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ilLlNOlS HISTORICAL SURVEY 



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SCENE I?« KRAPE PARK 



Survey 



oj the 



City 



of 



Freeport 



Freeport 
Chamber of Commerce 



JANUARY 1825 



Illinois 



.Qie 



33 f 



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NEW HIGH SCHOOL— TO BE COMPLETED SEPTEMBER, 1926 



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INTRODUCTION 

nS SUR\'EV is an exact and accurate presentation of conditions existing 
January 1st, 1925. 

It is a worthy expression of the character of our people. 
The circle map, with Freeport as the center, shows a territory embrac- 
ing a population of 52,000,000. The large map shows industrial possibilities. 

Please note our shipping facilities. Direct line to New Orleans and St. Louis tap- 
ping the coal fields with a short haul. 

Direct lines Southwest, West and Northwest. 

Three direct lines to the East. These lines strike the Chicago Belt line many 
miles from the city proper facilitating shipments. 

Two lines to Milwaukee. W'hen the Ocean \\'aterway is completed this makes us, 
to all practical purposes, a Lake Port. 

Our financial interests are graphically shown by the Bank statements. 
Our committee organized a Credit Extension which extends financial help to in- 
dustries in the form of a loan. This organization receives recommendations from our 
organization, acting independently. Loans are never made to other than going concerns. 
Labor conditions in Freeport are ideal. \\'e supply labor of the very highest 
class — home owners — loyal Freeporters. 

Living conditions, we think, are better here than any place in America. 

We are surrounded by one of the very best agricultural countries in the world. 

^■^ The History of Freeport shows the type of our citizenship — every phase of our civic life 

nji is shown in the various articles in the Survey. Socially, we have everything the large 

r*^ city has. We are a friendly people, a contented people, a ])rosperous people. Freeport 

and all of the people in our district, through this Survey, invite you to come and see us. 

Our slogan — "Freeport is our home — make it vour home" comes from the heart. 

1^ For further information address, 

^ THE FREEPORT INDUSTRL\L COMMITTEE 

Freeport, Illinois 



Page Two 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 




ON GRANT HIGHWAY AND A. Y. P. TRAIL 

Opened to the Public 
January 15th, 1925 



FREEPORT. ILLINOIS 



J^uropean. Jjcm. 




S.L.FRIEDLYLProp 
FREEPdRTjLL. 



THE SENATE HOTEL 

A GOOD HOTEL— MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



M.J.OTONNELL 

Better Built Upholstered Furniture Made to Order 
FURNITURE UPHOLSTERING 



AUTO TOP WORK 

LAMP SHADES 

130 E. MAIN ST. 



NOVELTIES, ETC. 



FREEPORT. ILL. 



DRAPERIES 



14 S. ADAMS AVE. 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Three 







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CENTER STREET SCHOOL 



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Our Advertisers 

HE spirit of Freeport is best shown by the advertisements in this Survey. No ad- 
vertisement was taken with any idea of financial gain — only with the desire to make 
this Survey possible. 

The co-operation practiced by Freeport industry and business is demonstrated by 
these advertisers and each of them unite in our slogan — 

"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME— MAKE IT YOUR HOME." 

?EEjaraMaiaiajaiBM3MaiaraiaiaiaMaiaiaMaf3iaMaf3ic 




PRESENT HIGH SCHOOL 
To be Junior High When New High is Completed 



Page Four '^FREE'PORT IS OUR HOME 



STATE BANK of FREEPORT 

FREEPORT - - - ILLINOIS 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS OVER ONE HALF MILLION 

DOLLARS 



FOR MORE THAN THIRTY YEARS THIS BANK HAS BEEN CLOSELY^ 

IDENTIFIED WITH THE PROGRESSIVE INTERESTS 

OF THIS COMMUNITY 



STRENGTH SECURITY SERVICE 

The Freeport 
Building Sz Loan Association 

Is a progressive institution for the promotion of THRIFT and HOME OWNERSHIP 

It welcomes you to its membership either as an Investor cir a I.^iorrower 

Perfect Safety — Adequate Profits 

Office: 227 W. Stephenson St. Phone: Main 282 



N 



O one thing means so much to Freeport as the advancement of individual ownership of homes. 

For FORTY ONE years this Association has been helping Freeport people "Own their 

Homes." That the service rendered by this Association, to the people of the community, is a 

satisfactory one, is evidenced in its steady growth. Get acquainted with the business that is making 

Freeport a real City of Homes. 

UNION LOAN & SAVINGS ASSOCIATION 

212 West Stephenson Street 
Authorized Capital $12,000,000.00 Assets $2,620,826.41 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Five 



INDEX 



Articles 



Advertisers 



Page 

Introduction 1 

Our Advertisers 3 

Index 5 

Banks 7-9 

B. & L. Associations 9 

Post Office 9-11 

Taxation 11 

Transportation 11-13 

Fuel and Construction 13 

Water 13 

Electricity 13 

Gas 15 

Manufacturers 17 

Chanil)er of Commerce 19 

Library 19 

Telephone 21 

Police and Fire 21 

I. C. R. R 21 

Churches 23 

Frecport History 25-27 

Schools 27-29-31-33 

Old Folks Home 33 

Theatres 33 

Health 33-35 

Views of Hospitals 36 

Hospitals 35 

Civic Center 35-37-39 

Womans Club 39 

Amity Society 41 

Insurance 41-43 

Recreation 45 

Y. M. C. A 45-47 

Y. \V. C. A 51 

Agriculture 51-53 

Fraternities 53-55 

Rotary 55 

Kiwanis 59 

Parks 63 

Print eries 69 

Newspaper 69 

Circle Map 72 

Insert Map 72 



Page 

Hotels 2 

M. J. O'Connell .'.... 2 

Banks 4-6-8-iO 

Stover Steel Tank 12 

Gas Co 14 

Water Co ". ',[ 14 

Arcade Mfg ].16 

Structo ......IS 

Emmert Drug ""jg 

Western Newell ~20 

Telephone Co 20 

"Put Your Car Inn" 22 

Ford-Lutz 22 

Dodge- Miller [...; [ 24 

Johnson Oils 24 

Leader Oils ; 24 

Metal Specialties 26 

C. H. Little I!""!!I!I"!""I!!26 

Place Hardware "'26 

Sanitary Laundrv 26 

E. & W. Clothing ' 28 

Moline Plow 30 

Patterson Lumber 32 

Kuehner Furniture 32 

Walton Nephews 34 

F. A. Read Co 34 

Hildreth & Co ! J.".'.'.'.'.'..' 38 

Ridgway Electric 38 

Angelos Restaurant 38 

Farm Bureau 40 

John Schwarz & Sons 40 

John \'aupel 40 

Guyer & Calkins 42 

Swartz Mfg. . 42 

John Knobel ,'. 42 

Straub Printing 44 

Freeport Ptg. Co ..........46 

Griffith & Young ....^.'.46 

Stemper Music .'....'....46 

Wagner Ptg. Co. ...........4S 

Billerbeck Baking 48 

E. A. Blust ' ''''''^48 

Emrick & Ringer 50 

Charles Demeter 50 

A. C. Emrich 50 

Swartz & Crawford „ 52 

Freeport Paper Box "..52 

Prescott & Gochanaur 52 

Leath & Co. ^..52 

Rotary ...........54 

Moogk & Meisenbach 56 

Robert Luecke Sons 56 

W. H. Shons Co. 56 

H. H. Hineline ''56 

Kiwanis 53 

Nortridge Brush ^[.60 

Shoemaker Hatchery 60 

Chas. E. Meyer 62 

Keene Canning Co. 62 

L'nion Dairy 52 

Holtum Mfg. Co '"'62 

W'oodmanse Mfg 64 

N\'agners Ice Cream 64 

Rosenstiel Co .64 

Frcidag Mfg 66 

Lindo 66 

Sanford & Zartman 68 

Frederick Smith Co 68 

Chamber of Commerce 70 

Crum & Forster 71 

Bankers Mutual 71 

Prairie State 71 

Mid- West 71 



Page Six ' FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



Stephenson County Bank 



FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 
Established 1876— Organized as State Bank 1894 



48 YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL OPERATION 
CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS $400,000.00 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS AND TIME CERTIFICATES 

OF DEPOSIT 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 



Freeport 
Trust & Savings Bank 



THE BANK OF THE PEOPLE 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Seven 



Banks and Banking 

Bv K. H. Knowlton, Cashier Knowlton State Bank 



FREEPORT has seven Banking institutions. Best 
showing the stabihty of the financial institutions 
are the Government reports. Briefly, the totals 
of the last reports are : 

Total resources of all, approximately $10,310,000.00 

Total surplus and undivided profits 

approximately 1,341,000.00 

Estimated value of Banking Houses 

and fixtures 585.000.00 

Freeport Banks are at all times willing to heartily 
cooperate with business and industry. 

Government Reports October 10th, 1924 



FIRST NATIONAL 
Resources 

Loans and Discounts $1,707,073.68 

U. S. Bonds and Other Securities 501,835.41 

Banking Houses and Fixtures 118,878.38 

Other Real Estate Owned 17,493.66 

Cash and Exchange 647,259.52 



$2,992,540.65 

Liabilities 

Capital Stock Paid in $ 150,000.00 

Surplus and Net Earnings 449,534.23 

National Bank Notes . 98.700.00 

Deposits 2,294,306.42 



$2,992,540.65 



SECOND NATIONAL 
Resources 

Loans S 928.081.75 

Overdrafts 1.293.57 

Bonds, etc 181,760.60 

Banking House and Fixtures 165,195.82 

Other Real Estate 53,151.11 

Cash and Due from other banks 48,941.21 

Other Resources 67,311.62 



Total Resources $1,445,735.68 

Liabilities 

Capital Stock Paid in $ 150,000.00 

Surplus 50,000.00 

Undivided Profits 111,266.02 

Deposits 1,035.694.12 

Circulating Notes, etc. 98,775.54 



$1,445,735.68 



STATE BANK OF FREEPORT 
Resources 

Loans and Discounts $1,506,280.08 

Bonds and Securities 204,910.00 

Banking House and Fixtures 242,464.72 

Cash and Due from Banks 506,707.19 

Total Resources $2,460,361.99 



Liabilities 

Capital Stock Paid in $ 150,000.00 

Surplus 150,000.00 

Undivided Profits (Net) 267,560.21 

Dividends Unpaid 60.00 

Reserved for Taxes and Interest 28,000.00 

Deposits 1.864.741.78 



Total Liabilities 



$2,460,361.99 



FREEPORT TRUST AND SAVINGS 

Resources 

Loans $367,118.17 

Overdrafts 2,542.25 

Bonds 96,796.94 

Banking House and Fixtures 54,750.20 

Other Real Estate 1.000.00 

Cash and Due from Banks 140,416.29 

Other Resources 3,762.28 



$666,386.13 



Liabilities 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

Surplus 6,500.00 

Undivided Profits 15,111.50 

Deposits 539.816.18 

Reserve Accounts 4,958.45 



$666,386.13 



STEPHENSON COUNTY BANK 

Resources 

Loans on Real Estate (1) $ 221,478.75 

Loans on Collateral Security (lb) 200,835.00 

Other Loans (Ic) 581,599.45 

Overdrafts (2) 1,370.74 

U. S. Government Investments (3) 129,300.00 

Other Bonds and Stocks (4) 117,362.50 

Due from Banks. Cash and Other Cash 

Resources (7, 8, 9) 559.812.61 

Other Resources (12) 2,559.74 

Total Resources $1,814,318.79 

Liabilities 

Capital Stock (1) $ 150,000.00 

Surplus (2) 50,000.00 

Undivided Profits (Net) 222,525.68 

Time Deposits (4a) .' 778,295.82 

Demand Deposits (4b) 600,997.29 

Reserve Accounts (6) 12,500.00 

Total Liabilities $1,814,318.79 



Page Eight 'FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 



CHICAGO AVE. and MAIX STREET 



COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS BANKING 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS— INVESTMENTS 



FIRST 
NATIONAL BANK 

OF FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 
Incorporated 1864 

OFFICERS 
ADDISON BIDWELL ----- President 

JOHN BRUCE - ------ Vice President 

J. MANLEY CLARK ----- Cashier 

J. T. HINDERKS . - - - Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Edwin Hall Boyd P. Hill Addison Bidwell L. L. Munn 

John Bruce James R. Cowley J. Manley Clark 

\\\- have money to loan upon approved security at reasonable rates, issue drafts and letters of credit, 
also travelers' checks available ever\-whcre at home and abroad. 



The Knowlton State Bank 



Solicits Your Account 



We are large enough to serve you efticiently, and 
yet small enough so that your identity is not lost 
sight of and your personal interest carefull_\- guarded 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Nine 



KNOWLTON STATE BANK 
Resource* 

Loans on Real Estate (la) $306,419 72 

Loans on Collateral Security (lb) 43,705.64 

Other Loans (Ic) 38.903.69 

Overdrafts (2) 2.862.64 

U. S. Government Investments (3) 8.006.77 

Other Bonds and Stocks (4) 67.710.2^ 

Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures (S) 6.912.27 

Other Real Estate (6) 23,808.43 

Due from Banks. Cash and Other Cash 

Resources (7, 8. 9) 92.644.00 

Other Resources (12) 2.826.05 



GUARANTY TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK 



Total Resources $593,799.50 

Liabilities 
Capital Stock (1) $125,000.00 

Undivided Profits (Xet) (3) . 6.034.62 

Time Deposits (4a) 326.145.91 

Demand Deposits (4b) 135.551.80 

Due to Banks (.Ac) 1.067.17 

Total Liabilities $593,799.50 



(esources 



Loans on Real Estate (la) $ 48,050.00 

Loans on Collateral Security (lb) 85,945.00 

Other Loans (Ic) 113,545.75 

Overdrafts (2) 700.48 

Other Bonds and Stocks (4) 58,077.58 

Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures (5) 8,831.36 
Due from Banks. Cash and Other Re- 
sources (7, 8, 9) 21,909.71 



Total Resources 



Liabilities 



Capital Stock (1) 

Surplus (2) 

Undivided Profits (Net) (3) 
Time Deposits (4a) 
Demand Deposits (4b) 

Total Liabilities 



$337,059.88 



$100,000.00 

.. 10,000.00 

4,807.05 

176.270.70 

45,982.13 



$337,059.88 



Building and Loan Associations and Housing 

By Clark J. Browne 



BL'ILDIXG and Loan Associations in Freeport 
are the American, the Freeport and the Union. 
Their combined assets are approximately three 
million dollars. Almost the entire sum is 
loaned on Freeport residence property. They are all 
old and well seasoned institutions and have contri- 
buted and are contributing in the most helpful wav 
to home ownership among our people. 

While there are some minor variations in the 
workings of these three associations, the general plan 
is the same, all operating on monthly payments of 
both interest and principal, so that in a period of less 
than twelve years a debt to the Association is fully re- 
paid even at the minimum monthly payment required. 
Larger monthly payments are permitted so that the 
time of repayment of a loan is entirely within the con- 
trol of the borrower. Xot only have the Associations 
contributed to home ownership but they have made an 
important contribution to the community welfare in 
building up habits of thrift on the part of their many 
stockholders who are not borrowers. They oflFer their 
stockholders a high earning rate on their money with 
that perfect security afforded by loans on the homes 
of the people. They are well officered and directed 
financial institutions. 

It is not altogether easy to adequately state our 



housing condition. The acute shortage of houses that 
existed a few years ago is not now troubling us. We 
have not, at the present time, any excess of housing 
facilities and yet it is not impossible or even difficult 
to secure good accommodations at fair rental rates. 
These rentals run from twelve to seventy-five dollars 
per month. The iiiinimuiu rental secures the more 
undesirable properties, while the maximum figure 
named will afford a well located home with all needful 
improvements. 

I have no statistics on the percentage of home 
owners but a careful consideration leads me to be- 
lieve that from fifty to sixty per cent of our dwelling 
houses are occupied by their owners. 

Building sites exist in adequate numbers and at all 
sorts of prices, ranging both up and down from a 
thousand dollars. A reasonably good lot on a paved 
street with sewer and water can be had for a thousand 
dollars, while tliere arc many outlying lots to be had 
at a lower price, while, of course, the more choicely 
located lots run to very much higher prices. There 
has been no serious inflation of real estate values in 
Freeport and the condition of the market is, as we 
look at it, a wholesome one. 



Post Office 



By C. W. Meier, 

A Federal Building controlled by the Trea- 
sury Department houses the Post Office, the 
Postmaster being custodian of the building. 
This building also houses the United States 
District Court for Northern Illinois, Western Division. 
Value of building and grounds approximately $150,000. 



Postmaster 

Freeport, Illinois, is a first class Post Office with 
the following employees — Postmaster, Asst. P. M.. 
Supt. of Mails. 16 clerks, 19 city letter carriers, 6 rural 
carriers, 4 substitutes and 1 special delivery carrier. 

Postal receipts for the year ended Sept. 30, 1924. 
$173,036.67. 



Page Ten 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 




SECOND NATIONAL BANK 



OF FREEPORT 



; The Banli of Human Service : 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME' 



Page Eleven 



Money Order business — Fiscal year ended June 
30. 1924. 

43.756 orders issued amount- 
ing to $ 329.063.89 fees $2,734.26 

78,523 orders paid amount- 
ing to 1,142,112.75 

Total $1,471,176.64 

Fees 2.734.26 



Grand Total 



$1,473,910.90 



Register Business — Fiscal year ended June 30. 1924 

Number of articles registered 19,423 

Number delivered (approximated) 15,000 

Number handled in transit (approximated) 35,000 



Special Delivery Buainess 

Number mailed — .Approximated 20,000 

Number delivered — .Approximated 24,000 

Parcel Post Business 

Delivered by trucks — Incoming 129,384 parcels 
were delivered by truck during the year ended Sept. 
30, 1924. 9.602 of these were C. O. D. This does not 
include parcels handled by regular carriers. 

Outgoing P. P.— 

Parcels mailed annually — approximated 600,(XX) 

Parcels insured annually 50,000 

C. O. D. parcels mailed annually 20,(XX) 

This office has six numbered stations throughout 
the city where stamps are sold and money order, regis- 
ter and insured and C. O. D. business is transacted. 

In the Public Buildings Bill introduced in Con- 
gress Dec. 1924. Freeport is allotcd the sum of $100,000 
for additional ground and enlargement of buildings. 



Taxation 



By \V. H. Jenner, Secretary of Chamber of Commerce. 



COST of Government has always been a matter 
of interest to those on whose shoulders the 
cost, reflected in taxes, fall. 

The tax rate in Freeport for 1925 is 
$6,705^ per hundred dollars assessed value. 

The appraised value for tax purposes of real prop- 
erty in Ilhnois is approximately 50% or 60% of the 
fair sale value. The assessed value of real property in 
Freeport is $9,278,000 or an actual value of $30,000,000 ; 
so that the basic value for tax purposes in this city 
is the minimum and that while the tax rate is fairly 
high the actual tax paid is far below any city its size. 
The Board of Review has been practically kind 



to the manufacturer here in keeping his assessment 
down, one case in particular is a valuation placed by 
the owner of a manufacturing property of $150,000 and 
their assessment last year was $621.00. This is illus- 
trative of two facts. First, that on manufacturing and 
business property the valuations are low. Second, 
that the tax rate on these low values is very reason- 
able and that taxes in Freeport are less than other 
cities. 

Economy, therefore, in the administration of 
Government here has been compelled and this econo- 
my permits a wide latitude in making comparisons of 
other cities less fortunate in their civil administration. 



Transportation 

By W. H. Jenner, Sec'y Chamber of Commerce 



THE transportation history of Freeport, Illinois 
is in part the transportation history of the 
State and Nation. Among the pioneer rail- 
roads in Illinois, in fact the pioneer, was what 
is now the Galena Division of the Chicago & North- 
western Railway which terminates at Freeport. 
Through this line Freeport reaches Chicago, Milwau- 
kee. Minneapolis and all points on the Chicago and 
Northwestern Railway direct. 

The Illinois Central Railroad was given birth 
through an Act of Congress approved September 20th, 
1850 and accepted by the Legislature of Illinois Feb. 
17th, 1851 whereby a grant of every alternate section 
of land designated by even numbers, for six sections in 
width on each side of said railroad was made for the 
purpose of aiding the building of this railroad from 
Cairo through Galena to Dubuque with branches to 
Chicago. This main line was built through Freeport 
and later, lines were extended to Chicago, St. Louis. 
Madison and Dodgeville, Wisconsin and through 
Dubuque to Omaha, Sioux Citv, Iowa and Sioux Falls, 
S. D. 



The Illinois Central Railroad have established 
here Division Headquarters, extensive shops and yard 
facilities, an added advantage in the movement of 
freight. 

The Chicago Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway 
operate the Racine & Southwestern division through 
Freeport connecting their main line out of Milwaukee 
with their main line to Kansas City and Chicago, thus 
Freeport has direct connections by these carriers with 
all the important centers of the West. 

These railroads tap the coal fields of Northern, 
Central and Southern Illinois as well as the coal fields 
of Western Kentucky thus fuel is always obtainable at 
a minimum of cost. 

The development of the Great Lakes waterways 
project is of even greater importance to Freeport than 
to either of the great lake ports Chicago or Milwaukee 
for the reason very few manufacturing plants are 
located at a steamer's dock and practically all raw 
materials and finished products must be moved to and 
from the boat at an extra expense in switching that 
often costs more than the balance of the through rate 



Page Twelve 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



Soft Water -- No Cistern 

No Pumping Equipment or TanKs 



Stover 

Water 

Softeners 




Domestic 

and 
Industrial 



Result — Filtered, absolutely soft water 

Simplicity — Note only two valves 
MjKTate when cleansing mineral. 

No Acids or Chemicals Used — Our insolu 
1)]l- mineral lasts indelinitclv. 



Easy to Install — Only 
tions. 



two pipe connec- 



Price and Description — On application 




DOMESTIC TYPE 

SOFT WATER — Soft Water has always been in great de- 
mand in the home, in the laundry, in the factory and in 
the hotel, as well as other institutions. 

In the kitchen, soft water may be used for drinking, 

cooking and washing. Due to its being absolutely soft, 

to and odorless, it requires less time to bake, cook fruits 

and vegetables, and the natural flavor is maintained, 

also leaves no lime or other deposits on them or utensils. 

MAKES HOUSEWORK EASIER— Every household task 
is lightened— dishes wash easier and become clear and 
shiny and free from all film. Soft water cuts grease, 
keeps the hands soft through elimination of soaps and 
washing powders excessive in lye and caustics; saves 
soap. 

SKIN CLEANER AND SOFTER— For the bath, washing 
of hands and face, etc., softened water is far superior, 
being restful and soothing to the skin, also exceptional 
eieanness is immediately noticed. 

BEAUTIFUL HAIR— For shampooing, it adds lustre and 
softness to the hair. 

SHAVING — This is done more quickly and does not chap 
the skin in cold weather like hard water. Soft water 
softens — hard water hardens. 

STOP SCOURING— The noticeable high water line in the 
sinks and in the bath tub will not be present and 
scouring is done awav with. 

CLEANER CLOTHES— SOFTER HANDS— In the laun- 
dry, suit water washes the clothes to a snow white. 
Stron? cleaning soaps, washing powders, and other 
chemicals, injurious to the clothes and hands, are no 
longer needed. 

SAVES FUEL Soft Water in the heating plant reduces the amount of oil, 

Lo'il or gas required to heat, and the common scale which cakes on the water 

surfaces -ind tubes is avoided. The necessity of replacing the coils and tubes 
in furnaces and water heaters is reduced to a mmimum. 

SCALE GONE— The scale, so 
commonly noticeable in a 
tea kettle and utensils, is 
iiii loH'^er there. 

PAYS FOR ITSELF— In 

hotnes, factories, hotels, 
hospitals, etc.. where water 
is used daily for heating, 
the oil, coal or gas con- 
sumption is kept to a mini- 
mum, therefore the soften- 
er pays for itself in a very 
short time. 




VERTICLE TYPE— Single units or batteries 
as conditions require. 



HORIZONTAL TYPE— Units 
signed for use where very lai 
water are required. 



or batteries dc- 
■ge quantities of 



Stover Steel Tank & Mfg. Co. 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 



MAKE IT \OLR HOME 



Page Thirteen 



to Freeport. This gives Freeport a choice of either 
port in service with the added benefit that no part of 
the local tax for these dock developments fall on the 
shoulders of a Freeport industry. Through bills of 
lading are given from and to the plant at Freeport 
whereas no through bills of lading are issued covering 
a switch movement thus relieving the shippers here of 
hazards and delays inherent to all switch movements. 

Freeport's central location is better illustrated by 
drawing a line showing a radius of 410 miles of Free- 
port. This line, it will be observed, passes through the 
cities of Detroit, Duluth, Omaha, Kansas City, Cairo, 
Cincinnati and Toledo, Ohio. And within this radius 
are the cities of Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St. 
Paul, St. Louis with direct lines to each. (See map). 

The population of over 27,000,000 living within this 
radius demand a transportation service that Freeport 
does and can give. 



Freeport is located within and on the extreme 
northerly boundary of Central Freight Association 
territory, a decided advantage in freight rates to and 
from the East and Southeast. Rates to and from the 
South are on the same basis as in Chicago while on 
rates to the West and Southwest Freeport has an ad- 
vantage under the Chicago rates to most of this terri- 
tory. 

Freeport's proximity to the coal fields and the 
source of raw materials through her adequate trans- 
portation facilities and favorable rate adjustment 
which, together with her Central Location in the 
largest consuming market in the world, is an assur- 
ance to any industry whose product covers the field of 
normal human needs, that greater success follows its 
establishment in Freeport than in some center less 
favored. 



Fuel and Construction 



By William 

EIGHT well equipped fuel yards carry an ample 
supply on hand at all times, consisting of the 
following 1924 prices : 

4 sizes of Anthracite selling from $17.00 to $19.00 
per ton. 

3 sizes of High Grade Coke selling from $13.00 to 
$14.00 per ton. 

5 sizes of Franklin Co. Soft Coal selling from $7.00 
to $8.50. 

2 sizes of Genuine Pocahontas selling from $12.00 
to $13.00 per ton. 



Huenkemeier 

Hard and Soft Slabs and Oak Cord Wood. Spe- 
cial prices in car lots to steam users. 

There are three Lumber Yards with a combined 
stock of approximately 2'X million feet of well assort- 
ed lumber. In addition to lumber, a full line of build- 
ing materials such as brick, cement, lime, sand, gravel, 
tile, millwork is carried in stock. 

From reliable information the retail prices are as 
low if not lower than most cities of like size. 

Dealers are always pleased to give estimates on 
requirements, whether small or large amounts. 



The Freeport \( ater Company 



By W. A. 

FREEPORT'S water supply is taken from 
wells in the glacial drift and from deep wells 
penetrating St. Peter's sandstone. The exist- 
ing wells are capable of supplying over three 
times the amount of water being pumped at the 
present time. 

Freeport water is noted for its purity and at all 
times conforms to the Treasury Department standards 
for use on inter-state carriers. 

The water is treated for iron removal only, by 
areation and filtration. The Company has a stand by 
chlorinator for sterilization should any emergency 
arise. 

The rates, both domestic and commercial, are su- 
pervised by the Illinois Commerce Commission and are 
as follows : 



Hutchins, Supt. 

The first 4,000 cubic feet at $.309 per 100 cubic feet. 

The next 16,000 cubic feet at $ .15 per 100 cubic 
feet. 

All in excess of 20,000 cubic feet at $ .08 per 100 
cubic feet. 

The distribution system consists of a gridiron of 
mains in sizes ranging from 24 inch to 4 inch and over 
60 miles in length. There are over 430 fire hydrants. 

The fire protection value of the water supply is 
rated high, consequently Freeport has a low insurance 
rate. 

The Water Plant stock represents over three 
quarters of a million dollars of invested capital. It 
is owned by a private company, most of the stock 
holders being citizens of Freeport. 



Electricity 



By G. B. Fluehr, Dist. Supt. Northern Utilities Co. 



(A) Source 

SUPPLIED over three separate 33,000 volt, 60 
cycle, alternating current, transmission lines; one 
oi which is energized from Dixon, Illinois, with 
a large steam and water plant behind it. An- 
other source of supply is at Waukegan. Illinois, the 



tremendous plants of the Public Service Company of 
Northern Illinois. .\ tie-in between these two lines 
enables us to feed over two lines from Di.xon. The 
hydraulic plants in Sterling and Oregon are also con- 
nected to these lines. The third line conies in by way 
of Lena — a 33,000 volt, 60 cycle, alternating current, 



Page Fourteen '^FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

Freeport Gas Company 

IS HERE TO SERVE YOU 

DAY OR NIGHT— 365 DAYS IN THE YEAR. GAS SERVICE AVAILABLE 
FOR INDUSTRIAL PURPOSES 



''If It's done with Heat, you can do it with Gas 



1 7 



105 \V. Main St. Phone Main 67 



FREEPORT HAS BEEN OUR 
HOME FOR 42 YEARS 



The Freeport Water Company 



WE GROW WITH THE CITY— COME AND GROW WITH US 



MAKE IT ^OLR HOME 



Page Fifteen 



transmission line, where we are connected to the 
Byllesby plants at Galena and the Wisconsin Power 
and Light Company plants, both hydro-electric and 
steam, including connections with their large Kilbourn 
and Prairie Du Sac hydraulic plants. This connection 
also completes a tie-in with the Milwaukee. Wisconsin 
properties, making available any amount of power 
for this district. 

(B) Prices 

All our rates are based on load factor; that is, a 
given amount of demand will earn a certain rate in a 
given period of hours. If the hours of operation arc 
increased and the demand remains constant, the rate 
rapidly decreases ; if the hours of operation are de- 
creased and the demand remains constant, the rate 
increases. Our power rates are comparable with anv 
power rates extended in the state of Illinois. Under 
our regular rate "B" the average customer earns a rate 
in the neighborhood of four cents per kilowatt-hour. 
Under our wholesale light and power rate, the average 
customer earns a rate of slightly over two cents. It is 
possible, however, under the wholesale light and power 
rate to earn better than a one and one-half cent rate 
as several of our customers are now doing. The aver- 
age factory on nine hours operation, wholesale light 
and power rate, with 100 kilowatt demand, would earn 
about a two cent rate. The same factory on twenty- 
four hours operations would earn better than one and 
one-half cent rate. On all wholesale light and power 
contracts only one meter is installed to measure both 
light and power, but on small power installations (on 
loads of less than 100 horsepower) separate meters are 
installed for light measurement. 

(C) Terms and Conditions 

Bills are rendered monthly. 

Discount period ends the 10th of the month. 

The Company reserves the right at any time to 
require the customer to make a reasonable deposit in 
advance to secure the payment of bills. Such deposit 
is made to bear interest as provided in the receipt 
issued by the Company. 



The average power contracts may be signed for a 
year or more ; wholesale light and power contracts 
must be signed for not less than five years. 

The Company runs the service to the manufac- 
turer's building at the most convenient point and the 
customer brings the service outside of the building in 
a proper conduit entrance, having arranged a proper 
meter loop for the Company to use in installing its 
meter. The Company owns and installs meters with- 
out expense to the customer. 

All installations, where the connected load is lesj 
than one horsepower, shall be classed as lighting ser- 
vice. Motor installations of less than one horsepower 
shall be 110 volts, 60 cycle, single phase, except such 
motors as started frequently ; for example, coffee 
mills, meat grinders, pumps, etc., which motors shall 
be wound and operated at 220 volts. Installations of 
one horsepower or more shall be classed as power 
and are entitled to power rates. All installations, 
where the connected load is one horsepower or more, 
up to and including five horse power, shall be 220 
volts, 60 cycle, single phase. Where three phase ser- 
vice is available, installations of more than five horse- 
power shall be three phase. 220 volts, 60 cycle. In 
case of large installations. 440 volts or 2200 volts may 
be used, provided the customer arranges his equip- 
ment so that his total installation can be metered by 
one meter or set of meters. .All motors with a rated 
capacity of thirty-five horsepower or more shall be of 
the slip-ring or wound rotor type. 

.■Ml motors with a rated capacity of seven and 
one-half horsepower or more shall be equipped with 
low voltage release attachments and starting appar- 
atus which will disconnect such motors from the Com- 
pany's lines in case power on said line is interrupted. 
The Company agrees that one switch equipped with 
low voltage release attachments on main service shall 
be considered as fulfiUing this requirement. All mo- 
tors with a rated capacity of seven and one-half horse- 
power or more, which are to be automatically started 
and stopped, shall be of the slip-ring or wound rotor 
type and the details of the automatic equipment con- 
trolling such motors shall be approved by the Com- 
pany before such motors are connected to the Coi:. 
pany's lines. 



Freeport Gas Company 

By Wm. McMaster. Manager 

Source — Manufactured Water Gas. 

Regular or Standard Meters — 

First 5.000 cu. ft. @ $1.60 per M 

Next 5,000 cu. ft. @ 1.55 per M 

Xc-xt 15.000 cu. ft. @ 1.50 per M 

Xext 25.000 cu. ft. @ 1.45 per M 

Over 50.000 cu. ft. @ 1.40 per M 

Prepayment Meters 1.55 per M 

Minimum per meter per month, 75 cents. 

A charge of $1.00 is made for reconnecting a gas 
meter for the same consumer on the same premises 
within six months of the time it was turned off or re- 
moved : provided such suspension of service was caused 
through no fault of the gas company. 



.\ discount of 10 cents per M. cu. it. is allowed on 
all gas used through standard meters until the lOth 
of the month following the month in which the gas 
is used. 

.Appliances sold on easy terms, one-fourth cash 
down and balance in six equal monthly payments. 5% 
discount for cash in 30 davs. 



100 ft. of street main installed free for new con- 
sumer. Service pipes and connection cost is based on 
a fixed charge for a miximum length of 25 feet from 
the property line with a slight charge added for any 
excess over 25 ft. 



Page Sixteen "FREE PORT IS OUR HOME 



l\RCnDE 

MANUFACTURING 

CO. 



FREEPORT, ILL., U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 



MOULDING MACHINES 
SAND BLAST BARRELS 
FOUNDRY EQUIPMENT 



COFFEE MILLS 
MOP STICKS 

SPRING HINGES 

CAST BRASS CUSPIDORS 
DAMPERS 

REFRIGERATOR HARDWARE 



5 YEARS 



CAST IRON TOYS 
YELLOW CAB 

FORD MINIATURES 

CHEVROLET MINIATURES 
MACK TRUCK 

ANDY and CHESTER GUMP 
W. & K. TRUCK TRAILER 

McCORMICK-DEERING TRACTOR 
OLIVER PLOW 

FAGEOL COACH 



MANUFACTURING EXPERIENCE WOOD TOYS 



KKUbE 






MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Seventeen 



Manufacturers 

By W. H. Jeiiner, Scc'y Cli;iml)cr of Coninierce 



Name 

Arcade Mfg. Co. 
Duck, L. F. Mfg. Co. 
Freidag Mfg. Co. 
Freeport Paper Box Co. 
Freeport Dairy & Produce Co. 
Freeport Equipment Mfg. Co. 
Furst-McNess Co. 
Gross, L. M. Co. 
Henney & Co., John \V. 

Held, \V. .\. Co. 

Hess Manufacturing 
Holtuni Mfg. Co. 
Hoefer Mfg. Co. 
Jean Caro Products Co. 
Kautenberg Co., W. E. 
North Ridge Brush Co. 
Rawleigh, \V. T. Co. 
Ribback, Nat Co. 
Shoemaker Hatchery 

Stover Mfg. & Engine Co. 
Stover Steel Tank & Mfg. Co. 
Spinaway Boat Motor Co. 
Structo Mfg. Co. 
Swan, S. N. Co. 
Swartz Mfg. Co. 
Western Newell Mfg. Co. 
Woodmanse Mfg. Co. 
Illinois Central Railroad Co. 



Total of Employees 

375 

2 
70 
25 
28 

6 
85 
26 
SO 

25 

10 
12 
25 

10 

35 
474 
160 

10 

600 

17 
5 

76 

28 

67 

80 

57 
1200 



Article Produced 

Hardware, Toys and Foundry Equipment. 

Radio Sets, Mirrors and Silver Plating 

Toys, Golf etjuipnient and Grey iron castings 

Paper Boxes 

Butler, ice cream and dairy products. 

Barn Equipment 

Remedies, Extracts, Toiletries, Brushes 

Aprons, Bloomers, Princess Slips, Dresses. 

Hearses, Ambulances, Pleasure Cars and Commercial 

Bodies 
Bird Houses, Flower Pots, Rustic Conveniences for 

Lawn and Garden. 
Houseliold articles. 
Hardware Specialties 

.\uxiliary Drilling Heads & Special Drilling Machines 
Toys and Brushes 

Household Specialties, Toys and Games. 
Twisted Wire Brushes 
Medicinal, Toilet and Food Products 
Ladies Dresses 
Baby Chicks, Pure Bred Fowls. Operates a 30,000 

egg incubator. 
Engines, Windmills, Grinders & Hardware Specialties 
Tanks and Plate Works 
Detachable Out Board Motors 
Educational Toys and Looms 
Furniture and Radio Cabinets 
Gray Iron Pistons 
Extension curtain rods 
Wind Mills, Pumps and Tanks 



The 1923 payroll was $3,068,548. This includes the local 
here but "on the road." 



R. R. Shops but not the railroad employees residing 




-"^-^i^. 



3K':'- 




.^•^S^ 






^ 



SCENE IN KRAPE PARK 



Pagf" Eighteen 



•FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 




EDUCATIONAL TOYS 
STRUCTO ARTCRAFT LOOMS 



STRUCTO MFG. CO. 



New Industries 



Welcome 



to Freeport 



79 YEARS A DRUG STORE 



EMMERT DRUG CO 



ARTHUR A. HAAS, Pres. 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Nineteen 



Chamber oj Commerce 

By \V. H. Jenner, Sec'y 



FREEPORT Chamber of Commerce originated 
from the Citizens' Commercial Club which came 
into existence in 1885. Since that time Freeport 
has had a body functioning as a Chamber of 
Commerce in which the manufacturers, business and 
professional men have been interested and taken part. 
Practically every advance in the civic welfare of 
Freeport was initiated or aided by the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Since October 4th. I'^iO the Chamber of Com- 
merce has been governed by a Board of fourteen 
directors elected by the membership and they elect a 
president, who for the year 1924-25 is Mr. Arthur A. 
Haas, president of the Eniniert Drug Company. These 
directors serve without compensation. 

The Chamber of Commerce is a body of local 
business and professional men engaged in improving 
trade conditions, urging legislation beneficial to com- 
merce and the social welfare and most important, en- 
couraging the growth and prosperity of this communi- 
t.v. 

Some of the outstanding accomplishments of the 
local Chamber in the past have been : 

Aid in the establishment of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Shops at Freeport. 

The improvement of train service both passen- 
ger and freight. 

.■\djustment of rates to and from the East. 
Promotion of good roads. 
The county system of highway patrol. 
Promoted the Senate Hotel Corporation. 

The Chamber of Commerce helped in the organi- 
zation and establishment of the John \V. Henney 
Company, Western Xewell Manufacturing Company. 
Freeport Equipment Manufacturing Company and 
others. 

It can be said without fear of contradiction that 
Freeport holds its present commanding position in the 



business and professional world through the civic 
effort of its citizenship banded together in a unity of 
eflfort whose net result has been to make Freeport one 
of the best governed cities and a delightful place to 
live. 

Modern civilization and its complexities each day 
bring new problems to solve and their solution can 
only be accomplished with credit by the continuance 
of an energetic, militant policy and such problems 
judiciously studied and public opinion moulded. 

Without a Chamber of Commerce or some body 
functioning as such, decisions on matters of public 
interest cannot be reached. Neither can unity nor 
harmony prevail. A conmiendable spirit in the citizen- 
ship of Freeport has brought into being an organiza- 
tion that is worthy not only of support but the active 
cooperation of every citizen in the community, who 
desires to make it a leading example in like cities of 
the Nation. 

1925 Officer* 

A. .\. Haas, President. 

A. C. Enirich, 1st V. President. 

H. B. Zartnian, 2nd V. President. 

C. VV. Meier, Treasurer. 
W". H. Jenner, Secretary. 

Industrial Committee 

F. Bache Van Nuys, M. D., Chairman. 

D. F. Graham, Treasurer. 
Pres. Second National Bank. 

A. H. Steenrod, Secretary. 

Sec'y Woodmanse Mfg. Co. 
Hon. Al. N. Stephan, Former Mayor. 

Mgr. •'Put-"5c'our-Car-Inn" Co. 
C. L. Ringer, Enierick & Ringer. 
Clark Browne. 

V. Pres. Hildreth & Co. 

G. \V. Benfer, Capitalist. 



Freeport Public Library 

By Ruth P. Hughes, Librarian 



N'alue of library property — Books, $60,000 ; Furni- 
ture, $15,000; Building and grounds $50,000. 

Number of volumes — 19,750. 

Library is governed by board of directors appoint- 
ed by the city council. 

Library is supported by appropriation by the city 
council from taxes. 

Departments — Circulation, Reference, Children's. 



We have deposit stations in each school building 
and in the Lutheran and St. Mary's schools. We have 
had deposits of books in each fire station and also in 
the different factories which ask for them. We are 
a clearing house for information on almost any sub- 
ject, many days answering fifty calls from all sources. 
These calls come over the telephone. 

We also give help to out of town residents, school 
teachers, ministers and club women. 



Page Twenty 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 




Western Newell 

Manufacturing 

Company 

FREEPORT, ILL. 

Manufacturers of 

ROUND AND FLAT 
CURTAIN RODS 



Freeport's unexcelled railroad facilities enable 

us to ship direct to all points North, 

South, East or West. 



STEPHENSON COUNTY 
TELEPHONE COMPANY 



A Locally Owned Telephone System, connecting with the Long 



Distance Lines of both the Bell and Independent Companies 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Twenty-one 



Steph 



henson County 

By G. x' c: 

O ITERATES a modern featured cuiiiiium liattery 
telephone system, with hnes extending tlirough 
underground and aerial cables to all sections 
of the city. 
This entire system has been rebuilt and new 
central office equipment installed within the last four 
years. 

The value of the property used in furnishing local 
and long distance telephone service to the people 
of Freeport is approximately one million dollars. 

In the City of Freeport and the immediate rural 
community there are six thousand four hundred tele- 
phones receiving service through the Freeport Ex- 
change. 

In addition there are approximately five thousand 
teleplione stations in the small towns and rural com- 
nnniities in the County directly connected by trunk 
lines with the Freeport Exchange. 



Telephone Company 

annon, Supt. 



Every telephone connected witli this system is a 
long distance telephone and can be connected with any 
other of the more than fifteen million telephones in 
the seventy thousand communities in the United 
States and Canada by means of the Bell and Inde- 
pendent long distance lines. 

An average of forty two thousand (42,000) local 
telephone messages a day are bandied througli the 
Freeport Exchange. 

Four hundred long distance messages are originat- 
ed and approximately the same number come into 
Freeport each business day. 

The telephone system is owned and operated ex- 
clusively by Freeport people who take pride in 
furnishing to the community the best and cheapest 
telephone service that can be found in any Cit.v of 
similar size in this Great Middle West. 



Total employed in the Police Department, 15. 

One Chief of Police. One Patrol Driver. 

One Ass't Chief of Police. One Motorcycle Officer. 
Two Desk Sergeants. Nine Patrolmen. 

Police Pension Fund. 



Departnient of Police 

George C. Donstad, Chief 



Total in Police Pension Fund $9,486.23 Dec. 1st, 
1924. 

One olficcr drawing pension $82.50 per month. 

Ambulance Service. The city of Freeport has the 
best Ambulance Service in the country bar none. We 
average thirteen ambulance calls per month. 



THERE are three stations, twenty-three fire- 
men, chief, assistant chief, three captains and 
one lieutenant. Gamewell fire alarm system, 
430 hydrants, pumping capacity 10,000,000 gal- 
lons daily, average pressure of 75 pounds. 

1923 Fire Loss $20,866.75 

1923 Alarms 307 



Fire Department 

By E. T. Nolan, Chief 

Equipment 

Three combination Scagrave Trucks, one 75 foot 
aerial truck, one triple combination truck automatic 
hoist and ladders. 

The Department makes monthly inspection of 
business and manufacturing districts. 



Illinois Central R. R 



By W. S. Williams, Gen'l 

F FREEPORT is fortunate in being served by one 
of the principal railroad systems of the country 
— the Illinois Central, which operates through 
eighteen States of the Union, touching such im- 
portant commercial centers as Chicago, Sioux City, 
Omaha, St. Louis, Memphis, Birmingham, New Or- 
leans, and many other large cities. From Freeport 
alone this line operates in five directions, affording 
e.xcellent outlet for the business of the city. 

Freeport is not only a division point on the Illinois 
Central, but there is also located here one of the 
largest machine and car shops on the system, to which 
113 locomotives are assigned, and where an average 
of 2,071 freight cars are given light, medium and heavy 
repairs each month. These shops alone employ 506 
skilled and common laborers. 

In addition to the large shops at Freeport, tlicr 
is also an extensive train yard, where trains are mad 
up and dispatched north, east, south and west. During 
the year 1923 there were 19,266 freight and jiassenger 



Supt. Western Lines 

trains dispatched from Freeport. 

There are 661 other employes of the Illinois Cen- 
tral living in Freeport, making a total of 1,167 em- 
ployes at this point, 461 of whom own their homes. 
To these employes the Illinois Central paid out 
through the Freeport office in 1923 $2,097,925.80 in 
wages, in addition to which over a quarter of a million 
dollars was paid out for material and supplies dis- 
bursed. 

The freight and passenger train service on the 
Illinois Central in all directions from Freeport is un- 
excelled, and this company has an enviable reputation 
for on time operation of trains, as well as for the 
quality of service rendered industries located on its 
line. 

Freeport is blessed with an abundance of Water 
for industrial purposes, and is only a short distance 
from the coal fields. There are many desirable loca- 
tions available for all kinds of industries and those 
seeking locations for industrial plants would do well 
to look over the opi)ortunitics afforded at Freeport. 



Page Twenty-two '^FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



GREETINGS BY 



"PUT-YOUR-CAR-INN" 



FIRE PROOF AUTO STORAGE 
OILS 
RADIO GASOLINE 

EQUIPMENT WASHING 

AND ELECTRICAL REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES 

SERVICE IGNITION SERVICE 

GENERAL SERVICE 

AL. STEPHEN, Manager. 

W. L. KARCHER, M. D., Treas. \T Ti J "nv 1 

F BACHE VAN NUYs, M D . Pres Van Bureii and Douglas 



LUTZ MOTOR COMPANY 



SELLS 



^^k)7Hi^ 



PRODUCTS 

AND 



BOOSTS FREEPORT 

Opp. Court House Main 1470 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Twenty-three 



Freeport Churches and Their Activities 



By Rev. R. E. Chandler 



All have aid, mi 

Name Members 

First M. E. 700 

Embury 820 

First Presbyterian 500 

Second Presbvterian 595 



First English Reformed 150 

German Reformed 187 

St. John's Evangelical 500 

Oak St. Evangelical 363 

Trinity Evangelical 265 

English Lutheran 300 

Immanuel Evan. Luth. 420 
(Mo. Syn. Luth.) 

Evan. Lutheran of 145 

the Redeemer 

Grace Episcopal 300 

Baptist 504 

Brethren 66 

United Brethren 235 

Cent. Methodist 70 

Christian 55 

4 Catholic 2760 

Free Methodist 40 

Baptist (Colored) &4 

Meth. (Colored) 50 
Christian Science 



sionary. Sabbath School, etc 
Property Values 

S 75.000 



100.000 
200,000 

60,000 



35,000 
10,000 
55,000 
25,000 
30.000 
60,000 
125,000 



20,000 

75,000 
69,000 
20,000 
25,000 
15,000 
5,000 
275,000 

5,000 
5.000 

15.000 



including Men's Bible Classes. 
Activities 

7 local preachers doing work in the community and country. 
Mission study classes, 2 Epworth Leagues. 

Choir Classes, Pageantry. Epworth League, Mission Study. 

Mission study, teacher training, music instruction in chorus 
choirs, men's class, women's organizations. 

3 Men's Bible Classes, 3 C. E. Societies, 1 Young Men's Lead- 
ership Class, 1 Teacher's Training Class, Mission Study 
Classes. 

Athletics, 2 Boys Basket Ball Clubs, 1 Girl's Basket Ball club. 

C. E. Society. 

Teacher Training Class. 

Class in Study of Religion. 

Children's Mission Band. 

Parochial School 8 grade course. Moving pictures, Bowling, 
Pool, etc., in school building which serves as a Parish 
Centre. Stage, etc., for dramatics. 

Men's Club, Y. P. Society, Girls Choir. 

3 Ladies Guilds, Boys & Girl's Organizations. 
Mission Study Classes, Brotherhoods, Music Class. 

C. E. Society Guild. 

Parish Welfare Societies, Care of Poor, Social and Athletic 
Activities. Two Parochial Schools. 

Industrial, Domestic Science. Athletics and Scout classes. 

First Church of Christ Scientist of Freeport. 




HARLEM SCHOOL 



Page Twenty-four 'FREEPORT IS OUR HOM E 



Dependable 

First, last, and always we are Dodge Brothers Dealers in this territory — loyal to their high 
standards — faithful to their sound principles of doing business. 

We sell transportation. That means dependable new cars, 
, dependable used cars, and dependable service. 

A new car is as good as the manufacturer who builds it. A 
used car is as good as the dealer who sells it. 

Our new location in the only modern garage building in Freeport assures you of our per- 
manency. 

We want your business. 

M. L. Miller Sales Co. 



PHONE MAIN 830 



PENNZOIL 

SUPREME PENNSYLVANIA QUALITY MOTOR OIL 

THREE UNIFORM GRADES GASOLINE FROM ONE INDEPENDENT 
REFINER OF GARBER CRUDE. NO BETTER SOLD ANYWHERE 

JOHNSON HIGH TEST OIL COMPANY 

FREEPORT, FORRESTON AND WINSLOW, ILLINOIS 



GASOLINE 

and MOTOR OBLi 

THE BEST THAT CAN BE MADE 

LEADER PETROLEUM COMPANY 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 




MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Twenty-five 



History of Free port 

By Prof. L. A. Fulwidcr 



AMONG cities of 20,000 to 30,000. Freeport is not 
just another city — it is exceptional — it is dif- 
ferent. Here is a city that has a most fiir- 
tunate geographical location, a population of 
unusually high character, a steady progress in busi- 
ness and industries, far above the average in schools 
and churches, in pul)lic parks and social qualities, civic 
organizations and withal a genuine, wholesome spirit 
of cooperation and loyalty. Everybody likes Free- 
port. It is diflferent, as is told by its history. 

Following the buflfalo. the Indian and the lead 
miners came the first settler to Stephenson County 
to build his cabin near Waddams in 1833. Waddams 
was a typical pioneer. He first built a home in Ohio, 
then in Southern Indiana, and for a lime lived in 
Peoria. Galena. ShuUsburg. Apple River, and at the 
age of 47 the attractive environs of Stephenson 
County ended his roving and here he lived till death. 
Two years later in December 1835. William Baker 
built the first home in Freeport, on the banks of the 
Pecatonica, near the present site of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Station. Then followed settlers in great num- 
bers. Up from the South and out from the east, fol- 
lowing the long, weary but hopeful trails of the 
American homebuilders came hundreds of families 
to Freeport. They stopped in Freeport, because it was 
different, a splendid location for a city, surrounded 
by the finest farm lands in America. 

These people were different. They tired of the 
commonplace of former homes and stopped here to 
build anew, with new hopes, new ideals, a new and a 
rich environment. To come out into the new country 
these people had high hopes, courage, faith, initiative 
and honest industry. The dull, the commonplace were 
left behind. They were different. They made Free- 
port an unusual city with a distinct character all its 
own. 

They named it FreePort. The first home builder 
in this city. William Baker, was hospitable. Travel- 
ers crossed the Pecatonica on his ferry, and Mrs. 
Baker was kept busy caring for strangers invited to 
her home by her too generous husband. One evening 
a group of men were discussing a suitable name for 
the town that was to be built here, when the tired 
Mrs. Baker broke in and said it should be called Free 
Port, and by the name of Freeport the village, town 
and city has been known to the world. Xor has 
the city failed ever to maintain the characteristic tb.at 
inspired its name. 

The county was organized in 1837 by act "f tlv 
legislature, the first election was held in. May, in June 
Freeport was named the county scat and Xelson Mar- 
tin opened the first school. A frame court house was 
built in 1840 and served till 1870. A stage line be- 
tween Freeport and Chicago was opened for business 
in 1838, The trip required two davs, the fare being 
$5.00. 



The town grew. In 1840 it had a population of 49. 
The first circus came in 1842. At the opening of the 
Mexican war a patriotic mass meeting was held in the 
court house and 25 men enlisted, one of whom, William 
Goddard, won the rank of Captain. The first news- 
paper was published in 1847, the Pr.^irie Democrat, 
founded by Hon. Thomas J. Turner, and edited by S. 
D. Carpenter. The Freeport Journal appeared in 1848. 
In 1853 the Deutschcr .^nzeiger was founded by 
William Wagner Sr. In 1850 the population of Free- 
port was 1486, and town government was established, 
and in 1855 city government was organized. 

Early Industries 

The De Armit Plow Company was established iii 
1857 and the Williams Threshing Machine Company 
in 1851. In 1856 J. X. Manny and his father, the in- 
ventor of the Manny reaper, started a factory in 
Freeport making reapers, hay presses and a subsoil 
plow. A planing mill was erected in 1853. A steam 
flour mill was built in 1856 and a saw mill in 1857. The 
Brewster Hotel was opened to the public August 27, 
1857. The city Charter was received in 1855, and Hon 
Thomas J. Turner was elected first Mayor. Lincoln 
carried the county in 1860 by 900, and Freeport by 205 
votes. 

Freeport business men took the leadership in 
Northern Illinois to secure a railroad from Chicrgo. 
The people subscribed $20,000 in stock and the first 
train arrived August 26, 1853. These business men 
then announced, "We want more hotels, factories, 
store rooms and dwellings." They secured them. 
That is the Freeport way. 

Historic Lincoln Douglas Debate 

Friday. August 27, 1858, 25,000 people gathered in 
Freeport to hear the great debate betvi-een Lincoln and 
Douglas. It was in the Freeport debate that Lincoln's 
second question drew a reply from Douglas that won 
for Douglas the Senatorship. but lost him the presi- 
dency, and elected Lincoln in 1860. The historic ques- 
tion was, "Can the people of a United States Territory 
in any lawful way, against the wish of any citizen of 
the Lnited States exclude slavery from its limits, prior 
to the formation of a state constitution?" Douglas 
answered, "In my opinion the people of a territory can, 
by lawful means, exclude slavery from their territory 
prior to the formation of a state constitution." This 
answer pleased X'orthcrn Democrats, but angered 
Southern Democrats who refused to support Douglas 
'n his campaign for the presidency in 1860. This re- 
ply split the Democratic party and made Lincoln's 
election certain. A fine granite boulder marking this 
historic spot, was erected by the Freeport Woman's 
Club, and dedicated by President Roosevelt in 1903. 
The Freeport debate was one of the great events 
in American history, and ranks with Plymouth Rock 
and Independence hall. 



Page Twenty-six ' FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

METAL SPECIALTIES CO. 

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PAINTING, TRIMMING, BODY WORK, SHEET METAL WORK AND 
ENAMELING. METAL WORK and STAMPING OF ALL KINDS 

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FOR FORTY YEARS 

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H/\S STOOD FOR GOOD CROCKERY 



C. H. LITTLE & COMPANY 



PHONE MAIN 483 



PLACE HARDWARE COMPANY 



TIN AND COPPER WORK A SPECIALTY 
HARDWARE, CUTLERY, STOVES, FURNACES 

103 E. Stephenson St. 



SANITARY LAUNDRY 

FOR FAMILY SERVICE 

Phone 22 14 East Exchange St. 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Twenty-seven 



Freeport in Three Great Wars 

April 17, I80I President Lincoln called for volun- 
teers to put down the rebellion. April 18, a mass 
meeting was held in Plymouth Hall, Freeport, at 
which stirring patriotic speeches were made. Smith D. 
Atkins, drafted an enlistment roll and wrote his name 
at the head of the list. Three thousand people saw 
the first company leave Freeport May 1, 1861, with 
Mr. Atkins, Captain. During the w-ar 3168 men of 
Stephenson County enlisted and went to the front for 
the Union. Of these almost 700 never returned. The 
companies fought with valor in most of the great 
battles of the war and many Stephenson County men 
won high rank as officers. 

The National G. A. R. Encampment 

In May 1909, Freeport was honored by the Nation- 
al Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
From all over the country delegates came to Freeport. 
The decorations of the city were unsurpassed. Never 
did the city present such a beautiful appearance and 
never was its hospitality so unlimited. For three days 
the city entertained its distinguished guests. On the 
programs were many of the most noted men of the 
nation. The local organization, the John A. Davis 



post, were the official hosts and their management of 
tlie city encampment reflected credit on their post 
and the city. 

The Lincoln-Douglas Debate Celebration 

.Vugust 26, 1922 Freeport celebrated the 64th An- 
niversary of the historic Lincoln-Douglas debate. 
The event attracted nation wide publicity because of 
the historic interest in one of the greatest landmarks 
of American history, and because of the eminent ora- 
tors of the day. From the speakers platform in 
Taylor's park, aided by loud speakers. Senator "Pat" 
Harrison of Mississippi and Honorable Karl Schuyler 
of Denver addressed thousands of people. Five bands, 
a parade, a ballon ascension, a pageant, daylight fire- 
works, and two great orators attracted here the largest 
crowd ever assembled in Freeport — more than 25,000 
people. The organization and management of the 
celebration and the cooperation and the hospitality of 
the city w-as characteristic of Freeport. This was a 
great educational event. Freeport came more fully 
to appreciate the fact that here was one of the shrines 
of our national history, and the nation at large went 
to school again and learned the historical importance 
of the Freeport Lincoln-Douglas debate of 1858. 



Freeport s Public Schools 

By Prof. S. E. Raines, Supt. 



FREEPORT'S Public Schools compare favorably 
with cities of similar size and larger. They are 
organized on modern methods of specialization 
and departmental teaching in the upper grades. 

This enables pupils not only to have the experi- 
ence of teachers specially trained in the subjects in 
which they specialize but prepares them for the differ- 
entiation of teachers and subjects in the High School. 

It is the purpose of the school authorities to make 
decent, intelligent, cultured, law abiding citizens of 
the boys and girls in their charge. 

They teach not only the regular academic branches 
but also music, art, physical training, including super- 
vised play, domestic science, manual training, thrift, 
citizenship, bible stories, picture study and character 
training. 

These things that go to make decent boys and girls 
— wholesome, courteous, kind, humane, thrifty, patri- 
otic and cultured withal — are given places on the regu- 
lar daily or weekly program the same as the con- 
ventional subjects of reading, arithmetic, and the like. 

People from other places coming into our schools 
remark the excellence of these traits manifested in the 
behavior of the pupils. 

That the schools are making a studied effort to 
give a sound fundamental education will be clearly 
seen from the decalogue of educational aims which 
the teachers of the grades strive daily to accomplish. 
More advanced aims are, of course, emphasized in the 
High School. 

They are : 

1. To know how to study and how to find the 



things they want to know. 

2. To use good English. 

3. To get the thought of ordinary discourse and 
intelligently express it. 

4. To spell all the words they have occasion to 
write. 

5. To write a neat legible hand. 

6. To perform readily and accurately the princi- 
pal operations in arithmetic. 

7. To think for themselves. 

8. To have some appreciation of the Good, the 
True, and the Beautiful in their environment. 

9. To have good morals and manners and a prop- 
er respect for law and authority. 

10. To develop a definite sense of responsibility 
and fitness for some worthy vocation in life. 

Another guiding principle of the schools is, "The 
Child is the Center of the School". His nature and 
needs must determine everything else. School houses, 
apparatus, books, course of study, teachers, supervis- 
ors, — all are secondary to his welfare ; and only after 
it has been considered, may these elements of the sys- 
tem come in for consideration on their own account. 

TEACHERS—The Board holds that the greatest 
problem of the schools is to secure and hold efficient 
teachers and that all other matters in a school system 
dwindle into insignificance when compared with this. 
They hold that teachers must have and maintain a 
liberal scholarship, a high order of general culture, and 
a notable devotion to duty ; that they must possess 
a laudable spirit of study, and a marked desire to find 
out the best tliat is known and done in the profession. 



Page Twenty-eight 



'FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



wmrwrwrmmmmmcm-^^^- 



mmwrwmrmwm^m^rr^ircMjm 



Seven Stores 
in Seven 
Cities 




9-11 WEST MAIN 
STREET 




^KEEPODT.liL. SPRINGFIELD.ILL. 
ROCKK)RD,IU. 0ESnOINES.IA. 
STERLWQ.ILL. SIOUX CITY.IA. 
DAVENPORT, lA. 



FREEPORT, 
ILLINOIS 



^mmmMM^'M^'ifiJMJifiJA MfLiMJAVm 



u^ioMoiui uiooLUiLuakuamm. m 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME' 



Page Twenty-nine 



They believe tlie best service school officials can 
render a community is to secure live, competent, en- 
thusiastic teachers and see that they are paid in ac- 
cordance with the qualifications demanded of thcni. 

Statistical Data 

There are eight grade school buildings several of 
which are strictly modern. The others are gooJ 
buildings kept in the best of repair and sanitation. 

The present high school building is not well adapt- 
ed to the needs of the High School but on the com- 
pletion of the new High School building it will be re- 
modeled and turned into a consolidated school for 
the seventh and eighth grades thus relieving the 
crowded condition of the grades for some time to 
come. 

The grades enroll 2600 pupils and the High School 
900. This requires 110 teachers — 76 in the grades and 
34 in the High School. 

According to the latest school census taken in 
June 1924, there were in the district 4788 children 
of school age with 6749 under 21 years of age. 

The cost of the schools last j'ear was $225,417.18 
and the percapita costs — $56.00 in the grades and 
$126.58 in the high school. 

The valuation of the buildings and equipment is 
appro.ximately one million dollars. 

The Board employs a full-time health inspector 
and medical inspection as needed. 

It also employs a part time school dentist who 
inspects the teeth of all children twice a year and 
dental service is rendered free to all those whose 
parents can not afford prompt service. To do this 
work eflfectively the board has fitted up a modern den- 
tal room in tlie Higli School building. 

Taxes — Considering the educational advantages 
oflfered the school tax rate is low. For the current 
year the school tax was $2.54 with a total tax rate for 
the city of $6.58. 

School Savings — For many years the schools have 
had a system of School Savings in which the children 
deposit weekly. It has been very successful with 12% 
of the total enrollment of the schools depositing and 
the weekly savings running between $500 and $600. 
Last year the schools saved more than $20,000. 

The High School 

The first school in Freeport was taught by Nelson 
Martin in a log cabin. High School courses were 
offered in 1852. In 1860 the Principal and the older 
boys joined the army and almost broke up tlie school. 
After the war the high school enjoyed a steady growth 
passing the 100 mark in 1890. In 1903 the enrollment 
was 305 with 52 graduates; in 1910, 430 with 66 gradu- 
ates. In 1920 the enrollment passed 800 and in 1922 
numbered 903. The largest class, that of 1924 listed 
ISO graduates. The growth of the high school has 
gone up to 900 and a few years will see 1000 boys and 
girls of the city in Freeport High School. An out- 
standing feature of the high school is that boys and 



girls are almost equal in number in the enrollment 
and in the graduating classes. Out of the class of 150 
that graduated from the High School in June 1924, 
there wer^ forty live tliat entered institutions of high- 
er learning in September this year. 

Modern in Courses of Study 

Practical courses found an opining in the curri- 
culum for the first time in the year 1904-5. Manual 
training was tlicn established. A year later drafting 
was added. In 1906 cooking classes were organized 
and a year later sewing was made a part of the course 
of study. In 1910 courses in Bookkeeping, Shorthand 
and Typewriting were introduced. In 1921 classes in 
Auto-Mechanics were begun. Freehand drawing, art- 
crafts, music and i)ublic speaking have been a part of 
the courses offereil in Freeport High Scliool. 

Scholarship 

After inspection by authorities from the Universi- 
ty of Illinois and the Xortli Central Association, Free- 
port High School is on the highest accredited list in 
America. The school's graduates are admitted without 
examination to all colleges and Universities of the 
United States which admit any students without ex- 
examination. To all Colleges and Universities the en- 
tering students of Freeport High School's graduates 
have seldom had difficulty in passing successfully and 
most frequently pass with unusually high standings. 
A few years ago a graduate of the Freeport Higli 
School made the highest grade among the hundreds 
wlio took the Harvard University entrance examin- 
ations, winning a $250 prize. For three years the 
University of Illinois, after a visit of inspection by a 
University faculty representative, has offered college 
credit for work done in Trigonometry and College 
.•\lgebra by Freeport High School students. These 
students start second year Mathematics at the Uni- 
versity. It is doubtful if any high school sends a 
greater number of students to Colleges and Universi- 
ties who have won honors including Phi Beta Kappa. 
More than any other feature, Freeport High School 
is proud of its scholastic standing. 

Athletics 

Few schools liave a better reputation in Football, 
basketball and track atliletics than Freeport High 
School. The halls are covered with shields, cups and 
banners won on athletic fields of battle. In 1916 the 
Freeport High School Basketball team won the state 
championship, was runner up in 1915, has won many 
district and conference championships, was runner up 
in the University of Chicago Central West Contests 
in 1917. In 1917 the Big Seven Conference was or- 
ganized and tliat year Freeport's heavyweight and 
lightweiglit teams won both conference championships. 
For the past two years Freeport has won the Freeport- 
Rockford relay race, HYi miles, 57 runners. 



Page Thirty 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



NEW MOLINE PLOW COMPANY 



MOLIXE. ILLINOIS 



MANUFACTURERS OF FARM IMPLEMENTS INCLUDING 



Walking Plows 
Wheel Plows 
Stalk Cutters 
Listers 

Tractor Drills 
Disc Harrows 
Tractor Disc 
Harrows 
Corn Planters 
Cotton Planters 
Peg Tooth Harrows 



Spring Tooth Harrows 
Cultivators 



Beet Tools 



Spreaders 



Mows 



rs 



Sulky Rakes 
Hay Loaders 
Grain Binders 
Corn Binders 
Grain Drills 
Side Delivery Rakes 



MAKE IT \ O L R HOME 



Page Thirtv-one 



Football Championship 

This year the Freeport High School foot ball 
teams have made a wonderful record. 

The heavy weight team won the Northern Illinois 
conference championship by defeating: 

East Aurora 31 to 6. 
DeKalb 46 to 0. 
Englewood 30 to 10. 
Beloit 21 to 0. 
Elgin 16 to 9. 
West Aurora 20 to 6. 
Belvidere 26 to 0. 
Joliet 10 to 9. 
Rock-ford 24 to 0. 
La Salle 31 to 7. 
Total points made by Freeport 253 ; by opponents 
47. 

Freeport was then challenged for an East-West 
game by Ansonia, Connecticut, whose team had not 
been beaten in two years and who were admittedly 
the champions of the Eastern States. 

The challenge was accepted and our team after 
two days hard travel, on a new field and with 15,000 
rooters against them, and none for them, beat An- 
sonia in a hard fought game 33 to thus making them 
practically the champions of the country. 

The light weight team did fine work, going 
through the season with only one defeat. 

The whole city is wonderfully proud of the teams 
and gave them a rousing reception on their return 
from the East. 

Coaches Holmes. McLean and Moon deserve much 
credit along with the teams for this fine season's work, 
as also does the Board of Education for the construc- 
tion of the fine athletic field, and the public for its 
enthusiastic support. 

New High School Building 

Plans for a new $650,000 model High School build- 
ing have been drawn and approved by the Board. 

Work will be begun on the new building early in 
the Spring and it will be finished and ready for oc- 
cupancy by September 1926. 

This new High School building will be of brick, 
steel, tile and cement, absolutely fire proof and thor- 
oughly modern in every respect. 

The dimensions of the main academic building 
will be approximately 170 feet by 270 feet with the 
Manual Arts building 55 by 150 and the heating plant 
as adjacent structures separated by some distance from 
the main building. In addition to these the auditori- 
um and gymnasium will be 80 by 233 feet. 

There will be a boys' and girls' gymnasium which 
can be thrown into one when needed. These will be in 
conjunction with the Auditorium and all so arranged 
that on needed occasions they may be used as one 
large hall seating 3000 persons. 

New High School Athletic Field on New High 
School Site 

Freeport High School has a 25-acre site bordered 
by stately elms. On this site the Board of Education 
has completed one of the finest athletic fields in the 



country. The football field is a natural stadium, with 
bleachers seating 3000 people, surrounded by a quarter 
mile cinder track with a 220 yard straight-away. There 
is room for 3000 more bleacher scats when needed. 
The field is enclosed by a high steel fence and check- 
ing turnstiles are at the entrance. Besides the playing 
field, there are two practice fields. 

The grounds, 25 acres in extent, in addition to the 
fine athletic field already mentioned will have space 
for forestry, botanical gardens, agricultural experi- 
ment station and drill grounds. 

When building and grounds are completed Free- 
port will have one of the best High School plants 
in America. 

The practical courses have proved popular with 
students and patrons of the high school. The me- 
chanical drawing room is crowded every hour of the 
day with more than ISO boys taking mechanical draw- 
ing, machine drawing, architectural drawing and ad- 
vanced courses in machine design. This work is so 
well done that boys in high school do drafting work 
in Freeport factories after school, Saturdays and dur- 
ing vacation. 

In auto mechanics the school provides a very com- 
plete equipment though crowded for space. In ad- 
dition to the motors owned by the school, it is not 
uncommon to see the high school boys at work on 
five cars in the shop and two or three more outside 
on the school grounds. Frequently an old rusty car 
is brought in, torn down, rebuilt and painted and sent 
out to do good service. 

The woodworking classes do considerable work 
for the board of education, and the boys turn out 
many pieces of fine furniture for their homes. 

The cooking and sewing rooms are occupied by 
girls classes through out the day. A two year's course 
is given in cooking to girls learning to do plain cook- 
ing chiefly, planning and preparing meals, purchasing 
supplies, figuring costs, selecting meat cuts and serv- 
ing meals and operating a cafeteria. 

In the sewing department the girls learn plain 
sewing and then advance to garment making and 
millinery. Many girls in the Freeport High School 
sewing classes make their own underwear, aprons, 
blouses, middies, dresses and hats. It is not uncom- 
mon to see a display of 80 dresses made by the girls 
of the dressmaking classes, and from 15 to 20 hats of 
their own design and make. 

The Commercial Department 

The business courses are always crowded. More 
than 300 boys and girls may be found in the book- 
keeping, shorthand and typewriting courses. Here the 
student has an opportunity to take two years of 
bookkeeping, two years of stenography and typewrit- 
ing, and courses in penmanship, spelling, business 
arithmetic, conmiercial geography and English. These 
courses and the efiiciency of the instructors turn out 
boys and girls who are well prepared to take up their 
work in offices of Freeport and other cities. Two- 
year courses are given for those who do not wish to 
take a four year course. This department has es- 
tablished a reputation for excellence in training second 
to none. 



Page Thirty-two 



"FREEPORT iS OUR HOME 



Good Lumber 



Clean Coal 



J. H. PATTERSON CO. 



Cement and Plaster 



Real Service 





FURNITURE-RUGS-DRAPERIES 

UNDERTAKING 



201-207 West Main Street 



Freeport. 111. 



MAKE IT ^'OUR HOME 



Page Thirty-three 



Public Speaking 

For many years extempore speakers, debaters and 
orators of the public speaking classes have without 
question surpassed those of all other high schools in 
this section. They have repeatedly won contests in 
debate with larger schools, and in oratory have won 
contests at Beloit College, Northwestern University, 
and the University of Illinois. 

The Music Department 

In the course of study and excellence of attain- 



ment in music it is doubtful if any high school sur- 
passes Freeport. In addition to daily classes in musi- 
cal appreciation, there is a large class of 50 in the 
boys' glee club and SO in the girls' glee club, and drill 
in assembly singing. The High School Band of 60 
pieces, in brilliant orange and black uniforms presents 
an imposing appearance, and for years has ranked as 
one of the best High School bands in the country. The 
High School orchestra of 24 pieces is also a remarkable 
organization. All these music classes, glee clubs, band 
and orchestra are this year at the peak of excellence. 



The Old Folks Home 



S 



OME years ago two bequests were left to the 
city to be used as the nucleus of a fund to 
erect an Old Folks Home. During the summer 
of 1924 a drive brought this fund up to a suffi- 



cient amount to build the home. A beautiful ten acre 
tract very near to Krape Park was purchased and 1925 
will see the completion of this splendid charity. 



Theatres 

By John Dittman 



OUR city enjoys the special privilege of having 
one of the most modern and finest theatres in 
any city of its size in the United States. This is 
the Lindo Theatre, so named by contracting 
the words "Lincoln and Douglas" and the name com- 
memorates the famous debate of those two gentlemen 
in Freeport. The theatre covers a tract 120x150 feet 
and the auditorium proper is 90x120 feet. There are 
1202 seats, all on one floor and the management lays 
special stress on the element of safety. There are no 
stairs, no steps and no balconies and the entire build- 
ing is a fire proof construction. Satisfactory entertain- 



ment is provided by vaudeville programs once a week 
and motion pictures the balance of the time inter- 
spersed with fitting prologues and presentations. 

The theatre is equipped with special lighting 
eflFects and uses both ten piece orchestra and organ 
music. 

The theatre has been the cause of favorable com- 
ment by out of town people who have been amazed 
at times to find such an elaborate theatre in a city of 
this size. 

Two other movies, the Strand and the Superba 
present high class and pleasing pictures. 



Health 



By Dr. R. J. Burns, Connnissioner of Health 



IT would be difficult to find in any country a more 
beautiful region than that surrounding Freeport. 
Rugged picturesque features, combined with the 
gentle swell of rolling prairie, gratefully studded 
here and there with noble trees and spacious farm 
buildings please the beholder and bring back appre- 
ciation of the abundant fertility of the soil. 

Seven hundred and sixty two feet above the sea 
level, guarded from the sweep of storms from the 
west and north by the state's highest ridge, located 
on the banks of the Pecatonica river, covering an area 
of four and one-fourth square miles, Freeport is a 
city of beautiful, comfortable, pleasant, well-kept 
homes. 

The homes of a community indicate the health 
plane of the people. Where there is a sense of well- 
being, the result of favorable industrial conditions, the 
people are alert to promote and preserve life's great- 
est boon — Good Health. 

The Residence district of Freeport is largely on 
the west side of the river. Manufacturing establish- 



ments and railroad yards are for the most part on the 
east side. .\s the prevailing winds are from the west, 
this arrangement contributes to the cleanliness, and 
thus to the healthfulness of the city. 

A fundamental sanitary requirement for a city is 
a sewer system. Freeport provides forty-eight miles 
of sewer, draining nearly all property within the 
city limits, in addition to nearly ten miles of storm 
sewer. Conmiunity water supply is an all important 
consideration. Freeport's excellent water supply, 
furnished by a corporation known as the Freeport 
Water Company, has its source in several artesian 
wells. 

Safeguarding the health of a city calls for the co- 
ordination of many forces. Physicians are naturally 
authoritative leaders in sanitation and hygiene, and 
the members of the medical profession of Free- 
port at all times lend time and intelligent interest 
to any effort directed toward general health improve- 
ment. As a result of the united support of the people, 
Freeport has been able to establish and maintain an 
efficient, thoroughly organized health service. 



Page Thirty-four "FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



A GOOD ASSET 



T 



HERE is no power in business like the power of a good name. 

Men and Women do not inspect every bolt and screw in an automobile, nor every cog and 
spring in a watch. 



They select firms they can trust and they buy on faith. The name alone is a Guarantee 
of square dealing to one and all. 

Since 1858 the Citizens of this Community have patronized this store until now we are serving 
the grandchildren and great grandchildren of our first customers. Reliable merchandise at prices 
commensurate with quality has been the basis of all our transactions and upon this theory we have 
labored to serve our hundreds of customers. Our store has grown in size only because of the ser- 
vice rendered to those far and near. We give real honest value for every dollar left with us. 

WM. WALTON NEPHEWS 

RETAIL DRY GOODS and CLOTHING 

ESTABLISHED 67 YEARS 
FREEPORT, STEPHENSON COUNTY, ILLINOIS 



VISIT OUR NEW AND ENLARGED APPAREL SECTION 
FOR MERCHANDISE THAT IS 

RIGHT IN STYLE 

RIGHT IN QUALITY 

RIGHTilN PRICE 

Always the latest styles for the School girl — Young Miss and Business 
\\^oman at prices she will happily pay. 

F. A. READ CO. 

DRY GOODS— LADIES READY TO WEAR— MILLINERY 
CARPETS AND LINOLEUM 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Thirty-five 



The Health Department proper consists of tlie 
Health Commissioner, the Sanitary Officer and the 
Health Committee of the City Council. 

One of the principal duties of a health department 
is the control of contagious diseases. The Department 
utilizing the various agencies, such as school nurses, 
tuberculosis nurse, and school boards, has been able 
to check and control incipient epidemics in a satis- 
factory manner. 

Through the courtesy of Saint Francis Hospital, 
the Department is assisted by an efticient laboratory 
service, furnished without charge. This is a valuable 
factor in the early diagnosis and control of contagious 
diseases. 

The beneficient effect of various effort is shown in 
the high average of school attendance, and Freeport's 
low death rate, of ten per thousand population. 



Fne garbage service, with bi-weekly collections, 
is maintained at heavy cost, but with commendable re- 
sults with regard to cleanliness of streets and alleys, 
abating the fly pest and possibly preventing disease. 

An excellent milk ordinance regulating the produc- 
tion and sale of milk in the city, insures a wholesome 
supply of that important article of food. 

Time and increase of population bring changes and 
new problems of sanitation. The recognition of these 
changes and solution of attending problems have been, 
and will continue to be the work of those to whom 
sanitary matters are entrusted. 

It will be the aim in the future, as it has been in 
the past, for the Freeport Health Department to stand 
guard over the health of the community, giving to 
its citizens prompt, efficient, up-to-date service in 
sanitation. 



St. Francis Hospital 

Superior 



By the Sister 

ST. Francis Hospital was established in 1889. 
Beginning with a very small building the needs 
of the community have been met by frequent 
enlargements until in December 1924 the 
demand for more hospital room necessitated the 
building of another addition. When the new addi- 
tion is completed, work upon which was begun 
December 1st, 1924, St. Francis will have a total 
capacity of 150 patients. The new addition will be a 
four story structure joining with the present building. 
The top floor will be devoted to surgery with two 
major operating rooms, eye, ear, nose and throat 
room, pus room, emergency room and laboratories. 
The equipment will be modern and fully complete in 
all details. The new structure taken with the present 
building will give to Freeport a hospital fully as good 
and fully as well equipped as may be found in any 
very large city. 

The average number of patients cared for now is 



about 1700 yearly. The rates charged are actually be- 
low the operating cost ranging from ward rates of 
$14.00 per week to $25.00 per week for the best private 
room. The actual operating cost shows the ward 
patient costs the hospital $15.00 per week and the 
highest priced room costs $24.50 per week thus actual- 
ly proving in dollars and cents that the hospital is 
purely an institution not run for profit. 

Out of over 6000 patients cared for in the last four 
years one out of every six was a purely charity case. 
If a money value can be placed on charity this service 
alone would reach the sum of $25,000. 

The value of the present buildings is $350,000 with 
the new addition to cost $200,000 besides equipment. 

Xo case has ever been refused admission to this 
hospital. No distinction is ever made on account of 
race or religion the Sisters devoting their lives to 
purely Christian Service exemplified in daily self sac- 
rifice. 



G 
G 



HXERAL Hospital, 218 W. Clark St.; Estab- 
lished 1910; 35 beds: 9250 patient days 
per year; modern equipment; training school 



General Hospital 

By Alice Jordan Smith, Supt. 

with average of 14 nurses ; 2 graduated nurses em- 
ployed in capacity of Head Xurse and Surgical Nurse ; 
general; open staff. 



Evangelical Deaconess Hospital 

By J. H. Bauernfeind, Supt. 

LOBE Hospital was taken over in March 1924, ments, an accredited nurses training school, leading 

by the Evangelical Church. Its government to degree of R. X., general medical and surgical staff 

rests in the Evangelical Church. There are open to all physicians in good standing and a nurses 

thirty rooms; well equipped surgical depart- home. In 1925 it is planned to build a large addition. 



CIVIC CENTER 
Comnnmity Service Bureau 



By Miss Bertha Bidwell, President 

T;iE Community Service Bureau, formerly the the Secretary acts as Probation Officer for the Juve- 

.\ssociated Charities, is completing its twelfth nile Court of Stephenson County and as Attendance 

year. It was organized by a group of citizens Officer for the Public Schools of Freeport. The Home 

to care for the social problems of the community Service work of the County Red Cross is also handled 

through the efforts of trained workers. In addition, by this office. 



Page Thirty-six 



FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 




ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL 




GENERAL HOSPITAL 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Thirtv-seven 



119 families assisted in the Family Welfare De- 
partment. 

SO families assisted in the department of Juvenile 
Probation. 

55 ex-service men helped. 

Ill families visited and 386 absences investigated 
in the School Attendance Department. 

301 different families given service and assistance 
in all these departments of work during the year. 

Of these 45 were widows, 9 were deserted women, 
5 were divorced women receiving no alimony, 11 were 
unmarried mothers. 14 were children under 18 in homes 
other than their own and supervised by the Community 
Service Bureau, 29 were disabled war veterans. 

Some of the problems met in the families of the 
55 married couples assisted : 



budget is raised by private subscription. It is the 
policy not to give benefits, but to solicit funds yearl.v. 

Financial Statement for the Year 1923 

Bank Balance $ 362.51 

RECEIPTS 

Contributions .. $ 2994.83 

Refunds 62.70 

Special Funds 550.00 

Fixed Income 1454.92 

Borrowed from Bank 100.00 



Illness 
Old age 
Unemployment 
Insanity 
Epilepsy 

Crippled children 
Crippled adults 
Subnormal children 



Subnormal adults 

Immorality 

Intemperance 

Non-support 

Debt 

Incompetence 

Poor home conditions 

Domestic difficulties 
The Board, which is elected by contributors, be- 
lieves the type of problems listed above demands the 
most expert handling available and should be in charge 
of professional family case workers. Our method is to 
show clients the way out of present difficulties by re- 
moving handicaps, restoring broken connections and 
giving friendly counsel. When relief, such as clothing, 
food, rent or financial assistance is necessary, it is ade- 
quately given. 

The County Board of Supervisors pays $500.00 a 
year for the service of the Probation Officer ; the Free- 
port School Board pays $500.00 a year for the work of 
the Attendance Officer. The Red Cross pays $420.00 a 
year for the work for ex-service men. The rest of the 

Stephenson County 

By Miss Xelda Xolti 

THE Stephenson Co. Tuberculosis Board oper- 
ates under the so-called Glackin Law, a law 
which regulates tuberculosis activities in the 
Stale of Illinois and which was voted upon in 
Stephenson Co. several years ago. The object of this 
law is prevention and treatment of tuberculosis, erec- 
tion of district sanatoria, hospitalization of diagnosed 
cases, in fact any activities concerning tuberculosis. 

The County Board has the power to levy a tax for 
this purpose on all ta.xable property in the county, and 
in this manner funds are obtained to carry on the 
work. This Fund is known as the Stephenson Co. 
Tuberculosis Sanatorium Fund. 

This Fund may be applied for the erection of 
Sanatoria, nursmg care, institutional care of cases of 
tuberculosis, if the patient so wishes. The benefits 
and privileges of such institution may be extended into 
the home of the patiefit under proper regulation. 

The policy of the Stephenson Co. Tuberculosis 
Board is prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. At 
the present time two nurses are employed by this 
Board. The county Tuberculosis nurse and the 
Countv School nurse. The Tuberculosis Xurse extends 











$5524.96 


EXPENDITURES 






Salaries, probation officer. 






attendance officer, home 






service secretary 




$ 1454.92 


Salaries, family welfare 






work 




1373.38 


Miscellaneous office expense . 




630.39 


RELIEF 






Rent 


$ 489.25 




Groceries » 


747.49 




Fuel 


46.90 




Clothing 


... 63.22 




Board and care 


14.75 




Household equipment 


14.00 




Loans 


27.00 
85.85 




Cash pensions 




R R Transportation .... 


27.03 




Miscellaneous relief 


5.75 




Hospital and medical care 


277.65 








1798.89 




$5257.58 


Bank Balance 




$267.38 



Tuberculosis Board 



ng, R. X., T. B. Xurse 

her activities into all parts of the county. It is her 
duty to look up all cases of Tuberculosis who want her 
services, to see that all cases of Tuberculosis suspects 
are brought under the care of a physician and prop- 
erly diagnosed and treated, that all who wish institu- 
tional care are put in touch with such institutions 
and that such care is financed by the above mentioned 
Board in such cases where the patient would other- 
wise have to go without this care. 

A record of all activties is kept in the office of the 
Stephenson County Board. Xo one is denied help or 
comforts needed. The patients ill of tuberculosis are 
brought to the attention of the nurse in various ways 
and are given immediate consideration. There are 
many problems to solve and conditions to adjust which 
require detailed attention. The Health Work in the 
County Schools is also supervised by this nurse. 

The county school nurse is employed by the 
Stephenson Co. Tuberculosis Board. This nurse visits 
the rural and small town schools. She weighs and 
measures each child at least once each year. If any 
apparent defect is noticed, or if the weight deviates 
very materially from the normal, a notice is sent to 



Pag e Thirty-eight '^FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

THE C. F. HILDRETH CO. 

IS A LOCAL LEADER IN ALL THINGS PERTAINING TO 

INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

IT BIDS THE STRANGER A HEARTY WELCOME 
Office 227 W. Stephenson Street Phone: Main 282 

RIDGWAY ELECTRIC CO. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1902 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS FOR— 

CROSLEY 

FEDERAL 

KELLOGG 

SHAMROCK 

EVERREADY BATTERIES 

CHELSEA 

BRISTOL 

CUNNINGHAM 

TUNGAR 

NILES 

FROST 

RADIOTRON 

Our service is quick — intelligent and complete. We have the best Freight, 

Post and Express facilities of any cit}' within 125 miles. 

Send for FREE Catalogue No. IR. 



"BEST PLACE TO EAT IN FREEPORT" 
MEALS AND LUNCH THAT SATISFY 

Special V^oonday Lunch Special Evening Thinner Special Sunday T)inner 

Ice Cream Fountain Service Confectionery 

A Congenial A 1 ^ Happy 

Atmosphere ^^\ TlSCLOS ^'^'^^ *° ^°™^ 

Second [A[ational iT^ank 'J^uilding 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Thirty-nine 



the parent, or better still, a visit is made to the home 
of such chilli aiul medical supervision and diaRnosis 
is urged. Many cases of defective teeth, defective 
vision, abnormal throats, etc., are corrected tbrouKb 
this activitv each vcar. .As these abnormal conditions 



tend to undermine health and in some cases predis- 
pose to serious trouble, tuberculosis for instance, what 
is more fitting than that the above mentioned fund 
be expended to help the coming generation to build up 
resistance to disease. 



By Mrs. Frank 

W 1 111.1'. not Iiouscd with the other organiza- 
tions working under a general plan, and 
known as the Civic Center, this organization 
is a charitable one filling a place not 
filled by any other in the city. The objects of 
this organization arc, iirimarily, to provide a home 
for the unprotected girl and to surround her with 
a Cliristian influence. Secondarily, to give aid 
to the needy in the way of clothing and food ;nul 
to reach them through ways directing them tow-ard a 
religious life. There arc many other things done by 
our organization one of which is an industrial school 
directed by the officers with the .Assistant Sup't in 
charge. 



The Kings Daughters 



■urry. President 

We own a building at 101 Kast Main Street known 
as "The Settlement Home." There are three floors 
and a basement. The ground floor houses a Rest 
Room which is used also as a Sunday school room and 
for other purposes directly connected with the work. 
One l)usiness room is rented the income going into 
the treasury. The second floor has the office rooms, a 
l.irge connnunity room, dining room and kitchen. The 
third floor is divided into rooms with kitchenettes 
leased to working girls at nominal charges. Eighteen 
girls can be accommodated with homes here. 

The annual budget averages about $6,500.00, this 
sum being raised by an annual tag day, by pledges of 
the "King's Circles" and the generous gifts volun- 
tarily sent in by our many friends. 



Red Cross 



By Henrietta S. 

OCR Chapter is not able to do very much, now, 
on account of lack of funds. However, we 
supplement the work of the Government in the 
Home Service work for the ex-soldier, and we 
maintain an office and help in the purchasing of sup- 
plies for the County School Nurse (wlioni we used to 



Hill, Secretary 

support entirely). 

There is but one employee, the secretary, who re- 
ceives a nominal sum for clerical services. Our funds 
are raised by an Armistice Drive, once a year, which 
necessitates a house to house canvass. 



Country Clubs 



By C. F 

THE Freeport Country Club is the outgrowth of 
the old Freeport Club, which was a social club 
organized some thirty-five years ago. As a 
golf club, it has been in existence for something 
like fifteen years. It owns eighty acres of ground 
about two miles from the court house and is now ne- 
gotiating the purchase of an additional forty acres, in 
order that the course may be increased from nine to 
eighteen holes. It has a very commodious club house, 
which was enlarged a year ago at a cost of approxi- 
mately $18,000. Its assembly and dining rooms are 
the center of many social activities during the club 
season, which opens in the spring and ends with a 
Hallowe'en celebration in the fall. The social and cu- 
linary features are in the hands of an accomplished 
hostess who has popularized the institution to a won- 
derful extent. The locker room and shower bath 
facilities for both men and women are commodious 
and popular. The present membership fee is $105 and 
the annual dues $55, payable quarterly. These figures 



Hildreth 

include government tax. The golf course is one of the 
"sportiest" in this western country. Nature evidently 
intended it for a golf course. The membership is 
limited to two hundred and there is usually a con- 
siderable waiting list. I presume $50,000 would be a 
fair estimate of the present value of the grounds with 
their improvements, to which will be added $20,000 
with the purchase and improvement of the additional 
land. 

The Welty Golf Club is a new organization located 
a few hundred yards from the Freeport Club. A nine- 
hole course has been laid out and improved and a 
commodious club house erected on the grounds. This 
ground has the undulating characteristic of the older 
course, and a very delightful golf course is well along 
in the making. The membership dues are $25.00 — 
no membership fee. The new organization makes an 
especial appeal to the younger men of the community. 
Both clubs arc easily accessible from the Krape Park 
extension of tlie street railway or by automobile. 



The Woman s Club 



FREEPORT Woman's Club, an organization of 
over five hundred members, whose object is the 
self improvement of its members and united 
effort for the advancement of social and civic 
conditions in the home and in the connnunit\ . 



By Mrs. F. E. Furst, President 

The activities are directed by departments of art 
and literature; education; music; civics and home 
economics and drama. The club is a member of the 
General, State and District Federation and has its 
club rooms in the Masonic Temple. 



Page Forty '^FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

STEPHENSON COUNTY FARM BUREAU 

FREEPORT. ILLINOIS 

PROMOTIXG scientific agriculture in co-operation with the U. S. D. A. and the U. of I., by 
encouraging the Illinois System of Soil Fertility. Growing Better Crops through the use 
of Hardy Adapted Varieties. Livestock Improvement through better care, better feeding, 
better breeding, performance records and breed organizations. 

COOPERATING WITH 

The State and National Organization. 
The American Farm Bureau Federation. 
The Illinois Agricultural Association. 

FOSTERING AND ASSISTING LOCAL FARM ORGANIZATIONS 

Stephenson County Holstein Association. 
Stephenson County Swine Breeders Association. 
Shorthorn Breeders Association. 
Livestock Shipping Associations. 
Farmers Elevators. 
Community Organizations. 



JOHN SCHWARZ & SONS 



r^ I A Q Q ^^^ ^^^ PURPOSES 



. . i-i /-.i AC • li Wall Paper, Paints and 

Automobile Glass A Specialty 

====^^^ WINDSHIELDS Painters Supplies 

SEDAN and COUPE GLASS 

24 E. Main St., Main 714 



Z^^KJ K>«0^>s/ 




I CLOTHIER 



ESTABLISHED 1 880 FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Fortv-one 



1 he Amity Society 

By Mrs. John Commons, President 



THE Amity Society is the oldest charitable or- 
ganization in the City of Freeport. Organized 
in the late seventies, it has, for almost half a 
century, been actively engaged in fostering the 
charitable and social work of the city. 

Its present work, that of child conservation, was 
assigned it in 1917 when the United States began a 
definite program in child welfare. While the Freeport 
Society is absolutely self governed, it has always en- 
joyed the cooperation and assistance of the Illinois 
State Board of Health and it is an affiliated member 
of the National Child Health Association of which 
Herbert Hoover is president. 

The Society has an active membership of forty 
women, each of wliom pays in as dues the sum of 
$13.00 a year. This takes care of the rent and other 
expenses incidental to the maintenance of a Child 
Welfare Station which is located at the Civic Center. 

All stenographic and record work is done by an 
office committee drawn from members of the Society 
and is wholly volunteer. 

So admirable a system prevails in the Child Wel- 
fare office, that Mr. Francis McLean, president of the 
U. S. Charities, after a visit of investigation, was 
pleased to comment approvingly upon it. 

Further funds for the carrying on of the work of 
the society are secured by public subscription or are 
earned by the society. Money appropriations by the 
city of Freeport and the Town Board testify to the 
value of the work in the community and many in- 
dividual gifts together with generous donations from 
such organizations as the Elks, the Masons, the Ro- 
tarj- and Kiwanis Clubs make possible a program in 
child welfare work of which Freeport may well be 
proud. 

Miss Kathryn Dixon of Moline, Illinois, is em- 
ployed as supervising nurse and is in charge of the 
station at the Civic Center. The program which she 
carries out is both educational and preventive. 

Her advice and assistance are oflFered to any 
mother who may need it, and under the direction of 
the Freeport doctors, she superx'ises many feeding 



cases. Her report for October 1924 showed 133 Free- 
port babies under her personal supervision. Many of 
these babies are brought regularly to the station to be 
weighed and measured. Careful records arc kept and 
the development of each baby closely studied. 

Well-Baby Conferences are held twice a month 
under the direction of a local physician who will ex- 
amine eacli child and talk over with the mother any 
questions pertaining to diet or nutrition. 

For five years the Amity Society has sponsored 
Orthopedic clinics. These clinics are under the general 
direction of the State Rotary Club and are designed 
to care for children crippled by infantile paralysis. 
Nearly 500 cases have received attention at the Free- 
port clinics. 

The Child Welfare nurse attends to all the follow- 
up work suggested by these clinics. In this she is 
assisted by the visiting housekeeper. Miss Elizabeth 
Martin, who also devotes a part of her time to Amity 
Service. 

A kindergarten class for colored children of pre- 
school age is conducted each week and a lunch of 
milk and cookies always served. 

In addition to the nursing service offered, the 
-\mity Society provides a morning lunch of milk and 
crackers for each of the undernourished children of 
the Public Schools. Two hundred thirty-one children 
received this lunch last year with decidedly beneficial 
results. Milk is also supplied in a few hpmes to chil- 
dren who could not otherwise obtain it. 

Infant birth and death statistics for various Illinois 
towns in 1923 show Freeport with a higher birth rate 
but a decrease in the death rate of 12 per thousand. 
The Freeport figures, it was pointed out in Washing- 
ton, D. C, were better than those for both rural and 
urban Illinois. 

The Amity Society's budget for 1924 called for an 
expenditure of $4,000.00. This sum was entirely se- 
cured. The society with pride calls attention to the 
fact that it has never exceeded its budget and has 
never closed a year with a deficit. 



/ 



nsu ranee 



WE enjoy in Freeport, a distinction among 
cities of its size in being an Insurance 
center, having the home offices of a number 
of the best and strongest companies of the 
middle west. A study of the companies will show 
Freeport capital and Freeport people the active force 
of this, one of Freeport"s big assets. 

BANKERS MUTUAL LIFE COiMPANY 

By J. C. Peasley, Gen. Mgr. 

This Company was organized in 1907. It has been 
under practically the same management since the date 
of its organization. It is licensed and doing business 
in Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri. It has at 



this time $17,000,000.00 of insurance in force. It has 
paid in claims since date of organization over $700,000. 
It has increased its deposit with the Insurance De- 
partment of Illinois during the past year and now has 
$100,000.00 deposited, and the present year. 1924. will 
be far the best the Company has ever had both in the 
production of business and increase in assets. 

The officers are as follows : W. B. Erfert. Presi- 
dent and Treasurer, A. P. Woodruff, Vice President ; 
J. C. Peasley, Secretary and General Manager, and 
Dr. C. L. Best, Medical Director. These officers and 
Mr. L. R. Jungkunz, Cashier of the Stephenson County 
Bank, constitute the Board of Directors. 



Page Forty-two 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



Guyer & Calkins Co. 





Distributors 




"Gold Cord" Brand 




PURE FOOD PRODUCTS 




A Piston of Character 



SWARTZ 

STANDARD 

PISTONS 

A complete line of grey 
iron pistons to service all 
cars, trucks and tractors 
from 1912-25. Pistons for 
over 2000 different models 
carried in stock. Write 
for the Swartz Mig. Co. 
catalogue. 

Freeport, III. 



CASTINGS 



W'e pour a dense grain, easily machinable, 
grey iron for our pistons. Our large foundry 
capacity enables us to do job work. Castings 
that are designed to withstand great pressures, 
gasoline, kerosene and such liquids will be es- 
pecially adapted for our grey iron. 

W'rite for details 

THE SWARTZ MFG. COMPAXY 



JOHN KNOBEL & SON 



FLOUR, FEED AND GROCERY SPECIALTIES 



113-117 East Spring Street 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Forty-three 



CRUM & FORSTER 

By .1. \V. (.rij^wry. A>>t. Mgr. 

The Cruni & Forster organization in Frecport cm- 
ploys 125 people and owns and occupies the property 
where they are located. The value of this property is 
$125,000. In 1923 we handled $7,000,000 in premiums 
through this office. There are sixteen states in the 
Middle West and West that report to us through the 
medium of 6,000 agents. Locally we are represented 
by twenty ditTerent agents for the various companies 
under our control, and our annual business in Free- 
port alone amounts to more than $50,000 in premiums. 

MIDWEST AUTOMOBILE UNDERWRITERS 

By J. C. Peasley, Secretary. 

This Exchange was organized in 1919. Tlie At- 
torney-in-Fact is the Mid-West Insurance Agency 
Corporation, a stock company. The officers are A. P. 
Woodruff. President ; Dr. C. L. Best, Vice President 
and J. C. Peasley, Secretary. 

The Exchange has always confined its etTorl to a 
territory near its Home Office and writes only in the 
State of Illinois. Its business has expanded rapidly 
and its premium income for the year of 1924 will be 
AQ^c in excess of that of any other year in its history. 

SAMSON AUTO INSURANCE ASSOCIATION 

By C. T. Kiplinger, President 

The object of this .-Kssociation is the underwriting 
of the risks of the automobile owner. 

The Samson Association is managed by the Sam- 
son Company, a corporation known as the Attorney-in- 
Fact. Risks are written strictly on the reciprocal, or 
inter-insurance plan, and the Association is licensed 
and doing business in the states of Illinois, Indiana, 
Minnesota, Kansas, Michigan and North Dakota. 

The Association was organized in March 1919 and 
has an agency force composed largely of bankers in 
the six states where Samson Insurance is now sold. 
The officers of the Samson Co. are C. T. Kiplinger, 
President ; J. J. Commons, Vice President and R. L. 
Britt, Secretary and Treasurer. The officers of the 
Association are H. H. Antrim, President of the State 
Bank of Freeport, A. J. Clarity, Chief Justice of Illinois 
Court of Claims ; E. E. Lugeanbeal, President of the 
Citizens State Bank of Elk City, Kansas ; A. J. 
Stukenbcrg. I. J. Kiplinger and C. T. Kiplinger, J. J. 
Commons and R. L. Britt, officers of The Samson 
Company. 

PRAIRIE STATE CASUALTY COMPANY 

By J. C. Peasley, Secretary 

This Company was organized in 1916 and has been 
operated under exactly the same management since 
date of organization. It operates only in the State of 
Illinois and has a complete line of policies paying 
indemnity for loss of time on account of sickness, acci- 
dent, accidental death or dismemberment. 

Its Officers and Directors are as follows: W. B. 
Erfert, President; A. P. Woodruff, Vice-President; 
J. C. Peasley, Secretary, and Dr. C. L. Best, Medical 
Referee. These together with Mr. L. R. Jungkunz, 
Cashier of the Stephenson County Bank, constitute the 
Board of Directors. 



ECONOMY AUTO INSURANCE 

By Kclw:ir.i Cilhert, Sec'y. 

The Economy Auto Insurance Association, the 
oldest Automobile Insurance Association in Freeport, 
was organized in the fall of 1915. The business of this 
Association is confined to selected territories in 
Northern and Central Illinois. At the present time, 
the Association has approximately 12,000 active policy 
holders and business in their territory is solicited 
through approximately 500 agents or representatives. 

The Association writes full coverage automobile 
insurance at rates which represent a material saving 
under Stock Company rates and during the two year 
period from January 1, 1922 at which time the Illinois 
Reciprocal Law was passed and adopted, this Associa- 
tion has built up an actual cash surplus for the protec- 
tion of its members of $78,000. This surplus represents 
approximately three times the Association's annual 
losses and is doul)le the amount of reserve required by 
the state. 

The affairs of the Association have always been 
carefully and conservatively managed, enabling this 
Association to take its place among the strongest 
and most reliable insurance carriers operating in tlu 
state. 

AMERICAN AUTO INSURANCE ASSOCIATION 
Freeport, Illinois 
By L. G. Younglove, Sec'y 
Cash Assets, Dec. 31, 1923, $93,663.37. 
Liabihties, Dec. 31, 1923. 

Reserve for unpaid losses and claims $9,598.09 

Unearned premium deposits 20,783.27 

Total Liabilities $30,381.36 

Net cash surplus 63,282.01 

Total $93,663.37 

This is an inter-insurance exchange which was 
organized and received its license from the Illinois In- 
surance Department March 22, 1919, and connnenccd 
business on the same day. 

The attorney-in-fact is the .American Auto Insur- 
ance Agency, incorporated March 1919, under the 
laws of the State of Illinois for $15,000 fully paid in. 

The officers of the attorney-in-fact are: President, 
Addison Bidwell, President First National Bank, Free- 
port, Illinois ; Vice President, C. W. Chapman, Presi- 
dent of Security Trust Company, Freeport, 111. ; Trea- 
surer, C. P. Young; Secretary and Manager, L. G. 
Younglove. 

The directors arc the above officers and B. P. Hill, 
president of the Hill Grain Company, and L. H. Bur- 
rell, attorney-at-law. 

The exchange writes fire, theft, tornado, cyclone, 
collision, property damage and public liability on auto- 
mobiles. 

The largest gross and net lines written are, fire, 
tlieft and collision, $3000; liability, $10,000-$20,000. 
The exchange makes its own rates, based upon the 
losses. 



Page Forty-four ^^FREEPORT IS OUR H O M E 



''Economy First— Quality Always" 



/^UR location in Free port has enabled 
us to sustain our motto in its maximum, 
capacity. 

Though new in the field of large edition 
printing, our rapid progress in organizing 
and equippuig an institution capable of 
julfilling satisfactorily the commands of 
the larger buyer has been so great that we 
now have as one of our customers the largest 
corporation in America. 



H. J. Straub Printing Co 



Large Edition Printers 



Main Office and Plant : Chicago Office : 

Jackson and Van Buren Streets 20 E. Jackson Blvd. 

Freeport, Illinois Wabash 7421 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Fortv-five 



Extracts from Financial Statements as of Decem- 
ber 31. 1923: 

Income ; — Premium deposits, assessments, sub- 
scribers lees and dues, gross, $117,304.28; less reinsur- 
ance, $445.77; less return premium deposits, $691.68; 
net premium deposits, etc., $116,156.83; interest, rents, 
etc., $1,084.73; returned federal taxes, $379.14; total 
income, $117,620.70. 



Disbursements : — Losses paid, gross, $35,047.43 ; 
less salvage, $1207.00; net losses, $33,840.43; claim ad- 
justing expenses, $4,814.57; paid to attorney-in-fact for 
administration expense, $44,116.85; legal expense 
$302.91; taxes, licenses, fees, $91.06; guarantee fund, 
$15036.25. salaries and office expense, $6,154.82; total 
disbursements, $104,356.89. 



Recreation 

Bv L. .A. Jayiie. State's .Attorney 



WHILE Freeport is located in tlie heart of 
the agricultural and dairy district of Illinois, 
still it maintains what we term above the 
average supply of fish and game for the 
sportsman. We have the Pecatonica River draining 
the south western part of Wisconsin, and Freeport 
being the first city of any size located upon the river 
below its source and above the dam in the city, the 
water is very suitable for all kinds of game fish and 
witliin recent years it has been stocked heavily. 
The fisherman is now able to bring home a nice string 
of bass, wall-eyed pike, and catfish at most any sea- 
son of the year, although the river is not to be com- 
pared with its tributary. Yellow Creek, which is a 
small stream running through a rocky portion of the 
county, and has been stocked exceptionally heavy each 
year for the past five or six years, and the Izaak 
Walton League, in cooperation with the game warden, 
Mr. Rigney of this city, has placed 120 cans of game 
fish in this stream alone during the season of 1924. 
While this has brought about much better fishing 
conditions, we find that the spring fed sloughs and 
streams are well-stocked with small game fish. We 
are located within thirty-two miles of the beautiful 
Rock River, which is another fisherman's delight and 
is well supplied with bass, wall-eyed pike, pickerel and 
catfish. 



Apple River, running through the hills of Joe 
Davis County is easily reached by concrete road from 
this city, and is a beautiful bass stream, noted for 
its big mouth, red gilled fighters. 

We are located within one day's drive of 3000 
lakes, the country advertised as "clover land," and 
"the playground of .-Kmerica." There lakes are noted 
for their beauty and their wonderful surroundings, 
and here the wild deer, ducks, porcupine, and beaver 
work and roam the country in their natural state. 

The Izaak Walton League is a live-wire organiza- 
tion, having for its president Mr. E. M. Harnish, who 
is a red-blooded sportsman, glad at all times to assist 
anyone seeking recreation in locating the proper spot 
to meet his desires. 

The sportsman, no matter where he goes, finds 
the best fishing in the lake just a few miles further 
away, and on the opposite side of the lake from where 
he camps, and while this distance lends enchantment, 
we can assure the lover of the great outdoors, just as 
many pounds of fish or as much game in the terri- 
tory surrounding Freeport as in the much-advertised 
resort countries of the north or west, with the ex- 
ception of the large game which only exists in the 
wilderness. 



The Freeport Y M C A. 

By C. F. Ogden, General Secretary 



OL'R Young Men's Christian Association of 
Freeport has for fifty-five years been help- 
fully serving the young men and boys of our 
city. It has grown steadily in strength and in- 
fluence, until it is today one of the outstanding or- 
ganizations of its class in the city. 

The Association building is one of the very best to 
be found in cities the size of Freeport. It was erect- 
ed in 1916 at a cost of $115,000. Its equipment con- 
sists of two large lobbies — one for men and one for 
boys — reading room, cafeteria, sixty dormitories, class 
and committee rooms, gymnasium, running track, hand 
ball court, locker rooms, shower baths, tile swimming 
pool with filtered water, billiard tables, bowling alleys, 
and in fact everything that goes into a fully equipped, 
modern Association building. 



The staff is composed of a General Secretary, 
Director of Boy's Work. Director of Physical Educa- 
tion and Office Secretary. These are all trained and 
e.xperienced men, who are able to give to the mem- 
bers the very best program of activities and service. 

The membership is at present approximately 700 
men and 400 boys, and with their multitude of activi- 
ties tax the building and equipment to the limit. 

While the Association deals with both men and 
boys, yet in actual practice most of the emphasis is 
placed on the work among the boys and youth of the 
city. The guiding principle is expressed by the say- 
ing, "It is better to build a fence at the top of the cliflF, 
than to place an ambulance at the bottom." The most 
intensive work is of course among its members, and 
yet it serves in a very definite way fully six hundred 
boys of the city and vicinity outside of the member- 
ship. 



Page Fo rty-six '^FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

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Page Forty-seven 



The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation is primarily the development of Christian 
character among men and boys. The local Associa- 
tion's statement of purpose is somewhat more definite. 

Statement of Purpose of the Freeport Y. M. C. A. 

1. To win men and boys to the Christian life. 

2. To develop men and boys spiritually, mentally, 
physically and socially ; an all around development. 

3. To eliminate undesirable habits, by the sub- 
stitution of profitable habits. 

4. To give proper direction to the energy of 
youth. 

5. To discover and develop latent ability. 

6. To inculcate the idea of service for others. 

7. To discover, train and supply leaders for 
church and community. 

8. To cooperate with and supplement the work of 
other agencies dealing with men and boys. 

The Y. M. C. .\. is a high grade men's and boy's 
Club, Christian, but non-sectarian. 

It is an athletic organization that does not use 
men to promote athletics, but uses athletics to develop 
men. 

It is home for young men away from home. 

It is a place for a young man to find friends and 
to make himself a friend to others. 

The program of the Association is varied enough 
to meet the needs and interests of any and all groups 
of men and boys as will be seen by the summarized 
program which follows. 

Bible Classes. Religious meetings for both men and 
boys. Gospel teams. Personal Interviews, State and 
Local Older Boys Conferences, Leader Training 
Groups, Training Class for Gospel Team Workers, 
Hi-Y Clubs with their large range of activities, and 
a whole hearted cooperation with the Churches and 
Sunday Schools include the major religious activities 
of the Association. 

Reading Room, lectures, educational classes and 
clubs, public speaking classes, vocational guidance 
groups and leader training clubs are the principle edu- 
cational features. 

Physical examinations, shower baths, swimming 
and swimming instruction, calisthenics, gymnastics, 
track events, mass games, bowling, athletics, wrestling, 
boxing, volley ball, indoor base ball, basket ball are 
only a partial list of the indoor athletic activities. 
Hikes, outings, camps, horse shoes, tennis, bicycling, 
follow as part of the summer program. 

Lobby Pops, socials, parties, carnivals, billiards, 
checkers, game tournaments and leagues, gym and 
swimming exhibitions. Father and Son, and Mother 
and Son banquets, dinners, wiener roasts, fire side 
stunts, movies, stereopticon exhibitions and dozens of 
other similar affairs, indicate the attractive social pro- 
gram that is constantly under way in the big Associa- 
tion building. 



In addition to the regular program for members 
there is a great amount of work carried on for those 
who are unable to participate as members. The fol- 
lowing list of such activities give some idea of the 
volume of such work. 

Sunday School Basket Ball League, 110 boys. 
Grade School Basket Ball League, 120 boys. 
City Basket Ball League. 65 young men. 
City Basket Ball Tournament, 80 young men. 
County Basket Ball Tournament, 60 young men. 
County horse shoe tournament, 30 men. 
Grade School swimming instruction, 250 boys. 
Xon-members taught to swim, 146 boys. 
Cooperation with High School in all athletics. 
Entertaining all visiting High School teams, 200 
boys. 

Twilight Base Ball League, 125 men. 
Hikes and outings, 200 boys. 
Church Bowling League, 50 men. 
Lobb.v Pops and Open House, Open to the public. 
Tri County Older Boys Conference, 125 Boys. 
Gospel Teams furnished to churches within and 
without the city. 

Father and Son Banquet, 600 men and boys. 
Cooperation with churches and Sunday schools 
and Young People's societies. 

.\ Board of Directors composed of fifteen promi- 
nent Freeport business and professional men, are re- 
sponsible for the policies, program and finances of the 
Association. The budget of $30,000 is carefully ad- 
ministered under their supervision. 

The membership fees, the income from the busi- 
ness features, such as dormitory and restaurant, and 
the endowment income cover the major part of the 
e.xpense, but in addition there must be raised each 
year approximately $6000 to cover the expense of the 
Boys Division. This amount has to be raised in con- 
tributions from the friends of boys in the city. 

Freeport men have always been strong advocates 
and supporters of the Y. M. C. A. 

Because, Character, the product of the Y. M. C. A. 
is the basis of a successful life. 

Because, the Y. M. C. A. makes a strong bid for 
the spare time of men and boys and thus finds oppor- 
tunity to direct their energies into wholesome channels. 

Because the physical activities meet a real need in 
the lives of young men and boys. Clean sport and 
clean speech become habits at the Y. M. C. A. 

Because the Y. M. C. A. is a fine place for social 
life and fellowship under splendid surroundings and 
under proper supervision. 

Because it prompts religious life through Bible 
classes, training classes, lectures and personal inter- 
views. 

Because it builds clean, virile Christian manhood. 

Because the Y. M. C. A. invests Sympathy and 
gets Friendship; it invests Truth and gets Confidence; 
it invests Money and gets Manhood. 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



Page Forty-eight '^FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

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Wagner Printing Co. I 









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Freeporfs Dependable Printers 

for over -jo years -since iSj^ 



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Freeport, Illinois 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Forty-nine 




YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 




YOUNG WOMEN'S CHKlsllAN ASSOCIATION 



Page Fifty "FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



O. D. EMERICK C. L. RINGER 



EMERICK & RINGER 

S W. STEPHENSON STREET 

DIAMONDS PEARL BEADS 

WATCHES CORDOVA PURSES 

CLOCKS UMBRELLAS 

JEWELRY POTTERY 

FINE HAVILAND CHINA DINNER SETS 

(OPEN STOCK) 



CHARLES DEMETER 



WALL PAPER AND PAINTS 
PAINTING 
SIGN WRITING 

ARTISTS MATERIALS PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS 

WINDOW SHADES C>ILS AND VARNISHES 

ROOM MOULDING PAPER HANGING 

Estimates Given on Interior Decorating 

Sole Agents for the Sherwin-Williams Co.'s 

Paints and Varnishes 



A. C. EMRICH 



"QUALITY" 
CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS 

I'KEEPORT, ILLINOIS 



MAKE IT Y O L" R HOME 



Page Fifty-one 



Young Woman's Christian Association 

By Miss Add Lionberger, General Secretary 

physical, social, mental and spiritual training and to 
become a social force for the extension of the King- 
dom of God. 



HOUSED in a well kept S12.000 club house sur- 
rounded by attractive shrubbery and backed 
by a recreational ground which includes out- 
of-door basket ball and tennis courts, the 
Freeport Y. W. C. A. is open the year around to the 
girls and women of the community. A large electric 
sign over the side walk invites the stranger to enter 
the very attractive home-Hke building, the equipment 
of which includes a large living room with fire-place, 
victrola, piano, books and magazines, a dining room, 
kitchen, offices, bowHng alleys and shower rooms on 
the first floor with a small gj-mnasium and an audi- 
torium on the second floor. 

The staff of the Association, a General and Asso- 
ciate Secretary, super\-ise the varied activities. .-Xmong 
these, during the first seven years of its existence, 
the Association sponsored: 

Physical — Gymnasium classes, bowling, tennis, 
basket ball, volley ball, roller skating. 

Social — Hikes, summer camps, slumber parties, 
picnics, circus, bazaars, parties, lawn fetes, ice cream 
socials, county fair. 

Mental — Classes in public speaking, telegraphy, 
short hand, book reviews, civics, musical history, 
Christmas gift making, cooking, sewing, French, 
English, millinery, typewriting, first aid, war activi- 
ties. 

Spiritual — Vespers, Bible study, weeks of prayer, 
conferences, conventions. Mission study. 

Girl Reserve — At least one Girl Reserve Corps 
is maintained in each grade school and a Junior and 
a Senior Orange and Black club in the High School. 

Older Clubs — Among the clubs of older girls were : 
Business women, comrade, many centers, rainbow, 
F. H. S.. girl scouts, makio, blue triangle, Vs Owls. 

Outside organizations to the number of eighteen 
make use of the building as a place of meeting. 

Financial 

The local association has been on a sound financial 
footing since its founding in 1917. The building was 
opened free of debt and has been run at an average 
of $10,000 a year and each year has closed with no 
indebtedness. 

Purpose 

The purpose of the V. \V. C. A. is to promote 
growth in Christian character and service through 



Early Beginning 

The first step toward the beginning of a Young 
Woman's Christian .Association in Freeport was taken 
by the Campfire Girls in 1917 under the direction of 
Miss Ruth Hughes, guardian of the local camp. 

The girls soon interested a number of women in 
the project and these consecrated women determined 
to pay the mortgage on the Freeport Club House and 
purchase the building. Among the early workers 
were Mrs. Dexter Knowlton, Mrs. Edward Bengston, 
Mrs. Harvey Zartman, Miss Bertha Bidwell, Mrs. 
B. .\. Arnold, Mrs. Mosely and others whose stories 
of the early struggles are as fascinating as a novel. 

Especially interesting was the meeting at which 
only a few very much discouraged women gathered 
at the home of Mrs. Dexter Knowlton. The women 
were telling that they had been repeatedly advised 
to give up the project because of war times and 
were telling each other of many rebuffs when one 
dear woman whose hearing was not very acute and 
so had missed much of the conversation, knelt to 
pray. She thanked God for the success they were 
having, asked for a strengthening of their faith and 
thanked Him for their ultimate success. 

The women present were so stirred that they 
would not tell her of their discouragements but went 
forth determined to succeed and in May 1917 the 
building was opened to the women and girls of Free- 
port, free from debt. Within two years of the open- 
ing night, one out of every ten of the girls and women 
in Freeport belonged to the Y. W. C. A. 

The first secretary. Miss Margaret White, was de- 
voted to the cause and served faithfully until called 
to serve her country as a Y. W. C. A. worker at the 
French front. Here she labored until the close of the 
war when she was assigned to the work of the -Asso- 
ciation in Turkey. 

The Freeport -Association has in the past and 
always will stand as a place where the highest stand- 
ard of womanhood is upheld and as such it welcomes 
within its doors the women and girls of the com- 
niunitv. 



Stephenson County Agricultural Situation 

Bv L. M. Swanzev, Pres. Farm Bureau 



SIEPHEXSOX County is naturally one of the 
most beautifully located, as well as being most 
varied in its production, in the State of Illinois. 
Lying at the extreme northern boundry, it 
shares with Wisconsin, the many small streams that 
are tributary to the Pecatonica River, whose valley 
is one of beauty from early spring until the autumn 
leaves have fallen. Everj-where are scattered burr oak 



and sugar maple, with frequent groves of oak, elm and 
ash, telling of the forests that were once protected 
from prairie fires by the bed of the river. .Along 
these streams and among these forests, the first 
settlers built their homes and developed their farms. 

To the south and west, Stephenson County has a 
prairie soil that vies with Central Illinois in fertility. 
.As a whole the county is of a rolling topography. 



U. OF ILL LIB. 



Page Fifty-two 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



SWARTZ & CRAWFORD 

'Prescription T)ruggists 

A SERVICE STATION OF CIVILIZATION 

THE HOME OF S. & C. REMEDIES 



FREEPOPJ PAPER BOX CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 
SET UP AND FOLDING 



PAPER BOXES 



QUALITY AND SERVICE 
FREEPORT PAPER BOX CO. 

PHONE MAIN 177 



HARDWARE. TOYS, 

DRUGS, TOILET 

PREPARATIONS, FOOD 

AND CLOTHING BOXES 



PRESCOTT & GOCHNAUR 



20 West Main Street 



STYLE WITHOUT EXTRAX'AGANCE 



H. H. PRESCOTT 
G. A. GOCHNAUR 



LADIES and MISSES READY-TO-WEAR 
AND MILLINERY SPECIALISTS 



A. LEATH & CO. 

FURNISHERS OF BEAUTIFUL HOMES 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 



One of 24 Leath Stores, whose J^Iillions of buying power makes it possible for the 

conmiunities they serve to buy 
GOOD FURNITURE FOR A LITTLE LESS 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Fifty-three 



Tlic principle types of soil are brown silt loam, 
and yellow gray silt loam, with many variations in 
smaller areas, containing more or less clay or sand, 
with out-cropping gravel and limestone. General 
farming has always characterized the county. While 
in an early day vast quantities of grain were shipped 
out of the county, at the present time the ma- 
jor part of the farms feed their entire crop to live- 
stock upon the farm, as is evidenced by a livestock 
production of $4,595,100 annually. The large and nu- 
merous barns and silos to be seen everywhere, tell the 
tourist that they are in a dairy country. The exten- 
sive limestone and alfalfa program put on by the Farm 
Bureau, makes it evident that Stephenson County will 
continue to not only be a dairy county, but is to be a 
leading county in breeding the best type of high 
producing dairy cattle. 

The Holstein Friesian has been and w-ill continue 
to be the predominating breed because Stephenson 
County is the leading cheese producing county in the 
state, and contributes very largely to the condensary 
and whole milk trade as well as to butter making. 
Brown Swiss and Milking Shorthorns compose many 
herds. 

While milk prices vary with the season, the many 
market outlets give the dairyman the competitive 
markets of two shipping points to the Chicago whole 
milk trade, about 25 cheese factories, mostly co- 
operative ; four large creameries, one condensary and 
the local supply to Freeport. 

The Stephenson County Holstein-Friesian Breed- 
ers disburse a large number of breeding stock and 
milk cows at their fall and winter sales and the Tri- 
County Shorthorn Breeders, representing Stephenson, 
Winnebago and Ogle Counties, also sell twice a year 
at Freeport. 

The importance of pork production is evidenced by 
farmers' shipping associations covering all points in 
the county, and also by the prominence of the County 
Swine Breeders Association with their regular sales 



in I'reeport as well as many other large breeders' 
sales. Duroc, Polands, Chester Whites and Spotted 
Polands are the popular breeds in the order named. 
Poultry 
Freeport has been widely know-n as a poultry 
breeding center for the last twenty years. The hatch- 
ery interests are developing at a rate that keeps pace 
with breeding production ; and general egg and poultry 
production is increasing from general farm flocks, 
with the growth of the accredited hatchery. 

The annual sales of market eggs and poultry are 
conservatively estimated at $1,250,000. 

There are about 2790 farms in Stephenson County, 
averaging about 125 acres each. The number of ten- 
ants at the present time is less than half of the farm- 
ers. A large number of landlords and tenants are 
getting together on a form of livestock lease that tends 
toward longer leases and less shiftlessness. 

Stephenson County Farmers do not berate the 
tenant farmer, but offer safe opportunity to the man 
who can keep pace with them. 

It has been because of the intensive farming and 
aggressive livestock enterprises that they did not 
suffer financially as severely as the grain farmer of 
the West, during the years of depression. Better 
buildings, better equipment and better methods of 
farming — which mean more fertility returned to the 
fields ; and a larger use of limestone and phosphate are 
bringing their reward, as is evidenced by a farm sell- 
ing recently a few miles from Freeport at $300 per 
acre. 

There are 1400 members in the Stephenson Coun- 
ty Farm Bureau and for more tlian a year the Home 
Bureau has been growing in touch and service with 
the homes of the county. 

There are three cooperative elevators, two co- 
operative stores, and one creamery, with the 17 ship- 
ping associations and about 25 cheese factories. These 
bespeak the growth of the group and community 
idea in business among our farmers. 



Fraternities 



FREEPORT has the usual number of fraterni- 
ties and secret societies. Many of them own 
their own homes. The Odd Fellows Temple is 
a splendid building with the largest auditorium 
in the city. The valuation of this Temple is approxi- 
mately $100,000. The Elks and Moose are well housed 
and are very active in local affairs. Knights of Pythias 
are active in local affairs as are many others. 

MASONRY 

By B. L. Figeley 

There are two Blue Lodges in Freeport namely ; 
Excelsior, chartered February 1850 with a membership 
of 652 and Evergreen chartered in 1855 with a member- 
ship of 389. 

Every branch of Masonry has a very active body 
in Freeport such branches being the Cliapter R. A. M., 
Council R. & S. M., Commandery, Eastern Star, 
White Shrine and Boy Builders. All of which hold 
rigular semi-monthly meetings in the Masonic Temple. 

Freeport Consistory chartered in 1873 now has a 
membership of 3000 members located throughout 



northern Illinois. This body meets semi-annually and 
is the owner of the Masonic Temple and adjoining 
property representing an investment of $150,000. We 
might add that it is the expectation of Freeport Con- 
sistory to erect in the very near future a large temple 
and auditorium that will be a credit to the fraternity 
and also a building that will be a valuable asset to 
Freeport for use as an auditorium. 

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 

By William Wilson, .\ltorney 

The Freeport Knights of Columbus are located in 
their large and spacious home situated in the heart 
of the business district of the city. 

The home is modern in every respect and thor- 
oughly equipped to afford to its members the utmost 
comfort and recreation. The club rooms are open 
daily and are constantly in charge of a competent cus- 
todian, offering to its members and visitors a cordial 
wt Iconic at all times. The home is designed and pro- 
vided with the finest equipage, consisting of pool and 



Page Fifty-four 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



The Freeport Rotary Club 

Meets every Monday noon at 12:10 and most cordially in- 
vites all visiting Rotarians or any one interested in our 
city to attend. 

As to the activities of this organization would respect- 
fully refer you to the splendid article of our Brother 
Rotarian, L. A. Fulwider on the opposite page. 

Freeport is not only recognized for its standing as a most 
advantageous manufacturing center, its healthf ulness and 
beauty but also for its many flourishing and delightful 
Fraternal organizations. 

He Profits Most Who Serves Best 




Service Before Self 



OFFICERS 

C. P. GUENTHER. President 
GEO. X. CANNON. Vice President 
C. F. OGDEN. Secretary 
A. C. EMRICH, Treasurer 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



PROGRAM, M. B. Marvin. 
P.USINESS METHODS, Oscar Ennenga. 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN, H. J. Credicott. 
GOOD ROADS, L. H. Burrell. 
PUBLICITY, W. H. Kunz. 
MUSIC, H. H. Stahl. 
SOCIAL, R. J. Stewart. 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 

J. H. Nortridge 
BOY'S WORK, H. B. Zartman. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 
C. F. Ilildreth. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS. J. S. Clark 

E.MPLOYER & EMPLOYEES, 
L. T. Fargher. 

EDUCATIONAL, J. R. Jackson. 

CONFERENCES & CONVENTIONS, 
A. J. Stukenlierg. 

FELLOWSHIP & INTRODUCTORY, 
H. C. Boeke. 

SPORTS, W. F. Ridgway. 

SICK AND VISITING, F. W. Ridgway. 

EMPTY STOCKING, G. X. Cannon. 



MA K E IT YOUR HOME 



Page Fiftv-five 



billiard rooms, card rooms, beautitul ball room, and 
large and inviting lounging apartments. 

The membership of the Council consists of ap- 
proximately 800 citizens of the City of Freeport. The 



council is very active in both fraternal work and social 
entertainment, and has always assisted and been high- 
ly interested in all civic affairs tending toward the 
betterment of the City of Freeport. 



Rotary 



By Prof. L. 

PROFESSIONAL men and business men com- 
ing to Freeport are glad to find in this city one 
of the most representative and active Rotary 
Clubs in International Rotary. The district 
governor of this district recently said that the Freeport 
Club was regarded as one of the strongest clubs in his 
district. The club was organized in 1918 and held its 
first meeting under its first officers on N'oveniber 11 
of that year. There are now 68 members of Freeport 
Rotary which is one of 1800 Rotary Clubs in 17 coun- 
tries of the world with a total membership of more 
than 100,000. 

Rotary is well known as the pioneer service or- 
ganization and prospective citizens will at once feel 
assured that Freeport is an inviting city when they 
know that they wnll find here a strong and active Ro- 
tary Club. 

While it is one of the fundamental principles of 
Rotary to inspire its membership to take an active in- 
terest in the functioning of civic organizations to 
which they belong, some of the outstanding achieve- 
ments of Freeport Rotary may be modestly stated. 

For six years Freeport Rotary has financed and 
directed the "Empty Stocking" enterprise. Every year 
a survey of the city is made by the associated chari- 
ties and those homes of the city are noted in which 
there would be no Christmas presents to brighten the 
day for unfortunate children. The name and address 
of each child is secured, appropriate presents of toys, 
candies and fruits are packed and labeled, and on 
Christmas morning every member of Freeport Rotary 
in Automobiles, call at these homes and courteously 
present the Christmas gifts to the children who other- 
wise would have a dreary Christmas. The happiness 
of the children is equalled only by the joy of gift bear- 
ers. 

Freeport Rotary's Community Christmas Tree is 
an annual event in the city. For a week before 
Christmas Rotary"s large decorated and illuminated 
Christmas tree adorns the Courthouse lawn. At V 
o'clock Christmas day the less fortunate children of 
the city are entertained about the great tree by a band 
concert, and then more than 2500 of them file through 
the court house corridors greeted by Santa Claus, and 
receive at the hands of the Rotarians, toys, candy an . 
fruit. For hundreds of children an otherwise dull da> 
becomes a cheerful Christmas. 

Freeport Rotary has an active part in the work for 
crippled children. Every member of Freeport Rotary 
is a member of the Ilhnois Society for Crippled chil- 
dren. In addition to membership dues, Freeport Ro- 
tary contributes hundreds of dollars to the local and 
state funds to aid in procuring surgical service and sur- 
gical appliance to relieve the suffering of the children 
and to rebuild them and make them able to become 
useful and happy members of society. The Freeport 
clinic held monthly with the assistance of the 
Amity Society is sponsored and financed by the 



A. Fulwider 

Rotary Clubs of Illinois, of which Freeport Rotary 
is an active contributing member. At a single day's 
clinic more than 30 children of all types of crippled 
condition are brought, some of them for 30 miles to 
receive at Rotary's direction relief and strength to 
grow into useful manhood and womanhood. In all 
this, the Empty Stocking plan, the Community Christ- 
mas tree, and the healing of crippled children the 
great heart of Rotary is cheerfully expressed. 

In work for the children Freeport Rotary has 
aided the Y. M. C. .\.. the Y. \Y. C. A., boys camp, the 
back to school movement. 

The good roads comni'ttee of Freeport Rotary has 
led for good roads in Stephenson County. Through its 
etirorts many miles of graded and oiled roads were 
constructed, and the county patrol system adopted. 
Annually Freeport Rotary entertains at luncheon all 
the patrolmen and the county supervisors, prizes of 
several hundred dollars being awarded to the more 
efficient patrol men. The committee has been influen- 
tial in securing the right of way for hard roads and in 
cooperating with the state hard roads organization 
to the effect that 42 miles of concrete road have been 
laid in Stephenson county. 

Freeport Rotary stands solidly and actively with 
the Freeport Chamber of Commerce to aid that body 
to function efficiently for the city. Its members are 
large contributors to the credit Bureau fund, the pur- 
pose of which is to aid local industries and to secure 
new industries, several members contributing §5000 a 
piece. 

Prominent among the achievements of Freeport 
Rotary are inter-city Rotary meetings and annual golf 
matches with the Madison Rotary Club. 

The Lincoln-Douglas debate celebration August 27, 
1921, was initiated at a meeting of Freeport Rotary by 
one of its members, and because of its city-wide im- 
portance its direction was passed on to the Chamber 
of Commerce. This event was of nation wide inter- 
est and 25,000 people gathered in the city to hear two 
great orators. Senator Pat Harrison and Honorable 
Karl Schuyler in commemoration of the great de- 
bate of Lincoln and Douglas in 1858. 

Many eminent speakers have been brought to the 
city of Freeport Rotary among whom should be men- 
tioned, Fritz Kunz, of India : Wallace Bruce Amsbury ; 
George Hambrecht, Jacob Rubin, Gov. Charles S. 
Deneen, Senator Medill McCorniick, Senator McKin- 
zie, Senator Pat Harrison, Hon. Karl Schuyler, Dr. 
East. Jim Hcrron, Private Peat, Douglas Malloch. 
President Markham of the Illinois Central Railroad, 
\'ice President Thomas Marshall, Hon. John Barrett 
of Washington City, President McConnaughy of 
Knox College and President Brannon of Beloit Col- 
lege. 

To prospective citizens of Freeport Rotary says, 
"Come and live with us in one of the most historic and 
most happy cities in America. Freeport Rotary Wel- 
comes you." 



Page Fifty-six 'FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



MOOGK and MEISENBACH 



DRUGGISTS AND PHARMACISTS 

AT YOUR SERVICE 
22-24 South Chicago Avenue 



ROBT. LUECKE SONS 



EVERYTHING FOR MEN AND BOYS 
SHOES FOR EVERYBODY 



18 E. Main St. 
Established 1867 



ESTABLISHED 1896 TELEPHONE MAIN 264 

THE W.H.SHONS COMPANY 

CONTRACTORS 

BUILDERS OF BRIDGES IN ILLINOIS. WISCONSIN, IOWA. INDIANA. 
KENTUCKY AND TENNESSEE 



H. H. HINELINE 

lis N. Van Buren Ave., Telephone 221 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 

Estimates Furnished — Jobbing Promptly Attended to 

40 years e-Kperience in the routint;- Inisiness. 



MAKE IT ^' O L R HOME 



Page Fifty-seven 





EAST SIDE SCHOOL 



UNION STREET SCHOOL 




THIRD WARD SCHOOL 





LINCOLN SCHOOL 



FIRST WARD SCHOOL 



Page Fifty-eight 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



Freeport 

Kiwanis 

Club 




OFFICERS 

A. H. STEENROD. President 

C. H. KNOWLTON, First Vice President 

G. H. SCHMELZLE. Second Vi^e President 

AL SMYTH Treasurer 

GEO. P. SMITH, Scribe 

JUDGE O. E. HEARD, Trustee 

DR. F. BACHE VAN NUYS, Secretary 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

HENRY HAMILTON 

B. C. TRUEBLOOD 
CARL KIPLINGER 
ROSS HEPNER 

A. A. HAAS 
E. R. SHAW 
A. R. DRY 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN 

ATTENDANCE 

Donald Billis 
BUSINESS METHODS 

Fred V. Hayner 
CLASSIFICATION and 
MEMBERSHIP 

C. A. Stelle 
EDUCATION 

B. C. Trueblood 
ENTERTAINMENT 

H. H. Deery 
FINANCE 

H. W. Hamilton 
GOOD ROADS 

Chas. Hepner 
GRIEVANCE 

W. A. Hutchins 
HOUSE 

G. W. Benfer 
INTER CITY and CLUB 

O. E. Heard, Jr. 

INDUSTRIAL 

J. J. Riley 
LAW and REGULATION 

E. R. Shaw 
MUSIC 

Art Franz 
PROGRAM 

C. T. Kiplinger 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
A, A. Haas 

PUBLICITY 

George P. Smith 
RECEPTION 

Glen Carter 
SICK 

Edw. Gilbert 
SPORTS 

Ozro Hill 

UNDER PRIVILEGED CHILD 
A, R. Dry 



TN keeping with the slogan adopted by 
Freeport Kiwanis for the year 1925 — 

''Selling Freeport to Itself and to 
the World" 

And in the spirit of the slogan of the 
Industrial Committee — 

"Freeport Is Our Home--- 
Make It Your Home" 

We take this opportunity of saying we 
honestly believe Freeport is worthy of 
the most careful consideration by an 
industry seeking a location and by those 
seeking the Ideal home city. 
Freeport Kiwanis cordially invites you 
to come and see us. 



REGULAR MEETINGS WEDNESDAY 12:15 HOTEL LICONDO. KIWANIANS ALWAYS WELCOME 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Fifty-nine 



Kiivanis 

By Dr. F. Bache Van N'uys 
Secretary Freeport Kiwaiiis Club 



KIWAXIS International is a composite group of 
men engaged in business, the professions and 
in agriculture, who, through a unique type of 
organization, are rendering civic and social 
service of a most practical nature to the respective 
communities in which the many clubs are located. 

This International organization is made up of 
almost 1300 clubs in as many cities of the United States 
and Canada, each of these clubs enjoying large auton- 
omy, but each functioning in direct connection with 
district and International administration. 

A Kiwanis Club is a local organization, whose rea- 
son for being is based on service to the community for 
the benefit of all in the conmiunity. Each club is made 
up of two leaders in each business and profession in 
the city, who are brought together in close association 
and fellowship to aid in the solution of their local, 
state and national problems. Because of the type of 
membership, its freedom from political, racial or sec- 
tarian prejudices, and the team-work developed 
through personal contact, a Kiwanis Club is able to 
bridge the gap that would otherwise exist between 
highly specialized social service agencies and the 
general public. 

In every community there exists a shortage of in- 
fluential man power to carry out civic and social ser- 
vice projects, rather than a shortage of tasks. Agencies 
to promote industrial conditions, education, religion, 
and to render specialized service are needed in every 
community. In many they all are maintained, in 
others some features are neglected. In all, Kiwanis 
Clubs supply a co-ordinating element, which, as is 
shown by thousands of definite accompHshments each 
year, helps insure the success of a contemplated civic 
project. Kiwanis Clubs work for no political party, for 
no sect, for no one class of any kind. 

The name "Kiwanis" is a coined word. The real 
meaning of it today is the result of the constructive, 
unselfish work of Kiwanians. The motto of the or- 
ganization, "We build" is an expression of the spirit of 
Kiwanis. 

In all this work, Kiwanis believes that progress in 
a community depends upon the organized influence of 
its citizens. The influences should be representative 
of the whole community. If it is representative, and is 
free from petty jealousies, it can stimulate good legis- 
lation, obedience to law and order and can build to 
general civic betterment. 

Kiwanis believes that the problems of communi- 
ties are opportunities for service. It recognizes these 
opportunities as duties, and that duties call for per- 
formance. 

A report of the activities of Freeport Kiwanis 
Club can only be given in part — a full report would 
cover pages of this book. 

Freeport Kiwanis took leadership in the effort to 
promote monthly round table meetings betweci. 
Rotary, Chamber of Commerce and Kiwanis. It took 
almost a whole year to get results but a booster meet- 
ing of the three organizations, and the general citizen- 
ship, early in December 1924 started the ball rolling, the 
future holding prospect of real cooperation. 



A drive to put over the .\. Y. P. Trail was an ap- 
parent failure until taken in hand by Kiwanis. Result — 
Freeport has the trail. 

(iave material aid to the .Vniity Society making a 
cash donation to the free tiiilk fund as a part of Ki- 
wanis Christmas activities. 

Promoted a Tri-Statc Kiwanis conference in Iowa, 
Wisconsin and Illinois. Hundreds attended and de- 
clared it the greatest single effort successfully pro- 
moted by any club. 

Gave active assistance to the successful drive for 
an Old Folks Home. 

Inaugurated the plan of holding the weekly meet- 
ing in communities tributary to Freeport. Meetings 
held at Lena, Cedarville and Van Brocklin, each a 
great success. 

Successfully organized the Credit Extension which 
is explained elsewhere. Made possible the present ac 
tive and harmonious cooperation existing between all 
organizations looking to the improvement of local In 
dustrial conditions. 

Brought to Freeport, Kiwanis effort alone, two in- 
dustries. One a Garment Factory with a capacity of 
sixty employees and the other a Hatchery which is : 
branch of the largest Hatchery in the world. This 
Hatchery will bring thousands of dollars to Freeport 
and will pay large amounts to egg and poultry pro- 
ducers in the surrounding territory. This Hatchery 
has one incubator with a capacity of 30.000 eggs each 
hatching. The buildings and equipment cost around 
S30.000 and are a great asset to Freeport. 

Brought to Freeport many noted speakers of 
national reputation. Among them. Proctor of Michi- 
gan, who was a delegate to the convention which 
nominated Abraham Lincoln for President ; Jamie 
Heron, Daniel Wentworth, Thomas J. Webb, Xic Le 
Grand, Fred High, the community builder, Dudley of 
the Chicago Press Club, Jules Brazil of Toronto and 
many local speakers of note, Donald Breed, Clark 
Eichelberger. George Ladd Munn. Each of these 
speakers had an audience among which were Rotar- 
ians, prominent business and professional men not 
Kiwanians as the local Club always passes the good 
things around. 

The social activities are many and of the highest 
type. Dinner dances, parties, social visits to other clubs 
with return visits, l)owling matches, golf matches, etc. 
Took the Orphan's Band to the District convention 
at Galesburg. This band consists of thirty orphan 
boys from the local orphans home. Carried in a splen- 
did Freeport float in the Galesburg parade this band 
attracted wide attention and approval. Freeport Ki- 
wanis always gives this orphanage a happy Christmas 
remembrance consisting of toys, fruits, candies, etc., 
distributed l)y a real Santa Claus. 

Freeport Kiwanis stands unitedly and loyally be- 
hind the Chamber of Commerce in all of its activities. 
Freeport Kiwanis has adopted as its 1925 slogan, 
"Selling Freeport to Itself and to the World." 

Freeport Kiwanis meets Wednesday of each week 
at noon luncheon. Visiting Kiwanians always wel- 
come. 



Page Sixty 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



Sold All Over The World 




HOME OF NORTH RIDGE BRUSHES 



ONE OF THE 

LARGEST 

TWISTED-IN- 

WTRE BRUSH 

COMPANIES 

IX AMERICA 

NORTH 

RIDGE 

BRUSHES 

ARE 

SANITARY 

CONVENIENT 

ECONOMICAL 



ILLINOIS LARGEST PURE BRED POULTRY BUSINESS 

AND HATCHERY 

We sell 53 varieties of Pure-Bred Poultry, Eggs for Hatching, Baby Chicks, 
Incubators, Brooders and Poultry Supplies. 

Produce Baby Chicks by the thousand every week during the season. Shoe- 
maker strain are of high quality and from well mated, line bred, heavy egg 
producing flocks. 

Over 55,000 customers in the United States, Canada and many foreign coun- 
tries. We satisfy and please or could not hold this large number of cus- 
tomers. 

We can ])lease you. Send for our Poultry and Baby Chick book. It is 
FREE. Just drop us a card, be friendly anyhow. 

SHOEMAKER POULTRY FARM AND HATCHERY 

BOX 202, FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 




MAKE IT YOUR HOME" 



Page Sixty-one 







s^;yc'- 









• ■'■ 'V•L^t'■■■•/'- 



SCENE IN KRAPE PARK 



Page Sixty-two - FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 

SINCE THE YEAR 1858 
THE HOME OF 

MEYER'S 

"Seek No Farther" CIDER VINEGAR 

CHAS. E. MEYER & CO. 

SPRING STREET 



KEENE CANNING COMPANY 

PACKERS OF THE FOLLOWING BRANDS 
OF CORN. PEAS AND PUMPKIN 

WHITE OWL, BICYCLE, EMBLEM, K, 
OUR COUNTRY, NOBILITY 

A HOME INDUSTRY 



UNION DAIRY COMPANY 

RETAILERS AND WHOLESALERS OF THE 

"BLUE RIBBON BRAND" OF MILK, CREAM 
AND BUTTER 

715-717 E. Stephenson Street 



HOLTUM MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

(NOT INC.) 
BRASS AND ALUMINUM FOUNDERS 

HOLTUM PRODUCTS 

Freeport, Illinois 



Manufacturers of 
CEMENT WORKERS TOOLS 
AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 
HEARSE HARDWARE 
RADIATOR CAPS, Etc. 
CONTRACT WORK TAKEN 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Sixtv-three 



Freeport Public Parks in 1924 

By Charles Demeter, President Park Board 



PUBLIC Parks in Freeport will stand comparison 
with any city tour times the size of Freeport, 
whether in regard to beauty, size or attraction. 
Freeport has several small city parks and one 
large city park, oi 90 acres. One natural park outside 
the city limits of about 140 acres. The two large 
parks were acquired under the Illinois Park District 
Law and all Parks and Boulevard Drives are maintain- 
ed by the Park Board from taxes collected lor that 
purpose. 

The Freeport Park Board spends approximately 
$40,000 annually for the up-keep and improvements 
of these parks and roads. The City Park, called 
Taylor's Park, contains a seven acre artificial lake 
supplied by spring water, which is used for bathing 
purposes, also skating during the cold season : a bath 
house and beach, made use of by thousands of people 
during the hot summer months. Several miles of 
beautiful drive-ways bordered bj* trees, a band stand, 
shelter house, rows of tables and benches for pic- 
nickers. The several hundred benches are filled to 
capacity during the summer months when Sunday 
concerts are given by the Freeport Concert Band. 
There are tennis courts and other amusements for 
the use of the public. This park has a capacity 
for automobile parking of approximately 3,000 
cars. A baseball diamond is maintained for the 
use of the various organizations enjoying the Na- 
tional game. Within the last few years many flowers 
have been planted and are admired by the general 
public. This park is always used for the 4th of July 
celebration and other large gatherings not for profit 
and is free to the general public, subject to the park 
rules. 

Krape Park is beautifully located along Yellow- 
Creek among rugged cliffs covered by trees and shrubs 
of many varieties. The creek is dammed in the park 
and offers a fine stretch of water for the fifty or more 
canoes of private ownership. The Park Board also 
maintains a number of boats for the use of the public. 
This park has some wonderful places for picnickers 
and is extensively used by people from all over the 
northwest, sometimes in parties of fifty to one hundred 
cars, to spend the day in this beautiful park, where 
the facilities, such as tables, shelter houses, stoves, 
wood, water and lights are furnished in abundance by 
the Park Board. 

For the amusement of children, the Park contains 
two monkey houses, with various monkeys, always 
surrounded by young and old to watch their antics. 
A large variety of Deer and Elk. besides Buflfalo, 
Black Bear and other small animals are also main- 
tained in this park. Near the dam there is a Bath 
house and Bird house where a number of live and 
stuflfed birds are on exhibit. The Park Board also 



maintains a Plant Nursery for their own use in the 
Parks. This Park is being steadily improved by beau- 
tiful drives and boulevards. 

Leading to and from the park is a boulevard sys- 
tem which is being improved by the erection of beau 
tiful private homes. The Freeport Country Club with 
its beautiful grounds and club house is located on 
the north boulevard. The city street cars run to the 
entrance of the park, giving transportation during the 
summer and fall season. 

The citizens of Freeport are justly proud of this 
park, but a just description cannot be given, nor can 
the numerous improvements be mentioned, to do this 
park justice in this limited space. 

The Freeport Park Board is elected by the people 
and consists of five active business men. They have a 
vision for the future and by conservative management 
many improvements are planned and will be carried 
out in the coming years. 

More than 150,000 various game fish have been 
secured during this season from the State, to stock 
the water in this Park where fishing is permitted. 

The program laid out for the Freeport Parks is 
not a temporary one and as some of the park land- 
scape architects expressed themselves "Only the sur- 
face has been scratched." The 1925 program includes 
an additional city park to be constructed west of the 
new high school, beginning at Mosely Ave., and con- 
necting at the new park road, south on Empire St., 
giving a continuous drive on hard roads from Krape 
to Taylors Park. 

This Park will contain driveways, a small lake sup- 
plied by two springs, play grounds and walks. The 
Park consists of about six acres of land donated by 
public spirited citizens. 

A Park drive along the shore of Yellow Creek 
connecting route 26 on So. West Ave., to Krape Park 
is planned, also a scenic drive west of Krape Park and 
an additional 50 ft. boulevard into the park from the 
Pearl City road near Oakland Cemetery. The Park 
Board is astonished at the liberal and free oflEering of 
land for road purposes made by land owners in that 
vicinity and will avail themselves of this offering as 
soon as their finances will permit. 

A fish hatchery sponsored by the Isaac Walton 
League will be one of the new attractions in Krape 
Park in the coming year. 

Illinois law gives to Park Boards the right to build 
a Coliseum and, the year of 1925 may see a Coliseum 
erected in Taylor Park. Freeport needs a large 
assembly hall for conventions, fairs, exhibits and other 
large gatherings. 



Page Sixty-four 



_' FREEP ORT IS OUR HOME 




OiWfNDf^ MILLS 
IL-UATH 



xro.nu. 



w 








ft 



FOR 



ONE PRODUCT 

ONE COMPANY 

ONE LOCATION 

OVER HALF A CENTURY 

FREEPORT CAN SUPPLY YOUR NEEDS 



TheWoodmanse Mfg. Co. 



210 E. MAIN ST. 



FREEPORT, ILL. 






^=0 



WAGNER'S ICE CREAM 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



Phone 143-484 






o 
o 



Phone main I43 
established \90t 



^>.l^ 



^mM!Mj\^seimiel to yonxa 



INVESTMENTS 




MONEY TO LOAN 



REAL ESTATE 



WE EXTEND A CORDIAL INVITATION 
RIDE WITH US 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Sixtv-five 




SCENE IN TAYLORS PARK 




SCENE IN KRAPE PARK 



Page Sixty-six 



"FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



FREEPORT 

HAS BEEN GOOD TO US 

WE MAKE HIGH GRADE 

GREY IRON, ALUMINUM AND BRASS CASTINGS 

FOR 40 CHICAGO MANUFACTURERS 

WE DOUBLED OUR CAPACITY IN 1924 AND WILL SURELY 
DOUBLE IT AGAIN IN 1925 

SEND US SAMPLE CASTINGS FOR QUOTATION 

FREIDAG MFG. CO. 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 




The finest Theatre between 
Chicago and Minneapolis. 

Positively the last word in 
Theatre Construction. 

It is one institution that helps 
make Freeport a good placed in 
\vhich to live. 





MAKE IT YOUR H'O M E 



Page Sixty-seven 




LINDO THEATRE (Interior) 



= ,-..;■ ^^ -#^^^ 






-■Sits , ^; 't i ,. , ... ■••' 


■HM^ 





SCENE IN KRAPE PARK 



Page Sixty-eight 



''FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 



pbone 

MAIN 

7 



MAIN 

7 



Building Headquarters 



l.\JMBE^K CO. 



102 East Exchange St. 



phone 

MAIN 

7 



pkbne 

MAIN 

7 



BUILD IN FREEPORT DURING 

1925 



THE HOME OF GOOD LUMBER AND ECONOMY COAL 



FREDERICK G. SMITH & CO. 



327 EAST STEPHENSON ST., PHONE iMAIX :^3 



BUY FROM THE YELLOW WAGONS 



''MAKE IT YOUR HOME 



Page Sixty-nine 



The Prinlino Facilities of Freeport 



By Paul Wurtzell 






PRINTING facilities of Freeport 
are unlimited. Because of its ideal 
shipping location Freeport has become 
one of the best printing cities in the 
country and printed matter is sent to 
customers in nearly every State of the 
Union. Recently one of our printers handled a job 
for a South African concern. Printing equipment is 
one of the necessary things for every manufacturer 
to consider and in this respect Freeport is ideal. 

The Freeport printing plants are equipped to 
handle anything from a calling card to the largest edi- 
tions of mailing folders and catalogues both in one 
color and process colors. Manufacturers can rest as- 



sured of having the services of first-class modern 
equipment and printers who are artists in their line. 
Freeport plants are c<iui|)ped to handle English, 
French, Spanish, Portuguese and German composition. 
Many manufacturers send catalogues to countries that 
are inhaljitcd by the a])Ove nationalities and having the 
work done at lumie under direct supervision is of great 
advantage. 

The printing industry is represented by the H. J. 
Straub Printing Co., the Freeport Printing Company 
and Wagner Printing Company. These establish- 
ments have typesetting machines of every description 
and small and large cylinder presses. In addition to 
the above there are several small jobbing offices. 



Freeport Has a Live, Up-to-date Daily Newspaper 

By James R. Cowley 



In the Daily Journal-Standard Freeport has a 
live, up-to-date newspaper which is always abreast of 
the times and stands always for the best interests of 
Freeport and her people and institutions. It has a 
daily circulation close to 10,000 and covers Freeport 
and surrounding country and towns thoroughly. The 
paper carries the full leased wire service of the United 
Press ; has its own Washington correspondents ; the 
full service of the Newspaper Enterprise Association, 
and has many correspondents scattered throughout 
Northern Illinois and Southern Wisconsin. The paper 
prints from twelve to twenty-four pages a day and 
thoroughly covers the news of the world as well as 
state and county news and pays especial attention to 
the local news. 

The Journal-Standard has one of the most ex- 
pensive and complete plants in the state, outside of 
Chicago, and the physical value of its eeiuipnient is 
$150,000. It has six type-setting machines of the 
latest designs and they are in constant operation night 
and day. The paper has forty men and women on its 
pay-roll and this is in addition to fifty city carriers 
and a large staff of special correspondents. 

The Journal-Standard is a consolidation of the 
Freeport Bulletin. cstal)lished in 1847; the Freeport 
Journal, established in 1848, and the Freeport Stan- 



dard, established in 1887, all of which were published 
regularly up to the time of consolidation some jxars 
ago. 

The Journal-Standard is pul)lislied by the Free- 
port Journal-Standard Publishing Co., with the follow- 
ing officers: President, Jas. R. Cowley; Vice President, 
W. L. Kunz ; Secretary, W. H. Foil ; Treasurer, D. L. 
Breed. Jas. R. Cowley, who has been identified with 
the various publications mentioned above for the past 
forty years, is the editor of the Journal-Standard; T. 
H. Lawless, who has been identified with the news- 
papers of Freeport for the past twenty-five years is 
the city editor; D. L. Breed, is the business manager 
of the Journal-Standard, and is the son of the late 
D. B. Breed, who was identified with the newspapers 
of Freeport for over fifty years, and he succeeded his 
father as business manager. W. H. Kunz and W. H. 
Foil have been identified with the paper for the past 
ten or fifteen years, and many of the employees have 
been on the paper for many years. It has a splendid 
corps of employees and they are all boosters for Free- 
port. 

The Journal-Standard is a member of the Audit 
Bureau of Circulation; the National Press -Association; 
the Inland Press Association and the Illinois Press 
Association. 



Page Seventy ''FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 




HE Board of Directors of the 
Chamber of Commerce and the 
Industrial Committee, under whose 
supervision this book has been is- 
sued, respectfully direct the atten- 
tion of the reader to the fact in a 
treatise of this nature an adequate 
\vord picture could not be dra\vn. 

^ Facts tersely told have governed 
the writers of the articles, and addi- 
tional information and inquiries 
will be appreciated and promptly 
answered. The Chamber of Com- 
merce extends to you a cordial 
invitation to visit Freeport. 

Freeport Chamber of Commerce 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME' 



Page Seventy-one 



CRUM & FORSTER 



WESTERN DEPARTMENT 



TERRITORY: 



Ohio. Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South 
Dakota, North Dakota, Colorado, Wyoming, Xew Mexico. 

COMPANIES REPRESENTED: 

United States Fire Ins. Co., New York 

North River Ins Co.. New York 

United States Underwriters of New York 

Western Assurance Co., Toronto. Ontario 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto, Ontario 

Richmond Insurance Co., New York 

Union Fire Insurance Co. Buffalo, New York 

New York State Fire Insurance Co. Albany, New York 

Potomac Insurance Company, Washington, D. C. 

United States Merchants & Shippers Ins. Co. New York 

Writing all lines of insurance allied with Fire & Marine, maintaining an Engineering Department in a position to 
give expert service on Fire Engineering and Fire Prevention 



Asaett 


LiabiKtiei 


Policy Holder* 
Surplus 


$18,624,518 


$11,821,776 


$ 6,802,742 


12.323,399 


7,740,416 


4,582,983 


30,947,918 


19..V)2,193 


11,385.725 


4,296.821 


2.865,112 


1,431,709 


2,274,516 


1,451,783 


822,733 


1,993,070 


1,538,590 


454,480 


634,632 


223,835 


410,797 


774,557 


434,053 


340,504 


1,166.533 


613,006 


553,527 


4,447,786 


2,331,202 


2,116,584 



Chicago Brokerage & Service Office 

1849 Insurance Exchange, Chicago 

R. I. READ, Manager 



FRED M. GUND, Manager 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 



Marine Office 
803 Insurance Exchange 
THOS. S. DEERING, Manager 



Do you need Life, Accident and Health or Automobile Insurance? 
If you do Freeport's own Companies can supply 

your wants. 



BANKERS MUTUAL LIFE COMPANY 
PRAIRIE STATE CASUALTY COMPANY 



MID-WEST AUTOMOBILE UNDERWRITERS 



The amount of Losses paid by these Companies since their organization is over $1,000,000.00 

Combined admitted assets are over $250,000.00. 



Page Seventy-two 



'FREEPORT IS OUR HOME 




/xr£/vroc/cY 




' /^C £r/='or?-}' /i.i//s at s, 



T^£ /£>£/ii. /A/OUST/^/^/. C^^-r^TA? 



Freeporl is Our Home—^^al^e it Your Home 



We bought this space for the express 
purpose of telling the world what we think of 
Freeport. Good Old Freeport, City of Churches. 

We think it is the best city of its size 
(approximately twenty two thousand) in the United 
States. Geographically it is ideally located 
for manufacturing; and within one hundred and 
fourteen miles of Chicago. 

It has so many advantages over most of 
the larger cities that it would take a book much 
larger than this one to mention all of them. 
It's schools, churches and fraternal organiza- 
tions are the best to be found anywhere and its 
laboring men of the highest type, thrifty and 
industrious and most of them owning their own 
homes . 

We want to extend you a personal and most 
cordial invitation to locate in our beautiful 
city. 

Yours very sincerely, 




Pres 




FREEPORT'S METROPOLITAN STORE 

tubnlei^&porcher 



Dhy Goods . Coats . Suits , 
Millinery 6l Rugs 
19-2i.23-25w. main st. fheeportill. 




m'm^^^'"^'^' 




r.m ».& «•««'#.*«. ^*A*A*/'*A ^ . 



-• • %• ^ . ^ •A-^'AV- - - :'<*%v\ • 




UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOISURBWA 



CDD1 



fKoFTHECnOFFREEPOBT.UF 



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