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Full text of "St Andrew's College Review, Mid summer 1921"





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11 



1921 





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THE MEN'S SHOP IN THE NEW STORE 

OVERCOATS and RAINCOATS 

For the College Boy 

London Tailored Overcoats by such famous makers as "Kenneth Durward" 
— "Studd and Millingtcn" — "The Aquascutum" — "The Zembrene" — all 
weights for all seasons — priced from $45 to $75. 

Reliable Raincoats— English Makes $18.50 to $65. 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, Umbrellas, Canes and Travelling Goods. 

FAIRWEATHERS LIMITED 

MONTREAL 88-90 YONGE ST., TORONTO VVLNNIPEG 



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Ryrie Bros. Limited 


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DIAMOND MERCHANTS 






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AND SILVERSMITHS 




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Special attention given to Class Pins and 




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College Insignia 




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SEND FOR OUR BOOKLET : 

" CLUB AND CLASS PINS." 




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134-136-138 Yonge Street 




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TORONTO 






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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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IMPERIAL BANK of CANADA 

Capital Paid up - $7,000,000 
Reserve Fund - 7,500,000 
Total Assets over 130,000,000 



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EVERY BANKING SERVICE IS OFFERED TO STUDENTS 



Nearest Branch to St. Andrew's College is 
South-East corner of Yonge and Bloor Sts. 



H. Morgan, Manager. 



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We arc located in the 

North-West 

Residential Section 

of the City 



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Phone College q^^ 



We have special facilities 
for handling the Laundry 
work of Residential Col- 
leges. Our extensive ex- 
perience and success speak 
for themselves. 



Puritan Laundry Co. 

LIMITED 
BRUNSWICK AVENUE 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 






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*' BUILD STRONG " 



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Strength may be Moral, Mental 
or Muscular—^ 

All are qualities of men of might. Nature's own 
food builds strong bodies. 



For *' Milk of Quality " phone us 



College 2040 




Company, Limited 



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RATHBONE 



and Co. 



92 Yonge Street 

Importers of 

Exclusive Men's Wear 

FLANNEL and DUCK 

TROUSERS 

SPORT SHIRTS 

and 

BATHING SUITS 

Phone Main 2928 



Class Pins 

The making of Class Pins is big 
business li'ith us. Hundreds of 
different designs to choose from. 
Come in and see them. 



TROPHIES 
PRIZE CUPS 
MEDALS 



SHIELDS 
PENNANTS 

SWEATER CRESTS 



// yoti require anything in the 
above, we are sure ta please you 
and our prices are tight. 

We welcome suggestions arid will 
follow your ideas in special designs, 
if you desii e. 

THE TORONTO 

TROPHY-GRAFT 

COMPANY 

1711 ROYAL BANK BUILDING 

TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Make Every Journey a Pleasure by Riding a 

"PLANET BICYCLE" 



The exercise of bicycling is just 
the thing. 

There is nothino^ that will build 
up the muscles and make the 
mind so active and healthful as 
a bicycle ride before and after 
school. 

A first class line of bicycle 
supplies always on hand. 




THE PLANET BICYCLE CO. 



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69-71 QUEEN STREET E 



TORONTO 



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BACON 
LARD 



TTie Whyte 

Packing Co. 

Limitea 

66 Front St. East, Toronto 

BUTTER 
EGGS 

— arg ^.g -atr — 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



When You Want the Real Thin^ 
in Athletic Equipment Look for 
this Trade Mark 




It Stands for the Best and Guarantees Satisfaction and Seivice 



Baseball, Tennis, Cricket and Golf Supplies, Sweaters, Jerseys, etc. 

CATALOGLE MAILED ON REQUEST 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

207 Yonge Street Toronto 



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Solicits the orders of Student Societies for 



— PRINTING — 

Invitations, Tickets, 

Programmes, At-Home 

Cards, etc. 



BINDING — 



IN ALL 

ITS 

BRANCHES 



R. J. HAMILTON, B.A. 



Manager 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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The University of Toronto 

(THE PROVINCIAL UNIVERSITY OF ONTARIO) 

With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and its special departments, offers 
courses or grants degrees in 

Arts— Leatling to the degrees of - - B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 

Commerce -------- Bachelor of Commerce. 

Applied Science and Engineering— B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc, C.E., M.E., 

E.E.Chem.E. 

Medicine- - - - M.B. B.Sc (Med.) and M.D. 

Education— -------- B.Paed. and D Paed. 

Forestry— --------- B.Sc.F. and b .'h. 

Music— - - - ^I"s. Bac. and Mus. Doc. 

Household Science and Social Service. ^ x r r^ ^u n 

Lg^^_ LL.B.,LL.M. and LL.D. (Hon.) 

Dentistry— oPx^' 

Agriculture— B.S A. 

Veterinary Science— B.V.S. and JJ.v.s. 



Pharmacy- 



Phm.B. 



Tsachers' Classes, Correspondence Work, ana Summer 
sessions are arranged for the special benefit of teachers in service. Evening tutorml 
Tafsl and sZdvgloUs dor those in Toronto u'ho uish to lake advantage of them), sntgle 
lerttcresa\ycZrs% 01 lectures, (for outside cities and towns) are also arranged, so far as 
pSe (pZhiform^^^^^ regarding these write the Dnector, University Extension). 

For general information and copies of calendars, write the Registrar, University of 
Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges of Faculties. 



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The Best Heads at St. Andrew's 
College are wearing 

JESS APPLEGATH 

HATS 



SOLE AGENT FOR 

Famous Ross Silk Lined 
Soft Hat or Derby 



KS 



Battersby Hats 

COMPLETE RANGE OF 

John B. Stetson's 

AND 

Borsalino Hats 

85 Yonge Street 

Near King Street 

MONTREAL STORE 

473 ST. CATHERINE ST. W. 



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WEBB'S y 

Great New Bakery 

DAVENPORT ROAD 

Foot of M' aimer Rd, Hill 

Finest in Canada 

ELECTRIC DELIVERY 



No Stable No Horses 
No Odors 



, The Harry Webb Co., Ltd. 



TELEPHONE C(\(\f\ 
HILLCREST dUUVI 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




HEADQUARTERS 



For Young Mens' Sty/es 




TUDENTS and other 

young men who are 

looking for the best 

clothes values should 

visit 

PASCOE'S UPSTAIRS 

CLOTHES SHOP 
2nd Floor Kent 
Bld'g where the 

correct new mod- 
els are always 
shown first — and 
where prices are 
FREE FROM HIGH 
RENTS and UNNEC- 
ESSARY SELLING 
EXPENSES. 

Newest Suits 
and Topcoats 

At Our Upstairs Prices 

^ 8 to H5 

Salisfaction always willingly guar- 
anteed or money cheerfully refunded. 



scoES 

CLOTHES SHOP ^^ 

Second Floor Kent Building " 
Corner YONGEand RICHMOND STREETS 



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tKfje ^t ^nbrelu'si College 

Review 




illtb=£Summer, 1021 



jEMtorial Boar5 



MR. A. 
R. H. ANDERSON 
J. H. SUPPLE 
D. H. FINDLAY 
A. G. FINDLEY 



R. RAMSEY 

F. R. DAYMENT 
J. V. RUSSELL 
W. A. BEER 
F. O. SISSONS 



K. B. CARSON 



Business /iDanaoers 



E. G. SMITH 

F. R. GRAYSON 



R. S. EARLE 
J. A. CAMERON 



Issued by the Editorial Board 
EVERY CHRISTMAS, EASTER AND MIDSUMMER 



iWibSummer, 1921 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Frontispiece: The Review Staff 

Editorials 11 

Museum Madness 14 

When We Were Held Up 16 

Poetry 18 

On Being Unimportant 19 

The School 21 

Cricket 43 

Our Old Boys 61 

Exchanges 69 

Skits 71 

Lower School Skits 85 



St. x4ndrew's College Review 

nDib=*6ummer, 1921 

EDITORIALS 

We are gently reminded by all our elders that there is no doubt about 
school boyhood being the "golden" time of life. Such being true we 
unhesitatingly assert that each summer term is the finest time of the 
boarding year. "Then if ever come perfect days," and then, also, come 
those tranquil twilight hours. 

Outside birds warble in their leafy haunts; bees drone from flower 
to flower; a summer perfume fills the air; and above in the cloudless sky 
Old Sol pours forth his genial warmth. With windows open, the class- 
room displays martyrs of industry. The master has laid aside his gown 
for a moment, and towsled heads are craned over books in brave attempts 
at concentration; for examinations are approaching with the speed of 
fiends. In mid-afternoon this pent-up energy bursts forth, and at the 
sound of the three o'clock bell the campus is over-run. Then white 
ducked figures dot the sward. The masters indulge in some strenuous 
tennis, and the boys bowl on the crease. Many a carefully planned 
break is followed by the "whang" of the cricket bat, and the shout goes 
up — "boundary!" 

But after supper when the "light is beginning to lower" comes the 
peaceful lull which seems to have been made for a breathing space; 
but soon the noisy bell again calls us to study, and our books give us one 
last period of work for the day. 

Any Saturday afternoon when a game is scheduled on the College 
campus, one may see crowds watching the contending teams. The side- 
lines present many a bizarre color scheme, while under a tree sits the 
score keeper, — the man of many secrets. From the side terrace the 
Headmaster dressed in the white of summer, watches the game with 
interest. Over yonder the tuck-shop is doing a large business selling ice 
cream and ginger-ale. Win or lose, our team is in it for the spirit of 
the game, and the school is heartily behind it to the last boy. 

And so in another twenty years, and for some of us less than that, 
we shall be enjoying again in memory the happiness of boyhood. These 

11 



12 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

many experiences of school life, its pleasures, and its petty perplexities 
will return to us, and we too shall believe that such felicity is permitted 
only to youth. 

F. Roper Daymext. 



It is at this season of the year that the Review always "hands out 
bouquets." During the past school-year the members of the Editorial 
Board have all worked faithfully. Those who have not had experience 
in editing a school paper can scarcely realize the amount of work in- 
volved in publishing, three times a year, such a magazine as the Review. 
If it were not for the enthusiasm and hard work of a very small group of 
boys the school paper would not exist. 

This is the last number of the Review to be published by the present 
Editorial Board, so now for the aforementioned "bouquets"! Dayment 
has been a regular contributor to the college paper for the past four years ; 
his work is always carefully done and he possesses a style more mature 
than is usually found in the writings of a school boy. "Skit" Carson, 
or more correctly K. Brait Carson, has developed a Skit Department 
which we consider more humorous than that of any other school paper. 
Carson has also contributed a number of splendid articles and stories 
all written in his own inimitable style. Anderson is probably the most 
enthusiastic Review "fan" in the school. He has reported most of the 
sporting events in our last two issues and is also responsible for most of 
the cartoons and illustrated headings which have helped to brighten our 
magazine. Russell has worked hard collecting photographs for repro- 
duction and has also written a number of articles concerning events of 
school life. He is our musical and dramatic critic. Supple has done a 
lot of useful writing and Beer, Findlay I and Findley II have always 
handled most satisfactorily any work assigned to them. Sissons I 
has conducted a good Exchange Department and our business managers 
Smith I, Cameron I, Earle I and Grayson have successfully solicited 
a fine lot of very desirable advertising. 



Near the close of the Easter term, and several days after the last 
number of the Review had gone to press, we were all deeply grieved to 
learn of the death of one of our companions, Harry Gordon Stubbs. 

He was born in Toronto on August 30th. 1906 and came to St. 
Andrew's College from Grace Street Public School in January 1919, 
entering the First Form in the Lower School. In June 1919 he obtained 
his removal to Form II, standing ninth in the Honour List. In June 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW- 



IS 



1920 he was promoted to Form III B. On Feb. 22nd he was taken ill 
with what proved to be an attack of influenza, which developed into 
pneumonia. While the pneumonia cleared up it proved to be too great 
a strain for a heart already w^eakened by an attack of rheumatism, and 
he passed away on Sunday, March 6th, 1921. 

Gordon Stubbs will be much missed by his class mates, by whom he 
was deservedly well liked. He was a conscientious boy in all he did. 
Although somewhat reserved in character, his steady attention to work 
and his readiness to enter into all the boyish activities of school life made 
him thoroughly popular with the boys of his age in school, by whom he 
will be much missed. On their behalf, as well as in the name of the school 
as a whole, the Review tenders most sincere sympathy to his parents and 
his famiK' in their time of sorro v. 





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PREFECTS 1920-21 




We went to the Museum on Sunday and we desire to tell^of our 
experiences there, in fact, we insist upon relating them. Well, we turned 
off Bloor St. and went up a path past a sign reading, "Free on Sundays," 
which was the reason of our visit, it being a cheaper pleasure than going 
to church. We entered the portals of a large Moorish edifice, and pass- 
ing a very business-like field-gun (a relic of the late war) we came into 
the Chinese laundryman's paradise and during the afternoon we looked 
upon so much oriental grandeur that our eyes began to slant. 

These impressions should rightfully be divided into two parts; the 
objects on exhibition, and the people one sees viewing the objects. 
However, as they were all curios no great harm is done in taking them 
together. There was a large preponderance of people with Jewish 
features, but China was well represented in the oriental section. We 
were much disappointed that no Eskimoes were on hand to view the 
Eskimo exhibit. 

We saw Ptolemy's Mack Sennet comedies and a pair of mummies as 
tightly wrapped as a roll of magazines. We did not like the mummies, 
although two undertakers near us enjoyed that exhibit immensely. 
We were more interested in the exhibition of ivory dice dating from the 
year one. It seems that Adam "rolled the bones" to see whether he 
would eat the apple or not; unfortunately, he rolled an eleven thus 
changing the whole course of human existence. 

The glass cases lent themselves very well to use as mirrors and we 
discovered that in direct comparison with a statue of Apollo we possessed 
more beauty than we were ever aware of. W^e discovered by applying 
our hats to the marble brow of a bust of Cicero that the worthy orator took 
a seven and a quarter Stetson. Little things like that are nice to know. 

The movie magnates overlook a great comedy when they pass by 

14 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



15 



a museum. A maniac with a hodful of bricks could give a very 
amazing exhibition in the course of a few moments, breaking glass cases 
and smashing statuary images. We were much disappointed that that 
building contained no statute of Charley Chaplin but the discovery of 
Buddha sitting on a lotus flower made the disappointment less keen. 

In telling of our experiences, we lay great stress upon the enjoyment 
we derived from viewing the pottery-ware; we do not mention the pretty 
girl on the other side of the glass case. We discovered that the ancient 
Greeks used fire extinguishers. We saw one in the corner of the Hellenic 
section. How surprised we were to find what an immense variety of 
weapons there were with which to kill people! Everything from Vene- 
tian daggers to bass viols. As we looked at the aged garments in the cases 
we wondered if the very suits we wore would some day be laid out to 
view before the curious eyes of some future generation of supermen 
who would contemplate with interest the tag on the inside of the coat 
collar, "Abe. Levi, Simcoe St." Or would our very bodies wrapped in 
straw mats repose a thousand years hence in glass cases? And there were 
the bones of some prehistoric beasts, half birds; we thought that the poul- 
try business must ha\'e been a rather hazardous occupation for the 
ancestors of the stone-age men. We nearly had a fight with a very 
homely plumber, we thought he was a Dinosaur. He was going to lay 
us cold with a section of Roman lead-pipe. 

Indeed, we saw a lot of things, George Washington's sport shirt 
and Hannibal's tooth-brush for ajl we know. We knew that we would 
dream that night. We dreamed that Queen Elizabeth (first floor) was 
flying in the airplane in the basement. At last our heads reeling with 
thoughts of wild Indians, Chinamen, Eskimoes, and Mummies we 
staggered into the exhilarating atmosphere of Bloor St. and mistook an 
Overland for a Chinese palaquin. — We are still mad! 

K. B. Carsox. 




WHEN WE WERE HELD UP 

Past the curve on the Country Club road the first hght on the high- 
way gleamed dully. We lounged in the back of the car, tired after the 
strenuous, but pleasant afternoon spent in the tennis tournament. 
Half asleep and speaking only occasionally we watched the lights flash 
by like golden fire flies in the dark. Ted, my cousin, was driving and 
the tennis racquets were piled in the seat beside him; Fred and Geoff 
sat beside me in the back. Luck had not been with us in the afternoon 
and we pretended extra drowsiness to avoid explanations of poor plays. 

The road was almost deserted. An occasional car whirled past, secure 
in fast travelling at that late hour. Trees, weird and black against a 
star-lit sky, marched by, and a few summer houses loomed up startlingly 
and were gone. 

The road turned sharply and the headlights of the car threw into 
relief a scene that might have been taken from the latest movie thriller. 
In the grinding of the brakes, the sudden jerk of the car coming to a 
stand still, we were silent, dumb with amazement and fear. On the left 
of the road, its engine running softly, stood a powerful motor car and 
in front, a piece of fence, evidently removed from the top of the bank at 
our right, was laid across the road. A man stood behind the barricade 
masked and hatless, holding a black and business-like revolver pointed 
at the windshield. It would have been impossible to proceed without 
wrecking the car and perhaps ourselves, but before we had more than 
considered the rashness of such an act, two men almost identical in 
appearance with the first, stepped on the running board of the car on 
either side. 

"Now," said a gruff voice, "We'll just trouble you for your little 
trinkets before we say good-bye." 

There was a silence. I seemed to have swallowed my tongue and 
my heart had settled in my throat beating with loud thumps. Evidently 
the others were troubled in the same way for not until the owner of the 
gruff voice had shoved his revolver over the side of the car did we speak 
or stir, then, it seemed, we all moved at once. The action was a relief; 
my heart beat more normally and I remembered that I had only forty 
cents, two stamps, and an Ingersoll to present to the man. Almost 
cheerfully I turned out my pockets and handed him the contents. 
The others followed suit, and with anger and distrust growing in his face 
he snatched our offering and thrust his gun further into the car. We 
convinced him, finally, that this was all we had, and after a whispered 

16 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 17 

consukation the two men began to move the fence while the third still 
kept us covered with his gun. 

The car moved off softly and quickly gathered speed. As it dis- 
appeared around the curve we turned to one another with excuses 
tumbling from our lips: 

"If I could have reached a racquet," began Geoff. 

"I was just ready to grab his gun," Ted muttered. 

"I ," said Fred. 

"I'd have had him in another minute," I added. 

We looked at one another sheepishly, and laughed. I lied, and knew 
they lied, and they knew it too. 

We looked about us. On one side a dilapidated piece of fence 
straggled off the road, over the tops of some distant trees the moon 
glimmered palely, and fields stretched off into the far sky. Faintly we 
heard a motor horn, then silence except for the chirping of a thousand 
crickets and the mournful croak of a night bird. 

Ted started the engine. We leaned back lazily, our eyes fixed on the 
nearing highway, remembering with satisfaction the money we had left 
at home. 

Maclaren 1 1 . 




PLUGGING 



POETRY 

Being myself a poet, I realize what a great and profound subject I 
have chosen to'enlarge upon to-day for the benefit of the general public. 

To begin with, poetry must be treated seriously, nothing light or 
frivolous can ever enter the realms of Poetic Art where abide great 
genii such as Milton, Carson, Shakespeare, and last but by no means least, 
myself. If any of my readers would become great and talented artists 
as those whose names I have mentioned, I beg to give them a few hints. 

Firstly, let your poetry be deep, the deeper it is the greater you will 
become. For example, take my own effusions they are so deep that no- 
one ever gets beyond the first line in any of them. Allow me to enlarge 
upon this point, take for instance the first line of my immortal ode to 
Westminster Abbey. "Oh Westminster, tower of beauty." When 
we read these glowing words what do we see in our minds? Towers of 
all kinds rise up in our bewildered brains. But the possibilities presented 
by these words are far too numerous to expatiate upon; therefore I shall 
leave them with my beloved readers to ponder over as much as they wish 
and continue on the subject of Poetic License. This exceedingly useful 
aid to poets could certainly not be omitted in an article on poetry, and 
especially by such an illustrious writer as myself. Of course as to the 
meaning of this most useful aid I do not need to dwell for any length 
of time, sulificient to say that it merely allows poets the privilege of 
saying anything that they wish, as long as they do not abuse the English 
language more than is necessary while doing so. For instance, if I 
should wish to allow our most gracious sovereign Elizabeth to make a 
tour of her dominions in her new Rolls Royce it would be quite permis- 
sible, providing I did not print her language when she had a puncture. 

Secondly, your handwriting must be illegible or else the publishers 
would find flaws in your metre or your rhyme, for example look at Shakes- 
peare; his poetry did not rhyme so they invented a name for it, called it 
blank verse and made him the greatest known poet. Moral — Why 
worry about rhyme? And if your handwriting is illegible, dozens of 
people will write copious notes explaining what you mean, (when you 
are dead and can't stop them) as in the case of our dear friend, William 
Shakespeare. 

Thirdly, and lastly, pay great attention to that old proverb. "A 
prophet hath no honour in his own country." This applies to poets as 
well as to prophets. I discovered this through my own tragic experience, 
and my next batch of inspirations I will send to Zululand where I hope my 
true genius will be realized, as at present no-one appears to see my 
undoubted perfection in the World of Poetry. 

Tom Aspden. 
18 



ON BEING UNIMPORTANT OR EGOTISTICAL 
DISSERTATIONS BY A MODEST MAN 

I am unimportant because I don't cut any ice. Many other people 
I know can account for their condition quite as easily, but don't. I must 
confess that I am not rendering great services to the human race in my 
obscurity, such as any respectable "white-wing" gives to the public. 
I am a schoolboy. 

Tom Brown, who used to go to Rugby, was the only important 
schoolboy who ever lived ; he acquired fame, I believe, by teaching 
youngsters to say their prayers and by beating up bullies whenever he 
saw them. Opportunities such as these have never come my way, so 
I am still unimportant. 

I like to consider the thoughts my present teachers will have when 
I have become famous. How baffled they will be when they discover that 
a genius has been fostered under their tender care. When I shall alight 
from my Rolls-Royce before the front door, and, resplendent in morning- 
coat and gray trousers, make a speech about perseverance and hard work 
(which I never did myself), while all the little schoolboys with their pink 
cheeks wonder if the old guy will give them a half-holiday — Great 
dreams these! 

Already in my dreams I have attained great eminence as a financier, 
author, philanthropist, murderer and detective. These dreams are 
largely determined by the literature I read. I think Horatio Alger 
had a soul like mine- — a poor boy rising to high positions by helping 
millionaires. I frequently go along Bloor St. in the hope of helping 
millionaires and have narrowly escaped death from Packards and Fierce- 
Arrows while doing so. As a schoolboy I am unimportant because I 
am lazy. Here is the confession of every dead-beat in the country. 
My lack of importance will yet drive me to the perpetration of some great 
crime. My Heavens! My mind is made up. I will cheat the street- 
car conductor out of my fare. 

If I lived in the United States I would no doubt be made president. 
As a rule the people select an unimportant person for that post, but in 
the rosy glow of history be becomes a god. There, is the greatness of 
the United States, they exaggerate their unimportant wars, their un- 
important men and their mediocre literature, until in the eyes of the 
American people they all become important. 

A lunatic is an important person when let loose on some "Main 
Street," but put him in an institution with a lot of other lunatics and 

19 



20 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



he becomes of little note. Fame is largely a matter of environment and 
opportunity. Even now I could acquire some notoriety by walking 
around town in a bathing suit, but put me in with a lot of other people 
who would make a custom out of it, — I am nothing. 

In about fifteen years I will accept my humble lot by assuming that 
I am important. As I mop up the floors in the parliament buildings 
and trip up the premier with my mop, I can soliloquize on my greatness 
for bringing about the downfall of so great a personage. 

K. B. Carsox. 




LIBR.\RI.\NS 1920-21 



The School 



THE ASSAULT AT ARMS 

On March eighth, the annual Assault at Arms was held in the gym- 
nasium. For two weeks before the main bouts, the preliminaries were 
run off, and every class was keenly contested. In these, the best were 
the heavy-weights, Earle and Richardson, and two of the best bouts in 




LITERARY SOCIETY EXECUTIVE 1920-1921 

the lighter classes were Carrick III vs. Russel III and Craig vs. Robert- 
son. 

In these three bouts there was nothing but the cleanest of boxing, 
and Carrick III, though afterwards defeated in the semi-finals, bids fair 
to become in a few years, his brother's successor as school champion. 

Earle I showed the same good style as last year, notwithstanding 

21 



22 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

this Richardson put up a good fight and was not decisively beaten till 
the third round. "Giant" and Craig have become a fixture, and are 
always looked forward to with pleasure — they came up to our highest 
expectations, and "Giant" had to hustle to beat Craig. 

In the wrestling the outstanding event was Rivera vs. Drynan, and 
for science and speed these two boys are the best in the school. Rivera 
won in three minutes extra by his slightly superior strength and speed. 

The Finals were a long list of surprises — first came the startling afifair 
of Armstrong defeating Carrick II for the wrestling championship in a 
bout brim-full of excitement- — ^"Tonald" was fast but Armstrong was 
faster and he fully deserved his hard-earned victory. 

"Bobbie" Grant I had his hands full with Noonan, but after wrestling 
overtime he received the decision. As usual "Don" Patterson III won 
his bout. "Don" has won his weight, as far as history goes back, and it 
looks as if he intended to do so for a long time 3-et. "Giant" won his 
wrestling weight, although he seemed to be worried whether Tom Gordon 
would be present or not. 

In the boxing, one of the finest programmes for years was put on. 
As usual "Giant" headed the list, but he did not run away with the 
medal this year. As the "Sunday World" so ably expressed it, "he 
cried and fought, and cried and fought, so the referee gave him the 
decision." It seems to us, however, that the boy who beats "Giant" will 
have a harder time breaking the school tradition than winning the 
fight. 

Sprott vs. Parker was a fine bout, and Sprott won by his wonderful 
boxing ability. Meek and Fisher gave an exhibition of Jeff and Mutt. 
Meek won, and then came the event of the evening. Carrick and Earle 
for the school championship. The wise m.en (the prefects and a chosen 
few) were puzzled. Carrick was heavier and a better boxer, but Earle 
was supposed to have more endurance and a harder punch, also Carrick 
was tired after his bout with Armstrong, so conditions seemed to favour 
Earle. "Tonald" upset this theory, and in the third round gave an 
exhibition of speed, science and footwork that would make many a 
"pro" envious. Earle went groggy, and Carrick II was Stirret's suc- 
cessor as school champion. He fully deserved the victory, and the 
Review feels that we have a very able champion to represent the school 
for the next few years. 

More interest was shown in fencing this year than in former times 
and there were many entrants in the different classes. Robertson II 
won the Senior Championship, and Dyment won the Junior. 

On the whole the Assault at Arms was one of the best ever held, and 
Mr. Chapman is to be congratulated on the sporting spirit which was 
shown throughout by his pupils, and the science which they showed. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 23 

Summary of Events 
Boxing — 

55-lbs. Class— Robertson (III) defeated Grant (IV.). 

65-lbs. — Lumbers (II.) defeated Barber (II.) 

75-lbs.— Stewart (II.) defeated Cowie (II.) 

85-lbs. — Spratt (II.) defeated Parker. 

95-lbs.- — Stewart (I), defeated Colbrook. 
105-lbs. — Noonan defeated McLaren (I.) 
115-lbs.— Meek (I.) defeated Home. 
125-lbs. — Findlay (III.) defeated Murchison. 
135-lbs.— Meek (II.) defeated Fisher (I.) 
145-lbs.- — Stronach won class. 
158-lbs.- — Supple won class. 

Heavyweight class — Carrick (II.) defeated Earle. 
Wrestling — 

55-lbs. Class — Robertson (II.) defeated Grant (IV.) 

65-lbs. — Lumbers (II.) defeated Power. 

75-lbs.— McLennan (II.) defeated Stewart (II.) 

85-lbs. — Brown (I.) defeated Lang. 

95-lbs.— Bell defeated Colbrook. 
105-lbs. — Grant (I.) defeated Noonan. 
115-lbs.— Home (II.) defeated Munn (I.) 
125-lbs.- — ^Robertson (II.) defeated Rivera. 
135-lbs. — Patterson (III.) defeated Earle. 
145-lbs.— Marshall (III.) defeated Stronach. 
158-lbs. — Burry won by default. 
Heavyweight class — Armstrong defeated Carrick (II.) 

R. H. Anderson. 



MENDELSSOHN CHOIR CONCERT 

On the evening of April 12th, the school accompanied by Dr. and Mrs. 
Macdonald attended the ninetieth concert of the Mendlssohn Choir 
This famous Toronto Choir was ably assisted by the Philadelphia Orches- 
tra under the peerless leader Stokowski. The soloists were Mme. 
Florence Hinkle, soprano, and Mr. Royal Dadman, baritone. The 
latter is a new-comer here and at once made a local reputation for 
himself by his deep, resonant voice and his expressive singing. Mme. 
Hinkle is well known in musical circles here. 

The programme opened with the stirring ode "England," by our 
Canadian composer, Dr. E. C. Macmillan. This work was excellently 
handled by the choir, much, care having been taken in the preparation 



24 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



of the chorus parts. The finest singing of the evening was done in 
Fanning's a capella chorus "How Sweet the Moonlight Sleeps." This 
was an exquisite piece of interpretation and showed the splendid qual- 
ities of the choir. The ladies' voices were heard to advantage in De- 
bussy's setting of Rossetti's "The Blessed Damozel." This showed 
remarkable workmanship in the scoring, the effects being ethereal for 
both solo and chorus. A very popular contribution to the programme 
was the fine Sea Songs by Stanford for baritone solo, men's chorus and 
orchestra. The tunefulness and British spirit of the music swayed the 
audience very much. 

Mr. Stokowski and his orchestra were the recipients of a very fervid 
demonstration of applause. The Wagnerian excerpt was faultlessly 
rendered and made an imposimg climax to the concert. 

Russell I 



GAMES' DAY 

Our Twenty-first Annual Athletic Meeting, which was held on May 
18th, had an unusually large attendance. Under favourable weather, 
the competition was well marked. The school heartily congratulates 
Sissons I who easily won the Senior School Championship with 29 points 
to his credit. Peene captured the Boarders' Cup with 10 points. 
Ault with 15 points and Munn II with 13 points won the Junior Cham- 
pionship and Boarder's Honours respectively. All the events were well 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



25 




contested. A novel feature of the day was the playing of Pipe Major 
Fraser and four of ouf pipers. Mrs. Lionel Clarke very kindly presented 
the various prizes after which she asked that a holiday be given the 
school. Head Prefect Smith then presented Mrs. Clarke with a gold 
medal bearing an inscription "From the Boys of St. Andrew's College." 
Hearty cheers were then given for Mrs. Clarke and Dr. and Mrs. Mac- 
donald. Tea was served by Mrs. Macdonald in her house following the 
presentations. The younger guests of the boys then enjoyed a The 




26 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGP: REVIEW 




Dansant which took place in the Assembly Hall. Without a doubt this 
was the most successful Games' Day in many a year. 

The results of the different events were as follows: 

One Mile Run — 1st, Home H; 2nd, Peene;3rd, Cameron HI. 

Half Mile Run — 1st, Peene; 2nd, Sissons I; 3rd, Home H. 

Quarter Mile Run — 1st, Burry I; 2nd, Sissons I; 3rd, Peene. 

Throwing Cricket Ball (Sr.) — 1st, Richardson; 2nd, Peene; 3rd, 
Stronach. 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



27 





^^hV^^^^^^^^^^b BII^^P^"iV^I^H^B *^^ '^" .^H^^^^M^^^^i 





FINDLEY II WINNING THE HIGH JUMP 

Throwing Cricket Ball (Jr.)— 1st, Munn II; 2nd, Ault; 3rd, Fair- 
clough. 

J unior Runing High Jump — 1st, Ault ; 2nd, Munn 1 1 ; 3rd, Herchmer. 

Senior Standing Broad Jump — 1st, Sissons I; 2nd, Burry I; 3rd, 
Armstrong. 

Junior Standing Broad Jump — 1st, Ault; 2nd, Herchmer; 3rd, 
Munn II. 



^J^BK/^k- - r,-^.* 






Jgn 


^s^ 





28 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Senior Running Broad Jump — 1st, Sissons I; 2nd, Armstrong; 
3rd, McRae I. 

Junior Running Broad Juimp — 1st, Ault; 2nd, Herchmer; 3rd. 
Dunlap. 

Putting the Shot — 1st, Burry I ; 2nd, King. 

100 Yard Dash (Under 17)— 1st, King; 2nd, Rivera; 3rd, Robinson. 

50 Yard Dash (Prep.)— 1st, Strathy ; 2nd, Robertson III ; 3rd, Bell II. 

100 Yard Dash (Senior) — 1st, Sissons I; 2nd, King; 3rd, Rivera. 
Time 10 4/5 seconds. 

Hurdles (under 16)— 1st, Morton I ; 2nd, Herchmer; 3rd, Cook III. 

100 Yard Dash (under 13)— 1st, Archibald I; 2nd, Dunlap; 3rd, 
Foster. 




Three-legged Race — 1st, Cameron II. and Findlay III.; 2nd, Find- 
lay I. and Robertson I. 

220 Yard Dash (Senior)— 1st, Sissons I ; 2nd, Burry I ; 3rd, Howell. 

100 Yard Dash (under 16) — 1st, Rivera;2nd, Robinson ; 3rd, Morton I. 
Time 11 seconds. 

Lower School Handicap — 1st, McLean I; 2nd, Dennis; 3rd, Noriega I. 

100 Yard Dash (Junior) — 1st, Robinson; 2nd, Munn II; 3rd, Noonan. 

Three-legged Race (Prep.)— 1st. Strathy and Bell ; 2nd, Applegath III ; 
and Evans. 

Hurdle Race (Senior)— 1st, Findlay III ; 2nd, Findlay II ; 3rd, Peene. 

220 Yard Dash (Junior) — 1st, Robinson; 2nd, Noonan; 3rd. Munn II. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



29 



Sack Race — 1st, Cameron II; 2nd, Lentz; 3rd, Peace I. 

Obstacle Race — 1st, Cameron II; 2nd, Herchmer. 

Senior Running High Jump — 1st, Findley II; 2nd, Sissons I. 
Height 4' 11". 

Junior Hurdle Race — 1st, Munn II ; 2nd, Herchmer; 3rd, Noonan. 

220 Yard Dash (under 17)— 1st, King; 2nd, Rivera. 

Junior Consolation — 1st, Marshall I\'; 2nd, Noriega I. 

Senior Consolation — 1st, McRae I. 

Old Boys' Race — 1st, Darroch; 2nd, Holliday. 

Table Relay Race — Won by Peene's Table (Team — Howell, Richard- 
son, Curry, Peene). 




SCHOOL CHAMPIONS 

From left to right: Robhrtson M (Fencing-); Sissons I (Track and Field Sports); Pekne (Boarders' 

Championship); Carrick H (Boxing). Absent--.\RMSTRONi; (Wrestling). 



30 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



CADET CORPS 

Never has the St. Andrew's College Cadet Corps brought to a finish 
a more successful year's work. It has been larger than ever before, and 
has certainly maintained the standard which has given it a name of 
which to be proud. 

Early in March, the Corps turned out on parade to the Government 
House, where they w^ere inspected by His Excellency the Duke of 
Devonshire. From there they proceeded to the Armouries for an 
inspection by Sir Henry Burstall, Inspector General of Cadet Corps in 
the Dominion. 




fetP 




SUNDAY: O D.\Y OF REST AND GLADNESS 

The following letter is self-explanatory: 

211 College St., 
Toronto, Ont., Mar. 31, 1921. 
Principal. St. Andrew's College, 

Toronto, Ontario. 
Dear Sir: 

I desire to drop you a line to say how proud I am as General Officer 
Commanding, Military District No. 2, at the magnificent showing of 
your St. Andrew's College Cadets on the recent inspection held by the 
Inspector General. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



31 



I know that the Inspector General was greatly impressed by the 
magnificent physique of your boys, their steadiness on parade and their 
whole turn-out, which would reflect credit on any Unit in the British 
Empire and I desire to congratulate you and the officers and cadets as 
a whole upon their showing. 

With kindest reagrds, believe me to be, 
Sincerely yours, 
(Signed) Victor A. S. Williams, 

Major-General. 

The annual parade to W^estminster Church on Sunday, May 8th, 
was in every detail a success. 

On Sunday, May 22nd, the Corps paraded to St. Paul's Church, 
when His Excellency, the Duke of Devonshire, and the Government 
House party attended the service. Dr. Cody wished the retiring 
Governor-General god-speed, and assured him the gratitude of the 
Canadian people for his noble endeavours. At the conclusion of the 
service the St. Andrew's College Cadet Corps performed the "march 
past" which was received by His Excellency from the steps of the Church. 

For the first time since the war the customary Garrison Parade was 
held on May 29th. As the Cadet Corps is affiliated with the 48th 
Highlanders we turned out, and marched to Massey Hall, where an 
impressive service was conducted. 

Summing up the year's activities we would say that the mid-winter 
dance was as bright an event as ever; the inspection a "credit to any 
Unit in the Empire"; the parades highly successful; and the bearing and 
steadiness of the Corps truly commendable. Special recognition should 
perhaps be made of the splendid work done by Sgt. Major Fig in drilling 
the boys. Also the bugle band, under the able direction of Capt. Slatter, 
was wonderfully trained and the efforts of Pipe Major Eraser have never 
met with better success in developing an excellent pipe band. 

F. Roper Dayment. 




32 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



MAJOR GRANT'S SERMON 

On Sunday, May 15th, at evening chapel service, we had the pleasure 
of a short address by Major Grant, principal of Upper Canada College. 

His text was from the New Testament, "O Lord I thank Thee that I 
am not as other men are." He spoke on the labour troubles and strikes 
in Great Britain and the feelings of the different interests involved to 
one another. He applied his text in the idea that each party was more 
or less selfish and self-conceited; neither realized its own bad qualities, 
yet each was only too ready to condemn its fellow. 

We are all sincere in saying that we hope Major Grant's visit will 
become an annual event, in the years to come. 

Mention might be made of the orchestra, which played exceptionally 
well; the singing was also very good on this occasion. 

FiXDLEY n. 




OHARA THE MAN WHO RINGS THE BELL 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 33 

SIR JOHN WILLISON'S ADDRESS 

On Sunday evening, May 22nd, Sir John Willison delivered a very 
interesting address on "The British Empire" to the assembled school. 
Before beginning his speech he complimented the Cadet Corps on its 
splendid showing at St. Paul's Church on the morning of that day, saying 
that no finer advertisement for the school could be found than our well- 
drilled Corps. 

Returning to the subject of his address, he carried us back to the days 
when as a boy he witnessed the celebarations held by the early settlers 
of Western Canada on the 24th, Queen Victoria's birthday, and described 
the sterling character of those pioneers, who laid so firm a foundation for 
the future greatness of Canada. The Motherland, he compared to 
a homestead, from which the children, setting out, had founded new 
homes and had gone forward to greater achievements, but always 
conscious of the bond of love, uniting colony to mother country. He 
emphasized the impossibility of understanding and appreciating a 
country, even Great Britain of whom we consider ourselves a part, 
unless visited in person. He, himself had never fully understood the 
spirit of the Motherland until he had wandered in the historic transept 
of Westminster Abbey and among the tombs of those who made England 
famous. Only then was the consciousness of England's true grandeur 
borne to him in its fullest power, filling him with love and pride in the 
knowledge that Canada was the daughter of so great a country. 

Digressing for a moment, he impressed upon us the value and comfort 
derived from the knowledge of foreign languages, especially French, 
since with one's own language and French, one could travel anywhere 
without trouble or inconvenience. Also, he showed the educational value 
of books and the benefits and enjoyments reaped from them. 

Resuming his subject, he reviewed Great Britain's part in the war, 
and while not wishing to make any undue claims for Britain's pre- 
eminence as a warring nation, he thought she was the rock upon which 
the Allies stood firm, and upon which the strength of the enemy was spent 
and shattered. In speaking of the crisis through which Britain had 
passed with firm and unyielding courage, he gave this quotation, "But 
none of the ransomed ever knew how deep were the waters crossed." 

He showed that Canada as one of the foremost members of the 
Empire had a great influence over the lesser colonies, and that any seem- 
ing lack of loyalty might produce a corresponding feeling in the sister 
colonies; therefore, it was absolutely essential that Canada follow Eng- 
land with unwavering loyalty. 

In conclusion he only regretted that he could not speak longer, 
saying that he appreciated our position as a school, which he thought was 



34 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

much akin to that of a battalion paraded for inspection, which heartily 
wishes the ordeal were over. We should like to take this opportunity 
however, of assuring Sir John Willison that we thoroughly enjoyed his 
address, ajid should he ever visit us again he is assured of a hearty 
reception. 

FiXDLAY I. 



CAPTAIN PAULIN'S SERMON 

On Sunday evening, May 28th, Captain Paulin, pastor of the Rose- 
dale Presbyterian Church, spoke to the school, taking for h,is text, 
verses from the 22nd Chapter of Luke. His address was very interest- 
ing, and since he pointed out its special application to school life, very 
beneficial to its hearers. 

Captain Paulin stated that the boy living in the midst of too congenial 
surroundings and protected from all trials and temptations is to be pitied 
rather than envied, inasmuch as one's character and strength of will 
are only developed by the constant meeting with, and overcoming of 
difficulties. Just as it is impossible to judge the sea-worthiness of a ship 
until it has battled with the elements, so it is impossible to estimate 
the worth of a boy's character until he has met and coped successfully 
with his boyish problems. Truly "Sweet are the uses of Adversity." 

Every boy should have a goal to which his ambition urges him, and 
for the attainment of which he must strive with all the strength that is 
his. He must turn his back upon the slothful ways of the aimless, 
resolutely choosing the narrow way, filled though it be with endless 
striving and patient endeavour. 

That man is greatest who has given his strength for the uplifting of 
the weak, and that man most blessed whose life has been one of self- 
sacrifice. To illustrate the spirit of self-sacrifice, he told a story of how 
the French soldiers, fighting with indomitable courage at Verdun, 
though dying of thirst themselves, gave their last drops of water to cool 
the guns so that their fellow soldiers might have life, and their beloved 
country, freedom. In closing he said he knew of no greater tribute that 
could be paid to any man, than to have it said of him that this world was 
a better world for his ha\'ing lived in it. 

FiXDLAY I. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



35 



THE SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 

The orchestra has had a very successful year being composed of 
some good musicians and a drummer. The suspense the whole school 
was subjected to during some of the practises was inconceivable but, 
owing to the proximity of the C.P.R. tracks, the agony was slightly 
relieved. 

The first opportunity that the orchestra had of appearing before the 
school was on Prize Day and, judging from femarks heard after, they 




SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 1920-21 



lived well up to their reputation. The next appearance was the big 
event of the school year — the minstrel show. Here they proved them- 
selves competent rivals of Ted Lewis by their rendering of Southern 
coon melodies in syncopated form. Later on in the year they played on 
a number of Sundays, which added greatly to the attractiveness of 
chapel service. On their final appearance they firmly established their 
reputation in the able manner in which they gave Rubinstein's "Melody 
in F." 



36 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Persoxxel 
Smith, "Gerry."— 

Our very efficient drummer sometimes erratic but always on the job. 
Claims that the music of the drums under his careful supervision hath 
charms which can soothe the savage beast, namely, Blauvelt. 

Hunter, "Al."— 

Started at the first of the season with a clarinet but later discovered 
that the scope of this instrument was too limited for his musical abilities, 
so transfered to a sax. Al improved greatly towards the end of the year 
(due to daily inspirations through the mail) and thus was a great help 
to the orchestra. The greatest difficulty was to keep him from jazzing 
Rubinstein's "Melody in F" or Handel's "Largo." 

Scott, "Jimmy."— 

One of our first violin players and very dependable. At practices 
was never at rest, and when the orchestra was resting, he would often 
be found practising "Souvenir" or "Ave Maria." Had a great mania 
for getting off in one corner and playing by himself. 

Hillary, "Art."— 

The only contribution we have from the day-boy delegation. Con- 
trary to day-boy principles, always on time for practises and one of the 
best musicians in the orchestra. 

Cameron, "Joe." — 

Our second \iolin player; the only one we have but, nevertheless, 
holds his end up admirabh'. Claimed his musical training was received 
in Ottawa. 

Mr. Laidlaw. — 

Always on hand for classical selections. The only real musician we 
have. It is due largely to this gentleman's inspiration that the orchestra 
has been so successful. 

Proudfoot, "Doug."— 

Our very efficient pianist. We have been very lucky in obtaining 
his services as hcis one of the best. His worst habit is shimmyng on the 
piano stool when in action. 

Giffin, "Foss."— 

Our solo cornetist and the only one of his kind in existance. Insists 
on carrying his mute with him in case of unexpected explosions occuring 
in the depths of his fog horn. Has performed the duties of conductor 
very successfully throughout the year. 'Tis rumoured he was made a 
prefect upon reaching and holding for one hour high x. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 37 

THE UPPER SIXTH 

For the Upper Sixth this school year has been one of the most illus- 
trious in many moons. The members of the form are marvels of intellect 
and learning" and will make their mark in the world even if it is only a 
blot. 

Bethune, "Gus."— 

Before us we have the shining light of the Upper Sixth. He rarely 
comes to school except for the "spares" and he even finds them rather 
tedious. His favourite method of greeting friends and enemies a^like is 
to creep upon them from behind and stun them with a blow on the small 
of the back deli\-ered with his open hand. He is the proud possessor 
of a Kupmobile and finds it more suitable to his purposes than the Ford 
which he had last year. We don't know what his purposes are but we 
can guess. 

Brunt, "Bill."— 

Species — Ferocibus Ilanoveria. 

Habitat — The species is found only in the mud banks oi the Saugeen 
River. 

Description — This little-known creature grows to a height of from 
four to five feet and is covered with a thick coating of upstanding black 
hair. Its eyes like members of the species "cat" aire adapted to nocturnal 
use. 

Disposition — Usually quiet and gentle but dangerous when aroused. 
Although very treacherous it may with constant care in handling, be- 
come an ideal pet for children and young ladies. 

Chalker, "Woof- Woof."— 

As the name "Woof- Woof" indicates, this bright member of the Upper 
Sixth hails from Newfoundland (Zoological note: "Woof- Woof" is the 
strange call used by a young Newfoundlander while at play.) His 
nature like the coa§t of his native isle is rough and repellent. As a 
child he graced the art of sleep-walking and when in this state of corna 
used often to remove articles belonging to different mfembers of the 
household. Now we can explain the mystery pertaining to the strange 
disappearance of Colonel Taylor's hat. This young man's greatest 
delight is to spend the best part of an afternoon in masticating a piece 
of white rock which he calls Newfoundland hard bread. 

Daly, "Bus."— 

A prefect and native of Napanee. In spite of the fact that he has 
been at St. Andrews for two years he has not outgrown his ambition to 
be leading man in a minstrel show and at frequent intervals he insists on 
inflicting on the form a series of coon jokes which he professes are original 



38 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 

but which have a decided likeness to s-ome that appeared in Dr. 
Chase's Ahnanac of 1906. He still plays the piano but has been forced 
into retirement before the advancing popularity of Douglas Proudfoot 
whom we will presently mention. 

Deacon, "Freddie." — 

Yes, Freddie says Belleville is the only place in the world for him. 
He is one of the proud and haughty buglers belonging to the school band 
a^nd although the sounds he makes don't sound much like music he really 
convinces himself that they do. Freddie ab — so — lutely has to use Olive 
Oil for he's getting gray hairs you know. Since he came here last 
fall he has succeeded in amassing one house-late detention for coming in 
late on a Saturday night. Can you imagine the state this angel would 
be in if he got a double gating and three hours work? He'd just naturally 
pass away. 

Derby, "Bill."— 

This is one of the four by the name of "Bill" in the Upper Sixth and 
the only person coming from Hanover who could be called human. 
He is rough and boisterous retaining much of the true Hanoverian 
spirit for house-wrecking. Has a mania for street-car riding and his 
chief delight is trying to see how many times he can go around the Belt 
Line on the same nickel. 

Earle, "Happy."— 

Formerly this gentleman was a boarder but someone told him he was 
too good for the place so he left to become a day-boy. Alas for him, 
his doom is sealed! He used to be prompt and never late for school, 
but now look at him. Since the day-boys have got hold of him he has 
acquired a decided aversion to arriving for the French class on time, or 
for any other class. He usually lands in about half way through the period 
and disturbs master and boys alike, by bidding a cheery good morning 
to his bosom friends. "Happy" will never pass into the next world 
because he is sure to be late for the boat which crosses the River Styx. 
We don't know what will happen to him once he misses that boat but 
we send our prayers. 

Ellis. "Hep."— 

Another specimen from Newfoundland and although under the hand- 
icap of coming from the above place be is really very well educated being 
proficient in French, Spanish and Eskimo. Among his other accomplish- 
ments he is expert in the construction of snoA\ houses, can spear walruses 
and won first prize at the Lapland seal skinning contests for three suc- 
cessive years. He has long flowing hair A\hich was formerly kept in a 
dazzling state of brilliance by the frequent application of that well- 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 39 

known substance "Brilliantine" but under the new regime he has reverted 
to the use of "Bras-so" alone, which, he says, gives very satisfactory 
results 

Findlay, "Dune."— 

F"rom the village of Carleton Place 

Comes Duncan Findlay's shining face. 

His heart is true, his spirit bold, 

But don't believe all that you're told. 

Over the roof at night he stalks 

The lair of Brunt the w ily fox. 

Right then begins a fearful strife. 

For freedom liberty and life, 

Which ends up in the common way 

With work for two on Saturday. 

This youth has eyes of greenish blue 

And ha.ir of a peculiar hue; 

His feet are large, his head is small. 

Of brains! he ain't got none at all. 

Griffin, "Foss."— 

Orchestra leader and cornet player. Only living rival of Romanelli. 
With a certain amount of musical ability and lots of nerve this gentle- 
man stands a fair chance of making Paderewski look like the size of a 
fly on an elephant's ear. As a politician "Foss" is second to none and 
here again he threatens the power of the famous Polish musician and 
leader. His chief ambition is to become leader of Shea's Orchestra and 
have his fiancee come to see the performance. MacGregor, Manitoba 
is his birthplace and he was proud of it till a ticket agent at the Union 
Station told him there was no such place. 

Home, "Les."— 

The ladies have for this young man a great and magnetic attraction. 
No woman-hater he, far from it. By his own accounts he has a love 
in every port. Oh "Les!" A second Barney Oldfield, he has. already 
broken the world's record for taking out telephone poles along with five 
or six square feet of the pavement adjoining. All the "cops" know "Les." 

Knechtel, "Max."— 

Species — Pugnatius Hanov-erius. Though much similar to the species 
"Ferocibus Hanoveria,'' this creature differs from it in several respects. 

Habitat — The same as "Ferocihus Hanoveria." 

Description — This species is carnivorous, living only on the flesh 
of the animals it preys upon. It is larger than " Ferocibus Hanoveria," 
sometimes attaining a height of six feet. Its head is covered with a thin 



40 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

sprinkling of fawn-coloured fur which extends for a short distance down 
the back of the neck. 

Disposition — Fierce and war-like at all times. The male at the slight- 
est sign of danger stands erect on his hind legs and uttering terrible 
crys, pounds his chest with clenched fore paws. This creature is abso- 
luteK' untameable even when taken young. 

MacKenzie, "Bill."— 

Motorcycle owner and speed fiend. He claims that by mi.xing two 
parts T.N.T. with three of gasoline he increases the velocity of his 
Harley- Davidson from seventy to a hundred and ten miles per hour. 
His earlier experiments with T.N.T. were carried out on an Indian 
motorbike but it couldn't stand the strain. "Bill" was born in Toronto 
with Nerves in the ascendant. 

Milne, "Porky"— 

Although an inmate of St. Andrews, this fastidious youth constantly 
refuses to be lured into Bowles, maintaining that the service at the King 
Edward is of a higher standard. His taste in dress runs to wing collars 
and Natural Tread shoes. He spends much time in barber shops and 
regularly astonishes the barber by asking for a shave when his face is as 
void of hair as the drum-heads in the college band. 

Peene, "Dave"— 

Dave comes from Hamilton. As this long suffering city has been 
made the butt of too many more or less clever jokes we will refrain from 
mixing our humour with that of the common herd. Cricket is his only 
dissipation. As a side line he entered the sports and won the Boarder's 
Championship. His favourite indoor sports are shower-bathing. and 
pillow fighting. He attributes his fine complexion to constant and per- 
sistent use of the razor; he's only eighteen even though he has hair on his 
upper lip! "Say fellows can I borrow some soap?" is his usual early 
morning request to his long suffering room-mates. 

Proudfoot, "Doug. " — 

Musician and Scotchman. Besides having the distinction of being 
a second Beethoven he is an honoured member of the Pipe Band and 
can produce at a moment's notice from his ancestral bag-pipes the most 
weird sounds ever visited on the human race. "Doug." claims Hunts- 
ville as his birthplace but as this village has never been found we sadly 
fear that "Doug." is trying to conceal-a dark past. 

Pugsley, Herb. " — 

A virtue possessed by very few day-boys is imbedded in the body of 
Herbert Pugsley. He is a hard worker. His matric was a sure thing 
if he had stayed with us, but no, he longed for a taste of the sea and is now 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 41 

far away on a schooner such as delights the eyes of Newfoundlanders. 
May the ocean be kind and gentle, for seasickness really is a most dis- 
turbing influence and interferes with a good trip. 
Robins, "Slog. "— 

One of the day-boys who graces us with his presence. In spite of all 
the laws of the day-boys, written and unwritten, this city-dweller arrives 
at school every day and on time too. From a distance he appears to be 
just an ordinary human but as one draws closer, that impression 
vanishes for Slog is no ordinary person. He is a genius. Yes, he is a 
genius, and the less said about genii the better. 
Shaw, "Bill."— 

From the Indian village of Manitawaning hid deep in the virgin 
forests of Manitoulin Island comes William Ulric Shaw. When Bill 
hit Toronto last fall he was dazzled. How different from the winding 
trails was Yonge St! How different the King Edward from the crude 
comfort of an Indian tepee! As he stepped forth from the Union Station, 
and halted in uncertainty as to where he should go, Bill was heard to 
utter by a passerby these words, which shall go down to posterity. 
"Oh fiddlesticks, I'm all rattled!" As a mathematician Bill is without 
a peer in the Upper Sixth, and on several occasions has astounded the 
master and class with the uniqueness of his answers. A man of few 
words he rarely opens his mouth except to eat. 

Smith, "Jerry." — 

This charming young man comes from the justly famous town of 
Pembroke — it's on the map if you know where to find it. By his noble 
carriage and the manly stride which fears no master, you pick him out 
for head prefect at first glance and you are right. He occupies this 
position through no fault of his own but because it was thrust upon him. 
An excellent reader, Jerry promises to be one of the best roll-callers the 
school has ever produced. Even now, he has acquired such speed in 
calling the roll that many a poor fellow has served a double gating and 
three hours work, merely because he wasn't able to distinguish his own 
name from the stream which poured forth from the head prefect's lips. 

Supple, Jeff. " — 

O, you red-headed Irishman! We don't know about your nationality 
but that's a starter. Yes, Jeff hails from Pembroke which he tries to 
make us believe, is on the railway somewhere between Ottawa and North 
Bay. He takes great joy in abusing the bag-pipes which we can't under- 
stand. He is the only one in the Upper \T who has been given the honour 
of wearing on the top of his nut a red patch. His greatest joy in life is 
getting into trouble so that he can use his brains to get out of it. But 
alas! his brains don't always respond. 



42 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 





PERSONNEL 

First Cricket Eleven 

Richardson, "Jim" — 

Third year on team. Last year's eleven was unfortunate in not hav- 
ing his services, as he has proved himself to be one of our best all-round 
players. A steady bat, but certainly excels in bowling, being most 
effective in this department. 

Lyon, "Freddie"— 

An old colour. Has had hard luck in batting so far this season, but 
has made up for this by his steady and consistent bowling. However, 
we are expecting him to make some high scores, as he is one of our 
best bats. 

King, "Bruce"^ — 

An old colour. Has improved wonderfully in fielding. Is a splendid 
bowler, but his batting is undoubtedly his strongest point. 

Ellis I; "Hep"— 

Also of last year's team. Is a hard hitter and has imprcK'ed his 
batting as the season advanced. His keen fielding has saved many 
runs. A hard worker. 

Skeaff, "Red"— 

First year on team. A valuable man to the team on account of his 
ability to get runs quickly. Strong in the field and also a fine bowler. 

Earle II, "Happy " — 

An old colour. A bit slack in the field, but is steadily improving 
in his batting. Will be a valuable player for next year's eleven. 

43 



44 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



Findlay III, Bruce"— 

An old colour. P^ields his position in the slips faultlessly. Batting 
not yet up to his last year's standard, but by the end of the season should 
be well up in the batting averages. 

Cameron II, "Joe" — 

Came up from last year's seconds. His wicket-keeping has given the 
team great confidence. His decided improvement in batting during the 
season proves the ability of our coach. 




PEENE Captain of First Cricket Elevkn 



Home II, "Ken" — 

Also of last year's seconds. Can always be depended on to do more 
than his share of the batting. Reliable in any position in the field. 

Palmer, "Jimmie"^ 

A new boy. Turned out to be the "find" of the season. His par- 
ticular style of batting is of a high order. Top-scorer in one of the 
practise games. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



45 



McCannell, "Jack" — 

An old colour. Shows up well in the practises, but spoils his effective- 
ness in matches by his nervousness. 

Peene, "Dave" — 

Captain. Second year on the team. The best fielder w^e had last 
year, winning his position by a wide margin. Shows good judgment 
in running the team, and always makes a double figure score. Fills his 
position as captain excellently 




RICHARDSON AND LYON— Our Chikf Wicket Getters 



S.A.C. vs YORKSHIRE C.C. 

On Saturday, April 30, the first eleven met the Yorkshire Cricket 
Club. The match was not a great success, as our team had had very 
little practice and had not struck its stride, while the Yorkshire's, 
who won last year's championship were in the best of form and took a 
wicket almost every over. 

Richardson and Lyon bowled well, while Skeaff made a w^onderful 
catch in the field. 

Yorkshire C.C. 

Kirkslake b. Richardson 4 

Joy b. Lyon 2 

Priestley c. Peene b. Richardson 28 



46 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Campbell 1. b. w. bowled Lyon 

Dyson b. Lyon 2 

Rutheren c. Skeaff b. Richardson 10 

Pickard c. Earle b. Lyon 11 

Greenwood c. King b. Richardson 1 

Jones b. Lyon 1 

J. W. Priestley 1. b. w. bowled Richardson 5 

Murray not out 6 

Byes 4 

Total 74 
Bowling Analysis 

Lyon 5 for 44 

Richardson 5 for 30 



S.A.C. 

Lyon c. Greenwood b. Murray 1 

King b. Dyson 

Richardson b. Jones. 1 

Peene, b. Dyson 

Home II b. Jones. ^ 1 

Skeaff c. Priestley b. Dyson 

McCannel b. Priestley 2 

Earle II b. Dyson 

Ellis I b. Pickard 3 

Cameron II not out 

Reid c. Greenwood b. Pickard 

Total 8 



S.A.C. vs. OLD BOYS 

On Saturday, April 7, the annual old boys' game was played and the 
present boys ably demonstrated that they are getting better every year. 
Although the old boys' team was headed by Hewitt, and had such shining 
lights, as Auld, Cassels, "Joe" Taylor, and "Choppie" Grant, they went 
down to ignominious defeat before Peene's aggregation. 

Cassels was high man for the Old Boys, while Coatsworth, Grant, and 
Taylor did some very good bowling. For the college Richardson bowled 
well, getting three wickets in one over, while Skeaff and Home were the 
high men with the bat. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



47 



The score: 

Old Boys 

Auld b. Richardson 

Gallagher b. Lyon 

Taylor 1. b. w. bowled Richardson. 

MacKenzie b. Richardson 

Cassels c. Earle b. King 

Coatsworth b. Richardson 

Grant b. Richardson 

Hewitt b. Lyon 



5 

8 

9 

3 

....: 13 





4 

MacDonald b. Lyon 1 

Duncanson c. Peene b. King 7 

Darroch not out 

Byes 3 

Total 53 




PORTER SHOWS US HOW IT SHOULD BE DONE 



48 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 

BOWLLXG 

Lyon 3 for 27 

Richardson 5 for 1 2 

Findlay for 8 

King 2 for 2 






\»jt 



O'* 



X: 




£>oWLtD 




^IVry* K(^(j'^iiTW5' 





ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 49 

S.A.C. 

Lyon b. Taylor •. • • • 2 

Richardson b. Grant 9 

Peene b. Coatsworth 10 

Skeaff not out 25 

King s. Macdonald b. Grant 

Findlay III b. Coatsworth 5 

Home II c. Gallagher b. Grant 23 

Earle II did not bat 

Ellis I did not bat 

McCannel did not bat 

Cameron II did not bat 

Byes 4 



Total 78 



BOWLI NG 

Taylor 1 for 21 

Grant 3 for 29 

Coatsworth 2 for 20 

Gallagher for 4 



S.A.C. vs. TORONTO • 
On May 14, the first eleven had a game with Toronto, and decisively 
defeated them by a score of 123 to 20. The Toronto team was not at 
full strength, so they should not be judged by the score. 

Our fellows demonstrated that through Mr. Muschamp's careful 
coaching, they had become almost a perfect fielding team while at bat 
most of the boys got into double figures. Peene and Home being high 
men with 22 and 23 respectively. It was also in this game that Richard- 
son gave his first demonstration of real bowling which he has kept up 
throughout the season. 

Toronto 

Raines b. Richardson 8 

Maynard c. King b. Richardson 2 

Leighton b. Lyon 

Neill b. Richardson 1 

Mitchell c. Lyon b. Richardson 5 

Robb c. Lyon b. Richardson 

Dimmock b. Lyon 2 

Mews b. Richardson 



50 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE RE\'IE\V 

Johnson c. King b. Richardson 

Gregory c. Lyon b. Richardson 2 

Dodge not out 

Total 20 
Bowling 

Lyon 2 for 6 

Richardson 8 for 14 

S.A.C. 

Richardson b. Leighton 5 

Peene c. Maynard b. Robb 22 

SkeafT b. Robb 2 

Lyon b. Leighton! 7 

King b. Robb 11 

Findlay III s. Maynard b. Leighton 12 

Holme II b. Robb , 23 

Cameron II c. Dodge b. Leighton 19 

McCannel b. Leighton 

Palmer b. Leighton 7 

Earle II not out 7 

Byes 8 



Total 123 



BOWLIXG 

Leighton 6 for 67 

Robb 4 for 48 



S.A.C. vs. U.S.C.C. 
May 21 found our team again in the field, this time against United 
Services, and Richardson our bright and gleaming star once more did 
some very effective bowling. The team again showed its fielding powers, 
and at bat, Palmer and Peene were the high scorers the former making 
31 while Peene added a useful 21. The final score was 115 to 64. 

L'XTTED Service's C. C. 

Atkens c. Skeaff b. Richardson 3 

Mellot c. King b. Richardson 24 

Taylor b. Richardson 6 

MacLennan c. Palmer b. King 11 

Preston b. Richardson 4 

Buckle b. Richardson 10 

Turner b. King 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



51 



Fairclough c. McCannel b. Richardson 

Watson c. King b. Richardson 

Robertson c. King b. Richardson 

Evans not out 

Byes 

Bowling 

Lyon for 28 

Richardson 8 for 31 

King 2 for 4 



3 



2 

1 



Total 64 




S.A.C. vs. UNITED SERVICES 

S.A.C. 

Richardson b. MacLennan 15 

Peene c. Taylor b. MacLennan 21 

Lyon c. Taylor b. MacLennan 2 

Skeaff b. Mellot 9 

Cameron II c. Preston b. MacLennan 

King b. MacLennan 10 

Palmer c. Watson b. Atkins 31 

Reid 1. b. Mellot 11 

Ellis I s. Preston b. Buckle 11 

Earle II b. Buckle 1 

McCannel not out 

Byes 4 

Total 115 



52 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Bowling 

Buckle 2 for 33 

MacLennan 5 for 30 

Atkins 1 for 7 

Mellot 2 for 40 




ST. ANDREW'S vs. U.C.C. 

On Saturday, May 28, the first eleven played their first Little Big 
Four Game, and, although defeated, the team deserves the highest 
credit. The first innings of the game was played in a blinding light and 
on a slippery field, while in the second the crease was in fairly good shape. 

U. C. C. were first to bat and made eighty runs and, undoubtedly, 
would have made more had it not been for Lyon's fine bowling; he, in 
spite of a very bad wicket, surpassed anything he did last year. The 
St. Andrew's fielding was also good. 

St. Andrews went to bat and made the small total of twenty-six, 
Peene being high man with seven. White was U. C. C.'s star bowler, 
taking nine wickets for nine runs. 

In the second innings everything looked bright again as S.A.C. had 
nine down iof twenty-six, when Hargraft, for U.C.C, the last man in, 
piled up twenty-runs and U.C.C. 's score was eighty for the first innings 
and forty-eight for the second, — a grand total of one hundred and 
twenty-eight. 

The old St. Andrew's spirit was aroused, and the team determined 
that if they could not win they would give U.C.C. a close run, and with 
the score twenty-six to one hundred and twenty-eight, started to bat. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 53 

White, the boy who had made the great bowling record in the former 
innings, weakened considerably and all the work devolved on Greey, the 
other bowler, St. Andrew's had eighty-three runs for seven wickets — 
nineteen runs to make, but when Greey bowled two men in quick suc- 
cession the game was lost,- — but what a creditable loss! It was a grand 
fight, from a poor start to within fourteen runs of winning — Peene and 
his team deserve to be congratulated. 

It is hard to pick out stars, everyone played well, but undoubtedly 
the best were Hargraft, for U.C.C., and Lyon and Palmer for S.A.C. 

This was the first school game to be played on the new U.C.C. 
grounds and we congratulate Upper Canada on winning it, and hope the 
teams which represents them on this field will always be as sportsmanlike 
and as good players as this one. 

First Innings 
U.C.C. 

Grier c. and b. Lyon 3 

Seagram II 1. b. w. bowled Lyon 13 

Smith c. Ellis b. King 19 

Greey c. Richardson b. Lyon 19 

White b. King 1 

Thompson hit wicket b. Lyon 3 

Wright b. Lyon • . . . . 1 

Hargraft played on b. Lyon 10 

Seagram I b. Lyon 2 

Hinton b. King 2 

Cooper not out 

Byes 5 

No balls : 2 

Total 80 

S.A.C. 

Richardson b. White 1 

Peene c. Grier b. White 7 

Skeaff b. White ., 3 

Palmer b. White 1 

Lyon c. Seagram II b. White , 5 

King b. White 1 

Home b. White 

Cameron II b. White 

Ellis I b. White.., 

Findley III b. Greey 6 



54 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Earle II not out 2 

Byes 

Wides 

Total 2G 



Second Ixxixgs 
U.C.C. 

Grier. b. Lyon.. , 

Seagram II c. Ellis b. Lyon 10 

Cooper b. Richardson 10 

Smith c. Earle b. Richardson 1 

Greey c. Peene b. Lyon 1 

White c. and b. Lyon 

Wright c. Palmer b. Richardson 

Thompson 1. b. \v. bowled Lyon. 2 

Seagram I b. Lyon 

Hargraft c. Lyon b. Richardson 20 

Hinton not out 3 

Byes. . 

Wides 1 

Total 48 



S.A.C. 

Richardson c. Hinton b. White 2 

Peene b. White 10 

Skea'ff b. White 1 

Palmer b. Greey 22 

Lyon run out 13 

King b. Greey 14 

Home b. Greey 17 

Cameron II. b. Greey 9 

Findley 1 1 1 b. Greey 

Ellis I not out 

Earle b. Greey 

Byes ' 1 

Wides . 

Total 89 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Bowling Analysis 

S.A.C. First Innings 

Lyon ; 7 for 23 

Richardson for 37 

King. .'. .3 for 13 

U.C.C. 

Greey 1 for 17 

White 9 for 9 

S.A.C. — Second Innings 

Richardson 4 for 33 

Lyon 6 for 14 

U.C.C. 

Greey 6 for 29 

White 3 for 53 

Cooper for 6 



55 




56 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\IE\V 



THE SECOND ELEVEN 



S.A.C. II.-U.C.C. II. 

On Wednesday, May 11, St. Andrew's College Serond Eleven met 
that of Upper Canada and the result was a victory for the former by a 
score of 105-87. A high wind and bright sun made the fielding far from 
satisfactory on both sides, but Reid, at point for St. Andrew's made 
some fine catches. 




SECOND CRICKET ELEVEN 1921 

At bat both teams did well. For Upper Canada, Grier was best, 
while Palmer for St. Andrews's made high score, forty-nine. 
The score: 

U.C.C.II. 

Cooper b. Palmer 

Grier not out 33 

Burns c. Lumbers b. Patterson II 3 

Logic 1. b. w^ bowled Blauvelt 22 

Seagram b. Blauvelt 2 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 57 

MacLaren c. Findley II b. Palmer 5 

Rogers c. b. Easton 3 

Matthews c. Reid b. Palmer 7 

Deeks b. Palmer 2 

Hutchison c. Reid b. Easton 

Mason c. Reid b. Easton 5 

Byes 5 

Total 87 
Bowling 

Palmer 4 for 40 

Patterson 1 for 7 

Lewis for 12 

Blauvelt 2 for 15 

Easton 3 for 8 

S.A.C. II. 

Reid b. Rogers 9 

Lumbers c. Seagraham b. Rogers 

Patterson III . c. Cooper b. Rogers 12 

Palmer b. Matthews 49 

Rivera c. Deeks b. Grier 2 

Supple c. Matthews b. Mason 8 

Smith I c. Hutchison b. Rogers 2 

Easton b. Cooper 4 

Blauvelt b. Grier 4 

Lewis not out 6 

Findley II b. Rogers 3 

Byes 6 

Total 105 



MASTERS vs. S.A.C. II 

A very snappy game of cricket came off on Wednesday, May 6, 
The Masters, having defeated the thirds, sought, as Mr. Laidlaw said, 
"new worlds to conquer"- — They did not conquer, and as the saying goes, 
"the way of the oppressor is hard"- — so it was this time. 

The Masters, after much debating, had dropped Mr. Robinson, and 
taken on Dr. Macdonald, a choice which showed its wisdom later. 
Their former stars Messrs. Ramsay, Tudball, Church and Laidlaw 
proved to be falling stars and Mr. Fleming was high-man on this 
occasion, proving that day-boys show up sometimes. For the Seconds, 
Reid, Home and Palmer were best. 



58 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

The final score was: — Well, perhaps we had better not say any more 
about it. 



SECOND TEAM vs. LAKE LODGE SCHOOL 
On Wednesday, May 25th, the Lake Lodge School First Eleven 
visited St. Andrew's College to play the Second Team. The game began 
at one thirty o'clock. The day was not one for cricket, the ground being 
heavy with rain; the wicket favoured the bowler. St. Andrew's went in 
first, getting out for forty-eight runs. Palmer batted out in his usual 
style and knocked up twenty-five runs for S.A.C. Lawrence bowled well 
for Lake Lodge getting six wickets for twenty-one runs. Lake Lodge 
were put out for fifty-eight runs, of which Morris got eighteen. Findley 
III bowled in fine style for S.A.C. gettingseven wickets for fourteen runs. 
In the Second Innings St. Andrew's got forty-four runs for four 
wickets down and declared, while L.L.S. got forty-four runs for three 
wickets. 

The final score was: In the first innings, S.A.C. 48; L.L.S. 58; in 
the second innings, S.A.C. 44 for four wickets down; L.L.S., 44 for three 
wickets. 



SECOND ELEVEN vs. RIDLEY II'S 
On Saturday, May 28th, the Ridley College second team came to 
St. Andrew's College to play the second eleven. St. Andrew's went in 
first. Ridley bowled well and S.A.C. went out for twenty-six runs. 
McKenzie secured five wickets for eight runs. Ridley did much better, 
getting seventy-seven runs. Osier major was not put out and made 
thirty-eight. 

In the second innings St. Andrew's got sixty-one runs. Findley II 
scoring sixteen and Blauvelt thirteen, not out. Ridley went in again 
but no wickets fell and when stumps were drawn, they had scored thirteen 
runs. 

The final score was: In the first innings, S.A.C. 26; B.R.C. 77. 
I n the second innings, S.A.C. 61; B.R.C. 13, for no wickets. 

Ridley II's 

Osier mi c. Reid b. McConnell 9 

Palmer mi b. Reid 6 

Hyslop b. McCanell 5 

Coleman c. Lumbers b. Reid 

Synder c. Patterson III b. Reid 2 

Osier ma not out 38 

Shearson c. Reid b. Reid 

Warren c. Findley lib. Easton 1 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



59 



Stewart b. 

McKenzie b. 

Weatherstone b. 



Easton 7 

Easton 3 

Rivera 6 



Total 77 
St. Andrew's II 

Reid b. McKenzie 4 

Rivera run out 1 

McCanell b. Weatherstone 9 

Lumbers b. McKenzie 

Patterson III b. Weatherstone 

Supple b. Weatherstone 

Findley II c. Palmer b. McKenzie 5 

Smith I c. Snyder b. McKenzie 1 

Easton not out . ._ 3 

Blauvelt b. McKenzie 2 

Leask run out 1 

Total 26 




60 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



THE THIRD CRICKET TEAM 

Up to the time of going to press the Thirds have only played one game. 
On Saturday, May 15th, a game was played at Grimsby against Lake 
Lodge School and, though badly outclassed on this occasion, the team 
has not lost heart and is endeavouring to arrange other matches. Two 
friendly contests have been played with the Masters, the latter win- 
ning the first game, but a sudden rain storm was the only thing that pre- 




LOWER SCHOOL CRICKET TEAM 

vented the Thirds from easily winning in the second encounter. The 
players on the Third team lack experience, the majority playing cricket 
for the first time this season, but some good material is being developed 
and we expect to hear from some of the boys next year. Our best score 
at Lake Lodge was made by Mason who scored twelve not out, while 
Birkett, Drynan, Ferguson and Haizell did some very fair bowling in 
this game. 



I 



Our Old Boys 



OLD BOYS' NEWS 

Roy Lowndes, who was at St. Andrew's from 1906 to 1912, is this 
year's star on the fencing team of Columbia University. Out of fifteen 
bouts in which he participated, Roy won eleven, and was responsible 
for Columbia winning the Intercollegiate Championship. 

Gordon Hewitt has also won fencing honors, and now has his "T" 
from Toronto University. 

The Montreal Branch of the Old Boys' Association now report fifty 
old Andreans on their mailing list. 

"Wes" Winans has returned to Toronto and intends to enter business 
here. During the past term he has become quite a familiar figure at the 
College. 



OLD BOYS' DINNER 

The Sixteenth Annual Dinner of the St. Andrew's College Old Boys' 
Association was held at the old Rosedale building on April 1st, 1921, 
being the first gathering of the Old Boys in the old school since the War. 
107 were present and it was one of the most enjoyable evenings in the 
history of Old Boys' gatherings. Jules Brazil entertained with songs 
during the dinner and recited some very amusing rhymes on some of the 
members present and several excellent rounds of Boxing were given by 
some of the boys at present in attendance at the school. A telegram 
from Bobbie Gill was read regretting that he could not be present. 

The usual toast to the school was made by Gordon McGillivray 
President of the Old Boys' Association in Montreal, who during the 
course of his speech gave the Toronto Association an interesting review 
of the gatherings and the work of the Association in his town. The 
Toast was followed by a rousing "Hoot." Dr. Macdonald replied to 
the Toast and briefly reviewed the history of the Association from its 
inception to the present day, laying particular stress on the fact that the 
Old Boys' had not only captured many University championships at 
both McGill and Toronto in the sport life of those colleges, but had also 
carried off the highest academic honours. In addition to this in all walks 
of life St. Andrew's Old Boys' were to be found at the top of the ladder. 

Mr. A. M. Campbell representing the Board of Governors supple- 

61 



62 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\IE\V 

mented Ur. Macdonald's reply to the Toast. Dr. Almon Fletcher, being 
the second Old Boy to occupy the important position of House Physician, 
favoured us with a short outline of his work and expressed his apprecia- 
tion of the honour which had been bestowed on him. Alan Ramsay, 
lately appointed resident Master, was also heard from, this being his 
first year in this capacity. 

On behalf of the Old Boys' Association, Mr. Howe made a presenta- 
tion to Miss Brookes, for her untiring efforts in assisting in every way 
possible with the work of the Association. 




THE OLD BOYS RACE 

Mr. Robinson proposed the Toast to the Old Boys' Association, which 
was supplemented by remarks from Col. Taylor, Mr. Findlay and Mr. 
Fleming. Mr. Howe responded to the Toast. 

Douglas Fraser, the first boy enrolled in the school was present and 
the members of the Association were interested in hearing that Fraser 
had two boys enrolled in the school. 

A vote of thanks was tendered by Lyman Howe on behalf of the Asso- 
ciation to Mrs. Macdonald, Mrs. Montgomery and Miss McCollum, also 
to the boys who had boxed. Dr. Macdonald and the ladies then retired 
and the business of the Association was commenced, with Lyman Howe 
in the chair. The following officers were elected for the year: 

President — Lyman Howe. 

1st Vice Pres. — Joe Taylor. 

2nd \'ice Pres. — Alan Ramsey. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 63 

Sec.-Treas. — Ed. Whitaker. 
Review Reporter — E. A. Burns. 

The evening was concluded by the singing of God Save the King, 
Starr Edmonds officiating at the piano. 



AN OLD BOY'S IMPRESSIONS OF THE DINNER 

Friday night. 
Dear Jack: 

Went to the Old Boys' dinner the other night. Great institution, 
don't you think, this annual bringing together of "Andreans" for a 
word of cheer, a smoke, and a look around; not forgetting, of course, a 
jolly good dinner — man is such a debased animal, and is at his best only 
when wrapped round a comfortable meal. 

Speaking of looking around— ^for which there was some time before 
going into the dining-room, — the place fairly bristles with old memories 
and associations, right from the very gates, which, you will recall being 
presented by Mr. A. M. Campbell. There is the tree that Goldwin Smith 
planted (and Paul Findlay and his gang of wild men one night replanted) 
There is St. Andrew over the front door — still with his hand out. (I 
wonder if the copper you put in it is there yet.) Inside, everything looks 
much as it did in our time. Dr. Mac's office is in the same place — it is 
a good thing, of course, not to have too perfect a memory, and on the wall 
hangs the little silver spade with which Mrs. Macdonald turned the first 
sod for the building on that sunny April morning in 1904 when we all 
trooped over from Chestnut Park. The walls of the corridors are now 
simply covered with photographs of the teams and mighty interesting 
they are. Altogether it is most delightful to wander through this 
"Salle de pas perdus" as someone so aptly called it. 

But best of all was it to meet old friends. Truly, old friends are 
best! The time was all too short to meet and talk to everyone; at 
most, one could but shake hands. Funny, isn't it, how the names we 
get at school stick for life. 

During the dinner Jules Brazil, the entertainer, provided music and 
monologue and between courses, the whole party joined in the songs, 
old and new, from the song sheets which he distributed. 

I wish you could have seen the three sets of game little scrappers that 
came on with the coflfee. I have forgotten their names, but Dr. Mac. said 
they had been picked at random from the boys in school and were there 
to show us how the youngsters were being trained in the "manly art.' 
They put on a neat and clever exhibition. 

Then there were the toasts, and I wish I had time to tell you about 



64 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

them because I know you would be interested in them all. Dr. Mac- 
donald in responding to the toast to the school made a brief resume of the 
past twenty years and spoke with optimism of the future before the 
school. He told also, of his recent attendance at the meetings of the 
Old Boys at Winnipeg and Montreal. 

There were short speeches by those good old "stand bys," Mr. Rob- 
inson, Mr. Findlay, Mr. Fleming and Mr. Taylor, all of whom were 
applauded heartily. 

Did you know that there were five old boys on the board of Governors 
now? Albert Gooderham, Bill McPherson, Lyman Howe, Ken 
MacLaren and Bob Gill. Also Almon Fletcher is the school physician 
and Al Ramsey is on the teaching staff. 

But when I tell you that there are three boys of the second generation, 
that is, old boys' boys attending the school, well, Tempus certainly does 
fugit doesn't it! 

Yours, as ever, 

Bill. 



THE MATCH AT YORK MILLS 

On Saturday, May 7th, the annual cricket match between the Old 
Boys and Present Boys was played at York Mills. An account of the 
game may be found elsewhere in the Review but this event is also worthy 
of note in this section, for it was not merely a cricket match but an 
old boys' reunion. 

Quite a large number of old Andreans took advantage of the fine day 
and brought their families along to enjoy the outing. Many had not 
previously seen the new college grounds and expressed themselves 
agreeably surprised at the fine site for the school, the splendid athletic 
field and the delightful surroundings. The youngsters particularly 
seemed to enjoy themselves and several objected rather strenuously 
when time to go home arrived. Andy Duncanson's son helped his dad 
field in the slips and you should have seen Dick Burton playing tag 
with Miss Nancy Burton and a score of other juveniles! Ken McLaren 
Jr. shocked his mother and dad by addressing the Headmaster as 
"old sport," while the ever-adventurous Elise Howe led a party of 
tots to the top of the hill on an expedition of discovery. Yes, it was a big 
day! And we nearly forgot to mention the refreshments — pink ice- 
cream, any amount of it, and cake and lemonade and lots of other things. 
Everybody said these old boys' games should be played oftener; well, 
there'll be another one next year and if any of you old boys have never 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



65 



attended one of these functions (that's a good name for a cricket match) 
you've missed a great treat, so make a mental note of next year's game 
right now. 



OLD BOYS' DINNER AT MONTREAL 

We are pleased to be able to publish below the minutes of the Annual 
Meeting of the St. Andrew's College Old Boys' Association of Montreal. 

The Old Boys' Association of St. Andrew's College held a very 
successful dinner at the University Club on March 11th, when Dr. 
MacDonald was present as the guest of honor. 




The Old Boys in the field, but the Small Boys are most interested in the refreshment table. 



25 members were present and following the dinner the toasts were: 

The King — proposed by the Chairman, Mr. R. I. Green. 

The School — proposed by G. L. MacGillivray, seconded by R. L. 
Warden and replied to by Dr. MacDonald, who in an interesting talk 
told of the development of the School and the plans for the future and 
also mentioned the splendid showing made by a number of the Old 
Boys in college, business and in athletics. 

Following the Toasts, the election of Offtcers for the year ensued, and 
the following were nominated and elected : 

Hon. Pres. — Rev. Dr. MacDonald. 

President. — G. L. MacGillivray. 

Vice Pres. — Dr. L. C. Montgomery. 



66 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Secretary — Bruce McMurtry. 

Treasurer — John Easson. 

A discussion was held regarding making an effort to hold more than 
one dinner each year and the new executive was asked to consider this 
and to take what action was decided on. 

The fee of S2.00 per annum includes the subscription to the St. 
Andrew's Review, the balance to cover postage, etc., in sending out 
notices. 

A vote of thanks was passed to the outgoing executive and especially 
to Gordon Spohn for the work he had done in connection with the dinner. 



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THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE, 1920-21 



BIRTHS 

To. Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs Blackstock, on March 29th, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Bowdex, on May 4th, 1921, a son, 
Frank Edward Forfar. 

To Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Bryan, on April 22nd, 1921, a daughter. 
To Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Errol Munn, on April 5th, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. T. Irving Findley, on May 7th, 1921, a daughter. 
To Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Kent, on May 7th, 1921, a son. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 67 

To Mr. and Mrs. W. Harry Leishman, on March 25th, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. W. Reg. Shaw, on April 28th, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Adam D. Sproat, on March 31st, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Leatch, on May 20th, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. C. Starr Edmonds, on May 25th, 1921, a daughter. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Alisox, oh June 6th, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Griffith B. Clarke, on June 10th, 1921, a 
daughter. 



MARRIAGES 

BoNNAR, Hector D., to Miss Annie Marguerite Ardagh, of Toronto, 
March 5th, 1921. 

Carver, Frank, to Miss Edna Wilson of Seattle, Wash., March 
17th, 1921. 

Macdonald, Capt., Frederick Wyld, M.C, to Miss Marjorie 
Young Telfer, April 16th, 1921. 

Stewart, Capt. Alan E., M.C, to Miss Helen Grace Cassels of 
Toronto, April 6th, 1921. 

Wallace, Richard Edgar, to Miss Grace Foote of Great Neck, 
Long Island, April 2nd, 1921. 

Fleming. Donald W., to Miss Isobel Blanchard of Winnipeg, June 
4th, 1921. 

Young, Dr. H. Maitland, to Miss Madeline Patricia Thomson of 
Westmount, June 1st, 1921. 



OBITUARY 

Galbraith, Daniel Murray Bayne, was born on April 27th, 1895. 
He came up to St. Andrew's College from Carleton Place High School in 
September 1914 and went into F'orm Lower VL, from which he matricu- 
lated into McGill University in June 1915. After writing his Matricu- 
lation he took his training in Aviation, and in November of the 
same year went overseas as a Flight Sub. Lieut, in the R.N.A.S. He 
was soon on service in France and early in 1916 received "special men- 
tion" for his work. In Nov., 1916 he received the Distinguished Service 
Cross and the French Croix de Guerre for gallantry, and in March, 1917 
received an additional bar in both orders for subsequent gallantry, as well 
as the Medal of Valour from Italy. On two occasions he emerged victor 
when attacked by six enemy aircraft. By August, 1917, he had ac- 
counted for 35 enemy air machines. In the autumn of 1917 he returned 
to Canada on leave, then holding the rank of Flight Commander. In 
December he went back to active service. When the Armistice was 
declared he held the rank of Captain in the R.A.F. 



68 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



In Nov^ember, 1918, he married Miss Maureen O'Bergin. P'or a 
time he remained in the R.A.F. but returned to Canada in 1920 and 
entered into business as a Contractor. Later he joined the Canadian 
Air Service as an instructor at Camp Borden. On March 29th, he was 
killed in a motor accident at Camp Borden. His car turned turtle and 
he succumbed to his injuries some two hours later. 

Murray Galbraith was only one year at St. Andrew's College, but he 
will long be remembered with affection for he filled a large place. His 
uniformly good work in Class, and his unusual prowess as a wing and 
place kicker on the famous football team of 1914. rendered his achieve- 
ments one of the traditions of the school. In addition to such achieve- 
ments, his uniform good nature and cheery disposition made him de- 
servedly one of the most popular boys of his year. 

All who knew him at his old school join in expressing deep sympathy 
with his parents and with his widow and little two year old boy in their 
great sorrow. 



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INTERESTED SPECTATORS 




The impression that the number of exchanges has diminished since 
last term, comes to the editor as he lays them down by his side. Though 
there are fewer, they seem harder to criticize. The most outstanding 
fact on going through them all is the lack of good, interesting stories. 
But, the editor must continue and cast his opinion of each Exchange 
separately: 

There is the Windmill from Saint John's School. The illustration.^ 
are cleverly executed. "Back Again," is a very fitting frontispiece. 
Credit is due your large Exchange Column. 

The Graduation Number of the Managra is most complete. 

Poetry in the Upper Canada College Times improves it greatly. 
There are some well drawn sketches also worth mentioning. The lack 
of a good story is noticeable. 

This one has an attractive appearance. It comes from Appleby 
College. The article in the Argus, on "Commercial Flying," is well 
written. The photos add greatly to the story. 

Little need be said of the Gateway Monthly of Alberta University. 
It still maintains its lofty standard. 

Acta Ridleiana published by Ridley College might be improved by 
the addition of a Table of Contents. Why not try and enlarge your 
magazine? 

Exchanges from distant Colleges are always welcome. From 
Australia comes the St. Peter's College Magazine which portrays college 
life in Australia. It also presents some new ideas. 

Another distant friend is the Boone Review representing Boone 
University, China. The Review contains some very worthy material. 

The Ashburian is up to its usual high standard. 

Niagara Falls High School Chronicle is always looked upon by the 
editor as being one of the best papers on his exchange list. It might be 
suggested that a photograph or snap once in a while would add to your 
paper. 

69 



70 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

The Windsorian of King's College has displayed a new idea by 
making one issue consist of school songs. 

Another publication has been added to the exchange list. It is the 
Viewpoint edited by Cranbrook High School. Improvements might be 
expected in the joke department of the Viewpoint. 

Trinity College School Record is well balanced. It is observable 
that your Old Boys' take quite an interest in the Record. 

The cover on Inklings is rather loud. But the interior gives one a 
better impression of it. Exchanges are well written. Also the poetry 
is fine. 

Absence of snap-shots is most noticeable in the Lowell High School 
Review. The illustrated headings are splendid. 

Though it is a small publication, the Basket Ball Number of the 
Carteret is well developed in all sections. The composition on "Ghosts" 
certainly holds the readers interest. 

Acadia Athenaeums, March issue holds its usual attractiveness. 

Ogletree Sissons. 



I 



1 




APOLOGY TO MASTERS 
We (the editors) desire to make public in this issue an apology to 
those long suffering targets of our doubtful wit — The Masters. We 
thank them for their forebearance when we have used their own 
witticisms, putting them into the mouths of boys who never could con- 
jure them in this wide world. All this is necessary, for we must cater to 
our public, — the boys. And Christians were burned to make a Roman 
holiday. 



Hat Clerk: "What kind of hat do you wish, Christy, Fedora, 
Stetson — ?" 

Everhart: (just from Soda Fountain— ) "Mix them and give me a 
straw." 



'No spitting allowed," shouted the polite feline during the cat fight. 



A SHY YOUTH 

At Branksome Hall and Havergal 
Bob Grant has girls galore. 
At B.S.S. also St. Mag's 
He has them by the score. 



Up in Midland, not a few 
While in Toronto, dozens. 
But Bobby masquerades them all 
As first or second cousins. 
71 



72 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



YOUNG SIR GALAHAD 

Moses (our own Moses) was downtown, he came to the Allen; 
he was just about to pass within when suddenly he rushed at the doorman 
crying: "Stop punching those little tickets!" 



Bus.: "What did the master do to you when he caught you coming 
in last night?" 

Gus.: "Oh nothing, I told him I was out for a morning stroll." 




If you took away everything you learnt at St. Andrew's 



Girl: "Don't you just adore art?" 

Reid: "Yes, I love the Katzenjammer Kids." 



Galbraith : "Why did the barber call his son Herpicide?" 
Pup. Murchison: "Because the kid was baptized with hair- 
tonic instead of water." 



Fat Smith (Highbrow): "Reawlly I cawn't see what I shall do this 
summer, mosquitoes take such a fawncy to me." 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 73 

WHAT A NEW BOY BELIEVES 
Prefects are all fine singers, 
Prefects are always handsome, 
Prefects are never wrong, 
We all love the Prefects. 



A DRAMA 

Heroine: "What brought you here, love, greed or ?" 

Tyrer: (from front row) "Two dollars and twenty cents." 
Usher: "This way out." 



Mr. Findlay: "Let us dramatize this beautiful poem of Words- 
worth's. Supple, you take the part of the Cuckoo, while I take the part 
of Wordsworth, — Now^ — ." 



"I put a bold face on the thing," said the artist after he had sketched 
"Pup" Murchison. 



FAMOUS LAST WORDS 
MacLeod : "Hair brushes and a comb are all I ask in my future life." 
Aspden: " 'Twas thus that Socrates expired." 
Carrick I : "I pulled a good one in class to-day." 
Sissons L: "Tell the people of Medicine Hat to give the school 
children a half holiday." 

Everhart: "I reckon I won't be back'next year." 



Moore: "That fellow Sheppard would argue that white is black." 

Marshall: "How so?" 

Moore: "Why he just told me that my white ducks were black." 



Sixth Former: "What makes the Fifth look so weary?" 

Fourth Former: "They have been trying to reason out why Fat 
Smith exists." 

Sixth: "Any result?" 

Fourth: "No, on Fat's own motion the subject was abandoned as 
idiotic." 



Sissons II (after seeing MacLeod's tie): "Now^ I know where my 
shoe-laces go." 



Jake Russell (after Massey Hall) : 'What did you think of 
Stokowski?' 

Jaffray: "He didn't have his tie on right." 



74 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



40—30 
Right merrily the masters play 
At tennis on the green; 
With many a bold and lusty stroke, 
To make excitement keen. 



Sometimes they argue over points 
(They're human in moments loose), 
Loud dissension fills the air, 
Whether the count is deuce. 




The Masters' opinion of us. 



Armstrong: "Your dog bit me on the face." 
Mclnerney: "That accounts for his broken teeth." 



"Tut! tut!" went the fliver and stopped. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 75 

Jaffray (heatedly): "I don't know any swells? Why I know a 
man whose uncle played poker with the Prince of Wales!" 



THAT JITNEY BUS OF MINE 

I've cussed it and I've mussed it, 
And I've pushed it down the road; 

I've coaxed it and I've hoaxed it, 
And I've even packed its load, 

I've cranked it and I've spanked it, 
And I've begged the thing to run ; 

I've tried everything from Fall to Spring 
That ever has been done. 

When I write about the cussed thing 
From front to rearmost wheel ; 

I have to change the meter 
To express just how I feel. 

I've warmed the carburetor, 

With hot water by the pail ; 
I've primed it with directions, 

That were never known to fail. 

I've cleaned up every spark plug, 

I've bathed it in the sun, 
And when I got through nursing it, 

The blamed thing wouldn't run. 

I've even strained its gasoline. 

Put perfume in its oil; 
I've manicured the battery, 

Tied ribbon on the coil. 

I've kept it like a pig pen 

So my friends would feel at home; 
And when I'd want to show it off. 

The blamed thing wouldn't "roam." 

I've prayed for thieves to steal it. 

And get stung by the deal; 
But if they tried to start it 

They could never turn a wheel. 



76 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



If I only had an enemy 
I'd give him that machine 

And know I had the best of him 
By everything that's mean. 

I'd dump it 1^1 the river; 

But if I took this whim 
It would pollute the water 

So the fish there couldn't swim. 



Texas Clark. 




A WORKER ON THE SOIL. 

THE SUICIDE 

He leaned out of a window in the college; he looked at the trees and 
then at the lawn; he glanced at the pretty girl across the way. He 
was going to end his life by a leap to the ground because he was going to 
fail in his exams. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 77 

He tried to feel exalted, but could not. What he thought of was no 
death, but that Howard owed him two dollars and five cents and what a 
pity to kill himself and leave Howard the two dollars and five cents. 
Then, too, his Dad was going to buy a new car and it seemed such a 
shame to spoil the summer by a funeral. 

A room mate entered at this moment and aksed him, jocularly, 
whether he was contemplating suicide and our hero replied, "Just 
planning to work and get my matric." 

To make this tale the equal of contemporary dramatic fiction we 
must add, "And the devil gnashed his teeth." 



DEATH 

A night as black as a locomotive; terror ixi the air. Death! Death! 
The lad seemed terror stricken; although his real attitude could not be 
discerned through the gloom he seemed to be holding his hands to his 
face in abject terror. 

A motor car coming in the driveway illumined a garbage can, and the 
boy could be seen holding a handkerchief to his nose. Something had 
died — indeed! ! 



Our ancestors all used to live 

In Scotland, home of cheer, 
The Camerons, Grants, McLeods and Shaws 

And other Clans are here. 
We are of rugged fighting stock, 

Ye Sassenachs take warning! 
But it's O'Hara's bell that gets us up, 

At seven every morning. 

W'e march in bonny tartan kilts 

Behind our braw pipe band; 
We're useful lads at any job, 

W^e'll gladly lend a hand, 
To cut the grass, paint motor cars, 

Or cure a horse of spavin, 
But when a water pipe is burst, 

We have to call in Flavin. 

W'e eat our porridge every morn, 

And oat cakes now and then, 
And marmalade and good Scotch broth, 

Will make us stalwart men ; 



78 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

But if wc want a record clean, 

For Saturday morning's journey, 

We must get credit through the week, 
With work for Mclnerney. 



You all know Freddie Deacon. Well, Freddie was going downtown 
on a Church Street car and two girls were talking. One said, "Isn't 
he just perfect, so manly." Well, you can just imagine how Freddie felt. 
Gee, but he was proud; but darn it, he turned around and found that 
they were looking at an Arrow Collar advertisement. 



AND TENNYSON SHOUTED, "STOP THIEF!" 

Contemplate all this bunch of guys, 

The student labouring in his zeal, 

The weary day-boy on his wheel. 
The amorous slicker making eyes. 

We trust that those we call poor fools. 

May soon outgrow their childish faults, 
Have many bonds in downtown vaults, 

Or use their money founding schools. 

Skit. 



Daly (to room-mates): "Where is our cake of soap?" 



McLachlan (during the holidays): "Oh yes, the masters were very 
strict-, we used to get punished for everything. Why you couldn't 
even take a shower without getting soaked. 



Shirlev McRae: The man with the concave chest. 



♦ 



This happened on Sports' Day: 

\'isitor (seeing Buckley and Curry engaged on their seventh dish 
of ice-cream) : "I wonder what race that is?" 



"Eyes right," said the cross-eyed man looking towards the left. 



As fragile as a Ming vase, more frail than a violet is a schoolboy's 
dignity. 



Hink: "Rufe Curr>' is so smoothe that he has to wear rubber heels 
to keep from skidding." 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 79 

WHO'S WHO IN S.A.C. 
Fairy McLachlan — Prominent clubman (Bowles). 
Louie McRae^ — Prominent clubman (Bowles). 
Pup. Murchison — Prominent clubman (Bowles). 

etc. 



Taggart: "Don Patterson has a terrible temper." 
Joe: "How's that?" 

Taggart: "He got sore at the phonograph the other day and broke 
all records." 



Messenger-boy (gazing at our Greek motto over the door): "Thi 
must be a Jewish school." 



A NUTTY NUT STORY 
Miss Hazel Nutt from Nuttingham 
Sold nuts for a nutty grocery man; 
She had hazel nut eyes and chestnut hair 
She would look at the nuts with a nutty stare 
She sold hickory nuts to all the hicks 
And cocoanuts, peanuts and ice cream bricks 
She supported the whole Nutt family, 
Was as good as a nutty girl could be. 
'Twas on a bright nut-sundae morn 
The Nutts at home felt quite forlorn, 
For all they had to eat that day 
Were grape nuts, doughnuts, and shredded hay 
Then old Axle Nutt flew off his nut. 
And grabbed a shot gun by the butt. 
And when this nut made a bolt for the door, 
It made the whole Nutt family sore, 
And every Nutt on the family tree, 
Was a raving nut at that jambaree. 

Texas Clark. 



THE MANIAC FROM STEWIACKE 

Scene: A peasant hut with a tin roof, surrounded by fields of hops. 
It is twilight and the lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea. While the 
ploughman homeward plods his weary way. 

Ploughman: "I'm done in, I've been cutting up all day with my 
plough." 

Lowing Herd: "Moo — Moo." 

Ploughman: "Where is my brother Marmaduke?" 



80 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Lowing Herd: "Moo^ — Moo!" 

Enter Marmaduke from the left of the right cow in the lowing herd. 

Marmaduke: "Here I be, your brother that is, your brother that 
was and your uncle that will be." He calls "Sola! Sola!" 

Enter Sola. 

Sola: "If the quality of mercy were not strained I'd hand you a 
swift one." 

Ploughman: "Let us hit the hay before another day dawns." 

Exit Ploughman and Marmaduke. 

Sola: "Well, the moonlight sleeps upon the bank but as long as there 
is no bull-dog sleeping there also it should be an easy job for a good 
burglar like myself." 

Exit Sola with flashlight. 

Lowing Herd: "Moo! — Moo!" 

This is a mystery play, the mystery consisting of what it's all about. ■ 

The maniac is supposed to be one of the lowing herd. I trust everything f 

is clear now. 



ALL THE LATEST MAGAZINES 

Popular Science. .^ Mr. Goodman's period. 

Popular Mechanics Fixing the Radiator. 

Literary Digest F. Roper Dayment. 

The Century^ The last period in the afternoon. 

The Bookman Mr. Gregory. 

Smart Set Room 214. 

\^anity Fair Galbraith at his mirror. 

Everybody's Cricket. 

The Etude. "Pup" Murchison. 

The American Eddie Noonan. 

The Blue Book Detention Sheets. 

Physical Culture "Horse" Marshall. 



"Love in the stone age was like this," thought McLachlan when the 
girl "beaned" him with a golf club. 



There was a bold prefect named Peene 
Whose moustache could hardly be seen. 

To make it grow faster 

Used Herpicide plaster 
And turned the blamed thing a bright green. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 81 

THE WIT 
There is a pleasing sort of chap 
One meets in any city, 
He mostly has a smiling map, 
And people call him witty. 

"Hot-dog" is his favourite phrase 
And when it takes its toll, 
He puts his audience in a daze 
By shouting "Jelly-roll." 

So he goes onward gaining fame. 
With many a slang expression, 
Calls a lady a "Snappy dame" 
Don't kill him! Use discretion. 

K.B.C. 



EXTRACTS FROM PRIZE FICTION 

Alonzo was a dentist so when the shark opened its mouth to swallow 
Alonzo^he said "Those two back teeth need filling." 
Exit the shark afraid of the drill. 

His piercing orbs gazed on the 'incandescent panorama revealed by 
the dawn and his thoughts returned to Seraphima the creature of his 
dreams. . 



Father. "You asked me for fifty dollars two weeks ago and now you 
ask for another twenty-five." 

Son: "Well you told me to economize." v 



The Apostle of suavity traced to his lair 
Hink Russell's the man. He reads Vanity Fair. 



Marshall: "What keeps me from going mad?" 
Pup: "The fact that you are mad already." 



Master: "How is it that I find you out of bed at this time of night?" 
Carrick II : "I'm sleep-walking sir, stand aside." 



Hunter: "What are bag-pipes anyhow?" 

Dayment: "A joke that the Scotch haven't seen yet." 



82 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 

It is rumoured that this advertisement will be included in the school 
calendar — "Beer (W.A.) at the table for all meals." 



A TESTIMONIAL 
Mr. J. Murchison says "I consider Bowles' Beans to have few equals 
and no peers as a sustaining food for any man." 



Peene: "My watch has stopped." 

Al. Findlay: "What's wrong?" 

Peene: "A bed-bug got between the ticks." 



Girls: "Where will I meet you, in front of the ice-cream parlour 
or the movie threatre?" 

Doug. Proudfoot: ."Meet me in front of the hardware store." 

CURRENT MOVIES * 

The Kid Garth Porter. 

Black Beauty Shirley McRae. 

W^ay Down East Gerald Buckley of Halifax. 

Forbidden Fruit The Master's Grapefruit. 

The Gilded Lily Galbraith. 

The City of Silent Men .S.A.C. after lights out. 

The Love Special A High Park Car. 

Sentimental Tommy Tom Aspden. 

The Nut "Mabel" Sissons. 

The Old Swimin' Hole. Carrick's Table. 

A Small Town Idol ....'. "Cully" W'ilson. 

Lying Lips Rufe Curry's leave yarn. 

The Last of the Mohicans. . . • "Pigg>'" McLelland. 

Through the Back Door Everyone except Prefects and Upper YI. 

Spanish Love Rivera. 

The Little Clown.' "Tiny" Fleck. 



YOU'RE ANOTHER 

Show me the man who tells you 
He never lied to his wife; 

And I'll show you the biggest liar, 
That ever was brought to life. 

If you ever meet a woman, 

Who has always spoken the truth; 
She's been an Egyptian Mummy, 

Since the days of her early youth. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 83 

And there's only one deduction, 

Though it's pretty tough to face, — 
But lying's the greatest accomplishment, 

That is known to the human race. 

Texas Clark. 



McLennan: "I suppose that now that we have to wear sport shirts 
Cully Wilson will have to wash his neck." 

Everhart: "Ah No! Cully purchased a black sport shirt to prevent 
that." 



King: (early morning) "What's that noise?" 
Brunt: "Only the dawn breaking." 



"Bill Brunt at St. Andrew's."- — A greater book than "Tom Brown 
at Rugby." 



"Abide with me," said the hotel manager 



Edmund Temple engineers more explosions in the S.A.C. lab. than 
the Katzenjammer kids do in the comic supplements. 



THE GLADIATORS AT HOME 
Characters 
Carrick L Ellis L 

Supple. Crowther. 

Chalker. Bill Brunt. 

Scene: The gladiator's den. Supple is dancing on the table. 
Carrick patting himself on the back. Ellis brushing his hair. Chalker 
reading Snappy Stories and Crowther looking out of the window. 

Supple: "Hurrah fellows I've got the Fairy McLachlan wobble 
down fine now." 

Carrick I: "Bravo my pupil you may yet reach the perfection of 
Michael Fokine's greatest rival — myself." 

Ellis: "Go on! Chalker looks like Pavlova beside you — you flat- 
fish." 

Carrick (controlling himself as usual): Such words are worthy of a 
member of the Upper Sixth. But beware for my anger is as far reaching 
as my brother Don's arm at dinner." 

Chalker: (putting aside Snappy Stories): "You've forgotten about 
brother Alex., Jess." 

Crowther raises his hand as if for a benediction. 
Crowther: "Peace my brethren." 



84 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

The stage is darkened and then lighted again for the entrance of the 
famous comedian, Brunt. 

Brunt: "Knetchel just hit me in the eye with one of King's neckties 
and burned me badly." 

All: "Curses on the infamous desperado." ! ! 

Brunt: "To the gallows with the fiend." 

Carrick: "I pulled a good one in class to-day." 

Ellis: "Cease and listen to Brunt." 

Carrick mounts on a dresser and tells his story forcibly. During the 
recital Supple faints and is assisted outside by Crowther. 

Chalker: "There's a good way to kill him, let Jess tell Knetchel 
the story." 

Brunt: "Well, let us go." 

He goes out followed by Carrick, Ellis and Chalker. 

Enter Supple and Crowther. 

Supple : "This is too much ; let us tear up Carrick's bed." 

This is done and they make their exit toward Knetchel's room. A 
great noise is heard in the hall like the sound of thunder or Huffy blowing 
his nose. 

Enter Carrick, much battered, his face more flat than usual. 

Carrick: "Ho, my cravat is torn into many pieces, my beauty sadly 
marred." (He sees his bed.) "Alas, my couch, also undone! Ven- 
geance, Vengeance! Don, Alec! Alec, Don! Call the clan together 
and let us wipe the earth with that bag pipe pla^^er. Supple. Curses!" 

Curtain. 



ABIE PLAUNT'S SPRING-SONG 

This lovely morn is Saturday, 
The birds sing in the tree, 
Ikey Cochrane comes this way, 
To borrow a dollar from me. 



THE WILY HAT CLERK OR HEAD EXPANSION 

Anderson (trying on new hat) : "This is too large." 
Hat Clerk: "My! but you are a handsome boy." 
Andy: "There, it fits now." 



Master: "What is a canine?" 
Draper: "A kind of pepper. Sir." 



The sun sets in the west and out of the "yeast" the moonshine. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 85 

FAMOUS SAYINGS OF FAMOUS MEN 

"How could you go wrong on such a simple little bit of syntax? 
Question, Carrick?" 

"Come, come, boys, do you realize that we only have five more hours 
of class time if all our periods were added up from now 'till Matric? 
That reminds me, a boy made the same mistake in another form this 
morning." 

"Now, lads, I know you feel sleepy, but carry on while I briefly 
sum this up." 

"Put everything away. Here! What are you doing? — Heaven 
help you ! Just take these notes." 

' 'There you are again with that silly mistake ! How many times must 
I tell you that verb is irregular?" 

"This room is very stuffy, boys! Carson, fifteen lines — no book-v— 
Thursday'. Write out memory w^ork." 

"W'hoareyou? Your case I must consider separately! Better take 
a double gating and four hour's work." 

R.S.V.^. 



LOWER SCHOOL SKITS 

Lentz: "May I get into my drawer for my handkerchief?" 
Mr. T.: "No, you are too big." 



Crowe: "Do you like Grape-nuts?" 
Noriega I: "What are they?" 
Crowe: "It's a cereal." 
Noriega I: "Who's playing in it?" 



Mr. Tudball: "You don't look well this morning, are you ill?" 
McLaren I: "Yes, Sir, I have just undergone a terrible operation. 
The Bursar cut my allowance." 



Noonan: "Have you got the ties Mr. Ramsey promised me?" 
Herchmer: "No, but there are lots out on the railway track." 



Bethune II : "I lost a drafting pen." 
Bethune I : "Did it blow away?" 



86 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE RE\'IE\V 

An original joke submitted by "Giant" Robertson. He says it's 
a good one. 

Full pitch. Boundary — six. Lost ball. Costs a lot. 



Munn II : "What would you do if a deaf and dumb asylum caught 
fire?" 

Bartram: "Ring a dumb-bell." 



1st Flea: "Where have you been?" 

2nd Flea: "On a journey; where have you been?" 

1st Flea: "On a tramp." 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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^t ^nbreto'si College 



^ l^oronto 

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A ^ 

" BOARD OF GOVERNORS ^ 

CHAIRMAN: I 
J. K. Macdonald, Esq. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN: 
Colonel Albert E. Gooderham Y 



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GOVERNORS: f 

Rev. Prof. Kilpatrick, D.D. „ 

Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A., LL.D. f 

Sir Joseph W. Flavelle, Bart. 

D. B. Hanna, Esq. ► 

Frank A. Rolph, Esq. '' 

A. M. Campbell, Esq. 

H. E. Irwin, Esq., K.C. i 

Sir John C. Eaton '' 

D. A. Dunlap, Esq. 

y ^ 

j Thomas Findley, Esq. L 

Ralph Connable, Esq. 

J W. B. McPherson, Esq. 

^ Albert E. Gooderham, Jr., Esq. 



Lyman P. Howe, Esq, 
Kenneth B. MacLan 
Robert J, Gill, Esq. 



" Kenneth B. MacLaren, Esq. l 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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#len iilator 

651 SPADINA AVENUE, TORONTO 
Residential and Day School for Girls 

Principal— MISS J. J. STL ART 

(Successor to Miss Veals) 
Classical Tripos, Cambridge University, England. Large well-ventilated house, pleasantly 
situated. Highly qualified staft of Canadian and European teachers. The curriculum 
shows close touch with modern thought and education. Preparation for matriculation 
examinations. Special attention given to individual needs. Outdoor games. 

School Reopens September 20th, 1921 

>e\v Prospectus from Miss Stuart 



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Telephone Adelaide 102 



The Macoomb Press 

Printing 

That gets results 



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16 JOHNSON STREET 



Toronto 



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Office Phone M. 2877 



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Warehouse M. 5236 



Produce M. 2390 



STRONACH & SONS 

WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits Butter, Eggs, Produce of all Kinds 

Apples and Potatoes in Car Lots 



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LET THE 






British-American Cleaners and Pressors 

LOOK AFTER YOUR CLOTHES 

Our Special Students Contracts at $5.03 for 12 Suits. Guarantees Satisfaction. 
SUITS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 



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485 SPADINA CRESCENT 



Phone College 5390 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Toronto Auto Accessories 

LIMITED 



N. 4292 



J. S. GREEN. 
S.A.C.. '07-m 



M. S. GOODERHAM, 
S.A.C., 'Ol-'IO 



AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT \ 



598 YoNGE Street 



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Distinctive 
Photography 

CHARLES 

AYLETT 

— STUDIO — 

96 Yonge Street 

SITTINGS BY 
APPOINTMENT 

Phone Main 1098 



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y R.T. MclNTYRE 

BARBER 



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Special Attention 

to 

College Boys 



1226 YONGE ST 



5 minites walk from 
St. Andrew's 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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C/ZE/^/^ F FLIP 



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ROBERTSON BROS. LTD. 
TORONTO 



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"TAPLIN NATURAL TREAD SHOES" 

FACTORY TO POCKET 

Scientific, Good Looking, Comfortable. The most highly approved 
shoe in the world. These wonder shoes are now made in our own 
factory at Belleville, and for the first time in history the public is 
able to secure them without unnecessary delay. During the period 
of distribution to Retail Stores throughout Canada we are prepared 
to give our usual attention to mail orders received at our model 
retail store — rememtjer that. 

"Taplin Natural Treads" are the only Canadian Shoes approved 
by the Hygiene Committees of the Y.W.C.A. of the United Statss 
and Canada. Begin now to be proud of your feet by taking care of 
them. We guarantee absolute protection as well as maximum 
correction in all " Taplin Natural Treads." 

"Taplin Natural Treads" are largely worn by the most exclusive 
people and will be found to meet the demands for all occasions. 
They are made in the finest leathers and finest qualities, in turns 
and welts, and in 9 widths in all sizes. 

Write for information and measurement forms 

NATURAL TREAD SHOES LIMITED 

310 YONGE STREET, TORONTO 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




Men's Furnishing 
House 

Latest Styles — 

Best Qualities 

PRICES RIGHT 

COOPER & CO. 

IMPORTERS 

67 & 69 King St. East 

TORONTO 



Plan and Prepare 
for Your Vacation 



Don't overlook the sup- 
plies that are going to 
mean so much to you 
this Summer. 

See that you have your 

Rackets^ Golf Clubs, 

Fishuig Tackle^ 

Camp Supplies, etc. 

before you go away. 

We are now showing 
complete variety of all 
Summer Sport and Out- 
ing Supplies. 

See us before yoic leave on Vacation 

The HAROLD A. WILSON Co. Ltd 



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297-299 YONGE ST., TORONTO 



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BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

A.D. 1S33 
Head Office - TORONTO 

Firct Marinct Hailt and Aatomobile 

W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 
E. F. GARROW, Secretary 

Assets, over ------- $4,300,000.00 

Losses Paid Since Organization, over - - $47,500,000.00 



WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

" Fire, Marine, Automobile, Explosion, Riots, Civil Commotions and Strikes ^ 
Head Office, TORONTO, ONT. Incorporated 1851 



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Assets, over . . . 

Losses Paid Since Organization, over 



$8,000,000.00 
$77,700,000.00 



W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 



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C. S. V^^AINWRIGHT, 

Secretary 



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A. R. PRINGLE, 

Canadian Fire Manager 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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nDc(BUl ^nivereit^ 

MONTREAL 

.^ griculture 

Applied Science (For Men) 

Architecture, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, 
Mechanical, Metallurgical, and Mining 
Engineering. 

Arts 

Commerce 

Dentistry 

Household Science (For Women) 

Law 

Medicine 

Music 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education 

School for Graduate Nurses 

(For Women) 

Public Health Nursing for Teachers and 
Supervi'.ors in Schools of Nursing. 

Social Service 

All of the above courses, except those 
otherwise specified, are open to Men and 
Women. 

The Calendar containing full parti- 
culars regarding Matriculation, Courses 
of Study, the uork comprised in each 
year, and the details of double courses 
offered, may be obtained from 

The Registrar. 



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THE LUMSDEN BLDG. 

BARBER 
SHOP 

YONGE and ADELAIDE 

(Basement) 



8 



CHAIRS 

Absolutely Sanitary 



The barbers of this establishment 
are authorized by the proprietor 
to refuse to shave or do any work 
on customers whose faces or 
scalps give any evidence of in- 
fection whatever. Main 2535 



SMITH & WALSH 



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LIMITED 



Insurance Brokers 






BANK OF HAMILTON BLDG. 
TORONTO 



BEST INDEMNITY AT 
MINIMUM COST " 



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F.A.BOWDEN&SONS 

Established 1880 
Phone Gerrard 220—221 

Retail Lumber 

LATH, SHINGLES, 

SHEETING, SHELVING, 

CRATING, FLAG POLES, 

BEAVER BOARD, Etc. 



Cld Boys 

FRANK G. EOWDEN 
HARRY V. EOWDEN 
ARTHUR (Pat) EOWDEN 



Greenwood Ave. G.T.R. Tracks 

TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




Hawaiian Music is still the rage for popularity in 

Canada and we think its popularity will remain. 

A feature of Hawaiian Music is the ease with 

J which the instruments can be learned. i 

» Yoti can learn to play a Guitar well in 60 days ' 

and a Ukulele in much less time. 



1 



We have guitars from $7.50 up and Ukuleles 
$3.50 up. 

R. 5. TT 1 IwlwlrViTlO LIMITED 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS OF QUALITY 

145 YONGE STREET - - TORONTO 

Established 1849 




The Very Best SPORTING GOODS 

BASEBALL, SOCCER, CRICKET. TENNIS 
GOLF, TRACK AND FIELD SUPPLIES 

Fishing Tackle, Canoes, etc. 



Write for Catalogue. 



Jerseys, Sweaters and Sweater Coats ^ 



PERCY A. McBRIDE 

343-345 YONGE ST., TORONTO. PHONE AD. 6450 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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EAT AND ENJOY 

NASMITH'S 
=BREAD= 

It is the bread that 
meals are made of 



For Delivery Phone 
. . . Main 6535 . . . 



5 42-56 DUCHESS STREET, 
TORONTO 



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11 GALLAGHER & CO. [j 

LIMITED 



Phones 



Main ■'^ Established i88i 

^"'^'" 17498 



" Direct Importers and Distributors 
of 
FRUITS and VEGETABLES 
FISH and OYSTERS 



to 

Hotels, Clubs and Restaurants 

Hospitals and Colleges 

Railways Dining Car and 
Camp Supplies 

107 KING ST. EAST 
TORONTO 



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YOU EAT A 






CHRISTIE BISCUIT 



YOU EAT THE BEST 



CHRISTIE, BROWKI & CO., LTD., TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 






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Established 1864 



iiJOHNCATTOCO.ltd. 

Make an interesting exhibit of 

SCOTTISH CLAN and 

FAMILY TARTANS 

In fine saxony cloths in all the principal 
Clan and Family Names. .-Mso in 

Heavy Kilting Cloths 

J For the making up of Mens and Youths 
** Kilts. 

Highland Costumes 

Made to Order 



We carry all accessories for the complete 
Highland Costumes as Glengarry Caps, 
Balmorals, Tam O'Shanters, Sporrans, 
Hose, Brooches, Cocktail Feathers, Garters, 
etc., etc. 

Tartan Silk Sashes 

In big range of all the principal Tartans. 

Automobile Rugs 

All Wool reversible Rugs in great variety 
of Clan and Family Names. 



f1 219-23 YONGE ST. .^^k. 



TORONTO 



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GAGE'S 

MeIAND 

A^ correspondence paper that 
makes wntirtg a pleasure. 

The beautiful texture and pen- 
inviting surface and the 
fashionable envelopes 
lift it above all other 
inexpensive writing 
papers. Its use vvill add 
distinction to your letters. 



So?d by 
AIL GOOD SKTIONERS 



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CRICKET, BASEBALL, TENNIS f 
LACROSSE SUPPLIES 



N&W Spring and Summer Footwear 



J. BROTHERTON 

Phone N. 2092 580 YONGE ST. 

Open Evenings 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Telephone Main 2912 

James 
Manson 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



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J. J. McLaughlin 

Limited 



32 

Adelaide Street Ea^ 
TORONTO 

FINEST SELECTION 
OF SCOTCH TWEEDS 
AND WORSTEDS 



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"Pest" 
peberages 

are for Sale at 

St. Andrew's 
^■^A^- Tuck 



SAFEST and BEST 
to DRINK 




HENRY SPROATT, L.L.D., R.C.A. 
ERNEST K. ROLPH. 



SPROATT 
''' ROLPH ^ [ 



^rcfjitects 



36 NORTH STREET 
TORONTO 



Brown Bros. 

Limited 

1 and 3 St. Lawrence Market 

Main 868 
Main 869 

DEALERS IX 

All kinds of Fresh and Salt 
Meats, Hams and Bacons 

Corned Beef a Specialty 
All Kinds of Poultry in Season 

BRANCH 

2 and 4 St. Patrick's Market 

TORONTO 



■SZBZ. 



TELEPHONE ADELAIDE 2665 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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COLES 

Caterer 

and 

MANUFACTURING 
i CONFECTIONER 



Si 



Catering a Specialty 

S{ 



PHONE N. 154 

719 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO 



13: s{ 

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When You Buy 

CAKES 



Ask for 



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Eclipse 

They are the Be^ 



Manufactured by 

Eclipse Baking Co. 

Limited 

TORONTO 






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PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL OR CLASS 



LESSONS BY APPOINTMENT 



Mosher Studio of Dancing 

583 Church Street Phone North 4530 



TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 






Use Our 

Xelephone Service M^ore 

Boys 

When you need anything just call up our Boy's Department — 
say what you want — and let us do the choosing for you. You 
can rely on the quality — and the prices you may depend upon 
to be right with equal confidence. 

We are always glad to see you — and want you to come often — 
but we know there are times when a fellow really can't "get off" 
— and we want to suggest that you phone for what you need, 
when you can't come. 

THE NUMBER IS ADELAIDE 5100 



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MURRAY-KAY COMPANY, Limited 

Everything For Boys" 15-31 King Street East 



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SMART SHOES 
FOR YOUNG MEN 



Shoes for every and each 
occasion. The best to be 
had at the price. Made 
to fit as well as to wear. 
Tr}^ us for your next pair. 



H. & C. Blachford 

LIMITED 

286YongeSt.,opp.DundasE. 



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TWO STORES 



BOND BROS. 

2)ruQc;t6t9 



453 YONGE STREET 

Phone North 350 

Cor. MADISON AVE. 

and DUPONT ST. 

Phone Hillcrest 812 
TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



li VICTORY BONDS 

On the open Market 



D 



J Central Canada Loan and Savings Company ^^ 

26 KING STREET EAST, TORONTO f 



We have opened a special depaitment to take care 
of Mctory Loan trading and shall be glad to have 
you correspond, telegraph or telephone at our ex- 
pense for the latest quotations, regardless of the 
amount you may be selling or purchasing. 



BONDS WILL BE DELIVERED TO ANY 
^ PART OF CANADA FREE OF EXPENSE 

Dominion Securities 
corporation limited 

" HEAD OFFICE : TORONTO 26 KING ST. E. 

MONTREAL Established 1901 LONDON, ENG. 




CAPITAL (Paid Up) $1,750,000 RESERVE FUND $1,750,000 ^ 

Surplus Security for Depositors and Debenture Holders, $4,417,952.00 t 



DEPOSITS received in sums of $1.00 and upwards. Subject 

to cheque withdrawal. 
DEBENTURES issued in sums of SlOO and upwards, payable in 
from one to five years, or upon sixty days' 
notice, and upon which special rates of interest are allowed, 
depending upon the term of investment. These Debentures 
are authorized as a Trustee Investment by Special Order in 
Council. 

E. R. WOOD, President 

G. A. MORROW, Vice-President H. C. COX, Vice-President 

A. B. FISHER, Asst. Manager 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




mg CAMP g^ 

KagawonG 

Present indications are that 
the Camp will again have a 
waiting list this year and old 
boys as well as new boys in- 
tending to enter are requested 
to make application early. 

For illustrated booklet and 
further information. 

Address 

E. A. CHAPMAN, 

.S7. Andrew's College 




Games 
Sailing 
Fishing 
Shooting 
Camping 
Ffrst A id 
Dramatics 
Swimming 
Life Saving 
Fancy Diving 
Nature Study 
Canoe Cruises 
Sailing Cruises 



St. Andrew's Boys at Camp 1920 



Allen II 

Ashenhurst 

Bristol 

Blauvelt 

Brown I 

Carrick I 

Carrick II 

Carrick III 

Colebrook 

Craig 

Crowe 

Dennis 

Dyment 

Easton 

Fair 

Fleck 

Grant II 

Grant III 

Hall I 

King 



Lentz 

Lumbers II 

Lyon 

McCarter 

MacLennan 

Noriega I 

Noriega II 

Power 

Rivera 

Rolph 

Skeaff 

Smart 

Sloan 

Smith II 

Stollmeyer I 

Stollmeyer II 

Stollmeyer III 

Stewart I 

Watts 



Boxing 

Archery 

Baseball 

]\'restling 

Woodcraft 

Gymnastics 

Canoeing 

Volley Ball 

Captain Ball 

Photography 

Water Baseball 

A thlelic Sports 

Manual Training 




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The 

Youn^ Man's 

Shop 

Here's a Young Man's Shop that 
makes a special appeal to the un- 
dergrads with fine hand-tailored 
Clothing and Haberdashery that 
are the first choice of careful 
dressers and careful buyers 
everywhere. 




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102 Yon^e St. 




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made from the finest carefully selected 


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perfect the rich chocolate flavor. <~^ 


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Cheerful Warmth 
at JCov^ Cost 



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The Radiantfire is a remar liable gas heating 
appliance that should he in every fireplace. 
It can always he depended upon for instant 
warmth. It lights without puffing and burns 
without the trace of an odor. Its ever 
changing opalescent glow is as good to lool^ 
upon as it is effective at heating. 

Considering the efficiency of this gas heater, 
the cost of operation is indeed very small. 



See DISPLAY of RADIANTFIRES 

Sales Dept., 19 Toronto Street 

THE CONSUMERS' GAS CO. 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS