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of Early English Drama 






416-585-4504 



PLEASE RETURN TO 

RECORDS OF EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA 

150 CHARLES STREET WEST 

TORONTO, ONT. M5S 1K9. 

ATTN: SALLY-BETH MACLEAN 



RECORDS OF EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA 



Records of Early English Drama 




SUSSEX 



EDITED BY CAMERON LOUIS 



BREPOLSQ PUBLISHERS 
and 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS 



University of Toronto Press Incorporated 2000 
Toronto Buffalo 
Printed in Canada 

First published in North America in 2000 by University of Toronto Press Incorporated 

ISBN 0-8020-4849-8 

and in the European Union in 2000 by Brepols Publishers 

ISBN 2-503-50905-3 



Printed on acid-free paper 

Canadian Cataloguing in Publication Data 

Main entry under title: 
Sussex 

(Records ot early English drama) 
Includes bibliographical references and index. 
ISBN 0-8020-4849-8 (University of Toronto) 
ISBN 2-503-50905-3 (Brepols) 

1 . Performing arts - England - Sussex - History - Sources. 

2. Theater - England - Sussex - History - Sources. 
i. Louis, Cameron, 1949- . n. Series. 

PN2595.5.S88S88 2000 790.2 09422 5 COO-900905-1 



This book has been published with the help of a grant from the Humanities and 
Social Sciences Federation of Canada, using funds provided by the Social Sciences 
and Humanities Research Council of Canada. 



The research and typesetting costs of 

Records of Early English Drama 

have been underwritten by the 

National Endowment for the Humanities and the 

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada 



Contents 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS vii TRANSLATIONS 223 

INTRODUCTION ENDNOTES 260 

Historical Background xi 

Drama, Music, and Ceremony xxxvi PATRONS AND TRAVELLING 

The Documents liv COMPANIES 293 

Editorial Procedures Lxxxiii 

Notes Ixxxviii GLOSSARIES 

Introduction 337 
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY c Latin Glossary 341 

English Glossary 353 

MAPS CIV 

INDEX 363 
SYMBOLS 2 

THE RECORDS 3 

APPENDIXES 

1 Taillifer and the Battle of Hastings 211 

2 Reports from the Great Yarmouth Herring Fair 215 

3 The Battle of Winchelsea 2 1 9 

4 Saints Days and Festivals 221 



Records of Early English Drama 



The aim of Records of Early English Drama (REED) is to find, transcribe, and publish 
external evidence of dramatic, ceremonial, and minstrel activity in Great Britain before 
1642. The executive editor would be grateful for comments on and corrections to the 
present volume and for having any relevant additional material drawn to her attention at 
REED, 150 Charles St West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1K9 or reed@chass.utoronto.ca. 

ALEXANDRA F. JOHNSTON University of Toronto DIRECTOR 
SALLY-BETH MACLEAN University of Toronto EXECUTIVE EDITOR 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 

PETER CLARK University of Leicester 

PETER GREENFIELD University of Puget Sound 

C.E. MCGEE University of St Jerome s College 

PETER MEREDITH University of Leeds 

DAVID MILLS University of Liverpool 

A.M. NELSON University of California, Berkeley 

BARBARA PALMER Mary Washington College 

J.A.B. SOMERSET University of Western Ontario 

ROBERT TITTLER Concordia University 

DEVELOPMENT BOARD 

EDWARD JACKMAN 
NADINA JAMISON 
PATRICIA KENNEDY 
J. ALEX LANGFORD 
PATRICIA MCCAIN 
MOIRA PHILLIPS 
ROSEANN RUNTE 
ELIZABETH WILSON 



EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD 

j.j. ANDERSON University of Manchester 

HERBERT BERRY 

DAVID BEVINGTON University of Chicago 
L.M. CLOPPER Indiana University 
JOANNA DUTKA University of Toronto 
IAN LANCASHIRE University of Toronto 
RICHARD PROUDFOOT King s College, 
London 

JOHN M. WASSON 
GLYNNE WICKHAM 

LAETITIA YEANDLE Folger Shakespeare 
Library 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

GORDON OXLEY Typesetter 
ARLEANE RALPH Associate Editor 
MIRIAM SKEY Bibliographer/Copy Editor 
ABIGAIL ANN YOUNG Associate Editor 



Acknowledgments 



The fact that it is my name that appears on the title page of this volume is in some ways a 
distortion of reality. There is no onlie begetter of this book but rather it is the result of the 
work and dedication of many individuals. Good fortune has played a large role in this project 
and a large part of that good fortune lies in the many colleagues, archivists, editors, supporters, 
and friends that I have been lucky enough to work with. It is my pleasure to acknowledge my 
many collaborators, without whose assistance it could not have been completed at all. 

Foremost among the collaborators have been the staffs of the record repositories of the 
documents published here. Almost invariably my research interest has been encouraged and 
welcomed with willing assistance and enthusiasm. I first would like to thank C.R. Davey, 
county archivist of the East Sussex Record Office, and his competent and knowledgeable staff, 
who have participated in this project for almost twenty years. I consider myself fortunate to 
have begun this project while Graham Mayhew was employed by the ESRO and to have bene 
fited from his exceptional knowledge (generously shared) of the Rye records. Dr Mayhew has 
also willingly helped with on-site checking of documents. Important assistance was provided 
by Philip Bye, Judith Brent, and Christopher Whittick, as well as others. 

Equally helpful have been the West Sussex county archivists, R.J. Childs and his predecessor, 
Mrs P. Gill. I deeply appreciate the interest and assistance of the WSRO staff, especially Alison 
McCann and Timothy McCann, who have provided informed answers to my many queries, 
have performed on-site checking, and have shown deep interest in and enthusiasm for this 
project since its inception. I would also like to acknowledge the assistance of Alan Redmond. 

At the Hastings Museum and Art Gallery my fellow researchers and I were welcomed and 
assisted by Victoria Williams, Catherine Walling, and Sophie Houlton. Further help was pro 
vided by Margaret Bird at the Rye Museum, Roger Norris at Durham Cathedral, and R.C. 
Yorke at the College of Arms. Mary Robertson of the Huntington Library answered some 
complex questions concerning the records of Battle Abbey. Also to be thanked are the staffs 
of Arundel Castle and Nottingham University Library. The Right Honourable the Earl of 
Scarbrough very generously provided me with a photocopy of one of his private documents 
and E.A. Everett, CBE, esq., facilitated access to the West Tarring Churchwardens Accounts 
when they were still kept at St Andrew s Church. 

I have also at various times had to rely on the services and good will of many colleagues 
and fellow researchers. Alan Nelson, James Gibson, and Alan Fletcher have been especially 



vni ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

generous with their time and talents in tracking down material for me and providing additional 
information. I am also indebted to Dr Gibson for permission to quote from and refer to his 
unpublished transcriptions of the records of east Kent. Some extensive checking of records was 
done by Ian Milder. Help with more specific problems (sometimes at very short notice) 
has been provided by the late Father Leonard Boyle, o.p., Claire Breay, Jane Cowling, J.C. 
Cummings, Peter Dembowski, Michael Heaney, Sheila Lindenbaum, Jeanne Shami, Reta Terry, 
Penny Tucker, and Laetitia Yeandle. William Edwards (in consultation with Brian Merrilees) 
did the translation of French texts and assisted with their transcription. Catherine Emerson 
checked the Latin Translations and Glossary. C.E. McGee drew my attention to the records of 
the Edwards family and generously provided me with copies of them along with the text of his 
own writings on the subject. 

An enormous amount of editing, correction, suggestion, encouragement, and criticism 
has come to me from the staff of the REED office in Toronto. As a former member of that 
staff I feel a close sense of camaraderie with them and hope the users of the REED volumes 
will appreciate their contribution to this very large enterprise. What has impressed me most 
about all the REEDers I have worked with is that they have looked upon their duties not 
merely as a job but they have carried out their duties with a sense of selfless idealism and 
dedication and a determination to get things right, Sally-Beth MacLean has performed her 
functions as executive editor in an admirably professional manner and provided many help 
ful suggestions and advice, in addition to organizing the office work on the volume. William 
Cooke was my first editorial contact at the office and did much of the palaeographical checking 
as well as invaluable research into the dating of documents. More recently he has been respons 
ible for checking the English Glossary. Theodore De Welles provided some initial bibliographical 
support as did Tanya Hagen at a later stage. I especially want to thank the trio of editors who 
have been my close collaborators as the volume has been brought into publishable form. 
Arleane Ralph did much of the palaeographicaJ checking (including an on-site visit to the UK), 
as well as managing the compilation of the records and keeping up a vigorous e-mail cor 
respondence with me to keep things to the schedule. Her tact and encouragement, as well as 
good cheer when things were not going so well, were much appreciated. Miriam Skey has been 
the bibliographer and has sent me many useful references. Later on she was the copy editor 
and fact checker; in this capacity she has been fierce in her pursuit of accuracy and saved me 
from many inconsistencies, errors, stylistic infelicities, sloppy thinking, and outright stupidities. 
Abigail Ann Young has provided a combination of skills in palaeography, Latin translation, 
church law, lexicography, and computer technology. Parts of this volume were only possible 
with the help of her unique scholarly abilities. The typesetting was done by Gord Oxley, with 
assistance from his predecessor William RowclirTe. Research for the Patrons and Travelling 
Companies section was carried out by John Lehr, with some preliminary work by Robert 
Ormsby. The business end of the REED project is managed by Cissy Yun. The two modern maps 
have been prepared by Subash Shanbhag. 

Another key role in improving the quality of this volume has been played by outside 
assessors and readers. Robert Tittler has provided many helpful comments and suggestions 
from the point of view of a historian. I have also been fortunate in the two anonymous 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

readers contacted by the University of Toronto Press. Their astute and remarkably detailed 
reports resulted in many changes ro this volume. 

The University of Regina has participated as well. At an early stage of my research Cam 
Blachford, former associate vice-president of research, gave encouragement and approved a 
research grant from the President s Fund. The university library staff and inter-library loans 
office have been unfailing in their assistance. Finally, M.A. Wigmore, head of the English 
Department, and K.M. Knutilla, dean of the Faculty of Arts, arranged for a reduced teaching 
load for me in the winter of 2000. This gesture, which can only be called extremely generous 
in this era of short staffing and underfunding, was of incalculable help at a key time in the 
production of this book and fully demonstrated the commitment of the university to research. 

I am also grateful for two summer research grants from the REED project. I formally acknow 
ledge permission to publish excerpts from documents held by the following repositories: 
Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, British Library, Dorset Archives Service, East Sussex Record 
Office, Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, Koninklijke Bibliotheek van Belgie-Bibliotheque 
Royale de Belgique, and Public Record Office. In quoting the documents in the West Sussex 
Record Office I acknowledge the permission of Chichester County Council; episcopal archives 
are quoted by permission of the bishop of Chichester; and the capitular archives are quoted by 
permission of the dean and chapter of Chichester. Parish documents are quoted by permission 
of the incumbents. The appropriate excerpts from the Battle Abbey accounts are reproduced 
by permission of The Huntington Library, San Marino, California. Extracts from the De Lisle 
MSS, a private collection, appear by kind permission of Viscount De Lisle. Quotations from 
Durham Dean and Chapter Library Ms. C.rv.27 appear by permission of the dean and chapter 
of Durham. Quotations from Oxford University College MS. 148 are printed by permission of 
the master and fellows of University College, Oxford. 

To conclude, I have three acknowledgments that I have to call special, because they are 
particularly heartfelt. First, I thank Father Edward Jackman, who has given generous financial 
support towards this volume through the Jackman Foundation. Equally important have been 
the interest, enthusiasm, and encouragement he has had for this project over the years. For 
me as a humanities scholar to have had a patron in these times is surely a unique experience 
for which I feel extremely grateful. I doubt that the travelling players of the Middle Ages and 
Renaissance were nearly so well served. 

Second, I would have to say that there are few people who have had as much influence on 
the direction of my life as Alexandra Johnston, the director of Records of Early English Drama. 
Sandy was the first reader of my PhD thesis, gave me my first job, introduced me to the person 
who was to become my wife, and asked me to take on the Sussex volume. As one who worked 
with her in the early years of REED I feel even more than most others that she is to be congrat 
ulated for the vision and courage she showed in setting up the project and in committing so 
much of her time and energy to it. 

Finally, Mary Blackstone, my wife and partner in so many things, did not do the index or 
the proof-reading, or single-handedly clean the house, cook the meals, and do the laundry while 
I was busy compiling this volume. However, what she did do was give me the benefit of her 
peerless knowledge of early modern theatre history and patronage of the performing arts, as 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



well as her encouragement and moral support. Over the past twenty years, beginning with our 
work as colleagues in the REED office, this project has grown and flourished along with our 
relationship and so it is with great pleasure that I see it come to fruition. In closing, I refer Mary 
to Chaucer s Tale ofMelibee, VH. 1107-8. 

This book is dedicated to the memory of my mother, May Woo Louis, who lived from 191 1 
to 1962 and continues to be the inspiration of my life. 



Historical Background 



The physical geography of Sussex is formed by three layers traversing the length of the county: 
the coastal plain, the South Downs, and the Weald. The coastal plain begins near the Hamp 
shire border but only reaches as far east as Brighton. The South Downs are a series of chalk 
hills reaching to the Channel on the east and widening out on the western side, with a north 
erly shelf on which several farms and villages rest. The northernmost and largest of the three 
strips, the Weald (or Wild ), extends along the Surrey border, and in Kent from Edenbridge to 
Lympne, just north of Romney Marsh on the east. The Weald in turn consists of three sub- 
areas, the most southern of which is a hilly strip called the Wealden Greensand. Just north is 
the Low Weald, a flat clay area stretching from Pevensey Levels on the east and widening out 
to the Surrey border north of Crawley. The elevated section, the High Weald, is an area of hills 
and deep vales, partly sandstone, partly clay, going through the Ashdown Forest, Tunbridge 
Wells, and Wadhurst. 1 Two other areas, which do not fit into any of these divisions, are the 
marshy lands in the southeast coast around Pevensey (the Levels ) and just west of the Kentish 
border including the town of Rye. 

One effect of this geographical setting was to provide natural barriers, in the form of the sea 
to the south and the heavily forested High Weald, which to some extent cut eastern Sussex off 
from Kent, Surrey, and London, in spite of its proximity in terms of distance. As well, each 
distinct geographical area had definite advantages and disadvantages for its inhabitants. The 
coast areas were well placed for fishing, for transport, and for trade with other coastal ports and 
with London and the Continent, as well as for less respectable activities like smuggling and 
piracy. On the other hand they were also extremely vulnerable to enemy attack and to natural 
disasters such as sudden storms or slow erosion or silting. The downlands were exceptionally 
fertile and amenable to farming of grain, as well supplying rich grasses for sheep grazing, but 
also providing limited employment for the local inhabitants. The Weald, at first seen as a wild 
forest inhabited by social outcasts, was more dependent on its natural resources such as wood 
and iron. Agriculture was also possible in the Weald but with much higher labour intensity 
than on the Downs and with much more fertilization of the acidic soil required. The Weald 
was, with some effort, also made hospitable to cattle farming. The southeastern marshes were 
at first used for crops, but later highly valued as areas for fattening cattle, sheep, and horses. 
Unfortunately they also were breeding grounds for diseases and thus were not desirable places 
for human habitation. 2 



Xll HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

The settlements of Sussex which were the most significant in the late Middle Ages and in 
the early modern period tended to be located in the most easily cultivable areas along the 
coastal southern portion, which had been stripped of its woodland in prehistoric times. The 
port of Rye was at the extreme east and commanded the Rother River, which was navigable 
by barge as far as Udiam near Salehurst. West of the marshy area of Rye, and at the edge of 
the Weald, were the ports of Winchelsea, Pevensey, and Hastings. Further along the coast on 
the plain area were the ports of Seaford (near the mouth of the Cuckmere), Meeching, later 
Newhaven (at the mouth of the Ouse), New Shoreham (at the mouth of the Adur, which 
flowed by Steyning further north), and Chichester. Further inland, but important as sites for 
fortresses because of their location on waterways, were Lewes on the River Ouse, Bramber on 
the River Adur, and Arundel on the River Arun. These three rivers (with varying degrees of 
navigability) were used for important north-south barge traffic from central Sussex to the coast." 
The Weald was slower to populate but important market towns emerged there in the late 
Middle Ages, for example, East Grinstead, Horsham, Midhurst, and Petworth. 

The political divisions of Sussex have tended to straddle the natural east-west geographical 
features described above and in fact to divide the county into two separate eastern and western 
entities. Part of the reason for this tendency is that the settlements of east Sussex in particular, 
from the Middle Ages to the present day, have been oriented more to their neighbours in Kent 
than to those of west Sussex. Even in Anglo-Saxon times there was a tribal division between the 
eastern and western halves of the county. The Normans set up an administrative structure 
which further accentuated the east-west split of the county. Partly because of the tendency for 
traffic to flow north and south between London and coastal settlements, the Normans divided 
the county into six north-south strips called rapes, each named after a port city or coastal 
fortress (Chichester, Arundel, Bramber, Lewes, Pevensey, and Hastings), each with a mar 
ket town and a harbour, and each put under the authority of a baron. In time the rapes of 
Hastings, Pevensey, and Lewes came to be known as the Eastern Division, and Bramber, 
Arundel, and Chichester the Western Division. Each rape was divided into hundreds and each 
hundred into parishes. The splitting of the county into two halves originates from a recogni 
tion in early modern times that the county was too diverse and had no natural centre. Thus 
from 1504 the sheriffs court alternated between Chichester in the west (where in previous 
times it had always been held) and Lewes in the east. s The actual division of east and west 
Sussex into two separate administrative counties dates from 1889/ The reorganization of 1974 
formalized the separation of east and west Sussex into two distinct counties and transferred 
some parishes in the centre of the county, as well as their records (including East Grinstead), 
from East Sussex to West Sussex. 7 

Roads and Transport 

As they did elsewhere the Romans left a system of roads throughout Sussex, three of which led 
from London to the coast or near to the coast. One of these was Stane Street, which went 
through the settlement that was later to be known as Chichester, while the other two followed 
different routes to sites that are near the settlements now known as Lewes and Brighton. A 



VIII 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

fourth went from what is now Rochester in Kent through the Weald to the coast at the site 
of Hastings or Pevensey. There is some additional evidence of an east-west road along the foot 
of the South Downs (now the Greensand Way), running east from Stane Street (at Bignor, 
northeast of Chichester), possibly as far as Pevensey and from there connecting with the coastal 
ports of Kent. It has also been suggested that there was a coastal route from what is now 
Brighton west to Chichester and Southampton." 

The Normans divided Sussex into rapes partly to secure the trading roads from London to 
the coast. The fact that the fortresses and cities for whom the rapes were named (see p xii) were 
also located on the Roman roads suggests that by and large the ancient ways were still in use. 
The Gough map in the Bodleian Library (dated mid-fourteenth century) is not very helpful for 
north-south roads in Sussex but it does seem to indicate an east-west road running from 
Southampton in the west, through Havant, Chichester, Arundel, Bramber, Lewes, Winchelsea, 
and Rye, ending at Canterbury in Kent. However, it is also clear that new roads were being 
added throughout the period. There was a road from at least the sixteenth century between 
London and Hastings, which was maintained by the Fishmongers Company of London as a 
means of expediting the delivery offish to the city. Main routes that were probably used in the 
late Middle Ages and Renaissance are indicated on the county map (see pp cvi-cvii)." 

Aside from the routings of the Sussex roads two further observations need to be made. One 
is that Sussex in the late medieval and early modern periods became notorious for the poor 
condition of its highways, especially the north-south routes in the Weald. Heavy commercial 
traffic from the Weald resulted in road surfaces that were muddy and riddled with potholes, 
and which were repaired only at the goodwill of local parishes (at least in the post-Dissolution 
period) and the scolding of justices of the peace. Complaints about Sussex roads became a 
cliche in the writings of Tudor and Stuart travellers, and Jacobean and Caroline judges refused 
to go further south than Horsham for the winter assizes." More seriously, poor transport 
infrastructure added prohibitive costs to agricultural and other products, thus at times crippling 
the county economy. Landowners were likewise discouraged from living on their Wealden 
estates. 12 Speed also attested to the poor condition of the roads, calling them ill in winter. 13 
In the seventeenth century bad weather could effectively isolate the county from London. In 
fact the earliest known comprehensive map of the county, in Ogilbys Britannia of 1675, shows 
only five major thoroughfares and even these were dismissed by a cartographer in the 1720s 
as mere open horsetracks. 14 On the other hand the problem may have been exaggerated and 
unfairly generalized (spatially and temporally) through bad experiences in the Wealden clay 
in the wet winters. Regulations of the sixteenth century assumed that fish could be delivered 
by specialty transporters called rippiers from Hastings and Rye to London in twenty-four 
hours. IS It is also true that these poor surface conditions probably were not as extreme in the 
east-west roads outside the Weald, which were likely much more passable and useable. Thus 
travellers in the southeast (including entertainers in all likelihood) should have found it easier 
to travel between the ports and coastal settlements than to go out south from London to the 
coast via the market towns of the county. 

Alternate means of travel were also available in Sussex though there is no direct evidence that 
entertainers used them (here or elsewhere), and in any case we have little evidence of travel 



XIV HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

by them within the county at all. Some commercial traffic may have made use of routes off the 
main ones, such as the crests of the downlands or the ridges in the High Weald." Also there 
was throughout our period a well-developed system of boat traffic along the southeast coast. 
We know, for instance, that in the fourteenth century a ship regularly sailed from Arundel, 
picked up consignments at New Shoreham and Seaford, and then delivered its load at Dover. 17 
Any of the other ports along the coast could have served as calling points for ships as well. 
Inland waterways provided by the easily navigable Arun, Adur, Ouse, and Rocher Rivers could 
also be used for travel between the coast and a limited area in the central part of the county, 
and there is evidence that travellers on horseback made use of the beaches for quick, efficient 
journeys. 1 * Performers travelling short distances could well have used alternate transport; for 
example, players from the villages in the hinterland of Rye may have reached the port via short 
boat trips down the Rother. However, for long-distance travellers like patrons entertainers 
most of these alternate forms of transportation could only have been a partial assistance during 
longer journeys. 

Political and Economic History 

To a large extent the history of Sussex has been determined by its proximity to the Continent. 
When the Roman invasion of Britain began in earnest in AD 43, they found the area now 
referred to as West Sussex inhabited mainly by the Atrebates, an offshoot of a Gaulish tribe 
that had emigrated from what is now France and the Low Countries beginning around rhe 
middle of the previous century. Roman occupation itself, which kept an Atrebate king called 
Cogidubnus as a local client king of the area, has left considerable archaeological evidence, 
mostly on the coastal plain and the Downs. For example, there appears to have been a fortified 
city at the present site of Chichester (complete with an amphitheatre) and a palace nearby at 
Fishbourne, as well as several villas scattered throughout the area. |IJ 

During Saxon times the area was more or less split between the Hacstingas, inhabiting a 
small portion of the far eastern area, and other South Saxons, living in the west. It is from this 
early period that the concept of Sussex originates, both as the kingdom of the South Saxons 
and as a diocese of the church. And because of the natural boundaries formed by the sea, the 
Weald, and the marshes, the area has been fairly consistently defined since. As a coastal region 
the Sussex area also suffered during the Danish raids, especially at the end of the tenth century. 2 " 
The ecclesiastical see dates from the time of St Wilfrid s mission of 681-6 (see below, p xviii) 
although its continuous existence is from between 709 and 716. 

During the time from the Norman Conquest to the thirteenth century Sussex became an 
important area, not merely because the decisive battle of the era took place on Sussex soil but 
also because it was the region of England closest to Normandy. As we have seen, the Normans 
devised a system of divisions which focused on the importance of certain ports and fortresses 
along the coast of the county. These ports and their roads to London and other destinations 
made Sussex part of important trading routes, especially for importing wine and cloth and 
exporting wool and wood. In fact the thirteenth century was a time of great prosperity for the 
county, largely due to trade. Hastings, the only founding member of the Cinque Ports located 



XV 
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

in Sussex, became the headquarters of the federation and, with the addition of The Two 
Ancient Towns of Rye and Winchelsea, came to assume the leadership role among the ports. 21 
Sussex benefited from Edward is program of building new towns to restore the ports of the 
south coast, specifically in the construction of New Hastings and New Winchelsea. 22 Ship 
building also prospered, partly because the Cinque Ports (see below, pp xxii-xxiv) fulfilled their 
obligations to the Crown by supplying ships but also because the Weald furnished both the 
oak and the iron that were necessary. The Weald also was the source for much of the labour 
that supported the productivity of the fertile coast in general and thus became a kind of 
dependent economy with respect to the coast. 23 Enclosures in the Weald further moved workers 
to take jobs on the coast. 24 

However, great changes in Sussex were about to take place. Some of the same benefits of 
geography also proved great liabilities during the later Middle Ages. The French attacks, begin 
ning in the time of King John, were largely concentrated on Sussex and in the late fourteenth 
century the French conducted extremely destructive raids on Winchelsea, Seaford, Hastings, 
Lewes, and Rye. The later Middle Ages were also a time of great social unrest in the area, 
especially the Kentish and Sussex Weald where governmental control was tenuous and conflict 
between peasantry and lords was acute. Withholding of labour by peasants after the Black 
Death was an especially severe problem for landowners in the southeast. The Weald of Sussex 
and Kent was the main theatre of conflict in the Peasants Revolt in 1381 and Cade s Rising 
in 1451. The burning of John of Gaunt s London palace in 1381 was a sign of his unpopu 
larity in the southeast. There was also in the late Middle Ages a rapid depopulation of the 
Downs and the coastal areas due to enclosure of open fields, the Black Death, and erosion of 
the coast. " In Sussex in general there was a steady conversion of arable land to pasture, along 
with an upsetting of the traditional categories of peasants as either freeholders, copyholders, 
or leaseholders. 2 " In the fifteenth century rural Sussex was in economic depression, particularly 
in comparison with Kent. 27 

The Tudor and Stuart period, during which it has been estimated the population of Sussex 
rose to 60, 000, 2 " marks a shift in economic emphasis from the coast to the Weald. The ports, 
having already suffered from war and storms, declined more dramatically as many of them saw 
their harbours silt up. By the middle of the sixteenth century Winchelsea and Seaford had 
ceased to function as ports and others were in decline, including Chichester and Hastings. On 
the other hand the Downs had recovered much of their former prosperity with a relatively 
uniform and integrated economy based on large holdings of sheep pasture and arable land, 
producing grains, wool, and mutton. Through the nearby coastal ports, products of this area 
had accessible markets in London and other parts of England. 2 1 There was great economic 
expansion in other areas, especially the Weald, formerly thought of mainly as a wilderness, 
where the economy began to develop around the harvesting of wood and the pasturing of 
cattle, as well as some labour-intensive farming of such crops as grains, hops, and fruit. 1 " 
Equally important was the development of manufacturing and crafts in the Weald. A great 
influx of population (mostly tradespeople and farmers with small holdings), together with 
appropriate resources, resulted in new industries in textiles, gloving, tanning, brick and tile 
making, gunpowder, and glass. 11 However, the most important part of the Wealden economy 



XVI HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

in the sixteenth century (along with the lumber industry) was iron production, which thrived 
due to the availability of ore, timber, water power, and labour. By the 1570s over a hundred 
furnaces and forges were operating in the Weald, helping to release England from dependence 
on foreign sources for iron and ordnance. 2 The southeastern marshlands had historically been 
used for crop farming but by the seventeenth century they had been almost entirely converted 
to highly valued grazing land. 31 

One palpable result of the economic prosperity in most of the county was a boom in the 
construction of new mansions, probably the best known of which is Cowdray, built by Sir 
Anthony Browne during the reign of Henry vm. Others included Woolavington, built by the 
London ironmonger Giles Garton in the late sixteenth century, and Slaugham Place, built 
by the Protestant parliamentarian Walter Covert in 16 12. 34 

COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

In the Middle Ages the sheriff of Sussex (paired with Surrey under the same sheriff almost 
continuously from the thirteenth century until 1636) was the most important shire official. 
In the sixteenth century the sheriffs duties included presiding over the county court (which 
handled minor civil litigation) and working with the courts of assize and quarter sessions, 
empanelling juries, producing prisoners, and executing sentences. He also ensured that royal 
writs were delivered and he collected certain ancient royal taxes. He was responsible for paying 
the wages of his undersheriffs and extending hospitality in the county to the queen and foreign 
ambassadors, duties which meant that holding the office cost more than it paid. The other two 
main shire officials were the coroner and the escheator." 

During the time of Henry vm the shire position of lord lieutenant was created, which in 
some counties came to supersede the office of sheriff in power in military matters although 
the sheriffs retained most of their onerous duties. Under Elizabeth the holder of the lord 
lieutenancy (usually retained for life) was always a peer and sometimes a privy councillor. The 
position was originally created to deal with internal and external security problems brought on 
by the Reformation and thus involved drafting men into military service and training and (with 
the assistance of muster masters) inspecting musters. It also involved extracting loans to the 
Crown from people of substance as well as provisioning food for the navy, rationing in times 
of famine, and enforcing Lenten restrictions. One further duty became crucial during the 
Reformation, that of supervising and persecuting recusants. During Elizabeth s reign more and 
more of the duties of the lord lieutenant were shifted to deputy lieutenants, sometimes as many 
as six to a county (Sussex had three in 1569 and four in 1592). 36 The deputies were appointed 
by the Crown, usually on the recommendation of the lord lieutenant. As the lord lieutenant 
reported to the privy council, he was the link between the central government and the provin 
cial localities but as he was nominated by the Crown, he was also a means of local control by 
the central government. 37 The lord lieutenancy of Sussex was exceptional in that it was usually 
split between two or three leading members of the aristocracy to reconcile factions such as 
religious ones. Thus in the mid-sixteenth century the lieutenancy was split between Arundel 
and Lumley until 1569, when the ties of these two Catholic magnates to the lords of the north 



YVI I 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

made them politically too suspect. At that time a new commission of lieutenancy was issued 
to the Protestant Buckhurst, the non-committal William West (soon to become Lord De La 
Warr), and the loyal Catholic Montagu. As the tolerance of even loyal Catholics decreased, 
Montagu was removed in 1585 and Lord Admiral Charles Howard (later earl of Nottingham) 

replaced him. 38 

At the local level the most important figure was often the justice of the peace, a member of 
the gentry or nobility who acted as a magistrate in criminal matters (in responsibility for which 
he came to supersede the sheriff) and also performed administrative duties. These officials were 
appointed by the Crown and such posts, although unpaid, were avidly sought after both for 
social prestige and for the political power that came with them. One result was the appoint 
ment of increasing numbers of justices in the Tudor period, reaching about forty or fifty per 
shire in Elizabeth s time. Although in any individual county the number of justices undoubtedly 
varied over time we do know that in 1609 Sussex had forty-six. The justices administered the 
growing number of statutes in the Tudor period, especially those relating to apprenticeship, 
the poor, and vagrancy. They also were responsible for keeping the peace, including making 
enquiries into felonies and hearing cases relating to breaches of the peace. The powers of the 
justices in criminal matters included committing individuals to gaol, ordering the sheriffs to 
make arrests, reporting against Catholics, and enforcing laws against illegal hunting, games, 
tippling, and horse theft. During the Reformation there was of course some concern about the 
religious leanings of justices but in fact there was usually more concern about the shortage of 
capable individuals to hold these posts, regardless of religion. 3 1 

The quarter sessions were an assembly of the justices of the peace, held at regular intervals 
m Lewes (for the eastern rapes) or Chichester (for die western rapes). 40 The justices of the peace 
were supposed to attend (though most did not) along with die sheriffs. The juries of die quarter 
sessions reported on and tried crimes such as murder, assault, witchcraft, and failure to attend 
church. The courts also dealt with administrative matters such as the poor laws and wage 
regulations. 41 

At the more local level shires were divided into hundreds and parishes. Justices of the peace 
often were unofficially organized by hundreds, although officially at the head of each hundred 
were two high constables, whose main duties were tax collection and policing. The parishes 
were in the charge of a constable as well as the churchwardens. From the time of Mary the 
parishes also had responsibility for the maintenance of roads in addition to their more tradi 
tional duties in poor relief and church law. This decentralization of responsibility over roads 
was one of the reasons why they were so inconsistently maintained. 42 

Along with this common county administration there were two other strong political forces 
in Sussex. One was the duchy of Lancaster. For example, in the late fourteenth century the 
duchy had extensive holdings in the county, especially in the area around Pevensey and the Ash- 
down Forest. Consequently the steward of the duchy in Sussex and the constable of Pevensey 
Castle wielded considerable power. 43 The lord warden of the Cinque Ports (see below, p xxiii) 
was also a key figure in Sussex politics, even though his seat was at Dover Castle in Kent. In 
fact his relationship with the citizens of the Ports was pardy an adversarial one as he was mainly 
an instrument of royal control over them and specifically a means of insuring that the Ports 



XVlll HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

fulfilled their national duties, although he was also an advocate for their interests in the central 
government. Part of the lord warden s relationship widi the Ports seems to have taken the form of 
maintaining a troupe of performers who made regular visits to the Ports (see below, pp xli-xlii). 
Sussex was represented in parliament by MPS for the county as well as for the towns of 
Arundel, Bramber, Chichester, East Grinstead, Horsham, Lewes, Midhurst, New Shoreham, 
Seaford, and Steyning. So-called barons of the Cinque Ports sat in parliament representing 
Hastings, Rye, and Winchelsea as well. In the late Middle Ages the parliamentary represen 
tation of Sussex was strongly influenced by the Fitz AJans, earls of Arundel, and most of the 
MPS of the fourteenth century had strong ties to the family (on borough representation, see 
below, pp xxiv xxxi). With the accession of Henry iv the influence passed to the duchy of 
Lancaster, most notably in the repeated elections of John Pelham and Sir John Dallingridge, 
though the Arundels reasserted their influence with the accession of Henry v. 44 Parliamentary 
patronage in the fifteenth century was more evenly divided between the dukes of Norfolk, the 
earls of Arundel and of Southampton, and the Barons Abergavenny, Dacre, De La Warr, and 
Seymour of Sudeley. Independent gentry such as Sir John Gage and Sir Richard Sackville also 
gained election. Even after the Protestant Thomas Sackville became Baron Buckhurst the 
Catholic Arundel family continued to influence the county parliamentary elections into the late 
sixteenth century. 4 ^ In the sixteenth century the lord wardens struggled to control the election 
of members from the Cinque Ports but their attempts appear to have had only partial success, 
especially in Rye. 46 

Religious History 

The origins of Christianity in Sussex lie in the arrival of St Wilfrid, bishop of Northumbria, in 
681. Strongly encouraged by the nominally Christian south Saxon King Ethelwold, Wilfrid 
rapidly converted most of the populace before his return to the north in 686. In 71 1 the seat of 
the south Saxon see was established at the village of Selsey but it was moved to Chichester by 
the Normans in 1075. The Normans quickly multiplied the number of religious houses and 
parish churches in the county. The thirteenth-century struggle between Henry in and the 
church over ecclesiastical temporalities deeply affected the episcopate of Richard de Wyche, who 
was bishop of Chichester 1244-53. Although the saintly, ascetic Richard attempted to make 
peace with the king he staunchly defended the rights of the church while showing no interest 
in increasing its wealth. In the later Middle Ages the most urgent concern of the church was 
Lollardry and the bishop of Chichester, like other bishops, was ordered to seek out and punish 
heretics. However, there is little evidence that such orders actually located any degree of Lollard 
heresy in Sussex, although the neighbouring Kentish Weald apparently was deeply affected by 
the reformists. 47 The only Lollard executed in the county was Thomas Bagely, burned at the 
stake in 1432. Heresy did become an issue with Bishop Reginald Pecock of Chichester, who 
managed to offend both reformers and the established church by his highly original and daring 
writings on the clergy and theological matters as well as his anti-Lollard tracts. However, when 
he was arraigned as a heretic in 1457 he promptly confessed his error. 48 

There was no overt opposition to the Dissolution in Sussex; indeed the evidence from wills 



XIX 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

seems to indicate that the people of the county did not feel generously disposed to monasteries 
in the years before 1536." However, in time the religious turmoil of the Reformation period 
deeply affected the county as it did all parts of England. But even then the county did not 
function as a monolith in religious matters, either spatially or temporally. Goring thus sums 
up the regional reactions to the Reformation in Sussex: 

There was more support for the Reformation in East Sussex than in West, more enthusiasm 
for religious change in the Weald than in the Downs, more positive signs of Protestantism 
in towns and other industrial areas than in the purely agricultural countryside. And there 
was stronger loyalty to the old religion in regions where the landlords had firm control and 
cujus regio ejus religio prevailed."" 

Thus many historians emphasize the traditionalism in the county, especially in the areas in the 
west and those dominated by aristocratic lords, particularly in the early Reformation. Manning 
depicts Elizabethan Sussex as a county more reluctant than most to accept Protestantism, with 
only scattered pockets of reformers in the towns of the eastern section. M Similarly, Kitch has 
argued that a strongly Catholic aristocracy and gentry in the county delayed the conversion to 
Protestantism,^ while Timothy J. McCann has shown by numbers of deprivations that many 
traditional clergy kept office in Sussex well into the time of Elizabeth." Catholicism was espe 
cially strong in the west, largely due to the greater proximity of the conservative cathedral. The 
abolition of the feast of St Richard of Chichester and the destruction of his shrine met with 
considerable resistance from the cathedral leadership. M Another important factor was the pres 
ence and power in the county of a well-established Catholic gentry and aristocracy, most 
notably the Fitz Alans at their stronghold at Arundel." Not surprisingly, with the accession 
of Queen Mary, some of the first parishes to restore the trappings of Catholicism were in the 
west, including Billingshurst, Clapham, Eastergate, and West Tarring. 

During the Elizabethan period there were also strong but small pockets of recusancy in the 
east in the area of influence of the Browne family in and around Battle and of the Gages at 
Firle.^ A further factor was the intercession of the Protestant Lord Buckhurst during his lord 
lieutenancy (1586-1608). Because of his personal alliance with Viscount Montagu and his 
general distaste for religious persecution, Buckhurst frequently refused to carry out the directives 
of the privy council and moreover sometimes challenged the right of deputy lieutenants to 
restrain and detain recusants/ At the accession of James I there were still 250-300 practising 
Roman Catholics in Sussex, about half of whom lived in separate communities on the lands 
of Catholic families such as those of the Shelleys at Clapham, the Montagus at Cowdray, the 
Gages at Firle, the Kempes at Slindon, the Thatchers at Westham, and the Carylls at West 
Harting, mostly in the western parts of the county." Indeed there have been a number of hiding 
places for priests found in the former houses of Roman Catholic gentry and aristocracy such 
as at Slindon House, near Arundel." It is thus not surprising that most of the survivals of 
traditional customs found in the Sussex records come from parishes in and around Chichester, 
such as the lords of misrule in Bosham in 1598/9 and in Chichester in 1586/7, the morris 
dancers in Cocking in 1616/17, and the maypole in Eastergate in 1623. Other western areas 



XX HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

that demonstrate this attachment to old customs are the proximate villages of Steyning and 
West Tarring, which continued church ales well into the Protestant era, and the inland western 
parishes of Petworth, which had May gaming in 1593, and Horsham and Rudgwick, which 
had maypoles in 1582 and 1612 respectively. 

On the other hand the roots of Sussex Protestantism lie to a large extent in the eastern part 
of the county, especially in the Weald, which in contrast to the rest of the county may have 
been influenced by the significant Lollardry of the Kentish Weald, and in the coastal towns, 
which were also subject to influence from Protestantism through refugees from the Continent. 
The movement first established roots in Sussex in the Weald, then gradually came to dominate 
the urban centres of Hastings, Lewes, Rye, and Winchelsea. It appears to have taken hold first 
among the wealthier, non-aristocratic townsmen and yeomen farmers, who were also among 
the best educated. 6 " The fact that these areas were located so far from the episcopal seat in 
Chichester, together with the difficulty of travel within the county, helped to give them a 
different religious character. 61 A measure of the early strength of the reformers in the county 
is the fact that during the Marian period, twenty-seven Protestants were burned in Sussex, 
including ten at once in Lewes in 1557, the highest after London, Kent, and Essex. Of the 
martyrs, fifteen came from the Weald." The mid-sixteenth century also marked the rise of a 
large number of Protestant gentry in the county, some of whom gradually replaced the Catholic 
justices on the county bench and effectively neutralized the influence of the Catholic gentry 
and aristocracy. 63 All historians agree that a further significant factor was the profound effect 
on the county of the episcopate of Richard Curteys (1570-82), during which time large num 
bers of zealous Protestant preachers spread throughout the county. 64 During the Civil War the 
county for the most part supported parliament, although Royalist gentry succeeded in seizing 
Chichester from its aldermen, an event which led to the siege of the city in 1642. Thomas 
Bowyer was the only Sussex MP to support the king. The Puritan movement was assisted by a 
number of prosperous gentry families, such as the Bowyers (Sir Thomas support of the king 
notwithstanding), Coverts, Mays, Morleys, and Pelhams. 6S 

THE BISHOPS OF CHICHESTER 

The history of the Chichester episcopate is in many ways separate from the religious history 
of the county. It cannot be said that the Chichester bishops during and after the Reformation 
reflected the religious views of the populace of the area as much as they reflected the views of 
the powers in London. In the earliest period of the Reformation the cathedral was so physically 
isolated from religious changes that it was Catholic for some time. 66 Not surprisingly the long- 
serving Bishop Robert Sherborne (1508-36) was a very reluctant Protestant and George Day 
(1543-51 and 1553-6) was an active counter-reformer who was deprived under Edward vi and 
restored by Mary. But the only other Catholic bishop in this period was John Christopherson 
(1557-8), who served briefly during the reign of Philip and Mary and was imprisoned by 
Elizabeth. John Scory (1552-3) and William Barlow (1559-68) were Protestant loyalists and 
dedicated reformers who went into exile during the reign of Philip and Mary. Richard Curteys 
(1570-82), Thomas Bickley (1586-96), Anthony Watson (1596-1605), and Lancelot Andrewes 



HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

(1605-9) were also loyal Protestants, with close ties to Elizabeth. Curteys had a bigger impact 
on his diocese than anyone else in his recruitment of parish priests, many of whom were of 
Puritan leanings. Samuel Harsnett (1609-19) was a somewhat more ambiguous figure, being 
a very high church bishop who preached strongly against Calvinism and Puritanism, as did 
Richard Montague (1628-38), an anti-Puritan extremist who stressed the importance of ritual. 
George Carleton (1619-28), on the other hand, was a severe Calvinist, while Brian Duppa 
(1638-41) and Henry King (1642-3, 1660-9) were moderates with close ties to Charles i. 67 
However, the bishops, being imposed from above and often stopping only briefly in Chi- 
chester on their way to a higher position, did not necessarily reflect the views of the cathedral 
dean and chapter, let alone the parishioners. It appears that the cathedral itself remained quite 
conservative throughout the Reformation. The strongly Protestant Curteys and Bickley espe 
cially found the dean and chapter to be infuriatingly conservative and resistant to their wills. 
Many of the Protestant bishops had little effect on the dean and chapter and in fact some did 
not even live in Chichester. 68 

RELIGIOUS HOUSES 

There were at the time of the Dissolution nine monasteries, two nunneries, and six friaries in 
Sussex ." These were in fact lower numbers than existed for most counties of England. The 
two largest religious houses were Lewes Priory and Battle Abbey. The former was a Cluniac 
institution founded by William Warenne and dedicated to St Pancras. It was somewhat aloof 
from the local populace but received great influence from the Continent as a result of being 
a cell of the Abbey of Cluny in Normandy. Much of the Norman painting in Sussex churches 
may possibly have been executed by a guild of artists from the priory. 7 " The largest and wealth 
iest of the religious houses of Sussex, Lewes Priory was at its height in die twelfth century, when 
it housed over 100 monks. It declined steadily in the later Middle Ages but it still housed 
thirty-six monks in 1405 and was the twenty-fourth richest monastic institution in the country. 
The priory was the first religious house in England to surrender voluntarily at the Dissolution, 
when it housed twenty-four monks, after which it was given to Thomas Cromwell in 1 537. 
Shortly after, it was razed to the ground but not before Portinari, the Italian engineer in charge 
of demolition, wrote a detailed description of the buildings. 71 Although many of the records 
of Lewes Priory survive (including some of the household variety), there is no evidence in them 
of dramatic or musical activity, a fact that may reflect the priory s orientation to the Continent 
and lack of interest in English culture. 

Battle Abbey was founded by William the Conqueror on the site of his victory over the 
Saxon armies. William and his successors gave the Benedictine abbey a banlieu, several churches 
and manors, and much royal favour in the form of endowments and jurisdictional privileges 
in the surrounding area. The banlieu gave the abbot a circular estate and absolute power over 
all lands within a radius of 1.5 miles. There were twenty-seven monks at Battle in 1393 and 
thirty in 1490." The abbey itself became a complex industrial and social organisation. 7 Such 
vast estates required able administrators and the many detailed surviving accounts of the officers 
of the abbey reveal the wealth of the institution, especially in the fourteenth century. After 



XXII HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

1330 the abbey established close connections with the local gentry as it began to hire members 
of prominent families as stewards, who acted as the chief legal officers of the abbey. One 
example was Bartholomew Bolney, who served from c 1420-77 and was the grandfather of 
Sir John Gage (who in turn was Anthony Browne s father-in-law). The beadle was the chief 
administrative officer within its leuga, or estate, and usually was a member of one of the leading 
burgess families of the town. 74 

During the later Middle Ages the abbey, like all landowners, suffered from the shortage of 
labour and much of the estates was dispersed into tenancies. At the same time the town of 
Battle continued to grow, partly due to emigration from the coastal towns that were under 
attack from the French, and in time the town burgesses gained more and more control over 
their own affairs as the power of the abbey declined," although the abbey continued to give 
frequent payments to entertainers right into the 1520s. At the Dissolution the abbey was 
reported to be in poor condition, with seventeen monks. In 1 538 the abbey and its lands were 
given to Anthony Browne, who razed the church, cloisters, and chapter house, using some of 
the proceeds of the sale to finance the construction of Cowdray. 7fa 

Rather smaller and more austere was the Cistercian abbey of Robertsbridge, founded around 
1 176 by Alvred de St Martin, sheriff of the rape of Hastings. Befitting the rigorous and con 
templative lifestyle of the order, it was located in the high Weald. However, the abbey was 
visited by both Edward I twice and by Edward n once, a fact which confirms that it was not 
inaccessible to travellers in general, including travelling entertainers. Indeed, if the road from 
Hastings to London, which we know existed in the sixteenth century (see above, p xiii), 
was already in place in the fifteenth century, Robertsbridge probably was on this route and thus 
could have been accessible from both the north and the south. After the Dissolution, when it 
housed eight monks, the abbey and its lands were given to the Sidney family. 77 

Towns 

THE CINQUE PORTS 

The Cinque Ports are a confederation of southeastern ports that dates back at least to the 
cime of Henry n. The basis of the association lies in charters given to individual ports for 
customary privileges in exchange for maritime service rendered to the Crown. Chief among 
the privileges granted in the 1278 charters were the honours of court, especially the right 
of the barons of the Ports to bear the canopy over the king and queen at the coronation 
and the right to participate in the important annual Yarmouth Herring Fair, as well as the 
older right of exemption from attendance at the local courts and from customary taxation. 78 
The reciprocal sea service consisted of supplying a quota of ships and sailors for the king s 
use annually. Of the original five Ports four were in Kent (Dover, Hythe, New Romney, 
and Sandwich), with Hastings the only Sussex member. However, by a charter which also 
dates back to the reign of Henry n, the Sussex Ancient Towns of Rye and Winchelsea 
were recognized as members of Hastings. 79 As time went on other ports were able to 
buy forms of membership by sharing charges so that by the Tudor period, Seaford and 



HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

Pevensey were corporate limbs attached to Hastings, Tenterden (in Kent) was attached to Rye, 
and other similar arrangements were made with the Kentish ports. Less formalized, non 
corporate agreements were made with still more localities."" The Cinque Ports thus in many 
ways have to be considered as a separate part of the county. Indeed they were oriented eastward 
to Kent rather than to the rest of Sussex. The main economic purpose of the federation from 
the point of view of the Ports themselves was consultation over the fishing industry. Another 
less official mutual interest concerned the considerable piracy practised by men of the Ports. 81 

From the thirteenth century the Cinque Ports were supervised by a lord warden, who was 
appointed by the Crown but also sworn to uphold the privileges of the Ports. Thus the lord 
warden s function was largely to strike a balance between local and national interests and also 
to provide a channel of communication between the strategically important Ports and the 
royal court. He also had admiralty jurisdiction in the area (such as control over shipwrecks) and 
responsibility for peace and order and for passports and customs. Although originally chosen 
from the ranks of professional officials, by the fourteenth century the office of lord warden was 
coveted by the nobility (often from Kent) and the result was more influence at court by the 
Ports, even as their economic fortunes declined, but less control over their own affairs. 82 The 
incumbent lord warden also could benefit commercially, such as from his right to create 
freemen by purchase. One source of occasional friction was the claim of the warden to nom 
inate at least one of the MPS from each Port (see pp xxvi, xxx-xxxi). 83 

Royal jurisdiction over the Ports was exercised partly through the irregularly held court of 
Shepway, presided over by the lord warden, with each Port represented by jurats. Two other 
courts of deputations from member Ports, which were summoned by the Ports themselves 
rather than by the Crown or the warden, seem to have been less formal and more important. 
One was the Brotherhood (also known as the Brodhull or Brotheryeld), which probably began 
on an informal and irregular basis in the thirteenth century but had regular sittings twice a 
year by 1432, held at New Romney. The other courts, Guestlings, began in the fifteenth cen 
tury as meetings of only the Sussex ports of Hastings, Rye, and Winchelsea in the village of 
Guestling. In the sixteenth century, however, Guestlings were held sometimes of just the 
Kentish Ports, at other times of all the Ports, and even sometimes of all the Ports and the cor 
porate limbs. 84 One purpose of both the Brotherhood and the Guestling was to decide on the 
degree of ship service to be rendered to the monarch by each Port but they also enforced disci 
pline and provided a forum for consultation. However, as time went on the main function of 
the Brotherhood court became consultation on the protection of the privileges of the courts. 
Another important function was to elect bailiffs to the Yarmouth Fair, the site of the autumn 
herring sale. During this fair, from 29 September to 10 November, all business in the Cinque 
Ports effectively ceased and because the Cinque Ports were heavily involved in this significant 
annual event, they were obliged to send the bailiffs to help enforce discipline and to deal with 
frequent friction between the men of the ports and those of Yarmouth. 8 1 

Thus it is clear that for much of the medieval and early modern period there were close 
geographic, economic, and legal ties between the Ports in Sussex and Kent, largely based 
on links with the maritime economy. The confederation in effect was a community that cut 
across county boundaries and joined certain Sussex towns more closely to places in Kent. It 



XXIV HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

would not be surprising then that cultural links would also have been strong, partly in the form 
of local playing troupes but also in the form of performers with patrons among the nobility 
and gentry with local political connections (see below, pp xlii-xlv). 

The Cinque Ports began their economic decline in the fourteenth century and had ceased to 
be a major political force by the fifteenth. The decline was due largely to the erosion of the 
coastal cliffs and the silting of the harbours as well as the ill repute brought on by piracy. 
The Cinque Ports virtually collapsed as an effective political institution in the 1630s, when 
Charles fs requests for ships were beyond anything the Ports could supply and as a result they 
were required to remit large amounts of ship-money instead. 86 

CHICHESTER 

Chichester has been a site of strategic importance since Roman times, when it was a port, 
market centre, and fort known either as Noviomagus or Regnum." 7 During Saxon times it also 
served as a base for KJng jlle. The significance of Chichester as a religious centre dates from 
1075, when the bishops seat was moved there from Selsey and a Norman cathedral was built 
on the site of the Roman forum. Among the bishops of Chichester during medieval times the 
most celebrated was Richard de Wyche, elected in 1244, who was subsequently canonized. A 
popular shrine was dedicated to him in the cathedral and became an object of pilgrimages.** 

Chichester prospered in the late Middle Ages largely as a result of its status as a market town 
and its annual fairs, which began in the reign of Henry I. From that time there was an eight- 
day fair beginning on the feast of St Faith (6 October) and later other fairs were granted about 
the feasts of St Lawrence the Martyr (9-11 August) and of St Michael (29 September). A fair 
on the vigil and feast of St James (24-5 July) was proclaimed in the thirteenth century and 
another on St George s Day (23 April) goes back to 1500. 8 Chichester s administrative impor 
tance was recognized when it was named the site of the county court in 1336. The port was 
also active in the export of wool and the import of wine. From the early thirteenth century 
customs on wool and hides were collected in the harbour and Chichester was named one of 
the wool ports in 1353. On the basis of the parliamentary subsidies of the 1330s and the poll 
tax of 1 377 Chichester could be considered to be by far the most prosperous town in Sussex, 
with a population of over 1,300. * 

The political history of late medieval Chichester has much to do with its economic status 
and with struggles between traditional ecclesiastical authorities and emerging secular powers. 
During the fourteenth century there was a record of conflict between the town and the cathe 
dra], especially over the latter s privileges. The growing power of the Chichester merchants was 
demonstrated by the formation of a guild merchant in the twelfth century, the burgesses of 
which governed the town along with the bailiff or reeve." The merchant guild gradually took 
the civic governing authority away from the bishop s reeves and by the thirteenth century a 
mayor (who was also the guild master in later times) was being elected in place of the reeve. 
In the fourteenth century the merchant guild became associated with the religious guild of 
St George, which in the fifteenth century was remodelled to represent the religious functions 
of the merchant guild. 2 The mayor was elected on the Monday before Michaelmas from among 



XXV 
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

the aldermen of the guild. He was assisted by the aldermen (all former mayors) and a number 
of freemen, as well as a recorder, bailiff, customer, and portreeve. 3 There is also evidence of 
trade guilds from the late fifteenth century, although their political significance was probably 
dwarfed by that of the merchant guild. * 

Early modern Chichester was unique among Sussex settlements in that it was a centre of 
manufacturing activities, in corn-marketing, malting, flour-milling, paper-making, and needle 
production. Moreover, the port of Chichester was reasonably prosperous in the Tudor period, 
largely through corn exports although assessments of the citizens during the period do not 
seem to indicate great individual wealth. " Two factors made the city quite traditionalist in 
religious matters and more reluctant to embrace Protestantism than most. One was the con 
servatism of the cathedral dean and chapter, regardless of whoever was appointed bishop 
(see above, pp xx-xxi). The other was the proximity and influence of the Catholic earls of 
Arundel, which began in the Middle Ages and continued well into the Tudor era. Even after the 
Arundels fell into disgrace after the Ridolfi plot in 1569 the influence continued through Lord 
Lumley, the earl s son-in-law. * Such conservatism put Chichester out of step with much of 
the rest of the county and undermined the authority of its leadership. It would also not be 
surprising that Chichester was conservative in cultural matters, especially those involving 
traditional ceremonies and rituals. On the other hand the division between the city and the 
cathedral, which went back to medieval times, probably worked against this conservatism and 
by the time of Laud s visitation in 1635 the city was split between a puritanically inclined 
mayor and council, and a royalist cathedral and neighbouring gentry led by members of the 
Compton, Ford, and Lewkenor families. In the Civil War Chichester sustained considerable 
damage, after royalist troops were besieged there and routed by parliamentary forces, who later 
vandalized parts of the cathedral. 7 

Nevertheless, Chichester remained with Lewes as one of the two largest towns in the county 
throughout the early modern period. One estimate for the population of Chichester in 15245, 
based on the lay subsidy rolls, is 1,500 but another gives 2,000 for the 1520s. 8 According to 
Morgans figures the population of the city in the early modern period grew from 1,600 in 1524 
to 1,800 in 1610. In 1625, he says, there were 2,000 inhabitants and 2,200 in 1641. Similarly, 
on the basis of Protestation Returns, Clark and Hosking estimate 2,240 inhabitants for I64l/2. w 

For much of our period Chichester elected two MPS, usually local people and usually without 
any evidence of outside influence or family cliques. In the sixteenth century one member was 
elected by the merchant guild and the other by the commoners although there is evidence that 
the commoners voted for an individual suggested by the guild."" 

During die period up to the Civil War Chichester s known parishes within the city walls were 
All Saints in the Pallant, St Andrew (in East Street), St Andrew in the Pallant, St Martin 
(in St Martin s Lane), St Olave (in Upper North Street), St Peter the Great (including the 
cathedral close), St Peter the Less (in North Street), and St Peter in the Market (in South 
Street, perhaps the same as St Mary in the Market). Outside the city walls were St Bartholomew 
and St Pancras (both destroyed in the Civil War)."" In 1604 there were seven inns in the 
town: the Crown, the George, the Lion, the Plough, the Spread Eagle, the Swan, and the 
White Horse." 12 



XXVI HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

HASTINGS 

Unfortunately our whole view of Hastings in the Middle Ages and early modern period is 
obscured by a dearth of records. However, its importance is first evidenced in records of the 
tenth century, when it is identified as the location of a Saxon mint. The town was recognized 
by William the Conqueror as a key location, both as a site for a castle and as a port. In the 
twelfth century it was one of the most important ports of passage to the Continent and the 
base for attacks on French coastal shipping. However, the harbour soon decayed and the town 
was burned by the French in 1339 and 1377. Because of frequent storms and silting the har 
bour was never rebuilt and the port of Hastings gave way to Rye and Winchelsea in impor 
tance. 103 Moreover, the port lacked the water links with the interior of the county enjoyed by 
Rye and thus its trade was restricted to a local area. 

In the sixteenth century the primary activity of the inhabitants of Hastings was fishing, 
though the same fishing vessels were aJso involved with freight transport. 1 " 4 Although Hastings 
was the headquarters of the Cinque Ports in the sixteenth century, as an actual port it never 
regained its former significance. Late in that century the town even had to suspend payment 
of the mayor s stipend. 11 * Although little is known about the religious history of Hastings during 
the period, it appears to have been an early centre of Protestantism in spite of the influence 
of the Catholic Sir Anthony Browne, because of the proximity of his estates in Battle."" 1 Estim 
ates of the population of Hastings in the early modern period show sporadic and slow growth 
reflecting its wavering fortunes. It is thought that in 1544-7 there were between 1,300 and 
1,400 inhabitants; by 1565 the population was about 1,250 1,300. l07 Clark and Hosking give 
a population figure of 1,270 based on the 1603 diocesan survey." * 

As for civic governance, for most of the medieval era Hastings was under the lordship of the 
Crown and thus was ruled by a feudal bailiff appointed by the king. However, at an early point 
in the post-Conquest period the bailiff was elected by the barons or freemen of the town on 
the Sunday after Hock Day, who thereupon chose twelve jurats."" The town was incorporated 
in 1588 and the bailiff then became the mayor. Government from then on was by the mayor 
and twelve jurats, assisted by the town clerk and chamberlain. The mayor presided over a 
quarterly court of sessions. Hastings, like all the Cinque Ports, had two members of parliament. 
The elections of the MPS in the early modern period were heavily influenced by the lord war 
dens of the Cinque Ports, especially Sir Thomas Cheyne, who regularly nominated one member 
in the 1540s and 1550s, and Lord Cobham in the later part of the century. Lord Buckhurst 
may also have influenced the elections in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries." 
Hastings was divided into eight parishes: All Saints, Holy Trinity, St Andrew of the Castle, 
St Clement, St Leonard, St Mary of the Castle, St Mary Magdalene, and St Michael. 

LEWES 

Lewes is strategically situated on the wide estuary of the Ouse at the site of the only bridge 
across the Ouse River between the Low Weald and the sea, thereby controlling much of the 
east-west road traffic along the coast." 1 It appears to have been an important settlement even 



Ill 



HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

.. Saxon times, when it was one of three Sussex towns to have a mint. In the time of Edward 
the Confessor it was the virtual capital of East Sussex and a market centre." 2 The Norman 
period saw the construction of Lewes Castle and the Cluniac Priory of St Pancras, both estab 
lished by William Warenne, baron of the rape of Lewes. The town of Lewes was to remain a 
manorial borough of the Warennes for most of the Middle Ages, thus never achieving the 
independence of many similar towns. Finally it descended to the Fitz Alan earls of Arundel 
and was that family s chief estate in east Sussex. It is possible that the Fitz Alans controlled the 
selection of the bailiffs in the Middle Ages but the chief local officers may also have been elected 
by the townsmen. Some self-government is evidenced by the annual election of two constables 
in the borough court on the Monday after Michaelmas. Lewes also had a largely unsuccessful 
but continuous rivalry with Chichester as the most important town in the county as a whole 
and particularly as a focus for the wool trade. Economic prosperity came from its market and 
wool and there is evidence of a fair in Whitsun week, recorded from the fifteenth century. 
However, Lewes is best known in this period as the site of a battle fought there during the 
Montfort rebellion. Men from Lewes apparently also gave strong support to the Cade rebellion 
in 1450." 3 

This prosperity continued into the Tudor and Stuart period. By the time of Henry vm the 
castle, manor, and borough had passed into divided interests and the borough was for all 
practical purposes self-governing. As in Chichester local power in this period shifted to wealthy 
merchants, who exercised authority through the Society of Twelve (usually more than that 
number), as well as the constables elected by the council from the council membership. The 
council was in fact a survival of a guild merchant, which went back to early Norman times and 
had the attributes of a manorial borough. It became an oligarchy of the wealthy tradespeople 
of the town. The council was supported by a larger council of Twenty-four." 4 

Lewes was without doubt die chief town of Sussex from 1504 as the county gaol was located 
there and half the sittings of the county court and the quarter sessions court were held in the 
town (the other half being held at Chichester). In the commercial sphere it appears to have 
been the hub for much of the business of east Sussex, with a population of 1,500 in 1524. One 
development that greatly increased Lewes economic importance was the establishment of 
Newhaven as an outport of the town in the 1540s. Foreign and coastal imports through Lewes 
included spices, textiles, paper, glass, tobacco, dried fruit, and beef Exports and storage of grain 
were strongly controlled by Lewes brokers and granaries. Sussex products like grain, wool, and 
iron were shipped to London via Lewes. As well Lewes was not as vulnerable as the Cinque 
Ports because its economy was more varied and less dependent on maritime pursuits."^ The 
prosperity of the town was demonstrated by the construction of a new manor house, called 
The Grange, in the priory grounds of the adjacent but separately administered township of 
Southover by William Newton in 1572. " Moreover, Lewes was the location of many town 
houses owned by area landowners, such as George Goring, Henry Goring, John Kyme, Thomas 
Pelham, and John Shurley (Pelham and Shurley also served as MPS for Lewes)." 7 

Parliamentary representation of Lewes in the Tudor period (sometimes shared with South- 
over) was influenced by the Protestant Sackvilles, who owned Southover manor and borough." 8 
Lewes also became a centre of somewhat radical religious beliefs, partly imported by Flemish 



XXVIII HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

and French Protestant refugees and partly in reaction to the executions there in 1557 during 
the reign of Mary when seventeen heretics were burned. The reformist Bishop Barlow reported 
approvingly of the Protestant spirit in Lewes in 1564 and no recusants out of 400 commu 
nicants were found in two Lewes parishes in 1603 (the town had about 2,500 inhabitants in 
all in 1625). The town was strongly pro-parliament during the Civil War, consistently returning 
Puritan members and even putting one of the archidiaconal courts in Puritan hands." 9 We thus 
can see that for most of our period Lewes was a busy commercial and administrative centre, 
thoroughly steeped in the reformist tradition from the earliest times of the Reformation to the 
Civil War. It is likely then that its local culture was an austere one without abiding attachment 
to old religious traditions. On the other hand the evidence from wills indicates that pockets 
of Catholicism persisted in the town into the mid-sixteenth century. 12 " 

Although it now has only four parishes, during the period under study Lewes had eleven: 
All Saints, Holy Trinity, St Andrew, St John sub Castro, St Martin, St Mary in Foro, St Mary 
Westout, St Michael, St Nicholas, St Peter the Less, and St Peter Westout. 121 

RYE 

The towns of Rye and Winchelsea functioned very much as a pair in the Middle Ages and 
Renaissance although much more is known about the former than the latter. Both originate 
as parts of the manor of Rameslie, which was held by the Abbey of Fecamp even before the 
Conquest. Although it remained under the overlordship of the abbey after 1066, because of 
its distance from Normandy Rye appears to have become a self-governing borough in the 
twelfth century. However, after the loss of Normandy by King John both Rye and Winchelsea 
came under the control of the Crown and remained in dispute between the French and the 
English during the thirteenth century. Authority in Rye was thence held by the king s bailiff 
until the fourteenth century, when the mayor s court took over control (although the king s 
bailiff continued to function with limited duties) and the mayor was recognized as both the 
king s representative and the head of the town government. The mayor was elected annually 
by the freemen of the town (the commonalty) at the cross in the churchyard on the Sunday 
after St Bartholomew s Day (24 August). The mayor then could appoint up to twelve jurats 
of his choice, although in practice incumbents were seldom displaced. The jurats then, in 
concert with the mayor, chose other officers, including two chamberlains. After 1478 the 
chamberlains were chosen on the Sunday following the mayor s election. They usually held 
office for one or two years and almost always were wealthier members of the community. From 
the late sixteenth century a distinction was made between the sea chamberlain, who collected 
dues relating to the fishery, and the land chamberlain, who dealt with all other collections. 122 

Because of concern by the town elite and the lord warden about their lack of control over 
the decisions of the commonalty, between 1575 and 1590 a common council of Twenty-four 
was chosen by the mayor and jurats, which together with the mayor, jurats, and the town clerk 
then governed the town as an oligarchy, in spite of fierce opposition from the commonalty. The 
common council was abolished in 1590 but by that time the commonalty had been shrunk so 
much by restrictions on admitting freemen that it had become a very small franchise in any 



v-v I V 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

case. " There were no trade guilds in Rye except for a brief experiment in the 1570s, when the 
cordwainers, fishermen, mercers, and tailors and drapers briefly had companies. However, Rye 
corporation acted as a kind of overall guild authority for the protection of the rights of the 

freemen. 124 

Rye s economic history was tied up with its position as a port. Not only did it face the 
Continent at a strategic point for commerce, it was also located at the mouth of the Rother, 
which was navigable up to Udiam near Salehurst and thus carried much of the trade of eastern 
Sussex. 12S French raids in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries hindered the development of 
the port but Rye benefited from the early sixteenth-century decline of Winchelsea and remained 
one of the best harbours and most prosperous towns in the southeast up to the 1570s. The 
shipping trade of Rye was based on medieval links with southern France and northern Spain 
for wine and salt, the sale of timber and cloth to Flemish and French ports and the outpost of 
Calais, and transport of iron and ordnance to London. The main imports were grain and 
coal. 126 The town, unlike any other Sussex port, was also a key player in goods, passenger traffic, 
and mail between London and the Continent via Dieppe, rivalling Dover as an international 
port. In fact the royal mail to France went through Rye right up until 1636. 127 Rye harbour 
and the Camber (the lagoon into which the Rother, Brede, and Tillingham flowed) played a 
very significant role in times of war as a port of refuge for ships on their way to campaigns on 
the Continent. 128 Also extremely important was the fishing industry, especially die herring catch, 
and the related business of piracy. " There was a royal purveyor offish resident in Rye and 
seafood from Rye was transported to London within a day of harvesting. 130 One further fac 
tor of economic importance was the arrival in the 1560s and 1570s of hundreds of religious 
refugees from the Continent, mostly French Huguenots but also Flemish and Walloon Prot 
estants. The refugees were a great stimulus to the local economy but also were the cause of 
friction with local tradesmen, who perceived them as a threat to their monopolies. 131 One 
population estimate for Rye at the height of its prosperity in the 1550s and 1560s is of 
5,000 inhabitants, which would make it one of the larger towns in England, comparable to 
Southampton or Leicester. 132 

The decline of Rye began with the loss of links with Calais in 1558, continued with the 
silting up of the harbour in the 1570s, and was exacerbated by losses in trade due to competi 
tion for the port of London and the unreliability of supplies of goods from the Wealden 
areas due to poor roads. 133 Elizabeth s celebrated visit to the town in 1573 should thus be 
seen as a glorious interlude in the midst of financial troubles. It has also been pointed out 
that the fall in the shipping industry could not help but be disastrous for fishing, which 
was closely linked by the use of the same boats and crews, so that fishing at Rye was almost 
extinct by the Restoration. According to Mayhew s figures Rye s population fell to 4,000 in 
1580 and half that by the end of the century. 134 The town experienced even more financial 
catastrophe after enormous amounts of money were spent on failed improvements to the 
harbour in the later sixteenth century. 13S Not willing to risk raising taxes the town in the 
seventeenth century was reduced to trying to raise revenues from such activities as tippling 
offences and presentments. 13 

Apart from economic developments the political history of Rye is one of extreme fractiousness 



XXX HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

in the town in the sixteenth century, based on religion, personalities, and cliques. One import 
ant factor in Rye s religious politics was that, exceptionally for a town of its size, it had only 
one parish church (dedicated to St Mary). Although this fact may have in turn encouraged 
the cohesiveness of the community, it also meant that diversity could not be spread among 
several parishes, and competing factions had to fight for dominance in one place of worship. 
As a town with reformist roots going back to the Lollard era, part of Rye s establishment con 
sisted of Protestant seafarers and merchants. On the other hand there was also a group of more 
recent arrivals with gentry and landowning connections, associated with the wealthy Fletcher 
family, who were traditionalist in religious matters. Beginning with the removal in 1538 of the 
traditionalist curate William Inold, the Protestant faction battled fiercely against the tradi 
tionalists to elect mayors and jurats, even defying the privy council to elect a Protestant mayor 
during the Marian period. The deep-rooted Protestantism of the town was further manifested 
when there was a riot in the church in 1554, when the mass was reintroduced. 137 Significantly, 
Bishop Curteys, in cooperation with the preacher Richard Fletcher and the jurats of Rye, 
attempted to create an ideal Protestant community in Rye in 1574-6. In the last quarter of the 
century, however, factionalism in the town was rooted more on rivalry between trades based on 
capital (such as brewers, goldsmiths, and tanners) and trades made up of ordinary artisans 
(such as butchers)."" 

The politics of the later sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries were generally marked less 
by religious factions than by strategies by the town elite to consolidate its exclusive power in 
times of economic decline. The election of MPS in this period likewise was characterized by 
increasing deference to the choices of the lord warden in the hope that he would be more 
likely to intercede on their behalf in London. 13 However, during the Civil War Rye was a centre 
of strong Puritan sentiment. 14 " By the Restoration there were fewer than 1,300 inhabitants and 
it was a minor market town."" 

In general during our period Rye was a town whose economic condition went through huge 
swings of fortune. Along with this it was a pluralistic town of both English and European 
inhabitants, open to outside influences and varied in its religious views. However, this pluralism 
was not accompanied by tolerance, for the history of the town is marked by attempts by a 
wealthy traditionalist faction and a committed Protestant faction to dominate the politics 
and religion of the town, and by an economic elite to control its trades and business. Indeed 
the diversity of the community contrasts with its monolithic institutions, with only one parish 
church, a very small council of mayor and jurats, and only one macro-guild controlling all 
of the trades. This concentration of religion, power, and finances may have made possible 
officially sanctioned cultural productions, such as plays in the church and payments to trav 
elling players, but made impossible productions by smaller groups, such as individual guilds 
or small parish churches, so that a large degree of diversity of culture was only expressed over 
time and with changes in elites. Moreover, we do see a variety of cultural practices in the 
records of Rye but often in the context of disputes and attempts by authorities to control 
them, such as the mumming in 1556-7 or the musician confronted by a Puritan mayor in 
1609-10. These ingredients made for a turbulent community marked by power struggles 
and conflict. 



XXXI 
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

WINCHELSEA 

Old Winchelsea was an important port during the reign of John but from 1250 onwards a 
series of storms inflicted severe damage on the town, culminating in the tempest of 1287, 
which destroyed the port and completely eradicated the nearby settlement of Broomhill. As 
part of his project of new towns and in order to prevent the loss of a vaJuable port, Edward I 
chose to rebuild Winchelsea by the River Brede atop a hill near Icklesham. New Winchelsea, 
as a planned town, was remarkable for its orderliness and proportion. M! The town had its 
heyday as the chief Sussex port during the reign of Edward in, primarily through the export 
of wood and wine. In the 1370s it lost its preeminence in timber to Rye and was supplanted 
by Chichester as the most important port of the county, primarily as a result of the French raids 
and the later silting up of the harbour in the fifteenth century. At the same time Winchelsea 
remained as a favoured location for town houses owned by east Sussex gentry. In Henry vin s 
time Camber Castle was built south of the town." 1 Queen Elizabeth visited Winchelsea during 
her progress in 1573 and dubbed it Little London, an epithet that probably indicates more 
about her sense of humour than the actual condition of the town. A population figure of 270 
has been given for Winchelsea in 1603, which would make it an extremely small fishing village 
by that time. 14 1 

Government in Winchelsea was by the familiar Cinque Ports model of a mayor (elected by 
a common assembly held on Easter Monday) and twelve jurats chosen by the mayor, although 
the king s bailiff 7 (usually absentee) retained considerable powers up to the fifteenth century. 
It also appears that the election of the mayor became less democratic after 1435, when the vote 
was restricted to the jurats and a council of Thirty-six. MS As the importance of the town as a 
port declined in the Tudor period so did the power of the townspeople in local politics. By 
the time of Elizabeth s reign the greatest influence on both the government of the town and 
the selection of MPS had passed to neighbouring gentry families, almost all with connections to 
Lord Warden Cobham and almost all with strong Protestant leanings, such as Herbert Morley, 
Herbert Pelham, the Puritan Henry Fane, and the Marian exile Thomas Wilford."" 

Within the walls of New Winchelsea were three parishes: St Giles (in ruins by Elizabeth s 
time), St Leonard, and St Thomas. A fair was held on 14 May but it is not clear how old a 
tradition this was. M 

Nobility and Gentry 

The history of nobility and gentry in Sussex is very much related to the religious history of the 
county. In the fourteenth century the Warennes and the Fitz Alans were the only families of 
comital rank in Sussex, the former based in Lewes, the latter in Arundel. The Warenne estates 
passed to the Fitz Alans by marriage in 1347. Richard Fitz Alan, earl of Arundel (d. 1376), was 
among the half-dozen or so wealthiest men in England, whose influence reached to the centre 
of power in the fourteenth century and who held estates in Sussex in excess of 13,000 acres. 148 
The earls of Arundel continued to be the dominant Sussex noble family in the early Tudor 
period and were also figures of national importance. William Fitz Alan (earl from 1438-87) 



XXXII HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

held the important regional positions of constable of Dover Castle and lord warden of the 
Cinque Ports, a fact that demonstrates his influence and power in the southeast of England, 
beyond the Arundel stronghold in west Sussex. His successors were Thomas Fitz Alan, earl from 
1487 to 1524, who had attended the coronations of Richard in and Elizabeth, queen consort, 
in 1487, and William Fitz Alan, earl from 1524 to I544. m With the Dissolution the Fitz Alans 
increased their wealth by means of seized monastic wealth, as did a growing number of new and 
old Sussex nobility. But the aristocracy still clung to the old religion for some time. At the 
beginning of Elizabeth s reign all the Sussex nobility were Catholic, including Arundel and 
Viscount Montagu, and these magnates dominated the county through large land holdings. 

By the 1580s the religious situation among the nobility had at last changed to one of more 
diversity. Among the five noble families who had principal seats in Sussex and were active in 
county affairs, the earl of Arundel and Lords Montagu (Browne), and Lumley were Catholics 
but Lord Buckhurst (Sackville) was Protestant, and Lord De La Warr (West) was non-committal. 
The most significant development was the decline of the influence of the earls of Arundel. 
Henry Fitz Alan, earl from 1544 to 1580, was a staunch Catholic who had received high office 
under Queen Mary, including the stewardship of the royal household. At first Arundel retained 
his high office under Elizabeth and was also appointed lord lieutenant of Sussex and Surrey. 
But his decline began with Elizabeth s rejection of his suit of marriage to her, which led to his 
resignation of his offices in 1564 and his loss of influence at court. Although Arundel con 
tinued to be a force in west Sussex through his feudal landholdings, his loss of royal patronage 
was a major blow to his wider political power. He fell into disgrace through his involvement 
in Catholic intrigue, namely the Ridolfi plot and the scheme to marry the duke of Norfolk 
to the queen of Scots, and he was imprisoned. The Howards succeeded to the Arundel title in 
1580 and maintained the allegiance of the family to Catholicism. 1 " 1 

Lumley was closely associated with Arundel as his son-in-law and co-holder with him of the 
lord lieutenancy after 1567. Like Arundel he was implicated in the Catholic plots of the 1560s 
and 1570s and imprisoned. After his release Lumley took steps to demonstrate his loyalty to 
Elizabeth and even sat on the commission that tried Mary, queen of Scots. In 1 59 1 he enter 
tained Elizabeth at Stansted Park, which he occupied after the Fitz Alans abandoned it. 
However, he remained a Catholic." 1 

Montagu was raised to the peerage by Queen Mary and was quite openly Catholic, even to 
the point of speaking against the bills of royal ecclesiastical supremacy in 1559, although he 
had in fact greatly benefited from the Dissolution, having been given seventeen imptopriations 
in the county by his half-brother, the earl of Southampton. 1 " On the other hand Montagu 
was able to combine this Catholicism with ostentatious displays of loyalty, such as the Cowdray 
entertainment, his participation in the defence of England against the Armada, and his appear 
ance at the queen s review at Tilbury, pledging his life, his children, his land, and his goods 
to her defence. As a result he was the only Catholic peer that the queen trusted and showed 
favour to and he retained power and influence during her reign, even succeeding to the lord 
lieutenancy in 1558 and 1569. Although he was removed from the lieutenancy in 1585, up to 
that time Montagu shared patronage with Buckhurst and was able to appoint Catholics 
to various offices. Montagu s area of influence was the Midhurst area, where Cowdray was 



HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

located, but he also had an estate at Battle, to which his widow moved after his death in 1592. 

Part of Montagu s success was due to his association with Buckhurst, who shared the lord 
lieutenancy with him in spite of their religious differences and was without doubt the dominant 
Sussex noble in Elizabeths time. Buckhurst began his career as Thomas Sackville, an ambitious 
and wealthy member of the Sussex gentry, before being elevated to the peerage in 1 567 and later 
appointed to die privy council, ultimately receiving the title of earl of Dorset under James I. His 
interest in literary matters is known through his poetry and his co-authorship of the Tragedy 
ofGorbuduc, which was performed before Elizabeth at Whitehall. 154 His pre-occupation in 
county affairs was to wrest power away from die Arundels and Lumleys, in which endeavour he 
succeeded with the help of Montagu. Buckhurst s national importance waned in the 1 580s 
due to disputes widi the earl of Leicester. The power base of the Sackvilles was their estates at 
Withyham, in the northeast Weald, which geographically complemented Montagu s base in 
the west. 1 " 

The barony of De La Warr owed its substantial Sussex holdings in Bramber, Horsham, 
New Shoreham, and St Leonard s Forest to a grant by Henry vii in 1486 to Thomas West, of 
lands formerly belonging to die attainted duke of Norfolk The tide was in abeyance from 1 554 
to 1 570, when it was revived in favour of William West, perhaps in desperation to find lords 
who were not implicated in Catholic plots. However, West had a bad reputation, owing to his 
attempt to dispatch his uncle, who had adopted him as his heir, by poisoning, and his par 
ticipation in the plot against Queen Mary in 1556. He was a lord lieutenant of Sussex with 
Buckhurst and Montagu and actively worked against the Arundel/Lumley faction but was 
probably guided by opportunism rather than religious conviction. His successors to the title 
were avowed Puritans. The home of the De La Warrs was at Halnaker, in the far west of the 
county." 6 

The barony of Dacre came into the Fiennes family in 1446 through the marriage of Sir 
Richard Fiennes to Baroness Dacre. At around the same time Richard s uncle, James Fiennes 
of Knole in Kent, attained die barony of Say and Sele. The Fiennes are believed to have gained 
their wealth through spoils of war and corruption, and James" removal as lord treasurer and 
his execution by the Cade rebels in 1450 was one result. The family estate was based at their 
manor house at Herstmonceux, built by Richard s father Roger around 1 440. Richard became 
sheriff of Surrey and Sussex in 1452 and later chamberlain to Edward rv s queen, Elizabeth. 
Richard was succeeded by his grandson Thomas, who held the title from 1483 to 1533. The 
fortunes of the family had a precipitous decline when Thomas grandson, also named Thomas, 
Lord Dacre from 1553, was hanged for murdering a park keeper. By the seventeenth century 
the Dacres were considered to be nonentities. " 

The other aristocratic presence in Sussex was the Percys, earls of Northumberland, who 
appear to have had a southern residence at Petwordi since the twelfth century. The Percys were 
a strongly Catholic family as well and they were involved in the Pilgrimage of Grace in the 
1530s, the Ridolfi plot of 1569, and the Gunpowder plot of 1605. The degree of influence of 
the Percys on Sussex is difficult to measure as their attentions were usually focused on their 
lands in the north and Middlesex. On the other hand the Percys probably had associations 
with the Arundels based on geographical proximity and religion, and it is not surprising that 



XXXIV HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

the two earls were linked with each other in the 1569 plot. The thirteenth earl retired to 
Petworth in 1621 but this was after sixteen years in prison and a fine of 1 1,000, when he had 
lost all interest in political affairs. 158 

By the 1 620s the nobility of Sussex had lost control over the affairs of the county and power 
passed to the gentry. Religious problems led the Arundels and Montagus to withdraw from 
county affairs. The Lumleys spent most of their time on their lands in Durham and the 
Sackvilles moved to Knole in Kent. iw 

The nobility of Sussex thus exercised enormous influence on the religious and political 
affairs of the county although as the Reformation progressed conflicts within the aristocracy 
made it difficult for any one family to have a wide influence. But perhaps we can see some 
of the influence particularly of the Catholic nobility in the documents of certain parishes in 
our records. It may be no accident mat the western parishes of Cocking, Graffham, Westbourne, 
and Yapton were all at some point under the ownership of the families of Browne, Fitz Alan, 
or Lumley. 160 This connection with Catholic patronage could in some cases explain the per 
sistence of old customs, such as the morris dancing at Cocking. It should also be said that the 
regional cleavages of the county were reflected by the distribution of the nobility in the six 
teenth century. The many Catholic aristocrats tended to live in the west, where the large, 
non-labour-intensive agricultural holdings suited their lifestyle. The east of the county was 
less suited to the traditionalist nobility, not only because of its religious radicalism but also 
because the agriculture there was split up into smaller holdings and required a large number 
of workers. 1 " 

The gentry was a much larger and more varied group. Even in the Middle Ages, before the 
great religious divisions appeared, the gentry families of Sussex, such as the Etchinghams, the 
Dallingridges, the Pelhams, the Poynings, the Sackvilles, and the Waleyses, were characterized 
by diversity and separation from each other. It was, in Saul s words, a county of communities," 
in which the Sussex elite was formed by groups of men who lived sometimes at considerable 
distance from each other and who belonged to quite separate networks of clientage and col 
lective responsibility. 162 The gentry of Sussex throughout the early modern period was char 
acterized by its strength and its influence, on both the Catholic and the Protestant sides, mough 
the conversion to Protestantism was as slow among this class as it was among the nobility. 
During the first half of Elizabeth s reign the progress of the Reformation was hindered by the 
Catholic sympathies of die Sussex gentry, who held die offices of JPS and thus were in a position 
not to enforce the laws against Catholics. Moreover, Lord Buckhurst was reluctant to move 
against Catholic JPS and in fact patronized Catholics for minor positions. 163 Arundel and 
Montagu created a circle of contacts for many of the Catholic gentry, especially in west Sussex. 
Notable Cadiolic gentry included the Carylls of West Haning; the Dawtreys of More House 
at Petworth; the Gage family of Firle, who held high office under Mary (Sir John Gage 
was her lord chamberlain); the Leedes of Wapping Thorne; and the Shelleys of Clapham. 1M 
However, the rise of Protestantism in Sussex in the latter half of Elizabeth s reign was led by 
a number of Protestant gentry, such as the Bowyers of Cuckfield, die Coverts of Slaugham, the 
Gorings of Burton, the Jefferays of Chiddingly, the Morleys of Glynde, and the Pelhams 
of Laughton, mainly from the eastern part of the county. By 1570 there were only a few 



HISTORICAL BACKGROUND XXXV 

Catholics left on the commission of the peace, although some Catholic families, such as the 
Carylls, were able to maintain power and position through political skill and astuteness. 
Significantly, many of these Protestant families were extremely wealthy and some had made 
their fortunes from the iron industry of the Weald. " The Pelhams are especially notable for 
their wealth, for their leadership in county affairs, and for having brought the Renaissance 
to east Sussex in the 1530s with their terracotta friezes and window jambs on the tower 
at Laughton Place. 166 By the early years of the seventeenth century die administrative structure 
of the county had fallen into the hands of Puritan gentlemen. 167 



Drama, Music, and 
Seasonal Customs 



Sussex was a county with religious, social, and economic diversity and a unique landscape 
providing both isolation and accessibility. To some extent we have medieval and early modern 
records of drama, ceremony, and music that reflect the diversity of the area over time as well 
as space. We have records of both professional and amateur performers, folk and religious 
performances, touring companies of noblemen and local troupes, audiences of royalty and 
workmen, music teachers and musical instruments, boy bishops in church and lords of misrule 
in towns and villages, and civic and parish rituals. What we do not have is an evenly distributed 
set of surviving records diat would accurately reflect the quantity of activity in die area dirough- 
out the period. For instance, in civic records we have a splendidly detailed set of records from 
the late medieval and early modern port of Rye but only sparse documents surviving from 
the fellow ports of Hastings (which has almost no documents at all from the period) and 
Winchelsea (which has left us only legal and legislative documents). Records relating to die 
Cinque Ports confederation itself can provide some evidence of entertainment, as can be seen 
in the Yarmouth Herring Fair Books and the payments in the Rye Chamberlains Accounts to 
musicians performing at the Brotherhood and Guestling meetings. 

We have some informative account books from the western administrative centre of Chi- 
chester from the early to mid-sixteenth century (1517-23, 1532-7, and 1543-4) but the 
eastern administrative centre of Lewes has only a few summary accounts from the middle of the 
sixteenth century. The market towns of the Weald have left even less. One partial explanation 
for this spotty survival rate lies in the lack of local archives, as in many cases up to the twentieth 
century town clerks kept die records in their own offices and passed them on to dieir successors 
(or not) when their terms of office were up. On the other hand we do have a large collection 
of diocesan documents from the early modern period, which tell us the policies of the central 
authorities regarding dramatic activities, while at the same time court records provide infor 
mation about drama and music at the level of the parish, town, or village. Of the important 
religious houses, we have many records from Lewes Priory but none that reveal musical or 
dramatic activity. On the other hand the records of Battle and Robertsbridge Abbeys give us 
more interesting information about such activity from die late medieval and early Renaissance 
periods than we get from any other sources. 

Family records from any county are erratically preserved and Sussex is no exception. What we 
do have are records mostly from the gentry of the seventeenth century (the earlier sixteenth- 



DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

century accounts of the Roberts family are a welcome exception). What we appear not to have 
are relevant documents from the great aristocratic families like the Fiennes, Fitz Alans, Lumleys, 
Saclcvilles, and Wests, although we do have records of the Brownes, notably that of the Cowdray 
entertainment. The records of the Percy family are being edited by Robert Alexander for a 
future REED collection. 

As for parish records, churchwardens accounts survive from about thirty-two parishes from 
the period before 1642 but only four (St Andrew s and St Michael s, Lewes; St Mary s, Rye; 
St Andrew s, Steyning; and St Andrew s, West Tarring) contain relevant material. Significantly, 
however, these four are about half of the Sussex churchwardens accounts that go back as far 
as the early sixteenth century. 

We also should remember that these records were not made for the twentieth- or twenty- 
first-century scholar but kept for other purposes so that a performance only appears in an 
account book if it was paid for or cost money, in a law court book if it was illegal, or in visita 
tion books if it was forbidden. One wonders about not only die records that have not survived 
but also the hundreds of performances and ceremonies that went on legally, without recorded 
payment or prohibition. Nevertheless our records give us many potentially valuable clues to 
drama, music, and ceremony in this important area of the south coast and show us complex 
parallels between die cultural history of Sussex and its religious, economic, and social history. 

Travelling Performers 

The most striking aspect of performance activity in Sussex that does arise from the records is 
not one of large-scale, well-organized productions of the kind found in such great cities as 
Chester, Coventry, Norwich, and York but radier one of great numbers of travelling minstrels, 
players, animal keepers, jugglers, jesters, and musicians. 168 Perhaps it was partly in response to 
this great amount of activity that, as noted in Edward vis journal, in 1550 Ther was a /priuie 1 
serch made thorough al Sussex for al uagaboundes, egiptians, conspiratours, prophetes, il plaiers 
and such like. 169 

We have the best evidence of travelling performers through the payments made by the town 
of Rye, usually in return for performances before the mayor, for the years 1449-65 and 1474- 
1617. The Rye Chamberlains Accounts record almost 500 payments to performers travelling 
under the name of a patron; they are usually ministralli, minstrels, players, and bearwards, 
with the occasional harpers, trumpets, tabor, juggler, jester, and (in the seventeenth century) 
musicians. There are also a few foreign performers paid, including the Spanish minstrels of 
1505-6 and the French minstrels in 1529-30, which may be a sign of Rye s accessibility by sea. 
Most of these visiting performers are called minstrels or ministralli in the records before 1465. 
From 1474 onwards the English terms minstrel and player are both used, although the former 
still is used in a majority of cases. The former term seems to imply more of a musical perfor 
mance and the latter more of a histrionic one although many of the performers undoubtedly 
made use of both talents, as possibly is implied by the wording of the payment to a minstrel 
for singing and playing at a Brotherhood dinner in 1 554-5. 17 That these terms were not 
always interchangeable is shown by the Chamberlains Accounts of 1537-8 where both the 



XXXVIII DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

lord warden s players and the lord warden s minstrels are paid (different sums) on the same day, 
possibly for a performance together. However, it is also clear that player does not always mean 
actor, as individuals who danced or played with swords are called pleyers in 1507-8 and the 
verb play is used to refer to performances on musical instruments in 1494-5 and 1587-8. The 
exact nature of the performances of minstrels and players is not clear as play titles are not 
specified. Very vague hints are given in 1566-7 when the earl of Worcester s men are called 
Enterlute players and the queen s men are called interlud players. We are more certain about 
the nature of the performance when it comes to bearwards, who appear in the accounts about 
once or twice a year during die most intense periods of visiting performers, as do other itinerant 
animals, such as the camels of 1509-10 and 1521-2, the king s lion of 1483-4, and the 
king s bull of 1524- 5. 71 

Payments made to different performers on the same day occur occasionally. In 1496-7 three 
bearwards are listed under the same sum, which could be a total amount paid to all bearwards 
performing during the quarter, or possibly could indicate that all three were in the town at 
once in a kind of festival of bearwards. More likely to indicate a joint or at least consecutive 
performance is the 5s paid to the minstrels of the archbishop of Canterbury and of the earl of 
Oxford in 1498-9 as the immediately following entry suggests they were entertained together. 
The payment to the players of the queen and the players of Robert Dudley in 1560-1 is 
another possible joint performance, one also fraught with political symbolism. 172 

The amounts paid vary considerably in the period from the mid-fifteenth century to the time 
of Edward vi but typically companies of players were paid either 3s 4d or 6s 8d, perhaps 
depending on the size of the group (which is never indicated) as well as the prestige of the 
patron, performers under members of the royal family usually meriting the higher payments. 
After this time there was considerable inflation in the payments as well as less variation, partly 
due to the decreasing frequency of rewards to performers. In Elizabeth s time the standard 
payment to the queen s men was 13s 4d with 6s 8d given to other companies in the 1560s, 
jumping to 20s and 10s respectively by die 1580s. There are also records of payments for play 
ers and minstrels expenses, such as for wine, bread, and horse bread, and for expenses in 
showing them hospitality. Payments to travelling individuals are even less predictable and in 
some cases are remarkably high, such as the 10s paid to Adams, the king s bearward in 1513-14. 
It should also be remembered that these payments probably do not record the total perfor 
mances of the entertainers during their visits but only those which were charged to the civic 
authorities, usually for an initial performance before the mayor and jurats. 

There was also considerable variation over time in the numbers of travelling performers com 
ing to Rye. It is our good fortune to have an almost continuous run of Chamberlains Accounts 
(supplemented by the transcriptions of the Historical Manuscripts Commission of some 
accounts no longer extant, and by rough accounts from the period) from 1448 to 1642, 
with the only gaps being the accounts for 1465-74 and 1477-9. Travelling performers appear 
diroughout this run of accounts up to 1630, starting with a few per year in the mid-fifteenth 
century, continuing on to the greatest density between 1474 and 1555, when as many as eleven 
companies or individuals identified by patron visited the town in a year, as they did, for exam 
ple, in 1516-17. There was a gradual but not steady decline in the numbers through the middle 



DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

of the sixteenth centuiy, with a drastic tailing off in the 1570s. By the early seventeenth century 
only one or two companies visited per year and the series of payments ends rather dramatically 
in 1616-17 with the record of a payment of 20s to the queen s players being disallowed, and 
one additional unnamed company of players paid in 1629-30. The fall in numbers of visiting 
performers begins in the 1550s, when there were still many travelling companies and well 
before the time when Protestant towns tended to become hostile to them for religious reasons. 
Thus at least initially the fall in numbers of visiting performers was probably more closely 
related to the declining economic fortunes of the town than to religion (see above, p xxix). 17 
Of course some companies may have been turned away without payment, especially as the 
Reformation took hold. Indeed during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries there 
definitely was religious hostility to performers although even then there were likely as many 
financial reasons not to come to Rye as there were religious ones. The discouragement felt by 
visiting performers to Rye in early 1610 upon hearing that the mayor was a Puritan may be 
indicative. Interestingly these performers were not players but musicians, who, unlike actors, 
supposedly were tolerated by the Puritans. 

More definitive conclusions about the itineraries of travelling performers will have to await 
the completion of the REED project but there is already ample evidence that Rye was part of 
a circuit of southeastern and southern locations (and sometimes beyond) often used by trav 
elling performers. For example, Leicester s men performed in Rye on 5 February 1 587/8 but 
they also appeared in the same month or slightly earlier in the records of Dover and in undated 
accounts in the same year in the Kentish towns of Faversham, Folkestone, Lydd, and New 
Romney. Although not necessarily as part of the same tour, they appear in the southwest later 
in the same year in Lyme Regis, Dorset, on 28 April and in Plymouth, Devon, on 15 May. 174 
They also went further west to Bristol and Gloucester in June of the same year. 1 " In 1596-7 
the queen s men visited a number of southeastern locations in and around March, including 
Canterbury, Faversham, Lydd, Folkestone, and Dover, as well as Rye, and then headed north 
to East Anglia, where they performed in Ipswich, Dunwich, Saffron Walden, and Cambridge. 76 

The short run of accounts from the St Georges Guild from 1517-18 to 1522-3, along with 
some scattered accounts from the guild and the Cathedral Communar s Accounts from the 
1530s and 1540s, indicates several visiting entertainers to Chichester, usually called mimi, 
lusores, bearwards, or jugglers. The difference in terminology from that used in Rye is likely 
due to difference in accounting practices rather than types of visiting performers but it is not 
clear what distinction was made in the minds of die Chichester record keepers. The Chichester 
lusores may correspond to the players in Rye but the term mimi is even more difficult to 
pin down as it appears sometimes to have referred to musicians in the Middle Ages in spite 
of its reference to actors in classical times. 177 On the other hand one group of mimi in 1520-1 
were definitely musicians, as they are called Troppattw, and so the term may in fact be a 
synonym for Rye s ministralli. However, the Chichester visitors show some important differ 
ences. For one thing there is much less variety of companies and individuals, most being 
identified with either the earl of Arundel (who lived close by and had strong economic and 
religious influence in the whole area of west Sussex) or die king. Consequently it is much more 
difficult to see that Chichester was part of a larger touring pattern for travelling players. 



xl DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

Moreover, because the account payments were not given specific dates conclusions about travel 
patterns require a certain degree of guesswork. Of course the king s various servants, who appear 
frequently in these accounts, were likely on tour. Another example appears to have been the 
duke of Suffolk s bearward, who came to Chichester in 1519-20 and is known to have per 
formed in Lydd, New Romney, and Sandwich in 1519-20 as well. 17 * There are a few instances 
of entertainers who appear in both die Chichester and the Rye accounts in the same year: the 
king s bearward in 1517-18, again in 1519-20 (at a New Romney Brotherhood in the Rye 
accounts), and in 1521-2; the duke of Suffolk s bearward in 1521-2 and 1522-3; and the 
king s minstrels in 1536-7. There is as well a remarkable degree of consistency in die amounts 
paid, with the king s players almost always receiving 6s 8d and Arundel s half that, although 
many of these payments to both groups are labelled as ones for the whole year, suggesting that 
they are a total of all made in twelve months, or a customary stipend given independent of 
particular services rendered. We have almost no idea of the nature of the performances in 
Chichester or in Rye. However, in a much later period it appears that the people of the area 
were exposed to some forms of drama, as is indicated by the words of Joan Pay of Warbleton 
parish, about six miles west of Chichester, as quoted in an Archdeaconry of Chichester De 
tection Book. Joan was accused of saying that her vicar preened like a foole in a play, & that 
he is fitter to make a fidler or a tincker then a minister. 179 

Travelling performers visited religious houses as well. Sporadic payments were made to 
histriones and ministralli by Robertsbridge Abbey in die early fifteenth century and payments 
to lusores, ministralli, and histriones ( lusores with puppets in c 1478-82) were made by 
Batde Abbey in the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries (coincidentally there is no overlap in the 
coverage of the extant accounts of the two houses). Many of the accounts for both institutions 
are summary and thus of limited use. However, one notable entry is the payment to the 
minstrels of the king of Navarre at Battle in 1381-2, which is another of the few instances of 
foreign performers in the Sussex records. The abbey accounts are especially useful in one respect 
because, unlike civic accounts, they sometimes include the names of the performers although 
it is seldom clear whether they were in fact travelling, or local, or even residents of the abbeys. 
Thus from Battle Abbey we have the name of Robert Pole (or Robert the Fool) and from 
Robertsbridge we learn of the minstrel Nicholas Hope. What is not clear is the status of other 
individuals named in the accounts in entries related partly but not necessarily exclusively to 
entertainers: John Wayne in the Battle accounts and Richard Ferour, Richard Kas, and William 
Russell in the Robertsbridge accounts. 

The family records of Sussex also mention a few travelling entertainers. Notable are Jacomo 
the Italian, who did one-man comedies for the Percys at Petworth in 1596-7, and die two-head 
ed calf, which was brought there in 1 582-3. * The Carylls of West Harting were entertained 
by an ape performing tricks and an Irish harper in the 1630s. The minstrels who appear in the 
accounts of the Roberts family in the 1 560s and 1 570s may be a much different matter. It 
seems clear rhat since the family could not have afforded to employ musicians on a regular basis, 
these minstrels were itinerant. As well, they may have been of a rather low professional level. 
The fact that in 1 572 the family ended up buying ribbon, pins, and thread from a minstrel 
suggests that these individuals were travelling hucksters, who may have played music but also 




DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

sold a variety of goods, much like Autolycus in The Winter s Tale. 

The patrons of the travelling performers in Sussex fall mainly into two categories: lords and 
gentry with strong local connections and lords with no obvious local connections but of 
national importance. The dominant local patrons in our records are without question the 
earls of Arundel and their families. Groups called the earl of Arundel s (or Lord Mautravers ) 
ministralli, lusores, mimi, histriones, minstrels, and players appearing in the records of 
Battle Abbey, Chichester, and Rye are recorded between 1381-2 and 1543-4 but the bulk of 
them fall between 1498-9 and 1520-1 in Battle, between 1517-18 and 1522-3 in Chichester, 
and between 1452-3 and 1518-19 in Rye. That would place most of the performers during the 
time of William Fitz Alan, earl from 1438 to 1487 (lord warden of the Cinque Ports 1470-87) 
and Thomas Fitz Alan, earl from 1487 to 1524 (see Patrons and Travelling Companies). 
It is not clear how many different groups of actors and/or musicians were involved but it is 
likely that more than one was being maintained, especially since in 1520-1 and 1521-2 separ 
ate payments were made to Arundel s lusores and his mimi in Chichester. It is significant that 
in 1520-1 in Chichester some of Arundel s performers are referred to as Mimis ... vocatis 
Tropattw, a phrase which seems to indicate that at least at that time one group consisted of 
musicians. (Arundel s men are also called trumpets in 1521-2.) However, die earls also patron 
ized a harper (Rye, 1489-90), Claionerw (Rye, 1494-5), and a dancing boy (Chichester, 
1518-19). It appears from an incident in Singleton in 1506 that the earl of that time may 
have had a fool as well who, perhaps befitting the stereotype of the tragic clown, committed 
suicide. 8 Although the performers of the earls of Arundel were based in Sussex they also trav 
elled extensively outside the county and during the time of William and Thomas Fitz Alan they 
appear extensively in the records of Kent and Devon. 182 The appearances of Arundel s performers 
in Rye in 1 526-7 and Chichester in 1 543-4 show that Thomas Fitz Alan s successor, who like 
his grandfather was called William (earl from 1524 to 1544), kept entertainers as well. While 
gaps in the Chichester records prevent us from knowing how often William s performers went 
there they seem to have gone to Rye but once. The reasons for this abrupt fall-off in visits to 
Rye after the passing of Thomas Fitz Alan in 1 524 are not clear. This was well before the decline 
of the Arundels political fortunes, which only began with Henry Fitz Alan s resignation of 
his positions at court in 1564. It may be that the earls after Thomas were just not interested 
in performance patronage as a political tool. In any case as the sixteenth century progressed 
through the Reformation performers who had these Catholic earls as patrons would likely not 
have been welcome in Protestant Rye and certainly would not have been received by the time 
the tide passed to the Howards in 1580. 

Payments to the performers of the lord wardens of the Cinque Ports are a recurring feature of 
the Rye accounts up until 1569-70. The cessation of visits after that time (with the exception of 
one payment in 1593-4) may only be a result of the general decline in travelling performers 
coming to Rye but it may also be a sign of the deteriorating state of the confederation of the 
Cinque Ports. Clearly, however, for some time the wardens perceived regular touring by their 
servants through the Ports as an important part of their duties - and the Ports obviously felt 
obligated to receive their performers. It is not always easy to see exacdy how much of this tour 
ing is directly connected to the position of warden, as some lord wardens were often also 



xlii DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

important members of the nobility or the administration of the county and some also already 
had strong local connections before appointment. For instance, as we have seen, Arundel 
served as warden in the late fifteenth century but his players appeared in Rye before his term in 
diat office with no noticeable change in the amounts paid to them. Prince Henry was lord war 
den from 1492 to 1504 but this probably was not the only reason why his minstrels came to 
Rye during that time as tJiey likely were touring throughout the country. Sir Edward Poynings 
probably did not become lord warden until 1 509 but his minstrels appeared in Rye as early as 
1 500-1. l83 Interestingly they also appeared outside the Cinque Ports at Battle Abbey in 
1520-1, the year before or of his death. It may or may not be significant that during all this 
time payments were usually made to performers identified as the lord warden s but sometimes 
they were named for die title or family name of the patron, even during their patron s terms as 
warden, eg, Arundel, Buckingham, Cobham, Poynings, and Warwick (see Patrons and Travel 
ling Companies). It is thus important to see that these performers usually had an independent 
existence apart from their patrons position as warden and were not likely to have been local 
musicians and actors from the ports themselves drafted for the purpose of serving the warden. 
It seems to have been standard practice to have musical performers at the Brotherhood meetings 
but they were not always the lord warden s musicians. Visits to Rye of the performers named as 
those of the lord admiral in 1512-13, 1529-30, 1552-3, 1585-6, 1589-90, 1591-2, and 
1 592-3 are much fewer but widely ranged in time. These are also likely to have been related to 
the town s position as a Port. 

Other patrons with strong local connections are of interest as well. Sussex magnates other dian 
Arundel do not appear as patrons nearly as often. Minstrels of the Fiennes of Herstmonceux 
appear once in the Robertsbridge Abbey accounts in 1416-17, in the Rye accounts of 1453-4, 
and once under the tide of Dacre in Rye in 1459-60. The minstrels of Lord Saye and Sele, also 
a member of the Fiennes family but based in Kent, came to Rye in 1448-9. Performers of 
the lady of Northumberland appeared in Chichester in 1518-19 and those of the earl of 
Northumberland in Rye from 1482-3 to 1516-17. Although payments were sporadic they may 
have been connected with the Percys residence at Petworth, which they had occupied since the 
thirteenth century. The players of George Nevill, Lord Abergavenny, appear in the Rye accounts 
in 1516-17 and 1517-18. Abergavenny belonged to an east Sussex family which held vast 
estates in the area and whose castle at Eridge near the Kent border was visited by Elizabeth 
during her progress of 1573 (see p li). He had ties by marriage with the Fitz Alans and the 
Percys. The lord of borgaynes whose players are referred to in the Rye accounts of 1570-1 was 
George Nevill s son Henry, who inherited the tide in 1535." 4 

Sir Henry Guildford s minstrels appeared in Rye in 1516-17, 1517-18, 1523-4, 1525-6, 
and 1 530-1. These visits were probably related to Henry s connections widi Kent (he was con 
stable of Leeds Castle 1512-31) and his half-brother Edward s position as lord warden in 
1 521-34. However, it is also known that Sir Henry (who, unlike most patrons, was a member 
of the gentry rather than the nobility) had a personal interest in drama for he and his half- 
brother acted with the newly crowned Henry vin in 1510 in a play of Robin Hood and his 
men to amuse the queen, and he was also master of the revels at court in later years. " Another 
prominent Kent gentry patron was Sir Edward Poynings, whose minstrel made frequent visits 



to 



DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

_ Rye between 1500 and 1521, during at least part of which time Poynings was lord warden. 
Poynings probably was not actually in Kent for much of this time as he served Henry vn and 
Henry vin in many official, diplomatic, and military capacities. 186 

Of die patrons without local connections the most prominent were obviously the monarchs 
and other members of the royal family. The histriones of Henry vi appeared at Robertsbridge 
Abbey in 1424-5, as did those of Henry vii at Battle Abbey in 1499-1500. The Battle Abbey 
record of 1 508-9 also mentions a visit from the king s players (either Henry vii or Henry vin); 
another visit from Henry vin s bearward is mentioned in c 1522. Our short run of Chichester 
accounts records visits from Henry vin s performers, with his players coming almost every year 
for which we have records, in addition to several visits from his bearward and his juggler (see 
pp 14-16). The Rye records have payments to the king s various performers almost every year 
during the reigns of Henry vi, Edward rv, Richard in, Henry vn, Henry vin, Edward vi, and 
Mary. Elizabeth s players came every year until 1570-1, then again sporadically from 1583-4 
to 1588-9, and 1594-5 to 1596-7. During these last two periods her players were among 
the very few who came at all. Patrons among other royal family members include Queen 
Elizabeth, Prince Edward, and the duke of Clarence in Edward rv s time; Queen Elizabeth, the 
duchess of York, Prince Arthur, and Prince Henry in Henry vn s time; and Prince Edward in 
Henry vin s time. During the reign of James i, when the companies were consolidated, it is not 
surprising that the few companies that came were under the patronage of members of the royal 
family. Though the king s players themselves did not appear, those of Queen Anne, Princess 
Elizabeth, and Prince Charles did perform in Rye. 

The remaining patrons of performers visiting Rye were a mixed lot but mosdy individuals of 
national significance. They included the earls of Kent (who in spite of their tide held most of 
their lands in the home counties, the Midlands, and East Anglia) in the 1480s and the 1490s 
and later in 1519-21; the earl of Derby in the 1480s and 1490s; the earls of Oxford from i486 
to 1519; 187 Robert Dudley, later the earl of Leicester, from 1559-60 to 1587-8; and the earl of 
Worcester in the 1 590s. Presumably these companies were spreading the influence and good 
will of their patrons in areas where their lords were not otherwise connected. The entry record 
ing a joint payment to the minstrels of the earl of Oxford (John de Vere) and of the archbishop 
of Canterbury (John Morton) in 1498-9 is significant because in the same year payments to 
minstrels of these patrons were entered consecutively in the Dover Chamberlains Accounts and 
they were given another joint payment (with the king s minstrels) in Plymouth. 88 It is even pos 
sible that the consecutive payments to the histriones of the earl and the archbishop in the same 
year in the Battle Abbey accounts are for the same entertainers, although a different identifying 
term is used by the scribe. The companies of these two privy councillors may have been touring 
die south together though there is no obvious deeper political connection between them. There 
were also many patrons without obvious strong local connections, whose performers appeared 
in Rye only once or twice, such as Lord Welles in 1490-1, the marquess of Exeter and earl of 
Devon in 1530-1 and 1534-5, the marquess of Dorset in 1540-1, and the earl of Pembroke 
in 1592-3. 

There was one more type of travelling performer who played a major role in the cultural life 
of Sussex. From 1456 to 1560 almost a hundred payments are recorded in the Battle Abbey 



xliv DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

accounts and the Rye Chamberlains Accounts for players, banns criers, or, occasionally, waits 
or morris dancers but they are identified by locations (rather than by patrons) in Sussex, Essex, 
and most frequently Kent (see Patrons and Travelling Companies). Some of the most frequent 
visitors were from the Cinque Ports and other major centres of Kent like Canterbury, Faversham, 
and Maidstone. Others came from the other Sussex ports of Hastings and Winchelsea and from 
other Sussex towns like Chichester, Lewes, and West Tarring (or Tarring Neville). Many of die 
most frequent visitors, however, came from places in die marshy hinterland around Rye, such as 
Appledore, Cranbrook, Peasmarsh, and Wittersham. The furthest any town minstrels seem to 
have come is from Colchester in Essex in 1519-20 and from London in 1485-6. Thus these 
performers came from nearby communities that had a variety of economic relationships with 
Rye including fellow ports and trading partner towns that imported and exported goods 
dirough the port of Rye. Most of these settlements were within a twenty-five mile radius of Rye, 
especially to the north or east in Kent but some lay to the west in Sussex as well. It is not known 
for sure how these travellers reached Rye but it was not an inaccessible town by any means. 
Travellers from inland Kent could have visited Rye by means of the admittedly poor roads 
through the Weald from Rochester, with the final leg possibly by barge on the Rother River, 
which probably also provided access from many of the nearby hinterland area villages. Rye 
could have been reached from coastal settlements like Chichester, Winchelsea, and Hastings to 
the west or New Romney and Dover to the east eidier by die coastal road, or perhaps by boat. 
Town players from Winchelsea also performed before die abbot of Battle c 1478-82 as did 
others from Cranbrook, Maidstone, Mailing, and Tenterden in 1520-1. A number of the 
payments at Rye are for entertaining banns criers (eg, see Rye 1487-8, 1502-3, and 1525-6) 
from locations in Kent, presumably as an advertisement for locally performed plays. We also 
know that travelling banns criers, players, and minstrels from die town of Rye made reciprocal 
visits, through payments made to them in the records of Lydd, New Romney (both within 
fifteen miles of Rye), and Sandwich (over thirty-five miles down die coast). "" 

This type of local dramatic activity started later than that of die travelling performers with 
patrons (in around the 1470s) and also seems to drop off earlier (in die 1530s). It is dius likely 
that the type of drama involved was of the pre-Reformation variety, either religious plays on 
biblical or hagiographical subjects or folk plays like those on Robin Hood. One fact that is 
clear is that these performers were treated widi financial respect as many received as much or 
more dian die professional companies. Considering diat many of diese locations were probably 
villages of no more dian a hundred people or so, it is remarkable that so few people could have 
produced so much drama. This was a situation both similar to and different from diat of cides 
in which various economic groups came together in friendly competition and cooperation for 
die purposes of celebration and entertainment. Here a community of communities or cultural 
neighbourhood seems to have been in operation, in which the production of drama created 
and reinforced a regional network and presumably overcame geographical distances as well as 
differences in economic status. These players also served social and economic functions differ 
ent from those of the entertainers with patrons. While the latter served as symbols of royal and 
aristocratic authority and were reminders to all of die hierarchical social relationships between 
them, 1 * the town players must have been a way of reinforcing economic and geographical 



xlv 
DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

bonds between communities which, while they may have been of unequal status, were not 
bound by traditional relationships and hierarchies. 

Playing Places 

Although playing places are usually not specified in the records almost all that we do know 
about fall into five categories: town halls or other civic government buildings, churches, streets, 
public houses and inns, and private homes. To begin with civic buildings, the main function 
of these structures was of course housing the local government and in some cases the quarter 
sessions or the local market, but they would also be obvious venues for performances, even if 
we have no direct records of their use for this purpose. Tittler has identified six town halls or 
analogues to town halls constructed or converted from other uses in Sussex during the period 
1500-1640, located at Brighton, East Grinstead, Horsham, Lewes, Midhurst, and Rye. 191 
During our period there also seems to have been a market or town hall at Arundel, a market 
house in Cuckfield, a market building in Hailsham, a court house in Hastings, a market hall 
in Petwordi, a market house in New Shoreham, a town hall in Steyning, a market place in West 
Tarring, and a town hall in Winchelsea. 192 In the Rye records many payments are for perfor 
mances before die mayor and jurats although usually no location is stated. However, two entries 
for 1569-70 make it clear that the payments were for performances staged in die Court Hall, 
which was located above the shops in the Butchery but which no longer survives. Also in Rye 
men from Lydd showed a contynaunce of their play in the market place in 1485-6 and banns 
criers from Appledore performed in the same place in 1487-8. The market place (in Tudor 
times apparently a covered area below the Court Hall) would have been an obvious place for 
crying banns and it is safe to assume they most often took place there. 193 Similarly, a ioculator 
(an entertainer of some kind, possibly a juggler) performed in die Council House in Chichester 
in 1543-4, which was probably located on the site of the present Council House in North 
Street. The covered market cross at the centre of Chichester, which still stands and dates from 
1500, may have been a performance site too." 4 The Chichester records of 1543-4 also note a 
performance in le hape but it is not known what building this refers to. 

Many of the performances in Rye are stated by the records to have taken place in church, 
such as the one by the players of New Romney in 1474-5, of Maidstone in 1480-1, or of 
Winchelsea in 1489-90. Minstrels also performed there, such as those of die duchess of York 
in 1485-6. As we have seen there was only one parish church in Rye and as a surviving per 
formance space St Mary s is in itself a valuable piece of evidence. The church building dates 
back to die middle of the twelfth century, with extensive renovation work done in the fifteenth 
century; it was also badly damaged at the time of the Reformation. The parts that date from 
the early Middle Ages include the chancel, nave, transepts, and crossing, along with the large 
chapels on either side of the chancel and the north and south aisles of the nave. The porches 
on either side of the nave were built in the fourteenth century, along with the present square 
central tower and arches above die crossing. Light in the chancel is mostly supplied by a large 
early-fifteenth-century window in the east wall. 19 Wasson suggests that the east end of the 
nave before the choir screen would have been a logical place to perform at least one twelfth- 



xlvi DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

century church play 96 but a Rye account of 1485-6 states that the players of the earl of Arundel 
performed in the choir. We also know that a stage for a play was constructed in the church in 
1 522-3 but it is not stated where it was located in the church. Another record of 1476-7 says 
that the players of Winchelsea performed in the churchyard. Almost all of these references to 
playing in the church come from records of the fifteenth century but it would be risky to con 
clude that there was a change in venue after that time, especially since it is known that locally 
produced drama did take place in the church in the sixteenth century (see below, p xlviii). 

There are a few references to theatre in the streets of Rye. In 1507-8 we are told that players 
from Essex played wit/> sword at the stronde, which was the street bordering on the quay 
(see map, p cix). The one tantalizing reference to a pageant house in the Rye Chamberlains 
Accounts for 1573-4 (see p 121), the year of die queens visit, suggests that at least one time 
there may have been performances on wagons in the town or perhaps a procession of some 
kind. Given the large number of people from the Continent in Rye during this period, it is 
tempting to see the potential influence of European staging techniques here though, as is well 
known, the same devices were used in medieval England. Of course it is possible that a much 
larger number of street performances took place as these are the sort of event that would not 
have been recorded. 

The last two categories of playing places, public houses and private houses, are the most 
difficult to separate. We are told that in 1453-4 the duke of Buckingham s minstrels were at 
a tabfrnam (an inn or a tavern) in Rye, though it is not clear whether they performed there 
or just ate and drank there. On the other hand the several references to performances at the 
mayors house in Rye were presumably at a private domicile, such as those of Robert Croche 
in 1479-80, Nicholas Sutton in 1514-15 and 1516-17, John Wymond in 1525-6, William 
Byspyn in 1526-7, and John Fleccher in 1530-1. Many of the other performances are said 
to have taken place at an individual s house, such as William Eston in 1490-1 and 1491-2, 
Thomas Barbor in 1493-4 and 1495-6, and Laurence Stephen in 1505-6 and 1516-17. In 
many cases these were probably inns. There were in fact forty victualling houses in die town 
of Rye in 1 576 but probably only a few were respectable inns where the mayor would appear. 
The Crown, where the players of Canterbury performed in 1526-7, was one of the most 
prominent. Other well-established inns where performances may have been held were the Red 
Lion and the Three Kings. 197 Indeed there are payments for entertainers at die houses of known 
innkeepers such as Nicholas Sutton in 1507-8 and 1514-15, and Clement Adam in 1510-11, 
1511-12, 1513-14, and 1521-2 (in addition to odier payments for performances at his house 
when he was mayor, such as in 1512-13). Other individuals whose houses are frequendy men 
tioned as the venue for dramatic or musical performances may also have been innkeepers, such 
as Drynker (1486-7, 1488-9, 1490-2, 1494-5) and Wayte (1513-14, 1517-18). There is 
also a payment in 1532-3 for candles during a performance. In general it seems that most often 
the recorded payments in Rye are for performances in public or private houses rather than the 
seat of civic government. 

As previously noted there were seven inns in Chichester in the seventeenth century (see 
p xxv) but we have no records of performances in inns there in any period. As a major admin 
istrative and trading centre Lewes also had a number of inns and taverns in the sixteenth and 



DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

seventeenth centuries but likewise we have no records of performances there. 198 Outside of Rye, 
public or private houses mentioned as performance places include those of John Mathewe in 
1520-1 and Thomas Grigges in 1608/9 (both in Chichester), Edward Lucas of Funtington in 
1602, John Keale of Pett in 1586, and John Dunke of Salehurst in 1581. Thomas Lusy of 
Westbourne is identified in 1 573 as a victualler who kept a minstrel in his house. 

Performances in the great houses or large estates of Sussex undoubtedly took place although 
we have lirde evidence of diem. The few references to performers at Petworth are one exception 
(see above, p xl) but the Cowdray visit by Elizabeth is the major one. The entertainment 
in 1591 took place on the grounds of the 600-acre estate, located near Midhurst at the edge 
of a wood called La Coudraie. The Cowdray property originates from the Norman castle of 
Savaric de Bohun, which came into the hands of Sir David Owen. His manor house was re 
constructed by William Fitzwilliam, earl of Southampton, who bought the estate from Sir 
David in 1 529. After Fitzwilliam died without issue in 1 543 Cowdray came into the possession 
of his half brother, Sir Anthony Browne. In 1548 the estate was passed to Sir Anthony s son, 
also called Anthony, who was created Viscount Montagu in 1554. Montagu died in 1592, the 
year after die queen s visit, whereupon the estate was left to Montagu s grandson, also Anthony, 
Viscount Montagu. Cowdray was occupied by the parliamentary forces in the Civil War and 
sustained extensive damage at that time. The house was destroyed by fire in 1793. 

Cowdray, mainly completed during the time of Fitzwilliam, is primarily known from eight 
eenth-century antiquarian descriptions and drawings. It was a symmetrical structure built 
around a courtyard, widi a great gatehouse on the west side and Gothic towers at each corner. 
At some point the courtyard had an Italian Renaissance marble fountain. Another notable 
feature was the tall oriel window in the great hall. One eighteenth-century travel writer, George 
Walpole, also mentions a large parlour with a painting of the exploits of Henry vin by Holbein 
and a long gallery. 199 

Notable among the castles of Sussex were Bodiam on the Rother River, Scotney Castle on 
the border with Kent, Amberley Castle, near Arundel, and Herstmonceux near Hailsham. Apart 
from Cowdray, major aristocratic residences included the Fitz Alans and, later, the Lumleys 
vast estate at Stansted Park; Halnaker House, which was surrendered to the king by the De 
La Warr family in 1539; Offington, where the De La Warrs moved in 1539; Chesworth, owned 
by the dukes of Norfolk in the sixteenth century, and Petworth, the southern estate of the Percy 
family. Gentry estates included Bolebrook House (Lewkenor), Buckhurst (Sackville), Firle 
Place (Gage), Isfield Place (Shurley), and Michelgrove (Shelley). Another likely venue was 
the bishop s palace at Chichester, which still stands and includes a 34-square-foot hall called 
the Great Kitchen. 200 At the other end of the spectrum of playing places is the barn in Felpham 
where minstrels were caught playing in 1609. 

Seasonal Activities and Local Customs 

Owing to the scarcity of extant parish records we do not have a clear picture of local dramatic 
and ceremonial activities in Sussex during our period. However, it is also possible that there 
was not much of such activity to begin with, especially in the eastern pans of the county like 



xlviii DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

the Weald, which did not populate heavily until well into the Tudor period and which seems 
to have had deep historical affinities with Protestantism. Sussex also has few records of religious 
guilds. 201 On the other hand there is some evidence that the seasons in Sussex were marked by 
local festivals, celebrations, and rituals. Many of these practices were predictable plays that 
celebrated the important events of the Christian year but others reversed hierarchies and cel 
ebrated the temporary loosening of normal social inhibitions. Of course many of these latter 
activities had pagan origins and most came into ill repute in the Reformation. 

If we begin with the Christmas season we see that there is one reference to boy bishop cere 
monies at the feast of St Nicholas in die town of Batde in the Battle Abbey records of 1498-9 
and several from the churchwardens accounts of St Andrew s and St Michael s in Lewes in the 
1520s and 1530s. 202 These latter records are especially useful because they show details of die 
expenses and the receipts connected witJi the traditional ceremony, which continued up close 
to the time it was banned in England by Henry vm in 154 1. 203 The Christmas season was 
also celebrated in Rye by plays. Sometimes these plays were performed by visitors, such as the 
players of Lydd in 1476-7 or of Mailing in 1507-8. However, as die origins of other Christmas 
players are not specified (eg, 1483-4, 1504-5, 1506-7, 1514-15) they may have been local. 
There is no indication of the subject of the Christmas plays but the records seem to deliber 
ately draw attention to the seasonal nature of the performances. Given the dedication of Rye 
church it would not be surprising if the plays focused on the Virgin Mary, at least before the 
Reformation. There is also a record of a fine levied in Rye against two of its most prominent 
citizens for mumminge in maskyng in December of 1556. It is not clear why this was con 
sidered to be an offence though it may have been unease with numbers of people going about 
in disguise, thus providing criminals with easy movement. 204 A lord of misrule is possibly 
recorded in a puzzling entry of Battle Abbey in 1498-9 at Christmas, which could refer to such 
a lord in a great household (Herstmonceux Casde?); another is briefly mentioned in die eccle 
siastical records relating to Bosham in March 1 598/9 although this could possibly be a summer 
lord. A much more revealing record comes to us from Chichester in 1586/7 in the Arch 
deaconry of Chichester Detection Book for an incident dated 30 December 1586. It appears 
that this lord of misrule was expected to harass people who were not joining in on the local 
festivities. This example of a Christmas lord is especially interesting because he seems to be in 
the employ of the townspeople and not an appointee of a household or a college, as was more 
common. The punishment for not being in the spirit was apparently to be forced to ride 
on a cowlstafF, exposed to the mockery of the townspeople. 20 Clearly this was one local 
custom that survived well into the Protestant era. The cross-dressing incident in West Thorney 
in the winter of 1620/1 may have been related to some sort of carnivalesque celebration 
as well. 

Easter was marked in the Rye church by the performance of a play of the Resurrection, with 
the construction of a stage and a special coat made for the actor playing the part of God 
recorded in 1522-3. There is one later reference to plates for the play in 1525-6 and one 
possible further reference to the coat in 1546-7 but it is doubtful that religious drama could 
have survived this long in a strongly Protestant town. On the other hand Hocktide ceremonies 
did exist in the 1 530s in Lewes. This parish activity consisted of women (in this case apparently 



DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

the churchwardens wives) playfully kidnapping members of the community and holding them 
for ransom to raise funds for the church. The fact that the St Andrew s and St Michaels Church 
wives had raised their take from 2s in 1532-3 to an astonishing 20s in 1538-40 suggests that 
they had a remarkably good final year, the success of which may have been its downfall. Like 
boy bishops and lords of misrule this tradition was a temporary upsetting of the normal 
hierarchy for festive and financial purposes and was considered to be disruptive by many 
authorities. 206 

Springtime brought May ceremonies to many Sussex communities and we hear about 
maypoles when troubles, even death, resulted from their use in Warbleton in 1572, Horsham 
in 1582, Rudgwick in 1612, Chichester in 1620, and Eastergate in 1623. This appears to 
have been one custom that survived well into the seventeenth century, at least in the west 
ern half of the county, in spite of Puritan animosity towards it. 207 There is one vague ref 
erence to May gaming in Petworth in 1593 but there is a much fuller description in the 
Cocking record from 1616/17, which gives an example of a group of morris dancers, includ 
ing a Maid Marian figure and a hobby horse. This combination is strikingly like that depicted 
in the famous Betley window from Staffordshire. There is not necessarily, however, a con 
nection between the dancers and Robin Hood plays. 208 This is a very late date for a per 
formance like this, even for a western Sussex parish, but it may only have been an aberration 
and it was swiftly punished. William Witcher s dances in Yapton in 1623 also show a late 
resistance to Puritan prohibitions in west Sussex. 

The town of Rye had May celebrations as can be seen from the reference to May Day players 
in 1531-2, minstrels at the feting of the May in 1555-6, and a drummer at a May game in 
1559-60. These last two entries use somewhat vague terms that could refer to a combination 
of any number of activities such as folk dancing, May kings and queens, and Robin Hood plays 
and disguisings. 209 There was also a spring or summer visit by morris dancers to Rye in 1533-4. 
A spring or summer Robin Hood visitation, which was a form of fund-raising rather than a 
play, is reported in the Rye accounts for 1510-11. 

Church ales play an important role in the churchwardens accounts of Steyning in 1519-22/3 
and 1545-8/9 and of WestTarring from 1515-90 (with some interruptions). In neither of 
these sets of accounts are there exact dates within the year given for the ales but these festivities 
usually took place in May or later in the summer. 210 The Steyning ales are at first referred to as 
a kyng play in 1519, which metamorphosed into the kyng ale, and later, in the 1540s, the 
church ale. Presumably what is involved here is some kind of fund-raising activity in the form 
of a summer game, probably starting as a naming of a king of the proceedings. 2 " The West 
Tarring accounts refer to a long series of church ales, sometimes with parishioners contributing 
beer or malt instead of cash, but it is not clear whether the plays, minstrels, and morris dancing 
in the same accounts are connected. Perhaps it is significant that these parishes were in the 
western, more Catholic area of the county. Hutton states that the 1 570s were the period in 
which church ales vanished in East Anglia, Kent, and Sussex (the one entry from West Tarring 
in 1 590 ap-parently is an exception) and shrank in number in other areas. 212 Rye has no such 
references to ales but the records of plays on dedication day (eg, 1503-4) may indicate some 
similar form of activity. 213 



1 DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

Waits and Other Musicians 

Travelling players who were musicians have previously been noted (see p xxxvii) but we also have 
records of other musicians and musical instruments. Rye had local performers, as is confirmed 
by numerous payments from 1480 on to individuals variously named as minstrels, waits, or 
players. These may have been actors at some point but the bulk of the entries seems to indicate 
they were waits. There is no naming of specific instruments and in fact they may have been 
only the members of the watch at some point. The payments to them are sporadic, being 
tendered in 1479-80 (2s), 1482-3 (3s 4d and 12d), 1485-6 (20d), 1487-8 (6s 8d for gown 
doth), 1489-90 (20d), 1493-4 (2s), 1505-6 (7d), 1513-14 (6s 8d twice), 1514-15 (3s 4d), 
1515-16 (6s 4d and 3s 4d), 1516-17 (5s), 1526-7 (3s 4d and 3s), 1559-60 (25s for coats), 
1560-1 (35s for livery), and 1569-70 (30s for livery). There is little pattern in the amounts 
paid; this may be due to the survival of records or maybe to different numbers of waits at 
different times. Only the 1526-7 record specifies that there were two waits in that year. In the 
late sixteenth century, however, the payments were made every quarter, beginning with 1 573 
when the waits were also rewarded for their service during the queen s visit and their wages 
were legislated. But it soon becomes clear that the two waits were now in fact performing the 
functions of fife and drum for musters and the watch for much of the time. They were paid 
5s each per quarter until 1585, when the wages were raised to 13s 4d, only to fall back to 5s 
in 1610-1 1. The year 1573-4 also marks the first time the waits are identified by name, as 
Philip Fayrefyld and Angel Shawe. In 1576-7 they are for the first time named as Shawe and 
Thomas Stronge; from 1582-3 to 1608-9 Shawe alone is named. Noah Radford and John 
Skinner begin in 1610-1 1 and are joined by Clement Church the following year. This trio con 
tinues to 1616-17, when Radford drops out; Church and Skinner are named until 1619-20, 
when Church is replaced by Francis Casheire. The latter s service ends with a payment to his 
widow in 1627-8. Skinner is joined by John Pedle in 1630-1 and this pair continues up to 
the year before our termination date of 1642-3, when Pedle is at first named alone and then 
along with his son. Chichester too may have had city musicians, as performers who played for 
the Carylls at West Harting in 1632-3 and 1633-4 are named for that city. 

Other records of minstrel activity in Rye and elsewhere clearly are musical and sometimes 
show musicians working in official capacities. Minstrels were used to pipe a woman about the 
town of Rye in 1533, presumably as a public humiliation for some moral transgression, and 
a taborer paraded a dice-player about the town in 1540. In 1555-6, also in Rye, minstrels were 
hired to play for road repair crews. The intriguing stammering minstrel who appears in Rye 
twice in 1513-14 is in a class all his own and begs the question of whether stammering was 
a part of his act or just an identifier. 

Household musicians are very much in evidence in the few family records we have from 
Sussex, among both Catholics and Protestants. 214 The Edwards family employed distinguished 
musicians, including William Sanders and William Webb, to teach dancing, singing, and play 
ing the virginals and the lute (see p 290, endnotes to DRO: D/FSI: box 222 ff [9, 18, 23, 24, 
27] and ff [30v, 33, 37, 42, 44, 45, 50, 52, 54, 55]). Similarly the Pelham family engaged 
masters to teach dancing and the lute. We also know that the Sackville family employed a 



DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

group often musicians in their household. 2 " Otho Paullwheele apparently was a music teacher 
in the households of gentlemen (see Chichester 1616/17) and was labelled a seditious papist 

for his trouble. 

We have some glimpses of independent musicians as well. An early non-verbal record comes 
in the form of a twelfth-century wall painting of fiddlers in the church at Hardham. 216 In a 
much later time minstrels seem to have been hired to perform in private houses or inns, as we 
see in Westbourne in 1573, Salehurst in 1581, and Petworth in 1586. The previously men 
tioned employment of minstrels in West Tarring in 1562-3 and dien from 1567-8, 1568-9, 
and 1570-1 suggests that the church hired minstrels for their church ale. Most of the odd 
mentions of minstrels in the ecclesiastical court records concern fiddlers but the case from 
Ashurst in 1603 records one who played fiddle, pipe, and tabor. Wills are also valuable records 
in this regard. The will of the minstrel, Robert Banwell, seems to indicate a kind of appren 
ticeship system, as he left stringed instruments to his Boye (see p 39). That of John Shamler 
mentions some sort of pipe (see p 14) while Henry Trashe bequeathed violins and music 
books (see p 41). 

Royal Visits 

In spite of its reputation as a difficult region in which to travel, Sussex was in fact the site of 
a large number of royal visits during the Middle Ages and early modern period. Aside from 
the obvious visit of William die Conqueror, die earliest recorded royal visits were by John, who 
was in the county in 1199, 1205, 1206, 1208, 1209, and every year from 1211 to 1216. 
However, as Blauuw has noted, John may have been in Sussex often but he seems to have 
travelled quickly and litde is known about his activities there. 217 Henry HI of course was in 
Sussex at the batde of Lewes. The first royal visit we know of that was made largely for cere 
monial purposes was diat of Edward I in 1276, when the court attended the transferral of die 
bones of St Richard to a shrine in Chichester Cathedral. In 1281, 1285, 1286, and 1290 
Edward was again at Chichester often attending the shrine, and later was in Sussex in 1294, 
1295, 1297, 1299, 1302, and 1305. 218 In 1324 Edward n paid a visit to Sussex, which included 
a stay at Batde Abbey followed by a journey to die coast at Pevensey and westward to Petwordi, 
where the Percys already had their southern residence. 219 We know that during this visit 20s 
was paid to Nicholas le Harper, minstrel of Sir Ralph de Camoys, for performing before the 
king at Midhurst. 220 Subsequent royal visits included trips by Edward in in 1350, 1355, 1360, 
and 1372 (at the battle of Winchelsea); by Edward rv in 1479 (to Chichester); by Henry vin 
to Rye in 1487; 221 and by Edward vi to Petworth and Cowdray in 1552, 222 Odier than die pay 
ment to Nicholas die harper we have no extant records of entertainment during diese visits. 

The most famous royal visits to Sussex were those of Elizabeth, die first of which took place 
in August 1 573. This progress was actually a journey dirough Kent and parts of eastern Sussex, 
where die main stops were Eridge and Rye. 223 Litde is preserved about her six-day stay at Eridge, 
a seat of the Lords Abergavenny, but it is known that she stayed in Rye for three days, from 
die 1 1th to the 14th, and while there knighted Thomas Shirley, Thomas Guilford, Thomas 
Walsingham, and Alexander Culpepper. She was presented widi 100 gold angels and dubbed 



ii DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

the town Rye Royal. Tradition has it that she was received in Grene Hall, the home of the 
Gaymer family, which still stands. During her stay Elizabeth also visited Winchelsea (see 
p xxxi)." A 

Elizabeth apparently planned a visit to Sussex in 1577 to see Lord Montagu at Battle, Lord 
Buckhurst at Southover, Lord Arundel at Arundel Castle, and Henry Goring at Burton but 
the trip was cancelled because of the plague." 5 However, in the summer of 1591 Elizabeth 
journeyed through west Sussex on her way to Portsmouth. Elizabeth was in Surrey at Loseley 
on the 22 or 23 of July and at Farnham Castle (home of the bishop of Winchester) on 14 
August. She arrived at Cowdray the same day, leaving for Chichester on 20 August. 226 

The entertainment at Cowdray has many elements of medieval feudalism as its main thrust 
was to express Montagu s unwavering loyalty to the queen and his devotion to her service. Right 
at the queen s entrance the Porter tells her of Montagu, what he speakes you may constamlie 
beleeue: which is, that in duetie and seruice to your Maiestie, he would be second to none: in 
praieng for your happinesse, equall to anie (see p 189, 11.13-15). This is followed by Lady 
Montagu bursting into tears at die queen s condescension and by many elaborate compliments 
to the queen. This to a large extent was an attempt by Montagu to express his loyalty to 
Elizabeth and overcome suspicions about him because of his abiding allegiance to the Catholic 
faith. Concern about Montagu s religion was probably very real as he kept priests at Cowdray. 
It must also be remembered that two of Montagu s fellow recusants among the Sussex nobility, 
Arundel and Northumberland, had come to grief over the Ridolfi plot of 1569, along with 
Arundel s son-in-law, Norfolk. 227 The queen s reply that she would sweare for him, there was 
none more faithfull was, as Wilson says, no doubt directed to Montagu as well as to the Porter. 
The visit was also an opportunity for Montagu to show his Sussex neighbours that he enjoyed 
the favour of the queen in spite of his religion. 228 

Indeed much of the deference expressed in die entertainment speaks in the voice of die coun 
ty of Sussex and, typical of discourses of the less powerful directed to the more powerful, it 
indulges in self-deprecation and willingly adheres to stereotypes held by the powerful of the 
weaker. Thus the text makes use of London images of the county as a place of wild forests 
populated by ruffians and fishermen, who are nevertheless unquestioningly loyal to the sover 
eign. So die shields hung on die oak (which is also symbolic of a ship) demonstrate in medieval 
fashion the loyalty of the Sussex nobility and their willingness to champion the queen (see 
p 192), but her guide in all this is a wild man, who in medieval literature was a guardian of 
mysteries and supporter of feats of arms 229 but to Elizabethans would also seem like a slight 
exaggeration of a typical inhabitant of die Weald. Similarly die speeches of the Sussex Angler 
and the Fisherman may contain many Christian references but die combination of complaint 
and humour in their words (particularly the punning) also makes them objects of fun and 
possibly derision. The presentation of die fish should also be seen in light of the fact diat most 
Londoners, especially those in the royal household, would have thought of Sussex mainly as 
die place diat supplied them widi seafood. 230 It all ends widi Lord and Lady Montagu showing 
their solidarity with the good folk of the county by joining with the countrie people (see 
p 194, 11.17-21) (who have at last been let in) in an appropriately rustic dance. 

The entertainment should also be seen as another contribution to the cult of Elizabeth, 



DRAMA, MUSIC, AND SEASONAL CUSTOMS 

especially in its comparisons of her to Juno and the emperors of Rome. As Greenblatt says, 
theatrical celebrations of royal glory were a way by which Elizabeth retained power through 
symbols without having to maintain the material infrastructure of armies and bureaucracy." 
Montagu clearly is following the pattern set out in other entertainments of the queen. 

As a dramatic production the Cowdray entertainment is not elaborate in comparison with 
others mounted on Elizabeths progresses. Wilson suggests that the acting could have been 
handled by two actors playing the parts of Porter, Pilgrim, Wild Man, Angler, and Fisherman, 
with a boy playing die Nymph and Peace. We have no idea who die performers were and diere 
is no evidence diat Montagu had his own performers. It even appears that die musicians used 
were the queen s own (see p 189, 1.32). Properties included die two wooden porters, die shields 
on the tree, and die net for the fish, as well as the gold key. 

Thomas Phillips, courtier and MP for Hastings, reported from Portsmouth that the queen 
had been magnifisewrlye entertayned at Cowdray. 232 The rest of her itinerary included Chi- 
chester, Petwordi, Stansted, Portsmoudi, and Winchester. 2 " However, diere is no other record 
of her travels in Sussex on diis progress diough apparendy her stay of several days in Chichester 
was once recorded in corporation records. 234 

The bad reputation of Sussex roads may have been a deterrent to royal visits in the seven- 
teendi century as diere is little evidence that the Stuart kings came to the county, aldiough of 
course they seldom went on progress. However, Nichols makes note of local traditions that 
James I visited Parham (home of Sir Thomas Bishopp) and die Ashdown Forest. 23 But by this 
time die general picture of drama and music in Sussex had wound down to a few survivals of 
old customs in scattered locales and the odd travelling performers. The Puritan era was on 
the horizon. 



The Documents 



The division of Sussex into East and West applies to the location of records as well. Civic 
and parish records for East Sussex are mostly located in the Record Office in Lewes, while 
those of West Sussex are for the most part found in the Record Office in Chichester. The 
ecclesiastical records of the diocese of Chichester, all of which are kept in the West Sussex 
Record Office, are the exception. Both offices also have several collections of family papers, 
although many of the records of Sussex families are scattered across various other reposi 
tories. 

With regard to ecclesiastical records the diocese of Chichester had for the most part the 
same borders as the county of Sussex with a few exceptions in the form of peculiar or exempt 
jurisdictions. The diocese in turn was divided into two archdeaconries, those of Chichester 
and of Lewes. The detection books of the two archdeaconries record the proceedings of the 
ecclesiastical courts for cases of correction, ie, alleged offences against church law. Detec 
tion books are extant from 1538 for the archdeaconry of Chichester and from 1550 from 
the archdeaconry of Lewes although both series have gaps for several periods. The registers 
of presentments (which exist only for the archdeaconry of Chichester) record all cases of 
offenders against ecclesiastical law presented by the churchwardens. These presentments 
were usually made at Easter and Michaelmas and during the bishop s or archdeacon s visi 
tation. They are extant from 1571, with many gaps, especially in the early seventeenth 
century. 

Two of the areas in Sussex that were not in the jurisdiction of the diocese of Chichester 
were the dean of Chichester s peculiar, which as its name implies was under the jurisdiction 
of the dean of the cathedral and not subject to visitation by the archdeacon, and the exempt 
deanery of Pagham and Tarring, which fell under the direct control of the archbishop of 
Canterbury. As these jurisdictions were much smaller it was possible to record many dif 
ferent types of records in act books, which included not only correction and detection 
causes but also instance causes, probate acts, wills, marriage licences, and admissions to 
benefices. These act books give spotty coverage from 1484 for the dean of Chichester s pecu 
liar and from 1538 for the exempt deanery of Pagham and Tarring. 

The documents are listed below in the order in which they appear in the collection, be 
ginning with the Diocese of Chichester, followed by Boroughs and Parishes, Religious Houses, 
and Households. 



Iv 
THE DOCUMENTS 

Diocese of Chichester 

BISHOP RICHARD DE WYCHE S STATUTES 

These statutes are ascribed to Bishop Richard de Wyche, later St Richard of Chichester, who 
is best known for his long resistance to royal interference in the affairs of the Church. 23 

Oxford, Bodleian Library, University College MS. 148; 1245-52; Latin; paper; i + 1 16 + i; 245mm x 
175mm; contemporary pagination; illuminated capitals, coloured ink; good condition; white calf binding. 

CHICHESTER CATHEDRAL CARTULARY 

This cartulary, also known as Liber E, is a miscellaneous volume, containing cathedral statutes, 
legal memoranda, royal charters, church appropriations, and papal taxations. It is the source 
for both the synodal statutes and the articles of inquiry for Bishop Gilbert of St Leofard s 
visitation. 

The synodal statutes are collated with a text in Henry Spelman, Concilia, Decreta, Leges, 
Constitutiones in Re Ecclesiarum Orbis Britannia, p 404 (Wing: S 4920). This text was copied 
from a seventeenth-century manuscript owned by Richard Montague, bishop of Chichester, 
which is no longer extant and which was neither copied from nor the source for WSRO: 
Ep. vi/1/4. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. vi/1/4; late l4di c. with some I6di and 17dn c. entries; Latin; 
parchment; i + 147 + i; 255mm x 190mm; modern foliation, with l4uS c. foliation running ff 137275 
(with gaps); illuminated initial letters, red ink for special marks; 17th c. calf binding. 

CONCILIA, I DECRETA, LEGES, I CONSTITUTIONES I In Re Ecclesiarum I ORBIS I BRITANNICI; I viZ. I 
PAN-ANGLICA, SCOTICA, HIBERNICA, I Provincialia, Diocesana: I Ab introitu Normannorum, 
An. Dom. MLxvi. I Ad exutum Papam, sive a.dAn. Dom. MDxxxi. I Accesserunt etiam alia ad rem 
Eccle- 1 siasticam spectantia; I Uti reperiuntur in eorundem Actis, Canonibus I Ecclesiasticis, Principum 
Rescripts, Libris Impressis, Antiquis Manu- I scriptis, Chartis, Schedis, & Monumentis Veteribus. I 
Studios^ congesta Opera & Scrutinio. I [rule] I Henrici Spelmanni I Equitis Aurati. I [rule] I LONDINI, I 
Apud ALICIAM WARREN Anno Domini I MDCLXTV. Wing: S 4920. 

VISITATION ARTICLES 

The churches of Sussex were subject to visitation by the archbishop of Canterbury, the bishop 
of Chichester, and the archdeacons of Lewes and Chichester. The archbishops visitation articles 
will appear in James M. Gibson s edition of Kent: Diocese of Canterbury, forthcoming in the 
REED series, with the exception of the diocese of Chichester in particular, which was subject 
to visitation by the archbishop of Canterbury as metropolitan. 

As is often the case with visitation articles, these texts were printed in black letter with 
occasional Roman for the word Item, marginalia, display capitals, and headings. 



Ivi THE DOCUMENTS 

Bishop Thomas Bickley s Visitation Articles 

Thomas BickJey was bishop of Chichester 1586-96. 

Articles ministred by I the Reuerend Father in God. Thomas I by the grace of God Bishoppc of Chi- I 
Chester, to the Churchwardens throughout the whole I Diocesse of Chichester at the Visitation 
begon I there die 14. of September 1586. and to be en- I quired of quarterly within the said 
Diocesse. I [ornament] I At London printed by Thomas Purfoote I for Gregory Seaton. STC. 10179. 

Bishop Anthony Watson s Visitation Articles 

Anthony Watson was bishop of Chichester 1596-1605. 

ARTICLES MINI- 1 stred by the Reuerend Fa- 1 ther in God Anthony by the grace I of God Bishop of 
Chichester, to the I Churchwardens throughout the I whole Diocesse of Chichester, at the I visitation 
begun there the 6 of I September 1600, and to I bee enquired of quarter- 1 ly within the saide I Diocesse. I 
[ornament] I Imprinted at London for Tho- \rnas Charde. I 1600. STC: 10180. 

Archbishop Richard Bancroft s Visitation Articles 

Richard Bancroft was archbishop of Canterbury 1604-10. These articles are printed here 
because they represent a visitation of the diocese of Chichester in particular, conducted on 
behalf of the archbishop as metropolitan. 

Articles to be inquired I Of in die first Metropoliticall Visitation I of die most Reuetend Father: Richarde I 
by Gods Prouidence, Archbushop of Canterbu- 1 ry, and Primate of all ENGLANDE: in, & for, all thiese 
Diocesses I following, (Viz.) Exeter Norwich, Chichester, St. Davids, I Landaffe, Heriford, Worcester, 
Bristol, Badi & Welles I and Coventrie &c Litchfielde, in die yeare of our I Lorde God, 1605. and in die 
first yeare of his I Graces Translation. I [printers device, McKerrow 298 widi I.W. voided] I At London 
Printed by Ralph Blower, for I Thomas Pavier, and are to be solde at his Shop I neare die Royall Exchaung 
An. Dom. 1605. STC. 10158. 

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes Visitation Articles 

Lancelot Andrewes was bishop of Chichester for the period 1605-9. 

[Ornament] I Articles to be enquired I of within the Diocesse of Chi- I chester, in the second General! 
Visitation I of the Reuerend Fadier in God, Lancelot I Bishop of Chichester. I Holden in die yeere of our I 
Lord God 1609. I [ornament] I \ Imprinted at London I by R. B. I Anno 1609. STC. 10181. 

These articles of enquiry were originally printed in 1606 for Andrewes first general visitation but were 
used again in 1609. On the title page of the only extant copy identified by the STC (Jesus College 
Library, Cambridge: B.5.1 1/1) the printed year 1606 is cancelled (both times it occurs) by underlin 
ing to mark it for substitution with the year 1609, which is twice written in ink by a contemporary 
hand to the right of the printed text. The printed words first Generall are also underlined ( Generall 
was then marked to let stand and first is completely crossed out) and the word second is written to 



THE DOCUMENTS 

the right of the line in ink by the same hand. Also hand written on the title page in a different and later 
hand is the surname Andrewes. 

Bishop Richard Montague s Visitation Articles 

Richard Montague was bishop of Chichester from 1628 until 1638, when he was translated 
to Norwich. 

ARTICLES I TO BE ENQVIRED I OF, THROVGHOVT I The whole Diocesse of I CHICHESTER: I 
Ministred and giuen in charge to the I Church-wardens and Sidemen within I the same Diocesse; I By 
the Reverend father in God RICHARD by I Gods prouidence Bishop of CHICHESTER, in I his generall 
Visitation. Holden \Anno Domini 1631. I [rule] \Anno Consecrations sutt quarto. I [rule] I [ornament] I 
[rule] I LONDON, I Printed byR.Y for Thomas Bourne. I MDCXXXI. STC. 10182.5. 

ARTICLES I TO BE ENQVIRED I OF, THROVGHOVT I The whole Diocesse of I CHICHESTER. I 
Ministred and given in charge to the I Church-wardens and Side-men within I the same Diocesse. I 
By the Reverend Father in God RICHARD by I Gods providence Bishop of CHICHESTER, I in his generall 
Visitation: Holden I Anno Domini 1634. I [rule] I Anno Consecrationis sua seftimo. I [rule] I [ornament] I 
[rule] I LONDON , I Printed by MILES FLESHER. I MDCXXXIV. STC. 10183. 

Archbishop William Laud s Visitation Articles 

William Laud was archbishop of Canterbury 1633-45. These articles are printed here because 
they represent a visitation of the diocese of Chichester in particular, conducted on behalf of 
the archbishop as metropolitan. It was most likely held in 1633. 

ARTICLES I TO BE I ENQVIRED OF I IN THE METROPOLITICALL I VISITATION OF THE 
MOST I REVEREND FATHER, I WILLIAM, I By GODS Providence, Lord Arch-Bishop of I 
Canterbury, Primate of all England; and I METROPOLITAN: I In and for the Dioces of Chichester, In the 
yeere of our I LORD GOD \(y$(blank), And in the (blank) yeere I of his Graces Translation. I [printer s 
device, McKerrow 417] I Printed at London, by Richard Badger. I \63(blank). STC. 10167. 

Archdeacon Roger Andrewes Visitation Articles 

Roger Andrewes was archdeacon of Chichester 1608-35. 

ARTICLES I TO BE INQV1RED OF I WITHIN THE ARCH- I DEACONRY OF I CHICHESTER I 
IN THE ORDINARY VISI- I tation of the Right Worshipful), D. ANDREWES, \Arch-deacon of 
Chichester. \Anno Domini, 1634. I [rule] I [printers device] I [rule] I LONDON I Printed by Richard Badger. 
STC: 10185.5. 

Archdeacon Laurence Pay s Visitation Articles 

Laurence Pay was archdeacon of Chichester 1635-40. 



Iviii THE DOCUMENTS 

ARTICLES I TO BE ENQVIRED I OF IN THE ORDINARY I Visitation of the WonhipfiM, Mr. I 
LAWRENCE P\\,Arch- I deacon of Chichester. \Anno Domini, 1635. I [rule] I [printers device] I [rule] I 
Printed by THOMAS COATES. STC. 10186. 

ARTICLES I TO BE ENQVIRED OF I In the ordinary Visitation of the I Right Worshipfull LAWRENCE I 
PAY, Doctor of Divinitie, Arch- I Deacon of Chichester. I Holden, Anno Dom. 1638. I [printer s device] I 
LONDON, I Primed by B.A. for Richard Meighen. I 1638. six:-. 10187. 

Bishop Brian Duppa s Visitation Articles 

Brian Duppa was bishop of Chichester from 1638 until 1641, when he was translated to 
Salisbury. 

ARTICLES I TO BE I 1NQV1RED OF, I Thoroughout the Diocesse of I CHICHESTER, I In the first 
Visitation of the Rt. Reve- I rend Father in GOD, I BRIAN DUPPA, I Bishop of that Diocesse. I Anno 
DOMINI 1638. I [rule] \Anno Consecrationts sux primo. I [rule] I [printer s device] I LONDON, I Printed 
by Richard Badger. 1638. STC. 10185. 

Archdeacon James Marsh s Visitation Articles 

James Marsh was archdeacon of Chichester in 1640-1. 

ARTICLES I TO BE ENQVIRED I OF IN THE ORDINARY I Visitation of the Right I WORSHIP- 
FULL, I LAMES MARSH, I Dr. of Divinity, Arch-Deacon of I Chichester. I Holden Anno Dom. 
1640 I [ornament] I [rule] I LONDON, I Printed by BA. for RICHARD MEIGHEN. I 1640. STC: 
10188. 

Boroughs and Parishes 

ASHURST 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. i/17/l 1; October 1603-September 1606; Latin and 
English; paper; 273 leaves; 290mm x 190mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; 
parchment cover. 

BEXHILL 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. n/9/7; September 1593-October 1595; Latin and English; 
paper; 244 leaves; 320mm x 210mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 



THE DOCUMENTS 

BILLINGSHURST 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Books 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/9; September 1596-September 1600; Latin and English; 
paper; 269 leaves; 295mm x 195mm; modem foliation; no decoration; poor condition; parchment cover. 
This book also yielded an extract for Bosham. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/10; October 1600-September 1603; Latin and English; 
paper; 247 leaves; 295mm x 185mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; no cover. 
This book also yielded an extract for Funtington. 

BIRDHAM 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Register of Presentments 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/23/2; 1573; Latin and English; paper; 27 leaves; 350mm x 
215mm; modern foliation; no decoration; no cover. 
This book also yielded an extract for Westbourne. 

BOLNEY 

Bill of Complaint in Wilkinson and Langford v. Pellatt et al 

London, Public Record Office, STAC 8/294/23; 1608; English and Latin; paper; 2 sheets, consisting of a 
reply (sheet [1]) with bill of complaint (sheet [2]) attached; reply: 240mm x 523mm, bill of complaint: 
715mm x 810mm. 

BOSHAM 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Book 

See above under Billingshurst for WSRO: Ep. 1/17/9. 

CHICHESTER 

While ecclesiastical documents of the diocese ofChichester are plentiful, early civic and parish 
records are scarce. The reason for the lack of civic records may lie in the lack of a permanent 
archive for much of the city s history. Up until the twentieth century the civic records were 
stored by the town clerk, an independent solicitor, sometimes in a cellar. Widi such primitive 
document storage and with every change of the clerkship, probably more and more records 
were lost. There is anecdotal evidence that at one point some medieval documents were 
destroyed because they had congealed. The total lack of churchwardens accounts from our 
period is harder to explain. In any case the result is that little is known in general about 
medieval and early Renaissance Chichester. 



x THE DOCUMENTS 

Civic Records 

St George s Guild Accounts 

The St George s Guild was the merchant guild of the town of Chichester, consisting of the 
mayor and the most prominent citizens of the town. The putative purpose of the guild was 
the performance of charitable works and prayer. However, the numerous payments to enter 
tainers and performers contained in the accounts seem not to be charitable donations but 
rather payments for performances. 

The accounting year for these accounts runs from Michaelmas to Michaelmas. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Chichester City Archives AE/1; 1517-23; Latin; paper; 47 + i; 
290mm x 195mm; modern foliation; no decoration; repaired; in blue file folder. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Chichester City Archives AE/2; 1 543-4; Latin; paper; 6 mem 
branes, attached at top; 41 Omm x 300mm; modern numbering; no decoration; wrapped in blue 
file folder. 

Cathedral Records 

Cathedral Communars Accounts 

These accounts are largely for expenses incurred for the upkeep and repair of the cathedral 
building, although gratuities and salaries also figure prominently. 
The accounts run from Michaelmas to Michaelmas. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Cap. i/23/l; 1513-14, 1532-8; English and Latin; paper; 232 
leaves; 320mm x 200mm; modern pencil foliation; cardboard casing. Cap. i/23/l includes ecclesiastical 
statutes and a survey of chapter lands as well. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Cap. 1/23/2; 1543-98; Latin and English; paper; 130 leaves; 
310mm x 205mm; modern pencil foliation; 17th c. leather binding, tide on spine: Extracts from Old 
Register Act Book Computus etc. Cap. 1/23/2 devotes some space to extracts from registers and act books. 

Ecclesiastical Court Records 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Books 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/6; March 1585/6-March 1588/9; Latin and English; 
paper; 202 + i; 310mm x 210mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; paper cover. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/16; July 1615-May 1617; Latin and English; paper; 
3 booklets of 30, 24, and 13 leaves; 290mm x 200mm; modern foliation (each booklet numbered 
separately); no decoration; poor condition; no cover. 



THE DOCUMENTS 

Act Books for the Dean of Chichester s Peculiar 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. in/4/5; January 1590/1 -July 1601; Latin and English; 
paper; 141 leaves; 295mm x 190mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. m/4/7; October 1605 -March 1609/10; Latin and English; 
paper; 107 leaves; 300mm x 200mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. in/4/10; April 1619-October 1622; Latin and English; 
paper; 186 leaves; 290mm x 185mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment covers. 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery of Pagham and Tarring 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. rv/2/13; July 1622-September 1629; Latin and English; 
paper; 288 leaves; 295mm x 190mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 
This book also yielded an extract for West Tarring. 

Miscellaneous Records 

Will of John Shamler, Musician 

Shamler was a musician attached to the cathedral. Among his other beneficiaries were the 
cathedral fabric, the vicars choral, the parish clerk, the choristers, and the bell-ringers. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. ni/4/1; May 1484-January 1503/4; Latin; paper; i + 119 + i; 
300mm x 225mm; modern foliation (partially foliated in 15th c. Roman numerals as well); no deco 
ration, extensively repaired; 20th c. white leather binding: Ep 111 4 T on spine. This volume is an Act 
Book for the dean of Chichester s peculiar, which contains a number of wills as well. 

COCKING 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/17; September 1615 -July 1617; Latin and English; 
paper; 180 + i; 300mm x 200mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; parchment 
cover. 

EASTERGATE 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/23/8; 1621-6, 1628, and 1664-70; English; paper; i + 52; 
295mm x 200mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 
This book also yielded an extract for Yapton. 



ii THE DOCUMENTS 

FELPHAM 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/13; September 1609-May 1612; Latin and English; 
paper; 225 leaves; 295mm x 195mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; parchment 
cover. 

FOLKINGTON 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. n/9/2; April 1580-January 1585/6; Latin and English; paper; 
197 leaves; 325mm x 210mm; modern foliation; no decoration; extremely poor condition; unbound. 
This book also yielded an extract for Salehurst. 

FUNTINGTON 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Books 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/22; November 1626-January 1628/9; Latin and 
English; paper; 278 leaves; 300mm x 195mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; 
parchment cover. 

See also under Billingshurst (p lix) for WSRO: Ep. 1/17/10. 

GRAFFHAM 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Register of Presentments 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/23/5; 1579; English and Latin; paper; i + 67 + i; 285mm x 
205mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 

HASTINGS 

As explained previously (see p xxvi), our view of early Hastings is obscured by a lack of doc 
umentation. This dearth of records may have been at least partly caused by die serious decline 
of the port in our period. 

Hastings Custumal 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 57/4; 15th-early 17th c.; French; paper; 200 leaves; 314mm x 
216mm (24lmm x 159mm); ink foliation; good condition; calf binding: Presidents, entries, etc. on 
spine. As well as a copy of the Hastings custumal, this volume contains precedents and other legal matter 
pertaining to the corporation of Rye. 



THE DOCUMENTS 



Order from the Warden of the Cinque Ports against Plays 



London, British Library, Egerton MS 2093; 1520-47; English and Latin; paper; ii + 219 + Hi; 300mm x 
215mm, average 30 long lines; modern pencil foliation; repaired and rebound in modern green leather 
binding. The MS includes memoranda of acts, ordinances of Dover, and a register of royal writs, letters, 
and proclamations. 

Chamberlains Account 

The Hastings Chamberlains Accounts begin at the very end of our period. The accounts run 
from the third Sunday after Easter in one year to the same day in the next. 

Hastings, Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, D/A.1.1; 1642-3; English; parchment; 10 membranes 
attached at top; 350mm x 295mm; numbered seriatim. 

HEATHFIELD 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. n/9/1 1; October 1606-October 1610; Latin and English; 
paper; 281 leaves; 295mm x 190mm; modern foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 

HELLINGLY 

Henry Burton, A Divine Tragedie 

Henry Burton (1578-1648) was a highly controversial Puritan preacher and writer. As rector 
of St Matthew s, Friday Street, in London, he attacked the supposedly popish tendencies of 
several bishops. As a result Burton was deprived of his benefice, pilloried, mutilated, and 
imprisoned. However, he remained popular with his parishioners and other members of the 
public and was exonerated by parliament in 1641. The Divine Tragedie is not one of his best- 
known works. 

The same text (with only spelling variants) appears on the same page in STC. 4140.7. The 
difference is that STC. 4140.7 has this entry as example 8 (but coming between examples 52 
and 53), while STC. 4140.8 lists it as example 38, in correct sequence. Wing: B6161 is a later 
text, published in 1641; it has no substantive variants for this incident, except for the one 
noted in the endnote (see p 263). 

A DIVINE TRAGEDIE I LATELY ACTED, I Or I A Collection of sundry memorable exam- I pies of Gods 
judgements upon Sabbath-breakers, and other I like Libertines, in their unlawful! Sports, happening 
within I the Realme of England, in the compass only of two yeares I last past, since the Booke was 
published, worthy to be I knowne and considered of all men, especially such, who are I guilty of the 
sinne or Arch-patrons I thereof. I Psal. 50. vers. 22. I Now consider this, ye that forget God, lest he teare 
you in peaces, I and there be none to deliuer you. I Grtgorius M. Moralium.lib. 26.C.18. I Deus, etsi 



Ixiv THE DOCUMENTS 

quazdam longanimiter tolerat, quardam tamen in hac vita I flagellat, & his nonnunquam socire inchoat 
quos sterna I damnatione consummat.l Tibullus Elegiarum. lib.3.EUg.7. I Foelix quicunque dolore I 
Alterius disces posse carere tuo. I Condi. Paris.2.lib.3.c.5. I Salubriter admonemus cunaos fideles, ut diei 
Dominico debitum ho- 1 norum 6c rcverentiam exhibeant. Quoniam hujus dehonoratio, & I a Religione 
Christiana valde abhorret, & suis violatoribus anima- I rum perniciem procul dubio general. I Alex. 
Altnsis exHieron. P.3.Q32.M.4.Art.l. Rfsol. I Quis dubitat Sceleramus esse commissum, quod gravius 
est punitum? I ut Nvm.l5.35.ibid.l [ornament] I Anno M.DC.XXXVI. src. 4140.8 

HORSHAM 

Horsham was a parliamentary borough located in a heavily forested area in the Weald, from 
which few documents survive. It passed into the possession of the Mowbrays in the fourteenth 
century and though it was lost during the reign of Edward vi, it was given to the Howards by 
Mary in 1553. In die sixteenth century Horsham prospered a great deal from the iron industry, 
as well as from stone quarrying. 237 

St Mary s Parish Register 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Par. 106/1/1/2; 1558-1717; English; parchment; 397 leaves; 
290mm x 190mm; modern pencil foliation; headings, years, and months in coloured ink; parchment 
gatherings, rebound in original parchment bindings with strapping and ties and boxed. 

Inquest on the Death of John Rowe 

London, Public Record Office, KB 9/1026/74; 25 May 1582; Latin; parchment; single membrane; 
41 Omm x 1 10mm; unnumbered; mutilated with hole on right side; bound with other documents of 
various sizes in a fabric cover. 

ITCHINGFIELD 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/8; 1592-6; Latin and English; paper; 366 leaves; 
295mm x 200mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; parchment cover. 
This book also yielded an extract for Petworth. 

LEWES 

Lewes is another important Sussex community for which few early documents survive. The 
town books are very revealing about many aspects of the town government but they contain 
only summary accounts. 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

These accounts begin with those of the church of St Andrew from 1522 to 1546, when it was 



THE DOCUMENTS 

amalgamated with St Michael s and probably St Mary s in Foro and St Martin s, likely at the 
time the church of St Andrew was destroyed. The amalgamation was the result of the impov 
erishment of St Michael s parish, which had not been able to support a curate and had lain 
abandoned for six years. St Michael s was retained, however, as the church building. 238 The 
volume continues with the accounts of the amalgamated parishes up to 1601. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, PAR 4l4/9/l/la; 1522-1601; English; paper; 105 leaves (ff 33-105 
bound upside down); 300mm x 205mm; modern foliation; no decoration; good condition; parchment 
binding, shelfmark on spine. 

Town Book 

There are five Lewes Town Books surviving, stretching continuously from 1542 to 1882. The 
only records from Lewes before 1642 appear in the first Town Book, which mainly records the 
annual election of the constables at the court leet held on the Monday after Michaelmas. The 
constables accounts are also included, as well as inventories of the town property handed over 
by them. 

In the 1586 inventory of the goods of the town there is included a note of Too Toune 
bookes of Recorde (f 31). One of these appears to have been the Old Register Book, lost in 
the seventeenth century; the other is ESRO: LEW/C 1/1. This volume was, in fact, started in 
1576, with the entries from 1542 to that date abstracted from the Old Register Book. 239 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, LEW/C 1/1; 1542-1740; English; paper; vi -t- 205 + i; 410mm x 
275mm; modern foliation; no decoration; damp stains; 18th c. brown calf binding. 

NEWHAVEN 

Depositions at the Trial of George Berdesworth 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 47/47/5a; 7 March 1592/3; English; paper; 1 sheet folded in 
half; 300mm x 400mm; unnumbered. 

Letter Concerning the Trial of George Berdesworth 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 47/47/5b; 9 March 1592/3; English; paper; single sheet; 210mm 
x 200mm; unnumbered; writing only on recto. 

OV1NG 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Register of Presentments 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/23/7; 1584 and 1586-7; English and Latin; paper; i + 41 
+ i; 305mm x 205mm; modern foliation; no decoration; covered with an old will. 



Ixvi THE DOCUMENTS 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/12; October 1606-September 1609; Latin and 
English; paper; 277 leaves; 295mm x 190mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; 
parchment cover. 

PAGHAM 

Will of Robert Banwell, Minstrel 

This volume, WSRO: STA 1/7, is a register of wills. The Banwell will itself is not dated although 
the probate date is appended to it, as is done with most of the wills in this register. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, STA i/7; 1592-1622; paper; iv + 159 + xi; 300mm x 205mm; 
contemporary foliation; first words of each will in large capitals; good condition; parchment cover. 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. rv/2/14; October 1629 -July 1636; Latin and English; paper; 
228 leaves; 305mm x 190mm; modern foliation; no decoration; covered with board wrapped in 
parchment. 

PETT 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. n/9/3; July 1586-January 1586/7; Latin and English; 
paper; 94 leaves; 310mm x 210mm; contemporary foliation; no decoration; parchment cover. 

PETWORTH 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Book 

See under Itchingfield (p Ixiv) for WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8. 

Wilt of Henry Trashe, Musician 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, STC 11 /Box 10; 20 April 1622, proved 16 October 1622; 
English; paper; single sheet; 395mm x 305mm; Henrye Trashe his Last will and Testament on 
dorse. 

Inventory of the Goods of Henry Trashe, Musician 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/29/149, no. 23; 15 October 1622; English; paper; single 
sheet; 330mm x 155mm; Henricus Trashe de Petworth 1622 on dorse. 



THE DOCUMENTS 

ROTHERFIELD 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. n/9/14; January 1617/18-June 1618; Latin and English; 
paper, 20 leaves; 310mm x 195mm; modern foliation; no decoration; no cover. 

RUDGW1CK 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Instance Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/10/30; May 1612-July 1613; Latin and English; paper; 
118 leaves; ff 1-70: 280mm x 205mm, ff71-118: 305mm x 210mm; modern foliation; no decoration; 
no cover. 

RYE 

The surviving records of Rye are extensive. Richard F. Dell lists 157 classes of documents at the 
ESRO, many of which include materials from before 1643. 24 " Included are manuscripts relating 
to assembly and council, oaths of office, registration and deposit, coroners, courts of record, 
general files, customs and precedents, the Cinque Ports, finance, musters, water and sewers, 
harbour records, charities, deeds, maps, and parish affairs. In general all documents from 
before 1643 have been searched for REED material, except for those relating to musters, water, 
harbour activity, charities, and land title. The relevant records are listed below beginning with 
civic documents (legislative, legal, financial, and miscellaneous), followed by parish documents 
and miscellaneous items. 

Civic Records 
Assembly Books 

Minutes of the meetings of the assembly, which consisted of the mayor, jurats, and all other 
freemen, along with the judicial and administrative proceedings of the mayor and jurats, are 
preserved in the assemblies, hundreds, and sessions books. These records survive, with gaps 
from 1538 and continuously from 1549. During the period 1574-90, another body, a 
common council, made up of twenty-four commoners, was vested with the powers of the 
assembly in an attempt by the town elite to restrict governing power. 241 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 1/3; 1561-7; English and Latin; paper; ii + 214 + i; 295mm 
x 205mm; modern ink foliation; no decoration; good condition; brown leather binding, Rye Hundred 
&c 1561 to 1567, no 25 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 1/4; 1567-82; English and Latin; paper; iii + 384 + ii; 300mm x 



Ixviii THE DOCUMENTS 

200mm; contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; rough brown calf binding, Rye 
Hundred &c on spine. 

Court Book 

From at least as early as the thirteenth century Rye had a court of record for the hearing of 
civil pleas before the mayor and jurats. There are records of this court from 1475. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 33/7; 1530-1665; English and Latin; vellum and paper; ii + 159 
+ ii, 280mm x 205mm; 18th c. foliation; good condition; 18th c. leather binding, Rye Courts on spine. 

Chamberlains Accounts 

On the second Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day (24 August), one week after the election of 
the mayor and the appointment of the jurats, two chamberlains (one of them a jurat) were 
elected to serve for the year as chief financial officers of the corporation. 

The financial year was divided into four quarters, beginning at St Bartholomew s Day (or 
rather the Sunday thereafter, when the mayor was elected), followed by Christmas, Easter 
(later Lady Day), and Midsummer Day, at which times there was an opening of the boxes, 
when receipts were tendered and salaried employees of the town were paid. The receipts and 
expenses for each quarter were then entered into the account books under the quarterly head 
ing. However, the quarterly opening and closing dates were sometimes treated with some 
flexibility, and late entries were often included in the previous quarter, perhaps at times due to 
a late opening of the box. Sometimes, especially in the 1 540s, the quarterly terms were not used 
but the entries were entered continuously. As well, after 1544-5 the fiscal year was adjusted 
slightly to begin and end not on the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day but on the following 
Sunday, when the chamberlains were actually elected. Here too we sometimes find late entries 
registered by outgoing chamberlains in the period of change-over after the accounting year had 
technically ended. 

Although most of the entries presented here come from the payments of the chamberlains, 
of course about half of the actual accounts are in the form of receipts, which come first in the 
reckonings for each year. In the latter part of the fifteenth century and the first half of the 
sixteenth century, the interval at the accounting year end between St Bartholomew s Day and 
the mayor s election (or in some cases, the chamberlains election) was treated as a fifth quarter 
and debts outstanding on 24 August were assigned to it. 

The extant accounts run 1405-6, 1448-1606 (excepting 1464-74 and 1570-1), and 
1718-1833. The actual accounts for 1474-7 are now lost although they were in existence at 
the time of the Historical Manuscripts Commission report and are known from the transcripts 
that Riley included in his report. 

The rough accounts also exist for 1570-2, 1586-7, 1588-9, 1591-3, 1594-5, 1600-6, 
1608-24, 1629-32, 1633-5, 1637-8, and 1640-3. Although these accounts contain the 
same information as the final accounts word-for-word, they are useful for our purposes in 
supplying the missing accounts for the period after 1606. There is also a rough account 



Ixix 

THE DOCUMENTS 

for 1573-5 in the Rye Museum (Rye Museum: Nl/281; see below). 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/2; 1448-64; Latin and English; paper; ii + 109 + ii; 400mm 
x 290mm; contemporary foliation; headings somewhat elaborated; several pages partially torn or ripped 
out; rough brown calf binding, Chamberlains Accts 1448-1464 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/3; 1479-93; Latin and English; paper; ii + 122 + ii; 390mm 
x 280mm; contemporary foliation; headings elaborated; good condition; rough brown calf binding, 
Rye Hundred Accts 1480-1494 No. 2 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/4; 1493-1514; Latin and English; paper; iii + 325 + ii; 
410mm x 290mm; modern foliation; no decoration; good condition; rough brown calf binding, Rye 
Hundreds &c. 1494 to 1515 No. 3 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/5; 1514-42; Latin and English; paper plus single, final 
parchment leaf; i + 392 + ii; 400mm x 290mm; contemporary foliation; some headings elaborated; good 
condition; rough brown calf binding, Rye Hundreds etc 1515 to 1543 No. 4 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/6; 1542-50; English and Latin; paper; iv + 223 + ii; 380mm 
x 280mm; contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; rough brown calf binding, Rye 
Hundreds &c. 1543-50 No. 5 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/7; 1550-64; Latin and English; paper; ii + 320 -t- ii; 390mm 
x 290mm; contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; rough brown calf binding, Rye 
Hundreds &c. 1551 to 1564 No. 6 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/8; 1564-73; Latin and English; paper; ii + 246 + ii; 370mm 
x 280 mm; roughly contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; rough brown calf binding, 
Rye Hundred &Cc. 1564 to 1572 No. 7 on spine. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/9; 1573-93; English and Latin; paper; iv + 330 + ii; 420mm 
x 290mm; contemporary foliation; some elaborated headings; good condition; rough brown calf binding, 
Rye Hundreds &c. 1573 to 1593 No. 8 on spine. 

There is a stray chamberlains account book for 15735 (Rye Museum: Nl/281) that has the same 
expenses listed as ESRO: RYE 60/9. It probably is the original list of expenses although it does not give 
a detailed rental. The corresponding folio numbers from the Rye Museum manuscript are referenced 
in the endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 9v, 12v, 13, 13v, 16, I6v, 17, 18, 20, 22 (pp 278-9). 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 60/10; 1593-1606; English; paper; iv + 188 + vii; 390mm x 
260mm; contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; rough brown calf binding, Rye 
Hundred &c. 1593 to 1605 No. 52 on spine. 

Chamberlains Accounts (AC) 

The accounts for 1474-7 are now missing so that the only extant record we have of them is 



Ixx THE DOCUMENTS 

the Historical Manuscripts Commission report done by Riley in the nineteenth century. Riley 
is best known as a translator of Latin classics and editor of chronicles. His most extensive work 
for the Historical Manuscripts Commission was on the documents of the colleges of Oxford 
and Cambridge. 

Historical Manuscripts Commission. Henry Thomas Rilc7 (ed), The Manuscripts of the Corporation 
of Rye, The Fifth Report of the Manuscripts Commission, Appendix, pt I (London, 1876), 488-516. 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/1-4; 1570-1; English; paper; ii + 80 + ii; 4 gatherings 
bound together, 61/1 in 12, 61/2 in 30, 61/3 in 10, 61/4 in 28; 61/1-2: 330mm x 230mm, 61/3-4: 
310mm x 210mm; modern foliation running continuously through 4 gatherings; no decoration; 
modern brown cloth binding. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/13; 1604-7; English; paper; ii + 88 + iii; 305mm x 195mm, 
17th c. foliation to f 86; no decoration; extensively repaired; modern brown leather binding. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/14; 1608-9; English; paper; ii + 22 + ix; 305mm x 200mm; 
17th c. foliation; no decoration; repaired; bound together in modern brown leather binding with 
ESRO: RYE 61/14-20. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/16; 1610-11; English paper; i + 22 + i; 305mm x 200mm; 
17th c. foliation; no decoration; bound together in modern brown leather binding with ESRO: RYE 

61/14-20. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/18; 161 1-12; English; paper, i + 43 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
erratic contemporary foliation; no decoration; damp stains; bound together in modern brown leather 
binding with ESRO: RYE 61/14-20. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/19; 1612-13; English; paper; i + 22 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; signs of damp; bound together in modern brown leather binding 
with ESRO: RYE 61/14-20. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/20; 1613-14; English; paper; i + 34 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; bound together in modern brown leather bind 
ing with ESRO: RYE 61/14-20. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/21; 1614-15; English; paper; i + 27 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 
61/21-5. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/22; 1615-16; English; paper; i + 28 + i (several single pages 
clipped on); 310mm x 210mm; contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; bound in 
modern cover with ESRO: RYE 61/21-5. 



I VY| 

THE DOCUMENTS 

Lewes, Ease Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/23; 1616-17; English; paper; ii + 28; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; good condition; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 
61/21-5. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/24; 1617-18; English; paper; ii + 48 + ii; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 61/21-5. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/25; 1618-19; English; paper; ii + 43 + ii; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 61/21 5- 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/26; 1619-20; English; paper; ii + 28 + ii; 300mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 61/26-31. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/27; 1620-1; English; paper; i + 28 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; damp stains; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 
61/26-31. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/28; 1621-2; English; paper; i + 19 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 61/26-31. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/29; 1622-3; English; paper; i + 20 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 61/26-31 . 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/30; 1623-4; English; paper; ii + 27 + ii; 300mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern cover with ESRO: RYE 61/26-31. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/32; 1625-6; English; paper; i + 22 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/32-40. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/33; 1626-7; English; paper; i +17 + ii; 305mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/32-40. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/34; 1627-8; English; paper; i + 18 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/3240. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/35; 1629-30; English; paper; i + 10 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/3240. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/36; 1630-1; English; paper; i + 14 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/32-40. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/37; 1631-2; English; paper; i + 14 + i; 310mm x 210mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/32-40. 



Ixxii THE DOCUMENTS 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/38; 1633-4; English; paper; i + 8 + iv; 305mm x 200mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/32-40. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/39; 1635-6; English; paper; i + 10 + i; 300mm x 200mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; repaired; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: 
RYE 6 1/32 -40. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/40; 1637-8; English; paper; i + 11 + ix; 305mm x 200mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; repaired; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: 
RYE 61/32-40. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/41; 1640-1; English; paper; i + 9 + iii; 315mm x 205mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; repaired; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: 
RYE 61/41-55. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/42; 1641-2; English; paper; i + 9 + i; 305mm x 205mm; 
contemporary foliation; no decoration; repaired; bound in modern brown leather cover with ESRO: 
RYE 61/41-55. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 61/43; 1642-3; English; paper; 16 leaves; 275mm x 165mm; 
modern foliation and incomplete contemporary foliation; no decoration; bound in modern brown 
leather cover with ESRO: RYE 61/41-55. 

Other Civic Documents 

Miscellaneous papers relating to the business of the town are kept in 182 bundles dating from 
1382. They include correspondence, sessions papers, letters testimonial, depositions, and 
indictments. SeveraJ of the items calendared in the HistoricaJ Manuscripts Commission report, 
including some that may have been relevant to REED, are now missing although from the 
calendars themselves it is impossible to be sure. Notable among these missing documents is 
one granting 40s each and a livery to Philip Fayrefyld and Angel Shawe for their pains with 
drome and phife during Queen Elizabeth s visit in 1573 and their going about the town in 
winter for the watches. 242 However, the same decree does appear in the Rye Assembly Book, 
ESRO: RYE 1/4 f 156v, which is printed herein (see p 121). 

Depositions at the Trial of Francis Daniell 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 47/77/2; 18 March 1609/10; English; paper; single sheet; 

31 5mm x 205mm. 

Letter of Certificate and Passport 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 47/89; 12 July 1617; English; paper; single sheet; 4 15mm x 

310mm. 



IYY i ii 
THE DOCUMENTS 

Parish Records 

St Mary s Churchwardens Accounts 

These accounts run from Easter to Easter until 1530, when the accounting year changes to 
Michaelmas to Michaelmas. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, RYE 147/1; 1513-70; English; paper; ii + 212 + iii; ff 1-173: 410mm 
x 280mm, ff 174-212: 390mm x 280mm; contemporary foliation; good condition; rough brown calf 
binding, Churchwardens Accounts 1513 to 1570 No. 17 on spine. 

Miscellaneous Record 

Order from the Warden of the Cinque Ports against Plays 

See under Hastings (p Ixiii) for BL: Egerton MS 2093. 

SALEHURST 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

See under Folkington (p Ixii) for WSRO: Ep. n/9/2. 

STEYNING 

Steyning was a parliamentary borough and an important market town, from which few records 
survive. Located about a mile from Bramber, it acquired borough status in the time of 
Edward I and became an important market centre due to its easy access to roads to London to 
the north and to the sea to the south. 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts 

These accounts are not a complete run. Most significantly for our purposes the accounts for 
1522-41 are missing, as folio lOv is dated 1522, and folio 1 1 begins with accounts for 1541. 
As the book has been repaired it is not possible to tell whether these folios were originally in 
different gatherings. Moreover, some of these accounts are clearly not the original but a later 
copy. Specifically, the entries on folios 9-10v are all in the same hand, probably from the mid- 
sixteenth century. 

As is common with churchwardens accounts there is no consistency in the length of the 
accounting year. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Par. 183/9/1; 1519-1877; English; paper; ii + 164 + ii; 400mm 
x 275mm; modern foliation; no decoration; good condition; modern white calf binding. 



Ixxiv THE DOCUMENTS 

WARBLETON 

There are no surviving churchwardens accounts from this parish for our period. 

St Mary the Virgin s Parish Register 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, PAR 501/1/1; 1559-1663; English; vellum; i + 67; 280mm x 195mm; 
modern foliation; good condition; vellum cover with Baptisms & Marriages and Burials from November 
1559 to 1663 on front. 

Inquest on the Death of Noah Spynner 

London, Public Record Office, ASSI 35/14/6; 22 May 1572; Latin; parchment; single membrane; 
375mm x 150mm; unnumbered; indented; faded on right side; bound with other documents of various 
sizes in fabric cover. 

WESTBOURNE 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments 

See under Birdham (p lix) for WSRO: Ep. 1/23/2. 

WEST TARRING 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts 

These accounts are dated by the date of appointment of the churchwardens, which until the 
1 540s at least appears to have occurred around the first or second Sunday in Advent. However, 
the actual date of appointment varies from year to year and in later decades, as can be seen 
from the records. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Par. 193/9/1; 1515-79; English; paper; iii + 65 + iii; 295mm 
x 215mm; modern foliation; no decoration; extensively repaired; modern cardboard cover with part of 
original parchment cover pasted on spine. 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Par. 193/9/2; 1580-92; English; paper; i + 26 + iii; 305mm x 
210 mm (original size cannot be determined due to extensive repair); modern foliation; modern card 
board cover. 

Ac t Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 
See under Chichester (p Ixi) for WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13. 



I YYV 
THE DOCUMENTS 

WEST THORNEY 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Book 

Chichester, West Sussex Record Office, Ep. 1/17/19; January 1619/20-June 1622; Latin and English; 
paper; 332 leaves; 305mm x 190mm; modern foliation; no decoration; poor condition; parchment cover. 

WINCHELSEA 

There are surviving court books of the hundred from Winchelsea from 1527-1629. These 
manuscripts aJso contain records of the assembly and the sessions of the peace. Other records 
of the town are mostly minutes of the Brotherhood and Guestling meetings of the Cinque 
Ports from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries, as well as a book of extracts from the 
court books and one sixteenth-century inventory. 243 

Order from the Warden of the Cinque Ports against Plays 
See under Hastings (p Ixiii) for BL: Egerton MS 2093. 
Court of the Hundred Book 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, WIN 53; 1568-86; English; paper; ii + 281 + i; 305mm x 1 95mm, 
contemporary ink foliation; no decoration, but partially thumb-indexed; good condition; vellum cover 
with Hundred Book on front. 

YAPTON 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Register of Presentments 

See under Eastergate (p Ixi) for WSRO: Ep. 1/23/8. 

Religious Houses 

BATTLE ABBEY 

After the Dissolution most of the archives of Battle Abbey presumably were given to Sir 
Anthony Browne, the recipient of the Sussex property of the institution. The estate passed to 
the Webster family in the eighteenth century, and in the nineteenth the documents relating 
to the abbey became part of the collection of Thomas Phillips, the bulk of which passed to 
the Huntington Library. However, records of the abbey are now also found in the East Sussex 
Record Office, the Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, the Public Record Office, the Senate 
House Library of the University of London, and other repositories. 24 1 

Most of the visiting entertainers were paid from the Abbots Accounts but they were also 
remunerated from the accounts of three other officers: the seneschal, the treasurer, and the 



Ixxvi THE DOCUMENTS 

chaplain. This suggests that entertainment expenses were not necessarily assigned to one posi 
tion but could be reimbursed from several different accounts. 

Abbots Accounts 

The rolls of Battle Abbey Abbots Accounts at the Huntington Library have come apart or been 
taken apart at the sewing joints. The individual membranes or sheets of these rolls are not 
systematically numbered and thus numbers have been editorially assigned. In some cases, the 
MS pieces or groups of pieces bear modern numbering, presumably from a superseded system 
of classification. This has been noted below but the editorially assigned numbers have been 
preferred for the records texts themselves. The Huntington Library MS reference numbers 
appear on the dorse, not the face, of the documents. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 139; 29 September 1346-29 September 1347; Latin; 
vellum; 3 membranes now separate, originally sewn serially; 558mm x 240mm; unnumbered; written 
on both sides, dorse text begins on back of first membrane. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 142; 29 September 1351-29 September 1352; Latin; 
vellum; 2 membranes now separate, originally sewn serially; larger 725mm x 230mm, smaller 4 18mm x 
230mm; unnumbered; written on both sides, dorse text begins on back of first membrane. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 144; 29 September 1357-29 September 1358; Latin; 
vellum; 2 membranes now separate, originally sewn serially; larger 865mm x 233mm, smaller 490mm x 
283mm; unnumbered; written on both sides, dorse text begins on back of first membrane. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 140; 29 September 1364-29 September 1365; Latin; 
vellum; 2 membranes now separate, originally sewn serially; 475mm x 285mm; unnumbered; written 
on both sides, dorse text begins on back of first membrane. 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, AMS 4901; 29 September 1365-29 September 1366; Latin; parch 
ment; 2 membranes sewn serially; 560mm x 285mm and 280mm x 285mm; unnumbered; written top 
to bottom on both sides. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 146; 29 September 1381-29 September 1382; Latin; 
vellum; 4 membranes now separate (with modern numbering as 378-1 to 378-4), originally sewn 
serially; largest 540mm x 305mm, smallest 182mm x 300mm; unnumbered; written on both sides, dorse 
text begins on back of first membrane. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 145; 29 September 1382-29 September 1383; Latin; 
vellum; 2 membranes now separate (with modern numbering as 433-1 and 433-2), originally sewn 
serially; 845mm x 290mm; unnumbered; written on both sides, dorse text begins on back of first 
membrane. 

London, Public Record Office, SC 6/1251/1; 29 September 1393-29 September 1394; Latin; parchment; 



I y Y V 1 1 

THE DOCUMENTS 

2 membranes sewn serially; 800mm x 350mm and 100mm x 350mm; unnumbered; both sides of each 
membrane written on seriatim. 

London, Public Record Office, SC 6/Henry 7/1878; c 1478-82; Latin; paper; 16 sheets, attached serially; 
440mm x 100mm; unnumbered; dorse text begins on back of last sheet. 

London, Public Record Office, SC 6/Henry 7/1874; 29 September 1498-29 September 1499; Latin; 
parchment; 22 leaves; 360mm x 245mm; unnumbered; no decoration; no cover. 

London, Public Record Office, SC 6/Henry 7/861; 1499-1500; Latin; paper; bifolium; 265mm x 
500mm; unnumbered. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 272; 1508-9; Latin; paper; 3 sheets now separate, 
originally sewn serially; 4 10mm x 280mm; unnumbered; written on one side only. 

Chaplains Account 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 278; 25 March 1520-25 March 1521; Latin; paper; 
originally 3 sheets attached serially then indented, now 2 pieces, ie, each half of indenture; largest 
350mm x 310mm, smallest 155mm x 310mm; unnumbered; written on one side only. 

Seneschals Accounts 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 275; 1513-14; Latin; paper; 13 sheets (now grouped 
into 7 pieces with modern numbering for pieces 1-6 ), originally sewn serially; largest 440mm x 
310mm, smallest 150mm x 310mm; unnumbered; written on one side only. 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 277; c 1522; Latin; paper; 8 sheets (now grouped into 
2 pieces made up of 2 and 6 sheets with modern numbering 47-1 and 47-2), originally sewn serially; 
largest 710mm x 310mm, smallest 578mm x 310mm; unnumbered; written on one side only. 

Treasurer s Account 

San Marino, California, Huntington Library, BA 1 1 1; 29 September 13503 April 1351; Latin; vellum; 
2 membranes now separate, originally sewn serially; 690mm x 180mm; unnumbered; written on one 
side only. 

ROBERTSBRJDGE ABBEY 
Bursars Accounts 

Documents relating to the abbey have been owned by the Sidneys since the Dissolution, when 
the abbey was granted to the family. The Sidneys have had the De L Isle title since the nine 
teenth century. 2 ^ 

These accounts are dated by quarters, normally Christmas to Lady Day (or Easter), Lady 



Ixxviii THE DOCUMENTS 

Day to St John the Baptist, St John the Baptist to St Michael, and St Michael to Christmas. 

Maidstone, Centre for Kentish Studies, U1475 Ql; 25 March 1416-25 March 1417; Latin; paper; 
4 sheets attached at top; 420mm x 220mm; numbered; written on dorse seriatim. 

Maidstone, Centre for Kentish Studies, U1475 Q2; 25 March 1417-25 March 1418; Latin; paper; 
4 sheets attached at top; largest 510mm x 300mm, smallest 510mm x 230mm, numbered; written on 
dorse seriatim. 

Maidstone, Centre for Kentish Studies, U1475 Q3; 23 April 1424-8 April 1425; Latin; paper; 4 sheets 
attached at top; 430mm x 300mm; numbered; written on dorse seriatim. 

Maidstone, Centre for Kentish Studies, U1475 Q5; 29 September 1426-29 September 1427; Latin; 
paper; 4 sheets attached at bottom; 440mm x 295mnr, numbered; written seriatim. 

Maidstone, Centre for Kentish Studies, U1475 Q4; 17 April 1435-8 April 1436; Latin; paper; 4 sheets 
attached at bottom; 445mm x 300mm; numbered; written seriatim. 

Maidstone, Centre for Kentish Studies, U1475 Q6, 25 December 1437-13 April 1438; Latin; paper; 
4 sheets attached at bottom; 450mm x 295mm; numbered; written seriatim. 

Households 

BROWNE OF COWDRAY 

A manuscript of the speeches given at the entertainment for Elizabeth is listed in the Historical 
Manuscripts Commission report on the documents at Loseley Park 246 but it cannot now be 
traced. Other than the printed accounts of the visit of Elizabeth, no records of entertainment 
at Cowdray survive. The household book of the second Viscount Montagu (dated 1 November 
1595) does exist as WSRO: MS. Cowdray 18 but no mention is made of household entertainers. 247 
The STC. 3907.5 text appears to have been the original imposition while STC: 3907.7 is pardy 
a reimposition with the addition of three songs and corrections of errors. It appears that to 
make room for the songs some material was excluded from STC; 3907.7, including all of 
Thursdays and Fridays activities. On the other hand Wilson believes that STC. 3907.7 may have 
been made for distribution before the actual performance and STC: 3907.5 was printed after, as 
it contains more of Elizabeths reactions. 248 In this volume, STC. 3907.5 has been printed in its 
entirety with collation notes to STC. 3907.7. Only the three songs from STC. 3907.7 have been 
included here. 

The Honorable Entertainment Given to the Queen 

[Ornament] I THE I HONORABLE I Entertainment giuen to the Queenes I MAIESTIE in Progresse, 
at Cowdrey in I Sussex, by the right Honorable the I Lord Montecute. I 1591. I [ornament] I LONDON I 



IVY |Y 

THE DOCUMENTS 

Printed by Thomas Scarlet, and are to bee solde by I William Wright, dwelling in Paules Churchyard I 
neere to the French Schoole. I 1591. STC. 3907.5 

The Speeches and Honorable Entertainment 

[Ornament] I The Speeches and I HONORABLE I Entertainment giuen to the Queenes I MAIESTIE 
in Progresse, at Cowdrey in I Sussex, by the right Honorable the I Lord Montacute. I 1591. I [ornament] I 
LONDON I Printed by Thomas Scarlet, and are to bee solde by I William Wright, dwelling in Paules 
Churchyard I neere to the French Schoole. I 1591. STC. 3907.7 

CARYLL OF WEST HARTING 

The Carylls were a royalist and Roman Catholic family whose estate was located at West 
Harting, about 15 kilometres or 9.3 miles northwest of Chichester. Sir John Caryll, whose 
accounts these are, was the father of Lord Caryll, secretary to Mary of Modena, queen to 
James n. 

These accounts are organized on a Michaelmas to Michaelmas fiscal framework. 

Sir John Carylls Household Accounts 

London, British Library, Additional MS 28242; 1631-1735; English; paper; i + 193 + ii; 345mm x 
210mm; modern pencil foliation; no decoration; good condition; 19th c. green BL binding. 

EDWARDS OF FAYRE CROOCH 

Judith Edwards was the daughter of Francis Throckmorton and widow of Thomas Edwards, 
a London mercer, whose estate of Fayre Crooch (no longer standing) was located near 
Wadhurst. The payments in her book for music teachers were for the education of her daugh 
ter Susanna, who married Sir Giles Strangways in the mid- 1630s, and of her other daughters 
Lucy and Judith/ 1 

The cashbook is organized on a Lady Day to Lady Day year. 

Judith Edwards Cashbook 

Dorchester, Dorset Record Office, D/FSI: box 222; 1626-31; English; paper; i + 90; 191mm x 152mm; 
unnumbered; vellum cover, illegible label on cover. 

EVERENDEN OF SEDLESCOMBE 

John Everenden was a member of the Protestant gentry with strong connections to the Sackville 
and Pelham families. A later entry in the account book notes expenses of Everenden in London 
at a St George Day feast when I waited on the Earle of Dorset. This book in fact includes 
sporadic accounts of the Everenden family from 1586, 1592, and 1609, as well as accounts of 
John s son Walter from 1661-78. However, the only interesting part of the book for our 



Ixxx THE DOCUMENTS 

purposes is devoted to Johns accounts from the years 1618/19 to 1660 (though those of the 
period 1632-43 are somewhat incomplete). 2 

The account book is organized on a Lady Day to Lady Day framework. 

John Everenden s Accounts 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, FRE 520; 1586-1678; English; paper; i + 222; 305mm x 205mm; 
contemporary foliation; leather cover embossed on spine, bound with 3 spiral straps (part of buckle on 
1 strap), deed pasted on inside front cover. 

GODFREY OF WINCHELSEA 
Thomas Godfrey s Diary (A) 

Although the Godfrey family is primarily known for its prominence in Lydd it dated back to 
the early fourteenth century in Winchelsea. They left Winchelsea in the sixteenth century but 
Thomas Godfrey, the second son of Thomas Godfrey of Lydd and auditor of the lord cham 
berlain s accounts, returned to the town in 1609 and became a freeman." 

The manuscript contains various papers relating to the Godfrey family. However, it ap 
pears to be an eighteenth-century copy of an original. There is no indication of dates within 
the year. 

London, British Library, Lansdowne MS 235; 18th c. copy of original papers for 1609-55; English; 
paper; v + 15 (single leaves mounted on stubs in a guardbook); 310mm x 210mm; modern foliation; 
large capitals in headings; good condition; bound with Lansdowne 236 in BL red leather binding, title 
on spine: Sir Francis Bacon s Speeches etc. /Brit. Mus. Lansdowne MSS 235, 236. 

RICHARD MONTAGUE, BISHOP OF CHICHESTER 

Montague, renowned as a scholar and theologian, was bishop of Chichester 1628-38 and 
rector of Petworth (part of the time in commmdarn) at the same time. He was known as a 
vigorous opponent of Puritanism and a supporter of ritual. Any of the expenses in his book 
could have been incurred at either Petworth or Chichester. 

The document which Steer published his article on was WSRO: Ep. vi/4/3. Unfortunately 
the book has been missing for several years, so the Steer transcript is now our only source. Steer 
describes the manuscript as a gathering of 28 folios, 1 1.4 x 7.4 in, which has been badly 
stained by damp. 2 2 There is no definite indication of the dating system of the accounts but 
it seems to run January to December. 

Richard Montague s Personal Accounts (A) 

F.W Steer, Bishop Montague s Personal Accounts, 1636-8, SAC 95 (1957), 28-41. 



THE DOCUMENTS 

PELHAM OF HALLAND PLACE 

The Pelhams were one of the leading Protestant families of Sussex. They built Laughton Place 
in the 1530s but moved to Halland Place (which no longer stands) near East Hoathly in 1595. 
This manuscript relates to Sir Thomas Pelham, the only son of Sir Thomas Pelham, an MP 
and sheriff of Sussex and Surrey, who died in 1624. The Sir Thomas Pelham who kept these 
accounts died in 1653." 3 

The accounts are organized by terms only without any indication of year breaks. The book 
as a whole begins with the Lady Day term (25 March-24 June) in 1626. 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts 

London, British Library, Additional MS 33145; 1626-49; paper; English; ii + 234 + ii; 295mm x 
190mm; modern pencil foliation; no decoration; good condition; BL binding, with title on spine. 

ROBERTS OF BOARZELL 

The Roberts family had roots in Kent and two members of the family had served as sheriff and 
justice of the peace in that county. Thomas Roberts inherited the Boarzell property in 1553 
and died in 1 567. His widow Margaret appears to have been in charge of the property for the 
next twenty years although Thomas younger brother John and his wife Elizabeth moved onto 
the estate. 2 ^ The Roberts family were Roman Catholics, who had supported Mary Tudor 
in the Wyatt rebellion. They were minor gentry whose fortunes were in decline in the latter 
part of the sixteenth century. 

Boarzell was located at Ticehurst in the Weald. Although the house was demolished in the 
nineteenth century, an eighteenth-century drawing and a photograph show a sixteenth-century 
two-storey, barn-shaped structure, probably with a hall on the ground floor. The estate was 
primarily devoted to cattle farming. 2 " 

The dating of the accounts is problematic. Items appear to have been entered as they were 
made but it is not clear at what point the accounting year started." 6 The period covered by the 
accounts largely coincides with the time from the beginning of the widowhood of Margaret 
Roberts, the wife of Thomas the younger, until her death, so it can be safely assumed that the 
accounts are part of her management of the estate. 

Margaret Roberts Accounts 

Lewes, East Sussex Record Office, DUN 37/2; 1566-79; English; paper; 125 leaves; 284mm x 190mm; 
modern foliation; no decoration; damp stains, some pages cut; unbound. 

SHELLEY OF MICHELGROVE 

Inventory of the Goods and Chattels of William Shelley 



Ixxxii THE DOCUMENTS 

The Shelleys were a prominent Catholic family whose estate at Michelgrove was located in 
Clapham parish, about 7 kilometres or 4.4 miles northwest of Worthing, having been built 
or reconstructed in the reign of Henry vm. The house was reputed to be one of the finest in 
Sussex, a large quadrangle building with towers on the corners, and Henry vin was entertained 
there. William Shelley, who owned the house in the time of Elizabeth, was attainted of 
high treason for conspiring to murder the queen and enthrone Mary, queen of Scots, and 
his estates were confiscated. Shelley was sentenced to death but in the end escaped execution. 
The house was restored to the family in the reign of James I but was razed in the nineteenth 
century. 1 ^ One member of the family became Protestant and served as MP and jp in the reign 
of Elizabeth. 2 " 

This document is among the accounts of Richard Bostocke, sheriff of Sussex, which include 
inventories of the possessions of felons and people attainted for high treason. 

London, Public Record Office, E 199/43/32; 23 March 1585/6; Latin and English; 3 membranes at 
tached at top; 675mm, 575mm, and 300mm x 290mm; unnumbered; both sides of each membrane 
written seriatim; folded and enclosed in leather pouch. 



Editorial Procedures 



Principles of Selection 

This volume follows the REED procedures for selection of entries. Accordingly, I have attempted 
to locate and publish all references to drama, music, secular ceremony, and popular mimetic 
customs up to 1642. Drama has proven to be reasonably straightforward, even in the case of 
the Cowdray entertainment, which is one long dramatic performance put on mainly for an 
audience of one person. Words like play and stage have not triggered inclusion if there was a 
strong likelihood that gambling, sports, or carpentry was being referred to. 

Music has required some hard decisions. I have included all references I could find to musical 
instruments (except for church organs) but only included musicians when they were involved 
in performing. Thus the excerpt from the will of Robert Banwell is included more because it 
contains a bequest of instruments than because the will was made by a minstrel. Teachers of 
music and dancing are included as musicians. Singers are not included when it seems that their 
only duties were part of religious services. References to dancing in houses and maypoles are 
included when it is clear that such activity was being done as a form of entertainment or ritual. 
The use of musicians to parade malefactors before the public is admittedly borderline but since 
there likely was an element of entertainment in this for the townspeople (albeit of a cruel 
nature), such references are included. References to musicians in legal documents are not in 
cluded if their professions are named solely for the purposes of identification. I have, however, 
included the payments in the Roberts family records to minstrels for thread, ribbons, and pins 
because such payments may help us understand the other activities of travelling performers. 

The payments to town musicians in the Rye Chamberlains Accounts are somewhat prob 
lematic. They are at first named as waits and thus are clearly within the REED guidelines. How 
ever, in the later part of our period they become fife and drum, probably for military musters 
and/or the watch. In 1 574 the fife and drum definitely are said to be manning the watch but at 
the same time they are rewarded for their special duties during the queen s visit, a specification 
that seems to imply some sort of performing function. Because it is not clear to me exactly what 
the town musicians duties were at any time, I have decided to include all references to pay 
ments to them up to 1642. Also included are the Rye Chamberlains Accounts payments to 
musicians at Guestling and Brotherhood meetings, even though such meetings usually took 
place in Kent. This has been done partly to preserve the integrity of the Chamberlains 



Ixxxiv EDITORIAL PROCEDURES 

Accounts as documentary records, rather than splitting them up with another REED collection. 
As well, there is reason to believe that in some cases at least, these musicians were from Rye, 
as they are sometimes identified as such or as individuals (eg, Francis Casheire and Thomas 
Maxwell) who are otherwise known to have been Rye musicians or waits. Indeed these records 
help to complete our view of the range of the duties of the Rye waits. 

I have included all expenses which may be associated with royal visits. However, some fur 
ther expenses may be hidden in payments not explicitly related to the visits, such as costs of 
cleaning streets or repairing conduits. 

Parish activities are sometimes not clearly defined as dramatic or musical. References to 
church ales in general are not included, although exceptions are made in the cases of Steyning 
and West Tarring because at some point in the records there is definite mention of a play or 
music associated with the ales. Minstrels in churchwardens accounts are included whether or 
not there is any evidence they were performing outside the church service. 

Ecclesiastical court records have been searched and they have yielded relevant material, espe 
cially in the case of individuals indulging in dramatic or musical activity during time of divine 
service. However, I have not included all citations of a case when no new information is added. 
Thus if an individual is cited for non-appearance after the original charge is made only the first 
notice of the case is printed and the succeeding citations are summarized in an endnote. 

With regard to family records I have tried to search the documents that were promising and 
reasonably accessible. However, I have not been able to gain access to the uncatalogued doc 
uments at Arundel Castle, in spite of the fact that there is a possibility of records of the Fitz 
Alans and Howards being located there." 9 The records of the Lumley family are located at 
Sandbeck Park, which I have not visited. But the typescript catalogue of those materials seems 
to indicate only one document from our period of relevance to Sussex (EMA/1/4), of which 
I was able to see a photocopy and confirm that it had no REED items. Nor have I seen the 
AJnwick Castle records of the Percy family (see p xxxvii), even though they may contain 
references to performances at Petworth. I have also not included entries from the Sackville 
records, although the family had a residence at Buckhurst near Withyham. As the Sackvilles 
principal seat was at Knole in Kent their household records will appear in James M. Gibson s 
edition of Kent: Diocese of Canterbury, forthcoming in die REED series. In any case, it is not 
possible to establish which of these records relate to Sussex. 

There are a few cases where more than one document records the same information. In the 
case of the Cowdray entertainment I have printed one text and collated the variants. Likewise, 
there are situations in which we have both the rough and the final chamberlains accounts for 
Rye; in these cases the records in both sources are invariably identical except for spelling vari 
ants. I have therefore only printed the version from the final accounts and recorded where the 
same entry appears in the rough accounts. In those years in which the rough accounts are the 
only source, of course that version is the one presented. The Rye Museum account is also not 
printed from, as the accounts for that year are recorded in the regular account book. 

The following specific items have been omitted: 

I/ The town equipment in the Lewes Town Book provided for the Whitsun procession, which 
was primarily a military muster. 



I YVYV 

EDITORIAL PROCEDURES 

21 References to harpers, trumpeters, fools, and singing men in the Sussex coroners reports 
(PRO: KB 9/227, 9/438, 9/442 and 9/504). 

3/The records of repairs to stages in the Rye Chamberlains Accounts, when it is probable 
that the stage being referred to is a sawing stage. 

41 Various references to individual musicians in the county quarter sessions rolls (WSRO: QRE 
19/124-30/11) for the period 1617-27. Almost all of these citations are for victuallers recog 
nizances. 

5/ Regulations governing choristers and singing men at Chichester Cathedral contained in 
Bodleian Library: MS. Top. Sussex e. 1 . 

61 A request by the archbishop of Canterbury in 1635 that the city of Chichester provide access 
to a field for scholars for the purpose of playing, in MS. Lambeth Palace 943, pp 477-8. 
71 Court of Star Chamber proceedings in PRO: STAC 8/1 1 1/4, which make reference to 
people wearing masks while poaching. 

8/ References to chapel music at the Montagu estate in Battle contained in the Life of Lady 
Montague published in 1609. 

Dating 

Most of the records in this volume are financial in nature and are dated following whatever 
fiscal year was in use by the corporate body whose records they are. This results in a double 
year date (eg, 1573-4). The particular accounting period (the start and end dates) of a set of 
accounts is normally indicated in the record subheading. However, it is not supplied: I/ when 
the accounting period is the customary Michelmas to Michaelmas; 21 in those cases where the 
accounting term cannot be determined based on the available records, in which case readers 
should consult the endnote for further discussion; 3/ in non-financial records (eg, wills, regis 
ters, presentments) where the specific day/month can be supplied; and 4/ in the Rye Chamber 
lains Accounts (see below). Double years are not to be confused with slash years (eg, 19 January 
1573/4), which are used to correct the style of changing the year on 25 March rather than 
1 January. Ecclesiastical court records are dated by the time of the hearing of the case, not by 
the time of the actual incident. In many cases the time of the incident is not specified at all. 
Wherever possible, conclusions about the dating are based on evidence in the document itself. 
If this evidence is ambiguous or if external evidence has been used in dating, the information 
is given in a textual note or discussed in the endnote to the individual record. If the exact date 
of the record is known but not indicated in the text of the record (such as in the Rye Cham 
berlains Accounts or in some family records) the information is provided in the endnotes. 
Particulars concerning the documents, gaps in the records, and details about dating of individ 
ual documents are given on pp liv Ixxxii. 

As the Rye Chamberlains Accounts are usually dated by quarter (see p Ixviii), the entries 
quoted here have subheads according to the accounting term within the year (eg, 24 June- 
24 August 1522), except in those years when the accounts are dated by year only. Sometimes 
the actual date of the payment is given in the accounts and these have been preserved in the 
endnotes or textual notes of the individual records. Because the bulk of the entries in Rye come 



Ixxxvi EDITORIAL PROCEDURES 

from one series of accounts, those of the chamberlains, I have let their system of dating be the 
guide for the overall dating for other civic records in Rye. 

Editorial Conventions 

The documents are presented in the order in which they are listed in the Introduction: the 
Diocese of Chichester, Boroughs and Parishes, Religious Houses, and Households. The heading 
Diocese of Chichester is used for documents relating to the entire diocese or to its constituent 
archdeaconries and deaneries; these are arranged chronologically. Within the latter three cat 
egories, the listing is alphabetical and then chronological. Excerpts from legal records are listed 
under the name of the place in which the offence took place (when known), not where the case 
was heard. The records in the Households category generally are from documents of a private 
nature, such as account books and diaries. 

As with all REED volumes this collection attempts to present transcriptions of the texts of 
the documents with a minimum of editorial interpretation. Thus the layout of the documents 
has been mimicked where practical, except for lineation in prose texts but including placement 
of headings, marginalia, and columns. Where a marginale is in the right margin in the MS, it 
has been placed in the left here, but with the mark . At times the layout of ecclesiastical court 
documents has been impossible to imitate since in some cases the clerk found that he had not 
left sufficient room for the entry under the place name heading and had to finish his notes in 
available spaces in the margins. In such cases the MS layout is explained in the endnotes or 
textual notes. 

Letters are represented as diplomatically as possible. Thus the letters V j, I, u, and V are 
copied as they occur in the MSS, not assimilated to modern usage. The letter J is used only if 
it occurs in a printed source text. Capitalization also conforms to scribal practice, although 
many ambiguous forms have had to be dealt with on a case-by-case basis. Raised letters are 
silently lowered except after numbers, as in xxt . Inserted material, however, is enclosed 
between f 1 if written above the line and between i j if written below. 

Abbreviations have usually been expanded in italics. However, this has not been done for 
abbreviations whose meanings are obvious to the modern reader, such as Mr. or Viz., or 
which stand for sums of money, such as li., s., d., ob., and qua. There are also a few 
situations where expansion is avoided because it would require unwarranted editorial guessing; 
an example is the case of accounts where payments are made to ministrall, with no indication 
of whether the form is singular or plural. In such cases the conventional apostrophe replaces 
expansion. This problem is more common in Latin records but occasionally is also encountered 
in some of the early Rye accounts in English. Italics are not used for any other purpose: where 
a printed or MS text uses italics (or any other special lettering) they are replaced by roman type. 

In general the texts have been allowed to speak for themselves even when the chances of 
some sort of scribal error are high. Possible editorial corrections are dealt with in footnotes or, 
when more extensive discussion is called for, in endnotes. The one exception is the case of a 
wrong number of minims: then the corrected text is printed and the error noted in a footnote. 
Square brackets ([ ]) enclose material cancelled in the original. Angle brackets (( )) indicate 



EDITORIAL PROCEDURES Ixxxvii 

damaged or illegible text, with the number of enclosed dots showing the number of letters 
omitted; where there is extensive damage the matter is discussed in an endnote. Text written in 
a hand different from that of the rest of the text is enclosed in bubbles ( ); (blank) indicates 
that the scribe has clearly left room for matter (such as a total or a signature) which has not 
been supplied. 

MS punctuation has been preserved when the mark is still in use. Virgules are printed as 
slashes (/). Flourishes, line fillers, and decorations are not reproduced; in the few cases where 
such marks may be of some use in interpretation an endnote describes the situation. Braces are 
not usually reproduced but are retained in those cases where their presence contributes to die 
sense of the record. 



Notes 



1 On the geography of the Weald, see Brent, RuraJ Employment and Population, Part 
One, p 38; Alan Everitt, Continuity and Colonization: The Evolution of Kentish Settlement 
(Leicester, 1986), 52-7; and C.W. Chalkin, Seventeenth-Century Kent: A Social and 
Economic History (London, 1965), 10. 

2 This geographical sketch owes much to Leslie and Short, Historical Atlas of Sussex, pp 6-7; 
Herrup, Common Peace , pp 11-21; Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part 
One, pp 2748; and Horsfield, History, Antiquities and Topography, vol 1, pp 14. 

3 Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 36. 

4 Herrup, Common Peace, pp 18-19. 

5 Herrup, Common Peace, pp 21-3. 

6 A Descriptive Report on the Quarter Sessions, Other Official, and Ecclesiastical Records in the 
Custody of the County Councils of East and West Sussex, Record Publication, no 2 (Lewes 
and Chichester, 1954), viii. 

7 For details, see Judith A. Brent, East Sussex Record Office: A Short Guide, 2nd ed (Lewes, 
1988), 5. 

8 See Ordnance Survey, Map of Britain in the Dark Ages, 2nd ed (Southampton, 1966); I.D. 
Margary, Roman Ways in the Weald (London, 1948); R.A. Pelham, Studies in the Histor 
ical Geography of Medieval Sussex, SAC 72 (1931), 180; Martin G. Welch, Early Anglo- 
Saxon Sussex, Part 1 (Oxford, 1983), 1 1; and Leslie and Short, Historical Atlas of Sussex, 
pp 24-5. 

9 Bodl.: MS Gough Gen. Top. 16. 

10 Tittler, Accounts of the Roberts Family, p xvii; Herrup, Common Peace, p 18. 

1 1 Lowerson, Short History of Sussex, p 75. 

12 Brandon and Short, The South East, p 13. 

13 Alasdair Hawkyard, The Counties of Britain: A Tudor Atlas by John Speed, (London, 
1988), 176. 

14 Ogilby s Road Maps of England and Wales from Ogilby s Britannia, 1675. facsimile 
(Reading, 1971), plates 4, 29, 31, 39, 81; and Herrup, Common Peace, p 19. 

15 Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part One, p 28. Unfortunately there was 
also an early seventeenth-century London joke that compared stale news to Rye fish - 
both unfit for consumption (see Stephen Hipkin, The Maritime Economy of Rye, 



NOTES |XXX1X 

1560-1640, Southern History 20-1 (1998-9), 127). 

16 Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part One, p 28. 

17 Pelham, Studies in the Historical Geography of Medieval Sussex, p 173- 

18 Fletcher, County Community in Peace and War, p 7. 

19 See G.M. White, The Chichester Amphitheatre: Preliminary Excavations, The Anti 
quaries Journal 16 (1936), 149-58; and Armstrong, History of Sussex, pp 25-6. 

20 Armstrong, History of Sussex, pp 36-9. 

2 1 Armstrong, History of Sussex, p 7 1 . 

22 Maurice Beresford, New Towns of the Middle Ages: Town Plantation in England, Wales and 
Gascony (London, 1967), 124; and Brandon and Short, The South East, p 90. 

23 Armstrong, History of Sussex, pp 73-4; and Brandon and Short, The South East, pp 13-14. 

24 Searle, Lordship and Community, p 67. 

25 Brandon and Short, The South East, pp 95-8, 103-4. 

26 Mavis Mate, The Occupation of the Land: Kent and Sussex, The Agrarian History of 
England and Wales, vol 3, 1348-1500, Edward Miller (ed) (Cambridge, 1991), 119-36; 
also her The East Sussex Land Market and Agrarian Class Structure in the Late Middle 
Ages, Past and Present 139 (1993), 46-65, especially p 55. 

27 Mate, Occupation of the Land, p 136. 

28 Julian Cornwall, Sussex Wealth and Society in the Reign of Henry viii, SAC 1 14 (1976), 2. 

29 Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part One, pp 28-38; Herrup, Common Peace, 
pp 16-17; and Joan Thirsk, The Farming Regions of England: South-eastern England, 
The Agrarian History of England and Wales, vol 4, 1500-1640, Joan Thirsk (ed) (Cam 
bridge, 1967), 55-7. 

30 Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part One, pp 38-48; and Thirsk, Farming 
Regions of England, pp 579. 

31 Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part Two, pp 41-3; and Brandon and Short, 
The South East, pp 185-7. 

32 Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part Two, pp 43-7; Herrup, Common Peace, 
p 15; and J.J. Goring, Wealden Ironmasters in the Age of Elizabeth, Wealth and Power 
in Tudor England: Essays Presented to S. T. Bindoff, E.W Ives et al (eds) (London, 1978), 
204-27. 

33 Brent, Rural Employment and Population, Part One, p 43; and Thirsk, Farming 
Regions of England, pp 59-60. 

34 Armstrong, History of Sussex, pp 83-9. 

35 Herrup, Common Peace, p 24; Alan G.R. Smith, The Government of Elizabethan England 
(New York, 1967), 85-6; and G.R. Elton, The Tudor Constitution: Documents and 
Commentary, 2nd ed (Cambridge, 1982), 463. 

36 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 82, 148. 

37 Smith, Government of Elizabethan England, pp 86-9; Elton, Tudor Constitution, pp 463-4; 
and Gladys Scott Thomson, Lords Lieutenants in the Sixteenth Century: A Study in Tudor 
Local Administration (London, 1923), 1-13, 126-37. 

38 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 222-3, 232 n3. 



XC NOTES 



39 Smith, Government of Elizabethan England, pp 90-3; and J.H. Gleason, The Justices of 
the Peace in England 1558 to 1640 (Oxford, 1969), 81-2, 259. 

40 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 9-10. 

41 Smith, Government of Elizabethan England, pp 94-5. 

42 Smith, Government of Elizabethan England, p 96. 

43 Simon Walker, The Lancastrian Affinity 1361-1399 (Oxford, 1990), 127-41. 

44 Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vo) 1 , pp 645-7. 

45 Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 1, p 200; and Hasler, House of Commons 
1558-1603, vol 1, p255. 

46 Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 1 , p 254; and Hasler, House of Commons 
1558-1603, vol 1, pp 300, 305. 

47 See Shannon McSheffrey, Gender and Heresy: Women and Men in Lollard Communities, 
1420-1530 (Philadelphia, 1995), 20. 

48 This paragraph is based on essays by H. Mayr-Harting, E. Kemp, C.H Lawrence, J. Fines, 
M.J. Kitch, and T.J. McCann in Studies in Sussex Church History, Kitch (ed), pp 1-123. 

49 Jeremy Goring, Reformation and Reaction in Sussex 1534-1559, SAC 134 (1996), 143. 

50 Goring, Reformation and Reaction, p 151. 

51 Manning, Religion and Society, pp xi-xiii, 37-8. 

52 Kitch, The Reformation in Sussex, in Studies in Sussex Church History, Kitch (ed), p 79. 

53 McCann, The Clergy and the Elizabethan Settlement in the Diocese of Chichester, 
Studies in Sussex Church History, Kitch (ed), pp 100-2. 

54 Goring, Reformation and Reaction, pp 143-4. 

55 Kitch, The Reformation in Sussex, p 79; and Manning, Religion and Society, p 222. 

56 Goring, Reformation and Reaction, pp 148-50. 

57 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 146-7, 232-6. 

58 Nigel J. Abercrombie, From Counter-Reformation to Bourgeois Catholicism: Recusancy 
in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Sussex, Studies in Sussex Church History, Kitch 
(ed), pp 125-6; Brandon and Short, The South East, p 141; and Leslie and Short, 
Historical Atlas of Sussex, p 56. 

59 VCH: Sussex, vol 2, p 29; and Seward, Sussex, p 1 17. 

60 Fletcher, County Community in Peace and War, pp 61-2; also his Puritanism in Seven 
teenth Century Sussex, Studies in Sussex Church History, Kitch (ed), p 141; Manning, 
Religion and Society, pp 37-8; and G.J. Mayhew, The Progress of the Reformation in 
East Sussex 1530-1539: The Evidence from Wills, Southern History 5 (1983), 49-50, 58. 
Mayhew s conclusions, based on the formulae in wills, are slightly different from Fletchers, 
as he locates the strongest Protestantism in the coastal towns and parishes of eastern 
Sussex, followed by only some parts of the Weald. 

61 Manning, Religion and Society, p 15; see also Fletcher, County Community in Peace and 
War, p 8. 

62 Lowerson, Short History of Sussex, p 81; Mayhew, Progress of the Reformation, p 58; 
and Brandon and Short, The South East, p 138. 

63 Fletcher, Puritanism in Seventeenth Century Sussex/ p 142. 



NOTES 

64 See, for example, Manning, Religion and Society, pp 63-78. 

65 Brandon and Short, The South East, pp 144-7. 

66 Fines, Cathedral and Reformation 1500-40, p 64. 

67 The information on the bishops is taken from Stanford E. Lehmberg, The Reformation 
of Cathedrals: Cathedrals in English Society, 1485-1 603 (Princeton, 1988), 116-17, 134, 
147; and Brandon and Short, The South East, pp 144-5. 

68 Andrew Foster, The Dean and Chapter 1570-1660, Chichester Cathedral: An Historical 
Survey, Mary Hobbs (ed) (Chichester, 1994), 90-1. 

69 Kitch, The Reformation in Sussex, pp 83, 88; these figures are based on Valor ecclesiasticus 
temp. Henr. VIII auctoritate regia institutus, vol 1 (London, 1810), 293-355. Slightly 
different figures are given by Goring, Reformation and Reaction, p 141, even though 
he cites Kitch as his source. 

70 Armstrong, History of Sussex, p 61 . 

71 Kitch, The Reformation in Sussex, pp 89, 91; Malcolm Lyne, Lewes Priory: Excavations 
by Richard Lewis, 1969-82, Mark Gardiner (ed) (Lewes, 1997), 8-13; and VCH: Sussex, 
vol 2, p 66. 

72 Searle, Lordship and Community, p 23; and VCH: Sussex, vol 2, p 54. 

73 Lowerson, Short History of Sussex, p 55. 

74 Searle, Lordship and Community, pp 4223, 42531. 

75 Searle, Lordship and Community, pp 266, 342-3, 366, 397-9. 

76 Searle, Lordship and Community, pp 117-18, 442. 

77 VCH: Sussex, vol 2, pp 71-4; Cooper, Notices of the Abbey of Robertsbridge, p 142; 
W.H. Blaauw, Royal Journeys in Sussex, SAC 2 (1849), 141-2, 168-70; and his Visit 
of King Edward the Second, p 44. 

78 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 6-7, 82; and Hull, Calendar of the White and Black 
Books, pp xi xii, xxvi. 

79 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 1, 13 15. 

80 Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p xi. 

81 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 17, 33. 

82 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 77, 89, 120-1, 127-8. 

83 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 95 100. 

84 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 63, 139-59, 192-3; and Hull, Calendar of the White 
and Black Books, pp xii xv. 

85 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 140-8; and Robert Tittler, The English Fishing 
Industry in the Sixteenth Century: The Case of Great Yarmouth, Alhion 9 (1977), 
49-52. 

86 Murray, Constitutional History, pp 205-1 1; R.A. Pelham, Medieval Foreign Trade: 
Eastern Ports, An Historical Geography of England Before A.D. 1800: Fourteen Studies, 
H.C. Darby (ed) (Cambridge, 1969), 302-4; and VCH: Sussex, vol 2, pp 156-7. 

87 On the Roman name of Chichester, see VCH: Sussex, vol 3, p 9. 

88 Armstrong, History of Sussex, pp 36, 65-7; and Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, 
vol 1, p651. 



XCI1 NOTES 



89 VCH: Sussex, vol 3, pp 97-8. 

90 Morgan, Chichester, p 1 1; and Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1, p 651. 

91 Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1 , pp 651-2; Bindoff, House of Commons 
1509-1558, vol 1, p 203; and VCH: Sussex, vol 3, p 91. 

92 Lowerson, Short History of Sussex, p 67; and VCH: Sussex, vol 3, pp 92-3. 

93 Roskell, House of Commons 1386- 1421, vol 1 , p 652; Bindoff, House of Commons 1509- 
1558, vol 1, p 203; and Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 1, p 257. 

94 Morgan, Chichester, p 42. 

95 Patten, English Towns, pp 169, 208; and Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 1, 
p202. 

96 Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1, p 653; and Hasler, House of Commons 
1558-1603, vol 1, pp 257-8. 

97 VCH: Sussex, vol 3, pp 87-8; and Brandon and Short, The South East, p 148. 

98 Brandon and Short, The South East, p 125; and Patten, English Towns, p 100. 

99 Morgan, Chichester, p 1 1; and Clark and Hosking, Population Estimates, p 149. 

100 Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol, 1 , pp 257-8. 

101 VCH: Sussex, vol 3, pp 160-6. 

102 Morgan, Chichester, p 53. 

1 03 VCH: Sussex, vol 9, pp 8 - 1 0. 

104 Brent, Urban Employment and Population, pp 36, 44. 

105 Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 1 , p 302. 

106 Mayhew, Progress of the Reformation, pp 50-1. In 1547 Browne was granted the Col 
legiate Church of St Mary at Hastings Castle. Soon after that the church was dissolved, 
however (see VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 17). 

107 A.J.F. Dulley, The Early History of the Rye Fishing Industry, SAC 107 (1969), 64; and 
Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 45. 

108 Clark and Hosking, Population Estimates, p 151. 

109 VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 10; and Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1, pp 755-6. 

1 10 Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 1, pp 256-7; and Hasler, House of Commons 
1558-1603, vol 1, pp 301-2. 

1 1 1 Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 36. 

1 12 VCH: Sussex, vol 7, p 14. 

113 Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1, p 658; L.F. Salzman, The Town Book of 
Lewes 1542-1701, SRS, vol 48 (Lewes, 1946 for 1945-6), ii; and VCH: Sussex, vol 7, 
pp 16,32. 

1 14 VCH: Sussex, vol 7, pp 24-6; Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1, p 658; 
Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 1, p 205; Walter H. Godfrey (ed), The Book 
of John Rowe, Steward of the Manors of Lord Bergavenny 1597-1622, SRS, vol 34 (Lewes, 
1928), 120; and Jeremy Goring, The Fellowship of the Twelve in Elizabethan Lewes, 
SAC 119(1981), 160-1, 163, 169. 

115 Brent, Urban Employment and Population, pp 36-8, 47; and Leslie and Short, 
Historical Atlas of Sussex, p 64. The population figure is from Cornwall, Sussex Wealth 



NOTES 

and Society in the Reign of Henry vin, p 14; Clark and Hosking, Population Estimates, 
do not have complete figures for Lewes during our period. In contrast to Brent and Leslie 
and Short, Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 1, p 205, says that Lewes ceased 
to be a centre of commercial activity after 1537 due to the dissolution of the priory and 
the silting of the harbour. 

1 16 VCH: Sussex, vol 7, p 45. 

1 17 Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 50; and Leslie and Short, Historical Atlas 
of Sussex, p 64. 

1 1 8 Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 1 , p 260. 

119 Mayhew, Progress of the Reformation, p 50; VCH: Sussex, vol 7, p 17; and Manning, 
Religion and Society, pp 37-8, 213, 242-3. The population figure is from Fletcher, 
County Com-munity in Peace and War, p 8. 

120 Manning, Religion and Society, p 41. 

1 2 1 VCH: Sussex, vol 7, pp 40- 1 . 

122 VCH: Sussex, vol 9, pp 49-52; and Richard F. Dell (ed), The Records of Rye Corporation: 
A Catalogue (Lewes, 1962), xiii-xiv, 63-4. 

123 Stephen Hipkin, Closing Ranks: Oligarchy and Government at Rye, 1570-1640, Urban 
History 22 (1995), 321-3, 328; VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 51; Bindoff, House of Commons 
1509-1558, vol 1, p 260; and Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 1, p 305. 

124 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 166-7; Stephen Hipkin, Buying Time: Fiscal Policy at Rye 
1600-1640, SAC 133 (1995), 246-7; also his Closing Ranks, pp 326-7. 

125 Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 36. 

126 Richard F. Dell, Rye Shipping Records 1566-1590, SRS, vol 44 (Lewes, 1966), xxxiv; 
Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 6-7, 237-44; and Hipkin, Maritime Economy, p 108. 

127 See Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 38, 233-69; and Dell, Rye Shipping Records, p xxxv. 

128 Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 39. 

129 On the fishing industry, see Tittler, The English Fishing Industry in the Sixteenth 
Century: The Case of Great Yarmouth, pp 40-60; and Hipkin, Maritime Economy, 
pp 108-42; on piracy, see Dell, Rye Shipping Records, pp xlii-xliv, and Graham J. 
Mayhew, Rye and the Defence of the Narrow Seas: A Sixteenth Century Town at War, 
SAd22 (1984), 121-4. 

130 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 38-41; and Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 40. 

1 3 1 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 79 - 90 . 

132 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, p 23. Hipkin, Maritime Economy, p 108, gives a much more con 
servative figure of 3,500 for the 1560s. Clark and Hosking s figure of 1,410 in Population 
Estimates, p 151, based on the 1563 diocesan survey, cannot be correct. Comparative 
population figures for other English towns are given in Patten, English Towns, p 103. 

133 Hipkin, Maritime Economy, pp 1 17-23. 

134 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, p 23; and Hipkin, Maritime Economy, pp 108, 130. 

135 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 262-9; and Brent, Urban Employment and Population, p 39. 

136 Hipkin, Buying Time, especially pp 248-52. 

137 Graham Mayhew, Religion, Faction and Politics in Reformation Rye: 1530-59," 



xciv NOTES 



SAC 120 (1982), 140-8, 155; Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 1, p 260; 
and Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 60-77. 

138 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 76-8; Annabel Gregory, Witchcraft, Politics and 
"Good Neighbourhood" in Seventeenth-Century Rye, Past and Present 133 (1991), 
39-43. 

139 Hipkin, Closing Ranks, pp 330-3. 

140 Vidler, New History of Rye, p 75. 

141 Hipkin, Maritime Economy, p 108. 

142 Beresford, New Towns of the Middle Ages, pp 14-28. 

143 VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 70; Leslie and Short, Historical Atlas of Sussex, pp 8, 44; and Saul, 
Scenes from Provincial Life, pp 177-8. 

144 Leslie and Short, Historical Atlas of Sussex, p 44; and Clark and Hosking, Population 
Estimates, p 1 53. 

145 Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1 , p 766. 

146 Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 1, pp 306-7. 

147 VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 70. 

148 Brandon and Short, The South East, p 1 18; and Saul, Scenes from Provincial Life, 
PP 35-7. 

149 Complete Peerage, vol 1, pp 248-50. 

150 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 221-6; and Complete Peerage, vol 1, pp 250-3. 

151 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 226-8; and Complete Peerage, vol 8, pp 276-8. 

152 Brandon and Short, The South East, p 136. 

153 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 228-30, 234; and Complete Peerage, vol 9, pp 97-9. 

154 Norman Jones and Paul Whitfield White, Gorboduc and Royal Marriage Politics-. An 
Elizabethan Playgoer s Report of the Premiere Performance, English Literary Renaissance 
26 (1996), 6-7. 

155 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 230-4. 

156 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 235-6; and Complete Peerage, vol 4, pp 155-9. 

157 Complete Peerage, vol 4, pp 8-10, and vol 11, pp 479-81; VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 133; 
Seward, Sussex, pp 103-4; and Fletcher, County Community in Peace and War, p 23. 

158 Complete Peerage, vol 9, pp 720-1, 728-9, 732-4; Seward, Sussex, pp 184-5; and 
Manning, Religion and Society, p 226 nl. 

1 59 Fletcher, County Community in Peace and War, p 23. 

160 On Cocking, see VCH: Sussex, vol 4, p 45; on Graffham, see VCH: Sussex, vol 4, p 58; 
on Westbourne, see VCH: Sussex, vol 4, p 130; on Yapton, see VCH: Sussex, vol 5, pt 1, 
p250. 

161 Herrup, Common Peace, p 22. 

1 62 Saul, Scenes from Provincial Life, p 60. 

163 Kitch, The Reformation in Sussex, p 79; and Manning, Religion and Society, pp 239-40. 

164 For the Leedes, see Seward, Sussex, pp 117-18; on the Dawtreys, see Manning, Religion 
and Society, pp 248-50. 

165 Manning, Religion and Society, pp 152, 209n, 242, 244, 246, 250-2, 262-5; and 



xcv 

NOTES 

J.E. Mousley, The Fortunes of Some Gentry Families of Elizabethan Sussex, Economic 
History Review, ser 2, vol 1 1 (1958-9), 476. 

166 Fletcher, County Community in Peace and War, p 27. 

167 Herrup, Common Peace, p 22. 

168 On travelling performers, see Peter H. Greenfield, Touring, A New History of Early 
English Drama, John D. Cox and David Scott Kastan (eds) (New York, 1997), 251-68. 

169 BL: Cotton Nero C.x f23v. 

170 The Latin terms histrio, lusor, and ministrallus do not necessarily seem to indicate any 
one type of entertainer, although lusor probably did not refer to musicians. See Abigail 
Ann Young, Plays and Players: The Latin Terms for Performance, REEDN 9.2 (1984), 58, 
61-2. The minstrel at the 1554-5 Brotherhood may have been paid for singing and 
acting or for singing and playing an instrument. 

171 On bear-baiting, see James Stokes, Bull and Bear Baiting in Somerset: The Gentles 
Sport, English Parish Drama, Alexandra F. Johnston and Wim Hiisken (eds) (Amsterdam 
and Atlanta, 1996), 64-80. 

172 For other possible joint performances, see also under 1504-5, ESRO: RYE 60/4 f 170; 
1505-6, ESRO: RYE 60/4 f 182v; and 1512-13, ESRO: RYE 60/4 f 295. The Canter 
bury Chamberlains Accounts, Canterbury Cathedral Archives: CC/FA 16 f 159v, record 
a payment to Robert Dudley s players dated 17 March 1560/1 and an undated one to 
the queen s players but the entries are not consecutive. 

173 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, p 59, on the other hand, feels that the decline is related to increas 
ingly Protestant sentiments. On the decline in touring in the early seventeenth century, 
see Greenfield, Touring, pp 265-7. 

174 The Dover chamberlains recorded a payment for Leicester s men on 3 February 1587/8, 
(East Kent Archives Centre: DO/FCA 3 f 221), which means the bill should have been 
received during the previous fortnight, given how the town s finances were organized at 
that time. The undated payments under the 1587-8 account year are these: Faversham, 
CKS: FA/FAc 17 sheet 6; Folkestone, Folger Library: W.b.200 p 83 (antiquarian source); 
Lydd, Lydd Town Archives: Ly/FAc 7 p 52; New Romney, East Kent Archives Centre: 
FA/NRc 8 f 4. The Lyme Regis account is in Rosalind Conklin Hays and C.E. McGee 
et al (eds), Dorset/Cornwall, REED (Toronto, 1999), 216; and for the Plymouth record, 
see John M. Wasson (ed), Devon, REED (Toronto, 1986), 251. 

175 Mark C. Pilkinton (ed), Bristol, REED (Toronto, 1997), 133; and Audrey Douglas and 
Peter Greenfield (eds), Curnberland/Westmorland/Gloucestershire, REED (Toronto, 1986), 310. 

176 Scott McMillin and Sally-Beth MacLean, The Queen s Men and Their Plays (Cambridge, 
1998), 186. 

177 See Young, Plays and Players, p 61; see also Oxford Latin Dictionary, s.v. mimus. 

178 Lydd: Lydd Town Archives: Ly/FAc 2 p 50 (22 July 1520-22 July 1521); New Romney: 
East Kent Archives Centre: FA/NRc 6 f 128v (25 March 1519-25 March 1520, bear- 
wards here); and Sandwich: East Kent Archives Centre: FA/SAt 25 sheet 6 (1 December 
15 19-6 December 1520). 

179 WSRO: Ep 1/17/12 f 45. A complete text of the proceedings is printed by Cameron Louis, 



XCVI NOTES 



Two Fools from Sussex, REEDN 21.2 (1996), 16-18. The record is not included in this 
collection because the incident does not directly involve a performance or the occupa 
tion of the subject as a stultus (the term is used only as an identifier). 

180 Petworth House: MS 580 mb 2; MS 574 mb 13; these entries are not included in this 
collection but are to appear in a future edition by Robert Alexander of the Percy family 
records in the REED series. 

181 PRO: KB 9/442 mb 92. See also Louis, Two Fools from Sussex , pp 16-19. 

182 James M. Gibson s edition of Kent: Diocese of Canterbury, forthcoming in the REED 
series, has over seventy discrete entries for performers under the patronage of William 
Fitz Alan and over fifty for performers under the patronage of Thomas Fitz Alan. See 
also Wasson, Devon, p 458. 

183 Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 3, p 146. 

184 Complete Peerage, vol 1, pp 31-3; and Seward, Sussex, p 181. 

185 Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 2, pp 262-4. 

186 Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 3, pp 146-7. 

187 The de Veres were based in Essex; the thirteenth earl was made high steward of the duchy 
of Lancaster south of theTrent in the 1480s (see Complete Peerage, vol 10, pp 241-2). 

188 BL: Add. MS 29617 f 203v; in fact there are three consecutive payments, to the queen s 
minstrels, Oxford s minstrels, and die archbishop s minstrels. For the Plymouth payment, 
see Wasson, Devon, p 214, where the payment is to the king s minstrels, the archbishop s 
minstrels, and Oxford s minstrels. 

189 Lydd: 1478-9, Lydd Town Archives: Ly/FAc 1 f 1 58v; 1 520-1 , Lydd Town Archives: 
Ly/FAc 2 p 57; 1538-9, Lydd Town Archives: Ly/FAc 2 p 218; and 1539-40, Lydd 
Town Archives: Ly/FAc 2 p 226; New Romney: 1495-6, East Kent Archives Centre: 
NR/FAc5 f58; 1518-19, East Kent Archives Centre: NR/Fac 6 f 1 13v; and 1560-1, 
East Kent Archives Centre: NR/FAc 7 f 1 18v; Sandwich: 1516-17, East Kent Archives 
Centre: SA/FAt sheet 9. 

190 Greenfield, Touring, p 258. 

1 9 1 Robert Tittler, Architecture and Power: The Town Hall and the English Urban Community 
c. 1500-1640 (Oxford, 1991), 167. 

192 I am grateful to Robert Tittler for providing me with this list. On Arundel, see G.O. 
Cowley, Sussex Market Towns, 1500-1700 (PhD dissertation, University of London, 
1965), 27, 51; on Cuckfield, see Horsfield, History of Sussex, vol 1, p 255; on Hailsham, 
see L.F. Salzman, The History of the Parish of Hailsham, the Abbey ofOtham and the Priory 
ofMichelham (Lewes, 1901), frontispiece map; on Hastings, see VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 5; on 
Petworth, see Cowley, Sussex Market Towns, p 41; on New Shoreham, see VCH: Sussex, 
vol 6, pt 1, pp 146-7; on Steyning, see Cowley, Sussex Market Towns, p 29; on West 
Tarring, see VCH: Sussex, vol 6, pt 1, p 275; on Winchelsea, see VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 64. 

193 The courts were held in the Court Hall, adjacent to the market cross and the churchyard. 
The Court Hall dated from the fourteenth century and occupied the same site as the 
present Town Hall, which dates from the eighteenth century. See Vidler, New History 
of Rye, p 96; Mayhew, Tudor Rye, p 35; and A.F. de P. Worsfield, The Court Hall, Rye, 



NOTES 

SAC 66 (1925), 208-18. On the market place, see Mayhew, Tudor Rye, p 35. 

194 VCH: Sussex, vol 3, p 78; Tittler, Architecture and Power, p 95, notes that a deposition of 
1586 shows that the Chichester guild hall was a separate building from the Council 
House in spite of the fact that the merchant guild was the de facto government of the 
city. On the market cross, see VCH: Sussex, vol 3, p 73. 

195 VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 57; and Ian Nairn and Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: 
Sussex (Harmondsworth, 1965), 595. 

196 John M. Wasson, The English Church as Theatrical Space, A New History of Early 
English Drama, John D. Cox and David Scott Kastan (eds) (New York, 1997), 30. 

197 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, p 36. On the distinction between inns, taverns, and alehouses, see 
Peter Clark, The Alehouse and the Alternative Society, Puritans and Revolutionaries, 
Donald Pennington and Keith Thomas (eds) (Oxford, 1978), 48-9. 

198 Leslie and Short, Historical Atlas of Sussex, pp 64-5. 

199 VCH: Sussex, vol 4, p 49; Armstrong, History of Sussex, pp 84-5; and Seward, Sussex, 
pp 106-7. 

200 Brandon and Short, The South East, pp 113-16; Maurice Howard, The Early Tudor 
Country House: Architecture and Politics 1490-1550 (London, 1987), 204-17; and 
VCH: Sussex, vol 3, pp 147-53. 

201 Christopher Haigh, English Reformations: Religion, Politics, and Society Under the Tudors 
(Oxford, 1993), 36. 

202 On boy bishops, see Chambers, Mediaeval Stage, vol 1, pp 336-71; and Hutton, Rise 
and Fall of Merry England, pp 10-12. 

203 Hughes and Larkin, Tudor Royal Proclamations, vol 1, pp 301-2, no 203; see also 
Hutton, Rise and Fall of Merry England, p 77. 

204 Hutton, Rise and Fall of Merry England, pp 8-9. 

205 Chambers, Mediaeval Stage, vol 1 , pp 403-19; Hutton, Rise and Fall of Merry England, 
pp 90 1, 1 14 17; and Martin Ingram, Ridings, Rough Music and Mocking Rhymes in 
Early Modern England, Popular Culture in Seventeenth-Century England, Barry Reay (ed) 
(London, 1985), 168-71. 

206 Hutton, Rise and Fall of Merry England, pp 59-60; and Sally-Beth MacLean, Hocktide: 
A Reassessment of a Popular Pre-Reformation Festival, Festive Drama: Papers from the 
Sixth Triennial Colloquium of the International Society for the Study of Medieval Theatre 
Lancaster, 13-19 July, 1989, MegTwycross (ed) (Cambridge, 1996), 233-41. 

207 See Francois Laroque, Shakespeare s Festive World: Elizabethan Seasonal Entertainment and 
the Professional Stage, Janet Lloyd (trans) (Cambridge, 1991), 118. 

208 Chambers, Mediaeval Stage, vol 1, pp 195-6. 

209 See Chambers, Mediaeval Stage, vol 1, pp 160-81; Laroque, Shakespeare s Festive World, 
pp 111-36. 

210 Hutton, Rise and Fall of Merry England, p 28. 

21 1 Chambers, Mediaeval Stage, vol 1 , p 179; Hutton, Rise and Fall of Merry England, 
pp 30-1. 

2 1 2 Hutton , Rise and Fall of Merry England, p 1 1 9. 



xcvill NOTES 

213 See p 27 1 , endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 1 5 1 , 154. 

214 On the relationship between religion and family musical activities, see David C. Price, 
Patrons and Musicians of the English Renaissance (Cambridge, 1981), 153-77. 

215 CKS: U 269/al/l pp 17, 45, and 61. These records will be published in James M. 
Gibson s edition of Kent: Diocese of Canterbury forthcoming in the REED series. 

216 Jacqueline Wiltshire, Medieval Fiddles at Hardham, Galpin Society Journal 34 (1981) 
142-6. 

217 W.H. Blauuw, Royal Journeys in Sussex from the Conquest to Edward i, SAC 2 (1849) 
133-6. 

218 Blauuw, Royal Journeys in Sussex, pp 137-56. 

219 Blauuw, Visit of King Edward the Second, pp 41-53. 

220 PRO: E 101/381/4 mb 5 (King s Wardrobe and Household Account Roll). This entry is 
not included in the records of this volume because the royal records have not been 
searched systematically. 

221 Blauuw, Visit of King Edward the Second, p 53. 

222 John Gough Nichols, The Progress of King Edward vi in Sussex, SAC 10 (1858), 
195-204. 

223 Nichols, Progresses ana 1 Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth, vol 1, p 334. 

224 Vidler, New History of Rye, pp 50, 63. 

225 William Durrant Cooper, Queen Elizabeth s Visits to Sussex, SAC 5 (1852), 192. 

226 Nichols (Progresses and Public Processions of Quern Elizabeth, vol 3, pp 84, 90, 96) actually 
dates this to 15-21 August but he seems to be following errors in his source. The 
src: 3907.5 text actually gives the dates of 18 August and 15 August but these are 
emended to 14 August in src. 3907.7 (see p 188). The latter date appears to be correct 
as it is the only one that fell on a Saturday in 1591. 

227 Seward, Sussex, p 1 1 5. 

228 Wilson, Entertainments for Elizabeth, p 86. 

229 Wilson, Entertainments for Elizabeth, p 87. 

230 Charles Thomas-Stanford, Sussex in the Great Civil War and the Interregnum 1642-1660 
(London, 1910), 7, notes that even in the eighteenth century Londoners regarded 
Sussex as a savage and outlandish county and tales were circulated about monsters 
in the Weald. 

231 Stephen Greenblatt, Invisible Bullets: Renaissance Authority and Its Subversion, Henry tv 
and Henry v, Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism, Jonathan Dollimore 
and Alan Sinfield (eds), 2nd ed (Manchester, 1994), 44. 

232 PRO: SP 12, vol 239, no 159; dated 31 August 1591. 

233 Nichols, Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth, vol 3, pp 96-9. On Phillips, 
see Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 3, pp 219-20. 

234 Nichols, Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth, vol 3, p 96. 

235 John Nichols, The Progresses, Processions, and Magnificent Festivities of King James the First, 
vol 1 (London, 1828), xix-xxi. 

236 For the career of Richard de Wyche, see C.H. Lawrence, St. Richard of Chichester, 



NOTES 

Studies in Sussex Church History, Kitch (ed), pp 35-55. 

237 Roskell, House of Commons 1386-1421, vol 1 , p 656; and Bindoff, House of Commons 
1509-1558, vol I,p204. 

238 Whidey, Churchwardens Accounts of St Andrew s and St Michael s, p 40; VCH: Sussex, 
vol 7, p 41. 

239 Salzman, Town Book of Lewes, p [ii]. 

240 Dell, The Records of Rye Corporation: A Catalogue. 

241 Mayhew, Tudor Rye, pp 5, 103. 

242 Hardy and Page, Manuscripts of the Corporation of Rye, p 29. 

243 Richard F. Dell, Winchelsea Corporation Records: A Catalogue (Lewes, 1963). 

244 For a survey of the documents of the abbey, see Judith A. Brent, A Catalogue of the 
Battle Abbey Estate Archives, East Sussex Record Office Handbook, no 6 (Lewes, 1973). 

245 See H. Penfold (ed), Calendar of Charters and Documents Relating to the Abbey of 
Robertsbridge (London, 1873). 

246 Historical Manuscripts Commission. John Cordy Jeaffreson, The Manuscripts of William 
More Molyneux, Esq., of Loseley Park, Guildford, Co. Surrey, The Seventh Report of the 
Manuscripts Commission, Appendix (London, 1879), 666. 

247 Sibbald David Scott, "A Book of Orders and Rules" of Anthony Viscount Montague in 
1595, SAC 7 (1854), 173-212. 

248 Wilson, Entertainments for Elizabeth, p 88. Wilson (p 87) calls Bond s attribution of the 
entertainment to Lyly conjectural. 

249 I am indebted to C.E. McGee for drawing the Edwards cashbook to my attention. 
See McGee s Music for Marriage. 

250 ESRO: FRE 520 f 34. The earl of Dorset was Edward Sackville. On the Everendens, see 
William Durrant Cooper, Extracts from the Account Books of the Everenden and 
Frewen Families in the Seventeenth Century, SAC 4 (1851), 22-30. 

251 Cooper, History of Winchelsea, p 163. 

252 Steer, Bishop Montague s Personal Accounts, p 32. 

253 Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 3, p 194; Seward, Sussex, pp 179-80; and 
Christina Hallowell Garrett, The Marian Exiles: A Study in the Origins of Elizabethan 
Puritanism (Cambridge, 1938), 247-8. 

254 Tittler, Accounts of the Roberts Family, pp xv-xvi. 

255 Tittler, Accounts of the Roberts Family, pp xvii-xix. 

256 See Tittler, Accounts of the Roberts Family, p xxvi. 

257 Whidey, An Inventory of the Goods and Chattels of William Shelley of Michelgrove, 
1585. Whidey misdates the document. 

258 Hasler, House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 3, p 375. 

259 According to the Complete Peerage, vol 1 , p 254, the casde was conveyed to Philip Howard 
when he became earl of Arundel in February 1579/80. 



Select Bibliography 



The following list includes works that contain transcriptions of primary documents relevant to 
this collection. It also includes basic reference works for research on Sussex but not manuscript 
catalogues or guides to records. Nor does it include all works referred to in the Introduction 
and Endnotes. 

Armstrong, J.R. A History of Sussex. 4th ed (Chichester, 1995). 

Bindoff, S.T. (ed). The House of Commons 1509-1558. The History of Parliament. 3 vols 

(London, 1982). 
Blaauw, W.H. Visit of King Edward the Second to Battle and Other Parts of Sussex in 1324, 

SAC 6 (1853), 41-53. 

Bond, R. Warwick (ed). The Complete Works of John Lyly. 3 vols (Oxford, 1902). 
Brandon, Peter, and Brian Short. The South East from AD 1000 (London, 1990). 
Brent, C.E. Rural Employment and Population in Sussex Between 1550 and 1640, Part One, 

SAC 114 (1976), 27-48. 

- Rural Employment and Population in Sussex Between 1550 and 1640, Part Two, SAC 116 
(1978), 41-55. 

- Urban Employment and Population in Sussex Between 1550 and 1660, SAC 1 13 (1975), 
35-50. 

Burton, Henry. A Divine Tragedie (London, 1636; src: 4140.8). 

Chambers, E.K. The Mediaeval Stage. 2 vols (Oxford, 1903). 

Clark, Peter, and Jean Hosking. Population Estimates of English Small Towns 1550-1851. 

Rev ed (Leicester, 1993). 

Cooper, George Miles. Notices of the Abbey of Robertsbridge, SAC 8 (1856), 141-76. 
Cooper, William Durrant. The History of Winchelsea, One of the Ancient Towns Added to the 

Cinque Ports (London and Hastings, 1850; rpt 1986). 
Dawson, Giles E. (ed). Collections 7. Malone Society (Oxford, 1965). 
Evans, Allan. Actors in the Account Rolls of Battle Abbey, The Huntington Library Quarterly 

6.1 (1942), 103-5. 

- Battle Abbey at the Dissolution: Expenses, The Huntington Library Quarterly 6.1 (1942), 

53-101. 
Fines, John. Cathedral and Reformation 1500-40, Chichester Cathedral: An Historical 



SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Survey. Mary Hobbs (ed) (Chichester, 1994), 47-68. 

Fleming, Lindsay. History ofPagham in Sussex Illustrating the Administration of an Archiepiscopal 
Hundred, the Decay of Manorial Organisation and the Rise of a Seaside Resort. 3 vols (London, 

1949). 
Fletcher, Anthony. A County Community in Peace and War: Sussex 1600-1660 (London, 

1975). 
Gaimar, Geffrei. L Estoire des Engleis. Alexander Bell (ed). Anglo Norman Text Society, vols 14- 

16 (Oxford, 1960). 
Hasler, P.W. (ed). The House of Commons, 1558-1603. The History of Parliament. 3 vols 

(London, 1981). 

Hay, Alexander. The History of Chichester (Chichester, 1804). 

Herrup, Cynthia. The Common Peace: Participation and the Criminal Law in Seventeenth- 
Century England (Cambridge, 1987). 
Historical Manuscripts Commission. W.J. Hardy and W. Page, The Manuscripts of the 

Corporation of Rye, The Thirteenth Report of the Manuscripts Commission, Appendix, pt 4 

(London, 1892), 1-246. 
- Henry Thomas Riley, The Manuscripts of the Corporation of Rye," The Fifth Report of the 

Manuscripts Commission, Appendix, pt 1 (London, 1876), 488-516. 
Holloway, William. The History and Antiquities of the Ancient Town and Port of Rye, in the 

County of Sussex, with Incidental Notices of the Cinque Ports (London, 1847). 
Horsfield, Thomas Walker. The History and Antiquities of Lewes and Its Vicinity. 2 vols (Lewes, 

1824-7). 

The History, Antiquities, and Topography of the County of Sussex. 2 vols (Lewes, 1835). 
Hughes, Paul L., and James F. Larkin (eds). Tudor Royal Proclamations. 3 vols (New Haven, 

1964-9). 
Hull, Felix (ed). A Calendar of the White and Black Books of the Cinque Ports 1432-1955 

(London, 1966). 
Hutton, Ronald. The Rise and Fall of Merry England: The Ritual Year 1400-1700 (Oxford and 

New York, 1994). 
Johnstone, Hilda (ed). Churchwardens Presentments (17th Century). Part 1 , Archdeaconry of 

Chichester. SRS, vol 49 (Lewes, [1949] for 1947-8). 

Kingsley, David. Printed Maps of Sussex 1575-1900. SRS, vol 72 (Lewes, 1982). 
Kitch, M.J. (ed). Studies in Sussex Church History (London, 1981). 
Lee, William. Ancient and Modern History of Lewes and Brighthelmston (Lewes, 1795). 
Leslie, Kim, and Brian Short (eds). An Historical Atlas of Sussex (Chichester, 1999). 
Louis, Cameron. Early Drama in Sussex, SAC 123 (1985), 145-50. 
Lower, Mark Antony. A Compendious History of Sussex, Topographical Archaeological and 

Anecdotical. 2 vols (Lewes, 1870). 

Lowerson, John. A Short History of Sussex (Folkestone, 1980). 
MacDermott, K.H. Sussex Church Music in the Past, SAC 60 (1919), 1-33. 
Manning, Roger B. Religion and Society in Elizabethan Sussex: A Study of the Enforcement of the 

Religious Settlement 1558-1603 (Leicester, 1969). 



Cll SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Mayhew, Graham. Tudor Rye (Palmer, 1987). 

McGee, C.E. Music for Marriage: The Education of Susanna Edwards, The Early Drama, Art, 

and Music Review 13 (1990), 7-12. 

Medland, Thomas. Extracts from the Steyning Church-Book, SAC 8 (1856), 131-40. 
Morgan, Roy. R. Chichester: A Documentary History (Chichester, 1992). 
Murray, John Tucker. English Dramatic Companies 1558-1642. 1 vols (1910; rpt New York 

1963). 

Murray, K.M.E. The Constitutional History of the Cinque Ports (Manchester, 1935). 
Nichols, John. The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth. Vol 3 (London, 1823). 
Patten, John. English Towns 1500-1700 (Folkestone, 1978). 
Phillips, Charles James. History of the Sackville Family. 2 vols (London, 1930). 
Powicke, EM., and C.R. Cheney (eds). Councils and Synods, with Other Documents Relating 

to the English Church. Vol 2, AD 1205-1313 (Oxford, 1964). 
Pressey, W.J. The Churchwardens Accounts of West Tarring, Sussex Notes and Queries 3 

(1930-1), 18-21, 42-6, 77-80, 108-12, 145-9, 179-84, 209-14, 240-5; 4 (1932-3), 

9-14, 46-9, 80-5, 105-10, 140-4, 170-5, 185, 199-204, 229-32; 6 (1936-7), 

238-40; 7 (1938-9), 14-16, 43-7, 68-71, 107-9, 132-6, 174-5, 208-10, 230-2; 

8 (1940-1), 9-11, 53-6, 78-80, 115-16, 150-1, 160, 165-9, 191-3. 
Renshaw, Walter C. Notes from the Act Books of the Archdeaconry Court of Lewes, SAC 49 

(1906), 47-65. 
Rice, R. Garraway (transc and ed). The Parish Register ofHorsham in the County of Sussex, 

1541-1635. SRS, vol 21 (Lewes, 1915). 
Roberts, George. The Social History of the People of the Southern Counties of England (London, 

1556). 
Roskell, J.S., Linda Clark, and Carole Rawcliffe (eds). The House of Commons 1386-1421. 

The History of Parliament. 4 vols (Stroud, 1992). 
Salzman, L.F. (ed). The Town Book of Lewes 1542-1701. SRS, vol 48 (Lewes, [1947] for 

1945-6). 
Saul, Nigel. Scenes from Provincial Life: Knightly Families in Sussex 1280-1400 (Oxford, 

1986). 
Sayers, William. The Jongleur Taillefer at Hastings: Antecedents and Literary Fate, Viator 14 

(1983), 77-88. 
Searle, Eleanor. Lordship and Community: Battle Abbey and Its Banlieu 1066-1538 (Toronto, 

1974). 

Seward, Desmond. Sussex (London, 1995). 

Steer, F.W. Bishop Montague s Personal Accounts, 1636-8, SAC 95 (1957), 28-41. 
Swift, Eleanor. The Obedientiary Rolls of Battle Abbey, SAC 78 (1937), 37-62. 
Tinier, Robert (ed). Accounts of the Roberts Family ofBoarzell, Sussex c. 1568-1582. SRS, vol 71 

(Lewes, [1979] for 1977-9). 
The Victoria History of the Counties of England. History of the County of Sussex. Vol 1. William 

Page (ed) (1905; rpt Folkestone, 1973). Vol 2. William Page (ed) (1907; rpt Folkestone, 

1973). Vol 3. L.F. Salzman (ed) (1935; rpt Folkestone, 1973). Vol 4: The Rape of Chichester. 



SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 

LF. Salzman (ed) (1953; rpt Folkestone, 1973). Vol 5: Arundel Rape (South-Western Part) 

Including Arundel. T.R Hudson (ed) (London 1997). Vol 6: Bramber Rape. T.P. Hudson (ed). 

3 pts (London 1980-8). Vol 7: The Rape of Lewes. L.F. Salzman (ed) (1940; rpt Folkestone, 

1973). Vol 9: The Rape of Hasting. L.F. Salzman (ed) (1937; rpt Folkestone, 1973). 
Vidler, Leopold Amon. A New History of Rye (1934; rpt Rye, 1 971). 
Walcott, MacKenzie E.G. The Early Statutes of the Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity, 

Chichester, with Observations on Its Constitution and History. Archaeologia, vol 45 (London, 

1877). 
Whitley, Michell. The Churchwardens Accounts of St. Andrews and St. Michael s, Lewes, 

from 1522 to I601, i4c45 (1902), 40-61. 
- An Inventory of the Goods and Chattels of William Shelley of Michelgrove, 1585, SAC 55 

(1912), 284-98. 
Wido, Bishop of Amiens. The Carmen de Hastings prcelio of Guy, Bishop of Amiens. Catherine 

Morton and Hope Muntz (eds) (Oxford, 1972). 
Wilson, Jean. Entertainments for Elizabeth i (Woodbridge, 1980). 
Woodfill, Walter L. Musicians in English Society from Elizabeth to Charles i (Princeton, 1953; 

rpt 1969). 




Sussex, from John Speed, Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine (1611), reproduced by 
permission ofThe Huntington Library, San Marino, California. 




Chichcstcr, from John Speed, Theatre of the Emptre of Great Bn^ne (161 1), reproduced by 
perm,ssion of The Huntingron Library, San Marino, California. 





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Office. 




Rye in the sixteenth century. 



RECORDS OF EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA 



Symbols 



BL British Library ESRO East Sussex Record Office 

Bodl. Bodleian Library HL Huntington Library 

CKS Centre for Kentish Studies PRO Public Record Office 

DRO Dorset Record Office WSRO West Sussex Record Office 



A Antiquarian Compilation 

AC Antiquarian Collection 

DNB Dictionary of National Biography 

REED Records of Early English Drama 

SAC Sussex Archaeological Collections 

SRS Sussex Record Society 

STC A.W. Pollard and G.R. Redgrave (comps), Short-Title Catalogue ... 1475-1640 

VCH The Victoria History of the Counties of England 

Wing D.G. Wing (comp), Short-Title Catalogue . . . 1641-1700 

(after folio, page, membrane, or sheet number) see endnote 
(...) lost or illegible letters in the original 
[ ] cancellation in the original 
(blank) a blank in the original where writing would be expected 

matter in the original added in another hand 

text written above the line 
L j text written below the line 

A caret mark in the original 

ellipsis of original matter 
I change of folio, membrane, page, or sheet in continuous text 

right-hand marginale 
f marginale too long for the left-hand margin 



Diocese of Chichester 



1245-52 

Bishop Richard de Wyche s Statutes BodJ.: University College MS. 148 

p 189 col 1 

de ornam<?tis ecchuie. 5 

Ecclesie uero honeste cooperiantwr. calices & libri & owwia ornairuwa 
ecc/fj/astica sufficiewtia sim & honesta. & de bonis cUricorum decedewciuw 
secundum quod cmum fumt suppleantr nm in uita sua eccltsias ornauifrint 
cowzpetentfr. Cimitma claudantur. a parochianis quorum interest bene et 
honeste. & ad hoc arceantr si necce fuerit censura ecc^j/astica per loci 10 

capHlanuwz. Pretfrea prohibemus ne in cimittriis choree. ve\ turpes & 
inhonesti ludi qwi ad laciuiam inuitawt. agantr. & ne i&i tractentr cause 
s<fclares. nee mercztus. nee alibi dominicis diebus: nisi forte de uictualibwj 



15 

1289 

Chichester Cathedral Cartulary WSRO: Ep. vi/1/4 

( 188* (6 October) (Synodal statutes) 

20 

Constituc/oes sinodal domini Gilbeni Episcopi Cicestrearw 
Rectores eccliarw & alij quibw incuwbit regimen animarw plebes sib\ 
cowmissas exemp/o bone conumadowis. v^rbo exhortac/owis in fide recta & 
bonis moribztf diligent*r instruent & informent. Vt zutem libmwj & efficaciMj 

Collation with Henry Spelman, Concilia, Decreta, Leges, Constitutiones In Re 
Ecclesiarum Orbis Britannia (S), p 404: 21 Constituc/owes ... Cicestreruw] S 
adds lectz & publicatz in majori Ecclesia Cicestrensi, in festo Sancta Fidis Virginis, 
in Concilio Synodal! ibidem celebrate, prassidente dicto domino Gilberto Cicestrensi 
Episcopo, anno Domini MCCLxxxix. 

5/ dc ornamfntis ecclic: title written in red ink at right of text 



DIOCESE OF CHICHESTER 1289-1586 

.1. officiuw impleant exhortantis vniu^rsi znimzium curam h^entes ecclesiasticis 
officijs & alijs bonis studijs se ex^rceant/ oratioriibus &c lectiombus iugit^r & 
intendant. Sint pudici. virtutuw operac/one prrclari/ humilitate pmiiti. 
pacific! euang<rlizantes pacem annuwtiantes bona/ dissensiones. rixas rixas 
& scandala. resecantes ab illicit/ * spextacwlis se abstineant & prccipue a 
duellis & torneamentw luctis & alijs vbi sangwinis effusio pot<rit formidari. 
CTabfrnas 8c inhonesta couiuia now frequentent ex/ranearww fugiant 
cowsortia feminan/w & omnium ex quarww coh^^itac/owe sinistra suspicio 
potmt exoriri... 



10 



1292 

Chichester Cathedral Cartulary WSRO: Ep. vi/1/4 

f 265v (Bishop Gilbert ofSt Leofard s visitation articles) 

15 

C lt<?m. an ludi theatrales & inhonesti fiant in ecclia per vicar/ w & al/ w 
ecclwie mi/stros 



1586 20 

Bishop Thomas Bickley $ Visitation Articles src: 10179 
sig B2 

46. Whether they haunt ale houses, tauerns, Innes, or any suspected 
place, or vse any vnlawful gaiming as dauncing, carding, dicing, hawking 25 
and hunting. 



sig B3v 

30 

65. Whether any vitteler, vseth to receaue any minstrels, players at dice, 
tables, cardes, shouegrote, or vttereth any meat or drinke in time of deuine 
seruice, and sermons, or whether thee be any shewing of wares before 
morning prayer be done, in fayres and markets, also whether packemen or 
pedlers sell any kind of wares in the Churchyards. 35 



Collation continued: 1 exhortantis] exhortationis S 7 ex/ranearww] externarum S 

41 rixai rixas: dittography 331 thee: for there 

241 they: it, ministers 



DIOCESE OF CHICHESTER 1586-1609 

sig B4 



72. Whether any lords of Misrule, any Maygaimsters, Dauncers, Plaiers, 
or other disguised person doe daunce or play any vnseemely parte or once 
come into the church, churchyarde or chappel yard, also whether there be 
any common eating or drinking kept in Church or Churchyard. 



1600 

Bishop Anthony Watson s Visitation Articles src: 10180 10 

sig B3 

Of the Parishioners 

70 Whether the Parishioners and euery of them doe come dayly vpon the 
sundaies and holydaies to church, or kept open his shop, or done any worke 15 
vpon any such day, or vsed at any time to braule or fight in the Church or 
Churchyarde, or vse Maygames, Lords of Misrule, dauncing, on the Sabaoth 
day, or holy day in time of deuine seruice. 

71 Whether any that keepeth an Alehouse, Tauerne, or Inne or any other, 
suffereth any to daunce or play at any vnlawfull game, or vttereth any meate 20 
or drincke, in time of diuinc seruice, either of Sunday or holiday. 



1605 

Archbishop Richard Bancroft s Visitation Articles src: 10158 25 

sig B4v 

51 Item. Whether haue you or your predecessors Church-wardens there 
suffered since the last pardon, any plaies, feasts, banquets, Churche ales, 
drinkinges, or any odier prophane vsages to be kept in your church, chappell 30 
or church-yarde, or belles to be rung superstitiously vpon hollidayes or dales 
abrogated by Law. 



1609 35 

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes Visitation Articles src: 10181 
sig Bl 

47 Whether any Plaies, Feasts, Banquets, Suppers, Churchales, Drinkings, 
Temporal! Courts, or Leets, Lay luries, Musters, or any other prophane 40 

vsages haue bene kept in your Church, Chappel, or Churchyard. And 
whether any of your Parishioners haue behaued themselues rudely and 



DIOCESE OF CHICHESTER 1609-34 

disorderedly in the Church, in the time of Diuine Seruice or Sermon, or by 
vntimely ringing of Belles, walking, talking, or any disordered noyse hath 
hindered the Minister or Preacher. 



1631 

Bishop Richard Montague s Visitation Articles STC: 10182.5 

sig A4 

7 Whether is your Church-yard well mounded, and fenced, kept cleane 10 
without Nusance, or soyle cast in to it: is it incroached vpon, and by whom? 
doe any offensively keepe doores, outletts, or passages into your Church-yard: 
doe any vse to quarrell, fight, play, or make meetings, banquets, Church-ales 
there: doe any keepe Courts, Leetes, Lawdayes, Musters there: or otherwise 
vse it being a consecrated place, prophanely contrary to the 88. Canon? 15 



c 1633 

Archbishop William Laud s Visitation Articles STC: 10167 

sigs B2v-3 20 

Touching the Church-wardens and Side-men. 

WHedier you and die Church-wardens, Quest-men or Side-men from time 
to time, doe, and haue done dieir diligence, in not suffering any idle person to 
abide either in die Church-yard, or Church-porch, in Seruice or Sermon time, 25 
but causing them either to come into the Church to heare Diuine Seruice, or 
to depart, and not disturbe such as be hearers there? And whether diey haue, 
and you doe diligently see the parishioners duely resort to die Church euery 
Sunday and Holiday and there to remaine during Diuine Seruice and Sermon? 
And whether you or your predecessors, Church-wardens there, suffer any 30 
Playes, Feasts, Drinkings, or any other profane vsages, to be kept in your 
Church, Chappell, or Church-yards, or haue suffered to your and their 
vttermost power and endeauour, any person or persons to be drin-lking in 
any Inne or Victualling house in your Parish, during the time of the Diuine 
Seruice or Sermon, on Sundayes and Holydayes? 35 



1634 

Bishop Richard Montague s Visitation Articles STC: 10183 

sig A4 -to 

7 Whether is your Church-yard well mounded, and fenced, kept cleane 



DIOCESE OP CH1CHESTER 1634-8 

without Nusance, or soyle cast into it: is it incroached vpon, and by whom? 
doe any offensively keepe doores, outlets, or passages into your Church-yard: 
doe any vse to quarrell, fight, play, or make meetings, banquets, Church-ales 
there: doe any ke"epe Courts, Le"etes, Law-dayes, Faires, or Musters there: 
or otherwise vse it being a consecrated place, prophanely contrary to the 
88. Canon? 



Prophanation 
of Churches. 



Archdeacon Roger Andrewes Visitation Articles src: 10185.5 
sig A2 



10 



7 Item, Whether haue you in your Church or Chappell, or Church, or 
Chappell-yard, any Plaies, Feasts, Banquets, Suppers, Church-ales, Drinkings, 
Temporall Courts, or Leets, Lay-iuries, Musters, or any other prophane vsage, 
and who are the offenders, or by whom are such abuses suffered? 15 



Prophanation 
of Churches 



1635 

Archdeacon Laurence Pay s Visitation Articles src: 10186 

sig A2 

7 Item, Whether have you in your Church or Chappell, or Church-yard 
any Plaies, Feasts, Banquets, Suppers, Church-ales, Drinkings, Temporall 
Courts, or Leets, Layiuries, Musters, or any other prophane usage, and who 
are the offenders, or by whom such abuses are suffered? 



20 



1638 

Bishop Brian Duppa s Visitation Articles src: 10185 

sig A2v 

1 1 Haue there beene kept in the Church, Chappell, or Church-yard, any 
Playes, Feasts, Suppers, Church-ales, temporal! Courts, or Leet Lay Juries, 
Musters, meeting for rates, taxations, leuies, especially at the Communion 
Table by the Parishoners? 



30 



35 



Archdeacon Laurence Pay s Visitation Articles src: 10187 
sig A2v 

10 Have there be"en kept in your Church, Chappell, or Church-yard, any 
playes, feasts, banquets, suppers, church-ales, drinkings, temporall courts or 



40 



DIOCESE OF CHICHESTER 1638-40 

Le"ets, Lay luries, Musters, or any other such prophane usage? 



1640 

Archdeacon James Marsh s Visitation Articles STC: 10188 5 

sig A2v 

1 1 . Haue there beene kept in the Church or Chappell, or Church-yard, any 
Playes, Feastes, Suppers, Church ales, temporall Courte, or Leet Lay, luries, 
Musters meeting for rates, taxations, levies, especially at the Communion 10 
Table by the Parishioners? 



Boroughs and Parishes 



ASHURST 

1603 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. i/ 17/11 

f 17v* (3 December) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Henry 
Blaxton, STP, surrogate judge, in the presence of Christopher Theker, notary public 

William Tichener we present William Tichenor for playinge vpon his fidle 10 
pipe or tab[l]er in the time of eueninge prayer vpon the sundaye Quo die 
comptfruit Thomas wadye l/ttrratus et fidem fecit se diligenter quesitus fuit 
dictum Tichenor xxix die Novembris 1603 ad compflrendum isto die &c 
qo die facta pr;on/ z^c/owe pro dicto Tichener dominus decreuit citandww 
fore vijs et modw in pro\imum 15 



BEXHILL 

1593 20 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/7 
f 27v (6 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of Brighton before Robert 
Evans, cleric, in the presence of Stephen StapU, notary public and registrar 2 5 

Officiuwz domini contra Thomaw Goldinge de Hastinge 

detectttw for playinge w/th his fiddle in die Churcheyard of Bexhill tempore 

divinoruw Comparuit dicius Goldinge qui fassus est detect/ow<rw2 et submisit se 

12/ linatus: s written over m 12/ se diligenter quesitus fuit: for se diligenter quesiuisse 



10 



BEXHILL 1593 / BILLINGSHURST 1599-1601 

&c vnde dominus ei iniuwxit ad agnoscendaw culpam coraw vicario et 
gardianis de Bexhill predicta iuxta schedukm, et ad Certificandum in proximo 



12 d. 



Rudgewykd 
12 d. 



BILLINGSHURST 

1599 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/9 

f I63v (31 March) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Richard Kitson, STB, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

Anthowy HaJer personaUter for keping & suffering disorder in his house ye 
18 th day of february Being saboth Day tempore diumorttw as daunsing & 
such like & absent from Church him self quo die comparuj t & obzVcto 
arf/Vttlo fatetwr vnde dominus iniunxit ei ad p^ragendw penitenciam in 
ecclia paroc\\iali predicta die dominicz proxima ad septimanzm [& ac] 
prout h^^ebit in script/V & ad ceruficandum in proximo post 



f 164* 

\ohannes Booker [fo] a mynstrell for plaing A on his instrument 1 and kepinge 
of companye from Churche daunceing on the sabodi daye in ryme of devine 
prayer quo die comp<znm & ob/>rto arrtrwlo fatetwr vnde dominus monuh 
euw ad peragendw penitencum in ecclia parochiali de Billingshurste die 
dominicz proxima ad septimanzm prout h^^ebit in scriptw & ad cenificandum 
in proximo post 



10 



20 



25 



30 



[Rudgeweekc] 
Wis borough 
grene./ 



1601 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. i/ 17/10 

ff 100-lOOv* (26 September) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Richard Kitson, STB, surrogate judge of the vicar general, in the presence of 
Richard Juxon, notary public and deputy registrar 

Edwardus Vpchurche et Richardus Sendall 

quesit/ for playinge vpon theire Instruments and a greate multitude 

daunceinge in and at the house of Richard Stayneinge of Billingshurste 



40 



BILLINGSHURST 1601 / BOLNEY 1608 

Inkeeper vpon Midsomer daye beinge hollidaye prout in billa [qo] 

Billmgshurste/ Brigitta lupe v\or Richardi lupe et Ricruzn/us lupe Junior filius dicti 
Richardi senioris 

fFor daunceinge vpon Midsomer daye beinge Hallidaye in time of devine 
prayer 



WilWmus Hunt vnus 
fFor sufferinge the parties aboue named to daunce in time of devine prayer as 
we suppose, for in the time of devine prayer he came from them to churche 10 
& after prayer ended returned back againe where they weare prout in billa 

"Rich/zr^us lupe & dictus hunte did vtter diume slaunderouse speaches 
agaynst mr hilton vicar of Billingshurste vnde dominus monw/t eos ad 
pr<?ponend#w in forma in proximo/ I 15 

Richarde Staneinge personaliter fFor sufferinge the forenamed abuses in his 
howse & beinge reproved for the same disorder by the Churchewardens 
answeared that Edwarde Darkenoll of the same parishe woulde beare him 
out in yt qwo die dominus continuauit ceruficarium in proximum" 20 

Edwarde Darkenoll for revyleinge or minister in the open streete prout in 
billa "quo die vt supra" 

BIRDHAM 

1573 

Arc hdeaf onry of Chichester Register of Presentments WSRO: Ep. 1/23/2 

f2v* (June) 30 

Nicho/aus warner [is] dothe kepe daunsinge in his house in service tyme/ 
16 quo die comp^r/t warner quem dom/ns ex certis causis animuw suuw 
mo\entibus demisit &c./ 

BOLNEY 

1608 

Bill of Complaint in Wilkinson and Langford v. Pellatt et al 

PRO: STAC 8/294/23 40 

sheet 2* 

...But that the said Sir Beniamin and his said wife and his said other 



12 BOLNEY 1608 



confederate afore named not willing to lett passe the last tyme or oportunitie 
of there execucon of full revenge and malice against your said poore Subiecte 
They the said SIT Beniamin Alice his said wife Edward Pellat and all the rest 
of the Confederates aforenamed w/th others forthwith repayered and came to 
your said Subiect dwelling house beinge the vicaredge of Boulney aforesayed 5 
and then and there verrie rioutouse and vnlawfully w/thout the presence or 
companye of any Cunstable or lawfull officer whatsoever or any lawfull 
warrant or aurJioritie at all soe to doe entred into your said Subiect dwellinge 
house and there finding your said Subiect quietly in god peace A r & your 
ma/etyes 1 [and your Subiect] (being at his booke) they the said Sir Beniamin 10 
Alice his wife Edward Pellatt and the rest of there confederate aforenamed 
then and there verie riotouslye [roatusly] ^outouslye 1 and vnlaV fully being 
o[f] all of them vnlawfully armed weaponed A r and prepared w/th great fforce 
& violence assaulted your sayed subiect and haled 1 and pulled him out of his 
study or chamber in the said vicaredge house and also caused the como 15 
Stocks of Boulney aforesayed to be brought in to the paVlor of the said 
Vicaredge house and [that] A then and there putt and sett your said Subiect 
in the same stocks by the heales and brought his bed out of his chamber and 
laid yt neare the same stockej for your said Subiect to lye vppon and then and 
there the said Confederates leaped and danced about your said Subiect all the 20 
night after and then and there caused him your said Subiect to be garded and 
kepte from slapinge by such terrible noice shoutes and out cries as was 
intollorable and fearefull to be [heared] r heard^ or to behould the wA/ch said 
Confederate all the night longe fell to [dancinge and tramplinge] r drinkinge 
and tiplynge in barbarous manor and made themselves drunke w/th beare 25 
wA/ch was sent them from the house of the said Sir Beniamin and from die 
alehouse w/th mony geiven them by the said Sir Beniamin . . . And moreover 
the said Sir Beniamyn for further vexac/on trouble and Causles molestac/on of 
yor said subiect Samuell Wilkinson and to bringe him into publike disgrace 
in this most honowrable Courte Thereby intendinge not only to cause and 30 
procure him to be Committed to yor prison of [fflytte] A r ffleete 1 for 
supposed contemptes and misbehauinge himselfe shortly after presses out of 
this most honourable Courte served vppon him yowr said subiect at the suite 
of the said Sir Beniamyn but also to [schandelixe] scandalize 1 and lay a tainte 
vppon his Ministerial! Callinge suborned caused and procured the said lohn 35 
Lawrance and Richard Mower to comme into this most honourable Courte of 
Starr Chamber the Twenteth day of Aprill now last past and then and there 
to take there corporall othes before william Mills Esquire then and yet Clerke 
of yowr majesties Councell of the said Courte that an affidauit or othe 
formerly procured by the said Sir Beniamyn to be made and sett downe in 40 



21 execucon.- y&rexecuc/on; abbreviation mark mining 
13/ off J: cancellation incomplete 



BOLNEY 1608/BOSHAM 1598/9 



writinge [as] r w^ true which said Lawrance and mower by the subornac/ on 
and procurenwzt aforesaid vpon the said Twenteth day of Aprill last past did 
come before the said William Mills Esquire and weare then and there duely 
and lawfully sworne vppon die holy Evangelist diat which they had caused to 
be sett downe in writinge was true in which Affidauit they the said Lawrance 5 
and Mower amongest other thinges haue deposed and sworn that shortly after 
yowr said subiect Samuell wilkinson was searved with your Majesties presses of 
suppena out of this most honowrable Courte at the suite of the said Sir 
Beniamyn viz. on Sunday beinge the Tenth day of Aprill nowe last past 
certeine fidlers and a multitude of people beinge assembled in a Close 10 
adioyninge to the Churchyarde of Bolny aforesaid in the said open assembly 
he yowr said subiect Samuell Wilkinson went to the Alehouse there and drue 
the Alewiffe of the parish out of her house and A in his ioylitie oftentimes 
skippinge and turninge about with her with loude voyce in contemptuous 
and ridiculous manner Cryde hey hey for the Starr chamber hey hey for die 15 
Star chamber as in and by the said affidauit remaininge of record in this 
honowrable Courte more fully and at large it doth and may appere in & 
by which said affidauit they the said Lawrance and Mower haue committed 
willfull wicked and corrupt p<?riurie by the vnlawfull subornac/on and 
procurement aforesaid for yowr said humble subiect saith that he did never 20 
drawe out die said Alewiffe out of her house and in his ioyllitie oftentimes or 
at all skip & turne about with her or with loude voice in contemptuous and 
ridiculous manner Cry hey hey for the Starrchamber hey hey for the Star 
Chamber as in and by the said Affidauit they the said Lawrance and Mower 
haue most vntruly falsly wickedly and corruptly deposed. . . 25 



BOSHAM 

1598/9 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detec t ion Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/9 30 

f 157v* (3 March) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Richard Kitson, STB, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 



william Hildroppe Richard wouldridge 

gudiani pdTsorfl//<rr quoad ffreland et ad Cfrtificandum quoad the lord of 
misrule & the daunsing/ qwo die comparuit A ^olridge 1 & ex cents ca.ris 
dominus euwz mowwzt ad inquirendww qwoad arfrVwlos predictos citra 
proximum et ad tune ad comparendum ad zudiendum voluntatem domini/ 
& qwoad hildropp [prec] dominus continuauit cenificarium in proximum 



35 



40 



14 CHICHESTER 1493-1 $19 

CHICHESTER 



1493 

Will of John Shamler, Musician WSRO: Ep. ni/4/1 

f[55A]* (17 August; proved 4 October) 5 

In del nomine Amen xvij die mensis August! anno domini Miliesimo 
CCCC XC iij Ego lohannes shamler Compos mentw & sane memorie 
laudetwr dew* condo testamentum in hunc moduw ... Item volo quod 
Magister meus precentor ecclwie caihedralis predicts ha^eat meuw 10 

calamoduw cum scriptw hernisatww . . . hem lego domino wilWmo lane 
omnia Instrumenta mea.. 



1517-18 , 5 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 
ff 7-7v* (Allowances and payments) 

...Et soIutM/w Mimis Thome Comitw arundell per annum iij s. iiij d. Et 
in vino daw eisd^m xxj d. Et solutww Mimis d0wmi Regw hoc awo vj s. 20 
viij d. Et in vino daw eisdem xv d. Et solutwwz lusoribw Thome Comitw 
arundell per annum iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisdfm xvj d. . .. Et solutw 
Mimis Thome Comitw arundell iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisde m viij d. 
Et solutuw Mimis Thowe Comitn Arundell xx d. Et in vino viij d. Et 
solutHW in seruicio & Candel/V lusor domine Sarisbfrie hoc anno iiij d. I 25 
Et in regards dato Ricardo adams bereward xvj d. Et in vino x d. Et 
solutww Magistro Brandon logeler ij s. . .. Et solutw/w Mimis Thome Comitw 
arundell iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw viij d 

30 

1518-19 

St Georges Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 14 (Allowances and payments) 

...Et solutw Mimis Thome Comitw arundell hoc awwo iij s. iiij d. Et 35 

in vino daw eiusdfm xiij d. Et solutw Mimis domini nostri Reg/V per 
annum vj s. viij d. Et in vino daw eisdem ij s. Et solutr/wj lusoribw 
Thome Comitn arundell per annum iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisdem 
vj d.... 



271 brandon: 3 minims in/us 36/ ciusdnn: for cisdcm 



CHICHESTER 1518-21 
f 14V* 

. . .Et solutww le bereward domini Regis iij s. Et in vino daw eisdem xiiij d. . 
Et solutum le luggeler domini nostr i Regis iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisdrni 
xiiij d. . . . Et solutw s^ruient i Thome Comin s arundell vocato le dawnsyng 
boy hoc anno xx d. Et solutw le berewardw domine Mark hoc awwo xxj d. 
Et in vino daw eisdn xvj d.... Et solutw WilWmo More Mimis domini 
Regis xx d. Et in vino daw le bereward domine Northumbnr/aW x d. . .. 

10 

1519-20 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 23 (Allowances and payments) 

...Et solutttw Mimis dow; ni Regw hoc anno vj s. viij d. Et in vino daw 15 
eiusd^m xviij d. Et solutwm Mimis Thome Comitw arundell iij s. iiij d. 
Et in vino daw eisdem xij d. Et solutww lusoribw Thome Comitw arundell 
iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisdn [xij d.] xix d. ob. ... 

ff 23 v- 4 20 

...Et solutw/w le bereward d<wz/ne de Suthfeld xvj d. Et solutww le logeler 

domini Regw iij s. iiij d. Et in vino vj d Et solutww in regards le bereward 

Comitw kancz i? xvj d. Et solutww Mimis domine Matervers iij s. iiij d. Et in 
vino daw eisd^m xiiij d Et solutz Mimis Thome Comitw arundell xx d. 25 
Et in vino daw [es] eisdem vij d Et solutww in regards daw le berewardw 
domini Regis iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisd^m xij d. I Et solutw Mimis per 
mandatw/w maiom tempore Session/* xij d. Et solutww Mimis per mandatw 
maiorw viij d 

30 

1520-1 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

ff 3 1 - 1 v (Allowances and payments) 

35 

...Et solutttw Mimis domini Regis hoc anno vj s. viij d. Et in vino daw 
eisd^m ij s. I Et solutw Mimis Thome Comitw Arundell hoc Anno iij s. 
iiij d. Et in vino daw eisde m xx d. Et solutw A ^usoribw/ 1 Thome Comitw 
arundell hoc anno iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eiusdfm xv d Et solut#w 



4/ eisckm: for eidem (f) 221 Suthfeld: for Suthfolk (>) 

161 eiusdrm: for eisdem 39/ eiusd^m: for eisdem 



16 CHICHESTER 1520-3 



lusoribtt.f Thome Comitw arundell [apwd] in domo lohanms Mathewe iij s. 
iiij d. Et in vino iiij d. Et solutww Mimis Thome Comim arundell vocatis 
Troppatt iij s. iiij d. Et solutwm le logeler domini Regw hoc awo iij s. iiij d. 
Et in vino daw ei ij s. vj d 



1521-2 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 38v (Allowances and payments) 

10 

...Et solutww Mimis domini Regw hoc anno vj s. viij d. Et in vino dato 
eisdrni hoc anno xiiij d. Et solutww Mimis Thome Comitw arundell hoc 
anno iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisdmi xvj d. Et solutw lusorib.s Thome 
Comitw arundell hoc anno iij s. iiij d. Et in vino dato eisdrni (blank) . . . Et 
solut#w le logeler domini Regw hoc anno iij s. iiij d. Et in vino daw eisdfm 15 

xij d Et solutwm Trompattw Thome Comit/V arundell iij s. iiij d. Et in 

vino daw eisdrni ij s. iiij d. 

f 39 

20 

...Et solutwm le bereward domme de Suthfolgf xx d. Et in vino dato 
eisd^m xvj d. Et solutw le berewardw Domini nostri Regw cum expensis pro 
vino v s. Et solutwrn Mimis [dormni] Thome Comitw arundell iij s. iiij d. 
Et in vino daw eisd<?m [xiiij d.] ij s 

25 

1522-3 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 43 (Allowances and payments) 

30 

...Et solutwm j luson Domini Comius arundell hoc anwo iij s. iiij d. Et 
solutww le Trumpeters dicti domini Comit;V hoc awwo iij s. iiij d. Et in 
vino dato eisd^m xx d.. 



f 43v 

. . .Et solutww le Berwardw dow;ni de Suffolk xvj d. Et in vino daw eisdirm 

xviij d Et solut/w le logeler domini Regw iij s. iiij d Et solutww Mimis 

do/mni Comitw arundell iij s. iiij d. Et in vino dato eisd^m v d Et 

3/ Troppattn; for Trompattes, abbreviation mark missing 1 5/ eisdmi: for eidem (f) 



35 



CHICHESTER 1522-44 

solutww Mimis domini Comitw Arundell xvj d. . .. Et solutw Mimis domini 
Regw vj s. viij d 



1532-3 

Cathedral Communars Accounts WSRO: Cap. i/23/l 

f 71v* (Rewards) 

Item delyu^rd to the lcyng mynstrellw vj s. viij d. 

10 

1534-5 

Cathedral Communars Accounts WSRO: Cap. i/23/l 

f 83v* (Rewards) 

15 

Item to be kyng mynsterlkr vj s. viij d. 



1536-7 

Cathedral Communars Accounts WSRO: Cap. i/23/l 20 

f 97* (Necessary expenses) 

Apon be . . .Item to pe kyng mynstrell vj s. viij d 

church 

25 

1543-4 

Cathedral Communars Accounts WSRO: Cap. 1/23/2 

f 63v (Necessary expenses) 

In primis solui Mimis domim Comitw Arundellie in hebdomade 30 

Natalis domini hue advenietibw* vt solent r in regardo ill;/ xx d. 



f 64 

35 

Item solui 2 die lulij Mimis & histrionibw domini 

priwcipis [hoc] hue advenientibus xx d. 

30-17 hebdomade Naulis domini: 25 December -1 January 



18 CHICHESTER 1543-86/7 



St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/2 
mb 4* (Various charges and payments) 

Et Solutww in Regards ad loculator Ducts Suffokie & pro 

[g] candelw tuwc ij s x j. 5 

Et Mimis Comit/j Arundel ac ad vnuw loculatorew infra et 

extra le hape et pro pan<r & vino apwd Mr Molens vij s. 

Et Solutww le berwardw dow/ni Regw ad Mandatww Maiorw iij s. x d. 
Et Solutww Mimis in Regards Daw Domini Wriothisheye iij s. iiij d. 10 

Et Solutww eod^m tempore pro pan? & vino eis datw xii d. 

Et Solutww in die sancti georg// ad le princ berward xij d. 

Et Solutww loculator le prince ad Mandatww Maiorw in 15 

le Counsell howse iij s . iiij d. 

Et Solutww pro candelw eod^m tempor^ iij d. 



1586/7 20 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/6 



f 79v 

Proceedings of the court held, in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Anthony Skinner, judge 25 

Esrwyttmnge Mr H. weston iiij to die Marcij 1586. comp^ruit & obwrto ei aiticulo that he 
18 d. played at tables all night in an Inne in the Cyttye of Chechester publicqlye 

12 d. to the [offence of] slander of his function aJlegauit that he was sent for by 

vertue of a Cowmissyon from my Lor^Admyrall to be examyned aboute 30 
cmen [man] marine causes the A xxx c ^ [last] daye of december last and 
beinge in the towne somwhate late so that [yow] he coulde A ^ot 1 be 
dispatched to returne home agayne the same night he went ft ^o 1 the signe 
of the swanne for lodginge where being on the nexte daye in the morninge 
aboute eight of the clocke he played at the tables with the goodman of the 35 
house [when] A And he had not played aboue iij howers space but that one 
wyll/tf m A r Brunne ] who then played the p<me of a lorde of [myst] mysrule 
came in where thys examynate was at playe and sayde that that game was no 
Cristmas game & so perfore toke this examynate from thence & made hym 
ryde one a staffe to the highe Crosse 40 

39/ ptrfote: for perforce 



CHICH ESTER 1600-16/17 

1600 

Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar WSRO: Ep. in/4/5 

f 137v* (7 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Richard Kitson, STB, surrogate judge of Anthony Blincow, LLD, vicar general, in 
the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public and deputy registrar 

StPanchras dauid Bulke for daunsinge on sonday the vj th of July in tyme of eveninge 

prayer pronunciatur contumax pena in huwc diem/ 

lohn ffussell pro constmili pronunciatur contumax pena vt supra 



19 



10 



St Panchras 

iecepn4 d./4 d 
4 d./recffti 



1608/9 

Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar 

f 79v (23 March) 



WSRO: Ep. ni/4/7 



Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Hugh Barker, LLD, commissary, in the presence of George Stent, notary public 



15 



20 



Thomas Selden persona\iter citatj for fidlinge and playinge at Thomas 
Grigg house the xij 1 ^ of rTebrM^ry last in time of eveninge prayer prout in 
billtf quo die comparuit et obiecto art/ rulo fatetur that he did play there the 
said day but not in prayer time vnde dominus cum monic/one eum [al] pro 25 
hac vice dimisit 



f 80 

St Andrewes lohn Rose personsliter citatw for daunsinge at Thomas Grigg the 12 th of 
ffebruary last in time of eveninge prayer qz/o die comp^r/t et ob/Vrto 
ar^/Vwlo [lo] negauit virtute iuramenti per eum prestiti vnde dominus cum 
monic/ owe eum dimisit/ 



30 



35 



1616/17 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/16 

part iii, f 8 (8 February) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 



40 



20 



CHICHESTER 1616/17-20 



Subdeanry 



Subdeanrv 



John Craddock, LLD, surrogate judge and commissary, in the presence of John 
Swayne, notary public 

Otho Paullwheele quesitw* xxj die mensis lanuarij \\iimi preterit! pro causa 
sequent vizt. for not comeinge to his parishe Church to devine service and 
and as we haue heard is a very seditious papist and teacheth musicke at 
gentlemens howses Quo die introducto decreto vijs et modis al/<zs in hoc 
pane emanato loh^wnes Buttler \\tteratus fecit fidem &c se vj die mensis 
ffebruarij pred/cfz d/crum Otho Paullwheeler infra parochiam Subdecanatus 
alias Sancii Petri maioris infra Civitatem Cicestreruw predictam vbi habitavit 
et habitat ac moram facere consueu/t ad effectuw euw pfrsonal/ter citandww 
iuxta tenorem mandati iam introducti diligenter quesivisse Et quia ita 
latitavit quominus pfrsonali Citaczone apprehendi potuit ideo eundem 
Otho Paullwheele dicto die per affixionem mandati predict! in ostio solite 
habitac/onis eiusdem Paulwheele infra parochiam predictam iuxta vim 
formam et tenorem eiusdem mandati atq^ ad effectuw in eodem expressuw 
peremptorie Citasse deinde facta trina preconizaaoe pro dicto Otho 
Paullwheele ac nullo modo saltern legitime comparente sed contumaciter sese 
absentante dominus pronuwciavit euw contumacem ac in penam contumacie 
sue \\uiusmodi cum excommunicavit provt in schedula lusticia id poscentel 



Proceedings of the court held before William Cox, cleric, surrogate judge of 
Hugh Barker, LLD, commissary of William Thome, dean, in the presence of 
John Swayne, notary public 

Edwardus Southcott/ 

stat detectus pro causa sequent vizt. vpon a fame that vpon Assention day 
last past he and others did worke in tyme of divine servis in settinge vp a 
may pole Quo die comp^ruit pfrsonal/ter dictus Edwardus Southcott 
voluntarie et non citatus et dixit domino ludicanti that he hath heard that he 
is presented in forme aforesayd et allegavit that he did not him selfe labour 



20 



(blank) Paullwheele vxor dicti Otho Paullwheele pmonal//vr citaw &c pro 
causa, sequen/v vizt. for not comeinge to her p^rishe Church <...)eare divine 

( )ce and for teachinge of musicke at (...Memens (..>wses Oon co(...}ente 

pranunciatur (...) in (...) diem Quo die (...) 25 

1620 

Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar WSRO: Ep. ni/4/10 

f 86v (20 October) 



30 



35 



40 



5-6/ and and: dittography 



36-71 Aisention day last past: 25 May 1620 



CHICHESTER 1620-3 

[in] nor worke in settinge vpp the sayd maypole but he confesseth that in 
the morninge he did looke on et allegavit that the sayd maypole yf yt had 
not bin broken in the ioysinge had bin vpp earely before any prayers and 
was intended soe to haue bin et dixit that sixe a [be] clocke service began 
when yt was allmoste and yt should haue bin giuen of much cost and 
trouble had bin lost and daynger of breakeinge or fallinge whereby much 
hurte mighte haue bin done was lykely to haue insued/ et allegavit that 
afterwardes the pole was sett vpp he was at morninge quier service at nyne 
of the Clocke in the high Church and at sermon at Tenn quare \\um\\iter 
petijt pro hac vice dimitti et promisit that howsoever heareafter he will not 
vppon any occation in the lyke case giue the leaste cause of offence vnde 
dominus eum pro hac vice cum monic/one tantum dimisit 



21 



10 



AJI Saynts/ 
vijs ct modis/ 
emanaitit 

vijs et modis/ 
proximum 



1623 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring is 

WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13 
f 36* (24 May) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 20 
John Craddock, LLD, surrogate judge and commissary 

Thomas Huggens iun/or quesitz^ per lotiannem Butler literatuw decimo 
septimo die Maij pro causa sequent "vizt. for dauncinge on the sabboth day 
beinge the vj^ day of October all eve A n inge prayere tyme" 25 



Page quesitz p<r eundem eodem die pro causa, [sequen//] predicta 
"Quo die comp^ruit personaliter dictus Page et obiecto ei Articu\o predicto 
negavit tundem esse verum/ vnde dominus monuit euw ad interessedzwz in 
proximo ad videndww vlteriorew processuw &c et decrevit g&rdianos citandor 
fore ad tune interessendw/ 



30 



f 41* (21 June) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
William Cox, cleric, surrogate judge 



8-12/ morninge ... dimisit: written vertically in left margin and marked for insertion here 



22 



CHICHESTER 1623 /COCKING 1616/17 



All Sayntes/ 
luntinud/ur 
proximum 



wollavington 
viij d ttcefti 
quindenam 



Thomas Huggens p<rrsonal/ter citato dicto die per dictum Butler pro causa 
sequenfi vizt. for dauncinge on the Sabboth Day &c. 

Thomas Selden personaliter citatw; eode/w die pro causa sequent vizt. for 
fidlinge the same day/ Quo die comp^ruit p?rsonalj><rr dictus Selden quem 5 
d<?w/nus monuit ad interessendww in proximum/ 

COCKING 



1616/17 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/17 

flF 107v-8* (25 January) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
John Craddock, LLD, surrogate judge and commissary 

Johannes loye gardwj ibidem persona\itet citatus per lohannem Stent 
1/rtrratum xxj die mensis lanuarij predicti ad comp^rendww istis die hora 
& loco pro causa sequent vizt. for that he with his wyfe and Children vpon 
Trinitie sonday last past did [before] empty a kill of pottes, and did lade 
A them into a Carte in the morninge before service [beinge] began, and 
moreover in ryme of divine service at our Church his sayde Children with 
divers other youthes of our p^rishe made them selues ready in a morrice 
daunce and a hobby horse, and a mayde marryan and went 4 or myles to 
Cockeinge to daunce the morrice and the sayde lohn loye Churchwarden, 
and his eldest daughter went after the sayde youthes the same daye to 
Cockinge wheare they spent all that whole sabboth, Item vpon sondaye the 
xj 1 * 1 day of August last past the sayde lohn loy with his Children in the 
morninge before divine service did make a fyre full in the Church waye, 
and printed his sheepe with a printinge iron, Item vpon sondaye the xxijth 
of September last past the sayde lohn loye and his wyfe in tyme of divine 
service did ryde from [in] home when all the neighboures were goeinge to 
Church at morninge prayer tyme vpon sonday the vjth day of October last 
past beinge the very morrowe after my lord Bishopp his visitac/on the sayde 
lohn loye and his wyfe did ryde forth to bargayne for a yoake of Oxen as yt 
is reported, and weare not Church that whole sabboth, Item vpon divers 
other sabboth dayes in the very tyme of divine service ye [he] sayde John 
loye and his Children haue bin dringe and turninge theire pottes, and hath 
bin comonly scene of many of the neighbors of the p^rishe Quo die 
comparuit personal/ffr dzcrus loye et obiVctis ei ArttVwIis predi tfu fatetur 



10 



15 



20 



25 



30 



40 



17m/ wollavington: East Lavtngton 

20/ Trinitie sonday last past 26 May 1616 



36/ not: for not at 



COCKING 1616/17 

that vpon Trinitie sonday he A r and his wyfe 1 did in regarde he was to 
goe to a fayre far of very erley the monday morninge lode his pottes 
into his Carte et fatetur that he was absent from his p^rishe Church of 
woollavington that sabboth day when the morrice was vt supra but not 
with standinge he was at service at Cockeinge vt allegauit et fatetur that he 
did with his wyfe ryde forth as is presented but yt was to a freindes howse, 
and not to buy oxen as is printed et quoad cetera negavit vnde dominus ei 
iniunxit ad confitendz<w culpam suam predictam pro confessis in eccWia 
parochiali de woollavington predicta die dominica proxima ad septimanrfw 
tempore precum matutinaruw ibu&m coram mimstro gardianis et tota 10 
congregac/one et ad certificandww proximum diem Iuridicw ex tune 
I 



wollavington I. (blank) loye vxor dicti lohannnis loye personditer citaw die predicto ad 
viij d. ifctfti comparendum vt supra pro causa predicta I 

Maria loye personaliter citatrf vt supra pro causa predicta for goeinge with 
the morrice &c vt supra/ 

loriannes loye et Richardus loye persona\iter citat/ &c pro causa predicta 20 
vizt. for goeinge in the morrice vt supra/ 

Wilk/mus Coles Thomas Brookes et lohannes Philpes personal ter citat/ vt 
supra pro causa predicta vizt. for goeinge in the morrice &c vt supra 

25 



f 109v (1 February) 



viij d. Johannes loye 

viij d. will^/mus Coles 



recepti \ " ~ 

viij d. Thomas Brookes 

viij d. Johannes Philpes 

nil/ maria loye 

wollavington persor\a.\iter citat/ &c ad comp^rendww &c pro causa, sequenr/ vizt. for 

makeinge them selues ready in tyme of divine service for a morrice daunce 35 
with a mayde marrian and a hobby horse vpon the sabboth daye/ and soe 

sol. p. went 4 or myles vizt. to Cockeinge to daunce the morrice/ and lost both 

morninge and eueninge prayer vt dicitur Quo die comprfruerunt personaliter 
dicti lohannes loye wilWmus Coles Thomas Brooke et Johannes Philpes et 
obiecto eis Ar//Vwlo predicto fatentur vnde dominus eis ownibus et singulis 40 
iniunxit ad confitendz<w eoruw culpam predictam coram miw/stro et gardwww 

39/ : added later m space between Brooke and lohannes 



24 COCKING 1616/17 / FELPHAM 1609 

et inquisitoribus eras post preces vesprrtinas in cancello ecclie \\>idem et ad 
certificandww in proximo deinde dominus ex gratia quia ei intimatuw fuit 
[fuit] dictum mariaw loye hoc tempore egrotasse Itaqod [ht] iam sine 
pmculo ad hoc tribunals accedere [neq] potest A f eanV dimisit donee &c/ 



EASTERGATE 

1623 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments WSRO: Ep. 1/23/8 10 

f 26v* 

I lohn Thome one of ye Churchwardens of Eastergate doe hereby present 
Thomas Caplin one of ye sidemen of Eastergate aforesaid & v/il/iam ffarr 
his manservant That whereas there [had] was [an] a peece of timber which 15 
formerly had bene a may pole, bought for iiij s. by the Consent of the 
whole parishe to make a ladder for the vse of ye Church they the said 
Thomas Caplin & William ffarr assisted as I suppose by some others whose 
names I know not came in ye night tyme & cut the said tymber in peeces 
& Carryed away pan thereof so yat the remaynder thereof Could not serue 20 
for ye making of a ladder for the Church as it was appointed nor for any 
other good vse [abut] about ye Church 



FELPHAM 



25 



1609 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/13 

f 8v (7 October) 

30 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
John Drury, LLD, surrogate judge and vicar general, in the presence of George 
Stent, notary public 

8 d. lohannes Grey persona\iter citato eodem die for lettinge minstrell to play 35 
on the saboth daie in eveninge prayer tyme in his barne qo die comparuit 
et ob;>cto arfrVulo fatetur vnde dominus iniuwxit ei ad p^ragendww 
penitencizm publicam die dow/nica proxima ad septimanzm in eccl^ia 
CatlWra/i Cichestrensis tempore Cowwwwionis linthiamine induito pr0ut 
habebit in scriptis et ad certificandww in proximo post. -so 



35/ eodem die: 4 October 



FOLKINGTON 1 58 1 / FUNTINGTON 1602-28 

FOLKINGTON 

1581 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/2 
f 38v* (14 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in St Michael s Church, Lewes, before Giles 
Fletcher, official* in the presence of Hugh Treves, notary public 

Robte Brycher presented for playinge vpon his instrym^ntw on Sonday in 10 
the Service tyme comparuit dictus Brycher quem dominus assignauit ad 
purgandww se quarta manu in proximum 

FUNTINGTON 

1602 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/10 

f 163v (26 June) 

20 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Richard Kitson, surrogate judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

Edwardus Lucas personaliter vpon whitsondaye last did suffer a minstrell 
\wbet 12 d. to playe at his house whose name is as we are informed Thomas Seedes by 25 

meptos wA/ch meanes diuers of the p^rishe were there & ell where dauncinge 

and spendinge ther [saboth day] time from dinner vntill after eveninge 
[Alicia Auborn per] prayer of which company we doe not know the 
names of any Quo die comparuit d/c/us Lucas et [obiecto articiAo] ex 
cmis cawjis per euw allegau; dominus cum monic/owe euw dimisit 30 



1628 

Arc hdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/22 

f 214v* (4 July) 35 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
William Nevill, LIB, vicar general, in the presence of Edward Osborne, notary 
public and deputy registrar 

40 

Mr Thomas Langrish A vnus gardianorum veterum ibidem^ personaliter 

10/ Robte: for Robme; abbreviation mark omitted 24/ whitsondaye last: 2) May 1602 



26 FUNTINGTON 1628 / HASTINGS 1356-1528 

xi j d Citatzw per loh^nwem Butler \itterztum xxviij die lunij \\timo elapso pro Causa 
sequenft (viz.) ffor that hee suffered piping & dancing to bee in the howse one 
Bartholomew Till one shrove Sunday hee passing by it to Church etc etiam 
for suffering his servants to worke vppon St Mathias day at plow and other 
wordJy occasions/ Quo die facta pr^conizac/owe comparun dictus Langrishe et 
expresse negavit detecdo/zew ewe veram vnde dominus [in] decrevit magistrum 
Horseman citandww fore in pronimum ad iustificandww todem detecczone 



GRAFFHAM 



10 



1579 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments WSRO: Ep. 1/23/5 

f 23v 

15 

Woollavington Curate 

Grafham ys a parish of grete mysrule vpon sabaoth daies daunsing &c. whereto 
olid & young of my parish goo/ so as I haue seldom any at the cathechisme/ 

20 

HASTINGS 

1356-7 

Hastings Custutnal ESRO: RYE 57/4 

f 138V* 25 

. . .& en cas que celly ballz^deuye deuant le iowr [de] del eleccion soit encwru 
les lurres frount soner leur Corn<ff quel temps qil soit dedeins lann pur la 
commune Assembler de eslier vn autre baill/$" le qw^l baill/^Adonq^^s 
eslieu fra loffice tanqwal iowr del elecaon. . . 30 



1527-8 

Order from the Warden of the Cinque Ports against Plays 

BL: Egerton MS 2093 
f 80v* (3 June) 

Edward Guldeford knyght Constable of the Castell of Doverrf warden & 



21 one: for of one 71 eodem detecc/onc: for candem deteccionem 

3/ Barthololomew; for Bartholomew 16/ Woollavington: But Lavmgton 

3/ shrove Sunday. 24 February 162718 



HASTINGS 1527-1643 / HEATHFIELD 1610 

admyrall of the .v. pones & membres of the same to ail &C singwler Maiers 
Bailies luratw combarons & other officers and Mynystifrs of owr soiureigne 
lord the kyng of & in the seid poort & Membra & to eu^ry of them 
gretyng. ffbr certen vrgent causes the kyng highnes movyng. I in the behalf 
of his grace and by the auctorite of my seid office woll & also straightly 
charge & cowmaunde youe & eu^ry of youe that in eny wyse from hensforth 
ye do not make or play pmnytt & suffer to be made or played within eny of 
yowr offyces Romes or precynctes of the same noo man^r of stage pley Robyn 
hood pley wacches or wakes yeveales or other such lyke playes wherby that 
eny grete assemble of the kyng people shuld be made had &C. caused to be 10 
arreysed. ffayle ye nott therfor this to do with all effectuell diligence & 
celeryte as ye & eu^ry of youe wyll answer vnto the kyng highnes and to my 
seid offyce att yowr vttmnost pmll and lobard and that ye send ayene vnto 
me by this present berer this cowmaundment aftrr the sight & berth of the 
same, yeven at the seid Castell of Dovorrf vnder the seale of my seid offyce 15 
there, the thirde day of lune in the xx th yere of the reigne of owr seid 
Soufreigne lord kyng harry the 



1642-3 

Chamberlains Account Hastings Museum and Art Gallery: D/A.1.1 20 

mb 6 (1 May-23 April) 

To the Dron/m maior his ffee xiii s. iiii d. 

To the Drowm minor his ffee vi s. viii d. 



mb 6d 

It^m to Master Maior which he gaue to Mr Morleyej trumpetters xiij s. 



RichWuw Christopher Rogeruw Richardson et (blank) vxorem Phi///ppi 
Inman de Waldron 



25 



30 



HEATHFIELD 

1610 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep.ii/9/ 11 
f 276 (11 September) 

Proceedings of the court held in St Michael s Church, Lewes, before William 
In tans, cleric, surrogate judge 



40 



HEATHFIELD 1610/HORSHAM 1582 

Detect/, ffor that it is reported they were all the evening prayer tyme the 
x th of lune last past, being the sabboth day, at the howse of one Richard 
Baker of heathfield drincking & dauncing 

Citau omnes personnliter p^reundfrn quarto die instanm mens/ s infra 
dzcfam parochiam 



HELLINGLY 

1636 ,o 

Henry Burton, A Divine Tragedie STC: 4140.8 
sig D3* 

At Hellingsby 5. or 6. miles from Ason in Sussex, the booke being read on 
the Lords day, in the Church by the Minister, on the next day being Munday, 15 
an honest man, one Tomkins being on his way, a neighbour overtakes him, 
and scoffingly askes him, if hee would goe daunce with him the next Sunday; 
to whom the man answered, take heed that thou bee not dauncing in hell 
before that day come, or before it be long; By the next weeke Gods hand fell 
on the Scoffer, that himselfe and two more of his family dyed. 20 



HORSHAM 

1582 25 

St Mary s Parish Register WSRO: Par. 106/1/1/2 
f 240v (21 May) 

The 21 Day lohn Rowe alias Sparrowe killed w/th ye fall of a May pole as 

it was a settinge vp. w 



Inquest on the Death of John Rowe PRO: KB 9/1026/74 
single mb (25 May) 

35 

Inquisitio mdentata capta apwd Horsham in comitatu Sussex/rf predicta 
xxv die Maij Anno regni Domine nostre Elizabeths dei graaa Anglic 
ffrancie Hibcrnie regine fidei Defensorw &c. xxiiij coraw me Magno 

4/ ptreundtm John Htder, lummoner 



HORSHAM 1582/ITCHINGFIELD 1595 

ffowle coronatore [dicte domine] prmobilis viri Phillippi Comitw Arondell 
Rape sue de Bramber super visuw corporis cuiusdern lohanms Rowe alias 
Sparrowe nuper de Horsham predicto in comitatu predicto Shoemaker 
iacenm ibidem super terram mortui per sacramenta christofen lynner 
Thome Hurst Henrici Mychell Henrici Bottynge lohannes Dungat 
Ricardi Gynden RioWi Gates Thome Ive Henrici ffylder lohannis Baker 
Thome Boorne Bartholomei Sayers lohannes fforman WilWmi Hartrydge 
(. . .)ome (...) Champyon Qui dicuwt super sacramewta sua quod xx die 
Maij Anno regni Domine nostre Elizabeths nunc regine xxiiij apd 
Horsham (...) predictus lohannes Rowe al/<zs Sparrowe cum diucrsis 10 

alijs hominibwj laborans & conatus exigere quandaw perticaw estiualem 
Angiice a (...) xvj d. vna scala preci\ vj d. cum qua pmica predicta 
elevaw fuit frangebat Et infortunio pmica predicta cecidit super 
prediction Ioh^wem Rowe alws (...) ferijt ip/m super caput suuw 
dans ei [su] predicto loh^wwi Rowe vnaw plagaw mortalem A super caput 15 

suuw longitudinis septem polliciu/w latitudin/V quat(...) profunditatis 
duorww polliciuw ex qua plaga predictus Ioh/zes Rowe statim moritz/r 
Et sic infortunio cuw p^rtica predicta predictus lohannes Rowe nup^v 
(...) fuit / In cuius rei testimoniu/w huic Inquisitioni tam Coronator 
predictus quaw luratores predict} sigilla sua alternatim apposuerunt (...) 20 

die & anno supradict/V 

(signed) per Magnuw ffowle Coronatorem predictum 

per infortun/w 



25 



ITCHINGFIELD 

1595 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8 

f 3l6v* (29 November) 

30 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Edward Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

lohn Booker A fidler 1 of Ridgwicke quesitw* ffor daunsyng in contempt on 
R. [(.}) hahei Sunday before whitsuntyde vpon fame &C repon of the minister & diuers other 35 
vijs & modw in proximum post deinde comparuit dictus loh^wwes Booker ac 
obiecto ei articulo fassus est yat he on friday before whitsurctyde Last did play 
on his fyddle &C Robert hal<r & Richard ffast did dauns a dauns or ij but yt 
was not in servys tyme nor in contempt of the minister or gods servis & y^t he 

35/ Sunday before whitsuntyde: I June 1595 37/ friday before whitsuntyde Last: 6 June 1595 



30 ITCHINGFIELD 1 595 / LEWES 1523-9(?) 

was at praters both fornone & aftmione at Ichyngfelld vnde dominus cum 
monicione dimisit/ 

12 d Robert Hayler of Shipley personaliter [personaliter] quo die comparuit 

quern dominus iuramemo orurauit de fideliter r/>ondendo cents articulis 5 
&c. & monuit eum ad subeundww examen citra proximum quo exawiwato 
dominus for yat he did not dauns in servis tyme nor hoopyd nor haloyd 
cum monicione dimisit 

12 d lohn Hill of Shipley personaliter./ quo die similiter vt supra pro haler quo 10 
quidfm lohanne hill exawiwato dominus eo quod now cowstat that he 
daunsyd not at all nor hoopyd nor haJloyd cum monicione dimisit eum/ 

LEWES 

15 

1523-4 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR 41 4/9/1 /la 
f Iv* 

M 

Item Resseffede at sent nykelas tyde iij s. iiij d. 



1524-5 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 25 

ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /la 
f 3 

hem Resseffede off sent nykelas maney iij s. x d. ob. 

30 



1528-9(?) 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR 414/9/1 /I a 

f 19* 

hem payde for ij payer of gloues ij d. 

hem payde to ye bysshyp ij d. 

hem payde to ye croger j d. 

40 



LEWES 1529-34 

1529-30 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1/1 a 
f 25* 

5 

hem R;evyd at sent nykolas tyde Ideerly iiij s. ob. 



1532-3 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts \ o 

ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /la 

f 34v* (Rendered 18 January 1533/4) (Receipts) 

Item Received [f] of hokmonye ij s. ob. 

hem Received off saynt nycolay monye iiij s. iiij d. ob. 15 



f 36* (Payments) 

hem payd to the byschop & the crosyar for ther labor & ther glouyj v d. 20 

1533-4 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /la 25 

f 34v* (Rendered 18 January 1533/4) (Receipts) 

hem Received off ho kmonye ij s. [(..)] iiij d. ob. 

hem Received on saynt nycolaj euyn w/tA the bysschope iiij s. x d. 30 

f 37v* (Payments) 

hem payd to the besschope & the crosyar & for ther glouy* v d. 35 



14/ hokmonye: Hocktide was 8-9 April 
28/ h o kmonyc: Hocktide was 21 -2 April 



32 LEWES 1534-7 



1534-5 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR 414/9/1/1 a 

f 40* (Rendered 3 June 1536) (Receipts) 

5 

Received for ho ke money ij s. j d. ob. 

Received on sent nicolas yeue iiij s. vj d. 



10 



f 4lv* (Payments) 

hem payd to the byschop and the crosyar and the glouys v d. 

15 

1535-6 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR 41 4/9/1 /I a 

f 40* (Rendered 3 June 1536) (Receipts) 

20 

Received In hoke money ij s. ob. 

Received on sent nycoles yeue iiij s. iij d. ob. 

Received for hake money xxj d. oO 25 

f 4lv* (Payments) 

hem payd to the boschyp and the crosyar and there glouys vij d. 30 



1536-7 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR414/9/1/U 
f 43* (Payments) 

hem payd to the bychyp & the crosyer v d. 



61 hokemoney: Hocktide was 13-14 April 25/ hake money: HocktiJewas245 April 1536 

2\l hoke money: Hocklide was 5-6 April 1535 



LEWES 1536-52 

f 44v* (Receipts) 

Item Resevyed of Roberd morleys wyfe and lohn payne* wyfe ix s. x d. 

hem resevyd apon sent nycolas evyn ") s - 1X d. 



1537-8 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR 414/9/1/1 a 
f 43v* (Payments) 

hem payd to the bysshyp & the crosear vij d. 



f 44v* (Receipts) 

hem reseyved of hokmone ij s. ob. 

hem resevyd apon sent nycolas evye iiij s. iij d. 



20 



1538-40 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR414/9/1/U 

f 47v* 25 

Memorandum Receuyed of Thomas pokell wyfe of hock money xx s. 



1551-2 30 

Town Book ESRO: LEW/C 1/1 
f 5* (5 October-3 October) 

The said Constables have disbursed & are to be allowed for 

& about the punyshing of dyvers vagabondes & towardes the 35 

casting of the towne bell & ffor a reward geven to the kyngw 

servant a Musycyen & for dyvers other things & charges 

wherwith the said burrough ys charged The p<miculers wherof 

appeere yn the old booke yn the hole to iij li. iiij s. vj d. 

21 Icem ... ix s. x d.: probably for Hocktidt, 9-10Apnl 17/ hokmone: Hocktide was 29-30 April 



34 LEWES 1557-60 / NEWHAVEN 1592/3 

1557-8 

Town Book ESRO: LEW/C 1/1 

f 8* (4 October-3 October) 

The said Constables have disbursed & are to be allowed for 5 

diuers seu^rall su/wmes of money expended about the 

furnyture apparellyng & setting foorth out of this towne at 

one tyme ten souldyours at an other tyme twoo souldyours 

for the punyshement of smeyn vagaboundw & other 

offenders, ffor money geven to the Duke of NornW& his 10 

players, ffor wyne geven to the lord Bysshopp, ffor the 

bringing vpp of smeyn poore children, And for dyvers odiers 

thingw &C charges as p^rticulerly appereth yn the said old 

register booke yn the hole to xiij li. xvj s. ij d. 

15 

1559-60 

St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts 

ESRO: PAR4l4/9/l/la 

f 80v* 20 

Item layd out for playes when ye Vysetour wer here xx d. 



NEWHAVEN 



25 



1592/3 

Depositions at the Trial of George Berdesworth ESRO: RYE 47/47/5a 

ff [1-2]* (7 March) 

30 

Co ram 

Master Mayor Mr Radclyffe 

Mr Tolkin Mr Coxon 

Mr Dydsburye 

lohn Chambers of the Cytty of Norwych merchaunt sayeth yat he this 35 

examynant beinge in the Companye of one George Berdsworth a 

Trumpetter At new haven in Sussex in the presence of many other/ the 

said Trumpetter was requested to sounde his trumpett/ wheret he 

Aunswered yat he wold not sounde before he came before the governor 

of Cane/ Then yt was said to the Trumpetter A r here be some ya\ haue 

skill in sounds 1 [why wylt thow not sounde]/ & he sayed yat there was 

35/ Norwych: Norwich. Norfolk 40/ Cane: Caen, Normandy 



NEWHAVEN 1592/3 

none present yat were worth to heare any Soundeinge but the governor 
of Cane/ Then yt was sayde to him yat the Quene was worthy to heare 
Soundeinge/ & he the said trumpetter sayed yat she [shold] A cold not 
cowmaunde any Soundes in Cane/ & then further yt was sayed vnto 
him yat when the governor of Cane Dyd heare the name of the Queene 5 

of England he Bowed/ he made Light thereof & sayed [tush] tush &c. 

By me (signed) lohn Chambres I 

lohn Davyes of Rye Sayler, sayeth yat he beinge at a table at newhaven 
in Sussex At Supper in the prence of many, Amonge which was one George 10 
Berdesworth a Trumpetter who satt towerd the Lower ende of the table & 
this examynant sat aboue/ & hearing a murmering at the Lower ende of the 
table/ This examynant asked what the matter was whereupow one Aunswered 
George wyll not sounde/ 1 hope he wyll sayed this examynant/ & then one 
other whose name this examynant knoweth not sayed/ And further he sayeth 15 
y<zt there is no govenour in England/ then this examynant sayed/ [Dot] 
yf he say so I wyll heve his trumpet out of the wyndowe [which he dyd 
accordingly]/ &C afterwards s when die said George came Aborde the Shippe 
of this examynant he Demaunded of [the] hym yf he sayed the word 
Aforenamed & he confessed yat he dyd say so/ then this examynant sayed. 20 
Thow vylleine what moveth thee to say so Thy Master the governor of Cane 
wyll honor her ma/ry when eyther he seeth her Lettres or heareth her 
named/ whereat the said George made A mock & Aunswered [y^t] no 
not one whyt/ where vpow this examynant strooke him 

By me (signed) lohn Davis I 25 

Thorruzs Hurst of London Armorer sayeth yat when the said George [came] 
/was going 1 Aborde the Shippe of Mr Davyes/ he then Dyd heare all such 
speches as passed betwene Mr Davyes & him/ which were in effect as Mr 
Davyes before hath confesseth only this examynant can not tell whether he 30 
saide yat there was no gevernor/ or no goverment A r in England 1 but one of 
those word yt was 

(signed) Thomas Hurste 

All this was Donne on Shrovemonday where they were merry 35 

The saide George beinge [examyruzwt] examyned [say] what he ment to say 
the word Alledged against him/ & he sayeth yat Mr Davyes drynkeing to 
him dyd drincke to him in these woides I Drynck to owr governor/ & this 
examynant thinking by his word yat he Dranke to the governor of Cane/ 40 
he this examynant Aunswered you haue no governor/ meaning thereby yat the 

31 / gevernor: for governor 3 5/ Shrovemonday: 26 February 



36 NEWHAVEN 1 592/3 / OVING 1586-1607 

governor of Cane was not Mr davies governor/ but only the governor of this 
examynant & other meanyng he had none 

(signed) George Beardsworth 

Letter Concerning the Trial of George Berdesworth 5 

ESRO: RYE47/47/5B 
single sheet (9 March) 

To out Lord warden. Concerninge George Berdesworth 

Our Dutyes to yowr honor most humbly remewbredd/ So it is yf yt please 10 
yowr honor yat of Late diume mm:haunt and Soldyers beinge in this 
towne & bounde for fraunce/ amonge which was one lohn Chambers a 
irurchaunt/ & one George Berdesworth A Trompetter/ they twayne fell At 
varyance So yat the said Chambers called the said George Traytor/ vpon 
which wordes so extremely vttered by the said Chambers against the said 15 
Berdesworth in the presence of one of the Iuratt of Rye The said 
Berdesworth was cowmytted to pnson vnryll further examynac/on might 
be had of the matter & what Dyd move the said Chambers to vse those 
word/ whose examynaaon &: confession yor honor herew/th shall receaue 
together with the testemony of such as cold say any thing therevnto. 20 

Whereof we thought yt our Dutyes tadumyse yowr honor humbly Desyring 
yowr honorable Dyrecdon conorning the further Deleying or enlargeing of 
the said Trumpetter/ And so &c ix m^rtij Anno 1 592 

The maior & lurattw of Rye 

OVING 

1586-7 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments WSRO: Ep. 1/23/7 

f 27* 30 

One Pannell a mynstrell played on a sonday in s<rvys tyme but who were 
with hym we knowe not/ 



1607 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/12 

f 134* (10 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
John Drury, UD, vicar general 



OV1NG 1607 

Anna Good vxor willflmi Coolde pcrsonalifrr citatrf per fteniamen ffreemaw 
iiij to die instantw Octobrw for dauncinge in prayer cyme qo die [dominus] 
facta pra:onizac/oe trina vice pro dicta Anna et nullo modo comparente 
dominus pronunciauit earn contumacem &c in penaw contumacie sue earn 
excommunicavit prout in schedula./ deinde postea comparuit [quam dominus] 5 
et obzmo articulo fatetr vnde dominus iniuwxit ei to [pro\ima] heare a 
sermon on sonday come sevennight against prophaners of the saboth 

Robertas Gray personaliter citatwj dicto die pro consimili and for playinge 
at Gules in prayer tyme qo die comparuit & obiecto articulo fatetr vnde 10 
dominus iniunxit ei to procure a sermon on sondaye come seuenighte 
agaynst prophaners of the saboth daye and he &C the rest to stande out of 
their seat & heare the sermon & to confesse their fault accordinge to a 
shedule & ad cenificandum in proximo post" 

15 

f 139v* (31 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory ofChichester Cathedral before 
Francis Cox, cleric, surrogate judge 20 



\villelmus Peachey pifrsonal/ter citatwj was not at Church the 6 C ^ of 
September but had dauncinge in his howse Qo die comp<zr#/t et 
ob/Vrto articulo fatetz/r vnde dow/ns mow;t cum ad confitendww 
Culpaw iuxra schedubw [d] in Crastinuw in ecclwia parochiali predicta 25 

Tempore diuinorum et ad certificandww in proximo 

Lambertz/j Peachey persona\iter citato was dauncinge y^t day and lost 
his seruice qz/o die vt supra 

30 

Ra^M/phwi Smyth person a\iter citatwj pro consiw/li Quo die dominus 
continu^M/ t certificarium in proximum 



f 140* 

\ohannes Marten pfrsonal/V^r citatwj was dauncinge and lost his sluice that 
day qo die comparuit et ob; mo ar/zrwlo fatetwr y^t he was absent from 
sluice the same day vnde dominus iniuwxit ei ad confitendww Culpaw in 

71 sonday come scvennight: 18 October 1607 



38 OVING 1607-7/8 

ecclwia parochiali predicta [die dominica] in Crastinuw tempore diuinoium 
iuxta schedulrfw et ad certificandum in proximo 

[abr] Anne Gouldsmyth personal ter citat/z qwo die vt supra was daunsinge the 

sonday before St lames day last and lost her seruice qwo die vt supra 5 

Marie Hartley quesiw was daunsinge and lost her s<?ruice that daye qwo 

die comparuit et allegauit yat she was not w/thin the same parish the 

same day but was sent by her master to Bersted to attend & kepe a 

sicke woman and there remained about iij week [bef ] before she 10 

returned againe sup<r qua quidem allegations dominus monuil earn 

ad exhibendww certificarium sub manibwf minmri et gasdianorum ibidem 

citra proximum 

Katherina Miles quesit/z was dauncinge and lost her sfruice that daye qo 15 
die vt supra pro Marten et duke 



1607/8 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/12 20 

f 166* (21 February) 

Proceedings of the court held before John Drury, LLD, in his home, in the 
presence of Christopher Theker, notary public 

25 

Oudhani Henricus wakeforde for playinge A withe [vpon] his fidle at Ovinge on 

Sondayes in prayer cyme stat excowwwicatus xxj die mens/s ffebruarij 
Anno domini iuxta &c. 1607 Coram ven^rabili viro magistro lohanne 

3s. 8d. vcepn Drurye legum docfore &c in edibus suis infra clausuw Ciuiwm Cicestrie 

notone scit/5 et scituat/j Comp^r/t persona/ttei dictus wakeford in 30 

pr<ntia mei chrw/oferi Theker Notorij publici &c et petijt benificiuw 
absoluc/onis a Sententia excommunicatioms alias contra eum lata et 
promulgata vnde fact* fide per dictum wakeforde de p^rendo iuri et 
stando mandatw ecclwie dominus euw absoluit et restituit &c Tune 
dominus ex cents causis euw iuste moventibus monuit dictum wakeford 35 
ad confitendww culpam suaw coram mimstro et gardianis ibidem die 
dominica proxima imediate post preces vespertinas et ad cemficandum 
in proximo post 

4/ quo die vt supra: probably redundant occurrence of same phrase in line following 

5/ sonday before St lames day last: 19 July 1607 

10-1 3/ iij week . proximum: written in left margin and marked for insertion here 



~[estamentutn 

Robert! 

Banwell 



Dimiss/0 8 d. 



PAGHAM 1598-1631 

PAG HAM 

1598 

Will of Robert Banwell, Minstrel 

f 37v (Proved 29 September) 



39 



WSRO: STA i/7 



In the name of god Amen I Robert Banwell of the parishe [of] of Pagham in 
the cownty of Sussex Minstrel being sicke of bodye but of perfect memorie 
thankes be giuen to god for yt Doe for the setling of thos little goodes I muste 
leave behinde me whatsoeuer yt shall please god to take me ovt of this World 
of Wickednes and meserie Vnto his Kingdom ordayne & make this my last 
Will & Testament in manor &C forme following.... Item I giue to lohn lockey 
my Boye xxx s. and my best Treble &C second base. Item I give vnto lohn 
Stretton my my Boye. x Lambes. ... 



1631 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery of Pagham and Tarring 

WSRO: Ep. iv/2/14 

f 78v* (10 December) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, 
before Joshua Petre, cleric, surrogate judge, in the presence of John Swayne, 
notary public 

lohannes Ingram personalitet Citatum per eund<rm 7 die mensis predict/ 
pro Cawja sequen// vizt. I doe present lohn Ingram lunzor being 
Churchwarden in Ao 16[(.)]30 for not presenting such as did fidle 
& others dauncing on the Sabboth day neere the Church "Quibus die 
et loco Comptfruit personaliter d/c/us Ingram et ob/Vrto ei Articu\o 
predicto fatetur that he was in the yeare 1630 Churchwarden but he 
A doth not remember that there was any fidling or dauncing in theire 
p^rishe in prayers tyme or that he did at any tyme refuse to looke out 
of the Church to see god order observed in prayers tyme when he was 
comaunded by the minister soe to doe vnde dominus cum pro hac vice 
cuw sola monicione dimisit" 



15 



20 



25 



30 



35 



14/ my my. dittography 

26/ per eundcm: John Butler, summoner 



40 PETT 1 586 / PETWORTH 1 593 

PETT 

1586 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/3 

f 36 (2 November) 5 

Proceedings of the court held before Anthony Blincow, LLD, vicar general, in 
the presence of William Plett and Roger Leyland, notaries public 

officiuw domim contra lohannem Keale de Pett 10 

He is presented for suffering ministrell to playe in his howse at service 
dimissw tyme vpon the sabothe dayes and other holie dayes/ Comp^ruit et fatetwr 

detectionew ewe veraw A for one tyme onlie et submisit se correction! 
ij s ludicw. Dominus monuit vt in posteruw he doe not suffer anie suche lewed 

playing in his howse et ita dimissMJ est pro hac vice/ 15 

PETWORTH 

1593 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8 20 

fl!5v* (5 July) 

Proceedings of the court held in Petworth parish church before John Drury, LLD, 
surrogate judge, in the presence of John Henden, notary public 

25 

Wdlelmus Wakeford Iun/0r for daunsing & maygaming qwo die comparuit 
dictus Wakeford et fassus est yat he hath daunsed & vsed Maygaming on the 
saboth days but not in service tyme vnde dominus admonuit eum heraftirr to 
kepe holy the saboth days & not to prophane the same & diat he A do not 
vse heraftfr maygaming & daunsing sub penaw luris et sic cuw monic/one 30 
dimisit eum/ 

Robmus Piper luntor pro consimili quo die comparuit et fassus est modo 
et forma provt wakeford cumque tali admonic/owe 

35 

f 122v* (13 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Edward Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 40 



PETWORTH 1593-1622 

lohannes Wood personaJiter for daunsing & maye gamyng &c 

qwo die prcconizato & nullo modo 
comparente dominus pronuwtiauit euw 
coniumacem pena reseruaw in proximum 

5 

f 134v* (24 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory ofChichester Cathedral before 
Edward Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 10 

Ricardus goodyer for daunsing & maygamyng ptrsona\iter quo die vt supra/ 



1595 15 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8 
f 252v* 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Edward Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 20 

lohn Curtys for daunsyng on sabaoth days est z\communicatus die primo 
Aprilis coraw magistro Richard kytson &c. comparuit quem dowmus 
absoluit &c. ac cum monic/owe &c. dimisit 

25 

1622 

Will of Henry Trashe, Musician WSRO: STCll/BoxlO 

single sheet (20 April; proved 1 6 October) 

ntvm In the name of God Amen the xx^ daye of Aprill Anwo domini 1622 I 30 

Henrye Trashe of Petworth in the Countie of Sussex Musition, haueinge 
beene of longe tyme sicke in bodie, But in perfect minde and Memorie 
god [be] be thancked, doe make and Ordaine this my last will and 
Testament as followeth . . . Item I give vnto my Cozen Robart Trashe my 
Tenor violin, and my treble violen; with my Musick bookw, But my mind 35 
and will is that lesper Cachelo shall take & prick out anye of the same 
book if he will; A r and henrye Carelell shall likewise prick out of them 
what he will 1 . 



30/ In: elaborated and tlongatid I 



42 PETWORTH 1622 / RUDGWICK 1612 

I have Lyeing at lesper Cacheloes, a fether bed w/th a flock boulster ij 
blancketw, ij pair of Sheet in his wifes keeping &: on pair in my truncke, 
there, my base violles also there... 

Inventory of the Goods of Henry Trashe, Musician 5 

WSRO: Ep. 1/29/149, no. 23 
single sheet (15 October) 

hem Instruments and book xl s. 

10 

ROTHERFIELD 

1617/18 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/14 15 

f lv (13 January) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of St Michael s Church, 
Lewes, before William Inians, cleric, surrogate judge 

20 

Philippuw Alchorne de Retherfield 

Detectww for keeping of pipes & much Company in his house in 

evening prayers vppon Sonday & fighting & brawling 

Citatwj p<rrsonal/Y<T per Timotheuw Grover \itteiztum - 10 die 

lanuarij predicti 25 

"Comparuit d/crus Alchorne Cui obiecta detecoowe suprascripw 

[negat] expresse negavit eandmi esse veram vnde dominus monuit 

euw ad interewendww in proximo ad videndw vhetiorem &tc. 



RUDGWICK 



30 



1612 

Archdeaconry of Chic hester Instance Book WSRO: Ep. 1/10/30 

f 21 (27 June) 35 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 

1-3/ I have Lyeing . . . there: entered at bottom of will, after the signatures, and just above the probate note 
MM: t written over n followed by partially formed letter, possibly d for and 



RUDGWICK 1612 

Humfrey Booth, in the presence of George Stent, notary public 



43 



Officium domini promotum contra 

Henricum Cox abest g: 

solutio con. 
con. so\utio 



Robertum Mose luniorem comparuit 

lohannem Marcin comparuit 

lohannem Lee abest 

Nicholaum Naldret abest 

Ricardum Naldrett comparuit 

T\\omam Richardson abest 

lohannem Steyninge comparuit 

Thomam Steyninge comparuit 

Henricum Hedman comparuit 

Robertum Thayer comparuit 

Robertum More comparuit 

\\tnricum Thayer comparuit 

EdwarJum Clayton abest 

R\cardum Gatton abest 

Philippum Avenell comparuit 

Humfridum Blackwell abest 

lohannem Butcher abest 

Thow^w Steyninge comparuit 

Ricardum Butcher comparuit 

Ricardum stringer comparuit 

lohannem Ovingto comparuit 

lohannem Clayton abf 

lohannem Gardner [abr] comparuit 

Robertum Gatton comparuit 

lohannem Knighte comparuit 

Ricardum Longe comparuit 

Thomam Lewer comparuit 

Ricardum Carpenter comparuit 
for settinge vp of a maypole in the Churchyard 

Quibztf preconizam et comp^rentibw/ vt supra dominus monuit eos ad 
interewndz/w domino Episcopo apud Aldingborne in pom^ridiano huius 
diei et casu quo dominus Episcopus eos non dimisit dominus monuit eos 
ownes ad interewndz/w in proximo hoc in loco ad videndz/w vlteriorem 
processum fieri cxCc 



solutio 

solft<? con. 
solutio con. 
solutio 

con. 
solutio con. 



solutio 



solutio 
solutio 
solutio 

solutio 
solutio 
solutio 
solutio 
solutio 
solutio 



15 



20 



con. 
con. 
con. 



con. 



con. 



25 



30 



35 



18/ Pjcardum Gatcon ab/: underlined 



44 RYE 1448-53 

RYE 



1448-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 6 (24 June -24 August 1449) (Expenses) 5 

Item datum Ministrallo [domino] domim domini de Say xx d. 

Item in vino ec papulo equino eidew Ministrallo iiij d. 

Item Datum Ministrallis domini Regis pro honore ville iij s. iiij d. 10 

Item Datum A et in expensis alij Ministrallo domini domini 

de Say qui vocatwr Nichalaus lambutarme ij s. ij d. 



f 6v 15 

Itmi Datum Ministrallo Ducis de Somersed xij d. 



1449-50 20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 
f 14 (24 June-24 August 1450) (Expenses) 

Item in dando Ministrallis domini nostri Reg/V solutuw iij s. iiij d. 



f I4 



solutuw pro pabulo equino Ministrallorww domini 
Regis in domo lohannis Bayle iij d. 30 



1452-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 32v (1 April-24]une 1453) (Expenses) 35 

hem datum ministrall comitis de Arundell xx d. 



7, 1 1/ domini domini. Jittography 

30/ lohannis Bayle: John Bayle. jurat from 1449 



RYE 1452-5 45 

f 33 (24June-24 August 1453) 

Item datum Ministrallfi] 1 ^ 1 Domini Cancellarij xij d. 

hem solutww ministrallw A domim duds Bokyngham iij s. iiij d. 5 

hem in vino & pro expencw suorw equorzi/w ij s. 



1453-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 10 

f 36v (77 April -24 June 1454) (Expenses) 

hem datww MinistraJlw dowmi de Bowses & domim fFenys ij s. 



f 37 (24 June-24 August 1454) 



15 



datum Ministrallw domim duds Bukyngham & pro 
expends eorum apud tabmiam iiij s. 

20 

1454-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 42 (25 August -25 December 1454) (Expenses) 

25 

hem [so] datum ministrall* domim warwici iij s. iiij d. 

hem datum ministrall domim duds de 3orke iij s. viij d. 

f 43v (6 April -24 June 1455) 

hem 3ovyn to be Mynstrallw off my lord offArundell iij s. iiij d. 

35 

f 44 

hem 3ovyn to be Mynstrallw off my lord offexcetur xij d. 



3/ Cancellarij: c written over ss 
6/ suorum: s corrected over o 



30 



46 RYE 1454-7 

f 44v (24 June- 24 August 1455) 

Item 3ovyn to [>e Mynstrall off J>e duke off Bukyngham & ffor 
her hors expence 



1455-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 48v* (28 March -24 June 1456) (Expenses) 

10 
Item 3ovyn to \>c kyngy* Mynstralh^ iij s. iiij d. 

Item 3ovyn to |?e Mynstrallys off my lord bowsyrs in 

wyn & mony ij s. ij d. 

Item 3ovyn to men offlede when they shewyd her play vj s. viij d. is 



f 49* 

Item [In] yovyn to pe Mynstrallys off my lord off 20 

Bykyngham iij s. iiij d. 

Item for a qwart A [reed] 1 wyn the same tyme ij d. 

Item for a dorrey And a plays to j?e said mynstrallys iiij d. 
Item payd to Sutton for pe exspensyr off pe sayd Mynstrallyj 

bydyng all ny3t in hors mete And other Costy* xx d. 2s 



1456-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 54v* (17 April -24 June 1457) (Expenses) 30 

Item 3ovyn to pe Mynstrallw off my lord off Bukyngham iij s. iiij d. 

Item payd to John Sutton for |)e exspensw off my lord off 

Bukyngham mynstralf viij d. 3s 



f 55* (24 June -24 August 1457) 

Item 3ovyn to my lord off 3orke his Mynstrallw iij s. iiij d. 40 

1 5/ Icde: Lydd, Kent 24, 34/ Sutton, lohn Sutton: John Sutton, mayor. 1454-5, 1457-9 



RYE 1456-60 



47 



hem ffor bred and ale [at] A ^o 1 be said mynstrall and to 
Af a pan off 1 be Coitions 

Item payd to be mynstrall off be lord tresorer for her Dener 
and in reward 



iiij d. 



ij s. vj d. 5 



1457-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 60* (Expenses) 

hem to be kyng mynstrells 



iij s. vj d. 



10 



f 6lv* (24-7 August 1458) 

hem gefyn to my lord schrvysberye mynstrallys 



i] s. vj d. 



15 



1458-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 66* (27 August -25 December 1458) (Expenses) 

In primis Sicheratoribwj Comit/V Penbroche 

Itn Ministrall Comit Warru//c/ in expensis & a\ijs 
hem Ministr Duds Ebow 



20 



iij s. iiij d. 

iiij s. 
iiij s. 



25 



1459-60 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 79* (26 August 1459-31 August 1460) (Expenses) 

C Ite/w datuw Ministrallis domini de Dakers in pecunijs 

numeratis 

C Item solutMw circa ipjos in expensis 
C Itew [s] datuw Ministrallis Ducis Bukingkamie nostr\ Gardiani 

in pecunijs numerat/V 

Itew solutuw pro exorww expensis time temporis 



30 



xij d. 35 
iiij d. 

iiij s. 
ij d. ob. 

40 



39/ exorum: for eorum 



48 RYE 1460-3 



1460-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 84v* (31 August-25 December 1460) (Payments and expenses) 

C Item datw ministrallis Comitis warwyci xx. d. 

Itew solutww solutum in domo Thome Kynge pro eorum iiij or 
ministrallis expensis vna cum eorum quatuor equis xxvij d. 



1461-2 ,o 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO. RYE 60/2 

f 93v (30 August -25 December 1461) (Expenses and payments) 

Item datum Ministrallis domini nostri warwici Custodis 

nostri xxviij die Octobris et pro eorum cena in domo 15 

maioris et in dando potum meis cowuicinis interea tune 

temporis vj s. 



f 95v (18 April -24 June 1462) (Expenses) 20 

Itew datawz Ministrallis domini Regis vj in munere vj s. viij d. 

Itew solutww in expensis circa dictos ministrallos vij d. 



25 

1462-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 102 (29 August -25 December 1462) (Expenses and payments) 

C Item datum MinistraJlis d0wmi nostri Regis Edwardi 30 

in vigilia sancti Edwardi cowfessoris vj s. viij d. 

C Item solutum pro eorum expensis et eorum equorw 

tunctemporis j d. 

C Item datum ministrallis domini nojfri Warwyci nostri 

custodis et admirallis iij s. iiij d. tf 



61 solucww solutum: dittografhy 
71 ministrallis. for ministrallorum 
22/ datam: for datum 



RYE 1464-76 

1464-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 108 (24 June -24 August 1465) (Payments and expenses) 

Item datum Ministrallis domz ni warwici in crastino 

aperic/onuw pixidum ville vj s. viij d. 

solutum in expensis in toto circa diccos iiij or ministrallos 

in Sibis & vino x ij- d. 



10 

1474-5 

A Chamberlains Accounts Riley: MSS of the Corporation of Rye 
p 494 col 1 

...Payed to the players of Romeney, the which played in the chirche I6d 15 
Payede to the Kynges menstrellis what tyme they were here 6s. 8d. Payede the 
same tyme in the Mayers house for ther expences in wyne 12 l/2d Payde 
to the Dewke of Clarance mynstrelles what tyme they were here 5s. Spente 
upon them the same tyme in bred and wine 18d 

20 

1475-6 

A Chamberlains Accounts Riley: MSS of the Corporation of Rye 
p 494 col 2 

...Payd the ix day of Octobre to a berewarde of my Lorde of Clarance, 25 
for baytyng of the berys, for a stake to tey them by 2s. Id 

p 495 col 1 

...Paid the minstrels of our Lord of Arundelle, as assigned by the Mayor 30 
and Jurats, 6s. 8d.; and for expenses in bread and wine in the house of 

Master Graunford, Alderman, 5d Payede to my Lorde of Clarance 

mynystrallis the xi daye of Maye 6s. 8d. Payede in expences done upone 
the same mynstrellis, the same day 23d. Payede the xxvii day of Maye to 
the Kynges mynstrelles 10s.... 35 



8/ Sibis: 2 minimi in MS for second \ 26/ tey: Riley adds in square brackets tie 

1 5/ Romeney: New Romney, Kent 32/ Mister Graunford: either Babilon Graunford. 

15/ the chirche: St Mary s Church mayor, 1463-4, 1465-7, 1474-5, or 

2 5/ berewarde: Riley adds in square brackets bearward John Graunford. mayor, 1479-80 

261 bcrys: Riley adds in square brackets bears 



50 RYE 1476-80 



1476-7 

A Chamberlains Accounts Riley. MSS of the Corporation of Rye 
p 495 col 1 

...Gevyn in rewarde to the mynstrelles of the Kynges modire, vppone our 5 
Ladyes Evyn the Natyvite 3s. 4d.... 

p 495 col 2 

...Payed for a dyner for the Prynces mynstrelles, ther beyng the Mayer, the 10 
Baily, John Suttone, Robert Acroche, with othir more of theire brothern 22d. 
Gevyn to the saide mynstrelles the same tyme, the viii day of Novembire 6s. 
8d. By the consent of the Mayer and his bretherne, gevyn to the pleyers of 

Lede, the whiche pleyede here the Sunday after Cristemas halidayes, I6d 

Payed to the pleyers of Wynchilse, the whiche pleyed in the churche yerde, 15 
uppone the day of the Purificacion of oure Laday I6d 

p 496 col 1 

. . .Payede and gevyne to the Quenys mynstrelles, the seconde day of Maye 6s. 20 
8d. Payede the same daye for ther dyner, for brede, wyne, and fische I6d. 
Payede and gevyne to the Duke of Clarens (mynstrelles) the v day of May 6s. 
8d. Payed the same tyme for ther soper at Maister Graunfortes hous, the 
Maier and the Bailif, with sertayne of ther bretheren ther beyng present, for 
vitel and wyne, 2s 25 



1479-80 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 6 (25 December 1479-2 April 1480) (Payments and expenses) jo 

Item DatK/w in remuneracione Ministrallibwj ville ij s. 



5/ the Kynges modire: Riley adds in square brackets Cecily, Duchess of York 

1W John Simone. John Sutton. mayor, 1454-5, 1457-9 

\ \l Acroche. Riley adds in square brackets at the Cross, probably incorrectly; more likely, Robert Croche. 

mayor, 1479-80, 1489-90, and 1493-4 
14/ Lede: Riley adds in square brackets Lydd 
14/ the Sunday after Cristemas halidayes: 12 January 1476/7 
1 5/ the churche: St Mary s Church 
23/ Maister Graunfortes: either Babilon Graunford, mayor, 1463-4, 1465-7, 1474-5, or John 

Graunford. mayor, 1479-80 



RYE 1479-80 
f 6v 

hem paied to my lorde of Arundellis pleyer that pleyed herf 

in pe town V J s - vii ) d - 

5 

Itmi paied and gyevyn in rewarde vnto the pleyerw that come fro 

master lerveyse home the pleyed the xiij Daye of feuy^er at 

Crochis houce j s. iiij d. 

10 
f 7 (2 April -24 June 1480) 

Item Solutww ministrall Domini mei Arundell vj s. viij d. 

hem Solutww A r in vigilw Sancti marci euawgeliste ministrallis Dowmi 

nostri Regis r x s. 1 & pro expends eorundem r x d. 1 eodew die x s. x d. 15 



f 7v 

hem paied and gievyn in rewarde to the quenys mynstrellis 20 

be xxj ci day of May vj s. viij d. 

Itmi paied the same tyme for expend A in wyne by the 

cowmaundemewt of the Maier and his brethern xx d. 

Itfm paied and gievyn in rewarde to the princis mynstrell 

the xxiiij Daye of the saide moneth of Maij vj s. viij d. zs 

It^m spent vppon them the same tyme for wyne per beyng 

the maierw depute and his brethren ij s. vj d. 



f 8v (24 June -24 August 1480) 30 

Itmi paied the same Daye by the cowmaundement of the Mair 
Depute and his brothern to A ber<^vard of ^e Kyngwor my 
lord of Aru^del iij s. iiij d. 

35 

f 9 

hem paied the xviij Day of the saide moneth of August to 

the Kyng modyr mynstrallis v s. 40 

8/ Crochis: Robert Croche, mayor. 1479-80. 1489-90. and 1493-4 32/ the same Daye: 16 July 



52 RYE 1479-81 

hem spent the same tyme vppon the saide mynstrallis x d. 

1480-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 5 

f 13v* (3 September -25 December 1480) (Payments and expenses) 

Item paied the xxvij 11 Daye of the saide moneth of Septembir to 

my lorde of Gloweew his Mynstrellis .vj s. and viij d. Spent vppon 

them the same tyme .iiij d. in all vij s. 10 

Itmi paied and gievyw the xvij Daie of Octobir vnto Amynstrel 

of the Eril of kent. xx d. 

Itmi paied for expenc Don the same Tyme vppon the Maier 

and his bredirn & vppon the saide mynstrel iiij d. 15 

f 1 4v* (25 December 1480-22 April 1481) 

Item geuyw in Rewarde to the pleyers of Romene the whiche 20 

pleied in be chirch viij d. 

Itmi geuyw in Rewarde to the pleyers of maideston the whiche 
pleyed in pe chirche pe xiiij day of [the said mowhj iiij d. 

Itmi geuyn in Rewarde vnto ij mynstrell of my lorde of 25 

Arundellw the xj day of ffeuyryre iij s. iiij d. 

Irmi paied the same tyme for ther breke fast and for wyne iiij d. 

f 16 (22 April -24 June 1481) 30 

Item paied vppon the munday. next folwyng to my lorde of 

Arundellw mynstrellw vj s. viij d. 

Item paied and spent vppon them the same tyme for brede and Ale ij d. 

35 

f 17v (24 ] une -24 August 1481) 

hem paied the xxvj daye of lulij that is to say vppon seynt 

Annys Day to the quenys mynstrell iij s. iiij d. 40 

20/ Romene: New Romney, Kent 111 maidesron: Maidstone, Kent 

21/t>e chirch: St Mary s Church 32/ the munday. next folwyng: 30 April 



RYE 1480-2 

Item paied for Expences vppon the mair his brether and vppon 

the saide mynstrell^ ") " 



f 18 

Item paied vppon oure lady the assumpcion the xv Day of 

Auguste to the Kyngw mynstrellf* in rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

Itn spent vppon them the same tyme iiij d. 



10 



1481-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 22* (26 August -25 December 1481) (Payments and expenses) 

15 

Item paied the xiiij day of Octobir to the Mynstrellw of my lady 
the Kyng Mod^r iij s. iii) d. 

Item paied and spent vppon them the same tyme at lohn Adam 
his hous in brde & drywke iiij d. 

20 

f 22v (25 December 148 1 -7 April 1482) (Expenses) 

Item paied to the pleyer of Romeney the whiche pleyed in 

the chirche xxj d. 2s 

Item paied ahvr wardw vnto the pleyer of my lorde of Arundell 

the whiche pleied in pe chir ij s. v d. 



(7 April -24 June 1482) (Payments and expenses) 30 



paied to my lorde of Arundellfj mynstrellw beyng heir in 
Ester halydaies iij s . iiij d. 



f 23v 
mmstrell Item paied to my lorde of yorkes mynstrell iiij s . 



19/ brde: fur brcdc 

24/ Romeney: New Rornney, Kent 

25/ the chirclie: Si Mary s Church 

271 chir: for chirche (if, St Mary s Church); final che omitted for lack ofipace (?) 



54 RYE 1481-3 

minstrell Item paied [the xix] to the quenes mynstrell r the xix Day of lunij 1 iiij s. 

f 24 (24 June- 24 August 1482) 
> mynstrell hem paied to the prynces Mynstrellw xx d. 



f 29 (25 December 1482-30 March 1483) (Expenses and payments) 



5 



1482-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 10 

f 28v (25 August-25 December 1482) (Payments and expenses) 

Item paied to the kyng moder mynstrell the xxj c Day of 
nouembiv and gevyn in rewarde the same ryme v s. 

Itmi paied the same tyme for bred And wyne spent vppon the 15 

saide mynstrell there beyng the Maier and his Brothern xvj d. 

Item paied the same Day to the erle of kent his mynstrell in rewarde xx d. 



20 



Item paied [of] vppon newerw Day at evy to the pleyer of hythe ij s. 

hem paied to the pleyerw of Newendew vppon .xij. Evyn viij d. 

25 

Item paied the same ryme to the Mynstrell of the town 

in rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

hem paied the xij of lanyuer to the game pleyer of wittisham 

iw crouchis house. xij d. 30 



f 30v* (30 March -24 June 1483) 

Item gevyn in rewarde to the Mynstrellw of the town xij d. 

hem paled the same Day to my lorde of Arundellw mynstrellis iij s. iiiij d. 



18/ the same Day: 25 November 29/ wittisham: Witlersham. Kent 

23/ hythe: Hythe. Kent 30/ crouchis: Robert Croche. mayor, 1479-80. 

24/ Newcnden: Newenden, Kent 1489-90, and 1493-4 

267 the same tyme: 25 December 37/ the same Day: 6 April 



RYE 1482-4 

f 31 

Item paied the ix Day of Aprill to the lorde Stanleis Berward iij s. iiij d. 



f 31v* 

Item paied the tuysday nex aftfr ouir chirche haliday to the 

Duke of glowcest^r his Mynstrallis vj s. viij d. 

10 
linstrell Item paied to my lorde of Northumbirlandw mynstrellw ij s. ix d. 



1483-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 15 

f 38 (25 December 1483-18 April 1484) (Expenses and payments) 

hem paied in Crist masse halidayes by the maierf & his 

brethernes Cowmaundement to the game pleyerw that 

pleyid in Crouches hous xij d. 20 

Item paied to the lorde of arundell [Myn] Pleyer that 

pleyed in the Chirche iiij s. viij d. 

Item paied for bred & wyne spent vppon the maier and his 

brethern the same nyght iij s. 25 

Item paied to the keper of the kyng leon by the 

cowmaundement of the maier xx d. 



30 

f 4 1 v* (24 August-4 September 1484) 

nynstrell Item paied the friday next Aft^r the fest of Bartilmew to 

the kyngcj mynstrell & spent vpon them the same tyme 



m 



all 



iij s . v d. 35 



20/ Crouches: Robert Croche. mayor. 1479-80. 1489-90. and 1493-4 

23/ die Chirche: St Mary s Church 

25/ rile same nyght: 25 December 

33/ the friday ... Bamlmcw 27 August 



56 RYE 1484-6 



1484-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 46* (5 Septembcr-25 December 1484) (Expenses and payments) 

Item paied the Satirday next after the fest of the natyuite of our 
lady the xj Day of the saide monethe of Septembir the yerf afore 
sayde vnto pe mynstrellfs of be Erile of Northobelondw xx d. 



f 46v* 10 

Itmi paied vpon saynt Edwardw euyn to the Duchesse of york 

mynstrallw for \>er reward and for wyne spent vppon thew 

the same tyme iij s. viij d. 

15 

f 47* 

hem paied at harry swannes hous the xix Day of the seid moneth 

of Nouembir vnto the lord of Arundellw mynstrellw by the maierw 

cowmaundement & his brodern 

hem spent vpon them the same ryme ther beyng the maier & his 

brethirn w/ t/> ochir Comenerw for wyne xij d. 

25 

f 4 8 * (25 December 1484-3 April 1 485) 

hem paied the vij Day of lanyuerf to my lorde of 
mynstrell 



1485-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 54v* (28 August -25 December 1485) (Expenses and payments) 

hem paied to my lord of arundellw mynstrell At ther 

beyng her^ ) s - 



paied in gyvynd vnto my lorde of Arundell harper xx d. 

19/ harry swannes: Henry Suiann, mayor. 1497-8 



RYE 1485-7 

f 55 (25 December 1485-26 March i486) 

hem paied to the lorde of Arundellw pleyer that pleid her*- in 

the quere- afur Crist masse holydaies xj d. 

Item paied to ij Mynstrellw that come frome london in 

rewardyng them by be maier commaundement viij d. 



f 55v (26 March -24 June i486) 10 

Item paied & given to the wayt of this Town xx d. 

hem paied to a benrward by the maier cowmaundement xx d. 

mynstrello hem paied to the Duchese of yorkes mynstrell in the is 

chirche here iij s. iiij d. 



f 56 

20 

hem paied by the maierw cowmaundement & his brethern to 
men of lede that come to shew a contynaunce of their play in 
the market place iiij s. 

25 

f 56v (24 June -24 August i486) 

hem paied and gievyn in rewarde to the Erill of kent mynstrall xij d. 

30 

1486-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 60v (27 August -25 December 1486) (Expenses and payments) 

hem paied the xxix 11 Day A of Septewbre iw be fest of saynt 35 

Michel to the lorde of Arundellw mynstrallw iij s. iiij d. 



1 5-16/ the chirche: St Mary s Church 
22/lede: Lydd, Kent 



58 RYE 1486-8 

f 61* (25 December 1486-15 April 1487) 

hem paied the tuysday next aftrr [the] xij th Day to the pleyerw 

pleyeng at Drynkerw viij d. 

Item paied [for bred] to the lorde mat<rfac mynstrell xij d. 

hem spent vpon him in hasdem hous for brede And wyne vj d. 

hem paied to the pleyere; the whiche pleyed last at Drynkerw hous x d. 

hem paied to Willwm Eston for mony that he paied vnto the 

that pleyed in Robml a Crochis hous vij d. 



10 



f 6 1 v (15 April- 24 June 1487) 

15 

Itfm paied the xiiij Day of Maij in rewarde gievyn vnto the 
quenys MynstrelL?* iij s. iiij d. 

hem paied the next Day foluyng to a ber^ward of the lord 

of Oxenforthis ij s. ob. 20 



1487-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 67 (26 August -25 December 1487) (Expenses and payments) 25 

Ittrn paied to my lady of york mynstrellw ij s. 

Itrni spente vppon the/w the same tyme for maJmese iiij d. 



30 
f 67v 

Itmi paied to the pleyerw that played in the Chirche xiiij d. 



3/ the tuysday ... xij th Day: 9 January 

10/ Will/am Eston: William Eston, chamberlain. 1482-3 

1 1/ Robcrd a Crochis: Robert Croche. mayor, 1479-80, 1489-90. and 1493-4 

19/ the next Day foluyng: 30 May 

33 the Chirche, St Mary s Church 



RYE 1487-9 59 

(25 December 14 87 -6 April 1488) 

Item paied to the Town Minstrellw for their gown cloth vj s. viij d. 

5 

f 68v* (6 April -24 June 1488) 

Item paied to the pleyerwof apuldore What tyme they cryed the 

banys here- in the market place ij s. iiij d. 

hem paied to A mynstrell of the lord of Arundell xij d. 10 

Item paied to the kyng mynstrellis .v s. & spent vpon thew the 

same cyme there beyng certayn of the maier brethern & cowmener 

for bred and wyne .xij d. in all vj s. 

15 

f 69 (24 June -24 August 1488) 

Item paied to the quenys Mynstrellis iij s. iiij d. 

Item paied for wyne dronkyn at ther beyng here viij d. 

20 

f 69v 

Itmi paied to /a 1 bereward of the Erie of Derby ij s. 

It^m paied to A mynstrell of the lorde of Arundell xij d. 25 



1488-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 74v (31 August -25 December 1488) (Expenses and payments) 30 

Itrni paied to the pleierwof ffrittynden viij d. 

Icn paied to the pleierw of Cantdrbirry whiche pleied in 

dry;/ker hous. xv jjj J 

35 

Itmi paied in Cristmasse halidaies to the pleier b#t pleid 

in pe chirch. v j 



8/apuldorc: Appltdore, Kent 33/ Caiwrbirry: Canterbury. Kent 

32/ ffrittynden: Fnttenden. Kent 37/ f)e chirch: St Mary s Church 



60 RYE 1488-90 

f 75* (25 December 1488-19 April 1489) 

Item paied the ffirst Day of ffebruary the yere a fore said vnto 

pleieiw of lide that plaied last at drikar xx d. 

5 

Item paied to the pleyerej whiche pleied at lohn Eston hous x d. 



f 76 (19 April -24 June 1489) (Expenses) 

10 

hem paied. to the lord [Der] the Eril of derby bereward in 
a reward. iij s. iiij d. 



f 76v* (24 June -24 August 1489) (Expenses and payments) 15 

Itmi paied to the mynstrellw of the lorde of oxenforthis. iij s. iiij d. 



1489-90 20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 80 (30 August -25 December 1489) (Expenses and payments) 

ffirst paied to Maistrr Croche for that he paied vnto the kyng 

Mynstrell in the weke next after barthilmew the yere aforsaid vj s. viij d. 25 
Itmi paied the same tyme for bred and wyne xxij d. 

Itmi paied for fisshe the same tyme at sopere vj d. 

Itmi paied to the Eril of arundellw mynstrellw ij s. & expewdid 

vpow pern .j d. ij s. j d. 30 



f 80v* 

Itmi paied to the playerw of ffritrynden that pleyed in the chirche xij d. 35 



4/ lide: Lydd, Kent 25/ the weke next after barthilmew: 
4/ dnkarfl: for drif/ltares, abbreviation mark missing (f) 30 August-5 September 

6/ lohn Bton: John Eston, MI>, 1478 35/ ffrictynden: Frittcndtn, Kent 

24/ Maistrr Croche: Robert Croche, mayor, 35/ the chirche: St Mary s Church 
1479-80, 1489-90. and 1493-4 



RYE 1489-91 

(25 December 1489-11 April 1490) 

Item gevyn to the mynstrell of be town by be cowmaundew^nt of be xx d. 

Item paied at the Maierw hous vnto the pleierw of tentmkn xvj d. 



f 81* 

Item paied to an harper of my lord of Arundellw xij d. 10 

Item Spent vpon hym the same tyme iij d. ob. 
Item paied to the pleyerw of wynchelse that plaied in chirche xj d. 



f 81v* (11 April -24 June 1490) \<> 

hem gievyn in reward vnto the A ^own 1 mynstrellf* ij s. viij d. 

f 82* 20 

hem. paied & gievyn to the princes Mynstrel ij s. 

hem. spent vpon hym the same tyme xij d. 

2S 

f 83 (24 June -24 August 1490) 

hem. paied vnto the kyngw mynstrelltt vpon saynt laurenc^r day iij s. iiij d. 
It^m. expendid vpon them the same tyme iiij d. 

30 

1490-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 88 (29 August -25 December 1490) (Expenses and payments) 

35 

Item paied vpon holy Rode day vnto the Duke of bedford mystrell. ij s. 



3/ Jie 1 : rest of entry text omitted for lack afsfact 
5/ tent^rden: Tenterden, Kent 
1 2/ chirche: St Mary s Church 



62 RYE 1490-1 

f 88v 



It<m geven in rewarde to the princis mywnstrellw ij s. 



f 89v* (25 December 1490-3 April 1491) 

hem paied to the pleyerw that pleyed at Williaw Eston hous. and 

to the. players that played in Drynkenw hous iij s. 

10 
hem paied to the Eril of Arundellrt mynstrell xij d. 



f 90 

hern paied to the Eryle of Oxenforthis bereward iij s. iiij d. 

Item paied to therill of Derby his bereward xx d. 



hem paied. in reward to the lorde wellis Mynstrell xij d. 



20 



f 91 (3 April -24 June 1491) 

hem paied and gievyn to my lorde [wellis] derbyes mynstrel xij d. 

25 

hem paied to iiij of the lorde of Arundellw mynstrellis iij s. iiij d. 



f 91v* 

30 

hem. paied to the quenys mynstrellis ij s. 



f 93 (24 June- 24 August 1491) 

35 

These bene the Cost in the weke of Saynt margett first paied to 

iiij of the kynga Mynstrellw v s. 

hem expendid vpon the same mynstrellw \>er b e yng the maier 

and his brothern xiiij d. 

40 

8/ William Eston: William Eston. chamberlain, 1482-3 36/ the wekc of Saynt margcn: 17-23 July 

9/ played: d written over tfs 



RYE 1491-4 

1491-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f lOOv* (25 December 1491-22 April 1492) (Payments and expenses) 

hem gievyn in rewarde to the lorde of Arundell mynstrellw xx d. 

hem spent vpon hym be same tyme at bukkfj hous vj d. 

hem paied to the pleier of Redyng that pleid at William Estownes. xviij d. 

ID 

1492-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 108v* (26 August -25 December 1492) (Expenses and payments) 

hem paied to the pleyerw of madeston in the chirche xviij d. 15 



f 1 1 Iv (7 April -24 June 1493) 

hem paied & gievyn in Reward to the mynstrell of the lorde of 20 

oxenford and expendid vpon thew the same tyme f in all 1 ij s. j d. 



1493-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 25 

f 5 (25 August -25 December 1493) (Expenses and payments) 

ffirst paied the v Day of Septembnf to the kyng mynstrellw vj s. viij d. 
Itd-m paied for bred & wyne expendid vpon the saide mynstrell vj d. 

30 

f6v 

Itfm paide & gyven in Rewarde to my lorde A one 1 of 

Arundellw Mynstrallw xiiij d. 35 

hem paide the xx c . Day of Nouembr^ to a Bernard of my lord 

of Oxenfordw ij. s . 



8/ Redyng: Reading Street. Kent 

81 William Euonnes William Eston, chamberlain, 1482-3 

15/ madeston: MaiJstone, Kent 

15/ the chirche: St Mary s Church 

34-51 my lorde A one of Arundelln Mynstralln: for A onc of 1 my lorde of Arundelles Mynstralles 



64 RYE 1493-5 



hem expendid the same tyme at thomas barbors hous vpon the 

same berward for wyne iiij. 



f7 (25 December 1493-30 March 1494) 5 

hem paide to the town Mynstrallcs for a Reward ij. s. 

f 8* (30 March -24 June 1494) , 

hem paide &: yevew to pe town Mynstrallw the same tyme ij. s. 



f 9* , 5 

hem paied by the Cowmaundement of the maier and his brethern 

to the Criarrrt of the play of broklond iij s. iiij d. 



20 

f 1 Iv* (Expenses) 

These ben the Coste* And payments paied by Robert Crouche late maier 
of Rye. 

first gievyn in Reward to pe Eril of oxenford mynstrellw v s. 25 

hem gievyn in Reward to pe prince mynstrell iij s. iiij d. 



1494-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 30 

f 15 (31 August -25 December 1494) (Expenses and payments) 

ffirst paied the x ch Day of Septembrf to the Kyng mynstrellw vj s. viij d. 
hem paied the same Day for vyne expendid vpon thew v d. 

hem paied be xij c ^ Day of Septembrf to the lord gray Ritthy?/ his 35 

mynstrell whiche played vpon a Crowde xij d. 

hem paied for wyne expendid vpon hym the same day ij d. 



\1I the same tyme: on or about Easter, 30 March 18/ broklond: Brookland. Kent 



RYE 1494-5 65 

f I6v* 

hem gievyn in reward to Amystrell r of 1 my lord of Aruwdel & 

for drywk iw a] xiiij d. 

5 

Item paled to the players of Tentirden that plaied at Drynkerw xij d. 



f 1 7v* (25 December 1494- 19 April 1495) 

Itrni paied to be [prynsis] playerw of my lord princ. iiij s. iiij d. 



10 



f 18 

!> 

hem paied & gievyn to a Reward to ij mynstrell of my lord of 

oxenfordes to lohn Rixad & lamys belle 1 ij s. 

hem paied for wyne expendid vpon them at basedewnys ij d. 

hem paied to the Claionerw of my lorde of Aruwdell. iij s. iiij d. 

Itrni paied for Wyne expendid vpon thewz the same time. ij d. 20 



f 18v 

Itifm paied to A the Maier for brft he paied to 1 a mynstrell of the 25 

lode of SufFolke x d. 

Itmi A he expendid vpon \\yrn the same tyme ij d. 



f 21v* (24 June- 24 August 1495) 30 

Itn paied the next Day foluyng to iiij. mynstrellof my lady the 

Item expendid vpon them in wyne iiij J 



6/ Tentirden: Tenterden. KeM 

18/ basedennys: probably Thomas Baseden, merchant and jurat. 1504-8 

271 the same tyme: 21 July 

32/ the next Day foluyng: 21 August 



66 RYE 1495-6 



1495-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 28 (30 August -25 December 1495) (Expenses and payments) 

hem paide to the Icyngw Mynstrallei the xviij Day of Septembrf vj. s. vii) d. 5 
hem paide [to] the same tyme at thomas barbors for brede and 
wyne gyven to them & A r to the Maier & hys brethren vj. d. 

hem paide to The Erie of kent Mynstrallw the xix Day of Septembr^ xij. d. 

10 
f 30 (3 April -24 June 1496) 

hem gyven to the Erie of Arondell mynstrell xij. d. 

hem expendid vpon hym the same tyme j. d. 

15 

f 30v 

hem paide the same weke to the Erie of Arondell Mynstrellw iij. s. iiij d. 

20 

f 31v 

hem gyven in Reward to the players of Romene vj. s. viij. d. 

25 

Itt-rn gyven in Reward to the lord wardens Mynstrallf* iiij. d. 

hem paide for a drynking the same tyme at thomas barbors vj. d. 

hem paide to the prince; mynstrall with Trompett vj. s. viij d. 
Itrni paide for wyne the same tyme xij. d. 30 

hem paide for brede the same tyme iiij d. 

hem paide for ale the same tyme ij d. 

f 32v 35 

hem gyven in Reward to the lord of Oxfords Mynstrell 



vpon saint petirs even 



19/ the same weke: 10-16 April 
24/ Romene: New Romney. Kent 



ii.d. 



RYE 1495-8 67 

f 34* (24 June --24 August 1496) 

hem gyven in Reward by the Maier & hys brethrens awimaundementw 

to the Erie of Oxenford Bereward ij s. 

5 

1496-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 40 (28 Angust-25 December 1496) (Expenses and payments) 

10 

ffirst paid the xviij. Day of Septembr? to the Kyng Mynstrall vj. s. viij. d. 
hem paid the same tyme in expensw at thomas barbors. doon 
vpon bem iiij. d. 

15 

f 41* 

hem gyven in Reward by the Maiers cowmaundement to the 

players of Maydestan viij. d. 

20 

f 42* (25 December 1496-26 March 1497) 

hem gevyn to the kyng bereward the lord Wardeyns And the 

erle of Q\fordes xxv d. 25 



f 45 (24 June -24 August 1497) 

hem paied to the kyng Mynstrellys ij. s. 30 

hem expendid vppon them the same tyme ij. d. 



1497-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 35 

f 50v* (25 December 1497-15 April 1498) (Expenses and payments) 

Item gevyn in reward to my lord of Arrundellis mynstrellis xij d. 



19/ Maydestan: Maidttont, Kent 
3 1/ the same tyme. 25 July 



68 RYE 1497-9 

f 51* 
Item paied to A bereward of my lord of york iiij s. 

5 

f 53* 

Item paied to the pleiers of mallynge ij s. vij d. 

Item paied to the pleiers of Maideston xj d. 10 

f 56* (24 June- 24 August 1498) (Necessary expenses) 

Item paied to A Mynstrell of my lorde of Caunterburies xij d. 15 

f 56v* 

Item paied to My lorde of Oxforde* Mynstrell iiij s. 20 

(24-6 August 1498) (Expenses) 

Item paied to the prince* mynstrallis v s. 25 



1498-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 65* (26 August -25 December 1498) (Expenses and payments) 30 

Item gevyn in rewarde to the Prince* Mynstrallys vj s. viij d. 



f 67* (25 December 1498-31 March 1499) 35 

Item to lord of Oxforde* bereward for A reward ij s. ij d. 

Item gevyn in reward to my lorde of Caunterburies mynstralle* 

and to my lord of Oxforde* mynstralle* v s. 40 

8/ mallynge: probably South Mailing. Sussex, but possibly West or East Mailing, Kent 
10/ Maideston: MaiJitone, Kent 



Sharpe 



RYE 1498-1500 

hem expendid on them at bakers 

hem in rewarde to the quenys mynstrallw v s. iiij d. 

hem Spent on them in Wyne x j " 

5 

f 68v* (31 March -24 June 1499) (Brotherhood and other expenses) 

hem paied to my lord of oxfordw pleiers v s. iiij d. 

10 

Itmi paied to my lord of york mynstrall in reward v s. viij d. 

f 69v* (24 June -24 August 1499) (Expenses and payments) 

hem paied to the duke of yorkes Mynstrellw At Maters 

Cuwmaund vj s. viij d. 

Itcrn for ther brekfast the same tyme viij d. 

20 

1499-1500 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 83 (25 August- 25 December 1499) (Expenses and payments) 

hem paied to pleiers b#t pleid At Clement Adams byfore master 25 

meier and suw of his brethern viij d. 



30 



f 87v* (19 April -24 June 1500) 

hem gevyn in reward to my lorde of Cauntreberyes mynstrell iij s. iiij d. 
Itrni gevyn in rewarde to the pleiers of benynden vj s. viij d. 



f 88 35 

Itrm gevyn in reward to my lorde of kent benvard ij s. 



25/ Clement Adams: Clement Adam, mayor. 1506-7. 1508-9. 1512-13. 1517-18; also an innkeeper 
32/ benynden: Benenden, Kent 



70 RYE 1500-3 



1500-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 108* (24-9 August 1501) (Expenses and payments) 

hem to Mr Poinyngfj Mynestrell for A reward xij d. 



1501-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 117* (29 August -25 December 1501) (Payments and expenses) 10 

Item paied to players uppon Newyeres evyn at master 

mayers Cowmaundment xviii d. 



15 

f 120 (24 June -24 August 1502) (Expenses and payments) 

Item paied to Mr ponyngw bereward in Reward iiij s. vij d. 



20 

1502-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO. RYE 60/4 

f 133v (25 December 1502-16 April 1503) (Payments and expenses) 

Item gevyn to the players offwynchelse at Master 25 

Mayres Cowmaundment xviij d. 

ltn payed to a Mynstrell off Mr ponyngw in rewarde xx d. 

Item paied to A Mynstrell off my lorde off Arundelkf xij d. 

30 



f 134v (16 April -24 June 1503) (Expenses and payments) 

Item paied to the players off asshforde at Master 

Mayres cowmaundment xj d. 35 



34/ asshforde: Ashford. Kent 



RYE 1502-4 

f 135v 

hem paied to my lorde Wardens mynstrell at master 
Mayres Cowmaundment 

Item paied to the bane Cryers offlyde at the Cowmaundment 
off master May re 



71 



iiij s. vj d. 



vj s. viij d. 



f 138 (24 June-24 August J 503) (Expenses) 

hem paied to the bane Cryers offRomney vj s. vnj d. 

Itnn spendyd uppon the hole Company off Romney At that tyme iiij s. x d. 



10 



f I40v* (24-7 August 1503) (Payments) 

hem paied to my lorde prince berwarde And to mrponyng berwarde iiij s. 



15 



20 



mynstrell 



mynstrcll 



1503-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 1 5 1 * (27 August -25 December 1503) (Payments) 

hem paied to the kyng mynstrellw in Reward 
hem paied in exp^ns^f uppon the same mynstrellw 

Itmi paied to my lorde wardens Mynstrellw 
Itrni spended uppon the same Mynstrellrt 

f 152v 

hem paied to the players offRomney at master Mayres 
Commaundment 

hem paied to the pleyers off wynchelse at the Cowmaundment 
off master Mayre 



vj s. viij d. 25 
xd. 

vj s. viij d. 
ij s. iiij d. 

30 



xxij d. 35 
xij d. 



61 lydc: LytU. Kent 



12, 13, 34/ Romney: New Romney, Kent 



72 RYE 1503-5 

f 1 53 (25 December 1503 -7 April 1504) (Expenses) 

Item paied to the players off Caunterbury at master 

Mayres Cowmaundment xviij d. 

Item paled to my lorde off Arundellw mynstrel) xx d. 5 

hem paied to players off goudherst at the Mayres Cowmaundment viij d. 

hem to my lord prince bereworth iij s. viij d. 

10 

f I53v (7 April -24 June 1504) 

Item paied to Maister ponyng Mynstrell 

f 154* 

hem paied to the players off Cranebroke uppon dedicaaon day 

at the Cowmaundment off Master Mayre xij d. 20 



1504-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f I67v* (25 August -25 December 1504) (Expenses) 25 

hem paied to my lorde princes mynstrellw in Reward vj s. viij d. 

hem paied for A galon wyne spent uppon the same mynstrell viij d. 

hem paied to lohn buwne for Rewarde off players in 30 

the Cristmaswyke xiiij d. 



f 1 68 (25 December 1504-23 March 1504/5) 

35 

hem paied to my lorde off Arundels players at Master 

Mayres Cowmaundment ij s. vj d. 



3/ Cauncerbury: Canterbury, Kent 

II goudherst: Goudhurtt, Kent 

19/ Cranebroke: Cranbrook, Kent 

30/ lohn bunne. John Bunne, Serjeant, 15245 



RYE 1504-6 

hem paied to the players off tenterden at Master 

Mayres Cowmaundment iij s. uij d. 



f I69v* (23 March 150415-24 June 1505) 

Item paied to Maister ponyngw Mynstrell uppon dedicac/on day i) s. 

Item paied to the players offChichestre the seid day ij s. 

10 
f 170 (24 June-24 August 1505) 

Item paied to my lorde off Arundelw mynstrell xi) d. 

Item paied to my lorde princes and my lord of oxford mynstrellw iij s. iiij d. 15 
hem paied for expense uppon theym at Maister Loves xx d. 

hem paied at Mr barkeleys for ther horsmete iiij d. 



1505-6 20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 181* (31 August -25 December 1505) (Expenses) 

Item paied to my lord prince mynstrellw in Rewarde vj s. viij d. 

Item paied in expenses uppon theym iij d. ob. 25 



f 181v* 

hem paied to the players off towne Mallyng playng at 30 

laurence Stephens vj d. 



f 182* 

35 

hem paied in Reward uppon the spaynyssh mynstellw ij s. iiij d. 



I/ tenterden: Tenterden, Kent 

111 Mr barkeleys: Richard Barkeley, mayor. 1503-4 

30/ Mallyng: probably South Mailing, Sussex, but possibly West or East Mailing, Kent 



74 RYE 1505-7 

hem paied in Rewarde to the players off this Towne vij d. 

Item paied to swylboll the mynstrell at Wynchelse at the 
Cowmaundment off Master Mayre at agestlyng ther iiij d. 

5 

f 1 82v (25 December 1 505-12 April 1 506) 

hem paied to my lorde [price] prince berworthis and 

Mr ponyng berworthis iij s. viij d. 10 

f 184 (12 April -24 June 1506) 

hem paied in Reward to my lord princes Mynstrell iiij s. 15 

hem paied in Rewarde to the bane Cryers offbrokland iij s. iiij d. 

f 185* (24 June-24 August 1506) 20 

Item paied to Mr ponyng Mynstrell in Rewarde xij d. 

hem paied in exp^nsw uppon my lorde prince Mynstrellw 

at Mr barkeleys ix d. 25 



1506-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 195v* (30 August -25 December 1506) (Expenses) 30 

hem paied to My lorde prince mynstrell in Reward vj s. viij d. 

Item paied in expenses uppon the same Mynstrell vij d. 

35 

f 1 97 (25 December 1506-4 April 1507) 

hem paied in Reward to pleyers uppon sent Thomas day 

in Cristmasse viij d. 

40 
17/broldand: Brooklanti. Kent 25/ Mr barkeleys: Richard Barkeley, mayor, 1503-4 



RYE 1506-7 

Item paied in Reward to the players of douer in Cristmasse xx d. 



f 197v* 

5 

Item paied [to] in Reward to Mr lewkenor players xij d. 



f 198 

10 

hem paied to my Lorde off Northumberlonde berworthe in Reward iiij s. 
f 199v (4 April -24 June 1507) 

15 

Item paied to the pleyars offlydenden at Master 
Mayers Comaundement vj s. viij d. 

Item paied in Reward uppow Mr ponyngw Mynstrell xij d. 

20 

f 200* 

Item paied to [henr Gwen] the kyngw mynstrell in rewarde vj s. viij d. 
And in exp^ns [of] uppon the same mynstrellw vj d. ob. 2s 

f 20 1 v* (24 June- 24 August 1 507) 

Item paied to my lady the kynges moders mynstrellw in Reward iiij s. 30 

hem paied to x dykers that is to say Richard bocher T lankashyre 

Thomas stott antony frenshman Richard bocher sen/or the [brer] 

bereworth Nicolas Cobeler denney Cobeler and ij men off salcot 

dyggyng at the new key [at] and dyggyng the dyke in die Comons 35 

And workyng at blekwell and in theTowne dyke. And at [Rob] 

the west clyffe to ley the new worke there by an hole wyke takyng 

vj d. a day a man off theym fyndyng themselfe xxvij s. vj d. 



\l dourr Dover, Kent 36/ blekwell: Blekewell, or Queen s Well site of 

16/ lydenden. Lydden, Ktnl natural spring north of the lown 

34/ salcot: Saltott, Essex (?) 



76 RYE 1507-8 



1507-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 2 1 0* (29 August -25 December 1507) (Expenses) 

hem paied in Reward uppon my lorde prince mynstrell vj s. viij d. 5 

hem paied for wyne spent uppon the same mynstrell iiij d. 



f 2 1 2* (25 December 1507-23 April 1508) 



hem paied to the pleyers off Towne mallyng in Kent in Cristmasse 

at the Cowmaundement off Master Mayre xiiij d. 

hem payed to the players off Charte the same sonday at the 

Commaundement off Master Mayre ij d. 

hem paied at Mr barkeleys at A soper ordeyned for the pwrseuaunt 

that broughte the kyng writyng off the mariage by twen the prince 

off Casrylle and the kyngw doughter x s. j d. 

hem paied to A mynstrell at the same soper viij d. 



10 



15 



20 



f 212v 

hem paied in februar to the kyng bereworth at 25 

the Cowmaundement off Master Mayre vj s. [j d. ob.] r ix d. ob. 1 

hem paied in expenses at Mr barkeleys uppon Master 
Mayre his brethren and the said bereworthe ij s. 

30 

f 2 1 4* (23 April- 24 June 1508) 

hem paied in Reward to my lorde off oxford berworthe at the 
Cowmaundement of Master Mayre xvj d. 

35 

hem paied to the banecryers of betrisden in kent at the 
Cowmaundement off maistcr Mayre iiij s. 



1 1/ mallyng in Kent: Wat or East Mailing. Kent 16, 27/ Mr barkeleys: Richard Barkeley, mayor, 1503-4 
14/ Charte: Great or Little Chart, Kent 36/ betrisden in kent: Bethenden, Kent 



RYE 1507-9 

f 21 5v* (24 June-24 August 1508) 

Item paied to the pleyers of broklond uppon chuche holyday at the 
Cowmaundement off Mr [Wymond] vsaunt then beyng deputye for 
Master Mayre xx *. 5 



f 216* 

hem paied to the pleyers off essex that pleyd with sword at 10 

the stronde xiiij d. 



ff 2l6v-17 

5 

hem paied in Rewarde to my lord prince mynstrellw uppon 

mary mawdlen evyn iij s. iiij d. I 

hem spent uppon the same mynstrellw that tyme at Mr Suttons xvj d. 

Item paied to the kyngw mynstrellw in reward vj s. viij d. 20 

hem paied in exp^nsw uppon theym x d. 



f 217v 

25 

hem paied in Reward to the mynstrellw of my lord of (blank) iij s. iiij d. 
Item paied in expenses uppon theym iiij d. 



1508-9 30 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 228* (27 August -25 December 1508) (Expenses) 

Item paid in Rewarde to my lorde prince mynstrellw vj s. viij d. 

35 

f 228v 

Item paied to my lorde prince berworthe in Rewarde iij s. iiij d. 



40 



3/ broklond: BrookLind, Kent 18/ Mr Suttons: Nicholas Sutton, mayor. 1509-1 1, 15 16-17, 1529. 

3/ chuche: >rchurche 1531-2; HP. 1510-12. 1514. 1516. 1 529; also an innkeeper 



RYE 1508-9 

f 229v 



Item paied to the pleyrs off douer in Rewarde xj d. ob. 



f 230 (25 December 1508-8 April 1509) 

hem paid in Rewarde to ij Companyes players wiche played at 

William Wayt at the Cowmaundement of Master Mayre ij s. 

Item paied in lyke Reward to the players of harysam xij d. 10 



f 230v 

Item paied to pleyrs that played at William Waytes in reward vj d. 15 

f 232v (8 April -24 June 1509) 

hem paied in Reward to the kyng berworth vij s. 20 

hem paied in expenses uppon hym at Mr barkeleis xxij d. 



f 233 (24 June -24 August 1509) 

25 

hem paied to the bane cryers off lyde at Master 

Mayers Cowmaundement vj s. viij d. 

hem paied at basdens for expenses of the same banecryers vij s. vj d. 



30 

f 233 v* (24 -6 August 1509) 

hem paied in Reward to my lorde off Arundellw mynstrell iij s. iiij d. 



3/ doucr: Dover, Kent 

10/ harysam: probably Hametslhini, l\ent 

2 1/ Mr barkeleis: Richard Barkeley. mayor. 1503-4 

26/ lyde. Lydd, Kent 

28/ hasdcns: probably Thomas Btiseden, merchant and jurat, 15048 



RYE 1509-10 

1509-10 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 244 (26 August -25 December 1509) (Expenses) 

hem paied to the kynge; mynstrelle; in Reward vj s. viij d. 5 

Item paied in expense* uppon the same mynstrelle* xj d. 



f 246v (25 December 1509-31 March 1510) 

10 

Item paied to certen players at the Cowmaundement of 
Maiscer Mayre xviij d. 



f 247 15 

Item paied to the kynge* bereworth in rewarde vj s. viij d. 

Item paied in Rewarde to the man wiche brought the Camell vj s. viij d. 

20 

f 249v (24 June- 24 August 1510) 

Item paied to ij mynstrelle* off my lorde of oxenfordej and in 

expenses uppon them v s. 25 

Item paied to the players of Romeney in rewarde vj s. viij d. 

Item paied in expense uppon theym xxii d. 

Item paied to [the Ir] my lorde off Northumbrelonde berworthe 30 

in Rewarde v j s 

f 250 

35 

Item paied to Maister ponynge* mynstrell in Rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

Item in expense* uppon hym at Maister mayers xij d. 



277 Romeney: New Romney. Kent 



80 RYE 1510-11 



1510-11 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 255v (20 April -24 June 1511) (Receipts) 

hem receyued of A mynstrell for a fray made xvi d. 



f 260 (25 August-25 December 1510) (Expenses) 

hem paied in Reward to the kyng mynstrell vj s. viij d. i 

Item pajed in expenses uppon the same mynstrellw at Master Mayers xvj d. 



f 260v* 

is 

hem paied to Thomas Adam for the play hyre played at 
Churchmassday last past v s. 

hem paied to players offTenterden A f and other 1 in Cristmasse ij s. iiij d. 
hem paied to my lorde Stuardes mynstrell in Rewarde xx d. 20 

hem paied to the berworth in Rewarde [vj] vij s. viij d. 

hem paied in expenses uppon the same berworth at Clement Adams iij s. 

hem paied in expfns at Maistres Swannes uppon the seid berworth 

and other ther beyng Master Mayre & his brethren xvij d. :<, 

hem paied to Mr ponyngw mynstrelF in Rewarde iiij s. 

hem paied to A Mynstrell off my lorde off Northomberlond 

in Reward xx d. 



30 

f 263 (20 Apnl-24 June 1511) 

hem paied to the players off brokland vj s. viij d. 

hem paied in expense uppon theym at that tyme ij s. viij d. 


hem paied in Rewarde to my lorde off oxford mynstrellw iij s. iiij d. 



19/ Tcnterdcn-. Ttnttrden, Kent 

23/ Clemenc Adams: Clement Adam, mayor, 1506-7, 1508-9. 1512-13. 1517-18, also an innkeeper 

24/ Maisrres Swjnnes: possibly wife of Henry Swann, mayor, 1492-3 and 1497-8 

33/ brokland BrookLind, Kent 



RYE 1510-12 

f 264v* (24 June- 24 August 1511) 

Item paied for A barell off byer And ij Creuses for the worshipfull 
man Robyn hode f when [went] he went in visitac/ on about the 
Towne uppon Churchmasse day xiiij d. 



1511-12 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 275 (31 August -25 December 1511) (Expenses) 10 

Item paied in Rewarde to my lorde offoxfordw bereworth iij s. 

Item paied in Rewarde to the kyng mynstrell vj s. viij d. 

Item paied in Rewarde to my lorde offArundelI mynstrellw iij s. iiij d. 15 

Item paied for e\penses uppon the Same mynstrellw xx d. 



f 278 (25 December 1511-11 April 1512) 

20 

Item paied to the players off Tarryng at the Commaurvdemem 

off Master Mayre and his brethern xij d. 

f 278v 

25 

Item paied to thorolde Mr ponyng mynstrell in Rewarde ij s. 

Item paied in exp^ns^ uppon the same Thorold viij d. 



30 

Item paied to Adam the kyng bereworth for Rewarde in lent iiij s. 

Item paied in expenses uppon the same Adam at that tyme 

at Clement Adams viij d. 

35 

f 282v (24 June -24 August 1512) 

Item paied in Rewarde to my lorde offArundell mynstrellw xij d. 

2 1/ Tarryng: West Tarring or Tarring Neville 

34/ Clement Adams: Clement Adam, mayor, 1506-7. 1 508-9, 1512-13, 1517-18: also an innkeeper 



82 RYE 1511-13 

Item paied in expenses uppon the same mynstrellw iiij d. 

f 283 

hem paied in Rewarde to my lorde off bokyngham mynstrellw 

in August iiij s 

Item in expms uppon the same mynstrell At Clement Adams viij d. 



f 283v 

hem paied to my lorde Tresorers mynstrellw in Rewarde v s. 

hem paied in exp<?ns uppon the same mynstrell^ at Clement Adams ij s. 



f 284v (24-9 August 1512) 

hem paied in Rewarde to the kyng mynstrellw vj s. viij d. 

hem paied in exspfnsf5 uppon the same mynstrellfs at 21 

Clement Adams [xvj d.] xviij d. 



1512-13 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 2< 

f 292v (29 August- 25 December 1512) (Expenses) 

hem paid in Rewarde uppon the kyng bereworthe x s. 

hem paid in expenses uppon hym at Master Mayers xl d. 

hem paied in Rewarde uppon my lorde off oxforde berworth v s. v d. 3< 

hem in expms uppon hym at Mr Suttons viij d. 



f 294v (25 December 1512-27 March 1513) 

3! 

hem paied to A bereworthe at the Cowmaundement off Mr Sutton v s. 



8. 14, 21/ Clement Adams: Clement A Jam, mayor, 1506-7. 1508-9. 1512-13. 1517-18: also an 

innkeeper 

31, 36/ Mr Suttons, Mr Sutton: Nicholas Sutton. mayor. 1509-11. 1516-17. 1529. 1531-2; Mr. 
1510-12. 1514, 1516, 1529: also an innkeeper 



RYE 1512-14 

Item paied to my lorde admyrallw pleyers on rewarde ij s. ix d. 



f 295 

5 

hem paied to Adams the kyng bereworth uppon shroffsonday 
in [rewarde] rewarde vj s. 

hem paied to my my lorde Wardens mynstrell in rewarde ij s. viij d. 

It<rm in expanse; uppon theym bothe vij d. ob. 

10 

f 297 (27 March -24 June 1513) 

hem paied in Rewarde to the kyng mynstrellw iij s. iiij d. 

15 

1513-14 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/4 

f 3 1 5 (25 December 15 13- 16 April 1514) (Expenses) 

20 

hem paied to the mynstrellw of the Towwne in Rewarde vj s. viij d. 

hem paied to ij playes played in William Wayt house ij s. iiij d. 

hem paied to my lorde off Arundellw players xvj d. 2"> 

f 315v 

Itfm paied to other players that played at homfreys x d. 30 

f 316* 

hem paied in Rewarde to the Towne wat at eastfr vj s. viij d. 35 



6/ shroffsonday: 6 February 
8/ my my: dittography 
35/ caster: 16 April 



10 



20 



84 RYE 1513-15 

f 317 (16 April -24 June 1514) 

hem paied to Walter the stameryng mynstrell in Rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

f 318v* 

hem paied in Rewarde to the kyng mynstrellw the 

sonday After corpus christi vj s. viij d. 

hem paied in Rewarde to A pwrseuante wiche brought 

writyng gevyng Cowmaundement to kepe sure weche 

for the ffrenshe galys iij s. iiij d. 

hem paied in expenses uppon the said mynstrellw 

& pwrseuaunt iij s. viij d. 

hem paied to Adams the kyngw bereworth in Rewarde 

hem paied in expenses uppon the same bereworth And Mr 

humfrey gay beyng in the Company with Master Mayre 

And dyu^rse his brethren vj s. viij d. 

f 321 v (24 June-24 August 1514) 

hem paied to my lorde offArundell mynstrelltf in Rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

hem in expenses uppon the same at Mr adams xij d. 



f 323* (24-7 August 1514) 

hem paied to the stameryng mynstrell [(.)] in Rewarde ij s. 30 



1514-15 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 8v (27 August -25 December 1514) (Expenses) 

Item paid in rewarde to pleyers that pleyed At Master maior 

vppon Seynt lohn Day in Cristmas xij d. 



8-9/ the sonday After corpus christi: 18 June 

2V Mr adams: probably Clement Adam, mayor. 1506-7. 1508-9. 1512-13, 1517-18; 
also an innkeeper 



RYE 1514-15 85 

f 9 

Itmi paid to pleers of Essex play i ng At Master maiors the 

Same nyght the Box was openyd iij s. 

5 

f 9v (25 December 1514-8 April 1515) 

hem paid vnto the pleyers that pleyed At Rauf ij s. 

10 

Item paid vnto my lord of oxenford Bereward the thursday 
After seynt Antoney iij s. iiij d. 

hem paid to my lord of Arrundels pleyers by Master 

maior cowmaundemewt xviij d. is 

f 1 1 v* (8 April -24 June 1515) 

hem paid to the Townes Wayt in rewarde iij s. iiij d. 20 

Itmi paid in rewarde to too Mynstrellfj of my lord of oxforde by 

master maior commaundemem iiij s. 

Itmi spent vppon theym heir by Master Mayer cowmaundement x d. 

25 

f 12v* (24 June-24 August 1515) 

hem payd to the kynges mynstrelw vj s. viij d. 

hem spent Apon the Seyd Mynstrelw At Mr Sutton ij s . 30 

f 13* (24 -6 August 1515) 

hem payd to the kyng bereward in reward vj s. vij d. ^ 

hem spent Apon the seyd berward At Mr Adams ij s . ij d. 



1 1-I2/ the thursday After seynt Antoney: 18 January 

30/ Mr Sutton: Nicholas Sutton. mayor. 1509-11. 1516-17. 1529. 1531-2; Mr. 1510-12. 1514, 1516. 

1529: also an innkeeper 
36/ Mr Adams: Clement Adam, mayor. 1506-7. 1508-9. 1512-13. 1517-18, aha an innkeeper 



86 RYE 1515-16 



1515-16 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 21 v (26 August -25 December 1515) (Expenses) 

Item payd diume of my lord wardens Sfruantfj beyng 5 

mynstrell<?J iij s. iiij d. 



f 22v (25 December 1515-23 March 1515/16) 

10 
Item to the Waytw of the Townn vj s. iiij d. 



f 23v (23 March 1515/16-24 June 1516) 

15 

Item to the Town Waytw in reward iij s. iiij d. 

Item spent Apon my lord of Arundellw Mynstrell vj d. 



20 

f 24 

Item payd to the kyng gogeler ij s. iiij d. 

hern geuyn to the kyng mynstrelw vij s. viij d. And spent 25 

Apon theym xiiij d. vij s. x d. 



f 24v* 

30 

Item payd to the kyng bereward vj s. viij d. 

Item payd for hys sopper At that tyme iiij s. vj d. 

Item payd to players At that tyme At Mr Sutton ij s. 

a bis hem payd to my Lord of Arundellfj mynstrellfs &C 

ther drynk iij s. ix d. 



33/ Mr Sutton. Nicholas Sutton, mayor, 1509-11. 1516-17. 1529, 1531-2: Mr. 1510-12. 1514, 1516. 
1529: also an innkeeper 



RYE 1515-17 

f 25 

hem geven to my Lord of oxford mynstrellw xvj d. 

Item payd to Aberward vs. 5 

1516-17 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 34* (31 August-25 December 1516) (Expenses) 10 

Itmi payd pleyers pleyng At Master Mayers xxiij d. 

Itmi payd to My lord of Burgeueny pleyers at \aurence house ij s. 

\> 

f 34v* (25 December 1516- 12 April 1517) 

hem payd to the Wayt of the Town for ther reward v s. 

20 

Itmi payd to pleyers that pleyd At \nurence Stephen on Candelmese ij s. 

f 35 

2S 

Itmi geuen to Adam the king^ bereward for hys reward vj s. viij d. 

Itmi spent Apon hym At seu^ral tymes xx d. 

Itmi payd to my lord Warden mynstrell iij s. iiij d. 

Itmi Spent Apon hym At that tyme viij d. 

30 

f 35v 

Itmi payd to bleyers that pleyed At Master Meyer At Crysmesse xx d. 



35 



f 36v 

Itmi geuen in reward to my lord of kent berewardw iiij s . 

34/ bleyers: for pleyers 



RYE 1516-17 

hem spent Apon the Seid Bereward At Master Mayre iiij d. 

Item geuen in rewarde to sir henry Guldeforde Mynstrel 

& spent Apon hym At that cyme ij s. x d. 

5 

hem Spent At Master Mayre Apon the kyng Minstrel xx d. 



f 37v* (12 April- 24 June 1517) 

10 

hem geuen in reward to my lord of Arundell mynstrell iij s. iiij d. 

Itn geuen At that tyme to the erle of Wylshere mynstrel xx d. 

MS hem spent At that tyme At Master Meyr Apon theym xij d. 
hem payd to the bane cryers of Apuldre Apon holy 

rode daye vs. 15 

Imn payd to the banecryers of Romeny praclaymyng 

ther [(.)] banes vj s. viij d. 

he m spent At Meystres Alys Dyers Apon the seyd Criors xx d. 

20 

f 38 

nota hem payd to the kyng mynstrel Apon A f corpus cristi even 1 

[Cristy even] vj s. viij d. 2<i 

Item spent Apon the Seyd Mynstrel At Master Mayers At 

that tym [viij d.] x d. 



f 40 (24 June-24 August 1517) 30 

hem payd to William Tumor for dyufrse money that he 

paid at lohn Wynt^r to pleyers ther pleyng before Mr 

Adam Deputy ij s. viij d. 



14/ Apuldre: Apfledore, Kent 

17/ Romeny: New Romney. Kent 

24/ A corpus cnsn even : 10 June 

337 lohn Wyntir: John Wynter, chamberlain, 1518-19 

33_4/ Mr Adam Deputy: deputy to Clement Adam, mayor. 1506-7. 1508-9. /512-I3. 1517-18 



RYE 1516-18 

f 41* (24 -30 August 1517) 

hem payd to the Erie of lorthumbfrleyn bereward 

Itmi Spent At Mr Adam Apon therle of NorthumbMyn 

Mynstrel xx d. 

1517-18 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 50 (30 August -25 December 1517) (Expenses) 10 

Item geuen in reward to the kyng taberer iij s. iiij d. 

spent Apon the seyd Mynstrell xij d. 



15 
f 52v (25 December 1517- 4 April 1518) 

hem geuen in reward to pleyers of Brokelond xj d. 

hem geuen to my lord of Burgeueny pleyers ther reward xxj d. 20 

Itfm geuyn to my lord of Robtysbrege pleyers xviij d. 

hem geuyn in rewarde to pleyers that came from 

Setyngborne xxj d. 

25 



f 53v (4 April- 24 June 1518) 

hem geuen in reward to the kyngw bereward vj s. viij d. 
Itmi geuyn in lyke reward vnto the Kynges lugeler ij s . 30 

lt<?m spent Apon theym bought At Mr Wayte xx d. 



3/ lorthumbfrleyn: for northumberlcyn 

5/ Mr Adam: probably dement Adam, mayor, 1506-7. 1508-9, 1512-13, 1517-18. 

also an innkeeper 
18/ Brokelond: Brookland. Kent 

2 1/ Robcysbrege: for Robrrtysbrege, abbreviation mark mining 
24/ Setyngborne: Sittmgbourne, Kent 
3 1 / Mr Wayte: Gabriel Wayte, jurat, 1518-19 



90 RYE 1517-19 

f 54v 

Item geuyn in reward to sir henry Guldforde mynstrell ij s. iiij d. 

hem geuyn in reward to my lord wardens mynstrel iij s. 5 

1518-19 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 67* (29August-25 December 1518) (Expenses) 

10 

hem exspendid At lohn Wyntm At dyiurse rymes When the 
foot pleys Were pleid ther<? xx d. 

hem gevyng in reward to the pleiers that came fro Canterbury ij s. j d. 



f 67v 

hem gevyn in reward to the king<y mynstrellw vj s. viij d. 

hem Spent Apon theym At Mr Wymondes ij s. viij d. 20 



f 68v 

ffurst gevyn in reward to pleyers that came from Heth ij s. ij d. 25 

hem to pleyers that came from Tentfrden ij s. 

hem gevyn in reward to Duke of Suffolk^ bereward iij s. iiij d. 

hem Spent Apon hym At (blank) xv d. 

30 

hem gevyn in reward to the kyng bereward vj s. viij d. 
f 70v (24 April- 24 June 1519) 

hem gevyn in reward to my lord of Arundelf5 Mynstrell 35 

& spent Apon theym iiij s. viij d. 



1 1/ lohn Wynu-rs: John Wynter. chamberlain, 1518-19 

14/ Canterbury: Canterbury, Kent 

20/ MrWymond: probably either John or Robert Wymond, brothers, and both jurat! 

25/ Heth: Hythe, Kent 

26/ Tentmlen. Tenterden, Kent 



RYE 1518-20 

hem payd in rewarde tho the king mynstrellw vj s. vii) d. 

f 7 1 (24June-24 August 1519) 

hem geuyn in rewarde to my lord Warden mynstrel iij s. iiij d. 

hem spent Apon hym viij d. 

f 71v 10 

Item geuyn to my lord of oxeford mynstrell xx d. 



geuyn in rewarde to thym of Broklond when they 
proclaymed ther Baynys iiij s. 15 

1519-20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 80v* (25 December 1519-8 April 1520) (Expenses) 

20 

hem gevyn to thre foot pleys that pleyd At wynnrrs & hunfrys iij s. j d. 
hem gevyn to my lord of arundell s<ruant that pleyd At hunfry xix d. 

hem gevyn in reward to the Dukes of Suffolk Barer v s. 25 

hem to my lord of kent Bereward xvj d. 

f 81 (8 April- 24 June 1520) 30 

hem to mynstrellys of cholschestre xvj d. 

hem spent at Mr Wymond vppon theym of Broklond 

proclaymig ther Banyes for ther stage pley iiij s . viij d. 

35 



\l tho: for to 

14, 33/ Broklond: Brookland. Kent 

2 1/ wyntm: John Wynter. chamberlain. 1518-19 

32/ cholschestre: Colchester, Essex 

33/ Mr Wymond: probably either John or Robert Wymond, brothers, and both jurats 

34/ proclaymig: for proclaiming, abbreviation mark missing 



92 RYE 1519-21 

f 8 1 v* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

hem to Adam the king Bereward hys reward vj s. viij d. 



1520-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 92* (26 August -25 December 1520) (Expenses) 

hem paid to players of syttingbourne xij d. 10 

hem paied to the players of hith iiij d. ob. 

hem paied to other players by Master Mayers cowmaundement xij d. 



f 93v (25 December 1520-31 March 1521) 15 

hem paid to Thorawle my lord wardens s^ruant in reward 

by maistre Mayrw cowmaundement iij s. iiij d. 

Item paid to the frenche quenys bereward vj s. viij d. 20 

hem paid to the Erie of kent bereward iiij s. 

f 95* (31 March -24 June 1521) 25 

hem paid to the banecryers of Brokeland iij s. iiij d. 

f 95v (24 June -24 August 1521) 30 

hem paid to the king players the Sonday after saynt 

Thomas Day of Caunt^rbury v s. vj d. 

hem paid to the king Mynstreells vj s. viij d. 35 



IO/ syttingbourne: Sittingboumc, Kent 

I I/ hith: Hythe. Kent 

20/ the frenche quenys: Mary, widow of Louis XII and sister of Henry \1II 

111 Brokeland: Brookland. Kent 

32 -3/ the Sonday ... Caunt^rbury: 14 July 



RYE 1521-2 

1521-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f lOlv (24 June -24 August 1522) (Receipts) 

nota \tem of a Docheman for a trompet at strond gate xx a. 



f 104v* (25 August -25 December 1521) (Expenses) 

Item gevyn In reward vnto the person that brought the Camell hydre xx d. 10 

f 105* 

Item gevyn in Reward to players of Apuldore xiiij d. ob. 15 

gevyn to players of Rochester in Reward x| d. 



f 105v (25 December 1521-20 April 1522) 

20 

Item gevyn in reward to the players of tenterden ij s. j d. 

Item gevyn to the players of Sytingburne v d. 

Item gevyn in Reward to the duke of Suffolk bereward iiij s. 

Item exspendyd vppon hym at Mr Adams in drynke viij d. 25 

Item gevyn in Reward to Adams the kmg bereward vj s. viij d. 

Item exspendyd vppon his s^ruant^ at bymblys iiij d. 



f 108 (20 April -24 June 1522) 30 

Item gevyn in reward to the kingw mynstrels v s. 

hem gevyn to the bane Cryers of Ivecherche iiij s. 



5/ for: corrected from from 

1 5/ Apuldore: Appledore, Kent 

\6I Rochester: Rochester, Kent 

2 1/ tenterden: Tenterden. Kent 

221 Sytingburne: Sittingboume, Kent 

257 Mr Adams: Clement Adam, mayor, 1506-7, 1508-9, 1512-13, 1517-18: also an innkeeper 

33/ Ivecherche: Ivychurch, Kent 



94 RYE 1521-4 

f 108v (24 June-24 August 1522) 

Item gevyn to a bereward &: exspendyd vppon hyme iij s. vij d. 



1522-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 1 2 1 v* (5 April -24 June 1523) (Expenses) 

hem paid to the duke of Suffolk mynstrels the xxviij day in lune xx d. 



10 



f 122 

It^m paid to the players of mmham xvj d. is 

hem gevyn to the duke of Suffolk^ berewarde iij s. iiij d. 
hem paid to players of bounndon in Rewarde xvij d. 



20 



St Mary s Churchwardens Accounts ESRO. RYE 147/1 
f 39* (20 April -5 April) (Expenses) 

hem payd for a Coote made when the resurrecc/on was playde for 25 

hym that in playing represented the pan of almighty god xij d. 



f 39v 

30 

hem payd for making of the stage for the resurrecc/on at ester iij s. iiij d. 



1523-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 35 

f 128* (30 August -25 December 1523) (Expenses) 

hem to the king Berewarde in rewarde vppon saint Michels day iij s. iiij d. 



15/mfrsham: Mmham, Kent 3 1/ ester. 20 Apnl 

19/ bounndon: possibly Bonnington, Kent 



RYE 1523-5 

f 129v 

Item paid to Thorowld my lord wardens minstrell xx d. 

<> 
f 130v (25 December 1523- 27 March 1524) 

Item paid to sir henry guldefordw mynstrels the xx day of 
January by Maister Mayers assignement 

f 132* (27 March -24 June 1524) 

Item geuin in reward to my lord of Arundels mynsterls xx d. 

15 

f 132v 

Item gevyn to the kingw mynstrels by Master Mayers 

cowmaundement & luratw v s. 20 

Item geuyn to the duke of Noffb/& berewarde by Master 

Mayers assignement ij s. 

25 

f 133 

Item gevyn to my Lord lyles Mynstrels in rewarde xx d. 

hem paid to Master Comptrollers mynstrels in rewarde ij s. 30 



1524-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 146 (28 August -25 December 1524) (Expenses) 35 

Item gevin to the players of pesemarsshe in rewarde ij s. viij d. ob. 

hem geuin to the duke of Suffolk Berewarde in rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

Item geuin to players in Rewarde ij s . iiij d. 40 

14/ mynsterls: for mynstrels 



% RYE 1524-6 

hem geuin to my Lord warden Minstrels ij s. 

hem geuin to the kingw s<ruant that came hidre with a bull v s. 

hem geuin to players that plaid in willwm medes howsse ij s. iiij d. 

hem geuin to plaiers of Robme* brige for ther rewarde xij d. 5 

f 147v ( 16 Apnl-24 June 1525) 

hern geuin to the kingw minstrels in rewarde vj s. viij d. 10 



1525-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 155* (27 August -25 December 1525) (Expenses) , 5 

hem gevyn to the king berewarde in rewarde v s. viij d. 

hem gevyn to my Lord Cardinals Mynstrellis in rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

hem for ther drynking at Maister Mayers x d. 20 



f 155v 

hem gevyn in reward to maister Comptrollers minstrels ij s. 25 

hem to players of pessem/zrsshe that plaied before maister Maier xvj d. 

hem gevyn to the players of Billanca in reward ij s. 

30 

hem gevine to players of ffeveresham in rewarde xx d. 

hem to the gester in Rewarde v s. 

35 
f 156v (1 April -24 June 1526) 

hem to the bane Cryers of Romeney crying ther banys vj s. viij d. 



4/ will/am meder: William Mede, jurat. 1517-18 3 1/ ffeveresham: Favenham. Kent 

29/ Billarica: Billericay, Kent, or possibly Essex 38/ Romeney: New Romney, Kent 



RYE 1525-7 

f 157* (24 June -24 August 1526) 

hem gevyn to the king minstrels in rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

hem in reward to Thurrall my Lord wardens Minstrell xvj d. 



St Mary s Churchwardens Accounts ESRO: RYE 147/1 
f 50v (16 April -1 April) (Payments) 

10 

hem paied for [platw] plat for the play off the 

Resurrecdon [xij] xiiij d. 



1526-7 15 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 163* (26 August -25 December 1526) (Expenses) 

hem geuen the plaiers of Lews in rewarde by the 

cowmaundement of Master maire &x. ij s. 20 

hem geuen to the players of feu^rsham by the assigment 

of Master maire at vrilliam medes iij s. 

hem to the players of Canterbury that played at the Crowne [(.)] xj d. 25 

hem to the players of halden the xiiij day of January at dewardfj xv d. 



f I63v* (25 December 1526-21 April 1527) 30 

hem to [i]ij yong men that were waytwof the towne iij s. iiij d. 

hem to the player of Beleryca at the mair assignement xx d. 

35 

hem geuen to the duke of Suffolk Berward in rewarde iiij s. 



221 feufrsham: Favenham, Kent 25/ Canterbury: Canterbury, Kent 

221 assigment: for assignment (>) 211 halden High HaUm. Kent 

23/ william medes: William Medf, jurat, 1517-18 34/ Beleryca: Billericay, Kent, or possibly Essex 



98 RYE 1526-9 

hem to the players of Cranebroke at Master mairw howse xvj d. 

hem geuen to the king^ Berward in rewarde ij s. 

5 

f 164v* (21 April -24 June 1527) 

Item to ij yong men wayt of the towne iij s. 

hem to the Bane cryers of Brokelond on OUT cherche masdaye iiij s. 10 

f 165 (24 June -24 August 1527) 

hem geuen in rewarde to the king mynstrels iij s. iiij d. 15 

hem to the Erie of Arundels mynstrels xij d. 



1527-8 20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 173 (25 August -25 December 1527) (Expenses) 



hem rewarded to my Lorde wardens mynstrels xx d. 



25 



Order from the Warden of the Cinque Ports against Plays 

BL: Egerton MS 2093 

See Hastings 1 527-8 30 

1528-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f [184A]* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

35 

hem to my Lord /Admyrals 1 [of mynstrels] mynstrell in rewarde xx d. 



I/ Cranebroke: Cranbrook, Kent 10/ Brokelond: Brookland, Kent 



RYE 1529-31 

1529-30 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 190v (29 August -25 December 1529) (Expenses) 

hem to my Lord Admyrall players in rewarde ij s. iiij a. s 

hem gevyn in rewarde to the Duke of Suffolk Berewarde ij s. vj d. 



f 191 10 

hem reward gevyn to my Lorde of Westmorland Berewarde ij s. 

f 192v (24 June -24 August 1530) 15 

hem to the Duke of Suffolk berewarde in rewarde iiij s. 

f 1 94v* (Further expenses) 20 

hem to ffrench Mynstrells in reward iij s. iiij d. 

hem ffor Mynsterells that played Abowt the Town with one 

that was in the dage iiij d. 25 

1530-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO. RYE 60/5 

f 201* (28 August -25 December 1530) (Expenses) 30 

Itn Gyven to the kyng Mynstrells in reward the x^ 1 day 

of Septembre vj s. viij d. 

It<rm spent on them At Master Mayers ij s. vij d. 

35 

f 204v* 

Itmi to players in reward gyven by Master Mayre debyte iij s. ij d. 



100 RYE 1530-1 

f 205 (25 December 1530-9 April 1531) 

hem gyven in reward to players At the Comandment of 

Master Mayre debyte the ix tri day of ffebruary ij s. iiij d. 

5 

f 205v 

hem gyven to A bereward in reward At the instance of 

Master Mayre debyte the same tyme iij s. iiij d. 10 

f 206v* (9 April -24 June 1531) 

hem to Mistreis Mayeres for j Brekfast for the kynges 15 

Mynstrells that tyme ij s. vij d. 



f 207* 

20 

Itmi to the Inhabytauntes of Ivecherch beyng here Warnyng to 

ther pley in mete & Wyne the xxj day of may x s. 



f 208v* (24 June-24 August 1531) 25 

hem to the kyng Mynstrells for ther expense the ix day of August xx d. 

f 209v* 30 

Itmi to the kynges players the same tyme x s. 

hem to my lordwardeyns Mynstrells the xviij day of lune xx d. 

35 

Itmi to my lord Markes exceter Mynstreils in reward the same tyme iij s. 

Itmi to Syr henry Guldeford Mynstrells the same tyme in reward xx d. 



10/ the same tyme: 12 March 2 1/ Ivecherch: Iiychurch, Kent 

15/ Murrcis Mayercs: wife of John FUccher, mayor 32/ the same tyme: 10 October 

16/ that tyme: 23 Apnl 36, 37/ the same tyme: 20 July 



RYE 1531-3 

1531-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 2l6v* (27 August -25 August) (Expenses) 

hem to the players of lydd the xxviij th Day of Aprell vj s. viij d. 



f 217* 

hem yeven to the kynges Mynstrell the x th day of September 10 

in reward vij s. viij d. 

hem yeven to my lord lyles Mynstrell in reward the xxj th Day 
of Septembre iij s. 

15 

f 222 

hem to my lord Earners Mynstrells in reward the same tyme iij s. iiij d. 

20 

f 223 

hem for the expense of the players of lid being here 

the same tyme vj s. iiij d. 

25 

hem to the players on Mayday toward ther Charges vj s. viij d. 



f 225 

30 

It<?m yeven to the kynges Mynstrells the ffyrst day of August v s. iiij d. 



1532-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 239v* (25 December 1532-25 March 1533) (Expenses) 

hem to my lord Wardeyn pleyars At Thomas howse in reward ij s. x d. 



5, 23/ lydd, lid: Lydd. Kent 24/ the same tyme: JO April 

1 8/ the same tyme: 20 March 



102 RYE 1532-3 

Item for Candles At the same tyme iiij d. 

f 240v 

Item the viijt 1 Day in ffebruary to the players of hastyng 

in reward ij s. 



f 241 

hem yeven in reward to the kynges berard iij s. iiij d. 

hem to my lord lylez players in reward xx d. 



f 243* (25 March-24June 1533) 

Item the same Day to Mynstrells pypyng j Woman Abowt 

the Town ij d. 

20 



f 244v 







hem yeven in reward to my lord of Derby Bererd 



f 246v (24 June -24 August 1533) 

Item the same Day yeven in reward to the Wayt 

of Canterbury [ij s.] xx d. 30 



f 247v 

It<rm the same Day to the Duke of Suffolk Mynstrells 35 

in reward iij s. iiij d. 



18/ che same Day: 23 May 30/ Canterbury: Canterbury, Kent 

29/ the same Day: 12 August 35/ the same Day: 20 August 



RYE 1533-5 103 

1533-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 259 (25 December 1533-25 March 1534) (Expenses) 

Item the xxix v!l Day in January to the players of Essex 

in reward Swwma xiiij d. 



f 26 1 v* (25 March-24June 1534) 

10 

Itmi to the Bane Cryers of Brokelond of Gyst v s. 

Itmi expended on the same Cryers ij s. iiij d. 

hem Gyven in reward to the morres Daunsers of Mafeld 

daunsyng here on Churche masse day Swwma ij s. viij d. 15 

Itmi to the kynges Mynstrelles in[r] reward the xij Day 

in June vij s. vj d. 



f 265* (24-30 August 1534) 20 

Itmi to my lord wardeyn players in reward v s. ij d. 



1534-5 25 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 273 (30 August -25 December 1534) (Expenses) 

hem money geven to Mynstrellw At heth xvj d. 

30 

f 273v 

Itmi yeven in rewarde to my lorde Richemond berward by 

Cowmaundement x | J 35 



f 274 

Itmi paid to my Lorde off derby bereworth in rewarde 

1 1/ Brokelond: Bwokland, Kent 297 heth: Hythe, Kent 



104 RYE 1534-7 



5 



by Cowmaundement off Master Mayre & luratw 
with wyne spended 1 iij s . vj d. 

f 275 (25 December 1534-25 March 1535) 

Item paid to my lorde Warden Mynstrell in rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

f 279v (24 June -24 August 1535) 

10 

Item paied the xxiij 1 1 day in August to my lorde off Deuenshyre 
mynstrellw by the Cowmaundement off Master Mayre xvj d. 



1535-6 , 5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 29 1 * (29 August-25 December 1535) (Expenses) 

Item paid the x 1 * 1 day offoctobre to the kyng players by 
Cowmaundement off Master Mayre vj s. viij d. 20 

Item paid in expenses at mastre dyers uppow the same players 
1 Master Mayre & brethren 1 xiiij d. 



f 293 (25 December 1535-25 March 1536) 25 

Item paid the secunde day in ffebruary to my lorde Wardens players iiij s. 



1536-7 30 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 
f 314* (25 March -24 June 1537) (Expenses) 

Item paid the xxij day of Apryll to the kyng mynstrellw at 

Master Mayers cowmaundement vj s. viij d. 35 



f 3l4v 

Itmi paid to my lorde Wardyns Mynstrell at Master Mayers 40 

cowmaundement the v tri day of May vj s. viij d. 



.,,., Q 105 

RYE 1536-9 

f 317* (24 June -24 August 1537) 

hem paid the xx day of July to the kyng Mynstrell at Master 

Mayers cowmaundement v s - 

5 



1537-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 333v* (26 August -25 August) (Expenses) 

hem the xv Daye of Mey to my lord Wardens players 

hem thesame daye to my lord Wardens mynstrell ij s. 

15 

f 334* 

hem to the kyng players vj s. viij d. 

20 

1538-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 340v (25 August-25 December 1538) (Expenses) 

hem the xxi\\ daye of September payd in reward to the pryncw 25 

players by thassygnement of Master Meyre & hys Brethern iiij s. viij d. 



f 342 (25 December 1538-6 April 1539) 

30 

Itmi the thyrd daye of ffebruary to my lord Wardens players 
in reward x s. 



f 343v (6 April -24 June 1539) 35 

lum to our lord Wardens Mynstrellw in reward v s. 

1 3/ thesame daye: 29 May 



106 RYE 1539-40 



1539-40 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 355v* (25 December 1539-28 March 1540) (Expenses) 

Item paid the viij day of Apryell gyven in rewarde to or lorde 

Wardens players vij s. vi d. 



f 356* 

10 

Itmi paid to the bane cryers of Romney the ix day of Maye vj s. viij d. 
{(.em paid for their Expencw v s. ij d. 

hem paid to my lorde Wardens Mynstrelles the xij day 
of Mye iij s. iiij d. 



f 357 (28 March -24 June 1540) 

Item paid the ix Day of May to the prync players in reward 



Court Book ESRO: RYE 33/7 

f 57v* (25 January) 

lohn Rowland late banysshyd the Towne before Thomas Byrchett 25 

Meyre of Rye & hys Brethern for hys evell demeanour & also late by 
the verdyt of the lure sworn to enquyre/ presentyd to be a /s r Cowen 1 
dyse player wyth false dyse/ and nowe of late hath entryd the Towne 
wyth owt the Consent of the Meyre & hys brethern & hath prouokyd 
manye to playe at dyse & card wyth hym/ therfore nowe the xxv daye 30 
of lanuarye before thesayd Meyre/ lohn ffleccher/ Alexander wulphyn/ 
Rychtf/v/ Pedell/ Robm Barns/ Robm wymond/ & wy\\iam Mede/ yt 
ys cowcludyd that thesayd lohn Rowland shall in the Market place of 
Rye have A byllet naylyd to hys [one of hys] lyfte ere[s] & so be had 
round aboute the Town & a taber before hym & so had owt of the 35 

Towne of Rye/ neuer to retorn thyther ayene vnder payn of losyng 
both hys eres/ 



1 1/ Romney: New Romney, Kent 
14/ Mye: for Maye 



RYE 1540-1 107 

1540-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 

f 369v* (29 August -28 August) (Expenses) 

hem paid that day to the kyng Mynstrellw vij s. vj d. 5 

Item paid the v Day to the kyng playets att Master 

Mayers assignament xv s. 

10 
f 371 

hem paid the same Day to my lorde Grays players that playd 

before Master Mayer iij s. iiij d. 

15 

f 372v 

hem paid to the duke of Suffolkes players att Mr Wolvens assynement 
beyng depute ffor the Mayer the vij day of (February v s. 

20 

f 374 

hem paid to the lorde brodewaters players ffor a brakefast the 

fyrst day of May v s. 25 



f 374v* 

hem paid to my lorde Wardens Mynstrell [v] iiij s. 30 

hem paid the xij Day of lune to the pryncw players iij s. iiij d. 



f 375* 

Item paid to certen players that played in Gabryell[] Adams 

5/ chat day: 18 September 

71 the v Day: 5 October 

13/ the same Day: 18 December 

24/ brodewaters: jor bridgewaters (?) 

37/ Gabryell[] Adams: Gabriel Adam, jurat, and perhaps grandson of Clement Adam 



108 RYE 1540-3 



Trypett act Mr wolvyns Cowmaundement beyng depute for 

the Mayer xx 



f 375v* 

hem paid to my lorde Marcus Dossyters mynstrell att 

Master Mayers cowmaundement iij s. iiij d. 



10 
1541-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/5 
f 386v* (28 August -27 August) 

hem paid to A berward yat went with the kyng berys 15 

att the cowmaundement of Master Mayer iij s. iiij d. 



f 387* 

20 

hem paid the xix day of (February to my lorde wardens players vij s. vj d. 



f 388v* 

25 

hem paid the ij day of February to the Duke of Suffolkes players 

of Mr Wolven then depute Mayer And of hys brethern vj s. 



hem paid [x] the xiiij day of lune to peryn the kyngw Berward viij s. 

hem paid the last day of lune to the Erull of Sussex players iiij s. viij d. 



30 



1542-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 35 

f 37* (27 August -26 August) 

hem paid the v day of November to smaunt Berrwarde 

ffor the Townes rewarde vj s. viij d. 

40 



RYE 1542-4 109 

f 38v* 

hem paid the first f Day ] of December to the princes players 

ffor their rewarde iij s. iiij d. 

5 

f 39v* 

Itmi paid the xij day of (February to our lorde wardens players 

in rewarde of the Towne x s. 10 



1543-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 

f 60v* (26 August 1543-31 August 1544) 15 

hem paid the same day to Peryon the kyng beryars in Reward vj s. vii) d. 



f 61v* 20 

hem paid the same day to my Lord Wardens players vij s. vj d. 

f 62* 25 

Itmi paid the same day to lockwod the kyng sariant in Reward iij s. iij d. 



f 67* 

Itmi paid the same day to iiij of my lord Wardens mynstrellw v s. 

Itmi paid the fower day of May to prynse edwardw beryers in Reward iiij s. 



30 



f 67v 



35 

* 



Itmi paid the same daye for ij barellw of bere & a dosson of bred thatt 



177 the same day: 4 November 271 lockwod the kyngrt sariant: it. the king s jetttr 

Til the same day: 9 December 32/ the same day: 3 May 

271 the same day: 16 December 38/ the same daye: 1 1 May 



110 RYE 1543-6 



was dronke & eate at badyng act the cowmyng in of the Maye 

& the Mouster & one barrell of here that Mr Nycoll & other 

caused to be dronke the sonday before yat at the commyng in 

of the May v s. vj d. 

5 

f 71* 

Item paid the xix day of lune to the prynces players in Reward vj s. 



10 



21 Mr Nycoll: Richard Nycoll. jurat, 1 542-3 2 W the same day. 9 May 

3/ the sonday before yat: 4 May 3.V the the: dittography 

16/ the same Day. 23 March 



1544-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 

f 99* 

Item paid the same Day to Mr Perrean the kyngw berard 



f 102v* 

20 

paid the same day to owr lorde wardens Mynstrell iij s. iiij d. 



f 106v* 

Item paid the vij day of lulij to the Prynces players 



1545-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 

f 130* (5 October -5 September) (Expenses) 

Payd the the x Daye of September to the princes players 



RYE 1546-9 m 

1546-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 

f 147* (5 September- 4 September) (Expenses of Nicholas Mercer) 

paide the xviij Dale to my Lorde wardens mynstrelltt for reward v s. 5 



f I49v* (Expenses of Robert Williams) 

Paide the iij Dale to the kingw players [for playinge] r in rewarde 1 vj s. viij d. 10 



St Mary s Churchwardens Accounts ESRO: RYE 147/1 
f 112v* (Expenses) 

15 

Paide to Morrys Nogle for iij yard of Ruge and one yarde of 
Russet Gotten for the lynynge of the Cote At vij d. the yarde ij s. iiij d. 



1547-8 20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 

f 157v* (4 September- 2 September) (Expenses of John Young) 

paid to a mynstrell at Dynner iiij d. 

25 

f 1 64v* (Expenses of John Breads) 
paid to my Lord mynnystrell 



1548-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 

f 181 (2 September -1 September) (Expenses) 

35 
Item fryday the xix day payd in Reward for [(...) he layd owte] 

the towne by the Assygnement of Master mayre to my lord 
trumpetours iij s j^ j 



5/ the xviij Daie: 18 June 36/ the xix day: 19 October 

10/ the iij Daie: 3 May 



12 RYE 1548-51 

f 182 



Payd the sayme day to the kyng grace players gevyn in 

Reward for the towne vj s. 



f 187 

Sunday the iij Day payd to my lorde protectors seruaumes 

whych was gevynge in Rewarde of the towne vj s. viiij d. 10 



f 192v 

ffryday the Last Day of May payd to my lord wardens 
Mynstrell which was gevyn in Reward 



f 199v* 

20 

Tewsday the xxvij Day payd to myll the boder for bryngyng 
of ij proclymacyows one cowcernywg the pryc of woll thother 
cowcernywg players viij d. 

1549-50 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/6 

f 223 (1 September 1549-7 September 1550) (Expenses) 

payd ye 17 th daye to ye Mynstrellys of Canterburye vj s. viij d. 

30 

1550-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 8* (7 September 6 September) (Expenses) 

35 
payd to ye kynges mynystrellys vj s. viiij d. 



3/ the sayme day: 28 October 29/ ye 17 1 daye: 17 August 

9/ the n| Day: 3 March 29/ Canterburye: Canterbury, Kent 

21/ the xxvi| Day: 27 August 



RYE 1550-2 

f 8v* 



Payde to ye kyng players 



13 



x s. 



f 12v* 

payd to the Duke of Som*rsett players 

f 13* 

Payde the ye xjth Daye to my lorde wardens Mynstrellys 

payd to ye wayttof Caunterburye 



vj s. viij d. 



10 



vj s. viij 



id. 



X S. 15 



1551-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 37v* (6 September- 4 September) (Expenses) 

payd the same dale to the erle of bedfordw mynstrelles 



20 



iiij s. viij d. 



f 39v 



payd the xx daie to the king mynstrelles for plaing 



25 



VJS. 



f 40v* 



paid the same daye being xxvij daie to my lord Russelles mynstrelles v s. 



30 



f 4 1 v* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 
paid the same daie to mynstrelles 



35 



viij d. 



1 3/ the ye: dittography 
13/xj hDaye: 1 1 May 
15/ Caunterburye: Canterbury. Kent 
221 the same daie: 14 January 



271 the xx daie: 20 May 

32/ the same ... xxvij daie: 27 June 

37/ the same date: 26 July 



114 RYE 1551-4 

(Expenses) 

paid the same daye to my lord wardens mynstrelles in Rewards vij s. 



1552-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 
f 56v (4 September- 3 September) (Expenses) 

Itmi gyuew the ij daie of Apriell to the King plears in Rewards x s. 10 



f 57v 

hem gyuew the same daie to the duchis of Suffolk^ pleyars 15 

in Rewards iij s. iiij d. 

hem gyuew the same daie to my lord Admyralls musitions 
in Rewards iij s. iiij d. 



20 

f 58 (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

paid the same daie to mr Scott mynstrells viij d. 



25 

1553-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 74v* (3 September-2 September) (Expenses) 

In primis paid the xiijth daie of Septembre in Reward to my 
lorde Warden his mynstrelles 



f 78v 

35 

paid the v h daie of luly at the commaundemewt of Master Maior 

vnto the lord prevy Scales minstrelles in Reward v s. 



3/ the same daye: 8 August 23/ the same daie: 25 July 

15, 17/ the same daie: 12 July 



RYE 1554-6 115 

1554-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 98v (2 September -1 September) (Expenses) 

Paid the same dale vnto our lord wardens mynstrelles 

whyche was gyuen vnto them in Rewardes by master 

Mayor and his brytheryn x s. 



f 125v* 

To the mynstrells that pleid before the fetyng in of the maye 



10 



f lOlv 

hem gyuen the same daie vnto the quenes majesties lester 

in Rewards iij s. iiij d. 



15 
f 102* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

paid the same for dyn^r of master mayor certen of his 
brytheryn & other officers ther xxviij s. 

paid the daie vnto A mynstrell for singing and playing at 20 

that dynn^r xii d. 



1555-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 125* (1 September 1555-6 September 1556) (Payments) 

To iij mynstrell playeng before the laborers comeng from the 

mending of the highe waies xii d. 



30 



5/ che same daie: 30 September \ 8, 20/ the same, the daie: 27 July 

12/ the same daie: 15 June 



116 RYE 1556-8 



1556-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 1 35v* (6 September-5 September) (Receipts) 

Receyved the xvij daye of Henry gaym<r for going on 5 

[munge] mummynge in maskyng xij d. 

Receyved more the xxx c ^ day of peter adran for the 
like defaute xij d. 



f l42v (Payments) 

Item paide the xxj [ h Daie of December vnto the quens 

Maiestes Berewarde in rewarde at Master maiors 

comaundemente iij s. vj d. is 



f I49v* (Brotherhood expenses at Neiv Rornney, Kent) 

It^rn to mynstrells xij d. 20 

f I50v* (Payments) 

hem paid to \vi\\iam bereworthe for A cote for peter 25 

nicolles the minstrell xij s. xj d. 



1557-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 30 

f I66v (5 September 4 September) (Payments) 

hem paide the same daye to the quenes Players x s. 



5/ the xvij daye: 17 December 

5/ Henry gaymfr. poisibly Henry Gaymer, mayor, 1572-3 

II the xxx th day: 30 December 

71 peter adran: Peter Adrian, ship owner 

25/ will/dm bereworthe: William Bereworth, chamberlain, 1559-60 

33/ the same daye: 16 October 



RYE 1558-60 

1558-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 198 (4 September -3 September) (Payments) 

Itfm paid the xij th of Septembrf to my Lord wardens 
minstrellw in Rewarde 



f 203 

10 
hem paid the 12 daie to the quenes players in Reward xx s. 



1559-60 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 15 

f 222v* (3 September- 1 September) (Payments) 

paid the same daye to my Lord pars players for a reward 

given by Master Maier and his britherin in the name of 

the hole Towne vj s. viij d. 20 



f 223* 

paid to my Lord Dudlyes players given by Master Maier and 
his britherin in the name of the hole Towne 



f 224* 

paid the same daye to the drume player and to mak A brekfast 

for the may game iijj $. 

paid for v yardes of clothe for the waites cotes xxv s. 

paid to hym for a dynner for the Bane Cners of Romney xx s. 



1 1/ the 12 daie: 12 May 34/ cotes: t uncrossed 

1 H/ the same daye: 10 February 36/ hym: William Chapman 

I \l the same daye: 4 May 36/ Romney: New Romney. Ken: 



118 RYE 1560-4 



1560-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 252 (1 September 1560-7 September 1561) (Payments) 

paid the same daye to the quenes plaiers And S/r Robm 

Doodleys plaiers 

paid the same daye for the Lyveries of the Minstrelles to 

Nicholas Baker for iiij yeardes and di. quarter of clothe 

at viij s. vj d. the yearde xxxv s. 

paid to hym for ther ij conyzancw xiij s. iiij d. 



1562-3 

Assembly Book ESRO: RYE 1/3 

f 32v 15 

The same daie it is agreid that lohn strong lunwr shall haue 

for his paines in going about as the wait vj s. viij d./ 



20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 
f 296 (6 September- 5 September) (Payments) 

paid the ij daie to the quenes plaiers xiij s. iiij d. 

25 



1563-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/7 

f 3 1 8v (5 September 3 September) (Payments) 

30 

paid the xxvijth Daie to my Lord Roberta plaiers in 

reward vj s. viij d. 

paid the v [ h Daie to the quenes Bere Kepers vj s. viij d. 

35 



5. II the same daye: 22 March 31/ the xxvi) 1 Daie: 27 April 

17/ Tl\e same daie. 9 January J3/ the v 1 1 Daie. 5 May 

24/ the ij Jaie: 2 June 



RYE 1564-7 

1564-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/8 

f 8* (3 September-2 September) (Payments) 

paid to the quenes Beriar at Master Maiers assignement the 
Townes rewarde 



f 9 

10 

paid the x cl1 Dale to my Lord of warwickw (blank) in reward x s. 



f 13v* 

paid the quenes bereiars at master maiers comaundement v s. 

given the quenes pleiars at his comaundement xii] s. in) d. 



1565-6 20 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/8 
f 42* (2 September- 1 September) (Payments) 

paid the xxvj tri Daye of maye to the Quenes beward 



f 43* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney. Kent) 

paid the minstrells viij d. 

paid for ther dinner xviij s. M> 



1566-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/8 

f 6lv* (1 September 1566-7 September 1567) (Expenses) 

paid in reward to the Errle of Worsytors Enterlute players vj s. viij d. 



ll/ thex h Daie: 10 October 



120 RYE 1566-71 

f 64* 



Paid to the quenes maiestye interlud players for the Townes reward xvj s. 



1568-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/8 

f 125* (5 September -4 September) (Payments) 

Payde to the quenes playars ther Reward xiij s. iiij d. 10 



1569-70 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/8 

f 162v* (4 September 3 September) (Payments) n 

Item paid to my Lord wardens players when they playde at 

ye court Halle Before Master Maior xiij s. iiij d. 

20 

f 164* 

Item paid to the Erele of Laysters pleyers when they were here x s. 



f 164v* 

Item paid the waites at Mother strong^ that Master Maior and 

the luratw did Allowe them therof for there Liu^ry xxx s. 



f 175v 







Item Paid to my Lorde Riches men when thay were here to plaie 

at Master Maiors comaundement in the court hall vj s. viij d. ^ 



1570-1 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 6 1/2 

f 23* (3 September- 2 September) (Payments) 40 

hem geuen to my lord of borgaynes playeres for playng before master 



RYE 1570-4 

baylife ** master maiors Deputie 1 and his bretherin in rewarde the 
ixdayeofaprille 1570 ) s - 



121 



The Quenis 
present/ 



f 25 

Item givene to the quenes players in rewarde for plainge before 

master mayer and his bretherin the iiij of lulye xiij s. 



10 



1573-4 

Assembly Book ESRO: RYE 1/4 

f I40v (3 August) 

It is also agred by this assemble that ther shaJbe gevin to the Quenis Ma/mie 15 
at hir cowmynge to Rye for a present a hundred Angels in a purse. 



A decree for 
the drum and 
phife/ 



f I56v* (26 January) 

hem it is farther agreid at this openinge of the box. that Philipe fairefild and 
Angell Shawe, for and in cowsideracion of their paines taken this sommer w/th 
the drome & Phife when the quenis Mazmie was here/ shall haue paide vnto 
them presently xl s., betwene them bothe & a liuery a pece and frome 
hensforth yerly vppon their good and honest behavior xl s. a year betwene 
them, and euery of them a lyvery, beside the benevolence of the cowmons for 
their goinge abrod the winter night w/th their drum and phife for the watche 



20 



: 



the silke 
gowne/ 



f I62v (15 March) 

Memorandum the silke gowne that the oration was made in. was at this 
assembly Deliuered to willftzm Geire/ 



30 



Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 
f 9v* (6 September -5 September) (Receipts) 

Item of Thomas Cable for the pagent house at landgat xiij s. iiij d. 



35 



40 



33/ will/rfm Geire: William Gere, serjeant, 1558-9 



122 RYE 1573-4 

f 12v* (Payments) 

paid William Gere his bill for Coot xxiiij s. 

paid Thom/zs Tokey his bill for makinge of six soldiers coat 5 

at ij s. [vj d.] A r viiij d. 1 the coate xvj s . 

paid lohn Pedle for makinge of thre Coatw viij s. 

paid Thomas Durrant for iij Cottw viij s. 

paid Robert Dannell for vj Coatw xvj s. 

paid Edmond Chapman for iij Coat viii s. 10 

paid Thomas Blacke for iij Coatw viij s. 

paid John Mathewe for vj Coatw xvj s. 

paid widowe ffrenche for vj Coate xvj s. 

paid lohn Donke for vj Coat xvj s. 

15 

f 13* 

paid to lohn Pye Carpewter for two daies & half worke, 

coveringe the pipes of the cowduit at budgwell iij s. iiij d. 

paid him for his man for ij daies dimidium leike worke 20 

at xij d. ij s . vj d. 

Paid Walter holland Laborer for iij daies dimidium for 

carryinge of gounechambers together when the quene 

was heir/ & other workes about the conduit pipes iij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Thornton for iij daies leike worke at x d. ij s. vj d. 25 



f I3v* 

Paid mr Gaymer the mony he lent to the towne at the 30 

quenis beinge hear C li. 



f 16* 

35 

paid to Philipe fayrefyld & Angell Shawe the waytwof the 

towne, accordinge to a Deere xl s. 



3/ Will/am Gere: William Gere. Serjeant, 1558-9 
30/ mr Gaymer: Henry Gaymer, mayor, 1572-3 



RYE 1573-5 123 

f I6v* 

paid to my Lorde Chamberlains players at the cowmandmewt 

of Mr Raynold beinge Master Maiors Deputie vj s. viij d. 



f 17* 

paid [willm] to Mr Skott of Mootes for byrches the towne 

had when the querns Ma/mie came to Rye viij s. 10 

paid to Andro the berward at Master Maiors cowmandmewt iij s. iiij d. 



f 18* 15 

paid to lohn pope for iij yerdes of blewe for the waight xxiiij s. 

paid to the wayt of the towne for ther wag x s. 



20 

f 20* 

paid to the waightfj for their quarters wag x s. 



25 

f 22* 

ptf/ d the waightw of the towne their quarteridge x s. 



30 

1574-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 45* (5 September- 4 September) (Payments) 

Paid Angell Shawe and Philipe fayrechilde the waightw for 
their wag 



3 5/ fayrechilde: for fayrcfild 



124 RYE 1574-7 

f 46v* (Cuestling expenses at Dover, Kent) 

Paid to the Musisioners xij d. 

f 50v* (Payments) 

Paid Angell shawe at Master Maiors cowmaundmem xviij d. 



10 

1575-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 
f 61v* (4 September 2 September) (Payments) 



Paid to the Earle of Leicesters players 



X S. 15 



1576-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 89* (2 September- 1 September) (Payments) 20 

Paid Angell shawe in rewarde for playing vppon the drome v s. 



f 90v* 25 

Paid to the earle of bathes plaiers vj s. viij d. 

f 91v* 30 

Paid to my Lord Mongw plaiers v s. 

f 92v* 35 

Paid Angell Shawe & Thomas Stronge the drome and Phiffemrry of 

them v s. accordinge to a decre made this openinge of the box x s. 

Paid Thomas Bembricke for heddinge of Angell Shawes drome vj s. viij d. 

40 



125 
RYE 1576-8 

f 93* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

paid for drinke sent for out of dores and to the Minstrells vij d. 

5 

f 93v* 

Paid Angell for his quarters wages 

10 
f 94* 

paid Thomas Stronge his quarters wages 
Paid to the earle of Lecesters plaiers 



1577-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 109* (1 September 1577-7 September 1578) (Payments) 20 

Paid to Thomas Stronge the Phiff for his quarteridge v s. 
and for rewarde to playe the morninges as the wake vntill 
thanuwciac/ow next x s. 

Paid Angell Shawe the drome for the Leike x s. 25 



f HOv* 

Paid Angell Shawe his quarters wages v s. 30 

f 112v* 

Paid Angell shawe &C Thomas Stronge for theire quarters wages 
viz. the drome & Phif 

36/ drome: 4 minims in MS 



126 RYE 1577-9 

f 113v* 



Paid the Lord hawardw plaiers for theire rewarde 



vj s. viij d. 



A dccre against 
going to cut 
downc bowes 
in the 
morningw 



f H4v* 

Paid Angell Shawe and Thomas Stronge the Drum and Phiff, 
ther quarters wages 



x s. 



1578-9 

Assembly Book ESRO: RYE 1/4 

f 302 (11 May) 

It is orderid and Decreid by this assemblie, that none of the inhabitants 
of the towne of Rye yonge ne olde, shall in the mornings eny Daie issue 
out of the towne w/ th Dromes flagg or otherwise into the wodd of 
any man to gather or cut Downe any bowes, more or Lesse w/ thout the 
speciall Licence of the Owners or farmers of thees wodd thervnto fyrst 
had/ vppon paine of imprisonment by the space of thre Daies and thre 
night and to be otherwise ponished as to the Maior and Iurat shall 
seme good/ and before thoffendor be Deliuend out of prison to make 
satisfaccion to the p<mie offendid in this behalf/ 



10 



15 



20 



25 



Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 
f 125* (7 September- 6 September) (Payments) 

Paid to my Lord Chamberlens players 



X S. 30 



f 126v* 



Paid Aungell Shawe the Drome for his quarters wages 

Paid Thomas Stronge the Phif his quarters wages for the Leik 



v s. 35 
v s. 



f 128v* 



Paid Angell Shawe his wag 



40 



V S. 



RYE 1578-80 

Paid Thomas Stronge his wagrt 



f 129* 

Paid Angell Shawe for heddinge and newe tryminge 

the drvmes at London xvj s - 



f 130v* 

Paid Angell Shawe and Thomas Stronge the drome 

&C phif ther quarters wag * s. 



f 132v* 

Paid Angell Shawe and Thomas Stronge drome & Phif 
iheire qz/^rters wages 



1579-80 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f I44v* (6 September -4 September) (Payments) 

25 

Paid Angell Shawe drom his quarters wag v s. 

Paid Thomas Stronge Phiff his quarters wages v s. 



f I47v* 30 

Paid Angell Shawe Drome his quarters wag v s. 

Paid Thorns Stronge Phif the Leik vs. 

35 

f 149* 

Paid Angell Shawe & Thomas Stronge Drome & Phif 
theire quarters wag 



33/ Thorns: for Thomas, abbreviation mark omitted 



12S RYR 1579-81 

f I50v* 



Paid Angell Shawe Drome & Thomas Stronge Phiff their 
quarters wages 



1580-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 162* (4 September --3 September) (Payments) 

10 

Paid to my Lord Strainges players at the cowmandemewt of 
master Maior & the Masters, for the Townes Rewarde x s. 



f l64v* (Payments to officers) \=, 

Paid him for a dromehed that was burst iij s. iiij d. 

Paid him for his quarteridge for the drome v s. 

Paid Thomas Stronge Phiff his quarters wages v s. 20 

Paid his qzwrteridge for the Drome v s. 

f 165* 25 

Paid his qzwrters wages for the Drome v s. 

f I65v* 30 

Paid his Quarters wag for the Drome v s. 

Paid to Thorrws Stronge for iij qw^rters wag xv s. 

35 



17, 18/him: Angel Shave 
22, 27. 32/ his: Angel Shave s 



RYE 1581-3 

1581-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

ff 182-2v* (3 September- 2 September) (Payments) 

Paid his quarters wages for the Drome 

Paid Thomas Stronge his qzwrters wages for playinge vppon 

the Phiff 



129 



v s.l 5 



v s. 



f 183v* 

Paid him his quarters wages for the Drome 



v s. 



10 



f 184* 



Paid Thomas Stronge Phiff his quarteridge 



v s. 



15 



f 184v* 

Paid him his Quarteridge for the Drome 
Paid Thomas Stronge Phiff his Quarteridge 



v s. 
v s. 



20 



25 



f 185v* 

Paid him his quarters wages for the Drome 
Paid Thomas Stronge Phiff his quarters wages 



1582-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 202v* (2 September- 1 September) (Miscellaneous payments) 

Paid to Angell Shawe for amendinge of his Drome as apperith 
by his bill 



v s. 
v s. 



30 



35 



XX S. 



5/ his: Angel Shawc s 

1 1. 21. 28/ him: Angel Shawe 



130 RYE 1582-5 

f 203* (Payments to officers) 

Paid him his Quarterydge for the Drome 



v s. 







f 203v 

Paid him for his Drome v s. 

Paid him his quarteridge for the Drome v s. 10 

f 204* 

Paid him his quarteridge for the Drome vs. 15 



1583-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 218v* (1 September 1583-6 September 1584) (Miscellaneous payments) 20 

Paid to the Queries Players at master Maior his 

cowmandmewt xx s. 



25 

1584-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 228* (6 September -5 September) (Payments) 

Paid vnto Master Maior for the Queries Players xx s. 30 



f 229* 

Paid him for mony Disbursed for a Drome for the Towne 35 

and rwo heddw for the Drome xxxiij s. 

Paid him for a dry fate to putt him in ij s. ij d. 



3. 8, 10, 15/ him: Angel Shawe 35, 37/ him. him 1 : the mayor, Robert Carpenter 

3/ Drome: e corrected over other letters 



RYE 1584-7 

Paid him for puttinge in of the hedd and for strawe and 

carryinge of the same 1X " 

Paid the viij th Day for a Case for the Drome xx d. 



1585-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 245v* (5 September- 4 September) (Payments) 

Paid to my Lord Admiralls Players 
f 248* (Payments to officers) 

5 

Paid Angell Shawe Dromestate his quarters wages xiij s. iiij d. 

f 248v* 

20 

Paid Angell Shawe his quarters wages xiij s. iiij d. 

Paid Angell Shawe his quarters wages xiij s. iiij d. 

25 

1586-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 253v* (4 September-3 September) (Payments) 

Paid vnto Willwm Geere for that he Disbursed at the 30 

Cowmandemerct of Master Maior as by a Ticket may 

appere the 29 of September to the Queenes Players xx s. 



f 256* 

Paid to the Erie of Lecesters players at the cowmandemewt 

of Master Maior x s. 



W him: thf mayor, Robert Carpenter 30/ Willwm Geere: William Gere, terjeant, 1558-9 

4/ the viij h Day: 8 May 



35 



132 RYE 1586-8 

f 257v* 



Paid to the Queenes mziestes Players as by a bill made by 

master Maior appearith xx s 



f 258v* 

Paid Angell Shawe his qzwrters wag for the drome xiij s. iiij d. 

10 
Paid Angell Shawe, Drome his quarters wag xiij s. iiij d. 



f 259* 

15 
Paid Angell Shawe Drome his quarters wagrt xiij s. iiij d. 



f 259v* 

20 

Paid Angell Shawe his Quarters wages & so Discharged him xiij s. iiij d. 



f 260* 

25 

Paid to lohn Prowze to buy ij drome hedd at london vj s. 



1587-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 30 

f 272* (3 September 1 September) (Payments) 

Paid vnto the Lord of Lecestors plaiers at the assignment 

of Master Maior xiij s. iiij d. 



f 273* 

Paid to the Queenes Players by thassignment of Master Maior xx s. 



RYE 1587-9 
f 276v* 

Paid to Steven Harryson for a yeard & a quarter of stamwcll 

frise for to make the trumpeter apparell xiij s. v d. 

5 



f 280v* 

Paid vnto Angell Shawe for one whole yeares wages for 

playeinge on the drum liij s. iiij d. 10 



1588-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 284 v* (1 September 1588-7 September 1589) (Payments to officers) is 

Paid to Angle Shawe for his wages being droum xiij s. iiij d. 

Paid to Angle Shawe for his qzwrtres wages being drum xiij s. iiij d. 

20 

f 285* 

Paid to Angle Shawe for his wages for the drom xiij s. iiij d. 

2S 

Paid to Angle Shawe for his wag being drom xiij s. iiij d. 



f 286* (Ordinary charges) 

30 

Paid to the Earle of Essex players at the assignment of 

Master Maior xiij s. iiij d. 



f 288* 35 

Paid to the Quenes players at the appointment of Master Maior xx s. 

Paid to ye Lord Stafford^ plaiers at Master Maiors appointment x s. 



134 RYE 1588-90 

f 292* 



Paid to the Queries plaiers at the assignment of Master Maior xx s. 



1589-90 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 301* (7 September-6 September) (Payments) 

Paid to the Lord sandoies plaiers as per Master Maiors bill appereth x s. 



f 302v* 

Paid to the Lord Admiralls plaiers as per Master Maiors bill xiij s. iiij d. is 

f 303v* 

Paid to the Quenes plaiers at thassignement of Master Maior xx s. 20 

f 304* (Payments to officers) 

Paid to Angell Shawe being drome of the towne for his wages xiij s. iiij d. 25 

Paid to Angle Shawe for his wages beinge droum xiij s. iiij d. 

f 304v* 30 

Paid to Angle Shawe being dromer for his wages xiij s. iiij d. 

f 305* 35 

Paid to Angle Shaw for his wages being drom xiij s. iiij d. 



RYE 1590-2 

1590-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 310v* (6 September 5 September) (Payments) 

Paid to Angle Shawe his wages xiij s. iiij d. 5 

Paid him for newe hedinge the townes drome viij s. 



f 312* 

10 
Paid Angle Shawe for his quarter Due at o//r Ladye daye Laste xiij s. iiij d. 

f 313* 

15 

Paid to Angle Shawe his quarterage xiij s. iiij d. 

f 314* 

20 

Paid to Angell Shawe his quarters wag xiij s. iiij d. 



1591-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 25 

f 316* (5 September --3 September) (Payments) 

paid him for reward to my Lord Admirals plaiers x s. 

30 

f 318* 

Paid Angle Shaw wag for this first quarter xiij s. iiij d. 

35 

f 319* 

Paid Angle Shaw his quarters wag x jji s jjjj J 



28/ him: Steven Frencham. mercer 



136 RYE 1591-3 

f 319v* 



Paid to frencham for rewarde given to my Lord straing players xiij s. iiij d. 

f 320* 

Paid Angle Shawe his qwarters wages xiij s. iiij d. 



10 
f 320v* 

Paid to frencham to reward my Lord Morleys plaiers vj s. viij d. 

15 

f 321* 

Paid Angle Shawe his wages xiij s. iiij d. 

20 

1592-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/9 

f 325* (Payment!) 

To George White for Carryinge Letties to our Lord warden 25 

to London ix s. 

To him more for Carrying vp the trumpeter iij s. 



f 325v* 30 

To the Lord Admeralls plaiers in rewarde xiij s. iiij d. 

To the Earle of pembrock^ plaiers in reward xiij s. iiij d. 

35 

f 326v* (Officers wages) 

To him for his whole yeares wag as drome of the towne Iiij s. iiij d. 



3, 13/ frencham: Steven Frencham, mercer 38/ him: Angel Shawe 

25/ George White: George White, baker 



RYE 1592-4 137 

f 327* 

Geven in rewarde therle of Worcesters players xiij s. iiij d. 

5 

f 327v* 

Geven in rewarde to my Lord Darcies players xiij s. iiij d. 



10 

1593-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 
f 11* (2 September -1 September) (Payments) 

for wag for the Drum xiij s. iiij d. 15 



f 14* 

for wag for his Drum xiij s. iiij d. 20 

f 16* 

for wag for the Drum X11 j s . iiij d. 25 

for heding of three Drums xx s 



f 17* 

To my Lord Ogles Players 

f 17v* 

for his quanirs wag for the Drum 

15. 25/ Drum: i>. Angel Shawe 20. 36/ his: Angel Shawe s 



138 



RYE 1593-6 

f 1 8* (Guest ling expenses at Hythe, Kent) 

To Mr Cobbham his musitions 



ijs. 



1594-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 25* (1 September 1594-7 September 1595) (Payments) 

/d to Therle of Worsitors players 



X S. 10 



f 28v* 



To the Queens Players 



xx s. 15 



f 29\ 



for wages for his Drome 



xiij s. ilij d. 20 



f 31 



for wag for the Drome 



xiij s. iiij d. :<, 



f 32v* 



for wag for the Drum 



xiij s. iiij d. 30 



1595-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 39v* (7 September 5 September) (Payments) 

Imprimis to the right honorable the Lord of worstm plym 
for A rewarde beinge here 



x s. 



3/ Mr: for Lord (>) 
20/ his AngflShawe i 



25, 30/ Drome, Drum: if, Angel Shawt 



RYE 1595-7 139 

f 41* 

Paid to her Ma/Vnies Players as a rewarde to them given of 

the Townshipp beinge here xx s. 

5 

f 4lv* 

for his wag for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 

10 
for his Quarters wag for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 

1596-7 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 53v* (5 September -4 September) (Payments to officers) is 

Paid to hym for his quarters wages ffor his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 



20 



f 55* 

Paid for a Pottle of wyne bestowed vppon the Queenes players 

at the Assignement of Master Maior xvj d. 

25 

f 55v* 

Paid to hym for his wages for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 

30 

f 57* 

Paid hym for his Drome xiij s. iiij d 



f 58v 



35 

* 



Paid him for wages for his Drome x iij s 



9, 1 1/ his: Angel Shawt s 17. 28, 33, 38/ hym, him: Angel Shawe 



140 RYE 1596-9 

f 59* 



Paid for a reward given to my lord Chamberlens Players at 
the Assignement of Master Maior 



1597-8 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 68* (4 September-3 September) (Payments) 

10 
Paid him for his wages for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 



f 70* 

15 

Paid him for his Drome wages xiij s. iiij d. 



f 71* 

20 

Paid him for his wages for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 



f 73* 

25 

Paid him for his Wages for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 



1598-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 30 

f 79v* (3 September-2 September) (Payments) 

Paid him for his wages for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 

35 

f 81v* 

Paid more to Sir Thomas his Trumpetter for Reward ij s. vj d. 

11, 16, 21. 26, 33/ him: Angel Shawe 38/ S/r Thomas: Sir Thomas Fane 



RYE 1598-1601 l41 

f 82* 

Paid for his Wages for the Drome xiij s. iij d. 

5 

1599-1600 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 91* (2 September 1599-7 September 1600) (Payments) 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apireth ij 1. viij s. vj d. 10 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apireth j 1. xvj s. x d. 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apeireth j 1. xvj s. x d. 

f 91v* 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apireth j 1. xvj s. x d. 

20 

1600-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 98* (7 September-6 September) (Payments) 

25 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apireth ij 1. viij s. vj d. 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apireth j 1. xvj s. 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apireth j 1. xvj s. x d. 30 

f 98v* 

Paid Angell as by his bill Apireth j |. xvj s. x d. 35 



3/ his: Angel Shaives 



142 RYE 1601-3 



1601-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 109* (6 Septembfr-5 September) (Payments) 

And for the wages of his Drome As Appereth by bill xiij s. iiij d. 



f HOv* 

And paide for his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 10 

f H2v* 

Paid for the wages of his Drome xiij s. iiij d. is 

f 113v* 

Paid him for his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 20 



1602-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 123v* (5 September -3 September) (Payments) 

Paid him for Wages of his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 



f 125* 

Paid him for Wages of his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 

f 126v* 35 

Paid to him for his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 

5, 10, 15/ Ins: Angel Shaives 20, 27, 32. 37/ him: Angel Shawe 



RYE 1602-5 l43 

f 128* 

Paid him for the Wages of his Drome xiij s. iii) d. 



1603-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 137v* (4 September ~2 September) (Payments) 

Paid him for Wages of his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 10 



f 139v* 

Paid him for the Wages of his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 15 

f 141* 

Paid him for his wagof his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 20 

f 1 4 1 v* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

Paid to the Minstrels jj s . 25 

f I42v* (Payments) 

Paid him for his Wag for his Drome xiij s. iiij d. 30 



1604-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 161* (2 September- 1 September) (Payments) 35 

Paid him his quarters wages for ye Drome xiij s. iiij d. 



3. 10, 15, 20, 30, 37/ him: Angel Shau/e 



144 RYE 1604-6 

f 163* 
Paid him for his wages being Dromer xiij s. iiij d. 

f 166v* 

Paid him for his quarters wages for ye drome xiij s. iiij d. 



10 

f I68v* 

Paid him for his drome wages xiij s. iiij d. 



15 

1605-6 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/10 

f 179v* (1 September 1605-5 September 1606) (Payments) 

Paid him for his wages for playing w;th the drume xiij s. iiij d. 20 



f 182v* 

Paid him his quarters wages for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 25 

f 185* 

P/7/d him his quarters wages for the drome xiij s. iiij d. 30 

f 187v* 

Prt/d vnto him for his wages for the drome xiij s. iiij d. ^ 

3. 8, 13, 20. 25, 30, 35/ him: Angel Shawe 



RYE 1606-9 145 

1606-7 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61 /1 3 

f 74* (7 September -6 September) (Payments) 

Paid him for his quarters wag for the drome xiij s. iiij d. 



f 78* 

Paid him for his quarters wages for the drome xiij s. iiij d. 10 

f 80v* 

Paid to him for his wages for the drome xiij s. iiij d. is 

f 84* 

Paid him for his wages for the drome xiij s. iiij d. 20 



1608-9 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/14 

f 1 2v* (4 September 3 September) (Payments) 25 

Paid him for his wages of the drome xiij s. iiij d. 



f 17* 30 

Paid for the wages of ye drome xiij s. iiij d. 



f 20* 

Paid to him for the wages of his drome xiij s. iiii d. 



5, 10, 15, 20, 27, 37/ him: Angel Shawe 32/ drome: it. Angel Shawe 



146 RYE 1608-11 

f 22* 



Paid him for his quarters wages for the Drome xiij s. iiij d. 



1609-10 

Depositions at the Trial of Francis Daniell ESRO: RYE 47/77/2 

single sheet* (18 March) 

Depositions taken before Mr Richard Cockram Maior of Rye in the 10 

Countie of Sussex Thomas Ensinge William Thorpe & Marck Thomas 
Iurat and Justices of peace of the saide Towne the xviij th day of March 
Anno Regni domim nostri lacobi dei grar/ a Regis nuwc Anglic &c 
Septimo 1609 

Richard Colbrand of Holborne in the Countie of Middlesex music/on 15 

aged xxx tie yeares or thereabouts being first sworne vppon the holly 
Evangelist deposeth & saith as followeth/ viz. that he this deponent 
Lodginge at the Howse of ffrauncys Daniell of Rye afore said Inholder 
did heare the saide ffrauncys daniell speake these word followinge [viz.] 
of master maior of Rye on ffryday at night Last past viz./ That Wee have 20 
a [purit] Puritayne to our Maior and [therefore I weaned] therefore you 
may play as longe as you will at his doore but he will geve you nothinge/ 
And that was the occasion that they stayed from playinge & [geveninge] 
shewinge their Musick vnto master Maior/ 

(signed) Richard Colborne 25 

The rest of the said Richard Colbrand Companey Did Leikewiese 
affirme [that] the same A vppon their othes to be trewe beinge three 
in nomber that the said ffrauncys daniell dide speake these wordes of 
master Maior/ 

(signed) Tobyas Cannon TM signw Thome Millingbey 30 

1610-11 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/16 

f 20* (2 September- 1 September) (Payments) 

v 

Paid vnto Noye Radforde for playinge w/ th the drom v s. 

Paid vnto John Skynner for half a yeres playinge w; th the drome v s. 



3/ him: Angel Shawe 20/ ffryday ... past: 16 March 



RYE 1611-12 147 

1611-12 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/18 

f 17* (I September 161 1-5 September 1612) (Payments) 

Paid vnto Noye Radforde for his quarters wages for being the 

Townes drome v s. 

Paid vnto lohn Skynner ij s. vj d. 



f 20v* 10 

Paid to Noye Radford his quarters ffees for being drome to 
the Towne v s. 

Paid to lohn Skynner for the Leik ij s. vj d. 

Paid to the Queenes players by the Appointment of master \-> 

Maior for A rewarde xx s. 



f 22v* 

20 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages being the Townes drome v s. 
Paid to Noah Radford for the Leike v s. 



f 23* 25 

Paid to lohn Skynner for the Leike ij s. Oj d. 

f 24v* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 30 

Paid to the Music/ons for A Rewarde & diume tymes vj s. 

f 26v* 35 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages for beinge drome v s. 

Paid to Noah Radford for the Leike v s. 

Paid to lohn Skynner for the Leike ij s v j d. 

40 



148 RYE 1612-14 



1612-13 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/19 

f 16v* (6 September -5 September) (Payments) 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters ffee for playinge with 

the drume v s 

Paid to Noy Radford for ye Leik v s. 

Paid to lohn Skynner for ye Leik ij s. vj d. 

10 
f 20* 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters ffeee for ye drome v s. 

Paid Noah Radford the Leik v s. 

Paid to lohn Skynner ye Leik ij s. vj d. 15 



f 22v* 

Paid Clement Church his qzwrters wages for the drome v s. 20 

Paid Noah Radford for the Leik v s. 

Paid to lohn Skynner the Leik ij s. vj d. 



f 24V 



25 



Paid to Clement Church his qzwrters wages for beinge Drome v s. 

Paid to Noah Radford for ye leik v s. 

Paid to John Skynner for ye Leik ij s. vj d. 

30 

1613-14 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 6 1 /20 

f 13v* (5 September- 4 September) (Payments) 

35 

Paid to [(....)] Clement Church his quarters wages for beinge 

A Dromer v s. 

Paid to Noah Radford the Leik v s. 

Paid lohn Skynner for the Leik ij s. vj d. 



13/ ffeee: for ffee 



RYE 1613-15 l49 



. 



f 16 

Paid Clement Church his quarters wages for the dromer 

Paid to Noah Radford the Leik 

Paid to John Skynner for the Leike ij s. vj d. 

f I6v* 

Paid to Princes Elizabethes players by the Appointment of 

master Maior xj s. 10 



f ISv* 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages being drome vs. 

Paid Noah Radford for ye leik v s. 

Paid lohn Skynner the Leik ij s. vj d. 



f 20* 20 

Paid to the Queenes players by the Appointment of 

master Maior x s. 



25 

f 21* 

Paid Clement Church for his quarters wages for the drome v s. 

Paid Noah Radford for the leik v s. 

Paid lohn Skynner for ye Leik ij s. vj d. 30 



1614-15 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 6 1/21 

f 15* (4 September 3 September) (Payments) ^ 

Paid Clement Church his quarters wag for beinge drome v s. 

Paid Noah Radford ye Leik v s. 

Paid Edward Skynner for the Leike ij s v i J 

40 



150 RYE 1614-16 

f 17v* 



Paid to Clement Church his qarters wages for the drome v s. 

Paid to Noah Radford for the Leik v s. 

Paid to lohn Skynner the Leik ij s. vj d. 5 



ff 20-20v* 

Paid Clement Church his quarters wages for the Drome vs. I 10 

Paid to Noah Radford the leik v s. 

Paid lohn Skynner the Leik ij s. vj d. 



f 21* (Brotherhood and gttestling expenses at New Romney, Ke nt) 15 

Paid to the Music/ons iij s. iiij d. 

f 23* (Payments) 20 

Paid to Clement Churche for the drome v s. 

Paid to Noah Radford ye Leik v s. 

Paid to Edward Skynner ye Leik ij s. vj d. 

25 

1615-16 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/22 

f I4v* (3 September- 1 September) (Payments) 

30 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages, beinge drome v s. 

Paid to Noah Radford for the Leik 

Paid to lohn Skynner for ye Leik ij s. vj d. 

35 

f 16* 

Paid vnto the Princes Players by the Assignemfwt of master 

Maior & a pottle of wyne spent vppon them xviij s. 

40 
24/ F.dw/W Skynner: probably for lohn Skynner (?) 



RYE 1615-17 151 







f 17 

Paid to Clement Church his wages for the drome 

Paid Noah Radford for the Leike 

Paid lohn Skynner the Leike ij s. vj d. 



f 19* 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages beinge drom v s. 10 

Paid to Noah Radfordw widow v s. 

Paid to lohn Skynner Drome ij s. vj d. 



f 21* is 

Paid to Clement Churche his quarters wages beinge drome viij s. vj d. 

Paid to lohn Skynner drom for the Leike v s. 



20 

1616-17 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/23 

f 14* (1 September 161 6-7 September 1617) (Payments) 

Paid vnto Clement Church his quarters wages beinge drowmer vij s. vj d. 2^ 
Paid vnto John Skynner the leik v s. 



f 16* 

30 

Not to he Paid vnto the Queenes Players at the Appointment of Master Maior xx s. 

Allowed 



f 17* 

Paid to Clement Church for his quarters wages beinge drom vij s. vj d. 

Paid vnto lohn Skynner for ye leike v s 



3/ drome: 4 minims in MS 



152 RYE 1616-17 

f 18v* 



10 



Paid vnto Clement Church his quarters wages beinge drom vij s. vj d. 

Paid vnto lohn Skynner v s 



f 19* 

Paid to Mr Marke Thomas Maior for a Drome for the Towne xl s. 

f 20* (Payments to officers) 

Paid to Clement Church his qz^rters wages for beinge Drome vij s. vj d. 
Paid to lohn Skynner for the leik v s. 15 



Letter of Certificate and Passport ESRO: RYE 47/89 
single sheet* (12 July) 

20 

Ria To all those to whome these presences, shall come & especially to those 
to whome the same shall or may most cheifelie appfrteyn Wee Marke 
Thomas gentleman Maior of thauncient Towne of Rye in the Countie 
of Sussex and the luratej of the same towne Send gretinge, Certefieng 
you by the tenor of these presents A r for trueth 1 that the bearrer hereof 25 
named, Thomas Maxwell A Music/on by his vocac/on is an Inhabitant 
of the Towne of Rye aforesaid &: hath [resided] A dwelled here by the 
space of one whole yere, and before he came to Rye aforesaid to dwell he 
Dwelled & inhabited in the Towne of Battle in the Countie aforesaide, 
by the space of Seaven yeres Dureing all wkidn tyme the said Thomas 30 
Maxfeild, Did well behave him self aswell in wordes as in deedes (so 
farr as we have ever heard or knowen) And nowe in Regarde, the said 
Thomas [Maxf ] Maxwell hath a Brother Dwelling in the Lowe Countries 
in Middlebarowe (as he affirmeth vnto vs) named lohn Maxwell, one of 
the Marchantw of thee Englishe howse and that the said lohn Maxfeild 35 

hath a sonne of his dwelling with the said Thomas Maxwell named 
A r also 1 lohn Maxwell who is desireous to goe vnto his said (Father to 
see him & w/th him to remayne, and the said Thomas his vncle verie 
willing to see his said Brother, Hee the said thomas Max[feild] A well 

31, 3V Maxfeild: for Maxwell 34/ Middlebarowe: Middelburg. Zetland 



RYE 1616-18 153 

hath therefore not onelie desired these our Lettres of Certificat, But also 
required ^hese 1 owr favorable Lettres of passeporte for him A self lohn 
Maxffeildj well 1 his Nephewe Oliver Sanders his Servant & Michaell 
Borne his Apprentice r & Ambros DrOr one of his Company, to travel! 
w*th their Musicall Instruments to A the Towne & Port of Dovor in the 
Countie of Kent, and their to take passage for the Lowe Countries, These 
are therefore to desire you [not] & every of you [to whome these presenr.es 
shall [come] most cheifelie concerne] A r not only 1 peaceably & quietlie to 
p^rmitt & suffer the said Thomas Maxwell A r & his said Company to 
travell vnto Dovor aforesaid, but also to shewe him yor Lawful! favors for 10 
the passage of him & his said Company, [of] oversea to the place aforesaid 
& [the(. . .)] his Affaires beinge there Donne for their retorne backe againe to 
Rye aforesaid w/thout any yowr Lett or molestac/one vsinge them selves well 
& honestlie as appmeyneth, And as well in Leike case shall doe for you at 
any of yowr requests In witness whereof wee the said Maior & lurarrj of 15 
Rye aforesaid have caused [(.)] A the 1 Scale of Office of Mairaltie of the said 
Towne of Rye to these presenr.es to bee sett dated thee xijth day of luly in the 
yeres of the Raigne of our Soutraigne Lord lames by the grace of God Kinge 
of England Scotland ffraunce & Ireland Defender of the Faith &c, viz. of 
England ffraunce & Ireland the ffyfteenth & of Scotland the ffyftiethe 1617 20 

1617-18 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/24 

f I6v* (7 September -6 September) (Payments) 

2S 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages being drome vij s. vj d. 

Paid to lohn Skynner the leik v s. 



f 18v* J0 

Paid to Clement Church Drome for his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

Paid to lohn Skynner for ye leik v s. 



35 

f 20v* 

Paid to Clement Church his qzwrters wages for playing w/th 

ye Drome v jj s v j j 

Paid vnto lohn Skynner for leik v s 40 



154 RYE 1617-20 

f 23* 



Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages beinge drome vij s. vj d. 

Paid to lohn Skynner ye leik v s 

1618-19 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/25 

f llv* (6 September -5 September) (Payments) 

Paid to Clement Church his quarters wages beinge drom vij s. vj d. 

Paid to lohn Skynner the leik 



10 

V S. 



f 14* 

15 

Paid to Clement Church his q/^rters wages for 

beinge Drome vij s. vj d. 

Paid to John Skynner for the leik v s. 

f 15* 20 

Paid to Clement Church for his q<mers wages 

beinge drome vij s. vj d. 

Paid to lohn Skynner for the leik v s. 

25 



f 17v* 

Paid vnto Clement Church for his quarters wages 

beinge drome vij s. vj d. 

Paid vnto lohn Skynner for ye leik v s. 



30 



1619-20 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 6 1/26 

f llv* (5 September -3 September) (Payments) 35 

paid to Clement Church his quarters wages beinge drome vij s. vj d. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like v s. 



RYE 1619-21 155 



* 



f 13v 

paid to Clement Church for his quarters wages beinge drome vij s. vj d. 
paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages beinge drome v s. 

5 

f 14* 

paid to Clement Church r his wife 1 for her husbands quarters 

wages beinge drome vij s. vj d. 10 

paid to lohn Skinner for the Like v s. 

f 15v* 

paid to Thomas Radford for heading of the Townes drome iiij s. 15 

f 1 6* (Payments to officers) 

paid vnto lohn Skinner for his quarter wages being drome v s. 20 

paid vnto ffrancis Casheire for the like v s. 



1620-1 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/27 25 

f 9v* (3 September-2 September) (Payments) 

paid vnto ffrancis Chasheire his quarters wages being drume v s. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the Like v s 

30 

f llv* 

paid vnto ffrancis Casheire for his quarters wages being drum v s. 

paid to lohn Skynner for the like v s 35 

f 1 3v* (Payments to officers) 

paid to ffrancis Casheir his quarters wages v s 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like v s 



156 RYE 1620-3 

f 15* 



paid to ffrancis Casheire for his quarters wages being drome v s. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like v s. 



5 



1621-2 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 6 1/28 

f lOv* (2 September -1 September) (Payments) 

10 

paid to ffrancis Casheire for his quarters wages beinge drume v s. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like v s. 



f llv* (Payments to officers) 15 

paid ffrancis Chasheire his quarters wages being dromw v s. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like v s. 

20 

f 13v* 

paid to ffrancis Cashier his quarters wages v s. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like v s. 

25 

f 15* 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages v s. 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages v s. 30 



1622-3 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 6 1/29 

f llv* (I September 1622-7 September 1623) (Payments) 35 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages beinge drume vj s. iij d. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like vj s. iij d. 



12, 24/ Skinner: 4 minims in MS 



RYE 1622-4 
f 13v* 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vj s. iij d. 

paid to lohn Skinner the like vj s. iij d. 

5 

f 1 5v* (Payments to officers) 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vj s. iij d. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like vj s. iij d. KJ 



f 17v* 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vj s. iij d. 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vj s. iij d. 



1623-4 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/30 20 

f 9v* (7 September-5 September) (Payments) 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vj s. iij d. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like vj s. iij d. 

25 

paid for mendinge of the drume xij d. 



f 12* 

30 

paid vnto ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vj s. iij d. 

paid vnto lohn Skinner the like vj s. iij d. 



f 1 4v* (Payments to officers) 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vj s. iij d 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like v ; s \\ , j 



35 



RYE 1623-6 
f 16v* 



10 



paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vj s. iiij d. 

p/7/d to lohn Skinner for the like vj s. iiij d. 



1625-6 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/32 

f 8* (4 September 3 September) (Payments to officers) 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid to John Skinner for the like vij s. vj d. 



f 10* , 5 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his qz^rters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like vij s. vj d. 

20 

f lOv* 

paid to lohn Skinner for mending the drume w^zch belongs 

to ye selected bond iij s. 

25 

f 12* 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid to lohn Skinner for ye like vij s. vj d. 30 
paid to lohn Skinner for heading two droms for the towne 
braces and points for them xvj s. 



f 12v* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 35 

paid to ffrancis Casheire and Thomas Danyell for attending there viij s. 

paid to the musitians of Rye and Dovor & to tenders where 

wee lay xvij s. 

40 



38/ Dovor: Dover, Kent 



RYU 1625-8 !59 

f 13v* 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid to lohn Skinner for the Like vij s. vj d. 

5 

1626-7 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/33 

f 8* (3 September-2 September) (Payments) 

10 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid to Francis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 
paid to lohn Skinner for headinge the drume for the 
selected band vj s. 20 



f 11* 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 25 

paid to lohn Skinner for the like vij s. vj d. 



f 12v* 

30 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid for mendinge the drume belonginge to the selected bond ij s. 

35 

1627-8 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/34 

f lOv* (2 September 1627-7 September 1628) (Payments to officers) 

paid to ffrancis Casheire his quarters wages vij s. vj d w 

4/ Skinner: 4 minimi in MS 



160 RYE 1627-30 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

f 12v* 

5 
paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid ye \v\ddou> Casheire her husbands wages vij s. vj d. 



f 14* 

10 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



f 15* (Brotherhood and guestling expenses at New Romney, Kent) 15 

Paid to ye musicke vj s. 

f 1 6* (Payments to officers) 20 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



1629-30 25 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/35 
f 6* (6 September -5 September) (Payments to officers) 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

30 



paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

35 

f 8* 

paid him more that was given to a company of plaiers xj s. 



40 



him John Noivcll, mayor 



RYE 1629-31 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

f 8v* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

5 

paid the musicke iij * V J d - 



10 



f 10* (Payments to officers) 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



1630-1 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/36 

f 6v* (5 September -4 September) (Payments to officers) 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



20 

f 7v* 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



25 

f 8* 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s. 

30 

f 8v* (Brotherhood expenses at New Romney, Kent) 

paid Thomas Maxwell for his Musicke at the Brotherhood v s. 



(Payments to officers) 

paid. lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



162 RYE 1630-2 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s. 



1631-2 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/37 

f 6v* (4 September -2 September) (Payments to officers) 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s. 



10 



f 7* 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages vs. 15 

paid by the appointnvwt of Master Maior to lohn Skinner 

for headinge of the Townes drum iiij s. 



20 

f 7v* 

paid John Skiner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid John Pedle his quarters wages v s. 

25 



f 8* (Brotherhood and Guestling expenses at New Romney, Kent) 
paid to Thomas Maxwell for ye musick 

f 8v* (Payments to officers) 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. 

paid to lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s. 35 



I/ v s.: v corrected over another letter 
34/ vij $.: for vij s. vj d ( ) 



RYE 1633-6 163 

1633-4 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/38 

f 4v* (1 September 1633-7 September 1634) (Payments to officers) 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. v) d. 5 

paid him more for a new head cordes and brases to the 

Townes Drome vj s. 



f 5* 10 

Paied John Pedle his quarters wages v s. 



f 5v* 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Pedle for his quarters wages v s. 



15 



20 



paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s. 



25 



f 8* 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s 30 



1635-6 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/39 

f 6v* (6 September- 4 September) (Payments to officers) 35 

paid to lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s 



164 RYE 1635-8 

f 7v* 



paid lohn Skinner his quarters [wge] wages vij s. vj d 

paid lohn Pedele his quarters wages v s 

5 

f 8v* 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vii s. vj d. 

paid John Pedle his quarters wages v s. 10 



f 10* 

paid lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s. 



1637-8 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/40 20 

f 7* (3 September-2 September) (Payments to officers) 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages v s. 

25 

f 8v* 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages v s. 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 30 



f lOv* 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. js 

paied lohn Pedle his quarters wages v s. 



f llv* 

40 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 



RYE 1637-42 165 



paied lohn Beadle his quarters wages 



v s. 



1640-1 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/41 

f 5* (6 September -5 September) (Payments to officers) 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paied John Peadle his quarters wages 



v s. 

10 



f 6* 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages vs. 15 



f 7v* 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 20 

paied John Peadle his quarters wages v s. 



f 9* 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages v s. 



1641-2 30 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/42 
f 7* (5 September 4 September) (Payments to officers) 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages v s. 35 



f 8v* 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 10 

I/ Beadle: for Peadle 20/ Skinner: / minims in MS 



166 RYE 1641-3 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages v s. 

f 9v* 

5 
paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vi d. 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages v s. 



f lOv* 

paied lohn Skinner his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paied lohn Peadle his quarters wages v s. 



1642-3 

Chamberlains Rough Accounts ESRO: RYE 61/43 

f 1 1* (4 September-^ September) (Payments to officers) 

paid lohn Peadle his quarters wages and for mendinge 20 

the Townes drum xij s. vj d. 



f 12* 

25 

paid for 5 drum head x s. 

paid for bringinge them from London ix d. 



f 13* 30 

paid John Peadle his quarters wages vij s. vj d. 

paid him for mendinge the drumes vj s. 

paid the drummer for mending ye old drum iij s. vj d. 35 

paid for ribond &: brac for the drum iij s. x d. 



6/ Skinner: 4 minims in ins 36/ brac: corrected over braselets (?) 

26/ x s.: corrected from another figure, possibly v s. 



RYE 1642-3 / STEYNING 1519-20/1 l67 

f 14* 

paid John Pcadle theire quarters wages xij s. vj d. 

paid him for mendinge the drums i ij s. vj d. 

5 

f 15* 

paid lohn Peadles & his sonnes wages xij s. vj d. 

10 

SALEHURST 

1581 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/2 15 

f 38v* (14 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in St Michael s Church, Lewes, before Giles Fletcher, 

official, in the presence of Hugh Treves, notary public 

20 

lohn Dunke prwnted for kepinge mynstrell playinge in his howse on the 
xij d. Saboth Daie comparuit et negat ar/;Vluw vnde dominus assignauit sibi ad 

proximum purgandz^w se quarta manu in proximo 

STEYNING 

1519 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO. Par. 183/9/1 

f 9v* (Rendered 13 May) 30 

the same A yere & day come Rychard pellett & Wyllyaw gardener ,/lat 1 
wardens of the kyng play & yn lyke man^r made ther accompt for the 
urine of ij yere & all thyng^ accomptyd &C alowyd ther remaynythe 
clerely to the seyd churche iij li. vij s. iiij d. & so the seyd Rychard & 35 

Wyllyaw? to be clerely dyschargyd & acquytt 



1520/1 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 40 

f 1 (Rendered 6 February) 

the same day &C yere came lamis pellett &: lohn goff & delyue-ryd the mony 



168 STEYNING 1520/1-45 



of the kyng ale yn to the churche box xxxiiij s. vj d. ob. & so the sayd lamis 
& lohn to be clerely dyschargyd 



1521/2 5 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 
f lOv* (Rendered 11 February) 

the same day &i yere caw yn Roger burchfeld John bode the yongfr & 
wyllyaw person wardens of the kyng ale & haue delyudryd yn to the 10 

churche boxe all thyngw accowptyd & alowyd clerely xxxviij s. [vj d.J x d. 
& soo the seyd Rog^r lohn & wyllya/w to be clerely dyschargyd for the 
fyrst yere the -which mony was delyufryd vnto the brethered wardews 
thaw beyng [(...)] 

15 

1522/3 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 

f lOv* (Rendered 5 January) 

20 

the v day of January the yere of owr lord M ccccc xxij came lohn bode the 
yong^r & wyllyaw p^rsonn wardens of the kyng ale & haue A made 
accompt for iiij torches bogt with the mony savyd the second yere to ye 
sum of xxx s. &C so the seyd lohn &c wyllyam to be clerely dyschargyd 
for the sec(..)d yere & (...) 25 



1545 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 

f 12 (Rendered JO April) 

Memorandum The xt* 1 day of Apryll in the xxxvj ci yere of the reigne of 
our Sou<raigne lord henry the eighte by the grace of god of 
englond ffraunce &: of Ireland kyng deffendor of the ffaithe 
& in erthe Supreme hedd of the churche of England & Ireland 35 

Came Thomas parson & Thomas Gooff wardens of the 
Churche of Stenyng & hathe made their accomptw And so 
the said wardens hathe brought clerely in to the churche 
boxe sauyed by the churche Ale - xxx s. j d. & so the said 
wardyns be clerly dischargid for all rekenyng And so <o 

remayneth at this day viiij li. iiij s. ij d. 



STEYNING 1545/6-7/8 l69 

1545/6 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 

1 2v (Rendered 12 January) 

The xij daye of lanuarij In the xxxvijf yere of the rayne of our 

souerayne lord kyng henri the viiij th by the grase of god of yngland 

franse & yerland defender of the faythe and of the churche of yngland 

& also yerland suprem hede came lames pellett & edward parson 

wardens of the churche of stenyng & hathe made ther accomtes and 

so the sayd wardens hathe brothe clerly In to the church boxe sauyd by 10 

the churche ale xxix s. v d. and so the sayd wardens be clerly dyschargyd 

for all rekynyng, and so ther remaynyt at thys daye vij li. xv d. In the 

churche boxe 



15 

1547 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 

f 13 (Rendered 15 April) 

Memorandum the xv th day of Apryll in the ffyrst yere of the raigne of [k] our 20 
Sou^raign Lord kynge Edward the vj^ 1 came Thomas holland & lamys perys 
wardens of the churche of Stenyng for the yere past &C so the said wardens 
brought clerely in to the churche boxe for the churche ale xxxj s. iij d. ob. & 
so there remayneth at this daye in the churche boxe Iij s. viij d. ob. &: so the 
said wardens be discharged 25 



1547/8 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 

f 13v (Rendered 16 February) 30 

Memorandum The xvj daye of frebruarij In [ A ] the A second yere 1 rayne of 
out sou^-raigwe lord kyng edward the vj came rafe farnfold & wyll/ am pellet 
thounger wardens of the churche of stenyng for the yere past & so the sayd 
wardens brothe /clerli 1 to ye churche boxe for the churche ale xxvi s. and 35 
so ther remaynyt In the churche boxe at thys day vj li. v s. viij d. ob. & so 
the sayd wardens be clerly dyschargyd 



32/ second yere 1 : for second yere of the 1 (?) 



170 STEYNING 1 548/9 / WARBLETON 1572 

1548/9 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 

f 1 3v (Rendered 6 March) 

Memorandum the vj th day of marche in the [se] iij thyrde yere of the 5 

reigne of OUT Sousraigne /Lord 1 Kynge Edward the vj th came Thomas 
Broker A one of the churchewardens of Stenyng for the yere past & 
brought clerely to the churche boxe for the churche ale xx s. & so ther 
remaynith in the churche boxe at thys daye vj Angell of golde & in 
syluer xviij s. ix d. ob. & so the said wardens be discharged 10 



WARBLETON 

1572 

St Mary the Virgins Parish Register ESRO: PAR 501/1/1 
f 6 (16 May) 

Buried noye spenner a maryed man of the p^rishe of helsham the which 

was kelled w; t/> a arowe as he was a stellin of a maye poell at howse of 20 

lohn Symes 



Inquest on the Death of Noah Spynner PRO: ASSI 35/14/6 

single mb (22 May) 25 

Sussex Inquisitio Indentattf capttf apud Warbleton infra Rapam de Hastinges 

in comitatu predicto xxij to die Maij Anno Regni domine nostre Elizabeths 
dei gr^aa Anglie ffraunc/V et hib^rme Regine ffidei defensoris &c xiiij 
Coram Wills/wo Playfer generoso Coronatore (...) Henricz comit/ j 30 

Hunting^...) Rape sue de Hastinge predicte in comitatu predicto super 
visum corporis Noe Spynn^r nuper de Hailsham in comitatu predicto 
Carpender apud Warbleton predictum (...) et interfect/ per sacramentum 
Hugonis Collen lohanms Pettit Edwardi Ausrye Thome ffarmer lohanms 
ffarmer Roberti Pettit loh^wwis Awekes lohanms Bishoppenden Wills/mi 35 
Wemble Laurencij Swayne loh^wwis Weston Steph/7wi Godsall senioris 
lohanms Pecham lohanms Weston de Shernden Gregorij Langham & 
Dunstani Penkeherst Qui luratores prssentant et dicunt sup^r szcramentum 
suuw predictum <\uod predictus Noe Spynner cum diu^rsis alijs p^rsonis 

5/ iij [livrde: dittograpby 



WARBLETON 1 572 / WHSTBOURNE 1 573 

xiiij to die instantis mensis maij Anno xiiij to Suprad/c/o circa horam 
xj ma in nocte eiiisdem diei venerunt prope domum cuiusdam Iohrfis 
Symmes in Warbleton predicto in comitatu predifto ad auferendum 
quoddam maypole fixuw in lerram ante et prope portam cuiusdem 
lohannis Symmes Et quidrni lohannis Haywarde nup^r de Crowherste 
in comitatu predicto laborer existens tune et ibiettm in domo dict\ 
lohannis Symmes cum vno arcu ac vna sagitta prrcij vj d. quas in 
manibus suis tune tenuit tune et ibidem felonice sagitavit d/ c/am 
sagittam per fenestram dicte domus dicti \o\\anms Symmes ac cuw 
dicta sagitta felonice p^rcussit dictum noe spynn^r in gurgulione 10 

sua (..) in the windep(...) ac dedit predicto noe spynn^r vnaw plagam 
mortalem in latitudine dimidii vnius policis ac in profunditate duorww 
policiuw & dimid;/ vnius policis dc qua quidem plaga predictus noe 
Spynner tune et ibidem instants obijt. Et sic \uratores predict! dicunt 
super szcramentum suum Et quod predictus lohannis haywarde cum 15 

arcu et sagitta predictis die Anno loco et hora predictis predictum noe 
Spynner felonice interfecit & necavit contra pacem dicte domine Regine 
coronam & dignitatem suas Et vlterius luratores predict! dicunt sup^r 
sacramentum suum predictum quod predictus lohanms Hawarde tempore 
pcrpetrac/owis felonie predicte babu\t [vnuw equuw colore graye pr^cij 20 

xl s.] treis vaccas prarij Ix s. in pastura loruzwnis Symmes ad vsuw domini 
Vibtrtatis predicte In cuius rei testimonium tarn predictus coronator 
quaw \uratores predicti (...) sigilla sua apposueruwt Datuw die Anno 
& loco predictis I 
ponit se non cu\pabilem nee reatum Sed qwod loh^wwes Ap Noke (...) 25 

WESTBOURNE 

1573 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments WSRO: Ep. 1/23/2 30 

f 2v (June) 

we prwnte that Thomas Lusy a vyctuler retayned a mynstrell to playe 
in his house and suffred him ther to playe in the servyce tyme, and 
when the warden and sydmen came to serche the house he said that all 35 
thos that ther were wold rule the warden well ynoughe w/ th other evyll 
answeres/ 



5/ \o\\annK Haywarde: underlined in MS 2 1/ treis: for ires 

15, 19/ lohdnnis: for lohannes 



172 WEST TARRING 1515-20 

WEST TARRING 

1515 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 1* (25 March -9 December) (Receipts) 5 

Item Received on trynyte sonday for the chyrch 

[(.)] Ale And All cost payd xxvij s. x d. 

10 

1516-17 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 
f 3* (8 December -29 November) 

Memorandum that remaneth in the church 15 

Wardyns hondrt for the chyrch ale all costes 

deducte xxxix s. & viij d. 



1517-18 20 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 
f 4 (29 November 1517-6 December 1518) (Receipts) 

Item Resewyd r of ale (...) mony & the gewtys 

of the paryse Awle costys & cargys bore xx s. x d. 25 



1518-19 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 4v (6 December 4 December) (Receipts) 30 

Item resceyuyd of the cherche Alle & All thyng^ rekynd xxij s. 



1519-20 35 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 
f 5v (4 December 1519-9 December 1520) 

Memorandum that be parysche haue reseuyd of 

II trynyte sonday: 10 June 1515 



WEST TARRING 1519-34 

tomas kyngstuw & tomas hamper chyrche 

wardenys reseythe of be chyrche Alle xxx [(.)] s. & All costes borne 



1520-1 5 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 
f 6 (9 December 9 December) 

Memorandum b/zt pe paryche haue rescyvyd of Rychard 

blake & lohn bowne fore be church ale xxxix s. & all cost borne 10 



1522-3 

St Andrews Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f T (Receipts) 15 

resewyt for the chirche [hjaell vj xx s. vij d. 



1531-2 20 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 
f 12v (3 December 1531-13 December 1532) (Receipts) 

Item resceyuyd of the cherche Alle xx s. 

25 

1532-3 

St Andrews Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 13v* (13 December 1532-14 December 1533) (Expenses) 

30 

leyd ovtt for syngynge iij s . jijj J. 

hem for shryddyng of hovd for the cherch alle ji d. 



35 

1533-4 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 1$ (14 December -30 November) (Expenses) 

hem for wode for the cherch all shreddywng [[;; J <0 



1 71 vj: a false start to sum, not cancelled ( ) 



174 WEST TARRING 1536-46 



1536-7 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 17v* (Receipts) 

hem Reseved of the cherch all wi tA ye gyffts of ye parych 



xx s. 5 



1540-1 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 20* (Expenses) 10 

hem for vyllyng of Wod for ye cherch alle iiij d. 



1542-3 15 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 
f 21v* (Expenses) 

hem for shryedyng of Wod for ye cherth alle iiij d. 

20 

1544-5 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 22v* (17 December- 13 December) (Receipts) 

25 

Reseuyd for the vanttage of ye Ayll xx s. 



f 23v* 

hem Rescued for the vanttage of the Ayll lij s. v d. 



1545-6 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO. Par. 193/9/1 

f 24v (13 December 1545-21 December 1546) 

hem Receuyd for the vanttage of the Ayll xxvj s. v d. 



WEST TARRING 1546 63 

1546-7 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 26* (Receipts) 

hem oure chyrch haJle all thyng deschagged xxxiiij s. 5 



1547-8 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 28* (Receipts) 10 

hem ovr chyrch hal all thyng dys charged x s. 



1548-9 15 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 
f 29v* (Expenses) 

hem last by the Churche ale viij s. vj d. 

20 

1559-60 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 39 (13 February 1558/9-29 November 1560) (Receipts) 

25 

Itmi Reseued of the cherch chall xxij s. ij d. 



1562-3 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 30 

f 41* (Receipts) 

hem deceived of Devocion money to the Ayll ij s. xi d. 

hem Received of the Cheyrche Ayll xj li. xxiij d. 

35 

f 4lv* (Expenses) 

hem to the mynsstrylls vj s. viij d. 

hem for to loyd of feyrs {{[. s 40 

Itmi to the Drowme pleyr x jj J 



176 WEST TARRING 1562-8 

f 42* 



hem for morys beyles tha wey haue in stoyr v s. 



1563-4 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 42v* (Receipts) 

Recevyd for the All xix s. viij d. 



1564-5 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 43v (16 April- 31 March) (Receipts) 15 

Receued [a] in [whet] mault toward the call j d. 

Receued in whet iij bushel } peck 

Receued of the eall xlj s. vj (...) 

20 

1566-7 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 46* (31 March 1566 -6 April 1567) (Receipts) 

25 

fyrst fur the churche ale iiij li. vij s. iij d. 

Resevyd of or neyghtbours in Wheat & make 

&: money toward ye churche ale xxx s. 

30 

1567-8 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO. Par. 193/9/1 

f 46 (6 April 1567-25 July 1568) 

Recevid at the churche Ale Last the some of v li. v s. vj d. 

f 46v* (Expenses) 

40 

Itn paid to the mynstrels iij s. iiij d. 

ij barels of beer v ) s. 



WEST TARRING 1568-1625/6 

1568-9 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 

f 47* (25 July -10 July) (Expenses) 

Item paid for a barill of beare iij s. iiij d. 

Item paid to the mynstrelles ij s. vj d. 



1570-1 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 10 

f 50v* (29 July 1570- 16 September 1571) (Expenses) 

to lohn selden for mondayes play xij d. 

15 

f 51* 

payd to awsten for the menstrel owr Cheurch All day ij s. vj d. 

20 

1589-90 

St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts WSRO. Par. 193/9/2 

f 21 (3 May -3 May) (Receipts) 

Reseaved by owr chearche eale all thinge dessechearged xliij s. vij d. 25 



1625/6 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 

WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13 30 

f 132v* (11 February) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pal/ant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, 
before William Cox, cleric, surrogate judge, in the presence of Richard Eragge, 35 
notary public 

[wille/mus Willf/mus] Gilbertus Knight persona\itei Citatwj &c pro Causa. 
sequent viz. for his ribauldry & abusing iesting making & singing song 
to the discredit of his neighbowrs in non Comp^rendo &c similiter 40 

pronuwciatur Contumax &c. 



178 WEST TARRING 1625/6 

f 136v (11 March) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
Francis Rings ted, LIB, surrogate judge, in the presence of John Swayne, notary 5 
public and deputy registrar 

viij d WilWmus Byble inquisitor ibidem personal/tor citato per \ohannem Butler 
\ictntiai\im primo die mensis martij instantis ad comparendum istis die hora 
et loco ad iustificandww detecdowem contra Gilbertwm Knight de Tarring 10 
predirruw Quo die comparuit pfrsonalzrer dicrus Byble [et] quern dow/nus 
monuit ad interessendum in proximo ad recipiendwm Arfzcwlos et sic singulis 
sessionibus generalibus vsqwe- ad &c et assignavit Ottringham in necessarium 
promotorem officij sui &c deinde d/cfus Byble specificando dzcfam 
detecc/owem contra Knight exhibitaw dicit that he was told by one Thomas 15 
[Peacher] Parker whoe is since deceased that he the sayd Knight had 
demeaned himselfe in such manner and forme as A is 1 presented by the 
Church wardens and therevpon he told the Churchwardens thereof and 
caused them to presente yt, and sayth that he did not see the sayd Knight 
nor heare him vse any such speeches wordes or behaviour neyther hath he 20 
otherwayes since denyed the same presentment, [but] then in saying because 
the sayd Parker was dead he could not Justify nor proue the same "deinde 
tempore pomerediano eiusd<fm diei coram domino Surrogate predicto In 
presentia mei Richardi Bragge Notarij pubAci &c Comparuit persona\iter 
d/cms Bible et in tempus locuw ac processum dotnim ludicanto Consentient 25 
dominus obiecit ei That hee was drincking & revelling in the Alehouse of 
Thomas Parker in Tarring aforesaid vppon a Sabboth day during the tyme of 
General & deanry visitaczon vppon that parrish amongst divers that were 
presented for the same matter & that hee being sideman of the said parrish 
was omitted out of that prwntment Cui obiecczom dzcrus Bible responds 30 
that vppon a sabbath day at sunsett during the said visitacz on hee was 
requested by the aforenamed Thomas Parker A his nixt neighbowr to eate 
part of a shoulder of mutton w/th him at his howse And that he did not 
tarry there above half a quarter of an houre & as soone as any other 
Company in came in, hee went thence vnto his owne howse submittendo &c 35 
Vnde dominus iniuwxit ei ad agnoscendww huiusmodi Culpam suam Coram 
ministro gzrdianis et octo aJijs parorAwnis in Cancella ecclwie parochialis de 

1 7-201 in such ... vse any. written ferptndicularly in left margin offl36v and marked with a symbol 

for insertion here 
20-8/ such speeches . . divers: written in blank space at middle offI37v and marked with a symbol 

for insertion here 
35/ in came in: dittography 



WEST TARRING 1625/6-6 / WEST THORNEY 1620/1 

Tarring predicta die dominico xix die instanto martij post prices vespminas 
iuxta schedulam &c ad Certificandum exinde proximo die lwidtco./ 



179 



8d 
dirmssiff 
pro Aa 12 d 



fFestum 
Annunciaaoms 



1626 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 

WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13 
f I69v (27 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
Francis Ringsted, LIB, surrogate judge 

vide the Courte Day 1 1 martij 1625, et specificationem Bible ibidem * 
Gylbertus Knight pro causa, sequen// vizt. for his abusiue testing makeing 
or singing songes to the discredit of his neyghboures in non comp^rendo 
pronuwciatur contumax eius pena reservatur in hunc diem/ [(...)] 
"Quo die comprfruit personaliter dictus Knight et obiecto ei Articulo predicto 
in vim luramenti per euw prius prestit/ respondit negative/ vnde dominus 
euw pro hac vice cum monic/owe [dO] that he shall not at [h] any tyme 
hereafter vse any such misdemeanour euw dimisit/ 

WEST THORNEY 

1620/1 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/19 

f 118* (23 February) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before John 
Hullwood, cleric, surrogate judge, in the presence of Edward Osborne, notary public 

Clemens Stiler et \o\\annts lang 

gzrdiani ibidem p^rsonal/ter citat; per lohannem Butler l/V^ratuw xix die 
instant/> ffebruarij pro Ca#*is sequentibus viz. wee have never a bell that can be 
well rung they are so badly hanged or roped that there A ^ath 1 but one of 
them gone these 3 or 4 moneths. Item dog come dayly to Church to the 
great disturbance of the minister &: the people Item the Churchyard is badly 
fenced A r Also there is neither stayres nor ladder to goe vppe to the steeple by 1 
And also to inquire & make presentment of these abuses following ffirst there 



10 



15 



20 



25 



50 



p 178, 1.28-p 179, I.2/ that were ... luritftco: written in blank space at foot of f 1 37v and marked with 
a symbol for insertion here 



180 WEST THORNEV 1620/1-1 

are none that will Come to Church on wednesdayes & frydayes. Also the 
people stand in the Churchyard or Churchporch & talke after service is 
begun & must bee Called in. Also few or none of the youth that are to 
receave the Comwunion doe Come to the minister as they ought to doe to 
be Cathechised before they receave. Also few of the parrishe receave above 5 
once in the yeare but none of the youth/ Also certeyne maydens did daunce 
in mans apparrell & young men in maydes clothes vppon Sunday the 4 th 
of ffebruary at Thomas Romins & on Sunday the eleventh of ffebruary 
at (blank) hargood house Also there is such gaming on the sabboth dayes 
& holy dayes so that few or none come to evening prayer "Quo die facta 10 
prrconizac/ owe Comparuere persona\iter dicti Stiler et Lang quos dominus 
monuit ad ttparzndum premissa sequent vizt. wee have never A bell that 
Con bee well rung they are [b] so badly hanged or roped that they ther hath 
qumdenim but one of them gone these three or foure moneths also the Churchyard 

is badli fenced Also there is neyther stares nor ladder to goo vpp to the 15 
steeple by Citra ffestum Annunciac/owis Marie Virginis pro\imum et ad 
Certificandz/w exinde proximo die luridico extunc sequent Et quoad 
reliquaw part^w detecc/owis dominus iniunxit eis ad [& re] exhibendw 
veraw billaw detecc/ owis prmiissorww in istum diem quindenzm. pro\imum 

20 

1621 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/19 

f 152v* (19 May) 

25 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Francis Rings ted, LLB, surrogate judge, in the presence of Richard Bragge, 
notary public 

ptoximiim lohannes Hargood personaliter Citatw* per eundem eodem die pro Causa. 30 

sequent viz. for suffering maydens to dance in mans apparell & men in 
maydens Clothes in his howse 

pio\im,,>,i Thomazina Bonny [pmo] quesiw per eundmi in eodem die for dauncing 

in mans apparell 35 

Companut Thomas lang pmonal/ter Citato eundem eodem die [pro] for suffering 

Cvm monic/bne such dauncing as aforesaid 

dimissHj 



38/ daunting: 5 minims for un in J 



W1NCHELSEA 1 527-84 / YAPTON 1623 

WINCHELSEA 

1527-8 

Order from the Warden of the Cinque Ports against Plays 

BL: Egerton MS 2093 

See Hastings 1527-8 

1584 

Court of the Hundred Book ESRO: WIN 53 

f 236v* (6 October) 

At this hundred yt is agreed yat a drume be bought presently of Angell 
Shawe at xl s. or better cheape if yt may be had 

15 

YAPTON 

1623 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments WSRO: Ep. 1/23/8 

f 24v* (between 9-14 June) 10 

we present & make knowne to ye court yat one william witcher of Boxgrove 
fidJer cometh euery Sunday from his owne parish [church] to yapton & causeth 
divers of other parrishes sometimes 30 or 40 in a day to accompany him to 
yapton on ye sundayes & there spend ye best p^rt of ye day in dauncing, 25 
whether they come to church in tyme of divine prayer or no wee know not, 
but many youth in yapton when they should be in ye church on those [dayes] 
sundayes to bee Catechised are dien attending on him to daunce & namely ye 
last sunday being ye 8^ of lune ye said v/illiam witcher was at yapton [ye same 
day] from his parish Church all ye day playing on his Instrument And there 30 
were at yapton ye same day of Barnham william Dauie lohn Gerey Grace 
white Anne Gardiner & Peter luppe w/ th diverse others whose names wee 
know not And there were of yapton one Richard ffeest & Thomas ffeest a 
dauncing when they should have bene in ye church Catechised 

35 

f 26v 

wee answere yat wee have dauncing in owr parish & yat berweene morning 

& evening prayer eufry sabboth day now whether this bee lawful! or noe 40 

wee referre to the Court to ludge/ 



Religious Houses 



BATTLE ABBEY 

1346-7 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 139 

mb [2d] (Valuables and gifts) 5 

...In denary.? dat Nuncz/lf Histrionibwj & Homiw/bw; domini Reg/* 
Regine Principis & alion/w magnat0rw iiij. li. xj. s. ij d 

10 

1350-1 
Treasurer s Account HL: BA 111 

mb [Id] (29 September -3 April) (Valuables and gifts) 

. . .Item Menestral in die sancti Martini in yeme &C lohanni Wayne Ad 15 

vj s.... 



1351-2 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 142 20 

mb [Id] (Valuables and gifts) 



...In donw diu^rsw Ministrallw & Nuncz/V p^r diufrs^j vices simi\iter 
computatis Iiij s. iij d 



1357-8 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 144 

m b [Id] (Valuables and gifts) 

30 

...Et dat Robmo ffole vj s. viij d. Et aliis diu^rsis Ministrallu Hoc 



BATTLE ABBEY 1357-83 

anno xviij .s Et Ministr domim Regis & Nunc xvj .s 



1364-5 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 140 

mb [2d] (Valuables and gifts) 

...In donis dat diuwsw MinistraJlw hoc Anno cam in festis sancti Martini 
qwarn extra xl s.... 

10 



1365-6 

Abbots Accounts ESRO: AMS 4901 
m b [Id] (Valuables and gifts) 

15 

...In donis datis diu^rsw Ministrall/V tam in festis sancti Martini qwam 
exfra (...).. 



1381-2 20 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 146 

mb [3d] (Valuables and gifts) 

. . .Et datww diuersis MenestraJlw Domini Regis Anglic Regis Nauerine 

Comitis de Bokyngham Comitn Arundell & aliorww diu^rsorww 25 

Dominorum per vices hoc anno iiij li. xviij .s 



1382-3 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 145 30 

mb [2d] (Valuables and gifts) 

...hem datum diuersi i histrionibwj per mam Domini xiij. s. iiij. d. hew 
per manus Senescalli xlj s 

35 



1 71 (...): right edge of membrane decayed 



184 BATTLE ABBEY 1393-1499 



1393-4 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/1251/1 

mb [Id] 

(...) donis dan* diu^rsis haraldis Ministralh j &: Nuncijs hoc anno ix s. 5 
viij d 

c 1478-82 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/1878 

sheet [15]* (Gifts) , 

...Et custodibztf vrsorum domini de Stanley xx d Et cuid/zm histrioni in 
festo Sancti Martini in hieme viij d. Et cuid/zm Alij histrioni post id<rm festum 

viij d Et in dono histnW de wynchilse in Natale [p] domini iij s. iiij d. 

Et cuid/zm histrioni domu regia in natale viij d. Et lusoribw; cum popetys 15 
eodfm festo xvj d. Et lusoribw iiij die lanuary \\timi xviij d. datum per 
Conuentum vj d. Et [histr/W] "lusoribw/ domini Comit/ j Arundell xviij 
die lanuar/) v s. Et histn ow domini principis A ad pascham vj s. viij d. 
Et histrion domini Comitis Arundell eodfm tempore [viij] vj s. viij d. 
Et histrion domine Regine ad pentecostem vj s. viij d. Et ij Alijs \\istrionibus 20 
ad id<fm festuw xij d. Et ij histrionibus die dedicaa owis ecclie monast^rij 
xx d. Et histrion domini duds Glovern/V apd Bernhorn .vj s. viij d. Et 
custod vrsorum Domini de Mavtervers viij d. Et histrion domini Regis 
vj s. viij d. 

25 



1498-9 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/1874 

ff [1-lv]* (Rewards) 

30 

. . .Et in rewards domino locoso de herstmonceux I tempore NataJis domini 

iij s. iiij d Et in rewards Clericw sancfi Nicohoizi in villa de Bello xij d. . .. 

Et in rewards histrionibw domini Comitis Oxonie ij s. vj d. Et in rewards 
A l histrion 1 domini Cardinal/; Cantuar/V iij s. iiij d. Et in rewardo histrion 
dowmi Comitis Arundell iiij s. Et in rewardo lusoribuj ad ter hoc Ano 35 
xj s. viij d. . .. 



5/ (...>: tefi rdgr of membrane decayed 
221 Bernhorn : Bamhont Manor 



BATTLE ABBEY 1499-1521 185 

1499-1500 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/861 

f [lv]* (Rewards) 

. . .Et in dono domini lusoribiw Comit/s Oxonie &C Riorum dominorum ad 
festum NataJw domini xxiij s. iiij d. Et in rewards dato histrionib/tf domini 
Regis & DUCM Eboraci x s Et in donis & reward/; fact/* diuersis 
gfnfrosorum mimis &C famwl/j negocianft ^M* prediaa premissa ad diuersas 
vices hoc Anno ut patet p^rticwlarit^r per librww Seneschali hospicij xxxij s. 
viij d. 10 



1508-9 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 272 

sheet [3] (Gifts and rewards) 15 

. . .Et in rewardo lusoribwj in festo E.fip\\anie do7W/ni xx d Et in rewards 

dato histrionibzw domini Regw vj s. viij d Et in rewards daw ij histrionibj 

domini Comitis Arundell xx d 

20 

1513-14 

Seneschals Accounts HL: BA 275 

sheet [5]* (Gifts and rewards) 

25 

../Et in \\uiusmodi donis & rewardw datw inur festum Natal/ * & 
Annunciacionis beate Marie tuwc proxime sequentis in patet in dicto 
libro prefer festum circuwcisionis domim vnacuw lusoribw & histrionibztf 
xxiijj s. xj d 

30 

1520-1 

Chaplain s Account HL. BA 278 

sheet [2] (25 March -25 March) (Gifts and rewards) 

35 

. .Et in rewards hominibus de Cranebroke ludentibwj coram domino iij s. iiii 
d. Et in consimili rewards lusoribw* deTenterden iij s. iiij d. Et in \\uiusmodi 
rewardo lusoribw de Mallyng iij s. iiij d. Et in dono domini lusoribw de 

111 in 1 : for vt 38/ Mallyng: probably South Mailing. Sussex. 

36/ Cranebroke: Cranbrook, Kent but possibly West or East Mailing, Kent 

37/ Tentcrden: Tenterden, Kent 



186 BATTLE ABBEY 1 520- C \ 522 / ROBERTSBRIDGE ABBEY 1416-25 

Maydestone iij s. iiij d. Et in dono domini lusoribzu ex/raneis alia vice ij s. 
Et in rewardo daw lusoribw* domini Comitw Arundell iiij s.... Et in rewards 
histrioni Magistri ponyngw ad festum purifications beate Marie xvj d.... 



c 1522 

Seneschals Accounts HL: BA 277 
sheet [6] (Gifts and rewards) 

. . .Et so\ittum diuersis [lose] lusoribus coram domino ad varias vices xvj s. 10 
x d Et in rewardo custod/ vrsorum domini Reg/V xvj d. 



ROBERTSBRIDGE ABBEY 

15 

1416-17 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Ql 

sheet 4 (25 December-25 March) (Expenses) 

Item datuw Ministrall domini Rogeri fFenys & alijs venientibwj 20 

cum exennijs iiij s. 



1417-18 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q2 

sheet 1* (25 March -24 June) (Expenses) 

In vno spectacz/lo cum ij Ceris empm xiij d. 

30 

sheet 3v (29 September -25 December) 

Item datuw ffratnbus de Aylysforde ministrall et Alijs 

35 

1424-5 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q3 

sheet 1 (23 April-24 June) (Expenses) 

Datuw Histrionibw* & alijs diuersis xij d- 40 

I/ Maydestone: Maiditone. Kent 33/ Aylysforde: Aylaford. Kent 



ROBERTSBRIDGE ABBEY 1424-38 

sheet 2 (24 June -29 September) 

Datuw histrionibw^ domini Regw &: Ricardo Kaas iij s. x d. 



1426-7 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q5 

sheet 2 (25 December -25 March) (Expenses) 

Datuw Nicholao hope ministralltf de Echyngham wiUelmo 10 

russell &: kas iiij s. ij d. 



1435-6 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q4 15 

sheet 4* (17 April-8 April) (Expenses) 

Datuw Ricardo fFeroz^r Histrionibw & alijs diuersis vj s. 

20 

1437-8 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q6 

sheet 4* (25 December -13 April) (Expenses) 

Datuw cuid^m citheratori & Nicholao hope xij d. :s 

Ditttm ludentibwj per ij as vices ij s. iij d. 



Households 



BROWNE OF COWDRAY 

1591 

The Honorable Entertainment Given to the Queen src. 3907.5 

sigs A3-B4v* (14-20 August) 5 

The HONORABLE Entertainment giuen to her Maiestie in Progresse at 
Cowdray in Sussex by the Lord Montecute Anno. 1591. August. 18. 

THe Queene hauing dyned at Farnham, came with a great traine to the right 10 
honorable the Lord Mountagues, on saterdaie being the 15- daie of August 
about eight of the clocke at night. Where vpon sight of her Maiestie, loud 
musicke sounded, which at her enteraunce on the bridge suddenly ceased. 
Then was a speech deliuered by a personage in armour, standing betweene two 
Porters, carued I out of wood, he resembling the diird: holding his club in one is 
hand, and a key of golde in the other, as followeth. 

Saterday. 
The Porters speech. 20 

The walles of Thebes were raised by Musicke: by musick these are kept from 
falling. It was a prophesie since the first stone was layde, that these walles 
should shake, and the roofe totter, till the wisest, the fairest and most 
fortunate of all creatures, should by her first steppe make the foundation 25 
staid: and by the glaunce of her eyes make the Turret steddie. I haue beene 



Collation with STC: 3907.7, (S), sigs A3-B4v: 8 August. 18.] August. 14. in S 
10 hauing dyned at Farnham] omitted in S 11 the 15- daie] the 1 4 daie in S 

8/ August. 18.: />r August. 14. (?) 1 1/ the 15. daie: for the 14 daie (?) 

10/ Farnham: Farnham. Surrey 



BROWNE OF COWDRAV 1591 



189 



here a Porter manie yeeres, many Ladies haue entred passing amiable, many 
verie wise, none so happie. These my fellow Porters thinking there could 
be none so noble, fell on sleepe, and so incurde the seconde curse of the 
prophesie, which is, neuer againe to awake: Marke how they looke more like 
postes then Porters, reteining onlie their shapes, but depriued of their sences. 
I thought rather to cut off my eie liddes, then to winke till I saw the ende. 
And now it is: for the musick is at an end, this house immoueable, your 
vertue immortaJI. O miracle of time, Natures glorie, Fortune: Empresse, the 
worlds wonder! Soft, this is the Poets part, and not the Porters. 1 haue 
nothing to present but the crest of mine offiue, this keie: Enter, possesse 10 
all, to whom the I heauens haue vouchsafed all. As for the owner of this 
house, mine honourable Lord, his tongue is the keie of his heart: and his 
heart the locke of his soule. Therefore what he speakes you may constantlie 
beleeue: which is, that in duetie and seruice to your Maiestie, he would be 
second to none: in praieng for your happinesse, equaJI to anie. 15 

Tuus O Regina quod optas explorare fauor: 

huic iussa capescere fas est. 

Wherewithall her Highnes tooke the keye, and said she would sweare 
for him, there was none more faithfull: Then being alighted, she embraced :o 
the Ladie Montecute, and the Ladie Dormir her daughter. The Mistresse 
of the house (as it were weeping in her bosome) said, O happie time, O 
ioyfull daie! 

That night her Maiestie tooke her rest, and so in like manner the next 
day, which was Sunday, being most royallie feasted. The proportion of 21 
breakefast was three Oxen, and one hundred, and fourtie Geese. 

Mundaie. 

ON Munday at 8. of the clock in the morning, her Highnes took horse with 30 
aJl herTraine, and rode into the Parke: where was a delicate Bowre prepared, 
vnder the which I were her Highnesse Musicians placed, and a Crossebowe by 
a Nimph, with a sweet song, deliuered to her hands, to shoote at the Deere, 
about some thirtie in number, put into a Paddock, of which number she kjlled 
three or four, and the Countesse of Kildare, one. ^ 



Collation continued: 3 so noble] such in S 10 offiue] office in S 
19-26 Wherewithall ... Geese] omitted in S 32-5 her Highnesse ... one] 
placed her Highnes Musicians, and this dittie following song while her Maiestie 
shot at the Deere, followed by eighteen lines of verse in S 

10/ offiue: for office 3.V sweet song: step 195 for tang as added 

16-17/Tuus ... fas est: cp Virgil, Aeneid I, 7 , in STC. 3907.7 



190 BROWNE OF COWDRAY 1591 



Then rode hir Grace to Cowdrey to dinner, and aboute sixe of the clocke 
in the euening from a Turret sawe sixteene Buckes (all hauing fayre lawe) 
pulled downe with Greyhoundes in a laund. All the Huntinge ordered by 
Maister Henrie Browne, the Lorde Montagues thirde Sonne, raunger of 
Windsore Forrest. 5 

Tuesdaie. 

On Tewsday hir Maiestie wente to dinner to the Priory where my Lorde 
himselfe kept house, and there was shee and hir Lordes most bountifully 10 
feasted. 

After dinner she came to viewe my Lordes walkes, where shee was mette 
by a Pilgrime clad in a coat of russet veluet fashioned to his calling, his hatte 
being of the same with skallop shelles of cloth of siluer, who deliuered hir a 
speach in this sort following. 15 

Pilgrime. 

Fairest of all creatures vouchsafe to heare a prayer of a Pilgrime, which shall 
be short, and the petition I which is but reasonable. God grannt the worlde 
maie ende with your life, and your life more happie then anie in the world: 
that is my praier. I haue trauelled manie Countries, and iu all Countries 20 
desire antiquities. In this Hand (but a spanne in respect of the world) and in 
this Shire (but a finger in regard of your Realme) I haue heard great cause of 
wonder, some of complaint. Harde by, and so neere as your Maiestie shall 
almost passe by, I sawe on Oke, whose statelines nayled mine eies to the 
branches, and the ornamentes beguiled my thoughtes with astonishment. 
I thought it free, being in the fielde, but I found it not so. For at the verie 
en trie I mette I know not with what rough-hewed Ruffian, whose armes were 
carued out of knotty box, for I could receiue nothing of him but boxes, so 
hastie was he to strike, he had no leysure to speake. I thought there were 
more waies to the wood then one, and finding another passage, I found also 30 
a Ladie verie faire, but passing frowarde, whose words set mee in a greater 
heate then the blowes. I asked her name, she said it was Peace. I wondred 
that Peace could neuer holde her peace. I cannot perswade my selfe since that 
time, but that there is a waspes nest in mine eares. I returned discontent. But 
if it will please your Highnesse to view it, that rude Champion at your faire 3^ 



Collation continued: 3-5 All ... Forrest] omitted in S 12-15 After ... following] 
omitted in S 16 Pilgrime.] The Pilgrimes speech, in S 18 grannt] graunt in S 
20 iu] in in S 



)/ [lie I nory: proiMy l:a>choume friary 
20/ iu: for in 



BROWNE OF COWDRAY 1 59 1 

feete will laie downe his foule head: and at your becke that Ladie will make 
her mouth her tongues mue. Happelie your Maiestie shall finde some 
content: I more antiquities.! 

Then did the Pilgrime conduct her Highnes to an Oke not farre off, 
whereon her Maiesties armes, and all the armes of the Noblemen, and 
Gentlemen of that Shire, were hanged in Escutchions most beutifull, and a 
wilde man cladde in luie, at the sight of her Highnesse spake as foloweth. 

The wilde mans speech at the tree. 

10 

Mightie Prcinesse, whose happines is attended by the heauens, and whose 
gouernment is wondered at vpon the earth: vouchsafe to heare why this 
passage is kept, and this Oke honoured. The whole world is drawen in a 
mappe: the heauens in a Globe and this Shire shrunke in a Tree: that what 
your Maiestie hath oftew heard off with some comfort, you may now beholde 15 
with full content. This Oke, from whose bodie so many armes doe spread: 
and out of whose armes so many fingers spring: resembles in parte your 
strength & happinesse. Strength, in the number and the honour: happinesse, 
in the trueth and consent. All heartes of Oke, then which nothing surer: 
nothing sounder. All wouen in one roote, then which nothing more constant, 20 
nothing more naturall. The wall of this Shire is the sea, strong, but rampired 
with true hearts, inuincible: where euery priuate mans eie is a Beacon to 
discouer: euerie noble mans power a Bulwarke to defende. Here they are all 
differing somewhat in degrees, not duetie: I the greatnes of the branches, not 
the greenesse: Your maiesty they account the Oke, the tree of lupiter, whose 25 
root is so deeplie fastened, that treacherie, though shee vndermine to the 
centre, cannot finde the windings, and whose toppe is so highlie reared, diat 
enuie, though she shoote on copheigth, cannot reach her, vnder whose armes 
they haue both shade and shelter. Well wot they that your enemies lightnings 
are but flashes, and their thunder which filles the whole world with a noise of 30 
conquest, shall end with a softe show of Retreate. Be then as confident in your 

steppes, as Cerebrus in his Fortune. His proceedings but of con< ): yours of 

vertue. Abroad courage hath made you feared, at home honoured clemencie. 
Clemencie which the owner of this Groue hath tasted: in such sort, that his 
thoughts are become his hearts laberinth, surprized with ioie and loialtie. loy 35 
without measure, loyaltie without endeliuing in no other ayer, then that which 
breathes your Maiesties safetie. 

Collation continued: 11 Prcinesse] Princessc in S 31 show] shower in S 
32 Cerebrus] Cassar was in S 32 con(....>] conceit in S 36 endeliuing] end, 
liuing in S 

1 1/ Prcinesse: for Princessc 36/ endeliuing: forendc. liuing 



HUlVWNK OF COWDRAY 

For himselfe, and all these honourable Lords, and Gentlemen, whose 
shieldes your Maiestie doeth here beholde, I can say this, that as the veines 
are dispersed through all the bodie, yet when the heart feeleth any extreame 
passion, sende all their bloud to the heart for comfort: so they being in 
diuers places, when your Maiestie shall but stande in feare of any daunger, 5 
will bring their bodies, their purses, their soules, to your Highnesse, being 
their heart, their head, and their Soueraigne. This passage is kept straight, 
and the Pilgrime I feare hath complained: but such a disguised world it I is, 
that one can scarce know a Pilgrime from a Priest, a tayler from a gentlemaw, 
nor a man fro; a woman. Euerie man seeming to be that which they are 10 
not, onelie doe practise what they should not. The heauens guyde you, 
your Maiestie gouernes vs: though our peace be enuied by them, yet we 
hope it shall be eternall. 

Ehzabetha Deus nobis haec otia fecit. 

15 

Then vpon the winding of a Cornette was a most excellent crie of 
houndes, and three buckes kilde by the bucke hounds, and so went all 
backe to Cowdrey to supper. 

Wednesdaie. 20 

On wednesdaie the Lordes and Ladies dined in the walkes, feasted most 
sumptuously at a table foure and cwentie yards long. 

In the beginning her Maiestie comming to take the pleasure of the walks, 
was delighted with most delicate musicke, an d brought to a goodli Fish 25 
pond, wher was an Angler, that taking no notice of her Maiestie, spake 
as followeth. 

The Anglers Speech. 

30 

Next rowing in a Westerne barge well fare Angling, I haue bin here 
this two houres and cannot catch and oyster. It may be for lacke of a 
bait, & I that were hard in this nibling world, where euerie man laies 
bait for another. In the Citie merchants bait their tongues with a lie 
and an oath, and so make simple men swallow deceitfull wares: and 35 

Collation continued: 14 fecit] eighteen lines of verse inserted in S 17-18 and 
three ... supper] with whom h(..) Maiestie hunted and had good sport, in S 
23 at a table ... long] omitted in S 24 beginning] euening in S 25 and] 
and in S 32 and 2 ] an in S 

147 Elizabelha ... fecit: cp Virgil, Eclogue I, 6 25/ an d: for and 

14/ tee pp 195-6 for long at added in STC: 3907.7 32/ and 1 : for an 



BROWNE OF COWDRAY 1591 

fishing for commoditie is growen so farre, that men are become fishes, 
for Lande lords put such sweete baits on rackt rents, that as good it 
were to be a perch in a pikes belly, as a Tenant in theyr farmes. All our 
trade is growen to trecherie, for now fish are caught with medicins: 
which are as vnwholsom as loue procured by witchcraft vnfortunate. 
We Anglers make our lines of diuers colours, according to the kindes 
of waters: so doe men their loues, aiming at the complexion of the faces. 
Thus Marchandize, Loue, and Lordships sucke venom out of vertue. 
I thinke I shal fish all dale and catch a frog, the cause is neither in the 
line, the hooke, nor the bait, but some thing there is ouer beautifull 10 

which stayeth the verie Minow (of all fish the most eager) from biting. 
For this we Anglers obserue, that the shadow of a man turneth backe 
the fish. What will then the sight of a Goddesse? Tis best angling in a 
lowring daie, for here the Sunne so glisters, that the fish see my hooke 
through my bait. But soft here be the Netters, these be they that cannot is 
content them with a dish offish for their supper, but will drawe a whole 
pond for a market. 

This saide, he espied a Fisherman, drawing his nettes towarde where hir 
Maiestie was. And calling alowde to him. Hoe Sirra (quoth the An- 1 gler.) 20 
What shall I giue thee for thy draughte. If there be neuer a whale in it take 
it for a Noble, quoth the Netter. 

Ang. Be there any maydes there.? 

Net. Maydes foole they be sea fish. 

Ang. Why. 25 

Net. Venus was borne of the Sea, and tis reason 

she should haue maydes to attend hir. 

Then turned he to the Queene, and after a small pawse, spake as followeth. 
Madame, it is an olde saying, There is no fishing to the sea, nor seruice 30 
to the King: but it holdes when the sea is calme &C the king vertuous. 
Your vertue maketh enuie blush and stand amazed at your happines. 
I come not to tell the art of fishing, nor the natures offish, nor their 
daintines, but with a poor fisher mans wish, that all the hollow hearts to 
your Maiestie were in my net, and if there be more then it will hold, I 35 
woulde they were in the sea till I went thether in fishing. There be some 
so muddie minded, that they can not liue in a cleere riuer but a standing 
poole, as camells will not drinke till they haue troubled the water with 
their feet: so can they neuer stanch their thirst, till they haue disturbed 

Collation continued: 32 maketh enuie blush and stand amazed] doth make 
Enuie blush, and Enuie stands amazed in S 



194 BROWNE OF COWD RAY 1591 



the state with their trecheries. Soft, these are no fancies for fisher men. 
Yes true hearts are as good as full purses, the one the sinues of warre, the 
other the armes. A dish of fish is an vnworthie present for a prince to 
accept: here be some carpes amongst them, no carpers I of states, if there 
be, I would they might bee handled lyke carpes, their tongues pulled 5 

out. Some pearches there are I am sure, and if anie pearch higher than in 
dutie they ought, I would they might sodenly picke ouer the pearch for 
me. What so euer there is, if it be good it is all yours, most vertuous 
Ladie, that are best worthie of all. 

Then was the net drawen. 10 

The Netter hauing presented all the fishe of the ponde, and laying it at 
hir feete, departed. That euening she hunted. 

Thursday. 15 

On Thursday she dined in the priuie walkes in the garden, and the Lordes 
and Ladies at a table of xlviij. yardes long. In the euening the countrie people 
presented themselues to hir Maiestie in a pleasant daunce with Taber and 
Pipe. And the Lorde Montague and his Lady among them, to the great 20 
pleasure of all the beholders, and gentle applause of hir Maiestie. 

Fry day. 

On Friday she departed towards Chichester. Going through the Arbour 
to take horse, stoode sixe Gentlemen, whom hir Maiestie Knighted, the 25 
Lorde Admirall laying the sworde on their shoulders. I 
The names of the sixe Knights then made were these, viz. 
Sir George Browne, my Lords second Sonne. 
Sir Robert Dormir, his sonne in lawe. 

Sir Henry Goaring. 30 

Sir Henry Glemham. 
Sir lohn Carrell. 
Sir Nicholas Parker. 

So departed hir Maiestie to the dining place, whether the Lord Montague 
and his sonnes, and the Sheriffe of the shire, attended, with a goodly 35 
companie of Gentlemen, brought hir Highnes. 

The escutchions on the Oke remaine, & there shall hange, till they can 

Collation continued: 9 all] the greatest good in S 10 Then was the net drawen.] 
That ended: This Song of the Fisher man. followed by eighteen lines of verse in S 
12-13 The Netter ... hunted] omitted in S 

10/ see pp 196-7 for song as atUed in sn:: 3907.7 35/ Sheriffe of the shire: Herbert Ptlham, squirt 



BROWNE OF COWD RAY 1591 

hang together one peece by another. 

Valete 

The Speeches and Honorable Entertainment STC: 3907.7 
sigs A4-4v (Song on Monday morning, 16 August) 

A Dittie. 

BEhold her lockes like wiers of beaten gold, 

her eies like starres that twinkle in the skie, 

Her heauenly face not framd of earthly molde, 
Her voice that sounds Apollos melodic. 

The miracle of time, the worlds storie, 

Fortunes Queen, Loues treasure, Natures glory. I 

No flattering hope she likes, blind Fortunes bait 
nor shadowes of delight, fond fansies glasse, 

Nor charmes that do inchant, false artes deceit, 

nor fading ioyes, which time makes swiftly pas 

But chast desires which beateth all these downe, 

A Goddesse looke is worth a Monarchs crowne. 

Goddesse and Monarch of his happie He, 

vouchsafe this bow which is an huntresse part 

Your eies are arrows though they seeme to smile 

which neuer glanst but gald the stateliest hart, 

Strike one, strike all, for none at all can flic, 

They gaze you in the face although they die. 



sig B2v (Song on Tuesday afternoon, 1 7 August) 30 

The Dittie 

THere is a bird that builds her neast with spice, 
and built, the Sun to ashes doth her burne, 



Collation continued: p 194, 1.15-p 195, 1.2 Thursday.... Valete] For the rest 
of the Entertainment, honorable feasting, and abundance of all things that might 
manifest a liberal! and loyall heart, because I was not there, I cannot set downe, 
thus much by report 1 heare, &: by the words of those that deserue credite, that it 
was such as much contented her Maiestie, and made many others to wonder. And 
so her Maiestie well pleased with her welcome, & he throughly comforted with 
her Highnesse gracious acceptance, shee went from thence to Chichester in S 



196 BROWNE OF COWDRAY 1591 



Out of whose sinders doth another rise. 

& she by scorching beames to dust doth turne: 
Thus life a death, and death a life doth proue, 
The rarest thing on earth except my loue. 

My loue that makes his neast with high desires, 

and is by beauties blaze to ashes brought, 
Out of the which do breake our greater fires, 

they quenched by disdain consume to nought, 

And out of nought my cleerest loue doth rise, )0 

True loue is often slaine but neuer dies. 

True loue which springs, though Fortune on it tread 

as camomel by pressing down doth grow 
Or as the Palme that higher reares his head, 15 

whew men great burrhens on the branches throw 
Loue fansies birth, Fidelitie the wombe, 
the Nurse Delight, Ingratitude the tombe. 



20 

sigs B4-4v (Song on Wednesday afternoon, 18 August) 

That ended, 

This Song of the Fisher man. 
THE fish that seeks for food in siluer streame 25 

is vnawares beguiled with the hooke, 
And tender harts when lest of loue they dreame, 

do swallow beauties bait, a louely looke.l 
The fish that shuns to bite, in net doth hit, 
The heart that scapes the eie is caught by wit 30 

The thing cald Loue, poore Fisher men do feele 

rich pearles are found in hard & homely shels 
Our habits base, but hearts as true as steele, 

sad lookes, deep sighs, flat faith are all our spels, 35 

And when to vs our loues seeme faire to bee. 
we court them thus Loue me and He loue thee 

And if they saie our loue is fondly made, 

we neuer leaue till on their hearts we lite, 40 

23/ That ended: />, the fisherman s oration in STC: 3907.5: iff ff 193-4 



BROWNE OF COWDRAY 1 59 1 / CARYLL OF WEST HARTING 1632-4 

Anglers haue patience by their proper trade, 
and are content to tarrie till they bite, 
Of all the fish that in the waters moue 
we count them lumps that will not bite at loue. 



CARYLL OF WEST HARTING 

1632-3 

Sir John Caryll s Household Accounts BL: Additional MS 28242 10 

f 23v* (Disbursements) 

li. s. d. 

Itew to ye musicke of Chittecher for ye Chrismas 04 is 

Itew to a man mr henslowe sent for aboute ye maske 00 5 

f 30v* 20 

li. s. d. 
Itew to one yar. had an ape to shoo tricke* 00 6 



25 



1633-4 

Sir John Caryll s Household Accounts BL: Additional MS 28242 

f 36* (Disbursements) 

30 

li. s. d. 
Itew to an Irishe harper 00 6 

J5 

f 37* 

li. s. d. 
Itew to ye musitionw of Chittecher from my master 01 40 

17/ mr henslowe: Caryll s steward 



198 EDWARDS OF FAYRE CROOCH 1626-8 

EDWARDS OF FAYRE CROOCH 

1626-7 
Judith Edwards Cashbook DRO: D/FSI: box 222 

f [9]* (25 March-25 March) 

Vaid Mr Sanders in pane for teaching Susan on 

the virginalles 0002 10 



10 



Paid for a maske pro Mufres Susan 0000 01 6 



15 

f [23]* 

Paid Mr Sanders virginall master in full to this daie 0004 00 



20 

f [24]* 

Paid given to the Cittie waites 0000 01 



25 

f [27]* 

Paid Mr Onsloe dancing master 0003 00 

30 

1627-8 

Judith Edwards Cashbook DRO: D/FSI: box 222 

f [30 v]* (25 March-25 March) 

A [ Mr Webb 1 singing master to teach mistres Susan division entertayned 35 
[to te] att xx s. per moneth. 



7, 13, 35/ Susan: Judith Edwardi daughter 



EDWARDS OF FAYRE CROOCH 1627-8 

f [33]* 

Paid Mr Sanders virginal! master his quartridge due 

act or la^ daie last 0003 10 

Paid him for Morleyes ij panes pro Mistres Susan 0000 03 5 

Paid him for a virginall booke pro Lucie 0000 02 

f [37]* 

10 

Paid Mr Throckmorton by him paid Mr Webb 

singing master for one moneth ended 10 Instant 0001 00 

ffor trywming a lute 0001 00 

ffor a Case /to 1 the Lute 0000 08 

ffor a Silver lace about ye lute 0000 01 10 is 

ffor Stringing the lute 0000 12 

To Attertons wife & a fidlers boye 0000 01 

20 

f [42]* 

Paid for a maske pro Mistres & lace pro AW. 0000 03 06 

25 

f [44]* 

Paid Mr Webb singing master for three monethes 

ending on thursday nexte being the .9.^ of this 

instant 0003 00 00 30 

f [45]* 

Paid Mr Webb for a booke and lute strings 0000 05 00 35 

Paid Mr Sanders virginall master in full for a quarter 

ending 24 lunij. last 0003 10 00 



5/ Morleyes ij panes. Thomas Morley s First Book of Canzonets to Two Voices (1595, 1619) 

5/ Susan: Judith Edwards daughter 

6/ Lucic: Judith Edwards daughter 

1 1/ Mr Throckmorton: probably Sir Francis Throckmorton, father of Judith Edwards 



2(10 EDWARDS OF FAYRE CROOCH 1627-9 

f [50]* 

Paid Mr Webb for a moneth ending att Mufres Susans 

going to Wadherst vizt .30. August per agreem^wt 0001 00 

Paid him for Scringes due then & nowe 0000 04 5 



f [52]* 

Paid Mr Webb singing master for amoneth ended 10 

29. instant 1 



f [54]* 

15 

Given the Cittie waites per R. L 6 

paid Mr Onesloe for teachwg mistres Lucie iij 11. ij s. vj d. 

due vnto him att chm/mas last at .3. li. per annz/w 326 

20 

f [55]* 

paid Mr Webb for a monethes teaching ended this daye 

.20 s. &: for a violl 40 s. & strings & rosin. 8 d. 3 8 2< 



/ d mr Sanders virginall master for a quarter ended 
.20 rh december last 3 10 



30 

1628-9 

Judith Edwards Cashbook DRO: D/FSI: box 222 

f [57]* (25 March -25 March) 

Paid Mr Sanders virginall master for a quarter 

ended .20. th instant 3 10 



3/ Susans: ic. Judith Edwards daughter 18/ Lucie: Judith Edwards daughter 



EDWARDS OF FAYRE CROOCH 1628-9 / EVERENDEN OF SEDLESCOMBE 1619 
f [60]* 

Paid Mr Sanders virginall master for a quarters teaching 

Mistres Susan & ludith ending att Midsomwer [last] 2 10 

5 

Paid Mr Onsloe in parts for teaching Mistres Susan 
& ludith 2 

10 
f [61]* 

Paid Mr Webb for a moneth ended .19. instant 1 

Paid Mr Onsloe in full for teaching Mistres Susan & \\idith 15 

till .14. th Instant August 16 8 



f [62]* 

20 

Paid Mr Webb for .3. monethes ended .19 Instant 3 

Paid Mr Sanders virginall Master for a quarter pro mistres 
susan att Michaelmas last .30. s. & 2 monethes pro mistres 
ludith att Bartholomew tyde 13 s. 4 d. in all 234 25 



EVERENDEN OF SEDLESCOMBE 

1619 30 

John Everenden s Accounts ESRO: FRE 520 
f 12* (25 March- 25 March) 

li. s. d. 

35 

Spent at william Clarkes wedding on[e] the musitions 

and at the lusting posts 00 02 00 



4, 6-7, ] 5/ Susan & Judith, Susan & ludith, Susan & luJilh: Judith Edwards daughters 

4/2 10: 2 underlined 

24, 25/ sosan, ludith Judith Edwards daughters 

25/ Bartho/owu/ tyde: 24 August and the week following 



GODFREY OF W1NCHELSEA 1609- 1 / RICHARD MONTAGUE 1636-7 

GODFREY OF W1NCHELSEA 

1609-10 
A Thomas Godfrey s Diary BL: Lansdowne MS 235 

f i3v col r 5 

Item goeing to the Play 1 s. 6 d. 

f i4v col r 10 

Item the Players 1 8 (blank) 



RICHARD MONTAGUE, BISHOP OF 
CHICHESTER 

1636 
A Richard Montague s Personal Accounts 

Steer: Montague s Personal Accounts 20 

p 35* 

Item for Virginal! strings 2. 6. 



25 

1637 
A Richard Montague s Personal Accounts 

Steer: Montague s Personal Accounts 
p 36* 

30 

Item for a paire of Virginalls a matt and portage 2. 6. 6. 

Item for bringing them to Chichester 3. 6. 



p 37< 

Item for viall strings 1. 3. 6. 



PELHAM OF HALLAND PU\CE 1632-4 203 

PELHAM OF HALLAND PLACE 

1632 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 

f 53v (24 June -29 September) 

hem paid the d. Mr Henly the dancer for teachinge the 

children 4 weeks 400 



10 

1633 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL. Additional MS 33145 
f 60v (25 March-24 June) 

hem paid to Mr Henly the danser 1 is 



1634 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 

f 7 1 v (25 March-24 June) 20 

hem paid him w^/ch he gaue the trumpeters at London 050 



f 73 (24 June- 29 September) 25 

hem paid hir for the danser and writing man 2 18 

f 73v (29 September-25 December) 30 

hem paid for Mr Britten teachinge the children the lute 

halfe a yeere f hem for lute strings 1 4 [Q]l Q 



71 the d. Mr Henly the dancer: partial Jittogmphy; the d, not cancelled 
221 him: Millington, an employee of the household 
271 hir: Thomas Pelhamt wife 



204 PELHAM OF HALLAND PLACE 1635-8 

1635 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 

f 80 (25 March -24 June) 

hem given to Mr Henly the dansing master 200 



1635-6 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 

f 83v (29 September-2 February) 10 

hem given Besses lute master 10 



1636 15 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 
f 86 (2 February-25 March) 

hem paid ffor Phills lute 3 10 

20 

f 87 v (25 March -24 June) 

hem paid my Neese Mary ffor Phills master to singe and the lute 200 

25 

1637 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 

f 98 (25 March -24 June) 

30 

Item paid for a lute for hir 3100 



1638 

Sir Thomas Pelham s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 35 

f 106v (25 March-24 June) 

hem [pa/ d] giuen to Phill to pey hir lute master 200 



12. 3" Besses, hir: Thomas Pelham s daughter Bess 
19. 24, 38/ Phills, Phill: Thomas Pelham i daughter 



PELHAM OF HALLAND PLACE 1640 / ROBERTS OF BOARZEL1. 1566/7-70 205 

1640 

Sir Thomas Pell)am s Accounts BL: Additional MS 33145 

f 135v (29 September --25 December) 

hem paid the Dancinge Master Philes 12 5 



ROBERTS OF BOARZELL 

1566/7 10 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 
f 2 (January) 

payd the same day ij mynterels 



1569 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 45v (November) 

20 

to the players xx s 

to the mynstrels xx s 



1570 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 57 (July) 

hem payd to ye Minstrells x j: j 

hem paid to ye mynstrells X{ . j 

f 57v 

hem [paid to] geuen to the Minstrells v jj: j 



5/ the Dancmge Master Philes: it, Phiii dancing mailer 14/ the same day. 4 January 



206 ROBERTS OF BOARZELL 1570-1/2 

f 58 (August) 

Item paid to ye minstrells xii d. 



1571 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 
f 62v (May) 

hem geuen to a minstrell xij d. 



10 



f 64v (September) 

Item geuen to A Minstrell xij d. 15 

f 66 (November) 

hem [paid] geuen to a minstrell vj d. 20 

f 67 (December) 

hem paid to a minstrell xviij d. 25 



1571/2 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 67 (January) 30 

hem geuen to a minstrell ij s. 



f 68 (February) 35 

hem geuen to ye piper vj d. 

10/ minstrell: 5 minimi in Mi 



ROBERTS OF BOARZELL 1572-4/5 

1572 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 77* (April) 

hem geuew to ye Minstrels v ij 



f 71 v (June) 

Item paid to a minstrell ffor too yards & a halfe of Reben xiiij d. ]Q 

for a quarter of a li. of threed viij d. 

paid for yallowe Ryben iiij d. 

paid for pinnes iiij d. 

paid for ij yardes of brood Reebon xij d. 

15 

f 75 (December) 

hem geuen to a minstrell xviij d. 



20 

1573/4 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 90v (January) 

hem [pa] geuen to mynstrills xij d. 2S 



1574 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f91v (April) 

30 

geuen to the mynstrills xij d. 



1574/5 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 97 (January) 

hem Geuen to ye minstrils ij s 



208 ROBERTS OF BOARZELL 1 575-6 / SHELLEY OF MICHELGROVE 1585/6 

1575 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 99v* (March or April) 

Item payd to elexsaunder for borowinge of a horse for bayttinge xviij d. 5 



1576 

Margaret Roberts Accounts ESRO: DUN 37/2 

f 110 (April) 10 

Item [p] geuen to iij minstrills xvj d. 



f lllv (June) 15 

Item to the mynstryls xij d. 

SHELLEY OF MICHELGROVE 

1585/6 

Inventory of the Goods and Chattels of William Shelley 

PRO: E 199/43/32 

mb [1] (24 March) 

In the Parlor 
Iton one payre of broken virginalles 



APPENDIXES, TRANSLATIONS, ENDNOTES, PATRONS AND 
TRAVELLING COMPANIES, GLOSSARIES, AND INDEX 



APPENDIX 1 

Taillifer and the Battle of 
Hastings 



If eleventh- and twelfth-century accounts of the Battle of Hastings are to be believed, the 
county of Sussex can lay claim to what was without doubt England s first juggling and 
(possibly) musical performance of the Middle English period. The earliest source for the story 
is the Carmen de Hastingae proelio, once attributed to Guy of Amiens and dated before 1068 
but now given a date as late as the twelfth century. According to the Carmen this performer, 
referred to in the poem as a Ynimus (p 212, 1.16) and histrio (p 212, 1.8), juggled with his 
sword to exhort the Normans to battle, and in fact started the combat with the first killing. 
His name is given as Incisor ferri (Iron edge) (p 212, 1.16), an apparent attempt to render the 
name Taillifer into Latin. Whatever the truth of this account, the incident was accepted and 
embellished by other twelfth-century writers, notably GefTirei Gaimar in L Estoire des Engleis 
(c 1 140). According to Gaimar one Taillifer, a luglere (p 213, 1.19), threw his lance into the 
air and caught it three times and then did the same with his sword, before charging into the 
English line and perishing. Henry of Huntington s Latin Historia Anglorum (c 1 150) tells 
basically the same story. The most famous account of the incident comes from Wace in the 
Roman de Rou (after 1 170), which says that Taillifer sang of Charlemagne, Roland, and 
Oliver on the field before giving the first blow of the battle. William of Malmesbury does 
not name Taillifer but does mention that the Normans were inspired by the singing of a 
cantilena Rollandi. 

The development of the story is fully described by William Sayers, The Jongleur Taillefer 
at Hastings: Antecedents and Literary Fate, Viator 14 (1983), 77-88, and by John Southworth, 
The English Medieval Minstrel (Woodbridge, 1989), 29-35. As the Carmen is usually held 
to be the most respectable account, I print below the relevant excerpt from that work. Gaimar s 
text is also printed as an early, though suspect, elaboration of the story. The reader is referred 
to Sayers for references to later versions of the battle. 

Carmen de Hastings proelio 

Brussels, Koninklijke Bibliotheek van Belgie - Bibliotheque royale de Belgique, 10615-729; 12th c.; 
Latin; parchment; vii + 231 + i; modern ink foliation; 280mm x 190mm (225mm x 145mm), 73 lines 
per page in 2 columns; little decoration except large majuscules; several originally separate quires; 
19th c. brown leather binding with gold stamping, shelfmark on spine, rest of label illegible. This 
manuscript consists mainly of homiletic material. 



212 APPENDIX 1 

Geffrei Gaimar, L Estoirc des Engleis 

Durham, Dean and Chapter Library, Ms. C.iv.27; early 13th c.; French; parchment; i + 167 + ii; 
modern foliation; 225mm x 165mm, written in 2 columns per page; some illuminated capitals and 
some red lettering; 17th c. brown leather binding, WAGE GAIMAR FANTOSME stamped on spine. 

Nottingham, Hallward Library, University of Nottingham, Lincoln Cathedral MS 104; early 13th c.; 
French; parchment; ii - 189 + iv; modern pencil foliation; 255mm x 180mm (195mm x 120mm), 
written in 2 columns; decorations include plain and flourished initials in blue and red ink, pen and 
ink grotesques, a pencil sketch of St Christopher and the Christ child, a pencilled crest and shield 
of arms for one of the Courtenays, and other rough pencil sketches; manuscript condition good but 
binding loose; bound in early 20th c. brown pig skin with paper labels on spine. 

London, British Library, Royal MS 13 A. xxi; early 14th c.; French; parchment; iv + 194 + iv; modern 
pencil foliation; 255mm x 190mm (205mm x 145mm), written in 2 columns; alternating red and 
blue initials and rubricated capitals at line beginnings; good overall condition but ff 115-17 badly 
damaged; modern binding, half bound in red leather with brown buckram boards, gold stamp of 
arms of George ii in centre of upper and lower boards, gold lettering on spine: WACE. ROMAN 
DE BRUT ETC. BRIT MUS. ROYAL MS. 13 A. XXI. 

London, The College of Arms, MS. Arundel 14; early 14th c.; French; parchment; 238 + v; modern 
pencil foliation; 258mm x 179mm (195mm x 145mm), written in 2 columns; red and blue capitals plus 
some elaborated initials; good condition; original leather over wooden boards, 17th c. (?) spine label. 

1066 

Carmen de Hastings prcelio Koninklijke Bibliotheek van Belgie - 

Bibliotheque royale de Belgique: 10615-729 

f 229 col 2 (14 October) 

5 

Int^rea dubio pendent duw pMia marte. 

Eminet & telis mortis amara lues. 

Histrio cor audax nimiuw quew nobilitabat. 

Agmina pr^cedens innumerosa duels. 

Hortatwr gallos uerbis &C tfrritat angles. 10 

AJte proiciens \udit & ense suo. 

Anglorww quidaw cum de tot milibw^ unuw. 

Ludentfw gladio cernit abire procul. 

Milicie cordis tactw* feruore decent!. 

Viuere potfponens prasilit ire mori. 5 

Incisor ferri mimus cognomine dictws. 

Vt ruerat captwj pung/V equuw stimulis. 

Angligenae scutuw telo transfud/V acuto. 

Corpore prostrate distulit ense caput. 

Lumina conumens socijs hec gaudia profert. 



2H 

APPENDIX 1 



Belli pnncipiuw monstrat &: esse suuw. 
Omnes letantwr dommum paritdr uenerantz/r. 
Exultant ictus quod prior extat eis. 
Et tremor & feruor per corda uirilia currunt. 
Festinantqz/i? simul iung^re scuta uiri. 



Geffrei Gaimar, L Estoire des Engleis 

Durham Dean and Chapter Library: Ms. C.iv.27 

f 129 col 2-f 129v col 1 10 

Quawt les eschieles furent rengies 

E del ferir aparaillies 

Mult i ot gent dambes parz 

De hardemem semblent leuparz 15 

Vn des France is dune se hastat 

Deuant les autres cheualchat I 

Taillifer ert cil apelez 

luglere en ardiz asez 

Armes aueit e bon cheual 20 

si ert hardi e noble uassal 

Deuant les autres cil se mist 

Deuant engleis mfrueilles fist 

Sa lance prist par le tuet 

sicuw co fust un bastunet 25 

Encuntre murzt halt le geta 

E par le fer recu la 

Treis feiz getad issi sa lance 

la quatre feiz mult pres sauawce 

Entre les engleis la lancat 30 

parmi le cors un en naurat 

Puis trait lespee ariere uint 

Getat lespee quil tint 

Collation with Hallward Library, University of Nottingham: Lincoln Cathedral MS 
104, (L), f 147 cols 1-2; BL: Royal MS 13 A. xxi, (R), f 143 col 2-f l43v col 1; and 
The College of Arms: MS. Arundel 14, (H), f 1 18 cols 1-2: 12 furent rengies] 
furent rengees LH, sunt regees R 14 dambes parz] damp parz L, dambes dousparz 
R 15 semblent] semblad L 18 ert] estait R, omitted in H 21 noble] bon L 
22 cil] omitted in H 25 sicum] Com si R 25 bastunet] hastuned L 26 le geta] 
len getta H 28 getad issi] issi geta R 28 sa] la L 29 mult] omitted in H 
29 pres] par L, puis H 30 la] omitted in L 32 lespee] sespee LRH 33 Getat] 
Et getta H 33 lespee] sespee R 



214 APPENDIX 1 



Encuntremuwr halt le receit 
lun dit al autre qui co ueit 
Que co esteit enchantemewt 
Que cil faiseit deuant la gent 
Quawt treis feiz ot gete lespee 
le cheual ad la gule baiee 
Vers les engleis uint esleissie 
alquawt quident estre mangie 
Pur le cheual que si baiot 
le lugleur apris lui ot 
Del espie fiert un engleis 
le puin li fait uoler maneis 
Altre en fiert tant cum il pot 
Mai gueredon le iur en ot 
Ktfr les engleis de tutes parz 
li lancent gauelocs e darz 
Lui ocistrent e sun destrier 
Mar demanda le cop premier 



Collation continued: 1 halt le] puis la R 4 Que cil faiseit] Cil se fiert H 
6 ad la] od R 7 esleissie] a esleise R 8 alquawt] Si i ad alq;/anz ki R 9 que si] 
ki issi /?, qissi H 10 lui ot] cnpr venout H 11 espie] sespee H 12 maneis] 
des meins L, demanois H 13 Altre en] Vn autrc H 13 fiert] ferit H 15 les] 
li H 16 lancent] launcerent H 17 Lui] Sil H 



APPENDIX 2 

Reports from the Great 
Yarmouth Herring Fair 



Each fall the Cinque Ports sent bailiffs chosen from among the town jurats to help police the 
Herring Fair at Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, where the fishermen from the Ports participated in 
the annual catch. As part of their duties, the bailiffs filed reports of their activities at the Fair, 
which were kept at Hastings. Only a few of the reports from before 1642 survive. The waits 
of Great Yarmouth are also referred to in the extant records of that town but only in documents 
from the sixteenth century (see David Galloway and John Wasson (eds), Collections 1 1, Malone 
Society (Oxford, 1980/1), 14-15). 

Yarmouth Herring Fair Books 

Hastings, Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, A/H(a)l; 1640; English and Latin; paper; 10 leaves; 
unnumbered; 300mm x 200mm; no decoration except occasional use of italics; good condition; paper 
cover with title: Yarmouth book, Anno Domini 1640. 

Hastings, Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, A/H(a)2; 1641; English; paper; 8 leaves; unnumbered; 
305mm x 190-200mm; no decoration; good condition; parchment cover. 

Hastings, Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, AyH(a)3; 1642; English; paper; 12 leaves; unnumbered; 
305mm x 200mm; no decoration; good condition; paper cover with names of town officials written 
on cover. 

1640 

Yarmouth Herring Fair Book 

Hastings Museum and Art Gallery: A7H(a)l 
ff [3v-4] (29 September) 

5 

...soe then w/ th our companie we returned to our Lodging & or Clerke 
copied out or comissions & made readye in wrightinge a note of the names 
of or officers which were as followeth 



Thomas winge To blowe the brasen home 



10 



216 APPENDIX 2 



And after halfe an houres stay at our Lodgeinge wee were sent for by the 
Bayl/$s of yarmuth to the Tolehouse whether comeinge Mr Bay/*^ Lovell 
discreetly &t modestly began to declare hymselfe concerninge OUT ancient 
customes & priviledges but was presently taken of by their recorder who 
desired the sight of owr commissions saying withall that our priviledges & 5 
rights should in no wise be infringed wherevpon our Clerke deliuered to 
the Recorder the comission for Hastinge which being read in English by 
the towne clerke of yarmuth our clerke likewise deliuered to the Recorder 
the comission for I for Dover which likewise was by their clerke read in 
English & alsoe the names of our officers as aforesayd & the copies of 10 
owr comissions after which the Bayliffs and recorder desired vs to come 
vp & sitt w;th them but when it was instantly propounded by Mr BaylifF 
Pepper that wee ought to sitt whhin the compasse of the Kings armes & 
barr was presently answered by the recorder that wee neuer had place there 
but the place where wee sat (being wnhout the compasse aforesayd) was 15 
owr vsuall & accustomed place to which answere he was pleased to giue 
way And then wee accompanied whh the Bayl/$s & our attendants went 
& dyned w;th Mr Green Bayliff elect the loud musick playing before vs 
where wee had varietie of intertaynm^wt and aft^r dinner wee walked vpon 
the Key but had no compleints made to vs of any disorder & then 20 

returned to owr Lodgeing & after some stay there wee with owr Clerke 
& attendants went to Mr BaylifF wakemans to supper where wee had 
great enterteinmfwt... 

f [6v] (4 October) 

Sunday the 4 [ h of October wee acompanied w/ th Captain Roberts owr 
Landlord Clerke & officers went to Church and tooke owr places by 
the Baylijffes of Yarmuth & there heard divine service read & a sermon 
preached by Mr Brooke their minister & at owr comeing out of the 30 

church found owr Clerke srriant at the Banner and other officers 
attending our comeinge where after the sounding of the brasen home 
three several! times according to the vsuall manner our Clerke with 
an audible voice read his Maries proclamac/on which being done wee 
returned to owr Lodgeing to dinner & owr clerke and other officers 35 

being on horsebacke read the sayd proclamaczon in the other foure 
accustomed places v/zt. the markett crosse, Havens mouth, the Crane, 
and bridgefoote... 



9/ for I for: dtttograprty 34/ Matics: for Ma/ties, abbreviation mark mining 



APPENDIX 2 

1641 

Yarmouth Herring Fair Book 

Hastings Museum and Art Gallery: A/H(a)2 
f [3] (29 September) 

5 

The names of our Officers deliuered to theire Clerke we demanded the 
view of theire prisoners; but vpon request it was deferred vntill the next 
day. The affaires and busines for the presents being finished the Asemblie 
brooke vp, we went to our lodginge our Officers attendinge vpon vs, and 
the Bailiffes of Yarmouth to theire seuerall howses theire Officers likewise 10 
waightinge on them and the Townes Waightes playinge before them. 



1642 

Yarmouth Herring Fair Book 15 

Hastings Museum and Art Gallery. A/H(a)3 
ff [2-2v] (28 September) 

Vpon Wednesday the 28 th of September in the Morninge came Mr Allen 
one of the Cheife Marchantes of Loystaffe to giue vs a visitt who very 20 
courteouslie intreated our Companies vnto his A house where, after wee 
had tasted of his Beere; retourned to our Lodginge, tooke Horse and Rodd 
for Yarmouthe, when vpon the way there mett vs diuerse of Yarmouth and 
other places aswell Horsemen as others and Troop d w/ th vs in order vnto 
Yarmouth Bridge, where there mett vs a great Concourse of people w/th loud 25 
Exclamac/ons seeming to be much ioy d at our comminge still continuing 
their Running Riding and reioycing till wee came to our Lodginge, whither 
(after Sermon Ended (it being the fast day) came vnto vs the two old 
Baylifffj (namely) Mr Carter the Elder and Mr Gower, and the two new 
Bayliffe elect vizt. I Mr Call the Elder and Mr Symons togeather w/th their 30 
officers, where wee enterteyned them w/ th a Cup or two of Wyne & Beere 
And told them wee were sent by the Barons of the Cinque Pones w/ th a 
Commission to ioyne in Justice w/ th them, whose Answeres were that wee 
were very wellcome, and promised to affoord vs all the loue all the respect 
that [f(..)j Euer our Predecessors formerlie had, Soe after some small tyme 35 
of stay (their discourse and ours being ended) saluting vs tooke their leaues, 
Leauinge their officers behind them, to Invite vs, our Clerke, & our servants 
the next day to BayliffCall his house to Dinner, and to Bayliff Symonds to 
supper, whoe (After wee had retourned our thanks) did then ywmediatlie 
all departe; They being gone, came all the Wayt and Musique of the Towne 40 

20/ Loystaffe: Lowatofi. Suffolk 28/ (after Sermon Ended (it ... day): second closing parenthesis omitted 



218 APPENDIX 2 



and welcowming vs thither Played vnto vs, and not onely then but euery 
Morninge alsoe, (except the Lecture dayes) during our abode there; To 
whome at our departure wee gaue a Reward. 



APPENDIX 3 

The Battle of Winchelsea 



In 1350 the Spanish fleet under Charles de la Cerda waged a campaign of piracy against English 
merchant ships in the area of the English Channel, using ports of their French allies as bases. 
On 29 August of that year Edward in intercepted the fleet off Winchelsea as it was returning to 
Spain. Although underequipped and overmatched, the makeshift English fleet was successful in 
capturing half die Spanish ships and forcing the rest back to port. 

The text of Froissart s Chroniques appears in three redactions. The account of the Battle of 
Winchelsea appears only in the second (written 1376-83) and the third (written 1399-1405). 
The second redaction exists in over fifty manuscripts, and the third only in the Biblioteca 
Apostolica Vaticana: Reg. lat. 869. Because of the impracticality of establishing a text for 
the second redaction, the excerpt below is from the single surviving text of the third, without 
any attempt to collate variants from the second. This excerpt comes from chapter 271, which 
concerns Edward s demeanour immediately before the batde. 

Sir John Chandos (p 220, 1.4) was a soldier who fought with distinction at Cambrai, Crecy, 
and Poitiers. In 1360 he was appointed regent and lieutenant of the king of England in France. 
Chandos was closely associated with the Black Prince as well as with Edward and was killed 
while fighting in France in 1370. 

Froissart s Chronicles 

Vatican City, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Reg. lat. 869; early 15th c.; French; paper; 152 leaves; 

285mm x 220mm; contemporary foliation; no decoration; modern white vellum binding on boards. 

1350 

Froissart s Chronicles Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana: Reg. lat. 869 

ff I50v-l (29 August) 

. . .Li rois dengleterre qui estoit sus mer o tout sa nauie auoit ia ordonne toutes 5 
ses besongnes et deuise comment on se combateroit et auoit mesire Robert de 
namur fait mestre et gouureneur de vne nef que on appelloit la sale dou roi la 
ou tous li hostels dou roi estoit Et se tenoit li rois dengleterre ou chief de sa 

6-7/ Robert de namur: nephew of Edward s Queen Philippa and later a patron ofFroiuart 



220 APPENDIX 3 



nef vestis dun noir iaque de veluiel et portoit sus son chief vn noir chapelet de 
beueues qui bien li seoit et estoit adonc selonch ce que dit me fu par ceuls qui 
auoecqwf lui estoient ausi ioieus que onques on lauoit veu/ Et fist ses 
menestrels courner deuant li vne danse dalemagne que messires iehans camdos 
qui la escoit presens auoit nouuellemem raporte / et encores par esbatement il 
faisoit le dit cheual/>r chanter auoecques ses menestres et prendoit en ce grant 
plaisance/ Et a le fois reg<zrdoit en hault car il auoit mis vne gette ou chastiel 
de sa nef pour anonchier qant li espagnol venroient. Ensi que li rois estoit en 
ce deduit et que tout si cheualier estoient moult liet de ce que il le veoient si 
ioieus la gaitte qui perchut la nauie des espagnols venir fillant aual vent/ dist 
ho: ie vois vne nef venant et crei que elle Soit despagne/ lors cesserent li 
menestrel et fu a la ditte gaitte asses tos apries demande se il en veoit plus oil 
respondi il ien voi. .ij. et puis trois et puis quatre et puis dist ie voi la flote 
et aprocent durement/ done sonnerent trompetes ens I es vassiaus et 
claronchiaus grant plaisance etoit a loir et lors se requellient toutes nefs dou 
coste le roi dengleterre et se missent en ordenance ensi cowme il deuoit aler. . . 



21 beueues: for beueres (?) 



APPENDIX 4 

Saints Days and Festivals 



The following list contains the dates for holy days and festivals mentioned in the Records. 
All days are entered under their official names but unofficial names occurring in the Records 
are also given in parentheses and repeated in their alphabetical place as required. Only feast 
days themselves are listed; if the night or eve of a feast or its tide or season (likely the feast 
day itself with its octave) is referred to, its date may be inferred from that of the feast. Exact 
dates for moveable feasts are included in textual notes. See also C.R. Cheney, Handbook of 
Dates for Students of English History, corrected ed (London, 1996), 84-161. 



Ascension Day 

Candlemas (Purification of St Mary the Virgin) 
Christmas 

Circumcision, feast of 
Corpus Christi Day 

Easter 

Epiphany 
Hocktide 

Holy Rood, Exaltation of 
Invention of 

Lady Day (Annunciation to St Mary the Virgin) 
Lent 

May Day 

Michaelmas (St Michael) 
Midsummer Day 
New Year s Day 
Pentecost (Whitsunday) 



Thursday following the fifth Sunday after 
Easter, ie, forty days after Easter 

2 February 
25 December 
1 January 

Thursday after Trinity Sunday, the eighth 

Sunday after Easter 
Sunday after the first full moon on or 

following 21 March 
6 January 

second Monday and Tuesday after Easter 
14 September 

3 May 
25 March 

the forty days before Easter, beginning 

with Ash Wednesday 
1 May 

29 September 
24 June 
1 January 
seventh Sunday after Easter, ie, fifty days 

after Easter 



222 



APPENDIX 4 



St Anne 
St Antony 
St Bartholomew 
St Edward the Confessor 
St George 
St James 

St John the Evangelist 
St Lawrence 
St Margaret 
St Mark the Evangelist 
St Martin 

St Mary Magdalene 
St Mary the Virgin, Annunciation to 
Assumption of 

" " V T C 

Nativity or 
Purification of 

St Matthias 

St Michael 

St Nicholas 

St Peter 

St Thomas of Canterbury 

Translation of 

Shrove Monday 

Shrove Sunday 
Trinity Sunday 
Whitsunday 



26 July 

17 January 

24 August 
13 October 

23 April 

25 July 

27 December 
10 August 
20 July 

25 April 

10 and 1 1 November 

22 July 

see Lady Day 

1 5 August 

8 September 

see Candlemas 

24 February; 25 February in leap years 
see Michaelmas 

6 December 
29 June 

29 December 

7 July 

Monday before Ash Wednesday, the start 

of Lent 
Sunday before Ash Wednesday, the start 

of Lent 
Sunday after Pentecost, ie, eighth Sunday 

after Easter 
see Pentecost 



Translations 

ABIGAIL ANN YOUNG 



The Latin documents have been translated as literally as possible. The order of records in the 
Translations parallels that of records in the original. Place-names and given names have been 
modernized. The spelling of surnames in the Translations reflects the same principles as used in 
the Index. Capitalization and punctuation are in accordance with modern practice. As in 
the Records text, diamond brackets indicate obliterations and square brackets cancellations. 
However, cancellations are not normally translated; they may be translated when a whole entry 
is cancelled, especially if it appears that a cancellation may be administrative rather than the 
correction of an error, or if they seem of special interest or relevance. 

Round brackets enclose words not in the Latin text but needed for grammatical sense in 
English or alternative translations of ambiguous or difficult phrases. In accounts of cases heard 
before ecclesiastical courts, phrases in round brackets have also been used to complete formulae 
suspended with etc, when the remainder of a formula can be deduced with certainty. The 
dates in such cases, which are normally given according to the English church practice of 
beginning the year on 25 March, have not been adjusted to agree with the modern historical 
year. Two documents offered particular difficulties. The phrase domino locoso in the 14989 
Abbots Account under Battle Abbey was capable of two very different interpretations: they are 
discussed fully in the Endnotes (p 288) and the Latin Glossary under iocosus. The Latin 
poem found in Appendix 1 was also difficult to render in English in accordance with our 
prosaic guidelines for translation. 

The Anglo-Norman texts found under Hastings (p 26) and in Appendixes 1 and 3 (pp 213- 
14, 219-20) were translated by William Edwards. Not all the Latin in the text has been 
translated here. Latin tags, formulae, headings, or other short sections in largely English 
documents are either translated in notes or not at all. In translated documents containing 
a mixture of Latin and English, the English sections are normally indicated with (English). 
All Latin vocabulary not found in the standard Latin dictionary, the Oxford Latin Dictionary, 
is found in the glossary. 



224 TRANSLATIONS 

DIOCESE OF CHICHESTER 

1245-52 

Bishop Richard de Wyche s Statutes Bodl.: University College MS. 148 

p 189 col 1 

Of the ornaments of the church 

But churches should be properly roofed. The chalices, and books, and all 
the church ornaments should be sufficient and suitable and they (the churches) 
should be supplied from the goods of deceased clerics according to what is 
right, unless they (the deceased clerics) during their lives equipped the 
churches adequately. Churchyards should be well and properly enclosed by 
the parishioners affected and they should be compelled to do so if necessary 
by ecclesiastical censure by the chaplain of the place. Moreover we prohibit 
round dances or base and shameful pastimes which might incite (people) to 
immorality from being held in churchyards; nor should secular cases nor 
markets be held there nor anywhere else on Sundays, except possibly for 
(selling) needful foodstuffs 



1289 

Chichester Cathedral Cartulary WSRO: Ep. vi/1/4 

f 188* (6 October) (Synodal statutes) 

The synodial constitutions of Lord Gilbert, bishop of Chichester 
Rectors of churches and others upon whom the cure of souls falls should 
carefully instruct and inform the people entrusted to them by an example 
of a good way of life, a word of exhortation in true faith, and by good 
behaviour. Moreover, so that they may more freely and effectively fulfil 
the office of an exhorter, all who have the cure of souls should occupy 
themselves in ecclesiastical duties (or the divine offices) and other good 
studies and equally apply themselves to prayers and readings. They should be 
modest, outstanding in the working of virtues, endowed with humility, 
peacemakers who preach peace and announce good tidings, cutting short 
dissentions, quarrels, and scandals. They should keep themselves far from 
illicit shows and especially from duels and tournaments, wrestling matches, 
and other events at which there is a fear of bloodshed. They ought not to 
visit inns and shameful banquets; they should flee the company of strange 
women and all women from association with whom an evil suspicion can 
grow 



TRANSLATIONS 



1292 



225 



Chichester Cathedral Cartulary WSRO: Ep. vi/ 1 /4 
f 26 5 v (Bishop Gilbert ofSt Leofard s visitation articles) 

Also (ask) whether theatrical and shameful pastimes occur in the church by 
the doing of vicars or other ministers of the church. 



(A citation) was 
issued. 



ASHURST 

1603 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. i/ 17/1 1 

f 17v* (3 December) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Henry 
Blaxton, STP, surrogate judge, in the presence of Christopher Theker, notary public 

(English). Today Thomas Wadye, summoner, appeared and took an oath that 
he had diligently sought the said Tichenor on the twenty-ninth day of November 
1603 (to cite him) to appear on this day, etc. After a call had been made today 
for the said Tichenor, the lord (judge) decreed that he should be cited by ways 
and means for the next (court day). 



For the next 
(court day) 



BEXHILL 

1593 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/7 

f 27v (6 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of Brighton before Robert Evans, 
cleric, in the presence of Stephen Staple, notary public and registrar 

The lord s office against Thomas Goldinge of Hastings 

Detected for playing with his fiddle in the churchyard of Bexhill in time of 
divine service. The said Goldinge appeared. He admitted the detection and 
submitted himself, etc, (ie, submitted himself to the judgment of the court). 
Therefore the lord (judge) ordered him to acknowledge his fault before the 
vicar and churchwardens of Bexhill aforesaid according to the schedule (of 
penances) and to certify (his compliance) on the next (court day). 



226 TRANSLATIONS 

BILLINGSHURST 

1599 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/9 

f I63v (31 March) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Richard Kitson, STB, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

I2d Anthony Haler (was cited) in person (English) in time of divine service 
(English). He appeared today and after the article was charged (against 
him) he admitted (it). Therefore the lord (judge) ordered him to perform 
penance in his aforesaid parish church a week from next Sunday just as he 
will have (instructions) in writing and to certify (his compliance) on the 
next (court day) afterwards. 



f 164* 

John Booker (English). Today he appeared and after the article was charged 
I2d (against him) he admitted (it). Therefore the lord (judge) warned him to perform 

penance in the parish church of Billingshurst a week from next Sunday as 
he will have (instructions) in writing and to certify for the next (court day) 
afterwards. 



1601 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. i/ 17/10 

ff 100-lOOv* (26 September) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Richard 
Kitson, STB, surrogate judge of the vicar general, in the presence of Richard Juxon, 
notary public and deputy registrar 

Wisborough Edward Upchurche and Richard Sendall 

Sought (English) just as in the bill (of detection). 

Billingshursc Brigid Jupe, wife of Richard Jupe and Richard Jupe the younger, son of the 
said Richard the elder. 
(English). 



TRANSLATIONS 

William Hunt, one churchwarden. 
(English) as in the bill (of detection). 

"Richard Jupe and the said Hunt (English). Therefore the lord (judge) warned 
them to set forth (a certificate of penance (?)) in the (proper) form on the 
next (court day) ." I 

Richard Stayneinge (was cited) in person (English). "Today the lord (judge) 
extended the deadline for his certificate until the next (court day). 

Edward Darkenoll (English) as in the bill (of detection). "Today (he is dealt 
with) as above. 



BIRDHAM 

1573 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of Presentments WSRO: Ep. 1/23/2 

f 2v* (June) 

16. Nicholas Warner (English). Today Warner appeared. The lord (judge) dismissed 
him for certain reasons influencing his mind, etc. 

BOSHAM 

1598/9 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/9 

f 157v* (3 March) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Richard 
Kitson, STB, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

William Hildroppe (and) Richard Wouldridge 

The churchwardens. (They were cited) personally as for Freland and (had) to 
certify as to the lord of misrule and the dancing. Today Wouldridge appeared 
and for certain reasons the lord (judge) warned him to make inquiry about 
the aforesaid articles before the next (court day) and to appear at that time 
(/>, on the next court day) to hear the lord s will. And as for Hildroppe, the 
lord (judge) extended the deadline for his certificate until the next (court day). 



228 TRANSLATIONS 

CHICHESTER 



1493 

Will of John Shamler, Musician WSRO: Ep. m/4/1 

f [55A]* (17 August; proved 4 October) 

In the name of God, Amen. On the seventeenth day of die month of August, in 
the year of the Lord 1493, I John Shamler, being of sound mind and unimpaired 
recollection - praise be to God - establish my will in this manner . . . Also I wish 
that my master, the precentor of the aforesaid cathedral church, shall have my 
reed-pipe (?) decorated with writing.... Also I leave all my instruments to Sir 
William Lane.. 



1517-18 

St Georges Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

ff 7-7v* (Allowances and payments) 

. . .And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of Arundel, by the year, 3s 4d. And 
(spent) on wine given to the same (performers), 2 Id. And paid to performers 
of the lord king this year, 6s 8d. And (spent) on wine given to the same 
(performers), 15d. And paid to players of Thomas, earl of Arundel, by the 
year, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (players), I6d And paid 
to performers of Thomas, earl of Arundel, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to 
the same (performers), 8d. And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of Arundel, 
20d. And (spent) on wine, 8d. And paid on beer and candles for player/s of 
Lady Salisbury this year, 4d. I And as a reward given to Richard Adams, 
bearward, I6d. And (spent) on wine, lOd. And paid to Master Brandon, 
juggler, 2s And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of Arundel, 3s 4d. 
And (spent) on wine given (to them), 8d 



1518-19 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 14 (Allowances and payments) 

...And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of Arundel, this year, 3s 4d. And 
(spent) on wine given to the same (performers), 13d. And paid to performers of 
our lord king by the year, 6s 8d. And (spent) on wine given to the same 
(performers), 2s. And paid to players of Thomas, earl of Arundel, by the year, 
3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (performers), 6d 



729 

TRANSLATIONS 
f I4v* 

. . .And paid (to) the bearwards of the lord king, 3s. And (spent) on wine given to 
the same (bearwards), I4d.... And paid (to) the juggler of our lord king, 3s 4d. 
And (spent) on wine given to the same (juggler), I4d. . . . And paid to a servant of 
Thomas, earl of Arundel, called the dancing boy, this year, 20d. And paid (to) 
the bearwards of the lady marchioness this year, 2ld. And (spent) on wine given 
to the same (bearwards), I6d.... And paid to William More for the performers 
of the lord king, 20d. And (spent) on wine given (to) the bearwards of Lady 
Northumberland, 10d.... 



1519-20 

St Georges Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 23 (Allowances and payments) 

. . .And paid to performers of the lord king this year, 6s 8d. And (spent) on wine 
given to the same (performers), 18d. And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of 
Arundel, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (performers), 12d. And 
paid to players of Thomas, earl of Arundel, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to 
the same (players), 19 1/2 d.... 

ff 23v-4 

...And paid (to) the bearward of Lady Suffolk, 16d. And paid (to) the juggler 

of the lord king, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine, 6d And paid as a reward 

(to) the bearwards of the earl of Kent, 16d. And paid to performers of 
Lady Mautravers, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (performers), 
I4d And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of Arundel, 20d. And (spent) 
on wine given to the same (performers), 7d And paid as a reward given 
(to) the bearwards of the lord king, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to 
the same (bearwards), 12d. I And paid to performers by order of the mayor 
at the time of the sessions, 12d. And paid to performers by order of the 
mayor, 8d 



1520-1 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

ff 3 1 1 v (Allowances and payments) 

...And paid to performers of the lord king this year, 6s 8d. And (spent) on 
wine given to the same (performers), 2s. I And paid to performers of Thomas, 



230 TRANSLATIONS 



earl of Arundel, this year, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same 
(performers), 20d. And paid to players of Thomas, earl of Arundel, this year, 
3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (players), 15d.... And paid to 
players of Thomas, earl of Arundel, in the house of John Mathewe, 3s 4d. And 
(spent) on wine, 4d. And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of Arundel, called 
trumpeters, 3s 4d. And paid (to) the juggler of the lord king this year, 3s 4d. 
And (spent) on wine given to him, 2s 6d 



1521-2 

St Georges Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 38v (Allowances and payments) 

...And paid to performers of the lord king this year, 6s 8d. And (spent) on 
wine given to the same (performers) this year, l4d. And paid to performers 
of Thomas, earl of Arundel, this year, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the 
same (performers), I6d. And paid to players of Thomas, earl of Arundel, this 
year, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (players), (blank).... And 
paid (to) the juggler of the lord king this year, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given 

to the same (juggler), 12d And paid (to) trumpeters of Thomas, earl of 

Arundel, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (trumpeters), 2s 4d. 

f 39 

...And paid (to) the bearwards of Lady Suffolk, 20d. And (spent) on wine 
given to the same (bearwards), l6d. And paid (to) the bearwards of our lord 
king, with expenses for wine, 5s. And paid to performers of Thomas, earl of 
Arundel, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine given to the same (performers), 2s.... 



1522-3 

St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 

f 43 (Allowances and payments) 

.And paid to one player of the lord earl of Arundel this year, 3s 4d. And paid 
(to) the trumpeters of the said lord earl this year, 3s 4d. And (spent) on wine 
given to the same (trumpeters), 20d.... 

f 43v 

...And paid (to) the bearwards of Lord Suffolk, I6d. And (spent) on wine 



231 

TRANSLATIONS 

given to the same (bearwards), 18d.... And paid (to) the juggler of the lord 
king, 3s 4d.... And paid to performers of the lord earl of Arundel, 3s 4d. And 
(spent) on wine given to the same (performers), 5d.... And paid to performers 
of the lord earl of Arundel, I6d.... And paid to performers of the lord king, 
6s 8d.. 



1543-4 

Cathedral Communars Accounts WSRO: Cap. 1/23/2 

f 63v (Necessary expenses) 

First I paid to performers of the lord earl of Arundel arriving 
here in Christmas week as they are accustomed to, as a reward 
for them 20d 



f 64 

Also I paid on the second day of July to performers and entertainers 

of the lord prince arriving here 20d 



St George s Guild Accounts WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/2 
mb 4* (Various charges and payments) 

And paid as a reward to juggler/s of the duke of Suffolk and for 

candles at that time 2s 1 Od 

And to performers of the earl of Arundel and to one juggler inside 

and outside le hape and for bread and wine at Mr Molens" 7s 

And paid (to) the bearwards of the lord king at the order of 

the mayor 3s lOd 

And paid to performers of Lord Wriothesley as a reward 3s 4d 

And paid at the same time for bread and wine given to them 12d 

And paid on St George s Day to the prince s bearward 12d 

And paid to juggler/s (of) the prince at the order of the mayor 

in the Council House 3 S 4J 

And paid for candles at the same time 3d 



TRANSLATIONS 

1586/7 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/6 

f 79v* 

Proceedings of the conn held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Anthony 
Skinner, judge 

East Wittering Mr H. Weston appeared on the fourth day of March 1586 (/>, 1586/7) and 
I2d after the article was charged against him (English), he claimed (English). 

1600 

Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar WSRO: Ep. in/4/5 

f 137v* (7 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Richard 
Kitson, STB, surrogate judge of Anthony Blincow, LLD, vicar general in the presence 
of Richard Juxon, notary public and deputy registrar 

St Pancras David Bulke (English). He is pronounced to be contumacious and his penalty 

(was carried over) until today. 

John Fussell for the like (charge). He is pronounced to be contumacious and 
his penalty (was carried over) as above. 



1608/9 

Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar WSRO: Ep. in/4/7 

f 79v (23 March) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Hugh 
Barker, LLD, commissary, in the presence of George Stent, notary public 

Thomas Selden was cited in person (English) as in the bill (of detection). 
4d received Today he appeared and after the article was charged (against him) he stated 

(English). Therefore the lord (judge) dismissed him with a warning for this time. 



f 80 

St Andrew s John Rose was cited in person (English). Today he appeared and after the article 
was charged (against him) he denied (it) by virtue of the oath he had taken 



TRANSLATIONS 

before. Therefore the lord (judge) dismissed him with a warning. 



1616/17 

Archdeaconry ofChichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/16 

part iii, f 8 (8 February) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory ofChichester Cathedral before John 
Craddock, LLD, surrogate judge and commissary, in the presence of John Swayne, 
notary public 

ery Otho Paullwhecle was sought on the twentieth day of the month of January 

Anexcommu- last past for the following reason, that is, (English). Today after the decree (of 
niarion (order) c j tat j O n) by ways and means issued elsewhere in this regard was introduced, 
John Butler, summoner, took an oath, etc, that on the sixth day of the month 
of February aforesaid he had diligently sought the said Otho Paullwheele within 
the parish of the subdeanery, otherwise (called the parish) of St Peter the Great, 
within the aforesaid city ofChichester, where he has lived and (now) lives 
and has been accustomed to stay, in order to cite him effectively in person in 
accordance with the tenor of the order now introduced. And that, because 
(Paullwheele) kept out of the way so that he could not be arrested with a 
personal citation, he had peremptorily cited the same Otho Paullwheele on 
the said day by the fixing of the aforesaid order on the door of the usual 
residence of the same Paullwheele within the aforesaid parish according to 
the force, form, and tenor of the same order and according to the effect 
stated in it. Then after a call for the said Otho Paullwheele had been made 
three times and he had not lawfully appeared in any manner at all (/>, neither 
in person nor by proxy), but was contumaciously absent, the lord (judge) 
pronounced him to be contumacious and excommunicated him as a penalty 
for this his contumaciousness, just as in the schedule (of penalties), since 
justice demanded it. 

(blank) Paullwheele, wife of the said Otho Paullwheele, was cited in person, 
etc, for the following reason, that is, (English) (...); since she did not appear 
she is pronounced (...) until (...) day. Today (...). 

1620 

Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar WSRO: Ep. m/4/10 

f 86v (20 October) 

Proceedings of the court held before William Cox, cleric, surrogate judge of 



234 



TRANSLATIONS 



Hugh Barker, LLD, commissary of William Thome, dean, in the presence of John 
Swayne, notary public 

Subdeanery Edward SoUthcOtt 

He stands detected for the following reason, that is, (English). Today the 
aforesaid Edward Southcott voluntarily appeared in person and was not cited. 
And he said to the lord judge (English) and he claimed (English). And he 
claimed (English) and he said (English) and he claimed (English). Wherefore 
he humbly asked to be dismissed for this time and promised (English). 
Therefore the lord (judge) dismissed him for this time with a warning only. 



All Saints 

(A citation) by 
ways and means 
was issued. 

By ways and 
means 



For the next 
(court day) 



1623 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 

WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13 
f 36* (24 May) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
John Craddock, LLD, surrogate judge and commissary 

Thomas Huggens the younger was sought by John Butler, summoner, on 17 
May for the following reason, "that is, (English) . 

William Page was sought by the same (summoner) on the same day for the 
aforesaid reason. "Today the said Page appeared in person and, after the aforesaid 
article was charged against him, he denied that the same was true. Therefore 
the lord (judge) warned him to be present on the next (court day) to see the 
further process, etc, and he ordered the churchwardens (also) to be cited to be 
present at that time." 



AJI Saints 

Extended to the 
next (court day) 



For the next 
(court day) 



f41* (21 June) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
William Cox, cleric, surrogate judge 

Thomas Huggens was cited in person on the said day by the said Butler for 
the following reason, that is, (English), etc. 

Thomas Selden was cited in person on the same day for the following reason, 
that is, (English). Today the said Selden appeared in person. The lord (judge) 



TRANSLATIONS 

warned him to be present on the next (court day). 

COCKING 

1616/17 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/17 

S 107v-8* (25 January) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before John 
Craddock, LLD, surrogate judge and commissary 

Woolavington John Joye, churchwarden, was cited in person there by John Stent, summoner, 
8d received. on the twenty-first day of the month of January aforesaid to appear on this 
For a fortnight day, at this hour, and in this place for the following reason, that is, (English). 
Today the said Joye appeared in person and after the aforesaid articles were 
charged against him he stated (English) and he stated (English), as above 
(English), as he claimed. And he stated (English). And as for the rest, he 
denied (them). Therefore, the lord (judge) ordered him to confess his aforesaid 
fault pro confessis in the parish church of Woolavington aforesaid a week 
from next Sunday at the time of morning prayer there before the minister, 
churchwardens, and the entire congregation and to certify (his compliance) 
on the next court day following afterwards. I 

Woolavington J. (blank) Joye, wife of the said John Joye was cited in person on the aforesaid 
8d received day to appear as above for the aforesaid reason. 

Mary Joye was cited in person as above for the aforesaid reason, (English), etc, 
as above. 

John Joye and Richard Joye were cited in person, etc, for the aforesaid reason, 
that is, (English) as above. 

William Coles, Thomas Brooke, and John Philpes were cited in person as 
above for the aforesaid reason, that is, (English), etc, as above. 



f 109v (1 February) 



Received: 



8d 
8d 
8d 
8d 
nil 



John Joye 
William Coles 
Thomas Brooke 
John Philpes 
Mary Joye 



236 

Woolavington 

For the next 
(court day). 

Sol ap. 



TRANSLATIONS 

They were cited in person, etc, to appear, etc, for the following reason, that is, 
(English), as is said. Today the said John Joye, William Coles, Thomas Brooke, 
and John Philpes appeared in person and after the aforesaid article was charged 
against them they admitted (it). Therefore the lord (judge) ordered each and 
every one of them to confess their aforesaid fault before the minister and 
churchwardens and questmen tomorrow after evening prayer in the chancel 
of the church there and to certify for the next (court day). Then the lord (judge), 
because he was informed that the said Mary Joye was so ill at this time that 
she could not attend this court without danger (to her health), graciously 
dismissed her until, etc. 



8d 



FELPHAM 

1609 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/13 

f 8v (7 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
John Drury, LLD, surrogate judge and vicar general, in the presence of George 
Stent, notary public 

John Grey was cited in person on the same day (English). Today he appeared 
and after the article was charged (against him) he admitted (it). Therefore the 
lord (judge) enjoined him to perform public penance a week from next Sunday 
at the cathedral church of Chichester at the time of the Communion, dressed 
in a linen garment as he will have (instructions) in writing, and to certify 
(his compliance) for the next (court day) afterwards. 



FOLKINGTON 

1581 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/2 

f 38v* (14 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in St Michael s Church, Lewes, before Giles Fletcher, 
official, in the presence of Hugh Treves, notary public 

Robert Brycher (English). The said Brycher appeared. The lord (judge) 
assigned him to clear himself with four compurgators for the next (court day). 



TRANSLATIONS 

FUNTINGTON 

1602 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. I/ 17/10 
f I63v (26 June) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Richard 
Kitson, surrogate judge, in the presence of Richard ]uxon, notary public 

(The court) has Edward Lucas (was cited) in person (English). Today the said Lucas appeared 
received I2d. an j f or certam reasons claimed by him the lord (judge) dismissed him with 
a warning. 



1628 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/22 

f 2l4v* (4 July) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before William 
Nevill, LIB, vicar general, in the presence of Edward Osborne, notary public and 
deputy registrar 

Mr Thomas Langrish, one of the old churchwardens there, was cited in person 
I2d by John Butler, summoner, on the twenty-eighth day of June last past for the 
following reason, that is, (English), etc, also (English). Today the said Langrish 
appeared after he was called and explicitly denied that the detection was true. 
Therefore the lord (judge) decreed that Mr Horseman should be cited for the 
next (court day) to justify the same detection. 



HASTINGS 

1356-7 

Hastings Custumal ESRO: RYE 57/4 

f 138v* 

...And should this bailiff die before the day of the election has come around 
again, the jurats shall sound their horn, whatever time of year it be, to summon 
the commons to elect another bailiff, which bailiff once elected, shall hold 
office until the day of the election. . . 



238 TRANSLATIONS 

HEATHFIELD 

1610 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep.ii/9/ 11 

f 276 (11 September) 

Proceedings of the court held in St Michael s Church, Lewes, before William Iniam, 
cleric, surrogate judge 

(The lord s office against) Richard Christopher, Roger Richardson, and (blank), 
the wife of Philip Inman of Waldron 
They were detected (English). 

Excommu- They were all cited in person by the same (summoner) on the fourth day of 

the present month within the said parish. 



HORSHAM 

1582 

Inquest on the Death of John Rowe PRO: KB 9/1026/74 

single mb (25 May) 

An inquest, reported in the form of an indenture, was held at Horsham in the 
county of Sussex aforesaid on the twenty-fifth day of May in the twenty-fourth 
year of die reign of our Lady Elizabeth, by the grace of God of England, France, 
(and) Ireland queen, defender of the faith, etc, before me, Magnus Fowle, 
coroner of the right honourable man, Philip, earl of Arundel, for his rape of 
Bramber, upon the view of the body of one John Rowe, alias Sparrowe, late of 
Horsham aforesaid in the aforesaid county, shoemaker, lying there dead upon 
the ground, on the oadis of Christopher Jynner, Thomas Hurst, Henry Mychell, 
Henry Bottynge, John Dungat, Richard Gynden, Richard Gates, Thomas Ive, 
Henry Fylder, John Baker, Thomas Boorne, Bartholomew Sayers, John Forman, 
William Hartrydge, (... T)homas (...) Champyon. They say upon their oaths 
that, on the twentieth day of May in the twenty-fourth year of the reign of our 
Lady Elizabeth, now queen, at Horsham (...), (while) the aforesaid John Rowe, 
alias Sparrowe, with various other persons, was working and trying to set up a 
summer pole, in English a (...>, (valued at) I6d, a ladder valued at 6d, with 
which the aforesaid pole was being raised, broke. And by misadventure the 
aforesaid pole (then) fell on the aforesaid John Rowe, alias (...), (and) struck 
him on his head, giving him, the aforesaid John Rowe, a mortal wound on his 
head seven inches long, four inches wide, (and) two inches deep. The aforesaid 
John Rowe died immediately from this blow. And so the aforesaid John Rowe, 



TRANSLATIONS 

late (...) (of Horsham), was killed by misadventure with the aforesaid pole. 
In witness whereof both the aforesaid coroner and the aforesaid jurors have 
affixed their seals in turn to this inquest report on the abovesaid day in the 
aforesaid year. 

(Signed) By Magnus Fowle, coroner aforesaid. 
"(Death) by misadventure." 

ITCHINGFIELD 

1595 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book wsRO: Ep. 1/17/8 

f 3l6v* (29 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Edward 
Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

John Booker, fiddler, of Rudgwick was sought (English) by ways and means 
R. has (it) for the next (court day) afterwards. Then the said John Booker appeared and 
after the article was charged against him he stated (English). Therefore the 
lord (judge) dismissed (him) with a warning. 

I2d Robert Haler of Shipley (was cited) in person. Today he appeared. The lord 
(judge) bound him by oath to answer faithfully to certain articles, etc, and 
warned him to undergo an examination before the next (court day). After he 
was examined the lord (judge), (English), dismissed him with a warning. 

I2d John Hill of Shipley (was cited) in person. Today (his case was handled) in 
like manner as above for Haler. Indeed after John Hill was examined the lord 
(judge), because it was not agreed (English), dismissed him with a warning. 

OVING 

1607 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/12 

f 134* (10 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before John 
Drury, LLD, vicar general 

Anne Coolde, wife of William Coolde, was cited in person by Benjamin 
8d Freeman on the fourth day of October instant (English). "Today after a call for 
the said Anne had been made three times and she did not appear in any way 



240 TRANSLATIONS 



(ie, neither in person nor by proxy), the lord (judge) pronounced her to be 
contumacious and as a penalty for her contumaciousness, he excommunicated 
her just as in the schedule (of penalties). Then afterwards she appeared and 
after the article was charged (against her) she admitted (it). Therefore the lord 
(judge) enjoined her (English). 

Robert Grey was cited in person on the said day for the like (offence) (English). 
"Today he appeared and after the article was charged (against him) he admitted 
(it). Therefore the lord (judge) enjoined him (English) and to certify (their 
compliance) for the next (court day) afterwards." 



f 139v* (31 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory ofChichester Cathedral before Francis 
Cox, cleric, surrogate judge 

William Peachey was cited in person (English). Today he appeared and after the 
article was charged (against him) he admitted (it). Therefore the lord (judge) 
warned him to confess his fault according to the schedule on the morrow in 
the aforesaid parish church at the time of divine service and to certify for the 
next (court day). 

Lambert Peachey was cited in person (English). Today (his case was handled) 
as above. 

Ralph Smyth was cited in person for the like (offence). Today the lord (judge) 
extended the deadline for his certificate until the next (court day). 



f 140* 

John Marten was cited in person (English). Today he appeared and after the 
article was charged (against him) he stated (English). Therefore the lord (judge) 
enjoined him to confess his fault in the aforesaid parish church on the morrow 
at time of divine service according to the schedule and to certify (his compliance) 
for the next (court day). 

[She was Anne Gouldsmyth was cited in person today as above (English). Today (her 

absem ) case was handled) as above. 

Mary Hartley was sought (English). Today she appeared and claimed (English). 



TRANSLATIONS 



241 



In fact on the basis of this claim the lord (judge) warned her to exhibit her 
certificate signed by the minister and churchwardens there before the next 
(court day). 

Katherine Miles was sought (English). Today (her case was handled) as above 
for Marten and Duke. 



Chidham 
(parish but) 
presented at 
Oving 

3s 8d was 

received. 



1607/8 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/12 

f 166* (21 February) 

Proceedings of the court held before John Drury, LLD, in his home, in the presence of 
Christopher Theker, notary public 

Henry Wakeford (English); he stands excommunicated. On the twenty-first 
day of the month of February, in the year of the Lord 1607 according, etc 
(ie, according to English church practice, that is, 1607/8), the said Wakeford 
appeared in person before the honourable man, Master John Drury, LLD, etc, 
in his own home, well known to be located and situated within the Close 
in the city of Chichester, in the presence of me, Christopher Theker, notary 
public, etc. And (Wakeford) sought the benefit of absolution from the sentence 
of excommunication issued and promulgated elsewhere against him. Therefore 
after the said Wakeford took an oath to obey the law and abide by the orders 
of the church the lord (judge) absolved him and restored, etc. Then the lord 
(judge), from certain reasons justly moving him, warned the said Wakeford 
to confess his fault before the minister and churchwardens there next Sunday 
immediately after evening prayer and to certify (his compliance) for the next 
(court day) afterwards. 

PAGHAM 

1631 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 

WSRO: Ep. iv/2/14 

f 78v* (10 December) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
Joshua Petre, cleric, surrogate judge, in the presence of John Swayne, notary public 

John Ingram was cited in person by the same (summoner) on the seventh 



242 

Dismissal 8d 



TRAN SLAT IONS 



day of the aforesaid month (of December) for the following reason, that is, 
(English). "The said Ingram appeared in person today in this place and after 
the aforesaid article was charged against him he stated (English). Therefore 
the lord (judge) dismissed him this time with only a warning." 



Dismissal 
2s 



PETT 

1586 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1 1/9/3 

f 36 (2 November) 

Proceedings of the court held before Anthony Blincow, LID, vicar general, in the 
presence of William Plett and Roger Ley land, notaries public 

The lord s office against John Keale of Pett 

(English). He appeared and stated that the detection was true for one time 
only and submitted himself to the judge s correction. The lord (judge) warned 
him that in future (English) and so he was dismissed for this time. 

PETWORTH 

1593 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8 

fl!5v* (5 July) 

Proceedings of the court held in Petworth parish church before John Drury, LLD, 
surrogate judge, in the presence of John Henden, notary public 

William Wakeford the younger (English). Today the said Wakeford appeared and 
stated (English). Therefore the lord warned him (English) under pain of the law 
and so he dismissed him with a warning. 

Robert Piper the younger for the like (offence). Today he appeared and made a 
statement in manner and form just as Wakeford and (was dismissed) with such 
a warning. 



f 122v* (13 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Edward Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 



TRANSLATIONS 



John Woodes (was cited) in person (English), etc. 

"Today after (Woodes) was called and appeared in no way (/>, neither in person 
nor by proxy) the lord (judge) pronounced him contumacious. His punishment 
was reserved until the next (court day)." 



f 134v* (24 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory ofChichester Cathedral before Edward 
Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

Richard Goodyer (English); (he was cited) in person. Today (his case was 
handled) as above. 



1595 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8 

f 252v* 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory ofChichester Cathedral before Edward 
Bragge, judge, in the presence of Richard Juxon, notary public 

John Curtys (English); he was excommunicated. On the first day of April he 
appeared before Master Richard Kitson, etc. The lord (judge) absolved (him), 
etc, and dismissed (him) with a warning, etc. 

ROTHERFIELD 

1617/18 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. u/9/14 

f lv (13 January) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory ofSt Michael s Church, Lewes, before 
William Inians, cleric, surrogate judge 

(The lord s office against) Philip Alchorne of Rotherfield 

Detected (English). 

He was cited in person by Timothy Grover, summoner, on the tenth day of 

January aforesaid. 

"The said Alchorne appeared. After the abovewritten detection was charged 

against him he explicitly denied the same (detection) was true. Therefore the lord 

(judge) warned him to be present on the next (court day) to see the further, etc 



244 



TRANSLATIONS 

(*>, to see the further process). 



RUDGWICK 

1612 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Instance Book WSRO: Ep. 1/10/30 

f 21 (27 June) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before 
Humfrey Booth, in the presence of George Stent, notary public 



The lord s office 



Payment con. 
con. Payment 



Payment 

Payment con. 
Payment con. 
Payment 

con. 
Payment con. 



Payment 



Payment 
Payment 
Payment 

Payment 
Payment 
Payment 
Payment 
Payment 
Payment 
(English). 



promoted against: 

Henry Cox - he is absent. 

Robert Mose the younger - he appeared. 

John Marten - he appeared. 

John Lee - he is absent. 

Nicholas Naldret - he is absent. 

Richard Naldret - he appeared. 

Thomas Richardson - he is absent. 

John Steyninge - he appeared. 

Thomas Steyninge he appeared. 

Henry Hedman - he appeared. 

Robert Thayer - he appeared. 

Robert More - he appeared. 

Henry Thayer - he appeared. 

Edward Clayton - he is absent. 

Richard Gatton - he is absent. 

Philip Avenell - he appeared. 

Humfrey Blackwell - he is absent. 

John Butcher - he is absent. 

Thomas Steyninge - he appeared. 

Richard Butcher - he appeared. 

Richard Stringer - he appeared. 

John Ovington - he appeared. 

John Clayton - he is absent. 

John Gardener - [he is absent] he appeared. 

Robert Gatton - he appeared. 

John Knight - he appeared. 

Richard Longe - he appeared. 

Thomas Lewer - he appeared. 

Richard Carpenter - he appeared. 



con. 
con. 
con. 



con. 



con. 



74S 
TRANSLATIONS 

When they were called and appeared as above the lord (judge) warned them to 
be present before the lord bishop at AJdingbourne in the afternoon of this day 
and in case the lord bishop did not dismiss them the lord (judge) warned them 
all to be present on the next (court day) in this place to see the further process 
to take place, etc. 

RYE 

1448-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 6 (24 ]une -24 August 1449) (Expenses) 

Also given to a minstrel of Lord Saye 20d 

Also (spent) on wine and horse fodder for the same minstrel 4d 

Also given to minstrels of the lord king for the honour of the town 3s 4d 

Likewise given also in expenses to another minstrel of Lord Saye 

who is called Nicholas Lambutarme 2s 2d 



f 6v 

Also given to a minstrel of the duke of Somerset 12d 

1449-50 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 14 (24 June -24 August 1450) (Expenses) 

Also paid in giving to our lord king s minstrels 3s 4d 



f I4v 

Also paid for horse fodder for minstrels of the lord king in the 
house of John Bayle 



1452-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 32v (1 Apnl-24June 1453) (Expenses) 

Also given to minstrel/s of the earl of Arundel 20d 



246 TRANSLATIONS 

f 33 (24 June-24 August 1453) 

Also given to a minstrel of the lord chancellor 12d 

Also paid to minstrels of the lord duke of Buckingham 3s 4d 

Also (spent) on wine and for the expenses of their horses 2s 



1453-4 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 36v (21 Apnl-24 June 1454) (Expenses) 

Also given to minstrels of Lord Bourchier and Lord Fiennes 2s 



f 37 (24 June-24 August 1454) 

Also given to minstrels of the lord duke of Buckingham and for 

their expenses at the inn (or tavern) 4s 



1454-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 42 (25 August-25 December 1454) (Expenses) 

Also given to Lord Warwick s minstrel/s 3s 4d 

Also given to minstrel/s of the lord duke of York 3s 8d 



1458-9 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 66* (27 August-25 December 1458) (Expenses) 

First for harpers of the earl of Pembroke 3s 4d 

Also to minstrel/s of the earl of Warwick on expenses and 

other (charges) 4s 

Also to servant/s (possibly minstrel/s) of the duke of York 4s 



747 
TRANSLATIONS 

1459-60 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 79* (26 August 1459-31 August 1460) (Expenses) 

Also given to Lord Dacre s minstrels in coin 12d 

Also paid for them in expenses 4d 
Also given to minstrels of the duke of Buckingham, our 

warden, in coin 4s 

Also paid for their expenses at that time 2 l/2d 



1460-1 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 84 v* (31 August -25 December 1460) (Payments and expenses) 

Also given to minstrels of the earl of Warwick 20d 

Also paid in Thomas Kynge s house for the expenses of these 

four minstrels together with their four horses 27d 



1461-2 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 93v (30 August -25 December 1461) (Expenses and payments) 

Also given to minstrels of our Lord Warwick, our warden, on 

28 October and for their dinner at the mayor s house and in giving 

drink to my neighbours during this time 6s 



f 95v (18 April- 24 June 1462) (Expenses) 

Also given to six minstrels of the lord king as a gift 6s 8d 

Also paid on expenses for the said minstrels 7d 



1462-3 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 102 (29 August-25 December 1462) (Expenses and payments) 

Also given to minstrels of our lord King Edward on the eve of 

St Edward the Confessor fa gj 

Also paid for their expenses and those of their horses at that time Id 



248 TRANSLATIONS 



Also given to minstrels of our Lord Warwick, our warden 

and admiral 3 S 4J 



1464-5 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/2 

f 108 (24 June -24 August 1465) (Payments and expenses) 

paid Also given to minstrels of Lord Warwick on the morrow of the 

opening of the town s boxes 6s 8d 

paid Paid in all on expenses for the said four minstrels in food and wine 1 2d 



1479-80 

Chamberlains Accounts ESRO: RYE 60/3 

f 6 (25 December 1479-2 April 1480) (Payments and expenses) 

Also given in remuneration to minstrels of the town 2s 



f 7 (2 April- 24 June 1480) 

Also paid to minstrel/s of my Lord Arundel 6s 8d 

Also paid on the eve of St Mark the Evangelist to minstrels of 

our lord king, 10s, and for the expenses of the same (minstrels) 

on the same day, lOd 10s lOd 



SALEHURST 

1581 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book WSRO: Ep. n/9/2 

f 38v* (14 November) 

Proceedings of the court held in St Michael s Church, Lewes, before Giles Fletcher, 
official, in the presence of Hugh Treves, notary public 

I2d John Dunke (English). He appeared and denies the article. Therefore the lord 

(judge) has assigned him to clear himself with four compurgators on the next 
(court day) (court day). 



249 

TRANSLATIONS 

WARBLETON 

1572 

Inquest on the Death of Noah Spynner PRO: ASSI 35/14/6 

single mb (22 May) 

Sussex An inquest, reported in the form of an indenture, was held at Warbleton 
within the rape of Hastings in the aforesaid county on the twenty-second day 
of May in the fourteenth year of the reign of our Lady Elizabeth, by the grace 
of God of England, France, and Ireland queen, defender of the faith, etc, 
before William Playfer, gentleman, coroner (...) of (the right honourable man,) 
Henry, earl of Huntingdon, for his rape of Hastings aforesaid in the aforesaid 
county, upon the view of the body of Noah Spynner, late of Hailsham in the 
aforesaid county, carpenter, (now lying dead) and killed at Warbleton aforesaid 
(...), on the oath of Hugh Collen, John Pettit, Edward Averye, Thomas Farmer, 
John Farmer, Robert Pettit, John Awekes, John Bishoppenden, William Wembie, 
Laurence Swayne, John Weston, Stephen Godsall the elder, John Pecham, John 
Weston of Sharnden, Gregory Langham, and Dunstan Penkeherst. These 
jurors make presentment and say upon their aforesaid oath that the aforesaid 
Noah Spynner, with various other persons, did on the fourteenth day of the 
month of May instant in the abovesaid fourteenth year about eleven o clock in 
the night of the same day come near the house of one John Symmes in 
Warbleton aforesaid in the aforesaid county to take away a maypole set in the 
ground before and near the gate of one John Symmes. And one John Haywarde, 
late of Crowhurst in the aforesaid county, labourer, being then and there in the 
house of the said John Symmes with a bow and an arrow valued at 6d, which 
(bow and arrow) he then held in his hands, feloniously then and there shot the 
said arrow through the window of the said house of the said John Symmes and 
with the said arrow feloniously struck the said Noah Spynner in his gullet (...) 
(in English,) in the windpipe. And he gave to the aforesaid Noah Spynner 
a mortal wound one-half inch in width and two and one-half inches deep, 
from which wound the aforesaid Noah Spynner then and there died at once. 
And thus the aforesaid jurors say upon their oath. And (they say) that the 
aforesaid John Haywarde with the aforesaid bow and arrow on the aforesaid 
day in the aforesaid year and place at the aforesaid hour did feloniously kill and 
slay the aforesaid Noah Spynner contrary to the peace of the said lady queen, 
her Crown, and dignity. And further the aforesaid jurors say upon their 
aforesaid oath that the aforesaid John Haywarde had at the time of the 
commission of this felony aforesaid [a horse, grey in colour, valued at 40s] 
three cows valued at 60s in the pasture of John Symmes to the use of the 
lord of the aforesaid liberty. In witness whereof both the aforesaid coroner and 
the aforesaid jurors have affixed their seals (...). Given on the aforesaid day in 



250 



TRANSLATIONS 



the aforesaid year and place. 

He pleads not guilty nor liable but that John ap Noke (...) 



WEST TARRING 

1625/6 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 

WSRO: Ep. rv/2/13 

f 132v* (11 February) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
William Cox, cleric, surrogate judge, in the presence of Richard Bragge, notary public 



Gilbert Knight was cited in person, etc, for the following reason, that is, 



Penalty (is 

reserved) for the i- i " * 

nexc (court day) (English). For not appearing, etc, he is likewise pronounced contumacious, etc. 



f 136v (11 March) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
Francis Rings tea 1 , LIB, surrogate judge, in the presence of John Swayne, notary 
public and deputy registrar 

8d William Bible, questman there, was cited in person by John Butler, summoner, 
8d on 1 March instant to appear on this day, at this hour, and in this place to justify 
I2d his detection against Gilbert Knight of Tarring aforesaid. Today the said Bible 
appeared in person. The lord (judge) warned him to be present on the next 
(court day) to receive the articles and so at each general session until, etc, and 
assigned Ottringham as the necessary promoter of his office, etc. Then the said 
Bible, detailing the said detection exhibited against Knight, says (English). 
"Then in the afternoon of the same day, before the lord deputy judge aforesaid 
(and) in the presence of me, Richard Bragge, notary public, etc, the said Bible 
appeared in person and, when he consented to die time, place, and process of die 
lord judge, the lord (judge) charged him (English). To which charge the said 
Bible replied (English), submitting, etc. Therefore the lord (judge) enjoined him 
to acknowledge this his fault before the minister, churchwardens, and eight other 
parishioners in the chancel of the parish church of Tarring aforesaid on Sunday, 
die nineteenth day of March instant, after evening prayers, according to die 
schedule, etc, (and) to certify (his compliance) on the next court day thereafter. 



TRANSLATIONS 



251 



V 

Dismissal 
For the pro 
ceedings, 12d 



At the feast 
of the Annun- 



For a fortnight 



1626 

Act Book for the Exempt Deanery ofPagham and Tarring 

WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13 
f 169v (21 October) 

Proceedings of the court held in the parish church of All Saints in the Pallant, 
Chichester, under the peculiar jurisdiction of Christ Church, Canterbury, before 
Francis Ringsted, LLB, surrogate judge 

"See the court day 1 1 March 1625 (ie, 1625/6), and Bible s detailed statement 
(made) at that time.t 

Gilbert Knight for the following reason, that is, (English). For not appearing he 
is pronounced contumacious. His penalty has been reserved until today. 
"Today the said Knight appeared in person and after the aforesaid article was 
charged against him he replied in the negative on the strength of an oath taken 
by him earlier. Therefore the lord (judge) dismissed him for this time with a 
warning (English). 



WEST THORNEY 

1620/1 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book 

f 118* (23 February) 



WSRO: Ep. 1/17/19 



Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before John 
Hullwood, cleric, surrogate judge, in the presence of Edward Osborne, notary public 

Clement Stiler and John Lang 

The churchwardens there were cited in person by John Butler, summoner, on 
the nineteenth day of February instant for the following reasons, (English). "Today 
the said Stiler and Lang appeared in person when they were called. The lord 
(judge) warned them to amend the aforementioned (faults) following, that is, 
(English), before the next feast of the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary and to 
certify (their compliance) about these matters on the next court day then follow 
ing. And as for the remaining part of the detection, the lord (judge) ordered them to 
show a true bill of detection of the aforementioned (faults) a fortnight from today." 



1621 

Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Book WSRO: Ep. 1/17/19 

f 152v* (19 May) 

Proceedings of the court held in the consistory of Chichester Cathedral before Francis 



252 



For the next 
(court day) 



TRANSLATIONS 

Ringsted, LLB, surrogate judge, in the presence of Richard Bragge, notary public 



For the next John Hargood was cited in person by the same (summoner) on the same day 
(court day) f or t ^ e f o ll ow j n g rea son, that is, (English). 



Thomasine Bonny was sought by the same (summoner) on the same day 
(English). 



He appeared Thomas Lang was cited in person by the same (summoner) on the same day 
He was (English). 

dismissed with 
a warning 

BATTLE ABBEY 

1346-7 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 139 

mb [2d] (Valuables and gifts) 

...In coin given to messengers (or grooms), entertainers, and men of the lord 
king, the queen, the prince, and other magnates, 4 lls 2d 



1350-1 

Treasurer s Account HL: BA 1 1 1 

mb [Id] (29 September-3 April) (Valuables and gifts) 

...Also for minstrel/s on St Martin s Day in winter and to John Wayne at 
Christmas, 6d.... 



1351-2 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 142 

mb [Id] (Valuables and gifts) 

...On gifts given to various minstrels and messengers (or grooms) at various 
times, likewise reckoned at 53s 3d 



1357-8 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 144 

mb [Id] (Valuables and gifts) 



...And given to Robert Pole (possibly to Robert (the) fool), 6s 8d. And to 



TRANSLATIONS 



various other minstrels this year, 18s.... And to servant/s (possibly minstrel/s) of 
the lord king and to messenger/s (orgroom/s), I6d.... 



1364-5 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 140 

mb [2d] (Valuables and gifts) 

. . .In gifts given to various minstrels this year both on the feasts of St Martin and 
beyond, 40s 



1365-6 

Abbots Accounts ESRO: AMS 4901 

m b [Id] (Valuables and gifts) 

...On gifts given to various minstrels both on the feasts of St Martin and 
beyond, (...). 



1381-2 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 146 

mb [3d] (Valuables and gifts) 

. . . And given to various minstrels of the lord king of England, the king of 
Navarre (?), the earl of Buckingham, the earl of Arundel, and various other 
lords from time to time this year, 4 18s 



1382-3 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 145 

mb [2d] (Valuables and gifts) 

...Also given to various entertainers by the hand of the lord (abbot), 13s 4d. 
Also by the hand of the steward, 4 Is 



1393-4 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/1251/1 

mb [Id] 

...In gifts given to various heralds, minstrels, and messengers (or grooms) this 
year, 9s 8d.... 



254 TRANSLATIONS 



c 1478-82 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/1878 

sheet [15]* (Gifts) 

. . .And to bearwards of Lord Stanley, 20d And to a certain entertainer on the 
feast of St Martin in winter, 8d. And to another entertainer after the same feast, 

8d And on a gift for entertainer/s of Winchelsea on Christmas, 3s 4d. And 

to a certain entertainer from the royal household at Christmas, 8d. And to 
puppet-players on the same feast, I6d. And to players on the fourth day of last 
January, 18d (and) given by agreement, 6d. And to [entertainer/s] players of the 
lord earl of Arundel on the eighteenth day of January, 5s. And to entertainer/s 
of the lord prince at Easter, 6s 8d. And to entertainer/s of the lord earl of 
Arundel at the same time, 6s 8d. And to entertainer/s of the lady queen at 
Pentecost, 6s 8d. And to two other entertainers at the same feast, 12d. And 
to two entertainers on the dedication day of the abbey church, 20d. And to 
entertainer/s of the lord duke of Gloucester at Barnhorn, 6s 8d. And to 
bearward/s of Lord Mautravers, 8d. And to entertainer/s of the lord king, 
6s 8d. 



1498-9 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/1874 

ff [1-lv]* (Rewards) 

...And on a reward to the play lord of Herstmonceux (or to Dom Joyce de 

Herstmonceux) I at Christmas time, 3s 4d And on a reward to clerks of 

St Nicholas in the town of Battle, 12d And on a reward to entertainers 

of the lord earl of Oxford, 2s 6d. And on a reward to entertainer/s of the 
lord cardinal of Canterbury, 3s 4d. And on a reward to entertainer/s of the 
lord earl of Arundel, 4s. And on a reward to players on three occasions this 
year, lls 8d 



1499-1500 

Abbots Accounts PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/861 

f [lv]* (Rewards) 

...And on a gift of the lord (abbot) for players of the earl of Oxford and 
other lords at Christmas, 23s 4d. And on a reward given to entertainers of 
the lord king and the duke of York, 10s.... And on gifts and rewards made 
to various performers and household servants of gentlemen, being busy 
about the aforesaid aforementioned business (?) at various times this year 



TRANSLATIONS 

as appears in detail according to the book of the steward of the guesthouse, 
32s 8d. 

1508-9 

Abbots Accounts HL: BA 272 

sheet [3] (8 December-29 September) (Gifts and rewards) 

...And on a reward for players on the feast of the Lord s Epiphany, 20d 
And on a reward given to entertainers of the lord king, 6s 8d And on a 
reward given to two entertainers of the lord earl of Arundel, 20d 



1513-14 

Seneschals Accounts HL: BA 275 

sheet [5]* (Gifts and rewards) 

...And on gifts and rewards of this kind given between the feast of Christmas 
and of the Annunciation of St Mary then next following, as appears in the 
said book, excepting the feast of the Lord s Circumcision, together with players 
and entertainers, 24s lid 



1520-1 

Chaplains Account HL: BA 278 

sheet [2] (25 March-25 March) (Gifts and rewards) 

...And on a reward for men from Cranbrook playing before the lord (abbot), 
3s 4d. And on a like reward for players from Tenterden, 3s 4d. And in a reward 
of this kind for players from Mailing, 3s 4d. And on a gift of the lord (abbot) 
to players from Maidstone, 3s 4d. And on a gift of the lord (abbot) to players 
from elsewhere on another occasion, 2s. And on a reward given to players of 
the lord earl of Arundel, 4s And on a reward for an entertainer of Master 
Poynings at the feast of the Purification of St Mary, I6d.... 



c 1522 

Seneschals Accounts HL: BA 277 

sheet [6] (Gifts and rewards) 

...And paid to various players before the lord (abbot) at various times, 16s 
lOd And in a reward for a bearward of the lord king, I6d. 



256 TRANSLATIONS 

ROBERTSBRIDGE ABBEY 

1416-17 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Ql 

sheet 4 (25 December-25 March) (Expenses) 

Also given to minstrel/s of Sir Roger Fiennes and to others coming 

with gifts 4s 



1417-18 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q2 

sheet 1* (25 March -24 June) (Expenses) 

(Spent) on one show with two candles bought 13d 



sheet 3v (29 September 25 December) 

Also given to the friars of Aylesford, minstrel/s, and others 



1424-5 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q3 

sheet 1 (23 April 24 June) (Expenses) 

Given to entertainers and various others 12d 



sheet 2 (24 June-29 September) 

Given to entertainers of the lord king and to Richard Kas 3s lOd 



1426-7 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q5 

sheet 2 (25 December-25 March) (Expenses) 

Given to Nicholas Hope, minstrel, from Etchingham, to 

William Russell, and to Kas 4s 2d 



TRANSLATIONS 

1435-6 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q4 

sheet 4* (17 April- 8 April) (Expenses) 

Given to Richard Ferour, to entertainers, and to various others 6s 



1437-8 

Bursars Accounts CKS: U1475 Q6 

sheet 4* (25 December- 1 3 April) (Expenses) 

Given to a certain harper and to Nicholas Hope 12d 

Given to players on two occasions 2s 3d 



APPENDIX 1 

1066 

Carmen de Hastings prcelio Koninklijke Bibliotheek van 

Belgie-Bibliotheque royale de Belgique: 10615-729 

f 229 col 2 (14 October) 

In the mean time, while the battle hung in the balance, on doubtful terms 

And the bitter plague of death threatened with its weapons, 

An entertainer, far too bold in the heart for which he won renown, 

Going before the duke s countless ranks, 

Exhorted the French with words and terrified the English. 

He sported with his sword, even throwing it up high. 

An Englishman noticed from afar that one man 

Out of so many thousands was sporting with his sword: 

Touched by a fervent heart suited to the host, 

He, with no regard for living, burst forth to go to die. 

The performer, called by the nickname Iron edge, 

Spurred on his horse to give chase (?). 

He transfixed the Englishman s shield with his sharp spear; 

When his body lay prostrate, he cut off his head with his sword. 

Turning his eyes to his comrades, he offered these joys, 

He showed (them) the start of the battle and his own mettle. 

All rejoiced (and) equally worshipped the Lord; 

They rejoiced at the blow because it stood out first among them. 

Both fear and fervour coursed through their manly hearts, 

And the men hastened together to join shields. 



258 TRANSLATIONS APPENDIX 1 



Geffrei Gaimar, L Estoire des Engleis 

Durham Dean and Chapter Library: Ms. C.iv.27 
f 129 col 2-f 129v col 1 

When the battle lines were drawn up 

And were ready to strike, 

There were many men on each side 

Who appeared to have the courage of leopards. 

One of the French then advanced, 

Rode in front of the others. I 

Taillifer was his name. 

He was quite a bold minstrel. 

He had weapons and a good horse. 

He was a bold and noble warrior. 

He set himself in front of the others. 

He performed wonders in front of the English. 

He took his lance by the butt, 

As if it were a truncheon. 

He threw it up high, 

And caught it by the tip. 

Three times did he throw his lance in this manner; 

The fourth time he approached very close, 

And hurled it among the English. 

He wounded one of them through the body, 

Then he drew his sword, retreated, 

Threw the sword he was holding 

High up, and caught it. 

It was sorcery, 

said one, who saw 

What he did before the army, to another. 

When he had thrown the sword three times, 

The horse, its mouth open, 

Went galloping towards the English. 

With its mouth so wide open, 

Some thought they would be eaten by the horse. 

The minstrel had taught him this. 

He struck an Englishman with his sword, 

Causing his hand to fly off immediately. 

Another of them he struck as hard as he could. 

A poor reward he had that day, 

For the English on all sides 

Hurled javelins and darts at him. 



TRANSLATIONS APPENDIX 1 

They killed him and his horse. 

It was to his cost that he asked to strike the first blow. 



APPENDIX 3 

1350 

Froissart s Chronicles Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana: Reg. lat. 869 

ff 150v-l (29 August) 

...The king of England, who was at sea with all his fleet, had already ordered 
all his provisions and planned how the battle would be carried out and had 
appointed Sir Robert of Namur master and captain of a ship named the Salle 
du Roi, on board which was all the king s household equipment; and the king 
of England stood on the deck of his ship, dressed in a black velvet jerkin and 
wore on his head a black beaverskin cap which greatly suited him, and he was 
then, according to what I was told by those who were with him, happier than 
he had ever been seen before. And he had his minstrels strike up a German 
dance for him which Sir John Chandos, who was there present, had recently 
brought back and, in addition, from excitement he made the said knight sing 
with his minstrels and took great pleasure in it. And at the same time he 
would look up because he had put a lookout in the crow s nest of his ship to 
announce the arrival of the Spanish. While the king was so enjoying himself 
and his knights were so glad to see him so happy, the lookout who saw the 
Spanish fleet approach sailing before the wind said: I see a ship approaching 
and I think it s a Spanish one. Then the minstrels stopped and all paid attention 
and asked if he saw more of them. Yes, he replied, I see two and then three 
and then four, and then he said: I see the fleet and they are approaching fast. 
Then the trumpets and bugles sounded I within the ships. It was a great joy to 
hear and then all the ships assembled beside the king of England and were placed 
in order, ready to go 



Endnotes 



3-4 WSRO: Ep. vi/1/4 f 188 

The edited text follows the WSRO manuscript version collated with Henry Spelman, Concilia, Decreta, 
Leges, Constitutwnes In Re Ecclesiarum Orbis Britannici (London, 1664), (5), 404. See Introduction, 
p Iv. 

9 WSRO: Ep. i/17/ll f 17v 

This summary is repeated on f 24v for a session held on 14 January 1603/4. 

10 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/9 f 164 

This citation first appears on f l63v where it is cancelled with the marginal note Vacat quia in folw 
sequent/. Although Rudgwick is cited marginally as the parish of origin of the perpetrator, it is probable 
that the offence occurred at Billingshurst as Booker is ordered to perform his penance there rather than 
in his home church. 

10-11 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/10 ff 100-1 OOv 

The entry on f lOOv charges a Billingshurst parishioner with revyleinge owr minister in the open streete 
pwut in billa. There may have been a feud between a group of parishioners and the minister, of which 
the dancing may have been a part. 

On Sendall (p 10, 1.40), see E.A. Fry (ed), Calendar of Wills in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of 
Chichester 1482-1800, Index Society, vol 49 (London, 1915), 322, where a will for a Richard Sendall 
of Billingshurst is dated 1636. 

1 1 WSRO: Ep. 1/23/2 f 2v 

The heading for this entry is missing. 

11-13 PRO: STAC 8/294/23 sheet 2 

The plaintiffs were Samuel Wilkinson, preacher, assistant to the vicar of Bolney, and John Langford, 
yeoman. The defendants were Benjamin Pellatt, knight, his wife Alice, their son Edward Pellatt, William 
Streater, John Lawrance, and Richard Mower. Wilkinson and Langford alleged that the defendants 
conspired to accuse them of theft and thus put Wilkinson in the stocks in his own house, with the aim 
of driving him and Langford from the area. Lawrance and Mower were also accused of falsely alleging 
that Wilkinson publicly mocked the court of the Star Chamber as part of their plan to force Wilkinson 
from his position. 



ENDNOTES 

Sir Benjamin was in fact lord of the manor of Bolney in the time of Elizabeth (see Horsfield, The 
History, Antiquities, and Topography of the County of Sussex, vol 1, p 250). Samuel Wilkinson is listed as 
a minister in 1606 in Edward Huth (ed), The Parish Registers of Bolney, Sussex, 1541-1811, SRS, vol 1 5 
(London, 1912), 24. William Mill (p 12, 1.38), in addition to being clerk of the Star Chamber, was at 
one time MP for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, Dorset, and a notorious moneylender (see Hasler, 
House of Commons 1558-1603, vol 3, p 57). 

13 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/9 f 157v 

Churchwarden lohannes ffreeland of Bosham is cited earlier in the session (f 157) for irregularities in 
his accounts. 

14 WSRO: Ep. in/4/1 f [55A] 

This folio is numbered 55A editorially because there are in fact two folio 55s. This one is numbered 
V in the MS. William Lane (1.11) was the curate of St Mary in Foro, becoming rector in 1498. He 
subsequently became rector of All Saints parish, resigning in 1515 (see WSRO: Ep in/4/1 9 f 52v; 
WSRO: Ep in/4/1 f 82v; Lambeth Palace Library: Reg Warham f 357). 



v; 



14 WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 ff 7-7v 

On Adams (1.26), see David Galloway and John Wasson (eds), Collections 1 1 , Malone Society (Oxford, 
1980/1), 1 10: hem sol M. Adamys the Kyngis Bere man xijd. (Thetford, 1520/1). 

The name brandon (1.27) probably refers to Thomas Brandon, the king s juggler, who also appears 
in the records of Prior More of Worcester (see David N. Klausner (ed), Herefordshire/Worcestershire, 
REED (Toronto, 1990), 472, 478, 484, 487, 491, 494, 499, 504, 508, 514, 518, and 526), Thetford 
and Ipswich (see Galloway and Wasson, Collections 1 1, pp 1 12, 1 13, and 182), Cambridge (see AJan 
H. Nelson (ed), Cambridge, vol 1, REED (Toronto, 1989), 106, 109, and 1 1 1), and Shrewsbury (see 
J. Alan B. Somerset (ed), Shropshire, vol 1, REED (Toronto, 1994), 178 and 193). 

15 WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/1 f 14 

It is not clear whether William More (1.7) was on his own (with Mimis being an error for the 
singular), or was accompanied by a group of the king s players, or was a town officer being reim 
bursed for paying entertainers. The small amount of the reward might indicate that he was indeed 
on his own. It is likely, as well, that the payment was made to William More, the king s blind 
harper (thus once again indicating the broad application of the term mimus in documents of this 
period). More is also rewarded in the accounts of Prior More of Worcester in 1520 (see David N. 
Klausner (ed), Herefordshire/ Worcestershire, REED (Toronto, 1990), 466) and appears in the Shrewsbury 
corporation records of the same year as histrionem domini Reg/V while being rewarded eo quod 
est cecus & principalis citherator Anglic (see J. Alan B. Somerset (ed), Shropshire, vol 1, REED 
(Toronto, 1994), 177). The possibility that More was a town officer is supported by a payment to 
a magistri more on f 7v for the previous year. However, this may not be the same man as in the 
f I4v record. 

17 WSRO: Cap. i/23/l f 71v 

This entry is undated within the 1532-3 Michaelmas to Michaelmas accounts. It is listed by itself 

under rewards, after expenses for building materials, and before quit-rents. 



262 ENDNOTES 

17 WSRO: Cap. 1/23/1 f 83v 

This entry is undated within the 1534-5 Michaelmas to Michaelmas accounts and comes at the end 

of the yearly accounts in a list of various rewards to individuals. 

17 WSRO: Cap. i/23/l f 97 

As the marginal note would lead one to expect, most of the surrounding entries are expenses for repairing 
and washing the church building. There is no apparent reason for including the payment to the king s 
minstrels here, unless they were asked to entertain labourers. The entry is not dated within the 1536-7 
Michaelmas to Michaelmas accounts. 

18 WSRO: Chichester City Archives AE/2 mb 4 

Mr Molens (1.7) could have been William Molens, a member of the Guild Merchant, who died in 
1552 (will recorded in WSRO: STC 1/8 f 26). Other members of the Molens family at the time were 
John, who died in 1545 (will recorded in WSRO: STC 1/5 f 65), and Richard, who died in 1563 (will 
recorded in WSRO: STD i/2 f 53). See E.A. Fry (ed), Calendar of Wills and Administrations in the 
Peculiar Court of the Dean of Chichester 1577-1800, British Record Society, vol 64 (London, 1940), 
255 (for Richard Molens); and his Chichester Wills 1482-1800, British Record Society Index Library, 
vol 49 (London, 1915), 257 (for William and John). 

The meaning of le hape (1.7) is unknown; possibly it refers to a local landmark or establishment, 
such as an inn. 

18 WSRO: Ep. j/17/6 f 79v 

The court heading for this entry is on f 78 and indicates a sitting on 25 February. However, the entry 
itself indicates that the court did not hear Weston s testimony until 4 March. 

A Henry Weston is listed as the parson of East Wittering in E.A. Fry (ed), Calendar of Wills in the 
Consistory Court of the Bishop of Chichester 1482-1800, Index Society, vol 49 (London, 1915), 395, 
where his will is dated 1599. 

19 WSRO: Ep. in/4/5 f 137v 

This case is also written up in WSRO: Ep. i/ 17/10 f 13. 

21-2 WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13 fT 36, 41 

Page (p 21, 1.27) was summoned to appear in connection with this offence seven more times. See 
ff38v, 40, 42v, 45, 46v, 47, and 48. Huggens (p 22, 1.1) is cited again on f 43v (5 July). Selden 
(p 22, 1.4) is also cited on f 43v and dismissed on 19 July (f 45). 

22-4 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/17 ff 107v-8 

John Joye (p 22, 1. 17} may be the same person referred to in E.A. Fry (ed), Calendar of Wills in the 

Consistory Court of the Bishop of Chichester 1482-1800, Index Society, vol 49 (London, 1915), 205, 

whose will is dated 1627. A John Joy from Woolavington also appears in a list in R. Garraway Rice 

(ed), West Sussex Protestation Returns 1641-2, SRS, vol 5 (Lewes, 1906), 200, dated 16 February 

1641/2. 

24 WSRO: Ep. 1/23/8 f 26v 

As this comes from a register of presentments, not a record of proceedings, specific dates are not given. 



ENDNOTES 

25 WSRO: Ep. u/9/2 f 38v 

This case is also recorded on f 38 under the location of Salehurst but it is crossed out. Presumably the 
recorder at first made the entry under the wrong location, then cancelled his mistake and entered it under 
Folkington, the correct location. 
On f 41 (29 November) Brycher (Bridget) is reported not to have appeared and was excommunicated. 

25-6 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/22 f 2l4v 

St Matthias Day in 1628 (a leap year) was on 25 February rather than 24 February (see C.R. Cheney, 
Handbook of Dates for Students of English History, corrected ed (London, 1996), 75). The magistrum 
Horseman referred to here (p 26, 11.6-7) is either a court officer or the incumbent of the parish. 
On f 217v (9 July) it is reported that Langrish appeared, denied the detection, and was dismissed. 

26 ESRO: RYE 57/4 f 138v 

In the Cinque Ports and other Kentish towns horn blowing was apparently the ceremonial method of 
summoning the commonalty to the annual assembly and other common assemblies, as there are many 
records of the practice from Kent (see James M. Gibson s edition for Kent: Diocese of Canterbury, 
forthcoming in the REED series). Usually the musician is the wait or the town Serjeant. There is a 
problem in the translation of the text with the word encwru (1.27), which seems to refer to the word 
ior, but it makes no sense if it does. Presumably the contingency is in case of the bailiffs death during 
the year of his term. 

26-7 BL: Egerton MS 2093 f 80v 

This order, issued in the midst of Henry van s divorce proceedings, would have affected the head ports 
of Dover, Hastings, Hythe, New Romney, and Sandwich, as well as the ancient towns of Rye and 
Winchelsea. It would also probably have affected Rye and Winchelsea s corporate member Tenterden, 
in Kent, as well as Hastings corporate members Pevensey and Seaford. It is more difficult to establish 
which non-corporate members of Hastings would have been affected, ie, those places which were under 
the jurisdiction of a Cinque Port but usually without any formal agreement. We do know that by the 
fourteenth century ships and/or men were also being provided by Bekesbourne (Kent), Bulverhythe, 
Grange (Kent), Hydneye, Little Heigham (or Petit Iham), and Northeye (see VCH: Sussex, vol 9, p 36). 
Hydneye and Northeye were both small towns in the Pevensey Levels which are now deserted (see Leslie 
and Short, Historical Atlas of Sussex, p 49). 

Sir Edward Guildford (p 26, 1.38) was a close associate of the king and held the lord wardenship 
from 1521 until his death in 1534 (Bindoff, House of Commons 1509-1558, vol 2, pp 262-3). 

28 STC: 4140.8 sig D3 

Wing: B6161 reads A see in Sussex for Ason in Sussex. Both texts appear to be corrupt but the later 
one (Wing: B6161) seems to indicate that the name of a town is not being referred to here but merely 
the fact that Hellingly is about five miles from the sea. 

29-30 WSRO: Ep. r/17/8 f 3l6v 

It is not specified exactly where the offence took place. The accused are from Rudgwick and Shipley, 
parishes near Itchingfield. Booker does say that he attended church services in Itchingfield and the 
fact that the perpetrators are all presented at Itchingfield even though they were canonically resident 
elsewhere also suggests the offence took place here. Literally the MS does read quod now cowstat that 



264 ENDNOTES 

he daunsyd not at all nor hoopyd nor halloyd (p 30, 11.1 1-12). However, the sense seems to indicate 
that the double negative is not meant to be a positive but rather an emphatic negative. Thus the 
meaning seems to be either, it was agreed that he danced not at all nor did he whoop and holler, or 
it was not agreed that he did dance at all or whoop and holler. 

30 ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /I a f lv 

The accounting year of the St Andrew s and St Michael s Churchwardens Accounts cannot be precisely 
determined. The accounts are not continuous, being interspersed with various memoranda and rating 
lists, and some of the memoranda which name the outgoing and newly elected churchwardens and 
the date on which the accounts were rendered have not been recorded or do not survive. Until 1536 
the accounts were rendered in December or January but from 1536 onward the final reckonings (when 
precise dates are given) occurred in March, May, June, July, September, October, and December 
variously. 

30 ESRO: PAR4l4/9/l/la f 19 

There is no heading for these accounts but they are likely the expenses of churchwardens Flessher and 
Cayme, who surrendered their accounts and their offices in 1 529 (f 22v). There is a possibility, however, 
that they belong to the accounts of Parker and Culpepper, for whom there is no memo of final reckoning 
in the MS. Possibly some leaves of the MS have been lost (at least one year of accounts is not present); 
another (f 15b, which bears the date 28 February 1546/7 and names the four wardens of the newly 
amalgamated parish of Saynct Mychellw and Saynct Androwes ) has evidently been misbound. 

31 ESRO: PAR4l4/9/l/la f 25 

A heading on f 22v notes the changeover of churchwardens in 21 Henry vin (22 April 1529-21 April 
1530) and specifically in the yere offower lorde M ccccc xxviiijth but no day or month is given within 
the year. 

31 ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /I a ff 34v, 36 

These accounts are dated 1 531-2 by H. Michell Whitley, The Churchwardens Accounts of St. Andrew s 
and St. Michael s, Lewes, from 1522 to 1601, SAC 45 (1902), 45. However, there is no indication 
of this date in the MS although the page heading indicates that this is in a list of receipts by the 
churchwardens John Batnar and Richard Loke. Memoranda dated 18 June 1533 and 18 January 1533/4 
appear on ff37-7v and refer to Batnar and Loke as churchwardens. 

At this point it does appear that the churchwardens were serving two-year terms and entering their 
receipts and expenses for die whole term in one list beginning with biennial receipts followed by biennial 
expenses. For the purpose of clarity these receipts and expenses have been separated and transcribed 
under the appropriate year headings. 

31 ESRO: PAR 414/9/1/la ff 34v, 37v 

In the actual account the receipts and expenses for the year 1533-4 are listed together with those of 
15323. For the purpose of clarity the entries have been transcribed here under individual year headings. 

32 ESRO: PAR 41 4/9/1/1 a ff 40, 4lv 

In the actual account the receipts and expenses for the year 1534-5 are listed along with those of 
1 535-6. For the purpose of clarity the entries have been transcribed here under individual year headings. 



ENDNOTES 

32 ESRO-. PAR 4 14/9/1 /la ff40,4lv 

In the actual account the receipts and expenses for the year 1535-6 are listed along with those of 
1534-5. For the purpose of clarity the entries have been transcribed here under individual year 
headings. Because these accounts were rendered in June 1536 and the previous ones were rendered 
18 January 1533/4, it is assumed that the three Hock money receipts on f 40 are for each of the 
three Hocktides between those dates, in 1534, 1535, and 1536. Thus we have two Hock money 
receipts under 1535-6. 

32-3 ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /I a flf 43, 44v 

The new churchwardens took over on 3 June 1 536 but there is no indication of when these accounts 
were rendered. The receipts and expenses for the two years were written up as one account but the years 
of the accounts are identified by subheadings indicating the first or second year of the churchwardens 
term. For the purpose of clarity the 1536-7 and 1537-8 entries are here transcribed under individual 
year headings. The receipt from Motley s and Payne s wives (p 33, 1.2) on f 44v is assumed to be for 
Hock money for 1537 and the more explicit receipt for Hock money on the same folio to be that for 
1538. As Morley and Payne were the churchwardens in the preceding term (1534-6) there is reason 
to believe that their wives would have taken charge of the Hocking tasks (see Sally-Beth MacLean, 
Hocktide: A Reassessment of a Popular Pre-Reformation Festival, Festive Drama, Meg Twycross (ed) 
(Cambridge, 1996), 236). See also p 33, 1.27. 

33 ESRO: PAR 41 4/9/1 /la ff 43v, 44v 

In the actual account the receipts for the year 1537-8 are listed along with those for 1536-7 and are 
identified by an account subheading as second year receipts. The expenses for the second year of the 
churchwardens term are similarly listed. For the purpose of clarity the 1536-7 and 1537-8 entries are 
here transcribed under individual year headings. The new churchwardens began their two-year term on 
3 June 1536 but there is no indication of when these accounts were rendered. 

33 ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /I a f 47v 

Thomas Pokell (1.27) was one of the churchwardens in the preceding term (1536-8). See first endnoce 

to ESRO: PAR 414/9/1/la fT43, 44v. 

33 ESRO: LEW/C 1/1 f 5 

For the olde booke (1.39), see Introduction, p Ixv. The constables in 1551-2 were (as named in the MS) 
John Cottmott the elder and Thomas Gefferye. 

34 ESRO: LEW/C 1/1 f 8 

The constables for this year were Thomas Gefferye and John Colte. 

34 ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /I a f 80v 

The Vysetourw (1.22) were those of the queen (Elizabeth i acceded in 1558), who appointed two 
individuals at Lewes to levy & gather all arrerag & profytes growyng to ye person yerely (f 77). These 
visitors appear to have been among those commissioners who in August to October 1 559 were sent out 
to all parishes to enforce the Acts of Supremacy and Uniformity. It is not clear whether the playes 
referred to were dramatic performances or legal pleas. 



266 ENDNOTES 

34-6 ESRO: RYE47/47/5a ff [1-2] 

In 1593 Caen (p 34, 1.40) was the Huguenot capital of Normandy, held in the name of Henry of 
Navarre. Henry abjured his Protestant faith the same year. In spite of the implication of tension between 
Caen and England in the depositions, Elizabeth did in fact support the Protestants of Normandy. 

36 WSRO: Ep. 1/23/7 f 27 

In this register of presentments there are no headings. The date of this presentment is not specified but 
the previous entry is dated 1 1 February 1586/7. In WSRO: Ep. 1/23/5 f I4v, under the heading for 
Aldingbourne (a nearby village), a woman is cited for having an illegitimate child by one pannell a 
minstrell. For a possible identification of Pannell see E.A. Fry (ed), Calendar of Wills in the Consistory 
Court of the Bishop ofChichester 1482-1800, Index Society, vol 49 (London, 1915), 273. 

36-8 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/12 ff 134, 139v, 140 

The case concerning Gray is followed by another one concerning four other individuals for playing 
Cules and a fifth for watching, all of whom are dealt with as Gray is. They are the rest referred to on 
p 37, 1.12. It is not clear whether Anna Coolde is included. 

On ff 139v-40 there are, in addition to the citations transcribed here, several entries for individuals 
accused of missing service on 6 September but not explicitly cited for dancing. Two men are also cited 
for playing kayles on the same day. The citations of Ralph Smyth, William Peachey, and Lambert Peachey 
are repeated on f I4lv (7 November) where the fines laid against John Marten, Anna Gouldsmyth, and 
Katherine Miles are also entered. 

38 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/12 f 166 

This entry was also made on f 161 under 6 February but cancelled there with the marginal note Vacat 
quia sequitur xx instant; * ffcbruarij. Although the intervening acta paragraph on f 164 indicates that 
the charge was entered in preparation for the 20 February sitting, the entry makes it clear that Wakeford 
appeared not before the court held in the consistory ofChichester Cathedral but rather in the home of 
the judge the following day. A brief citation is given on f 159 as well as on f I67v. 

39 WSRO: Ep. iv/2/14 f 78v 

John Ingram of Pagham appears in a list in R. Garraway Rice (ed), West Sussex Protestation Returns 
1641-2, SRS, vol 5 (Lewes, 1906), 133, dated 16 February 1641/2. 

40-1 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8 ff 1 1 5v, 1 22v, 1 34v 

Wakeford (p 40, 1.26) was first summoned before the consistory ofChichester Cathedral on 23 June 
(f 111). Woodes (p4l, 1.1) failed to appear on 20 October (f 124). Goodyer (p 41, 1.12) failed to 
appear on 1 December (f 135). The Vt supra (p 41, 1.12) refers to the previous entry, in which the 
accused failed to appear, was pronounced contumacious, and had punishment reserved to the next 
court day. 

41 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/8 f 252v 

Although the charge against John Currys may have been entered for the 29 March session, the entry 

makes it clear that Currys did not actually appear until 1 April. 

46 ESRO: RYE 60/2 ff 48v, 49 

This and the following accounts have some problems of dating owing to the proximity of the election 



ENDNOTES 

of the mayor on the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day (24 August) and the end of the regnal year of 
Henry vi on 31 August. In this year the heading for the accounts on f 45 notes that the mayor was 
elected on the Sunday after St Bartholomew in 34 Henry vi. However, the expenses, which begin on 
f 48, are said to run from St Bartholomews Day 33 Henry vi to the same day in 34 Henry vi. The error 
appears to be the date on f 45, caused by the fact that the scribe apparently forgot that although election 
day was 31 August, that date was still in 33 Henry vi. 

46-7 ESRO: RYE 60/2 ff 54v, 55 

The heading for the years accounts on f 51 says that the mayor was elected on the Sunday after St 
Bartholomew s Day, 35 Henry vi, and f 53 says the first expenses for the year start on St Bartholomew s 
Day, 35 Henry vi. However, both these headings appear to be mistakes similar to that on f 48v (see 
pp 266-7, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/2 ff48v, 49). The accounts actually are for 34-5 Henry vi, having 
begun on 29 August 1456, before 35 Henry vi commenced on 1 September. 

47 ESRO: RYE 60/2 ff 60, 61v 

The heading for the year s accounts on f 56 says they are for the year following the Sunday after St 
Bartholomews Day, 36 Henry vi. However, this is likely to be an error for 35 Henry vi as the accounts 
for all of the rest of the year are headed 36 Henry vi as well. In fact the accounts began in the last days 
of 35 Henry vi (on 28 August 1457). 

There are also some problems with the method of dating the quarterly expenses. The first block 
of expenses is on f 58 and is said to be for Christmas term, 36 Henry vi (apparently no expenses 
were recorded for the first term). Then follow blocks of expenses for the terms of Easter and of St 
John. A larger block of expenses follows on ff 58v-60 but these are not broken down by quarterly 
terms. It is possible that these headings all refer to expenses incurred in terms ending with the speci 
fied date. 

The expenses on f 61 v are under a general heading of payments for the St Bartholomew term, 
36 Henry vi. This appears to be an example of a fifth quarter, wherein the accounts for the previous 
year were balanced between 24 August and 27 August 1458, or a final reckoning of accounts was 
done in the same period to clear the books before the commencement of the new mayoral year. 

47 ESRO: RYE 60/2 f 66 

The accounts for this year are dated on f 62 as beginning the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day, 
36 Henry vi. Contrary to some of the headings for the previous years, this appears to be correct 
and the accounts of this year are for 1458-9, with 37 Henry vi beginning on 1 September 1458. 
On f 69 (from which no excerpts have been taken) another set of fifth quarter payments is entered. 

47 ESRO: RYE 60/2 f 79 

These entries come as a block of payments at the foot of the page. They appear to be undated mis 
cellaneous entries, 

48 ESRO: RYE 60/2 f 84v 

The heading of f 81 dates the beginning of this year as Sunday, 31 August, 39 Henry vi. Technically 
31 August 1460 was still 38 Henry vi although 39 Henry vi began the following day. 

Thomas Kynge (1.6) is listed as a deputy in the delegations from Rye to the Brotherhoods in 1454, 
1455, 1456, and 1457 in Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, pp 32-4, 36-8. 



268 ENDNOTES 

52 ESRO: RYE 60/3 ff 13v, I4v 

The set of accounts excerpted from f 13v is headed 3 September, which is in fact the second Sunday 
after St Bartholomew s Day. Accounts in this period normally began on the first Sunday after St 
Bartholomew. Regarding the entries from f I4v, there is no heading for the entries for Christmas term 
but the block of expenses begins with In primus and the usual payments at the opening of the box 
are included. The block from which the first excerpt comes begins with a payment on Christmas Eve; 
[the said mowthj (1.23) is not specified but is presumably January since (as the second excerpt shows) 
the next block is for February. 

53 ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 22 

John Adam (1.18) is listed in Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 62, as a member of the Rye 
delegation to a Brotherhood in January 1470/1. 

54-5 ESRO: RYE 60/3 ff 30v, 31 v 

The payment on f 30v to the town minstrels (p 54, 1.35) was made on 6 April, at the opening of the 

box, the Sunday after the beginning of the Easter term. 

The chirche haliday (p 55, 1.8) is probably the dedication day of the church. See Theodor Erbe (ed), 
Mirk s Festial: A Collection of Homilies, by Johannes Mirkus (John Mirk), Early English Text Society, 
no 96 (London, 1905), 277, and p 271, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/4 ffl51, 154. See also p 77, 1.3. 

The payment to Northumberland s minstrels (p 55, 1.1 1) was made between 8 June and 22 June. 

55 ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 41 v 

This entry is an instance of a fifth quarter payment. 

56 ESRO: RYE 60/3 ff 46, 46v, 47, 48 

This set of expenses runs from the date of the election of the chamberlains, a week after the election 
of the mayor. 

56 ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 54v 

There is a slight discrepancy in the dating of the first quarter expenses. The heading dates the beginning 
of the term from the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day, 27 August. However, in 1485 the said Sunday 
was 28 August. 

58 ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 61 

Drynker (11.4, 8) may be the John Drynker listed as a member of the Rye delegation at a Brotherhood 
in April 1480 in Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 80. 

59 ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 68v 

The village of Appledore (1.8) is about five miles northeast of Rye in Kent. Thus the banns referred to 
here would have been advertisement to attract patrons from Rye. The expenses for the king s visit in 
August 1488 are recorded on f 70 but no payments for entertainment are included, unless the payments 
for the queen s minstrels were part of the visit. 

60 ESRO: RYE 60/3 ff 75, 76v 

On drikarw (1.4), see above, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 61. 

The payment on f 76v is not dated in the MS. However, this is the last in the block of quarterly 



ENDNOTES 

payments and the second payment in the block is dated 30 July, so we can assume it probably was 
made in August. 

60-1 ESRO: RYE 60/3 ff 80v, 81, 81v, 82 

The first payment extracted here from f 80v is probably from the period 12-24 December as the first 
payment in the block is dated the Saturday after the Conception of the Virgin, 12 December. The 
other two extracts on f 80v come in the first block of Christmas term expenses but precede payments 
for the Brotherhood at New Romney on 1 2 January, so they probably were made in the period between 
25 December and 1 2 January. The payments on f 81 come after the set of Brotherhood expenses and 
before a payment in the week before Candlemas (ie, 24-30 January), so they probably were made in 
the period 12-30 January. The payment on f 81 v is entered just after the payments at the opening of 
the box at Easter, so ic probably should be dated at Easter or the Sunday after (11 or 18 April). The 
entries on f 82 are part of a block where the first entry is dated 30 April. 

62 ESRO-. RYE 60/3 ff 88v, 89v, 91v 

Surrounding MS entries may provide a clue to the date of the f 88v entry. The preceding block of entries 
refers to a royal proclamation announcing peace with the king of the Romans and the king and queen 
of Spain. This proclamation is listed in Hughes and Larkin, Tudor Royal Proclamations, vol 1 , p 24, and 
dated 17 September 1490. The block of entries (on f 89) following the one extracted here refers 
to another proclamation, this one forbidding the purchase of goods plundered from allies. This 
proclamation is listed in Hughes and Larkin, Tudor Royal Proclamations, vol 1, p 25, and dated 17 
November 1490. The excerpts from f 89v precede an entry at the top of f 90 dated 8 February 1490/1 . 
The first payment in the block from which the entries from f 91 v are excerpted is dated the week after 
Corpus Christi, ie, 5 11 June 1491. 
On Drynker (1.9), see p 268, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 61. 

63 ESRO: RYE 60/3 f lOOv 

These excerpts follow an entry dated 10 January 1491/2 and precede another one dated 20 March 
1491/2. Bukk (1.6) may be the Laurens Buk listed as a Rye delegate to a Brotherhood in January 1491/2 
in Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, pill. 

63 ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 108v 

This excerpt is the last payment of the first quarter and therefore probably was made close to Christmas. 

64 ESRO: RYE 60/4 fF 8,9, llv 

The f 8 payment follows wages for the opening of the box at Easter (30 March) and thus was probably 
made at about that time. The f 9 payment is surrounded by other expenses at Hocktide, the second 
Monday and Tuesday after Easter. As Croche died in office his expenses on f 1 1 v were put in one list 
with no specific dates. 

65 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 16v, 17v, 21v 

The first excerpt seems to have been an added entry after the rest of the block entries had already been 
written. The f 17v entry is the last of a block of payments. The subsequent block begins with a payment 
dated 24 February. Folios 19 and 20 are missing from the MS. 
On Drynker (1.6), see p 268, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/3 f 61. 



270 ENDNOTES 

67 ESRO: RYE 60/4 f 34 

This payment comes almost at the end of the payments for Midsummer term, so it was probably made 

shortly before 24 August. 

67 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 41,42 

The f 41 entry is part of a block of payments assigned to the first quarter. However, the block contains 
payments relating to the writ for parliament, dated 7 and 12 January 1496/7. Clearly not all payments 
in the block were made before Christmas. The f 42 payment occurs in a block of expenses incurred at 
Winchelsea, at a Cinque Ports meeting to apportion a tax, which was probably the one voted by 
parliament sitting on 16 January- 13 March 1496/7. 

67-8 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 50v, 51, 53, 56, 56v 

The entries on ff 50v-l are a series of payments don at the opening of the box at Christmas 1497. 
According to a marginal note on f 50v these expenses should be on f 53. On ff 52-3 there is a 
series of expenses by the chamberlains for the first two quarters of the 1497-8 accounting year. 
The payments on f 53 precede expenses incurred for entertaining dignitaries on St Gregory s Day, 
12 March. The payment on f 56 occurs in a block after another block on f 55v referring to expenses 
for a Brotherhood on St Margaret s Day, 20 July. The first excerpt on f 56v comes in the last block of 
payments for Midsummer term. The second excerpt is a fifth quarter payment, incurred between 
24 and 26 August. However, it appears to be a separate expense from the one entered on f 65 (the 
amounts being different) although they both were presumably made during the same visit of the 
prince s minstrels. 

68-9 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 65, 67, 68v, 69v 

The payment on f 65 is the third registered after the beginning of the new account year on 26 August. 
It is probably a distinct payment from the one on f 56v in 1497-8 but also probably was made during 
the same visit in late August. The payments on f 67 precede expenses of Mr Ponynges and others in 
Lent, which was 13 February-30 March in 1499. The f 68v payments come from a block of expenses 
for die Brotherhood widi other expenses and so may or may not all be Brodierhood related. According 
to Hull, Calendar of the White and Block Books, p 123, the Brotherhood took place on 9 April 1499 in 
New Romney. On f 69v the marginal note Sharpe at the left of the entries appears to be some sort of 
endorsement by John Sharpe, one of the chamberlains in 1498-9. 

69 ESRO: RYE 60/4 f 87v 

These expenses were incurred on my lord of Southfolke when he went to calis. The earl of Suffolk 
(Edmund de la Pole) attended the king at his meeting with Archduke Philip at Calais in June 1500. 

70 ESRO: RYE 60/4 f 108 

This payment comes after the opening of the box on St Bartholomew s Day, during the period 24-9 
August, another fifth quarter payment. 

70 ESRO: RYE 60/4 f 117 

The first quarter appears to have been extended to after 6 January as the payments in the MS include 

one for a watch on Twelfth Eve and Night (5-6 January). 



ENDNOTES 

71 ESRO: RYE 60/4 f I40v 

This payment is also part of a series of fifth quarter expenses. 

71-2 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 151, 154 

The extracts from f 151 appear to refer to payments in September and October. The second entry after 
the first two extracts is dated afore myhelmasse (29 September) with the other two extracts immediately 
following. The dedicac/on day (p 72, 1.19) referred to on f 154 is presumably that of the parish church. 
However, the likely dates for a church dedicated to the Virgin Mary are 25 March (Annunciation), 
15 August (Assumption), and 8 September (Nativity), and this entry appears to be from the month of 
June as the following entry is dated in that month. Salutation Day (25 June) would put the date beyond 
the end of the term. Ronald Hutton claims that dedication feasts were in practice not held on the 
actual date of dedication but usually in the summer or early autumn. See The Rise and Fall of Merry 
England, p 46. See also church holiday on p 55, 1.8 and p 77, 1.3. 

72-3 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff I67v, I69v 

The first two excerpts on f 167v are preceded by a payment on Christmas Day. On dedicaoon day 

(p 73, 1.7), see above, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 1 51 , 1 54. 

73-4 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 181, 181 v, 182, 185 

There is a slight discrepancy about the beginning of the term for f 181. On f 173 the civic year is said 
to begin on the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day, 31 August. However, the heading for this account 
is dated from St Bartholomew s Day itself. The payment immediately preceding these excerpts is dated 
Michaelmas. The entry before the first excerpt on f 182 is dated 20 January but the last payment is dated 
Michaelmas. Obviously the entries are not in strict chronological order. The extracts on f 185 precede 
payments made on 20 July. Also the opening of the box seems to have taken place well after Christmas. 

On laurence Stephens (p 73, 1.31), a Laurence Stephyn is listed as a Rye delegate to Brotherhoods 
in April 1504 and April 1509 in Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, pp 131, 142. 

74-5 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 195v, 197v, 200, 201v 

On f 189 the heading says the civic year began on the Sunday after St Bartholomews Day, 30 August. 
However, the heading on f 195 dates expenses from St Bartholomew s Day itself. The accounts for this 
term may not be in strict chronological order. The payments on f 200 were probably made in June since 
they are in the last block of the Easter term. The entry concerning the dykers (p 75, 1.32), or ditch 
diggers, on f 201 v is included here because one of the workers is called a bearward. There is no direct 
evidence that he performed in Rye. 

At least three men might be Mr Lewkenor (p 75, 1.6). Edward, JP for Sussex in 1505 and 1509, Roger 
the elder ofTangmere (d. 1509), and Sir Roger (d. 1543), son of Sir Thomas Lewkenor ofTrotton. Two 
other Edwards, both from Kingston Bowcy, one dead in 1522, the other in 1528, might also qualify as 
Mr Lewkenor but they have left fewer traces than the others (see Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry u, vol 2 
(London, 1916; rpt 1970), 662-3; J. Challenor C. Smith (comp), Index of Wills Proved in the Prerogative 
Court of Canterbury, vol 2, The Index Library (London, 1895; rpt 1968), 335; VCH: Sussex, vol 7, p 81). 

76-7 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 210, 212, 214, 215v, 216 

The heading on f 210 says the expenses run from St Bartholomew s Day but the one on f 204 says that 

the civic year begins on the following Sunday, 29 August. 



ENDNOTES 

The supper for the messenger recorded on f 212 is related to plans for an important wedding. In an 
attempt to forge an alliance with the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian i, Henry vii betrothed his 
daughter Mary to Charles, Maximilian s grandson and heir to the Spanish and Hapsburg dominions. 
The treaty for the marriage of Charles of Castille and Princess Mary was concluded on 21 December 
1507. The contract was revoked by Mary s brother, Henry vin, in 1514, when he quarrelled with 
Maximilian and married Mary to Louis xn of France. As Louis widow she is referred to in the 
chamberlains accounts for 1520-1 as the frenche quenys (see p 92, 1.20). 

The payment immediately after the one to the bearward on f 214 is dated 7 May. The chuche 
holyday (p 77, 1.3) is probably the dedication day of the church (see p 271, endnote to ESRO: RYE 
60/4 ff 151, 154). As might be expected, the Strand (p 77, 1.11) referred to on f 216 is located at 
the harbour. Sword playing and sword dancing are forms of martial display related to folk drama and 
morris dancing. This performance may refer to some sort of dance over unsheathed swords or it may 
have been only a display of martial dexterity exhibiting prowess at manipulating and juggling swords. 
See Chambers, Mediaeval Stage, vol 1, pp 182-204, and John Forrest, The History of Morris Dancing, 
1458-1750, Studies in Early English Drama 5 (Toronto, 1999), 21, 74-7, 94, 104, 208-9. 

77-8 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 228, 233v 

The heading on f 220 dates the civic year from the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day, 27 August. 
The one on f 228 dates the expenses from the period between St Bartholomew s Day and Christmas. 
The civic year of 1509-10 did not commence until Sunday, 26 August. The payment on f 233v is a 
fifth quarter entry. 

80-1 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 260v, 264v 

Although the payments on f 260v appear to relate to Christmas season entertainment, the actual 
Christmas term expenses do not start until f 261. Visitations by a Robin Hood figure developed from 
those of earlier May kings or summer lords. The main character apparently went about the town in a 
procession raising money for the church by selling badges. See David Wiles, The Early Plays of Robin 
Hood (Cambridge, 1981), 8-12; also Alexandra F. Johnston, "What Revels Are in Hand?" Dramatic 
Activities Sponsored by the Parishes of die Thames Valley, English Parish Drama, Alexandra F. Johnston 
and Wim Huskin (eds) (Amsterdam and Atlanta, 1966), 95-7. 

The expression Churchmassday (p 80, 1.17, p 81, 1.5) is problematic. The phrase Mass-Day is 
glossed by the OED as a feast-day but there are no citations with Church. Forms of Churchmassday 
also appear in the Rye records of 1526-7 and 1533-4 (see p 98, 1.10 and p 103, 1.15). It is clear 
that this cannot be a specific date as the first instance in the 1510-1 1 record is in the period 25 
August-25 December 1510 and the second in 24 June-24 August 1511, while that of 1 526-7 is 
dated 21 April-24 June, and that of 1533-4, 25 March-24 June. 

83-4 ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 316, 318v, 323 

The Easter payment to the waits on f 316 was entered in the Christmas term well before the opening or 
the box at Easter (which is on f 317), so it may have been an advance. The entry concerning the pursuiv 
ant on f 318v is included here to explain the sum total of expenses spent on him and on the minstrels. 
They may have been offered hospitality together. The payment on f 323 is part of a series of fifth 
quarter expenses. 

85 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff llv, 12v, 13 

The payment to the minstrels of the earl of Oxford on f 1 Iv closely follows one for the proclamation 



273 

ENDNOTES 

of the peace treaty with France. Hughes and Larlcin, Tudor Royal Proclamations (vol 1, p 126) date this 
proclamation 16 April 1515- The payments on f 12v directly follow one dated 1 1 August. Those on 
f 13 are part of a series of fifth quarter expenses. 

86 ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 24v 

The heading states that this account goes to Michaelmas but this appears to be an error as it actually 

goes to St Bartholomew s Day. 

87-9 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 34, 34v, 37v, 41 

On \iwence and \aurence Stephen (p 87, 11.14, 21), see p 271, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 181, 
181v, 182, 185. The marginale MS (p 88, 1.13) apparently indicates the endorsement of Mayor 
Nicholas Sutton. The payments on f 41 are part of a series of fifth quarter expenses. 

90 ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 67 

The foot pleys (1.12) were probably dances. There are also payments for thre foot pleys in 1519-20 
(see p 91, 1.21). Chamberlains accounts for Lydd, Kent, record visits by foot players in 1525-6 and 
1529-30: Itmi payde to the foote players of Essex ij tymes at grenewaies house xv d. and hvm payde 
to ij Companyes of foote players at ij tymes xv d. (see Lydd Town Archives: Ly/FAc2 pp 109, 150; 
cited with permission from the materials deposited at the REED office by James M. Gibson, editor of 
the forthcoming collection of Kent: Diocese of Canterbury in the REED series). Suzanne R. Westfall, 
Patrons and Performance: Early Tudor Household Revels (Oxford, 1990), 145, implies that such entries 
refer to players who travelled on foot as opposed to by horse and cart. Of course foot plays may not 
be related to foot players at all, as the former term may refer to the nature of a performance, while the 
latter may only be a characterization of the players form of transportation. 

91-2 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 80v, 81 v 

On foot pleys (p 91, 1.21) see above, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 67. This Brotherhood was 
held nine days after Easter, on 17 April, at New Romney (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black 
Books, p 177). 

92 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 92, 95 

Some of the accounts for this year are misdated 13 and 14 Henry vin instead of 12 and 13 Henry vin. 
On f 84 the heading for the commencement of the civic year has been corrected from triodecimo to 
duodecimo. The entry from f 95 precedes one dated 28 April. 

93 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 104v, 105 

The second payment after this one on f 104v is dated 25 November. The entries on f 105 presumably 
are Christmas season payments although they are entered in the first quarter expenses. A block of 
payments for a Guestling in Winchelsea on 10 January follows these expenses. 

94 ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 12 lv 

This entry refers to an expense made shortly after the expiration of the term on 24 June. 

94 ESRO: RYE 147/1 f 39 

The Coote noted here may or may not be the same as the Cote that is lined over twenty years later 

in the churchwardens accounts for 1546-7. 



274 ENDNOTES 

94-5 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 128. 132 

Some of the accounts for this year, such as the excerpts from ff 128 and 132, are mistakenly described 
in the subheading as belonging to 16 Henry vin. On f 128, however, sextodecimo appears to have 
been corrected to xv. 

96-7 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 155, 157 

The payments on f 1 55 appear to have been incurred early in the term. The payments on f 1 57 follow 
one dated 7 July and precede die set of payments on f 1 57v that are for a Brotherhood held in July (Hull, 
Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 1 98). 

97-8 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 163, 163v, I64v 

The payments on f 163 follow one dated 19 November. The third excerpt immediately precedes one 
dated 6 January. The last one, being dated 14 January, is well past the nominal expiration of the term. 
The Crowne (p 97, 1.25) was an inn owned by John Sutton, probably the father of Mayor Nicholas 
Sutton, located at the corner of West Street and the High Street. The first excerpt from f 163v comes 
very early in the term. On cherche masdaye (p 98, 1.10), see p 272, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/4 
ff260v, 264v. 

98 ESRO: RYE 60/5 f [184A] 

This entry comes from a set of Brotherhood expenses at New Romney (dated 6 April) on an inserted 
leaf attached to the left edge off 184v. 

99 ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 194v 

The meaning of the second entry is not certain but it seems to involve a type of punishment in the form 
of being put on display and moved about the town accompanied by musicians (see also p 102, 11.18-19). 
The word dage (1.25) is likewise uncertain but it may be a form of the word dag, meaning a strip of 
cloth or leather used, in this case, for restraint. 

These excerpts are undated supplementary expenses and may be fifth quarter expenses. 

99-100 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 201, 204v, 206v, 207, 208v, 209v 

The accounts on ff 200-1 have the wrong heading, being dated for Christmas term, whereas internal 
dating indicates that they are for the period from the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day to Christmas. 
Expenses on ff 201v-4v are correctly dated as those for St Bartholomew s term. The payment on f 204v 
follows one dated 9 January. The heading for the account on f 206v originally dated it for the Easter 
term (which is correct) but it is mistakenly corrected to St John s term. Internal dating indicates the 
original heading was correct. The heading for the account on f 207 is once again incorrect, as it dates 
it for St John s term (beginning 24 June), though this payment is dated 21 May. The scribe began 
to date the f 208v entries as St John s term expenses but wrongly switched to dating them for St 
Bartholomew s term, in line with his previous incorrect corrections. 

The account heading says the f 209v entries are payments for the term of St Bartholomew but the 
internal dates include 10 October, 1 5 June, 20 July, 20 August, and 1 February (in that order), suggesting 
that these are miscellaneous payments for the year which were not accounted for in the usual term blocks. 

101 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 216v, 217 

There are quarterly headings for this year on ff 217, 217v, 218, and 218v. However, it is quite clear that 



ENDNOTES 

these headings are not accurate as there are several out-of-term paymencs under each heading. Ic appears 
that these headings may have been written in advance and then ignored when actual entries were made. 
Thus I have not included quarterly account terms for this year. 

101-2 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 239v, 241. 243. 244v 

The quarterly term headings for this year are once again problematic and not always useful. The 
payments on f 239v are dated in Christmas term; they follow an entry dated 17 January and precede 
another one dated 18 January and are thus very likely to have been incurred on one of those dates. The 
payments on f 241 are headed Christmas term and begin with entries dated 21 February and 14 March. 
However, a subsequent entry is dated 20 September. These two excerpts come right between rwo 
payments, the 20 September payment and another dated 26 September, with payments dated 3 and 
12 February following. 

The f 243 entry appears to be an instance of the practice of displaying offenders in a cart and having 
them led about the town. The accompaniment of minstrels would attract the townspeople s attention 
and add to the humiliation (see also p 99, 11.24-5). The f 244v entry cannot be dated with any certainty. 
The folio is headed Tfrmino annuciatiois and contains some dated entries from the period 25 
March-24 June. However, there is also an entry dated 1 5 March and expenses for a Brotherhood dated 
20 July. There are no dates in the block from which the excerpt printed here is taken. 

103 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 261v, 265 

On Churche masse day (1.15). see p 272, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff260v, 264v. The payment on 
f 265 is part of a series of fifth quarter expenses. 

104 ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 291 

Expenses for this year are divided into quarterly blocks but the headings do not state the period of the 
terms although there are specific internal dates. 

104-5 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 314, 317 

The heading for this folio is dated in the St John the Baptist term but clearly the expenses were incurred 
in the term ending (not beginning) with 24 June. The scribe may be using the feast day to indicate the 
date on which the term ended rather than began. Or it may be that the term dated refers to the time 
of reimbursement, not of initial payment. Likewise f 317 indicates the term is that of St Bartholomew 
but contains payments dating to a period of time ending on 24 August. 

105 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 333v, 334 

The expenses for this year are not divided by terms but written continuously. The individual entries are 
not dated at all. 

106 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 355v, 356 

These accounts are all for the period Christmas to Easter but some of the entries are as late as 27 May. 
Folio 356v starts the Easter to 24 June period with an entry dated 10 April. The periods appear to overlap. 

106 ESRO: RYE 33/7 f 57v 

Fleccher, Wolven, Barns, Wymond, and Mede (11.31, 32) are listed as jurats for this year in ESRO: RYE 

60/5 f 235v but not Pedle. Mede mayor may not be the same man who was a jurat in 1517-18. 



276 ENDNOTES 

107-8 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 369v, 374v, 375, 375v 

Accounting periods aren t specified in this account or in any other accounts until 1564-5. The entry on 
f 374v is entered between entries dated 3 and 1 1 June; the entry on f 375 is followed by one dated 
19 July; and the entry on f 375v is followed by one dated 3 September. 

108 ESRO: RYE 60/5 ff 386v, 387, 388v 

The expenses for this year are not divided by quarterly terms, except once, on f 386. The entry im 
mediately following the payment to the bearward on f 386v is dated 10 December. 

108-9 ESRO: RYE 60/6 ff 37, 38v, 39v 

The expenses for this year are not divided by quarterly terms but written continuously. 

109-10 ESRO: RYE 60/6 ff 60v, 6lv, 62, 67, 67v, 71 

The expenses for this year are not divided by quarterly terms but written continuously. 

110 ESRO: RYE 60/6 ff 99, 102v, 106v 

The MS header has not survived but the account presumably begins on the usual election date and 
appears to have run to the first week of October (judging by the internal date of the payments). This 
would be consistent with the shift in the accounting year signalled in the subsequent year, which is stated 
to have begun 5 October. 

110 ESRO: RYE 60/6 f 130 

The accounting year appears to have changed, as indicated by the starting date, which is a month later 
than usual. The civic year henceforth is dated from the day of the appointment of the new chamberlains, 
on the second Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day. This is the standard form of dating the accounting 
year from now on. 

111 ESRO: RYE 60/6 ff 147, H9v 

The expenses for 1546-7 are written up by month and separately for each chamberlain. Nicholas 
Mercer s accounts start with an entry dated 1 1 September (on ff 141-9) while Robert Williams 
date from 5 September (on ff 149v-50). The actual date of taking office for the chamberlains was 
5 September. 

Ill ESRO: RYE 147/1 f 112v 

From 1530 onward these accounts run from Michaelmas to Michaelmas. On the Cote (1.17), see the 
Chamberlains Accounts for 1522-3. These earlier accounts run from Easter to Easter, coinciding with 
the churchwardens term of office. 

111 ESRO: RYE 60/6 ff 157v, 164v 

The accounts for this year are divided by chamberlain and entered month by month. The payment on 
f 157v is dated to the month of July. 

112 ESRO: RYE 60/6 f 199v 

See Hughes and Larkin, Tudor Royal Proclamations, vol 1, pp 478-9, Prohibiting Plays and Interludes 
(6 August 1549; STC. 7827.3). The proclamation forbade players to perform any kind of interlude, play, 



ENDNOTES 

dialogue, or other matter set forth in form of play, in any place, public or private, from 9 August until 
1 November. The reason given was that plays being performed contain matter tending to sedition, 
and contemning of sundry good orders and laws. The next item in Hughes and Larkins edition is 
Prohibiting Unlicensed Export of Wool (9 August 1549, STC: 7827.7). 

112-13 ESRO: RYE 60/7 ff 8, 8v, 12v, 13 

The expenses were written up month by month and dated by the election of the chamberlains. 
Payments on ff 8-8v are dated to September. The payment on f 1 2v is for May and those on f 1 3 for 
May and June respectively. 

113-14 ESRO: RYE 60/7 ff 37v, 39v, 40v, 41 v 

The expenses are written up month by month and dated by the election of the chamberlains. The 
election notice incorrectly identifies the first and second Sundays after St Bartholomew s Day as 27 
August and 4 September respectively. 

114 ESRO: RYE 60/7 f 74v 

The election notice incorrectly identifies the first and second Sundays after St Bartholomew s Day as 
28 August and 4 September respectively. 

115 ESRO: RYE 60/7 f 102 

Although the payment here is dated 27 July, the Brotherhood commenced on 23 July (Hull, Calendar 
of the White and Black Books, p 25 1 ). 

115 ESRO: RYE 60/7 ff 125, 125v 

The accounts are divided by month with the exact dates given in the margin. The payments transcribed 
here are dated 20 April and 23 May respectively. 

116 ESRO: RYE 60/7 ff 135v, 149v, 150v 

The first entries are fines for mumming in the sense of disguising. Chambers, The Mediaeval Stage, 
vol 1, p 393ff, records several instances of individuals going about in masks and entering peoples houses, 
whereupon they invited the inhabitants to play at dice. This apparently was a Christmas custom (note 
the mid-December date of this entry) that was forbidden by order in London in 1334, 1393, and 1405. 
The Brotherhood payment on f I49v is dated in July and Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, 
p 255, indicates that the Brotherhood took place on 27 July. The payment on f 150v is dated to August. 

117 ESRO: RYE 60/7 ff 222v, 223, 224 

Technically this fiscal year might be said to end on 1 September 1560, when the new chamberlains 
were elected (see f 228v). However, the last payment of William Bereworth (for 1559-60) is dated 
4 September and the first of Richard Wainwright (for 1560-1) is dated 8 September. 

The payment on f 223 is dated to March, possibly 30 or 31 March. On f 224 the payment for the 
cloth for the waits coats is for 8 or 9 May; the payment to the banns criers is for 10 May. 

119 ESRO: RYE 60/8 ff 8, 13v 

Accounts again begin to be dated by quarters. These payments are dated 16 September (f 8) and 

24 May (f 13v). 



ENDNOTES 

119 ESRO: RYE 60/8 ff 42,43 

The election notice for this account incorrectly identifies the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day as 3 
September, the Monday after. The Brotherhood started 23 July (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black 
Books, p 269). 

J 19-20 ESRO: RYE 60/8 ff 6lv, 64 

The election notice for this account incorrectly identifies the Sunday after St Bartholomew s Day 
as 2 September, the Monday after. The accounts for this year are dated only sporadically in the 
margins. These extracts are not dated but the first comes between the box opening on 10 January 
and the one on 12 April; the second comes after the box opening on 12 April and before the one 
on 28 June. 

120 ESRO: RYE 60/8 f 125 

This payment is dated to the month of June. 

120 ESRO: RYE 60/8 ff 162v, 164, I64v, 175v 

These payments are from February (f I62v), March (f 164), April (f I64v), and August (f 175v). 
Mother strong (1.28) was possibly related to John Strong the wait (see p 1 18, 1.17) and Thomas 
Stronge the fife from 1575-6 onward. 

120-1 ESRO: RYE 61/2 f 23 

As part of the ancient manor of Rameslie, Rye was a possession of the Crown and thus fell under the 
direct control of a Crown bailiff. Although by this date the town had been incorporated, there continued 
to be a bailiff (in addition to the elected mayor) until the early eighteenth century (see VCH: Sussex, 
vol 9, pp 49-50). 

121 ESRO: RYE 1/4 f 156v 

For the actual payment see the Chamberlains Accounts for 1573-4. 

121-3 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 9v, 12v, 13, 13v, 16, I6v, 17, 18, 20, 22 

The entry on f 9v is dated 4 September 1 574. It is the only reference to a pageant house in Rye and there 
is no indication of the nature of the pageants being referred to. It is likely that the house was a storage 
place for a wagon on which plays or spectacles were performed (as in York). Landgate (p 121, 1.39) was 
at the northeast entrance to the town, leading from the causeway which linked Rye to the mainland. 
It is possible that this pageant is in some way connected with the visit of Queen Elizabeth i on 1 1-14 
August 1573. The occasion was marked with elaborate preparations and a gift from the town of 100 gold 
angels (see p 121, 1.16). Elizabeth reciprocated by dubbing the town Rye royal (see Vidler, Neu> History 
of Rye, p 63). 

We do not have detailed accounts of the other expenses incurred during her visit as the accounts for 
1572-3 are missing. However, the entries quoted here from ff 12v-13v appear to be connected. The 
coats were for the soldiers who escorted the queen (see Mayhew, Tudor Rye, p 34.) The conduit men 
tioned on f 13 (p 122, 1.19) went from Playden Hill across the causeway to the town. The payments 
for this year begin with undated ones (including the items quoted from f 12v) and then are dated in 
the margin beginning on 8 September. The payments quoted here from f 13 are dated 13 September. 

The entry on f 16 is dated 20 January and the entry on f 16v is dated 6 February. The same entries 
appear in Rye Museum: N 1/281 ff [12v] and [13] respectively. For the text of the Deere (p 122, 1.37) 



279 

ENDNOTES 

as recorded in the Assembly Book, see p 121, 11.21-7. The entries on f 17 are dated 1 1 March. They 
also appear in Rye Museum: Nl/281 f [13v] but the bearward payment there is dated 16 March. The 
birches (p 123, 1.9) are presumably for decorations used during the queens visit. The entries on f 18 are 
dated 25 April and also appear in Rye Museum: Nl/281 f [l4v], except that John Pope is there called 
goodman poope. The entry on f 20 is dated 1 1 July and it also appears in Rye Museum: Nl/281 f [17]. 
The entry on f 22 is dated 29 August. The following entry appears in Rye Museum: Nl/281 f [19v]: 
paid to Angell Shawe and Phillip ffayrechylde the wayghtw of the towew for this quarter wagis x s. On 
Rye Museum: Nl/281, see Introduction, p Ixix. 

123-4 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 45, 46v, 50v 

These payments are dated 16 January (f45) and 3 July (f 50v). The Guestling referred to on f 46v 

commenced on 6 April (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 299). 

124 ESRO: RYE 60/9 f 61 v 
This payment is dated 21 September. 

124-5 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 89, 90v, 91v, 92v, 93, 93v, 94 

These payments are dated 12 January (f 89), 10 April (f 90v), and 12 May (f 91v). There are no 
payments to Angel Shawe at the second opening of the box. The payments on f 92v are for July. 
The payments on ff 93v and 94 are dated 23 August (f 93v), and 30 August and September (f 94). 
The Brotherhood referred to on f 93 started on 23 July 1 577 (Hull, Calendar of the White and 
Black Books, p 307). 

125-6 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 109, HOv, 112v, 113v, 114v 

These payments are dated after 6 January (f 109), 12 April (f 1 lOv), 26 June (f 1 12v), 19 July (f 1 13v), 

and 30 August (f Il4v). 

126-7 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 125, 126v, 128v, 129, 130v, 132v 

These payments are dated 16 September (f 125), 12 January (f 126v), 2 May (f 128v), 15May(f 129), 

27 June (f 130v), and 30 August (f 132v). 

127-8 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff l44v, l47v, 149, 150v 

These payments are dated 9 January (f I44v), 16 April (f 147v), 2 July (f 149), and 27 August (f 150v). 
Shawe and Stronge were also paid four shillings each in wages for participating in the selected shott 
(ESRO: RYE 60/9 f l49v) (apparently a military muster) during Whitsuntide of this year. On f l44v 
it is recorded that Shawe and Stronge earned 2s each for selected shot wag for Michaelmas 1579, 
and ff l47v-8 say that Shawe earned 4s wages for selected shot in Easter week. 

128 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 162, 164v, 165, 165v 

These payments are dated 19 December (f 162), 1 July (f 165), and 26 August (f 165v). Payments on 
f 164v are dated 8 January with the exception of the last payment (1.22) which is dated 8 April. Other 
payments on ff 164v-5v to Angel Shawe (not included here) relate to his position as mayor s Serjeant. 
This year Shawe was first elected to the position of mayors Serjeant and served three consecutive terms 
as such (1580-1, 1581-2, 1582-3). He was elected to the position again in 1 592 and was incumbent 
in che position uninterruptedly until 1609. 



280 ENDNOTES 

129 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 182-2v, 183v, 184, 184v, 185v 

These payments are dated 18 January (ff 182, 182v), 28 April (ff 183v, 184), 30 June (f 184v), and 
25 August (f 185v). 

129-30 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 202v, 203, 203v, 204 

These payments are dated 6 July (f 202v), 13 April and 6 July (f 203v), and 24 August (f 204). The 
payment on f 203 is for the first opening of the box, which was normally in January. Entries for 1582-3, 
1583-4, 1584-5, and 1585-6 are in chronological order but also sorted by category (general accounts, 
miscellaneous accounts, payments to officers, etc.). 

130 ESRO: RYE 60/9 f 218v 

This payment is dated 14 September. There are no quarterly wages for fife or drum this year. For the 
organization of these accounts see above, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 202v, 203, 203v, 204. 

130-1 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 228, 229 

The payment on f 228 is dated 19 September. The payments on f 229 are all for 29 April with the 
exception of the last payment, which is dated 8 May. There are no quarterly wages for fife or drum 
this year. For the organization of these accounts see above, endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 202v, 203, 
203v, 204. 

131 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 245v, 248, 248v 

The payments are dated 15 July (f 245v), 8 January (f 248), and 20 July and 27 August (f 248v) but 
there are no second quarter wages for Shawe. For the organization of these accounts see above, endnote 
to ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 202v, 203, 203v, 204. 

131-2 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 253v, 256, 257v, 258v, 259, 259v, 260 

Most of the entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/5 ff 7v-16v. The payments on ff 258v-9v 
apparently are fees and other disbursements to or on behalf of the town officers. There is no heading. 
The payment on f 253v is for 6 October. The entry on f 256 is dated 1 March and also appears in ESRO: 
RYE 61/5 f 1 lv. The entry on f 257v is dated 12 August and also appears in ESRO: RYE 61/5 f 13v. 
The entries on f 258v are dated 14 January and 7 May respectively. The payment on f 259 is dated 1 July 
and that on f 259v 17 August. The entry on f 260 is in a separate list of miscellaneous expenses and is 
dated 13 September 1586. 

132-3 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 272, 273, 276v, 280v 

These payments are dated 5 February (f 272), 10 April (f 273), 8 July (f 276v), and 23 August (f 280v). 

133-4 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 284v, 285, 286, 288, 292 

The entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/6 ff 7-16. Payments on f 284v are dated 11 
January and 12 April respectively. Payments on f 285 are dated 15 July and 30 August respectively. The 
entry on f 286 is dated 1 October and also appears in ESRO: RYE 61/6 f lOv. The entries on f 288 are 
dated 17 February and also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/6 ff 12-1 2v. The entry on f 292 is dated 25 August 
and also appears in ESRO: RYE 61/6 f 16. 

1 34 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 301 , 302v, 303v, 304, 304v, 305 

These payments are dated 5 May (f 301), 23 June (f 302v), 25 August (f 303v), 24 January and 2 May 



ENDNOTES 



(f 304), 4 July (f 304v), and September (f 305). There is no confirmation of the 10s paid Essex s players 
in Rye in 1589 recorded in Halliwell-Phillipps Scrapbooks, vol 200, p 125 (see HalliweU-Phillipps 
Scrapbooks: An Index, J.A.B. Somerset (comp) (Toronto, 1979), microfiche p 089). 

135 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 310v, 312, 313, 314 

These payments are dated 13 January (f 310v), 3 May (f 312), 8 July (f 313), and 4 September (f 314). 

135-6 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 316, 318, 319, 319v, 320, 320v, 321 

The entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/7 ff3-l 1. The payment on f 316 is dated 18 
September. The payment on f 318 is dated 29 January and that on f 319 is dated 8 April. The entry on 
f 319v is dated 24 June and also appears in ESRO: RYE 61/7 f 9. The entry on f 320 is dated to 8 July. 
The entry on f 320v is for 19 August and also appears in ESRO: RYE 61/7 f lOv. The payment on f 321 
is daced 26 August. 

136-7 ESRO: RYE 60/9 ff 325, 325v, 326v, 327, 327v 

The account heading on f 322 dates the entries for this year as Michaelmas 1 592 to Michaelmas 1 593. 
However, actual payments begin on 4 September. In fact they probably cover the period from 3 
September to 2 September. The entries on ff 325-7 also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/8 ff 16-22. The 
payments on ff 325 and 325v are dated to July. Payments on fF 326v-7v come from a block of undated 
entries. The payment on f 327v also appears in ESRO: RYE 61/8 f 23v. 

137-8 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 11, 14, 16, 17, 17v, 18 

These payments are dated 15 January (f 11), April (f 14), July (f 16), 27 July (f 17), and 23 August 
(f 17v). The f 18 Guestling payment is undated but the meeting commenced on 1 3 August 1 594 (Hull, 
Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 343). 

138 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 25, 28v, 29v, 31, 32v 

The payment on f 25 is dated to September. Based on other internal dates it would be sometime before 
20 September. The payment on f 28v is dated 21 March and also appears in ESRO: RYE 61/9 f 9v. The 
payment on f 29v is dated 3 May. The payments on ff 31 and 32v are for the third and last openings of 
the box, ie, 25 July and 30 August respectively. There are no first quarter wages recorded for Shawe. 

138-9 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff39v.41.41v 

These payments are dated 7-12 September (f 39v), 24 April (f 41), and 30 April and 10 July respectively 

(f4lv). 

139-40 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 53v, 55, 55v, 57, 58v, 59 

These payments are dated 5 January (f 53v), 12 March (f 55), 16 April (f 55v), 9 July (f 57), 27 August 

(f 58v), and 29-31 August (f 59). 

140 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 68, 70, 71, 73 

These payments are dated 14 January (f 68), 6 May (f 70), 8 July (f 71), and 19 August (f 73). 

140-1 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 79v, 81v, 82 

These payments are dated 24 January (f 79v), 24 June (f 81v), and 25 August (f 82). 



282 ENDNOTES 

141 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff91,91v 

The payments on f 91 are dated 1 January, 9 April, and 9 July. The payment on f 91 v is dated 13 

August. Presumably Shawe s drum wages are included in his total wages. 

141 ESRO. RYE 60/10 ff 98, 98v 

The payments on f 98 are dated 17 January, 25 April, and 18 July. The payment on f 98v is dated 29 
August. The entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/10 ff 5-6. Presumably Shawe s drum 
wages are included in his total wages. 

142 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 109, 1 lOv, 1 12v, 1 13v 

These payments are dated 16 January (f 109), 12 April (f 1 10v), 2 July (f 1 12v), and 28 August (f 1 13v). 
The entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/11 ff8-l4. 

142-3 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 123v, 125, 126v, 128 

These payments are dated 15 January (f 123v), 7 May (f 125), 16 July (f 126v), and 27 August (f 128). 

The entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/12 ff8-l 1. 

143 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 137v, 139v, 141, I4lv, I42v 

These payments are dated 13 January (f 137v), 20 April (f 139v), 9 July (f 141), and 24 August (f 142v). 
The entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/12 ff 19-23. The Brotherhood expenses on 
f I41v are dated 24 July. 

143-4 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 161, 163, I66v, I68v 

These payments are dated 19 January (f 161), 20 April (f 163), 6 July (f 166v), and 23 August (f 168v). 

The entries for this year also appear in ESRO: RYE 61/13 ff 29v-39. 

144 ESRO: RYE 60/10 ff 179v, 182v, 185, 187v 

These payments are dated 13 January (f 179v), 20 May (f 182v), 5 July (f 185), and 30 August (f 187v). 

145 ESRO: RYE 61/13 ff 74, 78, 80v, 84 

These payments are dated January (f 74), 2 May (f 78), July (f 80v), and 30 September (f 84). 

145-6 ESRO: RYE 61/14 ff 12v, 17, 20, 22 

These payments are dated 16 January (f 12v), 29 April (f 17), 8 July (f 20), and 26 August (f 22). 

146 ESRO: RYE 47/77/2 single sheet 

On the struggle between the Puritan and traditionalist factions for control of the government of Rye, 
see Introduction, p xxx. 

146 ESRO: RYE 61/16 f 20 
This payment is dated 23 August. 

147 ESRO: RYE 61/18 ff 17, 20v, 22v, 23, 24v, 26v 

These payments are dated 18 January (f 17), 26 April (f 20v), 14 July (ff 22v, 23), and 1 September 
(f 26v). The Brotherhood expenses on f 24v are dated 28 July although the Brotherhood commenced 
on 21 July (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 397). 



"JQ 2 

ENDNOTES 

148 ESRO: RYE 61/19 ff 1 6v, 20, 22v, 24v 

These payments are dated 15 January (f I6v), 24 April (f 20v), 22 July (f 22v), and 28 August (f 24v). 

148-9 ESRO: RYE 61/20 ff 13v, 16, l6v, 18v, 20, 21 

These payments are dated 17 January (f!3v), 20 May (f 16), 21 May (f I6v), 23 July (f 18v), 17 August 

(f 20), and 30 August (f21). 

149-50 ESRO: RYE 6 1/21 ff 15. 17v, 20-20v. 21, 23 

Payments on fl 5 are made at the first opening of the box but are not dated. The other payments are 
dated 1 May (f 17v), 10 July (ff 20-20v), and 26 August (f 23). The Brotherhood and Guestling 
expenses on f 21 are not specifically dated but occurred between 10 July and 24 August. The Brother 
hood commenced on 25 July (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 408). 

150-1 ESRO: RYE 61/22 ff I4v, 16, 17. 19, 21 

These payments are dated 20 January (f I4v), 30 March (f 16), 20 April (f 17), between 6 and 8 July 

(f 19), and 23 August (f 21). 

151-2 ESRO: RYE 61/23 ff 14, 16, 17, 18v, 19, 20 

These payments are dated 18 January (f 14), 1 April (f 16), 26 April (f 17), 5 July (f 18v), 23 July 

(f 19), and 30 August (f 20). 

152-3 ESRO: RYE 47/89 single sheet 

AThomas Maxwell also receives payments for his music at the Brotherhoods of 1630-1 and 1631-2. 

153-4 ESRO: RYE 61/24 ff 1 6v, 1 8v, 20v, 23 

These payments are dated 6 January (f I6v), 1 1 April (f 18v), 13 July (f 20v), and 29 August (f 23). 

154 ESRO: RYE 61/25 ff 1 lv, 14, 15, 17v 

These payments are dated 1 1 January (f 1 lv), 17 April (f 14), 3 July (f 15), and 28 August (f 17v). 

154-5 ESRO: RYE 61/26 ff llv, 13v, 14, 15v, 16 

These payments are dated 16 January (f 1 lv), 25 April (f 13v), 8 July (f 14), 30 July (f I5v), and 

26 August (f 16). 

155-6 ESRO: RYE 6 1/27 ff 9v, llv, 13v, 15 

These payments are dated 13 January (f 9v), 14 April (f 1 lv), 7 July (f 13v), and 25 August (f 15). 

156 ESRO: RYE 6 1/28 ff lOv, llv, I3v, 15 

These payments are dated 19 January (f lOv), 27 April (f llv), 6 July (f I3v), and 23 August (f 15). 

156-7 ESRO: RYE 61/29 ff llv, 13v, 15v, 17v 

These payments are dated 1 1 January (f 1 lv), 15 April (f 13v), 5 July (f 15v), and 29 August (f 17v). 

157-8 ESRO: RYE 6 1/30 ff 9v, 12, I4v, I6v 

These payments are dated 10 January (f 9v), 27 March (f 12), 12 July (f l4v), and 28 August (f l6v). 



284 ENDNOTES 

158-9 ESRO: RYE61/32 ff 8, 10, lOv, 12, 12v, 13v 

The payments are dated 14 January (f 8), between 21 March and 13 April (f 10), 15 May (f lOv), after 

15 July (f 12), and 26 August (f 13v). The Brotherhood expenses on f 12v are dated between 15 July 

and 9 August. The Brotherhood commenced 25 July (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books 

P 434). 

159 ESRO: RYE 6 1/33 ff 8, 9, 1 1, 12v 

These payments are dated January (f 8), April (f 9), July (f 1 1), and 25 August (f 12v). 

159-60 ESRO: RYE 61/34 ff lOv, 12v, 14, 15, 16 

These payments are dated 4 January (f lOv), 14 April (f 12v), 5 July (f 14), and 29 August (f 16). 
The Brotherhood expenses (f 1 5) are dated 25 July although the Brotherhood commenced 22 July 
(Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 443). 

160-1 ESRO: RYE 61/35 ff 6, 7, 8, 8v, 10 

These payments are dated 9 January (f 6), 10 April (f 7), 18 June and 3 July respectively (f 8), and 
28 August (f 10). The Brotherhood expenses (f 8v) are dated 28 July; the Brotherhood commenced 
on 27 July (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 449). 

161-2 ESRO: RYE 61/36 ff 6v, 7v, 8, 8v 

These payments to officers are dated 15 January (f 6v), May (f 7v), and 8 August (f 8v). The payment 
on f 8 is undated but probably dates to June or July. The Brotherhood referred to on f 8v commenced 
on 26 July (Hull, Calendar of the White and Black Books, p 452). On Thomas Maxwell (p 161, 1.34), 
see pp 152-3. 

162 ESRO: RYE 6 1/37 ff 6v, 7, 7v, 8, 8v 

These payments are dated 7 January (f 6v), 7 April (f 7), 7 July (f 7v), and 25 August (f 8v). No date 
is given in the MS for the Brotherhood payment (f 8) but it commenced on 24 July (Hull, Calendar 
of the White and Black Books, p 456). On Thomas Maxwell (1.29), see pp 152-3. 

163 ESRO: RYE 61/38 ff 4v, 5, 5v, 7, 8 

These payments are dated 4 January (ff 4v, 5), 12 April (f 5v), 30 June (f 7), and 23 August (f 8). 

163-4 ESRO: RYE 61/39 ff 6v, 7v, 8v, 10 

These payments are dated 12 January (f 6v), March-April (f 7v), 29 June (f 8v), and 29 August (f 10). 

164-5 ESRO: RYE 6 1/40 ff 7, 8v, lOv, 1 lv 

These payments are dated 12 January (f 7), 7 April (f 8v), 9 July (f lOv), and 25 August (f 1 lv). 

165 ESRO: RYE 61/41 ff 5, 6, 7v, 9 

These payments are dated 13 January (f 5), 16 April (f 6), 3 July (f 7v), and 28 August (f 9). 

165-6 ESRO: RYE 61/42 ff 7, 8v, 9v, lOv 

These payments are dated 13 January (f 7), 5 April (f 8v), 1 1 July (f 9v), and 27 August (f lOv). 



ENDNOTES 

166-7 ESRO: RYE 61/43 ff 11. 12, 13, 14. 15 

These payments are dated 16 February (f 1 1), 17 May (12), 19 May and 2 June (f 13), 3 August (I 
and 25 August (f 15). John Skinner apparently died in the fall of 1642; a 25 October entry on f 
records payment of 7s 6d to the lurie yat inquired about John Skinners good by ye appointment of 
master Maior & his brethren. The f 1 1 payment marks the elevation of Pedle to principal drummer. 

167 WSRO: Ep. n/9/2 f 38v 

On f 41 (29 November) it is noted that Dunke (1.21) failed to appear and was excommunicated. 

167 WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 f 9v 

The date of rendering of this account of course gives no clue as to the actual date of the king play, 
which could have been performed any time in the previous year. 

168 WSRO: Par. 183/9/1 f lOv 

The dating has been confused here, possibly as a result of the fact that these entries appear to have been 
copied from an original. The first entry on f lOv is dated M.ccccc.xxty the xj th day of february but 
given the dates of the entries on f 10 (1520/1) and the bottom of f lOv (1522/3), this is probably an 
error for 1521/2. An archivist s marginal note 1521 next to the entry expresses agreement. 

The 1521/2 memo ends with obliterated names but the same individual who copied out the faded 
1522/3 entry has written in the two names below the cancellation, Pellatt & John Godfray. The entry 
for 1522/3 is written in extremely faded ink and has been copied out in a modern hand at the base of 
che page. 

172 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 1 

The page is headed Anno \\enrici viij vj (22 April 1514-21 April 1515) and the following note says 
that the new churchwardens were chosen on Annunciation Day, presumably 25 March 1515. Since in 
the following years the accounts run roughly from the first or second week of Advent to roughly the 
same time in the following year, it appears that this first year of accounting was a short one. 

172 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 3 

The dating for this entry is from f 2, where two sets of churchwardens elections are noted. The first is 
dated the second Sunday of Advent, 8 Henry vin. The second election noted on the page (which is the 
one applicable to this entry) is dated 8 December, 8 Henry vm (1516). I have assumed that the regnal 
year of the first date is an error for 7 Henry vin and that the second one is correct. 

173 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 7 

The exact date of the appointment of the churchwardens is not given. 

173 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 13v 

The singing paid for in the first entry (1.31) could of course have been liturgical rather than for 
entertainment. 

174 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 17v 

The exact date of the appointment of the churchwardens is not given. 



286 ENDNOTES 

174 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 20 

The exact date of the appointment of the churchwardens is not given. 

174 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 21 v 

The exact date of the appointment of the churchwardens is not given. 

174 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 ff 22v, 23v 

The churchwardens elected for this year originally were Thomas Fryman and William March. Apparently 
Fryman did not serve his whole term as churchwarden for 1 544-5. A new election is noted in the header 
on f 23v, whereby William March succeeded to the senior position of churchwarden and Richard March 
became the junior one but with no exact date of appointment. It thus appears that in 1544-5 there were 
two ales, one recorded for each set of churchwardens. 

175 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 26 

The account year began on 21 December but the end date is not known as there is no account header 
for the subsequent year. 

175 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 28 

The exact date of the appointment of the churchwardens is not given. 

175 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 29v 

The exact date of the appointment of the churchwardens is not given. After suffering this loss from the 
ale the church seems to have given up holding it until 1559. It also may not be coincidental that the 
period of the absence of ales also includes the reign of Edward vi (1547-53), when many parishes 
suspended church ales. 

175-6 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 rT4l,4lv, 42 

The account year began on 15 March 1561/2 but the end date is not given in the heading of the 

subsequent account. 

176 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 42v 

Since the outgoing churchwardens are named as Thomas Carus and Edward Weston, the wardens 
in 1562-3, we can assume that these are the accounts for 1563-4 in the absence of an exact date of 
election. 

176 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 46 

The exact date of the appointment of the churchwardens is not given. The account range has been 

derived from the start and end dates of the 1565-6 and 1567-8 accounts. 

176 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 46v 

Immediately preceding the payment to the minstrels are: Item one hate iiij s. and Itmi a frenche 

Crowne vj s. There is no evidence that these items are connected to the minstrels. The payment for 

the beer is probably related to the church ale although there is no explicit connection made in the 

manuscript. 



ENDNOTES 

177 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 f 47 

The payment for the beer is probably related to the church ale although there is no explicit connection 

made in the manuscript. 

177 WSRO: Par. 193/9/1 ff 50v, 51 

The entry on f 50v is not dated in the manuscript heading. However, 1 570 has been entered in a 

modern hand on f 49v. The date range has been derived from the start and end dates of the surrounding 

accounts. 

John Selden, the minstrel, is referred to in the second book of churchwardens accounts (WSRO: 
Par. 193/9/2) as paying a levy assessed on his eight acres of land (f 7v), being a churchwarden (f 8), and 
paying for church repairs (f 15v). Selden is primarily known through his son, John Selden the jurist 
(see Walter H. Godfrey, John Selden s Tomb in the Temple Church, Sussex Notes and Queries 1 3 
(1951), 97-8). 

The entry on f 51 also is not dated in the manuscript heading. 1571 has been entered in a modern 
hand at the top of the page. It appears, however, that ff 50v and 51 are both for 1570-1, being the 
accounts of the two churchwardens entered separately. 

177 WSRO: Ep. iv/2/13 f 132v 

Knight failed to appear seven times. See ff 141, l47v, 150v, 1 53v, 158, 160v, and 164. 

179-80 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/19 fl!8 

The two Sundays involving the cross-dressing happen to be Shrove Sunday and the Sunday before. The 

transgression might have been part of a Shrovetide merriment. 

180 WSRO: Ep. 1/17/19 f 152v 

Hargood (1.30) and Bonny (1.34) are cited again on f 155v (26 May) and f I59v (2 June). 

181 ESRO: WIN 53 f 236v 

There is every likelihood that this Angel Shawe is the same man as the Rye drummer and master serjeam. 

181 WSRO: Ep. 1/23/8 f 24v 

This entry is in a list headed Ester bills. However, the text itself refers to ye last Sunday being ye 8 th 
of June (1.29), which indicates that the presentment was made between the 9th and the 14th (before 
the following Sunday). 

184 PRO: SC/6 Henry 7/1 878 sheet [15] 

There is no heading or date on the roll because the first sheet or sheets is/are missing; the date in the 
PRO catalogue (1502-3) was assigned by the PRO on the basis of an antiquarian note on the outer part of 
the roll. Internal references in the text mention regnal years 17, 18, and 19 but not the name of the mon 
arch. An entry on sheet [15v] mentioning a bill dated 10 October in the 18th year of the present king as 
appears in the account at Easter in the nineteenth year is particularly helpful in suggesting possible 
dates. In the period for which the handwriting appears appropriate and there are no extant abbey 
accounts with secure dates, there are two sufficiently long reigns - those of Edward iv and Henry vn. 
Henry vii is not possible (although the antiquarian note and the PRO catalogue have assigned the roll 
to his reign) because of the mention of the duke of Gloucester on sheet [15v]: there was no duke of 



ENDNOTES 

Gloucester during the reign of Henry vii. In the reign of Edward rv, 10 October of year 18 and Easter 
year 19 would be 10 October 1478 and 1 1 April 1479 respectively. They fall during the same abbey 
fiscal year, Michaelmas 1478 to Michaelmas 1479, which makes 1478-9 the earliest year for which 
this could be the account, although that wording seems to suggest that it is more likely to be looking 
back at some 1478-9 expenses from a year or two later. 

Whoever the king may have been in whose reign this account was written, he was still on the throne 
when this account was made up since the wording refers to the reign of the present king. The latest 
likely date is 1481-2: since Edward iv died in April 1483, 1481-2 is the last complete Battle Abbey 
fiscal year of his reign. Thus the account can only be dated within the range 1478-82. 

Bernhorn (1.22) refers to Barnhorn Manor, one of Battle Abbeys most valuable estates. It was 
located on the uplands and marshes around Pevensey and consisted of corn fields and pastures (see Searle, 
Lordship and Community, pp 40-1 ). 

184 PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/1874 ff [1-lv] 

The phrase domino locoso de herstmonceux (1.31) is ambiguous because locoso could be either an 
adjective modifying domino or the English man s name Joyce or Josse (forms of the name of St Judoc, 
represented by locosus in Latin). The translation of the entry (p 254) reflects what we judge to be the 
two most likely possibilities. If the first alternative is the correct one, then either Herstmonceux Castle 
(at that time owned by Thomas Fiennes, Lord Dacre) or the parish of Herstmonceux had its Christmas 
festivities enlivened by a lord of misrule. Because the personal name Joyce or Josse had fallen out of 
common use by the fifteenth century, it seems more likely that a person bearing it at that time would 
do so as a name taken in religion (since St Judoc s relics were in the Benedictine New Minster at 
Winchester). Therefore in the second alternative dominus is taken as Dom, the honorific used in 
referring to a Benedictine choir monk, such as a member of Battle Abbey, and de herstmonceux is taken 
as a surname (which might or might not indicate origin). 

185 PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/861 f [Iv] 

Evans, Battle Abbey at the Dissolution: Expenses, pp 90-1, refers to a galliprelio or cockfight in the 
seneschal s accounts for 1499. However, there are no seneschals accounts extant for this date and I have 
been unable to locate the entry in the records that do still exist. 

185 HL: BA275 sheet [5] 

The first entry in this section provides the explanation for the phrase \\uiusmodt donis &C rewardw (1.26), 
such gifts and rewards as were given by the abbot to servants of the king and other magnates. These are 
said to be itemized in a chaplain s book to which d/cro libro (11.27-8) refers. 

186 CKS: U1475Q2 sheet 1 

In the left margin there is a letter (from a to k ) beside each entry. Four of them, including this one 
for a spectacwlo, are marked with an e. The others are for wine, a pewter vessel, and a horse. These 
expenditures have little in common but may indicate that they are being classified or are coming out 
uf the same budget. 

187 CKS: U1475 Q4 sheet 4 

The MS is damaged, making it impossible to determine the feast days for the quarters. The Historical 
Manuscripts Commission report by C.L. Kingsford, Report on the Manuscripts of Lord DC Lisle and 
Dudley, De L hle, vol 1 (London, 1925), 170, dates this quarter Christmas 1435 to Easter 1436. 



ENDNOTES 

187 CKS: U1475 Q6 sheet 4 

The heading for these entries is mutilated so that only the beginning of the accounting period (25 

December) shows. However, the usual term for these quarterly accounts runs from Christmas to Easter. 

188-95 src: 3907.5 sigs A3-B4v 

The edited text follows the src: 3907.5 version collated with src: 3907.7 (see Introduction, pp Ixxviii- 
Ixxix) except that since the texts of the songs on Tuesday, 17 August, and Wednesday, 18 August, are 
not included in STC: 3907.5, they are printed separately here. 

The allusion to the walls of Thebes (p 188, 1.22) refers to the building of part of the lower city by 
Amphion with the assistance of the lyre given by Hermes, while his scornful brother Zethus lagged 
behind. The words miracle of time (p 189, 1.8 and p 195, 1.12) are an allusion to Elizabeth as Truth the 
Daughter of Time. 

The Porter adapts some well known lines from Vergil s Aeneid (1.76-7) where Aeolus, king of 
the winds, obeys the will of Juno, queen of the gods, with the words: Tuus, O Regina, quid optes I 
explorare labor; mihi iussa capessere fas est (Your work, O Queen, is to discover what you wish: my 
duty is to carry out your orders). Speaking of Lord Montagu, the queen s host, the author of the 
entertainment changed this to: Tuus O Regina quod optas explorare I fauor: huic iussa capescere fas est 
(Your favour, O Queen, is what you choose to discover: his duty is to carry out your orders) (p 189, 
11.16-17). 

The priory in which the Browne family entertained the queen (and presumably where they stayed 
while she occupied Cowdray) probably was the nearby one at Easebourne, although it was in the 
possession of Lord Treasurer Fitzwilliam after the Dissolution ( VCH. Sussex, vol 2, p 85). The skallop 
shelles worn by the Pilgrim (p 190, 1. 14) may be an indication that he had been to the shrine of St James 
at Compostella. 

The shields hung on the oak tree (p 191, 11.4-7 and p 194, 1.37-p 195, 1.1) were meant to signify 
that the lords represented by the shields were challenging anyone who defied the authority of the queen 
(Wilson, Entertainments for Elizabeth, p 87). 

The reference to Cerebrus (p 191, 1.32) in the Wild Man s speech is corrected to Caesar was in 
STC. 3907.7. Neither Cerberus nor Caesar (whether Julius or Augustus) seems to make much sense 
and the variation suggests an illegible word or phrase in the original text: if the reference to hearts 
laberinth in 1.35 is intended to be part of the same extended metaphor, perhaps either Daedalus or 
Theseus is meant. 

The words Elizabetha Deus nobis hax otia fecit at the end of the Wild Man s speech (p 192, 1.14) 
are a close quotation from the famous pastoral scene at the beginning of Vergil s first Eclogue (1.6), where 
the shepherd Tityrus consoles his companion Meliboeus with praise of the peace which Augustus Caesar 
and Rome have brought: O Meliboee, deus nobis haec otia fecit (O Meliboeus, a god has made this 
repose for us). Since this context would have been familar to Elizabeth and many other hearers or readers, 
Vergil s implied praise of Augustus becomes a complimentary comparison between the emperor and 
the queen. 

Robert Dormer (p 194, 1.29) was to become MP in 1593 for Buckinghamshire, where he had extensive 
lands. His family had strong Catholic sympathies though he himself probably conformed. Goring (1.30) 
probably was a member of the Protestant Goring family of Burton. Henry Glemham (1.31) was MP 
for Lewes in 1593 and a close associate of the Sackvilles. In 1600 he was imprisoned on suspicion of 
being a Catholic spy. John Caryll (1.32) was a member of a staunchly Catholic family (see Introduction, 
p Ixxix). Nicholas Parker (1.33) was MP for Sussex in 1597. Although a conformist he was sometimes 
under suspicion because he had a number of Catholic relations. 



290 ENDNOTES 

197 BL: Additional MS 28242 ff 23v, 30v 

These entries are dated 4 January (f 23v) and 5 August (f 30v). 

197 BL: Additional MS 28242 ff 36, 37 

These entries are dated 20 December (f 36) and 14 January (f 37). 

198 DRO: D/FSI: box 222 ff [9, 18, 23, 24, 27] 

These payments are dated 17 August (f [9]), 10 November (f [18]), 23 December (f [23]), 2 January 
(f [24]), and 3 February (f [27]). McGee, Music for Marriage, p 9, speculates that Mr Sanders (1.7) 
may have been the same as the William Sanders who was a London wait in 1634 and a royal musician 
after the Restoration. The Cittie waites mentioned here (1.23) and on f [54] are not identified more 
fully. Cittie seems to imply that they came from the cathedral cities of Chichescer or Canterbury, in 
spite of the great distance of Fayre Crooch from either place. It is also possible that they were London 
waits, as Edwards was a London mercer. In any case their visits were probably connected with the 
Christmas season. McGee, Music for Marriage, p 9, indicates that Mr Onsloe (1.28) was a chore 
ographer of masques at court, specifically of Cupid s Banishment in 1617. 

198-200 DRO: D/FSI: box 222 ff [30v, 33, 37, 42, 44, 45, 50, 52, 54, 55] 
These payments are dated 10 April (f [30v]), 24 April (f [33]), 19 May (f [37]), 25 June (f [42]), 
7 August (ff [44, 45]), 22 November (f [50]), 22 December (f [52]), 3 and 7 January (f [54]), and 
19 and 22 January (f [55]). 

McGee, Music for Marriage, pp 9-10, suggests Mr Webb (p 198, 1.35) was a soloist in the masque 
The Triumph of Peace in 1634 and later a London wait and possibly a kings musician. For the city waits 
see above, endnote to DRO: D/FSI: box 222 ff [9, 18, 23, 24, 27]. 

200-1 DRO: D/FSI: box 222 ff [57, 60, 61, 62] 

These payments are dated 27 March (f [57]), 8 and 21 July (f [60}), 30 July and 16 August (f [61]), and 

27 October and 5 November (f [62]). 

201 ESRO: FRE 520 f 12 

The connection of the Everenden family with the Clarkes is uncertain. ESRO: SAU 1300 (dated 13 April 
1637, at Sedlescombe) is an admittance of Agnes Clarke to a tenement on the death of William Clarke. 
They may have been related to John Clarke, who was MP from Haslemere, Surrey, in the early seven 
teenth century and is believed to have moved to Battle and died there (see Hasler, House of Commons 
1558-1603, vol 1, p 61 1). The appearance of decidedly aristocratic jousting posts at this wedding may 
indicate that the affair was rather elaborate. The payment is dated in the month of July. 

202 BL: Lansdowne MS 235 f 13v col 1 and f l4v col 1 

The context of the surrounding entries makes it clear that the payment on f 13v was made in London. 
The entry on f I4v has no such suggestive context and probably was for a local performance. These 
entries cannot be dated from the MS. 

202 Steer: Montague s Personal Accounts p 35 

Entries before and after this one indicate that the payment was made between 16 December and 

23 December. 



ENDNOTES 



291 



202 Steer: Montagues Personal Accounts pp 36, 37 

Entries before and after the payments for the virginal indicate that they were made between 24 January 
and 27 May. The entries before and after the payment for strings indicate that the payment was made 
between 13 August and 20 August. 

207 ESRO: DUN 37/2 f 77 

In spite of the fact that this entry comes after the one on f 75 it applies to an earlier payment as there 
are two sees of accounts for the year. 

208 ESRO: DUN 37/2 f 99v 

Adjacent dated entries make it probable that this payment was made on or after Lady Day 1575. It could 
have been made in April as there is a later entry on the page dated 7 April. 

The meaning of this payment is not clear. Normally to bait a horse is to feed it rather than to use it 
for cruel entertainment but why would one borrow a horse for the former purpose? 



Patrons and 
Travelling Companies 

JOHN LEHR 



The following list has two sections. The first section lists companies alphabetically by patron, 
according to the principal title under which the playing companies and entertainers appear. 
Cross-references to titles other than the principal ones, if they are also so named in the Records, 
are given in the list and unusual variant spellings of some patrons titles are given in the Index 
with a direction to the relevant heading in the patrons list. The second section lists companies 
which have been identified by place of origin. 

The biographical information supplied here has come entirely from printed sources, the 
chief of which are the following: Acts of the Privy Council; S.T. BindofT(ed), The History of 
Parliament: The House of Commons 1509-1558, 3 vols (London, 1982); Calendar of Close Rolls 
and Calendar of Patent Rolls (edited through 1 582); Calendar of State Papers; C.R. Cheney (ed), 
Handbook of Dates for Students of English History, corrected ed (London, 1996); G.E.C., The 
Complete Peerage. . .; DNB; James E. Doyle, The Official Baronage of England Showing the 
Succession, Dignities, and Offices of Every Peer from 1066 to 1885, 3 vols (London, 1886); E.B. 
Fryde et al (eds), Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd ed (Cambridge, 1986; rpt 1996); P.W. 
Hasler (ed). The History of Parliament: The House of Commons 1558-1603, 3 vols (London, 
1981); Basil D. Henning (ed), The History of Parliament: The House of Commons 1660-1690, 
3 vols (London, 1983); Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry vni, 21 vols and 
Addenda (London, 1864-1932); J.S. Roskell, Linda Clark, and Carole Rawcliffe (eds), The 
History of Parliament: The House of Commons 1386-1421, 4 vols (Stroud, 1992); Josiah C. 
Wedgwood and Anne D. Holt, History of Parliament: Biographies of the Members of the Commons 
House 1439-1509 (London, 1936); and Josiah C. Wedgwood, History of Parliament: Register of 
the Ministers and of the Members of Both Houses 1439-1509 (London, 1938). Also consulted 
were Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, 12 vols 
(Canterbury, 1797-1801; rpt 1972); Felix Hull (ed),A Calendar of the White and Black Books 
of the Cinque Ports 1432-1955 (London, 1966); and VCH: Sussex. 

All dates are given in accordance with the style in the sources used. The authorities some 
times disagree over the dates of birth, death, creation, succession, and office tenure. Where this 
evidence conflicts, the Calendar of State Papers, Calendar of Patent Rolls, and similar collections, 
such as the following, are preferred: J.H. Gleason, The Justices of the Peace in England: 1558 to 
1640 (Oxford, 1969); List of Sheriffs for England and Wales from the Earliest Times to A.D. 1831, 
Public Record Office, Lists and Indexes, no 9 (London, 1898); and J.C. Sainty Lieutenants of 



294 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Counties, 1585-1642, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, Special Supplement no 
8 (May, 1970). 

Normally each patron entry is divided into four sections. The first lists relevant personal data 
and titles of nobility with dates. Succession numbers are given only for the most important titles 
held by a person, as well as for those titles by which he or she is named in the Records. These 
numbers follow the absolute sequence given in The Complete Peerage rather than the relative 
ones that begin afresh with each new creation. Knighthood dates are included only for minor 
gentry not possessing higher titles. 

The second section lists, in chronological order, appointments showing local connections and 
includes those known to have been used within titles of playing companies. Purely expedi 
tionary military titles have been largely omitted, along with most minor Scottish and Irish 
landed titles. For patrons holding peerage titles, minor civil commissions have been omitted, 
except for those concerning Sussex and the geographically proximate counties of Hampshire, 
Kent, Surrey, and the Isle of Wight. 

Where possible, the date of an appointment is taken from the date of a document assigning 
that position. If the appointment is stated in the document to be for life, then these words 
follow the job title. If the original document has not been edited and a secondary source is 
used that states until death, then this form appears. Otherwise dates of appointment and 
termination are given, if available. If the length of time an office was held is not known, then 
only the date of appointment is given. Alternatively, if the only evidence comes from a source 
dated some time during the period of tenure, then the word by and a date appears. If only the 
date of termination is known, until is used. For all minor commissions such as commissions 
of gaol delivery, commissions of array and muster, and commissions of die peace OP), years only 
are given. If the dates of these commissions cover several years in sequence, then the earliest and 
latest years of the sequence are separated by a dash. 

The third section, for which information is often incomplete or unavailable, contains the 
names and locations of the patron s principal seats, and of counties where he or she held lands. 
Extensive property lists have been condensed by limiting them to Sussex and the surrounding 
counties. 

The fourth section is an annotated index by date of the appearances of each patron s com 
pany or companies in the Sussex Records. Following the company designation (for example, 
minstrel ) is the location of the performance, and following the record dates are the page 
numbers in parentheses where the citations occur. If a patron s company appears under a title 
other than the usual or principal one, this other title is in parentheses next to the designation 
of the company. Companies named according to a patron s civil appointment are indexed 
under the name of that post as it appears in the Records: for example, Lord Warden. If the 
patron sponsored more than one type of performer, all entries for a given type (both singular 
and plural forms) are grouped together in chronological order. The performer type is only 
repeated within that grouping to indicate a change in the patron title by which the company 
is named (see, for example, the list of appearances under Shrewsbury ). Each group of entries 
is then listed according to the earliest year in which that company appears in the Records. If 
two or more companies first appear in the same year, alphabetical order is followed. In this 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



295 



section, the annotations Possibly or Probably indicate that the attribution of the performance 
itinerary item to the particular patron is not definite. 

Occasionally performance locations listed here are not in Sussex (see, for example, the 
locations listed under Scott ). The reason for this is that payments were occasionally recorded in 
the Rye accounts for performances at Guestling or Brotherhood meetings in other Cinque Ports 
locations. Even when these performances were in Kent, they are included in this Sussex volume 
(see pp Ixxxiii-lxxxiv). Thomas Maxwell s performances in New Romney, Kent, are also listed 
here under Rye since it is known that Maxwell was an inhabitant of Rye (see pp 152-3). 

The reader may also wish to refer to the Index for additional references to some of the 
patrons and to various unnamed companies and their players. 

Abbreviations: 



ace 


acceded 


adm 


admiral 


bef 


before 


bet 


between 


br 


brother 


capt 


captain 


comm 


commissioner 


cr 


created 


custos rot 


custos rotulorum 


d. 


died 


da 
gen 


daughter 
general 


gov 


governor 



JP justice of the peace 

jt joint (two or more) 

KG Knight of the Garter 

kt knighted 

lieut lieutenant 

m. married 

MP member of parliament 

nd no date 

parl parliament 

PC privy councillor 

pres president 

succ succeeded 

summ summoned 



296 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Companies Named by Patron 

Abergavenny 

George Nevill (1469-June 1535), succ as 5th baron of Abergavenny 20 Sept 1492; imprisoned 
about May 1521; pardoned for misprision of treason 29 Mar 1522. Comm of gaol delivery 
Canterbury Castle, Kent, 1485, Maidstone, Kent, 1498, 1509, Guildford Castle, Surr, 1503; 
jpKent 1485, 1487, 1489-90, 1493-4, 1497-1506, 1509-10, 1512, 1514-15, 1517, 1521, 
1524, 1528, 1531-2, Suss 1493-4, 1496, 1498, 1500-2, 1504-5, 1508, 1512, 1514-15, 
1524, 1526, 1529, 1531-2, Surr 1494, 1497-1506, 1512, 1514-15, 1520, 1522, 1524-5, 
1528, 1531-2; comm of array Kent 1490, 1496, 1512, 1513, Suss 1496, 1512, Surr 1512; 
comm oyer and terminer Kent 1495-6, Surr 1495, Suss 1495; comm of musters Kent 1496, 
Suss 1496, Canterbury, Kent, 1515; keeper of Southfrith Park, Kent, 1 Dec 1499-30 May 
1 508; chief larderer at coronations of Henry vni, qv, 24 June 1 509 and of Anne Boleyn, 
queen consort, 1 June 1533; acted as warden Cinque Ports in the absence of Edward Poynings, 
qv under Lord Warden, c 1512-15; PC 1515-21?; keeper of Ashdown Forest, Suss, 1515. 
Seat at Birling, Kent; lands in Kent, Surr, and Suss. 

players Rye 1516-17(87) 

1517-18(89) 

Henry Nevill (26 Nov 1527-10 Feb 1586/7), son of George Nevill, 5th baron of Abergavenny, 
qv\ succ as 6th baron of Abergavenny June 1535. JP Kent 1554, 1562, 1564; comm oyer and 
terminer Kent 1554, 1564, Surr 1564, Suss 1564; comm of musters Kent 1569, 1577. Seats at 
Abergavenny Castle, Monm, Wales, and Birling, Kent; lands in Kent, Surr, and Suss, 
players Rye 1570-1 (120-1) 

Arundel 

Richard Fitz Alan (1346-21 Sept 1397), succ as 15th earl of Arundel and 10th earl of Surrey 
24 Jan 1375/6; arrested 12 July 1397; attainted and all honours forfeited; beheaded 21 Sept 
1397. Kings councillor 20 July 1377; adm of the west and south 5 Dec 1377-10 Sept 1378 
and 10 Dec 1386; comm of array Surr 1377, 1379-80, 1386, Suss 1377, 1379-80, 1386, 
1388; JP Surr 1377, 1380-2, 1390, 1394, Suss 1377, 1380-2, 1390, 1392, 1394, 1397; 
comm oyer and terminer Surr 1378, 1382-3, 1394, Suss 1382, 1384, 1392, 1394, 1397; 
adm of all of England 1386-9; lieut and capt-gen of the army 26 Feb 1386/7; adm and lieut 
of the king on the sea 12 May 1387; lieut and capt-gen of the fleet 12 May 1388; PC 10 Dec 
1389; exemption from parl and from being made )P or commissioner of the king against his 
will, for life 30 Apr 1394. Seat at Arundel Castle, Suss; lands in Surr and Suss, 
minstrel/s Battle Abbey 1381-2(183) 

William Fin Alan (or Mautravers) (23 Nov 1417-1487), succ as 21st earl of Arundel 24 Apr 
1438. JP Suss 1440-2, 1444, 1450-8, 1460-4, 1466, 1468-81, 1483-7, Hants 1444-7, 
1452-3, 1455-6, 1458, 1461, 1463-8, 1470, 1474-9, 1481, 1483-6, Surr 1448, 1474, 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1485-6, Kent 1471, 1473-5, 1479-81, 1483-5; comm of musters Portsmouth, Hants, 1449, 
1453, Suss 1452, 1454, 1456, 1457, Hants 1458, 1472; comm oyer and terminer Hants 1451, 
1462, 1464, 1466, 1468, Kent 1451, 1456, 1460, 1464, 1483, Surr 1451, 1464-5, 1483, 
Suss 1451, 1456, 1464-5, 1470, 1483, Southampton, Hants, 1466, 1468; comm of array 
Suss 1452, 1454, 1456-61, 1464, 1469-70, 1472, 1484, Hants 1459, 1461, 1463-4, 1466, 
1468-70, 1472, 1475, Surr 1459, 1464, 1469, 1480, Kent 1464, 1472, Cinque Ports 1484, 
and parts of Dover, Kent, 1484; comm of goal delivery Guildford Castle, Surr, 1456, Canter 
bury Castle, Kent, 1485; justice of all forests, chases, and parks south of Trent, for life 19 Dec 
1459; custodian forests and parks of Buckholt and Melchet, Hants, 1 July 1461; keeper New 
Forest, manor and park of Lyndhurst, and hundred of Redbridge, Hants, for life 26 Feb 1466/7; 
constable Dover Castle, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports, for life 10 May 1470; lieut Cinque 
Ports 22 June 1471; master of game of all forests, parks, and chases south of Trent 17 May 
1483; justice in eyre south of Trent, for life 1 July 1483. Seat at Arundel Castle, Suss; lands in 
Surr and Suss. 

minscrel/s Rye 1452-3 (44) 

minstrels Rye 1454-5 (45) 

1475-6(49) 

minstrel/s Rye 1479-80(51) 

minstrels Rye 1480-1 (52) 

1481-2(53) 
1482-3 (54) 
1484-5 (56) 
1485-6(56) 
1486-7(57) 

entertainer/s Battle Abbey c 1478-82 (184) 

players Battle Abbey c 1478-82 (184) 

Rye 1479-80(51) 

1481-2(53) 

1483-4 (55) 

1485-6(57) 

harper Rye 1485-6(56) 

Possibly 

bearward Rye 1479-80(51) 

Thomas Fitz Alan (or Mautravers) (1450-25 Oct 1524), son of William, 21st earl of Arundel, 
qv\ styled Lord Mautravers; succ as 22nd earl of Arundel 1487. Comm of array Southampton, 
Hants, 1469, 1472, 1475, 1484, Surr 1469, 1480, Suss 1469-70, 1484, 1490, 1496, 1512-13^ 
JP Southampton, Hants, 1470, 1474-9, 1481, 1483-8, 1493-4, 1498, 1500-2, 1504, Suss 
1476-81, 1483-8, 1490-1, 1493-4, 1496, 1498, 1500-2, 1504-5, 1508-9, 1511-15, 
1524, Surr 1485-8, 1493-4, 1497-1506, 1511-12, 1514-15, 1518, 1520, 1522, 1524, 
Hants 1510, 1512-15, 1518, 1523; comm oyer and terminer Suss 1470, 1495, Kent 1478, 
1495-6, Southampton, Hants, 1491, 1502, Surr 1491, 1495; comm of musters Southampton, 



298 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



Hants, 1472, Suss 1488, 1496; keeper Alice Holt and Woolmer Forests and park of 
Worldham, all in Hants, sole 18 July i486 and jt 16 Mar 1509/10; comm of gaol delivery 
Guildford Castle, Surr, i486; warden New Forest, Hants, 1489; keeper forests of 
Bucltholt and Melchet, both in Hants, sole 23 Mar 1494/5 and jt 16 Mar 1509/10. 
Seat at Arundel Castle, Suss; lands in Hants. 



bearward/s (Mautravers) 
minstrel/s (Mautravers) 
minstrel 
minstrels 



minstrel 



minstrels 

minstrel 
minstrels 
minstrel/s 
minstrels 



minstrel 
minstrels 

harper 

clarioners 

entertainer/s 

entertainers 

players 



players (servants) 
players 



player 
performers 



Battle Abbey 

Rye 

Rye 

Rye 



Rye 



Rye 

Rye 
Rye 
Rye 
Rye 



Rye 
Rye 

Rye 

Rye 

Battle Abbey 

Battle Abbey 

Rye 



Chichester 



Rye 

Battle Abbey 

Chichester 

Chichester 
Chichester 



c 1478-82 (184) 
1486-7 (58) 
1487-8 (59) 
1489-90 (60) 
1490-1 (62) 
1491-2(63) 
1493-4 (63) 
1494-5 (65) 
1495-6 (66) 
1495-6 (66) 
1497-8 (67) 
1502-3(70) 
1503-4 (72) 
1504-5 (73) 
1508-9(78) 
1511-12(81-2) 
1513-14 (84) 
1515-16(86) 
1516-17(88) 
1518-19(90) 
1523-4(95) 
1489-90 (61) 
1494-5 (65) 
1498-9(184) 
1508-9(185) 
1504-5(72) 
1513-14(83) 
1514-15(85) 
1517-18(14) 
1518-19 (14) 
1519-20(15) 
1519-20(91) 
1520-1 (186) 
1520-1 (15-16) 
1521-2(16) 
1522-3(16) 
1517-18(14) 
1518-19 (14) 
1519-20(15) 
1520-1 (15) 



299 

PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1521-2 (16) 
1522-3(16-17) 

dancing boy Chichester 1518-19(15) 

trumpeters Chichester 1520-1 (16) 

1521-2 (16) 
1522-3 (16) 

William Fin. Alan (c 1476-23 Jan 1543/4), son of Thomas, 22nd earl of Arundel, qv\ styled 
Lord Mautravers 1487-1524; succ as 23rd earl of Arundel 25 Oct 1524. JP Suss 1509, 
1511-12, 1514-15, 1524, 1526, 1529, 1531-2, 1538, Hants 1510, 1512-15, 1518, 1523, 
1525; jt warden forests of Buckholt and Mechelt, Hants, 16 Mar 1509/10-21. Lands in 
Hants, Kent, Surr, and Suss. 

minstrels Rye 1526-7(98) 

performers Chichester 1543-4(17) 

Possibly 

juggler Chichester 1543-4(18) 

performers Chichester 1543-4 (18) 

Henry Fitz Alan (23 Apr 1512-24 Feb 1579/80), son of William Fitz Alan, 23rd earl 
of Arundel, qv; styled Lord Mautravers bef 5 Feb 1532/3; succ as 24th earl of Arundel 
1544; confined or imprisoned 1549, 8 Nov 1551-3 Dec 1552, 1568-72. JP Hants 1538, 
1540, 1542, 1547, 1562, Surr 1538, 1541-3, 1547, 1562, Suss 1538, 1545, 1547, 1562, 
1564, Kent 1562, 1564; deputy gov Calais 2 July 1540-Feb 1543/4; comm oyer and 
terminer Hants 1540, Kent, Surr 1543, 1544, 1564, Suss 1543, 1544, 1554, 1564; comm 
of array Hants, Surr, Suss 1545; lord chamberlain July 1546-Jan 1549/50; PC July 1546; 
lord steward of the household Sept 1553-64; comm of gaol delivery Suss 1555- Prin 
cipal seats at Arundel Castle, Suss, and Arundel House, London. Lands in Hants, Kent, 
Surr, and Suss. 
Possibly 

juggler Chichester 1543-4(18) 

performers Chichester 1543-4 (18) 

Bath 

William Bourchier (1557-12 July 1623), succ as 4th earl of Bath 10 Feb 1560/1. Seat at 
Tawstock, Devon. 

players Rye 1576-7(124) 

Bedford (duke) 

Jasper Tudor (c 1430-21 Dec 1495), cr 16th earl of Pembroke by 20 Jan 1452/3 and 
3rd duke of Bedford 27 Oct 1485; attainted 4 Nov 1461; restored 1470-1; attainted 
1471; fled England after 4 May 1471; restored to earldom 12 Dec 1485. PC 27 Oct 



300 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1485; JP Kent 1490, 1493-4, Suss 1491, 1493-4, Southampton, Hants, 1493-4, 
Surr 1493-4; earl marshal of England 1492. Seat at Pembroke Castle, Pemb, Wales; 
lands in Surr. 

harpers (Pembroke) Rye 1458-9 (47) 

minstrels Rye 1490-1 (61) 

Bedford (earl) 

John Russell (c 1485-14 Mar 1554/5), cr Baron Russell 9 Mar 1538/9; cr 3rd earl of 
Bedford 19 Jan 1549/50. PC 1536 until death; comptroller of the household 18 Oct 
1537-9; comm oyer and terminer Kent, Surr, and Suss 1538, Hants 1541-5; lord high 
adm 28 July 1540-17 Jan 1542/3; MP Hants 1540, 1542, 1547, Kent 1542-3, 1547, 
Surr 1542-3, 1547, Suss 1544-5, 1547; lord keeper of the privy seal 3 Dec 1542 until 
death. Seats at Berwick, Dors, and Chenies, Bucks; residence at Russell House, the 
Strand, Midd. 

minstrels Rye 1551-2(113) 

minstrels (lord privy seal) Rye 1553-4(114) 

Berners 

John Bourchier (1467-19 Mar 1532/3), succ as 2nd Lord Berners 1474. Comm of gaol 
delivery Guildford Castle, Surr, 1498; JP Surr 1498, 1506, 1511-15, 1520, 1524-6, 1528; 
chamberlain to Princess Mary 9 Oct 1514-16; chancellor of the exchequer 28 May 1516-27. 
Land in Hants and Surr. 

minstrels Rye 1531-2(101) 

Bourchier 

Henry Bourchier (1404-4 Apr 1483), succ as count of Eu (Normandy) 28 May 1420; cr 
Viscount Bourchier bef 14 Dec 1446; cr 14th earl of Essex 30 June 1461. Master of the kings 
hart hounds sole 28 Jan 1432 and jt 8 July 1478; comm of musters Winchelsea, Suss, 1436; 
comm oyer and terminer Kent 1450-1, 1458, 1460, 1464, Suss 1450, 1465, Surr 1465, 1468, 
Hants 1466, Southampton, Hants, 1466, throughout the realm 1469; treasurer of England 
29 May 1455-5 Oct 1456, shortly after 10 July 1460-Apr 1462, and Apr 1471-4 Apr 1483; 
chief justice in eyre south of Trent 1461 until death; master of the king s hunt in all forests, 
chases, and parks south of Trent, for life 18 Nov 1462- 4 Apr 1483; steward of the household 
1463-71; comm of array Hants 1464, Kent 1464, Surr 1464, Suss 1464; JP Kent 1471, 
1473-5, 1479-81, Surr 1475; chief steward duchy of Lancaster (southern parts) 1471 until 
death; keeper of the king s great seal June-July 1473- 

minstrel/s Rye 1453-4 (45) 

minstrels Rye 1455-6(46) 

Bridgwater 

Possibly 

Henry Daubeney (Dec 1493-8 Apr 1548), succ as 2nd Baron Daubeney 22 May 1508; cr 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1st earl of Bridgwater 19 July 1538. Seats at Ingleby, Line, and South Petherton, Somers. 
players Rye 1540-1 (107) 

Buckingham (earl) 

Thomas of Woodstock (7 Jan 1354/5-8 or 9 Sept 1397), son of Edward in, qv\ cr earl of 
Buckingham 1 6 July 1377, earl of Essex 26 Oct 1380, and 1st duke of Gloucester 6 Aug 
1385; imprisoned 10 July 1397. Guardian of the kingdom during the king s absence July 
1355-May 1360. Seat at Pleshey, Essex. 

minstrel/s Battle Abbey 1381-2(183) 

Buckingham (duke) 

Humphrey Stafford (15 Aug 1402-10 July 1460), succ as 6ch earl of Stafford and 7th Baron 
Stafford 21 July 1403, 5th earl of Buckingham 16 Oct 1438, and cr 1st duke of Buckingham 
14 Sept 1444. PC 15 Feb 1423/4; JP Kent 1424, 1428-9, 1432-3, 1435-44, 1446-7, 
1450-1, 1453-6, 1458-9; comm of musters Winchelsea, Suss, 1436; comm oyer and 
terminer Kent 1441, 1450-1, 1457, 1460, Surr 1441; constable Dover and Queenborough 
Castles, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports, for life 16 July 1450; comm of gaol delivery Maid- 
stone, Kent, 1453; comm of array Kent 1457, 1459-60. Seats at Stafford Castle, Staff, and 
Writtle, Essex, from 1421, and Maxstoke Castle, Warw, from 1438; granted manor of 
Penshurst, Kent, 28 Feb 1446/7. 

minstrels Rye 1452-3 (45) 

1453-4 (45) 
1454-5 (46) 
1455-6(46) 
1456-7 (46) 
minstrels (Buckingham, lord warden) Rye 1459-60(47) 

Edward Stafford (3 Feb 1477/8-17 May 1521), restored as 3rd duke of Buckingham, 8th earl 
of Stafford, 7th earl of Buckingham, and 9th Baron Stafford Nov 1485; beheaded 17 May 
1521. JP Kent 1498-1506, 1509-10, 1512, 1514-15, 1517, Surr 1499-1506, 151 1-12, 
1514-15, 1518, 1520; PC 1509. Seats at Brecon Castle, Brec, Wales, and Thornbury, Glouc; 
manor at Penshurst, Kent; lands in Kent and Surr. 

minstrels Rye 1511-12(82) 

Canterbury 

John Morton (c 1420-15 Sept 1500), elected bishop of Ely 8 Aug 1478, temporalities restored 
4 Jan 1478/9 and consecrated 31 Jan 1478/9; imprisoned in the Tower and in Brecon Castle, 
Brec, Wales, 1483; fled to Flanders until 1485; archbishop of Canterbury, elected 13 Jan 
1485/6, temporalities granted 13 July 1485, translated 6 Oct i486, and temporalities restored 
6 Dec i486 until death; made cardinal 1493. Chancellor of Edward, prince of Wales, 26 Sept 
1456; archdeacon of Norwich, Norf, by Mar 1461-bef July 1462 and by 1472-7, Chester, 
Ches, 9 May 1474-8, Winchester, Hants, 5 Mar 1474/5-8, Huntingdon, Hunts, 27 Mar 



302 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1475-8, Berks 6 Nov 1476-8, Norf 20 Jan 1476/7-8, and Leic 3 Jan 1477/8; master of the 
rolls 16 Mar 1471/2; keeper of the great seal 3 June 1473; JP Suss 1486-8, 1490-1, 1493-4, 
1496, 1498, Kent 1487, 1489-90, 1493-4, 1497-1500, Southampton, Hants, 1487-8, 
1493-4, 1498, 1500, Surr 1487-8, 1493-4, 1497-1500; lord chancellor 6 Mar 1486/7 until 
death; PC nd. 

minstrel Rye 1497-8 (68) 

minstrels Rye 1498-9 (68-9) 

minstrel/s Rye 1499-1500(69) 

entertainer/s Battle Abbey 1498-9(184) 

Cardinal 

Thomas Wolsey (c 1475-29 Nov 1530), dean of Lincoln 7 Feb 1508/9-14; dean of Hereford 
by 4 June 1509-12; dean of York 21 Feb 1512/13-14; precentor of St Paul s, London, 8 July 
1513-14; bishop of Lincoln, temporalities restored 4 Mar 1513/14 and consecrated 26 Mar 
1514; archbishop of York, temporalities restored 5 Aug 1514 and translated 15 Sept 1514; car 
dinal 10 Sept 1515; bishop of Bath and Wells in commendam 27 July 1518 and temporalities 
granted 26 Aug 1518; bishop of Durham in commendam 21 Mar 1522/3 and temporalities 
restored 30 Apr 1 523; bishop of Winchester in commendam 8 Feb 1 528/9 and temporalities 
restored 6 Apr 1529. PC by 1511; lord chancellor 24 Dec 1515;JP Kent 1517, 1521, 1524, 
1526, 1528, Surr 1518, 1520, 1522, 1524-6, 1528, Hants 1523-6, 1529, Suss 1524, 
1526, 1529. 

minstrels Rye 1525-6(96) 

Chandos 

Probably 

Giles Brydges (c 1548-21 Feb 1593/4), succ as 3rd Baron Chandos 1 1 Mar 1572/3. Seat at 

Sudeley Castle, Glouc. 

players Rye 1589-90(134) 

See also Sandys 

Clarence 

George Plantagenet (21 Oct 1449-18 Feb 1477/8), son of Richard, 3rd duke of York, av; cr 
3rd duke of Clarence 28 June 1461 and 17th earl of Warwick and 12th earl of Salisbury 
25 Mar 1472; attainted and executed 18 Feb 1477/8. Comm oyer and terminer Surr 1465, 
1468, Suss 1465, Southampton, Hants, 1466, 1468; JP Southampton, Hants, 1466-8, 1470, 
1474-7, Surr 1466, 1468-70, 1472-5, 1477, Suss 1466, 1468-77, Kent 1467, 1469-71, 
1473-5; chief justice in eyre south of Trent, for life 3 Sept 1468; lord chamberlain 20 May 
1472; comm of array Kent, Southampton, Hants, Surr, Suss 1472. Seats at Warwick Castle, 
Warw; lands in Surr. 

minstrels Rye 1474-5 (49) 

1475-6 (49) 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1476-7 (50) 
bearward Rye 1475-6(49) 

Cobham see William Brooke under Lord Warden 

Dacre 

Richard Fiennes (c 1422-25 Nov 1483), accepted by marriage as 7th Lord Dacre 7 Nov 1458. 
JP Suss 1451-83, Surr 1455-8, 1460-6, 1468-77, 1479-83, Kent 1481-3; comm oyer and 
terminerSuss 1451, 1455, 1465, 1470, Kent 1464, Surr 1465, Hants 1466, Southampton, 
Hants 1466; sheriff Suss and Surr 8 Nov 1452; comm of musters Suss 1454, 1456-7; 
comm of array Suss 1458-60, 1469-70, 1472, Surr 1459; jt steward of the prince of Wales, 
to administrate the principality of Wales, the duchy of Cornwall, and the county of Chester 
8 July 1471; jt tutor and counsellor to the prince of Wales 20 Feb 1473; PC 8 July 1475; jt 
chamberlain to Elizabeth, queen consort, nd. Seat at Herstmonceux, Suss; lands in Suss, 
minstrels Rye 1459-60 (47) 

Probably 

minstrel/s (Fiennes) Rye 1453-4 (45) 

See also William Fiennes under Fiennes 

Darcy 

Either 

Thomas Darcy (c 1565-21 Feb 1639/40), succ as 3rd Lord Darcy of Chiche 3 Mar 1580/1; 
cr Viscount Colchester 5 July 1621 and 4th Earl Rivers 4 Nov 1626. Seat at Chiche, now St 
Osyth, Essex; residence at Winchester House, London. 

or 

John Darcy (c 1530-18 Oct 1602), succ as 2nd Lord Darcy 28 Aug 1558. Seat at Aston, 
Yorks WR. 

players Rye 1592-3(137) 

Derby 

Thomas Stanley (c 1435-29 July 1504), succ as 2nd Baron Stanley 20 Feb 1458/9; cr 10th 
earl of Derby 27 Oct 1485; sovereign lord of the Isle of Man. Esquire of the body 1454; lord 
steward of the household 14 Aug 1471-Oct 1485; PC 1471-85; JP Surr 1472-5, 1477, 
1479; comm oyer and terminer Kent 1478, 1495-7; constable of England, for life 16 Dec 
1483 and 5 Mar 1485/6; comm of gaol delivery Canterbury Castle, Kent, i486, Guildford 
Castle, Surr, 1503. Seats at Knowsley and Lathom, Lane. 

bearwards (Stanley) Battle Abbey f 1478-82 (184) 

bearward (Stanley) Rye 1482-3 (55) 

bearward Rye 1487-8(59) 



304 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1488-9 (60) 

1490-1 (62) 

minstrel Rye 1490-1 (62) 

Edward Stanley (10 May 1509-24 Oct 1572), probably styled Lord Strange until he succ as 
12th earl of Derby, 1 1th Lord Strange, 4th Lord Stanley, and lord of the Isle of Man 23 May 

I 52 1 . PC 9 Aug 1 55 1 , 1 7 Aug 1 553, and 24 Nov 1 558. Seats at Knockin, Shrops, and 
Knowsley and Lathom, Lane. 

bearward Rye 1532-3(102) 

1534-5(103) 

Devon see Exeter (marquess) 

Dorset (marchioness) 

Margaret Wotton (nd-Sept 1541), da of Sir Robert Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, Kent; m. 
Istly, nd, William Medley (d. after 6 Jan 1508/9), m. 2ndly, in 1509, Thomas Grey, 2nd mar 
quess of Dorset (22 June 1477-10 Oct 1530); jt godmother to Princess Elizabeth. Residence 
at Gest Hall, Tilty Abbey, Essex. 

bearwards Chichester 1518-19(15) 

Dorset (marquess) 

Henry Grey (17 Jan 1516/17-23 Feb 1553/4), styled Lord Grey until he succ as 6th marquess 
of Dorset, 9th Lord Ferrers, 9th Lord Harington, 4th Lord Bonville, and possibly Lord Astley 
10 Oct 1530; cr 7th duke of Suffolk 1 1 Oct 1551; attainted and beheaded 23 Feb 1553/4. PC 

II Dec 1549-53; chief justice in eyre south of Trent 2 Feb 1549/50; warden of the marches 
towards Scotland Feb-Sept 1551. Seats at Bradgate and Groby, Leic, and Chewton, Somers; 
lands in Surr. 

minstrels Rye 1540-1 (108) 

Dudley see Leicester 

Essex 

Robert Devereux (19 Nov 1566-25 Feb 1600/1), styled Viscount Hereford until he succ as 
19di earl of Essex, 6di Lord Ferrers, and 9th Lord Bourchier 22 Sept 1576. Master of the horse 
1587-97; PC 25 Feb 1592/3. Seats at Chartley, Staff, and Lamphey, Pemb, Wales; residence at 
Essex House, Midd. 

players Rye 1588-9(133) 

Exeter (duke) 

Henry Holand (27 June 1430-Sept 1475), succ as 4th duke of Exeter and 15th earl of 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Huntingdon 5 Aug 1447; attainted 4 Nov 1461; fled to Flanders 1463-Feb 1470/1; held in 
custody 26 May 1471-20 May 1475. Lord high adm, jt 14 Feb 1445/6 and sole 5 Aug 
1447-60; constable of the Tower, jt 28 Feb 1446/7 and sole 6 Aug 1447-60; comm oyer and 
terminer Kent 1451, 1460. London residence at Coldharbour. 

minscrels Rye 1*54-5 



Exeter (marquess) 

Henry Courtenay (c 1498-9 Jan 1538/9), succ as 19th earl of Devon Dec 1512; cr 1st marquess 
of Exeter 18 June 1525. PC 1520; keeper Birling Park, Kent, 28 Apr 1522; JP Kent 1526, 1528, 
1531-2, 1537-8, Surr 1528, 1531-2, 1538. Seat atTiverton Castle, Devon; lands in Hants, 

Kent, and Surr. 

minstrels Rye 1530-1 (100) 

minstrels (Devon) Rye 1534-5(104) 



Fane 

Thomas Fane (nd-Jan 1607), kt 1598. JP Kent from c 1575, Suss from c 1579; sheriff Kent 
28 Mar 1580; lieut Dover Castle, Kent, 1588; MP Dover, Kent, 1589, 1593, 1597; deputy 
lieut Kent by 1596; deputy warden Cinque Ports 1603. Seat at Burston in Hunton, Kent, 
trumpeter Rye 1598-9(140) 

Fiennes 

Roger Fiennes (14 Sept 1384-Oct or Nov 1449), kt before Nov 1412. MP Suss 1416, 1429, 
1439, 1442, 1445; JP Suss 1416-17, 1424, 1427-8, 1433, 1435-7, 1439-41, Surr 1436, 
1448, Kent 1443-4, 1446-7; keeper Porchester Castle, Hants, 3 Apr 1421 until death; sheriff 
Surr and Suss 14 Feb-13 Nov 1423, 3 Nov 1434-7 Nov 1435; comm of array Kent 1430, 
Suss 1435-7, 1443, Surr 1437; treasurer of the household 9 Apr 1439-12 Nov 1446; chief 
steward, duchy of Lancaster (southern parts) and Wales 12 June 1441-1 1 Dec 1447. Seat at 
Herstmonceux, Suss; lands in Hants, Kent, and Suss. 

minstrel/s Robertsbridge Abbey 1416-17(186) 

William Fiennes (c 1428-14 Apr 1471), son of James Fiennes, 1st Lord Saye and Sele, qv\ 
succ as 2nd Lord Saye and Sele 1450. Comm oyer and terminer Kent 1452, Surr 1468; 
PC Mar 1453/4; comm of array Kent 1456-7, 1560; comm of musters Kent 1456-7; JP 
Kent 1460-2, 1464-5, 1467, 1469, Hants 1463?, 1464-8, 1470; keeper New Forest, Hants, 
5 Apr 1461-26 Feb 1466/7; constable Porchester Castle, Hants, for life 13 June 1461. Seat at 
Broughton Castle, Oxf; lands in Hants and Surr. 

Possibly 

minstrel/s Rye 1453-4 (45) 

See also Dacre 



306 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Gloucester (duke) see Richard Plantagenet (1452-85) under King 

Grey 

Edward Grey (1503?-2 July 1551), succ his father as 4th Lord Grey of Powis 15 Apr 1504. 
players Rye 1540-1 (107) 

Grey of Ruthin see George Grey under Kent 

Guildford 

Henry Guildford (1489-bef 22 May 1532), brother of Sir Edward Guildford, qv under Lord 
Warden; kt 30 Mar 1512; kt banneret 1513; KG 6 May 1526. Constable and keeper castle and 
park of Leeds, Kent, 24 Dec 1512; master of the king s horse 6 Nov 1515-18 July 1522; jp 
Kent 1515, 1517, 1521, 1524, 1526, 1528, 1531,Surr 1521; comptroller of the household by 
1 Sept 1522; steward manor of Legh, Kent, 1522. Residence in London; lands in Kent. 

minstrel Rye 1516-17(88) 

minstrels Rye 1517-18 (90) 

1523-4(95) 

minstrels (master comptroller) Rye 1523-4(95) 

1525-6(96) 

minstrels Rye 1530-1 (100) 

Home 

Gervase Home (1445- just bef 21 July 1493) of Appledore, Kent, arrested as a rebel 25 Apr 
1470; pardoned 1484. MP Barnstaple, Kent 1472-5, New Romney, Kent, 1483; bailiffNew 
Romney, Kent, 1481; comm of array Kent 1490. Lands in Kent. 

players Rye 1479-80(51) 

Howard 

Thomas Howard (c 1520-28 Jan 1581/2), 2nd son of Thomas Howard, 8th duke of Norfolk, 
qv\ restored in blood 1 May 1553 and cr Viscount Howard 13 Jan 1558/9. Comm oyer and 
terminer Southampton, Hants, 1564. Seat at Bindon, Dors. 

Possibly 

players Rye 1577-8(126) 

See also Charles Howard under Lord Admiral 

Kent 

Edmund Grey (26 Oct 1416-22 May 1490), succ as 4th Lord Grey of Ruthin 30 Sept or 
18 Oct 1440; cr llth earl of Kent 30 May 1465. PC 20 May 1443 and 24 June 1463; lord 
treasurer 24 June 1463; comm of array Kent 1470; comm oyer and terminer Kent, Surr, 
Suss 1483. Seat at Ruthin, Denb, Wales. 

minstrel Rye 1480-1 (52) 

1482-3 (54) 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

mmstrels Rye 1485-6(57) 

George Grey (bef 1455-16 Dec 1503), son of Edmund Grey, llth earl of Kent, qv; succ as 
12th earl of Kent and 5th Lord Grey of Ruthin 1490. JP Kent 1496; comm oyer and terminer 
Kent 1496. Seat at Ampthill, Beds. 

minstrel (Grey of Ruthin) Rye 1494-5(64) 

minstrels Rye 1 495-6 (66) 

bearward Rye 1499-1500(69) 

Richard Grey (c 1478-3 May 1523), son of George Grey, 12th earl of Kent, qv, succ as 13th 
earl of Kent and 6th Lord Grey of Ruthin Dec 1503. Residence in Lombard Street, London; 

lands in Hants. 

bearward/s Rye 1516-17(87-8) 

Chichester 1519-20(15) 

bearward Rye 1519-20(91) 

1520-1 (92) 

King 

Edward Plantagenet (13 Nov 1312-21 June 1377), son of Edward n and Isabella, da of 
Philip rv of France; summ to parl as earl of Chester 1320; proclaimed guardian of the kingdom 
in the king s name during the king s absence 27 Oct 1326; chosen king by parl 14 Jan 1326/7; 
crowned as Edward in 29 Feb 1326/7. 

entenainer/s Battle Abbey 1346-7(182) 

servant/s (possibly minstrel/s) Battle Abbey 1357-8(183) 

Richard Plantagenet (6 Jan 1366/7-14 Feb 1399/1400), son of Edward, prince of Wales, 
and Joan of Woodstock, suo jure Countess of Kent; cr prince of Wales 20 Nov 1376; ace as 
Richard n 21 June 1377; crowned 16 July 1377; abdicated 29 Sept 1399. 

minstrel/s Battle Abbey 1381-2(183) 

Henry of Windsor (6 Dec 1421-21 May 1471), son of Henry v and Catherine of Valois; ace as 
Henry vi 1 Sept 1422; proclaimed king of France 21 Oct 1422; John, 1st duke of Bedford, 
appointed protector 5 Dec 1422; crowned king of England 6 Nov 1429 and of France 16 Dec 
1431; deposed 4 Mar 1460/1; restored 3 Oct 1470; crowned 13 Oct 1470; deposed finally 
11 Apr 1471. 

entertainers Robertsbridge Abbey 1424-5(187) 

minstrels Rye 1448-9 (44) 

1449-50 (44) 
1455-6(46) 
1457-8 (47) 

Edward of York (28 Apr 1442-9 Apr 1483), son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd duke of York, 
qv, and Cecily Neville, qv under Queen Mother; ace as Edward iv 4 Mar 1460/1; crowned 



308 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

28 June 1461; fled England 3 Oct 1470-14 Mar 1470/1; restored 11 Apr 1471. 

minstrels Rye 1461-2(48) 

1462-3 (48) 
1474-5 (49) 
1475-6 (49) 
1479-80(51) 
1480-1 (53) 

entertainer/s Battle Abbey c 1478-82 (184) 

Possibly 

bearward Rye 1479-80 (51) 

Richard Plantagenet (2 Oct 1452-22 Aug 1485), son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd duke of 
York, qv, and Cecily Neville, qv under Queen Mother; cr 3rd duke of Gloucester 1 Nov 1461; 
protector of the realm 9 Apr 1483; ace as Richard in 26 June 1483; crowned 6 July 1483. 
entertainer/s (Gloucester) Battle Abbey c 1478-82 (184) 

minstrels (Gloucester) Rye 1480-1(52) 

1482-3 (55) 

minstrels Rye 1483-4 (55) 

lionkeeper Rye 1483-4 (55) 

HenryTudor of Richmond (28 Jan 1456/7-21 Apr 1509), son of Edmund Tudor, earl of 
Richmond, and Margaret Beaufort, qv under Queen Mother; ace as Henry vii 22 Aug 1485; 
crowned 30 Oct 1485. 

minstrels Rye 1487-8 (59) 

1489-90(60-1) 
1490-1 (62) 
1493-4 (63) 
1494-5 (64) 
1495-6 (66) 
1496-7(67) 
1503-4(71) 
1506-7(75) 
1507-8(77) 

bearward/s Rye 1496-7 (67) 

bearward Rye 1507-8(76) 

entertainer/s Battle Abbey 1499-1500(185) 

Possibly 

bearward Rye 1508-9(78) 

entertainers Battle Abbey 1508-9(185) 

HenryTudor (28 June 1491-28 Jan 1546/7), son of Henry vn, qv, and Elizabeth of York, 
qv under Queen; constable Dover Castle, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports 5 Apr 1492; cr 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



309 



duke of York 31 Oct 1494-18 Feb 1502/3; cr prince of Wales 18 Feb 1502/3; ace as 
Henry vm 22 Apr 1 509; crowned 24 June 1 509. 
minstrels (lord warden) Rye 

minstrels (York) Rye or New Romney, Kent 

Rye 

minstrels (lord warden) Rye 

Rye 
minstrels (prince) Rye 



minstrels 



minstrel 
minstrels 



minstrel 
minstrels 



bearward/s (lord warden) 
bearward (York) 
bearward (prince) 

bearwards (prince) 
bearward (prince) 
bearward 



Rye 



Rye 
Rye 



Rye 

Rye 

Chichester 

Rye 

Chichester 

Rye 



Rye 
Rye 
Rye 

Rye 
Rye 
Rye 



1495- 

1498- 

1498 

1502 

1503 

1504 

1505 

1506 

1507- 

1508 

1509 

1510 

1511 

1512 

1513 

1514 

1515 

1516 

1518 

1520 

1521 

1523 

1524 

1525 

1526 

1530 

1531 

1531 

1532 

1533 

1534 

1536 

1536 

1540 

1550 

1551 

1496 

1497 

1502 

1503 

1505 

1508 

1509 



6(66) 
9(69) 
9 (69) 
3(71) 
4(71) 
5(72-3) 
6 (73-4) 
7(74) 

8 (76-7) 

9 (77) 

10 (79) 

11 (80) 

12 (81-2) 
13(83) 
14 (84) 
15(85) 

16 (86) 

17 (88) 
19(90-1) 
1 (92) 
2(93) 
4(95) 

5 (96) 

6(97) 

7(98) 

1 (99-100) 
-2(101) 
-2(101) 
-3(17) 
-4(103) 
-5(17) 
-7(17) 
-7(104-5) 
-1 (107) 
-1 (112) 
-2(113) 
-7 (67) 

8(68) 
-3(71) 
-4 (72) 
-6 (74) 
-9 (77) 
-10 (79) 



310 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



hcarwards 

bearward 

bearwards 

bearward 

bearwards 

bearward 



bearwards 
bearward 

entertainer/s (York) 
players 



juggler 



performers 



Chichester 
Rye 

Chichester 

New Romney, Kent 

Chichester 

Rye 

Chichester 

Battle Abbey 

Rye 



Chichester 
Rye 
Rye 
Rye 



Rye 

Chichester 
Rye 
Chichester 



Chichester 



1511-12(81) 

1512-13 (82-3) 

1513-14(84) 

1514-15(85) 

1515-16(86) 

1516-17 (87) 

1517-18(14) 

1517-18(89) 

1518-19(90) 

1518-19(15) 

1519-20(92) 

1519-20(15) 

1521-2(93) 

1521-2(16) 

c 1522(186) 

1523-4(94) 

1525-6(96) 

1526-7 (98) 

1532-3(102) 

1541-2 (108) 

1543-4(109) 

1543-4(18) 

1544-5 (110) 

1499-1500(185) 

1520-1 (92) 

1530-1 (100) 

1535-6(104) 

1537-8 (105) 

1540-1 (107) 

1546-7(111) 

1548-9(112) 

1550-1 (113) 

1552-3(114) 

1515-16 (86) 

1517-18 (14) 

1517-18 (89) 

1518-19(15) 

1519-20(15) 

1520-1 (16) 

1521-2(16) 

1522-3(16) 

1531-2(101) 

1517-18(14) 

1518-19 (14-15) 

1519-20(15) 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1520-1 (15) 
1521-2 (16) 
1522-3 (17) 

laborer (minstrel) Rye 1517-18(89) 

1543-4 (18) 

servant with bull Rye 1524-5(96) 

jester Rye 1543-4(109) 

Probably 

bearward Rye 1542-3(108) 

Possibly 

bearward Rye 1508-9(78) 

entertainers Battle Abbey 1508-9(185) 

Edward Tudor (12 Oct 1537-6 July 1553), son of Henry vin, qv, and Jane Seymour; ace as 
Edward vi 21 Jan 1546/7; crowned 20 Feb 1546/7; Edward Seymour, 5th duke of Somerset, 
qv, appointed protector. 

players (prince) Rye 1538-9(105) 

1539-40 (106) 
1540-1 (107) 
1542-3(109) 
1543-4 (110) 
1544-5 (110) 
1545-6 (110) 

players Rye 1552-3(114) 

bearward (prince) Chichester 1543-4(18) 

bearwards (prince) Rye 1543-4(109) 

entertainers (prince) Chichester 1543-4(17) 

juggler/s (prince) Chichester 1543-4(18) 

performers (prince) Chichester 1543-4(17) 

musician Lewes 1551-2 (33) 

King of Navarre 

Charles d livreux (1332-1 Jan 1386/7), succ as count of fivreux 1343; became Charles n, 
king of Navarre, Oct 1349; crowned 27 June 1350; arrested and imprisoned by Jean n, king 
of France, Apr 1356; freed from prison Nov 1357; defeated by the French army 1364; received 
from Richard n, qv, a safe-conduct to come to England in 1383 but probably never used it. 
Seats in Evreux and Pamplona. 

minstrel/s Battle Abbey 1381-2(183) 

Leicester 

Robert Dudley (24 June 1532 or 1533-4 Sept 1588), br of Ambrose Dudley, qv under 
Warwick; imprisoned July 1553; attainted 22 Jan 1553/4; pardoned 18 Oct 1554; restored in 



312 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

blood 7 Mar 1557/8; cr baron of Denbigh, Denb, Wales, 28 Sept 1564; cr 14th earl of 
Leicester 29 Sept 1564. PC 23 Apr 1559; master of the horse 1559-87; high steward Andover, 
Hants, 1574; warden of the New Forest, Lyndhurst Park, and hundred of Redbridge, all in 
Hants, 15 June 1580; lord steward of the household 1 Nov 1584-8; warden and chief justice 
in eyre south of Trent 25 Nov 1 585 until death. Seats at Kenilworth, Warw, and Wanstead, 
Essex; residence at Leicester House, Midd; lands in Kent, Surr, and Suss. 

players (Lord Dudley) Rye 1559-60(117} 

players (Sir Robert Dudley) Rye 1560-1(118) 

players (Lord Robert) Rye 1563-4(118) 

players Rye 1569-70(120) 

1575-6(124) 
1576-7 (125) 
1586-7(131) 
1587-8(132) 

Lewkenor (Mr) 
Unidentified 

players Rye 1506-7(75) 

Lisle 

Arthur Plantagenet (c 1480-3 Mar 1541/2), natural son of Edward iv, qv; cr 6th Viscount 
Lisle 25 Apr 1523; imprisoned in the Tower 19 May 1540; pardoned Feb 1541/2. JP Hants 
1512-15, 1518, 1523-6, 1529, 1531-2, 1538, Suss 1524, 1526, 1529, 1531-2, 1538; sheriff 
Hants 9 Nov 1513; warden and keeper forests of Buckholt and Melchet, Hants, 26 Nov 1524; 
vice adm of England 1525; warden Cinque Ports 22 July 1536 until death; PC 1540. Lands 
in Suss. 

minstrels Rye 1523-4(95) 

minstrel Rye 1531-2(101) 

players Rye 1532-3(102) 

Lord Admiral 

Henry Fitzroy (c 1519-22 July 1536), natural son of Henry vin, qv\ cr 1st duke of Richmond, 
4th duke of Somerset, and 9th earl of Nottingham 18 June 1525. Lord high adm 16 July 1525 
until death; constable Dover Castle, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports May 1 536 until death. 
Residences included Sheriff Hutton, Yorks NR, and Pontefract, Yorks WR. 

minstrel New Romney, Kent 1528-9(98) 

players Rye 1529-30(99) 

bearward (Richmond) Rye 1534-5(103) 

Edward Clinton (or Fiennes) (15 12-16 Jan 1584/5), succ as 9th Lord Clinton and Say 7 Aug 
1517; cr 16th earl of Lincoln 4 May 1572. PC 4 May 1550, Apr 1557, and 1558; lord high 
adm 14 May 1550-Oct 15 53 and Feb 1557/8 until death; constable of the Tower 7-19 July 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1553; JP Surr 1554, 1562, 1564; lord steward of the household 1572-84. Lands in Kent, 
musicians Rye 1552-3(114) 

Charles Howard (c 1536-14 Dec 1624), succ as Baron Howard of Effingham 1 1 or 12 Jan 
1572/3; cr 10th earl of Nottingham 22 Oct 1597. Keeper Oatlands Park, Surr, 1562; MP 
Surr 1563, 1572; JP Surr by 1573 and Kent 1608; lord lieut Surr, sole 1573 and 3 July 1585, 
and jt 27 July 1621 until death; lieut of musters Surr 1 579; lord chamberlain of the household 
1 Jan 1583/4-July 1585; PC by 5 Mar 1583/4 until death; lord lieut Suss, sole 3 July 1585 and 
jt2Sept 1586; lord high adm 8 July 1585-27 Jan 1618/19; high steward Guildford, Surr, from 
1585; bailiff and steward of manors of Ashstead, Bagshot, Byfleet, Chertsey, Egham, Hardwitch 
in Hardwick, Leigh, Oatlands, Thorpe Worplesdon, and of royal lands in Chertsey, Chobham, 
Esher, Walton on Thames, and Weybridge, all in Surr, 24 Mar 1592/3; master of the game, 
Witley Park, Surr, 24 Mar 1592/3; chief justice in eyre south of Trent 15 June 1597 until death; 
lord steward of the household 24 Oct 1597-Nov 1615; queen s lieut and capt-gen in the 
south of England 10 Aug 1599 and 14 Feb 1600/1. Seat at Effingham, Surr; lands in Surr. 
players Rye 1585-6(131) 

1589-90 (134) 
1591-2 (135) 
1592-3(136) 

Possibly 

players (Howard) Rye 1577-8(126) 

See also Howard and for Lord Admiral, see John de Vere (1442-1513) under Oxford, Thomas 
Howard (1473-1 554) under Norfolk, and Richard Neville under Warwick 

Lord Chamberlain 

Thomas Radcliffe (c 1525 or 1526-9 June 1583), styled Lord Fitz Walter 27 Nov 1542-53; 
succ as 8di earl of Sussex and 3rd Viscount and 9th Lord FirzWalter 17 Feb 1556/7. Warden and 
capt Portsmouth, Hants, 24 Nov 1549 -Apr 1551; chief justice in eyre south of Trent 3 July 
1557 until death; PC 30 Dec 1570; lord chamberlain of the household 13 July 1572 until death; 
chief comm of array Kent 1579. Seats at New Hall and Woodham Walther, Essex; house at 
Bermondsey, Surr. 

players Rye 1573-4(123) 

1578-9 (126) 

George Carey (1547-8 Sept 1603), succ as 2nd Baron Hunsdon 23 July 1596. MP Canterbury, 
Kent, 1572, and Hants 1584, 1586, 1589, and 1593; knight marshal of the household 8 Oct 
1577; capt Wight, for life by 27 Apr 1582; JP Hants from c 1584, Kent 1584; vice adm 
Southampton, Hants, 2 Feb 1585/6; lord chamberlain of the household 17 Apr 1597-4 May 
1603; PC 17 Apr 1597-4 May 1603; comm custos rot Hants c 1593; lord lieut Hants, jt 
29 Oct 1597 until death. Seats at Carisbrooke Castle, Wight, and Hunsdon, Herts; house 



314 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

at Blackfriars, London; lands in Hants. 

players R ye 1596-7(140) 

Lord Chancellor 

John Kemp or Kempe (1380?-22 Mar 1453/4), doctor of civil law by 1413; archdeacon of 
Durham, collated 13 Oct 1417; bishop of Rochester, provided to the diocese by the pope 
26 June 1419, temporalities restored 9 Sept 1419, consecrated at Rouen 3 Dec? 1419; bishop of 
Chichester, translated by papal provision 28 Feb 1420/1, temporalities restored 21 Aug 1421; 
bishop of London, translated 17 Nov 1421, spiritualities received 22 May 1422, temporalities 
restored 20 June 1422; archbishop of York, translated 20 July 1425, temporalities restored 
22 Apr 1426, enthroned 1 Sept 1426; cardinal priest of Santa Balbina, appointed Dec 1439; 
cardinal bishop of Santa Rufina, appointed 1452; archbishop of Canterbury, elected 28 June 
1452, translated 21 July 1452, temporalities restored 6 Sept 1452, enthroned 11 Dec 1452. 
Comm oyer and terminer court of admiralty 1414-16, Kent 1450; dean of the court of 
arches and vicar-general to Archbishop Chichele 1415-?; keeper of the privy seal 1418-19?; 
chancellor of Normandy 1419-Aug 1422; king s council 1422-22 Mar 1453/4; lord 
chancellor of England 1426-25 Feb 1431/2, 31 Jan 1449/50-22 Mar 1453/4; jp Kent 
1436-44, 1446-7, 1450-1, 1453-4, Suss 1453. 

minstrel Rye 1452-3 (45) 

Lord Privy Seal see Bedford (earl) 

Lord Protector see Edward Seymour under Somerset 

Lord Steward 

George Talbot (1468-26 July 1538), succ as 7th earl of Shrewsbury, 9th Lord Furnivalle, Lord 
Talbot, Lord Strange, and earl of Waterford, Ireland, 28 June 1473. Comm oyer and terminer 
Kent 1495; lord steward of the household by 20 July 1506 until death; chamberlain of the 
exchequer sole 14 May 1509 and jt 17 July 1527; comm of gaol delivery Surr 1510/11; PC by 
July 1512; comm of musters Greenwich, Kent, 1512. Seat at Sheffield Castle, Yorks WR; 
London residence at Coldharbour. 

minstrel Rye 1510-11 (80) 

Lord Treasurer 

Thomas Howard (1443-21 May 1524), cr 13th earl of Surrey 28 June 1483; attainted and all 
honours forfeited 1485; attainder reversed and restored as earl of Surrey 1489; cr 7th duke of 
Norfolk 1 Feb 1513/14. Esquire of the body 1473; PC June 1483-5, 1501-21 May 1524; 
lord steward of the household 1483-4; lieut gen of the north 1489 and 1513; underwarden 
of the east and middle marches 1490; treasurer of the exchequer 16 June 1501-22; JP Surr 
1501-6, 1511-12, 1514-15, 1518, 1520, 1522, 1524, Suss 1501-2, 1504-5, 1508-9, 
1511-12, 1514-15, 1524; lord high steward for the trial of Edward, Lord Dudley 1503-4 
and for the trial of Edward, duke of Buckingham, 13 May 1521; earl marshal, for life 10 July 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1510; comm of gaol delivery Surr 1511; comm of array Suss 1512; comm of musters 
Greenwich, Kent, 1512; lord great chamberlain of England, steward of Essex or Waltham 
Forest and constable of the castle of Colchester, Essex, during the minority of John de Vere, 
14th earl of Oxford, qv, 29 May 1514-20 and 1523; guardian of England during the 
king s absence in France 31 May- 18 July 1520. Seat at Framlingham Castle, Suff; lands in 
Kent and Suss. 

minstrels Rye 1511-12(82) 

Possibly 

bearward (Norfolk) Rye 1523-4(95) 

See also Thomas Howard (1473-1554) under Norfolk and for Lord Treasurer, see 
Shrewsbury 

Lord Warden 

Edward Poynings (1459-22 Oct 1521), attainted Jan 1483/4; kt Aug 1485; attainder reversed 
Nov 1485; KG 1493- Comm of array Kent 1482, 1496; comm of musters Kent 1482, 1496, 
Maidstone, Kent, 1509, Cinque Ports 1512; comm of gaol delivery Canterbury Castle, Kent, 
1485, 1498-1500, 1503, 1508, Maidstone, Kent, 1488, 1504, 1509; JP Kent 1485, 1487, 
1489-90, 1493-4, 1497-1506, 1509-10, 1512, 1514-15, 1517, 1521; deputy lieut Calais 
1493; deputy lieut Ireland 13 Sept 1494-Jan 1496; lieut Dover Castle, Kent, 1496-1505; 
comm oyer and terminer Kent 1496; constable Dover Castle, Kent, 27 May 1505-22 Oct 
1521; deputy warden Cinque Ports 27 May 1505-9; warden Cinque Ports 9 June 1509- 
22 Oct 1521; comptroller of the household by 1509-19; MP Kent 1512, 1515?; lieut Tournai 
1513-14; chancellor Order of the Garter 1517; treasurer of the household 1519-22 Oct 1521. 
Seat at Westenhanger, Kent; lands in Kent. 

minstrel (Poynings) Rye 1500-1(70) 

1502-3(70) 

minstrel/s (Poynings) Rye 1503-4(72) 

1504-5 (73) 

minstrel (Poynings) Rye 1505-6(74) 

1506-7(75) 
1509-10(79) 

minstrel/s (Poynings) Rye 1510-11(80) 

minstrel (Poynings) Rye 1511-12(81) 

minstrel Rye 1512-13(83) 

minstrels (servants) Rye 1515-16(86) 

minstrel Rye 1516-17(87) 

1517-18 (90) 
1518-19 (91) 
bearward (Poynings) Rye 1501-2(70) 

1502-3(71) 
bearwards (Poynings) Rye 1505-6(74) 



316 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

entertainer (Poynings) Battle Abbey 1520-1(186) 

servant (minstrel) Rye 1520-1(92) 

Edward Guildford (by 1479-4 June 1534), br of Sir Henry Guildford, qv Guildford; kt 
25 Sept 1513; kt banneret by 1514. Master of armoury jt Dec 1493-1506 and sole 1506 
until death; JP Kent 1503, 1509-10, 1512, 1514-15, 1517, 1521, 1524, 1526, 1528, 1531, 
1532 or 1533; bailiff Winchelsea, Suss, 1506; esquire of the body by 1509; sheriff Line 8 Nov 
1511; marshal Calais 15 May 1519-31 Mar 1524; constable Dover Castle, Kent, and warden 
Cinque Ports 20 Nov 1521-4 June 1534; keeper Northfrith Park, Kent, 20 Aug 1523; jt 
standard bearer 13 Sept 1524 until death; MP Kent 1529; comm of gaol delivery Canterbury 
Castle, Kent, 1530; jt constable and doorward Leeds Castle, parker of Leeds and Langley 
Parks, Kent, Apr 1531 until death; PC by May 1534. Seats in Halden and Hemstead, Kent; 
lands in Kent and Suss. 

minstrel Rye 1523-4(95) 

minstrels Rye 1524-5(96) 

minstrel Rye 1525-6(97) 

minstrels Rye 1527-8(98) 

Rye 1530-1 (100) 

players Rye 1532-3(101) 

George Boleyn (nd-17 May 1536), cr Viscount Rochford c 1529; indicted 10 May 1536; 
tried and found guilty 15 May 1536; beheaded with all honours forfeited 17 May 1536. 
Squire of the body 26 Sept 1528; master of the buckhounds 1528; gov hospital of St Mary of 
Bethlehem, London, 27 July 1529; constable Dover Castle, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports 
23 June 1534-17 May 1536; keeper manor and park of Penshurst, Kent, and parks of 
Northleigh and Northlands, Kent, nd; PC nd; steward of Tunbridge, Kent, and receiver and 
bailiff of Brasted, Kent, nd. Lands in Kent. 

players Rye 1533-4(103) 

Rye 1535-6(104) 

minstrels Rye 1534-5(104) 

Thomas Cheyne (bef 1487-16 Dec 1558), kt by 10 Nov 1513; KG 18 May 1539. Es 
quire of the body by 1509-15; constable Queenborough Castle, Kent, and steward 
Merden and Middleton, Kent, 1512-16 Dec 1558; sheriff Kent 5 Nov 1515-9 Nov 
1516; knight of the body 1515-26; constable Rochester Castle, Kent, 16 June 1525-16 Dec 
1558; JP Kent 1526, 1528, 1531, 1537-9, 1540, 1542, 1544, 1547, 1554; MP Kent 
1529?, 1539, 1542, 1545, 1547, 1553, 1554, 1558; constable Dover Castle, Kent, and 
warden Cinque Ports 17 May 1536-16 Dec 1558; high steward lands of the archbishopric 
of Canterbury by 1536-40; comm oyer and terminer Kent 1538, 1554, Rye, Suss, 
1539, Dover, Kent, 1539; treasurer of the household 9 Mar 1539-16 Dec 1558; PC 
1539-16 Dec 1558; constable Saltwood Castle, keeper mansion of Westenhanger, chief 
steward of Allington and Chilham manors, bailiff and woodward of Chilham manor, 



317 

PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

keeper Westenhanger, AJlington and Saltwood parks, and master of the deer Lyminge? Park, 
all in Kent, 28 June 1540-16 Dec 1558; keeper forest of Chestenwode, Kent, 29 June 
1540; comm of array Kent 1545; comm of musters Kent 1546; lord lieut Kent 1551-3; 
bailiff Sandwich, Kent, 16 June 1553-16 Dec 1558; water-bailiff Dover, Kent, 24 Oct 
1557-16 Dec 1558. Seats in Blackfriars, London, and Shurland, Isle of Sheppey, Kent; 

lands in Kent. 

minstrels Rye 1536-7(104) 

1537-8(105) 
1538-9(105) 
1539-40(106) 
1540-1 (107) 
1543-4 (109) 
1544-5 (110) 
1546-7 (111) 
1548-9(112) 
1550-1 (113) 
1551-2(114) 
1553-4 (114) 
1554-5 (115) 
1558-9(117) 

players Rye 1537-8(105) 

1538-9(105) 
1539-40(106) 
1541-2 (108) 
1542-3(109) 
1543-4 (109) 

William Brooke (1 Nov 1527-6 Mar 1596/7), succ as 10th Lord Cobham 29 Sept 1558. MP 
Hythe, Kent, 1547 and Rochester, Kent, 1555; JP Kent 1558-9, 1562, and 1564 until death; 
constable of Dover Castle, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports, for life 28 Apr 1559; lord lieut 
Kent 26 May 1559 until death; PC 19 Feb 1585/6; keeper of Eltham Palace and Park, Kent, 
1592 until death; lord chamberlain of the household 8 Aug 1596 until death. Seat at Cobham 
Hall, Kent. 

players Rye 1569-70(120) 

musicians (Mr Cobham) Hythe, Kenc 1593-4 (138) 

See also Humphrey Stafford under Buckingham (duke), Henry Tudor under King, and 
Richard Neville under Warwick 



Master Comptroller see Guildford 

Mautravers see Thomas Fitz Alan under Arundel 



318 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Mautravers (lady) 

Anne Percy (bef 27 July 1485-1552), da of Henry Percy, 4th earl of Northumberland; m., 
15 Feb 1510/1 1, William Fitz Alan, then Lord Mautravers, later 23rd earl of Arundel (c 1476- 
23 Jan 1 543/4), ^i/. 

performers Chichester 1519-20(15) 

Morley 

Edward Parker (c 1551-1 Apr 1618), imprisoned Apr 1573; succ as 12th Lord Morley 
22Oct 1577. 

players Rye 1591-2(136) 

Morley (Mr) 
Probably 

Herbert Morley (2 Apr 1616-29 Sept 1667), succ father 1632. MP Lewes, Suss, 1640, Suss 
1654, 1656, 1659, Rye, Suss, 1660-7; JP Suss 1641-60, Surr 1650-2; colonel of horse 
(parliamentary) 1643-5; commissioner for relief of Ireland 1645; member high court of justice 
1649; councillor of state 20 Feb 1650/1-20 Apr 1653, 17 May-Oct 1659, Jan-May 1660; 
colonel of foot July-Oct 1659, Dec 1659- Aug 1660; lieut of the Tower Jan-June 1660; 
comm custos rot Suss 1660. Seat at Glynde Place, Suss. 

trumpeters Hastings 1642-3 (27) 

Mountjoy 

James Blount (c 1533-20 Oct 1581), succ as 6th Lord Mountjoy 10 Oct 1544. Comm oyer 
and terminer Hants 1564. Seat at Apethorpe, Northants; house in London, 
player Rye 1576-7(124) 

Navarre see King of Navarre 

Norfolk 

Thomas Howard (1473-25 Aug 1554), son of Thomas Howard, 7th duke of Norfolk, qv 
Lord Treasurer; styled Lord Howard 1483-1514; cr 14th earl of Surrey I Feb 1513/14; succ as 
8th duke of Norfolk 21 May 1524; imprisoned in the Tower 12 Dec 1546; attainted 27 Jan 
1546/7; released and restored in blood and honours 3 Aug 1553. Lord high adm 4 May 1513- 
July 1525; PC by May 1516 and 10 Aug 1553; treasurer of the exchequer 4 Dec 1522- 
Feb 1 546/7; JP Hants 1524, 1526, 1529, 1531-2, 1538, 1540, 1542, Suss 1524, 1526, 1529, 
1531-2, 1538, 1544-5, Surr 1525-6, 1528, 1531-2, 1538-9, 1541-3, Kent 1526, 1528, 
1531-2, 1537-40, 1542-3; earl marshal 28 May 1533; comm oyer and terminer Hants 1540. 
Seat at Kenninghall, Norf; lands in Kent. 
Possibly 

players (lord admiral) Rye 1512-13(83) 

bearward Rye 1523-4(95) 



Ill) 

PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

See also John de Vere (1442-1513) under Oxford 

Thomas Howard (10 Mar 1537/8-2 June 1572), grandson of Thomas Howard, 8th duke of 
Norfolk, qv, styled earl of Surrey; restored in blood and honours 2 Sept 1553; succ as 9th duke 
of Norfolk and 15th earl of Surrey 25 Aug 1554; imprisoned in the Tower 8 Oct 1569-3 Aug 
1570; recommitted to Tower by 20 Oct 1 571; attainted 16 Jan 1 571/2 and beheaded 2 June 
1572. Hereditary earl marshal 25 Aug 1554; PC Nov 1562. Seat at Kenninghall, Norf; residence 
at the Charterhouse, Midd. 

players Lewes 1557-8(34) 

Northumberland 

Henry Percy (c 1449-28 Apr 1489), imprisoned c 1464; removed to the Tower after 
Sept 1465-27 Oct 1469; restored as 8th earl of Northumberland 25 Mar 1470; succ as Lord 
Poynings Feb 1483/4. JP Kent 1471, 1473-5, 1479-81, 1483-5, Suss 1471-81, 1483-5, 
Surr 1472-5, 1477, 1479, 1483-4, Southampton, Hants, 1483-5; lord chamberlain 30 Nov 
1483-22 Aug 1485. Lands in Kent and Sussex. 

minstrels Rye 1482-3 (55) 

1484-5 (56) 

Henry Algernon Percy (14 Jan 1477/8-19 May 1527), son of Henry Percy, 8th earl of 
Northumberland, qv; succ as 9th earl of Northumberland, 8th Lord Percy, and Lord Poynings 
28 Apr 1489; imprisoned in the Fleet 1516. JP Suss 1509, 1511-12, 1514-15, 1524, 1526. 
Seats at Alnwick, Northumb, and Wressell, Yorks ER; house in Aldgate, London; lands in Suss, 
bearward Rye 1506-7(75) 

1509-10 (79) 
1516-17(89) 

minstrel Rye 1510-11 (80) 

1516-17(89) 

Northumberland (lady) 

Catharine Spencer (d. 19 Oct 1542), da and coheir of Sir Robert Spencer and Eleanor, countess 
of Wiltshire; m., bef 1502, Henry Algernon Percy, 9th earl of Northumberland and Lord 
Poynings (d. 1527), qv. Residence, after her husband s death, at Seamer, Yorks NR. 
bearwards Chichescer 1518-19 (15) 

Ogle 

Cuthbert Ogle (c 1540-20 Nov 1597), succ as 7th Lord Ogle 1 Aug 1562. Seat at Bothal, 
Northumb. 

players Rye 1593-4(137) 

Oxford 

John de Vere (8 Sept 1442-10 Mar 1512/13), succ as 13th earl of Oxford 26 Feb 1461/2; 



320 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

imprisoned in the Tower Nov 1468; pardoned 5 Apr 1469; attainted 1475; attainder reversed 
1485. Lord high adm 21 Sept 1485; high steward duchy of Lancaster south of Trent 22 Sept 
1485; JP Kent 1485, 1487, 1489-90, 1493-4, 1497-1506; PC and hereditary lord chamber 
lain after 1485; constable of the Tower, for life 29 June 1487; comm of array Suss 1513. Seat 
at Hedingham Castle, Essex; lands in Hants and Suss. 

bearward Rye 1486-7 (58) 

1490-1 (62) 
1493-4 (63-4) 
1495-6 (67) 

bcarward/s Rye 1496-7 (67) 

bearward Rye 1498-9 (68) 

1507-8 (76) 
1511-12(81) 
1512-13(82) 

minstrels Rye 1488-9 (60) 

1492-3 (63) 
1493-4 (64) 
1494-5 (65) 
1495-6(66) 

minstrel/s Rye 1497-8 (68) 

minstrels Rye 1498-9 (68) 

minstrel/s Rye 1504-5(73) 

minstrels Rye 1509-10(79) 

1510-11 (80) 

entertainers Battle Abbey 1498-9(184) 

players Rye or New Rom ney, Kent 1498-9(69) 

Battle Abbey 1499-1500(185) 

Probably 

players (lord admiral) Rye 1512-13(83) 

See also Thomas Howard (1473-1554) under Norfolk 

John de Vere (14 Aug 1499-14 July 1526), nephew and heir of John de Vere, 13th earl of 
Oxford, qv; succ as 14th earl of Oxford 10 Mar 1512/13; styled de jure Lord Plaiz. Hereditary 
lord great chamberlain of England. Seat at Hedingham Castle, Essex. 

bearward Rye 1514-15(85) 

minstrels Rye 1514-15(85) 

1515-16(87) 
1518-19(91) 

Parr 

William Parr (1513-28 Oct 1571), cr Baron Parr 9 Mar 1538/9, 17th earl of Essex 23 Dec 
1543, and 1st marquess of Northampton 16 Feb 1546/7; attainted 18 Aug 1553; imprisoned 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

in the Tower 26 July 1553; released 31 Dec 1553; restored in blood 5 May 1554, and restored 
to marquessate 13 Jan 1558/9. PC Mar 1544-Nov 1553 and 25 Dec 1558; lord chamberlain, 
for life 4 Feb 1549/50; lord lieut Surr 1551. Seats at Green s Norton, Northants, Kendal, 
Westmld, and Parr, Lane; lands in Surr. 

players Rye 1559-60(117) 

Pembroke 

Henry Herbert (after 1538-19 Jan 1600/1), styled Lord Herbert 1551 until he succ as 21st 
earl of Pembroke and Baron Herbert of Cardiff, Glam, Wales 17 Mar 1569/70. Jt keeper 
forests of Buckholt and Melchet, Hants, 26 June 1553; bailiff of Burley in the New Forest, 
Southampton, Hants, 15 May 1570. Seat at Cardiff Castle, Glam, Wales; residences at Ludlow 
Castle, Shrops, and Wilton, Wilts. 

players Rye 1592-3(136) 

See also Bedford (duke) 
Poynings see under Lord Warden 

Prince 

Edward of Woodstock (15 June 1330-8 June 1376), 1st son of Edward in, qv; cr 14th earl of 
Chester 18 Mar 1332/3, 1st duke of Cornwall 3 Mar 1336/7, and prince of Wales 12 May 
1343. Guardian of the kingdom 1 1 July 1338, 27 May 1340, and 5 Oct 1342. Principal seat at 
Berkhamstead, Herts; castles at Carisbrooke, Wight, Chester, Ches, and Flint and Rhuddlan, 
Flin, Wales. 

entertainer/s Battle Abbey 1346-7(182) 

Edward Plantagenet (2 Nov 1470-r Aug 1483), son of Edward rv, qv, and Elizabeth Wydevill, 
qv under Queen; cr prince of Wales 26 June 1471; ace as Edward v 9 Apr 1483; Richard, 
3rd duke of Gloucester, qv under King, appointed protector 30 Apr -25 June 1483; deposed 
25 June 1483. 

minstrels Rye 1476-7 (50) 

1479-80(51) 
1481-2 (54) 
entertainer/s Battle Abbey c 1478-82 (184) 

Arthur Tudor (20 Sept 1486-2 Apr 1502), 1st son of Henry vn, qv\ succ as 8th duke of 
Cornwall at birth; cr Prince of Wales and 20th earl of Chester 29 Nov 1489. JP Kent 1490, 
1493-4, 1497-1502, Suss 1491, 1493-4, 1496, 1498, 1500-2, Southampton, Hants, 
1493-4, 1498, 1500-1, Surr 1493-4, 1497-1501; keeper of the realm and king s lieut 2 Oct 
1492. Seat at Ludlow Castle, Shrops. 

minstrel Rye 1489-90 (61) 

minstrels Rye 1490-1 (62) 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1493-4 (64) 

minstrels with trumpets Rye 1495-6(66) 

minstrels Rye 1497-8 (68) 

1498-9 (68) 
players Rye 1494-5 (65) 

Charles Stuart (19 Nov 1600-30 Jan 1648/9), son of James i and Anne of Denmark, qv under 
Queen; cr duke of Albany 23 Dec 1600; duke of York 6 Jan 1604/5; succ as duke of Cornwall 
6 Nov 1612; cr earl of Chester and prince of Wales 4 Nov 1616; ace as Charles i 27 Mar 1625; 
crowned 2 Feb 1625/6; beheaded 30 Jan 1648/9. 

players Rye 1615-16(150) 

See also Henry Tudor and Edward Tudor under King 

Princess 

Elizabeth Stuart (mid-Aug 1596-13 Feb 1661/2), da of James vi (of Scotland) and i (of 
England) and Anne of Denmark, qv under Queen; m., 14 Feb 1612/13, Frederick v, elector 
palatine; crowned queen of Bohemia 7 Nov 1619. 

players Rye 1613-14(149) 

Queen 

Philippa of Hainault (c 1314-15 Aug 1369), m., 30 Jan 1327/8, Edward in, qv; crowned 
4 Mar 1329/30. 

entertainer/s Battle Abbey 1346-7(182) 

Elizabeth Wydevill (c 1437-8 June 1492), da of Richard Wydevill, 1st Earl Rivers, and 
Jaquetta de Luxembourg; m. Istly, Sir John Grey (d. 1461), m., 2ndly, 1 May 1464, Edward rv, 
qv; crowned 26 May 1465. 

minstrels Rye 1476-7 (50) 

1479-80(51) 
1480-1 (52-3) 
1481-2(54) 
entertainer/s Battle Abbey c 1478-82 (184) 

Elizabeth of York (11 Feb 1465/6-1 1 Feb 1502/3), da of Edward iv, qv, and Elizabeth 
Wydevill, qv under Queen; m., 18 Jan 1485/6, Henry vil, qv; crowned 25 Nov 1487. 
minstrels Rye 1486-7 (58) 

1487-8 (59) 
1490-1 (62) 
1498-9 (69) 

Mary Tudor (18 Feb 1515/16-17 Nov 1558), da of Henry vin, qv, and Katherine of Arragon; 
ace as Mary I of England 19 July 1553; crowned 1 Oct 1553; m., 25 July 1554, Philip, king 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

of Naples and Jerusalem, and king of Spain from 1 6 Jan 1 555/6. 

jester Rye 1554-5(115) 

bearward Rye 1556-7(116) 

players Rye 1557-8(116) 

Elizabeth Tudor (7 Sept 1533-24 Mar 1602/3), da of Henry vin, qv, and Anne Boleyn; 
ace as Elizabeth i 17 Nov 1558; crowned 15 Jan 1558/9. 

players Rye 1558-9(117) 

1560-1 (118) 
1562-3 (118) 
1564-5 (119) 

players (interlude) Rye 1566-7(120) 

players Rye 1568-9(120) 

1570-1 (121) 
1583-4 (130) 
1584-5 (130) 
1586-7(131-2) 
1587-8(132) 
1588-9(133-4) 
1589-90(134) 
1594-5(138) 
1595-6(139) 
1596-7(139) 

bearwards Rye 1563-4(118) 

bearward Rye 1564-5(119) 

bearwards Rye 1564-5(119) 

bearward Rye 1565-6(119) 

Anne of Denmark (12 Dec 1574-2 Mar 1618/19), da of Frederick n of Denmark and Norway 
and Sophia of Mecklenburg; m., 20 Aug 1589, James vi of Scotland (later James I of England); 
crowned queen of England 25 July 1603. 

players Rye 1611-12(147) 

1613-14 (149) 
1616-17(151) 

Queen of France see Mary Tudor under Suffolk (duchess) 

Queen Mother 

Cecily Neville (3 May 1415-31 May 1495), m., bef 18 Oct 1424, Richard Plantagenet, 
3rd duke of York, qv, and mother of Edward iv, qv, and Richard in, qv. Seat at Berkhamstead, 
Herts. 

minstrels Rye 1476-7 (50) 

1479-80(51-2) 



324 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1481-2 (53) 
1482-3 (54) 

minstrels (York) Rye 1484-5(56) 

1485-6(57) 
1487-8 (58) 

Margaret Beaufort (31 May 1443-29 June 1509), da of John, 1st duke of Somerset; m. Istly, 
bet 28 Jan and 17 Feb 1449/50 (dissolved before 24 Mar 1452/3), John de la Pole, 2nd duke of 
Suffolk; m. 2ndly, 1455, Edmund Tudor, 13th earl of Richmond (d. 3 Nov 1456); m. 3rdly, 
bef 1464, Henry Stafford, 2nd duke of Buckingham (d. 4 Oct 1471); m. 4thly, bef Oct 1473, 
Thomas Stanley, earl of Derby (d. 29 July 1504), qv\ mother, by her second husband, of 
Henry vn, qv. 

minstrels Rye 1494-5 (65) 

1506-7 (75) 

Rich 

Robert Rkh (c 1537-27 Feb 1580/1), succ as 2nd Baron Rich 12 June 1567. Seats at Leighs 
Priory and Rochford Hall, Essex. 

men (players) Rye 1569-70(120) 

Richmond see Henry Fitzroy under Lord Admiral 

Robertsbridge 

Probably 

William (nd), abbot of Robertsbridge Abbey, Suss, 1513, 1523. 

players Rye 1517-18(89) 

Russell 

Francis Russell (1527-28 July 1585), son of John, 3rd earl of Bedford, qv; summ to parl as 
Lord Russell 1 Mar 1552/3; imprisoned in the Fleet 29 July 1553; succ as 4th earl of Bedford 
14 Mar 1554/5. PC 21 Nov 1558 until death; comm oyer and terminer Southampton, 
Hants, 1564; chief justice in eyre south of Trent 26 Feb 1583/4 until death. Seats at 
Amersham and Chenies, Bucks, and Woburn Abbey, Beds; residence at Russell House, 
Strand, Midd. 

minstrels Rye 1551-2(113) 

Salisbury (countess) 

Margaret Plantagenet (Aug 1473-28 May 1541), da of George, 3rd duke of Clarence 
(d. 1478) and Isabella Neville (d. 1476); m., probably in 1491 and not later than 1494, Sir 
Richard Pole (d. 1505); heir to the earldoms of Warwick and Salisbury 28 Nov 1499; cr 
countess of Salisbury with restoration of her possessions upon the reversal of the attainder of 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Edward, earl of Warwick, 14 Oct 1 513; attainted 12 May 1 539; beheaded 28 May 1 541 . Lady 
of the chamber to Queen Katherine of Arragon 1 509; governess of Princess Mary from bef 13 
May 1520-after 1 Oct 1533. Seat at Warblington, Hants; lands in Hants. 

pl aycr / s Chichester 1517-18(14) 

Sandys 

Possibly 

William Sandys (bef 1555-29 Sept 1623), succ as 3rd Lord Sandys 1559 or 1560; imprisoned 

in the Tower 8 Feb 1600/1-5 Aug 1601. Seat at The Vyne, Sherborne St John, Hants; lands 

in Hants. 

players Rye 1589-90(134) 

See also Chandos 

Saye 

fames Fiennes (c 1395-4 July 1450), cr 1st Lord Saye and Sele by 24 Feb 1446/7; imprisoned 
in the Tower 1450. JP Kent 1433, 1436-44, 1446-7; comm of array Kent 1435, 1443; sheriff 
Kent 8 Nov 1436, Surr and Suss 3 Nov 1438; MP Kent 1439, 1442, 1445, 1447; constable 
Rochester Castle, Kent, 27 Mar 1442-bef 9 Feb 1442/3; bailiff Otford, Kent, Uckfield, Suss, 
and Stoneham, Hants, 24 Apr 1443; knight of the Body by 9 Oct 1444; steward lands of the 
duke of Warwick 3 July 1446; constable Dover Castle, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports 24 Feb 
1446/7-4 July 1450; steward Penshurst, Kent, 24 Feb 1446/7; king s chamberlain 1 Apr 1447; 
PC 1 Apr 1447; constable of theTower 7 Aug 1447; lord treasurer 22 Sept 1449-22 June 1450. 
Seat at Knole, Kent; residence in Westminster Palace; lands in Kent and Suss, 
minstrel Rye 1448-9 (44) 

Scott 

Probably 

Reginald Scott (1512-15 Dec 1554), kt shortly bef 29 Sept 1542. Comm of gaol delivery 
Canterbury Castle, Kent, 1539, 1542; JP Kent 1539, 1540, 1547, 1554; comm oyer and 
terminer Kent or Suss 1539, Kent 1554; surveyor of the king s works at Sandgate Castle, Kent, 
12 Feb 1539/40-2 Oct 1540; sheriff Kent 27 Nov 1541-21 Nov 1542; lieut castle of Calais 
24 June 1552-25 Sept 1554. Seat at Scot s Hall, Smeeth, Kent; lands in Kent, 
minstrels New Rom ney, Kent 1552-3(114) 

Shrewsbury 

JohnTalbot (c 1413-10 July 1460), succ as 5th earl of Shrewsbury, 7th Lord Furnivalle, Lord 
Talbot, Lord Strange, and earl of Waterford, Ireland, 17 July 1453. Comm oyer and terminer 
Kent 1450; PC bef 21 Nov 1453; lord treasurer 5 Oct 1456-Oct 1458. Seat at Sheffield Castle, 
Yorks WR. 

minstrels (lord treasurer) Rye 1456-7 (47) 

minstrels Rye 1457-8 (47) 



326 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Somerset 

Edmund Beaufort (c 1406-22 May 1455), cr count of Mortain, Normandy, 22 Apr 1427; 
styled earl of Dorset 1438-41; cr 2nd earl of Dorset 18 or 28 Aug 1442 and 2nd marquess 
of Dorset 24 June 1443; succ as 5th earl of Somerset 27 May 1444; cr 2nd duke of Somerset 
31 Mar 1448; imprisoned in the Tower Dec 1453-4 Mar 1454/5. Comm oyer and terminer 
Kent, Surr, Suss, and Southampton, Hants, 1451; justice in eyre, steward, and chief warden 
forests south of Trent, for life 2 July 1453. 

minstrel Rye 1448-9 (44) 

Edward Seymour (c 1500-22 Jan 1551/2), cr 1st Viscount Beauchamp 5 June 1536; cr 8th 
earl of Hertford 18 Oct 1537; cr Baron Seymour 15 Feb 1546/7; cr 5th duke of Somerset 

16 Feb 1546/7; deprived of all offices and imprisoned in the Tower 14 Oct 1549-6 Feb 
1549/50; pardoned 16 Feb 1549/50; imprisoned in the Tower 16 Oct 1551; beheaded 22 Jan 
1551/2. Lord high adm 28 Dec 1542 -Jan 1542/3; lord great chamberlain 16 Feb 1542/3- 

17 Feb 1546/7; councillor of regency and lieut of the realm 9 July 1544; lord treasurer of the 
exchequer 10 Feb 1546/7; earl marshal 17 Feb 1546/7; protector of the realm 12 Mar 1546/7; 
JP Hants, Kent, Surr, and Suss 1547; keeper various manors, Suss, 8 Aug 1550. Seats at Hatch, 
Somers, and Wolf Hall, Wilts; residence at Somerset House, Strand, Midd; lands in Hants, 
Kent, and Surr. 

servants (lord protector) Rye 1548-9(112) 

players Rye 1550-1 (113) 

Stafford 

Edward Stafford (17 Jan 1535/6-18 Oct 1603), succ as 12th Baron Stafford 1 Jan 1565/6. 
Seat at Stafford Castle, Staff. 

players Rye 1588-9(133) 

Stanley see Thomas Stanley under Derby 

Strange 

Ferdinando Stanley (c 1559-16 Apr 1594), styled Lord Strange from 1572; summ to parl as 
Lord Strange 28 Jan 1588/9; succ as 14th earl of Derby and lord of the Isle of Man 25 Sept 
1593. Seats at Knockin, Shrops, and Knowsley and Lathom, Lane. 

players Rye 1580-1 (128) 

1591-2(136) 

Suffolk 

Edmund de la Pole (1471 or 1472-4 May 1513), succ as 3rd duke of Suffolk 1492; surren 
dered the dukedom and accepted title of 10th earl of Suffolk 26 Feb 1492/3; indicted and 
pardoned for murder 1498; left England without leave Aug 1501; attainted and all honours 
forfeited Jan 1503/4; imprisoned 1504 until beheaded 4 May 1513. Comm oyer and terminer 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Kent 1497. Seat at Ewelme, Oxf. 

minstrel Rye 1494-5 (65) 

Charles Brandon (c 1484-22 Aug 1545), cr 5th Viscount Lisle 15 May 1513 and 4th duke of 
Suffolk 1 Feb 1513/14; surrendered viscountcy 20 Apr 1523. Comm of gaol delivery Surr 
1 51 l.Guildford Castle, Surr, 1513; JP Surr 151 1-12, 1514-15, 1520, 1522, 1524-6, 1528, 
1531, 1538-9, 1541-3, Hants 1531, 1538, 1540, 1542, Kent 1531, 1537-40, 1542-3, Suss 
1531-2, 1538, 1544-5; ranger New Forest, Hants, 3 May 1512; pcbef 15 May 1513 until 
death; earl marshal 21 May 1524-20 May 1533; pres privy council Feb 1529/30 until death; 
chief justice in eyre south of Trent 27 Nov 1534 until death; lord steward of the household bef 
13 Apr 1540 until death; comm oyer and terminer Hants 1540; lieut and capt-gen Kent, Suss, 
Southampton, Hants, 14 June 1545; comm of array Hants, Kent, Surr, Suss 1545. Seat at 
Tattershall Castle, Line. 

bearward Rye 1518-19(90) 

1519-20(91) 
1521-2(93) 
1522-3(94) 

bearwards Chichester 1522-3 (16) 

bearward Rye 1524-5(95) 

1526-7(97) 
1529-30(99) 
minstrels Rye 1522-3 (94) 

1532-3 (102) 

players Rye 1540-1 (107) 

1541-2 (108) 
juggler/s Chichester 1543-4(18) 

Suffolk (duchess) 

Mary Tudor (18 Mar 1494/5-25 June 1533), da of Henry vn, qv, and Elizabeth of York, 
qv under Queen; betrothed to Charles, prince of Castille, Dec 1507; compact of marriage 
renounced 30 July 1514; m. Istly, 9 Oct 1514, Louis xn of France (d. 1 Jan 1514/15), m. 
2ndly (secretly c Feb 1514/15 and publicly 13 May 1515) Charles Brandon, 4th duke of 
Suffolk, qv; crowned queen of France, 5 Nov 1514. 

bearward Chichester 1519-20(15) 

bearward (the French Queen) Rye 1520-1(92) 

bearwards Chichester 1521-2(16) 

Katherine Willoughby (22 Mar 1518/19-19 Sept 1580), de jure suo jure 12th Baroness 
Willoughby de Eresby (of Eresby, Line); m. Istly, c 7 Sept 1533, Charles Brandon, 4th duke of 
Suffolk (d. 22 Aug 1545), qv, m. 2ndly, probably early 1553, Richard Bertie; fled England 
5 Feb 1554/5; returned summer 1559. Residence at Westhorpe, Suff, from c 1528; seats at 
Grimsthorpe and Tattershall Castle, Line, from c 1536. 

players Rye 1552-3(114) 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

Sussex 

Robert Radcliffe (c 1483-27 Nov 1542), restored as 7th Lord FitzWalter 3 Nov 1505 and 
cr 1st Viscount FitzWalter 18 June 1525 and 6th earl of Sussex 8 Dec 1529. PC by 5 Feb 
1525/6; chamberlain of the exchequer 3 June 1532 until death; jp Suss 1538; comm oyer 
and terminer Kent, Surr, and Suss 1538; lord chamberlain, for life 3 Aug 1540. Seat at 
Attleborough, Norf. 

players Rye 1541-2(108) 

Warwick 

Richard Neville (22 Nov 1428-14 Apr 1471), in right of marriage styled Lord Bergavenny; 
confirmed in the earldom of Warwick 23 July 1449; cr 16th earl of Warwick 2 Mar 1449/50; 
attainted 20 Nov 1459; attainder reversed Oct 1460; succ as llth earl of Salisbury 30 or 
31 Dec 1460. Chamberlain of the exchequer 6 Dec 1450; PC by 6 Dec 1453; JP Kent 1460-1, 
1464-5, 1467, 1469-71, Southampton, Hants, 1461, 1463-8, 1470, Surr 1461, 1464, 1466, 
1468-70, Suss 1461-4, 1466, 1468-70; lord chamberlain 22 Jan 1460/1 and 7 May 1461; 
constable Dover Castle, Kent, and warden Cinque Ports 7 May 1461; lord high adm 13 Feb- 
July 1462 and 2 Jan 1470/1. Seats at Middleham and Sheriff Hutton, Yorks NR; held castle 
and honour of Abergavenny, Monm, Wales. 

minstrel/s Rye 1454-5 (45) 

1458-9 (47) 

minstrels Rye 1460-1 (48) 

minstrels (Warwick, lord warden) Rye 1461-2 (48) 

minstrels (Warwick, lord warden Rye 1462-3 (48) 

and lord admiral) 
minstrels Rye 1464-5 (49) 

Ambrose Dudley (c 1528-21 Feb 1589/90), br of Robert Dudley, qv Leicester; styled Lord 
Ambrose Dudley from Oct 1551; imprisoned and attainted 1553, pardoned 22 Jan 1554/5, 
and restored in blood 7 Mar 1557/8; cr Baron Lisle 25 Dec, and 21st earl of Warwick 
26 Dec 1561. Master of the ordnance, for life 12 Apr 1560; PC 5 Sept 1573. Seat at Warwick 
Castle, Warw. 

unspecified Rye 1564-5(119) 

Welles 

John Welles (after Apr 1447-9 Feb 1498/9), attainted Jan-Feb 1483/4; recognized as Lord 
Welles 7 Aug 1485; attainder reversed and succ as 10th Lord Welles Nov-Dec 1485; cr 1st 
Viscount Welles bet Nov-Dec 1485 and 8 Feb 1485/6. Comm oyer and terminer Surr 1491, 

Suss 1495. 

mmstrel Rye 1490-1 (62) 

Westmorland 

Ralph Neville (21 Feb 1497/8-24 Apr 1549), styled Lord Neville 1498-99; succ as 4th earl 



329 
PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

of Westmorland 6 Feb 1498/9. PC bef 5 Feb 1525/6. Seat at Brancepeth, Durham, 
bearward Rye 1529-30(99) 

Wiltshire 

Henry Stafford (r 1479-Mar 1522/3), cr llth earl of Wiltshire 28 Jan 1509/10. JP Kent 1512, 
1514; PC in or before 1520. 

minstrel Rye 1516-17(88) 

Worcester 

William Somerset (c 1527-21 Feb 1588/9), styled Lord Herbert until succ as 8th earl of 
Worcester 26 Nov 1549. Seat at Raglan, Monm, Wales; residence at Hackney, Midd. 
players (interlude) Rye 1 566-7 (119) 

Edward Somerset (c 1550-3 Mar 1627/8), son of William, 8th earl of Worcester, qv\ styled 
Lord Herbert until succ as 9th earl of Worcester and Baron Herbert 21 Feb 1588/9. PC 
29 June 1601; keeper Nonsuch Great Park, Surr, 1 Dec 1606; steward lordship and manor of 
Lewisham, Kent, 6 Feb 1613/14; keeper manor of Plesaunce, East Greenwich, Kent, and high 
steward Greenwich 19 May 1615; keeper of the privy seal 2 Jan 1615/16 until death; JP Kent 
1626. Seat at Raglan, Monm, Wales; residence at Hackney, Midd. 

players Rye 1592-3(137) 

1594-5 (138) 
1595-6(138) 

Wriothesley 

Thomas Wriothesley (21 Dec 1505-30 July 1550), cr 1st Baron Wriothesley of Titchfield, 
Hants, 1 Jan 1533/4; cr 2nd earl of Southampton 16 Feb 1546/7; under house arrest 5 Mar 
1546/7; freed by 1548; confined again 2 Feb 1549/50. Clerk of the signet bef 4 May 1530- 
Apr 1540; coroner and attorney in king s bench 2 Jan 1535/6; MP Hants 1539-40, 1542-4; 
jt principal secretary to the king Apr 1540-4; JP Hants 1540, 1542, Suss 1545; comm oyer 
and terminer Hants 1540; PC 1540-5 Mar 1546/7, 1548-2 Feb 1549/50; constable 
Southampton Castle, Hants, 8 Jan 1540/1 until death; bailiff Christchurch hundred and 
keeper of the adjoining chase called Stowrveld and deer therein, constable Christchurch 
Castle, steward Christchurch and Ringwood Manors, all in Hants, 20 Feb 1540/1 until 
death; constable of Porchester Castle, Hants, 28 Oct 1542; keeper Warblington Manor and 
Park, Hants, 3 Nov 1542; chief steward of lands of Margaret Plantagenet, late countess of 
Salisbury, qv, in Hants and Suff, 3 Nov 1 542; jt clerk of the crown and king s attorney, king s 
bench 1542; jt chamberlain of the exchequer, for life 28 Jan 1542/3; high steward borough 
of Andover, Hants, 14 May 1543; keeper of the great seal 22 Apr- 3 May 1544; lord 
chancellor 3 May 1544-6 Mar 1546/7; comm of array Hants, Surr, Suss, 1545; jt executor to 
Henry VIH, qv, 1547; jt gov Edward vi, qv, 1547. Principal seats at Lincoln Place, Holborn, 
Midd, and Micheldever and Titchfield, Hants; residence at Ely Place, Holborn, Midd; lands 



330 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

in Hants, Kent, and Wight. 

performers Chichester 1543-4(18) 

York 

Richard of York or Plantagenet (21 Sept 1411-30 Dec 1460), succ as 3rd duke of York 
25 Oct 1415, 6th earl of March, Lord Mortimer of Wigmore, Heref, and 9th earl of Ulster 
18 Jan 1424/5; restored as 5th earl of Cambridge by 19 May 1426; probably resigned earldom 
of March bet Sept and Dec 1445; attainted 20 Nov 1459; declared heir to the throne 25 Oct 
1460. PC 24 Feb 1438/9; justice in eyre south of Trent 14 July 1447-July 1453; JP Kent 
1447, 1450-1, 1453-6, 1458-60, Surr 1452, 1454-5, 1457-60; protector of the realm 
3 Apr 1454-Feb 1454/5 and 19 Nov 1455-25 Feb 1455/6. 

minstrel/s Rye 1454-5 (45) 

minstrels Rye 1456-7 (46-7) 

servant/s (possibly minstrel/s) Rye 1458-9 (47) 

Richard of Shrewsbury or Plantagenet (17 Aug 1473-after 16 June 1483), 2nd son of 
Edward rv, qv\ cr 5th duke of York 28 May 1474, 7th earl of Nottingham 12 June 1476, and 
5th duke of Norfolk and earl of Warenne 7 Feb 1476/7; imprisoned in the Tower 16 June 
1483. Lands in Surr and Suss. 

minstrels Rye 1481-2(53) 

See also Henry Tudor under King 

York (duchess) see Cecily Neville under Queen Mother 

Companies Named by Location 

Appledore, Kent 

players/banns criers Rye 1487-8(59) 

banns criers Rye 1516-17(88) 

players Rye 1521-2(93) 

Ashford, Kent 

players Rye 1502-3(70) 

Benenden, Kent 

players Rye 1499-1500(69) 

Bethersden, Kent 

banns criers Rye 1507-8(76) 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



331 



Billericay, Kent, or possibly Essex 

players Rye- 

player 



Bonnington, Kent 
Possibly 
players 

Brookland, Kent 

banns criers 



playe 



Canterbury, Kent 
players 



waits 
minstrels 

Possibly 
waits 



Chichester, Suss 
players 
musicians 



Possibly 
waits 



Colchester, Essex 

minstrels 



Rye 
Rye 



Rye 



Rye 

Rye 
Rye 

Fayre Crooch 



Rye 

West Hatting 



Fayre Crooch 



Rye 



1525-6(96) 
1526-7(97) 



1522-3(94) 



1493-4 (64) 
1505-6(74) 
1518-19(91) 
1519-20(91) 
1520-1 (92) 
1526-7(98) 
1533-4 (103) 
1507-8 (77) 
1510-11 (80) 
1517-18 (89) 



1488-9 (59) 

1503-4(72) 

1518-19(90) 

1526-7(97) 

1532-3(102) 

1550-1 (113) 

1549-50(112) 



1626-7(198) 
1627-8 (200) 



1504-5 (73) 
1632-3 (197) 
1633-4 (197) 



1626-7 (198) 
1627-8 (200) 



1519-20(91) 



332 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



Cranbrook, Kent 

players 



men 



Dover, Kent 
players 

musician/s 

East Mailing, Kent 

Possibly 
players 



Essex 

sword players 
players 



Etchingham, Suss 
minstrel 

Faversham, Kent 

players 



Rye 

Battle Abbey 

Rye 

New Romney, Kent 

Rye 

Battle Abbey 



Rye 
Rye 



Robertsbridge Abbey 



Rye 



1503-4(72) 
1526-7(98) 
1520-1 (185) 



1506-7(75) 
1508-9(78) 
1625-6(158) 



1497-8 (68) 
1505-6(73) 
1507-8 (76) 
1520-1 (185) 



1507-8(77) 

1514-15(85) 

1533-4(103) 



1426-7 (187) 



1525-6(96) 
1526-7(97) 



France (?) 

minstrels 

Frittenden, Kent 
players 



Goudhurst, Kent 
players 

Great Chart, Kent 

Possibly 
players 



Rye 
Rye 

Rye 
Rye 



1529-30(99) 



1488-9 (59) 
1489-90 (60) 



1503-4 (72) 



1507-8(76) 



333 

PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



Harrietsham, Kent 



"2-3002, 



Herstmonceux, Suss 

Possibly 

play lord Bade Abbey 1498-9(184) 

High Halden, Kent 

players Rye 1526-7(97) 

Holborn, Midd 

musicians Rye 1609-10(146) 

Hythe, Kent 

players Rye 1482-3 (54) 

1518-19 (90) 
1520-1 (92) 



Ireland (?) 

harper West Harting 1633-4(197) 

Ivychurch, Kent 

banns criers Rye 1521-2(93) 

1530-1 (100) 



Lewes, Suss 

players Rye 1526-7(97) 

Little Chart, Kent 

Possibly 

players Rye 1507-8(76) 

London 

minstrels Rye 1485-6 (57) 

Lydd, Kent 

men (players) Rye 1455-6(46) 

1485-6(57) 



334 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

players Rye 1476-7 (50) 

1488-9 (60) 
1531-2(101) 

banns criers Rye 1502-3(71) 

1508-9 (78) 

Lydden, Kent 

players Rye 1506-7(75) 

Maidstone, Kent 

players Rye 1480-1 (52) 

1492-3 (63) 
1496-7 (67) 
1497-8 (68) 
Battle Abbey 1520-1(185-6) 

Mayfield, Suss 

morris dancers Rye 1533-4(103) 

Mersham, Kent 

players Rye 1522-3(94) 

Newenden, Kent 

players Rye 1482-3 (54) 

New Romney, Kent 

players Rye 1474-5 (49) 

1480-1 (52) 
1481-2(53) 
1495-6 (66) 
1502-3(71) 
1503-4(71) 
1509-10 (79) 

banns criers Rye 1502-3(71) 

1516-17 (88) 
1525-6(96) 
1539-40(106) 
1559-60(117) 



Peasmarsh, Suss 

players Rye 1524-5(95) 

1525-6(96) 



PATRONS AND COMPANIES 



335 



Reading Street, Kent 

players 

Robertsbridge, Suss 
players 

Rochester, Kent 
players 

Rye, Suss 
musician/s 
musician 



Sittingborne, Kent 
players 



South Mailing, Suss 
Probably 
players 



Spain 

minstrels 

Tarring Neville, Suss 
Possibly 
players 

Tenterden, Kent 

players 



Rye 
Rye 
Rye 



New Romncy, Kent 
New Romney, Kent 



Rye 



Rye 

Battle Abbey 

Rye 

Rye 
Rye 



West Mailing, Kent 
Possibly 
players 



Battle Abbey 
Rye 



Rye 



1491-2 (63) 



1524-5 (96) 



1521-2(93) 



1625-6(158) 
1630-1 (161) 
1631-2 (162) 



1517-18 (89) 
1520-1 (92) 
1521-2(93) 



1497-8 (68) 
1505-6(73) 
1520-1 (185) 



1505-6(73) 



1511-12 (81) 



1489-90 (61) 
1494-5 (65) 
1504-5 (73) 
1510-11 (80) 
1518-19(90) 
1520-1 (185) 
1521-2(93) 



1497-8 (68) 



336 PATRONS AND COMPANIES 

1505-6 (73) 
1507-8(76) 
Battle Abbey 1520-1 (185) 

West Tarring, Suss 
Possibly 

P la y ers Rye 1511-12(81) 

Winchelsea, Suss 

Payers Rye 1476-7(50) 

1489-90(61) 
1502-3(70) 
1503-4(71) 

entertainer/s Rye c 1478-82 (184) 

Wittersham, Kent 

game players Rye 1482-3(54) 



Glossaries: Introduction 



The purpose of the glossaries is to assist the reader in working through the text. The criteria for the 
selection of glossary entries are discussed below, under the headings Latin Glossary and English Glossary. 
The glossaries include words found in records printed or quoted in the Records, Introduction, Ap 
pendixes, and Endnotes. Definitions are given only for those senses of a particular word which are used 
in the records printed in this collection. Within references, page and line numbers are separated by an 
oblique stroke. Words occurring within marginalia are indicated by a lower-case m following the page 
and line reference. Words occurring within collation notes are indicated by a lower-case V following the 
page and line reference to which the collation note applies. If the glossed word occurs twice in a single 
line, superscript numerals are used after the line number to distinguish the occurrences. Manuscript 
capitalization has not been preserved; however, if proper names are glossed, they are capitalized in 
accordance with modern usage. 

Latin Glossary 

Words are included in the Latin Glossary if they are not to be found in the Oxford Latin Dictionary 
(OLD), now the standard reference work for classical Latin. Words listed in the OLD whose meaning 
changed or became restricted in medieval or Renaissance usage are also glossed. If a word is found in 
the OLD but appears in the text in an obscure spelling or anomalous inflectional form for which the 
OLD provides no cross-reference, that word has been included and its standard lexical entry form indicated 
without giving a definition. If the spelling variants or anomalous inflectional forms have been treated 
as scribal errors and more correct forms given in textual notes, the forms thus noted are not repeated 
in the glossary. 

Most of the Latin words used in the records are common classical words whose spelling has changed, 
if at all, according to common medieval variations. The results of these common variations are not 
treated here as new words, nor are forms of glossed words resulting from such variations treated as 
variant spellings. These variations are: 

ML c for CL t before / 

ML cc for CL ct before ; 

ML d for CL t in a final position 

ML e for CL ae or oe 

ML ff Tor CLf, common in an initial position 

ML addition of h 



338 GLOSSARIES 

ML omission of CL h 

ML variation between / and e before another vowel 

ML n for CL m before another nasal 

Intrusion of ML/) in CL consonant clusters mm, mn, ms, or mt 

ML doubling of CL single consonants 

ML singling of CL double consonants 

No attempt has been made to correct these spellings to classical norms; rather, scribal practice has been 
followed in such cases. Where the same word occurs in spellings which differ according to the list above, 
the most common spelling (or the earliest, when numbers of occurrences are roughly equal) is treated as 
standard and used for the headword. However, the practice of the OLD has been used as regards i/j and 
u/v variation: in this glossary only the letter forms i and u are used. The genitive singular of first 
declension nouns appears only as the ML -e. All listed variant spellings will be found under the head 
word, at the end of the definition, set apart in boldface type. Where the variant spelling would not closely 
follow the headword alphabetically, it is also listed separately and cross-referenced to the main entry. 

It is difficult to know in some cases whether certain words are being used in a CL sense or in one of 
the modified senses acquired in Anglo-Latin usage during the Middle Ages. In these circumstances the 
range of possibilities has been fully indicated under the appropriate lexical entry. Unclear, technical, or 
archaic terms, especially those pertaining to canon or common law, performance, and music, are usually 
given a stock translation equivalent but receive a fuller treatment in the glossary. 

As a rule only one occurrence of each word, or each sense or form of each word, will be listed; etc 
following a reference means that there is at least one more occurrence of that word, sense, or form. The 
one occurrence listed is either the sole occurrence or the first chronologically. Since this volume is 
arranged by locality, the examples cited are not necessarily the first to occur in the page order of the 
Records; the other occurrence(s) indicated by etc may in fact precede the first occurrence in page order. 
Page order has only been used if there are two earliest occurrences in different documents assigned to the 
same year. In such cases the chronologically first occurrence which also appears earliest in page order is 
given. Multiple occurrences of each sense may be listed for words defined in more than one sense. 

All headwords are given in a standard dictionary form: nouns are listed by nominative, genitive, and 
gender; adjectives by the terminations of the nominative singular or, in the case of adjectives of one 
termination, by the nominative and genitive; verbs by their principal parts. 

English Glossary 

The English Glossary is not meant to be exhaustive but only to explain words, senses, or spellings apt to 
puzzle users not familiar with markedly provincial Late Middle and Early Modern English. Accordingly 
words and senses given in The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (NSOED) have usually been passed 
over and so have their obvious derivatives. Abbreviations have also been omitted if they are still current 
or widely known, as have forms whose only difficulty is a false word division, errors corrected in the 
footnotes, and matter corrected and replaced by the original scribe. No attempt is made to gloss words 
left incomplete by damage to the source texts. 

Readers are also expected to recognize such spelling variations as au/a, c/s, ea/e, ie/e(e), i/j, i/y, 
o/oo, o/ou, o/u, s/z, sch/sh, u/v, and the presence or absence of final V in the contexts where 
they commonly occur in older literature. They are presumed to have read enough old-spelling texts to 
know the values of b, 3, and y used for b and to recognize commonly occurring forms that are 



GLOSSARIES 

nearer to their Old English or Old French originals than the modern standard spelling, such as gievyn, 
moder, bloud, and ioie. 

A fuller treatment has, however, been given to certain words and phrases likely to hold special interest 
for users of a REED volume. These are chiefly names of musical instruments (eg, crowde ) and the 
specialized vocabularies of civic government (eg, bayliff, constable ), popular custom and pastime (eg, 
ayll, hokemoney ), and the performing arts (eg, morrice, mynstrell ). 

Normal headword forms are the uninflected singular for nouns, the positive for adjectives, and the 
infinitive for verbs but nouns occurring only in the plural or possessive, adjectives occurring only in 
comparative or superlative forms, and verbs occurring only in one participial or finite form are entered 
under the form that actually occurs. A verbal noun is subsumed under the infinitive when other parts 
of the same verb are also entered (eg, plainge under play ). 

The capitalization of headwords conforms with modern usage. A word appearing in severaJ note 
worthy spellings is normally entered under the one most often found in the text or else - when two 
noticed spellings are equally or nearly equally common - under the one nearer modern usage. Other 
noticed spellings are mostly entered in their alphabetical places and cross-referenced to the mam entry. 
As a rule only the earliest occurrence is cited for each inflectional form entered and further occur 
rences are represented by etc, unless the reader needs to be alerted that the sense in question applies 
in particular later passages. Two citations given without etc mean that the form or sense in question 
occurs only twice. 

Where the definition repeats the headword in a different spelling, the latter is normally the entry 
spelling in OED and NSOBD and further information can be found there. When that form is itself an 
archaism or ambiguous, a further brief definition usually follows. Any further citation of an authority or 
other succinct account of the glossarian s reasoning appears within square brackets at the end of the entry. 

Anglo-Norman Texts 

There is no glossary for the Anglo-Norman texts found under Hastings and in the Appendixes. Instead 
readers should consult the Old French and Anglo-Norman dictionaries given below under Works 
Consulted. 

Works Consulted 

Anglo-Norman Dictionary. Louise W. Stone and William Rothwell (eds). Fascicles 1-6 (London, 1990-7). 

Black s Law Dictionary. 5th ed (St Paul, 1979). [Blacks] 

Cheney, C.R. (ed). Handbook of Dates for Students of English History. Corrected ed (London, 1996). 

[Cheney] 
Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources. R.E. Latham and D.R. Hewlett (eds). Volume 1: 

A-L (London, 1975-97). [DHL] 
Dictionnaire alphabetize et analogique de la langue fiwtfaise. Paul Robert (ed). 2nd ed with corrections 

by Alain Rey. 9 vols (Paris, 1989). [Robert Diet] 
Dictionnaire de I ancien francais. A.-J. Greimas (ed). (Paris, 1988). 

Dictionnaire de I ancienne langue francaise. Frederic Godefroy (ed). 10 vols (Paris, 1881-1902). 
The English Dialect Dictionary. Joseph Wright (ed). 6 vols (London, 1898-1905). [EDO] 
Latham, R.E. (ed). Revised Medieval Latin Word-List from British and Irish Sources (London, 1965) 

[Latham] 



340 



GLOSSARIES 



Middle English Dictionary. Hans Kurath and Sherman H. Kuhn, et al (eds). Fascicules A.1-W.4 (Ann 

Arbor, 1952-2000). [MED] 

Munrow, David. [Musical] Instruments of the Middle Ages and Renaissance (London, 1976). 
The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary. Lesley Brown (ed). 2 vols (Oxford, 1993). [NSOED] 
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church. F.L. Cross and E.A. Livingstone (eds). 2nd ed with 

corrections (Oxford, 1978). [ODCC] 

The Oxford English Dictionary. Compact ed. 2 vols (New York, 1971). [OED] 
Oxford Latin Dictionary. P.G.W. Glare (ed) (Oxford, 1982). [OLD] 

Page, Christopher. Voices and Instruments of the Middle Ages. Appendix 1 (London, 1987). 
Young, Abigail Ann. Plays and Players: the Latin Terms for Performance, REEDN 9.2 (1984), 56-62, 

and 10.1 (1985), 9-16. 
- Minstrels and Minstrelsy: Household Retainers or Instrumentalists? REEDN 20.1 (1995), 11-17. 



Abbreviations 

abbrev 

abl 

ace 

act 

adj 

adv 

AL 

art 

attr 

CL 

coll 

comm 

comp 

compar 

conj 

C P 
dat 

decl 

E 
F 

f 

gd 
gen 
inf 
intr 

L 

Lk 



abbreviation 

ablative 

accusative 

active voice 

adjective 

adverb 

Anglo-Latin 

article 

attributive 

Classical Latin 

collective 

common gender 

compound 

comparative 

conjunction 

compare 

dative 

declension 

English 

French 

feminine 

gerund 

genitive 

infinitive 

intransitive 

Latin 

Luke 



LL 

m 

Mace 

Mk 

Mt 

n 

nt 

pa 

pass 

per 

Pf 

pfp 

phr 

Pi 
poss 

pp 
P r 

prep 

pron 

prp 

refl 

sbst 

s g 
tr 

v 
vb 



Late Latin 

masculine 

Maccabees 

Mark 

Matthew 

noun 

neuter 

past tense 

passive voice 

person 

perfect tense 

perfect participle 

phrase 

plural 

possessive 

past participle 

present tense 

preposition 

pronoun 

present participle 

reflexive 

substantive 

singular 

transitive 

verb 

verbal 



Latin Glossary 

ABIGAIL ANN YOUNG 



absento, -arc, -aui, -atum v intr to be absent 
20/19 

absolucio, -onis n /absolution, the formal assur 
ance of forgiveness from sin or remission of a 
penalty, such as excommunication, incurred for 
committing a sin in ecclesiastical law 38/32 

absoluo, -ere, -ui, -utum v tr to absolve, forgive a 
sin or the penalty or sentence for sin 41/24, etc 

accedo, -dere, -ssi, -ssum v intr with ad + ace to 
come to, attend 24/4 

actum, -i n nt legal proceedings, action, perhaps 
here used of the record of such proceedings 
!79/20m 

yAprep with ace 1. (of space) to, toward 24/4; used 
figuratively: of states or conditions ad laciuiam 
3/12; of goals ad hoc 3/10; 2. (of time) at (a 
particular occasion or season) 182/15, etc; ad 
diuersas uices 185/8-9 or ad varias uices 
186/10 at various times; 3. in accordance with: 
ad effectum 20/16; ad mandatum 18/9, etc; 

4. (expressing purpose) to: ad usum + gen to 
the use (of) 171/21; with ace ofgd 171/3, etc; 

5. expressing indirect object, as a substitute for 
the dative case 1 8/4, etc; 6. in various idioms: 
ad effectual effectively 20/1 1 ; ad tcr on three 
occasions, three times 184/35; ad tune at that 
time, then 13/40, etc 

admiral, admiralis n m admiral, here specifically 
lord high admiral, supreme commander of a 
national fleet 48/35 

admoneo, -ere, -ui, -itum v tr to warn, hence to 
issue a formal legal warning to offenders 40/28 

admonicio, -onis n f formal warning given by a 



judge to a defendant at dismissal enjoining 
better behaviour in future 40/34 

afflxio, -onis w/act of attaching or affixing some 
thing to a surface 20/14 

alias adv \ . elsewhere 38/32, etc; 2. with alternate 
names, alias 29/2, etc 

allegacio, -onis /allegation, claim 38/1 1 

allege, -arc, -aui, -atum v tr to allege, to state or 
claim (something) formally in court as true or 
sufficient 18/29, etc 

Anglia, -e ///England 183/24, etc 

Anglice adv in the English language 29/12 

Angligena, -ac n m Englishman, here specifically 
a Saxon 212/18 

Anglus, -i n m Englishman, here specifically a 
Saxon 212/10, etc 

anima, -e n f soul; see cura, regimen 

annunciacio, -onis nf announcement, here always 
the Annunuciation, die liturgical commemora 
tion of the announcement by an angel to the 
Virgin Mary of the impending birth of Christ 
(Lk 1.26-38) 275/16; see also festum 

annus, -i n m year 183/1, etc; in idioms: annus 
domini year of the Lord, AD 14/7, etc; annus 
regni regnal year (of a monarch) 170/28, etc; 
see also per 

apercio, -onis /act of opening, here in idiom 
aperciones pixidum the opening of the boxes, 
the formal beginning of the accounting quarter 
in Rye (see p Ixviii) 49/6 

appono, -oncre, -osui, -ositum v tr to place, put; 
in idiom sigilliun apponere to affix a seal, to 
seal 171/23, etc 



342 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



articulum, -i n nt article, a charge or list of charges 
laid against a person in court 167/22, etc 

Arundellia, -e w/Arundel, name of an earldom 
17/30 

assigno, -arc, -aui, -atum v tr 1 . to allot or assign 
a responsibility (to) 178/13; 2. (with ace or dat 
of the person) to order (someone to do some 
thing) 167/22, etc 

beatus, -a, -um adj blessed, used as the title of a 
saint, especially the Virgin Mary; see festum 

bellum, -i n nt war, battle 213/1; also as a place 
name Bellum Battle, a town in Sussex 1 84/32 

benificium, -ii n nt benefit, freely bestowed gift: 
with attrgen absolucionis benificium 38/312 

billa, -e w/complaint, allegation 11/1, etc; 
especially billa deteccionis bill of detection, 
list of allegations detected, that is, charged, 
against a defendant in an ecclesiastical court 
180/19 

Bukinghamia, -e nf Buckingham, name of a 
duchy 47/37 

calamodum, -i n nt reed-pipe, pipe(?) 14/11 

[DML, OLD calamus] 

calex, -icis n f in CL wine cup, hence chalice 3/6 
cancella, -e n f chancel (of a church) 178/37; 

cancellus 24/1 
cancellarius, -ii n m chancellor, originally the 

royal secretary, the post evolved to become 

that of the most senior administrative and 

judicial officer of the realm 45/3 
Cantuaria, -e n f Canterbury, name of an arch 
diocese 184/34 
capellanus, -i n m chaplain, a priest having charge 

of a chapel 3/1 1 
cardinalis, -is m cardinal, one of a group of 

senior bishops forming a council which elected 

and advised the pope 184/34 
cathedraiis, -tadj of or pertaining to the see of 

a bishop or his church; see ecclesia 
causa, -e nf \. cause, reason 1 1/33, etc, 2. law 

case, legal proceedings 3/12 
celebratus, -a, -umpjp pass to be held (eg, of a 

meeting) 3/2 Ic 



etna, -e n f supper, the latest of the three main 
meals of the day, usually less elaborate than 
dinner 48/1 5 

censura, -e w/censure, rebuke, punishment 3/10 

certificarium, -ii n nt certificate, a document 
introduced in court to verify a statement or 
compliance with an order (often written on 
the backs of citations or schedules of penance) 
or the act of producing such a document 
13/41, etc 

certifico, -are, -aui, -atum v tr (as legal idiom) 
to certify formally, eg, the truth of a statement, 
compliance with an order, or the performance 
of an obligation 13/37, etc 

chorea, -e nf dance, originally a round dance; 
apparently used to describe a country dance 
held out of doors 3/1 1 

Cicestrensis, -is w/Chichester, name of a city 
and a diocese 3/21, etc; Cichestrensis 24/39 

Cicestria, -e w/Chichester, name of a city 38/29 

cimiterium, -ii n nt churchyard 3/9, etc 

circumcisio, -onis nf circumcision, here the 
liturgical commemoration of Jesus circumcis 
ion (Lk 2.21); see festum 

citacio, -onis nf citation, here in idiom citacio 
personalis citation delivered in person, sum 
moning one to answer charges in an ecclesi 
astical court 20/13 

citherator, -oris m literally one who plays on a 
cithara (in CL a lyre but in AL usage a harp), 
harper; possibly a generic term applied to 
players of plucked-string instruments 187/25, 
etc; sicherator 47/24 

cito, -are, -aui, -atum v tr cite, issue a citation (to 
appear before an ecclesiastical court) 9/14, etc 

clausus, -us n m enclosure, close, here likely the 
Vicars Close of Chichester Cathedral 38/29 

clericus, -i n m cleric, one in holy orders, specific 
ally a cleric serving in a particular parish as a 
minister 3/7; in idiom clerici sancti Nicholai 
clerks of St Nicholas, boys in minor orders, 
usually students at a monastery school, taking 
part in boy-bishop celebrations on St Nicholas 
Day (6 December) or the feast of the Holy 
Innocents (28 December) 184/32 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



343 



cohabitacio, -onis nf literally act of living with or 
near (another person or persons), hen by exten 
sion act of close association with others 4/8 

comes, -itis n m earl, a peer ranking above a 
viscount but below a marquess 183/25, etc 

comitatus, -us n m county 1 70/28, etc 

communio, -onis /"(Holy) Communion, church 
service at which the Eucharist is celebrated and 
administered 24/39 [oocc] 

compareo, -ere, -ui v intr to appear before a judge, 
here in church courts 1 1/33, etc 

concilium, -ii n nt council; see sinodalis 

confessor, -oris n m literally one who avows or 
states, in Christian Latin writers one who bears 
witness to the faith but without having suffered 
martyrdom [ODCC] ; see uigilia 

confiteor, -fiteri, -fessus sum v tr to make a 
statement, acknowledge, confess 37/24, etc; 
idiom pro confcssis (possibly on account of 
things confessed (nt sg of pfp act used as sbst 
but with pass sense?)} appears to be the name 
of a particular type or form ot confession 
23/8 

congregacio, -onis n /"gathering together, meet 
ing; specifically a gathering of people in church 
for a service, congregation 23/1 1 

constitucio, -onis n/decision, decree 3/21 

continuo, -are, -aui, -atum v tr 1. to adjourn, 
postpone, defer, especially legal proceedings 
to another day or time 22/2m; 2. to extend 
a deadline, eg, for producing a certificate 
13/41, etc 

contumacia, -e /"contumacy, as a technical term, 
deliberate refusal to comply with a summons, 
sentence, or other order of an ecclesiastical 
court or its officers, punished by excommunica 
tion 37/4, etc 

contumaciter adv in a contumacious manner, 
that is, one characteristic of the offence of 
contumacy 20/18 

contumax, -acis^ contumacious, guilty of the 
offence of contumacy 41/4, etc 

conuentus, -us n m convent, religious house or 
the community living therein 184/17 

conuicinus, -i sbst comm neighbour 48/16 



cooperio, -are, -aui, -turn v tr to cover, hence of 
buildings, to roof 3/6 

corona, -e nf crown: standing symbolically for 
royal authority, the Crown 171/18 

coronator, -oris n m coroner, an officer whose 
responsibilities included jurisdiction over 
cases of accidental or violent death; usually a 
coroner was an officer of the Crown but here 
the coroner was an officer of a lord exercising 
a manorial or similar jurisdiction 170/30, etc 

corpus, -oris n nt body 212/19, etc; see also uisus 

corrcctio, -onis /(as legal idiom) correction 
(of wrongdoer by fine or other punishment) 
40/13 

culpabilis, -e adj guilty (as a plea or verdict in a 
court) 171/25 

cura, -e n f literally care, concern here in idiom 
animarum cura cure of souls, the responsibility 
borne by a cleric for parishioners entrusted to 
him 4/1 

custos, -odis n m literally guardian, keeper, hence 
\, warden, title of warden of the Cinque Ports 
48/14, etc; 2. custos ursoruxn bearward, keeper 
of bears for baiting 184/12, etc 

deprep with abl 1. about, concerning 3/5; 2. in 
partitive sense, of, from 3/7, 212/12; 3. express 
ing cause, from, of 171/13; 4. in regard to 
3/13; 5. with place names or the equivalent, 
expressing place of residence or origin, of 
186/33, etc; 6. substituting for CL genitive: 
with gdphr 30/5, etc; with landed titles 183/25, 
etc; 7. representing E of in expressions in 
which CL would use an appositive 170/27, 
170/31, 184/32 

decedens, -ntlsprp act literally dying but here used 
as if pfp pass deceased, dead 3/7 

decretum, -i n nt decree; see uia 

dedicacio, -onis n/act of dedicating a church, 
often used of an annual commemoration of the 
dedication, possibly influenced by the account 
(which uses the phrase dies dedicacionis ) of 
the annual celebration of the dedication of the 
Temple ordered by Judah Maccabee (1 Mace 
4.59); see dies 



344 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



demitto, -tterc, -si, -ssum v tr see dimitto 

denarius, -ii n m a penny, in pi money, coin 182/7 

dcteccio, -onis w/detection, formal laying of 
information against a suspected party before 
an ecclesiastical court, or the information so 
laid 40/13, etc 

delectus, -a, -um pfp pass literally uncovered, 
exposed, here by extension detected, having 
been formally named before church authorities 
for committing a canonical offence 9/28, etc 

dies, die! n m or f 1 . day 48/15, etc; 2. day of 
the week: dies dominica 3/13, etc, or dies 
dominicus 179/1 Sunday; 3. day set aside for a 
special purpose: dies iuridicus court day, day 
upon which legal business could be conducted 
23/1 1, etc; 4. a saints day: dies sancti Georgij 
St George s Day, 23 April 18/13; dies sancti 
Martini in yeme St Martin s Day in winter, 
another name for Martinmas, 1 1 November 
182/15; 5. feast day, festival, celebration (reli 
gious or secular): dies dedicationis dedication 
day, annual celebration of the dedication of a 
church 184/21 

dimissio, -onis n f dismissal of defendant from 
further proceedings, usually upon payment of 
court expenses and/or a fine 40/1 2m, etc 

dimitto, -ittere, -isi, -issum v tr to dismiss or 
release (an accused person) from court without 
further charges, punishments, or citations 
pending, usually upon payment of court 
expenses and/or a fine 40/15, etc; demitto 
11/34 

diuersus, -a, -van adj various, several 182/23, etc 

diuinus, -a, -um adj divine, pertaining to or 
suitable for God, hence nt pi as sbst divine 
service, an unspecified liturgical service, often 
used to refer to the main worship service at a 
parish church on any Sunday 9/29, etc 

doctor, -oris n m doctor, one holding the highest 
academic degree in one of the superior faculties 
(eg, theology or law): in idiom legum doctor, 
doctor of laws, LLD; the pi legum indicated a 
degree in both laws, that is, canon and civil, 
but after the teaching of canon law was for 
bidden at the universities by Henry vin, the 



degree was presumably in civil law only and 
retained the pi by custom 38/29 

domina, -e H/lady, honorific for royalty, peeress, 
or peer s wife 184/20, etc 

dominicus, -a, -um adj of or pertaining to the 
Lord; see dies 

dominus, -i n m 1. the Lord, title of God or 
Christ 213/2, etc; see also annus, festum, 
natalis; 2. lord: honorific for church dignitaries 
(abbot 183/33, etc; bishop 3/21, etc; cardinal 
184/34; ecclesiastical judge 1 1/33, etc); kings 
and princes 182/7, etc; peers 183/26, etc; or 
royal officers dominus cancellarius 45/3; 

3. Dom, title of Benedictine monk 184/31?; 

4. Sir: title of priest 14/11 or knight 186/20; 

5. the lord of a manor or liberty: dominus 
libertatis 171/21-2; see also libertas; 6. lord, 
title of a mock ruler appointed as part of 
traditional plays or other entertainments, often 
at Christmas time: dominus iocosus 184/31? 
(see also p 288 (endnote to PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/ 
1874 ff [I- 1 v]) and iocosus) 

domus, -us nf (domu and Aomo found as abl sg) 
1 . house, home 171/2, etc; the site of a public 
house 44/30, etc (in Rye it is often not possible 
to be sure whether the domus is a private 
dwelling, a tavern or inn, or both); 2. house 
hold: domus regia royal household 184/15 

duellum, -i n nt duel, a combat between two 
persons 4/6 

dux, -cis n m \. duke, ruler of a duchy, here the 
duke of Normandy 212/9; 2. duke, highest 
rank of the hereditary peerage 44/17, etc 

Eboracum, -i n nt York, name of a royal duchy 
47/27, etc 

ecclesia, -e nf 1. specific church or church build 
ing 3/5, etc; ecclesia cathedralis cathedral, a 
bishop s seat 14/10, etc; ecclesia monasterii 
monastery church, a church attached to a 
monastery and intended for monastic worship 
but frequently also serving a lay community in 
place of a parish church 184/21; ecclesia 
parochialis parish church 10/18, etc; 2. the 
church as a corporate or spiritual body 38/34 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



345 



ecclesiasticus, -a, -um adj ecclesiastical, of or 
pertaining to the church 3/7, etc; see also 
officium 

edes, -is n fin pi private house, here one used as 
the site of a court session 38/29 

effusio, -onis nf spilling, shedding, here in idiom 
sanguinis effusio bloodshed 4/6 

emano, -arc, -aui, -atum v intr to come forward, 
be promulgated, used of a legal order or de 
cision, especially from a bishop or his court 
9/13m, etc 

epiphania, -c n /"epiphany, revelation, here used 
of the liturgical festival commemorating the 
revealing of Christ to the gentiles (Mt 2.1-12); 
see festum 

episcopus, -i n m bishop, member of the highest 
of the major orders of clergy, the other two 
being deacon (diaconus) and priest (presbyter 
or sacerdos) 3/21, etc 

essc infos nt sbst one s being, character 213/1 

estiualis, -e adj of or pertaining to summer; see 
pertica 

euangelio, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to bring or 
proclaim good news 4/4 

euangelista, -e n m evangelist, one of the tradi 
tional authors of the four canonical gospels; 
see uigilia 

examen, -inis n nt judicial examination of a case, 
charge, or person 30/6 

examine, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to examine (a 
person or a case) judicially, used of a judge 
30/6, etc 

excommunicacio, -onis w^excommunication, 
ecclesiastical penalty under which the guilty 
party was punished by exclusion from the 
sacraments and especially the reception of 
communion 38/32, etc 

excommunico, -arc, -aui, -atum v tr to excom 
municate, impose the penalty of excommu 
nication on someone 41/22, etc 

exennia, -e/gift, present 186/21 

exigo, -ere v tr to set or raise up 29/1 1 

existens^r exsistens/>r/> act of ex(s)isto [OLD] 

expensus, -a, -urn pfp pass literally spent (of sums 
of money), hence nt sg as sbst that for which 



money is spent, expense 44/1 1 , etc; expencum 

45/6, etc 

extat/or exstat 3rd per sgpr act o/ex(s)to [OLD] 
extunc adv from that time, from then on 180/17 
exultant/or exsultant 3rd per pi pr act o/ex(s)ulto 

[OLD] 

famulus, -i n m servant, especially one who is a 
member of the familia, the extended house 
hold or family which comprises everyone 
living under the authority of the head of the 
house, household servant 185/8 

felonia, -e nf felony, a serious and premeditated 
crime reserved to royal courts, in particular to 
the assizes 171/20 

felonice rfdV in a felonious manner, that is, so as 
to involve a felony offence 171/8, etc 

festum, -i n nt a specific feast day or festival 
(secular or religious) 184/13, etc: festum 
annunciationis 179/34 -5m or annunciation!* 
... beate Marie 185/26 7 or annunciationis 
Marie Virginis 180/16 the Annunciation, 
Lady Day, 25 March; festum circumcisionis 
Domini the Lord s Circumcision, 1 January 
185/28; festum epiphanie Domini the Lord s 
Epiphany, 6 January 185/17; festum natalis 
(Domini) Christmas, 25 December 1 85/6, etc; 
festum purificacionis beate Marie the Puri 
fication of St Mary, Candlemas, 2 February 
186/3; festum sanctae Fidis Virginis feast of 
St Faith the Virgin, 6 October 3/2 Ic; festa 
sancti Martini the feasts of St Martin, that is, 
Martinmas, 1 1 November, and the feast of his 
translation, 4 July 183/8, 183/16; festum 
sancti Martini in hieme feast of St Martin 
in winter, another name for Martinmas, 
11 November 184/13 

fideliter /ft/!/ faithfully, in a trustworthy manner 
30/5 

Fides, -is nf Faith (as proper name): sancta Fides 
St Faith; see festum 

fides, -ei nf 1 . (religious) faith 3/23, etc; 2. oath, 
in idiom facere fidem to swear an oath 9/12, 
etc 

folium, -ii n nt leaf, folio (of a book) 260/10 



346 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



forma, -e nf 1. form of words, here that used in 
che public confession imposed as penance by 
church courts or a written copy thereof 11/15; 
2. tenor, purport 40/34, etc 
Francia, -e nf France 28/38; Frauncia 170/29 
(iratcr, -tris n m literally brother, hence member of 
an order of friars 186/33 

Callus, -i sbst m in CL an inhabitant of Gaul, hence 

a Frenchman 212/10 

g-ardianus, -i n m 1 . keeper, warden, here the lord 
warden of the Cinque Ports 47/37; 2. church 
warden 10/2, etc 

generalis, -c adj general, common; see sessio 
generosus, -in m gentleman 185/8, etc 
Glouernia, -e nf Gloucester, name of a royal 

duchy 184/22 

gracia, -en f \. mercy, forgiveness, favour, here in 
idiom ex gracia graciously, mercifully, used of 
the actions of a judge 24/2; 2. grace, divine 
favour 170/29, etc 

haraldus, -i n m herald, messenger 184/5 

hebdomada, -e nf a week: hebdomada natalis 
Domini Christmas week, probably the feast 
of Christmas and its octave, 25-31 December 
17/30-1 

hernisatus, -a, -urn pjp pass decorated 14/11 

Hibernia, -e / Ireland 170/29, etc 

histrio, -onis n m entertainer, probably one whose 
entertainment included music of some kind 
(likely often used as a synonym of mimus and 
ministrallus, although the phr mimi & 
histrioncs in 17/36 may be contrasting two 
groups): 1. used without specification, exact 
sense unclear 183/33, 184/12, 184/13, 184/20, 
184/21, 186/40, 187/18, 212/8; 2. with a 
royal, noble, or other patron expressed, such an 
entertainer under his or her patronage 182/7, 
etc; 3. such an entertainer in the employ of a 
town, town wait (usually with name of town 
expressed) 184/14 

homo, -inis n m 1. literally human being, person, 
but often used indistinguishably from uir, hence 
man, male human being; it is not possible to 



say in which way the word is used in 29/1 1; 
2. liege man, servant 182/7; 3. townsman, here 
member of a group of local players 185/36 

hospicium, -ii n nt hospice, guesthouse, a hostel 
maintained by a religious house for travellers 
and other strangers 1 85/9 

humilitas, -atis nf humility, lack of arrogance 
(seen as a positive virtue rather than with neg 
ative CL connotations) 4/3 

humiliter <7dV in a humble manner 21/9 

imediate ddV immediately, at once 38/37 

incisor, -oris n m one who cuts, here by extension 
cutting edge: incisor ferri Iron edge, attempt 
to render the nameTaillifer into Latin 212/16 

indentatus, -a, -um adj in the form of an inden 
ture, that is, having the top or bottom edge cut 
on a zigzag, used of either half of a legal docu 
ment drawn up in duplicate on a single sheet 
and then separated by cutting along a zigzag 
line; one half was given to each party affected 
by the document and the matching indenta 
tions authenticated die halves 1 70/27, etc 

induitus, -a, -umfor indutus pjp pass o/induo 
[OLD] 

informo, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to make (some 
thing) known, to inform, to teach 3/24 

infortunium, -ii n nt misadventure, accident 
29/13, etc [Black s Misadventure] 

infra prep with ace within (used of extent of space) 
18/6, etc 

innumerosus, -a, -um adj without number, 
countless 212/9 

inquisitio, -onis nf inquest, a judicial inquiry, 
here a coroner s inquest into the cause of a 
death 170/27, etc 

inquisitor, -oris n m questman, parish officer 
inferior to a churchwarden 24/1, etc 

instans, -ntisprp act (of dates) present, instant 
171/1, etc 

instanter adv at once 171/14 

instrumentum, -i n nt tool, instrument, here 
probably musical instrument 14/12 

intimo, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to inform 24/2 

iocosus, -a, -um adj of or pertaining to a iocus, a 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



347 



jest, a trick, or sometimes a play, hence dominus 
iocosus play lord (but possibly rather an occur 
rence oflocosus, -in m Joyce, Josse, Latin form 
of the name of the Breton St Judoc) 1 84/3 1 ; 
see p 288 (endnote to PRO: SC 6/Henry 7/1874 
ff [ 1 - 1 v]) and dominus 

ioculator, -oris n m entertainer, juggler 18/4, 
18/6, 18/15; in two of these three occurrences 
ioculator refers to an entertainer under 
expressed royal or noble patronage and so is 
possibly a synonym of histrio, mimus, and 
ministrallus. more usual terms for such an 
entertainer (and hence possibly a musician) 

itaquod conj so that 24/3 

iudicans, -antis sbst m judge, here in an ecclesi 
astical court 20/39, etc 

iunior, -ius compar adj the younger of two persons 
having the same name or surname 40/26, etc 

iuramcntum, -i n nt oath 30/5, etc; see also uirtus, 
uis 

iurator, -oris n m juror: a member of an inquest 
jury 170/38, etc [Black s Inquest] 

iuridicus, -a, -um adj of or pertaining to a court; 
see dies 

iustifico, -are, -aui, -atum v tr literally to justify, 
vindicate (eg, a person or action), here by 
extension to corroborate (a charge) 178/10, 
etc 

iuxta />/> with ace according to, in accordance 
with 10/2, etc; in idiom iuxta &c, abbrev of 
iuxta cursum ecclesic Anglicane according to 
the practice of the English church, used of 
dates to describe the English custom, retained 
formally until 1752, of treating Lady Day, 25 
March, as the start of a new calendar year (see 
Cheney, pp 4 -5) 38/28 

Kancia, -e w/Kent, name of an earldom 15/24 

laciuia, -esbstf dissolute or sexually lax behaviour 

3/12 
le form of the Romance definite art usually used 

to signal the beginning of an English word or 

phr in an otherwise Latin passage 15/4, etc; 

although le is formally singular it is not always 



in agreement with the noun it modifies, eg, 
le berewardes 1 5/3, etc 

lectio, -onis nf reading, act of reading aloud, here 
probably the prescribed readings of the divine 
office, the set of daily prayers and scriptural 
readings to be said by religious at the canonical 
hours 4/2 

lex, legis nf law; see doctor 

libertas, -atis nf liberty, a district made up of 
several manors held by the same lord, over 
which he exercised a common lordship 171/22 
[Blacks Manor, OED Liberty sb. 7.C.] 

licentiatus, -i sbst m properly a licentiate, one 
holding the licentiate degree but here used as 
synonym o/"lit(t)eratus: a summoner 178/9 

linthiamen, -inis n nt linen clothing 24/39 [OLD 
linteamen] 

lit(t)eratus, -i sbst m literally a lettered man, a liter 
ate person but here apparently short form of 
litteratus man da tar ius: summoner, officer of 
the ecclesiastical courts with special respons 
ibility for delivering citations to appear in court 
to accused persons 9/12, etc 

ludo, -dere, -si, -sum v tr 1 . to play, sport 212/11, 
212/13; 2. to play a sport, game, or play, 
engage in a pastime 1 85/36; prp act as sbst 
player, participant in an unspecified sport, 
pastime, play, or interlude 187/26 

ludus, -i n m game, sport, play, pastime, with 
various significances (which are sometimes 
difficult to distinguish): sport, (folk) game, 
popular pastime; turpes & inhonesti ludi 
3/11-12 (used of outdoor activity in church 
yards); ludi t heat rales & inhonesti 4/16 
(apparently referring to seasonal misrule by 
vicars choral and minor clergy attached to a 
cathedral) 

lusor, -oris n m player, participant in a sport, pas 
time, play, interlude, or other entertainment: 

1. used absolutely, with exact sense unclear 
184/16, 184/35, 185/17, 186/1?, 186/10; 

2. used of players under expressed royal, noble, 
or other patronage, with the nature of the 
entertainment unspecified 184/17, etc; 2. local 
player, usually with the name of the town or 



348 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



parish expressed 185/37, 185/38 , 185/38 2 - 
186/1, 186/1?; 3. puppet-player: lusores cum 
popetys 184/15 

magister, -tri n m 1. one who has authority or 
rank, master, used as a title of respect with 
names 14/27 or titles of office 14/10?, especially 
with the names of members of the gentry 
186/3 or of those who have earned an MA 
degree 41/23, etc; 2. master, teacher 14/10? 

magnas, -ads n m magnate, member of the gentry, 
peer, or other person of importance 182/8 

maior, -ius compar adj greater (in size, dignity, or 
worth): the phr major ecclesia Cicestrensis 
presumably refers to the cathedral in contrast 
to lesser, parish churches there 3/2 Ic; used as a 
simple positive 20/10 

maior, -oris n m mayor: of Chichester 15/28, etc; 
of Rye 48/1 6 

man us, -us nf 1. literally hand 171/8; 2. express 
ing direct agency; see per; 3. by synecdoche a 
person, especially in phr quarta manus; see 
purge; 4. something written by hand, espe 
cially a signature 38/12 

matutinus, -a, -um adj of or pertaining to morn 
ing; see prex 

menestral(l)us see ministrallus 

mercatus, -us n m market, an occasion for the 
buying and selling of goods 3/13 

mimus, -i n m performer, probably one whose 
performance included music of some kind 
(likely often used as a synonym of histrio and 
ministrallus): 1. used without specification, 
exact sense unclear 15/27?, 15/28?, 212/16; 
2. with a royal, noble, or other patron, such a 
performer under his or her patronage 185/8, 
etc; 3. such a performer in the employ of a 
town, town wait (usually with name of town 
expressed) 15/27?, 15/28? 

minister, -tri n m 1 . literally servant (possibly used 
for the related ministrallus) 47/27, 183/1; 
2. by extension with reference to Mk 10.43-5, 
clergyman, minister 4/17; specifically the 
incumbent of a parish 38/12, etc 

ministrallus, -i n m literally a servant (ultimately 



from LL ministerialis ); minstrel, performer, 
musician, often used either of a musician who 
is a member of a household or in die employ of 
a town (and likely often used as a synonym of 
histrio and mimus): 1. used without speci 
fication, exact sense unclear 182/23, 182/31, 
183/8, 183/16, 184/5, 186/33, 187/10; 
menestralus 182/15; 2. a minstrel under ex 
pressed royal, noble, or other patronage 186/20, 
etc; menestrallus 1 83/24; 3. a minstrel in the 
employ of a town, probably a town wait 50/32 
(in 3rd declform) 

modus, -in m way, manner 14/9, etc; see also uia 

monasterium, -ii n nt monastery, religious house 
for a community of monks; see ecclesia 

mora, -e nf elapse of time, usually with negative 
connotation, delay but in idiom moram facere 
used of a place of residence to stay, remain, live 
20/11 

mortalis, -e adj deadly, mortal 171/12, etc 

natalis, -eadj of or pertaining to birth; by exten 
sion of or pertaining to Christmas, hence nt sg 
as sbst (often with Domini) Christmas, the 
Christmas season 1 82/ 1 6, etc; see also festum, 
hebdomada, tempus 

Nauerina, -e nf possibly a form o/ Nauarra, 
Navarre, a Spanish kingdom 183/24 

negocior, -ari, -atus sum v intr to be busy with, 
to be occupied in 185/8 

notarius, -ii n m notary, person authorized to 
draw up and attest to various public and legal 
documents, thus giving such documents an 
authoritative status at law; often notaries served 
as registrars of ecclesiastical courts: notarius 
publicus notary public 38/31, etc 

notorie adv in a well-known manner 38/30 

numeratus, -a, -umpfp pass (of money) counted 
out, put down (in payment); see pecunia 

nuncius, -i n m messenger, servant, possibly groom 
182/7, etc 

obiectio, -onis nf objection, a charge or accusa 
tion brought in an ecclesiastical court 178/30 
obiicco, -icere, -eci, -ectum v tr to charge or 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



349 



accuse someone of something (with ace of 
charge and dat of person] \ 8/27, etc 

officium, -ii n nt 1. office, position of respons 
ibility, hence specifically a bishops judicial office 
or function, normally exercised by subordinate 
judges and so a name for a diocesan court 
40/10, etc; 2. duty, task, responsibility 4/1, 
4/2?; 3. in idiom officium ecclesiasticum 
divine office, the set of daily prayers and 
scriptural readings to be said by religious at 
the canonical hours 4/1-2? 

onero, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to bind someone by 
an oath, swear someone to an oath (used with 
ace of person and simple abl) 30/5 

oracio, -onis n f prayer, here likely with specific 
reference to the prayers of the divine office, the 
set of daily prayers and scriptural readings to be 
said by religious at the canonical hours 4/2 

Oxonia, -e n f Oxford, name of an earldom 
184/33, etc 

papulum, -i n nt for pabulum [OLD] 

parochia, -e w/parish, the smallest distinct unit of 

ecclesiastical jurisdiction and Christian ministry, 

each parish having its own church, priest, 

wardens, and tithes 28/5, etc 
parochialis, -eadj of or pertaining to a parish; see 

ecclesia 
parochianus, -i n m parishioner, member of a 

parish 3/9, etc 

particulariter adv in detail, item by item 185/9 
Pascha, -e nf Easter, Sunday after the full moon 

on or next following 21 March 184/18 
pastura, -ew/pasture 171/21 
pax, -cis n /peace, especially a state characterized 

by peaceful relations among neighbours 4/4; 

in idiom pax ... regine the queens peace, the 

public peace which royal officers are charged 

with preserving and breaches of which are 

under the jurisdiction of royal courts 171/17 
pecunia, -e n f money, here in idiom pecunie 

numerate ready money, coin, cash 47/34-5, 

etc 
Penbrocha, -e nf Pembroke, name of an earldom 

47/24 



penitencia, -e n f penance, act of contrition or 
restitution imposed by ecclesiastical authorities 
upon persons guilty of canonical offences; in 
case of moral offences such as Sabbath break 
ing, penance often took the form of public con 
fession on a set day or series of days 10/17, etc 

Pentecostes, -es or -is nf Pentecost, Whitsunday, 
Sunday fifty days following Easter 184/20 

per prep with ace 1. through, by, by means of 3/10, 
etc; 2. by, by reason of 1 5/27, 1 5/28, 185/9; 3. 
through, throughout (objects) 213/4, (a barrier) 
171/9; 4. in accordance with 29/4, 170/33; 
5. (of time) during, on, at: per diuersas uices 
on various occasions 182/23; ad ij* 5 uices on 
two occasions 187/26; per uices on occasion 
183/26; 6. in idioms per annum by the year, 
annually 14/19, etc; per manus + gen of person 
by (someone) 183/33, etc 

peremptorie adv in a peremptory manner 20/17 

perpetracio, -onis nf act of committing or per 
petrating (an offence) 171/20 

personalis, -eadj in person, personal; see citacio 

personaliter adv in person, personally 41/1, etc 

pertica, -e nf rod, pole 29/12, etc; hence pertica 
estiualis summer pole 29/1 1 

pixis, pixidis nf box see apercio 

pol(l)ex, -icis n m literally thumb, by extension 
inch 171/12, etc 

pomeridianus, -a, -um adj of or pertaining to 
the afternoon 178/23; nt sg as sbst afternoon 
43/35 

pono, -nere, -sui, -situm v tr put, place, by exten 
sion ponere se to enter one s plea, to plead 
171/25 

porta, -e n f literally (city or castle) gate, here by 
extension gate to a private dwelling or field 
171/4 

precentor, -oris n m precentor, member of a 
cathedral chapter responsible for directing the 
singing of choir services; administratively, the 
precentor is second to the dean 14/10 

preconizacio, -onis nf summoning, a formal call 
made in a church court summoning a cited 
party three times by name in an audible voice 
to appear before the court 9/14, etc 



350 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



preconizo, -arc, -aui, -atum v tr to summon 
(someone) formally to appear in a church court 
41/2, etc 

premissum, -i sbst nt what has gone before, the 
aforegoing, the aforementioned 185/8, etc 

presento, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to present findings 
(usually of a crime), used of an inquest jury 
170/38 

presto, -are, -iti, -atum v tr to furnish, provide, in 
idiom iuramentuni prestare to swear or take 
an oath 19/33, etc 

prex, -ccis nf(here only found in pi prcces, -cum) 
prayers, here always referring to one of the two 
post-Reformation offices of the Church of 
England: preces matutine morning prayer, 
matins, the morning office based upon the 
pre-Reformation offices of matins and prime 
23/10; preces uespertine evening prayer, 
evensong, the evening office based upon the 
pre-Reformation offices of vespers and com 
pline 38/37, etc 

princeps, -ipis n m prince, the king s eldest son 
182/8, etc 

pro prep with abl \. on account of, on the basis of, 
for 40/33, etc; 2. in payment for 44/29, etc; 
3. in view of, as befits, for 44/10; 4. in the case 
of, for 30/10, 38/16; 5. (with action of calling 
or summoning) for 9/14, etc; 6. (of time) for, 
on: pro hac vice on this occasion, this time 
40/15, etc 

processus, -us n m (legal) process, proceedings 
43/38, etc 

profunditas, -atis nf depth 171/12, etc 

promoter, -oris n m promoter, an officer of the 
court making promotion, a type of accusation 
against a person in a church court 178/14 

promotus, -a, -\tmpfy pass promoted, used of an 
accusation in a church court moved or initiated 
by someone other than the court itself or a 
person authorized to make presentment 43/3 

pronuncio, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to adjudge, 
pronounce (an opinion, sentence, or the like; 
used of a judge) 41/3, etc 

purgo, -are, -aui, -atum v tr in refl sense to clear 
oneself from an accusation by means of an oath 



with or without compurgators; the number of 
compurgators is expressed by manus in the abl 
sg with an ordinal or distributive number, eg, 
ad purgandum se quarta manu, but it is not 
clear whether that number indicates the cotal 
number of persons required including the 
accused or the total number of additional 
compurgators required 25/1 1-12, etc 
purincacio, -onis nf (ritual) purification, here 
used with reference to the liturgical commem 
oration of the Virgin Mary s purification after 
the birth of Christ (Lk 2.22-4); see festum 

quindena, -e nf fortnight 22/1 9m, etc; in idiom 
iste dies quindenam proximus two weeks 
after today, two weeks from now 1 80/ 1 9 

rapa, -e w/rape, one of six administrative districts, 
each made up of several hundreds, into which 
Sussex was divided 170/27, etc 

reatus, -a, -umadj liable, responsible 171/25 

rector, -oris n m rector, priest having respons 
ibility for and authority over a parish and 
entitled to enjoy its tithes 3/22 

regardum, -i see rewardum 

regimen, -inis n nt literally control, rule; here in 
idiom regimen animarum cure of souls, the 
responsibility borne by a cleric for parishioners 
entrusted to him 3/22 

regina, -ew /queen: 1. the reigning monarch 
170/29, etc; 2. wife of the king 182/8, 184/20 

regius, -a, -um adj of or pertaining to a monarch, 
royal; see domus 

regnum, -i n nt reign 170/28, etc 

remuneracio, -onis nf reward, customary pay 
ment 50/32 

reparo, -are, -aui, -atum v tr literally to mend, 
repair, hence to amend, correct (eg, faults) 
180/12 

respondeo, -dere, -si, -sum v intr (as legal idiom) 
to answer, reply to (eg, charges or questions) 
30/5, etc 

rewardum n nt reward, gratuity, customary pay 
ment 184/31, etc; regardum 14/26, etc 

rex, -gis n m king, a reigning monarch 182/7, etc 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



351 



sacramentum, -i n nt oath, especially the oath 
sworn by jurors to give true findings to the 
best of their ability 170/33, etc 

sagito, -arc, -aui, -atum v intr to shoot arrows at, 
attack wich arrows 171/8 

sanctus, -a, -um adj holy or blessed, with names 
as a title, Saint: parochia ... sancti Petri 
Maioris parish of St Peter the Great 20/9-10; 
see also clericus, dies, festum, uigilia 

sanguis, -inis n m blood: see effusio 

Sarisberia, -e nf Salisbury, name of an earldom 
14/25 

scandalum, -i n nt scandal, discredit 4/5 

schedula, -e nf schedule, here a schedule or list of 
penalties to be imposed on those guilty of 
canonical offences, apparently setting out a 
form of confession for lesser, or duly penitent, 
offenders 10/2, 37/25, 38/2, 179/2, and more 
severe punishments for the contumacious or 
other serious offenders 20/20, 37/5 

scituatus, -a, -umpjp pass located, situated 38/30 

scitus, -a, -um pfp pass for situs, -a, -um {OLD} 

secularis, -e. adj (as legal idiom) civil, ie, not 
ecclesiastical 3/13 

senescallus, -i n m steward, a monastic official 
183/34, etc 

senior, -ius compar adj the elder (of two persons 
having the same name or surname) 1 70/36, etc 

septimana, -e n f week; here in idiom dies 
dominica proxima ad septimanam a week 
from Sunday 10/18, etc 

seruicium, -i n nt beer, ale 14/25 

seruiens, -ntis sbst m servant 1 5/5 

sessio, -onis nf session, sitting, usually of the 
court of quarter sessions 15/28; generalts 
sessio usually the general session of the peace, 
that is, the quarter sessions, but here clearly 
a regular sitting of the ecclesiastical court 
178/13 

sibus, -i nf for cibus [OLD] 

sicherator see citherator 

sigillum, -i n nt seal, here properly the impression 
of a seal, used to authenticate an official docu 
ment 171/23, etc 

sigmim, -i n nt sign, symbol, hence a personal sign 



used by an illiterate person instead of a signa 
ture; in some cases these signs may be initials 
146/30 

sinodalis, -e adj of or pertaining to a synod, a 
local church council 3/21; hence concilium 
synodalis synod 3/2 Ic 

specificatio, -onis w/a detailed listing or descrip 
tion, specification 179/13 

specifico, -are, -aui, -atum v tr to specify, make 
a detailed list of 178/14 

spectaculum, -i n nt spectacle, show, usually 
unspecified but probably dramatic 4/5, 186/28; 
the hostility shown to spectacula in canonical 
sources probably arises from the term s associ 
ations with gladiatorial shows and the like [OLD] 

stimulus, -I n m in CL a goad but here more likely 
spur 212/17 

sto, stare, steti, statum v intr \. to stand (in a 
given condition), to be (in a state) 20/36; 2. to 
stay, continue (in a given state) 38/27; 3. to 
stand by, adhere to, in idiom stare mandatis 
ccclesie to conform to the church s regulations 
38/34 

subdecanatus, -us n m subdeanery, office or 
jurisdiction ot a subdean, deputy to the dean 
of a cathedral; in Chichester, another name for 
the parish of St Peter the Great, presumably 
because it was in some way under the subdean s 
jurisdiction 20/9 

submitto, -ittere, -isi, -issum v tr in reft sense to 
submit oneself (to the judgment or sentence of 
a court), used of defendants pleading guilty in 
a church court 40/13, etc 

Suffolcia, -e nf Suffolk, name of a duchy 18/3 

super prep with ace or abl 1 . on top of, upon 
29/13, etc; 2. about, concerning 29/2, 170/31; 

3. upon, by virtue of (an oath) 170/38, etc; 

4. on the basis of, upon 38/1 1 
supradictus, -a, -um pfp pass said earlier, stated 

above 171/1, etc 
suprascriptus, -a, -umpfy pass written earlier or 

above 42/26 
surrogatus, -i n m surrogate, deputy judge in the 

church courts 178/23 
Sussexia, -e nf Sussex, name of a county 28/36 



352 



LATIN GLOSSARY 



tabcrna, -e n f literally a shop, but usually in AL an 
inn, tavern 4/7, etc 

tempus, -oris n nt 1. time, occasion 184/19, 
etc; often with adj modifier or gen of speci 
fication defining the nature of the occasion (eg, 
tempus pomeridianum 178/23 or tempus 
session!* 15/28); 2. the octave or liturgical 
season associated with a major festival: 
tempus natalis Domini Christmas time, 
probably the feast of Christmas and its octave, 
25-31 December 184/31; 3. in idiom tune 
temporis then, at that time 47/39, etc; 
tunctemporis 48/33 

tenor, -oris n m tenor, tone, slant (of meaning, 
eg, in a document) 20/12, etc 

terminus, -i n m term, a set period of time, eg, 
an accounting term or quarter 275/16 

theatralis, -e adj of or pertaining to the stage, 
dramatic, theatrical; see ludus 

torneamentum, -i n nt tourney, tournament 
4/6 

transfudit 3rd per sg pfact apparently a phonetic 
variant for transfodityrow transfodio [OLD] 

tunctemporis see tempus 

uaco, -are, -aui, -alum v intr literally to be empty 
hence of legal or financial records to be null and 
void 260/10, etc 

uespertinus, -a, -um adj of or pertaining to 
evening; see prex 

uia, -e /way, manner, here in idiom uijs & 
modis by ways and means, name of a citation 
issued when a summoner was unable to serve 
the original citation personally, apparently 
authorizing him to use whatever way seemed 
appropriate for delivering the citation 29/36, 



etc; decretum uijs et modis order for the 
issuing of such a citation 20/7 

uicarius, -ii n m vicar: 1. one who acts as a deputy 
for a rector who cannot discharge his duties in 
a parish 10/1 ; 2. assistant or deputy for a mem 
ber of a cathedral chapter, often in carrying out 
choir duties, vicar choral 4/16 

uicis (gen) n f (nom sg lacking) 1. occasion, time: 
alia uicc on another occasion 1 86/1 ; trina uice 
three times 37/3; see also ad, per, pro 

uictualia, -ium sbst nt pi victuals, necessary 
supplies, especially foodstuffs 3/13 

uigilia, -e nf vigil, eve of a liturgical festival: 
uigilia sancti Edward! confessoris eve of the 
feast of St Edward the Confessor, 12 October 
48/3 1 ; uigilia sancti Marci euangeliste St 
Mark s Eve, 24 April 51/14 

uilla, -e/town 44/10, etc 

uirgo, -inis n f virgin: see festum 

uirtus, -tutis nf\. literally strength, power, hence 
uirtute iuramenti by virtue of one s oath 
19/33; 2. (Christian) virtue 4/3 

uis, uis n f authority, force (of an order) 20/15; 
also in idiom in uim iuramenti by virtue of 
ones oath 179/18 

uisus, -us n m literally view, sight, here in idiom 
uisus corporis view of a body, a coroner s 
inquest held to determine culpability in cases 
of accidental or violent death 29/2, 170/32 

ursus, -i n m (male) bear; see also custos 

usus, -us n m use, benefit 171/21 [Black s Use] 

Warwicum, -i n nt Warwick, name of an earldom 
45/26, etc; Warwycum 48/5, etc 

yems, yemis/or hiems [OLD] 



English Glossary 



abrod adv abroad, out of doors 121/27 

accompt n account 167/33, 168/23; accomptes 
/>/ 168/37 

accomptyd/)/) accounted for 167/33, 168/11 

admeralls, admiralls, admirals, admyrall, 
admyralles, admyralls, admyrals see lord 
admyrall 

aell see ayll 

agestlyng n phr a Guestling, a meeting of repres 
entatives of some or all of the Cinque Ports 74/4 

ale, ales, ail, alle see ayll 

arnendinge vb n repairing 129/36 

amynstrel, amynstrell see mynstrell 

and con; if 21/5 

angels n pi gold coins (also called angel-nobles) 
with image of archangel Michael, worth 10s in 
the reigns of Edward vi and Elizabeth i 121/16; 
angelles 170/9 

arreysed/)/) aroused 27/1 1 [OED Araisez/] 

Asonsee p 263 (endnote to src: 4140.8 sig D3) 
28/14 

assembly n in Rye, the gathering of all freemen of 
the town 121/33; assemble 121/15; assemblie 
126/16 

yyeneadv again 27/13, 106/36 

ayll n a convivial public drinking, usually held to 
raise money for some charitable or civic 
purpose 174/26, etc; ale 172/24; all 176/10; 
call 176/19; in comp churche ale ale held 
under the auspices of a parish church for its 
monetary benefit 168/39, etc; chcarche eale 
177/25; cherch all 173/40, 174/5; cherch alle 
173/33, etc, cherch chall 175/26; cherche alle 



172/32, 173/24; cherth alle 174/19; cheurch 
all 177/18; cheyrche ayll 175/34; chirche 
aell 173/17; church ale 173/10; chyrch ale 
172/7-8, 172/16; chyrch hal 175/12; chyrch 
halle 175/5; chyrche alle 173/2; churchalesX 
5/39, etc; churche ales 5/29; kyng ale ale held 
in conjunction with choosing a king of the May 
168/1, etc; paryse awle ale held in support of 
the parish church 172/25 

bailif see bayliff 

baily n in Rye and other Cinque Ports, the chief 
officer appointed by the Crown, but in practice 
of lesser authoriry than the mayor 50/11; 
bailies/./ 27/2 

band see selected bond 

banys n pi proclamation for a play 59/9, 96/38; 
banes88/18;banyes91/34;baynys91/l5; in 
comp bane cryers performers making proclama 
tion for a play 71/6, etc; bane criers 1 17/36 

barer see beriar 

barons of the Cinque Ports n phr freemen of the 
Cinque Ports 217/32; see also combarons 

barr n screen dividing a court or assembly room 
216/14 [ofoBar^ 1 22] 

base n bass viol or viol da gamba, stringed instru 
ment playing the bass part and held between 
the legs, like a modern cello 39/13; see also violl 

bayliffw 1. in Rye and other Cinque Ports, the 
chief officer appointed by the Crown, but in 
practice of lesser authority than the mayor 
bailif 50/24; baylife 121/1; 2. in Yarmouth, 
one of the two main officers of the town 



354 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 



bayliff 216/2, 216/12?, etc; bayliffes/)/ 
216/2, etc; bailiffes 217/10; 3. at the 
Yarmouth Herring Fair, a representative of 
the Cinque Ports appointed to police the 
activities of the fishermen from the ports 
bayliff 2 16/1 2?, etc 

baytyng vb n setting on of dogs for tormenting 
49/26; bayttinge 208/5 but see p 291 (endnote 
IOESRO: DUN 37/2 f99v) 

berc kepers n phr pi travelling guardians of bears 
118/34 

bcreward n bearward, one who leads a bear about 
51/33, etc; berard 102/12, 110/16; bcrerd 
102/24; berewarde 49/25, etc; bereworth 
72/9, etc; bereworthe 76/28, etc; berrwarde 
108/38; berward 63/36, etc; berwarde 
71/18 (2), etc; berworth 78/20, etc; berworthe 
75/11, etc; beward 1 1 9/24; berewardes pi 
15/3, etc; berwardes 16/37, 18/9; 
bcrworthis 74/9, 74/10 

beriar n bearkeeper 1 19/5; barer 91/25; 
bereiars/-/ 119/16; bcryars (sg?) 109/17; 
beryers 109/33 

besschope see byschop 

beyles see morrice 

blewew blue fabric 123/17 

boder n messenger 112/21 

bogtpp bought 168/23 

bond see selected bond 

borepp borne, ie, paid and subtracted from the 
total 172/25 

boschyp see byschop 

boulster see flock boulster 

bowes w />/ boughs 126/1 7m, 126/19 

box 1. in Rye, a box used for storage of 
revenues 85/4, 121/21, 124/38; 2. boxwood 
190/28 

boye n apprentice 39/13, 39/14, 199/18? 

braces n pi leather thongs sliding up and down the 
cords of drums, used to regulate the tension of 
the heads and thus the pitch of the notes 
158/32, 166/36; brases 163/6 

brasen home n phr in the Cinque Ports, a brass 
horn used to announce proclamations and 
official meetings 216/32 



brethered n brotherhood, ie, religious guild 

1 68/ 1 3; see also brotherhood 
brethem n pi jurats, fellow members of common 

council 51/23, etc; bredirn 52/15; brether 

53/1; bretheren 50/24; bretherin 121/1, 

121/8; bretherne 50/13; brethirn 56/23; 

brethren 51/27, etc; britherin 117/19, 1 17/26; 

b ro them 50/ 11 , etc; brytheryn 1 1 5/7, 1 1 5/ 1 9; 

brethernes pi pass 55/19; brethrens 67/3; 

brodern 56/21 

brothe v pa 3 pi brought 169/35;/>/> 169/10 
brotherhood n meeting of representatives of the 

Cinque Ports 161/34; see also brethered 
brothern, brytheryn see brethern 
burrhens n pi error for burthens(?) 196/16 
byer n beer 8 1 /3 
byllet n billet, ie, placard 106/34 
byschop n 1. boy bishop 31/20, 32/13; besschope 

31/35; boschyp 32/30; bychyp 32/38; 

bysschope 31/30; bysshyp 30/38, 33/12; 

2. bishop bysshopp 34/1 1 
by twen prep between 76/ 1 7 

camomel n camomile 196/14 

cargys n pi charges, expenses 172/25 

chall see ayll 

chamberlains, chamberlens see lord charnberlens 

cheapen bargain 181/14 

chearche eale, cherch all, cherch alle, cherch 
chall, cherche alle, cherth alle, cheurch all, 
cheyrche ayll, chirche aell, church ale, 
church ales, churchales, churche ale, 
churche ales, chyrch ale, chyrch hal, chyrch 
halle, chyrche alle see ayll 

chuche holyday n phr a holiday, originally on 
the dedication day of a church, but later 
probably a holiday so designated see p 268 
(endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/3 ff30v, 31v) 
77/3; chirche haliday 55/8 

churchmassday n phr see p 272 (endnote to 
ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff260v, 264v) 80/17; cherche 
masdaye 98/10, churche masse day 103/15, 
churchmasse day 81/5 

claioneres npl players of clarions (shrill trumpets) 
65/19 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 

clerely adv without encumbrance, net 167/35, etc; 

clerli 169/35; clerly 169/10, etc; kleerly 31/6 
coatc n 1 . long garment worn as a costume cote 

1 11/17?; coote 94/25; 2. livery cote 1 16/25; 

cotes/)/ 1 17/34; 3. soldiers uniform 122/6; 

coates/>/ 122/5, etc; cootes 122/3; cottes 122/8 
combarons n pi freemen of the Cinque Ports 27/2; 

see also barons of the Cinque Ports 
commeneres n pi freemen, burgesses 59/12; 

comeneres 56/23 
comons n pi 1. commonalty, body of freemen of 

a town 47/2; commons 121/26; 2. common 

ground or lands comons 75/35 
comptrollers see master comptrollers 
conduit n system of pipes for transporting water 

122/19, 122/24 
constable n 1. warden of a castle 26/38; 2. parish 

peace officer cunstable 12/7; 3. in Lewes, two 

annually elected chief officials constables pi 

33/34, 34/5 
contynaunce n sample or summary, perhaps a 

dumb show used as an advertisement 57/22 

[OED Continence 3] 
conyzances n pi badges 118/10 
coote, cootes see coate 
copheigth n a very great height 191/28 [OED 

Cop sb l 8] 
cordes see head 

cornette n cornett, a long, narrow wind instru 
ment with seven holes (not to be confused with 

the modern cornet) 192/16 
corporall othes n phr pi oaths ratified by touching 

a sacred object 12/38 [L corporale iuramentum] 
cote, cottes see coate 

court hall n phr in Rye, the town hall, the head 
quarters for civic government and civil law 

120/35; court haUe 120/18 
creuses n pi drinking vessels 81/3 [OED Cruse] 
criors n pi proclaimers 88/19; criarres 64/18; see 

also banys 
crosyar n bearer of the bishop s crook in a boy 

bishop ceremony 31/20, etc; croger 30/39; 

crosear 33/12; crosyer 32/38 [OED Crosier, 

crozier 2] 
crowde n bowed lyre 64/36 



355 

cules n pi kayles, a kind of nine-pin bowling or 

skittles 37/10 
cunstable see constable 

dage n confinement using leather straps(?) see 
p 274 (endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 1 94v) 
99/25 

dedication day n phr day celebrating patron saint 
or other dedication of church see p 271 (end- 
note to ESRO: RYE 60/4 ff 1 5 1 , 1 54) 72/ 1 9, 
73/7 

defaute n default, ie, offence 1 16/8 

dener dinner 47/4 

deschagged pp discharged, cleared 175/5; 
dessechearged 177/25 

devocion money n phr money given as an offering 
or oblation 175/33 

di. abb rev for L dimidium, used in E contexts for 
a half 118/8 

division n playing rapid melodic runs, somewhat 
like a descant 198/35 

Docheman n Dutchman 93/5 

doonpp made 67/12 

dorrey n dory (fish) 46/23 

dosson n dozen 109/38 

dringe/>rp drying 22/38 

drinking v b n a convivial drinking feast or bout, 
sometimes held to raise money for a church 
5/6; drynkyng 66/27, 96/20; drinkinges pi 
5/30; drinkings 5/39, etc 

drome n 1. drum, percussion instrument 121/23, 
etc; drom 133/24, etc; drowme 175/41; drum 
121/27, etc; drume 117/31, etc; dromes pi 
126/18; droms 158/31; drumes 166/33; 
drums 137/26, 167/4; drvmes 127/7; 2. 
drummer 124/37, etc; drom 127/26, etc; 
droum 133/17, 134/27; drum 121/22m, etc; 
drume 155/28, etc; in phr dromm maior 
principal drummer 27/23; dromm minor 
second drummer 27/24 

dromehed n comp membrane on top of a drum 
(see also headj 128/17 

dromern drummer 134/32, etc; drommer 
151/25 

dromestate n drumslade, drummer 131/16 



356 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 



ilrouni, drowme, drum, dnune, drumes, drums, 

drvmes see drome 
drynkyng see drinking 
dykers n pi workmen who dig ditches and chrow 

up embankments 75/32 

eale, call see ayll 

Egiptians n pi gypsies xxxvii/27 

enterlute see interlud 

erU n earl 52/13, etc; erile 56/7; erill 57/28; erull 

1 08/3 1 ; eryle 627 1 6; see also therill 
escutchions n pi escutcheons, heraldic shields 

191/6, 194/37 
examynant n one who is examined in court 

34/36, etc 

fate// vat 130/37 

fayre lawe n phr allowance in time or distance 

made to an animal that is to be hunted in 

order to ensure equal conditions; a start 190/2 
fetyng vb n fetching 1 1 5/34 
feuyr^er proper n February 51/7; Ffeuyrjere 

52/26 
feyrs n pi firs(?); or firewood(?) 175/40 [OED 

Fire sb 4b] 

ffole n jester or simpleton; or a surname^) 1 82/3 1 
fidle n fiddle 9/10, 38/26; fiddle 9/28; fyddle 

29/38 
fidle v play the fiddle 39/28; fidling vb n 39/32; 

fidlinge 19/22,22/5 
fidlerw fiddle player 29/34, 181/23; fidlers/>ow 

199/18; fidlers/)/ 13/10 
flat ^absolute 196/35 
flock boulster n phr long pillow made of tufts of 

wool 42/1 
foot pleys n phr pi performance dances see also 

p 273 (endnote to ESRO: RYE 60/5 f 67) 90/12, 

9 1 12 1 ; see also player 
frise see stammell frise 
fyddle see fidle 
fyndyngprp providing for 75/38 [OED Find v 19b] 

gaJd v pa 3 pi harassed in warfare with arrows 

195/25 
galys n pi galleys 84/ 1 4 



game n pastime or rite 1 8/39; see also may game 

game pleyeres n phr pi actors 54/29, 55/19 
[OED Garnet 17] 

gefyn/>/> given 47/17; in phr giuen of given up, 
relinquished 21/5; see also 3ovyn 

gester see iester 

gewtys n pi gifts 172/24 

gogeler n juggler 86/23 

gounechambers n comp pi gun chambers, small 
ordnance pieces without carriages 122/23 
[OED Chamber^ lOb] 

gowne n 1. formal robe 121/32, 121/33m; 2. liv 
ery coat gown 59/3 

gyst n room and board 103/1 1 

gyvynd vb n giving 56/39 

hake money see hokemoney 

hal, halle see ayll 

halidaies, haliday, hallidaye, halydaies see chuche 

holyday, holiday 
hall, halle see court hall 
haloyd v pa 3 sg halloed, shouted 30/7; halloyd 

30/12 
hape n see p 262 (endnote to WSRO: Chichester 

City Archives AE/2 mb 4) 1 8/7 
harper n harp player 56/39, etc 
head n membrane across top of drum 163/6; 

heades/)/ 166/26; heddes 130/36, etc; in comp 

head cordes/>/ strings attaching head of a drum 

163/6 
heading vb n mounting a head on a drum 1 55/15, 

158/31; heddinge 124/39, 127/6; heding 

1 37/26; hedinge 135/6 
her pron pi pass their 46/4, etc 
herth n hearing 27/14 [OED Hearth 2 ] 
hobby horse n comp morris dancer with a figure of 

a horse fastened about his waist 22/24, 23/36 
hokemoney n comp money raised from Hocktide 

ransoms 32/6, 32/21; hake money 32/25; 

hock money 33/27; hokmone 33/17; 

hokmonye 3 1/14, 31/28 
holiday n comp holy day, day kept with special 

church service 5/21, 6/29; hallidaye 11/5; 

hollidaye 1 1 / 1 ; halidaies pi 59/36; halidayes 

50/14, 55/18; halydaies 53/33; hollidayes 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 



357 



5/31; holydaies 5/15, 57/4; holydayes 6/35; 

see also chuchc holyday 
hoopyd v pa 3 sg whooped 30/7, 30/12 
horsmete n comp horse fodder 46/25, 73/17 
hovd see wod 
hundred n meeting of the freemen of a town 

181/13 

hydre<ft/f hither 93/10 
hyrc adv here 80/16 

tester n jester, professional buffoon or fool 115/12; 
gester 96/33 

interlude dramatic performance 120/3; enterlute 
119/37 

iobard n jeopardy 27/13 

iogeler n juggler, entertainer who uses feats of bal 
ance, conjuring, and sleight of hand 14/27, etc; 
iogeler 1 5/22; iugeler 89/30; iuggelcr 1 5/4 

ioy d pf gladdened 2 1 7/26 

ioysinge vb n joisting, supporting timbers 21/3 

iurates n pi jurats; in the Cinque Ports, freemen 
chosen as aldermen to assist the mayor 95/20, 
etc; iurattes 36/16, 36/24; jurats 49/31; 
iurates pi pass 27/2 

iure n jury (of inquest) 106/27 

iusting posts n phr pi jousting posts, ie, posts 
supporting shields at a tournament!?); or form 
ing a barrier between the jousters(?) 201/37 

kelled/>/> killed 170/20 
keyw quay, wharf 75/35, 216/20 
kill n kiln 22/20 
kleerlyw clerely 
kyng ale see ayll 

kyng play n comp ceremony in which a May king 
is chosen and celebrated 167/33 

laund n glade, open space in woods 190/3 
lawdayes n comp pi days appointed for holding 

secular courts 6/14, 7/4 
lawe see fayre lawe 
leet n secular manor court presided over by the 

lord or his steward 7/33, 8/9; leetes/>/ 6/14, 

7/4; leets 5/40, etc 
leikadj like 126/36, etc; leike 122/20, etc 



leikewiese adv likewise 146/26 

Icon n lion 55/28 

lettw hindrance 153/13 

liuery n distinctive clothing worn by members of a 
company or servants of a corporation 120/29, 
etc; lyvery 121/26; lyveries/)/ 118/7 

lode n lord 65/26 

lord admyrall n phr the officer of state charged 
with command of the navy and coastal security 
18/30; lorde admirall 194/26; lord admeralls 
pass 136/32; lord admiralls 131/11, 134/15; 
lord admirals 135/28; lord admyrall 99/5; 
lord admyralls 114/17; lord admyrals 98/36; 
lorde admyralles H V 1 

lord chamberlens n phr pass belonging to the 
chief officer of the royal household 126/30, 
140/3; lorde chamberlains 123/3 

lorde protectors n phr pass belonging to the 
regent, the nobleman appointed to rule during 
the king s minority 1 12/9 

lord of misrule n phr man chosen to preside over 
revels, often involving horseplay and inversion 
of the normal social hierarchy 13/37-8; lorde 
of mysrule 18/37; lords of misrule/)/ 5/3, 
5/17 

lord prevy scales n phr pass belonging to the 
keeper of the smaller seal of state 1 14/37 

lord tresorer n phr officer of state in charge of the 
king s treasury 47/4; lorde tresorers pass 82/13 

lord warden n phr attr belonging to the lord war 
den of the Cinque Ports, the officer exercising 
royal authority over the ports 87/28, etc; lorde 
warden 104/6; lord wardeyn 101/38, 103/22; 
lordes wardens pass 66/26; lorde warden his 
1 14/31; lorde wardens 71/3, etc; lord wardens 
86/5, etc; lord wardeyns 67/24, 100/34; lorde 
wardyns 104/40 

lowring/y> louring, gloomy 193/14 

loydes n pi loads 175/40 

lute n plucked stringed instrument 199/13, etc 

lyvery, lyveries see liuery 

maister comptrollers see master comptrollers 

malmese n malmsey, a strong sweet wine 58/28 
markesw marquess 15/6, 100/36; marcus 108/7 



358 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 



masdaye see churchmassday 

maskew 1. mask 197/17?, 198/13; 2. masque 

197/17? 
maskyng vb n in disguise, ie, while wearing a 

mask 1 16/6 
master comptrollers n phr pots belonging to the 

official appointed to monitor the lord treasurer s 

accounts 95/30; maister comptrollers 96/25 
matt n mat, coarse cloth used to protect or move 

furniture during transport 202/31 
maye n May rites 110/1, 11 5/34; May 1 1 0/4 
maygaimsters n comp pi participants in May 

rites 5/3 
may game n comp festivities associated with May 

rites 117/32; maygames/>/5/17 
maygaming vb n comp participating in May rites 

40/26, etc; maye gamyng 41/1; maygamyng 

41/12 
maypole n comp a high pole, decorated with a 

crest and streamers, around which celebrants 

dance in May festivities 171/4, etc; maye poell 

170/20 
membres n pi affiliated ports 27/ 1 , 27/3 see 

p 263 (endnote to BL: Egerton MS 2093 f 80v) 
menstreles, menstrellis, minstrel, minstrell, 

minstrelles, minstrells, minstrels, minstrills, 

minstrils see mynstrell 
meystres n mistress 88/9 
misrule see lord of misrule 
morrice n morris dance, folk dance performed 

by characters associated with the Robin 

Hood legend 22/25, etc; in comp morrice 

daunce 22/23-4, 23/35; morres daunsers 

pi performers of a morris dance 103/14; 

morys beyles bells worn by morris dancers 

176/3 
mouster n muster, assembling of soldiers 110/2; 

musters// 5/40, etc 
mue n place of confinement (from haiuking 

terminology) 191/2 [OED Mew^ 2 3b] 
mummynge vb n going from house to house 

performing in a mummers play 116/6 
musicke n company of musicians 160/17, etc; 

musique 217/40 
musisioners n pi musicians 124/3 



musters see mouster 

mynstrell n entertainer who uses music, story 
telling, and other varieties of performance 
54/18, etc; minstrel 88/6, 39/8; minstrell 
53/38m, etc; mynestrell 70/5, mynstralT (or 
pi?) 46/35; mynstrel 52/12, etc; menstreles/)/ 
177/18; menstrellis 49/16; ministrelles 40/1 1; 
minstrelles 54/lm, etc; minstrells 1 19/29, etc; 
minstrels 49/30, etc; minstrills 208/12; 
minstrils 207/38; mynnstrelles 62/3; 
mynnystrelles 1 1 1/29; mynsstrylls 175/39; 
mynstelles 73/36; mynsterells 99/24; 
mynsterlles 17/16; mynsterls 95/14, 
mynstralles 45/33, etc; mynstrallis 51/40, etc; 
mynstrallys 46/1 1, etc; mynstreells 92/35; 
mynstreles 85/29, etc; myrotrelles 49/18, etc; 
mynstrellis 49/34, etc; mynstrells 47/12, etc; 
mynstrellys 67/30, etc; mynstrels 93/32, etc; 
mynstrills 207/25, 207/3 1 ; mynstryb 208/17; 
mynterels 205/14; mynystrallis 49/33; 
mynystrellys 1 1 2/36 

mysrule see lord of misrule 

netter n fisherman who catches using nets 193/22, 

194/12;netters/>/193/15 
Neweres Day n phr New Year s Day 54/23 
noble n gold coin worth 10s, angel-noble 193/22; 

see also angels 

ob abbrev for L obolus, used in E contexts for 

halfpenny 47/39, etc 
Q\\adv out 39/10; ovtt 173/31 

packemen n pi pedlars 4/34 

pagent house n phr building used for storing 

pageant or play equipment, such as wagons 

121/39 
partes n pi vocal or instrumental parts of a musical 

composition 199/5 
paryse awle see ayll 
phiffw 1. fife; small, shrill-toned flute used mainly 

in military music 129/7; phife 121/23, 121/27; 

2. fife player 124/37, etc; phif 125/36, etc; 

phife 121 /22m 
picke v pitch, fall 194/7 [OED Pick v 1 4] 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 



359 



pipe n 1. small tubular wind instrument 194/20, 
9/11; 2. piper pipes pi 42/22 

piper n pipe player 206/37 

piping vb n playing of pipes 26/2; prp pypyng 
102/18 

plates n pi armour plates 97/1 1 

play n \. dramatic performance 46/15, etc; pley 
91/34, etc; plaies/./ 5/29, etc; playes 34/22 see 
p 265 (endnote to ESRO: PAR 4l4/9/l/la f 80v), 
6/31, etc; 2. ritual festivities 167/33; see also 
kyngplay; 3. gambling playe 18/38; 4. amuse 
ment playes/)/ 27/9; see also foot pleys 

play i 1 1. act in a dramatic performance 5/4, 27/7; 
plaie 120/34; played pa 3 sg 18/37; p\aidpa3 
pi 96/4; plaied 60/4, etc; playd 107/13; playde 
120/17; played 49/15, etc; pleid 57/3, etc; 
pleied 52/21, etc; pleyd 87/21, 91/23; pleyed 
50/15, etc; pleyede 50/14; pleyid 55/20; 
playing prp 85/3; playng 73/30; pleyeng 58/4; 
pleyng 87/12, 88/33; playde pp 94/25; played 
27/7; plainge vb n 121/7; playing 94/26; 
playng 120/42; 2. perform on a musical instru 
ment 29/37, etc; playe 171/33, etc; played pa 3 
sg 36/32, 64/36; played pa 3 pi 99/24, 218/1; 
pleid 1 15/34; playeng/>r/> 1 15/28; playing 
216/18; playinge 167/21, 217/1 1; plaingt^ 
10/24, 113/27; playeinge 133/10; playing 
1 15/20, etc; playinge 25/10, etc; 3. participate 
in a game or sport 5/20; played pa 3 sg 18/28, 
etc; playinge vb n 37/9; 4. gamble 106/30; 

5. amuse or disport oneself 6/13, 7/3; 

6. perform pleyd pa 3 pi 77/10, 91/21 
player n 1. actor, or possibly in some cases musi 
cian 97/34; plaiers/>/96/5, etc; playars 120/10, 
playeres 60/35, etc; players 49/15, etc; playes 
83/23; plears 114/10; pleers 85/3; pleiars 
119/17; pleieres 59/32, etc; pleiers 68/8, etc; 
pleyars 75/16, etc; pleyeres 51/3, etc; pleyers 
50/13, etc; pleyrs 78/3, 78/15; plyers 138/37; 
2. musician 117/31; pleyr 175/41; 3. gambler 
106/28; players/"/ 4/31; 4. performer pleyers 
pi 77/10; pleys 91/21?; see also foot pleys 

plays n plaice 46/23 
poell see maypole 
points n pi laces 1 58/32 



popetys n pi puppets 184/15 

prevy scales see lord prevy seales 

prick out v phr choose 4 1 /36, 4 1 /37 

prosses n process 12/32, 13/7 

protectors see lorde protectors 

purseuaunt n pursuivant, royal messenger 76/16, 

84/14; purseuante 84/10 
pyping see piping 

quere choir, church chancel 57/4; in phr 

mominge quier service morning prayer 21/8 
questmen n pi assistants to churchwardens 6/23 

rackt rents n phr pi rack rents, excessively high 

rents 193/2 

ram pi red v pp fortified with ramparts 191/21 
reben, reebon see ryben 
recorder n magistrate or judge having criminal and 

civil jurisdiction in a borough 216/4, etc 
reseythe receipts 1 73/2 
resseffede pp received 30/21, 30/29; resewyd 

172/24; rese-wyt 173/17 
ribondes see ryben 
rodd v pa 1 pi rode 217/22 
romes n pi rooms 27/8 
rosin n resin used for varnish or for lubricating 

bows 200/25 

ruge n rug, rough woollen material 111/16 
ryben n ribbon 207/12; reben 207/9; reebon 

207/1 3; ribondes />/ 166/36 

sariaunt see seriaunt 

Saynt Nycolas monye n phr money raised on St 
Nicholas Eve, when the boy bishop ceremony 
was performed 31/15; Sent Nykelas maney 
30/29 

selected bond n phr troop of citizen soldiers(?) 
158/24, 159/33; selected band 159/20 [OED 
Band^ 1] 

seriaunt n 1. officer in royal or noble household; 
here, jester sariaunt 109/27; in phr seriaunt 
berrwarde 108/38; 2. in phr seriant at the 
banner officer bearing a corporation s banner 
216/31 

shedule n written form 37/14 



360 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 



shoo i show, exhibit 197/24 

shouegrote n shove-groac, a kind of shuffle-board 

4/32 
Shroflsonday proper n comp Shrove Sunday, the 

Sunday before Ash Wednesday 83/6 
shryddyng vb n shredding 173/33; shryedyng 

174/19 
sidenian sidesman, assistant to churchwardens 

178/28; sidemen/>/6/22, etc; sydmen 171/35 
slapinge vb n sleeping 12/22 
staffe n cowlstafF 1 8/40 
stage n platform on which a play is performed 

91/34, 94/31 

stammell frise n phr stammel frieze, coarse wool 
len cloth 133/3-4 
stanch v quench 193/39 
stellin />r/> stealing 170/20 
suppena n subpoena, writ requiring the presence 

of a witness 13/8 
sydmen see sidenian 

taber n tabor, small drum played with one stick 

9/11, 194/19 

taberer ;; tabor player 89/12 
tainte n aspersion, vilification 12/34 
tenders n pi attendants 1 58/38 
tenor meaning or substance 152/25 
tenor violin see violin 
tey v tie 49/26 
tha conj that 1 76/3 
therill n phr the earl 62/17 
thounger ad) phr compar the younger 169/34 
thympron them 91/14 
tiplynge vb n drinking to excess 12/25 
treble n treble violin 39/13; see also violin 
tresorer see lord tresorer 
trumpet n 1. metal-tubed wind instrument 35/17; 

trompet 93/5, trumpet! 34/38, trompettes/)/ 

66/29; 2. trumpet players trompattes/)/ 16/16; 

troppattes 16/3 
trumpetter trumpet player 34/37, etc; 

trumpeter 133/4, 136/27; trompetter 36/13; 

trumpeters/)/ 16/32, 203/22; trumpetours 

111/38; trumpetters 27/29 
tryminge vb n 1. refurbishing 127/6; trymming 



199/13?; 2. tuning trymming 199/13? [OED 

Trim v 2 & 4] 
trypett n house, domain(?) 108/1 [cp F phr 

dans son tripot, in his domain ; Robert Diet 

tripot] 
twen see by twen 

vanttage n profit 174/26, etc 

violin n in phr tenor violin violin with range 

between base and alto 41/35; treble violen 

high-pitched violin 41/35 
violl n viol, instrument with six strings played with 

a bow 200/25; vial! 202/37; in phr base violls 

pi base viols (see base,) 42/3 
virginal! n musical instrument played with keys, 

set in a box without legs 198/18, etc; virginalles 

pi used to refer to one instrument 198/8; also in 

phr paire of virginalls 202/31 , payre of ... 

virginalles 208/28 
visitacion n canvassing, calling on people to raise 

money for charitable purposes 81/4 
vitel n victuals, food 50/25 
vitteler n victualler, purveyor of food and drink 

4/31 
vizt abbrev for L videlicet, in E texts meaning 

namely 200/4, 217/30 
vyllyngz^ n felling, ie, cutting(?) 174/12 
vyne n wine 64/34 
vysetoures n pi visitors see p 265 (endnote to 

ESRO: PAR 4 14/9/1 /la f 80v) 34/22 

wacches see watche 

wait n musician hired by civic corporation 118/18; 

waightes/)/ 123/17, etc; waites 120/28, etc; 

waytes 57/12, etc; wayttes 113/15; waites 

pi pass 1 17/34 
wake n man employed by a town to wake people 

up by playing his instrument 125/23 
wakes n pi local annual parish festivals 27/9 
warden, wardens, wardeyn, wardeyns, wardyns 

see lord warden 
wardens n pi trustees charged with funds collected 

or received 167/33, etc 

warnyng/>rp announcing, giving notice of 100/21 
watche n 1 . coll persons appointed to guard and 



ENGLISH GLOSSARY 



361 



keep civil order at night 121/27; 2. lookout 

weche 84/1 1; 3. summer evening revel wacches 

pi 27/9 

wcypron pi we 1 76/3 
winding vb n blowing (of a wind instrument) 

192/16 
wodw wood 174/12, 174/19; hovd 173/33; 

wode 173/40; woddes/-/ woods 126/20, 

126/30 



wot v 3 pr pi know 1 9 1 /29 
wyke n week 75/37 

yeue n eve 32/8, 32/23 

yeveales n comp pi eve-ales, ales (see ayll) held on 
eves of church festivals(?) 27/9 

3<>vyn/>/> given 45/33, etc; yovyn 46/20; ^ovyn 
45/33, etc 



Index 

ARLEANE RALPH 



The Index combines subjects with names, places, and book or play titles in a single listing. When 
identical headwords occur in more than one category, the order is as follows: names of individuals, 
titles of nobility, names of places, subjects, and titles of books or plays. Often items are grouped under 
broad topics such as animals or guilds and occupations to aid research. The pertinent members of 
these classes are then given either as subentries or referred to by cross-reference. 

Place names and surnames appear in modern form where that could be ascertained, and titles and 
family names of nobility and other public figures in forms commonly used by historians. Other surnames 
are usually cited in the most common form occurring in the Records text except that capitalization 
and the use of i/j and u/v have been assimilated to modern usage. Names are regularly followed in 
parentheses by any variant spellings, but these are given for titles only where clarity requires them. 
Nobles are entered under their family name with cross-references from any titles which occur in the 
text or apparatus, and royalty under their regnal or given names. Saints names are indexed under the 
abbreviation St, alphabetized as if spelt out. In many cases (eg, Mathewe ) it has been necessary to 
assign numbers to different individuals of the same name to distinguish them; those numbers are in 
parentheses following the names. Ellipsis dots are used in cases where a persons given name is not known. 
Occupations or titles of office are given only when considered relevant or to assist in distinguishing 
individuals of the same name. 

Place name spellings are based on the spellings provided in Eilert Ekwall (ed), The Concise Oxford 
Dictionary of English Place-frames, 4th ed (Oxford 1960; rpt 1980) and Oliver Mason (comp) 
Bartholomew Gazetteer of Britain (Edinburgh, 1977). The chief sources used for ascertaining the modern 
spellings of personal names were the following: DNB; J.H. Gleason, The Justices of the Peace in England: 
1558 to 1640 (Oxford, 1 969); List of Sheriffs for England and Wales from the Earliest Times to A.D. 1831, 
Public Record Office, Lists and Indexes, no 9 (London, 1898); and E.G. Withycombe (ed), The Oxford 
Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd ed (Oxford 1977; rpt 1979). Additional sources for the 
identification of royalty and nobility are specified in the headnote to Patrons and Travelling Companies 
to which the Index refers throughout. 



364 



INDEX 



abbeys xxi, xxviii 

See also Battle Abbey; Robertsbridge Abbey 
abbots see under Battle Abbey and Patrons and 
Travelling Companies under Robertsbridge 
Abergavenny, barons of xviii, xlii, li 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
absolution 38 
Acroche see Croche 

act books liv, Ixi, Ixvi, 19-22, 39, 177-9 
actors see players 

Acts of Supremacy and Uniformity 265 
Adam (Adams), Clement xlvi, 69, 80-2, 84-5, 
88-9, 93, 107 

- Gabriel 107 

- John 53, 268 

- Thomas 80 

Adams (Adam, Adamys), Richard, king s bearward 

xxxviii.14, 81, 83-4, 87, 92-3, 261 
admirals xvii, xlii, 18, 27, 48, 194 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under Lord Admiral, Oxford, and Warwick 
Adrian (Adran), Peter 1 16 
Adur River xii, xiv 
.flille, king xxiv 
Aeneid 189,289 
affidavits 12-13 
Alchorne, Philip 42 
aldermen xx, xxv, 4950 
Aldingbourne (Aldingborne) 43, 266 
ale 47, 52, 66 

alehouses see inns and alehouses 
ales 

church xx, xlix, li, Ixxxiv, 5-8, 27, 168-70, 
172-7,286 

king xlix, 167-8, 285 
alewives 13 
Allen, Mr 217 
All Saints, church of 

Chichester xxv, 21-2, 39, 177-9, 261 

Hastings xxvi 

Lewes xxviii 

Alnwick Castle, Northumb Ixxxiv 
Alvred de St Martin xxii 
ambassadors xvi 
Amberley Castle xlvii 



amphitheatres xiv 

ancient towns see Cinque Ports; Rye; Winchelsea 

Andrew, the bearward 1 23 

Andrewes, Lancelot, bishop of Chichester xx, 

Ivi, 5 

- Roger, archdeacon of Chichester Ivii, 7 
angels (money) see under coins 
anglers see fishermen 
animals 

baiting 49, 208, 291 

keepers xxxvii-xxxviii, 55, 79, 93, 96; see also 

bearwards 

kinds: apes xl, 197; bears 49,108; birds 195; 
bulls xxxviii, 96; cocks 288; dogs 179, 190, 
192; frogs 193; lambs 39; leopards, figurative 
213; lions xxxviii, 55; sheep xi, xv, 22; wasps, 
figurative 190; whales, figurative 193; see also 
camels; cattle; deer; fish; horses 
Anne of Denmark, queen of England see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies 
Annunciation to the Virgin, feast of see Lady 

Day 
antiquarian records 

Chamberlains Accounts, Rye xxxviii, 

Ixviii-lxx, 49-50 
Richard Montague s Personal Accounts Ixxx, 

202 

Thomas Godfrey s Diary Ixxx, 202 
antiquaries 

Riley, Henry Thomas Ixviii, Ixx, 49-50 
Steer, F.W. Ixxx, 202 
apes xl, 197 
Apollo 195 

Appledore (Apuldore, Apuldre), Kent 
banns criers from xliv-xlv, 59, 88, 268 
players from xliv, 59, 93 
apprentices xvii, li, 39, 153, 199 
arbours 194 

archbishops xxxviii, xliii, liv-lvii, Ixxxv, 5-6 
See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 

Canterbury 
archdeaconries see Chichester, archdeaconry of; 

Lewes, archdeaconry of 
archdeacons liv-lv, Ivii-lviii, 7-8 
archdukes 270 



INDEX 



365 



archives see record offices and repositories 

Armada xxxii 

armour xlviii, 188, 197 

armourers 35 

arrows 1701 

articles of enquiry see articles under visitations 

Arundel, earls of xxxix-xlii, xcix, 29 

See also Fitz Alan and Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

Arundel xii-xiv, xviii-xix, xxxi, xlv, xlvii 
Arundel, rape of xii 
Arundel Castle lii, Ixxxiv, xcix 
Arun River xii, xiv 
Ascension, feast of 20 
Ashdown Forest xi, xvii, liii 
Ashford (Asshforde), Kent 

players from 70 
Ashurst li 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 

Book Iviii, 9 
assault xvii, 12 
assembly books Ixvii Ixviii, Ixxii, 118, 121, 126, 

279 

Asshforde see Ashford 
assizes, court of xm, xvi 
Assumption, feast of 53 
Atrebates xiv 
Atterton, .... wife of 1 99 
Auborn, Alice 25 
Augustus Caesar liii, 191?, 289 
Autolycus (character) xii 
Avencll, Philip 43 
Averye, Edward 170 
Awekes, John 170 
Awsten, ... 177 
Aylesford (Aylysforde), Kent 186 

badges 272 
Badyng, ... 110 
Bagely, Thomas xviii 
bailiffs 

Chichester xxiv-xxv 
Cinque Ports xxiii, 27, 2 1 5- 1 7 
Greac Yarmouth 216-17 
Hastings xxvi, 26, 263 



bailiffs (cont) 

Lewes xxvii 

Winchelsea xxxi 

See also under Rye 
baiting (animals) 49, 208, 291 

See also bearwards 
Baker, ... 69 

- John 29 

- Nicholas 118 

- Richard 28 
bakers 136 

Bancroft, Richard, archbishop of Canterbury Ivi, 5 
banishment and exile xx, 106 
banners see flags 

banns and banns criers xliv-xlv, 59, 64, 71, 74, 
76, 78, 88, 91-3, 96, 98, 100, 103, 106, 117, 
268, 277 

banquets see feasts and banquets 
Banwell, Robert, minstrel li, Ixxxiii, 39 
Barbor, Thomas xlvi, 64, 66-7 
barges xii, xliv 

Barkeley (Barkelei), Richard 73-4. 76, 78 
Barker, Hugh 19-20 

Barlow, William, bishop of Chichester xx, xxviii 
Barnham 181 

Barnhorn (Bernhorn) 184, 288 
Barns, Robert 106, 275 
barns xlvii, 24 

barons xii, xviii, xxii, xxvi -xxvii, 27, 217 
barrels 81, 109-10 

Baseden (Basden, Basedenn), Thomas 65, 78 
basses see viols 
Bath, earls of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Batnar, John 264 
Battle xix, xxii, xxvi, xxxiii, xlviii, lii, Ixxxv, 152, 

184,290 
Battle Abbey xxi-xxii, xxxvi, xl, xlviii, li, 288 

abbots xxi, xliv, 186, 288; accounts Ixxv-lxxvii, 
182-5 

bearwards at xliii, 184, 186 

dedication day 184 

entertainers at xxii, xl-xli, xliii, Ixxv-lxxvi, 
182-6 

fool at xl, 1 82 



366 



INDEX 



Battle Abbey (cont) 
guesthouse 185 
minstrels at xl-xlii, 182-4 
performers at xli, 185 
players at xl-xli, xliii-xliv, 184-6 
puppet-players at xl, 1 84 
records: Abbots Accounts Ixxv-lxxvii, 182-5; 
Chaplains Account Ixxvii, 185-6; Seneschals 
Accounts Ixxvii, 1 85-6; Treasurer s Account 
Ixxvii, 182 

stewards xxii, Ixxv, 183, 185 
treasurers Ixxv 
Battle of Hastings 211-14 
battles xxvii, li, 211-14, 219-20 

See also Civil War; riot and rebellion 
Bayle, John 44 
beadles xxii 

Beardsworth see Berdesworth 
bears 49, 108 

bearwards xxxvii-xl, xliii, 15-16, 18, 49, 51, 
55, 57-60, 62-4, 67-72, 74-95, 97-100, 
102-3, 108, 116, 118-19, 184, 186, 271, 
279 
named xxxviii, 14, 81, 83-4, 87, 92-3, 

108-10, 123,261 
Beaufort, Edmund, duke of Somerset see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies 
- Margaret see Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under Queen Mother 
beaverskins 220 
Bedford, dukes of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Bedford, earls of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
beds 12,42 
beef xxvii, 189 

beerxlix, 12, 14,81, 109-10, 176-7,217,286-7 
Bekesbourne, Kent 263 
Beleryca see Billericay 
Belle, James, minstrel 65 
bells (morris) 176 

See also bells under churches 
Bembricke, Thomas 1 24 
Benedictines 288 
See also Battle Abbey 



Benenden (Benynden), Kent 

players from 69 
bequests see wills 
Berdesworth (Beardsworth, Berdsworth), George, 

trumpeter 34 6 

Bereworth (Bereworthe), William 116, 277 
Berners, Lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

Bernhorn see Barnhorn 
Bersted 38 
Bethersden (Betrisden), Kent 

banns criers from 76 
Betlcy, Staff xlix 
Bexhill 

churchwardens 10 

records: Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Iviii, 9-10 

Bible (Byble), William 178-9 
biblical plays xliv 

Bickley, Thomas, bishop of Chichester xx, Ivi, 4 
Bignor xiii 
Billericay (Beleryca, Billarica), Essex or Kent 

players from 96-7 
Billingshurst (Billingshurste) xix, 260 

church 10 

churchwardens 1 1 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 
Booklix, 10-11 

vicars 1 1 

bills lix, 11-13, 19,42, 180 
birches 123, 279 
Birdham 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of 

Presentments lix, 1 1 
birds 195 

Bishopp, Thomas liii 
Bishoppenden, John 170 
bishops xviii. lit, Ixiii 

See also boy bishops; bishops under 

Chichester, diocese of 
Black Death xv 
Blacke, Thomas 1 22 
Black Prince (Edward of Woodstock) 219 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 
Prince 



INDEX 



367 



Blackwell, Humphrey 43 

Blake, Richard 173 

blankets 42 

Blaxton, Henry 9 

Blekewell alias Queen s Well, Rye 75 

Blincow, Anthony 19, 40 

blindness 261 

Blount. James, 6th Lord Mountjoy see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Boarzeli see Roberts of Boarzell 
Bocher, Richard (I), the elder 75 

- Richard (2), the younger 75 
Bode, John 168 

Bodiam Castle xlvii 
Bolebrook House xlvii 

Boleyn, George, Viscount Rochford see Patrons 
and Travelling Companies under Lord Warden 
Bolney, Bartholomew xxii 
Bolney (Bolny, Boulney) 260-1 
churchwardens 12 
constables 12 
records: Bill of Complaint in Wilkinson and 

Langford v. Pellatt et al lix, 11-13 
bolsters 42 
Bonnington (Bounndon), Kent 

players from? 94 
Bonny, Thomasina 180, 287 
Booker, John, fiddler and minstrel 10, 29, 260, 

263 
books xxxvi, Ixiv-lxv, Ixvii, Ixxviii, Ixxxiv, 3, 12, 

28,33-4, 185,215-18,265 
cash Ixxix, 198-201 
instance Ixvii, 42-3 

See also act books; assembly books; court 
books; detection books; books under music; 
registers 
Boorne (Borne), Michael 153 

- Thomas 29 
Booth, Humfrey 43 
Bosham xix, xlviii 

churchwardens 13, 261 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 

Book lix, 13 

Bostocke, Richard Ixxxii 
Bottynge, Henry 29 



Boulney see Bolney 
Bounndon see Bonnington 

Bourchier, Henry, 1st Viscount Bourchier 
(Bowse, Bowsyr) see Patrons and Travelling 
Companies 

- John, 2nd Lord Berners see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- William, 4th earl of Bath see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
bowers 189 

bowling (kayles) 37, 266 
Bowne, John 173 
bows 171. 189, 195 
Bowse, Bowsyr see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Bourchier 
Bowyer of Cuckfield, family of xx, xxxiv 
- Thomas xx 

boxes 49, 85, 121, 124, 168-70 
Boxgrove 181 

boy bishops xxxvi, xlviii-xlix, 30-3 
boysxli, li, liii, 15, 39, 199 

See also apprentices 
Bragge, Edward 29, 40-1 

- Richard 177, 180 

Bramber xii xiii, xviii, xxxiii, Ixxiii 
Bramber, rape of xii, 29 
branding 22 

Brandon, Charles, 4th duke of Suffolk xl; see also 
Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Thomas, juggler 14, 261 
brawling see fights and fighting 

bread xxxviii, 18, 47, 49-50, 52-5, 58-60, 63, 

66, 108 

Breads, John 1 1 1 

breakfasts 52, 69, 100, 107, 117, 189 
Brede River xxix, xxxi 
brewers xxx 
brick making xv 
Bridger see Brycher 
bridges xxvi, 188, 216-17 
Bridgwater (Brodewater), earls of see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Brighton xi-xiii, xlv, 9 
Bristol, Glouc xxxix 
Britten, Mr, lute teacher 203 



368 



INDEX 



Brodcwatcr, Lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Bridgwater 
Brodhulls see Brotherhoods under Cinque Ports 
Broker, Thomas 170 
Brooke (Brookes), Mr, minister 216 

Thomas 23 

- William, 10th Lord Cobham xxvi, xxxii, xlii; 

see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under Lord Warden 
Brookland (Brokeland, Brokelond, Brokland, 

Broklond), Kent 

banns criers from 64, 74, 91-2, 98, 103 
players from 77, 80, 89 
Broomhill xxxi 

Brotherhoods see under Cinque Ports 
Browne of Cowdray, family of xvi, xix, xxii, 

xxxiv, xxxvii, xJvii, li, Ixxxv 

- Sir Anthony (1) xxvi, xlvii, Ixxv 

- Anthony (2), 1st Viscount Montagu, son of 

Anthony (1) xvi-xvii, xix, xxii, xxxii-xxxiv, 
xlvii, lii-liii, xcii, 188, 194, 289; royal 
entertainment by xxxii, xxxvii, xlvii, li-liii, 
Ixxviii, Ixxxiv, 289; records: The Honorable 
Entertainment Given to the Queen 
Ixxviii -Ixxix, 188-95; The Speeches and 
Honorable Entertainment Ixxix, 195-7 

- Anthony Maria, 2nd Viscount Montagu, grand 

son of Anthony (2) xlvii, Ixxviii 

- Elizabeth, wife of Robert Dormer, daughter of 

Anthony (2) 189 

- George, 2nd son of Anthony (2) 194 

- Henry, 3rd son of Anthony (2) 190 

- Magdalen, Lady Montagu, wife of Anthony (2) 

lii, 189, 194 
Brunne, William 18 
Brycher (Bridger), Robert 25, 263 
Brydges, Giles, 3rd Baron Chandos see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies 
Buckhurst, barons of see Saclcville 
Buckingham, dukes of xlii 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Buckingham, earls of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

Buckinghamshire, county of 289 
BudgweU, Rye 122 



bugles 220 

See also horns; trumpets 
Bukk(Buk), ... 63,269 

- Laurens 269 
Bulke, David 19 

bulls and bull wardens xxxviii, 96 

Bulvcrhythe 263 

Bunne, John 72 

Burchfeld, Roger 168 

burgesses xxiv 

burials 170 

bursars, accounts Ixxvii-lxxviii, 186-7 

Burton, Henry Ixiii, 28 

Burton see Goring of Burton 

Butcher, John 43 

- Richard 43 
butchers xxx 

The Butchery, Rye xlv 

Butler (Buttler), John 20-2, 26, 39, 178-9 

Byble see Bible 

Bymbly, ... 93 

Byrchett, Thomas 1 06 

Byspyn, William xlvi 

Cable, Thomas 121 

Cachelo (Cacheloe), Jasper 41-2 

Cade Rebellion xv, xxvii, xxxiii 

Caen (Cane), Normandy 34-6, 266 

Caesar 191,289 

Calais, France xxix, 270 

Call, Mr 21 7 

Calvinism xxi 

Camber Castle xxxi 

Camber Estuary xxix 

Cambrai, France 219 

Cambridge, Camb xxxix, 261 

camels xxxviii, 79, 93 

figurative 193 
Camoys, Ralph de li 
Candlemas 50, 87, 186 
candles xlvi, 14, 18, 102, 186 
Cane see Caen 
Cannon, Tobias 146 
canopies xxii 
Canterbury, archbishops of xxxviii, xliii, liv-lvii 



INDEX 



369 



Canterbury (cont) 

Ixxxv, 5-6 
See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 

Canterbury 
Canterbury (Canterbirry, Canterburye, 

Caunterbury, Caunterburye), Kent xiii, 
xxxix, 21,39, 177-9 
chamberlains xcv 
Christ Church 2 1,39, 177-8 
minstrels from 1 12 
players from xliv, xJvi, 59, 72, 90, 97 
waits from xliv, 102, 113, 198?, 200?, 290 
Caplin, Thomas 24 
caps see hats 
captains 216, 219 
cardinals see Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under Cardinal 
cards (playing) 4, 106 
Carelell, Henry 41 

Carey, George, 2nd Baron Hunsdon see Patrons 
and Travelling Companies under Lord 
Chamberlain 

Carlecon, George, bishop of Chichester xxi 
Carmen de Hastings proelio 211-13 
Carpenter, Richard 43 

- Robert 130-1 
carpenters 122, 170 

Carrcll see Caryll of West Harting 
Carter, Mr 217 

carts and wagons xlvi, 22-3, 273, 275, 278 
cartularies Iv, 3-4 
Cams, Thomas 286 

Caryll of West Harting (Carrell) xix, xxxiv-xxxv, 
xl, I, Ixxix 

- Sir John (1), father of John (2) Ixxix, 194, 197, 

289; household accounts Ixxix, 197 

- John (2), Lord Caryll Ixxix 
cashbooks Ixxix, 198-201 

Casheire (Casheir, Cashier, Chasheire), ..., widow 
of Francis 1, 160 

- Francis, drummer I, Ixxxiv, 155-60 
Castille, prince of 76, 272 

castles xvii, xxvi-xxvii, xxxi-xxxii, xlii, xlvii-xlviii, 

lii, Ixxxiv, xcii, xcix, 26-7, 288 
catechism 26, 180-1 



cathedrals 290 

See also Chichester Cathedral 

Catholicism xvii-xx, xxv-xxvi, xxxii-xxxv, xJi, I, 

Ixxix, Ixxxi-lxxxii, 289 
cattle xi, xv, Ixxxi 

calves xl 

cows 171 

oxen 22 -3, 189 

Caunterbury, Caunterburye see Canterbury 
causeways 278 
Cayme, ... 264 
Cerberus 191,289 
chalices 3 
chalk xi 
chamberlains xxxiii-xxxiv, Ixxx 

Canterbury, accounts xcv 

Dover, accounts xliii, xcv 

Hastings xxvi; accounts Ixiii, 27 

Lydd, accounts 273 

See also under Rye and Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Lord Chamberlain 
Chambers (Chambres), John 34-6 
Champyon, ... 29 
chancellors see Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under Lord Chancellor 
Chandos, Sir John 219-20 
Chandos (Sandoies), Lord see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
chapels xlv, Ixxxv, 5-8 
chaplains Ixxvi-lxxvii, 3, 185-6, 288 
Chapman, Edmund 122 
- William 117 
characters 

Autolycus xli 

God xlviii, 94 

Maid Marian xlix, 22-3 

nymphs liii, 189 

Peace liii, 190 

Pilgrim liii, 190-2, 289 

Porter lii-liii, 188-9,289 

Wildman lii-liii, 191,289 

See also boy bishops; fishermen-, fools; Robin 

Hood 

Charlemagne 211 
Charles I, king of England xxi, xxiv 



370 



INDEX 



Charles I (cont) 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 

Prince 
Charles II, king of Navarre xl 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under King of Navarre 
Charles, prince of Castille 76, 272 
CharIesdelaCerda219 
Chasheire see Casheire 
Chechester see Chichester 
Chester, Ches xxxvii 
Chesworth (manor) xlvii 
Cheync, Sir Thomas xxvi 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 

Lord Warden 

Chichester (Chechester, Chichestre, Chittecher) 
xii xv, xvii, xx xxi, xxiv xxv, xxvn, xxxi, 
xxxvi, xxxix, xlvi-xlix, li-lv, Ixxix, Ixxxv, 
194-5,202 
aldermen xx, xxv 
bailiffs xxiv-xxv 

bearwards in xxxix-xl, xliii, 14-16, 18, 261 
burgesses xxiv 
churches 21 

churchwardens 21 ; accounts lix 
clerks lix 

dancing boy in xli, 15 
fairs xxiv 

guilds xxiv-xxv, xxxix, Ix, xcvii, 14-18, 262 
harpers in? 261 

jugglers in xxxix, xlni, xlv, 1416, 18, 261 
maps cv 

mayors xxiv xxv, Ix 
members of parliament xviii, xxv 
minstrels in xl-xli, 17, 262 
musicians from 197 
performers in xxxix, xh xlii, Ix, 14 18 
places in: All Saints xxv, 21-2, 39, 177-9, 
261; Cathedral Close xxv, 38; Council 
House xlv, xcvii, 18; Crown Inn xxv; East 
Street xxv; George Inn xxv; le hape xlv, 18, 
262; High Cross xlv, 18; Lion Inn xxv; 
North Street xxv, xlv; the Pallant xxv, 21, 
39, 177-9; Plough Inn xxv; St Andrew 
(East Street) xxv; St Andrew (in the Pallant) 



Chichester (cont) 

xxv, 19; St Bartholomew xxv; St Martin xxv; 
St Martin s Lane xxv; St Mary in Foro 
(Market) xxv, 261 ; St Olave xxv; St Pancras 
xxv, 19; St Peter in the Market xxv; St Peter 
the Great xxv, 20; St Peter the Less xxv; South 
Street xxv; Spread Eagle Inn xxv; Swan Inn 
xxv, 18; White Horse Inn xxv; see also 
Chichester Cathedral 

players from xliv, 73 

players in xxxix, xli, xliii, 14-16, 261 

population xxiv-xxv 

records: Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar Ixi, 
19-21; Act Book for the Exempt Deanery of 
Pagham and Tarring Ixi, 21-2; Archdeaconry 
of Chichester Detection Book xl, xlviii, Ix, 
18-19; Cathedral Communars Accounts 
xxxix, Ix, 17; St George s Guild Accounts 
xxxix, Ix, 14-18; Will of John Shamler, 
Musician Ixi, 14 

reeves xxiv-xxv 

trumpeters in xxxix, xli, 16 

waits?!, 198,200,290 

Chichester, archdeaconry of liv-lv, 9-11, 13, 
18-19, 22, 24-6, 29, 36-8, 40-2, 171, 
179-81 

archdeacons liv-lv, Ivii-lviii, 7-8 
Chichester, diocese of xiv, xx-xxi, xxxvi, liv-lvii, 
lix 

bishops xviii, xx-xxi, xxiv-xxv, xxviii, xxx, xlvii, 
liv-lviii, Ixxx, 3-7. 22, 34, 43, 202 

records: Chichester Cathedral Cartulary Iv, 3-4; 
Richard de Wyche s Statutes Iv, 3; Visitation 
Articles Iv-lviii, 4-8 
Chichester, rape of xii 

Chichester Cathedral xix-xxi, xxiv, li, Iv, Ix-lxi, 
Ixxxv, 3-4, 24 

the Close xxv, 38 

communars, accounts xxxix, Ix, 17 

consistory 9-10, 13, 18-19, 22, 24-5, 29, 
36-7,40-2, 179-80,266 

dean and chapter xxi, xxv 

dean s peculiar liv, 19-20 

precentor 14 
Chiddingly see Jefferay of Chiddingly 



INDEX 



371 



Cbidham 38 

children 22, 34, 203 

See also boy bishops; boys 
Chittecher see Chichester 
choir service 21 
Cholschestre see Colchester 
choreographers 290 
choristers Ixi, Ixxxv 

Christ Church, Canterbury, Kent 21, 39, 177-8 
Christmas xlviii, 17-18, 50, 55, 57, 59, 72, 
74-6, 80, 84, 87, 182, 184-5, 197, 200, 
269-73, 277, 288, 290 
Christopher, Richard 27 

Christopherson, John, bishop of Chichester xx 
Chroniques 219-20 

Church (Churche), ..., wife of Clement 155 
- Clement, drummer 1, 147-55 
churches li, k xcii, 3, 5-6, 9, 1 1, 21-2, 24-8, 
38-40, 42, 179, 216, 260, 262, 287 

absence from xvii, 5-6, 10, 20, 22-3, 180-1, 
266 

aisles xlv 

bells Ixi, 5-6,33, 179-80 

chancels xlv, 24, 178 

choirs xlv-xlvi, 57 

dedication days xlix, 72-3, 268, 271 

doors 6-7 

holidays 55, 77, 268 

mass days 80-1, 98, 103, 272 

organs Ixxxiti 

ornaments 3 

plays and playing in xxx, xxxvi, xlv-xJvi, Ixxxiii, 
4-8,49,52-3,55, 57-61,63 

porches xlv, 6, 1 80 

roofs 3 

steeples and towers xlv, 179-80 

vessels 3 

See also ales; Chichester Cathedral and 

individual churches by name 
church-wardens xvii, liv, 5-6 

Bexhill 10 

Billingshurst 1 1 

Bosham 13,261 

Chichester 21; accounts lix 

Cocking 22-3 



churchwardens (cont) 
Eastergate 24 
Funtington 25 
Lewes xlix, 264-5; accounts xxxvii, xlviii, 

Ixiv-lxv, 30-4 
Oving 38 
Pagham 39 

Rye, accounts xxxvii, Ixxiii, 94, 97, 1 1 1 
Steyning 167-70; accounts xxxvii, xlix, Ixxiii, 

167-70 

Warbleton, accounts Ixxiv 
Westbourne 171 
West Tarring 172-3, 178, 285-7; accounts 

xxxvii, xlix, Ixxiv, 172-7 
WestThorney 179-80 
churchyards xxviii, xcvi, 3-7, 43, 179-80 

plays and playing in xlvi, 39, 50 
Cinque Ports, Sussex and Kent xv, xxii-xxiv, 
xxvi xxvii, xxxi, xxxvi, xli, xlii, xliv, Ixvu, 
26-7, 263, 270 
bailiffs xxiii, 27, 215-17 
barons xviii, xxii, 27, 217 
Brotherhoods xxiii, xxxvi-xxxvii, xl, xlii, Ixxv, 
Ixxxiii, xcv, 69, 92, 98, 113-16, 119, 125, 
143, 147, 150, 158, 160-2, 267-71, 273-5, 
277-9, 282-4 
Guestlings xxiii, xxxvi, Ixxv, Ixxxiii, 74, 124, 

138, 150, 160, 162, 273, 279, 281, 283 
jurats xxiii, 27, 215 
members xiv, xxii, 27, 263 
wardens xvii-xviii, xxiii, xxvi, xxviii, xxx-xxxii, 
xli-xliii, 26, 36, 136, 263; see also Patrons 
and Travelling Companies under Lord 
Warden 

Circumcision, feast of 185 
Cistercians see Robertsbridge Abbey 
Civil War xx, xxv, xxviii, xxx, xlvii 
Clapham see Shelley of Michelgrove 
Clarence, dukes of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
clarioners xli, 65 

See also trumpeters and trumpeting 
Clarke, Agnes 290 

- John 290 

- William 201, 290 



372 



INDEX 



clay xi, xiii 
Clayton, Edward 43 
- John 43 

Clemency (figurative) 191 
clergy xviii-xxi, xl, Hi, Ixiii, 3-4, 6, 9, 11, 21, 
23, 27-9, 37-9, 42, 177-80, 192, 216, 
260-3 

friars 186 

precentors 14 

See also archdeacons; abbots under Battle 
Abbey, bishops; archbishops under 
Canterbury; chaplains; curates; deans; 
rectors; vicars; vicars general 
clerks Ixi, 184,215-17 

Star Chamber 12, 261 

town xxvi, xxviii, xxxvi, lix 
Clinton, Edward, 9th Lord Clinton see Patrons 
and Travelling Companies tinder Lord 
Admiral 
cloisters xxii 
closes xxv, 13, 38 

cloth and fabric xiv-xv, xxvii, xxix, 1, 59, 99, 
117-18, 123, 190,274,277 

beaverskin 220 

cotton 1 1 1 

flock 42 

lace 199 

linen 24 

rug (frieze) 1 1 1 

silk 121 

stammel 133 

velvet 190,220 

See also ribbons; thread; wool 
clothing 24 

caps 220 

gloves 30-2 

gowns 59, 121 

hats 190,286 

jerkins 220 

See also coats; liveries 
clowns see fools 
clubs 188 
Cluniacs xxi, xxvii 
Cluny Abbey, Normandy xxi 
coal xxix 



coats xlviii, 1, 94, 111, 116-17, 122, 190,220, 

273, 277-8 

coats of arms see shields 
Cobeler, Dennis 75 
- Nicholas 75 
Cobham, Lord xlii 

See Brooke and Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Lord Warden 
cockfighting 288 
Cocking (Cockeinge, Cockinge) xix, xxxiv, xlix 

church 22-4 

churchwardens 22-3 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 

Book Ixi, 22-4 
Cockram, Richard 146 
Cogidubnus, Atrebate king xiv 
cognizances 1 1 8 
coins 47, 182 

angels li, 121, 170,278 

French crowns 286 

Colbrand (Colborne), Richard, musician 146 
Colchester (Cholschestre), Essex 

minstrels from xliv, 91 
Coles, William 23 
Collen, Hugh 170 
Colte, John 265 
comedies xl 
commissaries 19-22 
Commons, Rye 47, 75 
communars, accounts xxxix, Ix, 17 
communion 24, 180 

tables 7-8 

Compostella, Spain 289 
Compton, family of xxv 
comptrollers set Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Guildford 
conduits Ixxxiv, 122, 278 
consistories 42 

See also under Chichester Cathedral 
constables xvii 

Bolney 12 

Dover Castle xxxii, 26 

Leeds Castle xlii 

See also under Lewes 
contumaciousness 19-20, 37, 41, 177, 179, 266 



INDEX 



373 



Coolde, (Good), Anna, wife of William 37, 266 

- William 37 
cordwainers xxix 
corn xxv, 288 

cornetts (wind instrumem) 192 
coronations xxii, xxxii 
coroners Ixvii, Ixxxv, 29, 170-1 
Corpus Christi, feast of 84, 88 
costumes 180 

armour 188 

bells 176 

gloves 30-2 

gowns 59, 121 

See also coats; liveries 
Cottmott, John 265 
cotton 1 1 1 

Council House, Chichester xlv, xcvii, 18 
court books xxxvii, Ixviii, Ixxv, 106, 181 
Courtenay, Henry, 1st marquess of Exeter see 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Court Hall (Town Hall), Rye xlv, xcvi, 120 
court houses xlv 

courts xvi, xxii-xxiv, xxvii, xxxvii, Ixvii-lviii, xcvi, 
5-8,34, 106 

assizes xiii, xvi 

hundred 181 

leet Ixv, 5-8 

Shepway xxiii 

sheriff xii 

See also ecclesiastical courts; quarter sessions; 

Star Chamber court 
Coventry, Warw xxxvii 
Covert of Slaugham Place, family of xx, xxxiv 

- Walter xvi 

Cowdray (Cowdrey) see Browne of Cowdray 

cows see cattle 

Cox, Francis, cleric 37 

- Henry 43 

- William, cleric 20-1, 177 
Coxon, Mr 34 
Craddock, John 20-2 
Cranbrook (Cranebroke), Kent 

players from xliv, 72, 98, 185 
The Crane, Great Yarmouth, Norf 216 
Crawley xi 



Crecy,France219 
crimes and misdemeanors 

assault xvii, 12 

disorder 10-11,26 

heresy xviii, xxviii 

immorality 3 

perjury 13, 260 

sedition li, 20, 277 

smuggling xi 

suicide xli 

theft xvii, 170-1,260 

tippling xvii, xxix, 12 

treason Ixxxii 

unlawful arms 12 

unlawful assembly 27 

unlawful entry 12 

witchcraft xvii 

See also absence under churches; contuma- 
ciousness; murder; offences under sabbath 
observance; service and sermon, time of; 
slander 
Crochc (Acroche, Crouche), Robert xlvi, 50-1, 

54-5, 58,60,64,269 
Cromwell, Thomas xxi 
crosiers 30-3 

cross-dressing xlviii, 180, 287 
crosses xxviii, xlv, xcvi, 18, 216 
Crouche see Croche 
Crowhurst (Crowherste) 171 
Crown Inn 

Chichester xxv 

Rye xlvi, 97, 274 
Cuckfield xlv 

See also Bowyer of Cuckfield 
Cuckmere River xii 
Culpepper, ... 264 
- Alexander li 
Cupid s Banishment 290 
curates xxx, Ixv, 26, 261 

Curteys, Richard, bishop of Chichester xx-xxi, xxx 
Curtys, John 41, 266 
custumals Ixii, 26 

Dacre, Lord and Lady see Fiennes and Patrons 
and Travelling Companies 



374 



INDEX 



Daedalus 289 

Dallingridge, family of xxxiv 
- Sir John xviii 

dancers and dancing xli, xlix, lii, 4-5, 10-13, 15, 
19, 21-2, 25-6, 28-30, 37-41, 180-1, 
194, 260, 264, 266 

kinds: foot plays 90-1, 273; German dances 
220; round dances 3; sword dances xxxviii, 
272; see also morris dances 
masters I, Ixxxiii, 198, 200-1, 203-5 
Danes xiv 
Daniell (Danyell), Francis 146 

Thomas 158 
Dannell, Robert 122 

Darcy, John, 2nd Lord Darcy see Patrons and 
Travelling Companies 

- Thomas, 3rd Lord Darcy of Chiche see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies 
Darkenoll, Edward 1 1 
darts 214 
Daubeney, Henry, 1st earl of Bridgwater see 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
daughters see under women 
Davie, William 181 
Davyes (Davies, Davis), John 35-6 
Dawtrey of More House, family of xxxiv 
Day, George, bishop of Chichester xx 
deaneries (exempt), Pagham and Tarring liv, 21, 

39, 177-9 

deans xxi, xxv, liv, 19-20 
deaths xxxiii, xli, xlix, 26, 28-9, 212, 214, 263, 

269, 285 

See also executions; murder 
decrees 121-2, 124, 126 
dedication days xlix, 72-3, 184, 268, 271 
See also holidays and mass days under 

churches 

deer 189-90, 192, 195-6 
De La Warr, barons of see West 
depositions Ixv, Ixxii, xcvii, 34-6, 146, 266 
Derby, earls of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
detection books xl, xlviii, liv, Iviii-lxiv, Ixvi-lxvii, 

Ixxiii. Ixxv, 9-11,13, 18-19, 22-30, 36-8, 

40-2, 167, 179-80 



Devereux, Robert, 19th earl of Essex 281 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Devon, earls of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Exeter (marquess) 
Devon, county of xxxix, xli, xliii 
devotion money 175 
Deward, ... 97 
diaries Ixxx, 202 
dice (playing) 1,4, 106,277 
Dieppe, France xxix 

dinners xxxvii, 25,47-8, 50, 111, 115, 117, 119, 
190,216-17 

See also feasts and banquets; suppers 
dioceses see Chichester, diocese of 
disabilities I, 84, 261 
disguising xlviii xlix, 5, 277 

See also masks; mumming 
dishes 

cruses 81 

pots 22-3 

pottles 139, 150 

vessels 288 
disorder 10-11, 26 
Dissolution xviii, xxi-xxii, xxxii, Ixxv, Ixxvii, xciii, 

289 

A Divine Tragedie Ixiii Ixiv, 28 
divorce 263 
dogs 179, 190, 192 
Donke, John 122 
doors 6-7, 20, 146 
Dormer (Dormir), Robert, 1st Baron Dormer 

194,289 
- Elizabeth, wife of Robert, daughter of Anthony 

Browne, 1st Viscount Montagu 189 
Dorset, marquesses and marchionesses of see 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Dorset, earls of see Sackville 
Dorset, county of xxxix, 261 
Dover (Doverre, Dovor, Dovorre), Kent xiv, xxii, 
xxix, xxxix, xliv, Ixiii, 153, 158, 216, 263 

chamberlains, accounts xliii, xcv 

Guestlings at 124 

players from 75, 78 

See also Cinque Ports 
Dover Castle, Kent xvii, xxxii, 267 



INDEX 



375 



drapers xxix 

Drinkar see Drynker 

drink and drinking 4-7, 12, 28, 35, 48, 53, 

65-6, 86, 93, 96, 110, 125, 178 
See also ale; beer; wine 
drums, drummers, and drumming xlix, I, Ixxii, 

Ixxxiii, 27, 117, 121, 124-67, 175, 181,280, 

282, 285, 287 

See also tabors and laborers; waits 
Dr(.)r, Ambrose, musician 153 
Drury (Drurye), John 24, 36, 38, 40 
Drynker (Drinkar), ... xlvi, 58-60, 62, 65, 

268 

- John 268 
duchies xvii-xviii 

Dudley, Ambrose, 21st earl of Warwick see 
Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Robert, 14th earl of Leicester xxxiii, 

xxxviii-xxxix, xcv; see also Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
duels 4 
Duke, ... 38 
Dungat, John 29 
Dunke, John xlvii, 167, 285 
Dunwich, Surf xxxix 

Duppa, Brian, bishop of Chichester xxi, Iviii, 7 
Durham, county of xxxiv 
Durrant, Thomas 1 22 
Dutchmen 93 
Dydsburye, Mr 34 
Dyer, Alice 88 

- Mr 104 

dyke diggers 75, 271 

Easebourne Priory 190, 289 

East Anglia xxxix, xliii, xlix 

Easter xxxi, xlviii, liv, 53, 64, 83, 94, 184, 268-9, 

272-3, 279, 287 
Eastergate xix, xlix 

church 24 

churchwardens 24 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of 

Presentments Ixi, 24 
East Grinstead xii, xviii, xlv 
East Hoathly Ixxxi 



East Lavington (Wollavington, Woolavington, 

Woollavington) 22-3, 26, 262 
church 23 
curates 26 
East Mailing (Mallyng, Mallynge), Kent 

players from? xliv, xlviii, 68, 73, 76, 185 
East Street, Chichester xxv 
East Wittering (Estwytteringe) 18, 262 
ecclesiastical courts xxviii, li, liv, Ixxxiv-lxxxv, 
9-10, 13, 18-22, 24-5, 27, 29, 36-42, 
167, 177-81,266 
ecclesiastical records 

Act Book for the Dean s Peculiar liv, Ixi, 19-21 
Act Book for the Exempt Deanery of Pagham 

and Tarring liv, Ixi, Ixvi, 21-2, 39, 177-9 
Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection Books 
xl, xlviii, liv, Iviii-lxii, Ixiv, Ixvi, Ixxv, 9-11, 
13, 18-20, 22-6, 29-30, 36-8, 40-1, 
179-80; Instance Book Ixvii, 42-3; Register 
of Presentments liv, lix, Ixi-lxii, Ixv, 1 1, 24, 
26, 36, 171, 181 

Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book liv, Iviii, 
Ixii-lxiii, Ixvi-lxvii, Ixxiii, 9-10, 25, 27-8, 
40,42, 167 

Cathedral Communars Accounts xxxix, Ix, 17 
Chichester Cathedral Cartulary Iv, 3-4 
Richard de Wyche s Statutes Iv, 3 
visitation articles Iv-lviii, 48 
Eclogues 192, 289 
Edenbridge, Kent xi 

Edward i, king of England xv, xxii, xxxi, li 
Edward il, king of England xxii, li 
Edward ill, king of England li, 219-20 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Edward rv, king of England xxxiii, li 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Edward V, king of England see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies under Prince 
Edward vi, king of England xxxvii, li, 33, 286 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Edward of Woodstock, 1st duke of Cornwall, 
prince of Wales see Patrons and Travelling 
Companies under Prince 

Edwards of Fay re Crooch, family of 1, Ixxix, 
290 



376 



INDEX 



Edwards of Fayre Crooch (cont) 

- Judith (1), wife of Thomas, cashbook Ixxix, 

198-201 

- Judith (2), daughter of Judith (1) Ixxix, 201 

- Lucy, daughter of Judith (1) Ixxix, 199-200 

- Susanna, daughter of Judith (1) Ixxix, 198-201 
- Thomas Ixxix, 290 

Egyptions (gypsies) xxxvii 

elections xviii, xxiv, xxvi-xxviii, xxx-xxxi, Ixv, 

Ixviii, 26, 266-8, 276 
Elexsaunder, ... 208 
Elizabeth, Lady see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Princess 
Elizabeth I, queen of England xxxii-xxxiii, xlii, 

Ixxxii, xcv, 35,265-6,289 
royal visits xxix, xxxi xxxii, xxxvii, xlvi xlvn, 
l-liii, Ixxii, Ixxviii, Ixxxiii, 121-3, 188-97, 
278-9,289 
See also queen s men and Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Elizabeth of York, queen of England xxxii 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Elizabeth Wydevill, queen of England see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies 
emperors liii, 272, 289 
England 35, 190,266 
English Channel xi, 219 
Ensinge, Thomas 146 

entertainers and entertainment xiii-xiv, xxii, 
xxxvii, xxxix, xl-xli, xliii, xlv, Ixxv-lxxvi, 17, 
182-7,216,261,270 
ape tricks xl, 197 
bullwardens xxxviii, 96 
camel keepers xxxviii, 79, 93 
cockfighting 288 
cross-dressing xlviii, 180, 287 
disguisings xlviii-xlix, 5, 277 
duels 4 

fools xl-xli, Ixxxv, 182 
foot plays 90- 1,273 
hawking 4 
jousting 201, 290 
kayles (bowling) 37, 266 
lion keepers xxxviii, 55 
masques 290 



entertainers and entertainment (cont) 
processions xlvi, Ixxxiv, 272 
puppet-players xl, 184 
shove-groat 4 
tournaments 4, 201, 290 
two-headed calves xl 
wrestling 4 

See also animals; banns and banns criers; 
bears; bearwards; boy bishops; dancers 
and dancing; drums, drummers, and 
drumming; fiddlers and fiddling; fifcrs 
and fifing; gambling and game-playing; 
harpers; hunting; jesters; jugglers and 
juggling; maying and May games; 
minstrels; lords under misrule; mumming; 
musicians; performers; pipes, pipers, and 
piping; players; plays and playing; royal 
visits and entertainments; singing; 
trumpeters and trumpeting; waits 
Envy (figurative) 193 
Epiphany (Twelfth Night) 185, 270 
Eridge xlii, li 
escheators xvi 
escutcheons see shields 
Essex, earls of 281 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Essex, county of xx, xxxii, xxxix, xcvi, 75, 273 

players from xliv, xlvi, 77, 85, 96-7?, 103 
Eston (Estonn), John 60 

- William xlvi, 58, 62-3 
Estwytteringe see East Wittering 
Etchingham, family of xxxiv 
Etchingham (Echyngham) 187 
Ethelwold, Saxon king xviii 
Evans, Robert, cleric 9 

evening prayer 9, 19, 21, 23-5, 28, 38, 42, 

179-81 
Everenden of Sedlescombe, family of Ixxix-lxxx, 

290 

- John Ixxix; accounts Ixxx, 201 
- Walter, son of John Ixxix 
excommunications 20, 28, 37-8, 41, 263 
executions xviii, xx, xxviii, xxxiii, Ixxxii 
Exeter, dukes of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 



INDEX 



377 



Exeter, marquesses of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
exile xx, 106 

Fairefi Id see Fayrcfyid 

fairs xxii-xxiv, xxvii, xxxi, xxxvi, 4, 7, 23, 215-18 

famine xvi 

Fane, Henry xxxi 

- Sir Thomas see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Farmer, John 170 
- Thomas 170 

farmers and farming xi, xv, xx, 126, 193 
Farnfold, Ralph 169 
Farnham Castle, Surr lii,188 
Farr, William 24 
Fast, Richard 29 
Faversham (Feveresham, Feversham), Kent xxxix 

players from xliv, 96-7 
Fayre Crooch see Edwards of Fayre Crooch 
Fayrefyld (Fairefild, Fayrechilde, Fayrechylde), 

Philip, wait 1, Ixxii, 121-3, 279 
feasts and banquets 4-8, 189-90, 192, 271-2 
feathers 42 

Fecamp Abbey, France xxviii 
Feest, Richard 181 

- Thomas 181 
Felpham xlvii 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 

Book Ixii, 24 
Ferour, Richard xl, 187 
Feveresham, Feversham see Faversham 
fiddlers and fiddling xl, li, 9, 13, 19, 22, 39, 199 

named 10,29,38, 181 
fiddles li, 9, 29, 38, 181 
Fiennes, family of xviii, xxxiii, xxxvii, xlii 

- James, 1st Lord Saye and Sele xxxiii, xlii; see also 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Joan, 7th Baroness Dacre and wife of Richard 

xxxiii 

- Sir Richard, 7th Lord Dacre xxxiii; see also 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Sir Roger xxxiii; see also Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

- Thomas, 8th Lord Dacre xxxiii 



Fiennes (cont) 

- Thomas, 9th Lord Dacre xxxiii 

- Thomas, 10th Lord Dacre 288 

- William, 2nd Lord Saye & Sele see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies under Fiennes 
fifers and fifing I, Ixxii, Ixxxiii, 121, 124-9,278, 

280 
fights and fighting 5-7, 42, 80 

See also battles; Civil War; riot and rebellion 
fires xlvii, 22 

Firle Place see Gage of Firle Place 
firs 175? 

First Book of Canzonets to Two Voices 1 99 
fish xiii, xxiii, xxix, lii-liii, Ixxxviii, 46, 50, 60, 

192-4, 196-7 
Fishbourne xiv 
fishermen xxix, 215 

character lii-liii, 192-3, 196-7 
fishing and fish trade xi, xiii, xxiii, xxvi, 

xxviii-xxix, xxxi 
fairs xxii-xxiii, xxxvi, 215-18 
Fishmongers Company, London xiii 
Fitz Alan, family of, earls of Arundel xviii xix, 
xxv, xxvii, xxxi-xxxiv, xxxvii, xlii, xlvii, Ixxxiv 

- Anne, wife of William Fitz Alan, 23rd earl of 

Arundel see Patrons and Travelling Companies 
under Mautravers 

- Henry, 24th earl of Arundel xvi, xxv, xxxii, xli, 

lii; see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Richard, 14th earl of Arundel xxxi 

- Richard, 15th earl of Arundel see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Thomas, 22nd earl of Arundel xxxii, xli, xcvi; 

see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- William, 21st earl of Arundel xxxi, xli-xlii, xcvi; 

see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- William, 23rd earl of Arundel xxxii, xli; see also 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Fitzgerald, Mabel, countess of Kildare, sister of 

Anthony Browne (2), 1st Viscount Montagu 

189 
Fitzroy, Henry, 1st duke of Richmond see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies under Lord Admiral 
Fitzwilliam, William, 1st earl of Southampton 

xxxii, xlvii, 289 



378 



INDEX 



flags 126 

cognizances 1 18 

FIcccher, John xlvi, 100, 106, 275 
Fleet (prison) 12 
Flemish xxvii, xxix 
Flessher, ... 264 
Fletcher, family of xxx 

- Giles 25, 167 

- Richard xxx 
flock 42 

flour-milling xxv 
Folc, Robert xl, 182 
Folkestone, Kent xxxix 
Folkington 263 

records: Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Ixii, 25 
food 49 -50, 100 

fruits xv, xxvii 

salt xxix 

spices xxvii 

See also bread; fish; grains; meat 
fools xl-xli, Ixxxv, 182 
foot plays 90-1, 273 
Ford, family of xxv 

forests xi, xvii, xxxiii, Hi, 126, 190, 194 
Forman, John 29 
forts and fortresses xii xiv, xxiv 
Fortune (figurative) 195 6 
Fowle, Magnus 28-9 

France xiv-xv, xxi-xxii, xxvi, xxviii-xxix, 34-6, 
84,92,219,266,270,273 

minstrels from xxxvii, 99 
Freeman, Benjamin 37 
Freland (Freeland), John 13, 261 
Frencham. Steven 135-6 
French crowns (coin) 286 
Frenche , . . . , widow 1 22 
Frenshman, Anthony 75 
friars and friaries xxi, 186 
frieze 111 (rug), 133 (stammel) 
friezes (terracotta) xxxv 
Frittenden (Fritrynden), Kent 

players from 59-60 
frogs 193 
Froissart s Chroniques 219-20 



fruits xv, xxvii 
Fryman, Thomas 286 
Funtington xlvii 

church 26 

churchwardens 25 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichescer Detection 

Books lix, Ixii, 25-6 
furnishings 

beds 12,42 

blankets 42 

bolsters 42 

sheets 42 

tables 35, 192, 194 

trunks 42 
Fussell, John 1 9 
Fylder, Henry 29 

Gage of Firle Place, family of xix, xxxiv, xlvii 

Sir John xviii, xxii, xxxiv 

Gaimar , Geffrei 211-14 

galleys 84 

gambling and game-playing xvii, 3-5, 18, 37, 

54-5, 106, 180,277 
gaols see prisons 
Gardener (Gardiner, Gardner), Anne 181 

- John 43 

- William 167 
gardens 194 

Garton of Woolavington, Giles xvi 
Gates, Richard 29 

gates and gatehouses xlvii, 93, 121, 171 
Gatton, Richard 43 

- Robert 43 
Gauls xiv 

Gay, Humphrey 83?, 84 

See also Homfrey 
Gaymer, family of lii 

- Henry 116, 122 
Geere set Gere 
geese 189 

Gefferye, Thomas 265 
George Inn, Chichester xxv 

Gere (Geere, Geire), William 121-2, 131 
Gerey, John 181 
German dances 220 



INDEX 



379 



Gilbert of St Lcofard, bishop of Chichester Iv, 

3-4 

glass and glass-making xv, xxvij 
Glemham, Sir Henry 194, 289 
Gloucester, dukes of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under King 
Gloucester, Glouc xxxix 
gloves and glove-making xv, 30-2 
Glynde see Morley of Glynde 
Gearing )tr Goring of Burton 
God (character) xlviii, 94 
Godfrey (Godfray), John 285 
Godfrey of Winchelsea, family of Ixxx 

- Thomas (1), of Lydd Ixxx 

- Thomas (2), son of Thomas (1 ) Ixxx; diary Ixxx, 

202 

Godsall, Stephen 1 70 
Goff (Gooff), John 167-8 

- Thomas 168 

goldli, liii, 170, 188,278 

See also angels under coins 
Goldinge, Thomas 9 
goldsmiths xxx 
Goodyer, Richard 41, 266 
Gooff see Goff 
Gorbuduc xxxiii 
Goring of Burton (Gearing), family of xxxiv, 289 

- George xxvii 

- Sir Henry xxvii, lii, 194, 289 
Goudhurst (Goudherst), Kent 

players from 72 
Gouldsmyth, Anne 38, 266 
governors 34-6 
Gower, Mr 217 
gowns 59, 121 
Graffham (Grafham) xxxiv 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Register of 

Presentments Ixii, 26 
grains xi, xv, xxvii, xxix 

corn xxv, 288 

flour xxv 

hops xv 

malt xxv, xlix, 176 

wheat 176 
granaries xxvii 



Grange, Kent 263 

The Grange, Lewes xxvii 

Graunford (Graunfort), Babilon 49-50 

- John 49-50 
Gray see Grey 

Great Chart (Charte), Kent 

players from 76 
Great Yarmouth (Yarmouthe, Yarmuth), Norf 

bailiffs 2 16- 17 

clerks 2 16- 17 

Herring Fair xxii-xxiii, xxxvi, 215-18 

places in: The Crane 216; Havensmouth 216; 
Market Cross 216; The Quay 216; Tolhouse 
216; Yarmouth Bridge 216-17 

waits 215, 217-18 
Green, Mr 216 
Greensand Way xiii 
Grene Hall, Rye lii 
Grenewaie, . . . 273 

Grey (Gray), Edmund, 1 1 th earl of Kent see 
Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Edward, 4th Lord Grey of Powis see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- George, 12th earl of Kent see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

-Henry, 6th marquess of Dorset see Patrons and 
Travelling Companies 

- John 24 

- Richard 13th earl of Kent see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Robert 37, 266 

Grey of Ruthin, Lord see Patrons and Travelling 
Companies under Kent 

Grigges, Thomas xlvii, 19 

grooms 182-4 

Grovcr, Timothy 42 

Guestling xxiii 

Guestlings see under Cinque Ports 

Guildford, Sir Edward, lord warden of the Cinque 
Ports xlii, 26, 263; see also Patrons and 
Travelling Companies under Lord Warden 

- Sir Henry xlii; see also Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

guilds and occupations xxi, xxix-xxx, xxxix 
alewives 13 



380 



INDEX 



guilds and occupations (cont) 

armourers 35 

bakers 136 

brewers xxx 

butchers xxx 

carpenters 122, 170 

cordwainers xxix 

drapers xxix 

dyke diggers 75, 271 

farmers xx, 1 26 

fishermen xxix, 215 

Fishmongers xiii 

goldsmiths xxx 

grooms 182-4 

ironmongers xvi 

pedlars xl, 4 

rippiers xiii 

sailors xxii, xxx, 35 

shoemakers 29 

tailors xxix, 192 

tanners xxx 

tinkers xl 

yeomen xx, 260 

See also innkeepers; labourers; mercers; 
merchants; messengers; minstrels; 
musicians; St George s Guild; servants; 
soldiers; victuallers; waits 
Guilford, Thomas li 
gunpowder making xv 
Gunpowder Plot xxxiii 
guns 122 

Guy of Amiens 21 1 
Gynden, Richard 29 
gypsies (Egyptians) xxxvii 

Hxstingas xiv 

Hailsham (Helsham) xlv, xlvii, 170 

Maiden see High Halden 

Haler (Hayler), Anthony 10 

- Robert 29-30 

Halland Place see Pelham of Halland Place and 

Laughton 

halls xlv, xcvi-xcvii, 120 
Halnaker House xxxiii, xlvii 
Hamper, Thomas 173 



Hampshire, county of xi, xiii, xxix, liii, 288 

hangings xxxiii 

Hapsburgs 272 

harbours see ports and harbours 

Hard ham li 

Hargood, John 180,287 

harpers xxxvii, xl-xli, Ixxxv, 47, 56, 61, 187, 197 

named li, 261? 
Harrietsham (Harysam), Kent 

players from? 78 
Harryson, Steven 133 
Harsnett, Samuel, bishop of Chichester xxi 
Hartley, Mary 38 
Hartrydge, William 29 
Harysam see Harrietsham 
Hasdem, ... 58 
Haslemere, Surr 290 

Hastings, Henry, 20th earl of Huntington 170 
Hastings (Hastinge, Hastyng) xii-xv, xviii, xx, 
xxii-xxiii, xxvi, xxxvi, xlv, Ixii, 9, 211-15 

bailiffs xxvi, 26, 263 

barons xxvi 

chamberlains xxvi; accounts Ixiii, 27 

clerks xxvi, 215-17 

drummers 27 

jurats xxvi, 26 

mayor xxvi, 27 

members of parliament xxvi, liii 

places in: All Saints xxvi; Holy Trinity xxvi; St 
Andrew of the Castle xxvi; St Clement xxvi; 
St Leonard xxvi; St Mary Magdalene xxvi; St 
Mary of the Castle (collegiate church) xxvi, 
xcii; St Michael xxvi 

players from xliv, 102 

population xxvi 

records: Chamberlains Account Ixiii, 27; 
Custumal Ixii, 26; Order from the Warden 
of the Cinque Ports against Plays Ixiii, 26-7 

serjeant 263 

waits 263 

See also Cinque Ports 
Hastings, rape of xii, xxii, 170 
Hastings Castle xxvi, xcii 
hats 190,220,286 
Havant, Hants xiii 



INDEX 



381 



Haven see Newhaven 

Havensmouth, Great Yarmouth, Norf 216 

hawking 4 

Hayler see Haler 

Haywarde (Hawarde), John 171 

Heathfield 

records: Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Ixiii, 27-8 
Hedman, Henry 43 
hell 28 

(tellingly (Hellingsby) 263 
church 28 
records: Henry Burton, A Divine Tragedie 

Ixiii-lxiv, 28 
Helsham see Hailsham 
Henden, John 40 
Henly, Mr, dancing master 203-4 
Henry in, king of England li 
Henry vi, king of England see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Henry vil, king of England xxxiii, xliii, 76, 268, 

270, 272 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Henry vili, king of England xlii-xliii, xJvii-xlviii, 

li, Ixxxii, 92, 263, 266, 272 
See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Henry, king of Navarre 266 
Henry of Huntingdon 211 
Henslowe, Mr 197 
heralds see under messengers 
Herbert, Henry, 21st earl of Pembroke see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies 
heresy xviii, xxviii 
Herring Fair, Great Yarmouth, Norf xxii-xxiii, 

xxxvi, 215-18 

Herstmonceux xxxiii, xlii, 184, 288 
Herstmonceux Castle xlvii-xlviii, 288 
Heth see Hythe 
Hider, John 28 

High Cross, Chichester xlv, 1 8 
High Halden (Halden), Kent 

players from 97 
High Street, Rye 274 
highways see roads and highways 
High Weald see Weald 



Hildroppe (Hildropp), William 13 

Hill, John 30 

Hilton, Mr, vicar 1 1 

Hith see Hythe 

hobby horses xlix, 22-3 

Hocktide xxvi, xlviii, 31-3, 265, 269 

Hoi and Henry, 4th duke of Exeter see Patrons 

and Travelling Companies 
Holbein, Hans xlvii 
Holborn (Holborne), Midd 146 
holidays 55, 77, 268 

See also dedication days and mass days under 

churches 
Holland, Thomas 169 

- Walter 122 

Holy Rood, exaltation of 61 
Holy Rood, invention of 88 
Holy Trinity, church of 

Hastings xxvi 

Lewes xxviii 
Homfrey (Hunfry), ... 83, 91 

See also Gay 

Hope, Nicholas, minstrel xl, 187 
hops xv 
Home, Gervase 51 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
horns 26, 215-16, 263 

bugles 220 

See also trumpets 
Horseman, Mr 26, 263 

horses xi, xvii, 45, 48, 171, 189, 194, 212-14, 
288 

baiting 208, 291 

fodder xxxviii, 44, 46, 73 

travel by xiii-xiv, 216-17, 273 
Horsham xii-xiii, xviii, xx, xxxiii, xlv, xlix, Ixiv 

records: Inquest on the Death of John Rowe 
Ixiv, 28-9; St Mary s Parish Register Ixiv, 
28 

St Mary, church of 28 
households see under Sussex, county of 
Howard, family of xxxii, xli, Ixiv, Ixxxiv 

- Charles, 10th earl of Nottingham xvii, 194; 

see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
under Lord Admiral 



382 



INDEX 



Howard (cont) 

- Philip, 25th earl of Arundel xcix, 29 
Thomas, 7th duke of Norfolk see Patrons and 
Travelling Companies under Lord Treasurer 
Thomas, 8th duke of Norfolk see Patrons and 
Travelling Companies 

Thomas, 9th earl of Norfolk xxxii-xxxiii, lii; 

see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

Thomas, Viscount Howard see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Huggens, Thomas 21-2, 262 
Huguenots xxix, 266 
Hullwood, John, cleric 179 
hundreds (jurisdictions) xii, xvii, Ixxv, 181 
Hunfry see Homfrey 
Hunt (Hume), William 1 1 
hunting xvii, 4, 189-90, 192, 194 
Huntingdon, earls of 170 
Hurst (Hurste), Thomas (1), armourer 35 

Thomas (2) 29 
Hydneye 263 
Hythe (Heth, Hith), Kent xxii, 103, 263 

Guestlings at 138 

players from 54, 90, 92 

See also Cinque Ports 

Ichyngfelld see Itchingfield 
Icklesham xxxi 
immorality 3 

See also crimes and misdemeanors 
imprisonment xx, xxxii, xxxiv, Ixiii, 12, 36, 126, 
289 

See also prisons 
indentures 28, 170 
Ingram, John 39, 266 
Inians, William, cleric 27, 42 
Inman, . . . , wife of Philip 27 
- Philip 27 
innkeepers xlvi. 11, 18, 69, 77, 80-2, 84-6, 89, 

93, 146, 178 
inns and alehouses xlvi, li, 4-6, 12-13, 45, 178 

named xxv, xlvi, 18, 97, 216?, 262?, 274 
Inold, William xxx 
inquests Ixiv, Ixxiv, 28-9, 170-1 
instance books and causes liv, Ixvii, 42-3 



instruments see musical instruments 
interludes and interlude players xxxviii, 

119-20,276 

inventories Ixv, Ixvi, Ixxv, Ixxxi-lxxxii, 42, 208 
Ipswich, Suffxxxix, 261 
Ireland xl, 197 

iron xi, xv-xvi, xxvii, xxix, xxxv, Ixiv, 22 
Iron Edge (Taillifer), juggler 21 1-14 
ironmongers xvi 
Isfield Place xlvii 
Italy xl 
Itchingfield (Ichyngfelld) 263 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 

Book Ixiv, 29-30 
Ive, Thomas 29 
Ivychurch (Ivecherch, Ivecherche), Kent 

banns criers from 93, 100 

Jacomo, the Italian xl 

James I, king of England xxxiii, liii 

James n, king of England Ixxix 

javelins see spears 

Jefferay of Chiddingly, family of xxxiv 

jerkins see coats 

jesters xxxvii, 96, 109, 1 1 5 

Jockey, John, apprentice to Robert Banwell, 

minstrel 39 

John, king of England xxviii, li 
John of Gaunt xv 
journals xxxvii 
jousting 20 1,290 
Joyce of Herstmonceux? 184, 288 
Joye (Joy), } wife of John (1) 22-3 

- John (1)22-3, 262 

- John (2) 262 

- Mary, daughter of John (1) 22-4 

- Richard, son of John (1) 22-3 

judges xiii, 9-11, 13, 18-27,29-30,37-43, 

167, 177-80,266 
jugglers and juggling xxxvii, xxxix, xliii, xlv, 

15-16, 18,86,89,272 
named 14,211-14,261 
Julius Caesar liii, 191?, 289 
Jupe (Juppe), Bridget, wife of Richard (1)11 

- Peter 1 8 1 



INDEX 



383 



Jupc (cont) 

- Richard (1), the elder 11 

- Richard (2), the younger, son of Richard (1)11 
Jupiter 191 

jurats 

Cinque Ports xxiii, 27, 215 

Hastings xxvi, 26 

Winchelsea xxxi 

See also under Rye 

juries and jurors xvi-xvii, 1 70- 1 , 285 
justices xiii, xvii, xx, xxxiv, Ixxxi-lxxxii, 146, 271 
Juxon, Richard 10, 13, 19, 25, 29, 40-1 
Jynner, Christopher 29 

Kas(Kaas), Richard xl, 187 

{Catherine of Arragon, queen of England xlii 

kayles (bowling) 37, 266 

Keale, John xlvii, 40 

keepers 

animal xxxvii 
bull xxxviii, 96 
camel xxxviii, 79, 93 
lion xxxviii, 55 
park xxxiii 

See also bearwards; innkeepers 
Kemp, John, archbishop of Canterbury see 
Patrons and Travelling Companies under 
Lord Chancellor 
Kempe of Slindon, family of xix 
Kent, earls of see Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Kent, county of xi xiii, xv, xvn xviii, xx, 

xxii-xxiii, xxix, xxxiii -xxxiv, xxxix-xliv, 
xlvii-xlix, li, liii, Ixiii, Ixxx-lxxxi, 
Ixxxiii-lxxxiv, 21, 26-7, 39, 46, 49-50, 
52-4, 57, 59-61, 63-80, 88-94, 96-8, 
100-3, 106, 112-17, 119, 124-5, 138, 
143, 147, 150, 153, 158, 160-2, 177-9, 
185-6, 216, 263,268-70, 273 
keys liii, 188-9 
Kildare, countess of 189 
King, Henry, bishop of Chichester xxi 
king ales xlix, 167-8, 285 

See also ales 
kings xiv, xvin, xxiv 

of England xv, xxi-xxii, xxiv, xxvi, xxviii, 



kings (cont) 

xxxi-xxxiii, xxxix-xl, li, liii, Ixxix, 219-20, 
288; see also Edward vi; Henry vn; 
Henry vin 

foreign xl, 92, 266, 272 

May xlix, 272 

plays xlix, 167, 285 

summer xlix 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Kingston Bowcy 271 

Kitson (Kytson), Richard 10, 13, 19, 25, 41 
Knight (Knighte), Gilbert 177-9, 287 
- John 43 

knights 26, 194,260 
Knole, Kent xxxiii-xxxiv, Ixxxiv 
Kyme, John xxvu 
Kynge, Thomas 48, 267 
Kyngstun, Thomas 173 
Kytson see Kitson 

labourers 1 15, 122, 171, 262 

lace 1 99 

ladders 24, 29, 179-80 

Lady Day (Annunciation) 125, 135, 179-80, 

185, 199,271, 285 
Lady Elizabeth see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Princess 
lambs 39 

Lambutarme, Nicholas, minstrel 44 
Lancaster, duchy of xvii xviii 
lances 211, 213 
Landgate, Rye 121, 278 
Lane, Sir William 14,261 
Lang, John 179-80 
- Thomas 180 
Langford, John 11, 260 
Langham, Gregory 170 
Langrish (Langrishe), Thomas 25-6, 263 
Lankashyre, T. 75 
Laud, William, archbishop of Canterbury xxv, 

Ivii, 6 
Laughton Place see Pelham of Halland Place 

and Laughton 
Lawrance, John 12-13,260 
leap years 263 



384 



INDEX 



leather 274 

Lede see Lydd 

Lee, John 43 

Leedes of Wapping Thorne, family of xxxiv 

Leeds Castle, Kent xlii 

leets, court of Ixv, 58 

Leicester, earls of see Dudley and Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Leicester, Leic xxix 
Lent xvi, 81 

leopards (figurative) 213 
letters Ixiii, Ixv, Ixxii, 36, 136, 152-3 
levies see taxation 
Lewer, Thomas 43 
Lewes (Lews) xii-xiii, xv, xvii, xx, xxv-xxviii, xxxi, 

xxxvi, xlv-xlvi, xlviii, li, liv, xciii 
bailiffs xxvii 

churchwardens xlix; named 2645 
constables xxvii, Ixv, 33-4; named 265 
fairs xxvii 

members of parliament xviii, xxvii, 289 
musicians in 33 

places in: All Saints xxviii; The Grange xxvii; 
Holy Trinity xxviii; St Andrew and St Michael 
xxviii, xJviii-xlix, Ixiv-lxv, 25, 27, 30-4, 42, 
167, 264; St John sub Castro xxviii; St Martin 
xxviii, Ixv; St Mary in Foro xxviii, Ixv; St 
Mary Westout xxviii; St Nicholas xxviii; St 
Peter the Less xxviii; St Peter Westout xxviii; 
see also Lewes Castle; Lewes Priory 
players from xliv, 97 
players in 34 
population xxvii-xxviii 
records of: St Andrew s and St Michael s 
Churchwardens Accounts xxxvii, xlviii, 
Ixiv-lxv, 304; Town Book Ixiv-lxv, Ixxxiv, 
33-4 
Lewes, archdeaconry of liv- Iv, 9-10, 25, 27, 40, 

42, 167 

Lewes, rape of xii, xxvii 
Lewes Castle xxvii 

Lewes Priory (St Pancras) xxi, xxvii, xxxvi, xciii 
Lewkenor, family of xxv, xlvii 

- Edward (1), justice of the peace 271 

- Edward (2), of Kingston Bowcy 271 



Lewkenor (cont) 

- Edward (3), of Kingston Bowcy 271 

- Mr 75, 271 

- Roger (1), the elder, of Tangmere 271 

- Sir Roger (2), son of Sir Thomas 271 

- Sir Thomas, of Trotton 271 
Leyland, Roger 40 

libraries see record offices and repositories 
Lid, Lide see Lydd 

lieutenants xvi xvii, xix, xxxii-xxxiii 
lights (torches) 168 

See also candles 
linen (cloth) 24 
linens (bed) 42 
Lion Inn, Chichester xxv 
lion keepers xxxviii, 55 
Lisle, Viscount see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Little Chart (Charte), Kent 

players from 76 

Little Heigham (Petit Iham) 263 
Little London xxxi 
liveries I, Ixxii, 59, 116?, 117-18, 120-1, 133, 

277 

Lockwod, king s Serjeant and jester 109 
Loke, Richard 264 
Lollardry xviii, xx 

London xi xvi, xx, xxii, xxvii, xxix xxx, hi, Ixin, 
Ixxiii, Ixxix, Ixxxviii, xcviii, 35, 127, 132, 136, 
166, 203, 277, 290 

minstrels from xliv, 57 

waits 290 
Longe, Richard 43 
lords, summer xlviii, 272 

See also under misrule 
Loseley House and Park, Surr lii, Ixxviii 
Louis xii, king of France 92, 272 
Love, Mr 73 
Lovell, Mr 21 6 
Low Countries xiv, 152-3 
Lowestoft (Loystaffe), Surf 217 
Low Weald see Weald 
Lucas, Edward xlvii, 25 
Lumley, family of xxxiii -xxxiv, xxxvii, xlvii, Ixxxiv 

- John, 6th Baron Lumley xvi, xxv, xxxii 



INDEX 



385 



Lusy, Thomas xlvii, 171 
lutes 199,203-4 

masters I, 203-4 

Lydd (Lede, Lid, tide, Lyde), Kent xxxix-xl, 
xliv, Ixxx 

banns criers from 71, 78 

chamberlains 273 

players from xlv, xlviii, 46, 50, 57, 60, 101 
Lydden (Lydenden), Kent 

players from 75 
Lyly, John xcix 
Lyme Regis, Dors xxxix 
Lympne, Kent xi 

Madeston see Maidstone 

Mafeld see Mayfield 

maidens 180 

Maid Marian (character) xlix, 223 

Maidstone (Madeston, Maideston, Maydestan, 

Maydestone), Kent 

players from xliv- xlv, 52, 63, 67-8, 185-6 
mail xxix 
Mallyng, MaJlynge see East Mailing; South 

Mailing; West Mailing 
malmsey see wine 
malt and malting xxv, xlix, 1 76 
manor houses xvi, xxi, xxvii, xxxiii, xlvii 

See also households under Sussex, county of 
manors (jurisdictions) xxvii-xxviii, 261, 278 
maps xiii, Ixvii, civ-cix 
March, Richard 286 
- William 286 
marchionesses see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Dorset 
market crosses 
Chichester xlv, 1 8 
Great Yarmouth, Norf 216 
Rye xcvi 

markets and market places xlv, 3-4, 57, 59, 106 
market towns xii-xiii, xxiv, xxvii, xxx, xxxvi, Ixxiii 
marquesses see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Dorset and Exeter 
marriages xxxi-xxxiii, liv, 76, 201, 272, 290 
Marsh, James, archdeacon of Chichester Iviii, 8 
marshes xi-xii, xiv, xvi 



Marten (Martin), John (1) 37-8, 266 

- John (2) 43 
martyrs xx 

Mary I, queen of England xxxii-xxxiv, Ixxxi, 76, 
272 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Mary, queen of Scots xxxii, Ixxxii 
Mary of Modena, queen of England Ixxix 
masks xlviii, Ixxxv, 116, 197-9, 277 

See also disguising; mumming 
masques 290 
mass days 80- 1,98, 103,272 

See also dedication days and holidays under 

churches 
masses xxx 
masters see teachers 
Mathewe, John (1) xlvii, 16 

- John (2) 122 

Mautravers, Lady and Lord see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies under Arundel 
Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor 272 
Maxwell, John (1), mercer, brother of Thomas 152 

- John (2), son of John (1) 152-3 

- Thomas, musician, brother of John (1) Ixxxiv, 

152-3, 161-2, 283 
May, family of xx 
May Day xlix, 101, 107, 110, 115 
Maydeston, Maydestone see Maidstone 
Mayfield (Mafeld) 

players from 103 
maying and May games xx, xlix, 5, 40-1, 117 

kings xlix, 272 

queens xlix 

See also May Day; maypoles 
mayors 

Chichester xxiv-xxv, lx 

Hastings xxvi, 27 

Newhaven 34 

Winchelsea xxxi 

See also under Rye 
maypoles xix-xx, xlix, Ixxxiii, 20-1, 24, 28, 43 

170-1 
meat 4-5 

beef xxvii, 189 

geese 1 89 



386 



INDEX 



meat (cont) 

mutton xv, 178 

seafood xxix, lii 

See also fish 

Mede, William 96-7, 106, 275 
Meeching xii 

members of parliament xviii, xx, xxiii, xxv xxvii, 
xxx-xxxi, liii, Ixxxi-lxxxii, 60, 77, 82, 85-6, 
261,289-90 
men see players 
Mercer, Nicholas 1 1 1 , 276 
mercers xxix, Ixxix, 135-6, 290 
merchants xxiv, xxvii, xxx, 34, 36, 65, 78, 152, 
192,217 

guild xxiv-xxv, xxvii, Ix, xcvii, 262 
Mersham, Kent 

players from 94 
messengers 182-4, 112, 272 

heralds 184 

pursuivants 76, 84, 272 
metals and minerals 

chalk xi 

coal xxix 

pewter 288 

silver 170, 190, 199 

See also gold; iron; stones 
Michaelmas xxiv, xxvii, liv, 57, 94, 201 
Michelgrove see Shelley of Michelgrove 
Middelburg (Middlebarowe), Zeeland 152 
Middlesex, county of xxxiii, 146 
Midhurst xii, xviii, xxxii, xlv, xlvii, li 
Midsummer 11, 201 
Miles, Kathcrine 38, 266 
Mill (Mills), William 12-13, 261 
Millingbey, Thomas 146 
Millington, ... 203 

minstrels xxxvii-xxxviii, xl-xlvii, xlix, l-li, 
Ixxxiii-lxxxiv, xcv, 4, 17, 24, 40, 44-1 19, 
125, 143, 167, 171. 175-7, 182-4, 186, 
220, 262, 270, 272, 275, 286 

named xl, Ixxxiii, 10, 25, 36, 39, 44, 65, 74, 
81,84,92,95,97, 116, 187,205-8, 
213-14,266,287 

See also entertainers and entertainment; 
musicians; performers; players 



mints xxvi-xxvii 
misrule 26 

lords xix, xxxvi, xlviii-xlix, 5, 13, 18, 184?, 288 
See also summer kings and lords 
Molens, John 262 

- Mr 18,262 

- Richard 262 

- William 262 

money xxiv, 12, 46, 58, 88, 122, 130, 261 

coins 47, 182; angels li, 121, 170, 278; French 
crowns 286 

devotion 175 

Hock 31 -3, 265 

St Nicholas 30- 3 

See also gold; silver 

monks and monasteries see religious houses 
Montagu, Viscount and Lady see under Browne 

of Cowdray 

Montague, Richard, bishop of Chichester xxi, Iv, 
Ivii, Ixxx, 6; 

personal accounts Ixxx, 202 
Montfort Rebellion xxvii 
Moots (Mootes) 123 
More, Robert 43 

- William 15,261 

More House see Dawtrey of More House 
Morley, Lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Morley, family of xx 

- Herbert xxxi 

- Herbert, colonel see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

- Robert, wife of 33, 265 

- Thomas, composer 199 
Morley of Glynde, family of xxxiv 
morning prayer 4, 22-3, 181 
morris bells 1 76 

morris dances xix, xxxiv, xJiv, xlix, 22-3, 103, 272 
Morton, John, archbishop of Canterbury xxxviii, 

xliii 
See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 

Canterbury 
Mose, Robert 43 
Mountjoy, Lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 



INDEX 



387 



Mowbray, family of Ixiv 
Mower, Richard 12-13, 260 
mumming xxx, xlviii, 1 16, 277 

See also disguising; masks 
murder xvii, xxxiii, Ixxxii, 170-1 
museums see record offices and repositories 
music Ixxxiii-lxxxiv, 20, 188-9, 192, 197,211, 

283 

books li, 41-2, 199,216-17 
teachers xxxvi, 1-li, Ixxix, Ixxxiii, 20, 198-201, 

203-5 

See also musicians 
musical instruments xxxvi, xxxviii, 1-li, Ixxxiii, 

xcv, 10, 14,25,41-2, 153 
cases 130-1, 199 

kinds: bugles 220; cornetts 192; horns 26, 215- 
16, 263; lutes 1, 199, 203-4; organs Ixxxiii; 
violins li, 41; see also drums, drummers, and 
drumming; fiddlers and fiddling; fiddles; 
fifers and fifing; pipes, pipers, and piping; 
tabors and laborers; trumpeters and 
trumpeting; trumpets; viols; virginals 
strings 199-200,202-3,291 
musicians xxx, xxxvi-xxxvii, xxxix, xl-xlii, 1-li, 
liii, Ixxxiii, Ixxxv, xcv, 14, 33, 114, 124, 138, 
147, 150, 158, 160-2, 189, 197, 201, 263 
named Ixi, 14, 41-2, 146, 152-3, 274, 290 
See also clarioners; drums, drummers, and 
drumming-, entertainers and entertainment; 
fiddlers and fiddling; fifers and fifing; 
harpers; minstrels; performers; pipes, 
pipers, and piping; players; masters under 
singing; tabors and laborers; trumpeters 
and trumpeting; waits 
musters xvi, I, Ixvii, Ixxxiii-lxxxiv, 5-8, 1 10, 

158-9,279 
mutton xv, 1 78 
Mychell, Henry 29 
Mylles boder 112 

Naldret (Naldrett), Nicholas 43 

- Richard 43 

Navarre, kings of xl, 266 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
under King of Navarre 



navy xvi 

See also ships and shipping 
needle-making xxv 
Netherlands 152-3 

nets liii, 193 

Nevill, George, 5th baron of Abergavenny xlii; 
see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Henry, 6th baron of Abergavenny xlii; see also 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- William 25 

Neville, Cecily, duchess of York see Patrons and 
Travelling Companies under Queen Mother 

- Ralph, 4th earl of Westmorland see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Richard, 16th earl of Warwick xlii; see also 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Newenden, Kent 
players from 54 

Newhaven (Haven, New Haven) xii, xxvii 
mayors 34 

records: Depositions at the Trial of George 
Berdesworth Ixv, 34-6; Letter Concerning 
the Trial of George Berdesworth Ixv, 36 
New Minster Abbey 288 
New Quay, Rye xlvi, 75 
New Romney (Romene, Romeney, Romeny, 

Romney), Kent xxii, xxxix-xl, xliv, 263 
banns criers from 71, 88, 96, 106, 1 17, 277 
Brotherhoods at xxiii, xl, 92, 98, 1 13-16, 1 19, 
125, 143, 147, 150, 158, 160-2, 269-70, 
273-4 

Guestlingsat 150, 160, 162 
players from xlv, 49, 52-3, 66, 71, 79 
See also Cinque Ports 
New Shoreham xii, xiv, xviii, xxxiii, xlv 
Newton, William xxvii 
New Years Day 54, 70 
Nicholas, the harper li 
Nicolles, Peter, minstrel 116 
Nogle, Morris 1 1 1 
Noke, John ap 171 

Norfolk, dukes of xviii, xxxii-xxxiii, xlvii 
See also Howard and Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Norfolk, county of xxii-xxiii, xxxvi-xxxvii, 34, 



388 



INDEX 



Norfolk (cont) 

215-18,261 

Normandy, France xiv, xxi, xxviii, 34-6, 266 
Normans xii-xiv, xviii, xxi, xxiv, xlvii, 211-14 
Northeyc 263 

North Street, Chichester xxv, xlv 
Northumberland, earls and lady of xxxiii-xxxiv, 

xlii 
See also Percy and Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

Northumberland, counry of Ixxxiv 
Northumbria xviii 
Norwich (Norwych), Norf xxxvii, 34 
notaries public 9-10, 13, 19-20, 24-5, 29, 

38-41,43, 167, 177-80 
Nottingham, earls of xvii 
Noviomagus xxiv 
Nowell, John 160 
nunneries xxi 
Nycoll, Richard 110 
nymphs (character) liii, 189 

oaks xv, lii-liii, \90-1, 194, 289 

oaths Ixvii, 9, 12-13, 19-20, 29-30, 38, 146, 

170-1, 179 
Offington xlvii 
Ogle, Cuthbert, 7th Lord Oglewf Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Old Winchelsea xxxi 
Oliver 211 
Onsloe (Onesloe), Mr, dancing master 198, 

200-1 

orations 121, 188-94, 196, 289 
orders Ixiii, 20, 26-7, 263, 277 
organs Ixxxiii 
Osborne, Edward 25, 179 
Ottringham, ... 178 
Ouse River xii, xiv, xxvi 
Oving (Ovinge) 
church 38 
churchwardens 38 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 
Books Ixvi, 36-8; Archdeaconry of Chichester 
Register of Presentments Ixv, 36 
Ovington, John 43 



Owen, Sir David xlvii 
oxen see cattle 

Oxford, earls of xxxviii, xliii 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
oysters 192 

Page, William 2 1,262 
pageant houses xlvi, 121, 278 
Pagham 266 

churchwardens 39 

records: Act Book for the Exempt Deanery of 
Pagham and Tarring Ixvi, 39; Will of Robert 
Banwell, Minstrel Ixvi, 39 
Pagham, exempt deanery of liv, 21, 39, 177-9 
paintings xlvii, li 
palaces xiv-xv, xlvii 

The Pallant, Chichester xxv, 21, 39, 177-9 
Pannell, ..., minstrel 36, 266 
paper and paper-making xxv, xxvii 
Parham liii 

parish registers Ixiv, Ixxiv, 28, 170 
Parker, ... 264 

- Edward, 12th Lord Morley see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Sir Nicholas 194, 289 

- Thomas 178 

parks xxxii-xxxiii, Ixxxiv, 189 

Parr, William, 1st Baron Parr see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Parson (Parsonn), Edward 169 

- Thomas 168 

- William 168 
passports 152-3 

pastures and enclosures xv, 171, 288 
Paullwheelc (Paullwheeler, Paulwheele), ..., wife 
ofOtho20 

- Otho li, 20 
Pay, Joan xl 

- Laurence, archdeacon of Chichester Ivii, 7 
Payne, John, wife of 33, 265 

peace xvii, 4, 12, 171, 269, 273, 289 

character liii, 190 

See also justices 
Peachey, Lambert 37, 266 

- William 37, 266 



INDEX 



389 



Peadle see Pedle 

pearls 196 

Peasants Revolt xv 

Peasmarsh (Pesemarsshe, Pessemarsshe) 

players from xliv, 95-6 
Pecham, John 170 

Pecock, Reginald, bishop of Chichester xviii 
pedlars xl, 4 

Pedle (Peadle, Pedele, Pedell) son of John (2) 

I, 167 

- John(l) 122 

- John (2), drummer 1, 161-7, 285 

- Richard 106, 275 

Pelham of Halland Place and Laugh ton, family 
of xx, xxxiv-xxxv, I, Ixxix, Ixxxi 

- Bess, daughter of Sir Thomas (2) 204 

- Herbert (1) xxxi 

- Herbert (2), sheriff 194 

- John xviii 

- Mary, niece of Sir Thomas (2) 204 

- Mrs, wife of Sir Thomas (2) 203 

- Phill, daughter of Sir Thomas (2) 204-5 

- Sir Thomas (1) xxvii, Ixxxi 

- Sir Thomas (2), son of Sir Thomas (1) Ixxxi; 

accounts Ixxxi, 203-5 
Pellatt (Pellat, Pellet, Pellett), ... 285 

- Alice, wife of Sir Benjamin 11-12, 260 

- Sir Benjamin 11-13, 260-1 

- Edward, son of Sir Benjamin 12, 260 

- James 167-9 

- Richard 167 

- William 169 

Pembroke, Lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
penances 10, 24, 260 
Penkeherst, Dunstan 170 
Pentecost (Whitsunday) xxvii, Ixxxiv, 25, 29, 184, 

279 

Pepper, Mr 2 16 
Percy, family of, earls of Northumberland xxxiii, 

xxxvii, xl, xlii, xlvii, li, Ixxxiv 

- Anne, wife of William Ficz Alan, 23rd earl of 

Arundel see Patrons and Travelling Companies 
under Mautravers 

- Catharine, wife of Henry Algernon, 9th earl of 



Percy (cont) 

Northumberland see Patrons and Travelling 
Companies 

- Henry, 8th earl of Northumberland xlii; see also 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Henry, 13th earl of Northumberland xxxiv 

- Henry Algernon, 9th earl of Northumberland 

xlii; see also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Thomas, 1 1th earl of Northumberland xxxiii, lii 
performers xiv, xviii, xxiv, xli xlii, 14-18, 185, 

211 
See also entertainers and entertainment; 

minstrels; musicians; players 
perjury 13, 260 
Peron (Perrean, Peryn, Peryon), Mr, king s 

beanvard 108-10 
personal records 
diaries Ixxx, 202 
journals xxxvii 
See also inventories; wills 
Perys, James 169 

Pesemarsshe, Pessemarsshe see Peasmarsh 
Petit Iham (Little Heigham) 263 
Petre, Joshua, cleric 39 
Pett xlvii 

records: Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Ixvi, 40 
Pettit, John 170 

- Robert 170 

Petworth xii, xx, xxxiii-xxxiv, xl, xlii, xlv, xlvii, 

xlix, li, liii, Ixxx, Ixxxiv 
church 40 

records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Detection 
Book Ixiv, 40-1; Inventory of the Goods of 
Henry Trashe, Musician Ixvi, 42; Will of 
Henry Trashe, Musician Ixvi, 41-2 
Pevensey xi-xiii, xvii, xxiii, li, 263, 288 
Pevensey, rape of xii 
Pevensey Castle xvii 
Pevensey Levels xi, 263 
pewter 288 

Philippa of Hainault, queen of England 219 
See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Phillips, Thomas (1) liii 
Thomas (2) Ixxv 



390 



INDEX 



Philpes, John 23 

Pilgrim (character) liii, 190-2, 289 

pilgrimages xxiv, xxxiii 

pins xl, Ixxxiii, 207 

Piper, Robert 40 

pipes, pipers, and piping l-li, 9, 14?, 26, 42, 

102, 194, 206 

piracy xi, xxiii-xxiv, xxix, 219 
plague xv, lii 
Plantagenet, Arthur, 6th Viscount Lisle see 

Patrons arid Travelling Companies 

- George, 3rd duke of Clarence see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Margaret, countess of Salisbury see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Richard, 3rd duke of Gloucester see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies under King 

- Richard (of York), 3rd duke of York see Pacrons 

and Travelling Companies 

- Richard (of Shrewsbury), 5th duke of Yorksee 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
plates (armour) xlviii, 97 
Playden Hill, Rye 278 

players xxiv, xxx, xxxvii- xlviii, liii, 14-16, 34, 
49-55, 57-81, 83-114, 116-21, 123-6, 
128, 130-40, 147, 149-51, 160, 184-7, 
202,205,261,273,276, 281 
interlude players xxxviii, 1 19-20, 276 
menxlv, 46, 57, 120, 182, 185 
puppet-players xl, 184 

See also banns and banns criers; entertainers 
and entertainment; minstrels; musicians; 
performers 
Playfer, William 170 
playing places xlv-xlvii 
barns xlvii, 24 
council houses xlv, 18 
court and town halls xlv, 120 
doorways 146 
inns xlv-xlvi, li, 97 
market places xlv, 57, 59 
mayors houses xlvi, 48-9, 61, 79-80, 82, 

84_5,87-8,96,98-9 

private or public houses xlv-xlvii, li, 16, 19, 
25-6, 40, 44, 50-1, 53-6, 58-60, 62-7, 



playing places (cont) 

69, 73-4, 76-8, 80-91, 93, 96-7, 101, 
104, 107-8, 1 10, 167, 171, 273, 277 
streets xlv-xlvi 
wagons xlvi, 278 
See atso plays and playing under churches and 

under churchyards 

plays and playing xl, xliv, xlvii, Ixxxiii, 4-8, 19, 
24-6, 34, 36, 40, 46, 57, 80, 115, 151, 177, 
186,202,265,272 

kinds: biblical plays xliv; comedies xl; foot plays 
90-1, 273; interludes xxxviii, 1 19-20, 276; 
king plays xlix, 167, 285; puppet plays xl, 
184; Resurrection plays xlviii, 94, 97; stage 
plays 4, 27, 91 ; see also Robin Hood; royal 
visits and entertainments 
prohibition xxxvii, xxxix, xlviii-xlix, 26-7, 

276-7 

titles xxxiii, xli 

See also plays and playing under churches and 
under churchyards; entertainers and 
entertainments; minstrels; musicians; 
performers; players; playing places 
Plett, William 40 
Plough Inn, Chichester xxv 
Plymouth, Devon xxxix, xliii 
poetry see verse 
Poitiers, France 219 

Pokell wife of Thomas 33 

- Thomas 33, 265 

Pole, Edmond de la, 10th earl of Suffolk 270 
See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
poles 

summer 29 
See also maypoles 
poor and poor relief xvii, 34 
Pope, John 123, 279 
population figures xv, xxiv-xxxi, xliv 
Porter (character) lii-liii, 188-9, 289 
Portinari xxi 
ports and harbours xi-xv, xvii-xviii, xxiv-xxvi, 

xxix, xxxi, xxxvi, xliv, xciii, 272 
See also Cinque Ports and individual port towns 

by name 
Portsmouth, Hants lii-liii 



INDEX 



391 



pots 22-3 

cruses 8 1 

pottles 139, 150 
Poynings, family of xxxiv 
- Sir Edward xlii-xliii, 270; see also Patrons and 

Travelling Companies under Lord Warden 
prayers Ix, 4, 21,30, 190 

See also service and sermon, time of 
precentors 14 
presentments xxix, liv, lix, Ixi-lxii, Ixv, 1 1, 24, 26, 

36, 171, 178-9, 181,262,266 
princes xlii, 76, 219,272 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
princesses 76, 272 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
priories xxi, xxvii, xxxvi, xciii, 190, 289 
Prior More of Worcester 261 
prisoners xvi, 217 
prisons xvii, xxvii, 36, 126 

Fleet 12 

privy council xvi, xix, xxx, xxxiii, xliii 
privy seal, lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Bedford 
processions xlvi, Ixxxiv, 272 
proclamations Ixiii, 112, 216, 269, 272-3, 276 
progresses xxxi, xlii, li, liii, 188 
properties 

bowers 189 

bows 189, 195 

clubs 188 

keys liii, 188-9 

nets liii, 193 

plates (armour) xlviii, 97 

See also swords 

prophesies and prophets xxxvii, 188-9 
protector, lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Somerset 
Protestantism xvi xxi, xxv xxxii, xxxiv xxxv, 

xxxix, xli, xlviii, 1, Ixxix, Ixxxi-lxxxii, xc, xcv 
Prowze, John 1 32 
punishments xvi, Ixiii, 33-4, 37-8, 41, 266 

banishment and exile xx, 106 

burning xviii, xx, xxviii 

ear-cropping 106 

fines xxxiv, xlviii 



punishments (cont) 

hanging xxxiii 

penances 10-11, 24, 260 

public display xlviii, I, Ixxxiii, 18, 99, 102, 106, 
274-5 

stocks 12,260 

See also excommunications; imprisonment 
puppet-players xl, 184 

Purification of the Virgin, feast of see Candlemas 
Puritanism xx-xxi, xxviii, xxx, xxxiii, xxxix, xlix, 

liii, Ixiii, Ixxx, 146, 282 
purses 121 

pursuivants see under messengers 
Pye, John 122 

quarter sessions xvi-xvii, xxvi-xxvii, xlv, Ixxxv, 1 5 

quays xlvi, 75, 216 

queen mothers see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
queens xxxii, Ixxxii, 269 

of England xvi, xxii, xxxii-xxxiii, Ixxix, 219; 

see also Elizabeth I; Mary i 
May xlix 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
queen s men xxxvni xxxix 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under Queen 

Queen s Well alias Blekewell, Rye 75 
questmen 6, 24, 178 

Radcliffe, Mr 34 

- Robert, 6th earl of Sussex see Patrons and 
Travelling Companies 

- Thomas, 8th earl of Sussex see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies under Lord 
Chamberlain 
Radford (Radforde), ..., widow of Noah 151 

- Noah, drummer I, 146-51 

- Thomas 155 
Ralph (Rauf) 85 
Rameslie, manor of xxviii, 278 
rangers 190 

rapes (jurisdictions) xii-xiii, xvii, xxii, xxvii, 29, 

170 
Raynold, Mr 123 



392 



INDEX 



Reading Street (Redyng), Kent 

players from 63 
recorders xxv, 216, 263 
record offices and repositories xxxvi, liv, lix, 

Ixxv-lxxvi 
records 

dating Ixxxv-lxxxvi 

selection xxxvii, Ixxviii, Ixxxiii-lxxxv, xcvi, xcviii 

storage liv, lix, Ixxvi 

survival xxxvi-xxxviii, liv-lv, lix, Ixii, Ixiv-lxv, 

Ixvii, Ixxii Ixxiii, Ixxviii, Ixxx 
rectors Ixiii, Ixxx, 3, 261 
recusants xvi, xix, xxviii, lii 
Red Lion Inn, Rye xlvi 
Redyng see Reading Street 
reeves xxiv-xxv 
Reformation xvi-xvii, xix xxi, xxxiv, xxxix, xli, 

xliv xlv, xlviii 
registers Ixiii, Ixiv-lxv, 34 

See also parish registers; presentments 
registrars 9- 10, 19, 25, 178 
Regnum xxiv 
relics li, 288 
religious houses xviii-xix, xxi-xxii, xxviii 

Easebourne Priory 190, 289 

New Minster Abbey 288 

See also Battle Abbey; Lewes Priory; 

Robertsbridge Abbey 
Restoration 290 
Resurrection (play) xlviii, 94, 97 
Retherfield see Rotherfield 
revels and revelling 1 78 

masters xlii 
ribaldry 177 

ribbons xl, Ixxxiii, 166, 207 
Rich, Robert, 2nd Baron Rich see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Richard II, king of England see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Richard in, king of England xxxii 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Richard of Shrewsbury, 5th duke of York see 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Richard of York, 3rd duke of York see Patrons 
and Travelling Companies 



Richardson, Roger 27 

- Thomas 43 

Richmond, dukes of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Lord Admiral 
Ridgwicke see Rudgwick 
Ridolfi Plot xxv, xxxii-xxxiii, lii 
Rilcy, Henry Thomas Ixviii, Ixx, 49-50 
Ringsted, Francis 178-80 
riot and rebellion xv, xxv, xxvii, xxx, xxxii-xxxiv, 

lii, Ixxxi 
rippiers xiii 

rivers xii, xiv, xxvi, xxix, xxxi, xliv, xlvii 
Rixad, John, minstrel 65 
roads and highways xii-xiv, xvii, xxii, xxix, xliv, 

I, Ixxiii, 115 
named xii-xiii 
Robert, the fool? xl, 182 
Robert of Namur 219 
Roberts, ..., captain 216 
Robertsbridge, lord of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Robertsbridge 

players from 96 

Robertsbridge Abbey xxii, xxxvi, xl, Ixxvii 
abbots see Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under Robertsbridge 
entertainers at xxii, xl, xliii, 186-7 
harpers at 1 87 
minstrels at xl, xlii, 186-7 
players at 187 
records: Bursars Accounts Ixxvii-lxxviii, 

186-7 

Roberts of Boarzell, family of xxxvii, xl, Ixxxi, 
Ixxxiii 

- Elizabeth, wife of John Ixxxi 

- John, brother of Thomas Ixxxi 

- Margaret, widow of Thomas Ixxxi, 205-8; 

accounts Ixxxi, 205-8 

- Thomas Ixxxi 
Robin Hood 

plays xlii, xliv, xlix, 27 

visitations 81, 272 
Rochester, Kent xiii, xliv 

players from 93 
Roland 211 



INDEX 



393 



Romins, Thomas 180 

Ronienc, Romeney, Romeny, Romney see New 

Romney 

Romney Marsh xi 
ropes 179-80 
Rose, John 1 9 
rosin 200 
Rotherfield (Retherfield) 

records: Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection Book 

Ixvii, 42 

Rothcr River xii, xiv, xxix, xliv, xlvii 
round dances 3 

Rowe alias Sparrowe, John 28-9 
Rowland, John 1 06 
Royalists xx, xxv 
royal visits and entertainments xxii, xxix, xxxi, 

xlvi, 1-liii, Ixxii, Ixxxii-lxxxiv, 121-3, 268, 

278-9 
See also royal entertainment under Browne of 

Cowdray 
Rudgwick (Ridgwicke, Rudgeweeke, Rudgewyke) 

xx, xlix, 10, 29, 260, 263 
records: Archdeaconry of Chichester Instance 

Book Ixvii, 42-3 
rumours 20, 29 
Russell, Francis, Lord Russell see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- John, 3rd earl of Bedford see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- William xl, 187 

Rye xi-xv, xviii, xx, xxii xxiii, xxvi, xxviii xxx, 
xxxvi, xxxix, xliv, Ixii, Ixvii, Ixxxviii, 35, 263, 
267-9, 282 

aldermen, named 4950 

bailiffs xxviii, 50, 121,278 

banns criers from xliv 

banns criers in xliv-xlv, 59, 64, 71, 74, 76, 78, 
88, 91-3, 96, 98, 100, 103, 106, 117, 268, 
277 

bearwards in xxxvii-xxxviii, xl, 49, 51, 55, 
57-60, 62-4, 67-72, 74-95, 100, 102-3, 
108-10, 116, 118-19, 123,279 

bullwardens in xxxviii, 96 

camel keepers in xxxviii, 79, 93 

chamberlains xxviii, Ixviii, 270; named 58, 



Rye (cont) 

62-3,88,90-1, 111, 116, 270,276-7; 
accounts xliv, xxxvi -xxxviii, xliv, xlvi, 
Ixviii-Ixxii, Ixxxv, 44-167 

clerks xxviii 

common council xxviii, Ixvii 

deputy mayors 51, 88, 121; named 77, 107-8, 
123 

election 268, 276 

harbour Ixvii, 272 

harpers in xxxvii, xli, 47, 56, 61 

jesters in xxxvii, 96, 108, 1 15 

jugglers in xxxvii, 86, 89 

jurats xxviii, xxx, xlv, Ixvii-lxviii, 36, 126, 
152-3; named 44, 65, 78, 89-91, 96-7, 
107, 110, 146,275 

lion keepers in xxxviii, 55 

maps cviii, cix 

mayoresses 100 

mayors xxviii, xxx, xxxvii, xxxix, xlv xlvi, Ixvii 
Ixviii, 36, 48-50, 52, 54-6, 59, 61-2, 65-6, 
69, 76, 80, 84-5, 87-8, 96, 98-9, 104, 
107-8, 115, 120-1, 126, 267, 278; named 
xlvi, 46, 49-51, 53-4, 56, 58, 60, 64, 69, 
73_4, 76-8, 80-2, 84-6, 88-9, 93, 100, 
106, 116, 122, 130-1, 146, 152, 160,273-4 

members of parliament xxx; named 60, 77, 
82,85-6 

minstrels in xxxvii-xxxviii, xl-xlii, xlv-xlvi, 
44-115, 117,268,270,272 

morris dancers in xliv, xlix, 103 

musicians in xxx, xxxvii, xxxix, 114, 146 

opening of the box Ixviii, 49, 85, 121, 124 

places in: Blekewell alias Queen s Well 75; 
Budgwell 122; Butchery xlv; causeway 278; 
Commons 47, 75; Court (Town) Hall xlv, 
xcvi, 120; Crown Inn xlvi, 97, 274; Grene 
Hall lii; High Street 274; Landgate 121, 278; 
Market Place and Cross xcvi, 57, 59, 106; 
New Quay xlvi, 75; pageanc house xlvi, 121, 
278; Playden H.ll 278; Red Lion Inn xlvi; 
Strand xlvi, 77, 93, 272; Three Kings Inn 
xlvi; west cliff 75; West Street 274; see also 
under St Mary, church of 

players from xliv 



394 



INDEX 



Rye (cont) 

players in xxx, xxxvii-xxxix, xli-xlvi, xlviii, 
49-55. 57-81, 83-114, 116-21, 123-6, 
128, 130-40, 147, 149-51, 160,281; 
interlude players xxxviii, 1 19-20 

population xxix-xxx 

records: Assembly Books Ixvii-lxviii, 118, 
121, 126, 279; Chamberlains Accounts 
xxxvi-xxxviii, xliv, xlvi, Ixviii-lxxii, Ixxxv, 
44-144; Chamberlains Rough Accounts 
Ixx-lxxii, 120-1, 145-67; Court Book Ixviii, 
106; Depositions at the Trial of Francis 
Daniell Ixxii, 146; Letter of Certificate and 
Passport Ixxii, 152-3; Order from the 
Warden of the Cinque Ports against Plays 
Ixiii, 26-7; St Mary s Churchwardens 
Accounts xxxvii, Ixxiii, 94, 97, 1 1 1 

roads and highways 1 1 5 

royal visits to xxix, xlvi, l-li, Ixxii, Ixxxiii, 
121-3,268,278-9 

Serjeants, named 72, 121-2, 131, 279, 287 

taborers in xxxvii, 89 

trumpeters in xxxvii, 1 1 1 

waits (aka town musicians or minstrels) xliv, I, 
Ixxxiii -Ixxxiv, 50, 54, 57, 59, 61, 64, 74, 83, 
85_7, 97-8, 117-18, 120, 268, 272, 277; 
named I, Ixxii, 116?, 118?, 121-67,278-82, 
285, 287 

waits in xliv, 102, 1 13 

See also Cinque Ports 

sabbath observance 3, 28, 40, 181 

offences against 5-6, 10, 22-6, 28, 29, 36-42, 

167, 178, 180 

See also service and sermon, time of 
Sackville, family of xxvii, xxxiv, xxxvii, xlvii, I, 
Ixxix, Ixxxiv, 289 

- Edward, 7th earl of Dorset Ixxix, xcix 

- Sir Richard, 5th earl of Dorset xviii 

- Thomas, 1st Baron Buckhurst and 4th earl of 

Dorset xvii-xix, xxvi, xxxii-xxxiv, lii 
Saffron Walden, Essex xxxix 
sailors xxii, xxx, 35 
St Andrew, church of 
Chichester xxv, 19 



St Andrew (cont) 

Steyning xxxvii, 167-70 

West Tarring xxxvii, 172-7 
St Andrew and St Michael, church of, Lewes 
xxviii, xxxvii, xlviii-xlix, Ixiv-lxv, 25, 27, 
30-4,42, 167, 264 
St Andrew of the Castle, church of, Hastings 

xxvi 

St Anne, feast of 52 
St Antony, feast of 85 

St Bartholomew, church of, Chichester xxv 
St Bartholomew, feast of xxviii, 55, 60, 201, 

267 

St Clement, church of, Hastings xxvi 
St Edward the Confessor, feast of 48, 56 
St Faith, feast of xxiv 
St George, feast of xxiv, Ixxix, 1 8 
St George s Guild xxiv, xxxix, Ix 

accounts xxxix, Ix, 14 18 
St Giles, church of, Winchelsea xxxi 
St Gregory, feast of 270 
St James 289 
St James, feast of xxiv, 38 
St John sub Castro, church of, Lewes xxviii 
St John the Evangelist, feast of 84 
St Judoc 288 

St Lawrence the Martyr, feast of xxiv, 61 
St Leonard, church of 

Hastings xxvi 

Winchelsea xxxi 
St Leonard s Forest xxxiii 
St Margaret, feast of 62, 270 
St Mark the Evangelist, feast of 5 1 
St Martin, church of 

Chichester xxv 

Lewes xxviii, Ixv 
St Martin, feasts of 182-4 
St Martin s Lane, Chichester xxv 
St Mary, church of 

Horsham 28 

Rye xxx, xlv-xlvi, xlviii, 49-50, 52-3, 55, 
57-61, 63; accounts xxxvii, Ixxiii, 94, 97, 
111; dedication days xlix, 72-3, 268, 271; 
holidays 55, 77, 268; mass days 80-1, 98, 
103, 272 



INDEX 



395 



St Mary in Foro (St Mary in the Market), 
church of 

Chichester xxv, 26 1 

Lewes xxviii, Ixv 

St Mary Magdalene, church of, Hastings xxvi 
St Mary Magdalene, feast of 77 
St Mary of the Castle, collegiate church of, 

Hastings xxvi, xcii 
St Mary the Virgin xlviii 

St Mary the Virgin, annunciation to see Lady Day 
St Mary the Virgin, assumption of 53, 271 
St Mary the Virgin, church of, Warbleton 170 
St Mary the Virgin, nativity of 50, 56, 271 
St Mary the Virgin, purification of see Candlemas 
St Mary Westout, church of, Lewes xxviii 
St Matthew, Friday Street, church of, London 

Ixiii 

St Matthias, feast of 26, 263 
St Michael, church of 

Hastings xxvi 

Lewes see St Andrew and St Michael 
St Michael, feast of see Michaelmas 
St Nicholas, church of, Lewes xxviii 
St Nicholas, clerks of 184 
St Nicholas, feast of xlviii, 30-3 
St Olave, church of, Chichester xxv 
St Pancras, church of, Chichester xxv, 1 9 
St Pancras Priory, Lewes xxi, xxvii, xxxvi, xciii 
St Peter, feast of 66 
St Peter in the Market, church of, Chichester 

xxv 
St Peter the Great, church of, Chichester xxv, 

20 
St Peter the Less, church of 

Chichester xxv 

Lewes xxviii 

St Peter Westout, church of, Lewes xxviii 
St Richard de Wyche xviii, xxiv, li, Iv, 3 

feast xix 

saints xiv, xviii, xxiv, li, Iv, 3, 2889 
St Thomas, church of, Winchelsea xxxi 
St Thomas of Canterbury, feast of 74 
St Thomas of Canterbury, translation of 92 
St Wilfrid xiv, xviii 
Salcott (Salcot), Essex 75 



Salehurst xii, xxix, xlvii, li, 263 

records: Archdeaconry of Lewes Detection 

Booklxii, 167 
Salisbury, countess see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 

SalleduRoi (ship) 219 
salt xxix 

Salutation Day 271 
Sandbeck Park, Yorks Ixxxiv 
Sanders, Mr, virginal master I, 198-201, 290 

- Oliver 153 

- William, royal musician 290 

Sandoies see Patrons and Travelling Companies 

under CKandos and Sandys 
sandstone xi 
Sandwich, Kent xxii, xl, xliv, 263 

See also Cinque Ports 
Sandys, William, 3rd Lord Sandys (Sandoies) see 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Savaric de Bohun xlvii 
Saxons xiv, xviii, xxi, xxvi 
Saye and Sele, barons of see under Fiennes and 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Sayers, Bartholomew 29 
Scory, John, bishop of Chichester xx 
Scotney Castle xlvii 
Scott, Reginald see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
sea xi, xiv, xxvi, xxviii, xxxvii, 191, 193, 219-20, 

263 
seafood xxix, lii 

See also fish 

Seaford xii, xiv-xv, xviii, xxii, 263 
seals 27, 29, 153, 171 
sedition li, 20, 277 
Sedlescombe 290 

See also Everenden of Sedlescombe 
Seedes, Thomas, minstrel 25 
Selden, John (1), minstrel 177, 287 

- John (2), son of John (1)287 
Thomas 19,22,262 

selected shot see musters 

Selsey xviii, xxiv 

Sendall, Richard 10,260 

seneschals see stewards and seneschals 



396 



INDEX 



Serjeants 72, 108-9, 121-2, 131, 216,263,279, 

287 

sermons see service and sermon, time of 
servants xl, 15, 24, 26, 33, 38, 47, 86, 91-3, 96, 

112, 153, 183, 185 
See also players 
service and sermon, time of 4-6, 9-11, 20-3, 

25, 29-30, 36-40, 171, 180-1, 216-17, 

263, 266 

catechism 26, 180-1 
choir service 21 
communion 24, 180 
mass xxx 

morning prayer 4, 22-3, 181 
See also evening prayer 
Setyngborne see Sittingbourne 
Seymour, Edward, 5th duke of Somerset see 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Seymour of Sudeley, barons of xviii 
Shakespeare, William xli 
Shamler, John, musician li, Ixi, 14 
Sharnden (Shemden) 170 
Sharpe, John 69, 270 
Shawc (Shaw), Angel, wait 1, Ixxii, 121-46, 181, 

279-82, 287 
sheep xi, xv, 22 
sheets 42 
Shelley of Michelgrove, Clapham, family of xix, 

xxxiv, xlvii, Ixxxi-lxxxii 

- William Ixxxii, 208; inventory Ixxxi Ixxxii, 208 
shells 190,289 
Shepway, court of xxni 
Sherborne, Robert, bishop of Chichester xx 
sheriffs xii, xvi-xvii, xxii, xxxiii, Ixxxi-lxxxii, 194 
Shernden see Sharnden 
shields lii-liii, 191-2, 194, 212-13, 289 
Shipley 30, 263 
ships and shipping xii, xiv-xv, xxii-xxiv, xxvi, 

xxix, xliv, lii, 35, 84, 116, 219-20, 263 
Shirley, Thomas li 
shoemakers 29 
shove-groat 4 

shows see plays and playing 
Shrewsbury, earls of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 



Shrewsbury, Shrops 261 
shrines xix, xxiv, li, 289 
Shropshire, county of 261 
Shrove Monday 35 
Shrove Sunday 26, 83, 287 
Shurley, John xxvii 

Shurley of Isfield Place, family of xlvii 
sickness xi, xv, lii, 24, 38-9, 41 
sidesmen 6, 24, 171, 178 
Sidney, family of xxii, Ixxvii 
silk 121 

silver 170, 190, 199 

singing xxxvii, Ixxxiii, Ixxxv, xcv, 1 15, 173, 177, 
179,211,220,285 

masters 1, 198-201, 204 
Singleton xli 

Sittingbourne (Setyngborne, Sytingburne, 
Syttingbourne), Kent 

players from 89, 92-3 
Skinner (Skiner, Skynner), Anthony 18 

- Edward?, drummer 150 

- John, drummer 1, 146-66, 285 
Skott, Mr 123 

slander 1 1, 18, 177, 179 

Slaugham Place see Covert of Slaugham Place 

Slindon see Kempe of Slindon 

smuggling xi 

Smyth, Ralph 37, 266 

soldiers 34, 36, 122, 219, 278 

Somerset, dukes of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Somerset, Edward, 9th earl of Worcester see 

Patrons and Travelling Companies 
- William, 8th earl of Worcester see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
songs Ixxviii, 177, 179, 189, 194-7, 211, 289 

books 199 
sorcery 214 
Southampton, earls of xviii, xlvii 

See also Fitzwilliam 
Southampton, Hants xiii, xxix 
Southcott, Edward 20 
South Downs xi, xiii-xv, xix 
South Mailing (Mallyng, Mallynge) 

players from? xliv, 68, 73, 185 



INDEX 



397 



Southovcr xxvii, lii 

South Street, Chichestcr xxv 

Spain xxix, 219-20, 269, 272, 289 

minstrels from xxxvii, 73 
Sparrowe alias Rowe, John 28-9 
spears 2 12, 214 

speeches Ixxviii, 121, 188-94, 196, 289 
Spencer, Catharine, wife of Henry Algernon 
Percy, 9th earl of Northumberland see 
Patrons and Travelling Companies under 
Northumberland 
Spenner see Spynner 
spices xxvii 
sports 

cockfighting 288 

duels 4 

hawking 4 

jousting 20 1,290 

kayles (bowling) 37, 266 

shove-groat 4 

tournaments 4, 201, 290 

wrestling 4 

See also entertainers and entertainments; 
gambling and game-playing; hunting; 
plays and playing 
Spread Eagle Inn, Chichester xxv 
springs 75 

Spynner (Spenner) Noah 170-1 
Stafford, Edward, 3rd duke of Buckingham see 
Patrons and Travelling Companies 

- Edward, 12th Baron Stafford iff Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Henry, 1 1th earl of Wiltshire W Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Humphrey, 1st duke of Buckingham xlii; see 

also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Staffordshire, county of xlix 
staffs xlviii, 18 
stage plays 4, 27, 91 

See also plays and playing 
stages xlvi, xlviii, Ixxxiii, Ixxxv, 94 
stairs 179-80 
stammel 133 
Staneinge see Stayneinge 
Stane Street xii xiii 



Stanley, Edward, 12th earl of Derby see Patrons 
and Travelling Companies 

- Ferdinando, Lord Strange see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Thomas, 10th earl of Derby see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Stanley, Lord see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Derby 
Stansted, Kent 1m 
Stansted Park see Lumley 
Staple, Stephen 9 
Star Chamber Court Ixxxv, 12-13, 260 

bills of complaint lix, 11-13 

clerks 12,261 
statutes Iv, 3 

Stayneinge (Staneinge), Richard 10-11 
steeples xlv, 179-80 
Steer, F.W. Ixxx, 202 
Stent, George 19, 24, 43 

- John 22 

Stephen (Stephyn), Laurence xlvi, 73, 87, 271 
stewards and seneschals xvii, xxii, xxxii, Ixxv, 183, 

185-6, 197,288 
See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 

Lord Steward 

Steyning (Stenyng) xii, xviii, xlv, Ixxiii 
ales xx, xlix, Ixxxiv, 167-70 
churchwardens 167-70; accounts xlix 
records: St Andrew s Churchwardens Accounts 

xxxvii, Ixxiii, 167-70 
Steyninge, John 43 

- Thomas (1)43 

- Thomas (2) 43 
Stiler, Clement 179-80 
stocks 12, 260 

stones Ixiv 

chalk xi 

clay xi, xiii 

sandstone xi 
Stott, Thomas 75 
Strand, Rye xlvi, 77, 93, 272 
Strange, Lord see Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Strangways, Sir Giles Ixxix 

- Susanna (Edwards), wife of Sir Giles Ixxix, 

198-201 



398 



INDEX 



Strcatcr, William 260 

streets xlv-xlvi, Ixxxiv, 11, 260 

named xii-xiii, xxv, xlvi, Ixiii, 274 
Stretton, John 39 
Stringer, Richard 43 

strings (instrument) 199-200, 202-3, 291 
Strong, John, wait? 1 18, 278 
- Mother 120,278 

Stronge, Thomas, wait 1, 124-9, 278-9 
Stuart, Elizabeth see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies under Princess 
subpoena, processes of 13 
Suffolk, dukes and duchesses xl 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies 
Suffolk, earls of 270 
Suffolk, county of xxxix, 217, 261 
suicides xli 

summer kings and lords xlviii-xlix, 272 
summer poles 29 

See also maypoles 

summoners 9, 20-2, 26, 28, 39, 42, 178-9 
suppers 5, 7-8, 35, 50, 60, 76, 86, 192-3, 

216-17,272 

See also dinners; feasts and banquets 
Surrey, county of xi, xvi, xxxii-xxxiii, lii, Ixxviii, 

Ixxxi, 188,290 
Sussex, earls of see Patrons and Travelling 

Companies 
Sussex, county of 

administrative divisions xii: hundreds xii, xvii, 

181; manors xxvii-xxviii, 261, 278; rapes 

xii-xiii, xvii, xxii, xxvii, 29, 170 
agriculture xi 
boroughs and parishes: Aldingbourne 43, 266; 

Ashurst li, Iviii, 9; Barnham 181; Barnhorn 

184, 288; Bersted 38; Bexhill Iviii, 9-10; 

Bignor xiii; Birdham lix, 1 1; Boxgrove 181; 

Brighton xi-xiii, xlv, 9; Broomhill xxxi; 

Bulverhythe 263; Chidham 38; Crawley xi; 

Crowhurst 171; Cuckfield xlv; East Grinstead 

xii, xviii, xlv; East Hoathly Ixxxi; East 

Lavington 22-3, 26, 262; East Wittering 18, 

262; Eridge xlii, li; Etchingham 187; 

Felpham xlvii, Ixii, 24; Fishbourne xiv; 

Folkington Ixii, 25, 263; Graffham xxxiv, Ixii, 



Sussex (cant) 

26; Guestling xxiii; Hailsham xlv, xlvii, 170; 
Hardham li; Heathfield Ixiii, 27-8; Hellingly 
Ixiii-lxiv, 28, 263; Hydneye 263; Icklesham 
xxxi; Itchingfield Ixiv, 29-30, 263; Kingston 
Bowcy 271; Little Heigham 263; Mayfield 
103; Meeching xii; Moots 123; Northeye 
263; Old Winchelsea xxxi; Oving Ixv-lxvi, 
36-8; Pagham Ixvi, 39, 266; Parham liii; 
Peasmarsh xliv, 95-6; Pett xlvii, Ixvi, 40; 
Robertsbridge 96; Rotherfield Ixvii, 42; 
Sedlescombe 290; Selsey xviii, xxiv; Sharnden 
170; Shipley 30, 263; Singleton xli; 
Southover xxvii, lii; Tangmere 271; Tarring 
Neville xliv, 81; Ticehurst Ixxxi; Trotton 271; 
Udiam xii, xxix; Wadhurst xi, 200; Waldron 
27; West Thorney xlviii, Ixxv, 179-80; 
Wisborough Green 10; Withy bam xxxiii, 
Ixxxiv; Worthing Ixxxii; see also Arundel; 
Battle; Billingshurst; Bolney; Bosham; 
Bramber; Chichester; Cocking; Eastergate; 
Funtington; Hastings; Herstmonceux; 
Horsham; Lewes; Midhurst; Newhaven; 
New Shoreham; Petworth; Pevensey; 
Rudgwick; Rye; Salehurst; Seaford; South 
Mailing; Steyning-, Warbleton; Westbourne; 
West Tarring; Winchelsea; Yapton 

coasts and boundaries xi-xv, xx, xxiii, liv 

commerce and industry xi, xiii-xv, xxv 

courts xii-xiii, xvi-xvii, 15, 181 

fishing and fish trade XL, xiii, xxii-xxiii, xxvi, 
xxviii xxix, xxxi, xxxvi, 21518 

foreign raids or invasions xi, xiv-xv, xxvi, xxxi, 
211-14 

geography xi xv 

gentry xvi-xx, xxii, xxiv, xxx-xxxvi, xJi, Ixxix, 
Ixxxi 

households: Bowyer of Cuckfield xx, xxxiv; 
Chesworth xlvii; Covert of Slaugham Place 
xvi, xx, xxxiv; Dawtrey of More House xxxiv; 
Everenden of Sedlescombe Ixxix-lxxx, 201, 
290; Garton of Woolavington xvi; Godfrey 
of Winchelsea Ixxx, 202; Halnaker House 
xxxiii, xlvii; Jefferay of Chiddingly xxxiv; 
Kempe of Slindon xix; Leedes of Wapping 



INDEX 



399 



Sussex (cont) 

Thorne xxxiv; Lewkenor of Bolebrook House 
xxv, xlvii; Morley of Glyndc xxxiv; Offington 
xlvii; Roberts of Boarzell xxxvii, xl, Ixxxi, 
205-8; Shurley of Isfield Place xlvii; Thatcher 
of Westham xix; see also Browne of Cowdray 
and Battle; Caryll of West Harting; 
Edwards of Fayre Crooch; Gage of Firle 
Place; Goring of Button; Lumley, Pelham 
of Halland Place and Laughton; Shelley 
of Michelgrove 

maps xiii, Ixvii, civ-cix 

market towns xii-xiii, xxiv, xxvii, xxx, xxvi, 
Ixxiii 

officials: coroners xvi, Ixxxv, 29, 170-1; 
escheators xvi; justices xiii, xvii, xx, xxxiv, 
Ixxxi-lxxxii, 146, 271; lord lieutenants 
xvi-xvii, xix, xxxii-xxxiii; members of parlia 
ment xviii, xx, xxiii, Ixxxi-lxxxii, 289; sheriffs 
xii, xvi-xvii, xxii, xxxiii, Ixxxi-lxxxii, 194; see 
also barons and wardens under Cinque Ports 

pastures and enclosures xv, 171, 288 

places in: Amberley Castle xlvii; Arundel 
Castle lii, Ixxxiv, xcix; Ashdown Forest xi, 
xvii, liii; Bodiam Castle xlvii; Camber Castle 
xxxi; coastal plain xi, xiv; Fishbourne Palace 
xiv; Hastings Castle xxvi, xcii; Herstmonceux 
Castle xlvii-xlviii, 288; Lewes Castle xxvii; 
Pevensey Castle xvii; Pevensey Levels xi, 
263; St Leonard s Forest xxxiii; Scotney 
Castle xlvii; South Downs xi, xiii-xv, xix; 
see also Weald 

population figures xv, xxiv-xxxi, xliv 

ports and harbours xi-xv, xvii xviii, xxii-xxiv, 
xxvi, xxix, xxxi, xxxvi, xliv, xciii, 272 

religious history xviii-xxii 

religious houses xxi-xxii; 182-6, 288; 
Easebourne Priory 190, 289; see also Battle 
Abbey; Lewes (St Pancras) Priory; 
Robertsbridge Abbey 

rivers xii, xiv, xxvi, xxix, xxxi, xliv, xlvii 

roads and highways xii xiv, xvii, xxii, xxix, xliv, 

I, Ixxiii, 1 1 5; named xii-xiii 
Sutton (Suttone), John 46, 50, 274 
- Nicholas, son of John xlvi, 77, 82, 85-6, 273-4 



Swan Inn, Chichester xxv, 18 

Swann Mistress, wife of Henry 80 

- Henry 56, 80 
Swayne, John 20, 39, 178 

- Lawrence 170 
swearing fee oaths 
swords 194 

dancing xxxviii, 272 

juggling 21 1-14, 272 

playing with xxxviii, xlvi, 77 
Swylboll, the minstrel 74 
Symmes (Symes), John 171 
Symons (Symonds), Mr 217 
Sytingburne, Syttingbourne see Sittingbourne 

tables 35, 192, 194 

communion 7-8 

playing at 4, 18 

tabors and laborers xxxvii, l-li, 9, 89, 106, 194 
Taillifer (Iron Edge), juggler 21 1-14 
tailors xxix, 192 

Talbot, George, 7th earl of Shrewsbury see Patrons 
and Travelling Companies under Lord Steward 

- John, 5th earl of Shrewsbury see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Tangmere 271 
tanners and tanning xv, xxx 
Tarring, exempt deanery of liv, 21, 39, 1779 
Tarring Neville (Tarryng) 

players from? xliv, 81 

Tarryng see Tarring Neville; West Tarring 
taverns see inns and alehouses 
taxation xvi-xvii, xxii, xxiv, xxix, 78, 265, 

270, 287 
teachers xxxvi, l-li, Ixxix, Ixxxiii, 20, 198-201, 

203-5 
Tenterden (Tentirden), Kent xxiii, 263 

players from xliv, 61, 65, 73, 80, 90, 93, 185 
textiles see cloth and fabric 
Thatcher of Westham, family of xix 
Thayer, Henry 43 

- Robert 43 
Thebes 188, 289 
theft xvii, 170-1, 260 
Theker, Christopher 9, 38 



400 



INDEX 



Theseus 289 
Thetford, Norfolk 261 
Thomas, ... 101 

- Mark 146, 152 

Thomas of Woodstock, 1st earl of Buckingham 
see Patrons and Travelling Companies 

Thome, John 24 

Thome, William 20 

Thornton, John 122 

Thorold (Thorawle, Thorolde, Thorowld, 
Thurrall), Thomas, minstrel 81, 92, 95, 97 

Thorpe, William 146 

thread xl, Ixxxiii, 207 

Three Kings Inn, Rye xlvi 

Throckmorton, Sir Francis Ixxix, 199 

- Mr 199 

Thurrall see Thorold 
Ticehurst Ixxxi 

Tichenor (Tichener), William 9 

Tilbury, Essex xxxii 

tile-making xv 

Till, Bartholomew 26 

Tillingharn River xxix 

timber see wood 

tinkers xl 

tipplers and tippling xvii, xxix, 12 

See also drink and drinking 
tobacco xxvii 
To key, Thomas 122 

The Tolhouse, Great Yarmouth, Norf 216 
Tolkin, Mr 34 
Tomkins, ... 28 
torches 168 

tournaments 4, 201, 290 
Town Hall (Court Hall), Rye xlv, xcvi, 120 
tragedies xxxiii 

Trashe, Henry, musician li, 41-2 
- Robert, cousin of Henry 4 1 
treason Ixxxii 
treasurers xxxiii, Ixxv, Ixxvii, 182, 289 

See also Patrons and Travelling Companies under 

Lord Treasurer 
treaties 272-3 
trees 

birches 123, 279 



trees (cont) 

firs? 175 

See also oaks; wood 
Treves, Hugh 25, 167 
trials 34 -6, 146 

See also courts 
Trinity Sunday 22-3, 172 
Triumph of Peace 290 
Trotton271 

trumpeters and trumpeting xxxvii, xxxix, xli, 
Ixxxv, 16,27,66, 111, 133, 136, 140,203 

named 34-6 

See also clarioners 
trumpets 34-5, 66, 93, 220 

See also horns 
truncheons 213 
trunks 42 
Tudor, Arthur, prince of Wales see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 

- Jasper, 3rd duke of Bedford see Patrons and 
Travelling Companies 

- Mary, duchess of Suffolk see Patrons and 

Travelling Companies 
Tunbridge Wells, Kent xi 
Turner, William 88 
Twelfth Night see Epiphany 

Udiam xii, xxi