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Full text of "Surrey archaeological collections"

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SURREY 



l^hfcfltojjiital ^oll^tifltts, 



DELATING TO THE 



HISTORY AND ANTIQUITIES OF THE COUNTY. 



PUBLISHED EY 



2Tj)e 5:urrep ^rcfcoologtcal Society. 







VOL. II. 



■ 






LONDON : 

Pufcltsljcif for fl)c gacicty, 6» 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, 

COVENT GARDEN. 

MDCCCLXIV. 



[The Council of the Sdrrey Archaeological Society desire that it should 
be distinctly understood that they are not responsible for any statements or opinions 
expressed in the "Collections ;" the Authors of the several Communications being 
alone answerable for the same.] 



COX AND WYMAN, PRINTERS, GREAT QUEEN STREET, LONDON, W.C. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Reports of Proceedings at General Meetings of the Society, from the Year 
1856 to the Year 1863:— 

1. Croydon ix 

2. Lambeth xiii 

3. The Deepdene xvii 

4. South wark xx 

5. Ditto xx 

6. Ditto xxi 

7. Farnham Castle xxi 

8. Kennington xxvii 

9. Richmond xxviii 

10. Reigate xxxv 

11. Loseley xxxix 

12. Lingfield xli 

13. St. Mildred's Court, Poultry xliii 

List of Contributions to Library and Museum liii 

List of Members Ixi 

Rules Ixxvii 

Form of Application for Admission of Members lxxx 



1, — Roman Pavement, &c. upon Walton Heath. 

By W. W. Pocock, Esq., B.A., F.R.I.B.A 1 

2. — British Coins found in Surrey. 

By Richard Whitbouen, Esq., F.S.A., Honorary Local Secretary 
for Godalming 14 

3. — Elias Ashmole, his House and Lands at South Lambeth 18 

4. — On the Churchwardens' Accounts, and other Records relating to the 
Parishes of Seal and Elstead, in the County of Surrey. 
By William Henry Hart, Esq., F.S.A 27 

5. — On a Deed relating to John Evelyn, Esq. 

By William Henry Hart, Esq., F.S.A 45 



VI CONTENTS. 

FAGB 

6. — On some of the Ancient Inns of South wark. 

By George R. Corner, Esq., F.S.A 50 

7. — Notes from the Parish Registers of Richmond, Kingston, and Petersham, 
in the County of Surrey. 
By William Henry Hart, Esq., F.S.A 82 

8. — On an ancient Deed from the Muniment Room of the Hospital of the 
Holy Trinity, in Croydon. 

By John Wickham Flower, Esq 99 

9. — Notices relating to Mrs. Susan Barker (afterwards Dame Susan Billingsley), 
Donor to the Hospital of the Holy Trinity, in Croydon ; and her two 
Husbands, Edward Barker and Sir Henry Billingsley. 
By Thomas William King, Esq., F.S.A., York Herald 108 

10. — Additional Note on the Deed relating to John Evelyn, Esq. 

By William Dorrant Cooper, Esq., F.S.A 113 

11. — Notices of the Family of Cobham of Sterborough Castle, Lingfield, Surrey. 

By John Wickham Flower, Esq 115 

12.— Whitgift Gatherings. 

By Charles Spencer Perceval, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A 195 

13. — Notices of Grants of an Augmentation to the Arms of Archbishop Parker, 
and of a Crest to his Son John Parker. 
By Thomas William King, Esq., York Herald, F.S.A 203 

14. — The Vicar of Godalming and his Parishioners in 1640. 

By J. Evans, Esq., F.S.A 210 

15. — Memorandum on the Notices of the Family of Cobham of Sterborough . . 224 



Genealogical and Heraldic Memoranda relating to the County of Surrey. 

Copied from "The Visitacon of Surry, made A° 1623, by Samuel 
Thompson, Windsor Herauld, and Augustyne Vincent, Rougcroix, 
Marshalls and Deputies to Win. Camden, Esq., Clarenceux King of 
Armes." 

Edited by W. H. Hart, Esq., F.S.A., and J. J. Howard, Esq., LL.D., 
F.S.A. 



Index 293 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

Remains of a Roman Villa on the Heath, Walton-on-the-Hill, Surrey 1 

Ancient British Coins found in Surrey 14 

Staircase in Tradescant's House 18 

The George Inn, Borough 60 

The White Hart Inn, Southwark 64 

Fac-simile of Ancient Deed 99 

Portrait of Archbishop Whitgift 99 

Arms of Sir Henry Billingsley 108 

Effigy of Reginald, First Lord Cobham of Sterborough 123 

Brass. — Isabella Cobham 127 

Brass. — Katherine Stoket 129 

Brass. — Reginald, Second Lord Cobham of Sterborough 140 

Brass.— First Wife of Sir Reginald Cobham 146 

From the Chancel of Lingfield Church 149 

Effigies of Sir Reginald Cohham and Anne (Bardolf) his Second Wife 150 

Details from Tombs, Lingfield Church 152 

Seal of Lingfield College 168 

Archbishop Whitgift's Prerogative Seal (Copper-plate, presented by the Rev. 

George Dashwood, M. A.) 195 

Whitgift's Signet 197 

Fac-simile Autograph 201 

Arms of Archbishop Parker 205 

Arms of John Parker of Lambeth, eldest Son of Archbishop Parker 206 



Arms and Autographs to the Genealogical and Heraldic Memoranda of Surrey. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



AT 



GENERAL MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY, FROM THE 
YEAR 1856 TO THE YEAR 1863. 



CROYDON. 

The Third Annual General Meeting was held at Croydon, on 
Thursday, the 12th of June, 1856. The proceedings took place in a 
building once forming part of the ancient palace of the Archbishops of 
Canterbury, but now used as a girls' industrial school. 

Shortly after eleven o'clock, Sir William G. Hylton Jolliffe, Bart., 
M.P., a Vice-President of the Society, was called to the Chair. 

After a few introductory remarks from the Chairman, the Hon. 
Secretary, G. Bish Webb, Esq., proceeded to read the Minutes of the 
second Annual General Meeting at Guildford, June 28th, 1855, and of 
the Special General Meeting at South wark, October 30th, 1855, which 
were both duly confirmed. 

The following Report of the Council was then read : — 

In accordance with the rules, the Council have the pleasure of pre- 
senting a brief statement of the proceedings of the Society during the 
past year. 

Two General Meetings have been held, one at Guildford, the other in 
South wark. Ample reports of these Meetings being comprised in the 
first part of the Transactions which has just been issued, it becomes 
unnecessary to refer to them more particularly upon the present occasion. 

It* is with great regret that the Council have to record the loss 
sustained by the Society by the decease of His Gi'ace the late Duke of 
Norfolk, one of its earliest patrons, and president of the Society from its 
formation. 

By the lamented decease, also, of Sir William Molesworth, member 
for Southwark, the Society has sustained the loss of one of its distin- 
guished vice-presidents. 

The Council have the high gratification of announcing that His 
Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge has been pleased to honour the 
Society by becoming its Patron. 

Thirty-one Members have been added to our list since the date of the 
last Report, and the numbers are at present 430, of whom 58 are Life 
Members by composition. 

During the year, the London and Middlesex Archseological Society 
and the Cambrian Institute have been added to the list of Societies in 
union with this Society. 

Several contributions of interest and value have been made to our 



X REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

Library and Museum, copious lists of which are given in the Trans- 
actions. 

The Council regret that it becomes their duty again to invite serious 
attention to the large amount of subscriptions in arrear. They must 
beg Members to bear in mind, that one of the most important of our 
rules is that which provides that subscriptions become due in advance, 
on the 1st of January in each year, and that if this rule be neglected 
to the extent hitherto prevailing, the prosperity of the Society will be 
greatly endangered. 

On the motion of the Chairman, the Report was adopted. The 
Balance-sheet and Report of the Auditoi-s were also read. They were 
as follows [see pp. xi. xii.] 

Eight Members of the Council, whose retirement by rotation was 
announced, were unanimously re-elected. 

Several new Members were elected, and the Office-bearers for the 
ensuing year appointed. 

The following Papers were then read : — 

1. An Architectural Notice of the Hospital of the Holy Trinity, 

Croydon, founded by John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury. 
In the absence of the author, W. Petit Griffith, Esq., F.S.A., 
F.R.I.B.A., this Paper was read by the Rev. C. Boutell, M.A., 
Hon. Member. 

2. On the Monuments in Croydon Church. This Paper was read by 

M. H. Bloxam, Esq., the author, Edward Westall, Esq., being 
unavoidably absent. 

3. On the Derivation and Meaning of the word Cold-harbour, as 

applied to various Localities in Surrey, and elsewhere. By Cuth- 
bert W. Johnson, Esq., F.R.S. 

4. On the Antiquities of Streatham. By the Rev. "Walter Field, M.A., 

E.S.A. 

5. On the Monumental Brasses of Surrey, especially those in the 

vicinity of Croydon. By the Rev. C. Boutell, MA. This Paper 
was illustrated by a number of rubbings from brasses in the 
Churches of Croydon, Beddington, Lingfield, and Crowhurst, which 
were suspended on the walls of the schoolroom. 

G. John Wickham Flower, Esq., then laid before the Meeting an 
Account of a valuable parcel of ancient deeds and documents, very 
lately discovered by him in the Muniment-room of Whitgift's 
Hospital. Among the collection was the " Barker Deed," which 
was exhibited to the Meeting, and has since appeared in litho- 
graphic fac-simile in Part I. of the second volume of the Society's 
Transactions. 

Votes of thanks were unanimously passed to the Authors of the 
above-named Papers. 

A vote of thanks to the Chairman, for his courteous and able conduct 
in the Chair, was carried by acclamation. 

The Chairman returned thanks, and the Meeting was formally 
adjourned. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 



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Xll REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

Report of the Auditors, 1856. 

The Auditors have examined the Accounts, and find a balance of 
£106. 13s. lie?, in favour of the Society. They have to express a regret 
that the large sum of £45. 10s. remains unpaid for the years 1854 
and 1855 ; and they would suggest to the Council and Members the 
desirableness of adopting some plan for the obtaining these subscriptions, 
and for the retirement of such Members as continue two years, or beyond 
a certain period, in arrear. (Signed) T. J. S. 

E. R. 

As on former occasions, a Collection of Objects of Antiquarian and 
Artistic Interest had been formed and arranged in the Meeting-room. 
The following deserve particular notice : — " 

Seal of the Hospital of the Holy Trinity ; Facsimile, in colours, of 
ancient fresco, North wall St. John's, Croydon ; Sepia Drawing of 
Ancient Timber House, Bell-hill, Croydon ; Antique Pocket Clock, 
about the time of the Commonwealth ; History of Croydon, with 
manuscript and other addenda ; the Umbo, or Boss, of a Saxon 
Shield, found at Mitcham. 

By Sir W. H. Jolliffe, Bart. : A Bassinet, or Head-piece, and a Partizan 
once belonging to John Tatnall, of Nethern, in the parish of 
Merstham, Yeoman of the Guard to Queen Elizabeth. 

By J. W. Flower, Esq. : A curious old Roman Camp Kettle, found in 
Pethwell Pen, Norfolk, in the year 1850, under 1 feet of peat ; 
an Urn, taken up while digging several feet under the surface at 
the Chelsea Water-works, then in formation at Kingston - upon- 
Thames ; a large and very fine Roman-British Cinerary Urn of 
sun-baked clay, found between Brandon and Lakenheath, Suffolk, 
near the banks of the Little Ouse, more than twenty others being 
found in the same place, calcined, and placed with the mouths or 
openings inverted ; and an interesting collection of Ancient British 
Dagger- knives, Bride-knives, Bronze Handle of a Yase, Ring, 
Money, Keys, &c. ; and also a British Sword and Spear-head by 
permission of A. Kirkmau, Esq., to whom they belonged. 

By the Rev. James Hamilton : An Antique Brass Ring found at Bed- 
dington ; a Saxon Shield ; and several Ancient Arms. 

Mr. C. Lashmar : A Skull found, with a number of other human remains, 
Iron Weapons, Sword-blades, <&c, at the bottom of St. George's- 
street, Croydon ] Keys and Coins found at Bermondsey. 

Among the miscellaneous Articles were : Roman Coins found at King- 
ston, and also at Merton, between Croydon and Wimbledon, on the 
making of the railway ; ancient Pottery (by Mr. Stedman, Tulse- 
hill) ; encaustic Tiles ; part of an Iron Sole of a Shoe, used by the 
labourers in the iron-works at Maresfield, Sussex ; specimens of 
Ring-money ; Ancient Fetterlock ; Roman Bracelet ; Antique De- 
fensive Armour ; curious old Nutcrackers ; specimens of Stained 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. Xlll 

Glass ; Seals of the corporate Towns of Surrey ; specimens of ela- 
borate Stained Glass ; a piece of Defensive Armour for a Horse's 
Mouth and Nose ; an old Key from Chertsey Abbey ; valuable 
Coins, Images, Household Gods of the Romans, &c. &c. 

Amongst the books, a volume On the Ceremonials for the Healing of 
Diseases practised in the time of Henry VII. ; Anderson's Monu- 
ments and Antiquities of Croydon Church ; and several other 
rare works. 

Parties were formed for the inspection of the Parish Church of 
Croydon, dedicated to St. John; of the very considerable remains of the 
ancient palace of the archbishops of Canterbury (exchanged for Adding- 
ton in 1780); and of Whitgift's Hospital, situated in the centi-e of the 
town. A considerable number of the Members and their friends also 
proceeded to Beddington, where the parish church, and the Hall, the 
ancient seat of the Carews, were thrown open for their inspection. 

At half-past six, a collation was served at the Greyhound Hotel, 
Cuthbert W. Johnson, Esq., F.R.S., in the Chair. 

After the usiial loyal and occasional toasts, the health of the local 
Committee was proposed. The Committee comprised the following 
gentlemen : The Rev. J. G. Hodson, M.A., vicar of Croydon ; Rev. 
James Aitken, M.A. ; Rev. Jonathan Cape, F.R.S. ; Rev. George Oapel, 
M.A. ; Jonah Cressingham, Esq. ; John Drummond, Esq., F.S.A. ; 
George Engstrom, Esq. ; Rev. James Hamilton, M.A. ; C. W. Johnson, 
Esq., F.R.S. ; Rev. George Randolph, M.A. ; Edward Westall, Esq. ; 
Richard Yates, Esq., F.S.A. ; to whose joint exertions the proposer took 
occasion to attribute much of the success of the day. 

The two local Secretaries, Messrs. W. S. Masterman and S. Lee 
Rymer, together with the late lamented Hon. Secretary G. Bish Webb, 
Esq., obtained their fair share of congratulation on the satisfactory result 
of the Meeting. 



LAMBETH. 

A General Meeting was held on Friday, October 31st, 1856, at 
Lambeth Palace. His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury had kindly 
granted the use of the Dining-hall, or Guard Chamber, for the purpose 
of the Meeting. 

The Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Winchester, D.D., 
F.R.S., a Vice-President, took the Chair at noon. 

The Chairman opened the proceedings with a short address, in the 
course of which His Lordship said as follows : — 

" The place in which we are assembled ought to suggest many most 
interesting observations, — observations, at least, full of importance, full 
of usefulness, full of instruction, I may add, to those who look back upon 
history, not as an old almanack, but as a school from which at the 
present day we may derive advantages, by looking at the lights which 



XIV REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

have gone before us, and profit by them as a warning for the future. 
I need not tell you how many, how various, and how solemn are the . 
associations connected with the house in which we are this day assembled 
by the kind permission of his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury. 
Had you visited these precincts some few yeai's ago, you might have 
found that which, indeed, was not well suited to the wants of modern 
times, but which would have presented to you the very rooms, the very 
walls, which were hallowed, so to speak, by the predecessors of the 
present archbishop, — the Juxons and Whitgifts, and Parkers and 
Chicheleys, and a long list of worthies, whose names will ever be asso- 
ciated with the place in which they lived and laboured, and showed their 
love to God and man. 

" The present palace owes a great portion of its existence to the muni- 
ficence of the late Archbishop Howley, — a name never to be mentioned 
without veneration and love, and, least of all, by one who had the 
privilege of knowing him long, and who had opportunities of seeing how 
earnestly he watched over the interests of that Church of which he was 
the spiritual head on earth, as he was also one of its gi'eatest ornaments. 
The room in which we are assembled, in its size and form, is the one 
which previously existed ; but it has been greatly altered, and made 
suitable for the accommodation of an audience like the present. You 
will be conducted over some parts of the building, which retain the 
vestiges of their ancient form, and you will judge how much interest 
attaches to it, although little suited for modern use. I must be per- 
mitted to say one word in reference to the subject of archaeology, because 
I believe some observations which I have heard regarding it are founded 
in mistake. There are those who look upon archaeologians or ai*chaeo- 
logists — for I believe both names are correct — as simple individuals, 
whose pleasure it is to pore over musty records. Now, even if the 
studies of the archaeologists were only connected with parchments, I need 
not tell you there is much of interest to be derived from them. Indeed, 
we have before us, on the agenda of the day, a Paper the interest of which 
is wholly derived from parchments and deeds. But, in fact, the archae- 
ologist ranges over a vast extent of territory. I look on the individual 
who examines the ruins of Pompeii as a very legitimate archaeologian. I 
look upon the individual who traces the remnants of what was once the 
magnificent Castle of Kenilworth, and the marks of Queen Elizabeth's 
pageantry, as a true archaeologian, in the truest and best sense of the 
word. Even if you go to literature, you will find Bishop Percy, 
showing, by his Relics of Ancient Poetry, how much there was of the 
truest genius in what some considered musty and ancient documents. 
He is one whom we should be glad to bring under the title of a true 
archaeologian. I mention these as examples on which we may be dis- 
posed to defend the science of archaeology. It is not merely a Lemon 
or a Palgrave who may be called archaeologists ; we claim all who have 
a liking for ancient records and ancient buildings, or for age in any form. 
I was almost going to put in a word in favour of old men ; but I think 
we may venerate antiquity in material substances, if not in the human 
form. This is not the day when the hoary head is always looked upon 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XV 

as a crown of glory. But it may not be out of place for one who 
occupies a responsible position in this diocese to state, that it is my 
earnest prayer that each one whom I have the pleasure of addressing 
may in their day have that which I believe to be a true glory — the 
hoary head which covers the heart imbued with love to God and love to 
man." 

The Hon. Secretary read the Minutes of the Third Annual General 
Meeting, held at Croydon, on the 12th June, 1856, which were con- 
firmed. Several new Members were elected. 

The Hon. Secretary announced the following donations : — 

From Mrs. Howley : A Sei'ies of Engravings privately printed for the 
late Archbishop Howley, comprising plans and elevations of 
Lambeth Palace, before and after the alterations made by the 
Archbishop. 

From the Rev. S. R. Maitland, D.D., F.R.S., &c. : A copy of his "List 
of some of the Early Printed Books in Lambeth Palace." 

From the Cambrian Institute : " The Cambrian Quarterly Journal," 
Part II., Sept. 1856. 

From the Chronological Institute of London : Tart I. of the Trans- 
actions of the Institute. 

From the Ecclesiological Society : Annual Reports of the Society for 
1854, 1855, and 1856. 

From John Tanswell, Esq. : Engravings on Wood, illustrative of the 
Antiquities of Lambeth. 

From the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society : Part I. of the 
Transactions of the Society. 

The thanks of the Society were unanimously voted for these 
donations. 

The Right Rev. Chairman then said, that since the last Meeting the 
Society had had the misfortune to lose its President, the Duke of Norfolk. 
The Council had put themselves in communication with the Duke of 
Buccleuch, who had signified his willingness to accept the Presidency 
of the Society. 

The following Papers were then read : — 

1. A brief Account of the MSS. and Records in Lambeth Palace ; and, 

2. On the Title of the Palace and Manor of Lambeth. By William 

Henry Black, Esq., Hon. Member. 

3. Some passages in the Life of Archbishop Laud. By John Wickkam 

Flower, Esq. 

The Rev. Charles Boutell, M.A., then proceeded to give an historical 
and descriptive Sketch of the Palace, at the conclusion of which the 
Company inspected, under Mr. Boutell's guidance, the Chapel, Library, 
Picture Galleries, the Lollard's Tower, and other portions of the building. 



XVI REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

At three o'clock the Chair was again taken by the Bishop of 
Winchester, when the following Papers were read : — 

4. On the recent Discovery of the Remains of a Roman Villa on 

Walton Heath. By W. Willmer Pocock, Esq., F.R.I.B.A. 

This Paper was illustrated by a carefully- executed drawing of the 
mosaic pavement of the villa, and other illustrations. 

5. On two Deeds executed by Elias Ashmole, for the conveyance of bis 

house in South Lambeth. By George R. Corner, Esq., F.S.A. 

The Chairman having intimated that he was obliged to leave the 
Meeting, 

The Rev. E. P. Phillips moved, and the Rev. R. B. Byam seconded a 
vote of thanks to his Lordship for his kindness in attending and so ably 
presiding over the Meeting. 

The motion was carried by acclamation. 

His Lordship, having acknowledged the compliment, retired. 

The Rev. R. Burgh Byam, M.A., a Member of the Council, having 
been voted into the Chair, the concluding Paper was read : — 

6. On the History of the Manor of Hatcham. By W. H. Hart, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

Mr. W. Wi Pocock moved a vote of thanks to his Grace the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, for his Grace's kindness in allowing the Meeting 
to be held in the Palace. 

Mr. George R. Corner, F.S.A., seconded the motion, which was 
unanimously carried. 

Mr. Tanswell moved a vote of thanks to the Authors of the Papers 
read, which was duly seconded and unanimously earned. 

Mr. Corner moved and Mr. Kent seconded a vote of thanks to the 
Rev. J. Lingham, Rector of Lambeth, for his kindness in allowing the 
church to be inspected. Carried. 

Mr. Webb, Hon. Secretary, moved a vote of thanks to Felix Kny vett, 
Esq., Secretary to the Archbishop of Canterbury, for the kind and 
valuable assistance he had rendered to the Committee, especially in the 
trouble he had taken in placing before them the various MSS. they had 
requested might be exhibited. Carried unanimously. 

Thanks were also voted to 

The Chairman, moved by Mr. Godfrey, seconded by Mr. Webb ; 
and to 

The Honorary Secretary, moved by the Rev. R. B. Byam and seconded 
by Mr. Tanswell. 

The proceedings then terminated. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XVH 



THE DEEPDENE. 

The Fourth Annual General Meeting of the Society was held at 
The Deepdene, Dorking, on Monday, June 29th, 1857. 

Henry Thomas Hope, Esq., a Vice-President, took the Chair, at half- 
past twelve o'clock. 

After a few introductory remarks from the Chairman, 
The Hon. Secretary read the Minutes of the General Meeting held at 
Lambeth Palace, on the 3rd October, 1856, which were confirmed. 

The following Report of the Council was then read : — 

The Council, in presenting this their fourth Annual Report, feel fully 
justified in congratulating the Members upon the satisfactory progress 
made by the Society during the past year ; and also upon the present 
favourable condition of its affairs. 

Since the date of the last Report, two General Meetings have been 
held — the first at Croydon in June, and the second, by the kind per- 
mission of his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury, in Lambeth Palace. 
At these meetings twelve Papers of considerable interest and of varied 
character were read. The information contained in these communications 
will afford most valuable matter for future volumes of the Transactions. 
At both meetings the attendance of members and of visitors was very 
numerous ; but it may be remarked, in a more especial degree at 
Lambeth Palace, where, notwithstanding very unfavourable weather, 
upwards of four hundred persons assembled. 

It i3 with much regret that the Council have to refer to the serious 
losses by death that the Society has sustained during the past year. 
Within that period it has been deprived of four vice-presidents — the 
Earl Amherst, the Earl of Ellesmere, Viscount Downe, and Mr. Ga- 
desden, late High Sheriff of the county ; while the decease of the late 
Mr. George Gwilt, F.S.A., has deprived the Council of a member of 
their own body. From the list of Honorary Members also, two distin- 
guished names have been removed by the lamented decease of the 
veteran topographer Mr. John Britton, and of that learned archaeologist, 
Mr. John Mitchell Kemble. 

It is to be regretted that a considerable number of Members have 
retired from the Society ; nevertheless, this loss is more than counter- 
balanced by the large accession of new Members ; for, while the number 
at the date of the last Report, in 1856, was 430, it is now 450, of whom 
70 are Life Members. 

Numerous contributions to both the Museum and to the Library of 
the Society have been received, and will be duly chronicled in the 
Transactions. 

To the list of Institutions in union with the Surrey Archaeological 
Society, three have this year been added, — the Society of Antiquaries of 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the Exeter Diocesan Architectural Society, and 
the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire. 

The Council greatly regret that unforeseen interruptions in the 

VOL. II. b 



XV1U REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

progress of printing and illustrating the second part of the Transactions 
have retarded its publication until after the Annual General Meeting ; 
they trust, however, in a very brief period to place it in the hands of 
Members, when they have no doubt the care taken in its production 
will be found to compensate, in some measure, for the delay in passing 
it through the press. 

Council-Room, 

6, Southampton Street, Covent Garden, 
18th June, 1857. 

The Honorary Secretary then read the following Balance-sheet [see 
next page]. 

The following Report from the Auditors was next read : — 

The Auditoi's of the Surrey Archaeological Society have much pleasure 
in reporting a considerable improvement in the Society's Income, arising 
from a greater punctuality in the payment of annual subscriptions, and 
an increased number of Members. The Society is free from debt, with 
.£250 invested, and a balance in hand of £156. lis. 7c?., exclusive of 
£93, still due for subscriptions. 

For self and Colleague, 

25th June, 1857. (Signed) Edward Richardson. 

These Reports and Balance-sheets were adopted, and a vote of thanks 
to the Auditors was unanimously passed. 

The officers of the ensuing year were elected. 

The Honorary Secretary announced the following donations to the 
Society : — 

From the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle-upon-Tyne : " Archseologia 
iEliana, or Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Antiquity," published 
by that Society. 5 vols. 8vo. 

From Matthew Holbeche Bloxam, Esq., Hon. Member : " Fragmenta 
Sepulchralia ; or, A Glimpse of the Sepulchral and early Monu- 
mental Remains of Great Britain." By the Donor. 8vo. 

The Thanks of the Society were voted to the Donors. 

Several new Members were elected, and the Rev. Lambert B. Larking, 
Vicar of Ryarsh, Kent, was elected an Honorary Member. 

The Hon. Secretary read a letter addressed to him by John Wickham 
Flower, Esq., a Member of the Council, suggesting the formation of a 
series of archaeological maps of the county of Surrey, and describing the 
method of attaining that object by the combined action of the Members 
of the Society, the county being divided into districts, and a Local Com- 
mittee appointed to prepare the portion of the maps comprised in each 
of such districts. 

Mr. R. Godwin-Austen moved that the suggestion be referred to the 
Council. 

The motion was seconded by Mr. Butterworth, and after some 
further remarks by Mr. Flower, put from the Chair, and unanimously 
carried. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 



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XX REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

Mr. Maybank suggested that it would be desirable to adopt one of 
the county newspapers as a medium for questions and answers relating 
to the archaeology of the county. 

After a brief discussion, the matter was referred to the Council. 

The proceedings terminated by a vote of thanks to the Chairman, not 
only for his conduct in the Chair, but also for the interest which he had 
shown in the Society, by receiving the Members with great hospitality at 
his seat. 

This vote was suitably acknowledged, and the Meeting was adjourned; 
some of the Members and their friends availing themselves of the oppor- 
tunity so liberally accorded them, of inspecting the numerous treasures 
of art collected at the Deepdene, and of exploring the beautiful pleasure- 
ground there ; while others joined in an excursion to "Wotton Park, 
where they were most kindly received by the owner, W. J. Evelyn, Esq., 
a Vice-President, and conducted over the house and grounds, so in- 
teresting from their connection with the honoured name of " Sylva " 
Evelyn. 

A dinner was served at half-past six in the Assembly-room of the 
Red Lion Hotel, Dorking, at which between 200 and 300 ladies and 
gentlemen were present. 



SOUTH WARK. 

A Special General Meeting was held at the Bridge House Hotel, 
Southwark, on Thursday, the 22nd of October, 1857. 

The Chair was taken by John Locke, Esq., Q.C., M.P., a Vice- 
President. 

This Meeting was summoned to consider a proposal for' an extension 
of the operations of the Society to the county of Kent. 

A resolution in favour of this scheme was moved and seconded, but 
was not carried, and 

The Meeting adjourned. 



SOUTHWARK. 

A Special General Meeting was held at the Bridge House Hotel, 
Southwark, on Thursday, the 2Gth of November, 1857. 

The Chair was taken by John Locke, Esq., Q.C., M.P., a Vice- 
President. 

This Meeting was convened, on a requisition signed by 38 Members 
of the Society, for the purpose of further considering the proposal for 
an extension of the operations of the Society to the county of Kent. 

A resolution having this object in view was proposed and seconded, 
whereupon 

The previous question was moved, seconded, and carried; and 

The Meeting adjourned. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXI 

SOUTHWARK. 

A General Meeting -was held on Wednesday, May 12th, 1858, at 
the Saint Olave's Grammar School, Queen Elizabeth Street, Southwark. 

The Chair was taken by William Pritchard, Esq., High Bailiff of 
Southwark, Vice-President. 

The Chairman having briefly addressed the Meeting, the following 
Papers were read : — 

1. An Architectural Notice of the Nave of St. Saviour's Church, 

Southwark, made during its demolition, accompanied by numerous 
drawings from actual measurement. By William Pettit Griffith, 
Esq., F.R.I.B.A., Hon. Member. Read by his brother, Rev. 
C. H. Griffith, M.A. 

2. On the Ancient Inns of Southwark. By George R. Corner, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

3. Notices of Croydon Church. By John Wickham Flower, Esq. 

A new Member was elected. 

On the motion of the Chairman, the thanks of the Meeting were 
unanimously voted to the Authors of the Papers read. 

On the motion of George R. Corner, Esq., F.S.A., 

The thanks of the Meeting were unanimously voted to the Warden 
and Court of Governors of St. Olave's School, for their kindness in 
granting the use of the school-room for the purpose of the Meeting. 

On the motion of Robert Hesketh, Esq., seconded by Thomas Clark, 
Esq., 

The thanks of the Meeting were voted to the Chairman, who acknow- 
ledged the compliment. 

The Meeting was then adjourned to St. Saviour's Church, when 
Mr. W. Pettit Griffith offered some further remarks upon its architectui'e. 

The proceedings then terminated. 



FARNHAM CASTLE. 



The Fifth Annual General Meeting of the Society was held, by the 
kind permission of the Lord Bishop of Winchester, at Farnham Castle, 
on Tuesday, July 13th, 1858. 

On the way from the railway-station to the Castle, a large number of 
the Members and their friends stopped to examine the interesting parish 
church of Farnham, of which a descriptive sketch was read by the Rev. 
J. S. Utterton, the Vicar. 

The Chair was taken at twelve o'clock by the Right Reverend the 
Lord Bishop of Winchester, D.D., F.R.S., a Vice-President. 

The Chairman having addressed the Meeting, the Hon. Secretary read 
the Minutes of the Annual Meeting held in 1857, at the Deepdene, 
Dorking, and of the General Meetings at Southwark, which were 
confirmed. 



XXU REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

The following Report of the Council was then read : — • 

In presenting their fifth Annual Report, the Council are enabled to 
state that there has been, during the past year, no variation from that 
successful progress which the Society has hitherto made. 

Since the last Annual Report was submitted, two General Meetings 
have been held, — the first at Dorking in June, 1857, and the second in 
South wark last May. 

The first was held at The Deepdene, by the kindness of Henry Thomas 
Hope, Esq., one of the Vice-Presidents of the Society. From The 
Deepdene the Meeting adjourned to Wotton, the residence of William 
John Evelyn, Esq., another Vice-President, through whose courtesy an 
opportunity was presented of inspecting many interesting relics of the 
past associated with the memory of that accomplished and eminent 
person, "John Evelyn of Wotton." The Council have much pleasure in 
acknowledging the polite hospitality of Mr. Hope and Mr. Evelyn upon 
that occasion. 

The Meeting in Southwark, held on the anniversary of the Society's 
Inauguration in the same place (12th May) was not so fully attended, 
owing to the unfavourable state of the weather ; but three Papers were 
read, which will form valuable additions to the future publications of the 
Society. 

There have also been held two Special General Meetings in Southwark, 
upon the subject of a proposal to extend the operations of the Society to 
the county of Kent, which county, at the time the subject was first 
brought under the notice of the Council, had no similar society. As, 
however, the county of Kent has since established an Archaeological 
Society of its own, the proposed extension was abandoned. 

The Council cannot but rejoice that so important and interesting a 
county as Kent, the immediate neighbour of Surrey, should, at length, 
be archgeologically represented. They feel assured that the Members of 
this Society will be well satisfied that its influence has been exerted, 
although at some cost to themselves, in aiding the movement in Kent, 
inasmuch as the cause of archaeology must derive essential benefit by the 
formation of the Kent Archaeological Society, to which the Council 
heartily wish success. 

In the last Report an apology was offered for the delay occasioned by. 
unforeseen interruptions in the publication of the second part of the 
Transactions. That delay, prolonged for some months after the date of 
the Report, was occasioned by the abandonment of the editorship by the 
gentleman who had undertaken it. Fresh arrangements had to be 
made, and the plan of the work altered in consequence. The Council 
feel that in justice to themselves this explanation should be given ; and 
they are happy to add that they have pi'ovided against any recurrence 
of a similar impediment to publication. They trust that Part II., now 
published, will be deemed creditable to the Society. No time will be 
lost in preparing and issuing the succeeding parts. 

During the last twelve months two interesting discoveries of mural 
paintings in churches have been made in Surrey — the one at Fetcham 
and the other at Croydon. In each case the Council have succeeded in 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XX1U 

obtaining representations of the paintings for the purpose of publi- 
cation. 

It is satisfactory to the Council to report that there has been a con 
siderable increase in the number of Members. At the date of the last 
Report, the number was 450, while at present it is 500, of whom 72 are 
Life Compounders. 

The Council cannot but congratulate the Members upon the acces- 
sion to their numbers of so distinguished an archaeologist as Sir Henry 
Rawlinson, now a Vice-President of the Society. 

The Library and Museum have been enriched by many liberal contri- 
butions. 

In conclusion, the Council would urge upon the attention of Members 
the great advantage to the Society that might be derived from individual 
and personal efforts to increase its Members, thereby enhancing its 
efficiency, and enabling the Council the better to advance the objects for 
which the Association has been formed. 

Financial Report of the Council. 

The Council have much pleasure in submitting the Financial State- 
ment of the Society for the year ending June, 1858, to the General 
Meeting, and trust that the state of the Funds will appear satisfactory. 

In introducing the item of £72 payment to the Hon. Secretary, the 
Council beg to acknowledge the valuable services they have received 
from him, and to state that, owing to the heavy demands made upon his 
time during the past two years by the work of the Society, they came 
to the resolution of offering to him, as some remuneration for such 
services, the amount named, which they doubt not will be approved by 
the Members generally. 

Council- Room, 

6, Southampton Street, 8th July, 1858. 

The Balance-sheet was then read, as follows [see page xxvi]. 

The Auditors for 1858, W. Tayler, Esq., and J. T. Maybank, Esq., 
were unanimously re-elected. 

The Chairman moved the adoption of the Report of the Council and 
of the Balance-sheet, which motion was carried nem. con. 

The eight retiring Members of the Council were unanimously re- 
elected. 

Forty-three new Members were elected. 
The following Papers were then read : — 

1. On the Antiquities of Farnham. By H. Lawes Long, Esq. 

2. On the Parish Registers of Farnham, Elstead, and Seale. By W. H. 

Hart, Esq., F.S.A 

3. Notices of Farnham Castle. By the Rev. R. N. Milford. 

The formal proceedings then terminated by a vote of cordial thanks 
to the Chairman. 



XXIV REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

The Company then adjourned to the Hall of the Castle, where a very 
handsome collation awaited them. It was calculated that the number 
of the guests of the Right Rev. Chairman did not fall far short 
of 500. 

In the afternoon the company divided. A large party proceeded to 
Waverley Abbey, on the kind invitation of the owner, Capt. S. Nicholson. 
The ruins of the Cistercian Abbey here formed the centre of atti'action. 
The site was explored under the guidance of R. Godwin- Austen, Esq., 
who read a paper giving a slight sketch of the history of the Monastery, 
and afterwards pointed out the position of the principal buildings. 

A temporary Museum had been formed at the boys' school-room in 
Farnham, imder the superintendence of a committee composed of the 
following, among other gentlemen : — The Rev. J. S. Utterton, M.A. ; 
Robert Clark, Esq. ; Robert Oke Clark, Esq. ; Henry Lawes Long, 
Esq. ; R. H. Clutterbuck, Esq. ; J. J. Howard, Esq., E.S.A. ; and 
John Cough Nichols, Esq., F.S.A. 

The principal objects exhibited were as follows : — 

A large piece of Tapestry from Cardinal Wolsey's Palace at Esher, 
bearing the Cardinal's Arms. Exhibited by the Rev. Newton J. 
Spicer, who also contributed a Series of Carvings representing 
the various Bishops of Winchester, from the same edifice. 

Adjoining the Tapestry were a Series of Coloured Drawings, by M. 
Shurlock, Esq., of the remarkable collection of Tiles discovered in 
the site of Chertsey Abbey. Specimens of the Tiles, and a Model 
of the Stone Coffin found in the same place, were also exhibited 
by the same gentleman. 

Mr. Richardson, of Greenwich, exhibited three of his Metallic Rubbings 
of Monumental Brasses — viz., those of Baginton and Cow T fold, and 
Sir John D'Abernoun the Younger, in Stoke D'Abernon Church, 
Surrey. 

Several Curious Pictures of much local interest, by Elmer, of Farnham, 
were exhibited. They represented Farnham Castle, the Town, 
Waverley Abbey, and Mother Ludlam's Cave. 

A highly-curious and interesting Bird's Eye View of Moor Park, drawn 
by the celebrated Sir William Temple, attracted great attention. 

An interesting series of well-executed Rubbings of Brasses in Churches 
in Kent, was exhibited by Mrs. Charles J. Freake. 

Three large Drawings of Mural Paintings, discovered last year in 
Fetcham Church, Surrey, and since entirely obliterated, were exhi- 
bited by the Society. 

Au elaborate Drawing of a Tesselated Pavement found at Monks' 
Risborough, was contributed by Augustus W. Franks, Esq., F.S.A. 

On the tables were arranged Specimens of British, Saxon, Roman, 
and Mediaeval Antiquities. Conspicuous amongst these was a 
case containing about twenty-five Bronze Celts and other Reliques 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXV 

found at Crooksbury, near Farnhatn. Exhibited by J. Hewitt, 
Esq., of "Winchfield. 

Mr. R. Hawley Clutterbuck contributed a highly curious Piece of 
Sculpture in Alabaster, representing the Crucifixion, and a frag- 
ment of another ; also, various Encaustic Tiles, Pottery, and a 
Morion, Spur, and Halbert Head. 

A great variety of Ancient and Modern Arms, of various countries, 
was exhibited by different contributors. Amongst these was an 
Ancient Helmet from Farnham Church, exhibited by the Vicar ; 
a Sword and Head-piece of the seventeenth century, by Mr. Storold ; 
Indian Matchlock and Shield, by Robert Clark, Esq. 

Two Celts found in Surrey were exhibited, with other Antiquities, by 
H. Lawes Long, Esq. 

John "VVickham Flower, Esq., contributed a variety of highly in- 
teresting objects, including a very fine Roman Vase of glass, 
with cover quite perfect, and considered to be unique ; also a 
Roman Camp Kettle and Chain, Swords, Spear-heads, Poignard, 
Knives, Lamps, Keys, &c. 

Mr. Piper exhibited a fine Celt, an Alms Dish, Armlet, and many 
other curious articles. 

A Collection of Ancient Gold Coins was contributed by Charles 
E. Lefroy, Esq., of Ewshot, who further enriched the collection 
with two exquisite Antique Busts, Bronzes, Vases, Medals, Enamel 
Portraits, and a Watch of the time of Henry the Fourth. 

Mr. Cayley, of York Town, was a most liberal contributor of objects 
of interest, including Swords, Coins, Tradesmen's Tokens, En- 
caustic Tiles, Pottery, &c. 

J. J. Howard, Esq., F.S.A., exhibited a variety of Ancient Deeds, 
Pedigrees, Grants of Arms, Seals, &c. Amongst these was a 
splendidly emblazoned Pedigree of the Family of Dilke of Maxtoke, 
formerly Lords of the Manor of Godstone, drawn up by Sampson 
Lennard. Also, a Grant of Arms by Camden, with his Seal and 
Autograph, and two Early Deeds of the thirteenth and fourteenth 
centuries, with Curious Seals appended. 

C. J. Shoppee, Esq., exhibited several Illuminated MSS. Grants, and 
a curious Watch. 

Mr. Lance, of Frimley, contributed various Drawings and Maps, 
representing Roman Antiquities, Ancient Books, Pottery, &c* 

On Wednesday, according to the Programme, a barrow, or tumulus, 
situated at Wanborough, was opened under the superintendence of a 
Committee of the Society, and a large party of Members and Visitors 
were present at the operation. 

* Upwards of two thousand persons visited the Museum during the two days it 
was open to the public ; nor should we omit to state, that on the second day the 
Officers in Camp at Aldershot were specially invited to view the Museum, and many 
of them availed themselves of the invitation. 



XXVI 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 



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REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXVU 

The barrow, wliich is of large extent, had been already partially 
levelled. It is situated close to the high road, between Farnhain and 
Guildford. A cutting and cross-cutting were eifected, and carried down 
to a depth of three or four feet, but without any success. 



KENNINGTON. 

A General Meeting was held at the Horns Tavern, Kennington, 
on the Evening of Wednesday, April 20th, 1859. 

The Chair was taken at half-past seven o'clock by William Roupell, 
Esq., M.P., a Vice-President. 

After a few words from the Chairman, 

The Minutes of the last Meeting were read and confirmed. 

Several new Members were elected. 

The following Papers were then read : — 

1. Notices of the Royal Manor and Residence of Kennington. By W. 

H. Hart, Esq., E.8.A. 

(Mr. Roupell here vacated the Chair, which was taken by J. R. D. 

Tyssen, Esq., F.S.A.) 

2. Notes on the Parishes of Battersea and Penge. By W. H. Black, 

Esq., F.S.A. 

3. Remarks on the Deed of Sir Edward and Lady Barker, from the 
Muniment-room of Whitgift's Hospital, Croydon (since published 
in facsimile by the Society). By J. W. Flower, Esq. 

4. Notices of a MS. Diary of Archbishop Laud. By J. W. Flower, 

Esq. 

The Hon. Secretary called attention to a number of objects of interest 
which had been got together very shortly before the meeting, and in 
some haste, and were then exhibited in the meeting-room. 

This exhibition included the following articles : — 

A Collection of nearly sixty Rubbings from Brasses, mostly of large 
size and of good execution. Of these, nine specimens, exhibited 
by J. W. Flower, Esq., were from the Continent ; and twenty- 
seven others contributed by J. L. Peake, Esq., from Churches 
in Surrey, Kent, Middlesex, and the neighbouring counties. Con- 
spicuous among these were the Rubbings from the seven fine 
Brasses in Cobham Church, Kent. For other specimens the 
Society was indebted to Mrs. Charles Freake, A. Heales, Esq., J. J. 
Howard, Esq., G. H, Davies, Esq., and H. Sydney Barton, Esq. 

An early Italian Painting. Alfred Heales, Esq. 

A Romano-British Cinerary Urn, of sun-baked clay, found on the 
banks of the Little Ouse, in Suffolk. The urn was eighteen inches 
high by fifteen inches in diameter, and when found contained 
calcined human bones : also a Quern formed of the Conglomerate or 



XXVlll REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

Pudding-stone, and two Encaustic Tiles, from Neath Abbe} r , Glamor- 
ganshire. J. W. Flower, Esq. 

A Collection of Proclamations, Early Newspapei's, and Historical 
Tracts. G. Howels Davies, Esq. 

Autograph Signature of Sir William Fleetwood, Recorder of London 
temp. Elizabeth, subscribed to an Instrument dated from The Clink, 
in Southwark. J. J. Howard, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A. 

Thanks were voted to the gentlemen who had read Papers, and to 
the Exhibitors. 

On the motion of J. W. Flower, Esq., seconded by J. G. Pilchcr, 
Esq., thanks were given to W. Roupell, Esq., and J. R. D. Tyssen, Esq., 
for their kindness in presiding. 

Mr. Tyssen acknowledged the compliment, and the meeting adjourned. 



RICHMOND. 

The Sixth Annual General Meeting of the Society was held at 
Richmond, on Tuesday, July 5th, 1859, in the large room of the 
National Schools, Eton Street, which was placed at the disposal of 
the Society by the kindness of the Trustees of the Schools. 

At eleven o'clock the Chair was taken by the Right Hon. Lord 
Abinger, M.A., a Vice-President. 

After a brief Address from the Chairman, 

The Minutes of the last Meeting were read and confirmed. 

G. B. Webb, Esq., the Hon. Secretary, then read the Annual Report 
of the Council, to the following effect : * — 

The Council congratulated the Society on its satisfactory progress, in 
proof of which they mentioned that the two meetings held in the pre- 
vious twelvemonth at Farnhain and Kennington had been attended by 
upwards of GOO members and visitors, and that a steady increase of the 
former was still maintained. 

In preparing the Society's publications for the Press, the Council had 
on several occasions felt themselves reluctantly compelled to omit Illus- 
trative Engravings of much interest, in order to confine the expense 
within the limits allowed by the Society's ordinary funds. In order to 
meet this difficulty, the Council had opened an Illustration Fund, to 
which several Members of the Society had already contributed, and to 
which they now invited general attention. 

The Library and Museum had received considerable additions. 

It having appeared to the Council that in future it would be more 

* The draft of this Report was, it is believed, mislaid during the removal of papers, 
&c., consequent on the lamented decease of Mr. Webb, and has not since been 
recovered. Its substance, however, has been collected from other sources. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXIX 

convenient to make their financial year harmonise with the civil year, 
they had directed a supplemental Balance-sheet to be prepared, showing 
the income and expenditure of the Society for the six months ending 
December 31, 1858. This had accordingly been done, and the Balance- 
sheet would be read with the Auditors' report thereon. 

The Chairman moved the adoption of the Report, which was carried 
unanimously. 

The Balance-sheet (see page xxxiv.) and the Report of the Auditors 
were then read. 

Auditors' Report, Surrey Archaeological Society, 1859. 

The Auditors have much pleasure in submitting the accounts, made 
up, as requested by the Council, to the 31st December, 1858, being the 
half-year's accounts from July, 1858, to which time the accounts had been 
audited and submitted to the Meeting held at Farnham. 

They have also much pleasure in certifying the growing increase of 
the Society by the continued accession of new Members, as appears by 
the amount received for subscriptions, and the smallness of the arrears to 
Christmas, 1858. 

They have also vouched, through the medium of the Banker's 
account, the sum of £348. 9s. 3d. New Three per Cent. Annuities, 
which amount is now invested and standing to the credit of the Surrey 
Archaeological Society, in conformity with the rules, as being part of the 
Life Members' Compositions, and presenting the nucleus of a Permanent 
Fund, the dividends of which are periodically carried to Income account, 
and thus making an actual capital, with the value of the Library publi- 
cations and Collection belonging to the Society (the latter of which are 
placed at the very moderate value of £115), of £435. 

They also beg to add, on presenting this short summary of the affairs 
of the Society, their satisfaction with the clear and intelligent manner 
in which the accounts have been kept by the Honorary Secretary, and 
the accuracy of the vouchers produced for the sums expended by the 
Society. 

(Signed) William Tayler, ") And{tws 

John Thomas Maybank, J 

A vote of thanks to the Auditors was then proposed and carried 
unanimously. 

John Godefroy, Esq., and A. J. Hiscocks, Esq., were elected Auditors 
in the room of Messrs. Tayler and Maybank. 

The Council and Officers for the ensuing year were elected. 

The following presents were announced : — 

From J. Y. Akerman, Esq., Sec. S.A. : Twelve Roman Coins. 

From G. Dyer, Esq., of Richmond : Three Photographs from Rare 
Prints of the Ancient Palace of Richmond. 

A vote of thanks was passed to the Donors, and also to the Hon. Sec. 



XXX 



REPORTS OP PROCEEDINGS. 



and Officers of the Society for their able management of the Society's 
affairs during the past year. 

The following Papers were then read : — 

1. Notices of the Family of Cobham of Sterborongh Castle, and Ling- 

field, Surrey. By J. Wickham Flower, Esq. 

2. Notes from the Parish Registers of Richmond, Kingston, and 

Petersham. By W. H. Hart, Esq., F.S.A. 

3. On the Antiquities of Richmond. By W. Chapman, Esq. (Hon. 

Local Sec.) 

4. A Short Description of the Monuments in Richmond Church. By 

the Rev. W. Bashall (Hon. Local Sec.) 

Thanks were returned to the Authors of these Papers. 

On the motion of W. J. Evelyn, Esq., F.S.A., seconded by the Rev. 
J. Chandler, a vote of thanks was passed to Lord Abinger for his kind- 
ness in presiding. 

The Meeting then adjourned to the Parish Church, which had been 
thrown open for the inspection of the Society. 

At three o'clock Lord Abinger and the Company proceeded to the 
Lecture-hall of the Cavalry College, on Richmond Green. Here, with 
the kind permission of the Commandant, Capt. Bar-row, a temporary 
Local Museum had been formed by the exertions of the following 
gentlemen, who, together with the Hon. Local Secretaries, the Rev. W. 
Bashall, W. Chapman, Esq., and T. Meadows Clarke, Esq., had been 
formed into a Local Committee : — 



The 



B.D. 



Rev. Harry Dupuis, 
Vicar of Richmond. 
Eustace Anderson, Esq. 
Herbert Barnard, Esq., F.S.A. 
Henry G. Bohn, Esq. 
The Rev. R. Burgh Byam, M.A 
Edward H. Hills, Esq. 
John H. Jackson, Esq. 
G. Streater Kempson, Esq. 
W. Lambert, Esq. 



John Parson, Esq. 

John Brandram Peele, Esq. 

Edward Penthyn, Esq. 

John Allan Powell, Esq. 

Colonel Price. 

W. C. Selle, Esq., Mus. D. 

Henry A. Smith, Esq. 

Robert Smith, Esq. 

William Smythe, Esq. 

Samuel Walker, Esq. 



The Chairman formally opened the Museum with a brief address, 
calling attention to its contents. 

Among the objects of archaeological interest exhibited were the 
following : * — 

Celtic Wood Vessel from a Bog in the County of Armagh. 

* The collection was large and important, though of a rather miscellaneous 
character. It is much to be regretted that no accurate list either of the articles so 
kindly forwarded for exhibition, or of the names of the exhibitors, is to be found 
among the records of the Society. The list here given is the best which at this lapse 
of time can be made out. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXXI 

Bible of 1637; ditto of 1658. Exhibited by T. M. Clarke, Esq., Hon. 
Local Sec. 

Silver, and other Ancient Coins. Messrs. Marshall, of Bloomsbury. 

Portrait of the Noted Brewer of Bichniond. Mr. Hunt. 

Grant of Arms, dated 1570, to Robert Sheppard, of Tesemarsh. 

Ancient Seals — Ecclesiastical, Corporate, and Pei*sonal. Thomas Wills, 
Esq. 

Grant of Arms, -with the Autographs of Louis YI. and the Chevalier 
d'Hozier attached. 

Celtic Shoe (laced from the toe to the instep) ; Celtic Mallet ; and 
Celtic Quern, for grinding corn. Henry Christie, Esq. 

Looking-glass, formerly in the possession of Alexander Pope. H. G. 
Bohn, Esq. 

Roll of the Manor of Winchester, dated 1455, with the Signatures of 
Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Winchester, Duke of Norfolk, 
Earl of Warwick, Lord Cromwell, &c. 

Sir Isaac Newton's Spoon. T. M. Clarke, Esq. 

Watch, by the celebrated Tompion (died 1669). 

Pair of Infant's Shoes, formerly belonging to William Henry, Duke of 
Gloucester (born 1743), third son of Frederick Lewis, Prince of 
Wales, son of George II. 

A Pair of Shoes, worn by Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, which had 
been in the possession of the Galway Family since the reign of 
Queen Anne. 

Ditto, belonging to Countess Poulett. 

Chinese Shoes, from Lagos. Thomas Wells, Esq. 

Morse Ivory Thumb Ring, supposed to have belonged to an Earl of 
Surrey between 1443 and 1550. 

Liber Amicorum, a German Collection of Coats of Arms and Autographs. 

Case of Seals (Impressions) : One of them from the Seal of Milo de 
Gloucester, Earl of Hereford, 12th Century. T. Wells, Esq. 

Common Seal of St. Stephen's, Westminster. G. B. Webb, Esq. 

Original Draft of Burns' " Afton Braes ;" A Letter from the Poet 
Cowper, dated " Olney House, Nov. 25, 1785," addressed to Mrs. 
Hill. 

Autograph of Sir Ralph Abercromby; Promissory Note of General 
Wolfe's (1753). 

Deed of Feoffment, signed by Robert Catesby, of Gunpowder Plot 
celebrity, and also by his Father, Sir William Catesby. 

Two Receipts of John Horne Tooke; one signed John Home, and the 
other John Horne Tooke. 



XXXU REPORTS OP PROCEEDINGS. 

Letters of Dr. Johnson, of Sir John Franklin (the Arctic Navigator), 
and of Dr. Livingstone. 

Autographs of Sir Walter Raleigh ; of Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia ; 
two Receipts of Lord William Russell and Lady Rachel Russell ; 
Letter of Nell Gwyn, attested by Thomas Otway (this is the only 
known signature of the Poet extant). 

Letter of Lord Chesterfield. 

Autographs of five Great Men : Oliver Cromwell ; Frank, Duke of 
Albemarle ; Napoleon I. ; Nelson (before losing his arm) ; Duke 
of Wellington — one signed Wesley, another signed Wellesley. 

Letter of Flora Macdonald, acknowledging the receipt of .£027 — a 
document of great historical value, as it forms the connecting link 
in a chain of evidence, bearing out the statement in Lord Mahon's 
History, that a subscription of £1,500 had been raised for that lady 
in England. (Mr. Cole possesses two other letters, one in reference 
to the sum of .£800, the other to £80, which amounts, it will be 
perceived, just exceed £1,500.) 

Letter of Handel's, acknowledging the use of the kettle-drums for his 
oratorio. 

Autographs, in regular order, of Henry VII., Henry VIII., Elizabeth, 
James L, Charles I., Henrietta Maria, Charles II., James II., 
George III. (before losing his sight), George III. (when blind), 
Queen Charlotte, George (Prince Regent), Queen Caroline, William 
IV., Victoria. Robert Cole, Esq. 

Chair of Henry, Prince of Wales — made of metal, with the arms of Anne 
of Denmark, his mother. 

A very interesting collection of Keys and Rings ; two Roman Lamps, 
found at Calvert's Brewery ; Lock, from Hever Castle ; Blunderbuss ; 
Eagle, from Waterloo ; Key, found at Paul's Wharf; Key, found 
at Bow Church, &c. Thomas Wills, Esq. 

Chair in which Edmund Burke wrote his Essay on the French Revolu- 
tion ; and Old English Chair, 1538. H. G. Bohn, Esq. 

Casts from Inscriptions on Church Bells. J. R. D. Tyssen, Esq. 

The Scold's Bridle, from Walton-on-Thames. 

Specimen of Binding, 1470. 

Pope Joan Board, in silver. 

Picture of Richmond Park, the deer fighting for supremacy. 

Print of old Richmond Palace. 

Specimen of Lambert Pottery (1G61), framed in the Petersham Oak. 

Key, from Chertsey Abbey, presented by the Committee of the late 
Literary and Scientific Institution. 

Encaustic Tiles, from Chertsey Abbey. 



REPORTS OP PROCEEDINGS. XXX1U 

Spear-head, found at Kingston. Presented to the Society by F. Gould, 
Esq. 

Elizabethan Comb. 

Fifteenth Century Rings, one bearing the name of Thomas A'Beckett. 

Handle of a Gibeciere Purse. B. B. Woodward, Esq. 

Supposed Portrait of Martin Luther, by Holbein or Lucas Cranach, for- 
merly in the possession of Howard the Philanthropist. 

First Edition of Thomson's Seasons, 1730. J. Darnill, Esq. 

Documents of the year 1583, with the Signatures of Whitgift, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, Lord Chancellor Egerton, Earl of Dorset, &c. 
G. B. Webb, Esq. 

Ancient Iron Hour-glass Stand. J. R. D. Tyssen, Esq. 

" Early Deeds of the 13th and 14th Centuries." J. J. Howard, Esq. 

Roman Cinerary Urn, found between Brandon and Lackenheath. J. 
W. Flower, Esq. 

Sword of the time of Edward II., said to have belonged to Robert 
Bruce. 

Rubbings of Brasses, English and Foreign. Several Exhibitors. 

Roman, British, and Saxon Coins. 

Stone Implements. 

New Zealand, Australian, and Polynesian Arms and Implements. 

During the afternoon, some remaidcs on the recent excavations at 
Wroxeter, the ancient Uriconium, were delivered by Thomas Wright, 
Esq., F.S.A. 

The Museum was open on this day to the Members and their friends ; 
and on the two following clays admission was given to the general 
public. 

At seven p.m. a cold collation was served at the Castle Hotel, 
Richmond, when a lar^e number of the Members and their friends 
assembled under the presidency of Lord Abinger. After the usual 
loyal and complimentary toasts, the company dispersed. 



VOL. II. 



XXXIV 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 



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REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXXV 



REIGATE. 

The Seventh Annual General Meeting of the Society was held 
at Gatton Hall, Reigate. 

The company first assembled at Merstham Station, from whence they 
proceeded to the church, which was described by Alfred Heales, Esq., 
F.S.A. 

From thence to Chipstead Church, which was described by the Rev. 
P. Aubertin, the Rector ; after which the Members and their friends 
were conveyed to Gatton Church, which wa3 ably described by the Rev. 
J. C. Wynter. 

The company then proceeded to Gatton Hall, the house and grounds 
having been liberally thrown open to the Society by Sir Hugh Cairns, 
who at the time occupied this fine seat. 

The Chair was taken at two p.m. by the Hon. W. J. Monson, M.P., 
a Vice-President. 

The Chairman, after a brief address, called upon the Hon. Secretary, 
H. W. Sass, Esq., to read the Minutes of the sixth Annual General 
Meeting at Richmond, on July 5th, 1859, which were confirmed. 

The Report of the Council, the Balance Sheet for the year ending 
December 31st, 1859, and the Report of the Auditors, were then 
read : — 

Report of the Council. 

The Council have much pleasure in submitting the Financial State- 
ment of the Society for the year 1859-GO to the General Meeting, and 
trust that the state of the funds will appear satisfactory. 

The Council fully expected to have produced at this Meeting the third 
part of the Society's Journal ; but, owing to the decease of Mr. G. B. 
Webb, whose loss the Society deeply lament, some delay has been 
occasioned : they trust, however, that the Transactions will be ready for 
delivery to Members eai'ly in August. 

The Council beg to call particular attention to the Illustration Fund, 
and to point out that, OAving to the liberality of a few Members of the 
Society, & facsimile of a most interesting document will appear in Part 
III., which otherwise the funds at their disposal would not have 
allowed. 

At the death of Mr. Webb, the late Honorary Secretary, H. W. 
Sass, Esq., was requested to accept the office of Hon. Secretary, pro 
tempore, until the present Meeting, the Council being fully assured that 
this General Meeting will confirm the appointment. The Council have 
considered it beneficial to the Society's interests that the offices should 
be removed from Southampton Street to 7, St. Mildred's Court, Poultry, 
Mr. Sass having placed a room there at the Society's disposal. 

Council Room, 
7, St. Mildred's Court, Poultry, E.C., 
July 2, 1860. 

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KEPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXXV11 

Report of the Auditors for 1860. 

Your Auditors have examined the accounts of the Society from 
January 1st, 1859, to December 31st, 1859, and also up to the time of 
the decease of the late Honorary Secretary (Mr. G. B. Webb). 

They have the melancholy satisfaction of stating that the several 
accounts by the late Mr. G. B. Webb are borne out by the several 
vouchers. 

It appeal's that the sum of £390. Is. lOcl. New Three per Cent. An- 
nuities is invested equal to £380, and stands to the credit side of the 
Surrey Archaeological Society in the banker's book, which sum is duly 
invested, according to the rules of the Society. 

The Stock, consisting of the Library, Museum, and Publications, are 
set down at, we think, a moderate valuation of £125, making a total of 
£505 ; the liabilities of the past year amounting to £130. 13s. 8cl. 

Your Committee cannot conclude this very gratifying report without 
expressing their thanks to your present Honorary Secretary (Mr. Sass) 
for the very ready assistance he gave them in collecting the various 
papers and explaining the accounts. 

The increase of Members, and the growing importance of the Society, 
suggested to your auditors that a book should be procured and kept in 
such a manner that the accounts should be readily referred to, and can 
be seen at a glance without assistance. 

They also suggest that a Catalogue of the Museum and Books should 
be made, so that the Members may have an opportunity of knowing 
what they possess, and have thereby easier reference thereto. 

The expenses of the last Meeting held at Richmond have been, they 
observe, large ; but this item of expenditure must of necessity be variable, 
and subject to local circumstances, and so, they presume, influenced by 
the exertions of the Local Committee, where their meeting is held. 

(Signed) Alfeed James Hiscocks. 

The adoption of the Report of the Council was then moved, seconded, 
and carried unanimously. 

On the proposition of W. Tayler, Esq., F.S.S., seconded by J. J. 
Howard, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A., H. W. Sass, Esq., was duly elected Hon. 
Secretary, in the room of G. B. Webb, Esq., deceased. 

The Officers and Council for the ensuing year were elected. 

Several new Members were elected. 

Votes of thanks to the Patrons, President, and Officers of the Society 
for their past year's services were then passed. 

According to previous notice, the Meeting was then made Special, for 
the consideration of Rules XIII. and XVI. 

On the motion of W. H. Hart, Esq., F.S.A., duly seconded, it was 
resolved that these rules should in future stand thus : — 

Rule XIII. An Annual General Meeting shall be held in the 
month of June or July, at such times and places as the 
Council shall appoint, to receive and consider the Report of 
the Council on the state of the Society, and to elect the officers 
for the ensuing twelve months. 



:xxvm 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 



Eule XVI. The Council shall meet for the transaction of business 
connected with the management of the Society, once at least in 
every month, that is to say, on the second Thursday in each 
month, or on such other days as the Council shall from time to 
time direct. 

After a cordial vote of thanks to Sir Hugh Cairns, for allowing the 
meeting to take place at Gatton Hall ; to the Hon. W. J. Monson, for 
his efficient services in the Chair ; and to the Local Committee and 
Secretaries ; the party proceeded to Beigate Church, which was described 
by W. H. Hart, Esq., F.S.A. 

The Priory, the seat of Earl Somers, was the next point of attraction, 
and, among many interesting objects, the beautiful Oak Chimney-Piece 
from Nonsuch attracted great attention. 

The Baron's Caves, at Beigate, were then visited and described by 
John Lees, Esq. 

The Dinner took place at the White Hart Hotel, at which about 120 
members and friends were present. The Chair was taken by the Hon. 
W. J. Monson, supported by the Vicar of Eeigate, and Thomas 
Hart, Esq. 

A Conversazione was held in the evening at the Town Hall, where a 
temporary Museum of Antiquities, Eubbings, &c, was formed ; also a 
splendid collection of antique rings and jewellery, contributed by E. 
'Water ton, Esq., and the Eev. James Beak, which attracted general 
admiration. 

The following gentlemen had kindly undertaken the duties of a Local 
Committee, and the formation of the Museum was chiefly owing to their 
exertions : — 



The Eight Hon. the Lord Abinger. 
Sir Walter Eockliffe Farquhar, Bt. 
SirW. G. Hylton Jolliffe,Bt.,M.P. 
Sir Hugh Cairns, M.P. 
Colonel Sir Henry C. Eawlinson, 

K.C.B., RES. 
The Eev. P. Aubertin. 
George Baker, Esq. 
Francis Henry Beaumont, Esq. 
J. W. Butterworth, Esq., F.S.A. 
The Eev. A. Cazenove. 
T. Somers Cocks, Esq. (Treasurer 

and Trustee). 
Win, John Evelyn, Esq., F.S.A. 
J. W. Freshfield, Esq., F.K.S. 

(Trustee). 
The Eev. J. N. Harrison. 
W. II. Hart, Esq., F.S.A. 
Alfred Heales, Esq., F.S.A. 
Henry Thomas Hope, Esq. ' 



J. J. Howard, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A. 

Henry Lain son, Esq. 

John Lee:-, Esq. 

John Locke, Esq., M.P., Q.C. 

The Eev. John Manley. 

Peter Martin, Esq. 

Frederick Mellersh, Esq. 

Geo. Gibson Eichardson, Esq. 

William Eoupell, Esq., M.P. 

John Shelley, Esq. 

Andrew Sisson, Esq. 

General Smee. 

C. J. Smith, Esq. 

John Steele, Esq. 

William Street, Esq. 

J. E. D. Tyssen, Esq., F.S.A. 

William Wix, Esq. 

The Eev. J. C. Wynter. 

Thos. Hart, Esq. ) Local 

G. C. Morrison, Esq. J Hon. Sees. 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. XXXIX 

Mr. Thomas Hart was called to the Chair, and the following papers 
were read : — 

1. Notices of the Library preserved in Reigate Church. By W. H. 

Hart, Esq. 

2. On Early Bookbinding, illustrated by examples from the Reigate 

Church Library. By H. S. Richardson, Esq. 

3. On Newdigate Church and Parish, and the adjoining districts. By 

the Rev. S. M. Mayhew, Rector of Newdigate. 

Thanks were returned to the authors of these papers, and the meeting 
separated. 



LOSELEY. 

The Eighth Annual General Meeting of the Society was held at 
Loseley Park, by the kind permission of J. More Molyneux, Esq., F.S. A., 
on Tuesday, August 6th, 18G1. 

The Members and their friends assembled at St. Nicholas Church, 
Guildford, and then visited the Loseley Chapel. A description of the 
Monuments of the More family was given by W. H. Hart, Esq., F.S. A. 

From thence to the ruins of St. Catherine's Chapel, which were 
described by H. W. Sass, Esq. 

The Chair was taken at Loseley Hall, by James More Molyneux, Esq., 
F.S. A., a Vice-President, at one o'clock. 

Circumstances had delayed the holding of this Annual Meeting 
beyond the time limited by the rules of the Society ; the Chairman 
therefore commenced the proceedings by putting to the Meeting a 
resolution suspending for this occasion the operation of Rule XIII., 
which requires the Annual General Meeting to be held in June or July. 
The resolution was carried. 

The Minutes of the last Annual General and Special General Meetings, 
held at Reigate, on June 27th, 1860, were then read and confirmed. 

The following Report of the Council was read and adopted : — 

In presenting the eighth Annual Report of the Society, your Council 
congratulate the members on its continued prosperity, but would urge 
them all still to afford their aid, by inducing their friends in the county 
who have not done so to become members, and thus largely increase its 
prosperity and efficiency. 

Three years since your Council felt themselves most reluctantly com- 
pelled to remove from the list of members some gentlemen who were in 
arrear with their subscriptions ; and, although they do not intend to 
adopt the same course this year, they cannot refrain from alluding to the 
fact, as the expenditure for the collection of subscriptions is very large. 
In addition to the repeated applications of the collector, over 2,000 
letters are annually sent to persons in arrear. 

Your Council regret to have to report that sixty-three members have 
left the Society since last year ; six from death, and fifty-seven from 
resignation. This appears a lax*ge number ; but the great proportion of 



xl REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

resignations are of personal friends of the late Honorary Secretary, who 
have lost their interest in the Society at his death. The present number 
of members on the books of the Society is 555, of whom sixteen have 
joined during the present year. 

Your Council have great pleasure in submitting the Financial State- 
ment of the Society for the year ending December, 1860. The receipts 
for the year have been £223. 13s., and the payments £177. 14s. 6d., 
leaving a balance of £45. 18s. 3d. The assets of the Society, consisting 
of the balance in hand and the arrears of subscriptions, are £165. 18s. Gd., 
and the liabilities are rather under that amount ; while the property of 
the Society consists of New per Cent. Annuities, Library, Museum, and 
parts of Transactions, valued at £574. 15s. 

In the mouth of August last, your Council considered it desirable to 
assist a project formed for the establishment of Monthly Evening 
Meetings, in connection with this and the London and Middlesex 
Archaeological Societies, feeling that, although many Members resided 
too far from London to avail themselves of them, still a large number 
residing in or near London and Southwark might be able to do so. The 
result, they are happy to find, justifies their decision. From September 
to December upwards of forty members of the Surrey Society joined the 
movement, and the number has continued steadily to increase to the 
present time. 

Your Council feel it necessary to add that they have not the slightest 
wish or intention of uniting with the Middlesex Society for any other 
than the above purpose. 

The first Evening Meeting was held on the 18th of September, since 
which they have been held regularly on the evening of the third Tuesday 
in each month. At these meetings papers of great interest have been 
read both by members of the Council of the Society as well as of the 
general body. 

Eeports of these Meetings have appeared in the Gentleman'' s Magazine 
and other periodicals, and several members have joined the Society for 
the purpose of becoming members of the Evening Meetings. 

At the Preliminary Meetings of the Council, due consideration was 
given to the probable working expenses of these Meetings, and the 
yearly subscription for members was fixed at 5s. each, and arrangements 
made for the sale of Visitors' Tickets at the rate of 5s. per dozen, in 
packets of not less than six. 

On the resignation of Mr. Cox as the Hon. Secretary of the Evening 
Meetings, a Member of our Council, Mr. "W. H. Hart, F.S.A., was 
unanimously appointed Director of the Evening Meetings, and Mr. J. 
E. Price, Hon. Secretary. 

Your Council wish to draw the attention of the members to the great 
confusion which must necessarily arise from gentlemen not applying for 
tickets for dinner and conveyances at the time mentioned in the pro- 
gramme, and are compelled to state that in future no accommodation 
can be provided for those who do not apply by the stated time. More 
than half the tickets for the present Meeting have been applied for 
since the time mentioned in the Circular. 

The new part of the Transactions is now in pieparation, and your 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. xli 

Council hope before the end of October that it will be in the hands 
of the members. 

In conclusion, your Council will again urge the necessity of paying up 
all arrears of subscription, as the delay not only entails much trouble 
and expense on the Society and its officei's, but greatly fetters its 
operations. 

By order, (signed) H. W. Sass, Hon. Secretary. 

The officers for the ensuing year were elected. 

Several new members were elected. 

Thanks were voted to the officers for their past year's services. 

The following Papers were then read: — 

1. On Flint Implements found in the Drift. By J. Evans, Esq., 

F.S.A. 
(This Paper gave rise to some discussion, in which the Rev. Thomas 
Hugo, M.A., F.S.A., and Pt. A. C. Godwin-Austen, Esq., F.G.S., 
took part.) 

2. On the Loseley Manuscripts and Estate. By W. H. Hart, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

Upon the Table in the Hall several of the more populai'ly interesting 
volumes of this celebrated MS. Collection were exhibited. Some 
Curious Pedigrees of the Families of More, or Moore, were also dis- 
played on the walls. 

Thanks were voted to the authors of the Paper3 read, and to the 
Chairman for his able conduct in the Chair. 

After a brief reply from the Chairman, the Meeting adjourned. 

Luncheon was provided in the grounds by the kindness of the Presi- 
dent of the day. 

The company then proceeded to Compton Church, and from thence 
to the Almshouses and Chapel belonging to the Carpenters' Company at 
Godalming ; and to Godalming Church, a Paper on which was read by 
Alfred Heales, Esq., F.S.A. 

Dinner was provided at the Town Hall, Godalming, at which Mr. 
More Molyneux presided. About 120 members and their friends sat 
down. 



LINGFIELD. 

The Ninth Annual General Meeting of the Society was held at 
Lingfield, on Thursday, October 16th, 1862, under the presidency of 
Granville Leveson Gower, Esq. 

The members and their friends assembled at the Godstone Road 
Station, and from thence proceeded to Crowhurst Church, which, by the 
permission of the Rev. George Wheelwright, M.A., was thrown open. 

A Paper was read on Crowhurst Church and Monuments, by George 
Russell French, Esq. 

The company then proceeded, by permission of William Borrer, Esq., 
to Crowhurst Place, where a Paper was read by Charles Baily, Esq., on 



xlii REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

Ancient Timber Houses, as illustrated by Crowhurst Place and other 
Houses in the neighbourhood. 

From thence to New Place, by permission of J. Hall, Esq. 

To Sterborough Castle, by the kind permission of Mr. Tonge, the 
interesting features of which were pointed out by J. "W. Flower, Esq., 
and G. P. Corner, Esq. 

To Lingfield Church, by permission of the Pev. James Fry, M.A., 
where the monuments of the Cobhams were pointed out by J. W. 
Flower, Esq., and a Paper was read by G. P. Corner, Esq., on Ster- 
borough Castle and Lingfield Church. 

After which the company proceeded to Lingfield School, where the 
Chair was taken by Granville Leveson Gower, Esq. 

It was resolved that the operation of Rule XIII. should be suspended 
for this year. 

After an Address from the Chairman, 

The Minutes of the last Annual General Meeting, held at Loseley 
Park, on August Gth, 18G1, were read and confirmed. 

The following Report of the Council was then read : — 

In presenting the Report of the past year to the Ninth Annual 
General Meeting of the Society, the Council feel it incumbent on them 
to explain the cause of the Meeting being held so late in the year. 

They were anxious, in accordance with a wish expressed by his Grace 
the late Archbishop of Canterbury, the lamented Patron of the Society, 
to hold a Meeting at Lambeth Palace ; but, owing to his Grace's long- 
continued illness and ultimate death, the Meeting was obliged to be 
postponed, although the tickets and programmes were printed ready 
for distribution. The Council then felt that it was desirable to hold a 
Meeting previously contemplated at Lingfield. Here, however, another 
unexpected delay occurred, for they were unwilling to have a Meeting 
until the next part of the Collections, which has been recently distri- 
buted, was in the hands of the members. Owing, however, to the 
unavoidable delay of artists and engravers, the part has been delayed 
much longer than was anticipated. They confidently hope, however, 
that now it is in the hands of the members, they will consider it worthy 
of the delay. They considered that it was essential to the interest of 
the Meeting that the valuable contribution by one of their body on the 
History of the Cobhams should be in the hands of members as a guide- 
book in visiting Lingfield Church. 

Your Council lament sincerely the death of the Patron of the Society, 
His Grace the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, and hope that they shall 
be able to interest the sympathies of the Primate, so that he may occupy 
the same position in the Society so long and so worthily filled by his 
predecessor. 

They regret that they are unable to present the balance-sheet of the 
Society, owing to its not having been audited. 

On the last occasion that the Society assembled, your Council reported 
the establishment of Monthly Evening Meetings, held at the rooms of 
the Society jointly with the London and Middlesex Society. They are 
happy to be able now to report to you that the scheme is working well, 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. xliii 

and is self-supporting — the parent Society not having had in any way 
to assist in defraying the expenses. The attendance at them is on the 
increase, and although it can hardly be expected that a large number of 
Surrey members will be able to attend, they hope that for the pui'pose 
of seeing what is being done they will subscribe, and thus be enabled to 
receive copies of the Reports now in course of preparation. 

They have only to add that they have taken an unusual course in 
publishing a second part of their volume without the index, title-page, 
&c. ; but they propose to place these in a third part, which they hope 
will be in the hands of the members shortly, including the balance-sheet 
before mentioned. 

They cannot conclude without alluding to the change of Collector. 

Their late Collector having accepted a situation at the International 
Exhibition, they found it necessary to appoint Mr. Brittain instead — for 
this reason, many of the most punctual members of the Society have not 
yet paid their subscriptions. Your Council will therefore urge on all 
persons in arrear to pay at once, either to the Local Honorary Secretary, 
or at the Office of the Society. 

By order, (signed) II. "W. Sass, Hon. Secretary. 

This Report was adopted. 

The officers for the ensuing year and several new members were 
elected. 

Thanks were voted to the officers of the past year, to the gentlemen 
who had read Papers at the Meeting, and to the Chairman for his kind- 
ness in presiding. 

The Chairman returned thanks, and the Meeting adjourned. 



ST. MILDRED'S COURT, POULTRY. 

The Tenth Annual General Meeting of the Society was held at 
their Booms, St. Mildred's Court, on Wednesday, the 22nd July, 1863, 
at One p.m. for 1.30. 

J. W. Butterworth, Esq., F.S.A., in the Chair. 

The Minutes of the last Annual General Meeting, held at Lingfield, 
on October 16th, 1862, were read and confirmed. 

The Honorary Secretary read the Report of the Council : — 

In presenting their Report to the tenth Annual General Meeting of 
the Surrey Archaeological Society, the Council wish, in the first place, to 
say a few words in explanation of the course they have thought proper 
to adopt in summoning you to-day to this place, instead of following the 
practice which has been more usual — of combining the business meeting 
with one of the archaeological excui"sions. It has seemed to your 
Council that the practice of other Societies afforded a precedent which it 
would be well on this occasion to follow, and that by relieving the 
members and visitors at the County Meeting to-morrow from the dis- 
cussion of the dry details of business, more time could be devoted to the 



Xliv REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

reading of Papers, aud the examination of the various interesting objects 
which it is intended to view. 

The Council hope that the Society at lai'ge will concur with them as 
to the propriety of this alteration. 

Your Council have to announce that Mr. Sass, the Honorary Secre- 
tary, has intimated his intention of retiring from that post, the duties of 
which, from the pressure of private and professional engagements, he 
feels no longer in a position to perform with satisfaction to himself and 
to the Society. Mr. Sass, however, has kindly consented to allow his 
name to be submitted to this Meeting for re-election on the Council, 
where it is hoped that his local knowledge and acquaintance with the 
principal members of this Society will be of great advantage to his 
successor in office. In making this communication, the Council cannot 
omit to notice the zeal which Mr. Sass has shown in arranging and 
superintending the various Archaeological Meetings which have taken 
place during his connection with the Society. 

The members of such an Association as ours need scarcely be re- 
minded of the importance of the office of Honorary Secretary being 
filled by a gentleman of business-like habits, zeal, and ability, coupled 
with sufficient leisure to devote to its affairs. It is with great pleasure 
that your Council now announce that, in the absence of any candidate 
whom they could recommend for permanent appointment, one of their 
own body, Mr. Edward Vaughan Austin, has most kindly consented to 
act as Honorary Secretary for the next three months, at the expiration 
of which time it is hoped that some permanent arrangement may be 
made. 

On terminating the connection with the present Honorary Secretary, 
it becomes necessary to provide a new locality for the reception of the 
Museum and Library of the Society, and for the transaction of its 
business. Negotiations based on a liberal offer, made by auother Mem- 
ber of Council, are now on foot, which it is hoped may result in satis- 
factorily attaining this object. 

Towards the end of last year the attention of the Council was first 
called to the fact that the accounts for the last three years had not been 
audited. Immediately on ascertaining this, steps were taken to remedy 
so serious an omission, and the Council have now the satisfaction of 
laying on the table for the perusal of the members, copies of the 
balance-sheets of the last three years, up to December 31, 1862, duly 
examined with the vouchers, and signed by Mr. Richardson, your 
Auditor for the year 18G2-3, and by a member of the Financial Com- 
mittee of the Council, who, in the unavoidable absence of the other 
Auditor, was called in to assist Mr. Richardson, who has forwarded the 
following Report, containing several valuable suggestions, to which the 
Council will give their best consideration. 

Auditor's Report. 

In delivering the audited accounts for the three years ending respect- 
ively Christmas, 1860, '61, and J 62, I have to report : — 

First — That on being called upon at the commencement of the 



REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS. xlv 

present year to audit the accounts for 18G1, I proceeded to do so; but 
finding that receipts had been forwarded to the several Local Secretaries 
for the subscribers in their districts, and that no returns of such or for 
previous years had been made, and the accounts otherwise not prepared, 
I postponed the further audit, requesting the Secretary in the meantime 
to procure the necessary returns of receipts from the Local Secretaries. 

It being notified to me by the Secretary that my co-auditor would be 
unable to attend any audit until a late period in the year, I afterwards 
gladly availed myself of the kind offer of assistance made by Mr. Charles 
Spencer Perceval, whose aid, together with his knowledge of the pro- 
ceedings of the Council for some time past, I found most valuable. 

Second — On resuming the audit with Mr. Perceval in May, we found 
it necessary to examine the accounts for 1860, the year previous to that 
in which I had been appointed, and which proved not to have been 
audited. The result of the three years' audit is now before you, together 
with a Statement of Liabilities to Christmas, 1862. 

I regret to be compelled to remark upon the absence of a proper 
system in keeping the accounts — no cash-book, no book in which the 
receipts and payments of previous years have been entered for reference 
and as a standing record of receipts and payments — and would recom- 
mend that a Treasurer's book should be provided, and that the audited 
balance-sheets of the previous years should be duly entered therein. 

Third — It is my opinion that the financial operations of the Society 
would be much facilitated if, instead of the Secretary acting also as 
Treasurer, as has hitherto been the case, some Member of the Council 
were appointed Acting Treasurer, the Secretary and Collector paying 
over to him all moneys received ; and further, that no accounts be paid 
but by the Treasurer, and then only upon the authority of the Council, 
under the signature of the Chairman, all postage and petty cash expenses 
being paid quarterly, under the same authority. I would also recom- 
mend that separate receipt-books for the subscriptions be supplied to 
the Secretary, the Collector, and the Local Secretaries. 

Fourth — As to the expenses of the Society, I have no doubt that the 
experience of the past two years will lead to the adoption of some plan 
by which much of the expense of conducting the annual county 
gatherings of the members may be lessened, or altogether avoided. 
The recent alteration in the offices of the Society will also enable the 
Council to reduce the annual working expenses, hitherto much out of 
proportion to the annual receipts. 

Lastly — I feel called upon to refer to the large proportion of sub- 
scriptions in arrear. While the number of members has been reported 
as upwards of 500, the average of receipts for the past three years has 
been only from 300 members. Perhaps it will be possible in the 
Council to adopt some plan by which a more systematic collection of 
subscriptions can be made for the future, as also of the many arrears. 

(Signed) Henry S. Eichardson. 
July 21st, 1863. 



xlvi 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 



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REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. xlix 

Liabilities, as shown by accounts laid before me (but which do not appear to have been 

examined by the Council) up to Christmas, 1862 :* — 

£ s. d. 

Cowell (Anastatic Printer) 215 

Mitchener (Printer) 59 7 6 

Cox & Wyman (Printers) 150 11 6 

Crow (Carpenter) 15 6 7 

Maclure (Lithographer) 2 14 6 

Standidge (ditto) 18 

Houghton (Stationer) 1 9 4 

Esquilant (ditto) 3 11 

Rent, three-quarters of a year 18 15 

Services (Secretary), three-quarters of a year 37 10 

£298 8 5 
Assets at Christmas to meet these liabilities : — 

Balance in bank 20 9 9 

Ditto in Secretary's hands 77 11 1 

98 10 



(Signed) H. S. Richakdson. £200 7 7 



Owing principally to the neglect of the Annual Audit, it has been 
found (as, indeed, the Report just read shows) that several pecuniary- 
liabilities of considerable aggregate amount remained undischarged on 
the 31st of December last. It must be observed that some of these 
liabilities are of as long standing as 18G0, while the heaviest item, £156, 
consists of the Printer's account for the last part of the Transactions, 
1862. It is right to notice here, that in consideration of the pressing 
claims on the Society's funds, Mr. Sass has liberally proposed to forego 
his regular allowance for Clerks, &c, as from Christmas last. 

It will be within the recollection of the members, that at the General 
Meeting of the Society held at St. Olave's Grammar Schools, Southwark, 
on October 30th, 1855, a resolution was carried empowering the Council 
to sell £75 of the Stock standing in the names of the Trustees for the 
purpose of repaying the expense of publishing the first portion of the 
Society's Transactions. It was, however, subsequently considered that 
the ordinaiy income of the Society was sufficient to meet this charge, 
and the power was consequently not acted on, and is considered to have 
lapsed. The Council have now resolved to recommend that fresh powers 
be now given to them to sell a sum not exceeding .£150 out of the 
Stock (amounting to nearly £400), in order to enable them to discharge 
the expense incurred by the publication of the Transactions, which the 
ordinary income has proved insufficient to bear. 

The Council hope that if this is done they will find themselves in a 
position to issue with all speed the third and last part of the second 
volume of the Transactions, containing, besides one or two Papers of 
interest, the account of the proceedings at General Meetings up to that 
at Lingfield last year, with the balance-sheets for the last three years, 
Index, and List of Members. With regard to this List of Members, a 

* On examination, several of these items proved inexact. For the actual liabilities 
see Balance Sheet for 1863. 

VOL. II. d 



1 REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS. 

few words must be added. The Council, in investigating the affairs of 
the Society, have found much difficulty in ascertaining who are members 
and who are not. Repeated printed applications have beeD directed to 
be made to persons in arrear, inviting them either to liquidate those 
arrears, or to signify their intention of withdrawing from the Society. 
The Council regret to say that these circulars have in many cases received 
no attention ; but in stating this they must not conceal from the Society 
their serious apprehensions, that in some instances at least the circulars 
have never reached the parties to whom they were by the Council and 
the Honorary Secretary believed to have been sent. This uncertainty 
as to the number of members, and the consequent uncertainty as to the 
prospective income of the Society, must clearly embarrass the Council in 
the discharge of their duties. They therefore would beg all present 
to give a little help in this matter by mentioning the facts to such 
of their friends and neighboiirs as they may know to be or have been 
Subscribers ; begging them to look at their last receipts, and, if they 
find themselves in arrear, to pay up their arrears at once ; or, if 
they wish to withdi*aw from the Society, to intimate the same to the 
Honorary Secretary or to any Member of Council, in order that their 
names may be removed from the new List. 

The Council feel sure that nothing but inadvertence or misunder- 
standing prevents the collection of many outstanding arrears. 

In conclusion, the Council must express their conviction that much 
remains to be done for the History and Antiquity of the County of 
Surrey, and, with the hearty support of all interested in the subject, the 
Surrey Archaeological Society may reasonably be expected to contribute 
its fair share of that work. 

By order, (signed) H. W. Sass, Son. Secretary. 

The Report was adopted. 

The Officers for the ensuing year were elected — E. V. Austin, Esq., 
being appointed Honoraiy Secretary pro tempore. 

Sevei'al new Members were elected. 

It was proposed by Charles Spencer Rerceval, Esq., seconded by J. 
W. Flower, Esq., and carried, that this meeting sanctions the with- 
drawal of .£150 Stock from the invested funds of the Society for the 
purpose of meeting the present liabilities. 

Proposed by A. J. Hiscocks, Esq., seconded by Edward Richardson, 
Esq., that the thanks of the Meeting be given to the Chairman. 

The Chairman returned thanks. 

The Meeting then adjourned. 



The Council have much pleasure in subjoining (in anticipation of the 
Annual General Meeting of 1864) the Balance Sheet, &c. for the year 
ending December 31, 1863. 

Council Room, 
Danes Inn, February 4, 1864. 



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CONTRIBUTIONS AND DONATIONS. 



The Transactions of the Exeter Diocesan Architectural Society. Vols. V., VI., and 
Part 1 of Vol. VII. 4to. Plates. Presented by the Society. 

The Transactions of the Chronological Institute of London. Vol. I. Parts 2 and 4. 
8vo. 1859. Presented by the Institute. 

The Transactions of the Ossianic Society. Vols. I. to VI. 8vo. 

Presented by the Society. 

Papers read at the Royal Institute of British Architects during the Sessions 1853-4, 

1854-5, 1855-6, 1856-7, 1857-8. 4to. 
A Memoir of the Commendatore Canina and History of Alnwick Castle. Pamphlet. 
4to. Presented by the Institute. 

Reports and Papers read at the Meetings of the Architectural Societies of York, 
Lincoln, Northampton, Bedford, and Worcester, in 1856 and 1859. 8vo. 

Presented by the Northampton Society. 

Records of Buckinghamshire. Nos. 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, and Index of Vol. 1. Nos. 1, 
2, 3, 4, of Vol. II. An Index of Museum of Articles. 

Presented by the Bucks. Archieological Society. 

The Ecclesiologist, from April, 1856, to November, 1863. 

Presented by the Ecclesiological Society. 
The Transactions of the Kilkenny and South-East of Ireland Archaeological Society, 

from May, 1855, to December, 1863. Presented by the Society. 

The Geologist. Vol. I. No. 10. Presented by the Publisher. 

Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Parts 5, 6, and 7 of Vol. II. ; 

Parts 1 and 2 of Vol. III. 
The East Anglian ; or, Notes and Queries relating to Suffolk, Cambridge, and Essex, 

from October, 1858, to April, 1861. Presented by the Institute. 

Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire. Vols. IX., X., XL, 

XII., and XIII. 8vo. Presented by the Society. 

Journal of the Chester Archaeological Society. Parts 1, 3, 4, and 5. 8vo. Plates. 

Presented by the Society. 
The Cambrian Quarterly Journal for June, September, and December, 1856; for 

March, June, September, and December, 1857 ; for March, June, and December, 

1859 ; for March and September, 1860 ; for March and June, 1862. 

Presented by the Cambrian Institute. 



liv CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE 

The Archaeological Journal. 16 Vols. Svo. Presented by Mrs. Well. 

Five Numbers of the Reliquary. July and October, 1860 ; January and April, 1861 ; 
January, 1862. Presented by L. Jewitt, Esq., F.S.A. 

Archaeologia ^E liana, from 1857 to 1863. 

Presented by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 

Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society. Vols. 
VI., VII., VIII., IX., X., and XI. Presented by the Society. 

Transactions of the Essex Archaeological Society. Vol. II. Part 1. 

Presented by the Society. 

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of London. Second Series. Vol. 1. 
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Presented by the Society. 

Transactions of the North-Oxfordshire Archaeological Society. Part 1 of Vol. for 

1856; and a complete vol. for 1857-8. 
Eeports of the Society, 1856-7, 1857-8. Presented by C. Faulkner, Esq., F.S.A. 

The Journal of the Royal Dublin Society. Nos. 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25. 
Three Annual Reports of the Warwickshire Natural History and Archaeological 
Society. Presented by the Society. 

The Transactions of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society. 1 vol. 8vo. 

Presented by the Society. 
Flint Implements found in the Drift. By J. Evans, Esq. 
On Ancient British Coins. By J. Evans, Esq. 
An Account of a Gold Coin of Epaticcus. By J. Evans, Esq. 

Presented by the Author. 

Lives of Topographers and Antiquaries. By J. P. Malcolm, F.S.A. 

Presented by Mr. W. Crow. 

A Survey of the Early Geography of Western Europe as connected with the first 
Inhabitants of Britain. By Henry Lawes Long, Esq. 8vo. 

Presented by the Author. 

The Ordnance Map of Surrey. (Mounted.) Presented by William Hawlces, Esq. 

Fragmenta Sepulchralia. 1 vol. 8vo. By M. H. Bloxam, Esq. 
A Pamphlet on the Domus Inclusi. By M. H. Bloxam, Esq. 
A Pamphlet on Charnel Vaults. By M. H. Bloxam, Esq. 

Presented by the Author. 

A Chronicle of London, 1089 to 1483. Edited by the late E. Tyrrell, Esq., City 
Remembrancer. Privately printed. 1 vol. 4to. 1827. 

Presented by the Pen. R. Fell, M.A. 

An Account of the Remains of a Tile Pavement recently found at Chertsey. By 
R. Shaw, Esq., F.S.A. Presented by the Author. 

The Origin of Sunday Schools. By T. Clark, Esq. Presented by the Author. 

Some Account of the Armour and Weapons exhibited amongst the Art Treasures 
of the United Kingdom at Manchester. By J. R. Planche", Esq. 

Presented by the Author. 

A Volume of Transcripts of the Epitaphs in the French Burial-ground at Wands- 
worth. 
Two Documents, dated 1707, relating to Epsom. 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. lv 

A Report on Deeds and Documents relating to Parish Property in Wandsworth. 
A Privately Printed Pamphlet on the Lambeth Water-works. 

Presented by J. T. Knowlea, Esq. 

An Historical Sketch of the Church or Minster of Lyminge, Kent. By the Rev. 
R. C. Jenkins. Presented by the Author. 

Memoir of Henry Barlow, of Newington Butts, with a Notice of Newington Church. 

Presented by Br. Barlow. 

Chronicle of London Bridge. By an Antiquary. Presented by R. T. Kent, Esq. 

Rambles round Guildford, 1857. Presented by J. P. Pollard, Esq. 

Observations on an Advowson of a Chantry (temp. Hen. VI.). By W. S. Walford, 

F.S.A. 
Remarks, or Four Deeds and Memoir of Sir William Oldhalle, Knight. By W. S. 

Walford, F.S.A. Presented by J. J. Howard, Esq., F.S.A. 

Report on Excavations made on the Site of the Roman Castrum at Pevensey in 

1852. By C. Roach Smith, Esq. 
On the Mutilation and Destruction of Church Monuments. By C. Roach Smith, Esq. 
Biographical Notice of Lord Londesborough. By C. Roach Smith, Esq. 

Presented by the Author. 

A Handbook to Excursions round Lincoln. By the Rev. E. Trollope, F.S.A. 
Domesday Survey of the Counties of Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. By S. Henshal 
and J. Wilkinson. 4to. 1799. Presented by J. W. Floioer, Esq. 

Description of some Merovingian and other Gold Coins discovered at Crondell, in 
Hampshire, in 1828. Presented by C. Lefroy, Esq. 

Sigilla Antiqua, 1st and 2nd Series. By the Rev. G. H. Dashwood, F.S.A., of 
Stow Bardolph, Norfolk. Folio. Plates. Presented by the Author. 

Akerman's Archaeological Index. 8vo. Plates. 

Brindley's Survey of the Thames. 1770. 

The 10th and 11th vols, of the Transactions of the Pakeontographical Society. 4to. 
Plates. Presented by Dr. Roots. 

The History and Antiquities of Hinkley. 4to. Plates. 1782. 

Presented by II. L. Long, Esq. 

An Illustrated Catalogue of the Collection of Antique Silver Plate in the possession 
of Lord Londesborough. Presented by T. W. Fairholt, Esq., F.S.A. 

A Map of the County of Surrey. Presented by Miss Webb. 

A Manual of Monumental Brasses. By the Rev. H. Haines. 8vo. 

Presented by the Author. 

Memorials of the Manor and Rectory of Lemington, Somerset. By John 

Tauswell, Esq. 
History of Lambeth Church. By John Tauswell, Esq. 
History and Antiquities of Lambeth. By John Tauswell, Esq. 

Presented by the Author. 
Copy of an Inscription upon a Stone erected at Thorpe to mark the Site of the 
Roman Road. Presented by Mr. Wyatt Edgell, 

A Letter to the Inhabitants of Richmond. By the Rev. H. Dupuis. 

Presented by the Author. 



lvi CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE 

A Descriptive Catalogue of the London Tradesmen's Tokens. By H. B. H. Beaufoy, 

Esq. 8vo. 1855. 
Catalogue of the Library of the Corporation of London, and two Supplements. 

Presented by the Corporation. 
The History and Antiquities of the Parish of Bermondsey. 8vo. Plates. By G. W. 

Phillips. Presented by the Author. 

The Abbey of St. Alban. 8vo. Woodcuts. 1857. 
Report of a Public Meeting held at the Town Hall, St. Alban 's, 3rd April, 1856, for 

considering the proposed Restoration of St. Alban's Abbey. 

Presented by the Rev. H. D. Nicholson. 
History of Epsom. 8vo. Plates. Epsom, 1825. 
A Guide to the Caterham Railway. By J. Wright, Esq. Pamphlet. 8vo. 

London, 1856. 
Brayley's Graphic and Historical Illustrator. 1 vol. 4to. London, 1839. 
Battley's Antiquitates Rutupinae. 1 vol. 4to. Oxford, 1745. Plates. 
Hussey's Notes on the Churches of Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Plates. 1 vol. Svo. 

1852. 
Nuttall's Classical and Archaeological Dictionary. 1 vol. 8vo. London, 1840. 
Diary and Correspondence of Ralph Thoresby. By the Rev. Joseph Hunter, F.S.A. 

4 vols. 8vo. London, 1830. 
Sommer's Treatise on Gavelkind. 1vol. 4to. London, 1726. 
A Collection of Acts of Parliament relating to Surrey, passed in the reigns of 

George I. and II. 1 vol. Svo. 1772. 
An Account of Surrey from the Old Magna Britannica. 
Aldershot and All About it. By W. Young. Cuts. 1857. 
Stow's Survey of London. Edited by Thorns. 1 vol. Svo. 1852. 
Four Tracts relating to the Civil War : — 

1 . Relation of the Marching of the Red Trained Bands of Westminster, the 

Green Auxiliaries of London, &c, showing the Service performed by Sir 
William Waller, at Basing, Farnham, and Alton. 

2. Narration of the Great Victory of Alton, 1643. 

3. Great Fight at Kingston between the Duke of Buckingham and the Wind- 

sor Forces. 

4. Letter from Hampton Court of 600 Horse and Foot risen for the King at 

Hounslow. Small 4to. 1648. 
Evelyn's Sculptura, with Portrait and Memoir. Svo. London, 1755. 
Memoir of the Life and Times of Sir Christopher Hatton, K.G. By Sir Harris 

Nicholas. London. Svo. Portrait. 1847. 
England's Remarques, giving an exact account of the several Shires, Counties, and 

Islands in England and Wales. 12mo. London, 1678. 
Iter Surriense et Sussexiense. By Dr. Burton. Svo. London, 1752. 
Keene's Beauties of Surrey. Svo. London, 1849. 
Bibliotheca Cantiana. By J. Russell Smith. 8vo. London, 1837. 
Camden's Britannia. Edited by Gibson. Folio. Plates. London, 1695. 
Evelyn's Parallel of Architecture. 2nd Edition. Folio. Plates. London, 1707- 
Evelyn's Sylva, or Discourse on Forest Trees. 3rd Edition. Folio. London, 1679. 
Evelyn's Numismata, a Discourse of Medals, Ancient and Modern. Folio. Plates. 

London, 1697. 
Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn, F.R.S. Edited by William Bray, F.S.A. 

8vo. 4 vols. Plates, London, 1854. 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. lvii 

Evelyn's Kalendarium Hortense, or the Gardener's Almanack. 10th Edition. 12mo. 

London, 1706. 
Evelyn's State of France as it stood in the ninth year of the present Monarch, 

Louis XIV. 12mo. London, 1652. 
A Catalogue of the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen that have compounded for their 

Estates. 12mo. London, 1655. 
The Castle of Hurstmonceux and its Lords. By the Rev. E. Venables. Eeported 

from the Sussex Archaeological Society's Collections. Svo. London, 1851. 
Official Reports on the Sewers of Surrey and Kent. 8vo. 1843. 

Presented by the late O. B. Webb, Esq. 

Observations on the Remains of an Anglo-Norman Building in the Parish of St. 

Olave, Southwark. 4to. Plate. London, 1859. 
Three Sermons preached at Kingston in 1700, and a Fragment relative to a Cure of 

Leprosy, 1694-5. Presented by G. R. Comer, Esq. 

Archaeology, its Past and its Future Work. By J. Y. Simpson, M.D. Svo. 1861. 
An Introduction to the Study of Gothic Architecture. By J. H. Parker, F.S.A. 

12mo. 1861. 
Liverpool Gallery of Invention and Science. 1st Annual Report. 1861. 
Dorking (Handbook of). 1 vol. 1855. 
Charities of the County of Surrey. 1 vol. 1840. 
Croydon Directory, 1S53, 1855, 1859. 
Britannia Depicta. 1 vol. 1736. 
Memoir of Henry Butterworth, Esq. 

A Sketch of the Beauchamp Tower of London. Pamphlet. 
A List of the Acting Magistrates of the County of Surrey. 
Farnham and its Borough. By Rev. R. Milford. 
Knight's Lambeth Palace, London Bridge, the Tabard, and Ranelagh and Vauxhall. 

Pamphlets. 
A Catalogue of Rings in the possession of Lord Braybrook. 
A Paper on one of the Monuments in Lambeth Church. 

Presented by the Rev. H. Clissold. 

Tracing of a remarkable Inscription on a Stone found in taking down the Steeple of 
St. George's Church, Southwark. Presented by J. W. Papivorth, Esq. 

A Paper entitled "Cowley, and the Poets of the 17th Century." By D. Buxton. 

Presented by the Author. 

An Essay on Antique Ivories, and a Catalogue of the Fejervary Ivories in his 
Museum. Presented by J. Mayer, Esq., F.S.A. 

A Handbook to Reigate. By R. Palgrave, Esq. 

Extracts from the Early Parish Register of Warminghurst, in Sussex. 
Vice-Admiral Smyth : A Letter on a Double-faced Brass in Stone Church. 
Smith's Charities. 8vo. 1800. 



lviii CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE 



,utttuta. 

Two Coins ound near the Industrial School of St. George the Martyr, Mitcham, 
viz. : — 
A Hamburg Schilling, date 1763. 
A Tradesman's Token. W. J. Thorpe, 1667. Presented by Mr. James Spratley. 

A Collection of 10 Seals. Presented by R. Stephenson, Esq. 

Five Seals of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Three of Merton Abbey, Surrey. 

Presented by G. B. Webb, Esq. 
Articles from New Zealand : — 

A New Zealand Spear. 

A New Zealand War-club. 

A New Zealand Tomahawk. 

An Australian "Woomera or Shaft with which the Spear is thrown. 

A Cloak formed of Skin and painted. 

Fringe in Imitation of the English. 

Belt, Pouch, with Sling and Stones. 

Two Stone Celts or Axe-heads with Handle. 

Specimens of Fibre used in Manufacture. 

Specimens of " Bitter Wood." Presented by Mrs. Bowling. 

A New Zealand Spear. 

Two New Zealand War Clubs. Presented by Mrs. Richard Webb. 

A Maori or New Zealand Fish-hook. 

A Maori Ear-ring. Presented by F. Hodson, Esq. 

Impression in Wax of the Seal of the City of Rochester. 

Presented by 0. Spence, Esq. 

An Impression in Wax from a Mediaeval Seal found at Farnham. 

Presented by Albert Way, Esq. 

A Matchlock Musket taken at Cbundanpore, Nepaul, in a Skirmish between the 
Rebel Forces under Bala Rao and the British under the command of Major- 
General Sir Hope Grant. 

A Powder Flask taken at Sultanpore after an Engagement between the Forces of . 
Mahomet Hoosein, and the British under General Sir Thomas Franks. 

Presented by Francis J. Shortt, Esq., H.M. 20th Rcgt. 

An Eastern Coin found at Merstham. Presented by Sir William H. Jolliffe. 

A Curious Fossil found near Croydon. Presented by Mr. Wright. 

A Pair of Fire-dogs, and the Back-piece of a Fireplace. 

Presented by the Rev. N. Spencer. 

A Token, without date, bearing the name of Margaret Catt, of "Rigate," with a 
quartered Coat of Arms. Presented by C. R. Smith, Esq. 

An Impression in Wax of the Seal of Archbishop Laud (as Vicar-General). 

Presented by Mrs. Howley. 

Coins found in an old House at Clapham. Presented by R. Raynham, Esq. 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. llX 

A Eubbing of the Brass of Sir John d'Abernon the Younger, from Stoke dAbernon 
Church, Surrey. Presented by Charles Kadwell, Esq. 

Casts of the Seals of Edward I. and II. ; also an impression in Wax from a Gold 

Signet-ring found near Bromley. Presented by H. F. Napper, Esq. 

A Flemish Brass of a Knight and Lady of the Compton Family, from Netley Abbey. 

Presented by Rev. H. B. Greene. 
This Brass is square, measuring 194 inches. On it are represented the figure of 
the Knight and Lady kneeling on a pavement. On scrolls encircling their 
heads are portions of the 27th Psalm. The ground is diapered with pine- 
apples and roses, with legend, "So have I cause." Date of Brass circa 
1510. 



DEAWINGS AND ENGRAVINGS. 

A Drawing of a Coin of Edgar Atheling, struck at Wandsworth . 

Presented by R. Whitbourne, Esq. 
A Plan of Lambeth Palace. 
A small engraved Portrait of James I., his Queen, and Prince Henry, by Simon 

Pass. Presented by J. J. Howard, Esq. 

An Engraving — "View of Betchworth." 

An Engraving — "View of Croydon." Presented by R. Hcsketh, Esq. 

A Drawing of a Gold Fibula discovered near Guildford. 

Presented by R. Whitbourne, jun., Esq., F.S.A. 
An Engraving — "View of Southwark." 
An Engraving — " Plan of the River Mole." 

An Engraving — "Two Ancient Chairs." Presented by Mr. Rowe. 

A Proof Engraving of the Remains of the East Gate of Bermondsey Abbey, with 

Letter-press. Presented by J. J. Laing, Esq. 

An Engraving of the Ladye Chapel, St. Saviour's, Southwark. 

Presented by Mr. Cleghorn. 
An Engraving of Lambeth Church in 1670. Presented by the late G. B. Webb, Esq. 

Van De Wyngrerde's Panoramic View of London, Westminster, and Southwark as 
they appeared in 1543. Presented by Dr. Roots. 

Engraving of an Easter Sepulchre, Northwold, Norfolk. 

Presented by J. R. E>, Tyssen, Esq. 
A Map of Surrey, from the Amsterdam edition of Camden. 

Presented by the late G. B. Webb, Esq. 

Fourteen Large Pencil Drawings of the Churches in the Hundred of Godalming. 

Executed expressly for the Society. By Miss Whitbourne. 
Armorial Bookplates of Surrey Gentry, viz. John Dupre", of Putney ; Temple 

Hardy, of Eastly End House ; Randolph Greenway, of Chertsey ; Flude, of 

Mortlake ; Sumner, of Farnham. Presented by J. J. Howard, Esq. 

Three Engravings of Mural Paintings discovered in Gawsworth Church, Cheshire. 

Lithographs. Presented by the late G. R. Webb, Esq. 



lx CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



MANUSCKIPTS. 

Some Manuscripts of Dr. Stukely. Presented by J. W. Flower, Esq. 

A Certificate of Burial in Woollen, dated 1707. Presented by R. Hesheth, Esq. 

Notes of Particulars relating to Surrey in some of the volumes of the British Archaeo- 
logical Association. Presented by Thos. Wells, Esq. 

A Paper on Lambeth Church. Presented by John Tauswell, Esq. 



LITHOGRAPHS. 

Lithograph of an Easter Sepulchre. Presented by P. II. Clutterbuck, Esq. 

Lithographic Views of the Nave and of the Lady Chapel of St. Saviour's, South- 
ward By G. Hawkins. Presented by J. R. D. Tyssen, Esq. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 

A Photographic Copy of an Engraved View of one of the Arches of Old London 
Bridge. Presented by T. J. Laing, Esq. 

Two Photographs of the Ruins of TJriconium, near "Wroxeter. By Mander, of 
Birmingham. Presented by W. Hawkes, Esq. 

Photograph of a View of London Bridge in 1745. Presented by T. J. Laing, Esq. 



Sumjj llrtjntobguai £>Btuty. 



|)ainw. 

His Royal Highness 

THE DUKE OF 
CAMBRIDGE, KG. 




|3«Slb£ltt. 

His Grace 

THE DUKE OF 

BUCCLEUCH, K.G. 



0k£-|)resibtnfs. 

His Grace the ARCHBISHOP of CANTERBURY. 

The Right Hon. the EARL of LOVELACE, F.R.S., Lord Lieutenant. 

The Right Rev. the LORD BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, D.D., F.R.S. 

The Right Hon. the LORD MONSON. 

SIR JOHN A. CATHCART, Bart. 

SIR WALTER ROCKLIFFE FARQUHAR, Bart. 

SIR W. G. HYLTON JOLLIFFE, Bart., M.P. 

Lieut-General SIR GEORGE POLLOCK, G.C.B. 

Colonel SIR HENRY C. RAWLINSON, K.C.B., F.R.S. 

WILLIAM BOVILL, Esq., M.P., Q.C. 

JOHN IV ATT BRISCOE, Esq., M.P. 

GEORGE CUBITT, Esq., M.P. 

GRANVILLE LEVESON GOWER, Esq., M.P. 

JOHN LOCKE, Esq., M.P., Q.C. 

GUILDFORD ONSLOW, Esq., M.P. 

CHARLES JASPER SELWYN, Esq., Q C, M.P. 

JAMES BELL, Esq., F.R.I.B.A. 

Colonel C. BISSE CHALLONER. 

T. SOMERS COCKS, Esq. (Treasurer and Trustee). 

WILLIAM JOHN EVELYN, Esq., F.S.A. 

J. W. FRESHFIELD, Esq., F.R.S. (Tnistee). 

ROBERT GOSLING, Esq. 

THOMAS GRISSELL, Esq., F.S.A., M.R.S.L. 

JAMES MORE MOLYNEUX, Esq., F.S.A. 

EDWARD R. NORTHEY, Esq. 

GEORGE ROBERT SMITH, Esq. 



feittU. 

E, A. C. GODWIN- AUSTEN, Esq., F.G.S., Chilworth Manor, Guildford. 

EDWARD V. AUSTIN, Esq., M.R.C.S., Rotherhithe. 

EDWARD C. S. BLAKE, Esq., F.R.I.B.A., 42, Parliament-street. 

REGINALD BRAY, Esq., F.S.A., Shere, near Guildford. 

JOSHUA W. BUTTERWORTH, Esq., F.S.A., Clapham Common. 

REV. R. BURGH BYAM, M.A., Vicar of Kew and Petersham. 

REV. A. CAZENOVE, M.A., Reigate. 

REV. JOHN CHANDLER, M.A., Vicar of Witley, 

JOHN WICKHAM FLOWER, Esq., Park-hill, Croydon. 

THOMAS HART, Esq., Reigate. 

WILLIAM HENRY HART, Esq., F.S.A., Folkestone House, Streatham. 

JOSEPH JACKSON HOWARD, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A., 4, Ashburnham- 

tcrrjics G r66n wicli 
CUTHBERT W. JOHNSON, Esq., F.R.S., Waldronhyrst, Croydon. 
E. BASIL JUPP, Esq., F.S.A., Grotes-buildings, Blackheath. 
W. WARWICK KING, Esq., Queen Street, Cannon Street. 
HENRY LAWES LONG, Esq., Hampton Lodge, Farnham. 
CHARLES SP. PERCEVAL, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A., 4, Old-square, 

Lincoln's Inn. 
W. WILLMER POCOCK, Esq., B.A., F.R.I.B.A., Craven-street, Strand. 
REV. J. WELSTEAD S. POWELL, A.M., Rector of Abinger. 
HENRY S. RICHARDSON, Esq., Greenwich. 
WILLIAM STREET, Esq., Reigate. 

J. R. DANIEL TYSSEN, Esq., F.S. A., 9, Lower Rock-gardens, Brighton. 
The Ven. ARCHDEACON UTTERTON, M.A., Farnham. 

Strmattr. 

T. SOMERS COCKS, Esq., 43, Charing-cross. 
T. SOMERS COCKS, Esq. J. W. FRESHFIELD, Esq. 

fiononmr Sccrctarg. 
EDWARD V. AUSTIN, Esq., M.R.C.S. 

fianorarg ijalatograpbcr. 

WILLIAM HENRY HART, Esq., F.S.A. 

gUbifors for 1863. 
E. F. LEEKS, Esq. G. R. FRENCH, Esq. C. H. ELT, Esq. 

§ ankers. 
Messes. COCKS, BIDDULPH, & Co., 43, Charing-cross. 

^onorarii ITotal ^rachitics. 

Chertsey. M. Shdrlock, Esq. 

Croydon W. S. Mastep.man, Esq. 

Dorking Charles Hart, Esq. 

Egham George P. Heyward, Esq. 

Farnham Robert Oke Clark, Esq. 

Frimley Mr. Edward J. Lance. 

Godalming R. Whitbourn, Esq., F.S.A. 

Goildford H. F. Napper, Esq., and H. T. Sissmore, Esq. 

Kingston Frederick Gould, Esq. 

Mitcham Mr. W. R. Harwood. 

Newington Frederick J. Chester, Esq. 

Nunhead T. P. Langmead, Esq. 

Reigate ........ George Morrison, Esq. 

Richmond Rev. William Bashall, M. A., Wm. Chapman, Esq., 

and T. Meadows Clarke, Esq. 
Walworth Rev. Francis F. Statham, B. A., F.G.S. 



LIST OF MEMBEES. 



(d) Those who have been Donors to the Funds or Collections, to the amount of 
Five Pounds and upwards. 

This * denotes Life Compounders. t Fast Members of the Council. 

Abbott, Thomas, Esq., St. Leonard's, Mortlake. 

Acworth, G. Briudley, Esq., Star Hill, Rochester. 

Ade, George, Esq., 12, Manchester-square, and 48, Hi oh -street, Southcark. 

fAmslie, Philip Barrington, Esq., E.S.A., S., The Mount, Guilford. 

Aird, Charles, Esq., Gas Office, Kingston-on-Thames. 

Aitken, Jaines, Esq., Carshalton Parle. 

Alexander, W .C, Esq., 40, Lombard-street. 

Allport, Douglas, Esq., Laurochesfel, Epsom. 

f * Anderson, Eustace, Esq., St. Leonard's, Mortlake. 

Ashford, William Kerr, Esq., Petersham. 

Ashpitel, Arthur, Esq., E.S.A., E.R.LB.A., 2, Poets' Corner, Westminster. 

Aston, George, Esq., Holland-place, Clapham. 

Atkinson, Henry, Esq., Petersfield, Hants. 

Austen, Robert A. C. Godwin-, Esq., ~E.G.S.,Chilworth Ma nor, Guildford. 

Austin, E. V., Esq., M.R.C.S., Rotherhithe. 

*Buccleuce, His Grace the Duke of, K.G., E.R.S., E.L.S., Montague 

House, Whitehall, and Richmond. 
Bacon, George P., Esq., Surrey Gazette Office, High-street, Leices. 
Backhouse, Henry John, Esq., Albany House, Egham. 
*Baggallay, Richard, Esq., Treasurer to St. Thomas's Hospital,' South 

taark. 
Baily, C, Esq., 72, Gracechurch-street. 
*Barnard, Herbert, Esq., E.S.A., C9, Portland-place, and Park-gate, 

Ham Common, Richmond. 
Barton, H. Sydney, Esq., 23, Foxley-road, Kennington-road. 
Barton, John, Esq., 73, Hamilton-terrace, St. John's-wood. 
Barton, R. Carroll, Esq., 4, Walsingham-plaee, Kennington-road, Lambeth. 



lxiv LIST OF MEMBERS. 

*Bell, James, Esq., E.R.I.B.A., 1, Devonshire-place, Portland-place. 

Bennett, Rev. Henry Leigh, Thorpe-place, Chertsey. 

Best, George, Esq., Eastbury House, Guildford. 

Biggar, Douglas, Esq., Dorking. 

Blades, W., Esq., Abchurch-lane. 

*Blake, Edward C. S., Esq., E.R.I.B.A., 42, Parliament-street. 

Blenkin, William, Esq., Woodlands, Addlestone. 

Bockett, Miss Julia B., Bradney, Burghfield-bridge, Reading. 

Bolm, Henry G., Esq., Twickenham. 

Bonnor, George, Esq., 49, Pall-mall. 

Bovill, William, Esq., M.P., Q.C., Worplesdon Lodge, near Guildford. 

Bovill, Mrs., ditto. 

*Boyson, Ambrose, Esq., 28, Newington-place, Kennington. 

Brackenbury, Bev. John M., Wimbledon. 

Bradbury, John, Esq., Bedford House, Streatham. 

Brancker, Rev. Henry, Thursley, Godalming. 

Brandon, Woodthorpe, Esq., Castle House, Barnes Common. 

Bray, Reginald, Esq., P.S.A., 57, Great Russell-street, and Shere, near 

Guildford. 
*Bremner, Alexander Bramwell, Esq., Billiter-square. 
*Bridger, Edward Kynaston, Esq., 4, Princes-place, Kennington-road. 
*Briscoe, John Ivatt, Esq., M.P., 60, Eaton-place, and Fox Hills, 

Chertsey. 
Browne, Edward, Esq., Oak-Hill Lodge, Surbiton-hill. 
Budd, Edward L., Esq., Wimbledon Common. 
Burmester, Rev. Alfred, M.A., Rector of Mickleham. 
Burrell, James E., Esq., The Manor House, Frimley. 
(n) Butterworth, Joshua W., Esq., E.S.A., 7, Fleet-street, and Grove 

Lodge, Clapham Common. 
*Buxton, Charles, Esq., M.P., Fox Warren, Cobham. 
Byam, Bev. Richard Burgh, M.A., Vicar of Kew and Petersham. 

Canterbury, His Grace the Archbishop of, D.I)., E.S.A., Addington 
Parle and Lambeth Palace. 

Calthrop, Thomas Dounie, Esq., Wray Pari-, Reigate, and Whitehall- 
place. 

*Calvert, Charles W., Esq., Ockley Court, Ocldey. 

*Candy, Charles, Esq., Wellfield, Streatham. 

*Cape, Rev. Jonathan, M.A., E.R.S., E.R.A.S., Croydon. 

Capron, John Rand, Esq., Guildford. 

Carless, Thomas, Esq., Richmond. 

Carr, Alexander, Esq., 12a, Park-lane, Piccadilly. 

Carter, R., Esq., The Grove, Epsom. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. lxV 

Catbcart, Sir John, Bart. 

Cayley, C. R, Esq., York House, York Town. 

Cazalet, Rev. W., 6, Grosvenor -street. ! 

Cazenove, Rev. A., M.A., Reigate. 

Cerjat, Rev. Henry Sigismund, M.A., West llorsley Rectory. 

*Challoner, Col. C. Bisse, Portnall Park, Virginia Water, Chertsey. 

Chandler, Rev. John, M.A., Rural Dean, Vicar of Witley. 

Chapman, Mr. Edwin, 5, Whitby-place, Walworth New Town. 

Chapman, William, Esq., The Green, Richmond. 

Chatfield, Charles, Esq., Croydon. 

Chester, Frederick James, Esq., 1, Church-row, Newington Butts. 

fChester, Henry, Jun., Esq., Church-row, Newington. 

Chilton, Rev. George, Puttenham, near Guildford. 

Clark, Rev. John C, Cowley House, Chertsey. 

Clark, Thomas, Esq., Netherwood, Godalming. 

Clarke, Rev. Charles, Esher. 

Clarke, Thomas Meadows, Esq., Richmond. 

Clayton, John, Esq., Hook, by Kingston, and Lancaster-place, Strand. 

Cleghorn, Mr. John, 4, Charlton-place, Islington-green. 

Clutton, Robert, Esq., llartswood, near Reigate. 

*Cock, Edward, Esq., St. Thomas-street, South war k. 

Cocks, Reginald T., Esq., 43, Charing Cross. 

*Cocks, T. Somers, Esq., 15, Hereford-street. 

*Collambell, Charles, Esq., 15, Lambeth-terrace, Lambeth. 

Cooper, Robert, Esq., 152, Fleet-street. 

Cooper, W. Durrant, Esq., E.S.A., 81, Guilford-street, Russell-square. ■ 

Coote, H. C, Esq., P.S.A., Doctors' Commons. 

Corderoy, John, Esq., 3, Kennington-green. 

Coupland, William Newton, Esq., Upper Streatham. 

Cree, Thomas, Jun., Esq., Tulse Hill, Brixton. 

Cressingham, J., Esq., Tlie Grove, Carshalton. 

Crisp, R., Esq., The Green, Richmond. 

Crowley, Alfred, Esq., 63, High-street, Croydon. 

Cubitt, George, Esq., M.P., Dorking. 

^Curling, George, Esq., Croydon. 

Currie, Henry, Esq., West Horsley-place. 

*Curzon, Hon. Sydney Roper, Grove House, Tooting. 

Cuthell, Andrew, Esq., Clapham-park. 

Dalby, Thomas, Esq., 52, Newinglon-place, Kennington. 
Daniell, E. T., Esq., 14, Devonport-street, Hyde-park. 
Davies, W. K., Esq., 49, Pall-mall. . 
vol. ii. e 



lxvi LIST OP MEMBERS. 

Dent, "William, Esq., Streatham-hill and Toicer-street. 

*Devas, Thomas, Esq., Wimbledon. 

*Dobie, Alexander, Esq., 2, Lancaster-place, Strand. 

Dobinson, Joseph, Esq., Egham Lodge, JEgham. 

Down, James Dundas, Esq., Dorking. 

Drew, George Henry, Esq., Coulsdon and Bermondsey. 

Drew, Beriah, Esq., Bermondsey and Streatham. 

Drummond, John, Esq., E.S.A., Croydon. 

*Ellesmere, The Right Hon. the Earl of, Bridgewater House, and 

Hatchford, Cobham. 
Ede, Charles, Esq., Lostifoed House, Wonersh, Guildford. 
Eden, Thomas E., Esq., M.R.C.S., Beulah-hill, Norwood. 
Edgeworth, Charles Sneyd, Esq., Langham House, Ham Common. 
Edgington, B., Esq., Lavender-hill, Battersea, and Bridge -street, 

Southward. 
Elt, Charles Henry, Esq., 1, Noel-street, Lslington. 
Elyard, Samuel Herbert, Esq., 15, Devonshire-road, Balham. 
Evans, Jeremiah, Esq., St. John's Lodge, Clapham Rise. 
(d) *Evelyn, Wm. John, Esq., E.S.A., Wot ton Park, near Dorking. 

Faith, George, Esq., Upper Tulse Hill. 

*Farquhar, Sir Walter Rocldiffe, Bart., Polesdon Park. 

Farquhar, James, Esq., Sunnyside, Reigate. 

Faulkner, J., Jun., Esq., 62, St. Martin 's-le-Grand. 

Fell, Rev. R. Crampton, M.A., Croydon. 

Fennings, James, Esq., King's-road, Clapliam-park, and Southcark. 

Ferrey, Benjamin, Esq., F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A., 42, Inverness-terrace, Bays- 
water. 

Few, Robert, Esq., Wolsey Grange, Bsher. 

Figgins, James, Jun., Esq., Forest-hill, Sydenham. 

*Fisher, John Philip, Esq., Pebble Coombe, Walton-on-the-IIill. 

*Fisher, Samuel, Esq., Merchant Taylors' Hall, London, and Montague- 
place, Clapham-road. 

Fitzpatrick, Darnel, Esq., Surbiton. 

Fletcher, Joseph Thomas, Esq., Woking. 

Flower, John Wickham, Esq., Park-hill, Croydon. 

Forman, Mrs., Pippbrook House, Dorking. ' 

Francis, George, Esq., Kilter's Green, Abbot's Langley, Herts. 

French, G. R., Esq., 7, Powis-place, Great Ormond-street. 

*Freshfield, James William, Esq., F.R.S., 6, Devonshire-place, Portland- 
place, and Mynthurst, Reigate. 

*F idler, Francis, Esq., Kenley, near Coulsdon. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. lxvii 

Gammon, E. B., Esq., 19, Loughborough-park, Brixton, S. 

Gardiner, Rev. Henry, M.A., Catton Rectory, Fork. 

Gardner, J. H., Esq., St. John's-wood Park. 

Giberne, George, Esq., Epsom. 

Giles, Mr. J. P., Richmond. 

Gilpin, William, Esq., Treasurer of Christ's Hospital. 

Godefroy, John, Esq., Church-End House, Little Hadham, Ware, Herts. 

Godman, Joseph, Esq., Park Hatch, Godalming. 

Goldsmith, William, Esq., Norbury House, Streatham. 

(d) *Gosling, Robert, Esq., Botleys Park, Chertsey. 

Gosling, J. H., Esq., The Green, Richmond. 

Gosse, Henry, Esq., Epsom. 

*Gouger, Henry, Esq. 

Gould, Frederick, Esq., F.L.S., Kingston-upon-Thames. 

*Gower, Granville Leveson, Esq., M.P., Titsey Park, Godstone. 

Granville, Rev. Augustus K. B., The Parsonage, Hatcham. 

Gray, Thomas, Esq., 34, Fen church-street. 

Green, Daniel, Jun., Esq., 11, Finsbury -circus. 

Greenwood, T. Bryan, Esq., Horselydown-lane, Southwark. 

*Grissell, Thomas, Esq., E.S.A., M.R.S.L., Norbury Park, Mickleham, 

and Kensington Palace Gardens. 
Groombridge, Henry, Esq., Ringstead Lodge, Croydon. 
*Gurney, Henry Edmund, Esq., The Priory, Nutfield. 
Gurney, Samuel, Esq., M.P., The Culvers, Carshalton. 

*Halkett, Rev. D. S., Little Bookham Rectory, Leatherhead. 

Hall, Rev. Ambrose, Debden Rectory, near Saffron Walden, Essex. 

*Hanson, Samuel, Esq., 43, Upper Har ley -street, Cavendish-square. 

Harcourt, George, Esq., M.D., Chertsey. 

Hare, Thomas, Esq., Gosbury-hill, Kingston-upon-Thames. 

Harris, Wintour, Esq., 16, Dorset-terrace, Clapham-road. 

Harrison, Capt. E., South-bank, Surbiton, Kingston-upon-Thames. 

Hart, Charles, Esq., Wych-street, Strand. 

Hart, Thomas, Esq., Reigate. 

Hart, William Henry, Esq., F.S.A., Folkestone House, Streatham. 

Hart, William, Esq., Folkestone House, Roupell-park, Streatham. 

Hart, Mrs., Folkestone House, Roupell-park, Streatham. 

Harvvood, Mr. William R., Lower Mitcham. 

Heales, Alfred, Esq., 8, Great Carter-lane, Doctors' Commons. 

Heard, G. G. G., Esq., E.S.A., E.R.G.S., 18, Devonshire-terrace, 

Hyde-park. 
Helme, Thomas, Esq., Little Bookham, Leatherhead. 
*Hesketh, Robert, Esq., F.R.I.B.A., Earlswood Mount, Redhill. 

e2 



lxviii LIST OP MEMBERS. 

Heywood, Samuel, Esq., 30, Norfolk-street, Strand. J ' 

Hill, Rev. Thomas, 30, Little Trinity-lane. 

Hills, Edward H., Esq., Tudor Lodge, Richmond -green. 

Hingeston, Charles Hilton, Esq., 30, Wood-street, Cheapside. 

♦Hiscocks, A. J., Esq., Wandsworth. 

Hiscoke, Mr. J. G., Hill-street, Richmond. 

*Hoare, Thomas Rolls, Esq., Harlow ILouse, Kingston-upon-Thames. 

Hodgson, Rev. John George, M.A., Vicar of Croydon. 

Hollingdale, Joseph, Esq., Kingston-upon-Thames. 

Hooper, J. Kinnersley, Esq., Newlands, Tooting Common. 

*Hope, Mrs., The Deepdene, Dorking. 

Hopgood, James, Esq., Clapham Common. 

*Hopkyns, D. D., Esq., Weycliffe St. Catherine, Guildford. 

Home, Edgar, Esq., 40, Parliament-street. 

*Hotham, Rev. H, M.A., Trinity College, Cambridge. 

Howard, Joseph Jackson, Esq., LL.D., E.S.A., 4, Ashburnham-terrace, 

Greenwich. 
Howes, Rev. Charles, M.A., The Close, Norwich. 
Hudson, G. E., Esq., Burgh Heath, Epsom. 
Hudson, Robert, Esq., E.R.S., Clapham Common. 
Hughes, Thomas, Esq., Wallfield Hoiise, Reigate. 
Hull, Mrs., Westbrook Bark, Godalming. 

Impey, Erancis, Esq., 12, Bedford-row, and Brixton. 
Ingle, William, Esq., Guildford. 

Jackson, William Gray, Esq., Dockhead, Southwark. 

Jaifray, J. R., Esq., East Sheen and 28, Eaton-square. 

Jaffray, A., Esq., East Sheen and 28, Eaton-square. 

James, E. Woolford, Esq., Croom's Hill, Greenwich. 

Jarvis, Henry, Esq., 29, Trinity-square, Newington. 

fJessopp, Rev. John, M.A., Chaplain to H.M. the King'of the Belgians, 
and Morning Preacher to the Female Orphan Asylum, Lambeth, 
East-Lndia United Service Club, St. James' s-square. 

*Johnson, Cuthbert W., Esq., F.R.S., Waldronhyrst, Croydon. 

*Jollands, W., Esq., Buxshalls, Linfield, Sussex. 

Jolliffe, Sir William George Hylton, Bart., M.P., Merstham. 

Jones, R. Minshull, Esq., 191, Tooley-street. 

Jupp, E. B., Esq., E.S.A., Carpenters' Hall, London-icall, and Grote's 
Buildings, Blackheath. 

+ *Kent, Robert T., Esq., M.A., Alma Villa, Sydenham-road, Croydon. 
Kermock, Mr. Edwin, London-street, Kingston-vpon-Thames. 9 



LIST OP MEMBERS. lxix 

Kershaw, William Weyland, Esq., M.D., Kingston-upon-Thames. 
Kevan, J. J., Esq., 3, Graham Villas, Pownall-road, Dalston. 
King, William Warwick, Esq., 29, Queen-street, Cannon-street West, B.C. 
Knight, Andrew Halley, Esq., Broad Green, Croydon. 

(d) * Lovelace, the Right Hon. the Earl of, F.R.S., Lord Lieutenant 

of the County, East Horsley Bark, Bipley. 
Lainson, Henry, Esq., Heath House, Beigate. 
Lance, J. H., Esq., The Holmwood, near Dorking. 
Lashmar, Charles, Esq., M.D., F.G.S., North End, Croydon. 
Lawrence, Major-General, C.B., Clapham Bise. 
*Leaf, William, Esq., Bark Hill, Streatham. 
Leeks, E. E., Esq., E.L.S., 2, Walbrook, E.C. 
Lees, John, Esq., High-street, Beigate. 
Legg, George, Esq., 9, Church-terrace, Lee. 
Linzee, Miss, Hampton Lodge, Farnham. 
Livius, Rev. William, Mickleham. 
Locke, John, Esq., M.P., Q.C., 63, Eaton-place. 
London, The Corporation of, Guildhall. 
Long, Henry Lawes, Esq., Hampton Lodge, near Farnham. 
Lovett, Philip William, Esq., Guildford. 

Madley, Frederick, Esq., Godalming. 

Malthus, Rev. Henry, Effingham Vicarage. 

Manley, Rev. John, Merstham Bectory. 

Marter, Emmanuel, Esq., Leatherhead. 

Martin, Peter, Esq., Beigate. 

Martin, Thomas, Esq., Beigate. 

Masterman, W. S., Esq., 15, Clifford's Inn, and Wellesley-road, Croydon. 

Matheson, Archibald, Esq., Lochner Holt, by Gtiildford. 

Mathews, Miss, Burford Lodge, Dorking. 

Matthews, Rev. Richard B., M.A., E.S.A,, the Vicarage, Shalford. 

Maudslay, Henry, Esq., C.E., 4, Cheltenham-place, Lambeth. 

Maybank, Mr. John Thomas, Dorking. 

McNiven, Charles, Esq., Perry's Field, Godstone. 

Mellersh, Frederick, Esq., Beigate. 

Mitcalfe, Stephen Wright, Esq., 12, Bhilpot-lane, City. 

Mitchener, E. A., Esq., 116, Great Bussell -street, Bloomsbury. 

Moates, William, Esq., The Parade, Epsom. 

Moates, Mrs., The Barade, Epsom. 

Molyneux, James More, Esq., F.S.A., Loseley-park, Guildford. 

Molyneux, Mrs., Loseley-park, Guildford. 

Monson, The Right Hon. Lord, Gatton-park, Beigate. 



lxx LIST OF MEMBERS. 

Moon, Rev. Edward Graham, Fetcham Rectory, Leatherhead, 
Moon, Mr. James, Kingstou-upon-Thames. 
Moon, John, Esq., Reigate, and Wellington-street, Southwark. 
Moore, Henry, Esq., Burlington House, Piccadilly. 
Muggeridge, Sir Henry, Alderman, Ashurst, Dorking. 
Myatt, William, Esq., 31, Throgrnort on -street, City. 

Neaxds, Mr. John, Guildford. 

Nelson, Charles C, Esq., E.S.A., E.R.I.B.A., Honorary Secretary to the 

Royal Institute of British Architects, 30, Hyde-park Gardens. 
Nevill, William, Esq., Woodberry House, Stoke Neioington. 
*Newman, James Henry, Esq., Dorking. 
Newton, John, Esq., Montpelier-road, Peckham. 
Nicholl, Rev. J. R., M.A., Rector of Streatham. 
Northey, Edward R., Esq., Woodcote, Epsom. 

f * Oakes, Captain George W., 13, Durham-terrace, Westbourne-park. 

O'Flaherty, Rev. Theobald R., Capel Parsonage, near Dorking. 

*01dfield, Copner Erancis, Esq., Belgrave House, Wandsworth-road. 

Ommanney, Octavius, Esq., East Sheen. 

Onslow, Arthur Pooley, Esq., Lawbrook, Shere. 

*Onslow, Guildford, Esq., M.P., Upton House, Alresford, Hants. 

Osmond, Samuel, Esq., 8, Ivy-lane, Newgate-street. 

*Ouvry, Frederic, Esq., Treasurer of the Society of Antiquaries, Queen 

Anne-street, Portland-place. 
Overall, S., Esq., 102, Lower Thames-street, E.C. 

Paine, Cornelius, Jun., Esq., Surbiton-hill, Kingston-upon-Thames. 

Paine, Mrs. J. M., Farnham. 

*Paine, William Dunkley, Esq., Cockshot-hill, Reigate. 

Palgrave, Reginald, Esq., Reigate. 

Pallett, Charles, Esq., 21, Cannon-street. 

Parker, Charles Guest, Esq., Stoke Newington. 

Payne, Mr. Serjeant, High Steward of Southwark, 2G, Brunswick-square, 

and Serjeants' Dm. 
Peele, John Brandram, Esq., Sion House, Richmond-hill. 
Penfold, J. W., Esq., 2, Charlotte-row, Mansion House. 
Perceval, Charles Spencer, Esq., LL.D., E.S.A., G4, Eccleston-square, 

and 4, Old-square, Lincoln's Dm. 
Pilcher, H. D., Esq., 34, Russell-square. 

Pilcher, Jeremiah, Esq., 34, Russell-square, and Morgan-lane, Southwark. 
Pilcher, Jeremiah Giles, Esq., 3, Percy-place, Clapham-road. 
Pilcher, John Dendy, Esq., 15, Taviton-street, Gordon-square. 



LIST OP MEMBERS. lsxi 

Pittman, J. P., Esq., Surrey Herald Office, Warwick-square. 

*Plowes, J. H, Esq., Old Broad-street, City. 

*Pocock, W. Willmer, Esq., F.R.I.B.A., 35, Craven-street, Strand. 

Pollard, George, Esq., Footscray, Kent. 

Pollard, J. Prince, Esq., 51, Upper John-street, Fitzroy-square. 

*Pollock, Lieut. -Gen. Sir George, G.C.B., Clapham Common. 

*Pott, Arthur, Esq., Bridge-street, Southicark. 

*Pott, William, Esq., Bridge-street, Southicark. 

Powell, Arthur, Esq., Milton-heath, Dorking. 

Powell, Rev. J. "Welstead S., A.M., Rector of Abinger, and Rural Dean 

of South-east Stoke. 
Price, George Peters, Esq., Surbiton-hill, Kingston-upon-Thames. 
Price, Lieut.-Col. TV., Member of the Asiatic Society of Calcutta, 

Richmond. 
Pugh, Charles, Esq., Blackman-street, Southicark. 
Pugh, Thomas Bless, Esq., 12, Percy-place, Clapham-road. 

f * Randolph, Rev. J. H., M.A., F.G.S., Sanderstead Rectory, Croydon. 
Ranyard, Samuel, Esq., Kingston-upon-Thames. 
Raphael, Edward, Esq., Ditton Lodge. 

*Rawlinson, Col. Sir Henry C, K.C.B., E.R.S., Oriental Club, Hanover- 
square. 
Richardson, Edward, Esq., 7, Melbury-terrace, Blandford-square. 
Richardson, George Gibson, Esq., Redhill, Reigate. 
Richardson, Mr. Henry S., Church-street, Greenwich. 
Rickards, Edward James, Esq., Cheam. 
*Rigge, Henry, Esq., 8, St. Mary Abbot' s-terrace, Kensington. 
Ritter, John, Esq., 157, Fenchurch-street. 
Robinson, C. F., Esq., Effingham Lodge, Leatherhead. 
Rogers, Mr. Edward Dresser, 7, Wellington-street, Southicark. 
Ross, E. D., Esq., M.R.C.S., Guildford. 

Roots, Augustus, Esq., 41, Inverness-road, Porchester-terrace, Bayswater. 
fRoots, George, Esq., B.A., E.S.A., 3, Tanfield-court, Temple. 
fRoots, Sudlow, Esq., E.R.C.S., E.L.S., Canbury House, Kingston. 
Roupell, Rev. Francis P., Walton-on-the-Hill . 
*Roupell, William, Esq. 
Russel, Mrs. E. S., Streatham. 
Rymer, Samuel Lee, Esq., North End, Croydon. 

St. Leonard's, the Right Hon. the Lord, P.C., LL.D., High Steward 

of Kingston-on-Thames, Boyle Farm, Thames Ditton. 
Salwey, Colonel Henry, Runnymede Park, Egham. 



lxxii LIST OF MEMBERS. 

fSass, Henry William, Esq., Tumbrils, Woodford. 

Saunders, William Wilson, Esq., E.E.S., V.P.L.S., Reigate. 

Selwyn, Charles Jasper, Esq., Q.C., M.P., 63, Chester-square, and Pagoda 

House, Richmond. 
Senior, F. B., Esq., The Rise, Richmond. 
Shand, George Long, Esq., Pickle Herring, Southwark. 
Sharp, James, Esq., Denmark-hill, Camberioell. 
Sharp, Samuel, Esq., Chilworth, Guildford. 
Shelley, John, Esq., Linkfield Cottage, Redhill, Reigate. 
Sim, John C, Esq., 39, Old Broad-street, City. 
Simmonds, John W., Esq., 22, York-road, Lambeth. 
Simpson, Henry, Esq., 13, Wellington-street, Southwark. 
Simpson, James, Jun., Esq., Grosvenor Iron-works, Pimlico. 
Sisson, Andrew, Esq., Reigate. 
*Slade, Felix, Esq., Walcot-place, Lambeth. 
Slee, Miss Maria, 1, Parish-street, St. Joh?i's, Southwark. 
*Smallpeicc, William Haydon, Esq., Dorking. 
Smee, Major-General Walter, Oakfeld, Reigate. 
Smith, Bassett, Esq., E.S.A., F.G.S., 1, Elm-court, Temple. 
Smith, Charles Joseph, Esq., Reigate. 
Smith, Edward William, Esq., Mickleham. 
(D)*Smith, George Robert, Esq., Selsdon'Park, near Croydon. 
Smith, Henry A., Esq., Richmond Green. 

*Smith, Henry Porter, Esq., E.S.A., Sheen Blount, Upper Past Sheen. 
*Smith, Henry Wynne Seymour, Esq., Sheen Mount, Upper East Sheen. 
*Smith, John Henry, Esq., Purley Lodge, Croydon. 
Smith, J., Esq., Woodlands Park, Leatherhead. 
*Smith, John, Esq., Mickleham Hall, Dorking. 
Smith, T. S., Esq., Upton, Essex. 

Snell, Bev. W. Middleton, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. 
Snooke, William, Esq., Duke-street, Southwark. 
Spyers, Bev. Thomas, D.D., Weybridge. 
* Squire, Frederick, Esq., 1, Pall-mall East. 
Squire, Miss, 58, Gloucester-terrace, Hyde-park. 

Stapylton, Bev. William Chetwynd, Bector of Maldon-cum-Chessington. 
Stevens, Miss, Farnham. 

Stevens, Mr. J. J., Darlington Works, Southwark-bridge-road. 
Stock, Henry, Esq., Duke-street, Southicark. 
Street, William, Esq., The Retreat, Reigate. 
Sturmy, Herbert, Esq., 8, Wellington-street, Southwark. 
Sumner, Morton, Esq., Puttenham Priory, near Guildford. 



LIST OP MEMBERS. lxxiii 

-(Tayler, William, Esq., E.S.A., E.S.S., 17, Park-street, Grosvenor- 

square, and Mill-Hill Lodge, Barnes. 
*Teulon, Seymour, Esq., Tenchley Park, Limpsfield. 
Tilleard, John, Jun., Esq., Upper Tooting. 
Topliam, John, Esq., Guildford. 
Tritton, Henry, Esq., Beddington. 

*Tritton, Rev. Robert, Rural Dean of Ewell, Morden Rectory. 
Trower, Mrs., Unstead Wood, Godalming. 
Trower, Miss, Unstead Wood, Godalming. 

fTupper, Martin Earquhar, Esq., D.C.L., l?.U.S.,lAlbury, near Guildford. 
*Twemlow, Major-General, Bengal Artillery, Poyle Lodge, Guildford. 
*Tyssen, J. R. Daniel, Esq., E.S.A., 9, Lower Rock Gardens, Brighton. 

Utterton, the Ven. Archdeacon, Farnham. ■ . 

Utting, R. B., Esq., 9, Cor mc all- crescent, Camden-road. 

*Van Voorst, John, Esq., E.L.S., Paternoster -row. 
Vickers, John, Esq., Borough-Market Distillery, Southwark. 
Vulliamy, Justin T., Esq., Mickleham. 

*Winchester, the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of, D.D., E.R.S., &c, 
Farnham Castle. 

Walmcsley, W. E., Esq., 1, Circus-road, St. John's-wood. 

*Ware, George, Esq., Blackman-street, Southwark. 

Waring, Thomas Albert, Esq., 42, Parliament-street. 

Waterman, Thomas, Esq., Coventry House, Streatham. 

Webb, Mrs., Marlborotigh-road, Lee, Kent. 

Webb, Miss, Marlhorough-road, Lee, Kent. 

Webb, Colonel Robert S., Milford House, Godalming. 

Webb, William, Esq., Bentley, Hants. 

Wellborne, Charles, Esq., 12, North-terrace, Peckham-road, Camberwell. 

Westall, Edward, Esq., Caterham. 

White, George, Esq., 70, Russell-square. 

*White, George E., Esq., West Hill, Wandsworth. 

White, Mr. James, Dorking. 

White, William Henry, Esq., Bridge-street, Leatherhead. 

Widnell, J. G., Esq., East Sheen. 

Wigan, Edward, Esq., Hibernia Chambers, Southwark. 

Wilde, George, Esq., Cheam House, Carshalton. 

Williams, Richard, Esq., Woodleigh Cottage, Cold-harbour-lane, Camber- 
well, S.W. 

Williams, W. E., Esq., Times Assurance, Ludgate-hill. 

Wills, WilUam, Esq., Kingstoti-upon-Thames. 



1XX1V LIST OF MEMBERS. 

Wilson, Alfred, Esq., Fir Grove, Weybridge. 

* Wilson, Cornelius Lea, Esq., Beckenham, Kent. 
*Wilson, Edward, Esq., Walton-on-Thames. 
Wilson, James H., Esq., 19, Onslow-square, Brompton. 
*Wilson, Richard Lea, Esq., Streatham Common. 

*Wilson, Col. S., Alderman of Bridge Ward without, Beckenham, Kent. 

Wilson, Sir Thomas Maryon, Bart., Charlton House, Kent. 

Witherby, Richard, Esq., Redhill. 

Withers, Frederick, Esq., 3, Wellington-street, London-bridge. 

Wix, William, Esq., Reigate. 

Wood, John, Esq., Fairlee Villa, Neicport, Isle of Wight. 

Wood, Thomas Fowler, Esq., Cold Harbour, Bletchingly. 

Woods, Charles John, Esq., Coroner for West Surrey, Godalming. 

Woodthorpe, Edmund, Esq., F.Il.I.B.A., Old Crouch Hall, Homsey. 

Wright, G. R., Esq., F.S.A., 5, Park-villas, Lonsdale-road, Barnes. 

Wyman, Charles, Esq., Valley Lodge, Snaresbrook, Essex, N.E. 

Wynne, Rev. Charles J., M.A., Wimbledon. 

Yate, Frederick, Esq., Godalming. 

* Yates, Richard, Esq., F.S.A., Beddington. 
Yeatman, Morgan, Esq., Lichfield House, Richmond. 
Young, George Frederick, Esq., Reigate. 

Young, Thomas, Esq., The Grove, Camberwell. 



HONOKAEY MEMBEES. 



Bell, William, Esq., Phil. D., 31, Burton-street, Burton-crescent. 

Bigsby, Robert, Esq., LL.D., 1, Victoria-road, Peckham. 

Blaauw, William Henry, Esq., M.A., P.S.A., Beeclilands, Uckfield. 

Black, W. H.,Esq., F.S.A., Mill-yard, Goodman's-fields. 

Bloxam, Matthew Holbecre, Esq., Rugby. 

Bruce, Rev. J. Collingwood, LL.D., F.S.A., Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 

Cooper, C. Purton, Esq., LL.D., Q.C., F.R.S., F.S.A., Hon. M.R.S.L. 

Ellis, Sir Henry, K.H., D.C.L., F.R.S., &c, 2-1, Bedford-square. 

Fairholt, Fredebick W., Esq., F.S.A., 11, Moutpelier-square, 

Brornpton. 
Franks, Augustus W., Esq., M.A., F.S.A., British Museum. 
Graves, Rev. James, B.A., Hon. Sec. Kilkenny Arch Ecological Society. 
Griffith, W. Pettit, Esq., F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A., 16, Guildford-street. 
Hardy, Thomas Duffus, Esq., Public Record Office, Chancery-lane. 
Hawkins, Edward, Esq., F.R.S., F.S.A., British Museum. 
Hugo, Rev. Thomas, 5, Finsbury-circus. 

King, Thomas William, Esq., F.S.A., York Herald, College of Arms. 
Larking, Rev. Lambert B., M.A., Vicar of Ryarsh, Kent. 
Lower, Mark Antony, Esq., M.A., F.S.A., St. Anne's, Lewes. 
M'Dougall, Lieut.-Colonel, Royal Military College, Sandhurst. 
Maitland, Rev. S. R., D.D., F.R.S., F.S.A., Gloucester. 
Nichols, John Gough, Esq., F.S.A., 25, Eaton Place, Brighton. 
Planche, J. R., Esq., Rouge Croix Pursuivant at Arms, Hon. Sec. 

British Archaeological Association, College of Arms. 
Scharf, George, Jun., Esq., F.S.A., National Portrait Gallery, 29, Great 

George-street, Westminster. 
Scrope, G. Poulett, Esq., M.P., F.R.S., F.G.S., Castle Combe. 
Shaw, Henry, Esq., F.S.A., 37, Southampton-row, Russell-square. 
Smith, Charles Roach, Esq., F.S.A., Temple-place, Strood, Kent. 
Thoms, W. J., Esq.,F.S.A., 26, Holywell-street, Westminster. 
Timbs, John, Esq., F.S.A., 88, Sloane-street. 
Wright, Thomas, Esq., M.A., F.S.A., 14, Sydney-street, Brornpton. 
Young, Sir Charles G, D.C.L., F.S.A., Lond. and Edin., Garter 

Principal King of Arms, Heralds' College, Doctors' Commons. 



SOCIETIES IN UNION. 



1. The Sussex Archaeological Society. 

2. The Essex Archaeological Society. 

3. The Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. 

4. The Buckinghamshire Architectural and Archaeological 

Society. 

5. The Architectural Society of the Archdeaconry of 

Northampton. 

6. The Kilkenny Archaeological Society. 

7. The Ossianic Society. 

8. The Liverpool Architectural and Archaeological Society. 

9. The Ecclesiological Society. 

10. The St. Alban's Architectubal and AecHaEological Society. 

11. The Irish Archaeological and Celtic Society. 

12. The Kent Archaeological Society. 

13. The Warwickshire Archaeological Society. 

14. The Somersetshire Archaeological Society. 

15. The London and Middlesex Archaeological Society. 

16. The Cambrian Institute. 

17. The Chronological Institute of London. 

18. The Exeter Diocesan Architectural Society. 

19. The Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

20. The Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire. 

21. The Chester Archaeological Society. 

22. The Architectural Museum. 



RULES. 



-*0*- 



I. — The Society shall be called The Surrey Archaeological Society. 
II. — The objects of this Society shall be — 

1. To collect and publish the best information on the Ancient Arts 
and Monuments of the County ; including Primeval Antiquities; 
Architecture, Civil, Ecclesiastical, and Military ; Sculpture ; Paint- 
ings on Walls, "Wood, or Glass; Civil History and Antiquities, 
comprising Manors, Manorial Eights, Privileges, and Customs ; 
Heraldry and Genealogy ; Costume, Numismatics ; Ecclesiastical 
History and Endowments, and Charitable Foundations, Records, 
&c. ; and all other matters usually comprised under the head of 
Archaeology. 

2. To procure careful observation and preservation of antiquities 
discovered in the progress of works, such as Railways, Foundations 
of Buildings, &c. 

3. To encourage individuals or public bodies in making researches 
and excavations, and afford them suggestions and co-operation. 

4. To oppose and prevent, as far as may be practicable, any 
injuries with which Monuments of every description may, from time 
to time, be threatened ; and to collect accurate drawings, plans, and 
descriptions thereof. 

III. — The subjects of all communications received, together with the 
names of the authors, shall be registei'ed in a book kept for the purpose 
by the Honorary Secretary, which book shall be open to the inspection 
of the Members of the Society. 

IV. — The Society shall consist of Members and Honorary Members. 

V. — Each Member shall pay an Annual Subscription of Ten Shillings, 
to be due on the 1st of January in each year, in advance, and an Entrance 
Fee of Ten Shillings, or £5. 10s. in lieu thereof, as a composition 
for life. 

VI. — All payments to be made to the Treasurer, to the account of the 
Society, at such Banking-house in the Metropolis as the Society may 
direct ; and no cheque shall be drawn except by order of the Council ; 
and every cheque shall be signed by two Members thereof, and the 
Honorary Secretary. 



lxxviii RULES. 

VII. — The Subscriptions of Members shall entitle them to one copy 
of all publications issued by direction of the Council during their 
Membership ; and no publication shall be issued to Members whose 
Subscriptions are in arrear. 

! VIII. — Every person desirous of being admitted a Member must be 
proposed agreeably to the form annexed to these Rules ;* and this form 
must be subscribed by him and by a Member of the Society, and addressed 
to the Honorary Secretary, to be submitted to the Council, who will ballot 
for his election, — one black ball in five to exclude. 

IX. — Ladies desirous of becoming members will be expected to con- 
form to Rule VIII., so far as relates to their nomination, but will be 
admitted without ballot. 

X. — Persons eminent for their works or scientific acquirements shall 
be eligible to be associated to the Society as Honorary Members, and be 
elected at a General Meeting ; and no person shall be nominated to this 
class without the sanction of the Council. 

XI. — The Lord-Lieutenant of the County, all Members of the House 
of Peers residing in, or who are Landed Proprietors in the County ; also 
all Members of the House of Commons representing the County or its 
Boroughs ; the High Sheriff of the County for the time being, and such 
other persons as the Council may determine, shall be invited to become 
Vice-Presidents, if Members of the Society. 

XII. — The affairs of the Society shall be conducted by a Council of 
Management, to consist of a President, Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, an 
Honorary Secretary, and Twenty-four Members, eight of whom shall go 
out annually, by rotation, but be eligible for re-election. Three Mem- 
bers of the Council (exclusive of the Honorary Secretary) shall form 
a quorum. 

XIII. — An Annual General Meeting shall be held in the month of 
June or July, at such times and places as the Council shall appoint, to 
receive and consider the Report of the Council on the state of the 
Society, and to elect the Officers for the ensuing twelve months. 

XIV. — There shall be also such other General Meetings in each year 
for the reading of papers and other business, to be held at such times and 
places as the Council may direct. 

XV. — The Council may at any time call a Special General Meeting, 
and they shall at all times be bound to do so on the written requisition 
of Ten Members, specifying the nature of the business to be transacted. 
Notice of the time and place of such Meeting shall be sent to the Members 
at least fourteen days previously, mentioning the subject to be brought 
forward ; and no other subject shall be discussed at such Meeting. 

XVI. The Council shall meet for the transaction of business 

* Copies of the form may be had from the Honorary Secretary. 



RULES. Ixxix 

connected with the management of the Society once at least in every 
month ; that is to say, on the second Thursday in each month, or on 
such other days as the Council shall from time to time direct.* 

XVII. — At every Meeting of the Society, or of the Council, the reso- 
lutions of the majority present shall be binding, and at such Meetings 
the Chairman shall have a casting vote, independently of his vote as a 
Member of the Society or of the Council, as the case may be. 

XVIII. — The Council shall be empowered to appoint Local Secretaries 
in such places in the County as may appear desirable. 

XIX. — Honorary Members and Local Secretaries shall have all the 
privileges of Members except that of voting. 

XX. — The whole effects and property of the Society shall be under 
the control and management of the Council, who shall be at liberty to 
purchase books, casts, or other articles, or to exchange or dispose of 
duplicates thereof. 

XXI. — The Council shall have the power of publishing such papers 
and engravings as may be deemed worthy of being printed, together with 
a Report of the proceedings of the Society, to be issued in the form of 
an Annual Volume. 

XXII. — The composition of each Life Member, less his entrance-fee, 
and so much of the surplus of the income as the Council may direct (after 
providing for the current expenses, printing the Annual Volume, &c), 
shall be invested in Government Securities,t as the Council may deem 
most expedient ; the interest only to be available for the current dis- 
bursements ; and no portion shall be withdrawn without the sanction of 
a General Meeting. 



->• 



XXIII. — Two Members shall be annually appointed to audit the 
accounts of the Society, and to report thereon at the General Annual 
Meeting. 



'o - 



XXIV. — No religious or political discussions shall be permitted at 
Meetings of the Society, nor topics of a similar nature admitted in the 
Society's publications. 

XXV — No change shall be made in the Rules of the Society except 
at a Special General Meeting. 

* Under a resolution of the Council, these Meetings now take place on the third 
Thursday in each month. 

+ The amount invested is, at present, £323. 7s. lOd. New Three per Cent. 
Annuities. 



FORM OF APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION OF MEMBERS. 



am desirous 



of being admitted a Member of The Surrey Archaeological Society, 
and am willing to conform to the Rides of the same. 

Signed 

Address 

Dale ____^__ 

/ being a Member 

of The Surrey Archaeological Society, do hereby recommend the 
said for Election. 

Signed __ 

A ddress 

Date 

To 

The Honorary Secretary of 

The Surrey Archaeological Society. 



The Subscription is Ten Shillings annually, with an entrance fee of Ten 
Shillings, or one payment of Five Pounds Ten Shillings constitutes a Life 
Member. 

All persons desirous of joining the Society, or of advancing its objects, 
are requested to communicate with the Honorary Secretary, at No. 8, 
Danes Inn, Strand. 

Donations of Books, Drawings, Prints, and Antiquities, to the Library 
and Museum of the Society, will be thankfully received and acknoioledged. 

The Museum and Library are deposited in the Council-room, where 
/hey are always open to Members for inspection and reference. 

EDWABD V. AUSTIN, 

Hon. Secretary. 
Council Koom, 
8, Danes Inn, Strand, 
January, 1864. 



A 'orth 




Scale. — 12 ft. to the Inch. 
REMAINS OF ROMAN VILLA ON THE HEATH. WALTON ON THE HILL, SURREY. 



The dark tints indicate the recent trei.ti e Lch foundations have been removed, the lighter ones 

more remote excavations. 



nxxq €aUtttia\x&. 



i. 

POMAN PAVEMENT, ETC. UPON WALTON 

HEATH. 

By W. W. POCOCK, Esq., B.A., F.B.I.B.A. 

READ AT A GENERAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY, HELD AT LAMBETH PALACE, 

31ST OCTOBER, 1856. 



Anything relating to the Romans, those great 
masters of the ancient world, must be interesting, on 
their account, even if comparatively trivial in itself. 
Their history, like that of other nations, is too much a 
page of wars and murders, to afford any general insight 
into their every-day, in-door life and habits, the scenes 
so dear to every English heart ; and yet so deeply have 
these imperial republicans stamped their impress upon 
the whole region of mind throughout Europe, that no 
investigation seems traced to the fountain-head, that 
does not extend back at least as far as the period of the 
Caesars. 

If this absorbing interest attaches to everything 
Poman throughout the world, how much more when 
the object of our research relates to our own beloved 
isle ! We do not deny that these foreigners were the 
conquerors of our land ; we are flattered by their 

VOL. II. b 



2 ROMAN PAVEMENT, ETC. 

admission that it was " reduced to obedience only, and 
not to servitude." We rather boast the length and 
obstinacy of the struggle our hardy forefathers main- 
tained against the science and discipline of the legions ; 
for though we have but a one-sided testimony from 
contemporary history, and that, scanty at the best, 
penned by those least inclined to do justice to the subju- 
gated, we cannot but admit the superiority of the 
invaders in point of science and of art. Gladly, there- 
fore, do we hail every discovery that withdraws, however 
partially, the thick veil in which the Anglo-Boman 
period of our history is enveloped. 

It is in this spirit, that I invite attention to the 
discoveries lately made on Walton Heath, which though, 
so far as I know, some of the most considerable yet 
brought to light in the county of Surrey, have not 
produced, hitherto, anything like the splendid works of 
Bignor, in Sussex, or Woodchester and Cirencester, in 
Gloucestershire. 

Walton Heath is part of the high ground forming the 
southern rim of the chalk basin of London, and of which 
Banstead and Epsom Downs are parts adjacent. It lies 
in the crow's flight from London to Chichester, and in 
a direct line with Parley Heath, where lately, such 
numerous Eoman remains have come to light. It is 
also in the direct line from Sandwich or Bichborough, 
the BitupiaB, and head-quarters of the Boman fleet, to 
Kingston or Walton on Thames, where, it seems, Caesar 
first crossed the river, and in which vicinity, it appears, 
the Bomans built their first bridge across that stream. 
The Boman street from London to Chichester must have 
passed at no great distance, if not across, the heath ; and 
not far from here, must be the most hopeful search for 
the long-lost Noviomagus of Antoninus. 



UPON WALTON HEATH. 3 

This Roman station, which has been looked for in 
Dartford, Croydon, Guildford, and perhaps a score more 
places, is described in the " Itinerary of Antoninus," 
compiled probably in the reign of Hadrian, or about 
A.D. 120, as situated on one of the roads from London 
to Canterbury, passing, not through Rochester, but 
through Vagniacse, probably Maidstone. Ptolemy, the 
geographer of about the same date, calls it the capital 
of the Regni, who inhabited Surrey and Sussex, in which 
he is also supported by Richard the Monk of Cirencester, 
who, in the fourteenth century, professed to compile an 
itinerary of Ptoman Britain from an ancient P^oman MS., 
and is generally considered a good authority. Chiches- 
ter, probably the Regnum of Antonine, was, in the time 
of this emperor, reached from London through Win- 
chester and Clausentum, or Southampton. But at a 
later date, the road from Chichester ran by Bignor and 
Pulborough, in Sussex, to Oakwood, in Surrey ; thence 
by Ockley and Anstie Bury Camp to Dorking ; and for a 
considerable portion of this distance, it still remains 
under the name of Stane Street. Prom Dorking it ran 
towards London, through Croydon or Wallington, either 
over Mickleham Down or Walton Heath, the road across 
which, still in use, has much of a Roman aspect, and in 
so doing it probably joined the road to Maidstone at 
Noviomagus. 

There seems good reason for supposing, that the whole 
of the country from Maidstone to Salisbury, was one 
unbroken forest, almost impervious to the Roman 
legions, the densest part being about the wild of Surrey. 
This Mr. Long supposes to have been the reason for 
the road to Chichester going round by Reading and 
Winchester, the wood in that direction being less thick. 

This south-east portion of the island was the part 

b2 



4 ROMAN PAVEMENT, ETC. 

first reduced by the Romans, Claudius having been 
instigated to the invasion by Bericus, doubtless the Veric, 
son of Coniius, whose coin Mr. Tupper found on Parley 
Heath. Two powerful tribes, twenty towns, and the 
Isle of Wight were subdued at this time, and Cogidunus 
made king of at least a portion of the reduced territory, 
the seat of his kingdom being at Chichester. And it is 
probably attributable to the fact related of him by 
Tacitus, to the effect that this chief remained faithful to 
the Romans down to the age of Agricola, that we hear 
so little mention of his dominions in the history of those 
early times. 

That the Romans occupied Surrey extensively is 
evidenced by the frequency of their remains. Brayley, 
in his history, mentions no less than twenty-six distinct 
localities in which they occur, and he might have added 
many others. Of these Gatton, Wallington, Kingston, 
Chertsey, Egham, Suningdale, Send, Worplesden, 
Holrnbury Hill, Parley Heath, Anstie Bury, and Blech- 
ingley form a complete circle of which Walton Heath is 
the centre. 

In the year 1772, Mr. Barnes called the attention of 
the Society of Antiquaries to R,oman antiquities dis- 
covered on this heath, consisting of foundations, walls, 
and some portions of a flue, and a small brass figure of 
Esculapius engraved in the Archseologia. In 1808 there 
still remained a large earthwork, supposed to have been 
the Praetoriuni of a Ptoman station. At one time a 
cottage was erected on the spot by some peasant, out of 
materials found there, but after a while the parochial 
authorities, as I understand, interfered, and enforced its 
demolition. 

My attention was first directed to these vestiges of 
Roman occupation, by my friend, the Rev. Ambrose 



UPON WALTON HEATH. 5 

Hall, in a conversation arising out of the Chert sey 
meeting of this society, affording, consequently, an 
illustration of the mode in which the operations of 
such an association tend to bring into the light and to 
gather as into a focus, the fragments of information 
scattered throughout the county. Having inspected 
some tessellse, remains of pottery, and other articles, 
he had himself dug up upon the spot, and learning 
that the remaining foundations were being destroyed 
for the sake of re-using the materials in a garden wall, 
a visit was soon arranged, and a very little labour 
sufficed to uncover a considerable portion of the pave- 
ment. At the same time I measured the trenches, 
from which rough masonry, consisting chiefly of flints, 
had lately been removed. These are distinguished on 
the plan annexed by the dark colour, whilst the 
lighter tint marks excavations made at a period more 
remote. 

The walls appear to have been little more than a foot 
in thickness, and the foundation to have been laid about 
three feet below the present surface, the pavement found 
being generally a foot below the turf, which distinguishes 
this site from the thick heath and gorse of the sur- 
rounding common. The excavations made extend over 
a space not more than 40 yards square ; but a very 
slight removal of surface reveals abundant remains of 
Roman fictilia at very considerable distances around, 
especially to the eastward, affording ample scope for 
enterprising diggers. 

Of the spaces within the walls, several retained a 
large portion of their pavements, mostly executed in red 
tesserse, 1-| to 2 inches square and an inch thick, of a 
coarse material, and apparently laid without reference 
to any figure. But the only one of an ornamental 



6 ROMAN PAVEMENT, ETC. 

character yet brought to light, is in an apartment 
towards the middle of the eastern side of the space 
occupied by the remains, and about 21 feet square. 
The design, it will be seen, consists of a central circle 
containing an urn, and surrounded by four semi-circles 
and four small squares disposed at the angles, all being 
included in a larger square, formed by a wide border, of 
a bold and elegant pattern, consisting of circles and 
points, the former containing alternately a heart and a 
figure resembling the seed of the columbine. On the 
outside of this larger square is a Greek meander, then 
a band of white ; and lastly, the large red tesserae, before 
described, complete the whole. 

The central urn already alluded to had its base toward 
the east, but was so indistinct in its markings when first 
discovered, and has since been so injured by a ruthless 
hand, that I am not able to speak with precision as to 
its exact form and details. It, however, was executed 
with great care, and in it I discovered two colours, that 
I could trace in no other part of the design. One of 
these was a deep crimson, and the other a purple or violet. 
This urn was surrounded by a circular border, consisting 
of a guilloche in three colours and two bands executed 
in two colours. This circle was enclosed in a square, 
formed by a double twisted guilloche, of not unfrequent 
occurrence at Cirencester, Woodchester, Prampton (in 
Dorsetshire), Alborough (in Yorkshire), and elsewhere. 
One of the angular spandrils was filled by a heart-shaped 
ornament, and I believe the others to have been similarly 
occupied. 

Each side of this inner square is flanked by a semi- 
circle of equal diameter, already alluded to, and formed 
by a border of a triple plat and bands, and within this 
the guilloche and bands first described, and which is 



UPON WALTON HEATH. 7 

continued across the cord as well as round the circum- 
ference of the circle. 

The interiors of these semi-circles are filled up with 
series of smaller semi- circles, and each of the centres is 
occupied by a flower of three petals. 

The angles of the general design are occupied by the 
four smaller squares, formed of the same guilloche, 
containing an effective and not uncommon border in two 
colours, the centre being filled by a double endless 
knot. 

By far the greater part of the cubes employed in this 
floor, were only sun-dried clay of a fine texture. Some 
were cubes of chalk, and the rest pieces of broken 
Samian ware, upon many of which the portions of 
figures or ornaments of various kinds occur on the 
under side. 

With the exception of a few found in the urn, the 
sun-dried tesselke were of two different colours, one at 
least having been tinted with some colouring admixture ; 
and it is probable that the firing was omitted with a 
view of obviating the red colour that would otherwise 
have been imparted to the clay. The general size of 
the tessellse is half an inch every way. 

In the absence of representations of living forms, and 
in paucity of colours, this pavement is inferior to many 
that have been found in various parts of the country ; 
but in beauty of outline, severity of taste, and boldness 
of handling, it is equal to any I am acquainted with. 
In general outline it greatly resembles one found in 
Dyer Street, Cirencester, some eight years back; the 
whole of the interior of which consists of a circle and 
parts of circles within a square framework. But the 
introduction of the central and corner squares, in the 
Walton design, give it such an admixture of straight lines 



8 ROMAN PAVEMENT, ETC. 

and curves, as produces a force and character that the 
Dyer Street pavement does not possess. The variety of 
proportion and character in the several bands gives it a 
boldness that leaves nothing to be desired upon that 
score. It is to be regretted that it was executed in so 
perishable a material that removing or preserving it un- 
covered, is quite out of the question ; and the great wonder 
is, that it has remained so long in so perfect a state, for, 
though I and my friends uncovered the larger half, we 
found but few defects in the design. It must, one 
would think, have been well saturated with oil when 
first covered up. 

I am not about to drag you through the vexata 
qiKZstio of a Roman house, with its cubicula, atria, peri- 
sty Ma, tablina, and oeci ; nor to discuss how far any or all 
of these are synonymous terms. But, in order to 
understand our subject, it is necessary to have a general 
idea of what a Homan house was. 

Those who have examined the Pompeian court at the 
Crystal Palace, will probably have obtained a sufficiently 
correct idea of a Homan town residence on a small 
scale. They will observe that the rooms are all on the 
ground-floor, and nearly level with the entrance. Indeed, 
if any rooms were upstairs, they were only store-rooms, 
or the apartments of the females, and occasionally the 
sleeping-apartments for the family. The state-rooms 
and rooms of entertainment were always (or nearly 
always) on the ground-floor, and in the city or town 
these were disposed around courts more or less open to 
the sky, and received their light and air from these 
courts, — a sufficient reason this for avoiding, as far as 
possible, the piling of one story upon another. And, 
forsooth, though in the imperial ages their public works 
and larger buildings were constructed with amazing 



UPON WALTON HEATII. 9 

solidity, yet in earlier times, and in private dwellings, 
the Romans were evidently not a whit better than the 
speculating builders of our own day ; for, low as their 
structures were, we hear frequently of their falling 
with a tremendous crash — another sufficient reason for 
preferring a habitation on terra fir ma „ to a five or six- 
storied house. 

A residence of any pretensions would have at least 
two such courts surrounded by colonnades, which 
afforded access to the various apartments. These would 
consist of dining-rooms, parlours or rooms for conver- 
sation, picture-galleries, libraries not necessarily very 
spacious, and probably one or more saloons or apart- 
ments which retained the original Greek name of the 
house, as the principal room of our farmers' homes still 
does in Yorkshire and other parts of the country. 
Besides these, there would be sleeping-apartments, on a 
small scale according to our notions, baths on a much 
larger scale, and domestic apartments ; and perhaps 
nothing is more calculated to excite our surprise, than 
the limited scale upon which the culinary department is 
usually designed. 

If to these we add the trade department, or stores for 
farm produce, if the proprietor be a land-owner, and 
perhaps a garden with fountains and sculpture, accom- 
modation for horses, and, in mansions, a basilica or 
theatre, and a temple mayhap, we have a pretty com- 
plete idea of a house in Rome. And as Rome was the 
empire, so everything at Rome was the model, and a 
similar arrangement would be observed in their country 
as in their town houses, except that, more space being 
procurable, many of the apartments would be lighted 
from the outside rather than the interior of the house, 
and more abundant provision would be made for farm 



10 HOMAN PAVEMENT, ETC. 

produce and farm servants ; for it seems to have been a 
principle always adopted that the whole of a man's 
establishment should be collected under his own roof, 
probably with a view to ostentation as well as security. 
We consequently find the patricians, in their houses 
at Rome, making ample provision for the entertain- 
ment of their clients and slaves, as well as the storing 
and offering for sale of the various products of their 
estates. 

These pavements, I may be allowed to remark for the 
sake of the uninitiated, were formed in two or three 
different ways. Pliny says they had their origin among 
the Greeks, who, he intimates, were in the habit of 
covering their flat-roofed houses with them. In such a 
position they were formed on concrete supported by 
planking and timbers, a construction for which Vitru- 
vius, the only ancient writer on architecture extant, 
gives minute directions. Pliny also informs us that 
they were first introduced among the Romans by Sylla, 
who used them in a temple he erected to Fortuna at 
Prceneste, and intimates that thev afforded the hint for a 
large portion of the mural and other decorations that 
subsequently came into vogue. With this agrees suffi- 
ciently what Vitruvius remarks, that the pavements in 
his day formed the most important part of the internal 
embellishment. 

When employed as a flooring to the rooms on the 
ground-floor, they were constructed on one of two 
principles, the one being on the solid ground, and the 
other on a substructure by which they were raised two 
or three feet, the earth being previously excavated to 
the required depth. In the former case the ground was 
rammed till it became perfectly solid, and any defects 
found made good ; and not unfrequently the whole space 



UPON WALTON HEATH. 11 

was covered with a foundation of concrete, but in any 
event a layer of pounded brick or mortar was placed to 
receive the tesselke. When the pavement was kept 
hollow from the ground, it was so formed for the 
purpose of passing fire or heated air under it. The 
excavation was then roughly paved, and piers, either of 
brick, stone, or hollow tubes, were erected at short 
intervals over the whole space. These were capped with 
larger bricks or tiles, and the whole covered with tiles 
laid close together to receive the concrete, first coarse 
and then fine, upon which the tessellse were to be laid. 
In either case the interstices of the tessellse were filled 
with cement and, if requisite, the surface rendered 
smooth by rubbing. 

The hollow pavement here described is called a 
siispensiira, though frequently, with less accuracy, a 
hypocaust, which is properly the furnace, or the system 
of flues by which the fire or heated air is brought from 
the furnace to beneath the floor. 

The pavement at Walton, to which I am now directing 
attention, was formed on the solid ground, with but a 
slight foundation of pounded brick under it, and as it 
was usual to form the floors of their principal rooms 
hollow, for the purposes of warming, that being the only 
or the principal method adopted of securing that end, we 
must conclude either that this was not a principal 
apartment, or that the building was not of a very 
important character. I adopted the former of these 
alternatives for the following reasons. 

Closely adjoining to the apartment in which this 
pavement occurs, may be seen a large excavation 
abounding in remains of tiles and bricks, many of which 
have been subjected to the action of smoke. This exca- 
vation is just such an one as would result from the 



12 ROMAN PAVEMENT, ETC. 

pulling up of the foundations of a suspensura and hypo- 
caust, and upon no other supposition can we account for 
the remains still going so deep into the ground. But 
not only so. Though we do not find any of them in 
their original position, yet there are abundant remains 
of the tiles which, wherever discovered, are used for the 
foundation of these hollow floors, and of the square flue 
tiles, and I believe I may add of the circular ones also, 
all of which are peculiar to these purposes. 

I have, therefore, no hesitation in saying that the pit, 
measuring fifty or sixty feet long by twenty-five feet 
wide, was once covered by apartments of a character 
superior to the one the pavement of which I have just 
described, though that, from its size and the beauty of 
the pavement, could have been a room of no mean 
character. That it was a covered apartment, and not a 
cavsedium or atrium (open courts), is certain; for a 
single winter, if not the first storm, would have effec- 
tually destroyed the sun-dried tesselhe; nor, for the 
same or similar reasons, could it have been any part of 
the baths. And yet even in the remains of the palatial 
residence at Bignor, there is no room analogous to this ; 
they are either smaller, or coarsely paved, or have 
hollow floors ; that is, they are either inferior, or of an 
altogether superior class. It cannot have been a sum- 
mer apartment, to which in Italy they would not have 
put a suspensura, for it has a wrong aspect, unless it 
was lighted from the east, which I think impossible; and 
it is too near the place of the destroyed suspensura to 
imagine the builders would have hesitated in introducing 
a hollow floor, if they had considered it necessary. 

We therefore seem shut up to the conclusion that this 
was an apartment of a secondary character ; a tablinum 
or entrance-hall, as I believe, and consequently that the 



UPON WALTON HEATH. 13 

best parts were on a large scale, and elaborate in style, 
and that what we have already discovered is but a small 
portion of a large establishment that once existed on 
this spot, and of which probably considerable remains 
still exist. Several of the apartments, adjoining that in 
which this pavement exists, are still pretty perfectly 
paved with the larger tesselhe, and at a distance of 
considerably more, I suppose, than a hundred yards, 
masonry and large paving tiles, 14 inches long by 10 
inches wide, have been discovered in situ, and consider- 
able quantities of lead in the interstices, evidently 
molten and running down amongst the masonry drop 
by drop, leading to the supposition that the building had 
been destroved bv fire. 

The remains discovered consist, in addition to the 
masonry and pavement, of pottery, exhibiting in some 
cases the potters' names; fragments of lead, iron, and glass, 
flue and other tiles, and a coin of the reign of Vespasian. 
Specimens of most of these I have been able to add to 
the collection of the Association. I may remark in 
conclusion that the tiles of various kinds exactly 
accord with those found in other localities, not only in 
their general features, but even in the minutiae which 
appear at first sight accidents of manufacture. 



N.B. — With exception of the points noticed in the text, full authority 
existed for the restoration of the whole pavement. 



14i ANCIENT BRITISH COINS 



II. 

ANCIENT BRITISH COINS FOUND IN 

SURREY. 

By RICHARD WHITBOURN, Esq., F.S.A., Honorary Local Secretary 

FOR GODALMING. 
IN A LETTER ADDRESSED TO HENRY LAWES LONG, ESQ. 



Godalming, 1st July, 1859. 

Dear Sir, — In accordance with your kind request, I 
forward herewith drawings of some ancient British coins 
found in Surrey, and on which, together with those 
published in the first volume of the Collections, and 
some discovered by Albert Way, Esq., E.S.A., I beg to 
submit a few brief observations. 

The question of the circulation of stamped money in 
Britain previous to the invasion by Julius Caesar, B.C. 
55, is, and probably will remain, open for discussion. 
Mr. Hawkins, in his work on the English coinage, p. 8, 
states as follows : — " There is in the British Museum a 
beautiful MS. of Caesar, of about the tenth century, 
which reads thus : ' Utuntur aut sere aut nummo aureo 
aut annulis ferreis ad certum pondus examinatis pro 
nummo.' They use either brass money or gold money, 
or, instead of money, iron rings adjusted to a certain 
weight." In later translations of Caesar, the assertion is 
positive that the British did not use stamped money. 

Erom the types of the most early coins of the series 
being evident copies of the stater of Philip of Macedon, 









3 

D 



P 
'A 
D 
O 

ft 



3 
O 



pa 

H 
z 

w 

O 

Z 
<1 



FOUND IN SURREY. 15 

I think the probability is, that a coinage of gold, silver, 
and brass was in circulation before the first Roman 
invasion. For specimens of these, see No. 10 and 11, 
p. 70, vol. i. " Surrey Archaeological Collections," found 
respectively at Leatherhead and Godalniing. 

The next types in point of date, I think, are those 
stamped on one side only with the crude representation of 
a horse, see No. 9, in the plate above referred to. Speci- 
mens of this type are probably the most common of any of 
the series of ancient British coins. One was, some time 
since, found at Farnhani Castle, and another (a remark- 
ably fine one) at Lambeth — both in Surrey. 

Farley Heath is particularly rich in these most in- 
teresting relics, and the best thanks of every lover of 
antiquity are due to M. F. Tupper, Esq., for his most 
interesting little work on them, although more recent 
discoveries have shown that he was mistaken as to 
" Mepati." Vericus was an undoubted son of Comius, 
as was also Epaticcus of Tascionanus, thus giving to two 
princes who held dominion in Surrey their proper places 
in the pages of the history of our island. 

The coins of Vericus, found in Surrey, are Nos. 1, 2, 
and 3, in the accompanying drawing; No. 4 is from 
Sussex. The coins of Epaticcus are only known to have 
been discovered in the immediate neighbourhood of 
Farley Heath. 

It is a remarkable circumstance that British and 
Roman coins are rarely found together, although there 
can be no doubt they had concurrent circulation. From 
the number of types of British coins, the amount of 
money in use, of this class, must have been very great, 
and may probably be, in some degree, accounted for in 
this manner : — Roman money was used by the soldiers 
and civilians of the Roman empire resident in Britain, 



16 ANCIENT BRITISH COINS 

and the British stamped money for circulation among 
the native inhabitants. The Romans, to enslave and 
subdue the natives, appointed petty kings, for whom 
they (the Romans) coined money, some of much finer 
work than those struck by native artists. 

Near Parley Heath, about ten years since, several 
gold coins were found, four of which are figured at 
p. 70, vol. i. " Surrey Archaeological Collections," being 
Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, on plate. They are of fine work, differ- 
ing from each other in minute particulars, yet according 
in weight and quality. 

The coins of Epaticcus, Nos. 5 and 6 in the accom- 
panying engraving, are of exquisite workmanship and 
finish, quite equal to the Roman coins of the same 
period. 

Some very interesting and rare specimens have, within 
the last few years, been discovered in the neighbourhood 
of Reigate. The most so are two in gold ; one similar 
to Ruding, plate 1, No. 7 ; the other, unpublished, 
weighing 83 grains, one side convex and plain ; on the 
other side, which is in remarkable preservation, appears 
the horse galloping to the left, with certain symbols in 
the field. This coin is singular in two respects — as 
having so well-formed a horse in conjunction with a 
plain or nearly plain obverse, and in having above the 
horse a clenched hand, apparently holding a branch. A 
hand below the horse is not uncommon in Gaulish 
coins. 

The class of gold coins to which this piece belongs 
was current both in Gaul and Britain. I am indebted 
to Mr. Way, by whom these two coins were obtained 
from the finders, for the notice of and information 
respecting them. 

The numismatic world is greatly indebted to John 



FOUND IN SURREY. 17 

Evans, Esq., E.S.A., for his able and persevering re- 
searches in this branch of its study. He found the 
Ancient British Series a disjointed, neglected chaos ; by 
his labour and intelligence he has reduced it almost into 
chronological order from the period of Tasciovanus and 
Comius. 

I am, dear Sir, 

Yours very truly, 

R. Whitbourn. 

To Henry Lawes Long, Esq. 



VOL. II. C 



18 ELIAS ASHMOLE, HIS HOUSE AND 



III. 

ELIAS ASHMOLE, HIS HOUSE AND LANDS 
AT SOUTH LAMBETH. 

In a LETTER from G. R. CORNER, Esq., F.S.A., to JOSHUA | 
W. BUTTERWORTH, Esa., F.SA. 

READ AT THE GENERAL MEETING HELD AT LAMBETH PALACE, 31ST OCTOBER, 1856. 



Dear Sir, — I send you for inspection at the meeting 
of the Surrey Archaeological Society, which His Grace 
the Archbishop of Canterbury has been so good as to 
permit us to hold at his palace of Lambeth, three deeds 
executed by Elias Ashmole, the celebrated antiquary and 
natural philosopher, the first of which is a conveyance 
from Robert Siderfin, of the Middle Temple, gentleman, 
brother and heir of Thomas Siderfin, late of the Middle 
Temple, esquire (the author of Siderfin' s Reports), to 
John Dugdale, of Coventry, esquire (son of Sir William 
Dugdale, and brother of Ashmole's wife), of a moiety 
of a house, garden, and orchard, at South Lambeth, in 
trust for Ashmole, and such person or persons as he 
should appoint by deed or will; and the others are a 
lease and release, being a settlement made by Ashmole 
of the entirety of the same house, garden, and orchard, 
with other lands at South Lambeth, on his third wife, 
Elizabeth (daughter of Sir William Dugdale). 

The first deed is dated 14th July, 31th Charles II., 
1682 : and it appears from that deed that Ashmole 
had obtained a term of 500 years in a moiety of the 




STAIRCASE IN TRADESCANT'S HOUSE. 



LANDS AT SOUTH LAMBETH. 19 

house, garden, and orchard, by assignment from Rebecca 
Blackamore, of London, widow, dated the 26th of 
September, 1681 ; and that the freehold reversion which 
was vested in Henry Wickham, of Ipswich, Clerk, had 
been conveyed by him to Thomas Siderfin, a trustee 
nominated by Ashmole ; which trust by the deed before 
us was transferred to John Dugdale. This deed is exe- 
cuted by Robert Siderfin and Elias Ashmole, and duly 
attested ; but the seals are broken, and they consist 
merely of lumps of wax covered with paper and showing 
no impression. , 

The lease and release are dated 25th and 26th June, 
2nd James II., a.l>. 1686 ; and the release is made 
between Elias Ashmole, of South Lambeth, Esquire, of 
the one part, and Sir John Dugdale, of the City of 
Coventry, Knt., and "William Thursby, of the Middle 
Temple, Esquire, of the other part ; and thereby the 
said Elias Ashmole conveyed to Sir John Dugdale and 
Thursby, "All that messuage or tenement, together with 
a parcel of land or orchard thereto belonging, containing 
by estimation one acre, and a close or parcel of land 
with a barn or stable thereon, called ' Smith's Close,' 
containing by estimation two acres and a half; and a 
close called ' Eorty-pence,' containing by estimation one 
acre, and another piece of land containing by estimation 
four acres, lying in South Lambeth field, and a close 
containing by estimation two acres and a half, called 
f Part of the Eive Acres,' and another close called 
* Thorpe Close,' containing by estimation nine acres ; all 
lying within the liberties, precincts, or territories of 
South Lambeth, alias ' Lambe-hithe,' in the county of 
Surrey ; and then or late were in the tenure or occu- 
pation of Richard Nightingall, his under-tenants or 
assigns : To hold the same to Sir John Dugdale and 

c 2 



20 ELIAS ASHMOLE, HIS HOUSE AND 

Thursby, their heirs and assigns, To the use of Elias 
Ashmole for his life ; and after his decease, To the use 
of Elizabeth, his wife, for her life, in part of her jointure; 
and after her decease, To the use of the said Elias 
Ashmole, his heirs and assigns, for ever." 

The lease and release are both executed by Ashmole, 
and duly attested, and the seals are attached ; but they, 
like those of the other deed, being mere lumps of wax 
covered with thin paper, show no impression. 




undy 



It is well known that Ashmole became the possessor 
of the museum of natural history formed by the Trades- 
cants at South Lambeth, 1 of which acquisition I find the 
following account in the memoir of Ashmole, in the 
" Eiographia Britannica:" — "He had lodged and boarded 
sometimes at a house in South Lambeth, kept by Mr. 
John Tradescant, whose father and himself had been 
physic gardeners there for many years, and had collected 
a vast number of curiosities, which, after mature delibe- 
ration, Mr. Tradescant and his wife determined to 
bestow on Mr. Ashmole, and accordingly sealed and 
delivered a deed of gift for that purpose on the 16th of 
December, 1659." 

This collection of the Tradescants was the foundation 
of the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford, which was pre- 

1 Ashmole wrote and published a catalogue of this collection, under 
the title of " Musaeum Tradescantianuni ; or, a Collection of Rarities 
preserved at South Lambeth, neer London, by John Tradescant. 
London : Printed by John Grismond, and are to be sold by Nathaniel 
Brooke, at the Angel, in Cornhill. mdclvi." 



LANDS AT SOUTH LAMBETH. 21 

sented by Ashmole to the university in 1682 ; but it 
does not appear that the house and land comprised in 
the deeds before us had ever belonged to the Tradescants, 
whose name is not mentioned in any of the deeds in my 
possession, even as occupiers ; but it does appear that 
by an indenture dated the 4th of May, 2nd James II., 
1686, and by a fine levied in pursuance thereof, John 
Plumer, of Gray's Inn, Gentleman, and Mary, his wife, 
in consideration of £600, conveyed to Elias Ashmole the 
house, orchard, and land, which he afterwards settled on 
Mrs. Ashmole ; and which are therein stated to have 
belonged theretofore to John Hartwell, son and heir of 
Abraham Hartwell, and to have been devised or conveyed 
by the said John Hartwell to John Plumer, Gentleman, 
father of the said John Plumer, of Gray's Inn. 

Anthony Wood says that "after Mr. Ashmole's death, 
his widow, Elizabeth, who seemed to have a great love 
and fondness for her husband (which was sometimes 
before company expressed), married a lusty man, called 
* Reynolds,' a stone-cutter, but had no issue by him." 
In a settlement, however, made after the marriage of 
Mrs. Ashmole with Mr. Reynolds, dated 19th April, 
1695, he is described as a merchant, and that settlement 
comprises " All that messuage, or mansion-house, with 
the gardens, orchards, and courts, situate at South 
Lambeth, and late in the tenure or occupation of the 
said Elias Ashmole." This property, after the death of 
Elizabeth Dugdale (in April, 1701), became the property 
of her husband, Mr. Reynolds, and was by him settled 
on his subsequent marriage with Mildred Prowde, of 
Stepney, Widow, by deed dated 16th September, 1st 
Anne, 1702. 

Ashmole's house was not the same that had been 
Tradescant's, but it appears from his diary, that twelve 



22 ELIAS ASHMOLE, HIS HOUSE AND 

years after the death of John Tradescant, viz. in 1674, 
Ashmole purchased or rented a house at South Lambeth, 
adjoining to that in which Mrs. Tradescant, the widow, 
resided ; and after her death in 1678, he obtained a 
lease of her house in addition to his own. 

Ashmole' s house has been much altered and modern- 
ized, but the staircase and some of the rooms are 
probably much as he left them. It is now called Turret 
House, and is situate on the south-east side of the South 
Lambeth Road from Vauxhall to Stockwell, near to 
Stockwell Green, and is now the residence of John 
Mills Thorne, Esq. 2 

I annex some extracts from Ashmole' s diary, which I 
have collected together as relating, more or less, to his 
house and property at South Lambeth, and his connection 
with the Tradescants, and which on that account may not 
be considered out of place here, although they are from a 
printed and published work. 

I remain, dear Sir, 

Yours very sincerely, 

George R. Corner. 

3, Paragon, New Kent Road, 
24:th September, 1856. 



2 When Tradescant's collection came into Ashmole's possession, he 
built a noble room to contain it, and adorned the chimney with his 
arms, impaling those of Sir William Dugdale, father of his third wife. 
There are no remains of this room, nor of the coat of arms ; but from a 
woodcut of the south side of the house, there appears to have been a 
shield over one of the windows on that side. Dr. Ducarel resided in 
the adjoining house, which had been Tradescant's. See his "Letter to 
Dr. Watson on the Early Cultivation of Botany in England. London : 
1773." 



LANDS AT SOUTH LAMBETH. 23 

Extracts from the Diary of Ellas Ashmole, relating to 
the Tradescants, and to his residence and property at 
South Lambeth. 

1650. June 10th. Myself, my wife, and Dr. Wharton went to visit 
Mr. John Tradescant, at South Lambeth. 

1652. I and my wife tabled this summer at Mr. Tradescant' s. 
Augt. 2nd. I went to Maidstone Assizes to hear the witches tried, 

and took Mr. Tradescant with me. 

Sept. 11th. Young John Tradescant died. 

15th. He was buried in Lambeth churchyard by his grandfather. 

October 20th. My wife went again to Mr. Tradescant's to stay some 
time there. 

1653. January 17. My wife left Mr. Tradescant's, and came to 
Mr. Flint's. 

1659. December 12. Mr. Tradescant and his wife told me they had 
been long considering upon whom to bestow their closet of curiosities 
when they died, and at last had resolved to give it unto me. 

14th. This afternoon they gave their scrivener instructions to draw 
a deed of gift of the said closet to me. 

16th. 5 hor. 30 min. post merid. Mr. Tradescant and his wife sealed 
and delivered to me a deed of gift of all bis rarities. 

1662. April 22. Mr. John Tradescant died. 

This Easter Term I preferred a Bill in Chancery against Mrs. Trades- 
cant for the rarities her husband had settled on me. 

1664. May 18. My cause came to hearing in Chancery against 
Mrs. Tradescant. 3 



3 It would seem that Ashmole was rather hasty in filing a bill in 
Chancery against Mi\s. Tradescant within a month after her husband's 
death ; but there was a reason for it. It appears from the bill that 
Ashmole had written and printed, at his own expense, a descriptive 
catalogue of the contents of the Museum, called " Musseum Trades- 
cantianum." The Deed of Gift is dated December 16, 1659, and is 
expressed to be in consideration of the entire affection and singular 
good esteem in which Mr. Tradescant held Mr. Ashmole, who, he had 
no doubt, would preserve and augment the said rarities for posterity ; 
and it assigned the collection, consisting of books, coins, medals, stones, 
pictures, mechanics, and other things, to Ashmole ; with a proviso that 
Mr. Tradescant and his wife should have the use and enjoyment of 
them during their respective lives. Mr. Ashmole agreed to pay £100 



24 ELIAS ASHMOLE, HIS HOUSE AND 

1666. October 11th. 1 hor. 30 niin. post merid. My first boatful 
of books, which were carried to Mrs. Tradescant's the 3rd September 
(the second clay of the great fire of London), were brought back to the 
Temple. 4 

18th. 4 jDost merid. All the rest of my things were brought thence 
to the Temple. 

1669. April 15th. Mr. Rose, the King's gardener, and myself went 
to Mrs. Tradescant's, and thence to Captain Forster's, at South Lambeth, 
where I first was acquainted with him. 



to Mary Edmonds, or to her children if she should not be living, when 
he should come into possession ; and possession was given to him by the 
delivery to him of a milled Queen Elizabeth's shilling, which Mrs. Trades- 
cant herself went upstairs to fetch, and she witnessed the deed by her 
own signature ; but she requested to be allowed to retain it, in order to 
consult some friends whether she had thereby prejudiced her own right 
to possess the articles, after her husband's death, during her own life; and 
she never returned the deed to Ashmole : and after her husband's death 
she disputed the validity of it, and alleged that it was obtained by 
unfair means, that it was a voluntary deed, made without adequate 
consideration, and therefore that it was void or revocable by her hus- 
band, and that he had in fact revoked it by his will, whereby he had 
bequeathed the collection of curiosities to her, on condition that, at her 
death, she would leave them to one of the Universities of Oxford or 
Cambridge ; that she had determined to leave them to Oxford ; and she 
said that the Universities ought to be defendants in the suit. By the 
decree, dated May 18, 1664, the Lord Chancellor declared that the deed 
had been fairly obtained by Ashmole, and without any undue practices ; 
that it had been made for a sufficient consideration, and that it should 
be established : and he directed a commission to issue to Sir Edward 
Byshe, Clarenceux, and William Dugdale, Esq., Norroy, to take an 
inventory of the collection, that the defendant should carefully preserve 
the articles during her life, and give security for the delivery of them to 
the plaintiff at her death. 

4 It is remarkable that Ashmole's library, which was brought from 
the Temple to South Lambeth, for its preservation from the great fire 
of London in September, 1666, should have been destroyed by a fire in 
the Temple on the 26th January, 1678, which consumed not only his 
books, but also a collection of 9,000 ancient and modern coins, and his 
collection of seals, charters, and other antiquities ; but his manuscripts 
escaped, being at his house at Lambeth. 



LANDS AT SOUTH LAMBETH. 25 

1674. October 2d. Eleven hor. 30 min. ante merid. I and my wife 
first entered my house at South Lambeth. 

5th. This night Mrs. Tradescant was in danger of being robbed, but 
most stx'angely prevented. 

Nov. 26. Mrs. Tradescant being willing to deliver up her rarities to 
me, I carried several of them to my house. 

Dec. 1. I began to remove the rest of the rarities to my house at 
South Lambeth. 

1675. April 17. The same morning I agreed with my carpenter for 
building the additional rooms I made to my house at South Lambeth. 

May 1. 10 hor. 30 min. ante merid. I and my wife came to my 
house at South Lambeth to lie there. 

5th. Ten hor. 20 min. ante merid. I laid the first stone of my new 
building there. 

July 15th. This morning a jury of sewers set out my brick wall 
made towards the highway at my house at South Lambeth. 

Aug. 28. One hour 40 min. post merid. I and my wife came to 
dwell at my house in South Lambeth. 

Nov. 16. Eleven hor. ante merid. I began to plant my garden walls 
with fruit-trees. 

1677. Mar. 28. 7 hor. ante merid. T laid the foundation of my 
back buildings to my house at South Lambeth. 

July 10. I made a feast at my house in South Lambeth in honour 
of my benefactors to my work of the Garter. 

17th. Count "VVallenstein, envoy extraordinary from the Emperor; 
Marquis de Este, Borgainianiers, envoy extraordinary from the King of 
Spain ; Mons. Swei'ene, envoy extraordinary from the Prince Elector of 
Brandenburgh, and the Count of Flamburgh, bestowed a visit on me at 
my house at South Lambeth. 

1678. April 4. 11 hor. 30 min. ante merid. My wife told me that 
Mrs. Tradescant was found drowned in her pond. She was drowned the 
day before, about noon, as appeared by some circumstances. 

6th. 8th hor. post merid. She was buried in a vault in Lambeth 
churchyard, where her husband and his son John had been formerly laid. 

22d. I removed the pictures from Mrs. Tradescant's house to mine. 

May 11th. My Lord Bishop of Oxford (Dr. John Fell), and Dr. 
Nicholas, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, gave me a visit at my house. 
7 hor. 30 min. ante merid. 

June 18. Mr. Lea and his wife's release to me of the one hundred 
pounds I was to pay after Mrs. Tradescant's death bears date. 

1679. Mar. 25. I entered upon the house adjoining to my house at 
South Lambeth, which Mr. Bartholmew let me a lease of. 



26 ELIAS ASHMOLE, ETC. 

31. 9 hor. 45 min. ante merid. Mr. Bartholomew sealed my lease. 

Aug. 15. My Lord Grace of Canterbury (Dr. Saucroft) came to visit 
me at my house, and spent a great part of the day with me in my 
study. 

1680. Nov. 4. Mr. Bartholomew sealed me a new lease of my 
house, &c, in South Lambeth. 

1685. Nov. 10. This morning I had some discourse with Mr. Gerard 
about purchasing Mr. Plummer's farm. 

1686. May 26. Mr. Plummer sealed his part of the conveyance of 
the farm to me, and his wife acknowledged a fine before the Chief 
Justice of the Common Pleas. 

July 13. I began to repair my barn at South Lambeth for Goodman 
Ingi'am. 

23. 5 hor. 30 min. post merid. I agreed upon conditions with Good- 
man Ingram to make him a lease of the farm I bought of Mr. Plummer, 
except the oat-field. 

25. 6 hor. post merid. I sealed the lease of John Ingram. 



At the same meeting, the Rev. T. A. Wills, of Lale- 
ham, exhibited another deed, being a lease for a year, 
dated 28th January, 2nd James II., a.d. 1686, from 
Matthew Ashmole, of Beverley, in the county of York, 
Gentleman (a brother of Elias Ashmole), to Michael 
Warton, of the same town. Esquire, of a close of pas- 
ture ground containing two acres, near Beverley, without 
the North Gate, commonly called " Saint Ebbitt's." 



ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS, ETC. 27 



IV. 

ON THE CHURCHWARDENS' ACCOUNTS, 
AND OTHER RECORDS RELATING TO THE 
PARISHES OE SEAL AND ELSTEAD, IN THE 
COUNTY OE SURREY. 

By WILLIAM HENRY HART, Esq., F.S.A. 

BEAD AT THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING, HELD AT FARNHAM CASTLE, JULY 13, 1858. 



The parishes of Seal and Elstead, in this county, are 
but so briefly descanted upon in the history of Manning 
and Bray, that a few observations on some features of 
interest which relate to these localities, and which are 
derived from hitherto almost unworked sources, may not 
be unacceptable to the meeting now assembled. These 
materials consist of a valuable set of Churchwardens' 
accounts, and other records of these parishes, which, by 
the kind permission of Henry Lawes Long, Esq., in 
whose possession these volumes now remain, I am 
enabled to exhibit to this meeting, and to call attention 
to some of the more remarkable entries therein. 

The accounts of Seal parish commence in the year 
1559, the first year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth ; so 
that we pass over that important era in our ecclesiastical 
history when the Catholic Church in England rejected 
the authority of the bishop of Rome, and reasserted her 
independence and her catholicity, irrespective of any 
foreign diocese. Had these accounts extended farther 
back, we should doubtless have seen many curious 



28 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

entries relative to this change ; but, fortunately, I can 
from other sources supply the deficiency to some extent ; 
namely, by giving the lists of the church ornaments in 
the time of Edward VI., both for this parish as well as 
for that of Elstead ; the nature and occasion of which 
documents it will be expedient briefly to explain. 

In the course of the reign of Edward VI., various 
commissions were issued for the purpose of taking 
surveys and inventories of the goods, plate, jewels, 
vestments, bells, and other ornaments belonging to all 
the churches, chapels, brotherhoods, guilds, or frater- 
nities within the realm, in order that the same might be 
safely kept and placed in charge of proper persons ready 
to answer for the same to the Crown. 

In the sixth year of his reign another commission 
was issued, wherein the commissioners were directed to 
make perfect inventories of the goods, comparing them 
with the former inventories, and to make inquiry by 
oath or otherwise of all such property as might be 
concealed or embezzled, and to certify their proceedings 
to the Privy Council. And another commission, issued 
shortly afterwards, gives further power for the same 
purpose, and specifies what ornaments are to be allowed 
to be retained for the administration of the holy 
communion : thus, in every cathedral or collegiate 
church, where chalices "be remayning," there were to 
be left one or two chalices, at the discretion of the 
commissioners ; and in every great parish one or two 
chalices, and in every small parish one chalice to be left. 
And after leaving " the honest and comely furnyture of 
coverynges for the communyon table and surples or 
surplesses for the mynyster or mynysters in the said 
churches or chapells," the commissioners were directed to 
distribute to the poor the residue of the linen ornaments 



THE PARISHES OF SEAL AND ELSTEAD. 29 

and implements of the said churches ; and they were to 
sell all copes, vestments, altar-cloths, and other orna- 
ments, not appointed "by the commission to be left ; and 
also to sell to the use of the Crown, by weight, all parcels 
or pieces of metal, except the metal of " greatt bell 
saunse bells " in every of the churches. 

Under these commissions returns were made for the 
parishes of Seal and Elstead. 

I will now read the inventory for Seal Church : — 

Seale pishe "| In p'mis j chalice of Tynne foure aullte r 
Churche / clothes. 

Itm ij towell 6 . 

Itm iij vestement 6 and ij aubbes. 

Itm iij Coopes and ij Surplussis. 

Itm iij Belles and one Sante Bell. 

Itm ij Candillstick 6 . 

Itin ij Sens rs . 

Itm j Crosse. 

Itm ij Crosse cloithes, 

Itm ij Crewitt 6 . 

All that lackinge of the former invitorie were stolen bie the vis 
when the Churche was robbid. 

But we will now return to the Churchwardens' 
Accounts. 

The first account appears to be imperfect : it is headed 
" The reconynge and accompt made by John Skynner to 
Willm Cranlye for charges laide out for tymber worke 
for the howse before Mychelmas 1559 and from the 
same feaste untill Michelmas then next following;" 
and it contains payments to the "tymber hewers and 
for ther meate and drinck," two shillings; to "ye 
sawyers for sawinge and for ther meate & drinck," two 
shillings ; and various payments to thatchers, for their 
work, and also for their meat and drink, or board, which 



30 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

seems to have been always supplied to them. The 
thatcher was paid four shillings and sixpence for seven 
days' work ; and three and fourpence for board during 
the same period ; and he appears to have employed 
females to assist in the work, for there is a payment 
"for v dayes worke to his maydens xxd. ;" and their 
board, "ijs. vjd." This account is continued until the 
year 1564, when it closes abruptly. 

In the year 1588 the accounts are resumed, and they 
then continue with some few interruptions to the year 
1723. I purpose calling your attention to the more 
remarkable of the entries in these documents, as forming 
historical notices of these parishes deducible from no 
other source ; and for this purpose it will be more con- 
venient to classify the subjects as much as possible, 
rather than to follow the strict chronological order of 
the accounts themselves. 

And first the bells : — 

They appear to have been a continual source of 
expense ; for in every account there is some entry 
relative to their repair, or that of the bell-ropes, and 
such-like. In 1588 there is a payment of twelve pence 
to " Jhon Jure for kepinge the belles ;" in 1589, fourteen 
pence for a new bell-rope ; in 1590, twelve pence for a 
new bell-rope and nails ; in 1591, twenty-two pence for 
two new bell-ropes ; twelve pence for ringing "when her 
Majestye came to Parnam ;" two pence to John Turner 
for ringing ; eight pence " in expenses upon the corona- 
tion day in drinke to the ringers ;" and three pence for 
iron about the bells ; in 1592, two pence for iron-work 
about the bells ; and three shillings and eight pence for 
three new bell-ropes ; in 1593, three shillings and six 
pence "to the carpinter for mendinge the bells three 



THE PARISHES OF SEAL AND ELSTEAD. 31 

daies worke ; " fourteen pence for " ironworke and 
nailes," and ten pence " for charges at the niendinge of 
the bells in bread and drinke;" in 1594, two pence "for 
a cleet that mended the stocke of the little bell;" and 
two shillings and sixpence for three new bell-ropes, and 
two pence "for mending of the goodgin of y e lyttle bell;" 
seven pence "for whitt Lether at Parnam Fayre to mend 
the bels bandreks ;" ten pence " to a carpinter for one 
dayes work mending the bells against the coronation 
daye ;" and six pence " for breacle & drinke for the ringers 
the coronation day at night;" in 1596, twelve pence for 
a new bell-rope, and two shillings and three pence "for 
ringers on the coronation day iij men ixd. a pesse;" in 
1597, fourteen pence for a new bell-rope ; four pence for 
mending a bell-rope, and one penny for soap to dress the 
bells ; in 1599, twelve pence for " thonglether " and 
mending the ropes ; in 1602, two shillings to ringers 
upon the coronation day, and two shillings and sixpence 
for two new ropes and a rope for the " sante " bell ; in 
1603, two shillings for mending the clapper of the great 
bell, and five pence for drink for the ringers on the 
coronation day ; in 1604, sixteen pence to the smith 
for iron-work about the bells ; and then a somewhat 
strangely worded item : " Item for ringeng for the king 
and grese for the bell roppes, vd. ;" Shortly after this 
the bells appear to have been all re-cast at Ockingham, 
for, in the account of 1606 we have an item — "p d to the 
Bellfounder for newe castinge of the bells and all 
charges belonginge thereunto as smyths work and 
carpinters and suche like; vti. js. ixd.;" and in 1607, 
" Item Laide out at Okengam when wee caried the 
Bells, ixs. vjd.," and again eleven shillings "at Okein- 
game when the bell was cast ;" and ten shillings for 



32 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

carrying and recarrying the bells ; also " p d to the bel- 
founder for mettall y* he put into the bell xiij li. at vj d. 
a pound, — vjs. vjd." 

In 1(337, three shillings and sixpence "for beere for the 
ringers on the day of the king beginning of his Raigne;" 
and two shillings and six pence " Laid out for beer for 
the ringers on the thanksgiving day." 

In 1686, eight shillings "for beere for the ringers 
on crownation day." 

In 1688, eight shillings "for beer on the thanksgiving 
day for the birth of the yong Prince ; " and seven 
shillings and six pence " for beer when the King and 
Qeene were crowned." 

In 1694, two shillings and sixpence "Layde oute 
uppone the ryngears when the kynge came horn." And 
thus much for the expenses relating to the bells. 

If we take these accounts as a correct guide, which 
within certain limits we are bound to do, the holy 
communion would appear to have been administered in 
this church but very few times in the year : thus, in 
1588, we meet with only three entries of the expenses 
incurred in providing bread and wine for that purpose ; 
viz., — 

In p'mis Laide out for breade and wyne at East 

for the CoiTiunion ij s. xth 

For bread and wyne at Hallewtide ijs. jd. 

Item for bread and wine at Candelmas and 

Slirov Sundaye for the Communion .... ijs. j d:. 

In 1589, provision of bread and wine is made at 
Easter and Hallowtide only ; in 1590, at Easter alone. 

In 1591 the account states the quantity of wine pur- 
chased : — 

In p'mis for breade and wyne at Easter, a 

gallon, lackinge halfe a pynte ijs. viijd. 



THE PARISHES OF SEAL AND ELSTEAD. 33 

And again at Hallowtide, eighteen pence for the same 
purpose. 

In 1592, and for several years following, the only 
occasions on which there appears to have been a com- 
munion are Candlemas, Easter, Midsummer, Hallow- 
tide, and Bartholomewticle ; but in the account for 1609 
we find the first departure from this rule, when there is 
a communion on Palm Sunday ; and the account for 
1611 plainly denotes an improvement ; and that, from 
some cause or other (a change of clergyman possibly), 
greater care than before was shewn for the more fre- 
quent and orderly administration of this sacred rite, 
for there was a communion on Easter Eve, and two 
shillings were expended for mats for the communi- 
cants, and eight shillings "for a Table Clothe and 
Fren°?e." 

In 1618 the communion is as;am mentioned on Palm 
Sunday, Easter Eve, and Easter Sunday, and in 1634 
Good Friday occurs, and again in 1639. 

In 1639 sixteen pence was laid out for " a matt laid 
at the railes in the chancell." 

In 1615 there is a perfect list of all the communicants 
within the parish that year. The number is about one 
hundred and thirty. 

In 1590 are the following charges concerning the 
surplice : — 

Itm for sixe elles of holland to make the surplusse, 

at xxd. the ell xs. 

For cutting of the surplusse ij d. 

For two penyworthe of white threede ijd. 

Itih for making of the surplusse xij d. 

In 1602,— 

Layde oute for washinge of the Communion Cloathe 

and the Surplisse ij d. 

VOL. II. D 



34 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

This item is frequently repeated in the succeeding 
accounts. In 1639 a new surplice was had : — 

Paid for Cloth for the Surplesse and for thread 

to make it xxxijs. vjd. 

Paid for making the Surplesse ijs. 

The festivities of Whitsuntide, which it was formerly 
the custom of the country people to celebrate under 
the name of Whit sun Ales, or as they are called in 
these accounts "Church Ales," met with their due 
observance in this parish. Prom the large quantity of 
wine which was sometimes charged for under the head 
of bread and wine for the communion, it seems probable 
that some of it must have been expended in some other 
way, and that doubtless in the way of feasting and 
revelry on the great holidays of the Church. We find, 
however, among these documents, two separate accounts 
of the Church Ale furnished at the expense of the 
parish ; one in 1592, the other in 1611 ; and as they 
afford minute and interesting particulars of the pro- 
ceedings, I will extract them verbatim. 

And first the account for 1592 : — 

Charges Laide out concerning our Churchayle. 

In p'mis for iij Bushells of wheatte xiiijs. 

Ite for ix Barrells of Beere xls. 

Ite for veele and lame xxijs. ixd. 

Ite for a loode of woode and the carriadg. . vs. vjd. 

Ite for spice and frutte vijs. jd". 

Ite for Butter, Creame, and mylke iiijs. 

Ite for clettes & nailes to the smythe xiiijd. 

Ite for Guiie powder iiijs. 

Ite for more wheatte viij s. ijd. 

Ite paide to the musition for v days play . . xxs. 

Ite to the drumer ijs. 

Ite for more Butter & Creame ijs. iij d. 



THE PARISHES OP SEAL AND ELSTEAD. 35 

Ite for more spice and frutte iiij s. ijd. 

Ite to Goodman Shrubbs wyffe for helpinge 

all the tyme xij d. 

Ite for meatt and Beere for the musitions 

and other helpers viijs. iiij ch. 

The account for 1611 enters more fully into detail : — 

Charges Laide out for the Churchayle. 

In p'mis for tow quart rs of malte xls. 

Ite p d the Brewer for his worke, for hopps, 
wood, bere, corne, and suche like 

thinges xs. ij d. 

P d for x Barrels of Beere xls. 

P d for one q r ter of wheatt xxxiiij s. iiijd. 

P d for tow fatte calves xxs. iiijd. 

P d for another calfe vj s. vj d. 

P d for a fatt sheepe vij's. vj d. 

P d for iij Lambes xij s. 

P d for one fatte Larnbe vs. 

P d for vij fatte Lambes xxxviij s. vj d. 

P d for a Lodde of woode vs. vj d. 

P d Mabanke for his worke for that time . . iij s. vjd. 

P d to Turner for his worke ij s. iiij d. 

P d to Mabankes wyffe xviij d. 

P d to Shrubbs wyffe xvd. 

P d to weadowe Wilkes viij d. 

P d to Henrie Hathorne xij d. 

P d to Hamraon the Smithe for worke .... xiiijd. 

P d to Richard Lowrance Lickfolds man . . xijct. 

P d to musitions the first daie vs. 

P d to the other musitions for iiij daies .... xxs. 

P d the last daie for musicke iiij s. 

P d the Drume plaier vs. 

P d the Vice, otherwise the Poole vs. 

P d for puter for Raflinge xiiij s. iiijd. 

P d for silke pointes and laces xijs. 

P d for earthen pottes and Godhods xij dr. 

D 2 



36 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

P d to goodwife Hardinge for butter, cheese, 

and creme viijs. 

P d to goodwife Lickfold, for butter, cheese, 

and creame vj s. 

P d to Oliver his wiffe for beere and cakes . . iiij s. 

P d to goodman Michinar for have vj d". 

P d to Rowland charges he laide out xviijs. vjd. 

P d to Richard Hardinge charges he laide 

outt '. vj s. viij d. 

Having thus gone through these accounts under the 
principal heads, we will now glance at a few miscel- 
laneous entries. 

In 1591, five shillings and five pence to the painter 
for painting the Ten Commandments. 

In 1595, six pence was paid towards a brief for one 
Jacomo Myleita, " an outlandish man." 

In 1596, three shillings and six pence for " a newe 
booke of Comon Praier bought at London;" and also 
four pence " for a lityll Praier w ch is to be redd in the 
churche ;" l and four pence "for a lityll praier booke." 

In 1598, fourteen pence to Harry Hathorne "for a 
boorde and mendinge the pulpett, one daies worke;" 
three shillings and six pence for a new book of homilies, 
and twelve pence for the head of a fox. 

In 1603, five shillings were paid for a new chest for 
the church, also six shillings " for iij lockes for the new 
coffer vidlt the greatest in the middle, iij s. vjd., and the 
tow lesser w th nailes and hanges, ijs. vjd." 

In 1605, twenty-five shillings were paid to the painters 

1 This is one out of two prayers which were set forth by authority 
in the year 1596 ; the first for the prosperous success of her Majesty's 
Forces and Navy ; the other a " prayer of thanksgiving, and for con- 
tinuance of good success to her Majesty's Forces." See Liturgies and 
occasional forms of prayer set forth in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, 
published by the Parker Society, pp. 665 and 668. 



THE PARISHES OF SEAL AND ELSTEAD. 37 

" for painting the Kinges Amies in the churche, & 
suche like." With regard to this practice, now happily 
unknown, of setting up the royal arms in churches, 
considerable diversity of opinion has prevailed as to its 
origin, some contending that it was in obedience to an 
express law or regulation (though this has never been 
produced), others that it was merely in accordance with 
a general custom which had grown up insensibly, and 
obtained many adherents in the land. It seems, how- 
ever, to be the better opinion that there never was any 
express law enjoining the practice ; but that the royal 
arms thus set up were always considered part of the 
architectural ornaments or decorations of the church, in 
the same manner as the cross on the chancel screen 
is now considered by the judges, in the case of the 
Knightsbridge churches to be part of the architectural 
ornaments. They were sometimes emblazoned in one of 
the painted windows. Instances have occurred of the 
royal arms being set up in a church before the Refor- 
mation ; so that we cannot conclude, as some are inclined 
to do, that their exhibition in a church was an assertion 
of the supremacy of the crown, because that was not 
complete until the Reformation. In course of time, 
however, these insignia began to assume a more pro- 
minent position in the church, and during the last 
century were frequently placed over the chancel arch, 
almost to the overshadowing of the altar, a practice not 
more indecent and unbecoming in itself than character- 
istic of the age ; for it was indicative of the proneness 
of the national mind to that Erastianism which was 
rapidly creeping over the face of the Church, and from 
which, after a century of lifelessness and torpor, we are 
only now emerging. 

In 1606, twenty pence " for the bookes of Canons and 



38 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

a Table for degres of niarriag;" and two shillings and 
six pence to the glazier for glazing the church. 

In 1619, two shillings were " layed out to the cunstable 
tourdes billding the beakon;" and in the same year 
" layed out for two foote and a halfe of newe glasse and 
two foote newe leded, and for mending of two panes at 
iiijd the pane, and for xxxv. quaries, a peny a quarie, 
vs. iiijd. 

In 1624 are these expenses : — 

Ite p d for three yeards of Cloyth for the 

Cumunion Table and Pulpit, at iij s. vj &. 

per yeard, the some of xs. vjd". 

Ite p d for the greene frindge for them .... iij s. iiijd". 
Ite p d for makeing them iij d:. 

In 1636,— 

Item layd out for timber and workeman- 
shipp about setinge up the raille in the 
Chauucell xv s. viij d". 

A considerable proportion of the money in all these 
accounts was expended in charity ; mostly to disabled 
persons, those who had met with loss by fire or by sea, 
poor travellers, Irish men and women, and others ; but 
in this year (1636) we find a clerical recipient of the 
parish bounty, thus : — 

Item gave to a ould minnistar .- vj d. 

In 1637 seven shillings were expended for seven 
foxes' heads, and again, in 1691, two shillings for the 
same purpose. 

In 1639, three shillings and two pence for mending 
the great west window ; and six shillings for glass for 
the new window; and "for new making the littell 
window, xd." 



THE PARISHES OE SEAL AXD ELSTEAD. 39 

The same year eight pence " for an houre glasse for 
the Church," according to the custom of the period. 

In 1668, eleven shillings were paid " for the Ten 
Commandements." 

Throughout the earlier of these accounts there occurs 
an item which, as we proceed onwards gradually, and, 
at last, totally disappears ; namely, that of the expense 
of making the transcripts of the registers for the dio- 
cesan registry. In too many parishes has it been the 
custom entirely to forget this most salutary and whole- 
some regulation, and I cannot speak too strongly of this 
neglect, because at the present day we are often made to 
feel its effects, and to suffer the loss of information 
which we have no other way of supplying. 

Parish registers are among the most valuable records 
we possess ; but they have in their time been treated in 
a manner which can only be described as most pitiable, 
they have been tossed about between parson, clerk, and 
sexton, till they have sometimes spent their last hours 
either in helping to singe the goose or light the fire of 
one of those worthies ; and the transcript not being 
transmitted to the diocesan registry, we are now obliged 
to be content often to allow an historical or genealogical 
doubt to remain in its uncertainty, or even to relinquish 
a legal claim because the required evidence is lost to us 
for ever. 

Following these churchwardens' accounts are the 
accounts of the overseers of the poor, under the act of 
the 43rd year of Queen Elizabeth; they commence in 
the year 1603 and contain particulars of the collection 
of the poor rate, and also its expenditure in its various 
items, many of which are curious, as entering into the 
minutiae of details, such as the following from the 
account for the year 1607 : — 



40 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

Ite p d to W m Michinall for thatchinge 

Weadowe "Whealers howse xij d. 

Ite p d to W m Michinall for workinge aboute 

Underwoods howse iij s. viij d. 

Ite to James Lickfold for poore folkes .... xd". 

Ite p d for a paire of newe shewes & lether, 

and mendinge shewes iijs. iiijd. 

Ite for tow sherttes to Underwood iiij s. ijd. 

Ite for carriadge of a lode of woodde xjd. 

Ite for a waistcotte for Christian Hill .... ijs. iiijd. 

The name of Underwood appears on these accounts 
for a long time ; viz., from 1607 to 1629, when he died 
an old man, and during that period he received relief 
and assistance every year, the particulars of which are 
all set down, so that a small history even of this obscure 
pauper might be written. 

I will extract a few of the items ; — 

In 1608 — 

P d for iiij yeardes of Rusett Cloth for apprell 

for Jhon Underwood viij s. viijd. 

Ite for iij yeardes and iij quarters of cotten iijs. viijd. 

Ite for halfe an elle of canvas vj A. 

Ite for necessaris for his bedding iij s. 

Ite for mending Underwoodes showes .... iiij d. 

In 1616,— 

Item to Jhon Underwood for a paire of 

showes iijs. 

Item p d to Jhon Eames for mendinge John 

Underwoddes showes vj d. 

Item for the same Underwood for iiij yeardes 

& a quarter at ijs. the yearde ixs. ijd. 

Item for iiij yeardes and a qr r of cotten at 

xiiijd the yearde iiij s. xjd. ob. 

Item for an ele of canvas xij d. 

Item for makinge this apperrell ij s. 



THE PARISHES OF SEAL AND ELSTEAD. 41 

In 1625,— 

Layed out to John Underwod for a Shurt 

and making ij s. vj d. 

More for a sheete and making iiij s . ijd. 

In 1629 he makes his last appearance on the stage of 
life; thus, — 

Item laide out for a wynding sheet for John 

Underwod 2s. 

Item for bread and beere at his buriall .... 1 — 

Item laid out unto Thomas Brombe for 

ringing a knell and makeing his grave 8d. 

In 1613,— 

Paid unto Besse Collenes, a pore wench . . ixs. vd. 

In 1627 — 

Item a payer of shooese for Elizabeth Collen ij s. 

Item layd out for v yardes of graye cloth at 

ij s. iijd. y e yarde xj s. iij d. 

Item for makinge of Elizabeth Collines 
sauefgerd and waste coate, w th John 
Underwoods stokinges js. iiijd. 

Item layd out for graye cloth to make 
Nicholas Hountingeford a payre of 
hose & for lininges iij s. ixd. 

Layed out to Elizabeth Collen for tow elles 

of canves to make hir a smoke ij s. iijd. 

More for a pare of shooes xxij d. 

More for mending hir shooes vj d. 

The account for 1632 is worthy of remark, as hearing 
a very perfect signature of the father of one whose 
name is always to be held in veneration and respect 
in this county, the illustrious John Evelyn ; the remem- 
brance of whose character, as an English gentleman of 
the most polished taste and the highest feeling, will 
ever be most dearly cherished. 



42 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS RELATING TO 

Richard Evelyn, whose autograph we have here, signs 
this account, together with Richard Onslow, both of 
whom were justices of the peace. 

The account for 1634 is noticeable in this respect, as 
containing almost the first entry relative to the expenses 
incurred by the overseers in maintaining those children, 
who, from the circumstances of their birth, were a 
burden to the parish ; and it closes with a testimony to 
the prevailing superstition which, in the hour of sick- 
ness, placed its dependence on the supposed virtue of 
the royal touch ; thus, — 

To Will'm Giles for bis charitie and travell to 
London w th Widowe Hilles children to be 
cured of the King's evill, by a rate for that 
cause made by the p'islie, as appears under 
divers of their hands ix s. 

In the account for 1635 are various other expenses 
concerning illegitimate children ; thus, — 

Layed out to the Widdow Huntingford for 
keeping of a base born child from the 
27 of September unto the seaven and 

twentieth of December 19 6 

Ite for a Coate for the bastard, being two 

yards 3 1 

Item for linen for the bastard, an ell & halfe 16 

For makeinge of the coate 6 

For makeinge of two wasequets for the bastard 4 
Layed out for makeing of linen clothes for the 

bastard 5 

At the end of these accounts are a few proclamations 
for general fasts and other matters, which were directed 
and sent to the clergyman and churchwardens of Seal 
for their guidance. 



I will now proceed to Elstcad parish. 



THE PARISHES OF SEAL AND ELSTEAD. 43 

The following is the list of Church ornaments for this 
parish, taken under the before-mentioned commission of 
Edward the Sixth. 

Elsted. 

In p'tfris j Chalice of Sillv* pcell gillt waing viij onc e bie 

Extymacon. 
Itiii ij Coopes, the one redd Sattyn of Briddgis, and the other 

a Sangwyne colorid Coope of Sattyn of Bryddgis very ollde. 
Itm a Sattyn Crosse. 

Itm a ollde Sheyn r of Singill Sarcenet paynted. 
Itm a ollde Crosse bothe of Grene Silke. 
Itiii a aullter clothe of Lynnen. 
Itm iij Belles in the steple waing bie Extimacon the best 

iiij C, the Second bell iij C, and the third bell ij C. d 

hundred. 
Itiii ij Surplussis of Lynnyn Clothe. 

All wiche is commyttyd to the custodye of - * * * * 
the vjth of Octobe 1 ", in the vjth yere of the reign of owre Sovereigne 
Lord. 

All that lackithe of the forme 1- invitorie were stolyn bie thevis 
whan the Churche was robbid, onely exceppt Sartyn candillstick 6 
of brasse; that is to wete, ij Lyttill candillstick 6 and ij great 
candillstick 6 , w ch weare solid for vs, and the money thereof be- 
stowed uppon the Repacons of their Brydge. 

The churchwardens accounts for Elstead parish are not 
so numerous as those for Seal, neither do they extend 
over so long a period, inasmuch as they cover only about 
ten years; but they relate to the troublous times of 
Charles the First and the Commonwealth, and are, on 
that account, interesting. 

They commence with a charge of five shillings, dated 
Nov. 10, 1652, for setting up the states arms; then 
" payd for nue casting the Belle, and for Thurteene 

2 Blank in original. 



44 ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS, ETC. 



pound of Mettell mor then shee waved when shee was 
caried away, 3li. 13s." And lastly, we have the custom 
of the parish for the payment of tithes to the vicar. 

We then have a summary of the collections made 
from Elstead parish towards the expenses of maintaining 
the garrison at Parnham Castle, Sir Thomas Fairfax's 
army, the Scottish army, and the militia. These pay- 
ments hegin May 1st, 1644, and are continued to the 
year 1654. 



DEED RELATING TO JOHN EVELYN, ESQ. 45 



V. 
ON A DEED RELATING TO JOHN EVELYN, Esq. 

By WILLIAM HENRY HART, Esq., F.SA. 



In my paper on the Churchwarden's Accounts for 
the parishes of Seal and Elstead, in this county, reference 
is made to the father of the celebrated John Evelyn, 
viz. Richard Evelyn, whose signature is attached to 
one of the accounts of the overseers of the poor for 
Seal parish. I am fortunate in possessing a deed under 
the hand and seal of this Richard Evelyn, whereby he 
makes certain provisions for the advancement of his 
sons John and Richard ; and as this document is his- 
torically interesting, I append a transcript, together 
with a facsimile of the signature. 

fcJIS I£8#8««84B made the Sixeteenth day 
of June in the Eleaventh yere of the Raigne of our 
Soveraigne Lord Charles by the grace of God of England 
Scotland Erance and Ireland Kinge Defendor of the 
Eaith &c. Betweene Richard Evelyn of Wootton in the 
County of Surrey esquier on thone partie and Robert 
Hatton of the Midle Temple London esquier and George 
Duncumbe of Albury in the said county of Surrey 
esquier on thother partie WITTNESSETH that the 
said Richard Evelyn for the naturall love and affecc'on 
which he beareth to John Evelyn gentleman his second 
sonne and Richard Evelyn his yongest sonne and for 



46 ON A DEED RELATING TO 

their better advancement and preferment in tyme to 
come, and to thintent the Landes Tenements and here- 
ditaments aftermencoiaed may goe remayne and be To 
the uses intents and purposes herein and hereby lymitted 
expressed and declared Under and uppon the Provisoe 
and condic'on aftermenc'oned Doth covenant and graunt 
for him his heires executors and assignes to and with 
the said Robert Hatton and George Duncumbe their 
heires and assignes by theis p'nts in manner and forme 
following, that is to say, That he the said Richard 
Evelyn and his heires and all and every other person 
and persons which now doe or hereafter shall stand or 
be seized of or in all those landes tenements and heredi- 
taments with thapp'ten a ncs called or knowen by the 
name or names of Old Mawling or by any other name or 
names whatsoever conteyneing by estimac'on threescore 
acres scituat lying and being in Sowth Mawling in the 
county of Sussex now or late in the tenure or occupac'on 
of Thomas Trayton gentleman or of his assignes, and of 
or in any other landes tenements or hereditaments in 
South Mawling aforesaid late purchased by the said 
Richard Evelyn of and from John Levett George Levett 
and Arthur Levett or of anv or either of them Of or in 
any estate of Inheritance either in possession Reverc'on 
use or Remaynder shall and will for ever hereafter stand 
and be seized thereof and of every part and parcell 
thereof with thapp'ten a nces and of the messuage barne 
and buyldinges uppon the landes first menc'oned scituat 
and standing and of all woodes underwoodes and trees 
comons wayes easements passages proflits comodityes 
and apptennces to the said Landes and p'misses before 
menc'oned and every any or either of them belonging or 
app'teyneing or now or heretofore accepted reputed 






JOHN EVELYN, ESQ. 4<7 

taken or knowen leased used occupyed or enioyed as 
part parcell member or belonging of or to the same or 
of or to any part or parcell thereof, and of the Revercon 
and Reverc'ons Remaynder and Reinaynders thereof 
and of every part and parcell thereof To and for thuses 
intents and purposes after in and by theis p'nts lymitted 
expressed and declared Under and uppon the Provisoe 
and Condic'on after in these p'nts menc'oned and to or 
for noe other use or uses intent or purpose, that is to 
say, TO THUSE and behooffe of the said Richard 
Evelyn partie to theis p'nts for and dureing the Terme 
of his naturall lief without ympeachment of wast And 
after his decease To thuse and behoof of the said John 
Evelyn and the heires males of his body lawfully to be 
begotten and for want of such yssue To thuse of the said 
Richard Evelyn the sonne and of the heires males of his 
body lawfully to be begotten And for want of such 
yssue To thuse and behooffe of George Evelyn gentle- 
man sonne and heire apparant of the said Richard 
Evelyn partie to theis p'nts and of the heires males of 
his body lawfully to be begotten And for want of such 
yssue To thuse of the heires of the body of the said 
Richard Evelyn party to theis p'nts begotten and to be 
begotten And for want of such yssue To the use of the 
right heires of George Evelyn esquier deceased late 
[Father of the said Richard Evelyn partie to theis p'nts 
for ever and to or for use other use or uses intent or 
purpose PROVIDED allwayes that yf the said Richard 
Evelyn partie to theis p'nts shall at any tyme or tymes 
hereafter dureing his naturall lief by any wryting to be 
sealed and subscribed by him the said Richard Evelyn 
party to theis p'nts in the presence of twoe Credible 
wittnesses or by his last will and testament in wryting 



48 ON A DEED RELATING TO 

subscribed and published in manner as aforesaid Revoke 
or make voyd or publish expresse or declare his mynd 
and rneaneing to be to Revoke or make voyd this present 
Indenture or any the use or uses herein or hereby 
lymitted either of for or concerneing all the said Landes 
and p misses or of for or concerneing any or either of 
them or of any part or parcell of them or of any or 
either of them That then and from thenceforth this 
Indenture and the use and uses estate and estates 
herein and hereby lymitted expressed or declared as to 
such and soe many of the said Landes and premisses 
whereof any estate or estates use or uses shalbe revoked 
or made voyd or declared or intended as aforesaid to be 
revoked or made voyd shall cease determyne and be 
utterly made voyd And that then and from thenceforth 
the said Richard Evelyn Robert Hat ton and George 
Duncumbe and every of them and their and every of 
their heires and all and every other person and persons 
which now doe or hereafter shall stand or be seized of 
such of the said Landes and premisses whereof any 
estate or estates use or uses before in and by theis p'nts 
lymitted shalbe soe revoked or made voyd or declared or 
intended to be revoked or made voyd To and for such 
other use and uses estate and estates intent and purpose 
as the said Richard Evelyn partie to theis p'nts shall 
by his last will or by any other wry ting to be sealed and 
subscribed before Twoe sufficient and credible wittnesses 
as aforesaid lymitt or appoynt the same And that from 
and after such new use or uses lymitacon and appoynt- 
ment shall end and determyne Then to and for thuse 
and behooffe of the said Richard Evelyn partie to theis 
p'nts and of his heires for ever and to or for noe other 
use or uses intent or purpose This Indenture or any* 



JOHN EVELYN, ESQ. 49 

thinge herein conteyned to the contrary in anywise 
notwithstanding IN WITTNES whereof the partyes 
first abovenamed to theis present Indentures Inter- 
changably have sett their handes and seales the Day 
and yere first above wrytten 1635. 



Sealed and delyv'ed in the presence of 

John Howe 
Henr Baldwin 
William Wilding 

HlCHAED HEIGHAM. 



VOL. II. 



50 ON SOME OF TEE ANCIENT 



VI. 

ON SOME OE THE ANCIENT INNS OE 
SOITTHWABK. 

By GEORGE R. CORNER, Esq., F.S.A. 

BEAD AT THE GENERAL MEETING HELD IN SOUTHWARK, 12TH MAY, 1858. 



" Shall I not take my ease in mine Inn 1 " 

Henry IV., Part L, act 3, sc. 3. 

The borough of Soutliwark, more especially the High- 
street, having for so many ages been the only entrance 
into London from Kent, Surrey, and Sussex, and the 
chief road to and from Erance, and the shrine of St. 
Thomas a Becket at Canterbury, to which, in times 
before the Preformation, pilgrims resorted by thousands 
every year, it is not surprising that the Borough became 
celebrated for its inns, which, from the accommodation 
they afforded to travellers, brought no inconsiderable 
profit to the inhabitants of this part of the metropolis. 

Honest John Stow, in his " Survey of London " (first 
published in 159S), says: " Erom thence (the Marshal- 
sea) towards London-bridge, on the same side, be many 
fair inns for receipt of travellers, by these signs : — the 
Spurre, Christopher, Bull, Queen's Head, Tabard, George, 
Hart, King's Head, &c." 

Of these inns mentioned by the old chronicler, the 
Spur, the Queen's Head, the Tabard (now called the 
Talbot), the George, the White Hart, and the King's 
Head still exist as inns for travellers ; and it is of three 



INNS OF SOUTHWAEK. 51 

of those hostelries, and of a few others in this borough, 
that I propose to give some account : and first, as the 
most celebrated, although not now maintaining its an- 
cient character, I will tell you what I have been able to 
collect about 

THE TABAED INN, SOUTHWAEK. 

So much has been written of this celebrated hostelry, 
that the subject may be supposed to have been ex- 
hausted, and it may be considered presumptuous to 
attempt to tell anything, not already known, of the inn 
renowned in Chaucer's verse, as the place where he and 
the nine-and-twenty pilgrims met, and agreed to enliven 
their pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas a Becket 
at Canterbury, by reciting tales to shorten the way. 
Nevertheless, the subject is so interesting, that a collec- 
tion of facts relating to "The Tabard" and its jovial 
host, whom Chaucer represents as not only merry him- 
self, but the cause of mirth in others, may not be 
unacceptable ; especially as some few particulars, not yet 
in print, have been discovered, and will add something 
to the general interest of the subject. 

The date of the Canterbury Pilgrimage is generally 
supposed to have been the year 1383 ; and Chaucer, 
after describing the season of Spring, says : — 

" Befelle, that in that seson, on a clay, 
In Southwerk, at the Tabard as I lay, 
Eedy to wenden on my pilgrimage 
To Canterbury, with devoute corage, 
At night was come into that hostelrie 
Well nine-and-twenty in a compagnie 
Of sondry folk, by aventure yfalle 
In felawship ; and pilgrimes were they alle, 
That toward Canterbury w olden ride. 
The chambres and the stables weren wide, 
E 2 



52 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

And wel we weren esed atte beste, 

And shortly, whan the sonne was gon to reste, 

So hadde I spoken with hem everich on 

That I was of hir felawship anon, 

And made forwoi'd erly for to rise, 

To take oure way ther as I you devise." 

Lines 19 to 29. 

" The Tabard " is again mentioned in the following 
lines : — 

" In South werk at this gentil hostelrie, 
That highte the Tabard, faste by the Belle." 

Lines 720, 721. 

" The Tabard " was the property of the Abbot of Hyde, 
near Winchester, who had his town residence within 
the inn-yard ; and the earliest record that I have been 
able to meet with relating to the property is in the 
33rd Edward I., a.d. 1304 j 1 when the Abbot and Con- 
vent of Hyde purchased of William de Lategareshall 
two houses in Southwark, held of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, by the annual rent of 5s. \\d., and suit to 
his court in Southwark, and Id. a year for a purpresture 
of one foot wide on the king's highway ; £4 per annum 
to John de Tymberhuth, and 3s. to the prior and convent 
of St. Mary Overie, in Southwark. Value clear, 40s. 3 

On the 6th August, 1307, the Abbot of Hyde had a 
licence from the Bishop of Winchester for a chapel at 
his hospitium, in the parish of St. Margaret, South- 
wark. 3 

1 Two tenements will appear to have been conveyed by William de 
Ludegarsale to the Abbot, &c, de Hida juxta Winton in 1306, and 
which are described in a former conveyance, therein recited, as extending 
in length "a coramuni fossato de Suthwerke versus orientom, usque 
Fiegiam viam de Suthwerke versus occidentem." — liegistrum de Hyde, 
MS. Harl. 1761, fo. 1 GO— 173. 

2 Esc' 33 Ed. I. n. 227 ; 34 Ed. I. n. 127. 

3 Register "Winton, 64 a . 



INNS OP SOTJTHWARK. 53 

The jovial host of "The Tabard," who proposed that 
each of the pilgrims should tell a tale on the journey to 
Canterbury, is thus described by Chaucer : — 

" A semely man our hoste was with alle, 
For to ban ben a marshal in an halle ; 
A large man he was, with eyen stepe, 
A fairer burgeis is ther non in Chepe ; 
Bold of his speche, and wise and wel ytaught, 
And of manhood him lacked righte naught. 
Eke therto was he right a mery man." 

Lines 753 to 759. 

And we have the host's name in the Prologue to the 
Cook's Tale, to whom 

" Our hoste answerd, and sayde, ' I grant it thee : 

Now tell on, Roger, and loke that it be good, 

For many a pastee hast thou letten blood, 

And many a jacke of Dover hast thou sold, 

That hath been twies hot and twies cold. 
. . * * * * * 

Now tell on. gentil Roger, by thy name, 
But yet, I pray thee, be not wroth for game ; 
A man may say ful soth in game and play.' 
' Thou sayst ful soth,' quod Roger, ' by my fay ; 
But soth play quade spel, as the Fleming saith : 
And therfore, Herry Bailly, by thy faith 
Be thou not wroth, or we departen here, 
Though that my tale be of an hostelere.' " 

Lines 4342 to 4358. 

Henry Bailly, the host of " The Tabard," was not 
improbably a descendant of Henry Fitz Martin, of the 
borough of Southwark, to whom King Henry III., by 
letters-patent dated 30th September in the 50th year 
of his reign, at the instance of William de la Zouch, 
granted the customs of the town of Southwark during 
the king's pleasure, he paying to the exchequer the 
annual fee-farm rent of £10 for the same. 

By that grant Henry Eitz Martin was constituted 



54 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

bailiff of South wark, and he would thereby acquire the 
name of Henry the Bailiff, or le Bailly. 

But be this as it may, it is a fact, on record, that 
Henry Bailly, the hosteller of " The Tabard," was one 
of the burgesses who represented the borough of South- 
wark, in the parliament held at Westminster, in the 
50th Edward III., a.d. 1376; and he was again re- 
turned to the parliament held at Gloucester, in the 
2nd Richard II., a.d. 1378. 

We cannot read Chaucer's description of the host 
without acknowledging the likelihood of his being a 
popular man among his fellow-townsmen, and one likely 
to be selected for his fitness to represent them in parlia- 
ment. His identity is further corroborated by the fol- 
lowing extract from the Subsidy Roll of 4th Richard II., 
1380, dorso,— 

Henr' Bayliff, Ostyler, Xpjan, Ux\ eius ijs. 

from which record it appears that Henry Bayliff, 
hosteller, and Christian his wife, were assessed to the 
subsidy at two shillings. 

Of the wife of our host, Chaucer has given us a very 
unfavourable character, in the words of her lord ; unless 
they are to be understood as said in jest, rather than in 
sober truth ; for after the Merchant's tale, which is of a 
bad wife, he makes the host to say, — 

" I have a wif, though that she poure be ; 
But of hire tonge a labbing shrewe is she ; 
And yet she hath an hepe of vices mo, 
Tberof no force ; let all swiche thinges go. 
But wete ye what 1 in counseil be it seyde, 
Me reweth sore I am unto hire teyde ; 
For and I shulde rekene every vice, 
Which that she hath, ywis I were to nice ; 
And cause why, it shulde reported be 
And told to hire of som of this compagnie, 



INNS OF S0UTHWAKK. 55 

(Of whom it needeth not for to declare, 
Sin women coirnen utter swiche cbaffare ;) 
And eke my wit sufficeth not thereto 
To tellen all ; wherfore my tale is do." 

Lines 10,301 to 10,314. 

On the dissolution of the monasteries in the reign of 
King Henry VIII., " The Tabard Inn," with the Abbot 
of Hyde's house in South wark, were surrendered by 
John Salcote, or Saltcote, alias Capon, the last abbot, to 
the king, in April, 1538, and in 1544 were granted by 
the king to John Master and Thomas Master. The 
following is the description of the property in the 
particulars for the grant : — 

" Item certain houses in South warke, whereof one 
called 'The Taberd,' parcel of the possessions of the 
late monastery of Hide, in the county of Southampton, 
by year, as appeareth by the particular is £22. 16s. Sd., 
which, rated at eight years' purchase, doth amount to 
the sum of £182. 13s. M. 

" Memd'. the king must discharge the buyer of one 
annuity of 26s. &d., going out of the said houses in 
South wark, to one Rauff Copwood." 

" The farm of one house at London, in Southwark 
aforesaid, within the hostlery called ' The Taberd,' lying 
on the outer part thereof, called the Abbot's Place, 
and one stable, called the Abbot's Stable, with the 
garden belonging to the said place, called the Abbot's 
Place, which said garden lies on the west part, abutting 
upon a small rough place or dung-place leading from 
'The Taberd' aforesaid to the ditch which goes from the 
Thames, called ' le Temmes ; ' and on the north part 
the said garden abuts on divers small gardens adjoining 
to the outer part of the sign of ' St. George,' in South- 
wark aforesaid, demised to John Orayford, clerk, by 



56 ON SOME OP THE ANCIENT 

indenture dated the 27th of October, 29th Henry VIII., 
for a term of four- score and ten years, paying, therefore, 
at the feast of St. Michael the Archangel, 20 shillings 
per annum, clear. 

" The said house, and other the premises lying in 
South wark, within the suburbs of the City of London, 
and builded within the sign of ' The Taberd,' is in dis- 
tance from the King His Majesty's house, and park, 
in South wark aforesaid, one arrow-shot, and from his 
grace's Palace of Westminster, and his highness' house, 
and park of St. James's in the Fyld one mile and more ; 
all which premises were reserved to the late abbot and 
convent of the aforesaid late monastery of Hide, now 
demised as above is mentioned. 

" The rent or farm of all that messuage or tenement 
situate, lying, and being on the north part of the 
messuage, or hostel, called ' The Taberd,' in Southwark 
aforesaid, with the chambers above the gate of the said 
1 Taberd,' with the garden and the appurtenances to 
the same messuage or tenement belonging, demised to 
Mathew Screville and Oliver Hogerson, and their as- 
signs, by indenture dated 4th November, 30th Henry 
VIII., for the term of thirty -one years, paying at 
Christmas-day, Lady-day, Midsummer, and Michael- 
mas, 53s. 4<d., the lessees keeping the premises in 
repair. 

" The rent or farm of three messuages or tenements, 
and three gardens to the same belonging, situate, lying, 
and being together, within the parish of St. Margaret, 
Southwark, demised to Ralph Copwod and Joan his 
wife, and their assigns, by indenture dated 16th August, 
29th Henry VIII., for the term of thirty-one years, at 
the rent of £6. ; the lessees covenanting to keep the 
premises in repair, and maintaining the pavement in 



INNS OF SOUTHWARK. 57 

the street before the said three messuages, as well with 
stones as all other necessaries. 

" The rent or farm of two messuages, or tenements, 
with two gardens and their appurtenances in Southwark, 
situate, lying, and being within the said parish, on the 
east part of the churchyard of the same parish, and 
on the south part of a messuage or hostlery called ' The 
Tabbard,' demised to Rowland Lathum, his executors 
and assigns, by indenture dated 15th May, 29th Henry 
VIII., for the term of 41 years, at the rent of £4. 

" The rent or farm of one garden in Southwark, late 
in the tenure of William Miller, formerly of John 
Crosse, at the will of the lord, paying per annum 3s. 4<d. 

" The fee of Ptalph Copwood, collector of the rents of 
all the lands and tenements within the borough of 
Southwark aforesaid, by writing of the late abbot and 
convent of the said monastery, under their seal, dated 
5th August, 30th Henry VIII. 

"The farm or rent of all that messuage or hostel, 
called ' The Taberd,' with the appurtenances, situate, 
lying, and being in the parish of Saint Margaret, South- 
wark, wherein one Robert Patty late dwelt, together 
with certain utensils and household stuff, as expressed 
in a certain schedule annexed. Except and reserved to 
the late Bishop Comendator and his successors and 
assigns a certain messuage called the Abbot's Place, and 
one garden and stable called the Abbot's Stable, situate 
and being within the messuage or hostel called ' The 
Tabard,' demised to William Putter and his assigns, 
by indenture under seal of the Bishop Comendator and 
convent of the said late monastery, dated 5th September, 
30th Henry VIII., for the term of 41 years, at the rent 
of £9, confirmed by the Court of Augmentations, in 
Easter term, viz. 1st April, 31st Henry VIII." 



58 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

The Bishop Comendator was John Salcote, Sulcot, 
or Saltcoat (Saultcot on his seal, engraved in the 
Monasticon), alias Capon, D.D., of the university of 
Cambridge, who was translated to Hyde Abbey from 
the Abbey of Hulm in Norfolk, in 1529 : he was the 
last abbot of Hyde, and as a reward for having been 
instrumental in engaging his own university to comply 
with the King's divorce, he was promoted, 19th April, 
1534, to the bishopric of Bangor, which he obtained 
leave to hold in commendam with this abbacy ; and for 
his good services at the dissolution of the monasteries, 
and readily yielding up his monastery to the king's 
visitors, in April, 1538, and procuring his monks, 
twenty-one in number, to join with him in the sur- 
render, he was furthermore preferred, July 31st, 1539, 
to the bishopric of Salisbury, which he held for eighteen 
years, where deceasing, 6th October, 1557, he was buried 
in that cathedral. 4 

As regards the name of the inn, Stow says of " The 
Tabard," — " That it was so called of a jacket or sleeve- 
less coat, whole before, open on both sides, with a 
square collar, winged at the shoulders : a stately gar- 
ment of old time, commonly worn of noblemen and 
others, both at home and abroad in the wars ; but then 
(to wit, in the wars) their arms embroidered or otherwise 
depict upon them, that every man, by his coat of arms, 
might be known from others. But now these tabards 
are only worn by the heralds, and be called their coats 
of arms in service." 

Mr. Speght, in his edition of Chaucer (1602), after 
giving a similar account of the meaning of the word 

4 See a memoir of him in Cooper's " Atliense Cantabrigienses," vol. i. 
p. 171. 



INNS OF SOUTHWARK. 59 

tabard, goes on to speak of the inn so called, as " the inn 
in Southwark, by London, within the which was the 
lodging of the Ahhot of Hyde, by Winchester. This," 
he says, " was the hostelry where Chaucer and the other 
pilgrims met together, and with Henry Baily, their host, 
accorded about the manner of their journey to Canter- 
bury ; and whereas through time it hath been much 
decayed, it is now by Master J. Preston, with the 
abbot's house thereto adjoined, newly repaired, and with 
convenient rooms much increased for the receipt of 
many guests." 

Erom this notice by Mr. Speght we learn that the 
original "Tabard" was standing in 1602. It was an 
ancient timber house, probably as old as " Chaucer's 
time," and there is a view of it in Urry's edition of 
Chaucer, which was reproduced in 1833, in vol. xxii. of 
"The Mirror." 5 

" The Tabard " was burnt in the great fire of South- 
wark which happened in 1676, of which fire I will say 
more in my account of " The George Inn," because, 
having but little to say about the inn itself, I shall have 
more space to tell you what I know about the fire, 
which destroyed that inn as well as " The Tabard," and 
great part of Southwark. 

" The Tabard " was within the old parish of St. Mar- 
garet (now part of St. Saviour's), Southwark. Aubrey, 
the historian of Surrey, in 1719 says : " The ignorant 
landlord or tenant, instead of the ancient sign of • The 
Tabard,' put up ' The Talbot,' a species of dog, and on 
the frieze of the beam supporting the sign was this 

5 A valuable periodical magazine of literature, art, antiquities, and 
general information, edited by my friend Mr. J. Titnbs, author of 
" Curiosities of London," " Things not Generally Known," and other 
estimable works (and who is a native of Southwark). 



GO ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

inscription : — ' This is the inn where Sir Jeffery Chaucer 
and the nine-and-twenty pilgrims lay in their journey to 
Canterbury, anno 13S3." 

A most interesting paper on " The Tabard," by Mr. 
J. Saunders, will be found in " Knight's London," vol. i. 
page 57. 

Robert Bristow, Esq., of Broxmoor, Wiltshire, was 
owner of "The Talbot Inn" in 1822. 

Mr. Saunders is of opinion that part of "The Tabard," 
and that, "The Pilgrims' Hall," is still existing; but 
candour obliges me to say that, having personally 
examined the premises (at some risk), there is nothing 
in the now existing remains of a date earlier than the 
fire of 1676. The fireplaces which he mentions in two 
of the corners of the room, are not older than the reign 
of King James II., and the whole of the supposed " Pil- 
grims' Hall" was built after that fire. 

THE GEORGE. 

This is one of the inns described by Stow as existing 
in his time, and it is mentioned at an earlier period; 
viz. in 1554, 35th Henry VIII., by the name of the 
" St. George," as being situate (as it is) on the north 
side of " The Tabard." ' 

I have not been able to find any notice of this inn 
from the time of Stow until the seventeenth century, 
when two tokens were issued from "The George," which 
are in the Beaufoy Collection at the library of the 
corporation of London, at Guildhall, and described in 
Mr. Jacob Henry Burn's catalogue of those tokens. 
The first is a token of " Anthony Blake, Tapster, y e 
George in South warke ;" and on the reverse are three 
tobacco-pipes ; above them, four beer-measures. 

The other token is inscribed, " James Gunter 16 . ." ? 



INNS OF SOTJTHWARK. 61 

— St. George and Dragon, in field. E.everse, " In 
Sonthwarke : " in the field " i.a.g." 

Mr. Burn quotes some lines from the " Musarum 
Delicias," or the "Muses' P^ecreations," 1656, upon a 
surfeit by drinking bad sack at "The George" tavern in 
Southwark. 

" Oh, would I might turne poet for an houre, 
To satirize with a vindictive power 
Against the drawer ! or I could desire 
Old Johnson's head had scalded in this fire ; 
How would he rage, and bring Apollo down 
To scold with Bacchus, and depose the clown 
For his ill government, and so confute 
Our poet-apes, that do so much impute 
Unto the grape's inspirement !" 

In the year 1670, " The George Inn " was, in great 
part, burnt and demolished by a violent fire which then 
happened in the Borough, and it was totally burnt 
down in the great fire of Southwark, in 1676 ; which I 
have mentioned in speaking of " The Tabard," and of 
which I promised to give a further account in the 
history of "The George." 

Prom the records of the Court of Judicature, esta- 
blished by Act of Parliament for settling differences 
between landlords and tenants, and owners of adjoining 
houses, in consequence of this fire, we learn that the 
owner of "The George," at that time, was John Sayer, 
and the tenant, Mark Weyland. 

In the year 1676, ten years after the great fire of 
London, a great part of Southwark, from the bridge to 
St. Margaret's Hill, including the town hall, which had 
been established in 1540, in the Church of St. Mar- 
garet, was destroyed by a fire, which broke out in the 
Borough ; and being as yet, like old London, chiefly built 
of timber, lath and plaster, the fire spread extensively, 



62 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

and destroyed considerable property. After this it was 
found necessary to pass an Act of Parliament for ap- 
pointing a Court of Judicature, to determine differences 
between owners and tenants of the houses and buildings 
destroyed. The records of the proceedings under that 
act are preserved at Guildhall. 6 

The following is an account of the fire of Southwark, 
from the "London Gazette," 29th May, 1676. 

" London, May 27th. — Yesterday, about four 1 in the morning, broke 
out a most lamentable fire in tlie Borough of Southwark, and continued 
with much violence all that day and part of the night following, not- 
withstanding all the care and endeavours that were used by his Grace 
the Duke of Monmouth, the Earl of Craven, and the Lord Mayor, to 
quench the same, as well by blowing up of houses as other ways. His 
Majesty, accompanied by his Royal Highness the Duke of York, in a 
tender sense of the calamity, being pleased himself to go down to the 
bridge in his barge, to give such orders his Majesty found fit for putting 
a stop to it, which, through the mercy of God, was finally effected, after 
that about GOO houses had been burnt or blown up." 

The following is from the Diary of the Rev. John 
Ward, written a few years later : — 

" Grover and his Irish ruffians burnt Southwark, and had 1000 pounds 
for their pains, said the Narrative of Bedloe. GifFord, a Jesuit, had the 
management of the fire. The 26th of May, 1676, was the dismal fire 
of Southwark. The fire begunne att one Mr. "Welsh, an oilman, near 
St. Margaret's Hill, betwixt the 'George' and ' Talbot' innes, as Bedloe in 
his Narration relates." — Diary of the Rev. John Ward, 8vo. 1839, p. 155. 

The fire was stopped by the substantial building of 



fi The commissioners in the Act of Parliament were the Justices of 
the King's Bench and Common Pleas, the Barons of the Exchequer, the 
Lord Mayor, the Recorder, the Aldermen of London who had been 
Lord Mayors, Viscount Longford, Sir Francis Yincent, Sir Adam Brown, 
and Sir William More, Baronets ; Sir Edward Bowyer, Sir William 
Haward, Sir Nicholas Carew, Knights ; Arthur Onslow, George Evelyn, 
Roger James, Thomas Dalmahoy, George WoodrofFe, William Eliot, 
Roger Duncomb, Thomas Tinge, Thomas Barber, James Reading, 
Rich Howe, Peter Rich, John Freeman, John Applebe, Esqs. 



INNS OF SOUTHWARD. 63 

St. Thomas's Hospital, then recently erected; and in 
commemoration of the event, there is a tablet placed on 
the great staircase, over the door of the hall or court 
room, with the following inscription : — 

" Upon the 26th of May, 1676, and in the 28th year of the reign of 
our Sovereign Loixl King Charles the Second, about three of the clock 
in the morning, over against St. Margaret's Hill, in the Borough of 
Southwark, there happened a most dreadful and lamentable fire, which, 
before ten of the clock at night, consumed about five hundred houses. 
But in the midst of judgment God remembered mercy, and by his 
goodness in considering the poor and distressed, put a stop to the fire 
at this home, after it had been touched several times therewith, by 
which, in all probability, all this side of the Borough was preserved. 
This tablet is here put, that whoso readeth it may give thanks to the 
Almighty God, to whom alone is due the honour and praise. Amen." 

Although the present building of "The George Inn" 
is not older than the end of the seventeenth century, it 
seems to have been rebuilt, after the fire, upon the old 
plan, and it still preserves the character of the ancient 
English inns, having open wooden galleries leading to 
the chambers on each side of the inn yard. 

In the year 1789, " The George Inn" was the pro- 
perty of Thomas Aynescomb, Esq., of Charterhouse 
Square, whose will is dated 11th May, in that year, 
from whom it descended to his grand-daughter, Valen- 
tina Aynescomb, who married Lillie Smith, Esq. 

Iu 30th George II., an Act of Parliament was passed 
for vesting the settled estates of Lillie Smith, Esq., and 
Valentina, his wife, in trustees, to be sold. And in 
1785, "The George Inn," with considerable other pro- 
perty, was sold and conveyed to Lillie Smith Aynescomb, 
Esq., of Thames Street, London, merchant ; and within 
a few years past, it has been purchased by the trustees 
of Guy's Hospital, to which it adjoins. 



64 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

In the conveyance of 1785, the inn is described as 
having been formerly in the occupation of Mary Way- 
land (probably widow of Mark Wayland, who was the 
host in 1676), afterwards of William Golding; and then 
of Thomas Green, who, in 1809, was succeeded by his 
niece, Frances, and her husband, Westerman Schoh 
field ; since whose death " The George " has been, and 
is still, kept by his widow, Mrs. Prances Scholefield, 
now above eighty years of age. 7 

THE WHITE HART 

is one of the inns mentioned by Stow, but it possesses a 
still earlier celebrity, having been the head-quarters of 
Jack Cade, and his rebel rout, during their brief posses- 
sion of London, in the year 1450 ; when Henry VI. was 
king. And it has been immortalized by Shakespeare, in 
the Second Part of his play of King Henry VI., when 
a messenger enters in haste, and announces to the 
king : — 

" The rebels are in Southwark. Fly, ray loi'd ! 
Jack Cade proclaims himself Lord Mortimer, 
Descended from the duke of Clarence' house ; 
And calls your grace usurpei", openly, 
And vows to crown himself in Westminster." 

And, again, another messenger enters and says : — 

" Jack Cade hath gotten London-bridge ; 
The citizens fly and forsake their houses." 

Jack Cade afterwards thus addresses his followers : — 

" And you, base peasants, do ye believe him 1 "Will you needs be 
hanged with your pardons about your necks 1 Hath my sword there- 
fore broke through London gates, that ye should leave me at the "White 
Hart in South wark V — Shakespeare's Henry VI., Part Second, act iv. 
scenes 4 and 8. 

Cade entered London from Blackheath, through the 

7 She died in 1859. 




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INNS OF SOUTHWARD 65 

Borough ; and towards evening lie retired to " The 
White Hart," in Southwark. He continued there for 
some days, entering the city in the morning, and re- 
turning to Southwark at night ; hut at last, his followers 
committing some riot in the city, when they would have 
entered they found the bridge gate shut against them ; 
whereupon a battle ensued between them and the 
citizens, which lasted all day, and ended, at the approach 
of night, by a cessation of arms till the morrow; but 
during the night a proclamation of pardon, which was 
published in the Borough, induced the great body of 
Cade's followers to desert him, and he was obliged to 
fly, and endeavour to conceal himself in Sussex ; where 
he was soon afterwards slain by Alexander Iden, at 
Hothfield. 

There is a contemporary account of some of Cade's 
doings in Southwark, in a letter to John Paston, Esq., 
from J. Payne, servant to Sir John Eastolf, who was 
sent by his master from his house in Horselvdown to 
the rebels' camp at Blackheath, to obtain the articles of 
their demands ; and Payne, being taken by the rebels, 
was about to be beheaded, but his life was spared on the 
intercession of Robert Poynings, Esq. (of Southwark, 
who was engaged in the rebellion, and is mentioned as 
having been carver and chief doer for Cade), and Payne 
was sent back to Southwark, to array himself, under a 
promise to return to the rebels. On returning home, 
he counselled his master, Sir John Eastolf, to send away 
the soldiers and munitions of war, which he had pro- 
vided for the defence of his house at Horselydown; 
which he did, and went with his men to the Tower. 
Payne was seized, and taken before Cade at " The White 
Hart," who ordered him to be despoiled of his array; 
and he seems to have lost all that he had ; and they 



G6 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

would have smitten off his head, but Poynings again 
saved his life, and he (Payne) says : " I was put up till at 
night that the battle was at London Bridge [8th July, 
as the historians have it ; but by a note in one of the 
Paston letters, Cade fled on the 22nd June from Black- 
heath] and then at night the Captain put me out into 
the battle at the bridge, and there I was wounded and 
hurt near unto death, and there I was six hours in the 
battle, and might never come out thereof." 

The " Chronicle of the Grey Friars" (one of the 
publications of the Camden Society) records another 
deed of violence committed bv Cade and his followers at 

v 

this place. 

" At the "VVhyt Hai'te in Southwarke, one Hawaydyne, of Sent 
Martyns, was belieddyd." — Chron. of Grey Friars, p. 19. 

The "White Hart" as now existing, is not the same 
building that afforded quarters to Jack Cade; for in 
1669 the back part of the old inn was accidentally burnt 
down, and the inn was wholly destroyed by the great 
fire which happened in Southwark in 1676. 

The records of the Court of Judicature inform us 
that John Collett, Esq., was then the owner of the 

property, and Robert Taynton, executor of was 

the tenant. 

" The White Hart " appears, however, to have been 
rebuilt upon the model of the older edifice, and still 
realizes the descriptions which we read of the ancient 
inns, consisting of one or more open courts or yards, 
surrounded with open galleries, and which were fre- 
quently used as temporary theatres, for acting plays 
and dramatic performances in the olden time. 

A popular writer of the present day, in one of his 
earliest productions, has given us a capital description of 
the Borough inns, and of " The White Hart " in parti- 



INNS OF SOUTHWARK. 67 

cular, and I hope my readers will not quarrel with 
me for recalling to their recollection " The Pickwick 
Papers," and their old acquaintance Samuel Weller. 

" In the Borough especially (says Mr. Dickens) there still remain 
some half-dozen old inns, which have preserved their external features 
unchanged, and which have escaped alike the rage for puhlic improve- 
ment and the encroachments of private speculation. Great, rambling, 
queer old places they are, with galleries, and passages, and staircases, 
wide enough and antiquated enough to furnish materials for a hundred 

ghost stories It was in the yard of one of these inns — of no less 

celebrated a one than 'The White Hart' — that a man was busily 
employed in brushing the dirt off a pair of boots, early on the morning 
succeeding the events narrated in the last chapter. He was habited in 
a coarse striped waistcoat, with black calico sleeves and blue glass 
buttons, drab breeches, and leggings. A bright-red handerchief was 
wound in a very loose and unstudied style round his neck, and an old 

white hat was carelessly thrown on one side of his head The 

yard presented none of that bustle and activity which are the usual 
characteristics of a large coach inn. Three or four lumbering waggons, 
each with a pile of goods beneath its ample canopy, about the height of 
the second floor window of an ordinary house, were stowed away beneath 
a lofty roof, which extended over one end of the yard ; and another, which 
was probably to commence its journey that morning, was drawn out into 
the open space. A double tier of bedroom galleries, with old clumsy 
balustrades, ran round two sides of the straggling area, and a double 
row of bells to correspond, sheltered from the weather by a little sloping 
roof, hung over the door leading to the bar and coffee-room. Two or 
three gigs and chaise carts were wheeled up under different little sheds 
and penthouses ; and the occasional heavy tread of a cart-horse, or 
rattling of a chain at the further end of the yard, announced to anybody 
who cared about the matter, that the stable lay in that direction. 
"When we add that a few boys in smock-frocks were lying asleep on heavy 
packages, woolpacks, and other articles that were scattered about on 
heaps of straw, we have described, as fully as need be, the general 
appearance of the yard of ' The White Hart Inn,' High Street, Borough, 
on the particular morning in question." 

A pictorial representation of " The White Hart Inn " 
yard illustrates this scene from " The Pickwick Papers," 
chapter 10. 

f 2 



6S ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 



THE BOAR'S HEAD. 

Soutkwark had its "Boar's Head" as well as East- 
cheap, and it is singular that the latter has been 
rendered famous by our Immortal Bard, as one of the 
scenes of the revelries of Prince Hal, and his fat friend, 
Sir John Falstaff ; and that the former was the property 
of Sir John Fastolf, of Caistor Castle, in Norfolk, who 
also had a large house in Stoney Lane, in St. Olave's, 
Southwark, and who died in 1460, possessed, among 
other estates in Southwark, of one messuage in the 
parish of St. Mary Magdalen (now part of St. Saviour's), 
in Southwark, called "The Boreshead." 8 

Mr. Chalmers, in his " History of Oxford," says : 
"It is ascertained that ' The Boar's Head ' in South- 
wark, then divided into tenements, and Caldecott manor 
in Suffolk, were part of the benefactions of Sir John 
Pastolf, Knt., to Magdalen College, Oxford." 

Henry Wyndesore, in a letter to John Paston, dated 
in August, 1459, says : " And it please you to remember 
my master (Sir John Fastolf) at your best leisure, 
whether his old promise shall stand as touching my 
preferring to ' The Boar's Head,' in Southwark. Sir, 
I would have been at another place, and of my master's 
own motion he said that I should set up in • The Boar's 
Head.' " 

Boar's Head Court was situate on the east side of the 
High Street, and north of St. Thomas's Hospital, oppo- 
site St. Saviour's Church ; and that court was I doubt 
not the site of the old " Boar's Head Inn." 

In the churchwardens' accounts of St. Olave, South- 
wark, in 1014-15, I find this house mentioned thus : 

8 Inquisitiones post Mortem, 38 & 39 Henry VI., No. 48. 



INNS OF SOUTHWARK. 69 

" Received of John Barlowe, that dwelleth at Ye Boar's 
Head, in Southwark, for suffering the encroachment 
at the corner of the wall in ye Flemish church yard, 
p' one yeare, iiiis." 

Mr. Halliwell presented to " The British Archaeological 
Association " a rare small brass token. In the centre of 
the obverse is a boar's head (lemon in mouth), and 
around it — " At the Bore's Head ; " on the reverse 



■"In Southwark, 1649;" in the field, " 



WM. 



There is a similar token in the Beaufoy collection of 
tradesmen's tokens, at Guildhall Library ; and Mr. Burn, 
in his valuable catalogue of those tokens, refers to 
the letter of Henry Wyndesore, and to the note from 
Chalmers. The house in High Street, at the corner of 
Boar's Head Court, and those in the court, were formerly 
on lease to the father of John Timbs, Esq., E.S.A., author 
of " Curiosities of London," &c. 

The site of this house is now part of the front of 
St. Thomas's Hospital. 

THE BEAK AT THE BRIDGE-FOOT 

was a noted house of entertainment during the fifteenth, 
sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries; and it remained 
until the houses on old London Bridge were pulled down, 
in or about the year 1760. 

This house was situate in the parish of St. Olave, 
Southwark, on the west side of the High Street, and 
between Pepper Alley and the foot of the bridge. 9 

9 This was properly within the city of London, and formed part of 
Bridge Ward Within, which extended all over the bridge, and included 
the gate at the south end of the bridge, and some houses on each side of 
the way, in the parish of Saint Olave, Southwark, as far as the stulpes 
(wooden posts), which marked the extent of the barrier, or outer fortifi- 
cation of the bridge gate. 



70 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

Tor the earliest notice of " The Bear " at the bridge- 
foot, as well as for some others of which I have availed 
myself, I am indebted to the notes of Mr. Jacob Henry 
Burn to his Catalogue of the London traders', tavern, and 
coffee-house tokens current in the seventeenth century, 
presented to the library of the corporation of London by 
Henry Benjamin Hanclbury Beaufoy, Esq. Mr. Burn 
tells us that " The Bear " at bridge-foot was a house of 
considerable antiquity, and that among the disburse- 
ments for Sir John Howard, in the steward's accounts, 
yet extant, are noticed — 

Mar. 6, 1463-4. Item, payd for red wyn at the Bere 

in Sowthewerke ... ... ... ... ... ... iijc£ 

March 14th (same year). Item, payd at dyuer at the 

Bere in Sowthewerke, in costys ... ... ... iijs. iiije£ 

Item, that my Masytr lost at shotynge ... ... ... xxd. 

The next mention I have found of " The Bear " is in 
a deed in my own possession, dated 12th December, 
1554, in the first and second years of Philip and Mary, 
whereby Eclmonde Wythipolle, of Gwypiswiche (Ips- 
wich), gentleman, conveyed to Henry Leke, of Suthwerk, 
berebruer, (with other premises) the yearly quit rent of 
two shillings, going out of a tenement, being a tavern, 
called "The Beare" in Southwark aforesaid, and in the 
parish of St. Oleef (St. Olave) ; and another deed of the 
same date, to the like effect, is witnessed by Roger 
Hyepy, who, I find by the parish books, was at that 
time landlord of "The Bear," which was a house much 
frequented by the inhabitants of Southwark. It is fre- 
quently mentioned in the accounts of the churchwardens 
of St. Olave's, for instance — 

15G8 to 1570. 

Itm for iiij Dinners at the Visitations, whereof 

one at the church hows and three at the Beare viijli. xiijs. 



INNS OF SOUTIIWAIIK. 71 

Itm, p'd for drinkinge at ye Beare, w h Mr. 

Norryes, pson, and certaine of the Auncients 

ofthepishe ixs.injcl.ob. 

Itfu, p'd another tyme at the same place for the 

lyke drynkynge ... ... ... ... vs. \i\jd. 

There are extant two tradesmen's tokens of the seven- 
teenth century, issued by occupiers of "The Bear." 
One has on the obverse a bear with a chain, and the 
inscription — " Abraham Browne at ye ; " and on the 
reverse — " Bridg Foot, South wark ; " in the centre — 
" His Halfpeny." And the other has on the obverse a 
bear passant with collar and chain, and the inscription 
"Cornelius Cooke at the;" reverse — "Beare at the 
Bridgefot ;" in the centre—" C.A.C." 10 

Cornelius Cooke was a man of some note in his time ; 
I find him mentioned in the parish accounts of St. 
Olave's, as overseer of the land side, as early as 1630. 
He afterwards became a soldier, and was a captain of the 
trained bands. He rose to the rank of colonel in Crom- 
well's army, and was appointed one of the commissioners 
for sale of the king's lands. 

After the restoration of King Charles II. he seems to 
have settled down among his old friends in St. Olave's, 
as landlord of "The Bear" at the bridge-foot, where 
he doubtless frequently fought o'er his fields again, 
and told his tales of the civil wars. 

Gerrard, in a letter to Lord Strafford (printed among 
the Strafford papers), January, 1633, intimates that all 
back doors to taverns on the Thames are commanded to 
be shut up, only the Bear at the bridge-foot is exempted, 
by reason of the passage to Greenwich. 13 

10 Manning and Bray's Surrey, vol. iii., Appendix, p. cxiii. Akerman's 
Tradesmen's Tokens. 

11 Akerman's Tradesmens Tokens. Burn's Catalogue of Beaufoy 
Collection. 12 Burn's Catalogue, p. 46 n. 



72 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 



The cavaliers' ballad on the magnificent funeral 
honours rendered to Admiral Dean (killed June 2nd, 
1653), while passing by water to Henry the Seventh's 
chapel, has the following allusion : — 

" From Greenwich towards the Bear at bridgefoot, 
He was wafted with wind that had water to't, 
But I think they brought the devil to boot, 

Which nobody can deny." 

In another ballad, "On banishing the ladies out of 
town," by the Commonwealth authorities, the notoriety 
of " The Bear " at bridge-foot is again manifest : — 

" Farewell bridge-foot and Bear thereby, 
And those bald pates that stand so high, 
We wish it, from our very souls, 
That other heads were on those poles." 13 

" The Bear " at London Bridge foot is twice mentioned 
by Samuel Pepys, in his amusing Diary : — 

'■'24 Feb., 166G-7. Going through bridge by water, my waterman 
told me how the mistress of the Beare tavern, at the bridge-foot, did 
lately fling herself into the Thames, and drown herself; which did 
trouble me the more, when they tell me it was she that did live at the 
White Horse tavern in Lumbard-street, which was a most beautiful 
woman, as most I have seen. It seems she hath had long melancholy 
upon her, and hath endeavoured to make away with herself often." 

"3 April, 1GG7. Here I hear how the king is not so well pleased 
of this marriage between the Duke of Richmond and Mrs. Stewart, as 
is talked ; and that he by a wile did fetch her to the Beare, at the Bridge- 
foot, where a coach was ready, and they are stole away into Kent, with- 
out the king's leave ; and that the king hath said he will never see her 
more : but people do think that it is only a trick." 

There is yet another poetical reference to " The Bear" 
at bridge-foot, in a scarce poem entitled " The Last 
Search after Claret in Southwark, or a Yisitation of the 

13 Burn's Catalogue of Beaufoy Tokens, p. 46 n. The allusion to 
bald pates refers to the traitors' heads exposed on the bridge gate. 



INNS OF SOUTHWARK. 73 

Vintners in the Mint, with the Debates of a Committee 
of that Profession, thither fled to avoid the cruel perse- 
cution of their unmerciful creditors. A poem. London : 
printed for E. Hawkins, 1691," 4to., u in which " The 
Bear ' is thus mentioned (after landing at Pepper 
Alley) :— 

" Through stinks of all sorts, both the simple and compound, 
Which through narrow alleys our senses do confound, 
We came to the Bear, which we soon understood 
Was the first house in Southwark built after the flood, 
And has such a succession of vintners known, 
Not more names were e'er in Welsh pedigrees shown : 
But claret with them was so much out of fashion, 
That it has not been known there a whole generation." 

" The Bear" continued to afford hospitable entertain- 
ment to all who could pay, until the year 1761, when it 
was pulled down, on the bridge being widened, and the 
houses thereon removed. 

In " The Public Advertiser," of Saturday, December 
26th, 1761, is the following announcement : — 

" Thursday last, the workmen employed in pulling down the Bear 
tavern, at the foot of London Bridge, found several pieces of gold and 
silver coin of Queen Elizabeth, and other monies to a considerable 
value." 15 

THE WHITE LION, THE CEOWN AND CHEQUERS, THE THREE 
BRUSHES, OR HOLY-WATER SPRINKLERS. 

I now come to one of the inns of Southwark to which 
the poet Shenstone's lines will hardly apply. 

" Whoe'er has travell'd life's dull round, 
Where'er his stages may have been, 
May sigh to think he still has found 
The warmest welcome at an inn." 



14 From a communication by J. O. Halliwell, Esq., F.S.A. 

15 Chronicles of London Bridge, 548. 



74 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

For, alas ! the inn, of which I have now to speak, was 
also a prison ; a house of entertainment to which guests 
were compelled to go by pressing invitation from the 
sheriff of Surrey. 

Stow, in his " Survey of London," describing the 
High Street of Southwark, says : " Then is the White 
Lion, a gaol so called, for that the same was a common 
hostelry for the receipt of travellers, by that sign. This 
house was first used as a gaole within this three-score 
years last (i.e. from about 1538), since which time the 
prisoners were once removed to an house in Newtowne 
(Newington), where they remained for a short time, 
and were returned back again to the aforesaid White 
Lion, there to remain as the appointed gaole for the 
county of Surrey." 

Among the records of the Court of Augmentations 
are the particulars for a grant by King Henry VIII. , in 
the 36th year of his reign, to Robert Cursen, of part of 
the possessions of the dissolved monastery of St. Mary 
Overy, consisting of a tenement called " The Whyte 
Lyon," situate and being in the parish of the blessed 
Mary Magdalen, in Sowthwarke, which said tenement, 
on the east part abuts upon the new burying- ground of 
St. Olave's and a garden belonging to the late monastery 
of Lewes, on the west part on the king's highway, on 
the north part on the sign of "The Ball" late per- 
taining to the hospital of Thomas Becket, on the south 
part on a tenement belonging to Master Uobert Tyrrell, 10 

16 From this description, the site of the house, called "The White 
Lion," in this particular, may be clearly and undoubtedly ascertained ; 
as the new burying-ground of the parish of St. Olave (called the 
Flemish Ground) was in existence until the Greenwich Railway Com- 
pany took it for making the road to the London Bridge termini, and it 
now forms part of the garden of St. Thomas's Hospital. " The White 



INNS OF SOTJTHWARK. 75 

in the tenure of Henry My nee, as demised to him by 
indenture dated 12th January, 29th Henry VIII., from 
Christmas-day then last, for the term of thirty years, at 
the yearly rent of sixty shillings, repairs at the king's 
charge, except the glazing and the emptying of the privies 
and cesspools, as in the said indenture appears. Com- 
prised in the same particulars, is also the rent of one 
garden there, with a tenement situate in the same 
garden, lying and being within the parish of St. George, 
in Southwark, in the tenure of Walter Carter, demised 
to him by indenture dated 6th March, 27th Henry VIII., 
from the Annunciation next after the date, for thirty 
years, at the rent of 26s. 8c/. 17 

Presuming that " The White Lion " was the same 
house that was afterwards called " The Crown," or 
" The Crown and Chequers," and subsequently Baxter's 
Coffee-house, it existed until the year 1832, when it was 
pulled down for forming the approach to London-bridge, 
and the site is now occupied by the new north wing 
of St. Thomas's Hospital. This house is mentioned in 
" The Epicure's Almanac," 1815, as interesting on ac- 
count of its antiquity, and the author states that it was 
part of a palace, where King Henry VIII. once kept his 

Lion " was between the churchyard and the High Street, and nearly- 
opposite to St. Saviour's Church. I am not sure, however, that this house 
was the White Lion Prison, which, at a later period, was certaiuly in 
the parish of St. George, on the east side of the High Street, near 
St. George's Church, and afterwards became the Marshalsea prison ; 
now the shop and warehouse of Messrs. Twiddy and Tippet, cheese- 
mongers. 

17 This house and garden in St. George's was then, or afterwards, 
known by the name of Hangman's Acre. It was situate at the corner 
of Gravel Lane and Friar Street, and belonged to the White Lion estate 
when it came into the hands of the county. On it was built a house of 
correction, and it is now a soap-manufactoxy. 



7G ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

court. The writer says it was decorated externally with 
the remains of the roval insignia. Some of the rooms, then 
occupied by a hop-merchant, had ceilings richly embossed 
with the arms of the Royal Harry ; and then the author 
conjures up a fanciful picture of King Henry and Anna 
Boleyn, and I know not who besides ; and he refers to 
the Marquis of Salisbury's picture at Hatfield House, 
which he says represents King Henry VIII. at Ber- 
mondsey Eair, leaning on Cardinal Wolsey. This is 
the picture to which I had the honour of drawing the 
notice of this Society, at a meeting held at Horselydown 
in October, 1855, and which has been beautifully etched 
by Mr. Le Keux, in the first volume of our Proceedings. 
The spot represented is, I believe, Horselydown, and 
very near to the place where we are now assembled 
(St. Olave's New Grammar School) ; but the date of the 
picture is 1590, half a century later than Henry's time, 
and the Royal Harry, Cardinal Wolsey, Anna Boleyn, 
and the rest, are mere creations of the author's fancy ; 
as also is the idea of the house in question having been 
a royal palace, and the king's arms being embossed on 
the ceiling of one of the rooms. 

But we have seen that " The "White Lion " was part 
of the plunder of the monastery of St. Mary Overy, and 
was sold by King Henry VIII. to Robert Cursen ; and 
that will account for the kind's name having become 
traditionally connected with it. In a house adjoining 
there was a panelled room having on the ceiling the 
arms of Queen Elizabeth, with the letters E.R. ; and 
(if this "White Lion" was the prison of that name) 
the room so decorated was probably the court-room, in 
which the justices sat and held their sessions. 

That the house was an ancient and curious building, 
you may judge from the engraving of the exterior view 



INNS OF SOUTHWARK. 77 

(from Taylor's " History of St. Saviour's"), and from 
1 he delineation of the ceiling, and one side of the court- 
room, and of the staircase (from drawings by E. Hassell), 
which I now have the pleasure to exhibit. 

The house to which this room with the panelled 
wainscoting and ceiling ornamented with the royal arms 
of Elizabeth, belonged, was situate in a small court 
between Baxter's coffee-house and the house of the late 
Mr. Josiah Monnery, hosier and glover, and at the rear 
of the latter house ; it was occupied by Mr. Solomon 
Davies, a tobacconist, for some time during the progress 
of the new street to London Bridge. This house had 
formerly been known by the sign of " The Three 
Brushes," or holy-water sprinklers. 

In 1652, it w r as conveyed by Thomas Overman to 
Hugh Lawton, who died in 1669; and in 1678, by 
bargain and sale enrolled in Chancery, Abraham Law- 
ton, and Mary his wife, he being nephew and heir of 
Hugh, and eldest son of Abraham Lawton, eldest 
brother of Hugh, conveyed the premises to Nathaniel 
Collier, who by his will, dated 7th November, 1695, 
devised the same to his daughter, Susannah Lardner, 
wife of Richard Lardner. A fine was levied in 1703, 
and in 1739, Richard Lardner by his will devised to 
his son Nathaniel, who by his will, dated 9th March, 
1767, gave a moiety of " The Three Brushes, or 
Sprinklers," to his niece, Mary Lister, eldest daughter of 
his sister, Elizabeth Neal, and the other moiety to 
Elizabeth Solly and Mary Rogers, daughters of his 
nephew, Nathaniel Neal. 

In 1769, Isaac Solly, of Jeffery Square, St. Mary 
Axe, merchant, and Elizabeth, his wife; and John 
Rogers, of Bartholomew Close, warehouseman, conveyed 
and levied a fine of their moiety to the R-ev. Win. Lister, 



78 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

of Ware, who by his will, in 1777, devised this property 
to his sons, Daniel Lister, of Ware, gentleman, and 
William Lister, M.D., of the university of Edinburgh, 
and his daughter, Elizabeth Lister (who died unmarried) ; 
and in 1795, Daniel Lister, of Hackney, gentleman, 
eldest son and heir of William Lister, clerk, and Mary, 
his wife, conveyed the premises to Joseph Prince, of the 
borough of Southwark, hop-merchant, and of Camber- 
well ; whose son, John Prince, Esq., of Southwark and 
Earnham Hall, Hertfordshire, married, in 1809, Harriett 
Hannah Hall, daughter of John Hall, Esq., of Halkin 
Street, Grosvenor Place ; and in 1832 this property was 
sold to the governors of St. Thomas's Hospital, and is 
now comprised within the hospital gates. 

A plan on a lease of the date of 1767 calls the public- 
house "The Crown." And in 1783 the premises are 
described as, " All those two several messuages or tene- 
ments, formerly one messuage or tenement, and after- 
wards three, situate in the parish of Saint Saviour, 
Southwark, heretofore called or known by the name or 
sign of * The Holy-water Sprinklers,' or the ' Three 
Brushes ;' theretofore, in the several tenures or occupa- 
tions of Henry Thrale, Esquire, Josiah Monnery, and 
John Hargreaves, but then in the occupation of the said 
Josiah Monnery and Joseph Prince." 18 

The house in front of the High Street, and on the 
south side of the passage, which was occupied by Mr. 
Monnery, became his own freehold property by purchase, 
and was sold by him to the corporation of London, for 
making the new street to London Bridge. 

The only further notice I have of these premises is 
from Mr. Burn's Catalogue of Mr. Beaufoy's collection 

18 These particulars are from the deeds belonging to St. Thomas's 
Hospital, by liberal permission of Richard Baggallay, Esq., Treasurer. 



INNS OF SOUTHWARK. 79 

of tradesmen's tokens at the library, Guildhall; in 
which collection is a token inscribed "Robert Thornton, 
Haberdasher, his Halfe Penny ;" and on the reverse — 
"next the Three Brushes, in South warke, 1667 ; " and 
Mr. Burn in a note tells us that "The Three Brushes " 
was a tavern of some notoriety. In one of the disgraceful 
prosecutions under the papistical reign of King James 
the Second, Bellamy, mine host of "The Three Brushes," 
figured most contemptibly, as a witness for the Crown, 
on the trial of the Rev. Samuel Johnson, at West- 
minster Hall, on Monday, June 21st, 1686. 

I now come to " The White Lion " as a prison ; but 
I am by no means certain that "The White Lion " of 
which I have before treated is the same house that was 
the county prison ; for at that time, when houses were 
not numbered, especially if they were occupied by trades- 
men, they were known by signs ; from which it did not 
follow that they were inns or public houses ; but there 
was in the High Street of Southwark, as we have seen 
from Stow's " Survey of London," an inn called " The 
White Lion," which was used as a prison for the county 
of Surrey. In the 21th year of Queen Elizabeth's reign, 
the Queen granted the keepership of the Whyte Lyon 
prison in Southwark, to Thomas Lewis and Ann his 
wife, by letters patent, dated July 5th. 

In a letter (contained in a volume of original letters 
and papers, in the library of the dean and chapter of 
Canterbury), from Lord Burghley to Sir Thomas Browne, 
sheriff of Surrey, written from the court at Oatlands, 
21th of September, 1583 : " The wife of one Thorp, late 
gaoler of the White Lion, complains that he had been 
injured, being put from keeping the prison by one 
Lewier, who made a lease of that house to Thorp for 
sixty years, whereby he claimed to have the same, and 



80 ON SOME OF THE ANCIENT 

to be jailer there ; he gave bond to the sheriff in £900." 
Lord Burghley desires Sir Thomas to inquire into it. 
The result does not appear. 19 

"While "The "White Lion" was used as a prison, 
during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, the Roman Catholic 
recusants were confined there, as appears from the 
account of Donald Sharpies, renter (or receiver of rents) 
for Thomas Copley, Esq. 20 (of Gatton, Surrey, and the 
Maze, Southwark), of receipts and payments on account 
of rents of lands and tenements in Southwark, a.d. 1569. 

Paid to Mr. Cooke, keeper of the goale in Southwark, 
called the White Lion, for the charges of 3 pri- 
soners — Ingram, Marshall, and Lawrance ... 31%. Ss. 

Paid Mr. Waye, keeper of the Marshalsea, for 

2 prisoners — Pichd. Cooke and Pob. Cooke ... 48s. Sd. 

And in 1570,— 

Paid in the Crown Office, to Mr. Ive, for the fynes 

of the indictments of 18 persons ... ... ... 53s. 

Paid for their fines to the Queen, ceassed by the 

Justice Southcoote, at 5s. each ... ... ... 4K. 10.?. 

Among the State Papers (domestic series, vol. cxl. 
No. 39), there is a certificate of Thomas Lewys, keeper 
of " The White Lion," dated 31st July, 1580, of the 
prisoners that were then or had been lately in his custody 
for matters of religion. 

The records of the clerk of the peace for Surrey go no 
further back than the time of the restoration of King 
Charles II. ; from them we learn that " The White 
Lion" had at some time been purchased by the county 

19 Manning and Bray's Hist, of Surrey, vol. iii. App. xvi. 

20 The Copleys were a Roman Catholic family, who suffered much for 
their religion in those times of persecution ; and Mr. Copley was then 
abroad to avoid proceedings against him. These accounts are printed in 
Nicholls' " Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica." 



QTNfl OF SOUTHWAE.K. 81 

for the purpose of a prison, and that in 1681, " The 
White Lion" was in so ruinous a state, that prisoners 
could not he kept there safely, and, at the quarter- 
sessions held at Dorking in January of that year, a 
committee was appointed, hut nothing was done till 
1695, when the county prisoners, having heen kept in 
the Marshalsea prison for some years in consequence 
of the ruinous state of "The White Lion," the sheriff 
agreed with Mr. Lowman, then keeper of the Marshalsea, 
for the use of that prison to keep the county prisoners 
in, and that Lowman should have the benefit of " The 
White Lion," except of that part of it which had heen 
used as a house of correction ; and in 1696 a lease of 
" The White Lion " was granted to Lowman for fifty- 
nine years. 21 

When the present Queen's Prison (formerly called the 
King's Bench) was built, in the year 1758, the old 
King's Bench prison, which was on the east side of High 
Street, Southwark, near St. George's Church, became 
the county prison, and in 1811, after the building of 
Horsemonger Lane Gaol, the county magistrates sold it 
under the powers of an act of parliament, and it became 
the Marshalsea prison. 

21 Manning and Bray's Hist, of Surrey, vol. iii. App. p. xi. 



VOL. II. G 



82 NOTES PROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OF 



VII. 

NOTES PROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OP 
RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM, 
IN THE COUNTY OP SURREY. 

By WILLIAM HENRY HART, Esq., F.S.A. 

READ AT THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING, HELD AT RICHMOND, JULY 5, 1859. 



It is not improbable that the title prefixed to the few 
remarks I am about to address to the meeting now 
assembled, may somewhat impress many that I am 
proceeding to detail nothing more than a dry list of 
births, deaths, and marriages ; or, in other words, that I 
merely make myself an animated first column of the 
Times for the occasion : this is, however, not the case ; 
for I hope to be able to undeceive those who may be 
under that impression, and to show to them that out of 
old Parish Registers may be gleaned facts, often of 
historical importance, which can be gathered from no 
other source ; and also mention of various little inci- 
dents of considerable local interest, some of which are 
even seasoned with a spice of romance. 

Parish Registers were instituted in pursuance of an 
injunction of the Lord Vicegerent Cromwell, dated in 
September, in the 30th year of Henry VIII., whereby, 
to use the words of the original, — 

" I, Thomas Lord Cromwell, Privy Seal, and Vicegerent to the King's 
said Highness, for all his jurisdiction ecclesiastical within this realm, 
do for the advancement of the true honour of Almighty God, increa.se 
of vertue, and discharge of the King's Majesty, give and exhibit unto 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 83 

you these injunctions following, to be kept, observed and fulfilled, upon 
the pains hereafter declared : — Item, that you and every parson, vicar, 
or curate within this Diocese, for every church keep one book or 
register, wherein he shall write the day and year of every wedding, 
christening, and burial, made within your parish for your time, and so 
every man succeeding you likewise, and also there insert every person's 
name that shall be so wedded, christned, and buried. And for the safe 
keeping of the same book, the parish shall be bound to provide of their 
common charges one sure coffer, with two locks and keys, -whereof the 
one to remain with you, and the other with the Wardens of every 
Parish wherein the said book shall be laid up, which Book ye shall every 
Sunday take forth, and in the presence of the said Wardens or one of 
them, write and record in the same, all the weddings, christnings, and 
burials made the whole week afore, and that done, to lay up the book in 
the said coffer as afore ; and for every time that the same shall be 
omitted, the party that shall be in the fault thereof shall forfeit to the 
said church iijs. iiij<£, to be employed on the reparation of the said 
church." 

Registers were thus confined, properly speaking, to 
entries of baptisms, marriages, and burials ; but in the 
ancient ones this order was not strictly adhered to ; and 
it was found convenient to make use of these books 
wherein to enter memoranda of extraordinary events 
worthy of remark ; such as a great flood or tempest, the 
rebuilding or alteration of the church, gifts of pulpit, 
altar-cloth, or other ecclesiastical furniture, names of 
preachers on special occasions, licences for persons to 
eat flesh in Lent, briefs for collections for charitable 
purposes ; in short, in the early days, when the news- 
paper was unknown, and the means of perpetuating 
information not so readily attainable as at the present 
day, the Parish Register was perhaps the most natural 
place in which to record events somewhat out of the 
common course; and, therefore, it is to that custom 
that at this hour we owe the possession of much local 
and antiquarian information, which otherwise would 
never have been handed down to us. 

G 2 



81 NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OF 

The Richmond Registers commence in the year 1583, 
and from a memorandum at the head of the first 
volume, the earlier ones appear to have fallen into 
confusion and disorder, and thereupon to have been 
recopied in the first year of the reign of King James I. 

In the year 1596 is this curious entry : — 

" Laurence Snowe was buried w ch Laurence was executed at King- 
stone and by bis wife brougbt to Eicbuiounte and tbere buried 
July 24 1596." 

We next come to two entries illustrative of the 
curious custom which prevailed in former times, that of 
lodging the heart and bowels of a person separately, and 
in many cases at remote distances from the body, which 
was buried elsewhere ; and to which custom, it will be 
recollected, many of our early kings conformed. 

In pursuance of this fashion, we find the following 
entry in the Richmond Register for the year 1599 : — 

"Nov. 12. Mrs. Elizabeth Ratcliff one of tbe maides of honor died, 
and her bowells buried in the chancell at Bichmont." 

The other instance occurs in the following year. Sir 
Anthony Poulet was eldest surviving son and heir 
of Sir Amias Poulet, Knight, and was constituted 
Governor of the Isle of Jersey on the death of his 
father, Sept. 26, 1588 ; he was likewise Captain of the 
Guard to Queen Elizabeth, who conferred the honour of 
knighthood upon him. He died in the year 1600, and 
by his "Will, dated in the month of May that year, 
directed his executors to bury him in the church of the 
parish where he might happen to die ; but by a codicil 
to his Will, he ordered a tomb to be erected for himself 
and family in the parish church of Hinton St. George, 
in Somersetshire, the ancient residence of the family. 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 85 

In the Richmond Register Ave find the following 
entry : — 

"July 24 1600. Sir Antony Paulet Knight died at Kew, whose 
bowells were interred at Richmounte." 

Thus one part of the directions of his "Will was com- 
plied with, while the remainder of his injunction was 
fulfilled by his body being buried in the church of 
Hinton St. George, where there remains a fine monu- 
ment to him and his lady. 

There are frequent entries of deaths, where the burial 
has taken place elsewhere, as for example, — 

"Sir Edward Gorges Knight dyed Aug. 29. 1G25 and was caried to 
London to be buryed." 

"Elizabeth Veere, Countis of Darbie died here March 10. 1626 and 
at ye Abbye buried." 

This lady was eldest daughter of Edward Vere, 17th 
Earl of Oxford ; she was married to William, 6th 
Earl of Derby, on the 26th June, 1594, and was buried 
at Westminster Abbey on the 11th March, 1626, the 
day after her death. 

In these registers, as in most others, are several 
entries of burials of chrisom children. Thus, — 

"A chrisom child of Reynald Ashen buried Aug. 24. 1626." "An 
Johnson a crisom buried Dec. 10. 1634." "A crisome of M r3 Best of 
Kew buried Dec. 7, 1636." "A chrisome of Sir Harbar Lunsons buried 
March 12. 1650." 

There is room for considerable discussion on the 
proper use of this term " chrisom children," but it 
would be out of place, and would take too much time 
here to enter into any arguments on the question ; 
suffice it, for the present purpose, to say, that according 
to the better opinion, it means those children who die after 
their baptism, but before the churching of the mother. 



86 NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OP 

However, through the inadvertence or neglect of the 
clergy, whose duty it was to make up the register 
hooks, the term came to be applied to children dying 
unbaptized ; and when met with in ancient parish 
registers, must he understood in that sense, although 
the wrong one. 

The reader may, perhaps, remember how this word, in 
its correct sense, is used by Shakspere, in his play of 
King Henry V., when the death of Ealstaff is announced, 
and Mrs. Quickly replies : — 

" Nay sure, lie's not in hell ; lie's in Arthur's bosoin, if ever man 
went to Arthur's bosom. 'A made a finer end, and went away, an it 
had been any christom child." 



Again, we find Bishop Taylor, in his " Holy Living 



5 



making use of the word in the following most beautiful 
passage : — 

" This day is mine and yours, but ye know not what shall be on the 
morrow ; and every morning creeps out of a dark cloud, leaving behind 
it an ignorance and silence, deep as midnight, and undiscerned as are the 
phantasms that make a chrisome child to smile." 

Wheatley, in his work on the "Book of Common 
Prayer," says : — 

" By the first common prayer of King Edward, after the child was 
thus baptized, the godfathers were to lay their hands \ipon it, and the 
minister was to put upon him his white vesture, commonly called the 
chrisom, and to say, ' Take this white vesture as a token of the innb- 
cency which, by God's grace, in this holy Sacrament of Baptism, is given 
unto thee : and for a sign whereby thou art admonished so long as thou 
livest, to give thyself to innocency of living, that after this transitory life 
thou mayest be partaker of the life everlasting. Amen.' ' 

"Then the priest, anointing the head, says this prayer: 'Almighty 
God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath regenerated thee 
by water and the Holy Ghost, and hath given unto thee remission of all 
thy sins ; he vouchsafe to anoint thee with the unction of his holy 
spirit, and bring thee to the inheritance of everlasting life. Amen.' '' 

From this anointing with chrism the garment was 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 87 

called chrisom, which " it was the custom anciently for 
the newly-baptized persons to appear in at church 
during the solemn time for baptism, to show their 
resolution of leading an innocent and unspotted life for 
the future, and then to put them off, and to deliver 
them to be laid up, in order to be produced as evidences 
against them, should they afterwards violate or deny 
that faith which they had then professed. And this, I 
suppose, was the design of our own Church, at the be- 
ginning of the Reformation, in ordering the woman to 
offer the chrisom when she came to be churched. For 
if the child happened to die before, then it seems she 
was excused from offering it; and, indeed, there was 
then no occasion to demand it, since it would be of no 
use to the Church when the child was dead. And, there- 
fore, in such case it was customary to wrap the child 
in it when it was buried, in the nature of a shroud." 

And thus arose the term chrisom children. 

Monumental brasses, when laid down to the memorv 
of chrisom children, have a distinctive feature peculiar 
to themselves. There is a very good specimen at the 
church of Stoke D'Abernon in this county, and there 
are also specimens engraved in Cotman's Norfolk 
Brasses. The figures are represented as bound up in 
folds of linen, ornamented with Vandyked edges, bound 
down with strips of Vandyked lioen, in such order that 
the intersection on the upper and lower fourth of the 
body's length, shall present the form of a cross. 1 

Chrisom children are not frequent in the Kingston 
Registers, while in those of Petersham I do not find a 
single instance. 

1 A full account of chrisom children will be found in a paper read 
before the Exeter Diocesan Architectural Society, by Thomas George 
Norris, Esq., in 1847. See their Transactions. 



88 NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OE 

One of the changes which took place, on the great 
Revolution in political and religious affairs, occasioned 
by the usurper Cromwell, manifested itself in the laws 
relating to marriage. Tor the especial benefit of those 
who preferred that their union should be unblest with 
the benedictions of the Church, a statute was passed in 
August, 1653, enabling Justices of the Peace to solem- 
nize weddings; and the Richmond Register, in 1654, 
contains an entry of the celebration of one of these 
ceremonies, thus : — ■ 

""William Sauley and Mary Austin had ye Publicacon of their 
marriage published upon the 12 th y e 19 th and y e 26 th day of February 
and were marryed by Richard Graves Esquire ye 26 th day of March 
1 65i in y e presence of "Walter Symmes Rob* Warren and others." 

I will conclude the Richmond Registers by quoting 
some miscellaneous entries, worthy of notice : — 

" Nazareth the base borne Daughter* of Joane Maskall " christened 
Febx. 25 162f. "James Gouldstone & Tho : Gouldstone sounes of 
Lawrance Gouldstone (uno partu) " christened May 1, 1623. "Richard 
Greene, sonne of Will : Greene (junior) and Will: Evans, sonne of Ryce 
Evans (a travailing stranger) whose wife laye in at Sheene." Clmstened 
May 8, 1625. " Deborah, a vagrant, christ d Dec. 11. 1638." " Clement 
Cochman to the Lady Elizabeth's Grace. Buried Feb. 8 161|." "An 
Wright a Londoner, buried Feb. 9. 161f." "Roger Magar a Londoner 
buried Jan. 3 16l£." "John Mangus (a Scotishman) buried August 25 
1623." "John Smyth y e bird catcher, buried Nov. 13. 1634." 
" Matthew a Blackamoor buried May 20 th 1671." 

I now pass to the Kingston Registers, a slight survey 
of which will, I think, be productive of more interesting 
results than those of Richmond. They commence in 
October in the second year of the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth, and are in good preservation. 

In the early part of the first volume is an account of 
the different preachers at the church during the years 
1572, 1573, and 1574, which forms an interesting local 
record. 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 89 

Nov. 23. 1572 It her was a chaplaine of iny Lord of Bedford w ch 
preched twise on the daye being Sondaye. 

26. Item heer was a Chaplaine as the same pertayned to the Erll of 
Bedford. 

Item, on M the 22 of Dess 1 " preched her M r Beelle Chaplain to 

my Lorde Erie of Lecister. 

25 Dec. Item the Deane of the quens majestis Chapell preched here 
on Christmas day befornone. 

Item at afternone preched her M r Beale ut supra. 

On day was her one of the quens chapell and preched. 

January. 

11 Item M r Jaymes my Lord of Lecester Chaplain preched her the 
Sonday the 1 1 of Januarii. 

1 1 Item at afternone preched a chaplaine of my Lord of Bedford. 
18 Item M 1 ' Beall preched her the 18 day. 

March. 
18 Item there preched her a young man chaplayn to the Duchess ot 

Somersett. 

April. 

25 Item y e preacher of my Lordde Canterrburys chappeleyn for to 
surmons. 

26 Item ye xxvi daye y e preacher of my Lordde of Beddford^ chap- 
pelayne. 

Maye. 

3 Item my Laydye of Somersetts Chappellen precher. 

7 Item Master Wayener preacher at y c buriall of ollde Foxxe. 

1573 November prechyngs. 

The xix th daye of November at the buriall of M r Selbye the vicer of 
Twickenam prechyde. 

Item y e vicer preachyd y e xxij daye of November. 

Item more M r Dagenfimle of Oxxforde prechyd y e xxij daye of 
November. 

xxix daye Item M r Eton vicer of Twickenam prechid. 

xxx daye Item M r Eton vicer of Twickenam preachid. 

December, 
ij daye. Item y e second daye of December M 1 ' Eton prechyde. 

January. 

xxiiij Item M 1 ' Coke Chapplen unto my Lorde Chamberlayne prechyd. 
xxviij Item y e xxviij daye M r Eton prechyd twysse. 



GO NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OF 

February 1573. 

y e iij daye Item y e iij daye of Februarye M 1 ' Coke prechyd. 
xiiij daye M r Eton preacbyd twisse. 

March 157-. 2 
Item M r Coke precbyd y e viij daye of Marcbe. 

March 1574. 
Item M r Eton precbyd y e xxv th daye of Marcbe. 

Apriell 1574. 

Item M r Knelle precbyd y e xiiij th daye of Apriell. 
Item more M r Knelle precbyd y e xvij daye of Apriell. 

In the old times it was the custom for persons in 
distress, or who had met with accident or misfortune, 
and required the eleemosynary aid of their richer 
brethren, to obtain from the Ecclesiastical Court what 
was termed a " brief," or, in other words, a species of 
authority to go about begging at any church they might 
think fit ; and thereupon to throw themselves upon the 
bounty of indiscriminate congregations even at a remote 
distance ; thus : — 

June 25. 1570. Sonday was her Jho Jinkin by pattin w ch was 
robbid on the sea by Spanyards. 

February 1571. 

10 Sonday was her a man for his Father who was robbed on the Sey 
by Lycence from my Lord Admirall. 

10 Item was here the proctor of Kingsland beside Knightbrig. 

24 Sonday was here ij wemen the mother and dowghter owte of 
Ireland she called Elynor Salve to gather upon the deathe of her 
howsbande a gentlman slayne amongst the wylde Iryshe being Captaiue 
of Gallyglasses and gathered xviijrf. 

May 26. Item her was a man from Dorkinge whose howse was brent. 

August 20 Item the proctor of Kingsland was here the Sonday being 
the 20 of August. 

In the same day was here ij men being robbid on the Seye. 



Sic. 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 91 

In December, 1569, is a little note of local interest : — 

Item in tins monthe of December was the Ponde made in the Horse 
Market. 

In 1570, October 9, is this note : — 

Thursday at nyght rose a great winde and rayne that the Temps rosse 
so hye that they myght row w* bott 3 owte of the Temps a gret waye in 
to the market place and upon a sodayne. 

In the year 1572 a new cucking-stool was made at 
the expense to the parish of £1. 3s. 4cl. This was an 
instrument or contrivance for the punishment of women 
who made so much use of their tongues as to disturb 
their neighbours, as well as their own families. Wher- 
ever there was a pond or stream of water in the parish 
(in this case the river is handy), a post was set up in it ; 
across this post was placed a transverse beam, turning 
on a swivel, with a chair at one end of it, in which, 
when the culprit was properly placed, that end was 
turned to the pond, and let down into the water. This 
was repeated as many times as the circumstances of the 
case required. 

No sooner was this new cucking-stool provided, than 
occasion required its application, as the following entry 
in the Register will show : — 

1572 August. On Tewsday being the xix day of this monthe of 

August 3 Downing wyfe to 3 Downinge gravemaker of this 

parysshe she was sett on a new cukking stolle made of a grett hythe and 
so browght a bowte the markett place to Temes brydge and ther had 
iij Duckinges over hed and eres becowse she was a common scolde and 
fyghter. 

It is remarkable that this entry has been struck 
through, and the name Downing partially obliterated ; 
this was done at some period not long after the date of 
the entry itself, judging from the colour of the ink, and, 

3 Blank in original. 



92 NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OE 

doubtless, by some person interested in destroying so 
objectionable a record, though his efforts have proved 
unsuccessful. 

In the next month occurs an entry which seems to 
show that the inhabitants of Kingston were not so 
peaceable and orderly in their habits as decorum re- 
quired ; for on September 8, 1572 : — 

This day in this towne was kept the Sessions of gayle Delyverye and 
her was hangid vj persons and seventene taken for roges and vagabonds 
and whyppid abowte the market place and brent in the ears. 

In the 33rd year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth is 
an interesting specimen of those curious documents 
entitled licences to eat flesh in Lent : — 

Kingston upon "^ " Decimo octavo mensis Martii tricesimo 
Thames. ) tertio regni Elizabethe. 

M y l ye day & yeare abovesaid I Thomas Lammyng Clerke did give 

licence to eate flesh to Francis Cox wyfe unto John Cox of Kingston 

gent being weake and sickely in the tyme of Lent &, upon other dayes 

prohibited for eating of flesh such flesh as might be convenient for 

y e helth of her body & to y e best liking to her storaak in as larg & 

ample manner & for so long tyme as I y e said Thomas Lammyng 

may or can grant by force and vertu of her maj tics lawes & statutes. 

Before "William Youg one of y e Churchwardens & Thomas Ha ward and 

Thomas "Warthcll. 

By me Thomas Lammyng 

Curatt of Kingston aforesaid. 

Ye rnarke of _. , TT .,,. ,,. 
™ , n *ii William Yong. 
Churchwarden *■ ° 

Tho. Haward. Thomas "Wartho. 

I will now read from the burial registers a few 
miscellaneous entries worthy of notice : — 

1575 February 14 A straunge woman the which followed the 
courte. 

16 January 157|- Henry the sonne and heire of the Lord Burgh 
slayne at the Court by M r Holcroft. 

January 24. 157|- Boger Toogood a minstrell. 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 93 

November 30. 1578. Jhon Byrder a stranger folloinge the Court. 

January 19. 159f. A poore woman founde dead in a barne buryed. 

June 4. 1593 John Akerleye wentte too bathe hymsellfe and was 
drownde & buryede. 

5 February 159| A pore man that dyed in Thomas Ellmares barne. 

24 June 1597. Christopher Atkyngson found dround in the cheker 
well and was bered. 

June 12. 1598. An Flood was found mordred at M r Hiliers shop 
hous on the downs. 

August 25. 1598. "William Hall was bered being shott by thefes 
when he was Constabl at Coolers Hoi. 

June 27. 1601. Jone Chapman widdow, an inhabitant of Temmes 
Ditton, killed by meanes of a Carte going over her neare "Westby 
Temmes the 27 of June 1601 was buried the sayd 27. 

September 28. 1623. Richard Ratlive a Londenner which was 
slayne. 

17 January 162f W m Foster son of W m a goer about. 

And then this very peculiar note : — 

July 11. 1629 A Bird called a Cormorant light on the top of the 
steeple and Aaron Evans shot, but mist it. 

On the fly-leaf of the sixth Register Book is this 
memorandum : — 

For the Clarke of this parrish Richard Best Itt was ordered by the 
baylefes & freemen of this towne in the Cort Hall the 14 of January 
1635 thatt he showld have the keeping of the cloke and the ringing the 
4 a cloke bell & for the same he is to have in the yeere Al. 13s. Ad. 

The Petersham Registers of Baptisms, Marriages, and 
Burials, commence each in 1574, and they are of con- 
siderable interest as containing various entries relative 
to the family of the Earls of Dysart, the noble owners of 
Ham House, which is situated within the limits of this 
parish. 

In one of the early hooks is this note : — 

On Tuesday 11 th June 1667 M r Henry Walker was by M r Twetty of 
Kingston apointed to the cure of Petersham whither he went and tooke 
possession of the church where he marryed a coople that morning. 

M r "Walker went to the Hon ble the Countess of Disart, & acquainted 



94 NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OF 

hex- of his being sent by M r Twitty but she said the right was in her 
& M r Walker being allowed by her honour had afterwards licence from 
my Lord Bishop of Winchester and was confirmed in the place. His 
first day of preaching there was June 16. 1667 upon approbation. 

Among the baptisms are these : — 

Nicholas the sonne of Eebecca Cock filius populi bapt. Jan. 28. 1633. 

Phillip Herbert the eldest sonne of the hon ble James Herbert Esq re 
was baptized the 22 of May 1659. 

Mary the daughter of Thomas Raimond and Elizabeth his wife bap- 
tized privately by Mr. Burford Curate of Richmond May . 

Received publickly into the church May 18 1679. 

Phoebe the daughter of Robert Vines and Jane his supposed wife 
baptized October 1 st 1 679. 

Lambert y e son of William Vandebrant ; a private centinell of his 
Majesties Regiment of Dutch Blew Guards, and under y e command of 
Captaine Subel, and of Katherine his wife was baptized y e 16 th day of 
January 169£. 

Mary Creed of the age of twenty five yeares, and a servant maid to 
M r Francis Barker of this Parish, was baptized in the church upon 
Sunday y e twenty first day of August imediately after evening Service 
1698. 

John the son of Samuel Desborough of S e Margarets Westminster 
Gent' 1 and Loisa his wife was baptised (in the Parish afores d but by y c 
Minister of Petersham) Novem r 17 1701. 

May 26. 1703 Ann y e Daughter of Benjamin and Margaret Skiuer 
a wanderer was baptised. 

"VVe then have the record of an illustrious marriage ; 
and also a church gift on the occasion : — 

The Ricrht Honrable John Earle of Lauderdale was married to the 
right hon b,e Elizabeth Countess of Desert by the Reverend Father in 
God Lord Bishop of Worcester in the church of Petersham on the 
17 day of Februarij 1671 publiquely in the time of reading the 
Common Prayer and gave the carpets pulpet cloth and cushion. 

The following is a miscellaneous selection from the 
burial registers : — 

S r Lionel Tolemach husband of the Right Hon ble The Countess of 
Disert died in France, and was buried at Helmingham in Suffolk. 
(No date, but apparently in 166S.) 

The Lady Katherin Murry sister to the Right Honble the Countesse 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 95 

of Disert died 10 Februarij 1669 and was buried tbe 12 of February- 
following in the vault of the chansell of the Church at Petersham. 

Eleezabeth Gardner a nurse child of Goody Tanners was buried 
21 June 1669. 

4 another nurse child of Goody Tanners was buried 9th of 

August 1669. 

A still borne childe 4 of 4 a stone cutter 'that 

wrought at the Countesse of Diserts was buried. (No date.) 

Thomas 4 of 4 neere Southampton that came with 

a passe from S l Georges in Southwarke died in the Street of Petersham 
17 th September 1670 was layd in a grave that day, and buried the 
next day following being 18 lh Septemb. 1670 

Mary the wife of Henry Walker minister of Petersham died 15 May 
1671 at Petersham and was carred to be bured in the church of 
S l Giles Crepplegate London. 

4 Coachman to the Right Hon ble the Countesse of Disert 

buried 22 December 1671. 

M rs Joban Carlisle widow of S l Martyns in the Fields buried Feb. 27 
167f. An affidavit for whose being buried in woollen was brought 
March y e 3 ld . 5 

The right honerable the Lady Anne Murrey buried April y e 16 th 
1679. Notice given Apr. 28, 79 to y e Churchwarden y l no affidavit 
was received as touching her Ladyships being buried in Woollen. 

The honourable the Lady Carnocke buried June 24, 1680. An 
affidavit for whose being buried in woollen was received June 26 th . 

John Parsons his body was brought from London to y e house upon 
y e hill in y e Parish of Richmond and from thence hither and buried 
January the 15 th 169£. 

William Diamont, Seaman belonging to their Majesties Ship y e Monk 
under y e command of for y e Summers expedition 1692 died in 



4 Blank in original. 

5 In the 30th of Charles II. a statute was passed, whereby it was 
enacted that, after August 1, 1678, no corpse should be buried in any 
shirt, shift, sheet, or shroud, or anything whatsoever made or mingled 
with flax, hemp, silk, hair, gold, or silver, or in any stuff or thing other 
than what is made of sheep's wool only, under the penalty of £5 ; and 
an affidavit was to be made, within eight days after the burial, that 
the person was buried in woollen, and in nothing else. 

Thus it was sought to compel eveiy person to be buried in woollen ; 
but the aristocracy, and others, who could afford to contravene the 
statute, frequently did so, and enjoyed the luxury of being buried in 
linen, for which their representatives paid the fine. 



93 NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS OF 

y 8 Parish, and was buried y e third day of October 1692. His name, 
and y e Ship to w ch he lately belonged appeared to us by a certificate 
w ch was found about him under y e chirurgions hand of y e Hospitall in 
Siddenburg in Kent ; f m whence he was discharged, being cured of 
y e wounds w ch he received in y e engagem* w* y e French Fleet in y e 
month of May in y e present Summer 1692. 

William Mosely ; Gardiner to the Grace y e Dutchess of Lauderdale, 
was buried from Ham house upon y e 12 day of May 1693. 

The Lady Ann Jenner, wife of S r Thomas Jenner Knt. and Serjant 
at Law, was buryed y e twenty second day of March 169 §•. Mernord" 1 
Noe affidavitt made w*in eight days and notice accordingly given to y e 
churchwarden. 

Her Grace Elizeabeth late Dutchess of Lauderdale and of this Parish 
was interred y e 16 th Day of June 1698. No affidavitt made w th in 
8 dayes, and Information of her Graces being buryed in Linn en given 
by myself to Sir John Buck worth &c. accordingly. 

The Lady Katherine Campbel daughter of John Earl of Argile of 
y e Kingdome of Scotland was buried y e 25 th day of January ^f^f . 

Cicillia Cotton Servant to her late Grace Elizeabeth Dutchess of 
Lauderdale in y e Quality of Housekeeper was buried y e 17 day of 
March if|& 

Winifried the wife of Ferdinando King, the parish clarke of this 
parish was buried May 30 1701. 

Ferdinando King Parish Clark of Petersham was buried June 22 
1702. 

June 26. 1703. A still borne childe of Eobert and Letishia Scot of 
Ham was put into the ground. 

January 2 a still born childe of Robert Scott of Ham was laid in 
the ground 170^. 

A Foundling childe whose name and parents were unknowne was 
laid in the ground Feab. 24 17 0|. 

January 10 170f- S 1 ' Tho s Jenner Knight Serjant at Law was buryed 
in Petersham Ch. he dyed Jan. 1. 17 Of. 

Walter Ellis Gardiner to my Ld Rochester was buried March 18 170f. 

We then have the collections made upon briefs, most 
of which are for the relief of sufferers by fire, together 
with some for the benefit of Irish Protestants : — 

Collected in y e Parish of Petersham in y e County of Surry upon y c 
Breif for Relief of y c Irish Protestants y e full sum of five pounds one 
shilling p d y c saide &c to M 1 ' Robert Chapman Register of y e Arch- 
deaconry at his office in D rs Commons y e 4 th day of July 1689. 



RICHMOND, KINGSTON, AND PETERSHAM. 97 

Collected in y e Parish of Petersham in y e County of Surry upon y e 
Breif for y e poor sufferers by fire at Bungay in Suffolk y e sum of Two 
pounds one shilling paid y e said sum to M 1 ' W ra Middleton loging at 
M r Clavells at y e Peacock in S e Pauls Church Yard y e 26 day of Nov m,)r 
1689. 

Collected in y e Parish of Petersham in y e County of Surry up n y e 
second Breif for y e Irish Protestants y e sum of four pounds, four 
shillings and three pence, paid y e said sum by y e hands of John Barns 
to M r Pi: Harris Receiver at M r Robert Chapmans Peg r of y e Arch- 
deac n y in D r Commons upon y e 12 day of Aprill 1690. 
as p r printed receipt. 

Collected upon y r Majesties Brief for the poor sufferers by fire, y e 
inhabitants of S' Ives in Huntingtonshire y e sum of ten shillings eight 
pence, paid y e said sum by order of W lm Middleton Esq r y e appointed 
Reiceiver, to M 1 ' Clavell at y e Peacock in S' Pauls Church Yard Lond 
May 28 th 1690. 

Collected upon y e Breife for y e Poor Sufferers by fire of S' George 
Southwark y e sum of eighteen shillings, jjaid y e same to M r Richard 
Harris Collect 1 y e 27 th day of Septemb r 1690. 

Paid July y e 16 th 1695 y e sum of three pounds, seaventeen shillings, 
and eightpence unto M r Ch. Armitt at M 1 ' Robert Chapmans Deputy 
Rigister of y e Deanary upon y e Breif for y e late dreadfull fire of 
Warwick. 

Collected and paid to William Blakesly Collector of the following 
Breifs, upon y e 13 th day of May 1699, viz. for the poor sufferers by fire, 
of y e Town of Newberry in the County of Berks, the sum of Eleaven 
shillings and ninepence and for y 3 Breife for the late fire of Minhead 
in the County of Somersett y e sum of ten shillings and three pence. 

Collected and paid upon y e 25 th day of May 1699 unto Thomas Fell 
Collector of y e Breif for y e late poor sufferers by fire of y e Town of 
Lancaster in y e County of y e same, y e sum of Eleaven shillings and four 
pence at y e visitation held in the Parish Church of Mitcham in y e 
County of Surry upon y e day and in y e year of our Lord above writt. 

Collected and paid unto M r Francis Nixon, Deputy Register of the 
Archdeaconary of Surry at y e visitation of y e Deanary of Yeovil, 6 held in 
y e Parish Church of Mitcham in y e County aforesaid, upon y e 25 th day 
of May in y e yeare of our Lord God 1699 upon y e breif granted by his 
present Majesty King William y e third for the releif of our distressed 
and persecuted Bretheren y e Poor exiled Yaudois and French Refugees 
y e sum of Nine pounds, seaven shillings and sixpence. The aforesaid 



6 Ewell. 
VOL. II. H 



98 NOTES FROM THE PARISH REGISTERS. 

M r Francis Nixon being apointed Receiver of y e s d Breif by y e 
Reverend Tho: Sayer, D. D. and Archdeacon of y e County." 

By the order of John Blakesly Collector of y e Breifs for fires 
gathered in y e County of Surry ; Paid upon y e 14 th day of October 
1699 to M r Hatton Woolridge at y e Plow in Kingston upon Thames y e 
sum of fifteen shillings and eight pence being y e collection made within 
this parish upon y e Breif for y e late sufferers by fire of Derby Court in 
Channel Row within y e citty of Westminster and in y e County of 
Middlesex. 

I cannot conclude these remarks without tendering 
my thanks to those clergymen who have kindly allowed 
me access to their registers for the purpose of drawing 
up this paper. 




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ON AN ANCIENT DEED. 99 



VIII. 

ON AN ANCIENT DEED FROM THE MUNIMENT 
ROOM OE THE HOSPITAL OE THE HOLY 
TRINITY IN CROYDON. 

By JOHN WICKHAM FLOWER. 



The deed, of which a facsimile accompanies this part 
of the Society's Proceedings, and of which a translation 
is appended, is preserved, together with other interesting 
documents relating to the Hospital, in the Muniment- 
room over the gatehouse. 

Archbishop "Whitgift (the founder) seems to have 
been more than usually careful for the safety of these 
muniments. In the statutes which he ordained for the 
government of the Hospital, we find the following 
direction : " Whereas, I have allotted owte a speciall 
roome in the gate howse next unto the streete for keepinge 
of the evidences of the lands and revenews of my sayde 
hospitall, and for other thinges of some momente, being 
not of dayly use : I doe ordeine that, in the same roome 
there shall be one other cheste, wherein shall be kepte 
the foundation and donation of the hospitall, and all 
other evidens whatsoever, well sorted accordinge to the 
severall parcells of landes, into several! greate boxes, 
superscribed wythe papers of direction." This injunction 
seems to have been carefully complied with by successive 
wardens, and the deeds and evidences are now found 
in the several " greate boxes " in which they were in 
all probability placed by the founder, or in his time. 

h 2 



100 ON AN ANCIENT DEED. 

This deed is the grant of a rent-charge of £6. 13s. M. 
per annum (twenty nobles), by Susan Barker, wife of 
Edward Barker, Esq., to the Warden and Poor of the 
Hospital, and it is interesting in an archaeological point 
of view, not only as regards the parties to the grant, 
and the singularity of the motives which induced them 
to make it, but also on account of the elegant and 
artistic style in which the deed is prepared. 

Susan Barker (the grantor) was the daughter of 
Richard Tracy of Stanway, by Barbara, daughter of that 
Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlcote, to whom some of 
Shakespeare's early troubles were, or at least are said to 
be, attributable. She thus descends from two families, 
the names of both of which are very familiar to the 
students of English history. Her husband Edward 
Barker was principal Registrar of the High Commission 
Court, a piece of preferment which probably he owed to 
the Archbishop, who, in his frequent dealings with recu- 
sants and papists, had much to do with that dreaded 
tribunal. Probably this grant to an establishment 
founded by the Archbishop himself, and in which he 
took so large an interest, may have been a graceful 
method of expressing the Registrar's obligations to his 
patron. 

The motives which led to this benefaction, (that which 
lawyers term the consideration for it) are of a somewhat 
unusual kind : — 

After reciting that William Tracy, one of the donor's 
ancestors, had taken part in the murder of Thomas a 
Beckett, she states that not only out of esteem and 
respect for Archbishop Whitgift, but also in order that 
it might be openly made known, that the episcopal order 
was not at all hateful to her family, as some spiteful 
persons had reported, she was induced to grant the rent- 



ON AN ANCIENT DEED. 101 

charge in question. Probably she bore in mind the old 
Gloucestershire proverb, in which it was suggested that 
an avenging Nemesis pursued her ancestor's descendants 
on account of his crime : — " The Trades have always, 
the wind in their faces ;" or, possibly, the lady, although 
a Protestant, may have been insensibly influenced by 
some lurking belief in the Papistical doctrines —that 
ancestral guilt needed atonement, and that the perform- 
ance of good works was efficacious for that purpose; 
— and that thus a handsome donation to the hospital 
founded by one Arclibishop, might, in some sort expiate 
the guilt of murdering one of his predecessors. 

I am not aware that any other of William Tracy's de- 
scendants attempted to atone for their ancestor's crime 
by the endowment of any chantry, or other like founda- 
tion. It appears, however, from Canon Stanley's most 
able and interesting work, entitled "Historical Memorials 
of Canterbury," that Tracy himself gave certain lands 
in Morton to the church of Canterbury, for the health 
of his own soul, and those of his ancestors, and for the 
love of St. Thomas, Archbishop and Martyr of venerable 
memory, and that the rents of this estate were to be 
applied to feed and clothe daily, for ever, one monk, to 
celebrate the divine offices "pro salute vivorum et requie 
defunct oram" This deed was witnessed by the Abbot 
of St. Eufemia, in Calabria, which place was probably 
visited by Tracy on his way to the Holy Land, where 
he died. It also appears that Amicia, the widow of 
William Thaun, resigned to the treasurer of the cathe- 
dral of Exeter, on behalf of the church of Canterbury, 
certain lands which her husband had held under Tracy, 
and which he had made her swear she would dulv assign 
to St. Thomas and the convent, but which, under the 
influence of her second husband, she had for some time 



102 ON AN ANCIENT DEED. 

withheld. This resignation was effected in a somewhat 
unusual manner, by the delivery to the treasurer of her 
cap — ' pilliolumf as a symbol of the actual delivery of 
the land. 

Mr. T. W. King, York herald, who has very kindly 
supplied me with the pedigree subjoined, has also given 
me the following description of the armorial bearings 
with which this curious document is emblazoned. On 
the left-hand side (but the dexter, heraldically speak- 
ing), are the arms of Tracy, Lucy, Throckmorton, and 
Empson, and on the opposite side, those of Barker, 
Brett, Waterhouse, and Davenport. It will be observed 
that the arms of the lady's family (as also her signature) 
thus take the precedence of her husband's. She was the 
daughter of Bichard Tracy of Stanway, by Barbara 
daughter of Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlecote, by Elizabeth, 
who was the daughter of Sir Bichard Empson, Knight, 
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster in the time of 
Henry VII. Bichard Tracy was the second son of 
William Tracy of Toddington, in the county of Gloucester, 
LL.D., by Margaret daughter of Thomas Throckmorton, 
sub-treasurer of England in the time of King Henry VI. 
(whose pedigree is printed in the first volume of the 
Surrey Arch geological Collections), by Alianor daughter 
of Guy Spiney of Coughton, in the county Warwick. 
Edward Barker was the son of Erancis Barker (whose 
family is said to have come out of Yorkshire), by Julia 
daughter of James Waterhouse of Ludlow, in the county 
of Salop, and Anne daughter of Thomas Davenport. 
Erancis Barker was son of Thomas Barker by Julia Brett, 
of whose family we have no trace at present. Susan 
Barker, after Edward Barker's decease, married Sir 
Henry Billingsley of London, Knight. 

The mode by which possession of the annuity purports 



ON AN ANCIENT DEED. 103 

to be given is worthy of notice. It is said to be, " by 
the delivery of a piece of gold money of the value of ten 
shillings, affixed to these presents." This coin, which 
still remains thus affixed, is an angel of the reign of 
Henry VIII. The seals both of Susan Barker and her 
husband are appended to it, the ribbons passing through 
four holes made in the coin, and so through the parch- 
ment. These ribbons are azure and argent, the principal 
tinctures of the Archiepiscopal arms of Canterbury, 
which, impaling those of Whitgift, are emblazoned on 
the upper part of the deed. 

Attached to Susan Barker's own signature is the seal 
of the family of Tracy (the arms, however, occur without 
the escalop, an instance of which occurs in a MS. temp. 
Henry VIIL, in the College of Arms), suspended by 
ribbons or, and gules, the two first colours of the arms of 
Tracy. Edward Barker's seal is suspended in a similar 
way by ribbons or and sable, the tinctures of his arms ; 
and is likewise impressed with his arms. The form of 
the shields of these seals is the same, and rather unique 
for that period, bearing some resemblance to a heater 
shield, having two curvatures on the upper part. 

The Mansion-house known as Lancaster College, in 
St. Paul's Churchyard, upon which the payment of this 
annuity was charged, was founded by the executors of 
John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. It contained lodg- 
ings and a common hall for thirty priests, who were 
appointed to officiate daily in the chapel on the north 
side of the choir of old St. Paul's, in which John of 
Gaunt, and his first and second wives, were entombed. 

These, probably, were the same priests for whose 
maintenance, John of Gaunt's executors gave to the 
church of St. Paul the manors of Bowes and Pecleshouse 
in Middlesex, that they might sing masses for his soul. 



104 ON AN ANCIENT DEED. 

This college was suppressed at the Reformation, and 
was granted by Edward VI., on the 9th September, in 
the second year of his reign, to William Gunter, from 
whom probably it devolved to Susan Barker, or her 
ancestor, and eventually appears to have come into 
the possession of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, 
who, by indenture dated the 26th of February, 16Gi, 
demised it to Thomas Pory of London, merchant. 
In this lease it is described as " Lancaster College, 
against the south gate of St. Paul's Cathedral, and 
encroached into the Churchyard." It was doubt- 
less destroyed in that vast conflagration which, two 
years afterwards, consumed the cathedral itself. Its site 
is now occupied by the large buildings at the south- 
east corner of St. Paul's Churchvard. 

It is a singular circumstance, that although so care- 
fully prepared, and so beautifully adorned, this deed was 
after all invalid : it seems to have been the production of 
a herald, rather than of a lawver. At this time, and 
indeed long afterwards, a married woman could neither 
charge, nor alien, her freehold estate, except by a form of 
procedure known as a fine. This formality does not seem 
to have been observed, and it appears from the Hospital 
records, that some litigation took place in consequence. 
The defect was afterwards remedied, and the Hospital has 
continued to receive the annuity to the present time. 

The device of giving seisin of an annuity, by the de- 
livery of a piece of gold money, was altogether fanciful, 
and could have had no legal operation. This formality 
is one, which applies only to the conveyance of land, 
and was in no way essential to perfect the grant of an 
annuity, otherwise valid, nor would it have operated to 
set up an invalid grant. 



105 



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TRANSLATION. 

Co all the faithful in Christ, to whom the present writing shall 
come. I, Susan Barker, daughter of Richard Tracy of Stanwaie, in the 
county of Gloucester, Esquire, and of Barbara Lucy, daughter of Thomas 
Lucy of Charlcote, in the county of Warwick, Knight, send greeting. 
£2Ui)crcaS, in time past, William Tracy, Knight, one of my ancestors, 
wishing to please his king, transgressed rashly against the life of Thomas, 
formerly Archbishop of Canterbury, whatsoever may have been his rebel- 
lion. ISnoil) Vt, that I, honouring the most loyal disposition towards 
her Royal Majesty, of the most reverend father in God, John Wliitgifte, 
now Archbishop of Canterbury, as also his gentleness, and his truly 
episcopal life, and desiring that it should be made apparent that the 
pontifical dignity was never at all hateful to our family (as some 
malicious persons have reported). Bnohj Vt, I say, that I (with the 
consent in this behalf of my most beloved husband, Edward Barker, 
Esquire), have given, granted and confirmed to the Warden and Poor 
of the Hospital of the Holy Trinity in Croydon, of the foundation of 
John Wliitgifte, Archbishop of Canterbury, a certain annuity or yearly 
rent of six pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, of lawful money of 
England, yearly to be paid and issuing from and out of our mansion-house 
called Lancaster College, lying and being in the Chm-cbyard of St. Paul, 
London : 2To l)nbc and perceive the aforesaid annuity or yearly rent of 
six pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, to the aforesaid warden and 
poor of the Hospital of the Holy Trinity in Croydon aforesaid, and their 
successors, from the day of the date of these presents to the end of the 
term, and for the term, of one thousand years next following, and fully 
to be completed, to be paid yeai'ly, at the four most usual feasts or 
terms of the year, to wit, the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 
the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, St. Michael the Archangel, and the 
Birth of our Lord, by equal portions. Hlffl if it shall happen that the 
said annuity, or yearly rent, shall be in arrear and unpaid, in part or in 
all, for the space of one month next after any one of the feasts aforesaid, 
on which as is aforesaid it ought to be paid, that then and thence- 
forward, it shall and may be lawful for the aforesaid wai'den and poor of 
the Hospital of the Holy Trinity in Croydon aforesaid, and their suc- 
cessors, to enter upon our said mansion-house, and distrain, and the 
distresses there taken to carry away, and keep until full satisfaction shall 
be made for the said annuity or yearly rent aforesaid, together with the 



TRANSLATION. 107 

arrears (if any there shall be). <Hntt I, Edward Barker, Esquvre, Chiet 
Registrar of the Queen's Majesty in Causes Ecclesiastical, approving the 
pious charity of my most dear wife, for myself and my heirs and assigns, 
in manner and form aforesaid, do confirm the donation and grant afore- 
said of the annuity or yearly rent, of six pounds thirteen shillings and 
four pence, to the aforesaid warden and poor, and their successors, for 
the term of one thousand years, but nevertheless on this condition, that 
the said warden and poor of the hospital aforesaid, or their successors, 
shall in no wise sell, waste, or alienate the said annuity or yearly rent, 
or any part thereof. <Hnfc $ promise and agree by these presents for 
myself and my heirs, with the aforesaid warden and poor of the hospital 
aforesaid and their successors, that I and my heirs and assigns, for and 
duing the term of three years next ensuing, will do all and singular such 
further lawful acts (when we shall be so required), at the costs and 
expenses of the said warden and poor and their successors, by which 
they may the more securely and the better have and possess peaceably 
the said annuity or yearly rent of six pounds thirteen shillings and four 
pence for the whole term of the said one thousand years ; and we have 
put the said warden and poor of the hospital aforesaid into the seisin 
and possession of the said annuity or annual rent, by the delivery of a 
golden coin of the value often shillings affixed to these presents. 

hx fottncs'3 lufjcrtof we have set our seals to these presents, the first 
clay of the month of January, in the forty-third year of the reign of the 
most illustrious princess in Christ, Elizabeth, by the grace of God, of 
England, France, and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c, and in 
the year of our Lord, according to the course and computation of the 
English Church, one thousand six hundred. 




Susan ( L.S. \ Barker. 




Edwarde / l.S. I Barker. 



10S NOTICES RELATING TO 



IX. 

NOTICES RELATING TO MRS. SUSAN BARKER 
(AFTERWARDS DAME SUSAN BILLINGSLEY), 
DONOR TO THE HOSPITAL OE THE HOLY 
TRINITY, IN CROYDON; AND HER TWO 
HUSBANDS, EDWARD BARKER AND SIR 
HENRY BILLINGSLEY. 

By THOMAS WILLIAM KING, F.S.A., York Herald. 



Sir Henry Billingsley, Knight, was Lord Mayor 
of London in 1596, and was son of Roger Billingsley, 
of Canterbury. He was Customer to the Queen for 
strangers; and married, according to his funeral certi- 
ficate in the Heralds College, first, to Elizabeth, 
daughter and one of the heirs of Henry Boorne of 
Yorkshire, Esquire, by whom he had issue. He 
married, secondly, Bridget, daughter and coheir of 
Sir Christopher Draper, of London, by whom he had 
no issue. His third wife was Catherine, daughter of 
Sir John Killigrew, Knight, by whom he had issue, and 
widow of Robert Trapps, of London, Gentleman; she 
died 4th May, 1598, at her house in Eenchurch Street, 
and was buried in the chancel of the parish church of 
St. Catherine Coleman. Her funeral certificate is re- 
corded in the Heralds College. Sir Henry Billiugsley 

married, fourthly, Elizabeth, daughter of Monslow, 

and widow of Rowland Martin ; and, fifthly, Susan, 
daughter of Richard Tracy, of Stanway, in the county 




SIR HENRY B1LLINGSLET 



MRS. SUSAN BARKER. 109 

of Gloucester, Esquire, widow of Edward Barker, Regis- 
trar for Causes Ecclesiastical, by whom he had no 
issue. Sir Henry Billingsley died 22nd November, 
1606, at his house in London, and was buried at 
St. Catherine Coleman aforesaid, on the 18th December 
following. His son, Sir Henry Billingsley, of Sison, in 
the county of Gloucester, Knight (by Elizabeth Boorne), 
was chief mourner. Pedigrees of Billingsley were en- 
tered at the visitations of London in 1568, Shropshire in 
1623, and London in 1624. The arms of Billingsley, at 
the visitation of London, a.d. 1568, were argent within 
a cross voided between four lions rampant, five estoiles 
sable ; and at the visitation of Salop, a.d. 1623, quar- 
terly 1 and 4 gules a fleur-de-lis and canton or, 2 and 3 
the above-mentioned coat. 

The following is a copy of the funeral certificate of 
Dame Susan Billingsley : — 

" The Eight "Worshipful Dame Susan Billingsley, daughter of Richard 
Tracy, of Stanway, in Gloucestershire, Esquire, departed this niortall life 
at London, upon Thursday, the 25th of April, 1633, and was interred 
with escocheons in St. Gregory's Church, near Paules, where she had in 
her lifetime erected a monument for Edward Barker, Esquire, her first 
husband. She married two husbands, y e first was Edward Barker afore- 
said, and her second was Sir Henry Billingsley, sometime Lord Mayor 
of London. She had not any yssue by either of them. This lady made 
Mr. Thomas Billingsley, 3rd son of the said Sir Henry, her sole executor. 
This certificate was taken by us, Thomas Preston Portcullis and George 
Owen Bougecroix, to be recorded in the College of Armes, and the truth 
hereof is testified by y e subscription of Henry Billingsley." 

In St. Gregory's Church (by St. Paul's) was the 
monument to the memory of Edward Barker, Esquire, 
Principal B.egistrar in Causes Ecclesiastical to the 
Queen's Majesty, on which was a Latin inscription. 
He died 26th May, 1602 ; a copy of the inscription is 
given in Stow, ed. 1720, book iii. 228. 

In the church of St. Catherine Coleman was the 



110 NOTICES RELATING TO 

monument of Sir Henry Billingsley, Knight, Alderman 
and Lord Mayor of London, who died 22nd November, 
1606 ; and also of Elizabeth, his first wife, who died 
29th July, 1577. He was then one of the Queen's 
Majesty's Customers in the port of London. — Vide Stow, 
ed. 1720, book ii. 79. 

Mr. Barker made his will on Whit-Sunday, 23rd May, 
1602, in which he describes himself " Edward Barker, 
of London, Esquire." He directs his funeral to be per- 
formed without pomp, and a monument to be placed to 
his memory. He directs his wife, " Susan Tracye, alias 
Barker," to bestow £100 upon Susan Tracy at her mar- 
riage, "if her father deal kindlie with me." He ordains 
for executors " my loving brothers, Rowland Smarte, 
Esquire, and Nathaniel Tracye, Gentleman." Mentions 
a bond payable by Sir Thomas Lucy and " my brother 
Paul Tracy." Gives the reversion of the lease of 
the subsidy and aulnage of salable clothes and office 
of aulnage, after his wife's decease, to his nephew 
Edward Barker, on condition that, within two years 
after he becomes possessed of it, he shall pay to the 
Masters and Eellows of Trinity College, Cambridge, 
£50 ; and shall give security to deliver at the Hospital 
of the Holy Trinity, in Croydon, for twenty years, " one 
sorting cloth of Gloucester sheere," making about the 
price of five or six pounds, for clothing for the poor, at 
the discretion of the warden. He gives legacies to, and 
otherwise mentions, amongst other persons, " my brother 
Thomas Barker, and his children, except his son Edward ;" 
cousins Ed. Lucy and Richard Varney, nephew James 
Barker, cousin Brooke, cousin Henry Barker, Esquire, 
sister Price, and Mrs. Penelope Parrett, daughter of the 
Countess of Northumberland. The executors proved the 
will on 22nd June following. 



MRS. SUSAN BARKER. Ill 

The will of Sir Henry Billingsley is dated 6th August, 
1606. He gives to his wife Susan Billingsley all his 
plate, and desires that she should have the use of his 
house in the parish of St. Catherine Coleman, by 
Aldgate, in London ; after which he devises the same to 
his son Sir Henry Billingsley, Knight. He mentions 
several of his children and other relations ; amongst 
whom, his brother-in-law Mr. Nathaniel Tracy, and 
Susan Tracy, his wife's niece. Proved 30th December 
following. 

Dame Susan Billingsley, his widow, made her will 
21st February, 1631. She describes herself of the parish 
of St. Catherine Coleman, and desires to be buried in the 
parish church of St. Gregory, near St. Paul's, "where 
there is a tomb made for Mr. Barker and me, my first 
love and my most kind husband;" and to be buried in 
the night, as her friend the Lady Garrett was. She gives 
legacies to Lady Lettice, Countess Dowager of Leicester, 
Lady Ann Delawarr ; her nephews and nieces, Paul 
Tracy, Esquire, Alexander Tracy, Mrs. Alice Tracy, and 
Mrs. Susan Tracy ; and to Timothy Throckmorton, son 
of her nephew Michael Throckmorton, deceased. She 
gives her cousin James Barker her gilt salt, "which 
hath his uncle Barker's arms and mine engraven there- 
on." She also names her cousin Mrs. Elizabeth Lucy, 
daughter of Sir Edmund Lucy, Knight ; as also some of 
her husband's children and relations. She gives a silver 
cup to New College, Oxford, "for Mr. Baker's sake, 
who was a fellow of that college ;" and gives legacies to 
Samuel, Richard, Sarah, Susan, Ann, Judith, Catherine, 
and Hester, the eight children of her nephew Thomas, 
son of her brother Samuel. She appoints her son-in-law 
Thomas Billingsley sole executor, who proved the will 
26th April, 1633. ' 



112 NOTICES RELATING TO MRS. SUSAN BARKER. 

This lady, Dame Susan Billingsley, wife successively 
of Edward Barker and Sir Henry Billingsley, was one of 
the daughters of Richard Tracy, of Stanway, by Barbara, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, and sister 
of Sir Paul Tracy, of Stanway, who was created a baronet 
29th March, 1611, and of Samuel Tracy, of Clifford 
Priory, in the county of Gloucester, whom she mentions 
in her will. She was grand-daughter of William Tracy, 
of Toddington, in the county of Gloucester, LL.D., by 
Margaret, daughter of Thomas Throckmorton, Sub- 
Treasurer of England, temp. Henry VI., of which men- 
tion has already been made in the pedigree which I 
communicated to my friend Mr. Plower. 



ADDITIONAL NOTE ON DEED. 113 



X. 

ADDITIONAL NOTE ON THE DEED RELATING 
TO JOHN EVELYN, Esq. 

By WILLIAM DUREANT COOPEE, Esq., F.SA. 



The estates at South Mailing and Old Mailing had 
come into the possession of Richard Evelyn by his 
marriage with Ellen, daughter and heiress of John 
Stansfield, who had purchased of Robert, Earl of Dorset, 
part of the property of the suppressed college of South 
Mailing, and other property at Old Mailing. In 1626 
John Evelyn laid the first stone of the new church, 
and, at the close of 1628, was present at its opening by 
license.* It was in this year that John Evelyn was 
placed with Citolin, a Erenchman at Lewes, to learn the 
rudiments of Latin, and also to write ; he next went to 
school with Mr. Potts, in the Cliffe, and was thence 
transferred, in 1630, to the grammar school (founded by 
Agnes Morley in 1512). The district of Old Mailing is 
different from the collegiate property. The deed before 
described is dated in June, 1635 ; and on the 10th 
October, 1637, the mansion and greater portion of the 
property was sold by Richard Evelyn to William 
Kempe. 

The first witness to the deed is John Rowe, the well- 

* In his Diary (vol. i. p. 5) he states that he was at the consecration 
in the year 1627 ; but though the church was opened for service, the 
actual consecration did not take place until May 23, 1G32. 

VOL. II. I 



114 ADDITIONAL NOTE ON DEED. 

known Sussex antiquary, who was born in 1560, and 
was, consequently, in the 75th year of his age; his 
signature, of which a facsimile is here given, is parti- 
cularly firm. 




Mr. Howe left an only daughter Elizabeth, who 
married Edward Raines ; and her descendant Annabella 
Medley married into the Evelyn family, her husband 
being James Evelyn of Eellbridge ; the estates going by 
subsequent marriages to the second and last Earl of 
Liverpool. 



NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM. 115 



XI. 

NOTICES OP THE FAMILY OE COBHAM 
OE STERBOROUGH CASTLE, LINGEIELD, 
SURREY. 

By JOHN WICKHAM FLOWER. 



However humiliating such a confession may be, it 
must be acknowledged that in former times the county 
of Surrey has produced but few men who have been 
distinguished in arts, in arms, or in letters. Various 
causes might be assigned for this dearth of great 
names. Until the resources of the soil were developed 
and improved by a better system of husbandry, it 
was, for the most part, barren and unproductive as 
compared with many other districts, and thus it offered 
but few inducements for the residence of wealthy and 
powerful families. The number of monasteries and 
religious houses in the county was remarkably small, 
and it has never possessed either a cathedral city, or 
any considerable college. As regards military affairs, the 
opportunities and inducements for warlike training and 
exercise have, amongst us, usually been wanting ; for 
with societies, as with nations and individuals, it is 
ever found that the occasion generates, or at least calls 
into exercise, those qualities which the occasion requires. 
Thus, a Douglas or a Scott on one side the border, never 
wanted a Percy to match him on the other ; in the 
marches of Wales, the Glendower was checked by a 
Mortimer ; while in Ireland, the vigilance and courage of 

VOL. II. K 



116 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

the Lords of the Pale were kept in constant exercise by 
the hostility of the native or mere Irish. But on the 
chalk downs, and in the pastoral valleys of Surrey, this 
stimulus was for the most part wanting; and if its 
inhabitants were thus exempt from the trials to which 
they would have been exposed in a less quiet neigh- 
bourhood, they also wanted that discipline and skill 
which the presence of warlike neighbours is pretty sure 
to engender. 

But not only must it be confessed that the county 
has not produced many illustrious men, but it must be 
owned also, that the few whom it has produced, have, for 
the most part, " died and gone without their fame." It 
would seem as if our local historians had considered the 
soil too barren to be worth much culture, and that thus 
they have passed by in silence the history of many who 
are justly entitled to a place, not only in the annals of 
the county, but in those of the empire. It is of one of 
these neglected families that I have now to speak ; of 
those who were born and bred in the little village of 
Lingfield, of which, and of the neighbouring castle of 
Sterborough, they were the lords, and within the walls of 
whose parish church they were in succession entombed. 

The parent stem from which the possessors of Ster- 
borough sprang, was the family of the same name long 
settled at Cobham, and at Cowling Castle, in Kent. A full 
account of this family would be found extremely valuable, 
not only for genealogical and topographical purposes, but 
also in an historical point of view. There exist abundant 
materials for such a memoir, and it seems much to be 
desired that some one competent to the task would collect, 
and reduce them into order. During that most eventful 
and interesting epoch of our history, which comprises the 
reigns of Edward III., Bichard II., and the fourth, fifth, 






OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 117 

and sixth Henries, various members of this wide- spread- 
ing family were employed in the most important diplo- 
matic services, and were engaged in almost all the great 
battles of those troubled times. Closely connected with 
the Court, and usually on terms of intimate friendship 
with the reigning Sovereign and his family, they formed 
alliances with the most powerful families in the land ; 
and eventually, by the marriage of the heiress of Cob- 
ham of Cowling with Sir John Oldcastle, the pedigree 
of the elder branch became stained with the blood of 
one of the first victims of that fierce persecution which 
was instituted against the Lollards by Archbishop 
Arundell. 

The Sterborough branch contributed in no small 
measure to swell the renown of the race from which it 
sprang. It flourished indeed in its pride and power but 
for four generations, yet it was remarkable, not alone for 
the value and extent of its possessions, or for the noble, 
and even royal alliances which it formed, but for having 
produced soldiers and statesmen second to none, in one 
of the brightest periods of English history. Long as 
our language may endure, will men speak with pride of 
those who were foremost at Crecy and Poictiers ; and 
they will ponder also on the marvellous history of that 
proud princess, the wife of the Lord Protector, whom 
all her husband's power and influence could not shield 
from the vengeance of his uncle, and who was thus 
compelled, bareheaded and barefooted, with a lighted 
taper in her hand, and a white sheet around her, to do 
penance as a sorceress in the lanes and market-places of 
London. 

The account of this family, as printed by Dugdale 
(Baronage, ii. 65), is, in many respects, careless and inac- 
curate, principally, it would seem, from want of atten- 

k 2 



118 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

tion while passing through the press. He has thus 
contradicted himself, and confused persons of the same 
name, more than once ; and, as usual, his loose state- 
ments have been adopted by subsequent compilers. 

To attempt a complete recension of Dugdale's article 
would indeed be a useful task for many purposes ; but it 
is one which, on the present occasion, I am not called 
upon, and do not propose, to undertake. Some cor- 
rections of his mis-statements, so far as regards the 
Surrey line, will, however, be found appended to the 
pedigree which is subjoined. 

The common ancestor of the Kentish and Surrey 
branches of the family was John de Cobham, a Justice 
itinerant in the reign of Henry III., who died in or 
about the 36th year of that king, having purchased the 
manors of Cowling and Westchalke, in the county of 
Kent. He is said, and in all probability with reason 
(though I find no direct evidence of record or charter 
in support of the assertion), to have been married 
twice ; first to Joan, daughter of William or Warrine 
Eitz-Benedict ; secondly to Joan, daughter of Hugh de 
Nevill. He left certainly five sons surviving him: 
(1) John de Cobham the younger, his heir, ancestor of 
the Cobhams of Cobham and Cowling, and of Beluncle, 
county Kent, and Pipardsclive, county Wilts ; (2) Henry 
de Cobham of Boundal, or Randalls, and Hever in Hoo, 
county Kent, whose posterity long continued settled 
there ; (3) Sir Reginald, of whom presently ; (4) James ; 
(5) William. Of these, John and Henry seem to have 
sprung from a first marriage ; the remaining three from 
the second. James and William appear to have left 
no issue male. Of Sir Reginald, the eldest son of the 
assumed second marriage, we know little more than that 
prior to the 13th Edward I., he had married Joan, 



OF STEREOROTJGH CASTLE. 119 

daughter and heir (or co-heir) of William de Evere, pro- 
bably the same person, who, by the name of "William de 
Heure, had a grant of freewarren in the 9th of Edward I. 
(Rot. Chart, ej. an. num. 87), in Chidingstan, and Heure 
(Hever), in Kent, and in all his demesnes in Lingefeld, 
county Surrey ; which last-mentioned lands would seem 
to have descended through his daughter to the Cobham 
family. He was succeeded by his son and heir, Reginald, 
the first Lord Cobham of Sterborough, born about 1295, 
as appears from an inquisition taken on the death of 
his uncle William (whose heir he was), in the 14th of 
Edward II., when he was twenty-five years old and 
upwards. l This nobleman may justly be regarded as 
the founder of the Surrey branch of the family, as well 
as the most illustrious member of the illustrious stock 
from which it was an offshoot. He not only greatly 
increased its possessions, but raised its renown to the 
highest pitch, having made himself eminent amongst the 
many eminent men of Edward the Third's reign. The 
account of his employments and exploits will be found 
at large in Dugdale's " Baronage," and it seems needless, 
therefore, for our present purpose, to do more than 
notice those which appear the most interesting. In the 
second year of Edward III., he was sent on an embassy 
into Brabant, and in the following year (1329) he was 
in the train of the king on his expedition to Erance, and 
was present at Amiens, when Edward did homage to the 
king of Erance for the duchy of Aquitaine and the 
earldoms of Poitou and Montreuil. In the 14th of 
Edward III., on account of his great wisdom and fidelity, 
he was sent on a special embassy to the Pope. In the 
following year he obtained a charter to embattle or cas- 
tellate his manor-houses of Orkesden in Kent, and of 

1 Esch. 24 Edw. II. n. 17. 



120 NOTICES Or THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

Prinkham in Surrey ; which last was thenceforward 
known as Streburgh or Stereburgh, afterwards corrupted 
into Starborough Castle. In the 17th of Edward III., 
he was again sent to Eome as one of the ambassadors to 
treat before Pope Clement VI. with Philip de Valois, 
king of Prance, concerning the truce. To narrate the 
battles and sieges at which he was present, would be to 
recount almost every one of those famous combats which 
occurred in Prance and Planders during the first thirty- 
five years of Edward the Third's reign, and the memory 
of which is preserved in Proissart's pages. He was at 
the battles of Cogant and Vironfosse, at the siege of 
Tournay, and in the expedition into Brittany. In these 
wars he had for his companions, the King himself, 
Henry, Duke of Lancaster, the Black Prince, Sir Walter 
Manny, Sir John Chandos, and the other barons and 
knights of this time, who, by their successes against far 
superior forces, carried the renown of Englishmen to a 
height before unknown. The Lord Cobham seems ever 
to have borne himself as one worthy of such comrades. 
He was one of the principal leaders at the battle of 
Crecy, and it was to his care, and to that of Sir John 
Chandos and the Earl of Warwick, that the King com- 
mitted the Black Prince, who was then to make his first 
essay in arms. 

Proissart's narrative of this transaction has been too 
often quoted to warrant its repetition here ; but it is so 
characteristic of the men and of the times, as to be 
worth the while of any reader unacquainted with it, to 
turn to the passage (vol. ii. p. 167). 

At the battle of Poictiers, the Lord Cobham marched 
in the van as Marshal of the Black Prince's army, and 
he had the good fortune to save the king of Prance from 
the hands of his actual captors, who were quarrelling 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 121 

which should have him, and in the strife were like to 
have slain him. Having received him from these 
knights, he conducted him with great respect and cour- 
tesy to the Prince. 

It was not to be expected that one who had so long, 
and so well, served such a king as Edward III., and that 
in most important transactions, both military and civil, 
should be left unrewarded or unhonoured. We find the 
records of numerous grants and gifts made to him at 
various periods. Thus, amongst many other benefactions, 
in the 13th of Edward III., when he was made a Knight 
Banneret, he had assigned to him for the better support 
of that dignity, the mill under the Castle at Oxford, and 
the meadow there, called the King's Mede. In the 18th 
of Edward III. he was made admiral of the king's fleet, 
from the mouth of the Thames westwards, which grant 
was renewed four years later. In the 21st of Edward III. 
he had a grant of an annuity of £500 for life, the 
better to support his degree and dignity of Banneret. 
Erom the 16th to the 35th of Edward III., he was sum- 
moned to Parliament by writ, and in 1352, upon the 
death of Sir Thomas Wale, he was elected a Knight of 
the Garter (being the fourth knight in order of election), 
and filled the ninth stall on the Prince's side, where his 
plate still remains. At his death he was possessed of 
the manors of Oaksted or Oxted, and Prinkham or 
Sterborough in Lingfield ; of Langley Burrell and Lye, 
in Wilts ; of Northey in Sussex ; and of West Cleve, 
East Cleve, Bordefielde, Horton, Orkesden, Eynesford, 
Eancourt, Chidingstone, Holtesbury, Brokeland, and 
Halstede, in Kent. It is reasonable to believe that he 
would acquire great wealth from the ransom of some of 
the numerous lords and knights who were taken pri- 
soners at the battles of Crecy and Poictiers, and from 



122 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

the spoils of those who were slain. Thus it appears 
from the Patent Rolls, that in the 33rd of Edward III., 
the king gave him a bond for 6,000 old florins de scuto, 
part of the ransom for the Count de Longueville, one of 
the king's prisoners belonging to him j and Froissart 
relates that at Poictiers, he made the Count de Damp- 
martin prisoner. We learn from the same source, that 
the Lord Cobham was appointed, with Sir Richard Staf- 
ford, to take an account of those who fell at Crecy on 
the French side ; that they were accompanied, by three 
heralds, appointed to discover the names and rank of 
the slain by their armorial bearings, and two priests to 
take down the names ; and that they found there, eighty 
standards, and the bodies of eleven princes, twelve 
hundred knights, and three thousand men-at-arms. 

Lord Cobham was not destined to meet his death in 
battle. In the autumn of 1361, he died of what was 
called the second pestilence, which proved fatal to so 
many eminent persons, and in particular to his old 
companions in arms, Henry, Duke of Lancaster (the 
father-in-law of John of Gaunt), and William Fitz 
Waryn, to several of the bishops, and many of the 
clergy and gentry. 

Strange as it may appear, neither the chronicles of 
his own time, nor the topographers of later times, afford 
any information as to the burial-place of one who played 
so important a part in the wars and diplomacy of his 
country. A Knight of the Garter, when that honour 
was the token of services in the field ; an ambassador 
to various foreign states ; a Lord Admiral ; a principal 
leader in two of the most famous battles in which Ens:- 
lishmen were ever engaged ; the companion and friend of 
the noblest of his contemporaries — we might have ex- 
pected that some intimation would have been given of 




S 01 REGINALD . FIRST LORD COBHAM OF STERBORODGH. 
Chancel aisle. Iangfield Chnri 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 123 

the place in which his remains were entombed. No 
allusion, however, to the subject is to be found iri 
Aubrey's " History of Surrey," or in that of Manning 
and Bray, or in later histories, although these writers 
profess to describe the church of Lingfield, and notice 
the tomb under which the knight is interred, which they 
describe as a marble altar-tomb with the effigy of a 
knight in armour. It was from a casual allusion in his 
son's will, that I first learned the place of this lord's burial. 
Reginald, the second Lord Cobham, in giving directions 
for his own burial, desired that it should be in the parish 
church of Lingfield, and he designates the exact spot, as 
was frequently done in wills Of the period. It was to be 
" de rere le teste mon tres honorable sieur et pier,"-— 
behind the head of his very honourable lord and father. 
On visiting the church, it will be seen that the son's 
tomb is now placed parallel with that of the father, rather 
than behind it ; but it has evidently been removed from 
its original position. The tomb, Of which engravings 
are here given, is evidently that of the first Lord Cob- 
ham. Not only is it the only one in the church of 
an older date than that of the son, and therefore the 
only one that answers to the description given in 
his will, but it will be found, on examination, that 
the left leg of the effigy was originally encircled with 
the Garter, in a kind of porcelain or enamel, some 
portion of which still remains ; thus evidently indi- 
cating the first Lord Cobham, who was the only one 
of this family thus distinguished. The crest upon the 
helmet on which the knight's head reposes, viz. a Moor's 
or Turk's head, clothed with a turban (the same figure 
being also repeated at the feet of the effigy), corresponds 
with the plate on this knight's stall in St. George's 
Chapel, and also with the crest upon the fine altar-tomb 



124 NOTICES OP THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

in the chancel, which is undoubtedly that of this noble- 
man's grandson. Not improbably, this crest was adopted 
to commemorate some adventure in which this lord's 
ancestor, Henry de Cobham, was engaged, when he 
accompanied Richard I. to the Holy Land. It is re- 
ferred to as "a Soldan " in Joan Lady Cobham' s will, 
given in the Appendix. 

The tomb, as usual, has been much mutilated. The 
effigy of the knight is represented with the face un- 
covered, and a conical helmet upon the head, with a 
camail of chain mail attached to it, and falling below the 
chin. This camail originally was wrought in blue and 
silver enamel. The body is covered with a cyclas, or 
short surcoat, which has once been richly gilt, and was 
emblazoned with the arms of Cobham upon the breast. 
This is confined by a girdle composed of small square 
plaques filled in with blue enamel, and much resembling 
in its character that on the effigy of the Black Prince 
at Canterbury. The plate armour consists of jointed 
greaves and br assarts, and vambraces, with small aux- 
iliary plates to protect the elbow and knee joints. The 
knees are protected by genoaillieres, and the legs are 
covered with short buskins, ending just above the prick 
spurs, which are fastened with straps and buckles. Three 
are twelve escutcheons upon the tomb, of which, how- 
ever, only six are now visible, and the armorial bearings 
upon these are almost effaced. It appears, however, 
from a MS. and drawing made by Vincent, and pre- 
served in the College of Arms, that eight out of these 
twelve shields were in his time emblazoned as follows : 

1. Gules, on a chevron or, 3 estoiles sable. — Cobham of Sterborough. 

2. Gules a chevron between 6 cross crossletts in chief, and 4 in base 

ai'gent. — Berkeley. 

3. Cobham, impaling or a chevron gules. — Stafford. 



OF STERBOROrGH CASTLE. 125 

4. Paly nebulee of 6, or and gules, in a bordure ermine. — Valenges. 

5. Argent a fess between 4 gemelles gules. — Badlesmere. 

6. Gules 3 water budgets argent. — Boos. 

7. Argent a cross flory or, in the first canton, a martlet or. — Pavely. 

8. Azure, 3 Roses or. — Cosynton. 

The tomb having been much injured, faint traces only 
are seen of the first three coats, and also of another 
shield which is not figured in the drawing preserved at 
the College of Arms ; viz. Cobham impaling Berkeley. 

This latter shield commemorates the first lord's mar- 
riage with Joan, daughter of Thomas Lord Berkeley 
(third of that name). Dugdale (quoting a careless state- 
ment of E-obert Glover's) makes her a daughter of 
Maurice de Berkeley ; and both Sir "William Segar and 
Vincent, in their MS. Baronages, preserved in the 
College of Arms, adopt this error. In his article on the 
Berkeley family, however, Dugdale states her to have 
been daughter of Thomas ; and this is clearly so, for her 
will (set out in the Appendix) states distinctly that her 
husband purchased the manor of Langley Burrell, Wilts, 
of John de la Mare, in her honoured father's presence ; 
and she goes on to direct that a chapel shall be endowed 
bv her son, with the advowson of that church, for the 
health of the souls of the said Sir John de la Mare, and 
of Thomas Lord Berkeley : while it further appears from 
Smyth's " Lives of the Berkeleys," that this manor, with 
the advowson, was purchased by Thomas Lord Berke- 
ley in the same year in which his daughter was married 
(17th Edward III.), and was given to her as a marriage 
portion. 

Another mistake as to this lord's marriage occurs in 
Sir William Segar's pedigree. He states, that Lord 
Cobham married a first wife, Elizabeth, daughter to 
Hugh, second Earl of Stafford, and widow of Sir John 
Ferrers of Chartley. But this Hugh certainly was not 



126 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

born until 1344, and Lord Cobham was undoubtedly 
married before 1348 (as his eldest son was born in that 
year) to Joan Berkeley, who survived hirn. Mr. Beltz, 
in his History of the Order of the Garter, has fallen into 
much the same error ; he makes Elizabeth Stafford the 
second wife of this lord. These mistakes have obviously 
arisen from confounding Reginald the son, who probably 
did marry the daughter of an Earl of Stafford, with 
Reginald the father ; and this error again may probably 
be traced to the circumstance that at one time (as already 
noticed) the arms of Cobham impaling those of Stafford 
were depicted on the father's tomb. This proceedings 
as in similar instances, could hardly fail to produce 
much confusion. Probably when Lingfield College was 
founded, and the church was rebuilt, by the first lord's 
grandson, about the year 1431, this tomb was restored, 
and was then adorned with the arms of those families 
which were the most recent alliances, and the old ones 
were necessarily omitted. In no other way can we account 
for the circumstance, that while the arms of Cobham of 
Cobham, of Neville, and of de Hever, this nobleman's 
immediate ancestors, are wanting, those of Stafford (his 
son's wife) and de Boos (his grand-daughter's husband) 
are preserved, together with those of Badlesmere, 
Cosyngton, Valenges, and Paveley, with whom we have 
no reason to believe that he was in any way allied. 

By his wife, Joan Berkeley, this lord left one son, 
Reginald, then aged thirteen years, and also a daughter, 
Joan, married to Lord Henry de Grey, from whom the 
noble family of Grey of Codnor is descended. One of 
the daughters of this marriage (Joan) is named as a 
legatee in Lady Cobham' s will, but neither she nor her 
mother is named in any of the pedigrees preserved in 
the College of Arms. 




BRASS. LINGFIELD CHDRCH. 
.Probably Isabella Cobham, of Gatwick.j 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 127 

It is certain that this nobleman left a willj since that 
of his widow contains frequent allusions to its provisions. 
A very diligent search has not, however, enabled me to 
discover any traces of it, further than that it was proved 
at the Bishop of Winchester's palace, Southwark, on 
7th of October, 1361, by the executors, Amand Fythlyng, 
and a certain " I, ? ' possibly Joan his widow. 2 



JOAN, WIFE OF REGINALD, FIRST LORD COBHAM 
OF STERBOROUGH. 

As already noticed, the first Lord Cobham inter- 
married with Joan, daughter of Thomas, Lord Berkeley 
(third of that name), and sister of Maurice (fourth of 
the name). In Smyth's "Lives of the Berkeley s," it is 
said that her marriage portion was £2,000 in money, 
and also the manor of Langley Burrell, Wilts ; but in her 
will she states that her husband purchased this manor, 
and also the manor of Lye, of John de la Mare, in her 
father's presence. Possibly both accounts may be re- 
conciled by assuming that her husband made the 
purchase, and her father supplied the funds. 

This lady survived her husband eight years, having 
died 2nd October, 1369. A brass effigy is still preserved 
on the north aisle of Lingfield Church, of which the 
annexed engraving is given in the able work on monu- 
mental brasses compiled by Mr. Haines, who suggests 
that it was probably intended to mark the burial- 
place of this Lady Cobham. There are, however, many, 
and strong objections to this hypothesis. The brass in 
question is of a very inferior design and coarse work- 
manship, and is altogether such a one as would hardly 

2 Registr. Edyndon t 



128 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBIIAM 

be placed over the remains of a lady of great wealth and 
position, and so nobly allied ; especially as the tombs of 
this family were, as Mr. Haines justly observes, remark- 
able for the beauty and elaborate workmanship of their 
brass effigies. Besides, as will be seen, she gave such 
careful and precise directions for her burial in St. Mary 
Overy's churchyard, and accompanied them with such 
liberal benefactions to those who should assist at her 
obsequies, that it is hardly possible that her wishes in 
this respect should have been disregarded. It seems far 
more reasonable to believe that the brass figured by 
Mr. Haines was placed over the grave of Isabella, the 
wife of Reginald Cobham, of Gatwick. The inscription 
is torn away, but it appears, from some ancient notes in 
the College of Arms, which have been preserved and 
arranged by the care of Robert Laurie, Esq., Clarencieux, 
that there was formerly an inscription remaining on some 
tombstone in the church (and this is now the only one 
that seems to have lost its inscription), as follows : — 

" Hie jacet Isabella Cobham 
Uxor Reginaldi Cobham de Gatewyck 
quse obiit 2° die Aprilis Anno Domini 1460." 

The first Lady Cobham' s will is dated August 13, 
1369, and is preserved in the register of Archbishop 
Wittlesey. A short and imperfect notice of it is to be 
found in the Harleian MSS., which Sir Harris Nicolas 
has copied in the " Testamenta Vetusta ;" and this again 
has been adopted by several of our county historians. 
The will is one of the most elaborate documents of 
the kind (of the same early date) extant. It contains 
many interesting and minute particulars, as well in 
relation to the lady's own family, as to the manners 
and customs of the period, and her possessions in plate, 
books, and furniture. These have been left unnoticed 




I . u T. 



BRASS. LINGFIELD CHDRCE 
K.itkerine Stc • 



OF STERBOROTJGH CASTLE. 129 

in the published abstracts, and I have therefore 
thought it best to subjoin a complete transcript with 
a translation. 

Amongst other things, she directed her body to be 
buried in the churchyard of St. Mary Overy, spelt in 
the will, " Overthere," before the door, over which the 
blessed Virgin sitteth on high. She was to be interred 
under a plain marble stone, with a cross of metal, and 
around it these words in French : — ■ 

" "Vous qui par ici passietz, 
Pur l'aline Johane de Cobham prietz." 

She directs that before everything else, 7,000 masses shall 
be celebrated for her soul immediately after her death, 
and that they shall on no account be delayed or deferred ; 
and that there should be paid for them £29. Ss. 4td. 
Amongst many articles of plate, and jewels, and books, 
and garments, bequeathed to various friends and rela- 
tions, she mentions a horn made of a griffin's hoof, with 
a silver gilt cover. She gives legacies to the priests, and 
to the sisters ministering in St. Thomas's Hospital, also 
to the sick persons lying there, and to the prisoners 
lying in chains and fetters near St. George's, Southwark. 
It will be seen that amongst other objects of her bounty, 
she distinguishes Katherine Stoket, one of her damsels 
or ladies in waiting, and together with various corsets, 
and gowns and hoods, she bequeathed to her twenty 
marks for her advancement, — " pro promolione sua." It 
would seem, however, that notwithstanding the pos- 
session of these garments and the twenty marks, 
Katherine never did come to her promotion. On the 
chancel floor of Lingfield church may yet be seen the 
effigy of a woman, with hands meekly clasped upon her 
breast, and an inscription beseeching the prayers of the 
faithful for the soul's repose of her who lies below. 



130 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

The family of Stokett, of which Katherine doubtless 
was a member, was at this date settled at Oxted, in 
which parish there is yet a manor known by their name. 
Oxted being part of the possessions of the Cobhams, and 
immediately adjoining to Sterborough, its inhabitants 
could hardly fail to be on friendly terms with the 
lords of the neighbouring castle. Thus we find that 
in 1345, Roger at Stokett, son and heir of John (and 
very probably brother of Katherine), was in ward to the 
lord of the manor of Oxted ; and in the bailiff's accounts, 
ten pence per week for thirty weeks is charged for his 
commons on going to school, seven weeks being deducted 
when he was at Sterborough (probably for his holidays), 
and in addition, the sum of eleven pence is charged for 
cloth for one pair of hose, a penny for sewing, and ten 
pence for two pairs of shoes. 3 

illusion is made in this I^ady Cobham's will to a 
transaction of which I have found no other instance. 
Amongst Robert Glover's notices of the family of Cob- 
ham of Cobham, to which reference is made in the notes 
to the pedigree subjoined, is preserved a document of 
which the following is a translation ; — 

" Memorandum, that John de la Mare, Knight, sold the manor of 
Langley Burrell, Wilts, to Lord Reginald Cobham, the father of Lord 
"Reginald de Cobham who now is, on condition that the said Reginald 
should endow two chantries, in which prayers should daily be offered 
for the souls of the said John de la Mare and his ancestors, which 
chantries by the will of the said Lord Reginald, the son of the said 
Lord Reginald, were established in the collegiate church of Cobham, &c." 

In the same collection is also preserved a deed, by which, 
in the fifth year of Richard II. (1382), Ralph de Cob- 
ham, of the county of Devon, gave to Sir John de Cob- 
ham, lord of Cobham, to Reginald de Cobham, parson 

3 Manning and Bray, Hist, of Surrey, ii. 389. 



OF STEHBOROUGH CASTLE. 131 

of Northfleet, and to Ralph de Cobhani of Chafford, 
the manor of Sharnden, and the marsh of Elmele, as 
security that Reginald de Cobham, Lord of Sterborough, 
or his heirs, should appropriate to the College of Cobham 
a church of the full value of forty marks, &c. It seems 
probable that this appropriation was intended as a pro- 
vision for the masses to be celebrated for the soul of Sir 
John and his ancestors, in compliance with the stipula- 
tion made when he sold Langley Burrell. 

It will be seen, on reference to Lady Cobham's will, 
that she also mentions this purchase and the condition 
annexed to it, as described in the memorandum above 
referred to. It would appear that the engagement had 
not been fulfilled in her husband's lifetime, and she 
conscientiously directs, that if her son should appropriate 
the church of Langley Burrell for the maintenance of 
two priests to celebrate the masses in question for the 
souls of Sir John de la Mare, and those of her own 
husband and father, her executors should enfeoff her son 
and his heirs in her water-mill at Edun Bridge, and her 
house in Southwark, so that he might bear the burthen, 
and in time to come might answer on this account for 
her deceased lord, and for her soul, before the Supreme 
Judge. 

For some reason or other, it would seem that the 
church of Langley Burrell never was appropriated for 
the pious uses thus designated, and it was probably 
considered equally efficacious, and much more con- 
venient, that the chapels in question should be endowed 
in the college or chantry at Cobham, which had been 
founded in 1361, by John Lord Cobham of Kent ; and this 
endowment was doubtless considered sufficient to satisfy 
the condition contained in Lady Cobham's will ; inas- 
much as the water-mill in Edenbridge, and the house in 

VOL. II. L 



132 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

South wark, certainly passed to her son. The latter was 
the hostel or town house of the family. It was known 
as Cohham's Inn, and formed part of the possessions with 
which Reginald, the grandson of this Lady Cobham, 
long afterwards endowed his own college of Lingfield. 

Prom another document preserved by Glover, we learn 
that all the masses for Lady Cobham were not celebrated 
until more than twelve years after her death ; for, in the 
fourth year of Richard II., Richard Maubanke, one of 
her executors, appointed John de Cobham, Lord of Cob- 
ham, his attorney, to pay to the prioress of Higham in 
Kent, £20, which the said Lord Cobham had formerly 
received from Amand Eythlyng, Canon of St. Paul's, 
London (another of the executors), that the said prioress, 
together with the convent of Higham, should pray for 
the souls of the said Dame Joan, and of Sir Reginald de 
Cobham her husband, and of all Christians. 



REGINALD, SECOND LOED COBHAM OF 
STERBOROUGH. 

This nobleman, the only son of the first Lord, was 
born in 1348, and was thus only thirteen years of age 
when his father died. At the date of his mother's will, 
eight years later, he had already been engaged in the 
wars of that troubled time, for she mentions certain 
silver dishes and salt-cellars which she had delivered to 
him when he went into Gascony. In 44th and 46th 
Edward III. he was summoned to parliament. In 48th 
Edward III. he was one of those noble persons who 
were chosen to treat of peace with the king of Erance, 
and he was in the Erench wars in the first year of 
Richard II., and also in the third year of Henry IV. 



OF STERBOE.OUGH CASTLE. 133 

It is stated in Dugdale's " Baronage," that he was twice 
married, his first wife being Elizabeth, the widow of 
Eulk le Strange, and afterwards of Sir John Ferrers, of 
Chartley. Prom the Inquisitiones 'post mortem, it 
appears that this lady died 49th Edward III. (1374), 
and that she held for her life the manor of Wrokwar- 
dyn, Salop, with remainder to the heirs of John le 
Strange, of Blakemere ; also that she held for her life 
the manor of Broughton, Wilts, and (conjointly with 
John de Eerrers, her late husband) the manors of 
Teynton and Bicknore, Gloucestershire ; and that 
Bobert de Eerrers was the son and heir of the said 
Elizabeth and John. It is also stated that she was the 
daughter of Hugh, earl of Stafford. No mention of her 
is to be found in this earl's will, although he does 
mention by name several of his sons and daughters ; but 
the statement derives some confirmation from the cir- 
cumstance of the Stafford arms having been depicted 
on the first Lord Cobham's tomb. 

In the inquisition, this lady is stated to have been the 
wife of " Reginald Cobham, Chivaler" and it seems 
not very improbable (in the absence of any other evi- 
dence) that she may have been the wife of one of the 
other knights of the same name, of whom there were 
several living at this date. 

After his first wife's decease (if indeed he were twice 
married), Lord Cobham, about the year 1380, married 
Eleanor, the daughter of John Maltravers (who died in 
the lifetime of his father, John, Lord Maltravers), and 
co-heiress, with her two sisters, of her brother Henry 
Maltravers. This lady was the widow of Sir John 
Eitz-Alan, marshal of England, who was shipwrecked 
and drowned in the Irish Channel, while in command 
of a force of two hundred men-at-arms, and four hun- 

l 2 



134 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

dred archers, which the king had despatched to the aid 
of the duke of Brittany, in December, 1379. He was the 
son of Richard, fifth earl of Arundell (by his second 
countess, Eleanor, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, earl 
of Lancaster), and was thus brother of the archbishop, 
and of Richard, the sixth earl, who was beheaded, by 
order of Richard II., in September, 1397. Like the 
archbishop and some others of his family, Sir John 
Eitz-Alan assumed his father's and brother's title of 
honour for his own surname. By his will (in which he 
styles himself Sir John Arundell), dated in November, 
1379, he directed that he should be buried in the Priory 
of Lewes, in the great church there, under an arch near 
the funeral chapel ; he mentions his wife, Eleanor, and 
appointed Sir Robert Rouse and Maltravers execu- 
tors. He left several children by Eleanor Maltravers, and 
amongst them, John, who eventually became ninth earl 
of Arundell, and a Knight of the Garter ; Margaret, who 
married William, Lord de Roos, of Hamlake, K.G. ; and 
William, who died in 1400. Agnes, the widow of 
William, died in the following year ; and by her will, 4 
dated September 6th, 1401, she gave to the priory 
church of St. Andrew, Rochester, in which she desired 
to be buried, under the tomb where the images of her 
husband and herself are depicted, " one thorn of the 
crown of Jesus, wherewith he was crowned at the time 
of his passion;" to her lady mother, a gold brooch, 
enamelled with red and black colours, with a balass 
ruby in the middle; to her sister Roos, a "speculum ," 
round and gilt, having the representation of the Trinity 
on the one side, and of the Blessed Virgin on the other ; 
to her sister, Margaret Cobham, " cluas uncias de perlys 

4 Reg. Arundell, 183 a. 



OE STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 135 

communis ponder adonis" (two ounces of pearls of the 
common weight) ; to her brother, Richard Arundell, 
" unitm halle cle haras" [the (hangings for) a hall of 
arras]; to the countess of Hereford, " unumsperver squar 
linen embroide cum auro" (embroidered bed furniture). 
There appears to have been some relationship between 
Lord Cobham and Sir John Eitz- Alan's widow, the 
nature of which has not hitherto been very accurately 
denned. In a MS. pedigree of the family, preserved in 
the Bodleian Library, and which purports to have been 
compiled by Sir "William Dugdale and Sir Richard St. 
George, it is stated that Eleanor's paternal grandmother 
(Ela or Eva) was the daughter of Maurice Lord Berke- 
ley. 5 No mention, however, is made of this lady in 
the account of the Berkeley family contained in Dug- 
dale's " Baronage," nor in Smyth's " Lives of the Berke- 
leys," nor in Eosbroke's " History of Gloucestershire." 
These authorities concur in representing Joan as the 
only daughter of Thomas, and that all the daughters 
of the fourth Maurice died unmarried ; and that the 
third Maurice had but one daughter, Isabel, the wife of 
Robert Lord Clifford. In one of the MS. pedigrees of 
the Cobham family, preserved in the Harleian Collection, 
and which purports to have been compiled by Mr. 
Heneage, Keeper of the Records in the Tower, Joan, 
the wife of the first Lord Cobham, and Ela or Eva, the 
wife of the second lord, are bracketed together, appa- 
rently as if nearly related ; and it is also mentioned, that 
the second lord was divorced from his wife on account 
of their being related in the third degree of consan- 
guinity, that they procured a dispensation to contract a 
fresh marriage, and that several of their children were 

5 Vincent (cited by Mr. Greenfield, Topographer and Genealogist, 
ii. 312) makes the same statement. 



136 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

born before, and several after, such second marriage. 
The fact of this relationship throws some light upon 
the marriage of John Baron Maltravers, about which 
but little is known, and tends to strengthen the state- 
ment, that his first wife was daughter of Maurice Lord 
Berkeley. And assuming Maurice, the third of that 
name, to be meant, she would then be sister of the 
second Lord Cobham's maternal grandfather ; and her 
own grand-daughter, Eleanor Maltravers, and her 
brother's grandson, would be second cousins, and re- 
lated in the third degree of the Canon Law. 

The proceedings relative to this dispensation, which 
are fully recorded in Archbishop Courtney's register 
(folio 58 et seqq.), afford an interesting illustration of 
the perils which beset the path of those who braved the 
anger of the Church by marrying within the degrees 
forbidden by the canon law ; they also throw some 
light upon the methods by which those vast funds were 
provided, which were required for the erection of our 
cathedrals and other public edifices. 

The process, which was long, and doubtless propor- 
tionally expensive, commenced by a humble petition from 
the husband and wife to the Pope (Urban VI.), setting 
forth that, notwithstanding they were aware that they 
were related to each other in the third degree of con- 
sanguinity, they had, nevertheless, publicly contracted 
a marriage per verba de prcesenti, no banns having been 
published, in the face of the Church, and that they 
were unable to continue in such a matrimony unless the 
Pope's apostolical dispensation were obtained. Upon 
this petition, the Pope issued his bull (dated at Naples, 
the 14th kalends of May, in the seventh year of his 
elevation), in which, after setting out the petition, he 
empowers the archbishop, if he should think proper, 



Or STERBOROrGII CASTLE. 137 

and provided also that the petitioner and his wife should 
remain separate as long as he should see fit, to grant 
them a dispensation to contract a fresh marriage, and 
to legitimate their issue, as well begotten as to be 
begotten. He directed, however, that whichever of 
them should survive the other should remain for ever 
after unmarried. Upon this, the archbishop issued a 
commission addressed to the bishop of Rochester, and 
dated Sept. 9th, 1384, setting forth the bull, and re- 
citing that he himself being much occupied with his 
metropolitan visitation, and other urgent business, was 
unable personally to attend to the affair ; and he there- 
fore empowers the bishop to execute all the functions 
committed to him by the Pope's bull, and to grant to 
Lord and Lady Cobham the required dispensation, if 
they should consent to live apart from each other for one 
whole month. On 11th November following, the bishop 
made his return to this commission, certifvim? that he 
had examined the parties and also their witnesses, and 
had received their confessions, and had thereupon 
granted them fall absolution, and also the apostolical 
dispensation to contract a fresh marriage, and to render 
their issue legitimate. 

It might be supposed that the cousins were now out 
of their troubles; but the Church had not vet done with 
them. On 6th January (1384-5), the archbishop issued 
a fresh commission to the bishop of Rochester for the 
infliction upon the guilty pair of the following acts of 
penance, viz. : — That as long as either of them should 
live, they should provide a secular priest to celebrate 
for them in the cathedral church of Canterbury, at some 
altar to be appointed by the Prior of that church ; also, 
inasmuch as they had remained in their unlawful mar- 
riage for the space of four years without a dispensation, 



138 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

they were, for the space of four whole years, to abstain 
from eating meat, and from drinking wine on every 
Wednesday (singulis quartis feriis) , and at each of the 
six fasts they were to refrain from eating of that kind 
of fish which was the best, and the most agreeable to 
them. Further, for the same period of four years, they 
were enjoined to feed daily four poor persons, waiting 
upon them in person, publicly, a little before dinner-time, 
in the great hall, if they should be at home ; but if not, 
then they were to be served by the most honourable 
person at that time in the house, and each pauper was 
to have one loaf, with one dish or ration of flesh or fish 
according to the season, and the half of a flagon of ale ; 
and in addition, they were to be clothed at the expense 
of the penitents once in every year with tunics and 
hoods of russet. They were further required to expend, 
for the reparation of the walls of the city of Canterbury, 
two hundred marks, to be paid to the prior or sub-prior 
of the church there, or to William Topclyve, at the next 
feast of the Annunciation, and one hundred marks for 
the building of Rochester bridge, to be paid to the prior 
of the church there, or to the same AVilliam Topclyve ; 
and they were to produce the acquittances for these 
various sums to the bishop. The bishop made his return 
to this commission, dated March 1st, certifying that 
these sums had been duly paid, and the acquittances 
duly produced to him ; and on 3rd December following, 
the archbishop issued his monition to Lord Cobb am 
and his wife, enjoining them to the due performance 
of what remained unperformed of their penance, on pain 
of excommunication : and thus, it is to be presumed, 
this tedious process was at last closed. 

It appears from Archbishop Arundel's register, that 
on 7th August, 1402, one Clement Eccleston was 



OF STERBOROITGH CASTLE. 139 

collated to St. Mary's chauntry, in the parish church of 
Croydon, to which he had been presented on the resig- 
nation of John Park, by William Draper, vicar (the 
rector being absent), Thomas de Bergh, William Oliver, 
John Eraunceys, Walter at Grene, John Scarlet, John 
Ry chard, John Spycer, John Staunton, William Ham- 
mon, Richard Rook, and Richard Wake, parishioners 
of the said church, in whom the patronage of the 
chauntry had been vested by the founder's appoint- 
ment ; and it is stated that the chauntry had been then 
lately founded by the noble Sir Reginald Cobham, lord 
of Steresburgh. In Manning and Bray's History of 
Surrey, it is said that the incumbent was to pray for 
the souls of Reginald Lord Cobham and Joan his wife, 
and their children, and all Christian souls. Steinman, 
in his History of Croydon, says, of Thomas Lord Berkley 
also. This, however, does not appear from the arch- 
bishop's register, nor is any authority quoted in support 
of the statement. It appears from the minister's and 
bailiff's accounts in the Augmentation Office, that this 
chauntry was endowed with lands in and near the town 
of Croydon, which were valued, at the suppression of 
colleges and chapels (3rd Edward VI.), at £16. Is. 2d. 
per annum. It does not appear that those estates ever 
formed part of the founder's patrimony, nor does it 
seem that he had any connection whatever with the 
town of Croydon. We know, however, from other 
sources, that the beautiful parish church in which this 
chauntry was founded was just at this time in course of 
erection, having been commenced by Archbishop Court- 
ney, and continued by his successors, Arundell and 
Chicheley. It seems not improbable, therefore, that out 
of regard to Archbishop Arundell (his wife's brother- 
in-law), or at his instigation, Lord Cobham may have 



140 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

founded this chaimtry in the church of which the arch- 
bishop was the patron, and which immediately adjoined 
his palace ; or it may be, that he was induced to endow 
it, by way of further expiation of his offence in marry- 
ing his second cousin without the papal dispensation. 

Lord Cobham died in 1403, a few days only before 
the battle of Shrewsbury, and was buried, pursuant to 
the directions contained in his will, in the parish church 
of Lingfield. His tomb still remains there, inlaid with 
an effigy in brass, of which an accurate representation 
is here given. 

This effigy gives an excellent and instructive repre- 
sentation of the armour in use at this period, showing 
how much more elaborate and elegant it had become in 
the forty years which had elapsed since his father's 
death. He is represented in plate armour, with a 
pointed skull-cap, and a hood of chain mail to protect 
the neck, and a skirt of mail also. The epitaph, in 
Leonine hexameters, differs so much from the style of 
those in use on such occasions, that, though it has 
already appeared in print, I may be pardoned for re- 
producing it here. That part of the brass which bore 
the words given in brackets has long been broken away 
and lost ; but, from an ancient manuscript copy in the 
College of Arms, I have been able to supply them : — 

" De Steresburgh dorninus de Cobham S r Reginaldus 
Hie jacet. Hie validus miles fuit ut leopard us. 
[Sagax consiliis, satis audax omnibus horis,] 
In cunctis terris famam predavit honoris. 
Dapsilis in mensis, formosus, morigerosus, 
Largus in expensis, imperterritus, generosus. 
Et quando placuit Messia3 quod moreretur, 
Expirans obiit. In ccelis glorificetur. 
Mille quadiingeno trino . . Julii (quoque trino) 
Migravit ccelo — sit sibi vera quies ; 
Amen. Paternoster." 




SSl S? ^ijjatcmiQb^Dijm'imam^maUwxgBiojjuao^g 



BRASS, LINGFIELD CHURCH. 
Keginald, second Lord Cobham of Sterborough. 



OP STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 141 

Rendered into English, this epitaph informs us that 
he was brave as a leopard, wary in council, yet bold 
enough when occasion required ; that he carried away 
renown from all lands, was sumptuous in his house- 
keeping, handsome, affable, munificent, undaunted, and 
generous; and that when it pleased the Messiah that 
he should die, he breathed his last. 

The description here given bears a close resemblance 
to the well-known passage in the prologue to the 
" Canterbury Tales," in which Chaucer gives the 
character of his knight. As he and Lord Cobham 
were contemporaries, and were both in attendance upon 
Edward III. and his queen, it seems not impossible 
that the poet may have intended thus gracefully to 
commemorate a friend and companion. 

The second baron greatly increased the family pos- 
sessions, probably by both his marriages ; but whether 
these fortunate alliances were due to the courage, or to 
the beauty, or to the other virtues described in such 
glowing terms on his tomb, the chronicles of the period 
do not state. It appears from the inquisition taken 
after his death, that besides the estates which descended 
to him from his father, he was possessed of no less than 
forty other manors and estates in various counties, in- 
cluding one third part of the manors of Buckland, West 
Becheworth, Wauton, and Colle, in Surrey ; of which 
last he was seized in right of his widow, they being her 
dower of her first marriage. 

His will, which is in Erench, and of which a trans- 
cript from Archbishop Arundell's register at Lambeth, 
with a translation, are now subjoined, affords an inter- 
esting example of the wills of the period. It will be 
seen that while he gives nearly £400 to be laid out in 
various masses and prayers for the dead, only two 



142 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OP COBHAM 

hundred marks (£133. 6s. Sd.) are given for his daugh- 
ter's marriage portion, in case she should he disposed 
to take a husband. A sum of £100 was to be laid out 
in masses for the soul of Queen Philippa, whom he 
describes as his commere (gossip). In what manner 
the tie of so called " spiritual affinity," which this word 
indicates, was induced between him and the queen, 
I have not been able to ascertain ; as the queen was 
married about twenty-five years before he was born, it 
is not probable that he was godfather to one of the 
numerous children of King Edward III., and that he 
thus became entitled to call the queen "commere." 

It will be seen that this lord, following his mother's 
example, gave special directions in his will that the 
masses which were to be celebrated for him should be 
completed as soon as possible after his decease — " en si 
brief temps com' Us pourraient etre faicts ;" and that 
the price to be paid for them is also exactly specified, 
being somewhat less than that mentioned by his mother. 
Lady Cobham's will is the earliest in w r hich I have 
found any such direction. Before her time, it seems to 
have been usual to give a considerable sum, sometimes 
the whole of the testator's estate, to be laid out in this 
manner, leaving the particular mode of expending it to 
the executors' discretion. This method was doubtless 
found' to be liable to abuse. Prom the neglect or dis- 
honesty of executors, it frequently happened that the 
masses were not purchased at all; and when this did 
not happen, the bequest was often a subject of strife 
between the various religious orders, w r ho, as we learn 
from Chaucer and from Piers Plowman's Crede, were at 
all times extremely jealous of each other, and were con- 
stantly engaged in intrigues to procure these legacies, 
and in disputes concerning them, when obtained. In 



OF STERBOROrGH CASTLE. 143 

wills of later date it is not at all unusual to meet with 
similar provisions ; and occasionally we find that tes- 
tators also went on to direct what particular kind of 
mass should be sung. Thus John de Cobham, of Hever, 
directed that ten thousand masses, and twenty trentalls 
of St. Gregory, should be celebrated for his soul ; while 
Cardinal Beaufort (an abstract of whose will is printed 
in Nicolas' " Testamenta Vetusta," and may be referred 
to by the curious on such subjects), in giving instructions 
to his executors, directed that 3,000 of the 10,000 masses 
to be said for him, should be of requiem ; 3,000 of the 
Holy Spirit ; 3,000 of rorate cceli desuper ; and 1,000 of 
the Trinity. 

The Lady Margaret mentioned in Lord Cobham's 
will seems to have been minded to take a husband in 
her father's lifetime, although within three months of 
his decease. It appears from the register of William of 
Wickham (in whose diocese of Winchester the castle is 
situate), that a special licence was granted by that bishop, 
on 17th of April, 1403, for the solemnization in the castle 
chapel of this lady's marriage with Reginald Courtays, 
of Wraggeby, in Lincolnshire. It also appears from the 
same register, that eleven years previously, viz. on 9th of 
April, 139-1, the same bishop granted a similar licence 
for the marriage of this nobleman's step-daughter (being 
the daughter of Eleanor, widow of Sir John Eitz-Alan), 
with the Lord de Roos. This lady, in most, if not all of 
the pedigrees, is wrongly represented as the daughter of 
Lord Cobham himself. She is described in the licence 
as " Margareta filia Elienorce uxoris Domini Reginaldi 
de Cobham;" whereas her half-sister is designated as 
" Margareta Jilia Domini Reginaldi de Cobham" And 
further, in his will dated in 1100, his own daughter is 
alluded to as being then unmarried, as well as in the 



146 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

He was twice married ; first, to Eleanor, the daughter 
of Sir Thomas Colepeper, whose effigy in "brass (of which 
an engraving faces this page) is yet preserved in Ling- 
field Church, although in imperfect condition. This 
lady died in 1422, and he then intermarried with Ann, 
daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Lord Bardolf, and 
widow of Sir William Clifford, Knight. This second 
marriage must have occurred in, or shortly before 1427, 
since in the minutes of the proceedings of the Privy 
Council for that year, we find that it was agreed by the 
lords of the council, that a warrant should be issued to 
the Treasurer of the Exchequer, concerning the pay- 
ment to Reginald de Cobham, Knight, of Sterborough, 
who had married Anna, late the wife of William Clifford, 
Knight, deceased, executrix of the said William, and 
who had accounted in the King's Exchequer, for the 
office of captain and constable of Eronsak in Acqui- 
taine, for the time in which the said William held 
the said office, and after his decease, for the time of 
the said Anna, of the sum of £1,422. 10s. 10c/., as 
appeared by a certain petition filed in the office of the 
privy seal. 

The only public service in which it would seem that Sir 
Reginald Cobham was engaged, was the taking charge 
of the Duke of Orleans, afterwards Louis XII., who was 
taken prisoner at Azincour, and was only released after 
an imprisonment of more than twenty years, and on 
payment of an enormous ransom. 

The mode in which this prince should be disposed of, 
was one of the numerous subjects upon which Hum- 
phrey Duke of Gloucester, the Lord Protector during 
Henry the Sixth's minority, disputed with his uncle, 
Henry Beaufort, the Cardinal bishop of Winchester. 
The Lord Protector wished to detain the duke in Eng- 




,»uqnuao)f jm8 itg oyamb 




BRASS. LINGFIELD CHURCH. 
Eleanor Colepeper), first wife of Sir Reginald Cobharn. 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 147 

land, alleging that the late king had expressed his 
desire that he should never be restored to liberty. The 
cardinal, however, doubtless for some good reasons of 
his own, desired to release him ; and it was one of the 
articles of impeachment, which Hall says were exhibited 
to the king, in the 20th year of his reign, by the duke 
against the cardinal, that — - 

" The deliverance of the said duke of Orleansce is utterly appointed by 
the mediation, counsayll, and steryng of the said cardinall, and 'the 
archbishoppe of York, and for that purpose divei's persons been come 
from your adversaries into this your realme, and the said duke brought 
also into this your city of London ; whereas my Lord, your father (whom 
God assoile) peising so greatly the inconvenience and harme that might 
fall only by his deliverance, concluded, ordained, and determined in his 
last will utterly in his wisdom, his conquest in his reaulme of Finance." 

The duke was entrusted to the care of several keepers 
in succession ; and eventually, in order probably to 
guard against any attempts on the part of the cardinal 
to get possession of him, the Lord Protector seems to 
have placed him in the charge of Sir Reginald Cobham 
(to whose daughter he had been married some years 
previously), and on whose fidelity he might reasonably 
rely. 

In 1436, we find from Rymer's Pcedera, that a petition 
was presented to the king and the Privy Council by 
" Reginald Cobham, Chevalier" setting forth that the 
king, by his letters patent, had committed the Puke of 
Orleans to the safe custody of the petitioner, as from 
May 12th then last ; and that he was to be allowed for 
the time that the said duke should be in his custody 
the same payments daily that the Earl of Suffolk had 
been accustomed to receive on the same account, but that 
up to that time he had received nothing whatever. The 
petition goes on to pray the king, by the advice of his 
council, to consider the great charges and expenses that 

VOL. II. M 



148 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

the petitioner had incurred, and to grant him letters 
under the privy seal, directed to the Treasurer of 
England, to pay him what was due. On this petition, an 
order was made by the council on 19th November, 15th 
Henry VI., that what the petitioner desired should be 
done, the Duke of Gloucester, the Archbishop of York, 
the Bishop of Norwich, and other lords being present ; 
but not the cardinal. 

It appears also, from a minute of the council, dated 
24th October 1437, that it was ordered that there should 
be made a letter to Reginald Cobham, to bring the 
Duke of Orleans to London, " so that he might be with 
the king at Shene on Monday next, to confer with him 
of certain matters of the pees, that the chancellor in 
France might take payment in Prance for the soulcle of 
certain archers and men at arms." Erom the tenor 
of this minute, it would seem that at this time, the 
duke was in the custody of Sir Reginald Cobham, 
and as he appears to have had no other residence, 
the duke was probably an inhabitant of Sterborough 
Castle. 

There is preserved in the British Museum, a MS. 
volume of poems composed by the duke while in 
captivity. It is adorned with a beautiful and curious 
illumination, representing the Tower of London with 
the Traitors' Gate, and Old London Bridge with its 
chapel and houses in the distance. This, probably, is 
the most ancient view of these buildings extant. The 
duke is first seen sitting at a window, then meeting 
and embracing a knight at one of the gates, and lastly 
galloping away on horseback, as if rejoicing in his new- 
found liberty. The illuminations throughout the volume 
are adorned with the badge of the portcullis, and are 
probably of Henry the Seventh's time. The poems are 




^ylM 



OF STERBOllOUGH CASTLE. 149 

chiefly love sonnets and ballads addressed to some real 
or imaginary mistress ; but there are also several 
passages in which the writer bitterly laments his cap- 
tivity, and expresses a passionate desire once more to 
revisit his "Belle Prance." Of these, the following 
may serve as an example : — 

" Je dois etre un saison 
Enlargy pour purchasser 
La prix aussi ma menson 
Si je peux suerte trouver, 
Pour aller et retouruer 
II faut qu'en bate la querir 
Si je veuille brief achever 
En bon ternies ma matiere 
Or gentil due Boui'gignon, 
A le coup veuillez m'aider 
Come mon intencion 
Est de vous servir et amer, 
Taut que vyf pourra durer 
Eu vous et France entiere 
Or in'ayderey a finer 
En bons termes ma matiere." 

In 1431, Sir Reginald Cobham, conjointly with his 
second wife, founded the college of Lingfield adjoining 
the church, for a provost or master, six chaplains, and 
certain clerks of the Carthusian order, and the church 
was thereupon constituted a collegiate church. He en- 
dowed it with lands in this neighbourhood and elsewhere, 
which at the Reformation were valued at £75 per 
annum. Amongst these estates was included an inn, 
called "The Green Dragon," in Southwark, probably 
the same as is alluded to in the will of Joan Cobham, as 
her inn or hostel. 

It would seem that when the college was founded, 
the parish church was almost or entirely rebuilt, and 
stalls were placed in the chancel for the provost and 

m 2 



150 NOTICES OE THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

chaplains. These are still remaining, and are embel- 
lished with the armorial bearings of Cobham and 
Bardolf. 

This Reginald died in the year 1446, in the same 
year in which, as it is believed, his son-in-law, Humphrey 
Duke of Gloucester, was murdered, at Bury St. Edmunds, 
by the procurement of the queen, the Earl of Suffolk, 
and Cardinal Beaufort. 

By his will, dated 12th August, 1446, he directed his 
body to be buried in the collegiate church of Lingfield, 
before the high altar, appointing that a tomb of ala- 
baster should be placed there for his monument ; also 
that £40 should be allowed for his funeral expenses, 
and for his Trental and alms to poor people at those 
solemnities. To Anne, his most dear wife, he thereby 
disposed of all his household goods within his castle at 
Sterborough at the time of his decease, appointing that 
during her life she should have the use of all the 
furniture of his chapel in that castle, and after her 
death to remain to the master of the collegiate church 
of St. Peter, at Lingfield, then newly by him founded, 
and to the priests therein and their successors for ever; 
and lie also gave £80 to buy books and vestments for 
the college, and appointed his son, Sir Thomas Cobham, 
Knight, one of his executors. 

The injunctions contained in this will as to the tomb 
were religiously followed by his widow and son. In the 
chancel of the church may yet be seen the lofty and well- 
proportioned tomb of alabaster, of which engravings 
are here given, and upon it are laid full-length effigies of 
the knight and his second wife. The first wife, as 
already stated, rests in a much more humble grave. 

It may be noticed as another proof, how little pains 
have been taken hitherto to compile our county his- 




EFFIGIES OF SIR REGINALD COBHAM AND ANNE (BARDOLF), his second Wife, 
Founders of Lingfield College. 



OF STERBOROUOH CASTLE. 151 

tories, that although a very slight investigation of the 
subject might have satisfied the writers as to the history 
of the persons here entombed, yet neither in Manning 
and Bray's History of Surrey, nor in Brayley and 
Britton's, is any information given with regard to them. 
All that is said amounts to this — that upon this tomb 
are to be seen the whole-length figures of a knight and 
his lady in white marble ; conveying to the reader just 
as much information as is given in exhibition catalogues, 
" Portrait of a gentleman, or of a lady, whole length." 

This knight's effigy is in a perfect suit of plate 
armour, except the head and face and hands, which are 
left uncovered, the head being laid upon a helmet sur- 
mounted by the crest, the turbaned Soldan's head. 
This armour, when compared with that of his father 
and grandfather, affords a good illustration of the 
changes which had taken place in the course of eighty 
years. It is very much more ponderous and elaborate 
than theirs, although, probably, not more serviceable 
than the armour of him who led the van at Crecy and 
Poictiers. The genouilleres, or knee-plates, are massive, 
with a broad flat plate, of an ivy leaf, or heart-shaped 
pattern, lapping over the knee joint ; a smaller plate 
of the same pattern is also seen on the elbow joint. 
The stomach is protected by five of the broad plates or 
bars which were called taces, opening with hinges on 
the right side, and fastening with a strap and buckle 
on the left. The tuilles, or coverings for the thighs, 
are very large, nearly of a heptagon figure, about eight 
inches by seven, and are fastened by straps and buckles 
to the taces. The feet are encased in sollerets, and the 
gauntlets are hung at the girdle. 

The shields of arms emblazoned upon his tomb are 
as follows : viz. Cobham. — Bardolf, Azure, three cinque 



152 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

foils or; Cobham impaling Bardolf; Az. a winged 
dragon, argent ; Gules, a lion rampant, argent. The 
lady's head is enveloped in a widow's wimple, or hood, 
plaited at the edges, and folded below the chin, and 
descending to the breast, and is laid upon a pillow, 
semee with cinque foils or, and supported by two angels 
with golden wings and hair. The knight is represented 
without beard or moustachios of any kind ; unlike his 
grandfather, who has a small moustachio, but no 
beard. He has a ring of a different pattern on each 
finger, except the little finger of the left hand. 

The inscription has long since been lost ; but, for- 
tunately, I have been able to supply it from the manu- 
script note in the Heralds' College, before alluded to. 
It was as follows : 

" <&tati pro ciutmabug 3i\? ginattri Cobljam nultttsS, et &nnae, con* 
Sortts Sue, funUatorum ijujuS CoIIegu." 

His wife, who survived him, is thus clearly designated 
as one of the founders of the college, and this is con- 
firmed by an entry in the Patent Ptolls of 24th, 25th, 
26th of Henry VI., relating to an endowment (which 
must have been made immediately after her husband's 
death), and from which it appears, that she, with others, 
gave to the warden and chaplains of the college of St. 
Peter, in Lingfield, the manors of Hexted and Byly- 
shersh, with other lands in Lingfield. 

According to Sir Wm. Segar's " MS. Baronage," it 
would seem, that this knight left six children by his 
first marriage ; viz. : Elizabeth, the wife of Lord Strange 
of Knocking ; Margaret, the wife of Reginald Courtays ; 
Reginald ; Eleanor, the wife of Humphrey Plantagenet, 
Duke of Gloucester ; Ann, a nun at Barking, and Sir 
Thomas Cobham, Knight. Vincent, in his "MS. 




DETAILS FROM TOMB OF SIR REGINALD AND LADY COBHAM. 
I Cobbam. II. Bardolf. III. Cobham and Bardolf. IV. Quaere. V. Quaere. 

VI. Profile of Mouldings. 
VII. Profile of Mouldings, from Tomb of Reginald, 1st Lord Cobham. 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 153 

Baronage," also gives the same account, except that he 
makes Margaret the wife of Reginald Courtney. So far 
as the daughter Margaret is concerned, however, these 
accounts are incorrect ; for, as we have already seen, the 
wife of Reginald Courtays was this knight's sister, and 
not his daughter. 



THE SECOND SIR REGINALD COBHAM, KNIGHT, 
OF STERBOROUGH. 

This Reginald Cohham, the eldest son of Sir Regi- 
nald, by his marriage with Eleanor, daughter of Sir 
Thomas Colepeper, died in his father's lifetime. It 
appears that he was knighted in the fourth year of 
Henry VI., and the occasion on which this ceremony 
took place was a singular one. The Duke of Gloucester 
and his uncle, the Cardinal Beaufort, had long been 
engaged in that fierce strife which, having lasted more 
than twenty years, ended only with the duke's life, and 
which not only wrought such vast mischief to the 
realm, but contributed to the downfall of the house of 
Lancaster. At this time they had agreed to refer all 
their disputes to arbitration, and thus a short and 
insincere reconciliation was effected. They shook hands 
in the presence of the king and of the parliament, on 
Whitsunday, at Leicester, the king being then five 
years of age. Upon this event great rejoicings ensued, 
the king himself was knighted by the Duke of Bedford, 
many promotions were made in the peerage, and 
several gentlemen were knighted, and, amongst others, 
this Reginald, and also Sir John Chideoke, probably 
his wife's brother. According to Sir William Segar's 
account, he married Thomasine, the daughter of Sir 
Ralph Chideoke, Knight, and left one daughter, Mar- 



154 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

garet, who married Ralph Neville, earl of Westmoreland, 
and died without leaving issue, having had one child, 
a daughter, Margaret, who died in infancy. I have 
been unable to discover where this knight was buried, 
or whether he left any will. 



SIR THOMAS COBHAM OF STERBOROUGH, KNIGHT. 

Upon the death of his father, in 1446, his second son, 
Sir Thomas Cobham, succeeded to the family estates, or 
at least to that portion of them which was situate in 
this county. It does not appear that he took any active 
part in the public affairs of his time. Erom the con- 
nections and traditional politics of his family, he was 
doubtless attached to the house of Lancaster, and thus 
would not find much favour in Edward IV. 's reign; 
while the untimely fate of his wife's first husband 
would probably deter him from taking part in the plots 
which were then so rife. He married Anna, the widow 
of Aubrey de Vere, who, with his father John de Vere, 
Earl of Oxford, was beheaded in the first year of 
Edward IV., and with him was buried in the church of 
the Augustine Eriars, London. This lady was the 
daughter of Humphry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, 
and her brother, Sir Henry Stafford, Knight, was the 
second husband of Margaret, Countess of Richmond, 
mother of Henry VII. In this way the Cobhams again 
became connected with the house of Lancaster. Sir 
Thomas Cobham died between April and July, 1471, 
leaving his wife and a daughter Anne, and also a 
bastard son, Reginald Cobham (whom in his will he 
describes as a nephew of Gervase Clifton), surviving 
him. It appears from his own will, as well as from 



OF STERBOItOUGH CASTLE. 155 

that of his widow, that he was buried in the church of 
Lingfield ; but no traces either of his tomb, or of hers, 
are now to be discovered. 

Dame Anne Cobham, his widow, died in April, 1472, 
and by her will, dated on the 12th day of that month, 
desired that she should be buried in the college (col- 
legiate church) of Lingfield, " where the body of my 
dear heart and late husband lyeth." She also mentions 
her brother, John Stafford, K.G., Earl of Wiltshire, 
her sisters, Katherine Stafford, wife of John Talbot, 
Earl of Shrewsbury, and Joane, the wife of William 
Lord Beaumont. 



ANNA, WIFE OF SIR EDWARD BOROUGH, OF GAINS- 
BOROUGH, LINCOLNSHIRE, AND HER DESCENDANTS. 

Upon the death of Sir Thomas Cobham, the Cob- 
hams of Sterborough in the male line became extinct, 
having remained in the county for four generations, 
comprising a period of about one hundred and fifty 
eventful years. Anne Cobham, only daughter of Sir 
Thomas, was betrothed, while yet a child, to the son and 
heir of the Lord Mountjoy, who died before the marriage 
was completed. Sir Thomas Borough, of Gainsborough, 
in Lincolnshire (descended from Hubert de Burgh, earl 
of Kent), obtained her wardship from Edward IV., and 
thereupon married her to his eldest son, afterwards Sir 
Edward Borough. Of this marriage there was issue 
a son, Thomas, who was summoned to parliament 
21st Henry VIII., and by his wife (Anne, the daughter 
of Sir William Tirwhit, of Kettleby, Lincolnshire), he 
left issue Thomas, his son and heir, who had issue a 
son, Henry. Erom him the estate seems to have 



15(3 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

passed, in some way, to William Lord Borough, who, 
in the 15th of Queen Elizabeth, was summoned to 
parliament. By Catherine, his wife (a daughter of 
Edward, Earl of Lincoln), he had issue two sons, viz. 
Sir John Borough, Knight, who died in his father's 
lifetime, and Thomas, who succeeded him in the 31st 
year of Queen Elizabeth. Sir Thomas was appointed 
ambassador in Scotland, with a view to counteract the 
intrigues in which the Spanish government was then 
engaged with King James. He was afterwards made 
Governor of the Brill, one of the cautionary towns de- 
livered to Queen Elizabeth by the Dutch ; and, in the 
fortieth year of Queen Elizabeth, was appointed Lord 
Deputy of Ireland, in which post he died soon after- 
wards. He left issue a son, Robert, who died under age, 
and three daughters, Erances, Ann, and Elizabeth, who 
thus became his co-heiresses. Elizabeth married George, 
a younger son of William Lord Cobham, and thus re- 
united the Sterborough branch to the parent stem of 
Cobham and Cowling. These three ladies sold Ster- 
borough Castle, and what was left in Surrey of the family 
estates, to Sir Thomas Bichardson, chief justice of the 
Queen's Bench, the same whom Archbishop Laud took so 
severely to task before the Lords of the Council for pre- 
suming to charge the grand jury against parish wakes. 
Thus both the name and family of Cobham became 
extinct in Surrey, and their possessions, once so extensive 
in this and the adjoining county, passed into the hands 
of strangers. 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 157 



ELEANOR COBHAM, WIFE OF HUMPHREY 
PLANTAGENET, DUKE OF GLOUCESTER. 

It remains only to trace, as far as our scanty mate- 
rials permit, the eventful life of this lady, the daughter 
of the third Reginald, the founder of Lingfield College, 
and great grand-daughter of the first lord, founder of 
Sterborough Castle. 

The first occasion on which her name appears in his- 
tory is on the occasion of her marriage with Humphrey, 
Duke of Gloucester. The duke had been married, in 
1424, to Jaqueline of Hainault, while her husband was 
yet living. Their various adventures after this ill-fated 
union constitute one of the most striking chapters in 
what has been called the romance of history, only 
equalled in interest by the strange history and tragical 
fate of the second wife. The duke's first marriage was 
dissolved by the pope's bull, and very shortly after- 
wards, viz. in 1428, he married Eleanor Cobham. Hol- 
linshed says, that he had tenderly loved her as his 
paramour before their marriage, but no other chronicler 
appears to have suggested this slander, and there seems 
no reason to believe it. It is far more probable that 
this statement is no more than one of the slanders 
to which Cardinal Beaufort and his faction might be 
expected to resort. Those who could murder the 
husband, were not very likely to spare the reputation 
of the wife. 

The fortunes of the family might be supposed to have 
now reached the zenith. One of their house had thus 
become a queen in all but the name ; the wife of the most 
powerful prince in England, and, indeed, in Europe, the 
Lord Protector of the realm, and as he was wont to style 



158 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

himself in his charters, the son, the uncle, and brother 
of kings ; renowned alike for his warlike achievements 
and for his great ability, and the idol of the common 
people, by whom his memory was long cherished. But, 
in those times, the steps of a throne were often but a 
slippery resting-place, and so it chanced with Eleanor 
Cobham ; for nothing could avail to save her from the 
relentless hate of her husband's uncle and rival, the 
Cardinal Beaufort. 

Por some years, while the duke maintained his ground 
at court, his wife appears to have been regarded with all 
the respect due to her rank and position. The following 
entries of presents of gold and jewels received from, or 
given to her, are preserved in the minutes of the pro- 
ceedings of the Privy Council for the year 1437 : — 

" Item, delivered to send that same day to my lady of 
Glouc. a nouche, made in the manner of a man, garnized 
with a fayre gret balass, v gret perles, j gret diamand, 
pointed with thre hangers, garnized with rubies and 
pearl, bought of Bemonde, goldesmyth, for the sum of 
xl li." On the same day there was delivered by the king's 
commandment to send to Quene Joane, for her yeres gift, 
" a tabulett of gold, garnized with iv balasses, viii perles, 
and in the middes a gret saphire entaille weying vi unc. 
j. q a rt T n. di the which tabulett sometime was geve 
the kynge by my lady of Gloucestere." It also appears 
from the same record, that she was summoned with 
other peeresses and peers to attend the funeral of Joan, 
the widow of Henry IV., which took place this year at 
Canterbury. 

But these happy days, if happy days they were, were 
not destined to be of long duration. During the whole 
of the young king's minority the Lord Protector had been 
eno-ao-ed in an incessant strife with his uncle, the Cardinal 



OF STERB0R0UGH CASTLE. 150 

Beaufort. These disputes and divisions which not only- 
prepared the way for the overthrow of the house of 
Lancaster, and contributed to the loss of those pro- 
vinces of France which had been won at such cost 
by Edward III. and Henry IV. and V., eventually 
involved Eleanor Cobham in ruin. While the king 
was yet young, the Duke of Gloucester, supported as 
he was by the common people by whom he was much 
beloved, seems to have held his own against the car- 
dinal. But, as time wore on, the young king seems to 
have fallen more and more under the influence of his 
father's uncle, who knew but too well how to avail 
himself of his weakness and superstition. 

In the nineteenth year of Henry VI. (1441), about 
thirteen years after her marriage, it appears that 
Eleanor Cobham was accused and convicted of certain 
crimes and misdemeanours. Hall's account of this 
extraordinary transaction is as follows : — 

" For first this yere, Dame Elyanour Cobham, wife of the said duke, 
was accused of treason, for that she, by sorcery and enchantment 
entended to destroy the kyng, to thentent to aduance and to promote 
her husbande to the crowne : upon thys she was examined iu St. 
Stephen's Chappel before the Bisshop of Canterbury ; and there by 
examinacion convict and judged to do open penance, in iij open places, 
within the city of London, and after that adjudged to perpetuall prisone 
in the Isle of Man, under the kepyng of Sir Jhon Stanley, Knyght. 
At the same season wer arrested, as ayders and counsailers to the sayde 
duchesse, Thomas Southwel, preiste and chanon of St. Stephen's, in 
Westmynster, Jhon Hum, preist, Roger Bolyngbroke, a conyng nycro- 
mancier, and Margerie Jourdayne, surnamed the witche of Eye, to whose 
charge it was laied y l thei, at the request of the duchesse, had devised an 
image of waxe, representing the kyng, which by their sorcery, a litle 
and litle consumed, entendyng therby in conclusion to waist, and destroy 
the kynges person, and so to bryng hym to death ; for the which treison 
they wer adjudged to dye, and so Mai'gery Jordayne was brent in 
Smithfelde, and Roger Bolyngbroke was drawn and quartered at 
Tiborne, takyng upon his death, that there was neuer no such thing by 



160 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

theim ymagined ; Jhon Hum had his pardon, and Southwel died in the 
toui'e before execution." 

Hollinshed's account is somewhat different. He 
says : — 

"This woman, in the 19th year of the said Henry VI., upon the 
taking of Henry Bollingbrook for practising necromancies, thereby to 
consume the king, fled in the night to Westminster for sauctuarie, which 
caused her to be suspected of treason. Whereupon Bullingbrook con- 
fessing that he wrought the same at the procurement of the said Ellinor, 
desii-ous to know to what estate she would come unto, the same Ellinor 
did often times for the same appear before the bishop, and in the end 
was convicted. After which, in the 20th of Henry VI., she did grevous 
penance therefoi-e, and so escaped with her life." 

Thus far the chroniclers, who, however, can only be 
regarded as embodying the popular belief of the time so 
far as relates to the nature of the offence with which 
the duchess was charged. I have searched Archbishop 
Chicheley's register, and the entries in the books of the 
corporation of London preserved at the Guildhall, and 
the parliament rolls of the time, as well as the minutes 
of the Privv Council, and can find no record of the 
process instituted against the duchess, nor any allusion 
to it ; possibly, those who were actors in it were not 
anxious that any such memorial should remain. The 
only authentic document that I have been able to dis- 
cover at all relating to this trial is preserved in Bymer's 
Fcedera. This is a writ of safe-conduct, or rather of in- 
demnity, granted by the king to the archbishop. It is 
dated 9th August, 1441, and sets forth, that the arch- 
bishop had proceeded to institute an inquiry in the 
college of St. Stephen's Chapel, Westminster, on the 
25th day of July then last, concerning certain crimes, 
defaults, and causes (criminibus, defectibus, et cmisis), 
wherein Alianor, Duchess of Gloucester, stood detected, 
and that he had ordained that she, together with 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 161 

certain persons, in due form of law sworn to keep her 
in custody, should remain in the castle of Ledes. The 
writ proceeds to enjoin that no one should interfere 
with the jurisdiction of the archbishop, nor molest the 
said Alianor during the said proceeding, nor arrest nor 
attach her goods, but that she and the persons aforesaid 
along with her should be removed to Ledes Castle, and 
remain there until October 21st then next, when she 
was to be brought again before the Archbishop at St. 
Stephen's, without any let or hindrance in going, staying, 
or returning. 

The document next in order appears to throw more 
light upon the matter, or at least upon the motives and 
conduct of some of those who were engaged in it. On 
the last day of October, in the same year, a warrant was 
issued to the treasurer and chamberlains of the Exchequer 
for the payment of various debts due by the king ; and 
amongst other payments, they were directed to distri- 
bute the sum of £20 amongst the doctors, notaries, and 
clerks who had been lately engaged about the super- 
stitious sect of necromancers, enchanters, and witches 
(nigromanticoram, incantantium, et sortilegomim) for the 
purpose of putting an end to the said arts. 

Owing doubtless to the pious zeal of these doctors, 
notaries, and clerks, ample evidence was produced to 
convict the poor witch Margery. Stow's account of 
her is as follows : — ■ 

" There was taken also Margery Gurdemayne, a witch of Eye, beside 
Westminster, whose sorceries and witchcraft the said Eleanor had long 
time used, and by her medicines and drinks enforced the duke of 
Gloucester to love her, and afterward to wed her ; wherefore, and for 
cause of relapse, the same witch was brent in Smithfield on the 27th 
day of October." 

To have put the Duchess of Gloucester (then the lady 



162 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBI1AM. 

of highest rank in the kingdom, and wife of the heir 
apparent to the throne) to death on such a wretched 
pretence as this, would have been too strong a measure 
even for the malignity of the cardinal. Indeed, we 
have no reason to believe that the archbishop, and the 
bishops to whom the trial or examination of the 
duchess and her confederates (if she had any) was 
entrusted, were disposed, even if they had the power, 
to inflict any very severe punishment. All that they 
seem to have done in the matter was, to enjoin her to 
the performance of certain acts of penance, which, if 
imposed upon any one of a lower station, would not 
perhaps have been looked upon as very degrading. 
Shakespeare, indeed, when with his iron grasp he seized 
upon this strange story, and made it the ground-work 
of one of his plays, has, with the licence assumed by 
poets, not only introduced the queen (Margaret of 
Anjou) upon the scene, although she did not arrive in 
England until three years later, but, in order to 
heighten the effect of the picture, he has exaggerated 
the disgrace inflicted upon the duchess, by representing i 
her as walking through the streets barefoot, with papers 
pinned upon her back, and clothed in a white sheet. 
The indignity, great as it was, was probably not quite 
so great as this. In Stow's account of the transaction, 
no mention is made of the white sheet, of the bare feet, 
or the papers. 

After giving an account of the apparatus with which 
Bullingbrook wrought his incantations, and the masses 
which the canon of St. Stephen's celebrated in order to 
forward the impious work, and which he says were 
performed in the lodge of " Harnesey Parke " (probably 
Hornsey), near London, he adds : — 

" Shortly after, a commission was directed to the earls of Huntingdon, 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 103 

Suffolk, Stafford, and Northumberland, the treasurer, Sir Ralph. Cromwell, 
Sir John Cornwall, Lord Fauhope, Sir Walter Hungerforde, and to 
certain Judges of both benches, to enquire of all manner of treasons, 
sorceries, and other things that might be hurtful to the King's person. 
Before whom the said Roger and Thomas Southwell, as principals, and 
Dame Elianoi*, as accessary, were iudicted of treason at the Guildhall of 
London." 

The result of this indictment is not stated, and it 
therefore seems reasonable to conclude that the accused 
were acquitted of treason. 

The chronicler proceeds : — 

"The 21st October, in the chapel aforesaid, before the Bishop of London, 
Robert Gliberte of Lincolne, William Alnewicke of Norwich, and 
Thomas Brown, the said Alianor appeared ; and Adam Molins, clerk of 
the King's counselle, read certain articles objected against her of sorcery 
and negromancy, whereof some she denyed, and some she granted. The 
three-and-twentieth day of October Dame Alianor appeared again, and 
witnesses were brought forward and examined, and she was convicted of 
the said articles j then was it asked if she would say anything against 
the witnesses, and she answered, ' Nay,' but submitted herself. The 
27th day of October she abjured the articles, and was adjourned to 
appear again on the 9th of November. The 9th of November Dame 
Alianor appeared again before the archbyshopp and others in the said 
chapel, and received her penance, which she performed. On Monday, 
13th November, she came from Westminster by water, and landed 
at the Temple Bridge, from whence, with a taper of wax, of two 
pound, in her hand, she went through Fleet Street, hoodless, save a 
kerchefe, to Paul's, where she offered her taper at the high altar. On 
the Wednesday next, she lauded at the Swan in Thames Street, and 
went through Bridge Street, Gracechurch Street, strait to Leadenhall, 
and so to Christ Church, by Aldgate. On the Friday she landed at 
Queen Hive, and so went through Cheap to St. Michael's, Cornhill, at 
which time the Maior, Sheriffs, and Crafts of London received her and 
accompanied her." 

It does not appear that the duke made any great 
effort, either to avert or to resent this outrage. Time 
was, when he would have involved two powerful nations 
in war, that so he might retain another man's wife; but 
now he seems to have been so far changed, that he could 

VOL. II. N 



164 NOTICES OP THE FAMILY OE COBHAM 

not strike a blow to save his own. Hall says : " The 
Duke of Gloucester toke all these things patiently, and 
saied little :" and Shakespeare, who followed closely upon 
the popular belief, represents the duchess as entreating 
her husband to rescue her from this outrage, and warn- 
ing him, that if he submitted to it, his own turn would 
soon follow. 

" And York, and impious Beaufort, that false priest, 
Have all limed bushes to betray thy wings ; 
And fly thou how thou canst, they'll taugle thee." 

To this passionate entreaty, the duke is made meekly 
to reply : 

" Wouldst have me rescue thee from this reproach 1 
Why, yet thy scandal were not wiped away, 
But I in danger for the breach of law. 
Thy greatest help is quiet, gentle Nell : 
I pray thee sort thy art to patience ; 
These ten days' wonder will be quickly worn." 5 

It is commonly supposed that the duchess, imme- 
diately after her penance, was consigned to perpetual 
imprisonment in the Isle of Man, an opinion probably 
derived from Shakespeare's play. The events of real 
life do not, however, follow upon each other with that 
startling rapidity which it suits the purpose of poets and 
romancers to attribute to them. It is certain that she 
was not sent to the Isle of Man until a considerable 
time after her penance, and very probably not till after 
her husband's death. This is evident from Letters 
Patent, dated October 26th, 1443 (being nearly a year 
and a half from the date of the duchess's first imprison- 
ment), by which the constable of the castle of Chester 
is commanded to bring the duchess, who was then 
detained in his custody, to the castle of Kenilworth, and 

5 Shakespeare, 2nd Part King Henry VI. act ii. scene iv. 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 165 

to deliver her into the custody of the keeper of that 
castle or his deputy, and for that purpose, he is to furnish 
himself both with men and horses, and carriages, and 
with provisions ; and that he might be able more safely 
and securely to conduct the said Ellinor to the said 
castle, the king took the said Ellinor and also the 
constable, and all his goods, into his special care and 
protection. Eventually, the duchess was certainly 
removed to the Isle of Man, where she remained, as 
Hall says, under the care of Sir John Stanley. 
Shakespeare says, under that of Sir Thomas, but he 
had died in 1432. 

Her husband died so suddenly, that he had no time 
to " choose executors, and talk of wills," and ac- 
cordingly we find, from a document printed in the 
" Ecedera," that upon his death, the king procured from 
the archbishop the administration of his estate, alleging 
that he had died intestate. As neither he, nor the duchess 
had been convicted of treason, or any other crime amount- 
ing to felony, she would be entitled to a large share of his 
fortune ; nevertheless it seems that it was all confiscated, 
and that she had during her imprisonment but 100 
marks yearly allowed for her maintenance, although 
some other payments are recorded as having been made 
for her use. The islanders have a tradition that she 
was very restless, and impatient of her captivity, and 
made many fruitless efforts to escape. The place of her 
imprisonment is still pointed out in a crypt under the 
chancel of the cathedral of St. Germanus in Peel Castle, 
which was long afterwards used as a place of confine- 
ment for excommunicate persons, although the duchess, 
having duly performed her penance, could scarcely be 
considered as excommunicate. Here she remained until 
death released her in the year 1454. 

N 2 



166 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

She was buried in the dungeon in which she had lived; 
but no sumptuous tomb or sculptured brass marks the 
last resting-place of one so nobly descended and allied. 
It was long, and perhaps still is believed, that her 
ghost was accustomed to ascend the stone staircase 
leading to the walls, and to descend when the cathedral 
clock was striking midnight. 

In the entire absence of all authentic records of this 
memorable process, and amidst the conflicting accounts 
given by the old chroniclers, it is difficult to say how far, 
if at all, the duchess may have merited the censures of 
the Church ; but it seems certain that the offence of 
which she was accused could not have merited the cruel 
punishment inflicted. Hapin (without quoting any 
authority) says that she confessed that she had applied 
to a witch for a philtre, to fix the love of her husband ; 
and Stow savs that the witcli had furnished her with 
drinks and medicines, and thus she had enforced the 
duke to love her, and afterwards to wed her. Con- 
sidering that this amounted neither to treason, nor to 
witchcraft, and that the wedding in question had taken 
place thirteen years previously, and that the duke (the 
only person aggrieved) did not complain, the offence 
could hardly justify the punishment. Hollinshed's 
statement, that Bolingbrook confessed that he wrought 
his necromancies by the duchess's desire, desiring to 
know to what estate she would come, is inconsistent, 
since it clearly was not necessary, by the laws of 
witchcraft, to consume the king in order to tell the 
duchess's fortune. It is also at variance with Hall's 
statement, that he denied, even when at the scaffold, 
that he had any such design. It is difficult to believe 
that a lady of the rank and position of the duchess 
should have had any faith in the vulgar superstition of 



OF STEUBOE-OTJGH CASTLE. 167 

the little waxen image ; although, like many other 
ladies in a much later and more civilized period, she 
may have, perhaps, consulted a cunning man in order 
to know " to what estate she should come." 

It appears hy a comparison of dates that this accusa- 
tion was made against the duchess almost immediately 
after the duke had exhibited his impeachment against 
the cardinal, in which he laid to his charge many treasons 
and misdemeanors. It seems, therefore, most probable 
that the cardinal and the duke's other enemies, either 
finding that his wife was in their way, or determined by 
her means to humble and degrade him in revenge for 
the impeachment, hit upon this expedient, which, from 
the well-known weakness and superstition of the king, 
was not very difficult of execution ; and that thus the 
ruin of the wife, as well as the murder of the husband, 
may justly be attributed to "Beaufort, that false 
priest." Such at least was the belief of the time, and 
in proportion to the love and admiration which the 
common people felt for the " good Duke Humphrey ' 
was the hatred and execration which they lavished upon 
the cardinal, whom they believed to be his murderer. 
This opinion easily led to a belief (which certainly the 
chroniclers of the time have favoured) that the cardinal 
on his death-bed was filled with horror and remorse at 
the remembrance of the long catalogue of crimes of 
which he had been guilty ; and thus it has happened, 
that when a novelist or poet would describe, or a painter 
represent, the death-bed of a hopeless and impenitent 
man, they have often introduced that of Henry Beau- 
fort. Shakespeare avails himself of this tradition, when 
he makes the king say to the dying cardinal : — 

- Lord Cardinal, if thou think'st on Leaven's bliss, 
Hold up thy hand, make signal of thy hope. — 
He dies, and makes no sign. O God, forgive him ! 



168 



NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 



It is not likely that these mysteries will ever be 
cleared up ; and we may therefore be content to follow 
the king's injunction to the Earl of Warwick, as they 
left the cardinal's bedside : — ■ 

"Forbear to judge, for we are sinners all, — 
Close up his eyes, and draw the curtain close, 
And let us all to meditation." 6 



6 Shakespeare, 2nd Part Henry VI. act iii. scene iii. 




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OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 109 



APPENDIX No. I. 

TRANSCRIPT OF THE WILL OF JOAN, LADY COBHAM. 
Copia Testamenti Domince Johannce de Cobham. 

In Nomine Domini Amen, xiii die rnensis Augusti anno Domini 
millesimo ccc m0 lxix , et anno regni Regis Eduardi tertii post conquestum 
quadragesimo tertio, Ego Johanna de Cobham et de Stereburgh, sana, 
compos mentis, et bonee memorise, in hunc modum testamentum meum 
ordino et condo. 

Imprimis commendo Deo et beatae Marise et omnibus Sanctis animam 
meam, et corpus meum ad sepeliendum in cimiterio Sancta? Marias 
Overthere in Southwerke, videlicet, ante hostium Ecclesiae conventualis 
ubi imago de beata Virgine sedet in sublimi dicti hostii ; et ordino et 
volo quod ponetur super corpus meum una lapis marmorea plana, et 
quod sculpantur una crux de metallo iu medio lapidis, et in circuitu 
lapidis ista verba in Gallico, 

" Vo s q' p'ici passietz 
P r l'alme Johane de Cobham prietz." 

Hsec est voluntas mea ultima si apud Southwarke deberem claudere 
diem meum extremum. Item volo et firmiter ordino ante omnia alia 
quod statim post mortem meam faciant celebrare septem millia missas 
pro anima, mea, et quod non tardantur nee differantur nullo modo, et 
volo quod dictae rnissae celebrentur per canonicos de Tunbrugge et de 
Tanrugge, et quatuor ordines religiosos apud London, videlicet, Praedi- 
catores, Minores, Augustinenses, et Carmelitas, et haberent pro eorum 
labore viginti novem libras tres solidos et quatuor denarios. 

Item lego distribuendas in die sepulturse meae inter pauperes decern 
m areas. 

Item lego pro expensis diversis faciendis pro sepultura mea, una cum 
panno nigro pro liberatione ministrorum, et duodecim pauperum por- 
tantium xii torticios cum cera, et in aliis necessariis, et in die octavo, 
quadraginta marcas. 

Item lego ad fabricam ecclesiae conventualis Sanctae Marias de 
Southwerke viginti libras sterlingorum. 

Item lego priori qui pro tempore fuerit xl s. 

Item lego unicuique canonico existenti in ordiue sacei'dotali xxs. et 
unicuique canonico non sacerdoti xs. 

Item lego clerico conventuali ejusdem domus vi s et viii d . 

Item lego pulsatoribus campanas in berfreto ejusdem ecclesiae tres 
solidos et quatuor denarios. 



170 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBIIAM 

Item lego summo altari dicti prioratus duos pelves argenteos de nieliori- 
bus, cum armis domini in centro. 

Item lego ad fabricam ecclesia? parochialis Sancta? Maria? Magdalen* 
juxta ecclesiaru conventualem prsedictam centum solidos. 

Item lego capellano pai-ocliiali qui pro tempore fuerit xx s. 

Item unicuique capellano celebranti in ecclesia memorata, illo tempore 
sex solidos et octo denarios et majori clerico ejusdem ecclesia? vi s et viii' 1 
et subclerico iii s et iv a . 

Item ordino qnod duodecim pauperes xii torticios in die sepultura? 
portantes sint vestiti cum tunicis et capuciis de panno nigro, et statim 
post celebrationem missa? sex tortitii liberentur summo altari capella? de 
beata Yirgine. 

Item volo quod alii sex liberentur summo altari Maria? Magdalena? pro 
levatione sacramenti. 

Item volo et firmiter ordino quod omnibus his peractis solvantur 
debita reverendi domini mei illis omnibus qui bene et de jure potuerint 
probare, vel per certas literas obligatorias, vel per alia scripta, vel vera 
munimeuta, et similiter debita mea si qua? sint, quod absit. Et similiter 
fiat satisfactio plena de omnibus transgressionibus dicti domini mei cum 
omni celeritate et diligentia. 

Item lego ecclesia? de Lyngefeld unum frontorium de armis Berkele et 
Cobbam stantibus in albo et purpure. Item unara casulam et unum album 
(sic) de armis Berkele et Cobham de velvetto. Item unum dalmaticum et 
unum tuuiculum viride de secta casula?, irradiatum cum filo aurco. 

Item unara capam viridem pro Rectore chori. 

Item eidem unum corporale broudatum in una parte Annuntiatione 
beate Maria?, et in alia parte Nativitate Christi cum imagine beata? Maria? 
jacentis in puerperio. 

Item lego Reginaldo filio meo unum annulum cum uno deamande et 
unum firmale de auro cum uno rubie. 

Item unum par de avez de am-o, viz. sexaginta aveez. 

Item volo quod libei-entur omnia vestimenta, libri, et duo calices 
et omnia alia existentia in custodia mea qua? dominus metis mihi 
tradidit ad terminuin vita? mea?, et post mortem meara tradentur 
dicto Reginaldo ; exceptis vestimentis meis superius legatis ecclesia? 
parocliiali de Lyngefeld. 

Item volo quod liberentur dicto Eeginaldo post mortem meam omnia 
subscripta, et per dominum meum sibi in testamento siio data et 
legata viz. 

Unum lectum viride, broudatum cum uno Soudano et armis domini, 
cum uno quilt, et una, selura integra, et iii cortinas et iiii tapetas de 
secta eadem, et unum coopertorium pro lecto de croupgrys. 



OF STEKBOROUGIi CASTLE. 171 

Item duo sargia rubea cum tribus cortinis de l'ubeo, brouduratis cum 
heuma domini. 

Item dedi perantea dicto Eeginaldo unurn dorsorium maguum pro 
aula de Stereburgh, cum novem regibus stantibus, de curialitate mea 
propria. 

Item feci liberare dicto Eeginaldo omnia arma et armatura existencia 
in garderoba domini mei apud Stereburgh quae dictus Eeginaldus de me 
acceptavit, et ille omnia prsedicta arma una cum magno dosso prsedicto 
deputavit Lokward ad custodiendum, et ab illo tempore usque in pre- 
senter diem dictus Lokward custodiam et clavem garderobse babuit. 

Item libera vi dicto Eeginaldo unum cipbum argenteum quern dominus 
sibi legavit. 

Item volo quod executores mei reddant et liberent dicto Eeginaldo 
unum alium cipbum argenteum cum cooperculo. 

Item similiter duodecim discos argenteos, et duodecim salsaria ar- 
gentea qua? Dominus sibi legavit. De quibus dictus Eeginaldus recepit de 
me sex discos et quatuor salsaria argentea quando ibat apud Gasconiam. 

Item volo quod dictus Eeginaldus babeat tres discos argenteos de 
melioribus de meis, in recompensatione duorum cbargeriorum per domi- 
num sibi legatorum. 

Item volo quod liberentur dicto Eeginaldo per executores meos duo 
pelves argentese cum armis Domini, et duo lavatores argentei de meli- 
oribus. 

Item lego eidem Eeginaldo omnia vasa mea serea ad coquinam et pis- 
trinam pertinentia, cum omnibus suis pertinentiis, et etiam lego eidem 
omnia vasa lignea pertinentia ad utrumque officium. 

Item lego eidem Eeginaldo centum libratas in catallis, et in stauro 
animalium, et in bladis, et si contingat, quod absit, quod prsefatus Eegi- 
naldus moriatur ante me, et ego etiam superstes, tunc volo quod omnia 
bona et catalla superius per me legata eidem ut predictum est, ad me et ad 
executores meos revertantur et remaneant sine contentione aliqua, et tunc 
volo et concedo quod ego et executores mei de illis bonis per me legatis 
et similiter de omnibus illis bonis per dominum meum sibi legatis et 
contends libere possumus et poterimus disponere et ordinare sicut mihi 
et executoribus meis melius pro aiiimabus nostris expedire videbimur. 

Item lego Domino Henrico de Grey unum ciphum argenteum cum 
armis de Cobham et de Berkele in centro, cum cooperculo. 

Item lego Dominse Johannse de Grey uxori suse unum magnum librum 
curiose illuminatum et operatum, cum Mortumalo et Geuenyles in 
principio libri, cum Salutatione beata? Virginis. 

Item eidem unum librum vocatum Manuel Eeche. 

Item eidem duo lyntbiamina de panno de Eeyns cum decern telis. 



172 NOTICES OF THE FxYMILY OF COBHAM. 

Item eidem imam bonaru et meliorein cofram meam quam Laurentius 
tie Mountz milii dedit. 

Item lego eidem Johanna? filiae nieae unum aunulum cum uno rubeo, 
et xvii dyamandes fixas in circuitu annuli. 

Item eidem unum tabernaculum parvum de puro auro cum imagine de 
beata Maria Virgine interius, cum duobus parvis Angelis a dextris 
ejnsdem et sinistris. 

Item eidem unum firmale planum de auro cum uno pare de aveez viz. 
quinquaginta de auro et quinquaginta aveez de geet. 

Item lego Johannee filise Domini Henrici de Grey unam cuppam argen- 
team planam, factam ad modum calicis cum cooperculo, et si praedicta 
Johanna moriatur ante matrem suam tunc volo quod retradatur Dominse 
Johanna? de Grey matri suee. 

Item lego eidem Johannae filia? Henrici pragdicti unum agnum Dei cum 
crucifixo amalato in una parte, cum sancta Maria et sancto Johanne 
stantibus, et in altera parte uuum agnellum Dei stantem in uno circulo 
et cum una catena argentea. 

Item volo et firmiter ordino in casu quod bona mea in fine vitae 
mese non sufficiaut pro solutione debitorum reverendi domini mei, vel 
debitorum meorum, tunc volo quod executores mei unanimi consensu 
vendant molendinum meum aquaticum in ponte Edulun quod perquisivi 
de hseredibus de Shardenne sicut plenarius patent et demonstrant per 
cartas illorum Item similiter volo quod hospitium meum in Southwarke 
juxta London vendatur et de pecunia pro eisdem recepta, fiant solu- 
tiones et restitutiones debitorum domini mei et pro debitis meis similiter 
ut supra dictum est. Item volo quod duo capellani sint conducti ad 
celebrandum in ecclesia parocbiali de Laugleborel pro animabus domini 
Johannis de la Mare militis, [qui] quondam ibidem dominus erat, domini 
Reginaldi de Cobbam, domini Thoma? de Berkle, et pro animabus bene- 
factorum meorum, et si contingat quod Eeginaldus filius meus, vel alii 
hseredes mei, voluerit vel voluerint appropriare et firmiter confirmare 
dictam ecclesiam ad inveniendum duos capellanos in perpetuum cele- 
braturos sicut conditio et intentiones predicti Domini Johannis fuerunt 
ordinati quum ipse vendidit domino meo maneria sua de Langele et 
Lye in presentia, reverendi Domini patris mei de Berkele, tunc volo his 
peractis fideliter, et sine fraude completis, quod [si] praedictus Reginaldns 
filius meus vel alii heredum meorum prsedicta onera subire et plenarie 
supportare voluerit vel voluerint, quod ex tunc executores mei faciant 
feoffare dictum Jteginaldum, vel veros et legitimos heredes meos qui 
pro tempore erunt in predictum molendinum meum aquaticum in ponte 
Edulun, et in hospitium meum in Southwerk cum omnibus juribus et 
pertinentiis sine ulla retentione in perpetuum possidendum. Ita tamen 
quod ipse Reginaldus supportabit, vel alii heredes mei supportabunt onera 



OF STEREOROrGH CASTLE. 173 

predicta etc., sicut ipse vel ipsi alii heredes qui pro tempore fuerit vel fue- 
rint respondeat vel respondeant pro domino meo patre eorum, et pro anima 
mea coram Summo Judice. Et si noluerit vel noluerint onera predicta im- 
plere et consummare, tunc volo et firmiter ordino quod executores mei fa- 
ciant sicut supra ordinatum est, et lisec est firma et ultima voluntas mea. 

Item lego Domino Johanni de Cobham unum osculatorium argenteum 
et deauratum, cum uno crucifixo, cum sancta Maria in dextra parte, et 
Sancto Johanno in sinistra parte stantibus. 

Item lego eidem unum ciphum deauratum cum cooperculo ejusdem 
sectse, et sub pede ejusdem cipbi tres leones stantes, et portantes pre- 
dictum ciphum. 

Item lego eidem Domino unum librum dictum Apocalyps, et in principio 
libri stat imago Sancti Pauli. 

Item lego Dominse Aleyzaa moniali de Berkyngg unum annulum cum 
una saphira, de antiquo opere et xx solidos sterlingorum. 

Item lego Domino Amando de Fythlyng unam tabulam eburneam cum 
salutatione Beataa Marise, ct Trinitate, et Passione, cum aliis historiis 
ibidem. 

Item lego eidem xx librae sterlingorum. 

Item lego Roberto Belknappe unum cornu de ungue unius griffonis 
cum cooperculo argenteo deaui-ato, et in cooperculo arma Domini de 
Cobham et Domini de Berkele, et dictum cornu est cum circulo argenteo 
et habet duos pedes argenti deauratos. 

Item lego eidem xx libras sterlingorum. 

Item lego Bogero Dalym-egge xx libras sterlingorum. 

Item lego Bicardo Mabanke unum largum ciphum argenteum cum 
duabu3 imaginibus adinvicem osculantibus in centro, et in circulo folia 
et glandes, et eidem similiter xx libras sterlingorurn. 

Item lego Johanni de Cobham de Deverchirche centum s. sterlingorum. 

Item lego Margaretse Mabanke in casu quod trahat moram mecum 
usque ad finem vitaa mese, tunc volo quod habeat x marcas et si non 
sit mecum circa finem meum tunc non habebit nisi xl solidos tantum, 
et volo quod ilia principalis domicella mea quae pro illo tempore fuerit 
habeat x marcas. 

Item lego Johanni Mabank filio Bicardi Mabanke xl solidos, et quatuor 
filiis ejusdem Bicardi, cuilibet eorum xx solidos. 

Item lego illse doinicellse quaserit socia principalis dornicellse meae x marc. 

Item lego Katrine Stoket pro promotione sua xx marcas et in casu 
quod fuerit per me promota, tunc volo quod habeat in fine vitaa mese x 
marcas. 

Item lego eidem meliorem corsettam meam cum meliore tunica et 
cum meliori caputio furrurato. 

Item lego duabus domicellis principalihus meis et Katerine Stoket vel 



174 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

illi qua? pro tempore illo fuerit principalis cameraria tres mantellos 
meliores et furruratos. 

Item volo quod omnia alia mantella mea et omnes alii panni mei 
usuales cum caputiis et furruris sint divisi et dati inter servos meos qui 
sunt vel fuerunt mecum. 

Item lego duabus domicellis meis et Katerine Stoket,vel illis domisellis 
et cameraria? qua? pro illo tempore fuerint, imam cofram cum appai'atu 
omni pertinente ad caput meum die et nocte. 

Item lego lotrici mea? qua? illo tempore fuerit xiij solidos iv denarios. 

Item lego Elianora? Stoket si tunc fuerit mecum xl solidos. 

Item lego Johanna? filia? Thorna? Chaumberleyn si fuerit mecum in fine 
meo xl solidos. Item lego Domino Willelmo de Wrotham Capellano meo 
si moram fecerit mecum usque in finem meum x marcas, et [sin autem ?] 
habebit nisi xl solidos. Item illis capellanis qui mecum erunt illo tem- 
pore si sint unus vel duo unicuique illorum v marcas. 

Item legopiucenario meo qui pro tempore fuerit lx s. Item lego magis- 
tro coquo meo qui pro tempore fuerit lx solidos. Item lego clerico bospitii 
mei, camerario meo, et clerico capella? mea?, qui pro tempore fuerint 
unicuique illorum xl solidos. Item pagetto panetvia? xx solidos. Item 
lego servienti in coquina qui pro tempore fuerit xx soliilos, et pagetto 
x solidos. Item lego janitori qui pro tempore xx solidos. Item lego cuilibet 
sacerdoti celebranti in spitla Sancti Tboma? vi solidos et viij denarios. Item 
cuilibet sorori ibidem iij solidos iv denarios. Item distribuendum inter 
infirmos ibidem jacentes sex solidos et viij denarios. Item lego prisonia 
jacentibus in vinculis, et carceratis juxta Sanctum Georgium sex solidos 
et octo denarios. Item lego cuilibet sacerdoti celebranti in collegio Domini 
de Cobham vi solidos viij denarios. Item majoribus clericis ibidem unicui- 
que illorum duo solidos. Item unicuique cboristarum ibidem xij denarios. 
Item lego pro ornamentis chori de Lyngefeld per visum rectoris qui pro 
tempore fuerit x marcas. Item lego Laurentio Warde xxvi solidos viij de- 
narios. Item lego Katrina? qua? fuit uxor Cadentis de Layton unura librum 
ad cujus principium est imago de sancto Johanne Baptista et alia? imagines 
depicta?, cum matutinis de Beata Maria. Et si contingat quod Beginaldus 
filius meuset heres impediat, vel per suos impedire faciat quod executores 
mei sint impediti in aliquomodo (quod absit) quod non possint implere et 
confirmare ultimam voluntatem meam in isto testamento expresse conteu- 
tam nolo nullo modo, et dictos executores meos hortor et moneo quod 
dictus Reginaldus nihil habeat de omnibus bonis sibi legatis in predicto 
testamento sed quod ilia bona distribuantur et ordinentur pro salute 
aniina? Domini mei et benefactorum meorum. Item lego Thoma? Fythling 
c solidos. 



OF STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 175 

Inventarium Vasorum diversorura ai-genti remanentiuni in custodia 
dornina?, ultra legata superius in testamento meo (? suo) die confectionis 
testamenti prsedicti. 

Imprimis xiii disci argentei cum v salsaribus ponderati cum pon- 
dere aurifabri : xiij lib. x sol. Item xii disci argentei quos domiua 
emit de executoribus Simonis Archiepiscopi, ponderati cum pondere 
aurifabri quindeciin libras. Item xij salsaria ai'gentea empta de execu- 
toribus ejusdem ponderata cum pondere aurifabri : iij lib. xv sol. Item 
dua? pelves argentei ponderata? per pondus aurifabri cxv sol. cum pondere 
pra?dicto. Item duo aquatica cum fistulis ponderata : per pondus aurifabri 
iv lib. Item duo aquatica cum vasibus ponderata iv lib. v sol. Item qua- 
tuor olla? argentea? ponderata? per pondus aurifabri : xij lib. xij sol. Item 
una olla argentea et deaurata ponderata per pnedictum pondus : lxx sol. 
vi den. Item ii ciphi argentei cum cooperculis de armis domini amalatis 
ponderati per pondus prsedictum : lx sol. 

Item i ciphus c\im nodo frettato pouderatus per pondus prsedictuin : xxx 
sol. Item duo ciphi ad modum calicis cum cooperculo ponderati per 
pondus prsedictum : iv lib. Item xiij pecii plani ponderati : cvij sol. 
Item ii salsaria pro sale ponderata iij lib. v sol. Item xxiv cocblearia 
argentea pondere : xxxviij sol. Item ij disci argentei pro speciebus 
ponderati : 1. sol. Item i ciphus de berillo non appreciato (sic). 

Summa predictorum vasorum ponderatoruin cum ponderibus aurifabri 

XX 

iiij iij lib. xvij sol. vi den. 

Invextarium bonorum meorum pro parte quae sunt in possessione mea, 
isto tempore et dato istius testamenti, videlicet in maneriis nieis que di- 
mittuntur certis tirmariis ut plenius continetur in indenturis inter illos 
et me confectisqui respondebunt executoribus meis in fine vitas niea?. 

Imprimis Radulphus atte Hulle, Johannes Othere, et illorum manu- 
captores reddent et solutionein facient pro manerio meo de Stereburgh 
sicut tenentur ex eorum conventione etc, hoc est, ad terminum vita? mea? 
Hi lib. xiv sol. sterlingorum. 

Item Ricardus Aleyn et ejus manucaptores respondebunt executoribus 
meis pro manerio sibi dimisso ad tempus vita? sua? pro Oksted quatuor 
viginti et septendecim libra?, xv sol. et iv d. 

Item Johannes Robyn et ejus manucaptores respondebunt et solu- 
tionem facient executoribus meis pro manerio meo de Northe ; dimisso 
sibi etc. cxiij lib. xiv sol. x den. 

Item "William Brounyng et ejus manucaptores respondebunt et solu- 
tionem facient pro manerio meo de Chydyngstone sibi dimisso, etc., lxi lib. 
et xvi sol. 

Mem m . quod ceconomia manerii mei de Orkesden in Kant est in manu 



176 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

mea, et nulli diinissa ad firmam, Ideo non possum certificari de valore illius 
nee de surnrna nisi per ordinem compoti de anno in annum, etc. 

Sum ma maneriorum predictorum cccxxvi lib. et ii deu. extra prove- 
nientibus et exitibus de manerio de Orkesden quia non dimittitur ad 
firmam. 

Item hie sunt scriptoe et computatse firma? mese de marescis meis in 
Kant viz. de Aubynesmershe in Elmele de ejusdem firmario Will°Symme 
et de ejus manucaptoribus xxvi lib. xiij sol. iv den. Item pro maresco 
meo vocato Lytelovene viz. de Johanne Aleyn firmario meo ibidem 
per annum cvi sol. viij den. 

Item pro Mullefletes mouth per Bobertuin Bonhomme reddet per 
annum versus (?) xvi sol. 

Item pro Shardesmersh Simon atte Boure et frater ejus respondent 
per annum pro eadem xiij lib. vi sol. viij den. Item pro Woldhammersh 
xxxiij sol. et iv den. per manus prions Boflensis firmarii ibidem. Item pro 
Neweheth iij marc iij sol. iv den. per manus Johannis Warde firmarii 
ibidem. Item pro Shelve xxiv marc vi sol. ob. q. per manus Henrici 
atte Watre firmarii ibidem. Item pro Aldyngton xi marcas per manus 
John Moonk. Item pro Westwell iv marcas per manus Bicardi Bethynden 
firmarii ibidem. Item pro Newegare c sol. per manus Avicie Chaum- 
berleyn quondam uxoris Chaumberleyn de Milton firmarii ibidem. Item 
pro Denhull iv marcas per manus Domini Thomse de Graunson firmarii 
ibidem. Item pro Stonrokke lxiij sol. iv den. per annum. Item, pro Dag- 
manshope x sol. per annum. Summa firmarum de comitatu Kantian pro 
marescis predictis et terris dimissis ad firmam ex marcas xx den. ob. q. 

Hujus autem testamenti mei superius scripti et plenarius contenti 
ordino et constituo executores meos dilectos meos in Christo Dominum 
Arnandum de Fithlyng, Bobertum Belknappe, Bogerum Dalenregge, et 
Bicardum Mabanke, dando eis plenam potestatem et auctoritatem ad 
ministrandnm et ordinandum omnia bona mea contenta in testamento 
meo, habendo ratum et gi-atum et confirmatum quodcunque ipsi fecerint 
in premissis ad laudem Dei, et sure sauctissinice matris Marine. 

Brobatum apud Otteford 3° Idus Maii 1370. 

[From Lambeth Begisters, Wittlesey, fo. 114.] 



No. II. 



TRANSLATION. 



In the name ol the Lord Amen. On the 13th day of the month of 
August in the year of our Lord 1369, and in the 43rd year of King 
Edward the Third, I Joan de Cobham and de Stereburgh, being of good 



OF STERBOROITGH CASTLE. 177 

health, sound mind, and of good memory, make and ordain my testament 
as follows : — 

In the first place I commend my soul to God, and to the blessed 
Mary, and to all Saints, and my body to be buried in the churchyard of St. 
Mary Overthere in Southwark, (to wit) before the door of the Conventual 
Church where the image of the Blessed Virgin sitteth on high over the 
said door. And I will and direct that a plain marble stone shall be 
placed over my body, and that a metal cross shall be sculptured 
upon the middle of the said stone, and round about it these words in 
French : — 

" Vous qui par ici passietz, 
Pur 1' alme Johane de Cobham prietz." 

This is my last will if I shall happen to die in Southwark. Also I will 
and direct that before everything else, immediately after my decease, there 
shall be celebrated seven thousand masses for my soul, and that these 
be on no account delayed or deferred, and I desire that the said 
masses shall be celebrated by the Canons of Tunbridge and Tandridge, 
and the four religious orders in London, viz. the Preachers, the Minors, 
the Augustines, and the Carmelites, and that they shall have for their 
pains £29. 3s. 4c?. 

Also I bequeath ten marks to be distributed to the poor on the day 
of my burial. Also I bequeath forty marks for the various expenses of 
my sepulture, and for black cloth for the livery of the attendants and of 
twelve poor men carrying twelve wax torches and for other expenses and 
for the octave. Also I bequeath £20 sterling to the fabric of the Conven- 
tual Church of St. Mary of Southwark. Also I bequeath 40s. to the Prior 
for the time being. Also I give to each Canon in priest's orders 20s. and 
to each Canon not in priest's orders 10s. Also I bequeath to the chapter 
clerk of the same house 6s. 8c?. Also I bequeath 3s. id. to the bellringers 
in the belfry of the same church. Also I bequeath to the high altar of 
the same church two of my best silver basins with my lord's arms in the 
centre. Also I bequeath 100s. to the fabric of the parish Church of St. 
Mary Magdelene near the said Conventual Church. Also I bequeath 20s. 
to the Chaplain for the time being of the parish. Also to each Chaplain 
officiating in the church at that time 6s. 8c?. and to the principal 
clerk of the same church 6s. 8c?. Also to the sub-clerk 3s. 4c?. Also 
I direct that twelve poor men carrying twelve torches on the day 
of my burial shall be clothed in cloaks and hoods of black cloth, and 
immediately after the celebration of the mass six of the torches shall be 
offered at the high altar in the chapel of the Blessed Virgin, and I direct 
that the other six shall be offered at the altar of Mary Magdalene 
for the elevation of the host. Also I will and strictly direct that all 
these things being performed the debts of my honoured lord be paid 



178 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

to all those persons who can well and rightfully prove them either by- 
bonds or other writing or true documents, and likewise my own debts 
if there should be any (which God forbid) and in like manner that full 
satisfaction be made for all trespasses of my said lord with the utmost 
quickness and diligence. Also I bequeath to the Church of Lingfield 
one frontour with the arms of Cobham and Berkley embroidered in white 
and purple, and also one chasuble, one alb of velvet with the arms 
of Berkeley and Cobham. Also one dalmatic and one green tunicle of 
the same set as the chasuble, worked with gold thread. Also one green 
cope for the master of the choir. Also to the same person a corporal 
embroidered on one side with the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin 
Mary, and on the other with the Nativity of Christ with the image of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary lying in child-bed. Also I bequeath to Regi- 
nald my son a ring with one diamond and one buckle of gold with one 
ruby. Also one pair of beads of gold (to wit) sixty beads. Also I desire 
that all the vestments and the books and the two cups and all other 
things now in my keeping which my lord gave to me for the term 
of my life, and after my death to the said Reginald my son shall be 
delivered to him, except my vestments before given to the parish 
church of Lingfield. Also I desire that there shall be delivered 
to the said Reginald after my death all those things after mentioned 
which were given and bequeathed to him by my lord in his will, that 
is to say ; One green bed embroidered with a Soldan,* with the 
arms of my lord, with one quilt and one entire seeler, and three curtains 
and four carpets of the same silk, and one coverlid for the same bed of 
badger's fur. Also two red serges with three red curtains embroidered 
with the helmet and crest of my lord. Also I have already given 
to the said Reginald, of my own good will, one great dorsor with the 
nine kings standing therein for the hall at Stereburgh. 

Also I have given up to the said Reginald all the arms and equip- 
ments in my lord's wardrobe at Stereburgh which the said Reginald 
accepted from me, and he delivered all the said arms with the great dorsor 
before mentioned to Lokward to take care of, and from that time to the 
present the said Lokward has had the custody thereof, and the key of the 
said wardrobe. Also I have delivered to the said Reginald one silver cuji 
which my lord bequeathed to him. Also I desire that my executors 
should deliver to the said Reginald one other silver cup with a cover, 
also twelve silver dishes and twelve silver salt-cellai-s which my lord 
bequeathed to him, and of which the said Reginald received from me 
six dishes and four salt-cellars when he went into Gascony. Also I desire 
that the said Reginald should have three of the best silver dishes of 

* The Cobham crest. 



OP STERBOROUGH CASTLE. 179 

my own, in recompense for the two chargers bequeathed to him by my 
lord. Also I desire that there should be delivered to the said Reginald 
by my executors two silver basins with the arms of my lord, and two of 
my best silver washing-basins. Also I bequeath to the said Reginald all 
my brass vessels for the kitchen and bakery with all their appui'tenances 
and I also bequeath to the same all my wooden vessels belonging to either 
of those offices. Also I bequeath to the said Reginald one hundred pounds' 
worth in chattels, and in stock of beasts, and in corn ; and if it should chance, 
which God forbid, that the said Reginald should die before me, and I 
should be the survivor, then I direct that all my goods and chattels above 
bequeathed to him as aforesaid shall revert to and remain with me and 
my executors without any dispute, and in that case I will and grant that 
I and my executors may freely dispose of the goods so by me bequeathed, 
and likewise of all other goods by my lord bequeathed to him, as to me 
and my executors shall seem best for the health of our souls. 

Also I bequeath to Sir Henry de Grey one silver cup with a cover with 
the arms of Berkeley and Cobham in the centre. Also I bequeath to the 
Lady Joan de Grey his wife one large book curiously illuminated and 
wrought with moHumalo (1) and gevenyles (?) in the beginning of the said 
book, and the Salutation of the Blessed Virgin. Also to the same, a book 
called " Manuel Peche." Also to the same two sheets of cloth of Rennes 
of ten breadths. Also to the same, my best coffer which Laurence de 
Mountz gave to me. Also I bequeath to the said Joan my daughter one 
ring with a ruby and seventeen diamonds set round the ring. Also to the 
same one little shrine of pure gold with the image of the Blessed Virgin 
Mary inside and two little angels on her right and on her left. Also 
to the same one plain buckle of gold with one pair of beads, viz. fifty 
beads of gold, and fifty of jet. Also I bequeath to Joan daughter of 
Sir Henry de Grey one plain silver cup made after the fashion of a 
chalice with a cover, and if the said Joan shall die before her mother 
then I wish it should be given to the Lady Joan de Grey her mother. 
Also I bequeath to the said Joan the daughter of the said Henry one 
Agnus Dei with an enamelled crucifix with St. Mary and St. John 
standing on one side, and on the other a little Agnus Dei standing in 
a circle and with a silver chain. Also I will and direct, in case my goods 
at the time of my decease shall not suffice for the payment of the debts 
of my honoured lord, or of my own dehts, then that my executors, by 
their common consent, shall sell my water-mill in Edenbridge, which 
I purchased of the heirs of one Shardenne, as more fully appears from 
their charters ; also in like manner I direct, that my inn in Southwark 
near London be sold, and from the money received for the same pay- 
ment be made of the debts of my lord, and of my own debts as before 
VOL. II. O 



180 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

mentioned. Also I direct that two chaplains shall be retained to cele- 
brate [masses] in the parish church of Langley Borel for the souls of 
Sir John de la Mare, Knight, formerly lord of that place, of Sir Regi- 
nald de Cobham, of Sir Thomas de Berkley, and for the souls of my 
benefactors. And if it should happen that my son Reginald, 'or my other 
heirs should be minded to appropriate and confirm the same Church to 
provide for ever two chaplains to celebrate [masses] according to the 
condition and intentions of the said Sir John when he sold to my lord 
his manors of Langley and Lye, in the presence of my honoured father de 
Berkley, then I direct, these things being perfected and faithfully com- 
pleted, that if the said Reginald my son or my other heirs should be 
minded to submit to, and fully to support the burdens before mentioned, 
that then my executors shall enfeoff the said Reginald or my true and 
lawful heirs for the time being in my aforesaid water-mill in Edenbridge, 
and my hostel in Southwark with all their rights and appurtenances, 
without any reserve, to be held by him or them for ever thereafter. Bat 
so that the said Reginald or my other heirs shall bear all the aforesaid 
burthens, &c, as he, or my heirs for the time being, shall answer for my lord 
their father, and for my soul before the Supreme Judge ; and if he or they 
shall refuse to fulfil and complete all the burdens before mentioned, then, 
I will and direct that my executors do as is before appointed, and this 
is my positive and last will. Also I bequeath to the Lord Cobham 
one pax silver-gilt with a crucifix, with St. Mary standing on the 
right, and St. John on the left. Also I bequeath to the same one 
gilt cup with a cover to match and under the foot of the said cup three 
lions standing and bearing the said cup. Also I bequeath to the same 
lord a book called Apocalypse, and in the beginning of the said book 
stands the image of St. Paul. Also I give to the Lady Alice a nun of 
Barking a ring with a sapphire of antique work and 20s. sterling. Also 
I bequeath to Sir Amand de Fithlyngg an ivory tablet with the Salutation 
of the Blessed Mary, the Trinity, and the Passion with other histories. 
Also I give to the same 20 pounds sterling. Also I bequeath to Robert 
Belknappe a horn made from a griffin's hoof with a silver-gilt cover, and 
on the cover the arms of the Lord Cobham and the Lord Berkley, and the 
said horn has a silver rim and has two silvei'-gilt feet. Also I bequeath 
to the same 20 pounds steiding. Also I bequeath to Roger Dalyngregge 
£20 sterling. Also I bequeath to Richard Mabank one large silver 
cup with two images embracing each other in the centre, surrounded 
with leaves and acorns, and to the same likewise £20 sterling. Also 
I bequeath to Margaret Mabank in case she shall remain with me 
until my death ten marks, and in case she shall not be with me at 
my death then she shall have but 40s. And I will that she who 
shall be my principal chamber-woman at that time shall have ten 



OP STERBOROTJGH CASTLE. 181 

marks. Also I bequeath to John son of Richard Mabank 40s. and to 
the four sons of the said Richard, to each of them 20s. Also I bequeath 
to that damsel who shall be the companion of my principal damsel 
ten marks. Also I bequeath to Katherine Stoket for her advancement 
20 marks, and in case she shall be advanced by me then that she 
shall have 10 marks at my death. Also I bequeath to her my best 
corset with my best gown and my best furred hood. Also I bequeath 
to my two principal damsels and to Katherine Stoket or to her who 
shall for the time being be my principal chamber-woman my three best 
furred mantles. Also I desire that all my other mantles and all my 
other ordinary clothes with my hoods and furs be divided amongst 
my servants who are or shall be with me. Also I bequeath to my two 
damsels, and to Katherine Stoket, or to those persons who at the time 
of my death shall be my damsels and chamber-woman, a coffer with all 
the attire for my head by day or at night (?). Also I bequeath to 
my laundress at that time 13s. 4c£ Also to Eleanor Stoket if she 
shall then be with me 20s. Also I bequeath to Joan daughter 
of Thomas Chamberleyn if she shall be with me at my death 40s. 
Also I bequeath to my chaplain Sir William de Wrotham if he shall 
remain with me to my end, 10 marks, but otherwise he shall have but 
40s. Also I bequeath to the chaplains who shall be with me at that 
time, whether one or two, to each of them 5 marks. Also I bequeath 
to my then butler 60s. Also I bequeath to my then master cook 
60s. Also to the clerk of my household, my chamberlain, and to the 
then clerk of my chapel, to each of them 40s. Also to the pantry page 
20s. Also I bequeath to the servant in my kitchen for the time being 
20s. and to the page 10s. Also to the porter for the time being 20s. 
Also I bequeath to every priest celebrating in St. Thomas's Hospital 
6s. &d. also to every sister there 3s. Ad.; also to be distributed amongst 
the sick men lying tkei'e 6s. 8d. Also I bequeath to the prisoners lying in 
bonds, and imprisoned near St. George's 6s. Sd. Also I bequeath to each 
priest officiating in the College of the Lord Cobham 6s. 8d. ; also to the 
principal clerks there 2s. apiece and to each chorister there 12 pence. 
Also I bequeath for the ornaments of the choir of Lingfield at the discre- 
tion of the rector for the time being 10 marks. Also I bequeath to 
Laurence Warcle 26s. 8d. Also I bequeath to Katherine who was the 
wife of Cadens de Layton a book, at the beginning of which is the image 
of St. John Baptist with other figures depicted, and the Matins of the 
Blessed Mary. And if it should happen that Reginald my son and heir 
should hinder, or cause to be hindered by his agents, my executors from 
fulfilling my will, which God forbid, then I desire that on no account, and 
I so exhort and admonish my executors, the said Reginald shall have any 
part of the goods bequeathed to him by my said will, but that all such 

o 2 " 



182 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

goods shall be disposed of for the health of the soul of my lord and my 
benefactors. Also I bequeath to Thomas Fythlyngg 100s. 

AN INVENTORY of divers silver vessels remaining in the custody 
of my lady beyond the articles before bequeathed in her will on the day 
of its making : — In the first place, thirteen silver dishes with five salt- 
cellars weighed by goldsmith's weights .£13. 12s. Also twelve silver 
dishes which my lady bought from the executors of my lord Simon the 
Archbishop weighed by goldsmith's weights £15. Also twelve silver 
salt-cellars bought of the same executors weighed by goldsmith's weights 
£3. 15s. Also two silver basins weighed by goldsmith's weights 115s. 
Also two ewers with spouts weighed by goldsmith's weights £4 and two 
ewers with vessels weighed, £4. 5s. Also four silver pots weighed by 
goldsmith's weights £12. 12s. Also one silver-gilt pot weighed by the 
aforesaid weights 70s. 6d. Also two silver cups with covers enamelled 
with my lord's arms weighed by the said weight 60s. Also one cup with 
a knop of fretwork weighed by the said weight 30s. Also two cups in 
the fashion of a chalice with a cover weighing £4. Also thirteen pieces 
plain weighed 107s. Also two salt-cellars for salt weighed £3. 5s. 
Also twenty-four silver spoons weighing 38s. Also two silver dishes for 
spices weighing 50s. Also one cup of beryll not appraised. Amount 
of the aforesaid vessels weighed by goldsmith's weight £83. 17s. 6d. 

Inventory of such part of my goods as are in my own possession at 
the date of this my will, namely in my manor's which are demised to 
certain farmers as is more fully set forth in the indentures made between 
them and me and who shall answer to my executors on my decease : 
— 'In the first place, Ralph atte Hulle, John Othere and their bonds- 
men shall render and make payment for my manor of Stereburgh 
as they are bound by their agreement, that is, for the term of my life 
£52. 14s. Also Richard Alleyn and his bondsmen shall be answerable 
to my executors for my manor demised to him for the term of my life, 
for Oksted £97. 15s. 4c?. Also John Robyn and his bondsmen shall be 
answerable and make payment to my executors for my manor oi 
Northeye demised to him £113. 14s. 10c/. Also William Brounyng and 
his bondsmen shall be answei'able and make payment for my manor of 
Chydyngstone demised to him £61. 16s. 

Memorandum that the management of my manor of Orkesden in Kent 
is in my own hands and not let to any one to farm, therefore I cannot 
speak of its value except by way of reckoning from year to year. 

Total of the manors aforesaid in permanent rents : — £326. 0s. 2d. 
except the rents of the manor of Orkesden not being let to farm. 

Also hereunder are written and computed the farms of my marshes 
in Kent viz. from Aubynes-mersh in Elmle of William Symme tenant of 
the same and his bondsmen £26. 13s. Ad. Also of my marsh called 



OF STERBOROTJGH CASTLE. 183 

Lytelovenes viz. of John Aleyn my tenant there yearly 106s. 8d. Also 
for Mullefleetsmouth by Robert Bonhomme yearly rent viz. 16s. Also 
for Shardesmarsh Simon atte Boure and his bi'other shall be answerable 
yearly for the same <£13. 6s. 8d. Also for "Woldham Marsh 33s. Ad. by 
the hands of the Prior of Rochester tenant there. Also for New Heath 
3 marks 3s. Ad. by the hands of John Warde tenant there. Also 
for Shelve 24 marks 6s. 8d. by the hands of Henry atte Watre 
tenant there. Also for Aldyngton 11 marks by the hands of John 
Moonk. Also for West well 4 marks by the hands of Richard 
Bethynden tenant there. Also for Newegare 100s. by the hands of Alice 
de Chamberleyn formerly wife of Chamberleyn of Milton tenant there. 
Also for Denhull 4 marks by the hands of Sir Thomas de Graunson 
tenant there. Also for Stonrokke 63s. Ad. per annum. Also for Dag- 
manshope 10s. per annum. Total of the farms in the county of Kent 
for the marshes aforesaid and the lands let to farm 110 marks 20fc?. 

I make and constitute my well-beloved in Christ Amand de 
Fithlyng, Robert Belknappe, Roger Dalenregge, and Richard Mabanke 
executors of this my will above written, giving to them full power and 
authority to administer and manage all my goods contained in my 
testament, ratifying and confirming whatsoever they shall do in the 
premises to the praise of God, and of his most holy mother Mary. 

Proved at Otford May 13, 1370. 



No. III. 



TRANSCRIPT OF THE WILL OF REGINALD, SECOND LORD 

COBHAM. 

Testamentwm Domini Reginalds de Cobeham. 

En le nom de Dieux, et en nom de le Seynte Trinite, le Piere Fitz et 
Seynt Esprit, et en le nom de gloriose Virgine Marie Mere de Dieux, et 
de toutz Seyntz Jeo Raynald de Cobbeham S r de Stresburgh, en saunte" 
de corps et en seyne memorie le viii jour de Septembre Fan mil cccc 
devise mon testament en le forme q'ensuet. En primis jeo devise ma 
alme au Dieux qui moi fist et forma, et al gloriose Yirgine Marie sa mere, 
et a toutz seyntz, et mon corps d'estre ensevele en la parochial esglise de 
Lyngefeld de rere le teste mon treshonorabile Seigneur et pier. Item jeo 
devise al cathedrale esglise de Caunterbirs xls. Item al cathedrale esglise 
de Roucestre xls. Item al cathedrale esglise de Cicestre xls. Item al 
cathedrale esglise de Wyncestre xls. Item al cathedrale esglise de 
Salesbire xls. Item al cathedrale esglise de Loundres xls. Item jeo 



184 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

devise a les gai-deynes de les biens de la esglise parocliiale de Lyngefeld 
en maintenaunce et sustenannce de la dit esglise xls. et mon meliour ves- 
tiinent et ruon nieliour chalis. Item jeo devyse c li. queux jeo voile 
qu'il (sic) soiount emploies en messes et divines servicez et en aultres 
almoynes par vewe de mes executours pour la alme de ma treshonorable 
dame Phillipe jady Reyne d'Angleterre ma commere. 

Item jeo devyse 1 li. les queux jeo voille qu'ils soiount emploies en messes 
et divines servicez et autres almoynes pour les almes S r Armand Fitzlyng 
et S 1 ' Thomas Fitzlyng son frere. 

Item jeo devise c. marc, affere pour les despensez le jour que je sei"ai 
enterre et le jour de mon anniversarie. Item jeo devyse xxx li. pour 
x m messez a chaunter pour mon alme maintenaunte apres mon deces en 
si brief temps comme ils pourroient etre faitz. 

Item jeo devyse cli. pour divine services et aultres almoynes affere 
pur ma alme par la bone ordinaunce de mes executours. 

Item jeo devyse cc marc, pour emploier entour la mariage Margarete 
ma file si ele soit taille pour aver baron. 

Item jeo devyse xl li. pour departier entre mes servaunts pour leur 
reward a chescon selon ceo qu'ils ont desservi. 

Et comment jeo ay done a S r Thomas Yokeflet Clerk Tliomas Blast et 
S r John Yngham Clerk les manoirs de Kyngeswalden et Northye ma 
volonte est que mes diets feffes aurount tous les diets manoirs ove tons 
les profitz dil jour de mon moriant tanque ils auront payes mes dectez 
et accompli ceste testament apres quel jeo voille que les diets feffes 
fasount solonc ceo que jeo ordeinerai en temps avener. 

Et voillez savoir que moi le dit Raynold Thomas Yokeflet Clerk 
Thomas Blast et John Yngham avoms graunte a Nicolas Leby Boteler 
pour le leal et greable service q'il moi ad fait en temps passe et ferra en 
temps avener un annuel rente de xls. a prendre de dit manoir de Northie 
susdite a terme de sa vie com picrt par un feit a lui ent fait. 

Et en mesme le maner si avoms graunte a Simond Radeboune 
pour son greable service q'il moi ad fait et ferra en terns a vener un . 
annuel rente de xls. issant dil manoir de Kingswaldeu pour terme de 
sa vie com piert par un fet a lui ent fait. 

Item jeo devise a chescun de mes executours q'emprenount l'ad- 
ministracion de mon testement xx li. 

Item jeo devise et ordeigne mez executours pur accomplier cest 
testement et pour paier mes dettez solonc ceoque mes biens suffiserount 
mon tres revei'ent et treshonorable pier en Dieux et S r Mons r Thomas 
par le grace de Dieux Erchcvesque de Canterbirs primat de tout Engle- 
terre mon tres ame cosyn John S r de Cobbeham, John Wodecok, Mercer 
de London, Frere John Lynne, Mestre de Divinite, Thomas Yokeflet Clerk, 



OP STERBOllOTTGH CASTLE. 185 

Thomas Blast, et William Furby a queux plese par Dieux et en amer de 
charite q'ils eynt facent accomplicement. 

Proved July 13, 1403, in the Palace of Canterbury. [From Lambeth 
Regg. ; Arundtll, 1, 203 b.] 



No. IV. 

TRANSLATION. 



In the name of God, and in the name of the Holy Trinity Father 
Son and Holy Spirit, and in the name of the glorious Virgin Mary 
Mother of God, and of all Saints I Kaynald de Cobbeham Lord of 
Streburgh, in health of body, and in sound memory the eighth day of 
September in the year 1400 make my testament in the manner fol- 
lowing. In the first place I bequeath my soul to God who made and 
formed me, and to the glorious Virgin Mary his Mother, and to all 
Saints, and my body to be buried in the Parish Church of Lingfield 
behind the head of my very honourable lord and father ; and I bequeath 
to the Cathedral Church of Canterbury 40s. Also to the Cathedral 
Church of Rochester 40s. Also to the Cathedral Church of Chichester 
40s. Also to the Cathedral Church of Winchester 40s. Also to the 
Cathedral Church of Salisbury 40s. Also to the Cathedral Church of 
London 40s. Also I bequeath to the Warden of the goods of the 
Parish Church of Lyngfeld, for the maintenance and support of the said 
Church 40s. and my best vestment and my best chalice. Also I bequeath 
one hundred pounds which I wish should be expended in masses and divine 
services and other alms by the direction of my executors for the soul 
of my very honourable Lady Philippa late Queen of England, my gossip. 
Also I bequeath fifty pounds which I desire should be expended in 
masses and divine services and other alms for the souls of Sir Armand 
Fitzlyng and Sir Thomas Fitzlyng his brother. Also I bequeath one 
hundred marks for the expenses on the day of my burial, and the day 
of my anniversary. Also I bequeath thirty pounds for ten thousand 
masses to be sung for my soul immediately after my death in as 
short a time as they can be accomplished. Also I bequeath one hundred 
pounds for divine services and other alms for my soul at the good dis- 
cretion of my executors. Also I bequeath two hundred marks to be laid 
out about the marriage of Margaret my daughter if she shall be minded 
to take a husband. Also I bequeath forty pounds to be divided between 
my servants for their reward, to each according to his deserts. And 
whereas I have given to Sir Thomas Yokeflet Clerk, Thomas Blast, and 



186 NOTICES OP THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

Sir John Yngham Clerk, the manors of King's Walden and Eorthye 
my will is that my said feoffees shall have the said manors with all the 
profits from the day of my death until they shall have paid my debts 
and fulfilled this will, after which I will that the said feoffees should do 
as I shall appoint in time to come. And know ye that I the said 
Baynald Thomas Yokeflet, Thomas Blast, and John Yngham, have 
granted to Nicolas Leby, butler, for the good and loyal service which he 
has done for me and will do in time to come, an annual rent of 40s. 
issuing out of the said manor of Northye for the term of his life as 
appears by a deed to him made thereof, and in the same manner we have 
also granted to Simon Badebone for his pleasing service which he has 
done for me and shall do for the time to come, an annual rent of 40s. 
issuirjg out of the said manor of King's Walden for the term of his life 
as appears by a deed to him made thereof. Also I bequeath to each of 
my executors who shall undertake the administration of my will £20. 
Also I constitute and ordain my executors to perform this will and to 
pay my debts as far as my goods shall suffice, my very reverend and 
very honourable father in God, Thomas, by the grace of God Archbishop 
of Canterbury, Primate of all England, my well-beloved cousin John 
Lord Cobham, John Wodecok Mercer of London, Brother John Lynne, 
Master of Divinity, Thomas Yokeflet Thomas Blast and William Furby. 
To whom may it please for God's sake, and in love of charity that they 
may accomplish it. 



No. V. 

TRANSCEIPT OF THE WILL OF ELEANOR ARUNDELL. 
Testamentum Alianorce Domince de Lychet. 

En nom de Pier, et de Fitz, et de Seint Esprit, Amen, Jeo Alianor 
Arondell en pur ma viduite, esteant en seyne memorie, le xxvi jour de . 
Septembre Ian de Boy Henry quart puis le conqueste quincte A Lechet 
Mautravers face mon testament en maniere come ensuyt. En primez 
jeo devise malme a Dieu tout puissant mon createur, et a sa gloriouse 
mere Seint Mary, et toutz seintz, et mon corps destre ensevele en le 
priorie de Lewys en le meme arche que mon tres honorable seigneur 
John Arundell git, qui Dieu assoile. Item jeo vuille que nies executours 
facent enchaunter mil'le messez pour malme en tout hast que poet etre 
apres mon departier de ceste secle. 

Item quiles facent chauntier cent marcat(?) trentalls de Seint Gregory. 
Item jeo devise un prestre a chauntier pur malme chescun jour pour un 
an de la salutacion de notre dame la jeo ou (sic) sera ensevele a qui 



OF STERBOUOUGH CASTLE. 187 

jeo devise x in arc. pour son salarie, et vm vestement de drap dor vert 
et blank ou chesible et aube. Apres que 1' an jeo vuille que les ditz chesible 
et prestre (auront a) (?) totz dys prier pur malme. Item jeo devise 
al Cathedrale esglise de notre dame al Salisbury un basyn et un ewer 
d'argent, a les armes mon seigneur Arondell, pour prier pur malme. 
Item jeo devise ae priorie de Lewys un oucbe ouec un marc a prier pour 
moy. Item jeo devise al moignez de dit priorie xx. li. d'argent a prier 
pour malme. Item jeo devise a l'eglise de Wymborne un drap d'or bloy 
a prier pur malme. Item jeo devise al yle notre dame a Lecbet, pour 
amendement de dit yle xl s. 

Item jeo devise a ma dame de Herforde un tablett d'or ou ymagerie 
de Cokile. Item jeo devise a ma dame de Kent un anel d'or ou mon 
meliour sapbire. Item jeo devise a ma file de Roos un coler d'or, ou 
un baleys en le Toret, ovecques ma benison. 

Item jeo devise a ma file Jobanna un paire des avez de quorrell ouec 
gaudez d'or ou un bon fermall. 

Item jeo devise a mon fitz Richard Arondell un banap ennorre et 
xx li. d'or et un lits noire de say ou les appurtenantz, et xii esquels 
ou deux cbargeourez d'argent. 

Item jeo devyse a mon fitz Reynald un banap d'argent annorrez, 
ouesque un sorte de perles enfilez en mon noire forser. 

Item jeo devise a ma file Margaret Curteys mon serklet quest en ma 
noire forser, paiant a Joban Quynton x li. 

Item jeo devise a Joban Quynton un hanap d'argent ou un covercle, 
et x marc. 

Item jeo devise a Edward Matrauers, une paire des avez de corall ovec 
gaudez d'or, et un fermall d'or, ou 1. soutb d'argent. 

Item jeo devise a Jonet Beteyne un gonne de noire de Wrystede furre 
ou grys, ou cent soutb d'argent, et eel non pas le meliour. 

Item jeo devise al William Warre un paire des avez ou gaudes 
ennorrez, ov un fermal ou 1. south, et vn anell et un satire. 

Item jeo devise a Agnes, ma damicelle, un gonne de noire enorre, 
et xxs. d'argent. 

Item jeo devise a Elizabeth Arderne un gonne de Russett, et xls. 
d'argent, et un lit de wirstede noire en dimisele. 

Item jeo devise a John Kent, xls. 

Item jeo devise a William Arderne un pees d'argent, ou c s. d'argent. 

Item jeo devise a Vyker de Mordone xxs. 

Item jeo devise a William Dorvaunt Viker de Spertisbyri 40s. d'argent 
et un paire des avez. 

Item jeo devise a S r Henry, mon prest, un vestemente de Rouge, 
ovesques le bloy orfreys, et 40s. d'argent pour prier pur malme. 

Item jeo devise a Thomas Arderne un couvrelit, un tester avec Roos (?) 



188 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

ou canevas materas, un pair de lyntheux, et deux blankitt, et xls. d'argent 
et un gonue de skarlett furre ou grys. 

Item jeo devise a Robert Bottillere deux peeces d'ai'gent et i. maser 
ov xls. 

Item jeo devise a "W m Wittkarn un couvrelit, un tester, ou les appur- 
tenantz, et xls. 

Item jeo devise a W m Kybbard un couvrelit, un tester, ou les appurte- 
nantz, et ij marc. 

Item je voile que mes garsons soient regardez a cbescun sicorne ils 
ount desservi par avis de mes executours. 

Item jeo vuille que mes executours vendant mon atyre mes perles ou 
roses et esteilez ov felet perles et deamauntz a performer mon testament 
s'ile bosoigne. Item jeo vuille que toutz mes vestements soient emploies 
ou plus grand mystier y soit pour prier pour malme par avys de mes 
executors. 

Et residue de mes bienz nient devisez jeo voille q'ils soient don6s et 
devisez par mes executours, la ou ils voiieut que sout meux affaire. Et 
auxi jeo pri mes executours que toutz mes servantz soient la ou le jeo 
morge entier tanque le jour de moys soit tenu par mes executors et en 
cas que mes executours pourront recouvrer les biens queux jeo doy aver 
de droit de mes deux Seigneurs qui Dieu assoille soient le moitie done a 
mon fitz Richard pour acquiter part de ses dettez et l'autre part soient 
partiez par mes executors a mes autres servauutz solonc la vise de mes 
executours. 

Item jeo voille que mon enterment soit tenuz solonc la vise de mes 
executors et nemy a grant costage sinon a pourez. 

Item jeo face mes executors S 1 ' William Dorraunt viker de Spettesbery 
et John Quynton pur acompler mon testament. 

Item jeo ordeigne et prie mon entier fitz Ricbard Arondell, et Mestre 
Jolm Tytyllyng par etre surueours et eydours que mon volunte soit 
pleinemeut acomple. 

Proved January 16, 1404-5, at Maidstone. 

[From Lambeth lleg., Arundell, 221 b.] 



No. VI. 

TRANSLATION. 



In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, 
Amen. I, Eleanor Arundell, in my pure widowhood, being of sound 
memory, this 26th day of September, in the fifth year of King Henry 
the Fourth since the conquest, at Lychet Maltravers, make my will in 



OF STEItBOROTJGH CASTLE. 189 

manner following : — In the first place, I bequeath my soul to God 
Almighty, and to his glorious mother Mary, and to all Saints — and my 
body to be buried in the Priory of Lewes, in the chest in which lies 
my honourable lord John Arundell whom God assoile. Also I wish 
that my executors should cause one thousand masses to be sung for my 
soul with as much haste as possible after my departure from this world. 
Also that they cause to be sung, for one hundred marks (1), trentalls of 
Saint Gregory. Also I appoint a priest to sing (masses) of the Saluta- 
tion of our Lady, for my soul, every day for one year, in the place where 
I shall be buried, to whom 1 bequeath ten marks for his salary, and 
a vestment of cloth of gold green and white, with a chasuble and alb. 
After the expiration of the year, I will that the said chasuble and 

priest (?) to pray for my soul. Also I bequeath to the 

Cathedral Church of our Lady at Salisbury, to pray for my soul, a 
basin and ewer of silver with the arms of my lord Arundell. Also I 
bequeath to the Priory of Lewys to pray for me, an ouche, and 
one mark. Also I bequeath to the monks of the same Priory, to pray 
for my soul, twenty pounds in silver. Also I bequeath to the Church of 
Wymborne to pray for my soul, a blue cloth of gold. Also I bequeath to 
our Lady's aisle at Lechet, for the repair of the same aisle 40s. Also I 
bequeath to my Lady of Hereford, a tablett of gold with imagery of Go- 
kile ( 1 Cameos of shell). Also I bequeath to my Lady of Kent a ring of 
gold with my best sapphire. Also I bequeath to my daughter de Roos, 
a collar of gold with a ruby in the toret (pendant 1) with my blessing. 
Also I bequeath to my daughter Joan, a pair of aves (a rosary) of 
coi-al with golden gaudes, with a good clasp. Also I bequeath to my 
son Richard Arundell a hanap gilt, and .£20 in gold, and a bed of black 
say with the appurtenances, and twelve spoons, with two silver chargers. 
Also I bequeath to my son Raynald an hanap of silver gilt, with a 
suite of pearls threaded in my black forser. Also I bequeath to my 
daughter Margaret Curteys my circlet which is in my black forser, she 
paying to John Quynton <£10. Also I bequeath to John Quynton a 
silver hanap, with a cover, and ten marcs. Also I bequeath to Edward 
Matravers, a pair of beads of coral with golden gaudes, and a golden 
clasp with five shillings of silver. Also I bequeath to Janet Beteyn a 
gown of black worsted, trimmed with fur, with one hundred shillings of 
silver, and that not the best one. Also I bequeath to William Warre 
a pair of beads, with gilt gaudes with a clasp, with fifty shillings, and a 
ring and a sapphire. Also I bequeath to my damsel Agnes, a gown of 
black worked with gold, and 20s. in silver. Also I bequeath to Eliza- 
beth Arderne a gown of russett, and 40s. in silver, and a bed of 
black worsted, with a demi-selour (*?). Also I bequeath to John Kent 
40s. Also I bequeath to William Arderne a piece of silver, with 100s. 



190 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

in silver. Also I bequeath to the Vicar of Mordou 20s. Also I 
bequeath to William Dorvaunt, Vicar of Spertisbury, 40s. in silver 
aud a pair of beads. Also I bequeath to Sir Henry, my priest, a 
vestment of red with the blue orpbreys, and 40s. in silver to pray for 
my soul. Also I bequeath to Thomas Arderne a coverlet, a tester 
with roses, with a canvas mattress, a pair of sheets and two blankets, 
aud 40s. in silver, and a scarlet gown trimmed with badger's fur. Also 
I bequeath to Robert Botillere two pieces of silver, and one maser. 
Also I bequeath to William Wittham, a coverlet, a tester with the 
appurtenances, and 40s. Also I bequeath to William Kybbard a 
coverlet, a tester with the appurtenances and two marcs. Also I will 
that my boys (pages) should be rewarded, to each according as they 
have deserved at the discretion of my executors. Also I desire that if 
necessary for the purposes of my will my executors should sell my 
attire my pearls with roses (1) and stars, my fillet (seed 1) pearls and 
diamonds. Also I desire that all my vestments should be employed 
where most need shall be in prayers for my soul at the discretion of my 
executors. And I desire that the residue of my goods not bequeathed 
should be given and bestowed as they think proper, and best to be done. 
Also I pray my executors that all my servants shall be maintained by 
them in the place where I may die, until the day of the month (after my 
decease 1) and in case my executors shall be able to recover the goods 
which I ought to have of right from my two lords (whom may God 
assoile) one half should be given to my son Richard to pay part of his 
debts, and the other part should be divided by my executors between 
my servants at the discretion of my executors. Also I wish that my 
burial should be celebrated according to the discretion of my executors, 
and not at great cost save as to the poor (1). Also I appoint Sir William 
Dorvaunt Vicar of Spertisbury, and John Quynton, my executors to 
perform my will. Also I nominate and entreat my entire son Richard 
Arondell and Master John Tytyllyng, to be overseers and aiders, that 
my will should be fully performed. 



OF STERBOROTJGH CASTLE. 191 

No. VII. 

s 

NOTES TO THE PEDIGREE OF COBHAM OF STERBOROTJGH. 

(The following notes have been kindly furnished to me by Charles 
Spencer Perceval, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A., to whom I am also indebted for 
much other valuable assistance.) 

The following, among other authorities, have been used in the com- 
pilation of this Pedigree, and are thus cited : — 

Glover. — A collection of extracts, &c, from Charters at Cobham, made 
by Robert Glover, Somerset, in 1574, and printed from the original MS. 
in the Library of the College of Arms, in vol. vii. Collectanea Topog. 
et Genealog., pp. 320 — 354. The numerals indicate the page re- 
ferred to. 

Thynne. — An account of the Cobhams, by Francis Botevile, alias 
Thynne, Lancaster Herald, made in 1586, which will be found printed 
in vol. iv. of Holinshed's Chronicles, p. 777, 1st ed. He seems (inde- 
pendently or not) to have drawn from the same sources as Glover. 

Segar. — Pedigree by Sir William Segar, in a MS. Baronage compiled 
by him, and preserved in the Library of the College of Arms. 

Dugdale. — The Baronage. 

The names and statements in the Pedigree, which are included in 
brackets, are to be taken as supported at present by no better evidence 
than the bare assertion of one or more of the above authorities. 

(1 .) Henry, son of Serlo. See grant (circa 1200 — 1220) to him, printed 
2 Archseologia Cantiana, 226. — "Terra quse fuit Serlonis de Cobbeham, 
in villa de Cobham." — Glover, 320, from charter presently mentioned. 
For charter of confirmation, see Rott. Chart, p. 178 b. 

(2.) By a charter sans date {Glover, 320), John, "William, and Reginald, 
sons of Henry de Cobeham, partition his lands. John takes {inter alia) 
the capital messuage of Cobham and all Serlo de Cobham's land there ; 
land and marshes called Rundale in Shorn ; and lands and rents in 
Burdefeld. William is named next ; therefore probably the second son 
(Dugdale makes him the third). He and Reginald take the residue of 
the lands (at Hoo, Grean, Clyve, Shorn, Strood, Rochester, and else- 
where in Kent). 

(3.) Simon de Delham dat Johanni de Cobeham manerium de Cou- 
lynge, &c, pro summa quatuor centum marcarum prae manibus solutis. 
—Glover, 347. 



192 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM 

(4.) " Hugo Nevill, fil. Hugonis, dat terras Johanni, filio Henr. de 
Cobham, s. d." (Glover, 344). And this grant included West Chalke; for 
on an Inquisition (ad q. d.), 20 Edw. II. num. 25, as to the right of 
Henry de Cobham to a weir or fishery (gurges) in the Thames the jurors 
find that one Hugh de Nfevill, in the time of Henry, grandfather of our 
lord the King, had a fishery in a certain place called Weston Mersh, per- 
taining to his manor of Westchalke, where the said fishery in question is 
now situated : which Hugh sold the said manor, with the appurtenances, 
to John de Cobeham, grandfather of the said Henry de Cobham. (The 
manor was then held of Hugh de Neville, by service of half a knight's 
fee.) — Vide etiam, Hot. Hund. i. 222 b, Shamele Hundred. 

(5.) Ceased to exercise judicial functions in 35 Hen. III., and died 
soon after. — Dugd. ; and see Foss. Lives of the Judges, sub nomine. 

(6) (7.) Dugdale quotes Glover for both marriages. Thynne corrobo- 
rates him. I find no record. There probably were two marriages. 

(8.) Segar unsupported. 

(9.) Third son {Dugd.) ; but see above (2) : dead in 50 Hen. III. 
{Glover, 346). A charter (sans date, but witnessed by Stephen de Pen- 
cestre, two of which name lived temp. Hen. III. and Edw. I.) of Jo- 
hanna de Hegharn, daughter of William de Cobham, who, in her widow- 
hood, grants to James, son of Sir John de Cobham, four marcs of rent, 
<fec, descended to her on the death of her uncle Reginald, and Mary his 
wife, gives us the fact of this William de Cobham's marriage (Glover, 
336). Another entry (p. 337) makes it probable that his wife was 
named Hawesia. — See also Mus. Brit. Add. MSS. 14,311, p. 24. 

(10.) Second son (Dugd.), but see above (2). 

(11.) 1 Excerpt, e Rott. Fin., p. 328. 

(12 ) William de Cobham, by deed sans date, gives to John, son of 
John de Cobham (i. e. John junior, of Cowling), his share of a messuage 
on the death of his brother Reginald, or of Maria, formerly wife of 
Reginald (Glover, 343). Segar calls her Maria de Valognes. See 
also (9). 

(13.) This Sir Reginald is confounded by Dugdale, first with Roger 
de Cobbeham (of the Kentish branch), to whom, and not to Reginald, 
Edward I. (anno 32) granted freewarren in Pipardsclive, co. Wilts ; and, 



OP STERBOROTJGH CASTLE. 193 

secondly, with his own son, Sir Reginald, K.G., whose exploits Dugdale 
recounts as those of Reginald, son of John, and of his wife Joan, daughter 
of Hugh de Nevill. But John de Cobham died in 1251 or 1252, as 
shown above, and Reginald, K.G., in 1361 ; therefore, another genera- 
tion is clearly wanted. And see post (15). 

(14.) Thynne gives James, William, and another Reginald, as brothers 
of Sir Reginald of Orkesden, and half-brothers of John of Cowling. 
As to the other Reginald, quaere ; but Thynne, in other respects, is 
borne out by Glover, 321, who notes a fine levied 54 Hen. III., where 
rents in Burdefeld and Shelve, pasture in Halesgroeste, in the hundred of 
Hoo, were settled by a John de Cobham to James de Cobham and his 
brother William, successively in tail ; remainder to their brother Regi- 
nald. James and William appear to have died without issue, and the 
remainders to have successively taken effect ; for in 14 Edw. II. a Wil- 
liam de Cobham (Esch., ej. an., n. 17) dies seised of manors of Shelve, 
Orkesdene, and Mondefeld (qucere Burdefeld), which he held of Henxy 
de Cobham, Knt. (that is, as I take it, of Henry of Cowlinge, son 
and heir of John), and leaving Reginald de Cobham his heir then 
25 years old and upwards. Their relationship is not stated ; but the 
dates well support the opinion that this was his nephew Sir Reginald, 
KG., whom we find afterwards seised, inter alia, of Shelve and Borde- 
field, and also of Chidingstone, of which this William as above died 
seised. 

(15.) Rot. Fin., 13 Edw. I., m. 6, " Et de gratia sua, speciali concessit 
(Rex) Reginaldo filio Johannis de Cobham, qui Johannam filiam et 
heredem Willelmi de Evere defuncti duxit in uxorem, quod," &c. (license 
to pay a debt of £50 due from W. de Evere by annual instalments of 
ten marks). This William is probably identical with William de Heure, 
who, 9 Edw. I. (Rott. Cart., ej. an.) had a grant of freewarren in Heure, 
Chidingstone, and Lingfield, of lands in all which places Reginald, K.G., 
was subsequently seised. Hever Castle is close to Chidingstone, and 
appears to be the place described as Heure and Evere ; but if so, there 
remains to be solved this problem — how this William de Evere acquired 
that castle, which was built by Stephen de Pencestre (license to crenel- 
late, 54 Hen. III., Gentleman s Mag., 1856, p. 209), father or grandfather 
of the heiress who married Henry de Cobham, founder of the Kentish 
branch of Roundal. The lands in Chidingstone cannot have been those 
which, as above, William, uncle to Reginald, K.G, possessed. Note, 
that there were also lands in the Roundal family (but of the old Cobham 
inheritance) called Hever, in Hoo. 



194 NOTICES OF THE FAMILY OF COBHAM. 

(16.) As to this Sir Reginald, see Dugdale, who, however, quoting 
Glover, is mistaken in calling his wife daughter of Maurice Berkeley. 
She was daughter of Thomas Lord Berkeley and sister of Maurice, as 
Dugdale himself (under Berkeley) has stated. 

I give no authorities in support of the rest of the Pedigree, as the 
later steps are sufficiently clear. A few corrections are given in the 
body of Mr. Flower's paper. 

The pi'esent Table may, I think, be relied upon as far as it goes. 
More than one female name has still to be inserted in its proper place. 

C. S. P. 




mm**mto$ jilt J i*l 

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WHITGIFT GATHERINGS. 195 



XII. 
WHITGIET GATHERINGS. 

By CHARLES SPENCER PERCEVAL, LL.D., F.S.A. 



Ever since Crammer, in 1537, " finding," as Strype 
says, " that the spreading demeans of the Church were 
in danger to be torn off by the talons of avarice and 
rapine, to mortify the growing appetites of sacrilegious 
cormorants," 1 partedwith his magnificent Kentish palaces 
of Otford and Knoll, in favour of the Crown, our county 
of Surrey has been almost exclusively honoured by the 
residence within its limits, at Croydon and Lambeth, 
and latterly at Addington, of the successive occupants 
of the Archiepiscopal See of Canterbury. Among these 
prelates no one is more deserving of remembrance by 
Surrey men than the pious founder of the Hospital of 
the Holy Trinity, at Croydon, the muniment-room of 
which institution possesses the interesting deed which 
forms the subject of Mr. Elower's paper at page 99 of 
this volume; and no apology can be needed for the 
introduction into our collections of the engravings 
which the present remarks accompany. 

The upper figure, in the large plate (for which the 
Society is indebted to the liberality of the Rev. George 
H. Dashwood), gives an accurate representation of the 
Seal of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, of the 
time of Archbishop Whitgift. The counter-seal is 
represented in the lower figure of the same plate. 

1 Memorials of Cranmer, ii. 283. 
VOL. II. P 



196 WIIITGIPT GATHERINGS. 

The example from which our engraving is taken, is 
from an exemplification of administration out of the Pre- 
rogative Court, dated December 31, 1590, and certifying 
that on Oct. 19, 1575, the administration of the goods 
of Rowland Hare, late of Stork, in the county of Essex, 
gent., deceased, was committed by the Dean and Chapter 
of Canterbury, guardians of the spiritualties of the 
Province (sede vacante), to Nicholas Hare, of the Inner 
Temple, London. Rowland and Nicholas were sons of 
John Hare, of Stow Bardolph, Esq. Nicholas, the elder 
son, in 1589, according to Burke (Extinct Baronetage, 
sub nom.), rebuilt the mansion at Stow Bardolph, from 
the muniment-room at which place the instrument in 
question has, through the great kindness of Mr. Dash- 
wood, been placed at the disposal of our Society for the 
purpose of engraving the seal. 

The upper compartment of the seal appears to repre- 
sent the Disputation in the Temple, while an escutcheon 
at the base bears the arms of the See of Canterbury, 
impaling — , on a cross humette flory — , four roundlets, 
for Whitgift. The legend is [Sigilltjm] Curi^: Pre* 

ROGATIV^E JoHANNIS WHITEGIFTE, DEI GRATIA CANT 

[tjariensis. Archiepiscopi]. The words in brackets 
are broken off with the top of the seal, but are easily 
restored as above. 

This seal is, with the exception, of course, of the im- 
paled coat, and of the legend, an exact repetition of the 
Prerogative Seal of Whitgift's predecessor, Matthew 
Parker, 2 who first introduced this type, which has con- 
tinued to our own day, with the sole difference that the 
s^al of the late Prerogative Court, tempore Sumner, was 
round, and not oval. Even such details as the two small 

2 Figured in Gorhatn's Reformation Gleanings. 



WHITGIFT GATHERINGS. 



197 



columns on either side of the shield were closely followed 
in the last seal of the lately abolished Court. 

The counter-seal appears to represent a mark or 
personal device of a tree eradicated. I have not been 
able to learn whether the practice of counter-sealing 
was usual in the case of Prerogative Seals, or, if so, 
whose seal was employed for the purpose ; and can give 
no satisfactory explanation of the device. 

It is to the ready courtesy of our Vice-President, 
James More Molyneux, Esq., whose hospitable reception 
of the members of the Surrey Archaeological Society, in 
the summer of 1861, will long be remembered, that we 
owe the annexed woodcut of the arch- 
bishop's signet, and the facsimile of his 
signature, placed as a tail-piece to this 
paper. Both are from a letter of this 
prelate, dated from Croydon, October 2, 
1593, and addressed thus, " To my verie 
loving frend Sir "Willm. More, knight, 
The letter, which is preserved among the 
Losely MSS., is, with the exception of the signature, in 
the hand of a secretary, and in itself is of no peculiar 
interest, relating merely to some preliminary proceed- 
ings of a commission then lately issued for the visitation 
of colleges, hospitals, &c, of which" commission the 
Archbishop and Sir William were members. 

The personal arms of the Archbishop appear the same 
on both seals : the cross being charged, in each instance, 
with four roundlets (bezants) ; while on his tomb at 
Croydon, on the frontispiece to Paule's Life of TVhitgift, 
and elsewhere, the cross is charged with five bezants. 
The fact is, that the Archbishop had more than one grant 
of arms, the bearings differing slightly in each grant. 
The following notes on this subject, for the substance of 




give these. 



198 WHITGIFT GATHERINGS. 

which I have to express my thanks to Thomas "W. King, 
Esq., York Herald, may be found interesting. 

On the 2nd May, 1577, 19° Eliz. Sir Gilbert Dethick, 
Garter, granted to John Whitgift, D.D., Bishop of 
Worcester, this coat ; Or, on a cross fleurette azure, 
four bezants. 

In June, 1588, 30° Eliz. it appears, but from a draft 
only, that Robert Cooke, Clarencieux, granted to John 
Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury, a crest " out of a 
crown of gold, a Lyon's paw, silver, holding a laurel gar- 
land vert." In this grant of a crest the prelate's arms are 
thus described: " Quarterly silver and gold, in the first, 
on a cross flory, sable, four bezants ; and in the second, 
on a cross flory, azure, four bezants, and so quarterly ; " 
and are recognized in a docquet-book in Cooke's hand- 
writing. 

A second draft exists, whereby, in July, 1588, 30 
Eliz., Sir William Dethick, Garter, granted to the Arch- 
bishop, " Argent, a cross humette, flory de liz, sable, 
with four bezants ; " and for crest, " the leg or paw of a 
Lyon, gules, set in a crown, gold, holding a garland or 
chaplet of laurel or bays, proper" The crest, however, 
appears limited to the Archbishop's brothers. 

Now, although this instrument is a mere draft, and 
there is no primary evidence to prove that a grant in 
fact issued in conformity with it, yet in the Visitation 
of Essex, in 1634, the pedigree of the Archbishop is 
entered with the plain coat, " Argent, on a cross fleu- 
rette, sable, four bezants;" and the crest, "out of a 
ducal coronet, a lion's paw erect, argent, holding a 
wreath of laurel, vert," the coat being the first and 
fourth quarter of the grant by Cooke in Jane, 1588. 
The whole appears to agree with Dethick' s draft of 
July, 1588, excepting that there the lion's paw is gules, 



WHITGIFT GATHERINGS. 199 

and not argent, as is the case in the Visitation, and 
also in Cooke's grant of June, 1588. In a note to this 
pedigree of 1634, it is stated that the arms were 
"exemplified by Lres. Pattents to John Whitgift, the 
Archbishop, William, George, and Richard, his bro- 
thers, and to their descendants for ever, by Sir Wm. 
Dethick, als. Garter, Principall King of Arms, dated 
the 4th July, 1588." 

Upon this evidence, Mr. King, on the whole, con- 
cludes that the Arms of the Archbishop were really 
those as entered in the Visitation of Essex, in 1G34, 
with the crest as appertaining to his brothers. This 
view is corroborated by the evidence of our two seals. 

Another draft grant remains in the College of Arms. 
This is in Latin, dated 22nd January, 1598, 40 Eliz., 
and by it Sir William Dethick, Garter, and William 
Camden, Clarencieux, grant to the Archbishop, Argent, 
jive bezants on a cross formee flory, sable, and the crest 
a noil's foot or, eraced sanguine, armed gules. 

It seems singular that so soon after Cooke's grant, in 
June, 1588, another should occur by Sir W. Dethick in 
July of the same year. To explain this, Mr. King men- 
tions that about this time there were great dissensions 
between the King of Arms as to their several powers 
and jurisdictions, which may account for the two 
grants — one within, or nearly within, a month of the 
other. In illustration of this remark, I may notice, 
on the authority of the Athense Cantabrigienses, that 
Matthew Hutton, Archbishop of York, on May 1, 1584, 
had a grant from William Flower, Norroy, of these arms, 
" Gules, on a fess between three cushions, lozenge-ways, 
argent, fringed and tasselled or, as many fleurs de liz 
of the field ; " with this crest, " on a cushion, placed 
lozenge-ways, gules, an open booh edged or, and inscribed 



200 WHITGIFT GATHERINGS. 

Odor Vitce;" and in the same year, on the 20th July, 
Sir G. Dethick, Garter, granted a similar coat and crest, 
except that the charge on the fess was a cross humette 
between two fleurs de liz. 

It is not our purpose to enter into any detail of par- 
ticulars of Whitgift's life. An excellent memoir of this 
prelate, embodying briefly the information collected by 
Strype and many others, has recently appeared in the 
second volume of Messrs. Cooper's Athense Cantabri- 
gienses. The following short notes, however, showing 
the various steps in the Archbishop's long and successful 
career, may be useful. 

He was born at Great Grimsby, in 1530 or 1533 ; 
proceeded B.A. from Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, in 
1553-4; Fellow of Peterhouse, 1555; M.A., 1557; 
B.D., 1563, when he became Margaret Professor of 
Divinity. In 1567, he was elected Master of Pembroke 
Hall, and proceeded D.D. In the same year he became 
Master of Trinity College, and Regius Professor of 
Divinity, and in 1570, Vice Chancellor of the University. 
His election to the Deanery of Lincoln followed in 1571, 
and in 1577 he was consecrated Bishop of Worcester, 
whereupon he resigned the Mastership of Trinity Col- 
lege, which he had held for ten years. In 1583, he was 
translated to the Metropolitan See of Canterbury, and 
held the primacy for more than twenty years, dying at 
Lambeth, Peb. 29, 1603-4. He lies buried in Croydon 
Church, under a handsome monument, still existing at 
the S. E. corner of St. Nicholas' chantry. This spot was 
probably selected on account of its being at that time 
the customary seat of the brethren of the Archbishop's 
hospital during public Avorship. The tomb is adorned 
with the armorial bearings of Peterhouse, Pembroke 
Hall, and Trinity Colleges, ttye Deanery of Lincoln, and 



WHITGIFT GATHERINGS. 



201 



the Sees of Worcester and Canterbury, besides his own 
coat, of the last grant ; the cross, however, according 
to Mr. Steinman's History of Croydon, page 175, is now 
coloured red instead of black. 

The inscriptions on the monument are printed by Mr. 
Steinman, and in Lyson's Environs of London, i. 181. 

The accompanying pedigree has been compiled from 
copies of the Visitations of Surrey and Essex, in the 
British Museum. As an appropriate conclusion to these 
notes we insert the autograph of the Archbishop. 







a,n n^. <zjir- 




202 



!*bt<jm of Mbitrjtfi 



[Taken from Visitations of Surrey, 1623 (MSS. Earl. 1397, fo. 133 b), and 
of Essex, 1634, Earl. 1542.] 



John Whitgift, from = N.N. 
the county of York. 



Robert Whitgift, Abbat 

of Wellow-by-Grimsby, 

corn. Lincoln. 



Henry "Whitgift, of 
Grimsby, Merchant. 



Anne Dinewell, Isabella, m. to 
of Grimsby. Michael Shaller, 
Verger of St. Paul's 
Cathedral, s. p. 



John Whitgift, D.D., 
Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, born at Grimsby, 
1530, ob. s. p. 



William Whitgift, : 
of Curies, or Curleys, 
in Clavering, com. 

Essex. 



Margaret, 
dau. of 



Philip. 



Alice, m. 
Henry 



- Bell, of George, s. p. Cockson, 

— , com. s. p. 

Norf. Richard. 



Isaac, 
ob. s. p. 



Alice. 



Jane. 



Elizabeth. Bridget. 



John Whitgift, of = 
Curleys, heir to 
the Archbp. 



Geoffrey. 



Anna, daur. of 

John Goodman, 

of Comberton Greene, 

com. Hertford. 



Mary, wife of 
Samuel Aylmer. 



John Whitgift, of 

Boram, com. 
Essex, alive 1634. 



Elizabeth, dau. 
of Samuel Aylmer, 



of. 



in com, 



Suff. 



Aylmer Whitgift, 
5 years old in 1634. 



NOTICES OF GRANTS. 203 



XIII. 

NOTICES OE GRANTS OE AN AUGMENTA- 
TION TO THE ARMS OE ARCHBISHOP 
PARKER, AND OE A CREST TO HIS SON 
JOHN PARKER. 

By THOMAS WILLIAM KING, Esq., York Hekald, F.S.A. 



The first of the two documents now printed is the 
grant of an augmentation to the arms of Matthew 
Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury, by Sir Gilbert 
Dethick, Garter, dated November 28th, 1559. The 
grant is surrounded by a floriated border. In the 
centre is introduced the Tudor rose surrounded by the 
garter and surmounted by the imperial crown; on 
either side is a fleur-de-lis or. The initial letter con- 
tains the figure of Garter in his official tabard holding 
a wand pointing to the shield. 

The original arms of the Archbishop were gules a 
chevron between three keys argent, to which coat the 
augmentation of three stars gules was by this instru- 
ment assigned. 

The shield is surmounted by a mitre, having upon 
the fillet a portion of the Archbishop's motto, 
" Mundus transit," This is the only instance I have 
seen of a motto so placed. The entire motto was this : 
" Mundus transit et concupiscentia ejus." It may be 
here remarked that the mitre is not encircled with the 
ducal coronet which of late years has been introduced, 

VOL. II. Q 



204 NOTICES OF GRANTS. 

erroneously, in representations of the mitre of an 
arclihishoip. 

Two seals were originally appended to this document, 
but one only now remains, being the official seal ; whilst 
the other was, as was generally usual at the period 
when grants of this nature were made, the personal 
seal of the King of Arms. The arms on the seal now 
extant being A cross of St. George, in the dexter 
canton a dove ; on a chief, between a lion of England on 
the dexter and a fleur-de-lis of France on the sinister, 
a crown within a garter. Legend : ^ s * officii * 

GARTERII • REGIS " ARMORVM * SANCTI * GEORGII. 

The second document, being the grant of a crest to 
John Parker (afterwards Sir John Parker, knight, 
eldest son of the Archbishop) is also surrounded by an 
ornamental border ; the Tudor rose being in the centre, 
having on each side a gold fleur-de-lis. This grant was 
by Robert Cooke, Clarenceux, and is dated May 28th, 
1572. The initial letter contains, as in the former case, 
the figure of the King of Arms. 

Both seals are here preserved. The first has the 

arms of the office of Clarenceux : A cross of St. George, 

in the dexter canton a fleur-de-lis, on a chief a lion 

of England. On either side of the shield a cross-crosslet 

fltche, and above the shield a lion rampant. Legend : 

>J< S ' OFFICII ' CLARENCIEVLX * REGIS * ARMORVM * PT ' 

avstral. The second, or personal seal, has the arms 
of Cooke — A cinquefoll pierced ermine in an orle of 
cross-crosslets fltche. Legend : >J< SIG ' ROBerti ■ 

COOKE * CLARENCIEVLX ' REGIS ' ARMORVM. 

It is to the kindness of W. Sandys, Esq., P.S.A., 
their present possessor, that the Surrey Archaeological 
Society is indebted for permission to print these two 
grants. 



NOTICES OF GRANTS. 205 



I. Grant to Archbishop Parker. 

Omnibus xpi fidelibus has pfites Iras inspecturis 
uisuris uel auclituris Gilbertus Dethick ats Garter Miles 
Principalis Ilex Armoru Anglicoruni Salutem cuni 
debita et humili commendacione. Equitas vult et racio 
postulat q d homines virtuosi Laudabilis dispositionis et 
uite honorabilis sint p eorum nierita honorati et re- 
munerati in suis psonis existen in hac uita mortali tarn 
breui et transitoria et in quolibet loco honoris pre 
ceteris exaltati demostrando signa et exempla virtutis 
honoris ac etiam humanitatis ea intencione ut p eorii 
exempla alij magis conentur eorii nitarn in bonis 
operibus et factis clarissimis exercere. Et ideo ego 
predictus Hex armoru ut supra non solum ex diuulgata 
fama uerum etiam ex meo ceterorumq, nobilium fi.de- 
dignorum testimonio sum ueraciter instructus et in- 
formatus q d # mu3 in xpo Pr. Dfis Matt h eus Parker 
Archiepus Cantuariefl ex preclara familia ortus gerens 
arma uel insignia ac diu in uirtute claruit ac ueri et 
xpiani Presulis officio functus est ac indies fungitur 
adeo ut mereatur et dignus sit in omnibus locis honoris 
admitti numerari et recipi in numerii et consortiii 
aliorum ueteru et illustriu uiroru. Quapropter cum 
mecum ipse perpenderem laudabilia ipsius merita et 
egregias ipsius anirni dotes magnamc^ in rebus gerendis 
dexteritatem aliquod meum affectionis signum eiusq 
uirtutis testimoniu. exhibere uolui. Igitur additione in 
ipsius arma quibus antecessores sui ab antiquo tempore 
utebantur in hunc ut sequitur modum decoraui vz : Sur 
ung cheueron d' argent trois estoilles geulcs ut latius 
in scuto hie depicto apparet, Habendum et gaudendum 
predicta arma una cum additamento prcdicto dicto 

Q 2 



206 NOTICES OF GRANTS, 

$ mo PrT Matt h eo Parker Archiepo ut supra, et ut ipse 
in liijs ornatus sit ad eius honorem imppm. In cuius 
rei testimoniu sigillum nieum ad arma una cum sigillo 
officij mei Regis armomm presentibus apposui ac manu 
niea propria subscripsi. Dat. Londini Anno Dili Mill 1110 
quingentesimo quinquagesimo nono Die uero xxviij 
Mensis Nouembris ac Anno Regni Elizabeth Dei gfa 
Anglie Francie et Hibernie Regine, fidei defensoris, etc. 
secundo. 

p me Gartier principallem (sic) 

Regem Armor um. 



II. Grant to John Parker. 

To all and singtjler as well nobles and gentles as 
others to whome these presentes shall come be seene, 
heard, read or understand Robert Cooke Esquire, alias 
Clarencieulx kinge of Armes of the East, West, and 
South partes of England from the ryuer of Trent 
Southwardes, sendeth greetinge in our lorde god euer- 
lastinge. Forasmuch as aunciently from the beginninge 
the Vertuous and Valiaunt actes of excellent persones 
haue ben coniended to the worlde and posteritie with 
sondrey monumentes and remembrances of their goode 
deseartes : Emongest the which the cheifest and most 
vsuall hath ben the bearinge of signes in shieldes called 
Armes, beinge none other then demonstrations and 
tokens of prowesse and valoir, diuersly destributed 
accordinge to the qualytes and deseartes of the persones 
merytinge the same. — To th'entent that such as in 
their lyues and conuersation do shew foorth the fruictes 
of true nobilitie that is to say the lyuely operations of 
Prudence, Justice, Fortitude, and Temperance, deser- 



NOTICES OF GRANTS. 207 

uinge a fame for excellency in theim : and haue more- 
ouer quitte theim selfes well in pure faith to god, in 
faithfull hart to their prince, and in harty loue to their 
Contrey and kinnesfolke : may therfore receaue due 
honor in their lyues, and also deryue and conueygh the 
same to their posteritie to be in theim contynewed 
successiuely for euer. Emonge the which nombre 
John Parker of Lamhith in the Countie of Surrey 
gentleman, eldest sonne of the most reuerend father in 
God Lord Matthew Parker, Archbisshoppe of Canter- 
bury, Primate of all England and Metropolitane, beinge 
one of the berars of those tokens of honor by iust 
descent and prerogatiue of birth from his auncestors : 
and yet not knowenge for certeyn of eny Creast or 
Cognoysance incident or belonginge to his auncyent 
Armes (as vnto very meny auncyent cotes of Armes 
ther be none) hath required me the sayd Clarencieulx 
kinge of Armes to assigne vnto his sayde auncyent 
Armes a Creast or Cognoysance meete and lawfull to 
be boren without preiudice or offence to eny other 
person. In consideration wherof for a further de- 
claration of the worthinesse of the sayde John Parker 
and at his request, I the sayde Clarencieulx kinge of 
Armes by power and authoritie to me comitted by 
letters patentes vnder the great e Seale of England, haue 
assigned giuen and graunted vnto the sayde John 
Parker to his auncyent Armes of gules with a Cheueron 
betweene three kayes argent, for his Creast or Cognoy- 
sance vpon the heaulme on a torce argent and gules an 
Elephantes hedde couppe argent tusked golde : Man- 
telled gules doubled argent : As more playnly appeereth 
depicted in this margent. Which Creast or Cognoy- 
sance I the sayd Clarencieulx kinge of Armes do vnyte 
vnto the auncient Armes of the sayde John Parker and 



208 NOTICES OF GRANTS. 

by these presentes do ratify confirme giue and graunt 
the same vnto the sayde John Parker and to his 
posteritie for ever : And he and they the same to haue, 
holde, vse, beare, enioy and shew foorthe with their due 
differences accordinge to the lawe of Amies at all 
tymes and for euer heerafter at his and their libertie 
and pleasure without the impediment, lett, or inter- 
ruption of eny person or persones. In witnbsse 
wherof I the sayde Clarencieulx kinge of Armes haue 
signed these Presentes with my hande and sette 
therunto the Seales of myne Armes and of myne office 
the xxviij th day of May : In the yere of our Lorde god 
a thousand fyue hundred seuentie two : And of the 
reigne of our most gracious souucreigne Lady Elizabeth 
by the grace of god queene of Englande, Prance, and 
lrelande, Defendor of the fayth, &c. the fourtenth yere. 

Rob. Cooke, alias Clarencieulx 
Roy Darmes. 




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210 THE VICAR OF GODALMING 



XIV. 

THE VICAR OE GODALMING AND HIS 
PARISHIONERS IN 1610. 

By J. EVANS, Esq., F.S.A. 



There are certain portions of English history which, 
though they relate to occurrences that took place some 
scores or even hundreds of years ago, can hardly be 
discussed at the present time, without exciting almost 
the same bitterness of party spirit as any of the passing 
political events of the day. It is more especially with 
regard to the times of Charles I. that this remark holds 
good. There is hardly a single person who took any 
active part in the concerns of the State during that 
eventful period, but whose name will excite the opposite 
extremes of admiration and hatred in different minds, 
according to their natural bias, and habits of thought in 
politics and religion. 

The advice given by an old writer not to follow too 
closely on the heels of current history, lest haply they 
kick out your teeth, seems equally applicable to some 
of the topics of the time of the Great Rebellion, as the 
fires of political and ecclesiastical discord, which, after 
long smouldering, then burst into flames, are never 
likely to be entirely quenched. There are as ardent 
admirers of Laud and Strafford, of Hampden and Pym, 
at the present day as there were 200 years ago ; and 
that such should be the case becomes the less remark- 
able, when we consider how close a parallel may be 
drawn between some of the ecclesiastical disputes of 



AND HIS PARISHIONERS. 211 

the last few years, and those of the days of Charles I. 
A quarrel between a parson and his parishioners at the 
present day would, however, he hardly a fitting subject 
to bring under the notice of this Society ; and possibly, 
from the reasons already mentioned, a quarrel of that 
character, even though it took place more than two 
centuries ago, might also seem an objectionable subject, 
unless treated in a perfectly impartial and dispassionate 
manner, and without holding up either of the parties 
concerned to unqualified admiration or wholesale con- 
demnation. The local interest attaching to the dispute 
to which I am about to call your attention will be some 
justification for introducing it ; and in laying before you 
the Articles presented in Parliament by the parishioners 
of Godalming against their Vicar, the Rev. Dr. Nicholas 
Andrewes, I will endeavour to hold the balance even 
between them, and neither declaim against the un- 
reasonableness exhibited on the one side, nor the want 
of discretion on the other, but confine myself as far as 
possible to the facts of the case. I must take you back 
to the time 

" When civil dudgeon first grew high, 
And men fell out they knew not why ; 
When hard words, jealousies, and fears 
Set folks together by the ears ; " 

" When tinkers bawled aloud to settle 
Church discipline for patching kettle, 
And oyster-women locked their fish up, 
And trudged away to cry ' No Bishop ! ' " 

A time when even the porters of London petitioned 
against Episcopacy, as a burden, says Puller, "too 
heavy for their shoulders." 

In those days of Malignants and Roundheads, of 
prelatists and saints, one Nicholas Andrewes, M.A., and 



212 THE VICAR OE GODALMING 

afterwards D.D., of the University of Cambridge, was 
Hector of St. Nicholas, Guildford, and also Vicar of 
Godalrning ; and having what would now be termed a 
High Church tendency, and possibly some other prin- 
ciples which were not popular among those in whose 
breasts the new lights of the time had sprung up ; some 
of the more zealous of his parishioners, instigated 
possibly by some godly minister who would not have 
objected to hold the doctor's livhig in his stead, pre- 
sented the following Articles against him to the House 
of Commons, which had already, among other royal 
prerogatives, begun to assume to itself the office, if not 
the title, of the Supreme Head of the Church : — 

Articles in Parliam* ag fc Nicholas Andrewes, 
Vicar of Godalmynge, A 1640. 

To the Honorable Assemblie of the Knights, Citizens, 
and Burgesses of the Commons House of Parlia- 
ment. 

The humble Petition of the Parishoners of the parishe 
of Godalmynge in the countie of Surry Humblie sheweth 
their manie grievances, wh they suffer under Nicholas 
Andrewes, Vicar of the said parishe, whose Pride, 
Idlenes, and affectacion of Poperie, his imperious manner 
of Cariage and demeanour, his discountenancinge, and 
suppressing^ of good Preachinge and Teachinge, his 
denyinge them to have a Lecturer (and yet himself 
refusinge to preache), his superstitious observacon and 
peremptorie pressinge and urginge of Ceremonies and 
Innovations, his denyinge to Church women, and to 
administer the Sacrament of the Lords Supper, as 
formerly they have used to have the same administered 
unto them, w th manie other things of much vexacon and 
verie burthensome to the consciences of many of his 



AND HIS PARISHIONERS. 213 

parishions, As may appear by the Articles hereunto 
annexed, doe all render him much undesired of his said 
parishioixs (beinge a verie greate congregation) whoe 
(for want of an able paynefull and industrious edifyinge 
Minister, w h they (before all things in the world) doe 
most cheifly desire) doe lyve in a verie disconsolate 
estate and condicon, like unto those that have almost 
loste their Religion. Most humblie therefore doe they 
praye the wisdom and Justice of this Honor 1 ' 16 house to 
take this theire Petition and the said Articles, into your 
pious and religious consideracons, that the said Nicholas 
Andrewes may answeare the same and that some speedie 
course may be taken, for the settlinge and establishinge 
of an able and constant conscionable and religious 
mynistrie in the said parishe, to the Honour and glorie 
of Almightie God and for the comfortable instruccon 
and Soules healthe of the people in the said parishe 
Inhabitinge, beinge a verie numerous congregation, and 
your Petitions (accordinge to theire bounden dueties) 
shall dayly praye for your happines and prosperities. 

Articles offered to be proved against Nicholas An- 
drewes, Yicar of Godalmynge in the Countie of 
Surry, and Chapleyne to the Bishopp of Ely. 

1. That the said vicar Nicholas An- 1 
drewes being a double beneficed man 
(videl* havinge the vicarage of Godal- 
mynge, worthe about £180 per annum, 
and the Parsonage of St. Nicholas in 
Guldeford worth £140 per annum, and . 
a Prebend of Salisburie worth £60 p. * 
anum, and haveinge neere £100 p. anum 
in Temporall meanes) is a man much 
affected to his ease and pleasure, an 



John Randall 
' John Smith 



Joshua Perior 
John Purchis 



214 



THE VICAR, OF GODALMING 



enemy to Preachinge, denyinge unto his 
parishorxs Sermons w h were gyven by 
will, and alsoe denyinge Sermons at 
the buriall of the deade, and at the 
christeninge of Children, and some- 
tymes at the administracon of the Sa- 
crament of the Lords Supper And 
havinge beene by his parishioners re-' 
quested to admyt of a Lecture in the 
said parishe to be performed by a con- 
formable man, he himself preachinge 
but seldom, and then alsoe but in a 
verie fruytlesse and unprofitable mann r 
as others likewise doe w preache there 
at his appoyntmente, he utterly denyecl 
theire said requeste affirminge that Lec- 
tures were good for nothinge but for 
women to meete to make gossippinge 
matches. 

2. That the said vicar, when his^i 
parishioSs have gone to any of the 
neighebouringe and adjoynynge pa- 
rishes, on the Sabaoth dayes to heare 
the word of God there preached when 
neyther he himself, nor any for him 
did preache, he hath threatened to 
presente them, and hath said that 
there were but 4 conformable mynis- 
ters in the County of Surry, whereof 
doctor Leifeild and himself are twoe, 
and he hath said that he would not 
leave out the readinge of any one col- 
lect for the best sermon that ever was 
preached. 



Sir William 
Elyott, Knight 



- Joshua Perior 



Caleb Smith 
John Westbrooke 
John Morland 
> Phillipp Mellershe 
W m Moseran, Gent 
S r William Elyott 



AND HIS PARISHIONERS. 



215 



3. That the said vicar (himself) and 
others by him broughte in have 
preached false and strange doctrines he 
himself sayinge ffye uppon that doctrine 
that saithe that the greatest parte of 
the worlde shalbe damned as yf soe be, 
that God shonld be so uniust as to 
bandie men's soules upp and downe 
sometymes over the Lyne and some- 
timis under the Lyne not caring into 
what hazard he stroake them. 

4. That the said vicar is a Haunter, 
and frequenter of tiplinge in Innes, and 
tavernes, and useth gameinge both at 
cards and Tables as well uppon the 
Lords dayes as others, contrarie both to 
the Canon, and articles. 

5. That the said vicar when he hath 1 
beene desired by some of his parishions, 
to church theire wyves, at theire houses, 
by reason of their weakenes, and im- 
potencie, he hath refused it, and that at 
twoe severall tymes, he denyed to church 
one M rs Buckley (his parishioner), when 
she came to church and sate there all 
the tyme of dyvine service, because she 
was not attyred w th an hanginge ker- 
chief, and soe returned her back de- 
prived of publique thankesgyveing unto 
this daye. 

6. That the said vicar, notwith- 
standinge the greate number of com- 
municants in the parishe, w h maketh it 
(in a mann r ) impossible for all to come 



Samuell Buckley 

i- John Juxon, Gent 

John Westbrooke 



Samuell Buckley 
John Monger 



Nicholas Edwards 
John Westbrooke 



John Randall 
Samuell Buckley 
Josias Elyott 
Joshua Badger 



216 



THE VICAR OF GODALMING 



S r William Elyott 



upp to the Bayle, at the tynie of the Jc 
administracon of the Sacrament of the 
Lords Supper without greate disturb- 
ance to men's devotions, he hath refused 
to administer the same to such as come 
not upp, althoughe he hath beene much 
desired thereunto, by dyverse, whose 
Seates are adjoynynge to the Chauncell, 
and (by reason of weakenes) cannott 
well endure to sitt soe longe out of 
theire seates in cold weather, and al- 
thoughe the same hath been formerly 
accustomed to be administred unto them 
in the Seates neere adioynynge to the 
Chauncell. 

7. That the said vicar is a greate 1 Samuell Buckley 

, . . . . , „ James Hill 

presser and superstitious observer ol 
innovated ceremonies (gyveing thereby 
unto the consciences of dyverse of his 
parishioners, much offence) as (namely) 
by his lowe and frequent cringeinge 
unto the Eont and Comunion Table, his 
preachinge of damnacon unto such as 
were covered in the Sermon tyme, and 
personating them in the Pulpett ; and 
by preachinge in surplices and readinge 
of service parte before Sermon and parte 
after Sermon ; and by Bowinge to the 
Communyon Table, in the tyme of the 
administracon of the Sacrament, as often 
as he goeth by, or taketh eyther Breade 
or Wyne from the same. 

8. That the said vicar, being requested i 
by his Curat that then was to admytt | 



Josias Elyott 



Henry Bowler 

Sir William Elyott 



AND HIS PARISHIONERS. 



217 



of a sermon to be preached at the buriall 
of his childe, he denyed it, and said unto 
him that be knew well enoughe that he 
(the said vicar) loved not preachinge, 
and that he hoped to lyve to see that 
tyme, when there should be noe other 
Lawes in our Kin^dome but theires 
(videl 1 ) the Ecclesiasticall Lawes. 

9. That the said vicar (beinge moved ! 
by his Curat that nowe is, to suffer him 
to catechise, uppon the Sabbaothe dayes 
in the afternoones (the neglect whereof 
the parishions had formerly complayned 
of) he answeared he should not, to w h 
the Curat replyed eyther you or I must 
doe it, whereunto the vicar answeared 
that then he would reade Prayers him- 
selfe Bidinge him to use noe more words 
to that purpose for yf he did he would 
ruyne him. 

10. That the said vicar is of a verie ' 
proude presumptuous, imperious and 
tyrannicall caryage and disposition, 
encrochinge uppon the rights and pry- 
viledgs of the parishioners, and takeinge 
uppon him to alter and change dyverse 
of theire good and orderly customes and 
usages, and other things of and in theire 
church, and endeavouringe to have and 
doe and order all things therein accor- 
dinge to the oblique Rule of his own 
will to the greate charge, disturbance, 
vexacon, oppression, and grievance of 
the said parishioners. 



Hugh Butler 



John Mann 
John Monger 
Jonathan 
Sachiverell 



Richard Woodier 
Susan White 



218 



THE VICAR OF GODALMING 



11. That the said Vicar is popishly 
affected and keepeth in his house at the 
vicarage in Godalmynge aforesaid, dy- 
verse crucifixes (whereof some are of 
greate price) one hanginge in his Bedd- 
chamher and another curious one is 
kepte in a Boxe w th foldinge windowes, 
in his Studie, and dyverse Bomishe 
pictures w h he keepeth secretly behinde 
the hangings in his said house. 

12. That the said vicar and M r Way- ^ 
ferar, Parson of Compton, in the said 
Countie of Surry, roade to Southampton, 
to eate Eishe and to make merrie to- 
geather, and there (dyverse tymes) 
drank healthes to the Pope calling him 
that honest olde man. 

13. That upon conference betweene-j 
some of the parishions of Godalmynge 
aforesaid and the nowe Curat of the 
same parishe concernynge some jelousies 
that might arise, whether the said vicar 
(for his owne excuse) myght not shifte 
off from himself, unto the said Curat, 
some of the matters charged uppon him 
the said Vicar, concernynge the neglect 
of catechi singe and some other things, 
the said Curat answeared, that if he 
should doe so, he knew soe much by the 
said Vicar, that had he 20 Bishoppricks 
and as many other lyvinges in commen- 
dam upon his disclosinge what he knew 
of him he would be eiected out of them 
all. 



John Mann 
John Monger 
Jonathan 
Sachiverell 



John Tichborne 
John Monger 



John Monger 



John Mann 
Jonathan 
Sachiverell 



Jonathan 
Sachiverell 



AND HIS PARISHIONERS. 



219 



14. That one M r Monger of Godal- 
mynge aforesaid heareinge that the said 
vicar had a cerfaine Popish Booke called 
a Marie's Psalter (als) Our Ladies Psalter 
he desired the said vicar to lend him 
the said booke ; whereunto the vicar 
answeared that (althonghe he made 
greate accompte of the saide Booke the 
same being of a Geneva print) yet he 
would lend it unto him, and that after 
the Borrowinge of the said Maries 
Psalter (as aforesaid) the said vicar 
tooke occasion to tell the said M r Mon- 
ger that he liked a man that would 
chuse his religion before it came. Por 
this (said he) is our Religion (nieanynge 
the Religion that is contayned in the 
said Marie's Psalter (als) our Ladies 
Psalter — and that the said Religion 
was then cominge. 



John Markwick 
John Deane 
Thomas Burges 
Edward Pii 



Such were the articles of complaint against Dr. 
Andrewes ; and most of the alleged grievances are such 
that their character can readily be recognized at the 
present day. There are, however, some among them 
about which a few words of explanation may be desirable. 
One of the complaints is that the vicar refused to admit 
a godly lecturer into his pulpit at Godalming ; and when 
we consider what was the usual character of the lec- 
turers of those times, and the objects for which they 
were appointed, we cannot think a reluctance to admit 
one into his parish was by any means unreasonable on 
the part of any incumbent. They were usually appointed 
by the Parliament, mainly with a view of crying up 

VOL. II. R 



220 THE VICAR OF GODALMING 

their authority and for the promulgation of anti- 
monarchical principles, but also partly as a means of 
worrying the regular ministers out of their livings. It 
would hardly be in place here to adduce specimens from 
some of their lectures with a view of showing the style 
of their discourses ; I will only say that the utter pro- 
fanity of some passages is almost beyond belief. But 
what was to be expected from over-zealous and at the 
same time ignorant men, when those in authority com- 
mitted unfortunate clergy to Newgate for singing ma- 
lignant psalms, and others because, as their " mittimus " 
words it, they daily read most malignant chapters ? 

With regard to the charge of haunting and frequent- 
ing of t^pling in inns, I will quote the words of Walker 
in his " Sufferings of the Clergy," who says that the 
charge of tavern-haunting and common swearing was 
one of those most commonly made in accusations such 
as that now before us, the first of which was very often 
plainly no other than the innocent freedom of taking a 
glass of wine in a public-house; and very frequently 
the other, the using in discourse the asseveration, " By 
my faith ! " With reference to the complaint of Dr. 
Andrewes not administering the sacrament to those who 
sat in their pews, I may mention that the practice of 
kneeling to receive it was by the Puritan party con- 
sidered Popish and superstitious ; attempting to make 
the clergy carry the bread and wine to the pews, seems 
to have been a test to which they were put to try their 
opinions. " I have known some sectaries in London," 
says the writer of the JPersecutio Undecima, " command 
their servants to go to the Sacrament, and to sit in the 
lower places of the Church to try whether the minister 
would bring the Sacrament to them in their seats, that 
so they might have an Action of Law against the 



AND HIS PARISHIONERS. 221 

minister, or else complain against liim to the Parlia- 
ment." With regard to the " hanging kerchief," which 
Mrs. Buckley would not wear, it certainly appears as if 
Dr. Andre wes were attempting to revive the old practice 
of wearing a white veil on the occasion of thanksgiving, 
though the rubric only prescribed that she should be 
decently apparelled. Mrs. Buckley was, however, more 
fortunate than another woman in the diocese of Nor- 
wich, in the reign of James I., who, for refusing to wear 
such a veil, was excommunicated for contempt. 

But I must not enter into further particulars, and 
will now give yon a summary of the otfences of poor 
Dr. Andrewes and their result, in the words of White's 
"First Century of Scandalous and Malignant Mi- 
nisters " : — ■ 

" The Benefices of Nicholas Andrewes, D.D., Rector 
of the Parish Churches and Vicar of Godalmine in the 
county of Surrey, are sequestered, for that he is not 
only negligent in preaching himselfe, but hath also 
expressed himself to be an enemy to frequent preach- 
ing, inveighing in his sermons against long Sermons, 
saying that Peters sword cut off but one eare, but 
long Sermons like long swords cut off both at once, 
and that the Surfeit of the Word is of all most dan- 
gerous, and that the silliest creatures have longest 
eares, and that preaching was the worst part of Gods 
worship, and that if he left out anything he would 
leave out that; and refused to give the Parishioners 
leave to have a Lecturer to preach unto them, and hath 
presented his Parishioners that went to heare sermons 
at other Churches, when they had no preaching at 
home ; and caused the Churchwardens and Sidesmen to 
be presented for not presenting such unto the Eccle- 
siastical Court; and in delivering the bread in the 



222 THE VIC All OF GODALMINGr 

Sacrament, he elevateth it, lookes upon it, and bowes 
low unto it, and usetb other frequent bowing in ad- 
ministering the Sacrament, and in his Sermons greatly 
exclaims against that Doctrin which teacheth, that the 
greatest part of the world should be damned; and 
frequenteth Tavernes, and consumes his time in sitting 
and tipling there : And hath refused to publish the 
Order of Parliament concerning the removall of super- 
stitious and Idolatrous pictures and Images, and hath 
substituted to officiate for him in the said cure very 
scandalous and malignant curates, viz. Bucock, Lever- 
land, Pasterloe, Heath, and one Blane, who is in the 
army raised against the Parliament ; and when his 
people have propounded honest and orthodox men to be 
his curates, he hath refused them." 

Such is the Puritan account of Dr. Andrewes. Let us 
now see the High Church version, which unfortunately 
contains a most melancholy sequel, and is to be found 
in Walker's " Sufferings of the Clergy," and elsewhere. 
According to this account, he was zealously attached to 
the Established Church ; " for which, as well as for 
refusing to admit a factious lecturer into his church, 
and for preaching against certain Calvinistical doctrines 
then much in fashion, his Livings were sequestered by 
the Committee for Religion, in 1613. At length, having 
been hurried from Jayl to Jayl, and for some time also 
imprisoned on shipboard, he died under this barbarous 
treatment and confinement, being, in a word, a zealous 
man for the Church of England and a Great Loyalist." 

Poor Mr. Wayferer, Ptector of Compton, who, it will 
be remembered, rode down to Southampton with Dr. 
Andrewes, to eat fish and make merry together, and 
while so doing, drank the health of "that honest old 
man " the pope, nearly met with a similar fate. He 



AND HIS PARISHIONERS. 223 

was, in December, 1640, called to account for speaking 
scandalous words of the Lords who petitioned the King 
in the North, for which he was sequestered from his 
living of Upham, Hants, and probably Compton also, 
to which, having in some manner made his peace with 
the powers that were, he was again presented in 1642. 

I have only to add that the original copy of these 
articles is preserved in the extensive and curious col- 
lection of family papers belonging to Mr. More Moly- 
neux, of Losely, who has kindly placed it in my hands, 
and that without anv knowledge whatever of local 
politics, I am sure I may congratulate the present 
vicar and parishioners of Godalming on their lot having 
fallen in times more peaceful than those of their pre- 
decessors two centuries ago. 



224 MEMORANDUM ON THE NOTICES OF 



XV. 

MEMORANDUM ON THE NOTICES OF THE FAMILY 
OF COBHAM OF STERBOROUGH. 



Since the publication of the second part of our present volume, the 
fifteenth volume of the Sussex Archaeological Collections has appeared, 
containing an interesting Paper by W. Durrant Cooper, Esq., F.S.A., 
entitled "Sussex Men at Agincourt." At page 124 the following passage 
occurs : — " The retinue of the Earl of Arundel was, indeed, partly com- 
posed of men from Surrey and from his Welsh estates. His banneret 
was Sir Reginald Cobeham, of Steresborough, Surrey, who, in his 
letters of safe-conduct, dated 5th June (Rot. Franc. 3 Hen. V. m. 20), 
is called brother and heir of John, son of Reginald de Cobham, who also 
held the manor of Northeye, in Sussex. Sir Reginald was certainly at 
the battle, and he so appears in the Earl of Arundel's roll, although, in 
the carefully-written notices of the family, in the Collections of the 
Surrey Archaeological Society, it is stated that he is not mentioned in 
the Roll of Agincourt, as having taken part in that great battle." — 
Mr. Cooper refers to page 144 of our volume, and correctly remarks that 
the name of Sir Reginald's deceased brother, John, is not given there. 
Neither is he mentioned in the pedigree of the family which follows 
page 168. 

It is with pleasure that we notice these corrections. Mr. Durrant 
Cooper has abundantly proved that Sir Reginald Cobham was engaged 
in the Agincourt expedition. The contrary statement arose from the 
fact that Sir Reginald's name does not occur in Sir N. H. Nicolas's 
Agincourt Roll : an omission now explained by the circumstance that he 
had no independent command. In the writ of protection referred to by 
Mr. Durrant Cooper (Rot. Franc, ub. supra), Sir Reginald is thus 
described : — " Reginaldus Cobham de Sterresburgh in Comitatu. Surrise 
miles, alias dictus Reginaldus de Cobham miles frater et heres Johannis 
filii Reginaldi de Cobham de Sterresburgh militis senioris, alias dictus 
Reginaldus frater Johannis filii Reginaldi de Cobham de Sterresburgh 
militis senioris." It may be conjectured that Sir Reginald sued out the 
king's writ, with this careful description of himself, under some appre- 



THE FAMILY OF COBHAM OF STE HBO ROUGH. 225 

tension of legal proceedings being taken against him while absent from 
England, in consequence of a liability he had incurred as heir of his 
brother. At present we find nothing more of this John. He certainly 
died before his father Sir Reginald senior, as Sir Reginald of Agincourt 
is returned as heir in the inquisition held on the father's death,* which 
fact confirms the statement of his heirship in our pedigree. 

The following errata et corrigenda in the " Notices of the Family of 
Cobbam " may suitably be introduced here : — 

P. 171, line 8 : for dosso read dorsorio. 

lb., last line but 4 : " cum Mortumalo et Geuenyles in principio 
libri." A very probable explanation of these two odd-looking words, 
which occur in Joan Lady Cobham's will, and which we were compelled 
to leave without interpretation, has been suggested by G. R. French, 
Esq. He proposes to read thus : " cum [armis de] Mortymers et 
Genevyles in principio," &c. (with Mortimers' and Geneviles' arms at 
the beginning of the book, together with a picture of the Salutation). 

Joan de Cobham, the testatrix, was daughter of Thomas Lord Berke- 
ley, by Margaret, daughter of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, and his 
wife Joan, daughter and co-heir of Peter de Genevile, Lord of Trim in 
Ireland. The Earl by this marriage acquired the right to impale, and 
his children to quarter, the arms of Genevile with that of Mortimer ; 
and it seems likely enough that the handsome illuminated volume 
bequeathed by Lady Cobham had been executed for her maternal grand- 
father, or for one of his family, and that, after the fashion of the period, 
these two coats (either impaled or quarterly) had been introduced as 
an accessory to the miniature on the first page. 

The only serious difficulty in this interpretation, namely, the necessity 
of inserting the words " armis de," becomes very slight, on an inspection 
of the context. It will be seen that the expression " cum armis de " 
occurs only three lines before the passage in question, in a bequest of 
a cup with the arms of Cobham and Berkeley ; and a blunder in 
transcribing the original will from a draft might easily happen, parti- 
cularly if, in the draft, the two groups of identical words chanced to 
stand one immediately over the other. Supposing the words " armis de " 
once dropped in this way in the original will, the sense would be lost, 
and the clerk who engrossed the registered copy from which we print 
might, it is suggested, turn Mortymers into Mortumals or Mortumalo, 

* In q. p. m. Reginaldi [in the Calendar misprinted Rogeri] Cobham ; 4 H. 4. 
num. 34. — He was then aged 21 years and upwards. 



226 MEMORANDUM ON THE NOTICES. 

for, indeed, the final letter of the word in Wittlesey's Register may be 
read either way, though the other letters are quite plain. Geuenyles 
may equally well be read Geneuyles, there being in fact no distinction 
in the MS. between the u and the n. 

lb., last line but one : " Manuel Peche." The book intended is clearly 
the " Manuel des Peches," of Robert Grossteste, Bishop of Lincoln. See 
pp. xii and xxxiii of Mr. Luard's Introduction to Grossteste's Epistles, 
lately published by direction of the Master of the Rolls. 

P. 145, line 1 ; 187, 1. 14; and 189, 1. 24 : " Un colet d'or ov un 
baleys en le Toret." The meaning of the word toret being doubtful, it 
was translated " pendant," with a note of interrogation. More probably 
it means Turret. " A gold necklace with a ruby, in the Turret." A 
little lower down in the will is a bequest of " perlez enfilez en mon noire 
forser " (a string of pearls in my black jewel-case), and by analogy the 
words " en le Toret " may well indicate the place where the subject of 
this legacy was to be found. As to the word itself, it may be sufficient 
to note the spelling of Langley Burrell in the same will : " Langele 
BoreV A turret in the Middle Ages was an ordinary place of security 
for valuables, muniments of title, &c. 

P. 184-5. By the expression " ma commere " in Reginald Cobham's 
will, it seems more likely that the testator intended to describe the 
Queen Philippa as his own godmother than as his gossip. In this 
sense the word is used by Jean de Troyes, in his Chronicles of Louis XL, 
in the following passage, which is in itself interesting from its connection 
with English history : " Au dit tems et le Samedi dernier jour de Juinz, 
1470, environ entre deux et trois heures du matin, la royne accoucha au 
chateau de Amboise de ung beau filz qu'illec fut baptise, et nomine 
Charles par Monseigneur l'Archeveque de Lyon, avecqnes le Prince de 
Galles, filz de Henry, jadis Roy d'Angleterre, et prisonnier detenu par 
Edouart, qui se disoit roy du dit pays d'Angleterre, et la commere fut 
Madame Jehanne de France, Duchesse de Bourbon." 

In the Pedigree, near the bottom, for ob. vivo fratre, 20 Hen. 6 : 
read ob. vivo patre, 20 Hen. G. 

C. S. P. 

J. W. F. 



(Settmtogiial mtir ^ttuMt Ulcmnranba 



RELATING TO 



THE COUNTY OP STJEEEY. 



EDITED BY 

WILLIAM HENRY HART, F.S.A., 

AND 

JOSEPH JACKSON HOWARD, LL.D., F.S.A. 



vol. ii. a 




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C'lipeus gentilitius sive Insignia Georgij Cole de Petresham in Coraitatu Surriae 
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hseredem, cui Richardus Cole de Slade prcedicta Armiger, qui obijfc sine liserede de 
corpore suo, dedit et intalliavit (per voluntatem suam ultimam) omnia terras et 
tenementa sua in com: Devonise et Cornubia3. 

Hsec igitur Anna una cum Crista sicut supra depicta sunt, in gratiam Gregorij Cole 
prsedicti, ego Clarenceux Rex Armorum exemplificanda curavi. 

GuiLiELMfs Camden, Clarenceux 
Rex Armorum. 



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Insignia Gentilitia hie supra depicta, spectant ad Guilielniu Knightley de Kingston 

super Thamisim in co: Surr: filium Joliis Knightley de Nottingham Generosi ; 

antiqua Knightleiorum Northamtoniensiuni Familia. oriundi. Qui quidem Gulielmus 
ab alijs ejusdem nominis Familijs distingui petens. Ego Clarenceux Rex Armorum 
partium Angliae Australium, authoritate officij mei dedi et concessi et per prassentes 
tradidi et confirmavi eidem Gulielmo suisq: posteris, ut portent, Quarterly Ermine 
and palewayes of six pieces or and gules, over all a bend Azure charged with a launce 
of the Second mantled gules doubled Argent. His creast on a wreath Or and Azure a 
staggs head Argent charged on the necke with a Trefoyle vert and attired or. In 
quorum omnium confirmationem Ego prajfatus Clarenceux mauu mea propria hie in 
calce subscripsi Decimo die mensis Julij AnuoSalutis nostrse Millesimo Sexcentesimo 
et Vigesimo. 

Guil. Camden Clarenceux 
Rex Armor : . 



JMsPeg, 



Johannes Knightley, = 
de Nottingham, 
gen. 



Will'mus Knightly, 
de Kingston, 
in com: Surr: ar. 
sup'stes 1626. 



Margeria, filia 
, . . . Wodlande, 

de Rye, 
in com: Sussex. 



Susanna, filia 

Joh'is Price, 

de Kingston, 

in com: Surr: gen. 



Will'mus Knightly, 
filius et hseres, 
astat: 4 annor: 
14 Octob. 1626. 



Robertus, 2 filius, 

EEtat: 1 ann: 
5 Decenib: 1626. 



Sara, 
aatat: 3 annor: 
18 Jan: 1626. 



Cluster. 



Nicholaus Banester, 
de Banke, 
in comitatu 
Lancastrise. 



Thomas 

Banester, 

de com: 

Lancastrise, 

filius 

et hares, 

fuitclericus. 



Will'us 

Banester, 

de 

Bretherton, 

in com: 

Lancastr: 

2fil. 



. . filia 
Ball, 
de com: 
Lane. 



Johannes 

Nicholaus 

Richardus 

Thomas. 



Margareta. Jana. 



Johannes Bartholomeus 



Nicholaus 

Richardus 

Thomas 



Banester, 

de Croydon, 

in co: Surr. 

a° 1623, 

ccelebs. 



Margareta, 
ux. 



Jana, 
obijt innupta. 



Signum Baeth. 



n 



Banester. 



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Waterer beareth per pale Asure and Gyeules a fesse betwene three woolves hedds 
truticked in Travers Or, the Creaste ys a woolves hedd arrached Or, his mouth 
embrued with blud, His wreathe ys Or and Asure. 



W&tikxtx. 



William Waterer, 

of Whitrooffes, 
in Woking, in the 
County of Surrey. 



; Margarett, da: of 

Sampson, of 

Sampson's Hall, 

inCareseybyHadley, 
in com: Suff: Esq. 



William Waterer, = 
sonne and heire, 
Clarke of his Ma'ties 
Acatry, 1623. 



Grace, da: of 

Will'm Mountioy, 

of Copford, in 

com: Essex, Esquire. 



Thomas 


John 


Mary, 


Alice, 


Waterer, 


Waterer, 


aged 


aged 


aged 


aged 


17 yeares. 


12 yeares 


15 yeares. 


11 yeares. 







VOL. II. 





M^Mau) fret 




prafrbxib^e. 



Henricus Bradbridg, = 
de Compton, 
in co: Sussex. 



Thomas Bradbridg-, 
de Compton, in 

Sussex. 



Christiana, filia 

.... Beale, 
de Fromsliain. 



Johanna, 

ux: Thomse Smith, 

de Compton. 



Rosa, 

uxor Joh'is Mathew, 

de Compton. 



Thomas Bradbridge, = 

de Lambheth, 

in com. Surrey, 

fil: et hseres superstes, 

A° 1623. 



Anna, filia 

Whitmore, 

relicta 

Obadite Smith, 

de London. 



Thomas, filius 

et hser. apparens, 

astat. 2 an nor: 

A° 1623. 



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Made A° 1623 by SAMUELL THOMPSON, Windsor Herauld, 

AND 

AUGUSTYNE VINCENT, Rougcroix, 
Marshalls and Deputies to Wm. Camden, Esq., Clarenceux King -of- A vines. 



EDITED BY 

JOSEPH JACKSON HOWARD, LL.D. 



VOL. II. 



jnbte. 




)ahhzss. 



Johannes Hobbes, de = 
Wotton under Edge, in 
co: Gloces. 



Willimus Hobbes, de 

London, mercatoris 

adventerr'. 



Amia, filia natu 

maxima Johannis 

Brooke, de London, 

gen: 



Margareta, filia 

primogenita 

Samuelis Lennard, 

de West Wickham, 

in Kent, militis, 

s. p. 



Thomse Hobbes, de 

Tootingbecke, in com: 

Surr: et de hospitio 

Graiensi Ar: jam 

superstes a° 1623. 



Susanna, filia primogenita 

Recardi Amcotes, de 

Aistrope, in com: Lincoln. 

militis balneati. 



Hanah, 
3 filia. 



Susanna, 
1 filia. 



Amia, 2, obijt, 
in teneris annis. 




Stm%. 




Smt%. 



Maria, filia = Thomas Smithe, 
. . . Cely. de Micham, in 

com: Surrey. ' 



Elinora, filia .... 

Hesilrigge, de com; 

Leic' uxor 2. 



Georgius Smithe, 

de Micham, in 

com: Surr: Ar. 

jam superstes, 

A° 1623. 



= Rosa filia, 
Joh'isWorsope, 
de Clapham, 
in Surr: gent. 



Edwardus, s. p. 
Edmundus, 3. 
Thomas, s. p. 



Elinor, ux: 

Gilberti Bourne, 

Juris Civilis 

Doctoris. 



Thomas Smithe, de 

Micham, til: et her: 

apparens, setatis 30, 

annor'. 



Sarra, filia Humfridas 

Hondford, militis, 
alderman ni, London. 



Willimus. 



Elizabetha, 
ux: Rici 

Wyche, de 
London. 



Georgius Smithe, 
aetatis 1 anni. 



Sara. 



Rosa. 



Maria ux: 
Johis Leigh, 
de Micham, 
militis 1623. 



Rosa. 

Margareta. 

Susanna. 

Agnes. 

Martha. 



CtelL 







Khrtll. 



Johannes Tirrell, 

de Burstow, in 

com: Surrey. 



.... filia 
. . . . Bowit. 



2. Willimus, 3. Bowittus, 4. Erasmus, Johannes Tirrell, de = Elizabetha, filia 



s. p. 



s. p. 



s. p. Burstowe, in 

comitatu Surrey. 



Cotton, de 
com: Berks. 



Jana, nupta Johannes Tirrell, 

Joh'i Hampton, de Rigate, in com: 
de Rigate. Surrey, 1623, coelebs. 



Juliana. 



Rachell. 



Syned by John Tirill. 



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Sable, a chevron argent between three hedgehogs or. 



Nicholaus Harrys, 

de Bromley, in 

com: Cant'. 



Elizabetha, fii: Henrici 
Royden, de Surrey. 



1. Mattheus, Elizabetha, Thomas Harris, 
s. p. s. p. de Bromley, in 

com: Cant'. 



Maria, filia Elizabetha, uxor 

Tho: Harman, Henrici Calthrope. 

de Craford, 
in com: Cant'. 



Willimus, Elizabetha, Nicholaus Harris, 

Tobias, s. p. de Croyden, in 

Anthonius, Surrey, 1623. 

s. p. 



Aubria, filia Anna, Maria, 

David Bulbecke, s. p. s. p. 

de com: Southt. 



Barbara, 33tat'. 15. 

t'pe visitation: 

an° 1623. 



Elizabetha, obijt 
aetatis suae 8 
annor' s. p. 



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Jf arrant 



Willi'ruus Farrant, = Maria, filia 



Juris Civilis Doctor. 



Hay nes, relicta 
Orrell. 



Richardus Farrant, de 

Micham, in com: 

Surrey, gent. 1623. 



=== Elizabetha, filia 
Georgij Garthe 
de Moreden, in com: 
Surrey. 



Margareta, obijt 
virgo, s. p. 



Georgius 2. Richard 
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1 sonne. 



3. Will' 

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Syned by Rich. Farant. 



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VOL. II. 



^ 



<§>ar%. 




Given to Richard Garth, Esquier, 
by W m . Harvy, Clarenciulx, 
8th Julij, 1564, an 6 Elizab: 



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Arraa sive Clipeus gentilitius 

Radulphi Benet, de Wallingford, 

in comitatu Berk : 

Gulielmus Camden, 
Clarenceux Rex Armorum. 





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Ctcjjfojonte. 



Johannes 
Tichborn. 



Thomas Martyn, hater 
Martyn, Justiciary. 



Johannes 
Tichborn. 



Ric'us Martyn, 
tie Eton Bridge. 



. . filia et 
h seres 
..Wallis, 



Johannes 
Tichbome. 



.... filia et hseres 
Richardi Martin , 



Mauritius 
Tichburn. 



. . . . filia. . . 
Courthop. 



Nicholaus 
Tichborn. 



Martinus 

Tichbome, 

s. p. 



Richardus — 
Tichborn. 



. . filia . . 
Suliard. 



Johannes = 
Tichborn, 
2 filius. 



. . . flliae .... Wolfe, 
de Ashington. 



Margareta, ux: 
Bertrami Calthorpe. 



Maria, ux: . . relicta = Mauritius 
Tho: Potter. . . Segrave. Tichbome, de 
comit: Southt: 
filius et heres. 



Jan a, fll: 

Tho: Chaloner, 

de Lindfield, 

in co: Sussex, 



Johannes 

Tichbome, 

fll: 2, duxit 

Doratheo, filise 

Tho: Chalinor. 



Maria, 
filia.... 
Somers. 



• Franciscus = 

Tichbome, 

de Eatonbridge. 

1 fil. 



Johanna, 

filia.... 

Posier, de 

Eatonbridge, 



Richardus Tichbome, 

de Eatonbrldge, in 

Kent, 2 fil. 



Alicia, fll: 
Wenborne, 
de Wakhurst, 
in Sussex. 



Maria, 
ux: 1 



renupta. 

.... White, 

rectori 

eccl: de 

Hollingburne. 



Sarah, Maria- Franciscus, 2. Richardus. Maria, nupta Johannes = Amia, filia Alicia, 

ob. infans. 3. Robertus. HugoniWaffe, Tichbome, Nicholai nupta. 

4. Franciscus, de London. de Rigate, Rowley, 

s. p. aurifabro. in Surrey. de Horley, 

5. Thomas, a° 1623, in co: Surrey. 



Sined by John Tichborne. 



%\t Bhxtuhtt of Swng, 

Made A° 1623 by SAMUELL THOMPSON, Windsor Herauld, 

AND 

AUGUSTYNE VINCENT, Rougcroix, 

Marshalls and Deputies to Win. Camden, Esq., Ctamiceux King-of- Amies. 



EDITED BY 
JOSEPH JACKSON HOWARD, I,L.D, 



VOL. II. 



SJIciw. 




Edward Alleyn, of 
Willen, in the 
County of Buckingham. 



Margaret, da: of John 

Townley, of Townley, 

in com: Lancast: 



John Allen, - 
of London. 



John Allen, 
died issuelesse. 



Edw: Alleyn, Esq., M r of ; 
his Ma tics Game of Bulls, 
Bears, and Mastive Dogges, 
and founder of the Colledge 
of Godsguift, in Dulwiche, 
in the County of Sun- 
now living a° 1623. 



: Joane, da: of 

Phillip Henslow, 

Gentleman Sewer 

of his Maties Chamber 

who died 28 June 

(April, Harl. 1561) 

a° 1623, & buryed 

in the Colledge at 

Dulwich. 



William. 
Olliver. 



Percivall. 



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Robertus Litton de = 
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Robertuo Litton, de = Katharina, filia . . 



Feltham, in Suff: 



Dade, de com: Suff: 



Robertus Litton, 

de Wallington, 

in com: Suit: 

ar: a" 1623. 



= Alicia, 
filia Willi 
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in Suit: 



Eliz: uxor 
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de Ratlesden, 
in Suff: gen: 



Anna, ux: 
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ad legem. 



Brigitta, nupta 

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Chatesam, in Suff: 



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VKntnelL 




1 Wyvt.ll, 2 Pigolt, 3 Fitz Randolph, 4 Scroop, 5 Nevill, 6 Nevill, 7 Buhner, 
8 Middleham, 9 Glanvill, 10 Clavering, ]1 Montague, 12 Graudison, 13 Tregoz, 
14 Ewyas, 15 Monthermer, 16 Francis, 17 Holland, 18 Zouche, 19 Woodstock, 
20 Wake, 21 Brewer, 22 Stutevill, 23 Inglethorpe, 24 Delapole, 25 Bradatone, 
26 Burgh, 27 Tiptoft. 



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This Pedigree was thus testified : This is the lineall descent of Robert Kemp, of 
Uissing, in the county of Noiff: Esquier, according to the last Visitacon taken l>y 
William Hervy, Clarencieux King of Armes. In witnes whereof I have Sett to 
my hand, 

Rob: Cooke, alias Clarencieux 
Roy d'Armrs. 



|Ump. 



Ed'rus Hastings, miles = 



I 

Fhilippus Hastinges = 



Alanu.s Kempe = Isabella, filia Philippi 
Hastings, militis. 



Will'iis Buttevilein, de Cottesbrook, =■ 
in co: North'ton. • 

Robertas Duke, = Juliana Buttevilein, 



de Brampton, 
in Suff: 



consang: et una hscred. 
W'mi Buttevilein. 



Johannes Kempe,— Alicia, soror et hseres 
de Weston, ar. Walteri Duke. 



Walterus Duke, 
obijt s. p. 



2 Johannes Robertus Kempe, = Maria, filia Barthi White, Anna, uxor Willielmi Loveday, 

Kempe. de Weston, ar: de Shatiham. de Norwich. 



Galfridus Kempe, de Weston, = filia Sherington, de Cranworth, 
ar; co: Norff 



Robertus Kempe, de Weston, — Elizabetha, filia Curson, de 
ar: Stonton, in co: Suff: 



I 

Edm'us Kemp, 

de London, 

fil: 2. 



Eliz: fil: Johannis— Robertus Kempe, = Anna, filia Clifford, 



Apleyard, 

de Braknash, 

in Norff: 



de Gissinge. 



de Kent, ux: 2. 



I 

Johannes 

Kempe, 

fil. 3. 



Anna, ux: 
Rici Bacon. 



Elizab: fil: 
Edmundi 

Smithwin, 
de com: 
Berks. 



Elizabetha, 
obijt virgo. 



Maria, ux: 
Tho: Jernegan, 
de com: Suff: 



Barth's = Anna, filia 



Kempe, 
fil: et hser. 



Johis Allen 

de Burgo 

s'ci Edmundi 



2 Lodovicus Margar: ux: 
Kempe. Rob: Blener- 

hanstt , de 
com: Warr: 



I 

Robertus 

Kempe, 

de Gissing, 

in Noiff: 

fil: et h: 



= Elizab: fil: 

Edmundi 

Gray, de 

Morton, 

uxor 2. 



2 Willielmus. 

3 Anthonius. 

4 Edward us. 



Elizabetha, ux: 

Leonelli 

Throckmorton, 

de Flixton, 

in Suff: 



I 

Barth's 

Kempe, 

de 

London, 
fil: sextus. 



5 Franciscus. 



Barbara, 

fil: 
Sharpe, 

de 
London. 



I 

Richardus 

Kempe, 
fil: et h?er. 

Johes. 



Margareta. 
Anna. 



Thomas 
Kempe. 

Robertus. 



Willielmus. 



I 

Barth'us Kemp, 

de Croydon, 

in com: Surr: 

fil: et ha?r: 

jam superstcs, 

1623. 



Brigetta, filia Nich'us 

Johan: Adlin, Kempe, 

de London, obijt 

mercatoris. ccelebs, 



I 

Batth'us Kemp, 

fil: primogen: 

aet: )7 annorum 

tempore visitac'ois, 

1623, 



I 

Willielmus Kemp, 

fil: 2, 
fetatis 15 annorum. 



Franciscus Kemp, 
retatis 2 annorum , 




Given by Tho: Wriothsley, Garter, and Thomas Benolt, Clarenceulx, to Thomas 
Morton, of Lechlade, in the county of Gloster, Esq r , sonn of Will'm, sonn of Richard 
Morton, of St. Andrewes Milborne, in the county of Dorsett, sonn of Will'm Morton, 
brother of Robert Morton, of Morton, in the county of Nottingham, Esq r , 15 of May, 
1515. 



Iforton, 



Carol us Morton 



Robertus Morton, 
de Morton, 

in com: Nott: 
ar: a quo Morton 

de Bawtrey. 



Willielmus Morton, 

frater 

Robcrti Morton, de 

St. Andrews, Milborne, 

Alius secundus. 



Richard us Morton, de 

St. Andrews Milborne, 

in co: Dorsett. 



Willielmus Morton, 

de Cerne, 

2 fil: a quo Morton 

de Estoker. 



Johannes Morton, 
Archiepiscop: Cantuar. 



Willielmus Morton, 
filius et haeres. 



Thomas Morton, 
de Lechlade, in co: Gloucc-tr. 

a°7 H. VIII. 
obijt 25 Decembr: 8 H. VIII. 



— Margareta, filia 

et haeres 

Willielmi Woodford, 

ilc Ashby Folvillc, 

in com: Lcic. 



Robertus Morton, 
ep'us Wigoroia;. 



Robertus Morton, 

filius et haeres, 

de Lechlade. 



Johannes Morton, 

de Croydon, 

filius et haeres, 

aetatis ISannorum, 
a°9H. VIII. 



Elizab: filia 
et cohaer: uxor 
Georgii West, 

militis p'ris 

Willi Domini 

La Warr. 



Hellena, filia 

Roper, 

de com: Kant: 
attornati Regij. 



Willielmus Morton,— Margareta, 



de Deckling, 
in com: Kant: 
fil: secundus. 



filia 

.Tohannis 

Kirton. 



Margareta, 
fil: et cohaer: 

ux: 

Radi Johnson, 

de London, 

de Tisehurst, 

in Kent. 



Margareta, uxor 

Francisci Smttli, 

de Ashby Folvile, 

in com: Leic. 



Willielmus Morton, == Hellena, filia 



de Croydon, 

in com: Surr: ar: 

anno 1623. 



Tho: Shirley, 

de Croydon, 

in Surr: 



Margareta, filia et hoeres, 
uxor Johannis Mayney, 
dc Bidenden, in Kent. 



Jana, filia 
Thorn: Kirton, 

de Thorp 

Mandevill, in 

com: Nortli'ton. 



Willielmus Morton, — Maria, filia 
de Croydon, .... Savage, 

in com: Surr: ar: de Kinton, 

a° 1623. in com: Warr: 

ux: secunda. 



Thomas Morton, 
fil: 2, aetatis 
27 annorum. 



Maria, ntrpt: 
Tho: Man, 
dc London, 

haberdasher. 



Willielmus Morton, 
filius priraogen: 
aetatis 34 annor'. 



Jana, uxor 

Francisci Man, 

de London, 

mcrcatoris. 



Elizabctha. Dorothea. 



$olstor. 




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INDEX TO VOL. II. 



A. 

Agnes, the widow of William Arunclell, 

her will, 134. 
Andrewes, the Rev. Dr. Nicholas, vicar of 

Godalruing, articles against, 212, lb. 
Antiquities, collection of, contributed for 

exhibition, xii. 
Antoninus, Itinerary of; description of 

Roman stations at Dartford, Croydon, 

and Guildford, 3 
Armour, see Brass of Lord Cobham ; on 

the tomb of Sir Reginald de Cobham, 

description of, 151 
Arms of .Sir Henry Billingsley, 108 ; of 

Sir Reginald de Cobham, 151, ib. See 

Pedigrees 
Arundell, the ninth earl of, 131 ; Eleanor, 

transcript of the will of, 186 et seq. ; 

translation of, 188 etscq. 
Arundell, Archbishop, register of, at 

Lambeth ; the will of Lord and Lady 

Cobham, 141, 144 
Ashmole, Elias, two deeds executed by, 

xvi. ; his house and lands at South 

Lambeth, 18 ; deed of gift to, of the 

Tradescant Museum, 20 ; catalogue of 

.this collection, when and where published, 

20 n. ; extracts from the diary of, relating 

to the Tradescants, and to his residence 

and property in South Lambeth, 23 et 

seq. ; a bill filed in Chancery against 

him relating to the Museum, by Mrs. 

Tradescant, 23 n. ; library of destroyed, 

with his valuable collection of ancient 

and modern coins, 24 n. 
Ashmole, Matthew, lease to Mr. Warton, 

of Beverley, Yorkshire, 26 
Ashmolean Museum presented to the 

University of Oxford, 20 et seq. 
Augustine Friars, the Church of, Aubrey 

and John de Vere, his father buried in, 

154 
Austen, Mr. R. Godwin-, his remarks on the 

Monastery at Waverley Abbey, xxiv. 
Austen, Mr. E. V., appointed Secretary 

pro tern., 1. 

VOL. II. S 



B. 

Bailt, Mi\ C, read a paper on ancient 
timber houses, xli. 

Barker, Sir Edward and Lady, deed of, 
xxvii. ; Edward, pedigree of, 105 ; Susan 
and her husbands, notices relating to, 
108 

Bashall, the Rev. W., read a paper de- 
scribing the monuments in Richmond 
Church, xxx. 

Battersea and Penge, parishes of, xxvii. 

Bear Inn, at the bridge foot, desciip- 
tion of, 69 et seq. ; ballads relating to, 
72 ; mentioned by Pepys in his diary, 
ib. 

Beltz, Mr., history of the order of the 
Garter, error therein as to the marriage 
of Lord Cobham corrected, 126 

Berkeley, Thomas Lord, marriage of Joan, 
his daughter, to Lord Cobham, 125 ; 
statement of Robert Glover regardiug 
this lady corrected, ib. 

Billingsley, Susan, donor to the hospital 
of the Holy Trinity, and her two hus- 
bands, 108 et seq. 

Black, Mr. W. H., read papers on the title 
of the palace and manor of Lambeth, 
xv.; the parishes of Battersea and Penge, 
xxvii. 

Boar's Head, account of, 68 et seq. 

Bodleian Library, MS. pedigree of the 
Berkeley family, 135 

Borough, Sir Thomas, of Gainsborough, 
married Anna, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Cobham, 155 ; their descendants, ib. 

Boutell, the Rev. C, papers read by, x. — 
xv. 

Brasses, Reginald first Lord Cobham, 123; 
Isabella Cobham, 127 ; Katherine Stoket, 
129 ; Lord Cobham, 140 ; Eleanor, the 
daughter of Sir Thomas Colepeper, 146 ; 
Sir Reginald and Anna, in Lingfield 
Church, 150 

Broughton, Wilts, the manor of, 133 

Brushes, the three, or holy water sprinklers, 
Sauthwark, 77, 79 



294 



SURREY COLLECTIONS. 



Burn, Mr., Hues upon drinking bad sack 
at the George tavern, South wark, 61 ; 
the Boar's Head and the Bear inns in, 
69, 70 

Bury St. Edmunds, the Duke of Glou- 
cester murdered at, 150 



Cade, Jack, head-quarters at the White 
Hart, Southwark, 64 ; some account of 
his doings, in a letter to John l'aston, 65 

Chapman, Mr. W., read a paper upon the 
antiquities of Richmond, xxx. 

Chicheley, Archbishop, registers of, 160 

Coal Harbour, paper on the meaning of, x. 

Cobham, notices of the family of, xxx. ; 
college or chantry, founded by John 
Lord Cobham, 131 

Cobhara, of Sterborough Castle, Lingfield, 
notices of the family of, 115 ; of 
Cowling, the heiress of, married to Sir 
John Oldcastle, 117 ; the inaccurate 
account of this family given by Dug- 
dale in his Baronage, ib. ; John de, the 
common ancestor of the Kentish and 
Surrey branches of this family, 118 ; 
marriage of, ib. ; the sons of, ib. ; Sir 
Reginald, the son of, his marriage to the 
daughter of William de Evere, 119 ; 
succeeded by his son and heir Reginald, 
the first Lord Cobham, an account of, 
119 et seq. ; numerous grants to, 121 ; 
manors possesed by, ib. ; bond of 6,000 
old florins to, as a ransom for the Count 
de Longueville, 122 ; appointed to take 
an account of the slain at the battle of 
Crecy, ib. ; the death of, in 1361, ib. ; di- 
rections as to the place of his burial, 123 ; 
crest upon the helmet on which the 
knight's head reposes, ib. ; account of 
the effigy upon the tomb of, 124 ; 
mistakes as to his marriage corrected, 
125 ; the tomb of, in Lingfield College 
restored, 126 ; he left one son Reginald, 
and a daughter Joan, married to Lord 
Henry de Grey, the founder of the 
family of Grey of Codnor, ib. ; Joan 
named legatee in Lady Cobham's will, 
ib. ; the will of Lord Cobham proved at 
the Bishop of Winchester's palace, South- 
wark, 127 ; Joan, wife of Reginald first 
Lord Cobham, account of, ib. ; brass 
effigy of, preserved in Lingfield Church, 
description of, ib. ; will of, preserved in 
the register of Archbishop Wittlesey, 
128; Reginald second Lord Cobham of 
Sterborough, notices of, 132 ; summoned 
to parliament in the reign of Edward 
III., ib.; chosen to treat for peace with 



the king of France, ib. ; his marriages, 
133 ; marriage to Eleanor, the daughter 
of John Maltravers, ib.; penance inflicted 
upon, 137 ; founded the Chantry of 
St. Mary, in the parish church of 
Croydon, 139; death of, 140; inscrip- 
tion upon the tomb of, ib. ; will of, 141 
et seq. ; John de, of Hever, masses for 
the repose of the soul of, 143 ; Eleanor 
Lady Cobham, the will of, 144 et seq.; 
Sir Reginald de Cobham of Sterborough, 
an account of, 145 ; marriage of, 146 ; 
charge of the duke of Orleans, afterwards 
Louis XII., ib. ; founding the College of 
Lingfield, 149 ; death of, 150 ; will of, 
ib. ; effigy of, in Lingfield Church, 151 ; 
arms of, ib. ; inscription on the tomb of, 
152 ; the second Sir Reginald Cobham, 
knight, of Sterborough, account of, 153 ; 
knighted, ib. ; marriage of, ib. ; Sir 
Thomas of Sterborough, knight, an ac- 
count of, 154 ; married Anna Stafford, the 
widow of Aubrey de Vere, ib. ; death of, 
in 1471, ib. ; buried in Lingfield Church, 
155 ; Dame Anne, his widow, died in 
1472. buried in the same church, ib. ; 
Anna, daughter of Sir Thomas, married 
to Sir Edward Borough, of Gainsborough, 
Lincolnshire, an account of, and her 
descendants, ib. ; Eleanor, wife of Hum- 
phrey Plantagenet, duke of Gloucester, 
accountof, 157 ; a description of presents 
of gold and jewels received from, or given 
to her, 158; accused and convicted of 
certain crimes and misdemeanours, 
Hall's account of, 159; Hollinshed's 
account of, 160 ; trial of, for witchcraft, 
161 ; penance of, 162 ; imprisonment of, 
164 ; death of, in 1454, ib. ; burial of, 
166 ; notes to the pedigree of, of Ster- 
borough, 1G8 ; Joan, Lady, transcript 
of the will of, 169 et seq. ; translation 
of, 176 et seq.; Reginald, second lord, 
transcript of the will of, 183 et seq. ; 
translation of, 185 et seq. ; Cobham of 
Sterborough, notes to the pedigree of/ 
191 ; memorandum on the notices of 
the family of, 224 ; Sir Reginald, de- 
cription of, ib. ; engaged at Agincourt, 
ib. ; words in Joan Lady Cobham's 
will explained, 225. 
Coins, ancient British, found in Surrey, 

account of, 14 
College of Arms, shields of the Cobhams 

preserved at, 124 
Compton Church, visit to, xli. 
Cooper, Messrs., Athenae Cantabrigienses, 

notes therein upon Whitgift, 200 
Cooper, Mr. W. D., additional note on 
the deed relating to John Evelyn, 113 ; 
on Sir Reginald de Cobham, 224 



INDEX. 



295 



Corner, Mr. G. R., papers read by, xvi., 
xxi., xlii. ; his letter on Elias Ashmole, 
his house arid lands, 18 ; papers on some 
of the ancient inns of Southwark, 50 

Courtays, Reginald, marriage of, 143 

Courtney, Archbishop, register of, 136 

Crecy, account of the name and rank of 
those who were slain at the battle of, 
1-22 

Crowhurst, Church and monuments, xli.; 
Place, visit to, xli. 

Croydon, meeting of the Society at, ix., x. ; 
architectural notices of the Hospital of 
the Holy Trinity, x. ; monuments in the 
church of, ib. ; brasses in the vicinity, 
ib. ; notices of, xxi.; St. Mary's Chantry 
founded by Lord Cobham, 139 

Cucking-stool made for the parish of 
Kingston, account of, 91 



D. 

D mPMABTIW, Count de, made prisoner at 

Poictiers, 122 
Dethick, Sir W. Garter, grant to Whitgift 

of arms, 198 
Du«dale's Baronage, inaccurate account 

of the family of Cobham, 117 ; his 

account of Joan, daughter of Sir T. 

Berkeley, the wife of Lord Cobham, 125 



E. 

Eduxbridge, water-mill at, 131 

Edward the Black Prince, committed to 
the care of Lord Cobham, 120 

Epaticcus, coins of, 16 

Evans, Mr. J., read a paper on flint imple- 
ments, xli. 

Evelyn, John, deed relating to, 45 ; addi- 
tional note upon, 113 



Farley Heath, gold coins found near, 16 
Faruham Castle, meeting at, xiii. ; notices 

of, xv. ; antiquities of, parish registers 

of, notices of the, xxiii. 
Fastolf, Sir John, Knt., presentation of 

the Boar's Head, Southwark, to Mag- 
dalen College, 68 
Ferrers, Robert de, 133 
Field, the Rev. W., paper read by, x. 
Fitz-Alan, Sir J., marshal of England, 

shipwrecked, 133 ; his parentage, 134 ; 

extracts from the will of, ib. 
Flint implements found in the drift, xli. 
Flower, Mr. J. W., papers read by, x. — xv., 

xxi., xxvii. — xxx. ; on an ancient deed 



relating to the Hospital of the Holy 
Trinity in Croydon, 99 et seq. ; on the 
family of Cobham, of Sterborough Castle, 
115 ; memorandum on the latter, 224 

French, Mr. G. R., read a paper on Crow- 
hurst Church and monuments, xli. ; his 
note on a passage in Joan Cobham's will, 
225 

Fythlyng, Amand, canon of St. Paul's, 
132 

G. 

Garter, Knight of the, Lord Cobham 

elected, 121 ; John, the ninth earl of 

Arundell, 134 
George Inn, Southwark, account of, 60 ; 

tokens of, ib. ; destroyed by fire, 61 
Glover, R., notices of the family of 

Cobham, 130 
Godalming Almhouses and Chapel, visit to, 

xli. ; a paper upon the church of, ib. ; 

vicar of, and his parishioners in 1640, 

210 etseq. 
Green Dragon Inn, in Southwark, reference 

to, in the will of Joan Cobham, 149 
Grey of Codnor, the founder of the family 

of, 126. 
Grey Friars, the chronicle of, mentions a 

deed of violence committed by Cade and 

his followers at the White Hart Inn, 66 
Griffith, Mr. W. P., papers read by, x., 

xiii. 
Guildford, visit to St. Nicholas Church 

and St. Catherine's Chapel, xxxix. 
Guildhall, records of the proceedings under 

the Fire Act, preserved at, 62 



H. 

Haixes, Mr., description of the brass of 
Lady Cobham in Lingfield Church, 128 

Harleian MSS., notice of the will of 
Lady Cobham, 128 ; pedigree of the 
Cobham family, 135 

Hart, Mr. W. H., papers read by, xvi., 
xxiii. — xxvii. — xxx., xxxix., xli. ; on the 
Churchwardens' account and other re- 
cords relating to the parishes of Seal and 
Elstead, 27 ; on a deed relating to John 
Evelyn, 45 ; notes from the parish regis- 
ters of Richmond, Kingston, and Peter- 
sham, 82 et scg. 

Hatcham, manor of, history of, xvi. 

Heales, Mr. A., read a paper on Godalming 
Church, xli. 

Higham, in Kent, the prioress of, 132 

Hyde, abbot of, Tabard Inn the property 
and residence of, 52 ; two tenements in 
Southwark conveyed to, 52 n. 



296 



SURREY COLLECTIONS. 



I. 

iNQuismnNEs tost mortem, the death of 
Elizabeth, the widow of Fulk le Strange, 
133 



Johnson, Mr. W., read a paper, x. 

K. 

Kennington, royal manor of, xxvii. 

King, Mr. T. W., York Herald, pedigree of 
E. Barker and description of the armorial 
bearing of, 102, 105 ; notices relating to 
Mrs. Susan Barker, 108 et seq. ; descrip- 
tion of Whitgift's arms, 198 et seq. ; an 
augmentation to the arms of Archbishop 
Parker and crest to his son, 203 et seq. 



Lambeth Palace, MSS. and records in 
palace and manor of, descriptive sketch 
of the, xv. 

Lancaster College, St. Paul's Churchyard, 
founded by John of Gaunt, 103 

Langley Burrell, the church of, masses to 
be said there for the soul of Sir John de 
Cobham, 131 

Laud, Archbishop, passages in the life of, 
xv. ; MS. diary of, xxvii. 

Lewes, the priory of, burial of Sir John 
Pitz-Alan, 134 ; the burial of Lady 
Cobham, 144 

Library of the Society, contributions to, 
xv., xviii., xxix. 

Lingfield, meeting at, xli. ; the church of, 
tomb of Lord Cobham, 123 ; description 
of the effigy upon, 124 ; founding of the 
college and the church, built by the 
grandson of the first Lord Cobham, 1431, 
126 ; account of the brass effigy of Joan, 
the wife of the first Lord Cobham, 127 
et seq. ; burial of Lord Cobham, 140 ; 
brass of Eleanor, the daughter of Sir 
T. Colepeper, 146 ; stall-work in, 149 ; 
founding of the college of, ib. ; burial of 
Sir Reginald Cobham, 150 ; brass of, 
and Anne, ib. ; details of the tomb of, 
152 ; burial of Sir T. and his wife, 154 

Long, Mr. H. L., paper read by, xxiii. 

Longueville, Count de, ransom of, 122 

Loseley Hall, visit to, xxxix. ; MSS. and 
estate of, xli. 

M. 

Mare, Sir J. de, masses for the repose of 

the soul of, 131 
Masses, account of, 143 



Martin, H. Fitz-, customs of the town of 
Southwark granted to, by Henry III., 53 

Mayhew, the Rev. S. M., his paper on 
Newdigate church and parish, xxxix. 

Milford, the Rev. R. N., papers read by, 
xv., xxiii. 

Monumental brasses, x. 

Museum, temporary, formed at the follow- 
ing places, and list of antiquities exhi- 
bited : — Farnhain, xxiv. ct seq.; upwards 
of 2,000 persons visited, xxv. ; Kenning- 
ton, xxvii. et seq. ; Richmond, xxxi. et seq. ; 
Reigate, xxxviii. 



N. 

Newdigate church and parish, notices of, 
xxxix. 

Nicolas, Sir Harris, Testamenta vetusta, 
notices of Lady Cobham 's will, 128 ; 
abstract of the will of Cardinal Beaufort, 
143 ; of the will of Eleanor, Lady Cob- 
ham, 144 

O. 

Oiikesden, in Kent, the manor-houses of, 

119 
Orleans, the Duke of, imprisonment of, 

147 ; poems composed by, 148 



P. 

Parker, Matthew, Archbishop, augmenta- 
tion to the arms of, 203 ; original grant, 
205 ; pedigree of, and family, 209 

Parker, Sir J ohn, grant of a crest to, 204 ; 
original grant, 206 

Paston, John, letter to, with some account 
of Cade's doings in Southwark, 65 

Patent Rolls, bond of Count de Longueville 
to Lord Cobham, 122 ; endowment of 
Lingfield College, 152 

Patent Letters, imprisonment of Eleanor, 
wife of Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, • 
164 

Pedigrees of Edward Barker and Susan 
his wife, 105 ; Cobham of Sterborough, 
191 ; Whitgift, Archbishop, 202; Parker, 
Archbishop, and family, 209 

Pedigrees and Arms of the following per- 
sons in Appendix : — Abbot of Guildford, 
Alleyn, Banestor, Benet, Bradbridge, 
Brereton, Bynd, Burton, Clifton, Cole, 
Drake, Farraut, Finch, Garthe, Harris, 
Hobbes, Kemp, Knightley, Litton, Lloyd, 
Moxton, Parkhurst, Polsted, Sinithe, 
Thurland, Tichborne, Tin-ell, Tons tall, 
Waterer, Wyvell. 

Penance of Lord and Lady Cobham, 137 



INDEX. 



297 



Perceval, Mr. C. S., bis notes to the 
Cobham pedigree, 191 ; Whitgift Gather- 
ings, 195 ; memorandum on the notices 
of the family of Cobham, 224 

Pickwick Papers, some account of the 
White Hart Inn, 67 

Pocock, Mr. W. W., paper read by, xvi. ; 
his description of a Roman pavement 
found at Walton Heath, 1 

Poictiers, the battle of, Lord Cobham saves 
the life of the king of France at, 120 

Proceedings of the Society during the years 
1856 to 1863, ix. to 1. 

R. 

Reigate, visit to the church of, Chipstead 
Church, and Gatton Hall, xxxv. ; the 
Priory oak chimuey-piece from Nonsuch 
at, and the baron's caves, xxxviii. ; no- 
tices of the library, examples of early 
binding from, xxxix. ; gold coins found 
at, 16 

Richardson, Mr. H. S., on examples of 
early bindings, xxxix. 

Richmond, local antiquities of, monuments 
in the church, and the parish registers, 
xxx. ; notes on the parish registers of, 
likewise Kingston and Petersham, 82 

Rochester, the church of St. Andrew, 
134 ; bridge, 100 marks for the rebuilding 
of, 1 38 

Roman pavement, &c, found at Walton 
Heath, account of, 1 ; town residence, 
description of, 8 

Rymer's Fcedera, petition of Reginald Cob- 
ham, respecting the custody of the Duke 
of Orleans, 147 

S. 

St. Mart Oveey, burial of Lady Cobham 

in, 129 
St. Mildred's Court, meeting at, xliii. 
St. Saviour's Church, architectural notices 

of the nave, xxi. 
Sass, Mr. H. W., elected honorary secretary, 

xxxvii. ; resigned, xliv. 
Seal and Elstead, churchwardens' accounts, 

27 
Seals, official, of Sir G. Dethick Garter, 

204 ; Robert Cooke Clarenceux, official 

and private, ib. 
Segar, Sir W., mistake in his pedigree cor- 
rected, 125 ; MS. baronage account of 

the family of Cobham, 152 
Shakespeare's account of Eleanor, wife of 

Duke Humphrey of Gloucester, in Henry 

VI., 167 
Smith's Close and other lands in South 

Lambeth, lease and release of, 19 
Smyth's Lives of the Cerkeleys, 135 



South war k, account of ancient inns in, 50 ; 
fire of, 62 ; records of the proceeding 
under the Fire Act, ib. ; St. George's 
legacies to the prisoners there, 129; Lady 
Cobham's house in, 132 

Stafford, the earl of, 133 

Steinman, Mr., history of Croydon, 201 

Sterborough Castle, xlii. 

Stoket, Katherine, legacy to, 129 ; notices 
of the family of, 130 

Stow, John, names of the inns in South- 
wark, 50 ; description of the Tabard 
sign, 58 ; George Inn described, 60 ; of 
the White Lion as a gaol, 74 ; Margery 
Gurdemayne, a witch of Eye, her trial, 
161 ; also of Eleanor, wife of Duke 
Humphrey, 162 

Strange, John le, of Blackemere, 133 

Streatham, antiquities of, x. 

Streburgh or Steresburgh, afterwards cor- 
rupted into Starborough Castle, xlii. — ■ 
120; sold to Sir Thomas Richardson, 156 

Surrey, monumental brasses of, x. ; genea- 
logical aud heraldic memoranda relating 
to, edited by Mr. W. H. Hart and Mr. 
J. J. Howard, Appendix 

Surrey Archaeological Society, its meetings 
and proceedings at Croydon, ix. et seq. ; 
Lambeth, xii. ; the Deepdene, xvii. ; 
Southwark, xx., xxi. ; Farnham Castle, 
xxi. et seq. ; Kennington, xxvii. ; Rich- 
mond, xxviii. ; Reigate, xxxv. ; Loseley, 
xxxix. ; Lingfield, xli. ; Lambeth Palace, 
1 ; Farnham Castle, 27 ; Southwark, 
50 ; Richmond, 82 

T. 

Tabard Inn, Chaucer's description of, 51 ; 
Henry Bailly the host of, 53 ; description 
of, and his wife, 54 ; Mr. Speght's de- 
scription of, 59 ; views of, in the Mirror, 
ib. 

Thomas's Hospital, St., legacies to the 
priests and sisters of, 129 

Three Brushes Tavern, Southwark, token 
of, 79 

Tradescant, John, museum formed by, at 
South Lambeth, 20 ; extracts from the 
diary of Elias Ashmole relating to, 23 

U. 

Urban VI., Pope, petition to, 136 ; and 
bull of, relating to Lord and Lady Cob- 
ham, ib. 

V. 

Vere, John de, and Aubrey de, beheaded 

in the reign of Edward IV., 154 
Vericus, coins of, found in Surrey, 15 
Vincent's, MS. Baronage, account of the 
family of Sir Reginald de Cobham, 152 



298 



SURREY COLLECTIONS. 



W. 

Wale, Sir T., decease of, 1352, 121 

Walton Heath, remains of a Roman villa 
at, xvi. ; description of Roman pave- 
ment upon, 1 

Waverley Abbey, the monastery of, xiv. 

Wayferar, Mr. Parson, of Compton, 218 

Webb, Mr. G. B., late secretary, decease 
of, xxxv. 

Westall, Mr. E., paper by, x. 

Westminster, St. Stephen's Chapel, inquiry 
at, 160 

Whitboum, Mr. R., his paper on ancient 
British coins found in Surrey, 14 

White Lion, the Crown and Chequers, &c, 
73 ; afterwards a prison, 74, 80 



White Hart Inn, account of, 64 et seq. 
Whitgift Gatherings, 195 ; seal of, ib. ; 

sign&t, 197 ; arms, ib. ; autograph, 201 ; 

pedigree, 202 
Wickham, William of, extract from the 

register of, 143 
Wills, transcripts of Joan Lady Cobham, 

169 ; translation, 176 ; Reginald, second 

lord, 183 ; translation, 185 ; Eleanor 

Arundell, 186 ; translation, 188 
Wilts, manor of Langley Burrell, purchased 

by Joan, daughter of Thomas Lord 

Berkeley, 1 25 ; a different account of, 

by Smyth, ib. 
Winchester, lord bishop of, address of, at 

Lambeth Palace, xiii. et seq. 
Wrokwardyn, Salop, the manor of, 133 



END OE VOL. II. 



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weSEM 



sftra 



%m 



rn 



ass 



Mb 



as 



&6& 



m 



BBHL 



«Btt 



■ 



Mm