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Full text of "The Sword and the trowel"

8BSB 



ffl£ 






THE J. F. C. 

HARRISON 



COLLECTION OF 

NINETEENTH CENTURY 

BRITISH SOCIAL HISTORY 







^e JU— ^ 




I 







THE EIFFEL TOWER, FARIS. 



THE 




wmAwdikt^ixmd; 



A RECORD 



OF 



COMBAT WITH SIN AND OF LABOUR FOR THE LORD. 



EDITED BY C. H. SPURGEON. 



1889. 



"They which builded on the wall, and they that bare burdens, with those that laded, every 
one with one of his hands wrought in the work, and with the other hand held a weapon. 
For the builders, every one had his sword girded by his side, and so builded. And he that 
sounded the trumpet was by me." — Nehemiah iv. 17, 18. 



Sandoit : 

PASSMORE & ALABASTER, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS, 

AND ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



Index of Texts of Sermons, etc., by C. H. 
"The Sword and the Trowel," Vols. 



Spurgeon, en 
I.— XXV. 



GexxGsis i. 7 

„ viii. 11 

» xv. 1 

,, xlii. 22 
Exodus iii. 6 

,, viii. 8 

,, xvii. 8, 9 

„ xxxiii. 14 ... 
Leviticus xxvi. 4 
Deuteronomy xxii. 8 

„ xxxii. 11, 

Joshua ii. 21 

Judges iii. 20 

Ruth ii. 14 

I. ISam. i. 27 

„ ix. 3, 20 

II. Sam. xvii. 23 
,, xxi. 10 

„ xxiii. 9, 10... 
,, xxiv. 12 

I. Kings iv. 33 

„ v. 14 

II. Kings iv. 29-37 ... 

„ iv. 38, 41, 42 
vi. 1-7 ... 
,, xiii. k0 ... 
Nehem. viii. 10 

Esther vi. 6 

J ob xxxii. 7 

,, xxxvii. 7 

,, xxxviii. 23 

Psalm xvii. 3 

„ xxxiii. 18 

„ xl. 17 

„ xl.17 

., lxi. 2 

,, lxviii. 28 

„ lxxi. 16 

,, lxxx. 14 

,, lxxxiv. 10 

., Ixxxvi. 16 ... 

„ xci. 1 

,, civ. 28 

„ cvii. 17-22 ... 

,, cxi. 5 

„ cxix. 89-96 ... 

,, cxxi 

,, cxxviii. 
Proverbs v. 16 

Eccl. ix. 4 

Canticles ii. 3 
„ ii. 12 

ii. 16, 17 ... 
iv. 7 
,, ,, ... 

Isaiah v. 17 

„ vi. 1-8 

,, xxix. 5 
,, xxxviii. 1 

,, xliii. 1 

„ xliii. 10 
„ Iii. 13, 15 



12 



Year Page 


1871 


399 


1879 


153 


1884 


566 


1877 


541 


1889 


49 


1884 


3 


1889 


585 


1884 


613 


1882 


282 


1869 


319 


1870 


49 


1875 


148 


1874 


545 


1882 


337 


186S 


108 


1872 


109 


1870 


537 


1868 


294 


1876 


439 


1878 


517 


1889 


153 


1883 


569 


1867 


99 


1876 


337 


1868 


99 


1866 


5 


1867 


172 


1865 


2 


1878 


1 


1883 


3 


1878 


212 


1886 


609 


1889 


105 


1871 


5 


1885 


201 


1878 


97 


1888 


5 


1832 


6 


1878 


382 


1888 


521 


1888 


4 


1880 


108 


1874 


297 


1871 


462 


1880 


445 


1882 


117 


1882 


528 


1883 


171 


1878 


286 


1868 


108 


1879 


201 


1870 


97 


1883 


289 


1865 


229 


1865 


277 


1876 


485 


188) 


493 


1878 


193 


1870 


207 


1888 


105 


1875 


501 


1885 


153 



Isaiah liii. 12 ... 

,, lviii. 8... 

„ lxi. 1 ... 

„ lxv. 24... 
Jer. ii. 36 
„ vi. 16 
Lamen. iii. 56 
Joel ii. 8 
Amos v. 8 

„ v. 24 ... 

„ vii. 1 ... 
Jonah i. 4 

„ ii. 7 ... 
Zech. x. 3 

,, xiv. 20... 
Malachi iii. 17 
Matthew v. 1-12 
v. 3... 
,, xiii. 12 
,, xiv. IB 
,, xxiii. 37 
,, xxiv. 12 
,, xxvi. 3J 
Mark iv. 38, 39 
Luke viii. 46 ... 

,, viii. 49 ... 

„ x. 34, 35 

„ xi. 5, 6 ... 

„ xi. 21, 22 

,, xxii. 14... 
John i. 16 

„ iv. 34 ... 

,, xii. 3 ... 

,, xiii. 10... 

„ xiv. 18 ... 

,, xvi. 31, 32 

,, xviii. 18 

,, xix. 19 ... 

„ xxi. 16 ... 
Acts ix. 18 ... 

„ xii. 18 ... 

,, xvii. 34 ... 

,, xxiii. 10-13 
Romans xiii. 12 
I. Cor. iv. 1, 2 

»> » 

„ x, 16, 17 
Eph. ii. 8 

„ vi. 15 ... 
Phil. iii. 2 ... 

„ iv. 19 ... 
I. Tim. i. 15 ... 
Heb. iii. 18, 19 

„ xiii. 7 ... 
James v. 11 ... 
I. Peter ii. 7 ... 

" '». ;•• 

., ,, 24, 25 
I. John v. 18, 20 
III. John 2 ... 
Rev. i. 17, 18 ... 
„ v. 9 



Year Page 

1882 49 

1869 460 

1877 493 
1889 489 

1870 393 
1879 105 
1872 202 

1869 241 

1870 312 

1878 286 
1872 364 
1878 193 
1872 545 
1866 195 
1866 97 

1866 481 
1874 8 

1874 129 
1878 346 

, 1871 49 

. 1870 49 

, 1883 521 

1867 481 
1885 1 

, 1873 407 

. 1885 561 

1888 49 
, 1886 1 
, 1887 49 
, 1873 61 
. 1865 471 
. 1873 5C8 
. 1876 49 
. 1870 25 
. 1870 450 
, 1871 145 
. 1876 97 
. 1884 472 
. 1877 289 
. 1877 97 
, 1873 362 

1889 201 
. 1881 201 
. 18S9 537 

1837 255 

. 1887 325 

. 1883 53 

. 1887 3 

. 1874 497 

, 1876 257 

. 1877 1 

1872 293 
. 1877 371 
, 1875 405 

188 J 49 

186) 481 

1873 120 
1888 473 

1875 59 

1868 462 
1882 505 

1876 447 



PREFACE. 



"We have now completed twenty-five years of our Magazine. The 
Sword has not lost its edge, nor has the Trowel grown rusty. Our 
dependence has been upon a strength which outrides the tide of time ; 
and for this reason, and for this reason only, we have not been suffered 
to fail. This Magazine remains to bear witness for the Lord against 
abounding error, and at the same time to encourage and stimulate every 
holy endeavour to glorify the name of Jesus. Herein we rejoice, yea, 
and will rejoice, that while the present period is a sad victim to the 
energy of falsehood and worldliness, it is the object of Christian solici- 
tude and endeavour to a very high degree. The weeds are shedding 
their seeds, but the wheat is ripening its corn. Surely the harvest is 
drawing near ! 

Next year, to begin another quarter of a century, we shall adopt a 
new wrapper for The Sword and the Trowel ; but there will be no 
change in its doctrine, nor in its method of promoting it. Our colours 
are nailed to the mast. 

Progress in the knowledge of truth does not imply the relinquish- 
ment of that God-given gospel which has throughout the centuries saved 
the souls of men. We ask our compeers whether the gospel of Paul, of 
Augustine, of Calvin, of Owen, and of McCheyne, did not assuredly 
bring salvation by Jesus Christ to those who knew nothing of " advanced 
theology," and they dare not question that it did. We ask them whether 
it does not still foster a true religious life, and they cannot deny it. 
We shall therefore keep to that which has been so long tried and proved ; 
and all the more so, because we see nothing new in " the new theology " 
which is one half so likely to produce the same result. If he who doubts 
the Divinity of our Lord, and the plan of Substitution, is called a 
Christian by the advocates of novelties ; even they have not gone so far 
as to deny the Christianity of those who firmly believe these glorious 
truths : therefore, on the very lowest ground, we resolve to take that 
road which is confessed to be safe, and in which a man may walk with 
the holiest. But more, we tremble at the disappointment which will 
surely come to those who lean on the bowing wall and tottering fence 
which the moderns set before them. A faith which knows not Christ 
as God, the divine Judge will not know at the last great day ; and 
those who trample on the atoning blood will reap nothing but con- 
demnation " in that day." 

While we shall not bear the Sword in vain, but use it against error, 
our Magazine will fully represent the work of the Trowel, in upbuilding- 
the cause of God. Throughout another year our friends have sustained 
The College, The Orphanage, The Evangelists, The Colportage, and The 
JJooJr, Fund, and we thank them with a full heart. To these is added 
The College Mission, which in Spain and North Africa has already done 
some little for foreign lands. This last will need to be greatly enlarged, 
and may safely be helped without injury to any other of the older 
missions. We are rivals to nobody, but hope to do our own work in 



IV 



PREFACE. 




quiet. We hope that, throughout the coming years, while we are 
spared to conduct these many enterprises, we may have the sympathy 
and the generous aid of the Lord's people, who judge us to be a fit 
agent in these matters. We need assistance ; but we look for it to the 
Lord himself, and lift our heart in prayer to him, that he may direct his 
stewards to supply our needs. 

Oar child, in its new 
dress, still lives in its 
old house, and we en- 
treat readers of the maga- 
zine and the weekly 
sermon, to think of the 
church in the Taber- 
nacle in their prayers. 
Our congregations have 
never been more gene- 
rally crowded than dur- 
ing the year 1889, and 
the number of conver- 
sions has never been 
more continuously cheer- 
ing. The Spirit of the Lord is with us. But what if his gracious 
presence were withdrawn ? Then might we call it Ichabod, for the 
glory is departed. We are filled with anguish at the very supposition of 
the good Lord's being grieved by the sin which he sees in us, so as to 
turn from us in anger. That were a grief we could not bear. Death 
would be desirable a thousand times beyond the least withdrawal of the 
sacred power. In vain the crowds, the societies, the ministry, if such 
a dire calamity should befall. Prayer must continually ascend that it 
be not so ; for then the adversary would rejoice, and the gospel would 
be ridiculed as having proved a failure. Truly, it would not have 
failed, because our sins were thus sadly visited ; but it would seem so 
among ungodly men, and " what would the Egyptians say ? " May the 
Lord continue to bless his own work in our hand, for his name's sake ! 

Once more we offer our heartfelt gratitude to our readers and 
helpers ; and we pray them to sustain us during the new period upon 
which we shall enter next month. Amid our perpetual engagements, 
the editing of this periodical is a heavy task; but we will press on 
while life and health shall last, and the Lord shall help us. Praying in 
the Holy Ghost, resting in the precious blood, trusting in God All- 
sufficient, and looking for the coming of our Lord, we set up our banner, 
and advance to a new year. 

So writes, 



The servant of the Lord's servants, 

C. H. SPURGEON. 



INDEX. 



Aerated Rationalism 
Almost a Hundred 
Apostolical Succession 
Artesian Eloquence 
Auxiliary Book-Fund 



PAGE 

, 427 
. 219 
. 113 
, 218 
73 



Books, Notices of — 

After Shipwreck, 662 ; Agnostic Fallacies, 661 ; 
Alone with the Word, 619 ; Among the Palms, 
38f ; Analysis of the Old Testament, 452 ; 
Anecdotes of Natural History, 87 ; Anecdotes 
of the Wesleys, 618 ; Anecdotes of Whitefield, 
618; Anecdotes on Bible Texts, 39, 238; An- 
gelic Apostasy, 143 ; Antichrist, The, 36 ; 
Around the Wicket Gate, 665; Authorship of 
the Fourth Gospel, 523 ; Autobiography of a 
Soldier, 239. 

Baptist Hymn Writers, 240 ; Barton Memorials, 
239 ; Beginnings of Religion, 575 ; Beyond the 
Stars, 86 ; Bible Briefs, 291 ; Bible-class Notes 
on Luke, 36 ; Bibles of England, 450 ; Bible 
Studies, 85 ; Bible Talks, 448 ; Bible Work, 
288; Biblical Illustrator, 235; Biblical Trea- 
sury, 36 ; Birds and Beasts, 87 ; Birds in my 
Garden, 621 ; Blackie's Encyclopaedia, 384 ; 
Blots and Blemishes, 382 ; Book Fund and its 
Work, 185 ; Book of Isaiah, 291 ; Books for the 
Young, 34, 35, 39, 144, 145, 192, 239, 240, 241, 
293, 389, 454, 456, 525, 526, 527, 528, 622, 623, 
662, 663, 664 ; Boys and Girls who have Risen, 
662 ; British Weekly Pulpit, 577 ; Buddhism, 
448. 

Captain Lobe, 526 ; Cards and Booklets, 35, 577, 
623, 660, 662 ; Catacombs, The, 295 ; Century 
Dictionary, 623 ; City of Faith, 524; Children's 
Angel, 661 ; Children's Text Book, 666; Child's 
Life of Christ, 290; Christ and His People, 
142 ; Christian Conscience, 290 ; Christianity 
according to Christ, 237 ; Christianity in Daily 
Life, 142; "Christian" Portrait Gallery, 661; 
Christian Progress in China, 455 ; Christian 
Solidarity, 142; Church History, 190; Church 
History Series, 618 ; Cloudy Days, 185 ; Coming 
Prince, 617; Commentary on Genesis, 450; 
Comments on Daniel, 242 ; Concise History of 
the Church, 140 ; Conquests of the Cross, 238 ; 
Conversations of the Unity Club, 190 ; Cottage 
Lectures, 662: Covenanters, The, 387; Crime, 
its Cause and Remedy, 87 ; Cry of Christendom, 
386 ; Cup and the Kiss, 620 ; Curve Pictures of 
London, 88. 

Daily Thoughts, 577 ; Dairyman's Daughter, 288 ; 
David, 238; David: his Life and Times, 238; 
Decisive Events, 296 ; Decline of the Church, 
140; Devil's Mission of Amusement, 140; Dis- 
ciple's Prayer, The. 86 ; Dissenter's Catechism, 
575 ; Doctrine of the Sacraments, 660 ; Dog- 
matic Theology, 451 ; Do Something for Jesus, 
388 ; Drake and the Dons, 87. 

Early Explorers, 296; Echoes from Japan, 572; 
Echoes from the Welsh Hills, 185; Eld Lane 
Chapel, Colchester, 618 ; Elijah, 242 ; Elijah 
and Ahab, 658 ; England of Shakespeare, 574 ; 
English Reviser's Greek Text, 452 ; Epheme- 
rides, 191 ; Epistles of St. John, 619 ; Epistle 
to the Galatians, 185 ; Epistolary Studies, 573 ; 
Essays on Sacred Subjects, 188; "Every Day," 
620; Every Morning, 242. 

Faith Mission, 616 ; Fallen on the Field, 618 ; 
Fancy Fair Religion, 39 ; Farmer George, 574 ; 
Fifteen Hundred Facts, 384; First Steps to 
God, 453 ; Five Talents of Woman, 141 ; Flashes 
from the Welsh Pulpit, 235 ; Flora's Feast, 244 ; 
Folk Lore, 382 ; Forbidden Fruit, 388 ; Foreign 
Missions, 576 ; Form of the Christian Temple, 



Books, Notices of (continued) — 
237 ; Four Last Words, 659 ; Fugal Tunes, 185 ; 
Future Probation 289. 

George Washington, 455; Gifford Lectures, 658 ; 
Glimpses of Fifty Years, 618; God in Nature, 
236 ; God in Business, 388 ; God's Jewels, 624 ; 
God's Power to Save, 387 ; Gordon's Sermons, 
295; Gospel in Song, 521; Great Question 
Answered, 658 ; Graham's Essays, 83. 

Hall's Poems, 292 ; Handbook of Baptism, 616 ; 
Handbooks for Bible-classes, 576; Happiest 
Half -hour, 36 ; Harold's Bride, 385 ; Helpful 
Truth, 455 ; Henry M. Stanley, 620 ; Herald of 
Mercy, 577 ; Herod's Temple, 383 ; Heroes of 
Every-day Life, 38 ; Historic Service of Song, 
665 ; History of the Presbyterians, 453 ; Hit- 
tites, The, 189; Hold the Fort, 574; Holland 
Road Pulpit, 244 ; Home of a Naturalist, 141 ; 
" Home Words " Publications, 35 ; Homiletical 
Commentary, 619 ; Hymns for Temperance 
Societies, 526 ; Hymns of our Pilgrimage, 
666 ; Imperfect Angel, 289 ; Impressions of 
Australia, 455 ; Incidents of Gospel Work, 187 ; 
Indian Missions, 453 ; India's Needs, 140 ; Inner 
Mission, 142 ; Inspiration of Scripture, 143, 189 ; 
Intaglio Texts, 294 ; Interpreter, The, 34 ; In 
the Far East, 239 ; Introduction to the New 
Testament, 186 ; Iris, 659 ; Is Bad Sight on the 
Increase '.' 620. 

John Bright, 525 ; John Hazelton, 37 ; John 
Ploughman's Almanack, 615 ; John the Baptist, 
449 ; Jonah, 186. 

Kensington, 525 ; Kingdom of God, 660 ; King's 
Own, The, 665. 

Lady Missionaries, 623 ; Law of Liberty, 450 ; 
Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, 143 ; Least of all 
Lands, 235 ; Leisure Hour, 39 ; Lewis's New 
Readings, 87 ; Life of James Frazer, 521 ; Life 
of J. Comber, 141 ; Life of Jeremiah, 84 ; Life 
of Mrs. Sewell, 294 ; Life of Savonarola, 146 ; 
Life of Submission, 529 ; Life of Timothy, 
294 ; Life's Problems, 87 ; Light and Colour, 
189 ; Light of the World, 297 ; Living Springs, 
388 ; London Slums, 88 ; Louise of Prussia, 38. 

Magazine Volumes for 1888, 191, 240 ; Magazine 
Volumes for 1889, 662, 663 ; Makers of India, 
38 ; Manliness, and other Sermons, 659 ; 
"Many Infallible Proofs," 295; Martyr 
Scenes, 38 ; Memoir of S. Deacon, 190 ; Memo- 
rable Bible Nights, 238 ; Memories of Eastern 
Travel, 38 ; Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit, 
34 ; Miller Manning, 243 ; Missionary Year 
Book, 455 ; Missions in Formosa, 385 ; Mis- 
sion Work in Central Africa, 385; Modern 
Church Amusements, 452 ; Modern Cyclopaedia, 
622 ; Modern Miracles, 575 ; Modern Mission, 
The, 140 ; More Stray Leaves, 449 ; Musings in 
Green Pastures, 37 ; Mystic Voices, 659 ; My 
Strongholds of Love, 665. 

New Testament Morality, 289 ; Nine Famous 
Crusades, 292 ; North Country Poets, 578 ; 
Not Cunningly-devised Fables, 40 ; Not Cun- 
ningly-devised Gospels, 617; Notes for Boys, 
236 ; Notes on Shorter Catechism, 576 ; Not 
Weary in Well-doing, 83. 

Obedience of a Christian Man, 572 ; Old Pastor's 
Testimony, 386 ; Old Testament Commentary, 
238; Old Wang, 296; On the Way to the 
Throne, 287 ; Onward, 39 ; Onward Reciter, 
621; Our Celestial Home, 386; Our Present 
Hope, &c, 573 ; Our Senior Scholars, 521 ; 
Our Wee Boy, 526; "Out of the Depths," 
616. 

Passim Papers, 188 ; Pastoral Epistles, 185 ; Path 
of Wealth, 238 ; Pearl of Days, 448 ; Peep into 
Russia, 292; People of the Pilgrimage, 242; 



Tl 



INDEX. 



Books, Notices of (continued) — 

Peshito-Syriac New Covenant Scriptures, 452 ; 
Physician's Sermon, 388 ; Pictures from Eastern 
Lands, 295 ; Pictures from the Life of Christ, 
573 ; Pioneer Boy, 555 ; Plenary Inspiration, 
382 ; Poet's Bible, 288 ; Popular Educator, 
292 ; Popular Sociology, 620 ; Practical Essay 
Writing 1 , 240 ; Preacher's Commentary, 383 ; 
Preachers of Scotland, 234 ; Preaching Christ, 
297 ; Preaching Tours of George Muller, 576 ; 
Pre-Millennial Coming of our Lord, 288 ; Pre- 
sent Day Tracts, 572 ; Prophetic Notes, 288 ; 
Prophet Jonah, 577 ; Proverbs of all Ages, 146 ; 
Pulpit Commentary, 40, 658 ; Pulpit Notes. 523. 

Questions of the Bible, 523 ; Quiver, The,' 621. 

Beligious Census of London, 292 ; BeHgious 
Teaching and Modern Thought, 616 ; B. T. S. 
Library. 294 ; Beport of Missionary Conference, 
188 ; Bipples in the Starlight, 236 ; Bobert 
Morrison, 38 ; Bomance of the Mountains, 88 ; 
Bomance of Psalter and Hymnal, 621 ; Bose- 
bud, The, 624 ; Buth, 188. 

Salt Cellars, 382, 616, 665 ; Samuel Butherford, 
296 ; Saved at Sea, 85 ; Saving Spirit, The, 387 j 
Scotland and the Bevolution of 1688, 386; 
Scripture Animals, 386 ; Scripture Concordance, 
291 ; Scripture Mother's Help, 386 ; Scripture 
Scenes, 288 ; Sermon Bible, 36, 290 ; Seven the 
Sacred Number, 85 ; Shepherd Psalm, The, 619 ; 
Short Biographies, 88, 239,658; Slum Pioneers, 
387 ; Spurgeon's Almanack, 615 ; Stephen 
Grellet, 146; Stockwell Beciter, 233; Stories 
for Bible Beaders, 387 ; Story of Christian Life, 
529; Story of Jesus, 449, 521, 524; Story of 
our Colonies, S8 ; Story of the Nations, 141, 
292, 453, 620 ; Sunbeams from Heaven, 452 ; 
Sunday Afternoons, 87 ; Sunday Letters, 236 ; 
Sunday School Convention, 577 ; Sun of 
Bighteousness, 86. 

Teacher's Pocket-Book, 665 ; Tea Meeting Talks, 
523 ; Temple of Solomon, 84, 383 ; Tempted 
London, 88 ; Three Years in Central London, 
666; Threshold of Manhood, 384; "Through 
Samaria," 84 ; To Him that Overcometh, 288 ; 
Toilers in London, 526 ; To the Lions, 385 ; 
Treasure Book of Consolation, 623 ; Trinity of 
Evil, 529 ; Triumph of Grace, 388 ; Trophimus, 
616; True Psalmody, 237; Turning Points, 
142. 

Unchanging Christ, 661 ; United Presbyterian 
Church, 620 ; Upward and Onward, 88 ; Voices 
of the Spirit, 40. 

"Waldensian Church, 37 ; War, 455 ; Way Back, 
238, 453 ; Weiss' s Introduction to the New 
Testament, 291 ; Westwood Leaflets, 449 ; 
What are we to Believe ? 188 ; What is a 
Christian ] 666 ; What is Man \ 236 ; When I 
was a Boy in China, 87 ; Whitaker's Almanack, 
146; Will Making, &c, 455; Winter on the 
Nile, 189 ; Women Friends of Jesus, 383 ; Won- 
derful Box, 621 ; Word Studies, 666 ; Words of 
Life, 238 ; Working for God, 451 ; Works and 
Claims of our Lord, 187 ; Written Word, The, 
522. 

Young Men's Text Book, 292 ; Young Plants, 
&o, 387. 



Brass Kettle, The 

Bridges, Charles- 
Eyes Bight 

Brown, H. Bylands — 

Here and There 

Our Countrymen in India... 

Bundle of Papers, A 

Burnham, J. — 

J. J. Kendon 

Seeking to Save 

"By Dilution" 

Can She Spin? 

Case3 of Providential Provision 



641 

65 

555 
3/7 
638 

516 

445 
122 

184 

432 



Chaplin, M.A.— 

Search Lights 

The Old Theology 

Charlesworth, V. J. * 

Cheering Look 

Chettleborough, B.E. — 

Sunset in the Southern Sca« 
Child Born a Hundred Years Old 
Christian who was Trusted 
Church of the Holy Befrigerator 
Church that will Hold, A 



611 
226 ; 
277 
427 

366- 
597 
28 
373 
562 



Colportage Association, Beceipts of, 48, 101, 152, 
200, 252, 304, 395, 468, 536, 584, 632,676 ; Beport 
of, 397. 

Cook, Charles — 

A Visit to Foreign Prisons 114 

Copying the Crack 160 

Crouch Hill Baptist Chapel 654 

Davis, C. A. — 

Bernard Gilpin 503 

Denby, Colonel- 
Foreign Missions 563 

Ecclesiastical Amusements 273 

Ellis, J. J.— 

The Martyr's Seed a Martyr 636 

Experience of J. Frazer 518 

Fetch themln 498 

Fry, E. Sargood — 

Medical Mission Work in Travancore... 33 

Fullerton, W. Y.— 

Covenanting Mountain Peaks 171 

Life which is Life Indeed 36& 

Qadees, Qadayrat, Qasaymeh 214 

" White already to Harvest " 542 

Gibson, Mrs. H. L — 

How my Bible-class Grew 55 

Godliness with Contentment Great Gain ... 637 
Golding, Harry — 

A Word for my Alma Mater 614 

Govett, B.— 

Pardon of Sin under the Law 566- 

Graham, Dr. W. — 

A Plea for Calvin 66 

Greenwood, Thomas— 

Unconscious Sanctification 267 

Illustrations: — Bees and Hives, 592; Canadian 
Emigrants, 17 ; Chapels at Crouch Hill, 654, 
Hampton Court, 319, Bennington, 327, Man- 
chester (Coupland Street), 336, New Brompton, 
329, Norbiton, 321, Talbot Tabernacle, 324, 
Tring, 331, Wimbledon, 338, Worthing, 326; 
Charlesworth, V. J., 276; Christmas Dinner, 
18; C. H. Spurgeon, 456, 529; "C. H. Spur- 
geon, The," 275; C. H. Spurgeon, Mrs., 578; 
J. A. Spurgeon, 667; Colporteur, 609; Eiffel 
Tower, 2 ; Flock in Winter, The, 650 ; Hotel 
Beau Bivage, 82 ; In the Forest, 437 ; In the 
Woods, 514 ; Japanese Nurse, 572 ; J. J. Kendon, 
516 ; Lepers, 428 ; More Fishers than Fishes, 
365; N. H. Patrick, 553; Orphan Girls, 381; 
Pastors' College, 305; Scottish Martyrs, 173; 
Street in Old London, 604 ; View of Old Men- 
tone, 138 ; W. E. Hurndall, 16 ; Wilton House 
of Best, 514. 

Impressions of the Conference 282 

Interpreters of Scripture 602 

In the Forest 437 

" I shall Look out for Jesus " 165 



Jamieson, David — 

King Amaziah's Money Difficulty 
John Newton's Preaching 

Ladds, F. G — 

Fighting the Dummy 

Lazenby, C— 

Why Always Whisper ? 

Learning to Sing 



167 
271 



275 

255 
227 



INDEX. 



Vll 



Lewis, E. T.— 

Three dingers for Christ, and one for a 

Friend 635 

Lord's Work, Receipts for General Use in the, 48, 

102, 152, 200, 252, 304, 396, 536, 584, 632, 676. 
Luff, William— 

The Blood-marked Path 165 

Make Points 334 



Marsh, F. E.— 

Elijah's Experience Retold 

The Butcher and his Goat... 
Midlane, Albert — 

The Father's Love 

The Up-Grade Journey ... 

Missionary Appeal 

Missions in the South Seas 



218 

278 

598 
269 
502 
220 



Notes — 
A Black Bill, 580 ; Agra, 627, 669 ; Allison's Bible 
Class, Mrs., 148; Annual Church Meeting, 195 ; 
Ashley, 531 ; Atherton, 627 ; Auckland, 581 ; 
Auxiliary Book Fund, 90. 
Bahamas, 531 ; Ballarat, 195 ; " Baptism Dis- 
covered," 194 ; Baptisms at the Tabernacle, 45 ; 
93, 149, 197, 247, 298, 393, 460, 534, 581, 629, 671 ; 
Baptist Missionary Society, 194 ; Barking, 458 ; 
Barton Cliff, 531 ; Bath, 627 ; Birmingham, 195, 
391 ; Book Fund and Mrs. Spurgeon's Illness, 
43; Book Fund, The, 147; Books received, 148, 
245 ; Boulsher, Mr. G., 581 ; Bournemouth, 391 ; 
JBow, 458, 670; British and Foreign Sailors' 
Society, 297, 391 ; Brighton (Sussex-street), 246 ; 
Brixton, 627 ; Branderburgh, N.B., 581 ; Broken 
Hill (S.Australia), 44; Brothers Young, The, 
390; Burnham, Mr. J., 44, 92, 148, 196, 246, 298, 
392, 459, 523, 531, 627, 671 ; Bunessan, 91 ; 
Bunyan and the Down Grade, 41 ; 'Bus Text 
Mission, 297. 
CJaineon Missions, Mr., 193 ; Calamity at Grimsby, 
194; Canada, 195; Carrington, 581; Cape 
General Mission, 531 ; Cardiff, 91 ; Carrick- 
fergus, 297 ; Coate, 581 ; Carter, Mr., 45, 93, 
196, 246, 459, 628 ; Central India, 581 ; Cham- 
berlain, Mr., 44, 459, 671 ; Charles and Thomas 
Spurgeon, Messrs., 147 ; Cheque Booh, The, 
Translation of, 147 ; Cherry Cheek (Wyoming), 
458 ; Chester, 246 ; China Inland Mission, 44, 
195, 245 ; " Christly Ethical Church," 578 ; 
Christmas at th± Orphanage, 667 ; Church 
at the Tabernacle, 89, 668 ; Clifford at South 
Place Chapel, Dr., 244 ; Colportage Work, 
45, 93, 196, 298, 393, 459, 534 ; Coggeshall, 195 ; 
Conference on Evangelical Preaching, 40 ; Con- 
ference, The, 148, 196, 246 ; Congo, The, 44 ; 
Coseley, 581 ; Croyde and Georgeham, 195. 
Dawley, 458; Day of Special Prayer, 297, 458; 
Defection in Scotland, 579 ; Denominational 
Meetings, 624 ; Departure from the Truth, 297 ; 
Derby (St. Mary's Gate), 246 ; Doorkeepers 
and Pew-openers, 390 ; Driffield, 44 ; Dunn's 
Bible-class, Mr., 668; Durham (Ontario), 195. 
Emsworth, 531 ; Error in Nonconformist churches, 
193 ; Evangelical Association, 390, 671 ; Evan- 
gelists' Association, 626 ; Evangelists' Training 
Class, 148. 
Falkland Islands, 670 ; Family Trials, 90 ; Farn- 
worth, 580 ; Faringdon, 44, 195 ; Father Damien 
Committee, 389; Foreign Prisons, 580, 625; 
"Freeman" and the Ethical Church, 297; 
Friday lectures to Students, 44; Fullerton 
and Smith, Messrs., 43, 44, 92, 148, 196, 246, 
297, 392, 458, 532, 580, 581, 627, 671. 
Greenwich (South Place Chapel), 457 ; Guernsey, 

392,457 
Haddenham, 44 ; Halstead, 627 ; Harefield, 458 ; 
Harley House, 670; Harmer and Parker, 
Messrs., 44, 92, 148, 196, 246, 298, 392, 459, 533, 
581, 627, 628, 671 ; Harrison, Mr., 45, 93, 148, 
196, 246, 298, 392, 532, 581, 628; Hatherleigh, 
458 ; Hawthorne (Victoria), 195 ; Henley-in- 



Notes {continued) — 
Arden, 297 ; Holbeach, 5S1, 670 ; Home Mis- 
sionary Society of Scotland, 391. 

Idle, 581 ; Irthlingborough, 44 ; Isle of Mull, 91 ; 
Isle of Thanet, 627. 

Jamestown, 297 ; Keys and Travers, Death of 
Messrs., 670 ; King's Cross (Arthur-street), 
581 ; King Williamstown, 580. 

Ladies' Benevolent Society, 195 ; Landport, 91 ; 
Letter from China, 531 ; Letter from the 
Deacons, 147 ; Letters from India and Aus- 
tralia, 91 ; Leyton, 670 ; Loan Tract Society, 
669; Londonville (Ohio), 44, 148 ; Long Pres- 
ton, 91. 

McNeill, Mr., 147 ; Manitoba, 195 ; Maternal 
Society, 626; Matters Personal, 41, 42; Mild- 
may Park Conference, 456 ; Millom, 245 ; Mill- 
port (N.B.), 91; Millwall, 91; Minchinhampton, 
44; Minnedosa (U.S.A.), 391,458; Minne- 
sota, 44, 297 ; Missionary Association, 531 ; 
Missionary Convention, 580, 627 ; Micham 
( Adelaide), 44 ; Morley, 44 ; Mount Vernon, 
(U.S.A.), 195; "Mr. Spurgeon in the Law 
Courts," 389. 

Newbury, 246; New London (Ohio), 532; New- 
man Hall, Mr., 456 ; New members, 245, 530. 

Oban, 91 ; Old Fugal Tunes, 245, 297, 390 ; Oke- 
hampton, 194 ; Orkney Isles, 391 ; Orphanage, 
The Stockwell, 45, 93, 149, 196, 246, 298, 392, 
459, 581, 628, 671. 

Pastor Bceckmann, 530 ; Parker, Mr., 93, 148, 196, 
246, 392, 459, 581, 628, 671 ; Pastor T. Spurgeon, 
533, 624 ; Pastors' College, Balance Sheets of, 
90 ; Pastors' College Meetings, 580, 627 ; Pen- 
arth, 44 ; Penzance, 581 ; Personal Notes, 149, 
247 ; 298, 393, 460, 534, 628 ; Perth, 391 ; Pike 
(Wyominsr), 458; Plattsville (Ontario), 195; 
Plumstead, 44, 581 ; Poem by Professor Rogers, 
391 ; Poor Ministers' Clothing Society, 91, 19i, 
458. 530, 628 ; Port Colborne, 195 ; Port Eliza- 
beth, 580 ; Portslade-by-Sea, 246 ; Portsmouth 
(Lake-road), 391 ; Potters' Bar, 91 ; Prayer for 
Children, 579 ; Prayer- Meetings, 625, 668, 670 ; 
Prayer-meeting Testimonies, 579 ; Prisons of 
the World, 670 ; Prescott, 193 ; Publishers' An- 
nouncements, 658 ; Putney, 581. 

Ridgetown (Ontario), 195 ; Rochester, 245; 
Rumours and Reports, 529. 

Salt-Cellars, The, 667 ; Sandown, 670 ; Sermon 
Tract Society, 669; Sheerness, 245; Shefford, 
195 ; Shipley, 627 ; Shirley, 458 ; Shoreham, 
670 ; Shouldham Street, 44 ; Shrewton, Tils- 
head, and Chitterne, 195 ; Soham, 531 ; South- 
end, 531, 627; South Shields, 581; Special 
Prayer-meetings, 90 ; Spurgeon and the Press, 
Mr., 244 ; Spurgeon, Death of Mrs. Samuel, 
90; Spurgeon, Mr. R., 581; Spurgeon, Mrs. 
578; J. A. Spurgeon, Mr., 667; Spurgeon's 
Accident, Mr., 89, 147 ; Spurgeon's Portraits, 
Mr., 456, 529; Spurgeon's Rest, Mr, 667; 
Spurgeon's Return, Mr., 194; Spurgeon's Ru- 
moured Retirement, Mr., 578; Stiff's Bible- 
class, Mrs., 669; Stoke Newington, Bouverie 
Road, 245; Stotfold, 91, 627; Students at 
Westwood, 391, 531 ; Students' Total Absti- 
nence Society, 44 ; Sunday-school Annual 
Meeting, 245 ; Sunday-school Convention, 457 ; 
Sunday-school Chronicle, The, 244; Surrey 
and Middlesex Association, 391, 669; Surrey 
Gardens' Memorial, 668 ; Sussex (N. Bruns- 
wick), 195; Sword and Trowel, 667; Syston, 
531. 
Tabernacle Prayer - meeting, 43; Tabernacle 
Services, 195 ; Tangier (North Africa), 44, 670; 
Temperance Mission, 580, 626 ; Tenbury, 91 ; 
Tithes, 530 ; Twickenham, 297. 
Uffculme, 195 ; Urquhart, Mr. John, 624 ; Walnut 
Hills (Ohio), 195; Walthamstow, 195; Wash- 
ington Territory, 44 ; Waterbeach, 457 ; Week 
of Prayer, 90 ; Welshpool, 195 ; West Hartle- 
pool, 44; Westlake at Radcliffe, 458; West 
Mailing, 627 ; Westmoreland, 627 ; Weymouth, 



Vlll 



INDEX. 



Notes {continued) — 

246 ; Whitechurch, 670 ; Widnes, 195 ; Willen- 
hall, 91 ; Winchester, 195 ; Winslow, 581 ; 
Woodstock (N. Brunswick), 195 ; Work at Dar- 
jeeling, 193; Workers' Meeting, 196; Wrex- 
ham, 195 ; York, 195. 



No Time for Doubts 

Old Time Negro Sermon 
Orphan Girls 



176 



376 

381 



Palmer, Levi — 

Drones 592 

Parrot-like Preaching 515 

Pastors' College, Account for the Year, 103 ; 
Annual Eeport of, 305; Missionary Associa- 
tion's Receipts, 582, 630, 672 ; Receipts of, 45, 
94, 149, 197. 247, 299, 393,460, 534, 582, 630, 672. 

Patrick, N. H — 

Cheering Words from Africa 553 

Tike, G. Holden— 

Bad Reading, and those -who Provide it, 6 ; 
Bible in Prance, 441 ; Colporteur in London, 
606 ; England in the Fifteenth Century, 603 ; 
Flower Girls of Clerkenwell, 50S ; Gospel in 
New Guinea, The, 29 ; Holy Land and the 
Bible, 78 ; Mission to Deep-Sea Fishermen, 
224 ; Open-air Preaching in and about Lon- 
don, 361 ; Samuel Morley the Merchant Phil- 
anthropist, 117 ; Short Notes on Great Sub- 
jects, "181; W. Evans Hurndall in East 
London, 16, 58; Work at Costers' Hall, 651. 

Poetry : A True Incident, 177 ; Blood-Marked 
Path, The, 165; Father's Love, The, 598; 
Greatest of these is Love, 266 ; Lines for the 
Times, 437; Old Theology, 266 ; Renewal of the 
Heart, 496 ; Up-Grade Journey, The, 269. 

Polish and Power 364 

Post-Mortem Salvation 228 

Pratt. W. E.— 

What Church? 

Radcliffe.Mrs. R.— 

"Know thy Opportunity" 

Rumberg, I. — 

The Gospel among the Letts 

Salter, J.— 

Central African Mission Stations 

Secret Declension 

" See what there is to be Seen " 

Shindler, R.— 

Anecdotes of American Baptists, 67 ; A Noble 
Woman, 499; John Leland, 10; Richard 
Baker, 556 ; 1689-1889, 599. 

Smith, J. Manton — 

A Chat in Havre-des-Pae. 547 : Little Mary 
the Martyr, 131 ; My Friend Jack, 358 ; 
Saved from the Sinkinpr Ship, 594 ; " Short 
Life and a Merry One, A," 425. 

Snell, F. T.- 

" Are you Ready?" 165 



507 
279 



123 
ISO 
552 



Society of Evangelists — Account for the year, 
104 ; Receipts of, 48, 102, 252, 304, 396, 468, 536, 
584, 632, 676. 

Spiritual Cuckoos 232 

Spurgeon, C. H. — 
Coming Day, The, 537 ; Eighth Wonder of the 
World, 3; Fighting and Praying, 585; 
Flock in Winter, 651 ; Growing on the Wall, 
153 ; Hotel Beau Rivage, 81 ; Human Side 
of Inspiration, 551 ; In the Woods, 514 ; 
Launch out into the Deep, 15 ; Leprosv, 
429 ; Lost Jewels, 28 ; Mark This, 544 ; More 
Fishers than Fishes, 365 ; Nettleton Anec- 
dotes, 648; Never Bring Cares Indoors, 513 ; 
No Help, No Hope, 166 ; Our Treasure Trove, 
431 ; Power in Prayer, 489 ; Preacher's 
Power, The, 254, 349, 413 ; Self-Searching, 23 ; 
Special Pleading with the Specially Feeble, 
105 ; Strange Notions of Religion, 24 ; This 
End of the Streets of Glory. 23 ; This must be 
a Soldiers' Battle, 633 ; Trialogue on a Wet 
Sunday, 360; View of Old Mentone, 138; 
Whose God is Jehovah ? 49 ; Who shall Keep 
the Keepers? 129; Word with the Obscure, 
A, 201. 
Spurgeon, Thomas — 

Butterflies, 545 ; Glowworms, 111 ; Mos- 
quitoes, 422 ; Sleeping in Church, 209 ; 
Spiders, 161, 216; "We have Lost our 
Boats," 497. 
Spurr, F. O— 

Borrowing a Knife 374 

Easily Tested 32 

Stanley, J. L. — 

Elihu 43S 

" Our Enemies being Judges " 178 

Stockwell Orphanage, Receipts of, 45, 94, 150. 
198, 248, 302, 394, 461, 535, 582, 630, 672 ; Report 
of, 469. 

Students and their Work 133 

Suggestion, A 211 



Taylor, Annie — 

A True Incident 

Tell vour Minister 

" The C. H. Spurgeon " 

Thirty Yf ars' Peace 

Townsend, C. W.— 

Rescue in the Gulf of Finland ... 

Counterfeit Gospels 

Tuclmell, John — 

Questions for Down-Grade Doubters 
Tydeman, E.A. — 

" Lovest Thou Me ? " 

" The greatest of these is Love " 

The Renewal of the Heart 



Why always Whisper ? ... 
" Ye must be Born Again " 



... 177 

... 225 
... 275 
... 166 


... 26 
... 37S 


... 139 


... 544 
... 266 
... 49ft 


217, 265 


... 433. 



&'-^^&<$*^^^>&^>&3r*^*S>& : $*g>'^^ 




Zi^<S>^'^&^^' : $>&l3*^^>&&^i£*^^ 



THE 



SWORD AND THE TROWEL. 



JANUARY, 1889. 




BY C. H. SPURGEON. 

HE Eiffel Tower does not, at present, strike the observer as 
anything very marvellous, but it aspires to be the eighth 
wonder of the world, and if it be finished without a hitch, 
it will deserve that honour. In round numbers, it is to be 
a thousand feet high, and a comparison with the other 
buildings, which we have requested the artist to introduce into our 
engraving, will show how greatly it overtops any other erection of men. 
Who would wish to climb it ? Happily for the ambitious, there will be 
lifts, which will bear the visitor to the summit in six or seven minutes; 
and then he can, at pleasure, look down upon Paris, which will lie low 
at his feet. The towers of Notre Dame scarcely reach to the first story 
of Mr. Eiffel's vast iron erection. No wonder that the workmen com- 
plain of the distance they have to climb before they can begin their day's 
work. Although only one-half is finished, it is no trifle to run up five 
hundred feet before you can commence your labour; to some of us it 
would be a good day's work to go up and down, even if the only labour 
required at the top would be refreshing the inner man. 

The tower is said to have great strength to resist the wind. It could 
bear a strain of 3,284 tons of wind force, and this is nearly twice as 
much as has been experienced during the most violent tempest which 
has visited the city. So far, so well. As to the sustaining of the enor- 
mous weight by the foundations, this, we doubt not, has been attended 
to, for many of the most stupendous engineering works in iron have been 
produced by Mr. Eiffel, who ranks this as his masterpiece. Otherwise, 
one might well fear that so vast a mass of iron would press unduly upon 



4 - THE EIGHTH WONDER OF THE WORLD. 

the river banks, and upon the clay on which it rests, and would come to 
an untimely fall. We are told that it will be completed by the opening* 
of the Exhibition, and that, when finished, it will be painted a light 
orange colour, which, it is said, will give it a dazzling golden appear- 
ance when the sun is shining upon it. Assuredly, it has the virtue of 
originality, if none beside. 

Many have enquired as to the safety of the tower from lightning. It is 
affirmed that it will act as a huge lightning conductor for Paris, and, 
possibly, may be a safeguard to the whole city. Just so ; but what of 
the conductor itself, and those who may be venturing upon it ? Fears of 
this kind are answered by enthusiastic believers with a smile, and, for 
aught we know, the smile is the answer of wisdom ; but the following 
incident, recorded in The, Times of Nov. 28, enables us to repeat our 
question without fear of being condemned as unreasonably nervous : — 

■ The Guion Line steamer Alaska, from New York, which arrived at 
Queenstown yesterday evening, brings intelligence of the ship Edivard, 
from Havre, with a cargo of iron ore, whose captain reported that the 
vessel encountered a terrible electrical storm in the Atlantic, on the 
night of the 31st ult., when in lat. 41 42 N., long. 54 42 W., lasting 
for several hours. The vessel was continuously enveloped in lightning, 
which prostrated on the deck 11 seamen, and deprived them of sight 
for nearly half a day. The second officer and the boatswain were also 
dashed to the deck, and received serious injury, and the former was 
speechless for five hours. Three balls of fire exploded with a tremendous 
report over the main rigging, scattering flaming fragments over the ship, 
and driving the remaining members of the crew in terror into the fore- 
castle. From 3 a.m. until 7 p.m. the captain and mate were the only 
persons on board capable of doing any work, and on them devolved the 
task of keeping the vessel before the easterly gale. The captain states 
that all on board the ship were trembling with fear during the time that 
the electrical storm lasted, which was the most terrible he ever witnessed ; 
and he adds that, no doubt, the iron ore with which the Edward was 
laden acted as a magnet to attract the lightning." 

It is more to our point to believe that our reader will enquire — 
"What is the use of this modern tower of Babel ? The enquirer knows 
as much as the writer. It is to be a feature in the great Exhibition, 
and to be talked of as the loftiest of buildings that man has yet piled 
upon the earth. There may be other recondite scientific uses ; but this 
is probably the main object of the tower. To reach the greatest 
altitude, to overtop all other buildings : is not this an object worthy of 
this mass of metal, this expenditure of labour, this display of skill ? 
Perhaps. Certainly, in many other lines, this would seem to be consis- 
tent with the genius of the age. We go ahead, and everybody wants 
to lead the race. We must have everything bigger, noisier, more glaring, 
more amazing than any before us or with us. The old, silent toil for 
excellence, and the quiet realization of it, are out of date ; we work by 
steam, and beat the drum to call the world's attention to every puff of 
the engine. The world is crowded with these Eiffel towers, and stunned, 
every now and then, with the crash of them. Men must be richer, than 
millionaires, speakers must shout down ail rival orators, writers must 
achieve a world-wide success, and even the maker of a pill must dose 



THE EIGHTH WONDER OF THE WORLD. . 5 

the universe and a world or two besides. "Excelsior!" Never mind 
how you build. It is needless to wait for iron ; wood will be sooner put 
together, hay will be easier to carry up, and stubble, if you can only 
keep it together long enough, will be best of all. Let your manufactures 
deteriorate into rubbish, your finances run to bankruptcy, and your 
people pine into penury ; it does not matter, so long as you are a great 
people, with great men at your head, able to boast great things. 

This also would be little in the line of our business, if this spirit did 
not threaten the religious community as well as any other. It may 
come to pass that we also may desire to do some great thing, and may 
overlook the far greater importance of keeping close to the right and 
the true. If God gives to his servants a large sphere of usefulness, 
they must accept the responsibility with a grave gratitude ; but if they 
have it not, they must not fret and fume, as though the proper object of 
life could be to fill a considerable space in the thoughts of men. The 
comfortable abodes which cluster around a cathedral are far more ser- 
viceable, and more to be desired, than a place among the clouds which 
hang over its lofty towers. If we will do our life-work well, we shall be 
nearer to happiness than if we neglect the commonplaces of duty to 
soar into the heavens of publicity. Usefulness is far more equally 
distributed than many think; for the results of insignificant actions 
are often greater than the consequences of brilliant deeds. The plants 
which come of life's sowings are not always in proportion to the size 
of the seeds. A nation's destiny may turn upon a word ; while a torrent 
of eloquence may effect nothing. Let us serve our God ; but as to our 
relative elevation among our fellow-mortals, let us fight against the self- 
idolatry, which would permit us to waste a moment's thought upon it. 

Far be it from our churches to vie with each other, and go in to 
build their Babels. To be largest in number, to have the most intel- 
lectual persons in our ranks, to attempt the most ambitious missions — 
these are little enough as objects of ambition. Just now, the tendency 
is to seek to wield the most potent political influence in Parliaments, 
Councils, Boards, and Corporations. There may be reasons for this 
thirst for power ; but we earnestly trust they will never even seem to 
have weight enough to decoy Christians from their legitimate calling ; 
which is, not to win positions, but to win souls; not to canvass votes, 
but to convince consciences. The hunt after respectability is another 
form of this tower-building. So is the longing to have the finest 
building, the largest organ, the most learned doctor, the most eloquent 
preacher. What ! In the worship of God is there to be competition ? 
At our Maker's feet are we to try to outshine each other ? Are sinners 
to contend who among them shall be the greatest, while they are crying, 
■" Lord, have mercy upon us" ? Are saints to rival saints as they together 
chant, "Not unto us! Not unto us! but unto thy name, Lord, give 
glory" ? Yet, we say it with great sadness, there is a tendency among 
all denominations to carry the competitions of trade and politics into 
the sanctuary of God. Zion and Bethel bid for hearers ; the vicar and 
the pastor tout for customers ; the choir, the organ, the stained-glass 
windows, are a part of the paraphernalia of the shop. This must be 
ended. At the very least, it must be avoided by all spiritual men, and 
whenever it is seen, it must be treated as unbearable. 



G BAD READING, AND THOSE WHO PROVIDE IT. 

Why should we say, " Go to, let us build a tower " ? Do we not 
remember how the Lord stopped the work by confounding; the language 
of the workers ? Are not many of our confusions nowadays caused by 
our ambitions? May we not hope for the restoration of a pure language 
when we take more heed to the one foundation, and are content to build 
thereon those far smaller, but infinitely more precious, structures which 
can be fashioned from gold, silver, and precious stones ? 



BY G. H. PIKE. 

OCCASIONALLY, when the public conscience receives a shock, some 
wholesome results follow; and we have recently seen this to be 
the case in regard to the circulation of bad reading. The truth is that, 
for some time past, the English law, as represented by Lord Campbell's 
Act, has been stronger than has been generally supposed ; and the fine 
of one hundred pounds which a well-known London publisher had to 
pay in the Central Criminal Court, on the last day of October, was in 
itself conclusive proof, that, for years past, the law has been broken 
because no one took the trouble to put it in force. When the case came on 
before the Recorder, the Solicitor-General argued the case at considerable 
length, and so shocked the ears of the respectable jury by reading extracts 
from the works of the French author complained of, that the occupants 
of the box desired him to desist, having neard quite enough to ensure 
their verdict. The publisher had not only to pay the fine already named, 
he had to undertake that he would issue no more of the offending works ; 
but then the old proverb about locking the stable-door after the steed 
was stolen was partially verified in this instance. Some tens of thou- 
sands of volumes, the matter of which the prosecuting counsel described 
as revolting, have been let loose, and, being in as many homes, they will 
still poison the atmosphere for years to come. This is not the liberty 
for which Milton pleaded ; it is a crime committed under a reign of 
too much license, which a proper police vigilance would not have 
allowed. 

Commenting on this trial, a daily paper, which had previously fre- 
quently advertised the works in question, said that if anyone could read 
them " without an intolerable sense of nausea and disgust, he must have 
unusually strong nerves and unusually obtuse perceptions." Speaking 
of the author himself, the same paper says further : " He does not depict 
things vicious and brutal because there is an ethical or artistic lesson 
to be drawn from them, but simply and solely, as far as we can perceive, 
because he either delights in them, or because he supposes that they will 
delight the taste of depraved and degraded readers. ... It was an 
outrage to write such books, it is an aggravation of the offence to 
translate them, and it makes the matter worst of all to issue them in 
a cheap and popular form." This is well, so far as it goes ; but while 
advertisements of such books have been freely accepted by leading news- 
papers, some have sufficiently commended them to promote their sale. 
Now that the criticisms of the Solicitor- General have overridden all 



BAD READING, AND THOSE V\HO PROVIDE IT. 7 

others, however ; and now that the law has vindicated itself, we have 
reason for some satisfaction. 

There can be no doubt that this trial, by the publicity it has given to 
the subject, and by the check the purveyors of printed garbage have re- 
ceived, has done good. The public begin to see, more than they have 
done before, the character of the deadly evil that is in their midst ; and 
they are becoming impatient while unprincipled printers, in London 
alone, send forth hundreds of thousands of sheets weekly, which inflict 
untold evil on that susceptible class educated in our Board-schools. 
This represents quite a different department of the corrupt trade from 
that of French translations. Belonging to it are the weekly periodicals, 
some of which are far worse than others ; the worst of all, perhaps, 
being the stories about adventures in crime, which appear in penny 
numbers, and which sometimes cost, by the time that they are complete, 
a considerable price for young people to give for a single book. Much 
of this garbage keeps within the letter of the law, and is therefore much 
more difficult to cope with than French importations, that, as a rule, 
may be supposed not to reach the hands of scholars in Board-schools. 
This is the reading that is chiefly doing harm among the young ; and 
if, as some assure us, the circulation amounts to a quarter of a million 
sheets every working day, one may be able to form some notion of the 
moral havoc that is being effected. 

The public are indebted to Mr. Samuel Smith, M.P., for calling the 
attention of Parliament to this evil ; and for making other efforts, which 
have drawn forth a promise from the Government that they will do 
what the law enables them to do to check the circulation of impure 
reading. The writers who deal in this sort of thing make heroes of 
well-known criminal adventurers ; and as such exploits readily appeal 
to the taste of the young and the ignorant, the numbers containing 
them soon command a large constituency. Some would tell us, that the 
children of the poor forget all that has been taught them in Board- 
schools soon after engaging in the serious business of life ; and if this 
is so, it may also be true that it is owing to taking in so large a quan- 
tity of this corrupt reading, the natural tendency of which would be to 
wholly occupy the mind by excluding everything else. But human 
nature is the same, whether in low or high life, so that the humbler 
classes are not the only readers of what is vicious. Referring to the 
general tendency of the times, a daily paper lately said : " We can hardly 
wonder that publishers, more enterprising than scrupulous, when they 
see tales of vice and crime, of murder, forgery, and seduction, eagerly 
devoured by the educated classes, easily blind themselves to the wrong 
they are committing by supplying similar stories to a different class of 
palates. A vitiated taste in. fiction, and, to some extent, in poetry, too, has 
been visible in English society for many years past, and novel writers of 
great ability and power of imagination have not hesitated to minister to 
it. The evil has spread downwards, and we are now confronted with 
the gigantic growth to which Mr. S. Smith has called attention." This 
shows us where we are, and the dangers to which we are exposed by 
the plague that has come upon us. The demon that carries on this 
conspiracy, is, as it were, a hydra-headed monster, and his operations 
are carried on in many directions at the same time. What with the 



S BAD READING, AND THOSE WHO PROVIDE IT. 

importation of novels and pictures from France, the production of costly 
indecent books, which can only be obtained by the initiated, the circula- 
tion of penny dreadfuls and more expensive horrors, we are in a bad way 
indeed. Though one would not say that the present is the most corrupt 
time that has been known during the Christian centuries, we have, un- 
doubtedly, a greater supply of impure reading than was ever known 
before. 

In the old times of two or three generations ago, when the majority 
of people could not read, the mental pabulum that found its market in 
provincial towns and secluded villages alike was represented by the 
production of the Catnach Press, in St. Giles's, broadsides relating to 
startling current events, and songs which those who were ignorant of 
the alphabet could learn from hearing others repeat them. From the 
curious collection which Mr. John Ashton has just made of the songs* 
more particularly of other days, we find that so far from having 
advanced, we have actually gone back ; for when compared with some 
of the things we have mentioned, the songs for which authors in 
St. Giles's attics received the honorarium of half-a-crown each were 
quite harmless productions. The subject of popular songs is one in 
which Macaulay and other students of our social customs have shown 
themselves to be greatly interested, and the times were when writers of 
songs exercised great influence over the popular mind. Mr. Ashton's 
book will be valuable for purposes of reference, showing what ideas 
ruled among the common people, before music-halls and faster ways 
ministered to more vicious tastes. Of course w,e do not refer to the 
old ballads to commend them, but rather to show that we have, as a 
nation, not much amended our literary ways since patterers and flying 
stationers sold their wares to wondering rustics. " Rough though some 
of these street ballads may be, very few of them were coarse," says Mr. 
Ashton ; and we may add that the old ballads did not generally instil 
criminal sentiments as is now done by the tales which have highwaymen 
and burglars for their heroes. 

The results of evil reading are continually becoming manifest. The 
result may actually be nothing less than murder, the murderers being 
mere children. A tragedy at Maidstone, in which two boys were the chief 
actors, is proof of this; and if the traffic in blood-and- thunder papers 
continues, more things of this kind will surely happen ; indeed, at 
the time of writing, a boy of eleven is charged with a capital crime, 
which suggests that these papers have been his tutors. Again and 
again, the cases in police-courts have shown how readily children 
advance from reading to action. They will run away from honest work 
in some instances, and actually arm themselves, and ''take to the road." 
They have done this in England ; and a story which lately came from 
Chicago shows that the effects are the same in the United States. 

There were two boys, who having gone through a course of reading 
about burglars and "gentlemen of the road," quite naturally made 
arrangements for themselves adopting the same profession. Accordingly, 
they ran away from home, dug for themselves a cave on a vacant piece 

* " Modern Street Ballads." By John Ashton. Author of " Social Life in the 
Reign of Queen Anne." With Fifty-six Illustrations, Chatto & Windus, 1888. 
Price 7s. Gd. 



BAD READING, AND THOSE WHO PROVIDE IT. 9 

of ground, and set up as thoroughly equipped bandits. Hen-roosts and 
clothes-lines were preyed upon, and even houses were broken into ; for 
of course carpets, rugs, and chairs were needed for their cave. While 
living in this manner, they even indulged in the freak of capturing two 
little girls, on the road between school and their home, and these were 
confined as captive queens ! They were finally arrested for stealing 
game chickens ; but being of such a tender age, they were to be pitied 
as much as blamed, because they had merely acted out in real life what 
their more guilty instructors had taught them. 

Notwithstanding all, however, it is a very encouraging feature of 
these times that the supply of what is good is as large as it is, and that 
it is of such high quality from a literary point of view. Were the 
Scriptures ever before so extensively circulated ? Was there ever such 
a Bible House seen in the world before as that which is now a chief 
architectural ornament of Queen Victoria Street ? We suppose that 
in round numbers the issues of the Religious Tract Society reach over 
half a million a day. Great advances have been made in the quality of 
the periodicals and tracts. When we look at the rich banquet pro- 
vided in the volumes of The Leisure Hour, and The Sunday at Home, 
for 1888, we realize that the best that money can procure is provided for 
the subscribers. The Boy's Own Paper, and The GirVs Own Paper, 
stand at the head of their class; and those who started them, under 
our enterprising and lamented friend, Dr. Samuel Manning, little thought 
that their efforts would be so instantly and widely appreciated. When 
our brother, Mr. Charles Bullock, a quarter of a century ago, began to 
provide reading that the Evangelical clergy could circulate in their 
parishes, he little thought of the vast proportions his work would assume, 
or that an Archbishop of Canterbury would confer on him the dis- 
tinction of B.D., in recognition of his distinguished services in editing 
The Fireside, Home Words, The Day of Days, and The Fireside News. 
In the case of the Manchester carpenter, John Cassell, how could he 
foresee what gigantic proportions the tree he planted would assume ? 
The Quiver, which he started three or four years before his death, st'ill 
retains all the charms of youth and freshness, as an examination of the 
volume for 1888 will pleasantly show. 

We might extend the list through several pages ; but the above are 
typical publications, and they show how good and how abundant is the 
supply of elevating reading. We thus live in a favoured age ; and if 
the battle must go on between the pure and the impure, Christian people 
are only true to their cause when, by every means, they promote the cir- 
culation of what is good. Through the recommendation of its friends, 
why should not the circulation of The Sword and the Troivel be largely 
increased during the year 1889 ? 



10 

J0|w ^thnlt, i\t &patl* of Virginia, rair 
$,mmtm §agtMs a ptwh*ir fpars ago/ 

BY ROBERT SHINDLER. 

THE first British colony in North America was founded, in 1587, by 
Sir Walter Raleigh, in Virginia, which colony was so named after 
Elizabeth, the Virgin Queen of Great Britain. This settlement was not 
a success. The first abiding settlers in this new colony were chiefly 
cavaliers, from the upper classes of English society. They carried with 
them their notions of aristocratic government and religious formularies. 
They believed in the divine right of kings, and in the Church of England 
as the safeguard of the State, even as the king was Head of the Church, 
and " Defender of the Faith." In the Virginia charter of 10th April, 
1606, the Church of England was made the religion of the State, and 
adherence to it a test of loyalty. This was long before the May Flower 
landed the Pilgrim Fathers at Plymouth Rock, and more than twenty 
years before Massachusetts Bay was colonized. 

The first structure reared for the worship of God — the first, it would 
seem,' in the whole of North America, and certainly the first in connection 
with British colonization — was set up at Jamestown. The patriarchal 
captain, John Smith, who figures so prominently and so favourably in 
the history of American colonization, gives a graphic description of it. 

An awning, or old sail, was stretched to four trees, and walls were 
formed of rails of wood ; the seats were unhewn trees or cut planks, and 
the pulpit a bar of wood nailed to two trees. This was the first church. 
It was followed by a " homely thing like a barn, with crotchets,! 
covered with rafts, sedge, and earth ; so were also the walls, which could 
neither keep out wind nor rain." In this place prayer was offered 
morning and evening, and two sermons preached by "our minister, 
Mr. Hunt," until he died. Happy had it been for the State and the 
people if the same simplicity had characterized all ecclesiastical pro- 
ceedings and laws. Far otherwise is the record of the historian. 

The charter made non-attendance on Episcopal services a crime 
punishable with arrest and imprisonment, and, in some cases, with being 
sent, with all convenient speed, " into our realm of England, to receive 
condign punishment for his or her said offence." 

Each governor promulgated his own code of laws in the spirit of the 
charter, directing his subordinates in all the details of administration. 
And so, as the governor was more or less a bigot, the laws were more or 
less severe. Every new-comer was required to give an account of his 
religious principles to the minister. If he refused, he was to be whipped : 
if he still refused, he was to be whipped twice, and to acknowledge his 
fault in church the following Sunday ; and if he yet refused, he was to 
be whipped every day until he complied. The very severity of such laws 

* History of the Baptists. By Dr. Armitage. Elliot Stock, London. 

f Timbers forked or branching out, like crotches in a tree. The whims, fancies, and 
conceits of disordered and eccentric minds, commonly known — too much known, indeed 
— as crotchets, give no support to roof, walls, or anything, inside or out. 



JOHN LELAND, THE APOSTLE OF VIRGINIA. ] 1 

rendered thefn more or less inoperative ; but it placed a power in the hands 
of "unreasonable and wicked men " which they were not slow to use. 

At that time the boundaries of Virginia were not very rigidly denned, 
excepting as by the coast and rivers. The present state is smaller than 
the old colony, but, even now, including Virginia West, which separated 
on the slavery question in 1861, it is larger than England and Wales by 
several thousand square miles. As the colony increased in inhabitants, 
the parochial system of the old country was acted on. Every parish 
was to have a church and a minister, and every householder was to 
pay his portion of taxes for their support. Tobacco was the staple pro- 
duct, and the minister's salary was changed from £80 to 16,000 lbs. of 
tobacco per annum, a pound of "the weed " being valued at twopence. 
Anyone who wilfully absented himself from church was to be fined fifty 
pounds of tobacco for each Sunday, and a Nonconformist was to pay 
£20 per month ; and if this continued for a year, he was to be appre- 
hended, give security for his good behaviour, or remain in prison until 
he was willing to attend church. This was one way of understanding 
the injunction, " Compel them to come in." 

This was the sweet and gentle spirit of the gospel of peace and love 
— that is, as they understood it, or, rather, ^m-understood it. What- 
ever of bitterness, wrath, and uncharitableness, the Congregational 
Puritans of New England — Massachusetts especially — manifested 
towards the Quakers and Baptists of the Eastern States, the much- com- 
mended cavaliers, with their " gentle blood " and polished manners and 
ideas, were at least their match. The " brutal intolerance " of the 
English court under the infamous Stuarts was reproduced in the colony 
of the Virgin Queen. 

It may very naturally be said, Could Baptist principles ever enter 
or take root under such oppressive and restrictive laws ? Yes, they 
did ; and they entered to stay ; and they have taken root downward, 
and borne fruit upward. Comparison of the population and the number 
of Baptist churches, ministers, and members in England and Wales and 
in Virginia, will show what amazing growth there has been, and prove 
that a mighty agency must have been in operation. 

In England and Wales there are about twenty-six millions of in- 
habitants, and of these, 291,014 are members of Baptist churches, and 
1,751 ministers, while churches number 2,642. In Virginia and West 
Virginia, there is a population of 1,667,177 — rather more than one- 
fourteenth of that of England and Wales — while there are 1,608 Baptist 
churches, 868 ordained ministers, and a total membership of 230,266. 

And yet there was no Baptist church formed in Virginia until 1714 7 
and during the present century there has been a very large secession from 
the ranks of Regular Baptists to the body formed through the ministry 
of Alexander Campbell, who went to America, from the north of Ire- 
land, in 1807, became pastor of a Presbyterian Church in Pennsylvania, 
but joined the Baptists in 1812. 

Another Baptist triumph is that the Constitution of the United States 
has been formed very much on the model of Baptist Church polity ; not 
as a mere accident, but from actual study of the matter by the Revo- 
lutionary leaders, Patrick Henry, and Madison, both of whom were 
Presidents of the Republic in after days. Jefferson, a third leader, 



12 JOHN LELAND, THE APOSTLE OF VIRGINIA. 

had an aunt, who was a member of a Baptist church in Goochland 
county. This aunt was a great favourite with him, and, when young, 
he frequently visited her, and attended Baptist meetings, and, it is said, 
in this way caught his first ideas of a democratic form of government. 

During the Commonwealth, Virginia went in strongly for the king, 
and those of an opposite opinion were persecuted, some even to the 
death. Four men, who had been soldiers under Cromwell, were taken 
and hanged out of hand for their religious opinions, which were sup- 
posed to be treasonable. In 1661-2, an Act was passed amercing every 
one who refused to take his child to an authorized minister for baptism 
in the amount of two thousand pounds of tobacco. This was aimed at 
the Friends, for Baptists had no existence at that time in Virginia. 

The improved state of things in England following the accession of 
William and Mary, did not alter the law in Virginia until twenty years 
after. There were a few scattered Baptists at that time in the state 
who resolved to assert their rights as British subjects. They appealed 
to their brethren in England for ministers, who, in 1714, sent them 
Robert Norden and Thomas White. The latter died upon the voyage- 
Thus, the first church was established in 1714. There were Baptists in 
other States, as in Pennsylvania and Delaware, and Maryland, and 
ministers from these colonies came into Virginia. Some Welch Baptists 
in Pennsylvania were also very active. A young man, of whom we shall 
have something to say in another paper, went with two ministers from 
New Jersey into Virginia. He felt prompted to preach, and obeyed the 
inward suggestions. His name was John Gano. The church of which 
he was a member called him to account for his disorderly conduct, but 
wisely requested him first to preach before them. He did so, and he 
was " called" and ordained. 

The General Baptists soon became Particular, and turned from evan- 
gelical Arminianism to a healthy Calvinism, from which position, as a 
rule, their descendants have not receded. 

" Down to the Revolution," says Dr. Armitage, " all the colonies, with 
the exception of Rhode Island, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, had a 
•church established either by law or custom, as the rightful controller of 
the spiritual interests of the people, and those of Massachusetts and 
Virginia were peculiarly intolerant. In these, the influence of the 
Baptists, as the champions of religious equality, was especially felt, as 
they resisted the legislative, judicial, and executive departments com- 
bined. They were emboldened in this resistance from the fact that they 
took and held a footing despite the combination against them, and by 
piecemeal wrenched from their foes the recognition of their rights." 
As time went on matters developed more rapidly. Men of equal power 
and energy and piety, and deep-souled earnestness of purpose, were 
raised up. Besides Dr. Isaac Backus, the historian, there were Drs. 
Still man and Manning and John Leland, and others less distinguished. 
Drs. Stillman and Manning were both men of considerable culture, they 
were clerical in their dress and habits, and wielded a powerful influence 
with the more educated ranks of the denomination. John Leland was 
less cultured, but perhaps a greater preacher, and more popular than the 
others. "Every man in his own order." They worked on their 
lines ; he worked on his : they in New England, and he in Virginia. 



JOHN LELAND, THE APOSTLE OF VIRGINIA. 13 

"Iceland's convictions were as clear and deep as they well could be, 
but his tastes and habits, as well as his early training, all ran in other 
channels than those of his compeers. His powers were rare and 
natural : theirs were moulded by culture. They were polished, measured, 
graceful ; he followed the instincts of mother wit, quick adaptation and 
eccentric eloquence. They reached the grave, the conservative, and 
thoughtful ; he moved the athletic masses. They did more to begin 
the Baptist struggle under the Federalism of the Bast ; he lived ta 
finish the triumph in the radical democracy of the South." * 

John Leland was born at Grafton, Massachusetts, in 1754, and was 
baptized at the age of twenty. He had gone through " most intense 
soul-agonies on account of his sins and exposure to the second death.' , 
His deliverance was clear, decisive, and thorough. He remembered the 
"hole of the pit," and knew who had raised him out of it. His 
testimony was therefore strong and clear, and unhesitating. His feet 
were on the rock, and his song was of redeeming love and sovereign 
grace. " By grace ye are saved " meant everything in his experience 
and his preaching. 

A year after his baptism he started on his first preaching tour through 
New Jersey and Virginia. Whitefield had visited most of the colonies,, 
both east and south, and his preaching had been blessed to tens of 
thousands. Many of the Congregational ministers, and some of the 
Presbyterians, had closed their pulpits against him, but they could not 
close the hearts of the people against the message he brought ; for who 
can shut where God opens ? Those of his followers who left the dry 
and cold teaching of a sleepy orthodoxy were known as " New Lights," 
and by degrees many of them became Baptists ; and better even than 
that, they joyfully accepted such heart-stirring preaching as Leland's. 

He settled for a time as pastor of the church at Mount Poney 
Culpepper County, and then removed to Orange County in the State of 
his adoption. But he could not confine himself to one narrow sphere: 
he went about in all directions preaching the gospel of the kingdom. 
In fifteen years he baptized seven hundred on their profession of faith. 
It has been said that he was the most popular preacher who ever resided 
in Virginia. He was a Calvinist, though he would not be bound either 
by Dr. Gill or Andrew Fuller. He tells us that one time when he was 
preaching his own soul got " into the trade ivinds,'' and when the Spirit 
of the Lord fell upon him he paid no attention either to Gill or Fuller, 
and five of his hearers confessed Christ. He did a noble work in 
Virginia, first as a minister of Christ's gospel, and then as an advocate 
of civil and religious liberty. When he entered, the state persecution 
had abated. "The dragon roared," he says, "with hideous peals, but 
was not scarlet-coloured." 

A touching story is told in "English Hymns" (3rd edition, 1888) 
of John Leland's " Evening Hymn," which was copied from the Century 
Magazine^ 1885. A lady records, in her diary of the siege of Vicksburg, 
under 5th June, 1803, that their house was struck by a shell. " The 
candles were useless in the dense smoke, and it was many minutes 
before we could see. Then we found the entire side of the room torn out. 

* Dr. Armitage. 



14 JOHN LELAND, THE APOSTLE OF VIRGINIA. 

The soldiers who had rushed in said, " This is an eighty-pound Parrott." 
It had entered through the front, burst on the pallet-bed, which was in 
tatters ; the toilet service and everything else in the room being smashed. 

The soldiers assisted H to board up the breach with planks to keep 

out prowlers, and we went to bed in the cellar as usual. This morning 
the yard is partially ploughed by a couple that fell there in the night. 
I think this house, so large and prominent from the river, is perhaps 
taken for headquarters and specially shelled. As we descend at night 
to the lower regions, I think of the evening hymn that grandmother 
taught me when a child : 

" Lord, keep us safe this night, 

Secure from all our fears ; 
May angels guard us while we sleep, 

Till morning light appears ! 

Surely, if there are heavenly guardians, we need them now." 

Leland began his ministry about a year before the war of Indepen- 
dence. "Scarcely was the first shot fired at Lexington," says Dr. 
Armitage, " when every Baptist sprang to his feet and hailed its echo 
as the pledge of deliverance, as well from domestic as foreign oppressors. 
Leland was to the front." The time had come to strike for freedom — 
freedom to worship God according to conscience, and freedom from the 
domination of a State Church, both Congregational and Episcopal. The 
Episcopal Church had lost, almost entirely, what it had ever possessed 
of spiritual life, and many of its ministers were godless, carnal, and 
scandalous in their lives. The Baptists were now a considerable, though 
not a numerous body. They had some noble leaders, and they were 
generally people with strong convictions, and men Avho knew "what 
Israel ought to do ;" and they did it. They were the first to suffer in the 
war. " Wherever the British standard was triumphant, their pastors were 
obliged to flee from their flocks, their meeting-houses were destroyed, 
and they were hated by all men." Alongside of the battle for Indepen- 
dence, the battle of State-Churchism was fought, though in the latter 
case without blood. Men like Leland, with will and nerve and un- 
flinching fidelity, were needed, and were not wanting. Their resistance 
to State-Churchism was well-organized, and their position gave them 
such importance, that they could not be dispensed with by the asserters 
of liberty. Sixty churches met and addressed the State Convention of 
Virginia. They stated that "they were alarmed at the oppressions 
which hung over America, and had determined that war should be made 
with Great Britain, that many of their brethren had enlisted as soldiers, 
and many more were ready to do so, and that they would encourage 
their young ministers to serve as chaplains in the army which should 
resist Great Britain. Also, they declared the ' Toleration by the civil 
government is not sufficient; that no State religious establishment 
ought to exist; that all religious denominations ought to stand on the 
same footing ; that, to all alike the protection of government should 
be extended, securing to them the peaceable enjoyment of their own 
religious principles and modes of worship.' " 

In the end their cause triumphed, as the world knows ; but it was not 
until 1833, that Church and State were for ever separated, and all laws 



LAUNCH OUT INTO THE DEEP. 15 

sanctioning the connection removed from the statute books of all the 
states. John Leland lived to see the end of what he called the " felo- 
nious principle," dying in 1841, at the age of eighty-seven. 

God has put honour upon the denomination in America, for no 
denomination has been more blessed and used by God in soul-winning. 
The churches have continued faithful to evangelical truth, moderate 
Calvinism being everywhere held and taught ; and whatever of "down 
grade" there may be among Congregationalists in places, there is 
scarcely any among Baptists. Mr. Spurgeon's sermons are read all over 
the States ; but his teaching finds no heartier echo anywhere than among 
the three million members of Baptist churches. 



§amu$ jorci ink % *§n$. 

LLOYDS' agents report, concerning a late gale, that " The casualties 
are confined to coasters.'' This is often the case upon the sea of 
religious life. Those who hug the shores of the world, and never lose 
sight of its associations, are very liable to be blown on the rocks w*hen 
the storms are out. They have to study men, circumstances, profits, 
and losses, and these are as rocks or quicksands to their integrity. 
Brave men have quitted the inviting but fatal coasts, and have sailed 
away to the deep seas of true trust in the living God, and these find sea- 
room in the gale, and ride out every storm. In the late tempests of 
heresy, it will be found, on reference to the wreck register, that great 
havoc has been made among the fleet of coasters, whose avocation has 
always been in the shallows. These know nothing of chart and compass, 
for they never go out of sight of the cliffs of society, and therefore are 
quite unable to keep clear of the dangers with which they have so long 
been flirting. If men only knew the more than earthly joy of being alone 
with God, and out of sight and sound of human reliance and influence, 
they would up with the anchor, and seek the glorious main, where 
apparent danger is real safety, and manifest solitude is the truest com- 
pany. Farewell, ye sandy shores of human trust ! Adieu, ye green 
hills of human admiration! At last, we lose sight of even you, ye 
highest peaks of trusted attachment ! Now our soul waits only upon 
God, and our expectation is from him. Above, beneath, around, is the 
Godhead's fathomless sea ! God the horizon, and the zenith, and the 
whole circle ! Now we dare fly before the wind, and leap the billows 
with delight. There are no rocks or quicksands here ! coasters ! 
could ye but know this liberty and life, ye too would fly your present 
fancied safety. C. H. S. 



1G 



THE horrible tragedies which have recently occurred at the East End 
have at least had the effect of directing public attention to that 
vast and crowded area about which respectable people know too little. 
We have had descriptions true to life, or coloured with sensational 
exaggerations ; but now all alike are outdone by the details of the grim 
reality which has startled and shocked the public to a degree hardly ever 







W. EVANS HURNDALL, M.A. 

before paralleled. Some of us have long known that the streets of 
London at night represent the very saddest phase of sin in our fallen 
world ; but because the subject was not one to be talked about, or 
written about, the truth has not been understood because it has been 
so little known. Now, however, whether respectability will have it so 
or not, the hideous thing has stalked forth out of the darkness to pro- 
claim its true character in the broad daylight of our every-day life. We 
are not pessimists, for we know too much of the work that Christians 



W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LOMDON. 17 

are carrying on to allow of our taking despairing views of the situa- 
tion. But while we do not anticipate a repetition in London of the 
French Eevolution, and while we regard the Whitechapel murderer as a 
ghoulish phenomenon which will not repeat itself once in a century, the 
victims of the nocturnal adventurer are representatives of a class the 
existence of which ought to alarm us on account of its numbers. To 
write as some do, as if the entire East-End were given over to evil, or 
as if the mysterious murderer were a fair sample of its population, is 
absurd. At the same time, it were folly to shut our eyes to the fact, 
that there is in our midst an evil power which will undermine the very 
foundations of society, unless it be overcome. 

Having recently given some articles on the far-reaching work of 
the most popular Baptist pastor at the East-End of London, we would 
now direct attention to the invaluable services of Mr. Brown's near 




EMIGRANTS SENT TO CANADA BY ME. HURNDALL. 

neighbour, W. Evans Hurndall, M.A., who belongs to the Congrega- 
tional denomination. Like Mr. Brown, Mr. Hurndall is the director of 
a great and comprehensive Mission, as well as the pastor of a church. 
The preaching of the Sabbath is followed up by earnest labour among 
the people during the six days of the week. He did not build for him- 
self a Tabernacle. After serving for a time elsewhere, he lighted upon 
the spacious old chapel in Harley Street, Bow Eoad, whose first pastor, 
in the days of William IV., was the eloquent brother of James Parsons, 
of York. When Mr. Hurndall first appeared on the scene, twelve years 
ago, the outlook was of that melancholy kind which is peculiarlv 
characteristic of chapels which have " had their day." If the building 
had ever been crowded at all, it must have been with cobwebs and 
empty seats. To build up a church, and attract a congregation, was an 
achievement which grandly testifies to the power of the gospel simply 
and earnestly preached. 

2 



18 



W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 



Mr. Hurndall was born at Berkeley, in Gloucestershire, in 1845. At 
the age of twenty-one he succeeded his father as partner ia an extensive 
manufacturing business at Bristol; and in this sphere he gained much 
experience concerning men and manners, which he has been enabled to 
turn to good account in the ministry. In the Western Metropolis Mr. 
Hurndall became associated with the church at Castlegreen, where he 
taught the young men's Bible-class, the attendance of which he saw in- 
creased from thirteen to about one hundred and fifty members. Soon after 
this he settled in London, to advance the interests of his firm ; and while 
thus engaged during the week, he devoted his services on the Sabbath 
to a congregation at Putney, where the building soon filled. Being 
so far successful, Mr. Hurndall decided to give up business, and devote 
himself wholly to pastoral work. Pressing invitations from several 




A CHRISTMAS DINNER IN A POOR HOME. 



quarters would have made an early settlement easy ; but the young 
preacher preferred to enter St. John's College, Cambridge. At Cam- 
bridge he was throughout very successful ; he won the essay prize given 
by his college, and also an exhibition ; and in 1879 he took the degree 
of M.A., three years after he had accepted the pastorate at Harley 
Street, Bow Road. 

Great success at once attended Mr. Hurndall's ministry, and his efforts 
to organize a working church in his densely-populated district. The 
renovation of the old chapel, at a cost of £2,000, was undertaken, and 
since that date an additional £4,000 has been expended in necessary 
enlargement, and in providing new rooms. The ordinary congregations 
were exceedingly crowded, while the membership of the church became 
as numerous as the seats in the chapel. This success was the more 



W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 19 

gratifying because it was in East London, where, in an ordinary way, so 
small a proportion of the people are amenable to Christian influences. 
Since then, Mr. Hurndall has more thoroughly organized his forces, and 
correspondingly extended his operations. Apart from his tract-visitors, 
who now number nearly one hundred, and who call upon some thousands 
of families every week, he has nine missionaries. One of these is an 
agent of the City Mission, whose salary is paid in part ; the others, with 
one exception, devote the whole of their time to the work, and four, 
being women, are able to render special service. In his last account, the 
support of these missionaries amounted altogether to only £518 18s., 
the total amount received in the year for mission purposes being nearly 
£2,000. 

The church's field of enterprise is the world ; the field in which the 
Harley Street church expends its energies is East London, which 
becomes more and more unfashionable year by year. Had Mr. Hurn- 
dall studied his own advancement and ministerial prestige, he cer- 
tainly would not have chosen such a sphere, though he could not have 
found one of greater usefulness. He must have been willing, at the 
outset, to make great self-sacrifice ; but perhaps at first, as a younger 
man and less experienced veteran, be could not see quite all that his 
action involved. Even in a dozen years the outlook has altered in a 
degree that could not have been anticipated when the start was made: 
and, in a sense, the change that is ever going on is not for the better. 
Think of the different state of things which now obtains from the days 
when Harley Street could show its row of carriages on Sunday, waiting 
to carry home the wealthy persons who attended on the ministry of 
Edward Parsons ! People were then content to reside in the district 
where they carried on their business, and made their money ; nowadays 
they are not content unless they can at least sleep in a more congenial 
region. Our friend complains that people take their departure " just as 
soon as they can grow wings big enough." He then adds, with caustic 
wit, that " a gentility is prevalent which cannot endure the letter E at 
the end of its postal address. S.E. or N.E. may be tolerated, but bare, 
unadorned E. is shunned by many with far more eagerness than Satan 
himself." This habit which people have contracted of hastening away 
to quarters which are better chiefly because there is no E. in the postal 
address, is condemned, because " there is less excuse for leaving than 
many apprehend. East London is not unhealthy. Many parts will 
compare favourably with the most aristocratic metropolitan regions." 
If possible, Mr. Hurndall would retain those whom the poor cannot 
part with without incurring additional suffering, he even pleads for 
" the immigration of those who are sufficiently human to realize that 
there are other people in the world beside themselves." He actually 
makes the "startling suggestion" that the Sovereign herself should 
pass part of her time in Bow or Whitechapel, in a palace reared by the 
unemployed on a selected healthy site. He thinks that such a conces- 
sion would be a graceful finale of the Jubilee, since it would touch the 
most sensitive spot in the heart of the people. "Victoria would go 
down among kings and queens as Queen Pre-eminent, with a strange 
halo encircling her name ; because, in an age of self-indulgence she was 
content to dwell among her poorer subjects." 



20 W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 

Meanwhile, while people who are anxious about their social standing 
are migrating to more congenial regions represented by the other three 
letters of the compass, the hungry crowd of those who have to be satisfied 
with E. on their postal address, daily increases in volume. Taken in its 
social aspect, the saddest characteristics of the East End become more 
intensified in proportion as the population increases. Thither, in a 
never-ceasing stream, gravitate all kinds of people who have lost their 
footing in the world ; some being examples of misfortune, while others are 
victims of their own folly or sin. At the best of times, the great area 
shows an unnatural amount of poverty and suffering ; but in times of 
exceptional distress it is a world of despair. 

Is it, then, a world without any light on its horizon, and are its 
myriads to be abandoned to their fate without pity ? So far from there 
being no encouraging signs, Mr. Hurndall assured us, that on the whole 
the people are getting better. The chief cause of their extreme poverty 
and consequent suffering is early and improvident marriages. Drink 
is the next cause of misery. In reference to the hardships caused by the 
over-crowded state of the labour-market, it is thought that the Govern- 
ment should give more attention to the condition of the unemployed — 
an opinion in which all heavily-burdened ratepayers should heartily 
concur. When Britons can go round the world on their own possessions ; 
and when the richest colonies for all practical purposes are limitless, 
unemployed persons who are intensely anxious to obtain work should have 
direction and help granted them in accordance with the truest prin- 
ciples of political economy. At all events, the distressing scenes which 
take place every morning outside the Docks are discreditable to the 
nation ; for if men who can work in the Docks, but who daily ask piteously 
for work in vain, can work in the Colonies, why are they not taken 
there in larger numbers ? Mr. Hurndall believes that emigration will 
be one of the most profitable departments of his enterprise. While he is 
no alarmist, he fears that there may be trouble ahead unless this great 
question of want of employment is generously dealt with. The acute 
misery of the people had much to do with the first explosion of the. 
French Revolution ; and if any similar storm-cloud ever gathers in this 
great city, what human power could stop its disastrous progress ? If 
nothing short of drastic measures will bring relief, the pastor is not 
even afraid to try such a prescription. He says, "It is childish folly 
to brand proposals as ' Socialistic,' and therefore to denounce them.''* 
" All proposals should be treated upon their own merits, and examined 
without foregone conclusions. v While uttering such common-sense 
sentiments, Mr. Hurndall recognizes the truth, that there is still work 
to be done which can only be done by Christianity and its messengers, 
lie says, " the root-matter is this, after all, that the people themselves 
need to be changed, and nothing in the universe can effect this but 
Christianity. Carry Christianity to the people, and its many fruits 
with it." * 

Let us now look at a few of the cases which came under the notice 
of Mr. Hurndall and his missionaries. 

In one room there is a young man who is still under twenty -five 
years of age, who has been compelled to lie in bed during four years 
under peculiarly painful circumstances. At the too early age of twenty 



W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDOX. 21 

he was married ; and about a fortnight after the wedding-day he met 
with an accident that permanently injured the spine, thus making it 
necessary for him to lie on his back. Instead of yielding to despair, as 
he might have been excused for doing, this brave young fellow still sets 
a striking example of patience and industry. While still obliged to 
remain in one position, he learned to make wool-work on frames, and at 
this he is constantly employed. A market for what he makes is found 
by Mr. Hurndall, so that a small but regular income is secured. The 
young wife, who appears to be a fitting companion for such a man, 
does her part with uncomplaining cheerfulness ; a testimony to her 
character in this respect being seen in the clean and tidy room. Such 
an example of industry as this shows that none need really despair if 
they will but persevere. 

A more commonplace, but still deserving case is that of a family of 
eight — man, wife, and six children — who were found all living in one 
room. The man being laid up by sickness, the duty of looking after 
him, and also of earning a livelihood for the family, devolved upon the 
woman, whose only resource consisted in making match-boxes at 2Jd. 
a gross. Even at such employment she contrived to keep herself and 
children out of the workhouse, which was her main ambition. We may 
moralize as we will about the folly of such persons taking upon them- 
selves family responsibilities without any suitable provision ; but when a 
woman is found devotedly toiling to get bread for her sick husband and 
six children, by making boxes at less than a farthing a dozen, Christian 
instinct prompts the giving of some assistance. These are the people 
that Mr. Hurndall assists in their laudable endeavours to keep out of 
the ranks of pauperdom. 

In a general way, Mr. Hurndall is not in favour of free teas ; but 
occasionally it may not be amiss to invite a number of the poor to such 
an entertainment. A short time ago, we were present at such a gather- 
ing, when an opportunity was afforded of seeing representatives of the 
classes who are fighting life's hard. battle at the Bast End ; those honest 
and struggling poor, whom to assist is the truest charity. 

The first who enters is a woman, who has arrived at that age which 
is accounted the best part of life ; but she is very poor, and has no 
change of clothes in which to appear on this festive occasion. Her un- 
happy lot is to do what she calls shirt-work at eightpence a dozen ; she 
works at home with a machine w r hich cost £7 10s., and on account of 
which she pays Is. 6d. a week. As it requires four good hours to turn 
out a dozen, it is almost impossible to do double that quantity, because 
the same hands have to do the house-work as well. The result is that 
the earnings are about a shilling a day, twenty-five per cent of which 
must go towards the gradual paying off of the great debt on the machine. 
This reckoning only applies to times when trade is brisk. In dull seasons, 
shirts, even at eightpence a dozen, are by no means plentiful, and may 
even have to be waited for during inany weary weeks. 

The next subject is a married woman, whose sick husband and five 
children depend upon her for support ; a mangle, for which she has 
been helped to pay £4 10s., being her only means of earning money. 
It is hardly possible to get a shilling a day at such an occupation ; for 
when we learn that there are seven other mangles in the same street, it 



22 W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 

becomes plain that the artisans who construct these useful machines* 
have a better time of it than the women who depend upon them for a 
livelihood. The multiplication of mangles stimulates competition, thus 
bringing the price down from three-halfpence to a penny a dozen ; and 
how genuine a grievance this is, we should speedily realize if we had 
ourselves to provide for a household of seven by such an occupation. 
Of course, this sad -looking woman receives some assistance from Mr. 
Hurndall, and those who supply the funds will be glad to hear that she 
does so. These cases are merely representative of many others. 

Through being subject to fits, the next subject does nothing but 
attend to her children ; and as eight out of eleven have survived to need 
attention, she does not lack employment. Her husband is a steady 
man, who has been a teetotaler for five years ; but, notwithstanding, 
things have seemed to go against him ; for, after filling a situation in 
a mat factory for twelve years, the growing hardness of the times at last 
took away his employment. His only resource is now to go through the 
terrible ordeal of seeking work at the Docks, and those who know what 
kind of a scene is to be witnessed outside of the gates in the early 
morning, and again at noon, when some are taken on for half a day, will 
feel for him. Here, then, at all events, is a family which has not been 
brought down by drink ; and there are many others of the same kind, 
people who do their utmost to keep themselves above the low-water 
mark of pauperism, and who count it a privilege to attend religious 
meetings. 

Another subject, whose work is that of a trousers finisher, at two- 
pence-halfpenny a pair, is lower down, if possible, than the others, 
her wages being equivalent to about a halfpenny an hour. It will be 
observed, however, that wages cut down to the lowest point do not repre- 
sent the chief affliction of these women ; for two of the number have 
husbands disabled by sickness, and one has a son doubly ruptured. 

Their testimony in regard to drunkenness is that drinking is nothing 
like so bad as it used to be ; but that still the drink is a main cause of 
poverty and suffering. The fact comes out that in wet or wintry weather 
bad shoes hinder people from attending the meetings. Many of these 
people, who have reached middle life, are unable to read, and deeply da 
they regret their ignorance. Mr. Hurndali finds that some who come 
forward to join the church have not yet mastered the alphabet. 

Such are the kind of people who are reached and benefited by the 
church at Harley Street ; and the work is done by those who hold 
very uncompromising notions respecting the inspiration of the Bible 
and the doctrines of grace. In regard to Modern Thought, the 
pastor holds very clearly-defined opinions, maintaining that its funda- 
mental idea is a mistaken one, that it tends to lessen the authority of 
Holy Scripture; that it exalts man; that it lays little emphasis upon 
prayer ; and that it lessens the sense of the sinfulness of sin. If the 
objection is raised that he is " putting back the clock," his reply is,, 
that "Christianity which goes according to a clock is likely to be a very 
queer faith. Theological clocks are among the most cranky pieces of 
mechanism that the world has ever been cursed with. No faith worth a 
farthing can travel by a clock ; it must move with the sun. Now, here 
comes the question : Is there a sun to go by ? Modern-thought people 



SELF-SEARCHING. 23 

seem to doubt or deny. We contend that there is, and that it is found 
in the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints, this being 
wholly of Christ the great Sun of Righteousness. If my clock does not 
agree with/ the Sun, I had better alter it until it does." For " abreast 
of the times " he substitutes " abreast of the apostles." 

There is thus no uncertain ring about the preaching at Harley Street 
Chapel. It is a gospel that shows its divine character by its effect 
upon the poor. By living close by, at 16, Cottage Grove, Bow, Mr. 
Hurndall shows his preference for dwelling among his own people. 
In another paper we hope to show what is being done by means of 
emigration, as well as in other ways, and meanwhile, we commend the 
pastor and his work to all who have at heart the cause of the poor. 
Now that winter has settled down upon the East End, those who are 
devoting time and energy to work such as Christ himself would have 
commended, should receive the most generous encouragement. 

G. H. P. 



)t\f~$mxtYm%. 



THE newspapers the other day told us that " the Searches Bill was 
advanced a stage." We are glad to hear that anything has been 
advanced in a Parliament which is degraded by obstructionists : but 
what the Bill may be this deponent sayeth not. Yet this is sure, that 
we have each need, not only to pass such a Bill, but to carry it out. 
May be, because we are slow in so doing we are brought into more trials. 
God hath undertaken this work in answer to our prayer, " Search me, 
O God ! " Did we know what we asked for ? Those pains, those 
depressions, those losses and crosses. Were these black horses sent to 
bring with them, as in chariots of iron, " deep searchings of heart " ? 
It is highly probable, and it would be our wisdom, and our relief, if 
we more voluntarily set about heart-searchings, and as the practical 
result, put away every evil thing. C. H. S. 



is (iMr jjf fyt %lxni% ai 6Iorg. 

AN old writer says, "The streets of glory have their beginnings on earth" 
This witness is true. What is heaven but eternal life; and this is life 
eternal, that we know the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom he hath 
sent. This we already know, and have believed. Heaven is rest, and in 
taking Christ's yoke upon us and bearing his yoke we have already 
found rest unto our souls. Heaven is communion with saints, and 
with their Lord, and this we also have the privilege of enjoying in a 
delightful measure. Heaven is holiness, and the Spirit hath wrought 
in us the beginnings and elements of perfection. Heaven is victory, 
and in him that hath loved us we are more than conquerors even now. 
Heaven is hallowed service, and this day " he hath made us unto our 
God kings and priests." Heaven is glory, and when we suffer for 
righteousness' sake " the Spirit of glory doth rest upon us." 

Truly the old preacher spake as an oracle, and the light of prophecy 
gleamed from his eye when he said, " The streets of glory have their 
beginnings on earth." Let us walk as far down those streets as we 
may. C. H. S. 



24 

BY C. H. SPURGEON. 

T\7ITH how little God is satisfied, according to the notions of men ! 
V ▼ That Thrice Holy One, who, in the Scriptures, is described as 
requiring truth in the inward parts, and the love of all the heart and 
soul, and strength, is dreamed of by worldlings as a Deity who, by a sort 
of witchcraft, is propitiated by pious words, or clerical persons, or 
pecuniary gifts. While considering the vain hopes of worldlings, frailer 
than spiders' webs, and more illusive than the mirage, we have given 
the words of Watts a fresh sense, and cried — 

1 ' Great God, on what a feeble thread 
Hang everlasting things ! " 

One would think that the gate to eternal life was by no means strait, 
and that to enter it required no striving. Men have strange notions as 
to what they must do to be saved. These ideas take forms which are 
absurd in essence, and sometimes ridiculous in appearance. We re- 
member the true story of the gentleman who was thrown from his horse 
in the hunting-field, and was carried into a house, and found to be fatally 
injured. A sporting friend, finding that he must die, offered to hasten 
off and bring a clergyman, evidently supposing that something might be 
lacking which the ordained person could supply. The dying man de- 
clined the aid of the rector or vicar, for, said he, il I attended my own 
parish church last Sunday.'"' He evidently felt that he had taken in his 
full supply of religion for the week, and that it covered all the emer- 
gencies of the period. 

No doubt, religion is viewed by many as a blackmail paid to avert 
misery, or a decent homage rendered to a superior power, or a kind of 
exemption-money in lieu of personal service to a mysterious Lord. It 
is, to such, not a part of life, much less the essence and soul of character ; 
but a thing to be done and done with, as we observe a matter of 
etiquette or propriety, and then take our pleasure. What a mistake lies 
at the bottom of all this ! True religion means the love of God, and a 
delight in his ways. It is not the saying nor the doing of this or that, 
but the being reconciled to God and his commands and ways, and the 
exercise and enjoyment of friendship towards him, and intercourse with 
him. Such a thing as unpleasant religion is impossible. How can 
there be such a thing as forced love, or unwilling friendship ? If these 
things are true, they are voluntary and pleasurable. What a different 
affair is this from going to church, having prayers in the house, taking 
the sacrament at intervals, and giving a guinea to the poor-fund ! These 
things are done by genuine Christians ; but they are scarcely men- 
tioned, and never over-valued. They are such a matter of course to 
the hearty believer that the idea of trusting in them never occurs to 
him. His trust is in another and a higher than himself, and in gifts, 
and deeds, and prayers, which are of more than mortal origin. 

The story has often been told of the sporting lord who made no 
pretence to religion, nor even to morality ; but, on the contrary, rather 
gloried in his free-thinking and his free living. His time came to enter 



STRANGE NOTIONS OF RELIGION. 25 

eternity, and he was laid low by a sickness which was the forerunner 
of death. One of his wild companions, calling upon him, was greatly 
surprised to see the parson coming out of the bedroom, and mentioned 
the fact to the sick man. The explanation was soon given in sporting 
language : " Yes," said the departing libertine, "lam trying to hedge." 
He feared that his speculation in free opinions and ungodliness might 
turn out to be a loss, and so he was speculating a little in the other 
direction, to save himself in some degree. He was carrying out for 
spiritual things what he had often tried in betting on the turf. The 
story did literally occur. The conduct which it sets forth has struck 
bolder and more honest sinners as rather a mean piece of business, 
and they have been heard to say that, having been in the service of the 
devil all their lives, they were not prepared to desert . him at the last. 
Such a consideration has small weight with those selfish beings whose 
one thought is to enjoy themselves at as little risk as possible ; or, if at 
great risk, then to discover some secret method of insurance by which 
the pleasure of the sin could be enjoyed, and the punishment of the sin 
could be escaped. 

There are among us, F self-contained and self-satisfied persons, who can 
dispense even with the minimum of religion which others concede, 
because they are so good without it, that it would seem superfluous to 
care about it. If they pay respect to its outward forms it is from deference 
to society, but not from any personal need for the performance. Very 
wonderful are these superior persons. They assert that they are quite 
as good as religious people, and, in some points, a great deal better. They 
themselves assure us that this is the case, and they ought to know. 
They are so excellent, that to contemplate their own virtues is, to them, 
far more exhilarating than the worship of God. Such worthies remind 
us of the eccentric nobleman, who talked to himself in his travelling 
carriage all the way from Brighton to London, and ended by inviting 
himself to dinner, as the most pleasant companion he had ever travelled 
with. Surely to them there can be no higher heaven than eternally to 
enjoy their own society ! Alas ! when they wake up from their present 
delusion, and see themselves as God sees them, this supposed paradise 
will darken down into the worst of hells ; for of all society, the most 
degraded will be that of one who dared insult his Saviour by the proud 
pretence that his own righteousness rendered faith in the cross needless, 
and indeed made the redeeming death a superfluity. It would be 
difficult to make a table of degrees of sins ; but assuredly, though self- 
righteousness may seem a small evil towards man, its Godward character 
is of the blackest. It refuses mercy, it denies truth, it depreciates 
grace, it dishonours the Saviour ; it is, in fact, a rebel in the robes of a 
courtier, or, as Thomas Adams would have said, "a white devil." 

From the religion which is without righteousness, and from the 
righteousness which is without religion, may the Lord deliver us ! 



2G 

% %mm m fyt §ulf jof jfmlmtir, 

AS SEEN FROM THE SKELETON BRIDGE. 

I SHALL not soon forget a scene which I witnessed recently in the* 
Gulf of Finland. I was on board the steamship Goldm Horn, 
bound for St. Petersburg. One day, shortly before noon, the steward 
pushed into the cabin to tell me that there was a raft with two men on 
it, and that they were raising a signal of distress. I immediately went 
on deck, and could see in the distance something floating on the water, 
with two persons on it. Our good captain (Captain Leisk) at once had 
the steamer put in the direction of them. On coming nearer, we found 
that there were a man and a woman on the keel of a boat which had 
been capsized. The man was standing up, and the woman kneeling 
with one hand clutching the boat, while with the other she was- 
beckoning to us in the most excited way. One of our boats was lowered, 
and soon returned with the two shipwrecked people. They were poor 
Finns from an adjacent island, and could not speak a word of English. 
They had been away to another island, and were returning home with 
a cargo of wood, hay, and — I was about to add stubble, for to the eyes 
of an Englishman it looked very worthless stuff. Their boat was a 
rough affair, with two rude sails, and in a sudden squall it had been, 
overturned. After we got them on board, the captain had their boat 
righted and baled out. While this was being done the poor creatures 
were partaking of something to eat and drink. They seemed very 
grateful for the kindness they received. The woman was weeping 
incessantly. The captain found her a few dry articles of clothing, and 
I gave her my travelling rug. We took them as near to the island to 
which they belonged as we well could, and then put them into their own 
boat, and soon they were rowing away towards their home, which no 
doubt they reached in safety. But what excitement prevailed during 
the scene which I have thus poorly described ! From the captain to 
the humblest sailor, all seemed intensely interested. The steward,, 
cook, and nearly everybody, were rendering assistance. Sailors are 
amongst the bravest and kindest of men, and I was glad to have an 
opportunity of being in their company at a time when their better 
qualities were in exercise. 

Now for the thoughts suggested by the foregoing incident. One 
thing was uppermost in my mind, and it was a desire that Christians 
might only be as much in earnest in rescuing people from eternal death 
as the captain and crew of the Golden Horn were in saving those poor 
Finlanders from a watery grave. Everything was forgotten at the 
time but the one purpose of delivering two fellow-creatures from 
danger. brethren, let us arouse ourselves to save poor sinners who 
are perishing all around us. Shame upon us for our sloth in a matter 
of life and death ! Let us 

" Rescue the perishing, care for the dying, 
Snatch them in pity from death and the grave.'* 

The efforts made to rescue those people were prompt. When it was 
once discovered in what imminent peril they were placed, no time was 



A RESCUE IN THE GULF OF FINLAND. 2T 

lost in going to their aid. Every moment is of value at such a time. 
Delay is dangerous, for procrastination may mean the loss of lives. 
In spiritual matters we need to act with more promptitude. While we 
are talking about reaching the masses the masses are sinking into the- 
black waters of eternal death. How foolish and even sinful it is to be 
squabbling about little matters of procedure in Christian service while 
thousands are dying ! If our captain and officers had retired to the cabin 
to hold a committee-meeting about what should be done, in all proba- 
bility those two people would have been in eternity long ere their talk 
was done. But they were not so foolish. They set to work with all 
eagerness. The captain stood giving orders with the utmost readiness. 
and the greatest urgency, and was not satisfied till he saw our boat 
speeding over the waters to the assistance of those in distress. This^ 
is what we need as Christian workers. We must be up and doing at 
once. By all means we must save some. Whatsoever our hands find 
to do, we must do with our might. 

In saving men there should be no respect of persons. Those two people 
belonged to another country ; but they were human beings, who stood 
in need of help, and that help was not withheld because they were- 
strangers and foreigners. Our one business is to seek the salvation of 
all mankind, of whatever tribe and tongue. We are bidden to go into, 
all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature. We are debtors 
both to the Greeks and to the barbarians ; both to the wise and to the 
unwise. There is no difference, for the same Lord over all is rich unto 
all that call upon him. Those Finlanders were very poor. They looked 
wretched objects ; they could not in any way repay those who rescued 
them ; but they had lives to lose, and that was sufficient to awaken 
sympathy. We also must seek the salvation of the poorest. All have 
souls to be saved or lost. Let us be as anxious to save a peasant as 
a prince. " My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, 
the Lord of glory, with respect of persons." Oh, that we had less, 
desire for the presence of the fashionable and wealthy in our congrega- 
tions, and thought more of that immortal soul which belongs as much 
to the meanest as to the noblest ! 

Again : we must not merely rescue people, but endeavour to restore 
the loss which sin has caused the sinner. It would have been only half 
a kindness to save those Finlanders, and leave their boat to drift 
away ; for their livelihood depended upon it. But when their boat was 
recovered, and they were placed within it, they were in a position to- 
help themselves. Now, of course, in a spiritual sense, we cannot undo 
what has been done by sin ; but we can help to alleviate its temporal 
consequences. We can assist the discharged prisoner to obtain honest 
employment, or help the poor drunkard to gather about him once more 
the comforts of a home. This is of the utmost importance, and is,, 
perhaps, too much overlooked by the churches. May we all arise to the 
holy and blessed work of saving men, and carry out that work in a 
Christ-like way. On the great ocean of life moral and spiritual wrecks 
are all around us. On every hand there are signals of distress, if we 
had but eyes to see them. Let us strive to imitate him who came to 
seek and to save that which was lost. 

C. W. Townsend. 



28 

%\t $|rathw &j^0 to twsMr. 

A CHRISTIAN Santal was once going through several villages to 
make an extensive purchase of rice. In the first of the villages he 
got part of what he required, in the second also he got some baskets, and 
so forth, all for cash payments. But when he brought out his money at 
the last village, he found that he was twelve shillings short of the sum 
necessary to pay for what he had bought ; and as the Santals never give 
credit, the man had no alternative but to ask the seller to take back 
twelve shillings' worth of the rice. Meanwhile, the seller had perceived 
that he had to do with a Christian ; and as this impression was confirmed 
on his directly putting the question, he declared, without more to do, 
that he would be content in the meantime with the partial payment, 
and would trust to the buyer that he would soon bring him the balance. 
Herein was a great marvel for that part of the earth. 

Unfortunately, the tax-collector came next day to the village to collect 
the dues. The man who had parted with his rice on credit was not 
able to pay his dues fully at once, and told, by way of excuse, what 
had befallen him, and how he had hope of being paid before long. The 
tax-gatherer deemed it incredible that a Santal should part with his goods 
without getting the money for them. His suspicion was very greatly 
confirmed by the fact that the man could give neither the name nor the 
residence of his debtor, and only took his stand upon # this, that he was 
a Christian, and would certainly pay the twelve shillings ere long. Even 
the other villagers did not believe the story, and the collector sentenced 
the supposed liar to a suitable measure of stripes. A few days after, 
the Christian returned and paid his debt. His creditor had scarcely 
recovered from his undeserved ill-treatment ; but he forgot his pains 
in the joy of being able to vindicate himself and his honourable 
debtor before his neighbours and acquaintances. He called them all 
together, and said triumphantly : " You laughed at me lately because I 
trusted to the word of a Christian. There he is. Look well at him. 
I have not dunned him for his debt. I knew neither his name nor 
where he lives, and yet he has come to pay me the twelve shillings ! " — 
From "Modern Missions and Culture." 



Host §*fo*Is. 

THEY are searching in the Adriatic, near to Trieste, for a valuable 
case of jewels, which was lost in September, 1812, when a French 
corvette was sunk by an explosion. It is seventy-seven years ago, and 
yet they search for the jewels ; the original owner must long ago have 
died, yet others set great store by the gems. The case is at the bottom 
of the sea, which can only be searched at great expense, yet the rocks 
will be ransacked, or the mud upturned. Have any of us lost our jewels 
of fellowship with God, power in prayer, joy in the Holy Ghost, and 
delight in the Lord ? Let us not rest until we find them. If we go to 
the bottom of the sea of humiliation, and seek amid the depth and 
darkness, yet let the labour be continued till once again we wear upon 
our neck and arm the priceless love-tokens of our heavenly Bridegroom. 

C. H. S. 



29 

THE conquests of the gospel in the South Seas have all along been 
wonderful, many of the smaller islands being transformed into 
gardens of the Lord ; and now the greatest achievement of all in those 
sunny regions — the reclamation of New Guinea from idolatry and can- 
nibalism — is making rapid progress. In the future, the names of such 
veterans as Chalmers, Macfarlane, and Lawes, will be intimately asso- 
ciated with the honourable service. People who love to read about 
adventure on the virgin soil of unexplored countries will find plenty of 
instruction and entertainment in Mr. Chalmers' pages. The author 
warns his readers that he has made no effort to produce l * a finished 
book," the bulk being made up of what was written while on his travels. 
This will not detract from the value of a book which describes the 
progress which Christianity is making in the great island continent, 
which is about 1,400 miles long and nearly 500 miles wide at its 
broadest part. What there may be in the interior beyond vast stretches 
of grand scenery, great mountain ranges, and broad rivers, no traveller 
has yet been able to tell. There are remains of an older civilization, 
from which the people have fallen. All savage races show that so far as 
they themselves are concerned, they have miserably fallen ; and in no 
single case have they ever been found to be rising in the social scale 
until reached by the gospel. Mr. Chalmers says, " The influence of 
the gospel of peace is already so marked, that it is working rapid 
changes in the thoughts and habits of the natives. Succeeding mis- 
sionaries and observers can never see these people in the same stage 
of savagery as when we acquired their friendship." 

But while the prospect of success is fair to the Christian missionary, 
there are clouds on the political horizon. Our author says : " If New 
Guinea is handed over to Queensland — and this seems to be by no means 
improbable — there will be a repetition of one of the saddest and cruellest 
stories in Australian history ; the weaker race will go to the wall, and 
might will be substituted for right. The young colony will not readily 
admit that the savage has any rights, and it is altogether too fond of 
the doctrine that the day of the savage is gone, and it is time that he 
made way for the robuster, so-called civilized race." 

In giving a few extracts, which will convey to the reader a clear 
notion of the country and its people, we will begin with 

A LOCAL DISEASE. 

Elephantiasis seems very prevalent ; there are many swollen legs. I 
have found on all my travels that elephantiasis prevails on the banks of 
the rivers ; yet I believe that the most healthy localities to be found in 
New Guinea will be the banks of the rivers at the mouths. Twice in 
the twenty-four hours there is a general cleaning up by the tide, a con- 
stant supply of fresh, good water, and no unpleasant smells, and the 
villages are all built on the sandy spits where no water can rest. 

* Pioneering in New Guinea. By James Chalmers. With a Map and Illustrations 
eugraved by Edward Whymper from Photographs taken by Lindt of Melbourne. The 
Religious Tract Society. Price 16s. 



30 THE GOSPEL IN NEW GUINEA. 

A NATIVE MAN OF FASHION. 

Here comes a swell in the most fashionable dress. His woolly hair is 
tied well back, and round it is a circle of bright red hibiscus flowers, 
backed by a coronet of beautiful feathers, and enlivened in front with a 
chain of white shells. On his forehead is a frontlet of shells ; between 
the eyebrows a round shell, with a finely cut piece of tortoise-shell 
something like a large watch- wheel, and on each temple the same. In 
his nose is a large piece of round shell, and hanging from his ears are 
various fancy pieces of tortoise-shell. His face is one mass of red ochre, 
and round his neck is a large necklace made of small shells, and hang- 
ing underneath are a crescent-shaped pearl shell and a large boar's 
tusk. On his arms are arm-shells, and wrought armlets and new 
bowstring guards, and round his waist a large carved belt made from the 
bark of a tree and coloured red and white ; his trousers consist of a narrow 
strip of native cloth of various colours, and ends hanging down in 
front, and under his knees and ankles are very nicely knitted garters 
and anklets. He feels himself handsome, and knows that he is now 
being admired. 

PRAYING AND TEACHING. 

Sunday, October 14th (among the cannibals of the Gulf in 1883). 
Last night in the dark we had evening prayers. The deacon gave a 
short address, I, through him, another ; then he engaged in prayer. It 
was a strange, weird meeting. There were about a dozen present, and 
we taught them to pray, "0 Lord Jesus, give us light, save us." Nothing 
more ; it was quite enough. And will he not answer them ? Long the 
deacon spoke to them and told them of God's love . . . 

Last night in the dark an old fellow got up and spoke : " Tamate 
(i.e. teacher), we are glad you have come again, that we all might see 
you, as we heard so much of you : we thought you must be a spirit, now 
we see you are a man like ourselves, only white." We have just had 
service, a hymn, a few verses of St. Matthew, and prayer by the deacon 
in the Elema dialect. The deacon also gave an address on God's love 
to man, and his desire that all might be saved . . . 

October 16th. Slept outside on the platform, and had a splendid 
night. Arnako fulfilled his promise, given at Orokolo, and for long held 
forth on Adam and Eve, Noah and the Flood ; and both he and Arna- 
daera spoke about Jesus our Lord and his love . . . They listened well, 
asked questions, and expatiated freely. Soon after sunset it commenced, 
and when I sought sleep it was still going on. Although not a pre- 
possessing people, yet they seem kind, and would, I believe, listen to 
the gospel, and receive it as good news from God to man. When I 
awoke, the sun, I found, had preceded me, and they were then, perhaps 
still, talking and listening. I went into the dubu, and looking my 
friend Arnako, who was now quite hoarse, in the face, I said, u Arna, 
have you been at it all night ? " He replied, " Yes, and when I lay 
down they kept asking questions, and I had to get up, go on, and 
explain. But enough, 1 am now at Jesus Christ, and must tell them 
all about him." Yes, my friend had reached him to whom we all must 
come for light, and help, and peace. When Arna had finished, there 
was but one response from all their lips : " No more fighting, Tamate ; 



THE GOSPEL IN NEW GUINEA. 31 

no more man-eating ; we have heard good news, and we shall strive for 
peace." 

NATIVE GARDENS. 

Near. all their dwelling-houses they have small flower-gardens. A 
platform is made about ten feet high, surrounded with a fence, and 
inside, earth brought from far inland and the coast, is placed, to the 
thickness of about two feet, various kinds of plants are grown, but in 
the majority tobacco prevails. I think these gardens famish farther 
'evidence that there is a kind of civilization amongst these people ; and 
this taste for the beautiful can surely be worked upon with much good 
result. 

NEW GUINEA AS A MISSIONARY FIELD. 

This is indeed a splendid field for missionary labour. Will the church 
of Christ in the South Seas give the men, and the church in Britain 
and the Colonies the money, with a few more missionaries? How 
niggardly we act in everything for Christ. We speak too much of 
sacrifices for the gospel's sake, or for Christ. I do hope we shall for 
ever wipe the word sacrifice, as concerning what we do, from the mis- 
sionary speech of New Guinea. May there never be a missionary or 
his wife in this mission who will speak of their " sacrifices," or of what 
they have suffered ! 

THE PHYSIQUE OF MISSIONARIES. 

They (the Motumotuans) were anxious to know if their teachers 
were big men, and when I told them they were, they were greatly de- 
lighted. Not only do savages look for physique in these teachers, but 
more civilized nations like appearance also. It is a grand mistake to 
send out men of small stature to these savages. 

BAPTISM OF CONVERTS. 

On Sunday afternoon we returned to Maiva, when we met five people 
anxious for baptism — one, a good old friend, who begged earnestly to 
foe received into the church of Christ. On the Monday there was one 
of those soul-stirring gatherings that are met with in these heathen 
lands, composed of a crowd of natives who have come to see the first 
native converts baptized into the church of Christ, the converts them- 
selves, and the mission-party. Only after a long period of preparation 
as catechumens, and receiving instruction, and after a thorough public 
profession of faith in Christ, do we baptize them. . . . The enlighten- 
ing goes on, and one after another is led from the dense darkness, 
through the glimmering light, on to the full light of glorious freedom 
in Christ and his cross — set free from their superstitions by his truth. 
But not in the present or following generation will the superstitions of 
these people be entirely overcome. There are nearly two thousand 
people being taught on New Guinea connected with our branch of the 
mission ; and it may safely be hoped the young will know little of the 
past, and they will be free from much their parents believed. 



32 



feilg S^sfefo. 



TO such as, in the midst of the darkness that doubt has created, are 
seeking a place of true rest for the soul, the following may be useful : — 

A few weeks ago, at the close of our Sunday-evening service, a young 
lady sought an interview with the writer, in his vestry. She was in a 
troubled state of mind, owing to the inner battle between the Holy Spirit's 
light and her own native darkness. God had made known his love to her, 
and the good Spirit was leading her ; but at that time there was no settled 
peace. Surrounded in society with practical atheists, and herself reading 
some of the most poisonous religious literature of the day — the poison, how- 
ever, being cleverly and fiendishly concealed under the coating of pious 
expressions — it was scarcely to be wondered at that her great difficulty was 
in believing "the record that God hath given of his Son." 

In short, her difficulty was this : Could she absolutely rely upon the (to 
her, at that stage, so-called) "Word of God as a worthy agent in her salva- 
tion ? Supposing the Bible to be human, and not divine, or only partially 
divine ; and the distinction between the divine and the human portions not 
defined distinctly, or left to clever wits to discover ; how, in such a case, 
could she be sure that her confidence was not misplaced, and her hope a 
complete delusion? This was her "stone of stumbling" — a "stone," by 
the way, placed in her path by religious impostors, who traduce the gospel 
to which they are indebted for their daily maintenance. After she had 
opened her heart to me, I quietly said, "You desire rest of soul, and an 
assurance of acceptance with God: let us see if this Bible meets your case." 
"We then turned together to several Scriptures, as follows : — 

" Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give 
you rest." "I am the Bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never 
hunger : and he that believeth on me shall never thirst." " I am the light 
of the world : he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall 
have the light of life." 

When we had read these, and many others, I said, " Now, in each Scrip- 
ture that we have read, there is a distinct promise in the present tense. If 
words mean anything at all, these mean that Jesus Christ promises specific 
blessings on specific conditions. You are not asked to work at some knotty 
problem, the true solution of which you will never know this side eternity ; 
but most distinctly you are invited to participate in a present Messing. In 
your case, the validity of the Scriptures must be settled, not by argument, 
or appeal to ancient documents (which, however, constitute proofs beyond 
the shadow of a doubt), hut by your personal experience. You may easily 
test the truth, or otherwise, of our Lord's promises. And now I ask you, in 
his name, will you venture upon his bare word, and take the consequences ? ;; 

AIL was not clear yet : there came another objection, and I proceeded — 
" Let me use an illustration. Suppose that you were in deep poverty, and 
hopelessly in debt. In your extremity, a gentleman — whose reputation for 
benevolence is not wholly unknown to you — hands you a cheque, the amount 
of which will cover your present liabilities, and provide for your near future. 
Under such circumstances, would you argue thus : ' Well, this gentleman 
has given me a cheque, and, if it is genuine, it will meet my need ; but then, 
I am not sure of its genuineness ; it may be a cruel trick to awaken my 
hopes, and then dash them to pieces again, leaving me worse than before. 
Now, considering the fact that such roguery exists, I will lay this cheque by 
until proof is forthcoming of its honesty' ? " 

Here my enquirer laughed, and I saw that the arrow had hit the mark ; 
so I continued : "I see that you recognize the absurdity of the position 
supposed. Now, tell me, what would be your readiest method of ascer- 
taining the genuineness of the cheque ; for, remember, as a cheque it is 
worthless ? " 



MEDICAL MISSION WORK IN TRAVANCORE. 33 

My enquirer replied immediately, " Why, present it at the bank for pay- 
ment." "Exactly so; and now do you see my point ? This is precisely 
what I want you to do with my Lord's promises — his cheques, we may say." 

Then there came a pause, and the tearful eyes were an index to the work 
within. In a few minutes she rose up, and said, " I see it all now ; He 
bids me come and rest — I will. I take him now and here to be all to 
me." And so it was settled. Subsequent events have proved the reality of 
her trust. 

Eeader, put Jesus to the test: that is just what he likes — "Prove me 
now herewith." All difficulties vanish when He is received into the heart. 
St. Bernard sang sweetly and correctly : — 

" When once thou visitest the heart, 
Then truth begins to shine : 
Then earthly vanities depart, 
Then kindles love divine." 

You will never get any good through criticizing or merely admiring God's 
promises. They must be received, and personally tested, before their power 
and sweetness can be known ; and, once known, there remains no room for 
doubt. 

" If our love were but more simple, 
We should take him at his word ; 
And our lives would be all sunshine 
In the sweetness of our Lord." 

Cardiff. F. C. Spurr. 



SleMral Misstett WLml m Wmbmtm. 



BY E. SARGOOD PRY, MEDICAL MISSIONARY, NEYOOR. 

IN The Sword and the Trowel, of September, 1888, there are two articles 
bearing on Mission Work in India, the one narrating the short but noble 
life of Dr. T. S. Thomson, the other drawing attention to the work recently 
commenced among the lepers of India. As a kind of supplement to these 
two articles, it may be of interest to glance once more at the field of labour 
once filled so well by Dr. Thomson, which is now the corner of the great 
harvest field apportioned to the writer of the present paper. 

The band of young men, who were trained in medicine and surgery by 
Dr. Thomson and his predecessor, Dr. Lowe, still do good service in the 
eight branch dispensaries connected with the Mission, and month by month 
they meet the medical missionary with reports of the work that has been 
done, of the seed that has been sown in hearts softened by affliction, and of 
one and another who, by divine grace, are turned from " darkness to light," 
and " from the power of Satan to serve the living God." A young man who 
has for some months been under treatment at the central hospital at Neyoor, 
and on whom a successful operation for the removal of dead bone has been 
performed, has given evidence of a simple faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, 
and is about to be baptized in the hospital with his family. 

This being the jubilee year of the establishment of the Medical Mission 
in Travancore, a new and more commodious hospital is now being erected, 
the funds for which are almost all in hand ; indeed, as Hudson Taylor has 
remarked, " All is in God's hand, and to be put into our hands when 
the proper time comes." Last, but not least, a separate "Leper Ward" 
in connection with the " Mission to the Lepers, of India " has been begun, 
and medical help, kindness, and the glorious gospel, are being brought to 
bear upon these afflicted ones, for whom also Christ died. 

May the Holy Spirit breathe through these various agencies, so that dead 

3 



34 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



souls may be made alive ! We are in need of a Pentecostal shower of bless- 
ing ; for amongst our forty-five thousand professing Protestant Christians of 
South Travancore, we have to deplore much coldness of spiritual life. The 
visit of Messrs. Mateer and Parker last year did much good. Will all 
readers join in prayer that Travancore may be a " garden of the Lord " ? 



Ipfta 0f §00fes. 



Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit for the 
Year 1888. Passmore and Alabaster. 

With thankful heart we issue the 
thirty-fourth annual volume of ser- 
mons. Despite frequent illnesses, no 
week has been without its discourse, 
though on one occasion, at least, we 
were within measurable distance of 
a failure, through sheer inability to 
hold the pen. In their separate form 
the sermons have gone forth in their 
thousands, and now in their compacter 
shape we hope they will secure a lodg- 
ment in many a library. We trust our 
friends will continue to sustain the 
sale for the truth's sake. 

The Interpreter ; or, Scripture for 
Family Worship. By C. H. Spur- 
geon. Passmore and Alabaster. 
We are greatly rejoiced that our 
publishers see their way to the reissue 
of The Interpreter in parts, for thus it 
will come within the reach of the 
many. There will be twenty parts at 
sixpence each ; or the whole can be 
had bound for twelve shillings and 
sixpence. We took great pains to 
make this book suitable for reading at 
family prayer, and from the testimony 
of many who have used the volume 
we believe we succeeded. A large 
edition of the work was cleared out, 
but as it was printed on fine paper it 
was somewhat costly, and it is with 
much pleasure that we see a cheaper 
edition prepared for the press. In the 
best form it will still be obtainable, 
but in these sixpenny parts we trust 
it will reach many more homes. May 
the Lord restore the spirit of pure 
devotion which delights in family 
prayer ; for we fear that this holy 
institution is dying out in many 
quarters. 

Our Own Picture Booh. By Emma 

Marshall. Nisbet and Co. 
Exactly what it professes to be. A 
very varied assortment of engravings ; 



these are used as texts for short chats 
with the little ones. This is a splendid 
Christmas-box for those who are 
beginning to read. What must the 
sensation be of reading a page of 
letterpress for the first time in one's 
life ? Assuredly, a good engraving 
must be a great help to the struggling 
scholar. 

How the Home ivas Won Bach. A 
Story for Mothers. By Mrs. G. S. 
Reaney. Nisbet and Co. 
For years in the East of London Mrs. 
Reaney 's ministry was " a blessing to 
mothers." Manchester mothers, among 
the humbler classes, will, by this time, 
have learned to love her for her work's 
sake. This little book is intended for 
those higher in the social scale. It 
is full of practical wisdom for both 
daughters and their mothers. But — 
reviewers always keep a large store of 
" buts " — what a poor compliment the 
writer pays to her husband's Noncon- 
formist brethren ! In their ranks she 
could not find or imagine a helpmeet 
worthy of her model daughter, with- 
out going to the Novelists' " Stores" 
for "a nice curate, if you please." 
"The priest, all shaven and shorn, that 
married the maiden all forlorn," ap- 
pears to be as absolute a necessity to 
the bride's new home as to " The House 
that Jack built." 

Left Behind. By Jennie Chappell. 

Shaw. 
School-boys will like the story. As it 
is all about one of themselves it is 
not likely to be " left behind." 

Adeline Mayling. By David Newton. 

Primitive Methodist Book Dep6t. 
A good Methodist story. The fidelity 
of a loving sister is the silver thread 
which runs through the entire narra- 
tive. It is full of interest, and well 
illustrates the Scripture: — "He that 
trusteth in the Lord, mercy shall com- 
pass him about." 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



35 



Raphael Tuck and Sons, of London 
and New York, take a leading place 
in producing works of art for the 
season. Some of their productions 
will be more acceptable to High 
Churchmen than to those of less florid 
taste, and of simpler creed ; yet such 
works as ' ' the Infant St. John tvith 
Lamb " will be acceptable to all. In 
books and booklets, this firm is as 
successful as usual. " Harbour Lights" 
strikes us as a specimen of how poetry 
and the pencil, working together, 
make scenes visible to the eye, and 
almost audible to the ear. In a 
special line of high art, the name of 
Raphael Tuck is to the front. The 
works of the firm are so well known, 
that we need only mention that they 
are supplying the market, as usual, 
with a great variety of beautiful things 
for the season. Cards, books, and 
copies of great pictures, are proffered, 
so that both the juvenile with his 
pence, and the nabob with his guineas, 
can find opportunity for expenditure. 

Mr. H. J. Drane, LovelVs Court, 
Paternoster Bow, sent us specimens of 
Gift-books for the season, but they 
were too late for theDecember number. 
They are as attractive a set of things 
as we have yet seen, and in some re- 
spects, we set them above all we have 
hitherto reviewed. 

In a box at six shillings, we have 
Songs of Love and Joy. Poems by Dr* 
H. Bonar. This is simply perfect, and 
we may safely call it the gift-book of 
the season. Four books in boxes, at 
2s., entitled, " The Talking with Jesus 
series" are each so good, both spi- 
ritually and artistically, that we know 
not which to choose, but are glad to 
have lingered over all four. Any one 
of these would be just what you are 
looking for to give Jane a present 
which may not only please, but profit. 

Following these are charming books 
at one shilling, and others at nine- 
pence. We advise our friends to write 
for a catalogue, for when we reach so 
low down as 6d. and4d., and still find 
beauty and art, we give up the task 
of making a list. On the Sea-shore, in 
the shape of a scallop, is finely poetical 
throughout, and is only Is. Booklets 
fashioned as thistles, shamrocks, and 
rose-leaves, are striking, and will 



please many — they only cost sixpence. 
Autograph Albums, also at Is., will 
suit the juveniles. Altogether, it is 
our duty, as well as our pleasure, to 
commend Mr. Drane' s issues to the 
special attention of the Christian 
public. 

Year by year we use the calendars 
of Bemrose and Son, tearing off the 
number day by day. The figures are 
sufficiently bold to be conspicuous 
even in a large room. There are 
three sorts, each costing a shilling. 

The Day of Days. Home Words. The 
Fireside. Hand and Heart. Volumes 
for 1888. 7, Paternoster Square, 
E.C. 

These four serials, edited by our 
honoured friend, Mr. Bullock, are as 
good as ever, and we do not see how 
they can be better. The "Home 
Words Office" is the seat of a great 
Religious Tract Society, which sup- 
ports itself by its own sales. "Suc- 
cess to it," say we. 

Favourite Bible Stories for the Young. 
Illustrated. Nelson and Sons. 

Illustrated indeed. We have seen 
nothing better this season. For taste 
and beauty these publishers are always 
to the front. A cheap and handsome 
present for a child. We prefer it 
to most of the books of the season. 

Pictures and Stories of Animal Life. 
By James Weston. Partridge. 

A DAINTY shilling's-worth. In the 
most entertaining manner children are 
introduced to many of those forms of 
animal life which stupid people do 
not admire. This is a rare book for a 
New Year's gift. 

The Children 's Treasury of Pictures and 
Stories for 1889. Nelson. 

So good that we don't see how it 
could be better. Cheap too. 

Nursery Land. By Frederic E. Wea- 
therly. Illustrated by Helena J. 
Maguire. Hildesheimer & Faulkner. 

A GEM of gems. Nothing can be more 
artistic, or better adapted to fill all 
Nursery-land with an uproar of jubila- 
tion. Cannot some good spirit make 
us all trotties again ? 



36 



NOTICES OP BOOKS. 



The Sermon Bible. 1 Kings to Psalm 

LXXVI. Hodder and Stoughton. 
Another volume of a condensed com- 
pilation, which will be of the utmost 
service to poor, hard-pressed preachers. 
It is all stolen material, but the sources 
are honestly given. We cannot vouch 
for the quality of every particular 
stone in this mosaic ; but, as a whole, 
it will be a great work. Get this 
second volume at 7s. 6d., and secure 
the one before it, and you will have 
no need of spoil, for you will have 
enough and to spare. 
The Happiest Half- hour. Sunday 
Talks with Children. By Frederick 
Langbridge, M.A. Eeligious Tract 
Society. 
Very good reading. We are not 
carried away by it ; but still it will be 
useful to friends who want something 
to read to the youngsters on Sunday. 
The Biblical Treasury of Expositions 
and Illustrations. Old Testament 
Series. Vol. IX., Jonah to Malachi. 
NewEdition. Sunday-school Union. 
Every teacher, without a single ex- 
ception, should possess a full set of 
the Biblical Treasury, and in so doing 
he will have by him a great store of 
Scriptural illustrations. This is one 
of the very best things which the 
Sunday-school Union has ever done ; 
and in its present form, issued in 
volumes according to the order of the 
books of the Bible, it is simply in- 
valuable to the rank and file of the 
great army of Sunday-school teachers. 
Bible-class Notes on the First Seven 
Chapters of the Gospel of St. Luke. 
By Old Christopher. Second 
Edition. Jarrold and Sons. 
Ear beyond the average of such notes 
as to depth and spirituality. Old 
Christopher is true to the gospel of 
the grace of God, with which we 
believe, from his Notes, he has a 
truly personal acquaintance through 
the inward teaching of the Spirit of 
God. This is a handsome book ex- 
ternally, and within, it has the beauty 
of truth and grace. We do not observe 
much that is astonishing ; but, what 
is better, we find abundance of gra- 
cious, edifying teaching. We hope 
Old Christoxmer will be encouraged 
to bring out all the rest of the Gospel 
which he has so well begun. 



The Antichrist, Babylon, and the Com- 
ing of the Lord. By G. H. Pember, 
M.A. Hodder and Stoughton. 

The triple title of this little book 
points to three distinct essays. In this, 
as in his previous works — " Earth's 
Earliest Ages," and " The Great 
Prophecies " — the author adheres to 
the primitive literal school of interpre- 
tation. In fact, like De Burgh, B. W. 
Newton, and Mr. Govett, of Norwich, 
he is a " Futurist "; while Elliot, of the 
1 ' Horse Apocalypticse " ; Cumming, and 
our good friends Mr. and Mrs. Guin- 
ness, have preferred the more modern 
system, generally known as the 
li Historico - Prophetic." This causes 
a divergence of views which, happily, 
does not imperil collision, for they 
travel on totally different lines of 
interpretation ; but they are alike 
evangelical and pre-millennial. They 
concur where they are never likely to 
collide, in looking for the coming of 
our Lord. Some of our friends may 
be curious enough to ask by which 
train (of expectation ?) we prefer to 
book. Well, in our little wisdom, we 
will give them an answer as opaque 
as a Delphian oracle. The sentence is 
borrowed from Seneca. " Veritatis 
simplex oratio est." We observe that 
Mr. Pember holds his Bible in his 
hand, and asks no other help, as by 
the aid of exegesis he aims to unfold 
the sacred text. The scenery through 
which his train travels is Scriptural. 
By the historic route you have saloon- 
carriages, furnished with libraries of 
secular history, heraldry, astronomy, 
and the inductive sciences, in profusion 
enough to prove that the Apocalypse 
could have been of little use to our 
poor progenitors. If you strain the lan- 
guage of metaphor with a lively sug- 
gestion, and put a little colour into your 
pictorial narrative, extraordinary coin- 
cidences will crop up, and our fear is 
that some of the historic coincidences 
of the historico -prophetic school are 
simply coincidences, and nothing more. 
Mr. Pember's favourite text is 1 Cor, 
x. 32 : " Give none offence, neither to 
the Jews, nor to the Gentiles, nor to the 
church of God." You see here in these 
three classes the triple thread of his 
meditations. We commend them to 
your evening hours. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



37 



Musings in Green Pastures; or, Food 
for the Lambs of Christ's Fold. By 
Edward Carr, Minister of Ebe- 
nezer Chapel, Leicester. Gadsby, 
Bouverie Street. 
Rich dainties for Zion's pilgrims. 
There are still left among us a few 
who love the good old ways, and have 
a, sweet tooth for covenant truth ; and 
such will enjoy the gracious teachings 
of Mr. Edward Carr. To us it has 
been a relief to turn from reviewing 
modern theology, rotten at the core, 
to the sound, spiritual, devout mus- 
ings of this man of God. The book 
costs Is. 9d. Only simple-hearted 
believers will think it worth reading. 
The worldly-wise will sneer at its ex- 
perimental testimony ; but that will 
not matter, so long as the God of 
saints blesses it, and the saints of God 
are blessed by it. 

John HazeUon : a Memoir. By W. J. 

Styles. Robert Banks and Son. 

Price 3s. 
Mr. Styles has written with the 
ardour of a friend, and with the skill 
of a practised hand ; and hence he has 
produced a memoir which must be 
eminently satisfactory to all associated 
with Mr. Hazelton, either in his family 
or in his church. To us this biography 
has furnished special enjoyment, for 
Mr. Hazelton came from our own town 
of Colchester, and became a member 
of that same Baptist church with which 
we often worshipped. Many of the 
names mentioned awaken happy 
memories in our heart. Mr. Hazelton 
was led to embrace what we should 
have called hyper-Calvinism, if we had 
not seen from these pages that the 
word is distasteful. We only mean by 
that designation a doctrine which goes 
beyond Calvinism : suppose we call it 
stronger Calvinism. Mr. Hazelton 
faithfully adhered to those views which 
were advocated by Dr. Gill ; but he 
held them with courtesy and peace- 
fulness. How he went from Mount 
Bures to Bungay, from Bungay to 
Guyhirn, from Guyhirn to Clerken- 
well ; and how he fulfilled in Clerken- 
well a faithful and useful ministry of 
thirty-six years, we have here written 
with an able pen. 

Those who love the doctrines of 
sovereign grace will be refreshed by 



the allusions here made to the good 
men, now departed, who stood firm in 
their day. Many of these we knew, 
and esteemed. Those religionists who 
will not see the special beauty of the 
Strict Particular Baptist, might do 
themselves a service and a pleasure if 
they were to read this memoir, to see 
the nature of ' ' the sect which is every- 
where spoken against." No conceal- 
ment is used, and no apologies are 
offered : the author is convinced that 
he is in the right, and hence he writes 
out of his heart in all naturalness, and 
lets you see both himself and his friend 
in a clear light. This is as it should be. 

The points of difference between us 
and friends like brethren Hazelton and 
Styles are not unimportant; but we 
have far more points in common. We 
wish prosperity to the churches hold- 
ing strong doctrine : may they be 
multiplied. It is a pleasure nowadays 
to meet with a man who believes any- 
thing; but a far greater joy to meet 
with one to whom the Scriptures are 
really inspired, and to whom the doc- 
trines of grace are marrow and fatness. 

John Hazelton's place will not easily 
be filled. He was a good man and true. 
Clerkenwell misses him. May the 
Lord raise up a faithful successor, and 
may the good man himself, through 
this memoir, though dead yet speak. 

The Waldensian Church in the Valleys 
of Piedmont, from the Earliest Period 
to the Present Time. By the late 
Jane Louisa Will yams. Religious 
Tract Society. 
This is a very desirable book. Those 
who have no work upon the Vaudois 
church should get it at once. We 
need not give it a full review, for 
this is the second edition, and we are 
sure that the work will make its own 
way, for the subject is of perennial in- 
terest to all who love the gospel of 
our Lord Jesus Christ. 
Sunday Afternoons at Rose Cottage. By 
E. M. Waterworth. Religious 
Tract Society. 
Ten capital chats with the children. 
Printed in good type, and written in 
simple language. We know some little 
ones that are very delighted with the 
book, and never seem weary of hear- 
ing it read. This is the best recom- 
mendation. 



38 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Heroes of Every-day Life. By Laura 

M. Lane. Cassell and Co. 
Capital. We have here no heroes of 
ten centuries ago, or of lands ten 
thousand miles off ; but we have men 
and women of our own time and town, 
of our own common-place order. This 
is just the sort of book to spread 
abroad. It will do good in a thousand 
ways. Old England is not lost yet 
while among her sons and daughters 
such brave spirits are reared. 

Mothers of the Bible. By Eev. CllAS. 

Leach, F.G.S. Nisbet and Co. 
Very good. Nothing to set the 
Thames on fire, but something to feed 
the flame which burns so happily on 
the domestic hearth. 

Louisa of Prussia, and other Sketches. 

By Eev. John Kelly. Eeligious 

Tract Society. 
These princesses and queens seem to 
have been very good ladies, and indeed, 
for their station in life, quite remark- 
able for piety ; hence it is well to 
record their doings. And yet we have 
met with many a life among the poor, 
infinitely richer in all that can edify 
and elevate. When we get a little 
from a queen, we are justified in 
thinking much of it ; and yet, as a 
rule, it is no more than the hyssop on 
the wall, while in every-day life we 
see grace comparable to the cedar in 
Lebanon. To many, this story of 
royalties will have unusual charms, 
and they will read, we trust, to profit. 

Robert Morrison, the Pioneer of Chinese 
Missions. By William John 
Townsend. Partridge and Co. 
A biography of the first class. As 
cheap as it is good. So richly illus- 
trated, and so much of it for eighteen- 
pence ! Get it for the Sunday-school 
library at once. 

The Makers of British India. By W. H. 
Davenport Adams. With a Map 
and twelve Illustrations. John 
Hogg. 

Mr. Davenport Adams is great in 
the use of the pen, and in this case he 
has a thrilling subject to descant upon. 
Young Englanders ought to know how 
their fathers subdued a great nation : 
thus may they learn courage and per- 
severance. Our sons ought also to know 



what follies and mistakes British con- 
querors are prone to exhibit : thus may 
they learn to treat a vanquished race 
with the consideration which may con- 
done past oppression. This is fine 
reading, and such as we like to com- 
mend in preference to this all-pre- 
vailing fiction — which is mere wind. 
In the last great day men will be 
startled to discover how much the 
crime, the hollowness, the heartless- 
ness of this generation is due to the 
surfeit of novels to which it is treating 
itself. We make our lives fictitious by 
feeding upon fiction. 

Martyr Scenes of the Sixteenth and, 
Seventeenth Centuries. Designed and 
drawn by Edward Backhouse and 
William Bell Scott. Etched by 
W. B. Scott. Hamilton, Adams, 
and Co. 

Those who keep alive the memory of 
heroic saints by such works as these, 
are doing good service to their gene- 
ration. Our Quaker friend, E. Back- 
house, who has now gone among the 
shining ones, had, by the aid of his 
friend, William Bell Scott, prepared a 
dozen telling martyr-pictures to illus- 
trate some of his writings : they are 
given here with short explanations. 
The scenes are a little out of the com- 
mon way of such things, and are there- 
fore all the more to be prized. Foxe 
kept to a beaten track of anti-Eomanist 
sufferers ; but here we have Congre- 
gationalists, Quakers, and Gospellers 
of all sorts. The power to discern 
truth, and to follow it at all costs, 
is a privilege of the elect, which, 
whatever of trial it may cost them, is 
in itself more precious than hid trea- 
sure. " Few there be that find it." 

Heart and Thought Memories of Eastern 
Travel. By T. Holmes, Bolton : 
J. W. Gledsdale, Deansgate. 

Mr. Holmes has a special correspon- 
dent's eye. Travelling over lands 
which have been observed and written 
upon without stint, he yet spies out 
new objects of a striking kind, and 
these he paints in graphic language. 
We had sooner read these unpreten- 
tious and perfectly natural pages than 
all the learned observations with which 
the profound Dr. Von Drone has fa- 
voured the present and future ages. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



The Mother's Friend. Volume for 1888. 

Hodder and Stoughton. 
Very good and taking. Will make 
its own way. The volume is tastefully 
got up, and is cheap. 

Our Boys and Girls. Volume for 1888. 

Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School 

Union. 
Several other annual volumes give 
twice the amount for a shilling which 
we find here. The magazine is very 
fair at a halfpenny, and we wish it 
success. 

Horner's Stories for the People. First 
and Second Series. Horner & Son, 
27, Paternoster Square. 
We commend these penny stories, only 
wishing that they would kill the penny 
dreadfuls. There is a fulness of gospel 
truth in most of these stories which 
makes us desire to see them widely 
scattered among the tale-lovers of the 
period. Bound together, the stories 
make attractive volumes. 

Sunbeams, By F. E. Weatherly. 
Illustrated by E. K. Johnson and E. 
Wilson. Hildesheimer & Faulkner. 

This is wonderfully fine, and aesthetic 
— in fact, a little "too too." Little folks 
who have such play- books ought to 
grow up artists. We wonder if they 
will. 

Sunshine for 1888. G. Stoneman, 67, 

Paternoster Row. 
Dr. Whittemore must have needed 
all his wit, and more, to find sunshine 
in all the months of 1888. In this 
volume he presents us with the Sun- 
shine of the year for eighteen-pence. 
Well, there was not much of it. 
Surely this is good money's worth. 
You can hardly buy sunshine too dear 
in this foggy little island. Dr. Whit- 
temore is never more at home than in 
conducting a juvenile magazine. 

The Leisure Hour. Volume for 1888. 
Religious Tract Society. 

This is a gorgeous volume. For range 
of reading, freshness of style, wealth 
of illustration, and sterling instruc- 
tion, what can beat it ? It is excel- 
lent as a serial, and equally good as 
a bound volume: for the material is 
not for the month only, but for all 
time. 



Anecdotes on Bible Texts. Ephesians 

to II. Timothy ; Titus to Revelation. 

By J. L. Nye. Sunday School 

Union. 

These collections of anecdotes are 

well arranged, and must be of great 

service to teachers and preachers. 

Good value for a shilling. 

Sunny Faces . Bible Pict ures and Stories . 

Partridge. 
These are two shilling books for the 
children. Full of pictures. Just the 
thing for Christmas. 

Early Days. 66, Paternoster Row. 
A lively magazine done up in a neat 
coloured cover for Is. 6d. Contents 
very excellent. 

Onward. Volume XXIII. 1888. 

Partridge. 
Canon Wilberforce makes a strik- 
ing frontispiece. The year's issue 
forms a handsome volume. We do 
not think it a miracle of cheapness at 
three shillings, but certainly it is very 
handsomely bound, and the contents 
are wide-awake. 

The Onward Reciter. Vol. XVII. 

Edited by Thomas E. Hallsworth. 

Partridge and Co. 
If there is little strikingly new in this 
seventeenth volume, who can wonder ? 
There must be an end to telling ex- 
tracts at some time or other. To us it 
is wonderful that this serial has held 
out so long, and kept up its character 
for interest. The complete set of this 
work would set a Temperance man up 
for life. 

Fancy Fair Religion ; or, The World 
Converting Itself. By Rev. J. 
Priestley Foster, M.A. Swan 
Sonnenschein and Co. 
This is not a jot more severe than 
true. The Christian heart is bowed 
in sad prostration before the Lord at 
the recital of the shameful things 
which are being done to raise money 
for the thrice-holy Lord. This shil- 
ling pamphlet should be universally 
read, and then, perhaps, there might 
come an end to tomfoolery in the 
name of Jesus. All who are getting 
up a bazaar should read the whole- 
some words of Mr. Foster, and it is 
possible that the form of the business 
will be greatly altered. 



40 



NOTES. 



Voices of the Spirit. By George 
Matheson, D.D., Minister of St. 
Bernard's, Edinburgh. Nisbet. 

To our mind, a very valuable work. 
It costs only 3s. 6d., but it gives no 
less than ninety-five meditations or 
sermonettes upon different phases of 
the Holy Spirit's offices and opera- 
tions within the soul. We feel sure 
that it must be exceedingly helpful to 
students of the Word, and to preachers 
of the same. At the same time, it 
will aid the devout emotions of those 
who do not aspire to instruct, but only 
long for vigorous spiritual life in their 
own souls. 

Not Cunningly devised Fables. By the 
late Eev. Alexander Ewing. With 
Memorial Sketch by Mrs. Ewing. 
Hodder and Stoughton. 

The title is taken from one of the 
sermons : a vicious method, which 
ought not to be followed, for it mis- 
leads. The book is made up of ser- 
mons which deserve to live, for they 
bear witness to living truth. The brief 
memoir excites our tender sympathies 
for the widowed lady, who therein 



treasures up the relics of her husband's 
life, and makes us wish that such a 
career could have been lengthened. 
The discourses are full and deep, and 
always distinctly upon the right side. 
The preacher felt no difficulties as to 
the need and the justice of substitu- 
tion. The gospel is not hidden away 
in these pages, nor even dimmed by 
qualifications and apologies. Would 
that all modern sermons were of this 
clear evangelical type ! 



The Pulpit Commentary. 
Kegan Paul and Co. 



II. Samuel. 



Digging the knife here and there into 
this great mass of commenting, we 
seem always happy in getting a slice 
of satisfactory material. This is a 
garden full of flowers and fruits, and 
he must be singularly sleepy who 
cannot gather a handful worth carry- 
ing away. This Second of Samuel is 
a good book for preachers, and it has 
been but little used : we shall expect 
to hear something which will strike 
and stick when preachers are familiar 
with this huge tome, which is a moun- 
tain of exposition. 



The Cheistian World, in its review of the 
nondescript Conference on "Evangelical" 
Preaching, which was held in the month of 
November, very accurately says of it: "It 
started from nothing, and it ends nowhere." 
This may serve as a very fair description of 
much of the less pronounced theology of 
the period. We view matters from a point 
of view which is precisely the opposite of 
The Christian World ; but we come to the 
same conclusion as it has done, namely, that 
what is sought to be palmed off upon the 
public by many as Evangelicalism, "on its 
intellectual side, lies neither here nor there, 
but is consistent with the most widespread 
differences of belief." You may believe 
anything, everything, or nothing, and yet 
be enrolled in the "Evangelical" army — 
.so they say. "Will there arise no honest, 
out-spoken evangelicals among Dissenters 
to expose and repudiate this latitudinarian- 
ism P Are all the watchmen asleep ¥ Are 
all the churches indifferent ? We quote, 
however, from our antagonistic cotemporary 
that we may reproduce its testimony to our 
correctness of judgment. It cannot be 
supposed to be a witness biased in our 
favour, but it says, 't It is now established 



by abundant signs that Mr. Spurgeon is well 
within the mark in asserting that among 
Nonconformist preachers there is a very 
marked defection from the doctrinal standard 
maintained by their fathers, and still upheld 
by him; and every day that defection is 
becoming more visible." We do not now 
need this testimony, for ministers who at 
first denied our impeachment have passed 
far beyond that stage, and admitting the 
truth of what we objected to, are glorying 
in the defection as a happy advance, a 
laudable piece of progress, a matter not 
needing defence, but deserving to be carried 
still further. Is it not so ? If it be so, upon 
whose heads will rest the guilt of this evil 
hour? The " Evangelical " leaders of the 
day, who are dallying with the grossest 
heresies must answer for it in the day of the 
Lord's appearing. 

As John Buuyan has, by a thousand-horse 
power engine, been dragged into the Down- 
Grade controversy, as though he was, or 
would have been, opposed to our protest, 
we thought we would look into his works, 
to see if he had ever been opposed to a creed ; 
and, as our readers will have guessed, we 



NOTES. 



41 



soon found that he had one of his own, ex- 
ceedingly full and clear. It seems like a 
joke, that the most reckless of our opponents 
should attempt to put Honest John on the 
wrong side ; and, in no spirit of jest, hut 
in downright earnest, we suggest to any who 
are inclined to repeat the clumsy experi- 
ment, that they should first study Bunyan s 
own Confession of Faith. As we are half 
afraid that they will decline the task, we 
make them a present of his belief upon the 
Doctrine of Election. If they should not 
take delight in reading it, there may be 
others who will. At any rate, the Scriptural 
teaching which he sets forth in his homely 
way deserves consideration. Thus wrote 
the author of " The Pilgrim's Progress " :— 

OF ELECTION. 

"1. I believe that election is free and 
permanent, being founded in grace and the 
unchangeable will of God. 'Even so then 
at this present time also there is a remnant 
according to the election of grace. And if 
by grace, then is it no more of works pother- 
wise grace is no more grace. But if it be of 
works, then is it no more grace ; otherwise 
work is no more work' (Rom. xi. 5, C). 
' Nevertheless the foundation of God 
standeth sure, having this seal, The Lord 
knoweth them that are his' (2 Tim. ii. 19). 
• In whom also we have obtained an inherit- 
ance, being predestinated according to the 
purpose of him who worketh all things after 
the counsel of his own will' (Eph. i. 11). 

"2. I believe that this decree, choice, or 
-election, was before the foundation of the 
world ; and so before the elect themselves : 
had being in themselves ; for, ' God, who 
quickeneth the dead, and calleth those 
things which be not as though they were ' 
(Rom. iv. 17), stays not for the being of 
things to determine his eternal purpose by ; 
but having all things present to him, in his 
wisdom, he made his choice before the 
world was. Eph. i. 4; 2 Tim. i. 9. 

"3. I believe that the decree of election 
is so far off from making works in us fore- 
seen, the ground or cause of the choice, 
that it containeth in the bowels of it, not only 
the persons but the graces that accompany 
their salvation. And hence it is, that it is 
said, we are predestinated ' to be conformed 
to the image of his Son' (Rom. viii. 29), 
not because we are, but ' that we should be 
holy and without blame before him in love ' 
(Eph. i. 4) . ' For we are his workmanship, 
created in Christ Jesus unto good works, 
which God hath before ordained that we 
should walk in them' (Eph. ii. 10). He 
blessed us according as he chose us in Christ. 
And hence it is again that the salvation and 
calling of which we are now made partakers, 
is no other than what was given us in Christ 
Jesus before the world began ; according to 
his eternal purpose, which he purposed in 
Christ Jesus our Lord. Eph. iii. 8 — 11 ; 
2 Tim. i. 9 ; Rom. viii. 29. 

"4. I believe that Christ Jesus is he in 
whom the elect are always considered, and 



that without him there is neither election, 
grace, nor salvation. 'Having predesti- 
nated us unto the adoption of children by 
Jesus Christ to himself, according to the 
good pleasure of his will, to the praise of 
the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made 
us accepted in the beloved. In whom we 
have redemption through his blood, the 
forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of 
his grace .... that in the dispensation of the 
fulness of times he might gather together 
in one all things in Christ, both which are 
in heaven, and which are on earth ; even in 
him' (Eph. i. 5—7, 10). ' Neither is there 
salvation in any other : for there is none 
other name under heaven given among men, 
whereby we must be saved ' (Acts iv. 12). 

"5. 'I believe that there is not any im- 
pediment attending the election of God that 
can hinder their conversion and eternal 
salvation. ' Moreover, whom he did pre- 
destinate, them he also called : and whom 
he called, them he also justified : and whom 
he justified, them he also glorified. What 
shall we then say to these things ? If God 
be for us, who can be against us ? . . . Who 
shall lay anything to the charge of God's 
elect? It is God that justifieth. Who is he 
that condemneth ?' &c (Rom. viii. 30, 31 ; 
33_35). < What then ? Israel hath not ob- 
tained that which he seeketh for ; but the 
election hath obtained it, and the rest were 
blinded ' (Rom. xi. 7) . ' For Israel hath not 
been forsaken, nor Judah of his God, of the 
Lord of hosts ; though their land was filled 
with sin against the Holy One of Israel' 
(Jer. Ii. 5). When Ananias made inter- 
cession against Paul, saying, ' Lord, I have 
heard by many of this man, how much evil 
he hath done to thy saints at Jerusalem: 
and here he hath authority from the chief 
priests to bind all that call on thy name, 
what said God unto him? ' Go thy way : 
for he is a chosen vessel unto me, to bear 
my name before the Gentiles, and kings, and 
the children of Israel' (Actsix. 13—15). 

"6. I believe that no man can know his 
election, but by his calling. The vessels of 
mercy, which God afore prepared unto glory, 
do thus claim a share therein : ' Even us 
(say they), whom he hath called, not of the 
Jews only, but also of the Gentiles. As he 
saith also in Osee [Hosea ii. 23], I will call 
them my people, which were not my people ; 
and her beloved, which was not beloved 
(Rom. ix. 24,25). ; '. 

"7. I believe, therefore, that election 
doth not forestall or prevent the means 
which are of God appointed to bring us to 
Christ, to grace and glory; but rather 
putteth a necessity upon the use and effect 
thereof; because they are chosen to be 
brought to heaven that way ; that is, by the 
faith of Jesus Christ, which is the end of 
effectual calling. ' Wherefore the rather, 
brethren, give diligence to make your call- 
ing and election sure.' 2 Pet. i. 10; 
2Thess. ii. 13; 1 Pet. i. 12." 

As loving friends pressingly wish to know 



42 



NOTES. 



of the Editor's whereabouts and welfare, 
I venture to give them what else I should 
never think of writing — namely, a little ac- 
count of matters personal. 

When I left home it was with great diffi- 
culty I tottered up the stairs of Heme Hill 
station, and I felt quite spent while waiting 
for the train by which I reached Dover; 
therefore I stopped by the sea for the night. 
Our friend, Miss Dawson, cheered me by a 
call. How much the Orphanage is indebted 
to her for taking our sick children into her 
hospitable home, I cannot express in words. 
She has by her own bounty supplied us with 
a Convalescent Home for our Girls — and 
with something better than any institution 
can ever be. 

OnTuesday morning I crossed the Channel 
with exceeding comfort, and reached Paris, 
whither Mr. and Mrs. Passmore had pre- 
ceded me, to make all arrangements. I was 
very weak, but felt better than when I left 
home. At Paris our party remained till 
Thursday evening, our kind deacon, Mr. 
Higgs, and his wife, helping to cheer us. 
Thursday night saw me on my way to Mar- 
seilles. The night journey was a trial, but 
it proved a light one, for sleep made the 
long miles slip away unobserved, and Mr. 
Allison, a third deacon, and Mr. Ladds, 
secretary, kindly ministered to me. The 
day was clear and bright at Marseilles. The 
Mediterranean soon drives away colds ; and 
when Marseilles is without wind, its weather 
is genial. A ride round the Prado and the 
port helped to bring on a restful night, and 
on Saturday I was on the road to Menton, 
enjoying the warm sun, the balmy air, and 
the continuous succession of lovely views. 
The Lord that healeth us was tenderly do- 
ing his gracious work by his great minister, 
the sun. 

Rooms were ready at Menton, and Chris- 
tian friends had sent in bouquets of flowers 
to express their welcome. The host and 
hostess at H6tel Beau Bivage are of the 
kindest sort, and never fail to make our 
party feel quite at home at once. The first 
Sabbath was literally, as well as spiritually, 
a day of rest, and I found myself free from 
pain, but weak to an extreme. Since then 
the days have usually been more sunny than 
our midsummer, and though by no means 
scorching, yet delightfully warm and balmy ; 
so that each day I have been out in the air, 
and have rapidly improved, and at the time 
of writing I am well until I reach my knees. 
The feet continue to swell in a very disagree- 
able manner night by night ; but as they 
get right by the morning, the doctors assure 
me that it is only weakness. Soon may that 
weakness disappear, that I may be able to 
climb the Alpine staircases of the Taber- 
nacle, and may be able to stand during a 
whole service, which at present I could not 
do. This once accomplished, the pleasurable 
duties of my ministry will have more charm 
for me than all the ease and health which 
this sheltered and sunny paradise can afford 
me. It is a daily sorrow that my dearest 



companion cannot be with me, and that she 
continues to suffer at home ; but we see the 
hand of God in our afflictions, and in the 
needful separation which they involve, and 
we drink together from a secret well which 
flows both in Norwood and in Menton, and 
fills our hearts with peace. 

I have to thank friends, who have not 
written me during the time of my retreat, 
for the thoughtf ulness of their abstinence ; 
but I am also grateful to several who 
could not withhold glad tidings of souls 
saved through reading the sermons. I 
could not blame anyone who aroused me in 
the middle of the night with news of sinners 
brought to Jesus, backsliders restored, and 
saints sustained in their dying hours. I 
never yet felt too weary or too ill to listen 
to the bells of heaven as they rang out over 
11 one sinner that repented." 

The best news from home flies to me as 
on dove's wings, and brings me peace of 
heart. God has blessed the work of brethren 
Fullerton and Smith far beyond all previous 
experience. Hundreds declare that they 
have found the Saviour, and many more 
have been awakened. The officers of the 
church, and all the workers, are bent upon 
making up for my absence ; and I trust they 
will succeed in doing far more than that. A 
spirit of prayer is poured out, and zeal is 
aroused, and from this, under the divine 
blessing, welcome results must follow. The 
special blessing of Mr. William Olney's 
ability to be once more at all meetings calls 
for devout gratitude ; for the Lord uses him 
greatly as a leader in stirring up the hearts of 
others by his own ardour in every holy work. 
It is a severe loss to the work that my beloved 
brother should be for a time laid aside ; but 
even this only calls out double diligence from 
my good brethren, and thus in weakness the 
church finds its strength renewed. How can 
I do otherwise than praise the Lord for his 
goodness, and take heart ? 

The various preachers who have supplied 
the pulpit have been graciously assisted, and 
the people have been edified. Mr. McNeil 
set the vast audiences on fire. He will be 
a great gain to London. 

Friends at home and here press me to 
remain a longer time than usual, that I may 
the longer continue in vigour when I re- 
turn ; but I must see what progress I make. 
When I feel well and strong I cannot stay 
out of the pulpit ; but I have not reached 
that point at this present. I will not be 
away a day more than is necessary. 

It is no doubt true that those who address 
great audiences and superintend important 
enterprises must rest after a period of 
unusual strain, or else they will break down 
very seriously. If ever a human being has 
had a supremely severe pressure of mind 
to endure, I think I am at least his equal 
in endurance. Hence it may not be an un- 
mixed evil that my bodily pain rendered rao 
incapable of mental effort, and that at this 
present I have no choice in the matter, but 
must cease from preaching. 



NOTES. 



43 



One would like to keep on for ever telling 
the great .message ; but the next best thing 
is to be gathering strength to begin again, 
while for a season silence is compulsory. Of 
course, by the time this reaches the reader, 
a great change may have occurred, for, in 
preparing a magazine a thousand miles from 
home, one has to take time by the forelock, 
and commence early in the month, and all 
the more so when one is quite uncertain as 
to how long health may permit writing of 
any sort. 

Friends must not imagine, as some of 
them evidently do, that the Booh Fund has 
ceased its gracious work on account of the 
more pressing illness of Mrs. Spurgeon. 
She was compelled to suspend the issue of 
books for a season, but she soon began 
again. The packing, &c, have been largely 
left in other hands, but the management 
and book-keeping are still with her, and 
preachers of all denominations are still 
obtaining parcels of books. There is no 
improvement in the condition of the vast 
number of poor ministers ; but, owing to 
agricultural depression, their incomes grow 
less and less. How can they buy books 
when they can scarcely buy bread i Many 
thousands have now been helped from Mrs. 
Spurgeon's Book Fund, and we trust that 
the supply will never cease to be forth- 
coming and forthgoing. The heart of the 
lone and languishing worker is cheered by 
help to her holy enterprise. We hope to 
be able next month to give our readers 
some account of the Auxiliary Book Fund 
which, under the charge of Mr. Bagster, has 
been for about a year supplementing Mrs. 
Spurgeon's work by supplying books to 
Christian workers who are beyond the range 
of her efforts. 

The hopes that wo expressed last month 
respecting Messes. Fullerton and Smith's 
Services at the Tabernacle were more 
than realized before the mission closed. The 
numbers in attendance increased nightly, 
until, at the closing service, not only was 
the Tabernacle densely packed, but over- 
flow meetings were held in three rooms in 
the College, and some thousands of persons 
were unable to gain admission. All who had 
professed to find the Saviour were asked to 
meet the workers in the lecture-hall, at the 
close of the public services, and very soon 
the hall was quite full. Those who were 
present will not soon forget the scene 
when, in response to Mr. Fullerton's re- 
quest, some hundreds of hands were held 
up in token of blessing received during the 
mission. 

In order to deepen the impressions that 
had been made, and to strengthen the new 
life that had been implanted, a meeting was 
held on Wednesday evening, November 28. 
Nearly five hundred invitations were sent 
out to those whose names had been taken 
by the workers, and the greater part of 
them met for tea, while afterwards, not- 



withstanding an almost tropical downpour 
of rain, the lecture-hall was well filled with 
workers, converts, and enquirers. Messrs. 
Fullerton and Smith came over from 
Bloomsbury for the first half -hour, and 
gave wise and weighty counsels to those 
who had been brought to decision. When 
they left, Mr. William Olney took the chair, 
and delivered a soul-searching and spirit- 
stirring address upon the evidences of the 
work of regeneration ; Mr. Harrald ex- 
pounded and applied Acts xi. 26 — 28 to the 
various classes present; Mr. Chamberlain 
sang and spoke, and then asked any who had 
been brought to decision during the mission 
just to rise, and declare that fact. In less 
than half-an-hour, no less than fifty- one 
persons bore oral testimony to what the 
Lord had done for them at the special 
services, and many more would have spoken 
if there had been time. The converts were 
of all ages, and of both sexes ; there were 
"young men and maidens, old men and 
children," praising the name of the Lord 
for the great things he had done for them. 

The whole proceedings of the evening 
were of such an interesting and profitable 
character, that it was decided that a similar 
meeting should be held every Tuesday even- 
ing, for the present, for further instruction 
and confirmation of the converts, and for 
the guidance of those who are not yet fully 
decided. The success of the mission has 
been a great joy to the officers and mem- 
bers of the church, the students of the 
College, and other workers who helped in 
the sowing and the reaping ; and they join 
in prayer that the work of revival may con- 
tinue to spread until thousands more are 
won for the Saviour. 

An effort was made to get Messrs. Fuller- 
ton and Smith to hold a few more special 
services at the beginning of the year, but 
their engagement at Exeter Hall prevented 
them from taking more than the Watch- 
night service, on Monday, December 31. 
Let us all pray for a great outpouring of 
the Holy Spirit on those who will be 
gathered at the Tabernacle at that meeting. 

On Monday evening, December 10, the 
Tabernacle prayer- meeting partook of the 
character of a farewell to the four students 
of the Pastors' College who are shortly 
leaving for the foreign mission field — viz., 
Messrs. Clark, Roger, Patrick, and Huntley. 
Mr. William Olney presided ; prayer was 
presented by Mr. Huntley ; Mr. Minifie 
(secretary of the Students' Missionary Asso- 
ciation) ; and Mr. F. Thompson (one of the 
Tabernacle missionary collectors) ; and ad- 
dresses were delivered by Mr. Scrivener, a 
missionary from the Congo, and Messrs. 
Clark and Roger, who are going to that 
region. Mr. Harrald explained that Mr. 
Patrick, who was leaving for Tangier, North 
Africa, would be supported by Mr. Spur- 
geon, who hoped to send out many more 
missionary students as the doors were 
opened, and his funds permitted. Mr. Patrick 



44 



NOTES. 



briefly spoke. Mr. William Olney and Mr. 
Dunn gave the departing brethren a few- 
words of loving counsel and encourage- 
ment, and then quite a large number of 
students and other brethren commended 
them to the Lord in prayer. There was a 
dense fog outside, and some of it penetrated 
the lecture -hall, where the meeting was 
held, but there has seldom been a happier 
or more enjoyable gathering. 

Farewell meetings for the missionary stu- 
dents have also been held at Beulah Chapel, 
Thornton Heath; Devonshire Square 
Chapel, Stoke Newington ; the Y.M.C.A. 
Aldersgate Street ; and several other places ; 
resulting in increased interest being taken 
both in the College and in the work of 
missions to the heathen. 

College. — Several students are leaving us 
for the foreign mission field. Mr. J. A. 
Clark, and Mr. J. L. Roger, who have been 
accepted by the Baptist Missionary Society 
for w T ork on the Congo, will be sailing about 
the time that this magazine is issued. Mr. 
N. H. Patrick is leaving this month for Tan- 
gier, North Africa. We have undertaken to 
support him, and we hope to be able to send 
out other brethren to labour amongst the 
twenty millions of Mahometans in that re- 
gion. Mr . Gr. A. J. Huntley has been accepted 
by the China Inland Mission, but the date of 
his departure is not definitely fixed. We ask 
our readers to pray very specially for these 
beloved brethren, that their lives may be 
spared, and that they may be the means of 
winning many souls for the Saviour. There 
are several other students who desire to go 
as missionaries to the heathen when the Lord 
opens the door for them. 

Mr. A. A. Witham has sailed for America. 
He hopes to be able to raise a Baptist church 
in Washington Territory. Mr. R. Hughes, 
who went to the United States a few months 
ago, has settled «,t Londonville, Ohio. Mr. 
F. Dann's health broke down under the 
great extremes of climate in Minnesota, so he 
has returned to England with the hope of en- 
gaging in pastoral work here. His address is 
35, Broad Street, Reading. 

Mr. A. W. Curwood goes next month to 
settle at West Hartlepool, where there ap- 
pears to be a wide sphere of work, though 
not without many difficulties. 

The following brethren have removed : — 
Mr. W. H. Smith, from Minchinhampton, 
to Haddenham, Thame ; Mr. J. O. Stalberg, 
from Faringdon, to Stanwell Road, Penarth, 
South Wales; Mr. J. B. Warren, from 
Shouldham Street, to Irthlingborough, 
Northamptonshire ; Mr. C. Welton, from 
Driffield, to Morley, Yorkshire ; and Mr. W. 
Coller, from Mitcham, Adelaide, to Broken 
Hill, South Australia. Mr. C. W. Towns- 
end his left Plumstead, and is preaching 
in connection with the Evangelization 
Society. 

During the President's absence the stu- 
dents have been greatly interested and in- 
structed by the Friday afternoon lectures 



delivered by the Revs. David Davics, J. 
Jackson Wray, and Dr. Sinclair Paterson. 

On Friday afternoon and evening, Novem- 
ber 23, the twenty -fourth anniversary of the 
Students' Total Abstinence Society was 
held, under the presidency of Professor 
Cheshire, when it was reported that every 
student in the College was an abstainer. On 
the following Friday evening, the annual 
soiree of the Students' Total Abstinence 
Union was held at Hackney College. Out 
of the two hundred and fifty-three students 
in the six colleges in the Union, two hundred 
and thirty-six are abstainers, a larger pro- 
portion than in any previous year. 

Evangelists. — Messrs. Fullerton and 
Smith have had a very successful mission 
at Bloomsbury Chapel, of which we shall 
give fuller particulars next month, when 
we shall also be able to present a report of 
the services at Peckham Park Road, which 
are being held while these " Notes " are in 
course of preparation. The Evangelists are 
to be at Exeter Hall from January 4 to 27 ; 
and in February they go to the Shoreditch 
Tabernacle and Dalston Junction Chapel. 

Mr. Burnham has been obliged to rest 
during the past month, but he reports him- 
self as better, and hopes to be able to resume 
work this month at Puddletown, Bere Regis, 
and Shefford. In each of these places he has 
already conducted two missions. 

Messrs. Harmer and Parker have com- 
pleted their series of services in connection 
with the Conference of General Baptist 
Churches in the Bradford district. Mr. A. 
White, the secretary of the Conference, 
writes: — "A week was spent at Queens- 
bury (the mother church of the district), 
a week at Sandy Lane, a fortnight at Deu- 
holme, another at Allerton, and the mission 
closed with a week's services at Clayton. 
The meetings have been well attended, 
especially considering the stormy weather ; 
and large numbers have manifested their 
desire after the better life by coming into 
the enquiry-rooms at the various churches. 
Mr. Harmer's simple, earnest, and effective 
gospel addresses have been warmly appre- 
ciated, and Mr. Parker's solos and efficient 
leadership of the service of praise have 
proved very useful in attracting people to 
the services, and in helping them to decision. 
The services will be ever remembered by 
many in this neighbourhood who have 
found blessing through them." 

After leaving Bradford, Mr. Harmer 
joined Mr. Chamberlain , for a week's mis- 
sion at Redditch. Concerning this, Pastor 
E. W. Berry writes :— " This is Mr. Har- 
mer's third visit to us, and the services have 
been more largely attended than on any 
former occasion. Many have professed con- 
version, and the members of the church 
have been wonderfully quickened." Mr. 
Harmer has since been to Orpington, and 
he is now at Crewkerne, with Mr. Parker. 



pastors' college. 



45 



Pastor D. Macmillan writes as follows, 
with regard to Mr. Carter's visit to King's 
Langley, Hunton Bridge, and Leavesden : — 
' ' In each place souls have been won for 
Christ, and the people of God encouraged 
and helped. A very pleasing feature has 
been the work done among the elder scholars 
of our Sunday-schools, many being led to 
decision." Mr. Carter is now at Farn- 
worth, by Bolton. 

Pastor W. Pettman writes thus about 
Mr. Harrison's services, at Bath : — " Our 
brother's visit has been the occasion of much 
blessing, and the earnest prayers of the 
church have been graciously answered. 
Large congregations were attracted each 
evening, and many were led to come out 
as enquirers, a considerable number of 
whom give good evidence of true conver- 
sion. Brother Harrison's clear and earnest 
preaching of the truth was deeply impres- 
sive. In the preparation for these services, 
and the actual engaging in them, the church 
has been much revived." This month Mr. 
Harrison goes to Bristol and Sittingbourne. 

Orphanage. — The magazine has to be 
issued before the Christmas festivities are 
over, so we must postpone our account of 
them until our next number. We need not, 
and we will not, postpone our thanks to the 
generous friends who evidently intend the 
children at Stock well to enjoy themselves 
as thoroughly as on former occasions. We 
are also very grateful to all who have again 
helped to ensure the success of the Orphan- 



age choir visits to Portsmouth, Gosport, 
Cowes, Southampton, and Winchester. 

Colpoetage. — During the past month the 
colporteurs have been busier than usual, 
on account of the increased demand for 
books, Christmas cards, &c, for presents. 
The total value of sales was £733 5s. 8d. 
This widespread distribution of the Scrip- 
tures, with Christian and sound, healthy 
literature, cannot fail to produce salutary 
and saving effects throughout the country 
in the districts occupied. But there are 
hundreds of localities equally needy, in 
which the same valuable work might be 
done, if only a church or association would 
guarantee the £10 a year required by this 
association. All denominations can com- 
bine to do this, as the work is carried out 
on unsectarian lines, while the subscription 
required is very small, considering that it 
secures the entire services of the agent for 
the locality. We hope to receive numerous 
applications for the extension of the work 
during the new year. 

The secretary has visited Salisbury during 
the month, and addressed a meeting in 
Brown-street Chapel, explaining the work, 
and advocating its claims. Bev. G. Short, 
B.A., presided. 

Any information or co-operation will be 
gladly given on application to the Secretary, 
W. Corden Jones, Colportage Association, 
Metropolitan Tabernacle, Newington Butts. 

Baptisms at Metropolitan Tabernacle : — 
November 29, two. 



Hastens' (forEege, Ipiraplita Memwle. 

Statement of Receipts from November \bth to December lit/i, 1888. 





£ 


s. 


d. 


Mr. William Buchan 


1 


u 





From a friend ... 


50 








A Presbyterian, Edinburgh 


5 








From Victoria Chapel, Wandsworth- 








road, per Pastor E. Henderson 


4 








Nameless 


1 








D. E. G., Wilts 





5 





Mr. D. J. Pillai (for missions) 


10 








Mr. Armstrong, Warrambeen 


10 








Lambda 


5 








A friend 


5 








Mrs. Pole 


1 


1 





Mrs. Russell 


2 








Mr. A. Robertson 


2 


2 





Mrs. Arnold 


1 









Collected at Drummond-road Chapel, 

per Pastor B . Briggs 

Collected at Bell-street Chapel, Rom- 

sey, per Pastor J. Smith 

Monthly Subscription: — 
Mr. R. J. Beecliff 

Weekly Offerings at Met. Tab. :— 
Nov. 18 25 3 3 

» 25 

Dec. 2 

„ 9 



£ s. d. 



4 11 



10 
2 G 



lit 


10 









IS 


2 


6 






4 
















£ 


60 15 


9 








169 17 


3 



Statement of Receipts from November \hth to December 14^//, 1888. 

d. 



£ s. 



£ s. d. 



The South West London Band of Hope 






Collected by Miss Keay 


... 


7 


(J 


Union, per Miss Carr . . 


2 2 





Messrs. Pannett and Neden 


... 2 


2 





Mrs. E. Wild 


10 





His steward 


... 1 


1 





Mercies received by A. U. 


1 





Jack, South Lambeth 


... 


y 





Miss M. Anderson 


5 





Collected by Mis. Willmot 


... 


14 


G 


Mr. James Scott 


2 





Collected by Mi*s L. Wikon . . . 


... 


5 






46 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



4 fii 





1 


7 61 
4 






4 6 

4 10J 



Collected by Miss Eodle ... 
Collected by Mr. and Mrs. 

Mason 

Collected by Mr. Binstead 
The Misses Hyyet and 

Delves 

Mr. Loekwood 



Mr. James Slater 

Miss E. Weymouth 

Sale of ring 

Balance left from the late Miss 

Chicken's estate, per Mr. A. J. Vining 

Mr. .T. Dodwell 

The Young Women's"Bible-class at the 

Orphanage, per Mrs. James Stiff ... 

Collected by Miss E. Betts 

Miss S. Chidlaw 

Mr. G. Smith 

Collected by No. 2 girls, per Mrs. Clark 

Prom Lewes, 6d. per week 

Collected by Mr. Piatt 

Mr. S. Slodden 

Collected by Miss Potts 

Mrs. Shaw 

Mr. John Barnes 

G. C, Tain, Ross 

Three Arniston miners 

A friend, Edinburgh 

From a friend 

Captain J. Williamson 

Carlisle Baptist Sunday-school, per 

Pastor A. A. Saville 

Mr. G. C. Howe 

Mrs. Smith, in memoriam 

Mr. John Best, J.P 

Mrs. William Hicks 

Part proceeds of lecture at Cranswick, 

by Pastor C. Welton 

Parley Green Mission-room 

"Rookery" children's box 

Mrs . Robert Davies 

Mr. James Gilmour 

Mr. W. McEwing 

Miss A. Leeder 

Mr. J. H. Mills 

Mrs. Lewis 

Mr. T. Underhill, per Mrs. Whittard 

Per Mrs. Nelson : — 

Collected 110 

Mr. J. W.Nelson (ann.)... 10 



Mr. S. Ager 

Young Women's Bible-class, West- 
bourne Grove Chapel 

Mr. Lawrence Shepherd 

Mr. J. Newling 

Mr. D. H. Lloyd 

Dr. Berdoe 

Mrs. Hooper, per Pastor H. J. Preece 

From the haven of peaca 

Miss M. Bassham . . . 

Mr. W. R. Deacon 

Mrs. M. Fryer 

Mr. R. Sherringham 

Mr. James Spence 

Nameless 

Miss Green 

Miss P. Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Diaper 

P. W. A 

A widow's mite, Dundee 

Miss A. Shelly 

M. C. S. F 

Miss M. Trevcnen 

Miss M.Smith 

Collected by Mrs. James Withers :— 

Mrs. J. Davis 2 6 

Mr. James Boorne ... 10 

Mrs. Hammond 10 



£ s. 


d. 


2 5 





1 1 





5 





5 





7 


6 


2 


6 


13 





6 





5 





10 





6 


7 


1 6 





4 


1 


2 


6 


1 





2 2 





10 





10 





1 





1 





50 





10 





7 


6 


1 





1 





1 





1 1 





7 


6 


11 


7 


5 





2 





1 





2 





10 





5 





1 1 





2 2 





2 1 





1 





15 





10 





10 





5 





1 





10 





5 





5 





5 





10 





5 





3 





10 





1 1 





3 





10 





4 4 





5 





10 





1 





10 





1 





1 12 


6 



Mrs. Walker 

Mr. George Anderson 

Miss Hawkes 

Mr. T. Steer 

Mr. William Paine 

D. E.G., Wilts 

Mr. E. McDonald, per Mrs. Armstrong 
Collected by Miss Armstrong, and 

her nurse, and Miss Maggie McNeil 

Mrs. J. C. Higham 

J. J., Harrogate 

Mrs. Williamson 

Mr. J. Ball 

Mrs. Swift 

Miss Toward, per Mrs. J. A. Spurgeon 

Executors of the late Mr. E. Boustead 
(second instalment of legacy) 

A friend, per Pastor H. Jones 

Mr. C. Fowle 

Mr. T. Vickery 

Mr. W. Kelley 

Captain W. J. Robertson 

Mrs. Best, per Mr. G. C. Heard 

Collected by Miss Retford 

Mrs. Job, per Pastor J, S. Paige 

Mattie Seaton 

Orphan girl's collecting card, M. 
Watson , 

Collected by Miss M. Thomas 

Mrs. Wainwright, jun 

Mr. J. Handy 

Collected by Miss E. L. Rawlins 

Mrs. Mannington 

Mrs. Brown 

Mrs. Hall 

Miss L. C. Greenlees 

Mrs. Ferguson 

Collected by Mrs. Nelson 

A friend 

Miss A. V. Wicks 

Mrs. Pole 

Mrs. Lowe and daughters 

Miss Pester 

One of the dear Lord's little ones 

Miss S. Thomas 

Mrs. Seivwright 

Mr. Edward Adam ... 

Mrs. Russell 

Mrs. E. Barrat 

Mr. George Turner 

Mrs. R. A. Snell 

W. W., Carluke 

Mr. R. R. Nelson 

Mrs. Wilkinson 

Mrs. Leask 

Mrs. Belcher 

Miss England 

Scissors, A. T., per Miss Anna Thatcher 

Additional proceeds of harvest thanks- 
giving service, per Pastor J. Stanley 

E. P., Brixton 

E. Y. B. C. 

B. P 

L. K. D 

J. B.C 

Miss E.Bates 

Mr. W. T. Chesterman 

Mrs. Arnold 

Mr. H. R. Parker 

Miss Janet Burdon, per Mrs. Spencer 

MissE. A. Fyeh 

Miss M. D. Macleay 

Miss E. Swabey 

Mr. W. Woolidge 

Mrs. Benham ... 

Collected by Miss Jesson : — 

Mr. W. Stanyon 5 

The Misses Bennett ... 5 

Miss Eames 5 

Miss Paynes 2 6 



£ s. 
2 2 
10 

5 

1 10 

2 2 



16 

5 

2 

1 



1 

1 

2037 
1 





1 

7 

1 1 
1 1 

10 

1 1 

10 
1 
10 
10 



10 

1 1 

10 
10 






5 
10 
10 
3 
2 



17 

1 10 
10 



1 
3 
1 
1 

2 
5 
10 
5 



d. 



7 












8 






o 
o 

6 






3 




6 

a 

o 
<; 
o 

o 



6 

















6 



6 


H 











17 6 




STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



47 



£ s. 


a. 










£ 


s. 


1. 


1 





Captain James Ewing 


... 




.. 


1 


1 





10 





Monthly Subscriptions: — 














1 5 





Mr. E. K. Stace 


... 




,. 





10 





5 





Mr. S. H. Dauncey 


... 




.. 





2 


6 


5 





Sandwich, per bankers ... 








2 


2 





10 





F. G. B., Chelmsford 


... 




... 





2 


6 


5 





Christmas I<'tstioities : — 














1 1 





Mrs. Shearman 






.. 


2 


2 





1 





Mr. and Mrs. Frame 








1 








1 





Mr. and Mrs. H. Proctor 


... 






1 








1 1 





Mrs. Joslin 






,. 





10 





2 





Mr. J. E. Saunders, for new shillin 


3 d 








2 


6 


for 250 girls 








12 


10 





2 





Adelphi 








1 








2 10 





Eskdale Shepherd 


... 









10 





10 





Miss Cousin 








2 








1 1 





A member of tho Church of Eng 


^and, 








1 





Sheffield 











2 


6 


70 





Mrs. Virtue 








1 








1 





Miss B. Fox 






... 





5 





5 





Miss Clover 











5 





5 





Mr. Spencer R. Turner ... 








3 








6 





Miss K. Daniell 


... 




... 





5 





1 1 





Miss J. Matthews 











5 





5 





Collected by Miss Anna Thatcher :- 










1 





Mrs. Dobbs 


1 














1 





Mrs. W. Mannington 














10 





(Isfield) 





5 











1 





Mr. J. Mannington 





5 











2 





Mrs. J. Mannington 





5 











1 





Mr. and Mrs. Caffyn 





5 











1 





MissCaffyn 





2 


6 








1 





Mrs. Faulconer 





3 











1 





Mrs. and the Misses Ham- 














5 





shar 





4 











5 





Mrs. Charles Mannington 





2 


6 








10 





Miss Mannington 





2 











5 





Mrs. Oyler 





2 











2 2 





Mrs. Guy 





2 











10 





Mrs. Porter 





2 


(■> 








10 


6 


Anna Thatcher 





S 











5 













3 


3 


6 








10 





Emma 


... 




.*• 





5 


Q 


10 





E. S. D 


... 









5 





10 





Mrs. Warmington 








1 








5 





Mr. S. Cornborough 








4 10 





5 





Mr. J. Wood 


... 









10 





7 





Mr. W. Colthup, per Mr. J. 


Wood 


I 







10 





10 





MissR. Smith 


... 




■•■ 


10 





1 





Miss C. E. Smither 

K. M 

Miss M. A. Mundy 


... 






1 






5 

5 







7 7 





Mr. J. Wilson 


... 









5 





16 12 


11 


H. E. S 






. ■■ 


2 


2 





163 15 





Mr. E. Goodman 








10 





10 





Mrs. McGregor 


... 






10 





14 6 





Mr. James Jackson 








1 


1 





1 14 


6 


Mr. W. Hillier 


••• 









5 





9 9 


6 



Mr. E. Upward 






... 


1 








1 1 


£2,694 11 


5 


X 1 




















Mrs. Dunlop 

Amite 

Mr. H. Munday 

D. A 

Mr. G. Nowell 

Mrs. W. Colthup, per Mr. J. Wood ... 
Captain Allenby, per Mr. S. J. Dobson 

Mr. G. Gibbs 

Stamps from Sunderland 

Mr. John Parkinson 

Mr. Smith Nutter 

Miss R. Smith 

Mr. MacDowell 

Mr. G. Russell 

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory 

Mr. J. Harridence 

Messrs. J. D. Williams and Son ... 

Mr. William Mingins 

Mr. William Matiiewson 

Miss Buckle 

For Jesus' lambs 

Mr. H. Humphry , 

Miss E. Ellis 

Messrs. Hine Brothers 

The Misses Bashall 

Mrs. Hall 

Dr. Mackintosh 

Mrs. McKenzie 

A. J. F 

Mr. W. Driver 

Mr. John Malcolm 

Mrs. Iteed 

Mrs. Mathewson 

Mr. J. Wilson 

Mrs. Reid 

Miss M. A. Downs 

Miss H. Fells 

Mr. H.Davie 

Mr. H. Greenwood Brown '. 

Miss E. Brotherton 

Mrs. Dodwell 

Mrs. Spindler 

The Countess of Seafield 

Mr. Henry Tribe 

E. Janem 

Mrs. Irwin 

Master B. Dennish 

Mrs. Shurmer 

A friend, per Mrs. Shurmer 

Mr. C. Wadland 

Meetings by Mr. Charlesworth and the 
Orphanage Choir: — 

Cross Street, Canonbury 

Brecon 

Cardiff 

Clifton Chapel, Peckham 

Hammersmith 

Gunnersbury, towards expenses 
Surbiton Baptist Chapel 

Annual Subscriptions : — 

Mrs. Appleton 

Mrs. Bagster 

List of Presents, per Mr. Charlesworth, from November 15th to December lith, 1888. — Provisions : — 20 lbs. 
Currants; 20 lbs. Raisins, Mrs. C. Reynolds; 1 New Zealand Sheep, Mr. A. Seale Haslam; 1 Cake, 
1 parcel Sweets, Miss Dawson ; 1 sack Potatoes, Mr. J. Walton ; 28 lbs. Oatmeal, Anon. ; 8 Geese, Mr. 




1 sack Flour, Mr. J. Lawman. 

Boys' Clothing.— 6 pairs Knitted Socks, Miss Hicks; 10 pairs Knitted Socks and 2 pairs Knitted 
Stockings, Mrs. Lenton ; a quantity of Neck Ties and 1 pair of Boots, Anon. ; 18 pairs Boys' Slippers, 
Mr. G. H. Kerridge ; 12 pairs Socks, Miss Jones ; 12 Flannel Shirts, The Misses Dransfield ; 12 Bow.- 
and 1 Shirt, Miss Harper ; 5 Suits and 1 Waistcoat, S. H. W. ; 4 pairs Socks and 6 pairs Stockings 
Mrs. Gregory ; 12 pairs Socks, Mrs. Dexter ; 12 Bows, Mrs. S. E. Knight. 

Girls' Clothing.— 12 Flannel Petticoats, Miss Burton ; 8 Dolls, Miss Salter's Bible-class ; 13 Articles 
The Misses S. and C Sharlow ; 6 Articles, Mis. Penstone ; 59 Articles, The Ladies' Working Meeting 
at Tabernacle, per Miss Higgs ; 6 Articles, Miss F. Leeder ; 6 Knitted Petticoats, S. N. A. ; 3 Aprons, 
6 Dolls, Mrs. S. E. Knight; 1 box of Clothing, &c, M. E. ; 6 Flannel Petticoats, Two Friends, 
per Mrs. Penstone ; 21 Garments, The Chatham Ladies' Working Meeting ; 64 Articles, Miss Harper ; 
3 pairs Stockings, 4 Petticoats, M. B. C. ; 34 Articles, Mrs. E. M. Lott; 20 Articles, Mrs. J. Harding; 



48 



COLPORTAGE ASSOCIATION. 



2 Flannel Petticoats, Mrs. Peel ; 12 pairs Knitted Socks, Mrs. Kine ; 4 "Woollen Articles and 12 Hand- 
kerchiefs, Mrs. H. Verrall ; 15 Articles, Mrs. Mannington ; 56 Articles, Mrs. Kemp ; a quantity of 
Articles, Mrs. Spooner. 

Genebal. — 1 Scrap Book and 4 Small Books, Miss Dawson ; 1 Jet Chain, 1 pair Earrings, a Well- 
wisher, E. H. ; 1 box Fancy Articles, Messrs. Axtens Brothers ; 1 Scrap Book, Mrs. S. E. Knight; 
1 piece White Calico and 1 piece Unbleached Calico, Mrs. Wainwright, sen. ; 9 Scrap Books, 4 Work 
Bags, Miss Harper ; 4 pairs Fancy Slippers, Mr. J. A. Maitland ; 50 copies of " Illustrations," Mr. F. 
G. Heath ; a quantity of Cards, Miss Bagster; 1 small box of Artificial Flowers, Messrs. Morley and 
Lanceley ; 1 box of Csef ul Articles, Mrs. Ling ; 1 box Fancy Articles, Mr. T. Barrett ; 2 boxes Arti- 
ficial Flowers, The Bon Marche. 



Statement of Receipts from November 15th to December lith y 1888. 



Subscriptions and Donations for Districts 

Mr. R. Scott, for Colchester District . . 

Sellindge, per Mr. Thomas R 

Worcester Colportage Association 

Mr. Thomas R , for Bower Chalk.., 

Southern Baptist Association ... 
Repton and Burton-on-Trent, per E. S 

Bower Chalk Baptist Church 

Maidenhead, per Miss Lassells 

Metropolitan Tabernacle Sunday- 
school, for Tring 

Rendham District, per Rev. J. Hollier 
Mr. J. J. Tustin, for Burstow and 

Horley 

M. A. H., for Orpington 



s: — 






£ 


s. 


d. 


. 10 








10 








30 








6 








. 50 








. 20 








. 5 








. 10 








. 10 








5 

1 








. 10 








5 








£171 









Subscriptions and Donations to the General Fund : 

£ s. 

M. C.S. F 

Mr. A. Todd 

D. E. G., Wilts 

Mrs. Williamson 

L. K. D 

S. W., per Mr. S. R. Pearce .. 



... 10 





... 5 





... 5 





... 15 





... 10 





... 1 





£3 5 






Statement of Receipts from November 15th to December lilh, 1888. 



Mrs. Raybould 

Mr. William Grant 

D. E. G., Wilts. ... 

Mrs. Everest 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Harmer and 

Parker's services at Allerton 

Mr. Armstrong, Warrambeen 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Harmer and 

Chamberlain's services at Hull 
Thankoffering for Messrs. Harmer and 

Chamberlain's services at Redditch... 
The Misses Kirtley 



£ s. 


d. 


1 





2 





3 





10 





8 11 


3 


10 





2 2 





3 5 





5 






Thankoffering for Messrs. Harmer and 
Parker's services at Clayton 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Harmer and 
Parker's services at Sandy Lane 

Thankoffering for Mr. BoyalFs services 
at Grantham 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 
and Smith's services at Metropolitan 
Tabernacle 



£ s. d. 
6 10 
2 2 
14 



30 O 
£71 17 3 



Jar (§>mtml Wiu in fyt Ifcrrfo's Wotk. 

Statement of Receipts from November 15th to December 14th, 1888. 



Miss Wood 

E. H., Cheltenham, per Pastor C. Spur- 
geon 




Friends sending presents to the Orphanage are earnestly requested to let their names or 
initials accompany the same, or we cannot properly acknowledge them ; and also to write to 
Mr. Spurgeon if no acknowledgment is sent within a week. All parcels should be addressed 
to Mr. Charlesworth, Stoekwell Orphanage, Clapham Road, London. 

Subscriptions will be thankfully received by C. It. Spurgeon, " IFestivood," Beulah Hill, 
Tipper Norwood. Should any sums sent before the l%th of last month be unacknowledged in 
this list, friends are requested to write at once to Mr. Spurgeon. Fost Office and Postal 
Orders should be made payable at the Chief Office, London, to 0. H. Spurgeon ; and Cheques 
and Orders should all be crossed. 







MlfXtlfXllttt 





-(spspspg 




HI® 

fffl&filf) 





THE 



SWORD AND THE TROWEL. 



FEBRUARY, 1889. 




A SHORT SERMON, BY C. H. SPURGEOK". 
"I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob." — Exodus iii. 6. 

T was great condescension on the part of the glorious 
Jehovah to give himself this title. There is such a 
difference between God and the greatest and the best 
of men, that it is a wonderful stretch of mercy that he 
should call himself "the God of Abraham, Isaac, and 
Jacob." It is still more marvellous that God should give to a creature 
property in himself, the Creator. That God is God is a glorious fact, 
but that he is our God has about it an infinite glory of tenderness, and 
love, and condescension. When I can say, "This God is mine," have 
I not said the greatest thing that man can say, and too great a thing 
for man to say if God himself had not first declared it ? The patriarchs 
could call Jehovah their God, because, first of all, God himself said, 
" I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob." 
The title-deeds to this possession must be drawn up by God himself. 
What right have I to God's love ? None ; but I must have far less 
right to God's self. Let us praise and bless Jehovah our God, as we 
read our text, and saj^ together, "This God is our God." 

When informed that God has called some men his own we naturally 
wish to know what sort of men they were. Who were these favourites 
of heaven ? Is it possible that we can ever be numbered among such 
choice spirits ? 

Here are eight particulars, and upon each one I shall be very brief. 
I. Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, these three, were chosen 

MEN. 

It would have seemed a most unlikely thing that Abraham should call 
Jehovah his God. He lived on the other side of the Euphrates with 
his fathers, who served other gods, and the Lord appeared unto 
Abram, and called him, and said to him, "Get thee out from thy 
country, and from thy father's house"; and Abram obeyed the voice of 



50 WHOSE GOD IS JEHOVAH ? 

God. But why was Abraham chosen? There were* many other decent 
men in Charan. There were multitudes of other men on that side of the 
flood who were serving other gods. Why came the word to Abraham ? 
"Even so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight." I know no 
other answer to the questiou. Abraham was called of God according 
to the eternal purpose of divine grace, and, therefore, he came forth 
to sojourn with the Lord in Canaan. 

As to Isaac, he was the son of Abraham. Do you think that he had 
claims to divine favour because of natural descent? It was not so, for 
there was one born unto Abraham before him, even Ishmael, whom his 
father loved, and for whom he prayed, " Oh, that Ishmael might live 
before thee!" But the purpose of God must stand; and Isaac was 
chosen to the covenant heritage, and Ishmael received his portion in 
this life, and went his way to be the father of earthly princes and 
nations. "In Isaac shall thy seed be called," was the divine purpose; 
and so it must be. 

The third of the chosen is Jacob. He is the son of a saint, and the 
grandson of a saint ; but grace runs not in the blood ; for you 
remember that he had an elder brother born at the same birth, a 
twin with him, and yet it is written, "Jacob have I loved, and Esau 
have I hated." In the particular matter of the covenant inheritance, 
Jacob was called into the service of Jehovah, and Esau was left by his 
own choice to follow out his own worldly purposes. It was in a 
sovereignty for which the Lord vouchsafes no reason that Jacob was 
chosen ; so Paul tells us, and so it was. 

Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, these three are the Lord's because he chose 
them for himself. A line of electing love threads these three names 
together as pearls are threaded on a string of silk. Whatever of 
mystery there maybe about it, it is according to the word of God; and 
so must it be. 

II. If this should seem obscure and difficult to you, believe it, 
and leave it ; for the next remark is, that these three were believing 
men. 

By the grace of God Abraham believed. When the call came to 
him he believed God, and he went forth not knowing whither he 
went. God promised to give him a land for an inheritance which he 
had never seen, and when he came to it the Canaanite was still there 
in full possession. Firmly he believed God, and dwelt as a stranger in 
a strange land, and yet found himself at home with God. When God 
promised him that he should have a son, though it was contrary to 
nature, he believed, and in due time the promise was fulfilled to him ; 
for no man ever believed God in vain. Abraham was so truly a 
believing man as to be the very father of believers. His sacrifice of 
Isaac showed that his faith would go to the very uttermost. This is 
the man whom the Lord calls his own; Jehovah is the God of all who 
trust him with childlike confidence. To the last, his life was one of 
true, simple-hearted, and yet princely faith in God. 

Isaac was equally a believer, and his quiet, patient life proved it. 
Read his life-story. He dwelt at home, and he addicted himself to 
the arts of peace ; but he believed, and therefore never quitted the 
pilgrim life, nor even, when blind, doubted the word of the Lord his 






WHOSE GOD IS JEHOVAH ? 51 

God. Such men, whether great as Abraham, or peaceful as Isaac, are 
the Lord's, and the Lord is theirs; for faith is the mark of their high 
privilege. 

Jacob was a man of many and manifest infirmities, but he was 
a great believer. Let us never so think of the faults of Jacob as 
to forget that he was a man of surpassing excellence in the matter of 
faith in God. If there were nothing else to prove it, that midnight 
wrestling at the brook of Jabbok, when he dared to say even to God 
himself, " I will not let thee go, except thou bless me," proved the 
depth of this patriarch's faith. Here was the evidence that Jehovah 
was his God. Not doubting, but believing, is the hall-mark of 
heaven's true silver. 

Neither Abraham, nor Isaac, nor Jacob yielded to the worship of 
idols. They reverenced no symbols, nor kissed their hand to the queen 
of heaven, nor adored the Great Invisible through any sign or emblem. 
Jehovah abhors such worship, for he has said, 4< Thou shalt not make 
unto thee any graven image nor any likeness of anything that is in 
heaven above, nor in the earth beneath, nor in the water under the 
earth. Thou shalt not bow down to them, nor worship them." The 
one Invisible Jehovah, the living God that made heaven and earth, 
was the sole object of the worship of these gracious men. They 
believed in God, and adored the Lord believingly. Spiritual faith is 
the great mark of distinction between the man of God and the man of 
the world. To many there is no God, or if there be any God, they are 
sorry that there is one. The man that loves God rejoices in God, delights 
in God : atheism to him would be absolute misery. All the heaven 
that we want or expect is to be with God, and to be like him ; and 
those who can say this may know that the Lord is theirs, since they 
trust in him. 

III. Advance another step : these three were ordinary men. 
Abraham, Isaac, Jacob — who were these ? "We pronounce their names 
with great reverence ; but, in themselves, there is no more about 
these three names than if I said ''Brown, Jones, and Eobinson." I 
bless God that it is not written, "He is the God of Nimrod the mighty, 
or of Methuselah the aged, or of Solomon the wise, or of Samson the 
strong," but "the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob," who were, 
of themselves, only common Bedaween of the plains. These were not 
kings, but little sheikhs, presiding over their own families and servants. 
Though Abraham was wealthy, yet, as compared with the riches of a 
London merchant, he was a poor shepherd. No foot of land he called 
his own ; his house was a tent ; his possessions were sheep, and goats, 
and cattle, and his life was that of a gipsy. There were thousands of 
men, richer, mightier, more renowned than Abraham, Isaac, and 
Jacob ; yet it is not written that God was the God of the kings of 
the East, or of the men of renown of that age, but he was the God of 
Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob. Turn hither, ye three angels ; if 
there be a place where ye may rest, it is not where the Babylonian 
monarch walks in all his pride, but beneath the oak of Mamre, where 
a keeper of sheep shall bring forth water and wash your feet. Jehovah 
loves to visit the lowly ; he dwells with humble minds. To this day 
he is seldom the God of the worldly great, or the worldly wise, but 



52 WHOSE GOD IS JEHOVAH ? 

his grace seems to say, ' ' I am the God of that farmer, that blacksmith, 
that tailor, that shoemaker. I am the God of that poor woman whose 
eyes ache as she stitches so many hours to earn her scanty living; the 
God of that widow woman, who has trusted me, and I have fed her ; 
the God of that 3 r oung lad from the country, whose one desire is that 
he may serve his mother's God." 

' ' When the Eternal bows the skies 
To visit earthly things, 
With scorn divine he turns his eyes 
From towers of haughty kings. 

* ' He bids his awful chariot roll 
Far downward from, the skies, 
To visit every humble soul, 
With pleasure in his eyes." 

The homes of the poor, the laborious, and the forgotten, are visited 
by the God of grace, and thus the word is fulfilled, " I am the God of 
Abraham, and of Isaac, and of Jacob " — the God of common people, 
who are little esteemed among men. 

IV. Fourthly: these men were imperfect men; yet the Lord 
avows himself their God. There were moments when even Abraham's 
faith failed him, and when, like other orientals, he condescended to 
equivocations. His character is grand : he is wortlry to be called the 
father of the faithful, but still he was imperfect. To a higher degree 
Isaac was imperfect too. We cannot help feeling that the good old 
man was rather weak in that day, when he must needs bless Esau 
because Esau made savoury meat for him. We should have thought 
that one able to bestow so great a blessing would have been absorbed 
in higher things. The facts recorded in Scripture about good men 
are not to be looked upon as solitary incidents, but as representative 
events, and hence we see the weak stuff of which Isaac was composed. 
It is not for us to find fault with Isaac, but it is for us to thank God 
that he was the God of Isaac, who was not perfect ; for hence we 
gather hope that he may be our God also. 

As to Jacob, he had many faults, largely taken from the mother's 
side — from that crafty family over which Laban presided. Jacob was 
wonderfully human, and like ourselves. Yet, brethren, God was his 
God. He runs away from home, as well he may, for he has done his 
brother wrong ; but when he dreams, God appears in the dream. He 
gets to Laban, and there it was " diamond cut diamond," one trying to 
get, and the other to keep ; but even then he looked to the God of his 
fathers, and the Lord brought him through. He comes back, and when 
he fears Esau, he cries to God as naturally as a child cries to its father ; 
and right along till he went down into Egypt, you can see that his 
trust is in the God of Abraham and Isaac, who was his own God. Yet 
he was imperfect ; and I stand here to thank God that the Bible does 
not conceal the failings of believing men. If they had been absolutely 
perfect, I should have said, " There is no hope for me"; but as I see 
that even the saints were not altogether saintly, I thank God that he 
has not made them all white as marble, and then set them up in niches,, 
saying to us poor mortals, "You stand down there, and look up at 



WHOSE GOD IS JEHOVAH ? 53 

tliem, but you can never be one of them." No, the Lord has put the 
saints among us, that we may imitate their faith, and have God for 
our God, as they had. 

V. Here let me say, in the fifth place, that these three were all 
differing men : they are very much unlike each other. Abraham 
stands alone, gigantic as a mount ; Isaac is like a valley after a hill ; 
Jacob is beaten about as the seashore. You cannot put the three in 
one class as to their conformation of mind, or their mode of action. 
They exceedingly differ. Learn from this that we must not pick out 
one good man, and read his life, and say, "I have to be like that 
man." When you find that your experience is not like that of another 
believer, you must not hence conclude that you are no child of God. 
No, no. Jehovah is the God of Abraham ; but do not judge your- 
self by Abraham, because he is a greater man than you are : for God is 
also the God of Isaac. Sit down in quiet with Isaac. Do you reply, 
" Alas ! I do not feel quite so calm as Isaac : I am often tossed to and 
fro, and troubled in my family " ? Then, go to Jacob, and see how the 
Lord heard even him. 

I do not want you, Abraham, to be like Jacob ; I should be sorry 
that you should come down so low ! You, Isaac — I am not going to 
urge you to be like Jacob ; you are better as Isaac. And you, Jacob, 
you cannot be Isaac, and yet God is your God. Let each man of 
God be God's man, according to his own manhood. Was not God 
the God of Luther ? Who dare deny it ? But was he not the God 
of Calvin ? Will anybody question that the seer of Geneva walked 
with God ? But was Calvin Luther ? or Luther Calvin ? And there 
is Zwingle, over there in Zurich. He is not at all like Calvin, nor 
in the least like Luther ; but I see God in Zwingle as well as in 
Luther : and why not ? Surely God, who is to be seen in wrens as 
well as in eagles, in the tiniest fish as well as in the great whales ; 
who is to be seen in the sparkling dewdrop as well as in the raging of 
the tempestuous sea, is to be seen in all kinds of characters where his 
grace is found. Read right joyfully these words : " I am the God of 
Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob." 

VI. But I pass on, for I have scarcely time to observe, in the sixth 
place, that these three were all praying men. There is that about 
them all. One is not like the other till you get him on his knees ; but 
when he is on his knees Abraham prays likes Isaac, and Isaac prays 
like Abraham, and Jacob prays like Abraham, and Isaac. There is no 
difference between them when they come to draw near to God. They 
are alike, dust and ashes, yet they alike prevail with God. Mind this : 
prayer is the essential mark of grace. The Lord is not your God unless 
in prayer you plead " Our Father." A prayerless soul is a godless soul. 
Oh, if you want this God to be your God, you must be men of prayer, 
and only as you love the mercy-seat can you read your title to the 
possession of divine grace. Like Abraham, get up early to your secret 
place and plead with God ; like Isaac, walk in the fields and meditate ; 
like Jacob, wrestle and prevail ; so shall the Lord be your God. 

VII. And the consequence was, in the seventh place, that these 

THREE MEN WERE PRESERVED BY THE POWER OF GoD. Their fight Was 

different, but their victory was the same. 



54 WHOSE GOD IS JEHOVAH ? 

As to Abraham, I should like to be exactly like him, if I might. 
He seems to me to move with calm dignity and grave ^-fulness. 
You never see him fluttered. He is undisturbed because of the great- 
ness and solidit}' of his faith. He deserved to be called " His Serene 
Highness." He was always equal to emergencies ; indeed, nothing 
appeared to be an emergency to him. The great father of the faithful 
could even turn soldier and pursue the kings who had carried away 
Lot. Whatever he does, he does it thoroughly well, because he 
believes in the Lord always. Oh, it is a grand thing to have Abra- 
ham's faith, and so to conquer from day to day without defeat ! 

Isaac — a milder, gentler, softer character — yet wins the day, and 
makes his life to be a success. He digs wells. The Philistines fill 
them up, and he digs more. What a victory of patience ! When 
they filled these, he still digged more till they ceased to molest him. 
Oh, the triumph of calm long-suffering! There is nothing braver, 
after all, than giving way and yielding your rights, because you feel 
that the Lord will take care of you, and you are in no need to quarrel 
with petty Philistines. Isaac was no warrior, but no one could harm 
him. Jacob had a severe battle in life : he might expect to have a 
fourfold measure of troubles, as he had four wives. He had stepped 
aside from the right path, and made his way difficult. And then that 
bargaining with Laban — that haggling — trouble must come of it. 
Many of the troubles of God's people come from not walking by faith, 
and from trying to match the men of the world in their tricks and 
moves. Policy is of no use to believers in God, " for the children of 
this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light," and 
we shall be beaten if we try conclusions with them on their own lines. 
If we walk by faith, doing the right thing, and trusting in God, we 
shall baffle all adversaries, for the Lord will be on our side. 

However, as in Jacob's life there was a line of true faith in God, 
and a resolve to do the right, he came out safely from all his afflic- 
tions. The Lord had said of his chosen, " Touch not mine anointed, 
and do my prophets no harm," and therefore these men of God were 
safe. Neither Philistine, nor Canaanite, nor Egyptian, could touch 
them. When God is our God, his angels are our guard, his providence 
is our protection, himself is our shield and our exceeding great reward. 
Come under the wing of Jehovah, and you shall find a most secure 
abode. Jacob became Israel, the prevailing prince, not b} r what he 
did as he touched that crafty forehead, but by what he did when his 
sinew shrank, and as he fell he clutched the covenant angel with " I 
will not let thee go, except thou bless me." Prayer did for Jacob what 
craft could never have done. Try the power of prayer, and leave the 
power of craft to those who like it. 

VIII. And now my eighth particular is — these thhee men are all 
living men. This we might never have thought of except the Saviour 
himself had said, " God is not the God of the dead, but of the living." 
These three men still live as Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Their bodies 
were laid in Machpelah to pass away in rottenness, and there is no relic; 
of them left ; but the Lord knows where they are. He is well aware as 
to the abode of their soul and their spirit. The body shall rise again ; for 
the Saviour was arguing upon this point when he used this expression — 






HOW MY BIBLE-CLASS GREW. 55 

" God is not the God of the dead, but of the living " : the soul still 
lives, for God is still the God of the whole man. Beloved, is God your 
God ? Then you shall never die. Is God your God ? Then you shall 
live for ever, for he is not the God of the dead, but of the living. 
You shall pass out of this world by what is called " death," but the 
reality of death can never pass upon the believer. Jesus says, " He 
that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live. He that 
liveth and believeth in me shall never die." It is not death to pass 
out of this world unto the Father. The real death in which the soul 
is separated from God for ever — for that is the second death — that 
shall never pass upon the man who is joined unto God in Christ by 
a love from which there is no separation. Wherefore let us joyfully 
set up our banners. We are numbered with the immortals. We shall 
take our place in eternal youth hard by the throne of him who says, 
" I am that I am," and we shall see the ages glide away, while we, 

u Far from a world of grief and sin, 
With God eternally shut in," 

shall live with the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God 
of Jacob, world without end. 



toft* mg §JtoMasa dtofo* 



BY MRS. H. L. GIBSON. 

I HAVE often been asked the question, " How did you manage to get 
such a large Bible-class ? " My answer has been, " I did not get 
the class, it grew." I little dreamt, when I began twelve years ago, 
that it would ever be so large; but, like the " little seed," it has grown 
from a very small beginning to a "great tree." 

I live in a town where there are a great many mills and factories, and 
consequently many young women. I often wished to do something for 
the spiritual good of this interesting class of the community, but did 
not know very well how to begin. One or two girls, who had got good 
at a small Sabbath-school class which I taught for some time, but which 
I was prevented from continuing, came and begged me, if I could not 
teach them on Sabbath, to take them during the week. I consented to 
do so, provided they could get two more to come with them. The 
following week four presented themselves j and this was the beginning 
of my young women's Bible-class. 

At first I intended that it should be only for Christians, as I thought 
something of this kind was needed to supply a felt want, viz., a class to 
instruct young believers more fully in the ways of the Lord. A week 
had not passed away, however, when one of the four asked me if she 
might bring a companion with her. "Is she converted?" I asked. 
"No; but she is very anxious to come." "Bring her, then, she may 
perhaps get a blessing," I replied. Another and another desired to 
come ; and this I took as an indication from the Lord that I should 
receive all who would come, and make it a regular Bible-class. 

From the beginning it has been quite unsectarian. Not one of the 
four belonged to the congregation with which I was connected. One 
was Established ; one, Free Church ; one, United Presbyterian ; and one, 
Congregational. This has continued all through, the members of the 



56 HOW MY BIBLE-CLASS GREW. 

class comprising representatives of all denominations. I would never 
waste my time in merely seeking to gather members to any particular 
Church, much as I love my own. My aim has ever been higher, even to 
win souls to Christ— work that will last throughout eternity. 

Each week new members were added to the class, not by any special 
effort of mine, but by the girls themselves bringing their friends and 
companions. Thus it became known in the different factories and mills. 
Three weeks after its formation, one of the young women was awakened, 
and soon after was brought to decision for Christ. Another and another 
followed in quick succession ; and each one who trusted him was eager 
to bring others to hear the glad news which, by the Spirit's power, had 
led her to the feet of Jesus. 

At the close of the first session of nine months, there were fifty-six on 
the roll; next year, seventy-seven. Then the kitchen of my house, in 
which we had always met, became too strait for us, so much so that I 
had to forbid them bringing any more. One girl came to me at this 
time, saying that, if I would allow her to bring a careless companion to 
the class she herself would stay away to make room for her ; " Although," 
she added, " I will be sorry to do so ; but having got blessing myself, I 
would like my friend to come, for maybe she will get the blessing too." 
She was, of course, allowed to bring her friend and to come herself also. 
This, however, made me decide to look out for another place of meeting. 
Accordingly, we in a short time removed to the hall of the church which 
I attended. Every week brought fresh members. The hall was soon 
as crowded as the kitchen had been, until the numbers on the roll 
reached two hundred or more each year. About this time, the Lord 
was graciously pleased to pour out his Spirit upon us ; and many were 
brought out of darkness into his marvellous light. 

There is nothing of an outward kind to attract. Many fall into the 
mistake of supposing that the interest of such a large class can be kept 
up only by the aid of music, story reading, and such like. My experience 
has been very different. I have used nothing but the Word of God ; and 
I believe this to be the secret of the success of my class. The more we 
honour God's Word, the more he will honour our work ; for he has said, 
"Them that honour me, I will honour." I consider it of great 
importance that the young women should be brought into personal 
contact with the Word. Each one has her Bible in hand, and during the 
lesson turns up the passages to which I may refer ; and these are marked 
by many of them. In this way they obtain a knowledge of their Bibles, 
which they would not otherwise have. 

I prepare very carefully, spending over each lesson seven or eight 
hours every week. As soon would I think of having no class at all, as 
of going to it unprepared. But while I seek to give instruction, my 
chief aim is conversion: and never once would I teach without 
appealing to, and pressing upon, my class the acceptance of Christ as 
their Saviour and Substitute. I also give an opportunity, at the close 
of each meeting, to any who may wish to converse with me, besides 
setting apart an evening each week, on which any of the young women 
may come to my house to get counsel and direction on the all-importaut 
matter of their salvation. Many have taken advantage of these 
opportunities ; and not a few have in this way been united to Christ. 



HOW MY BIBLE-CLASS GREW. 57 

I look upon personal dealing as a most important part of a teacher's 
work, and I never lose an opportunity of speaking to the members of 
my class about their spiritual state when I meet them alone, either in 
the house, or by the way. I also try to know them all by name, and to 
take an interest in all that concerns them. 

Another thing that has helped me very much is a little Prayer-meeting 
we have for twenty minutes, before the class gathers, at which two or 
three of the young women plead for the presence of the Spirit on the 
lesson that is to be taught. This has been a great source of strength to 
me, and often, when in fear and trembling, the simple earnest prayers of 
these godly young women have filled me with a power not my own. I 
believe in the power of prayer ; for our God is a great God, and he has 
said, "According to your faith be it unto you." None are admitted to 
this meeting, unless they take part in it. Some have said to me, " We 
wish that we could do a similar work amongst young women ; but, you 
see, God has given you the talent, and we have no talent ! " Now this 
is a great mistake ; God has given to every one of us talents for which 
we are accountable to him : but it is not so much great ability, as 
earnestness of purpose, perseverance, and tact that are needed for such 
a work. 

Many look upon our mill and factory workers as a sort of lower 
species. It is a great mistake ; for, while there are so many who are 
rough and uncouth, there are also many of the finest specimens of 
womanhood amongst them, ay ! and many noble Christians too. The 
way to raise them is to teach them God's truth, and anxiously to seek 
to bring them under its power; nothing else will do. It is not 
amusement they need, but something that will satisfy them, not only in 
time but throughout eternity. They require earnest and faithful dealing 
and warning ; for their temptations are many and great. Even careless 
girls know when they are faithfully dealt with, and despise in their 
hearts those who are only "half-and-half" in their dealing with them. 
During these twelve years, one thousand young women have passed 
through the class. Many of these are now in different parts of the 
earth ; not a few have gone into the eternal world. Some of these, by 
their lives as well as by their bright and happy deathbeds, have left a 
clear testimony behind them that they have gone to be with Jesus ; over 
the end of others we will draw the veil. 

I have had many precious testimonies as to how helpful the class has 
been, not only in leading to decision for Christ, but in preventing many 
from being led in the wrong way. As one lately said, "But for the 
class, where would I have been ? " The results are with God. This is 
our sowing time, and he can make it also our harvest season ; at all 
events, the reaping time is coming, when sowers and reapers will rejoice 
together. 

One word to fellow-teachers. Teach with a single eye to the glory of 
God, and aim at the conversion of each soul under your care ; anything 
short of this will not stand when God begins to reckon with us 
concerning our work. If we would have the " Well done ! " at last, we 
must be faithful in the discharge of our duties now. And let our 
practice be consistent with our teaching, otherwise we shall have no 
influence for good over those under our care. 



58 



(Bimm IPwntirall m fet §0tikrjL 

(Second Article.) 

THE visiting missionaries continually meet with numbers of interest- 
ing cases ; but although they may be admirably adapted for their 
work, they are not often able to give descriptions of what they see ; and 
in their own way they can talk of their adventures better than they can 
write about them. Let us refer to a few more cases selected from that 
great world of the East End, which, in some respects, is one of the 
greatest mission-fields in the whole world. 

We naturally become very indignant against working men who ill-use 
their wives ; but infamous as many of the charges under this head 
undoubtedly are, there are sometimes extenuating circumstances. Can 
Ave put ourselves in the place of some of these men, who may have 
grievances of which we, happily, know nothing ? There are men who 
would be very different from what they are if they were not dragged 
down into the mire of home surroundings. 

Take the case of Mrs. Slut — her representative, not her real name — 
whose besetting sin prompted her to spend hard-earned money at the 
gin-palace, when she ought to have laid it out with the baker and 
grocer. She is prevailed upon to attend a meeting ; but as meetings 
alone, however good in themselves, are not a cure for dram-drinking, she 
falls back into her old habit, proving that she would need a model of 
patience, indeed, to bear with her. On a certain day, when the man 
hastens home to a meal, instead of finding the table ready, all things are 
in a state of dirt and confusion, because, having received some money to 
which she was entitled, Mrs. Slut had forthwith taken it to the gin- 
palace. Of course, under such conditions, there will be much noise, and 
many threatenings ; and something more than ordioarily serious would 
happen if the missionary were not on the spot to act as peacemaker. 
Such subjects as these, however, are sometimes reformed, and live ever 
after as glorious trophies of mission work. 

Mr. Hurndall gives one of the largest Christmas dinners in London ; 
and some saddening sights are witnessed in connection with the filling- 
up of the forms. The friend who supplies the information about the 
representative Mrs. Slut, tells us, that on a day when a number of these 
forms were filled up, he saw a crowd gathered at one of the stations, 
composed of the most wretchedly haggard faces he had ever looked upon. 
We are sorry, too, to find, that he thinks that the general outlook of this 
winter is quite as bad as it was a year ago. How can we expect it to be . 
otherwise, until the labour market is relieved on a greater scale, by those 
being sent to the colonies who are willing to go ? 

Having devoted special attention to barbers and coffee-house keepers, 
this same observer tells some curious facts, especially about the former. 
According to the testimony of one of their own number, hairdressers are 
the most drunken of any class in London, while they are also much 
addicted to gambling, many of the lower kind of coffee-houses being little 
better than gambling-hells. Among both of these classes, Sunday labour 
is generally the rule, only one barber's shop in fifteen, and about one coffee- 



W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 59 

house in seven, in this locality, being closed on the Sabbath. In all of 
these places, evangelical papers are circulated, and are read by customers, 
as well as by the poor seven-days-a-week servants, and the masters 
and mistresses. The papers thus circulated are sure to have some good 
results ; but they are outdone in this respect by the special services 
which are held every Sunday evening, at the Bow and Bromley In- 
stitute, after the ordinary service at Harley-street chapel, and bring 
together quite another congregation. 

Thus, the missionary who has found so many friends among barbers 
and coffee-house keepers, says, " Grand things have been done for my 
district by our special mission-services ; twelve men, eighteen women, 
four boys, and four girls, have professed conversion. Some will make 
good workers for Christ." There are not many pastors who preach to 
two such congregations as Mr. Hurndall draws together on Sunday 
nights during the winter. His own chapel is crowded ; and, leaving 
that, he finds another expectant and crowded congregation at the In- 
stitute already named. The people who attend are the more interesting 
on account of their East End characteristics. They are " the working 
classes,'' without doubt. Here, too, are men who seem to have such a 
shrinking from attending a meeting at all, that they will not come with- 
out their wives ; and here are women who cannot conveniently leave 
home to appear at public worship until after eight in the evening, when 
fheir children are in bed. 

The privation through which some of these people pass is terrible 
indeed. Another of Mr. Hurndall's visitors tells of a man, his wife, and 
three children, to whom a succession of privations happened which were 
quite enough to unhinge the mind. The man, after twelve years of 
service, was obliged, through ill-health, to leave his situation. Then a 
child, five years old, was lost on the road between home and school for 
some days, and fright ended in the little one's death. Next came scarlet 
fever ; and the father, who was very ill himself, then lost his reason. 
The excessive grief of the wife made her ill also, so that she had to be 
removed to an infirmary, with her baby. Who would comfort such poor 
people if it were not for the mission visitors ? 

The female missionary, who gives the above facts, can also tell of many 
striking cases of good received at the late Sunday-night service at the Bow 
and Bromley Institute. In one instance, a woman who had not been in 
a place of worship for three years, was converted, with two of her com- 
panions. Another case was that of a man, who, perhaps, through being 
so severely tried by want of work, became cross-grained in temper, until 
he was more of a terror than anything else to his household. The family 
would, at times, be without food for days together ; but the grace of God 
touched his heart at the Bow and Bromley Institute ; and, despite all, 
he became such a changed character, that the children were quick to 
notice the difference. Then comes a case of sorrow, which might well 
shame many of us who too soon complain when affliction comes, and 
who, perhaps, are too ready to make privation an excuse for shirking 
duty. A mother has had a daughter ill for five years, and more than 
half that time the young woman has been in bed. The elder woman is 
a feather maker ; but although they are often short of things necessary, 
the sick daughter's room is always clean and well kept. More than that, 



60 W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 

the invalid has found her Saviour during the time she has been laid 
aside. What a commentary is this on the words, "It is good for me 
that I have been afflicted" ! It is in the poor rooms of the East End, in 
company with such friends as Mr. HurndalPs visitors, that we best see 
the other words of the Psalmist verified, " He forgetteth not the 
afflicted" ; " He heareth the cry of the afflicted"; " For thou wilt save 
the afflicted people." 

But let us proceed, and take notice of one or two of those cases which 
show us what is really meant by hard times for those who have no 
capital but their labour. 

Monotonously alike as these suburban East End streets may seem to 
be to casual visitors, it is surprising what variety there is in the life- 
stories that are to be heard in the rooms, some being as touching as 
~atl:ers are tragic. 

In one house, for example, there is a man whose father was of good 
social standing, and a town councillor. He served his apprenticeship in 
the regular way to a mechanical trade, and the referees who acknowledge 
him show the poor fellow to have been well connected. Eventually, 
however, he had to take a situation in a sugar refinery ; but when that 
trade declined, in consequence of the French, and others, thinking well 
to send us sugar under cost price, the firm became insolvent, and all 
their employes were cast adrift upon the world. Since that date, the 
man, who has a wife and four children, has not been able to obtain any 
regular work ; and, like others in such sad circumstances, he has parted 
with everything that is worth a shilling. Mr. Hurndall gave him a few 
shillings, as trading capital, and with this he bought a quantity of fish, 
to sell again, by which means he hoped to ward off actual starvation 
until he could return to his own trade. 

Men like the above do not belong to that class of noisy impostors 
who parade the streets to make capital of their sham poverty. In the 
majority of instances, if they were not sought out, the public would 
know nothing of their sufferings. The most touching cases of all are 
those of bread-winners whose health and strength become undermined 
through want of the food which cannot be obtained, but without which 
work cannot be properly done. 

The next example is a man who has also a wife and four children 
depending upon him, but whose health has suffered through want of 
proper food and clothing, until the seeds of consumption have been sown 
in his constitution, and he has been obliged to enter the infirmary. 
Think of all this coming upon a man at the age of thirty-two ! Can we 
wonder that he lay uneasily on his sick bed, and partook sadly of the 
comforts unstintingly provided for him in the hospital ; or, at last, that 
he became sufficiently imprudent to disobey the surgeon's order, and 
turn out, because he knew that his wife and children were wanting the 
barest necessaries of life ? He has nothing better to depend upon than 
work at the docks ; but though in an advanced state of consumption, 
he says he will drop at his work rather than let his dependants starve, if 
he can help it. When called upon by Mr. Hurndall's agent, the wife was 
nursing a sick baby ; but, notwithstanding, she was trying to make 
match-boxes, the price for which is under threepence a gross. A little 
help was given, such as flannel-shirts for the husband, and grocery for the 



W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. CI 

family, accompanied with words of cheer and Christian sympathy. 
There is no danger of pauperizing in assisting such subjects ; and if, 
instead of giving to got-up impostors in the streets, people allowed such 
almoners as these Christian visitors to dispense their bounty, the money 
would reach the right objects, instead of being worse than wasted. 

The next case is that of a man and wife without children, and whose 
only resources are what the woman can earn at finishing trousers at two- 
pence farthing a pair, the man having lost the sight of one eye, and being 
otherwise afflicted. Under such conditions, it is hardly so much living, 
as an actual fight for existence. The case of another woman in a bare 
room, with one child, almost naked, and unable to help herself through 
expecting another, is not a whit less deplorable. It was the monotonous 
old story of the husband being out of work. He was about as in- 
tensely anxious as a man could well be to provide what was necessary, 
and at last obtained a situation which might, probably, very barely 
supply the needs of the family. Even such an observer as the late 
Samuel Morley favoured the notion that the main part of the want and 
misery in London was the direst of wasteful drinking ; but although a 
proportion may be traced to that cause, we go wide of the mark if we 
make out drink to be the chief cause of trouble. The great thing to 
remedy is the terribly overcrowded state of the labour market, mainly 
brought about by too early and improvident marriages. 

A family, which another visitor describes as " very steady people," 
consists of a carpenter, who has been out of work for six weeks, and can 
only get anything to do now and then. As a rule, the winter means to 
them severely hard times at the best, being obliged to live from hand to 
mouth in a truly distressing manner. If we ask, How do such people 
live at all ? the very suggestive incident of a little girl being sent out to 
sell enough rags to procure a pound of bread to give a meal to nine 
persons, helps to give an answer. There is no drinking, nor do they 
crave relief so much as work. The wife does a little with her needle, 
but with a husband out of work and seven hungry youngsters around 
her, it is hardly the mother's fault if some of these latter occasionally 
go breakfastless to school. 

Apart from this, however, what shall be said about an afflicted woman 
of seventy-six years trying hard to support herself amid the fierce labour 
competition of the East End ? When in tolerable health she can do a 
little with her needle ; but that failing, she is partly dependent on what 
a relative is able to give her, and on what she receives from Mr. Hurn- 
dall's fund. Still, being in full possession of the Christian's hope, the 
old lady presents a rare picture of content ; and when she talks of how 
good the Lord is to her, she is not dealing in mere unmeaning words. 
To see Christian patience of the most genuine sort, we need to look in 
upon some of the poorest homes of the East End. 

In hundreds of other homes comes the same testimony to the difficulty 
of getting work, and of the impossibility of living without it. In one 
front room are man, wife, and two children, who, through the former 
having nothing to do, would at times have nothing to eat but for what 
they receive from Mr. Hurndall. Then you come upon a woman in an 
underground room, who, while depending on a mangle, has sometimes 
only fifteen-pence with which to find her board for a week. In another 



62 W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 

room there is a family of six, the children sleeping in one corner ; and, 
after paying five shillings a week rent, the parents do not know which 
way to turn to get a few pence to buy food. A jacket finisher at three 
farthings each, and a husband out of work, is another characteristic 
case. A similar case of devotion is seen in the case of the wife and 
daughter of a cabinet-maker, who make match-boxes at twopence 
farthing a gross, while the husband and father is too ill to work. Thus, 
there are many aged widows struggling for a livelihood on the one 
hand, and, on the other hand, many wives and children who are suffering 
the greatest privation on account of men being either out of work, or 
too ill to do any if work could be got. It should also be well borne in 
mind that this illness, with its disablement, is often occasioned by sheer 
want of the bare necessaries of life. 

It is a pleasant thing to turn from all this to that El Dorado of 
working people, our great Dominion of Canada. Here, at all events, 
is a country where people can settle without fear of being in one 
another's way, and where, at least for those who are willing and 
able to work, there will sure to be good lodgings and an abundance of 
food. It may be true that at times we hear murmurs of complaint from 
those who have gone out ; but when such is the case, we commonly 
suspect that some mistake has been made which might have been 
avoided if a little ordinary precaution had been observed. If intending 
emigrants will accept the social representations of interested railway 
shareholders instead of ascertaining what the officially appointed agents 
in London have to say, it is not surprising if they are misinformed and 
disappointed. We are happy to say that this is not usually the case 
with those who go out from the East End. " Discouraging statements 
as to the condition of the labour market in Canada have appeared in 
some English newspapers," remarks Mr. Hurndall ; " but the intelli- 
gence which has reached us suggests strongly that the Press is 
assuredly not infallible. All the letters that have come are of a hopeful 
character." There is a class of loafers who will even go out to the 
colonies by way of adventure ; and when they land they are no more 
prepared to work in the New World than they were in the Old. They 
are loafers still, and such will they remain wherever they may be. 

All we have to do in the present instance as impartial witnesses is to 
quote the testimony of those who have actually gone out and accepted 
such work as there is to be done. This is evidence that no one can 
gainsay. 

One boy went from Mr. Hurndall's district, who, on landing and pre- 
senting his letter of introduction, was invited to sit down to a dinner 
consisting of " roast beef, apple pudding, cheese, two kinds of cakes, 
green peas and potatoes " ; the board thus furnished being in point of 
fact typical of the superabundance of that land of plenty. The young 
emigrant adds : — "I got a situation after I came from dinner on the 
day I landed — eight dollars a month, board and lodging — with a cattle- 
dealer that has a small farm. They are very nice people, and it is just 
like home. I have every comfort there, and it is a very nice place, ten 
miles from Ottawa. ... I could have lots of places — one at Montreal, 
the instant I came ashore. There is work for thousands out here." A 
second lad obtained a similar situation, while a man got work at three 






VV. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 68 

dollars a day, which enabled him to set up what, to him, was quite a 
large establishment. Then a working man, who for years lived a life of 
great privation in East London, sends a letter from Ottawa which 
shows how great and rapid the progress of the country has been, and 
how unlimited are the openings for hard-working people of the right 
kind. He says : — " There are still standing at Ottawa some of the old 
log-huts that were put up in the time of the first settlement. Now 
there are the stately Parliament buildings, Government offices, General 
Post Office, churches of all denominations, immense hotels, streets of 
beautiful stores (Spark-street being the principal), and in suburban 
parts of the city, beautiful villas of very handsome design, all fitted up 
with the very latest domestic comforts. The beautiful verandahs and 
porches give quite a splendid appearance to the houses, and they are 
very pleasant to sit in in the evening ; and the gardens that surround the 
villas are fine. Altogether the scene is lovely and enchanting. I am 
at work on one of these villas. I believe the value is six thousand 
dollars. . . . The Canadians are very early people. They are out to their 
business very early in the morning. They are all work. It is no use 
whatever for anyone to come out here who is nob useful and willing to 
work ; but for a man who is so, there is a living for him ; and as a 
friend of our landlord, who is rich now, and started a poor man, said, 
* If a man cannot live in this country, he cannot live in any.* The city 
is lit up with the electric light, and also the major part of the stores." 

Another young man writes : — " Glad to say all our party is going on 
very comfortable. H. has got a steady job until Christmas at thirty- 
and-a-half cents (one and threepence farthing) per hour. D. is pick 
and shovel man, one dollar and seventy-five cents per day, which is 
seven shillings. Each of us works ten hours per day. The principal 
men wanted out here [Ontario] are bricklayers, thirty-six cents per 
hour; labourers nineteen cents; plasterers, thirty-and-a-half cents. 
Farm labourers twenty dollars per month and all found, to good men. 
It is no use anybody coming out here without they make up their mind 
to work." 

Of course we do not mean to say that all prosper alike ; some do not 
do all they hoped to accomplish. " One or two, not successful at first, 
by energy and pluck have secured employment," remarks Mr. Hurndall, 
who adds that " Canada is a land where grit is needed. People who 
want to lean against a wall and think, had better remain in England, 
and gravitate to the workhouse. " 

To give a few more testimonies about the country : — a married man, 
sent out by Mr. Hurndall, says : " I get nineteen dollars a fortnight, and 
do not work near so hard as I did in England." We will close these 
extracts with one which came from a married man, who had suffered 
terribly in London through want of work : — •" You will be pleased to 
hear that I got work the morning after we landed at Ottawa, with a 
firm of builders here, who have a great deal of work, and therefore 
I have every reason to suppose that it will be constant work, both 
summer and winter. We are all well and happy. We put our whole 
trust in God to guide us, and he does so in his great mercies to us. 
I put my whole trust in him before I left Euston, and I never felt the 
least fear or anxiety. You must accept our sincere thanks for your 



64 W. EVANS HURNDALL IN EAST LONDON. 

kindness, and your kind attention, and also your missionaries — and 
your seeing us off at Euston." 

Thus the over-crowded labour market is relieved on a small scale ; 
and we often wonder why, in the case of so great a country as ours, 
possessing colonies practically without limit, more is not done in the 
way of sending destitute but able-bodied people to the lands which will 
not only afford them plenty, but will themselves be richer for their 
labour. Meanwhile there is no truer charity than that of helping these 
poor people to help themselves. When we think of what the pressure 
really means in the case of those who feel it most severely, we shall the 
more thoroughly sympathize with those women whose husbands commit 
suicide because the anguish they bore could be borne no longer. 

We may here mention that, on Christmas Eve, Harley-street Chapel 
presented an example of "Keeping Christmas" on a scale such as is 
not often seen, even in London. As we were not there, we shall chiefly 
borrow a description of the scene from our fashionable contemporary, 
The Morning Post : — 

" A distribution of Christmas dinners, on a large scale, took place at 
the Harley-street Chapel; provision being made for some 12,000 of the 
poor of East London, representing in all 2,345 families. The Lord 
Mayor and Lady Mayoress attended early in the evening, and were 
warmly greeted by the recipients, who had already gathered in the 
building. Mr. Hurndall briefly opened the proceedings, after which the 
Lord Mayor said that it had been suggested that he should establish a 
fund for the purpose of dealing with the distress that existed in the 
East-end ; but while in some cases such funds might do good, and might 
be so administered as to be a benefit to the poor, he was, nevertheless, 
constrained to say that, judging from the experience of what he had 
seen three years ago, he should not feel disposed to open any fund at 
the Mansion House unless there were proper and better centres for its 
distribution than had existed on the last occasion. Provision for the 
distribution should, of course, be adequate ; but, above all, they should 
be discriminating ; and he was inclined to think that the real poor did 
not, on the occasion to which he referred, receive all the benefit from 
the fund that they were entitled to. Many who did not deserve assist- 
ance were then the recipients of it. He was not going to commit the 
same mistake, but would rather take a centre such as that in which 
they were assembled, with a man at the head of it with the character of 
Mr. Hurndall, and do all he could to assist him. Referring to the wider 
question of the removal of the causes of distress, he expressed the belief 
tnat something might be done by means of emigration if properly 
organized under the Government, though he thought the Government 
had to a great extent cut the ground from under their feet by not main- 
taining Crown Colonies more than they had done. He felt, too, that 
some Oar should be placed upon the admission of pauper foreigners 
into London, and hoped that some scheme might be devised by which 
land which was not now cultivated, but was capable of being so used, 
might be brought into cultivation. After further urging that the drink 
traffic should be more vigorously dealt with, he concluded by wishing a 
merry Christmas to all those present. The dinners which were given 
away during the evening consisted of joints of beef and materials for 



1 



EYES RIGHT. 65 



Christmas puddings. The distribution was carried out under the direc- 
tion of a committee ; the total cost, which was raised by subscription, 
amounting to £550." 

We may add that the weight of the food distributed on this occasion 
was 12 tons, 12 cwt., 52 lbs., divided as follows: 9,582 lbs. of beef, 
11,326 lbs. of materials for puddings, 7,368 lbs. of bread. 

At his residence, 16, Cottage Grove, Bow, Mr. Hurndall gives up 
three rooms for this mission work, one for an office, one for storing 
provisions, and one for clothing (which Mrs. Hurndall superintends). 
Parcels of clothing are always welcome. The Editor of The Sword and 
the Troivel would like to see such brethren as Archibald Brown and 
Evans Hurndall overdone with money and goods, and wishes that he 
may live to see them in such happy difficulties. 

But while Mr. Hurndall renders all the help he can to needy and 
deserving people, the mission he superintends has for its first object the 
carrying of the gospel to the poor. Apart from this Home Mission 
work, the burden of his pastorate year by year grows heavier. None 
save those who have to do it know what it is to have to preach with 
freshness to crowded congregations week by week. Nor is his pen idle. 
For some years he has very successfully edited The Shield and Spear, a 
penny monthly magazine published by Mr. E. Stock. The little 
volume, Thoughts by the Way, published when he was a Bible-class 
leader at Clifton in 1870, deserves to be reprinted as a treasury of 
bright and useful things. He has also by request supplied sermon 
sketches and homilies for 1st and 2nd Corinthians in The Pulpit 
Commentary. Thus the operations carried on represent a many-sided 
work, which confers immense benefit on the very poorest of people at 
the East End. G. H. P. 



$3P §tf0ji 

f ET thine eyes look right on" — Proverbs iv. 25 — like one ploughing, 
±J who must not look back. Look straight before thee. Had Eve 
done so, she would have looked on the command of her God, not on the 
forbidden tree. Had Lot's wife looked straight before instead of behind 
her, she would, like her husband, have been a monument of mercy. 
Achan was ruined by neglecting this rule of wisdom. David's example 
calls the holiest of us to godly jealousy : he looked when he should not, 
and fell into sin. In asking the way to Zion, be sure that your " faces 
are thitherward ; " for the pleasures of sin, and the seductions of a 
tempting world, do not lie in the road. They would not therefore 
meet the eye looking right on — straight before us. They belong to the 
bye-path on the right hand and on the left, or to some backward track. 
It is only, therefore, when the Christian lingers, turns aside, or turns 
back, that they come in sight. Take the racer's motto — " This one thing 
I do." Eye the mark, and press to it. Onwards, upwards, heavenwards. 

Charles Bridges. 



66 

% ffiea for (8/dfrm. 

BY DK. WILLIAM GRAHAM. 

BUT why plead in any wise for Calvin or Calvinism ? Their works 
praise them in the gate, and speak for both. Never since the 
beginning of Christianity has any man or system produced such im- 
mense, heavenly, and heroic fruits. That great mountain has sheltered 
many a valley, shaped by its rise, and lying at its foot. That deep 
digging and ploughing has made fruitful many a barren waste. That 
fountain of divine grace has parted into a four-fold river, and made 
paradise on every side. Nearly all the heroisms, most of the liberties, 
much of the highest wisdom and character of these three hundred years, 
trace themselves back straight to that lonely man. The children of his 
home died and left him solitary ; the children of his spirit grew a great 
and mighty nation. The last and best biographer of Calvin, Kampschulte, 
points out that his Eeformation is the only one that steps beyond the 
limits of his birthplace. Huss was more a political and Bohemian 
Reformer. Luther's Reformation, while deeply Christian, having its 
roots nourished by relations to his "dear German nation," has never 
struck kindly in any other soil. Calvin, living in Geneva, a free city, 
put off the Frenchman as he put off the Romanist, and came forth in 
his system a man and a Christian. From his hands the Reformation 
became a movement independent of nationality, and produced a truly 
Christian and Catholic church. Hence the breadth of his influence has 
touched all orders of mind. The highest in genius and culture rise in 
their mien of soul and measure of praise as they look up to him ; and 
many a peasant, with God's grace stirring mightily within, amidst a 
poor lot and dreary toils, has felt the bracing air of his stern doctrine 
and noble aims. Puss out from Geneva. See how he moved through 
and joined together the Swiss Reformed Churches, and had all but 
gained over into union the German Reformation too ! See how, though 
he never revisited his old France, yet his soul marched on at the head 
of the Huguenots, and but for black St. Bartholomew, had made France 
the central Christian power in Europe ! See how, in France also, a 
hundred years after, it was his truth, indirectly felt, that roused the grand 
and saintly spirits of Port Royal ! These two men, Calvin and Pascal, 
have lifted up the French mind out of its usual chasm into an 
unwonted sublimity. In Holland, Calvin gave a body to the medita- 
tions which had been cherished by Thomas a Kenipis, in the serene air 
of his monastery, and created its noble army of thirty-six thousand 
martyrs. Calvin's voice in his letters was a word from an emperor ; 
when about to die they saluted him. Ten years of added life to Edward 
VI., and Calvin, in his Reformation, would have shaped English Chris- 
tianity, and saved us from a conflict which is again deepening around 
us at this hour. As it was, he was the teacher and inspirer of the 
Puritans ; and men like Oliver Cromwell and John Milton, John Bunyan 
and John Howe, John Owen and, though differing in opinion, yet like 
in spirit, Richard Hooker, can answer well for the nobleness and beauty 
of souls that surrender themselves to divine grace. Shall we forget to 
call Scotland to bear testimony ? John Knox was, as Guizot says, no 
disciple of Calvin, but an equal ; yet he learned much from him, and 



ANECDOTES OF EARLY AMERICAN BAPTISTS. 67 

Scotland, to this hour, owes much of its Reformation to the sovereign 
intellect and example of Calvin. And was not the whole Covenanting 
struggle one for divine grace, spiritual independence, and human liberty ? 
Our own old Secession and Relief Churches called no man master but 
Christ, yet they look up to Calvin as one of his best scholars ; and in 
later years, under Chalmers, and in a revived Christianity, and the Free 
Church, the old truth has given new tokens of its undying power. In 
Germany also, the only system that has broken up Rationalism is that 
of Schleiermacher, which asserts, though with many defects, the person 
of Christ and the power of grace. But time would fail to tell of all the 
victories of the truth. It is the great spiritual force at this moment 
in America ; for the Pilgrim Fathers carried Calvin with them ; and it 
still lives in strength amid thousands of churches, and has been 
embodied afresh, and with marvellous skill and learning, in the great 
book of Charles Hodge, the patriarch of Presbyterianism. And away 
in far-off islands of the seas, and in continents to east and west, these 
principles rescue multitudes at this hour from heathenism, and bear 
fruit in homes of piety and churches of God. I venture, then, to claim 
for Calvinism, or rather the Christianity which it in good measure 
represents, a power no future age can exhaust. Its difficulties, after 
all, lie in its high thoughts and holy living ; and these, while they awe, 
and sometimes repel, at last attract and win men. The future of the 
church and the world is contended for by these three — Romanism, 
Rationalism, and pure Christianity. I have no fear for the issue. There 
may be swayings to and fro over the wide battle-field of contest ; but 
I am sure that the army that has deep convictions of sin, and lofty 
views of God and his grace, has elements of intellectual truth, moral 
power, and divine reinforcement that shall gain the day. These elements 
shall emerge after every failure, and at last stand fast and for ever. 
These are truest to God and to man, for God's praise and for man's 
good ; and these meet in him who has redeemed man from his lowest 
sin, by that death on the cross in which he has revealed God in his 
highest glory. 



D 



^MtMtn oi farljr %mtmm §ajj tists.' 



R. ISAAC BACKUS, the historian of the American Baptists of 
former days, lived from 1724 to 1806, and so saw all the stages of 
the Revolution, and his brethren, as well as his country, free. He had 
had no small hand in the transactions which led up to this happy result. 
His mother, Elizabeth (Tracy) Backus, was a strong as well as a devout 
•Christian. She was in her " first love" when her son Isaac was born, 
and she brought him up in the fear and love of God. With many 
others, she became a dissenter from Congregational State Churchism, 
refusing to pay the tax. In the fall of 1752, when ill, and seated before 
the fire, wrapped in thick clothing to induce perspiration, the officers 
came and took her off to prison. It was a dark and rainy night, about 
nine o'clock. The officer thought that being sick of a fever she would 

* "History of the Baptists." By Dr. Armitage. Bryan, Taylor and Co., New 
York. Elliot Stock, London. 



G8 ANECDOTES OF EARLY AMERICAN BAPTISTS. 

rather pay her rates than be cast into gaol — and gaols were gaols then. 
But he did not reckon her aright. "With a heroism worthy of a David, 
and with the spirit of Christ-like love to her persecutors, we find her 
saying:— 

" Oh, the condescension of heaven ! Though I was bound when 
cast into this furnace, yet I was loosed, and found Jesus in the midst of 
the furnace with me. Oh, then I could give up my name, estate, family, 
life, and health freely to God. Now the prison looked like a palace to 
me. I could bless God for all the laughs and scoffs made at me. Oh, 
the love that flowed out to all mankind ! Then I could forgive, as I 
would desire to be forgiven, and love my neighbour as myself." 

Great is the grace and strong the faith when weak women become 
" mighty through God." Such women are to be found now, no doubt ; but 
where shall we look for them ? The pleasure-loving " ladies " of the 
present day are not made of this stern stuff. Hearts of oak will not be 
found among them. 

In Massachusetts and Connecticut the adherents of George Whitefield 
and Jonathan Edwards, who insisted on the Scriptural principle of 
churches being formed of converted people, were called New Lights and 
Separatists. They greatly swelled the ranks of the Baptists, who stood 
well-nigh alone in the maintenance of this important principle. The 
colleges were under the control of the State Church party, and the Pre- 
sident of Yale showed what manner of spirit he was of when he expelled 
two students and their tutors for attending a private meeting for divine 
worship conducted by a layman. The young men pleaded that it was 
where their godly father attended ; but no matter, they were expelled. 

In 1758 the General Assembly of Georgia passed a law making the- 
Church of England the. church of the province. It established two 
parishes — Christ Church, Savannah, and St. Paul's, Augusta. Under 
this law Daniel Marshall was arrested one Sabbath " for preaching in the 
parish of St. Paul," contrary to the " rites and ceremonies of the 
Church of England." The congregation was assembled in " a beautiful 
grove under the blue sky, and he was on his knees making the opening 
prayer," when a hand was laid on his shoulder, and a voice heard, 
saying, " You are my prisoner " ! He was a white-headed old man of 
sixty-five. The venerable man of God rose, and gave security to appear 
the next day at Augusta, and the constable — one Samuel Cartledge — 
released him, the preacher offering no word of remonstrance or rebuke. 
But the matter did not end there. Marshall's wife was present, and she 
was a woman of spirit, and courage, and faith, and zeal withal, and 
eloquent in speech. She remonstrated stoutly with the constable,, 
and with equal authority, and solemnity, and earnestness, bid the man 
flee from the wrath to come, and seek the pardon of his sins and the 
salvation of his soul. Her words told. The man did repent and seek 
salvation. Mr. Marshall afterwards baptized him ; he became a deacon, 
and subsequently a pastor, dying so lately as 1843, ninety-three years 
of age. Verily " two are better than one," and it is better for a man to 
have a good wife than to be alone. All honour to you, Mrs. Martha 
Marshall ! and God be praised for the grace given you ! 

There was an Edward Bats ford, who emigrated from England in 1771. 
He was converted at Charleston, and was sent by the church there as a 



ANECDOTES OF EARLY AMERICAN BAPTISTS. 61) 

missionary into Georgia. The above D. Marshall had removed into 
Georgia, where Colonel Barnard introduced Batsford to him. Batsford 
was simply a licentiate, and Marshall was a veteran pastor. The latter 
said to the young recruit — 

" Well, sir ; you are to preach for us ? " 

" Yes, sir, by your leave. But I am at a loss for a text." 

" Look to the Lord for one," was Marshall's answer. 

He preached with great freedom from the words, " Come and hear, 
all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he has done for my soul." 
The old pastor found a blessing under the sermon ; and, taking the 
young man by the hand, said : " I can take thee by the hand, and call 
thee brother, for somehow I never heard convarsion better explained in 
my life/' He took the young man home to his house, and to his heart, 
and they were David and Jonathan together until Marshall was called 
home. 

Norwich, Connecticut, has been a large centre of Baptist power. 
Dr. Lord was the pastor of the State Church there when Whitefield was 
labouring there with his well-known success. At first Dr. Lord, who 
was a good man, was inclined to work with Whitefield, but his prejudices 
were allowed to get the better of his piety, and he began to persecute 
and oppress. There was a large secession from his church to form a 
Separatist congregation, and out of this movement the Baptist church 
was evolved. The Doctor came poorly off, for many refused to pay the 
tax, and he was reduced to the necessity of collecting the tax himself. 
One day he called upon a barber named Collier: — 

"Mr. Collier," said he, "I have a small bill against you." 

"A bill against me, Dr. Lord ? For what ? " 

"Why, your rate for my preaching." 

"For your preaching? Why I have never heard you ;] I don't 
recollect that I ever entered your meeting-house." 

"That's not my fault, Mr. Collier; the meeting-house was open." 

"Very well," said the barber," But, look here, I have a small bill 
against you, Dr. Lord." 

" A bill against me ? For what ? " 

" Why, for barbering." 

"For barbering ? I never before entered your shop." 

^That's not my fault, Dr. Lord, my shop was open!" 
This keen argument of the barber cut the conversation, and Dr. Lord 
followed suit. 

Mr. Whitefield's preaching was greatly blessed in Connecticut and 
New ^ York States, and he often found more sympathy among the 
Baptists than among either Presbyterians or Congregationalists, though 
some of the latter consorted with him. A remarkable sermon was 
given by the great preacher at the parsonage house, Centre Groton. 
The upper windows of the house were removed, and a platform raised 
in front, facing a large yard full of forest trees. When Whitefield 
passed through the window to this stand, he saw a number of young 
men who, like Zacchaeus at Jericho, were perched on the limbs of the 
trees. At that time it was no unusual thing, under his preaching, for 
a secret irresistible influence to descend on the congregation. The 
multitude would surge to and fro, a cry of agony would arise ; many 



70 ANECDOTES OF EARLY AMERICAN BAPTISTS. 

would fall to the earth in a state of unconsciousness, and then as 
suddenly awake full of ecstatic joy. The kind-hearted preacher asked 
them to come down, saying : — " Sometimes the power of God falls on 
these occasions, and takes away the might of strong men. I wish to 
benefit your souls, and not have your bodies fall out of those trees." 
They came down, and several were prostrated under the sermon. 
Great numbers were converted on this occasion, and more than one of 
the young men became preachers of the gospel. 

The first Baptist Church, New York city, met in the house of 
Nicholas Eyers. He was a brewer, and a noble-minded, discreet and 
godly man. He was baptized in 1714. There were eleven other 
candidates. For fear of the rabble the baptism was to take place at 
night. The company went to the river, and five females were immersed, 
when Mr. Eyers was seized with the conviction that they were not 
acting faithfully in shunning publicity. He remembered the word 
addressed to the Master, "No man doeth anything in secret, when he 
himself seeketh to be known openly." He therefore consulted the other 
candidates, and they agreed to postpone their baptism until the morning. 
Mr. E. then waited on the governor with a request for protection, which 
he not only gave, but went with many respectable citizens and witnessed 
the ordinance, remarking, " This was the ancient manner of baptizing, 
and is, in my opinion, much preferable to the practice of modern times." 
Mr. Eyers afterwards got his house licensed for worship, and he was 
chosen the first pastor of the church. 

John Gano has been named in a previous article. His grandfather 
Francis Gano was a French Huguenot, and had to fly from Guernsey, 
in consequence of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. He settled in 
New York state. John's father resided at Hopewell, New Jersey, 
where John was born in 1727. After his ordination, he was sent by 
the Philadelphia Association on a mission to the South. While in the 
back settlements of Virginia, he overheard the family with whom he 
lodged saying, "This man talks like one of the Joneses." On inquiry 
he found the "Joneses" lived about twenty miles off, their peculiarity 
being that " they did nothing but pray and talk about Jesus." He 
determined to see his own likeness, as he said. So, the next day he rode 
over. He found a large family — Welsh, we might gather, from the 
name — some of whom had been recently converted. They were 
engaged in worship. The sick father was lying before the fire, groaning 
with pain, and Gano accosted him by saying : — 

" How are you ? " 

" Oh ! I am in great pain," said the sick man. 

" I am glad of it," said Gano. 

" What do you mean ? " said the old man, somewhat excited. 

"I mean," said he, " that whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth.' r 
The old man at once fell in love with him. 

Gano reached North Carolina in company with another young man. 
Arriving at a plantation, they were invited to stay all night. 

" Are you a trader ? " the planter asked of the young preacher. 

" Yes," was his reply. 

" And how do you succeed ?," 

" Not so well as I could wish." 



ANECDOTES OF EARLY AMERICAN BAPTISTS. 71 

u Perhaps your goods do not suifc ?" said the planter. 
"No one has complained of them/' Gano replied. 
" Probably you set your price too high ?" 

" No," said Gano, " these are my terms : If gold tried in the fire — yea,, 
that which is better than fine gold, wine and milk, durable riches and 
righteousness — if these will suit you, you may have them without 
money and without price." 

" Oh ! " said the planter, " I believe you are a minister." 
Gano gave him proof of this by declaring unto him the freeness and 
fulness of the grace of Christ. 

When Gano reached Charleston, he had to preach for a Mr. Hart. 
There was a large congregation, and a " brilliant audience," among 
whom were twelve ministers, one of them being Mr. Whitefield. A 
momentary fear of man came upon him, and then he thought, "I have 
none to fear and obey, but God," and he was strengthened. On his 
return to North Carolina during the French war he was informed that he 
was to be seized as a spy. When he reached the place where he was told 
he would be arrested, he stopped at the inn, and asked if the people 
could come to hear a sermon on a week-day. The landlord told him 
there was to be a general muster for the county. Gano, instead of 
stealing off, sent to the Colonel who was to arrest him, to ask if it 
would be agreeable to him to have a short sermon addressed to the 
regiment before military duty. The Colonel accepted the proposal, and 
the men gave profound attention, excepting one man, whom Gano 
censured for his conduct. The Colonel thanked the preacher, rebuked 
the man, and Gano went on his way. 

On reaching the Blue Ridge, a storm overtook him, and he entered a 
house for shelter. The owner asked him if he was a " press-master," 
he said he was. The man was alarmed and asked if he took married 
ones. Gano assured him he did. that his Master's service was good, 
with high wages, and he wanted him to enlist, and his wife and children 
also. He then exhorted him to volunteer to serve the Lord Jesus. 

After various changes, Gano settled at New York city, where he 
remained twenty-five years, and saw many trials, but great blessing on 
his ministry. 

When the War of Independence was over, and Washington proclaimed 
peace, there were great rejoicings. After the proclamation was made, 
followed by three huzzas, John Gano gave thanks to Almighty God 
for his mercy, and an anthem was rendered by voices and instruments. 
Gano died in 1804. 

A remarkable incident in connection with the War of Independence 
is told in relation to Colonel Joab Houghton. While proceeding to 
the Baptist meeting-house at Hopewell, New Jersey, he met a messenger 
with the news of the defeat at Lexington. He kept silence until the 
service was ended, and then, in the open lot, told the story of the 
cowardly proceedings of the royal troops, the retreat of Percy, and the 
gathering of the pilgrims around the hills of Boston. Then, pausing, 
and looking over the silent crowd, he said slowly : " Men of New 
Jersey, the red coats are murdering our brethren in New England. 
Who follows me to Boston ? " Every man in the audience stepped out 
into line, and cried, " I ! " 



72 ANECDOTES OF EARLY AMERICAN BAPTISTS. 

Colonel Houghton fought through the war. He was every way a 
valiant man. A band of marauding Hessians had entered a house at 
More's Hill, New Jersey, for plunder, stacking their arms at the door. 
The colonel seized their arms, and made the leader and a dozen men 
prisoners, almost in sight of the British army. 

The Colonel was a member of the Hopewell Baptist church, and died 
in 1793. 

Dr. Shepherd, of Stathens, a young physician, visiting a patient, got 
hold of Norcott's book on Baptism. He read it, and became a Baptist, 
and subsequently a pastor, presiding over a church at Brentwood, New 
Hampshire, which had twelve branch meeting-houses and four hundred 
and forty-three members. 

The church at Newport, New Hampshire, worshipped in a barn beside 
a river. Thomas Baldwin the Good, as he was called, once preached 
there, when such a divine power was realized that the meeting continued 
till quite late at night. Mr. Baldwin had to ride all night to meet an 
engagement in the morning. Mounting his horse, and picking his way 
through the forest, he mused over the hallowed meeting in the barn. 
The fire burned, and he began to sing. The words were the well known 
American hymn, which then sprang, as it were, to his lips : — 

" From whence doth this union arise, 
That hatred is conquered by love ? " 

We have not exhausted our list of anecdotes ; but our paper will only 
admit of two more, which may be taken as points of contrast. 

Morgan Edwards went from Wales to New York in 1761. Landing 
one morning, he thought he would try and find a Baptist. He 
wandered up and down, and looked here and there, but could discern no 
trace of one. At length he saw an old man sitting in his doorway, 
with a red cap. He thought, " This is an old inhabitant, I will ask 
him." "Can you tell me, sir, where any Baptists live in this city ? " 
" Baptists ! Baptists ! " said the old man, musingly. " Baptists, I 
really don't know as I ever heard of anybody of that occupation in 
these parts." Times have changed since then. 

There was a great revival in Georgia in the years 1812-13, 1820, and 
1827. Between fifteen thousand and twenty thousand were added to the 
church. This was promoted greatly by the labours of Dr. Adiel 
Sherwood, who preached with power from on high. One Lord's- 
day he preached before an association at Antioch, Morgan county. The 
power of the Lord came down. At the close of the sermon he asked all 
who wished for the prayers of the assembly to present themselves. A 
young gentleman of high standing and culture was the first. He was 
afterwards known as Dr. John E. Dawson, a brilliant, pathetic, and 
useful preacher. It is estimated that four thousand people that day 
sought the prayers of the church, and that sixteen thousand persons, 
directly or indirectly, were gathered in in two years as the result of 
that sermon. Oh, for seasons like the past ! Lord, send them ! 

R. Shindler. 






73 



t &mi\m$ §ook $uvfo. 



THE history of the rise and progress of "Mrs. Spurgeon's Book 
Fund and its Work " must be familiar to most of the readers of 
The Sword and the Troivel. If there are any who are still unacquainted 
with the narrative, we should advise them to procure the charming 
volume in which the Founder of the Fund herself tells the story of its 
commencement, and of its loving and beneficent ministry during the 
first ten years of its existence.* 

In the last Annual Report of her work, Mrs. Spurgeon wrote : — 

" It has always been a grief to me that I have to limit my grants to one 
class of men — poor pastors of churches. I dare not extend the work beyond 
them, or my strength would utterly fail. But the need of books is felt by 
workers of all conditions, and in scores of cases a gift of suitable volumes to 
a devoted lay-preacher would bring in a splendid interest of glory to God, 
and gracious influence over poor sinners. There are the ' Local Preachers,' 
for instance ; a grand body of men, doing noble service for the Lord, worthy 
of all sympathy and help ; yet I have to refuse their applications, because 
my work is already so heavy and pressing that, to open the Fund to any 
but poor pastors, must practically result in the closing of it to everybody. 

" Listen to the pleading of one of these good men, and then join me in 
asking the Lord to raise up a friend, who will do for them what God has 
enabled me to accomplish during the past twelve years for those who have 
the care of the churches: — 'I write you,' he says, 'on behalf of poor 
" locals," who, I understand, are outside the pale of your Fund. Would it 
were not so ; for I feel we are, of all workers, the most forgotten ! Many 
of us are poor in purse, and short of time, and in need of teaching ; yet we 
do our best to quit us like men. We walk many miles, preach often, and. 
endeavour to glorify the Master in the salvation of souls. Oh, that we 
could have a share in this blessed book- distribution ! If it is so great a 
boon to our brethren in the recognized ministry, how much greater a 
benefit would it confer on us, who have to labour with our hands for the 
bread which perisheth, and, in consequence, have so little spare time to study 
and ponder God's Word! ' 

"This is a real cry for help; will it touch the heart of any who can 
respond to it ? " 

The cry for help did touch the heart of one who could respond to it, 
as will be seen from the following extracts from a letter signed by Mr. 
Sydney S. Bagster, of the Conference Hall, Mildmay Park : — 

" Dear Mrs. Spurgeon, 

" Have you received a response to pages 9 and 10 of ' The Book 
Fund and its Work, 1887 ' ? If not, I should like to offer to take up the 
work you there suggest should be done by some one. 

" I will note a few points : — 

"1. My own work as a (so-called) layman, engaged in preaching and 
teaching, with my affection for the contents of my own bookshelves, leads 
me to a lively sense of the needs of those so engaged, but not so provided 
as I am ; while my eager welcome to any addition to my treasures leads 
me to realize somewhat the joy of those poorer than myself at the sight of 
a helpful book. 

" 2. My hearty sympathy with old-fashioned theology would lead me to 

* " Ten Years of my Life in the Service of the Book Fund : being a Grateful Record 
of my Experience of the Lord's Ways, and Work, and Wages." By Mrs. C. H. 
Spurgeon. Third Edition. Sixth Thousand. Price 3s. 6d. In superior binding, gilt 
edges, with new Portrait and Autograph. Price 5s. Passmore and Alabaster. 



74 THE AUXILIAEY BOOK FUND. 

follow closely tlie lines of ' The Book Fund,' save that The Treasury of 
David would be beyond the loftiest aspirations of a ' local ' ; or, at least, 
only in special circumstances could one be thus enriched. 

" 3. I need hardly say that, while myself a Baptist, no distinction what- 
ever would be made as to the applicant's denomination. 

u 4. The question of funds I do not feel would be a difficulty, as one 
would only use what was given, assured that the Giver would not fail to 
give as much as he thought enough. 

# # fc * * 

"7. Will you let me know whether my offer meets with the approval 
of the Founder of ' The Book Fund,' and whether she would assent to the 
formation of an ' Auxiliary Book Fund,' to make grants to preachers (other 
than pastors) whose means are too small to permit of their purchasing ? " 

To this communication Mrs. Spurgeon replied : — 

" Dear Sir, — Your letter gladdens my heart exceedingly, and I thank the 
Lord for inclining your mind to this important and much-needed work. I 
note with joy your purpose to keep to the ' old-fashioned ' truths, and to 
make your work unsectarian, and I wish you ' God speed ' with all the hope 
inspired by the fulfilment of a long-cherished desire. Yes, you are quite 
right, the Lord will send you the means to carry out the work he gives you 
to do, and a perfect trust in him will bring all needful help. I shall be 
delighted to render you any assistance in my power ; and if you will tell me 
when and hoiu you propose to commence work, I will turn my promise into 
a performance. 

"Se «\» Sr 7? «? 

"No one else has ' offered himself willingly' for this work — I bless the Lord 
that yon have done so. May his sweet and gracious dealings with me be 
repeated in your happy experience ! I feel almost too glad and thankful 
to be able to express myself as I would — I am overwhelmed with the 
goodness of the Lord in thus granting me the desire of my heart. 

" Yours very sincerely, 

" (Mrs. C. H.) Susie Spurgeon." 

Notices of the proposed work were sent- to The Christian, Word and 
Work, and Service for the King ; and as the result of the publicity thus 
given, applications came, and the distribution of books commenced. 
One of the earliest applicants was a provincial city missionary, who 
wrote : — 

"I shall be most pleased and grateful for any books you may be kind 
enough to send me, having a rather long family (seven children), and one 
an invalid, not able to stand, also having to help my aged mother." 

Another of the same noble army of Christian workers gave these 
reasons why he should have a grant from the Auxiliary Book Fund : — 

" I have four meetings a week in my mission-room. I find I have to keep 
pegging away to get a little fresh food for the people. It is such a difficulty 

to buy a new book I make and mend the boots for the family, and 

get up early in the morning ; even then I never hardly think of buying 
books. But, bless the Lord, I am happy in my work, I love it ! " 

On receiving a parcel, the good man thus expressed his gratitude for 
the books : — 

" I do appreciate them, and will try and profit by them. I have seen The 
Treasury of David several times ; I think it is lovely. If ever your fund 
gets rich and strong, and you are moved to send it to me, I should be so- 
thankful." 

A third provincialcity missionary applied as follows : — 



THE AUXILIARY BOOK FUND. 75 

"At present I have to preach twice every Sunday, and, on an average, 
three times during the week, to the same people. Thus I find it rather 
difficult to present new matter at each service. In fact, I am feeling it to 
be a great mental and physical strain. Furthermore, I have charge of the 

carriage- works, and every week have to address at least five hundred 

men." 

A parcel was sent, and the recipient's thanks for the books were thus 
recorded : — 

" I shall carefully and prayerfully read them, and do my best to person- 
ally appropriate all that is good within them ; and, by God's help, 
endeavour to communicate the good I receive to those among whom I 

labour." 

# *• * $ a- 

The next two letters are from workers in connection with the 
Established Church : — 

" I am very poor, of humble origin, and have had to fight my own battle 
in the world from the time that I was between fifteen and sixteen years of 
age. After having been brought to a knowledge of the truth as it is in 

Jesus, under the ministry of , I felt an intense desire to enter the 

ministry. [After mentioning the removal of difficulties, and his entering 
College, he says : — ] I hope shortly to be ordained to the ministry in the 
Church of England ; but in going through this College course, all my little 
means have been entirely swallowed up. I have had to purchase many 
books which will be utterly useless in my ministry ; and, now, laying myself 
open to mission- work, I find great difficulty in preparing for it." 

" I have charge of one mission -church near here, and preach there twice 
each week ; and on Saturday we open another mission-room, where I shall 
also have two sermons each week. I am also trying to get up a meeting 
for working-men one night a week." 

In acknowledging the receipt of the parcel that was sent to him, this 
good brother writes : — 

" I have had such a delicious revel amongst the sermons every spare 
moment since I received them ; and I felt very much fresher for Sunday. 
I am now saving my mites for a Commentary ; but with a sick wife and two 
children, I shall need a great amount of patience." 

•J* «S* Jft J* «?* 

An evangelist, applying for a grant, and explaining his financial 
position, says : — 

" When a station is not self-supporting, we receive a salary of 18s. per 
week. We have 4s. 2d. to pay for rent. I am married, and have two little 
girls, who cost Is. a week for schooling. After paying rent and schooling, 
we have 12s. lOd. to live on and find clothes. This we have managed with^. 
but I have been hindered very much by not being able to purchase books." 

* # $ •& ■& 

Many local preachers apply to Mrs. Spurgeon for books, although it 
has been frequently stated that her grants must be limited to pastors in 
actual charge of churches. These applications are now all forwarded to 
Mr. Bagster. The following letter from a warm-hearted Welshman was 
thus sent, and on receipt of the parcel from the Auxiliary he wrote to 
Mrs. Spurgeon the second note : — 

" I am like Ishmael in the wilderness, unable to procure water, and dying 
of thirst, unable to procure that which is essential ; but, thanks be to God, 
that there is a Hagar who has found a well at ' Westwood,' which has 



76 THE AUXILIARY BOOK FUND. 

quenched the parched tongues and thirsty souls of thousands of Ishmaels ! 
My prayer is that the well will never run dry, but continue to pour out 
living water to thirsty souls, and that you will have health and strength to 
perform the heavy and arduous duties which have proved a blessing to many 
of God's servants." 

" I am at a loss to find words to express my thanks to you for your kind- 
ness, and I may say that the meeting between your books and myself was 
of the same description as that of Jacob and Joseph ; my heart was full, 
and no words can express that feeling. I have only 22s. per week, and a 
wife and four children, and I have had one of my little ones ill this four 
months, but I am pleased to say that the Lord has restored him." 

•&S- »£ 3? '£ «r 

We can only spare the space for a few of the letters of thanks that 
have been received from those to whom grants have been made. The 
following will give a fair idea of the way in which the recipients express 
their gratitude : — 

"I beg to acknowledge the receipt of the parcel of books to hand on 
Saturday, with very many thanks to you and the kind donor, Mrs. Spurgeon. 
They are beautiful, and will be very helpful. I prize them highly, and 
shall peruse them carefully As a lay preacher, I have conducted 2,298 
Sabbath services, and travelled 13,995 miles in attending them. About 300 
of the Sabbath services have been held in our own town, besides a large 
number of week- evening services." 

" Mr. Spurgeon's Sermon-Notes I value very much ; it is just the kind of 
thing I need. The books are all fresh to me, and are of a character fitted. 

undoubtedly, to help. I often take one of the services at , and I 

shall use Mr. Spurgeon's Sermon- Notes pretty freely ; there is plenty of grip 
in them. The trajectories of Mr. Spurgeon's missiles are low,* and con- 
sequently hit pretty frequently." 

"Parcel of books to hand, which I must say I am delighted with. By 
God's help, I trust they will not only make me wise to win souls, but to 
build them up in the knowledge of God. I do thank God there are such 
kind-hearted Christians as Mrs. Spurgeon and others, who are ever ready to 
help the needy. May God's richest blessings rest upon all who are support- 
ing this good work ! The books are more than one could expect, but it is 
the Lord's doings. They are a definite answer to prayer." 

" My heart is filled with joy in receiving your very kind parcel of books, 
such a very nice Concordance, and all the other books. I do like to read and 
also to have, Mr. Spurgeon's books ; they are always so fresh. Please to 
accept my heartfelt thanks, and may the Lord speed and bless you in this 
your work for him in cheering his servants ! ' ' 

" I most heartily thank you. I regard them as priceless treasures; even 
the sight of these books does me good. They are just the books that afe 
likely to be a very great help to me. My Sermon- Notes, Lectures to my 
Students, and Farm Sermons are books that I have long coveted ; but I had 
no idea that I should have the pleasure of saying that I have got the long- 
coveted prize in possession." 

" I feel most thankful to you for the trouble you have taken in selecting 
such a good and profitable assortment ; they are quite suitable to my 
situation." [This applicant, in a previous letter, explains that for upwards 
of forty years he has laboured for the Lord as a Sunday-school teacher 
and local preacher.] " My living," he says, " is rather precarious, it being 
obtained by buying, selling, and repairing second-hand boots and shoes." 

* We hope the good brother does not talk like this when he is preaching. In the 
books sent to him he will probably see that short, simple, Saxon words will " hit " where 
long Latinized expressions "pretty frequently " miss the mark. 



THE AUXILIARY BOOK FUND. 



77 



Friends will see from these letters that there is great need of books 
among local preachers, and that they are heartily grateful that an 
Auxiliary Book Fund has been started with the object of supplying 
their wants. No register of the denominations to which the applicants 
belong has been kept, but grants have been sent to Baptists, Bible 
Christians, Congregationalists, Episcopalians, " Joyful News " Evan- 
gelists, and Methodists of various sections. Some have been pastors in all 
but the name ; others, city missionaries, evangelists, Scripture-readers, 
or students still in College. The distribution of books commenced on 
May 1st, 1888, and from that time until December 31st, 126 grants 
had been made, comprising 1,142 volumes : — 
97 "Lectures to my Students." 

155 " My Sermon-Notes." 

218 other books by Mr. Spurgeon. 

672 books by other authors. 

Mrs. Spurgeon has given £50 worth of books to the Auxiliary, and 
has also forwarded a large quantity of second-hand books given or 
offered to her by various friends. The cash account for the nine months, 
from April to December, is as follows : — 



Dr. Eeceipts. 

£ s. d. 
To Two Donations . . 25 
,, Sale of Old Books, and 

Stamps for Carriage 2 15 6 



£27 15 6 



Expenditure. Cr. 

£ s. d. 
By Purchase of Books and 

Tracts .. . . 24 13. 9 

, , Postages, Stationery, 

and Carriage . . 2 18 11 

,, Balance carried to 

1889 . . . . 2 10 



£27 15 6 



Mr. Bagster wishes us to say that all applications for grants are taken 
in rotation ; and therefore, as he is a busy man, sometimes weeks may 
elapse before parcels are sent ; but so long as the books and funds at 
his disposal will permit, he will attend to all duly-certified applicants 
who comply with the conditions laid down for the proper workiDg of 
the Auxiliary. 

The conditions attached to grants of books are : — 

1st. Only laymen who are regular and habitual preachers are eligible ► 

2nd. No person is eligible who can afford to purchase for himself. 

3rd. In each case reference is required to some one — usually a minister— 
who will endorse the applicant's statement as to the 1st condition, and also 
state that, in his opinion, the applicant comes within the 2nd condition. 

No names or addresses of those to whom grants are made will be 
published. 

All communications needing a reply should contain a stamp. 

The carriage of parcels by railway or carrier is not prepaid by the Fund. 

Applications to be made by letter only, addressed : — 

Mr. S. S. Bagster, 25, Newington Green, London, N. 

It only remains for us to thank Mr. Bagster for having taken up this 
much-needed service for the Lord's poor preachers, and to wish for him 
as much success and blessing in his work as the beloved Manager of 
the Book Fund has found in hers during the past thirteen years. 



78 

DR. GEIKIE has become quite a worthy successor of John Kitto, 
who, in the earlier years of this century, won a well-deserved 
reputation as a writer who understood the art of making Bible subjects 
interesting to young persons and general readers. As regards the 
popular attractiveness of his style, Dr. Kitto had few equals in his own 
day; and, in his own department, Dr. Geikie has no superior in his. 
The books he has published are fine examples of good scholarship 
popularized ; and next to his elaborate " Life of Christ," his last work 
will probably rank as the most useful that he has produced. In the 
most comprehensive sense, it is a book of illustrations gathered fresh 
in Palestine itself ; so that while ordinary readers find plenty of enter- 
tainment, teachers and preachers have a rich treasure-house of material 
which they may explore with delight and use with good effect. " I 
visited Palestine," says the author, " with the intention of gathering 
illustrations of the sacred writings from its hills and valleys, its rivers 
and lakes, its plains and uplands, its plants and animals, its skies, its 
soil, and, above all, from the pictures of ancient times still presented on 
every side in the daily life of its people." No author ever more com- 
pletely carried out his design ; and no reader is likely to be disappointed 
with the result. The readiest way of giving the reader an idea of the 
quality of the Doctor's work will be to make a few extracts. Here is a 
picture of the present condition under Turkish rule of 

TANTURAH IN (LESAREA. 

It cannot be said that this neighbourhood is a very inviting one to 
the traveller, the natives being so savage and rude that their local feuds 
often give great trouble. Eock-hewn tombs are common, but the only 
use to which they are now put seems to be to hide away the bodies of 
men who have been robbed and killed. In one case Captain Conder 
found in an old Jewish tomb six corpses, belonging apparently to 
strangers recently murdered. The number of skulls and bones in other 
tombs, he adds, astonished him, till he found that many of them were 
fractured, and was told that they had belonged to persons murdered by 
the villagers. 

MELONS AT MUKHALID. 

It is in the heart of the chief melon-growing district of Palestine, 
and must present a striking scene when the crop is being harvested. 
Hundreds of camels then wait their turn to be loaded with the huge 
fruit, or stalk away with a full burden of it. Peasants in their white 
turbans and skirts, the latter duly girt round them by a leather strap, 
assiduously gather the different kinds of melons, while the tents of the 
tax-collectors, pitched in the fields, show that these oppressors are on 
the look-out to lay a heavy hand on the produce, for the Government. 
How is it that great vegetable globes, like these melons, so full of 
water, thrive thus wondrously on so hot and sandy a soil ? The camel- 

* The Holy Land and the Bible. A Book of Scripture Illustrations gathered in 
Palestine. By Cuuningham Geikie, D.D., Vicar of St. Martin's-at-Palace, Norwich. 
Cassell & Co., two vols., price 24s. 






THE HOLY LAND AND THE BIBLE. 79 



loads of them taken to the shore fill a thousand boats each summer. 
Indeed, if it were not for fear of the Bedouins, there need be no limit 
to the quantity grown. 

EASTERN TOWNS. 

No one who has not seen an oriental town can imagine its filthiness. 
The mud houses crumble into dust at a given rate daily, and all the 
garbage, offal, and foulness of daily life are thrown into the narrow 
lane, where the dust-hill is too far off. Rivulets of abomination soak 
out from a hole made for their escape at the side of each door. Nor is 
this the only kind of filth. There are no scavengers, and there is no 
decency. 

THE MORTALITY OF CHILDREN. 

More than a third of the children in Palestine, I was told, die in 
infancy, which is no wonder ; so ignorant are the people, and so dirty 
and unsanitary are their houses. Ophthalmia is epidemic, with blind- 
ness as its frequent result. 

THE CURSE OF THE TURKISH RULE. 

The hope of the peasant at Ascalon, that some of the Frank nations 
would soon come and take Palestine, is common to the whole population. 
Turkish government consists simply in collecting the taxes and quelling 
tumults, which often break out through oppression. The crops are 
assessed before the harvest, and are frequently left till over-ripe, the 
owner having to bribe the official with a larger share of them, to secure 
his coming in time to save what is left, before all the grain falls out of 
the dry ears. The taxes, moreover, are fixed without any regard to the 
amount of the crops, good years and bad having to pay alike, though 
nothing be left to the poor tiller of the ground. Bashi-Bazouks are 
sent out to gather the grain, or fruit claimed by Government, a fact 
that helps one to realize the extortion and villainy that follow. The 
Turk is the king of the locusts, his officials their desolating army. If 
the Kaimacan, or Governor, goes out with the soldiers, he and his 
followers must be fed and housed in the best style at the cost of the 
village. The soldiers also live at free quarters, and fleece the unhappy 
peasants at their will. 

BEIT JIBRIN. 

The town has an evil name, its population of well -grown, muscular 
men, who are thus very different from the peasants of other parts, being 
bold and insolent, though industrious, as a whole, and comparatively 
well-to-do. The father of the sheikh at whose side I sat had been a 
ruffian of the worst kind, the terror of the neighbourhood and of the 
townsmen. Tales of monstrous crimes committed by him were rife. It 
is said that if he heard of a man having married a handsome wife, he 
would invite the two to his house, and if he fancied the girl, would stab 
the husband on the spot, and make the widow marry him forthwith. 
Till his death no traveller dared visit Beit Jibrin, and the traders from 
Hebron would not venture to come near it with their goods. The Turks, 
however, have brought down the pride of the house since his death, for 
the family are now much reduced, as the ruinous condition of parts of 
the rough mansion showed. 



80 THE HOLY LAND AND THE BIBLE. 

THE MIRAGE.* 

About noon, the most perfect deception that can be conceived exhila- 
rated our spirits, and promised an early resting-place. We had observed 
a slight mirage two or three times before, but this day it surpassed all 
that I had ever fancied. Although aware that these appearances often 
led people astray, I could not bring myself to believe that this was 
unreal. The Arabs were doubtful, and said that as we had found water 
yesterday, it was not improbable we should find some to-day. The 
seeming lake was broken in several parts by little islands of sand, which 
gave strength to the delusion. The dromedaries of the sheikhs at length 
reached its borders, and appeared to us to have commenced to ford, as 
they advanced and became more surrounded by the vapour. I thought 
they had got into deep water, and moved with greater caution. In 
passing over the sand-banks their figures were reflected in the water. 
So convinced was Mr. Calmun of its reality, that he dismounted, and 
walked towards the deepest part of it, which was on their right hand. 
He followed the deceitful lake for a long time, and to our sight was 
strolling on its bank, his shadow stretching to a great length beyond. 
There was not a breath of wind ; it was a sultry day, and such a one 
as would have added dreadfully to the disappointment if we had been 
at any time without water. 

A STREET IN JERUSALEM. 

A few steps down David Street — the lane leading east and west from 
Joppa Gate to the Temple enclosure — brings you to Christian Street, 
which runs north ; and close to this, on the under side, is the Church 
of the Holy Sepulchre. But what would any one think of the street 
called after the hero king of Israel, if suddenly set down at the end it ? 
It is a lane rather than a street, with houses, for the most part only two 
storeys high, on each side, the lower one being given up to shops — if 
you can call such dens by so respectable a name. Over the doors a con- 
tinuous narrow verandah of wood, built at a slant into the houses, 
gives shade to the goods ; but when it was put up, or repaired in any 
way, is an insolvable historical problem. Its condition, therefore, may 
be easily fancied. The causeway of the street is equally astonishing ; 
for even a donkey, most sure-footed of animals, stops, puts its nose to 
the ground, and makes careful calculations as to the safe disposition of 
its feet, before it will trust them to an advance. No wonder there are 
no people in the streets after dark ; without a lantern they would 
infallibly sprain their ankles, or break a leg, each time they were rash 
enough to venture out. But during the day the stream of many-coloured 
life flows through this central artery of the holy city in a variety fco be 
found, perhaps, nowhere else. 

AN ANCIENT UNDERGROUND CITY.f 

I visited old Edrei — the subterranean labyrinthine residence of King 
Og — on the east side of the Zamle hills. Two sons of the sheikh of 
the village — one fourteen, and the other sixteen years of age — 

* Dr. Geikie quotes Major Skinner's description of this phenomenon, 
f Dr. Geikie quotes Consul-General Wetstein's description of one of these wonderful 
relics of antiquity. 



HOTEL BEAU RIVAGE, MENTONE. 81 

accompanied me. We took with us a box of matches and two candles. 
After we had gone down the slope for some time, we came to a dozen 
rooms, which, at present, are used as goat-stalls and store-rooms for 
straw. The passage became gradually smaller, until at last we were 
compelled to lie down flat, and creep along. This extremely difficult 
and uncomfortable process lasted for about eight minutes, when we 
were obliged to jump down a steep wall, several feet in height. Here I 
noticed that the younger of my two attendants had remained behind, 
being afraid to follow us ; but, probably, it was more from fear of the 
unknown European than of the dark and winding passages before us. 

We now found ourselves in a broad street, which had dwellings on 
both sides of it, whose height and width left nothing to be desired. 
The temperature was mild, the air free from unpleasant odours, and I 
felt not the smallest difficulty in breathing. Further along, there were 
several cross streets, and my guide called my attention to a hole in the 
ceiling for air, like three others which I afterwards saw, (now) closed 
up from above. Soon after we came to a market-place ; where, for a 
long distance, on both sides of a pretty broad street, there were 
numerous shops in the walls, exactly in the style of" the shops that w r ere 
seen in Syrian cities. After a while we turned into a side street, 
where a great hall, whose roof was supported by four pillars, attracted 
my attention. The roof, or ceiling, was formed of a single slab of 
jasper, perfectly smooth and of immense size, in which I could not 
perceive the slightest crack. The rooms, for the most part, had no 
supports; the doors were often made of a single square stone; and here 
and there I also noticed fallen columns. After we had crossed several 
cross-alleys and streets, and before we had reached the middle of the 
subterranean city, my attendant's light went out. As he was lighting 
again by mine, it occurred to me that possibly both our lights might be 
put out, and I asked the boy if he had any matches. "No," he replied, 
M my brother has them." " Could you find your way back if the lights 
were put out ? " " Impossible," he replied. For a moment I began to 
be alarmed at this under- world, and urged an immediate return. 
Without much difficulty, we got back to the market-place, and from 
there the youngster knew the way well enough. Thus, after a sojourn 
of more than an hour and a half in this labyrinth, I greeted the light 
of day. 



H0M §mu §p&ap, Ipnte* 

WE present our readers with the likeness of the homely, quiet hotel in 
which for several years it has been our great privilege to enjoy rest and 
Christian fellowship. Dr. Sewell, a courteous Canadian physician, residing 
in the hotel, was good enough to invite us, with Mr. Passmore, to stand upon 
his balcony while he took a view from below. The doctor was in the pursuit 
of photographs under difficulties in this case ; but he has succeeded, and we 
are grateful for the result. The nearness of the house to the road prevents 
its being made into an effective picture, especially as the road itself is narrow ; 
and then you have the sea, which is too skittish to furnish a foundation for a 
camera in which to take an instantaneous picture. Foreground on this 
and other grounds is out of the question. Our own apartments, on the first 

c 



<?9 



HOTEL BEAU RIVAdE, 31EXTONE. 



floor on the right, are, so far as this picture is concerned, completely veiled 
by the palms ; but that is not actually the case ; we are not among the palms 
yet, but far more among the buffetings. A good deal, therefore, must be left 
to imagination before one arrives at the actual fact. " Things are not what 
they seem " ; and the best photograph on earth can do no more than tell us 
" what they seem." In this instance things are better than they seem, and 
the hotel within surpasses the promise of its exterior. To us it seems as 
if the kindest and best people in all the world have been sojourning in this 
hostelry for the last three months, and that they have each one been more 




thoughtful and sympathetic than every other. Until we came " down with a 
crash " our morniug gathering for prayer at 9.30, and the reading through the 
Gospel of John, were bright beginnings of happy days. We were all there, 
and all there in time ; and the Lord himself was with us indeed, and of a 
truth. Looking out upon the ever-changing sea, and ever feeling the joy 
of the unchanging God, this hotel has been to us none other than the house of 
God. It makes no pretensions to grandeur or vastness ; but the host and 
hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Bernhard, devote themselves to the comfort of their 
guests, and those who have once come under their roof are very apt to return 
thither. The good people have no notion of our putting them into the 
magazine ; but we hope they will forgive us for our kind intent. — C. H. S. 



I 



83 



ffrta of §00fes. 



"Not Weary in Well-Doing ;" or, the 
Life and Work of Mrs. Helen 
Lockhart Gibson. By her Husband. 
With Preface by Dr. A. A. Bonar. 
Sirnpkin, Marshall and Co. 

This is a memoir which we recommend 
enthusiastically. Our subscribers must 
not be content with our brief note, but 
must buy the book. It is well written, but 
the value of it lies in what was written 
and done by this most exemplary 
woman herself. The gospel was her 
life, her food, her beauty, and her joy. 
She seemed to be good at everything : 
visiting, conversation, writing, giving 
addresses, and household manage- 
ment : she failed in nothing, for she 
did it with all her heart, resting in the 
Lord. There are no adventures in her 
life, no fine speculations, no great 
flourishes : she was a simple believer, 
living in her Lord and for him. It has 
been like waiting at the wells of Elim 
to read her biography, and we rise 
refreshed from it ; therefore we feel 
that we can hardly put upon paper all 
that we feel. This holy woman shone 
as a lamp on earth, and she now shines 
as the stars for ever and ever. 

We commend this life for its prac- 
tical value. It will direct many godly 
women in their work, and suggest to 
them what to do; how to deal with 
special cases, and how to meet pecu- 
liar difficulties. It will breed quiet 
heroines, whose faith will be unabashed 
when ridiculed, and unabated when 
confronted by obstinacy. Even in the 
minor matter of dress she was a notable 
example, and took that happy middle 
course which avoids both the slatternly 
and the gaudy. In life and in death, 
by her calm repose on Jesus and his 
Word, she was a true mother in Israel. 
Happy is her husband that he had the 
companionship of so noble a helpmeet : 
may he be comforted in his immeasur- 
able loss by the thought of her infinite 
reward. Greatly did we rejoice, when 
reading this charming book, to come 
across the following: — 

"1888. The New Year opened 
'brightly upon her, and thus she 
wrote:— 'For more than a month I 
iave had no breathlessness by night or 



by day. It is like a new world to me, 
and it is so nice to be able to run all 
over the house, and to do all my work, 
just as I used to do. I get out a great 
deal in summer, so I look forward to 
the bright days coming again.' It 
was the summer of glory, however, 
that was to burst upon her, before the 
bright days of another earthly sum- 
mer should come. Meantime she was 
brightness itself in the domestic scene. 
' As for me, I am never out ; but I am 
as happy as I can be, praising him who 
has healed me, and done so much for 
me.' ' I am as happy as I can be ' — 
yes, and with all the old winsome 
power of making others happy ! The 
few Lord's-days she was now to spend 
on earth were radiant with spiritual 
joy. When I used to return home 
after service in the church, she would, 
with beaming countenance, say, ' How 
short the time looks since you left ! I 
wondered when I heard your footstep 
at the door. I have had a service to 
myself; I sang, I prayed, I read the 
Bible, and I have had a sermon from. 
Mr. Spurgeon.' " 

It is worth working hard from day 
to day to prepare and revise sermons, 
to give to such an invalid a spiritual 
meal. There are doubtless thousands 
like her, " detained before the Lord " ; 
and the thought that our penny sermon 
furnishes them with a preacher when 
they cannot get out to the public 
assembly is more than a full reward 
for thirty-four years of continuous 
publication. 

We have enriched the magazine with 
extracts from this lady's memoir: all 
intended to whet the appetites of our 
readers, and make them buy and read 
the work. 

Professor William Graham, D.D. 
Essays : Historical and Biographi- 
cal. Edited by his Brother. With 
Personal Beminiscences by Dr. W. 
M. Taylor, of New York. Nisbet. 

These essays are exceedingly pleasant 
reading, and withal as profitable as 
pleasant. We have placed in our 
pages this month an extract from a 
lecture on Calvin and Calvinism, which 



84 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



will show the drift of Dr. Graham's 
theology. He has passed away from 
among us ; and we are glad that Dr. 
W. M. Taylor was able to seize upon 
his mantle as he was taken up from 
among us, and now exhibits it to us 
in the form of an interesting memoir. 
Our readers will excuse the mournful 
pleasure with which we subjoin the 
closing paragraphs. "Well do we re- 
member our happy meeting at the 
table of our Lord ; but we little 
dreamed that it was the closing scene 
of such a life. 

"But now these reminiscences must 
come to an end. The last time I saw 
my friend was in the month of July, 
1887. I arrived in London on Satur- 
day evening, the ninth of that month, 
intending to proceed early the next 
week to Homburg. Before I had been 
ten minutes in the hotel, Graham was 
in my room. He stayed with me till 
nearly ten o'clock; and arranged to 
meet me early next day and accompany 
me to morning service in the Metro- 
politan Tabernacle, that we might 
hear Mr. Spurgeon — which we did. 
The sermon of the great preacher that 
day was peculiarly tender. His text 
was Jacob's blessing of the sons of 
Joseph ; and as he had himself been, 
during the week, in the Essex pulpit 
that used to be occupied by his vener- 
able grandfather, his discourse was 
redolent of the experience through 
which there he had passed. It touched 
us both very deeply ; and at the close 
we went in to shake hands with the 
preacher. After a brief but cordial 
greeting, we went down with him to 
the communion service, at which Mr. 
Spurgeon seated us with the elders on 
the platform. He asked me to ' give 
thanks' over the bread, and Dr. 
Graham to ' give thanks ' over the cup ; 
and at the close of all offered a brief 
prayer himself. We had a delightful 
season ; and after it was over, Graham 
came with me to the hotel, dined, and 
spent an hour or two. Then I saw 
him take the omnibus to go to his 
friend Dr. Edmond, for whom, in the 
absence of his colleague, he was to 
preach that evening, and I went to 
worship in the Westbourne Church 
with my friend Dr. Morison. We 
hoped to see each other after my re- 



turn from a three weeks' trip on the 
Continent ; but our plans were frus- 
trated, and so that was our farewell. 
We had spoken our last word to each 
other — 

' Ah ! little thought we 'twas our last.' 
But it is pleasant to think that the 
table of the Lord was almost the last 
place at which we were together on 
earth. May we meet at the table of 
celestial communion, to be for ever 
with the Lord ! 

' ' I cannot think of him as dead ; and 
in the highest sense he is not dead, 
for to quote from the first book he 
gave me — 

1 Saints that seem to die in earth's rude 
strife, 
Only win double life ; 
They have but left our weary ways 
To live in memory here, in heaven by 
love and praise.' " 

" Through Samaria" to Galilee and the 
Jordan. By J. L. Porter, D.D. 
Nelson and Sons. 
Tins is a glorious volume: a royal 
feast for a Bible student. We speak 
from the experience of the couch of 
weariness, when we say that it is a 
rest and a refreshing to gaze upon the 
many scenes in the Holy Land so 
fairly depicted by the pencil, and 
then to read the fresh and life-like 
descriptions of Dr. Porter. However 
well acquainted the reader may be 
with Scripture countries, he will meet 
here with something which will be 
new to him, and as instructive as 
new. If you have money to spare, 
you will never grudge it upon such a 
book. 

Jeremiah: his Life and Times. By- 
Canon T. K. Cheyne. Nisbet. 

Poor Jeremiah is in the pit again, sink- 
ing in deep mire ; and, in addition, 
heavily chained. The Babylonians 
spared him ; but in this book he is in 
far worse hands than those of the 
Chaldeans. 
The Temple of Solomon. By Thomas 

Newberry. James Nisbet and Co. 

Price one shilling. 
Notes of four addresses by the ' ' Editor 
of the Englishman's Bible," to which 
work the lecturer refers us "for fuller 
and more complete information." 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



85 



Seven, the Sacred Number. By Kichakd 
Samuell. Kegan Paul and Co. 

It is well known, and widely acknow- 
ledged, that "seven" is a number 
frequently used in a mystic sense 
throughout the Holy Scriptures. 
Hence the sanction and the sanctity 
it has acquired in legend and in lore 
outside the circle of divine inspiration. 
Who among our boys and girls has 
not heard of "the seven wonders of 
the world," "the seven wise men of 
Greece," "the seven champions of 
Christendom," "the seven sleepers 
of Ephesus," and sundry stories of 
similar order ? Our author seems to 
imagine that he has wandered out of 
the beaten track, and turned up virgin 
soil ; for he says, " Not finding in any 
English work such full information on 
the subject as he wished, he deter- 
mined to seek it from the Scriptures 
themselves." Therefore he searches 
the Bible to find " sevens" ; and they 
turn up, to his intense satisfaction, in 
endless variety. His finding is that 
"number pervades nature," and 
"seven predominates in Scripture." 
Were any particular friend of ours to 
ask for a private opinion, we might 
probably whisper in his ear that his 
discovery of " heptadic occurrences of 
words and phrases," taking his figures 
for granted, may and must, in many 
instances, imply much more of coinci- 
dence than design. 

The main question with us, after all, 
is the moral of the whole work. You 
have to pick this up at odd points ; 
but we are fairly posed at the main 
issue. One little sip from the stream 
of symbols may help such of our 
young friends as read our paragraphs 
out loud for mutual edification to a 
little liveliness. Here it is — * ' There is, 
occasionally, noticeable in Scripture a 
certain connection between the num- 
bers six and seven. . . . Perhaps the 
most remarkable is in connection with 
the two genealogies of our Lord, given 
respectively by Matthew and Luke. 

It can be by no accident that 

our Lord is the sixty-sixth in descent 
from God, through Adam, in one line, 
and seventy- seventh in another. What, 
then, does it mean ? Six is man's 
number, as seven is God's; and the 
two numbers being used here, doubt- 



less point to the fact that our Lord 
was at once both Son of man and 
Son of God. So, in his very name, 
'Irjaovs Xpiaros, Jesus Christ, the human 
name, Jesous, contains six letters, and 
the official name, Christos, seven 
letters " (p. 456). 

For dilettante students of divinity, 
this farrago libelli, a very medley of 
minute manuscript, may appear de- 
lightful. It is, certainly, too discursive 
to be dreary. "Sevens" our author 
has sought after, and "sevens" he 
has found. They are strewn about 
or strung together in countless multi- 
ples and combinations. All nature 
vibrates with the symphony, all science 
repeats the echo. " Nunquam aliud 
natura, aliud sapientia dixit." In the 
study of sight or sound, you meet 
with it. Are there not seven colours 
in the sunlight, and are there not 
seven notes in music ? (p. 385). In 
the Prayer-book, as well as in the 
Pentateuch, you discover the same 
arrangement. (Appendix G compared 
with chapter I.) Chronologies and 
genealogies, of course, run in corre- 
sponding order (p. 340). On the 
sincerity of the author we cast not a 
shadow of doubt. Is there anything 
worth a groat in his discovery ? Well, 
we have carefully summed up the 
evidence, and we confidently leave the 
verdict to a competent jury of our 
subscribers. 

Bible Studies : Studies in Mark and in 
Jewish History. The International 
Sunday-school Lessons for 1889. By 
George F. Pentecost, D.D. Hod- 
der and Stoughton. 
These pages must be useful to teachers 
who wish to be prepared to meet their 
classes. They are gracious and edify- 
ing, though not very fresh or deep. 
The passage about our Lord's recep- 
tion of little children and the baptism 
of such seems rather confused to be 
written by a Baptist, and we suppose 
that Dr. Pentecost still holds Baptist 
views. It would be hard to tell from 
that paragraph what he holds : we 
cannot say that we admire dubious 
voices upon such subjects. 

Saved at Sea. By Mrs. O. F. WALTON. 
Eeligious Tract Society. 

As brisk and bracing as a sea-breeze. 



$6 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



The Disciples' Prayer : being Notes of 
Sermons on our Lord's Prayer. By 
Eev. J. M. Gibbon. Elliot Stock. 

Good things said in an original, and, 
sometimes, startling way. We have 
had to look at some sentences several 
times, for they looked awkward ; but 
on further examination we have seen 
that the author must mean right. It 
must have been lively work to hear 
these sermons on what is commonly 
called "the Lord's Prayer," but which 
is far more accurately styled "The dis- 
ciples' prayer." There is a rush and 
a dash about Mr. Gibbon's style, and 
withal a brave faithfulness, and a per- 
sonal driving home of truth, which 
we greatly admire. We should not 
subscribe to every sentence here 
written, but we feel all the better for 
making the acquaintance of this living 
and struggling book. 

The Sun of Righteousness, and the Dark 
River. By William M. Ferrar. 
Elliot Stock. 

A fairly good book, if you will only 
take the trouble to find out its merits. 
But surely a volume of over three 
hundred and sixty pages ought to 
contain a syllabus, index, or key to 
its contents. We had to make our own 
survey before we discovered whether 
it was even broken up into chapters. 
At length we ascertained the titles of 
four fresh departures, which we pen- 
cilled on the fly-leaf for our own guid- 
ance. A brief preface tells us that the 
author, avoiding controversy, simply 
and sincerely upholds the Christian 
faith, in its broad acceptation, against 
scientific scepticism, modern thought, 
and open infidelity. This is an excel- 
lent design, and we welcome into the 
field any man who comes on this 
errand. 

We became curious to know for 
whose benefit the work was com- 
piled. Obviously not for believers, to 
certify them concerning truths of 
which they are fully assured ! And, 
as obviously, not for adversaries, 
to smite them hip and thigh for in- 
vading our sacred territory. Well, 
we skimmed the surface till, at page 
1K3, we got a solution of our riddle. 
The book is chiefly intended for labour- 
ing men, who, with little leisure for 



reading, seek intellectual treats of an 
evening by listening to free-thought 
lecturers. With many such we can well 
imagine the author has met in Tas- 
mania, and he has longed to do them 
good. Nor can we think that he will 
be unsuccessful. Far be it from us 
to challenge his methods. If he opens 
his essays (notably chapters I. and 
IV.) with descriptions of the seasons,. 
or of the scenery of nature, he cer- 
tainly places his well- assorted library 
at the service of his friends by a sup- 
ply of elegant and substantial extracts 
from pure literature. This should sug- 
gest a bright idea to amateur mis- 
sioners of the gospel to rural towns 
and outlying hamlets. Intersperse 
bright passages from brilliant authors 
in your homely addresses. Jocular 
anecdotes are nearly played out : au- 
thentic history and genuine biography 
must take their place as we approach 
the twilight of a new century. The 
School Board will make it morally 
essential that teachers who, by lectures 
and other secular agencies, appeal to 
the common people of higher educa- 
tion, should do so in a nobler way 
than heretofore. The educated people 
must be regaled with wholesome food 
for the mind, and entertained with 
classic music rather than with nigger 
melodies. If this be so, there will be 
an end of much of the nonsense which 
degrades the present period, and men 
like our author will be welcomed with 
their solid teaching rather than mere 
jesters and story-tellers. 

Beyond the Stars; or, Heaven, its In- 
liabitants, Occupations, and Life. 
By Thomas Hamilton, D.D. T. 
and T. Clark. 
A good book upon a grand subject- 
If there is nothing ^startling here,, 
it is because Dr. Thomas Hamilton 
thinks more of the sobrieties of Scrip- 
ture than of the marvels of speculation. 
His writing is solid : he dissipates 
dreams, but he establishes authorized 
hopes. He deals with the famous 
passage in Peter about ' ' the spirits 
in prison," and has a blow at the 
dream of "the larger hope." Alto- 
gether, with its clear type, this is a 
book which a believer will enjoy all 
the more when he draws nearer to 
those blessed fields "beyond the stars." 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



87 



When I was a Boy in China. By Van 

Phon Lee, a Native of China, now 

resident in the United States. 

Blackie and Sons. 

A curiosity. Written by a Chinese 

youth. We already know most of the 

information, but it is curious to get 

it from a real Chinaman. The little 

book is written as one would suppose 

an Anglicized Chinese would write. 

Life's Problems, Here and Hereafter. 
An Autobiography. By George 
Turesdelle Flanders. Dickinson. 
A MAN" brought up in orthodox ways 
breaks loose from the Bible, and 
fashions a religion for himself. He is 
honest, but he is self -conceited ; for 
he prefers the infallibility of his own 
mind to the infallibility of Scripture. 
He is convinced of the immortality 
of the soul, for he sees a ghost — 
a statement quite as easily doubted 
as any revelation of Scripture. He 
believes in God, and in providence, 
and he is specially strong in his belief 
in prayer — confirmed therein by a visit 
to Ashley Down, and the reading of 
Mr. Miiller's Orphanage Reports. In 
fact, he arrives at right conclusions 
upon many points ; but his religion 
lacks the heart which mourns for sin, 
and finds comfort in the Saviour's 
death. Lacking this, to our mind, it 
lacks the vital point. If this man is 
in the way, we fear that he tumbled 
over the wall, and came not in by the 
wicket gate. Yet, looking upon him 
with all his blunderings and maunder- 
ings about the future state, we love 
him as our Lord loved the young man 
in the gospel, and we pray that he 
may yet be led to the feet of Jesus. 

This book is an interesting study to 
one confirmed in the faith, as showing 
where mere reason may wander, and 
yet again how the Bible may uncon- 
sciously sway those who think them- 
selves most free from its influence. 
To those who are not strong on their 
feet the speculations of this free-lance 
might prove a snare, and, therefore, 
we recommend them to let them alone. 
In fact, we do not recommend the book 
to anybody ; for, at its very best, it is 
but a fabric based upon the sand of 
human thought, and is not founded 
upon the rock of "Thus saith the 
Lord." 



Anecdotes of Natural History. By Rev. 
F. O. Morris. Partridge. 

Just the sort of book to keep ever 
before the eyes of our young people. 
We are glad to look it over again, and 
renew our acquaintance with Harrison 
Weir and his large circle of animal 
friends. Two shillings buys this book. 

Birds and Beasts. By Rev. J. G. Wood.. 
Shaw and Co. 

We have only to say that this is one 
of the Rev. J. G. Wood's Natural His- 
tory books, and our readers know that 
something good is before us. Being 
profusely illustrated and handsomely 
bound, this is, no doubt, prepared for 
a Christmas-box. In our young days 
we had many a box which could not 
for a moment be compared with such 
a noble volume as this. 

Crime, its Causes and Remedy. By 
L. Gordon Rylands, B. A. T. Fisher 
Unwin. 

Very sensible remarks upon crime and 
its punishment. All our parliament 
men should read it, and, indeed, all 
who regard themselves as philanthro- 
pists. Painful as the subject is, our 
author has managed to make his book 
extremely interesting. 

Lewis's Neiv Readings. Selections from 
the best Poets, Prose Writers, and 
Speakers. Lewis, Market Street, 
Manchester. 

A wonderful form of advertisement : 
a book worth a shilling is sold for a 
penny, and so the fame of Lewis, of 
Manchester, is kept ever green. The 
former selection of readings was 
cleverly made, and so is this. 

Drake and the Dons. By Rev. Richard 
Lovett, M.A. Religious Tract 
Society. 

The self-imposed task of the Editor 
to provide a really good boys' book in 
connection with the Tercentenary Cele- 
bration of the Defeat of the Spanish 
Armada has been admirably accom- 
plished. The ancient chronicles have 
been allowed to speak for themselves, 
and there is much novelty in the old- 
fashioned style. The portraits, maps, 
and illustrations are as interesting as 
the text, and the whole combined 
makes up a capital book for boys. 



88 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Bach Streets and London Slums. By 
Frederick Hastings. Eeligious 
Tract Society. 
Graphic writing, but truthful. It 
would do every godly man good to 
read and see what needs to be done, 
and must be done, before the church 
will have discharged her obligations to 
this city of millions. Altogether a re- 
markable little manual of the slums. 

Curve Pictures of London. By Alex- 
ander B. MacDowall. One shil- 
ling. Sampson Low and Co. 
An extraordinary series of diagrams, 
conveying a large amount of instruc- 
tion as to the moral and social con- 
dition of London. Leaders of armies 
need good maps of the country they 
invade : these are social maps of the 
state of our vast city. The idea is 
novel and valuable. Lovers of statis- 
tics will value the painstaking which 
has compressed so much information 
into a small space, and set it before 
the eye in squares and lines. When 
we read of a Norwich of prostitutes, 
and a Huntingdon of known criminals, 
we have a more painful idea of our 
degradation than any figures could 
convey ; and when we see the line of 
London's population overtopping that 
of Scotland, we are more appalled 
than when we only see the number 
written down in millions. 
Tempted London : Young Men. Hodder 

and Stoughton. 
We have no doubt that these articles 
were written with the best intentions ; 
but what may be the particular good 
to be compassed by their general read- 
ing we cannot tell. Our own im- 
pression is that young men are better if 
they know nothing about the vicious 
haunts of London than they ever will 
be if made fully aware of their ins- 
and-outs. Prurient literature, whose 
publication at the moment we thought 
absolutely imperative, has done more 
to defile our people than anything else 
attempted in modern times. We fear 
that the plan of reforming by giving 
publicity is of very doubtful efficacy : 
it advertises evil, and increases the 
temptation which it is supposed to ex- 
pose. This may be an old-fashioned 
notion ; but we dare not do other than 
express it, and thus our review will 



not be favourable to the sale of this 
book, though it is well meant. 

The Story of our Colonies. By H. R. 
Fox Bourne. New and revised 
edition. With six maps. John 
Hogg. 
A really important compilation. We 
know not where else one could obtain 
all this information as to our colonies. 
We do not hesitate to say that a man 
who does not know the story of our 
various dependencies is not half edu- 
cated, however fast he may jabber in 
French or in German. This should be 
read by all who think of going abroad, 
and by all who intend to stay at home. 
It is a fine volume for four-and-six. 

Romance of the Mountains. By ASCOTT 
R. Hope. John Hogg. 

What a book for boys ! Not a reli- 
gious work, but breezy and healthy, 
having, as a possible fault, the breed- 
ing of desires to climb Alpine summits 
and tempt the glacier's crevasses. 
These pages are sure to be read, for 
they are a web of stories, legends, ad- 
ventures, scenes, and so forth, in- 
finitely superior to fiction, and yet 
quite as romantic. Priced too low at 
3s. 6d. 

Short Biographies for the People. By 
Various Writers. Vol. V. Eeli- 
gious Tract Society. 
This fifth portion makes up sixty 
short and useful biographies— or shall 
we say beautiful miniature portraits ? 
Each volume costs eighteen-pence, and 
contains a world of charming instruc- 
tion concerning the lives of the best of 
our race. Each life has a portrait in 
the forefront. 

Upward and Onward : a Thought-Booh 
for the Threshold of Active Life. By 
S. W. Partridge. Partridge & Co. 
Mr. Partridge is rather a philosopher 
than a poet ; say rather, he is a little 
of each. His book has reached its 
thirteenth thousand, and has received 
genuine and well-earned tributes of 
praise. Sound sense is the life-blood 
of each line. There is no straining 
after the idiotic hypotheses of the 
period, and no decrying of the things 
on which the hopes of ages are repos- 
ing. His book will not astound, but 
it will instruct. 



89 



ftoles. 



Should this month's magazine appear to 
fall short, the Editor begs to be forgiven. 
He had all manner of promising irons in the 
fire, and hopeful designs upon the anvil ; 
but they have come to nought. A slip of 
the foot on this occasion has turned aside 
the cup from the lip. Three weeks, which 
would have been filled up with joyous inter- 
vals of writing alternating stretches of repose, 
have been dedicated to pains and patience. 
It is well, for so the Lord wills it ; but it seems 
not well as, from the Editor's uneasy chair, 
we view our untidy work, and marvel that 
we have done it at all. 

Well, if we must tell this poor little story 
— which in our small life bulges out into a 
striking incident — it happened thus : — It is 
our wont on the First Day of the week to 
break bread in memory of him who bade 
us "this do"; and this wont has been full 
of comfort and strength to the hearts of a 
little band of believers who have gathered in 
the Master's name, in the room of our hotel. 
On the last Sabbath of the year, our friend, 
Mr. Sommerville, and the friends at the Pres- 
byterian Meeting-room, held their Com- 
munion Service, and according to our 
custom our own service was absorbed 
thereby, that we might in no way divide, 
but ever unite the family of our Lord. 
Having given a word from the heart to the 
hearts of those around the table, our work 
was done. This left the Sabbath afternoon 
quite free ; and in order to enjoy as com- 
plete a rest as possible, four of us walked a 
short distance from the hotel to an empty 
villa, where we could sit, and sing, and 
read, and pray, and no one could visit us, 
because no one knew where we were. 
During that afternoon, sitting upon the 
covered balcony, we had the rolling sea 
below us, and the smiling hills around us, 
and enjoyed hearty Christian fellowship. 

The rising of a cold and blustering wind 
rendered it expedient to retire within ; and 
while the windows and doors were being 
secured on the upper story I quietly led the 
way downstairs. The stairs are amply car- 
peted in the middle ; and had I walked on 
the carpet, and kept my hand on the balus- 
trade, all might have gone well; but I 
trusted to my walking-stick ; it slipped, as it 
was most natural that it should do, upon the 
smooth marble, and down went the massive 
form which was so little prepared for the 
consequent descent. The more those who 
were present reflect upon the incident 
of that one ill step, the more are they amazed 
that it led to nothing worse. With bowed 
head the sufferer from that fall adores the 
Lord, who hath said, " Underneath are the 
everlasting arms." 

Our esteemed friend, Dr. J. R. Macduff, 
and others, have written to us of similar, 
and indeed almost identical experiences in 
connection with those luxurious man- traps — 
marble -stairways. There is room for a good 



racy article upon "the Falls of Men." In 
that production such questions might be dis- 
cussed as "Is it better for a thin man or a 
stout man to fall ? Is it better to fall back- 
ward or forward ? In what figure is it best 
to close the performance?" To us there 
was matter enough for present meditation 
in lost teeth and trembling members. Our 
dear friends were in sad concern, and we 
rallied them with a cheery word about pain- 
less dentistry, sat down upon a chair, and 
joined with them in singing praise to God 
for so special an escape. 

That Sabbath evening closed in with no 
great evil to deplore : a bruised knee seemed 
to be the only evil token. Soon the Scripture, 
which assures us that, if one member suffers, 
all the other members suffer with it, had a 
very emphatic illustration in our flesh, and 
bones, and tendons, and nerves ; and in a 
day or two we also learned how intimate is 
the connection between flesh and spirit. 
To anguish of body followed shattering of 
mind, so that thought was confused. We 
now tell the story with a running pen, but 
a week ago we could not have written a line 
without blundering, or even forgetting what 
we had intended to have said. 

It was at this time, when no one could 
tell whether the consequences would be 
merely to flesh and tendon, or to mind and 
thought, that I was called upon to telegraph 
to the beloved congregation at the Taber- 
nacle, and I did so according to my best 
judgment, and the writing which was 
delivered to the clerk was in terms of clearest 
accuracy. I felt that, as I could be sure of 
nothing as to my own condition, I had better 
make no hasty statement. At the same time, 
I did not wish to raise a needless fear, and, 
therefore, I gave for a text Matthew vi. 34 : 
" Take therefore no thought for the mor- 
row : for the morrow shall take thought for 
the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day 
is the evil thereof." Alas ! it pleased the 
movers of the wires to resort to the fifth 
instead of the sixth chapter, and conse- 
quently my brethren received the admoni- 
tion, " Swear not at all" — a superfluity, to 
say no more. 

Here, then, I find myself — lame through 
the fall, weak through its consequences, but 
in good hope that no evil will remain for 
permanent regret. I have risen out of utter 
prostration to fierce pain, and from that 
again to comparative ease ; a fierce cough 
has left me with a feeble voice ; and so one 
might go through a graduated list of miseries 
which have moderated into mercies ; but 
what of it all ? The good hand of the Lord 
is with us, and let his name be praised. 
Tribulation worketh patience, and patience 
experience, and the experience of one is for 
the profit of many, and the glory of God. 
I hope to be back as* soon as I can walk, 
and to preach as soon as I can think out a 
sermon, and stand long enough to preach it. 



90 



NOTES. 



The great kindness and true fidelity of 
the church at the Tabernacle have been 
proven beyond precedent by the present 
condition of its affairs. We cannot too 
greatly rejoice in God for sparing to us our 
beloved brother, Mr. William Olney, who, 
with other honoured helpers, has sustained 
the full burden of the service while our 
brother, J. A. Spurgeon, has been laid aside, 
and other church officers have also been dis- 
abled. Blessed be God for a people worth 
leading, and men of God in the church so 
fit to lead them ! 

The waters have met of late. Our vener- 
able sire, John Spurgeon, paid a visit to his 
brother, Samuel Spurgeon, of Maldon, and, 
alas ! during that visit his brother's wife 
died. This has been a great blow to our 
father, and he has been ill. C. H. S. was 
stricken down while seeking health, while 
his wife remained a special sufferer with 
increasing pain ; then J. A. S. was again and 
again brought very low, and rendered un- 
able for active service. Last of all, a trial 
for some little while expected came to its 
complete development, for our son Charles, 
of Greenwich, whose incessant labours have 
tried him with almost perpetual neuralgia of 
the head, has been compelled to follow the 
orders of the physician, and accept the 
loving suggestion of his church to take a 
voyage to New Zealand and back. He 
hopes to see his brother Thomas and return. 
God grant it may turn out to be a sure cure ! 
It is a singular gathering of the floods of 
trial. But the Lord sitteth King for ever 
and ever. 

According to promise, we give this month 
an account of the Auxiliary Book Fund, 
which we think will interest those of our 
readers who are helpers of Mrs. Spurgeon's 
work for poor ministers. Up to the present 
time Mrs. Spurgeon has been too ill to pre- 
pare any report of the operations of her 
Book Fund during the past year. If she is 
able to do so, she will write a brief record ; 
but if her pain and weakness prevent her 
from doing this, she will send her subscribers 
the balance-sheet, list of contributions, and 
summary of gifts, that they may see that, 
although the worker has been laid aside for 
so much of the last twelve months, the work 
has gone on usefully, though more slowly 
than before, and that many poor pastors 
have had to rejoice over the parcels of 
books which have replenished their scanty 
stores. 

Succeeding notes may contain repetitions, 
but it seemed good to tell the story from 
both sides. 

Our readers will not fail to notice that our 
lists of contributions, together with the 
balance-sheets of the Pastors' College and 
Society of Evangelists, occupy eleven pages 
of the present number of the magazine. 
We have not reduced the quantity of 
general reading matter, but have inserted 
eight pages extra. Those who look down 



the lists of donations can form only a very 
slight idea of the personal love for the 
Editor that is here represented, or of the 
sympathy which the donors express towards 
him in his protest against false doctrine and 
worldliness within the church. Out of the 
many hundreds of letters recently received 
from all parts of the kingdom, as well as 
from abroad, only tivo individuals have 
written in opposition to the course which 
the Editor has felt compelled to take. 

On Lord'' s-day evening, January 6, after 
an impressive sermon by the Bev. Mark Guy 
Pearse, and before the communion service, 
the members of the church and congrega- 
tion at the Tabernacle were invited to 
remain for a season of special prayer on 
behalf of the senior Pastor. The news of 
his accident had only become known to 
most of the members that day, although it 
happened a week previously. Scarcely a 
soul in the vast assembly moved; and as 
three of the elders and Brother Hewson led 
the supplications of the thousands present, 
it was a scene never to be forgotten, and, 
perhaps, unique in the history of the church 
of Christ. Earnest, sympathetic prayer was 
also offered for the recovery of Pastor J. A. 
Spurgeon, who was laid aside by illness, 
and unable to occupy his brother's place. 

On Monday evening, January 7, the 
prayer-meeting at the Tabernacle was of 
a special character in connection with the 
"Week of United and Universal Prayer." 
In the absence of Pastor J. A. Spurgeon, 
Pastor J. Douglas, M.A., of Kenyon Chapel, 
presided, and gave an earnest, spiritual ad- 
dress, founded on Psalm ciii. 1 — 5. The 
following neighbouring ministers took part 
in the devotional service : — Pastors J. Creer, 
W. H. Edwards, W. Exton, W. Glanville, 
W. Mottram, B. Senior, and F. J. Smith. 
Mr. A. J. Arnold gave au interesting account 
of the principles and operations of the 
Evangelical Alliance, especially recounting 
marked instances of spiritual blessing and 
increase to churches in Asia Minor and 
other distant regions, through the meetings 
for united prayer promoted by the Alliance. 

On X,ord J s-day evening, January 13, as 
the news from Mentone made it apparent 
that the Pastor's fall had injured him more 
seriously than had been at first supposed, 
the Rev. Newman Hall, who was preaching 
at the Tabernacle, somewhat shortened the 
service, and again almost the whole con- 
gregation remained to pray for the beloved 
sufferer in the distant land. Mr. Hall, Mr. 
William Olney, and three of the elders, 
pleaded in the name of the assembled mul- 
titude that pain might be abated, weakness 
removed, and health and strength restored ; 
and the prayers were heard, for on the fol- 
lowing evening, while a large number of the 
same people had met together to continue 
their prayers and supplications, a telegram 
from the Pastor arrived, announcing that 



NOTES. 



9* 



he had that day been able to go out for a 
short ride. From this welcome news it was 
concluded that he was much better, and for 
this token of the divine faithfulness and 
lovingkindness grateful thanksgivings were 
expressed to the Lord. 

Poor Ministers' Clothing Society. — 
Mrs. Evans asks us to acknowledge, with 
thanks, the receipt of a parcel fromB. H. R., 
Clapham. Contributions of money, mate- 
rials for making up, or clothes, are always 
welcome. 

A box of books was also received from 
C. B., East Dulwich, and at once forwarded 
to a country minister, who was very grateful 
for its contents. 

College. — Mr. J. L. Keys, jun., has 
completed his course with us, and settled at 
Tenbury, Worcestershire. 

Mr. T. W. Medhurst, after serving the 
church at Lake Road, Landport, faithfully 
and well for nearly twenty years, is leaving 
Portsmouth, and going to Hope Chapel, 
Canton, Cardiff. We wish him great hap- 
piness and blessing in his new sphere. 

Mr. T. D. Cameron, late of Willenhall, 
has gone to Millport, Cumbrae, N.B.; Mr. 
J. Davis, late of Millwall, has accepted 
the pastorate at Long Preston, near Leeds ; 
Mr. J. Hart has removed from Potter's 
Bar, to Stotfold, Bedfordshire ; and Mr. A. 
McDougall, from Oban, to Bunessan, 
Island of Mull, N.B. 

We feel sure that many of our brethren 
will be interested in the following letters 
from their fellow -students in India and 
Australia. The sight of these signatures 
brings tears to our eyes, joy to our heart, and 
a prayer to our lips, as we remember each 
brother, and commend him to the Lord in 
grateful sympathy : — 

" Calcutta, October 29, 1888. 
' ' Beloved President, — We send you again 
our hearty greetings, and warmest love and 
sympathy. Many miles are between us, and 
the distance from you to us is far ; but yet 
our love and esteem for you make us feel 
as if we were as near as we could be, and 
know no distance that is too far for us to 
reach. We are bound to you by ties that 
cannot be broken. We are one with you in 
sympathy, and prayer, and work ; and one 
with you in the struggle for right, and the 
battle with wrong. We know no Lord or 
Master but him of the thorny crown and 
wounded side. We know no symbol but 
the cross, for by it we hold and are held. 
We know no book but the Bible in our con- 
flict with evil. And so, by the sorrow of 
him who suffered unto death, of him who 
' bore our sins in his own body on the tree', 
we struggle for ' the faith once delivered to 
the saints.' 

" Your sorrows are ours, because we love 
you. Your burdens are ours, because we 
trust you. Your battles are ours, because 
we are 'bone of your bone, and flesh of 



your flesh ' ; we are one in Christ in a union 
that unites us in all things. 

" Our work is hard, and so is all work 
that is honestly done ; but our hopes are 
great, and faith leaps forward to the time 
when we shall be ' complete in him '—our 
work, our desires, and hopes, and friend- 
ships all ' complete in him.' And so we stand 
with our hands stretched out to you, and to 
our brethren in Australia, and they to others 
in America, and they to others nearer home, 
till we fancy we see the whole world belted 
by men that love you, and pray for you, and 
will stand by you ' till death us do part.' 

" Beloved President, believe us all to be, 
faithfully and lovingly, yours in the Lord 
Jesus Christ, 

"G. H. Hook, Lall Bazar, Calcutta. 

" J. G. Potter, Agra, N.W.P. 

"John Stubbs, Patna. 

" Geo. J. Dann, Allahabad. 

"Robert Spurgeon, Madaripore. 

" W. S. Mitchell, Dinapore. 

" R. Maplesden, Secunderabad. 

"Prank Durbin, Colombo, Ceylon." 

" Melbourne, Victoria, 

"15th Nov., 1888. 
" To the Rev. C. H. Spurgeon. 

" Honoured and Beloved President,— We 
have been brought together from the 
different Colonies of Australia to celebrate 
the Jubilee of the Baptist Churches of 
Victoria. It naturally occurs to us to give 
expression in a letter at this time to the 
affection which glows in all our hearts 
towards you. 

" We begin by assuring you of our con- 
tinued love for the great foundation doc- 
trines of the everlasting gospel, and of our 
determination, in the strength of God, to be 
loyal to the truth as it is in Jesus till we 
meet our Lord. 

" We cannot cease to praise God for your 
personal influence oyer us, and for all the 
equipment for service and sustenance in 
labour we have received through you and 
the College. 

" The main features of the Victorian Bap- 
tist Jubilee, which will make it gloriously 
memorable, are, the signal display of the 
hand of God in the origin and history of 
the Colonial churches, the raising of £50,000 
for the Victorian Baptist Fund, and, notably, 
the presence with us of the honoured Dr. 
Alexander Maclaren. This servant of God 
has perceived our peculiar spiritual needs 
and dangers out here, and has counselled, 
us how to meet them, and with an inspira- 
tion caught from God himself, his words 
have kindled in us an increasing love to 
Jesus, and a holier devotion to his service. 

"We may not multiply words, but we 
cannot close our epistle without the old 
heart -grip with which we were wont of 
yore to part from one another. 

" How can we avoid feeling how great a 
help to us, and to all the churches of Christ 
in Australasia, a visit from you would be P 
How can we refrain from again urging you 



92 



NOTES. 



to consider the desirability of such a visit, 
both for your own health's sake, as well as 
for our good ? Do come and see us ! 

"May our fervent prayers gain for you 
fresh anointing for study, preaching, and 
•endurance ! We desire to stand around you, 
though so far away, as a body-guard of 
loving younger soldiers in the glorious 
service for the King. We cannot grasp your 
hand in a letter, but we know we may 
depend on the love which has never been 
withheld from your old students, who now 
subscribe themselves, in loyalty to King 
•Jesus, and in love to you, 

"William Christopher Bunning, 
West Melbourne. 

"Alfred Bird, Ballarat. 

"Edward Isaac, Brunswick. 

4 ' William Clark, St. Kilda. 

" Robert Williamson, South Yarra. 

4 'James Blaikie. 

"Frederick Hibberd, Ashfield, New 
South Wales. 

" W. Whale, Brisbane. 

" William Higlett, Toowoomba, 
Queensland. 

" Jas. R. Cooper, Portland, Victoria. 

"A. J. Clarke, Wooloomooloo, New 
South Wales. 

•"J. A. Soper, Petersham, N.S.W. 

"Robert McCullough, Tasmania. 

" J. E. Walton, Tasmania. 

""John Downing, Victoria. 

"William E. Rice, North Adelaide. 

"Thomas Breewood. 

"Matthew Morris, Kapunda, S.A. 

" George D. Cox, Geelong. 

" F. G. Buckingham, South Melbourne. 

Evangelists. — The testimonies concern- 
ing the success of the work of our beloved 
brethren, Messrs. Fullerton <§ Smith, in 
Central and South London, are so numerous 
just now that we can only give extracts 
from the letters of thanks from the churches 
visited. 

Pastor Williams (Upton Chapel) writes : — 
' ' The labours of these honoured servants of 
our Master were more appreciated than I 
can tell you, and the blessings enjoyed will, 
I am sure, be a source of permanent strength 
to our church, and an eternal joy to many 
hearts." 

Pastor J. Baillie (Bloomsbury Chapel) 
says: — "We had been praying for great 
things, and expecting them, but we found 
the Lord able to exceed our petitions. Had 
you been present at the large enquirers' 
meeting which we held in the lecture-hall 
last night, your heart would have been re- 
joiced to hear the testimonies of God's 
power to save ; and many steady, matured 
Christians added their witness to the fresh 
power and renewed consecration which they 
had experienced during the mission." 

Pastor H. O. Mackey sends us a long and 
interesting report of the services at Peck- 
iham Park Road Chapel, from which we cull 
the following : — 

4 4 Mr. Smith's touching incidents, related 



with so much genuine pathos; his cheery 
songs and solos; and then Mr. Fullerton's 
solid expositions of Scripture, especially the 
foundation truths about sin, spiritual death, 
the need of a dying, atoning Saviour, ana 
the infinite love of God as seen at Calvary, 
soon won the attention of the people, and 
the personal acceptance of the evangelists' 
messages. Seldom have we known a 
finer blending of the instructive with the 
earnestly exhorting to immediate decision 
than was nightly listened to from Mr. 
Fullerton. On the Sunday afternoon, the 
meeting for men only was quite filled; 
and a grand sight it was to watch their 
faces as they listened to the racy, yet 
solemn appeals of both the brethren. 
The sound of their massive voices in the 
hymns was one to remember for many 
a day. Sunday evening saw the chapel 
packed long before the time for beginning 
the service, and hundreds went away disap- 
pointed, whilst a goodly number attended 
an overflow service in the schoolroom oppo- 
site. Best of all, great spiritual results have 
followed. No fewer than 150 persons went 
into the enquiry-room. Many of these have 
avowed their conversion to God, their newly- 
found faith in Jesus. Amongst these some are 
the children of the officers and members of 
the church , some are restored backsliders, 
and others are men and women who for many, 
many years have never gone inside a house 
of God. Although the mission only lasted 
nine days, it will not be merely a nine 
days' wonder ; the neighbourhood has been 
touched, the church has been filled with 
joy, souls have been born again, and the 
Saviour has been greatly honoured." 

Messrs. Fullerton and Smith conducted 
the Watch-night service at the Tabernacle. 
There was a good congregation considering 
the fact that New Year's Eve was one of 
the foggiest nights of the winter, and many 
who would have been present dared not 
venture out. Our brethren have been at 
Exeter Hall during the greater part of 
January, under the auspices of the Central 
Y.M.C.A. This month they go to Shoreditch 
Tabernacle and Dalston Junction Chapel. 

Mr. Burnham has had to rest much longer 
than he anticipated, but he trusts that now 
he will be able to continue his work for 
some time. While resting at Malvern he 
has taken part in the united meetings for 
prayer. He has now gone to Dorset to ful- 
fil engagements that had to be postponed 
through his illness, and afterwards he is to 
conduct a mission at Rotherhithe New Road. 
Pastor W. H. Broad kindly took Mr. 
Burnham's place at Ashdon and Radwinter. 
Brother Layzell writes : "Mr. Broad proved 
an excellent substitute. We have already 
seen the first-fruits from these services, and 
are prayerfully looking for the harvest." 

Mr. Harmons mission at Orpington, 
though held just before Christmas, was well 
attended, and productive of much blessing. 



NOTES. 



93 



On New Year's Eve, in conjunction with 
Mr. Parker, he commenced a series of 
services at Crewkerne, which were so suc- 
cessful that they were continued until 
January loth. Mr. Parker then went on to 
Falmouth, and Mr. Harmer, after a few 
days at home, went to March, Cambridge- 
shire. This month he is to be at Cheddar, 
Somerset ; and Tuddenham, Ipswich. 

Mr. Carter is much encouraged by the 
progress that is being made at Farn worth, 
Lancashire. He has recently put forth 
efforts to carry on evangelistic work by 
means of two new literary productions — 
The Pioneer Quarterly and Pioneer Papers, 
published by Alexander and Shepheard. 
These are likely to be very useful, the 
Pioneer Papers especially. They are much 
better for giving away than ordinary tracts, 
for they contain nothing but the Word of 
God, judiciously arranged under special 
headings. 

Pastor J. M. Steven gives this cheering 
report of Mr. Harrison's services at Rom- 
ford : — "He has a most effective and im- 
pressive style of address, and by his clear 
and forcible exposition of the truth brings 
conviction home to the consciences of his 
hearers. Many have professed faith in 
Christ during his mission here." 

Orphanage. — The Christmas Festival.— 
By the kindness of many friends, every- 
thing calculated to make the children happy 
was supplied without stint, and the Christ- 
mas festivities of 1888 were in every respect 
equal to those of former years. 

The dining-hall was gaily decorated, and 
was worthy of the Knights of the Round 
Table ; but, alas ! the beloved President was 
a thousand miles away in quest of health 
and repose. On the tables, a box of figs, a 
cosaque, an orange, a Christmas card, and a 
new shilling were placed for every child ; and 
when the merry party, numbering nearly 
half a thousand, trooped in, their eyes 
sparkled with gratitude, and the new- 
comers could not repress, at the same time, a 
look of sheer astonishment. A goodly 
number came to witness the sight, and the 
general verdict was, that it could not be 
surpassed at any Christmas gathering in 
the land. The trustees present were Messrs. 
W. P. Olney, W. C. Murrell, B. W. Carr, 
C. F. Allison, and H. Smith ; and they each 
presided at a table, other friends making up 
the necessary number. Grace having been 
sung, and a few words spoken by the Head 
Master, Mr. Carr read the following letter 
from the President : — 

"Dear Girls and Boys,— I wish you a 
Merry Christmas. Think of me as I shall 
think of you when you are eating the plum- 
pudding. Don't eat too much, but enjoy 
yourselves over head and ears. 

" I hope you have each one deserved 
a thousand good marks during the year. 



Mr. Ladds gives you good characters ; but I 
do not think even he will dare to say that no 
boy is up to mischief, and that all the girls 
are quiet at all times. I think you are 
better than the average of laddies and 
lassies, and this makes me feel very happy 
about you. God bless you, and make you 
noble men and women in due time ! I 
wonder which boys and girls will be mis- 
sionaries ; certainly not all, but all may be 
useful Christians. May the loving Jesus 
make you so ! 

" Give the Trustees three cheers, and do 
the same for the friends who give the shil- 
lings, the figs, and other things. I will be 
listening about two o'clock, and if I hear 
you cheering, I will cheer too ; and if you 
hear my voice, you will hear me say, 
' Another cheer for Mr. Charlesworth, the 
Matrons, and the Masters, &c.' 

"Bless God when you go to bed for 
giving you a happy day, and ask him to 
make you his own children. 

1 ' Yours lovingly, 

"C. H. Spurgeon." 

Cheers for the absent President, with whom 
the children always associate Mrs. Spur- 
geon; cheers for the Vice-President and 
Mrs. James Spurgeon, and the Trustees; 
cheers for the Head Master, Secretary, and 
staff ; and cheers for all donors ; followed 
in succession : and if the echoes did 
not reach the President in his warm 
retreat, the fault could not be attri- 
buted to the youngsters, for contrary to the 
admonitions which others receive in the 
presence of company, they did their best to 
be heard as well as seen. When the Head 
Master called for "silent grace," every 
head was bowed, and in the deep and 
sudden hush, the eyes of many of the on- 
lookers were moistened with tears ; and as 
the children filed out to their play-rooms, 
many a heart breathed the prayer, "God 
bless the boys and girls of the Stockwell 
Orphanage! " 

On Wednesday, January 2, the mothers, 
and other friends of the children spent the 
afternoon and evening at the Orphanage, 
when they brought in the sum of £87 18s. Id., 
as a practical expression of their gratitude 
that their fatherless boys and girls had 
found such a bright, happy, Christian home. 

Colportage. — The New Year is begin- 
ning hopefully for the extension of the work 
of the Association, as arrangements are al- 
ready made for the opening of two new 
districts, in connection with the Kent and 
Sussex Baptist Association, at St. Margaret's 
and Cowfold, respectively. It is hoped that 
other Associations will follow the lead, and 
share the good results so manifest from 
Colportage work in other districts. 

Baptisms at Metropolitan Tabernacle. — 
January 3, seven. 



94 



factors' Galltyt, Ipfnrplita %xbtmxrtt. 

Statement of Receipts from December 15th, 1888, to January lith, 1889. 



Tart collection at New North Road 
Chapel, Huddersfield, per Pastor 
F. J. Benskin 

Mr. A. A. Lennard, per J. T. D. 

Mr. Thomas Scoular 

Miss M. M. Ferguson 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Blott ... 

Miss E. Hudson 

Dr. and Mrs. Brougham 

Mr. W. C. Greenop 

Mr. R. Greenwood 

Mr. J. Pentclow 

Mr. Elijah Bew 

Mr. R. Purser 

Mr. W. A. Macfie 

Mr. J. Thornton 

A servant 

Miss Brown 

Mr. J. Mortimer 

Mr. C. W. Roberts 

Mr. W. H. Roberts 

Mr. W. Parlane 

Mr. D. McKercher 

Miss Ellen Cress 

Mrs. "Walker 

Moiety of proceeds of Mr. Philip 
Phillips' lectures 

Mr. R. Hunt, per J. T. D 

Mrs. Cracknel! 

Mr. II. O-mond 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Gray 



£ s. 


d. 


3 7 





5 





2 





1 





5 





7 





3 





1 1 





10 





1 





1 10 





10 





1 





1 





5 





5 





5 





5 





5 5 





10 





1 





5 





5 





5 





1 1 





3 





3 





1 






Collected by Mrs. James "Withers : 
Messrs. Heelas and Co. .. 

Mr. P. Davies 

Mr. G. Oakshott 



A debtor to grace 

Part valuation fee 

Mr. W. Casson 

Mr. A. Stewart 

Dr. MacGill 

Mr. and Miss Bloom 
Mrs. Reed 

Annual Subscription : — 
Mr. Robert Morgan 

Quarterly Subscriptions : — 

Adelphi 

Mr. J. Wilson 

Mrs. Elgee 

Monthly Subscription : — 
Mr. R.J. Beecliff 

"Weekly Offerings at Met. Tab. :— 
Dec. 16 

„ 23 

„ 3D 

Jan. (5 

„ 13 



£ s. d. 



1 1 









10 









10 













2 1 
2 











... 




5 


8 


... 




1 









5 









1 1 









2 


i) 


... 




100 





... 




1 1 









1 10 





... 


... 


1 11 


9 






10 


6 






2 


G 


lb. : — 

22 11 


3 






24 10 









24 


(1 






21 7 


6 






15 10 












1 


107 18 


g 




280 5 


6 



Statement of Receipts from December loth, 188S, to January lit It, 18S9. 



Mansfield-street Sunday-school children, 
per Mr. E. Johnson 

Collected by Mr. Hinton 

Mr. Thomas Howell 

Shillings for 250 boys, Messrs. Alabaster 
and Passmore 

Miss E. E. Sharpington 

Mrs. Sharpington 

Collected by Mrs. "Walker 

Miss Clarke 

Miss Farmer 

MissMcNab 

Collected by Miss Mc Arthur 

Mrs. C. Chapman 

Mr. F. "W. Straker 

Messrs. Lothian and Dougall 

Miss Turnbull 

Collected by Miss Pentelow 

Stamps from Dalkeith 

Mr. James Binstead 

Mr. James Lanchburv 

Collected by Mrs. W.'T. Clark 

The scholars of Mauchline Free Church 
Sunday-school, per Mr. D. McKee ... 

Mr. Williams 

Mr. D. Goodhall 

Mrs. "Wiley 

Postal order from Derby 

Miss E. M. Elford 

Mr. E. J. Beaumont 

Miss Sharp 

Mrs. T. Frohock and friends 

Mr. G. Saunders 

Mr. Robert D. Aldrick, per Bankers ... 



£ s. 


d. 


2 





2 12 


9 


5 





2 10 





10 





10 





5 7 





2 


6 


2 


6 


10 





17 


6 


2 


6 


5 





1 12 


5 


10 





2 





2 


6 


5 


6 


5 





7 





5 





5 





1 





5 





7 


6 


12 





4 


8 


10 





18 





1 





10 








£ s. 


d. 


Stamps, Miss A. B. Lccder 





9 


Sale of S. O. tracts 


u 1 





The executors of the late Mr. G. "W. 






Petter 


20 


9 


Miss Coxeters Bible-class \ 


3 3 


u 


Mr. S.Elson 


2 10 





Mr. G. Askey 


5 





MissE. Mibroy 


2 





The Borough-road Sunday evening 






class, per Mr. G. Stanhope 


10 


<; 


Mrs. Monk 


10 





Mr. "W. Strain 


5 


o 


Rev. "W. Dovey 


2 


a 


Postal order from Plymouth 


2 


<5 


Postal order from E. W. () 


10 





Miss Fort, per Mr. Henry Smith 


1 1 


o 


Mr. L. A. Spiller 


2 





Collected by Mrs. Tullis 


1 11 


6 


Mr. J. O'Gram 


10 





Collected by Miss J. Jones 


7 


(i 


Mr. H. Driver 


10 





Mr. G. T. Jobbins 


fi 





Mr. H. Finch 


5 





Mr. D. Rees 


2 





Mrs. Feme, per Mis. J. A. Spurgeon ... 


1 





Master A. B. McMaster 


2 1 





Mr. G. S. Miller 


5 





Miss A. Blake 


10 





Mrs. Fowler 


2 


() 


Mr. H. Stevenson 


10 





John-street Baptist Sunday-school, 






Rodborough, per F. E. D 


10 





Mrs. Hassell 


1 1 





Mr. W. E. Chamberlain 


5 


u 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



95 



Mr. J. Armstrong 

Mr. T. J. Fowler 

Mr. John Pugh 

Mr. It. Walker 

Miss B. H. Fielder 

Miss E. M. D. Mattick 

Collected by Mrs. and Miss Boyd 

Mrs. A. Itees 

Mr. H. Trevanion 

Mr. and Miss Taylor 

Mrs. J. Houston 

The Misses W. and E. Kay 

Mrs. M. Penning' 

Mr. J. Thorn 

Miss M. Muir 

Mrs. M. Parsons 

Mr. 8. T. Hudson 

Stamps from Glasgow 

Mrs. Browne 

Miss Derrick 

Mrs. N. Sparrow 

Mrs. Watts 

Mrs. Cox, sen 

Miss Mc Arthur 

The teachers of Regent- street Sabbath- 
school, per Mr. T. Blayney 

Mr. H. Robson, per Mr. B. W. Carr ... 

Mr. R. A. James 

Mrs. Jamieson 

Mr. Thomas 

Mr. W. A. Weightman 

From Rad, per D. Watt 

Mr. Taylor, per Pastor J. Small 

Collection at breakfast table, on Christ- 
mas morning, by young friends at 
Hampstead 

Fines in a business, per Mr. R. A. 
James 

From a friend at Winchester 

Collected by Miss L. J. Mumford 

Mr. T. J. Hughes 

Mr. Norkett 

Sale of Goods 

Mrs. R. Fakeley 

Mrs. M. Rogers 

A sermon-reader, Derby... 

Mrs. Farmer 

Mrs. Fisher 

Mr. C. Miller 

Mrs. E. AV. Price 

Mr. W.Powell 

The Young Women's Bible-class at the 
Orphanage, per Mrs. James Still' ... 

The Misses R. and L. Wigney 

Mr. G. E. Elvin 

Mrs. Bell 

Mr. W. J. Davidson 

Mrs. E. Chambers 

Mrs. E. S. White 

Mr. F. J. Aldridsre 

Mr. II. C. Bridgman 

Per Miss L. A. Blight: — 

Mr. Sharp 5 

Mr. E. S. Thoday 5 

Mrs. Thoday 5 



Collected by Mrs. Carwithen 

Collected by Miss N. Matthews 

Mrs. K. Spender 

Orphan boys' and girls' collecting-cards 

(first list) ;. 

Miss Edwards' Bible-class .." 

Mrs. Eaton ., \[\ 

Mrs. E. C. Tanner 

Miss Wilmot ,.] 

Mr. Robotham 

Collected by Mr. G. Tollcy ... ,.. 
With best wishes from a friend, New 

Barnet ... 

Mr. George Smith 

A. J. F. 



£ s. 


d. 


3 3 





5 





2 2 





10 





2 


6 


5 





14 





2 


6 


2 





10 





5 


3 


2 





5 





5 





10 





1 





7 





5 





2 


11 


5 





10 





2 





1 





5 





7 16 





25 





5 5 





1 





4 





5 





5 





4 






10 

4 17 11 

2 6 

8 6 

5 

10 
3 10 

7 

10 

2 

10 

5 

10 

6 6 

2 6 

12 6 

2 10 

10 6 
5 
10 10 
5 






10 



1 5 




15 

3 4 

9 9 

14 3 



87 IS 7 

7 

5 

2 

6 
10 

1 15 

2 
10 
10 



Mr. L. W. Reed 

Young Women's Bible-class, Lewi 

road, Streatham, per Miss Davis 

Mrs. Crackuell 

Mrs. Atkinson 

Collected by Mrs. Mott 

W. B , per Miss Jones 

Miss Jones 

Per Pastor T. Greenwood : — 

Self 3 3 

Master T. Greenwood ... o 2 

Master B. Greenwood ... 2 



Postal order from Aberdeen 

Mr. T. Scoular 

Mr. B. E. Knight 

Mr. H. J. Knight and brother 

Mr. Thomas Bush 

Mr. E. Vincent 

Mrs. Ling 

In memoriain, E 

Mr. A. M. Arthur 

Miss Annie Pritchard 

Mrs. Stewart and Miss Jane 

Mrs. Younger 

Mrs. Harrison 

Mr. Henry Hill 

Mr. H. L. Nunn 

Miss Yockney 

Mr. William Hill 

A constant reader of Mr. Spurgeon's 

sermons 

Allan and Percy White 

Nemo 

In memory of dear father and mother 

Mr. J. Marshall 

Mr. D. Thomas 

Mr. M. Brown 

Mr. Thomas P. Potts 

Mr. J. Lock 

Mr. W. Williams 

Mrs. Cloat 

Mrs. Alexander, per Mrs. Cloat 

Mrs. Taylor 

Mr. J. Hassall 

Mr. W. Turnbull 

Miss E. Skin 

Miss J. Scott" 

Mrs. Hutchison 

Miss Pearce 

Miss E. Pearce ... 

A friend 

Stamps from Wisbech 

Mrs. Muntons 

Two friends in Piteairnneld 

Scotch note from Aberdeen 

Mr. J. Alabaster 

Mrs. John Clarke 

A friend 

Mr. S. D. Lamb 

Mr. James Martin 

Mrs. Cuthbert 

Miss J. Allan 

Mr. T. T. Marks, C.E % ... 

Mrs. Cockburn ' ... 

A. J. R 

Rev. J. F. Linn 

Mr. W. Anderson 

Mr. W. L. Ferguson 

An aged friend 

Miss E. H. Nelson 

Mr. George Jingey 

Master J. E. Freei'ard 

Rev. William Parry 

Mr. James Lundie 

Mrs. Lundie 

Miss M. A. Mackay 

Mr. H. Munro 

Mrs. T. Poulter 

Stamps from Arbroath 

A widow 



£ s. d. 

5 9 

17 6 

3 

11 

18 

2 

2 6 



3 7 

5 

2 

10 

2 

2 G 

5 

5 





1 
5 







1 
1 



10 
5 
10 6 
110 
10 
10 
110 

5 

10 

10 

15 

10 

10 

2 6 

10 

10 




o 
l 

5 

10 

2 

O 



2 6 

2 6 

2 6 

3 




1 
1 
1 
O 




10 

20 

5 

o 

5 

2 6 



2 G 

2 O 

O O 

O 

2 6 

10 

10 

5 

2 

10 

6 

5 

5 



2 



1 
10 
110 
2 
3 



96 



Miss L. Belough 

Mis M. M. Ferguson 

Mr. James B. Falconer 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Blott 

Miss H. Jackson 

Mr. John Smith 

Mrs. J. Toller 

W. H. D 

Mrs. Holcombe 

Mr. William Church, jun. 

Mr. A. Hobson 

Mr. William Newton 

G. A 

Rev. J. R. Macduff, D.D. 

Mrs. C. Norton 

Mr. P. T. Adams 

Miss Louisa Bush 

Pastor George Cobb 

Miss Sprot 

Mrs. Chapman 

Miss E. Hudson 

Mr. S. Ashton 

Pastor W. G. Clow 

Mr. J. B. Near 

Mrs. Ellwood 

Mr. G. Redman 

Two friends 

Dr. and Mrs. Brougham 

Mr. A. A. Stephens 

Miss Scarf e 

A thankoffering 

Mr. George W. Camps 

Mr. William Dunn 

Mrs. Ironside 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown 

Mrs. Chew 

Mrs. J. G. Blake 

Miss Murray 

H. J. P. Meldrum 

Mr. W. Turnell 

Mrs. Puttock 

Mr. A. Jungling 

The Misses Cunnington 

B. H. 

Mrs. Keeley 

Mr. William Mitchell 

Mr. W. Pinkaman 

Mr. and Mrs. Scruby 

Mr. James Beere 

Mr. Thomas Rose and family . . . 

Mr. W. C. Greenop 

Mrs. R. B. Dall 

Miss A. J. Mallett 

Mr. W. O. Little 

Mr. E. Davis 

Mr. Whittaker 

Mr. James Lunn 

W. B 

Mr. C. Buchel 

Mrs. Pepperdine and friend 

Mrs. and Miss Hodges 

Mr. F. H. Butler 

Mrs. E. Campbell 

Mr. (i. D. Forbes 

Mrs. Cave-B.-Cavc 

Collected by M^ss Woodgate and 
pupils 

Mr. 8. J. Clements 

Mr. H. Sprigg 

A brother ploughman 

A friend to the orphans 

Postal order from Warrington ... 

Mrs. Boyle 

Mr. J. Patterson 

Mrs. Briggs 

Mr. James Fear 

Mrs. Brodie 

Mrs. Jackson 

Miss Huckett 

Mrs. Williams and friend 

Mr. W Oakley „ 



STOCKWELL 


£ 


s. 


d. 





1 





... 


10 





... 1 








... 5 








... 


14 





... 1 


1 





... 


10 





... 1 








... 1 








... 


5 





... 1 


1 





... 


5 





... 10 





... 2 


2 





... 


5 





... 1 








... 


10 





... o 


10 





... 5 








... 


2 


6 


... 


7 





... 10 





... 


5 





... 


2 


6 


... 2 








... 1 








... 2 








... 3 10 





... 1 








... 


1 





... 


2 


6 


... 


2 


6 


... 1 


5 





... 1 








... 


5 





... 


2 


6 


... 


5 





... 


5 





... 


5 





... 10 





... 


2 


6 


... 5 








... 2 


2 





... 10 





... 10 


6 


... 10 





... 10 


G 


... 10 





... 10 





... 10 





... 1 


1 





... 


5 


U 


... 1 








... 


5 





... 1 








... 1 


1 





... 


10 





... 


10 





... 1 


5 





... 


5 





... 


G 





... 10 





... 


3 





... 


2 


G 


... 1 








her 






... 1 








... 1 


1 





... 5 








... 


10 





... 


4 





... 


5 





... 


5 





... 10 





... 


5 





... o 


5 





... 


5 





... o 


10 





... o 


•2 


G 


... 


5 





... o 


2 






ORPHANAGE. 



Mrs. Anderson 

Mrs. Mills 

Miss C. Field 
Mr. H. Thomas 
Miss M. Pitts 

Mrs. Speed 

Mrs. Salmon 

Mrs. Slade 

Miss Simpson 

Mr. W. Willis 

Mr. W. Longhurst ... 

Mr. and Mrs. Higgins 

Mrs. Bentall 

Mr. H. A. Matier .., 

Mr. R. Burgess 

Miss A. Mackenzie .. 

Mr. A. Ballard 

The Sittingbourne 

school — boys 

The Sittingbourne Baptist 

Sunday-school— girls ... 



Baptist Sunday- 
110 



15 



M. B 

C. G. C 

W. and M. S., Glasgow ... 

G., Glasgow 

Mrs. Ferguson 

Mr. John How 

Mrs. Hep worth , 

A. CD 

Mr. S. Armans 

Mr. W. Furse 

Mrs. Mitchell 

Mr. R. Dale 

Mr. T. Kukpatrick 

Mr. J. Rugg 

Mr. E. Sparrow , 

Mr. and Airs. Underwood 

Mrs. Houlgate 

Miss Dunbar 

Mrs. Ewart , 

Mr. W. Graham 

Rev. J. R. Wood 

Miss A. E. Seymour 
Mr. H. Lincoln, jun. 

G. R. M 

Mr. C. J. Curtis 

Mr. Hartswell 

Per Mrs. Hickisson : — 

O. L 

R. S 

P. P 

Mrs. Hickisson 



2 6 

2 6 

2 6 

5 



Mrs. Thomson and friend 

Mrs. Dougall 

Miss E. Lander 

Bessie and Gerty Keylock 

Mrs. Jones ... • 

M. A. D., Trowbridge 

Mr. S. Gallifant 

Widow's mite 

J. C, Paisley 

W. G., Berkhampstead 

Mr. Joseph Hill 

Pastor G. B. Richardson's Bible-class, 

Eynsford 

Mrs. F. Bridge 

Miss Camps 

Mr. C. H. Ruddick 

Mr. G. W. Irons 

Mr. R. Lewis 

MissM. A. Moss 

Mr. Elijah Bew 

Workpeople at Southall Brothers and 

Barclay's, Birmingham, per Mr. J. 

B.Millard 

Mrs. Mitchell 

Mr. Peter Lamont... 

Mrs. H. Kilborn 

Miss E. Kil born 



£ s. d. 
10 
2 2 
2 

1 
5 
5 



10 

10 

12 6 

5 

8 

10 

10 

10 
110 

10 



2 6 

10 

2 

10 

2 

2 

10 

10 6 

10 

5 
110 
5 




10 



5 
110 

10 

6 
5 

10 

5 

10 

5 
2 

10 

5 

5 

2 











12 6 

12 6 
10 
10 
2 10 

13 
5 
4 
2 
5 



10 



9 

5 

5 

3 

2 

10 

10 6 

1 10 



2 3 

2 

10 

5 

5 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



97 



Miss H. Husk 

Miss A. Barefoot 

Mr. H. P. West 

Mr. A. McCay 

Collected at Sunday dinner-table, per 

Mr. W. Lewis 

Dr. Habershon 

Mr. J. B. Elgar 

Mr. E. Purser 

Mrs. E. Holdsworth 

Miss Botsf ord 

A few sermon-readers, per Mr. Thomas 

Weir 

Mr. A. S. Hunter 

Mrs. Moorhouse, per Mrs. Way 
Friends in the country, per S. M. 

Mr. W. A. Macfle... 

Collected by Miss A. H. Eust 

J. and H. Letch 

Mrs. Walsham 

Mrs. Forbes 

Mrs. Clarke 

Mr. A. B.Todd 

E. andM. H 

Mrs. Lane 

Mrs. Frearson 

Miss Frearson 

A servant girl near Forres 

Mr. J.Hooker 

A friend in India, per Mrs. Newman ... 

Pastor S. T. Williams 

Collected by Miss Cutts 

Collected at Llandrindod by Miss I. 

Harding 

Widow Smith and two friends 

Mr. EogerBate 

Miss E. L. Smith 

Mr. T. Trotman 

Miss Shaw 

Mrs. Harris and friends 

Mr. A. Barrett 

Mr. E. Davies 

Mrs. Owen Clover 

Mr. J. Cook 

Mr. J. Newcombe 

Mr. A. Hobbs 

Collected by Mr. W. Smith 

Mr. E. Ellis 

Mr. W. Green 

Mr. J. Bazeley 

Mr. D. Macpherson 

"Sixty-eight" 

L. ... ... ... ,,. 

Mr. and Mrs. Drummond Grant ... 

Mr. W. Dorward 

MissDeZoete 

Mr. W. L. Maynard 

A Burnham native 

Mr. W. T. Martin 

Mr. H. L. Heritage 

A servant 

Collected by Miss Hunter 

A lover of Bible-truth, Torquay 

Collection at Baptist Sunday-school, 

Niton, Isle of Wight 

Mrs. Casburn 

Mr. Frank Dodwell ... ..' 

Mr. W. Jones 

Mr. Thomas Benton ... ." 

Mr. N. Leeder "\ 

Janet Chalmers and friends 

Mrs. Bell ... |" '" 

Mr. J. Eossiter 

Mr. J. Hole J "' 

Mrs. Joyner, sen. 

"Bookery" .„' 

Mr. J. Aldington \[ 

Henley Tabernacle Bible-class 
Mr. J. W. Barnaby 

Mr. A. C. Barker 

Miss J. Webb 



£ s. 


d. 


5 





2 


6 


1 





2 





15 





10 10 





1 





1 





10 





5 





1 5 





4 1 


3 


4 





12 





1 





6 





1 1 





10 





5 





5 





10 





1 





5 





5 





5 





2 





3 


6 


15 





10 





5 





1 





3 





1 





10 





1 





1 





4 





1 1 





5 





15 





2 





2 


6 


3 





10 





10 





5 





10 


6 


5 





1 





1 





1 





1 





1 





1 





10 





5 





10 





5 





3 11 


6 


1 





1 1 





10 





5 





1 





5 





1 





.0 2 


2 


1 5 





2 2 





5 





.0.10 





10 





8 





10 





10 


6 


1 





5 






Mr. J. Eeid 

Mrs. Buik 

Mr. J. Lewis 

Mr. T. Farrow 

Mrs. Johnstone 

Mr. John McBeth 

Willie and Edie Carter 

E. A. and E. Dunstan 

Mr. James London ... 

Collected by Miss Evelyn Annie Sims .. 

Stamps 

Mr. W. Torrance 

Mr. James Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. David Lang 

Mrs. Lees 

Mr. T. Davies 

Nellie 

Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Hewat 

J. Stormont and Alex. A. Bisset 

Mr. Alex. Sutherland 

Mr. Thomas Hoghton 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Watson 

A thankoflf ering from three 

Mrs. Struthers 

T. P. 

Mrs. Keddie 

Pastor W. Fuller Gooch 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Elliot 

Mr. I. V.Ford 

Mr. J. Mortimer 

Mrs. Pearce 

Mr. S. Ormrod 

Mr. W. Manning 

Mr. and Mrs James Perrett 

Eev. S. K. Bland 

Collected by Mrs. Plummer 

Per Eev. J. E. Chrystal :— 
Hamilton Sabbath-school 10 

A. M. W., G., Walter, E., 

J., and Willie Chrystal... 2 9 



£ s. d. 



Miss M. J. Lewis 

Mrs. Cook 

Mrs. Parsons and friend 

Mr. W. Phillips 

Miss Cornell 

A friend in Dingwall 

A lover of Mr. Spurgeon's almanack ... 

Postal order from Bearsden 

Mr. John Carter 

Miss I. Hood 

Mrs. Perkins 

Miss Janet Shaw 

Mr. Ladbrook 

P. andP 

Mrs. Callam 

Mr. W. Glen 

Mr. G. J. Guyer 

Mrs. Oldfield 

Mrs. Ferris 

Miss Ferris... 

Mrs. Barnes 

Donations at annual missionary meet- 
** ing, U. P. Church, Stromness 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Wicks 

Miss E. Fisher 

Children at Sunday morning school, 

Llangynidr 

Colchester, per E. Spurrier : — 

Mrs. Arnold 2 5 

G. C 2 

36, High Street 10 

E. Blaxill 10 

Nellie and Eddie Spurrier 7 6 

Collected by Mrs. Lang, 
Cheltenham : — 

Mr. J. Lance 5 

Mr. J. Pillman, Plymouth 110 

Eev. W. L. and Mrs. Lang 2 2 





5 



o 



2 6 

5 

2 







5 

10 

5 

2 

8 

1 10 
10 6 
5 
5 
5 
10 

10 

1 1 
15 

110 

10 

5 

10 

1 I 

2 2 
10 6 
13 



2 9 

5 

5 

2 



2 6 



2 6 

10 

2 6 

5 



5 



5 

5 



10 6 

10 

10 6 

10 6 

12 

1 10 
10 
10 

4 



6 2 6 



3 8 



98 



STOOKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



Madame Joubert 

Mr. and Mrs. Robertson 

Mrs. Dalgleish 

Mr. John Storey 

Mr. John Hardy 

Mrs. Haynes 

Mr. W. Norton 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Wale 

Mrs, Batty 

Mr. W. Badden 

Mr. R. Mathieson 

Mr. W. Chudley 

Mr. G. S. Stowe 

Mr. D. Imlach 

A sermon-reader, B. B 

A truly sympathizing friend 

Annie and Katie 

Collected by Mrs. Barkwell 

Mr. R. Ryman 

Mr. C. W. Roberts 

Mr. W. H. Roberts 

Mr. W. Parlane 

Mr. E. Frisby 

Mr. S. H. Coles 

Mrs. Bossingham 

Devonshire Square Baptist Church, per 

Pastor E. H. Ellis 

Mr. J. "Wickham 

Mr. W. Hawker 

Mr. John C. Lance 

Mrs. and Miss Goslin 

Mrs. Pilgrim 

J. W 

Mrs. Davies 

Mrs. E. Dunnett 

Otley Baptist Sunday-school, per Pastor 

P. B. Woodgate 

Mr. "W. Rudd 

In memoriam 

First Free Church Sabbath-school, 

Blairgowrie 

Mr. T. Fleetwood 

Mary and "Willie Thomas 

Mr. R. F.Lewis 

Mr. S. W. Powell (U.S.A.), per Mr. E. 

Powell 

Mr. D. McKercher 

The Misses Murray 

Miss E. Rama^e 

Mr. A. D. Taylor 

Miss H. Jeggo 

Mr. E. Martell 

Mrs. F. Rowe 

Mrs. Runcieman's Sunday-school class, 

and a few well-wishers 

Mrs. S. L. Pakeman 

Miss E. A. Pakeman 

Master Stanley Jones 

Miss May Jones 

M. P 

Mr. James Cooper 

Mi\ Thomas Smith, jun 

Mr. Henry "Ward 

Collected by Baptist Sunday-scholars, 

Niton, Isle of Wight 

Mr. A. C. Johnston 

Mr. Samuel Johnston 

Miss Mann 

Friends at Ludlow, per Mr. Sidney 

Cornock 

Mr. J. E. Adams 

Miss Jarman 

Mrs. Bailey 

Mrs. Hawavd 

Miss Ellen Cross 

Messrs. Henry Head and Co 

Mr. and Mrs. Butcher 

Mr. T. Fleetwood 

Mr. A. B. Todd 

J. S. "W. C 

Miss A. Sluce 



£ s. d. 










£ s. d. 


10 


Collected by Mrs. C. Adlem 


— 








10 


P. L. E 


1 










5 


P. M 





10 







1 10 


S. B 





5 







5 


G. H 





12 







2 6 


G. W 





2 







10 


Church of England 





5 







2 


A. Adlem and family 





6 







3 
3 










3 
2 


Louisa , ... 








5 


Mrs. A. Alston 








10 


110 


Mr. and Mrs. Potts 








5 


10 


Birds from Paradise 








2 


10 


A friend at Thurso 








10 6 


5 


Mr. H. Osmond 






• •• 


2 


3 


Mrs. Pask 






■•■ 


10 


5 


Mrs. M. A. Bucknell, per C. H 


"s. 




... 


2 


10 


M. B., Penpont 


... 






5 


10 


A sincere friend (less 2d. for pc 


stage) 




2 10 


10 


F. M. N. B. (less 4d. paid for 


postage 




5 5 


and registration) 








4 8 


10 


J. W. G 








10 


2 2 


Collected by Mrs. James Withers .- 






10 


Mr. W. Moore 


2 


2 







2 6 


Messrs. Hulas and Co. 


1 


1 









Mr. P. Davies 


1 










2 2 


Mr. E. P. Collier 


1 










10 


Mr. E. Harvey 





10 


6 




5 


Mr. C. R. Stevens 





10 


6 




5 


Mr. Robert Oakshott 


10 







4.0 


Mrs. Hampton 





10 







10 


Mrs. Ravenscroft 


10 







5 


Mrs. Collier 





5 







5 


Mrs. Paulton 





5 







10 6 


Mr. Wells 





5 









Mrs. J. Davis 





2 


6 




1 12' 
10 










8 11 6 
2 6 


Miss M. E. Jenkins 








1 1 


Part proceeds of Christmas tree 


i Per 






Pastor John Field, Ecton 








6 10 


16 


Mrs. Gregory 


... 




.. 


10 


10 


Mr. R. Looker and friends 








10 


10 


Mrs. Quilty 


... 






10 


10 


Mr. and Mrs. Morrison . . . 
Mrs. Milne ... 






... 


10 
10 


10 


Mr. George Mitchell 






,, 


10 


5 


Mrs. Bell 








10 


4 


Pastor "W. Sexton and friends 


.. 




,. 


10 


2 6 


Mr. William Ronald 








1 10 


1 


Mrs. Spear, sen 


,. 






5 


10 


Mr. T. C. Mclntyre 


., 




., 


10 10 


3 


Miss Florence Bousfield ... 


.. 






15 


1 


M. N. W., Berbice 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Gray 


•• 




•• 


2 18 

3 


11 


Mi's. Bagster 


.. 






2 2 


1 1 


Mr. H. Lodwick 


.. 






10 


1 1 


A friend, Cumnock 


,. 


, 


,, 


5 


5 


Mr. D. D. Sinclair 


., 


. 


.. 


10 


5 


Mrs. Martin 








5 


5 


Mr. J. Minto 








10 


2 6 


Rev. R. Colman 




. 


,, 


1 1 


10 


Collected by Mr. A. Bamford 


.. 


. 


.. 


10 


5 


Mr. T. Butcher 

Mr. T. Bollard and friends 




• 


•• 


10 6 
7 


110 


Part valuation fee 


.. 






5 


2 6 


A country minister 








3 


10 


Mr. W. King 








2 


10 6 


Mrs. Bainbridge 

Mr. John Broadley 








2 2 
5 


7 6 


Miss A. C. Foster 






.. 


16 


10 


Collected by Mrs. Slater ... 






.. 


3 


10 


Miss C. Hands 


.. 






10 


110 


Mr. William Bates 






,. 


5 


1 


Mr. E. O. Brown 








10 


5 


Mr. W. Hey wood 








7 


1 1 


Miss R. Banister 








10 


10 


The Misses M. and J. Gardner. 




. 




6 


10 


Mr. R. P. Froste 








2 


2 6 


Miss E. Millar 


.. 






3 6 


2 


Mr. William Casson 








10 


10 


Mrs. Chiene 


.. 






2 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



99 



Collected by Mrs. Clews : — 

Mr. S. Lawrence 

Mr. Sloan 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick 

Mrs. Clews 

Mr. Dickie 

Mr. Scott 

Mr. M' Garry 

Mr. W. Laurence 

Mr. Poynton 



Mr. W. Walker 

J. C. 

Mr. J. Johnson 

Kent Street Sunday-school Bible-class 

Mr. J. Crocker 

Mr. T.N. Wade 

Miss M. Pentelow 

E. Webber 

Baptist Sunday-school, Long Preston... 

Mr. W. Murkin and friends 

A reader of Mr. Spurgeon's sermons... 

E. Morgan 

Mrs . and the Misses Kemp 

A friend 

M. E.H 

Mrs. Bell 

Mr. R. M. George 

Mr. A. Welfare 

Mr. W. Woolidge 

B. C. Forder 

Mr. J. Kerr 

Mrs. Beare 

Miss J. R. Moore 

Miss E. Macnicoll 

Mrs. Salt 

Christmas offering from Baptist Chapel, 
Garland Street, Bury St. Edmund's, 
after services conducted by Mr. 
Gordon 

Dr. MacGill ' 

Mr. and Miss Bloom 

Donald 

Collected by Mrs. Cockle 

MissBudd 

Rev. James Stephens, M.A 

Miss M. A. Chapman 

H. E. and F. S. Gavlor 

Mrs. Pollit 

Miss G. M. Taylor 

E. A. V 

Mr. J. Grant 

Stamps from Insch 

Mr. C.Rogers 

Miss H. F. Parker 

Mr. A. Cowan 

Mr. S. Foster 

Mr. W. Kirkland 

Mr. George Reid 

Stamps 

Mrs. Gregory 

Postal order, Anon. 

The Cowl Street Sunday-school, 
Evesham 

Mrs. K. M. T. Ambrose 

A friend at Mentone 

Mrs. M. Anderson 

Mamma's mite for the little orphans... 

Mr. Thomas E. Sykes 

Collected by Mrs. Way and Miss Payne 

Teachers and Scholars of Eld. Lane 
Baptist Sunday-school, per Mr. H. 
Letch 

The children of the Baptist Sunday- 
school, Lossiemouth, per Mr. William 
Smith 

Jack, South Lambeth 

Mr. James Owers 

Mr. John Courtnay 

"H. C," Torquay 

Collected by Mr. H. Andrews 



£ s. 


d. 


1 8 


6 


1 1 





10 





5 





8 





5 





1 





6 


6 


5 





10 


6 


1 1 





5 





5 





10 





20 





5 





1 





10 





1 





10 





15 





5 





7 


6 


1 





1 





3 





3 





2 2 





2 





5 





5 12 





10 





1 





1 





10 





5 





2 2 





4 5 


6 


3 





5 





1 





5 





5 





1 1 





7 


6 


10 





1 





10 


9 


5 





1 





8 





1 





5 





5 





3 16 





7 11 





1 10 





10 





3 


6 


10 





5 





5 





2 4 


1 



Mrs. Pickering 

Mr. J. Hillier, Grey town, New Zealand 
Communion collection at Boundary 

Road Chapel, Walthamstow, per 

Pastor A. Budgen 

MissHagger 

Mrs. Justican, per Mrs. James Spur- 

geon 

Young people's service, Immanuel 

Church, West Brixton, per Mr. A. 

Wilson 

Meetings by Mr. Gharlesworth and the 
Orphanage Choir : — 

Southampton 

Southsea 

Winchester ... 

Expenses at Barnsbury 

Gordon Hall, per Dr. T. B. Stephenson 

Brynrnawr 

Blackheath 

Gosport 

Portsmouth 

Cross Keys, Mon. 

Annual Subscriptions : — 

Mr. W. Sewell 

Mr. J. Baskervill (2 years' subs.) 

Miss S. Thompson 

Mr. Robert Morgan 

Mr. Joshua Shaw 

Mr. Alfred Smith 

Mrs. Leechman 

Mr. W. H. Pollard 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Fox 

Mrs. Gray ... 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Smith 

Miss H. A. Grose 

Miss Grose 

Mr. James Grose 

Mr. M. Davies 

Per F. R. T. :— 

Mr. Probin 5 

Mrs. Probin 5 

In memoriam, E. P. ... 5 

Mrs. Adrian 5 

Mrs. R. Taylor 5 

F. R. T 5 

In remembrance, J. R. T. 5 

A. A. T 1 10 

The late Mrs. Baskerville 10 

Mr. W. J. Norton 

Mr. James Plumbridge 

Half-yearly Subscription : — 
Mrs. Hallett's children 

Quarterly Subscriptions : — 

The widow's mite 

Mr. S. Bown 

Mrs. Yates 

Mrs. Elgee 

Monthly Subscriptions : — 

Mr. E. K. Stace 

Sandwich, per Bankers 

F. G. B., Chelmsford 

Mr. S. H. Dauncey 

Christmas Festivities : — 
Mrs. H. Rennard 

G. D. C 

Mr. E. R. Daniells 

Mr. S. Pearce 

Miss Lennard 

Mrs. E. Freeman 

The Misses R. and L. Wigney 

Mr. E. Porter 

M. G 

Miss M . Murray 

Miss E. T. Beddome 

Mrs. Keevil 

Mrs. Taylor and friend 

Friends at Bures, per Miss E. A. Dupont 
Miss A. Pratt 



£ s. d. 
5 
5 



2 4 
10 

110 
5 



15 3 6 

10 11 8 

13 2 

3 

2 10 

46 14 

6 7 

15 12 10 

51 5 5 

40 

110 

10 

12 6 

2 2 
10 

1 1 

3 
10 6 

50 

10 

2 2 
10 6 
110 
2 2 
5 



3 15 

10 
110 

12 

2 6 

10 

10 6 

10 6 

10 

2 2 

2 6 

2 6 



10 

10 

5 

10 
5 

3 

1 

5 

1 10 
10 
2 6 
10 
6 
13 6 
U 10 







100 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



Endymion 

Mrs. Elgee 

Mrs. Lane 

Mr. C. F. Alklis 

Miss Horton 

Miss P. M. Shaw 

Miss A. Broom 

Miss E. Newing 

Mrs. Brake 

Mr. Charles Noma 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. S mth 

Mr. Edwin Davis... 

Mrs. E. Johnson 

Mrs. Sydenham 

Friends at Risby 

Mr. and Mrs. Baker 

Mrs. B. Tice 

MattieTice 

Lottie Tice 

Bennie Tice .. 
Maud and Grace Crathern 
Collected by Miss Best, Helston : — 

Mrs. Cotton 10 

Mr. Heynes 10 

Mr. Winkworth 1 

Miss Best 5 

Collected by Miss Richards, Helston . 

Collected by Mrs. Cooper 

Mrs. Edwards 

Grove Road, Gosport, Sabbath-school 

children and friends 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodcock 

A sermon-reader, Glasgow 

Mrs. Griffiths 

Mrs. Tebbutt 





£ s. 


d 




10 







6 







1 







5 







2 


6 




5 





,, 


2 


6 




10 







1 







1 





., 


1 10 







10 







1 







1 







12 







10 







5 







2 







2 







1 







2 


6 
































1 6 







1 6 


2 




2 


6 


-.1 


2 





)L 


10 





. 


5 







1 





,. 


1 1 





.. 


1 






Mrs. Wil-here 

Mrs. Barlow 

Mrs. Johnson 

Pastor R. E. Sears 

Mr. G. Lawrence and friends . 

Miss M. Hay 

Mrs. W. Vinson , 

Mr. J. Beaumont 

The Misses Rowland 

A few friends at Bures, per Pastor G 

Monk 

Mr. C. Fleming 

A servant , 

Mr. and Mrs. Chenery 

Mrs. Stevenson 

Pastor J. H. and Mrs. Barnard.. 

Mrs. Rust 

Mr. W. Jones 

Miss E. Doerter 

Miss A. Drayson 

Mr. John Miles 

Collected by Miss Reeve and Mr. W. B 

Ashe 

M. H 

Tom 

Dora, Isabel, and Grace Walker 

Mr. J. H. Padgett 

Mr. H. Hall 

Mr. W. Johnson 

Mrs. Macgregor 

Mrs. Ely and friends 

The Bible-class and friends at Hitcham, 

per Mr. C P. Clover 



£ s. 


d. 


... 5 





... 1 10 





... 2 2 





... 5 





... 12 12 





... 5 





... 10 





... 5 





... 5 





G. 




... 16 


6 


... 10 





... 5 





... 10 





... 2 


6 


... 1 





... 2 10 





... 1 1 





... 14 





... 2 


6 


... 3 





B. 




... 2 





... 1 





... 2 


6 


... 5 





... 0.10 





... 1 





... 2 





... 1 





... 18 





m, 

... 10 





£1,315 2 


9 



Orphan Boys' Collecting Cards.— Abbott, H., 2s; Allison, S., 5s 2d; Barrett, F. B., 8s 3d; Bowen, 
W. G., 5s; Bull, L. O., 7s; Bates, W., 3s 3d; Burrows, G., 5s; Beadle, J. S., 2s 9d; Burnham, F., 
16s 8d; Baker, J., £1 Is; Beer, A. J., 4s 6d ; Burgoyne, W., 10s; Copsey, C, 9s; Carman, A. E., 
£1 2s ; Cook, G, 4s 4d ; Chamberlain, W., 4s 6d ; Chandler, C, 4s ; Cozens, H., 9s 3d ; Cooper, C, 2s ; 
Constable, F., 2s 6d ; Clode, W., 10s 6d ; Cartland, F., 2s; Deverall, G., 2s 7d; Drew, J., 5s; Earth- 
rowl, A., 8s 3d ; Edwards, G., 10s 6d ; Fitch, E., 8s ; Greenhough, G., 5s ; Green, A., lis Id ; Goddard, C, 
18s 6d; Golding, D., 15s; Gardiner, G., 2s; Gammon, A., £1 Is ; Hodgson, W., 12s ; Harris, W., 2s 9d ; 
Heath, W., £1 Is ; Horan, E., 3s 6d ; Hatcher, J., 4s Id ; Hills, E., 2s 9d ; Henderson, G., £1 Is ; Ingram, 
W. A., £1 Is ; Inward, W., 2s 3d ; Jenning, R. W., 13s ; Jansen, W., 6s 7d ; Kent, J. W., 8s ; Knap- 
pett, C. E., 6s 9d ; King, A., 2s 6d ; Lowne, J., 3s 6d ; Lenderyou, A. V., 7s 3d ; Long, H., 7s 6d ; Med- 
calf, T., £1 Is; Morton, P., 2s 6d ; Mead, H., 5s ; Marks, A. T., 3s; Maclean, C, 3s; Manser, N. H., 
5s; Newman, A. T., £1 2s 6d; Norton, R., 16s 8d ; Ounsted, A., 4s 6d; Ponton, M., 3s 3d ; Ponsford, 
H., 13s 7d; Payne, 0., 4s; Peachey, A., 5s 6d; Pritchard, G., 7s lOd; Pegg, G. W., £1 Is; Pitney, 
F. G., 14s 2d; Rodwell, B., 15s; Rye, C, 5s 2d; Stoner, W., 5s 4d; Sargeant, E., £1 2s ; Strike, A., 
3s 3d ; Surtees, J., £1 Is ; Smith, R. A., 13s ; Suttle, R., 10s 7d ; Schofield, J. S., 5s ; Tanner, J., 16s 6d ; 
Trim, J. T., 8s Id ; Teasdale, H., 3s 2d ; Unwin, E., 15s 6d ; Vokes, E., Is 6d ; Warner, G., 5s ; Walker, 
J., 6s ; Westhrop, C, 6s; Wincott, J. S., 4s 3d ; White, E. P., 2s 6d ; Walker, C, 5s 6d ; Winnen, J., 
5s; Williams, A.,4s6d; Williams, J., 4s 3d; Wilkins, J., 6s 3d; Ward, R, 5s; Wells, S. A., 10s; 
Bristow, J., 6s 6d ; East, G.. 7s 6d ; Far, E., 2s ; Fennall, A., 10s ; Green, W. S., £1 Is ; Mannell, W., 
£1 4s 6d; Moore, W., 4s; Mansell, E., 12s; Rathmell, H., 6s; Roberts, E. H., 13s; Rhodes, J. H., 
5s; Rogers, W., 10s; Stringle, W., Is 6d ; Sanders, W. G., £1 Is; Uren, G., £1 Is 5d; Westbrook, 
H. J., 5s; Wallis, F. G., 2s 5d ; Walker, A. J., 10s.— Total, £47 17s. 8d. 

Orphan Girls' Collecting Cards. — Attfleld, B., 13s 6d; Arnold, S., 13s; Attiken, E., 2s 6d ; Aldrich, 
M., 5s ; Arthur, P., 10s 6d ; Allsopp, L, Is ; Bigglestone, M., 10s 6d ; Bullock, L., 7s 2d ; Broadhouse, 
N., lis 9d; Bull, L., 6s; Bertwistle, E., 10s; Bird, A., 3s 6d; Bond, E., 3s; Burrows, F., Is lOd; 
Beetham, A., 2s 7d ; Boorman, V., 3s ; Barlow, M., 7s ; Brown, R., 7s ; Cord well, H., 9s 6d ; Collis, H , 
2s 6d ; Cragg, A., 2s Id ; Cooper, K., 4s ; Cousins, L., 5s 4d ; Dickerson, E., lis 6d ; Doncaster, A., Is ; 
Donnelley, G., 9s 3d ; Epps, F., 9s ; Evans, A., 8s 6d ; Guiver, K., 10s ; Hall, F., 6s ; Hoidge, A., £1 ; 
Hall, M., 4s 2d ; Heath, K, 14s; Hobbs, M., 2s 6d; Hunter, F., 8s Id; Howell, R M 4s 6d; Hallam, 
E., lis 6d ; Haydon, L., 3s 6d ; Ingle, P., 9s 9d ; Jacques, K., 2s 6d ; Jackson, L., 7s 6d ; Johnson, A., 
ls6d; Larkum, A., 6s9d; Lailey, J., 6s; Lagdon, G., £1 Is 6d; Leitch, G, £1 Is 6d; McKinlay, F., 
5s 6d ; Mayhew, Z., 2s ; Mockford, L., 8s 9d; Maynard, M., 4s 6d; Miles, M., 10s; Nutt, C, 4s 6d ; 
Newton, K., Is; Nash; M., 3s Id ; Orridge, A., 10s 7d; Palmer, B., 16s 6d ; Pearce, A., 4s; Peepall, 
G.,4s3d; Parker, A. , 3s ; Perry, R., Is 7d ; Page, L., £1 Is; Robottom, G., £1 Is; Richmond, B., 5s; 
Smith, A., £1 3s ; Smith, K., 2s 6d ; Soper, A., 10s ; Seymour, J., 3s 6d ; Smithers, L., 5s 2d ; Stone, E., 
2s; Smith, M., 5s 2d , Sawyer, V., 5s 6d ; Shorter, E., 4s ; Steel, M., 16s 6d ; Skinner, E., 3s; Thorpe, 
E., 5s; Trepte, E., 10s; Valler, C; 4s; Veryard, R., 4s; Walker, K , £1 Is; Wright, K., 12s; Wil- 
liams, N., 2s 6d; Wale, E., 5s; Witham, P., 13s Id; Woolfit, A., 5s 6d; Westwood, F., 10s; Youens, 
L., £1 Is; Bridgman, A., 5s 3d ; Bennett, L., £1 Is; Bishopp, E., 12s 6d; Cable., F., 5s ; Gray, E., 
5s 4d; Hinchley, E., 3s; Holman, E., lis 2d; Logan, K., 6s 2d; Moles, E., 2s 7d ; Maycock, W., 
£1 Is ; Page, M., 10s ; Price, E., £1 ; Sharland, A., Is ; Warwick, L., 6s ; Woodcock, J., 6s ; Wilmore, 
E., 2s 6d.— Total, £40 0s. lid. 

List of Presents, per Mr. Charlesworth, from December 15th to January 14.th, 18S9.— Puovisroxs : — 
1 Christmas Cake, and a few fancy packets of Sweets, Miss Morris; 3 dozen tins Beef, the Australian 



COLPORTAGE ASSOCIATION. 101 

Meat Company ; 1 sack of Flour, Mrs. Collins ; 1 case of Oranges, Mr. J. Gatward ; 1 box of Oranges, 
Mr. E. Newman ; 112 lbs. Corn Flour, Messrs. Brown and Poison ; 1 case of Oranges, Mr. W. Taylor ; 
500 boxes of Figs, Mr. W. Harrison ; 1 sack of Onions, Mr. F. Brown ; 2 sacks of Potatoes, Mr. J. 
Edmead ; 2 Bullocks' Heads, Mr. S. Bayner ; 2 sacks of Potatoes, Mr. Watts ; 1 sack of Flour, Mr. W. 
Medcalf ; 1 hamper Aerated Bread, Mr. N. Read ; 4 cwts. of Potatoes, Messrs. C. and A. Parker ; 

1 barrel of Apples, Mr. James Stiff; 224 lbs. Beef, Mr. Samuel Barrow; 6 bags of Sprouts, Mr. W. 
Vinson; an assortment of Grocery, &c.,MissPackeman ; 36 lbs. of Beef, Mr. T. Round; 2 hampers of 
Grocery, The Misses J. and J. Wiseman; 4 cwts. Jam and 2 cwts. Fancy Sweets, Messrs. Chivers and 
Sons ; 1 barrel of Apples, Mr. J. Cooper ; 1 Hind of Beef, Mr. A. S. Haslam ; 7 tins of Sweets, Mr. T. S. 
Price ; 1 Shortbread, Mr. H. Mills ; 1 large Loaf, Mr. J. Plant ; 300 Fancy Cakes, Messrs. Peek, Frean, 
and Co. ; 1 Leg of Salt Pork, Messrs. J. and J. Brough Nicholson and Co. ; a quantity of Short 
Cakes, Mr. Dobson ; 3 casks of Broken Biscuits, Messrs. Huntley and Palmer ; 1 sack of Flour, Mr. 
Goddard ; 28 lbs. of Baking Powder, Messrs. Freeman and Hillyard ; 85 Pork Pies, Messrs. J. Tebbutt 
and Co. ; 4 sacks of Potatoes, 5 dozen Savoys, Mr. Norkett; 1 sack of Cabbages, a Farmer ; 224 lbs. of 
Rice, Mr. J. L. Potier ; 2 dozen packets of Rizine, Mr. R. Speller ; 7 a lbs. of Sweets, Rock Cakes, and 
Chestnuts, Mrs. Thompson ; 6 lbs. Raisins, 6 lbs. Currants, Mrs. Hall ; a quantity of Butter, Mr. E. J. 
Gorringe. 

-bows' Clothing. — 11 Flannel Shirts, 6 Cotton Shirts, 4 Night Shirts, 7 pairs Socks, 4 Sheets, The 
Reading Young Xadies' "Working Meeting, per Mrs. J. Withers; 13 Articles and 1 suit o£ Clothes, 
Mrs. Hunter ; 3 Scarves, Mrs. White ; 12 pairs Socks, The Misses M. and C. Sherwood ; 12 pairs Socks 
and Stockings, Miss Morris ; 1 Jacket and 3 Waistcoats, Mrs. E. A. Ventris ; 10 Suits, 4 Coats, and 3 
pairs Trousers, Mr. J. S. Smith ; 20 Night Shirts, The Children's Sewing Circle, per Miss A. M. Davies ; 
10 Night Shirts and 24 Flannel Shirts, Mrs. G. Thompson ; 12 pairs Cuffs, Miss L. Grove ; 3 lengths 
Shirting, and 2 lengths Material, The Misses T. and B. Phillips; 3 pairs Gloves, Mrs. Wicks; 3 
Jackets and Vests, Mrs. Read ; 7 Scarves and 5 pairs Cuffs, E. C. M. ; 6 Handkerchiefs, Mrs. Parsons; 

2 Scarves and 2 pairs Stockings, Mr. J. Colver ; 2 pairs Socks, Mrs. S. A. Whitehead ; 17 pairs Socks, 
Mrs. Stockwell; 1 dozen Scarves, Miss Edwards; a quantity of Gloves, Scarves, Collars, Ties, &c, 
Messrs. S. and T. and E. Ellison ; 8 Shirts, The Ladies' Working Society, Wynne Road, per Mrs. R. S. 
Pearce. 

Girls' Clothing. — 42 useful Articles, Miss Meares ; 189 Articles, The Reading Young Ladies' 
Working Meeting, per Mrs. J. Withers ; 22 Articles, Mrs. Hunter ; 41 Jackets and Ulsters, Mr. T. 
Yorath ; 8 Articles, Mrs. Brierley ; 10 Articles, Mrs. E. Marshall ; 6 Articles, Mrs. Dixon ; 92 Articles, 
Mrs. E. Ventris; 9 Hats and 3 Ulsters, Mr. J. S. Smith ; 5 Articles, Miss J. Shaw; 53 Articles, The 
Juvenile Working Society, Metropolitan Tabernacle, per Miss Woods ; 109 Articles, Miss Chandler's 
Bible-class ; 11 Articles, Miss E. A. Hargrave ; 17 Articles. Miss J. Henry ; 7 Pinafores, Mrs. Lindup 
and Miss Evans ; 32 Articles, The Cheam_Baptist Working Society, per Mrs. E. Cox ; 66 Articles, Mrs. 
G. Thompson ; 12 Handkerchiefs, Miss Lt. Grove ; 9 Articles, Miss McKenzie ; 6 Trimmed Hats, The 
Misses T. and B. Phillips; 6 pairs Stockings, Mrs. Casburn ; 13 Articles, Miss Clarke ; 52 Articles, 
The Ladies' Working Meeting at Tabernacle, per Miss Higgs ; 50 Articles, The Fleet Baptist Chapel 
Working Society, per Mrs. Aylett; 21 Articles, The Chatham Ladies' Working Society, per Mrs. 
Harvey; 6 Articles, Miss Wood; 2 Articles, A. J. Hold en ; 1 Article, Miss Blinkhorn ; 2 Articles, 
Mrs. Stockwell ; 6 Articles, Mrs. Rolfe ; 4 Articles, Mrs. Tye : 21 Articles, Miss Poole ; 9 Articles, Miss 
Drake ; 9 Articles, Miss Salter ; 15 Articles, The Ladies' Working Society, Wynne Road, per Mrs. 
R. S. Pearce. 

General.— A quantity of Toys, Miss Clarke ; 6 Volumes, Rev. J. G. Van Rijn ; 11 Volumes, Mr. E. A. 
Petherick ; 2 boxes of Fancy Articles, Miss Descroix ; 2 boxes of Artificial Flowers, Mr. H. Edwards ; 
2 Scrap Books, Mrs. E. A. Perkins ; 1 Telescope, " In His Name" ; 1 box of Artificial Flowers, Messrs. 
Quinn and Axten ; a few Toys and Sundries, Mr. E. Newman ; 1 Scrap Book, Miss Leaver; an assort- 
ment of Cards and Books, Religious Tract Society ; a quantity of Cards, Mrs. Butting ; 1 load of Fire- 
wood, Messrs. J. Keen and Son ; 3 Articles, Anon. ; a few Dolls, Mrs. Gunn ; a few Cards, Anon. ; 
250 framed Christmas Cards, Pastor C. Spurgeon ; 6 Scrap Books and 2 Neck Ties, Mrs. Hall ; a few 
Books and Toys, Mrs. J. Robertson ; 1 load of Firewood, Mr. Jonas Smith ; 2 Scrap Books, Mrs. J. 
Withers ; 1 dozen Books, A. J. Holden ; a few Tracts and 6 Pin-cushions, Mrs. Dixon. 



Statement of Receipts from December 15th, 1888, to January 14th, 1889. 



Subscriptions and Donations for Districts : — 














£ s. d. 


Great Totham district 


S 








Wilts, and East Somerset 






Mr. R. W. S. Griffith, for 








Association 


25 





Fritham 


10 








Ironbridge and Coalbrook- 






Hadleigh district, per Mr. 








dale 


7 10 





R.H.Cook 


20 








Castleton, Cardiff , and Pen- 






Ludlow district, per Mr. 








rhicewiber, per Mr. John 






J. Evans 


10 








Cory 


20 





Suffolk Congregational 








Pastor E. J. Farley, for St. 






Union, for Thurlow 


10 








Luke's 


20 





Ross district, per Mr. Thos. 








Wolverhampton district . . . 


10 





Blake 


5 








Cambs. Baptist Association 


10 





Wendover and neighbour- 








Tewkesbury district, per 






hood .. 


10 








Mr. Thomas White 


8 15 





Okehnmpton district 


10 








Norfolk Association, Neatis- 






Minchinhampton district .. 


10 


U 





head district 
Yorkshire Association, 


10 













Bethnal Green : — 








Boroughbridge 


10 





Mr. C. E. Fox 5 








Mr. J. Dodson, for Little- 






Mr. W. R. Fox 5 








dale 


40 







10 









£ s. d. 



254 5 



102 



SOCIETY OF EVANGELISTS. 



Essex Congregational Union, 

Pitsea 10 

Oxfordshire Association : — 
Stow and Aston 10 
Witnev ... 20 



£ s. d. 



Mrs. H. Keevil, for Melk- 


30 








sliam • 


10 








Great Totham district 


2 








Borstall 


20 








Newbury 


10 








Southern Baptist Association 


50 








Wolverhampton district ... 


10 









£ s. d 



152 

£406 5 

Subscriptions and Donations to the General Fund: — 

& s. d. 

Mr. H. Payne 2 6 

Annual Subscriptions : — 
Mr. F. Fishwick ... ... 2 



Mr. F. Thompson ... 
Mr. J. J. Cook 



2 
110 
110 



Mr. J. Hall 


1 1 


i) 


Messrs. Cassell and Co. ... 


2 2 





Mr. E. Brayne 


10 


6 


Mr. J. Passmore, jun. 


1 1 





Mr. E. Hellier 


10 


6 


Mrs. B. Hellier 


10 


6 


Mr. C. F. Allison 


5 




1*. 9 rt 


Mr. W. A. Macfie 


1 





"Sixty-eight" 


1 





Bev. W. L. and Mrs. Lang 


2 2 





Mr. W. Parlane 


10 





Mr. A. Todd 


5 





Mr. H. Osmond 


2 





Part valuation fee 


5 





Mr. William Casson 


10 





Annual Subscriptions : — 






Mr. J. Stiff 


1 1 





Mr. W. Olney 


1 1 





Messrs. Hodder and Stoughton 2 2 









— 26 1 

£11 3 



Statement of Receipts from December Xbth, 1888, to January 14M, 18S9. 





£ 


s. 


d. 








£ 


s. 


d. 


Mr. John Barrie 


1 








Mr. W. Parlane 






10 








Mr. James Baxter 


1 








Mr. D. McKercher 






1 








Mr. and Mrs. W. Blott 


5 








Thankoffering for Pastor W. 


H. Broad's 








Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 








services at Ashdon and Badwinter 







10 





and Smith's services at Upton Chapel 


20 








Miss Ellen Cross 




... 





5 





Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 








Mrs. Broadhurst 


... 







5 





and Smith's services at Christ Church, 








Beaders of "The Christian Herald " 




29 


IS 


7 


Westminster Bridge Boad 


21 








Part valuation fee 






5 








Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 








Mr. William Casson 




... 





10 





and Smith's services at Bloomsbury 








Per Miss Susan Green : — 












Chapel 


40 








Mrs. Mackenzie 


10 











MissH. Husk 





5 





Mrs. Peter Fleming 


10 











Mr. W. A. Macfie 


1 








Mrs. and Miss Green 


5 











MissShillito 


1 


1 





Mrs. P. Cameron 


1 











Bev. W. L. and Mrs. Lang 


1 


1 












1 


6 





Mr. B. Dawson 





8 

















Thankoffering for Mr. Harmer's ser- 












£16E 


9 


7 


vices at Orpington 


4 


















— 


Mr. E. E. Sawyer 


25 





















Statement of Receipts from December 15th, 1888, to January l-ith, 1889. 



£ s. 


d. 




£ s. d. 


... 1 





A sermon-reader, B. B 


5 


... 1 





Mr. W. Perry 


10 


... 5 





Mr. William Moir 


3 


... 7 


6 


Part valuation fee 


5 


... 4 





Miss Seivwright 


16 


... 10 
... 2 2 






S. P., Warrington 


10 






... 1 
... 1 









£20 11 







J. W. Y 

Mr. C. Hunt 

Mr. G. Hacksley 

Mr. Thomas Land 

Mr. S. Francis Smith, L.B.C.P. 

Mr. James Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Way 

Mr. W. A. Macfie 

Mr. T. L. Jones 



Friends sending presents to the Orphanage are earnestly requested to let their names or 
initials accompany the same, or we cannot properly acknowledge them ; and also to write to 
Mr. Spurgeon if no acknowledgment is sent within a week. All parcels should be addressed 
to Mr. Charlesworth, Stockwell Orphanage, Clapham Road, London. 

Subscriptions will be thankfully received by O. 11. Spurgeon, " Westwood," Beulah Hill, 
Upper Norwood. Should any sums sent before the 13th of last mouth be unacknowledged in 
this list, friends are requested to write at once to Mr. Spurgeon. Post Office an. I Postal 
Orders should be made payable at the Chief Office, London, to C. JI. Spurgeon: and Cheques 
and Orders should all be o'ossed. 



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THE 



SWORD AND THE TROWEL. 



MARCH, 1889. 




A SHORT SERMON" BY C. H. SPTJRGEON. 

" Behold, the eye of the Lord is upon them that fear him, upon them that hope in 
Shis mercy." — Psalm xxxiii. 18. 

HE minister of God must be a Boanerges, and thunder 
against sin, hypocrisy, self-righteousness, and every form 
of evil. He should also be a Barnabas, a son of con-, 
solation, looking after the weaklings, and comforting the 
afflicted. A good shepherd fights Lions, but he cherishes 
lambs. We have had of late to fight ; but just now we will leave the 
wolves alone, and seek out the very feeblest of the flock, that lie faint 
and ready to die, and see if we may not be the means, in God's hand, 
of administering consolation to them. 

Observe the curious blending in the text. "The eye of the Lord is 
upon them that fear him, upon them that hope in his mercy." These 
people both fear and hope; and yet fear and hope would seem to be 
contradictions. These opposites are sure to be found in every heart 
that is seeking the Lord, and they beautifully harmonize. That is a 
blessed state of mind in which fear keeps the door, and hope spreads 
the table. All is well when fear is the watchdog without, and hope 
is the lamp within. Those who have gone even a little way to heaven 
will begin to be familiar with paradoxes. The Christian life seems 
plain to those who know nothing about it ; but those who possess it, 
find it to be a mystery. Within each believer's heart there is the 
company of two armies contending with one another. The life of 
God's people is made up of fearing the Lord, and hoping in his mercy. 

m * The Lord has lately thrown in my way many despairing ones ; and, in my own 
-sickness, I have prepared this sermon for them. May the "Comforter use it ! Will 
happy Christians put it in the trembler's way ? Please see what you can do ! 

8 



106 SPECIAL PLEADING WITH THE SPECIALLY FEEBLE. 

Those that hope in the Lord's mercy may be the very least of his 
people, but they are his true people, for his eye is upon them. They 
hope ; and that is by no means so strong a grace as assurance. They 
hope only " in his mercy " ; they have not gone far enough to look to 
his power or his immutability, though these are blessed grounds of 
hope. If you take hold upon the Lord anywhere, you have a hold of 
him : whether you touch the hem of his garment by hoping in his 
mercy, or lay hold upon his arm by grasping his power, you have him, 
and he is yours. 

I speak now with those whose sole hope is hope in God's mercy. 

I want you to notice, first, that this hope is one, and only one. 
11 Upon them that hope in his mercy." Have you any other hope? 
If so, it will fail you in the day of trial. The person I have in my 
mind's eye has no hope except in the mercy of God ; but I will question 
him a little, just to see whether it is so. 

Friend, have you any hope in your own character? I mark a kind of 
tearful smile as you hear the question. " Hope in my character, sir ! 
"Why, I am lost on that ground. I have done the things that I ought 
not to have done, and I have left undone the things that I ought to 
have done. My merit is demerit, and my desert is hell." I am glad to 
hear you say so, humbling as the admission is, because it is true of 
all, whether they think so or not. If any hope to be saved by their 
own righteousness, they are under a delusion. self-truster, you 
are a living insult to the cross of Christ! If you can be saved 
through your own works, why did Jesus die? What need of an 
atoning sacrifice if man can win eternal life by his own merit ? Hope 
in God's mercy you may have ; but hope in your own merit is a 
madman's dream. 

But listen. Have you no hope in external ordinances ? Have you not 
heard that we are born again in baptism ? Don't you think that if 
you come regularly to holy communion a good hope will be yours ? 
If you are a regular hearer of the gospel, and give a guinea or two 
to a charity, don't you think that this will lay the foundation of a good 
hope? Ah ! I see my friend shake his head, as he answers, " Oh no, 
that will never do. I could not depend on rites and ceremonies — not 
even on those which are of God's ordaining. I must be a believer in 
Christ. I must have the pardon of my sins from Jesus ; nothing else 
will ease my conscience." I am glad to hear you say so. It is a 
great relief to be delivered from all those foolish errors into which 
unthinking persons fall when they imagine that drops of water and 
priestly words, or the deep bath and Scriptural phrases, or consecrated 
bread and wine, or anything else, can avail in the least degree for the 
salvation of the soul. Nothing can help the man that is not saved by 
grace, renewed by the Spirit of God, and washed in the blood of the 
Lamb. 

But, friend, have you no trust in the priesthood ? Have you not heard 
that there are persons to whom God has given the keys of the kingdom 
of heaven, and that if you go to them in the proper way they can 
absolve you? When I come to this point, I do not know how to 
restrain my indignation. Beloved friends, trust in no man, whoever 
he may be. If he can trace his apostolical succession right up to- 
Judas Iscariot, yet do not trust him : if he says that he has power on 






SPECIAL PLEADING WITH THE SPECIALLY FEEBLE. 107 

earth, to forgive sins, do not believe him. Every minister of Christ 
has power to pronounce him absolved who believes in Jesus Christ ; 
but beyond that declaratory power, there rests in no man power to 
forgive sin ; and I am sure that if God has ever dealt with you by his 
Spirit, you will never be a victim of that delusion. 

Some seem to fancy that there is hope for sinners in scientific dis- 
coveries. Nobody knows what will be found out next. Years ago, 
" everything was done by steam, and men were killed by powder " ; but 
we have got long beyond that era, and are on our way to a glorious 
condition of things, if a great war does not blow us all to matches. 
They have discovered that our mother's Bible is not inspired, and that 
the glorious gospel of Jesus Christ is a worn-out fable. The new 
doctrine practically is — Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die ; 
or if we do not die, it does not matter, for we shall all come right in 
the end. If the Lord has ever dealt with your soul, you will hate 
this infidelity, and the lying hope which grows out of it. God has 
spoken by his Word ! Long lines of witnesses declare that Word to be 
true. Myriads have lived and died in the faith of it, and poured forth 
their blood for the defence of it. It must be true ; and if there be 
no hope in the Word of God for an unpardoned sinner, then there is 
no hope for him anywhere. Yet the Lord Jesus has proclaimed no 
hope for a man who will not believe in him. If the Book declares 
that the unbeliever shall go away into everlasting punishment, then, 
depend upon it, he will do so, for the Book does not lie. Though 
men, pretending to be wise, would play the will-o'-the-wisp, and lead 
souls into marshes of doubt, where they sink into destruction, we will 
not be deluded by them. There is no hope in vain philosophy. You 
are shut up to the one hope of the text, " them that hope in his 
mercy." 

Having thus talked of the folly of another hope, let us now consider 
the one commanded in the text. I have lately been greatly puzzled, 
saddened, and humiliated by having to deal with persons in despair. 
I have tried to rally them out of it, but not always with success. Let 
me try again while I show that this hope has good foundations. 

Dear friend, you are conscious that you have greatly sinned, and 
you are afraid that you cannot be saved. I rejoice in your sense of 
sin, but I lament your doubts of pardon. Let me give you hope, first, 
by a consideration of the merciful character of God. Everywhere in 
Scripture he is described as "the Lord God, merciful and gracious." 
He says of himself that "he delighteth in mercy " ; and his saints 
were wont to sing of him, that "his mercy endureth for ever." His 
very name is love. He bids you forgive unto seventy times seven, 
and he will certainly do that himself which he bids you do. Come, 
then, indulge a hope of his mercy, and though you deserve nothing at 
his hands, believe that he will pass by your offences. 

Let me encourage you to hope in his mercy, next, from the fact that 
there is a gospel. When the angels at first proclaimed the birth of 
Christ, they sang of good news for man. Every Sabbath-day the 
gospel is preached in ten thousand places, and everywhere it is good 
news. The essence of it is, " There is forgiveness for the greatest sin, 
for Jesus Christ has lived and died." Consider with joy that if there 
be a gospel it is not sent to mock you. Does not the very word 



108 SPECIAL PLEADING WITH THE SPECIALLY FEEBLE. 

" gospel " give you hope ? If there is good news for men, may there 
not be good news for you ? 

Next, take hope from the life and death of the Lord Jesus Christ. 
You know how he lived among men. Did he ever reject a soul that 
came to him ? When they brought to him her that was taken in 
the act of adultery, did he condemn her ? When a woman, that was 
a sinner, washed his feet with tears, did he spurn her ? He was so 
gentle, and so tender, that his life should make you feel that, if you 
would only trust him, he will receive you. But remember his death : 
the bloody sweat in the garden ; the cruel scourging ; the crown of 
thorns ; the nailing to the cross ; the groan of anguish. Why these ? 
We are told, he died, " the Just for the unjust." If Jesus died for the 
guilty, despair is absurd. When the Son of God bows his head to die 
for men, mercy reigns without limit. Sin, brought into contact with 
the divine blood-shedding, vanishes at once. 

I would ask the desponding to think of the Holy Spirit. Have you 
not heard that the Holy Spirit makes the bodies of men his temples, 
purifying them, sanctifying them ? Why ? To whom does he do this? 
To the guilty ; to those who are weak, and feeble, and cannot rise 
out of sin. He helpeth them ; but if they were good by nature, they 
would not want him. It is because they are hard that he comes to 
soften them : because they are dead, he comes to make them live. 
trembler, the Holy Spirit would not have been provided unless God 
had intended to meet all your wants and difficulties. 

And listen again. JVe may pray. Do you think that God would 
have bidden us pray, if he did not mean to hear us ? You un- 
believingly say, " He will never hear me." How dare you say that ? 
If there be no pardon, why has he spared you to pray for it ? Why 
does he let you live, and feel a desire to call upon his name, if he 
never intends* to hear you? It would be a wicked hoax if a man 
invited poor people to his house to receive charity, and then, when 
they came there, denied them relief. God will not invite you to pray 
without intending to hear you. Take comfort from this. 

If that does not cheer you, let me remind you of the many who have 
come to Christ, who tell you that they have been saved by him. I am 
one of them. I do not think that you are any worse than I was. I 
hope you are not. I do not think that you can be more careless 
than I was once ; and, on the other hand, I do not think that you can 
be in greater despair than I was afterwards. I came to Jesus as I 
was, and I trusted him, and he did not cast me away. Dear heart, he 
cannot cast 3 r ou away. I mean you who are reading these lines at this 
moment. Dare to hope in God's mercy, because so many others have 
hoped in it, and none of them have hoped in vain. If you met one 
of us who warned you, " Don't go to Jesus, he will refuse you," you 
might hesitate. But it is not so : we are unanimous in declaring 
that he will cast out none that come to him. 

If you want any other word said to you, let me remind you of my 
text, "The eye of the Lord is upon them that fear him, upon them 
that hope in his mercy." It reminds me of a king sitting at a 
window. There is a splendid gathering in the square, and the king 
is looking down upon it. What can he be looking at ? He passes 
over the helmets of the soldiery and the plumes of the ladies in their 



SPECIAL PLEADING WITH THE SPECIALLY FEEBLE. 2 09 

carriages. What is lie looking at ? The person for whom he searches 
is highly honoured. Transfer the picture to God, in the great heavens, 
looking down upon the whole mass of men. Whom is he looking for ? 
He is looking for him who dares to hope in his mercy. Surely, this 
ought to encourage you to hope, since God has an eye for you, and 
looks for you beyond all others. 

For a moment hearken to me while I try to exhort you to cast away 
doubts, that this hope may be yours. Let me try to chase away 
objections. 

Let me speak to those who despair. Is it, after all, true that your 
case is so peculiar? " Oh," say you, "I have been guilty of the worst of 
sins! " In the case of certain of you, I do not quite believe it. You 
have been, from early childood, amiable in temper, and excellent in 
moral character; and I do not like you to exaggerate, and make yourself 
out to be what you are not. You have enough to answer for without 
blackening yourself needlessly. "What are you driving at, sir? Do 
you want to prove that there is something good in me ? " Oh, no ! you 
are bad enough, and you are a deal worse than you think you are : I 
will warrant you that. But, still my drift is this — that worse sinners 
than } r ou are have come to Christ, and have been saved. And why not 
you ? If there is a door wide enough for a big sinner to go through, 
it is wide enough for you to go through too. A man had two dogs, 
and he liked them to go in and out of the house freely, and therefore 
he had two holes cut in the door. He was asked the meaning of this, 
and he answered, " That little hole is for the little dog." " But what 
is the big hole for? " Said he, " That is for the great dog." Then 
said one, "But the little dog might have gone through the same hole 
as the big dog, surely." " There! " said he, " I never thought of that." 
I want you to think of it : the little dog can pass where the big dog 
has entered. If the dying thief came to Christ, and was saved, why 
should not you ? If Saul of Tarsus, blood-red with persecution, found 
room, there is room for you. Write yourself down as black as you 
like, but still remember that others as bad as yourself have been saved ; 
and why not j r ou ? 

I would like to put a question to you, but I must whisper it. 
Perhaps the other friends will not listen. Don't you think that when 
people have no hope, and are a long time despairing, there is a little 
sullenness in it ? I do not want to say anything hard, but may there 
not be just a spice of rebellion against God in your humility ? You want 
the Lord to deal with you in a marvellous manner ; and as he does not 
choose to gratify you, you will not believe in him? You crave a 
remarkable dream ; you long for a striking text to jump right out of 
the Bible and fix on you ; and as you cannot get these special ex- 
periences, you will not believe in Jesus. I have put this very softly. 
Is there anything in it ? If so, just shake yourself out of that sullen 
spirit. I pray you do so by God's grace. Don't put Christ away from 
you out of a proud despair. Accept his mercy as a common-place sinner. 
Don't want to be a great personage in the kingdom of Christ ; but come 
as a common-place sinner, and accept such a Saviour as anybody else 
may accept. I am afraid there is just a tincture about you of wanting 
to be somebody — even though it be only to be worse than other people. 
I have known men take as much pride in blackening themselves with 



110 SPECIAL PLEADING WITH THE SPECIALLY FEEBLE. 

their sins as others have taken in their self -righteousness. You need 
not be so mighty proud of your rags : the very thought of them is 
detestable. Come just as you are, a common-place sinner, to take the 
common salvation which is provided in Jesus Christ. 

Listen to me again. Do you not think that, when you despair and 
refuse to hope in God, you are dishonouring him? You say, "He 
will never forgive me." How can you say so? You do him much, 
dishonour by that. " Oh, but he cannot!" Dare you use the word 
" cannot " in connection with omnipotent love? Unbelief gives God 
the lie. Despair is blasphemy against the infinite love and mercy of 
God. I am sure you would be ashamed to be guilty of that. Believe 
that the Lord is ready to forgive you. Come back to your Father's 
house with " I have sinned " upon your lip, and a full confession of 
your transgression written on the fleshy tablets of your heart. God 
grant that it may be so ! 

Let me try once more. So you think that God will never save you, 
but will leave you to perish ? May I ask you ivhat good you think 
your death will do to him ? What profit is there in your blood ? Sup- 
pose that you are lost, what gain is there to God in that? But 
suppose the Lord should save you. " Oh," say you, " He shall never 
hear the last of it ! 

' I will praise him in life, and praise him in death, 
And praise him as long as he lendeth me breath.' " 

He will be honoured then. You ought to hope that for his name's 
sake you may yet obtain mercy through Jesus Christ. 

I will ask you another question. Suppose you should now discover 
that the Lord chose you from before the foundation of the world, that 
your name is written in his Book of Life, that he has bought you with 
his blood, and has espoused you to himself by an everlasting marriage, 
and means you to sit at his right hand, in his glory — suppose it is so, 
what will you say to yourself, in the happy days which are coming, 
for having thought so badly of the Well-beloved ? If any of you has 
a dear friend at your side, or one nearer still than a friend, if there 
was ever a time when you used to think badly of the one you love so 
well, you cannot remember it without feeling a hot drop rising beneath 
the eyelid. It seems to me, that when I get to heaven and see my 
Lord, and am filled with his love, I shall marvel to think that I ever 
doubted him. Even now I want you to chide yourself for lack of trust 
in the dear Lord. Alas, that he loves you so, and yet you should not 
love him ! Rock, Rock ! Break ! Break ! The mighty rod of love 
hath smitten thee, pour forth thy streams of living love and deep 
repentance. Jesus loves thee. Oh, do not so live that afterwards thou 
shalt have to chide thyself for thinking so hardly of him. All the 
griefs that Christ bore do not so greatly vex his heart as that wicked 
thought of yours, that he is unwilling to forgive. By that thought 
you have stabbed him ! By that hard suspicion you have nailed him 
to the cross ! Oh, do not so ; but, guilty as you are, believe that he 
forgives. Wretch as you are, believe that he saves. Trust yourself 
with him : this is all the gospel. " He that believeth, and is baptized, 
shall be saved," is the fuller form of it. " Believe on the Lord Jesus 
Christ, and thou shalt be saved," is the essence of it. Neglect it not. 



Ill 

BY THOMAS SPURGEON, OF AUCKLAND TABERNACLE, NEW ZEALAND. 

" A GLOW-WORM, do you call it— that miserable, dull-coloured, 
J\. half-inch, creeping thing, a glow-worm ! There's precious little 
to go into ecstasies over, so far as I can see. A glow-worm, indeed ! 
Well, it is a worm, right enough, and a poor enough specimen at that ; 
but where the glow comes in beats me." The enthusiastic naturalist 
smiled in silence; but he thought the more. It was useless to expect 
admiration from such a critic. To him nature's choicest and most 
curious treasures were mean and miserable. The ignorant cannot judge. 
They are misled by appearances ; and, alas, they often will not learn ! 
The unenlightened one calls this little thing the most contemptible of 
worms ; nor can he be persuaded that it is a gem most beautiful. 

Suspend your judgment, courteous reader, on So-and-so. You do not 
know all. He may not be as mean a creature as he looks. Appearances 
deceive. Wait till you have learned what gifts and graces lurk within 
an uninviting exterior. The worm may be a glow-worm — crush it not. 
Uplift your heel, good sir. Bring it not down with violence, lest you 
stamp on a saint, and extinguish one of the lights of the world ! 

Special circumstances are necessary to reveal what is precious in cer- 
tain characters. The dusk of evening and the shades of night are the 
special circumstances of the glow-worm. Then it is true to its name ; 
a halo gleams about it; the grub is glorified. Then each tiny insect 
becomes a living flame, a fairy lamp, a mimic star. 

Ah, yes ! you should see the very ones you spurn and slight when 
their opportunity arrives. See them in the sick-chamber, or at the 
death-bed. See them when sudden accident or cunning treachery has 
turned the daylight into darkness. Then they rise to the occasion. 
Then their graces glisten : sorrow makes them shine. Perchance, dear 
reader, those whom you have once contemned have cheered you since, 
retaliating with sweet revenge by illuminating your darkest hour. Are 
you not glad you did not crush them ? 

There is a wonderful charm about the gleam of glow-worms, especially 
when they shine in myriads. The pale blue light of one or two may 
pass unnoticed, but of the shining host everybody says, " How beautiful ! " 
Can I ever forget the glories of the Tikitapu bush ? (Since then, alas, 
it has blazed with fiercer fires, belched forth from the flaming volcano of 
Tarawera !) There, in a cutting, w r as the glow-worms' rendezvous. The 
banks, on either side the road, were all a-twinkle. Ten thousand tiny 
stars sparkled from the grass and on the leaves. Every fern-frond was 
full of eyes. Bless the beaming beauties, beetles though they were ! 
They sent us on our way rejoicing. I defy the most skilful pyrotechnist 
to produce anything half as lovely. The coloured fires, and prismatic 
fountains, and fairy lamps of the costliest fete are not within " coo-ee " 
of this exhibition. Modest little glow-worms, you have triumphed! 
Yours is the First Prize for Illuminations ! 

Learn, hence, a two-fold lesson. The brightest blaze is not always 
the most beautiful ; and combination often makes amends for inefficiency 
and feebleness. Get together, you whose gifts are slender. Co-operate 



112 GLOW-WORMS. 

and amalgamate, if your powers are few, and your purses poor. Do not 
despise your own effort, but gleam in company. 

" Shine like a glow-worm, if you cannot like a star." 

Glow may be better than glory, after all. Li»ht is preferable to light- 
ning. I would rather be a glow-worm than a fire-fly, or a shooting-star,, 
for that matter. Would not you ? 

It is not every fraternity of glow-worms whose lot is cast in a public 
thoroughfare ; many are born to shine unseen. Do you think they 
murmur ? I came across an encampment of them once in some deep 
caves, little frequented. There, from the rough roof, their pale radiance 
streamed upon the else scarcely ever broken gloom. Yet these were as 
bright and beautiful as those which tourists were admiring every day. 
What cared they that so few saw them shine ? God put them there, 
and he could see them always. What is your lot, and where your sphere, 
good friend ? Be content, though unobserved and unapplauded. You 
may decorate a thorn-hedge with at least one diamond. You may glitter 
in a cavern, and mitigate its gloom. Shine on. God in heaven sees 
you, and will bless you. 

Why are these worms luminous? " In order that they may seize their 
prey," say some. Their victims are supposed to be attracted by their 
beam, as sea-birds by a lighthouse, or moths by a candle. Poor silly 
dupes, lured to their death by a pretty flame ! This sort of thing is not 
confined to insects and birds. A pair of bright eyes may decoy to 
destruction. The glare of the theatre and dram-shop may entice to ruin. 
The devil himself can pose as an angel of light. 

Then, again, some hold that the glow-worm's light serves as a defence 
against nocturnal enemies, as travellers kindle a watch-fire to keep the- 
beasts at bay. Riding at anchor, in the deep of darkness, these frail 
barques hang up their lantern, lest some leviathan should run them 
down. We shall do well to keep our beacons burning. A bold pro- 
fession, a clear outshining, may save us from collision and disaster. 

What if the Lord made these creatures lustrous merely that human 
eyes might glitter with delight at sight of them ? Let us be grateful 
for glow-worms, for he who " made the stars also " made them too. 

Perhaps they sparkle in the banks to teach us lessons. " We do our 
little best," they say ; " do you the same." " We get our light from 
above; is not yours borrowed, too?" "We are never more pleased 
than when, instead of praising us, onlookers say, ' How good and wise 
is God to make such wondrous things ! ' for we desire to honour hinu 
Let your light so shine that men may glorify your heavenly Father." 

It is a well-established fact, however, that the female glow-worm gives 
the brighter light ; the male can scarcely be said to glow at all. He 
does his best, poor fellow ; but he is not gifted with brilliance. His wife, 
his sister, his fair cousin, and his aunt do the shining. (I ought to say, 
in passing, that he can fly, while they are wingless. Nature always 
compensates.) There is no help for it. We men must give the palm 
for light and brightness to the gentler sex. 

" A lamp is lit in woman's eye 
That souls else lost on earth remember angels by." 

I find that poets have so often compared women to "stars of the 



THE TRUE APOSTOLICAL SUCCESSION. 113"' 

night," and " gems of the morn," that they may not take it as a com- 
pliment to be compared to glow-worms. Yet, truth to tell, there can 
scarcely be a better symbol ; and if you would see sweet woman at her 
best, behold ♦her in the time of grief. Then her true beauty appears: 
men are nowhere. Who, like her, can silently suffer and meekly bear ? 
Who, like her, can sympathize, and solace, and tend? Who more true 
and faithful ? Who so patient and long-suffering ? 

The glimmer of these lady glow-worms is thought by some to be the 
flame of love. With these the amorous belles allure the sterner sex ; 
and wherefore not, if God has made them so ? I am glad one poet names 
it to their praise. 

' ' They call thee worm, thy love ungently name ; 
Whilst thou, like Hero, lightest to thy nook 
Some bold Leander, with thy constant flame, 
Whose Hellespont may be this running brook. 
Oh, let the wise man-worm his pride abjure, 
And his own love be half as bright and pure ! " — Blackwood. 

And who can tell but that some of those soft gleams denote the joy of 
loving matrons welcoming their husbands home from business ? (The 
husbands have the wings, remember.) Next time I see a glow-worm, 
I shall look out for her " worser half," and shall almost hope to hear 
him say — 

" O Helen ! O Helen ! You're the light o' my dwellin'." 

This is as it ought to be. Would that it were so in every home on 
earth ! 

Farewell, bright little friends ! Many thanks for the light you have 
thrown on several subjects. We are worms, too; but we mean to be 
glow-worms, and shine to the praise of our Redeemer, for 

" Poor helpless worms in him possess 
Grace, wisdom, power, and righteousness." 



THE Church of Christ will never be denuded of faithful witnesses. 
When one champion and honoured servant is removed, another is 
found ready to take his place. " Moses my servant is dead." But, no 
sooner is that announcement made, than Joshua is summoned from his 
tent with the salutation and commission :— -"Be strong, and of a good 
courage." Elijah is carried up to heaven in a fiery chariot ; but the 
same hour Elisha stands before us, his worthy and accredited successor. 
The thunder-tones of Luther are in course of time silenced ; but the 
voices of other faithful witnesses and sponsors are prepared in turn to 
prolong the echoes. There is thus a blessed continuity in the Church 
of Christ, a true Apostolic succession. No sooner is the mandate given, 
" Remove the diadem, take off the crown," than some other is served 
heir to it : some new shoulders ready for the burden : — some fresh hand 
ready to seize the fallen banner and bear it onward. " The Lord gave 
the word, and great was the company of those that published it." 
(Ps. lxviii. 11.)— Macduff's "Ripples in the Starlight:' 



in 



% Wmi to Jowip $xmw* 

BY CHARLES COOK, OP HYDE PARK HALL, LONDON, W. 

THE story goes that King Henry VI IT., wandering one night in the 
streets of London in disgnise, was met at the foot of one of the bridges 
by some of the watch ; and, not giving a good account of himself, was car- 
ried off to the Poultry Compter, and shut up for the night without fire or 
candle. On his liberation he made a grant of thirty chaldrons of coals, 
and a quantity of bread, for the solace of night prisoners. A little 
personal insight and experience had awakened his compassion. There 
are prisons in other lands where the light of God's love never shines, and 
where the " Bread of Life " is never broken. May we, who are in happier 
case, sympathize with the inmates of such places, and feel it a privilege 
to carry to such the story of his love, who says, " I was in prison, and 
ye visited me ! " 

Having been to nearly all the prisons in Europe, as well as others in 
Africa and America, I here desire to give a short account of my 
endeavours to give the Word of God to those prisoners who were not 
provided with it, and to alleviate their sorrows. 

EGYPT. 

From seaboard to Soudan, from Alexandria to Philae, did we travel, 
scattering the Word in villages and towns, on board the steamers, and in 
cells of prisons. In Cairo, the prisons were not so very bad ; but in other 
places, aud specially in Upper Egypt, the gaols were most unhealthy ; it 
was no uncommon thing to find the water used for drinking pur- 
poses kept in the latrine, and a cesspool under the room where the 
prisoners slept. This was bad, indeed ; but on enquiry of the authori- 
ties, I found over one thousand four hundred men in prison awaiting 
trial, and I was officially informed that many of them had thus been 
imprisoned for nearly seven years. This, and other instances of in- 
justice, led me to ludge a strong protest at the Palace of the Khedive ; 
and, writing to his Highness, I complained bitterly of the inhumanity 
of detaining prisoners so long before bringing them to trial. Whether 
through this letter or not, I was pleased to notice that three days after- 
wards one hundred and fifty poor ivretches were released, and others were to 
follow. I ''thanked God, and took courage"; and having been enabled 
•to give copies of the Scriptures to all who could read in the prisons of 
Egypt, I left these miserable dungeons, with their chained and manacled 
inmates, and sailed for the classic shores of 

GREECE. 

Passing by the Island of Crete, in less than three days, from Alexan- 
dria, we reached the Pira3us, and after a long and dusty drive, we enter 
Athens, to find one of our travelling companions stricken with ophthalmia, 
which he had contracted somewhere in Egypt. 

* This is the second paper in which Mr. Charles Cook has called attention in our 
pages to his prison work. We deeply sympathize in his desire to bless these needy and 
suttering ones ; and we think his lectures will enable friends to help him, if they invite 
iiim to their churches. 



i, 



A VISIT TO FOREIGN PRISONS. 115 

Visiting the prisons here, we were surprised to find them dirtier than 
those we had recently left, and quite as unhealthy ; for in one room we 
found ten men, in a room ten feet square ; and in another, where thirteen 
men were confined — one being dangerously ill — the room measured 
twelve feet square, the only mode of ventilation we could see being the 
occasional opening of the door. No work was given the prisoners to do, 
and no books were provided for them to read ; whilst the floors, stair- 
cases, and passages were simply thick with dirt. On our arrival, the 
chief prison in Athens was in a great uproar, as three men had escaped, 
and only one had just been recaptured. This man we visited, and gave 
him a copy of the gospels ; but so dejected and miserable did the cap- 
tives all appear, that we first ordered, them all to be supplied with 
coffee, and then left copies of the Scriptures in modern Greek for them 
all. Shame on the land of Homer and Demosthenes ! and shame, indeed, 
on the authorities of Athens, to allow such dirt and misery to exist ! We 
wrote to the Minister, who has charge of the prisons, pointing out the 
need of reform, and complaining of the unsanitary condition of the 
place. We had to leave Athens before there was time to get an answer, 
•but trust something was done to mend matters. 

ITALY. 

" It is no good going to Italy," said many friends, " you will never 
get the Scriptures into the prisons of that country." "Never venture, 
never win," replied I, "yet I will endeavour to do so." What is the 
result ? From Milan, in the north, to Naples, in the south ; from 
Puzzuoli to Brindisi, in the old state dungeons of the Inquisition at 
Venice, to the convict prisons of Rome itself, have I had the joy and 
pleasure of distributing the Word of life. The people of Italy are 
struggling to be free from the thraldom of the priests ; are far more 
loyal to King than to Pope ; and I was rather helped than hindered in 
my work by all the officials I came in contact with. Among the 
many interesting visits paid to the gaols of Italy, I select but one. We 
had run through Rome, visiting every prison it possesses, and leaving 
behind us our precious books without any opposition from the authorities, 
and reached Brindisi, where some six hundred convicts were imprisoned 
in the old castle. So eager were these men to possess the Scriptures, 
that they pressed round us so closely as to anger the governor, who 
was conducting us over the place. We were in one of the exercising 
yards — prisoners in chains all around us clamouring for our books ; the 
governor was about ordering the men into their cells, because of their 
noise, &c. Not a moment was to be lost ; so, taking all the copies I had 
with me, and smiling the official into a good humour, I threw them into 
the middle of the yard. The noise of their chains clanking on the 
stones, and the scrambling of the convicts to obtain possession of those 
books, will ever live in my memory. In this country there are over 
iive thousand men imprisoned for life, and these are known by their 
dress, which consists of red jacket, green cap, and dark trousers. 

FRANCE. 

" How long has this man to endure solitary confinement ? " I asked 
of the warder who was conducting me over the " Maison Centrale," of 



116 A VISIT TO FOREIGN PRISONS. 

Caen, in Normandy. f% Ten years." " What is the effect of this on* 
the prisoners ? " "It drives them mad," answered the officer. Descend- 
ing into the lower part of the prison, I found a man in a " dark cell," 
and enquired the time he had been thus immured. " He has been in 
this cell twenty- five days, and has five more to stay," was the answer. 
The light of the lantern which I carried almost blinded the man. We 
gave away our books to the prisoners, and left the place. 

No Eoman Catholic Government supplies its prisoners with Bibles ; 
but I am thankful to say that in many such countries I have travelled, 
visiting them with this object in view, and have been most gladly wel- 
comed. The nine huge prisons of Paris alone occupied me nearly two 
years of what time I could spare from my own congregation in London. 
The prison discipline of France is extremely rigorous; but there is 
nothing about it which is calculated to reform a man, much less to con- 
vert him. The result is seen in the enormous number of men who 
are convicted again and again, and who, at last, have to be shipped as 
incorrigibles to New Caledonia. 

AUSTRIA. 

This was the most Papal country I had, as yet, seen. Several persons 
had been summoned for giving away tracts, and the wife of the chaplain 
to our own ambassador told me they were not allowed to hold a public 
prayer-meeting in their own house. We managed, however, to give 
away four hundred and fifty Testaments in four days in the streets of 
Vienna. By the aid of our credentials, we were soon in possession of 
the needful authority for visiting the prisons of Austria. It would not 
be wise, concerning this country, to speak in detail : enough to say that 
Protestants, Catholics, and Jews alike shared in the blessing of having 
the Word in their own language, we having received an official receipt 
for all the books which we gave away. Of course, I found that what 
could be done in Vienna it was possible to do in the provinces, and the 
receipt mentioned above was of great use to me. 

HUNGARY. 

Here we feel we are breathing another air. Though still under the 
rule of Austria, the Hungarians are a liberty-loving people ; and I had 
liberty given me to go where I liked, and do as I wished. In the 
capital — Buda-Pesth — in one day I supplied every prisoner with God's 
Word. Servians, Hungarians, Croatians, and others, all received the 
books with thankfulness. The ventilation of the prisons here was bad, 
the stench was horrible ; but the authorities thanked me for calling 
attention to it, and promised to remedy it. To God be all the praise. 

I am trying to arrange with some of our ministering brethren at home 
to lecture on " The Prisons of the World," illustrating the journey by 
about thirty costumes, which I have brought from many lands. The 
lecture will deal with prisoners, and the costumes will illustrate the 
manners and customs of the ordinary people of the lands I have visited. 
Letters addressed to me, Hyde Park Hall, London, W., will find me. 



117 



* 



SO far as the giving: of his substance to the cause of God was con- 
cerned, Samuel Morley was the foremost benefactor of England 
during the present century. No one can read Mr. Hodder's interesting 
biography without seeing that this chief among merchant princes was 
what he was because he was a Christian. Mr. Hodder's hero bore a 
name that was familiar to everyone ; but he differed in many essential 
particulars from the ordinary run of men who are supposed to deserve 
a biography after death. He was not a great scholar; in the con- 
ventional sense he was not a man of wide literary culture ; in his views 
of gospel truth, and of moral duty, many, priding themselves on a more 
"advanced " liberality, would have called him narrow. He has left no 
copious diary, and few letters worthy of being printed ; and his speeches, 
though marked by strong common-sense, were mainly exhausted by the 
occasions on which they were spoken. Many who knew the man as 
he was, and honoured him for what he did, at the same time wondered 
how the story of his life could be successfully told in a book. We 
are glad that Mr. Hodder's volume has justified the experiment. We 
see Mr. Morley as he lived and worked ; and his story is worth the 
telling. It should stimulate young men to aim high, and to put Christ 
first in all the associations of life. 

The Morleys are an old Nottinghamshire family, who, more than 
a century ago, possessed both wealth and influence. Samuel Morley, 
who died in middle-age, one hundred and twelve years ago, left three 
sons, and two of these, John and Richard, were the founders of the 
great firm in Wood Street. They were both of them shrewd men of busi- 
ness, as well as men of considerable capacity in other respects. Hitherto 
they had carried on the farm at Sneinton, and at the same time had been 
engaged in hosiery business at Nottingham. But with the changes 
that had come over their family life, there came changes also in their 
business relations. To meet the requirements of an increasing trade, 
it was mutually resolved that John should leave the old associations 
at Sneinton and Nottingham, and found a house in London, while 
Richard should carry on the farm, and at the same time extend the 
manufacturing business. The arrangement was, that while the London 
and Nottingham branches should be quite distinct as regarded the 
management, all accounts should be dealt with in London, and in both 
places the style and title of the firm should be " I. and R. Morley." 

In 1798 John Morley married Sarah Poulton, of Maidenhead, and 
these were the parents of Samuel Morley. John came of Puritan 
stock ; he was from the first an uncompromising Nonconformist, but he 
would, nevertheless, sometimes be seen in the family pew in Sneinton 
church. 

" Content with small beginnings, he engaged part of a house in 
Milk Street, Cheapside, immediately opposite to the spot where, until 
quite recently, stood the City of London School. Instead of setting 
up a large domestic establishment in the suburbs, as many would 

* "The Life of Samuel Morley." By Edwin Hodder. With etched portr^'t by 
Manesse. Hodder and Stoughton. Price 14s. 



118 SAMUEL MORLEY, THE MERCHANT PHILANTHROPIST. 

have done, he lived on the premises ; and when, in course of time, 
business increased, he moved to larger and better quarters in Wood 

Street When it was demonstrated to a moral certainty that 

success was ensured, and not till then, John Morley took a house in 
Homerton, where most of his children were born ; and when, in the 
course of a few years, the continued prosperity of the business justified 
the step, he removed to a much larger house, in Well Street, Hackney, 
where he lived till the end of his long life." 

Samuel Morley's days of childhood and youth were as happy as health, 
genial surroundings, and religion could make them. " His mother 
was a woman of character, of sweet and tender disposition, of intense 
affection, and of beautiful, unpretentious piety. His father was a man 
universally beloved, whose name stood well in the City, who was respected 
in a wide circle of religious and philanthropic workers ; in London, one 
of the best known Nonconformist laymen, and in his own home, always 
bright and genial." 

As a schoolboy, young Samuel passed some time at Melbourne, in Cam- 
bridgeshire, and also at Southampton. Although he did well at school, 
he showed no uncommon piety in youth ; and at sixteen, in 1825, he 
commenced his career by entering the business house in Wood Street. 
What he was at this time is thus described by Mr. Hodder : — 

" In many things the boy was father to the man. He was earnest in 
what he did. If he raced he raced as for his life ; and if he took his 
place in a tug of war, he pulled as if success or failure depended upon 
himself alone. His holidays were always spent at Hackney, except 
when an occasional visit was made, with his family, to the seaside. And 
happy holidays they were. There was the grand old garden, the large 
paddock with a pony to ride, and the companionship of brothers 
and sisters, and every encouragement from his parents to indulge in all 
healthy and manly recreations. Samuel loved his father and mother 
passionately, loved the home influences, and never associated the least 
notion of constraint with the family roof. It would be hard to say 
which exercised the greatest influence over him, his father or his mother. 
In after-life he used often to say, ' I am what my mother made me'; at 
the same time his father's influence was a most important factor in the 
formation of his character ; and no one who knew him can forget his 
constant reference to his father's opinions and sayings in such words as 
these, with which he would often commence or finish a sentence : ' As 
my dear father used to say.' " 

He was content to commence in a humble way, by working for seven 
years in the counting-house as an ordinary clerk, walking to and fro 
between Hackney and the City, the hours of business being from soon 
after nine until seven in the evening. John Morley, senior, used to be 
seen, with his two sons, making the journey on foot before popular con- 
veyances were available ; and during those morning and evening walks 
the father had many opportunities of teaching his children to become 
like himself— thorough-going Nonconformists as well as philanthropists, 
although he never unduly pressed his own views of religion and politics- 
upon their acceptance. The rising merchant and his amiable wife 
became " celebrated for their hospitality ; and among their visitors were 
all the prominent men of the day belonging to Nonconformist circles- 



SAMUEL MORLEY, THE MERCHANT PHILANTHROPIST. 119 

where Mr. Morley exercised, perhaps, a greater influence than any other 
layman of his time." Trained amid such associations, in a place which 
was then a centre of Nonconformity, it would have been singularindeed if 
the young Morleys had not done credit to their house. "We have, of 
course, all along to bear in mind, that the days of Mr. Morley's youth 
and early business life were very different from our own, and there 
was then much self-denial in a man's openly avowing himself a Non- 
conformist. 

Samuel Morley entered as heartily into his father's philanthropic 
enterprises as he did into the business ; but, contrary to what might 
have been expected when all was so prosperous, he appears to have been 
in no hurry to marry ; and, indeed, when he did come across the right 
lady, he did so by a sort of -happy accident. Having occasion to call 
on Mr. Wilson, of Highbury," he was introduced to the Misses Hope, of 
Liverpool, and to one of these, Eebekah Maria, he was married in 1841. 
Mr. Morley found in his wife a thorough help, a woman who knew 
how to govern the home, and make it comfortable while he was engaged 
in the now rapidly-multiplying duties of life. He had already begun 
to develop into the philanthropist ; and Richard Knill, later on, the 
friend of Mr. Spurgeon, was one of the first to receive a donation for 
his work at Wotton-under-Edge. Meanwhile there were many things 
in which such a man could not fail to be interested. Dissenters needed 
to be better represented in Parliament : the subject of primary educa- 
tion was being warmly debated ; and the founding of The Nonconformist, 
by Edward Miall, proved that the denominations could use the Press 
with a power which their opponents could not excel. In all such matters 
Mr. Morley had a part. As time went on, and after the death of his 
father, in 1848, when, as it were, Samuel Morley stood more alone in the 
world, there were plenty of other enterprises which he was glad to 
stimulate. The Home Mission work of the Congregational Union he en- 
couraged. The bettering of the condition of the working-classes in con- 
nection with theatre preaching, and the providing of better homes ; 
parliamentary reform; the currency question; and the celebration of 
the bi-centenary of the two thousand confessors who left the Church of 
England in 1662, all won his aid. The Memorial Hall, on the site of 
the old Fleet Prison, in Farringdon Street, commemorates the latter 
celebration, and £6,000 was contributed to the building fund by Mr. 
Morley. His long term of parliamentary life, the Nottingham election 
riots, his return for Bristol, and the disappointments, hard labours, and 
successes which followed, may be regarded as distinct episodes in his' 
busy life. It was contrary to the wishes of many far-seeing friends 
that he entered the House of Commons at all ; and though he may have 
rendered useful service, he did so at an expenditure of strength whiclr 
might have been given to what some considered his more legitimate 
calling. 

The glimpses which are given of Mr. Morley's home-life, both at 
Stamford Hill and Tonbridge, are not only pleasing in themselves, but 
they reveal the sentiments he held in regard to many who are content to 
dwell on a sort of border-land between the church and the world. Thus, 
when his children were kept at a party, at a minister's house, where 
dancing, &c, was kept up until the small hours of the morning, Mr.. 
Morley wrote to the pastor referred to : — 



120 SAMUEL MORLEY, THE MERCHANT PHILANTHROPIST. 

" There is a position, it appears to me, to be sustained between a 
rigid asceticism and moroseness on the one hand, and a laxity and negli- 
gence on the other ; but, without going into details, I am sure that at 
the present time, and especially in the suburbs of London, the danger 
lies in the direction of the forgetfulness of this ruling principle of con- 
secration, and, consequently, of undue approach to worldly maxims and 
ways. It was, therefore, with regret that I received a report of what 
transpired on the occasion to which your letter refers, because I thought 
the inevitable tendency of such proceedings would be to make it more 
difficult for some of us to keep back our children from ways and habits 
of life which, I am convinced, are injurious to their bodily and spiritual 
health. . . . It is not without reason, I think, that we look to you 
to check, rather than to stimulate, such tendencies in our circle." 

From the above no sensible Christian person will infer that Mr. 
Morley was in any sense narrow in restricting the liberties of the 
Christian household. 

" Mr. Morley was a kind and genial host. His attraction, however, 
•was rather to his study than to the drawing-room, especially when his 
guest happened to be a man . . who could set before him, in a clear 
and practical fashion, some new scheme of public usefulness. He was 
not very social, in the ordinary sense of the word. He very often asked 
people to have a chop with him in Wood Street, at one o'clock j but in 
the days prior to his entry into Parliament, he rarely gave dinner-parties 
•at home. The 'pleasures of the table' had no charms for him. He was 
simple in his tastes, never seemed to care for what is called 'good 
living,' and scrupulously avoided all habits of self-indulgence. He was, 
through life, exceedingly moderate in his food ; and when he took wine 
he only took it in very small quantities, and for some years before the 
time of which we are now writing, he had abstained from it altogether. 
It is hardly necessary to say that, although not caring for these things 
himself, he did not force his opinions on others." 

The picture we have of Mr. Morley as a business man is in all 
respects worthy of his Christian character. He never cut-down his 
workpeople's wages ; but while seeking their interests, he was never 
satisfied with anything short of the best service. Knowing that one 
captain in a ship was enough, he did not like to give the word of com- 
mand more than once ; and he was not disposed to " make allowances 
for men who were dull and slow." If hasty words escaped him, he would 
be one of the first to make amends. There were thus, as was inevit- 
able, flaws in his character, which no one lamented more than himself. 
"His best friends acknowledge that he carried imperiousness to a 
fault; and Mr. Morley himself averred that he had been all his life 
long trying to conquer his besetting sin of impatience." It has to 
be remembered, however, that the worries inseparable from managing 
so vast a concern were considerable. The house of Morley is the largest 
business of its kind in the Queen's dominions. When we find that 
two thousand letters "would be delivered each day by the general post, 
followed by from sixty to a hundred by every succeeding post throughout 
the day, some idea of the magnitude of the concern may be formed. 

The house in Wood Street was a school of training for many a youth 
or young man who was ambitious to make his mark in the world ; and 



SAMUEL MORLEY, THE MERCHANT PHILANTHROPIST. 121 

in many respects those who were engaged on the premises, found them- 
selves encouraged to be steadfast in the Christian life. A Home 
Missionary Association was formed ; and at the station established in 
the neighbourhood of Golden Lane, a missionary was appointed at a 
salary of £120 per annum. The quarterly meetings of the employe's 
were addressed by some of the leading ministers of the day. 

Another interesting passage in Mr. Morley's life was that relating to 
his association with the newspaper press. "On June 8, 1868, the price 
of The Daily News, which had hitherto been threepence, was, mainly 
owing to the exertions of Mr. Morley, reduced to one penny." It 
would have been far more satisfactory if the Christian merchant, as 
one of the largest proprietors, could have exercised more influence over 
the editorial staff. One of the crying wants of London is a daily paper 
of a high moral tone — one not having two or three columns a day 
devoted to racing and betting. If it had occurred to Mr. Morley to 
render this great service, he could have carried it out as only few have 
the ability to do. It is still an anomaly that many provincial towns 
should be more favoured in regard to their daily papers than the capital. 

Mr. Morley's philanthropy was local as well as general ; and thus, 
when, at sixty years of age, he removed from Stamford Hill to Leigh, 
near Tonbridge, the villagers of all ranks at once felt the benefit of 
having such a neighbour. Mr. Hodder says : — 

" The drainage of the village was very imperfect : he had it put in a 
state of thorough efficiency, almost entirely at his own expense. The 
water was not good or abundant : he had a well dug, and machinery 
erected to pump and filter the water into a reservoir holding thirteen 
thousand gallons ; he caused four fountains to be placed in the village, 
so that pure and good water could be within the reach of all, and a 
plentiful supply in a granite trough for dogs and horses. He found that 
there was no proper recreation-ground for the villagers : he caused one 
to be made and planted with trees, with a good road round it, and paths 
across it. The cottages needed radical improvement : he had some 
re-constructed, and new ones built of a model type. The villagers had 
no ground to cultivate as gardens: he set apart a plot of land for the 
purpose, cut it up into sections, and let them at a low rate. Cottage 
gardening was at a discount : he offered prizes for the best kept gardens 
and plants, and gave his gardener carte blanche to supply, free of charge, 
trees and shrubs to ornament the cottage gardens. In short, he found 
it a neglected village, and, as the gradual work of years, he transformed 
it into one of the neatest and prettiest in the country." 

Christian work in the village was superintended by Miss Morley, for 
whose preachers her father erected an "undenominational chapel," the 
lady's views being " very nearly in accordance with those held by the 
religious community known as Plymouth Brethren." While he erected 
a baptistery, attended the services, and sometimes partook of the Com- 
munion in the school-room, and admired his daughter's devotion, Mr. 
Morley " totally disagreed with the opinions of many branches of the 
religious community with which she was connected." It was at Leigh, 
as a neighbour of Mr. Morley's, that Robert Moffat, the veteran mis- 
sionary, spent his last days. 

In the narrow limits at our disposal, it would, of course, be impossible 

9 



122 "by dilution." 

to give anything like a complete account of the many-sided philan- 
thropic work of Samuel Morley ; but those who are able to do so will do 
well to look into the volume for themselves. Who does not know of his 
princely liberality ? What part of Christian work has been unwatered 
by his generosity ? For steady continuous giving, he was not to be 
outdone ; and yet his wealth seemed ever to be increased thereby. In 
this the Word of the Lord was fulfilled. The working-classes never 
had a more honest and ardent friend ; and among the enterprises which 
he supported on their behalf, some fuller mention might well have been 
made of the work at Lambeth Baths, superintended by the late G. M. 
Murphy, a work to which Mr. Morley munificently contributed. Mr. 
Morley's influence extended to all corners of the country ; and his> 
departure has left a gap which will not be readily filled. His whole 
heart went with the gospel of our Lord Jesus, and he often deplored 
those departures from it which were cropping up in his own day, but 
have become far more glaring since his departure. In the death of 
Shaftesbury and Morley, the evangelical workers of Great Britain have 
sustained a loss worthy of a mourning like that of " Hadad-rimmon, 
in the valley of Megiddo." 



" IT THAT is more unpleasant than to have to charge an opponent 
VV with telling a lie ? To use the term in its nude simplicity will 
excite in an audience (on average occasions) the feeling of disgust 
which, as Jeames Plush informed the master of the house, pervaded the 
servants' hall in reference to a dinner of leg of mutton, suet pudding,, 
greens, potatoes, and beer : * Substantial, sir, no doubt ; but corse, sir, 
very corse ! ' How can we remove the coarseness ? By dilution. We 
can say that our opponent reminds us of a conversation between a Friend 
in Philadelphia, and one who had made some incredible statement : 
' William, thee knows I never call names ; but, William, if the Mayor 
of this city were to come to me, and say, " Joshua, I want thee to find 
me the biggest liar in all Philadelphia," I should come to thee, and say, 
" William, the Mayor wants to see thee ! " ' .An English judge attained 
the same end in this way : • I should be sorry to say Brother Pearson is 
the greatest liar of a lawyer I ever saw ; but he is certainly more 
economical of truth than any counsel on this circuit.' " 

We copy the above from "For Further Consideration ." It has often 
come before our thoughts while reading Down-Grade literature. Can- 
dour seems to have departed the earth. Words are now, in the case of 
these gentlemen, often employed as instruments for concealing thoughts. 
If the New Theology men would only say what they mean, and mean 
what they say, we could deal with them ; but, truly, the serpent is more 
subtle than any beast of the field. If none enter heaven but those who 
have the simplicity of little children, they are not likely to get there. 
They would, if it were possible, deceive the very elect. We do not say 
that they would be guilty of deliberate lying ; but we do say that, if 
they were to fall into that habit, we should expect them to do it in a 
very natural and easy manner. 



123 

totral %ftim ixvfo am gpKimi ^Miom* 

BY J. SALTER. 

DR. LIVINGSTONE lived and laboured to bring the sorrows and 
wrongs of the Dark Continent to the notice of Christendom. 
He travelled, he wrote, he died with Africa heavy on his heart. His 
powerful pen made Europe acquainted with the horrors of the slave 
trade. He had marched along the route of the slave caravan, and had 
seen the human skeletons that marked the line of march. He had passed 
the charred ruins of once flourishing villages, the inhabitants of which 
formed emaciated caravans for sale on the coast if they did not perish 
on the way thither. His sympathetic nature was consumed as a whole 
burnt sacrifice on the altar of inner Africa. Africa laid heavily on 
his heart, and in the heart of Africa he died. 

The death of this great man has done more than his life, though the 
work that has been accomplished since his death could never have been 
achieved without the sacrificing of such a noble, self-denying life. 
He w r as the sun that shone on the dense darkness of the great Conti- 
nent, though there were other contemporary luminaries of lesser mag- 
nitude that cast no small flood of light over the terra incognita. Mr. 
Saker, of the Baptist Missionary Society, lived and laboured long among 
the Cameroons. Some of his translations are before us while we write. 
Dr. Moffat, from the London Missionary Society, and his noble, heroic 
wife, spent their lives in South Central Africa, between the Molopo and 
the Zambesi, and many were the trophies they won for Jesus, among 
whom was Africana, the terrible freebooter. While there were pioneer 
missionaries in South Central Africa, there were others in the North- 
East of equal ability, endurance, and zeal. Among these, L. Krapf, 
afterwards Doctor, and his able associate, J. Rebinann, both of the 
Church Missionary Society. The first of these was missionary among 
the Abyssinians, but that mission was abandoned in 1843, and the fol- 
lowing year L. Krapf settled at Mombassa, and after two years he was 
joined by his indefatigable countryman, J. Rebmann. Krapf was the 
tirst to announce to Europe the existence of a snow-capped mountain at 
the equator, known as Kilimanjaro. The news at that time was 
received with a smile of incredulity on the part of those who were not 
quite so familiar with snow mountains as the discoverer ; for who would 
expect to find a mountain of snow under a tropical sun ? He also 
reported the existence of a lake in the centre, which subsequent visitors 
to the interior proved to be true. He was the first to discover the con- 
cord of affinities peculiar to all the languages of the Bantu family. This 
was first worked out in his grammar of the Swahili language, sub- 
sequently elaborated and remodelled by the late Bishop Steere. 
Krapf's dictionary of the Swahili language is the only one extant, 
and is a great work in itself. Rebmann made the first translation of 
any portion of the Scriptures in the Swahili language. His gospel 
of Luke was printed by the British and Foreign Bible Society. 

* This paper, by our beloved brother, so long a missionary to the Asiatics, contains 
much that is deeply interesting to those who carry Africa upon their hearts. It strikes 
us as a very valuable paper. — C. H. S. 



124 CENTRAL AFRICA AND OUR MISSION STATIONS. 

It is pleasant to linger among this noble band of veterans a while; 
for while their services are recorded in heaven, there is a chance 
of their being forgotten on earth. It is the divine order that one should 
sow and another reap. Heaping is a happy work, far more pleasant than 
sowing ; and the age in which we live asks for reaping rather than 
sowing. Many will enter the harvest-field who do not care about 
ploughing and preparing the soil ; and in the joy of harvest, the toil of 
the labourer in early spring is forgotten. But without the toiler of 
spring, there would be no precious sheaves to gather. Those early 
veterans in the mission-field had first to acquire an unknown tongue, 
discover its grammatical formation, formulate a dictionary, and even 
teach the natives the mysterious art of reading and writing. New-comers 
have all this to hand, and are often able to revise and reconstruct 
the productions of these pioneers, so that the veterans cease to be 
identified with the work they initiated with so much toil. Moffat, 
Saker, Livingstone, and a host of others, whose bones lie buried in the 
dark land, are now in the glory-land. " Yea, saith the Spirit, and 
their works do follow them" ; and a glorious rest it must be to those 
weary toilers in the land of idols. In making these remarks, our mind 
is attracted to Krapf, Rebmann, and Carey. The last of these was the 
first in the field — not in Africa, but in India — whose early translation 
of the New Testament in Urdu is before us. I have no doubt but his 
heart rejoiced — and well might all the devoted brethren of Serampore 
rejoice with him — when such a work was completed ; and it was a fit 
occasion to do so ; but it is out of date now, having been revised, and 
the Dev Nagri character, in which it is printed, seldom used for that 
language. Indeed, a pioneer, though he lays the foundation on which 
others build, must not expect to produce a standard work. This, also, 
applies to the early missionaries — Krapf and Rebmann. Krapf was the 
first to reduce the singular language to order, to adapt it to Roman 
characters, and to produce the first grammar. But the aged Krapf has 
lived to see his noble work superseded by the laborious Bishop of 
Zanzibar. Bishop Steere has adopted a different literation from that 
used by Krapf, and has produced a grammar which will eclipse that of his 
forerunner in the work ; but, then, the Bishop had the missionary's 
materials and tools to work with. Krapf's solid foundation is out of 
sight, and the bishop's noble and beautiful superstructure stands full in 
view. 

Rebmann's translation will also cease to be a monument to his 
memory. It is in Krapf's literation. But the indefatigable Bishop 
lived to translate all the other parts of the New Testament, according 
to his own system, so that the Gospel of Luke, though forming part of 
the New Testament, is not in entire conformity with it. It is to the 
honour of the late Bishop that he felt a reluctance to obliterate the 
monument to the memory of the pioneer Rebmann ; so, while he 
has altered the literation to bring it into fair conformity with his own 
great work, the translation remains as Rebmann's, and his work is thus 
bound up with that of the Bishop in the New Testament. 

Bishop Steere's translation is in the Swahili of Zanzibar, Krapf and 
Rebmann in the Swahili of Mombassa, and, though only about one 
hundred and fifty miles apart, how soon changes in the language take 



CENTRAL AFRICA AND OUR MISSION STATIONS. 125 

place ! At Mombassa, a dislike is manifested to the " ch," and the " w,*' 
which are freely used at Zanzibar ; thus, Inchi (land) becomes nti, and 
Bwana (Lord) becomes Bana : among the Maiao and Makua, the r and 
the 1 are interchanged ; thus, God is Maungu, or Mulangu, or Murungu ; 
and yet this language belongs to a family of languages spoken from 
Zanzibar, in the Indian Ocean, to Old Calabar, on the Atlantic coast. In 
no other part of the world can a region be discovered where an unbroken 
system of intercommunication covers such a space of the globe. It ir 
interesting to notice how soon, in some directions, the sound of a word 
becomes changed by an altered articulation ; and yet, in another 
direction, words may travel many hundreds of miles with little or no 
change. Stanley Pool is about two thousand miles from Zanzibar ; but 
mark the affinity in the following words : — 

The chiefs three dogs. 
Zanzibar. Mbwa tatu wa Mfalme. 

On the Congo. Mbwa tatu a Mfumu. 

There is a strong element of intelligence and precision in this family 
group of tongues, inconsistent with a land always debased by slavery 
and cruel superstitious practices. Such intelligence and precision 
suggest a great past, which has been obliterated by Arab marauders, 
tribal wars, and heathen darkness. The history of this great continent 
is hidden, but we may predict a great future for both the language and 
the people. 

Our missionaries have generally been the first to explore foreign lands, 
and bring to notice the rites and habits of the people ; but in Africa 
this work has been largely shared by adventurous travellers, such as 
Baker, Speke, Cameron, and especially by Livingstone and Stanley. In 
our youthful days we used to look at the mysterious map of Africa 
with its coast line of bays, lagoons, and rivers, coming from some 
imaginary source, and reaching the sea by a course equally imaginary, 
while the centre was filled up with lions, timers, and elephants. In the 
map of to-day, these have all disappeared, and populous villages, towns, 
well-defined rivers and lakes appear where wild beasts were only 
supposed to roam. All t]iis has been done at no small sacrifice of life 
and wealth. Native prejudices and customs have been no small 
impediments in the way of development. The extravagant presents 
expected by some chiefs, through whose territory the traveller wishes to 
pass, and the hostility of other chiefs against any European entering 
their country, have been serious obstacles in the way. The climate, too, 
has claimed a very serious death-rate. On the banks of the Niger and 
the Congo, an old, wide-spread belief still lives, that the white traveller 
steals away the spirits of the black men, and secretly conveys them, 
confined in some article of merchandise, to the coast, where they again 
put on their mortal tenements, and are made to work for the white man. 
We have met with Africans who attest the truth of this statement ; for 
they assert that they have heard a noise among the European mer- 
chandise, which was construed into the voice of such a captured spirit 
crying for liberty. 

But the greatest enemies to the prosperity of the country are the 
Arab slave hunters, who have for so long a period held Africa from 
Whydah to Kiloa as a legitimate slave hunting-ground. At one tine 



126 CENTRAL AFRICA AND OUR MISSION STATIONS. 

the Western coast was the great outlet of this inhuman traffic, but the 
occupation of Sierra Leone, and that portion of land that separates 
Ashanti from the sea, has closed the trade in that direction. This refuge 
for freed slaves has been maintained at a terrible cost, and has well 
earned the name of "■ the white man's grave." Slavers were captured 
in the Atlantic Ocean, and their human freight landed here under 
British protection. How far the slave trade influenced the interior of 
Africa from the West Coast, may be imagined from the Polyglotta 
Africana, compiled by Dr. Koelle, in 1854, in which he collected from 
freed slaves at Sierra Leone, specimens of language from more than 200 
different tribes. Many of those liberated slaves were then rejoicing in 
their emancipation from a greater tyrant than the Arab hunter or the 
cruel master of the baracoon, for they were rejoicing in the liberty of 
the children of God. Our honoured S. Crowther, now Bishop of the 
Niger, rose from the ranks of the slave boys free at Sierra Leone. 

But slavery checked in the West found a speedy outlet in the East. 
How long Zanzibar had been a slave market we cannot tell, but its 
name would suggest an early trade there. Its original name is 
Unguja, by which it is still known among the natives. It was a bold 
stroke to compel Syud Berghas to close the slave market of that island, 
for his interest was great in it. He levied a poll-tax on each man, 
woman, and child sold. In vain he was urged to repair his lost revenue 
by honourable trade, but he did not care to give up a certainty for 
an uncertainty. It needed an English man-of-war to appear oft' 
Shangani before the Sultan saw the wisdom of acceding to the English 
proposal. A church now stands on the grounds of the old slave market. 
Thus another great avenue for commerce in human sinew and bone was 
stopped in 1873. Still Africa continues a slave hunting ground, 
villages are still turned into blood and smoke, and the death track of 
the slave caravan is still noted, though we are willing and happy to think 
it has already felt the influence of civilization. 

We have already referred to the great traveller and some of his 
contemporaries. We may now say how little has been accomplished 
that seems effectual to the removal of slavery, from Africa. But Living- 
stone's death has done more than his life. His life laid open the land, 
his death has been a call to arise and occupy. It seemed to need 
the sacrifice of such a noble life to rouse the churches and nations of 
Europe to action. Well might the sons and daughters of the Covenanters 
take the lead in the noble work ! Consecrated bands of Scotchmen went 
forth and occupied Blantyre, between the Zambesi and the Nyassa. These 
have gradually extended their influence along the shores of the lake. 
The Church Missionary Society occupied Uganda, at the northern end 
of the Victoria Nyanza, and planted intermediate stations along the long- 
line of route ; and the London Missionary Society has occupied Ujiji, on 
the Tanganyika, where Stanley discovered Livingstone, and they are 
extending their influence on the banks of this inland sea ; while the 
Universities Mission, fixing their head-quarters at Zanzibar, have placed 
stations inland, among the Wakua and Waioo, till they reach the oppo- 
site shore of the Nyassa, about which are moving our brethren from 
Scotland. These are all scattered about the slave hunting ground 
between the East coast and the centre. Thus a noble work has been 



CENTRAL AFRICA AND OUR MISSION STATIONS. 127 

accomplished in comparatively few years, and predicts a glorious 
result. 

So far, these preserves for hunting human game have been invaded ; 
but this applies only to the Eastern and smaller half of the continent. 
Glancing from the Western coast to the centre, our expectation runs 
along the newly- discovered Congo ; the old Zaire and Lualaba united 
in one. We are indebted for what we know of this great river more to 
Stanley than to Livingstone. The knowledge of the importance of this 
water-way will exert an influence on Africa that cannot be overrated, 
for it is destined to become the highway to the centre. Along this 
line of route the missionaries from the Baptist Missionary Society, 
who do not appear on the East, are most prominent. Already they have 
planted stations on the upper river, and have more than twenty workers 
engaged at the gigantic task before them, and are calling on others to 
follow as they press forward to the lakes, and thus join hands with our 
brethren from the East coast. Comber, and other volunteers, have 
sacrificed their lives to the great task ; others, baptized for the dead, 
have succeeded to their labours. Bentley has achieved a great work in 
the production of the grammar and dictionary that bear his name. 
This forms a grand stepping-stone between the West coast and the 
lakes, which missionaries and traders will highly value. The mer- 
chant has already passed on before, and an advanced station is now 
maintained at Stanley Pool ; and here we are truly in Central Africa, 
being about equidistant from the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. This 
is a noble achievement, worthy the object in view. And yet Stanley 
Pool is five hundred miles distant from the most advanced station 
from the Eastern coast. A journey of five hundred miles of jungle 
land, with unknown swamps, no roads, and bridgeless rivers to cross, 
and where all burdens must be carried by the natives, is a very long 
way to travel. The water-way extends to Manynema, and perhaps 
further, so that possibly this distance may be shortened by two hun- 
dred and fifty miles by this water-way. Thus great things have been 
-done. We say, " Praise the Lord ! Gird thy sword on thy thigh, 
most mighty ; and in thy majesty ride prosperously, because of truth 
and meekness and righteousness ; and thy right hand shall teach thee 
terrible things." 

We have thus far traced the triumphs of the churches in Central 
Africa, that we may the better understand the extent and nature of a 
change that is likely to discomfort most of these noble workers — a 
change which, though it may necessitate discomfort and re-organization, 
has, nevertheless, in it the death-knell of slavery, and tlie ultimate pro- 
sperity of the native churches of Central Africa. 

Those mission-stations scattered about Central Africa cannot fail to 
excite the hostility of the prowling Arabs. They have ever, with 
much reason, regarded the European as unfavourable to their craft, and 
their influence at Uganda, and elsewhere, has been felt with baneful effect. 
Their hunting ground, to which time immemorial has given them an 
imaginary claim, is invaded. Still they have thousands of miles of native 
wold, left over which they can chase their human victims, secure from 
European gaze. But there is another and more important element now to 
the front. We live in an age when Europe is extending her protection to 



128 CENTRAL AFRICA AND OUR MISSION STATIONS. 

every part of the globe where it can be enforced. The broad plains of Africa 
could hardly escape the notice of our over-crowded nations seeking an 
extension of colonization and trade. The formation of the Congo Free 
States, of which Leopold, King of the Belgians, is nominal monarch, 
was grandly conceived and brought to a successful issue. Here a 
civilized government will ere long make its power felt, and mission- 
stations will not be exposed to the whims of vacillating chiefs, but 
secured by national protection ; while a growing trade, aided by enforced 
law, will expel slavery in every form from the State. This is a happy 
forecast of a bright future. 

The rest of Central Africa is already under European protection, in 
which Portugal, France, Germany, and England claim rights. How will 
this arrangement affect our mission-stations now under a foreign protec- 
torate ? Already our missionaries at Madagascar, Gaboon, and elsewhere 
have been discomforted by a foreign protection. Is there a similar dis- 
comfort looming in the future for our noble brethren ot the Church 
Missionary Society, of the Universities' Mission, and our Scotch brethren 
on the Nyassa ? Unfortunately all, or nearly all, the stations belonging 
to the Universities' Mission lie within the German Protectorate, and 
must more or less be affected by it. The same may be said of most of 
the stations belonging to the other societies. Indeed, the route to 
Uganda, with all the stations that mark that line of route, are now in 
German hands. Our Scotch brethren are removed from German in- 
fluence, and will probably fall under British rule. Within the portion 
ceded to British rule, few mission stations exist ; but, probably, the 
present circuitous route to Uganda will be abandoned for a direct 
route — the route that cost Bishop Hannington his life — now through 
the British Protectorate. 

The slave hunters are aroused to desperation. They have made a com- 
bined attack on the station, at Stanley Falls, with too much success. 
They have come in collision with Germans, at Tanga, and left ten of 
their dead behind them. They have, also, measured their strength with 
our northern brethren on the lake. These are the dying struggles of a 
cruel giant. Christendom will rejoice when he is dead and buried. 

French, English, and German companies are already formed, and these 
will cultivate trade over vast regions, and will, to a great extent, ad- 
minister them. The British Protectorate includes Mombassa, the 
scene of J.Krapf's labours, where, indeed, he enjoyed the Sultan's autho- 
rity " to convert the world " ; it stretches from the coast to the Victoria 
Nyanza. This region has been reported unsafe for travellers, and even 
African cannibals have their reputed homestead there. Should the 
missions, under the German Protectorate, be too much under restraint, 
as they possibly may be, they must re-arrange and work under British 
protection. With slavery extinct, legitimate trade created, and European 
protection throughout the great Continent, the morning sun will dispel 
the darkness of the long night, civilization will extend, and, with this, 
we pray the gospel may run, have free course, and be glorified. 



129 



Wfyo sjjsll §^| % §wpre 

BY C. H. SPURGEON. 

QUIS custodiet ipsos custodes ? So say the Latins. Shepherds may 
keep the sheep ; but who shall pastorize the shepherds ? A ques- 
tion of the weightiest import, both for the flocks and the pastors. 

Politically, it is all very well to devise a form of government; but what 
if the governors themselves are ungovernable ? Look at poor France, 
whose first political necessity seems to be that her rulers should be ruled 
by a sense of justice, patriotism, and nobility. Given a Parliament where 
each man draws his pound a day, and secures his seat by promising to 
get subsidies for the district which returns him; he then sells his 
vote to those who will enable him to fulfil his promises, and a nation 
is dragged into needless expenses, which must end, sooner or later, in 
national bankruptcy. This happens in a republic, enjoying universal 
suffrage, which is, to some, the beau-ideal of perfect government. In 
our own land parliamentary institutions are becoming greatly degraded 
by the behaviour of certain representatives of the people. We may 
glory in our constitution ; but if God does not send us a race of true 
men to make up our House of Commons, where shall we be ? 

Of vital importance is this enquiry religiously. What is to become of 
any body of Christians whose ministers are not loyal to their Lord and 
to his gospel ? When a church has over it a man of whom it can be 
justly said that he shows no sign of ever having been converted, what 
spirituality can be expected to survive ? When another preacher has 
one creed for the pulpit, and another for the private fraternal meeting, 
how can truth and honesty flourish in the community ? When a third 
changes with the moon, and is not quite sure of anything, how can his 
hearers be established in the faith ? We are not imagining cases ; there 
are too many who answer the description. Evil in the pulpit is poison in 
the fountain. In this case we find death in the great pot out of which 
all the guests are to be fed. 

But who shall Jceep the keepers ? There is the great difficulty. This 
is a task beyond the power of the church and its most valiant champions. 
We might do well to watch the schools of the prophets, that more of 
deep devotion and fervent piety should be nurtured there. We might 
do no more than our duty if we were more jealously watchful over every 
election of ministers in which we take part, so that none were ordained 
but those sound in the faith, and filled with the Spirit. Even for these 
things, who is sufficient ? But if these were done to perfection, the 
plague might still break out among the teachers : their heads might be 
dazed with error, or their hearts grow chill with worldliness. We are 
thrown back upon him that keepeth Israel. It is well that it should 
be so. That which develops dependence upon God works for good. 

All plans, however wise in themselves, and however effective they 
would be if we had to deal with honesty and truth, are baffled by the 
moral obliquity which is part of the evil. The men are not to be bound 
by creeds : they confess that such things are useless to them. Their 
moral sense is deadened by the error they have imbibed. They have 
become shepherds that they might poison the flock, and keepers of 



130 WHO SHALL KEEP THE KEEPERS? 

the vineyard that they might spoil the vines : if this was not their first 
^motive, their course of action distinctly suggests it. There is no reach- 
ing them : they are bewitched and benumbed. Neither from within nor 
from without are healthy influences likely to operate upon them ; we 
must carry the case to the great Head of the church, and leave it in his 
hands. When he ascended on high he received gifts for men ; and these 
gifts were men of differing offices, for the perfecting of his people. We 
have need that he should anew send us such men. May be we have 
forgotten to look to the ascended Lord. May be we have been gazing 
about us to find the men without looking first to HIM from whom they 
must come. Our Lord can speedily raise us up a new race of apo- 
stolic preachers from amid our youth, or he can convert those who are 
now the devourers of the churches. In the Reformation, many of the 
ablest leaders were called from among the priests and the monks ; 
and to-day the Lord may breathe the life of faith into those who lie 
buried in sceptical philosophies. With him all things are possible. 
When we are at the end of our power and knowledge, we are on the 
confines of his omnipotence and omniscience. Let us bow our heads 
as we pass the frontier, and leave behind our own barren impotence to 
rejoice in his fruitful strength. Our confidence in the church of God 
lies not in her natural power, but in the fact that " God is in the midst 
of her ; she shall not be moved." 

Those who lament the declension of many among the present pro- 
fessed ministry should cry day and night unto the Lord to bless his 
people with pastors after his own heart. Let them also see to it that 
they walk wisely towards those they have. It behoves established 
believers to bear their testimony faithfully, but kindly, to young divines 
who are beginning to step aside ; for it may be that a gentle word may 
save them. In grosser cases, firmness may be needful as to the matter 
of quitting an unfaithful, Christless ministry ; or as to the removal of 
the false teacher. 

In the happy instances in which the gospel is held and fully preached, 
the faithful should encourage, sustain, and help with all their hearts. 
Those who are faithful to the truth of God, should find us faithful to 
them. God will have his gifts valued, and his servants well treated. 
He has among his chosen ministers those who feel tears of gratitude 
welling up in their eyes when they think of the kindness of their 
churches ; but there are other worthy men who are buffeted and bat- 
tered, left without a decent maintenance, and never appreciated as they 
ought to be. For these the Lord himself will plead with his people, 
if there be not speedy improvement. Let not true shepherds be for- 
gotten by the flocks to which they minister, nor by any of the faithful, 
lest their Master should be provoked to recall the gift which is not 
valued. Now, if never before, our eyes should be upon all the faithful 
of the land, to hold up their hands. No one must hold himself aloof lest 
that bitter curse should fall upon him which was of old pronounced 
• on Meroz and the inhabitants thereof, because they came not to the 
help of the Lord against the mighty. 



131 



#tle §prg \\t Hartjrr. 



A MONTH'S mission in the Strand, London, has caused me to know 
that Fashion is not Beauty, but often the contrary in many respects. 
A lady asked me, the other day, what I thought of the " get-up " of the 
ladies we saw rushing into the theatres in their various costumes ? 

I said, " You have rightly named it 'get-up? for it is indeed a 'get- 
up? Many of them," I replied, "do not seem to have the least idea that 
Nature and Beauty are twin sisters." But it is so ; therefore, the more 
natural we are in our dress, life, and speech, the more useful and beau- 
tiful shall we become. No manor woman need be ashamed of being natural 
and simple in life and dress. We are all God's workmanship, and all 
that God has made is worthy of his divine power. But I have witnessed 
much of late, how Fashion, Sloth, and Vice can mar even God's work- 
manship. Some so-called ladies seem quite dissatisfied with the form 
with which God has endowed them. I heard one person remark that she 
must now prepare to " get herself up " in order to witness the " Cats " 
(some foolish play, I imagined), and the pit, I thought, was the right place 
for such a person to appear in. This lady thought she must try and 
assist Providence to improve her personal appearance ; and what a fright 
she made herself look, to be sure ! She was only one among the many 
of both sexes I saw nightly rushing, in carriages, cabs, and hansoms, to 
these so-called places of amusement. 

This same person asked me if I had been to see " The Babes in the 
Wood." 

" No, madam," I replied ; " life is too brief to waste in folly and 
foolery. I like pleasure that is lasting, and fun without sin ; but the 
main thing in this life is to bring glory to God, and to be made a blessing to 
others ; and all who neglect to do this, miss the real object of life. This 
life is not an accident, but part of a divine plan ; and I may miss my 
part altogether if I am careless, but I shall play a pleasant and profitable 
part during this life if I seek divine guidance. Therefore, the sooner a 
girl or boy seeks the Lord, the better it will be for them, as well as for 
those with whom they come in contact." 

The person with whom I held this conversation, though she was a 
woman over seventy years of age, seemed to think there was nothing 
wrong in having dozens of young children employed on the stage, 
and trained for the pantomime. She could see no reason why mothers 
and fathers should not take their little girls and boys to witness such 
scenes. I told her my heart was pained, day after day, to see children 
being taken by hundreds to the theatres. I saw mothers rushing, with 
children in arms, fighting their way through the crowds into the pit. I 
said, " Madam, your conversation reminds me of a little girl I have heard 
about. It was an incident full of pathos. If you want interest, excite- 
ment, emotion, pathos, passion, and heroism, you need not go to the 
stage to get it. Listen, while I recite to you the story of this little 
heroic Christian girl." 

" She lived in what is known in America as a frame-house, built with 
wood. All the houses round her were mostly of the same kind. One 
day there was a sad and sudden shout of ' Fire ! Fire ! Fire ! ' It was, 
alas ! too true. The fire-demon was abroad in fury, and the wind 



132 LITTLE MARY THE MARTYR. 

caused the flames to make great headway before much assistance could 
be given. In one house the husband rescued his fainting wife, who 
had become unconscious through the smoke. He then sprang from the 
window, and saved himself; and then, like a poor maniac, went rushing 
through the crowd, crying, and tearing his hair. And why ? Ah ! that 
was the sad part of it. In his excitement he had saved his wife and 
himself ; and then it dawned upon him that his three dear children 
were asleep upstairs, and there was no possible chance of reaching them. 
Poor man ! he would have rushed into the burning house and perished 
with them but for strong friends who held him back by main force. 
But for them he would have destroyed his life in an utterly hopeless 
attempt. 

. " Soon the excitement became intense. Through the blinding smoke 
a weak voice was heard, and a dim form was seen at the top window. 
Little Mary was there, the heroine of my story. She was a sweet little 
Christian of twelve tender years. She was hugging her little brother 
Bobbie, and a cry was raised from beneath : 

" 'Jump, we will catch you ; jump, jump, quickly ! ' cried the crowd. 

" She heard the shout from beneath, and instantly dropped her little 
brother into the outstretched hands, which, happily, caught the child in 
safety. 

" ' Jump, jump, jump ! ' was again the continued shout. 

But no voice was heard to reply. All thought she had succumbed ; 
but soon her little figure was again discerned at the window. 

" Jump, jump, jump ! " said the people, with increased excitement ; 
and so she did. It was her last leap in this life, but it was a grand one. 
She was safely caught by the crowd, and in her arms was a dear little 
baby, scarcely hurt. Alas ! little Mary herself was terribly burned. 
She was soon taken into the house, and a doctor was tenderly examin- 
ing her. He saw at once that she was doomed. She was unable to see ; 
but still conscious. He did his best to alleviate her sufferings, and 
found, on removing the burnt clothing from the child, that only one 
part of her body had escaped the fire, and that was a patch round 
her heart, where she had so tightly clasped her brother and the babe. 
Her sight was gone, her hair was burnt off, but around the chest and 
heart there was no mark of fire. 

" ' Her patience in death,' said my friend the doctor, who shed tears- 
as he told me, l was beautiful.' 

" He said to her, * Mary, do you know me ? ' 

" ' Yes, doctor,' was her reply. 

" ' I fear, my dear, I cannot do any more for you,' said he. 

" 'Never mind, never mind ; thank you, doctor. I have saved Bobbie 
and baby, and Jesus has promised to save me, and he will, won't he r 
doctor ? ' 

" ' Yes, my dear, for he has done so already.' And he had scarcely 
said these words to encourage her, when Mary was no more. 

" Do you tell me, madam, after this, that I need the stage or fiction to 
stir my imagination, or move my emotional powers ? No, madam, I 
have no time to go and hear about the trials of those who never lived; 
nor to weep over events that never happened. But in the Bible, and 
in active service for Christ, I find full scope for all the faculties and 
emotions with which God has been pleased to endow me. 



STUDENTS OF THE PASTORS' COLLEGE AND THEIR WORK. 133 

* I tell you, madam, I was moved, refreshed, and improved for having 
heard the touching story of little Mary, because it has four grand lessons 
running right through it. You here get truth with trial, and trust with 
triumph, all of which may be the portion of every believer." 

The doctor who attended little Mary was the one who told this real, 
but romantic:, story to a large congregation at the Metropolitan Taber- 
nacle. I sat on the platform : beside me sat my dear friend, Mrs. Bartlett, 
who has since, like Mary, gone home to her reward. Oar beloved 
President, 0. H. Spurgeon, was chairman, and his big heart gave way 
during the telling of this incident by the American doctor. His manly 
face seemed none the less manly to me because a stream of tears came 
rolling down his face ; on the contrary, I thought, " How like his 
Master! ' Jesus wept.' " They tell us this short verse, " Jesus ivept," 
is the centre verse of the New Testament; if so, it is a fine pivot on 
which to swing the gospel of Christ's love. 

Reader, ask yourself the question, " Are any tears ever shed over 
my life ? " Does a mother, or sister, or wife, or pastor weep over you ? 
If so, what is the cause of them ? Remember, tears are caused by joy 
as well as sorrow. May God keep you and me from ever causing any 
tears of sorrow ! May we create tears of joy ! 

Had I been asked to write an epitaph for Mary's tombstone, I think 
I should have written, " She saved others, herself she could not save." 

J. Manton Smith. 



^lubtuh 0f \\t f agt0rs' Mltyt zxfti tytix Math 

MANY of the students now in the Pastors' College have the oversight of 
churches or missions in various parts of London or the country. We 
want our friends to know this, and to become better acquainted with our 
College work. Our aim is to send out good ministers of the gospel, and 
there is no better help in the education of such men than keeping them at 
work while studying. Many friends might help us to open up new places. 
We also need aid. in subscriptions towards the work. In this laborious and 
anxious service we beg the aid of all lovers of the truth of God. The 
following is a brief summary of the work carried on by students now, or 
until recently, in the College : — 

Mr. A. Curtis undertook the temporary pastorate of the Baptist church 
at Hornchurch, Essex, in November, 1886. The membership was then 
eighteen ; it has since increased to thirty- eight, while several are waiting to 
be received. The Sunday-school has increased from ninety-five to one 
hundred and thirty-two scholars, and from ten to fourteen teachers. There 
is also a flourishing Band of Hope of over one hundred members. The 
Sunday congregations are extremely good, the chapel, which seats two 
hundred and twenty, being crowded in the evenings. In respect of finances, 
the people have done well, having, by means of two sales of work, and the 
kindness of several contributors, entirely cleared off the debt of £125 which 
was on the school, and they have also paid off .£50 of the chapel debt. 
There is urgent need for enlarging the chapel, and this might easily be 
■done, as it was built with a view to enlargement, and sufficient land was 
acquired for the purpose ; but a debt of £125 still remains on the chapel, 
which must be cleared off before enlarging. This, however, our friends 
hope to do by next summer. -The increased interest in every department 



134 STUDENTS OF THE PASTORS COLLEGE AND THEIR WORK. 

of the work is exceedingly cheering. This cause, greatly aided by Mr. 
Abraham, of Hornchurch, is the child of the College. 

Mr. F. W. Dunster took up the work at Dell Koad Baptist Chapel,. 
Grays, Essex, eighteen months ago. At that time the church was not 
heartily united, but by God's blessing a better state of things now pre- 
vails. The membership has risen from twenty to fifty-three, while the 
congregations have been trebled, necessitating an extension, which fur- 
nished sittings for about seventy more people. The chapel now seats two 
hundred. The free-will offerings have been more than doubled, and a debt 
of i'100 has been cleared off. A Temperance Society, Christian Band, prayer- 
meeting, cottage-meeting, and open-air services have been instituted, and 
resulted in much blessing. 

Mr. F. T. B. "Westlake has been labouring, since April, 1887, at Parnell 
Road, Old Ford, E. The results of the first twelve months' efforts are briefly 
as follow : — When Mr. "Westlake went, there were twelve church-members ; 
there are now fifty-three. In the Sunday-school there were three teachers 
and seventy scholars ; the numbers at present are twenty and three hundred 
and sixty. Then there was but one service on Sunday, and no prayer- 
meeting ; now there are two services, and three prayer-meetings. No tracts 
were distributed ; now there are two thousand given away weekly. Bible- 
classes and other branches of work have also been established, the congre- 
gations have correspondingly increased, and the gospel has proved the- 
power of God unto the salvation of many souls. When our brother went, 
he found what he modestly calls "a few slight difficulties." The chapel, 
which is an iron one, was sadly dilapidated, two hundred squares of glass 
were broken, the stoves had a habit of emitting all the smoke into the chapel 
during service, some of the seats (not being very strong) collapsed under 
pressure, while others, being badly painted, would hold fast the worshippers 
in one position, and refuse to let them go without paying, as penalty, a 
portion of their garments. These obstacles have been overcome, and the 
church is rejoicing in the manifest tokens of divine blessing. 

Mr. A. G. Haste has been taking the oversight of the Baptist mission at 
Bracknell, Berkshire, since February, 1887. There are some twenty-five 
members on the books, the average Sunday morning attendance being 
thirty-six, and the evening seventy. The congregation meets in a most 
inconvenient room, and greatly needs a chapel, towards which the sum of 
£50 has been raised and handed over to Pastor C. H. Spurgeon, the 
treasurer of the building fund. There is a Sunday-school containing fifty- 
six scholars. This rising interest deserves aid from the Lord's stewards. 

Mr. T. Adamson has supplied the Baptist church, Siinningdale, Berkshire, 
for the past twelve months. The chapel has been recently enlarged, at a 
cost of £140, the whole of which has been paid off. The congregations are 
still increasing, and some believers have recently confessed Christ, and 
applied for baptism, while others are anxiously enquiring the way of 
salvation. The church has now a membership of forty-nine, and the 
Sabbath-school numbers fifty-three scholars. 

Mr. C. Stanley founded a Baptist cause at Silvertown, E., in September, 
1887, and a church was formed in November of the same year, when seven- 
teen persons were received into fellowship, nine of whom our brother had 
previously baptized, the rest being received by letter. The chapel, formerly 
known as the Drill Hall, was in a very dilapidated condition, and con- 
tained no furniture of any kind; but the friends who gathered round soon 
altered the condition of things, and made the place presentable. So well 
are the services attended, that it is difficult to find sufficient room to accom- 
modate all who are present on Sunday evenings. The church now consists 
of forty-two members ; and the Sunday-school, which commenced with 




STUDENTS OF THE PASTORS' COLLEGE AND THEIR WORK. 135 



ninety scholars and ten teachers, now numbers two hundred and twenty- 
scholars and nineteen teachers. Much good work has been done by the Open- 
air Mission Band, which is conducted chiefly by young men and women who 
have been brought to the Saviour since Mr. Stanley commenced the work. 
A larger building being absolutely necessary to meet the existing needs 
of the work, a building fund has been started, and nearly £130 obtained. 
Mr. Spurgeon will be pleased to receive and acknowledge any contributions 
for this object. 

Mr. G. H. Jackman commenced to preach at Coggeshall, Essex, in Octo- 
ber, 1887. At that time the average attendance was twenty ; at present it 
is about one hundred and twenty, and there is a membership of twenty- 
four. The chapel, on which there is a mortgage of £200, has been reno- 
vated during the year at a cost of about £45, which has been paid off. A 
Sunday-school was commenced the first Sunday in January, 1888, and there 
are now about forty children attending. 

Mr. N. H. Patrick, who has just gone as a missionary to North Africa, 
preached, while in the College, at St. Mary Cray, Kent, where there is a 
chapel seating one hundred and twenty. The church numbers sixty-seven, 
and there is a Sunday-school, with eighty-two scholars and ten teachers. 
The congregations are almost entirely of the working-class, and the church 
has had heavy losses, especially through the emigration of the younger 
members. Nevertheless, there is encouragement in the work ; the chapel 
is well filled, and two restored backsliders have lately been received into 
the church. Mr. A. W. L. Barker has taken Mr. Patrick's place at St. 
Mary Cray. 

Mr. H. A. Phillips entered upon work at Mill End, Richmansworth, Herts., 
in February last. The attendance has increased from forty to one hundred 
and sixty. Two backsliders have been re-admitted to membership, and four 
persons have been baptized, while several are under conviction of sin. 
Through visiting the people in their homes, a drunkard and his wife have 
been reclaimed. There is a Sunday-school of sixty scholars, and there is also 
a Bible-class. Our brother visits on Sunday afternoons, and though sin 
prevails on every hand, he hopes, "by prayer and plodding," to reach many 
who never attend the means of grace. 

Mr. H. Clark went to labour at Barking, Essex, in August, 1887. At 
that time the Sunday evening congregation was about eighty ; it has now 
doubled. The membership has increased from fifty to sixty- two. The 
school is very flourishing, numbering some two hundred and thirty scholars, 
with seventeen teachers. The blessing of God is resting on the work. The 
prayer-meetings are well-attended, and growing in interest and numbers. 

Mr. G. A. Miller went to Rochester, Kent, two years ago, to start a 
Baptist cause there. No building being, at that time, obtainable in 
Eochester itself, the Workmen's Institute, at Strood, was hired. Much 
encouragement attended the work, and a church was formed last March, 
when twenty persons signed the covenant. The number of members now 
is thirty-eight. In April, the way was opened to hire a building in 
Eochester. This it was necessary to furnish. Seats, platform, harmonium, 
etc., were procured at a cost of £60, which amount has been entirely paid 
off. A Bible-class for men is held on Sunday afternoons, and a goodly 
company gathers together at the Monday evening prayer-meeting. Several 
have been baptized, and others are coming out to confess Christ. The 
shadow of the cathedral is no help to a Baptist cause, but the church is 
earnest and united, and hopes soon to have a home of its own, where it 
can better worship and work for the Master. 

Mr. A. W. Curwood has had charge of the little church at Forest Row, 
Sussex, for the past eighteen, months. He has gone there himself once a 



136 STUDENTS OF THE PASTORS* COLLEGE AND THEIR WORK. 

month, and sent supplies the other three weeks, and this system has worked 
well. There were seven members when our brother went, and the number 
is now doubled. Besides these actual additions to the church, several con- 
versions have taken place, but the friends have joined other churches. The 
chapel, which holds one hundred and fifty, is filled on Sunday evenings. It 
has lately been re-seated, and freed from debt. 

Mr. E. Hughes, who lately went to the United States, for some time 
had the oversight of the church meeting at Zion Chapel, Chesham, Bucks. 
During his ministry, the church received an addition of forty-nine members, 
forty-two of whom our brother baptized. There are now about one hun- 
dred and twenty members. Since Mr. Hughes left, Mr. CuitwooD has 
been carrying on the work. The chapel, which seats three hundred, is 
filled every Sunday evening, and it has been decided to enlarge it, so as to 
accommodate two hundred more persons. A Sunday-school, Bible-class, 
prayer-meetings, and a Christian Band are all well-sustained, and a hearty 
spirit of love and unity dwells in the church. The friends have £40 or £50 
in hand towards the proposed extension. As Mr. Curwood is leaving for 
West Hartlepool, other students will take up the work at Chesham and 
Forest Eow. 

Mr. A. J. Reid has, for some months, been conducting a mission'' at 
Theydon Bois, Essex, a small village on the border of Epping Forest. Since 
the mission was started, four years ago, a steady work has gone on : many 
have been won to the Saviour by the preaching of the gospel, and ten have 
professed their faith by baptism. The average attendance on Sunday even- 
ings is sixty. There is also a good work going on amongst the young 
people. The school numbers fifty scholars. During the past year, the 
mission-room, and site for proposed chapel, have been purchased, and 
presented to the President by F. L. Edwards, Esq., of Loughton. 

Mr. A. Priter had the oversight of the church at Cheam, Surrey, till last 
August, when ill health compelled him to resign it. Since then Mr. A. E. 
Johns has taken up the work. The chapel seats one hundred and eighty, 
there is an average attendance of about one hundred and thirty, the mem- 
bership being seventy- three. There is also a Sunday-school, with one hundred 
children and fourteen teachers ; and there is an adult Bible-class, with about 
fifteen members. The cause has suffered somewhat lately through removals 
from the neighbourhood. 

Mr. J. L. Roger laboured for a year at the village of Shoreham, Kent. 
During this time there were four who professed conversion, three of whom 
were baptized at Eynsford, and joined the Baptist church there. Mr. D. 
H. Hay now carries on the work at Shoreham. 

Mr. Roger, after leaving Shoreham, laboured at Mitcham, Surrey, for a 
few months, and the congregations in that time were nearly doubled. The 
membership is thirty, and the Sunday-school contains ninety scholars. 
Mr. Roger has been accepted by the Baptist Missionary Society for work 
on the Congo, and has already sailed for Africa, so another student will go 
to Mitcham. 

Mr. G. A. J. Huntley, who is soon leaving for China, has been preach- 
ing for the past few months, on Sunday evenings, at The Rock Mission, 
Camber well. The room seats about one hundred, and is full every Sunday. 
The Lord has greatly blessed the work, and conversions have taken place at 
nearly every service. A week's special mission was held recently, and was 
the means of much blessing. A Young Christians' Association has just been 
started, with a view to recognize and help young believers, and to foster 
and develop their Christian life and character, as well as to train them for 
service for the Master. This Association is heartily taken up and appre- 
ciated by the young converts. 






STUDENTS OP THE PASTORS' COLLEGE AND THEIR WORK. 137 

Two brethren, Mr. A. A. Witham (who has now gone to Washington 
Territory, North America), and Mr. D. Loinaz, have had charge of a 
mission at John Street, Cambenvell, for the past few months. There are 
about forty members, and an average Sunday evening attendance of eighty 
persons. The congregations, though still small, have increased, and the 
outlook is hopeful. A prayer-meeting is held on Monday evenings ; and an 
adults' Bible-class and a Tract Distribution Society are about to be started. 

Mr. W. E. Wells has, for some time, laboured among the soldiers at 
The Soldiers' Home, Buckingham Palace Road. Our brother conducts a 
Bible-class there every Saturday evening. Much blessing has attended the 
work, especially latterly, in increased attendance, and in frequent manifesta- 
tions of the divine favour. Mr. Wells has been privileged to baptize some 
who have been led to Christ through these classes, and he is in communica- 
tion with many — some now far away from England — who at different times 
attended the meetings. 

Mr. W. C. Minifie, for some months past, has visited The Throat Hospital, 
Golden Square, every Sunday evening, and often during the week. The 
Sunday evening service, held in one of the wards, is made as attractive as 
possible, and has been attended with great blessing, many anxious souls 
having been led to the cross of Christ. Patients unable to rise from their 
beds are spoken to individually, and all are most willing to listen to what 
is said, and grateful for it. The President's sermons are gladly accepted 
by the patients, who come from various parts of England. 

Two or three of the brethren preach from time to time for The Evangeliza- 
tion Society. Some go occasionally to help in Miss Macpherson's Mission, 
Bethnal Green Road ; at The Strangers'* Rest, Ratcliff Highivay ; and in other 
spheres where their assistance is sought. 

There is also a Home Visitation Society in connection with the College, the 
object of which is to visit the people, leave the President's sermons, and try 
to get those who go to no place of worship to attend the Tabernacle services. 
A full report of this work was published in The Sword and the Troivel for 
June last. 

The Students' Missionary Association is in a flourishing condition, and the 
brethren are glad to give missionary addresses wherever their services are 
sought. There is a museum belonging to the Association, containing 
curios, &c, from various parts of the mission field; and these greatly add 
to the interest of an address. Many missionary meetings have been held 
during the past year. 

The College Temperance Society does a very useful work, and the students 
are in great demand to address Gospel Temperance meetings, Bands of 
Hope, &c. No fewer than one hundred and fifty meetings have been 
addressed by the students during the past year. 

Our brethren are ready to work wherever a church of baptized believers 
can be gathered ; and they ask for invitations from earnest friends in desti- 
tute places, who will back them up in missionary endeavours. Mr. Spurgeon 
encourages them in endeavouring, as far as possible, to form churches of 
which they may become the pastors when their College course is over. 

We trust that this necessarily condensed account will interest our readers 
in the College. Many think of the orphans, but forget the students ; yet 
surely both are equally worthy. The College appeals not only to our 
natural humanity, but to our spiritual nature. Help to train the men who 
are soon to be leaders in the churches of Christ. 



10 



138 



% Wttfo m m Unt. 








U|E, friends 
must not ima- 
gine that Mentone 
is a dull, unin- 
teresting place, 
made up of fine 
villas and great 
hotels. On the 
contrary, the old 
town is interest- 
ing, and full of 
old-fashioned bits. 
Here is an engrav- 
ing of one of 
the streets leading 
down to the port 
— and a respect- 
able street, too, 
perhaps a little out 
of repair through 
the earthquake. 
Did you say it was 
narrow ? That is 
one of the beauties 
of it. Don't you 
see it? These good 
people are not like 
your proud citi- 
zens, who like to 
dwell alone, but 
they prefer to put 
their houses close 
together, that they 
maybe near neigh- 
bours. This gives 
them shade in the 
hot summer days ; 

and if you once felt the burning sun, you would think this a great matter. 
Moreover, you do not offend your friends by passing them without recognition 
because the road is broad and you are near-sighted. If you can shake hands 
across the street without going out of doors, is not this a convenience to 
friendship ? Besides, if there happens to be a shop, you not only see but 
smell and touch the goods, as you pass close to them ; and this saves the 
tradesman standing outside and crying " Buy, buy ! " Seldom do carriages 
venture down the narrow streets ; for you may have to wait long while 
another trap backs to a broader place, or you may have to back yourself, 
which is worse. This keeps the street quiet, and saves a lot of rattle ; and 
who does not value this, after living in the roar of London ? In the case 
before us there are steps, and so no traffic comes along, except that which 
is caused by one's own fellow-creatures, namely, foot passengers and donkeys. 
This allows the good women, and merry children, and men who have 
nothing to do, to sit out of doors, and get better air than there is likely to 
be within. 

Truly, this little Jerusalem is " builded as a city that is compact together." 
Our visitors, as a rule, have a prejudice for broader thoroughfares ; yet an 
excursion into the ancient streets is not without its charms to one who does 
not despise the narrow way, and wishes to see the people at home. — C. H. S. 



139 

DEAE ME. EDITOE,— At the recent meeting of the London Baptist 
Association, in endeavouring to show the inutility of the "seven 
statements " which it was proposed should be attached to Eule I. of the 
Constitution, I submitted the following seven questions. To these ques- 
tions, which touch the very foundations of that mysterious theology in 
which so-called "Modern Thought" delights, no distinct answer is given 
by the seven statements. But, probably, they may be useful to others 
beside myself in the detection of error. I venture, therefore, to offer them 
to your readers for that purpose. The first question needs no explanation 
or comment. 

I. Do you believe the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments to be 
an infallible and sufficient guide in all matters of religious faith and practice ? 

II. Do you believe in the deity as well as divinity of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, i.e., that he is himself God ? 

Note that a man may acknowledge Christ to be divine, as he might 
acknowledge the Bible to be divine, without admitting that he is God. 

III. Do you believe that Christ, in his death, endured the penalty due to 
•divine justice for human guilt ? 

Note — Many admit that he died for us, but exclude the idea of penalty 
from his death. 

IV. Do you believe the Holy Spirit to be, not only a divine influence, 
but, in the true, real, and proper sense of the term, a divine person, and 
himself God ? 

V. Do you believe man to have become, by sin, a fallen creature, and to 
have lost, by his fall, his original peaceful, happy, and holy relations with 
his Maker ? 

Note — Schiller described the Fall as " a giant stride in the history of the 
human race." 

VI. Do you believe that, by regeneration, man becomes possessed of a 
new and higher life, described as spiritual ? that this life is only rendered 
possible by the mediatorial work of Christ ? that it is only rendered actual 
by the work of the Holy Spirit in the soul ? and that, apart from these 
means, it can never be enjoyed ? 

VII. Do you believe in the resurrection of the dead, as an event of the 
future, and not of continual recurrence ? 

I think, Mr. Editor, that these questions may be made of great service in 
determining the whereabouts of many a man, sermon, or book. 

Yours faithfully, 
Bayswater. John Tuckwell. 

[We agree with our correspondent that there is a ready way of dodging 
round the seven statements ; but even such questions as those which he 
suggests will not bring slippery gentlemen to book. We feel ashamed to 
have to draw up statements, and put questions to those who should be 
brethren. Methods which the subtlety of error renders necessary are, never- 
theless, greatly distasteful to simple, trustful hearts. We prefer to quit the 
company of those who plead that creeds have no binding power : they only 
too plainly avow their own characters. When one has to weigh words with 
a person, fellowship is out of the question. The phrases adopted by the 
L. B. A. look right enough, but it is clear that they can be every one of 
them evaded. Knowing what we do know of some who are called ministers 
of Christ, and in their heart of hearts do not believe the old gospel, we are 
saddened in soul, and wonder what next will come. — Ed.] 



140 



ftffta 0f §00ks. 



A Concise History of the Church : from 
the Apostolic Era to the Establishment 
of the Reformation. By Alfred E. 
Knight. Partridge and Co. 
Church history is usually made weari- 
some, and is generally rather the 
history of a worldly organization than 
of the elect band by whom the truth of 
God was upheld. The present volume 
is of so popular a character that we 
could introduce it, not only to students, 
but to common readers, with the as- 
surance that they would read the book 
quite through with much pleasure. 
The type is large and the lines are 
widely spaced, so that the reading is 
pleasant even to eyes which are losing 
their power. Mr. Knight seems to 
think that the seven churches of Asia 
were typical of stages of church life, 
and that we are nearing the end. His 
book is written in a devout spirit and 
from an evangelical outlook, and we 
trust it will make many of our plain 
church members well acquainted with 
the general run of religious history. 
This will be a refreshment to their 
faith, a stimulus to their zeal, and an 
excitement to their caution. The book 
is not very elegant in appearance, but 
we think its circulation will be greatly 
beneficial. 

India's Needs : Material, Political, So- 
cial, Moral, and Religions. By John 
Murdoch, LL.D. 
A pamphlet (octavo, 151 pp.)published 
at Madras, on sale at the offices of 
" The Christian Vernacular Education 
Society for India," No. 7, Adam 
Street, Strand. Is. post free. Very 
interesting. 

The Daivn of the Modtrn Mission. By 
W. Fleming Stevenson, D.D. 
Edinburgh : Macniven and Wallace. 
To pious sympathy this small volume 
has a pathetic interest. It comprises 
a course of four lectures. The author 
had finished his course before its 
publication. Like a dream, it was alike 
the delight and distress of his death- 
bed. So enamoured of his theme ! 
So embarrassed by his efforts to do it 
justice ! His heart pined to revise the 
proofs ; but his pulse failed. The task 
of revising them for the press fell on 
her to whom in life he was devoted. 



His idea is a comprehensive survey 
of two centuries of Christian enter- 
prise. The charm consists in lively 
photographs of light struggling with 
darkness among earth's tribes, where 
darkness has been slow to hail the day- 
break. The lectures were delivered in 
connection with the Duff Missionary 
foundation. 

Spiritual Decline of the Church of God. 

By Alfred Hill. Elliot Stock. 
A stirring address, delivered about 
twelve months ago, at the Clifton 
Church Institute, Brighton. Like a 
physician, our author feels the pulse of 
the Church, and mourns its feebleness. 
The DeviVs Mission of Amusement : a 

Protest. By Archibald G. Brown. 

Morgan and Scott. 
Our brother Archibald Brown is one 
of the valiant in Israel, and he has 
here struck a mighty blow at a giant 
evil. Oh, that the blow may tell ! It 
is all very fine to sneer, or to talk about 
exaggeration ; but we know that our 
friend has written nothing but sober 
truth and surface truth. If he had 
gone into more private matters, he 
might have raised the blush upon the 
cheek of those who know how the 
amusements of the mission have, in 
sad instances, had their evil f ollowings 
as surely as the amusements of the 
music-hall and of the theatre. We 
do not hesitate to assert that the cha- 
racters of many hopeful young people 
have been shipwrecked, not by the 
avowed haunt of vice, but by the in- 
fluence of the questionable entertain- 
ment in connection with their religious 
relationships. Pleasant lectures and 
wholesome singing were all very well 
when used for higher ends ; but there 
has been a gradual coming down, till, 
in some cases, the schoolroom has en- 
dured what the theatre would have 
refused as too absurd. 

This earnest warning ought to be 
poured like grapeshot upon the enemy, 
till the devil is driven to abandon the 
entrenchments of religious amuse- 
ment. At present, in many cases, the 
prince of darkness feels himself as- 
much at home in the church as in the 
world ; and it is time that something 
was done to disturb his repose. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



141 



The Home of a Naturalist. By Rev. 

BlOT Edmondston, and his sister, 

Jessie M. E. Saxby. Nisbet and Co. 
This is a natural, unsophisticated book. 
In some respects, it reminds us of 
White's " Selborne," for it does for 
Shetland somewhat of the same kind 
of service that White did for the 
Hampshire parish : it make us feel as 
if we knew the place. The lover of 
natural history, and of stirring adven- 
ture in the wild waters of the north, 
will find himself held captive by the 
charms of these pages ; and we shall 
be surprised if he does not find his 
heart yearning after a sight of those 
primitive regions. 

To our minds the book has more 
than its share of the records of folk- 
lore, and idle superstitions ; but, it 
may be, they were needed to complete 
the picture truthfully. Such a land 
must surely be ' ' meet nurse ' ' for elfin 
life, and uncanny fancy. It must have 
been a trying, but inspiring, life which 
fell to the lot of the Shetland doctor, 
who was often called to his patients 
from far over the sea, and had to en- 
counter many a storm before he could 
reach the sick-bed which was wearying 
for him. His avocations made him 
well acquainted with the Shetlanders 
within doors, and his natural bent led 
him to become familiar with all forms 
of animal life outside. What he saw 
and heard is well written, and will 
plSase the reader. 

Not for any special spiritual excel- 
lence ; but as a bright, refreshing bit 
of writing, such as may while away the 
weary hour, we commend this interest- 
ing work to our readers. 

Thomas J. Cornier, Missionary Pioneer 
to the Congo. By John Brown 
Myers. S. W. Partridge and Co. 
Young man, if you would have a 
place among the immortals of the ar- 
mies of the Lord, follow the example 
set by this noble servant of Christ. 
Get this interesting book ; read it, and 
then act out its suggestions. Dear is 
the name of Comber to us. This friend 
Thomas studied most earnestly in our 
evening classes before he went to Re- 
gent's Park College ; and his brother, 
Dr. Comber, was one of our own Col- 
lege men. The family of Comber has 
given itself for Africa, and the name 



will shine in the annals of the church 
of the Congo till time shall be no more. 
This life is superabundantly illustrated, 
and neatly produced. Let it be put in 
the school library. We believe the 
price is only Is. 6d. 
The Five Talents of Women. A Book 
for Girls and Women. By the Au- 
thor of " How to be Happy, though 
Married." T. Fisher Unwin. 
All who have read " How to be Happy, 
though Married," will expect a treat 
when they read this kindred produc- 
tion. Nor will they expect in vain. 
Good sense here expresses itself in 
wholesome proverb and quaint story. 
Our author can write for women, and 
to them. He is, therefore, you may be 
sure, no fool ; for women cannot en- 
dure fools to admonish them. He 
does not flatter, by any means, but he 
writes sense — such as sensible people 
will like to read. We believe we are 
doing real service to our friends when 
we say — Get this volume : it will make 
you laugh, at the very least, and that 
is good; but it will leave behind a 
wise and happy impression, worth a 
hundred times the price of the work. 

The Story of the Nations — Persia. By 
S. G/ W. Benjamin. T. Fisher 
Unwin. 
Again and again have we commended 
to our readers the series of The Story of 
the Nations. Persia is the one which is 
now before us. Speak of fiction, it 
has no interest or charm when set side 
by side with the more than romance of 
such history as this ! Mr. Benjamin 
writes splendidly, and his theme is 
bright as the stars of heaven, with a 
glittering attractiveness of many 
sparkling lights. You might read 
this "story" in separate chapters, 
and enjoy it : the book is so well put 
together that you may disjoint it with- 
out causing a fracture. From end to 
end the record of Persia is marvellous. 
That empire has been crushed many 
times, but has always been restored. 
We have by no means heard the last 
of it yet. Its vitality is a miracle 
among the nations. Taken for all in 
all, Persia in some respects excels each 
one of the other three great monar- 
chies, and chiefly in this, that it lives 
on, while none of the others has more 
than a name to do so. 



142 



NOTICES OK BOOKS. 



Turning Points in the Lives of Eminent 
Christians. By MARY E. Beck. 
Hodder and Stoughton. 

This is likely to prove a very useful 
book. It would do well for reading 
at working-parties. The conversions 
described are those of men of eminence 
from every age and every quarter of 
the church, from Augustine to Bunyan, 
from Luther to Brownlow North. In 
the story of Richard Knill, the authoress 
has included the incident of that good 
man's talk with the little boy Spur- 
geon. She has a genius for condensa- 
tion, and for setting out the notable 
bits. We cannot believe that these 
wonders of divine grace can be read 
without producing great searchings of 
heart. How we should like to hear 
of the real conversion of some who 
now figure in the outward church ! 
The rampant error and riotous worldli- 
ness which are now saddening the 
godly, arise, to a large extent, out of 
the fact that we have in the ministry 
men who might be true preachers of 
the gospel if they were but converted. 
We want more personal turning-points 
to be visible, and we should see a 
grand turning-point in church-history. 
These last words of ours must not, 
however, lead our reader to imagine 
that this is a controversial book. Our 
remarks are simply by-the-way : the 
volume itself is not responsible for 
them. We recommend its purchase. 
It costs 3s. 6d. 

Christ and his People. By Nine 
Ministers of the Church of England. 
Hodder and Stoughton. 

Thirteen discourses of the highest 
order of excellence. Clear as the sea 
of glass, but mingled with the fire of 
deep, believing earnestness. These 
sermons have appeared in The Record, 
and they well deserve to be put on 
more permanent record. Such preachers 
as Ryle, Richardson, Moule, Hoare, 
Everard, and others, need no com- 
mendation from us. They are not 
feebly evangelical, nor evangelically 
feeble ; but they arc masters in Israel. 
Here is a crown's worth of the old 
theology ; and, whoever may gainsay 
it, no other form of teaching can com- 
pare with it for building up in holiness, 
or holding up in comfort. Whether 



such doctrine be taught within the 
Establishment, or out of it, we therein 
do rejoice, yea, and will rejoice. 

Christianity in the Daily Conduct of 
Life. Hodder and Stoughton. 

Our unnamed author handles the 
subject of Christian character under a 
series of texts bearing upon the highest 
principles which govern our daily con- 
duct according to the Word of God. 
We are glad to find that he adheres 
to the old-fashioned doctrines of Scrip- 
ture. The secret piety of a true Chris- 
tian life is well set forth in the chapters 
upon Humility, Forgiveness, Anger, 
and Purity ; while the practical side 
is displayed by articles upon Honesty, 
Giving, Observance of the Sabbath, 
and the Conduct of Christ's Followers 
in Society. The careful and prayerful 
perusal of such chapters as these can- 
not fail to elevate the heart and culti- 
vate the mind. 

The Inner Mission. By T. B. Paton, 
M.A., D.D. Wm. Isbister. 

Christian Solidarity. By HENRY 
Stanley Newman. S. W. Part- 
ridge and Co. 

Two little books, which, though dis- 
similar in many respects, are yet alike 
in this, that they are each dedicated to 
the assertion of one and the same doc- 
trine; forsooth, that Christianity is 
communistic, sympathetic, and social- 
istic. " The bearing of one another's 
burdens " becomes thus, not merely a 
duty, but a system that challenges 
diligent study how best it may be dis- 
charged. Dr. Paton's four addresses 
were delivered on divers occasions 
during the past fifteen years. They 
are dedicated to the memory of Samuel 
Morley. As they have pleased and edi- 
fied privileged audiences before they 
were published, our praise is needless. 
Mr. Newman is more sentimental ; 
we do not say he is less sound. Charmed 
with a word, he chants " solidarity " 
in every chapter, on every page. His 
finding is that it means " fellowship." 
On the faith of divers dictionaries he 
gets assured of the fact ; and he fan- 
cies that, like "solitaire" it is of 
French extraction. His ten stanzas are 
all on the one string of " Solidarity" 
Neither of these works has aroused 
our enthusiasm. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



143 



Angelic Apostasy, &c, &c. By P. 
Grant, M. A. Edinburgh: Gemmell. 

The title-page of this work is volumi- 
nous. The excursions and discussions 
through which it conducts us are extra- 
ordinary. The author appears to ob- 
serve a loyal allegiance to the absolute 
and unconditional authority of Holy 
Scripture ; although he demurs to the 
human and traditional interpretation 
of much of the Divine record that 
passes current in our commentaries, 
and is endorsed by popular appre- 
hension. He sets himself no easy task 
who aims to divert the current of theo- 
logical literature. Some of his sugges- 
tions are sure to arouse the prejudice 
of those whom he is most anxious to 
propitiate, while they are not unlikely 
to foster the scepticism of those who 
sneer at an inspiration which (they will 
say) its own defenders claim a right to 
reconstruct at will. When he asks 
credit, in his preface, for honestly 
stating his ideas of things as he sees 
them in the light of his own judgment, 
availing himself of whatever assistance 
may lie within his reach, we cordially 
grant it, without consenting to follow 
his lead, and without compromising 
ourselves by accepting his conclusions. 
In a volume of such dimensions, com- 
prising forty-six chapters and eight 
important appendices, there is room 
for a wide and frequent differing from 
the author; for we cannot see with 
the eyes of his understanding. His 
aim, we take it, is two-fold : first, to 
rectify a habit of reading as literal his- 
tory certain records in the Bible, which 
were, according to ancient usage, 
purely symbolical ; and, secondly, to 
show that in the antagonism of in- 
genious thinkers to certain explicit 
doctrines of the Bible, the obscurity 
is not in the teaching of the Holy 
Spirit, but the veil lieth on their own 
heart. The first fight is, of course, 
over the Book of Genesis, and its 
earliest chapters furnish the arena of 
the fiercest conflict. Of " the real 
meaning of the Genetic narrative," 
he writes thus:-—" The two human 
creations mentioned in Genesis ii. 7 
and 22 respectively are really different 
and distinct, both in their nature and 
purposes, from that of Genesis i. 27." 
He gives his reasons. They are so 



satisfactory to himself that he says : 
" The distinction cannot reasonably be 
denied " (p. 33). Ln an appendix he 
tries to fortify his position. Here, 
however, he unfortunately gets into a 
fog. Referring to 2 Cor. xi. 3 (when 
he obviously means 1 Tim. ii. 13, 14), 
he observes that Paul ' ' evidently read 
the history in the uncritically indis- 
criminating way in which ordinary 
readers still do. Such nice questions 
were not debated in his day. He was 
neither geologist nor antiquarian, but 
not the less fitted on that account to 
be a true preacher of the cross " 
(p. 210). Poor Paul ! Truly was he 
"one born out of due time!" Our 
readers will not expect us to assent to 
this kind of reasoning. We have put 
a mark of interrogation against many 
another paragraph ; but we have no 
space for further samples. 

The Inspiration of Holy Scriptures. 
By Daniel Bagot, D.D., Dean. 
Hatchards, 1878. 

This is a smart little essay, but it was 
not published yesterday. You can 
read it through at a sitting. As an 
evening's recreation it will amply repay 
you. The Dean has seized on a central 
point — the distinction between ' ' in- 
spiration " and "revelation" — from 
which to glance over a wide field of 
study. Granted that, in general, his 
panorama is well painted, yet there 
are colourings in places which we do 
not delight in. Our friends can easily 
find these out for themselves. "The 
occurrence in the Bible of objection- 
able sentiments " is a rough way of 
referring to the imprecatory psalms. 
His explanation of them we cannot 
possibly entertain. It is a pity that 
there should be even a speck in so 
sound a work on the canon. 

Hooker. Book I. Of the Laws of Eccle- 
siastical Polity. Edited By E. W. 
Church, M.A., Dean of St. Paul's. 
Oxford : Clarendon Press. London : 
Henry Frowde. 

Commendation is superfluous. One 
of the first and most famous of English 
classics, edited and annotated by Dean 
Church, and published by the Claren- 
don Press, carries its own testimonials 
on the title-page. Of course it is a 
school-book intended for students. 



144 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Pixie's Adventures from his own Point 
of View ; or, the Tale of a Terrier. 
By N. D'Anvers. Shaw. 
The tale of this terrier is tied up with 
ribbons by the capital engravings, 
otherwise it would scarcely suffice to 
amuse even the smallest of a doggie's 
play-mates. The story is just a little 
too childish ; and we cannot see the 
value of a thousand marrow-bones in 
it, though the preface states that this 
was the joint reward of the two merry 
dogs whose names are set to this 
document. 

The Cave by the Waterfall. By Edith 

Kenyon. Sunday School Union. 
Most wholesome lessons are woven 
into two interesting stories, suitable 
for young girls. 

Vermont Hall. By M. A. Paull. 

Hodder and Stoughton. 
An interesting story. Another shot 
at the demon Drink. Will the death- 
blow ever be given ? 

The Lion of St. Mark : a Tale of Venice. 
By G. A. Henty. Blackie and Son. 
"Under twenty, charmed with 
Henty," may become a juvenile pro- 
verb ; for our author caters for boys, 
and knows their palate to a pinch of 
pepper. This is a soldierly- looking 
book, all scarlet and gold, and its 
outward appearance reminds us of a 
corpulent officer of a crack regiment. 
Within there is a mine of instructive 
history, intersected by a vein of rather 
strained adventure. A boy reviewer 
would call it " a jolly book.' ; It costs 
six shillings. 

Her Only Son. By the Author of 
"Jessica's First Prayer," "Nelly's 
Dark Days," &c. Houlston and Sons, 
Nothing more can be needed to com- 
mend this little book than the name 
of its author. It is as touching as any 
of her choice little stories. Its burden 
is " the Drink." It should be in every 
colporteur's pack, and it ought to be 
read by every big brewer in Britain. 

With Steady Aim ; or, Herbert Ford's 
Life Work. By W. J. Forster. T. 
Woolmer. 
A fairly good story, to show how a 
good lad became a prosperous man 
through steadily pursuing an aim in 
life. Not very original or striking. 



The Red Lion : a Temperance Tale. By 
James Crompton. Sunday School 
Union. 

Very good. The Eed Lion turns into 
the "White Lamb," and thus the 
plague of drink in the village is stayed. 
One of the best written of temperance 
stories. Put it in your library. 

Two Enthusiasts. By Evelyn Everett 
Green. Eeligious Tract Society. 

The stories of Miss Everett Green are 
never dry, even to readers who have 
not the entree of those baronial halls 
and quaint old moated mansions, in 
which, presumably, she is so much at 
home in the company of a wealthy 
heiress, a baron, or squire, or knight 
of the shire. These worthies are made 
to discourse on the responsibilities of 
wealth and position, the condition of 
the'poor. the causes of want and crime, 
and various theories for the upraising 
of the sad and sinful. There is more 
of the sensational and improbable in 
this than in previous works of the 
same author which have come under 
our notice ; but we must add that 
there are not a few paragraphs of clear 
Christian teaching in the book. 

Jack the Conqueror ; or, Difficulties 
Overcome. By Mrs. C. E. Bowen. 
Partridge and Co. 

A cheap shilling book, suitable for 
the village colporteur's pack. Mrs. 
Bowen says she wrote it "to show 
how great things even a child may 
effect by earnest resolve, if accom- 
panied by energy and perseverance." 

Will it Lift ? the Story of a London 
Fog. Jack Horner the Second. " The 
Song of Sixpence: " for the Bairns. 
By J. Jackson Wray. James Nisbet. 

What a wonderful man this Jackson 
Wray must be ! We could not con- 
coct a story for the life of us ; and he 
seems to reel them off by the mile at a 
time. Here are no less than three on 
our table now. Those who are more 
versed in tales, and such like, than we 
are, tell us that our friend is as good 
with the pen as with the tongue. 'Then 
he must be good, indeed. We best appre- 
ciate the vigorous, proverbial style of 
his writing. These are nuggets of gold 
upon the surface. 



NOTICES OP BOOKS. 



145 



" Nothing to You" ; or, The Home in 
Paradise Court. A Story for Maidens. 
By Charlotte Elizabeth Tidy. 
With Preface, by Kev. S. J. Stone, 
M.A. Partridge and Co. 

JUST as, a short time since, "slum- 
ming" was the fashion, so East-end 
waifs and strays are just now the 
staple of story-tellers. In so far as 
they tend to evoke practical sympathy 
for the poor, we are glad to commend 
such tales to our readers' notice. But 
we do not care to travel too far into the 
dark continent of the utterly incre- 
dible. Nor can we advise " maidens " 
to read a book wherein, even in the 
delicate manner of our authoress, the 
arts of the seducer are referred to. 

Climbing the Mountain Path. By B. 
Swan. Glasgow : John J. Eae. 

One of the "Snowdrop Series," and 
a really good story, setting in a lurid 
light the evils of the drinking customs 
of genteel society, and at the same 
time keeping the gospel well before 
the reader's mind. The " Snowdrops" 
are cheap at eighteen-pence, all things 
considered ; but the sample before us 
abounds in printers' errors, and the 
chief illustration illustrates nothing 
but the carelessness of all concerned 
in its selection and location. 

The Gate in Park Lane ; or, Arnold 
Lane's Courtship. By the Hon. 
Gertrude Boscawen. Msbet. 

Cover so pretty, and printing so good, 
that we should have liked to say a very 
good word for this simple country 
story ; but really it has too little in 
it for us to do so. 

Her Life's Work. By Lady Dun- 
boyne. Nisbet and Co. 

Church organs will be loud in praise 
of this story, for it is admirably written 
from that point of view. The "life 
work " of the chief personage in the 
tale is, the building and endowment of 
a church and schools in a churchless 
village, where drunkenness and crime 
held sway. Much of the religion de- 
scribed is certainly not that of the 
Word of God, though it seems to ac- 
cord with the Book of Common Prayer. 
Confirmation takes the place of re- 
generation, and works take the place 



of grace. "Confirmation Vows" — 
title of chapter XI. — prepares the 
young people for " The First Ball " — 
title of chapter XII. ; and of one of 
these newly-recruited ' ' Christian sol- 
diers " the record runs in a subsequent 
page: "He openly professes to dis- 
regard all religion, gambles recklessly, 
and drinks more than is prudent." 
Oh, that good church people would 
bring this wrong rite of Confirma- 
tion to the light of the Word ! 

Barbara's Brothers. By Evelyn 
Everett Green. Religious Tract 
Society. 

The author has a happy faculty for 
analyzing and vividly describing the 
inner life of young persons of the 
upper and upper-middle classes of 
society, and the temptations peculiar 
to their position. The vanity and 
vexation of spirit of those children of 
wealth whose lives are aimless and 
useless, and the happiness of those who 
devote themselves and their wealth to 
the service of the sad and suffering, 
are beautifully illustrated in this 
story, which is quite equal to any 
from the same pen. 

Dinah's Son. By L. B. Waleord. 
James Clarke and Co. 

The author is evidently anxious that 
his readers should " not mistake the 
purport of this little story," by sup- 
posing (as they probably would do) 
that he would damp the ardour of any 
youthful spirit inspired by the love of 
God and of the souls of the heathen, 
to go forth to mission- work in foreign 
lands. He tells us that the rather "he 
would have those who think they 
hear the divine call " see to it 
"that it is not the outcome of a 
restless nature, craving for excite- 
ment, or a novel field of action," to 
the neglect of evident service near at 
hand. The plot of the story is original, 
and gives scope for showing the worth- 
lessness of worldly Christianity, and 
the soul-destroying poison of "the 
root of all evil." To lay the blame 
of the moral and financial ruin of his 
relatives to the charge of a godly 
youth, because his example was re- 
moved from the family circle, doesn't 
commend itself to our judgment. 



146 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Proverbs, Maxims, and Phrases of all 
Ages. Classified subjectively, and 
arranged alphabetically. In two 
volumes. Compiled by Kobert 
Christy. T. Fisher Unwin. 

These are two splendid volumes. 
Students of proverbial lore will bless 
the laborious compiler. Chiefly is he 
to be praised for his system of arrange- 
ment, which is unique, and practi- 
cally useful. We have many alpha- 
betical lists of proverbs ; but we have 
none in which the subjects are the 
basis of the arrangement, and the al- 
phabetical commencement of the pro- 
verb is only followed as a secondary 
guide. We felt half sorry to see these 
volumes, because we are preparing a 
similar work, using for it the mate- 
rials collected in our John Plough- 
man almanacks. We have almost com- 
pleted our gathering of the proverbs, 
and are rapidly going on with the 
annotations thereon, and we were 
afraid that we were cut out of our 
market : but ours is a different thing 
altogether, and will suit, by its price, a 
class of persons who could not afford 
a guinea for these two volumes, which 
are, nevertheless, exceedingly well 
worth the money. We heartily re- 
commend this publication, and wish 
it a large sale : it deserves it. 

An Almanack for the Year of our Lord 
1889. ByJoSEPHWHITAKER, F.S.A. 

Whitaker. 

Whitaker's Almanack again ! We 
cannot pretend to review it : it is quite 
beyond praise. How any respectable 
person can get on without it we cannot 
tell ; for it is your friend and inform- 
ant at every turn. Complete, con- 
densed, well arranged, varied, accurate : 
we could not suggest an improvement. 
It is a marvellous shilling's-worth. 

Life and Times ofGirolamo Savonarola. 
By Professor Pasqtjale Villari. 
Translated by Linda Villari. 
T. Fisher Unwin. 

This is a standard life of the great 
Italian. The two volumes are worthy 
of their subject, and we cannot give 
higher praise. Our author is no parti- 
san. We are happy to note that he 



does not try to be impartial, for when- 
ever a writer is in that condition he 
becomes unjust ; but he really is im- 
partial, and both regards and reports 
facts with a well-balanced mind. 
Savonarola was sage and saint ; but 
he was also a little off the square in 
his mind. When he fell to prophesy- 
ing, and made one or two successful 
strokes, he deluded himself. Ever 
true, pure, brave, and we had almost 
added angelical, he was apt, at times, 
to believe in his reception of divine 
communications, when, in fact, he 
was in a dreamy or ecstatic state. This 
is very distinctly brought out by 
the biographer, without in the least 
diminishing our unbounded reverence 
for this Christian hero. 

The labour of research involved in 
the production of these volumes im- 
presses us. The theme is one of 
peculiar difficulty, and even with this 
new and revised edition, the writer 
does not seem quite content. Savo- 
narola is too great for a biographer : 
he believed amid general doubt, he 
was pure amid universal licentious- 
ness. God was in the man, and shone 
through him, and he was one of those 
born of the Spirit, of whom the Saviour 
said, " Thou canst not tell whence he 
cometh, or whither he goeth." 

■ 
A Missionary Life: Stephen Grellet. 

By Frances Anne Budge. James 

Nisbet and Co. 

Those who are not acquainted with 
the life of Stephen Grellet, the French 
Quaker, should invest a shilling in the 
purchase of this little book. One 
called him St. Stephen Grellet, and 
the name was well deserved. He 
travelled everywhere, encountered 
every form of peril, and braved every 
kind of adversary. In him the Spirit 
of God had free course, and his life 
remains a proof that there are some 
among our race who can hear even 
the whispers of God ; and who, hear- 
ing, are as ready to respond to the mind 
of God as is the hand of a man to obey 
the thoughts of his heart. Oh, that 
more of us were in such a condition ! 
There are worlds of wonder open if we 
will but yield to the divine influences, 
and permit the Lord's own power to 
work us to his will. 






147 



Ifcrteg. 



Feiends will not need me to say that I have 
recovered from the effects of my accident, if 
I am spared to preach the gospel in my own 
pulpit, as I hope to be doing before March 
magazine leaves the press. Writing in the 
middle of February, I feel myself to be, in 
many respects, in better health than before 
my painful descent, while the injured knee, 
after six weeks' gradual inprovement, is in 
such a state that I can walk a moderate 
distance. How great is the goodness of 
G-od in granting me this happy restoration, 
and the prospect of getting to work again ! 
I thank heartily the very many friends who 
wrote letters of sympathy. If I have not 
answered them all, it is because I should 
have had no rest whatever if I had at- 
tempted the task, and I know they would 
not have wished me to find their affection 
the occasion of toil. 

Will those members of the Christian public 
"who are making up their minds to ask for 
a sermon, a lecture, a speech, a bazaar- 
opening, or something or other, be so very 
gracious to me as to note the following letter, 
which I have received from the Deacons 
of the Tabernacle? I think I must obey 
their thoughtful admonition, for what will 
become of all order and discipline if a minister 
does not pay due heed to his deacons ? More- 
over, I know, by very painful experience, 
the common-sense of the request. I have 
frequently gone a little beyond my tether, 
and have suffered a month's pain in conse- 
quence ; and as soon as I have been half -well, 
somebody else has pleaded with me almost 
to tears to do the same thing again. I 
must this year be a little hard-hearted, and 
let the pleaders plead in vain. If I do my 
home-work, it is more than enough for one 
mortal man, and I must be happy to be 
able to keep on with it. I would, indeed, 
be grateful if friends could and would believe 
that I have not the strength of earlier years, 
and would excuse me when I cannot grant 
their requests. It is constantly the case that 
I have to write several letters before they 
will accept my answer in the negative ; and 
this is one of the inflictions which I think 
I ought to be spared. It is painful to me 
to say " No " once ; but it adds to the burden 
when another and another letter or deputa- 
tion come with the same plea. I do not 
lack will, but power. 

''Metropolitan Tabernacle, 
" Newington, S.E., Feb. 8th, 1889. 
"Dear Pastor, — At our meeting it was 
unanimously agreed to write you our strong 
and growing conviction, that you will be 
wise to husband your time and strength for 
home duties for the remainder of this year. 
We feel that you have, at times, overtaxed 
your immense powers by the attempt to 
compass work beyond any human en- 
durance ; and in the interest of the many 



' works of faith and labours of love ' in 
which you are the leader and main support, 
we must ask you to consider our fervent 
request to confine your engagements to those 
which, of necessity, arise, and to decline all 
invitations to go beyond these. Praying for 
you all help and blessing, and assuring you 
of our growing affection and esteem, 

" We are, 

" Your Fellow- workers and Deacons." 

The German translation of The Cheque 
Book is having a very generous reception. 
The reviewers are puzzled by the title, but 
warmly commend the work ; and the people 
are readily purchasing the parts as they 
appear. We hope by this means to speak 
with a multitude of Teutonic believers day 
by day. 

We cannot do less than express our grati- 
tude, deep and overflowing, to the men of 
God who have supplied the Tabernacle 
pulpit in our long absence. Specially do 
we desire for Mr. McNeill, on his coming to 
London, the best blessing of heaven. May 
he prove a standard-bearer of the truth, and 
a centre of holy influence in London ! Every 
fresh voice for the old faith is a great gain 
in these days, when truth is fallen in our 
streets. 

Many of our readers will rejoice when 
they learn that Mrs. Spurgeon has managed 
to write a brief Report erf the work of her 
Book Fund during the past year, by taking 
advantage of the intervals between the 
paroxysms of pain which she continues to 
suffer. Friends who read this record may 
be inclined to think that it is like the water 
that David's mighty men drew out of the 
well of Bethlehem, when he longed for 
another draught of the cooling spring which 
had often refreshed him. They need not, 
however, refuse the cup that is filled for 
them, if they will praise the Lord for the 
blessing which has rested upon the work 
during 1888, and pray that, if it be his 
gracious will, a renewal of health and 
strength may this year be granted to the 
beloved Manager of the Fund. The Report 
will be sent to all subscribers as soon as it 
is ready, or it can be obtained for six- 
pence through any bookseller, or post- 
free for six stamps from Messrs. Passmore 
and Alabaster, 4, Paternoster Buildings, 
London. 

Those who read "Son Tom's" bright 
article on "Glow-worms," in the present 
number of the Magazine, will be interested 
in hearing that a little " glow-worm," in 
the shape of a daughter, came to light up 
his Auckland home on Christmas-day, 1888. 
God bless both parents and child ! 

Son Charles left London on the 7th ult., 



148 



NOTES. 



in the steamship Aorangi, boundffor New 
Zealand. We trust that he will return com- 
pletely restored to health and strength, and 
that the Lord will graciously bless the work 
at Greenwich through the brethren who 
have kindly promised to serve the church at 
South Street during his absence. 

A second box of books has been received 
from C. B., East Dulwich, and sent to a 
poor country minister, who was very grateful 
for the contents. 

On Tuesday evening, January 22, the 
eleventh anniversary of Mrs. Allison's 
Bible -class was celebrated by a tea in the 
Tabernacle school-room, and a public meet- 
ing in the lecture -hall. After prayer by 
Mr. W. Olney, Mrs. Allison made a brief 
statement with regard to her loved work, 
and her pleasure in meeting so many workers 
of the church that evening, and then recited 
" Ezekiel's Dream," and" Richter's Vision." 
The secretary reported that the class con- 
tributes to the part- support of a colporteur, 
the amount raised for this year being 
£20 4s. 8d. ; also for Zenana Mission, £1 9s. ; 
Rescue Society, 16s. ; and a fund for poor 
non-members, £12 9s. 6|d. While the labours 
of Mrs. Allison are valued by the members, 
many of whom are Christian workers, they 
have also been owned of God in the 
conversion of sinners. 

On Tuesday evening, February 12, the 
annual meeting of the Training- class in 
connection with the Tabernacle Evangelists' 
Association and Country Mission was held, 
under the presidency of Mr. James Stiff. 
After prayer by Mr. Guthrie, the secretary 
(Mr. C. Branscombe) stated that there are 
one hundred and ten members in the class ; 
the attendance has been specially good 
lately, and much spiritual blessing has been 
experienced at the meetings. The chairman, 
on behalf of the class, presented to Mr. 
Elvin, the leader, four beautifully-modelled 
bronzes, and a written testimonial, express- 
ing the members' appreciation of his services. 
Mr. Elvin gratefully acknowledged the gift, 
and addresses were delivered by several of 
the members. 

College. — Mr. W. Perrins, having com- 
pleted his course with us, hopes to sail for 
the United States on the 2nd inst. We cor- 
dially commend him to the care of our 
brethren across the ocean. Letters may be 
sent to him to the care of Pastor R. Hughes, 
Londonville, Ohio. 

Mr. F. G. Gathercole has removed from St. 
Neot's to Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire ; and 
Mr. G. H. Trapp, from Towanda, to Coving- 
ton and Sullivan, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. 
Mr. A. Hyde has accepted the pastorate of 
the new church at Formby, Tasmania ; and 
Mr. H. G. Blackie has taken Mr. Hyde's 
place at Longford. 

The London brethren will be called to- 
gether as soon as possible after the Presi- 



dent's return, to make arrangements for the 
next Conference of the Pastors' College 
Evangelical Association. In all probability, 
the meetings will be held in the week com- 
mencing May 6, that is, the week after the 
Baptist Union meetings. 

Evangelists. — Messrs. Fullerton and 
Smith spent nearly the whole of the month 
of January at Exeter Hall, in a mission 
under the auspices of the Central Young 
Men's Christian Association. The weather 
was very trying at the beginning, the dense 
fogs affected the attendances; but later 
on the hall was well filled, and large num- 
bers professed to find the Saviour. 

The evangelists have since been at Shore - 
ditch Tabernacle, and are now at Dalston 
Junction Chapel. From there they go to 
Devonshire Square Chapel, Stoke Newing- 
ton, then to Salters' Hall Chapel, Islington. 

Mr. Burnham has conducted special ser- 
vices at Puddle town and Bere Regis during 
the past month. He had not long been at 
work before the unfavourable symptoms re- 
turned, making it clear that he must endea- 
vour to carry out the doctor's recommenda- 
tions, and take a sea-voyage, and reside for 
a year or two in a less trying climate than 
this. We hope soon to be able to announce 
that arrangements to this effect have been 
made. This month Mr. Burnham goes to 
St. John's Congregational Chapel, Ipswich ; 
and also to Amersham. 

Mr. Harmer's services at March were 
largely atttended, and productive of great 
blessing. There were many remarkable 
answers to prayer during the meetings, and 
much cause for praise and thanksgiving. 
After a short rest, Mr. Harmer went to 
Cheddar, where several were brought to 
decision for Christ. He has since been at 
Ipswich, conducting missions at Tudden- 
ham, Crown Street, and Washbrook ; the 
latter part of this month he is going to 
Tewkesbury. 

Mr. Harrison'' s mission at Stapleton Road, 
Bristol, is described as having been " re- 
markably successful in point of numbers, 
enthusiasm, and results." At Redditch, the 
services are reported as having been ' ' rich 
in spiritual results." During the past month 
he has been at Sittingbourne and Bury St. 
Edmund's. 

Mr. Parker reports successful services at 
Falmouth, Bourton, Ringstead, and Had- 
denham ; and says that he is booked until 
the end of this month. He will be glad 
to hear from any brethren desiring his 
services. They can direct to the Tabernacle. 
Pastor C. T. Johnson tells of great blessing 
resting on Mr. Parker's work at Falmouth, 
and speaks of him as a very sound, earnest, 
and able evangelist. 

Orphanage. — We are very glad to hear 
that, during the past year, threo hundred 



pastors' college. 



149 



and thirty-three garments have been sent to 
the Orphanage by the Reading Young 
Ladies' Working Meeting. Will all the 
ladies accept our hearty thanks for their 
continued kindness to our fatherless family ? 

Personal Notes. — Among the many 
cheering letters received lately, is one tell- 
ing us of the death of an earnest Christian 
worker, who was converted at one of our 
services at New Park-street Chapel, more 
than thirty years ago. Shortly before his 
departure, he told the minister who called 
to see him, that he went, one wet evening, 
to a meeting in an East End Mission Hall. 
As only eight people were present, an ex- 
perience meeting was held, when it was 
found that five of them had been converted 
under our ministry. Bless the Lord ! 

A young man informs us of the following 
singular chain of circumstances leading to 
his conversion. In 1881, on a Lord's-day 
evening, when the Tabernacle was thrown 
open to all comers, he came, and heard a 
sermon upon the text, " Come unto me, all 
ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I 
will give you rest. ' ' Four years ago he went 
to Australia. On leaving that land, a few 
weeks since, a Christian lady gave him two 
of our sermons, and asked him to read 
them. He threw them into his trunk, and 
took no notice of them, till one day, on the 
voyage, having nothing to read, he suddenly 
remembered them. On taking them out, he 
found that one of the two was the very 
sermon he had heard in the Tabernacle 
more than seven years previously (" Christ's 
Word with You," No. 1,691). He read it, 
and re-read it, the Holy Spirit blessed the 
reading, and now he can sing — 



" I came to Jesus as I was, 

Weary, and worn, and sad ; 

I found in him a resting-place, 

And he has made me glad." 

The reading of the following letter gave 
us great joy during our recent season of 
suffering. 

11 Newark, N.J., U.S.A. 
1 ' Rev. C. H. Spurgeon, 

."My dear Brother, — Four weeks ago, I 
began to use your book, All of Grace, in 
making plain to my people the way of salva- 
tion. Already God is blessing his Word, 
and your explanations and illustrations ; 
and I want you to know that I join in your 
prayer that your work may be, * by the 
power of God the Holy Ghost, used in the 
conversion of millions', some of whom shall 
come from my chapel. 

"I know that he will, according to his 
promise in Matthew xviii. 19. I pray for 
you, and I ask that you will ask God to con- 
vert many in my chapel, to the glory of his 
name. For years I have wished to write 
you. God has made you a blessing to me 
ever since I heard you preach, twelve years 
ago. I will indulge in no words of praise, 
only to say I love you, I thank God for 
you, and pray him to bless you more and 
more in his service. 

" For two years I was a missionary in 
Mexico ; for five years I have laboured for 
the poor in this city. Pray for me, dear 
brother, that while health prevents my 
return to Mexico, God will abundantly 
bless my labours here. 

"Very sincerely yours, 

" J. H. Polhemus." 

Baptisms at Metropolitan Tabernacle,— 
January 31, sixteen. 



Statement of Receipts from January \bth to February 14M, 1889. 



Collection at Peckham Park-road, per 
Pastor H. O. Mackey 

Do you love God ? 

What is your faith ? 

Keep thy mind stayed on him 

Mrs. Raybould 

Miss A. M. Morris... 

Part collection at Upton Chapel, per 
Pastor W. Williams 

Pastor Thomas Whittle 

Pastor J. S. Poulton 

Mr. C. Allard 

Rev. G. Hearson 

Rev. E. J. Farley 

Dear Grannie 

First division of surplus income from 
estate of the late Rev. Thomas King, 
Semley 

Pastor C. Welton 

A mother's prayer answered, Edinburgh 

An afflicted missionary in India 

Miss Jephs 

Two sisters „. 

Mr. P. Mackinnon ... 



£ s. d. 



3 12 


3 


50 





5D 





50 





1 





2 


6 


6 5 


1 


5 





5 





10 





2 2 





1 1 





1 





4 5 10 


10 





1 1 





1 





1 3 


6 


1 5 





10 






£ s. d. 
Christ Church, Aston, Birmingham, 

per Pastor G. Samuel 3 18 6 

Mr. John Cameron 10 

Collected at prayer-meetings at Man- 
sion House Mission, Camberwell, per 

Pastor G. W. Linnecar 10 

A friend, per C. L 2 6 

From Scotland 25 

A sermon -reader's gratitude 10 

Mrs. Griffiths 5 2 6 

Part collection at Lymington, per Pastor 

John Collins 1 11 € 

Rev. E. J. Farley , 110 

Monthly Subscription : — 

Mr. R. J. Beecliti 2 6 

Weekly Offerings at Met. Tab. :— 

Jan. 20 14 7 6 

„ 27 6 6 9 

Feb. 3 11 12 6 

„ 10 14 6 6 

46 13 3 



£270 19 11 



150 



Statement of Receipts from January Ibth to February l±th y 1889. 



Mr. William Jones 

M. D., of Old Deer 

Captain C. M. Moller 

Collected by Mr. A. S. Barter 

Rev. J. F. Avery, per Revt Dr. Booth... 

In memory of Bertie 

Mr. T.Wells 

Mr. A. Stacey 

Westgate Sunday-school, per Mr. J. 11. 
Birkinshaw 

Miss J. Baigent 

A. A. B 

Collected by Mr. J. Cooper 

Clements and Newling's ticket-writers, 
per Mr. Hawkins 

Collected by Mr. W. Armes 

South Norwood Baptist Church, collec- 
tion at communion-table, per Pastor 
J. Chadwick 

Rev. W. J. Gucrrier, per Mrs. J. 
Spurgeon 

A sincere friend 

Mrs. M. Watson 

Mr. H. Denby 

Mr. T. Fordham 

The Young Women's Bible-class at the 
Orphanage, per Mrs. James Stiff 

Collected by Mrs. Dodwell 

Collected by Mrs. Perry 

Mr. G. Smith 

Miss M. A. Dobson 

The Beauly Sabbath-school, per Mr. 
J. Paterson 

Mr. William Swain 

Mr. J. J. Pearce 

Mrs. Fordham 

Collected by Miss C. M. Stevenson 

Mr. W. Snook 

Bath 

Orphan boys and girls' collecting cards 
(second list) 

Collection at Townley Street Mission 
Hall, per Mr. R. H. Tomkins 

Jack, South Lambeth 

Mrs. Wakelin 

Miss Farmer and Miss Gibbs 

A friend in Canada 

Mrs. Hammerton 

Mrs. T. Barrett 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sellar 

Mr. C. Martin 

Half contents of Helen, Sybil, Margie, 
Jean, Berta, and Willma's box, 
opened on New Year's day 

Dear Grannie 

Mrs. Ward 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman 

Collected by Mr. James Miller 

First division of surplus income from 
estate of the late Rev. Thomas King, 
Semley 

Lockerbie Mission Hall Sabbath-school 

Executors of the late Mr. E. Boustead 
(additional interest on deposits) 

Mrs. Elliott 

Miss A. E. Seymour 

Mrs. Blyth 

Mrs. Cooper and friends 

Mrs. Garrett 

Mr. John Harris 

Pastor C. Welton 

Mr. and Mrs. Froggatt 

.Mrs. Ferguson 

Mrs. Chillingworth 

Mr. William Howard 



£ 


s. 


d. 





6 





5 








10 








1 











G 








5 








5 








4 





2 


5 








2 


G 





5 








12 


4 


4 


7 


10 





10 






1 10 o 



2 2 





5 





1 2 


6 


2 





1 1 





1 15 


7 


13 


7 


10 





10 





1 1 





1 





2 2 





1 





3 





15 


3 


7 


G 


10 





9 10 11 


11 


G 


3 





1 1 





1 





12 





10 





5 





2 2 





7 


G 


9 





1 





10 





6 





10 





4 5 


10 


7 





34 17 


2 


2 


6 


3 





1 





6 





3 


G 


2 





5 





2 





10 





10 





1 






Collected by Mrs. Coles 

Mr. J. Spilman 

Mr. F. J. Collier 

Mrs. Vowles and friend 

Mrs. McKessack 

A Scotch reader 

L. E. P., per Pastor Walter Brown ... 

Mr. A. F. Rogers 

Mr. W. Pickard 

A Folkestone working-man 

G. N., Edinburgh 

Stamps from Bradford 

Mr. John Thomson 

Mrs.Baines 

Miss Eyles 

Proceeds of cottage tea-meeting at 

Great Barton, per Mr. R. M. Scott ... 

Rev. Charles Miller 

Mr. George Gibb and friends 

Mrs. W. Warren, per Pastor E. Spur- 
rier 

Lynton Road Sunday-school 

Collected by Master Herries 

Collected by Mrs. R. C. Allen 

Mr. Charles Barker 

Mr. George Wight 

Mrs. Harvey 

Mr. C. Ibberson 

Mrs. Bell 

Miss A. Whatley 

A constant sermon-reader, per Mr. 

Gilbert Finch 

Mr. E. Joscelyne 

Pastor W. Jenkins 

Mr. George Sinclair 

Mrs. John Froggatt 

Mrs. Thompson 

Mr. William Fyson 

Baptist Sunday-school, Fraserburgh, 

per Pastor W. Richards 

Collected at Watch-night service, at 

Penge Tabernacle, per Pastor J. 

Wesley Boud 

Mr. D. Peck 

Mr. Sapsed, per Mr. Peck 

Mr. S. Sargeant 

Mrs. Doughty 

The scholars of the Carrow Works 

Sunday-schools, Norwich 

F. J. and friendsi 

Ruthie and Jackie 

Miss Hall 

Dr. Parry and friends, Bristol 

H. H. K 

Collected by Master H. Kingsnorth ... 

Mr. J. W. Green 

Rev. Dr. Beith 

Mr. A. McEae and friends 

Dr. and Mrs. Fearn 

Mr. W. Woolidge 

A native of Norwood 

Mr. T. D. Anderson 

Mrs. and Miss Haywood 

Mi's. Gifford 

Mr. P. Mackinnon 

Mr. Joseph Wiles 

Mrs. Talbot 

Mr. J. Culpin 

A f riend at Risby 

An aged believer 

Mr. Lawrence Shepherd 

Mr. Thomas Thomson 

Miss L. Fidkin 

Collected by Mrs. Whittaker 

Mr. L. Hakrh 



£ s. d. 

10 

10 

2 2 

12 6 

10 

2 

10 
110 

2 17 

10 

10 

2 5 

2 6 

10 

10 6 



11 

10 

9 

10 

in 6 

7 7 

12 

1 

1 

2 

2 6 

2 6 

5 








3 
2 

4 
ft 




2 







4 







1 

10 



17 6 



5 





2 


6 


4 





1 





10 





2 10 





3 





2 2 





12 


G 


5 





1 





7 


6 


1 





1 





14 





5 


O 


10 





1 





2 





3 


G 


5 


O 


L0 





1 1 





5 





1 





2 


(I 


6 





10 


(I 


3 





5 





10 





1 






STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



151 



A few friends at Irvine, per Miss Sarah 

Muir 

Mr. W. E. Eastman 

Per Mr. J. A. Abraham : — 

Mr. W. R Way 10 

Mr. H. S. H'aynes 110 

Mr. J. A.. Abraham ... 1 1 

Rev. A. M. Carter, B.A. ... 10 

Mr. II. Joslin, J.P. ... 110 

Miss Giles 110 



£ s. a. 

2 
10 



Mr. James "Woodward 

Mr. E. E. Wright 

Mr. R. Little 

Mrs. Lauder's Bible-class 

Mrs.Erost 

Miss S. A. Whitehead 

Per Miss E. L 

Miss E. L.'s Bible-class, St. Giles's Street, 

Edinburgh 

C. L., and friend 

Miss Westrope 

Friends at Lionsgate Mission-room ... 

Mr. John Horn 

Mr. Evans 

Collected by Mrs. E. Holiday 

Sale of S. O. Tracts 

Mr. E. Eno 

Per Pastor W. Burnett :— 
Mrs. Burnett's box ... 12 

Mrs. Record's box 10 5 

Mr. Bolton's box 3 6 

William Burnett's box ... 16 6 

Mr. Perry's subscription ... 5 

Profits from various small. 

books 4 

Collected by Miss Riddle 

Mr. C. Allard 

Mr. H. C. Bridgman 

Per Miss Bessie Dixon : — 

MissCutlack 3 4 

Miss Dean 2 8 

The Misses Dixon 7 6 

Mrs. Geale 1 6| 

Mrs. Harmer 1 3£ 

Mrs. Jupp 5 o| 

Mrs. Peck and Mrs. Bullen 2 7^ 

Mrs. Sear 5 2| 

Mr. Swameld 4 5 

Mr. Stuchfield 2 5£ 

Miss Sticehurst 1 8i 

E. J. Dixon's farthing fund 1 3| 

Mrs. George 

Executors of the late Mr. J. G. Pater- 
son, Glasgow 



6 4 

5 

2 10 

10 

6 6 

10 

5 

16 

5 

7 6 

10 

1 15 
2 6 
5 
10 
10 
3 



2 11 5 
4 
10 
16 



£ s. d. 



1 19 1 
5 

10 



Per Mrs. James Withers : — 
Mrs. Haynes, Hoe Bridge 
Mr. Thomas Huntley 

Mr. J. O. Cooper 

Mr. D. Heelas 

Mr. Austin Woodeson 
Mr. Ernest Woodeson 

Mr. Henry Cooper 

Mr. G. W. Palmer 

Mrs. Whitfield 

Donation from a friend ... 

Mrs. Fraser ... 

Mr. A. R.Coles 

Mr. and Mrs. Jordan 

Mrs. Crawley 

Mr. G. Shrewsbury 

Collected by Mrs. Grifiiths from friends 
at Kingswood and Wotton-under- 
Edge 13 6 

Received for 12 dozen " John 
Ploughman's Almanacks " 14 



10 o 









4 









2 









2 









15 









12 









10 









10 









5 













20 12 
20 












... 


5 









10 









1 1 









1 









1 1 






Mrs. Gray 

B. G., Norwich 

A friend from Shepperton 

Mrs. Brown 

Part collection at Lymington, per 

Pastor John Collins 

Mater 

Meetings by Mr. Gharlesworth and the 
Orphanage Choir: — 
The Soldiers' Institute, Portsmouth, 

per Miss S. Robinson 

Miss S. Robinson 

Miss Higgs (expenses of choir) 

Temperance Society, Barry Road Wes- 

leyan Chapel, East Dulwich, per Mr. 

Jordan 

Annual Subscriptions : — 

Mr. I. Vinall 

Mr. E. R. Close 

Per F. R. T. :— 

Mr. H. Keen 

Mr. S. Pewtress 

Mrs. George Dix 

Mrs. Henry Brown 

Mr. E. H. Bramley 

Monthlij Subscriptions : — 

Mr. E. K. Stace 

Sandwich, per bankers . . . 
F. G. B., Chelmsford 
Mr. S. H. Dauncey 



14 10 

6 

10 

10 

5 



1 11 
5 



35 
5 
10 



2 10 



... 


... 1 1 

... 5 






5 
5 
5 

10 







1 K 






... 


... 5 




... 10 

... 2 2 
... 2 
... 2 




6 
6 




£342 16 


8 



Orphan Boys' Collecting Cards (continued). — Barson, E. J., 2s; Gant, F. C, 5s 6d ; Hill, G, 10s; 
Lewis, E. R., 3s; Langridge, J., 17s 6d; Moppett, F., 3s; Piatt, A., 4s 6d; Virtue, C. F., 9s 2d— 
Total, £2 14s 8d. 

Orphan Girls' Collecting Cards {continued).— Blake, C, 12s 4d ; Donoghue, E., 13s 6d ; Fenn, A., 5s 5d ; 
Fitt, M., 3s; Freatby, E., 3s; Grimes, E., 10s; Haisell, J., 12s 5d; Hocking, L., £1 Is ; Jackson, A., 
5s ; Lovell, E., 2s ; Pennington, F., £1 Is ; Sands, M., 17s 4d ; Smith, P., 10s 3d— Total, £6 16s 3d. 

List of Presents, per Mr. Charlesworth, from January 15th to February 14th, 1889.— Provisions :— 
1 hamper Aerated Bread, Mr. N. Read ; 18 Wild Rabbits, Mr. J. Cooper ; 1 New Zealand Sheep, Mr. 
A. S. Haslam ; 1 Cake, Miss Dawson ; 18 Rabbits, Mr. S. Barrow ; 1 Fowl, 1 bottle Jam, and a 
quantity of Honey and Butter, Y. M. A. G. ; 6 Stilton Cheeses and 119 Pork Pies, Mr. J. T. Crosher. 

Boys' Clothing.— 12 pairs Knitted Socks, Mrs. Barlow ; 1 dozen Shirts, Mrs. Wilkinson ; 3 articles, 
The Young Women's Bible-class at the Orphanage, per Mrs. J. Stiff ; 12 pairs Knitted Socks, Mrs. 
Cunningham ; 3 shirts, Mrs. Wilmshurst ; 1 pair Socks, Anon. ; 18 pairs Knitted Socks, The Misses 
Thompson. 

Girls' Clothing.— 14 articles, Mrs. Bartholomew ; 39 articles, The Gosport Tabernacle Junior Dorcas 
Society, per Miss Hoare ; 2 Pinafores, E. Fennall ; 148 articles, The Young Women's Class at the 
Orphanage, per Mrs. J. Stiff; 1 Dress, Mrs. Wilmshurst; 2 Ulsters, 2 Hats, and 1 Pinafore, Miss 
Dawson ; 1 Muffler and 3 Scarves, Mrs. Hicks ; 17 articles, The Misses Thompson ; 106 articles, and 
35 Ribbon Bows, The Ladies' Working Meeting at Tabernacle, per Miss Higgs ; 8 articles, Mrs. Muir ; 
49 articles, Miss Jones' Bible-class; 7 articles, The Misses Horton; 54 yards Dress Material, Mrs. 
Thompson ; 57 articles, Mrs. J. Howard ; 8 yards Red Flannel, 18 yards Unbleached Calico, The 
Misses Milner ; 30 articles, The Juvenile Working Society, per Miss Woods. 



152 



COLPORTAGE ASSOCIATION. 



General. — 1 year's Magazines, Mr. J. B. Mead; 1 barge of Flints and Gravel, Messrs. Wills and 
Packham ; 4 Dolls, Mrs Wilmshurst ; a quantity of Almanacks and Date Cards, Mr. J. Tresidder j 2 
volumes •• Blue Lights," and 1 volume " Ready," Miss Robinson ; 1 cask Blacking, Messrs. Carr and 
Sons ; 6 fancy articles, Miss Jane "Workman ; a quantity of Magazines, Mr. J. W. Andrew ; a quantity 
of Stationery, Mr. B. P. Bilbrough ; 1 Doll, Mrs. Hall, per Mrs. J. A. Spurgeon. 

Statement of Receipts from January Ibth to February 14th, 1889. 



Subscriptions and Donations for Districts: — 

Mr. W. H. Roberts, for Ilkeston 
Mr. Thomas Greenwood, for Brentford 
Weston Turville Baptist Church 
Greenwich, per Pastor C. Spurgeon ... 
Stratford-on-Avon, per Mr. J. Small- 
wood 

Kettering, per Mr. W. Meadows, sen... 
Somers Town, per Miss Griffith 
Bromley Congregational Church, Kent 
Great Yarmouth Town Mission 
Dorking District, per Mr. W. Drane . . . 



£ 


s. 


10 





20 





1 


5 


10 





15 





10 





10 





10 





7 


10 


15 






d. 














£108 15 



10 



Subscriptions and Donations to the General Fund: — 

£ s. d. 

Mrs. Raybould 

Executors of the late Mr. Edward Bou- 

stead (additional interest on deposits) 

Mr. W. Howard 

Miss A. Whatley 

Two sisters 

Mr. P. Mackinnon 

Mr. A. Todd 

Mr. A. Perren 

Mr. D. Heelas, per Mrs. James Withers 

Annual Subscriptions : — 

Mr. J. Buswell (for 1888) 

Mr. Marshall, per Mr. Mears 

Half- Yearly Subscription : — 
Mr. H. B. Erearson 



20 18 


4 


1 





2 





10 





10 





5 





8 





1 





1 1 





1 1 





7 10 





£52 7 


4 



Statement of Receipts from January loth to February 14th, 1889. 



Thankoffering for Mr. Parker's services 

at Ringstead 

"Church of England," thankoffering 

for Mr. Spurgeon's sermons 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Harmer and 

Parker's services at Crewkerne 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarke 

Mr. P. Mackinnon 

Mrs. B , towards Mr 

support, 1889 , 

Mrs. Hallows 

Two sisters 

Mr. G. W. Slater 

Mr. R. P. Dayton 



£ s. d. 

16 

10 



cerne ... 6 7 


3 


1 





10 





Burnham's 




50 





5 





10 





10 





1 






Thankoffering for Mr. Burnham's ser- 
vices at Ulverston 

J.M 

Mr. C. F. Whitridge 

Thankoffering for Mr. Parker's services 
at Bourton 

Thankoffering for Mr. Burnham's ser- 
vices at Bere Regis 

Thankoffering for Mr. Burnham's ser- 
vices at Pudclletown 



£ s. d. 



10 
5 
4 



Statement of Receipts from January 15th to February 14th, 1889. 

£ a rt 



Mr. G. E. Medway 

"Kemnay" 

Mrs. Spencer 

Mr. and Mrs . Haynes 

Mr. H. Jones 

"Reliance," per Mr. S. J. Dobson 



£ s. 


d. 


2 





2 





5 





16 





5 





5 






2 17 



13 

1 18 6 
£96 6 9 



£8 8 



Friends sending presents to the Orphanage are earnestly requested to let their names or 
initials accompany the same, or we cannot properly acknowledge them ; and also to write to 
Mr. Spurgeon if no acknowledgment is sent within a week. All parcels should be addressed 
to Mr. Charlesworth, Stockwell Orphanage, Glapham Road, London. 

Subscriptions will be thankfully received by C. H. Spurgeon, " Westwood,^ Beulah Hill, 
Upper Norwood. Should any sums sent before the l%th of last month be unacknowledged in 
thin list, friends are requested to tvrite at once to Mr. Spurgeon. Post Office and Postal 
Orders should be made payable at the Chief Office, London t to 6. H. Spurgeon ; and Cheques 
and Orders should all be crossed. 



THE 



SWORD AND THE TROWEL. 



APRIL, 1889 




tofomfl 0w \\t Mall 

A DISCOURSE BY C. H. SPURGEON. 

" He spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that 
springeth out of the wall." — 1 Kings iv. 33. 

OLOMON was a great botanist, and his range of knowledge 
was of the widest sort. In nature God has made an amazing 
variety — from the cedar to the hyssop. In the creation of his 
grace there is an equal variety. Certain saints for strength, 
and glory, and excellence, are as the cedars of Lebanon.^ Other 
believers, equally alive unto God, are small ; their sphere is limited, and 
their position is difficult : they are like the " hyssop that springeth out 
of the wall." In order to complete a botanical system it is as necessary 
to mention the wall-flower as to mention the cedar. If any one of the 
plants that God has made be left out of the botanist's list, his knowledge 
is imperfect. So it is with the people of God: we must enumerate 
them from the least even unto the greatest, if we would comprehend the 
whole host. If we preach only to those who are strong, we shall be 
doing grievous wrong to those who are weak. If we mention only the 
captains of the Lord's host, we shall be despising the rank and file, 
who have to bear the burden and heat of the battle. To make full and 
complete proof of our ministry, it is quite as needful for us to think of 
the hyssop as to consider the cedar. The mercy is that, as Solomon 
did not forget the hyssop, so a greater than Solomon is here, and he 
does not overlook the very least of his people. In the records of his saints 
he puts down David, but he also notes the least of them, of whom our 
prayer is, that he may be as David, and David as the angel of the Lord. 

11 



154 GROWING ON THE WALL. 

There would have been no complete register of Jacob's children had 
Benjamin been left out; and of God's family the register shall be 
perfect, and no little Benjamin shall be omitted. 

I want those of you who are conscious of being little in Israel to feel 
that the Lord knows you and remembers you. The Psalmist was happy 
because he could say — " I am poor and needy ; yet the Lord thinketh 
upon me." God has an eye to the least plant of his right-hand planting ; 
and Jesus mentions, in his pleading, all his saints ; those that be great, 
for they need his intercessions ; and those that be little, for they cannot 
be forgotten of him. 

Let us learn — from Solomon first, if you will, but chiefly from the 
greater than Solomon — this lesson, never to despise the little ones in 
the church of God. Never say, " Lord, what shall this man do t" 
Never think of such a person — poor, obscure, destitute of gifts — and say, 
" Of what use is such a one in the church except to be a burden to 
it ? " Never imagine such evil in your hearts. Those members of the 
body that are uncomely are necessary ; and of those who are little, 
Christ has said what he says not of the great ones : li Whoso shall 
offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for 
him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were 
drowned in the depth of the sea." Be very tender of the feebler sort; 
and if you are tempted to be great, and to talk of your own attain- 
ments and perfections, mind what you are at, lest you offend the babes. 
Take heed, lest it happen to you, as it did to Israel of old in the days 
of the prophet, when the strong cattle pushed with horn and shoulder, 
and then God determined to be avenged on the strong because they 
regarded not the weak. Tread very tenderly when thou art among the 
tender. Injure no man by thy strength. If thy running be swift, run 
against no man ; and if thou must smite any man, do it as gently as 
thy God smites thee ; lest haply, being rough and untender, thou shouldst 
one day find God froward with the froward, and hard with the hard. 
If the wisdom of God creates hyssops, it is not for thee to despise them. 

We are told, too, that Solomon " spake" of hyssops. I do not know 
what he had to say about them ; but I am sure that his speech was wise. 
We, also, will speak of hyssops. " Who are they," say you — " these 
small plants ? " Well, I mean those people who have small abilities and 
powers. If they carry anything it must be ounces : if they do anything 
it must be done as with a child's hand. They never were, from their 
youth up, able to learn much ; and he that cannot learn is not likely 
to be able to teach. They still are, and probably always will be, men and 
women of one talent only. They are, for that reason, the hyssop on 
the wall ; but, moreover, they are placed in circumstances which are 
not very helpful to them. I know Christian persons who happen to 
be juniors in a family where all mock at them and persecute them for 
Christ's sake. They grow as upon a wall. Their foes are " they of their 
own household." Sometimes it is a wife who has the utmost difficulty 
to maintain a Christian profession at all in the teeth of a husband's 
hostility ; and, perhaps, added to that, there is opposition from those 
who are the children of her own bosom. I have known young people 
placed as apprentices, or as domestics in the house, where every possible 
difficulty is thrown in their way if they serve God. When they kneel 



GROWING ON THE WALL. 155 

at their bed-side, they are assailed with a roar of laughter. There is 
nobody to help them in the least, and everybody to hinder them. They 
are, like the hyssop that is to grow upon the wall, in very hard circum- 
stances. With others much hindrance arises out of their extreme 
poverty. They cannot give anything to the cause of God, except it be 
the widow's two mites that make a farthing. Their noses are to the 
grindstone always. They have to do the rough work of the race, and 
consequently they cannot rise to large service of Christ. So they 
think, though I think otherwise. 

Many are placed where their work and service in life allow them small 
gospel opportunities. Perhaps they do not get out more than once a 
fortnight to hear a sermon, and can scarcely ever come to the communion 
table. There are such occupations, and I believe there always will be 
as long as the world stands, wherein persons are obliged to forego the 
means of grace which others enjoy in such plenty. There are towns 
and villages in which the gospel is not preached. Nay, perhaps I 
may not say that it is not actually preached, but it is not preached 
with any fervour, or freshness, or power. I know some to whom the 
Sabbath, instead of being a day of refreshment, is a greater day of 
weariness than any other in the week, because the preaching they bear 
makes them sick at heart. The sheep look up, and are not fed ; they 
•are not led into green pastures of blessed gospel doctrine, but they are 
tantalized with philosophical essays. These, again, are like the hyssops 
that grow upon the wall. 

These are the people that I desire to talk to and talk about. God 
give them comfort ! 

I cannot forget the sunny skies beneath which I sat a little time ago. 
With all the clouds that have swept over my head, both natural and 
spiritual, I cannot forget that there are lands where ''everlasting spring 
abides"; and if the flowers do wither, yet, at least, they bloom again 
so quickly that one scarce knows that they are gone. I thought of this 
text, and of what I am about to say, by noticing the walls of the garden, 
m which I sat, covered from top to bottom with flowers of all colours. 
Between the cracks of the stones that supported the terraces of earth, 
there were growing such flowers as we can only rear in our conservatories, 
and only dare plant out in summer. These abounded from the bottom 
of the wall to the top. Many plants take delight in walls ; and though 
the place seems uncongenial, yet they bring forth sweet flowers, and shed 
a delicious perfume all around. 

Well, then, I thought, first, these flowers that grow on ivalls are suited 
for such places, and the places are suited for them. That is what I want 
to say to you, dear friend. Have you been grumbling because you 
cannot < do great service for God and come to the front ? Do you 
complain of your situation ? My dear friend, somebody must be in your 
position, and in all probability there is nobody so well fitted for it as you 
•are. You say, " Oh, but I need so much patience." The mercy is that 
God is ready to bestow that great patience upon you. "It is a very 
hard place, sir," say you. Yes, but it would be as hard for somebody 
^lse as it is for you ; and if somebody must fill it, are you not, in all proba- 
bility, the best person to do so ? How should God distribute his servants ? 
Should it not be by putting- each one where he is most fitted to be ? 



156 GROWING ON THE WALL. 

What would a commander do with his regiments in the day of battle ? 
Would he not send each company where it could do the best service to 
the royal cause ? So it is with the Lord. He has placed you where you 
are because you are the fittest flower to grow where he has planted you. 
Do you not know many others who would wither in your position ? Oh, 
yes, I know you do. Mind that you do not wither yourself! But at 
the same time, I feel sure that, although you would not choose the place, 
yet there was infinite wisdom in his heart who chose you for the place. 
You are the right flower for the wall, and the wall is the right spot 
for you. We ought never to quarrel with our positions, for, after all, 
dear friends, if we fail, the fault is not in our tasks, or in our offices, 
but in ourselves. To be very quiet in the family, and to glide through 
it making everybody happy, and to be yourself unnoticed, may seem to 
be a very little thing, yet is it a difficult matter, and she that has accom- 
plished it has done well. She is a flower that blooms on the wall. 
Some of you are just fitted for a quiet position, and such a position is 
just fitted for you. Do you say that you would have liked the high 
places of the field ? Ah me ! you do not know the trials which some 
of us endure in the front of the battle. If you cannot do well in a low 
estate, I am sure that you cannot do well in a high one. If your head 
swims on the level, what would it do if you had to stand on a high and 
beetling cliff in the teeth of the storm ? Be in no hurry to change. I 
w r ould not like to change my temptations. I know a little of the par- 
ticular devil that worries me : I would rather not have another tempter. 
He might strike me in a fresh place, and I might not be so well able to 
guard myself. The old cross fits the shoulder best : a new cross might 
raise a second blister. Grow where you are. Transplanted flowei'3 
seldom come to much; but he that can abide in his calling, and be 
satisfied not to move unless God moves him, shall bring to God glory 
by his life. 

A second thought: hyssops and plants that are on the wall have their 
uses. Not only the corn that grows in the field, and the fruits that 
hang on the trees, but the little hyssop and other wall-plants serve their 
ends. God's obscure people live not in vain. There is great usefulness 
in a sweet example ; it yields far better preaching than eloquent tongues. 
The preaching of a pious servant, or a godly mother, or a holy tradesman 
is manifest to everybody. The humble saint may be no spokesman, 
may never put six sentences together, but yet he yields much for God 
by holy living. With a godly example will often go sweet influences of 
comfort. I know Christian people who, if they were gone home, would 
be terribly missed ; not that a line they ever wrote would be remem- 
bered, or a word they ever said would be repeated, but they have been 
of use to everybody. Had you never an aunt of that kind, who was a 
mother and nurse to all the family ? Had you not a brother who was 
the friend of you all? Did you never know a friend most low r ly, yet 
most loving ? The hyssop on the wall is the image of such unobtrusive 
usefulness. 

And, let me whisper in your ear, you quiet people of God, you little 
ones, do you know what was chiefly done with the hyssop ? It was only 
a little plant ; but they gathered it, and when the blood was sprinkled 
on the lintel and on the two side-posts at the Passover, it is written, 



GROWING ON THE WALL. 157 

u Thou shalt take a bunch of hyssop." So the hyssop was stirred round 
in the basin of blood, and all that it did was, that it conveyed the blood 
to the person, or to the door-post, that was to be sprinkled. Oh, if, in 
my humble talk, even though it be on a sick-bed, I can but convey the 
blood of sprinkling to a guilty heart ! Oh, if by rny telling out of the 
gospel of Jesus, though it may be with many tears and broken words, I 
may but make that blood drop on one seeking sinner to his soul's sal- 
vation, I shall not have lived in vain ! Go on, then, you that cannot 
preach, or even teach in the Sunday-school ! Go on ; and, as often ^s 
you have opportunity, talk about that precious blood which cleanseth 
from all sin. You can speak, where, perhaps, I shall never be heard. 
There is a door-post accessible to you, and not to me ; a human heart 
over which you may have influence, though it be but the heart of your 
own little girl ; and I may never have a chance to speak to her. Grow 
on, you hyssops on the wall ; you have your uses. 

A third point I noticed about plants that grow on walls, and it was 
this — they make much of littles. I saw a fuchsia, and a cactus, and all 
kinds of flowers, which I cannot mention now, all rooted between the 
cracks of the stones, and growing well, too. There was very little earth, 
but much beauty ; very little space, but much fragrance. These plants 
went as deep as ever they could, sending their roots as far in between the 
cracks as possible, to get what little nourishment there was. So have I 
seen poor, humble-minded, lowly Christians, with very little ability, 
very little opportunity, and no worldly substance at all, but they have 
made a great deal out of very little : their lives have been so beautiful, 
their whole conduct has been so attractive, their words have been so full 
of Christ, that one wondered whence all their sweetness came. Though 
they had but little earth, they were deeply rooted. If they prayed,* they 
did pray. If they heard a discourse, they did hear it, and were not half 
asleep. When they could commune with God's people, they did not 
waste time in idle chit-chat, but they talked earnestly of the things of 
God. To hear these poor Christians speak, was to perceive that they were 
intense ; that what they believed, they lelieved ; that what they knew, 
they knew ; and that what they had received from God, they practised 
in their lives. I am afraid that we are, many of us, far too superficial ; 
our roots go skimming over the surface. We have much earth to travel 
over, but we do not suck in as much nutriment as we might. God's 
hyssops have very little earth, but they get all they can out of it. Oh, 
it is grand to see a man who has no books but his Bible ; and what a 
scholar he is in that sacred lore ! He has no second book, except his 
hymn-book ; but see how pat he brings in the verses of the hymns ! It 
would be a great blessing to many men if they had their books burned, 
.so that they could not read anything but their Bible, although other 
books are very helpful to him that reads his Bible first and foremost. 
Unlettered Christians, by diligence and deep experience, may become so 
acquainted with the things of God as to be fathers in Israel ; while 
others, with greater advantages, are feeble folk. 

The fourth thing that I thought of as I sat and looked at my 
illuminated book on the garden wall was this : they adorned the wall 
The wall looked far more beautiful than it would have looked without 
them. You have read, I suppose, " The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain." 



158 GROWING ON THE WALL. 

From the day that book was written it became a most respectable thing" 
to be a shepherd. You have read H The Dairyman's Daughter," too, I 
dare say. Well, every dairyman and every dairyman's daughter went up 
in the world as soon as that book became popular. These holy ones 
lived among sheep and cows ; and the plain and the cowhouse were 
beautified by their presence. Yes, a servant makes her drudgery divine 
when she does it for the Lord. A man may glorify God by sweeping 
chimneys : he may bring honour to the Most High by being a coster- 
monger in the street. You may degrade a pulpit, and it is often done ; 
but you may elevate the " scissor-to-grind " wheel of the streets by 
godliness. It matters not what we have to do, but how we do it. Put 
the most beautiful flower upon the wall, and it loses nothing by the 
wall ; but it gives much to it. The flower that is growing in the 
garden-bed may be passed by unnoticed ; but the flower on the wall 
is noticed because of the singularity of its position. I have seen pinks 
on the ruins of an old castle, which were not so fine as those I could 
grow in my own garden, and yet I valued them because they grew in 
that romantic spot. They seemed the fairer because, amid decay and 
ruin, they kept alive the freshness of beauty. dear friend, do not 
be sorry that you are placed in a difficult situation, but adorn your 
position, and " adorn the doctrine of God your Saviour in all things." 

I believe that sometimes, also, these ivall-plants help to hold the wall 
up. Their roots twist themselves about the stones and hold them fast. 
In railway cuttings nothing keeps the earth up better than shrubs,. 
or trees, or gorse. Life is a preservative always. Families are often 
kept together by almost unnoticed men and women. I am sure it is so 
in the Church. You that love your Lord, and live as he did — you that 
are true Christians, but unassuming, and unobserved — your secret 
prayers are known in heaven, though not on earth. Your communion is 
"with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ," and you bind the 
Church together better than any of us ; and, perhaps, when the Lord 
shall mete out rewards to his people, I may have little, and you may 
have much. There is an old story, it is of Popish origin, yet it has no 
Popery in it, but rather the reverse. It is a story of a successful preacher 
who had converted many, and he thought that his reward would be 
great in heaven ; but it was revealed to him that he would have none 
of the honour of the conversions. A poor old deaf man, who used to 
sit on the pulpit-stairs, and pray for him all the while he was preaching,, 
would have the reward. So it may be. Blind, or deaf, or poor, and. 
with little talent, you may, nevertheless, be the very backbone or 
right arm of a church. You may be keeping it together by that silent 
graciousness of yours ; and, if so, will you not be content ? Measure not 
your ministries by their glitter, or by the space they cover. Measure 
them by the grace that is in them, and by your obedience to God ; so 
shall you weigh them in the balances of the sanctuary. 

I merely throw out these things to be thought of: here is another 
hint : hyssops on the wall sometimes get the full sun ivhen others in letter 
positions do not. I have frequently noticed it. The sun comes gliding 
up in the East, and the garden under the wall is in the shade ; but there 
is a plant on the top of the wall, in a queer and awkward place, but the- 
sun kissed it or ever he was fully up ; and all day long, when the suxs 



GROWING ON THE WALL. 159 

has been spinning round the heavens, even to the last hour, when he 
dipped into the West, the lord of day seemed to toy with the floweret 
upon the wall. When half the garden lay in shade, the sun was smiling* 
on its blossoms, and only when he set did he bid his favourite farewell. 
So have I seen the child of God, poor, afflicted, obscure, despised, living 
in the light of God's countenance always. The strong, the worker, the 
well-known giver, the man that stood forth in public life — I have seen 
him in the shade. I have heard him cry to God to manifest himself to 
him ; and all this while the little one has had no need of such a cry, 
for he has basked in the light of Jehovah always. Ay, many of the 
Lord's sick ones can say, "In the night I am still with thee"; for 
though obliged to count the weary night-watches, they have not been 
dreary, for God has been there. If that is jour portion, my dear brother 
or sister, I want to cheer you, and make you feel glad to be that little 
hyssop growing upon the wall. 

Once more, these plants that grow upon the ivall have an opportunity 
of scattering their seeds in due time farther than others that grow in a more 
propitious place. I had a plant that grew upon my wall. It was little 
at first, but it grew up, and up, and up, with its tall spike and yellow 
blooms, till I should think it had reached two or three feet in height. 
I liked to see it on the wall. I am not quite so certain that I want ever 
to see it again, for it has managed to multiply itself all over the garden 
till I regard its offspring as too much of a good thing. Its posi- 
tion on the wall gave it this opportunity. When the wind came it 
carried away the seeds, or, if the pods burst open, the seeds leaped 
forth to a wider area than if they had been growing on the ground. 
Certain men and women have more influence for good than others, 
because of their disadvantages, their difficulties, their trials, and their 
lack of talent. If I speak, and I am helped to speak well, many will 
notice the words I utter, but the spiritual sense will miss them; but 
if some lowly individual here shall say a half-dozen broken sentences 
earnestly, there will be nothing in the style to beguile the listener, and 
the matter itself will be carried home all the better. I wish that you 
would put this to the test. 

" Oh, but I am so ill. I keep my bed." Beds are brave pulpits. 
Earnest words from sick beds go farther into hearts than fine orations 
from platforms. I am sure that it is so. 

" Oh, but I am so very poor." Yes, and if men hear godly talks from 
the very poor, they think the more of them. Many a working man who 
hears my sermon, will go home and say nothing at all about it ; but 
to-morrow morning, if one of you who work with him shall speak to him 
with tears in your eyes, he "will say to his wife when he gets home, 
" Missus, do you know Will So-and-so?" "Yes, John." "Well, he 
has been talking to me about my soul. I heard Spurgeon on Sunday, 
and I forgot what he said; for, you see, he is a parson, and it's their 
usual way to talk of these things. But Will told me he had tried true 
religion, and that it was his comfort in his trouble. You know, 
Missus, he is a very poor man. He does not earn half the wages I do. 
He was telling me how happy he and his wife are together, and how 
their children have turned out a comfort to them. I think, Missus, 
that it would be a good thing if we were to turn over a new leaf." Do 



100 COPYING THE CRACK. 

you nofc see that the man's position helps him in this talk ? This 
hyssop on the wall can throw its seeds farther because of the wail it 
stands on. Years ago, a man drew crowds to see him dance, because 
he had only one leg. It is odd, is it not ? I should think a man with 
two might do it more daintily. And there are cases, no doubt, in which 
disadvantages are advantages. Remember this, and use your trials and 
infirmities for your Lord. 

Having spoken to humbler saints, I finish by saying, that it is better 
to be the smallest believer than the greatest unbeliever ; better to be the 
most obscure saint than the most applauded sinner. It needs almighty 
power to make the smallest hyssop : it needs divine grace to make the 
smallest Christian. He that makes great saints must make little saints, 
or they never will be made at all. So then, fearing, trembling, weak 
believer, God is seen in you and glorified in you. I wonder which 
reveals most of God — the telescope or the microscope. If I had here 
two men who were skilful in these instruments, it would be difficult even 
for them to decide. The man of the telescope would talk of the stars 
and of their wonders ; but he of the microscope would glory that he had 
seen God's finger in a fly's eye ana in a butterfly's wing. If they dis- 
cussed the question, in which God's glory was best seen, they would 
never come to a clear conclusion. God is not less in the least than in 
the greatest ; and so, dear child of God, the grace of God will be greatly 
seen in bringing you, a little saint, to heaven, and making you to sing 
the praises of God world without end. If I am ever so insignificant, 
this shall be my comfort : God made me a plant of his garden : God 
alone could have made me so ; and God is seen in me. As the broad 
heavens may be seen in a single drop of water, so God's omnipotence 
may be seen in the tiniest drop of grace. 

And this is the last comfort. Every blade of grass has its " ain drap 
0' dewy Every hyssop on the wall has its own dew prepared for it. 
Say, child of God, " Blessed Spirit, drop from above on me. Moisten 
my leaf, and bring my flower to perfection unto thy glory." May my 
God bless every one of you ! You professed believers especially, may 
his blessing bind you fast together. Let us love each other heartily, and 
especially let us love those who are little in our Israel ; and let us all 
try, like Solomon, to speak of the hyssop on the wall. God bless you, 
for Jesus' sake ! Amen. 



IT often happens that a man made conspicuous among his fellows by 
dazzling deeds, is like Nebuchadnezzar's image in being compounded 
partly of precious metal and partly of miry clay. Every such man is 
certain to have a host of imitators, who succeed to admiration in repro- 
ducing the clay feet, but are not so successful with the golden head. A 
Chinaman had a cracked plate given him, with instructions to furnish a 
set like it. He did so : and every piece had a crack faithfully copied 
from the original. With many worshippers of faulty heroes, the crack 
is the one thing that is fairly well copied. — From " For Further 
Consideration" : an admirable booh Published by Elliot Stoclc. 






161 

BY THOMAS SPURGEON. 

SCARCELY anyone has so much as half a good word for spiders. 
All the opprobrious epithets imaginable have been hurled at the 
poor insect. According to the ladies, it is " just horrid." According to 
housewives and domestics, it is a perfect plague ; and even preachers of 
that gospel which calls nothing common and unclean refer to it only 
when they wish to illustrate some vice or other. Here are a few 
specimens. Bishop Hall saw a spider comfortably ensconced in his 
window, and straightway compared it to the " thieves by land and pirates 
by sea that live by spoil and blood." And is it not written in the 
commentaries of Manton: — "The spider spinneth a web out of her 
own bowels which is swept away as soon as the besom cometh ; so do 
carnal men conceive a few rash and un grounded hopes ; but when 
death cometh, or a little trouble of conscience, these vain conceits are 
swept away" ? Thomas Brooks is equally complimentary (?) — " There 
are some that would hammer out their own happiness, like the spider 
climbing up the thread of his own weaving." 

Perhaps this unanimous antipathy is not to be wondered at. As to 
the ladies, it would be strange indeed if they admired a creature which, 
it must be confessed, " isn't a bit nice." Domestics may surely be 
forgiven for speaking ill of spiders, for do they not make more work than 
enough by their everlasting web-spinning, and do not a dozen come to the 
funeral when one is swept away ? And 1 will say this for the preachers — 
they have Scripture to back them ; for of all the times the insect or its 
web is mentioned, there is but one reference that is not connected with 
frailty or iniquity or hypocrisy. 

Well, then, I suppose it must be admitted that spiders are not "nice." 
There is no disguising the fact. It is all very well to say that many of 
them are perfectly harmless ; that they keep the flies down, and so on. 
We don't like them for all that : (it is surely an a'cquired taste with 
those who do). Into some minds they positively strike terror. And 
truly some of them are sufficiently hideous. Take the Australian 
Tarantula for instance — with its bloated body and long hairy legs. We 
are inclined to sympathize with the new-chum domestic who, lifting up 
her hands in horror, cried aloud, " Lor', mum, there's a triantelope ! " and 
rushed shrieking from the room. Poor Bridget need not have been so 
scared, for their appearance is the worst of them. N.B. There are many 
things far less awful than they seem ! 

But is there nothing to say in the spiders' favour ? Have they no 
good qualities ? Can they teach us nothing ? Let us see. Why, there 
is something even in their name. " Spider, a corruption of old English 
spinder — from spin, so named from spinning its web." So saith the 
Dictionary. 

It is evidently true to its name. It is not itself a hypocrite, even if 
its web is an apt figure of a hypocrite's hopes. So that is one to the 
spider. Here endeth the first lesson. 

A spinner! Not a bad occupation that ! In a marriage register form, 
a lady of my acquaintance wrote herself down " spinster " in the column 
which should have recorded her occupation. That surely was a pardonable 



162 SPIDERS. 

mistake, especially as in her case the description was virtually correct p 
for if she did not actually spin, she was a true worker. This stands to 
her credit. Who need be ashamed of honest toil ? 

\ tC When Adam delved and Eve span, 
Where was then the gentleman ? " 

So a spider is a spinster, i.e., one who spins. Let idlers stand rebuked 
by the despised spider. This is the second lesson. 

No. 3. is, perseverance. You all know the story of Eobert Bruce and 
the indomitable spider. Go thou and do likewise. 

If I could only remember them, I am sure there could be told plenty 
of stories, and true ones too, about spiders, that would make us think 
more highly of them than we are wont to do. Did not one of them once 
save the life of a persecuted saint ? Fleeing from his foes, he crawled 
into one of the caves of the earth that sheltered those of whom the 
world was not worthy, and as soon as he was safely in, a spider came and 
shut the door — yes, shut the door, by spinning a web over the opening. 
" He cannot be there," said his pursuers, " for see, there's a spider's web 
over the entrance " — and on they passed. The glory of such a deliverance 
must be the Lord's ; but I feel inclined to call for three cheers for that 
spider. 

And who would have thought a spider sensible to the charms of music ? 
yet I read in D'Israeli's " Curiosities of Literature," of a certain officer 
confined in the Bastille who was greatly astonished when he played his 
flute (by special permission of the governor), " to see descending from 
their woven habitations crowds of spiders, who formed a circle about 
him while he continued breathing his soul-subduing instrument." 

There is another equally authentic story of a spider in the same 
renowned prison-house, which always responded to the sound of the 
bagpipe. This love of music is a pleasing trait in the spider's cha- 
racter. Do you retort that one need not be particularly musical to 
appreciate the bagpipes ? I confess it is not my favourite instrument. 
But some prefer it. Tastes differ. Perhaps this spider had a strain 
of Scotch blood in it. It may have been distantly related to Bruce's 
spider, for ought we know. Here again is the spider our teacher. 

11 The man that hath no music in himself, 
Nor is not mov'd with concord of sweet sounds, 
Is fit for treasons, strategems, and spoils ; 
The motions of his spirit are dull as night, 
And his affections dark as Erebus : 
Let no such man be trusted." 

There is one class of spider for which I own I have a certain sort of 
liking. He rejoices in the name of Cteniza nidulans, alias the Trap- 
door Spider. Ever since I had an opportunity of seeing him in hi& 
haunts by the blue Mediterranean, I have taken a real interest in him. 
He is so cunning and clever. Having bored a long tube, or tunnel, in 
the side of a bank, he lines it with some macintosh material made on 
the premises; and at the opening of this strange home he constructs a 
door, fitted in a frame, and working on a hinge. It is so hung that it 
shuts of its own accord, and without slamming. (0 spider, show our 
architects and builders how it is done !) 



SPIDERS. 16fr 

The outside of this door is for all the world like the surrounding bank, 
so that it is not readily discovered. Having found it, you try to open it,. 
and are surprised to note that something keeps it back. The fact is, my lord 
spider, whose castle you have so unceremoniously besieged, is resisting. 
He has laced his fingers (Solomon knew what he was talking about 
when he spoke of the spider's liands) into the webbing of the door, and 1 
is doing his level best to keep the portal closed. More power to him, I 
say. Well would it be for us did we take as many precautions to live 
securely, and to keep out intruders. How often do we leave our com- 
munion and fellowship exposed, though Christ himself has bidden us 
" shut to the door"! We run too many risks. We do not challenge 
every thought. We should guard our homes and hearts more jealously. 
See to it, dear reader, that the door hinges all right, and swings to 
readily ; and when unholy and mischievous interlopers come, take hold 
with your hands, and, at all costs, keep the intruder out. 

Yet another spider has some of my respect. He is the water spider. 
He must be a thorough-going Baptist, for he spends most of his time in 
a state of immersion. The wonderful thing about him is, that he carries 
down with him a big bubble of air, and lets it escape into a dome- 
shaped cocoon, which he has previously constructed. Then he goes 
above for another; and so on, until he has sufficient air to last for a 
long time. In this diving-bell he lives, watches for his prey, eats his 
meals, and rears his family; returning to the surface only when his 
stock of atmosphere is running short. 

Does it not occur to you that we have, in this curious specimen, a not 
inapt illustration of the Christian, who, compelled to live in an element 
which is not congenial to his new and better nature, can exist there only 
as he makes constant visits to the upper air, and secures fresh supplies 
of spiritual atmosphere? Fortified with this, he passes through con- 
ditions that else would destroy him, and, though in the world, is not of 
it. May we be ever thus ! 

Is my reader beginning to think better of spiders in general, and to see 
that there is something good, and worthy of imitation, in the humblest 
and ugliest ? I am glad of that. The balance is inclined to drop, is 
it ? Then let me add a few more facts that will surely kick the beam- 
Spiders are, without doubt, successful scavengers. Flies enough we 
have as it is, but the fourth of Pharaoh's plagues would be upon us if 
anything serious happened to the spiders. At God's command, they have 
set their traps and toils at every corner. I feel disposed (disinterestedly, 
of course) to wish them all success. Just now, at all events, I could 
wish that many more of the persistent little pests would accept the 
spider's kindly invite to walk into her parlour. 

Nor is the web of the spider so absolutely useless as most folks think- 
So strong is it, that a single thread can bear six times the weight of its 
maker. Some articles of apparel have been manufactured from it, but 
sufficient quantities are not obtainable. 

I will speak a word, too, in behalf of the much-abused cobwebs. Next 
time you cut your finger, try a cobweb. If it doesn't stop the bleeding 
almost immediately, it will be the first time I knew it fail. Really, I'm 
not joking. This is what the Americans call " a true fact." 

But here is a greater wonder still. Some eyes will open wide, I dare 



i-61 "I SHALL LOOK OUT FOR JESUS." 

say, when I assert that astronomers are not a little indebted to spiders ! 
Celestial spheres and spiders are surely far removed. Yes, verily ; but 
the astronomers are glad enough to get the fine threads the spiders spin 
to use as cross-wires for their telescopes. Fancy measuring the star- 
depths with spiders' webs ! To what high uses may the meanest things 
be put ! There is hope that our feeblest efforts for God may be of great 
service to him. " Base things of the world, and things which are 
despised, hath God chosen." 

Thus have I taken the spider's part and sung his praises as best I 
could. Suppose we all resolve to speak a good word for the despised 
and downtrodden ; to see the virtues which they surely have, rather than 
the vices, which too readily attract our eyes. Happy are we if we can 
see " good in everything " ! 

Let me conclude by quoting, in part, a fable I came across lately. 
u The Safest Place " is its title, and Joel Benton is its author. 

" Disturbed outside, two spiders went 
Into a church to pitch their tent ; 
"Where each might spin her pretty nest, 
"With none to trouble, or molest. 
When far within, one sought a pew, 
And on its top her fabric drew. 
But soon the sexton, prim and neat, 
Brushed it aside beneath his feet. 
The pulpit next she straightway took, 
But when the preacher moved his book 
One day, the web which she had spun 
"Was, in a moment, all undone. 
At length, the spider walked around 
Until her neighbour's home she found ; 
Then asked, " How is it you succeed, 
"While I am ever doomed to bleed ? " 
Then said her friend, " I took a spot 
Certain to give a quiet lot ; 
To save myself from calls, or knocks, 
I chose the contribution box." 



"1 s|rall bal ant fox $t&m" 

MOTHER," said a dear little boy of eight or nine summers, as he 
quietly crept into his invalid foster-mother's bedroom one 
morning, " while I've been lying in bed, I've been looking up at the 
stars ; and I thought they looked like angels. Then I said to myself, 
* Suppose this was the Judgment-day, and these were the angels coming 
with the Lord, what should I do ? ' Then I thought, * I'll look out for 
motherland keep close to her ' ; but then I remembered how weak you 
are, and I said, * No, mother couldn't help me, I'll look out for father ; 
lie's strong ; and then I thought, ' No, I know father wouldn't be able 
to save me ' ; then I thought, * I'll look out for Jesus, I know he can 
save me." 

Let this little-child-language and this little-child-faith teach you, 
timid disciple. Look out for Jesus ! He cannot fail you ? You know 
lie will not ; for whilst you look out for Jesus, Jesus will look out for 
you. F. E. B. 



165 



ito^-HutiM §ai|r. 



AN Indian, addressing his brothers, said the Saviour had showed us 
the way to the Father, and, " lest we should miss it, he marked it 
with his blood." 

Keep to the blood-marked path, brothers ! 

Keep to it all the way : 
Follow the steps of the Saviour, 

And nothing shall lead you astray. 
Blood on the first step of pardon, 

Blood on the next step of peace, 
Blood-mark on gladness and sorrow, 

Precious till sorrow shall cease. 

Follow the blood-marked path, brothers ! 

Jesus has traced all the road : 
Jesus has trod it before you, 

Bearing a heavier load. 
Go not where flowers are blooming ; 

Flowers must never decide : 
Go not where many are pressing, 

Only the blood be your guide. 

Follow the blood-marked path, brothers ! 

Follow it in your thought, 
Follow in practice and teaching, 

Jewels to this are nought. 
Follow it still in singing, 

Praise it with every breath : 
Follow it through the dark valley, 

Follow it on to death. William Luff. 



A YOUNG Christian stood in the midst of a workshop full of scoffers > 
Previous to his employment there, a professed and pronounced 
infidel had scattered his pernicious seed in every direction. On account 
of his aggressive and bullying manner, few, if any, of those who had 
respect for the truth of God's Word had dared to interfere. At length 
the new hand was taken on, and no sooner did he become aware of the 
awful company into which he had fallen, than, praying to God for 
strength, he resolutely confronted this servant of the devil. Day by 
day the battle waxed hard and furious ; in the end, the sceptic was 
silenced if not convinced, of his error. At the close of almost the last 
discussion, one of the workmen who, previously to this, had remained a 
silent spectator, stepped up to the Christian, and said, " I'm on your 
side ; I'm a Christian." " Are you really ? " said he ; " I should never 
have found it out, if you had not told me." The rebuke was keen, but 
it was well deserved, and came naturally to the lip of the earnest man. 
We fear there are many cowards in the Christian church as well as 



166 NO HELP : NO HOPE. 

out of it. If all renewed men would stand up for the honour of their 
Master whenever they heard his Word assailed, we should hear consider- 
ably less of the blatant scepticism now so prevalent in our midst. Many 
of Christ's followers have yet to learn that they are witnesses for him. 
Their lives are stunted and withered by their sinful cowardice. When 
Moses stood in the gate of the camp, he cried, " Who is on the Lord's 
side? let him come unto me"; and the Master cries after the same 
manner no less emphatically to-day. Oh, for a baptism of the Holy 
Ghost upon every individual believer in the Christian church ! What 
a mighty witnessing for Christ there would then be ! God send it, 
■and send it at once ! 

Guernsey. F. T. Snell. 



ifcr pjelp: no *§a$i 



A PITEOUS advertisement, in one of the daily papers, ends with the 
words: "No help : no hope." They sound like a funeral knell ; or 
like the cry of some lone swimmer, whose strength has failed him, and 
the deep is closing over him. Thank God, it is not a cry which my 
reader needs to take upon his lips. For every child of God there is 
help in the great Father's heart and hand. What is more, for every 
•creature there is help in the Creator, who forsaketh not the work of his 
own hands. What is best of all; for seeking ones, there is help for 
sinners ; for, on their behalf, the Lord hath laid help upon one that is 
mighty, by raising up "a Saviour, and a great one." We may not 
despair, now that God, in human flesh, has come to the rescue of the 
guilty, and in that flesh has burne the condemnation which fell on man 
through sin. There is help, and therefore there is hope. It is a sort 
of constructive blasphemy to deny ourselves hope, since it involves the 
•denial of honour to the divine Saviour. Is HE a failure ? Is his work 
unfinished ? Is his sacrifice insufficient ? 

Here is an advertisement which we insert gratis in The Sword and 
the Trowel: — 

THERE IS HOPE, FOR THERE IS HELP. 

Life up your head, despondent one, and look to HIM who now stands 
looking at you. From the window of love he gazes on your misery; 
look up to him from your low estate with the glance of hope. Do 
your eyes meet ? His looks forbid you to be any longer the slave of 
fear ! He shows you his wounds, and thereby heals your bleeding heart ! 
He cries, " Look unto me, and be je saved : for I am God, and there is 
none else. " C. H. S. 

W§t ftprtg |W §tm. 

HISTORY relates that Donald Cargill, the martyr, made from the 
scaffold the deeply interesting declaration, " I bless the Lord that 
these thirty years and more I have been at peace with God, and was 
never shaken loose of it ; and now I am as sure of my interest in Christ 
and peace with God as all in this Bible and the Spirit of God can make 
me." 



167 

BY DAVID JAMISON. 

1 TONEY — most persons will, no doubt, agree at once to the statement — 
ItA is a very good servant, but a very bad master. Perhaps, too, my 
readers will also allow that even as a servant much depends upon the 
way in which it is treated, whether, after all, it is a good servant or not. 
Good servants have a tendency and temptation, when their goodness is 
evidently appreciated, rather to presume upon the goodness, and to 
assume authority oftentimes in unasked advice and unauthorized action. 
And generally, when they do so, their goodness is very seriously dis- 
counted, not alone in the estimate of those with whose action they thus 
interfere, but often, too, in the effects which follow the interference, if 
it be permitted. 

A servant, to be really good and to continue to be good, must, as 
servants go in general, be kept in his own place, and confined to his own 
province : and this is emphatically true of money. Valuable as it is, 
and useful as it is, and while it may need much effort and require much 
wisdom to make it, it needs more effort and requires more wisdom to 
manage it when it is made j and so to manage it that there shall not be 
more of loss than of profit in its possession. 

Many, very many persons, as we must all know, by allowing money 
to occupy too high a place in the ordering of their affairs and to interfere 
with matters, as if superior to them, in comparison with which it was 
really subordinate, have suffered a damage which it was utterly valueless 
and powerless to countervail. 

One of the kings of Israel may be taken as furnishing an illustration, 
or rather as having come very near to doing so. For, fortunately for 
himself, a wise counsellor was at his hand, who prevented the illustration 
from being complete, and to whose wise counsel the king, in his turn, 
was wise enough to listen. 

We have the story told us in the much-neglected Books of the 
Chronicles — in the Second Book, and at the twenty-fifth chapter — and its 
commencement should warn us against yielding to similar considerations 
nowadays, of fictitious rather than of real importance, by which we are 
more apt to be influenced than we should be; and its close will show us, 
that when, nevertheless, we give the preference to higher considerations, 
as we always should do, we shall never lose by doing it. 

It is quite possible we may sometimes find ourselves in a similar per- 
plexity to that of Amaziah, the king referred to. And if, at such time 
or times, we act as he ultimately did, our policy may be condemned by 
some as Quixotic and unworldly. But we shall not find the apparent 
immediate loss a real loss, nor without, both at the time and afterward, its 
far more than counterbalancing compensation. There may rather, if 
it be best for us, result from it greater gain, even probably in hard cash, 
and certainly in higher and truer and much more lasting profit. 

The story is as follows : — Amaziah, king of Judah, apparently soon 
after his coming to the throne, and after he had justly put to death 
•those who had been concerned in the murder of his father, determined, 
for some unrecorded reason^ on a war against the people of Edom. The 



168 king amaziah's money-difficulty. 

•war seems to have been a justifiable one enough, for no fault is intimated* 
in Scripture, as being found with him on this account. But in order to 
be equipped for it, he not only musters and marshals his own available 
forces, enlisting all from the age of twenty years and upwards, but he 
also hires, at the same time, auxiliary forces to the number of one 
hundred thousand from the sister kingdom of Israel, at the cost of a 
hundred talents of silver — perhaps about £30,000. And here it was,, 
in this last particular, that his fault comes in. Not only did this step 
manifest a want of confidence in God, who could equally have led the- 
smaller as the larger army to victory ; but the Israelites being at that 
time idolaters, it evidenced lack of jealousy for God's honour, as well as 
lack of faith in God's power. 

A prophet is therefore commissioned to the king, who commands, 
him to dismiss these troops, and warns him that should he disobey and 
lead them to the battle, their presence shall ensure, not his victory, but 
his defeat. The king in no way resents the prophet's interference, nor 
repudiates his interdict ; but he is staggered at first, nevertheless, by a^ 
consideration of the money he must apparently lose if he obey. 

He asks — " But what shall we do for the hundred talents which I 
have given to the army of Israel ? " The prophet replies at once, " The 
Lord is able to give thee much more than this." And to his very great 
honour, it is recorded, that without any more ado, large as the sum waa 
which he had lost, and much as he might look to suffer from the 
resentment of the Israelites so unceremoniously dismissed (that they 
did resent it, and that he did suffer, the chapter tells us), he nevertheless 
dismissed them at once, and leads his own troops alone to the fight. 

He secures a complete victory also, even with the smaller army, and 
evidently, but that he did not continue to act with the same discretion 
afterwards, a bright page was then turned in the record of his life, which* 
only his subsequent forgetfnlness and folly brought abruptly and sadly 
to a close. 

This is a story, a story (that part of it with which we have to do at 
present) in the main to the credit of king Aniaziah. This question of 
his, however, " But what about the hundred talents ? " what are we to 
say about it ? 

Well, it is easy enough to see, and easy enough to say, that it was 
wrong and unworthy in king Amaziah to allow this question — a question 
of mere money — to weigh with him for even a moment against his 
duty — the duty of instant compliance with the mandate of the man of 
God. And of course it was so. Nevertheless, before we blame him too 
much, let us just ask ourselves, how many of us could safely afford to 
throw a stone at him ? If we ventured on censure of him should we not 
lay ourselves open to some such words as those of Paul, " Therefore thou> 
art inexcusable, man, whosoever thou art that judgest : for wherein 
thou judgest another, thou condemnest thyself; for thou that judgest 
doest the same things " ? 

If any ask, How so ? can they challenge the reply, that only too many,, 
not in the world only, but even in the church as well, allow this money- 
difficulty, all sordid and sorry though such an obstacle is, to come in 
between them and the interest of their souls in the one case ; their full 
and loyal allegiance to God in the other ? 



KING AMAZIAH'S MONEY- DIFFICULTY. 169 

For, first, as to the world, what is so popular and powerful a competitor 
with the gospel for the attraction and attachment of men as, just, 
money ? and what is it that so often, and so everywhere, and ia so many 
cases, stands to the last between the soul and its salvation, perilling it 
and preventing it, as, just, " the love of money," which as the apostle 
says, " is the root of all evil " ? Men of wisdom, men of sense, men who 
know that they have souls, and that these are immortal, men who are 
aware that there is a death and a judgment, and an eternity — a heaven 
or a hell before them — yet are so absorbed in money, that they forget all 
this, and live and labour and plan and propose all for earth, all for 
time, all for that which shall perish in the using — riches their only 
religion, gold their only god. 

And they do this, thousands do it, heedless about all else, day by day, 
month by month, year by year, discovering, many of them, their folly 
only when it is too late, only when, in the midst of their selfish, their 
pelfish calculations, the cry breaks in, " Thou fool, this night thy soul 
shall be required of thee : then whose shall those things be, which thou 
hast provided ? " 

Amaziah shines in comparison with these ; his was but a momentary 
hesitation ; theirs is a lifelong mania ; he chose God at length, at this 
time, at all events ; they cleave to Mammon with purpose of heart. 

Not only is it in the world, however, that this money-difficulty exerts 
so baneful an influence. In the church, too, its presence and its power 
are felt. Even among professing Christians, too many an ear is dulled 
to a " Thus saith the Lord," by the cropping up of such a question as 
this — ft But what about the hundred talents ? " 

They, these professing Christians, are engaged perhaps in some trade 
or occupation which, however legitimate so far as human law is concerned, 
is one they yet can hardly carry on, such are its causes, concomitants, 
or cod sequences, with a clear conscience, or are able, therefore, without 
effrontery to ask God's blessing on it. 

Or in a trade which is perfectly allowable in itself, they resort to 
expedients for making money which, though tolerated or even taught by 
the low, lame code of worldly morality, are yet incompatible with the 
letter and spirit of the gospel of Christ, and inconsistent with any proper 
profession of attachment or allegiance to him who "did no sin, neither 
was guile found in his mouth." And, as a consequence of engaging in 
this trade or adopting these expedients, when conscience twits them, or 
duty calls them, or some sermon or providence intimates their incon- 
sistency to them, how often, even when they are on the point of doing 
what they know and acknowledge they ought to do, they are hindered 
and held back by such a question as this — " But what about the hundred 
talents ?" What about the money I might make, or the money I 
might lose ? And how often, too, not as in Amaziah's case, the colloquy 
and the conflict end in — " If I did it, the hopes of my gains would be 
gone ; I could not — cannot do it ! " 

Too rarely indeed, as already intimated, is Amaziah's story paralleled 
in its finale here. Much to his credit he did not let the unworthy 
hindrance stand very long in the way of his duty. Large though the 
sum was he forfeited — some £30,000 — he came very soon to ask, " What 
about it ? " in a very different sense from that in which he asked it first. 

12 



170 KING AMAZIAH'S MONEY-DIFFICULTY. 

And should not the worldling, should not the Christian of the present, 
put it and look at it in the differing sense as well ? What about it ? 
" What shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose 
his own soul ? " 

It is true that money is valuable, money is necessary, and the 
possession of money is comfortable, and the loss or lack of money is 
awkward and annoying. But when money is brought into competition 
with the soul, with the light of God's countenance, with the hope of 
eternal life, with peace of conscience and joy in the Holy Spirit, oh, 
surely the wise, the rational man will say, " What about it? " and let it 
go at once, rather than prejudice, rather than peril, the far more 
important interest of his eternal well-being. Better, infinitely better, to 
be a Lazarus, if need be, here — that with Lazarus we may be hereafter — 
than to be a Dives on earth at the risk, and at the cost, of being a Dives 
in eternity. 

Besides, there is no need that the Christian should be a Lazarus here. 
The prophet said to Amaziah in reply to his question, " The Lord is able 
to give thee much more than this." 

And does not all the teaching of Scripture give a similar assurance 
to every Christian ? Does it not say, for example, the Lord himself 
being the speaker, " Verily I say unto you, everyone that hath forsaken 
houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, 
or lands, for my name's sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall 
inherit everlasting life " ? There is many a similar promise ; and here, 
let me say — it really needs to be^said — while there seems to be, with 
some, disinclination almost amounting, one would think, to disability to 
believe the promises of God in reference to money matters — though they 
may be believed in reference to everything else — there is no cause at all 
why this should be so. Giving does not impoverish God, nor does 
withholding make him richer. " The earth is the Lord's, and the fulness 
thereof." Surely such a thought about God is utterly unwarranted, 
utterly unworthy ! 

Look, then, at such matters aright. Be sure of this, that whosoever 
counts " all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of 
Christ Jesus," shall not only, no matter what he gives up for Jesus, 
receive a " much more than this " in the peace and the joy and the 
prospect of believers, but he shall also experience that "godliness is 
profitable unto all things, having promise of the life that now is." " The 
blessing of the Lord," let us never forget, " it maketh rich, and he" — 
and that cannot be said of riches gotten in any other way — " addeth no 
sorrow with it." If, then, anv of us are like Amaziah in his first hesitancy, 
in similar circumstances, let us be like him also, and rather, in his 
ultimate decision, to trust in God and do the right. Whatever, we may 
be sure, we give up for God, God will " much more " make up to us. 
"The Lord God of recompences shall surely requite." — From 
"Passim Papers." 



171 

®0tonlm0 fountain §Ms* 

BY W. Y. FULLERTON. 

CIRCUMSTANCES recently led me to make a short sojourn in Ayr, 
where heroic memories of Wallace and Bruce linger, and poetic 
memories of Montgomery and Burns, both of whom were born here, 
abound. Indeed, the sentiment of the town may be said to be kept 
alight by Burns and the scenes of his poetry ; while his birthplace and 
his monument annually attract thousands of visitors. In picturesqueness, 
the distant view of the almost alpine heights of the island of Arran, as 
seen from the sea-shore, is unsurpassed, especially when, in golden glory 
or in blushing glow, the sun sets behind the burnished peaks. It seems 
hard to understand how Burns should have seen this sight so often, and 
not have written a single line to show his appreciation of it : Arran 
and its charms are passed over in silence in his poems. 

Those towering heights seen over the sea in many a changing aspect, 
seemed irresistibly to remind me of the noble Covenanters who, in 
their day, were like giants amongst their fellows, and who in the very 
district of which Ayr is the centre — it is "flowered with martyrs' 
graves " — wrought some of their noblest deeds. When not hidden by 
mist, those mountains were weird and sombre in their grandeur on 
cloudy days, and the days were few when the sun shone and caused all 
to stand out in clear and cloudless outline. Nor did we ever forget that 
round about the roots of the mountains was always the treacherous sea. 
Thus were those men of God who, in troublous times, stood firm amidst 
the change and turmoil : not wavering and driven with the wind and 
tossed, as so many were ; yet, withal, sombre in their faith, though grand ; 
living not so much in the sunshine of Olivet as in the shadow of Sinai. 
Mistaken, doubtless, in some things, but heroes of God notwithstanding ; 
and when their sun set, the glory of their exalted character was revealed 
as clearly as the heights of Arran at the close of the day. Burns has 
not forgotten these brave men ; and for that we are quite prepared to 
forgive his silence about the hills. 

" The Solemn League and Covenant 
Cost Scotland blood — cost Scotland tears ; 
But it sealed freedom's sacred cause — 
If thou'rt a slave, indulge thy sneers." 

It is easy to criticize them while enjoying the fruit of their sacrifice. 
Yet, as Professor Wilson well says, u But for the single-hearted sufferings 
of these virtuous men, but for their resistance to tyranny — the proudest 
genius amongst us, perhaps even now, might have been clanking a chain, 
or adoring a wafer." 

It is not our intention to enter into the history of this movement, or 
to speak in detail of its various events from the signing of the third 
Covenant in 1638 until the end of persecution in 1(588, nor of the many 
martyrs who sealed their faith with their blood, especially during the 
second half of those fateful fifty years ; but as our attention was chiefly 
given to the summits of the Arran hills, there are seven sayings of these 
Covenanting saints which, like mountain tops, tower up from their record, 
and arrest our thought and heart. It is of these we write, and of so 
much history as is necessary to make them intelligible. 



172 COVENANTING MOUNTAIN PEAKS. 

"Ye have got the theory; now for the practice," was the 
utterance of the preacher Thomas Douglas, at the Conventicle of 
Drumclog, when he was told Claverhouse was approaching with his 
dragoons; and, in a sentence, this gives us the principle of the Covenanters. 
On the Lord's-day, 1st June, 1679, a band of faithful men and women 
met together on Loudon Hill, and were quietly worshipping God after 
the fashion their consciences approved ; but the presence of fifty horsemen 
fully armed, and the watchmen dotted over the heights made it clear 
that danger attended the gathering. When the alarm was given, the 
preacher issued the striking order of the day we have quoted, and the 
armed men formed in line of battle. Two hundred and fifty of them, 
some with only pitchforks or scythes set on poles, waited the coming of 
the soldiers, singing the seventy-sixth psalm, to the tune Martyrs, 
the while. The morass which lay between the opponents frightened 
the dragoons, but the Covenanters, with their good theory, and a good 
conscience, pluuged through it, and at last the dragoons fled, leaving 
forty dead and many wounded on what was afterwards always known 
as the only battlefield on which the Covenanters were successful — the 
field of Drumclog. Never did the word of the Lord Jesus, " They that 
take the sword shall perish by the sword," receive a more signal 
fulfilment than in the case of the Scotch heroes, and their very success in 
this first encounter raised in their ranks that fierce fanaticism which 
eventually proved their ruin on the battlefield. Let him that is without 
a single feeling of resentment towards his neighbour cast the first stone 
at them ! 

Many glimpses of deep tenderness are seen amidst the fierce struggle 
which show the spirit of these godly men. Kichard Cameron, one of that 
band of preachers which includes such men as Matthew Mouatt, William 
Guthrie, Blackadder, and McKail, died in battle at Ayr's Moss. The battle 
of Bothwell Brig had been fought and lost, and almost a year had 
passed, when Cameron and sixty friends were surprised by Bruce of 
Earshall, who came with a troop of horse. As at Drumclog the warriors- 
united in praise before drawing their swords, here they joined in prayer, 
and one petition, enough to make one weep, Cameron repeated thrice r 
" Lord, spare the green, and take the ripe." In the fight which 
followed, Cameron, his brother, and seven others fell, a few were taken 
prisoners, and the rest escaped over the moss where the soldiers could 
not follow. The head and arms of Cameron, being cut off, were taken 
to Edinburgh where they were delivered with the words—" There are 
the head and the hands of a man who lived praying and preaching, and 
who died praying and fighting." That tender heart beating in that 
rough breast, showed indeed a spirit ripe for glory. 

The records of those years have many incidents which show the 
courage of the Covenanted people. None is finer than the dying words 
of one of five men who were discovered in a cave in Glencairn, and 
instantly shot. He raised himself on his elbow, and cried with his 
dying breath, "though every hair of my head were a man, I 

WOULD DIE ALL THOSE DEATHS FOR CHRIST AND HIS CAUSE." Truly, 

they counted not their lives dear unto them, and doubtless their martyr 
crowns shine bright ! 
One of the most thrilling incidents of the time of persecution was- 



COVENANTING MOUNTAIN PEAKS. 173 

the death of John Brown at Priesthill. The answer of his wife to the 
taunt of his murderer after the cruel deed, is a sample of the sacrifice 
these true disciples gladly made for Christ. John Brown, overtaken by 
Claverhouse while digging moss in a field, was led up to his own door 
and, in his wife's presence, was asked to abjure the Covenants. He 
stoutly refused. He was then asked to swear he would never rise 
against the king, and again refused. Told that he must die, he begged 
time for prayer, and his prayer so touched the soldiers that none of 
them would shoot. Their commander himself fired the shot, and then 
turned to the wife with the angry question, " What think you of your 
goodman now ? " to which the noble woman replied " I ay thocht 

MEIKLE O' HIM, AND I THINK MAIR O' HIM NOO THAN EVER." What 

grandeur of character such an answer displays ! Well done, Isobel 
Brown ! 

But it is in the life of the saintly Peden that we see most of the 
trust these hunted people had in God. " He was a lonely man, and his 
loneliness was the result of his individuality." Men who walk near to 
God are always lonely, because there are so few of them. Enoch was, 
probably, the loneliest man of his generation, and Peden was another 
Enoch, who walked with his head in heaven and his feet on the earth. 
"0 to be wi ye, Ritchie ! " was the cry of his heart at the grave of 
Eichard Cameron ; but God spared Alexander Peden the martyr's 
suffering, and took him home in peace. " sirs," he said, " will ye 
trust God, and give him credit ? and he will help you in all your work. 
... He will even, as it were, rock the cradle, if it were necessary for 
you. He will condescend as low as you desire him." We need not 
wonder that a man of such a spirit was powerful in prayer. Well do I 
remember how my heart was touched, as a boy, and how I received one 
of my earliest impulses towards prayer when I read of the deliverance 
God wrought on the hillside in answer to the cry of "Peden the 
Prophet." On the Carrick Hills, he and a small party were surrounded 
by soldiers, and unable to flee ; he prayed that they might be delivered 
and their enemies scattered, and a sentence of his prayer is worthy of 
remembrance : f ( Lord, cast the lap of thy cloak over Sandy and 
these poor things, and save us this one time, and we will keep it in 
remembrance, and tell it to the commendation of thy goodness, pity, 
and compassion." Immediately a mist came down and hid them so 
effectually that they escaped their pursuers. How beautiful the close 
intimacy with God, which can plead to be allowed to hide under the lap 
of his cloak ! " He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his 
wings shalt thou trust." 

John Welch, of Irongray, is a famous name amongst this goodly 
company of confessors and martyrs. One incident in his life shows the 
poiver which rested on their testimony, as well as the boldness with 
which they spake. Engaged to preach at a gathering the next day, he 
took refuge from his pursuers in a house which he afterwards discovered 
belonged to an enemy of the Covenanters. In the course of conversation 
his host made no secret of his opposition, and mentioned the name of 
John Welch as being a specially obnoxious person, ignorant that the 
very man he hated was sitting at his table. The disguised preacher 
said, "I am sent to apprehend rebels. I know where he is to be 



174 COVENANTING MOUNTAIN PEAKS. 

found to-morrow, and will give him into your hands." His host was 
delighted, and early in the morning started, under his guest's guidance, 
in the hope of effecting a capture. His astonishment was very great 
when he saw his 'guide take his place at the head of the congregation, 
and greater still when he heard him, in the power of God's Spirit, pour 
forth his soul in an earnest exhortation to the people. The Word of 
God, quick and powerful — why have not we more faith in it ? — reached 
his heart, and when the sermon was over, instead of apprehending the 
preacher, this man of influence went up to him, and warmly greeted 
him. " You said you were sent to apprehend rebels," said he, " and I, a 
rebellious sinner, have been apprehended this day." The men who can 
thus touch sinners' hearts have no need to be ashamed. 

Only one more instance need be given ; but that one is, perhaps, the 
most touching in all the annals of martyrdom, and reveals the separation 
of these true disciples to their Lord. On the 11th of May, 1685, at 
Blednock, near Wigtown, Margaret Wilson and Margaret McLachlan 
were taken out to die for God and the Covenant — that Covenant which 
was Scotland's Magna Charta. It is said that remission had already 
arrived, but was kept secret by the cruel men in authority, Grierson and 
Legg. As neither of the two women would renounce their faith, the latter, 
who was older than her companion, was taken out to the sea edge, and, tied 
to a stake, almost at the ebb-mark, the incoming waves soon covered her. 
With that floating object before her, they again urged Margaret Wilson to 
recant ; and again she refused, saying that if she had not part with 
Christ's people she had no part with him. Her mother urged her to 
yield, but she loved not mother more than Christ. Then they tied her 
to a stake high up on the beach, and she had to wait loug ere the 
laggard tide reached her feet. As it crept slowly upward, one, Major 
Wmdram, anxious to save her, rode out, and said, " Dear Margaret, say 
* God save the king ! ' say ' God save the king ! '" " God save him, 
if he will ; for it is his salvation I desire," was her answer. " She 
has said it ! She has said it ! " he shouted, anxious to give her the 
benefit of any doubt. And then they came to urge her to save her life 
by taking the oath of abjuration. But her strong faith prevailed, and 
she gave an answer that should be written in gold — an answer which might 
make a key-note for every separated life. " Take the oath 1 " they 
cried ; and firmly came the heroic reply, " I will not ! I am one of 
Christ's children : let me go " ! They let her go ; they could not 
hold her back to forsake her Lord : serenely she raised a psalm amidst 
the sea — 

" ' To thee, my God, I lift my soul ! ' she sang ; 
And the tide flowed, and, rising to her throat 
She sang no more, but lifted up her face — 
And there was glory over all the sky ; 
A flood of glory — and the lifted face 
Swam in it, till it bowed beneath the flood, 
And Scotland's Maiden Martyr went to God ! " 

Her holy heroism and Christian courage place this maiden in the 
front rank of those who have stood firmly for God in all ages. Turning 
our eyes, we see those with whom, in glory, she stands : and she is not 
a whit behind the chiefest. Look at these mountain summits : — 



COVENANTING MOUNTAIN PEAKS. 



175 



Margaret Wilson said : " I will not ! I am one of Christ's children : 
let me go." 

John Bunyan said : " I have determined, the Almighty God being 




.Xa^/C^ij 



4> - y*t" 



my Helper and Shield, yet to suffer, if frail life may continue so long, 
even till the moss shall grow on mine eyebrows, rather than violate my 
faith and principles ! " 



176 SATAN SATISFIED. 

Martin Luther said : " Here I stand : I can do no otherwise. God 

help me ! " 

Peter said : " Whether it be right in the sight of God to hearken 
unto you more than unto God, judge ye : for we cannot but speak the 
things which we have seen and heard." 

Nehemiah said : "lam doing a great work, so that I cannot come 
down. Should such a man as I flee ? I will not go in ! " 

Joseph said : " How then can I do this great wickedness, and sin 
against God ? " 

The Covenanters were in this line of true nobility, and when we have 
half their fortitude it will be time enough to seek their faults. 



" ]"F Satan could remodel the prfaching of the day to suit himself, he 
_L would put the word reformation in the place of regeneration ; he 
would insist that living is everything, believing is nothing ; he would 
not object to having everybody belong to the church ; he would have 
science and morality and sentiment abound in sermons ; he would 
represent religion as an outgrowth of human effort, improving as the 
world grows wiser ; and he would endow a few chairs of " higher 
criticism " to prove that the Bible is not inspired, and was not written 
at the time, or by the men commonly supposed. He must be right well 
pleased with the way in which some men are preaching the gospel 
nowadays." 

So far The Central Baptist. We suppose the paper refers to Ameri- 
can preaching; and if so, it is sad to see how much it is like the 
English article. We have instances, sorrowfully abundant, of sermons 
which are as far removed from gospel as stones from bread. Just now, 
a preacher tells us that Jesus came very near to our humanity in that 
suffering and death ivhose reason is not revealed to us ; another tells us 
that he holds the atonement, but does not believe that our Lord suffered 
the penalty of sin. Satan cannot but be pleased to have his work so 
cleverly done by professed ministers of Christ. He sets on foot no 
propaganda for infidelity, because the Down-graders are doing his work 
for him to his complete satisfaction. C. H. S. 



fto %Amt lot §0«&ts. 

THE late Mr. William Munsie, of Glasgow, conspicuous, among 
other things, for his success during many years in imparting divine 
truth both to teachers and scholars, when asked if he had any doubts or 
fears, replied, " I have so much in Christ to think of, and so much to 
do for him, that I find little leisure for entertaining that question." 



177 

% %mt §trahnf. 

I THOUGHT it was my mother's voice ! " 
The startled accents fell from one 
Of Adam's fairest sons. The joy, 
The hope, in bygone happy days, 
Of parents passed into the skies. 
A mother's love had checked the ill 
That tried to spring up in his heart, 
And nurtured with untiring zeal 
The opening buds of promise there : 
Goodness — truth — gentleness, and all 
That stamped him one of God's chief works. 
A mother's prayers had helped, and moved 
The unseen hand to guide and guard 
Her boy through childhood's way. But ere 
One step was trodden in the path 
Of youthful dangers, where the foe 
Plies his temptations strongest, where 
He finds the readiest victims ; ere 
This path was reached — that mother's voice, 
Which in its last faint murmurs breathed 
A prayer for him, was hushed in death. 

* a- * * 

The boy grew on. The world's gay charms 
Allured him from the path of life. 
Pleasure, with siren voice, bade him 
Partake the cup she held. He heard, 
Tasted, and drank unto the dregs. 
He now, spell-bound, was being led 
Down to the gate of endless woe ; but one 
Who knew the worth of souls, and of 
A word in season, spake that word 
In earnest prayer, and gentleness and love. 

" Young man, beware!" 
The loving tone — the gentle touch 
Aroused the youth, who, starting, cried, 
" I thought it was my mother's voice." 
blest awakening ! The heart 
Which sin had hardened, melted now 
With deep contrition ; and the voice 
Of memory, which told of truths 
Long since forgotten, now was heard 
And heeded too. Then, after years 
Spent in his Master's service, he 
Has met again that mother blessed, 
And her, whose words of warning seemed 
The echo of a voice from heaven. 

Annie Taylor 

(Sister of the late Mr. G. M. Murphy J. 



>t 



178 



A WORD MORE ON SUBSTITUTION. BY JAMES L. STANLEY. 

WHEN the Lord was preparing Gideon to go against the Midianites, 
he strengthened the confidence of his servant in the reality of the 
call by various manifestations and answers to prayer. It appeared as 
though enough had been done to satisfy the most exacting requirements ; 
yet it pleased God to add to the previous signs another, and a most 
remarkable, confirmation. " Go thou with Phurah thy servant down to 
the host, and thou shalt hear what they say ; and afterward shall thine 
hands be strengthened to go down unto the host." Gideon obeyed this 
direction ; and in the stealthy visit which he paid to the camp of the 
enemy, heard from their own lips the words which expressed their doom. 
This is not the only occasion on which the enemies of God have borne 
witness against themselves. " Out of thine own mouth will I judge 
thee," expresses a principle which is often illustrated in God's dealings 
with men. 

It is not only among the friends of truth that evidence in its favour 
is to be found : from the quiver of its enemies we may extract arrows 
that shall tell effectively against themselves. The opponents of evan- 
gelical doctrine have become increasingly persistent, subtle, and bitter 
in their attacks upon the truth, their destructive criticisms being chiefly 
levelled against that great foundation truth, the sacrificial character of 
the death of Christ. Not having sufficient audacity flatly to deny what 
Scripture says, their ingenuity is devoted to the task of trying to make 
the Scriptures say what they were never intended to say. Knowing 
that they can never gain credence for their doctrines without some show 
of Scripture authority, they distort, and argue, and mystify, till they 
make it appear to their own satisfaction that the Word of God teaches 
exactly the opposite of what it really does teach. They are not willing 
to be on the side of the Scripture : they want the Scripture to be on 
their side. They want the patronage of the Bible without the authority 
of the Bible. To their mind, the simple believers in the Bible doctrine 
of the atonement are a biased and credulous people, the victims of an 
ancient superstition, who cling to childish traditions and exploded 
theories. 

It may be well, therefore, to let some other witnesses speak, whose 
scholarly attainments will lift them above the charge of ignorance, and 
whose decidedly anti-evangelical sentiments will free them of all sus- 
picion of favourable bias. 

Dr. W. Lindsay Alexander, in his " System of Biblical Theology," 
Vol. II., in the course of an exceedingly able discussion on the media- 
torial work of Christ, quotes the testimonies of four eminent Rational- 
istic writers in reference to the subject of Christ's expiatory work- 
First comes " Dr. Wegscheider, who may be regarded as the Coryphaeus- 
of the old Rationalist party in Germany, whose opposition to evangelical 
truth is well known. In stating what he calls the Doctrina Biblica on 
the subject of Christ's expiatory work, after referring to the Jewish 
notions of sacrificial atonement, and stating that the Jews do not seem 



"OUR enemies THEMSELVES BEING JUDGES." 179 

to have connected these with the Messiah (a statement to which we, of 
course, demur) he proceeds thus : ' By the N. T. authors, however, this 
opinion was approved, and they transferred that famous prophecy in 
Isa. liii. to Jesus .... whence, by almost all the sacred writers, in 
order to remove the odium and ignominy of the punishment endured 
by Jesus Christ, it was so expounded, especially by Paul, that they 
snowed the death of Jesus Christ as expiatory and also vicarious, as if 
the punishment incurred by the sins of all had been taken by him on 
himself, and that Jesus as a lamb, pure and immaculate, was destined 
by the Father himself to death as a piacular victim, who by his own 
blood washed away the sins of the world. They seem, therefore, to 
have attributed to the very obedience or virtue of Jesus a certain vicarious 
efficacy, whilst the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews asserts that 
whatever pertains to piacular sacrifices is accomplished by Christ in the 
heavenly temple. And clearly do all these writers assert that pardon 
of sins is granted to man by God, on the ground of no deed of theirs, 
or of any other cause, save the vicarious death of Christ alone, which 
they refer to God's supreme love to men.' " 

The candour of this statement is admirable, and we can only lament 
that it was not accompanied by a simple faith. The writer does not 
regard the teachings of Scripture as of divine authority, and does not 
hesitate to dissent from what he finds there ; but, it will be observed, 
that, on this point of doctrine, he is in no doubt as to what he does find 
there. There is no laboured and sophistical argument to make the 
Scriptures accord with his views : plainly and honestly he confesses that 
they do teach the sacrificial character of the death of Christ. Herein 
we have his testimony to a matter of fact : his opinion of that fact is 
quite another matter. 

The next witness quoted is Dr. Yon Ammon, another Rationalist 
divine. He says : " When the divine Teacher perceived that the end 
of his life was at hand, he compares his death, which elsewhere he teaches 
that he endured for the truth and the advantage of his followers, to 
a piacular sacrifice, by which was borne as a vicarious burden the punish- 
ment due to the sinner ; and this comparison apostles and teachers, in 
lengthened line, have followed. For Paul teaches that Jesus was des- 
tined by the Father himself as a piacular victim ; Peter calls him a lamb 
pure and immaculate ; John declares that by his blood the sins of the 
world are washed away; the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews 
writes that all things that pertain to the sacrifices offered for sin are 
performed by Jesus in the heavenly temple." Here, again, we have a 
clear testimony as to what the Scriptures do teach, coming from one 
who, to quote Dr. Alexander's own comment, " goes on to apologize for 
such statements as accommodations to the weakness of those whom the 
apostles had to teach, and who required to be conducted to higher and 
purer notions of religion by means of images and allegories." 

The third witness is Dr. Karl Hase, of Jena, another Rationalist, who 
gives this summary of the doctrine of the New Testament concerning 
the work of Christ : " In the N. T., Christ is set forth as sent by God 
to save the world ruined by sin. As the subjective condition of the 
salvation to be enjoyed through him, there must be repentance, con- 
version, and heart purity -as the condition of God's giving salvation or 



180 SECRET DECLENSION. 

pardoning sin, the whole life of Christ on earth, in its separate moments, 
above all, his death as a ransom price for our sins, as a sin offering in 
our stead, in virtue of which we are redeemed from the bondage of sin, 
and obtain forgiveness of sins, eternal life, and peace with God." 

The last witness is De Wette. He says : " The redemption which is 
through Christ consists in reconciliation with God, or in deliverance 
from the wrath of God and from condemnation ; more specifically (1) in 
the forgiveness of sins, i.e., the purification of the conscience from 
the feeling of guilt. (2) in deliverance from the feeling of sinfulness; 
hence (3) in trust in God ; (4) deliverance from death, the punishment 
of sin, and the enjoyment of eternal life, and hope of eternal felicity"; 
again, " Christ has saved men principally by what he has done and 
suffered. . . . The death of Christ Jesus is the central point of apos- 
tolic doctrine, and especially of that of Paul." " This death Jesus, the 
blameless and sinless, endured for the sins of men, accomplishing 
thereby, in the highest sense, what the sin-offerings of the 0. T. were 
intended to accomplish, as a voluntary sin-offering, well pleasing to God, 
as the self-offering of the High Priest." 

Such testimonies as these are valuable ; not that the Christian believer 
really needs to be taught by Rationalists what the Bible contains, but it 
serves as a confirmation of his faith, and gives strength in opposition to 
scepticism, to find such frank avowal coming from pronounced antagonists 
to the gospel. It is no small comfort to reflect that the way is so plain 
that " the wayfaring man, though a fool, shall not err therein," and that 
where a perverse and learned ingenuity stumbles and falls, the childlike 
believer may walk in confidence and safety. 

A few years ago, a Unitarian minister, giving an address before the 
Unitarian Club of Boston, U.S., said that fifty years' study of the Bible 
had brought him to the conclusion that " The vast majority of its 
readers, following its letter, its obvious sense, its natural meaning, and 
yielding to the impression which some of its emphatic texts make upon 
them, find in it orthodoxy. Only that kind of ingenious, special, dis- 
criminative, and — in candour I must say — forced treatment which it 
receives from us liberals, can make the Book teach anything but ortho- 
doxy." "This witness is true"; and while we deplore the intellectual 
pride and perversity of heart which make men persist in a course of 
unbelief, in spite of such confessions, we think their position, bad as it 
is, preferable to that of the men who profess a certain reverence for the 
■Scriptures, but by their dishonest subterfuge make them of none effect. 



%tm\ fftrtawum. 

YOU will sometimes see a great landslip from the side of a mountain 
by which thousands of tons of stones and earth are precipitated 
into the plain ; it is the work of a few minutes, but it had been 
prepared for months or years before by the water which, trickling 
down the mountain side, loosened the hold of the soil. And the great 
falls of professing Christians which now and again startle us, are not 
the work of a day, but the product of years of dubious faith and 
doubtful living. 



181 

%am $Ni Ifrte 011 tot ^nb\tch t 

THE HITTITES. 

IN his book about " The Hittites ; the Story of a Forgotten Empire," 
Dr. A. H. Sayce conducts us into something more than " a by-path 
of Bible knowledge." It was, of course, inevitable that, wheu the 
ancient stones of the East spoke at all, they should confirm the truth 
of Scripture. It was also to be expected that they would make clear 
many references in the inspired historical books, which, to superficial 
and self-confident critics, appeared to be wrong, because they were in 
advance of their own knowledge. The expectation has not been dis- 
appointed. Until quite recent times, the Hittites were supposed to 
have been nothing more than a small Canaanitish tribe ; and, because 
inferences from the Bible were opposed to such a supposition, the know- 
ing ones were quick to note what they regarded as " the unhistorical 
tone " of the Hebrew Scripture. Certain ancient stones at Hamath, 
which Dr. William Wright did so much to recover seventeen years ago, 
have given us a veritable romance of history. If one wishes to know 
more of this almost forgotten nation, he can consult Canon T. K. 
Cheyne's article on the Hittites in the new edition of the " Encyclopaedia 
Britannica." We are looking forward to an article worthy of the sub- 
ject, and abreast of the latest discoveries, in the new edition, which we 
believe has been long in preparation, of Dr. William Smith's " Dictionary 
of the Bible." 

If we ask Dr. Sayce who these Hittites really were, we see how the 
supposed "unhistorical tone" of the passage, when the mere name of 
the Hittites carries dismay to the besiegers of Samaria, really becomes 
a confirmation of history : — " In the days of Barneses II., when the 
children of Israel were groaning under the tasks allotted to them, the 
enemies of their oppressors were already exercising a power and a 
domination which rivalled that of Egypt. The Egyptian monarch soon 
learned to his cost that the Hittite king was as ' great ' a king as him- 
self, and could summon to his aid the inhabitants of the unknown north. 
Pharaoh's claim to sovereignty was disputed by adversaries as powerful 
as the ruler of Egypt, if not indeed more powerful, and there was always 
a refuge among them for those who were oppressed by the Egyptian 
king." 

DO NOT USE BIG WORDS. 

The good brother who complimented Mr. Spurgeon by remarking that 
the trajectories of his missiles were aimed low, would probably have 
been more in his element a century ago, when an after-dinner walk, 
translated into Johnsonese, was a " post-prandial perambulation," and 
when the distinguished lexicographer himself, afflicted as he was with 
some sort of xerophthalmia, practised, at certain seasons, that in- 
judicious xerophagia which has since excited the curiosity of enquirers. 
People formed very mistaken notions of Johnson's influence and merits 
as a writer ; but one thing that he did was to teach his disciples to 
speak and write in that high-flown Latinized style which long survived, 
and which lingers still. It is worthy of note, however, that men who 
were head and shoulders above Johnson in point of genius, such as 



182 SOME SHORT NOTES ON GREAT SUBJECTS. 

Goldsmith and Cowper, did not copy his style at all, but wrote in a far 
plainer manner, and one which may still be read as an example of English 
at its best. In one place, Paxton Hood gives an illustration of the style 
of one of the Claytons — representative, we suppose, of all the others : — 
" He never either could or would call a spade a spade ; he would have 
spoken of it as ' that marvellous illustration of the inventive resources 
and manipulatory processes of the essential genius of the being we call 
man. ,,, 

This failing is still so common that, even in this year's edition of 
" Sell's Dictionary of the World's Press," there occurs a passage giving 
advice to journalists, which preachers also may profitably take to heart. 
Here it is : — 

" In promulgating your esoteric cogitations, or articulating your super- 
ficial sentimentalities, and amicable, philosophical, or psychological ob- 
servations, beware of platitudinous ponderosity ; let your conversational 
communications possess a clarified conciseness, a compacted compre- 
hensibleness, coalescent consistency, and a concatenated cogency. 
Eschew all conglomerations of flatulent garrulity, jejune babblement, 
and asinine affectations ; let your extemporaneous descantings and unpre- 
meditated expatiations have intelligibility and veracious vivacity, with- 
out rhodomontade or thrasonical bombast ; sedulously avoid all poly- 
syllabic profundity, pompous prolixity, psittaceous vacuity, ventriloquial 
verbosity, and vaniloquent vapidity. In other words, talk plainly, briefly, 
naturally ; keep from ' slang ' ; don't put on airs ; say what you mean ; 
mean what you say ; and don't use big words / " 

THE COUNCIL OF TRENT. 

To understand Romanism in all its bearings it is so necessary to have a 
clear idea of what was discussed at this assembly, that the little volume, 
"The Council of Trent: a Study of Romish Tactics," by T. Rhys 
Evans, of Brighton, which the Religious Tract Society has just issued, 
deserves to be welcomed as a short cut to the knowledge of a difficult 
subject. It would need a very patient, persevering student to read what 
has been written by Protestants and Romanists on this matter; but Mr. 
Evans has made many rough places plain. 

The city of Trent in the Tyrol, the Tridentum of ancient times, now 
belongs to Austria. It is a very picturesque old town, of about twenty 
thousand inhabitants. In the church where the council was held there 
is a famous picture, containing portraits of all the members. 

The meeting of churchmen at Trent was reckoned as the Eighteenth 
General Council. The first meeting came off on December 13th, 1545 ; 
the last on the 4th of December, 1563. 

Speaking of the early years of the Reformation, Mr. Evans says : — 
u . There arose from many quarters, and prompted by very diversified 
motives, a strong desire for a general council. Devout Catholics, 
shocked by church scandals, Lutherans, princes, and magistrates, angry 
at the ever-increasing ecclesiastical encroachments upon the civil domain, 
groaning peoples — all these were desirous for a council." 

The decisions arrived at have for centuries been accepted as the standard 
creed of Romanism, so that in those decisions we are able to see the true 
character of popery. It was decreed, with the usual anathemas, that the 



SOME SHORT NOTES ON GREAT SUBJECTS. 183 

canon of Scripture was to include the Apocrypha; and that, while 
traditions were to be of equal authority with the Bible, the church was 
to be the only interpreter. " The seven sacraments " were also con- 
firmed. The effects of the council were chiefly disastrous to Italy. As 
Mr. Evans says, " ' Italy against Europe ' had been the watchword of 
Trent." He then quotes Edgar Quinet : " The holy chair throve at the 
expense of the political existence of Italy. The Papacy stifled in that 
country the breath of civil life; it absorbed the vital forces of Italy. . . . 
The grass grew upon the civil world as upon the Roman Campagna." 

A GENERAL ON WAR. 

The " Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan," General in the United 
States Army, with portraits and maps, together make up two large 
volumes, which Messrs. Chatto and Windus have issued in this country. 
The work is really an autobiography, and the reader has more vivid 
descriptions of the civil conflict of a quarter of a century ago than he 
can hope to get in ordinary histories written by those who were not eye- 
witnesses. In one passage the late General shows that war implies a 
great deal more than mere actual fighting : — 

" I do not hold war to mean simply that lines of men shall engage 
«ach other in battle, and material interest be ignored. This is but a 
duel, in which one combatant seeks the other's life ; war means much 
more, and is far worse than this. Those who rest at home in peace and 
plenty, see but little of the horrors attending such a duel, and even grow 
indifferent to them as the struggle goes on, contenting themselves with 
encouraging all who are able-bodied to enlist in the cause, to fill up the 
shattered ranks as death thins them. It is another matter, however, 
when deprivation and suffering are brought to their own doors. Then 
the case appears much graver, for the loss of property weighs heavy 
with the most of mankind ; heavier, often, than the sacrifices made on 
the fi--ld of battle. Death is popularly considered the maximum of 
punishment in war, but it is not ; reduction to poverty brings prayers 
for pence more surely and more quickly than the destruction of human 
life, as the selfishness of man has demonstrated in more than one great 
conflict." 

MAKING HOME ATTRACTIVE. 

Not before it was time, our outspoken friend, that true-hearted servant 
of the people, Archibald G. Brown, has raised his far-reaching voice in 
protest against jthe dangerous notion, that it is the mission of the church 
to provide congregations with amusements. Of course, those who pro- 
fess to be abreast of the age, and to have cast away everything that is 
narrow and out of date, think that the pastor of the East London Taber- 
nacle exaggerates, or goes too far ; but others, who love to keep within 
the boundaries which Scripture prescribes, know well enough that 
Mr. Brown's position is impregnable. 

It occurred to us, that, while this subject is engrossing the thoughts 
of many who take different views, we might just say, that home is the 
place where, at least, recreation should chiefly be found. Of course, we 
do nor mean that young persons should never go out; but we do insist 
that i hose who are so brought up that they find their principal pleasures 
at home, are highly favoured ; their recreation is, indeed, in some degree, 



184 CAN SHE SPIN? 

a safeguard ; and when they grow older, they are not so disposed to* 
exchange what has been tested and proved for the fatally vicious amuse- 
ments, or indulgences, which tempt the unwary in the world. 

In any middle -class home, even of the most modest kind, the appliances 
for recreation — which should always include self-improvement — ought 
not to be wanting ; and home resources are much greater than anyone 
might suppose who has never given the subject attention. In looking 
through two such guide-books as " Indoor Games and Recreations" for 
boys, and " The Girl's Own Indoor Book," which the Religious Tract 
Society has just issued, we come upon a very remarkable variety of 
recreations, many of which improve while they entertain. The truth 
comes home to us very forcibly, that the recreation which can be found 
abroad is meagre, and of inferior quality, compared with what may be 
enjoyed at home. In the best sense, the Christian home should be the 
place of recreation for our young people. 

The dangers attending the mixing up of religion and amusement in 
the church and congregation are very great. Any church, in which 
mere amusement is made a principal attraction, will inevitably degene- 
rate until there is little or no religion left. If we are not mistaken, 
there is, at all events, one congregation in London which hears the date 
of " the annual ball " given out from the pulpit. Young persons 
reared under such conditions will be brought up for the world alone, 
and not for Christ. We hope that Mr. Brown will not recede an inch 
from the position he has taken up. 



A YOUNG girl was presented to James I. as an English prodigy, 
because she was amazingly learned. The person who introduced 
her, boasted of her proficiency in ancient languages. " I can assure 
your Majesty," said he, "that she can both speak and write Latin, 
Greek, and Hebrew." " These are rare attainments for a damsel," 
said James ; u but pray, tell me, can she spin ? " For once this foolish 
Solomon was right ; the high and mighty prince spoke common-sense. 

Much the same test may be applied to Christian workers both in the 
pulpit and out of it. It is but a small matter that the worker can read 
three languages, and recite poetry, or can give birth to great thoughts, 
and utterance to fine language. Does he win souls ? is the question 
which it is far more important to answer. 

Had the fisherman a newly painted boat ? Does he boast a pair of 
fine blue eyes ? Can he sing a ballad of the sea ? These are all idle 
enquiries in connection with the man's pursuit. Has he caught anxj 
fish ? This is much more to the point, especially to the man's family at 
home, and all who depend upon his success. It is true, a first class fisher 
may often labour in vain ; but if his net always returns empty, how can 
he be called a fisher at all ? A fisherman who never takes a fish, a 
preacher who never saves a soul from death ! As well speak of a fire 
that never burns, a sun that never shines ! 



185 



ftoto 0f §oofa. 



The Booh Fund and its Work, for 1888. 
By Mrs. C. H. Spttrgeon. Price 6d. 
Passmore and Alabaster. 

This is to us as the water from the 
well of Bethlehem, which David felt 
to be all too precious, because it cost 
so much to those who bronght it to 
him. Our dear wife has written in 
pain and weakness of an extreme kind. 
But what has been written will be 
prized by her dear helpers, and by 
others who care for poor ministers. 
There is to us an inexpressible sweet- 
ness in these pages. We wish every 
one of our readers would invest six- 
pence in the purchase of a copy: it 
would cheer the weary worker, and 
help the work itself. 

Echoes from the Welsh Hills; or, Re- 
miniscences of the Preachers and 
People of Wales. By Eev. David 
Davies. Passmore and Alabaster. 

This book we have seen before, and 
we then gave it our benediction. Here 
we have a cheap edition at 4s 6d., and 
it is to be had of our own publishers. 
" These Welsh people think a deal of 
their ministers ! " And so would the 
English, if they could only under- 
stand the language, and were capable 
of that mystic, matchless fire which 
burns in a Welshman's heart. This is 
an attractive book. 

The Expositor's Bible. The Pastoral 
Epistles . By Eev. Alfred Pltjmmer, 
D.D. Hodder and Stoughton. 

There is much that is excellent in 
this exposition, but all this makes the 
more perilous the teaching which in- 
cludes Baptismal Eegeneration and 
Prayers for the Dead. This author is 
on some points a defender of the faith, 
but on others he is a very dangerous 
guide. 

The Epistle to the Galatians. By Pro- 
fessor G. G. Findlay, Headingley 
College. Hodder and Stoughton. 

This Exposition has a place of its 
own, and a very useful one. It keeps 
clear of the controversies which were 
once sure to arise out of comments 
upon this epistle, and it has little about 
it of the current phraseology of the 



schools. Largely practical, and keep- 
ing close to the text, it brings out the 
sacred teaching with much clearness 
and force. To a man who has other 
works upon the Galatians, it will be a 
welcome additional help. In this Com- 
mentary we have met with no trace of 
the modern spirit, but we have seen 
much to accept and enjoy. Having 
had to take exception to another of the 
volumes of The Expositor's Bible, we 
are glad to award, in this instance, our 
word of honest praise. 

Cloudy Days : Short Meditations on 
some Texts of Scripture, for the Pri- 
vate Use of those in Trouble. By the 
Eev. Francis Bourdillon, M.A. 
Society for Promoting Christian 
Knowledge. 

Our esteemed friend, Mr. Bourdillon, 
here gives the world another of his 
quiet, gracious, and always suggestive 
meditations. Nothing of flash ever 
defiles his page with meretricious dis- 
play : he is solid, deep, scriptural, and 
yet by no means dull and dreary. This 
is a honey- drop for a mouth which 
has been filled with wormwood. 

Fugal Tunes, with their Associated 
Hymns. Edited by John Courtnay, 
Precentor. Sunday School Union. 

Here we have twenty-two of those 
grand old fugal tunes which have been 
so carefully expelled from modern 
psalmody. Never was there heartier 
singing than when these were used. 
What grand bursts of unanimous praise 
then rose from voices of all kinds ! 
Now we go through the hymns at a 
gallop, and are glad to splash through 
the shallow stream of sound ; but 
aforetime we bathed in the deeps of 
music, and swam in seas of harmony. 
Silly jests have been manufactured to 
throw the old tunes into disfavour; 
but equally silly ones could be made 
about the present hop, skip, and jump 
tunes ; and, what is more to the point, 
facts can be stated which are not to 
their praise. We should be glad to see 
Hampshire, Eefuge, America, Calcutta 
and the like, restored to the places 
they so richly deserve. A shilling will 
be well spent on these tunes. 

13 



186 



NOTICES OP BOOKS. 



A Manual of Introduction to the New 
Testament. By Dr. Bernhakd 
Weiss. Translated from the Ger- 
man by A. J. K. Davidson. In 2 
Vols. Hodder and Stoughton. 

In this work, of which only the first 
volume is before us, the author aims to 
compile a historico-scientific criticism 
of the origin of the New Testament 
Canon. His drift it would be difficult 
to explain in a few sentences to those 
who are not acquainted with ' ' The 
foreign theological libraries." Even 
the word " Introduction " on the title 
page has a special significance, when 
it breaks on our ears with a German 
accent. The name of Dr. Bernhard 
Weiss must be familiar to many of 
our friends. Some years ago, Messrs. 
T. and T. Clark, of Edinburgh, 
published his "Biblical Theology of 
the New Testament " in three volumes. 
We called attention to it at the time. 
In the present treatise he aims to get 
behind that work ; or, in other words, 
he sinks a shaft into deeper strata. 
Be his task pious or profane, we hold 
our breath for the moment as we 
watch his proceedings. According to 
a comparatively new principle, an 
attempt has been made to read and 
examine the writings of the New 
Testament from a human point of 
view. The savans called this a re- 
action against the fetters of tradition : 
their method was to challenge and 
combat, severally and separately, the 
authenticity and apostolic authority 
of each component part of these Scrip- 
tures. Their idea is to effect a 
complete disintegration, in order to a 
more scientific reconstruction. We call 
this "an idea" because, as a positive 
fact, a century of labour has produced 
no result. They call it " a science," 
although they are well aware that not 
one problem of theirs has ever been 
demonstrated with mathematical cer- 
tainty from that " human point of 
view " which they like to talk about. 
Their scholars are all at issue with one 
another. The voxpopuli of Protestant 
Christianity has never proffered them 
a vote of thanks for their services. 
They have fostered scepticism, but they 
have never helped the struggling con- 
science of the living to a strong con- 
viction which could become an anchor 



to their souls ; nor have they fortified 
the dying even with so small a 
comfort as the rites of a church. 

The "merit " of setting this precious 
ball in motion belongs to the Tubin- 
gen professor, Ferdinand Christian 
Baur (page 12% With the close of 
the year 1850, the elder representa- 
tives of the Tubingen school came 
virtually to an end (page 18). May 
they sleep in peace ! Perhaps one 
of the most popular of these mole- 
eyed Germans, certainly one of the 
most ingenuous, is Edward Reuss, of 
Strasburg University. Well, he be- 
gan by persistently defending the 
genuineness of the epistles ; but in the 
fifth edition of his "Introduction" 
(1874), he entertained many doubts; 
and then, four years later, he adhered 
only to the second epistle to Timothy 
(page 419). Thus the deeper he delved, 
the darker he grew. 

We turn back to the preface, which 
is obviously a postscript, and there we 
have Dr. Weiss's last utterance. He 
has been for thirty- four years a Pro- 
fessor of Theology at Berlin. His aim 
during that extended period has been 
to teach young ministers to judge the 
Scriptures ! A questionable industry. 
Had he been a pastor instead of a pro- 
fessor, he might have tried to show his 
flock how the Scriptures judge them. 

The apology that confronts the reader 
on the first page is almost pathetic. 
So fluctuating is the literary com- 
modity in which the learned doctor 
speculates, that he regrets his inability 
to offer the most recent results of re- 
searches which were in progress while 
his manuscripts were in preparation 
for the press. Here is a perennial 
source of tears. They are for ever 
learning, but they never come to a 
knowledge of the truth. Their latest 
conclusions only last till the ink is dry 
with which they jotted them down. 

Jonah. Old Lessons for the New Year.. 

By Captain Dawson. Shaw. 
All Captain Dawson's writings are 
good and profitable. We don't think 
he quite catches the point of Jonah ? s 
character, and his reason for declining 
the great commission ; but as far as- 
they go, these lessons from Jonah are 
excellent. The little book is just the- 
thing to give away. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



187 



The Way the Lord hath led Me; or, 
Incidents of Gospel Work. By C. 8. 
London : G. Morrisb. 

Like all personal narratives written 
in the simplicity of a man's heart 
without the slightest concealment, or 
attempt at book writing, this is sin- 
gularly interesting reading. Persons 
who do not agree with Charles Stanley 
will take pleasure in reading the 
narrative of his life and work. Those 
who have a spiritual life within them, 
akin to his own, will find a deeper 
interest arising from their sympathy 
with his obedience to inner guidance, 
and the calm practicalness of his faith 
in God. The story which we mean to 
quote has a Quaker-like flavour about 
it, and it is one of many of the same 
sort which he here records. Some 
others of his narratives remind us of 
William Huntington, but not of the 
coarseness and selfishness which mar 
many of the anecdotes in the Bank of 
Faith. 

Mr. Stanley has right boldly de- 
clared the gospel of the grace of God, 
and has pursued a course which he 
believes to have been marked out for 
him by supreme authority ; so that he 
has not put his feet in another man's 
track, nor bound himself by the con- 
ventional bonds which have restrained 
the free Spirit in so many. "We know 
little of his peculiarities, but, having 
simply perused "The Way by which 
the Lord hath led Me," we are deeply 
interested by the narrative. Whether 
an heir of heaven be a Plymouth 
Brother, or a Baptist, or an Episco- 
palian, is, with us, a far less matter 
than that he should possess the 
heavenly life, be true to his solemn 
convictions, reverent to the Word of 
the Lord, and zealous for the salvation 
of men. Here is the story, which, from 
among many others, we quote ; not as 
being the most remarkable, but as a 
fair specimen of many which lie im- 
bedded in this personal story. 

"It is important to look to the 
Lord every day for the guidance of 
the Holy Spirit, as we never know 
when and where he may use us in 
sovereign grace. I was crossing the 
country, one day from Bristol, where 
I had been preaching, to Tetbury. I 
had never been in that part of the 



country before. On arriving at 
Wotton-under-Edge, I had some time 
to spare before going on. It was 
about five o'clock on a hot day 
in the midst of harvest. There was 
scarcely a person to be seen in the 
little town. I was very distinctly im- 
pressed from the Lord that I must 
preach the gospel there that afternoon, 
yet there appeared to be no people to 
preach to. Nearly all seemed to be 
out in the harvest field. Yet the con- 
viction deepened that I must preach. 
I took a few tracts, and gave them 
where I could find anyone. I was 
standing in a little shop, speaking to 
a woman about her soul, when a man 
came running up the road, the per- 
spiration streaming off his face. He 
turned into the shop, and said, ' Please, 
sir, are you a preacher of the gospel ? ' 
' Yes,' I said, ' I am, through the 
Lord's mercy, but why do you ask ? ' 
He replied, ' I am the bell-man, and if 
you will preach to-day I will cry it.' 
' Well,' I said, ' it was very much laid 
on my heart to preach the gospel here 
to-day, but I do not see any to preach 
to. Tell me, how is it you came in 
such haste, and asked me the ques- 
tion ? ' He replied, ' I was working 
in the field, and a woman came past 
and told me some one was distributing 
tracts in Wotton, and it was just as 
if a voice had said to me, " You must 
run, and there must be preaching in 
Wotton to-day." That is why I left 
my work, and came immediately.' 
As he was the bellman, I involuntarily 
put my hand in my pocket to give him 
a shilling. ' Oh dear no, sir,' he said, 
' I don't want the money, I want souls 
to be saved ' ; and the earnestness and 
solemnity of the man confirmed his 
words. In half-an-hour he had washed 
himself, cried the preaching, and we 
were on the way to the Chipping 
preach." 

Lessons on the (I.) Works of our Lord 
(II.) Claims of our Lord. By Flavel 
S. Cook, D.D., Chaplain of the 
Lock. Nisbet. One shilling. 
These fifty-two Lessons form a year's 
course of instruction for Bible- classes 
and Sunday-schools. Concise, but 
comprehensive, they are admirably 
fitted to guide teachers in their pre- 
parations. 



188 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Passim Papers, in Prose and Verse. 
By the Rev. David Jamison, B.A. 
Belfast : Sabbath School Society for 
Ireland, 12, May Street. 

Ox the old lines of the gospel, fresh 
as spring flowers. These papers will 
command a reading, and will benefit 
all who give it to them. One and 
sixpence is little for such good matter. 
To promote the sale, we have inserted 
one of the papers in this month's 
magazine. 

Essays on Sacred Subjects for General 
Headers. By the Eev. William 
Russell, M.A. Blackwood. 

We have been delighted with these 
essays. Amid the surging torrents of 
unbelief, these islets of strong and 
confident testimony lift their rocky 
forms, and we land upon them with 
delight. Thoroughly learned, and in 
every way masterly, these essays make 
short work with Darwinism, and all 
the other errors, which crowd the 
temple of the nineteenth century's 
monkey-god. The volume is a fine 
one in every way. We fear that in its 
present library form, at half - a-guinea, 
it will have a small sale compared with 
what it would have had in a smaller 
and cheaper shape. Were we able to 
do so, we should like to present a 
copy to every minister in the Three 
Kingdoms, in the hope that certain of 
the better ones, who are slipping, 
might find foothold by its means. 
However, he that chooses to fall, can- 
not be held up ; and such, we fear, is 
a true description of many modern 
teachers. 

Report of the Missionary Conference on 
the Protestant Missions of the World, 
held in Exeter Hall, London, 1888. 
Edited by the Rev. James John- 
ston, F.S.S. Two volumes. Nisbet. 

These volumes are of great value, 
especially at this time, when missions 
are somewhat roughly handled. The 
Conference of last year was carried 
out to perfection, and the papers and 
addresses were wide in range, and of 
a very high order. No one will ever 
call these pages dull or dry : they are 
rich with missionary information, 
mostly supplied by the labourers them- 
selves ; and they reveal how far the 



work has succeeded, and wherein it 
has failed. We are on the eve of a 
new departure in missions. Without 
breathing a complaint against the old, 
we shall welcome the new. The world 
has to be evangelized, and he that can 
show us how to do it, or even how not 
to do it, is our friend. 

As a compendium of missionary in- 
formation from all parts of the church, 
and all quarters of the globe, we con- 
sider these volumes to be altogether 
priceless. The publisher marks them, 
" Two volumes, 7s. 6d." Can he mean 
that both are to be had for that 
amount ? If so, they are the greatest 
bargain we have met with for many a 
day. 

What are we to Believe ? or, The Testi- 
mony of Fulfilled Prophecy. By 
John Urquhart. Second edition. 
J. and A. Mack. 

We are right glad to see a second 
edition of this precious treatise. We can- 
not too warmly comfend it. It is full 
of the best defence of our holy faith. 
We wish that every young man who 
is beginning to doubt could be induced 
to read these telling pages. Here he 
will find such proof of the inspiration 
of Scripture as none can overthrow. 
History, which is the hand of God 
acting, bears witness to revelation, 
which is the hand of God writing. 
Mr. Urquhart is entirely on the side 
of faith, and his book is one which 
ought to be scattered by tens of 
thousands. No reader will find it 
dull, but many will find it spiritually 
establishing. 

Euth : the Soul brought into Oneness 
tuith Christ. By George W. Hills, 
Vicar of Cambridge. Elliot Stock. 

Our author touches on a very delicate 
theme, and does it with a careful hand. 
These addresses, which spiritualize the 
Book of Ruth, are of that good old- 
fashioned order which the Puritans 
would have enjoyed; but this evil 
generation will take strong objection 
to them. We are glad that there is a 
vicar left who could venture upon such 
a subject, and succeed so well in his 
dealing with it. Still, the theme is 
rather for the inner chamber of the 
devout than for the promiscuous 
assembly. 






NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



180 



A Winter on the Nile, in Egypt, and in 
Nubia. By the Eev. Charles D. 
Bell, D.D. Hodder and Stoughton. 

This is a delightful book. It will suit 
our readers when they desire to read 
something interesting and gracious. 
The good canon does not drag in pious 
reflections, but they come to him, or 
rather from him, as flowers from a 
watered garden. He is a traveller 
who does not overlay his notes with 
learned lumber, but writes very simply 
what he sees, and does it in the style 
of an educated gentleman talking with 
his friends who want to know what 
he has seen. Some of his notes upon 
evolution at the end of the book are 
so good that we cannot resist the 
temptation to give an extract : — 

"On the theory of evolution, why 
should physical or mental development 
ever cease ? That it has ceased, or not 
been uniformly progressive, is evident. 
Has man, in grandeur of conception 
or in powers of execution, surpassed 
the builders of these colossal pyramids, 
these awe-inspiring sphinxes, these 
splendid palaces and temples ? Are 
these, the earliest monuments of the 
race, the work of the descendants of 
the ape and the baboon ? "Where is the 
development now ? Are the modern 
Egyptians, in mental capacity or phy- 
sical strength, in art or in science, supe- 
rior to the men who reared the obelisk 
and hollowed out the tomb ? Has 
not Egypt, the fountain of civilization, 
which drew an Herodotus, a Euclid, 
a Strabo, and a Plato to visit her uni- 
versities, and to learn in her schools, 
become one of the lowest of the nations, 
needing the occupation of a foreign 
power to guard her frontier and to 
control her finance ? If the theory of 
evolution had in it any truth — if man 
had to progress through an age of 
stone, and bronze, and iron, before he 
reached civilization, then the earliest 
nations should be the least developed, 
and be but little removed from the 
brute. But Egypt, the oldest historic 
nation, refutes this idea ; and her ma- 
jestic monuments, with their frescoes 
and sculptures, through which we read 
the daily life of the king, the priests, 
and the people, prove that in the times 
nearest to the creation of man she had 
attained to a higher condition Of im- 



portance and greatness than she has 
ever attained since. Hers is a develop- 
ment of degeneration. The descendants 
of this wonderful people, in outward 
appearance resembling the men we see 
in the sculptures and bas-reliefs on the 
monuments, can do nothing like them 
now, and cannot build or paint or 
write as their fathers builded and 
painted and wrote, cannot model the 
colossal statue or raise the magnificent 
pyramid. They have retrograded 
rather than advanced. They have lost 
the power of doing such works ; their 
evolution is from higher to lower." 

The Inspiration of the Scriptures. A 
Lecture. By Philip Reynolds, 
Pastor of Providence Baptist Chapel, 
Highbury. R. Banks and Son. 

Very good. The wilful sceptic will 
not be convinced, but the faithful will 
be established, by the line of argu- 
ment here adopted. As a lecture, 
costing only threepence, this may go 
where a larger work could not enter ; 
and, for certain, there cannot be too 
many voices raised in testimony to 
inspiration. 

Light and Colour emblematic of Revealed 
Truth. By the late Major R. W. D. 
Nickle. Edited by Sarah Sharp. 
Hodder and Stoughton. 

Written in a devout spirit, and with 
the best intentions, but we do not care 
for pushing a figure into such nice 
points, and fine distinctions. That red, 
blue, yellow, and the other colours, 
may be, and are, admirable emblems 
of holy things we allow ; but that we 
may regard their use in Scripture as 
dogmatic teaching we seriously doubt. 
This book is a religious curio, if nothing- 
more. 

By -Paths of Bible Knoivledge. XII. 
The Hittites. The Story of a For- 
gotten Empire. By A. H. Sayce, 
LL.D. Religious Tract Society. 

The pith of what is known of the 
empire of the Hittites. Those who 
are interested in that ancient, and 
yet newly-discovered, people, will not 
grudge half-a-crown for this book, 
which is one of the valuable series 
published by the Tract Society under 
the title of "By-Paths of Bible 
Knowledge." 



190 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Conversations at the Unity Club. Re- 
ported by a Member of the Club. 
Christian Commonwealth Publish- 
ing Company. 
Clever pleadings for the peculiar views 
of the denomination which calls itself 
" Christian." It is easy to write conversa- 
tions in which you represent the views 
of others in your own way, and then set 
them right according to your own 
more accurate j udgment ; but it is 
quite another matter to turn into fact 
the pretty picture which you have 
drawn. On paper the thing is settled 
for ever, but in fact nobody is con- 
vinced, and nothing whatever is 
proved. "We do not believe that Chris- 
tian unity will come by the way 
which Mr. Moore here advocates, 
though he argues with good temper 
and great skill. Churchmen and 
Methodists are a very long way off 
from his views, and Baptists, who may 
seem to be a little nearer, are by no 
means likely to accept baptismal sal- 
vation in any shape or form. We may 
all unite around the cross even now ; 
but when the happy day of union shall 
come, and the whole church shall 
recognize "one Lord, one faith, and 
one baptism," the faith and the bap- 
tism will neither of them be quite the 
same as those accepted among our 
Campbellite brethren. We use the 
name, not by way of reproach, but by 
way of information. We do not know 
how we can better indicate the views 
which are advocated by The Christian 
Commonivealth. It seems to us that 
our friends, who claim for themselves 
the name of "Christians," just add 
one more to the many sects already 
existing, and this in the name of 
unity. O unity, what deeds have been 
done in thy name ! 

Church History. By Professor Kurtz. 

Translated by Rev. John Macpiier- 

SON, M.A. In three volumes. Vol. 

I. Foreign Biblical Library. Hod- 

der and Stoughton. 
This is obviously a colossal work. The 
first volume comprises ooO pages oc- 
tavo of closely-printed matter. Such 
a theme is worthy of an author whose 
literary ability is of the highest order. 
We refrain for the present from at- 
tempting an adequate review, because 
we have before us only Vol. I., which is 



a comparatively uninteresting sample. 
Some such introduction was requisite. 
Here it is. We are indulged with an 
exhibition of fossils picked up from 
the early centuries of Christianity. 
Here, too, are " doctrinal controversies 
that grew up independently on Ger- 
man soil" — ("heresies," our author 
calls them). Nor does the writer 
forget " endeavours after reforma- 
tion," which seemed, for the time 
being, to have proved futile. 

Into the second and third volumes 
it has not been our privilege to peer ; 
but judging from the part we have 
perused, we believe that our author 
provides a thoroughly reliable digest 
of the best information, and of the best 
sources of information, in every depart- 
ment, condensed into the smallest com- 
pass. If you want to give a series of 
lessons, or a course of lectures, this is 
a complete text-book. On the other 
hand, it is not a continuous tale 
skilfully woven together into chapters, 
like Macaulay's " History of Eng- 
land," or D'Aubigne's "History of 
the Reformation." What if it lacks 
all the qualities that lend enchantment 
to literature ? That is no disparage- 
ment, for it was never designed to 
furnish circulating libraries with light 
reading. Enough that you are sup- 
plied with a comprehensive study, 
broken up into short sections, any one 
of which, if you are particularly in- 
terested in it, challenges further 
research. 

Preacher, Pastor, Mechanic : Memoir 
of the late Mr. Samuel Deacon, nearly 
forty years Pastor of the General 
Baptist Church, Barton. A Cabinet 
of Jewels. (Vol. I. of Barton Memo- 
rials). By S. Deacon. Elliot Stock. 
Our venerable friend, Thomas Cook, 
must always be at work for the cause 
he loves so well. He is doing good 
service by issuing a memoir of a worthy 
of the General Baptist Connexion, and 
by re-issuing one of his simple books, 
which had a measure of popularity 
years ago. The Cabinet of Jewels is 
very homely, but as earnest as it is 
plain. The modern General Baptists 
will do well to return to the standing 
of the fathers. Mr. Cook is a genuine 
specimen of the solid, earnest believer 
of the old school. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



191 



Ephemerides. The Dayes of the Year. 
1889. A London Almanack in the 
Olde Style. Unwin Brothers. 

We are sorry to mention so late in the 
year this quaint, curious, out-of-the- 
way sixpenny worth ; but we counsel 
our friends still to secure it, if they 
like a racy bit. Six stamps sent to 
the publisher will buy it. It is not a 
religious almanack ; but we note it as 
a literary rarity. 

Faithful Words for Old and Young. 
Alfred Holness. 

This magazine deserves support, be- 
cause it is not written for amusement, 
but for practical salvation work. It 
keeps solidly to the gospel, and is 
truly what its name implies. The 
yearly volume deserves our praise. 

St. Nicholas : an Illustrated Magazine 
for Young Folks. Volume XV. T. 
Fisher Unwin. 

Very wonderfully do our American 
brethren produce books for juveniles, 
and we do not wonder that they seek 
a market on this side of the water. 
St. Nicholas is not a religious maga- 
zine, and so is quite out of our line ; 
but the illustrations which adorn it 
are marvellous. 

The Century Illustrated Monthly Maga- 
zine. May, 1888, to October, 1888. 
T. Fisher Unwin, London. 

In the United States many processes 
of engraving seem to be in vogue, 
which, as yet, are not employed by 
English book-producers. For wealth 
of pictures, and for abundance of in- 
formation, the volume of ' ' The Cen- 
tury," for 1888, is second to none of all 
the secular serials. We have greatly 
enjoyed overhauling its contents. 
The chapters on Siberia are touch- 
in gly sad. 

Jingles and Chimes, and Nursery 
Rhymes. With 75 Illustrations. 
By M. Irwin. Shaw and Co. 

Yes, the real old nursery rhymes, and 
not a lot of new rubbish. Childish 
as the old jingles are, it would take a 
very clever man to make another of 
the sort. The new rigmaroles are not 
in the running at all; the little ones 
will not take to them. 



The Sun. A Family Magazine for 
General Eeading. Vol. I. Nisbet. 

This weekly magazine has a blazing 
title, and it would be too much praise 
to say that it comes up to it in bril- 
liancy ; but the first volume is a good 
one, and deserves to the full its secon- 
dary emblem of the Sunflower. Its 
literary merit is high. It makes a fine 
book for six shillings. Who would 
not buy " The Sun " at that price in 
this murky island ? 

The Christian Worker's Magazine. An 
Advocate of Aggressive Christian 
and Philanthropic Effort. (Two- 
pence monthly.) Marshall Brothers. 

This first number is very good. This 
is a monthly record of work done under 
the lead of Mr. Edward Wright, far 
better known as Ned Wright. 

The Tract Magazine, 1888. Eeligious 
Tract Society. 

This is always a good, useful maga- 
zine, and may be circulated by those 
who wish to do good. The annual 
volume is neatly bound. 

The Welcome : a Magazine for the Home 
Circle. Vol. XV. Partridge & Co. 

More and more welcome. In every 
way first-rate. 

The Methodist Family: an Illustrated 
Monthly Magazine. Vol. XIX. 61, 
Paternoster Row. 

Though we are not Methodists, we 
hold in high esteem "The Methodist 
Family." It is carefully edited, and 
contains much that tends to edifi- 
cation. Its tone is high. 

China's Millions. Edited by J. Hud- 
son Taylor, M.E.C.S., F.E.G.S. 
Morgan and Scott. 

Our friend Mr. Hudson Taylor leads 
in a glorious work in China, and this 
record of the Inland Mission is always 
cheering. The volume deserves a 
place in every good man's library. 

The Baptist Messenger, The Church, 
The Shield and Spear. These maga- 
zines, published by Elliot Stock, are 
each one excellent in its own way, and 
a really good pennyworth. 



192 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Mrs. Morse's Girls. A Tale of Ameri- 
can Sunday- school Life and Work. 
By Minnie E. Kenney. Eeligious 
Tract Society. 
We should like to know something 
about the writer of this exceptionally 
good story, if story it is. We will 
hazard the guess that she is the ' ' pas- 
tor's wife of the narrative, who, by 
God-given tact and holy earnestness, 
won for Jesus a class of girls — gentle 
and simple — which had been the 
despair of the Sunday-school authori- 
ties. Here is every element of a soul- 
winning book. God speed it and its 
authoress ! 

Alma Ryan ; or, Steadfast and True. 

By Charlotte Mason. Shaw. 
Tells how an orphan girl — a young 
disciple — bore herself, and was "stead- 
fast and true" to Christ when removed 
from her godly home, at the country 
vicarage, to the chilling atmosphere 
of a Belgravian mansion, where she 
suffered slow torture for conscience 
sake. Godly church people might 
make a worse choice than this of a 
book for a present to a young girl of 
the upper class. 

Eagle and Dove. A Tale of the Franco- 
Prussian War, founded on Fact. By 
M. E. Clements. Nelson and Sons. 
A capital story of the experiences 
of the inmates of a boarding-school 
for young ladies at Metz, during the 
whole period of the war, of which 
it furnishes a very cleverly-written 
epitome. The horrors of the be- 
leaguered fortress are described with 
fidelity, and yet with the delicacy of a 
woman's pen. The writer says the 
story is intended especially for ' ' the 
girls of this young generation " : the 
boys will take good care to read it as 
soon as their sisters lay it down. 

That Bother of a Boy. By Grace 

Stebbing. Jarrold and Sons. 
Tins example of unchecked mischief 
can do no good to anybody. 

Uncle Steve's Locker. By Brenda. 
John F. Shaw. 

We have thoroughly enjoyed reading 
this sweet story, and we think it takes 
rank with " Froggy 's little brother," 
by the same author, for interest and 
beauty. Get it. 



More than Conqueror. By Harriette 
Burch. Eeligious Tract Society. 

The temptations and trials of a young 
fellow in a house of business are here 
depicted, with the usual yielding on 
his part in the face of ridicule, and the 
ultimate victory gained through divine 
grace, over every temptation. 

Gianetta : A GirVs Story of her Life. 
By Bosa Mulholland. London : 
Blackie and Son. 

A very well written story for girls. 
We could have wished the author had 
put a little more spiritual teaching 
into the mouth of the best character 
in the book (Aunt Eve) who carries 
out a good scheme of philanthropic 
work for the benefit of the poor Irish 
peasants. The chapters upon the 
evictions are very graphic. When the 
present unhappy agitations are over, 
we hope all will unite in a common 
effort for the good of Ireland. Oh> 
that the gospel would bring Ireland 
liberty and rest ! 

Little Lady Clare. By Evelyn Eve- 
rett Green. Blackie and Son. 

Not at all a book for little ladies. 
Style somewhat stilted. Moral good. 

Red Herring; or, Allies Little Blue 
Shoes. By Frances Armstrong. 
John Hogg. 

Sensible people will not expect to 
find the tale of a red herring very 
fresh, or fine, or large, nor that it 
would find a place in the menu of the 
fastidious ; but boys and girls will 
relish the tale, and devour the entire 
herring, which is very well cooked. 

From Squire to Squatter. By Gordon 
Stables, E.N. John F. Shaw. 

A dashing story indeed : rather too 
much so for our liking, and yet one 
on which boys of pluck and spirit will 
feed, and these will grow into the men 
that Old England needs on flood and 
field, to keep up her greatness. Per- 
haps the one moral taught is the use 
of energy, physical stamina, and cour- 
age ; and for some boys this is a neces- 
sary one. A spice of religion is thrown 
in ; but in one instance a prayer seems 
rather too ghastly just before a fight 
with blacks. 



193 



ffoles. 



If any friends imagine that the growth of 
error in the Nonconformist churches has 
come to a pause, they are sadly mistaken. 
We have mournful evidence that the bad 
are growing worse, and some of whom we 
hoped better things are becoming unstable. 
The worst feature of the case is the want 
of moral honesty which allows persons to 
pass resolutions in which they do not believe, 
and to have one belief for the public, and 
another for private use. Years ago, the cry 
of Nonconformity was very loud against the 
Church of England, as a combination of 
men who vitally differed from each other : 
the inconsistencies of the Evangelical party 
were especially held up to reprobation, since 
they professed to accept a prayer-book 
which gives support to Ritualism. The 
protest was not without reason ; but how 
can it now be maintained by the protesters, 
since the extent to which error is not only 
tolerated, but encouraged, in at least two of 
the Dissenting bodies, goes beyond the 
comprehensiveness of the Establishment? 
A man who occupies a chapel, and preaches 
contrary to the trust-deed, ought to hold his 
tongue in reference to elastic consciences. 
He who reads the creed of an Association 
in a non-natural sense should throw no 
stones at one who interprets the Church 
Catechism in an ingenious manner. We do 
not object to the Nonconformist protest; 
but when it comes from men who are them- 
selves acting inconsistently, its force is 
gone. 

The remarks made by Mr. Caine as to 
Mission operations are not to be set aside 
because of minor errors in his statistics and 
other matters. He will have done good 
service to the great cause if the managers of 
the societies will take to heart whatever is 
right in his somewhat severe strictures. 
There can be no need to pull down what is 
already built up ; but there might be 
additions to the edifice. Missionaries, with 
their families, should not be stinted ; but a 
body of young men might be sent out, 
pledged to remain for, say, five years, and 
then permitted honourably to return. These 
could be supported in plenty at about £100 
a year each, and would be a great addition 
to the forces in the field. If the committees 
of the societies adopt all new suggestions 
which are prudent and promising, they will 
show themselves worthy of the occasion; 
but if not, the work will be done by those 
outside present organizations. To preach 
rather than to educate is the missionary's 
business ; and what he preaches must be 
the gospel, or he might as well have re- 
mained at home. He who points out a 
Haw or failure in any good work should 
not be howled at as an enemy, but utilized 
to the utmost as an aid to wiser procedure. 
So far as any man is opposed to Missions, we 
are opposed to him ; but so far as he can 
arouse us to deep regret that we have not 



more success, and awaken us to make bolder 
attempts to gain it, we welcome him. The 
whole constituency of the Missionary Society 
should look into the questions submitted 
to the Christian public ; and if this is done, 
a new interest will be aroused in the great 
enterprise of preaching Christ among the 
heathen. 

Some eight years ago, our most worthy 
brother, Mr. Harry Brown, went out from 
our College to endeavour to win souls in 
India, and he has continued to do good ser- 
vice, as pastor of the church in Darjeeling 
during one part of the year, and as an agent 
of the Indian Evangelization Society during 
the other portion of it. In this way we fur- 
nished a worker for India who has been 
supported on the spot, and has been greatly 
blessed of Grod. We promised to supply his 
need, if need there should be; but he has 
managed to make his own way. We are, 
therefore, glad to make room for a request 
which he has sent to us. 

"An appeal for a school in far-off Dar- 
jeeling may not at once commend itself to 
the readers of The Sword and the Trowel, 
but it may be that their attention has never 
been directed to the ever-growing European 
population, whose children need education, 
and whose circumstances compel that this 
education be given in India. Roman Catho- 
lics are alive to the fact, and have schools 
in all parts of the country, to which large 
numbers of Protestants send their children. 
The Jesuits are making Darjeeling one of 
their strongholds. The only other schools 
in the place are connected with the Church 
of England, and very sectarian; and it is 
much to be regretted that the tendency of 
that Church in India is decidedly away from 
Evangelicalism, towards either Ritualism on 
the one hand, or Indifferentism on the 
other. What need, then, is there for a 
school in Darjeeling, conducted, as George 
Midler puts it, upon Christian principles, 
i.e., in which the teachers are believers, 
where the way of salvation is scripturally 
pointed out, and in which no instruction is 
given opposed to the principles of the gospel, 
and of a high-class character as to teachers 
and course of study ! 

" To meet this need, a circular has been 
issued, from which the following are ex- 
tracts: — ' It is proposed to start in Darjee- 
ling a college for boys, and a college for 
girls, upon a purely undenominational basis, 
and vet with strict regard to the religious 
training of the pupils. With the view of 
making these institutions thoroughly suc- 
cessful, an efficient staff of first - class 
teachers will be engaged.' 

"It is supposed that a sum of at least 
50,000 rupees will be required to carry out 
the above scheme in a proper and satisfac- 
tory manner. Towards this sum one friend 
has offered to contribute 10,000 rupees,, 
provided three others will come forward. 



194 



NOTES. 



with a like sum of 10,000 rupees each, or 
provided any number of subscribers sub- 
scribe 40,000 rupees, so as to make up the 
sum of 50,000 rupees, required to start with. 
But no amount of money will suffice with- 
out God's blessing, and the prayers of his 
people are asked on this effort to meet a 
need, no less urgent, if not so universally 
recognized, as that for which missionaries 
plead. Any further communications may be 
addressed to D. Sutherland, Esq., Jessamine 
Villa, Darjeeling; or to H. Rylands Brown, 
The Manse, Darjeeling." 

Our friends will have noticed with regret 
the terrible calamity which has fallen upon 
the Grimsby fishing-fleet. There are some 
seventy orphans left in that town through 
the fearful gale. We hope to take some few 
into the Stockwell Orphanage ; but funds 
sent to the Relief Committee would be well 
applied. Oar friend, Mr. Lauderdale, the 
Baptist pastor at Great Grimsby, would be 
glad to receive donations. 

The smack C. H. Spur (j eon encountered a 
fearful storm. The disaster is thus described 
by our friend, Mr. Dobson : — 

"From the lips of the skipper of the 
C. H. Spur g eon, this morning, I heard such 
a tale of hardship and suffering as I never 
have heard before from any of our men. As 
I have before mentioned, the C. H. S. is one 
of the best-built vessels in the port ; that is, 
no doubt, the reason she has lived through 
all this rough handling. Last Saturday 
morning, about seven o'clock, the first sea 
struck the smack, taking, at one stroke, both 
the masts, every sail, and everything that 
was movable off the decks, including the 
boat, and half filled the ship with water. 
In this condition it was impossible to lie, 
so that the skipper and mate had to go 
to the head of the ship, and if possible get 
the anchor down to keep her head to the sea. 
In attempting to do this, another sea struck 
them, this time washing the mate overboard, 
and completely turning the ship round. 
This put the poor fellow out of the reach of 
any help, though the skipper said that he 
stood helplessly for some time, and watched 
him, until his heart grew sick, and then he 
turned away, so that he might not see him 
drown. When he turned to look again, the 
man lay upon the top of the water (his oil 
clothes keeping him up), but his spirit had 
gone. How the men on the smack lived 
through Saturday the skipper does not seem 
to know, as no less than seven of these huge 
seas rolled on board. During one of these 
the kettle, which was on the fire, was 
washed off, and the boiling water badly 
scalded the skipper. The mate was gone, 
as I have described. The third hand, in 
trying to do the mate's work, had his leg 
seriously injured ; and by night the cook, 
who wa3 a young man eighteen years 
of age, died through exposure and fright. 
At this time they were nearly two hundred 
miles from home. Sunday, the skipper 
said, was a long day ; but towards night 



another smack hove in sight, and seeing 
their distress, took them in tow, arriving in 
dock by last night's tide. The vessel pre- 
sented a sad sight ; you could never think it 
possible for the waves to have such power. 
This morning the skipper could neither 
open nor shut his hands, as they seem to 
have been half frozen to the pumps." 

The smack C. H. S. is not altogether an 
unsuitable type of its namesake : but those 
who desire to see either of the two vessels 
go down will have to wait a bit. They will 
both go to and fro, laden with fish, till 
their hour is come. Blessed be God, no sea 
can sink either smack or man till then ! 

Much aided in seeking the truth upon 
Believers' Baptism by our edition of Nor- 
cott's Baptism Discovered, Mr. H. N. Mit- 
chell, minister of the Congregational church, 
Okehampton, Devon, after studying the 
Scriptures, has been baptized by Mr. Meyer, 
of Regent's Park Chapel. He is now without 
a charge, and seeks a Baptist pastorate. He 
has long been known to several of our 
brethren, and can be commended to any 
church needing a pastor. 

Churches needing gospel preachers can, 
at any time, apply to C. H. Spurgeon. We 
have men in the College ready, and there 
are, beside these, experienced brethren 
anxious to move, of whom we keep a list. 

Mrs. Miller asks us to acknowledge, with 
thanks, the receipt of a parcel of clothing 
from S. E. Carter, Stockwell, for the Poor 
Ministers' Clothing Society. Such parcels 
are always acceptable. 

On Monday evening, February 25, at the 
first prayer- meeting in the Tabernacle after 
the Pastor's return from Mentone, the area 
and first gallery were well filled, and a spirit 
of devout thankfulness and earnestness pre- 
vailed. About 200 of the Orphanage chil- 
dren were present, and their sweet young 
voices helped in the service of praise. Many 
brethren prayed, and the Pastor spoke at 
intervals, relating interesting incidents 
which had occurred during his absence. The 
more we attend prayer-meetings, the more 
are we confirmed in the belief that they are 
an admirable means of grace, and that they 
are a true gauge of the spiritual state of a 
church. Love of entertainment marks 
"zero," and love of prayer marks "sum- 
mer-heat," in a church. 

On Monday evening, March 4, a number 
of the Tabernacle subscribers to the Bap- 
tist Missionary Society met for tea, after 
which Mr. A. H. Baynes made a statement 
with regard to the work of the Society, es- 
pecially in India, and replied to various 
questions. A denominational paper states 
that, " As a result of the gathering, an ex- 
pression of unabated confidence in the 
management of the Society was given." 
This is not correct, as there was no ex- 
pression either of confidence, or want of 
confidence. The friendly conference tended 



NOTES. 



195 



to awaken interest in mission-work in gene- 
ral, and to keep friends in touch with the 
actual working of the Society. 

At the prayer-meeting in the Tabernacle, 
the singing and supplications were mostly 
of a missionary character ; and addresses 
were delivered by Mr. A. H. Baynes ; Mr. 
Percy Comber, of the Congo Mission ; and the 
Pastor. Last year, the sum of £518 4s. 6d. 
was contributed from the Tabernacle to the 
Baptist Missionary Society, in addition to 
£170 for the Zenana Mission, and £200 raised 
by the Sunday-school for home and foreign 
missions. Beside this, we have our College 
Mission Fund, which is attempting work in 
North Africa, Mr. Patrick having gone 
thither. 

On Monday evening, March 11, the annual 
meeting of the Ladies' Benevolent So- 
ciety was held in the Tabernacle lecture - 
hall. Addresses in advocacy of the work 
were given by Pastors C. H. and J. A. 
Spurgeon, and Messrs. W. Olney and J. W. 
Harrald. The receipts for the year covered 
the expenditure, which we would gladly see 
increased. The demands upon the Society 
continue as great as ever, if not greater ; so 
the committee will be very thankful if other 
ladies of the church and congregation will 
help them by giving, working, or supplying 
materials that can be made up into gar- 
ments for the poor. Mrs. Phillips, Metro- 
politan Tabernacle, will be happy to receive 
the names of fresh subscribers ; and addi- 
tional workers will be heartily welcomed on 
the Thursday after the first Sunday in each 
month. Our poor are more numerous than 
ever, and the notion that the church at the 
Tabernacle has "enormous revenues," and 
is composed of wealthy people, is pure 
fiction. The working- classes and the poor 
are with us : and we have no need to call 
them together, and ask them why they do 
not attend public worship. There they are, 
and we are glad to see them. 

On Tuesday evening, March 12, the annual 
church -meeting was held at the Tabernacle. 
A large company met for tea, and other 
brethren and sisters came afterwards. It 
was a great family gathering, at which per- 
fect harmony and Christian love prevailed. 
The statistics for the past year were as 
follow :— Additions, by baptism, 218; pro- 
fession (persons previously baptized), 28; 
transfer, 61. Deductions, by dismission to 
other churches, 133 ; joining other churches 
without letters, 42 ; erasure for non-attend- 
ance, 91 ; emigration, 5 ; withdrawal, 1 ; 
exclusion, 5; deaths, 67. The number of 
members at the close of the year was 5,275. 
In connection with the Tabernacle church 
there are 26 mission-stations, with 4,110 
sittings; and 28 Sunday and Ragged- 
schools, with 594 teachers and 7,811 scholars. 
The treasurer reported a balance in hand on 
every account except one, which exactly 
balanced. The Pastors cannot but express 
their gratitude to God that they andj their 



beloved fellow-workers have been enabled 
to steer the good ship for another year with 
its vast loading of precious souls. Who is 
sufficient for these things ? We need in this 
great enterprise the prayers and sympathies 
of all the faithful. 

The Sunday services at the Tabernacle 
were exceedingly well attended during the 
Pastor's absence, but since his return the 
building has been densely crowded. The 
multitudes are as eager as ever to hear "the 
old, old story"; and, blessed be the name 
of the Lord, to many of them "faith cometh 
by hearing " ! Since his return, the Pastor 
has been very busy seeing candidates for 
church -fellowship. He was able to select, 
in three sittings, no less than 55, who have 
been proposed for membership. Day after 
day he returns wearied with the gladsome 
work of gathering in the sheaves. Owing 
to the wandering habits of Londoners, many 
leave us, and join other churches during 
the year; but even this has its good side, 
as it makes room for new-comers to hear the 
word, and live. 

There is still room for more people at the 
Thursday evening services, although the 
congregations then are very large. Probably 
there are many who could not venture into 
the great crowds on Sundays, who would 
be glad to come on the week-evenings, if 
they knew that they could gain admission 
without tickets and without difficulty. 
Many of them would also enjoy the Pastor's 
prayer-meeting, in the lecture-hall, at six 
o'clock on Thursdays. 

College. — The following students have 
accepted pastorates during the past month : — 
Mr. P. A. Hudgell, at Wrexham; Mr. H. 
Smith, at Faringdon ; Mr. S. ;Jones, at 
Welshpool ; and Mr. G. H. F. Jackman, at 
Coggeshall. 

Mr. G. A. J. Huntley, who was accepted 
some months ago by the China Inland Mis- 
sion, expects to sail for China on the 4th 
inst. Mr. R. Yeatman is leaving Widues, 
Lancashire, and sailing this month for 
Canada. He hopes to find a suitable sphere 
of labour in Manitoba, or the North-West 
Provinces. We cordially commend him to 
our brethren in the Dominion, as a good 
man and true. 

Mr. E. E. Fisk, late of Walthamstow, 
has gone to York ; Mr. W. Gillard has re- 
moved from Croyde and Georgeham, to 
Uffculme and Prescott, Devonshire ; Mr. 
W. J". Harris, late of Birmingham, has 
settled at Winchester; and Mr. Albert 
Smith has gone from Shefford to Shrewton, 
Tilshead, and Chitterne. 

Mr. A. Bird has removed from Ballarat to 
Hawthorn, Victoria ; Mr. A. F. Brown, from 
Woodstock, to Sussex, New Brunswick ; 
Mr. G. H. Malins, from Plattsville, to 
Bridgetown, Ontario ; Mr. J. E. Moyle, from 
Port Colborne, to Durham, Ontario ; and 
Mr. G. C. Williams, from Mount Vernon, to 
Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. 



196 



NOTES. 



On Friday evening, March 8, the London 
"brethren met at the College to make ar- 
rangements for the forthcoming Conference, 
and to spend a short season together in 
prayer and conversation upon the Lord's 
work. The meetings are to commence 
(d.v.) on Monday, May 6, at Dalston Junc- 
tion Chapel. The great desire of the 
brethren who were at this meeting was 
that this year's Conference might be the 
most profitable spiritual gathering that 
has ever been held in connection with the 
College ; and this result will be attained if 
all who are coming to the meetings, and all 
who take an interest in them, will "pray 
without ceasing" that the Holy Spirit's 
power may be realized more fully than ever 
before. 

We shall be glad if friends in London will 
help us in lodging the country brethren. 
Beds for four nights in the week would be a 
great assistance to our hospitality com- 
mittee. 

On the night of the College Supper, 
Wednesday, May 8, we trust our helpers 
will be as liberal as they were last year, 
when we felt our eyes moisten as we saw 
their resolve to provide for our work, though 
some had turned away from us. This year 
we shall need special help as much as ever. 

Special Notice. — Will all our London 
brethren kindly take note that the tea and 
prayer -meeting for pastors, church-officers, 
and workers, will be held on Tuesday even- 
ing, May 28, instead of May 21, as arranged ? 
Full particulars will be announced by cir- 
cular as the time approaches. 

Evangelists.— Our Evangelists are dili- 
gently at work, and the Lord is with them 
in a remarkable way. 

Our brethren Fullerton and Smith are 
still continuing their London campaign 
with much vigour and success. It is re- 
markable that, at the Shoreditch Taber- 
nacle, and Dalston Junction Chapel, the 
services were held while the pastors were 
obliged to be absent through illness. Pastor 
W. Cuff writes : — " I heard from our dea- 
cons of the great and gracious blessing 
attending the services as they daily went on. 
We arranged for a meeting of the converts 
and enquirers immediately on my return. I 
met them on Saturday evening ; that was a 
fortnight after the brethren had gone. Over 
two hundred came ; amongst them were all 
classes and all ages. We had a most blessed 

time with them Already many 

have decided to join the church ; some will 
join other churches. This is to me the glory 
of Fullerton and Smith's work — it blesses 
and helps the churches, all the churches 

round I think this last visit of our 

two brave brothers has done our church 
and work more solid good than any previous 
mission." 

During March our brethren have been 
at Devonshire Square and Salters' Hall 



Chapels ; and this month they go to Mildmay 
Park Conference Hall. 

Mr. Burnhani's services at Rotherhithe 
New Road were not without signs of bless- 
ing, although outsiders were not attracted 
in great numbers. His next mission was 
held at Harefield, near Uxbridge, where he 
had the welcome and efficient aid of Pastor 
W. H. Broad, and several were led to de- 
cision for Christ, while the believers were 
greatly strengthened in the faith. 

Mr. Burnham has since been to Ipswich 
and Amersham ; and this month he is to be 
at Hungerford Congregational Chapel. 

Mr. Harmer's missions at Tuddenham ; 
Crown Street, Ipswich; Washbrook, and 
Belstead appear to have been the means of 
blessing to many. During the latter part of 
March he has been at Tewkesbury ; and this 
month he goes, with Mr. Chamberlain, to 
Lydgate, Todmorden. 

Mr. Harrison had large congregations at 
Sittingbourne, and several persons pro- 
fessed conversion. During the past month 
he has had good services at Vernon Chapel, 
Pentonville, with Pastor J. T. Mateer, who 
was so successful as an evangelist before he 
succeeded our dear brother Sawday. This- 
month Mr. Harrison is to be at Great 
Grimsby and Kiddenninster. 

Mr. Carter has been for some weeks at 
Farnworth, Lancashire, and the Lord has so 
blessed his labours, that he has promised to 
take charge of the work for a time, together 
with the church at Radcliff e ; his hope being 
that, ultimately, the people will be able to 
support a pastor for the two places, if not 
one for each. 

Mr. Parker continues to hold successful 
services. Pastor A. E. Johnson writes of 
much blessing experienced during his visit 
to Westbury, in connection with the local 
Sunday-school Committee ; and Pastor D. 
Honour sends a cheering account of his 
mission at Deptford. 

Okphanage. — All our collectors are 
earnestly asked to note that the President 
hopes to meet them, at the Orphanage, on 
Friday evening, April 5. If any of them 
cannot be present, will they kindly send the 
amounts they have collected to the Secretary, 
Stockwell Orphanage, Clapham Road, Lon- 
don ? He will be happy to supply collecting- 
cards or boxes to any friends who are willing 
to have them. 

Colportage. — This useful agency con- 
tinues its unobtrusive, but plodding and 
vigorous work, with every token for good. 
Evidences of the continued necessity for 
pushing the sale of the Word of God, and 
literature of a sound moral and religious 
character, multiply. The results of reading 
pernicious serials are constantly printed in 
the newspaper reports of the criminal courts, 
while the necessity for checking the issue of 
the more outrageous publications has com- 
pelled the attention of Parliament to the; 



pastors' college. 



197 



subject. In the meantime, our seventy- eight 
men are scattered all over the land, diligently 
visiting, every month, thirty to forty towns 
and villages each, selling Bibles, books, and 
magazines, to the value of £728, besides 
regular house - to - house visitation, and 
simple preaching of the gospel in various 
ways. 

The following is just to hand from a local 
superintendent of a new district, and calls 
for devout thankfulness that the Lord's seal 
is being put upon the effort at the start : — 

" B is getting known and liked. I give 

you one incident : In his calls with his books, 
ne found a young farmer who was about to 
be married. He, with his intended, and 
their parents, being Christians, desired that 
the wedding-day might be marked by the 
conversion of some souls. They therefore 
offered to throw the house open on the 
Saturday evening for a meeting, if the col- 
porteur would go and conduct it. We prayed 
for him at our Saturday evening prayer - 
meeting, while he conducted the little service 
as suggested. He told me yesterday that 
one was led to trust the Saviour that even- 
ing, and he is hopeful about two more, 
one of whom (a young man) promised to 
meet him last night." 

Regular contributions to the General Fund 
are much needed, as from this source the 
Committee have to make up the deficiencies 
in the various districts, which in several in- 
stances are very heavy on account of special 
-circumstances. The Secretary will be glad 
to correspond with friends wishing to open 
up new districts where £40 a year can be 
raised, or to acknowledge any contributions 
sent to him. Address — W. Corden Jones, 
•Colportage Association, Metropolitan Taber- 
nacle, Newington Butts, S.E. 

In one district means to support a col- 
porteur have been withdrawn on account of 
the "Down-Grade controversy"; but, hap- 
pily, those who love the truth have rallied 
to the support of the work, and the attempt 
to stop it has been defeated. The Society, 
.as such, has nothing to do with the contro- 
versy ; and it is by no means a noble thing to 
assail Mr. Spurgeon through the colporteurs, 
whose only business is to scatter healthy 
literature, and preach the gospel. 



Personal Notes.— A Primitive Methodist 
minister recently sent to Mrs. Spurgeon 
the following cheering note: — "I have 
been for some months calling to see an 
aged, retired London tradesman, who had 
attended various houses of prayer during 
his long career without apparent spiritual 
benefit. His home now is in a lonely part of 
the country, where he can get to no place of 
worship. I tried several times, but in vain, 
to point him to Christ. One afternoon, I 
found him sitting in his easy chair, as usual, 
because of his affliction, and I knelt in front 
of him, and was praying fervently that God 
would be pleased to reveal salvation to him, 
when the old man stopped me, crying out 
with great tears, 'I've got it ! I've got it.' 
I enquired, ' How and when ? ' He replied, 
' By reading this sermon of Spurgeon's.' I 
noticed that the text was 1 Timothy i. 15. 
' This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all 
acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into 
the world to save sinners ; of whom I am 
chief.' 

"Will you kindly tell your esteemed 
husband that God preaches down here in 
many a wayside cottage through his printed 
sermons? " 

At the Tabernacle prayer-meeting, some 
weeks since, Mr. Warner, of the Irish Home 
Mission, related the following interesting 
incident : — A boy, who was in the employ- 
ment of a friend of his, was sent by his 
master, month by month, to get The Sword 
and the Trowel for him. He thought, from 
the title of the magazine, that it contained 
stories about " battles and pirates " ; and 
therefore, though he had not much money 
to spare, he bought a copy for himself as 
well as one for his master. He read it, it 
became the means of his conversion, and he 
is now a useful servant of Christ in the 
North of Ireland. The Sword and the Trowet 
lately has had a good deal to do with 
spiritual " battles and pirates." Oh, that 
the Lord would make it the means of the 
conversion of many more of its readers ! 

Baptisms at Metropolitan Tabernacle : — 
February 28, eighteen. 



§ asters' Gallegt, gptrogportifem Wwrade. 

Statement of Receipts from February 15th to March lith, 1889. 







£ s. 


Mrs. Mulligan 




... 10 


Mr. Thomas S. Penny 




..2 2 


Mrs. C. Norton 




..0 2 


G. G., near John o' Groats 




.. 1 


J. B. C 




... 1 


Mr. Robert Gibson 


... 


... 10 


Per Pastor J. W. Davies : — 






Collection at Bromley Road 






Chapel 


2 12 


9 


■Children's boxes 


19 


4 

Q 1") 



£ s. d. 

Mr. A. Briscoe 12 10 

Edward Ridgway, Sheffield 5 

Collections at Beulah Chapel, Thornton 

Heath, per Pastor J. W. Harrald ... 4 4 

Mr. F. "W. N. Lloyd 5 

Erin 1 (.: 

A friend, Hackney 2 2 ( 

Mr. T.N. Wade 1 

Mr. F. H. Cockrell 5 ( 

Miss C. M. Bidewell 5 

Rev. E. P. Barrett 1 1 



198 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



Pastor R. Herries 

Contribution from Baptist Church, 

Jersey, per Pastor C. A. Fellowes ... 

Pastor R. Speed 

The Misses Marlow 

Mr. and Mrs J. C. Parry 

Mr. H. R. Kelsey 

Mrs. Jeanneret 

Miss K. E. Cooper 

Mr. John Brewer 

Rev. G. D. Hooper 

Collection at Victoria Place Chapel, 

Paisley, per Pastor John Crouch 

Mr. D. Norrie 

Miss M. E. Nicholson 

Big Lizzie 

Little Lizzie 

Mrs. "Walters 



£ 


s. 


d. 


1 








1 











15 


6 





6 





1 








2 








1 


1 








5 





5 


5 





1 


1 





5 


5 





1 








3 








1 











10 








5 






Metropolitan Tabernacle Evaneelists' 
Association and Country Mission 
Training Class .. 

Mrs. Baldwin 

Mrs. Allan 

From M 

Friend 

Mr. A. H. Huntley 

Mr. W. Morgan 

"Weekly Offerings at Met. Tab. : — 

Feb. 17 30 3 9 

„ 24 40 15 6 

Mar. 3 23 10 

„ 10 28 9 



£ s. d. 



5 








2 








2 








100 








50 








5 








5 









122 10 O 
£371 12 1 



Statement of Receipts from February \bth to March 147/*, 1889. 



Miss Stearman's class in St. Simon and 
St. Jude's Sunday-school, Norwich... 

Farness Sunday-school, per Mr. T. 
Middleton 

Collected by Miss J. Keay 

St. Andrew's, Stockwell, Temperance 
Society, per Miss H. M. Bartlett ... 

Mr. F. A. Perrons 

Miss Wiley 

Mr. F. Freeman 

Mrs. S. Slodden ... 

Mr. D. Smith 

Executors of the late Miss Rachel 
Anthony 

Miss Kavanagh, per C. H. S 

Collected by Miss M. A. Burman 

The Leathersellers' Company 

Mr. D.H.Lloyd 

Collected by Miss Cowen 

Mr. J. E. Stephens (sale of old coin)... 

Young "Women's Bible-class at the Or- 
phanage, per Mrs. J. Stiff 

Mrs. Strong 

" A friend of yours and the orphans " 

Jack , South Lambeth 

Collected by Miss E. G. Comber 

P. O., Weymouth, Jer. xlix. 2, Rev. 
ii. 10 

Mr. William Lewis 

Collected by Mi\ Alex. Miller 

Emily 

Per Mrs. J. A. Spurgeon :— 

Mr. R. V. Barrow 2 2 

Mrs. R.V.Barrow 110 

Sir Thomas Edridge ... 2 2 

Mr. J. Pelton , 



2 12 



From a poor man, Ashdon 

Mr. A. S. C. Amos 

Orphanage boxes at Tabernacle gates 

Mr. Wadland 

Mrs. Bedells 

Mrs. Dixon 

Mrs. O B. Hallett 

Mr. John F. Wilkinson 

Mr. Charles Walter 

Mr. J. H. Matchett 

Mr. J. Batten 

Collection in Zion Chapel Sunday-school, 

Eastry 

Messrs. G. M. Hammer and Co. 

Mr. C. Ibberson 

Mr. Thomas D. Adams 

Mr. Thomas S. Penny 



£ s. 


d. 


1 2 





5 





1 8 


1 


1 1 





5 





2 





2 





2 


6 


4 4 





4 18 


8 


16 





7 


6 


10 10 





3 3 





2 7 





1 





11 


6 


10 





5 





3 


6 


13 





1 





1 1 





6 


6 


1 1 





7 17 


6 


2 





5 





4 1 


2 


1 





2 


6 


1 





5 





2 





10 





2 





10 





12 





3 3 





2 


6 


1 





2 2 






Mr. H. Jackson 

M. A 

Three little children, Blair Athole, N.B. 

Mr. J. Cooper 

Mr. J. H. Church 

Mr. G. Becker 

Per Pastor T. W. Medhurst :— 

Miss Clara Martin 15 

Mr. Barham 10 

Friends 5 G 



A poor domestic 

A thankoffering from Wilts 

Sydenham Chapel, Forest Hill 

Mr. J. E. and Miss May Williams 

Mr. John Martin 

Mrs. Thomas 

Mrs. Young 

J. B. C 

Mr. E. Williams 

Mr. W. Rogers, per Mr. E. Williams... 

Mr. P. Hooper 

Mr. Robert Gibson 

Mr. James Clark, per Pastor W. Wil- 
liams 

Mr. A. Briscoe 

Miss Bagshaw 

Mr. J. Bickford 

Per Pastor W. Jackson :— 

Tiptree congregation ... 100 

Mr. H. Birkin 5 

Per Pastor J. W. Davies : — 
Collection at Bromley Road 

Chapel 2 10 6 

Collecting-box 11 2 

Mr. J. Leeson 

M. C. P., Gloucester 

Mrs. White 

Mr. and Mrs. Mclnlyre and their chil- 
dren 

Mrs. E. Workman 

Collected by Miss E. Campkin 

Collected by Mr. J. Gwyer 

Collected by the employes of Messrs. 
Carter, Paterson, and Co., Penge ... 

Miss Raitt 

Mrs. Knott 

Pastor R. E. Sears 

In memory of Rev. E. Oldfield 

Mr. P. Nicholson 

Erin 

Mrs. B. Joyce 



£ s. & 

10 0' 

2 

3 

10 

10 

10 



1 10 6- 

2 6 

5 a 

11 3 2 

3O 

1 10 
3 

6a 

10 

o io a 
o 10 a 

10 

io o o 

31 10 

12 10 

05a 
o io a 



15a 



3 1 8~ 

10 

10 

6 

15 

10 

6 9- 

2 5 





o a 



1 10 



STOCK WELL ORPHANAGE. 



19$ 



£ s. 


d. 


1 





10 





1 





10 





10 





1 1 





10 





5 





5 





4 4 





5 





3 


7 


1 





5 





15 





1 5 


3 


5 





7 


6 


1 





2 


6 


1 





1 1 





10 





5 





2 





1 





IS 


6 


4 





5 





10 





2 





1 





5 





10 





1 3 


3 


1 





7 


6 


2 2 





10 





10 





20 





5 





3 





2 





2 10 





2 2 





14 14 


1 


1 1 





2 





5 





10 





1 10 





1 1 






A friend, per J. E 

Mr. E. Beattie ... , 

M. P., Highbury 

Mr. W. M. Grosa 

A friend of the orphans 

Mrs. Wilson 

A thankoffering 

St. Margaret's Hope, Orkney 

Mr. George Eeid 

A friend, Hackney 

Mr. J. Bovey 

Miss E. Ellis 

The Baptist Church, Crieff 

S. and A. L/ 

Mr. and Mrs. Gowing 

Collected by Master Herries 

Edward Bid gway, Sheffield 

Mrs. and Miss Stuart 

Mrs. Smith 

Mr. William Brown 

A friend near Keighley 

Mr. A. Storr 

Mr. G. Smith 

Mrs. Waters 

Mrs. Downing 

Lochee Baptist Sunday-school 

Collected by Miss A. Mackay 

Mr. E. H. Cockrell 

Mr. John T. Stevenson 

Eev. E.J. Farley 

Mrs. Milligan 

W. S 

Mr. Philip Martin 

A lover of Jesus 

Communion collection at Heme Hill, 

per Eev. F. C. Carter 

Mr. A. Wilson 

Mr. J. Gifford 

Mr. E.Frank 

Mrs. York 

Mr. E.Webber 

Messrs. G. Borwick and Sons 

Collected by Mr. H. Lymberry 

Sale of S. O. Tracts 

The Girls' Bible-class, Baptist Chapel, 

Hatherleigh 

Collected by Mrs. Gallyon 

Dr. Shaw 

Orphan boys' and girls' collecting cards 

(3rd list) 

Mrs. Hewkley 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Parry 

Mr. H. E. Kelsey 

Mr. George Gilbert, jun. 

Mr. Samuel Cone 

Mrs. Jeanneret 

Orphan Boys' Collecting Cards {third list).— Barter, A. S., £1; Bowles, E. C, 4s 7d ; Borrows, L., 
Is 8d ; Cambridge, H., 2s 6d ; Hawken, L., 10s 6d ; Jarvis, H, Is; Love, A., 4s ; Morrell, H., lis 3d ; 
McArthur, K., 10s 4d ; Peverall, W., 7s 7d; Sambell, F., 7s 2d; Tresidder, W. J., £1 Is ; Taylor, G., 
10s; Taylor, F., 5s ; Worker, S., £1 1.— Total, £6 17s 7d. 

Orphan Girls' Collecting Cards (third list).— Breakspear, A., Is 6d ; Boyles, L., 7s; Buddie, F., 3s; 
Castle, D., 3s 6d; Carr, A., 2s 6d ; Ellis, A., £1 ; Haydon, E., 10s ; Hollins, L., lsld ; Hoole, S., 6s 3d ; 
Hewitt, H, 6s; Hocking, M., 10s; James, F., Is 6d ; Kemp, M., 14s 6d ; Long, M., 2s; Martin, J., 
7s 9d; Mash, L., 2s6d; Neve, L., 5s; Paul, M., 2s 6d; Pope, A., 16s 3d; Eichards, L., 7s ; Eowsell, 
J., 3s ; Scott, L., 8s 6d ; Searing, S., 6d ; Sayers, A., 2s 2d ; Steele, E., 2s; Smith, J., 6d ; Seymour, I., 
Is : Tiley» E., la ; Unwin. M.. 2s 6d ; Willmnt. M.. 3s ; Ward. E.. 2s 6d.— Total. £7 Ifis 6d. 

List oj Presents, pet Mr, OharUsworth, from February ibzh to March \Uh. — Provisions : — 1 sack 
Potatoes, Mr. G. Batts; 224 lbs. Rice, Mi. J. L. Potier; 2 lbs. Tea, Miss S.Ellis; 1 New Zealand 
Sheep, Mr. A. S. Haslam , 3 jars of Butter, Mr. E. J. Gorringe. 

Boys' Clothing.— 4 pairs Socks, Anon.; 13 Shirts, Mrs. Holcombe; 17 Shirts, The Ladies' Working 
Society, Wynne Eoad, per Mrs. E. S. Pearce ; 48 Bows, Mrs. S. E. Knight. 

Girls' Clothing.— 4 pairs Socks, 2 pairs Cuffs, Mrs. S. Cound; 12 Articles, Mrs. Smith ; 18 Articles, 
Mrs. Bartholomew ; 10 Articles, Mr. J. Bickford ; 38 Articles, The Ladies' Working Meeting at the 
Tabernacle, per Miss Higgs ; 8 Articles, Miss Glazebrook and pupils; 12 Articles, Mrs. Kidner ; 
13 Articles, The Girls' Bible-class, Baptist Chapel, Hatherleigh ; 6 Articles, Mrs. S. E. Knight ; 57 
Articles, the Juvenile Working Society", per Miss Woods ; 7 Articles, Miss Marsh. 

General.— 1 volume "Ellen Montgomery's Bookshelf," Anon. ; 100 copies " Sunday Text Search- 
jugs," Miss Appleton ; 1 Desk and 1 small Table, Mr. Dougharty ; 11 Articles, Mrs. Mitchell ; 6 Scrap 
Books, Mrs. Brooks ; 1 dozen " The Words and Works of Jesus," Miss Tilly ; 30 yards Hoggin, Messrs, 
Wills and Packham ; 1 Quilt, Miss -Marsh. 



Postal orders from Belfast 

Mr. J. D. iisset 

Mrs. Mutch, per Mr. Bisset 

Mr. J. Brown 

Given to Mr. Fullerton at Dalston 

Junction Chapel 

Collected by M. M 

Proceeds of entertainment by Mr. 

Kaye's boys 

Mrs. Worsdell 

E. B. 

Mrs. Orr 

E. W 

Miss Hall 

W. Willis 

A sermon-reader for five years 

Mary Anne Williams 

Big Lizzie 

Little Lizzie 

Wick Baptist Sunday-school 

Miss E. Fyson 

Collected by Mrs. Johns 

Mr. John White 

Nemo 

Mr. James Morrison 

S. C.Bourton 

Collected by Miss Kate E. Buswell . . . 

Mrs. Willson 

Mrs. Fowler 

Mr. W. Squibb 

Mr. J. Eice 

Collected by Mrs. James Withers : — 
Mr. William Moore ... 5 

Mr. M. H. Sutton 2 2 

Mrs. Collier 5 

Mis. J. Davis 2 6 

Mr. E. K. Stace 

Mr. S. H. Dauncey 

F. G. B., Chelmsford ... 

Sandwich, per Bankers 

Meetings by Mr. Charlesworth and the 
Orphanage Choir: — 

Hackney, Mare Street 

Hemel Hempstead 

Twickenham 

Loughboro' Mutual Improvement So- 
ciety 

Expenses, Great Hunter Street School 

Messrs. Higgs and Hill 

Boston 

Northcote Eoad, Wandsworth Common 



£ s. 


d. 


1 5 


O 


5 





15 





1 





4 





15 





2 15 


2 


1 





10 





5 





2 





3 3 





10 





10 





5 





1 





10 





2 





2 





18 





1 





10 





1 


4 


5 





5 





5 





3 





4 





6 






7 9 


6 


10 


O 


2 


6 


2 


6 


2 2 





7 13 


6 


10 7 


6 


2 10 





2 17 


3 


2 





2 2 





6 10 





12 9 


7 



£406 6 



200 



(Mprtage 



Statement of Receipts from February loth to March 14th, 1889. 



•Subscriptions and Donations for Districts : — 

Sellindge, per Mr. Thomas R 

Mr. D. White, for "Oxbridge 

Cambridge Association. 

Mr. R. W. S. Griffith, for Fritham ... 
Mr. John Cory, for Castletown, Cardiff, 

and Penrhieweiber 

Repton and Burton-on-Trent, per E. S. 
Home of Industry, Bethnal Green 

Mr. R. Scott, for Colchester 

Mr. R. Cory, for Cardiff & Penrhieweiber 

Maidenhead, per Miss Lassells 

Mr. J. J. Tustin, for Horley 

M. A. H., for Orpington 

Mrs. Allison's Bible-class, for Orpington 
Wilts, and East Somerset Association 

Calne District 

Tewkesbury District, per Mr. Thomas 

White 

Wendover and neighbourhood 



£ 


s. 


d. 


10 








10 








10 








10 








20 








20 








10 








10 








20 








10 








10 








5 








11 


5 


4 


25 








7 


10 





7 


10 





10 









£ s. d. 
Metropolitan Tabernacle Sunday- 
school, for Tring 10 

£216 5 4 

Subscriptions and Donations to the General Fund: — 

£ s. d. 

Mr. G. Colyer 6 

Mrs. C. Norton 2 6 

Mr. Robert Gibson 10 

Erin 10 

Mrs. Mackenzie 

A friend, Hackney 

Mr. A.Todd 

Mr. F. H. Cockrell 

Mrs. York 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C Parry 



5 





2 2 





5 





5 





10 





10 





£24 10 






Statement of Receipts from February Ihth to March 14th, 1889. 



£ s. d. 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 

and Smith's services at Exeter Hall ... 50 

Thankoffering for Mr. Harmer's ser- 
vices at March 10 

Thankoffering for Mr. Parker's ser- 
vices at Falmouth 

Mrs. C. Norton 

Mr. Robert Gibson 

Thankoffering for Mr. Parker's services 

atHaddenham 6 11 

Miss Clarkson 1 

"Thankoffering for Mr. Harmer's ser- 
vices at Cheddar 2 3 



8 13 
2 

10 



Erin 

Thankoffering for Mr. Harmer's ser- 
vices at Tuddenham 

Thankoffering for Mr. Burnham's ser- 
vices at Rotherhithe New Road 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 
and Smith's servies at Peckham Park 
Road 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Parry 

Mrs. Allan 



s. d. 


4 7 



15 



10 10 
10 
10 


5 





£104 


9 



$ax &mm\ WLu m ifye iorVs Moth 

Statement of Receipts from February loth to March 14th, 1889. 

& s. a. 

Per Miss A. M. Morris 5 

Mr. and Mrs. Gaunt 

Mr. J. Pearmine 

A friend, Barton-on-Humber 

H. B. B 

£3 2 6 



2 





10 





5 





2 


6 



" Nemo " will please note that we thought it best to place his £10 to the Orphanage account. 

Errata.— £51 5s. 5d. for Orphanage, acknowledged in The Sword and the Trowel for February, from 
Portsmouth, ought to have been from Lake Road Chapel, Portsmouth, per Pastor T. W. Medhurst. 

Mr. M. Davies, £5 for the Orphanage, in the same magazine, ought to have been Mrs. Davies, per 
Mrs. Mott. 

Friends sending presents to the Orphanage are earnestly requested to let their names or 
initials accompany the same, or we cannot properly acknowledge them; and also to write to 
Mr. Spurgeon if no acknowledgment is sent within a tveek. All parcels should be addressed 
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THE 



SWORD AND THE TROWEL 



MAY, 1889. 






% Watit Mijr fyt ®famt. 

A SHORT SEEJVION BY C. H. SPURGEON. 
" A woman named Damaris." — Acts xvii. 34. 

E have all read the opening address of Paul to the philosophers 
on Mars Hill. We have not read the discourse itself, for 
that was never delivered. When he reached his subject, his 
congregation would listen no longer. They had gratified 
their curiosity, and when he made a bold declaration con- 
cerning Jesus and the resurrection of the dead, they would hear no 
more, and the meeting broke up. 

Paul, no doubt, had high hopes as to the result of his reasoning with 
the men of Areopagus. It was like preaching in a duke's drawing-room 
to the leading spirits of society, and it was an opportunity none could 
despise. One would say to himself, " What a grand occasion ! God 
grant that much may come of it ! " He therefore prepared himself 
with care, and spoke in a learned style quite unusual to him. The 
results, however, were very small. Paul, out of councillors, philosophers, 
and judges, gathered fewer converts than he might have done out of the 
common people. 

Three results followed his fragment of speech. Some mocked : these 
were the very learned ones, who had been pleased at his quoting one of 
their poets, and with his speaking of man as the offspring of God ; but 
they had been irritated by what they thought the ridiculous idea of the 
resurrection of the dead. Plato had spoken of the immortality of the 
soul, and on that point there was room for profound thought ; but the 
theory of the raising of the body was beyond endurance. When Paul 
spoke of a certain despised person as having risen from the dead, and. 

14 



202 A WORD WITH THE OBSCURE. 

asserted that this man would judge mankind, they laughed at the idea 
as preposterous. We hear their sarcastic words, and see their con- 
temptuous looks, and perceive that Paul has made no impression upon 
them. No audience under heaven is less likely to receive the Word than 
an assembly of philosophers. These receive not the wisdom of God, for 
they are wise in their own esteem. 

A second sort did not laugh ; they did not care enough about the 
matter one way or the other. As men of broad views, they were cour- 
teous, and replied to the preacher, " We will hear thee again of this." 
Probably the most of them were of the same spirit as flippant Felix, 
who said, "When I have a convenient season, I will call for thee." 
One of them had already lost an opportunity of hearing the news from 
the ship that was last in from Rome ; and so he quickened his pace to 
get down to the shore. Another had missed a philosophical lecture, and 
felt annoyed. They declined to hear more for the present. Of this 
second class we have always more than of the first : they do not oppose 
us with mockery, but they repulse us by indifference. 

Still a little handful remained to make up a third class. Paul must 
have greatly prized each one of that small company ; and Luke, who 
wrote the account of the whole affair, was careful to make full report. 
He mentions Dionysius the Areopagite, one of those who had made up 
the council before whom Paul pleaded: and he does not overlook "a 
woman named Damaris." Who she was, where she came from, and 
what she was like, we do not know, nor can anybody inform us ; but 
she came forward with the few who believed, and therefore her name is 
written in this honourable list: " a woman named Damaris." There 
were others; and although they were very few, a church was founded, 
which became a power in the city, so that Paul had not altogether 
laboured in vain. Thank God, we are not accountable for results : if 
our efforts are honest and faithful, the Lord accepts them. Paul, with 
a heavy heart, departed from among them ; but the few cheered him, 
and, among the rest, " a woman named Damaris " threw in her portion 
of consolation. We, too, may derive benefit from her at this time. 

I. My first remark is, that converts are very precious in evil 
times. Luke notes them as particularly as if they were jewels : here 
is one, a man ; yonder is another, a woman ; and there are two or three 
others who are counted, though not named. In the day of mockery 
every convert was worth a Jew's eye ; and this "woman named Damans,'* 
who might not have been remembered had she been one among the 
thousands of Pentecost, is specially noted among the few of Athens. 
Converts who dare to believe in Christ when the great mass of people 
reject him are among the excellent of the earth. 

Usually they are persons of a solid sort. My eyes twinkle as I read 
this verse. I will let you see what I mean. " Howbeit certain mm 
•clave unto him, and believed : among the which was Dionysius the Areo- 
pagite, and a woman named Damaris." What ? Is it really so ? " Cer- 
tain men, among whom was a w r oman named Damaris." She acted upon 
the inspiring exhortation, "Quit yourselves like men. Be strong!" 
She is, therefore, pot down among men, even this "Woman named 
Damaris." Those who will come out and follow Christ when the narrow 
way seems altogether without a traveller, are people of good metal. If 



A WORD WITH THE OBSCURE. 203 

they can go contrary to the stream when it is bearing away rank, fashion, 
and learning, they are worthy to be reckoned among true men-of-arms. 
Being strong of mind, clear in thought, and bold to do the right, they 
are choice spirits. Our converts, that come to us when there is a wide- 
spread religious movement, need to be watched with great care, lest 
they should be carried off when the stream flows in the opposite 
direction. We cannot highly value sons and daughters who join the 
church merely because their parents have done so; nor brothers and 
sisters who simply follow the family example in making a profession. 
Religion must be personal and individual. We are cautious when 
converts come in groups. I would have you come though your father 
and mother have come ; but do not profess the faith because of the ties 
of relationship. Come on your own account, because of your own 
conversion. If you do this as the first in your family, and dare to say, 
" I will follow Christ if I go alone," then you are the kind of person 
for whom we have great need in these evil days. The principal want 
of the day is want of principle. This "woman named Damaris" was 
made of genuine stuff, for she was not ashamed of the apostle when 
the great ones around her made him the subject of their ridicule. 

Persons who dare to confess Christ in evil times are pretty sure to ~be 
genuine converts. A certain class will always be mean enough to join a 
Christian church, if they fancy that something can be got by so doing. 
I have never tried to catch men with loaves and fishes, because such 
bait only attracts frogs, and not fish. Those who can be bought for 
church or chapel are not worth a farthing a dozen. These are not 
lovers of Christ's cross ; but of Christ's money-bag. Their lot will be 
cast with Judas. The " woman named Damaris" had nothing to gain by 
siding with Paul ; doubtless, she ran the risk of great persecution. 
She took the unpopular side when she stood out alone, following the 
man whom others rejected. This is the style of convert we covet. 

Such persons are also very valuable, because they will endure the test of 
persecution. A woman who dared to confess her faith in Christ when 
so much was said against him. by men of learning and repute, was sure 
to hold out against ordinary opposition. The preacher was called a 
fool and a babbler ; but she clave to him none the less, and therefore 
she showed herself to be of that race which may be crushed, but cannot 
be conquered. We read of Jabez that he was more honourable than his 
brethren, because his mother bore him with sorrow ; and I believe that 
the converts born to the church in days of persecution are more 
honourable and more reliable than others. They begin well. If plants 
live through the winter, they will nob die in the spring and summer. 
If men and women can bear the sharp frosts of early ridicule and 
slander, they will easily put up with after-opposition, and will endure 
even to the end. It is very important that all additions to our church 
should be of the right kind ; but they are not all such. I try to 
exercise, together with my elders, as great caution as is consistent with 
charity ; but do what we may we are deceived by those who say that 
they are Christ's, and are not, but do lie. I feel, however, pretty sure 
of my men when they come to us in the teeth of opposition. 

Such persons as this " woman named Damaris " are specially valuable, 
because they are generally people of vigorous spiritual life. Paul had only 



204 A WORD WITH THE OBSCURE. 

two or three converts at Athens, but he might have solaced himself with 
the old Greek fable of the fox and the lioness. The fox boasted 'of the 
number of her cubs, and taunted the lioness because she had but one. 
" Yes," said the lioness, "But that one a lion." Though Paul had but 
Dionysius the Areopagite, and this "woman named Damaris," the woman 
was of a noble breed. She believed unpopular doctrine, and confessed 
the Christ whom others despised. I venture to believe that theory 
fact that her name is here recorded implies that she was well known 
in those days. She was only " a woman named Damaris," but it was 
impossible to omit her name, she had written it too clearly upon the 
hearts of the saints. Certain I am that those who come to Christ when 
few are coming, and confess the faith in the midst of opposition, are 
the people who will leave deep footprints on the sands of time. These 
are no ciphers, but forcible personalities, whose influence will abide. 
Their courage proves that they are no triflers, but are bound to serve the 
Lord with diligence. 

II. But, secondly, this little note which constitutes my text, shows 
me that converts are all valued by the Holy Spirit, and by the 
church of God. Observe that we have here the honourable name of 
" Dionysius the Areopagite." There are many legends about him, none 
of which I believe, and therefore I shall not repeat them ; but he was, 
evidently, a man of consequence, for he was one of the notable council 
of Areopagus. Well, well : but here is " a woman named Damaris," 
of w 7 hom the best Biblical dictionaries say, " Nothing whatever is known 
of this person." Her name is not left out. See, it is put down side- 
by-side with that of Dionysius. Grace creates true " liberty, equality, 
and fraternity." Dionysius ? Yes, by all manner of means, put his 
name down. Damaris ? Yes, by all manner of means inscribe her 
name also. The saints are each one chosen, beloved, and redeemed ; 
they are each one called by the Spirit of God, put into the family of love, 
and made joint-heirs with Jesus, and they shall all reign with him for 
ever and ever. Dionysius the Areopagite, and the woman named 
Damaris, are equally written in the Lamb's book of life. 

Observe that sex is no detriment. How greatly God has blessed 
women in the midst of his church ! They have been highly favoured 
in their happy and holy experiences. If they were first in the trans- 
gression, they were last at the cross, and first at the sepulchre ; and no 
woman ever betrayed her Lord, or even denied him : that was left for 
men. I know of no wrong that is recorded of the female discipleship 
in the New Testament. There are sinners mentioned whom Christ 
made his disciples, but these loved much, and were the companions of 
those who ministered to him of their substance. Woman is raised to 
her right place by the tender hand of him who was " born of a woman." 

Obscurity also does not diminish the value of the believer. What if 
we know nothing about " a woman named Damaris " : yet the Lord will 
have her name emblazoned in the roll of his chosen. She shall be his in 
the day when he makes up his jewels. Ah, my dear friend ! you may 
have very little talent, scant wealth, and no name ; you may be quite 
hidden away among the masses ; but if you are a believer, you are on 
the roll of the armies of the Lord, and in that great day your 
name shall not be missed at the muster. 



A WORD WITH THE OBSCURE. 205 

No sort of singularity shall make the believer of any less value. I do 
not know that there is much in it, but the woman's name, according; to 
Cruden, means " little woman." Read for Damaris, " little dame." I 
have known, in the church of God, little men like Zacchaeus, and little 
women, like Damaris, and yet they have been great in the kingdom of 
heaven. I have known persons physically deformed, who were 
spiritually beautiful. They were the life of the meetings for prayer ; 
diligent as Dorcas, loving as Lydia, holy as Hannah, mothers in Israel 
like Deborah. The minister has often said, " I do not know what we 
should do without that little woman." So, too, many a brother who 
has been lame or blind has, despite his infirmity, been a man of great 
mind, and God has largely blessed him. Dr. Isaac Watts, the poet of 
the sanctuary, was a little man; and when he was spoken of in slighting 
terms, he said — 

" Were I so tall to reach the pole, 
Or grasp the ocean with my span, 
I must be measured by my soul, 
The mind's the standard of the man." 

This Damaris, whose name is little woman, is not the least among the 
thousands of Israel. Grace is the standard, and not the outward appear- 
ance. I want to say this, because unnoticed people are a little apt to 
be depressed on that account. If they join the church they cannot give 
any large contribution, nor shine as speakers, nor take up a leading 
position. Now, none of these things would cause the Lord to think any 
the more of you. Our Lord Jesus did not come into the world to save the 
talented, and the rich, and the famous : he came to save souls as souls, 
and he bought them for themselves, and not for their belongings and 
surroundings. "When you give your heart to Jesus, do not imagine for 
a moment that he will despise you because you are not a great lady, or 
a person of consequence. Do not fret because the pastor scarcely knows 
you among so many. How can he know everybody ? He would willingly 
be the shepherd of you all ; but if he cannot be, remember that the Lord 
Jesus Christ, that great Shepherd of the sheep, will gladly fold you 
among his blood-bought flock. Your lot is obscure, your name is 
unspoken ; you are little in presence, little in business, little in ability, 
little in every way ; but the Lord despiseth not one of those little ones 
which believe in him. 

Thus has u a woman named Damaris " taught us two truths. The 
most precious converts are those brought in in dark times, but none of 
them may at any time be lightly esteemed. 

III. Now, thirdly, converts exhibit much the same marks. No 
two converts are quite alike, and yet certain distinguishing marks are 
•always upon them. 

Note that it is written — "Howbeit certain men clave unto Mm.'" 
That is an instructive expression : they " clave unto him." They clave 
to the despised preacher of Christ. The wise men had gone home 
laughing; but "a woman named Damaris " stood up for him, cast 
in her lot with him, and stuck to him. She could not be beaten 
off from avowing herself a convert to the doctrine which others 
derided, and a friend of the man whom they called " a babbler." In this 



206 A WORD WITH THE OBSCURE. 

way conversion frequently begins. There is a cleaving, first of all, to the 
preacher himself, because he boldly speaks the truth, and then a cleaving 
to the truth which he speaks. What he has said has come home to the 
hearer's heart, and so he resolves to hear more of it, and to keep to the 
services. The preacher is in earnest, and has done the man good, and 
so he cleaves to him when others slander him. This cleaving to the 
preacher, if it be of the right sort, is, at heart, a cleaving to the preacher's 
Lord. Bearing reproach with the servant is bearing reproach for the 
Master, where the heart is right. I am glad to see you become 
camp-followers, for I hope you will soon enlist as soldiers of the cross. 

Better still, we find that they believed. It would have been of no use 
cleaving to Paul if they had not believed the gospel : but this they did. 
They trusted in the Son of God, who came from heaven to earth, and 
died, the Just for the unjust, to bring us to God. They trusted in 
him who rose from the dead. They left their idols and their good works, 
and placed their hope in the ascended Saviour, who is gone up into 
glory, and who will shortly come to judge the quick and dead. They 
believed : this was the great turning-point. 

When they had believed, what did they do next ? Why, they came 
forivard and confessed their faith. Did one say, " That is not in the 
text n ? It is in the text. How could Luke have written down the 
name of " a woman named Damaris," if she had only believed in her 
heart, and not avowed her faith ? How could her name have come into the 
Acts of the Apostles if she had not given in her adhesion to the faith ? 
By cleaving to the shepherd she, in fact, joined the flock, and became a 
partaker of the sufferings of the followers of Jesus. She did not hide 
herself from the shame which dogs the footsteps of Christ's disciples. 
She owned herself a Christian, and took the consequences. This is the 
mark of true converts : they cannot hide their love, but openly confess 
it. The verse before us reads like an extract from the church book 
of Athens : " Certain men clave unto him, and believed : among the 
which was Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, 
and others with them." Go, ye believers, and do likewise. Christ's 
people are compared to sheep, and sheep go together. Goats may wander 
one by one, but sheep are found in flocks. You do not meet a sheep 
all alone, unless it has gone astray. If you meet a Christian who has 
never joined a church you may call him a stray Christian. Converts 
went together in the olden time, as they do now. 

IY. Fourthly, converts are honoured by being joined to 
Christ's cause. 

Linlced with the good cause and its advocate, they were honoured. 
This obscure and unknown little woman is united with Paul and 
his life-story, and with the work of the Lord in Athens. She is, in 
her measure, a founder of the church in Athens, and is honoured in 
the deed. She had taken no degree, she wore no star upon her breast ; 
but still she was an honoured woman from the day in which she was 
willing to be put to shame for the sake of the apostle of Christ, and 
the cause he advocated. 

Her name is inscribed in the sacred Boole. It is no mean thing to have 
her name honourably written in Scripture. She clave to the apostle, 
and believed. What better thing could be said of her ? What more- 



A WORD WITH THE OBSCURF. 207 

could she have done ? "This is the work of God, that ye believe on 
him whom he hath sent." That godlike work she had performed. 

Better still, her name ivas inscribed in the Lamb's Booh of Life. 
" Notwithstanding, in this rejoice not," said Christ, " that the spirits 
are subject unto you ; but rather rejoice, because your names are writ- 
ten in heaven." At the last great day, when the family register of 
heaven is read, " a woman named Damaris " will be there to answer to 
her name. If she were not there, he who redeemed her would stop the 
proceedings of the judgment, and ask, " Where is Damaris ? On that 
day, at Athens, when the philosophers scoffed, she dared avow my name ; 
and now I will confess her before my holy angels. Where is she ? She 
cannot have perished by the way ; for I give to my sheep eternal life, 
and they shall never perish. Where is she ? Let the assize be sus- 
pended till my daughter is here." dear soul, you have been a 
member of a church, perhaps, for years, and you feel quite overlooked ; 
but you shall not be forgotten in that day. Jesus will remember you 
as he did the dying thief when he came into his kingdom. One would 
have thought that our Lord had enough to think of beside the thief; 
but when he entered into the glory of the Father, he would not be content 
to do so without the thief. He will remember the very least, and lowest, 
and poorest, and most despised of his dear blood-bought ones. If you 
have confessed him in the day of his humiliation, he will confess you in 
the day of his glory. I can imagine our Lord Jesus Christ, when he 
saw poor Damaris entering the golden gate, saying to the shining ones, 
* Make way for this daughter of the Lord ; for she bravely owned my 
name when the proud councillors of Athens mocked. She shall reign 
with me; for she was willing to be rejected for my sake." This honour 
came to "a woman named Damaris," and it shall come to every child 
of God, however mean or obscure, that shall confess Christ in this evil 
and adulterous generation. 

V. Last of all, learn that true converts are made useful. " That 
also is not in the text," cries one. It may not be in the words of the text,. 
but this sermon is a proof of it. " A woman named Damaris," of whom 
we know so little, brings glory to God at this hour by what little we do 
know of her. She clave to Paul, she believed, and she confessed Christ 
in that dark day ; and now, at this hour, she "being dead, yet speaketh." - 
She speaks to us all the more because of her obscurity. This woman 
has spoken to me many a time for years. Often and often, when I have 
been reading the Scriptures to myself, a whisper has said, " Preach a 
sermon upon ' a woman named Damaris.' " I have said to myself, " I do 
not know anything about her." At last it came to my mind that this 
was the beauty of the case. Say that Jesus Christ saves people of 
whom nobody knows anything. Talk of her of whom nothing is known 
but that she clave to Paul, and believed in Jesus. Many who will hear 
or read the sermon will be like her, and God will bless the word to- 
their comfort. 

Damaris speaks to the encouragement of humble persons, lowly, and 
unknown. You may come to Christ. I dread lest any of you should 
think that you must be of importance before you can be saved. No ; 
you must get rid of all notion of importance. We are all important to 
Christ because we have immortal souls ; but our having money, or our 



-208 A WORD WITH THE OBSCURE. 

displaying talent, or our wearing broadcloth or satin will not make us 
any more important in his eyes. Come to Christ, ye men in fustian, ye 
women in prints. If you swept a crossing and were clothed with rags 
you might believe and live. It is the soul that the Lord cares for, not 
the trappings. Come to Jesus, whoever you may be. Seek his face 
and trust him, because this humble woman named Damaris did so. 
Thus she is useful many long years after her death. 

You that are saved, but remain unknown, do not wish to he hioivn. 
How often have I longed that I could get where I should not be treated 
as a public exhibition ! You live under a glass case when once you are 
a public character. Everybody pries even into your domestic life; and 
falsehoods buzz about you like wasps. Do not court publicity, nor 
crave popularity : be quite satisfied to do your duty and serve your 
God, and never to be heard of; for the less you are heard of, and the 
less you are known, the more peaceful will your life be. You must 
accept as a cross that publicity which comes of being an example of 
faithfulness to your Lord ; but if nobody praises you, why do you want 
to be praised ? " A woman named Damaris " lost nothing by being 
unknown. Holy actions are spoiled if we wish them to be seen. I 
know a friend who wanted to give a present to another on her birthday, 
and the chosen article was bought secretly, but somehow it came to be 
seen by the person for whom it was intended, and the pleasure was 
spoiled. When you do anything for Jesus, do it by stealth. Hide your 
left hand behind you, and do not let it know what your right hand is 
doing. There is a certain bloom upon the fruit of grace which is the 
beauty of it : a single intrusive hand may rub it off. Like " a woman 
named Damaris," keep yourself unknown if you can serve Jesus the 
better in the rear rank. You shall be remembered, and your name 
shall be recorded, and you shall have your reward from the Lord alone. 
If you seek the applause of men, you have your reward, and a poor 
recompense it is ; but if you serve the Lord Christ, and wish only to 
be known of him who seeth in secret, then your reward shall be great. 

I have done. What I have been aiming at all the while is that I 
may cheer you into the courage which will make you confess your 
Lord. You will increase the number of the Church by one, and that 
is something, yea, much, if done for Christ's sake. We seek not yours, 
but you. We want " a woman named Damaris," though she has no 
long purse, nor long tongue, nor long train. Jesus Christ wants her, 
though she is not wealthy, nor beautiful, nor forward. Oh, that she 
might be led to say, " That blessed Saviour who consorted with the 
poor and needy, and cast out none that came to him — he shall have my 
trust, and I will be his servant evermore. Write my name down along 
with ' a woman named Damaris ' ! " 

Come, and welcome, ye hidden ones, for Jesus saith : " Him that 
cometh to me I will in no wise cast out." 



209 

BY THOMAS SPURGEON, OF AUCKLAND. 

THE first case on record is that of Eutychus, who fell from a window 
while Paul was preaching. There were extenuating circumstances 
in his case. Those confirmed slumberers who so often quote him that 
one is led to suppose him their patron saint, should remember that 
circumstances alter cases. Theirs is malice aforethought. They sin (if 
I may be allowed the Irishism) with their eyes open. As if their pew 
were a couch, or a sleeping-car, they settle down quite cosily, as regu- 
larly as the Sabbath returns, and as punctually as the text is announced. 
I speak not thus of all. Cases there are in which fatigue overpowers. 
One little knows what sorrows and sleeplessness have wearied some of 
the else most attentive hearers. It must be admitted, too, that if the 
preacher is dull as a beetle, the fault of the people is considerably 
minimized. But the inveterate sleeper we can neither spare nor pity. 
Henry Smith thus describes him :— " Another cometh to hear, but so 
soon as the preacher hath said his prayer he falls fast asleep, as though 
he had been brought in for a corpse, and the preacher should preach at 
his funeral." I feel inclined to say to such : " What ! have ye not bed- 
rooms to sleep and to snore in?" Under the most eloquent preachers 
I have seen them at it, and heard them too ; sleeping soundly, with 
shameful literalness. They would do well to imitate the Emperor 
Constantine and King Edward VI., of whom it is recorded that they 
would stand throughout the service, lest by any chance they might yield 
to drowsiness. I happened once on a good description of a sleepy 
congregation, away down at Drowsy Hollow, " where the congregations 
gather in the interests of sleep." 

' ' As they sit on Sabbath mornings in their sof tly-cnshioned pews, 
They begin to make arrangements for their reg'lar weekly snooze. 
Through the prayer a dimness gathers over every mortal eye, 
Through the reading of the Scriptures they begin to droop and sigh ; 
In the hymn before the sermon, with its music grand and sweet, 
They put forth a mighty effort to be seen upon their feet. 
Then, amidst the sermon, throbbing with the gospel's sweetest sound, 
They sink down in deepest slumber, and are nodding all around." 

Thus aptly does the poet describe them ; but, having discovered that 
these are the very sort of folk who, on their way home, say, " That was 
a stirring sermon we had this morning,' ' I venture to add two home- 
made lines : — 

And yet, when they are going home, saith the sleeper to his wife, 
11 I've never heard such stirring words in the course of all my life." 
And she, who had been sleeping too, thus made answer to her spouse, 
** 'Twas calculated, dear, to move, and will certainly arouse." 

If the discourse is over long, there is some excuse. Moore gives this 
anecdote of Dr. Barnes : u Being sometimes inclined to sleep a little 
during the sermon, a friend who was with him in his pew one Sunday, 
having joked with him on his having nodded now and then, Barnes 
insisted that he had been awake all the time. ' Well, then,' said his 



210 SLEEPING IN CHURCH. 

friend, ' cau you tell me what the sermon was about?' 'Yes, I can,' he 
answered, ' it was about half an hour too long.' " " Mamma," whis- 
pered a little fellow in church, " if you don't let me go to sleep, I shall 
holler 'Amen ' ; he's been talking long enough." 

A prosy sermon is at least as good an excuse as a long one. " Some 
parsons put a lot of sleeping stuff into their sermons," says John 
Ploughman. Hugh Latimer tells of a sleepless woman, to whom drugs 
were useless. "Take me," she said, " to the parish church." He 
quaintly adds, " They had better come to church to sleep than not at 
all ; for they may be caught napping." 

That was a sad experience of a certain Scotch minister, who, being 
off duty, went to hear another, but had to record : " I laid my head 
down to get a good sleep ; but never a wink could I get for the people 
about me, who were all snoring." Sydney Smith used to say, " Some 
preachers seem to think that sin is to be taken out of men as Eve was 
taken out of Adam — by first putting them to sleep." It was surely not 
a bad idea of his who once proposed to levy a tax on every dull good 
man who ventured to preach a sleepy sermon. There's a wrinkle for 
the Chancellor of the Exchequer ! 

Some amusing stories are extant of slumbering congregations, and 
the means taken to awaken them. 

One day sleep had overtaken the audience of Dr. South, including 
its most illustrious member, King Charles I. Stopping, and changing 
his voice, the preacher called three times, " My Lord of Lauderdale ! " 
when the earl woke up. " My lord," said he, " I am sorry to interrupt 
your repose, but I must beg you will not snore quite so loudly, lest you 
should waken his Majesty." He then went on with his sermon, but 
no one went on with his sleep. 

The late Eev. Mr. More, of Selkirk, while preaching from these words 
of Moses, "I beseech thee, shew me thy glory," observing many of his 
hearers fast asleep, made a pause, on which they awoke. He then, in a 
very solemn manner, addressed them to the following effect: "Do you 
think, my friends, had Moses been asleep when the glory of the Lord 
passed by, that he would have seen it ? The glory of the Lord in the 
dispensation of the gospel has just been passing by you, and yet you 
were all asleep." We may be sure his audience listened after that. 

You remember how Eowland Hill managed it ; somewhat eccentrically, 
of course. When preaching, one afternoon, he saw some sleeping ; 
whereupon he paused, saying, " I have heard that the miller can sleep 
while the mill is going ; but if it stops, he wakes. I'll try this method " 
— and so sat down, and soon saw an aroused audience. 

Here let me quote an interesting historical fact : — ft They had a strange, 
but effectual, mode of securing attention in the old American meeting- 
houses. A useful church-officer went about with a long wand, having 
a ball, or knob, on one end, with which to tap any man who would be 
overcome by sleep. From the other end of his wand there dangled a 
fox's tail, with which he politely brushed the faces of the women when 
he caught them dozing." 

But what is to be done when the parson himself slumbers ? That is 
worst of all. I remember to have read, in The Gomhill Magazine, an 
amusing account of a preacher who went fast asleep while he was 



A SUGGESTION. 211 

preaching. He was always slow; but on this occasion he got slower 
and slower, until he stopped together. He passed from a sermon to a 
snore. 

Another parson had gone to take service for a neighbour, a few miles 
off. He walked to the church, and, being in good time, went into the 
vicarage. "You seem tired,'' said a servant ; " won't you have a glass 
of ale to refresh yourself after your walk?" Yes, he would; and he 
did. The afternoon was very hot, and the rustic congregation, who had 
been reaping and binding all the week, mostly fell asleep. There was 
a nasal murmuring among the people. The doors, too, were wide open, 
and the bumble bees sailed slowly down the aisle, adding to the hum. 
Thus, when the preacher went into the pulpit, he caught the sentiment 
of the congregation ; and, putting his face reverently between his hands 
for a few seconds, remained in the same attitude, fast asleep. 

And now, to pulpit and pew alike, let me say, " Let us not sleep, as 
do others." We are children of the day. The needs of our own souls, 
and the claims of others, call us to eternal vigilance. What a deal we 
may miss by dozing ! Is it not written of the Transfiguration, " Now 
Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep : but when 
they were/w% awake, they saw his glory " (R.V.) ? Oh, to see all that 
there is to be seen of Christ, to view his glory, and to have its radiance 
streaming into our happy open eyes ! " Wherefore he saith, Awake, thou 
that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall shine upon thee."' 



SUGGESTIONS have played a remarkable role in their formative in- 
fluence in the history of the world. Every achievement iu the social 
life of our age has served as a suggestion or departing point for the next, the 
initial hint too often being held in contempt, instead of being, as would 
seem just, relegated to a place of honour in recognition of its useful service. 
Into the wisdom or otherwise of this method of action it is not our pur- 
pose to enter. But we are painfully aware that, while such a rule cannot 
be applied to the doctrines directly evolved from the Scriptures, yet 
there has grown up amongst us a company of teachers who, though too 
varied as to the opinions they hold to be described as a distinct genus, 
are united in this one point — they conceive that divine truth can be 
changed from year to year, or oftener, as it may please their whims. 
The leading feature of their creed (we must, we suppose, beg pardon for 
using such a word in this advanced age) consists in relegating to oblivion 
whatever was held sacred by their fathers, or even by themselves, but 
a short time since. 

So it has always been — suggestions, which nowadays are made to be- 
synonymous with doctrines, have played a sad part in the history of 
our humanity. Satan's approach to our Mother Eve was by way of sug- 
gestion ; and perhaps no weapon of the evil one has been so effectively 
wielded for the undermining of the life of faith in believers, or in keep- 
ing others from the consideration of the things most surely to be- 
believed. 



212 A SUGGESTION. 

But this line of thought would lead us aside from our purpose if we 
followed its tempting lure. 

We fear that, while we are most laudably in earnest about the souls of 
Hindoos, Chinese, and Hottentots, our very immediate neighbours are 
sadly overlooked. Nearly every village in our land resounds with 
echoes of the old Macedonian cry for help, if we only had ears to hear 
them. This is especially true of the smaller of them, which were always 
excluded from Nonconformist help by reason of their very smallness, or 
remoteness from larger centres. Very many of these are now deprived of 
the little spiritual help by way of visitation that was once possible. These 
circumstances are not unknown, nor is much sympathy for the large 
mass of people so circumstanced wanting, as the discussions at our various 
gatherings fully attest. But what is needed is practical help, and that 
at once, in order to rescue the perishing. Whenever the question of help 
is mooted, the suggestions offered invariably take the form of a preaching- 
room or a preachers' plan. These are good wheresoever they are prac- 
ticable, but preaching is not the most urgent spiritual instrumentality 
needed to-day in these rural districts. What is wanted is earnest pas- 
toral work, which will be in touch with the daily life of our scattered 
agricultural population. In the family circle, at the bedside of the sick, 
or at the arm-chair of the aged pilgrim, how sweetly acceptable is the 
Christian teacher bringing " good tidings " ! How gently, and yet how 
effectively, can a word of advice, or even of wisely-guided rebuke, be 
dropped ! Though the latter might be often misconstrued, by reason of 
the ignorance of the recipient, yet it seldom misses its mark. 

The long-continued depression in agriculture has caused an exodus of 
the younger and more able-bodied of the workers on the land, from under 
the village roof-tree into our colonies across the sea, or into our larger 
towns. But are the souls of the remaining — the very old, young, and 
poor — of no moment among us ? Surely, in the aesthetic progress of our 
age, we have not yet reached the point at which the heathen axioms of 
Grecian social life have been equally accepted with her art ? " Has the 
survival of the fittest " really become a rule of English life ? We are 
glad to be able to bear record to what an extent the ambulatory visits 
of the colporteur have improved this sad state of things. But the very 
poverty of these village people, to which we have referred, acts as a stern 
limitation to the effect of such a blessed instrumentality. 

This brings us to the suggestion which we would wish to present for 
consideration, prefaced by this crucial question : Are there not amongst 
us those who, though they may be deterred by various legitimate 
hindrances from going to earth's remotest bounds, in obedience to the 
Lord's command to every saved soul to bear his gospel, could nevertheless 
do very much at home — and are earnestly desirous of doing so ? We are 
perfectly aware that thousands do find good work for the Master next 
their hand. But we opine that there are many who are freed from busi- 
ness, professional, or other ties to any particular locality, and who could, 
if they were so pleased, settle in any central locality in the country, and 
thus initiate a new sphere of Christian influence, without the slightest 
antagonism to present forms of work. 

To make our suggestion clearer, we cite an actual case in point : — A 
friend, by the providential arrangements of God, removed to a large 



A SUGGESTION. 213 

country town, the centre of a number of spiritually needy villages and 
hamlets. Among them was more than the usual proportion of deserted 
ones, so far as pastoral visitation by the episcopal incumbents was con- 
cerned. The religious agencies of the central town were most complete, but 
very little of this surplusage of energy flowed out to its clustering suburbs.. 
The particular form of usefulness, to which our friend ultimately settled 
down, was altogether unknown. He accepted an invitation to see and 
converse with a poor villager who was tormented with doubts and fears 
to a terrible degree, who had for some time longed for converse with a 
Christian instructor. The vicar had been a non-resident for the greater 
part of the year, and no form of Nonconformist worship was held in the 
village. The moral condition of the parish was most saddening, as may 
readily be conceived. Others sought his aid, under like circumstances, 
and cottage-visitation soon revealed a depth of spiritual ignorance 
scarcely to be imagined by a dweller in the neighbouring respectable 
town. The issue of this investigation was, that our friend perceived 
a call to undertake a house-to-house visitation, in order to ascertain 
the places where his visits would be acceptable. Very soon his visits 
were looked forward to, and he became, to all who would receive him, 
a much-loved friend. This teaching from cottage to cottage soon bore 
fruit for the Lord. After this plan other villages were approached^ 
until five of them furnished our evangelistic friend with as much work 
as he could well undertake, a tricycle affording him the means of loco- 
motion. On four mornings in each week he rode forth, armed with a 
supply of Spurgeon's sermons, Kyle's tracts, Oxenden's books, and such- 
like literature, which he changed from cottage to cottage as loan tracts, 
this method of operation furnishing him with abundant means for 
profitable conversation upon spiritual matters. These gospel missives 
were, in many cases, passed on by the first receivers to friends in out- 
lying farms, thereby refreshing unknown persons. Our friend often 
found himself, and that not always by accident, at the school-gate, at the 
mid-day dismissal hour, distributing among the children publications, 
such as The British Workman, Band of Hope Review, Good Tidings, 
&c, each containing a useful religious tract. By means of these little 
missionaries he was heralded, and the way prepared for an effectual 
entrance to the cottages of the parents. Families of children in houses 
by the wayside between the villages look upon him as their most 
welcome weekly visitor. 

Of this much-needed form of work there is any amount ready to be 
taken up, the value of which is difficult to gauge. If the cracked 
and mended pot of the careful housewife of buried Pompeii has 
descended to us at this far-off date, as evidence of her care of such a 
humble utensil, what shall be the evidence of the existence of such 
a little-known helper in the Lord's vineyard, when the Lord of the 
harvest shall garner his fruits ? 



214 

BY W. Y. FULLERTON. 

TO pronounce these words take a Q, a K, and a G, mix them together, 
and dividing the result into three equal portions, use them for the 
initial letters of the words, giving voice accordingly. They are the 
Arabic names of three wells in the Wilderness of Zin, and it is a stand- 
ing puzzle how to represent the Arabic sound in equivalent English. 
Indeed, we are almost inclined to take the advice of the elder Mr. 
Weller to his son, when, with reference to his surname, he advised him 
to " spell it with a ' we,' Samivel, spell it with a * we.' " 

To Bible scudents these wells are, perhaps, the most interesting places 
in the whole desert lying between Egypt and Palestine, between the 
Mediterranean and that part of the Red Sea known as the Gulf of 
Akabah ; yet, strange to say, they have only been visited by travellers on 
three occasions during historic times. 

The great interest of Qadees is that, undoubtedly, it is the long- 
looked-for site of Kadesh-Barnea, from whence the spies went up to 
search out the Holy Land, and where from the smitten rock gushed forth 
the miraculous water. No satisfactory location for this Bible place 
could be found by any traveller until, in October, 1842, Mr. Rowlands, 
hearing of a spot called " Kadese," determined to find it. Unable at 
that time to pursue his purpose, he subsequently, on his journey home 
from Jerusalem, after some difficulty, came to the place. We cannot 
do better than give his own description of it from the appendix to 
Williams's " Holy City " :— 

"Now, my dear friend, for Kadesh, my much-talked-of and long- 
sought-for Kadesh. You may conceive with what pleasure I tell you 
that I have, at length, found this important and interesting locality to 
my entire satisfaction. Our excitement (I can speak, at least, for mine 
while we stood before the rock smitten by Moses, and gazed upon the 
lovely stream which issues forth under the base of this rock) would be 
quite indescribable. I cannot say that we stood still — our excitement 
was so great that we could not stand still. We passed backward and 
forward ; examining the rock and the source of the stream ; looking at 
the pretty little cascades which it forms as it descends into the channel 
of a rain-torrent beneath ; sometimes chipping off some pieces of the 
rock, and at other times picking up some specimens and some flowers 
along a green slope beneath it. The rock is a large single mass, or a 
small hill of solid rock, a spur of the mountain to the north of it 
rising immediately above it. It is the only visible naked rock in the 
whole district. The stream, when it reaches the channel, turns west- 
ward, and, after running about three or four hundred yards, loses itself 
in the sand. I have not seen such a lovely sight anywhere else in the 
whole desert — such a copious and lovely stream." 

When this description was published, persistent efforts were made by 
many other travellers to visit Qadees, but without success, as it is off 
the beaten track from Sinai to Hebron, and tribal difficulties among the 
Arabs prevented one tribe conducting pilgrims over the country of 
another. Grave doubts then began to be entertained as to the reality 



QADEES, QADAYRAT, QA.SAYMEH. 215 

of Rowlands' discovery, and at length ifc came to be generally believed 
that no such place as Qadees really existed, and that the enthusiastic 
Rowlands had given a highly-coloured picture of some other place, 
perhaps Qasaymeh. Then it became a question whether there were 
three wells, two wells, or only one well, in the district — a well in the 
wilderness is a notable landmark — and some even said there was no 
well in the neighbourhood at all. 

However, in May, 1878, Holland, one of the greatest of desert 
travellers, penetrated to this oasis ; but, unaware of the importance of 
the spot, left it for future investigation, and he died shortly afterwards. 

It was left to Dr. H. Clay Trumbull, of America, to settle all doubts 
by his visit, on March 30th, 1881, to both Qadees which had been twice 
seen before, and Qadayrat, on which neither European nor American 
eyes had ever rested. In his large and learned book, " Kadesh-Barnea," 
he gives a most diverting account of his manoeuvring with his Arab 
guides, and of the methods by which he at length induced the escort of the 
Teeyftyah tribe, at the risk of their baggage, and possibly their lives, 
to trespass on the Azazimeh territory, where the well and camping-ground 
are situated. After a dreary march of eight hours over the wilderness, 
it almost looked as if, after all, the search would be baffled. 

" But we kept up, and kept on ; and at 1.30, after nearly three hours 
of moving in the wady " (the dry bed of a winter water-course), " we sud- 
denly turned sharply to the right, at a scarcely-uoticed angle of the low 
limestone hill-range we had been approaching, and almost immediately 
the long-sought wells of Qadees were before our eyes. 

" It was a marvellous sight ! Out of the barren and desolate stretch 
of the burning desert waste we had come with magical suddenness into 
an oasis of verdure and beauty unlooked for, and hardly conceivable in 
such a region. A carpet of grass covered the ground. Fig-trees laden 
with fruit, nearly ripe enough for eating, were along the shelter of the 
southern hill-side. Shrubs and flowers showed themselves in variety 
and profusion. Running water gurgled under the waving grass. We 
had seen nothing like it since leaving Wady Fayran ; nor was it 
equalled in loveliness of scene by any single bit of landscape of like 
extent, even there. 

" Standing out from the earth-covered limestone hills, at the north- 
eastern sweep of this picturesque recess, was to be seen the ' large single 
mass, or small hill, of solid rock,' which Rowlands looked at as the cliff 
smitten by Moses, to cause it to 'give forth his water/ when its flowing 
stream had been exhausted. From underneath this rugged spur of the 
north-easterly mountain range issued the now abundant stream." 

Then, after describing a number of pools round about, and the ground 
strewed with the camel and goat dung of centuries, and the water, 
which was remarkably pure and sweet, Dr. Trumbull continues: — ■ 

" There was a New England look to this oasis, especially in the 
flowers, and grass, and weeds ; quite unlike anything we had seen in the 
peninsula of Sinai. Bees were humming there, and birds were flitting 
from tree to tree. Enormous ant-hills, made of green grass seed, 
instead of sand, were numerous. As we came into the wady we had 
started a rabbit, and had seen larks and quails. It was, in fact, hard 
to realize that we were in the desert, or even near it." 



21 G QADEES, QADAYRAT, QASAYMEH. 

This, then, is the place which, being the third camping-ground from 
Sinai, became, after the discouraging report of the spies, the head- 
quarters of the pilgrim Israelites for thirty-seven or thirty-eight years ; 
the tribes, perhaps, wandering all over the peninsula, looked to this as 
their centre ; and, at the end of the exile, it was here they gathered to 
begin their victorious march into the promised land. 

A clear conception of the features of this place will tend to solve 
many supposed Bible difficulties, and cause us to admire the wisdom and 
mercy of Jehovah, who did not, even amid abounding sin, allow his 
people, whom he brought out of Egypt, to perish in a dreary desert. 
With such a fertile plain, and with such a strategic stronghold as their 
rendezvous and rally ing-point during their wilderness sojourn, the 
taunt of the sceptic as to the lack of pasturage for their cattle, or water 
for their flocks, loses all point. And there can be no doubt but that 
they camped here ; for both Hobab and Moses, who knew the desert 
thoroughly, would lead the people to such a pleasant place ; or even if 
they were unaware of it, which we can scarcely conceive, God knew of it, 
and the Guiding Pillar would surely bring them into these green pastures. 

Thus, the place called at first Rithmah, probably on account of the 
broom growing round about, became Kadesh (" The Holy "), and from 
hence, in a few days, the Israelites might have easily invaded Palestine, 
and entered upon their rest. But unbelief stepped in, and failure, fol- 
lowed by swift judgment ; and hence the new name of En-mishpat was 
given to it. The people failed, in sending up the spies instead of 
believing the Lord's naked word ; the spies failed, in thinking more of 
the giants than of their God ; and again the people failed in attempting 
to invade the land after sentence of wandering had been passed upon them. 
Their unbelief was terrible — only paralleled by our own, which keeps 
us often from God's Canaan — yet it was well that none of these people 
(save two), who knew all Egyptian abominations, should enter into the 
land, else would the new country have been polluted. Thus, by over- 
ruling grace, the place of failure and judgment becomes the place of 
training and mercy. And it shall be even thus with thee, also, child 
of God, though thine unbelief is none the less blameworthy, the grace of 
the Saviour shall be the more extolled ! The old man must die in the 
wilderness — only the new man can know God's rest. 

When the tedious journeying around this central pivot was nearly 
over, again the tribes assembled their scattered camps at Kadesh, and 
again failure marked the spot. Excessive drought had dried up the 
wells, and the people murmured. Alas, they were little better than 
their fathers ! Worse than all, Moses and Aaron failed too, and in 
their impatience struck the rock instead of only speaking to it. 
" Must ive bring you out water ? " For this they w r ere condemned, like 
the rest, to die in the wilderness, and the Rock stands there to-day a 
symbol of the failure of even the best of men. Thus the fourth name, 
" Meribah," was given to this oasis ; but though the name changes, the 
teaching is still the same. What a marvellous spot is this ! Here, 
too, was Miriam buried, and, probably, here the earth opened to swallow 
Korah, Dathan, and Abiram. From yonder mountain, now called Jebel 
Madurah, then known as Mount Hor, Aaron looked down on the land 
and died ; and after further journeying, Moses, from Mount Nebo, saw 



WHY ALWAYS WHISPER ? WHY NOT SPEAK OUT ? 2l7 

the fair inheritance, but did not enter it. Thus, God's judgments are 
true and righteous altogether. But how great the mercy mingled with 
the judgment— the smiling plain, the fertile wady, and the gushing 
.stream of Qadees plainly show ! 



Jg alfrags fopspr? ffl%% not spak wrt? 

THE peculiar blessing of private prayer no soul can tell another. Like 
heaven's best gift, it is unspeakable. In secret, special nearness to 
our Immanuel is permitted ; making plain to the soul's experience Peter's 
expression, "Whom having not seen, ye love ; in whom, though now ye 
see him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of 
glory." Indeed, in sweet, solemn, lonely prayer, sight, akin to that of 
Moses, is given, and we endure as " seeing him who is invisible." 

At some such seasons, when the key is turned upon the world, and 
its din and sin are locked outside ; when he whose " visage was so marred 
more than any man " enters, and you " behold the King in his beauty," 
and the disciple is glad when he sees the Lord — then, at such times 
of gracious favour, why should we hold all the conversation with our 
best-Beloved in whispers? We know that he can hear without the 
utterance of a syllable. Jesus has more than a mother's insight. She 
reads her child's thoughts before they are expressed, and knows the little 
heart's contents by the upturned face. So is it with Jesus ; the heart's 
secrets are known unto him. The mother is pleased for her child to 
whisper secrets ; but what pleasure would she lose if the voice was 
never raised above a whisper. May it not be that, sometimes, your Lord 
and Master has reasons for saying, " Speak out ! We are alone " ? 

One of the brightest and most consistent members of a village church 
was asked, "And how came you to be a Christian?" and this was her 
reply, " When I was in service, my godly master always had an hour 
each morning, after family worship, for private prayer, in his own room, 
upstairs. I was curious to know how he spent his time ; so, one day, I 
listened at the door, and heard him talking to God just as though he 
was in the room with him ; just like I'm talking to you, sir. And I 
said to myself, ' If that's how near God comes to him, and if that's how 
real his God is to him, master's God shall be my God'; and I began at 
once to seek him. I hadn't long to seek before I found." 

Let David's language be yours: "My voice shalt thou hear in the 
morning, Lord ; in the morning will I direct my prayer unto thee, 
and will look up." Then, oftener will you be heard saying, " My soul 
doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit doth rejoice in God my Saviour." 

F. E. B. 

There is much sweetness at times in being able to use the voice in 
devotion. It aids the mind, and gives vividness to the exercise. We 
cannot, in many houses, gain so great an indulgence, for we should 
disturb others ; but when it is possible, and consistent with secrecy, it 
is certainly a high treat to pray aloud. Our friend has also incidentally 
shown that the use of vocal language may be made a blessing to others. 
These simple facts are invaluable. We wish more correspondents would 
favour us with the like. — C. H. S. 15 



218 

BY PASTOR F. E. MARSH, SUNDERLAND. 

IN these days, when men are trying to do away with the supernatural * 
and robbing the Bible of all that they cannot tone down, or reasonably 
explain, it may be well to remind them that, however much it goes against 
human reason, the story of Elijah being fed by the ravens can be re-told 
in our own day. The following incident may help to strengthen one's 
faith, and it may also convince unbelieving believers of our gracious 
Father's care for his children shown in the smallest matters. In Elijah's 
days God used the ravens to supply his servant with food : here we have 
a dog being used for a like purpose. 

There was a very poor saint, but a very bright one, in one of our 
northern towns, who, one day, had nothing to eat ; and, lifting up his 
heart to the Lord, on leaving the courtyard where he lived, in simple 
faith, said, u Lord, I am so hungry ! " Meanwhile, a greyhound appeared, 
bounding down the street, and, making for the old man, dropped at his 
feet a large piece of meat which it carried in its mouth. The dog looked 
up in the old man's face, as if to say " It is for you," and made off as 
hard as it could go. To satisfy himself, the old man made enquiry at 
the butchers' shops in the neighbourhood, to see if the dog had stolen 
the meat; but he could not find that it had. Thus God repeated his 
providence, as in the case of Elijah being fed by the ravens, and guided 
the dog to supply his child's need. 

How full of meaning is that precious passage, " My God shall supply 
all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus" ! 

A gracious Provider — " God." 

A glorious promise — " shall." 

A good portion — " supply." 

A gift that is perfect — " all." 

A gain that is personal — " your." 

A gladdened patient — " need." 

A granary of plenty — "according to his riches in glory by Christ 
Jesus." 

1 ' Why should I ever careful be 
When such a God is mine ? 
He watches o'er me night and day, 
And tells me, ' Mine is thine.' " 



Interna (Bbqatm. 

THE only eloquence that has value is of the Artesian kind, springing 
up from deep and inexhaustible wells of conviction. If a speaker's 
mind is gripped by a sense of certainty, and his faith in the truth of 
his doctrines is held tight in the vice of absolute assurance, he has the 
immovable fulcrum for eloquence ; and if the truths, thus certainly 
believed are such as strongly stir his feelings, he has also the lever. If 
he has any power of speech whatever, any culture and equipment, it 
is strange if he be not eloquent. " Out of the fulness of the heart the 
mouth speaketh." — From " For Further Consideration'' 



219 



^Imjjst % Himbftfr. 



THE memorial with which we occupy this page is sent us by one who 
knew this friend, and can testify to the truth of the record. It 
ought to strengthen the faith of many. 

TO RECORD THE UNCHANGING FAITHFULNESS AND LOVE OF GOD 

TOWARDS 

MARY HAYMAN, 

of exmouth. 
She was born on the 3rd of September, 1788. 

Shortly after her marriage to Kichard Hayman, in September, 1808, she 

experienced the converting power of the Holy Spirit, 

and thenceforward, for fifty-three years, through much trial, 

conflict, and sorrow, she prayed for the conversion of her Husband — 

" Faint, yet pursuing." 

Though it tarried long, the answer came at last ; 

then was her sorrow turned into joy, and her mouth was filled with praise. 

Through their advancing years she proved that underneath 

were the everlasting arms, for the Lord 

wonderfully sustained and strengthened her to attend to all the 

wants of her Husband, who became blind and helpless. 

She cheered and comforted him to the end, and finally closed his eyes in 

death, in March, 1878, in his ninety-first year, after a married 

life of sixty-nine years and six months. 

She then became the special care of her Heavenly Father, and he raised up 

friends who gladly ministered to all her need, even as 

she had ministered to others. 

Her daily testimony to the close of her lengthened pilgrimage was that 

the Faithful Promiser, continually gave 

her to prove to the very utmost the truth of his own words — 

"As thy days, so shall thy strength be," and 

" I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee." 

All the days of her appointed time she waited until her change came, 

and then, with undimmed faith, and in " the peace of God 

which passeth all understanding," through "the precious blood of Christ," 

On the 8th of MiY, 1888, 

Within four months of completing her one hundredth year, 

she joyfully departed, to be for ever with the Saviour whom she had loved 

and served for nearly fourscore years. 

On the 13th of May she was laid in the same grave with her 

Husband in the Cemetery at Withycombe, 

"Till he come." 



" Like as a father pitieth his children, so the Lord pitieth them that 

fear him." 

" Bless the Lord, O my soul ; and all that is within me, 
BLESS HIS HOLY NAME!" 



220 

fyt §omma of fissions in % $mty $m.* 

AMONG many readers of to-day, fiction alone is supposed to possess 
the charm of exciting interest and thrilling adventure. To such, 
we would earnestly commend the reading of such biographies as the one 
we purpose sketching briefly in the present paper. Jt has held us in 
unbroken interest from its first page to its last, kindled anew our en- 
thusiasm in mission work, an4 made us stronger in the confidence that 
Christ's kingdom shall yet come in all the earth. 

The story of the gospel's progress in the South Sea Islands, has been 
endeared to God's people by the martyrdom of John Williams, at 
Erromanga, nearly fifty years ago — November, 1839. The precious 
blood then spilt devoted the islands to Christ, and the reward of that 
martyrdom is seen everywhere. 

John G. Paton was born May 24th, 1824, at Kirkmahoe, near Dum- 
fries. His father was a working stocking-maker, living the humble, 
holy life of a godly Scot, in the quiet recesses of his village and his 
cottage. At five years of age, the home was changed from Kirkmahoe 
to Tortherwald, then a busy, thriving, and populous village, but now 
much deserted, the many small farms having been absorbed in one or 
two large ones. A glimpse full of pathetic beauty is given of that abode 
of piety. "Our home consisted of a 'but,' and a 'ben,' and a ' mid- 
room,' or chamber, called the * closet.' The one end was dining-room, 
kitchen, and parlour ; the other, my father's workshop. The * closet' was 
a very small apartment between the other two. This was the sanctuary 
of that cottage home. Thither daily, and oftentimes a day — generally 
after each meal— we saw our father retire and ' shut to the door,' and we 
children got to understand, by a sort of spiritual instinct, that prayers 
were being poured out there for us, as of old by the high priest within 
the veil in the Most Holy place. Never in temple or cathedral, on 
mountain or in glen, can I hope to feel that the Lord God is more near 
than under that humble roof.'' It was no wonder that religion under 
these influences stole into the child-heart, like a holy perfume. 
Though four miles lay between them and the nearest kirk, such was 
their love for God's house, that the whole family considered it a great 
joy to attend every Sabbath, the father only thrice in forty years 
being absent — "once, by snow so deep that he was baffled, and had 
to return ; once, by ice so dangerous, that he had to crawl back ; 
and once, by an outbreak of cholera in Dumfries." At home, religious 
instruction was not neglected, mother and children going regularly 
through the Shorter Catechism on the Sabbath evenings, the children 
not regarding it as a task, but as a pleasure. For twelve years the 
father was a missionary to the villages around, visiting the sick and 
dying, praying and singing in their cottages, until, in 1868, three years 
after his beloved wife's death, he went to his reward, to the sorrow 
of all. 

Before he was twelve years of age, little Johnnie Paton was set to 

* John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides. An Autobiography. Edited by 
his Brother. Hodder and Stoughton. 






THE ROMANCE OF MISSIONS IN THE SOUTH SEAS. 221 

learn his father's trade at the stocking-frame, every spare moment being 
used in study, chiefly the rudiments of Latin and Greek. He had 
already trusted the Saviour, and longed to be a minister of the gospel or 
a missionary of the cross. A few years sped by, and, after a brief en- 
gagement in the Ordnance Survey, then occupied in making a map of 
the county of Dumfries, he became a district visitor in connection with 
a Presbyterian Church in Glasgow, entered for a short time as a student 
at the College, ultimately becoming a school teacher at Maryhill Free 
Church School. Later on, the Glasgow City Mission appointed him as 
agent in one of their districts — a very degraded one — filled with " avowed 
infidels, Romanists, and drunkards." Great opposition and fierce conflict 
were experienced in this labour, mainly from publicans and Papists, the 
young missionary on one occasion, being stoned and left in the street 
stunned and bleeding. 

All this time the foreign mission work had been burning its way into 
Mr. Paton's heart, and clamouring for his practical devotion. Just at 
this time, the Reformed Presbyterian Church had advertised for 
a missionary to join the Rev. John Inglis, in his grand work in the New 
Hebrides. For two years they had appealed in vain, and in despair the 
Synod agreed to cast lots as to which minister of their number should 
leave home-work to go out as a missionary to the South Seas. The lot 
was arranged, and amid the strained silence of the assembly, the 
scrutineers announced the result as " so indecisive, that it was clear 
that God had not, in that way, provided a missionary." With tear- 
blinded eyes, young Paton watched the scene, longing to rise and offer 
himself as a missionary, yet held back by the fear that he might be 
mistaking his own desires for the will of God. After a few days con- 
tinuous prayer, he called on Dr. Bates, who had helped him to his first 
appointment in Glasgow, and offered himself for the New Hebrides 
Mission, and returned to his lodging with a heart light with joy, feeling 
he had at last fallen in with God's great purposes concerning him. 

Many of his friends opposed his resolve ; not, however, his father or 
mother. But his determination once made was never repented ; and, 
after a solemn ordination in Dr. Symington's church, Glasgow, in 
March, 1858, he sailed for the foreign mission field. The voyage out to 
Melbourne was a very pleasant one, the captain of the vessel being a 
godly Scotchman, who gladly availed himself of the missionaries' pre- 
sence to have services regularly on board. At Melbourne they left the 
Clatha, and joined an American vessel going to Penang, the captain of 
it agreeing to land them at Aneityum, New Hebrides. The contrast 
between the two voyages was most striking ; in one vessel all was 
quiet and orderly, in the other all noise and profanity. When they 
reached Aneityum the captain refused to land them even in boats, 
fearing that if they once touched shore his men, who hated him, would 
never return. Leaving the vessel, the mission party entered boats sent 
from the shore ten miles distant ; but these being overloaded, became 
unmanageable, and a total wreck appeared imminent. After drifting in 
great terror for some hours, they were seen from the shore : other boats 
were sent to their help, and, with great gratitude to God, they landed at 
Aneityum on the evening of August 30th, 1858. 

The New Hebrides number in all some thirty islands, twenty being 



222 THE ROMANCE OF MISSIONS IN THE SOUTH SEAS. 

well inhabited, and eleven of them of considerable size, lying one 
thousand miles to the north of New Zealand. 

After a little time spent in Aneityum, the largest island of the group, 
a meeting of the missionaries was called, to decide the place of settle- 
ment of Mr. and Mrs. Paton ; and, as a result, Port Resolution, in the 
island of Tanna, was named as their new sphere of service. A house 
was built by the paid labour of the natives, working under chiefs, 
who warily declined to promise protection to the mission families. 

The first view of this savage people made Mr. Paton's heart to sink 
within him ; all the sentimental glamour of " innocent heathenism/' 
indulged in by those who have never seen it, vanished before the stern 
reality of fact. He says — " The depths of Satan, outlined in the first 
chapter of the Romans, were uncovered there before our eyes, in the 
daily life of the people, without veil and without excuse." Cannibalism 
was rampant everywhere, the bodies of slain enemies frequently being 
eaten during the night of the battle. A few days after their settlement at 
Port Resolution, hearing a heart-piercing wail from the villages round, 
and enquiring its cause, they learned that a wounded man, just home 
from the battle, had died : and that his widow had been strangled, that 
her spirit might accompany him to the other world I No marvel that Mr. 
Paton should say, " Every new scene, every fresh incident, set more 
clearly before us their benighted condition and shocking cruelties, and 
made us long to speak to them of Jesus and of the love of God." 

One of the first necessities was to learn their language, for they had 
no literature, and not even the rudiments of an alphabet. The way in 
which this was done was " to hire some of the more intelligent lads and 
men to sit and talk with us, and answer our questions about names and 
sounds." The religious sense possessed by the natives was mainly one 
of fear, its aim being " to propitiate this or that evil spirit, to prevent 
calamity or secure revenge. They worshipped the spirits of departed 
ancestors and heroes, through their material idols of wood and stone. 
Their whole worship was one of slavish fear ; and, so far as I could 
ever learn, they had no idea of a God of mercy or of grace." 

When, however, in the island of Aneityum the gospel began to master 
their hearts, they longed for a fuller knowledge of God through his 
Word ; they endured great hardships, and made great sacrifices to ob- 
tain it. The story of their efforts to obtain a Bible in their own tongue 
reads like a piece of romance. " For fifteen years, day and night, the 
missionaries kept toiling in translating the Book of God ; and all this 
time the willing hands and feet of the natives toiled in planting and 
preparing arrowroot to pay the £1,200, the cost of its printing and 
publishing. Year after year the arrowroot, too sacred to be used for 
their daily food, was set apart as the Lord's portion ; the missionaries 
sent it to Australia and Scotland, where it was sold by private friends, 
and the whole proceeds were consecrated to this purpose. On the com- 
pletion of the great undertaking by the Bible Society, it was found that the 
natives had earned enough to pay every penny of the outlay ; and their 
first Bibles went out to them purchased with the consecrated toils of 
fifteen years." 

In the island of Tanna Mr. Paton found the natives terribly super- 
stitious. At one time a long drought was ascribed to the missionaries 



THE ROMANCE OP MISSIONS IN THE SOUTH SEAS. 223 

and their God. Their lives were threatened, unless rain were speedily 
sent ; and when it did come, they credited the missionaries' prayers 
with its bestowal. 

Into this gloomy picture these pioneers had sent, for their encourage- 
ment, some gleams of light and brightness. One of the native teachers, 
sickening and dying, left his message in these words : " I shall not 
return again to Port Resolution, or see my dear Missi. (missionary), 
but tell him that I die happy; for I love Jesus much, and am going to 
Jesus.'' 

Many were their dangers from the fickleness and treachery of the dif- 
ferent chiefs, and miraculous the frequent deliverances from them. At one 
time a man rushed furiously with his axe at Mr. Paton ; but a kindly 
chief, seizing a spade, averted the blow, and saved him from instant 
death. The next day a wild chief followed him about for four hours 
with his loaded musket, and though that weapon was often directed to- 
ward him, God restrained the murderer's hand. One evening he awoke 
three times to hear a chief and his men trying to force the door of his 
house ; but they were made to retreat with their work undone. 

During all this time the work of preaching the gospel was regularly 
continued, and though few results were seen, it was manifestly not in 
vain. Mr. Paton tells how that " several men, ashamed or afraid to 
come by day, came to me constantly by night, for conversation and 
instruction. Having seen the doors of the mission-house made fast, and 
the windows blinded so that they could not be observed, they continued 
with me for many hours, asking all sorts of strange questions about the 
new religion and its laws." 

Perhaps the saddest and most terrible difficulties were the revolting 
wickedness and cruelties of the English traders who came to the island, 
and by their atrocious excesses enraged the people against every white 
face. They tried to stir up war in order to supply the ammunition at 
fabulous prices ; and when terrified by the natives' reprisals, pleaded in 
abject terror for the missionaries to defend their lives. With a Satanic 
malignity they landed four men infected with measles at different ports, 
in order to spread the disease, destroy the natives, and supplant them 
with their own harpies. " Most of them were horrible drunkards, 
and their traffic of every kind among these islands was, generally 
speaking, steeped in human blood." Later on, some of these traders 
actually went the length of urging the natives to kill the missionaries, 
as they felt them to be a powerful obstacle to their own wicked pur- 
poses. The heathen were more Christian than these civilized demons, and 
the suggestion was rejected by them. Terrible trials were, however, 
coming, and early in 1862, Mr. Paton was compelled to leave Tanna, 
escaping only with his life ; his house, printing-press, and mission-church 
all being wrecked by the savage natives, goaded into treacherous 
revenge by the cruelties of the white traders. The story of the book 
ends here ; but we know that since that time, the seed sown with so 
many tears, and so much blood, has borne a marvellous harvest. 



224 

THERE can be little doubt that, next to agriculture, fishing is one of 
the most ancient industries of Great Britain. It is said that 
Great Yarmouth has been a fishing station for something like one 
thousand four hundred years. It was inevitable that a considerable 
portion of the population of our sea-girt isles should choose this avoca- 
tion, our coast-line being very extensive, and our tendencies as a race 
being towards adventures on the deep. Nor could it be otherwise that 
men would be tempted to go a fishing while fish could be found in such 
great variety, and of such tempting quality, as those which swarm in 
our seas. The rapid growth of this industry during the present reign 
is remarkable. In the days of our grandfathers, it was impossible to 
procure fish in a condition fit for food at long distances from the coast ; 
and even at seaside places the supply was inconsiderable ; for, as one 
authority on the subject tells us, " the fishing-boats were small, and 
there was little inducement to fish on a large scale, when the markets 
within reach were so few." Railways and steam-boats have extended the 
fishing business beyond what would, at one time, have been thought 
possible, by providing facilities for distributing the fish. The fishing 
fleet of the British Isles consists of something like seven thousand 
first-class boats, and between twenty and thirty thousand second and 
third class. Tens of thousands of men and boys are constantly engaged 
in this occupation. About a dozen large fleets are always out in the 
North Sea, each fleet being attended by steamers, which hurry off to 
one of the great ports as soon as they can be loaded up. Small boats ply 
between the fishing smacks and the steamers. Alas ! from time to time 
many lives are lost on the stormy sea. 

Much of the most important part of the work goes on in the dark 
hours, and when the fishing-ground is the North Sea, and the time 
mid-winter, it is impossible to realize what powers of endurance are 
needed by the men who watch or toil through the live-long night. 
What a luxury is fish ! But at what a cost is it provided ! There are 
twelve thousand fishermen always afloat in the North Sea alone ; and 
these surely deserve a place in Christian sympathy. For the benefit of 
these men the Mission founded by Mr. E. J. Mather employs seven 
cruisers, each of which is said to be " a church, dispensary, temperance- 
hall, and lending library." On board of these adventurous Bethels, 
congregations assemble for public worship; and during the summer 
holidays the gospel is preached in their cabins by various pastors from 
England and Scotland. 

The men and boys spend nearly the whole of their time upon the sea, 
except a week or so between each voyage of two months. In the old 
times they were little thought of ; but about seven years ago the atten- 
tion of Christian persons was drawn to the subject. It was during a 
cruise in 1881, that Mr. Mather took notice of a floating Dutch grog- 
shop, and he thought that something of a different kind ought to be 
provided. As was plainly seen, the proposed service could never be 
properly undertaken until a vessel was fitted out for the purpose ; and 
a friend devoted £1,000 to the purchase of the "Ensign," the first 
mission- vessel. Since then, others have been added; and eventually, 



TELL YOUR MINISTER. 225 

it is hoped that a vessel will be provided to accompany each fleet.. 
" Happily, the nature of the work is such that the mission smacks do 
not interfere with the legitimate occupation of the trawlers. "When 
a 'fishing breeze' is blowing, the nets are down, and the gospel ships 
fish like the rest, to maintain themselves ; but when the sea is calm, 
and the men are unavoidably idle, the mission flags are hoisted, and 
the nets are spread to catch men." 

By way of illustrating the power of the Bible on the sea, we will tell 
of something which occurred long before this Mission was founded. 

Some years ago, a Sunday-school teacher in London found himself 
greatly encouraged in his work by a call from one of his old scholars, 
who had left the shore for the dangerous avocation of deep-sea fishing. 
Callers of this description, who have outgrown recognition, have a 
habit of making their identity certain by showing the copy of the 
Scriptures used while in the class; and this is what the sailor did. 
After this, he gave a chapter of his experience. He had been joined 
to a fishing company in Scotland; and on the boat, which was 
frequently away from shore for weeks at a time, he was the only hand 
who could read. Because time would otherwise have hung heavily 
on his hands when the hooks were baited, he who had once been 
a scholar on the Sabbath now read his Testament alone, till the men 
desired that he should read to them also. They had hitherto been a 
profane company; but a reformation was soon wrought among them. 
The master gave up the practice of swearing, and the others followed 
his example. After this, they resolved to keep the Sabbath. Prayer 
and reading of the Scriptures became regular things on board the 
little craft ; and the men learned to read in their spare time. All 
became as thoroughly changed as though a miracle had been performed 
in their midst. Indeed, we may ask, is any miracle more wonderful 
than the transformation of the sin-hardened human heart ? 

Mr. E. J. Mather, founder and director of the Mission to Deep-Sea 
Fishermen, answers all enquiries at 181, Queen Victoria Street, E.O. 



«s 



M>tll gorac §puista. 



A FRIEND of mine, a layman, was once in the company of a very 
eminent preacher, then in the decline of life. My friend happened 
to remark what a comfort it must be to him to think of all the good he 
had done by his gift of eloquence. The eyes of the old man filled with 
tears, and he said, " You little know ! You little know ! If I ever 
turned one heart from the ways of disobedience to the wisdom of the 
just, God has withheld the assurance from me. I have been admired, 
and flattered, and run after ; but how gladly would I forget all that to 
be told of a single soul I have been instrumental in saving ! " The 
eminent preacher entered into his rest. There was a great funeral. 
Many pressed around the grave who had oftentimes hung entranced 
upon his lips. My friend was there, and by his side was a stranger, 
who was so deeply moved, that when all was over, my friend said to 
him, " You knew him, I suppose ?" " Knew him ! " was the reply. " No ; 
I never spoke to him, but I owe to him my soul ! " — From " Colloquies 
on Preaching " by Canon Tivells. 



226 

11 The old theology dies hard." 

OH, fatal folly ; what avails 
The neiv theology in death — 
When the huge thought of life-Ions: sia, 

Shortens the palpitating breath ? 
No Christ, no substitute, no Hood, 
To plead before a holy God ! 

Whose is the old theology ; 

And wherefore, wherefore should it die ? 
Those dear, reviving types of old, 

Were they but solemn mockery ? 
Call they the sprinkled blood a sham ? 
And a mere farce, the Paschal Lamb ? 

How gloriously the living bird 
Soared singing to its native skies, 

Dipt in its fellow's blood ! and here 
The marrow of the gospel lies. 

For very shame our face we hide, 

Yet sing and soar ; for Christ has died. 

The old theology for power 

Eclipses every human plan ; 
And while the march of intellect 

Proclaims th' abilities of man, 
We glory in a shifted curse, 
And Christ responsible for us. 

And shall God's old religion die, 

Since poor proud mortals love it not? 

Because they keep their eyelids dry, 
Shall weeping sinners be forgot ? 

Never ! Till misery shall cease, 

The Christ of God shall be their peace. 

I shudder as I see men dare 
To mutilate the Book Divine, 

And steal, with ignorance of pride, 
The sweetness from this hope of mine ; 

But the whole earth — on sea — on shore — 

Holds but one Bible, and no more. 

God's eye is on these mighty men, 
Of earthly fame and heavenly scorn ; 

Who boldly wield th' unholy pen, 
Of demon-like rebellion born : 

Shall he his righteous wrath forego, 

Because they will not credit woe ? 



LEARNING TO SING. 227 

Poor creatures : if the Holy Ghost 

Should overshadow them to-night, 
And bring their hideous sins of heart 
Before their eyes in Heaven's light ; 
How keen would be their shame-faced plea, 
" Jesus, undertake for me!" 

How can it die, this blessed hope, 

This only refuge from despair ; 
This scheme for glorifying Christ, 

Unfolded by the God we fear ; 
This vital faith which flings its arms 
About its God, in all alarms ! 

" He always wins who sides with God," 
And so on Revelation's rock 
I take my stand ; and though time's tide 
My faltering foothold seems to mock ; 
Through time, through tide, my hope shall be, 
Christ, and the old Theology. 

M. A. Chaplin. 
Galleywood, Chelmsford. 

Can be had at Is. per hundred of J. H. Clarke, 78, High Street, Chelmsford. 



Reaming to «^rag. 

rpHE following eight reasons why everyone should learn to sing are given 
JL by Byrd, in his " Psalms, Sonnets, and Songs," &c, published in 1588 : — 

1st. "It is a knowledge easily taught and quickly learned, where there 
is a good master and an apt scholar." 

2nd. " The exercise of singing is delightful to nature, and good to preserve 
the health of man." 

3rd. " It doth strengthen all parts of the breast, and doth open the 
pipes." 

4th. " It is a singularly good remedy for a stuttering and stammering in 
the speech." 

5th. " It is the best means to procure a perfect pronunciation, and to 
make a good orator." 

6th. "It is the only way to know where nature hath bestowed a good 
voice . . . and in many that excellent gift is lost because they want art to 
express nature." 

7th. "There is not any music of instruments whatever comparable to 
that which is made of the voices of men ; where the voices are good, and 
the same well sorted and ordered." 

8th. " The better the voice is, the meeter it is to honour and serve God 
therewith, and the voice of man is chiefly to be employed to that end." 

" Since singing is so good a thing, 
I wish all men would learn to sing." 



228 



jost-marlem ^al&ata; 



OR, CAN THOSE WHO DIE IMPENITENT BE AFTERWARDS SAVED ? 

THE words of the old Pilgrim Father, John Eobinson, to the effect that 
probably fresh light would break forth from the Word of God, have- 
been quoted to cover every kind of departure from "the good old way." 
Men stumbling on the dark mountains of error champion the cause of heresy 
by pretentions to greater light ; thus falling into the old folly of calling 
darkness light; and proving the words of our Lord — "If therefore the 
light that is in thee be darkness, how great is that darkness ! " 

The truth is that we get more light concerning matters of divine revelation 
only as we get nearer to God, for "God is light; " and " in his light we 
shall see light." Light cannot by any possibility become darkness, neither 
can truth, in its pure and simple form, ever become error. Gold is gold ; 
and, though it should be rolled into the thinnest leaf, drawn out into the 
finest wire, or reduced to an impalpable dust, every part of it would still be 
gold ; by no process whatsoever could it be converted into brass or copper. 
And so, the more light we get upon the truth — or, in other words, the more 
the truth stands out in its own native beauty, the more will its excellence 
appear, and the more hideous will the distorted forms of error be seen to be. 
The oak is an oak, from the planting of the acorn until the majestic tree 
bows before the strokes of the feller : it cannot by any means become a 
briar or a thorn. But what is impossible in nature and science, what would 
be truly absurd in philosophy and history, may be, as some seem to think, 
quite possible in theology. 

"We go higher than theology, we go to revelation. Theology, as a system 
of man's compounding, though the elements be all Scriptural and true, 
may possibly be defective here or redundant there ; but revelation never. 
It is God's voice, God's word, God's will, God's truth. We lay this down 
as a general principle, from which there can be no deviation ; for ' ' the 
words of the Lord are pure words, as silver tried in a furnace of earth 
purified seven times." All his words are true and right ; and if anything 
therein seems hidden, it is not because it is obscure, but because we need 
more light. Speaking of God's Word, one has truly said : — 

" If aught there dark appear, 
Bewail thy want of sight ; 
No imperfection can he there, 
For all God's words are right." 

Seeing, then, God has in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, and 
left with his church the sacred truths he has once for all delivered to it, we 
are bound to "keep this commandment without spot, unrebukable, until the 
appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ." We must defend the truths of the 
gospel when they are assailed, and contend for them as a treasure, for the 
keeping of which we are responsible to God. 

If our responsibility to God compels us to be faithful to our trust, so, 
also, should our compassion for man make us jealous of everything which 
would tend to remove from him healthy motives to care for his soul's eternal 
salvation. All that would tend to lessen his care for his own eternal well- 
being we ought to denounce. 

Hence it is, that we contend earnestly against all those who make it a part 
of their teaching that there will come a time after death, when those who have 
died in the neglect of the great salvation shall have mercy offered to them 
once more, with a possibility of their being raised from the prison of despair 
to ultimate happiness and glory. This view is one among many relating 
to the future state of those who die in impenitence. The absolute annihila- 
tion of the wicked, at some period or other, is the extreme on one side, and 
the universal restoration of the sinful race of man to eternal happiness, is- 
the extreme on the other. 



1 



POST-MORTEM SALVATION. 229 

Now, there could be no valid objection to either extreme, or to any of 
their various modifications, if they were not contrary to revealed truth. If 
God chose in any such way to glorify himself, it must, of course, be in perfect 
consistency with himself, and with what he has made known of his holy 
will ; for he can do nothing contrary to himself and his will. But has God 
revealed himself and his will to any such effect ? Is there anything in the Bible 
that looks that way ? Has God anywhere said that, after the present .state 
of probation has come to an end, there will be another ? Has he said that 
after men have continued for years to disregard his just claims, refuse his 
entreaties, and reject his gospel, and after he has executed upon them the 
judgment of which they were forewarned, he will, by methods unexplained, 
extend to them again the offers of mercy, so that, after all, they may finally 
share the joys of his right hand with those who, through faith and patience, 
inherit the promises ? If this is the will of God, he has somewhere stated it. 
It would be alike unjust and irreverent to suppose that, while stating with 
beautiful simplicity the terms of salvation offered in the gospel — that whoso- 
ever believeth in Jesus Christ shall never perish, but have eternal life, while 
urging his entreaties with all the arguments drawn from his mercy, from 
the personal dignity of the Eedeemer, from the efficacy of his blood, and the 
imperativeness of his claims, and while holding over the head of the 
unbelieving the most terrible of threatenings, he should, nevertheless, in the 
midst of all, secretly determine that he would not act in strict accordance 
with his own declarations, but would act otherwise than he threatened. 
Surely, such a course would make it appear that he was either merely 
working upon men's fears, or that the awful doom denounced was the 
utterance of passion, and not the deliberate sentence of a truthful Judge. 
To suppose such a thing would be next to blasphemy, if not blasphemy 
itself. Such proceeding on God's part is absolutely impossible. 

We ask, therefore, for some positive statement from the lips of the Eternal, 
that he intends, at some future period, to open the gates of paradise to those 
who have been cast into hell for their sins. An opinion, a theory, an 
inference will not suffice ; nothing less than a positive statement will be 
sufficient. We ask for this, but we ask in vain ; for the simple reason that 
no such passage can be found in either the Old or the New Testament. 
No, nor a single word sanctioning such an opinion. 

To hold a sentiment so utterly without Scriptural foundation, cannot be 
harmless to anyone ; for such an error seldom comes alone. For anyone 
to teach this baseless theory to others, must be mischievous in the extreme, 
and may end in the perdition of deceiver and deceived. 

But if we have no positive testimony, nor even so much as a hint, in 
favour of post-mortem salvation, a great deal is said on the other side, plainly 
showing that the perdition of those who die impenitent is not only righteous, 
but endless ; that a gulf is placed between the saved and the lost which can 
never be passed over. 

The condition of those who die impenitent may be considered under three 
■terms, or heads. It comprehends separation, privation, retribution. 

Separation : separation from God and those beings who are in harmony 
with him. The thought of this is unutterably painful and appalling to a 
gracious soul; for is not fellowship with God his greatest joy, even as union 
to him is his highest honour ? But sin is a turning away from God, as if 
the Ever-Blessed were a repulsive Being ; and every act of sin is a further 
•departing from God, making the distance greater. Man does " not like to 
retain God in his thoughts"; and if we put his actions into words, they 
speak out the hostility of his heart : — " Depart from us ; for we desire not the 
knowledge of thy ways." Sin is a "departing," a "going astray," a 
" turning of the back, and not the face," a revolt of the man from God ; and 
this is the course of all mankind, both where the gospel is preached, and 
where it is not preached : and in this course man continues to the end, 



230 POST-MORTEM SALVATION. 

notwithstanding all warnings and entreaties, unless the hand of sovereign 
mercy interposes to pluck him as a brand from the burning. 

Sometimes, even in this world, God seems to say of a man, " He is joined 
to idols ; let him alone " ; and when God thus, in this world, gives a man 
up, what hope or help is there for him ? But might not God justly give up 
to his own ways any and every sinner, here in this life ? There is nothing 
against it, except what God may find in himself, in his own love, and 
purpose, and grace. If he may justly give him up here, when he has 
hardened himself against God, he may justly do so in a fuller degree at 
death, and more terribly still at the resurrection. If he may justly give 
him up to his own ways, in life and death, and at the judgment, why not 
for ever ? If when at first the stone started slowly rolling down the 
mountain-side there was no pause, but an accelerated downward progress, 
what is to reverse the nature of things, and roll back the stone to the sunny 
height of the mountain ? In awarding to the impenitent sinner the awful 
doom of " everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from 
the glory of his power," God only gives to him the things he has chosen, the 
harvest of his own sowing. While God is God, and sin is sin, there can be 
no cancelling of the sentence, and no change in the portion of the sinner, 
excepting to deeper condemnation and despair. "When once the tree has 
fallen in the direction in ivhich it leaned, there it will lie for ever. God will, 
in effect, say to the hardened, impenitent one : ' ' You have chosen to depart 
from me ; take, therefore, that which is the result of your course. You have 
delighted in the things which I forbade and abhorred ; take them, therefore, 
to the full, as your everlasting portion." But we mentioned also 

Privation. — Privation, as here used, means the utter and eternal loss of 
all good. This must, of necessity, follow from being separated from God. 
He is essentially and eternally good. Separation from him must involve 
the loss of all good, for there is no good out of him. As sinners in this 
world, we have all forfeited all title and claim to God and goodness. Grace 
— the grace of God through Christ Jesus — makes its recovery possible, 
indeed, certain, to all who believe ; yea, that which the believer gains by 
grace exceeds by far what he had lost by sin. "Where sin abounded, 
grace did much more abound." Everything in creation is laid under con- 
tribution to illustrate and set forth the good which God has provided for 
those who seek him — his best gifts in this world, and in the world to come. 
All that man needs and desires ; all the grace, and holiness, and freedom, 
and happiness, that can be participated in here and hereafter, are summed up 
in this word " good " as belonging to God, and setting forth what he is. 
In view of his gracious provision for man's deep necessity, God says, in his 
gospel to the perishing children of men, " O taste and see that the Lord is 
good : blessed is the man that trusteth in him." 

But the multitude — oh, how wickedly and wilfully, in many, many cases ! 
— turn a deaf ear to all that God has said concerning salvation and eternal 
life ; and as if no voice had spoken, and no call had been addressed to them, 
they still ask, "Who will show us any good ? " " Lovers of pleasure, more 
than lovers of God," is the best that can be said of the world's votaries ; 
while of many it must be added, " Whose god is their belly, and whose glory 
is in their shame, who mind earthly things " ! The Lord leaves men to realize 
what they have sought as their chosen portion. The story of Dives is 
literally true of many. Earth's "good things," abused for selfish ends, 
are followed by their total loss and endless retribution. 

When men have selfishly, wickedly, wilfully, and repeatedly chosen the 
sinner's portion, though entreated to choose differently, and have perse- 
vered to the end in their evil ways — is it not in the nature of things, having 
respect to the claims of justice and the honour of outraged mercy, that the 
righteous anger of the Omniscient Judge should burn unquenchably ? that 
those who would have none of him should be eternally deprived of that 



POST-MORTEM SALVATION. 231 

which they refused ? Is it in accordance with what God has revealed of 
himself, his law, his government of the universe, and of his salvation by 
Christ Jesus, that the gulf between the lost and the saved should be so 
bridged over in a future state that there may be a passage from the one 
state to the other ? 

Suppose, for a moment, that we allow the thing may be possible, allow it 
for argument's sake ; how could the moral change be effected ? Or, first, let 
us ask, seeing they had finally rejected Christ, and counted him and his 
sacrifice as worthless things, how can the sins of earth, countless in 
number, and the deeper, blacker, more horribly blasphemous crimes of 
hell, be removed and purged away ? Can the fires of perdition cleanse 
them ? Suffering in this world, unless sanctified by the grace of God, 
makes the sinner more rebellious ; and can we hope that in the world 
beneath the effect will be different ? The notion of suffering cleansing 
the soul from sin may have a place in the deceptive theology of Rome, 
but it has no place in the Scriptures of truth ; and to them is our appeal. 

Retribution was the other characteristic of the future of those who die 
impenitent ; that is, they will be rewarded according to their works. All 
the descriptions given of the "Great Assize" present to our view a 
tribunal established in justice and righteousness ; a deliberate proceeding 
of judicial investigation. The books will be opened and examined, and 
every one dealt with according to his deeds. There will be no passionate 
wreaking of vengeance upon irritating adversaries, unexamined and untried. 
The Omniscient Judge will calmly investigate every character, action, and 
plea, seeing to the bottom of everything; for "all things are naked and 
opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do." 

It is a fact clearly stated in Holy Scripture, that the general resurrection 
will precede the general judgment; so that judgment will proceed "ac- 
cording to the deeds done in the body." The bodies of the wicked as well 
as of the justified will be raised ; and as soul and body sinned in concert, so 
soul and body will suffer the just retribution of a holy God. " Depart, ye 
cursed* into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels," is the 
doom which Christ himself will then pronounce on the finally impenitent : 
and as if to strike the mind with a deeper awe, and give additional assurance 
of the certainty of the threatened doom, he adds: " These shall go away 
into everlasting punishment." It must be noted that he uses the same word 
to denote the duration of punishment as he uses to denote the duration of 
heavenly happiness, and the same word which is used elsewhere in Holy 
Scripture to denote the duration of the divine existence. 

The retribution which God will deal out to the wicked at the general 
judgment is nowhere said to be corrective, but penal : not a chastisement 
in order to repentance and amendment, but a righteous retribution. " Woe 
unto the wicked ! it shall be ill with him : for the reward of his hands 
shall be given him." He shall have his true desert. Having sowed to 
the flesh, he shall reap accordingly. The forbearance which endured so 
long will now be at an end. The wicked " goes away," is " driven away," 
and " cast into hell." All these terms imply his entire abandonment to 
his merited doom, and his final expulsion from all hope of mercy. 

Such punishment must needs be without remedy. Let us quietly read 
together two verses of Holy Writ, and see if we can discern the least crack 
or cranny in the thick walls of the prison, through which the least ray of 
hope can penetrate. # " The Lord Jesus shall be revealed from heaven with 
his mighty angels, in flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not 
God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ : who shall 
be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and 
from the glory of his power ; when he shall come to be glorified in his 
saints, and to be admired in all them that believe (because our testimony 
among you was believed) in that day." And if the punishment will be 



232 SPIRITUAL CUCKOOS. 

without remedy, it will also be without end. Even in this world, we cannot 
conform to the will of God, and render even imperfect obedience, unless by 
the aid of divine grace. But in hell grace reigns not. The impenitent 
have already refused mercy's aid, and rejected her all-availing plea — the 
blood of Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God. Therefore there is neither hope 
nor help for them, and the doom of the disobedient must be theirs for ever. 
Does nature shudder at the sentence ? Does reason demur to its exe- 
cution ? Let us remember that God is able to fulfil his threatenings, 
and has already executed judgment in part on the devil and his angels. Let 
us also call to mind a transaction infinitely greater than the plunging of 
apostate angels into the dungeon of eternal despair — we refer to the offering 
up of his dear Son in all the agonies of Gethsemane and Calvary, when he 
was made a curse for us, that he might redeem us from the curse of the law. 
Reader, beware of speculating upon salvation for the impenitent after 
death ! It comes of that spawn of unbelief which suggested the first 
act of disobedience. The gospel is plain enough that, if we reject Christ, 
there remaineth no more a sacrifice for sin ; and we cannot be saved without 
a sacrifice. Do not tamper with the delusion. Do not risk your soul, nor 
your soul's peace. "He that believeth on the Son of God is not con- 
demned; but he that believeth not is condemned already." Oh, I beseech 
you, delay not a day, an hour, a moment to seek God's favour and grace ! 
" Be ye reconciled to God." " Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou 
shalt be saved." 

" Turn to Christ your longing eyes, 

View his bleeding sacrifice : 

See through him repentance given, 

Pardon, holiness, and heaven : 

Glorify the King of kings, 

Take the peace the gospel brings." 



>jjirit»al fckas. 



IT is a well known fact in natural history that, whether too lazy to rear a 
family, or from an entire dislike to parental responsibilities, or afraid to 
"be late for its summer holiday, the cuckoo drops its eggs in the nests of other 
birds. Another fact concerning it is not so well known. One would think 
that a young cuckoo, on finding itself an interloper in the nest, would, out 
of sheer gratitude, endeavour to make things comfortable all round. But 
it is not so. Being generally a stronger bird, and broader in the back than 
those in whose nest it has found a home, it requires more room, and generally 
gets it by turning the others out of the nest. In spite of protest on the young 
ones' part, that they are the proper owners of the nest, and of the parent birds 
that they built it for their offspring, the disagreeable cuckoo claims more 
than the children's share, and thus abuses its position. How suggestive in 
these times is such a fact ! Is it not in full swing in many quarters ? Here 
is a church, happy and useful, holding the doctrines of the gospel with a 
good conscience, having a pastor who delights to preach the Word that has 
been the saving of his own soul, to the manifest joy and prosperity of the 
people. Into their midst comes one who, at first, seems just like the rest. 
He is received with warm and affectionate greeting, and made at home with 
them. But presently there is a disturbance in the hitherto warm and happy 
family nest. 

What is it ? There are uncomfortable suspicions of being crowded, and 
some one wants more room. The question is somehow started — hangs about 
in the air as a whisper — as to the old-fashioned and out-of-date views of 
the pastor and some of the deacons. They actually believe the Bible to be 
inspired, and quote its sayings as though God had spoken them. They 
believe in miracles, have a strange notion that they are saved by sovereign 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



233 



grace, and that God meant to save them from all eternity, and certainly 
would do so ; and they even dare to hold that eternal punishment is the doom 
of the impenitent. It is whispered that no intelligent man believes these 
things now, and — well, it is evident that the old peace is gone. The centre 
of the commotion is found to be the recently received brother ; and the 
church is fortunate if it does not lose its best members, and perhaps its 
minister, while the cuckoo holds possession of the nest, io. which he has no 
right to be. In his case there is real guilt, for he knew, or ought to have 
ascertained before he joined, the things most assuredly believed among 
them. 

Sometimes the spiritual cuckoo gets into the pulpit. An earnest, gospel- 
loving church, served by a true and faithful minister, is called upon to 
choose a successor. One such case we have in mind. It is thought that 
the candidate will preach the same gospel as his predecessor, although with, 
perhaps, more culture, and so attract the young. He is elected to the pulpit. 
He serves the church a few years, and such is his wondrous progress along 
the lines of advanced thought, that one Sunday he announces from the 
pulpit, that he could no more preach the sermons he preached when he first 
came amongst the people, than he could wear the knickerbockers of child- 
hood. Then why not leave the pulpit ? Get out of the nest ! No, let others 
go, the people who invited and supported him in those early years. " Ah ! " 
said an aged deacon, with the tears rolling down his cheeks as he related 
the incident, " would God he would now give us some of the knickerbocker 
sermons ! " Such men may preach what they like — it is a free country — but 
let them, in all conscience, build their own churches, and not fancy they 
have a perfect right to the pulpits and the churches that were built by men 
who detest their doctrine, if such shadowy teaching as theirs can be called 
by that name. Mr. Cuckoo, build your own nest, and hatch your own 
eggs in it, and none will complain. 

And, lastly. A number of ministers meet in holy fellowship, so much 
agreed in heart and faith, that there is no question of writing down or 
formulating a creed, as they agree to work in hearty and loving co-opera- 
tion. "Words are used to designate their position which have but one mean- 
ing. For years the association does good work, and brings much happiness 
to its associates. And then there come in those who are entirely opposed, 
in their faith, to the early founders. They introduce new meanings to old 
words, and for a long time assert that they hold the truth as held by 
the original associates. The story is well known. The evangelical nest is 
greatly disturbed ; and, alas ! it is not those who cause the disturbance who 
leave, they are most tenacious of their hold on the nest others have built, 
but the original founders are compelled to turn out. "Where is the honesty, 
where the manliness of the thing ? Surely, if a man finds himself entirely 
out of sympathy and belief with those whom he has joined, his course is 
clear : he should himself leave, and leave the rightful owners in possession. 

Even the cuckoo may teach useful lessons. H. W. C. 



Notices rrf l00fes. 



The Stockwell Reciter: a Collection of 
Old and New Favourites for the Home, 
the School, and the Band of Hope. 
Edited by Vernon J. Charles- 
worth, Head Master of the Stock- 
well Orphanage. Passmore .and 
Alabaster. 
Mr. Charlesworth's selection is well 
made. The pieces are worth re- 



citing, and worth hearing. For six- 
pence we have here a wealth of good 
reading for those who do not recite ; 
while for those who aspire to oratory, 
the book will be most valuable as a 
practising ground for voice and 
gesture. All our readers should get 
the sixpenny part of this useful 
work. 

16 



234 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



The Preachers of Scotland from the Sixth 
to the Nineteenth Century. By W. 
G. Blaiiue, D.D. T. and T. Clark. 

A valuable volume. The lectures 
before us are an able tribute to those 
who in Scottish pulpits served, not 
Scotland only, but all our Lord's 
kingdom on earth. The ministry of 
Columba, the earliest apostle of Chris- 
tianity to Scotland, though not strictly 
within the limits proposed by the 
author, i3 a welcome prelude to the 
stirring and pathetic voices of later 
witnesses. That was a remarkable 
balancing of favours, if, as is believed 
by some, Patrick was Scotland's gift 
to Ireland, as Columba was Ireland's 
messenger to Scotland. 

The ten centuries between the intro- 
duction of Christianity and the Re- 
formation tell a sad story of decay and 
ruin of the church which had been 
raised upon evangelical foundations. 
Let us note well the fact that decline 
in missionary zeal ran parallel with 
decline in spirituality within the 
church. The flame of devotion must 
be kept bright upon the home altar in 
order that Christ's servants may bear 
the lighted torch to dark lands. 

In Scotland, as in Germany, there 
were Reformers before the Reforma- 
tion. Hamilton and Wishart prepared 
the way for Knox, as Huss for Luther. 
The Scotch forerunners were both bold 
and powerful preachers, and both be- 
came martyrs. This chapter in the his- 
tory of the Scotch pulpit reads like the 
Acts of the Apostles. A wicked hier- 
archy joined hands with the civil 
authority to silence the messengers of 
the Lord. Is it strange that the 
struggle was fierce ? Romish rites and 
ceremonies had stripped the early 
church of every shred of its evangelical 
power, and robbed it almost of life 
itself. Knox looked upon the mass as 
an abomination and rank idolatry, 
as in very truth it is ; and the fire shut 
up in his bones burst forth in devour- 
ing flames. Royalty trembled before 
the prophet of the Lord God, and Israel 
saw deliverance. Strong, and some- 
times rough, as the Reformers and 
Covenanters were, we must not think 
that their preaching was all granite 
and gall : the tender grace of the 
gospel was a characteristic feature of 



their pulpit; some of them were 
masters of pathos. James Lawson, 
the spiritual son and successor of 
Kuox, was never heard but with tears, 
both of repentance and joy. John 
"Welsh, of Ayr, the son-in-law of Knox, 
had a heart of such overflowing ten- 
derness that his preaching was won- 
derfully moving. It was he who 
kept his plaid at hand, and often rose 
at night to pray, because, as he said, 
' ' I have three thousand souls to 
answer for, and I know not how it is 
with many of them." 

Men who subscribed their names in 
their own blood to solemn covenants 
against popery and prelacy valued the 
pure gospel. There were chosen men 
for trying times. One was Alexan- 
der Henderson, a leader among the 
Westminster Assembly divines; an- 
other was David Dickson, an eminent 
preacher, but even more remarkable 
as an expositor of the deep things of 
God; a third was Samuel Ruther- 
ford, who was singularly successful 
in setting forth the love and loveliness 
of Christ, both in his sermons and 
letters. 

Four hundred of the flower of 
the Scotch clergy were ejected from 
their livings in 1662. Then began 
" the killing time." The wolves were 
abroad, and neither pastors nor flocks 
had safety. Then was the preaching 
full of the very essence of the gospel. 

It seems strange that a recoil from 
this fervently evangelical spirit should 
take place in the next century, and 
that many of the clergy should lose 
their grip upon fundamental truths. 
No wonder that the power of the 
pulpit declined when preachers courted 
the favour of fashionable society, 
sought literary distinction, and 
dropped saving truths to discourse 
upon bare morals. Infidelity became 
widespread, drunkenness became com- 
mon among the clergy, and morality 
greatly declined among the people. 
Then came the evangelical revival 
of the eighteentn century, with sound 
and earnest men at the front again, 
and the power of the pulpit felt as in 
earlier days. 

The history of the Scottish pulpit 
has many lessons for modern preachers. 
Professor Blaikie wisely points them 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



235 



out. Perhaps none is more clear than 
this : that the gospel of Jesus Christ 
best supplies the needs of every age. 
No other remedy for social wrongs 
and disorders is so effective. There 
need be no fear of failure in the 
pulpit so long as the gospel is faithfully 
preached ; but ministers who think 
that they must ever be telling some new 
thing may here see that nothing is so 
attractive as the old, old story of Jesus 
and his love. Oh, that Scotland may 
learn as well as teach the lesson of 
fidelity to the truth ! We fear that 
even in her faithful churches an un- 
hallowed leaven has begun its work. 

Flashes from the Welsh Pulpit. Edited 
by the Eev. Gwnoro Davies. With 
an Introductory Paper by the Eev. 
T. C. Edwards, D.D. Hodder and 
Stoughton. 

Herein are many precious things 
from the Welsh mountains, and some 
rather ordinary gatherings. We are 
afraid that the collector's preface in- 
dicates coming evil for the Prin- 
cipality ; but we are grateful that at 
present the old truth has sway, and 
novelties are not so highly esteemed 
as in England. This collection of 
good things will be useful to the 
preacher, and interesting to the 
reader. We subjoin a passage which 
sets forth a glorious truth : 

"Salvation is of grace alone." 
"The high priest goes into the 
middle court, clad in long flowing 
garments, the bells attached to his 
skirt ringing at every movement he 
makes. Now, you say, he is prepared 
to go into the holiest of all, and appear 
before God ? No, not yet. He must 
lay aside his gorgeous robe and his 
bells, and enter the sanctuary with 
nothing but the clean linen garment 
upon his flesh. No bells must ring 
before God. Everything must be 
silent there, that the blood may speak. 
Ring the bells of your good works in 
your family circle, and in all your 
spheres of influence; but beware of 
ringing them before God. All must 
keep silence there. The blood alone 
must speak. At the same time, if the 
bells don't ring in the middle court, 
the people will take for granted that 
the priest within the veil is dead." 



The Least of all Lands: Seven Chapters 
on the Topography of Palestine in 
Relation to its History. By William 
Miller, C.I.E., LL.D. Blackie. 

This work contains most instructive 
remarks upon events of Old Testament 
history, derived from personal exami- 
nation of the sites upon which they 
took place. As a corrector of mis- 
takes, and a setter forth of the great 
battles of the old times in a vivid 
manner, Dr. Miller has done good 
service to Bible students. But we 
take grave exception to his remarks 
upon our Lord's life, so far as we un- 
derstand them. We do not read with- 
out painful emotion that Jesus Christ 
' ' did not fashion the framework of 
his life on the pattern that he wished. 
The ideal that he realized was meaner 
than the one he aimed at." Such lan- 
guage shocks us, and makes us feel 
that all the pleasure we had in reading 
the earlier pages is curdled into indig- 
nation. Whatever else may be said to 
honour our Lord, these lines ought 
not to have been written by the Prin- 
cipal of a Christian College. 

The Biblical Illustrator ; or, Anecdotes, 
Similes, Emblems, Illustrations, &c, 
&c, gathered from a wide range of 
Some and Foreign Literature, on the 
Verses of the Bible. Galatians, 1 vol. ; 
Ephesians, 1 vol. By Eev. Joseph 
S. Exell, M.A. Nisbet and Co. 

Never were books so crowded with 
matter, pressed down, and compressed 
as by an hydraulic ram. Taken from 
all quarters, the comments are of 
varied value, making up a solid mass 
of expository thought such as can be 
found nowhere else in such profusion. 
Given discretion in their use, the con- 
tents of these volumes must be of the 
utmost value to working ministers 
with little money to buy books, and 
less time to search them. Of course, 
we do not endorse every extract con- 
tained in this omnium gatherum, but 
at 7s. 6d. each there is an absolutely un- 
rivalled quantity for money, to say the 
very least. If anything, there is too 
much ; but instead of finding fault at 
a failure of keen discrimination in se- 
lection, we marvel at the comprehen- 
siveness of the collection. What a 
worker Mr. Exell is ! 



23G 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



What is Man ? His Origin, Life-history, 
and Future Destiny, as revealed in the 
Word of God. By J. Anderson, 
M.D. London : J. Nisbet. 

A bulky volume, beautifully edited ! 
While we refuse to endorse all his expo- 
sitions of Scripture, we cannot refrain 
from congratulating the venerable 
author upon the sincere pleasure, 
honest pride, and heartfelt gratitude 
with which he dedicated it to his " dear 
wife " on his seventy- sixth birthday, 
last September. More than fifty years 
have rolled by since he first piloted the 
product of his pen through the press 
in a scientific work that befitted his 
medical profession, and bespoke his 
faith at the same time in the wisdom 
that cometh down from above. That 
disquisition on "The Nervous System" 
has been long out of print ; but we 
gather from an " advertisement " that 
the substance of it is condensed in 
chapter II. of the present treatise. 

Here, then, we ought to have the 
photograph of a mind gilded with the 
1 ' Golden Alphabet . ' ' Like the Author 
of the long Psalm, he professes to have 
found the words of God sweeter than 
honey to his taste, while the Prophe- 
cies have exerted such a fascination 
over him that he has seemed to himself 
to have " more understanding than 
all his teachers." 

As a Protestant he holds the right of 

private judgment, with the inevitable 

proviso that it involves the duty of 

personal research. The original text 

of both Old and New Testaments he 

has scanned daily and diligently. More 

than that, on many a critical passage 

he has marked the little variations 

which occur in the readings by such 

a comparison of codices and uncials 

as might only appear interesting to 

a microscopic criticism. A vein of 

conscientious industry pervades his 

studies, for which no prejudice of our 

own would prompt us to stint an 

eulogium. When we notice, however, 

that his Eschatology follows in the 

wake of those who teach " conditional 

immortality " and its concomitants, 

proclaiming "a larger hope" and a 

future probation for those who quit 

this life unsaved ; and when we hear 

talk of probabilities as if they were 

predictions of the Bible, we hoist the 



cone all round the coast, and wait 
with tremulous anxiety for a report of 
wrecks. 

Sunday Letters to a Schoolboy. By E. 

L. Montagu. Nisbet. 
A fairly good little book. Our lads 
would like it better if the style were 
livelier. It is possible to be pious 
without being prosy even on Sundays. 

Notes for Boys. By an Old Boy. 

Elliot Stock. 
The author of these notes is fond of 
aphorisms. If his youthful learners 
have an equal taste for laconics, they 
may find here piquant counsels on 
" Morals, Mind, and Manners." His 
"own son" for whom these pages 
were prepared, must have been de- 
cidedly a smart young fellow if he 
could follow the " old boy " in all his 
Latin and French phrases without the 
aid of one or more lexicons. Likely 
enough the '* old boy " thought this 
himself when he put a parenthesis on 
the title-page — sic, "Notes for boys 
(and their fathers)." If the boys cannot 
make out a passage, they are to ask 
their fathers. Very likely ! 

Ripples in the Starlight: Additional 
Fragments of Sunday Thought and 
Teaching. By J. E. Macduff, D.D. 
Nisbet. 
Dr. Macduff's stream of thought has 
rippled in the twilight and in the 
moonlight, and now in the starlight ; 
we look for its rippling in the sun- 
light. Ripple when it may, it is a 
pure stream, and long may it continue 
to flow ! Our friend, who elsewhere 
has given the Church great loaves, 
here brings forth cracknels, and dainty 
cakes. 
God and Nature. By Bev. N. Cur- 

nock, F.R.M.S. Woolmer. 
Mr. Curnock is a thoughtful and 
poetical writer, and frequently strikes 
out new and valuable thoughts ; but 
we do not think there is quite so much 
in his writing as there seems to be. He 
is deep, but not full. He will yet be 
clearer in style, and then he will be 
more powerful ; for he has evidently 
large resources of mind, and the will 
to use them for the truth's sake. Our 
verdict on this little work is — Too 
many flowers, sweet- smelling flowers 
though they be. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



237 



Christianity according to Christ. A 
series of papers. By John Monro 
Gibson, D.D. Nisbet. 

This volume contains much, excellent 
and deep thought ; and we know, of a 
surety, that our friend is always true 
to the gospel of the blessed God. If 
it were not for this assurance, we 
should be inclined to pick a bone, here 
and there, with him. He seems to us 
to have, in his mind's eye, certain ultra 
brethren, who, from ignorance or wil- 
fulness, mis-state orthodox truth ; and 
in the process of correcting them, he 
seems to be taking the loose side. "We 
do not believe that he does so in the 
least degree ; but he may easily enough 
be thought to do so. We could not 
endorse all that he has to say; and 
yet we feel sure that he thought it 
needful to say it, to remove out of the 
way those mis-statements which are 
the weak points against which adver- 
saries direct their attacks when they 
mean to assail the truth itself. Though 
bound to say as much as this, we are 
none the less glad to have read so 
many good things from his choice pen. 

The Form of the Christian Temple ; be- 
ing a Treatise on the Constitution of 
the New Testament Church. By 
Thomas Witherow, D.D., LL.D. 
T. and T. Clark, Edinburgh. 

A thoroughly learned book upon 
Church Government, arguing for pres- 
bytery in opposition to prelacy. In 
almost all his statements, we are at 
one with Professor "Witherow, and 
we think he defends his positions with 
great success. The dogma of aposto- 
lical succession he very effectually 
demolishes ; it is the merest dream 
that ever visited a silly brain, and yet 
it holds thousands of sensible men 
beneath its power. That the Anglican 
Church can claim any such succession 
is seen to be impossible in the follow- 
ing sentences : — 

" The way in which most people of 
intelligence will regard the matter is 
this : The Roman Church is either a 
true Church or a false Church. If a 
true Church, it was schismatical to 
separate from her ; if a false Church, 
it was not possible for her to transmit 
a divine Commission. If the popes 
were not usurpers, but honestly per- 



forming the duties to which God 
called them, then it was sin in Angli- 
canism to withdraw its allegiance 
from papal rule ; if, on the other 
hand, the pope is the man of sin, 
sitting in the temple of God, he must 
be Antichrist ; and a commission to 
preach Christ, which is derived from 
Antichrist, is not much to boast x)f. 
In either case, what the pope gave, 
the pope can take away ; and in this 
case he has taken away." 

The boastful claims of certain high 
churchmen, which they put forth when 
they denounce all dissent from their 
community, are sarcastically stated by 
Bishop Hoadley. 

" As for us of the Church of Eng- 
land, we have bishops in a succession 
as certainly uninterrupted from the 
apostles as your Church could com- 
municate to us ; and on this bottom 
we have a right to separate from you ; 
but no flesh living has any right to 
differ or separate from us." 

Those who are studying church 
government cannot afford to overlook 
this thoroughly able work. If they 
master this volume, they will hardly 
require anything else. 

The True Psalmody ; or, The Bible 
Psalms the Church's only Manual 
of Praise. Edinburgh : J. Gemmell. 

From a forensic point of view we may 
admire the argument of an able 
defence, when we are quite sure that 
the verdict will go in an opposite 
direction. Here we have an instance. 
Perhaps this is the best book that was 
ever compiled in favour of the exclu- 
sive use of the Scotch metrical version 
of the Psalms of David, as a complete 
manual of praise. No other, it is 
alleged, ought to be used in public or 
in private worship. Paraphrases are 
poisonous ; hymns are heresy. The 
good Presbyterians of Philadelphia, 
U.S., published this treatise thirty 
years ago. It is re-published now for 
the special benefit, we presume, of 
their brethren in Belfast. If not a 
lively oracle, it is at least a learned 
oration. To repeat a scratch proverb : 
" Credula res amor esV ; or to adopt 
the free translation of an old author, 
for the sake of its aptness : " The man 
who loves is easy of belief." 



238 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Conquests of the Cross. Part I. (in- 
cluding Presentation Plate). Price 
7d. Cassell and Co. 

This opens well, and promises to be 
a grand advocate for missions. "We 
trust the work will be read by the 
millions. The engravings are of fine 
quality. 

An Old Testament Commentary for 
English Readers. Edited by C. J. 
Ellicott, D.D. Cassell and Co. 

Ellicott's Commentary stands very 
high. Our own opinion of it has 
greatly risen since its first issue. The 
publication in parts is now far ad- 
vanced, even to the Psalms ; but it is 
not too late for our readers to obtain 
it in bound volumes, or in parts, if 
they prefer it in that form. 

Anecdotes on Bible Texts : St. Mark. 
By J.L.Nye. Sunday School Union. 

A GOOD shilling's-worth. Mr. Nye is 
now nearly through the New Testa- 
ment. Teachers with these collections 
of anecdotes ought never to be dull 
in their talks with their classes. 

The Path of Wealth ; or, Light from 
My Forge. A Discussion of God's 
Money Laws. By a Blacksmith. 
With an Introduction by Rev. A. 
Carman, D.D. Brantford, Ontario : 
Bradley, Garrepon, and Co. 

A capital book upon tithing and 
systematic giving. The subject is 
handled in a lively and earnest man- 
ner. We cannot say that the portrait 
looks much like a blacksmith, neither 
is the style of the book such as to 
sustain that character ; and yet we do 
not doubt that the author is a very 
superior son of the forge. The work 
is got up in an original, not to say 
homely, style ; but we should like to 
see it in thousands of Christian homes. 
Should the principle of regular syste- 
matic tenth-giving be taken up by all 
Christians, as it ought to be, we should 
hear no more of bazaars and entertain- 
ments, for the treasury of the Lord 
would be filled in a manner more 
pleasing to God, and more honourable 
to his church. Our friends in the 
Dominion should not let this book be 
overlooked : it will do them great ser- 
vice if they scatter it widely. 



The Way Bach. By JAMES L. STANLEY. 

Religious Tract Society. 
Very evangelical and spiritual. The 
rising steps which lead from conviction 
to consecration are well described, 
and an earnest effort is made to help 
the weak ones in the ascent. The work 
is issued in very neat form. 

Words of Life : Sermons on Christian 
Doctrine, Experience, and Duty. By 
David Merson, M.A. Dickenson. 

These seem to be good sermons, sound 
and practical. We rejoice that the 
English Presbyterian pulpit can show 
so good an average of excellence ; 
for we suppose these discourses to be 
very near the general level of the body 
to which the preacher belongs; and 
this is saying no small thing. 

David : the Man after God's own Heart, 
A Book for Young Men. By Rev. 
H. E. Stone. Nisbet and Co. 
Good practical observations, intended 
to promote faith and holiness. A 
thoughtful comment upon a great and 
chequered life. Mr. Stone has read 
carefully, and has written admirably. 
Believers will read with profit what he 
has written with prayer. 

David : his Life and Times. By Rev. 
W. J. Deane, M.A. [" Men of the 
Bible " Series]. Nisbet and Co. 
This is a more learned work than the 
former, and will meet the demands of 
quite another class of readers. But 
we draw no comparisons, each is good 
in its own line. One could hardly get 
better change for half-a-crown than 
this well-condensed, instructive, and 
suggestive epitome of the events of a 
right royal life. 

Memorable Bible Nights : Sunday After- 
noon Talks in the Chapel of the 
Children's Home. By Nehemiah 
Curnock, F.R.M.S. Methodist Sun- 
day School Union. 
You who want a series of holy talks 
to the young should get this, for it 
will put you on a tram-line, and you 
can engineer your own cars by the help 
of it. The work is specially well done, 
and is worthy of the audience to 
which it was addressed, namely, the 
officers and children of Mr. Stephen- 
son's Home, and a number of well 
trained children who dropped in. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



239 



Real Life Stories. Illustrated. Alfred 
Holness. 

Capital ! Just the thing to give to 
the careless, with, earnest prayer for 
their conversion. The pictures will 
attract, and the stories impress, and 
the cost is only one-and-six. Some of 
the stories brought out for a penny 
are written by an excellent member of 
our own College Conference, with the 
view of taking men from evil novels. 

Short Biographies for the People. By 
Various Writers. Religious Tract 
Society. 

A SELECTION from the series of short 
biographies already issued. In this 
list we have lives of Reformers. First- 
rate. Cheap and good. 

Barton Memorials: Works of Mr. 
Samuel Beacon. Published under 
the direction of Mr. Thomas Cook. 
Elliot Stock. 

This literature deserved reprinting, 
but it needed a helping hand to secure 
the publishers from loss ; and this 
the venerable Thomas Cook has sup- 
plied, very much to his own honour. 
Mr. Deacon's writings do not rise into 
the highest class, but they were on a 
level with the understandings and 
tastes of those to whom he addressed 
himself, and were calculated to do 
them real good. We trust that, with 
a new lease of life, the usefulness of 
these books will be repeated. 

In the Far East : Letters from Geraldine 
Guinness. Edited by her Sister. 
Morgan and Scott. 

What pathos there is in this plea for 
China ! A consecrated woman here 
tells her experience, and that of her 
comrade, and tells it in bravely modest 
language. She has upon her heart 
the pressure of the awful fact that a 
million of people die every month in 
China without the knowledge of 
salvation. She is on fire with this 
burning fact. She longs to bring to 
them the Word of life ; and her friend, 
Miss Read, has the same soul-hunger. 
It seems a strangely cruel thing to 
these earnest young ladies that so 
many of us should stay at home, and 
work over and over again the fields 
which are of such slender acreage, 
while boundless leagues of pur Lord's 



estate have never felt the gospel 
plough, nor received a handful of 
seed. May these pleadings be preva- 
lent in the church of Christ ! 

The book is handsomely brought 
out, and exceedingly well edited. If 
it charms others as much as it has edi- 
fied us, it will have a great sale, and 
will be of the utmost service to Chinese 
missions. 

The Children's Champion and the Vic- 
tories he Won. Nelson and Sons. 

Very good indeed. " The righteous 
shall be in everlasting remembrance." 
Shaftesbury deserves to be the subject 
of many pens and pencils. This pretty 
volume is chaste in its illustrations, 
handsome in its binding, and elegant 
in every part of its get-up. A suitable 
wreath to be laid upon the tomb of 
the beloved earl. 

Andreiu Gillon ; a Tale of the Scottish 
Covenanters. By John Strathesk. 
Edinburgh : Oliphant and Ferrier. 

A true tale of the Covenanters 
exceedingly well told by a writer who 
has a charming pen. Well worth the 
shilling asked for it. Be sure to buy it. 

The Autohiography of a Soldier in 
India, with his Conversion or Call oy 
Grace and Subsequent Experience and 
Call to the Ministry. By Thomas 
Witts, Minister of the Strict Baptist 
Church, Sydney, N.S.W. Part I. 
F. Kirby, 17, Bouverie Street. 

Those who belong to "the Gospel 
Standard " company may enjoy this 
bit of biography, but we hardly think 
that any one else will do so. This 
first portion is the journal of a soldier 
who has had terrible conviction of sin, 
and many soul conflicts, but holds 
firmly to predestination, and that side 
of truth which goes therewith. All 
the other part of the Word of God is 
outside the boundary of his faith, and 
he severely censures those who receive 
it. He is very hard upon ' ' the 
Brethren," " Temperance men," c< Ar- 
minians," and others who are not up 
to his mark. 

More Precious than Gold. By Jeannie 
Chappell. Partridge and Co. 

A story which rises above the com- 
mon level, and is sure to win attention. 



240 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



Our Little Dots. Keligious Tract 
Society. 

A splendid book for the times. The 
cover, with its silk and satin, beats 
all former attempts at pretty binding. 

The Juvenile : a magazine for the 
young. London Missionary Society. 
Snow. 

This little monthly strikes us as 
having much vivacity about it. The 
engravings are novel and striking. 
The volume for 1888 is one shilling. 

The Homilist. Edited by Eev. David 
Thomas, D.D., and Eev. J. J. S. 
Bird, B.A. Vol. LIX. Houlston. 

There are difficulties connected with 
a double editorship, but in this case 
they are softened, for Dr. Thomas 
writes with righteous indignation 
against the degeneracy of the age, 
and Mr. Bird inculcates old-fashioned 
doctrine with all his might. "We are 
glad to see this magazine upon the 
right side. It is sure to lose many of 
its former purchasers ; but we trust 
new ones are forthcoming. 

The Homiletic Magazine. Vol. XIX. 
Nisbet. 

This is a rich volume, both for con- 
tinuous expositions and for sermon 
outlines. One needs to discriminate, 
and leave out here and there that 
which is not up to the mark ; but so 
far as we can see, this is a help which 
ministers may safely use, and gather 
from it most valuable hints in the 
composing of their sermons. 

Old Jonathan. Collingridge. 

A lively magazine, with a clear gospel 
ring about it. 

Our Own Magazine. Published by the 
Children's Special Service Mission, 
13, "Warwick Lane. 

This magazine has an immense circu- 
lation, and it deserves it ; for it goes 
straight at the mark, and aims at the 
spiritual good of its young readers. 

Tlie Child's Companion. Vol. for 1888. 
Religious Tract Society. 

Our old friend grows better and better, 
and its dress surpasses all we have ever 
ueen. "We also heartily recommend 
The Cottager and Artisan, 



Horner's Stories for the People. Third 

Series. "W. B. Horner and Sons. 
Horner and Sons have tried, with 
popular stories of a high moral and 
religious tone, to cut out the vicious 
catchpennies which are depraving our 
boys and girls. They have gained an 
immense circulation for some of their 
stories, and so far they must have been 
successful, since a market for the good 
leaves so much less sale for the bad. 
In a bright cover, twelve of the stories 
are issued for one shilling. "We do not 
care for such literature for our own 
perusal ; but so far as it supplants the 
filthy fiction of the period we wish a 
large success to its spirited publishers. 

Practical Essay -ivriting, for the use of 
Candidates for Competitive, Qualify- 
ing, and other Examinations. By 
A. "W. Holmes-Forbes, M.A. Son- 
nenschein. 
This is a very sensible, useful, prac- 
tical treatise. Young men who wish 
to write well should not fail to read 
this most wise and instructive hand- 
book. It costs one shilling and six- 
pence ; but to the young essayist it 
will be worth much more, if he care- 
fully follows its directions. 

Saved by Love. A Story of London 
Streets. By Emma Leslie. Nelson. 
Tells how the little orphan child of a 
very poor Christian woman was led to 
consort with one of the wildest and 
worst girls in the street — ' ' Street 
Rubbish " she styled herself. How 
this semi-savage was Christianized by 
the patient love and simple Bible 
words of her little friend is well told. 

Baptist Hymn Writers and their Hymns. 

By Henry S. Burrage, D.D. 

Portland, Maine, U.S.A. London: 

Marlborough and Co. 
A VERY interesting work. We marvel 
how Dr. Burrage could make so much 
out of Baptist hymn makers. Cer- 
tainly, all that diligence and affection 
could accomplish has been wrought 
by his facile pen. Baptists should not 
neglect to purchase this portly volume. 
"We hardly think that C. H. Spurgeon 
deserved a portrait and a memoir as a 
hymn- writer : he has not often figured 
in that capacity, and may be forgiven 
for the little he has in that way in- 
flicted on the public. 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



241 



Robert Aske : a Story of the Reforma- 
tion. By Eliza F. Pollard. Part- 
ridge and Co. 

The story of Robert Aske, the leader 
of "The Pilgrimage of Grace," who 
was executed at York, in 1537, for the 
part he took in that insurrection, is 
thrillingly interesting, whether we 
accept the author's account of his se- 
cret marriage, by Cardinal Pole, to a 
daughter of the Earl of Essex, as his- 
torically correct, or not. The story 
embraces a miniature biography of 
Tyndale, and an account of "the ups 
and downs which attended his efforts 
•for the publication of the Bible " ; for 
as of "The Word made flesh," so of 
the inspired Word, it might have been 
said, " They seek the young child to 
destroy it." The book— a handsome 
volume for three-and-six — is full of 
stirring incident, and wise observa- 
tions on the events of the period, and 
will greatly enhance the writer's repu- 
tation. 

Higher Up. By Nellie Hellis. Re- 
ligious Tract Society. 

"A little child shall lead them," is 
the appropriate motto of this ingenious 
story. It is not altogether a child's 
book, though the central figure is a 
little gentleman who takes an omnibus 
ride in search of his mother, who had 
gone "higher up "—to heaven— a few 
days before. His strange talk to the 
old 'bus conductor sets that worthy 
thinking about his last journey, and 
how it will fare with him when death 
stops him. 

Tlie Christinas Child, and Only a Dog. 
By Hesba Stretton. Religious 
Tract Society. 

Two stories precisely what you would 
-expect from the pen that wrote Jessica's 
First Prayer. They are very short, very 
sweet, and, at sixpence, very cheap. 

Following Heavenward; or, the Story 
of Alfred Reid. By Pansy. Nelson 
and Sons. 

"Pansy " books need no commenda- 
tion in America: proprietors of reli- 
gious periodicals are offering them as 
"premiums for subscribers." Follow- 
ing Heavenward is by far the best of 
those we have yet seen. It is the 
•experience of a Christian lady with a 



class of roughs, or rowdies; and judg- 
ing from the descriptions we have 
read of the New York article, our 
home-grown rough is "nowhere" in 
comparison. Mrs. Roberts needed di- 
vinely-inspired tact, inventiveness, 
love, and patience in dealing with these 
incorrigibles ; and that these were 
liberally given in answer to prayer is 
evident in every one of the telling 
instances recorded. The book is full 
of stimulus and suggestiveness to 
Christian workers, and should be so 
to "out-of- workers." 

The Little Woman in Grey. Scenes and 
Incidents in Home Mission Work. By 
Charles R. Parsons. Stirling: 
Drummond's. London : Partridge. 

As delightful a book of experience in 
the gospel harvest-field as the • ' Pansy " 
book just noticed, and much on the 
sameliaes. Coming from Drummond's, 
we need not say that there is the 
clear ring of sound gospel truth in it. 

Among the Turks. By V. L. Cameron, 
C.B., D.C.L., Commander, Royal 
Navy. Thomas Nelson and Sons. 

Well done, Commander Cameron ! 
You convey to the boys a world of 
information in such a form that they 
must take it in. You are a master 
magician, and you use your art well. 
Don't draw the long-bow more than 
you can help. For illustrations this 
is a volume in Nelson's best style. 

Oliver's Old Pictures ; or, the Magic 
Circle. By Emma Marshall. Nis- 
bet and Co. 
The words " Second Edition," on the 
title-page, are good evidence that some 
connoisseurs have put an exceptional 
value on Oliver's Pictures. We are 
not much struck with the story ; but 
then, we have had to devour such 
quantities of story-teller's sweets, that 
probably our palate is out of order. 

The King's Daughters. By Emily S. 
Holt. John F. Shaw and Co. 

Miss Holt always writes what we can 
heartily recommend. We are told, by 
those who read carefully, that there is 
some careless writing in this story ; 
and we do not wonder that it should 
be so, when one pen produces so very 
much. Miss Holt's writing is all well 
meant, and of good quality. 



242 



NOTICES OF BOOKS. 



The People of the Pilgrimage. An Ex- 
pository Study of the " Pilgrim's 
Progress " as a book of Character. 
Second Series : Helpers, False Pil- 
grims, &c. By Rev. J. A. Kerr 
Bain. Hodder and Stoughton. 
Another good book. Mr. Kerr Bain 
appreciates the Dreamer's Allegory, 
and looks lovingly at its moving cha- 
racters. Every true Brnyanite will 
rejoice that such a commentator upon 
our great author has arisen : a man 
who is himself almost an allegorist, 
and, therefore, drops into the Bunyan 
line of things. As he proceeds with 
his writing, Mr. Bain takes fire, and 
brightens in thought and style. His 
two volumes make up an exposition 
of "Pilgrim's Progress" second to 
none. They cost six shillings each, 
and are worth it. Quiet readers, who 
enjoy a suggestive book at the fireside, 
will take much pleasure in these two 
sets of lectures. 

A Short Life of Christ for Old and 
Young. By Cunningham Geikie, 
D.D. Hatchards. 
This is not an abridgment of Dr. 
Geikie' s great work, but quite a new 
one. In our judgment, no one has 
ever written a satisfactory ' ' Life of 
Christ," and nobody will ever do so. 
The evangelists will ever be the only 
worthy chroniclers of the Lord's 
career. Still, among those who have 
done well, we give the preference to 
Dr. Geikie ; his book is much more 
reliable than that of Farrar, and far 
more full of teaching than any other 
we have ever perused. We do not 
profess to have read through this 
shorter " Life of Christ," but we have 
cut into the book in many places, and 
have always struck upon something 
excellent. It seems to us to be con- 
densed, full, plain, devout, and in 
every way instructive. Those who 
cannot buy a larger work may be well 
content with this. 

On the Book of the Prophet Daniel. 
Brief Comments. " Christian Com- 
monwealth" Publishing Company. 

Putting our paper-knife here and 
there into this book, we have come 
across many passages containing ex- 
cellent teaching. The book is well 
condensed in its historic portions, and 



useful lessons are drawn from the 
prophet, which thoughtful men and 
devout students of the sacred Word 
will know how to estimate. We can- 
not here attempt to go into the merits 
of the author's impressions as to the 
relation of the wonderful prophecy of 
Daniel to present-day questions ; nor 
are we prepared to fix the exact 
meaning and reference of all the 
passages quoted by the author ; but 
we commend to our readers the 
prayerful study of Daniel's own book, 
together with all the other prophetical 
books, each of which exhibits some 
special side of the truth which the 
Holy Spirit has revealed for our benefit. 
AH Scripture is given for our instruc- 
tion, and therefore all should be 
studied. We should not neglect any 
part of the divine Word. 
Every Morning : First Thoughts for 
First Hours. By Joseph Parker, 
D.D. Charles Burnett and Co. 
Very Parkeresque. We do not think 
that this book will cut out Jay, or 
Hawker, or Mason ; but there are 
many who will enjoy it, and be edified 
by it. It is exposition, meditation, 
prayer : in fact, many good and strik- 
ing things combined. We like it better 
than the doctor's usual productions. 
It is original in method and in general 
style, as might have been expected 
from the author's individuality. 

Elijah the Prophet and Daniel the 
Beloved. By W. M. Taylor, D.D. 
Charles Burnet and Co. 
Our esteemed friend, Dr. W. M. 
Taylor, has a genius for Bible Bio- 
graphy. He makes his characters 
fascinating, but not by what he heaps 
upon them. He goes deep, searches 
all the literature of his subjects, and 
brings out of the inspired narrative 
that which charms the reader. Here 
we have Elijah and Daniel, but 
aforetime we have had Joseph, David, 
Moses, Paul, and Peter. Any one of 
these can be had for 3s. 6d., and 
we very cordially recommend their 
purchase. Young men will meet with 
no modern nonsense here; but they 
will find a noble intellect, consecrating 
all its wealth of originality and 
acquirement to the cause of God and 
truth, and therein honouring itself and 
benefiting men. 



NOTICES OP BOOKS. 



243 



Miller Manning ; or, A Story of Cornish 
Life. By Matthew Forester. 
Bible Christian Book Room. 

This shilling book must become popu- 
lar, for it is the story of a real live 
man. Common sense and uncommon 
piety were the main characteristics of 
"Walter Manning, the miller. He had 
his own way of doing things, and it 
was straightforward and full of force. 
Lovers of true stories, in contradis- 
tinction to fiction, will find a refreshing 
feast in these pages. We extract a bit 
of a sermon, and a specimen of his 
sensible advice : — 

" It was quickly published through- 
out the town that 'Miller Manning,' 
of whom they had heard so much, was 
the preacher that day. In the evening 
the chapel was greatly thronged. His 
text was Isaiah xxv. 6: 'And in this 
mountain shall the Lord of hosts make 
unto all people a feast of fat things, 
a feast of wines on the lees, of fat 
things full of marrow, of wines on the 
lees well refined.' 'Religion is some- 
thing to eat,' was his opening sen- 
tence. ' There is a reality about it. 
It is satisfying. Whoever goes to a 
feast and is not satisfied, is not a proper 
person to be there. Something is the 
matter. He is either unwell, and can't 
eat; or he is sulky, and won't eat. 
' Religion,' he continued, ' is some- 
thing not only for the mind to under- 
stand, but for the soul to live upon. 
A lot of people, nowadays, are very 
knowing, and talk fluently about doc- 
trines and creeds ; but the enjoyment 
of Christ is better than all the dispu- 
tations in the world. Who would be 
guest at a feast merely to talk about 
the fat things and dainties ? There be 
many deep mysteries about religion, 
and it is very profitable to meditate 
upon them, and to talk about them ; 
but we must not allow the desire to 
fathom the deep things of God to de- 
prive us of the marrow and fatness of 
his glorious gospel. God maketh the 
feast. You would do a foolish thing 
were you to refrain from eating be- 
cause you did not know the art of the 
cook and confectioner. The guests are 
not required to know all that. Now 
here is pardon and peace — will you 
have them ? As I was coming on last 



evening (I did part of the journey 
yesterday, 'cause the " merciful man is 
merciful to his beast"), I overtook a 
young man on his way home to his 
parents, after three months' absence. 
I found he had been in the company 
of unbelievers ; for when I inquired if 
he was converted, he said, "Ah, the 
Bible ! the Bible ! There's a bone in 
the Bible I can't swallow." " Well," 
said I, " to be sure there is. And what 
of that ? You are going home to spend 
Sunday, and you expect father will 
have dinner for his dear boy. But how 
father would be surprised to hear you 
say, ' Ah, father, none of that leg of 
mutton for me — there's a bone in it I 
cannot swallow ! ' " 

"Walter's cure for a gossiping 
neighbour. 

" One of his class sought his advice 
in the trouble which is common enough 
in country villages, viz., newsing 
neighbours, who are not ' keepers at 
home,' but busy-bodies in other men's 
matters. The good woman — Jane Par- 
sons — was anxious to be at peace with 
all ; and particularly wished to be on 
good terms with those who lived near. 
But Agnes Saundry was such a great 
news-bag, that her calls on Jane were 
' neither few, nor far between.' Nor 
did she appear to c know the way out 
when once she got in.' Jane found 
Agnes' s conversation both unprofitable 
and disagreeable ; for she made so free 
with other people's names. This made 
Jane unhappy ; so much so that she 
dreaded Agnes' s coming. She resolved 
to lay the matter before her leader, 
who was not long in prescribing a 
remedy. ' Jane,' said he, ' keep your 
family Bible on the table, and, when 
she has been in the house long enough, 
ask her to read a chapter, or a psalm, 
and pray with you.' Jane followed 
this excellent advice. ' Agnes ! ' said 
Jane, 'you are a good scholar. I 
wish you would read a chapter, or 
psalm, and pray with me ; it might 
do both of us good.' Agnes excused 
herself on the ground that she was 
very busy. She would gladly do so 
another time when she could stay. 
We need scarcely say that Jane had 
no further cause to complain o£ 
Agnes's gossiping in her house." 



244 



NOTES. 



The Holland Road Pulpit, Brighton. 

Talks with Men, Women, and Children. 

By Eev. David Davies. Stock. 
Mb. Dayies, of Brighton, is publish- 
ing his sermons at a penny weekly. 
This is rather a bold venture for a pro- 
vincial town ; for even London penny 
pulpits do not live long, as a rule. 
Our friend is so bright and fresh that 
he may survive where others expire ; 
at any rate, he has our best wishes, 
for we found him true to the gospel 
when others fought against it. 



Flora's Feast : a Masque of Flowers. 
Penned and Pictured by Walter 
Crane. Cassell and Co. 

Walter Crane is, in this instance, a 
poet with his pencil. This " Masque 
of the Flowers " is beyond description 
delicious. Our favourites of the garden 
here live before us in human, super- 
human form, and charm us with their 
beauty. This is a crown's worth of 
delight. 



ftotes. 



Friends will have noticed the anxiety of 
the public press to put us into some ecclesi- 
astical position which they can understand. 
To be the pastor of a church of Christ is 
enough for us; but it seems to them that 
we must join some one of the great religious 
communities : one day it is the Presbyterian, 
and the next the Episcopalian. Meanwhile, 
nothing has been said or done by us indicat- 
ing any alteration in the position we have 
always held as to doctrine and church 
government. When we make a change, our 
friends will not need to learn it from the 
secular press : that when will not, probably, 
occur in this century, nor in the next. It 
does not yet dawn upon some minds that 
to quit a society like the Baptist Union 
involves no change in our position or senti- 
ments. Baptist ministers are pastors of 
separate churches, which may associate with 
other churches, or cease to associate with 
them, as they judge best ; but the minister 
and the church are not dependent upon the 
associations they may choose or decline. We 
are in fellowship with all the churches of 
our Lord Jesus which hold the truth, but 
have never entertained the thought of 
changing this way or that. Certainly we 
never dreamed of entering the Church of 
England. 

The Baptist Union President, Dr. Clif- 
ford, took one of a series of Sunday after- 
noon addresses at South Place, Finsbury, 
a chapel which belongs to a people who are 
something more, or worse, than Unitarian. 
He figures with Messrs. Voysey and Picton, 
and others of the exceedingly broad school ; 
and this not merely in his private capacity, 
but the bills are made clearly to state that 
he is President of the Baptist Union. This 
chapel is adorned with tablets, bearing the 
names of Moses, Voltaire, Jesus, Paine, 
Zoroaster, &c. The blasphemous associa- 
tion of our Lord with Thomas Paine and 
Voltaire creates an indescribable feeling in 
a Christian mind, and makes us wonder 
how a man, professing to be a servant of 
the Lord Jesus, could associate himself with 
such a place. Well might the Union resent 



our complaints against its more obscure 
wanderers, when its President, before he 
closed his year of office, would thus publicly 
associate himself with the deniers of our 
Lord's divinity. Has the body of Baptists 
over which this gentleman presides become 
so easy-going and docile that it will by its 
silence endorse the action of its President ? 
Is it really so, that to preserve their con- 
federacy any amount of looseness will be 
tolerated ? We do not see that anything 
worse can be invented than that which the 
governing party either condones or admires. 
On the "Down- Grade" the train travels 
very fast : another station has been passed. 
What next ? And what next ? 

We would like to agree with one who says 
that the bulk of our church- members love 
the old gospel ; but we are not quite sure of 
it. If there were so general a soundness in 
the rank and file, would they quietly endure 
the abounding errors of the pulpits, and the 
babyish amusements with which congrega- 
tions are being drenched ? We fear the 
plague is among the people as well as among 
the priests. Yet, surely, there must be some 
who will fling aside the dastard love of 
peace, and speak out for our Lord, and for 
his truth. A craven spirit is upon many, 
and their tongues are paralyzed. Oh, for 
an outburst of true faith and holy zeal ! 

In The Sunday School Chronicle, of April 
12, occurs an editorial note, which concludes 
as follows : — " Almost all writers now re- 
cognize the human element in the Bible, and 
see that this brings in human infirmity in 
matters of detail. We had a letter from a 
friend the other day, and there were several 
mistakes of spelling in it, but the letter quite 
fully conveyed to us our friend's thought. 
And if there are some inexactnesses, and even 
some mistakes, in the Bible, it carries to us, 
nevertheless, the mind and will of God. A 
lamp may give light to the feet on a dark 
night, even if the tin is a little bent in, and 
one of the panes is cracked." 

Is the Sunday School Union going to 
teach our youth that the Bible is like an old 



NOTES. 



245 



cracked lantern ? To this we call the atten- 
tion of those who are charged with the 
superintendence of the Union literature. 
Surely there are members of the Committee 
who cannot allow such teaching to pass 
unchallenged. 

The Pastor has been sitting at the Taber- 
nacle every Tuesday to see those who wished 
to confess the Lord Christ, and a large 
addition has been made to the church each 
month. The two months have yielded one 
hundred and forty two who have been 
actually enrolled, besides others who are 
waiting till they can come and receive the 
right hand of fellowship. This number is 
equal to many a church. 

On Monday evening, March 25, the annual 
meeting of the Tabernacle Sunday- 
school was held in conjunction with the 
prayer -meeting. A number of the scholars 
sang some of their hymns very sweetly, and 
prayer was presented by the superintendent, 
Mr. Pearce, and several of the teachers. 
Mr. Wagstaff , the secretary, read the annual 
report, which stated that there are 102 
teachers and officers, and 1,422 scholars, 
141 of whom are church-members, 37 having 
been received during the past year. £150 
has been raised for home and foreign mis- 
sions during the year, in addition to £50 
from Mr. Wigney's class for Mr. Easton, in 
China. The report gave interesting infor- 
mation about the various branches of the 
work, all of which appear to be in a healthy 
condition, except the library, and for that 
we have now provided, by the generous 
contributions of friends at the Tabernacle. 
Addresses upon Sunday-school work were 
delivered by Pastors C. H. Spurgeon, and 
David Davies, of Brighton. Our friends will 
like to know that this relates to the Home 
School only : the children in all our Sunday- 
schools, added together, nearly reach 8,000 
in number. God be thanked for this blessed 
agency ! 

On Monday evening, April 1, a number 
of brethren, who were about to sail for 
China, in connection with the China Inland 
Mission, came to the Tabernacle prayer- 
meeting, and so gave additional interest to 
the gathering. One of them was Mr. G. 
A. J. Huntley, a student in the Pastors' 
College, who spoke of the benefit he had 
received in that institution, and of his joy 
in going to the foreign mission-field. Other 
brethren told how the Lord had led them to 
give themselves to this work; and one 
friend, who is at home for rest after several 
years' service in China, gave a very graphic 
description of his experiences in that strange 
land. Several petitions on behalf of foreign 
missions were offered, and the Pastor prayed 
for each of the missionaries individually, 
and bade them farewell. At the close of 
the meeting, a number of believers put on 
Christ by being baptized on profession of 
their faith, as there were so many candidates 



that it was necessary to administer the 
ordinance on one Monday and three Thurs- 
day evenings during the month. 

The Pastor's heart, and the hearts of all 
his people, go lovingly forth to the China 
Inland Mission, which we regard as one of 
the Lord's most powerful instruments for 
gathering together his chosen from among 
that vast mass of human beings. 

On Monday evening, April 15, the new 
members who had been received into the 
Tabernacle church during the past quarter 
were invited to meet the pastors and officers 
at tea. The time was inconvenient for several 
who wished to be present, but out of the one 
hundred and eighty- seven entitled to come, 
over a hundred were in attendance. After 
tea, short addresses upon the privileges and 
responsibilities of church -members were 
given by the pastors and Mr. "William Olney , 
and by this means much useful information 
was conveyed, and the young members 
were made to feel at home in their new 
relationship. Our desire is that all who join 
the church may do so intelligently, with full 
resolve to be true working members of the 
community. Church-membership is far too 
lightly treated nowadays. Where it is so 
easy to come, it is equally easy to go ; and 
people pop in and out of the churches, and 
do not give themselves heartily to them as 
once they did. 

At the prayer-meeting, in the Tabernacle, 
there was a large attendance, and an earnest 
spirit of supplication prevailed. Mr. Har- 
rison, one of our College evangelists, gave 
us interesting incidents which had oc- 
curred in his work in Australia and Eng- 
land. This very able brother is prepared to 
labour in congregations which need an extra 
worker for the ingathering of undecided 
ones. Por this service he is peculiarly 
fitted. 

Another box of books from C. B. has 
arrived. The contents will be giveu to a 
poor country minister, as requested by the 
donor. 

Old Tunes. — Will all lovers of the old 
tunes note that, on Tuesday evening, June 4, 
we shall have a special gathering at the 
Tabernacle, when Mr. Courtnay and his 
friends will help us to praise the Lord by 
singing a number of the fugal tunes men- 
tioned in our review last month? Full 
particulars will be duly announced. 

College. — The following students have- 
accepted pastorates : — Mr. G. Curtis, at 
Sheerness ; Mr. G. A. Miller, at Rochester ; 
and Mr. C. Stanley, at Bouverie Boad, 
Stoke Newington. Mr. D. Tait, who has 
been for some time preaching at Millom, 
Cumberland, has settled there. Mr. C. 
Boyall is leaving the College, and holding 
services in connection with the Evangeliza- 
tion Society. 



246 



NOTES. 



Mr. G. W. Ball has sailed for the United 
States. We commend him to brethren there. 

Mr. J. O'Neill Campbell is removing 
from Sussex Street, Brighton, to Portslade- 
by-Sea; Mr. G. J. Knight, from Wey- 
mouth, to Newbury ; and Mr. A. Mills, from 
Chester, to St. Mary's Gate, Derby. May 
the divine blessing rest upon them in their 
new spheres ! 

We earnestly entreat the very special 
prayers of all the Lord's people on behalf of 
the Conference, which is to commence on 
May 6 ; and we trust that, at the supper on 
May 8, we shall have fresh evidence of our 
friends' determination to help us in our im- 
portant work of training preachers of the 
aid gospel. Our sorrow, arising out of the 
breaches in our ranks, would crush us did 
we not know that the like has happened 
aforetime in other ages of the church ; but 
the Lord has appeared and vindicated his 
own cause. He will again. However many 
may forsake the glorious gospel, the Lord 
will abide by those who are faithful to his 
unchanging truth ! 

Evangelists. — During the first half of the 
past month, Messrs. Fullerton and Smith 
have been at the Conference Hall, Mildmay 
Park. Great crowds have attended the ser- 
vices ; and the many earnest Christian 
workers, who have helped the evangelists, 
have met with large numbers who were 
either seeking the Saviour, or rejoicing in 
having found him. Next month we may be 
able to give fuller particulars of the mission, 
and also of the services at Devonshire Square 
and Salters' Hall Chapels. This month our 
brethren go to Dr. Barnardo's Mission Hall, 
" The Edinburgh Castle." 

Mr. Burnham was at Hungerford Con- 
gregational Chapel during the first half of 
April. His health has been so unsatis- 
factory that he must take a season of rest 
before he undertakes further missions. 

Mr. Harmer had successful services at 
Tewkesbury, where his help was heartily 
welcomed by Pastor A. Graham. He after- 
wards went, with Mr. Chamberlain, toLyd- 
gate, Todmorden. Pastor W. L. Stevenson 
writes : — " We thank God for the rich 
blessing attending the services of Messrs. 
Harmer and Chamberlain, and rejoice that 
such men have been raised up and sent forth 
in connection with the work of the Metro- 
politan Tabernacle. It would be a grand 
thing if your evangelists could visit all the 
churches annually ; it would result, I am 
sure, in an increase of spiritual life, of re- 
ligious fervour, and of the membership of 
the churches, as well as an increase of 
brotherly love." 

Pastor M. Cumming writes concerning Mr. 
Harrison's visit to Bury St. Edmund's : — 
" Many gathered to hear the gospel, which 
was most powerfully preached by our 
brother ; and the abiding results are mani- 
fested not only in souls converted, but in 



deepened interest in Christ's work, and in 
enlarged congregations." Pastor J. T. 
Mateer sends a glowing account of the mis- 
sion at Vernon Chapel, Pentonville. He 
says: — "I have much confidence in Mr. 
Harrison's work, for he does not deal in 
mere sentiment, or appeal only to the feel- 
ings of his audience; he convinces their 
judgment, and aims at their conscience, the 
Word of God being the quiver from which he 
draws the arrows of truth. It would have 
rejoiced your heart to have seen the joy of the 
new converts at the praise-meeting held spe- 
cially for their benefit. Altogether, it was a 
glorious mission, and we are expecting to 
receive quite a number of members as the 
result of it." 

In addition to his work atFarnworth, and 
Radcliffe, Lancashire, Mr. Carter has held a 
mission at St. Helens, concerning which 
Pastor J. Cottam sends us a very cheering 
report. Mr. Carter has just issued No. 2 of 
The Quarterly Pioneer, and he has also pub- 
lished The Pioneer Hymn and Tune Books for 
use in mission work. He judges that this 
small collection would suffice for churches 
at their first formation till they could afford 
something larger. 

Mr. Parker has recently conducted mis- 
sions at Aylsham, Norfolk ; and Melbourne, 
Derbyshire ; and in each place many were 
brought to decision for Christ. He has since 
been at Old Chesterton, Cambridgeshire. 

We expect to have all our evangelists with 
us at the Conference, when their reports of 
what the Lord has done through them will 
give additional interest to the meetings, and 
brethren will be able to secure their services 
for any dates they have at liberty. 

Orphanage. — A good number of friends 
attended the Collectors' Meeting, on Friday, 
April 5, and enjoyed a very pieasant even- 
ing. Tea was provided at five o'clock, after 
which the guests roamed over the various 
departments, and were much pleased with 
the appearance of the children, and the 
arrangements made for their comfort. The 
President was present, and, as usual, was 
beset by the children, all of whom were 
eager to shake hands with him, and to hear 
his cheery voice. The programme for the 
meeting was full of interest. Several pieces 
were performed with the bells, the children 
sang splendidly, and the recitations were 
first-rate — for matter and delivery. One, 
written by the head-master, entitled, " Oh, 
what a mistake, to be sure ! " caused a good 
deal of merriment. It is published in " The 
Stockwell Reciter." Addresses were given 
by Pastors F. H. Smith, of Peckham, and 
G. D. Hooper, of Hendon; and Benjamin 
Clarke, Esq., secretary to the Home for Little 
Boys, Farningham. The President was 
greatly cheered, and expressed the hope 
that the collectors would persevere in their 
good work. We should be glad to see the 
number of collectors largely increased, for 
it needs £10,000 a year in free-will offerings 



PASTORS' COLLEGE. 



247 



<to provide for the Orphanage. Collecting- 
boxes and books may be had on application 
to the Secretary, Stockwell Orphanage, 
Clapham Road. 

On Friday evening, April 12, the Presi- 
dent again visited the Orphanage, in order 
to preside at the annual distribution of 
prizes in connection with the Orphanage 
Sunday-school. This was an exceedingly 
interesting meeting, both to the children 
and their teachers. On Sunday afternoons, 
for many years, Christian ladies and gentle- 
men have come to teach the orphans, so as 
to give the regular staff a rest, but principally 
with the object of leading the children to 
the Saviour. Marks are given for lessons 
■and good conduct, and prizes are provided 
by the teachers for those whom they con- 
sider entitled to them. Those prizes were 
so very many that we had therein the best 
proof of the good behaviour of the children. 

After brief addresses by the President ; 
Mr. Evans, the superintendent of the school ; 
Mr. J. Manton Smith ; Mr. Harmer ; and 
Mr. Lake, one of the Orphanage "old 
boys" ; the prizes were handed by Mr. Spur- 
geon to those to whom they had been 
-awarded. 

Mr. Charlesworth and the choir propose 
to be absent on a visit to the Channel Islands 
from May 17th to 29th. 

Will our friends kindly notice that the 
Annual Festival will take place on the 
President's birthday, Wednesday, June 19? 

Personal Notes. — Our friend, who daily 
distributes our "Illustrated Tracts," and 
extracts from our sermons, informs us that 
during the past four years he has given 
away 90,000 copies, and has thus been 
enabled to personally address thousands of 
persons upon the most important subjects. 
He drops his tracts into letter-boxes, leaves 
them from house to house, cr gives them 
to individuals wherever he has the oppor- 
tunity. Are there not other Christian men 
or women who can go and do likewise ? 

The sermon No. 2,078, "The Believing 
Thief," is specially adapted for large dis- 
tribution. We gave eight hundred to the 
butchers, at their festival. We intend to 
issue it in book-form. 

A bush-missionary, in Queensland, writes : 
— " In several places that I have visited, 
hundreds of miles from the coast, it is the 
regular practice for ' all hands ' to be brought 
together for service on the Sabbath. The 
portions of Scripture you have read on the 



occasion of your preaching the sermon are 
read, a prayer — probably from a Church of 
England prayer-book, or some other — then 
the sermon, that you have preached in the 
ears of thousands in your Tabernacle, is 
carefully and solemnly read, although, per- 
haps, only in the hearing of half a dozen 
men. But who can estimate the good done ? 

"I know a man who rides twenty-five 
miles every Sabbath to attend one of these 
services at a neighbouring station, making, 
with the return journey, fifty miles, to hear 
one of your sermons read, and join with a 
few others in the service I have described. 

"I will not weary you with other in- 
stances that have come under my personal 
observation, though I could mention several. 
My object in writing at all was to assure you 
that this branch of your work is bearing 
rich fruit, the quantity and quality of which 
will only be known when the precious 
sheaves shall be gathered home." 

A Christian lady writes: — " I have long 
wished to let you know the blessing your 
sermons have been. Bather more than a 
year ago, I smarted a prayer-meeting in this 
village ; and, as I am very busy, I had not 
time to prepare an address, nor do I think 
I have the ability. My husband bought me 
two or three volumes of your sermons, and 
since then I have used them. I do not read 
them to the people ; I read them myself, and 
try to understand them as thoroughly as 
possible, and then tell their contents to my 
hearers. I know what they do for myself, 
and I do believe they have been the means 
of blessing souls here. Every week I just 
seem to find the very thing I want to 
say." Could not other friends follow this 
good example? Many a lonely hamlet 
might thus be blessed. 

A clergyman writes to tell us of the wife 
of an ecclesiastical dignitary, who has read 
all our sermons that have been published 
since the year 1861. He says : — 

' ' The origin of her reading them was this ; 
her father was in the habit of giving the 
sailors in his employ something to read 
while at sea. As a rule, they would accept 
no religious literature, except your sermons, 
with any relish. His daughter was chosen 
to select from your sermons ; so she read 
all, and does so to this very day." 

Baptisms at Metropolitan Tabernacle : — 
March 21, twenty-one ; March 28, eighteen; 
April 1, twelve ; April 4, sixteen. 



Statement of Receipts from March \bth to April \bth, 1889. 
£ s. d. 



Collection at Campsbourne Road Bap- 
tist Chapel, Hornsey, per Mr. S: J. 
Jones 1 16 4 

Collection at Union Church, Shefiford, 
per Pastor A. Smith ...'0 17 6 



Collection at the Lord's-table, Baptist 
Chapel, Bridgwater, per Rev. C. H. 
M.Day ... 

Pastor A. H. Stote 

Mrs. Hulett 



£ s. d. 



248 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



Postal order from Thaxted 

Mr. A. J. Score 

H. D 

Miss Traill 

G. L. 

Mr. R. S. Gould, per Pastor R. M. 
Harrison 

Mrs. Wilkinson 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Page and 
Gordon's services at Coliingwood 
Street Mission 

Part collection at Wallington, per 
Pastor J. E. Jasper 

Mr. George Green Hot Students' Ser- 
mon Distribution Fund) 

Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Rutherford 

Mr. W. Michael 

Mr. Charles Barker 

Mrs. Cartwright 

Collection at Manvers Street Chapel, 
Bath, per Pastor H. F. Gower 

E. K. G 

Edward Ridgway, Sheffield 

S. M 

Mr. Thomas Gregory 

Matthewxxv. 40 

A sermon-reader 

Collection from Hampton Court Bap- 
tist Chapel, per Pastor A. Hall 

Rev. C.Hewitt 

Mrs. Rainbow 

Collection at Cottage Green Chapel, 
per Pastor J. A. Brown, M.R.C.S. ... 

Pastor R. J. Williamson 

Mr. C. L. Kaufmann 

Mr. T. M. Whittaker 

Mrs. Phillips, per Pastor C. L. Gordon 

Pastor E. Spanton 

Contribution from East Hill Baptist 
Chapel, Wandsworth, per Pastor 
J. W. Ewing 

Contribution from Bromley Baptist 
Chapel, per Pastor A. Tessier 

Mr. and Mrs. Grange, per J. T. D. 

Rev. J. Burnham 

Rev. A. H. King 

Miss Rickwood, per J. T. D 

Miss Dawson 

Mr. E.Cross 

Mr. T. Harrison Evans 

Pastor J. L. Bennett 

Mrs. Jennings 

Mrs. Dent, per Pastor T. W. Scamell... 

Contribution from Esher Baptist 
Chapel, per Pastor J. E. Perrins ... 

£25 received from Mr. J. Dodson in 
Missionary Association, the accounts of 



£ s. 


d. 


10 





2 


6 


5 





5 





5 





4 





5 





2 2 





2 2 





2 


6 


5 





2 





1 





10 





6 6 





40 





10 





5 





1 





1 





10 





7 


6 


3 





1 





2 2 





1 





5 5 





5 5 





1 





5 





3 7 


6 


2 





5 





2 2 





3 





2 





1 





1 





2 2 





1 





5 





2 





10 






Collection at Lower Edmonton Baptist 

Chapel, per Pastor D. Russell ... 

Mr. J. Garner Marshall 

Mr. C. Tyrrell Giles 

Mr. Edwin Jones 

Madame Blim, per J. T. D 

Mrs. Charles Burt 

Mr. I. Mannington 

Mr. E. Townshend 

Mr. Everett's Bible-class 

Mrs. Mizen 

Mrs. Willis 

Mr. and Mrs. Grey 

Mrs. Elgee 

M. L. C 

Mr. E. Harris 

Mrs. Pepys 

Miss Hadfield ... 

Mrs. Pool 

Mrs. Lees 

Miss Descroix 

Mrs. Murray 

V. S. 

One blessed by the sermons 

Mr. E. W. Jacob 

Mrs. Brown 

Mr. R. Scott 

Miss Sillibourne 

Miss Cochrane 

Miss C. Coleman 

Highgate Road Chapel, per Rev. J. 

Stephen*, M.A 

Mrs. Lewis 

Miss L. Jones 

Mr. J. Wilson 

Mrs. Potter 

Mr. J. Holt Skinner 

Nameless 

Mr. C. Hunt 

The widow's mite 

Mr. T. G. Owens ... 

Quarterly Subscription :— 
Adelphi 

Monthly Subscription: — 
Mr. R. J. Beecliff (two months) 

Weekly Offerings at Met. Tab. :— 



£ s. d. 



March 17 
„ 24 
31 
7 
14 



April 



23 
30 6 
6 13 
29 4 
25 14 







1 14 3 
5 5 

2 2 
2 2 
10 
5 5 
5 

2 14 

3 
10 
5 
110 
10 6 

o io a 

5 

5 

10 

10 

10 

2 6 



O 

2 
5 




5 





5 







5 

2 

2 10 

10 

7 4 
110 

5 

1 11 

2 
5 

10 

3 
3 3 
5 

1 10 
5 O 



119 19 5 

£364 8 



October was thankfully placed to the funds of the College 
which will be published in the Annual Report of the College. 



Statement of Receipts from March Ibth to April \bth, 1889. 



Exors 

Jack, South Lambeth 
Orphan girl's collecting-card 
Mrs. Eddy 



£ 

86 




10 
lu 



10 

Collected by Miss E. Lewis 5 

Orphan girl's card, R. Pearce 12 

Orphan girl's card, M. Corbett 5 

Executors of the late Mrs. E. Douglas 300 

Rev. W. Sexton 5 

A widow, per Mrs. Wood, per J. T. D. 5 

Mrs. Sparrow 10 

Mr. F. H., Marychurch 10 

Collected by Miss Bickmore 1 10 

Sillyearn Sunday-school, per Mr. E. 

McDonald 5 6 



Mr. T. A. Flitton 

Mr. F. S. King, per Mrs. J. A. 1 
Collected by Mrs. Jarman 
Collected by Mr. J. Binstead 
Per Mr. Gracey : — 

Agnesetta Gracey 

Lillie Gracey 

Collected by Mr. S. C. White 
Collected by Miss Stammers 

Mr. G. H. Ouincy 

Collected by Mr. H. Payne 

Mrs. Rettie 

H. D 

Mrs. Parson 

A friend, Ross-shire 





£ s. d. 




10 O 


•urgeon 


110 





5 





12 


9 4 




10 8 







10 




1 10 




3 3 


... 


2 


... 


4 


... 


10 


'.'. 


10 


'.'. 


10 


• • ••• 


1 O 



6T0CKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



249 



MissE. A. Fysh 

Mr. L. Shepherd 

Mr. C. L. Jones 

E. K. G 

W A. M 

Miss Lizzie Thompson, per Rev. James 
Blythe 

Miss Duncan 

Miss M. Tillotson 

Mr. and Mrs. Bibby 

A widow's mite, J. R 

Matthew xxv. 40 

Collected by Miss E. Hardwick 

Collected by the teachers and scholars 
at the Old Baptist Chapel Sunday- 
school, Guildford : 

Girls' box 2 9 3 

Boys' box 2 1 10& 

Infants' box 8 8£ 

Mr. P. Pickett's box ... 1 12 6 

Mr. G. P. Pickett's box ... 10 8 

Mr. G. "Walker's box ... 5 6 

Mr. Eobert Turnbull 

A sermon-reader „ 

Mrs. J. Wenham 

Sandwich, per Bankers 

Collected by MissE. E. Jones 

Young women's Bible-class at the 
Orphanage, per Mrs. James Stiff ... 

Collected by Mr. E. E. Pullen 

Mr. E. K. Stace 

Miss M. E. Jenkins ... 3 6' 
A friend 10 



1 
10 
10 
40 
5 



16 
3 
10 



£ s. d. 

Mr. C. Ibberson ... „ 2 6 

Mrs. Wornell 110 

Mr. W. Williams 10 

J. B. C 10 

Miss F. M. E. Goodchild 10 

Grateful 10 

Mr. T. Wallis 4 

Mrs. Cloat 10 

Mr. H. Doorbar, jun 5 

Mrs. James Battershill 5 

Mr. J. W. Davies 3 6 

Miss Thornton ... 10 

Mr. G. Eves 

Mrs. Ord, per Mr. Thomas Newlands... 1 

Miss Macfadyen 1 

Miss E. E. Strowger 

Miss H. Inglis 1 

Mr. Thomas Jephcoat 1 

Postal order from "Waltham Abbey .. 

Albert P 

Mr. H. W. Hour 

Mrs. Beattie 

Postal order from Sittingbourne 

Mrs. Garner 

Mrs. Fairweather 

In memoriam, Ethel Bertha 
West Calder Free Church Sabbath- 
scholars 5 

F. G. B., Chelmsford 2 

Miss Farley 10 

A friend in Norfolk 10 

Mrs. Gray 5 

Mr. G. H. Laurie 5 

Mr. Samuel Bown 10 

Mr. John Hill 2 

Mr. John Hooper 2 

J. S 10 

Mrs. Yates 10 6 

Miss A. Rogers 2 6 

Mrs. Barnes 10 

Mr. B. Pope Froste 5 

A grateful grandmother 10 

Per F. R. T. :— 

Mrs. Collingwood 5 

Mr. T. R. Johnson 5 



1 





3 





10 
5 
10 
10 
7 6 
10 
4 6 
110 


6 



10 



5 

10 

5 

5 

2 6 




5 



7 8 6 

10 

2 6 

13 

2 2 

2 4 1 



4 6 



Collected by Miss F. Dunster 

Per Mr. J. Robinson :— 
Collection in Paglesham 

Chapel 11 

A lady friend 5 

Collected by Mrs. F. Battam 

G. C. G. Colliery Company, per Mr. 

Richards 

Collected by Mrs. Laker 

Collected by Miss W. Bagshaw 

Mrs. Morris 

Collected by Pastor J. H. Barnard ... 
Orphan girl's card, L. Richards 

Collected by Miss G. S. Brown 

Collected by Miss F. E. Barker 

Collected by Miss Fitzgerald 

Collected by Mrs. and Miss Houston ... 

Collected by Miss L. Battam 

Collected by Master Dowen 

Collected by Miss A. Parker 

Collected by Miss Nutt 

Collected by Miss L. Matthews 

Collected by Miss Greenop 

Collected by Mrs. Roberts 

Collected by Miss Florence Jeffery ... 
Mrs. Burton's school-room box 

Collected by Miss Helen Figg 

Collected by Miss M . Saunders 

Collected by Mrs. W. E. Barnard 

Collected by Mr. H. Teverson 

Collected by Mr. W. Dixon 

Collected by Mrs. Jackson 

Collected by Miss S. Jones ... 

Collected by Mrs. Robins 

Collected by Mrs. E. Castell 

Collected by Miss E. S. Girdlestone ... 

Collected by Miss A. Burton 

Miss Jones ... 

Mr. T. M. Whittaker 

Collected by Mrs. Welford 

Miss Scates 

Mrs. Raybould 

Collected by Mr. Garrett 

Collected by Mrs. Ewen 

Collected by Mrs. E. Luxford 

Collected by Mr. W. Bragg 

Collected by Miss Livett 

Collected by Mr. S. Snape 

Collected by Miss Bennett 

Mr. J. Williams 

Orphan boy's card, F. Gant 

Collected by Mr. L. A. Spiller 

Mr. James G. Romang 

Collected by Mr. James Hooker, jun.... 
Collected by Mr. A. G. Edgerton 

Collected by Miss Rintoul 

Collected by Miss Pavey 

Collected by Mrs. Co wen 

Miss, Lennard, per J. T. D 

Collected by Mrs. Wilmot 

Collected by Miss Dora 

Collected by Miss Linderman 

P. O., Govan Road, Glasgow (Jack and 

Maggie) 

Mr. Huntington Stone 

Collected by M. Chance 

Collected by E. Chance 

Collected by Sarah Jackman 

Collected by Leonard V. Palmer ... 

Collected by Miss L. Morgan 

Collected by Miss E. K. Rawlins 

Collected by Mrs. Penning 

Collected by Mrs. Perry 

Madame Blim, per J. T. D 

Mrs. Moore 

Box at Tabernacle gates 

Mr. and Mrs. Kay 

Mr. George Turner 

Collected by Mrs. Jno. Lord 

Collected by Miss E. M. Prior 

17 



£ s. d. 
6 C 



16 





1 2 


6 


1 1 





1 


6 


4 


6 


5 





3 





13 





1 





10 





1 2 


6 


8 





1 1 


9 


9 10 


2 


5 


2 


6 


10 


3 


2 0" 





12 





10 


6 


1 8 





8 


6 


6 


6 


4 


6 


17 





1 





10 





13 





1 13 


9 


6 





1 





2 11 


2 


6 


3 3 





10 


3 


50 





1 





8 


6 


2 15 





10 


6 


2 8 





15 





12 





10 


8 


10 





1 





10 


6 


10 





10 


6 


12 





6 





12 





1 5 





5 





15 





19 


8 


5 


6 


8 


6 


5 





4 


9 


5 


3 


5 


9 


10 





3 


2 


12 


4 


7 





7 


6 


10 





2 


6 


6 


9 


2 


6 


10 





7 





12 


1 



250 



STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



MissE. Clover 

Proceeds of halfpenny entertainment 
given by six little girls in the Chester- 
field silk-mill 

Mrs. Elgee 

Mr. R. Snell 

H. M., Camden Town 

Collected by Miss Barker 

Collected by Mr. James Simpson 

H. H., Aberdeen 

Collected by Mrs. G. Halsey 

Collected by Mrs. S. T. Pocock 

Mr. T. G. Owens 

Collected by Miss E. Tyler 

P. andP 

MissHadfield 

Collected by Mrs. W. Jones 

Collected at Richmond Street Sunday- 
school : — 

Young Men and "Women's 

Bible-classes 10 6 4 

The school 11 18 8 

Collected by Miss S. Gilpin 

Mr. Sutherland 

Bouverie Eoad Baptist Chapel Sunday- 
school 

H. E. S 

In memoriam 

Pence from sermons 

Miss Corkett 

W. and J. KM. '.'.'. 

Mr. Chatterton 

Mr. S. H. Dauncey 

Mr. G.Smith 

Mrs. T. Thomas 

Collected by Mrs. J. T. Crosher 

Mrs. Spencer 

Collected by Miss C. M. Bidewell 

Mrs. Woolland 

Miss Symington 

V. S 

Mrs. Williams 

Sabbath-school children at Bogmoor ... 

Mrs. William Low 

Mrs. "Watson 

Mrs. Cooper 

Mr. E. W. Jacob 

P. A. L. M 

Mr. Charles Stewart 

E. M. R 

E. I. M 

Collected by Pastor S.J. Baker 
Teachers and children of Halbeath 

Sabbath- school 

A country minister 

Mr. J. Meader 

Mrs. Lewis 

A thankoifering from three 

Mrs. Bowie... 

S. andN 

Mr. J. Wilson 

Maggie 

Miss I Anderson 

A Dorset friend, Anon 

MissE. Miller 

J^JO., Newcastle-on-Tyne 

A member of the Church of England ... 

Mr. R. Middleton and friends 

Mr. J. "W. Kirwan 

The late Mrs. John Rinder, Leeds, per 

Mrs. Walker 

Mr. "William Morris 

Meetings by Mr. Charlesworth and the 
Orphanage Choir: — 

Sale of programmes 

New Maiden 

"Westminster 

Hull, part proceeds 

Mr. Veitch's mission. Chelsea 



£ s. 


d. 






£ s. d. 


6 





Crouch Hill (donation) Mr. 


W. Sissons 


10 






Metropolitan Tabernacle United Chris- 








tian Brothers' Benefit Society ... 


2 15 6 


4 





Grimsby and Cleethorpes 


... ... 


48 14 


10 


6 


Received at Collectors' Meeting, April 5th. 




10 





Collecting Boxes: — 


£ s. d. 




10 





Adlard, Miss A 


13 




1 18 


6 


Abbey, Mrs. 


2 2 




1 





Amies, Miss 


2 2 




1 





Austin, Miss 


7 9 




10 





Ay liff e, Miss 


5 




17 





Belleini, Miss 


3 




5 





Brown, Mr. J 


7 11 




1 


10 


Barnden, Mrs 


118 




5 





Brice, F. and G. 


3 4 




10 





Butler, Mrs. 


10 8 




1 3 


7 


Brewer, Misses A. and L. 

Barber, Miss 

Boot, Miss N 

Buckingham, Miss 

Buswell, Miss 

Bilby, Miss 


13 
6 7 
18 5 

6 

1 19 9 
5 11 




22 5 





Boswell, Mrs. 


10 3 




10 


6 


Bell, Mrs 


12 




1 





Beecliff, Mr. J 

Bruin, Miss E 


18 5 
18 7 




1 o 





Brice, Miss C 


4 3 




10 10 





Beale, Miss J 


14 7 




5 





Brice, P. and A 


2 3 




11 





Burton, Mrs. W 


2 14 5 




2 


6 


Belleini, Miss 


2 8 




5 





Brooks, Miss 


6 11 




1 





Burrage, Mrs 


3 9 




10 





Cooper, Mr. 


4 4 11 




2 


6 


Collins, Mrs. 


9 4 




10 





Call, Mrs 


9 7 




1 1 


3 


Combs, Mrs. 


2 17 




13 4 10 


Cross, "W 


2 5 




5 





Charlesworth, Miss F. ... 


14 




7 





Conquest, Mrs 


13 8 




10 





Chard, Mr. T. P 


1 18 2 




1 





Caragerard, Miss 


2 3 




10 





Curtis, P. W 


19 




2 


6 


Cook, Miss 


6 7 




8 





Cairns, Miss L 


18 4 




10 





Cook, Miss A 


9 7 




5 





Davie, Mrs. 


7 8 




5 





Dolman, J. 


2 10 




10 





Deacon, L. and F. 


12 




1 





Everitt, Miss 


7 




1 5 





Ellerington, Mrs 


5 6 




2 10 





Esling, MissE 


5 4 




5 





Field, Mrs. 


2 2 




2 


3 


Fuller, MissE 

Furness, Mrs. 


4 2 
10 9 




2 


3 


Frost, Miss 


5 5 




3 





Fowler, Miss E 


9 3 




1 1 





Fathers, Mrs. 


2 6 




2 2 





Foster, Miss E 


3 11 




5 





Goetz, Miss 


110 




5 





Gage, S. V. L 


7 7 




10 





Guyer, Mrs. 


3 4 




10 





Hartley, Miss E 


2 




2 


6 


Hawgood, Miss 


2 2 1 




3 





Henderson, Mrs 


6 1 




5 





Hill, Miss L 


10 




10 





Hoyles, A. 


10 7 




5 





Hertzell, Mrs 


4 3 




5 





Hillen, Mrs. 


10 5 




1 





Hall, Miss L 


11 




1 





Hillier, Mrs. 

Hannam, E. H 


16 4 

10 




1 





Haitley, F. 


2 4 




1 





Hartley, E. 

Kingholme, Miss 

Larkman, Miss B 


9 
4 
6 1 




7 19 


7 


Lockyer, Mrs. 


12 3 




6 14 


5 


Lansdale, Miss A. ... 


10 




2 8 


9 


Landford, Master J. 


9 




18 15 


6 


Lansdale, A. 


7 




10 





Lowne, Mrs. 


4 6 





STOCKWELL ORPHANAGE. 



251 



Limebeers, Miss 

Landford, J. 

Laundry box, S. O . 
Matthews, F. and W. 

Mallison, Mrs 

Mills, F 

Middleton, Mrs 

Morgan, Mr. 

Mackay, Mrs 

Monk, Mrs. 

Moore, Miss E 

Missing-, Mrs. 

Miss Ivimey's mothers'- 

meeting ... 

Oliver, Miss F 

Palmer, Mrs. 

Price, Miss E 

Pitt, Mrs 

Philp, Miss 

Pearmain, Miss 

Pearce, Mrs. 

Preedy, Mrs. 

Parker, F 

Prior, Mrs 

Probyn, Miss Q 

Phillips, Miss 

Peters, Miss F. W 

Pike, Mr. G. H 

Price, Miss F. 

Podmore, Mrs 

Paviour, H 

Quennell, Mrs 

Bowe, Mr 

Earner, Mr 

Eidley, Mrs. 

Eound, Miss E 

Bansom, Miss E 

Eose, Miss B. 

Eussell, Mrs. 

Eose, MissH 

Boper, Mrs. 

Staines, Miss C 

Stratford, Miss E 

Smith, Miss G 

Sheard, Miss F 

Smee, Miss C 

Smith, Mrs. C. J 

Selth,Miss 

Spencer, Mrs. 

Smith, E. H. 

Stewart, Mrs. 

Sidery, Mrs 

Smith, Mrs. G '. 

Soulsby, Miss 

Terrell, Mr. E 

Turner, Mrs. 

Tyson, Mrs 

Taylor, Mrs ,J 

Turner, Miss M 

Thomas, Miss A 

Thomas, Miss G 

Wells, Miss 

Walter, Mrs. 

Wickham, Miss L 

Wickham, Mrs 

Wild, Miss M 

Watts, Mrs 

Warren, Miss M. 



£ s. 


d. 


2 








2 


7 


4 


4 


3 


2 


7 


6 





2 





13 


6 


7 





1 10 


8 


5 


8 


1 


7 


16 





3 


7 


2 


9 


5 


S 


19 


8 


5 


7 


6 





16 


2 


3 


6 


1 


6 


6 


1 


4 


6 


3 10 


13 


2 


6 


8 


2 


6 


4 


4 


2 


1 


6 





2 


9 


5 


1 


3 10 


11 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


8 





7 


2 


5 


7 


1 


9 


2 


3 


5 





1 3 11 


5 


2 


8 10 


4 





15 


2 


1 3 





3 


6 


1 


4 


5 





4 


8 


10 


4 


4 


1 


4 11 


3 10 


1 


5 


3 





1 5 





1 


1 


1 





5 





7 


4 



11 8 



Wingate, Miss N. 

Watling, Mrs 

Weekes, Miss 

Young, Mr. 

Young, Mr. J. A 

Odd farthings and halfpence 

Collecting Books: — 

Andrews, Mrs 

Alderton, Miss 

Bonser, Miss E 

Broughton, Mrs. ... 

Barrett, Mr. H 

Brown, Mr. J. H 

Charles, Miss F. B. 

Chew, Miss 

Colman, Mrs. 

Dee, Mrs 

Frost, Miss 

Fowler, Miss N. 

Fryer, Miss S. 

Fairey, Miss 

Good, Miss 

Hallett, Miss 

Hoare, Miss 

Jephs, Miss 

Lawson, Mrs. 

McDonald, Mrs 

Miller, Mr. C 

Scutt, Mrs 

Saunders, Mr. E. W. 

Walters, Miss 

Willis, Mrs 

Donations : — 

Barrett, Mr 

Jones, Mr. W. Corden 

Per Mrs. Charlesworth : — 
Aukland, Mr. J. L. 1 1 
Darling, Mr. Jas. 10 
Everidge, Mrs. ... 1 
Halsey, Mrs. ... 10 6 
A friend, per Mrs. 

Halsey ... 2 6 

Houghton, Mrs. E. 5 
Mills, Mrs. T. ... 10 
MurselhMr.G.A. 110 
Olney, Mr. Jno.... 2 2 
Pocock Brothers, 

Messrs 2 2 

Phillips, Mrs. ... 5 
Smith, Mr. G. E. 110 
Thompson, Mr. 

W. W 110 

Johnson, Mr. A. C, Sunday 
morning breakfast box 

Olney, Mr. T.H 

Stevenson, Mrs 

Teddington Baptist Sunday- 
school, per Mr. F. Eose... 

Townsend Street Sunday- 
school 

Tea tickets sold 



£ s. 


d 


£ s. d. 


9 10 




1 9 


6 




5 


5 




1 







6 







10 









66 8 


8 


5 




5 


6 




6 







8 


6 




3 8 







1 9 







7 


6 




5 







6 


6 




10 







1 







1 5 







17 


6 




1 11 


6 




6 







10 


6 




12 







2 10 







1 7 







10 







1 







6 10 




5 







8 







1 





25 18 9 


10 





5 








11 11 

10 

3 

10 

10 

3 17 6 

19 6 



- 22 13 

£956 9 9 



List of Presents, per Mr. Charlesworth, from March 15th to April 15th.— Provisions :— 1 dozen Hens, 
Mr. W. J. Graham ; 20 Pork Pies, 1 dozen Stilton Cheeses, and 1 dozen packets Hayes' Food, Mr. J. T. 
Crosher ; 28 lbs. Baking Powder, Messrs. Freeman and Hildyard ; 2 sacks Potatoes, Mr. H. Watts ; 
1 New Zealand Sheep, Mr. A. S. Haslam; half -chest Tea, Messrs. Pannett and Neden; 1 sack 
Potatoes, Mr. W. Cutler ; 1 Cake and 1 pot Jam, Mrs. E. Lovell. 

Boys' Clothing.— 20 Flannel Shirts, Mrs. Sifton ; 12 Shirts, Mrs. E. H. Williams ; a box of Ties, 
Mr. C. E. Garner. 

_» Girls' Closing.— 5 pairs Stockings, Mrs. Johnston ; 57 Articles and 1 Dress, The Ladies' Working 
Meeting at the Metropolitan Tabernacle, per Miss Higgs ; 6 Articles, Miss F. M. E. Goodchild ; 
19 Articles, Mr. E. McDonald ; 138 yards Dress Material, 2§ yards Calico, 1 piece Bed Braid, Mr. Hall; 
25 Articles, the Cheam Baptist Working Society, per Mrs. E. Cox ; 2 Articles, Mrs. E. Lovell ; 
8 Pinafores, Mrs. Loosely; 6 Articles, Miss A. Thatcher; 66 Articles, Miss Salter's Bible-class; 



252 



COLPORTAGE ASSOCIATION. 



18 Articles, Mrs. Watling ; 6 Articles, Miss McLaren ; 3 Articles, E. Rickwood ; 6 Articles, Mrs. J. 
Goodwin. 

Geneeal. — 3 dozen Tennis Balls and 2 Rackets, Mrs. A. Edmeades; 1 Article, Miss F. Sutton; 
4 volumes " Girl's Own Annual," 2 volumes " Every Girl's Annual," Mrs. W. S. Caine ; 25 volumes, 
Messrs. J. F. Shaw and Co. ; 1 Bat and Ball, 1 Scrap Book, Mrs. Loosely; 200 copies of " Perfect 
Peace," Mr. H. Putman. 



Ctflprtege %mtMian. 



Statement of Receipts from March Ibth to April \5th, 1889. 
Subscriptions and Donations for Districts: 



Okehampton district 

Bower Chalk district : — 

Miss Hardiman 10 

Mr. Martin 10 



Rendham, per Bev. G. Hollier 

Worcester Association 

Great Totham district 

Bethnal Green : — 

Mr. W. R. Fox 5 

Mr. C. E.Fox 5 



Norfolk Association, for Neatishead ... 
Estover district, per Mr. H. Serpell ... 

Mrs. H. Keevil, for Melksham 

Greenwich, per Pastor C. Spurgeon ... 
Fairf ord district, per Captain Milbourne 
Yorkshire Association, Borobridge 
Suffolk Congregational Union, Great 
Thurlow 



£ 


s. 


d. 


10 








1 








5 








30 








10 








10 








10 








40 








10 








10 








15 








10 








10 









£ 


s. 


d. 


15 








10 








10 








10 









Friends at Maldon 

Essex Congregational Union, Pitsea 
Mr. W. H. Roberts, for Ilkeston 
South Devon Congregational Union, 
Newton Abbot 



£216 

Subscriptions and Donations to the General Fund : — 

£ s. d. 

Mr. John Lister 

E. K. G 

Mr. A. Todd 

Mr. T. G. Owens 

H. E. S. ... ... ... ... ••• 

V. s 

Mr. E. W. Jacob 

Readers of "The Christian Herald"... 

£69 7 6 



2 





20 





5 





5 





10 10 





2 





5 





29 7 


6 



Statement of Receipts from March \5th to April Ibth, 1889. 



Mrs. Walter 

ThankofferingforMr. Parker's services 
at Westbury 

Thankoffering for Mr. Parker's services 
at Deptford 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 
and Smith's services at Shoreditch 
Tabernacle 

Balance of collection after expenses of 
Mr. Burnham's visit to St. John's 
Congregational Chapel, Ipswich 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Harmer and 
Chamberlain's services at Lydgate, 
Todmorden, Yorks 



2 9 6 

3 6 



16 16 



2 6 



9 10 



Mr. J. Sleigh 

Thankoffering for Messrs. Fullerton 
and Smith's services at Dalston 
Junction Chapel 

Mr. T. G. Owens 

V. S 

Mr. Jefferson 

Thankoffering for Mr. Parker's services 
at Melbourne 

Nameless 



£ s. d. 
5 



18 

5 

10 

10 

5 14 

10 



£65 4 



Jot (&mtm\ WLu in tfye iortr's Wmk 

Statement of Receipts from March 15th to April 15th, 1889. 

£ s. d. 

Sarah P 10 

I. C w 16 

Mrs. Smith 5 

Postal order from Fakenham 5 



£5 16 6 



£1 received from a sermon-reader shall be used for the distribution of sermons, but we fear it will 
not be possible to get anyone to call at each station as desired. 

Friends sending presents to the Orphanage are earnestly requested to let their names or 
initials accompany the same, or we cannot properly acknowledge them ; and also to write to 
Mr. Spurgeon if no acknowledgment is sent within a week. All parcels should be addressed 
to Mr. Charlesworth, Stockwell Orphanage, Clapham Road, London. 

Subscriptions will be thankfully received by C. H. Spurgeon, " Westwood," Beulah Hill, 
Tipper Norwood. Should any sums sent before the IZth of last month be unacknowledged in 
this list, friends are requested to write at once to Mr. Spurgeon. Post Offia and Postal- 
Orders should be made payable at the Chief Office^ London, to O. PL. Spurgeon ; and Cheques 
and Orders should all be crossed. 



THE 



SWORD AND THE TROWEL. 



JUNE, 1889. 




(water's ffrfiwr, aitir % toMlkwa 0f 
#Mammg it.* 

AN ADDRESS BY C. H. SPURGEON, AT THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF 
THE PASTORS' COLLEGE, HELD ON TUESDAY, MAY 7TH, 1889. 

RETHREN", we want to do our work rightly and effectively, 
and we cannot do it without power. Of course, no work 
of any kind is accomplished in this world without a cer- 
tain expenditure of force, and the force employed differs 
according to the matter in hand. The sort of power of 
which we feel the need will be determined by our view of our work; 
and the amount of power that we shall long for will also very much 
depend upon our idea of how that work should be done. I speak as 
unto wise men, who know their object, and know also whence their 
strength must come. I speak also to men who mean to use their 
office as in the sight of God ; but yet I think it desirable to stir up 
your pure minds, by way of remembrance, and put you and myself in 
mind of the grand design for which we need power. 

We could be ministers, as some men are ministers, without any 
particular power, either natural, or acquired. Merely to perform services 
(to use an ugly word) " perfunctorily " does not require special endow- 
ments. Any speaking machine might do as well. There are ministers 
whose sermons, and whose whole services, are so much a matter of 
routine, and so utterly lifeless, that if power from on high were 

* This address occupied one hour and thirty minutes in its delivery. The opening 
portion is all that we can give this month. It forms a subject by itself , and division 
further on was found to be too rough a breaking up of the discourse. — C. H. S. 

18 



254 THE preacher's power, 

to come upon them, it would altogether bewilder them. Nobody 
would know them to be the same persons; the change would seem 
too great. The same things are said, in the same tone and manner, year- 
after year. I have heard of a preacher, whom one of his people 
likened to a steeple, which had but two bells in it, for, he said, " It is 
always ding dong, ding dong, ding dong, ding dong." " Oh! " said his 
friend, " you ought to be abundantly grateful that you have as much 
variety as that, for our man has only one bell, and his voice is for ever 
Ding, ding, ding, ding." When this is the case among Noncon- 
formists it ruins the congregations, for it is death to every possibility 
of collecting people to hear ; and still more is it murder to all hope of 
their being improved if they do hear. I should think it is by no means 
difficult, with a liturgy, to be read without much alteration all the year 
round, to become a fine example of either the ding dong, or the ding, 
ding ; but with us, whose devotion is of a free sort, there is less excuse 
for monotony, and if we fall into the fault the result will be more dis- 
astrous. It is possible, even without a liturgy, to pray in a very set and 
formal style ; indeed, it is so possible as to be frequent, and then the 
long prayer becomes a severe infliction upon an audience, and the shorter 
prayers are not much better. When I have thought of the preaching of 
certain good men, I have wondered, not that the congregation was so 
small, but that it was so large. The people who listen to them ought 
to excel in the virtue of patience, for they have grand opportunities for 
exercising it. I have frequently said of myself that I would not go 
across the road to hear myself preach ; but I will venture to say of 
certain brethren that I would even go across the road in the other direc- 
tion not to hear them preach. Some sermons and prayers lend a colour 
of support to the theory of Dr. William Hammond, that the brain is not 
absolutely essential to life. Brethren, I trust that not even one of you 
will be content with mechanical services devoid both of mental and 
spiritual force. You will, none of you, covet earnestly the least gifts, 
and the dullest mannerisms, for you can obtain them without the 
exertion of the will. You desire to do your Master's work as it ought 
to be done, and therefore you long for excellent gifts, and still more 
excellent graces. You wish that people may attend to your discourse, 
because there is something in it worthy of their attention. You labour 
to discharge your ministry, not with the lifeless method of an automaton,, 
but with the freshness and power which will render your ministry largely" 
effectual for its sacred purposes. 

I am bound to say, also, that our object certainly is not to please our 
clients, nor to preach to the times, nor to be in touch with modern 
progress, nor to gratify the cultured few. Our life-work cannot be 
answered by the utmost acceptance on earth ; our record is on high, or it 
will be written in the sand. There is no need whatever that you and I 
should be chaplains of the modern spirit, for it is well supplied with 
busy advocates. Surely Ahab does not need Micaiah to prophesy smooth 
things to him, for there are already four hundred prophets of the grove 
who are flattering him with one consent. We are reminded of the pro- 
testing Scotch divine, in evil days, who was exhorted by the Synod to 
preach to the times. He asked, " Do you, brethren, preach to the 
times ? " They boasted that they did. " Well, then," said he, "if there 



AND THE CONDITIONS OF OBTAINING IT. 255 

are so many of you who preach for the times, you may well allow one 
poor brother to preach for eternity." We leave, without regret, the 
gospel of the hour to the men of the hour. With such eminently 
cultured persons for ever hurrying on with their new doctrines, the 
world may be content to let our little company keep to the old- fashioned 
faith, which we still believe to have been " once for all delivered to the 
saints." Those superior persons, who are so wonderfully advanced, may 
be annoyed that we cannot consort with them ; but, nevertheless, so 
it is that it is not now, and never will be, any design of ours to be in 
harmony with the spirit of the age, or in the least desirous to conciliate 
the demon of doubt which rules the present moment. Brethren, we 
shall not adjust our Bible to the age; but before we have done with 
it, by God's grace, we shall adjust the age to the Bible. We shall 
not fall into the error of that absent-minded doctor who had to cook 
for himself an egg ; and, therefore, depositing his watch in the saucepan, 
he stood steadfastly looking at the egg. The change to be wrought 
is not for the divine chronometer, but for the poor egg of human 
thought. We make no mistake here: we shall not watch our congrega- 
tion to take our cue from it, but we shall keep our eye on the infallible 
Word, and preach according to its instructions. Our Master sits on high, 
and not in the chairs of the scribes and doctors, who regulate the 
theories of the century. We cannot take our keynote from the wealthier 
people, nor from the leading officers, nor even from the former minister. 
How often have we heard an excuse for heresy made out of the desire to 
impress " thoughtful young men " ! Young men, whether thoughtful 
or otherwise, are best impressed by the gospel, and it is folly to dream 
that a preaching which leaves out the truth is suitable to men, either old 
or young. We shall not quit the Word to please the young men, nor 
even the young women. This truckling to young men is a mere 
pretence : young men are no more fond of false doctrine than the 
middle-aged ; and if they are, there is so much the more necessity to 
teach them better. Young men are more impressed by the old gospel 
than by ephemeral speculations. If any of you wish to preach a gospel 
that will be pleasing to the times, preach it in the power of the devil, 
and I have no doubt that he will willingly do his best for you. It is 
not to such servants of men that I desire to speak just now. I trust that 
if ever any of you should err from the faith, and take up with the new 
theology, you will be too honest to pray for power from God with which 
to preach that mischievous delusion ; and if you should do, you will be 
guilty of constructive blasphemy. No, brethren, it is not our object to 
please men, but our design is far nobler. 

To begin with, it is our great desire to hear ivitness to the truth. 
I believe — and the conviction grows upon me — that even to know the 
truth is the gift of the grace of God ; and that to love the truth, is the 
work of the Holy Spirit. I am speaking now, not about a natural 
knowledge, or a natural love to divine things, if such there be ; but of 
an experimental knowledge of Christ, and a spiritual love to him : these 
are as much the gift of God in the preacher, as the work of conversion 
will be the work of God in his hearers. We desire so thoroughly to 
know, and so heartily to love the truth, as to declare the whole counsel 
of God, and speak it as we .ought to speak. No small labour this. To 



256 the preacher's power, 

proclaim the whole system of truth, and to deal out each part in due 
proportion, is by no means a simple matter. To bring out each doctrine 
according to the analogy of faith, and set each truth in its proper 
place, is no easy task. It is easy to make a caricature of the beautiful 
face of truth by omitting one doctrine and exaggerating another. 
We may dishonour the most lovely countenance by giving to its most 
striking feature an importance which puts it out of proportion with the 
rest ; for beauty greatly consists in balance and harmony. To know the 
truth as it should be known, to love it as it should be loved, and then to 
proclaim it in the right spirit and in its proper proportions, is no small 
work for such feeble creatures as we are. In this grand, yet delicate 
labour, we have to persevere year after year. What power can enable 
us to do this ? While so many complain of the monotony of the old 
gospel, and feel a perpetual itching for something new, this disease may 
even infect our own hearts. This is an evil to be fought against with 
our whole being. When we feel dull and stale, we must not imagine 
that the truth of God is so ; nay, rather by returning more closely to the 
Word of the Lord we must renew our freshness. To continue always 
steadfast in the faith so that our latest testimony shall be identical in sub- 
stance with our first testimony, only deeper, mellower, more assured, and 
more intense — this is such a labour that for it we must needs have the 
power of God. Do you not feel this ? I pray you feel it more and 
more. brethren, if you propose to be true witnesses for God, your 
proposal is a very glorious one, and it will tend to make you feel the 
truth of what I am about to say, namely, that a more than human power 
must guide you, and make you sufficient for the difficult enterprise. 

Your object is, however, so to bear your personal witness that others 
may be convinced thereby of the truth of what is so sure to your own 
soul. In this there are difficulties not a few, for our hearers are not 
anxious to believe the revelation of God ; some of them are desirous not 
to do so. In the reign of Queen Elizabeth an order went forth that 
everybody should go to the parish church, at least, once on the Sunday. 
Of course, the bulk of the people were still Romish, and it went 
much against the grain for them to attend the Reformed service. I have 
read that when Romanists did go to the service prescribed by law, 
many of them put wool into their ears, that they might not hear. In 
a moral sense this practice is still in vogue. Certain parts of the truth 
men will hear, but other portions are disagreeable to them, and their 
ears are dull of hearing. You know — for you believe in the original sin 
of men (about the only thing original there is in many)— how Satan 
has most effectually blinded the minds of the ungodly, so that, speak we 
as wisely as we may, and as persuasively as we can, nothing but a miracle 
can convince men dead in sin of the truth of God. Nothing less than 
a miracle of grace can lead a man to receive what is so altogether 
opposite to his nature. I shall not attempt to teach a tiger the doctrine 
of vegetarianism ; but I shall as hopefully attempt that task as I would 
try to convince an unregenerate man of the truths revealed by God 
concerning sin, and righteousness, and judgment to come. These 
spiritual truths are repugnant to carnal men, and the carnal mind 
cannot receive the things of God. Gospel truth is diametrically opposed 
to fallen nature ; and if I have not a power much stronger than that 



AND THE CONDITIONS OF OBTAINING IT. 257 

which lies in moral suasion, or in ray own explanations and arguments, 
I have undertaken a task in which I am sure of defeat. "Well said the 
writer of one of our hymns, when he spake of the Holy Spirit, 
" 'Tis thine the passions to recall, 
And upward bid them rise ; 
And make the scales of error fall 
From reason's darkened eyes." 

Except the Lord endow us with power from on high our labour must be 
in vain, and our hopes must end in disappointment. 

This is but the threshold of our labour : our inmost longing is to call 
out a people ivho shall oe the Lord's separated lieritage. A new theory 
has lately been started which sets forth as its ideal a certain imaginary 
kingdom of God, unspiritual, unscriptural, and unreal. The old- 
fashioned way of seeking the lost sheep, one by one, is too slow : it 
takes too much time, and thought, and prayer, and it does not leave 
space enough for politics, gymnastics, and sing-song. We are urged to 
rake in the nations wholesale into this imaginary kingdom by sanitary 
regulations, social arrangements, scientific accommodations, and legis- 
lative enactments. Please the people with the word " democratic,'' and 
then amuse them into morality. This is the last new " fad." According 
to this fancy, our Lord's kingdom is, after all, to be of this world ; and, 
without conversion, or the new birth, the whole population is to melt 
into an earthly theocracy. Howbeit, it is not so. It seems to me that 
the Lord will follow up the lines of the Old Testament economy still, 
and separate to himself a people who shall be in the midst of the world 
as the Lord's kings and priests — a peculiar people, zealous for good 
works. I see, in the New Covenant, not less, but even more, of the 
election of grace, whereby a people is called out, and consecrated to the 
Lord. Through the chosen ones, myriads shall be born unto God ; but 
beside these I know of no other kingdom. Brethren, the election of 
grace, which is so often denounced, is a fact which men need not speak 
against, since they do not themselves desire to be elected. I never can 
make out why a man should cavil at another's being chosen when he 
does not himself wish to be chosen. If he wishes that he were chosen 
to repentance, if he desires holiness, if he longs to be the Lord's, and if 
that desire be true, he is chosen already. But seeing that he does not 
desire anything of the kind, why does he cavil with others who have 
received this blessing? Ask an ungodly man whether he will take up 
the humble, often-abused, and persecuted position of a lowly follower of 
Christ, and he scorns the idea. If it were possible for him to get into 
that position for a time, how gladly would he shuffle out of it ! He likes 
to be " in the swim," aud to side with the majority; but to be a live 
fish, and to force his way up the stream, is not according to his desire. 
He prefers a worldly religion, with abundant provision for the flesh. 
Religious worldliness suits him very well; but to be out-and-out for 
Jesus, called out from the world, and consecrated to obedience, is not 
his ambition. 

Do you not see in this your need of an extraordinary power ? To 
call men out to a real separation from the world and a true union with 
Christ, apart from the power of God, is an utterly futile effort. Go, 
whistle eagles into an English sky, or beckon dolphins to the dry land, 



258 THE PREACHER S POWER, 

or lure leviathan till thou play with him as with a bird, and then 
attempt this greater task. They will not come, they have no wish to 
come ; and even so our Lord and Master warned us when he said, " Ye 
will not come unto me that ye might have life." They will read the 
Bible, lt Ye search the Scriptures, for in them ye think ye have eternal 
life"; but they will not come to the Lord himself; that is too spiritual 
for their tastes. No, the command, "Repent ye, and believe the gospel," 
is too hard, too sharp, too humbling for them. Is not this enough to 
appal you ? Dare you go forward unless your Lord shall gird you with 
heavenly power ? 

Stop : we have only yet begun. They are called out ; but there is 
something further to be done through the instrumentality of our ministry : 
our hearers have to be horn again, and made new creatures in Christ 
Jesus, or else our preaching has done nothing for them. Ah, dear 
friends, we get into deep waters when we come to this great mystery ! 
Does any unregenerate man know the meaning of being born again ? 
Ask the learned doctors whether they know anything about it, and they 
will try to conceal their ignorance beneath a sneer. Ask them if they 
think there is anything in it, and they will perhaps reply, u Yes, there 
must be such a phenomenon, for many respectable and even scientific 
people have professed to be the subjects of it." Still they smile, and 
express their wonder that it is so. The confession of many a candid 
scientist is that it may be so, but he is not himself able to comprehend 
it. Why, then, do they not hold their tongues ? If they have not 
experienced the new birth, that fact is no proof that others have not. 
Why do they sneer as if they were our superiors ? The regenerate 
in this matter are necessarily their superiors. A person who has only 
one eye is a king among blind men ; let not the blind affect to despise 
him. If any of us have personally experienced the new birth, even 
though we may be ignorant of many other things, we are in this point 
better instructed than those who have never felt the divine change. But, 
just in proportion as you know what it is to be born again, you will feel 
that herein is a task indeed. How sublime a position for you to become, 
under God, the spiritual parents of men ! You could not create a fly, 
much less could you create a new heart and a right spirit. To fashion 
a world has less difficulty in it than to create a new life in an ungodly 
man ; for in the creation of the world there was nothing in the way 
of God, but in the creation of the new heart there is the old nature 
opposing the Spirit. The negative has to be removed as well as the 
positive produced. Stand and look that matter over, and see if you are 
at all able in and of yourself to work the conversion or regeneration of 
a single child in your Sunday-school ! My brethren, we are at the end 
of ourselves here. If we aim at the new birth of our hearers, we must 
fall prostrate before the Lord in conscious impotence, and we must not 
go again to our pulpits till we have heard our Lord say, " My grace is 
sufficient for thee : for my strength is made perfect in weakness." 

Supposing that to be done, remember those mho are brought to God 
are to be 7cept and preserved to the end; and your longing is that your 
ministry should be the means of keeping them from stumbling, and 
holding them fast in the way of righteousness even to the end. Do you 
propose to do that of yourself ? How presumptuous ! Why, look at 



AND THE CONDITIONS OF OBTAINING IT. 259 

the temptations which pollute this city ; and I suppose that the seduc- 
tions of evil are much the same in smaller towns, and in the villages, 
though differing in form. Their name is legion, for they are many. 
Look at the temptations which assail our youth in the literature of the 
tiour ! Have you even a slender acquaintance with popular literature ? 
Do you wonder that weak minds are made to stumble ? The wonder is 
that any are preserved. Yet this is only one of the many death-bearing 
agencies. How great is the leakage in our churches ! The most faithful 
minister has to complain of the loss of many who appeared to run well, 
but have been hindered, so that they do not obey the truth. The great 
'heap that we have gathered upon the threshing-floor is sadly diminished 
when he comes whose fan is in his hand. But we do propose, nevertheless, 
-to be the means, in the hands of God, of leading the sheep of Christ to 
pasture, and continuing to lead them, until they feed on the hill-tops 
of heaven with the great Shepherd himself in their midst. But what a 
task we have undertaken ! How shall we present them to Christ as 
pure virgins ? How can we keep them from the pollution of the all- 
surrounding Sodom ? How shall we, at the last, be able to say, " Here 
am I, and the children thou hast given me" ? Brethren, we cannot do it 
at all ; but the Lord can do it through us by the energy of his grace. 
If you have half-a-dozen converts, how greatly you will praise God, if you 
pass, with that half-a-dozen at your side, safely through the gate of pearl ! 
'Certain of us know many thousands whom we have instrumentally 
brought to the Saviour ; but unless we have a power infinitely greater 
than our own, how shall we shepherd them to the end? We may 
announce them as our converts, we may associate with them as workers, 
and feel thankful for them as fellow-heirs, and yet bitter may be our 
disappointment, when all comes to all, and they turn aside unto perdition. 
How grievous to be, to all appearance, rich in usefulness, and on a 
sudden to find that our converts are like money put into a bag that is 
full of holes, and that our treasured converts fall out, because they were 
not truly gathered to the Lord Jesus after all ! "Who is sufficient for 
these things." Weak we are, exceeding weak, every one of us. If there 
is any brother here who is weaker than usual, and knows that he is so, 
let him not be at all cast down about that; for you see, brethren, the 
best man here, if he knows what he is, knows that he is out of his 
depth in his sacred calling. Well, if you are out of your depth, it does 
not matter whether the sea is forty feet or a full mile deep. If the sea 
is only a fathom deep you will drown if you be not upborne ; and if it 
be altogether unfathomable, you cannot be more than drowned. The 
weakest man here is not, in this business, really any weaker than the 
strongest man, since the whole affair is quite beyond us, and we must 
work miracles by divine power, or else be total failures. We have all 
set up in the divine profession of working by omnipotence, or rather 
of yielding ourselves up to omnipotence that it may work by us. If, 
therefore, omnipotence be not within hail, and if the miracle-working 
power is not within us, then the sooner we go home and plough the 
fields, or open shop, or cast up accounts, the better. Wherefore should 
we undertake what we have not the power to perform ? Supernatural 
work needs supernatural power ; and if you have it not, do not, I pray 
jou, attempt to do the work alone, lest, like Samson, when his locks 
were shorn, you should become the jest of the Philistines. 



260 THE UP-GRADE JOURNEY. 

This supernatural force is the power of the Holy Ghost, the power ol 
Jehovah himself. It is a wonderful thing that God should condescend 
to work his marvels of grace through men. It is strange that instead 
of speaking, and saying with his own lips, " Let there be light," he 
speaks the illuminating word by our lips ! Instead of fashioning a new 
heaven and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness, by the mere 
fiat of his power, he couples himself with our weakness, and performs 
his purpose ! Do you not marvel that he should treasure his gospel in 
these poor earthen vessels, and accomplish the miracles, which I have 
very briefly described, by messengers, who are themselves so utterly 
unable to help him in the essential parts of his heavenly work ! Turn 
your wonder into adoration, and blend with your adoration a fervent 
cry for divine power. Lord, work by us to the praise of thy glory ! 

(To be continued.) 



"They go from strength to strength, every one of them in Zion appeareth before 
God." — Psalm lxxxiv. 7. 

HEAVENWARD going, heaven still nearing, 
Journeying on the pilgrim's line, 
Not by gradients steep and tortuous, 
But by beautiful incline. 

Still progressing ; golden sunshine 

Smiles upon me as I go, 
Pleasant landscapes are around me, 

Bright in all their summer glow. 

Blessed journey ! upward, heavenward, 

To the palace of the King, 
Marked by all that's fair and joyous, 

As upborne on eagle's wing. 

Onward still, the goal approaching, 

There ! it in the distance gleams ! 
More than filling up the picture 

Of the brightest, fondest dreams ! 

Who would cling to earthly pleasures, 
Moving downward, downward still, 

While the loftier joys are calling 
Every yielding heart to fill! 

Albert Midlane. 



261 

BY THOMAS SPURGEON. 

(Continued from page 164.) 

REALLY, I thought I had said all that could be said on behalf of 
spiders in my previous paper. Hence I gave no intimation that 
they would be " continued" in our next. I fancied I had spun all my web. 
But it is with this as with our sermons, something has been omitted, 
and we wish we could have another say on the same subject. Moreover, 
I have been away from home ! Home isn't the place to study the 
habits of spiders, at least, mine isn't, I'm glad to say. But my lot has 
been cast a while in a place where spiders most do congregate. There 
they flourished by the dozen and the score ; on the verandah, all down 
the hall, and in every nook and corner. 

Spiders to right of us ; spiders to left of us, 

I'm sure you'd have wondered 

Why the spiders weren't slain 

And their cobwebs weren't sundered. 

And you'd share my conclusion 

That some one had blundered 

In allowing such hangings 

To be there by the hundred. 

It was the spiders' paradise surely. No unkind besom marred their 

peace, or interrupted their business. Men might come and men might 

go ; but they held on for ever. Enemies from without there were, as we 

shall presently see, but fear of molestation from within the house there 

was none ; for the owner thereof had a special dislike to flies, and spared 

the spiders on that account. I'm not positive that this was the sole 

reason, but charity suggests it. Ah, well ! they were not there for 

nought. At all events, they served my purpose ; I had not far to go, or 

long to look, for specimens and illustrations. There was one daring 

fellow, swinging like a pendulum at the end of his long line; there was 

another, scampering down to the citadel of his castle at express speed, so 

as to extend as early a welcome as possible to an afternoon visitor ; 

while others watched like cats for mice, hungry hunters they were, and 

their more fortunate neighbours ruminated over their last fat fly, like 

Pharaoh's well-favoured kine " upon the brink of the river." Indeed, it 

seemed scarcely fair that there should be such manifest disparity in the 

fortunes of these creatures. There, standing out against the blue sky, was 

a tremendous fellow, a veritable Falstaff, as plump as a dumpling ; while 

at scarce a hand-breadth from him was another, as thin as a whipping 

post. Is providence partial amid spiders as well as among men ? Is 

that fellow Dives, and this Lazarus ? And fat as he was, he got more 

spoil than the starveling. He worked no harder, indeed he seemed too 

corpulent to stir; while the other was always "on the go." Their 

" stand " must have been equally good, for the one was alongside the 

other. How was it, then, that one was rich, and the other poor ? " Just 

luck," says one. Think you so, honestly and soberly ? And are you a 

Christian ? To believe in luck is tantamount to denying providence. 

Sir Thomas Brown has said, " Let not fortune, which hath no name in 



262 SPIDERS. 

Scripture, have any in thy divinity. Let providence, not chance, have 
thy acknowledgment." We are not as shuttlecocks to the battledores 
of frisky fairies and fickle chance ; and I, for one, find no difficulty in 
believing that the God who rules on high looks after spiders as well as 
sparrows. Is it not written " The eyes of all wait upon thee .... 
thou satisfiest the desire of every living thing " ? Why, then, are not 
-all served alike ? Wherefore this partiality ? Why does one man have 
to envy his fellow in such words as these : — 

" My house was still in the shadow, 
His lay in the sun ; 
I long'd in vain ; — what he asked for 

It straightway was done. 
Once I staked all my heart's treasure, 
We play'd — and he won." 

I know but one answer to the enquiry, and to the loyal heart it is 
enough. " The Lord is King." It is not for us to say, " What doest 
'thou ? " or, " Why hast thou made me thus ? " " The Lord maketh poor, 
.and maketh rich : he bringeth low, and lifteth up." Surely Joseph 
might send Benjamin a mess five times greater than those of his 
brethren, although he was the youngest, if he pleased ! The others did 
not grumble. Nor should we. " Even so, Father : for so it seemed good 
in thy sight." Speaking of " luck " reminds me that spiders themselves 
were once considered lucky. Fancy a sensible man writing in his diary, 
" I took, early in the morning, a good dose of Elixir, and hung three 
spiders about my neck, and they drove my ague away ! " What will not 
some fond folk believe ? Anything save the truth ! 

But I have wandered far from the spiders' paradise. There they 
were, as I have said, as plentiful as blackberries, and as "there is 
nothing without voice," I listened for their lessons. One of them said, 
emphatically, " Be patient.'' There he stayed all the hours, day after 
day. Possibly he went for a stroll when my back was turned ; but if so, 
he must have hurried home pretty smartly, for, on my return, he was 
in statu quo. I'm inclined to think that he never budged, until indeed 
the long-looked-for game flew into his trap ; then he moved, I tell you. 
His was a silent sermon, but it was very impressive. The text was, 
*' Your strength is to sit still." He showed me that all things come to 
him that waits. He bade me in quietness and confidence possess my 
soul. But I must own that what seemed as easy as kissing your hand, 
to the spider, is no child's play for men and women. To sit still ! Why, 
•as a boy, I was offered sixpence to sit still for five minutes ; and when, 
by an almost superhuman effort, I once succeeded, dear father chalked 
it up on the wall. I remember it as if it were but yesterday. Our 
heavenly Father has very few children who are not fidgety. Some of 
them seem all on wires — regular spring-heel Jacks. Not content with 
doing their part, they must needs worry and fret about results and 
issues. Wiser would they be if, having spun the web, they watched 
and waited. " See," said the sensible spider, " I spread my toils, and 
wait till God sends the fly." "I will act similarly," thought I. 

" I'll do the little I can do, 
And leave the rest to him." 






SPIDERS. 263 

1 will take due precaution against accident, and then beg him to shield 
me from harm. I will exercise all possible effort in my life's work, be 
it temporal or spiritual, and leave results to heaven. Meanwhile, my 
soul shall wait only upon God. Dear reader, may you learn this lesson 
too ! May you share in H the patience of the saints " ! " The Lord 
direct your hearts into the patience of Christ." (R.V.) 

Then, all the spiders seemed to say to me, " Be vigilant." It was 
not possible to surprise them, or to catch them napping. They seemed 
all eye. And, as if that might fail, they had each a thread communi- 
cating with the centre of their webs. Not only were their ears and 
eyes open, but they had, so to speak, tied a string from the door to 
their toes, so that they might know if anyone came to the front door, 
even if they happened to be in the back kitchen. Friends or foes, by 
this means, received due attention without delay. The spider and 
Peter give the same advice, "Be vigilant." Don't miss any privilege 
or opportunity. Be prepared for every enemy. Keep your eyes 
open. Some there are who have eyes, but they see not. "The wise 
man's eyes are in his head." " The eyes of a fool are in the ends of 
the earth." Above all, see that that thread is not broken, or hangs 
too slackly. Conscience itself needs to be tightly strung. 

" Quick as the apple of the eye, 
O God, my conscience make ; 
Awake my soul when sin is nigh, 
And keep it still awake." 

Yet another of these unpopular insects said, as plainly as a spider 
can speak, u Be valiant " ; and this is how he said it. A tremendous 
dragon-fly suddenly hove in sight. Thought I, "If that man-of-war 
should steer this way, good-bye to the web, and alas for the spider ! " 
But I was wrong. Presently the bright wings dashed into the snare, 
and almost before one could say the proverbial " Jack Robinson," 
Mr. Spider had pounced upon his prey. I was disposed to urge him back 
to his den. Is not discretion the better part of valour ? Surely such 
silvery wings, and such a length of tail could flash through the threads, 
and go on glistening in the sunshine ; or, if the dragon waited, could 
he not demolish the spider ? Had the little fellow counted the cost ? 
Did this David know that that Goliath " had an helmet of brass upon 
his head, and was armed with a coat of mail, with greaves of brass 
upon his legs, and a target of brass between his shoulders ; ' ? Whether 
he knew it or not, out he rushed. With wonderful celerity he passed 
his ropes over and under the gauze-like wings, and soon the dragon 
was in the inner prison, as it were, with his tail made fast in the stocks. 
His travelling days were done. He might whirr and whizz as he 
pleased; his doom was sealed. "Well done, little spider! I admire 
your pluck ; you evidently did not go by size, or weight, or looks. As 
for size, that dragon could have devoured you holus bolus ; as to weight, 
it must be admitted he has shaken your castle from centre to circum- 
ference, while his appearance was that of a flash of lightning. True, 
your net helped you amazingly. You remind me of the old gladiators 
who fought with a trident and net ; the net deftly flung entangled the 
swordsman, and then the big fork easily sucked his blood. So you first 
snare, and then slay your enemies. But you are brave for all that, else 



264 SPIDERS. 

you would not have tackled that glittering gladiator." I, too, would be 
brave betimes. Everyone grows courageous when all is over. Anyone 
can pursue the fleeing foe ; but to seize the decisive moment, to act 
and speak in the nick of time, to confront the foe without parlejing ; 
this is the test of courage and capacity. We Christians ought to be 
A 1 at this. Fear says, " All the Canaanites are sons of Anak " ; but faith 
cries, u . We can lay them low." Fearfulness calls every gnat a dragon- 
fly ; while fearlessness says, " The bigger the better ; there be more blood 
in his veins. He'll last over to-morrow ; whereas, a midge is but a 
mouthful.'' Oh, that believers were braver ! Oh, that Christians were 
courageous ! We fly when we should fight, and run when we might 
reign. Our valour has evaporated. We do not attempt such great 
things for God as he deserves, and as his cause demands. Besides, he 
is our helper, so we need not fear. As Jehoshaphat said to the priests 
and Levites, so saith the Lord to every saint, " Deal courageously, and 
the Lord shall be with the good." 

My sympathy for spiders is getting (as the Yankees say) " pretty 
considerable." I confess I had little enough to start with. I find that 
they have enemies not a few — hence my sympathy. Amongst these is 
a bee, who is both a mason and a murderer. A mason he certainly is, 
for he builds his house himself of clay, and a murderer, too, for his 
house is full of dead spiders. I saw at least a dozen fall out of a 
waterproof which had been hanging in the hall, and in which these 
building bees had made their home. There could be no mistake — the 
spiders were " as dead as door-nails." Alas, poor spiders ! there had 
been foul play some dark night ; and, like the Assyrians, "When they 
arose early in the morning, behold, they were all dead corpses." But 
who has not enemies ? Only those who have not grit enough to say 
" No," and to stem the current. " Life is strangely beset with enemies. 
No man is too contemptible to have one. Even humble creatures like 
the caterpillar have enemies." So says the Rev. J. G. Wood, of whose 
decease we have heard with deep regret. 

"The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death." Like these bees, 
he slays and bears us off to our lodging in the clay; but that, thank 
God, is not the end. " The skies, not the grave, are our goal," and 
they who see our sepulchres need not say, "Alas ! poor mortals"; for, 
unlike the spiders, we shall not have ceased to be, though some would 
relegate us to such a lot. Souls, with such materialistic minds, are as 
these spiders were. We believe it not. When our bodies are as lifeless 
as they, encased in clammy clay like them, our souls wiil be on high. 
The spirit shall return unto God who gave it. 

11 Thanks be to God, there is no death 
For all who trust his Word ; 
Thanks be to God for victory, 
Through Jesus Christ our Lord." 



265 

AN esteemed evangelist, a member of the Tabernacle church, sends 
the following interesting items : — 

While reading the short article in this month's Sivord and Trowel, 
entitled "Why always Whisper?" a similar incident occurred to my 
mind, and as you express a wish that other correspondents would favour 
you with such, I make bold to send you the following : — 

Some five years ago, I was preaching in the South London Palace. 
One Sunday night, amongst the audience were some personal friends of 
mine, a mother and two daughters ; also a near relative of my own, a 
poor fellow who had been afflicted with paralysis. One result of his 
affliction was that he could not whisper, but always talked very loudly. 
Under the preaching of the Word, that night, one of the daughters above- 
mentioned, was deeply impressed. I had some conversation with her, 
but she did not seem to grasp the truth. They left, accompanied by 
my poor friend, who, being very anxious for the salvation of this dear 
girl, went all the way home with the sisters, telling them all the way 
about the Saviour he loved so well. When he arrived at their home, he 
continued to urge this young woman to decide for Christ, and eventually 
she did so. Now comes the most wonderful part of the story. While 
telling them of Jesus, and praying with them, which, owing to his 
affliction, he did very loudly, they were rather startled, by hearing 
someone sobbing in an adjoining room. Upon going to see what was 
the cause of this sobbing, and who it was, they found it was a young 
woman, a niece of the landlady of the house, who, having heard through 
the wall all this poor brother had said about Jesus and his love, was 
thereby brought to see herself a poor, lost sinner. She was pointed by 
him to the sinner's Saviour, and was led there and then to trust in Jesus 
for salvation. She, with the others, came on the next Sunday to the 
South London Palace. I saw her then, and several times afterwards, 
and she appeared to be a bright, happy Christian. How wonderfully 
God works, using the very affliction of our poor friend for his glory ! 

It is sometimes a good thing to sing aloud, as well as pray aloud, as 
the following, I think, will show. David says, " I will sing aloud of 
thy mercy " (Psalm lix. 16). 

Some little time before the former fact occurred, I went to work in a 
new shop, where none of the nine or ten men were on the Lord's side. 
By his grace I did not hide my colours. As soon as I got on speaking 
terms with the men, which I soon did, one of them said to me, " We 
knew you were an old ranter, as soon as you came into the place." 
" Indeed," said I ; " how ? " " Why," said he, " you commenced singing 
Sankey's hymns as soon as you commenced work." It was true, and by 
God's help I kept on singing aloud at my work, and sometimes talking 
with them a bit, and the Lord, in his own good time, brought every 
•one in that shop to himself. (See Spurgeon's sermon, " Beginning at 
Jerusalem.") 

I trust you will pardon me in thus writing, but I thought these true 
incidents might interest and encourage you. 

Believe me to be your obedient servant, 

C. Lazenby. 



266 

HOW free in gift is Love ! 
Not like the host 
Who counts the cost, 
And fears lest he should give too much ; 
Love comes behind, with timid touch, 
And breaks the vase, in haste to pour 
On the dear feet its fragrant store, 
Unmindful of the glance 
That clouds the countenance 
Of him who scorns her in his arrogance ; 
More than content that he, 
Who thought and heart can see, 
Accepts the tribute of her loyalty. 

How brave of soul is Love ! 
When, cowardly, 
The strong men flee, 
Love, bold in weakness, ventures nigh 
Where hangs her Lord in agony, 
Braving the brutal ribaldry 
Of rabble and of soldiery ; 

And while the quaking earth 

Rebukes their heartless mirth, 
Love gazes sadly on the gentle face 

Once so divinely fair, 

But now •enlined with care 
And suffering, borne to save a guilty race. 

How true of heart is Love ! 
When faith has fled, 
And hope is dead, 
Love lingers at the empty tomb, 
Unmindful of the cheerless gloom, 
Unwilling to forsake the place 
Till she her missing Lord may trace. 

Her eyes o'erfilled with tears, 

And heart oppressed by fears, 
She waits without a thought of self or home, 

Till by his voice most sweet 

She knows, and at his feet 
Adores, him newly risen from the tomb. 

April 18, 1889. E. A. Tydeman, Bacup. 



267 

tttmaam %%tidifttntioy. 

A PAPER READ AT THE SECOND CONFERENCE OF THE PASTORS* 

COLLEGE EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION, 

BY PASTOR THOMAS GREENWOOD, CATFORD HILL. 

NOTHING- in the whole realm of Christian experience can compare 
in importance with sanctification. It is a great thing to be 
reconciled to God and accepted in the Beloved ; but forgiveness and 
reconciliation may be regarded more as a means than an end. We were 
predestinated to nothing less than to be conformed to the image of God's 
Son. Our sins are blotted out, and all hindrance to fellowship is 
removed, that the Holy Spirit may be given to us, and the Divine image 
renewed. If this be not done, forgiveness has not accomplished its 
purpose. Fully realizing the importance of holiness, we welcome every 
movement whose aim is to increase it in ourselves or in others. 

But I fear that many of these efforts suffer by a forgetfulness of the fact 
that true holiness, like every true greatness, is unconscious of itself. The 
endeavour to increase sanctification is confused with the desire to increase 
the consciousness of sanctification, which is a very different thing. We 
want to feel more consecrated, to know that we are growing ; and if we 
have not this feeling, or are not passing through experiences such as some 
one whom we admire describes, we begin to question if our sanctification 
be real. It may be we look back on our own history, and call to mind 
how at one time we had to invoke God's special aid in doing certain 
actions ; while we did them, then, consciously for Christ, we fear lest 
now we are led by mere force of habit. But may we not have formed 
the habit of serving Christ ? If so, the ease and persistency of our 
actions indicate a real advance. Perhaps we had, for example, a covetous 
disposition, and found it very hard to give liberally to any cause ; we then 
had to look right back to the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ in order 
to gain the necessary impulse. The only question we now ask is as to 
the proportionate claims of, say, the Pastors' College, as compared with 
the Orphanage. You have probably read the American story of the 
man who had listened to a sermon containing a powerful appeal ; at its 
close he was heard to say, "I'll give five dollars." But while the plate 
was coming he changed it to three dollars. A moment after he said to 
himself, " I'll only give two dollars." Evidently, there was a struggle 
going on within him between the old nature and the new. The col- 
lecting-plate soon brought it to a crisis. He flung ten dollars into the 
plate, and said, "Now, squirm, old natur' ! " My acquaintance with 
Yankee classics is not enough to enable me exactly to translate " squirm ,r 
into vulgar English; but its meaning is sufficiently evident: having 
given twice as much as he at first intended, his old nature was made to 
squirm. Such a struggle might take place again, but not often. One 
or two more victories as complete as this would end the strife, and then, 
without an effort, he would give to every cause as far as he was able. But 
would he then be less holy ? Assuredly not. Still, if you had offered 
him your congratulations that Sunday on his generosity, he would have 
accepted them. God had enabled him to be liberal, and he rejoiced in 
it, giving God the praise. But if, years afterwards, when greater 
liberality was habitually exercised, you should speak in the same way, he 



268 UNCONSCIOUS SANCTIFICATIOK 

would repudiate the idea of praise altogether, and only bemoan that he 
could do no more. 

Any man who has become a disciple of Christ will, before long, be 
confronted by a difficulty with regard to his old companions. Two 
paths lie before him : in one is continued honour from his friends, in 
the other is Christ's reproach. He finds it hard to follow his Master. 
He cries for help and is strengthened, then bravely undergoes all ridi- 
cule. After a while another crisis arises, and yet another. In them 
fidelity to Christ may involve a greater loss, and yet the struggles may be 
less keen, because the world has come to be less valued and Christ more. 
He has now learned to make his boast in the Lord. Is he, however, 
less holy because the struggle is less ? Unquestionably the reverse. 
But here again, if at first you said, u What a consecrated man you are ! " 
he would accept your praise, and he might, perhaps, go to the next 
Holiness Convention, tell of his difficulties in putting his earthly pros- 
pects on the altar, and declare he was now fully consecrated. But after- 
wards, he would disclaim all title to commendation, and say, " To follow 
Christ was so evidently better that I did it naturally ; but as for 
complete consecration," he might add, "if I were put into the position 
some have occupied, and had to ' turn or burn/ unless God gave me 
more grace, my faith would waver." 

The recently-converted thief is always struggling against dishonesty, 
but it is not so with the thoroughly honest man. He acts honourably 
without consideration. If a temptation arises to which his honesty is 
barely equal, then comes conflict ; but while he is superior, he knows 
nothing of either battle or victory. 

At first success causes delight, but afterwards it is tinged with shame. 
Instead of rejoicing that God gave us the victory, we mourn that we 
had to struggle over so small a matter. "After all the grace God 
has shown me, to think that for a moment I withheld what He asked ! 
If I had only loved the Lord more, I should have rendered it without 
an effort ! " 

Struggles will not cease while we aim at actual conformity to Christ. 
He who, in this life, has come to complete repose, is drifting down the 
stream. But while struggles remain, their causes will change. Paul 
had his agony, but the occasion of it in his case was not the same as 
with us. Many things which we can only accomplish by a supreme effort 
of faith had become habitual to him. It was the loftiness of his ideal 
which made him groan as he did. If we have not now the same signal 
victories that we once had, if we are unable to say, " I have realized 
what I was aspiring to," the reason may be that we are no longer 
occupied in meeting definite actual transgressions ; our ideal is higher 
now, and we are endeavouring to bring every thought and emotion into 
captivity to the obedience of Christ. 

It is very difficult to reckon our advances in spiritual things, or to 
compare our position with that of others. There are height and weight 
machines for the body; examinations serve the same purpose for the 
intellect ; but there is nothing to test or compare the growth of the 
spirit. A man may be exulting in progress when there has really been 
decline ; or he may be bemoaning his dissimilarity to Christ when he 
has been increasing in His likeness. The little shallow brook makes a 
great noise as it ripples over the stones and down its diminutive cataracts 



UNCONSCIOUS SANCTIFICATION. 269 

* — you can hear it at a distance, it attracts attention to itself. But 
wait until it becomes a huge river, on which navies can float, whose 
now is irresistible, and it will be so quiet that you are unaware of its 
presence until you stand on its banks. When love works great effects, 
it is greater than when it is emotional and self-conscious. If it has 
become so powerful that dams are impossible, and little impediments 
-cause scarcely a ripple, it is because its volume has increased. 

Struggles, then, while they indicate growth, show also a lack of 
complete attainment. We might further say that when we rejoice in our 
attainments, it is questionable if we have really made them. If a man 
tells you joyfully his liver is working well, it is evidently not accustomed 
to do so ; and you would not be surprised if a change of wind made him less 
jubilant about his health. When a man declares he is fully consecrated, 
that his all is on the altar, and he is waiting for the fire, he may be 
perfectly sincere ; but I fear his consecration is a little precarious, he 
is not so thoroughly devoted as he thinks, or he would not remark it so 
much. When a child begins to walk, every step is a triumph ; he stands 
at one chair, another is two feet away, he hesitates, balances himself, 
takes three steps, and looks up delighted; and rightly so, his father 
thinks, at any rate. But when he knows he can walk, he walks but 
little. When he is thoroughly able to do it, he does not congratulate 
himself upon taking three or three thousand steps without falling ; he 
never thinks of it, and is unconscious of danger or success. If he makes one 
fall, his mind dwells on that more than on the miles he has gone without 
stumbling. When a man says, " I have been three months without a 
conscious transgression," we are glad to hear it ; but it is evidently a 
new experience. We hope he will find that this should be the normal 
condition of Christian men, and not remark every day of success, but be 
very humiliated for every failure. 

Paul described his position thus : — " One thing I do, forgetting the 
things which are behind, and stretching forward to the things which are 
before, I press on toward the goal unto the prize of the high calling of 
God in Christ Jesus." His past achievements he does not think of so 
much as the distance which still separates him from the goal, that to 
which he has been called, that for which he was apprehended of Christ. 
Generous men have sometimes, on the summits of mountains, provided 
a seat on which is written, " Rest and be thankful." When you have 
reached the highest peak you may do this appropriately, but in spiritual 
climbing you never arrive there. While in the valley below you see the 
mountain is high, but clouds limit your vision, and you cannot tell how 
high it really is. As you ascend, the air becomes clearer, and you 
realize more and more how far you are from your destination. Never 
mind what is behind ! If it be a great advance, thank God, and take 
courage, but do not sit down and contemplate it. 

The pan who knows he is humble has lost his humility. The man 
who thinks of himself as kind, loving, gentle, moral, honest, has these 
graces in the smallest degree. They are not fully attained until they 
have become natural and unobserved. When the Saviour commends 
those on His right hand for their generosity and love, they feel them- 
selves altogether unworthy of His praise. True, they had helped the 
poor, they could do no less ;. but they were not conscious of serving the 
Lord as He indicates. Their well-doing had become a holy and blessed 

19 



270 UNCONSCIOUS SANCTIFICATION. 

habit with them, they had no anticipation of reward. This I take to 
be the perfect condition — that holiness should be our very nature, and 
we should be so accustomed to serve Christ as not to notice it in every 
particular action. 

Certainly, the converse of this is the deepest degradation. While a 
man feels the shame of drunkenness, there is hope of his reform. "While 
a man blushes at his dishonesty, you may bring him back to upright- 
ness. But when the drunkard feels no shame, when the man looks on 
dishonesty as a necessary condition of his business, and glories in his 
sharp practice, then he is as low as he can be ; there is no hope for 
him. God must convince him of sin before he will turn. And as 
unconsciousness of sin is the deepest degradation, so unconsciousness 
of purity is the highest holiness. 

In proportion as we attain to likeness to Christ, we cease to observe 
that likeness; but our failures stand forth prominently in our daily 
thoughts. Men talk of "the second blessing"; but there is a third 
blessing, of which, I am told, our President spoke in one of his ser- 
mons. Job had his first blessing when he became a God-fearing man ; 
he had his second blessing when the lamp of God shined on his head, 
and the secret of God was upon his tent, when everyone rose at hi3 
presence, and accorded him honour because of his many and signal 
virtues. But a third, and higher, blessing he received when he was 
made to say, " I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear : but 
now mine eye seeth thee. Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in 
dust and ashes." Brethren, it is this third blessing we prize. It is 
notour ambition to have attainments to dwell upon, or to "delight 
in a sense of inward purity," as one wrote; rather would we have 
a sense of inward impurity wherever it exists, and feel more keenly 
when we fail to resemble our Master. We would be holy — not as 
Mr. So-and-so is holy — but as He is holy whose whole nature it is 
to be holy. 

Beholding the Lord not only makes us abhor ourselves, but trans- 
forms us into His image from glory to glory; and this is real 
sanctification. In Israel's last era they lost that vivid conception 
of God which patriarchs and psalmists enjoyed. They would not 
use the august name of " Jehovah," lest it should be degraded, 
but substituted for it the name of " Lord." Refusing to look into the 
face of God, or to call Him by His true name, they lost sight of Him 
more and more. One consequence of this was that the very idea of 
holiness was changed, high moral principles ceased to be esteemed, and 
trifles were lifted into prominence. So will it be with us ; if we lose 
sight of Him in His unspeakable holiness, we shall be pedantic, squeamish, 
and censorious in our own holiness, instead of being deeply, freely, and 
joyfully holy. A little self-introspection is good ; better have much 
than be indifferent to one's condition ; but divine contemplation is most 
to be desired. It was not while Elijah abode in the cave, but when he 
went forth and stood upon the mount before the Lord, that his petulance 
was dissolved, and he was qualified to fulfil fresh duties. 

This is the will of God, even our sanctification. There is no sin which 
is unconquerable, no failure which is irremediable. If we attain to 
nothing higher it is because our willingness, or our faith, is at fault. 
Robert Murray McCheyne asked himself, " Is it the desire of my heart 



JOHN HSWTOXrd PREACHING. 271 

to be altogether holy ? Is there any sin I wish to retain ? Is sin a 
grief to me ? " To this he answered, "Lord, thou knowest all things. 
Thou knowest that I hate all sin, and desire to be made altogether like 
Thee." Can we say the same ? Am I really wishful, not for a sense of 
superiority over others, not for a comfortable feeling of having made 
progress, but for a complete likeness to Christ ? Lord, reveal my 
shortcomings to me ! Lord, remove them from me ! 

Sanctification is the essential thing, not consciousness of it. Let us 
be careful to discern what it is we are really desiring, lest, grasping at 
the shadow, we risk the loss of the substance. 



THE passage which we submit to our readers is from certain letters 
written by John Newton to Rev. W. Barlass, of New York. We 
transcribe it, not for the imitation of any, but as an instance of a method 
of preaching which most teachers would condemn, but which, in 
Mr. Newton's case, was satisfactory to his large audience. The good 
man was full, and could readily overflow ; he was also a practised and 
experienced speaker, and did, in his ripe age, what no young man could 
attempt without extreme folly. We give the passage, not only as a 
curiosity, but as a counterblast against that absurd elaboration which is 
so much cried up. As we said the other day, " Our preachers are not 
satisfied unless they can plant boiled potatoes : but boiled potatoes never 
grow." 

Let the venerable Newton tell his own tale. 

" I compare the rules which have been, or may be offered, either to 
ministers or believers, to lasts for shoes ; they must be accommodated 
to the foot, or else, though the shoe may look well, it will not set well. 
The rules of God's Word, indeed, discover their divine origin in this 
respect, that, being founded upon an exact knowledge of the heart of 
man, and the nature of his present state, they are applicable to all 
persons, times, and circumstances : no real inconvenience follows from 
observing them ; but the neglect of them is always of ill consequence. 
But the rules of men are too personal, partial, and short-sighted to 
deserve our notice any farther than as hints, which we may follow, or 
not, just as we find them suit. I should be glad to entrust you with 
my judgment pro re ?iata, in any point which might occasionally arise. 
But to offer you such copious advice as you desire, concerning the matter 
and manner of preaching, would not only be assuming too much, but 
would be acting contrary to my judgment and professed principles. I 
have formerly fettered myself by following other people's rules, and 
therefore ought not to shackle my friend by prescribing to him. You 
have the word of grace, the throne of grace, and the Spirit of grace 
with you. Under this divine direction, what passes within you and 
around you, will furnish you with better rules for your own manage- 
ment, than you could possibly receive from the wisest man upon earth, 
who was not exactly in your situation. 

" The one question you have specified, rather surprised me as coming 
from Scotland, where I thought written sermons were only of a late 



272 john newton's preaching. 

date, and even now only in use amongst those who, having departed 
from, the great truths of the gospel, are, of course, necessitated to live 
upon their own funds. I will so far answer it, as to tell you simply how 
I have been led. My first essay as a preacher was in 1758 (six years 
before my admission into the Established Church), in a Dissenting 
meeting-house at Leeds. I attempted it wholly extempore. But I 
thought I had my general and particular heads very methodically ranged 
in my mind. I set off tolerably well, though with no small fear and 
trembling. I soon feared and trembled much more ; for, after speaking 
about ten minutes, my mouth was stopped. I stared at the people, and 
they at me, but not a word more could I speak. I was forced to come 
down and leave the people, some smiling and some weeping. My pride 
and self-sufficiency were sorely mortified, and for two years afterward 
I could not look at the place without feeling the heart-ache, and, as it 
were, saying to myself, Hie Troja stetit. The disaster made me conclude 
it would be absolutely impossible for me ever to preach without book. 
Accordingly, I began to compose sermons at full length. The next 
time I was asked to preach, I did not feel much trepidation. I had my 
discourse in my pocket, and did not much doubt but I was able to read 
it. And I read it sure enough. But being near-sighted, and rather 
ashamed to hold up my notes in view, I held my head close down to the 
cushion ; and when I began, I durst not take my eye off for a moment, 
being impressed with a fear that I should not readily fix it again upon 
the right part of the page ; so that I hardly saw anybody in the place 
during the whole time ; and I looked much more like a dull schoolboy, 
poring over his lesson, than a preacher of the gospel. I was not much 
less disconcerted this time than the former ; and applied to my notes 
the poet's words, Nee tecum, nee sine te. " Nor with thee, nor without 
thee." At length the Lord put it into my heart to have a meeting for 
a few select friends in my own house, on the Lord's-day evening, which 
I continued for about the last three years I lived in Liverpool. And 
in these exercises he was pleased in some measure to open my mouth. 
"When I came to Olney, and long afterward, I used to write about as 
much as I have now written, upon the text before I preached ; but for 
some years past I have seldom written a page. Very often I cannot fix 
upon my text before I am in the pulpit ; and frequently I have begun 
when I have known no more what I should say, or how I should handle 
the subject, than any of the people before me ; and this not of choice, 
nor through indolence, but of necessity. At some such seasons, so far 
as I can judge of myself, I have preached to as much advantage as if I 
had studied my sermon for a month. Various have been the methods 
my wise and gracious Lord has taken to break down my spirit of self- 
dependence, and to hide pride from me. ' Of all the maxims I have met 
with about preaching, I most admire that of Luther, Bene precasse, est 
bene studuisse. " To have prayed well is to have studied well." 

" If my mind was in a right frame towards the Lord, I think I should 
not be greatly embarrassed if called to preach at five minutes' warning 
to the most respectable congregation. But often it is otherwise with 
me, and I am forced to venture with my heart sadly out of tune. How 
often, and how justly, might he stop my mouth, and put me to shame 
before the people ! But he is merciful." 



273 



(ffirjtlesiastinil Qmmtmtait. 



FROM a tract entitled "Ecclesiastical Amusements," by E. P. Marvin, 
Lockport, we cull the following. It is clear that America is in 
the same boat as England, and that in Mr. Marvin it finds the counter- 
part of our own beloved Archibald. Brown. May some of these hot 
shots work havoc among the masqueraders of the sanctuary, who set up 
the image of Baal in the house of the Lord ! 

" What shall we say, what would the Master say, of a bevy of vain 
and bedizened young ladies, fascinating and cornering susceptible young 
men, to sell them commodities above value, and which they did not 
want ? or a dance gotten up by the ' King's Daughters ' ? What of 
the many devices like grab-bag, fish-pond, bean-counting, ring-cake, 
and raffle, involving the gambling principle ? What of the Church of 
God showing wax- works, and peddling small wares and fun to the 
world? or getting up a variety show of Mother Goose, a Fan Flirtation, 
a Donkey Social, a Punch and Judy Show, or a gathering of Merry- 
andrews and Belly-worshippers (Phil. iii. 9), to replenish her treasury ? 

" At one of them a lady sang the song beginning with ' Lord, send 
me a husband!' An owl is supposed to respond, 'Who, who ? ' She 
answers: 'Almost any one, Lord, will do.' 

" Comic songs, humorous recitations, dramatic exercises, and operatic 
selections are employed, often with the help of professionals, and 
sometimes advertised as f Howling Entertainments.' A certain Y.M.C.A. 
held a Smoking Concert, and an entertainment by a popular actress 
and dancer; and another in Mexico, when all else seemed too tame, 
held a Bull Fight, and 'made a pot of money.' 

" Said an infidel to me : 'I think your God must be in great need of 
money, by the tricks the churches practise to get it for him.' Many 
of the pious grieve over these things, and hang their heads for shame. 
Even those who aid and attend these performances cannot well approve 
them. Why have they not conscience and courage enough to witness 
against them ? No intelligent Christian can ask God's blessing upon 
such practices, nor expect it to rest upon money so procured. 

" Amateur dramatics to please the world and put money in the purse 
of the Church, silence the testimony of the pulpit against the stage, and 
even promote its interests. The theatre has always been a school of 
immorality, from the time when the Greeks sang and danced around 
their wine-god Bacchus until now, and these performances are training- 
schools for the play-house. A young man who had been employed in 
a Brooklyn theatre told me that he received his first training and taste 
for the stage in Sunday-school concerts. A Sunday-school in Hamil- 
ton, Canada, has lately furnished three actors for the stage. 

" In fact, most of these leading ecclesiastical play people attend the 
theatre and the dance, and play cards, and not a few leading pulpits are 
weakened or silenced in their testimony against these things. 

"And this babel cry for ' amusements,' with the frenzy of enterprise 
in the Church to meet it, has not yet culminated. God only knows 
where it will lead ! It is world wide. I am told that a Coloured 
Church, South, lately dramatized and acted the Prodigal Son, actually 
killing and eating the Fatted Calf. It is said that their Church festivals 
are often characterized by the vilest orgies. Eph. v. 12." 



275 



" %\t ft. f . £pT0*0tt." 



AT the College meeting, at Dalston Junction, May 6th, Mr. Lauderdale, 
of Great Grimsby, greatly interested the people by the story of the 
fishing-smack The C. H. Spurgeon. That vessel has endured exceedingly 
rough weather, of which we gave some account in a former number : we 
now add a photograph. The damage is evident to every eye. The G. H, 8. 
seemed done for, and indeed, had it not been exceedingly well-built, it 
must have gone to the bottom. In the picture, Mr. Empson, the owner, 
es standing in the companion, and boxes and tools are lying about, 
belonging to the carpenters, who lost no time in getting to work with 
repairs. It is wonderful how soon the boat was restored to its former 
glory. Long ago, what seemed a wreck has been so completely restored 
as to be as brisk as any other of all the fleet in fishing the deep sea. Long 
may the good ship be profitably occupied for its master in taking multi- 
tudes of fishes ! We need not indicate the. way in which Mr. Lauderdale 
turned the vessel C. H. S. into an emblem of the preacher C. H. S. 
Storms have happened, but the flag of C. H. S. is still flying, and his 
net returneth not empty. Praise the Lord ! 



DURING our visit to Mentone we frequently saw the French soldiers 
at drill. The recruits were made to go through certain exercises, 
with sticks for swords. These men were raw recruits indeed — many of 
them fresh from the country, where they industriously till the soil, and 
lead frugal and quiet lives. The conscription compels them to quit 
their peaceful avocations, and come to learn the tl art of war." Alas 
that it should be so ! When will men learn war no more ? As we 
stood, one day, looking at the young soldiers at drill, we observed them 
performing a certain exercise which greatly interested us for the moment. 
A dummy was made to represent a soldier, and was set upright with 
supports. The soldiers " formed into line," and at a distance of some two 
or three hundred yards the word of command was given, and on rushed 
the heroes with their weapons, to attack — what ? The aforesaid dummy ! 
As they neared the effigy a great shout was raised, one or two leading the 
attack ; a fierce onslaught was made upon — what ? The dummy ! We 
suppose this exercise is useful in training the raw recruit, but we could 
not help reflecting thereon. How much this is like some of the 
preachers and teachers of the present day ! Are they not fond of setting 
up all sorts of dummies to attack ? spending time and energy in raising 
-dummies of doubt and philosophy, in order to show their cleverness in 
destroying them. Theories of which nobody ever heard before are 
set up to be knocked down, and doubts are suggested, of which no one 
in the congregation ever dreamed, that they might be demolished. Oh, 
that these good people would not waste their energies upon such foolish 
work ! ^ Let them preach Christ and him crucified, and maintain his 
•everlasting truth. So will his name be glorified, and the sons of men be 
blessed. F. G. Ladds. 




V. J. CHAELESW'OETH. 



277 

A JUBILEE MEMENTO, HASTILY SKETCHED BY A FRIENDLY HAND. 

ME. SPURGEON has been greatly favoured of the Lord by obtain- 
ing the help of co-workers singularly loyal and devoted, who,, 
under his infectious zeal, work the innumerable societies clustering round 
the Tabernacle, each individual being strikingly suited to his position. 

Conspicuously has this been the case in reference to the large orphan 
family of five hundred boys and girls at Stockwell. From its opening, 
in 1869, the Orphanage has enjoyed the wise guidance, the sympathetic 
control, and the enthusiastic service of the Eev. V. J. Charlesworth, as 
Head Master. He this year celebrates his personal jubilee, and twenty 
years of service at the Stockwell Orphanage. 

Looking over the years that have passed since 1839, the thoughtful 
mind can trace the divine hand which trained Mr. Charlesworth for his 
special service, and the divine strength which has upheld him therein. 

Like Mr. Spurgeon, Mr. Charlesworth is an Essex man. He was 
born April 28th, 1839. In 1858 he entered Homerton College as an 
educational student. His first experience of orphanage work was gained 
with Dr. Laseron, at his Training Home and Schools at Tottenham. 

In 1864 Mr. Charlesworth became co-pastor with Mr. Newman Hall, 
at Surrey Chapel, and for five years found a congenial training-school, 
where all his sympathy for the poor and the sad might be exercised ; 
so that, when, in 1869, Mrs. Hillyard's splendid gift of £20,000 com- 
pelled Mr. Spurgeon to begin his Orphanage, and it was necessary to 
find the man who could nurture it into vigorous life, the unerring hand 
of God led the Pastor to Mr. Charlesworth, and in him to the right 
man for the place. We have a quaint sense of ancient history as we 
read in The Sivord and the Trowel for June, 1869 : " Mr. Charlesworth, 
late assistant minister to Mr. Newman Hall, has now become the resident 
Master of the Stockwell Orphanage ; " and, three months later, another 
" Note," also by the President, saying, " Mr. Charlesworth is a great 
acquisition as Master." In this, as well as in other matters, the con- 
victions of former years are, with Mr. Spurgeon, only deepened by the 
lapse of time. 

Here, then, began the life-work by which Mr. Charlesworth will be 
best remembered. Most readers of The Sword and the Troivel have 
seen the fruits of his labours, either at the Orphanage itself, or during 
the visits of the Choir of boys to the provinces. 

Mr. Charlesworth is eminently a man of fatherly kindness and sym- 
pathy. If the face be " the index of the soul," then he is one with 
whom no lad would presume to take liberties, but from whom he would 
never shrink in cringing fear. Cross the quadrangle of the Orphanage 
when you will, you shall hear the merry laugh that tells of the happy 
and free domestic life of the Institution. 

Here, at any rate, there is no " great gulf fixed " between the palace 
of the master and the prison of the children ; the Orphanage is only an 
enlarged home. In latter years the return visits of "old boys" to the 
scene of their former days, have been very frequent, for " Stockwell is a 
fragrant memory." 



278 THE BUTCHER AND HIS COAT. 

The same kindly urbanity has secured for the inner working of the 
Institution that " absence of history" which constitutes the bliss of a 
community. Wise tact and sympathy have established mutual regard 
between the master and his fellow- workers. .Revolt and revolution 
have never looked within its gates, and even serious friction has never 
been reported. Among the larger anxieties of such a work, the placing 
out of the lads and girls in suitable situations is a very real one; 
but herein Mr. Charles worth has been signally successful. As a rule, far 
more applications for the youths and girls are received than can be met. 

Growing out of the increased financial necessities of the Orphanage, 
as well as from the desire to let the people in the provinces have eye- 
witness of its work, have sprung up the visits of the Choir and Hand- 
bell-ringers all over the United Kingdom. This has created an interest 
in the Orphanage never known before, intensified it where already 
-existing, and brought in annually hundreds of pounds to the exchequer. 
In all these things the special genius of Mr. Charlesworth has been 
manifest, and his zeal as a coadjutor of Mr. Spurgeon put beyond ques- 
tion. We gladly echo, as his fiftieth birthday goes by, the wish we once 
heard Mr. Spurgeon express concerning him, "0 king, live for ever!" 

The other works in which Mr. Charlesworth has engaged are neither 
few nor insignificant. The Sword and the Troiuel has often carried his 
pen-productions, prose and poetic, to its readers. Many of the " Stock- 
well Orphanage Tracts" are the work of his busy brain ; and often does 
he render a friendly turn to a tired minister by his acceptable pulpit 
services. His " Life of Rowland Hill," a permanent reminiscence of his 
Surrey Chapel associations, is the raciest book on that racy man that we 
know : it will pass through more editions yet. As a man, as an author, 
as a preacher, to know him is to esteem him ; but his chief honour 
is that for twenty years already — and, we trust, for many, many more 
— he was, and will be, f the much-esteemed Head-master of the Stock- 
well Orphanage." 

%\t §«tc]jtr mis |is fct. 

BY PASTOR F. E. MARSH, SUNDERLAND. 

" TF I were to take off my overcoat, you would be able to see of what 
JL trade I am." So said a good Christian brother — a butcher by 
trade — and, he continued, " If Christians would only take off the coat of 
selfishness, which many of them wear, the world would be able to see 
that they are the followers of Christ indeed." 

Let us take off the coat of selfishness, and deny self once for all. Say of 
self as Peter said of his Master, " I know not the man." Sinners will 
not believe what we say, but they cannot deny what we do. The say 
of the lip must be proven by the sanctity of the life. John com- 
mended the elect lady for walking in the truth, not for talking about it 
(3 John 3, 4). We must keep upright in our walking, or our head will 
go before our heels, and we shall soon be grovelling. 

Selfishness is the curse of the world, and the cause of all the division 
in the church. Let us be unselfish, and so be in unity with him who 
humbled himself to the death of the cross. 



279 

BY MRS. REGINALD RADCLIFFE. 

FOR many years Sailors' Homes and excellent Seamen's Missions, 
with painstaking and laborious missionaries, have been a blessing 
to our seaports; but in 1876 an additional institution, on quite a 
different plan of action, was opened in Liverpool, and called a " Strangers' 
Rest," followed, about a year after, by a similar one in London ; then by 
several other Strangers' Rests in Hull, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, 
Smyrna, Constantinople, the Cape, &c, &c. 

The Rest in Liverpool is furnished very plainly, and does not supply 
food or beds, but offers a hearty welcome, a warm fire in winter, and a 
fountain of pure water. Upon its windows is painted, in several 
languages, the following invitation : — 

" strangers' rest. 
" Seamen and Foreign Emigrants may read or write their letters, or rest. 

"nothing to pay." 

Inside they find a row of Bibles, in many languages, for their use in 
the house, and others are sold or given away with tracts. 

Of the band of workers in Liverpool, numbering, perhaps, as many 
.■as seventy brethren and sisters, no one but the brother who keeps and 
cleans the house is paid. These workers come from the congregations 
of various denominations; and we would fain hope that the friendly 
churches who have thus contributed helpers have themselves been 
■stimulated thereby. 

The house is open every week-day from ten a.m., and on Sundays 
from two p.m. The harmonium, at the upper end of the general 
reading-room, is a great attraction. The hymns are mostly led by a 
lady ; and I have seen men of four or five different nations, each from a 
book in his own language, joining in the same tune at the same time. 

Paper, envelopes, pens and ink are supplied gratis; and many a son 
is thus induced to write to his father or mother after years of silence. 

As the general reading-room fills, the workers invite the men upstairs, 
each nationality going to a separate room. There the workers read the 
Bible, and speak and pray with the strangers in their own tongue. 
During the last twelve years many have so been led to Jesus, and 
thus the gospel, free of cost, is carried to the far-off parts of the world. 

To the London Rest the Jews habitually resort, and several have 
been converted. At times of hardship or persecution in Russia, many 
Jews are welcomed at the Liverpool Strangers' Rest. 

"When Mrs. Osborne was working at the London Rest, Miss Lowe 
asked her if she had ever thought of the foreign field. This suggestion 
was prayed over, and Mrs. Osborne started, at her own charges, for the 
"Cape of Good Hope, and opened a Soldiers' and Sailors' Rest at Table 
Bay. For years there has been much blessing there. She writes home 
of a young soldier, a private in the ordnance corps, converted on 

* With the hearty desire that friends will be moved to aid this institution, and others 
like it, we gladly insert this article. The honoured name of the writer will command 
special attention. 



280 "know thy opportunity." 

Mr. Yarley's subsequent visit to the Cape, who, from that moment, began 
to work earnestly amongst the poor natives in Cape Town. He did not 
live long afterwards; but both black and white people were weeping- 
over his grave. Every corps in the garrison was represented at his 
funeral. During his three weeks' illness it was most touching to hear 
the constant enquiries from the poor natives at the Military Hospital. 
The work this soldier began has spread abundantly. 

A Russian sailor, converted at the Rest in London, translated two 
English tracts given him there, and sent his translation to his parents 
in Russia, whereby they were both brought to the Lord. This sailor 
now writes from his Russian home : — " My heart is still overflowing 
with gratitude to my King of kings for his keeping power, and his 
loving-kindness and tender mercies to me. Hallelujah ! Glory be to 
God alone for evermore, for I am safely home now, and all is well with my 
parents, and they are living for Jesus ; but, oh, do pray for me, that 
our heavenly Father may grant it, and give this blessing for it, that I 
may be allowed to speak here for Jesus in public. Oh, my heart weeps 
over these erring ones here, but I can't do anything for them yet. 
Lord, Lord, have mercy on them, with death's shadow covered over the 
people here. Yes, Lord, I keep believing that they will see that real 
light." 

From my own experience of Russia, I can sympathize deeply with 
this heart-prayer ; for when in Russia, not long ago, with my husband 
and daughter, the police kept a very sharp look-out on all attempts to 
preach the gospel publicly. One evening, when we had, with other 
friends, met more than, perhaps, one hundred people in a house, the 
police surprised us. The meeting had been a very blessed one. We 
were all so happy together, singing and praying, and seekers finding the 
Saviour, that we for a time had quite forgotten the police. Suddenly a 
loud knock reminded us where we were, and an officer, with his men, 
entered, crimson with passion. He stamped up and down, his sword 
clanking at his side. Words poured out like a torrent, but fortunately- 
some of us did not understand Russian. The meeting was, of course, 
suppressed, names and addresses of the people present taken down, and 
shortly afterwards our host of that evening was compelled to depart from 
his beloved Russia. 

Mr. Torre, who has been for six years a devoted and wise helper at the' 
London Rest, believing that the Lord would have him go and tell of his 
mighty love where there are fewer Christians, began , two years ago, to 
look for an opening so to do, where he could support himself and his 
family. He is now sailing immediately with his wife and children for 
South America. He intends to be a self-sustaining missionary, and 
expects, also, to open a Strangers' Rest at Buenos Ayres. 

At the Liverpool Strangers' Rest, one of the most blessed branches of 
the work has been to extend a hand of love and sympathy to the crowds 
of foreign-speaking emigrants on their way to America, who stay about 
two nights. Their hearts are often made tender by recent partings, and 
so they listen most gratefully to words of comfort from Christian friends, 
and many write back of blessing received. On arriving in Liverpool, 
they go to their boarding-house, and, after refreshment, have a long 
evening to pass. In nearly every group of emigrants some one who can 



" KNOW THY OPPORTUNITY." 281 

interpret is often to be found, and is of use when our foreign-speaking 
workers are not present. These strangers need no formal service, but 
real, earnest helpers to draw them to Jesus. Just now is the emigrant 
season with us, and thousands of these foreign-speaking men, women, 
and children are passing through Liverpool to the far West. 

The Rev. Josiah Strong, D.D., of New York, thus writes in Our 
Country,]). 39: — "The United States has many attracting influences, 
while the influences of Europe are expellent, and the facilities of travel 
are increasing year by year. . . . These threefold influences, therefore, 
which regulate immigration, all co-operate to increase it, and insure 
that for years to come this great gulf-stream of humanity will flow on 

with a rising flood In view of the fact that Europe is able to 

send us nearly nine times