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Full text of "Superintendents of the Yellowstone National Park, February 1967"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/superintendentso00uns_64c 




REFER TO: 

A2bi5 



WEAIriER 



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CViiii-oSoW 



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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83020 

March 14, 1967 

Summary of February VJbi MonLhly Narrative Report 

Unusually mild; considerable snowmelt 
I:ax. 57 degrees; Min. -29 decrees 

2,624 visitors; 729 vehicles; North Entrance 
29% increase 

24 over-snow veuicies ret. at Mammoth & North lint.; 
30 L small machines 3/509 people & 131 large macnines 
w/1,108 people entered through West Entrance 

10 small snowmobiles traveled from Colter Bay to 
West inumb 



Pa^e 
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SNOW JCURic Di fA 



1-2 
2 



ViaiiuRS 



Reporters from NBC, ABC, CBS, magazines and 
news media in on elk management program and 
reduction 



INSPECTIONS Carpenter and Powers from Waso; Smith, San 
Francisco; Snegosky and Riha 



3 



oFuCIaL Robert R. Lovegren, new Assistant Superintendent (0PR) 
ACTIVITIES arrived Feb. 13 

*isst. Ch. Pk. Naturalist Cancer flew as observer, 
elk reduction, 2/15; So. Dist. Naturalist Lake, 
collections, etc., elk data 

Supt., Ch. Pk. Ranger, Ch. Pk. Naturalist to 
Billings, met Uuall's Wildlife Advisory 
Committee on Feb. 6 

Superintendent & Ch. Pk. Naturalist to Old 
Faithful, met vim Dr .Vincent Schaeier, Feb. 1 

Wildlife Students from Univ. of Mont, in 2/3; 
Utah State Univ. in 2/24-25 



Biologist to Seattle, 2/15 

Park Forester attend. Interior Inter-Bureau Fire 
School, Denver, 2/13-24 



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BIRTH 



MISCELLANE OUS 



Chief at Haint. & Supt. to Billings, 1/31-2/1 
Coordination Committee Eaestinc. Joint area map 
to be prepared of visitor accamao. 

Supt. to Denver, raet BPR representatives, East 
Entrance road will not be closed during summer 4 

San, to Project Supervisor, John Larson, 2/23. 
Livingston Metaorial 5 

AFGE & {^FE mo. meetings 2/13 and 2/6 

Social gathering for Lovegrens, 2/24 5 

Supt. Staff Meetings 2/9 and 2/23 5 



P2RS0S8SL 
Promotion 
Reassignment 

Transfer In 

Oat 

aeiecLed 



IN- SERVICE 

training 



HISTORY 



RESEARCH AMD 
OBSERVATIONS 



SAFETY ANK 
HEALTH 



Ersria L. Atw ood to Procuressest Agent 
Carles i. Moray to North District Park Ranger 
Sale H. Haas to South District Park Ranger 
Lynn R. Wi XIiataeon to West District Park Ranger 
Harold D. Oaks to Foreraa.i II -Maintenance 
jfcgbgrt D. Hetherell to national Landmarks Div. 
John &. Douglass, Supv. Park Naturalist (West Di*,t.) 
Kenneth R. Ashley to Blue Ridge Parkway as Cb.Rgr. 5-6 

Park Ranger A Idea L. Hash to Spring session at 
Albright Training Center, March §~May 26 6 

Length -of -Service e^hlem to Jasses H. Batsloff 

for 10 years of service 1/28 6 

Naturalist Haines to St. Paul - 2/12 

gathering information on Tell, history 6 

2 Pine Bwrtens observed at V?. Yell; 

Bald eagle observed near Lewis River bridge; 

Regular observation of neckbanded bison by 

Lamar and Tower Sub-District sj 

Seismograph at Northeast and Lake inoperative 6 

Rehabilitation at Maacaoth Museum 6 

1 on-the-job injury, no lost tia*« 

4 «etcr vehicle accidents 

Cars Husa bitten by coyote, 2/8 7 



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Yellowstone National Pari:, Wyoming 






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RAMCER. 



ACTIVITIES 






IftSSCTS AMP 

T&ss diseases 






£2&g 



ffaa&csscag ass 



leaded firearms.; sign* on tepti«a& Creek road 
helpful; 

4 permlta issued huaters to irmiwfi elk ia Gullet .a; 
tracks of oversnov ranch ioe* ci'f roads 



Daily patrols into C lletia daring Special Hunting 
Season. Closed Feb. a at 3j§© p.aw 

Several o¥ersajow patrols »ade from West Tel lover oat i 
to Becbler ares Feb. 11 and 12 , .?od i£ sad 19 

Gtopiete lire. e^ulp. tsobil. i&ant:zy prepared 
Ti2«t Sefeael in Denver, 2/1 - 

Prep* Ksdte attend 2-day seeeiing f /1-2 ia fllgs. 
an Air Operations Center at i»li. 

Fixe brigade training 2/14 end 21 

FSre at JfiG on 2/6; fireplace cfe is sa ey - $250 



Foretfcry Report ca&pieted 2/16 
ftagJUm 1 halts ribes eotttt preaent 

Ski patral Druid Peak, Csc&e Creek to Cooke City 
boundary patrols Friday , Saturday and Sunday ia 
Morfck Bi strict 

Spring Im Reasovei started 2/20; 
fe<? Caok* City kept ©pea 
Sassiest expected April i 



Kfthabilitatlon ok" Steseua 40£ easpl«te 
C<snwr floor in plumbing &hog> 
I&eadry facilities at Lamar c-oraplefced 
Aatesaa pole «i8t. stesheura brakes* tetsporary 
installed until next 



13$ fiig&s constructed; 150 raft lit ifiiiiifi >© re lettered 
Cfels-^y tire at Ita 2/6, eat* desssge $250 



aad YFCe. «»£ficisl« isad© owersnov tear fros 
fce 0.F., feasibility ot scheduling tripe 



direct reduction started Febra^ry 2? » 19 killed 

t induction 
Live Shipped 1,044 

Hester Kill Outside Fark 1,103 (494 G llatin) 

Isgleal Colleetlen 
Trap tea* 

Speciaama I 

2/333 



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Yellowatoiae Met lees I Parh, Wyoming 



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PUBLICITY 



m use 

public 

ESLATlCgS 



Vcllov s tcma Weekly Keys issued each Thursday 
1 presw release; Elk Reduction Prograa 2/3 

Protestant services held threug&yut asonth 

£*agex- Seniorth presented Winter Coses to 
Xelloyst^ne'* to Cleft Palate Assoc, nesting at 
W. Tell. 35 attendants 



U 
12 



Cfc.Pk.Ketisrslist €ood guest speaker at Big Tleber 
2/10. His subject 'Thoughts on Yellowstone's 
*isi Tear.** 45 attendants 



lie aaLB HftnoaftL Mmmm - ^st** 



as sies Am 

asgSTRUCTIGN 



Yellowstone Hatiooal Park Listed 

Big ftcle Sat ions! Battlefield - Listed 



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Yellowstone national Park, vyoming 



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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 03020 



EPLY REFER TO 

A2615 



Marcn 14, i9b7 

Memorandum 

To: Director 

From: Acting Superintendent, Yellowstone 

Subject: Superintendent's Moutuiy Narrative .iaporL, February 1967 

General 

W eatner Conditions 

Temperatures were unusually mild in February, resulting, in considerable 
snowmelt at low elevations ana on south and west slopes. Snowfall was 
relatively li&ht. Following is a summary of winter snow conditions 
throughout the Park: 

Greatest snow accumulation - Lewis Divide, 107 inches 
Least snow accumulation - East Entrance, 34 inches 
Average snow accumulation - 57 inches 

Average water content - ib.l incncs 

This is 120 per cei.t of ouc 13-year average. 

Various high and low temperatures recorded arouad the Park were: 





Maximum 




Minimum 






Temperature 


Da to 


Tom}. 


eratuve. 


i.;.-. 


North Entrance 


57 uegreos 


2/27 


4 


decrees 


2/2C 


Mammoth 


47 


2/27 


6 


, 


2/20 


Lamar 


46 


2/25 


-22 




2/17 


Tower Fall 


44 


2/27 


-lb 


n 


2/20 


Snake River 


42 " 


-- 


-24 


i . 


2/2u 


Old Faithful 


40 


2/24 


-25 


'■ 


2/20 


West Yellowstone 


39 M 


2/25 


-29 


ii 


2/20 


Northeast Entrance 


3 . " 


2/13 & 14 


-21 


i' 


2/20 



Increase or Decrease in Travel 

Visitors entering the Park during February totaled 2,62<+. .iutomobiie^ 
entering the Park reached 729. This is a 34.5 per cent increase as 
compared to February 19b0. 

The North Entrance reported a 29 per cent increase in travel as 
compared to February 1966. 



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Oversnow Travel 

a total of 24 oversnow vehicles registered at Maasaoth end the North 
Cu trance. There have been few enow vehicles entering from Cooke City 
for use in the P*rk. 

At West Yellowstone 301 swell oversnow Machines with 509 people entered 
the Park. Also, 131 large oversnow machines with 1,103 people entered 
through this entrance. 



On February 22, ten swell track snowmobiles left Colter B*ty for Old 
Faithful via c*>uth Entrance. The going was aiiiicult so they went only 
to West Thumb and returned. 



Saow Course Data. February 1967 

The following la a list oi snow courses taken at the end ot February 
1907. The data tabulated gives the percent of water content as expressed 
over a 15-year average as calculated by the Soil Conservation Service. 
The years 1946-1962 are used to express th e 1 5-year average 



Course 



Date 



->now 



1 j- year 

average Percent 
Water water of Section 

content content average ftf Park , 



Northeast 


3' 6/67 


39.0 


11.0 


7.5 


147 


* 


Lupine 


3/ 3/67 


44.0 


13.5 


9.5 


142 


1 


Nor r is 


3/ 1/67 


41.0 


12.4 


9.0 


138 


N 


Hew Lake «te 


2/28/67 


40.0 


11.2) 


9.0 


128 


s 


Old Lake tfl 


2/28/67 


42.0 


11.7) 






s 


Cesiyon 


2/26/67 


55.0 


lt>.8 


13.1 


126 


M 


Sylvan Peas 


2/27/67 


48.0 


12.0 


12.6 


y5 


o 


East Entrance 


2/27/67 


34.0 


9.0 


10.4 


86 


■i 


Lewis Divide 


2/26/67 


107.0 


39. 


36.1 


102 


:> 


Aster Creek 


2/2b767 


89.0 


31.2 


28.3 


110 


9 


West Thumb 


2/28/67 


66.0 


22.3 


20.0 


112 


■> 


Coulter Creek 


2/23/67 


60.0 


20.6 


20.6 


100 


s 


Snake River 


2/28/67 


58.0 


18.0 


18.6 


97 


J 


Precipitation Totals 




Average Water Content 






Snake River 


2.90 




North . . 


. . 139% 






Tower Fall 


• 66 




South . . 


. . 104% 






Lamar 


.34 




Park Average. 122% 






Lake 


1.44 












Mammoth 


1.00 











Yellowstone national Park, Wyoming 



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the visitors to the Pork during the stonth were the following repre- 
sentative* who wore gathering information far television, radio, novo 
and akagasiue articles la connection tilth the elk ssanagefaeut program: 



Willie© Lindsay, WC Bewst Here Anderson, AftC Bows; Sen Bloon, CSS Sews; 
Sell Stenger, ABGQST ttogaaiues Herbert Shwidine, POJUIA& SCXi** tfontbiy; 
bsmi Sehoenfield, POPSLAB. SCXSBCS end BA&E Kogasiaes Lee J. Cosh, M&2; 
Mike Kinnick, The L1YISGST0S SUKRKUSK} J«n«« *. $raff , Yellowstone Park 
Company, Helena; Oiek &endaii, photographer fro» fweson, Arixoaa. 

Photographer and presssaan Jack Richard of Cod/, Wyoming wee in the Bark en 
the 15th and loth lor a story on reduction activities. 

Mr. J« I. Carpenter fro® the Siroctor*s Office, Mr. ftrwce Fevers of 
Katioaai Capital Parka, end &r. Joe M. Siha of the Midwest i^giousl 
Office are in teilo«si«m« in connection with stodging Supply Center 
operations with respect to establishing lev cost sales. 

Hr« Merrick &&ith, frost &*n Francisco Planning £od Service Canter was 
in the Park on Mas- tar Plan, Stadias. 

The findings on the cosreonication study isada by the iionniaiB States 
Telapaeno Company ware presented to us en February 27 and 28. Haaars. 
Jack K. durdick, logons Sar^s, and J. A. Burnett of the Casper, loosing 
office of the Mountain States telephone Colony prasentod the various 
phases of the sftssy and node their racojasendetioas. Saroid J. Ssegesky 
of the Washington Office and Joe g« Siha of the Midwest anglonal Office 
were present sad heard the Telephone So«p«ay*s presentation* Mr. Snegosky 
carried several copies of the study back to Washington for the Washington 
Office review. 

isf«*Hrt ittsatthM 

Mr. Robert k. Lovagroa, the new Assistant Superintendent (Operations), 
his wife* Judy, and five children, iCarsn, Sally and Susan (twins), Joan 
and Jlasgr, arrived in the Park an February 1$. Ht« Lovagran transferred 
fros Sopoty, Assistant director, Administration^ Washington Office. 

On February 13, Assistant Chief Park naturalist Canter flew s» an air 
ebsecver in the elk reduction program. 

On February 16, Superintendent John S. McLaughlin accompanied by Chief 
Perk Bangor Bar old J. £st«y and Chief Park Bator alls t John fc. Good want 
to Silling*, Hantaan, where they net with membere of Secretary Odall's 
wildlife Advisory Comnittee relativs to direct reduction of the Kor thorn 
Yellowstone elk herd, they returned to Hanaaoth the following day. 
Hsnftt rs of the Ceundttee prooaat were: A. Starker Leopold, Assistant to 
the Chancellor, University of California at Berkeley, and Thanes A. Klebsil, 
Executive director » SaUonel Wildlife Federation. 

3 
Yellowstone national Park, tqrewing 






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South District naturalist lake participated in the direct elk reduction 
•>» F*:bruaiy 27 and 2fe, his priisary responsibilities being biological 
collections and the recording of biological data. 



Super la tendaat and Chief Perk Saturaliat want to Old Faithful en 
February 1. they conferred with Or. Vioceot Schsafer, Leader, Yello*- 
atene Field *U search Sapedltien, atiaoapaerlc Sciences Research Program, 
and t*enbers of hie research team, the Kxpeditlcn departed Old Faithful 
em February 4. 



Ob the evening of the 3rd, a progxas* regardlag the wildlife 
program was presented to 23 vi Id life fiaaaageBKrot students from the 
University of f&utena, Nisseula, i&mtans who were *ccowp«mied by 
St. tea Fengeily. This group observed an elk drive into the Serdlner 
trap ©a thu &ozntn% of the 4th, 

©a the 24th and 2S»th a group of wildlife s*na$astent students free Utah 
State University visited the Park for a look at the wildlife ttanegcjsent 
programs. Evening programs ware presented to the& on the 24th asd 25th. 
They were also given "shows* trips over portions of the not there range. 
An attempted elk drive detaonatration on the earning of the 24th failed 
because of poor flying conditions. Og February 24 Chief Park saturaiist 
Coed gave a talk on Xatianal Park Service philosophy to fer« dese Low and 
his 35 wildlife ssana^oiaefet e&idents £r»a Utah State University. On the 
25th Aeaieteat Chief Park gaturaiiat Canter accosapanisd 33 wildlife 
wanageeeni students fro* Utah State University Ml a half "day tour to 
Korris Geyser Basin. 

Biologist gar&orft presented his aspen paper to a abating of the Americas 
Society of Ranges Manage&snt in Seattle, "Waahitx&tos on February 15. 

Bark ganger (Forestry) w. Lowell White attended the Interior inter-bureau 
Fire gehavior School at Stealer, Colorado, February 13 through 24. 

Or January 31 &w& February I, chief of Fork Maintenance Elliott accosapanled 
the Superintendent to the Coordination Committee meeting held is Bil lings , 
M s ntsas . At this aeetiug with the Forest Service Supervisors from the 
surrounding forests, mutual probleias ware discussed and plana csadc. The 
principal objective at this tiras is the preparation of a joint ttxt^ map 
ahowing all visitor nnffsmnsriatliMuu 

Super iateadeat ftcLeughlia attended a aeetiag of the bureau of Public goads 
representatives in Denver, Febreary 14 and IS. its timet as on the East 
la trance road have increased considerably. The road will not he cioaed 
during the baay visitor season this summer. It is hoped that one-way 
traffic can he maintained. Proa September 10 to October 15, the road will 
be cioaed from midnight to 10:00 A.H. After October IS, the road will be 
closed for the season. 

4 

Tellowetoae national Park, Wyoming 






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tbe American Fadaratioa ȣ eoveraaeat feaaleyeas hald their regalar 
aeaSaly a&eting *« Pafcrasry 13* 

flit gfrti 4»1 F*«erati&« of Federal EMpl*y*«£ a«i4 tkfcir regular starkly 
aeetia$ aa Febrtiisry $. 

A social gathering w*a fee la la the Haiti ~?arp#** &**xa, Feevteftry 24 : t. 
valeseA *ail «eet eh* JUAart ft. kftva^rea*. 

Vital Statistics 

fifth A «««» /a* Christ! *», w>* bora Tbaraaay. February 23* at caa 

Liviagstaa Sfewsri si Kesaital, Lfvia&stoa,, Montana. This i* the fourth 
chile of /©a eae Barbara hare^a. £fe. l^resa is Froject Supervisor.. 

£ua«riat4Hiaeat'£ ataff aseaiag* taara hel4 Faazeary $ aae S3, 

a^sijai& trati -,a 

There vare 134 a* the gNrjnrall for the psri^s* easlag February 11 c(xsp»x*4 
fee 137 a year ajp*« Taera war** 1.3ft oa th# p-jv&XX t&* the perio4 eadiag 
Fafersusry 25 eoc^r«4 in 14? a yea* ago. 

fracgalfraea* aae laaECHSByy .fr*^, of ,*^iaors Acjfc&yiijta 

6a«BetiU*e eau&inetir&s aaattaBcea by the vyaaiag Xatere$eaej S--.-r4 $£ 
Sa&Biaers Cor p MMU ieas *t YelXoweteae will ra*§aia ooeit iaaefialtely. 
This active was re^^«Hse«^<l ia view of the Haltae 1 ossber ef spalisatioaa 
received far the >ari<»*» aaaotmcdssea&s of elactriciea, catyeacar, palate** 
aae helper eeeititfas. 



Srtt iia, l,Mwgi , fir<« Property Heaagejaaat Aeslstaat, ©S~7* 
to Pro&sreaaat Agaat» 65-9 1 affective February 12 ♦ 

fl te fr »J k..MSSBt> fr?fe ^* a 1U strict Park aattger la 
Biatrict Park Kaager, effective February 26. 




ftala §L, jaeee . frs« fcftat Bi*trict Park SLaager t? 
Seath Si strict Park&aager, effective February 26* 

■■Nlat *mJU~MlteB2^BU •*■ la fifitiiyM Park Reader, «S~9, 

la t*ke sssaa* to sfepervleory F»rk ftaagar, 6S~ll< 

Mast district Reader, effective February 2a. 

s. Oaks , MBiataaaaceiaaa* Flaeiiag C^rft«, to 
Zl*Hsiataa«ace, affectlva Fabruary 2a. 

Oat &»barc j». Matheral| . Park Raa*er (kileliia »mataaeat> 

aa* aaaaataa rasa? itaaaat to tae Waabiar.toa Office, 
affective Hareh 12 » with Mati'^aal Laa^artcs Oivlsica 

5 
aallaa taari i^cx.noi Mai iPaaaaj 



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Selected John A. Douglass . P«rk Naturalist, GS-9, White 5/mds 
national R nuaaeot, has been selected for promotion to 
Supervisory Park Naturalist (Wast District), GS-U, 
effective ftarch 12. 

Kenneth k. <ishiey . Assistant Chief Park Hanger, h&9 
accepted the posiiioa ox Chief *ark danger ,GS-1J, 
Blue Aiuge Parkway, to be effective April 23. 

JteJbBad^M Park rUnger alden L. Nash has beea accepted tor the jpriug 
Training . session in introduction to Park operations at the Albright 

Training Center, Grand Canyon, Arizona, March b through 

Say 26. 

A*ard 



H. Bats i off, Vteat District Foreman Ili-Maintenance, completed ten 
years of Government service as of January 2b. Presentation of the 
Deparatent of the interior* a Lengtb-of- service tables was made by 
Foreaan IV-Maintenanee William Hepe. 

Park Naturalist Aubrey L. Haines left for it. Paul, Minnesota on 
February 12, for the purpose of examining the records of the Northern 
Pacific Railway and the Langiord papers at the Minnesota Historical 
Society. He returned on February 19. 

Research and Observe c ion 

Two pine asrten have been observed all aonth in the vicinity of the 
West Yellowstone quarters. 

a bald eagle was observed near the Lewis tfiver bridge in the Snake 
River Sub-District. 

Laaar and Tower iub-Sistricts have been staking regular observation of 
aeckbanded bison in the Lataar area for Naturalist Hary Meagher. 

On February 2b Assistant Chief Park Naturalist Canter and Electronics 
Technician Uuffnan serviced the seismograph at Northeast Entrance. The 
wWVB receiver was renoved and brought to Mausaoth for repairs. The 
selsaogreph at Lake is still inoperative. 



Progress is continuing on exhibit rehabilitation at the M»assoth tfusoua; 
the work is being done by Bill Chapman, local artist. 



Yellowstone National P*»rk, 4yoaing 









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Safety and Health 

One on- the- job injury \m* reported, the first £«r 1967. Pedicel treatment 
was required but it was not a lost time accident. 

There were f i/« motor vehicle accident* reported and investigated for 
the month of February. 

On February b*, Cera Jfeiss, daughter of District Ranger Bel* a. Nuss, was 
bitten by a coyote while she waa on the way to school. She was given 
rabiee vaccine. Jvsveral coyotes were shot and their carcasses sent to 
Montana State University for examination. The seat day, Manger Ladd gave 
a short talk to children at the Haonoth grade school, cautioning them about 
feeding and approaching too close to aeer and coyotes in the P.rk. 

Law enforcement , 

Four law enforcement cases involving five persons were brought before 
U. S. Commissioner Brown. The incidents were identical in that all 
defendants were charged with having assembled and loaded firearms in 
possession Inside the Park boundary in the Gardiner area, nil defenearts 
plead guilty to the charges a&d were fined accordingly. 

The signs on the Stephens Creek road and at the SSorth Entrance warning 
people about entering the Park with loaded or assembled firearms have 
proven most effective. Very few hunters have had assembled guns when 
contacted by CUngers* 

Permits were issued to four hunters to drag their legally killed elk 
across the strip between the Gallatin River ami U. S, Highway 191 in 
Gallatin. 

There are many tracks of the small oversnow machines off the roada 
between the West entrance and Madison Junction. The same is true of the 
West Entrance area but Rogers have not been able to apprehend the 
violators in the actual time of violation. 



D&iiy patrols were made into the Gallatin during the special hunting in 
the areas adjacent to the f rk. Special hunting season in the Gallatin 
closed at 3:00 p.m. on February 8. 

S< vera! patrols were made from the West Entrance into the Park by over- 
snow vehicles by the itangers at West VI lows tone. Patrols were made 
into the Bechler area on February 11 and 12, and February lfc and 19. 
•ittow was shovelled from half the Bechler buildings. 



7 
Yellowstone H- Lionel P rk, Wyoming 



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Upon special request, a complete fire equipment mob i licet ion inventory 
he s been prepared end forwarded to the Midwest Regional Of i ice. 

Forester a. Lowell white attended the annual interbureeu Fire School 
in Denver, Colorado, February 13 through 24. Ibis year, training waa 
devoted primarily to Fire Behavior and Coamunicatiou*. Represented were 
the Bureau of jpoct Fisheries end Wildlife, Bureau of Land Hanageaent » 
Bureau of Indian ai fairs, U. I. Foreat Service, Colorado u^partaent of 
Forestry, and 13 individuals froa the national Park Service. 

Preparations were made to attend e two-day meeting, March i and 2, in 
Billings, Montane on the 196? operation of the Interagency Air Operations 

Center at West Yellowstone. 

Building Ffre .Profcectjon 

The Mammoth building fire brigade training was conducted on February 14 
and 21, with a good turnout. Because of recent and pending transfers, 
a revieee brigade list is being tsad e up. 

A fire was reported at the Mammoth Motor inn on February 8. Apparently, 
a spark, frost the fireplace chimaey, high winds, And a ehimuey that waa 
too short contributed to the ignition of the fire. At the time the brigade 
arrived at the scene, ieiiowafcone ftak Company employees had put the fire 
out with extinguishers, Damage to the roof &ad to the interior ceiling 
waa estimated at $2%). iince this fire, an extension has been put on the 
chimney, but it is still below the drown of the roof. 

Imaects and Tree Disease* 

the Annual Forestry Import was completed on February lb. 

Definite word was received froa the Midwest i^gion chat the U. S. Forest 
Service, u^gicu 1, plana to halt ribea control efforts on their forests 
pending further evaluation studies. Yellowstone's Blister Rust Control 
program could eventually be jeopardised by such a cutback. We are 
presently planning an evaluation survey of our own during the coming 
ir season. 



Lamar Uub-Diatrict personnel made a croaa-country ski patrol to the top 
of Druid Peak on the 7th, and an overnight trip to Cache Creek cabin and 
out over Republic Pass to Cooke City on the 20th. 

Frequently eerly and late patrola were maintained throughout the North 
District. Bounder y patrol was made on Friday, S turday and Sunday 
during the special elk hunt in the Gardiner area. 



Yellowstone National ?&rk, Wyoming 



, — ... . -., .1 
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- - •'--"■ - '-'■-•' '.'.:' '.•;' 

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ttpada and Icalls 

The jprla^ Snow Removal crews started the initial Spring Opening on 
February 20. Crews' progress was on schedule encountering snow depths 
of 35 inches between Mammoth and itorrls, and 38 inches at uyon. The 
weight of the snow is averaging approximately 20 lbs. per cubic Coot 
or about 32 per cent water content. 

Continuous snow removal was normal during the jaonth with seven-day 
coverage in the MastaoLh Area, Mnmacith to Cooke City, and Mammoth to 
Gardiner. 

Approval was received to negotiate with the American Snowbiast Corp. 
for delivery of a new &-2200 rotary aaowplow, replacing &n old Sno-Go. 
Delivery is expected before April I, so the new machine can be used 
this season. With three large Snowblasts, the efficiency of the Spring 
Opening operation should improve greatly. 

Buildings and Utilities 

Work has been started on the rehabilitation of the museum storage space. 
This project is approximately 40% complete. 

A cement floor was poured in the plumbing shop so that all welding, 
acetylene cutting, and soldering can be done is this area without danger 
of fire. 

Laundry facilities have been completed at the Usaar Unit. 

A large antenna pole on Mount Washburn was broken off at the base 
because of unusual wind and ice loading. A temporary antenna will 
be installed for use until the pole can be replaced next suaner. 

*lxn* 

One hundred thirty signs were constructed; 130 signs refinished; and 
30 signs relet tered. 

A fireplace chimney fire at Mammoth H tor inn en February &; damage 
estimated at $250. 

On February 14 John »1. Clay, gaward J. Widmer and Theodore Scott 
accompanied Yellowstone fmitk Company officials on an ovarsnow tour 
from Mammoth to Old i-oitkful. The purpose of the trip was to explore the 
feasibility of scheduling Bombardier "Snowbus" trips from Mammoth to 
Old Faithful. This equi p m ent made the hard trip in 10% hours under 
rather severe snow conditions. 

9 

Yellowstone National F rk, *yomlag 



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The reduction program was lap i sweated oa a full-tine basis throughout 
the mouth. On January 31, the initial attempt was made to haze elk 
across the Yellowstone River and out of the P.rk to be available for 
hunters oa open season days, Friday through Sunday. On January 31, 1&5 
elk were crossed; end on February 1, 120 elk were based out. Of these 
305 hazed out, hunters took 217 on the weekend February 3 through 5. 

On February 7, 3o4 elk were hazed across the Yellowstone klver Just 
below Bear Creek: on the bin, 175 were crossed near the Gardiner airport; 
and on the 9th, 250 more were driver out Just below the wouch of Sear 
Creek. Of these 7B9 animals, hunters harvest ed Mb during the weekend of 
F bruary 10 through 12. 

The following week the weather became atomy and no flying was possible 
on the 13th and 14th. On Wednesday, the 15th, an attempt was made to drive 
elk from the Turkey Pen area across the Yellowstone below the mouth of Bear 
Creek. This particular group of elk would not move to the river and flying 
conditions deteriorated to the extent the effort had to be abandoned. This 
was the first failure in the effort to hexe elk across the river. 

On the lfeth, 150 el* were successfully driven troa the Stephens Creek area 
across the river to the Gardiner airport. Following this drive about SO 
animals were driven into the Gardiner trap. Of the 150 elk moved out of 
the Perk during the period February 13 through 14, hunters killed 114 on 
the 17th through the 19th. 

0a Wednesday, February 22, efforts were resumed to base elk out of the 
Park and Ilk were driven out of the P«rk at the Gardiner airport. On the 
23rd, one group of 127 elk were driven frost the north end of Mount averts 
across the Yellowstone below the mouth ot gear Creek, Immediately follow- 
ing this drive, 124 elk were assembled along the north side of the Yellow- 
stone River below Duck&rd Flats. These animals were then driven down the 
river ami up the west side of bear Creek. Pressure was applied to both 
the groups until they moved on to the west slopes of the £agie Creek drainage, 
Of the 3fe7 elk baaed out of the Park on the 22nd and 23rd, hunters harvested 
225 over the weekend period from the 24th through the 26 th. 

At the close of the month, it does not appear that driveable numbers of 
elk are available for driving out for hunter harvest, in the vicinity of 
Stephens Creek, 21k Fla&e, the north end ol Mount Everts, and the Turkey 
Pen eree. Ihe Montana hunting season will remain open through the weekend 
of MUrch 3 through 5. 



this program wee f irat accepted with reluctance by some Montana 
people, it has proved to be quite successful for all concerned. 



10 
Yellowstone National Park, -yoming 



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: 






Tb« live trapping program was carried ou throughout the aw nth alon h with 
the above (mentioned activity. When weather and the availability of elk 
allowed, elk were driven out of the Park for hunters during the Monday 
through Thursday period when no hunting w«s permitted and live trapping 
pursued while the hunting season was opea in <*rea 313 (Friday through 
Sunday) 

On the 4th, a trapping drive was made frost around Boiling tiver to the 
Gardiner trap. The initial inspection of the group did not detect a bull 
in the group with scabies. The scabies infected animal was detected the 
following day so the entire group was condemned for live shipment for 
transplant. The group was sent for slaughter at she recommendation of 
Br. Paul Holcomb, Veterinarian, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

On the 10th, a group ox about 125 animals was taken out of sieese Creek to 
the Stephens Creek trap. This group broke out of the trap during the 
evening and was lost. 

On the 12th, a group of about 30 elk was trapped at Stephens Creek. Out 
of this group, 39 were shipped to the Crow Indian Tribe, Crow agency, 
Montana. 

On the loth, about SO elk were trapped at Gardiner. Of this group, 42 
were shipped to the Cow Indian vrlbe and 16 were taken for the biological 
collections. 

On the 19th, about 60 animals were trapped at the Gardiner trap. Of this 
group, 6 were taken for the biological collection and the rest of the 
shippable elk were 3*nt to Wyoming for release near i*usk, Wyoming. 

On the 2oth, a reconnaissance of the upper limits of the winter range 

was made by the Chief i'ark Ranger and the Acting Management biologist. 

On this flight, 944 elk were counted in widely scattered, remote locations, 

i*s originally planned, the direct reduction phase of the reduction was 
announced on February 3 to begin on the 13th. Public pressures from 
Wyoming and Montana grew so intense the Washington Office decided on 
f bruary 10 to delay the direct reduction activity pending a restudy by 
the Leopold Committee. Ail members of the Committee were not available 
so Messrs. Leopold and Kimball functioned as a sub-committee. Toe 
committee report to the Director recommended in favor of the direct 
reduction. Direct reduction was begun on the 27th in the Upper Black tail 
area when 19 elk. were killed. On the 2fcth, 24 animals were taken. 
Carcasses were field dressed and taken warm in Service trucks to kicks 
Packing Plaut la Livingston, Montana, for processing, mil salvage of 
these carcasses is going to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Billings . rea 
Office for distribution to Indian tribes. 



11 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 



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Elk reduction through February 28 : 

Gallatin Northern Yellowstone 



Direct Reduction 




41 


Live Shipped 




1,044 


Hunter Kill Outside i ark 


126 + 368 


168 + 935 


Biological Collection 




103 


Xrap Loss 




40 


Museum Specimens 




2 



494 2,333 

Hunter figures are regular season + special season. 

Public Relations 

Publicity 

On each Thursday, the Yellowstone Weekly News was issued to keep 
employees, concessioners, and others currently informed of Park 
happenings . 

One press release was issued: Yellowstone's £lk Reduction Program, 2/3. 

Religious and Chapel Use 

Protestant services were held at Mammoth throughout the month. 

Public Relations 

Ranger Ekmforth presented the film "Winter Comes to Yellowstone" to the 
Cleft Palate Association meeting at the Stage Coach Inn, Wjst Yellow- 
stone. There were 35 members present and they represented several 
western states. 

On February 10, Chief Park Naturalist Good was guest speaker at the 
Big Timber Lions Club Ladles' Night banquet. His subject was "Thoughts 
on Yellowstone's Centennial Year." Approximately 45 were in attendance. 



12 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83020 



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Bf ft ma Hatted HUk&aM 

We ather Conditions 

The weather mi tjuite varied during the Month with miles daytime 
temperatures. 

Maximum Tempera tare - 4b degrees February 28 
Minimum Temperature • 12 degrees February 22 
Snow Jepth • J2 inches e'ebruary 19 

a etors on February la, toppled power poles in Grasshopper Valley, about 
30 miles southeast of the Battlefield, creating a power outage which 
lasted from 3:40 a.m. until 2:50 pus. Temperatures during this period 
were around 20 degrees, Heat was kept up in the trailer with the kitchen 
propane stove and in the pump house with a gas lantern. 

the Hastens State highway plow from Wisdom, plowed out the Battlefield 
access road on six occasions. 

Hr. Virgil Triplet t, In charge of the Montane rfighway Maintenance 
Section in Wisdoa, has transferred to Butte. 

Interpretive fcElyltles 

Developments for the Big Uele ft*tional Battlefield was discussed with 
Mr. doiiingsworth, Chairman of the sUville County Improvemeut 
Association, in Hamilton, on February 3. 



13 
Yellowstone National P*.rk, Wyoming 



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YfflUUJWCTOMR HATIOHAL PARK 

Design and Construction Narrative 

February 1967 

All contract construction work has ceased for tha winter, due to 
weather condition*. 

Plana, Haps and Survey a : 

The following drawings were reviewed or approved: 

Concessioner Working Drawing JIP-YEL-8333-A, Laundry & Shower Building, 
Canyon Village. Approved by Regional Director February 13, subject 
to comments. 

Concessioner Preliminary Drawing HP-YEX.-8499 - Preliminary Site Plan, 
Hew Cabins, Canyon Village Area B-2. Approved by Regional Director 
February 17 subject to comments. 

Concessioner Preliminary Drawing HP~Y8L-850© - Preliminary Site Plea, 
Hew Cabins, Lake Lodge Area. Approved by Regional Director February 
17 subject to consents. 

Concessioner Preliminary Drawing ftP-YEL-BOBS, Cabin Development, 

Yellovatona. Approved by Regional Director February 17, subject 
fee comments. 

Concessioner Preliminary Drawing SP-VEL-3753 - Proposed Cabin Site Plan, 
Roosevelt Lodge. Recommended by Superintendent February 2, subject 
to comments. 



Concessioner Preliminary Drawing !tP-TEL-854b-A, women's Dormitory 

Laundry Facilitiea, iieonoth. Recommended by Acting Superintendent 
February 14. 

Concessioner Preliminary Drawing NP«YZL-87ee - Hea's Bunkhouse Remodeling, 
Mammoth. Recommended by Superintendent February 17. 

Co nces sioner Preliminary Drawing 8P-YBL-6767, Addition & Alterations to 
Old Faithful Inn Boys' Dormitory. Recommended by Superintendent 
February 17. 

Concessioner Preliminary Drawing 3P-YEL-8776, Canyon Village kitchen 
Alterations, natinmmanrtsit by Superintendent February 17. 



Concessioner Preliminary Drawing NP-YKL-8782, Remodeling Public Rest 
i, Lake Lodge. Recommended by superintendent February 24. 



-•/-;« oa3 IMM I Ml 

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Concessioner Preliminary Drawing .4P-YEL-8790, Remodeling Wotaen's 
Rest Room, Old Faithful inn. Recommended by Superintendent 
February 24. 

Drawing NM-BHB-3009-A, Revised Study of Apartments, Big Hole, 
Recommended by Acting Superintendent February 13. 

Meetings attended by the Management Aaslstant (Programs) included: 

Staff Meetings, February 9 and 23. 



15 

Yellowstone Rations! Park, Wyoming 



V 









BIG BOLE NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD 
Design and Construction Narrative 
February 1967 

All construction work has ceased for the winter, thus to weather conditions. 



Robert R. Lovegren 
Acting Superintendent 



Enclosures 

In triplicate 

cc: 

Regional Director, fc&<k*est Region 

Library 

As st. Supt. SS 

File 



16 
Yellowstone Nation:?! Park, Wyoming 



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Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. February 1967 

BULL ELK 
From mid- January through the spring melting of snow is 
the critical time for all wildlife in their search for 
food and survival efforts. 



NPS Photo 




Yellowstone Vftticfl*2 ?ark, wyocing 



February 1967 



Cars Nuss, daughter of South District Park Roa&er lule H. Suas, 
at Undine Ski Axas, developed and maintained by the Yellovstcma 
Park Ski Club. The. annaul Ski Meet is the highlight of the 
Skiing season. 

hps piiot o 



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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYOMING 



Chimney fire at Mammoth Motor Inn. 



FEBRUARY 8, 1967 



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II REPLY RE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83o2o 

£2oTS February 1967 

CHIEF PARK RANGER'S MONTHLY NARRATIVE REPORT 

GENERAL 

Weather Conditions ; Temperatures were unusually mild in February, 
resulting in considerable snow melt at low elevations and on south 
and west slopes. Snowfall this month was relatively light. Following 
is a summary of winter snow conditions throughout the Park: 

Greatest snow accumulation - Lewis Divide, 107 inches 
Least snow accumulation - East Entrance, 34 incnes 
Average snow accumulation - 57 inches 
Average water content - 18.1 inches 

This is 120 percent of our 15-year average. 

Various high and low temperatures recorded around the Park were: 

Max. Min. 

Temp Date Temp Dat> 

North Entrance 57 2/27 4 2/20 

Mammoth 47 2/27 - 6 2/2C 

Tower Fall 44 2/27 -16 2/20 

Lamar 46 2/25 -22 2/17 

Northeast 34 2/13 A 14 -21 2/20 

Old Faithful 40 2/24 -25 2/20 

west Yellowstone 39 2/25 -29 2/20 

Snake River 42 — -24 2/20 

Increase or Decrease in Travel ; Visitors entering Yellowstone National 
Park during February totaled 2,624. Automobiles entering the Park 
reached 729. This is a 34.5 percent increase as compared to February 
1966. 

The North Entrance reported a 29 percent increase in travel as compared 
to February 1966. A total of 24 oversnow vehicles registered at 
Mammoth and the North Entrance. There have been few snow vehicles 
entering from Cooke City for use in the Park. 

Three hundred and one small oversnow machines with 509 people entered 
at West Yellowstone during the month. One hundred and thirty-one large 
oversnow machines with 1,108 people also entered through this entrance 
of the Park. 




HDIVH32 KRAI JAUOlTAk 

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On February 22, ten small track snowmobiles left Colter Bay for 
Old Faithful via South Entrance. The going was difficult so they 
only went to West Thumb and returned. 

Visitors ; Photographer and pressman Jack Richara of Cody, Wyoming, 

was in the Park on the 15th and 16th for a story on reduction activities. 

Special Activities : The Assistant Chief Park Ranger attended the 
Superintendent's staff meeting on February 9, and the Chief Park Ranger 
attended on February 23. 

On the evening of the 3rd, a program regarding the wildlife management 
program was presented to 25 wildlife management students from the 
University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, who were accompanied by 
Dr. Les Pengelly. This group observed an elk drive into the Gardiner- 
trap on the morning of the 4tn. 

Or. A. Starker Leopold and Mr. Tom Kimball of the Secretary's 
Committee on Wildlife Management met with the Superintendent, the 
Chief Park Ranger and the Chief Park Naturalist in Billings, Montana, 
to review the wildlife management program. 

Biologist Barmore presented his aspen paper to a meeting of the 
American Society of Range Management in Seattle, Washington, on 
February 15. 

On the 24th and 25th, a group of wildlife management students from 
Utah State University visited the Perk for a look at the wildlife 
management program. Evening programs were presented to them on the 
24th and 25th. They were also given "show-me" trips over portions 
of the northern range. An attempted elk drive demonstration on the 
morning of the 24th failed because of poor flying conditions. 

Chief Park Ranger Estey was interviewed on the telephone by CBS, from 
New York, on the elk reduction program on February 27. The interview 
was broadcast over the radio. 

Ranger Danforth presented the film "Winter Comes to Yellowstone" to 
the Cleft Palate Association in February. There were 35 members 
present and they represented several different western states. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Personne I : Lynn R. Williamson assumed his duties as West District 
Ranger the end of February. 

A I den Nash, Northeast Entrance Perk Ranger, departed February 25 for 
the Albright Training Center at Grand Canyon. This session will run 
from March 5 to May 26. 



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On February 3, a training session on over snow equipment operation 
and maintenance was conducted for Ranger personnel by Dale Nuss. 

During the month, 113 Blister Rust Control and 93 Fire Control Aid 
applications were rated. The applicant register files were closed 
on the 15th. The recruiting program was started on February 20, 
when 49 Blister Rust Control and 13 Fire Control Aid job offers 
were mailed out. This completed the rehire register. Selections 
from the new applicant file will begin the first week in March. 

A new Forestry Technician (seasonal) position was approved by the 
Midwest Regional Office. The incumbent of this position will serve 
as project supervisor for Blister Rust Control activities. 

A Fire Dispatcher (seasonal) position description has been written 
in rough draft and is now in the process of review. This position, 
if approved, will aid great iy toward a more efficient fire control 
operation. 

Safety and Health : Five motor vehicle ace i cents were reported and 
investigated for the month of February. 

On February 8, Cara Nuss, daughter of District Ranger Dale Muss, was 
bitten by a coyote while she was on the way to school. She was given 
rabies vaccine. Several coyotes were shot and their carcasses sent 
to Montana State University for examination. The same day, Ranger 
Ladd gave a short talk to children at the Mammoth grade school, 
cautioning them about feeding and approaching too close to de&r and 
coyotes in the Park. 

CONSERVATION, INTERPRET AT I ON & USE 

Research and Observations : Two p I ne marten have been observed a 1 1 
month in the vicinity of the irfest Yellowstone quarters. 

On February 20, a grizzly bear killed a small elk near the Old 
Faithful dump. 

Lamar and Tower Sub-Districts have been making regular observation 
of neckbanded bison in the Lamar area for Naturalist Mary Meagher. 

A bald eagle was observed near the Lewis River bridge in the Snake 
River Sub-District. 

Moose have been quite active just south of the Flagg Ranch. 

Protection ; Eleven record checks were made for other federal, state 
and private agencies during the month. 



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Four low enforcement cases Involving five persons were brought 
before the U. S. Commissioner. The incidents were identical in 
that all defendants were charged with having assembled and loaded 
firearms in possession inside the Park boundary In the Gardiner 
area. All defendants plead guilty to the charges and were fined 
accordingly. 

The signs on the Stephens Creek road and at the North Entrance 
warning people about entering the Park with loaded or assembled 
firearms have proven most effective. Very few hunters have had 
assembled guns when contacted by Rangers. 

Lamar Sub-District personnel made a cross-country ski patrol to the 
top of Druid Peak on the 7th, and an overnight trip to Cache Creek 
cabin and out over Republic Pass to Cooke City on the 2Cth. 

Frequent early and late patrols have been maintained throughout the 
North District. Boundary patrol has been worked on Friday, Saturday, 
and Sunday during the special elk hunt in the Gardiner area. 

Daily patrols were made into the Gallatin during the special hunting 
in the areas adjacent to the Park. The special hunting season in 
the Gallatin closed at 3:00 p.m. on February 8. 

Permits were issued to four hunters to drag their legally killed 
elk across the strip between the Gallatin River and U. S. Highway 
191 in the Gal latin. 

Several patrols have been maoe from the West Entrance into the Park 
by oversnow vehicles by the Rangers at West Yellowstone. Patrols 
were made into the Bechler area on February II and 12, and February 
18 and 19. Snow was shovelled from half the Bechler buildings. 

Four snowplane trips were made to the South Entrance. A Jackson Lake 
patrol was made by Ranger Ives in the snowplane. 

There are many tracks of the small oversnow machines off the roads 
between the West Entrance and Madison Junction. The same is true 
of the West Entrance area, but Rangers have not been able to 
apprehend the violators in the actual time of violation. 

Forest Fire Protection : As is required each year at this time, 
fire overhead qualification ratings were completed with qualification 
cards distributed and a summary submitted to the Midwest Region. Last 
year's busy fire season presented a good -training opportunity for 
several of the Park's protection personnel. Also, upon special request, 
a complete fire equipment mobilization inventory was prepared and 
forwarded to Region. 



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February 13 through 24, Forester White attended the annual 
Interbureau Fire School in Denver, Colorado. This year, training 
was devoted primarily to Fire Behavior and Communications. 
Represented were the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and wildlife. 
Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U. S. Forest 
Service, Colorado Department of Forestry, and 15 individuals from 
the National Park Service. 

Preparations were made to attend a two day meeting (March I and 2) 
in Billings, Montana, on the 1967 operation of the Interagency Air 
Operations Center at West Yellowstone. 

Building Fire Protection : Specifications are in the process of 
being drawn up for a replacement fire truck for the Old Faithful 
area. As a result of a request for data from the American La France 
Company, they are planning to send a sales representative to Mammoth 
on March 6, with complete information on their fire trucks. 

The Mammoth building fire brigade training was conducted on February 
14 and 21, with a good turnout. Because of recent and pending 
transfers, a revised brigade list is being made up, 

A fire was reported at the Mammoth Motor Inn February 8. Apparently, 
a spark from the fireplace chimney, high winds, and a chimney that 
was too short contributed to the ignition of the fire. At the time 
the brigade arrived at the scene, Yellowstone Park Company employees 
had put the fire out with extinguishers. Damage to the roof and to 
the interior ceiling was estimated at $250. Since this fire, en 
extention has been put on the chimney, but It is still below the 
crown of the roof. 

Insects and Tree Diseases ; The Annual Forestry Report was completed 
on February 16. 

Some time was spent toward the preparation of a slide lecture program, 
consisting of forest disease and insect conditions in the Park. It 
is planned to present this to the Protection Division as part of 
the overall winter training program. 

Definite woro was received from the Midwest Region that the U. S. 
Forest Service, Region I, plans to halt ribes control efforts on 
their forests pending further evaluation studies. Yellowstone's 
Blister Rust Control program could eventually be jeopardized by 
such a cutback, we are presently planning an evaluation survey of 
our own during the coming summer season. 

Llk Management and Distribution ; The reduction program was implemented 
on a full-time basis throughout the month. On January 31, the initial 



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attempt was made to haze elk across the Yellowstone River and out 
of the Park to be available for hunters on open season days, Friday 
through Sunday. On January 31, 185 elk were crossed; and on 
February I, 120 elk were hazed out. Of these 305 hazed out, hunters 
took 217 on the weekend February 3 through 5. 

On February 7, 364 elk were hazed across the Yellowstone River just 
below Bear Creek; on the 6th, 175 were crossed near the Gardiner 
airport; and on the 9th, 250 more were driven out just below the 
mouth of Bear Creek. Of these 789 animals, hunters harvested 388 
during the weekend of February 10 through 12. 

The following week the weather became stormy and no flying was 
possible on the 13th and 14th. On Wednesday, the 15th, an attempt 
was made to drive elk from the Turkey Pen are& across the Yellowstone 
below the mouth of Bear Creek. This particular group of elk would 
not move to the river and flying conditions deteriorated to the extent 
the effort had to be abandoned. This was the first failure in the 
effort to haze elk across the river. 

On the 16th, J 50 elk were successfully driven from the Stephens Creek 
area across the river at the Gardiner airport. Following this drive 
about 80 animals were driven into the Gardiner trap. Of the 150 elk 
moved out of the Park during the period February 13 through 16, 
hunters killed 114 on the 17th through the 19th. 

On Wednesday, February 22, efforts were resumed to haze elk out of 
Park and 116 were driven out of the Park at the Gardiner airport. 
On the 23rd, one group of 127 elk were driven from the north end of 
Mount Everts across the Yellowstone below the mouth of Bear Creek. 
Immediately following this drive, 124 elk were assembled along the 
north side of the Yellowstone River below Deckard Flats. These 
animals were then driven down the river ano up the west side of 
Bear Creek. Pressure was applied to both the groups until they 
moved on to the west slopes of the Eagle Creek drainage. Of the 
367 elk hazed out of the Park on the 22nd and 23rd, hunters harvested 
225 over the weekend period from the 24th through the 26th. 

At the close of the month, it does not appear that driveable numbers 
of elk are available for driving out for hunter harvest in the vicinity 
of Stephens Creek, Elk Plaza, the north end of Mount Everts, ana the 
Turkey Pen area. The Montane hunting season will remain open through 
the weekend of March 3 through 5. 

Though this program was first accepted with reluctance by some 
Montana people, it has proved to be quite successful for ail 
concerned. 



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The live trapping program was carried on throughout the month 
along with the above mentioned activity. When weather and the 
availability of elk allowed, elk were driven out of the Park for 
hunters during the Monday through Thursday period when no hunting 
was permitted and live trapping pursued while the hunting season 
was open in Area 313 (Friday through Sunday). 

On the 4th, a trapping drive was made from around Boiling River 

to the Gardiner trap. The initial inspection of the group did 

not detect a bull in the group with scabies. The scabies infected 

animal was detected the following day so the entire group was 

condemned for live shipment for transplant. The group was sent 

for slaughter at the recommendat ion of Dr. Paul Ho Icomb, Veterinarian, 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

On the 10th, a group of about 125 animals was taken out of Reese 
Creek to the Stephens Creek trap. This group broke out of the 
trap during the evening and was lost. 

On the 12th, a group of about 50 elk was trapped at Stephens Creek. 
Out of this group, 39 were shipped to the Crow Indian Tribe, 
Crow Agency, Montana. 

On th© 16th, about 60 elk were trapped at Gardiner. Of this group, 
42 were shipped to the Crow Indian Tribe and 16 were taken for 
the biological collections. 

On the 19th, about 60 animals were trapped at the Gardiner trap. 
Of this group, 6 were taken for the biological collection and ihe 
rest of the shippabie elk were sent to Wyoming for release near 
Lusk, Wyoming. 

On the 26th, a reconnaissance of the upper limits of the winter 
range was made by the Chief Park Ranger and the Acting Management 
Biologist. On this flight, 944 elk were counted in widely scattered, 
remote I oc at i ons . 

As originally planned, the direct reduction phase of the reduction 
was announced on February 3 to begin on the 13th. Public pressures 
from Wyoming and Montane grew so intense the Washington Office 
decided on February 10 to delay the direct reduction activity 
pending a restudy by the Leopold Committee. All members of the 
Committee were not available so Messrs. Leopold and Kimball 
functioned as a sub-committee. The committee report to the Director 
recommended in favor of the direct reduction. Direct reduction was 
begun on the 27th in the Upper Blacktai I area when 19 elk were killed. 
On the 26th, 24 animals were taken. Carcasses were field dressed and 
taken warm in Service trucks to Ricks Packing Plant in Livingston, 



Montana, for processing. All salvage of these carcasses Is going 
to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Billings Area Office, for 
distribution to Indian tribes. 

Elk reduction through February 28: 

Gallatin Northern Yellowstone 



Direct Reduction 




41 


Live Shipped 




1,044 


Hunter Kill Outside Park 


126 •* 368 


168^ 935 


Biological Collection 




103 


Trap Loss 




40 


Museum Specimens 




2 



494 2,333 

Hunter f i gures are regu I ar season ^ spec i a I season 

Maintenance : The snowplane gas barrels apparently had some sludge 
in them which got into the gas tank inspite of using a screen when 
filling the plane. This caused the sediment bulb filter to clog 
and kill the motor every two miles or so. The gas tank was removed, 
flushed and reinstalled. This required almost complete striping 
of the interior of the plane. The left rear skf of the plane was 
also repaired and a slight improvement was made to the steering 
mechanism. 

A purchase requisition was submitted for the construction of a 
small 2-wheel trailer for mounting a "slip-on" building fire 
protection unit. This unit will be used for protection at the 
Blister Rust Control barracks and mess hall at West Thumb. 

Work was continued on storage carts for 25-man forest fire 
suppression outfits. Fifteen were fabricated by month's end. 

Concessioners : On February 14, Ed Widmer, John Clay, and Ted Scott 
accompanied Yellowstone Park Company officials on an oversnow tour 
from Mammoth fo Old Faithful. The purpose of the trip was to explore 
the feasibility of scheduling Bombardier "Snowbus" trips from Mammoth 
to Old Faithful. This equipment made the trip in I0i hours under 
rather severe snow conditions. 



Harold J. Estey 
Chief Park Ranger 



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REPLY REFER TO: 

N2615 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83020 

March 7, 1967 



Memorandum 

To: Superintendent 

From: Chief Park Naturalist 

Subject: Monthly Narrative Report, Interpretation, February 1967 

Interpretive Services and Planning : 

The 1967 Naturalist Program, activity posters, and Upper Geyser Basin 
trail guide have all been revised and are ready for the printer. 

The Lake Interpretive Prospectus draft was completed by the South 
District Naturalist during the month and submitted to the Chief Park 
Naturalist for review. 

In-Service Training : 

On February 3 personnel of the Naturalist Division attended a training 
session on operation and maintenance of oversnow vehicles sponsored by 
the Protective Division. 

Personnel: 

West District Naturalist Canter and South District Naturalist Lake 
rated approximately 65 applications for seasonal ranger-naturalist 
positions. 

Yellowstone Library and Museum Association : 

Merrie Good, Bookroora Clerk, worked a total of 2fc hours during the 
month . 

Special Activities: 

On February 1 Chief Park Naturalist Good accompanied Superintendent 
McLaughlin to Old Faithful. They conferred with Dr. Vincent Schaefer, 
Leader, Yellowstone Field Research Expedition, Atmospheric Sciences 
Research Program, and members of his research team. They returned to 
Mararuoth the following day. 




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On February 10 Chief Park Naturalist Good was guest speaker at the Big 
Timber Lions Club Ladles' Night banquet. His subject was "Thoughts on 
Yellowstone' 8 Centennial Year," Approximately 45 were in attendance. 

On February 15 Assistant Chief Park Naturalist Canter flew as an air 
observer in the elk reduction program. 

On February 16 Chief Park Naturalist Good accompanied Superintendent 
McLaughlin and Chief Park Ranger Estey to Billings, Montana where they 
met with members of Secretary Udell's Wildlife Advisory Committee 
relative to direct reduction of the Northern Yellowstone elk herd. They 
returned to Mammoth the following day. Members of the Committee present 
were: A. Starker Leopold, Assistant to the Chancellor, University of 
California at Berkeley and Thomas A. Kimball, Executive Director, 
National Wildlife Federation. 

On February 24 Chief Park Naturalist Good gave a talk on National Park 
Service philosophy to Dr. Jess Low and his 33 wildlife management students 
from Utah State University. 

On February 25 Assistant Chief Perk Naturalist Canter accompanied 33 
wildlife management students from Utah State University on a half-day 
tour to Norris Geyser Basin. 

On February 27-28 South District Naturalist Lake participated in the 
direct elk reduction, his primary responsibilities being biological 
collections and the recording of biological data. 

History: 

Park Naturalist Aubrey Haines left for St. Paul, Minnesota on February 
12, for the purpose of examining the records of the Northern Pacific 
Railway and the Langford papers at the Minnesota Historical Society* 
He returned on February 19. 

Research and Observation : 

On February 28 Assistant Chief Park Naturalist Canter and Electronics 
Technician Huffman serviced the seismograph at Northeast Entrance. 
The WWVB receiver was removed and brought to Mammoth for repairs. 
The seismograph at Lake is still inoperative. 



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Museum ; 

Progress is continuing on exhibit rehabilitation at the Mammoth Museum; 
the work is being done by Bill Chapman, local artist* 



Prepared by : / $ * 



Margaret B. Dupaix 
Secretary 

(Sgd.) John :X G; 

Submitted by: 



John M« Good 

Chief Park Naturalist 



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Superintendent Kerch 6, 1967 

Administrative Officer 

Monthly report - February 

One on-the-job injury via* reported, the first for 1967* Medical treatment 
wee required but it was not a lost ti»e accident* 

Two employee suggest iona were received, They are being evaluated locally 
and will be forwarded to the Midwest Regional Office upon completion of 
tills evaluation. 

James B. letsloff, Mast District Foreman IXX-Msinteaance » completed tea 
years of Government service as of January 28. Presentation of the Depart* 
meat of the Interior's Length-of- Service Emblem wee made by Foreman IV- 
Williee Rape. 



Feck laager (Forestry) W. Lowell v&ite attended the Interior Xnterbureau 
Fire Sehavior School at Den ver » Colorado, February 13 through 24. 



Park laftfljsr Aleea L. Rash has been accepted for the spring session in 
Introduction to Park Operations at the Albright Training Center, Creed 
i, Arizona, March 6 through May 26. 



Mrs. Catherine 8. Fratt was selected for a Career-Conditional ( Subject- to- 
Furlough) appointment effective February 26 and received orientation 
materiel for new employees. 

Final classification action was taken by the Midwest Regional Office for 
the following positions: 

Engineering Technician (Drafting), CS-802-7— a redeecrlptlon of the 
position formerly Incumbered by Richard K. Weaver. Recruitment has 
been initiated through the Regional Career Development sad Placement 
Flea. 

Program Assistant (Typing), GS-3G1-5. Establishment of a GS-5 
position, not to be filled concurrently with Program Asslatant, 
6ft- 30 1-7. 

Biological Technician, CS-4G4-5. Seasonal position in Resources 

it end Visitor Protection Divialon, wildlife end lloiogy Drench, 



Forestry Technician (General)* GS-456-7. Seasonal position In 
Resourcee Management and Visitor Protection Division, Forestry 
and Fire Control Branch. 



A redeecriptlon of the position formerly occupied by Krwin L. Atwood was 
submitted to the Midwest Regional Office for classification action. Title 
serf series of the position wee recommended *• General Supply Assistant . 
CS- 2001-7. Recruitment for this position has also been initiated through 
the Regional Career Development and Placement Plan. 







Previous 




Posit lorn 


J&Y.MJ*?*. 


Incumbent 


Action 


Program Asst. (Typing) 
#0026 


Supt. Office 


8cm 
position* 


Pending 


Prop. Mgmt. Asst., #1041 


Admin. 


E. Atwood 


Pending 


Personnel Clerk #1062 


Admin. 


6. Stork 


Pending 


Supv. Park Naturalist 
#2040 


Interp. 


S. Canter 


J. Douglass 
selected 


Perk Ranger #3057 


Ranger 


J. Court 


Pending 


Clerk-OHT #3065 


Simmer 


X. Warren 


Pending 


Sup*. Civil engineer 
#4003 


Meint. 


C. bucko 


Pendimg 



Civil 



#4004 



Hedeocrlbod 
position 



Pending 



electronics Technician 
#4009 


Us Int. 


Bern 

position 


fmglneirlng Tech. (oft.) 
#4011 


■mint. 


R. leaver 


Secretary (Scene.) #4015 


Maint. 


M. yells 


Foreman II-Ruilding #4027 


Kaint. 


J. Batsloff 



ly filled as Program Clerk GS-7 by Florence Salisbury. 



Pending 



The following personnel actions 



effective during the month: 



ft. Lovegren - from Deputy, Assistant Director, Administration, 
W a shin g ton Office, to Assistant Superintendent GS-15. 



SI 



Krwln L. Atwood - froa Property nenagea snt Assistant GS-7 to Procurement 
tift-9, effective February 12. 



Lyon ft. Williamson - froa Supervisory Perk ftanger 63-9, Lake Heed, to 
Supervisory ferk imager GS-il (Meet Viet rice Park Ranger). 



Harold 0. Oeke - froa Haintenaaceaan, Flaming Gorge, to Foreman II- 
Halntenancc, $3.63 per hour. 



George F. Lucko - froa Supervieory Civil Engineer to Civil Engineer GS-13, 
Hldweot Segioael Office. 



Charlee &• Moray - reaesignnent froa Sooth District Fork Ranger to north 
District Park 



Dale B. Moss - reaeaignaent froa West District Ferk Sanger to Sooth 
district Fork ganger. 

John ft. Oouglass, Psrk naturalist 6S*t » tfelte Sends notional Monument, has 
been selected for promotion to Supervisory Ferk naturalist (West district), 
CS~li, to be effective Karen 12 • 



Chief Park ganger Kenneth R. Ashley has accepted the position 
of Chief Fork Hanger GS~13, Slue ftldge Parkway, to he effective April 23. 



Fork ganger (wildlife Kaaageaeet) ftoeert 0. Metherell has accepted 
to the Washington Office, effective Match 12. 



Supply Clark Vera Adkiae was pieced en furlough for the period February 13 
through February 24. 



Supply Clerk tennis Ituaphraj was pieced on furlough February 27 . 



All last Ms se n 's cooks end aaes attendant* have Veen contacted and advised 
of the p r o p nee d opening dates of the aaes halls. Favorable replies have 
been received and it appears that they will be sale to report for duty ea 
the required dates. 

ftxeaiasrs for positions at Yellow* one will remain open indefinitely, 
this action wee itcsnasiiriss la view of the Halted nuaber of applications 
received for the various announcement* of Kiectriclaa, Carpenter, Painter, 
and helper posit Ions. Local penal members have completed ratings on a 
large number of applications which have been seat to the Interagency Board 
in Cheyenne, Wyoming, for registering* 



Letters of onpl oyn o n t inquiry received . • « . . 220 

Application* for enploynent received ...... 593 

Applications rated . . . . 209 

Application* entered on register 20 

Examination* given - 6 



There were 136 on the payroll lor the period ending February 11 compared 
to 137 a year age. There were 13d on the payroll for the period ending 
February 23 coopered to 147 a year ego* 

Total paid enployeee aa of February 26, 1967 • • • . 149 

Accessions 14 

Separation* . . . 3 

There were 29 wage assignment* for UCFK to three States: Idaho, M ont a na 
end Wyonlng. 

the payroll unit worked up a list of enployeee and appropriations by 
pet* inert t sad seasonal number on the rolls at the end of the month. Also 
they wade up new control cards for 1967 for all enployeee on the rolls. 



Purine the nonth there were 23 Bills for Collection issued totaling 
$22,576.63. 



The cost sheets for the nonth of January were received in the fiscal 
office on February 13. 

Mr* J* I* Carpenter froa the Director's Office, Mr* Bruce Fevers of 
national Capital Parks, and Mr* Joe H. Slha of the Midwest Regional Office 
are in Yellowstone in connection with studying Supply Center operations 
with respect to establishing low cost sales. 

The findings on the ci-nsu nicotian study nade by the Mountain States 
Telephone Conpany wee presented to us on February 27 and 28* Messrs. Jack V* 
Burdlck, Eugene Hams, and J* A* Burnett of the Casper, Wyoming office of 
the Mountain States Telephone Conpany presented the various phases of the 
study and nade their reconnendations to us. Harold Snegesky of the 
Washington Office and Joe B. ftiba of the Midwest ftegienal Office were 
present and heard the Telephone Conpany *s presentation. 

The study wes prepared In excellent forn and appeared to include pertinent 
facta in support of the Telephone Conpany' s reeonnendationa . Mr. Snegoaky 
carried several copies of the study back to Washington for the Washington 
Office review. 

One hundred fifty-three shipnents were checked in totaling 490 line itens 
with a value of $12,028. Issues valued at 312,199 comprising 1,033 line 
itens were nade to 389 customers. Surcharge orders were processed in the 
it of $8,604 in addition to $22,784 in direct charge orders. Stores 



valuation as of February 21 totaled $89,722. itores stock shi,*aen£8 
during the wont** «asounted to 22,924 pounds. Une hand red thirty five 
purchase orders were issued during February with an approximate value of 
$108,753. 

a Aoc of Ratal shelving was Installed in the new paint storage addition 
aad the najor portion of the paints stored in the old paint storage 
lding was moved to the new location. 

The annual equipment inventory continue* to utilise the tiiae of the Bran. 
personnel, 'fhe inventory has been physically ta^en and is being recon- 
ciled to the property cards, uufouad and Kissing iteev. I .-a listed 
separately and will be carried in suspense until founo or removed frost 
accountability by appropriate means. 

a survey conceroinp. the utilisation and use of .ill electric typewriters 
was made. A list showing title of position, location, type and extent 
use, and a brief justification £©*' retention of each: typewriter was jaade. 
The survey revealed that 5 of our 30 electric typewriters did not saeet 
the retention standards of the General Services Administration, disposition 
of the five electric typewriters is as fallows; one to lup> K'lnfc— i— fc 9 
Rocky Mountain National Par*.; three to Superintendent, Curecantl Uationsl 
Recreation Area; one Is in the process of heiu& reported excess. 

Also, under our property tasfiageaent program eight pairs of binoculars and 
oae polaroid camera were transferred to Curecanti. 

An Invitation to Sid and Award was atede to the Cowboy Tieber Treat in , 
lac, of Handerscu, Wyoming for MM ea. Guard Rail Logs IS feet lon^. 

The bid opening on Invitation to Sid 67-2 for Field Dressing approxieately 
elk was held on February 10 • 



C. L. Manner 



cc: 

Asst. Supt. (Opr.) 
Hanner 
r^Tracy 
Hint on 
Files 

Reading File 
Admin. 

CLHanner:neh 









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OPTIONAL FORM NO 10 
MAY 1W2 EDITION 
GSA GEN. REG. NO. 27 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 



1 /f* 7 frf//^ 

Memorandum m, £je r 

' Superintendent \I7\ i&k^ date: March 6, 1967 



Administrative Officer 



CT: Monthly report - February 

One on-the-job injury was reported, the first for 1967. Medical treatment 
was required but it was not a lost time accident. 

Two employee suggestions were received. They are being evaluated locally 
and will be forwarded to the Midwest Regional Office upon completion of 
this evaluation. 

James H. Batzloff, West District Foreman Ill-Maintenance, completed ten 
years of Government service as of January 28. Presentation of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior's Length-of- Service Emblem was made by Foreman IV- 
Maintenance William Hape. 

Park Ranger (Forestry) W. Lowell White attended the Interior Interbureau 
Fire Behavior School at Denver, Colorado, February 13 through 24. 

Park Ranger Alden L. Nash has been accepted for the spring session in 
Introduction to Park Operations at the Albright Training Center, Grand 
Canyon, Arizona, March 6 through May 26. 

Mrs. Catherine E. Pratt was selected for a Career-Conditional (Subject-to- 
Furlough) appointment effective February 26 and received orientation 
material for new employees. 

Final classification action was taken by the Midwest Regional Office for 
the following positions: 

Engineering Technician (Drafting) , GS-802-7--a redescription of the 
position formerly incumbered by Richard K. Weaver. Recruitment has 
been initiated through the Regional Career Development and Placement 
Plan. 

Program Assistant (Typing), GS- 301-5. Establishment of a GS-5 
position, not to be filled concurrently with Program Assistant, 
GS-301-7. 

Biological Technician, GS-404-5. Seasonal position in Resources 
Management and Visitor Protection Division, Wildlife and Biology Branch 



Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Regularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 



Forestry Technician (General), GS-456-7. Seasonal position in 
Resources Management and Visitor Protection Division, Forestry 
and Fire Control Branch. 

A redescription of the position formerly occupied by Erwin L. Atwood was 
submitted to the Midwest Regional Office for classification action. Title 
and series of the position was recommended as General Supply Assistant, 
GS-2001-7. Recruitment for this position has also been initiated through 
the Regional Career Development and Placement Plan. 

Vacancies - Permanent Positi ons 

Position 

Program Asst. (Typing) 
#0026 

Prop. Mgmt. Asst., #1041 

Personnel Clerk #1082 

Supv. Park Naturalist 
#2040 

Park Ranger #3057 

Clerk-DMT #3065 

Supv. Civil Engineer 
#4003 

Civil Engineer #4004 

Electronics Technician 
#4009 

Engineering Tech. (Dft.) 
#4011 

Secretary (Steno.) #4015 

Foreman 1 1- Building #4027 

^Formerly filled as Program Clerk GS-7 by Florence Salisbury. 





Previous 




Division 


Incumbent 
New 


Action 


Supt. Office 


position* 


Pending 


Admin. 


E . Atwood 


Pending 


Admin. 


G. Stork 


Pending 

J. Douglass 


Interp. 


S. Canter 


selected 


Ranger 


J. Court 


Pending 


Ranger 


I. Warren 


Pending 


Maint . 


G. Lucko 


Pending 


Ma int. 


Redescribed 






position 


Pending 




New 




Maint . 


position 


Pending 


Maint. 


R. Weaver 


Pending 


Maint. 


M. Wells 


Pending 


Maint . 


J. Batzloff 


Pending 



The following personnel actions were effective during the month: 

Robert R. Lovegren - from Deputy, Assistant Director, Administration, 
Washington Office, to Assistant Superintendent GS-15. 



Erwin L. Atwood - from Property Management Assistant GS-7 to Procurement 
Agent GS-9, effective February 12. 

Lynn R. Williamson - from Supervisory Park Ranger GS-9, Lake Mead, to 
Supervisory Park Ranger GS-11 (West District Park Ranger). 

Harold D. Oaks - from Maintenanceman, Flaming Gorge, to Foreman II- 
Maintenance, $3.63 per hour. 

George F. Lucko - from Supervisory Civil Engineer to Civil Engineer GS-13, 
Midwest Regional Office. 

Charles R. Morey - reassignment from South District Park Ranger to North 
District Park Ranger. 

Dale H. Nuss - reassignment from West District Park Ranger to South 
District Park Ranger. 

John R. Douglass, Park Naturalist GS-9, White Sands National Monument, has 
been selected for promotion to Supervisory Park Naturalist (West District) , 
GS-11, to be effective March 12. 

Assistant Chief Park Ranger Kenneth R. Ashley has accepted the position 
of Chief Park Ranger GS-13, Blue Ridge Parkway, to be effective April 23. 

Park Ranger (Wildlife Management) Robert D. Metherell has accepted 
reassignment to the Washington Office, effective March 12. 

Supply Clerk Vern Adkins was placed on furlough for the period February 13 
through February 24. 

Supply Clerk Ronnie Humphrey was placed on furlough February 27. 

All last season's cooks and mess attendants have been contacted and advised 
of the proposed opening dates of the mess halls. Favorable replies have 
been received and it appears that they will be able to report for duty on 
the required dates. 

Recruitment and Interagency Board of Examiners Activities 

Competitive examinations announced by the Wyoming Interagency Board of 
Examiners for positions at Yellowstone will remain open indefinitely. 
This action was recommended in view of the limited number of applications 
received for the various announcements of Electrician, Carpenter, Painter, 
and helper positions. Local panel members have completed ratings on a 
large number of applications which have been sent to the Interagency Board 
of Examiners in Cheyenne, Wyoming, for registering. 



V 



Letters of employment inquiry received 220 

Applications for employment received 593 

Applications rated 209 

Applications entered on register 20 

Examinations given ..... 6 

There were 138 on the payroll for the period ending February 11 compared 
to 137 a year ago. There were 138 on the payroll for the period ending 
February 25 compared to 147 a year ago. 

Total paid employees as of February 28, 1967 .... 149 

Accessions 14 

Separations 3 

There were 29 wage assignments for UCFE to three States: Idaho, Montana 
and Wyoming. 

Tne payroll unit worked up a list of employees and appropriations by 
permanent and seasonal number on the rolls at the end of the month. Also 
they made up new control cards for 1967 for all employees on the rolls. 

During the month there were 23 Bills for Collection issued totaling 
$22,576.63. 

The cost sheets for the month of January were received in the fiscal 
office on February 13. 

Mr. J. I. Carpenter from the Director's Office, Mr. Bruce Powers of 
National Capital Parks, and Mr. Joe H. Riha of the Midwest Regional Office 
are in Yellowstone in connection with studying Supply Center operations 
with respect to establishing low cost sales. 

The findings on the communication study made by the Mountain States 
Telephone Company was presented to us on February 27 and 28. Messrs. Jack N, 
Burdick, Eugene Harms, and J. A. Burnett of the Casper, Wyoming office of 
the Mountain States Telephone Company presented the various phases of the 
study and made their recommendations to us. Harold Snegosky of the 
Washington Office and Joe H. Riha of the Midwest Regional Office were 
present and heard the Telephone Company's presentation. 

The study was prepared in excellent form and appeared to include pertinent 
facts in support of the Telephone Company's recommendations. Mr. Snegosky 
carried several copies of the study back to Washington for the Washington 
Office review. 

One hundred fifty- three shipments were checked in totaling 490 line items 
with a value of $12,028. Issues valued at $12,199 comprising 1,033 line 
items were made to 389 customers. Surcharge orders were processed in the 
amount of $8,604 in addition to $22,784 in direct charge orders. Stores 



valuation as of February 21 totaled $89,722. Stores stock shipments 
during the month amounted to 22,924 pounds. One hundred thirty- five 
purchase orders were issued during February with an approximate value of 
$108,753. 

A block of metal shelving was installed in the new paint storage addition 
and the major portion of the paints stored in the old paint storage 
building was moved to the new location. 

The annual equipment inventory continues to utilize the time of the Branch 
personnel. The inventory has been physically taken and is being recon- 
ciled to the property cards. Unfound and missing items have been listed 
separately and will be carried in suspense until found or removed from 
accountability by appropriate means. 

A survey concerning the utilization and use of all electric typewriters 
was made. A list showing title of position, location, type and extent of 
use, and a brief justification for retention of each typewriter was made. 
The survey revealed that 5 of our 30 electric typewriters did not meet 
the retention standards of the General Services Administration. Disposition 
of the five electric typewriters is as follows: one to Superintendent, 
Rocky Mountain National Park; three to Superintendent, Curecanti National 
Recreation Area; one is in the process of being reported excess. 

Also, under our property management program eight pairs of binoculars and 
one polaroid camera were transferred to Curecanti. 

An Invitation to Bid and Award was made to the Cowboy Timber Treating, 
Inc., of Manderson, Wyoming for 100 ea. Guard Rail Logs 18 feet long. 

The bid opening on Invitation to Bid 67-2 for Field Dressing approximately 
600 elk was held on February 10. 

(Z J) /<JcU^^ 

C. L. Hanner 



OPTIONAL FOKM NO. 10 

MAY 1962 COITION 

GSA FHM« (41 CFRI 101-11.4 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 




Chief of Park Maintenance 




date: 



icki 3 'l 

March 3, 1967 



Monthly Activity Report, February, 1967 



Roads and Trails : Normal winter weather prevailed during the month, 
The Spring Snow Removal crews started the initial Spring Opening on 
February 20. Crews' progress was on schedule encountering snow 
depths of 55 inches between Mammoth and Norris and 58 inches at 
Canyon. The weight of the snow is averaging approximately 20 lbs. 
per cubic foot or about 32 per cent water content. 

Continuous snow removal was normal during the month with seven day 
coverage in the Mammoth Area, Mammoth to Cooke City, and Mammoth 
to Gardiner. Sanding for ice control was carried out as needed. 

Buildings and Utilities : Maintenance crews were very busy during 
the month because of small sized crews. 

New cupboards, sink and work area were installed in Qtrs. #2B. 
Also, the complete interior was painted, kitchen rewired, and 
new service panel installed. 

A new base cabinet and sink was installed in Bldg. #16. Wood- 
work in the kitchen was refinished and the hallway painted. 

Installation of acoustical tile in the Ranger Office along with 
interior painting was completed. 

Work has been started on the rehabilitation of the museum storage 
space. This project is approximately 40% complete. 

A formica counter top and back splash was installed in Appt . #1E 
and wood work was refinished. 

A cement floor was poured in the plumbing shop so that all welding, 
acetylene cutting, and soldering can be done in this area without 
danger of fire. 

The Paint Storage Building has been completed with perfa-tape, 
painting and steel shelves. Most of the stock paint has been 
moved into this building. 



Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Regularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 






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The interiors of Qtrs. #80 and 81 have been repainted. Two bed- 
rooms were wallpapered in Qtrs. #11B. 

The shower floor was painted and duck boards constructed for 
South Barricks Bldg. #36. 

Miscellaneous repairs and painting was accomplished throughout 
the month by carpenters and painters. 

130 signs were constructed, 150 signs refinished, and 50 signs 
relettered. 

An exhaust fan was installed and electric range relocated in Bldg. 
#95. 

New wiring is being installed in the Plumbing Shop to meet safety 
standards. 

A new pressure reducing valve and relief valve for hot water tank 
was replaced in Bldg. #375. 

Laundry facilities have been completed at the Lamar unit. 

Radiator and radiator valve repair and replacement is approximately 
90 per cent complete in Bldg. #36. 

The plumbers answered 22 trouble calls for the month. 

A large antenna pole on Mount Washburn was broken off at the base 
because of unusual wind and ice loading. A temporary antenna will 
be installed for use until the pole can be replaced next summer. 

Office : A meeting was held with District Supervisors and Craft 
Foremen to determine needs and personnel assignments for the season's 
operations. 

One traffic accident involving a government vehicle was reported. 
No personal injuries were reported during the month. 

Harold D. Oaks entered on duty February 26, 1967, as Foreman II, 
Maintenance, in North District. He transferred from Flaming Gorge 
Recreation Area. 



On January 31, and February 1, the Chief of Park Maintenance ac- 
companied the Superintendent to the Coordination Committee meeting 
held in Billings, Montana. At this meeting with the Forest Service 
Supervisors from the surrounding Forests, mutual problems were 
discussed and plans made. The principal objective at this time is 
the preparation of a joint area map showing all visitor accommoda- 
tions. 

Approval was received to negotiate with the American Snowblast 
Corp. for delivery of a new R-2200 rotary snowplow, replacing an 
old Sno-Go. Delivery is expected before April 1, so the new 
machine can be used this season. With three large Snowblasts, 
the efficiency of the Spring Opening operation should improve 
greatly. 




F. B. Elliott