mr. Halstead. It is. 

Mr. Mondell. And that, as a matter ^of fact, you were put to a con- 
siderable amount of trouble in separating the service oi a man who 
m a general way was preventing fraud when you assigned him espe- 
cially and particularly and peculiarly to the work of preventing 
fraud? 

Mr. Halstead. It would be impossible to say how much of that ap- 
propriation is used for the detection and prevention of fraud. 

Mr. Mondell. What is the advantage of having that segregated ? 

Mr. Halstead. I do not see any. 

Mr. Mondell. How about that, Mr i; -Secretory? 

Mr. Peters. I do not see any. 



*j$4 SUNDBY, r CIJTIL APPROPRIATION .BILL,, W6. 

Mr. Mondell. Jt wa&.mside pretty clear to me in the headings last 

year that there was^really no good reason for this. If you wanted 

v Iq put your whole force at one time on work that might be called the 

prevention of fraud, you would do it without any regard to this limi- 

' tation. On the other hand, under a strict construction, if every time 

a man went on special work you were to segregate him from his ordi- 

* nary work in the matter of payment, you would probably exceed your 

.$200,000. 

. Mr. Halstead. It has always been considered that this was the limit 
,pf the expense of the, fraud roll of the special agents 9 service. 

,.Mr. Mondell. But there isi no such thing as a clear and definite 
line between the fraud-prevention service and the ordinary service 
of the department. 

Mr. Halstead. More than half of the entire appropriation, and I 
should say 90 per cent of it, is used for the detection and prevention 
of fraud. 

Mr. MondhLl. How much in the fiscal year 1914 -did .you actually 
, charge to this item on your books? 

Mr. Halstead. We charged it with the fraud roll of the special 
.agents' service. 

Mr. Mondell. How jnuchdid it amount to? 

Mr. Halstead. To about $160,000, in. round numbers. It was ex- 
lW tiy $161,935. 

Mr. Mondell. That fraud roll, as I understand it, does not consist 
of men who are permanently kept on that roll ? 

Mr. Halstead. Yes, sir; they are permanent employees, known as 
customs agents. 

salaries. 

The Chairman. How is it that your salary roll is to be larger in 
1916 than in 1914. with all of those eliminations and reductions? 

Mr.TETERS. We estimate $10,250,000 

The Chairman (interposing). 1914 was the. high- water year? 

Mr. Halstead. I can not explain it. 

The Chairman. After all the eliminations and changes, you now 
estimate that in 1916 your total salaries will amount to $9,539,273.50, 
and you actually expended in 1914, $9,517,626.45. 

Mr. Peters. That comes f ropT regrading the inspectors along, the 
Canadian border. I can > take you down through afl of this estimate 
and show you where each change comes in. 

The Chairman. 1014 was the high-water year in the matter of ex- 
penditures, or should be as compared with 1916, because you spent 
in 1914, $10,446,000. 

Mr. Peters. Yes ; $5G0-,G00,less than the previous year. 

The Chairman. You are reducing your expenditures by $8OO;O00l 

•Mr. Peters. If you will turn tp the estimate, I think I can show 
.you where each change is jnade. For instance, we have done away 
with many of the $1,000 grade of clerks. 

The Chairman. What did you put in their places? 

Mr. Peters. Increased jtyie number in the $1^00 grade. 

The Chairman. If you are going to spend $806,000*less Q^xt year 
than in 1914 you can not do that by increasing. 

Mr. Halstead. Yes;. you can. 



OTHTORY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 265 

The Chairman. How? 

Mr. Halstead. Four men at $1,200 ($4,800) to do the work of five 
men at $1,000 ($5,000), a net saving of $200. 
The Chairman. Have you worked it put in that way? 
Mr. Halstead. It is worked out in that way in a good many places. 
The Chairman. Then your total will be less instead of greater? 
Mr. Halstead. Yes. ' 

CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Mr. Mondell. I notice in your estimate, on page 83, you have re- 
duced the item of contingent expenses for 1916 below the actual ex- 
penditures for 1914. $90,000. Along what lines do you expect to 
make that saving ? 

Mr. Halstead. Our rents are given separately and they are $10,000 
less. That reduction is largely in the cartage of merchandise and in 
the employment of temporary laborers in tne weighing of merchan- 
dise, because of more efficient methods employed. 

Mr. Mondell. You expect less expenditures for rent? 

Mr. Halstead. Yes; $10,000. 

Mr. Mondell. Is there some specific item of rent that is going to 
be reduced? 

Mr. Halstead. There is one, for instance, we are paying now $5,500 
a year for the rent of wharfage space for revenue cutters devoted 
exclusively to customs purposes. It has been questioned by the ac- 
counting officers, so they have carried that into their appropriation, 
and, of course, that accounts for $5,500; and then the other items 
are cases in which we found we were renting wlure there was no 
necessity. 

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 

Mr. Mondjell. Under the item of miscellaneous expenses, special 
agents, and fraud roll you have a reduction of $10,000. 
Mr. Halstead. That is due to traveling expenses, and that sort of 



thing. 



fr. Mondell. You anticipate, then, a saving of $115,000 in these 
miscellaneous items? 

Mr. Peters. About that; yes. 

Mr. Mondell. The balance of your reduction over 1914 is in your 
salary roll? 

Mr. Peters. Yes; we will cut down the number of employees. 

Mr. Mondell. How are your expenditures for 1916 going to com- 
pare with your expenditures for 1915? 

Mr. Peters. I can only give you the first half, and of course De- 
cember has to be estimated. The total advances for the first half of 
the fiscal year 1914 are $5,018,717.19, and that. shows a saving, com- 
pared with the six months' period of the previous year, of $298,930.60. 

Mr. iMondbll. Then you anticipate getting through this year on 
jour appropriation without a deficiency ? 

Mr. Peters. Yes. 

vbhicles. 

The Chairman. Have you any motor-propelled or horse-drawn 
vehicles paid for out of this appropriation? 



266 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Peters. None that I know of. 

Mr. Halstead. Do we own any? 

The Chairman. Do you pay for any! 

Mr. Halstead. No, sir; we do not pay for any. 

The Chairman. Do you intend to pay for any? 

Mr. Peters. It is not intended to purchase any motor vehicle. 

Mr. Mondell. You do not rent any? 

- Mr. Halstead. When one is traveling under certain conditions he 
can take a taxicab from the station to the hotel, and of course be 
rents it for the time being. 

The Chairman. That is not what I mean; that is a traveling 
expense. 

Mr. Halstead. Yes. We have nothing that comes under the pro- 
visions of the recent act. 

Mr. Peters. We have just had estimates for cartage in New York 
submitted, and I notice that the lowest estimate contemplates the 
doing of that cartage by motor vehicles, and an examination is being 
made of the bids now. 

The Chairman. That is contracts? 

Mr. Peters. Yes ; that is contracts. 

The Chairman. The statute contemplates only passenger-carry- 
ing vehicles? 

Mr. Peters. Yes. 

The Chairman. Have you fixed any sum for subsistence in lieu of 
actual expenses under that act? 

Mr. Halstead. I do not think so. 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION. 

The Chairman. You are asking that the unexpended balance of 
the appropriation made by the sundry civil act for the fiscal year 
1915 for the necessary expenses and salaries of the Customs Service 
at the Panama -Pacific International Exposition be continued and 
made available for the fiscal year 1916. 

The $200,000 was appropriated on the theory that it would cover 
the entire cost, and this is to continue the appropriation to the next 
fiscal year, when the exposition will end ? 

Mr. Peters. Yes. 

Mr. Halstead. It will cover the entire cost. 

Mr. Mondell. Have you the plan pretty well worked out now ? 

Mr. Halstead. Yes. 

Mr. Mondell. You were not very clear last year what you could 
do, or should do. 

Mr. Halstead. Our plans are finished, and it will cost about $165,- 
000 for the exposition. 

Mr. Mondell. You think you will be able to carry it through for 
that amount? 

Mr. Halstead. I think so. It is pretty hard to tell exactly, be- 
cause the exposition has not opened, although we are operating 
there, because the imports are arriving. 

Mr. Mondell. You are far enough along to have a pretty clear 
idea of what you will have to do? 

Mr. Peters. We have our plans all completed and know the num- 
ber of men we expect to use. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 267 

Mr. Halstead. They estimated $500,000, and we cut it to $250,000, 
and you cut us to $200,000, and then we saw we would have to get 
busy and see what we could do, and this is the result. 

Mr. Mondell. That is $50,000 which the chairman saved against 
my protest, because it seemed to me after the hearing that you had 
cut their estimate down pretty well. Clearly their original estimate 
was out of all reason. 

Mr. Halstead. It was. 

Mr. Mondell. Your reductions seemed to me to be getting down to 
somewhere near what would be necessary, and then the chairman in- 
sisted on cutting that $50,000, and now you are going to save about 
$40,000 more. 

Mr. Halstead. Of course, we would not have spent all the money 
if you had appropriated it. 

Mr. Mondell. If we had appropriated $500,000 to begin with y<*u 
would have spent more than you will now spend. 

Mr. Halstead. Maybe so. When people have $500,000 which they 
can spend it is harder to keep the expenditures down than when they 
have only $200,000. 

8CALES. 

The Chairman. You are asking for the unexpended balance of the 
appropriation for scales for the Customs Service, and also for $50,000 
additional. I thought you did not want any more scales now.' 

Mr. Peters. We are completing the automatic scales put in at 
Philadelphia, and also completing one in New York. 

The Chairman. How many have we altogether, and how much did 
they cost apiece? 

lir. Peters. We have 65 automatic scales. Their cost, completed 
and in operation, was $2,749 each. 

The Chairman. Are these scales of real value in the service, and is 
it worth while spending all this money on them? 

Mr. Peters. They are proving of real value, I should say, in 
handling sugar, Mr. Chairman. Of course, one great problem has 
been how long they are going to stand up under the work. 

The Chairman. They will not have to stand up much longer if 
you are only going to use them on sugar. 

Mr. Peters. No; but they can be used under certain conditions on 
work other than sugar. Of course, you have to have merchandise 
coming in in large quantities, the same class of merchandise con- 
signed to the same consignee all in one load, to make the automatic 
scales available. 

The Chairman. That is why I ask whether it is the part of wis- 
dom to go on with these scales. 

Mr. Peters. I believe it will be sufficient to have the unexpended 
balance of the appropriation for last year made available. There 
is a balance forward from 1914 of $8,500, and the amount appro- 
priated for 1915 was $50,000. There has been expended from July 
1 to date $1,301, and I believe the balances from previous appropria- 
tions will be sufficient for next year. 

Mr. Mondell. What is the character of those scales? Why can 
you not use them for ordinary weighing? 

Mr. Peters. You see, Mr. Mondell, jbhey have to register one par- 
ticular weight and you have to have all the same quantity of article 
in one load, because it is not of any advantage if you are importing 



<U68 StTNDEY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

*'a lot of various krticlesbn which the duties may be varying amounts, 

'and 'it afco'mtfst be all to the Same consignee. For instance, if you 

have sugar all in one load but going to different consignees it is of 

no advantage to have the total weight, because you would have to 

separate it and find out how much the duty would be on each par- 

' tieular consignment. 

Mr. Mondell. Do I understand that these automatic scales are 
very large scales? 

Mr. Halstead. Yes; all we have now are large platform scales 
' that register automatically the amount of weight by electricity. 

Mr. Mondell. They would register a small load as well as a large 
one? 

'Mr. Peters. Yes; but, don't you see, you have to get the whole 
load. You have to get two things. You can only register one load, 
' of course, and it must be all of the same article, and it must be all to 
the^ same consignee. If you want to cart over the scales article by 
article a mixed consignment you could do it; but, you see, they do 
not want to load up a team and take it off the wharf with only one 
article in it if that article amounts to less than a full load. 

The Chairman. These scales were for use where you had a cargo 
• practically of one character of merchandise consigned to one con- 
< cern and you were trucking it out and automatically registering the 
weight? 
Mr.' Peters. Yes. 

Mr. Halstead. The average steamer carries merchandise to. 800 
or 1,000 different people. Now, you can not weigh the merchandise 
for two people together for customs purposes, .neither can you 
'weigh* merchandise together Which is subject to different rates eVen 
when consigned to the same person. Now, there are some ware- 
. houses where the merchandise comes in all under the same tariff 
classification, in large quantities consigned to the same consignee. 
In such cases the automatic 1 scales can be used. Just how far they 
can be used has not yet been determined. 

The Chairman. These automatic self-registering scales are only 
•available where you have large and* continuous consignments going 
to one consignee of the same class of goods? 

COMPENSATION IN LIEU OF MOIETIES. 

Mr. Peters. Yes; so it can weigh the full load to one consignee. 

The CnAiRMAN. The next item is compensation in lieu of moieties. 
$50,000. 

Mr. Peters. Mr. Chairman, the amount requisitioned against that 
up to December 3, 1914, is $6,924.91, and I suggest that the appro- 
ipriation be made available next year, the unexpended balance, which 
will amount to $43,075.09. 

The Chairman. We do not like to do that as a rule. It is dif- 
ferent in the case of the scales, because that was not an appropria- 
tion for an annual service, but for a specific job. How much was 
spent last year for these compensations? 

Mr. Peters. $27,763.74 was expended in 1914. 

The Chairman. Of course, the amount is always uncertain. Why 
would it not do to simply appropriate $25,000? 

Mr. Peters. Then, if we nad some .particular case come up % it 
would be a quite proper item to ^present for consideration in a de- 
ficiency bill, would it not? 



SUNDRY CIVII. APPROPRIA^ON BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. Yes ; in 1912 we had the sugar cases. 

Mr. Peters. You see, Mr. Chairman, it is always possible that we 
may have some very considerable demand unexpectedly maderUpoii 
this item. 



Thursday, December 31, 1914. 

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. 

STATEMENTS OF DR. RUPERT BLUE, STOGEON GENERAL PUBLIC 
HEALTH SERVICE; DR. A. H. GLENNAN, DR. W. G. STIMPSON, 
DR. L. E. COPER, DR. J. W. KERR, AND DR. W. C, RUCKER. 
ASSISTANT SURGEONS GENERAL. 

PAT, ALLOWANCES, ETC., COMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND PHARMACISTS. 

The Chairman. " For pay, allowance, and commutation of quar- 
ters for commissioned medical officers and pharmacists, the appro- 
priation is $679,858, and the estimate is $746,856. 

Dr. Blue. The increase is $66,998. 

The Chairman. How do you figure that ? 

Dr. Blue. This increase is composed as, follows : Automatic in- 
crease on account of promotions, longevity, and commutation under 
the laws and regulations of the service, $12,238 ; return of one passed 
assistant surgeon from the Philippines, $2,640 ; two additional phar- 
macists not estimated for in the fiscal year 1915, which vacancies 
were unfilled, $2,120; for additional assistant surgeons, $50,000. 

The Chairman. How many additional assistant surgeons would 
that provide ? 

Dr. Blue. We asked last year for $100,000 for additional assistant 
surgeons and you only granted half the amount. Nineteen assistant 
surgeons were commissioned during the fiscal year, 

The Chairman. You asked for $50,000 for additional surgeons last 
year. 

Dr. Blue. One year ago we asked for $10.0,000 and you granted 
just half the amount. 

The Chairman. But for this year you asked for $50,000 for addi- 
tional assistant surgeons. 

Dr. Blue. I have here a statement that will explain all the addi- 
tional appropriations we have received. 

In 1914 the estimates for pay of commissioned officers, etc., were 
&>99.320, and a separate item for additional assistant surgeons was 
submitted amounting to $50,000, making a total estimate of $649,320. 
Congress reduced the estimate of $599,320 to $547,640 and allowed 
the item for additional assistant surgeons — $50,000 — making a total 
appropriation of $597,640. In 1915 the estimate for pay of com- 
missioned officers was $729,858. This included $100,000 for addi- 
tional commissioned officer?. Congress appropriated $679,858. This 
appropriation being only $50,000 less than the estimate, therefore 
allowed $50,000 for additional commissioned officers. For 1916 the 
<>timate for pay of commissioned officers is $746,856. Of this amount 
there is included for additional commissioned officers, $50,000. 

The Chairman. Doctor, a certain portion of this increase is what 
*e might term mandatory or inevitable because of law: that is, the 



270 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

increase in compensation by reason of longevity and the like. Let 
us see if we can not segregate it; How much of it is due to auto 
matic increases? 

Dr. Blue. $12,238, and one other item of $2,120 for two addi- 
tional pharmacists. 

The Chairman. They are two pharmacists who have been author- 
ized, but 

Dr. Blue (interposing). Yes, sir; but whose places are unfilled. 

The Chairman. You also have the return of one doctor? 

Dr. Blue. That is automatic also — $2,640, making a total of 
$16,998. 

The Chairman. And the balance — $50,000 — is for additional as- 
sistant surgeons which you request? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many additional assistant surgeons would 
that mean? 

Dr. Blue. That would mean, if we paid their commutation, 19. 

The Chairman. How many have you all told? You had 42 in 
1914. How mjany have you now ? 

Dr. Blue. At the close of the fiscal year, June 30, 1914, the com- 
missioned Medical Corps consisted of the Surgeon General, 10 senior 
surgeons, 66 surgeons, 43 passed assistant surgeons, and 47 assistant 
surgeons; total, 167. 

Tne Chairman. You are asking us to increase that number? 

Dr. Blue. Twenty-two more. 

The Chairman, i ou are asking for 202 for 1916, which would be 
an increase of 35. 

Dr. Blue. We have 184 up to date, and the 22 would make a total 
of 206. 

The Chairman. Why do you ask for 19 additional assistant sur- 
geons? 

Dr. Blue. The work of the service is increasing very rapidly, and 
I would like to give you the places where these officers are needed. 

The Chairman. We haw given you a lot of money to take care 
of that increase in work.- 

Dr. Blue. On public health work we need 10 additional assistant 
surgeons; interstate sanitation, 3; marine hospitals, 4; quarantine 
stations, 4. There is a doctor urgently needed at Portland, Staple- 
ton, New York, Baltimore, and Norfolk, and at the quarantine sta- 
tions. Two are needed in the Canal Zone, 1 at New Orleans, and 1 
at Cape Charles. Again, sir, I would like to state that the act of 
June 24, 1914, authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to detail 
for dutv on revenue cutters such surgeons and other persons of the 
Public health Service as he may deem necessary, and up to this 
time we have detailed 6 officers to revenue cutters. 

The Chairman. What do they do? 

Dr. Blue. They look out for the sanitation of the revenue cutters 
and health of their crews. The cutters are now making longer 
cruises, remaining out from port longer, in view of the conditions in 
Europe, and there is a cutter especially on duty for the fisheries. 
The Androscoggin has been recently sent to the Grand Banks and 
she will have to have a surgeon detailed on her permanently. 

Mr. Mondell. How many men does she carry, officers and crew ? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPBIATION BILL, 1916. 271 

Dr. Stimfson. The number of the crew is 72. She § is to furnish 
relief to fishermen on the Grand Banks. That is by a special author- 
ization of Congress, the act of June 24, 1914, and this vessel has 
been fitted out by the Revenue Cutter Service and our service to 
furnish relief to fishermen on those banks. This has been done 
for a number of years by a French vessel partly, but for a long time 
the fishermen have been asking the Government to furnish them 
relief, and this vessel goes out and stays a month and then comes in 
and puts the sick ashore and then goes out again. She is completely 
equipped, has a hospital and operating room and dispensary and 
everything for that purpqse. 

Mr. Mo n dell. They care for the men on the fishing fleet? 

Dr. Stimpson. They care for the men on any American vessel, but 
especially for the men on the fishing fleet. They have an itinerary, 
so that they know that the Androscoggin will be at a certain point 
at a certain time, and the fishing fleet can bring any sick or injured 
people to that place at that time. 

The Chairman. You mentioned the places you wanted these. 
additional surgeons. What are those places? 

Dr. Blue. On thepublic health work, 10. 

The Chairman. What do vou mean by " public health work"? 

Dr. Blue. Work in the field in connection with public health 
matters — investigation of public health matters. I will ask Dr. 
Kerr to say a word on that. 

The Chairman. We give you special appropriations for that work, 
<Io we not? 

Dr. Kerk. That expression is used just to contrast this portion of 
the service with the quarantine service and the Marine Hospital 
Service. It includes the work in connection with the enforcement 
of the interstate quarantine laws and regulations, and investigations 
of disease. The money appropriated for the field investigations of 
the diseases of man is spent, some of it for salaries, but it does not 
include to any extent the pay of medical officers. As explained to 
the committee, it was always the intent to depend on the regular 
medical officers wherever possible, and the employment of medical 
officers out of that general fund was in the nature of temporary em- 
ployment Of course at the time the request was made for that 
'"mount it was contemplated to pay the salaries of sanitary engineers, 
°f uhom we had none, sanitary chemists, sanitary bacteriologists, 
and that character of workers. The ten persons that we have had 
in mind in making this request are needed in the following lines of 
work at the present time: Two on pellagra, two on malaria and 
rural sanitation studies combined; two on industrial hygiene; two 
«»n the trachoma work; one on State organization investigations; 
and one on the pollution of coastal waters. Last year an estimate 
w as presented for 14 officers for public health work, and of the 
number that have been appointed this year out of the money that 
*as allowed last year, 4 have been assigned to public health work, 
leaving 10 who have not been provided for. 

The Chairman. Now, for instance, in the investigation of indus- 
trial hygiene the Department of Labor has taken uj) that work and 
is going into it extensively. There are several services duplicating 
that work. 



2T2* SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910. 

Dr* Kerr. Sp far as I know, the Department of Labor is not en- 
gaged in the purely studies of industrial hygiene and vocational 
disease, but we have been engaged in that work for some time and in 
the last year have enlarged those studies and we feel that that work 
is; purely a sanitary work that is connected with general sanitary 
work and should be performed by the Public Health Service. 

The Chairman. We argued that in the House, but the House re- 
fused to take it away from the Department of Labor. 

Dr. Kerr. That was a bill providing for a bureau of labor safety. 
It was amended in the House and it is now in committee, as I under- 
stand, of the Senate, and representations .have been made by the 
chairman of the Public Health and National Quarantine Committee 
of the Senate that he proposes to add amendments which were not 
added in the House. 

The Chairman. This work ought to be confined to one place or the 
other. 

Dr. Kerr. Yes, sir. That bill has not been passed, and the bill 
contemplated not only labor safety, but industrial hygiene studies. 
The two are not necessarily associated. The one is largely mechan- 
ical and the other at once goes into the broad subject of general sani- 
tation. We now have several men in the field making studies of this 
particular subject of the hygiene of industries and we must take into 
account the influence of environment outside of the shop and to get 
that information and in order to accomplish our end we must work 
with the State and local authorities with whom we are cordially iden- 
tified not only by law but by actual understanding. It seems to me 
that it is very important that the public-health work should not be 
further dissipated or divided among departments. 

The Chairman. I agree with you, and I think it all ought to be 
in one place. 

Dr. Kerr. We have already the organization to carry on this work 
and practically the only thing we need is additional field officers. 
We have the bureau organization. 

The Chairman. How many additional officers altogether do yon 
think you need? You say you want these 19 additional officers 
authorized now? 

Dr. Blue. The work is developing very rapidly. We could U9e 
many more than we are asking for. 

The Chairman. I know that. Every department of the Govern- 
ment could use twice as much money as we give them. 

Dr. Bluk. We simply did not want to ask for all we needed at 
this time. 

The Chairman. You have taken six men off of work they had been 
doing and have put them on revenue cutters. Outside of the An- 
droscoggin, the revenue cutters do not make very long trips. 

Dr. Blue. There are five or six cutters that go to Alaska every year, 
a cruise of about six months. I would like to mention the sad occur- 
rence of the loss of Asst. Surg, Jenkins last summer while serving on 
one of these cutters. 

The Chairman. Outside of that Alaskan vessel and the Androscoo- 
ghu which you say is going to be assigned to the fishing fleet, these 
other vessels are not out of port any length of time? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 273 

Dr. Kerr. Those vessels leave the Pacific coast in April or May, 
and remain out the entire summer and until October and November. 
They are the last ships practically down from Alaska. 

The Chairman. How many of them are there? 

Dr. Kerr. There are at least five that go up every year. 

The Chairman. Five cutters? 

Dr. Kerr. Five cutters. One of them goes as far as Point Barrow 
in the Arctic Ocean. Each one of those vessels carries a medical 
officer, and the officer not only takes care of the health and sanitation 
of the crew, but they give relief to the Indians from port to pott, as 
they stop on the way up, and the men sometimes go ashore and 
actually establish an operating room and perform necessary major 
operations. 

The Chairman. When did they start to do that? 

Dr. Kerr. From time to time for the last two or three years they 
have been doing that. For the last 10 or 15 years whenever a cutter 
was making a special cruise an officer has been assigned to her, but 
it has become the regular practice within the last two or three years 
or a trifle longer. 

Dr. Stimpson. I was up there five years ago, and there was tan 
officer on each cutter at that time. 

The Chairman. Are we to understand that the only cutter you 
assign a surgeon to is the Androscoggin? 

Dr. Kerr. And one in Porto Rican waters and one in Honolulu. 
Whenever a cutter goes on a voyage around the world or to the 
Philippines an officer must be placed on board. The McCuUough^ 
which served as the supply or express ship for Admiral Dewey's 
fleet, carried an officer of the service. 

The Chairman. If you were doing that, you did not need the 
authority. 

Dr. Kerb. Those officers must be taken from other places. 

The Chairman. If you already had the authority, you did not 
need the authority contained in the act which you produced. 

Dr. Kerr. This act would probably appear to be mandatory that 
officers should go on certain of these cutters. 

The Chairman. No; it just says the Secretary of the Treasury is 
authorized to do it. There must have been some question which 
arose as to his authority. 

Dr. Blue. It has been hard to spare the officers to do this work. 

The Chairman. It would not be any easier if that language should 
be included. 

PAT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

The next item is " For pay of acting assistant surgeons (noncom- 
missioned medical officers), and your estimate is the same as the 
current appropriation, $200,000. Are these men taken over from the 
quarantine service. 

Dr. Glennan. They are the same men, all of them. 

The Chairman. They are retained? 

Dr. Glennan. Yes, sir ; carried along. 

The Chairman. The expenditures run about the same every year? 

72786—15 18 



274 SUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1SW. 

Dr. Blub. About the same: yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Who are tne men that you designate as acting 
assistant surgeons? 

Dr. Blue. The acting assistant surgeons supplement the work of 
the regular officers in the service. Tne majority of them are em- 
ployed to carry on the work at small stations and do not. devote their 
entire time to the work. Their compensation varies from $100 a 
year to $2,400 a year. They are paid in accordance with the im- 
portance and amount of work done. 

Mr. Mondell. You say they are paid how much? 

Dr. Blub. From $100 to $2,400 a year. 

Mr. Mondell. There seems to be one at $3,000? 

Dr. Blue. We have an expert employed at the leprosy investiga- 
tion station at Molokai, Honolulu, who receives $3,000. 

Mr. Mondell. Is he there permanently? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. If you secured additional surgeons, as you desire, 
would you take them from among the acting assistant surgeons? 

Dr. 6lue. We would take them from the acting assistant surgeons 
if they could comply with the laws and regulations governing en- 
trance into the corps. They must be between the ages of 23 and 32 
and must pass a successful examination before a board of commis- 
sioned medical officers. 

Mr. Mondell. Are the acting assistant surgeons paid under this 
item, some of them at least, men who are anticipating commissions 
and who are in the service with the expectation of later being com- 
missioned? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. I believe there may be a few young officers 
who anticipate taking the examination. 

Mr. Mondell. How do you employ these people? 

Dr. Blue. From the civil-service list. We ask for a list of eligibles 
whenever there is a vacancy. 

Mr. Mondell. A list of eligibles as acting assistant surgeons? 

Dr. Blub. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. It is altogether a different list than that from whidi 
you select your assistant surgeons? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. This list is not to any considerable extent a trainin| 
list? m i 

Dr. Blue. No, sir. I 

Mr. Mondell. It is not made up, to any considerable extent, oj 
men who are looking forward to appointment as assistant surgeons' 

Dr. Blue. It is not. 

i 

PAT OF ALL OTHEB EMPLOYEES. 

The Chairman. The next item, is, " For pay of all other employed 
(attendants, etc.)," and the appropriation is $502,606, and your est! 
mate is the same as the appropriation. Did you have any une^ 
ponded balance in 1914? 

Dr. Blue. We had a balance of $3,571.88. 

The Chairman. Are you going to use all the money you have th 
year? 



SUNDRY CJVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 275 

Dr. Blub. Yes, sir; we need every cent of it. 

The Chairman. Is this to pay for the organization outside of the 
commissioned and noncommissioned officers? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. This includes the pay of the professors of the 
Hygienic Laboratory, technical assistants, all attendants at marine 
hospitals, quarantine and immigration stations, the attendants at 
the Fort Stanton Sanatorium for consumptives, the leprosy station 
in Hawaii, and the pilots, engineers, and crews of quarantine vessels. 
The total number of employees paid out of this fund is 1,134. 

FREIGHT, TRANSPORTATION, AND TRAVELING EXPENSES. 

The Chairman. The next item is, "For freight, transportation, 
and traveling expenses," etc., and the appropriation is $30,000, and 
your estimate is $30,000? 

Dr. Blue. We had a balance of $113.39. This amount will be suf- 
ficient for the fiscal year. 

The Chairman. I notice from the detailed statement that the ex- 
penditures average about the Sfme in the various items each year 
under this head ? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir ; about the same. 

The Chairman. Have any of your officers attended meetings of 
associations for the promotion of public health ? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir ; we have had officers attend several meetings. 

The Chairman. Do you confine them to any particular charac- 
ter—National or State? 

Dr. Glennan. State and National. 

The Chairman. Those are the only kinds? 

Dr. Glennan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many did they attend? 

Dr. Glennan. I suppose maybe 12 or 14. This is a printed list 
which gives a detailed statement of all travel expenditures in House 
Document No. 1245, in the letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
dated December 7, 1914. 

Dr. Blue. Requests for details have increased, but the expendi- 
tures &ave not increased, for the reason that if possible we select 
the man stationed at the place where the meeting is held. 

The Chairman. That is, if a man is on duty at a certain place 
where there is a meeting, you detail him to attend the meeting? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. 

FUEL, LIGHT, AND WATER. 

The Chairman. The next item is, "For fuel, light, and water," 
and your appropriation is $75,000, and your estimate is $75,000? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir; the same amount appropriated for 1915. We 
Had an unexpended balance of $848.65. For several years the ap- 
propriation was $72,000. Then it was reduced to $70,000, but in 
1^14 a deficiency appropriation of $4,000 was allowed. Seventv-five 
thousand dollars will be sufficient for our needs unless extraordinary 
"•nditions as regards weather prevail. 

The Chairman. Do you buy your fuel on the British thermal unit? 

Dr. Stimpson. I think not. I do not believe it is bought on any 
particular unit. It is all bought under contract. 



276 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. Does the Bureau of Mines make any test? 

Dr. Stimpson. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Or prepare any specifications? 

Dr. Stimpson. No, sir. 

The Chairman. It is claimed that you can save a very considerable 
sum if you get in touch with the Bureau of Mines in these matters. 

Dr. Blue. We buy at so many different places that it would be 
quite expensive to have the tests made. 

Mr. Mondell. You have some officer who does the purchasing? 

Dr. Blue. Our contracts are made for supplies at each station. 

Mr. Mondell. You do not use any very great quantity of coal? 

Dr. Blue. No, sir; not very much. 

Dr. Stimpson. We do not use much at any station. 

Mr. Mondell. The quantities are comparatively small and your 
coal purchases are more in the nature of retail purchases? 

Dr. Stimpson. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. It would not be possible, of course, for you to go 
into the matter of the character of the coal as thoroughly as the 
Government bureaus that buy in very large quantities? 

Dr. Kerr. The Government supply committee makes contracts for 
supplies in Washington for a great many items and, among others, 
coal, and, of course, we take advantage of those contracts for the 
Hygienic Laboratory, the only station we have here in Washington. 
That coal is tested, as I understand, by the Bureau of Mines from 
time to time. 

Mr. Mondell. And probably purchased in accordance with the 
tests they establish ? 

Dr. Kerr. Yes, sir; I think so. 

furniture and repairs to same. 

The Chairman. The next item is " For furniture and repairs to 
same, $8,000." The same as your current appropriation? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. We had an unexpended balance of $4.44. This 
is the same amount appropriated for the present current fiscal year, 
and will be sufficient. 

purveying depot. 

The Chairman. The next item, " For purveying depot, purchase of 
medical, surgical, and hospital supplies, $45,000, the same as your 
current appropriation ? 

Dr» Blue. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. This depot is in one of the buildings on Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue on a site acquired by the Government? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What is the value of the stock which you carry? 

Dr. Stimpson. We carry medicines. 

The Chairman. I know ; but what is the value of the stock? 

Dr. Stimpson. About $20,000. It depends on the time of the year. 
We usually take in stock on the 1st of July and the 1st of January, 
and as requisitions come from different stations we fill them during 
the succeeding six months. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 277 

MAINTAINING HYGIENIC LABORATORY. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For maintaining the Hygienic 
Laboratory," and the estimate is $20,000, the same as the current 
appropriation ? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir; the same amount. There was a balance in 
that appropriation of $187.82. 

MAINTENANCE OF MARINE HOSPITALS. 

The Chairman. The next item is, "For maintenance of marine 
hospitals, including subsistence, ana all other necessary miscella- 
neous expenses which are not included under special heads," and the 
estimate is $256,000, the same as the current appropriation ? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir; the same as the current appropriation. For 
1914 there was a balance of $5,002.11. 

The Chairman. How many hospitals have you ? 

Dr. Blue. Twenty-three, including the sanatorium for consump- 
tives in New Mexico. 

The Chairman. How many patients did you take care of? 

Dr. Blue. The number of seamen treated in the marine hospitals 
during the last fiscal year was 53,226, which was 2,622 more than 
during the preceding fiscal year. 

The Chairman. Is that persons or days? 

Dr. Blue. Persons. 

The Chairman. What is the cost per capita ? 

Dr. Stimpson. $2.06. That includes the salaries of the officers and 
everything. 

The Chairman. All overhead? 

Dr. Stimpson. Yes, sir; everything. If you take out the officers' 
salaries it would be $1.55. 

The Chairman. Are all of the hospitals filled? 

Dr. Stimpson. No, sir ; they are not filled. 

The Chairman. Which hospitals are you going to close? 

Dr. Blue. We do not contemplate closing any of them. 

The Chairman. You thought of closing some of them a couple of 
years ago when you said that you would look them over and give us 
a report? 

Dr. Blue. Those hospitals, as some member of the committee men- 
tioned two years ago, we intend to make public-health stations, and 
have already done so in the case of some oi them. 

The Chairman. What do you mean by public-health stations? 

Dr. Blue, For the study of diseases of man and for laboratory 
work. 

The Chairman. Which ones are those? 

Dr. Blue. Pittsburgh, Louisville, Cincinnati, and New Orleans. 

The Chairman. Are ypu utilizing them now for the general public- 
health work? 

Dr. Kerr. We have public-health work going on at ^yilmjngton, 
S. C; Savannah, Ga.; Mobile, Ala.; New L)rleans, La.; Louisville, 
Ky.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Pittsburgh, Pq,.; and St. Louis, Mo., *nd we 
have requests from the Indian medical service to do laboratory wcjrk 
at our several stations, which will not involve any great amount of 



278 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

work, but it is mentioned as an indication of the additional use that 
these stations can be put to as public-health stations. 

The Chairman. Do you completely occupy the hospitals now that 
were conspicuous because of their emptiness? 

Dr. Blue. You mean as regards their bed capacity? 

The Chairman. Yes, sir.. 

Dr. Blue. No, sir; we have not the hospitals filled with patients 
anywhere. Of course, the number of patients varies with the season. 
In the winter, on account of the close of navigation there will be more 
patients than in summer, and on the Lakes the same. 

The Chairman. When they can not work they go to the hospitals? 
. Dr. Blue. We expect the clientele to increase with the opening 
of business on the Ohio River. I understand they are building bulk- 
heads, or dams, in order to maintain the head of water all the year 
round. That would increase naturally the number of patients treated 
at Pittsburgh, Evansville, and Louisville. 

Dr. Glennan. There have been 500 more vessels registered. 

medical examinations, care of seamen, etc. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For medical examinations, care 
of seamen, care and treatment of all other persons entitled to relief, 
and miscellaneous expenses other than marine hospitals, which are 
not included under special heads," and your appropriation is $126,000, 
and you are asking for $135,000? 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. This is an increase of $9,000. 

The Chairman. Why? 

Dr. Blue. A part of the $9,000 additional is to establish three new 
stations of the third class, namely, at Everett, Wash.; Kingston, 
N. Y.; and Palatka, Fla. 

The Chairman. What kind of stations are they to be? 

Dr. Blue. Stations of the third class. 

The Chairman. What is a station of the third class? 

Dr. Blue. A station at which an acting assistant surgeon is sta- 
tioned and where a contract has been let to a local hospital, with au- 
thority granted to the acting assistant surgeon to treat seamen, but 
to send all cases of sickness which would last longer than 20 days to 
the nearest marine hospital. 

The Chairman. Why send them to Kingston? 

Dr. Blub. We would not send them to Kingston. We would es- 
tablish a station there and pick up the seamen and send them to 
New York. 

The Chairman. Is there any local traffic on the river? 

Dr. Stimpson. There are 75 tugboats and about 1,500 men. 

The Chairman. The boats touching at Kingston either run to New 
York or to Albany, and all the tugboats are towing to New York? 

Dr. Stimpson. We have had numerous requests for several years 
for the establishment of a third-class station at that port. 

The Chairman. How much of this amount is paid to hospitals for 
the care of seamen? 

Dr. Stimpson. How much of this appropriation? 

The Chairmian. Yes, sir. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1918. 279 

Dr. Stimpson. The salaries of the officers are not paid out of this 
fond. 

The Chairman. How much is actually paid to the hospitals for the 
care of the seamen? 

Dr. Stimpson. Whenever we have an office for the physician 

The Chairman (interposing). You have it combined — examina- 
tion and care of seamen; how much do you pay to the hospitals 
alone? 

Dr. Stimpson? About two-thirds of the amount. 

The Chairman. You can furnish that information? 

Dr. Stimpson. Yes,, sir. 

STATEMENT REGARDING EXPENDITURE OF APPROPRIATION FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATION, 
CARE OF SEAMEN, ETC., FISCAL TEAR, 1914. 

The appropriation for medical examination, care of seamen, etc., fiscal year 
1914, in amount of $126,000, is accounted for as follows: 

Paid out for the care of sick seamen in contract hospitals during 
the year $105, 754. 84 

Paid out for medical examinations, medicines furnished seamen, 
burial of deceased seamen, office rent, telephone rent, station- 
ery, etc 14, 945. 76 

Balance remaining at the end of the year 5, 299. 40 

Ttotal 126, 000. 00 

The Chairman. How much do you pay to the hospitals? 

Dr. Stimpson. Different prices; from $1 to $3. $3 is paid only in 
Alaska. At Nome, Alaska, we have to pay $3. At most of the 
stations we pay $1, $1.25, and $1.50. The prices have increased a 
peat deal this year in numerous places, so if we have the same num- 
ber of patients as last year we will have to spend $6,589 more. 

The Chairman. How many .patients are cared for under this ap- 
propriation? 

Dr. Stimpson. Twenty-two thousand and six altogether. 

The Chairman. About how many days? 

Dr. Stimpson. Hospital days, 88,343, not including marine hos- 
pitals, only contracts. 

The Chairman. You did not say how many patients were cared 
for in the marine hospitals. 

Dr. Stimpson. Nine thousand eight hundred and fifteen patients 
were treated in the marine hospitals alone ; the number of days relief 
furnished was 322,779. 

The Chairman. Do you send people to the hospitals for stated 
periods? 

Dr. Stimpson. For not over 20 days, if they are able to travel. If 
they require more than that they are transferred to the marine 
hospitals. 

The Chairman. That would show that they averaged about four 
days each? 

Dr. Stimpson. It varies a good deal. A man with typhoid fever 
could not be transferred. 

The Chairman. Twenty-two thousand patients and 88,000 days 
would make the average about 4 days? 

Dr. Stimpson. Yes, sir; about. 



280 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

JOURNALS AND SCIENTIFIC BOOKS, 

The Chairman. The next item is " For journals and scientific 
books (subscriptions for journals may be paid for in advance)," and 
your appropriation is $500, and you are asked for $500 ? 

Dr, Blue. Yes, sir. This appropriation is necessary in order to 
provide journals and scientific books for the bureau, not for the 
service. 

The Chairman. Do you spend $500 a year? • 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. We ought to have $1,000. We asked for 
$1,000 last year, but it was not granted. 

QUARANTINE SERVICE. 

The Chairman. The next item is "Quarantine service." How 
many officers have you detailed to immigration work? 

Dr. Cofer. We now have 87 medical officers, all told, assigned to 
the work exclusively. In addition to that there are a number of 
other medical officers doing marine hospital and quarantine work 
at stations where the immigration work does not justify the detail 
of an officer for thispurpose exclusively. 

The Chairman. The immigration is falling off to such an extent 
that you are going to have a number of officers released? 

Dr. Cofer. The immigration has fallen off, and at several ports 
officers have been relieved and put on other work. This falling off is 
confined practically to four ports — Boston, New York, Philadelphia, 
and Baltimore. 

The Chairman. That is where you had the bulk of the officers ? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir. The great bulk of them are at New York. 
The difference in the falling off is not as great at any other station 
as at New York. I have the figures, if you would like to see them. 
Last year we examined at Boston, for example, 80,322 people. Figur- 
ing up to the end of this month what we have done at Boston and at 
the same rate, we will examine 16,324 for the year. You see the dif- 
ference in the long run between examining 16,000 and 80,000 is not 
as great as it appears, and it takes almost the same complement for 
that work. In New York I will admit that the falling off has been 
something unparalleled. At the present rate we can not expect over 
32,000 to arrive at New York this year. Of course, the arrivals may 
increase from now on. We are only figuring on what has occurred 
since July. Last year it was 1,009,854. The complement of officers 
has been almost cut in two ; in fact, even more than that. 

Dr. Blue. Advantage has been taken of the diminution in immi- 
grants at Ellis Island to make a thorough physical and mental exam- 
ination of arriving aliens. On certain days when small shiploads 
arrive the aliens are all sent to the examination room and thorouglhy 
overhauled. They are given what you might call an intensive 
examination. 

The Chairman. As a result of this intensive examination has there 
been any larger number of aliens admitted ? 

Dr. Slue. So far it has been very encouraging. There has been 
no definite report made yet as to the increase, but it is thought that 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPJROPBIATION- BILL, 1916. 281 

the number of certificates might be increased to 5 per cent of the 
whole number examined. 

The Chairman. How many officers did you have on duty at Ellis 
Island? 

Dr. Cofer. Twenty-five medical officers. The officers relieved there 
have been detailed to public health work. 

Dr. Blue. To the eradication of the plague in New Orleans, for 
instance. 

Dr. Cofek. There is another point — the question of when the war 
is going to end and when this immigration business is going to be 
resumed. I think we will have an enormous amount of work ex- 
amining arrivals put upon us for some time after the war is ended. 
At the present time at Ellis Island we have about the largest number 
of detained persons in the hospital that we have had for a long 
time — considerably over 200 — on account of the fact that they can not 
be deported. I only mention that to show that although our com- 
plement of officers there is a good deal smaller than it was, those 
there have all they can do on account of these conditions. I bring 
these points up to show the exigencies. 

The Chairman. You are reimbursed for them by the steamship 
companies? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir ; they pay for all of that. 

The Chairman. They pay only for the subsistence, or do you 
include an overhead charge to take care of the officers? 

Dr. Cofer. They pay a flat per diem rate of $1.50. There is no 
doubt but what the Government makes money on it. They do not 
charge them for just what they get; they charge a regular flat rate. 

The Chairman. I do not see how the Government can make money 
when the steamship lines pay $1.50 and it costs $2.06 to take care of 
the patients in the hospitals. 

Dr. Cofer. It is different in the immigration business. The Gov- 
ernment makes a large amount of money on examining immigrants. 
In the report of the Commissioner General of Immigration for last 
year he shows a balance from the head tax of nearly $10,000,000. 

The Chairman. There is no balance. 

Dr. Cofer. I know; but just for the sake of argument, we are 
making money rather than losing it on examining immigrants. 
Dr. Glennan was figuring the other day that so far as we are con- 
cerned we only spent about 12.6 cents per alien examined last year. 

The Chairman. You can not prove that any of these services are 
revenue producers? 

Dr. Cofer. No; I do not say that, but I think the Immigration 
Service charges the steamship lines ior a great deal more than the 
subsistence costs. 

The Chairman. Then we have a lot of money invested there? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir; that is an enormous plant. I believe that 
40 cents a day is the outside actual cost 

The Chairman. For subsistence? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir; and the rest can be treated as overhead. 

The Chairman. For this item " Quarantine Service " the appro- 
priation is $155,000 and you are asking $160,000? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir. 



282 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. Why do you ask for an increase? 

Dr. Cofer. Mr. Chairman, that is on account of two conditions. 
The phraseology of the item is just the same as it was last year, and 
the only difference is the extra $5,000, which is asked for on account 
of the increased work incident to the opening of the floating quar- 
antine detention plant at Providence, and also the prospective com- 
plete opening of the station at Galveston. We have not been able 
to open that station fully so far on account of the bulkhead not 
being completed, but we htave had the station open since the refugees 
came back from Mexico. 

The Chairman. Out of this appropriation you maintain the 
leprosy hospital? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir. I have here a table showing how we ex- 
pended this appropriation last year and what we propose to do with 
it in the future. 

The Chairman. You maintain vessels out of this appropriation? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many vessels? 

Dr. Cofer. We have two barges, six hulks r 

The Chairman. What? 

Dr. Cofer. Hulks — an old warship like the Newark or the James- 
town — 5 steam tugs, 6 steam launches, 25 gasoline launches, and 56 
rowboats, sailboats, etc., of various sizes. These vessels* have to be 
not only scraped and painted, so far as the hulls go, every year, but 
the machinery has to be kept up, broken parts replaced, and tools and 
all of that sort of thing replaced. 

The Chairman. What was your unexpended balance in 1914? 

Dr. Cofer. $7,367.35. 

The Chairman. What did you do with the balance of this money 
in addition to that you have accounted for? 

Dr. Cofer. We expended $149,000. 

The Chairman. You had $180,000 and you have only accounted 
for $149,000. 

Dr. Cofer. You are referring to the $25,000 for the Newark? 

The Chairman. The Providence boat? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You spent it all on that boat? 

Dr. Cofer. Here is a statement as to that. 

The Chairman. You had $155,000? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir; in the regular quarantine-service appropria- 
tion. 

The Chairman. And you had $7,367.35 unexpended out of the 
$155,000? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Then you received $25,000 to fit up the Newark 
to be used as a station at ^Providence? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir; a floating station. 

The Chairman. And this is a statement of how that money was 

exnended ? 

Dr. Cofer. Yes, sir. We have a balance of a little over $2,000. 
We have considerably more to spend on it. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 283 

(The statement submitted by Dr. Cofer follows:) 

Appropriation: Providence (B. I.) Quarantine Station, 1914-15. 

Preparing hulk Newark and transfer from Norfolk: 

Norfolk Navy Yard, outfitting, etc., estimated $10,000.00 

Boiler and stack 404.70 

Coal for transfer 609.00 

Towing 159.60 

Outfit for complement en route 218.37 

Lighter to aid in anchoring 35.00 

* $11, 426. 67 

Launch 2, 000. 00 

Roofing, etc 3, 593. 90 

Heating system 2, 250. 00 

Travel, incident to inspection, etc., estimated '. 1,000.00 

Outfit ing and miscellaneous: 

Blankets $315.00 

Tools 153. 86 

Mattresses, etc 221. 20 

Household articles 301. 46 

Paints 223. 95 

Drayage 68. 75 

Lumber 332.53 

Miscellaneous and freight ^ 612.68 

2, 229. 43 

Approximate balance 2, 500.00 

Amount of appropriation g 25,000.00 

PREVENTION OF EPIDEMICS — BUBONIC PLAGUE, NEW ORLEANS, CALIFORNIA, 
AND SEATTLE, WASH. 

The Chairman. For the prevention of epidemics the current ap- 
propriation is $200,000 and you now want $500,000. We gave you a 
deficiency of $220,000. 

Dr. Blue. The estimate for 1916 is $500,000 and the appropria- 
tion for 1915 is $300,000, so the increase is $200,000. The deficiency 
was for 1915. We asked for a deficiency of $220,000 for this year. 

The Chairman. And we gave you that. 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you want $500,000 for next year? 

Dr. Rucker. This sum is $20,000 less than was given us for carry- 
ing on this work in 1915. 

The Chairman. No, sir; it is $80,000 more. 

Dr. Eucker. You gave us more. There was a balance of $100,- 
449.52, there was an appropriation of $200,000, and there was a 
deficiency appropriation of $220,000, making a total of $520,499.52. 

The Chairman. That was $100,000 that escaped us. 

Mr. Mondell. Was that for the current year? 

Dr. Rucker. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. We reformed this thing a couple of years ago, 
and you are trying to work it up on us again. What do you pro- 
pose to do with this sum? 

Th. Rucker. It will be necessary for us to continue the work at 
New Orleans until plague has been eradicated there. 

The Chairman. You will never stop that unless we do. 



284 SUNDBY CIVIL AFPBQPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

Dr. Rucker. Yes, sir; I think we will. 

The Chairman. When? 

Dr. Euckbb. I can not tell you, sir, at the rate things are going 
now. In the heart of the city the plague has been, so far as we know, 
practically eradicated. We have discovered in the last few days the 
cause of the focus of infection which existed in New Orleans, but, 
unfortunately, we have found a chronic form of plague among rats 
outside of the parish of Orleans. One was found in Weswego, in 
the parish of Jefferson, and one was found in St. Bernard Parish, 
not far from Chalmette. The original area of infection has, there- 
fore, been enlarged, and at the present time consists of about 41 
square miles. It is estimated that about $220,000 will be necessary 
for New Orleans for the first six months of the next fiscal year and 
that $90,000 will be necessary for the second six months. That is 
for New Orleans only. In addition, it will be necessary to con- 
tinue the antiplague surveillance in California. That work has 
been very largely taken over by the State of California, the expense 
at the present time being borne by the service varying between $2,665 
per month and $3,000 per month. The allotment to California 
would therefore be $36,000. Bubonic plague still continues in Seattle, 
Wash., plague rats being found there from time to time. There has 
been an increase in the cooperation on the part of the Seattle au- 
thorities, and it will be necessary for the service to continue this 
work in order to get them to finish up their part of the work. 

The Chairman. How much per month did you say the bubonic 
plague work in California and on the Pacific coast costs? 

Dr. Rucker. It is costing frojn $2,665 per month to $3,000 per 
month. 

The Chairman. That will be about $36,000 a year. 

Dr. Rucker. Yes, sir ; $36,000 for the year. 

The Chairman. What else have you? 

Dr. Rucker. The work at Seattle still continues, and it is esti- 
mated that for the next fiscal year it *will be necessary to spend 
$12,000 there, or $1,000 per month. The city of Seattle has begun 
its cooperative work, and it will be necessary for the Government 
to give them assistance in order to get the work done properly. It 
will also be necessary to do some postepidemic work in Porto Rico 
to make certain that the disease has been entirely stamped out there — 
that is, bubonic plague — and it is estimated that $200 per month will 
be necessary there, making a total of $2,400 for the year. In foreign 
ports it will be necessary, it is estimated, to expend $15,600, or $1,300 
per month. 

The Chairman. What are you spending now ? 

Dr. Rucker. We are spending now at the rate of $1,300 per month. 
We are spending that in China, Italy, Japan, and Cuba, and there 
are miscellaneous expenditures of $50 per month. For travel, vac- 
cines, and other materials which are purchased out of this fund, it 
is estimated we will require about $1,000 per month, or $12,000 for 
the year. In the trachoma work, which is being carried on in the 
Appalachian Mountains, the cost is now $2,000 per month, s^nd it is 
estimated that it will be necessary for it to continue at the same rate 
during the coming year, or at the rate of $24,000 a year. That ac- 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 285 

counts for the grand total of $412,000, and the $88,000 balance is to 
be held in reserve for new epidemic work which may arise. At the 
present time cholera is spreading rapidly in continental Europe. It 
has already appeared in Vienna, and great fear is being expressed 
by British medical journals and newspapers that the disease may 
gain admission to that country. If such a thing happens, and it is 
not at all improbable that it will, we may look for the introduction 
of chronic cholera carriers in this country, and we will have to do 
some pretty active work to keep cholera out of this country next 
year. It might also be mentioned that plague at the present time 
is spreading in the Mediteranean littoral. It has appeared in 
Cartana, Sicily, and is also widely spread throughout the Greek 
Archipelago. It will be necessary to hold $88,000 in reserve for 
those things. 

FIELD INVESTIGATIONS DISEASES OF MAN, SANITATION, SEWAGE, POLLU- 
TION OF WATERS. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " Field investigations : For in- 
vestigations of diseases of man and conditions influencing the propa- 
gation and spread thereof, including sanitation and sewage, and the 
pollution of navigable streams and lakes of the United States, in- 
cluding personal services, $250,000." The current appropriation is 
$200,000. 

Dr. Blue. This increase is needed in order to meet the demands 
that are constantly being made upon us. 

The Chairman. If you were to meet all of these demands we 
would not be able to supply the means to carry on the work. 

Dr. Blue. This demand is insistent for expert help in public 
health matters, and it is made by governors, mayors, and health 
bodies. 

The Chairman. You do not pay your surgeons and assistant sur- 
geons out of this, do you? 

Dr. Blue. No, sir. 

The Chairman. If you have not got the men, how can you supply 
them ? 

Dr. Blue. We pay out of that the salaries of som^ acting assistant 
surgeons, who work for short periods on certain problems. 

The Chairman. What are you doing now under this appropria- 
tion? 

Dr. Kerr. Last year, when this money was appropriated, we 
endeavored to carry out the line of invfestigation that was explained 
to the committee. That included investigations of the Ohio River 
and the Potomac River, and investigations of the coastal waters of 
Chesapeake Bay and vicinity; We paid special attention to pel- 
lagra, malaria, trachoma, diphtheria, typhoid fever, and the muni- 
tion of tuberculous persons in interstate traffic. Special examina- 
tions and studies were made of localities, of the sanitary condition ^f 
schools, laboratory studies were made of tuberculosis, studies were 
made of industrial hygiene and rural hygiene, and I might mention 
also investigations of sewage disposal and waste disposal. The work 
that we carried on this last year has been most promising. 



286 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

PELL AG B A. 

[Seep. 290.] 

One line of investigation alone has, we think, been of an epoch- 
making character, and that is in connection with pellagra. As a 
result of our studies and work in connection with pellagra that have 
been going on now for several years we have found that the disease 
is not an infectious disease and that it is probably due to an unbal- 
anced diet. We have tentatively reached that conclusion, and we 
have some highly significant data to prove it, but that needs to be 
added to and it needs to be tried out by States and institutions hav- 
ing the care of pellagra patients. 

The Chairman. You have a special appropriation for that? 

Dr. Kerr, We are maintaining a hospital at Spartanburg, S. C, 
and, in addition, we continued last year and this year our epidemo- 
logical studies of pellagra. As we explained to the committee last 
year, our studies of pellagra as carried on have included laboratory 
studies at Savannah, Ga., laboratory studies at the hygienic labora- 
tory, field studies of institutional pellagra at Milledgeville, Ga., and 
at other insane asylums and at certain orphanages throughout the 
country. We first demonstrated that we could not reproduce the 
disease in the lower animals. We then made a special study of the 
mental manifestations of pellagra, of the condition of the brain and 
of the cerebrospinal fluid as compared with conditions in other 
mental infections of a toxic origin. Then we undertook to deter- 
mine by epidemological studies why pellagra developed in certain 
institutions and not in others. We found that in the insane asylum 
at Milledgeville, Ga., 7.65 per cent of the patients who have been in 
that institution over one year developed pellagra in the institution. 
It was discovered that no case ever developed among the employees. 
This was significant. Then we followed these studies further and 
found that the disease appeared in certain classes of insane patients 
in those institutions; for instance, dementia praecox patients, who 
are very indifferent and suffer from melancholia. In a word, it was 
found that the only essential differejice in the environment of the 
individuals was in the matter of diet. In one orphanage we found 
that 32 per cent of 211 children had pellagra, and in another we 
found that 139 out of 226 children had pellagra. The grouping of 
the cases in these instances was striking, and to our own minds every- 
thing pointed conclusively to diet as the cause. For instance, in- 
fants under a certain age who were allowed milk developed no pel- 
lagra, and those above 12 years of age developed practically no 
pellagra, the enormous prevalence of pellagra occurring among 
children between 6 and 12 years of age. 

Mr. Mondell. Did that develop in the institution? 

Dr. Kerr. Yes, sir ; and our investigations show that it is a disease 
that develops in institutions. We attacked it from that standpoint 
after we had made studies of about 1,450 patients in private life. 

Mr. Mondell. What did you learn about the diet in those cases? 

Dr. Kerr. We learned that essentially three different diets wen* 
fed to those children, and we grouped them accordingly, and found 
that it was in the middle group of children, who had the middle diet. 
that most of the cases of the disease developed. The work that we 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPBIATTON BILL, 1916. 287 

propose to do this year and the work we are now doing is to treat 
those cases and to take the necessary measures to see whether we can 
prevent the disease from developing. 

Mr. Mondell. Have you reached a conclusion as to what is lacking 
in the diet? 

Dr. Kerb. No, sir. That will be a very difficult question to de- 
termine. The great practical question to be determined is whether 
this disease is due to diet and whether a diet of milk, meats, beans, etc., 
will cure it. In my judgment, the proof of that — and we have tenta- 
tively concluded that that is the cause — will be of more value to this 
country than was the determination of the method of the transmis- 
sion of yellow fever. Another analogous disease to this is beriberi, 
which was a scourge to the Japanese Navy for years. In recent years 
it has been discovered that the cause of that disease is the eating of 
polished rice. That condition is somewhat analogous to this. 

The Chairman. If the disease were due to some particular diet or 
article of diet, the elimination of such diet would mean the elimina- 
tion of the disease, would it not ? 
Dr. Kerr. We rather suspect it is due to a deficiency in the diet. 
The Chairman. But if it was due to some particular diet, the 
elimination of it should eliminate the disease? 

Dr. Kerr. Yes, sir. Our plan was to take two of those orphan- 
ages and supplement their diet with those particular foods in which 
we thought those diets were deficient. That we ought to do. We 
went to those institutions and made a careful physical examination of 
those children and recorded their histories and diets. We gave them 
a treatment which would not have a distinct bearing on the cure of 
the disease until we had finished with their physical examination. 
We then started this diet, and the results have been remarkable. Of 
course, the studies will have to be continued for a period of a year 
or eighteen months, because the disease is cyclical in its manifesta- 
tions. It comes in the spring and disappears in the late summer. 
That is not true in every case, but it is in the early cases. Therefore, 
*e were only able to begin our supplementary dietary treatment in 
August, but among 226 children treated in one orphanage in the 
South, where 139 cases of pellagra were present when the observa- 
tions were begun, the disease practically disappeared within five or 
six weeks. If our conclusions are right and we can prove them, it 
will be entirely practicable to eliminate pellagra from this country, 
and very speedily. 

TEMPOBABY ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

Mr. Mondell. I notice that in your statement of the persons you 
intend to employ under this item you have a number or acting as- 
sistant surgeons. Are they persons who are also estimated for under 
the head of acting assistant surgeons? 

vi. is^tAitt. xxny medical otticers employed or paid out of this fund 
would be only temporary in character, and a certain number of these 
employees were hired temporarily while this work was being devel- 
oped. On the 30th of June there were about 114, all told, who were 
employed and paid out of this appropriation, but the number has 
gradually dropped off until there are now about 74, all told. It has 
dropped off practically one-half. We are not able to continue the 



288 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

field investigations at the same rate throughout the year. Such work 
can be done much better in summer, and as soon as we finish a piece 
of work we discontinue the temporary employment. As soon as a 
particular officer who has been employed is not required he is dis- 
continued. 

Mr. Mondell. How do you secure these people? 

Dr. Kerr. The most of these employees are secured from the civil- 
service list; but here and there, where there is a job of work as, for 
instance, special studies of the cerebrospinal fluid and the mental 
manifestations of pellagra, we get the permission of the Civil Service 
Commission to employ a man as a special expert for a period of not 
to exceed three months, which may be extended a further period of 
three months, but not beyond that time. A number of our employees 
paid out of this fund have been of that special character. 

Mr. Mondell. The people paid out of this fund are, in the main, 
temporary employees, are they ? 

Dr. Kerr. There are certain classes of employees under this fund 
that we have added since the law of August 24, 1912, was enacted, 
and that we did not have before, such as sanitary engineers, who will 
be permanent, and certain sanitary chemists and sanitary bacteriolo- 
gists. But all of the acting assistant surgeons mentioned in that list 
that appears in the Book of Estimates, namely, 19, have been dis- 
continued since the first of the year, because they were only temporary. 

INTERSTATE QUARANTINE SERVICE. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " Interstate Quarantine Service: 
For Cooperation with State and municipal health authorities in the 
prevention of the spread of contagious and infectious diseases in 
interstate traffic, $15,000." The current appropriation is $15,000. 

Dr. Eucker. This is the same amount that was asked for last year 
and the same amount that was appropriated last year. 

The Chairman. The same amount was also appropriated in 1914. 

Dr. Eucker. The amount of the balance left was $3,758.73. 

The Chairman. That was the unexpended balance? 

Dr. Eucker. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. It was about the same in 1914? 

Dr. Eucker. Just about. 

The Chairman. Then you do not spend any more than that? 

Dr. Eucker. During the coming year there will be more money 
expended, because of the opening of laboratories for the examination 
of water supplied to trains engaged in carrying interstate passengers, 
and also for the investigation of the watersheds supplying such 
waters. Very frequently that is necessary. For example, at a rail- 
road point not a great ways from this city it was discovered on ex- 
amination that the water contained fecal organisms. An officer was 
dispatched by the Surgeon General to make an investigation of the 
water supply, and he found that there was very gross pollution tak- 
ing place there, and that this water which was grossly polluted was 
going to interstate passengers on two different lines of railroad. It 
was also being given as the water supply of passengers who stopped 
at a hotel that was operated by one oi the railroads. The use of 
this supply of water was discontinued, and in the clean-up which 
followed a filtration plant was put in and the sewage outlet was 



BTJKDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 28d 

placed, below the water intake instead of above it. Laboratories 
have been purchased during the year, and have been installed and 
put to work in the examination of water supplies. These are simply 
water laboratories for the examination of water furnished to pas- 
sengers in interstate traffic at railroad points. 

Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a dangerous communicable disease 
which prevails in Montana, has been worked on during the past 
year, and a great deal has been accomplished in the prevention of its 
spread. It will be necessary, however, to carry on this work for a 
further period of one year in order to make sure that it has been 
damped out. 

The work with regard to the investigation of the ventilation of 
railroad coaches is still in progress, and the investigation of the 
juestion of track polution is still being conducted with the coopera- 
tion of State and municipal health authorities. 

This fund is necessary because the work done under it is not 
covered by any other fund. It is particularly intended for the pre- 
vention of the interstate spread of such diseases as diphtheria, 
typhoid fever, scarlet fever, tuberculosis, and many other communi- 
cable diseases. 

The Chairman. Do you make any regulations governing the dis- 
infection of sleeping cars? 

Dr. Rucker. Yes, sir; regulations have been made with regard to 
keeping cars. 

The Chairman. With reference to disinfecting them? 

Dr. Rucker. Studies are now in progress with regard to.the dis- 
infection of sleeping cars. During the past year studies have been 
made with regard to the travel of tuberculous persons, particularly 
from the view-point of preventing the bad influence they have on the 
health of the traveling public. 

COLLECTING INFORMATION OF THE PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 

The Chairman. You are asking $16,000 for the collection of in- 
formation of the prevalence of disease. The item is, " For collect- 
or* information of the occurrence of epidemics and the prevalence 
<f disease throughout the United States, including the pay of special 
•ollaborators, compilers, or agents, and all other expenses attached 
thereto." This is the same request youTnade last year. 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir; we made that request last year, and we have 
requested it again this year with the hope that the committee will 
provide us with a fund for the collection of morbidity statistics. 

The Chairman. We have a great Census Bureau created for the 
purpose of collecting statistics, and yet everybody else wants to 
"•llect them. 

Dr. Blue. But they only collect mortality statistics. 

The Chairman. It is their business to collect statistics, and yet 
»ye have every other department of the Government collecting sta- 
ti>tics. 

Dr. Blue. We need current information of the prevalence of dis- 
uses in order to take measures against them. The Census Bureau, 
'< a rule, is a year behind in the publication of their statistics, and 
then they only publish deaths. Some diseases prevail that do not 

72785— lH 19 



290 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1816. 

result in death, and if we were to depend upon the Census Bureau 
for the statistics, we would not have information concerning any of 
those diseases. 

The Chairman. We went into this fully last year. 

Dr. Blue. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Doctor, you carry on your general quarantine work, 
your work under the head of the prevention of epidemics, your* field 
investigations, and the work of your interstate quarantine service, 
as well as your studies of pellagra and other diseases; that being 
true, why can't you, in connection with that work, without anj 
special or extra appropriation, tabulate the information which you 
are asking for under this head of appropriation ? 

Dr. Blue. It can not be done. 

Mr. Mondell. You must necessarily, in the various branches of 
your work, get that information. 

Dr. Blue. We already have the authority to collect this informa- 
tion, but we are now asking for a fund with which to pay the 
expense. 

Mr. Mondell. You want to employ extra people. Why can't you 
take the information that you have already gathered, and that you 
must necessarily have gathered in your" different fields, and tabu- 
late it? 

Dr. Blue. We do not gather sufficient data on the subject. 

Mr. Mondell. Your work covers, at least, the entire field of con- 
tagious and infectious diseases? 

Dr. Blue. We get reports. 

Mr. Mondell. It seems to me that you should have in your office 
the very information for the securing of which you ask this appro- 
priation. 

Dr. Blue. No, sir; we do not collect it. We never have collected 
it, and can not collect it unless you provide for a field force. 

study of pellagra. 

[See p. 286.] 

The Chairman. The next item is, " Study of pellagra : For rental, 
equipment, and maintenance of a temporary field hospital and labor- 
atory, including pay of personnel, for special studies of pellagra, 
$40,000." In the current year we appropriated $47,000 for this 
purpose. 

Dr. Kerr. Yes, sir. 

The CnAiRMAN. That is available this year, is it not? 

Dr. Kerr. Yes, sir. We have established a small hospital and 
laboratory and have employed three biological chemists. We have 
two medical officers at this small hospital. The whole hospital is 
devoted to the study of the character of the diet, with the idea of 
determining exactly bv laboratory work what there is in the diet, or, 
rather, what is the deficiency in the diet that causes pallagra. 

Mr. Mondell. Where is this hospital located ? 

Dr. Kerr. The hospital is located at Spartanburg, S. C. It was 
placed there in a building that was rented from one of the cotton 
mill companies for $1 per month. We have accommodations for 24 
beds, and we have thought to add a tent annex. We should have a 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 291 

larger number of patients in that institution. The total cost this 
year will be less than it was formerly. 

The Chairman. This is necessary in order to continue this hos- 
pital during the next fiscal year? 

Dr. Kerr. We think so. 

The Chairman. That is what it is asked for? 

Dr. Kerr. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. What are private parties doing in the study of 
pellagra ? 

Dr. Kerr. There has been a commission of a New York medical 
school studying pellagra, but their work has been discontinued. They 
have issued a report, but we have not been informed of their last 
findings. But aside from that work that was going on up until 
about the 1st of October, we have no knowledge of any other sys- 
tematic studies of pellagra being made. 



December 31, 1914 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. 

STATEMENTS OF MB. CHARLES D. WALCOTT, SECRETARY SMITH- 
SONIAN INSTITUTION; MR. RICHARD RATHBUN, ASSISTANT 
SECRETARY; MR. W. DE C. RAVENEI, ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIST- 
ANT; MR. F. W. HODGE, ETHNOLOGIST IN CHARGE OF BUREAU 
OF AMERICAN ETHNOLOGY; MR. C. G. ABBOT, DIRECTOR ASTRO- 
PHYSICAL OBSERVATORY; DR. FRANK BAKER, SUPERINTEND- 
ENT NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK; AND MR. LEONARD C. GUN- 
NELL, ASSISTANT IN CHARGE OF REGIONAL BUREAU FOR THE 
UNITED STATES, INTERNATIONAL CATALOGUE OF SCIENTIFIC 
LITERATURE. 

INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGES. 

The Chairman. " International exchanges : For the system of in- 
ternational exchanges between the United States and foreign coun- 
tries, under the direction of the Smithsonian Institution, including 
•compensation of all necessary employees and purchase of necessary 
books and periodicals." The appropriation is $32,000 and your esti- 
mate is $32,000 ? 

Mr. Walcott. That is the same as last year. . 

The Chairman. For American ethnology the appropriation is 
*42.00O, and the estimate is $66,800. 

Mr. Hodge. I have a very brief itemized statement covering the 
stimated increase. This is divided into a number of items, and are 
arranged, I might say, as nearly in the order of their importance as 
practicable. 

i. For ethnological researches in Alaska $4, 500 

(a) Two ethnologists at $1,500 $3,000 

(b) Field expenses 1,500 

-- For the extension of ethnological researches among the tribes of the 

Mississippi drainage 2, 600 

(a) One ethnologist at $1,00 

(b) Field expenses 800 



292 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

8. For the excavation and study of archeological remains in the South 

and West $3, 750 

(a) One archeologist at $1,500 

(b) One assistant (6 mos.) , 750 

(c) Field expenses 1,500 

4. Toward the preparation of a series of handbooks on the Indians of the 

respective States, with special reference to the needs of schools 

and colleges 3, 600 

This sum is desired for the purpose of employing specialists and 
for the purchase of manuscript material for publication. 

5. For the exploration and preservation of antiquities, including the cliff 

dwellings in the arid region 4. 000 

(a) One assistant archeologist $1,000 

(b) Field expenses, including the employment of laborers, 

etc 3,000 

6. For the acquirement of original manuscript material pertaining to the 

American Indians and the natives of Hawaii, for publication 2, 400 

7. Toward the preparation of a revised edition of the Handbook of 

American Indians, including the employment of specialists and of 
editorial and clerical assistance 2,600 

The Chairman. When was the last edition of the Handbook of 
American Indians published? 

Mr. Hodge. The first volume in 1907 and the second volume in 
1910. In 1912 Congress ordered the work reprinted in an edition of 
6,500 copies, of which 6,000 copies were for the use of Congress and 
500 copies for distribution by the bureau. The superintendent of 
documents has had the handbook reprinted several times for sale at 
$3 for the two volumes. As the work of the bureau has proceeded 
much more information has been obtained, and it is very desirable 
that this should be incorporated in the form of a new edition of the 
handbook, for which the demand has been very great. Indeed, the 
demand seems to be just as great as it was at the time of the publica- 
tion of the work. The estimated sum of $2,600 is needed in order 
that specialists outside of the bureau can be enlisted in the work 
where they have special knowledge of the subjects involved. This 
is the most economical method to pursue in revising a work of this 
kind. Of course, some editorial and clerical assistance will be neces- 
sary. 

8. For the employment of additional clerical assistance (chiefly tempo- 

rary), and for office expenses, stationery, supplies, and equipment, 
incident to the increased field work $1,350 

In all, $24,800. 

The Chairman. And the balance is to continue the work engaged 
on last year ? 
Mr. Hodge. Yes ; it is the plan to continue that. 

INTERNATIONAL CATALOGUE OF SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, 

The Chairman. International Catalogue of Scientific Literature. 
The appropriation is $7,500 and your estimate is $7,500. 

Mr. Walcott. Mr. Chairman, there is a suggestion I would like 
to make in regard to that item, and that is to provide that not to 
exceed $600 of this appropriation may be used to pay for technical 
services of employees of other Government departments and estab- 
lishments; and provided further, that such services shall be per- 
formed only while said employees are not engaged in their official 
duties. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 293 

The Chairman. What is the purpose of that? 

Mr. Gunnell. Mr. Chairman, the technical knowledge needed to 
classify all of the papers indexed is very great, as we cover all the 
branches of science and have a very limited appropriation, and as 
there are very few people regularly engaged in this work it is neces- 
sarv at times to obtain the assistance of specialists, and it is not pos- 
sible to get one or two people with sufficient knowledge to classify 
all these sciences outside of the Government service. There are no 
people outside of the Government service in Washington able to do 
this work, and for a number of years we were allowed by the former 
comptroller to employ the Government employees of other bureaus 
and pay them a certain amount, they doing the work outside of their 
regular office hours. It amounted to only about $600 a ye*r, but the 
present comptroller does not agree with his predecessor and thinks 
we are not authorized to use the appropriation in this way; this de- 
cision has really handicapped our work to a great extent. We simply 
want to continue the method we used formerly. I have an argument 
here covering a couple of pages, but I have given you a digest of the 
matter. 

( Suggested provision to be inserted in sundry civil bUl after appropriation for 
International Catalogue of Scientific Literature, under Smithsonian Insti- 
tution:) 

Provided, That not to exceed $600 of this appropriation may be used to pay 
for technical services of employees of other Government departments and estab- 
lishments : Provided further, That such services shall be performed only while 
said employees are not engaged in their official duties. 

The Chairman. What else do you spend this money for? 

Mr. Gunnell. Simply preparing the index catalogue of American 
scientific literature. It is spent for salaries. 

The Chairman. It is all spent for personal services? 

Mr. Gunnell. Yes, sir; practically. Not 5 per cent of it goes for 
office requirements. The salaries amount to $6,660, and the $600 I 
ask to be used in this way would go in as a part of the salaries, of 
course. 

Mr. Walcott. That would be $7,260 out of the $7,500 appro- 
priated. 

ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY. 

The Chairman. "Astrophysical Observatory : For maintenance of 
A?trophysical Observatory, under the direction of the Smithsonian 
Institution, including salaries of assistants, purchase of necessary 
books and periodicals, including payment in advance for subscrip- 
tions, apparatus, making necessary observations in high altitudes, 
repairs, and alterations of buildings, and miscellaneous expenses." 
The appropriation is $13,000, and you ask for $15,000 for 1916. 

Mr. Abbot. Mr. Chairman, the main purpose of the increase 
which is asked for is to employ one additional computer. We are 
now getting many more results from our observations on Mount 
Wilson than we clid formerly, and it is practically impossible to 
b*n up to date with the computing. 

The Chairman. This is for an additional computer? 

Mr. Abbot. Yes; at $960. Then, furthermore, it is the intention 
to pet some more apparatus. We find ourselves much handicapped in 
oar work by lack of convenient apparatus for laboratory purposed. 



294 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Whenever we want to do anything we practically have to make the 
apparatus in order to do it and it delays us a good deal. If we could 
have those conveniences which other laboratories have, and which we 
have found ourselves deprived of by the scarcity of our funds, we 
could get on faster than we are doing. Those are the main uses for 
the additional sum which is asked. 

I will say, sir, that in the past year we have obtained what seems 
to us a very interesting and striking result. We sent up a balloon 
to a great height, about 12 miles, and registered by automatic con- 
trivances the heat of the sun at that enormous elevation, where, in 
fact, more than nine-tenths of the air is below the instrument. The 
intensity of the radiation of the sun there was found to agree 
very closely with what we had computed from our observations of 
past years. So it has practically checked up the results of former 
years. 

I had hoped very much, Mr. Chairman, that certain foreign Gov- 
ernments would take up the work of observing the sun day by day. 
I began trying to interest them last July. But in August the war 
broke out. Since, however, we have shown in the last tew years the 
substantial variability of the sun, it is greatly to be hoped tnat when 
the war ceases and things return to a normal condition observations 
of the sun may be made at widely-separated regions of the earth day 
by day. I think, sir, it will be found that they will be valuable in 
tne prediction of temperatures, rainfall and the like, and for other 
purposes. That, however, is something which the war has probably 
postponed some years, unless the United States should be disposed 
to undertake it on its own account. 

BOOKSTACKS FOR GOVERNMENT BUREAU LIBRARIES. 

The Chairman. "Bookstacks for Government bureau libraries/' 

Mr. Walcott. Mr. Chariman, the original request for an appro- 
priation was $40,000, and $15,000 was first appropriated for 1914 
and $10,000 for 1915. Now, we have estimated a further sum of 
$6,750 to complete the work, and I have a list here of the items : 

To complete the metal bookstacks at the west end of the hall, 
$1,550. 

That is at the same rate as the original contract for the book- 
stacks at the east end of the hall, which are now completed. We 
have $9,500 available, and it is necessary to get $1,550 to complete 
the stacks. I have photographs here showing the completed end of 
the hall and the present condition of the noncompleted portion at 
the west end. This $1,550 is to finish up and complete that end of 
the hall. 

Then it is necessary to install the lighting equipment as origi- 
nally planned, and we have a tentative estimate for lighting the 
main hall of $1,675, and the lighting of the west end will cost about 
$500, and we estimate for that $2,500, which will, we think, com- 
plete the work fully and put it in good shape. 

Then there is an estimate of painting of $1,500. 

This sum for the painting is based upon an estimate for the 
painting of the east end of the hall, and the $1,500 will apply to the 
entire hall. 

Then for repairs and other incidental expenses, $1,200. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 295 

This includes replacing a part of the floor. That floor was put in 
there many years ago; also repairing the ceilings and walls and 
some of the ornamental parts which have been cut or loosened in 
connection with the work now going on. 

This makes a total expenditure of $6,750, and that will complete 
the building, and if practicable it is very desirable to have that 
made available, as the men are ready to go right on with the work. 

The Chairman. You strike out the words " exclusive of carrier." 

Mr. Walcott. There is no estimate for a carrier. The impres- 
sion was that the committee did not care to undertake that this 
year and no estimate is put in for the carrier. 

NATIONAL MUSEUM. 

The Chairman. " National Museum : For cases, furniture, fixtures, 
and appliances required for the exhibition and safe-keeping of col- 
lections, including compensation of all necessary employees." The 
appropriation is $25,000, and you are asking for $25,000. 

Mr. Rathbun. That is the same as the current appropriation. 

CASES, FUBNITUBE, AND FIXTURES. 

The Chairman. What is your situation in regard to these cases? 
Are you up to your current needs or way over them? 

Mr. Rathbun. No, sir; we are way below our current needs, and 
as the chairman made some remarks last year which are left upon the 
record, I think it might be well to offer an explanation, but that 
explanation can be left out if the chairman is satisfied with our 
single statement. 

The Chairman. Just tell us what the situation is. 

Mr. Ravenei* Of the $25,000, $8,000 will be spent on construction, 
remodeling, and repairing of exhibition furniture. I have a state- 
ment of that here, as follows : 

Proponed schedule showing classified expenditures for appropriation for furni- 
ture and fixtures, J 916. 

Exhibition furniture and fittings: For construction, remodeling, and re- 
pairs of exhibition furniture, including frames, stands, and holders $8, 000 

Storage and furniture for collections : 

40 76-inch steel storage racks, at $45 $1, 800 

30 30-inch steel storage racks, at $25 750 

15 steel insect cases 900 

32 quarter-unit cases 800 

12 half -unit cases 476 

25 herbarium cases 625 

2,000 unit drawers, wood 2,100 

1.000 half-unit wooden trays 500 

400 insect drawers, standard 1,160 

200 insect drawers, without cork 450 

Repairing, remodeling cases, drawers, etc 1,160 

10, 721 

18, 721 
Jars, bottles, vials, boxes, trays, etc. : 

Glass jars, bottles, and vials 3,000 

Paper boxes and trays 1,000 

4.000 



296 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Miscellaneous furniture and fixtures, laboratories, offices, etc. : 

2 file cases, cap size $80. 

10 file cases, letter size 300 

80 card catalogue cases, at $5.50 440 

6 bookcases, at $30 180 

6 tables 100 

4 desks, at $30 120 

4 chairs, at $7 ■ 28 

6 typewriters, at $70 420 

6 typewriter cnairs 34 

10 lockers, at $7.50 75 

2 water coolers 20 

60 window shades, at $2 120 

Miscellaneous furniture and fittings 362 

2.279 

Total 25.000 

Mr. Bathbun. Mr. Chairman, I would like in view of what has 
been said regarding this item of appropriation to make a few re- 
marks. The underlying principles of museum growth and activities 
necessitate continuous apppropriations for furnishings. This is ex- 
emplified in all great museums in this country and abroad. You can 
not get away from it. As to the National Museum, from 185S to 
1878, Congress gave to the Museum for this purpose $98,500. During 
this time the Museum was occupying only a small part of the Smith- 
sonian Building, even though most of the Museum expenses were paid 
from the Smithsonian fund. From 1881, when the older Museum 
Building was completed, until 1909, when appropriations began to be 
made for the new building, there were annual appropriations which 
averaged in yearly amount $30,700, and aggregated for the entire 
period of 28 years $860,000. Since the furnishing of the new build- 
ing began in 1909 there has been appropriated an aggregate of 
$675,000, a small part of which has, of course, been used for the older 
buildings. The new building contains over three times the area of 
the other two buildings combined. About $625,000 has been expended 
on its furniture as against over $1,000,000 on that of the two older 
buildings. A misunderstanding may very well arise from the nature 
of the growth of this Museum and of all museums. Were it possible 
to complete the furnishing as a single job, as, for instance, in a great 
office building or a great manufacturing building, it would greatly 
relieve the duties of the Museum administrator, and except for the 
fact that the Museum had in readiness beforehand a large amount of 
material for the exhibition collections for the new building, the in- 
stallations could not have been carried forward nearly as rapidly as 
they have been, and not nearly the amount of furniture already use J 
could have been planned for up to the present time. 

Now, Mr. Chairman, as to a few instances of how these matters 
come up. During the current year the Museum has been presented 
with one of the most remarkable historical collections of musical in- 
struments in existence, valued at many thousands of dollars, and occu- 
pying about 4,000 square feet of floor space. This collection is now 
being arranged in the open, as there are no funds to obtain cases. I 
might add that this came after our estimates for next year were made 
up and is not included in them. A wealthy New York man has just 
offered as a gift his collection of ceramics, one of the finest in any 
museum in this country, on condition that it be appropriately in- 
stalled. We have space for it, but not the means for furnishing the 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 297 

oases; but nevertheless the Museum can not decline such a gift and 
is accepting it. That is the way these needs for furniture come up. 
The collection which is offered and of which I have just spoken is in 
29 packing cases. We do not know # the number of pieces. Instances 
of such gifts are becoming more* and more common every year. 
Then, of course, as the committee knows, we are fitting up the older 
Museum buildings for the arts and industries, but there we are using 
mostly the old cases, though they require repairs and refinishing. 
Last year two halls were so fitted up. Then we must have provision 
for the little receptacles, the bottles, jars, and boxes in which these 
things are kept. I would like, Mr. Chairman, to add to this statement 
the fact that from 1881 to 19.09, or previous to the completion of the 
new building f there was an annual appropriation for furniture 
without exception, and on an average of $30,700 a year. 

HEATING, LIGHTING, TELEGRAPH, TELEPHONE, ETC. 

The Chairman. "For expenses of heating, lighting, electrical, 
telegraphic, and telephonic service," the appropriation is $46,000, 
and your estimate is $46,000. 

Mr. Rathbtjx. Mr. Chairman, neither the estimate nor the method 
of expending it has been changed. It is the same as last year. 

The Chairman. For continuing the preservation, exhibition, and 
increase of collections the appropriation is $300,000, and you are 
asking for $330,000. 

Mr. Kathbun. Mr. Chairman, that estimate can give rise to a 
long explanation or a short one. 

The Chairman. If you want to get any more money this year it 
had better be a satisfactory one. 

Mr. Rathbun. Mr. Chairman, last year an additional $20,000 was 
requested to this item wholly in the interest of the Department of 
Arts and Industries. The argument for such an item was very ex- 
plicitly defined in the hearings of last year. This request is repeated 
again this year as the most important and the most material require- 
ment of the Museum. It is very hard not being able to organize at 
least the more important branches which I am certain will insure 
practical benefits for* the people far above even our own anticipa- 
tions. That is the sum of the argument made last year. An addi- 
tional $10,000 is requested for the scientific departments, being other 
than the arts and industries, of which the one most immediately in 
need of it is the National Herbarium. 

The force is now much too small to handle the large collection and 
reduce it to a state of proper classification. The National Herba- 
rium has a close affiliation with the Bureau of Plant Industry of the 
Department of Agriculture, which, to a large extent, is dependent 
upon it for its systematic or classificatory work. The department 
has recently turned over to the Museum its entire collection of 
grasses, about 100,000 in number, and all of the plant specimens are 
held at the service of the department. 

To go more into detail, Mr. Chairman, the Museum was founded 
by Congress in 1846, and its organization began in 1850, though its 
first appropriation from the Government was not received until 
1857. During the first 25 years of its existence, the Smithsonian 



298 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Institution spent much more for its support than did the Govern- 
ment, or over $110,000, and, except for the energetic action of the 
institution, it is more than likely that the Museum would long ago 
have ceased to exist. But the Museum was carried safely through 
its crucial stage and passed to that in which its greatness and im- 
portance began to be comparable with the corresponding estab- 
lishments in Europe. But through all of its existence it has never 
had the support requisite for its ordinary proper maintenance, and 
to-day the conditions are relatively more taxing than ever. With 
the two older buildings, containing 3 acres, the appropriation 
reached $190,000, while to-day, with 14 acres, they have been in- 
creased to only $300,000, out of which amount some $80,000 is 
required for the watch and cleaning force for the maintenance of 
the public exhibition halls. The use of " acres " for purposes of 
comparisoi* is, of course, only a crude way of expressing growth, 
yet the collections have grown and exhibitions have expanded to a 
marvelous degree, and this extension has brought greater activities 
and greater utilitarian results. Those Members of Congress who 
drafted the fundamental act displayed marvelous wisdom in pro- 
nouncing upon the program for the Museum. 

Of first importance was the direction to care for the collections of 
natural history acquired by Government expeditions, and to increase 
them by means of exchanges and other ways. These collections now 
form the backbone of the Museum and caused the erection of the new 
building. Next came the gallery of arts, and in furtherance of this 
subject the Institution expended about $3,000 in 1847 for a collection 
of engravings which is now worth some $75,000. Eeal activities in 
the gallery did not, however, begin until 1906, and since then the 
donations have exceeded $2,000,000 in value, not including the build- 
ing to be erected' by Mr. Freer. Outside of the Freer collection, the 
gallery in the new building contains several hundred thousand dol- 
lars worth of paintings which are being maintained without cost to 
the Government, simply because we have an artist on the scientific 
staff. His own particular duties are very exacting, and it is an impo- 
sition to call upon him for this special work ; but no request for his 
relief is now pending, though the matter should soon be settled in 
one way or another. 

The Chairman. It is only a question of how rapidly you will pre- 
pare for exhibition purposes the material you have ? 

Mr. Rathbun. Mr. Chairman, it is not a question solely of exhibi- 
tion, but it is a question of work and activities that would make 
these collections of use. That is what we need. Men who are not 
expert can not prepare collections or classify collections, or label 
them for exhibition purposes. First of all. the real question to-day 
is the getting into shape of the important branches in the arts and 
industries, and of starting work upon such branches as animal 
products and vegetable products, which, of course, comprise im- 
portant subjects still undeveloped. They contain matters or the very 
greatest importance. In the textiles, in the mining products, in 
ceramics, and in medicine we have an immense amount of work to 
do, and we are doing it with the minimum force. In fact, we have 
nobody in most of the branches — we have a very inadequate force. 
During last year we put into shape several more of the exhibition 
halls, and we have done it mainly by taking old cases and allowing 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPB0PBIATT0N BILL, 1916. 299 

people to put things in them in order to make some show. Now is 
the time when, if ever, the Museum has the opportunity of doing an 
especially important work, and that work is to put our people in the 
possession of information and of methods that will allow them to 
compete under the conditions which are going to follow this war 
in Europe. This is not a fairy story, but is something that has long 
been done throughout the countries of Europe which we call civi- 
lized 

The Chaibman (interposing^. We do not want to do what they do 
in those civilized countries, it present conditions are the result of 
those things. 

Mr. Walcott. He said we call them civilized countries. 

Mr. Rathbun. The point that I wished to bring out in what I 
was saying was that we must get organized to a certain extent. 

BOOKS, PERIODICALS, AND PAMPHLETS. 

The Chaibman. The next item is, " For purchase of books, pam- 
phlets, and periodicals for reference, including payment in advance 
for subscriptions, $4,000." The current appropriation for this pur- 
pose is $2,000. 

Mr. Rathbun. Mr. Chairman, I really made last year the strongest 
argument I could make with regard to books. We need them and 
ought to have them. 

The Chaibman. We can not give you as much time on it this year 
as we gave last year, because we must finish with the bill. 

BEPAIBS TO BUILDINGS, ETC. 

The Chaibman. The next item is, " For repairs to buildings, shops, 
and sheds, including all necessary labor and material, $15,000." Tne 
current appropriation for this purpose is $10,000. 

Mr. Rathbun. Mr. Chairman, I am going to ask that Mr. Ravenel 
speak about that. 

Mr. Ravenel. We ask an appropriation of $15,000, and it is pro- 
posed to expend approximately $7,900 of it on the roofs of the differ- 
ent buildings. 

The Chaibman. Again? 

Mr. Ravenel. The items referred to are the refastening the copper 
roofs on the new building and replacing the slate roofs on the south- 
west pavilion and on the four towers of the old building. Those 
slate roofs have been there since the building was constructed, and 
they are in very bad condition. An estimate for the remodeling of 
the skylights over the three large halls of the new building is also 
included, amounting to $4,000. 

The skylights measure about 146 feet in length by 30 feet in width, 
and have leaked ever since the building was finished, because of the 
improper setting of the glass. We have conducted some experi- 
ments within the last 12 months and are now prepared to complete 
that work if this appropriation is made. In addition to the above, 
we include estimates for the repainting of the exterior work, wood 
and metal, on the old and new buildings, sheds, and shops, at a cost of 
$1,300; for replacing with cement the old asphalt water table on the 
fast end of the old building at a cost of $435 ; water table west end 



300 SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

of Smithsonian Building, $700; for covering with sheet metal the 
ceilings of the six ranges in the old building, $1,800; and $2,000 for 
repainting, pointing up, and repairs to walls, ceilings, and floors of 
old and new buildings. 

Mr. Mondell. What is the character of the skylight on the new 
building that it should require replacing so soon ? 

Mr. Ravenel. The skylights are made of metal and glass, but I 
think that Mr. Rathbun knows more about the construction of the 
skylights. 

Mr. Rathbun. I would say this, that is seems as though the 
modern architect were unable to put on any big building a roof that 
will stand. We have been extremely unfortunate in both the sky- 
lights, which are very long, and in the roofs. They have put the 
copper on in too wide sheets — 32 inches wide — which could not be 
fastened in such a way as to make a. good roof. The only thing for 
us to do with the copper is to split it in half and put in intermediate 
strips to which the new edges will be attached in a manner to permit 
of expansion. At the present time the copper roof is full of leaks; 
so far as the skylights are concerned — -— 

Mr. Gillett (interposing). What building is this? 

Mr. Rathbun. It is the new building, I am sorry to say. So far 
as the skylights are concerned, they were made on an improved plan 
that has not turned out well. The glass is fastened in an overlapping 
manner like this [indicating] by a new method, which allows much 
of the water coming down the surface to pass through, and, not- 
withstanding the fact that gutters are placed underneath the glass, 
the water leaks through onto the ceiling lights and the floor. The 
gutters overflow. 

Mr. Gillett. Who was responsible for the original mistake? 

Mr. Rathbun. That I can not say. Mr. Green was the superin- 
tendent of construction, but, of course, we all know that Mr. Green 
was beyond question expert and honest. It was, presumably, a new 
form of skylight which had been approved elsewhere and was ac- 
cepted on such apprdval. 

Mr. Gillett. It was not the fault of the copper, was it? 

Mr. Rattibun. Not as to the skylights, but the copper roof, unfor- 
tunately, is also in bad condition. 

Mr. Gillett. Who was responsible for it? 

Mr. Rathbun. The construction was all under the same manage- 
ment. The building was delivered to us, and it was built under the 
supervision which Congress ordered. 

Mr. Gillett. Who was the architect? 

Mr. Rathbun. Hornblower & Marshall, but they had nothing to 
do with laying the roofs. 

Mr. Gillett. Who was responsible for the roofs? 

Mr. Rathbun. Mr. Green. The roofs should never have been cov- 
ered in this way, but if you examine some of the new, large buildings 
in New York City you will find the roofs made according to similar 
methods, and they turn out just as bad. The best roof in Washing- 
ton to-day is the roof which this committee allowed us to rebuild a 
little each year, and which, of course, was finished several years ago. 
That is the roof on the old Museum building, and it will last forever. 
It is of tin. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 301 

POSTAGE STAMPS AND POSTAL CARDS. 

The Chairman. The next item is " for postage stamps and foreign 
postal cards, $500." The current appropriation is $500. 
Mr. Ratiibun. This is a small item, and all of it is needed. 

NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 

STATEMENT OF int. FEANK BAKES, SUPERINTENDENT. 

CONSTRUCTION OF BOADS, WALKS, BRIDGES, MAINTENANCE, ETC. 

The Chairman. .We will now take up the National Zoological 
Park. The first item is — 

For continuing the construction of roncls, walks, bridges, water supply, sewer- 
age, and drainage; grading, planting, and otherwise improving the grounds; 
erecting and repairing buildings and inclos^res: care, subsistence, purchase, 
and transportation of animals, including compensation of all necessary em- 
ployees; and general incidental expenses not otherwise provided for. including 
purchase, maintenance, and driving of horses and vehicles required for official 
purposes, for the purchase of necessary books and periodicals, payment in ad- 
vance of subscriptions, $125,000. 

The current appropriation is $100,000. What is the necessity for 
that increase in the appropriation for the Zoological Park? 

Mr. Baker. In addition to the regular expenditures, we wish to 
repair the injury done by the construction of the interceptor sewer 
which has been constructed along the west bank of the creek. There 
is a very decided gash made by that upon the side of the creek which 
is very disfiguring, indeed, to the park. 

The Chairman. What do you want to do to it? 

Mr. Baker. I want to fill it up and grade it so it can be planted. 
I want to do that so the defacement will be removed. 

The Chairman. How much will that cost? 

Mr. Baker. We estimate that will cost $3,500. 

ANIMALS. 

The Chairman. What do you want the other increase for? 
Mr. Baker. We want to get some new T animals if we can. 
The Chairman. You can not buy animals in Europe now. That 
is where you buy them, is it not? 
Mr. Baker. We do not buy all of them in Europe. 
The Chairman. How much do you want for that purpose? 
Mr. Baker. We want for that purpose $8,000. 
The Chairman. You can do without that this year. 

BOUNDARY FENCE. 

Mr. Baker. Then, we wish to repair and reconstruct the boundary 
fence, which is practically all gone except the posts. 
The Chairman. What fence is that? 

Mr. Baker. The boundary fence which surrounds the park. 
Mr. Gillett. Is it a wire fence? 
Mr. Baker. Yes, sir. 
Mr. Giixett. Has the wire rotted out? 



302 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Baker. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much will that cost? 

Mr. Baker. That will probably cost $7,000. 

The Chairman. How long has that fence been up ? 

Mr. Baker. For 12 years. 

The Chairman. When did it get in a bad condition? 

Mr. Mondell. What is your estimate for that? 

Mr. Baker. $7,000. 

The Chairman. When did that fence commence to get in a bad 
condition ? 

Mr. Baker. It has been getting so this year and last year. It has 
been gradually rotting out. 

The Chairman. What else do you want? 

PUBLIC-COMFORT STATIONS. 

Mr. Baker. We want a public-comfort house and toilet facilities 
for the public. 
The Chairman. Where? 

Mr. Baker. We want to erect that in the park for about $6,000. 
The Chairman. Where is that to be? 
Mr. Baker. Somewhere near the center of the park. 
The Chairman. Then, you propose to increase some salaries? 

ANIMAL LABORATORY AND HOSPITAL. 

Mr. Baker. There are some very slight increases of salaries. We 
wish also to increase our scientific activities by putting in a hos- 
pital and laboratory for sick animals. 

The Chairman. Why not send them to this animal hospital of the 
Marine Hospital Service? 

Mr. Baker. We have urged this for some time. 

The Chairman. You want a separate building for sick animals? 

Mr. Baker. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many sick animals do you have? 

Mr. Baker. We have a good many sick animals. 

The Chairman. How many did you lose last year? 

Mr. Baker. About 350. We usually lose from 200 to 400 in a year, 
including many that are nearly dead when received and those that 
are injured in fighting and by accidents. Last year about 30 per 
cent of the loss was in the mammals, 55 per cent in the birds, and 
15 per cent in the reptiles. 

The Chairman. What kind? How many animals have you out 
there? 

Mr. Baker. About 1,400. There were 1,468 in the collection at the 
beginning of the year and 325 new animals were added during the 
year, so that the percentage of loss would be based on a total of 
about 1,800 animals, the greatest risk being on the new animals. 

The Chairman. And you lose five or six hundred every year? 

Mr. Baker. Perhaps not so many as that, but something from 10 
to 20 per cent usually. 

The Chairman. That would be only 140 if you have 1,400. If 
you have so many sick animals, we ought to give you a hospital and 
no new animals. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 303 

Mr. Baker. We ought to have a hospital. We have needed that 
for a good many years. 

The Chairman. Are there any animal hospitals anywhere else? 

Mr. Baker. They have one in Philadelphia, in New York, and in 
Cincinnati. In every well-appointed zoological garden there ought 
to be a hospital. 

The Chairman. How is it that you have never thought of asking 
for a hospital before? 

Mr. Baker. We have presented it year after year. 

The Chairman. You have never mentioned it since I have been a 
member of the committee. 

Mr. Baker. It was first submitted in the estimates for 1892, also 
in those for 1905 and 1906, and it was included in the list of buildings 
required as given at the hearing on the 1915 estimates. 

Mr. Mondell. What is the estimate for this animal hospital? 

Mr. Baker. About $5,000. This building is needed not only for 
a hospital, but to furnish a place where new animals can be kept in 
quarantine until it is determined that they have no communicable 
disease. It would greatly reduce the amount of trouble of that 
kind if we could quarantine animals that are suspected of being 
diseased. 

CONSTRUCTION OF AVIABY BUILDING. 

The Chairman. The next item is, u For construction of an aviary 
building, with interior and exterior cages, including labor and ma- 
terial and all necessary incidental expenses, $80,000." Is this the 
matter we went into so fully last year? 

Mr. Baker. Yes, sir. There was a statement made here last year 
in reference to a public comfort building and restaurant. 

Mr. Mondeli* Which of these items do .you need most, the public 
comfort station, the hospital, or the repairs to damages done the 
scenery by the sewer? 

Mr. Baker. The scenery can wait ; but, as you will notice, it is a 
very great disfigurement to the park. I would prefer to have the 
hospital and laboratory. I think that is the most important of all. 

PAYMENT TO ASSISTANT SECRETARY. 

The Chairman. I notice that you have an assistant secretary. To 
whom is he an assistant? 

Mr. Baker. He is assistant to the Secretary of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 

The Chairman. What does he do? 

Mr. Baker. He looks after the park. 

The Chairman. He is paid $500 per year? 

Mr. Baker. That is only a part of his salary. 

The Chairman. Where is the rest of it? 

Mr. Baker. It is paid out of other Smithsonian appropriations. 

The Chairman. They take a part of this appropriation to bolster 
up somebody's salary somewhere else? 

Mr. Baker. This is an arrangement made by the Secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution. That assistant secretary is paid in part 
from Smithsonian appropriations. 

The Chairman. What does he do at the Zoological Park? 



304 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Baker. He assists in a number of ways. 

The Chairman. In what way ? Tell us what he does about the 
park that entitles him to $500 out of this appropriation. 

Mr. Baker. He had general supervision of the affairs of the park 
in the same manner that assistant secretaries of the departments 
have general charge of various bureaus in them. The park was one 
of the branches of the Smithsonian Institution coming under his 
general charge. All correspondence and everything that affected 
the policy of the park or related to am* action of unusual importance 
was referred to him. r 

The Chairman. Why not have the correspondence answered there 
by some one who knows about it? What does he krow about the 
park? 

Mr. Baker. He had knowledge of the park. 

The Chairman. Does he sign his name after you prepare the 
letters? 

Mr. Baker. No, sir. He advises us in regard to what we oncrlit 
to do. If we have a new project, we submit it to him, and it under- 
goes his approval. 

Mr. Gillett. Who is this assistant secretary? 

Mr. Baker. It was Mr. F. W. True last year. 

Mr. Gillett. Who is it this year? 

Mr. Baker. Nobody now, at the present moment. Mr. True is 
dead. 

Mr. Gillett. How long since he died? 

Mr. Baker. About six months ago. 



Monday, January 4, 1915. 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION. 

STATEMENTS OF ME. JAMES S. HARLAN, CHAIRMAN; MB. GEORGE 
B. M'GINTY, SECRETARY; MR. C. A. PROTJTY, DIRECTOR OF 
VALUATION; AND MR. GEORGE F. GRAHAM, DISBURSING 
CLERK. 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

The Chairman. For all other authorized expenditures necessary 
in the execution of laws to regulate commerce, the appropriation for 
1015 was $910,000; for 1914, $950,000: and the estimate is $925,000. 
What was the unexpended balance in 1914? 

Mr. Graham. Of the general appropriation the unexpended bal- 
ance was $22,797.04 for the year 1914. 

The Chairman. What is the necessity for this additional appro- 
priation ? 

Mr. McGinty. Mr. Chairman, the appropriation of $950,000 was 
reduced by $40,000, taking out what had been the approximate 
expenditure for our hours-of-service work, which made the amount 
of the general appropriation for the current year $910,000. For the 
ensuing vear the commission has reduced its estimate for printing 
by $15,000 and added the $15,000 to the $910,000, making the esti- 
mate for the ensuing year $925,000, the reasons therefor being the 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 305 

general increase in the commission's work, which we will endeavor 
to explain in detail if you wish. 

The Chairman. That does not explain the necessity for an in- 
■ reuse in this item. 

Mr. McGinty. I can explain that right now, sir, by saying that 
taking a comparison of the December pay roll, 1914, with the De- 
cember pay roll, 1913, there is an increase of 60 employees, or a total 
of $636,560 per annum, which, Mr. Chairman, will so increase the 
< unmission's expenses that it will be necessary for the commission 
tL is month to put in a deficiency estimate for the current fiscal year 
tu cover these increases. 

The Chairman. What is the necessity for this increase? 

Mr. McGinty. The necessity, I have just said, is for the 60 em- 
ployees brought about by the additional work. The commission has 
had during the year 35 special investigations, 8 of which have been 
in response to resolutions of the Senate, 1 was a continuing investi- 
gation in response to a joint resolution of the Senate and House, 3 
investigations by request of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign 
Commerce of the House, and 23 investigations were specially ordered 
1 the commission on its own initiative. The increase in formal 
complaints filed with the commission has been 139. During the year 
wiling December 31, 1914, there were filed 1,169 complaints as 
:'irainst 1,030 complaints for the same period of 1913. Also, during 
the last four months of this year — September, October, November, 
.mil December — it has been necessary for the commission to conduct 
v ir> hearings as compared with 545 hearings during the same months 
of the previous year, or an increase of 270 hearings. This has neces- 
sitated the employment of 18 additional attorneys for the commis- 
sion, at an increase in expense of $77,120 per annum, ?\nd has neces- 
sitated a general increase in .practically all of the divisions of the 
commission. 

Mr. Harlan. Those attorneys, Mr. Chairman, are really exam- 
iners who hear testimony. They are not attorneys in the ordinary 
>ense. 

Mr. Sherley. How do you explain this very great increase in 
your activities in view of the statement of there being very much 
less railroad activity in the country now as compared with some 
previous years? 

Mr. Harlan. Well, Mr. Sherley, as the secretary has intimated, 
we have had an unusual number of important investigations to 
make under resolutions either by the House of by the Senate. Such 
investigations ordinarily are very extensive and require a great deal 
<>f labor and result is very large records; and, as the secretory indi- 
cates, they are more expensive. They require us to put on the work 
a large number of accounting examiners and other examiners to 
examine the records of the carriers. They are not like litigated 
cases where the reasonableness of a rate is involved and the com- 
plainant makes up his own case and presents it to us. Where we 
;re requested by the Senate or the House to conduct investigations 
nobody is ready ordinarily to help us and we must help ourselves 
K v digging out the facts through our examiners. In one such in- 
vestigation we had as many as 50 accountants at work; and these 
investigations partially explain our larger requirements at this time. 

7278&— 15 20 



306 ST7NDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Sherley. Eight in that connection, you have a system for 
uniform accounting of railroads and that has been in operation for 
some years now ? % 

Mr. Harlan. Yes. 

Mr. Sherley. I am speaking of the system that the railroads have 
now adopted. They have a uniform system and presumably that 
system tells you their financial story. That is the theory of it. 

Mr. Harlan. Yes. 

Mr. Sherley. And that raises the inquiry as to why it is not easier 
to arrive at any desired data touching the railroad than would seem 
to be indicated by your answer a few moments ago. 

Mr. Harlan. The financial story of a railroad as carried into its 
books does not give us the details of the bills and much other infor- 
mation often required by us. To get that we have to go back to the 
original records of the carriers. 

Mr. Sherley. Is that because of false bookkeeping? 

Mr. Harlan. No; simply to get the necessary information. There 
is much information which the railroads do not themselves bring for- 
ward onto their books of account, and we have to go back to the 
original records and papers; we have had a great deal of that kind 
of work during the past year. 

Mr. Sherley. One of the things vou cite as evidence of increased 
activities is the increased number of complaints that are filed. How 
do you account for that ? 

Mr. Harlan. Well, possibly the general growth of our work is 
due to some extent to the better understanding in the country of the 
opportunities shippers have to come before us and ascertain whether 
their rates are reasonable or not, and possibly the general commercial 
conditions have led the merchants to inquire more closely as to 
whether they are paying too much in freight charges. 

Mr. Sherley. That would rather indicate, would it not, that both 
the slacking of business and the constant work of the commission 
over a series of years would tend to decrease rather than increase 
litigation touching rates? In other words, I am wondering whether 
we are reaching a period where our legislation simply invites and 
requires more and more litigation between shipper and railroad or 
whether we are presumably carrying out the theory of the thing 
which was to bring about such an equitable situation as would dis- 
pense with such litigation in large part. 

Mr. Harlan. My own impression is that our cases are growing 
larger in the sense that they involve broader issues, and are settling 
rate questions more broadly than former cases did. We have more 
cases now than formerly where whole systems of rates are involved 
and perhaps less cases where individual rates between two given 
points are questioned. 

The shippers of the country are looking into rate matters more 
carefully than they used to. A great many industries have employed 
traffic managers to look into rates on their shipments, and they dis- 
cover occasionally inequalities and maladjustments that often are 
liot known to the carriers themselves. This results in many addi- 
tional cases before the commission. 

Mr. Sherley. Are you not really having a situation where the 
commercial clubs and boards of trade of various cities in the country 



StJNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 30? 

are hiring men whose chief occupation is to find some way in which 
tiiey can either do away with what they think is an inequality or get 
an advantage over some competing city, and that practically the 
shipping fraternity has gone into various local combinations for the 
purpose of litigating rate making, so that they may get different 
rates and differentials? 

Mr. Harlan. Undoubtedly that is so. We have now a great many 
nses that are brought by shippers' associations or boards of trade 
and shippers' leagues, which have hired rate experts, often from the 
railroad service, and occasionally from our service, to look into the 
rates of that particular community to see what rate inequalities and 
discriminations exist and to bring them to our attention. There are 
also many independent claims bureaus or so-called audit companies 
that go to shippers and ask for their expense bills. Those people 
very often discover overcharges or file complaints alleging preferen- 
tial or discriminatory rates and asking for reparation. They are 
compensated often on a percentage of the damages recovered. We 
have a number of such suits always pending before us. 

Mr. Shbrley. How far are the suits alleging unfair treatment as 
between shippers, as contradistinguished from localities, increasing 
or decreasing? 

Mr. Harlan. I do not know that we have made any analysis of 
that kind. 

Mr. Sherley. I am wondering how far the evolution of rate mak- 
insr by the commission is developing into a consideration of differen- 
tials between competing localities rather than questions between indi- 
viduals. 

Mr. Harlan. As I say, our cases are becoming larger. Localities 
are moving in a body to investigate their rates as compared with the 
rates of other localities. We have had this fall several very important 
<*ases of that kind. I have m mind one that was before us last week, 
where the interior cities of California were questioning the reason- 
ableness of their rates when compared with the lower rates to the 
port towns of California. That was under the fourth section. We 
have a great many cases of that general nature. 

Mr. Sherley. How far are you getting cases of this character 
^here. for instance, there are, say, two seaport towns, one north and 
'>ne south, just as an illustration, and questions come up as to the 
rates that are made from some interior point of magnitude to, say, 
Boston "as against Baltimore or Philadelphia, or New York as against 
Charleston, what might be called questions of differentials between 
Valities? 

Mr. Harlan. We have had very few of those cases on the Atlantic 
oast. The differentials as between Boston and New York and Phil- 
Melphia have long been settled. They were submitted to the com- 
mission by agreement for arbitration about two years ago. That case 
ins been reported. We have had a few cases involving the South 
Vtl antic ports in which discrminations were alleged on cotton, for 
sample, from interior points. We have had some cases on the Pacific 
oast. Seattle and Tacoma have been before us in regard to their 
Nation of rates. Then in southern California we have had Los 
\ngeles and Santa Barbara and Santa Eosa and San Diego before 
'* on the ground that one port got better rates than another. Two 



308 SUNDRY CiyiL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

or three years ago we had such a case between Texas City and Gal 
vestcn, and later between Texas City and Port Arthur, on the Gull 
coast ; and we had a contest between Pensacola and Mobile. In all, 1 
should say we have had 10 or 12 such cases. They are not very numer 
ous and they come before us in a rather large aspect, so that whei 
they are once settled they remain settled. 

Mr. Chairman, the secretary has already intimated that we may b 
before you later in this month with an estimate for a deficiency ap 
propria tion for the current year, and it is only proper to say tha 
while we put in an estimate for $925,000 for the ensuing year it i 
altogether probable we shall ask before that year is over for a defi 
ciency appropriation. 

The Chairman. Do you not think the railroads will behave so muci 
better, now that they have secured this increase of rates, that you wil 
not have to do as much work? 

Mr. Harlan. Perhaps one of the indications of their intention t< 
behave better is that they are coming to us with their troubles mor 
and more. 

The Chairman. In the statement filed with your estimate I notic 
in 1914, under the heading of "Other expenses," you expends 
$141,838.32, and in the estimate for next year you figure on $45,501 
What is included under this heading "Other expenses"? 

Mr. McGinty. We are taking $50,000 for payment of outside coud 
sel from one column and putting it into another, and when the esti 
mate was made in the past it was extended rather to take care of th 
possibilities, whereas in the present estimate we estimated to take car 
more nearly of the actual expenses. The commission has not spen 
any great amount of the $50,000 allowed for outside counsel, and i 
does not propose to spend any great amount during the ensuing yea 
unless it becomes absolutely necessary. 

Mr. Gillett. Did I understand you to say you had not used an 1 
of that $50,000 in the last year? 

Mr. McGinty. Only a small amount. 

Mr. Gillett. What do you mean by a small amount? j 

Mr. McGinty. $11,500 has been the entire amount used. 

examination of accounts of carriers. 

The Chairman. "To further enable the Interstate Commerc 
Commission to enforce compliance with section 20 of the act \o regu 
late commerce as amended by the act approved June 29, 1906, in 
eluding the employment of necessary special agents or examiners/' 

The appropriation is $300,000 and your estimate is $300,(KH 
What was your unexpended balance in 1914? 

Mr. Graham. 1914 shows an unexpended balance of $4,234.57. 

The Chairman. Have you a permanent organization under thi 
authorization? 

Mr. McGinty. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How frequently do you make these investiga 
tions? What is the plan followed? 

Mr. Harlan. We have what are called general examinations, whei 
we go into all the accounts of a carrier ; and we have special examini 
tions in which we go into particular accounts. Our division of cai 
Tiers' accounts does that work. It consists of about 109 examiner 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 309 

s 

and clerks, and they are constantly on the books of the carriers. We 
have suboffices — one at Chicago, one at New York, one in San Fran- 
cisco, one in Pittsburgh, one in St. Louis, and one in St. Paul. This 
saves traveling expense and per diem charges. We made a large 
saving last year by having those headquarters established. Those 
examiners are constantly on the books of the carriers in one form or 
another, and our theory is that wherever we come in contact with the 
accounts of carriers we are carrying out the purposes of section 20. 
The result of that work is made available to the commission in the 
form of reports, and they are analyzed or taken up by way of criti- 
cism with the carriers' accountants, in order to get their accounts in 
proper shape. That force is very actively engaged at all times on the 
books of the carriers. 

The Chairman. You have established a uniform method of re- 
ports '. 

Mr. Harlan. Yes. 

The Chairman. Have you also established a uniform method of 
accounts ? 

Mr. Harlan. Oh, yes. The present system was inaugurated in 
1W7. Of course, it has been subject to growth, and it has been modi- 
fied in various minor particulars from time to time. 

The Chairman. Is there any indication that the railroads are now 
living up to the requirements of the various acts? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, Mr. Chairman ; the commission has been much 
gratified to find among the carriers a growing spirit of cooperation 
with us in the keeping of their accounts. I think the railroads them- 
selves have found the value of a uniform system, so that, among 
other things, they may compare their own results with the results 
of other carriers operating under similar conditions; and I think 
there is a general desire throughout the railroad world to cooperate 
very cordially with the commission in the keeping of their accounts 
in accordance with our rules and regulations. 

Mr. Sherley. Have you come to a fixed situation touching what 
should be charged to operating expense and what to capital account, 
or is that question still undergoing evolution? 

Mr. Harlan. If I gather your question, that is a matter that is 
still in process of evolution, but pretty well settled now. 

Mr. Sherley. The reason for my inquiry was in part due to some 
personal experience in the totally false showing that was made as 
to conditions of railroads by virtue of charging to capital account 
a great many items that should have gone to operating expense. 
The result was they had a paper capital invested which was not a 
real one, and they had a paper profit which did not exist. In other 
words, the roads were^howing the earning of dividends and actually 
paying dividends out cH money that they were really borrowing, and 
only upon investigation does that become apparent. Now, one of 
the abuses, or perhaps the chief abuse, aimed at was that particular 
one. I wondered how far you had come to understanding it, because 
there is a great deal of proper difference of opinion as to what should 
go to operating expense and what should go to capital account. 

Mr. Harlan. Of course we have been very conscious of the defects 
in the property accounts of the carriers, and that matter has been 
mentioned in our investigation of the St. Paul accounts and is re- 
ferred to in the Five Per Cent case in the original report and in the 



310 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

% 

recent report. But, answering your question in a general way, we 
understand perfectly that prior to 1907, when our uniform system 
of accounts went into effect, the property accounts of carriers were 
very unreliable and not at all dependable. Many carriers practi- 
cally admit that. But since that time we think that the margin of 
departure from proper accounting in that particular has been rela- 
tively small. Of course we have not attempted to correct prior er- 
rors. We simply insist upon a proper handling of those accounts 
since the law went into effect ; but whatever errors existed formerly 
are still in existence. 

Mr. Sherley. That would be checked up, of course, by the pro- 
posed valuation of railroads. 

Mr. Harlan. That would correct it; yes. 

Mr. Sherley. What I wanted to know was not only the dispo- 
sition on the part of the railroads to obey the requirements, but 
whether you have come to a fixed condition touching the require- 
ments. There are a good many questions in dispute as to what 
should be charged in one instance and the other. 

Mr. Harlan. Our system was adopted after all those questions had 
been thrashed out in conference with the State commissions and 
with the railroads. 

Mr. Sherley. And it has been maintained ever since practically 
without change? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes. The only question that was long in dispute 
after 1907 was the matter of depreciation on equipment, and we 
are getting that question into shape at this time. 

Mr. Gillett. Returning to the question I asked you a moment 
ago, would there be any objection to furnishing for the record a 
statement of the amounts paid to outside counsel for the last year* 

Mr. Harlan. Xot at all. But I can state the facts now. There 
has only been one attorney, I believe, employed during that year. 
That was Mr. Brandeis, who was employed in the Five Per Cent 
case. For that work, extending through the year, he was paid 
$11,500. This included his expenses. That has been our only ex- 
pense for outside attorneys during the past year that I now recall. 

The Chairman. One of the objects in having the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission to examine into the accounts of carriers was to 
prevent the juggling of accounts so as to cover up discriminations, 
rebates, and other advantages given one shipper as against another. 
Have those practices been eliminated in so far as they were deliberate 
on the part of the carrier ? 

Mr. Harlan. We think they have been practically eliminated. 
The old-fashioned form of paying rebates in cash, or through charg- 
ing a less rate to a favored shipper than to a competing shipper, has 
been practically eliminated, and we get very few cases of that kind. 

The Chairman. How about the matter of superior facilities pro- 
vided for one shipper over another in the same line of business i 

Mr. Harlan. We have had such contentions before us growing out 
of car shortages, when the traffic was moving in such large volume 
that the carriers were not able to take care of it promptly and com- 
plaints have been made that one shipper was getting more than his 
percentage of the cars. We have had a number of complaints of that 
tind from the coal fields. The coal equipment of the carriers is 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPEOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 311 

usually less than the amount necessary to move the " peak " of the 
coal output^ and we have had cases where one man would claim that 
another man got more than his share of cars; but we have adjusted 
much of that trouble by requiring carriers to adopt and publish cer- 
tain definite rules for the distribution of their coal cars. I do not 
think there is much complaint now of discrimination in that form. 
We have relatively few cases of that kind at this time. If rebates 
are paid at all at this time it is done in the form of discriminatory 
rates or in allowances of one kind or another to shippers with private 
railroads or other facilities. I think that we all agree that the old- 
fashioned form of rebate is practically eliminated. That has come 
about largely through the severe fines that the courts have assessed 
in particular cases and because we follow these things very closely 
in the accounts. Rebates now occur often in the form of preferences 
under published tariffs. The Secretary suggests another form of 
paying rebates — and I have no doubt it exists — namely, in the pay- 
ment of claims. For instance, there will be a shipment of wheat 
and the shipper will set up the claim that some wheat has leaked out 
of the car in transit and that the car was not in proper condition for 
the shipment. There are also a vast number of claims for damage 
to goods in transit, some of which are excessive and some altogether 
fraudulent. That method of paying rebates is doubtless used to 
some extent. For a year or more we have been looking into those 
matters, and while I do not think that we have completely elimi- 
nated rebates in that form, they have been minimized both in 
number and amounts. They are difficult to get at — difficult for us, 
and often difficult for the carrier. During the past year all carriers 
have reported their claims to us ; we have had that done for two pur- 
poses — first, to ascertain how promptly carriers paid their claims; 
and, second, to ascertain what causes gave rise to the claims. There 
was great complaint by shippers that their claims were not being 
paid promptly but were held up for months. We undertook thi9 
investigation for the purpose, among other things, of seeing what 
were the causes of the. delay in the payment of claims. That work 
is partly completed. 

Mr. Sherley. Has your attention been" called to the inequity ex- 
isting touching the statute of limitations relating to claims as be- 
tween the shipper and the railroad company? 

Mr. Harlan. What kind of claims have you in mind? 

Mr. Sherley. I have in mind this, that where a claim comes in for 
an excess payment and becomes known by virtue of some action taken 
touching the rate, the shipper's right to get that claim allowed is 
barred practically by virtue of a sort of statute of limitations de- 
vised by the railroad company. I have not in mind the statute in 
detail closely enough to speak with more accuracy than that, but I 
think my general statement is true. 

Mr. Harlan. Where the carrier has collected more than the au- 
thorized rate, say, 60 cents instead of 50 cents, we have held that that 
being an overcharge the carrier is under the duty of refunding it. 
The statute is not altogether satisfactory in regard to the time limited 
for filing^ complaints before us, and we speak of it in our report. 

Mr. Siierley. I have not seen the report for this year. 

Mr. Harlan. It is spoken of in one of the previous reports. 



312 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Sherley. I have heard of complaints arising of that kind. 
Now, reverting for a moment to another matter that was touched un. 
what sort of adjustments are you making of complaints touching the 
exchange of facilities by carriers with each other, as, for instance, 
the transfer of freight and the use of facilities belonging to one rail- 
road by another railroad, or by shippers generally when the shippers 
have that right? I find that there are more complaints among the 
public touching those things, whether w T ell founded or not, than 
almost any other. 

Mr. Harlan. We had very few complaints last year of that kind— 
that is, of the denial by a carrier to another carrier of the use of its 
facilities. 

Mr. Sherley. For instance, the Louisville & Nashville Railroad 
declines to enter into complete reciprocal relations with other rail- 
road companies at various terminals touching the transshipment of 
freight, the exchange of cars, etc. ? 

Mr. Harlan. Well, we have had two Louisville & Nashville cases 
recently. One complaint was from Mobile, where it declined the use 
of its docks to ships that did not belong to certain companies. We 
adjusted that by holding that those docks were public facilities and 
must be opened to all ships under like conditions. Then, we had a 
case wherein the Louisville & Nashville refused to check baggage 
through to a small summer resort on another line in Tennessee. 
They refused to sell through tickets and check baggage through, but 
I do not recall any other complaints of that nature against the Louis- 
ville & Nashville during the last year. 

Mr. Sherley. I do not know that the^ have reached the point 
of complaints. I may be misinformed but my understanding is that 
the Southern Railway, for instance, does not have complete recipro- 
cal arrangements with the Louisville & Nashville touching the 
handling and disposition of cars, I think, at Atlanta, because the 
Louisville & Nashville does not afford complete facilities at Louis- 
ville. 

Mr. Harlan. I see the point in your mind a little more clearly 
than I did before. We have had some cases where roads have tried 
to so arrange their rates, etc., to divert their traffic to a preferred 
connecting line, but those matters are usually fought out among the 
carriers themselves. They do not always affect the shippers to the 
extent of giving the shippers grounds for coming to us. 

Mr. Sherley. 1 do not know whether the shippers have come to 
you, but the fact that they are very materially affected is one of the 
things that I am constantly hearing, and that is one of the things 
that some of the boards of trade have been somewhat stirred up over. 
Of course the contention of the railroad is that they, having pre- 
pared at great expense certain facilities, should not be required to 
give to competitors the use of them, but that does not again fully 
consider the public viewpoint. 

Mr. Harlan. As you know, there has been a change in the law 
in that respect. One of the changes provides practically that there 
must be through routes and rates over all lines, and the other chares 

fives the shipper the right to route his shipments. Since that time we 
ave had very f ew r formal cases involving the questions you speak of. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATIpN BILL, 1916. 313 

Mr. Sherlts. I understand, but the trouble comes when the shipper 
is unable to route his freight. It is routed, but routed the wrong 
way. The shipper simply goes up against those invisible obstacles 
that delay and hamper him and he gives up in despair. 

Mr. Harlan. Wc have had a few cases where a railroad not having 
adequate terminal facilities at a given point comes to us with the 
complaint that another line denies it the use of its terminal facilities 
at that point. The tendency of the commission in recent cases has 
been to open terminal facilities of all lines to the use of shippers at 
reasonable rates. We have had relatively few cases involving that 
general question. 

Mr. Sherley. That brings up another matter that I would like 
to ask you about : Has the commission ever undertaken to consider 
the question of the physical connection of railroads touching pas- 
senger traffic ? There are a number of cities in America where there 
are several different stations and where the railroads have traffic 
arrangements with some other railroads. For instance, Buffalo, 
X. Y., is a conspicuous example of that. There are three railroads 
there, the Lehigh Valley, the New York Central, and the Erie, and 
they actually touch each other. Yet there are three separate pas- 
senger stations at Buffalo. The New York Central 'Railroad works 
in connection with the Canadian Pacific, and the Lehigh Valley, I 
think, connects with the Grand Trunk, although I may be mistaken 
about that. When a passenger comes into Buffalo over one of those 
roads and desires to go out over a road other than the one with 
which that particular road has a connection, he frequently finds him- 
self unable to effect a transfer of his baggage, and he also experi- 
ences a great deal of inconvenience in going from one station to 
another. He is also subjected to great inconvenience in the matter 
of time schedules, which are nearly always so arranged as to force 
a continuation of travel by the passenger over the line that the road 
by which he enters has an agreement with. Have you ever gone 
into that question and considered whether it lay within your field ? 

Mr. Harlan. In very few cases. One of our cases involved the 
through checking of trunks, Where the passenger presented a mile- 
age ticket to one point on his journey and a regular ticket beyond 

Mr. Sherley (interposing.) I do not mean cases that have come 
before you, because usually the individual can not afford to bring 
a case; but there is a great deal of annoyance to the traveling pub- 
lic due to the fact that railroads arrange their schedules so as to 
compel travel by the passenger along certain lines. When the pas- 
senger runs up against that inconvenience he is not likely to bring 
a suit, because, so far as he is concerned, the evil has happened and 
is behind him. I want to know whether the commission has gone 
into that question, and also into the question of requiring the physi- 
cal connection of railroads in cities? 

Mr. Harlan. No, sir ; we have nothing to do with time schedules. 

Mr. Sherley. I can see that there is a right inviting field there. 
I can say that from personal experience, having traveled over the 
country a good deal. 

Mr. Harlan. I do not recall at the moment any case where we 
have been asked to consider the time cards either of passenger or of 



314 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



freight trains. The schedule of trains is something within the 
domain of physical operation of roads, and that *we do not deal with 
under our act. 

Mr. Sherley. But that is just the point. Here is a situation 
where the individual never has a sufficient estate to warrant him in 
bringing action, yet it is something in which the public as a whole 
has a very proper interest in seeing that the schedules are arranged 
so as not to simply serve as feeders for the railroads, but for the ac- 
commodation of the traveling public. 

Mr. Harlan. We have never had a case of that kind. 

The Chairman. Under this heading, in addition to the various 
positions which are set out, you state that you expended for other 
expenses $107,421.74; can't you file a statement showing how that 
money was spent? 

Mr. Graham. That statement is made up to show the amount of 
salaries and the total for other expenses. 

The Chairman. Can't you segregate the item of "other ex- 
penses " ? 

Mr. Graham. Yes, sir. That is as follows: Traveling expenses, 
$98,770.33; communication, which includes telegraph and telephone 
service, $823.59 ; for services other than personal, $308.76 ; material, 
$18.84; stationary, $977.87; supplies, $188.91; office furniture^ 
$2,326.08 — a large amount of that is occasioned by the equipping of 
district offices throughout the country; for mechanical office equip- 
ment, $1,248.50; other equipment, $628.93; and rents, $2,375.14. 

Mr. Harlan. What is the total? 

Mr. Graham. The total is $107,666.95. 

The Chairman. The great bulk of that is traveling expenses? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir. 

Interstate Commerce Com mission, 

Washington, January G, 1915. 
Hon. John J. Fitzgerald, 

Chairman Committee on Appropriations, 

House of Representatives. 

My Dear Mr. Fitzgerald : Complying with your request at the hearing of 
representatives of the Interstate Commerce Commission before your committee 
on Monday, the 4tli instant, for a statement by months during the period of 
July 1 to December 31. 1914, of actual expenditures and encumbrances of our 
general appropriation, I submit the following: 

statement uf general appropriations for first half of fiscal year 1915. 



Pro rata 
allotments. 



Actual ex- 
penditures 
and encum- 
brances. 



Surplus or 
deficiency. 



July 

August. 

September . 

OcUber 

November. . 
December . . 



175, 833. 33 
75, 833. 33 
75,833.34 
75, 833. 33 
75,833.33 
75,833.34 



$73,624.75 
77,498.40 
77,792.79 
85,228.70 
89,406.22 

» 87,580. II 



12,208.58 
U, 665. 07 
11,959.45 
19,393.37 
i 13.632.89 
» 11,746.77 



Total 455, (XX). 00 



491, 19a 97 



136, 19a 97 



1 Deficiency. 

» December traveling expenses and stenographic services est imated. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



315 



Permit us also to embody herein a detailed statement- by office or division of 
employees and salaries on December 31, 1914, as compared with December 31, 
1913, on basis of which the annual salaries and increases are indicated, as 
follows : 

Statement of employees and salaries. 





Number. 


Annual salaries. 


Division. 


Dec. 


31— 


Increase. 


Dec. 31— 


Increase. 




1913 


1914 

14 

12 

48 

9 

120 

81 

11 

19 

6 

IS 

11 

24 

39 

56 

38 

3 

4 

9 

2 


1913 


1914 


Commissioner's office 


15 

10 

27 

8 

104 

86 

9 

13 

3 

13 

11 

24 

38 

46 

37 

3 

4 

7 

3 


»1 
2 

21 
1 

16 

»5 
2 
6 
3 
2 


$26,400 
16,600 
69,480 
12.9C0 
154,260 
122,420 
15,8-10 
25, 740 
12,020 
18,480 
16,200 
24,000 
34,440 

47,s:o 

19.560 
4,500 
3,300 
8,400 
4,140 


$24,020 

20,oro 

146,600 

13,260 

181, HO 

119, 120 

19,500 

41,780 

22,140 

21,540 

16.920 

25, 140 

35,280 

58,560 

20,640 

4,500 

3,780 

9,600 

2,760 


i $2,380 

3,420 

77,120 

300 


Swretarv's office 


( 'Lief examiner 


DM ursoments and accounts 


Tar ill s 


26.8S0 


Statistic 


•3,300 
3,660 


Tourth sect ion board 


Inquiry 


16,010 
10,120 


L&r 


Claim* 


3,060 
720 


('orresj ondence 


I)<xl-ets 




1,140 


Mails and files 


I 
10 

1 


8iu 


stenography 


10, 740 


Nipf lies 


1,030 


Printme section 


Doniment section 




480 


lrr'irej! 


2 


1,200 
* 1,380 


Library 






Total 


461 


521 


eo 


636,560 


786,300 


149,740 







Yours, very truly, 



» Decrease. 



James S. Harlan, Chairman. 



SAFETY ON RAILROADS. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " To enable the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission to keep informed regarding and to force compli- 
ance with acts to promote the safety of employees and travelers upon 
railroads, including the employment of inspectors." The current ap- 
propriation is $245,000 and you are asking for $245,000. Now, this 
is the first year you have been working under this consolidation, and 
I see that you are suggesting that we eliminate certain language from 
this provision. You are asking us to drop out the following lan- 
guage : 

The act requiring common carriers to make reports of accidents and authoriz- 
es: investigations thereof; and to enable the Interstate Commerce Commission 
to investigate and test block-signal and train-control systems and appliances in- 
tendpd to promote the safety of railway operation, as authorized by the joint 
resolution approved June 30, 1900, and the provision of the sundry civil act 
approved May 27. 1008. 

Mr. McGinty. The reason for not putting that in was that under 
this consolidation all matters of safety would come under this one 
appropriation and would be taken care of by our one division of 
safety. However, there is no objection to leaving it in. 

Mr. Sherley. Undel* the act conferring this power, do you have 
jurisdiction over the sanitation of trains? 



816 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. McGinty. That probably is under the Public Health Service 
of the Treasury Department. 

Mr. Harlan. We have had one such complaint during the past 
year, but we have not felt authorized under the law to take any action- 
The health authorities have general control 

The Chairman (interposing). Have you during the past year had 
any applications to investigate or test block-signal systems or train- 
control systems? 

Mr. McGinty. Yes, sir. During the year, up to October 1, 1914, 
plans of 315 devices were presented to the commission for considera- 
tion. 

The Chairman. During what period? 

Mr. McGinty. From January 1 to October 1 of this year. Of this 
number 284 have been examined and opinions regarding the devices 
transmitted to the proprietors. Of the number of plans examined, 
131 of the devices disclosed were so impracticable and crude that they 
were considered practically worthless; 12 of them possessed merito- 
rious features, but, as a whole, required further development to enti- 
tle them to serious consideration; 19 were found to disclose devices 
which were not intended primarily to increase safety and which 
would not effect safety of railroad operation sufficiently to warrant 
further consideration being given them in these investigations; 22 
disclosed devices that were considered to possess merit from the 
standpoint of safety, and experimental tests of certain of these latter 
devices are desirable to determine their practical utility, and several 
experimental tests have been made on the lines of railroads, and the 
commission is now preparing a report to the Congress, which report 
will give in detail everything that has been done in this connection. 

Mr. Sherley. I would like to ask if you permit the use of the 
old-fashioned open stoves on passenger trains now? 

Mr. Harlan. I have not understood that the commission has any- 
thing td do with such matters as that. 

Mr. Sherley. In that connection I want to read to you the lan- 
guage of the item — " to promote the safety of employees and travel- 
ers upon railroads." I do not know of anything that could perhaps 
more directly and vitally affect the safety of travelers upon railroads 
than these old : fashioned open stoves in case of a wreck. 

Mr. Harlan. You have left out two words, Mr. Sherley — "to en- 
force compliance with acts to promote the safety of employees and 
travelers upon, railroads." Under the terms of these acts we have 
not considered that questions regarding open stoves in passenger 
cars could come before us. 

Mr. Sherley. Am I to understand that the commission does not 
think it has jurisdiction? 

Mr. Harlan. I will put my reply a little differently. If you will 
look at those acts you will see that they relate largely to specific ques- 
tions and state what our powers are. Apparently no one has ever 
thought that our powers under those acts extended to such matters 
as you have just suggested. 

Mr. Sherley. I have not examined the acts with that in mind, but 
it strikes me if your jurisdiction is limited to certain questions with 
regard to safety that the authority had better be eliminated or the 
acts broadened so as to give you real jurisdiction. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 317 

Mr. Harlan. The first act in this pamphlet is entitled " Safety- 
Appliance Act," and it specifically refers to brakes and matters of 
that kind. Then we have the hours-of -service act. I do not recall 
any act that in its terms touches the question of stoves or heating 
apparatus in passenger cars. 

Mr. Sherley. That is just one thing which can occur to a man and 
which would be important ? 

Mr. Harlan. I appreciate that. 

BOILER-INSPECTION SERVICE. 

The Chairman. The next item is, "For all authorized expendi- 
tures under the provisions of the act of February 17, 1911, to pro- 
mote the safety of employees and travelers upon railroads by com- 
pelling common carriers engaged in interstate commerce to equip 
their locomotives with safe and suitable boilers and appurtenances 
thereto," etc., and the appropriation is $220,000 and your estimate is 
$220,000. What was your unexpended balance in 1914? 

Mr. Graham. $17,612.06. 

The Chairman. Is that about the rate of expenditure or have 
you increased this year ? 

Mr. Graham. There was an increase of 2.2 per cent over the pre- 
ceding vear 1913, and in 1913 there was an increase of 32.2 per cent 
overl9i2. 

The Chairman. Has there been any diminution in the number of 
boiler explosions as a result of these inspections ? 

Mr. McGintt. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What has been the result of this work which 
has been going on for nearly four years ? 

Mr. McGintt. The number of locomotives inspected during 1914 
was 92,716; the number found defective, 49,137; the percentage found 
defective, 52.9 per cent; and the number ordered out of service, 
3,365. 

Mr. Harlan. May I interrupt? These same figures show that in 
1012 the percentage of locomotives found defective was 65.7; in 1913, 
60.3 ; and in 1914, 52.9. It seems to indicate a betterment of condi- 
tions, and the probability that accidents are occurring less frequently 
because of our inspections. 

The Chairman. Although still very bad? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Gillett. What was the proportion of those found defective 
and put out of commission ? I notice it was 3,000 last year. 

Mr. Harlan. In 1912 three thousand three hundred and odd loco- 
motives were ordered out of service; in 1913, more than 4,600; and 
in 1914, more than 3,300. 

Mr. Sherley. In that connection, there is pending in Congress 
a bill to give you jurisdiction not only over the boiler but over the 
entire locomotive. That bill will probably be enacted into law. 
What effect is that going to have on the expense of this work ? 

Mr. Harlan. The locomotive tender. The same inspectors, we 
think, with the expenditure of some additional time will be able to 
make those investigations. That is, in looking at the boiler they can 
also look at other parts of the locomotive and tender. 



318 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. Will they be competent to do that? 

Mr.. Harlan. We have thought generally they would be. 

The Chairman. They can do that very much larger inspection 
without a very considerable increase? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes. Without ;i very considerable increase in travel- 
ing expenses and maintenance, and without a great increase in the 
number of inspectors. 

The Chairman. In what condition must a locomotive be before it 
is ordered out of service? 

Mr. Harlan. Mr. Chairmaji, that is a question that I can not 
answer. Our inspectors could tell you. 

The Chairman. How has the number of accidents compared in 
these years? 

Mr. Harlan. In 1912 the number of accidents that got on our 
records was 856; in 1913, 820; and in 1914 the number was 555; 
1914 showed a decrease of 32.3 per cent in accidents over those for 
1913. 

The Chairman. In 1914 there was a very perceptible reduction in 
the number of accidents? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir. The number killed in 1912 was 91 ; in 1913, 
36; and in 1914, 23. The number injured in 1912 was 1,005; 1913, 
911; and 1914, 614. Those figures seem to show that our work has 
been beneficial. 

Mr. Mondell. To what extent has the reduced number of trains in 
1914 tended to reduce the number of accidents ? 

Mr. Harlan. The reduction in the number of passenger trains you 
have in mind occurred, according to my information, since this cur- 
rent year commenced, so that the figures are not yet available. 

Mr. Sherley. There has been more reduction in the number of pas- 
sengers carried than in the number of trains? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir; I presume so; but, as a matter of fact, those 
reductions have taken place since the 1st of July, very largely. 

The Chairman. Is it the opinion of the commission that it is ad- 
visable to extend the inspection to the other portions of the locomo- 
tive and tender? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir; we went over that with a great deal of care 
and thought that it was an advantageous thing to do. 

The Chairman. In connection with the pending bill? 

Mr. Harlan. In connection with the pending bill; yes, sir. The 
pending bill had consideration in conference, and my recollection is 
that it was somewhat modified by the commission; in its present 
form it has had the approval of the commission. They think it a 
desirable thing. 

The Chairman. Do you think that the increased inspection will 
tend to reduce the number of accidents? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir. I think we all feel that it will be a helpful 
measure and bring results. 

The Chairman. Is there any resistance on the part of the railroads 
to the enforcing of the law ? 

Mr. Harlan. No. We have had occasional complaints by carriers 
that our inspectors are too strict. 

The Chairman. That is rather a good complaint? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir; that is rather a good sort of complaint. 
They have not been made very frequently, but we have had such com- 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 319 

plaints. We have had cases, for instance, where an inspector ordered 
a locomotive immediately out of the service so that it was not per- 
mitted to haul the train 4 or 5 miles to a repair point. That kind of 
strictness has been complained of. The same way with cars. They 
have been ordered out of service where the railroad people thought , 
they could be hauled without danger to the next repair point. We 
have had complaints of strictness in those particulars, but no other 
complaints that I recall. 

Mr. Sherley. Do you compile statistis showing the accidents that 
occur outside of those resulting from collisions or derailment or some 
injury to the train; in other words, a man is run over at a street 
crossing? 

Mr. Harlan. I think under the law the carriers are required to * 
report all those things to us and we have regular annual statistics on 
those questions. Of course, as you know, in case of a serious accident 
we investigate. 

Mr. Sherley. I understand ; but what I had in mind was the com- 
monplace killing of people. 

Mr. Harlan. In the annual report for 1914, at page 100, are the 
statistics for the year ending June 30, 1914, which seem to cover all 
accidents. The totals are somewhat large. The grand totals show 
that there were killed during 1914, 10,302 persons, and in 1913, 10,964. 
There were injured during 1914, 192,662, and in 1913, 200,308. Those 
were accidents on the steam railways. The electric railway accidents 
are shown separately. The figures differ a little on electric lines. 
The figures for 1914 are slightly in excess of those for 1913, but on 
the steam lines there was a small percentage of improvement when 
the two years are compared. 

Mr. Gillett. As Mr. Mondell suggested, there was probably less 
traffic in 1914 than in 1913? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir. Following page 100 in our annual report 
are other statistics, in which we attempt to analyze the causes of 
these accidents. 

Mr. Gillett. I notice that somewhat more than half of the 
$200,000 is spent for salaries and $85,000 for other expenses. In 
general, for what kind of other expenses is the money spent? 

Mr. Graham. We will give you a statement of all the expenses. 
Traveling expenses, communication, services other than personal, 
materials, stationery supplies, office furniture, mechanical office 
equipment, rent, and other equipment, $85,166.16. 

Mr. Harlan. The per diem and expense of travel are a very im- 
portant part. 

Mr. Gillett. What do you mean by the per diem? 

Mr. Harlan. The per diem charge covers their hotel bills. 

Mr. Gillett. You mean sustenance? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. McGinty. We will leave this statement with you. 

Mr. Mondell. Judge, do you assume that you have any authority 
with regard to the speed of trians ? 

Mr. Harlan. No ; wq have never understood that we had. 

Mr. Mondell. You have never made any effort to regulate the 
speed of trains? 

Mr. Harlan. No ; I assume, expressing my thought at the moment, 
that in case of discrimination against one community in favor of 



320 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

i 

another in the matter of fast trains given to one and denied to the 
other, we might consider that we had jurisdiction; but on the general 
question we have not thought so. 

Mr. Mondell. What I had in mind was the speed of trains as it 
affects the safety of passengers. It has developed that with the 
increase of the weight of the cars, and therefore the weight of the 
trains, the use of steel coaches, there is greater danger of accident, 
unless the rail is correspondingly strengthened, in the running of 
fast trains than in the running of trains at moderate speed, x ou 
have never assumed any authority to control in that matter? 

Mr. Harlan. Not to control; but in our investigations of accidents 
we have frequently found that speed had some relation to the acci- 
dent, and we have criticized the carriers on that ground, but we have 
not assumed that we had any general power to control the speed of 
railroad trains. 

Mr. Sherley. You do have jurisdiction to require automatic 
brakes, which bear a relationship to the speed and weight of the 
trains? 

Mr. Harlan. We have certain standards in those matters under 
the law, and we compel compliance with those standards. 

Mr. Sherley. The standards are dependent somewhat on both 
speep! and weight? 

Mr. Harlan. Yes; sir; I assume we do make a difference in our 
standards according to the character of the equipment. 

Mr. Chairman, on this question of taking in the inspection of 
tenders and other parts of locomotives it may be of interest to you 
to know that in his third annual report the chief of our locomotive- 
boiler inspection division shows that during the last year his in- 
spectors found 2,141 locomotives defective in respect to matters for 
which the present laws do not provide a remedy ; of these, 1,155 had 
defective wheels. I refer to this because it illustrates the statement 
I have made that our locomotive-boiler inspectors can very readily 
look at the whole machine and the tender and ascertain what other 
defects may exist. 

The Chairman. Were those serious defects? 

Mr. Harlan. The report does not indicate. It simply indicates 
that our inspectors found those defects and reported them to the 
railroad authorities. 

The Chairman. Although they were not required to do so? 

Mr. Harlan. Although under the law they were not required to 
do so; and almost one-half of these were cases of defective wheels. 

The Chairman. My attention has been called to the fact that the 
claim has been made that the men now engaged in making the boiler 
inspections have not had the necessary mechanical training and 
skill to make these investigations, and that it would require a sepa- 
rate force of men. Can you state, from your information, whether 
it is necessary to have a separate force to do this work ? 

Mr. Harlan. Mr. Chairman, I would a little prefer to advise my- 
self more fully on that point and make you a statement in writing. 
I have been under the general impression that the addition to our 
force would not be considerable if the proposed bill should pass. 
Of course, we will need some additional clerks to keep the additional 
records. It may be the suggestion you make may prove to be the 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 321 

case, but I have been under the impression that it would not require 
a very large additional force. 

Mr- Mondell. In any event it would not be necessary to have two 
separate forces? 

Mr. Harlan. That is our view — that it could all be done under 
this one division. 

Mr. Mondell. The men qualified to inspect the boilers have suffi- 
cient knowledge of the working parts 01 an engine to be able to 
inspect the engine as a whole? 

Mr. Harlan. The secretary tells me that our present force of in- 
spectors under the locomotive-boiler act consists entirely of trained 
men who have been sufficiently skilled to perform the entire inspec- 
tion. I assume from that that the commission's impression has been 
that they would also be able to look at all parts of the locomotive 
and the tender. 

Mr. Mondell. Your inspectors are not merely boiler makers and 
men with technical knowledge of boilers, but men with a general 
knowledge of locomotives? 

Mr. Harlan. And how to run them, all the parts of a locomotive. 

Mr. McGinty. I discussed this particular bill with our chief in- 
spector of boilers, who said that he would not need any addi- 
tional force whatsoever to take care of the additional inspections, 
unless perhaps some additional clerical assistance should be neces- 
sary in the offices of the district inspectors, so that they could spend 
more time on the road, whereas at present the majority of inspectors 
consume a week or more of each month in office work, checking 
reports, etc. 

VALUATION OF CARRIERS. 

[See p. 940.] 

The Chairman. You have had altogether about $2,400,000? 

Mr. Prouty. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you are asking for next year $3,000,000? 

Mr. Prouty. The commission has asked for $3,000,000. I asked 
for $3,500,000. When I was here a year ago, touching an appropria- 
tion for the present fiscal year, I said to you gentlemen that while 
the commission had asked for $2,000,000, in my judgment, if the 
work was developed up to the proper point and prosecuted in an 
economical way, it would require $2,500,000. You appropriated 
$1,900,000. You appropriated $2,000,000, but you made $100,000 of 
it apply to the previous year in lieu of a deficiency appropriation. 
Now it has turned out exactly as I expected. We are spending 
to-day at the rate of $2,000,000, but if we develop the work as we 
should for the next six months, an additional five or six hundred 
thousand dollars will be required. 

The Chairman. For the balance of this fiscal year? 

Mr. Prouty. Yes. 

The Chairman. Are you asking for that in a deficiency or are 
you going to ask for it here? 

Mr. Pkopty. I understand the commission has voted to ask for 
$400,000 in the way of a deficiency appropriation. 

The Chairman. The understanding was that the money would 
be appropriated as rapidly as you could do the work. 

73785—15 21 



322 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. I 

Mr. Pbouty. The situation, Mr. Chairman, is this: At the present 
time we have five districts and we have in the field in each district 
eight road and track parties. The road and track party is the party 
that goes over the railroad, measures the embankment, inventories 
the property with the exception of structures of considerable size; 
bridges more than 20 feet in length, buildings, etc.. are inventoried 
by another party ; but the road and track party takes an inventory 
and measures the quantities and therefore sets the pace at which the 
Work is to proceed. The eight road and track parties which we have 
began work on the 1st of September ; that is, we developed up to that 
point, so that on September 1 we began work with eight parties in 
every district. In the month of December we covered about 1,500 
miles; in the month of October we covered 1,800 miles; in the month 
of November, owing to various causes, but principally inclement 
weather, we fell back to between 1,500 and 1,600 miles. I am satis- 
fied that eight parties in each district, 40 parties in all, can cover 
approximately 24,000 miles a year, about 2,000 miles a month. 

Now, we are spending at the rate of $2,000,000 a year; $2,000,000 
a year, with perhaps some slight addition, because our land work is 
not fully developed yet, will carry all parts of the work along at the 
same pace; that is to say, would cover approximately from 20,000 to 
25,000 miles of railroad a year. Of that $2,000,000, over $500,000 is 
what may be termed overhead expense, and that expense would not 
be increased if you doubled the number of our parties; and it has 
always been my belief that we should conduct this work at the rate 
of about 50,000 a year; that is to say, we should practically clean up 
the work between July 1 next and July 1 four years later. 

Mr. Gillett. When you say miles, do you mean miles of single 
track? 

Mr. Prouty. Miles of single track. There are about 250^000 miles 
of single track in this country and you must add about 1 mile of side 
track and additional track for every mile of single track in order to 
know how many miles of railroad in all there are. Our surveys in 
September, October, and November just about maintained that rela- 
tion; that is to say, we surveyed of all tracks about one-half more 
than we did of first track. 

Mr. Gillett. Let me make sure that I understand you. As 1 
understand, you do about 1,200 miles of single track and in addition 
about half as much more? 

Mr. PfiouTr. We did in September, for example, 1,500 miles of 
first track and we did between 2,200 and 2,300 miles of all track, 
and that is about the proportion which exists in this country. 

The Chairman. Has there been any intimation from the railroads 
that in view of existing conditions they would be as well satisfied 
if vou slowed up a trifle in your work? 

Mr. Prouty. No; I have received no intimations from the rail- 
roads to that effect. The intimations that we get from the railroads 
come mostly through the press. They get something into the news- 
papers and mark the copy and send it to me. That is the only infor- 
mation I get. There is a presidents' committee which represents 
practically all the railroads in this country, and the secretary of that 
committee is Mr. Hume, and I see him every Monday and come in 
very close contact with him. Mr. Hume has not intimated to me he 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 323 

thought we ought to slow up on the work because he knows pretty 
well we can not slow up. If this work is to be economically done 
you either would have to stop altogether and begin all over again 
or else go ahead with it. You can not afford to do this work at 
my halfway pace. 

The Chairman. The railroads themselves are Necessarily doing a 
\ery large amount of work as a result of this valuation work? 

Mr. Prouty. They are doing more talking than they are work up 
to the present time, but some 01 them have done a good deal of work. 
The Boston & Maine road, for example, which is poor and can not 
afford it, has been obliged to do a great deal of work and is laying 
out a great deal of money. They had no maps at all. They had no 
records at all. 

Mr. Ghxett. How much does it cost them relative to your cost? 

Mr. Prouty. One hundred dollars a mile. The Boston & Maine 
road has laid out — at least they furnished me those figures and I 
have no doubt they are correct-— approximately $100 a mile on one- 
half of its system up to the present time, and in order to complete 
the work it will cost $100 a mile on the balance of the system. 

Mr. Giixett. How much does it cost you a mile? 

Mr. Prouty. It will cost us about half that. But the Boston & 
Maine is peculiarly situated. The Boston & Maine had no maps at 
all and had no records at all. It is a very old road and it had to 
dig down to the very bottom of things and get the best information 
it could. 

The Chairman. I have heard it suggested that you are jnaking it 
very difficult for the roads by compelling them to prepare complete 
maps of a uniform character, whereas if you would accept maps on 
varying scales it would not be nearly so expensive. 

Mr. Prouty. We do accept maps on varying scales. We prescribe 
a certain scale. We prescribe a certain scale for the ordinary road 
and track map and a different scale for the station map where the 
tracks are thicker and have to be shown in greater detail. But we 
accept maps on any scale provided the maps will show the informa- 
tion which we must have. For example, we have just accepted the 
maps of the Southern Pacific, which are on a scale four times as 
large as the ordinary scale. Ordinarily we have 1 mile of railroad 
"n each sheet. Now we allow them to put 4 miles of railroad on 
rach sheet. 

The Chairman. So long as it contains the data you must have? 

Mr. Prouty. Yes: out in those desert countries you can show 4 
or even 8 or 10 miles on a sheet, and we accept whatever map they 
have, provided it shows the information we must have. 

The Chairman. You have five divisions in your organization? 

Mr. Prouty. Yes, sir ; five districts. 

The Chairman. And you have field parties now at work? 

Mr. Prouty. Yes, sir; eight in each district. 

The Chairman. And you estimate it will take you how long from 
the 1st of next July to complete the field work ? 

Mr. Prouty. That depends on how much money you give us. 

The Chairman. Assuming we give you all the money you ask? 

Mr. Prouty. Then I estimate we will do our surveying work in 
shout four years from the 1st of next July; that is, if the work is 



824 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

done in the most economical way it will be covered in about four 
•years from the 1st of next July. 

Mr. Gillett. At the rate of $2,500,000 a year? 

Mr. Prouty. No; at the rate of $3,500,000 a year. While the com- 
♦ mission has asked for $3,000,000 this year, I want to say to you 
gentlemen, now, as I did a year ago, in order to conduct the work 
economically it will require $3,500,000. 

The Chairman. You will know the absolute necessity next De- 
cember, and we can give you that additional half a million dollars 
then. 

Mr. Prouty. It will be perfectly satisfactory if it is done in that 
way. 

The Chairman. We have done that so far. 

Mr. Prouty. . Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. There has been some question raised as to whether 
we have given the commission as much as it could use. My recollec- 
tion is we have given you the money just as rapidly as you could 
use it. 

Mr. Prouty. Yes, sir ; up to the present time that is true. If you 
appropriate $3,000,000 now, it will result in our coming back here in 
a year from now for a deficiency appropriation of from $500,000 to 
$700,000, if we go ahead as we ought to, just as we shall be back here 
for a deficiency appropriation of $500,000. 

Mr. Gillett. You think you can finish the work in four years at 
that rate? 

Mr. Prouty. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That isr the field work only. 

. Mr. Prouty. There will be a lag at first between the field work and 
the final appraisal of the railroads, because there are certain funda- 
mental questions that have to be determined before we can put the 
valuation on a railroad. For example, you have got to determine the 
amount to be allowed for engineering ; you have got to determine the 
interest charge ; you have got to determine a great many of those pre- 
liminary questions. The valuation division does not have anything 
to do with that. It will take the commision a year or two before they 
determine those questions ; but when they are once determined, then, 
as soon as we get our surveys completed, there is no reason why we 
should not apply prices and overhead charges and give the valuation. 

The Chairman. Judge, it was suggested to me that from the stand- 
point of the railroad, and perhaps from everybody's standpoint, there 
was one omission in the present law that perhaps should be supplied, 
and that is that a great many questions will be raised during the 
progress of the work which if they could be authoritatively deter- 
mined by some one before the work was completed would make the 
valuation of much greater value. For instance, the railroads can not 
raise such questions until they get into court on a rate fixed on the 
valuation, while if some of these intermediate questions could be de- 
termined before you have gone too far we might save time and make 
the work more effective. 

Mr. Prouty. I have expressed that opinion myself and I think 
that is so. While the railroad may raise the question before the 
commission when the tentative valuation is filed, it can not raise 
the question before the courts until that valuation is used in a r»ie 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 325 

case, and it is quite possible we might proceed upon some wrong 
theory and never know it until the valuation work was entirely com- 
pleted. Therefore I have thought if any way could be devised — I 
do not know whether one could be or not— -so that the railroad might 
raise those questions as we went along and get the opinion of the 
court it would be very helpful. 
The Chairman. It would obviate a lot of work being done again ? 
Mr. Prouty. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Unless the finding of the commission could be 
conclusive? 

Mr. Prouty. Well, you can not make the finding of the commis- 
sion conclusive without giving the railroad a chance to be heard* 
I think you can say that the railroads shall have an opportunity to 
be heard, and that after hearing the determination or the commis- 
sion of the questions of fact shall be conclusive. But ; then, Mr. 
Harlan's opinion about that would be worth more than mine. I have 
thought that should be done. What I am trying to do in getting 
together the quantities and the inventory and all that is to so coop- 
erate with the railroads as we go along that there never can be any 
question but what those are^ correct so that we start out — if we ever, 
get this valuation done — with a virtual admission by the railroad 
that the quantities are correct. Of course, prices will change. They 
vary from year to year, and they will vary one five years with an- 
other five years, but the quantities should be determined once for all 
and we should know precisely what the railroads have. 

The Chairman. Are the railroads cooperating freely in that part 
of the work? 

Mr. Prouty. I think they are. Up to the present time I have had 
do fault to find. 

Mr. Gillett. You said you thought it would be well if certain 
questions could be brought oef ore the court as you go along; can you ( 
think of any way that could be brought about? 

Mr. Prouty. I have not given that sufficient consideration so that 
I would like to express an opinion. I do not know that it could be 
made a judicial question that the court could take cognizance of until 
the valuation was completed and used in a rate case. I do not know 
that that could be done. It has occurred to me it might be done. 

Mr. Sherley. Suppose vou give it some thought before you come 
to revise your notes and then submit any suggestions you may have 
touching the matter. 

Mr. Prouty. I would be glad to do that, but it is a question of some 
delicacy and I would want to think about it before expressing a final- 
opinion. I will transmit my views to the committee at an early date 
by letter. 

Mr. Sherley. I understand that, and the committee would like to 
have your matured opinion about it. 

Mr. Giixett. Concurrently with this work of examining the track, 
etc., is the other work in reference to gathering information concern- 
ing their stocks and bonds, etc., going on ? 

Mr. Prouty. It is. I want to say this because I want to put myself 
right against anything that may possibly happen in the future. Some 
people connected with this work think that the sums which I name 
now are altogether too small ; that it will cost a great deal more than 1 



* i 



826 SUNDKY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

that. Now, what this work will cost depends on what we undertake 
tb do. For example, we are required to show the original cost of the 
land which the railroad owns. In doing that we have to go back to 
every original deed and consider the cost of each parcel obtained 
by tne railroad. We are also required to show the present value of 
that land. Now, when we show the present value we do not pay 
any attention to the different parcels; We just say, " Here is so much 
land which the railroad owns and it is worth so much money." Some 
of the railroads have objected to that, and say that we ought to con- 
sider it parcel by parcel in determining the present value. I put that 
question up to the commission and the commission advised me that 
it thinks we ought to consider it parcel by parcel. In my own mind I 
do not feel it lmew exactly what it was saying when it said that, and 
I- do not think it will adhere to it, but if it should, it will cost us a 
good many thousand dollars more; I think, perhaps, two or three 
hundred thousand dollars a year more. 

Mr. Harlan. Just illustrate what you mean by that. 

Mr. Gillett. The purpose is to show the difference between the 
cost price and the present price? 

' Mr. Prouty. Yes ; that is their idea. I mean this, Mr. Chairman ; 
here is a stretch of railroad where the land is all alike for one mile. 
I can illustrate it better by taking the land up in my country, where 
the land was acquired from different individuals. Possibly in that 
mile they crossed half a dozen farms. Today we take the whole 
utile and we say there is so much land of a certain kind — of a cer- 
tain value. We ascertain the value in that way. The railroads say, 
" You are obliged to take each parcel ; you are obliged to say, here is 
a certain section that comes from John Jones's farm." Now, to 
take that section out would damage John Jones's farm so many 
thousand dollars, and we are obliged in that way to go from parcel 
to parcel. I do not think that will ever be done, but I am very sur* 
if it were done it would cost a very great deal more money than to do 
it the way we are doing it now. 

Mr. Gillett. It would take more time? 

Mr. Prouty. It would take a great deal more time, and would be 
an entirely different proposition. It would cost $10 a mile more. 

Mr. Harlan. How do you apply that thought to a terminal con- 
dition ? Take the Pennsylvania Railroad station site in New York, 
which consists of a great many lots. 

Mr. Prouty. It would be impossible to do it in the case of a termi- 
nal situation, because every boundary practically has been obliter- 
ated there, and still, roughly, it might be done. So it is with this 
accounting work. The Congress has required us to show the original 
cost to date in detail of the railroad property. If we were to carry 
that out to a literal compliance it will cost more to do the accounting 
work than it will the engineering work. It would cost an immense 
sum. I suppose it would add $15,000,000 to the figures I have been 
talking about here. I do not think that Congress will ever ask 
us to do that, because it does not do any good, and I do not think 
the commission will be disposed to do it. But still, if that were to 
be done it woirid increase these figures. I am assuming in giving 
these figures that we are going to do what is necessary in a common- 
sense and in a practical way to ascertain the facts that the Govern- 
ment has to know. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 327 

DEFICIENCY IN GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Mr. Harlan. Mr. Chairman, I called your attention to the fact 
that for the ensuing year we will probably have to ask for a deficiency 
appropriation before the year is over. 

The Chairman. In what item? 

Mr. Harlan. In the general appropriation. 

The Chairman. Why do you not submit a supplemental estimate! 

Mr. Harlan. I was going to ask whether you would prefer at this 
time to have the full estimate for the year. 

The Chairman. Yes; submit a supplemental estimate, and under 
the law you have ta set forth the reasons for your failure to ask for 
the full amount in the regular book of estimates. I think it will be 
better to do that since you know that you will require more than you 
have asked for. 

Mr. McGinty. On the basis of the pay roll alone it will be neces- 
sary to have an increase in the appropriation. 

$fr. Gillett. How did you happen to put in this estimate? 

Mr. McGinty. As I explained in the beginning, the increases have 
occurred since the estimate was put in. 

The Chairman. And the appropriation for the commission was 
reduced upon their own suggestion $5(T,000 for 1914? 

Mr. McGintt. Yes; and, Mr. Chairman, for 1912 and 1913, re- 
spectively, you gave the commission $1,000,000. It has been reduced 
from that amount. 

The Chairman. You told us you could get along with less than 
that amount 

Mr. McGinty. Yes; and we did for one year. 

printing and binding. 

•The Chairman. For printing you had $125,000 this year and you 
are asking for $120,000. I thought you stated you were going to 
reduce that $15,000. 

Mr. McGintt. No, sir ; we do not propose to reduce it below what 
it is by $15,000. 

The* Chairman. You said you did. 

Mr. McGintt. We requested $135,000 last year. 

The Chairman. That is what you asked for. 

Mr. McGintt. It was a reduction under what we asked for by 
$15,000. 

The Chairman. How much did vou have unexpended last year? 

Mr. Graham. $84,572.63. 

The Chairman, unexpended? 

Mr. McGnrrr. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How do you explain that! 

Mr. McGintt. That was due to the fact that the valuation print- 
ing was not ready by the end of that fiscal year. As you will recall, 
we told' you we could not possibly tell how quickly the valuation 
printing would be ready. It is now ready and is being printed 
rapidly, and there will be guite an expense; in fact, an enormous ex- 
pense for valuation printing because they will have a number of 
forms and those forms must be put in plates, and the larger expense 
will be due to the plate printing. 



328 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. I thought you would have all those forms out by 
this time. 

Mr. McGintt. No, sir; we have not. 

Mr. Gillett. Is not the cost of printing included in the cost of the 
valuation work? 

Mr. McGintt. Yes; but it does not come out of the valuation 
appropriation. 

Mr. Gillett. How much a year does it amount to ? 

Mr. McGinty. There is no way of telling how much it is going 
to be. 

Mr. Proutt. We are going to require the railroads to furnish their 
own blanks. We shall prescribe the form and they will perhaps buy 
that form from the Government printer. We snail have to print 
forms enough to serve upon them, so that they may know what the 
forms are. We, of course, will require a certain number of forms 
in our work, but I do not think that our printing expense will be 
anything very extravagant. I would not want to undertake to put 
it in dollars and cents now, but 1 do not think it will be very large. 

Mr. Gillett. What do you mean by that, roughly speaking? 

The Chairman. What do you call a large sum, Judge? 

Mr. Prouty. How much have we spent, Mr. McGinty, up to the 
present time? 

Mr. McGinty. From July 1 to December 31, 1914, we have spent 
$11,375.13. 

Mr. Prouty. I was going to say somewhere between $30,000 and 
$50,000 a year would cover it. 

Mr. Gillett. Is that for all the printing, including the printing of 
the railroads? 

Mr. Prouty. That is our printing. Mr. McGinty, $o you think 
that is about right ? 

Mr. McGinty. I think that is about right; and if it is between 
$30,000 and $50,000, that will be a good part of our printing allot- 
ment. 

Mr. Gillett. Why do the railroads have to furnish the blanks? 

Mr. Prouty. Of course I am talking about something I do not 
know anything about. I may be utterly wrong about it. 

Mr. McGinty. I do not think it will run to $30,000; not more than 
that, at any rate. 

Mr. Gillett. A moment ago you said that was about right. 

Mr. McGinty. I think $30,000 is about right. I think that is the 
maximum. 

Mr. Prouty. We can not get any printing done except at the Gov- 
ernment Printing Office. I would almost be willing to pay for it 
myself if I could have it done at some other place l>esides the Gov- 
ernment Printing Office. It takes us 90 days to get any work from 
them. We produced the forms necessary to do our telephone and 
telegraph work and sent them over there and it was 90 days before 
we got the forms, and in the meantime we could not do a thing. 

The Chairman. Did you tell them you wanted them in a hurry? 

Mr. Prouty. Yes, sir ; we put it on the " expedite " schedule, but 
that does not expedite the work. 

Mr. Mo n dell. When was that? 

Mr. Prouty. That was on the 1st of July, sir, and ran from July 
through Au list and September, h 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 329 

Mr. Gillett. Why should the railroads have to furnish their own 
blanks? 

Mr. Prouty. I do not know why. the commission should furnish 
the blanks. They have to make the report to us. We simply prescribe 
the form on which that report shall be made. They make, for ex- 
ample, an inventory of their equipment showing us the cars and 
locomotives they have on hand. We prescribe the form but they fur- 
nish the material. 

Mr. Harlan. They buy other blanks which the commission has 
prescribed. 

Mr. McGinty. Mr. Chairman, in the deficiency of April 6, 1914, 
you appropriated $25,000 to take care of what we thought would be 
the valuation work, of which sum $4,500 may be spent for State 
forms at cost. In the sundry civil bill the reading is this : " For the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, $125,000, of which sum $4,500 shall 
be available to print and furnish to the States report-form blanks," 
and you do not say " at cost." Does that mean that we may give them 
the forms? 

The Chairman. No ; they have got to pay for them. You do not 
ask for that at all this year. 

Mr. McGinty. It was not requested last year. 

Mr. Graham. It was not requested last year but it was inserted in 
the bill. We had not determined on the amount. 

The Chairman. It was not in the estimates, but you came in here 
and told us it was very important that you should do it although they 
did not ask for it. 

Mr. Graham. That is exactly right. 

The Chairman. And the various State commissioners wrote to us 
and other Members of Congress about it. 

Mr. McGinty. Now, Mr. Chairman, here is what we are up against 
this year. There will probably be four new classifications which will 
require report forms from telephone companies, water carriers, pipe 
lines, and telegraph companies. Now, as soon as we prescribe the 
classifications either the State railroad or utilities commissions will 
ask us for those forms. Now, may we print those and sell them to 
the States at cost? That falls within the same category as the forms 
we now furnish. 

The Chairman. Why should not the telephone and telegraph com- 
panies print their own blanks? 

Mr. McGinty. They would not be uniform. 

The Chairman. They would be uniform if you prescribed one 
form for all of them. The reason why we furnished these forms to 
the State commissions was on your argument that they were willing 
to make these reports, but they had no appropriation from which 
they could buy the forms. 

Mr. McGinty. Yes. 

The Chairman. That is not true of these public-utilities com- 
panies. 

Mr. McGinty. I do not know how the commission looks upon this 
matter, because I have not said anything to any member of the com- 
mission about it. 

The Chairman. All you have to do is to prescribe the form and 
tell them to furnish the reports in that way. 

Mr. McGinty. But it all falls in the same category. 



330 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. No; it is entirely different. Some of these com- 
missioners not only did not have any appropriation, but their legis- 
latures would not meet for four years. 

Mr. McGintt. You understand it will pay for itself, as the States 
will reimburse the United States the cost of the work. It costs the 
Government nothing in the end. They will all be uniform if we 
can print them at the Government Printing Office. 

The Chairman. If you will submit a provision along the lines yon 
desire, we will see what can be done. 

Mr. McGinty. The provision we would submit, Mr. Chairman, 
would be exactly in accordance with what is in the deficiency bill, 
only we would increase the amount, say, to $10,000 for the reasons 
just stated. 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION. 

Washington, January j, 1915. 
Hon. John J. Fitzgerald. 

Chairman Committee on Appropriation*, Home of Repretvntatire*. 

My Dear Sir : The urgent deficiency bill of April 6, 1914, in respect to print- 
ing and binding for the Interstate Commerce Commission provided tlwt : " For 
printing and binding for the Interstate Commerce Commission, $25,000, of which 
sum $4,500 shall be a vn liable to print and furnish to the States, at cost, report- 
form blanks.'* 

The sundry civil bill of August 1. 1914. referring to the same subject, pro- 
vided as follows: "For the Interstate Commerce Commission, $125,000, of 
which sum $4,500 shall be available to print and furnish to the States report- 
form blanks." 

I am transmitting herewith statement of the blank annual report forms fur- 
nished to the various States at cost, in accordance with provisions of the de- 
ficiency act first referred to, which is self-explanatory. 

For the year ending June 30, 1915, an increase in the number of interstate 
forms will be needed, the necessity therefor being due principally to the in- 
crease in the number of corporations from which reports will be required and 
especially because of the general revision of report forms for the current fiscal 
year. This revision will be far more extensive than it has been since 190S. 
because material changes are requisite to adapt the report forms to the com- 
mission's revised cassiflcaion of accounts that became effective July 1. 1914, 
and because it has seemed important, as well as opportune, that the require- 
ments in the forms for reports be comprehensively revised and changed mate- 
rially in details of arrangement involving a printed page of slightly greater 
dimensions. The revision of these forms will necessitate a large expense for 
compostion and plating not usually incurred. 

In addition to the needs for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1914, interstate 
report forms are in course of preparation for large telephone companies and 
for large carriers by water and separate modified forms are in contemplation 
for the lesser important carriers of the same classes. Similar forms will be de- 
signed for telegraph companies and for pipe-line companies. 

At the annual convention of the National Association of Railway Commis- 
sioners, held in this city in November last, a special committee on the revision 
of annual-report forms for State commissions was appointed. It is the purpose 
and desire of the States that the State forms harmonize, as nearly as practica- 
ble, with the Interstate forms, which will necessiate the reprinting and replat- 
ing of the State forms which will correspond to those interstate forms which 
must be changed because of the modification of the classiflcaion above referred 
to; also the railroad and utilities commissions of the States will doubtless call 
upon us to furnish for the States the blank forms for the telephone, telegraph, 
and pipe-line companies, in order that the accounting practices and statistical 
compilations may be uniform. It is extremely desirable, as explained in the 
past, that there should be this uniformity as between the State and interstate 
forms. It is impracticable at this time to give any detailed estimate of the prob- 
able number of forms that the respective States will desire, but it is believed 
that the cost therefor will not exceed $10,000. Bearing in mind the desire of 
your committee that the States should pay for these forms, we would respect- 



ST7NDEY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 



831 



fully suggest that In the appropriation for printing and binding for this com- 
mission there be embodied a provision reading, in substance, as follows : 

" For printing and binding for the Interstate Commerce Commission, $120,000, 
of which sum not exceeding $10,000 shall be available to print and furnish to 
the States, at cost, report-form blanks." 
Yours, very truly, 

James S. Harlan, Chairman. 

Blank annual report forms furnished to various States, at cost, in accordance with pro 
visions of th' deficiency act of Apr. 6, 1914. 





Reports for steam carriers. 




State forms, at 
£0 cents each. 


Interstate. 


State. 


Form A t at 
69 cents each. 


Form B, at 
63 cents each. 


Form F, at 
51 cents each. 




Num- 
ber. 


Amount 


Num- 
ber. 


Amount. 


Num- 
ber. 


Amount. 


Num- 
ber. 


Amount 


Alabama. . 


100 
80 
50 

225 

120 
30 
85 
60 
75 

150 
80 


$50.00 
47.20 
29.50 

132. 75 
70.80 
17.70 
50.15 
35.40 
44.25 
88.50 
47.20 














Arizona 














Arkansas 














California 














Colorado 














Connecticut 














Florida 














Georgia 














Idaho 














Iowa 














Kansas 














Louisiana.. 














Maine 


55 

125 


32. 45 
73.75 














Maryland 




• 










Massachusetts 


27 


$18.63 


27 


$17.01 


87 


$44.37 


Michigan^ 


220 

no 

36 
400 
30 
50 
100 
25 
75 
60 


129.80 
64.90 
21.24 

23a 00 
17.70 
29.50 
59.00 
14.75 
44.25 
35.40 




Minnesota 














Mississippi 














Missouri 














Montana 














Nebraska. . 














Nevada . ... 














New Hampshire 














New Jersey 














New Mexico 














NewYorki 














North Carolina 


100 

20 

325 

100 

130 

800 

24 

80 

40 

50 

25 

120 

125 

200 

50 


59.00 
11.80 

Ml. 75 
59.00 
76.70 

472.00 
14.16 
47.20 
23.60 
29.50 
14.75 
70.80 
73.75 

118.00 
29.50 














North Dakota. 














Ohio 














Oklahoma. 














Oregon 














Pennsylvania 














Rhode Island 














Sooth Carolina 














Sooth Dakota. 














Vermont' 














Vermont* 














Virginia. 














Washington 














West vfi^ipia 














Wisconsin 




























Grand total 


4,530 


2,672.70 


27 


18.63 


27 


17.01 


87 


44.87 







1 Ordered by and furnished to commission of second district of New York. 
1 Ordered by and furnished to the Public Service Commission. 
* Ordered by and furnished to the tax commissioner of Vermont 



332 SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPRIAXION BILL, VM. 

Blank annual report forms furnished to various States, at cost—OmtiumeA. 



State. 


Reports for 

electric 

carr'ers, at 

54 cents each. 


Reports for 

express 

companies, at 

68 cents each. 


Reports for 

sleeping-car 

compan es. at 

$2.87 each. 


Ainouot 
paid. 


Amovnt 
unpaid. 


Total. 




Num- 
ber. 


Amount. 


Num- 
ber. 


Amount. 


Num 
ber. 


\mount. 




Alabama 


36 
12 


S10.44 
6.48 

""8i.*66 
8.10 


12 
4 

8 
15 
15 
6 
6 


S7.92 
2.64 
1.98 
9.90 
9.90 
3.(6 
3.96 


...... 


"iii.48* 


S86.36 
67.80 


"$3i.*48* 


S8AK 


Arirona 


67.fi 


Arkansas 


3L4S 


California. 


150 
15 


3 


8.61 


232.26 
88.80 
21.66 
54.11 


m» 


Colorado 




88.9 


Connecticut 








21.61 


Florida 










'"Him 
*"i37*40" 


64.11 


Georgia 


30 
10 
60 
40 


16.90 

5.40 

32.40 

21.60 






51.61 


Idaho 


20 
26 
16 
12 


13.20 
16.50 
10.56 
7.92 






. 62.86 


62.8* 


Iowa 






137.41 


Kansas 


5 


14.35 


93.71 
7.92 
32.45 
166.49 
91.49 
183.58 
86.74 
27.36 
415.48 
27.24 
28.50 
89.60 
24.65 
44.25 
56.02 
27.32 
59.00 
21.04 
345.69 
118.73 
116.90 
721.00 
37.56 
54.16 
33.50 
53.62 


93.71 


Louis ana 




7.92 


Maine , 












32.45 


Maryland 


100 


64.00 


50 


33.00 


* "*2* 

4 
4 


5.74 
11.48 
11.48 




166. • 


Massachusetts 




91.49 


M'chigan 


60 
16 
4 
250 
3 


32.40 

8.64 

2.16 

135.00 

1.62 


15 
20 
6 
50 
12 


9.90 
13.20 

3.96 
33.00 

7.92 




183.58 


Minnesota 




86.74 


Mississippi 








27.36 


Missouri.. 


4 


11.48 




415.48 


Montana 




27.24 


Nebraska 








29.59 


Nevada 


20 


10.80 


30 
15 


19.80 
9.90 








89.60 


New Hampshire 








24.65 


New Jersey 












44.25 


New Mexico 


8 


4.32 


16 
24 


10.56 
15.84 


2 
4 


5.74 
11.48 




56.08 


New York» 




27.33 


North Carolina 








59.00 


North Dakota 






14 
20 
12 
20 
50 
6 
4 
15 
12 


9.24 
13.20 
7.92 
13.20 
33.00 
3.96 
2.64 
9.90 
7.92 








21.04 


Ohio . 


250 
80 
50 

400 

36 

8 


135.00 
43.20 
27.00 

216.00 
19.44 
4.32 


2 
3 


5.74 
• 8.61 




345.69 


Oklahoma 




118.73 


Ore Ron 




116.90 


Pennsylvania 








' 721.09 


Rhode Island 








37.56 


South Carolina 








54.16 


South Dakota 








33.50 


Vermont * 


30 
15 


16.20 
8.10 




::::::::: 


* 22.85" 


53.63 


Vermont * 






72.85 


Virginia 








..:*":: 


70.80 
136.15 
188.50 

29.50 


70.89 


Washington 


85 
100 


45.90 
54.00 


25 
25 


16.50 
16.50 









136.16 


West Virginia 








188.50 


Wisconsin 








29.50 




















Grand total 


1,868 




575 


379.50 


37 1 MA. 10 


4,003.79 


243.33 4.947.13 













i Ordered by and furnished to commission of second district of New York. 
« Ordered by and furnished to the Public Sarvice Commission. 
» Ordered by and furnished to the tax commissioner of Vermont. 



Saturday, January 2, 1915. 

BOARD OF MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION. 

STATEMENT OF HA. W. I. CHAMBEBS, COMMISSIONER, UNITED 
STATES BOARD OF MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION. 

The Chairman. United States Board of Mediation and Concilia- 
tion, the appropriation for 1915 is $50,000 and you are asking for 
$50,000. Just what has been done, Judge? 

Mr. Chambers. At the request of the clerk of the committee, Mr. 
Chairman, we filed, about two weeks ago, copies of my annual report 
to the President of the United States. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 338 

The Chaibman. Can you give us a brief statement of your activi- 
ties? 

Mr. Chambers. The appropriations for the year covered by this 
$25,000, and subsequently a deficiency appropriation of $10,000, and 
report were the original appropriation when the act was passed of 
later a second deficiency appropriation of $40,000, making a total of 
$75,000. This annual report explains how the $75,000 appropriation 
was disposed of. At the end of the fiscal year certain arbitrations 
which were in process of negotiation at the time the last appropria- 
tion of $40,000 was made had not been concluded, and the unex- 
pended balance of $20,787.83 of that appropriation was turned back 
into the Treasury. 

The Chairman. Out of the $75,000? 

Mr. Chambers. Out of the extra $50,000. That came about be- 
cause the arbitrations had not yet ended and all the accounts inci- 
dent to them had not been audited and paid, so that the expenditures 
of the commission out of the appropriation of $75,000 were $54,- 
212.17. We are now, of course, operating under the appropriation 
for 1915 of $50,000 ; but, as was stated to the committee, the actual 
cost of the work will depend on the number of arbitrations. It costs 
about $25,000 a year to administer the law. The exact amount for 
1914, covering 11 months and 13 days of the life of the law, was 
§18,365.23. I have here a statement showing all the receipts and 
disbursements of the board. It cost last year $18,365.23 for adminis- 
tration expenses, which included the salary of the commissioner of 
$7,500, and of the assistant commissioner, $5,000, clerk hire, rent, 
traveling expenses, hctel bills, etc. The arbitration expenses were 
$33,644.51, from which it will be seen that much the larger portion 
of the expense of the board falls under the head of arbitration in- 
stead of mediation. 

The Chairman. You do not know, of course, what you are going 
to be called on to do? 

Mr. Chambers. No, sir; we never can tell. For instance, we have 
an arbitration pending in Chicago with 98 western railroads, which 
include all the railroads west of the Mississippi and the Illinois 
Central this side of the river, and the engineers' and firemen's or- 
ganizations of approximately 64,000 men. That board consists of six 
arbitrators. The law permits arbitration boards of either three or 
six members, and the Board of Mediation has established the prac- 
tice, with the approval of both sides, that where the controversy is 
between one railroad and one organization of labor that the board 
shall consist of three members, one to be chosen by each of the 
parties and the other as provided by the act of July 15, 1913. If 
the arbitration involves more than one railroad and more than one 
labor organization we consent, if the parties request it, to a board of 
six. The Government must pay the salaries of the neutral arbitrators 
appointed by the board, and the parties themselves pay their own 
arbitrators, except in those cases where the arbitrator lorfeits salary, 
and in that case the Board of Mediation has paid the salaries of 
the arbitrators representing the two parties. 

Mr. Gillett. What do you mean by " forfeits the salary " — gives 
up some position he held ? 

Mr. Chambers. Yes, sir. For instance, the parties generally ap- 
point one of their own officers. The trainmen will appoint one of 



334 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

its vice presidents, and the conductors one of its vice presidents, and 
in this present arbitration now pending the railroads appointed a 
vice president of the Burlington Kailroad and the vice president of 
the Illinois Central Railroad. Now, manifestly, we would not allow 
compensation on the basis of the salary of those gentlemen, because 
one of them, I understand, gets $25,000 a year. A maximum of $10 a 
day is what we have paid to arbitrators chosen by the parties. 

Mr. Gillett. They do not forfeit their positions, those vice presi 
dents? 

Mr. Chambers. In the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy arbitration 
Mr. Harrington, one of the vice presidents of the conductors' organ 
ization, served at a compensation of about $7 or $8 a day: He had 
to resign his position temporarily; that is, he had to forfeit his 
salary while he was on that board of arbitration, and his compensa- 
tion, which is stated in our accounts, was just what his salary would 
have been for that time. I think he was drawing a salarv of perhaps 
$3,000 a year. 

The Chairman. You are asking that the rent allowance be made 
$2,820 instead of $2,280. 

Mr. Chambers. That comes about, Mr. Chairman, from the fact 
that the Commission on Industrial Relations and the Board of Medi- 
ation jointly had two rooms. We have a conference room, which is 
sometimes overflowing, as the mediation conferences for all the rail- 
roads south of Washington and east of the Mississippi, and also for 
the Baltimore & Ohio Kailroad, are held in our offices here, and we 
necessarily need a large room. While we call it a conference room, 
it is really a hearing room. It is probably not as large as this room 
and has a table of this size, and we sometimes have as many as 40 
or 50 men there. The railroads have their officers and the organiza- 
tions have their committees, and the hearing sometimes lasts 10 days 
to 2 weeks, and in one instance 23 days. We actually require such 
a room. The Commission on Industrial Relations needed it when 
they first organized here as much as we did, but now they have 
transferred their field work to Chicago, and the difference iJetween 
what we had last year and what we ask now is the difference that 
we will have to pay for the whole of that room. 

The Chairman. A difference of about $600? 

Mr. Chambers. $540. 

The Chairman. Have these arbitrations been successful in their 
results? 

Mr. Chambers. Very much so, sir. Since this law was passed there 
was a strike on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad of which we had 
notice about 7 o'clock one Sunday afternoon, and it was to take 
place at 6 o'clock Monday morning. Both parties were, perhaps, 
under the impression that the other would yield, and did not call 
the attention of the Board of Mediation to the controversy until that 
hour. I immediately telegraphed the officers of the railroad and the 
executive heads of the organizations tendering the services of the 
board, and urged them to maintain operations until we could take 
hold of the matter. The assistant commissioner left at 12 o'clock 
and was in Albany at 11 o'clock the next morning. I had assembled 
the parties by telegraph, and at 7 o'clock that afternoon, through 
the services of the assistant commissioner, the strike was called off. 
It promised to be one of the most serious controversies during the 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL,. 1916. 335 

year. The Atlantic division of the Southern Pacific Railroad had 
a strike on its Texas lines. That continued for about three days. 
The distance had something to do with it. I went to New York im- 
mediately upon hearing of it The first knowledge we had came 
from the Senators from Texas and some of the Representatives. 
I went to New York, as I say, and met the higher officials, and 
my assistant immediately started for Houston, Tex. We demanded 
certain conditions that the railroads and the men should comply 
with upon our guaranty that we would negotiate for them, and as a 
result of our intervention operations were resumed and the questions 
in dispute were settled afterwards by mediation. With those excep- 
tions there have been no strikes anywhere in the United States since 
this law was passed. The table of cases will show that there were 
28 cases of that nature, and in every instance strikes were averted 
where we had notice in advance. 

Mr. Gillett. When was this board established? 

Mr. Chambers. The law was passed the 15th of July, 1913. This 
table of cases by no means represents the work of the board, because 
the custom has grown up — I think wisely — between the organizations 
and the railroads that when they reach a point in their controversy 
where there is likelv to be any disturbance dertimental to the public 
interest they refer it to our board. The board renders no decisions, 
as we have no power to enforce them, but there has not been a single 
instance where our rulings have been disregarded. They now bring 
to us questions of discipline, which formerly brought about great 
friction and expense to the railroads. For instance, they discharge 
an engineer for an accident occasioned by the locomotive running off 
the track. He contends it was the fault of railroad construction or 
defect in machinery, and they contend he was running too fast or 
that he was not managing his engine properly. The man refers it 
to his organization, and they take a vote to sustain the man if it is 
held that he has been unjustly dismissed. Now, formerly those dis- 
putes went on until there was a sympathetic vote by the other organi- 
zations, and the men would retire from the service. Instead of that 
procedure they now bring the matter to our board and it is disposed 
of there. 

Mr. Gillett. There is not nearly the frequency of strikes during 
times when employment is scarce as when employment is plentiful, 
and last year was a time of scant employment. 

Mr. Chambers. Of course, there would be fewer strikes when the 
men fear they will probably lose out. There would be less strikes, 
too, perhaps, in prosperous times when the railroads think they are 
likely to lose out for the same reason. 

Mr. Mondell. Are there not generally more strikes under pros- 
perous conditions, because of the fact men can secure other employ- 
ment if they lose the employment they have? 

Mr. Chambers. I think that is probably true, sir; but there are 
more controversies in times of depression that might result in strikes 
except for the fact that settlement of disputes along amicable lines 
are made easier from a labor standpoint. The efforts of the railroads 
to economize, to work with fewer men, those conditions bring about 
contentions about small things tliat would not arise in prosperous 



336 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Mr. Mondell. In the matter of the pay of the arbitrators, you say 
that you only pay those appointed by the parties in interest in cases 
where, by reason of their employment as members of the board, they 
forfeit pay? 

Mr. Chambers. Yes, sir. That only applies to where they appoint 
some of their own officers. In some instances they appoint independ- 
ent outside parties. 

Mr. Mondell. In such a case you do not pay? 

Mr. Chambers. In such a case we do pay. We would rather they 
would appoint independent arbitrators all the time. It would be 
better, I think, for all parties if all the arbitrators* were neutral. 

Mr. Mondell. You pay in all cases where they appoint outside 
parties? 

Mr. Chambers. In all cases except where the arbitrator declines 
compensation. I recall one in San Francisco, a very prominent law- 
yer, upon whom all the parties agreed, and he would not accept any 
pay. He considered it a public service. Mr. Seth Low, in New York, 
who was chairman of the eastern conductors' arbitration, declined for 
a long time to take pay, and only finally accepted nominal compensa- 
tion, because his colleague, Dr. Finley, was not a man of wealth and 
could not contribute fifty-odd days of his time. The trustees of the 
college had to excuse Dr. Finley for the time that he was serving on 
this board. The sessions continued from 9 o'clock in the morning 
until 4.30 o'clock every afternoon, except Sundays and holidays, until 
the arbitration was finished. 

Mr. Mondell. In cases where the arbitrators are officers of labor 
organizations or officers of the railroads, you say you do not pay 
them? 

Mr. Chambers. We do not pay them if they continue to draw their 
salaries from the organizations or the railroads while the arbitration 
is going on. 

Mr. Mondell. Do they ordinarily continue to draw their salaries 
from the organizations? 

Mr. Chambers. Yes, sir. I recall now only one instance where we 
have paid compensation to an arbitrator chosen by the employees, 
and in his instance there was something in the law of his organi- 
zation which required him to give up his office if he was engaged 
in any other work. 

Mr. Mondell. I was simply anxious to learn what your practice 
was. You say there has been only one case where the arbitrator 
was an officer of a labor organization or an official of a railroad com- 
pany where you paid him compensation? 

Mr. Chambers. No. He is the only man who forfeited his pay. 
Prior to this arrangement which we made with the parties we paid 
everybody, whether he forfeited his pay or not, but we did not think 
it was right that the practice should continue. That had been the 
practice lor years before this board was organized, to pay every man 
on the arbitration board a per diem. That was continued through 
two or three arbitrations. A conference was held with presidents 
of the larger railroads and the chief officers of the organizations, 
and it was agreed in the conference with us that wherever an 
officer of an organization, railroad or labor, was appointed on a 
board of arbitration no compensation would be paid for his services, 



SUNBBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 337 

except by way of remuneration for any forfeiture he might make of 
his salary. 

Mr. Mondell. When was that? 

Mr. Chambers. I have not the date with me. I think, perhaps, 
a year ago. This board had been established only four or five 
months. 

Mr. Mondell. Since that time you say that only one person who 
was an officer of such an organization has been paid ? 

Mr. Chambers. Yes, sir ; in only one instance since that agreement 
was made has an officer of a labor organization been paid for service, 
and in no case has a railroad officer taken compensation. • 

Mr. Mondell. That was a case where an officer of the railroad 
organization was, by the terms of his employment, compelled to lose 
his compensation while serving on the board ? 

Mr. Chambers. Yes, sir ; under the law of his organization his vice 
chairman took his place and received his salary when he went to any 
other work. 

Mr. Mondell. What have been the more important cases which 
you have arbitrated in the last year and a half? 

Mr. Chambers. The demands of the conductors and trainmen in 
what is known as eastern territory against the 42 eastern railroads 
l>ejrinning alphabetically with the Baltimore & Ohio and ending 
with the Wheeling & Lake Erie 

Mr. Mondell. Please put in the record a statement of those you 
« onsider the more important. ] 

Mr. Chambers. I have a list of the 28 more important printed here. 
There have perhaps been as many as a hundred other controversies 
bought to the board and settled through mediation. 

(The statement submitted by Mr. Chambers follows.) 

72785—16 22 



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SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 343 

Monday, January 4, 1915. 

MILITARY RECORDS OF THE REVOLUTION. 

STATEMENT OF CAPT. H. C. CLARK, UNITED STATES ARMY, 
DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATION OF REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY 
RECORDS. 

The Chairman. " To continue under the direction of the Secretary 
of War, as provided in the act approved March 2, 1913 (37th Stat. L., 
p. 723) , the work of collecting or copying and classifying, with a view 
to publication, the scattered military records of the Revolutionary 
War, to be immediately available and to remain until expended. 
You are asking for $50,000. How much have you already had for 
this work ? 

Capt. Clark. We have had $25,000 for the War Department and 
$7,000 for the Navy. 

The Chairman. Altogether, $32,000. How much do you expect 
this work is going to cost? 

Capt. Clark. You mean the entire work? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Capt Clark. I have an estimate here that the entire work will 
not exceed $250,000. 

The Chairman. When was that prepared and by whom ? 

Capt. Clark. This estimate was prepared by myself. 

The Chairman. How do you figure that ? 

Capt. Clark. The question came up at the last hearing, Mr. Chair- 
man, and some comparisons were made there between the cost of this 
undertaking and the cost of the publication of the so-called Rebellion 
Records. It was said that this undertaking would probably cost — I 
think Maj\ Bigelow stated that this undertaking would probably 
cost one-third as much as the Civil War records, or about $1,000,000, 
the Civil War records having cost nearly $3,000,000. After it was 
pointed out that the Civil War records were copied on the type- 
writer or by pen, and that this process was very slow, inaccurate, and 
expensive as compared with photostatic copying, a very rapid and 
absolutely accurate method, it was estimated that the total cost 
would be about $500,000. The lowest estimate submitted at the hear- 
ing was that of Assistant Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt, who said 
he thought an annual appropriation of $32,000 for 10 or 12 years 
would be sufficient. After a year's experience in the work and a 
careful study of the most economical methods of copying records, 
we submit that the work will not cost more than $250,000, including 
the editing and publishing. Would you like to have the figures 
upon which that estimate is b^sed ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Capti Clark. In three States — Massachusetts, Virginia, and North 
Carolina — we have made in about seven months 14,941 photographic 
prints of original Revolutionary documents at an actual cost or 44 
cents per print, including all costs of the photographic work, equip- 
ment, supplies, and the salaries and traveling expenses of the pho- 
tographers. While more than $20,000 has been expended in the 
work, $ large amount was necessarily spent in securing and organ- 



344 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

izing the personnel, the establishment of offices in Washington and 
State capitals, the preparation of instructions to searchers, the pur- 
chase of office and photographic equipment, and going through the 
experimental stages of locating the records and determining upon 
the most effective and economical method of collecting the records. 
In one State we employed a photographer and furnished him with 
all equipment and supplies, in another State the photographer em- 
ployed furnished his own equipment, and in a third State a contractor 
furnished the prints at 30 cents per print. As a result, we have come 
to the conclusion that the last-named method is the most rapid and 
the most economical means of copying in places where large quanti- 
ties of records are deposited. No doubt as the work progresses and is 
advertised more extensively prints may be procured by this method 
at less than 30 cents each. 

Mr. Gillett. What do you mean by contract? Do you mean that 
you simply let the work out to some one else? 

Capt. C!lark. Yes, sir ; after setting bids. 

To the cost of the actual production of the prints are to be added 
the salary and traveling expenses of the historians, the salary and 
traveling expenses of the director, the salary of his clerk, the cost 
of office equipment and supplies at headquarters, and an. allowance 
made for the payment of salaries, etc., during interruptions incident to 
moving from one place of deposit to another, and taking into consid- 
eration all these expenses, it is estimated that the cost per print will 
not exceed 50 cents. For instance, experience has shown that, with- 
out interruptions, a contractor can make 4,000 prints in one month 
at 30 cents per print. The salary of the historian, $200 per month, 
brings the cost up to 35 cents per print, and adding to this work its 
proportionate share of expenses at headauarters, the cost per print 
under normal conditions would not exceed 40 cents. 

The three States in which we are now working probably contain 
the largest deposits of records. We have made 14,941 prints, and 
our records show that there are many thousand more still to be 
copied in Massachusetts and Virginia, but not so large a number are 
to be found in the other 10 States; some of the records of Delaware, 
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Vermont were copied 
some years ago by The Adjutant General's Office. We estimate, how- 
ever, that the thirteen original States will yield an average of more 
than 15,000 prints each, or a total of about 200,000 prints. We esti- 
mate that about one-third that number will be found outside of the 
thirteen original States, which would make a total of about 275,000 

Erints, and at 50 cents per print the entire cost of the collection would 
e less than $150,000. 

Mr. Gillett. Are these records largely in public places or in 
individual possession? 

Capt. Clark. Largely in public places. In North Carolina we 
have oeen allowed to copy some private possessions of great value, 
including letters written by John J^aul Jones and Gen. Washington. 

Mr. Gillett. Would not searching out those private collections 
extend your work quite indefinitely ? 

Capt. Clark. It will extend it a great deal. 

Mr. Gillett. I do not see how you can estimate how long that 
will take. 

Capt Clark. That is simply based on my experience. In Virginia, 
for instance, I had this poster : 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 19J6. 345 

FEVOLUTTONARY WAS RECORDS. 

The United States Government desires to ascertain the whereabouts of all 
original records, both military and naval, relating to the American Revolu- 
tionary War, 1775 to 1783. 

This Is a matter of great importance to historical students, librarians, insti- 
tutions of learning, patriotic societies, and all persons interested in their 
country's struggle for Independence. 

It is believed that many such records are in the hands of private owners as 
well as in official archives and libraries. It is not desired to purchase these 
papers, but to obtain a complete list of them and their location, with a view 
to publication. Information in regard to All such papers will help complete 
the record of Virginia's part in the Revolution. 

The task of gathering this information in Virginia has been placed in the 
hands of Mr. Morgan P. Robinson, of Richmond, and Mr. J. H. Lindsay, of 
Charlottesville. 

All persons having knowledge of the existence of such records are requested 
to write to Morgan P. Robinson, historian for War and Navy Departments, 
care State Library, Richmond, Va., giving a short description of the documents 
and the post-office address of their owner or custodian. 

put up in every post office in the State of Virginia by authority of 
the Postmaster General ; its contents were published in every news- 
paper and periodical, and over 7,000 copies were mailed to librarians, 
educators, public officials, and members of patriotic, literary, ana 
historical societies, and the result was we got a great many letters 
from private owners. 

Five photostat machines working continuously could turn out 
275,000 prints, at the rate of 4,000 a month, in about 14 months. 
But allowing for necessary interruptions incident to moving from 
one place of deposit to another, and delays incident to the examina- 
tion and selection of materials, and taking into consideration that 
at places where there are but few records the work will have to be 
done with the ordinary camera, which method is not so rapid as 
photostatic copying, it is estimated that the work can be done in 
about three years from this date, including the necessary editing and 
preparation for printing. The cost of editing and printing is dif- 
ficult of estimation at this time, but it is believed that the remaining 
$100,000 would cover the cost of both. 

The estimate, then, of $150,000 is for getting the prints and ap- 
proximately $100,000 is for the editing and printing. 

The Chairman. Has there been a survey made to determine just 
what material is in existence to be collected and published? 

Capt. Clark. A partial survey. 

The Chairman. How partial? 

Capt. Clark. In the States of Massachusetts, North Carolina, and 
Virginia. 

The Chairman. What did that survey consist of? 

Capt. Clark. Four historians were appointed who were recom- 
mended as experts by the American Historical Association, one in 
Massachusetts, one in North Carolina, and two in Virginia, to in- 
vestigate and report upon the matter. 

The Chairman. I was asking you about the survey, and you said 
that a partial survey had been made. 

Capt. Clark. I will amend that by saying that the survey covers 
*U the field in Massachusetts, Virginia, and North Carolina. We 
have made accurate surveys 

The Chairman (interposing). How were they made? 



346 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Capt. Clark. By historians appointed under this act. 

The Chairman. Have you spent all the money appropriated ? 

Capt. Clark. No, sir. We have spent about $21,000 out of both 
appropriations. 

The Chairman. The law in which that was appropriated pro- 
vided that the work should be completed for that sum. 

Capt. Clark. The act of March 2, 1913, which was a lump sum 
appropriation 

The Chairman ( interposing). It was the understanding of the 
Military Affairs Committee when it reported that bill that the work 
would be completed for $32,000. 

Capt. Clark. I do not know about that. I was not connected with 
the work at that time. 

The Chairman. Nobody was connected with it at that time, be- 
cause that was when it was authorized. That was the original 
authorization, and it was the understanding that it would be com- 
pleted for that amount. Your estimate is that it will cost $250,000 ? 

Capt. Clark. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Does that include publishing? 

Capt. Clark. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many volumes will there be? 

Capt. Clark. That will depend upon the editors, but it would not, 
in my opinion, exceed 50 volumes. 

The Chairman. What do you base your opinion upon? 

Capt. Clark. It will be impossible to retain everything 

The Chairman (interposing). We must have something definite 
upon which to work. Now, upon what do you base your estimate? 
We might make a mistake about it, and there might lie 100 volumes. 

Capt. Clark. You can always place a limit on a publication. 
You can say that it shall not exceed 50 volumes or 100 volumes. 

The Chairman. You could not say that unless you knew what was 
essential. You would not like to limit it regardless of what was 
left out. What we want to know is how many volumes will be re- 
quired for those records. 

Capt. Clark. Inasmuch as the War of the Rebellion records re- 
quired 150 volumes, I think that this will be approximated 50 
volumes, or not more than one-third of the War oi the Rebellion 
Records. 

The Chairman. That is all. 



Saturday, January 2, 19ir>. 

ARMORIES AND ARSENALS. 

STATEMENTS OF BRIO. GEN. WILLIAM CR0ZIER, CHIEF OF OBD- 
NANCE, AND COL. E. B. BABBITT, ASSISTANT TO THE CHIEF OF 
ORDNANCE. 

BENICIA AR8ENAL, CAL. 

The Chairman. " Benicia Arsenal, Benicia, Cal. : For increasing 
storage facilities, $25,000; for increasing the water supply, $80,000; 
for increasing facilities for fire protection, $10,000 ; in all, $55,000.*' 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1910. 347 

STOREHOUSE, 

Gen. Crozier. You will remember, Mr. Chairman, that after a 
rather disastrous fire which thej; had at Benicia Arsenal two or three 
years ago there was an appropriation of $15,000 made to cover what 
was left of the storehouse that was burned, using a portion of the 
wall left standing; and then I made an estimate of $300,000 to build 
a storehouse of proper size to meet the storage requirements there. 
That sum was not appropriated. I then reduced it to $200,000 for 
the same purpose, and that sum was not appropriated. 

Now, I have here made an estimate which is in pursuance of a 
somewhat different plan, a much more modest plan, $25,000, with 
which it is proposed to build a storehouse of cheap construction 
which will enable us to get along there unless some considerable emer- 
gency should come along, in which case we will have to do the best 
we can. But with this amount we can get along in ordinary times. 
Here is a map of Benicia Arsenal, which is skirted along the water- 
side by the Central Pacific Railroad running along here [indicating], 
and there is a spur which runs into the arsenal ground at this point. 
These are the main buildings of the arsenal right in this region. 
Here are the shops and offices. Here is the storehouse which is 
already there, and here is another storehouse which is already at the 
arsenal, and now it is proposed to build a storehouse of small size, 
an issuing storehouse of rather cheap construction, at this point right 
alongside of the spur, which will require about $17,000 of the $25,000 
estimated for. Then we expect to build alongside of that not much 
more than a storage shed composed partly of material taken from a 
stable which is inconveniently situated and of which the frame is 
pretty good, which will be taken down and reerected at this point. 

In preparing for the foundations for these buildings certain ma- 
terial will be excavated, because it is hilly ground, and that material 
will be used in filling up swampy ground which will have to carry 
part of the foundation of the building and some further swamp 
alongside here [indicating on map], which will give out-of-door 
storage space near the railroad, which is very considerably needed. 
Then what is left will be used to fill up some further marshy space 
along the railroad there as far as it will go, all of which is shown on 
this plan. The building which it is expected to put up, the first one 
I mentioned, is shown m general construction by this sketch (indi- 
cating]. 

The Chairman. How big a building is it to be? 

Gen. Crozier. In dimensions 138 by 55, containing about 7,500 feet. 

The Chairman. And it is to cost $17,000? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes; it will be rather cheaply built of reinforced 
concrete foundation and walls, and it will not be fireproof, although 
it will be what they call fire-resistant; that is to say, it will not be 
easily set on fire. 

The Chairman. What do you want to store in that building? 

Gen. Crozier. We will put in that building stores which can be 
described as those which are needed for the retail issue business of 
the arsenal. Benicia Arsenal, you know, issues stores for all kinds 
of troops for the Pacific coast. It is the only arsenal we have on the 
Pacific coasts and this storehouse will be used in the first a lace as an 



848 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

issuing store and also to store those goods which are in constant use 
as distinguished from those which are put awav in reserve. 

The Chairman. Thej are the finished goods? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Why should they not be sent over to Fort Mason 
and stored there? 

Gen. Crozier. If they were sent over to Fort Mason we would have 
to send over a personnel to handle them. v 

The Chairman. Even so, you would have all the stores there to- 
gether. That is the great supply depot on the Pacific coast. 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; that is right. 

The Chairman. That is where they all ought to be stored. 

Gen. Crozier. Then we will have to have an ordnance personnel 
over there to issue them. You see there is a great deal of issuing 
and a great deal of receiving done at these arsenals ; things that are 
constantly coming in for renovation, old things, or perhaps obsolete 
things which have to be sold. 

The Chairman. As a matter of efficient business, would it not be 
better to have all the stores ready for issue issued from one point? 

Gen. Crozier. No ; I do not think it would. 

The Chairman. If we were going to load a lot of supplies for the 
Philippine Islands or Hawaii, if they were stored at Fort Mason 
they would be loaded on a vessel right at the wharf? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes. 

The Chairman. It would be very inconvenient to load those sup- 
plies at Benicia. 

Gen. Crozier. The supplies, in all probability, would be sent down 
from Benicia by a barge to Fort Mason, and those to go put to the 
Philippines and Hawaii would be sent down and delivered in large 
quantities. It is the retail issuing which is done here and the loading 
is done on railroad cars which run all over the Pacific coast, whicfi 
could not be done at Fort Mason. There is not any railroad connec- 
tion at Fort Mason. 

The Chairman. What are you doing now in the absence of the 
storehouse? 

Gen. Crozier. We are getting along inconveniently, using a re- 
stricted space in one of these other storehouses and keeping away 
from there stores that ought to be there. 

The Chairman. Where are those stores kept? 

Gen. Crozier. They are kept back at the manufacturing arsenals. 
You see, this is a very considerable reduction from the plan that 
has been presented to you before, and this reduction involves making 
use of the storage space at such places as Fort Mason and to a cer- 
tain extent at the fortifications themselves instead of having the 
stores kept at Benicia. 

Mr. Sherley. What have you got at Benicia Arsenal, roughly 
speaking, in the way of a plant? 

Gen. Crozier. We have a machine shop, carpenter shop, and foun- 
dry. The main purpose for which we keep those things there is to 
effect repairs on the Pacific coast both of seacoast armament and 
of certain articles of arms and equipment in the hands of the mobile 
army that are sent in and are not transported halfway across the 
continent for repairs. We do there a certain amount of small man- 
ufacturing, mainly for the purpose of keeping on hand a force of 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 349 

workmen able to do the repair work, which is always spasmodic. It 
has not been considered heretofore an economical manufacturing place 
on account of the scarcity of fuel and the high price of labor. 
Whether we will be able to do work by electric power at such prices 
as will change that in the future is somewhat problematical. We are 
now using electric power altogether, which we get from commercial 
sources. 

Mr. Sherley. One of the things I am impressed with is that you 
have the Presidio, you have Fort Mason and you have Benicia ; and 
then the Navy has various establishments, some of which it owns, 
and then it has certain leases touching dry docks, etc. All of that is 
within what might be called San Francisco, using that expression 
not as indicating a town, but a point as a supply base for the Army 
and Navy. Is it not conceivable that something might be done to 
consolidate a lot of these places, so as to both save cost and increase 
efficiency? I am struck with one suggestion just made by the chair- 
man, and which has been made here from time to time. Here at 
Fort Mason you are handling a certain character of Army stuff, and 
a little distance away, at Benicia Arsenal, you are handling another, 
and at the Presidio you have a great deal of land. It is true it is 
very valuable land, and some of it could well afford to be sold to 
San Francisco 

Gen. Crozier (interposing). You think it looks like a duplication 
of facilities? 

Mr. Sherley. I am wondering whether we are not more scattered 
than we ought to be. 

Gen. Crozier. As far as that is concerned, this arsenal at Benicia 
is better situated than either the Presidio or Fort Mason for the 
purpose I have been speaking of, namely, to keep the troops on the 
coast supplied, because it has railroad facilities. It connects right 
up with all the lines of that region and of the country, for that 
matter, which is not the case at either Fort Mason or the Presidio. 
When articles come there in great bulk and are to be shipped after- 
wards by transports across the sea, Fort Mason is a good place to 
ship them from, but that is not the kind of work that is done at 
Benicia Arsenal. 

Mr. SHERLEr. If Fort Mason has not railroad facilities, can it 
be a good place to ship from under any conditions? 

Gen. Crozier. It is rather expensive to get the stuff to it because 
it has to be sent there partly by vessel, but when you do that in very 
large quantities and are not doing it all the time, it does not increase 
the cost very much. Besides that, you have to have some place that 
the vessel can get up to. 

Mr. SHERLEr. What does Fort Mason do? What is its purpose? 

Gen. Crozier. Fort Mason is now mainly a depot of the Quarter- 
master's Department. It was originally part of the defense of San 
Francisco, and had a little battery there and one company of Coast 
Artillery and a couple of 8-inch guns ; originally a couple of 10-inch 
smooth-bore guns, which were replaced by a couple of 8-inch rifles; 
but it is not regarded of value now for that purpose, and the land, 
which is a small quantity right in San Francisco — the city is all 
around it — is used mainly for the people who belong to the quarter- 
master's depot. It is on a small bit of land down on the shore, where 
they have put up these storehouses and where they have built wharves 



850 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

for the transports. It is rather restricted, however. I do not know 
whether the Quartermaster's Department thinks it is ideal for its 
work or not. Perhaps they do. I am not informed. 

Mr. Sherley. What sort of water facilities have you at Benicia? 

Gen. Crozier. Carquinez Strait runs right by there, and we have 
deep water; but whether it is deep enough for ocean-going steamers 
or not, I do not know. None ever goes up to Benicia. 

Col. Babbitt. They anchor right off there in the straits. 

Gen. Crozier. But" they can not get up to our wharf. It is not built 
out far enough. 

Mr. Sherley. You could make a deep-water landing there? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes; by extending the wharf out, if it was thought 
worth while. 

INCREASING WATER SUPPLY. 

The Chairman. For increasing the water supply, $20,000. What 
is the necessity of this item? 

Gen. Crozier. The necessity for that arises from the fact that they 
have at Benicia a long dry season during which they have to retain 
constantly on hand a supply of water in the reservoirs for fire pur- 
poses. If we were free to use all the water that our reservoirs out 
there would hold we would probably not need any more, but we 
always have to keep a certain margin in case of fire, and this $20,000 
is intended for an additional new reservoir by putting a dam across 
a valley shown in this position on the plan. There are now at the 
arsenal only two reservoirs. One of them has a capacity of about 
2,250,000 gallons, which is this one [indicating], and the other one 
has a capacity of about 250,000 gallons, and these reservoirs will be 
connected up with the new one. 

The Chairman. Would it not be cheaper to run a line to the water 
and put in a pump for fire purposes? 

Gen. Crozier. Unfortunately it is not fresh water. We do that to 
a certain extent, but at certain seasons of the year and at low tide 
when the sea has gone out, you can get brackish water there and we 
do have a pump and make some use of it. 

Mr. Sherley. For fire purposes salt water is just as good as fresh 
water. 

Gen. Crozier. That would do for fire purposes; yes. You would 
have to have a larger pump than we have there and we would use 
these same water mains, of course. This water we have, such of it as 
we can use right along, we can use for sprinkling also. You under- 
stand there 33 no rain from May to February. 

The Chairman. You have never suffered from a lack of water out 
there yet? 

Gen. Crozier. In a way we are suffering all the time at certain 
portions of this post and we can not at any time do the amount of 
sprinkling that ought to be done. The main reason for it, however, 
as I say, is on account of the fire protection. 

Mr. Sherley. Havr you considered the possibility of putting in 
some gasoline pumps to afford your fire facilities from the ocean ? 

Gen. Crozier. That has been considered; ves. What commends 
this plan as against that is that by reason or adding this reservoir 
we would have a margin for fire purposes, and of 'course we would 
have somethin fveg that mar ' , because in pigtin in a new thing 



SUNDRY CIVIL APFBOPBIATIOJr BILL, 1916. 351 

like this we do not limit ourselves to ottr strict requirements, and we 
could use the surplus for purposes for which we could not use the 
salt water. 

Mr. Sherley. Of course, in that way you would get additional 
fresh water? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes. 

Mr. Sherry. But, assuming you got sufficient fresh water if you 
do not have to hold it for fire protection, it occurs to me it ought 
to be very easy to have installed a system by which you could pump 
water in case of emergency. 

Gen. Crozier. We have that arrangement at some places, for in- 
stance, Sandy Hook. But if we are going to increase the supply of 
fresh water and increase the supply of salt water, it would add two 
installations, and, I suspect, we would not get out as cheaply. 

Mr. Sherley. We are simply wondering whether you need to in- 
crease your fresh-water supply. 

Gen. Crozier. We do need to, although that is not the primary 
reason we are asking for this increased capacity. The primary rea- 
son is the fire protection. Needing it for that purpose, it is econom- 
ical to put in a little larger dam there and have a little more, of a 
reservoir and be able to use the water, or a part of it, for other pur- 
poses for which we need fresh water. We need it somewhat for 
manufacturing purposes. 

Mr. Sherle?. Have you not enough fresh water now if you could 
use all you have got? 

Gen. Crozier. Well, I doubt that. You mean to say if we were 
privileged to drain these reservoirs we have there now ? 

Mr. Sherley. Yes ; if you were not holding water for fire protec 
tion and could use all the water for other purposes and depend 01 
pumping salt water to take care of fires, would y(>u not have enough 
iresh water there? 

Gen. Crozier. It would be a rather close calculation, but we might 
have. 

FIBE PBOTECTION. 

The Chairman. "For increasing facilities for fire protection, 
$10,000." What is this item? 

Gen. Crozier. Some of these fire plugs which we have there are 
supplied by mains which are too small and which are very old. " 

The Chairman. We gave you an appropriation for fire protection 
one year right after you had a fire there. 

Gen. Crozier. You gave us something. You gave us $6,000. 

The Chairman. For a sprinkling system? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes; for an extension of the sprinkler system. 

The Chairman. That was all you asked? 

Gen. Crozier. That was all we asked, but we did not promise we 
would never ask for any more. Now we want to put in some better 
mains to replace old ones and to put in mains of larger size, so as to 
get a better flow. You understand, we had some experience with that 
fire, and we do not want to repeat it. We also want to put in some 
additional fire hydrants at places marked here on the map. The red 
lines on this map show pretty much what we want to do with the 
*10,000. 



352 SU28TDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

The Chairman. What are the sizes of the present mains? 
Gen. Crozier. Four-inch and 6-inch, and we want to put in, man} 
of them, 8-inch mains. 

FRANKFORD ARSENAL, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

The Chairman. " Frankf ord Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pa. : For one 
tin shop, $72,000." 

TIN SHOP. 

Gen. Crozier. There is one thing, Mr. Chairman, that it is awfully 
hard to prove, and that is if you do not have a certain fire protec- 
tion, you are bound to have fires. It is pretty hard to make a demon- 
stration of that, but there is one class of protection that I hesitate 
very much not to ask, and that is protection against fire. That is 
true, because we do not carry insurance — and it is not good business 
to do so — and we do have the fires. That $72,000 for the tin shop 
at the Frankf ord Arsenal in intended to construct a building about 
245 feet long by 55 feet wide. It is intended to house the machinery 
for doing all of the sheet-metal work that we have to do at the 
arsenal, of which we have a good deal. We have now to make our 
artillery ammunition as well as our small-arms ammunition boxes 
out of sheet metal, and we make a great many boxes there. We have 
to handle this sheet metal now away from the railroad. As you can 
see, the railroad runs from there [indicating] to this place [indicat- 
ing], and then it has to be taken by cartage. The new shop is to be 
put alongside the railroad here [indicating]. 

The Chairman. You have shops there [indicating] now. 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; along there [indicating]. This [indicat- 
ing] is a little low building, only 11 feet high, and it is so contracted 
and we are so badly off for room that it is impossible to work to 
advantage more than one shift, because the product of that one shift 
gets in the way of the other, and until you clear it out there is no 
room to work. 

The Chairman. You mean to work more than eight hours a day? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; more than eight hours. In addition to 
that, this raw material should be provided for. There is no room 
in which to store it there, and it must be stored in other buildings 
and then carted to that building. The amount of business of this 
kind that we do is indicated by the fact that we purchase 600 tons 
of this sheet metal every year, and manufacture it into boxes. 

The Chairman. You are going to have this building right on the 
railroad track? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; right there. That track [indicating] will 
be taken away. This railroad that you see through here [indicating] 
will be taken away, and it will be moved to this position [indicating]. 
It will be right along here [indicating], alongside the building. 
That side [indicating] will be taken out, and it will be moved over 
here [indicating] to this point, so that the railroad will run along 
here between the buildings [indicating], as you see it. 

The CnAiRMAN. Does this sum of $72,000 include all of the fittings 
and everything else connected with the building? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; that will complete the building, and we 
have the equipment now. Of course, I do not mean to say that we 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1915. 353 

will never add to the equipment, but we have the machines now in 
the other building, and will simply move them over to this building. 

EXTENSION OF LUMBER SHED. 

The Chairman. The next item is, "Extension of lumber shed, 
£82,500." 

Gen. Crozier. We want to manufacture at the Frankford Arsenal 
shrapnel cases and shell forgings which are made by the use of large 
presses. We have never done that at the Frankford Arsenal, but we 
have been getting them from outside manufacturers, and we think 
that we can advantageously do a portion of this manufacturing at the 
arsenal. As you see, it is proposed to extend this lumber shed [indi- 
cating] by the building which is shown in red, so that the extension 
and elevation would look like this [indicating]. Here is the lumber 
shed [indicating] and here is the extention [indicating]. The ex- 
tension is to be a little over 100 feet. We think that it will be good 
economy to manufacture a portion of this kind of material at the 
arsenal. 

The Chairman. Do vou now manufacture them at any place at all? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir; we do not manufacture them anywhere at 
all now. 

The Chairman. What is the character of this building — of steel 
frame! 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir ; of steel frame, brick walls, concrete founda- 
tions, and slate roof, just the same as the lumber shed. 

The Chairman. How large is it to be? 

Gen. Crozier. Over 100 feet long and of the full width of the 
lumber shed, which is about 58 feet. 

EXTENSION OF DOUBLE-ACTION PRESS 8H0P BUILDING. 

The Chairman. The next item is "Extension of double-action 
press shop building, $6,000." 

Gen. Crozier. That is shown here [indicating]. The double-action 
press shop is a shop where are situated the presses which are used 
for the manufacture of cartridge cases, which are pressed out of sheet 
brass. There is great lack of space there in which to store the sheet 
metal from which those cases are pressed, and a good part of it has 
to be stored in a building which we intended to use for the storage 
of scrap, which is sh6wn here [indicating]. We have a great deal 
of valuable scrap there, and it is desirable that it should not be stored 
out of doors. We put it in a building for the purppse of housing and 
safeguarding it, because it is worth stealing; but we have to use that 
building largely for the storage of new sheet metal, and this exten- 
sion will relieve us from that necessity. 

The Chairman. Didn't we give you a storage building last year? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir; it was several years ago that you gave us 
that. 

The Chairman. We gave you an appropriation for the extension of 
a metal storehouse last year? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; you gave us an appropriation of $13,500 
with which to extendi it. 



a jy 



354 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

IMPROVING FACILITIES OF THE BOILEB PLANT. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " Improving facilities of the 
boiler plant, $15,000." 

Gen. Crozier. That is mainly for the purpose of putting in a set 
of mechanical stokers for the boilers in the boiler plant. This will 
effect a saving in labor by enabling us to dispense with the services 
of a fireman, or, perhaps, two, and a helper. It will enable us to 
dispense with the services of two employees, and perhaps three, and 
that saving will amount to in the neighborhood of $2,000 a year in 
their pay. Not only that, but it results in a more economical con- 
sumption of coal. We spent there last year about $22,000 for coal, 
and we expect a saving in that of from 5 per cent to 10 per cent by 
the use of these stokers. In addition to that, they do away with the 
smoke nuisance. They have an ordinance in the city of Philadelphia 
which forbids the emission of smoke in the air from factories and 
other establishments, and, although we are not subject to that ordi- 
nance, we think it but proper consideration on the part of the Gov- 
ernment that it should do in that respect what other manufacturers 
there are required to do. 

The Chairman. Then you would be the only one that did not emit 
smoke there, would you not ? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir; the emission of smoke from factories has 
been very largely reduced. 

The Chairman. Just how much economy is there in fuel consump- 
tion by the use of these mechanical stokers ? 

Gen. Crozier. The people who put them in want us to think that we 
will save 10 per cent; but, coming within that, we think we should 
save 7.5 per cent, and that would oe about $1,800 a year on the cost 
of the fuel which we consume there. 

The Chairman. Do they really believe that a saving of 10 per cent 
in the operation of boilers can be effected by the use of those mechan- 
ical stokers? 

Gen. Crozier. They say they are willing to guarantee a saving of 
10 per cent, but I think that is pretty high. Of course, I would be 
very glad if we could do that, but I have thought of a rather more 
conservative estimate. Ten per cent on the amount expended for 
coal would be about $2,200. That would be the saving in that item 
alone. The saving which we make in the number of employees re- 
quired is a very certain one, of course. So that, taking the two sav- 
ings together, one in the less amount of fuel consumed and the other 
in the smaller number of employees reauired, I think we can expect 
a saving of 15 per cent. That would be taking into consideration, 
also, the maintenance and depreciation of those stokers. I think we 
would save about 15 per cent on the iilvestment. 

The Chairman. Does the operation of the stoker result in the 
consumption of more carbon ? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Does that give you a higher heat efficiency? 

Gen. Crozier. A higher efficiency; yes, sir. We can evaporate 
more water with the same consumption of coal — that is, we can evap- 
orate more water per pound of coal. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 355 

PURCHASE OF ADpiTIONAL LAND. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For the purchase of additional 
land, $130,000." 

Gen. Crozier. That vou have heard of before. You will see where 
that land lies with reference to the arsenal from this plat [indicat- 
ing]. 

Mr. Gillett. That is the same thing j^ou had up last year ? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir. Here [indicating] is a map or Frankford 
Arsenal and its vicinity. I will draw my finger along the boundaries 
of the arsenal. Here [indicating] is the Delaware River, and here 
| indicating] is the land which we are considering. The city is built 
up all about that [indicating], and if we do not get that piece of land 
there is no other property available for the extension or the arsenal 
grounds. Now, we have certain buildings on the arsenal grounds 
which contain explosives and which are now, on account of the erec- 
tion of additional buildings and the enlargement of the arsenal, 
closer to some other buildings than they ought to be. Some of them 
are along here [indicating]. They are magazine buildings, and 
they ought to be over here on this land [indicating]. Another con- 
sideration is that we do a certain amount of firing. Here [indicat- 
ing] is the artillery firing range, and here [indicating] is the 
small-arms firing range, and if this land should be built upon by 
other people for private purposes, particularly for dwelling pur- 
poses, we would undoubtedly have trouble from that firing. They 
would want to stop it, and would complain of it as being a nuisance. 

The Chairman. They would not have jurisdiction of it. 

Gen. Crozier. They could not stop us, but they could make life a 
burden to the Member of Congress from that locality, and he would 
do, as he always has to do, come down and transfer it to us. As the 
arsenal stands now, we do not have any frontage on the Delaware 
River, and, therefore, we do not have a good chance for loading 

The Chairman (interposing). You have a water frontage at the 
junction of the river aiid creek. 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; but it would be a good plan for us to 
have the water front that would go with that land back here [indi- 
cating]. 

The Chairman. How much land is in that tract? 

Gen. Crozier. There are 25 acres, and it will cost about $5,000 
per acre. 

The Chairman. There were more than 25 acres when this matter 
came up before. 

Gen. Crozier. There are just about 25 acres. It may possibly be 
26 acres. 

The Chairman. Do you know you can get it for $130,000 ? 

Gen. Crozier. That is my information now. It belongs to an 
estate, and it has been devised to the University of Pennsylvania, 
so there does not seem to be any opportunity for a private deal in 
the transaction. Now, you have expended at Frankford Arsenal in 
the last 10 years something like $500,000 in the increase of the plant, 
and you have imposed upon us by legislation the duty of manufac- 
turing everything that we use which is of a class that we can manu- 
facture at our own arsenals. All of that goes to show that this is 



356 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1016. 

a very live sort of place, and we have to look out for its efficient 
maintenance and operation. 

Now, any private corporation being in that situation would acquire 
possession of that land, if they could get it at anything like a rea- 
sonable price, as we are able to do at present. There is another 
economy to be effected by the purchase of this land which arises 
from the necessity we are now under of shipping artillery ammuni- 
tion that is manufactured at the Frankford Arsenal to the Picatinny 
Arsenal, in New Jersey, for storage and reshipment to the service. 
If we had this land, we would have room for putting all of the 
storehouses there, and by that means we would avoid that shipment 

The Chairman. If we should authorize you to buy this land, you 
would immediately come back here and request money with which to 
put something on it. 

Gen. Crozier. We would certainly use it, and we could not use it 
without spending something on it. You would have to look forward 
in the estimates to some construction work on that land, because 
otherwise there would be no use in having it. 

PICATINNY ARSENAL. 
PURCHASE OF ADDITIONAL LAND. 

The Chairman. You ask $10,000 for the purchase of additional 
land at the Picatinny Arsenal. Is that the same thing we had 
before? 

Gen. Crozier. That is the same thing. We have had it up several 
times before. 

The Chairman. Have they raised the price? 

Gen. Crozier. You could have acquired it several years ago for 
$7,500, but now you can not get it for less than $10,000. There is a 
good deal of necessity for this. 

The Chairman. If you should start a rifle range down there the 
price would tumble. 

Gen. Crozier. That would cost us more than what would be re- 
quired to get the land. You can see how it juts out into our own land 
here [indicating], and there are some valuable springs of water on 
it which we ought to control. The water question at the Picatinny 
Arsenal is one of some magnitude, particularly since we have to 
manufacture all of our powder, as we are required to do at present. 
We think this purchase ought to be made before the price goes up 
any more. 

ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL. 
[See p. 373.] 

INCREASING FIRE-PROTECTION FACILITIES. 

The Chairman. You ask $10,300 for increasing the facilities for 
fire protection at the Kock Island Arsenal. We gave you all you 
asked for this purpose last year, and now you are asking this $10,300. 

Gen. Crozier. I will show you what that is for. I have never come 
before you feeling that I was able to press for all that was required 
at an arsenal in a single bill, and it has been rather impressed upon 
me that I had better string it out or put off some things 

The Chairman (interposing). Last year we gave you $8,222, and 
it was thought that that would be ample to safeguard this arsenal. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 357 

Gen. Crozier. This is what we intend to do : It is intended to put 
an 8-inch main across here [indicating] and put some fire plugs in 
two places there [indicating], so as to afford protection to the two 
storehouses. It is also intended to buy with that $10,300 a fire engine. 

The Chairman. How many? 

Gen. Crozier. We have a fire engine there now which has been in 
use since about 1865, and it is entirely worn out. We expect to re- 
place it out of this $10,300 by putting in a new fire engine with auto- 
mobile transportation. The present one is an old steam fire engine 
drawn by horses, and it is nearly 50 years old. 

The Chairman. Last year you said that the shops were pretty 
well protected. 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir ; they are fairly well* protected. 

The Chairman. I asked you last year whether, if this $8,222 were 
given you, there would be anything else necessary in connection with 
fire protection, and in answer you said : 

Not that I know of now. That will protect all the line of officers' quarters and 
the public stables. The shops are pretty well looked after. I am not dead sure 
we will not in the future call for some additions to the sprinkling system, espe- 
cially if we put stores in some of the places we now have not Rot them in but 
which we may have to fill tip, but there is nothing immediate. 

Xow you ask $10,300 for this purpose. 

Gen. Crozier. I am not adding any sprinkling system now. Here 
is the trouble : these mains running down there run down to a dead 
end, and you can not use one main to help the flow around this side 
of two large shop buildings to the other. However, I will say this, 
that I do not consider that that is of as much importance as the fire 
engine, because we have some buildings here not reached by fire 
mains, and this old engine, 50 years old, is the only reliance. It 
would be practically of no use in case of fire. Therefore, if you feel 
that vou do not wish to make that appropriation now, cut it in two, 
and 1 will use what is left for the fire engine. 

ROAD REPATRS. 

The Chairman. For road repairs you are asking $18,000. 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. We gave you last year all that you asked. 

Gen. Crozier. I stated last year that it would repuire $24,000 to 
repair the entire road, and that I would use $6,000, or one-fourth of 
it, and would ask for the remainder of the amount later. That road 
is nearly 3 miles long, and, as I explained last year, it has been 
pretty well torn up by automobile traffic. It is impossible for us to 
maintain it out of our general fund for the maintenance of the 
arsenal. However, after we rebuild it, I think that I may be able 
to maintain it without asking an increase of the general fund for 
that purpose. As I explained last year, we hope to put a sort of 
dustless covering on it so that there may not be so muchi sprinkling 
necessary, and by that means save $1,000 a year which we could put 
in ordinary repairs occasioned by automobile traffic. Now, the ap- 
propriation of $6,000 which you made last year became available so 
late in the year that we could not use any of it last year, and, there- 
fore, we still have it. I expect this winter to buy tne materials and 
get at this road in the spring and finish it up in one season. That 



358 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

will also be the most economical way of doing it. I have not any- 
thing to add in the way of information about that road to what I 
told you last year in my hearings. 

The Chairman. You have not started to build the road ? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Last year they would not allow you to ask for 
more than $6,000, because they did not want to swell the estimates '( 

Gen. Crozier. I can not think of any other reason. 

The Chairman. But this year, with the Treasury in a much worse 
condition, they let you put in an estimate of $18,000 instead of $6,000. 
Does anybody know what is happening to the Treasury of the United 
States just now? 

Gen. Crozier. That is only temporary. 

STOREHOUSE FOB STORAGE OF OILS, ETC. 

The Chairman. The next item is " For a storehouse for the storage 
of oils, etc., and its equipment, $15,000." 

Gen. Crozier. We have a small oil storage space at the arsenal now 
for oils which are used for manufacturing purposes at the arsenal 
itself, but this refers to oils, paint, cleaning materials, and other 
inflammable substances, of which we have a good many for issue to 
the service. Those materials are now kept in an expensive store- 
house, which is near the place where we propose to put the oil store- 
house, and which also contains a great many valuable stores. That 
storehouse occupies the position of its predecessor which, with two 
or three million dollars' worth of goods in the same, was destroyed by 
fire about 10 years ago. Now, we expect to put this building in the 
rear of that storehouse 

The Chairman (interposing). Where is that material stored now? 

Gen. Crozier. It is now stored in this storehouse I have referred 
to, along with the other stores. 

The Chairman. Of what type will the building be? 

Gen. Crozier. Tt will be a low building, with a sort of basement 
entrance on one side, and it will be closed on the other. It will be 
made of brick and will have a slate roof. Its dimensions are shown 
in this sketch [indicating]. Here [indicating] is an underground 
tunnel which will connect it with the storehouse here [indicating^ 
which is close to it. That will run under the railroad track. The 
entrance will be on this side [indicating], and the building will be 
closed on the side toward this storehouse. It is a very low building 
and is shown in- sections here. 

The Chairman. What are the dimensions? 

Gen. Crozier. One hundred and forty-seven feet long by 32 feet 
wide. It will be a building of one low story. 

REPAIRS TO BRIIX1K. 

The Chairman. General, you are asking that the unexpended bal- 
ance of the appropriation of $5,500 for replacing sidewalks and re- 
painting all metal work of the bridge between Rock Island Arsenal 
and the city of Rock Island. 111., made in the sundry civil appropria- 
tion act for the fiscal year 1915 shall continue available during the 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 359 

fiscal year 1916, and that, in addition, $12,500 be appropriated for 
repairs to the bridge and viaduct. Is that the same bridge? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; the same bridge. 

The Chairman. What is the trouble ? 

Gen. Crozier. The trouble is that the roadway of that bridge con- 
sists of brick pavement which is laid on planks, and those planks, 
making a flooring, rest on crossties, which rest on iron girders. The 
plank flooring and the upper part of the crossties have rotted away, 
which became evident when we started to make the repairs for which 
you appropriated last year. We did not finish the job. We spent, 
a portion of the appropriation to relay the sidewalks and we did a 
certain amount of painting, but left a portion of this brick pavement 
which had to be taken up. We simply put it back loosely— did not 
replace it properly — because we knew it had to come up again in 
order to make the repairs which I am asking for this year. The 
unexpended balance does not amount to much; I do not remember 
the exact amount; a considerable portion has already been expended. 

REPAIB8 TO SHOP H — REAPPROPRJATION. 

[See p. 373.] 

The Chairman. You are asking also for the reappropriation of 
the unexpended balance of the appropriation of $65,000 for repairing 
the foundations and walls of shop H ? 

Gen. Crozier. I am glad to say that the progress we have made in 
examining that project makes it very likely that we will be able to 
accomplish what we wanted with the $65,000. When I asked you 
for the money I told you that I was not certain that we could accom- 
plish the object at all, but now T we think we shall be able to. It is a 
large piece of work and can not be done in the closed season very 
well. The probabilities are that it will extend on beyond the close 
of the present fiscal year, and if it should we should like to be able 
to continue the work and to expend what is necessary to finish it out 
of the appropriation already made. 

Ms. Sherley. Would the appropriation otherwise lapse? 

(Jen. Crozier. Yes, sir. The sundry civil bill is headed "Appro- 
priations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the nscal 
year ending June 30, 1915," and me interpret it as a limited appro- 
priation, an appropriation with a limited life. 

REPAIRS TO ARSENAL BUILDING. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For repairs to arsenal building, 
$2 ? 400." 

Gen. Crozier. "Arsenal building " is rather a queer name to give it, 
but it is a detached building used for storage purposes down near 
the railroad. Here [indicating] are the main buildings and here is 
the arsenal building. It is quite a large building and rather a fine 
building. It has a clock on it. I mention that simply to indicate 
the character of the building. You do not put clocks generally on 
insignificant buildings. The basement of that building, which is a 
partial basement, the windows extending a little above the ground, 
is damp and not good for storage purposes, and as we are hampered 
for storage space, we should make use of it. It is intended to con- 
struct an areaway around that, which will extend down to the base- 



360 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

ment floor. It will not be very wide, only 2 or 3 f6et wide, not a 
place to walk around, but just enough to keep it dry. I think the 
building is good enough to be worth that. 

COAL BINS AND COAL-HOISTING APPARATUS FOB BOILEB HOUSE. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For coal bins and coal-hoisting 
apparatus for boiler house of Shop F, $5,500." 

Gen. Crozier. That is to avoid the teaming and handling of coal 
for the boiler house. Here [indicating] is the place that it is to go, 
Mr. Chairman. This [indicating] is the double row of shops at the 
arsenal. Here [indicating] is the middle one on the north side. In 
this small building the boilers are placed, and it is alongside of that 
that this coal apparatus is to go. We now have to team the coal in 
and handle it by hand. It is expensive. We intend to run a spur 
of this railroad [indicating] in there with a conveyer system, which 
has been very successful at other arsenals and very successful at this 
arsenal on the opposite side, and we intend to handle the coal in a 
better way. This [indicating] shows the arrangement. 

The Chairman. It is a desirable but not an imperative improve- 
ment? 

Gen. Crozier. It could properly l>e classed as that. It is worth 
the money. 

Mr. Sherley. What sort of saving do you expect to make? 

Gen. Crozier. I do not know whether we have that completely 
figured out here. I can give you a statement as to the conditions 
by which you can make an estimate whether the saving would be 
large or small. The present coal bin we have there holds something 
less than 100 tons. It is necessary to unload the greater portion ot 
the coal from the cars onto the ground and to reload it on wagons 
and wheelbarrows and haul it to the boilers. 

The Chairman. How many tons? 

Gen. Crozier. It will hold about 100 tons. The new one will hold 
very considerably more. In the handling of the coal, particularly 
hi the cold weather, when we have to make a great deal of steam 
for heating purposes, we sometimes have to use three or four teams 
a day. Much of the transportation at the Rock Island Arsenal is 
hired transportation, and we have to pay $6 a day for a team. Dur- 
ing a part of the year we have to use $18 to $24 a day simply in hiring 
these wagons. We would do away with a very great portion of that 
Of course, that does not go on all the time. 

Mr. Mondell. What is the coal capacity there a day? 

Gen. Crozier. I have not that here ; I can give it to you. 

Mr. Mondell. Is it very considerable? 

Gen. Crozier. Not in proportion to the size of the establishment, 

because our power there is obtained from the Mississippi River. We 

• use electric power; but more coal than you would think is used for 

heating, and it is also required for certain manufactures, for making 

iron castings, and for blacksmithing processes. 

Mr. Mondell. It is rather extraordinary that a boiler plant of any 
considerable size and a considerable consumption of coal would be 
built, in the first place, without trackage? 

Gen. Crozier. That is true. I presume they were pressed for 
money, as we always are. and that they simply did not have th* 1 
monev. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 361 

Mr. Mondell,. What is the distance that they haul by wagon? 

Gen. Crozier. It is not very far. I think you can get the coal 
within a couple of hundred yards of the building. The necessity of 
having the teams makes it expensive. 

Mr. Mondell. Any considerable boiler plant should be constructed 
uith trackage? 

Gen. Crozier. It should, and with all mechanical improvements 
for handling the coal from the cars. 

Mr. Mondell. Is this for trackage facilities? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. It does not cost so much to toss the coal out of the 
car. You could run a track in thqre for a small portion of the money 
you ask? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; that would not cost very much. Most of 
it would have to be unloaded in the open in that case. 

MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION OF POWEB PLANT. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For maintenance and opera- 
tion of power plant, $12,500." Is this the water plant? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; the same amount w T e ask for every year. 

The Chairman. My recollection is there were statements made 
that it is costing you very much more to generate power at this 
arsenal than at the Frankford Arsenal. How do you account for 
that? Please put in the record a statement of the cost of producing 
power at both places. 

(Jen. Crozier. In July, 1913, the cost of electric power as produced 
at Frankford Arsenal was $0.01 per kilowatt-hour. Since that date 
a new 750-kilowatt direct-connected steam-turbine set has been in- 
stalled, but we have not yet data as to the saving in cost of power 
effected by that installation. I can not give you exact figures as to 
the cost oi power at Rock-Island Arsenal, although the commanding 
officer has own requested to furnish it. However, it can be stated 
to be less than 1 cent per kilowatt-hour and probably not less than 
half a cent. 

BOCK ISLAND RR1DOE8 AND VIADUCT. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For operating, care, and pres- 
ervation of Bock Island bridges and viaduct, and for maintenance 
and repair of the arsenal street connecting the bridges, $18,000." 
How much did you have left last year? 

Gen. Crozier. We did not have any left. We had to spend for 
superintendent, $1,733.75 ; three draw operators, $2,656.75 ; two draw 
tenders, $1,642.50; sweeper, $626; 12 guards, $8,064; telephone rent, 
$60; and for the purchase of different classes of material — lumber, 
oil, and electrical supplies — for this plant which is necessarv to 
operate it, $3,220, which makes up the $18,000. We get part of it 
back. 

Mr. Sherley. Your statement here does not show that it was all 
expended. 

Gen. Crozier. I was giving you the expenditures for the fiscal 
year 1914. 

Mr. Sherley. This shows a grand total of $17,264.45. 

Qen. Crozier. That is pretty close to $18,000. 



362 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

PROVING GROUND, SANDY HOOK, N. J. 
STOREHOUSE. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " Proving Ground, Sandy Hook, 
N. J. : For one storehouse, $10,000." 

Gen. Crozier. That is an estimate for the construction of a store- 
house to replace two old frame shacks which have been shaken to 
pieces by the gunfire of the proof battery. It is too expensive to 
keep them standing- up. This will provide for a small building 
which we will put in this location [indicating]. Here [indicating] 
is the wharf where you land. New York is in your direction [indi- 
cating]. Here [indicating] is the Atlantic Ocean, out here. Here 
1 indicating] is the proof battery. Here [indicating] would be the 
ocation of this small building, which would be constructed of re- 
inforced concrete. 

The Chairman. Where are the old ones? 

Gen. Crozier. Eight on the same site, to be replaced. They are 
near the same site. These [indicating] are the two which will be 
replaced. 

The Chairman. What is stored there? 

Gen. Crozier. Breech blocks and tools and appliances that are 
used in the proof battery. 

GRADING FIRING RANGE. 

The Chairman. The next item is, " For grading the firing range 
from the proof battery to the 2,500-yard target, $10,000." 

Gen. Crozier. That is shown on this plan. The portion it is de- 
sired to grade is shown in red. That terrain is such as is formed 
always by the joint action of the water and winds, which is re- 
sponsible for the whole of Sandy Hook, and the reason for the 
grading is that the rough ground is too difficult for us to measure 
ranges over. We have to do a good deal of experimental firing with 
our field guns, and the accuracy of the work is less than it should be 
on account of the roughness oi this ground. We do not propose to 
grade it very smooth, to make it anything like a lawn, but it should 
be smoothed out. • - 

The Chairman. Do you think that it will "stay put"? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Sherley. Is that under water at all? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir. 

Mr. Sherley. In case of a storm ? 

Gen. Crozier. The edge of it is subject to be beaten by storms. 
In the past we have had a good deal of trouble with the water occa- 
sionally scouring out a very considerable area on that side [indi- 
cating], but by working over that problem for a number of years 
and building jetties along out from the shore we have stopped that. 

Mr. Sherley. The grading would only be subject to the ordinary 
wind and rain? 

(Jen. Crozier. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mondell. Is the roughness of the ground due to any con- 
siderable extent to the wind action ? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; to a very considerable extent. 



SUNDBY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 363 

Mr. Mondell. If you change the present contours, will not the 
wind proceed to do it over again? 

(Jen. Crozier. There is a little vegetation which grows when it has 
a chance. 

Mr. Mondell. Will the wind not loosen it up and blow it away? 

(Ten. Crozier. Yes, sir; but we will try to preserve enough so that 
it will grow quickly. Maybe we will have bad luck with it, but I 
hope that we will make it stand. 

FILLING BAILBOAD TRESTLE. 

The Chairman. The next item is " For permanently filling a por- 
tion of the railroad trestle connecting Sandy Hook Reservation with 
Highland Beach, including necessary concrete culverts, $25,000. " 4 

Gen. Crozier. Sandy Hook is connected with the mainland by a 
very narrow neck and along that neck runs a wagon road and the 
ra if road. The railroad is our principal means of transportation 
for heavy supplies, coal, heavy guns, etc. We have for passengers 
and light freight a boat which runs down from New York. Thp sea 
has been doing harm down there for a long time and quite recently 
it has done a great deal of harm. I have a series of photographs 
here which show something of what happened there in the last 
storm. Looking at this map, the Atlantic Ocean is on the side 
toward you [indicating] ; this [indicating] is Highland Beach down 
here [indicating]. This [indicating] is the commencement of Sandy 
Hoot The great body of the Hook is to the northward. Here 
[indicating] is Shrewsbury River and here [indicating] is the nar- 
row neck of land. Here [indicating] is the line of railroad running 
down on the trestle and here [indicating] is a line of riprap stone 
wall which was made to protect this narrow neck of land which used 
to get every once in a while washed entirely out by the action of 
the sea. 

Mr. Gillett. What river is that? 

Gen. Crozier. The Shrewsbury River, and the bay farther north. 

The Chairman. Is that neck of land a couple of hundred feet 
wide? 

Gen. Crozier. Something like that. That is two or three hundred 
feet. This trestle now needs repairs. Like every other wooden 
construction it requires renewal, and what we propose is to replace 
a considerable portion of it by filling it in. 

The Chairman. With what? 

Gen. Crozier. With sand, and then provide a way through it 
with culverts for the water. This riprap wall is subject to the di- 
rect action of the waves. With this construction we will just have 
smooth running water, and if we can take care of that through 
culverts we think that we can get rid of the difficulty; the action will 
be the action of running water and not the action o^ violent waves. 

Mr. Gillett. How much above the ordinary level of the sea does 
the wall come? 

Gen. Crozier. At high water waves dash over it; that is, they 
come over the bulkhead a little lower down, which is on the prop- 
erty of the Jersey Central road. You can see a wave breaking over 
it in this photograph. 

The Chairman. Is this our road or the Jersey Central ? 



364 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Gen. Crozier. The Jersey Central, which is below ours. 

The Chairman. You just propose to fill that with sand? 

Gen. Crozier. We want to fill that trestle all up with sand— fill 
it in. 

The Chairman. Pump it in? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir; we will probably put it in with cars. 

Mr. Mondell. How high is that? 

Gen. Crozier. The trestle is probably 8 or 9 feet above the ordinary 
surface of the ground. 

The Chairman. The sand could be pumped in quickly? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir. That would have to be done under con- 
tract, and will be done in that way if anybody will do it cheaper. 

The Chairman. Will the sand hold ? 

(jen. Crozier. Yes, sir; if we put proper culverts in place and 
allow the water to run off that will accumulate between the fill and 
the riprap wall. 

The Chairman. Will that make a sufficiently solid bed? 

Gen. Crozier. If it will only stay there the sand will make a very 
good bed. 

Mr. Gillett. Why should not the water wash it right away? 

Gen. Crozier. The part behind that riprap wall is not subject to 
the violent action of the waves. 

Mr. Gillett. As I understand now it does wash it awtfy; it goes 
over there and washes it away? 

Gen. Crozier. Not so much. The principal trouble now is that we 
have to rebuild the trestle and to put in new beams and replace some 
of the piles, and that is expensive. 

The Chairman. How long is the trestle? 

Gen. Crozier. Nearly a mile long. We do not intend to fill in the 
whole mile, but only to fill in about 400 feet at the upper end and 
2,900 feet at the lower end; about 3,300 feet altogether — something 
over half a mile. 

Mr. Mondell. Is there not danger of the water coming over and 
eventually washing the sand outf 

Gen. Crozier. If it came over violently it would, but with the 
concrete culverts we think the action of the water will not be very 
violent except just where it goes through the culverts, and we expect 
to meet that. It is a troublesome problem. The Jersey Central 
Railroad and the residents of Seabright, Highland Beach, and those 
little places, have a great deal of trouble and their property is con- 
tinually in jeopardy. 

Mr. Gillett. Is this our railroad ( 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir ; our railroad. 

STABLK. 

The Chairman. The next item is " For one stable, $8,000." Did 
we not make an appropriation for that stable? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir ; you never did. I have been talking to you 
about that stable for a good many vears but have never secured any 
money for it. It is in such condition now that it would be a waste 
of money to repair it. It is a little frame structure and the walls 
are all rotting. There [indicating] is the condition of some of the 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 365 

lower timbers of the building. It is on its last legs. I do not want 
to spend any more money in replacing the rotten parts. 

The Chairman. How many animals will it take care of? 

Col. Babbitt. Twelve horses. 

The Chairman. And how many carts? 

Col. Babbitt. None. 

The Chairman. Just for 12 horses? 

Col. Babbitt. Yes, sir ; the carts are put in a shed outside. 

Gen. Crozier. Col. Babbitt can tell you all about that, because he 
has just come from command at Sandy Hook, where he had been for 
some time. 

Mr. Mondell. How many animals? 

Gen. Crozier. Twelve. 

Mr. Mondell. And carriage space? 

Gen. Crozier. No, sir ; the horses we have down there occupy this 
little stable. 

Mr. Mondell. What is this stable to be constructed of, brick or 
stone? 

Gen. Crozier. Concrete. We want to make it fireproof. It is the 
kind of a structure that it is economical to put up if you are building 
permanently. 

The Chairman. How large a building? 

Gen. Crozier. Here [exhibiting] is a plan of it. The dimensions 
are not shown on here. 

Mr. Mondell. I suppose there is no necessity of a building for ap- 
pearances' sake at Sandy Hook? 

Gen. Crozier. Not at all. We are only building here a structure 
which, we hope, will stay put and which will not be expensive for 
renewal, the most economical structure we can build ; that is, regard- 
ing its permanency and regarding the necessity for keeping it in 
repair. There is no occasion for its having an ornamental appear- 
ance at all, because it is not in a conspicuous part of the gr6unds. 

Col. Babbitt. The dimensions are about 105 feet by 30 feet, with 
a wagon storage at one end. 

The Chairman. Is it to be for wagon storage also ? 

Gen. Crozier. The present stable, which is about ready to fall 
down, has in it no room for wagons, and the wagons are kept under 
a wooden shed alongside of it, which in itself is rather dilapidated. 
This little group of buildings form the stables. Here is the one we 
have there now and which will be demolished, and these are frame 
structures. This is the shed building under which vehicles are kept 
[indicating]. 
Mr. Gillett. What kind of horses do you have there; work horses? 
Gen. Crozier. Work horses mostly, and some of the officers have 
saddle horses and they are entitled to stabling for them. 

SPRINGFIELD ARSENAL, MASS. 
COAL BINS AND CONVEYORS. 

The Chairman. "Springfield Arsenal, Springfield, Mass.: For 
the erection of new coal bins, including convevors and hoppers for 
transferring coal from cars to bins, $14,500." 



366 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

unloaded from the cars on wagons and then hauled up a long wooden 
inclined plane and dumped into the coal bins from the top, and the 
whole thmg is very ramshackle and needs reconstruction. It has 
rotted away, the way that kind of construction always does. It has 
been further weakened, due to the fact that last summer the thing 
caught fire, the middle of the coal pile caught fire from spontaneous 
combustion, and the floor burned away so that that would have to be 
rebuilt in any case. We propose to put a proper reinforced concrete 
and metal coal bin there with a conveyor system so that the coal 
will be unloaded directly from the cars into the bins. Something 
will have to be done in any case, and it is not economical to spend 
«tny more money on the old timber bins. 

The Chairman. How much coal do you burn there every year? 

Gen. Crozier. Considerably more than we do at Rock Island 
Arsenal, because we use it for power. 

The Chairman. Do you know the number of tons? * 

Gen. Crozier. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1913, 4,836 tons 
of coal were expended at Springfield Armory. 

REPAIRS TO STREET. 

The Chairman. " For repairing streets, $7,200." Is this inside or 
outside the arsenal? 

Gen. Crozier. We got an appropriation for the outside street last 
year, and this is entirely for the inside street. It is the street called 
Federal Street, which runs between two parts of the arsenal. 

The Chairman. I thought that street was in very fine shape. I 
never heard any complaint about that at all. I thought it was the 
outside street — Pearl Street. 

Gen. Crozier. We fixed that up last year. 

The Chairman. What is the matter with Federal Street? 

Gen. -Crozier. Federal Street is roughened by the automobile 
traffic, the way they all are, and the surface has to be replaced by one 
of these automobile-resisting roadways. 

The Chairman. How long is this street? 

Gen. Crozier. It is 1,300 feet long. 

The Chairman. That would be at the rate of $28,000 a mile. 

Mr. Gillett. I do not think that can be all for Federal Street 
because they did all the work on Pearl Street for $9,000, and that is 
a great deal longer. This must be for other streets also. 

Gen. Crozier. There is not as much traffic on Pearl Street as Fed- 
eral Street. 

Mr. Gillett. Oh, yes. 

The Chairman. We build the finest automobile roads, 16 feet 
wide, in the most expensive places to build them for between $10,000 
and $15,000 a mile. 

Mr. Gillett. I think the chances are that this includes other 
places, like Lincoln Street, which is also in the grounds. I do not 
think that can all be for Federal Street. 

Gen. Crozier. According to the estimate here, it is all estimated 
for Federal Street. Of course, it is a good deal more than 16 feet 
wide. 

Mr. Sherley. Where does the wear on that street come from— 
from city traffic? 



BUNDBY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1&16. 367 

Gen. Crozier. Largely from city traffic and our own traffic also, 
but mostly from city traffic. I suppose there are from 10 to 20 vehi- 
cles belonging to the city to one of ours that goes over that street. 

Mr. Sherley. Has the city ever suggested paying for any of the 
upkeep of this street? 

Gen. Crozier. The suggestion has not come in yet; no. 

Mr. Sherley. Do you not think it might be in order to invite 
that suggestion? 

Mr. Gillett. Would you let the city do work on Government 
grounds ? 

Mr. Sherley. I would either do that or let them use their own 
streets. 

Mr. Mondell. How wide a street is it, General? 

Gen. Crozier. It is 37 feet wide. That is, it is a good wide street, 
and, of course, it ought to be paved from curb to curb. 

The Chairman. Do you mean that the roadbed is 37 feet wide? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes. 

FIRE PROTECTION AND BRICK VAULT. 

The Chairman. " For increasing facilities for fire protection, in- 
cluding the construction of a brick vault for safe storage of draw- 
ings, master templets, and gauges, $20,000." Did we not fix up the 
fire protection facilities there also? 

Gen. Crozier. In 1913 was the last appropriation for fire pro- 
tection. 

The Chairman. How much? 

Gen. Crozier. $5,000. 

The Chairman. That was all you asked? 

Gen. Crozier. I guess that is all I asked. In 1910 we had $5,100 
for fire protection; in 1908 we had $4,000 for fire protection, and 
then we had nothing for that purpose back to 1903. This is for the 
installation of a sprinkler system in the lumber storehouse and in 
one of the finishing shops of the armory, in the main office building, 
and for a brick vault for the storage of drawings, master templets, 
and gauges. This vault is to be fireproof. You know that the equip- 
ment of master templets and of gauges for a system of repetition 
work like the manufacture of the musket is very expensive, indeed. 
It would be a great misfortune if they were lost. It constitutes one 
of the most considerable items in a small-arms plant. At Spring- 
field Armory the whole subject of interchangeability of the guns is 
regulated for both the guns that are manufactured there and for 
those manufactured at Kock Island. They all depend upon Spring- 
field Armory for the master templets ana gauges. 

The Chairman. Where do you store them now? 

Gen. Crozier. They are stored in these buildings, but they are not 
fireproof. 

The Chairman. How much is this brick vault going to cost? 

Gen. Crozier. The separate items are as follows: 

For sprinkler system in main office building $8,000 

For sprinkler system in old filing shop 5, 500 

For sprinkler system in lumber storehouse 4, 500 

Tor brick vault for drawings, master templets, and gauges 2,000 

Total 20, 000 



368 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1«16. 

Mr. Gillett. In what building are these vaults going to be built' 
Gen. Crozier. One of them is in the main office building and the 

other is over near the polishing room in the Hill shops. Both of them 

are up at the Hill shops. It will take two of them. 

POWER PLANT. 

Mr. Gillett. General, I notice there is no estimate here for some 
work which the colonel commanding talked to me about as very 
important, the reconstruction of the power plant. I suppose you did 
not think it was wise to estimate for that this year or else did not 
think it was as imperative as some other things ? 

Gen. Crozier. I did not think it was a very good year to put that 
in. If we were to start up Springfield Armory at full capacity we 
ought to have the power plant in better condition than it is. It ought 
to be overhauled. But as I do not see any immediate prospect of 
that, and as we can run the armory very well with the power plant 
as it is now, I have not thought it worth while to put in an estimate 
and I will not unless more careful examination of the question will 
show that irrespective of the rate at which we run the armory, it 
will afford a good saving on the investment. 

Mr. Gillett. The colonel told me he thought it would save about 
6 per cent. 

Gen. Crozier. That is true; but we have not gone into it closely 
enough to ascertain that. If we can make out a good case of saving. 
I would be willing to ask for the money ; but we do not need the power 
plant now, and we have such a good store of arms that I think we 
can trust to the plant we have there, and, as I say, the economy ha? 
not yet been fully demonstrated. 

WATERTOWN ARSENAL, MASS. 
NEW ROOF ON SMITH SHOP. 

The Chairman. " Watertown Arsenal, Watertown, Mass.: For re- 
placing wooden roof on smith shop by a steel structure, including the 
necessary repairs and alterations to the building, $40,000." Is thi* 
the beginning or the end of that job? 

Gen. Crozier. It is very near the end. 

The Chairman. How much have we given you, all told? 

Gen. Crozier. When I first submitted that to you I had in view a 
project which would cost about $170,000. I hpve now gone over that 
again. 

The Chairman. How much did you get of that amount? 

Gen. Crozier. I have only had by appropriation $10,000, but I have 
allotted out of some of my general funds about $26,000, so that I have 
put into the project about $36,000 altogether. Now,' then, there re- 
mains, as the project stands, about $53,000, and I am asking $40,000 
for it now, and t expect to ask next year for between $13,000 and 
$14,000, and that will finish it at a cost of something like $75,000 less 
than the original estimate submitted to you* 

The Chairman. What will that be for? 

Gen. Crozier. For some electrical cranes and the crane runway 
for a forging press and for one or two local cranes and some wir- 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 369 

ing. The principal item, $8,000, will be for an electric traveling 
crane. 

TESTING MACHINES. 

The Chairman. Testing machines, $15,000. This is your usual 
estimate? 
Gen. Crozier. That is the usual estimate. 

watervliet arsenal, n. y., power plants. 

The Chairman. " Watervliet Arsenal, West Troy, N. Y. : For in- 
creasing capacity of power plants, $7,000." I thought we fixed that 
up last year. 

Gen. Crozier. No ; we did not do that last year. 

The Chairman. We put in those pumps for you, did we not? 

Gen. Crozier. No; I asked you for that, but you did not give it 
to me. I did not get anything last year and I did not get anything 
the year before. 

The Chairman. What is this $7,000 for? 

Gen. Crozier. This is for the purpose of putting in a new electric 
generator or converter. You know we run the arsenal by electric 
power purchased from a neighboring power company, and we use 
at the arsenal itself what we call rotary converters; that is to say, 
a combination of motor and dynamo. We use the current to run a 
motor, and then with a dynamo convert that current into one of a 
voltage suitable for use in our machinery, which the current as it 
comes to us is not suitable for. The ones we have there now are 
very considerably overloaded. They are used all the time and used 
hard, and used very considerably beyond their rated capacity. 

The Chairman, x ou are only running about one- third or one-half 
time there, are you not? 

Gen. Crozier. No; we are running two shifts a good part of the 
time. 

The Chairman. At full capacity? 

Gen. Crozier. For some part of the work we are running more 
than the one-shift capacity of the establishment. Altogether we 
are not getting the full output of the establishment, but we have 
certain choke points where we are running two shifts. We have 
increased up there very considerably in the last year, owing to the 
fact that we have got increased appropriations for field artillery, 
all of which we are directed to spend in our own establishments 11 
we can. 

The Chairman. Is this an important item? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes, sir; this is an important item. They are run- 
ning up there at 60 per cent overload for two or three hours at a 
time often, and, of course, that ought not to be done. In the last 
two years we have added motors in that shop to the extent of about 
140 horsepower, without any increase of the generating capacity. 

LIGHTS IN GUN SHOP. 

The Chairman. " For lights in large gun shop, $3,000." 

Gen. Crozier. That is almost too large an item for me to carry out 

of my general fund. I think it is appropriate to say right here, 

Mr. Chairman, that within the last two or three years a good many 

of these establishments have had their plants increased, notably 

72785—15 24 



370 SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 

Frankford Arsenal and Rock Island Arsenal, and of course the gen- 
eral upkeep expenses have been increased also. But my general 
fund which is known as the fund for repairs and improvements of 
arsenals has not been increased.' I am very much inclined to think 
it ought to be increased, and if there were a little better prospect 
of getting it I think I would ask for an increase of that general rund 
now. I am inclined to think that such items as this ought to come 
out of the general fund; that I ought not to come down here and 
make special estimates for them. 

The Chairman. What is the necessity for lights in the gun shops? 

Gen. Crozier. We have a certain amount of night work which is 
necessary there. For instance, I have been ordered to speed up the 
work on the Panama Canal armament as fast as I can, and that 
means night work. If we were allowed to take our time at it we 
would not have any night work. Moreover, it is pretty far north 
up there, and in the short days of the year along aoout the present 
time it gets dark and we have to have light for a considerable por- 
tion of the time before closing down. The closing hour is gen- 
erally 5 o'clock. 

The Chairman. You must have some lights up there now. 

Gen. Crozier. Yes; but they are not good, and it is not economical 
not to have good lights. 

The Chairman. Are these to be large arc lights? 

Gen. Crozier. No; we have something better than the arc light. 
It is a light that gives very good illumination on the incandescent 
principle. I do not know whether they use the tungsten burner or 
not. They will do that if the tungsten is considered able to stand 
the vibration of the machinery. You know it is rather delicate in 
that way. 

FIBE PROTECTION. 

The Chairman. " For increasing facilities for fire protection, in- 
cluding one motor-driven pump and house to contain same, $16,000." 

Gen. Crozier. That is the item I spoke of last year which I did 
not get. 

The Chairman. Is this the same item? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes; except I have cut it down a little from last 
year. I estimated for $20,000, but I cut out $1,500 altogether and 
allotted $2,600 out of my general appropriation, and those two items 
bring the total now wanted down to $16,200. 

BORING AND TURNING LATHE. 

The Chairman. " For one 100-inch boring and turning lathe. 
$05,000/' 

Gen. Crozier. There are two reasons for that. One is that in the 
heavy-gun work which we do up there now the machines which we 
are using are all old. Some of them have been pieced out by parts 
of other machines, so as to enable us to take a longer gun, and they 
are not art economical in their operation as more modern machine?. 
Another thing is that our maximum capacity at the Watervliet Ar- 
-enal now is a 12-inch 40-caliber gun. 

The Chairman. How many feet is a 40-caliber gun? 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 371 

Gen. Crozier. In a 12-inch gun it would be 40 feet. The caliber is 
the bore of the gun. 

The Chairman. It is the diameter times the length, so that a 40- 
caliber 8-inch gun would be 40 times 8 inches? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes; or two-thirds of 40 feet. I ought to explain to 
you that that does not measure the over-all length of the gun. It is 
the length of the bore of the gun from the muzzle back to the bottom 
of the bore. 

The Chairman^ It does not include the breech mechanism at all? 

Gen. Crozier. No ; just the length of the bore. I made a mistake in 
telling you our capacity was a 12-inch 40-caliber gun. By taking 
a couple of other lathes and breaking them up and using the parts of 
the two lathes we have extended one of the lathes so that we can go 
to a 12-inch 45-caliber gun. 

The Chairman. What do you want a 100-inch boring and turning 
lathe for? ' 

Gen. Crozier. We are called on now to manufacture larger guns 
than we can build up there for the Navy, using our plant for the pur- 
pose, and we will be called on, if you meet the War Department's 
projects for defense, to manufacture 16-inch guns of 45 calibers length. 
Xow, that would be beyond our capacity, and we would have to have 
a machine of this kind to do it, and will have to make some other 
changes also. 

The Chairman. You did manufacture a 16-inch gun there? 

Gen. Crozier. Yes ; but it was not 45 calibers long. It was only 34 
calibers long. 

The Chairman. The new gun will be much longer? 

(ien. Crozier. Yes. 

The Chairman. And you must have this machine in order to build 
that gun? 

(Jen. Crozier. Yes. We can not build it with anything we have 
there now. While I do not imagine there will be any call for a very 
large number of them right away, yet there will be a call for larger 
iruns than any we can build up there now ; and, in addition to that, 
this machine will be a good investment because of its economy of 
operation as compared with the older machines which we use now. 

repairs, improvements, and machinery at arsenals. 

The Chairman. " For repairs and improvements at arsenals, in- 
cluding $125,000- for necessary machinery for manufacturing pur- 
poses, $290,000." 

Gen. Crozier. As I said a moment ago, I think that the portion of 
that appropriation which is not applicable to machinery is very 
>canty, but I have not prepared myself to ask for any more money 
now. I coul<J use more very advantageously, and I wish it were 
larger. The part you give me for general purposes of machinery is 
sufficient. I do not need any more for that, because when I have 
any special project like this lathe I have just been speaking to you 
about, I come before you with a special estimate. It is not intended 
to cover such very considerable and important additions to the 
plant as that lathe would constitute. So that the $125,000 for 
machinery is sufficient, but the other part is scarcely sufficient. Let 
me tell you a little of what I have to contend with on account 



372 SUNDRY CIVIL APPBOPBIATION BILL, 1916. 

of the scantiness of that appropriation and of similar general appro- 
priations. You know in every manufacturing estabfishment there 
are certain general expenses which can not be charged to any par- 
ticular manufacturing order, as, for instance, the power, whatever 
that may be, and the oil and the waste and a good many" of the 
helpers and most of the superintendents and foremen and people of 
that class come from a general fund. My method of recruiting that 
general fund is to charge a certain percentage on direct labor and 
a certain amount for the classes of machines employed in each par- 
ticular manufacturing order, and that gives a certain rake-off from 
the allotment into this general fund. 

Now, I have endeavored to define as carefully as I can what class 
of expenditure that general fund may be used for. But there is a 
continual tendency to encroach upon it and to charge anything and 
everything that they have not a special appropriation for to this 
general fund, because the people have necessities pressing on them, 
and they want to do this and that and the other thing. For instance, 
this matter of the lights, for which I have estimated $3,000. There 
will be a pressure from the commanding officer to use this shop- 
expense fund obtained by taking percentages of the allotments for 
the manufacturing orders for such things as that. I am continually 
having from the Frankford Arsenal requests from the commanding 
officer to utilize the shop expense fund for tunneling for steam 
piping and tunneling for gas mains or tunneling for electric wires, 
and it is rather difficult to draw the line between the class of ex- 
penditures which should be met from that shop fund, which is really 
a part of the manufacturing appropriation and this general mainte- 
nance fund which you give me. If you did not give me this gen- 
eral maintenance fund, in some respects I would be better off, because 
I would then just take off from the manufacturing appropriation 
whatever was necessary to keep up the general manufacturing ap- 
pliances of the shops and keep the buildings in order, and then, 
of course, I would be all right until the manufacturing appropria- 
tions fell off to pretty nearly nothing and I had the arsenal to main- 
tain and no money from which I could deduct percentages for that 
particular purpose. Of course this has not any particular relation 
to this estimate now, because I have not asked you to increase the 
general fund, but I say this for the purpose of convincing you, I 
hope, that it certainly ought not to be decreased. I would be very 
glad if you would increase it by $20,000 or $10,000. It would help 
out a good deal. 

Mr. Sherley. In pleading certain matters are sometimes alleged in 
the nature of inducement. It is not a necessary averment and has 
nothing to do with the particular issue to be tried, but is in the nature 
of inducement, and this is for next year, I presume. 

Gen. Crozier. You know. Mr. Sherley, how great the tendency is 
for the man on the spot wno feels the necessity of the situation to 
treat a fund like that shop fund, which is a rake-off from manufac- 
turing appropriations, like a kind of slush fund ? and I have been 
fighting against it all the time, and one of the things that increases 
the difficulty of that battle with my efficient and enthusiastic subordi- 
nates is the scantiness of this general maintenance appropriation. 

The Chairman. You are asking for some legislation. I think we 
understand that. 



SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION BILL, 1916. 373 

Wednesday, January 6, 1915. 

STATEMENT OF BBIG. GEN. WILLIAM CBOZIEB, CHIEF OF 

ORDNANCE. 

;land arsen 
[See p. 356.] 

STOREHOUSE. 

The Chairman. General, we have before us H. K. 7763, to appro- 
priate $200,000 for additional storehouse at Kock Island Arsenal, to 
U used as an adjunct to the proposed plant for the manufacture of 
field artillery gun carriages and vehicles of the field artillery. Are 
you asking for such a building? 

Gen. Crozier. No. 

The Chairman. Is there any necessity for such a building? 

Gen. Crozier. There is no immediate necessity. Such a building 
would be ultimately useful, however. 

The Chairman. The situation at present does not require it? 

Gen. Crozier. It does not; no. 

Mr. Mondell. And will not within the next fiscal year? 

Gen. Crozier. No ; I think not. 

SHOP H. 

[See p. 869.] 

The Chairman. There is also a bill here to appropriate $65,000 for 
repairing shop H at Rock Island Arsenal. 

Gen. Crozier. That appropriation has already been made and is 
now in course of expenditure. • 

FIELD ARTILLERY MATERIAL. 

The Chairman. Also a bill to appropriate $250,000 for increasing 
the capacity for field artillery material. We have appropriated that, 
have we not ? 

Gen. Crozier. I think that bill is intended to call for an addi- 
tional $250,000. 

The Chairman. No; this bill was introduced August 26, 1913, 
and our bill was pass