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Full text of "The syllabus of Northwestern University"

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THE UNIVERSITY 

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Designs, Samples and Prices sent on Application. 

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furnished from photographs, designs sent us or designs furnished by us. 

Garrett Biblical Institute. 

EiZKNSTON, ILL, 



FACULTY. 

Henry B. Ridgaway, I). I).. LL. D.. Presi- Charlks J. Little, Ph. D., LL. D., Profes- 

dent, and Cornelia Miller Professor of sor of Historical Theology. 

Practical Theology. Robert L. CUMNOCK, A. M.. Professor of 

Mines Raymond, D. D., LL. D., Professor Elocution. 

of Symste.natic Theology. Charlks Horsvvkll, A. B., B. P., Ph., D. 

Charlks F. BRADLEY, D. D., Professor of Adjunct Professor of Biblical Languages 

New Testament Exegesis. and Exegesis. 

MILTON S. TERRY, I). D., Professor of old Nels E. Simonsen, A. B., B. D., Principal 



Testament Exegesis, and Biblical Theology. 



of Norwegian-! )anish Department. 



AH the Departments of Instructions usual in a Theological Seminary. 



Fall Term Begins Thursday, September 8. 



For Catalogue and Further Information Address the President. 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



HENRY WADE ROGERS, A. M., L.L. D., PRESIDENT. 

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, 

At Evanston, 111., offers four courses of instruction, viz : 

I. A CLASSICAL COURSE. 

II. A PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE. 

III. A SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

IV. A MODERN LITERATURE COURSE. 

Applications for catalogues should be addressed to the President of 
the University at Evanston. 

THE MEDICAL SCHOOL, 

At Chicago, 111., offers a three years' course of study in the principles 
and practice of medicine and surgery, leading to the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. For information relating to the Medical School, as well 
as for catalogues, address Frank Billings, M. D., Secretary of the Fac- 
ulty, 235 State street, Chicago. 

THE LAW SCHOOL, 

At Chicago, 111., offers a two years' course of study in the law, lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Law, and a postgraduate course of 
one year leading to the degree of Master of Laws. For information 
relating to the Law School, as well as for catalogues, address Secretary 
of the Law Faculty, 40 Dearborn street, Chicago. 

THE DENTAL SCHOOL, 

At Chicago, 111., offers a three years' course in the study of dentistry, 
leading to the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. For information 
relating to the Dental School, or for catalogues, apply to Edmund 
Noyes, D.D. S., Secretary of the Faculty, 65 Randolph street, Chicago. 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, 

At Chicago, 111., offers extended courses in Pharmacy, leading to the 
degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. For information relating to this 
school, or for catalogues, apply to Professor Oscar Oldberg, Dean of 
the Faculty, 40 Dearborn street, Chicago. 

THE WOMAN'S MEDICAL SCHOOL, 

At Chicago, 111., offers to women a three years' course of study in the 
principles and practice of medicine and surgery. For information, or 
catalogues, apply to Professor Marie J. Mergler, Secretary, 29 Waverly 
place, Chicago, 111. 

THE THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL. 

The Garrett Biblical Institute is the Theological School of the Uni- 
versity. It offers a three years' course of study. For information, or 
catalogues, apply to Henry B. Ridgaway, D. D., L.L. D., President. 
THE OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

lor information in regard to the Preparatory School, apply to Pro- 
fessor H. F. Fisk, Principal, Evanston, 111. 

For information in regard to the Conservatory of Music, apply to the 
Director of the Conservatory of Music, Woman's College, Evanston, III. 
I or information relating to the School of Oratory, apply to Professor 
k. L. Cumnock, Principal, Evanston, 111. 



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156x25 feet. Correspondence solicited. 

DR. BAYARD HOLHES, 

After May 1st, the Venetian Building. 240 WABASH AVENUE. 

Chicago Homoeopathic Medical College. 

OPPOSITE THE GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

The Seventeenth Autumn and Winter Session opens on Tuesday. 
September 20, 1892. 

Fon Annual Announcement and Catalogue, giving the Collegiate Regulations and other information, 
Address, 

J. R. KIPPHX, 7Ut. D., L-L-. B„ 

3154 Indiana Avenue, Chicago. Secretary, 

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THE SYLLABUS. 



Northwestern University, 



EVANSTON, ILL. 



Published by the Fraternities of the 



College of Liberal Arts 



Volume VIII. 
1892. 

THE INDEX CO.. PWNTERS. EVANSTON 



To the 

Hon. John Evans, M. D., 

President of the Board of Trustees, 

do we, the editors, 

dedicate this volume of 

The Syllabus. 



Editorial Board. 



DANIEL W. TERRY, Jr., '92, <f> K *, Editor-in-Chief. 

MARY K. SINGLETON, '93, A *, SECRETARY. 

HENRY R. HATFIELD, '92, B G II, j 

- Literary. 
MARY E. GLOSS, '92, K A 0, \ 

EDMUND LUDLOW, '92, 2 X, ATHLETICS. 

EFFIE VV. MILLER, '92, K K L, C. L. A. 

ALBERT S. MASON, '92, A T, CUTS AND GRINDS. 

ETHEL BAKER, '92, A T, Alumni. 

MARY K. SINGLETON, '93, A 4\ Fraternities. 

THOMAS C. HOLLINGSHEAD, '92, <I> K 2, City Departments. 

MARY E. PATTERSON, '92, r 4> B, Honors and Event 



Financial Board. 



HOWARD T. RICKETTS, '94, A Y, Business Manager. 
ELLA E. GARY, '94, K A G, Secretary. 
CARL R. LATHAM, '94, 2 X. 

GEORGE W. BAKER, '93, * K 2. 
ELVA BARBER, '94, T <P B. 

CHARLES H. BUCKS, '92, * K *. 

HARRIET L. OSGOOD, '92, K K T. 

CHARLES A. PHILLIPS, '92, B G II. 
GRACE E. GERMAIN, '94, A 4>. 

ANTOINETTE MEINHARDT, '94, A F. 















Praefatio 



'jWho thinks a perfect piece to see 
Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er can be."— .P^/V 



THE editors do not claim to have published an ideal annual. Indeed, it 
was with some apprehension that we took the responsibility of the work, 

feeling that much more was demanded by the college community now 
than in previous years. We felt that the steady growth and prosperity which 
has characterized the university during the past year should be exemplified 
in the chief publication by its student constituency, yet we felt it a difficult 
task to even maintain the standard set up by our predecessors. Hence it 
has been the aim of the editors to make the eighth volume of The Syllabus 
a true index of the inner and outer life of Northwestern during the past 
year. The college year that is just passing has been one of rapid advance- 
ment. The faculties of the various schools have been strengthened by addi- 
tional instructors, while many munificent gifts have made possible the estab- 
lishment of new lines of work. 

Two movements have been started during the year which will extend 
the influence and reputation of Northwestern — viz. : The Chicago Society for 
University Extension and the Northwestern University Settlement in the city 
of Chicago, an account of which organizations will be found in the succeed- 
ing pages. 

Athletics have been receiving their due share of attention, and are on a 
better organized foundation than ever before. With the fitting up of the new 
grounds in Athletic Park we shall have a place for outdoor sports second to 
none among western colleges. 

Several changes from previous editions will be noticed by our readers. 
The listing of students in the College of Liberal Arts is placed under two 
heads — "Candidates for a Bachelor's Degree," and "Not Candidates for a 



[039471 



Degree." Special attention has been given to the literary department. 
Through the generosity of several friends of the university, the Editorial 
Board has been able to offer one hundred dollars in prizes for certain styles 
of literary productions. 

We do not expect to escape some criticism, as we well know we cannot 
please everybody ; but we hope it will be remembered that we have given 
more time to the work than we could well afford. We have answered 
"present" for each other in "Theism" and "Bible Study," and have taken 
special examinations in chapel exercises for having broken the one-eighth rule, 
yet with all these troubles the work has been a pleasure, and we send forth 
The Syllabus of '92 with greeting and best wishes to every one who will 
pay the business manager $1.00. 

The Editors. 



General Calendar. 



892. 



January 


6, 


January 


7» 


March 


10, 


March 


30. 


March 


3°> 


April 


6. 


April 


!•> 


April 


26, 


April 


28, 


May 


3? 


May 


5' 


June 


12, 


June 


13' 


June 


14. 


June 


16, 


June 


25^ 


July 


28, 


September 


1, 


September 


*3« 


September 


14, 


September 


i5> 


September 22, 


September 27, 


September 


28, 


December 


21, 


December 


23. 


January 


4, 


March - 


22, 


March 


29, 



Wednesday, Second Term in College of Liberal Arts begins. 

Thursday, Second Term in Law School begins. 

Thursday, Summer Term in School of Pharmacy begins. 

Wednesday, Second Term in College of Liberal Arts begins. 

Wednesday, Second Term in Law School ends. 

Wednesday, Third Term in College of Liberal Arts begins. 

Thursday, Third Term in Law School begins. 

Tuesday, Commencement in Dental School. 

Thursday, Commencement in Medical School. 

Tuesday, Spring Course in Dental School begins. 

Thursday, Commencement in School of Theology. 

Sunday Baccalaureate Address. 

Monday, Examinations for Admission to College of Liberal Arts. 

Tuesday, Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Thursday, Commencement in College of Liberal Arts and Law School. 

Saturday, Spring Course in Dental School ends. 

Thursday, Summer Term in School of Pharmacy ends. 

Tuesday, Winter Term in School of Pharmacy begins. 

Tuesday, Examinations for Admission to College of Liberal Arts. 

Wednesday, First Term in College of Liberal Arts begins. 

Thursday, Year begins in School of Theology. 

Thursday. Winter Term in Law School begins. 

Tuesday, Year begins in Dental School. 

Wednesday, Year begins in Medical School. 

Wednesday, First Term in College of Liberal Arts ends. 

Wednesday, First Term in Law School ends. 

1893. 

Wednesday, Second Term in Cdllege of Liberal Arts begins. 
Wednesday, Second Term in College of Liberal Arts ends. 
Wednesday, Third Term of College of Liberal Arts begins. 

IT 



University Trustees. 



Officers of the Board 



HON. JOHN EVANS. M. 
ORRINGTON LUNT, 
WILLIAM DEERING. 
FRANK P. CRANDON, 
JAMES G. HAMILTON, 
THOMAS C. HOAG, 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Second Vice-President, 
Secretary. 

Assistant Secretary. 
Agent and Treasurer. 



Elected by the Board 



Term of Office Expires in 1892 



Hon. John Evans, M. "D 

JOSIAH J. PARKHURST, 

Thomas C. Hoag, 

David McWilliams, 

Rev. Richard Haney, D. D., 

Turlington W. Harvey, 

E. J. Fowler Willing, A. M 

Mary Fish, 

David R. Dyche, M. D., 

Gistavus F. Swift. 



Term of Office Expires in 1893 



Orrington Lint. 
Nathan S. Davis, Jr., M. 
James G. Hamilton, 
Charles Busby, 
Hlmphrey H. C. Miller, 
George H. Foster, 
Frank E. Tyler, 
Rev. David Swing, D. D., 
James H. Raymond, A. M., 
Dr. William F. Poole, 

Term of Office expires in 1894 

Edmund Andrews, M. D., LL. D., 

James Frake, A. M., LL. B., 



Denver, Col. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Dwight. 

Altona. 

Chicago. 

New York. 

Joliet. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Kansas City. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 



Chicago. 
Chicago. 



19 



Nathan Smith Davis, M. J)., LL 
Henry Sargent Towle, LL. B., 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, 
John B. Kirk, 

Henry WADr. Rogers, LL. D., 
Norman W, Harris, 



I). 



Hon. Oliver H. Horton 

William Deering, 

Morris R. Eddy, 

Deborah H. Cummings, 

William A. Fuller, 

James B. Hobbs, 

Frank P. Crandon, 

Hon. Lorin C. Collins, A. M., 



Term of Office Expires in 1895 
LL. D., 



< Chicago. 
Chicago. 
( 'hicago. 
Evans ton. 
Evanston. 
( Ihicago. 

Chicago. 

Kvanston. 

Kvanston. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 



Elected by Conferences, 



Rock River Conference. 

Rev. Amos W. Patten, D. D., Aurora, 111. 

Rev. W t illiam A. Spencer, D. D., . . . ; . . . Philadelphia, Pa. 

Detroit Conference. 

Rev. Arthur Edwards, D. D., Chicago. 

Rev. W. W t . Washburn, A. M., Saginaw, Mich. 

Central Illinois Conference. 

Rev. James W. Haney, A. M., D. D., ..:... Geneseo, 111. 

Rev. Richard D. Russell, A. M., Milford, 111. 

Michigan Conference. 

Rev Daniel C. Riehl, A. M., Quincy, Mick. 

Rev. N. L. Bray, ....'. Coldwater, Mich. 



Executive Committee. 



Hon. John Evans, M. D. 
Orrington Lunt, 
James G. Hamilton. 
Thomas C. Hoag. 
William Deering. 



JOSIAH J. PARKHURST. 

Henry Wade Rogers, LL. D. 
Frank P. Crandon. 
David R. Dyche, M. D. 
John B. Kirk. 



James H. Raymond. 



20 



Officers of 

Administration /* Instruction 



Faculty of the College of Liberal Arts. 

HENRY WADE ROGERS, A. M., LL. D., 

University of Michigan, 1874 (A A 4>); LL. U. Wesleyan University, 1890. 
President, and Professor of International and Constitutional Law. 
DAMEL BONBRIGHT, A. M., 

Vale College, 1850 ( 4> B K ); LL. D. Lawrence University, 1878. 
John Evans Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, Librarian. 
OLIVER MARCV, A, B., 

Wesleyan University, 1846 ( 4> B K ) ( 4> X 9 ); LL. L)., University of Chicago, 1873. 
Dean of College of Liberal Arts, William Deering Professor of Natural 
History, and Curator of Museum. 
JULIUS F. KELLOGG, A. M., 

Lawrence University, 1859. 
Noyes Professor of Mathematics. 
HERBERT F. FISK, A. M., 

Wesleyan University, i860 ( $ B K) ( 4> X 0):' 1). D. Wesleyan University 1888: 
Willamette University 1888. 
Professor of Pedagogics, and Principal of Preparatory School. 
ROBERT L. CUMNOCK, A. M., 

Wesleyan University, 1868 ( * B K ) ( * Y ). 
Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution. 

ROBERT BAIRD, A. M., 

N. W. U., 1869 (4> K *). 
Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

CHARLES W. PEARSON, A. M. 

N. W. U., 1871 ( $ K * ) (4> B K ). 

Secretary of the Faculty of Liberal Arts, and Professor of English Lit- 
erature. 
ROBERT D. SHEPPARD, A. M. 

University of Chicago, 1869;!). D., Garrett Biblical Institute, 1885, 

Professor of Political Economy and History. 

21 



A. V. E. YOUNG, Ph. B., 

Michigan University, 1875, ( A K E ). 
Professor of Chemistry. 
EMILY F. WHEELER, A. M., 
N. W. U., 1880. 
Professor of the French Language and Literature. 

CHARLES S. COOK, B. S., 

Dartmouth College, 1879 (2 A IT). 
Professor of Physics. 
GEORGE W. HOUGH, A. M., 

Uuion College, 1856 (<J> B K) (A T). 
Professor of Astronomy, and Director of Dearborn Observatory. 
JAMES TAFT HATFIELD, A. M., 

N. W. U., 1883 (B6n); Ph. D., Johns Hopkins, 1890. 
Professor of the German Language and Literature. 
CHARLES B. ATWELL, Ph. B., 

Syracuse University, 1879; Ph. M., Syracuse University, 1881 (A K E). 
Instructor in Natural History, and Registrar in College of Liberal Arts. 
ELIAKIM H. MOORE, A. B., 

Yale University, 1879; Ph. D., Yale University, 1885 (* Y). 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
GEORGE A. COE, A. B., Ph. D., 

Rochester University, 1884 (<P B K) (¥ T) ; Boston School of Theology, S. T. B. 
Professor of Philosophy. 
P. S. STOLLHOFEN, Ph. D., 

University of Strassburg. 
Assistant Professor of French and German. 
WILLIAM E. SMYSER, A. B., 

Wesleyan University, 1889 (A K E) (<P B K). 
Assistant Professor of English Literature. 
GEORGE H. HORSWELL, A. M., B. D., Ph. D., 
X. W. U., 1879 (* K *)• 
Assistant Professor of Latin. 
MRS. EMILY HUXTINGTON MILLER, Ph. B., 
Oberlin College, 1857. 
Dean of the Woman's College. 
LODILLA AMBROSE, Ph., B., 
X. W. U., 1887. 
Assistant Librarian. 
PHILIP GREINER, 

Instructor in Gymnastics. 



22 



Faculty of the Law School 



HENRY WADE ROGERS, LL. D., 

President, and Lecturer on Comparative Constitutional Law. 
HENRY \Y. BLODGETT, LL. D., 

Lecturer on Admiralty Law, and Dean of the Law Faculty. 

HARVEY B. HURD, 

Professor of the Law of Corporations, Evidence, Commercial Paper, and 
Statutory Law. 
MARSHALL D. EWELL. LL. D., 

Professor of Elementary and Criminal Law, and the Law of Partnership 
and Torts. 
WILLIAM W. FARWELL, 

Professor of Equity Jurisprudence and Code Pleading, and Secretary of 
the Law Faculty. 
NATHAN S. DAVIS, M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

Instructors in the Law School. 

JOHN MAYNARD HARLAN, v 

Instructor in the Law of Real Estate. 
JAMES E. BABB, LL. B., 

Instructor in the Law of Sales. 
JOHN BARTON PAYNE, 

Instructor in the Law of Domestic Relations. 
JOHN T. CONDON, LL. B., 

Assistant. 

KENESAW M. LANDIS, LL. B., 

Assistant. 

Faculty of the Medical School. 

HENRY WADE ROGERS, LL. D., 

President. 
NATHAN S. DAVIS, M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, 
Dean. 
EDWARD O. F. ROLER, A. M., M. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics. 
EDMUND ANDREWS, M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, Treasurer. 
RALPH N. ISHAM, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Principles and Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery.. 
JOHN H. HOLLISTER, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
SAMUEL J. JONES, M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

23 



MARCUS P. HATFIELD, A. M., M. I) , 

Professor of Diseases of Children. 
JOHN H. LONG, Sc. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Director of Chemical Laboratory. 
EMILIUS CLARK DUDLEY, A. M., M. I)., 

Professor of Gynaecology. 
JOHN E. OWENS, M. 1)., 

Professor of Principles and Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 
OSCAR C. DeWOLF, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of State Medicine and Public Hygiene. 
ISAAC N. DANFORTH, A. M., M. I)., 

Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
WILLIAM E. CASSELBERRY, M. I)., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics, Laryngology, and Rhikology. 
WILLIAM W. JAGGARD, A. M., M. I)., 

Professor of Obstetrics. 
NATHAN S. DAVIS, Jr., A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicink. 
FRANK S. JOHNSON, A. M., M. I)., 

Professor of General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy. 
FRANK BILLINGS, M. S., M. D., 

Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Medicine, Lecturer on Prac 
tice of Medicine, and Secretary. 
E. WYLLYS ANDREWS, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
FRANK T. ANDREWS, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Histology. 
GEORGE W. WEBSTER, M. D., 

Professor of Physiology. 
JOSEPH ZEISLER, M. D., 

Professor of Dermatology and Syphilis. 
HERBERT H. FROTHINGHAM, M. D., 

Professor of Descriptive Anatomy. 
ELBERT WING, A. M., M. I)., 

Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases, and of Medical Jurisprudence 
WILLIAM E. MORGAN, M. D., 

Lecturer on Operative Surgery and Surgical Anatomy. 
GEORGE S. ISHAM, A. M., M. D., 

Clinical Assistant to Professor of Surgery. 
JOHN I). KALES, M. D,, 

Demonstrator of .Pathology. 
RUFUSG. COLLINS, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Obstetrical Operations. 
THOMAS BENTON SWARTZ, A. M., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, and Clinical Assistant in Gynaecology. 
HORACE M. STARKE V, M. D., 

Clinical Lecturer on Ophthalmology and Otology. 

24 



THOMAS J. W ATKINS, M. D., 

Clinical Assistant in Gynaecology. 
EDWARD TYLER EDGERLY, A. M., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Histology, and Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 
JOHN LEEMING, M. D., 

Lecturer on Materia Medica. 
JARED C. HEPBURN, M. D., 

Clinical Assistant in Laryngology and Rhinology. 
JAMES T. CAMPBELL, M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 
SAMUEL C. PLUMMER, A. M., M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 
DANIEL N. EISENDRATH, A. B., M. D., 

Curator of Museum. 

Faculty of the Woman's Medical College. 

CHARLES WARRINGTON EARLE, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Diseases of Children and Clinical Medicine. 
ISAAC N. DANFORTH, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Renal Diseases. 
DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D., 

Professor of Diseases of the Neryous System and Clinical Medicine. 
SARAH HACKETT STEVENSON, M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics. 
DAVID W. GRAHAM, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 
WILLIAM T. MONTGOMERY, M. D., . 

Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

E. FLETCHER INGALES, A. M., M. D., Treasurer, 

Professor of Diseases of the Chest and Throat. 

F. L. WADS WORTH, M. D., 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine. 
MARIE J. MUGLER, M. D., . Secretary, 

Professor of Gynecology and Clinical Gynecology. 
EUGENE S. TALBOT, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Dental Surgery. 
JEROME H. SALISBURY, A. M., M. D., 

Proeessor of Chemistry and Toxicology and Clinical Medicine. 
MARY H. THOMPSON, M. D., 

Clinical Professor of Gynecology at the Hospital for Women and Children. 
ELIZA H. ROOT, M. D., 

Professor of Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence, and Professor of Clinical 
Obstetrics at the Hospital for Women and Children. 
FRANK CAREY, M. D., 

Professor of PATHOLOGY. 

25 



JOSEPH ZEISLER, M. D., 

Professor of Dermatology. 
MARY A. MIXER, M. D., Assistant Secretary, 

Professor of Physiology. 
JOHN EDWIN RHODES, A. M., M. D., 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Chest. 
EDWIN M. SMITH, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy and Instructor in Surgery. 
HENRY T. BYFORD, A. M., M. D., 

Clinical Professor of Gynecology at the Woman's Hospital of Chicago. 
JAMER B. HERRICK, A. B., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 
RACHEL HICKEY-CARR, M. D., 

Professor of Histology and Director of the Histological Laboratory. 
LUDWIG HEKTOEN, A. B., M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Director of the Pathological Laboratory. 
FREDERICK C. SCHAEFER, M. D., 

Professor of Surgery. 
W. GODFREY DYAS, M. D., F. R. C. S., 

Professor Emeritus of Theory and Practice of Medicine. 
G. C. PAOLI, M. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 
T. DAVIS FITCH, M. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Gynecology. 
R. G. BOGUE, M. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Surgery. 
WILLIAM J. MAYNARD, A. M., M. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Dermatology. 

Faculty of the School of Theology. 

REV. HENRY B. RIDGAWAY, D. D., LL. D., 

A. B., Dickinson College, 1849; D. D., Dickinson, 1869; LL. D., Dickinson, 1889. 
President, and Cornelia Miller Professor of Practical Theology. 

REV. MINER RAYMOND, D. D., LL. D., 

A. M. (honorary), Wesleyan University, 1840; D. D., Wesleyan University, 1854: 
LL. D., Northwestern University, 1884. 
Professor of Systematic Theology. 

REV. CHARLES F. BRADLEY, D. D., 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1873 (* B K ) ; D - D -« Lawrence University, 1887. 
Professor of New Testament Exegesis. 

REV, MILTON S. TERRY, D. D., 

A. M. (honorary), Wesleyan University 1879; D. D., Wesleyan University, 1879 
CI- B K) ; N. W. U., 1891. 
Professor of Old Testament Exegesis. 

2G 



REV. CHARLES J. LITTLE, LL. D., 

A. B., University of Pennsylvania, 1861 ; LL. D., Dickinson College, 1885. 
Professor of Historical Theology. 
ROBERT L. CUMNOCK, A. M., 

Wesleyan University, 1868 (* B K) (t T). 
Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution. 
REV. CHARLES HORSWELL, Ph. D., 

A. B., N. W. U., 1884 (4> K *) ; Ph. D., Yale, 1891. 
Adjunct Professor of Greek. 
REV. NK1.S E. SIMONSEN, A. M., B. 1)., 
A. B., N. W. U., 1880. 
Principal of Norwegian and Danish Theological Seminary. 

Faculty of the School of Oratory. 

ROBERT McLEAN CUMNOCK, A. M., 

Director. 
ADELAIDE LAURA MURPHY, 

Instructor in Delsarte System of Physical Culture. 
LUELLA ELECTA JONES, 

Instructor in Dramatic Art. 
ISABEL THERESA GARGHILL, 

Instructor in Expressive Reading. 

Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 

HENRY WADE ROGERS, LL. I)., 

President. 
OSCAR OLDBERG, P. D., 

Professor of Pharmacy, Director of the Pharmaceutical Laboratories, and 
Dean. 
JOHN H. LONG, Sc D., 

Professor of Chemisty and Director of the Chemical Laboratory. 
E. S. BASTIN, A. M., F. R. M. S., 

Professor of Structural and Systematic Botany. 
MAURICE A. MINER, F. R. M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy. 
MARK POWERS, B. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
HARRY KAHN, Ph. M., 

Instructor in Pharmacy. 
W. K. HIGLEY, Ph. C, 

Director of the Microscopical Laboratory. 
W. E. QUINE, M. D.. 

Lecturer on Physiology, Therapeutics and Toxicology. 
ERNEST B. STUART, F. R. M. S., 

Lecturer on Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy. 

27 



Faculty of the Dental School. 

HENRY WADE ROGERS, LL. I)., 
President. 

E. I). SWAIN, I). I). S., 

I) KAN. 

G. V. BLACK, M. D., I). 1). S., 

Professor of Dental Pathology. 
GEORGE H. GUSHING, M. I)., D. I). S., 

Professor of Principles and Practice of Dental Surgery. 
JOHN S. MARSHALL, M. 1)., 

Professor of Clinical Dental Surgery. 
CHARLES P. PRUYN, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Operative Dentistry. 
ISAAC A. FREEMAN, D. D. S., 

Professor of Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
THOMAS L. GILMER, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Oral Surgery. 
ARTHUR B. FREEMAN, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Human and Comparative Dental Anatomy. 
B. S. PARMER, B. S., D. D. S., 

Professor of Embriology and Dental Histology. 
W. B. AMES, D. D. S., 

Professor of Prothetic Dentistry. 
ARTHUR B. MATTESON, D. D. S., 

Professor of Orthodontia. 
E. L. CLIFFORD, D. D., S., 

Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 
G. W. HASKINS, M. D., D. I). S., 

Professor of Metallurgy. 
G. W. WHITEFIELD, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Crown and Bridge Work. 
D. M. CHATTELL, D. D. S., 

Professor of Operative Technics. 
II. P. SMITH, D. D. S., 

Instructor in Prothetic Technics. 

Faculty of the Conservatory of flusic. 

PETER CHRISTIAN LUTKIN, 

Director, and Professor of Piano Instruction, Musical Theory, and Com- 
position. 
WILLIAM IT CUTLER, 

Professor of Organ Instruction! 
WILLIAM SMEDLEY, 

Professor of Sight Reading and Chorus Singing. 
\LLL\ HERVEY SPENCER, 

Professor of Piano Instruction. 

2 « 



JAMES HARRY WHEELER. 

Professor of Voice Culture and Vocal Physiology. 
JOSEF VILIM, 

Professor of Violin Instruction. 
GEORGE H. BOWERS, 

Instructor in Mandolin, Guitar, and Bank*. 
EDITH I. GALE, 

Instructor in Voice Culture. 
CORNELIA HOPKINS, 

Instructor in Piano. 
MARY C. LULL. 

Instructor in Piano. 

JIT. I A PHELPS. 

Instructor in Harp. 
JENNIE M. SANBORN. 

Instructor in Piano. 
MRS. FRANK S. THOMPSON. 

Instructor in Voice Culture. 

Faculty of the Preparatory Department, 

REV. HERBERT F. FISR. D. D.. Wesleyan University, i860. 

Principal, and Professor of Latin. 
REV. JOSEPH L. MORSE. A. M.. Wesleyan University. 1S50. 

Assistant Principal, and Professor of Latin. 
CHARLES B. THYYING. A. M.. N. W. U.. 1888. 

Instructor in Physics. 
CHARLES H. GORDON. M. S.. Albion College. 1886. 

Instructor in Biology. 
GEORGE YY. SCHMIDT. Ph. M.. Syracuse University. 188S. 

Instructor in German and French. 
HENRY BENNER, M. S.. University of Michigan. 1889. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
ADA TOWNSEND, A. B.. N. YY- I.. 188 

Instructor in Latin. 
FREDERIC G. AXTELL. A. M.. YYesleyan University. 1S88. 

Instructor in Latin. 
EFFIE R. PRICE. A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University. iS8q. 

Instructor in English. 
LOUISE PEARSONS. A. B.. Wellesley College. 1S89. 

Instructor in Mathf.matics. 
JOHN A. SCOTT. A. B.. N. W. U.. 1891, 

Instructor in Greek. 
CHARLES H. ZIMMERMAN. A. B.. N. W. U.. 1891. 

Instructor in Latin. 
ARTHUR H. WILDE, B. I)., Boston University. 1887. 

Instructor in History. 
JULIA E. FERGUSON, Cooper Institute. 1890. 

Instructor in Drawing. 

29 



Special Lecturers. 



Special Lecturers Before the College of Liberal Arts. 



EDWARD W. BEMIS, Ph. D., 
FRANKLIN H. GIDDINGS, Ph. D 
ALBERT SHAW, Ph. D., 
FRANCIS A. WALKER, LL. I)., 
CARROLL D. WRIGHT, A. M., 
MILTON S. TERRY, D. D., 



Political Economy. 

Sociology. 

Political Science. 

Finance. 

Statistics. 

English Bible. 



Nashville, Tenn. 
New York City. 
New York City. 
Boston, Mass. 
Washington, D. C. 
Evanston. 



Special Lecturers Before the Law School. 

JOHN M. HARLAN, LL. D., . . . . . . Washington, 1). C. 

Lecturer on Constitutional Law. 
WALTER Q. GRESHAM, ...... Chicago. 

Lecturer on Public International Law. 
ROMANZO BUNN, . . . . • . Madison, Wis. 

Lecturer on Federal Jurisprudence. 

BVRON K. ELLIOTT, LL. D., Indianapolis, Ind 

Lecturer on Equity Jurisprudence. 

SIMEON I'. SHOPE, Lewiston. 

Lecturer on Fixtures and Easements. 
SEYMOUR D. THOMPSON, LL. D., . . . . .St. Louis, Mo. 

LECTURER ON Private Corporations. 
ALDACE F. WALKER, A. M., . . ... . Chicago. 

Lecturer on Inter-State Commerce. 
ROBERT I). SHEPPARD, A. M., I). I)., .... Evanston. 

Lecturer on Constitutional History. 



:{() 



H. If. C. MILLER, A. M., ..... 

Lecturer on Municipal Corporation; 
SAMUEL MAXWELL, 

BENJAMIN F. LEE, LL. I). 

GWYNN GARNETT, 



Lecturer on Code Practice 
Lecturer on Patents. 



Lecturer on Wills. 
MELVILLE M. BIGELOW, Ph. D., . 



Lecturer on Insurance 



JOHN X. JEWETT, 



Lecturer on Railway Law. 
WILLIAM G. HAMMOND, LL. D., 



Lecturer on History of English Law. 
LEROY I). THOMAN, ....... 

Lecturer on Private International Law. 
RUFUS WAPLES, LL. D., 

Lecturer on Proceedings in Rem. 
GEORGE W. SMITH. ....... 

LECTUR E R < > N W A T E R S . 

CHRISTIAN C. KOHLS AAT, ...... 

Lecturer on Administration and Distribution of Estates of Deceased 

Persons. 
LESTER L. BOND, ....... Chicago. 

Lecturer on Trade Marks and Copyrights. 
CHARLES G. ALDRICH, A. M., ...... 

Lecturer on the Law of Express, Telegraph, and Telephone Companies 
SIGMUND ZEISLER, Jr., M. D., ..... Chicago. 

Lecturer on Roman Law. 



Chicago. 

Fremont, Neb. 

New York City. 

Chicago. 

Boston, Mass. 

Chicago. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Chicago. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 



:',1 



University Council. 



HENRY WADE ROGERS, LL. D., . . . . President 



Oliver Marcy, LL. I)., ) 

> College of Liberal Arts. 
Daniel Bonbright, LL. D., ) 



Nathan S. Davis, M. D., LL. D., j 

r Medical School. 
Edmund Andrews, M. D., LL. D., ) 



W. Blodgett, LL. D., 

] Law School. 
Marshall D. Ewell, LL. D., | 



Oscar Oldberg, Ph. D., ) 

I s 



, School of Pharmacy. 
John H. Long. Sc. D., \ 



Edgar D. Swain, D. D. S., i 

\ Dental School. 
Isaac A. Freeman, M. D., j 



:V2 



University Senate. 



President Henry Wade Rogers, I.L. D. 
Oliver Marcy, LL. D. 
Daniel Bonbright, LL. D. 

Herbert F. Fisk, D. D. 
Charles B. Atwell, Ph. M. 
Henry R. Hatfield. '92. 
Ethel Baker, '92. 



Frank McElwain, '95. 



Edgar P. Cook, '92. 
George B. Dyche, '93. 
William T. Scott, '93. 
Edson B. Fowler, "93. 
Almon C. Abel. '94. 
John M. Ericson, '94. 
C. A. Petterson. '95. 



Northwestern University Settlement, 



143 West Division Street, Chicago, III. 



Officers. 

HFXRV WADE ROGERS, 

WILLIAM DEERIXG, ROBERT D. SHEPPARD, 

GEORGE A. COE, ..... 



Managing Council. 



President Henry Wade Rogers. 

William Deering. 

Robert D. Sheppard. 

George A. Coe. 

Mrs. Henry Wade Rogers. 



President. 

Vice-Presidents. 

Secretary. 

Miss Emily Wheeler. 
Rev. Frank Bristol. 
Rev. Charles M. Stcart. 
James Taft Hatfield. 
Charles F. Bradley. 



33 



The Chicago Society 



For University Extension 



Joint University Board 



MR. FRANKLIN H. HEAD, 
MRS. CHARLES HENROTIN, 
MR. FRANKLIN MacVEAGH, 
MR. CHARLES ZEUBLIN, 



Presiden I . 
Vice-President 
Treasurer. 
Secretary. 



Northwestern University. 

President Henry Wade Rogers. 
Professor A. V. E. Young. 
Professor J. T. Hatfield. 

Wisconsin University. 

President T. C. Chamberlain. 
Professor J. C. Freeman. 
Professor F. J. Turner. 

Illinois University. 

Regent T. J. Burrill. 

Professor S. A. Forbes. 
Professor Charles M. Moss. 

Lake Forest University. 
President' William C. Roberts. 
Professor J. J. Halsey. 
Professor William A. Locy. 



Beloit College. 

President E. D. Eaton. 

PROFF.SSOR II. M. Will INKY. 

Professor C. J. Densmore. 

Indiana University. 

President J. M. Coulter. 
Professor E. W. Huffcut. 
Professor J. A. .Woodburn. 

Chicago University. 

President William R. Harper. 
Professor F. F. Abbott. 

Wabash College. 

President Tuttle. 
Professor Milford. 
Professor Alex. Smith. 



Pk ESI di 

Presidi 

Pl< ESI 1)1 



Executive Committee. 

nt Henry Wade Rogers. 
nt William C. Roberts. 
:\t J. M. Coulter. 



34 




College of 



Liberal Arts. 



-mp 



U3RARY 

CF THE 

U^aVERSITY OF ILLINOI 



t 




a 




Ninety =Two 



Colors : Dark Red and Pink. 



Yell: Who! Wah ! Who! N. W. U. 
Vive=la ! Vive=la ! Ninety=Two. 



Officers, 



LOREN H. KNOX, 
HARRIET L. OSGOOD, 
RALPH H. SMITH, 
HENRY R. HATFIELD, 
MARY E. PATTERSON, 



President. 

Vice-President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Chaplain. . 



History of Senior Class. 



THE work of the faithful historian must be impartial. He must face un- 
flinchingly the bald facts (and the facts are particularly bald in regard to 
the Senior Class). It has been the favorite custom of class historians to 
laud the services and triumphs of their fellows. (See histories of the three 
lower classes in this volume.) The present writer makes no apology for his 
innovations, but he is not at liberty to follow in the footsteps of his pre- 
decessors. First, because the facts will not allow it, and second, he is too 
modest to praise himself, even indirectly. If he should mention the cane- 
rushes, ball games, and athletic contests in all of which '92 was victorious, 
it would excite at once the envy of the Juniors and the wonder of our 
parents. 

The "faculty" had great hopes for '92 from the first day we entered 
college, and they told us so in no uncertain terms, adding by way of em- 
phasis that if we " kept on increasing in wisdom and knowledge throughout 
our college course we would gradually get to knowing more and more, and 
as we continued to cram facts into our systems and glean intelligence we 



87 



would by and by become better informed." This prophecy has become true 
in regard to some of the class, but the writer will not lay himself open to the 
censure of the faculty by saying that this is true of all. 

We are compelled to say that the class is not as large as it once was, 
and, if we were not confined to mere history, we would venture the assertion 
that it will not be as large in the immediate future as it is at present. We 
have lived to see many changes in these four years ; some of our members 
have gotten the better of the faculty and graduated ; others have gotten the 
better of dame nature and have mated ; and still others (" the historian must 
be impartial") have taken advantage of their mammas' absence and dissipated. 

It would be a matter of great importance to the Registrar to have a 
tabulated list of the ladies of the class — ages, engagements, etc. — because he 
is reasonably certain that the record he now has cannot be correct, for the 
average age (judged partly by actions) is lower than that of any Senior Class 
in the history of the University. Indeed the average is not as high now as 
it was three years ago. It remains that the additions to the class must have 
greatly reduced this average. But a new difficulty meets us here — the old 
girls of the class are not ready to have this go down as a matter of record. 
In regard to the above-mentioned " engagements," the writer, having his life 
insured, and being worth more dead than alive, would boldly say they are all 
engaged. 

We cannot forget the kindly interest the faculty have always taken in 
our welfare. Some of them are urging us to stay another year in clearing 
up the conditions they have kindly put upon us, and out of deference to 
their opinions, some of us at least may stay another year or so. As indi- 
viduals we have always been impressed with this fact : that whatever we do 
not do at once or at some time in the future, unless some one else does it, 
will in all human probability remain forever undone. As we look from this 
pinnacle of wisdom back on our college course we can see here and there 
in the light of chastened experience where, if we had not done just as we 
did, perhaps we should have done differently. And we are perfectly aware 
that what we are to-day and what we will be to-morrow, and the next day, 
and the day following, and next week, and next month, and next year, and 
all through our eventful lives, as one has beautifully expressed it, " is not 
so much what we in vain anticipation regard ourselves retrospectively as what 
we ultimately were, or some day might previously be." 

36 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

DIVERSITY OF ILUN- IS 



UDRARY 

CF THE 

L DIVERSITY OF ILLI^"* 




£ 










y v*Jp\ 






Ninety=Three 



Colors : Salmon and Light Blue. 



Yell : Boom=a=la ! Boom=a=la ! 
Rip ! Rah ! Zee ! 
Whoop=her=up ! Whoop=her=up ! 
For Ninety=Three. 



Officers. 



EDSON B. FOWLER, 
HARRIET E. CAUGHRAN, 
HENRY L. HARVEY, 
GEORGE P. HILLS. 
BENJAMIN F. BEAZELL, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Chaplain. 



History of Junior Class. 



HND it came to pass in the year 1889, in the ninth month, and the 
jl eleventh day of the month, that the mighty Doctor who was President 
of the University looked forth in chapel into the numerous and hand- 
some faces of the new Freshman Class. And his heart was filled with heavi- 
ness and prophetic presentiment, insomuch that he cried out in the words of 
the Psalmist : " Lord, how are they increased which trouble me ! " 

And it came to pass that the Doctor's presentiment was fulfilled. For 
this class was exceeding frisky, and with great friskiness did its members 
frisk, insomuch that it became necessary that punishment should be meted 
out upon them. And it came to pass that there was a great cane-rush in 
the land, at which all the classes of the school were present. And behold, 
there was a mighty tumult, mingled with cries and groans ; and in the midst 



-LI 



of it the cane was broken. Thus were the Freshmen defeated, and obliged 
to pass a year without the support of canes. But the class was young and 
strong, and spent its superfluous energies in compiling a catalogue of Prof. 
Baldy's jokes and stories until the month of June. 

Now it came to pass that June was the month of jubilee, for the Fresh- 
men had been released from the tyranny of Prof. Baldy. Therefore a jubilee 
celebration was to be held on the Woman's College grounds ; and to this 
celebration was assigned the name Trig Cremation. Now it came to pass 
that the Sophomore Class planned a scheme to prevent this celebration, and 
appeared on the scene with ropes, horns, and fire-extinguishers. But in spite 
of these efforts to the contrary, the Freshmen succeeded in sending the Trig 
to heaven in a blazing balloon ; and this may still oe seen as a star of the 
first magnitude shining brightly above the Woman's College. Students come 
there nightly to observe it ; but all seem more interested in certain stars 
which are said to be within the building. 

And it came to pass in the year following that this class became 
Sophomores, and was filled with great dignity. And a new band of Fresh- 
men appeared in the land. Now these Freshmen were irreverent and dis- 
respectful, insomuch that they boldly walked into chapel each of them sup- 
porting his delicate frame on a cane ; and this without asking permission of 
the dignified Sophomores. This greatly incensed the latter ; and the record 
of Chicago papers states that a resolute band of three Sophs waded into the 
Freshman Class and broke all the canes ; and verily the Chicago papers 
never lie. 

Now it came to pass that in the spring of the year these Freshmen 
determined to have a Trig Cremation, even as their predecessors had done. 
Now the Freshmen had waxed exceeding fearful of the Sophomores, insomuch 
that they planned to have their exercises in Chicago. But when they looked 
for their President, behold, he was not, for the Sophomores took him ; the 
other features of the program, ditto. Now it came to pass that when the 
Freshmen looked for their fine and expensive fireworks, behold, the fireworks 
had disappeared, as had the President before them. But they soon reap- 
peared on the scene ; for as the Freshmen got off the train on their return 
ride, they were greeted with a sight of their own fireworks, all discharged 
together, at the hands of the Sophomores. It was a brilliant display. 
Rockets, candles, and pyrotechnic figures of all varieties were displayed in 

42 



such endless profusion that the memory of the sight lingers with the in- 
habitants even unto this day. 

Individuality is one of our marked characteristics. Mailley has hitherto 
been patriarch of the class ; but when he left us for '92 his place was ably 
filled by Aldrich. who is now our only married man. Ward has had a vast 
and wonderful experience ; from his own observation he can illustrate every 
topic discussed in the class-room. We are an agricultural class ; for while we 
possess but a Singleton of Hay. we have nourishing fields of Oates and Pease. 
And we have a band of talented and progressive girls, who did not hesitate 
during the sleighing season to take advantage of leap year. 

It is the prevalent opinion among Juniors, Freshmen, third and first-year 
preps that the odd-year classes are the only brilliant classes in school. 
Among these, of course, the Juniors take the lead in all matters moral, in- 
tellectual, and physical. We have set a good example for others to follow 
in supporting a missionary in Japan, and conducting a mission Sunday-school. 
As to the intellectual part of our nature, we are the wonder of the school. 
For two years we have carried off first honors in the Gage and Congdon 
contests, and five of our members have received such mental stimulus that 
they will graduate with '92. All of us have a vast amount of useful in- 
formation stored away in the spare shelves of our brains. Some of us, 
doubtless, could give a list of all ponies used in American colleges. As to 
our physical powers — well, sometimes we are "in it." and sometimes not; 
but that is the case with all great people. 

We have but just passed the half-way post of our college course, and the 
task of the historian properly ends here. But if a prejudiced member of the 
class may be permitted to prophesy from past indications as he has seen 
them, our prediction is that the class of '93 will bring great credit to 
Northwestern for its distinguished representatives in all departments of useful- 
ness and honor. 



!•■! 




A t r-. X <K ' «" 



USEARY 
Cf THE 
i v£RSITY OF fLL^ 



a 




Dveka PMla 



Ninety=Four. 



Colors: White and Lilac. 



Yell: Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Roar ! Roar ! Roar ! 

X. C. I. V. Vive=la! Ninety=Four. 



Officers, 



HARRY E. AMBLER 
GRACE E. OWEN. 
HANNA I. DREW, 
LESLIE W. BEEBE, 
BENJAMIN RIST, 
JOHN M. ERICSON, 
FRED L. CHARLES. 
JARED \Y. YOUNG, 
BAYARD H. PAINE. 



President. 
Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Assistant Secretary 

Treasurer. 

Chaplain. 

Poet. 

Historian. 

toastmaster. 



History of 5ophomore Class. 



|y| OW it came to pass in the year of the Triumvirate. B. B. B..* 1890, 
Jl that the venerable walls of Northwestern were shaken to their founda- 
tions by the coming of the class of '94. For did not Demosthenes 
prophesy the surpassing glory of this class when he said their "reputation 
shall be above envy?" Yea, verily he did, for the class motto is: " JOSA 
XPEITT9.X TUX MONOYNTQN." But now in the Sophomore year Socrates 
more than any other philosopher deserves to be called our presiding genius. 
For he was pronounced by the oracle at Delphi to be the wisest man of his 
time, because he knew that he knew nothing. And for that same reason is 
not the Sophomore, the I0Q02 MQP02, the wise fool, vastly superior to the 

45 



Verdant Freshman ? Vea, verily, for the Freshman is a fool yet knoweth it 
not, but the Sophomore wists of his folly. 

Yes, we are Sophomores now, and yet, for the most part, we look back 
on our achievements during F'reshmanhood with pride and satisfaction. Who 
does not know how, when the Nine Muses poured forth with lavish hand 
their inspiration on our numbers, the first class song book appeared in all 
its pristine loveliness? Who has not heard of the magnificent art museum, 
with its spacious galleries crowded with the masterpieces of the orient and 
the Occident, and which proudly boasts '94 as its founder ? Truly not to 
know our class argues thyself unknown. 

How we smote '93 hip and thigh on the base ball field ! How '93 — 
but, then, alas! who has not heard how we burned "Trig" at three in the 
morning? Verily, verily, that was a time of weeping and slugging and 
smashing of teeth. 

When the Sophomores came flown like a wolf on the fold, 
And captured our fireworks with cussedness hold : 
But the racket they had cost a nice little hill. 
And, though sad to relate, they are owing it still. •[ 

Yes, these were stirring times, but now we are through with such fri- 
volities and are only bent on training our intellectual and moral faculties. 
How some of us, however, who took elective bumming during the spring term 
managed to pass all the ." exes " and turn up O. K. in the fall, was for a 

long time a mystery, until one day Mr. J was heard singing through the 

college halls : 

Oh, the horse ! the beautiful horse ! 
Bearing me onward through my course, 
Giving me ten tens day after day, 
Though others may flunk in the usual way ! 

To me there is nothing on earth half so tine 
As the beautiful, dutiful college equine. 

Yea, verily, when he bucketh not the creature is a blessing. 

So far this year '94's course has been comparatively peaceful. During 
the fall term there occurred the great Sophomore sleigh-ride, participated in 
exclusively by the girls of the class, who claim to have had an excellent 
time despite the tabooment of the sterner sex. 

Perhaps the most important achievement of '94 was the new impetus 
which it gave to literary pursuits in the college. On its entrance the liter- 

40 



rary societies were at a very low ebb, and after trying in vain to infuse some 
life into them, '94 decided to found one on its own account, and organized 
the Owl Club. This was soon followed by a similar society among the gfrls 
of '94, which is known as "The Larks." The work of these societies has 
been of the highest order, and their members have received great benefit 
from them. 

A history of '94 would be incomplete without an account of Northwest- 
ern's first class fraternity, which it claims the honor of founding. This is 
the Mystic XIII., which sprang into being last year. When darkness has 
come upon the face of the earth and the good folks of the community have 
retired to their peaceful slumbers, the Mystic Thirteeners don their Satanic 
robes and meet in solemn conclave. An odor of brimstone fills the air, and 
while the watchdog howls piteously and the dismal hoot of the night owl is 
heard, dark and bloody deeds are concocted. The horrors of their initia- 
tory rites are said to rival those belonging to the famous Grecian mysteries, 
of which it was said that no one who had been through the ordeal ever 
smiled again. As is well known, their 1| 



$10 


00 




35 


35 


00 


6 


15 



*This does not stand for " Bixby's Best Blacking," but for Bobby, Bonny, and Baldy. 

•f-Hack fare and hotel bill for captured President, ..... 

Express on fireworks, ........... 

Clothing damaged while intombed in water tank. ..... 

Hatchets and Clubs, . . . . . . . . . . 

Total, $51 50 

jThe gentleman's name is omitted by special request. 

|| Owing to the abrupt withdrawal of the Goddess Clio the historian was obliged to dis- 
continue his task sooner than he expected. Any details omitted here will be found in next 
year's annual. 



CF THE 
L*!SVERSITY OF ILLir^ 



Ninety=Five. 



Colors: White and Gold. 

Yell: Rho! Rah! Rhe ! 
Rho! Rah! Rhe! 

'95 '95 
X. C. V. 



Officers. 



BURTON E. EMMETT, . 
THEODORA U. IRVINE, 
LOIS RICE, 

ALEXANDER G. BENNETT, 
WALTER D. SCOTT, 
FRED. L. GUTHRIE, 
LULU MOORE, . 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Assistant Secretary 

Treasurer. 

Chaplain. 

toastmaster. 



History of Freshman Class. 



f\ YOUTH with flaunting feathers, a favorite of Fortune, did that fickle 
yl goddess guide to N. W. U. to join the ranks of '95. For this lucky 
bit of humanity all studenthood was not, in Caesar's language, " quartered 
into three halves," but into two. There were beings who were in '95, and 
beings who were not in it ; and this youth spotted so well this higher order 
of students after his first two days' sojourn in Evanston that only once did 
he give the grip of the great brotherhood to an outsider, and he, a Senior, 
only woke up to the fact that something extraordinary had happened when 
it was too late to remember exactly what it was. So no harm came of it. 
This youth's love and reverence for '95 increased towards infinity as he re- 
mained in Evanston. Friends told him of her brilliant career in prep ; how 
never in history had a class held sessions of such length and parliamentary 
excellence. "Why, even Congress," they said, "is no better nursery of 



49 



orators, parliamentarians, and politicians, than these famous sessions. Speeches 
of remarkable length and oratorical power daily surpassed our wildest dreams. 
And points of order ! Our orderly men would have confounded Roberts. 
And you see the result to-day. No class in college can produce such men 
as we have. " How the class had delighted all Kvanston with Boston's 
Lotus Glee Club ! How, after finishing the prep course with astonishing 
records, they took a lake trip to Lake Bluff and Waukegan, and the jolliest 
trip that ever was had ! There came a time in the second month of his 
sojourn when he was told of the famous woodpecker battle, when the boys 
of '95 whipped all the rest of prep in twenty minutes ; that it was then that 
a taste for class hats had developed that had always remained a character- 
istic of the class. Then did the youth understand the deep-lying cause for 
the special meetings and long discussions held over class hats, when every 
individual member showed the class tendency towards hats by wearing in 
succession each of the dozen or two different hats the long-suffering com- 
mittee furnished at the numerous meetings. For a few weeks our young 
friend was dazzled only by the brilliancy that shone in the class room. 
The reverence paid ninety-fivers by the profs at first astonished him. Any 
slight mistakes were known to be mere slips. For example : Prof. A. — " Miss 
N., what case is sui ? " Miss N. — " Dative." Prof. A. — "Genitive, of course 
you mean." 

Soon the youth was struck with the originality of a class-meeting that 
our worthy president called on the corner of Chicago avenue and University 
place. Behold the result ! That very evening our youth was raised to the 
seventh heaven of delight as the class appeared at the Fern Sem in its 
function as a social organization. Words fail in the description of his rap- 
tures. He had never dreamed of finding one hundred and fifty-nine creatures 
all of his rare genius. While the warm days still lasted there came one 
that was proudest of them all, when his idols vanquished the boasting Sophs. 
With flying colors and music of fish-horns did those Sophs march gallantly 
to the field, and lustily did they sing and shout for '94. Well did their 
team play, manfully they strove, but the boys of the white and gold, with 
calm front and unyielding strength, played steadily on to victory. And when 
the play was played out, softly did the Sophs creep home, leaving the 
Freshies shouting their triumph and rending the air with "What's the 
score?" "Sixteen to four! !" Despite this awful warning, soon the Juniors 



rashly rode to defeat in pride and a tally-ho, and this short, sad story wrote 
he of the flaunting feathers in his book with the red cover: "The Juniors 
rode gaily to the field of conflict — and rode away again." Soon came the 
snow and our Freshie joined the merry class ride, when great sleighs went 
dashing through the snow with their precious burdens. After that did the 
class offer prizes to the poets and composers whose talents should furnish 
to the class the best tribute in song. And such verses ! The muses turned 
green with jealousy. But there was one marvel the youth has never ceased 
to wonder at. "Of all creatures of undying energy," thinks he, "our treas- 
urer and finance committee are unsurpassed ! " Twice again since that night 
when he ascended to the seventh heaven did the youth of '95 ascend again, 
and even higher did he go when a lovely lassie begged the pleasure of his 
company to the leap-year party to the lads of '95. And one night as he 
lay on his downy couch thought he how that very day they had talked of 
another of those divine socials and the boys had — raffled ; and he with 
trembling hand had dragged his pencil straight through" his lady's name. 
Dared he ask the dainty godlike creature Would she 




51 



Graduate Students. 



Resident Graduates. 



Babcock, Florence, Ph. B., 

Northwestern University. 


Kenilworth, 


Chemistry. 


Ewing, Laura L., A. B., 
Baker University. 


Ottawa, Kas., 


Greek, 


Martin, Riley Paddock, Ph. B., 
Northwestern University. 


Rockfcrd, 


Physics. 


Scott, John Adams, A. B., 

Northwestern University. 


Fletcher, 


Greek. 


Zimmerman, Charles Hamline, A. B., 
Northwestern University. 


Evanston, 


History and Latin. 

4- 



Candidates for a Master's Degree. 



Doing Work in Absentia. 



Graduates of the College of Liberal Arts, 



Alabaster, Francis Asbury, A. B., 
Demorest, Frederick Coe, A. B., 
Graves, Charles Stephen, A. B., 
Herben, Grace Foster, B. L., 
Herben, Stephen Joseph, A. B., 
Mattison, Myrtle Eugenia, A. B., 
Noyes, Lizzie Browning, B. L., 
Quereau, Edmund Chase, Ph. B., 
Shumway, Philip Raymond, Ph. B., 



Little Rock, Ark., 

Morgan Park. 

Chicago, 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Joliet, 

Waupaca, Wis., 

Freiburg in Baden, 

Evanston, 



Greek. 

Early English. 

Law and History. 

English Literature. 

English Literature. 

History and Literature. 

Political and Social Science. 

deology. 

Political Science. 



-,:', 



Candidates for 

A Bachelor's Degree 



Abel, Clarence Almon, <f> K -f, 

Adams, Charles Pelham, B G n, 

Alabaster, Fanny Grace, A 4>, 

Alabaster, John Lewis, <i> K *, 

Aldrich, Charles Sherman, A Y, 

Alexander, Maude, 

Ambler, Harry Egbert, 2 X, 

Anderson, Mary Lucinda, 

Arnold, John William, Jr., 4> K 

Asher, Walter Simpson, A Y, 

Ashley, Myron Lucius, 

Atkinson, Peter Charles, 

Aylesworth, William Wild, 

Babcock, Helen, A r, 

Baker, Edith Mae, K K T, 

Baker, Ethel, A r, 

Baker, George Wilson, 4> K 2, 

Barber, Elva, r $ B, 

Bartlett, Charles Henry, 

Bass, James Kelley, 4> K ¥, 

Beardsley, Wilfred Fitch, B IT, 

Beazell, Benjamin Tell, 

Beebe, Leslie Walter, 

BELKNAP, Frederick Waldo, <f> K 2, 

Belknap, Lewis Franklin, 

Bellows, John Austin, <J> K •¥, 

1 5 in now, Lee Levi, 

Benneti , Alexander George, 

Bergstrom, Walter Berzelius, 



A. B.. 


Chicago. 


Ph. B., 


Topeka. Kas. 


B. L., 


Evanston. 


A. B., 


Evanston. 


A. B., 


Fredonia, \. Y 


Ph. B., 


Sterling. 


Ph. B., 


Chicago. 


Ph. B., 


Sheldon. 


2, B. S., 


Lock port. 


A. B., 


Marion, Kas. 


B. S., 


Vorkville. 


Ph. B., 


Sheldon. 


Ph. B., 


Highgate, Ont. 


Ph. B., 


Kenilworth. 


A. B., 


Evanston. 


Ph. B., 


Chicago. 


Ph. B., 


Chicago. 


Ph. B., 


Lancaster, Wis. 


Ph. B., 


South Evanston 


A. B., 


Evanston. 


[, A. B., 


Wilmette. 


A. B., 


Chillicothe, Mo. 


A. B., 


Chicago. 


S, B. S., 


Evanston. 


A. B., 


Monroe, Ore. 


B. S., 


Maryville, Mo. 


A. B., 


Omaha, Neb. 


A. 1!., 


Evanston. 


B. S„ 


Moline. 



54 



Blamenser, Benjamin Jacob, 

I Ji.iss. Jessie Stillman, K K r. 

bonebright, john edward, 

Booth, George, 

Bowen, Anna Maude, 

Bradbury, James Thomas. 

Brown, Gertrude LeRoy, 

Brown, Margaret, 

Bucks, Charles Henry. <p K *. 

Burns, William Foster, <f> K t. 

Burt, Anna Jarusha, 

Burton, Alfred Wen dale, A Y. 

Butters, Addison Fred, 

Bverly, Minnie, 

Caraway, Harry Reat, 

Charles, Fred Lemar, 

Chattel, Mary, A <I\ 

Clancy, Dennis Cranmer, 

Clarkson, Matthew Alexander. 

Cole, Joseph Harrison, <I> K *, 

Colebeck, Edward L., 

Coleman, Howard I)., 

Cook, Edward Pumphrey, 4> K 2, 

Cotter, George Elmar, A T, 

Cox, Frederick Henry. 

Craig, George Freeman, 

Culbertson, Carey, 2 X, 

Culver, Alvin Howard, 

Demorest, May Elizabeth, A 4>. 

Demfsey, W t alter Archibald, <1> K 

Denyes, John Russell. 

Dickey, John Wallace, A T, 

Dickinson, Jay Rogers, A Y. 

Dingle, John Nankivell, 

Dixon, John Arthur. 

Dohle, William Breen, A Y, 

Drew, Hannah Isabelle, 

Dunlop, Anna Grace, 

Dv he, George Boyd, 4> K 2, 

Earheart, Robert Francis, 

Earnheart, Chauncey Burnett, 



B. 


s.. 


I!. 


p.. 


B. 


s.. 


Ph 


. B. 


Ph 


. B. 


B. 


S., 


Ph. 


B.. 


B. 


P., 


Pli. 


B. 


A. 


B., 


B. 


P., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


P>.. 


I'h 


. B. 


Ph. 


B. 


B. 


S.. 


Ph, 


, B. 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B., 


Ph 


B. 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B. 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B.. 


A. 


P».. 


Ph. 


B. 


Ph. 


I',. 


B. 


s.. 


A. 


B., 


B. 


s., 


A. 


B., 



Niles Center. 
Evanston. 

Nora. 
Onarga. 

Chicago. 

Kewanee. 

Evanston. 

Pa Salle. 

Morris. 

Chicago. 

Henry. 

Belvidere. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Sharpsville, Pa. 

Tuscola. 

Austin. 

Aurora. 

Albion, Mich. 

Rock Falls. 

Bridgeton, X. J. 

Ree Heights, S. D. 

Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Mendota. 

Peoria. 

Winslow. 

Evanston. 

Piper City. 

(ilencoe. 

Muscatine, La. 

Chicago. 

Santa Clara, Cal. 

Cherokee, la. 

Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Dwight. 

Evanston. 

Monticello, la. 

Chenoa. 



Eastman, Marettk Edn v, 
Eaton, Carrie Estella, 

ECHLIN, IlKNkV MAGIFFORD, 15 6 IJ, 

Eckert, Clara Belle, r <i> B, 

Eddy, William Lincoln, 

Emery, Ethelyn, k a 0, 

Emmett, Burton Ellis, <i> K ¥, 

ERICSON, John Mark, <J» K t, 

Evans, Cora Lee, K K \\ 

Everz, Ernest Hammond, 

Ewing, William McDonald, <I> K t. 

Karris, William, 

Fegtly, Samuel Marks, 

Kitch, Louie Josephine, K A 0, 

Fleager, Arthur, 

Fluck, John Emanuel, 

Fowler, Edson Brady 

Eraser, Herbert A., 

Freeman, Alice Sofronia, A <I>, 

Gaffney, James Finley, 

Gale, Thomas Keene, 

Gary, Ella Ethel, K A 0, 

Gates, Fanny, A $, 

George, John Edward, 

Germain, Grace Estelle, A <i>, 

Gilson, Mabelle, 

Gloss, Mary Elgin, K a 0, 

Goetzman. Charlotte Eve, 

Goshen, Elmer Isaac, A T, 

Grey, Ethel, A 4>, 

Griffith, Frank Wesley, 

Griffith, Herbert Eugene, <I> A 0, 

Griggs, Alice Lorraine, 

Grover, Louise Mary, 

Guthrie, Fred Lincoln, 

Hadley, Edwin Marshall, B IT, 

Hall, James Vernon, 

Harbert, Arthur Boynton, 2 X, 

Harris, Merritt Melvin, 

Hart, Alice Celia, 

Hah i man, CLEANDER Raymond, 

II A R V E V , II E N RY L A W R E N ( I E , 



I'll 


. B., 


I'll 


. B., 


B. 


s., 

1 


i >. 
A. 


1 .. , 

B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph 


. B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph 


. P., 


I'h 


. B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


B. 


L., 


B. 


S., 


Ph. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


Ph 


. B., 


Ph, 


B., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


Ph. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


S-, 


B. 


s., 


Ph. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 



kavenswood. 

Aurora. 

Toronto, Can. 
Nojthwood, hi. 
Evanston. 

Hryan, O. 

Steward. 

Kidgefield, Conn. 

Fairbury. 

Evanston. 

Areola. 

Fennimore, Wis. 

Nevada, la. 

Evanston. 

Sheldon. 

Elgin. 

Buda. 

Plainfield. 

Evanston. 

White Cottage, O. 

Mason City, la. 

Wheaton. 

Waterloo, la. 

Braidwood . 

Gardner. 

Aurora. 

Evanston. 

Boone, la. 

Earmington. 

Evanston. 

Waterman. 

Moline. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Wichita, Kas. 

Peoria. 

New Milford. 

Evanston. 

Mason City, la. 

Harvey. 

Chicago Lawn. 

Chicago. 



56 



Hatfield, Henry Rand, B e H, A. B., 

Hathaway, Kate Douglass, B. L., 

Hay, Helen Scott, B. L., 

Hayes, Charlotte 15ki.it:, a <1>. 15. I... 

Hazzard, Charles, a T, Ph. B., 

Hebbard, Katherine, a <l>. Ph. 15., 

Heil, John Henry, A. B., 

Hemenway, Francis Wood. 2 X, A. B., 

Hills, George Phii.o, 2 X, A. B., 

Hitchcock, Anna Laura, A P. Ph. I!.. 

Hoag, Ernest Bryant, B 9 n, B. S., 

Holden, Harry Ross, A. 15., 

HOLLINGSHEAD, THOMAS CHURCH, <l> K S, A. B., 

Holmes, Daniel James, A T, A. 15. . 

Holt, Robert Newton, Ph. B., 

Hough, George Jacob, B. S., 

Houghton, Horace Levan, Ph. B.. 

Howard, Burt Foster, 2l X, Ph. B., 

Howard, Nina Foster, A r, Ph. B., 

Hughes, Hugh Jones, B. L., 

Hull, Zilpha Leonard, K K P, Ph. B., 

Hunt. Irving Leslie, A. B., 

Hunt, Nettie Josephine, K K P, B. L., 

Irvine, Theodora Ursula, K K r, Ph. B., 

Irving, George Washington, A. B., 

Jacobs, Bert Ernest, Ph. B., 

Jamison, George, A. B., 

James, Alva Monroe, Ph. B., 

Janssen, John, A. 15., 

Jennings, Henrietta May, K A 9, Ph. B., 

Johnson, Ernest Clarence. B. S., 

Johnson, Franklin Lee, B. S., 

Johnson, Ralph Milner, A. 15.. 

Jordan, Edith Viola, 15. L., 

Keli.ey, Charles Asm ry, A. P... 

Kendall, Robert Rogers, B 9 n, B. S., 

Kennedy, Hugh, Ph. 15. . 

Kennicott, Ransom Eugene, B 9 II. B. S., 

Kerr, Robert Joseph, 1 X, A. B., 

K.ITENDANGLE, EUGENE FRANKLIN, A. B., 

Knox, Loren Henry, 15. S., 

Knudson, Theodore Tames, B. S., 



Evanstoti. 

Rochelle. 
Savanna. 

Chicago. 

Peoria. 

Fvanston. 

Centralia. 

Evanston. 

Ottawa. 

Evanston. 

Fvanston. 

Clinton, Mass. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Rockf ord . 

Evanston. 

Hughesville, Pa. 

Glencoe. 

Glencoe. 

Sadorus. 

Fvanston. 

Aurora. 

Aurora. 

Detroit, Minn. 

Apple River. 

Victor, N. V. 

Libertyville. 

La Fayette. 

Evanston. 

Mattoon. 

Fvanston. 

Decatur. 

St. Josepl 

Fvanston. 

Altoona, la. 

Evanston. 

Travels City 

The Grove. 

Chicago. 

1 )unning. 

Evanston. 

Cross Plains 



Mo 



Mich. 



Kohlsaat, Philemon B., 2 X, 

Lamay, John. 

Lank, Prank, 

Lanky, David Alfred, <I> K 2, 

Latham, Carl Ray, 1 X, 

Leach, Howard Emmett, 

Lent, Philander Smith, 

Lockwood, Charles Daniel, 

Lucas, Charles Walter, 

Ludlow, Edmund, 2 X, 

Mack, Emily Butts, 

Mahood, Edward Wildridge, 

Mailley, James, 

Maltman, Elizabeth Estelle, A <t>, 

Marsden, Frank Freeman, 

Marshall, Elvis Cottell, 

Mason, Albert Sherman, A Y, 

Masslich, Chester Bentley, 

Mattison, Marvin Dyson, 

Mattison, Mortimer Wheeler, 

Maxwell, Will James, <J> K 2, 

McCasky, Harriet Louise, A <1>, 

McConnell, Anna Crosby, A <1>, 

McElwain, Frank, 

Meinhardt, Antoinette, A F, 

Meissner, William Gustav, 

Meredith, Jean Hannah, K A 9, 

Miller, Annie Marcy, A 4>, 

Miller, Clarence, 

Miller, Effie Windle, K K F, 

Mills, Maude Foster, 

Moehlenpah, Henry August, <p K 2, 

Moore, Eva Leona, A <t>, 

Moulding, Joseph Watkins, 4> K ■*, 

Murray, Marietta Myrtilla, 

Myers, Clifford Lincoln, <i> K t, 

Neiglich, Anna, 

Nelson, Helenk Maria, 

Nicholson, Thomas, 

Nils, Leopold Adolph, 

Oates, James Franklin, 4> K t, 

Oakey, [da Jane, 



Ph 


. B., 


I'll 


. B., 


I'h 


. P,., 


B. 


S., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


H. 


s., 


Ph 


. B., 


Ph. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph 


B., 


B. 


S., 


B. 


S., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


B. 


S., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


s., 


B. 


L., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


Ph. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B , 


Ph. 


B., 



Chicago. 
Evanston. 

I -ton. 

Savannah, Mo. 

Wilmette. 

Joliet. 

Kossmore, Ont. 

Salina, Kas. 

Ravenswooc). 

Paxton. 

Joliet. 

Lakelet, (Jnt. 

York, Neb. 

Chicago. 

Fennimore, Wis. 

El Dorado, Kas. 

Sycamore. 

Evanston. 

Joliet. 

Joliet. 

Lowell, Ind. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Cedar Falls, la. 

Burlington, Wis. 

Reinbeck, la. 

Oak Park. 

Peoria. 

Rock Rapids. 

Kensington. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Macomb. 

Cincinnati, O. 

Chicago. 

Des Moines, la. 

Union City, Mich. 

Dallas, Tex. 

Clinton, la. 

Corning, la. 



Olin, Grace, 

Osgood, Harriet Louise, K K 
Osgood, Susan Conde, K K r, 
Osgood, William Pleasants, 
Owen, Grace Evelyn, K K r, 
Ozanne, Irving Eugene, 
Paine, Bayard Henry. 
Parkes, Charles Herbert, <p K 
Patten, Harrison Eastman. 
Patterson, Mary Etta, r 4> B, 
Patterson, Minnie Larette, r 
Pearsons. Harry Putnam, B B 
Pease, William Arthur. 
Peck, Ralph Leroy. 
Peck, George Nelson, 
Pegram, Mary Elizabeth, 
Perrine. Charles Hiram. 
Peterson, Mary B., 
Petrie, Alexander Card.no. 
Petterson, Christian August. 
Phillips, Charles Abbott, B G 
Phillips, Jessie Rogers, K A ft, 
Plimpton, Mary, Eliza. A <t>, 
Poppenhusen, Herman Adolph, 
Potter, James. 
Potter, Mary Ross, K a ft. 
Price, Annie Harriett, 
Ramsey, Gordon Aiken. 
Ransmeier, John Christian. 
Rawlins. Cora Monnier, 
Raymond, Jerome Hall, B ft II, 
Reade, Grace Myrtle, 
Ream. Thomas Eli, 
Redeield, Hat tie Louise, A P, 
Rex. Anna Mary, K K T, 
Rice, Lily, K A ft, 
Rice, Lois, K A ft. 
Ricketts, Howard Taylor. A T 
Ridings, Edward Joseph, A T. 
Rist, Benjamin. 
Roberts, Frederick Charles, 



* B, 

n. 



n. 



p. 


s., 


B. 


L., 


Ph 


. B. 


B. 


S., 


A. 


B., 


Ph 


. B. 


B. 


S., 


B. 


s., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


P.. 


A. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


B. 


L., 


Ph, 


, B. 


Ph 


. B. 


Ph 


, B. 


Ph, 


B. 


Ph. 


B. 


B. 


s., 


Ph, 


B. 


Ph. 


B. 


B. 


S., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B. 


B. 


S.. 


Ph. 


P., 


A. 


B.. 


A. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B. 


Ph, 


B.. 


B. 


L., 


A. 


P.. 


A. 


B., 


A. 


P.. 


A. 


B.. 


1!. 


S.. 



Xeb. 



Evanston. 

Marseilles. 

Marseilles. 

Austin. 

Mokena. 

Somers, Wis. 

Grand Island 

Chicago. 

Aurora. 

Fox River, Wis. 

Fox River, Wis. 

Evanston. 

Irving Park. 

Barrington. 

Oregon. 

Carrollton. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Clinton, Wis. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Menominee, Mich. 

Perris, Cal. 

South Evanston. 

Carthage, Mo. 

Bloomington. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Murphysboro. 

Scales Mound. 

Aurora. 

Evanston. 

Hampshire. 

Evanston. 

Creston, la., 

Aurora. 

Aurora. 

Fisher. 

Morris. 

'Toulon. 

Mastodon, Mich. 



59 



Roberts, Joseph Francis, 
Roland, Clementine Leah, 
Ross, Ella Almeda, 
Royer, Elizabeth, 
Rundell, Charles Lewis, 
Sanborn, Elizabeth Delight, a <i> 
Sarchet, Corb M., 
Sargent, Carla Fern, K K r, 

SCHOTTENFELS, Il)A MAY, 

Scott, Lida Shaffnkr, K A (), 
Scott, Walter Dill, 
Scott, William Thompson, 
Seager, Minnik Gertrude, 
Sellew, Roland Rodolphus, 
Sheets, Frank D., 
Sheets, George B., 
Sheldon, Lucy Delight, K A 0, 
Sherman, Charles King, <J> K 2, 
Sherman, Eugene Buren, 
Shronts, Claude Frank, 
Shuman, Lucy Estelle, K 
Simonson, Anna Pauline, 
Simonsen, Ida Sophia, 
Sinclair, James G., M. D. 
Singleton, John Calhoun, 
Singleton, Mary King, A <i>, 
Skelsey, Albert Wesley, A T, 
Smetters, Samuel Tupper, 
Smith, Anna Mitchell, A I\ 
Smith, Faith Edith, 
Smith, Maude Martha, K K r, 
Smith, Newland Farnsworth, 
Smith, Ralph Ham, <J> K 2, 
Spies, Alice, K A 6, 
Spindler, James Urvln, <J> K 2, 
Spinner, George William, 
St. mil, Josephine, 
Staver, Frances Mary, a <l>, 
Staver, John Frederick, 
Staver, Nellie Hannah, A <l\ 
Stebbings, Albert Lester, 



k r, 



A X, 



A. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 

i 


Ph. 


l ,. , 
I'.., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B., 


Ph 


. B., 


Ph, 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


s.. 


B. 


L., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B., 


B. 


s., 


Ph. 


B., 


R. 


L., 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B-, 


Ph. 


B . 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B. s 


Ph 


. B., 


B. 


L., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


L., 


Ph. 


B , 


B. 


s., 


Ph. 


B., 


B. 


S., 


Ph. 


B., 


Ph. 


B., 

i 


\ >. 
Ph. 
B. 
Ph. 


i .. , 
B., 

L., 
B., 



Mastodon, 
Freeporl . 
Hai mon. 
Sterling. 

< hit ;ig(;. 

Evanston. 
( Charleston. 

( 'hicii^'/. 
( Chicago. 
Cambridge, O. 
Fletcher. 
Lebanon, Mo. 
St. James, Minn. 
Fargo, \. I). 
Rockford. 

< )regon. 
Evanston. 
( 'hicago. 
Maiden. 
Momence. 
Evanston. 
Evanston. 
Evanston. 
Chicago. 
Evanston. 
Evanston. 
Houston, Tex. 
Waverly. 
Evanston. 
Aurora. 
Geneseo. 
Aurora. 

Alameda, Cal. 
Menominee, Mich. 
Englewood. 

Lake Zurich. 
Diagonal, Ta. 
Monroe, Wis. 
Portland, Ore. 
Portland, Ore. 
Park Ridgr. 



(><) 



Stebbins, Webster Jonas, B 6 li. 

Stevens, Fannie Adelaide, 

Stevens, Luella Fannie, 

Stevens, Roberi Waterman, ^ X. 

Stewart, Lucy Shelton, 

Stowe, William Cass, 

Strawn, Theodore, 

Stryker, Stanton Wellington, 

Sturges, George Perry, 

Swail, Louise Marie, a <J>. 

Tabor, Florence Marion. 

Taft, Jessie Winslow, 

Taylor, Charlene, K a h. 

Terry. Daniel Webster, Jr., 4> K t. 

Thayer. Hermin Saxe, 

Thoburn, Blanche. 

Thompson. Del Beveridge, A Y, 

Timm, August Jacob Christian, 

Tomlinson, Wilbur Fisk, A T. 

Towle, Edwin Herman. 

Tlbbs, Myra Emily. K K T. 

Turner, Minnie Belle, a 4c 

'Tyrrell. William David, 

Van Sant, (Irani. <l» K t. 

Van Sickle, Maid Ethelyn, 

Van Tressler. Anna Richards »n. K a R, 

Wakeman, Oka Edith, K K T. 

Walker. Joseph Little, A T. 

Wai.z, John Albrecht, <I> K f. 

VVambaugh, Effyan Reel. 

Wanless. Laura Ada. 

Ward. Elias Wilbur, <J> K t. 

Washburn, Ella Man, 

Watson, Frances Susanna, 

Watson, L< i i i ie Bell, 

Way, Willis Edward. A T. 

Wells. Theodora Lyman, 

Wei. ton. Mabel Ella, K A 0, 

Wen/, Matthew Gossner, 

Whitehead, Harry Woodworth, K H J], 

Whitei.y, Elizabeth, a T, 



A. H.. 



I'll. 
11. 


B. 

s.. 


A. 


11. . 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B., 


B. 


S. 


A. 


15.. 


B. 


s., 


B. 


1... 


A. 


B.. 


Ph. 


B. 


B. 


L., 


A. 


B.. 


B. 


S., 


B. 


I.., 


Ph. 


B. 


I'ii. 


B. 


A. 


B.. 


B. 


S., 


B. 


T... 


Ph 


. B. 


A. 


T... 


Ph 


. B. 
. B. 



B. 1. 



A. 


B., 


A. 


B-, 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B., 


A. 


B.. 


A. 


B., 


B. 


S.. 


B. 


>.. 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B.. 


Ph. 


B. 


A. 


B.. 


Ph 

li. 


. B 
L., 



I'tiea. Minn. 
Moline. 

Dwight. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Ottawa. 

Portland, Ore. 

Rogers Park. 

Belvidere. 

Benton Harbor, 

Evanston. 

Cambridge. (). 

Stuyvesant, X. 

Whitewater. Wi: 

Peabody, Kas. 

Buffalo Gap. S. 

Chicago. 

Marion, Kas. 

Falls City. Neb 

Kirkwood. 

Evanston. 

Elgin. 

Winona, Minn. 

Evanston. 

Bryan, O. 

Chicago. 

Paris, Ont. 

Chicago. 

Kearney. Neb. 

Raymond. 

Aurora. 

Saginaw. Mich. 

Minooka. 

Minooka. 

Geneseo. 

Evanston. 

Cambridge. 

Springfield. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 



Mid 



(H 



Wilcox, Mae, k a o, Ph. B., 

Wilcoxon, Howard Thomas, A. J'.., 

Wilder, Jessie C, P $ P>, Ph. B., 

Wilkinson, William Willing, B. S., 

Williams, Edward Jesse, B. S., 

Wilson, Charles Demmon, Ph. B., 

Wilson, Horace Plummer, Ph. 15.. 

Wilson, Wilbur Fisk, A. B., 

Wilson, William Louis, B. S., 

Winchell, Harley Carson, B G II, A. B., 

Windsor, Phineas Lawrenck, Ph. B.. 

Wing, Allston Grant, Ph. B.. 

Witwer, Edward Brown, Ph. B., 

Woodard, George La Moule, 4> K 2, B. S., 

Woolworth, Walter Wallace, A. B., 

Young, Jared Wilson, 4> K *, A. B., 

Young, Josephine Estabrook, K K r, J!. L., 

Young, Will Sanborn, $ K ^, B. S., 

Zimmerman, Ethel Gary, Ph. B., 



Champaign. 
Free port. 
Crete. 

Evanston. 

West Salem 

Evanston. 

Burlington, 

Arlington. 

Napoleon 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Rockford. 

Clinton, Wis 

Warren. 

Kansas City, 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 



Wis. 



Mich. 



Mo. 



•••••••e®«®®««: 



02 



Not Candidates for a Degree. 



Adams, Cornelia Belden, 
At; at, Isaiah, 
Ballou, George Frost, 
Baker, Earle Sherman, B 9 II, 
Carter, William Bun, 4> K 2, 
CaughrAn, Harriet Ellen, K K 
Clancy, James Franklin, A T, 
Dale, Christina Ponton, 
Daniels, Harriet McDaniel, K 
Dickinson, Clarence, B B II, 
Ellsworth, Frank Seymour, 
Frankenstein, Victor Samuel, 
Gunn, Amelia Varick, 
Hall, Osman Frederick. 
Hamilton, Herbert Oscar. 
Haven, Fred Stewart, 
Holdridge, Cora Bertha, 
Holt, Harlin Vincent, 
Hubbart, Joseph Roy, 
Johnson, Anna, 
Jldd, Norman Watson, 
Kendall, Elizabeth Rhodes, A 
Lewis, Ralph Percy, 
Lowing, Jacob Arthur, . 
Mais, Henry George, 
Maxwell, Marcia Alma, 
McGurk, Mrs. Annie Lockwooi 
Morse, Webster Ellsworth, 
Newman, Nelden Abram, 
Nichols, Edith, 
Nickell, Frank Rosco, 
Parkes, Sara Henrietta, 
Reynolds, Dattjs Ensign, 
Sager, Juliet Gilman, 
Thompson, Margaret Higgins, 
wolfenden, james rupert, 



r, 



k r. 



a r. 



South Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Cedar Rapids, la 

Waukegan. 

Lancaster, Wis. 

Tacoma, Wash. 

Albion, Mich. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Austin, Tex. 

Chicago. 

South Evanston. 

Herbert. 

Whitewater, Wis. 

New Lenox. 

Plainfield. 

Rockford. 

Evanston. 

Oak Park. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

High Point, Mo. 

Port Byron. 

Evanston. 

Roxbury, N. V. 

Evanston. 

Aurora. 

Beatrice, Neb. 

Evanston. 

Austin, Minn. 

Belvidere. 

Glencoe. 

Chicago. 



63 



OF THE 
L M !VERS!TY OF ILU^"* 




Nathan S. Davis, M. D., LL. D., 

DKAN OF MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



Medical School. 



Senior Class 



Officers, 



T. A. STOKES, 
L. W. DUNAVAN, 
G. W. ROBERTS, 
THOMAS HUGHES, 

Boomer, Paul Chamberlain, 
Brami.age, Clemens, 
Broei.l, Adolph John, 
Brown, Henry Morton, . 
Carpenter, Townsend Seei.v, 
Carpenter, William James, Ph. G. 
Cheney, Henry William, 
Corcoran, Albert Lyle, 
Daniels, Herman P. 
Drenning, Frederick Chatlain, 
Dunavan, Louis William, P>. S., 
Eastman, Burt Eeander, 
Edwards, Alonzo Mathes, 
Evans, Horace Martin, B. S., 
Farren, John Alphonsus, 
Findley, Thomas Palmer, B. S., 
Garen, Dana Howard, 
Gibson, Horace, M. S., A. M., 
(mi. i. more. Robert Tracy, 
Gustafson, Frank Angus, 
Hemphill, Russel James, B. S., 
Hessert, William, 
Hoik, Berton, , 

Hoy t, George E., 
Hughes, James Gilbert, 
Hughes, Thomas, . 
Hunt, Green Roschetxe, 



President. 
Vice-President 

Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Evanston. 

St. Henrys, O. 

Dubuque, Ta. 

Capron. 

Chicago. 

Lena. 

Chicago. 

Brimfield. 

Scottsville, Kas. 

Galena. 

Jacksonville. 

Burlington, Kas. 

Marion. 

Valparaiso, Ind. 

Chicago. 

Atlanta, la. 

Racine, O. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Elwood. 

Chicago. 

Havana. 

Menomenee Falls, W 

Cascade, Wis. 

Monteno. 

Lincoln. 



Johnson, IIl<;ii Henjamine, 
Johnston, Charles Hamilton, 

KlERULFF, LUDWIG ARENT, (ir. P 

Kimmit, William Alexander, 

Kortebein, Henry Frederick, Ph. ( 

Langer, Charles, 

Leard, Samuel Elmer, B. S., 

Lewis, Sherman T., Ph. B , 

Marquis, George Paul, A. B., 

McDonald, James Wellington, B. S. 

McGaughey, Thomas Walker, 

Menge, Frederick, 

Millman, James Charles, IS. S., 

Mitchell, Oliver Luther, 

Nehmer, Ernst, 

Nesbitt, George Wallace, Jr. 

Peterson, Herman Durand, 

Pickerill, John Thomas, A. B 

Poindexter, Randal Everett, 

Ringle, Charles Arthur, 

Roberts, George Sutton, 

Seymour, Walter Frederick, B. S.. 

Sodt, Frank Beinhard, . 

Stanton, Samuel Cecil, B. S. 

Steele, Henry Danford, 

Stevens, Edwin Luther, 

Stevens, Harry Lester, 

Stewart, Edward Samuel, 

Stoakes, Thomas Arnos, . 

Taylor, William Jacob, B. S., 

Thomas, Arthur Roscow, 

Toler, Thomas Wickliff, 

Vosburg, Paul Bruce, 

Ward, John Peter, 

Werkmeister, Arthur Martin. 

Will, Harry Clayton, 

Wilson, Joseph Ross, 

W'ray, Austin Lee, M. D., 



Underclassmen 



Se< ond Year Class, 
First Year Class. 



AugUSta, Wis. 
Valparaiso, [nd. 
( Chicago. 
Chicaj 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Chicago. 
Prairie City. 
Honey Creek, Wis. 

Aurora. 

Macomb. 

Chicago. 

Elk Grove, Wis. 

Orland. 

Chicago. 

Sycamore. 

Sheffield. 

Eureka. 

Thompsonville. 

South Bend, Ind. 

Corinth. 

Reedsburg, Wis. 

Barrington. 

Chicago. 

Princeton. 

Decatur. 

Chicago. 

Plainfield. 

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Liberty, Pa. 

West Eaton, N. Y. 

Astoria, 

Granville, la. 

Sussex, Wis. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

La Roy, Ind. 

Cable. 



8.3 
123 



66 



OF THE 
i VERSITY OF \ll\W 




Hon. Henry Booth, LL. D. 



Law School 



Post Graduates, 

Barnes, Philip R. (Albany Law School), LL. B., . 
Brockway, Guv (Union College of Law), LL. B.. . 
Caldwell, Andrew S., Licensed Attorney, 
Condon, John T. (University of Michigan!, LL. B.. 
Leinen, Oscar E. (Union College of Law). LL. B., 
LANDIS, Kenesaw M. (Union College of Lawi. LL. B.. 
O'Donnell, Joseph A. (Union College of Law), LL. B.. 
Stone. Albert B. (Yale Law School). LL. B.. 



Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Denver, Col. 
Seattle. Wash. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 



Senior Class 



GEORGE W. DIXON. . 

Abernathv, High LL. . 

Agard, Edgar A.. 

Albright. Alice M.. . 

Andrus, George YY.. 

Amos, Charles LL, 

Baird, Max (Yale University), A. B., 

Bates. Harry M.. (University of Michigan). Ph. B. 

Baumer, Barnard J., 

Bower, John H., 

Boyd. Harry L.. 

Brewer, Frederick G.. 

Briggs, Wesley (University of Illinois), B. L.. 

Brigham, Bret H. (Lombard University). B. S.. 

Bixkley. Arthur E.. 

Bullock, Carl C .... 

Camelon. J<»hn McL.. .... 

Carpenter, Lisle G., .... 



President. 

Chicago. 

Ottawa. 

Cedar Rapids. la. 

San Francisco. Cai. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Madrid. Neb. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Englewood. 

Chicago. 

Libertyville. 

Chicago. 

Maple, Ont., Can. 

South Bend, Ind. 



67 



C'AVETT, SCOT'1 0. (State College, Kentucky), B. S., 

C'HISHOLM, William (Drake University), A. I'.., 

( ogswell, Frank II... 

Covey, Frank R., .... 

Creager, Perry I). (Perdue University), B. S., 

Dickenson, William II., 

Dixon, George W. (Northwestern University), A. I!. 

Dudley, J. Sherman, . . . ' 

Dupee, George W. (Yale University), A. B., 

Duwalt, Gottfried, .... 

Eames, Henry P., 

Eberhardt, Huger, .... 

Elting, Philip E., .... 

Evans, Fred J., .... 

Everett, William K., .... 

Finney. James M., .... 

Gemmill, William M. (Cornell University), Ph. B., 

Gilmore, Thomas E., .... 

Grier, James P. (Northwestern University), A. B,, 

Haigler, Loman J., 

Hennessy, Mary (;., .... 

HENRY, EDWARD E. (Western Reserve College), A. I 

Holt, Charles H., , 

Houlihan, Francis J., .... 

Hubbard, Jacob J., 

Humphrey, Wirt E. (Northwestern University), Ph. 

HUTCHINSON, Otis K. (Vale University); A. P., 

Inwood, Richard S. (University of Michigan), I!. . 1 

Joslyn, David R., 

Kriktl, Frank E., 

Kolar, Otto E., .... 

Eodge, William F., .... 

Martin, William S., 

Mather, Richard IE, .... 

Milchrist, William A., 

Miller, Ernest E., .... 

McCULLOCH, ROBERT W. (Michigan Agricultural Colle 
McGrath, Thomas E., .... 
McMahon, William E. (Illinois Wesleyan University) 
McMams, Robert C. . 
Nate, Joseph C. (Illinois Wesleyan University), A. 1 



.^•; 



A. I 



Franklin, Ky. 
Des Moines, [a. 

Vinlcn. 

dere. 
Kendallville, Ind. 
Pittsfield. 
( Chicago. 
Quincy. 
( 'hicago. 

New York. 
Blue Island. 
( Chicago. 

Macomb. 

Bel\ i<lerc. 

( hicago. 

( hicago. 

Marion, la. 

Effingham. 

Evanston 

Black Walnut. Mo. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Salem. 

Chicago. 

Mason City. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

South Bend, Ind. 

Woodstock. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Monticello. 

Chicago. 

( hicago. 

Chicago. 

Clinton, la. 

Spokane, Wash. 

Chicago. 

Lincoln. 

Ottawa. 

Chicago. 



68 



. Mary M.. . 

NlEBERGALL, Cl INI ON F., 

Oden, William E. (De Pauw University), A. 1 
O'Hara, John l>.. . . 

Payne, William 1'., 

Pettis, William, .... 

Pierce, William L.. 

Pike, Eugene R (Vale University), A. I].. 
PaCHiN, Fkei» L. (De Pauw University), A. 15 
Pratt, Harry E. (Vale University. A. B. 
Rice, William G.. 
Riggs, Frederick I... 
Robinson. Frank W.. 
key, John J.. Jr.. 
k — . David. .... 

Salter, Louis E.. 
Shaefer. William C, 
Scheirzer, Albert H , 
Shaw, Everett C, 

Sherman. Bemis W. (Middlebury College), A. 
Simpson. Joseph A.. 
Singleton, Shelby M., 
Sink. Edward H., 
Tumbaugh, John D., 
Vocke, Henry, .... 

Veeder. Henry (Vale University), A. B., 
Walker, Edwin K.. 
Wallace. Richard T.. . 
Whitaker. William H.. . 
White, James S.. . 

Wilhartz. William (University of Michigan), 
Wilson, Chilton. .... 
Withrow. Frank E.. 
Williams. John R.. 
Wright. Byard W.. 



B., 



Oakland, Cal. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Vermont. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Belvidere. 
Chicago. 
Spencer. Ind. 
Chicago. 

Houghton, Mich. 
Chicago. 
Ravena, 0. 
Chicago. 
Sanford. Fla. 
Chicag 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Joliet. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Evanston. 
X. Chile. N. 
Mt. Carroll. 
Chicago. 
Englewood. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chesterville. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Washington C 
Chicago. 
St. Charles. 
Wenona. 



V. 



H.. (). 



Juniors, 
Special Course, 



Underclassmen 



I 4 S 



Woman's Medical School 



Graduating Class, 



Arentzen, Helene Hansen, 










1 Denmark. 


Allison, Minnie L., 










Minnesota. 


Beaver, Ida Noyes, 










Colorado. 


Berwig, Elise Schuman, 










Wisconsin. 


Bunnell, Addie Gertrude, 










Kentucky. 


Davis, Eeea V., 










Illinois. 


Davenport, Isabelle Montgomery, 










Illinois. 


Denig, Blanche A., 










Illinois. 


French, Viola M., * . 










Wisconsin. 


Gaynor. Lucy A., 










Illinois. 


Hofma, Elizabeth Prlim, 










Michigan. 


Jeffery, Alicia F., M. L. A., 










Illinois. 


Kimball, Fannie Gray, 










Illinois. 


Kearns, Frances, 










Massachusetts 


McCrea, Maggie Letitia, 










Kansas. 


McFarland, Anne Hazen, A. B., 










Illinois. 


McGuire, Evaline Merriam, . 










Iowa. 


MacNeill, Mary, 










Canada. 


Morrill, E. Franc, A. M., 










Illinois. 


NlSWONGER, CERILDA, 










Missouri. 


O'Driscoll, Mary T., . 










Ohio. 


Olsen, Marie A., 










Norway. 


Phelps, Ada M., 










Illinois. 


Simmons, Margaret E., 










Nebraska. 


Smith, Martha J., 










Indiana. 


Sri. i. ivax, Marguerite E., 










Illinois. 


We i more, Josephine M., 










Iowa. 


Willard, Rose, 










Illinois. 


White, x. Emily, 










Kansas. 


Wilson, OLIVE A. CHARLES, 










Indiana. 


Whole Ni aiukk of Stude 


NTS, 








117 



70 




W. H. Byford, LL. D., M. D., 

FOUNDER OF THE WOMAN'S MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



OF THE 
L e !VEBSITY OF ILU* 8 



School of Theology 



Resident Graduate, 



Barnett, John Franklin. M. S., 



Farmington, la. 



Senior Class. 



Boner, Frank M.« 

Brown, George Arthur, B. S., 

Clancy. James Franklin. 

Coleman, Lewis Benjamin, A. B., 

Douglas, Lane, . 

Dleker, Henry Jasper, A. B., 

Eakin, Walter Beattie, 

Ellis, Farmun, 

Erickson, Edward William, A. B., 

Gleasox. Anna M., 

Hanks, John, 

Harbert, Erastls Glstayus, 

Hunt, George Jacob, A. B., 

Kester, Reese Bowman, B. S . 

.Main, George Henry. 

Marsh, Byron Whalon, 

Montgomery, James Shera, 

Moore, CLAUD SIDNEY. 

Nicholson, Thomas, 

Nimits, Frank Antonie, M. S. 

Northrcp, William Ewing, 



Union City, O. 
Saline, Mich. 
Albion, Mich. 
La Crosse, Wis. 
Maryville, Mo. 
Lawrence, Kas. 
Walla Walla. Wash. 
Olin, la. 
Evanston. 
Kewanee. 
Knoxville, la. 
Owray, Col. 
Montrose, Mo. 
Colony, Kas. 
Bancroft, Neb. 
Minden, Neb. 
Howard City, Mich. 
Sandwich. 
Union City, Mich. 
Frankville, Wis. 
Evanston. 



Pasmork, William John, 
Patterson, E. B., A. B., 
Patton, William Moore, A. 
Pierson, Thomas Frederick, 
Powers, Perley, 
Pruen, James Wright, 
Reno, Simeon Ralston, 
Robinson, William John, 
Robinson, J. W., 
Rowe, Jamks, 
Sisk, Jonathan Allen, 
Stranohan, Walter Scott, 
Taylor, John William, 
Taylor, Jamks Orlando, 
Virden, Charles, 
Weeden, Burr M., A. B., 
Wrede, Frederick George, 
Youngs, Benson John, 



da. 

n Harbor, Mich 
Hillsboro, 0. 
Dc Witt. 
Chicago. 
Pontiac, Kas. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
Grantley, Ont. 

Redfield, S. I). 

Wichita. Kas. 

Topeka, Kas. 
Grayling, Mich. 
Maysville, Mo. 
Godfrey. 
Evanston. 
Chicago. 
Binghampton, N. V. 



Underclassmen 



Middle Class, 
Junior Class, 



48 
82 




72 



LIBRARY 

Cf THE 
I WERSITY OF ILUN 




Oscar Oldberg, P. D., 
dean of school of pharmacy. 



School of Pharmacy. 



Senior Class. 



Armstrong, Byron, 
Bass, Henry J. 
Becker, William H., 
Beecher, William L., 
Bennett, Joseph J., 
Binford, Alfred L., 
Bishop, James C, 
Brezki, Louis H., 
Brown, Edwin P., 
Brown, Louzdn B., 
Brown, William H., 
Brunstrom, Charles, 
Bitter worth, Willis T., 
Camden, William J., 
Cassel, Robert E. Lee, 
Clegg, John T. 
Clemens, Andrew M., 
Collins, Ernest C, 

COTTINGHAM, JAMES W., 

Cowley, Scott L., 
Curtner, Paul H., Jr., 
Davison, John A., 
Degen, Lewis, 
Dieter, Edward M., 
Dudley, Erank W., 
Dunn, Jay E., 
Ehlers, Charles F., 
Engle, Charles E., 
Powers, William V., 
Exley, Benjamin, . 



Girard. 

Abilene, Tex. 

Red Wing, Minn. 

Marysville, O. 

Crystal Springs, Miss. 

Beloit, O. 

York, Neb. 

Portage, Wis. 

Cjuincy. 

Narborne, Mo. 

Dickinson, N. D. 

Moline. 

Marquoketa, la. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Windom, Ky. 

Falls City, Neb. 

Marion. 

Red Oak, la. 

S. Carrolton, Ky. 

Loraine, O. 

Hazleton, Ind. 

Springfield, S. D. 

Ottawa. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Bloomington. 

Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Tower City, N. D. 

Ft. Bliss, El Pasco, Tex ■ 

Martins Ferry, O. 



Fahrig, Ernest R., 
Fulton, Herbert L., 
Gale, Abram, 
Gram, William J., 
Griswold, Viola A., 
Groos, John, 
Grote, Henry W., 
Guthrie, Charles S., 
Hansen, John C, 
Hayhurst, William C., 
Hayes, Sidney C., 
Hazleton, David N., 
Henn, Louis P., 
Herbert, Earl T., 
Hess, Harvey F., 
Hicks, Thomas C., 
Hill, William T., 
Horrell, Edward E., 
Johnson, Anton C., 
Johnson, G. Adelbert, 
Johnson, Henry A., 
Kasper, Albert F., 
Kaull, Osborn B., 
Kerth, Addison T., 
Kleinpell, Henry H., 
Koch, John W., 
Koeberle, Theodore A., 
Koepenick, Julius E., 
Koivupalo, Edward H., 
Katzenberg, William J., 
Kraft, John E., 
Krieger, George J., Jr., 
Kurz, Frederick C, 
La Force, Burdette D., 
Lanning, Walter D., 
Lathrop, Charles E., 
Lewis, Martin P., 
Lloyd, Elmer M., 
Martin, Henry J., 
McClure, Ulysses G., 
McDonald, Lindsay J., 
McIntosh, Llewellyn E., 



Washburn, Wis. 

Cornwall, Canada. 

Oak Park. 

Chicago. 

Fox Lake, Wi». 

Wells, Mich. 

Wheaton. 

Erie. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

Waterloo, Wis. 

Woonsacket, S. D. 

Hazleton, Ind. 

Chicago. 

Trenton, Tenn. 

Bethlehem, Pa. 

Trenton, Tenn. 

Chippewa, Wis. 

Olney. 

Ottumwa, la. 

Boyne, Mich. 

Sioux Rapids, la. 

Chicago. 

Frankfort, S. D. 

Cairo. 

Cassville, Wis. 

Maryville, Mo. 

Chicago. 

Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Red Jacket, Mich. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Wooster, O. 

Chicago. 

Ottumwa, la. 

Sylacauga, Ala. 

Ainsworth, Neb. 

Defiance, O. 

Spring Valley, Minn. 

Defiance, O. 

Warren, Ind. 

West Superior, Wis. 

Claire, Mich. 



74 



McQuillen, Francis, 
Merrell, Courtney, 
Merriman, Luther L., 
Metzger, George F., 
Miller, Austin E., 
Miller, Jay E., 
Miller, James H., 
Moberg, Arthur, 
Morrow, Robert B., 
Musser, Thomas O., 
Myers, Ira L., 
Nance, Charles H., 
Negley, Howard S., 
Nelson, Horace C, 
Nyquist, William, 
(Jake, William T., 
Olds, Clifton B., 
Otsuki, Osanew, M. D., 
Ottens, Robert F., 
Pape, Charles C, 
Peiffer, William C, 
Pelton, J. Wesley, 
Peterman, Peter J., 
Pfennig, William M., 
Phalen, James M., 
Pritchard, Theodore, 
Pritzker, Nicholas J., 
Richardson, George H., 
Rissinger, John F., 
Roberts, George C, 
Rowe, Thomas D., 
Rowlands, Robert J., 
Rudntcki, Joseph, 
Schmidt, Henry G., 
Schroeder, Julius H., 
Sewell, Joe L., 
Shaw, William S., 
Snyder, Alva E., 
Spellman, Chris L., 
Stoffregen, William H.. 
Stork, Edward H., 
Stuckey, Emile M., 



Melvin. 

South Chicago. 

Grass Lake, Mich. 

Bethlehem, Pa. 

Cherokee, la. 

Buchanan, Mich. 

Bryan, O. 

Bloomington. 

Somerset, Ky. 

Orangeville. 

Rome City, Ind. 

Chicago. 

Farmington. 

Chicago. 

Clinton, la. 

Sabula, la. 

Kendalville, Ind. 

Fukui, Japan. 

Chicago. 

Effingham. 

Lemont. 

Bowling Green, O. 

South Chicago. 

Janesville, Wis. 

Harvard. 

Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Chicago. 

Marengo. 

Mason City, la. 

Prairie du Chien, Wis. 

Dodgeville, Wis. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Elgin. 

Chicago. 

Chanute, Kas. 

Centerville, la. 

Bryan, O. 

Chicago. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Quincy. 

Cartock. 



75 



Thometz, Michael F., 
'in.i.soN, Alonzo H., Jr., 
Tupi'er, Nathan W., 
Tyler, Bert A., 
Voigt, John E., 
Van Lanken, William, 
Waldron, Patrick J., 
Way, James P., 
Wickhorst, Max, 
Wilder, William B., 
Williams, Claud W., 
Williams, Samuel T., 
Woolesen, Peter, 
Woodward, James, 
Woolley, Trvin R., 
Woolsey, George A., 



Shannon. 

1 )ixon. 

< 'anning, Nova >« oti; 
Evans ton. 

Monterey, Wis. 

Tuscola. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Circleville, O. 

Garrettsville, O. 

Daingerfield, Tex. 

Lockport. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Rockford. 



Underclassmen 



Junior Class, 
Special Students, 



194 

7 



UBRARY 

OF THE 

DIVERSITY OF ILUr * 




George H. Cushing, M. D., D. D. S., 

PROFESSOR OF DENTAL PATHOLOGY. 



School of Dentistry. 



Senior Class. 



Raird, Joseph Free, 
Baldwin, Charles Martin, 
Barnes, William Leonard, 
Blish, James Louis, 
Chapman, Edwin Morgan, 
Celley, Louis Samuel, 
Fethmann, Adam William, 
Foster, John Lloyd, 
Garnett, William Fielding, 
Grove, William Alfred, 
Graham, Abram Bradman. 
Hiller, George Byron, 
Merritt, William Edward, 
Miller. Augustus Goodman. 
Mitchell, Samuel Thomas, 
Roberts, Clifford Merry, 
Warren, George Eyerett, 
Wilcox. Dock Merritt. 



Adanville, Pa. 

Oak Park. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Keirenee. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Richmond, Ind. 

Elkhart, Ind. 

Chicago. 

Sterling. 

Eldorado, Kas. 

Flint, Mich. 

Battle Creek, Mich. 

Morris. 

Sidney, la. 

Chicago. 

Washingtoi., la. 

Oconto, Wis. 



Underclassmen 



Junior Class, 
Freshman Class, 



6 
28 



School of Oratory. 



Seniors, 



Batchelder, Clara Burbank, 
Clark, Cora Amy, 
Cameron, Ola Delle, 
Farwell, Ruth Louise, 
Farris, William, 
Garton, Edith May, 
McMillan, Gertrude, 

MULVANE, VlRGILINE, 

Rennick, Sally Adella, 
Robinson, Anna Eleanor a, 
Van Norman, Janet, 



Denver, Col. 
Covington, Ky. 
Knightstown, Tnd. 
Evanston. 
Fennimore, Wis. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Detroit, Mieh. 
Topeka, Kas. 
Chicago. 

West Union, la. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Juniors, 



Adams, John Porter, 
Alabaster, John Lewis, 
Aldrich, Charles Sherman, 
Anstell, Oscar, 
Bellows, John Austin, 
Blackmer, Mina Addie, 
Brown, George Arthur, 
Bucks, Charles Henry, 
Carns, Myrtle, 
Caughran, Harriet Ellen, 
Coleman, Lewis Benjamin, 
Diehl, William Wilbur, 
dornsythe, samuel seiler, 
Dueker, Henry Jaspkr, 
Du ['i.aine, Eleanor Adelaide 
Edwards, Olive, 



Sandwich. 
Evanston. 
Fredonia, N. Y. 
Elwood, Tnd. 
Maryville, Mo. 
Albert Lea, Minn. 
Saline, Mich. 
Morris. 

Iron wood, Mich. 
Tacoma, Wash. 
La Crosse, Wis. 
Milford, Mich. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Lawrence, Kas. 
Evanston. 
Greenfield. 



7S 



Ewing, William McDonald, 
Gorten, Charlotte Delight, 
George, Bessie Loella, 

Gibbs, Henry Carroll, 
Glick, Jonathan, 
Harker, Emma, 
Hatfield, Henry Rand, 
Harker, Ray Clarkson, 
Haskins, Emary Sherman, 
Irvine, Theodora, 
Knox, Loren Henry, 
Loining, Jacob Arthur, 
Marsh, Byron Whalon, 
Morse, Webster Ellsworth, 
McCasky, Harriet Louise, 
McGurk, Daniel, 
McNally, Bird Emily, 
Nicholson, Thomas, 
Osgood, Harriet Louise, 
Parkes, Sara Henrietta, 
Pearsons, Harry Putman, 
Powers, Perley, 
Reed, Alice, 

RlCHEY, CANDACE, 

Rollins, Frances Laban, 
Scott, John Adams, 
Smith, Martha Constance, 
Smith, Winifred Amelia, 
Smith, Maud Martha, 
Stanford, Mary Elizabeth, 
Shuman, Raphael Roy, 
Towle, Herman Edwin, 
Virgin, Altazeo, 
Virden, Charles, 
Walrath, William Bradley, 
Wambaugh, Effyan Reed, 
Walz, John Albright, 
Wilbur, Edith, 
White, Laura Agnes, . 
Whitely, Elizabeth, 
Zimmerman, Charles Hamlin, 



Evanston. 

Maiden. 

Rockford, Mich. 

Harristown. 

Dightour, Kas. 

Mitchell, S. D. 

Evanston. 

Shullsburg, Wis. 

Piper City. 

Detroit, Minn. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Minden, Neb. 

Roxbury, N. Y. 

Chicago. 

Salina, Kas. 

Cedar Falls, la. 

Union City, Mich. 

Marseilles. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Chicago. 

Cairo. 

L'Ostant. 

Elgin, Minn. 

Fletcher. 

Evanston. 

McGranville, N. Y. 

Geneseo. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Fall City, Neb. 

Fairbury. 

Godfrey. 

Evanston. 

Kearney, Neb. 

Chicago. 

Burlington, W r is. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 



Special Students. 



Baker, Ethel, 
Baker, Lulu, 
Boner, Lizzie, 
Campbell, Alma Tracy, 
Capron, Florence, 
Church, Minnie Estelle, 
Foster, Seville, 
Gloss, Mary Elgin, 
Gleason, Anna M., 
Hamilton, Joseph Robert, 
Hay, Helen Scott, 
Holderman, Mary Belle, 
Hunt, Nettie Josephine, 
Jennings, Henrietta May, 
Mack, Emily Butts, 
Plimpton, Mary Eliza, 
Reeves, Lou Bella, 
Rist, Franklin, 
Sanborn, Elizabeth Delight, 
Shanmo, Eva Belle, 
Stevens, Fannie Adelaide, 
Taylor, Madge, 
Tubbs, Myra Emily, 
V andercook, Inez, 
Walker, Alice E,, 
Watson, Lottie Belle, 
Wei/ion, Mabel Lucele, 



Chicago. 

Rock Island. 

Panola. 

Joliet. 

Winnetka. 

Walworth, Wis. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Kewanee. 

Evanston. 

Savanna. 

Morris. 

Aurora. 

Mattoon. 

Joliet. 

Perris, Cal. 

Wellsburg, W. V* 

Toulon. 

Evanston. 

Muscatine, la. 

Moline. 

Denver, Col. 

Kirk wood. 

Cherokee, la. 

Evanston. 

Minooka. 

Cambridge. 



HO 



Conservatory of Music. 



Students in Instrumental Department. 



Bailey, Belle L., 
Baker, Lulu, 
Beason, Ella, 
Belknap, May, 
Bennison, Minnie E., 
Boynton, Bessie, 
Cascadden, Pearl, 
Carus, Myrtle, 
Cornelius, Sara, 
Cushing, Anna, 
Dale, Christina, 
Dart, Sadie, 
Dornsife, Daniel, . 
Dunn, Mabel, 
Eversz, Mrs. Josephine, 
Foster, Eva Cornelius, 
Good, Mrs. J. W., 
Gortner, Mae, 
Grafton, Fannie, . 
Harrington, Lillie, 
Hathaway, Junia, 
Hathaway, Kate Douglas 
Henderson, Alice, 
Hilliard, Alberta May, 
Holderman, Ella, 
Horswell, Gale, 
Hunt, Lora B., 
Hunter, Mrs. W. A., 
Jennings, Grace, 



M< 



Evanston. 

Rock Island. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Kewanee. 

Evanston. 

York, Neb. 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Indianapolis, Ind 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Kansas City, 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Mechanicsville, 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

River Forest. 

Rochelle. 

Evanston. 

Minnedosa, Man 

Morris. 

Evanston. 

Harvard. 

Evanston. 

Laramie, Wyo. 



la. 



SI 



|(>nks, Ida, 








Sandwich. 


[ONES, WaLTEK Clinton, . 








Sandwich. 


KlLBURN, NoRMI M., 








Bryan Centre, Mich. 


Kinkade, Agatha, 








Lanark. 


Kinsey, Edna, 








Richmond, [n<L 


Lowen, Emma A., 








Evanston. 


Meredith, Jeannette Hannah, 








(Chicago. 


Mori, Shedzu, 








Kenshen, Japan. 


Moulding, Joseph W., 








Chicago. 


Nelson, Adelia, 










Nesnuth, Myrtle Alice, 








C apron. 


Reed, Alice, 








Cairo. 


Reeves, Amelia, 








Wellslmrg, \V. \'a. 


Richards, Ai.lie Gay, 








Joliet. 


Robinson, Mrs. Elizabeth, 








Evanston. 


Roy, Lucille, 








Sioux City, la. 


Van Sant, Grant, 








, Winona, Minn. 


Sears, Helen, 








Kenilvvorth. 


Skinkle, Bertha, . 








Richmond. 


Smetters, Samuel, 








Waverly. 


Staver, Frances, . 








Monroe, Wis. 


Strickler, Barbara,, 








Lanark. 


Taylor, Charline, 








Cambridge, ( ). 


Thomas, Martha, 








Watertown, S. D. 


Tubes, Myra E., 








Kirkwood. 


Ward, Sadie G., 








Evanston. 


Ward, Roselle, 








Evanston. 


Welder, Richard, 








Evanston. 


Wright, Nettie, . . 








Prairie du Chien, Wis 



Students in Vocal Department. 



Ambler, Harry Egbert, 
Baker, Liu . 
Beckitt, Minnie Ella. 
Bennison, Minnie E., 
butterfield, charles, 
Clarkson, Mathew Alexander. 
Cornelius, Sara, 
Cushing, Anna. 
Dart, Sadie, 
Dn ii: ty, Miss 



Chicago. 

Rock Island. 

Northwood, Ta. 

Kewanee. 

Evanston. 

Rock Falls. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 



82 



Gates, Fannie, 
Gordon, Nellie A., 
Harris, Merritt Melvin, 
Harvey, Henry Lawrence, 
Hilliard, Alberta May, 
Holt, Robert Newton, 
Johnson, Franklin Lee, 
Jordon, Edith, 
Kay, Howard L., 
Kohlsaat, Philemon B., 
Lowen, Emma A., 
Marshall, Elias Collett, 
Masslich, Chester Bentley, 
Reeves, Amelia, 
Seabrook, William, 
Sherman, Eugene B., 
Stanford, Mary E., 
Stebbins, Walter J., 
Strickler, Barbara, 
Taft, Jesse W., 
Thompson, Frank S., 
Way, Willis Edward, 
Whitehead, Harry, 



Waterloo, la. 
Evanston. 

Mason City, la. 

Chicago. 

Minnedosa, Man 

Rockford. 

Decatur. 

Evanston. 

Watseka. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Eldorado, 

Evanston. 

Wellsburg 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Evanston. 

Winona, Minn. 

Lanark. 

Whitewater, Wis 

Evanston. 

Geneseo. 

Evanston. 



Kas. 



W. Va. 



Students in Theoretical Department. 



Beason, Ella, 
Bennison, Minnie E., 
Cushing, Anna, 
Hilliard, Alberta Mary, 
Jones, Walter Clinton, 
Kinkade, Agatha, 
Kinsey, Edna, 
Nesmith, Myrtle Alice, 
Strickler, Barbara, 



Evanston. 

Kewanee. 

Evanston. 

Minnedosa, Man. 

Sandwich. 

Lanark. 

Richmond, Ind. 

Capron. 

Lanark. 



83 



Sigma Chi. 



Founded at niami University, Oxford, Ohio, June 28, 1855. 



Colors: Blue and Gold. 



Active Chapter Roll. 



Bucknell University, 

Dickinson College, 

Pennsylvania College, 

Cornell University, 

Stevens Institute of Technology, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

University of Virginia, 

Washington and Lee University, 

Roanoke College, 

Randolph-Macon College, 

Hampden-Sidney College, 

Ohio Wesleyan, 

Wooster University, 

University of Cincinnati, 

Ohio State University, 

Denison College, 

Center College, 

University of North Carolina, 

University of Texas, 

Tulane University, 

Vanderbilt, 



I)e Pauw University, 
Indiana State University, 
Butler University, 
Purdue University, 
Hanover College, 
Wabash College, 
Albion College, 
University of Michigan, 
University of Wisconsin, 
Beloit College, 
Northwestern University, 
Illinois Wesleyan, 
University of Kansas, 
University of Nebraska, 
University of California, 
Lehigh University, 
University of Minnesota, 
University of Mississippi, 
University of Southern California, 
University of Illinois, 
Pennsylvania State, 



Leland Standford, Jr. 

Alumni Chapters. 

Chicago, Cincinnati, Columbus, 

New York, St. Paul, Washington, 

Montgomery, Lafayette, Kansas City, 

Springfield, Ohio, Indianapolis, Lincoln. 



86 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

' CRSITY OF ILLim 



Omega Chapter 



(Sigma Chi.) 



Chartered June 23, 1869. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Merritt C. Bragdon, A. M., M. D. 

Frank M. Brewer, M. D. 

Frederick D. Raymond, A. M. 

Frank A. Fletcher. 

Edward H. Webster, A. M., M, D. 

George P. Merrick. 

Edwin L. Shuman. 

Frederick D. Hesler, M. D., U. S 

James Deering. 

R. Rov Shuman. 

Frank M. Elliot. 



X. 



George Lint. 

Henry A. Pearsons, A. 

Charles A. Wightman. 

Giles Hubbard. + 

Dexter P. Donelson. 

Henry Caddock. 

Clarendon B. Eyer. 

Burr M. YVeeden. 

Jesse J. Shuman. 

Fred P. Vose. 

W. C. Van Benschoten. 



M. 



Fratres in Facultate. 

Medical School. 

E. Wyllys Andrews, A. M., M. D. Frank T. Andrews, A. 

Nathan Smith Dayis, Jr., A. M., M. D. 



M., M. D. 



Byron W. Marsh. 
Frank G. Jackson. 



Fratres in Universitate. 

School of Theology. 

Burr M. YVeeden, C. L. A., 

Hedical School. 

Charles H. Johnson. 
Robert Harvey. 

Law School. 

Frederick J. Tourtellotte, C. L. A. '88. W. T. Alden. C. L. A., '91. 

Joseph C. Nate. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

Seniors. 

Edmund Ludlow. 

Juniors. 



'89. 



F. W. Hem en way. 

Robert J. Kerr. 
Phil. B. Kohlsaat. 

Robert K. Steyens. 

Burt Howard. 



Sophomores. 



Freshmen. 



George P. Hills. 

Arthur B. Harbert . 
Harry E. Ambler. 
Carl R. Latham. 

Carey Culbertson. 



^7 



Phi Kappa Sigma. 



Founded at the University of Pennsylvania, October 20, 1850. 



Colors : Black and Gold. 



Active Chapter Roll. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Franklin and Marshall. 

Randolph-Macon. 

Washington and Jefferson. 

University of Virginia. 
Richmond College. 

University of North Carolina. 

Northwestern University. 

Haverford College. 

Pennsylvania State College. 



8H 



LIBRARY 

1 "vebsSyoml, 



Upsilon Chapter. 



Phi Kappa .Sigma. 



Established at the Northwestern University in 1872 



Fratres in Urbe. 



W. F. Singleton, '61, 
F. B. Dyche, So. 
W. A. Dyche, '82, 

1.. S. Rice. '83. 

\Y. A. Phillips, S3. 

Charles S. Raddin, '84, 



C. B. Rick. '78, 

F. L. Rice, 

M. M. Gridley, n ;. 

E. B. Quinlan, ex'83, 

Conrad Bunn, 

W. D. Sargent, I4 



Frater in Facultate. 



Frank S. Johnson, A. M., M. D. 



Fratres in Universitate. 

Seniors. 
Edgar P. Cook, Jr.. Ralph H. Smith. 

Frederick W. Belknap, X. W. M=dical School, 04. Thomas C. Hollingshead. 



George W. Baker, 
W. J. Maxwell, 



J. W. Arnold. 
David A. Lanky. 



Juniors. 
Sophomore. 

George L. Woodard. 

Freshmen. 



Charles K. Sherman. 
George B. Dyche. 



YY. C. Carter. 
I. X. Spindler. 



- 



Beta Theta Pi. 



Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, July, 1H30. 



Colors : Pink and Blue. 



Active Chapter Roll. 



Harvard, 

Brown, 

Boston, 

Maine State, 

Hampden Sidney, 

Amherst, 

Dartmouth, 

Stevens, 

Cornell, 

St. Lawrence, 

Union, 

Columbia, 

Syracuse, 

Dickinson, 

Johns Hopkins, 

University of Pennsylvania, 

Pennsylvania State, 

Colgate, 

Cincinnati, 

Bethany, 



Virginia, 

Richmond, 
Randolph-Macon, 

Centre, 
Cumberland, 

Mississippi, 
Vanderbilt, 

Texas, 

Miami, 

Ohio, 

Western Reserve, 

Washington-Jefferson, 

Ohio Wesleyan, 

University of North Carolina, 

Wittenberg, 

Denison, 

Wooster, 

Kenyon, 

Wesleyan, 

Minnesota. 



Missouri, 

Ohio State. 

De Pauw, 

Indiana, 

Michigan, 

Wabash, 

Hanover, 

Knox, 

Beloit, 

Iowa State, 

Iowa Wesleyan, 

Wisconsin, 

Northwestern, 

Westminster, 

Kansas, 

California, 

Denver, 

Nebraska, 

Davidson, 



Alumni Chapters, 



Boston, 
Baltimore, 
Chicago, 
( Cincinnati 



Cleveland, 
Denver, 
Indianapolis, 
New York, 
Wheeling. 



Providence, 
Richmond, 
San Francisco 

St. Paul, 



<><) 



IV 
Of THE 
( ERSITYOFILI 




'I r, /,-,/ . /'////, r 



Rho Chapter. 



(Beta Theta Pi. 



Founded July 30, 1873. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Rev. Henry A. Delano. 

Isaac R. Hitt. 

Rev. C. H. Zimmerman. 

William A. Hamilton. 
Frank E. Lord. 



Phillil R. Shumwav . 
Frank C. Whitehead, 

Henry S. Shedd. 
Arthur S. Underwood. 
Charles G. Le\yi>. 



Fratres in Facultate. 



Prof. J. H. Long. 
Prof. W. W. Jaggard. 



Prof. James T. Hatfield. 
Charles H. Zimmerman. Jr. 



Fratres in Universitate. 

Law School. 

Ward P. Sawyer. C. L. A.. '91. Albert D. Rich. 

School of Pharmacy. 
Sheldon S. Anderson. 

Hedical School. 

T. P. FlNDLEY. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

Seniors. 

Henry R. Hatfield. 
Charles A. Phillips. 
Jerome H. Raymond. 

Junior. 
Wilfred F. Beardsley. 



J. S. Brown. 



Henry M. Echlin 
Ernest B. Hoag. 



Ransom E. Kennicott. 
Clarence Dickinson. 

Harry P. Pears* >ns. 
Edwin M. Hadley. 
Webster J. Stebkin>. 



Sophomores. 



Freshmen. 



Harry W. Whitehead. 
Robert R. Kendall. 

Charles P. Adams. 
Earle S. Barker. 
Harley C. Winchell. 



«.U 



Phi Kappa Psi. 



rounded February, 1852, at Jefferson College, Penn. 



Colors: Pink and Lavender. 



Active Chapter Roll 



Washington and Jefferson College, 

Allegheny College, 

Bucknell University, 

Pennsylvania College, 

Dickinson College, 

Franklin and Marshall College, 

Lafayette College, 

Swarthmore College, 

Cornell University, 

Syracuse University, 

Hobart College, 

Madison University, 

University of Virginia, 

Washington, and Lee University, 

Hampden -Sidney University, 

Columbian College, 

University of South Carolina, 

University of West Virginia, 



Ohio Wesleyan University, 

Wittenberg College, 
Wooster University, 
Ohio State University, 
I)e Pauvv University, 
Indiana State University, 
Wabash College, 
Northwestern University, 
University of Michigan, 
University of Wisconsin. 
Beloit College, 
University of Iowa, 
University of Minnesota, 
University of Kansas, 
University of Pacific, 
Johns Hopkins University, 
University of Mississippi, 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 






Alumni Associations. 



Pittsburgh, 
Minnesota, 



Springfield, 
Cincinnati, 
Kansas City. 



New York, 
Chicago, 



92 



Of THE 
I .VERSiTY OF fLU^ 



Illinois Alpha. 



(Phi Kappa Psi.) 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Wilber J. Andrews, A. M. 
George A. Bass, Ph. B. 
Charles K. Bannister, A. M 
William M. Raymond, A. M. 
Perkins B. Bass, A. B. 



William C. Comstock, A. B. 
Charlks M. Stuart, A. M., B. I). 
Fred C. Collins. 
J. E. Christy, A. B. 
James P. Grier, A. B. 



Stephen J. Herben, A. B. 

Fratres in Facultate. 



Robert Baird, A. M., 

Chair of Greek. 



Charles W. Pearson, A. M., 

Chair of English Literature. 
George M. Schmidt, Ph. B., 

Instructor in German and French. 



George H. Horswell, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Latin and German. 

Charles Horswell, A. M., B. D., 

Instructor in Greek and Hebrew, G. B. I. 

Charles B. Thwing, A. M., 

Instructor in Physics. 



Fratres in Universitate. 



G. W. Dixon. 

S. A. Maltman. 



J. Lewis Alabaster. 
Charles Henry Bucks. 



Walter A. Dempsey. 

J. F. Oates. 

A. Clarence Abel. 
John Mark Ericson. 

W. Foster Burns. 
Bert E. Emmett. 
Joseph Moulding. 



Law School. 

T. C. Moulding. 



J. P. Grier 



Wirt E. Humphrey. 



W. A. Hall. 
College of Liberal Arts. 

Seniors. 

Daniel W. Terry. 
Juniors. 

Sophomores. 



James K. Bass. 
Freshmen. 



Clifford L. Meyer: 
93 



John A. Bellows. 
John A. Walz. 

William E. Ewing. 
Elias W. Ward. 

J. Harrison Cole. 
Jar f.d W. Young. 



Herbert Parkes. 
Grant Van Sant. 
William S. Young. 



Delta Upsilon 



Pounded at Williams College in 1H34. 



Colors : Sapphire Blue and Old Gold, 



Active Chapters. 



Williams, 

Amherst, 

Rochester, 

Brown, 

Cornell, 

Michigan, 

Wisconsin, 

Lehigh, 



Union, 

Adelbert, 

Middlebury, 

Madison, 

Marietta, 

Northwestern, 

Lafayette, 

Tufts, 



Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania, 



1 [amilton, 

Colby. 
Rutgers, 
New York, 
Syracuse, 
Harvard, 
Columbia, 
De Pauw, 
Minnesota. 



Alumni Chapters. 



New England, 
New York, 
Minneapolis, 



Western New England, 

Syracuse, 

Chicago, 

Cleveland. 



Rhode Island, 

Rochester, 

Buffalo. 



<U 



USRARY 
OF THE 
:V£RSITY OF !LU*~ ^ 



Northwestern Chapter 



(Delta Upsilon.) 



Established February 18, 1880. 



Fratres in Urbe, 



Charles S. Harmon. 
William R. Parkes. 
Frederick Arnd. 
Frank G. Middlekauff. 
J. W. Howells. 



Parke E. Simmons. 
Shelby M. Singleton. 
D. Corbin. 

William B. Walrath. 
W. W. Scott. 



George Arnd. 

Fratres in Facultate. 

George W. Hough, A. M., 

Professor of Astronomy and Director of Dearborn Observatoy. 

Leonard L. Skelton, M. D., 

Lecturer in Woman's Medical School. 

Fratres in Universitate. 

School of Theology. 

Ray C. Harker, C. L. A., '91. Amary S. Haskins, C. L. A., '91. 

Law School. 



Shelby M. Singleton. 



Alfred W. Burton. 

Joseph L. Walker. 
George E. Cotter. 

Howard T. Ricketts. 
Del. B. Thompson. 

Daniel J. Holmes. 
John C. Singleton. 
A. W. Skelsey. 



College of Liberal Arts. 

Seniors. 

Albert S. Mason. 

Juniors. 

Willis E. Way. 
James F. Clancy. 
Sophomores. 



Freshmen. 



Elmer J. Ridings. 
95 



Avery R. Hayes. 



William B. Doble. 

Wilbur F. Tomlinson. 

Charles S. Aldrich. 

J. Wallace Dickey. 
Elmer I. Goshen. 

Charles Hazzard. 
Jay R. Dickinson. 
Walter S. Asher. 



Alpha Phi. 



Founded at Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y., 1872. 



Colors: Bordeaux and Silver Gray. 



Active Chapter Roll 



Alpha — Syracuse University, '72. 

Beta — Northwestern University, '81. 

Eta— Boston University, '83. 

Gamma — De Pauw University, '87. 

Delta — Cornell University, '89. 

Epsilon— Minnesota State, '90. 

Zeta — Baltimore University, '91. 

Chicago Alumnae Association, '89. 

Boston Alumna. 1 Association, '89. 

Syracuse Alumnae Association, '92. 



96 



UDRARY 

OF THE 
1 -RSiTY OF JLLi^ 



f ^' 




Beta Chapter, 



(Alpha Phi.) 



Established May, 1881. 



Sorores in Urbe. 



Frances E. Willard. 
Harriet Towle Perrin, '87. 
Frances Towle Collins, '87. 
Helen Pearsons Calkins, '87. 
Anna Towle, '87. 
Dr. Anna Gloss, ex'84. 
Mary L. Bennett, '91. 
Minnie R. Terry, '91. 



Gertrude Eva Simmons, '91. 
Grace Foster Herben, '89. 
Elizabeth Edwards Field, '89. 
Lizzie Hill Leek, '87. 
Stella Bass, '89. 
Mary Henry, '85. 
Martha C. Smith, '91. 
Olive M. Finley, '91. 



Eyie Vail 



, ex- 94. 



Sorores in Universitate. 



E. Delight Sanborn. 
Mamie Chattle. 



Fannie Gates. 
Charlotte B. Hayes. 



Nellie Staver. 
Frances Staver. 



Law School. 

Mary Maltman, C. L. A., '91. 
School of Oratory 

Anna E. Robinson, C. L. A., '91. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

Senior. 
Harriet L. McCasky. 

Juniors. 

May Demorest. 
Mary E. Plimpton. 

Sophomores. 
Grace Germain. 
Alice Freeman. 
Anna McConnell. 

Freshmen. 
L<>r Moore. 
Anna Miller. 
Bessie Maltman. 



Mary K. Singleton. 
Fanny G. Alabaster. 

Minnie B. Tlrner. 
Louise Swaii.. 



Ethel Gray. 
Kathryn Hebbard. 






Delta Gamma. 



Founded at Oxford, Hiss., 1872. 



Colors : Bronze, Pink and Blue. 



Active Chapter Roll. 

Eta — Buchtel College. 

Omega — Wisconsin State University. 

Lambda — Minnesota State. 

Sigma — Northwestern University. 

DELTA — Univ. of Southern California. 

Alpha — Mount Union College. 
Chi — Cornell University. 

Xi — Michigan State University. 

Phi — Colorado State University. 

Tau — Iowa State University. 

ZETA — Albion College. 

Kappa — University of Nebraska. 

Alumnae Chapter. 

Theta — Adelkert. 



98 



OF THE 
I -;v£RSITY OF ILU> 



r^-, 




/>,,■!,-,,. Phil*. 



Sigma Chapter, 



(Delta Gamma.) 



Established March, 1882. 



Sorores in Urbe. 

Elizabeth R. Hunt, '77. 

Helen Redfield Horswell, '84. 

Alida G. White, ex-'85. 

Rose Birch Hitt, University of Wisconsin, '87. 

Alice Cummings Bonbright. 



Anna L. Crandon, '83. 
Leila M. Crandon, '84. 
Aurora L. Fisk, '90. 
Louise E. Rice, ex-'cji. 
Hattie Butler Juno, ex-'o,2. 



Mary W. Lord, ex-'o^. 



Sorores in Universitate. 

School of Oratory. 

Junior. 

Sara Parkes. 



Helen Babcock. 

Anna M. Hitchcock 
Louise Redfield. 
Anna Smith. 

Nina Howard. 



College of Liberal Arts. 

Seniors. 
Sophomores. 



Freshmen. 



Ethel Baker. 

Elizabeth Whitely. 
Margaret Thompson. 
Antoinette Meinhardt 

Bessie Kendall. 



99 



Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, III., 1870. 



Colors : Light Blue and Dark Blue. 



Active Chapter Roll. 

Alpha Province. 

Phi— Boston. Beta Beta— St. Lawrence. 

Psi— Cornell. Beta Alpha— Pennsylvania State. 

Beta Epsilon— Barnard. Gamma Rho— Allegheny. 

Beta Tau — Syracuse. 

Beta Province. 

Lamda— Buchtel. Beta Delta— Michigan State. 

Beta Gamma — Wooster. Xi— Adrian. 

Beta Nu— Ohio State. Kappa— Hillsdale. 

Gamma Province. 

DELTA — Indiana State. Eta — Wisconsin. 

Iota- -De Pauw. Upsilon — Northwestern. 

Mu- Butler. Epsilon— Illinois Wesley an. 

Delta Province. 

Cm Minnesota State. THET a— Missouri State. 

Beta Zeta Iowa State. Sigma— Nebraska State. 

Omega— Kansas State. 



100 



M3RA8V 
Cf THE 
^SJTY OF Hlll^'l 




Ih, I.;, P/aUi 



Upsilon Chapter. 



(Kappa Kappa Gamma.) 



Sorores in Urbe. 



Fannie Simpson, '84. 
Kate Simpson, ex-^. 
Mary S. Morse, ex-'86. 
Lelia Jones, '82. 
Isabel R. Morse, '90. 
Hattie Alling, ex'96. 



May E. Van Benschoten, '86. 
Kate M. Alling, '87. 
Emma Thompson, ex-'87. 
Belle Alling, '88. 
Minnie Hamline, ex-'88. 
Florence Bucks, ex-'92. 



Sorores in Universitate. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

Seniors. 

Nettie J. Hint. Effie Miller. 

Maude M. Smith Hattie Osgood. 

Junior. 

Hattie Caughran. 
Sophomores. 

Myra Tubbs. Grace Owen. 

Edith M. Baker. Josephine E. Young. 

Freshmen. 



Theodora Irvine. 

Lucy Shuman. 

Zilla Hull. 

Anna Rex. 



Sue Osgood. 

Jessie Bliss. 

Hattie Daniels. 

Carla Sargent. 
Ora Wakeman. Cora Evans. 



101 



Kappa Alpha Theta. 



Pounded at De Pauw University, Greencastle, Ind., Jan. 27, 1870. 



Colors: Black and Gold. 



Active Chapter Roll. 



A. De Pauw University, 1870. 



B. 



Indian; 
A. 



State University, 1870. 
Illinois Wesleyan University, 1S75. 
E. Wooster University, 1875. 

I. Cornell University, 1881. 

K. University of Kansas, 1881. 

A. University of Vermont, 1881. 

M. Allegheny College, 1881. 

X. Hanover College, 1882. 
University of Southern California, 1887. 
II. Albion College, 1887. 

P. University of Nebraska, 1887. 

T. Northwestern University, 1887. 

T. University of Minnesota, 1889. 

*J>. University of the Pacific, 1889. 
X. Syracuse University, 1889. 

^. University of Wisconsin, 1890. 

il. University of California, 1890. 

A-B. Swarthmore College, 1891. 



102 



U3RARY 
( r THE 
I . OTY OF ILLW 




/'/ i l,i: I 'hi l,i 



au Chapter, 

(Kappa Alpha Theta.) 



Established September 29, 1887. 



Sorores in Urbe. 

Mrs. William Smyser. Grace Reade, ex-'95. 

Sorores in Universitate. 

School of Oratory. 

Senior. 

Edith May Gartox. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

Seniors. 

Mary Elgin Gloss. Mary Ross Potter. 

Juniors. 

Jean Hannah Meredith. Henrietta Jennings. 

Sophomores. 

Louise Josephine Fitch. Ella Gary. 

Lucy Delight Sheldon. 

Freshmen. 

Lois Rice. Helene Nelson. Lilly Rice. 

Jessie Phillips. Alice Spies. Mae Wilcox. 

Mabel Welton. Anna Van Tressler. Lida Scott. 

Charlene Taylor. Ethelyn Emery. 



103 



Gamma Phi Beta. 



Founded at Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y., 1874. 



Colors: Seal Brown and Fawn. 



Roll of Chapters. 

Alpha — Syracuse University, 1874. 

Beta — Michigan State University, 1882. 

Gamma — Wisconsin State, 1886. 

Delta — Boston University, 1887. 

Epsilon — Northwestern University, i5 



104 



OF THE 
{ JVERSITY OF fLUN' 



Epsilon Chapter. 



(Gamma Phi Beta.) 



Established 1888. 



Sorores in Urbe. 

Pearl Farwell. Caroline Clifford, '90. 

Beulah Houston. 

Sorores in Universitate. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

Senior. 

Mayme Patterson. 

Sophomore. 

Elva Barber. 

Freshmen. 

Minnie Patterson. Clara Eckert. 

Jessie Wilder. Laura Barker. 

Conservatory of Music. 

Antoinette Wright. Sara W. Cornelius. 



lo: 



UBRABY 
OF THE 
RSiTV OF iLU* 8 




/'»'■'' Bhilm 



Tau Kappa Phi 



(Local Fraternity.) 



Established Oct, 5, 1891 



Colors : Olive and Old Rose. 



Fratres in Universitate. 

Juniors. 

Robert N. Holt. William A. Pease. 

Charles D. Lockwood. 
Edson B. Fowler. Howard T. Wilcoxon. 

Sophomores. 

Leslie W. Beebe. Franklin L. Johnson. 

Fred L. Charles. Joseph F. Roberts. 

Freshmen. 

Edward B. Witwer. Charles H. Bartlett. 

Frank McElwain. 
Horace L. Houghton. Phineas L. Windsor. 



Alpha Chi Omega 



(Music Sorority.) 



Founded at De Pauw University, Greencastle, Ind., 1885. 



Colors: Scarlet and Olive Green. 



Active Chapter Roll, 



Alpha — De Pauw University, 1885. 

Beta — Albion University, 1886. 

Gamma— Northwestern University, 1890. 

Delta — Allegheny College, 1891, 



OH 



( F THE 

iTY OF ILL^' 




A'/,'/,-,, /•////</ 



Gamma Chapter. 



(Alpha Chi Omega. 



Established November 14, 1890. 



Resident Graduate. 

El Fleda Coleman. 

Seniors. 

Mary E. Stanford. Anna Cushing. 

Juniors. 

Barbara Strickler. Agatha Kinkade. Kate Douglas Hathaway 

Fannie Grafton. Minnie Beckett. 



109 



Phi Delta Phi 



(Law Fraternity.) 



Founded 1869. 



Colors : Wine and Pearl Blue. 



Active Chapter Roll, in Order of Seniority. 

KENT — University of Michigan. 

Booth — Northwestern University. 
Story — Columbia College. 

C00LEY — St. Louis Law School. 

POMEROY — University of California. 

Marshall — Washington (D. C.) Law School. 
Jay — Albany Law School. 

Webster — Boston University. 

Hamilton — Cincinnati Law School. 

Gibson — University of Pennsylvania 
Want. — Yale University. 

(n< >ate — Harvard University. 

FIELD — University of the City of New York. 
CONKLING — Cornell University. 

TlEDEMAN — University of Missouri. 

Minor — University of Virginia. 

Dillon — University of Minnesota. 

Chase — University of Oregon. 

Daniels — Buffalo Law School. 

Harlan — University of Wisconsin. 



110 



OF THE 
I !VERSITY OF fLU*~ 



Booth Chapter. 



(Phi Delta Phi.) 



Established 1877. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



J. A. BlTRHANS, A. B. 

Jay J. Read. 

H. B. Walmsley. 

F. W. Walker. 

C. E. Anthony, A. B. 

George M. Rogers, A. B. 

Frank H. Scott, A. B. 

F. E. Lansing, A. B. 

F. L. Brooks. 

W. L. Davis. 

E. B. Felsenthal, A. B. 
A. K. Manning. 

W. A. Paulsen. 
L. C. Ruth. 
J. R. West. 
S. C. Brooks. 
J. H. Fitch. 
H. G. Fitch. 
N. W. Halsey. 

F. A. Helmer, A. B. 
A. Lund. 

J. A. May. 

J. O. Hinklf.y. 

F. A. Smith, A. B. 

M. H. Whitney. 

ML W. Pincknf.y, B. S. 



L. Wkinschenck, A. B. 

Arthur D. Wheeler, A. B. 

Walpole Wood. 

A. H. Adams. 

E. S. Cummings, A. B. 

M. M. Gridley, Ph. B. 

L. A. McDonald. 

S. D. Snow. 

J. S. Going, A. B. 

E. Mahrr. 

H. N. Cooper. 

T. D. Knight, A. B. 

F. A. Bangs. 

F. H. Clark, A. B. 
H. W. Stillman. 
S. A. Wheeler. 
F. P. Hopkins. 
F. LI. McCulloh. 
A. B. Camp, A. B. 
J. B. Anthony. 

E. F. Runyan, Jr. 
A. S. J. Magruder. 

Grant Newell, A. B. 

F. C. Caldwell. 

G. N. Morgan, 15. L. 
E. A. Aborn, A. B. 



W. A. Doyle. 

F. O. Lowden, A. B. 

C. B. Moore. 

F. B. Pease. 

J. M. PURSELL. 

F. L. Wean. 
W. E. Foster. 

T. E. D. Bradley. 
Harry Hamill. 
W. R. Heath. 
J. F. Madden. 
S. S. Parks, A. B. 

G. J. Norden. 
Guy Brockway. 
J. P. Gardner. 

J. H. Hopkins, B. S. 
M. O. Naramore, A. H. 
S. E. Vermilyea. 
W. H. Allen. 
C. A. Buell. 
M, A. Drezmal. 
C. R. Francis. 
T. A. Hendricks. 

S. L. LOWENTHAL. 

J. A. McKeever. 

C. C. Stillwell, I). S. 



Ill 



II. C. Van ScHAACK, A. li. II. < . ADCOCK, A. B. II. \V. Win 

Jamks E. Babb, B. S. g. I). Anthony, a. B. \v. MS . Allen. 

F. L. Douglas, A. B. F. L. Velde, a. li. i,. w. Winchi mi 

E. T. Glennon. A. \v. Barnum. \\ . I . McCallum. 

G. E. Porter. C. C. Bowerstock. A. B. Stratton, Ph. B, 
C. W. Shurtleff. II. N. Culver. C. E. Piper, A. B. 

H. M. Carter. II. R. Cody, B. S. J. II. Garnsey. 

W. II. SAFFORD. C. <i. HAWLEY. A. Ross. 

G. R. Mitchell, A. B. R. W. King. I. s. Shrimski. 

W. W. Ross, A. It. C. W. MARTYN, B. S. 15. M. SMITH, B. S. 

G. E. Read. S. F. Havvi.i.v, Ph. B. C. \V. Young, Ph. B. 

W. K. Clarke, Jr., A. li. 

Fratres in Facultate. 

President Henry Wadk Rogers, LL., I). 

Dkan Hknrv Booth, LL., I). 

Il<>\. William \V. Farwell. 

Hon. Harvey 15. Hurd. 

Fratres in Universitate. 

Senior Class. 

S. M. Singleton. H. E. Pratt. P. D. Creager, 15. S. 

G. W. Dixon, A. R. R. H. Mathkr. J. P. Grier, A. B. 

W. L. McMahan. H. M. Bates, A. B. W. T. Payne. 

L. E. Sauter. F. J. Tourtellotte. W. E. Humphrey, Ph. B. 

F. L. Pochin, A. B. F. J. Evans. W. E. Oden, A. B. 
W. H. Dickson. William Pettis. W. H. Whittaker. 

F. R. Covey. 



112 



L53RARY 



iTY OF !lU> 



Phi Rho Sigma. 



(Hectical School.) 



MILBANK JOHNSON, 
H. H. FORLINE, 
L. E. BONN, 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary and Treasurer, 



Fratres in Collegio. 



Class of '02. 

H. M. Brown. A. L. Corcoran. S. T. Lewis. 

O. S. Parker (Tulane Medical College, New Orleans.) 















Class 


of 


'93- 






H. 


Ay 


LING 








L. E. 


Bonn. 






E. 


M. 


Brown. 






H. 


H. 


FORLINE. • 






W 


. H, 


, BORROUGHS. 






J- 


E. R. 


Hawley. 








M 


[LBANK 

T. B. 
J- 


Johnson. 
McCown. 
P. Noble. 








B. A 

S 


. Martin. 
. E. Munson. 
B. O. Nobles. 












J. A. Poling. 








T. J. Robeson 












F. J. 


Rucavado. 






J. P. Taugher. 










S. 


L. 


Thorpe 






M. R. 


Wilkinson. 












O. 


O. WlTHERBEE. 


N. 


E. Woessnf.r. 














Class 


of 


'94- 








A. 


C. 


Eakin. 












Murray Horne (San 


Francisco Med 




C. 


H. 


Ives. 












ical College.) 






J- 


L. 


Porter, 












David C. Roach. 





118 



Nu Sigma Nu. 



(Medical School.) 



Founded at the University of Michigan 1882. 



Chapter Roll. 

Alpha — University of Michigan. 

Beta — Detroit College of Medicine. 

Gamma — Medico-Chirurgical College. 

Delta — Western Pennsylvania Medical College. 
Epsii.on — University of Minnesota. 

Zeta — Northwestern University. 

Eta — College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Theta— Ohio Medical College. 



1 14 



LIBRARY 
OF THE 
L ::V£RSITY OF ILIF 



Zeta Chapter. 



(Nu Sigma Nu.j 



Established at Nortfcwfegfcsrji University in 1891. 



Colors : Garnet Red and White. 



Fratres in Facultate. 

X. S. Davis, Jr., A. M.. I X. Joseph Zeisler, M. D.. 

Xorthwestern University. 1 (University of Vienna.) 

E. C. Dudley, A. B., e A X, # B K. Frank Billings. M. S.. 

(Dartmouth College.) (Xorthwestern University.) 

G. W. Webster, M. D.. M. P. Hatfield. A. M., B 6 n, 

Xorthwestern University.) (Xorthwestern University.^ 

W. E. MORGAN, M. D.. (University of Wisconsin.) 

Fratres in Urbe. 

R. E. L. Rodger-, A. B., M. D. Thomas J. Sullivan, M. D. 

George P. Wintermute. M. D. 

Fratres in College. 

Class of '92. 

Harry William Cheney. Henry Frederick Kortebein, Ph. G., X t. 

Louis William Ddnavan, B. S., (University University of Wisconsin.) 

of Illinois Arthur Roscoe Thomas, (Cornell University.) 

George Sutton Roberts. 

Class of '93. 

Guy Clayton Bowe. Wiillam G. Stearns, (Pottsdam. S. T. School. 

Joseph De Silya, A. B.. (University of Illi- Francis Gurney Stubbs. A. B.. 4> A ft, (Al- 

nois. legheny College. ) 

Lewis Walton Dudley. John Anthony Walker. A. B.. (University of 
T. Parmer Findley. B. S.. B ft IT. it'niver- Illinois.) 

sity of Iowa. 1 Charles Thomas Waters. B. S-, A K E. 
Richard Bartlett Oleson. (University of ( Hobart College.) 

Wisconsin.) Arthur Martin Wrrkmeister. 
T«'HN Rudolph Sieyers. Ph. G., (Gymnasium Etzehole. j 

115 



\^M:o,,- 




_~^22^^^^^j^^u / u^ 




IT ERARY, 



T7-T7 rr/s/f/rr/TS' ' 




Hinman 



Officers. 



w 


M 


EWING, 


A. 


L. 


STEBBINGS, 


N. 


F. 


SMITH, 


C. 


I). 


LOCKWOOD 


C. 


H. 


PERRINE, 


E. 


J- 


GOSHEX. 


M. 


G. 


WENZ, 


K. 


N. 


HOLT, 


B. 


F. 


Beazzell. 


T. 


E. 


BONEBRIGHT. 


A. 


\V. 


Burton. 


W 


F. 


Burns. 


w. 


B. 


Bergstrum. 


G. 


E. 


Cotter. 


M. 


A. 


Clarkson. 


W 


M 


EWING. 


F. 


H. 


Cox. 


E. 


B. 


Fowler. 


II. 


A. 


Fraser. 


\Y 


1.1. 1AM Farris. 


i;. 


T. 


G< tSHEN. 





Members. 


T. 


K. Gale. 


II 


L. Harvey. 


R. 


X. Holt. 


H 


V. Holt. 


A. 


M. Janes. 


B. 


E. [acobs. 


L. 


H. Knox. 


C. 


A. Kei i y. 


J- 


A. Loining. 


C. 


D. Lock wood 


M 


D. Mattison. 


F. 


McElwain. 


T. 


T. Knudson. 


C. 


H. Terr ink. 



President. 

First Vice-President. 

Second Vice-President 

Secretary. 

Critic. 

Chaplain. 

Organist. 

Sergeant- at-Arms. 



J. Potter. 
T. E. Ream. 
W. T. Scott. 
X. F. Smith. 
G. P. Sturges. 
A. L. Stebbino^. 
W. E. Way. 
M. G. Wenz. 
J. YYalz. 
C. D. Wilson. 
H. P. Wilson. 
W. w. Wilkinson. 
P. L. Windsor. 



117 



Ossoli 



Officers. 



LAURA A. WANLESS, 
GERTRUDE L. BROWN, 
CORA HOLDRIDGE, 
ANNA DUNLOP, 
ANNA PRICE, 
LUELLA STEVENS, 
WINIFRED SMITH, 
FLORENCE TABOR, 



Josephine Stahl. 
Laura Wanless. 
Anna Dunlop. 
Myrtle Nesmith. 
Pauline Simonson. 
Anna Price. 
Elsie Rowe. 
Winifred Smith. 
Mabelle Gilson. 
Etta Murray. 



Members. 



President. 

Vice-Presiden i . 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Chaplain. 

Chorister. 

Marshal. 

Critic. 



Bertha Fovvler. 
Luella Stevens. 
Ola Cameron. 
Mary Blackmere. 
Gertrude Brown. 
Cora Holdridge. 
Lucy Stewart. 
Carrie Eaton. 
Florence Tabor. 
Anna Ross. 



IIS 



MM 




Officers. 



w. F. WILSON, 

E. B. WITWER, 

B. H. PAINE, 

F. L. CHARLES, 
J. W. TAFT, 
CHESTER MASSLICH, 
BENJAMIN RIST, . 
J. F. ROBERTS, 



C. B. Earnhart. 
M. M. Harris. 
H. O. Hamilton. 
Chester Masslich, 
Bayard H. Paine. 
H. E. Patten. 
J. E. Ransmeier. 
Benjamin Rist. 
Joseph F. Roberts. 
H. S. Thayer. 



Active Members. 

W. F. Wilson. 
Robert W. Stevens. 
L. W. Beebe. 
W. L. Eddy. 
Fred L. Charles. 
H. T. Ricketts. 
N. W. Judd. 
J. Mark Ericson. 
Alexander Bennett. 

Honorary flembers. 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Critic. 

Chorister. 

Pianist. 

Marshal. 

Chaplain. 



S. T. Smetters. 
J. R. Denyes. 
E. B. Sherman. 
J. A. Dixon. 

E. B. Witwer. 
W. S. Asher. 
J. W. Taft. 
Charles Hazzard. 
Fred S. Haven. 

F. L. Guthrie. 



John E. Fluck. 



J. W. Young 



Roberi J. Kerr. 
119 



The Larks. 



BELLE DREW, 
LOU GROVER, 
ELVA BARBER, 
SUE OSGOOD, 



Officers. 



President. 
Vice-President 

Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



Hembers, 



Grace Owen. 
Alice Freeman. 
Josephine Fitch. 
Elva Barber. 
Maud Van Sickle. 
Charlotte Goetzmann. 
Louise Swail. 



Anna McConnell. 
Fanny Gates. 
Belle Drew. 
Sue Osgood. 
Charlotte Hayes. 
Louise Grover. 
Ida Simonson. 



120 



Deutscher Verein. 



Officers, 



X. W. JUDD, 
BESSIE KENDALL, 
CHARLENE TAYLOR. 
B. H. PAINE, 
H. POPPENHUSEN. 
I. M. ERICSON. 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Critic. 

Chorister. 



riembers. 



Laura Budlong. 

Josephine Fitch. 
Alice Griggs. 
Ethel Gray. 

Clementine Roland. 
Lou Swail. 



Ida Simonson. 

Fanny Gate^ 



Elya Barber. 
Jessie Bliss. 

Amelia Gunn. 
Lou Grover. 

Charlotte Hayes. 
Lily Rice. 

Lucy Sheldon. 

Charlene Taylor. 
Alice Freeman. Bessie Kendall. 

Mvra Tubbs. Fred Charles. 

J. M. Ericson. I. L. Hunt. 

Frank Johnson. W. P. Osgood. 

B. H. Paine. H. Poppenhusen. 

S. T. Smetters. N. W. Judd. 

E. C. Marshall. John Walz. 

W. S. Young. J. H. Cole. 

P. L. Windsor. M. G. Wenz. 



121 



French Club. 



E. B. WITWER, 
LUCY SHUMAN, 
FANNY STEVENS, . 
CHARLES HAZZARD, 
R. W. STEVENS, 



Officers. 



Members. 



Presideni . 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Serge am -,vi - Arms. 



Harry E. Ambler. 
Ei.va Barber. 
Fred L. Charles. 
Ethelyn Emery. 
Louie Josephine Fitch. 
Charlotte E. Goetzman. 
Merritt M. Harris. 
Charles Hazzard. 
Zilpha L. Hull. 
Thko. U. Irvine. 
Alva M. James. 
Franklin L. Johnson. 



Robert R. Kendall. 
Minnie L. Patterson. 
John C Singleton. 
Lucy E. Shlman. 
Lucy S. Stewart. 
Fanny A. Stevens. 
Robert YV. Stevens. 
Hkrmin S. Thayer. 
Mabel E. Welton. 
Edward B. Witwer. 
Jessie C. Wilder. 
Ora E. Wakeman. 



122 



Science Club. 



PROF. ELIAKIM H. MOORE. 



Secretary 



Active Hembers. 



C. B. Atwell. 
H. Benner. 
C. S. Cook. 
C. H. Gordon. 
G. W. Hough. 



J. F. Kellogg. 
O. Marcy. 
E. H. Moore. 
C. B. Thwing. 
A. V. E. Young. 



Associate Members. 



Florence Babcock. 
Ethel Baker. 
Mr. Burbank. 
F. L. Charles. 
E. P. Cook. 
W. M. Ewing. 
V. S. Frankenstein, 
Mary E. Gloss. 



H. E. Griffith. 

E. C. Johnson. 

F. L. Johnson. 
Edmund Ludlovy. 
R. P. Martin. 
W. P. Osgood. 
Louise Pearsons. 
C. H. Perrine. 
C. A. Petterson. 



C. A. Phillips. 
W. A. Phillips. 

C. F. Shronts. 
R. H. Smith. 

D. W. Terry. 

W. F. Tomlinson. 
W. L. Wilson. 
Josephine Young. 



123 



Linnsean Society 



Tantus Amor Naturae.' 



Officers. 



EDMUND LUDLOW, 
FRED L. CHARLES. 
ELLIS K. KERR, 



Members' Topics. 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



Geology, 

Bacteriology, 

Protophyta, 

Protozoa, 

Fungi, 

Entomology, 

Ichthyology, 

Systematic Botany, 

Ornithology, 

Physiology, 

Local Botany, 

Photography, 

Biography, 

Systematic Zoology, 



Fred L. Charles. 
H. S. Thayer. 
Phil. B. Kohlsaat. 
Ellis K. Kerr. 
F. C. Roberts. 
Walter B. Bergstrom. 
Bayard H. Paine. 
Robert R. Kendall. 
Will P. Osgood. 
Edmund Ludlow. 
William W. Wilkinson. 
H. E. Patten. 
Leslie W. Beebe. 
Franklin L. Johnson. 



124 



Social Science Club. 



Executive Committee. 



Prof. George A. Coe, 



J. A. Bellows. 



H. R. Hatfield. 



Members. 



J. L. Alabaster. 
J. A. Bellows. 

L. L. Benbow. 
C. H. Bucks. 

E. P. Cook, Jr. 
H. M. Echlin. 

Arthur Fleager. 
H. E. Griffith. 

H. R. Hatfield. 
A. W. Burton 



L. H. Knox. 

H. E. Leach. 
E. Ludlow. 

A. S. Mason. 
J. A. Walz. 



Prof. George A. Coe. 

Prof. R. D. Sheppard. 
R. N. Holt. 

C. H. Perrinf 



Calends Club. 



flembers, 



Prof. C. B. Atwell. 
Prof. G. A. Coe. 

Mr. F. E. Lord. 

Dr. M. P. Hatfield. 



Prof. C. F. Bradley. 
Prof. C. S. Cook. 

Prof. J. T. Hatfield. 
Prof. C. Horswell. 



Prof. G. Horswell. 

Prof. N. E. Simonson. 
Rev. C. M. Stuart. 
Mr. Lorado Tafi 



Prof. E. H. Moore. 

Prof. W. E. Smyser. 

Prof. C. B. Thwing. 

Prof. A. V. E. Young 



Prof. Lewis Stuart. 

Prof. H. H. Kingsley 



Mr. G. E. Half. 
Prof. Abbott 



125 



Athanasian Society. 



(G. B. I.) 



Officers. 



E. F. SPICER, 

F. M. BONER, 



Presiden i . 
Secretary 



Members. 



P. W. ASHCRAFT. 

G. A. Brown. 

L. B. Coleman. 
Lank Douglas. 

Joseph Dutton. 
II. R. Fisher. 

William Groves. 
E. G. Harbert. 
G. J. Hunt. 

R. J. Jones. 
Mrs. Long. 

E. R. Mahood. 
Q. A. Meyers. 

F. T. Nichols. 

W. E. North rui\ 
Perley Powers. 
Mrs. Pusey. 

W. C. Sage. 

J. K. Shields. 

R. M. Stavely. 
a. Thompson. 

H. W. Walt/. 



W. G. Atwell. 

T. E. Chandler. 
Judson Cooper. 
H. J. Dueker. 
F. Ellis. 

J. Giesler. 

J. I. GUNN. 

R. C. Harker. 
M. A. Jacokes. 
Joseph Long. 

R. B. Lvtle. 

D. C. McLean. 

Eugene Moore. 
F. A. Nimitz. 

C. E. Parsons. 

M. J. PUSEY. 

S. R. Reno. 
J. A. Sisk. 

E. M. Stafford. 
J. E. Stone. 

A. T. Thompson. 
B. J. Youngs. 



1 26 




i Of Preparatory, i 



Yell: P. H. I. Phi! L. O. Lo! 

Populi Sumus! R=R=R=R=R=Rho ! 



M. S. PETTIT 

GRANT JONES, 

JOHN M. SPRINGER, . 

FRANK TAKASUGI, 

HENRY W. B. CONRAD. 

T. A. OYERHOLT, 

C. I). LEE. 

\Y. H. WRIGHT, 

J. M. ELDRIDGE, 

J GATES, 

J. P. MORTON. 

C. B. La FOUNTATNE, . 



Officers, 



President. 
Vice-President. 

Secretary. 
Assistant Secretary 
Treasurer. 
Attorney. 
Critic. 
Chaplain. 
Embassador. 
Organist. 
Chorister. 
Sergeant -at- Arm-.. 



127 



riembers. 



F. Agnew. 

L. R. Anderson. 
1*;. P. Bennf ii. 
B. B. Bobb. 
L. G. Brown. 
W. M. Cook. 
L. Beason. 
J. Chapman. 
W. A. Cooling. 
W. H. Craven. 
A. W. Cravkn. 
H. Gadekv. 
D. Gates. 
J. W. Patterson. 
A. M. Hardino. 
Mr. Chatfield. 

F. W. Stewart 



K. Hendricson 

T. I'. Howard. 
M. H. JORDON. 

W. K. JU I ISDN. 

F. Troxell. 
W. II. Parks. 
C Werntz. 

J. G. Leekley. 

H. Long. 

J. E. Newbeggin. 

G. D. Newbeggin. 
H. W. Windsor. 
R. E. Goin. 

H. G. Eichorn. 
Mr. Drew. 
Mr. Hicks. 

Mr. Melville. 



C W. (,<>[N. 
II. E. M IDLER. 

S. Sinclair. 
F. Thompson. 
B. K. Nause. 

R. C. LlBBERTON. 

J. (i. Orchard. 
A. Snow. 
T. J. Smith. 

I'. S. Sanners. 

S. WlRSHING. 
A. J. Waller. 
F. G. Zavordsky 
0. C Stine. 

Mr. McLean. 
T. E. Eldridge. 




128 




i Of Preparatory.) 



Yell: Vive=la! Euphronia! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Vive=la! Euphronia! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Vive=la! Euphronia! Vive=la! Euphronia! 
Preparatory ! Preparatory ! Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 

Officers. 



H. J. JOHNSON". 
W. J. KELLY. 
WILLIAM SHELLLR. 
G. A. HENRY. 
R. H. RITCHIE, 
G. B. MASSLICH, 
WILL C. LEVERE, 
R. X. HATHAWAY. 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Financial Secretary 

Treasurer. 

Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Critic. 

Chaplain. 



129 



I). McKENZIE, ....... Ambassador. 

C. C. CISSELL, ....... Editor. 

\\ . P. KAY, ....... Chorister. 

W. C. [ONES, ....... Organist. 



Members. 



(). 


1'. 


Aiken. 


15. 


R. 


Barber. 


M. 


I). 


Bush. 


C. 


C. 


Cissell. 


A. 


E. 


De Riemer 


K. 


W. 


Gillette. 


G. 


A. 


Henry. 


I). 


J- 


Johnson. 


W. 


P. 


Kav. 


F. 


H. 


Lathrop. 


G. 


B. 


Masslich. 


E. 


A. 


Mock. 


C. 


S. 


Peters. 


W. 


R. 


Pricket r. 


R. 


H. 


Ritchie. 


C. 


W. 


Spofford. 


T. 


G. 


Sargent. 



('. Anderson. E. S. BATTERSON. 

II. S. Brown. R. C. Brown. 

C. A. Butterfield. J. R. Campbell. 

II. A. Cole. C. E. Decker. 

G. H. Freeman. A. FlSHER. 

R. E. Hanks. R. X. Hathaway 

(i. W. Hknson. E. B. Hint. 

II. J. Johnson. \Y. ('. JoNES. 

W. J. Kelly. James King. 

W. C. Levere. W. I). Lowey. 

I). McKenzie. H. B. Merwin. 

C. E. Moore. J. X. Pearce. 

J. T. Peterson. W. E. Pew. 

I). B. Rawlins. E. W. Rawlins. 

J. A. Schaad. William Sheller. 

R. R. Sellew. J. R. Stead. 

J. R. Thompson. D. E. White. 
O. T. Wilson. R. E. Wilson. 



180 



s&5* IK "?< 




'Of Preparatory.) 





Yell: 


L=E=Ze! T=A=Ta! 

Zeta ! Zeta ! Le=the=a ! 








Officers. 




G. H. SMITH, 






President. 


G. A. BIRD, 






Vice-President. 


WILLIAM A. NEWING, 






Secretary. 


E. A. PETOKY, 






Treasurer. 


C. E. HARVEY, 






Chaplain. 


E. J. AIKEN. 






Sergeant-at-Arm 


J. M. CHAMBERS, 






Critic. 


('. H; FAHS, 




Members. 


Ambassador. 


E. J. A I KIN. 




Mr. Banks. 


A. Beernick. 


G. A. Bird. 




C. \Y BlSSETT. 


J. W. Chambers. 


E. L. Clearwater. 




C. H. Eahs. 


W. C. Falconer. 


Mr. Gillian. 




F. A. Graham. 


E. Haist. 


W. H. Head. 




W. B. Hawkinson. 


C. E. Harvey. 


J. A. Jenkinson. 




William A. Newing. 


E. A. Petokv. 


E. H. Pierce. 




H. Price. 


J. M. Prentiss. 


E. E. Phelps. 




I). M. Ralston. 


G. H. Smith. 


Mr. Schaffer. 




W. K. TlNDALL. 


Mr. McElfresh. 


R. I). 


Williams. 


M 


r. Harris. 



i:-U 



Eugensia. 

(Of Preparatory.) 



Yell : Rip ! Rap ! Rep ! riusics and Preps ! 
Fem Sems and Elocutes ! 
Cottage girls and other cutes ! 
Vive-la! Eugensia. Rah! Rah! Rah I 



Officers. 



NEENAH M. WAKEMAN, 
ALICE EATON, 
THIRZA M. PIERCE, 
LILY HAMMERS, 
FLORA PERRY, 
ADA GRIGGS, 
BARBARA STRICKLER, 
MELVA LIVERMORE, 
NELLIE BARKER, 



President. 
Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Critic. 

Chaplain. 

Ambassador. 

Chorister and Pianist 

Sergeant- at- Arms. 



Members. 



Nellie Barker. 
Grace Gammon. 
Clara Hepperly. 
Maid Mettler, 
Esther Miller. 
Flora Perry. 
Maid Shadford. 



Alice Eaton. 

Ada Griggs. 

Gail Horswell. 

Shids Mori. 

Thirza M. Pierce. 

Mary Smith. 

Neenah M. Wakeman. 



Addie Eldredge. 
Lily Hammers. 
Melva Livermore. 
Lou Patton. 
Jessie Root. 
Ida Strey. 
Barbara Strickler. 



132 



Ruthean 



(Of Preparatory.) 



Officers. 



CHARLOTTA PRICE, 
LORA HUNT, 
MARTHA THOMAS, 
JESSIE CAMPBELL, 
ADA COLE, 
JESSIE BOOMER, 
JESSIE SWEENEY, 
HELEN STEWART, 
MINNIE BENISON, 
HARRIET HOLDERMAN 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Sergeant-at-Arm> 

Chaplain. 

Critic. 

Ambassador. 

Chorister. 

Pianist. 



flembers, 



Lulu Baker. 
Minnie Beckett. 
Jessie Campbell. 
Mary Garten. 
May Hilliard. 
Charlotta Price. 
Mable Ricketts. 
Ida Stockwell. 
Ethel Tennery. 
Maud Van Kirk. 
Pearl Carscadden. 
Edith Dean. 



Minnie Benison. 
Alta Bowlus. 
Ada Cole. 
Ella Holderman. 
Lora Hunt. 
Bessie Renwick. 
Ada Ross. 
Helen Stewart. 
Martha Thomas. 
Jeannette Wood. 
Emma Harker. 
Cora Dean. 



Jessie Boomer. 
Anna Campbell. 
Clara Everts. 
Hattie Holderman. 
Agatha Kinkade. 
Annie Leland. 
Guy Richards. 
Jessie Sweeney. 
Grace Van Sickle. 
Anna Burt. 
Flora Moore. 
Carlotta Gartens. 



138 




Young Men's Christian Association 



J. FRANK OATES, 
BENJAMIN RIST, . 
BAYARD H. PAINE, 
PHINEAS L. WINDSOR, 
HOWARD T. RICKETTS, 



Officers. 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Recording Secretary. 
Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer. 



Members, 



Alabaster, J. L. 
Ai.drich, C. S. 
Asher, W. S. 
Atkinson, P. C. 

AVLESWORTH, W. W. 

Baker, G. W. 
Beardsley, W. F. 
Beazell, B. F. 
Beebe, L. W. 
Bellows, J. A. 
Bennett. A. G. 



Gale, T. K. 
Goshen, E. J. 
Griffith, H. E. 
Guthrie, F. L. 
Harris, M. M. 
Harvey, H. L. 
Hatfield, H. R. 
Haz/.ard, Charles 
ii em en way, f. w 
Mills, C. P. 
Holt, H. V. 



Pearsons, H. P. 
Pease, W. A. 
Perrine; C. H. 
poppenhusen, h. a. 
Potter, James. 
Ransmeier, J. C. 
Reynolds, D. E. 
Ricketts, H. T. 
Ridings, E. J. 
Rist, Benjamin. 
Roberts, F. C. 



134 



Booth, George. 
Bradbury, J. T. 
Bucks, C. H. 

Burton, A. \Y. 
Butters, a. F. 

Cl.ARKSON, M. A. 

Coe, Prof. G. A. 
Cole, J. H. 
Colebeck, E. L. 
Cotter, G. E. 
Cox, F. H. 
Craig, G. F. 
Dempsey, W. A. 
Denyes, J. R. 
Dickinson, J. R. 
Earnheart, C. B. 
Eddy, W. L. 
Em.mktt, B. E. 
Ericson. J. M. 
Ewing, \V. M. 
Farris, William. 
Fegtly, S. M. 
Flick, J. E. 
Fowler, E. B. 
Fraser, H. A. 



Houghton, H. L. 

Jacobs, B. E. 
Jamison, Georok. 
Janes, A. M. 
Jan^sen, John. 
Johnson, F. L. 
Judd, N. W. 
Kennedy, Hugh. 
Kitendaugh, E. F. 
Knox, L. H. 
La may, John. 
Lockwood, C. I). 
Ma hood, E. W. 
Mason, A. S. 
Mauley, James. 
Martin, R. P. 
Masslich, C. B. 
Mattison, M. I). 
Meissnek, W. G. 
Moehlenfah, H. A. 
Myers, C. L. 
Newman, N. A. 
Xies, L. A. 
Oates, J. F. 
Paine, B. H. 



Roberts, J. F. 
Scott, W. D. 
Scott, W. T. 
Smetters, S. T. 
Smith, N. F. 
Stebbins, W. J. 
Sturges, G. P. 
Terry, D. W., Jr. 
Thayer, H. S. 
Tomlinson, W. F. 
YYalz, J. A. 
Ward, E. W. 
Way, W. E. 
Walker, J. L. 
Wenz, M. G. 
Wilcoxon, H. T. 
Wilkinson, W. W. 
Wilson, C. D. 
Wilson, H. P. 
Wilson, W. F, 
Windsor, P. L. 
Witwer, E. B. 
Woolworth, W. W. 
Young, J. W. 



135 



Young Women's Christian Association. 



Officers. 



JOSEPHINE STAHL, 
MAYME PATTERSON, 
EMILY MACK, 
HARRIET McCASKY, 
HARRIET E. CAUGIIRAN, 



President. 
Vice-President. 

Recording Secretary. 

< Corresponding Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



Members. 



Mrs. Emily Huntington 
Maud Alexander. 
Mary Pegram. 
Lou Swail. 
Anna Dijnlop. 
Mary Chattle. 
May Demorest. 
Henrietta Jennings. 
Harriet McCasky. 
May E. Plimpton. 
Cora M. Rawlins. 
Josephine Stahl. 
Florence M. Tabor. 
Nettie J. Hunt. 
Maude M. Smith. 
Ida Okey. 
Mayme Patterson. 
Charlotte Hayes. 
Mabelle Gilson. 
Luella Stevens. 
Gertrude McMillan. 
Elsie Rowe. 
Blanche Thoburn. 



Miller. Helen Hay. 

Edith Nichols. 
Bertha Fowler. 
Anna Gleason. 
Anna Johnson. 
Mary B. Peterson. 
Ola Cameron. 
May Hilliard. 
Bertha Thorpe. 
Fannie Stevens. 
Agatha Kinkade. 
Ora Wakeman. 
Grace E. Owen. 
Carla F. Sargent. 
Laura A. Wan less. 
Jessie C. Wilder. 
Isabella Drew. 
Charlotte E. Goetzman. 
May Washburn. 
Alma Maxwell. 
Anna M. Bowen. 
Emily F. Wheeler. 
Anna Price. 

Alumnae. 

Martha Constance Smith. 
Minnie R. Terry. 



Laura Barber. 
Grace Germain. 
Fanny Gates. 
Anna Burt. 
Myrtle Nesmith. 
Faith Smith. 
Etta Murray. 
Cora Holdridge. 
Carrie Eaton. 
Frances Staver. 
Myra E. Tubbs. 
Minnie L. Patterson. 
Ida Stockwell. 
Ida Simonson. 
Alice Freeman. 
May Gloss. 
Josephine Fitch. 
Nora Kilburn. 
Anna Miller. 
Harriet L. Osgood. 
Effie W. Miller. 
Harriet E. Caughran, 
Emily B. Mack. 



1 36 




C. I). LEE. 
J. R. THOMPSON, 
L. P. HAIST, 
H. L. KAY, 

H. W. B. CONRAD. 



Officers. 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Recording Secretary, 
correspi >nding secretary 
Treasurer. 



Anderson. F. R. 
Anderson. J. C. 
Barber, B. R. 
Batterson, E. >. 
Benner. Henry. 
Bell. B. B. 
Bennett. E. P. 
Beeson, L. 
Beernink. A. 
Bird. G. A. 
Bobb. B. B. 

BlSSETT. C. N. 

Bi»EVE. J. E. 

Brown. R. C. 
Bctterfield. C. E. 
BrsH. M. I). 



Active Membership 

Harvey. C. E. 
Hathaway. R. X. 
Hawkinson, W. I >. 

Heslet. W. A. 
Head. W. H. 
Henry. G. A. 
Howard. L. P. 
Johnson. V. O. 
Jones, YV. C. 
Jordan. M. H. 

JUDSON, W. E. 

Kay. W. P. 
Kay. H. L. 
Kean. R. A. 
Kelley. A. T. 
LA FONTAINE, C. V. 



Pierce. E. H. 
Rawlins. I). K. 
Rawlins. E. X. 
Renfr.'. W. H. H 
Ritchie. R. H. 
Scott, John. 
Schmidt. G. W. 
Sanney, P. S. 
s\rgent. i. g. 
schaad, j. a. 
Sinclair, Samuel. 
Smith, G. H. 
Smith. E. J. 
Spofford, C. W. 
Springer. J. M. 
Stead. L R. 



]:r 



Campbell, R. 
Chatfield, (i. II. 

( IIAI'M AN. | VMES. 

Chambers, J. \l. 
Chase, R. T. 
Conrad, II. W. I',. 
Cobb, G. C. 
Cleveland, \V. E. 
Clearwater, E. S. 
Cooling, W. A. 
De Bra, II. R. 
Decker, ('. E. 
De Riemer, A. E. 
Eldredge, J. M. 
Eldredge, T. S. 
Fahs, C. II. 
Fisher, A. I.. 
Froula, J. C. 
Gates, J. X. 
Gates. D. L. 
Gillilan, A. \V. 
Graham, F. A. 
Ha ist, L. P. 



I, ii. ( . I). 
Leekley, J. (i. 

LlBBERTON, K. ('. 

Long, II. 

Mann, W. A. 
Marsh, B. II. 
Marsh, I). F. 
MASSLICH, G. 15. 
McLean, I). E. 
McKenzie, I>. 
Morton, J. 1'. 
Moore, G F. 
Muse, B. K. 
Newing, \Y. A. 
Orchard, J. S. 

OVERHOLT, F. A. 

Parks, M. H. 
Pettit, M. S. 
Petskev, E. A. 
Peters, Charles. 
Peterson, F. J. 
Pew, W. E. 
Pierce, J. N. 



Swift, D. J. 
Seahrook, William. 
Shelley, William. 
Snyder, F. J. 
Takasugi, F. 
Tennery, George. 
Tennery, P. E. 
Thwing, C. B. 
Thompson, J. R. 
Troxel, T. F. 
Tubbs, ('•. S. 
Van Gcnten, I). 
Waller, A. J. 
White, I). F. 
Williams, R. I). 
Wilson, J. 
Windsor, J. G. 
Windsor, H. N. 
Wiseman, W. H. 
Winslow, Charles. 
Wright, W. H. 
Wilde, Prof. 
Zimmerman, C. FI. 



Associate Hembers, 



Agnew, F. 

Banks, Irvinc^.. 
Downey, C. W. 
Freeman, George 
Jenks, C. X. 



Jones, F. E. 
King, J. S. 
Prickett, W. R. 
Sellew, R. R. 



Singleton, F. R. 
Stewart, F. W. 
Stine, O. C. 
Gadeky, H. F. 
Newbegin, J. D. 



1?.S 



Young Women's Christian Association 



NEENAH M. WAKEMAX. 
MAUDE METTLER, 
ELSIE ROWE, . 
THIRZA M. PIERCE, . 
ESTHER MILLER, 



(Of Preparatory.) 



Officers. 



Members. 



President. 
Vice-Presiden i . 
Recording Secretary. 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer. 



Grace Crippen. 
Grace Gammon. 
Maude Mettler. 
Nellie Barker. 
Xeenah Wake man. 
Jessie Cole. 
Hope McCaleb, 
Esther Miller. 
Flora Perry. 
Elsie Rowe. 
Melva Livermore, 
Thirza Pierce. 
Ada Griggs, 



Clara Hepperlv. 
Allie Eaton. 
Rose Beason. 
Elenor Troxel. 
Gail Horswell. 
Maude Shadford. 
Barbara Strickler. 
Mary Smith. 
Ida Strey. 
Anna Campbell. 
Bessie Campbell, 
Ethel Tenner y, 
Ai.ta Bowlcs. 
Ada Townsend, 



Anna Burt. 
Addie Eldredge. 
Efeie K. Price. 
Jessie Sweeney. 
Lillie Hammers. 
Ella Trimble. 
Miss Eyarts. 
Mable Ricketts. 
Laura Whitlock. 
Lillian Gornwell. 
M. Thomas. 
Miss Stokwell. 
Miss McCrary, 



J 39 



Phi Kappa Sigma Mandolin Club. 



Mandolins. Guitars. 

R. II. Smith. J. \Y. Arnold, Jr. I). A. Laney. G. YY. BAKER. 



R. L. Sheppard. 



II. C. Cook. C. J. Wells. 



Flute. 

\\. ii. Carter. 



College Choir 



Pianists. 

Maude M. Smith. R. W. Stevens. 



Director. 

J. T. Hatfield. 



May E. Plimpton. 
Isabelle H. Drew- 
Anna McCONNELL. 

Fanny Gates. 
Grace E. Owen. 
Effie W. Miller. 



Members. 

Harriet E. Caughran. 
Charlotte B. Hayes. 
Delight E. Sanborn. 
M. M. Harris. 
C. Meyers. 



W. J. Stebbins. 
YY. W. Way. 
H. L. Harvey. 
J. L. Alabaster. 
E. L. Colebeck. 
E. C. Marshall. 



Phi Kappa Sigma Orchestra 



R. II. Smith, J. W. Arnold, 
W. H. Carter, 

R. L. Sheppard. 



C. J. Wells, 
140 



Violins. 

Flute. 
Cornet. 

Piano. 



( F THE 
tBSITY OF ILL!*" 




m 

D 
-I 
O 

o 

-i 

z 
< 

CO 

>- 
h 

(/) 
oc 

u 

> 
z 

D 

z 

u 

h 
(/) 
u 

I 
I- 
cc 
o 

z 

Ul 

z 

»- 
(0 

< 
z 
3 
o 

z 



University Glee Club. 



Officers. 



HARRY E. AMBLER, 
MATTHEW A. CLARK SOX, 
WILLIS E. WAV. 
J. HARRISON COLE, 

First Tenor. 

W. J. Stebbins. 
W. E. Way. 
H. L. Kay. 
William Seabrook. 

First Bass. 

P. B. KOHLSAAT. 

F. L. Johnson. 
R. N. Holt. 
E. B. Sherman. 



Presiden i . 

Director. 

Treasurer. 

Business Manager 
Second Tenor. 
H. E. Ambler. 
M. A. Clarkson. 
M. M. Harris. 
H. W. Whitehead. 

Second Bass. 

Frank Thompson. 
H. L. Harvey. 

E. C. Marshall. 

C. E. B( T TTERFIEL1). 



K. W. STEVENS, Accompanist. 



Phi Kappa Sigma Banjo Club 



Piccolo Banjo. Banjeaurine. 

R. H. Smith. C. J. Wells. 

Banjos. 

J. W. Arnold, Jr. E. P. Cook, Jr. C. K. Sherman. 

H. C. Cook. F. W. Belknap. 

H. A. Mf.rriman. G. I- Woodard. J. W. Spindler. 

Guitars. 

C. W. Baker. R. L. Sheppard. 

I). A. Lanka. W. B. Carter. 



141 



Delta Upsilon Dancing Club. 



Requirements for Admission. 

An accurate, practical knowledge of the latest dance-figures, a la Carmencita. 
together with the ability to graphically illustrate the same. 

Members. 

Alfred W. Burton. William B. Doble. J. Frank Clancy. 

Albert s. Mason. Joseph L. Walker. Charles S. Aldrich. 

Wilbur F. Tomlinson. 



Phi Kappa Psi Orchestra. 



George Springer, ] 

Grant Van Sant, ; . . . .. . . . . . Banjos. 

Bert E. Emmett, I 

Joseph Moulding, ) Guitars 

Will S. \oung, i 

John M. Ericson, ...... Flute. 

BERT PARKES, ..... Mandolin. 

Clifford L. Meyers, . . Piano. 



Alpha Phi Guitar and Banjo Club 



Members. 

Mary K. Singleton Grace Germain. 

Nellie Staver. . Anna Miller. 

Frances Staver. Marie Stuart 

142 



LIBRARY 
OF THE 
I IVERSITY OF ILL!*' 



Delta Upsilon Walking Club. 



Requirements for Admission. 

A roving disposition, an eye for the beautiful, and the ability to flirt grace- 
fully with the same at the drop of the hat. 



J. W. Dickey. 
Fay R. Dickinson. 



flembers. 

John C. Singleton. 
George E. Cotter. 



Frank R. Singleton. 
Charles Hazzard. 



Delta Upsilon Duck and Bear Club 



Hembers. 



Shelby M. Singleton, 
J. Wallace Dickey, 
Howard T. Ricketts, 
Walter S. Asher, 
Frank R. Singleton, 
Jay R. Dickinson, 
John C. Singleton, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Second Vice-President. 

Chaplain and Bottle-Holder. 

Keeper of the "Deck.'' 

Scullion. 

Chief Cook. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Ability to recognize a gun at sight, an unimpeachable character for veracity, an appetite un- 
dismayed by trifles, and a thorough knowledge of the scientific principles of the game of 
''Cinch." 



143 




T I' 1 1' 1\ A 1 J E l\ A K A .1 A 1 1' T A Z i> A. 



Colors: Black and Red. 

Emblem of the Order: The Fire Shovel. 



Grand High Arch Demon, 

High Arch Demon, 

Scratch Devil, 

Keeper of the " Rocks," 

Guard of the Dark Abyss, 

Chief Stoker, 

Pitchfork Grinder, 

Leader of the Devil's Dance, 

Ferryman of the Shades, 

Director of Wails and Shrieks, 

Brimstone Mixer, 

Fiery Spanker, 

Last hut Not Least of the Imps, 



Why They Went Down There 



*|f Jared W. Young. 

If} H. T. WlLCOXON. 

*|j H. E. Patten. 
■Til H. T. Ricketts. 
•[* J. Mark Ericson. 
Iff R. W. Stevens. 
*[* J. N. Dingle. 
■J* Clarence Abel. 
*[|| J. F. Roberts. 
Iff @ L. W. Beebe. 
If* | J. H. Cole. 
•fll Benjamin Rist. 
•ft Robert J. Kerr. 



* Danced Old Dan Tucker. 
f Took part in a class scrap. 
" i reneral cussedness. 



|| Cheated at cards. 

\ Dealt in fast horses. 

(w Snapped camera on Dr. Bon bright. 



144 



Student Publications. 



The Northwestern. 

The Northwestern is a sixteen-page magazine, published every Friday throughout the college 
year. 

Editor=in=Chief. Business Manager. 

R. N. Holt, '93 C. H. Bucks, '92. 

Associate Editors. 
W. L. Wilson, '92. May Demorest, '93. W. F. Tomlinson, '93. 

C. B. Masslich, '94. W. S. Asher, '95. 



The Northwestern World. 

A four-page newspaper published every Friday morning throughout the college year. 

Editorial Staff. 

William Farris, '93, Managing Editor. Ben. F. March, '93, Law School. 

Bayard H. Paine, '94, J. H. Heil, '95, P. A. Pyper, '93, School of Dentistry. 

College News. Lodilla Ambrose, Library Notes. 
C. H. Fahs, '96, Preparatory. 



The Syllabus. 

Published annually by the fraternities and sororities of the College of Liberal Arts. 



14r, 



The Volunteer Band. 



W. F. TOMLTNSON, 
H. A. FRASER, 
ANNA JOHNSON, 
IDA J. OKEY, 
F. L. GUTHRIE, 



H. A. Fraser. 
Josephine Stahl. 

A. S. Mason. 

B. F. Reazell. 

W. F. TOMLINSON. 

Ida J. Okey. 
D. C. Clancy. 
A. F. Butters. 
J. F. Roberts. 
F. L. Guthrie. 
Anna Johnson. 
F. H. Cox. 
O. F. Hall. 
P. C. Atkinson. 



Officers. 



Members. 

Ella Ross. 
Mabelle Gilson. 
Ada M. Griggs. 
Neenah Wakeman. 
Melva Livermore. 
George C. Cobb. 
W. C. Falconer. 
A. J. Waller. 
Frank Takasugi. 
C. H. Fahs. 
J. P. Morton. 
Thirza Pierce. 
C. N. Bissett. 



Leader. 

Vice-Leader. 

Reco k di n( ; Sec r eta r v . 

Corresponding Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



A. Beernink. 

A. W. Mell. 
Alice Fluck. 
C. E. Harvey. 

B. H. Marsh. 
Ella Trumbull. 
J. A. Schaad. 

G. H. Chatfield. 
P. S. Sanner. 
F. A. Graham. 
W. D. Hawkinson. 
Miss Mori. 
W. H. Wright. 
Maud Mettler. 



The Volunteer Band is organized under the supervision of the Missionary Committees of 
the Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations of the College of Liberal Arts and 
the Preparatory School. It is composed of those who intend to enter upon foreign missionary 
work. 

[Owing to the late hour at which the above was handed in, it could not be put in its 
proper place. — Ed.] 



146 



Columbus. 



(Awarded First Prize.) 



"H 



OW old the world is growing! Still men's eyes 
Open upon the sun and close in sleep ; 
Still as of old proud nations grandly rise, 

And set in darkness ; still the aged deep 
Rolls its dull tide-waves far beyond my sight. 

The clouds fly by ; swift sea-birds plume alway 
Their wild, glad pinions, and with sweep of white 
Beyond mine eyes have passed in circling play. 

Is this the end of all ? Is there no trace 

Of aught behind, when men have ceased to be? 
Does not some fairer kingdom rise in grace 

Where sank the old in ruin drearily? 
Do not the vanished suns greet other eyes? 

The dark waves break somewhere in silver spray? 
The sea-birds rest their tired wings where skies 

Smile in the cloudless blue of fairer day?" 

Thus ever in his waiting, longing soul 

The vision comes and goes ; its luring light 
Hovers before him ; to one certain goal 

His thought speeds ever ; on his quickened sight 
New lands, green-bowered, sweet with wild-bird notes 

Gleam from the great sea's azure setting still, 
While perfume from flower censers softly floats, 

And life and hope his throbbing pulses thrill. 

And lo ! upon the old world's sin-dark night, — 

The sad, old world by crime and folly torn, — 
Shines the sweet radiance of a tender light, 

And in its glow the earth is newly born. 
O sunlit sails of hope that westward flew, 

O heart whose faith outrode the tossing sea, 
O dreams that through the cycles swift came true, 

These are the glory of all Time-to-be ! 

Nettie J. Hunt. 
148 



UBKARY 
O'f THE 
L IVERSITY OF IlLF 




A. V. E. Young, Ph. B., 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY. 



Abram Van Eps Young. 



EARLY in the year 1640, John Youngs, a dissenting clergyman of Hingham, 
England, came with his flock to America and formed one of the earliest 
settlements on Long Island, the town of Southold. In those early days 
the minister was a magistrate as well, and the chief man of the parish, and 
accordingly we find the Youngs family holding the chief offices of the muni- 
cipality for many generations following. At a later time, when the animosi- 
ties aroused by the Dutch invasion of Long Island had died out, an 
adventurous member of the family migrated to central New York and joined 
his fortunes with the substantial Dutch family of Yan Eps. In 1840, two 
hundred years after the settlement of Long Island by his renowned ancestor, 
Abram Young moved to Sheboygan, Wis., where he has since resided. Here 
the subject of this sketch was born and passed his boyhood years. He 
prepared for college at the Grand Rapids High School, and entered Michigan 
University in 1870. At the end of his Sophomore year he went abroad for 
a year's study in Paris. Returning to Ann Arbor, he completed his course 
and was graduated with the degree of Ph. B. with the class of '75, taking 
at the same time the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

In the following September he returned to Ann Arbor as assistant to the 
Professor of General Chemistry and Physics. This position he held for two 
years, giving instruction chiefly to medical and pharmacy students. In 
December, 1877, he went to Johns Hopkins University for graduate study in 
chemistry and physics, receiving in the following year an appointment as 
Fellow in Chemistry, a position which he was the sixth person to hold. 
He was reappointed Fellow in 1879, but shortly after resigned to take up 
private instruction, still continuing his studies at Johns Hopkins until 1881, 
when he went to Cambridge, where a year was spent in graduate study and 
private instruction. After another year spent in study abroad he returned to 
Harvard for some special work under Professor Cooke, to whom he was 
appointed assistant in 1884. While in this position he had charge of the 
Summer School of Chemistry. 

149 



In the summer of 1885 he resigned his position at Harvard to become 
Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern, a position which he has filled with 
marked credit to himself and to the institution. Before Professor Voung 
took charge of the department no laboratory work had been done, instruction 
being given by lectures and text book. He immediately fitted up temporary 
quarters in the basement of University Hall, where he introduced the 
methods of instruction which have made his work so justly popular with 
scientific students. 

The new chemical laboratory was planned by Professor Young after an 
extended tour throughout the East, and few, if any, laboratories anywhere are 
more completely or conveniently equipped. Many ingenious arrangements of 
the Professor's own invention serve to make the laboratories models of con- 
venience and efficiency. 

Professor Young's ingenuity in devising apparatus has stood him in good 
stead in his favorite line of original research — Chemical Dynamics, for which 
also he was fitted by special studies in Physics. Some of his inventions are 
described in an early number of Remington 's Journal, and descriptions of 
others are soon to be published. He has contributed several book reviews 
and scientific articles to the American Chemical Journal, prominent among 
which may be mentioned "A Thermochemical Analysis of the Reaction Be- 
tween Alum and Potassium Hydrate," a paper most admirable for the 
thoroughness and painstaking accuracy of the methods employed, and especially 
interesting for the light it throws upon the but slightly understood phenomena 
known as mass reactions. 

With all his interest in science, Professor Young has always found some 
time for the cultivation of the humanities. He is especially fond of music, 
was for several years President of the Evanston Browning Club, and is a 
member of the Chicago Literary Club. 

Professor Young is known and admired in the village for his breadth ot 
culture and refinement of manners, respected and loved by his students for 
his clear and forcible style as a lecturer, his skill and tact as an instructor, 
combined with the genial kindness and patience of the true teacher, and is 
honored by his colleagues in the faculty and his co-workers in science as a 
patient investigator and accurate scientist. May the number of such men 
increase among us. 

C. B. Thwing. 

L50 



In the Wilderness 



THE morning sun shed golden beams 
Where, murmuring on with glassy gleams, 
Flowed one of proud Virginia's streams, 
The silver Rapidan. 

And singing birds set songs afloat 
In adoration's pleasing note, 
And spring-time, dressed in May's bright coat 
Life's joys proclaimed to man. 

That morn Potomac's splendid train, 
To martial music's wild refrain, 
Came sweeping o'er Virginia's plain, 
A brilliant pageantry. 

And soon along the river's bank 
O'er burnished arms and glittering rank, 
A thousand banners rose and sank, 
Bright folds of Liberty. 

Then pressing on in broken lines 
They wound their way 'mid sighing pines 
Past stunted oaks through tangled vines 
Until the foe appeared. 

His pomp and glory thrown aside 

War bade Death's doors swing open wide, 

And in that surging human tide 

A court of carnage reared. 

151 



At noon the battle's thunder tone 
Was frought with many a dying moan 
On stretchered forms the sunlight shone, 
And yet no victory. 

In flickering rays the evening sun 
Saw yet the battle still unwon, 
Saw shattered rank and broken gun, 
And cold, still soldiery. 

Its morning light with hopes did bloom, 

Its noonday beams scarce pierced the gloom, 

Its evening rays gave but a tomb 

To end all hopes and fears. 

And when the smoke had cleared away 
The stars looked down on Blue and Gray ; 
In silence for that direful day 

They wept in dewy tears. 



W. J. Maxwell. 




152 



Evanston Hall. 



THERE is a hidden philosophy in the words "University Settlement." 
The spirit of Arnold Toynbee, who had sought and, as he believed, 
found '• that form of Christianity in harmony with progress, freedom, 
and knowledge," had already inspired some of the students at Oxford when 
Mr. Barnett, vicar of St. Jude's in Whitechapel, proposed to a group of 
students that a settlement of University men should live and work among 
the poor of the east end. In Mr. Barnett's words, " Vain will be the higher 
education, music, art, or even the gospel, unless they come clothed in the 
life of brother-men." This principle, which is the quintessence of the parable 
of the good Samaritan, is the sure foundation on which all university settle- 
ments have been built. This is the motive which prompted Thomas Hill 
Green and Arnold Toynbee to sacrifice social and political preferment to the 
interests of the unfortunates of East London, and which gave birth to the 
movement which has done so much to lessen the prejudices of both rich and 
poor in that great metropolis. It has had the happy result of dispelling the 
illusions not only of the aristocracy of wealth and birth, but also of intellect. 

The aristocracy of learning has become the besetting sin of the demo- 
cratic student of our American university, and is deepening the gulf between 
the educated and the illiterate. Praiseworthy efforts to bridge this gulf have 
been made by the university students of Boston and New York by establish- 
ing college settlements among the less fortunate classes of those cities. 

It is the privilege of the Northwestern University to meet the equally 
difficult problems of Chicago. Friends of the University have organized the 
Northwestern University Settlement Association. The constitution defines the 
objects of the association as follows: "The object of the association shall 
be the establishment and maintenance in Chicago of one or more College 
Settlements, where college graduates and others may reside for educational, 
social, and religious work in the neighborhood." 

Under the auspices of this organization a settlement has been located at 

153 



143 West Division street, near Milwaukee avenue, in the northwestern part of 
Chicago. A six-room flat at the above address is the home of the residents, 
Mr. Charles Zeublin, the Resident Secretary, and Mr. and Mrs. Clark |. 
Tisdel. Here are held the social gatherings and the girls' clubs. At 225 
West Division street a large store and basement, known as Evanston Hall, 
have been temporarily secured for the educational work of the settlement. 
The store is used for a reading-room during the afternoon and evening, for 
concerts and entertainments Thursday evenings, and for the Social Science 
Club on Friday evenings. The boys' clubs, the young men's club, and the 
cooking classes meet in the basement. 

The aggressive work of the settlement has been begun by the organiza- 
tion of these clubs among the young people of the neighborhood. Two clubs 
of boys between the ages of twelve and sixteen meet respectively Monday 
and Saturday evenings. The former is under the guidance of Messrs. Frazer, 
'92, and Wilson, '93 ; the latter is directed by Professor George A. Coe. 
Through these clubs the boys can be taught independence, and by ripening 
friendship the leaders gain an influence on their lives. The first part of each 
meeting is devoted to acquiring facility in parliamentary practice, the second 
part to military drill and athletics, the third to reading or study. The last 
part is given up to amusement. A club of young men from sixteen to 
twenty-five years of age meets on Wednesday evening to discuss municipal 
questions from a non-partisan standpoint. Working girls between the ages of 
sixteen and twenty-two have been organized into a club, which meets every 
Tuesday evening under the direction of Miss Effyan Wambaugh, '93. Miss 
Harriet Caughran, '93, has charge of a club of girls from twelve to sixteen 
years of age, which meets every Friday evening. Miss Grace Scripps, ex-' 87, 
and Miss Lila Jones, '82, of Evanston, are the leaders and teachers of a 
club of girls who meet Saturday afternoons. 

At present the most important organization for carrying out the work of 
the settlement is the Social Science Club, composed of representatives of 
several nationalities and every shade of social and economic thought. Organ- 
ized with especial reference to correcting municipal abuses, this club promises 
to be an important agent in reform. It will furnish the student at the 
university with an experimental station for testing his economic theories. 

The work that has been accomplished at the settlement is a real encour- 
agement. Among the new ventures, which will be introduced as rapidly as 

154 



possible, may be mentioned a kindergarten, classes for instruction in various 
branches, the organization of such needy laborers as the sweaters' employes, 
and Sunday afternoon lectures. The field open to the settlement is a wide 
one, the population heterogeneous, and it is proposed that the work of the 
settlement shall be broad and varied. The aim will be to employ loving 
hands and leisure moments in reaching with comfort and help the many sides 
of man's nature that were touched by Him who " went about doing good." 

Charles Zeublin, Resident Secretary. 



The Old and the New 



THE old regulation proved a failure, no doubt, 
For the girls seven evenings each week could go out 
They had no concern for the wrong or the right, 
If they only reached home some time in the night ; 
And after the party or concert was out, 
This they ^ u about. 

c/5 a c ^ 

the £ £ wan 

But now all is changed, and with the new rule, • 
We're likely to have a most excellent school ; 
One night in the week is all they dare go, 
And they have to be in at ten thirty, you know ; 
If one minute late they expect a big row, 



•So thia • 

ms *s the 






ome n OH . 



The Dig*. 



OUR sense of humor is a very peculiar thing. The notion of the comic 
eludes all attempt at definition and yet exercises its powerful sway 
over all persons, times, and places. Americans, they tell us, are 
peculiarly its subjects ; but even here, following the tendency of the age to 
specialization, it claims as its most abject disciple the American college 
student, and, in reward for his admiration, seems to have initiated him a 
little farther than other mortals into its dark mysteries and enabled him to 
discover the most intense humor where ordinary people can not even smile. 
If you never noticed this peculiarity, just try to tell the best college joke 
you know to some outside friend and you will be convinced. 

The thing is dull indeed which can not furnish the average student some 
amusement, but perhaps the most ancient and honorable of all sources is the 
College Dig. Strange how funny he is ! Even his clothes have pointed 
paragraphs without number in college papers, and set the girls on the back 
seat giggling from time immemorial. The queer brim of his old-fashioned 
hat is " perfectly killing." His coat, grown shiny at the seams and frayed 
around the edges, is "just too funny for anything," and his baggy trousers 
and squeaky heavy boots complete the figure which his classmates, with such 
evident enjoyment of the term, courteously denominate a guy. Odd, is it 
not, how much amusement there is in seeing people wear old clothes ? 

However, amusement does not end with his clothes by any means. 
Every thing he says or does is excrutiatingly funny. It is wonderfully 
amusing to see a man who comes to college avowedly to attend recitations, 
who makes some attempt to be prepared for them, who takes no part in 
college society, is not athletic, and occasionally tells his classmates that he 
" can't afford" to put his name down on a subscription list. 

It has been funny for so long one hardly remembers to ask in what the 
humor lies, and yet, just out of curiosity, stop and think a moment the next 

1 :><> 



time you are amused by some of your queer friend's performances. Suppose 
you begin by wondering why Digs dig. You can not assign to them the 
reason you give for so many of your own actions. They do not do it " for 
fun." "Oh," you say, "if this is in earnest we have other reasons too, but 
we hardly like to acknowledge them. We are ambitious ; we keep our 
records up to first grade almost all the time, and have planned all sorts of 
brilliant careers for ourselves after we graduate. We are fond of the people 
at home, too, and are grateful for their kindness, but don't we repay them 
amply when we make our allowance meet one-half or one-third of our ex- 
penses and answer every third or fourth letter?" 

Just here the Dig does not agree with you. Somewhere or other he has 
managed to pick up the old-fashioned, uncomfortable quality of earnestness — 
the particular "bete noir " of this day and generation. To him every day 
at college is an opportunity that he is bound to make the most of. He has 
worked for it himself, his father has planned for it for years, his mother has 
saved for it since he was in his cradle, his pretty sister perhaps is giving 
up now the dainty knickknacks girls can not help loving, that he may stay 
and study. And, strange as it may seem, the hundred miles that lie between 
him and his dear ones have dimmed no memory of their sacrifices. It is 
not that his circumstances are peculiar, for more than one of your most 
particular friends knows, perhaps, in a dreamy sort of way, that " times are 
a little hard" at home. He means to do great things for them all some 
day, but as for cutting down expenses — why the boys would think him 
"stingy" like our friend, the Dig, and he is sure it is a virtue to be gener- 
ous. Aye, truly, so it is : but honestly, my friend, which one of these two 
men is generous? 

I am no more asking sympathy for our friend than he would ask it for 
himself. His mode of life is to some extent voluntary, and he finds allevi- 
ations in his own way. Your home letters, for instance, come in sometimes 
as one detail of a crowded day, are hurriedly read over in some spare 
moments between whiles, and leave you, perhaps, with some slight twinge of 
conscience if they are too tender, fond, or hopeful — perhaps with a very dis- 
tinct feeling of annoyance and of not being properly appreciated if they 
venture any criticism or remonstrance. It might surprise you to discover 
that the Dig can find in one simple letter an ample recompense for all the 
petty annoyances and troubles of a long, hard week. Still less can your jolly, 



popular ladies' man realize that in the small square envelopes addressed in 
the same girlish hand which come to him so regularly our friend the Dig 
finds something which makes his exclusion from all your gaieties more than 
tolerable. If he only had your sense of humor he might even be induced 
to smile at your evident sympathy for his loneliness. And as for the college 
honors you would all like to have when the time comes to award them, the 
most of you give gracefully in to the inevitable and say, " Oh, well, the poor 
Dig ought to have something for all his trouble and we'll give him these." 
It is very kind of you, and if the Dig were only humorous he might be 
amused again. 

His feminine prototype at the ''college" or " cottage " has hardly received 
her share of the paragraphers' attention, but in general characteristics we 
find them wonderfully alike — the girl perhaps gets closer to the pleasure and 
brightness she is denying herself. It is a little harder to settle down to 
work when the door bell is ringing, the door girl hurrying from room to 
room with cards, and snatches of gay talk and laughter are coming to her 
ears in spite of all her attempts at concentration ; a fleeting glimpse of some 
associate who passes her in the hall in a dainty evening dress with grace- 
ful wtappings and fragrant flowers, make her heart beat fast for a moment 
with a longing that she can not even name. She would not change places 
with the little butterfly who has just passed ; she is realizing the desire of 
her life in this opportunity for study, and yet she is still young and girlish 
and it is never easy to 

" Live in the house with pleasure 
And see but yet know her not." 

The puzzle we started to solve, the innate humor in the Dig, finds no 
solution in that quarter, and so with all humor's own inconsistency we must 
needs laugh the harder. Aye, and keep on laughing till Commencement 
comes, and we stop then to sigh a little over the good times that are gone 
and try to make some preparation for the brusque change to life's reality 
that now awaits us. Our Dig stops working too, but with a little 
different feeling. His play time ended long ago, and now he looks 
forward only to a change of occupation for which he is conscious the last 
four years have helped to make him fitter. We find no explanation here 
and rashly anticipate a decade or so only to find in many instances the 
old fable of the snail and the hare repeated — to slowly realize that time 

158 



wasted can never be made up — and that in the race of life no brilliancy of 
intellect or quickness of thought can ever keep pace with the patience and 
perseverance which so strongly characterizes the Dig. The ground of our 
amusement is still a mystery, and my last hope of its solution is confined to 
the especially brilliant jokes and grinds which this wonderful Syllabus of '92 
will be sure to furnish us. 



Translation of Horace 



(Ode V., Book 1.) 



l I /HAT slender dandy dude, 
^^ His clothes with musk o'erstrewed. 
Does hug thee now, my love, 
Beneath the roses just above ? 
For whom with tender care 
Dost bang thy borrowed hair ? 

How oft shall he regret 
The day when you he met ! 
Xot knowing how you flirt. 
So giddy, gay, and pert, 
He thinks that you will be 
Forever for him free. 

I once did play a part. 
Like him I sought your heart 
And felt quite sure I'd win it ; 
His hope like mine shall fly 
When he hears your sad reply — 
" My dear, you are not in it." 



159 



Qurls. 



(Awarded Second Prize.) 

I i /HEN a feller wants to tell about a subjeck what he knows, 
^^ He had better write it straight off in the good ole-fashioned prose 
But if he is in fur sayin' what his feelin's prompt him to, 
Common talk won't sarve the purpose, nothin' only rhyme'll do. 

Now I hold this savin' worthy uv yore thought without no mirth, 
That a true and noble woman is the noblest thing on earth, 
An' a young one, in partic'lar, is the apple uv my eye, 
So wherever they are meetin' I am always hoverin' nigh. 

There's as wide or wider difference 'twixt the young gurl's that I've met, 
As betwixt the risin' sun-rise an' the goin' down sun-set ; 
Different in their ways uv thinkin', consequently, actin' too, 
As the fiercely blowin' cyclone an' the gently fallin' dew. 

There's a mighty sight uv differ'nce 'twixt their gineral looks and size, 
An' the one that strikes my feelin's might not please no other's eyes ; 
Yet, a jedgin' by myself like, ever feller has his taste, 
If they all get matched to suit 'em, there'll not be a gurl to waste. 

Some prefer the hair that's yeller as the new wheat in the stack, 
Some'd see it like the crow's wing, blacker as the blackest black ; 
Some like noses well pertrudin', lookin' like the ole Greeks wore, 
Some'd ruther see 'em smaller like the dolls have in the store. 

Some prefer dark eyes that sparkle like a cool, refreshin' spring, 
Some prefer the sky-blue true uns as the poets like to sing ; 
Some'd take a gurl that's taller, some choose one not quite so tall, 
Hut there ain't no use uv quarlin', there enough to suit 'em all. 

160 



These here things that I'm a talkin' ain't the main p'ints uv the case, 
Only triflin' accidentals, though they're all right in their place ; 
But this rule is never failin' — He'll regret who makes his choice 
On the theory uv noses or the most bewitchin' voice. 

Now I ain't opposed to beauty, fur God made it ever'where, 
On the leaves an' in the bird's song an' the clothes the lilies wear, 
An' there ain't no place more fairer fur to make its restin' place 
An' no where it looks more charmin' than upon a woman's face. 

But it ain't the form nur features, nur the eyes, nur nose, nur chin, 
It's the thinkin' an' the actin' an' the beatin' heart within ; 
If in them respecks she's all right, though her looks'd scare the crows, 
She's the queen bee uv the beehive an' the grandest thing that grows. 

Fur the lastin' kind uv beauty is the kind that's uv the soul, 
As the parson in his sarmonts has the congregation tole, 
An' its somethin' more than lastin', like the widder's oil, it grows, 
Ever day it's shinin' brighter than the day before it shows. 

It is seen in all their talkin' and in ever thought and deed, 
An' it looks on them that's ugly like a rosebud on a weed, 
An' it opens up more fuller ever day in cloud or sun, 
Bein' in its fairest bloomin' on the day that life is done. 

An' the only seemin' purpose why they're livin on this earth, 
Weepin' where there's bitter sorrer, laughin' where there's joy an' mirth, 
Is to make all others happy by the sunshine uv their face, 
An' to teach 'em to be better by their unassumin' grace. 

So fur ever one that's weary or that's got the blues or sad, 

They can spare a smile or kind word that'll make the heart grow glad 

An' they always keep their tempers runnin' at an even rate, 

Treatin' jest alike the pore ones an' the rich an' small an' great. 

I have seen 'em when their fathers lost most all they had on earth, 
Drawin' closer round the fireside, makin' brighter glow the hearth, 
Holdin' up their mother's spirits with their words uv love an' cheer, 
Nur the heart don't beat that's braver than it takes to do this here. 

161 



So I've seen 'em by the bedside, watchin', waitin' on the sick, 
(lently feelin' how the pulse beat, whether it was slow or quick, 
Fannin' down the ragin' fever, whisperin' so soft an' sweet, 
That it sounded like the zephyrs playin' in the summer wheat. 

So I've seen 'em by the graveside when a soul had took its flight, 

Pointin' all the sad grief-stricken to the everlastin' light, 

An' across the dark deep waters, showin' 'em the other shore, 

Where there'll be an end uv sickness an' where friends won't die no more. 

No, it ain't the form nur features, nur the eyes, nur nose, nur chin, 
It's the thinkin' and the actin' and the beatin' heart within ; 
If in them respecks she's all right, though her looks'd scare the crows, 
She's the queen bee uv the beehive an' the grandest thing that grows. 

Fred L. Pochin. 




\(Y2 



The Scrap. 



SHOULD you ask me whence the scrap, 
Whence the inky, bloody faces, 
'Mong the " Freshies " and the Soph'mores 
On the eve of the great " social," 
Of the dark and dismal cellar, 
Of the damp and loathsome cellar, 
Crowded with the ghosts and shadows, 
Warriors with their clubs and handcuffs, 
Full of darksome bins and barrels 
Crossed and interlaced with cobwebs, 
I should answer, I should tell you 
How the Freshmen planned their social, 
How the night was bright and starry, 
How the moon rose o'er the waters, 
How the dark and gloomy oak-trees, 
How the firs with cones upon them, 
Becked and nodded on the lake-shore ; 
How the Soph'mores gathered early, 
Having made a league against them, 
Jealous of their lovely women, 
Of their brave and noble warriors, 
Of their skill at foot-ball playing, 
That they might molest and harm them ; 
How they watched for the great Chieftain 
In the shadow of the maples ; 
How he came, his pure face shining, 
Young and tall and very handsome. 
Then how Clarkson -not a warrior, 

1 63 



For he stuttered, gasped, and shuddered, 
For he reeled and staggered backward. 
With his heart like lead within him, 
And his courage like the swallow, 
For it winged its flight far from him, 
Grasped his comrade by the elbow, 
And he tried to speak unto him ; 
But his voice came like the north-wind, 
When it hisses 'mid the icebergs, 
And he groaned unto that comrade : 
" Here he comes ! O grab him ! grab him 
Here he comes ! O grab him, Stevens." 
But his comrade stood there speechless, 
But his knees they shook together, 
But his arms hung down like shadows, 
For they trembled in the moonlight ; 
Then his heart came up and choked him, 
With a shudder reeled he forward, 
Would have fallen on the cold stone : 
But our Great Chief saw his anguish, 
Saw the terror that possessed him. 
With one stride he stood beside him, 
In his strong young arms he caught him ; 
Then that mob of evil Soph'mores 
Who lay hidden, him awaiting, 
With a wild yell rushed upon him, 
Dragged him downward and o'ercame him ; 
Then his face with ink they painted. 
Then his wrists with chains they shackled, 
Then they left him, hair dishevelled, 
Plumage torn and garments tattered, 
In that dark and ghostly cellar, 
While they stole away like spectres 
Down the alley and up Church street, 
Where they waited for the FVeshman, — 
Crouching low among the bushes, 

K)4 



Who with " favors " would be passing, 

Souv'nirs for the banquet table. 

When he came they sprang upon him, 

Then they wrestled there together, 

In the glory of the starlight, 

And the more they strove and struggled, 

Stronger still grew our brave Freshman, 

Till it took eighteen to " do him." 

Then they gagged him and they dragged him 

Down the alley to that cellar, 

Where they locked his wrists in handcuffs, 

And they ruffled up his toilet ; 

But the cellar seemed so gloomy, 

Like the den of ghosts and shadows, 

Crowded with the darksome spectres, 

That their quaking hearts quite failed them, 

And they rushed out toward the " Fern Sem ; 

For they knew that their own women, 

Faded, old, and wan, and haggard, 

Sere and yellow like the autumn, 

They would do to scare them fully. 

There they dragged them in the hallway, 

And they acted so like wild-men 

That the Dean, up in her sanctum, 

Listened to their noisy talking, 

To their howling and their yelping, 

To their kicking and their stamping, 

Then descended to the hallway. 

Consternation seized the Soph'mores, 

At the sight of this one woman, 

For they hastened toward the doorway, 

For they piled out through the entry, 

For they rushed away like mad-men ; 

Thus they left their captive Freshmen. 

Then the captives sought the social. 

When their classmates learned the story, 

1G5 



Then like living coals their hearts were, 

Then they said unto the maidens : 

"We will go and seek the Soph' mores, 

We will learn from them the meaning 

Of this outrage and this insult." 

Forth they strode into the starlight, 

Passed the " Cottage " on the corner, 

Passed the "Annex" and the " l ; em Sem," 

Came upon a crowd of Soph'mores, 

Which they captured and brought with them 

To the social of the Freshmen. 

There unbound and acted to them 

As one brother to another ; 

Bade them enter in the pleasure, 

In the games and in the banquet, 

Mingle with our 'broidered linen, 

Their own costume A la hunting. 

Then the next day rose our Master, 

Rose he in the College Chapel, 

With a wise look and benignant, 

With a countenance paternal, 

Warning, chiding spoke in this wise : 

" Oh, my poor misguided children, 

I am weary of your quarrels, 

Weary of your scraps and bloodshed, 

Of your wrangling and dissension. 

Let your classes be united, 

Let your old feuds be forgotten, 

And the old wounds healed forever. 

Other scraps this word unheeding, 

Other trouble e'er engaged in, 

If my cautions be not minded, 

And I have a voice upon it, 

Will, I warn you, be imprudent." 



166 



Chronicles. 



(Awarded First Prize.) 



Chap. I. 

f\ ND in those days there arose a new ruler that knew not Joseph, and 
II he was called Henreweighed. 

2. He was a great and mighty man of words, and his fame has 
gone out to all lands. 

3. For when he began to reign, the rulers gave a great feast and a 
great congregation came to the temple. 

4. And he was arrayed in fair garments like unto the swallows of the 
air, and his loins were girt with a strange girdle, and his lungs were filled 
with wind. 

5. And he did begin at the second hour and did talk until the fifth. 

6. And the sons of the prophets would .fain descend and devour the 
feast, and they could not for the end was not yet. And at about the sixth 
hour he made an end. 

7. And the people did all rejoice, and praised him with all kinds of 
instruments. But the harp they did not use. For Henreweighed did not 
love the Harper. 

8. And the people sang a song : Great is Henreweighed for he hath de- 
livered us from his noisy pestilence. For verily, he hath told us all he 
knows, and hereafter our land shall be at rest. Selah. 

9. *[ But verily they did fool themselves. For it came to pass that 
there was held the feast of Purim. For at that time the tribe of Seen Yours 
were freed from their masters and did ordain each year a feast of rejoicing. 

10. And the High Priest doth call all the people together to talk to 
them. 

11. And when the people had come together, lo Henreweighed had 
usurped the place of the High Priest. 

107 



12. And he was clad in Strange black robes, and did wear a hat; yea, 
he did wear a hat in the sanctuary. And he did talk. 

[3. But he did not talk like as in the former day. For then he told 
all he knew. And now he must read from the book of the Chronicles of 
the Kings, and from Allibone's Dictionary of Authors. 

14. And the people marveled, for there had not been so great a talker 
in all the land. 

15. For as the tribe of Seen Yours is great above the men of Fresh, so 
is Henreweighed great above all talkers. 

16. If And Henreweighed waxed great, and was known through all the 
land for the wonder of his raiment. F^or even Bobrummel was not arrayed 
like unto him. 

17. F^or he wore a broidered scarf about his neck, in color like unto 
the destruction of Sodom. His kerchief was black like unto the Queen of 
Sheba, and was long and trailing, like unto Absalom's hair. 

18. And his nether garments were ring-streaked and speckled, like unto 
the cattle of Laban. Yea, he was altogether wonderful. 

19. And behold, he would appear in the morning clad in a Sakkote and 
Pluggat, and in the evening behold it was gone and he was seen in the 
garment of Prince Albert and a Slowchat. 

20. And these things were not seemly, and they were a stench in the 
nostrils of the Seen Yours. 

21. And Henreweighed became greater than all the rulers and his word 
was law. 

22. F'or he spake, and the music of the Tabor ceased ; he commanded, 
and the sound of the Baker grinding at the mill became low. And these 
were great deeds, for they are women. 

Chap. II. 

And it came to pass in the second year of his reign he said : Go to. 
I will become yet greater, for I will gain favor with the people. And I will 
blind their eyes, and they shall think that they rule, but I, even I, will 
hold trumps. 

2. But because the people think they rule will they be peaceful. And 
it shall be a Pic-nic, which is to say a Snap. For I, Henreweighed, am 
Phoxie. 

3. So he sent forth a proclamation that they should choose them ten 

168 



great men, for to meet in council. And all the affairs of the nation should 
come before them. 

4. And they were chosen and did rejoice and said : Verily we are the 
people. 

5. Now the chief scribe of Henreweighed was Seebatwell, who is called 
Gratestuf, and who knows it all. And he was wroth, for he saw they were 
not Bibs, that is to say, sons of the Prophet, that were chosen. And he 
reviled them. 

6. But the people were content and said : Have we not a Vizry 
council? Gracious is our great king. Hosannah ' 

7. *[ But lo, things went as they had in the days of the fathers. For 
Henreweighed had no use for the Vizry council, for they were not Bibs. 
And the people saw they were not in it and said : Rodentia ! which is, 
being interpreted. Rats ! 

8. And Henreweighed heard the murmurings and said : I will gird me 
up and call the Vizry council. And he did so, even he, the king. 

Chap. III. 

And these are the great men of the Vizry council. 

2. Frisky, the shepherd of the kids of the land of Prep by the great 
water. Yea, he that doth rule them with a rod of iron. 

3. And Boni, of the tribe of Dan, who is also a shepherd. But he has 
only one kid. And he rules not with a rod of iron, but with the somnam- 
bulent paregoric. 

4. And Oliver, whom all revere. But the women revere him not, for 
he does not love them. And Seebatwell the scribe, who is called Gratestuf. 
And these are all princes. 

5. And of the common people these are they that came to the Vizry 
council. 

6. Moli, who was great and boasted : Did not I lead the men ot 
Fresh out of the land of Prep ? And am not I greater than the old 
Fakeltee ? And Frisky and he were not like unto David and Jonathan. 

7. And there was John Mark of Soph, he that knows more than seven 
men with whiskers. And Dike, who worships Phikap. 

8. And the other men were not great, save the Baker of the Seen 
Yours. And she was a woman. 

9. If And they gathered themselves together, and Henreweighed hid his 
hands in his pockets, which signifies Go on ! 

169 



io. And Frisky began and said: Hear, O ye men! The Gentiles 
have destroyed my kids, and have broken down my Orchard ! 

ii. And this people did go on a Toot. And they have given their 
monies to the Philistines, and have spent their money for beer. 

12. And this is all because of Phut Baal, whom they worship. There- 
fore cursed be Phut Baal, from the land of Dan to Beer-Milwaukee. 

13. Then Hem the Sig spake, and he was the chief priest of Phut 
Baal. And he said with a loud voice : 

14. Hear, O ye people ! I, even I, was in the land of Beer-Milwaukee ; 
and no one was full. Nay, no one, neither male nor female, save eleven ; 
and they were full of milk. 

15. And the Philistines did not spoil us of our shekels, for it was Aty. 
Therefore ye Frisky and Boni, go to. And all the people said Ahthere. 

16. Then one of the tribe of Seen Yours, he who is like unto the 
setting sun, sang a song unto Boni of the tribe of Dan. It was a song of 
the storehouse where the books were hidden lest the people should perchance 
see them and be corrupted. 

17. And Boni was wroth and looked on the young man, and he be- 
came very small. 

Chap. IV. 

xAnd the worshipers of Phut Baal came unto Henreweighed, saying : 
Lo, you have taken away our land and we are desolate. And verily the 
Philistines will do us, for we have no land where we can worship Phut 
Baal. 

2. And Henreweighed was skilled in the ways of Taffy. And he replied 
unto them : I have taken your land but I will repay. Yours shall be the 
goodly land lying toward the North. And ye shall build you an altar there 
and I, even I, will spend many shekels to beautify it. . And the people were 
content. 

3. But lo, after many months they looked and it was not ; and they 
went unto Henreweighed, with ashes on their heads, and clad in sackcoats. 

4. And he began to make excuses and said : It is because Tesee is 
away. When he returns I will pull his leg. And the people went away 
rejoicing for a time. 

5. And they came unto him yet a third time after many moons, and 
he said : I can not now for it rains. But bye-and-bye ye shall have 

170 



shekels upon shekels. Three score and ten, yea and ten times three score 
and ten. But the shekels came not, for Tesee carried the bag. 

6. Then were the people very wroth, and they called the Vizry council. 
But there came unto the Vizry council only three of the people and none 
of the princes ; for they knew it was a Fake and had no power. 

7. And Henreweighed said unto the three : Only possess ye your souls 
in patience and I, even I, will get you land for to worship Phut Baal. 
For I am Slow but Mighty. And the three with one accord said : Kas- 
tanioi, which is being interpreted, Chestnuts ! 

Chap. V. 

Now in those days also Henreweighed drove out of the courts all man- 
ner of unclean beasts and birds. 

2. For in aforetime the owls did roost there. 

3. But it raised a tumult, for the people loved the owls. 

4. And Henreweighed was afraid because of the tumult, and he said : 

5. Is thy servant a dog to do this thing? Nay, it is the Fakeltee. 
For I, even I, love the people. 

6. Thus did he become solid with the Bhoys. 

Chap. VI. 

And in the fourth month of the second year of his reign there arose a 
great leader. And his name was Ekklin. But they called him Boss, for he 
was Eyrysh. 

2. And he was great, for his cheek was plated with copper; yea, with 
sheets of brass riveted with copper. 

3. And his heart was filled with deceit. And he was also called Beta, 
for he beat his way. 

4. And he gave a great feast, and the people came from the North and 
from the South. 

5. These are the tribes that gathered themselves together at the com- 
mand of Boss Ekklin : The Femsems, the Pillers, the Fisisanalfafees, the 
Medics, the Levites, and they that draw up great teeth with a hook. 

6. But the Pharisees and the Preps came not. For Boss Ekklin loved 
not the Preps ; and the Pharisees, which are called Bibs, loved not Boss 
Ekklin. 

7. And there was great mirth and feasting; but the bills are not paid 
unto this day. 

17J 



8. And about the eleventh hour Boss Kkklin became drunk with coffee, 
and he said : Get me dancing women. 

9. And they gat him dancing women, and dancing men fair ' to see. 
And they danced before Boss Kkklin, and before Henreweighed. 

ro. And this was not right in the eyes of the governors, and it made 
much talk. 

n. If And as for the rest of the deeds of Henreweighed are they not 
written in the book of the Herald? Yea, verily, for Henreweighed paid 
many shekels that they should be written there, so that his fame should go 
abroad in the land. 




172 



The Thomas Concert. 




HILE I before the hearth was 

sitting. 
One evening in my room 

alone, 
Sweet memories to my mind 

came flitting, 
Of loved ones far away at 

home : 
When all at once 1 heard a 

groaning, 



A wild and weird, unearthly moaning : 
My hair stood straight upon my head, 
I quickly crawled beneath the bed ; 
But there my heart so thumped the floor 
I thought the ghost would find me sure. 
I tried to pray ; I could not do it ; 
The words all stuck inside my thro-at : 
I listened — "M-a-r-i-a-r!'' in awful tones 
Near froze the marrow in my bones. 
"A female ghost!" in fear I cried. 
With terrors new I almost died. 
Then soon I heard another sound 
Just like the first, but far away : 
Another ghost is coming round 
Its ghostly compliments to pay 



173 



I thought. Then still another cry 
Not far away but very nigh, 
And soon the neighborhood around 
Gives forth one ghostly-sounding sound. 
" Come one, come all ! This bed shall fly 
From its bed- posts as soon as I ! " 
In desperation wild I called, 
And from beneath the bed I crawled ; 
The window raised and thick and fast 
The missiles in their midst I cast ; 
Off through the brush and weeds they steered 
And in a flash had disappeared. 
When morning came I rose from bed 
And out the window stuck my head ; 
It was a scene of desolation, 
The likes of which you all well may shun ; 
In wild confusion scattered round 
A lot of debris strewed the ground : 
Some wads of fur, my shears and cane, 
A lot of hair, a window pane, 
Five eyes, six ears, some coal, a book, 
Three paws, a boot-jack, poker and hook, 
Two tails, four legs, and three bed-slats, 
My shaving-mug, inkstand, and two dead cats. 
Those mournful voices were not ghosts, 

They were only a drove of cats having a social out in the 
back yard. 

R. P. M., '90. 



174 



The Inveterate Caller. 



(Awarded Second Prize. | 

Iff ELL, here it is, the day for which I have been longing — Saturday : a 
\XJ cloudy sky outside and bright fire within my room : just the con- 
ditions necessary for a good morning's study. Now I will com- 
mence to review that Greek, and get matters in shape for the coming week. 
The college dormitory is somewhat retired, and I am not likely to have anv 
visitors to-day. I will get the rocker and, discarding the usages of polite 
society, placing my feet on the table, I shall commence on that wonderful 
Greek. 

I have just about started to work, when there comes a knock at the 
door. I cry: ''Come in," and there enters Clarence Riggs. Mr. Riggs 
is a B. A., a graduate of some western ''university." and is now taking 
work in some of our departments. I had met him but once before. He 
takes a chair, at my request, and states that he desires to ask my advice. 
I reply that as I am old. toothless, and decrepit, and have had much 
experience in this peculiar world. I do not doubt that I can help him on 
almost every subject. Whereupon he tucks his feet under the lower rungs 
of the chair, hangs his shining beaver on one of his knees, and remarks : 
"As you probably know, I am a graduate of the Boomtown University, which 
was organized by some real estate men, and which has had a marvelous 
success. At the request of the faculty, I delivered the Address before the 
students last Commencement. The subject of my Address was: 'The Negro 
and the South: or, Shall we Have Another War?' It was received with 
great favor by the local paper." I congratulate him on his apparent success. 
and state : " I suppose you have given this subject a considerable amount of 
thought and reading ; have traveled in the South, and also conversed with 
northerners who have lived in that part of the country and understand the 
situation better than those who stay at home and read distorted statements 



concerning that tiresome old subject?" My visitor wiggles round on his 
chair and says: "I must confess I have not been South; have read very little 
on the subject, and that only in the local papers ; yet I have concentrated 
my mind on the question. However," he continues, " what I called par- 
ticularly to see you about was this : my alma mater recognizes my ability in 
this lecture and wishes to honor me by bestowing upon me the degree of 
I). I). What do you think about it?" I frankly acknowledge that it is a far- 
reaching interrogation, and that he had better settle the question himself; 
adding, in conclusion, that it seemed to me if one wanted to be truly great 
he had better discard the suffix D. 1)., as those initials were about as frequent 
as examinations in our Preparatory School, and, so far as I was concerned, 
I preferred plain " Mister." My visitor evidently does not like the advice 
given him. A few minutes later I happen to mention the name of Micawber. 
Riggs looks at me with a vacant expression, and says : " I think you have 
the advantage of me, sir; I never met the gentleman. Is he a student in 
my department?" I remark that he is not; in fact, had been dead some 
years, as was also Copperfield, but that Dickens might help him out. 
Riggs still looked mystified, and as it seemed cruel for me to attempt to 
enlighten a B. A., I left him in blissful ignorance of the whereabouts of 
Micawber. Finally, Riggs unwinds his legs, puts his hat on the side of his 
head, bids me good-day — and we parted. 

I again went to work on my Greek, but in a few minutes there was 
another rap at my door, and, in response to my ungracious reply, there 
entered a lady. I at once offered her one of the objects of luxury in my 
room — the rocking chair. She started the conversation by remarking about 
our old friend the weather, and I, as in duty bound, assented to all that 
she said. Then she spoke about the university, the world's fair, the proba- 
bilities of war with Chili, politics, and why a man should not be a mugwump. 
After annoying me in this way for some minutes, during which time I won- 
dered whether she was a dynamite crank after the students or simply a true 
and tried book agent, she suddenly, with a dextrous movement, confronted 
me with a large roll of papers which she had concealed somewhere in the 
intricacies of her dress reform skirt. I at once hastened to assure her that 
I had all the books I desired, and if I wanted any more there were a few 
volumes left in the university library. She, however, insisted that the aver- 
age student did not know enough of literature and art, and that the only 

176 



way to obtain such knowledge was to have it accessible in his own room, 
and further, that she had just the desired works. In answer to my plea that 
I would have to wash dishes or take care of furnaces in order to buy this 
valuable work from her, she claimed that she had to support seven children, 
and that I could better afford to battle with this cruel world than she. The 
sobs were coming in thick and fast, and the Greek was still an uncertain 
quantity, so I, in desperation, told her that I would take the "works of 
art," on paper, for the balance of the year. She was a smart woman, very ; 
for when the first installment of books came to me a few days later I 
found, for the first time, that the paper I had signed agreed that 1 should 
take the full series of magazines, which ran through a period of two years. 
I may, however, misjudge her ; the poor creature was doubtless too grief- 
stricken, or she would have called my attention to the terms. Such is life 
— and the female book agent. 

I was having a most unpleasant time with the Greek conditional sen- 
tences, when the door of my room was thrown open, and red-headed Yonkers 
came in. He said he had an essay that he knew I would be glad to read. 
Upon inquiring whether it was original or furnished him by one of our 
prolific essay bureaus, he stated that it was the product of his own brain, 
and that his subject was: "The Physical Exercise of a College Student." I 
promised to read it later in the day, and gave him the assurance that I had 
no doubt that many students who were working their way through college 
would be very glad to learn concerning the best methods of physical exer- 
cise — when they had time for such luxuries. 

Having disposed of Yonkers, I thought I would try a change of studies, 
and wrestle with Livy and his fabulous stories. To make sure against 
visitors, I locked my door and resolved that I would let no one enter. I 
was getting Hannibal well over the Alps, when I found that my fire had gone 
out, and as the dormitory was built two years since with all the /^conven- 
iences of fifty years ago, I had to go through the ordeal of getting some 
kindling and coal to start the fire. I got through the task without adding 
to my small stock of piety. As it was then about dinner time, I went to 
the club that I might revel in our usual sumptuous repast. Different engage- 
ments occupied my time during the rest of the day, and ten o'clock at 
night found me back in my room and my recitations not prepared for 
Monday. I had hardly lighted the lamp when one of the students from the 

177 



Preparatory School, a second-year, I think, came in to ask my advice. Ik- 
stated that he was seriously thinking of getting married ; that before he 
finished the college course he would be well on in years ; and that he did 
not think it quite right to keep the dear girl waiting too long a time. I 
asked him his plans, and he stated that if he married he thought he would 
lease a large house, rent rooms to students, and in that way help pay his 
expenses. Of course I told him not to burden himself in that way, but he 
probably thought I was jealous and giving prejudiced advice, for I understand 
he is to be married next week. 

I am determined to have rest from my visitors, so I go to bed, and am 
soon dreaming that the only way to escape the inveterate caller is to be 
under the ground, with a tombstone above my head, when, suddenly, there 
is a continued knocking somewhere, and I, half dazed, think that some of the 
dormitory boys have been locked out and are now tapping at my window 
pane — but what is this? The sun is shining, and I am sitting in my rocker 
with my Greek book on the floor at my feet : it is yet morning, and I have 

been dozing in my chair ! ! 

A. \Y. Skelsey. 



178 



Be Doing. 



I walked with the Night, in the soft moonlight 

Whilst the breezes caressingly blew ; 
And my soul rejoiced with the feelings they voiced, 
That thrilled me with pleasure anew. 

Down the shadow-strewn walk, where the night-zephyrs talk, 

In Revery's realm I rove ; 
The sighing winds blush, in the evening hush, 

As they whisper their story of love. 

There's a melody sweet that I cannot repeat, — 

And it touches the tenderest chords, — 
In the music that streams from the moon's silver beams, 

And I hear, as I listen, these words : 

" Oh, ambitious youth, accept now the truth, 

The dawn of thy doing draws nigh ; 
Leave off thy seeming, — be doing, not dreaming, 

And then shall the days that flit by 

Be each one a note in the hymn that shall float 

Like a grand and harmonious swell, 
Whose echo unending, sweet memories blending, 

Shall whisper to thee, ' It is well.' " 

In the mist of the morn, ere the day was yet born, 

I wandered 'midst Nature's nooks, 
Where hepaticas grow, and violets bend low 

To list to the murmuring brooks ; 

179 



Where the cuckoo is wooing his mate with his cooing, 

And the rabbit and chipmunk play, 
And the lark mounts higher, in buoyant desire, 

To welcome the dawning of day. 

The whole sky is gleaming with golden rays beaming 

Like the arrows shot from the sun 
Over meadows and lakes, and the glad earth awakes, 

For she knows that the day has begun. 

Wood-flowers and field fresh fragrance yield ; 

To his busy task hastes the bee ; 
Over earth's noises dim floats the melodious hymn 

That carries this message tc me : 

"Youth, shake off thy slumbers, and all that encumbers 

Thy soul in the race it must run ; 
Like the bird, wake, arise, meet thy Sun in the skies, 

Like the flower, turn to the sun. 

Learn early the beauty that dwells in the duty 

That's done as it comes in thy way ; 
In action sublime is the noblest of rhyme, 

To labor is to pray." 



Fred L. Charles. 



l.so 




'M the famous Prof, of Latin, 
I'm the arbitrary Bonny, 

And I'd like to gently murmur 
I have got a brand new sonny. 

I am proud of all my wisdom 
And my wealth of ancient lore ; 

But the thing I'm mostly proud of 
Is because I am a pa. 

I've two dozen pair of breeches, 
And have houses more than one ; 

But the greatest of my treasures 
Is a bald and toothless son. 

I was early called a Doctor, 

And the name of Dean I had ; 

But the greatest of my titles 
Is my latest .one of "Dad." 

I was rather late in starting, 
But I got there just the same ; 

And at last I've a descendant 
To perpetuate my name. 




Society as I Have Found It. 

i i /E cannot all be Ward McAllisters, and we cannot, alas! all of us have 
\XJ f° ur hundred such friends as our eminent countryman, but society of 
one kind or another we each and all have, and must have. " Man 
is by nature a political animal," said Aristotle. He should have said " Man 
is by nature a social animal." Wasn't there society in the Garden of Eden 
before any one even thought of politics? It is something we cannot live 
without. If we are deprived of one kind, we will find some way to get 
another ; and if we are heartlessly shut out from the elite of New York be- 
cause we, instead of our husbands and fathers, happen to have soiled our 
hands with trade, we must console ourselves by concocting a society of our 
own. 

And what a variety of societies do we find among the extra-four hun- 
dred ! The literary circles, the artistic circles, the crank circles, the philan- 
thropic circles, and even the home circle, are species of society. But of all 
these the most novel, the most unique in every way, is college society. 
Forming its own rules of etiquette, it marches serenely along in its own 
path, with a sort of " I-pities-yer-ignorance-and-despises-you " air toward all 
the outside world. Of course each university has its peculiarities, and very 
marked ones they are, too, but there is something about them all — a genuine- 
ness and a heartiness — which distinguishes theirs from any other society in 
the world. 

But let us not for a moment suppose that society in any university is a 
perfect unit. Dear me, no ! Look at our own society at Northwestern ! We 
have them of all kinds — from the dig, who does not intend to belong to any 
society at all but the Y. M. C. A., and so joins a society composed of people 
who don't wish to enter into any society — to the girls who gad, and the boys 
who care less for their books than for the baneful pleasures of the Fem Sem 
and the sweet society of the fair co-eds. 

182 



With these latter we shall concern ourselves mostly, as the former would 
prefer to be ignored by us, and people who seek oblivion never have much 
trouble in finding it. But these gadders are not such a bad lot as you 
might think. They may not possess all ,the grace and elegance of the society 
leaders of New York or Chicago, but they can tell " whether hie, haec, 
hoc is Troy weight, or whether three times four is Taurus, a bull." Their 
college records are not so high, perhaps, as that of the dig, whose horizon 
is comprised within the covers of his text book, but they keep way ahead 
of Morse, and as large a proportion of them get on Kirk as of their breth- 
ren who make nothing else but records. 

And how much more does the man who goes moderately into society get 
out of his college life ! He learns that books contain but the formal prin- 
ciples of life, while life itself lies deeper than mere book learning and 
parrot-talk. He sees that the Homer and Vergil whom the dig so worships 
could never have written as they did if they had gleaned their thoughts 
from books alone ; that no man ever achieved greatness unless he lived, 
loved, and suffered in a life of his own ! 

And then how much the society of women, yea, even of Fern Sem girls, 
can improve a man ! You would hardly believe, you gentlemen of much 
book-learning who think that the time " spent in coeducation" is a sinful 
loss and the first step on the downward path, that a good woman's influence 
might give you a higher ambition than merely to make a college record ; 
that the society of girls would make you careful of little things, would teach 
you much that is not writ in books, and without which you can make no 
success in life outside the four narrow walls of your Alma Mater ! 

Of course the gadders gad too much, but the digs dig too much, too. 
This is a world of extremes. Class parties where the boys raffle for the 
girls, frat parties where the boys invite the girls, and other frat parties where 
the boys are so popular that each one takes about three girls in order to 
pay off all their obligations, quite ignoring the fact that, though half a loaf 
may be better than no bread, a third of a man is much worse than no 
man at all — " all these make up the sum of college life." Of course we 
must not leave out the sorority parties, where the girls do the inviting, and 
where entertainment of all kinds is furnished, from " Going to Jerusalem " and 
the festive game of " Peanuts," to the dancing which outsiders condemn as 
the eighth deadly sin. And then there are all sorts of class meetings, frat 

1 83 



meetings, calls in the Kern Sem parlor, spreads, walks home from recitations 

and chapel (the best part of chapel), committee meetings of all kinds, ex 

cursions to the Big Woods, and various other places in the botany season. 

It is a busy world and a happy one, notwithstanding the recitations and 

the bothersome examinations, that will intrude where they are not wanted, 

but which are still tolerated for the joys that come in their train. ft is a 

world where a man ceases to regard girls as pretty painted dolls, and learns 

to honor and admire a noble woman, and perhaps to feel the help and 

strength of a woman's friendship. It is a world where a girl ceases to look 

upon boys as tin gods on wheels, and discovers that they are quite human 

after all; that some of them can almost equal their sisters in their ability to 

flunk and do other foolish and useless things. It teaches both men and 

women to distinguish the false from the true, the wheat from the chaff; it 

gives them both depth and breadth of character, and if an accident happens 

once in a while and a heart gets broken by mistake, why, that's only the 

little thorn in the great big rose ! It is a world better than that of those 

people who live only for the pleasures of a butterfly life ; it is a broader 

world than that of the man who derives all his life from books and Dead 

Sea fruit. So let us join hands, brothers and sisters, thankful for the lessons 

she has taught us and hoping for many more, and join in one rousing cheer, 

" Hurrah for Coeducation ! ! " 

Retsilla C. M. Draw. 




m w m^ 



1H4 



That's What the Wild Waves are Saying. 



NORTH WESTERN'S a college that's right in the swim 
And that's what the wild waves are saying ; 
Coeds there are plenty who dance with a vim, 
And that's what the wild waves are saying. 
But when in the midst of society's joys 
They dizzily whirl in the arms of the boys, 
The fossilized faculty kicks up a noise, 
And that's what the wild waves are howling. 

Chorus : 
The lake has some secrets which now she will tell, 
So stroll on the beach with your girl and umbrell, 
Listen intently but don't ever tell 
What the wild waves are constantly saying. 

In the ranks of the dancers there's Satan as well, 

And that's what our " Bobby " is saying ; 

If you persist in this evil you'll all go to grass, 

And that's what he's all the time saying. 

O this is the cream of all Methodist schools, 

O this is no place for you giddy young fools ! 

You'll stick to your books or abide by our rules, 

And that's what the Trustees are saying. 

In a day or two now the returns will come in, 

And that is what Atwell is saying ; 

Some marks we have for you will cause a grim grin. 

For that's what the wild waves have told him. 

To stay up all night for slight recreation 

185 



Has had some effect on your ex-amination, 
And you will be fooled in your anticipation, 
For that's what the wild waves are saying. 

O Henry Wade Rogers has laid down the code, 

The Sophies know what he's been saying ; 

The next time they scrap they'll change their abode, 

For that's what Dean Miller is saying. 

To paint like wild injuns those poor verdant jays, 

And show them before the young women's bold gaze, 

I'll bet you a quarter they don't think it pays, 

And that's what they're sometimes heard saying. 

Professor Cook's lectures don't always take place, 

And that's what the wild waves are saying; 

The reason for this don't appear in the case, 

And that's what the wild waves are saying. 

Suicide or foul murder were the views of us all, 

From the small note and meagre he left in the hall, 

And — he never came back, he never came back 

Till we'd waited a fortnight or more. 

The first words he said when he showed up his head 

Were : " My eye, it was terribly sore." 

At present the banjo is just all the rage, 

And that's what doesn't need saying. 

The fellows buy dress-suits and go on the stage, 

Ye gods! can't we keep them from playing? 

They played to the bums in Waukegan city, 

They played in the slums of Chicago — the pity ! 

For — they never came back, they never came back, 

The lake rose up with a roar. 

They are happy to-night way up out of sight, 

Playing harps on that beautiful shore. 



180 



" fa art tU Feejlte " 

"Hch- hr th* F™ 4>±* • *►* |p| 




-ru i 




7TJ+T7 Of 



•ui ~7\±z^'--' O'-O i^sUfti' 



\ || HEX we Freshies awoke next day 

After the foot-ball game, 
It almost took our breath away 
To find things much the same. 

The sun still shone in the heavens, 

The sky was the same old blue ; 
And in spite of the way we swiped the Sophs, 

They persisted in showing up too. 

People didn't even take off their hats, 

When they saw us on the street : 
And the girls, they only smiled at us, 

Which makes us feel real cheap. 

Now to place ninety-five in the proper light, 
With the will of the powers that be, 



]*- 



We put ourselves in the Syllabus 
For every one to see. 

Bunker, of course, is the biggest man, 

He's a youth of Fraternity aims ; 
The Sophs say that wool on the top of his head 

Takes away the strength of his brains. 

After the ball comes Moehlenpah, 

Hadley, Loining, Dixon, and Scott ; 
Then Singleton, Knudson, Laney, and Smyth — 

That's all the men we've got 

On the picture. We left out one, 

And that's our embryo Shep. 
People didn't seem to like it much, 

'Cause he's got two years in Prep. 

We know you'll think we're awfully nice 

If you see our pictures here ; 
We are so noble, purty, and clean 

When dressed in our foot-ball gear. 



]HH 



First Offense, and Proved an Alibi 



BANG ! Thump ! came Jim Butterball, bounding into his room one night 
at the usual late hour of 11:30. "Halloo, chum: Got your ethics?" 
he shouted, slapping Billy Straitlace on the back with a gusto which 

Vice is a almost caved in that important part of the poor fellow's 
nonster- anatomy. 

•• Yes.'' answered Billy, with a groan, and then added tartly : " You 
needn't break my back, though.'" 

" Only a love- tap. my boy — only a love-tap : besides, all you need, to 
change you into a man, is to have your back broken in a few places ; 
you're too prim and proper. You're only a dig at the — but. what in thun- 
der is the matter ? You needn't look as black as the ace of spades, if I 
do call you a dig." 

"Jim Butterball." said Billy, solemnly, "I don't believe you have one of 
your lessons for to-morrow." 
Of so frightful "Granted. What of it?" 

mien — •• It is really a shame, the way you are going on—'' 

" Come, preach me another of your sermons : " I just want something to 
put me to sleep." interrupted Jim. 

"You may think it's none of my business what you do; but you are 
disgracing our Sigma Beta fraternity, with the way you hang around that 
Fern Sem — squandering enough money on girls to save the souls of a hundred 
heathen if it were sent to a missionary— wasting your time on the soft, 
giddy sex, and flunking systematically in consequence." 

"Whew! Cxot the stomach-ache, Billy?'' 

" If you have no sense of shame for the precious privileges you are 
squandering," continued Billy, ignoring the interruption, " you might at least, 
for the good of the frat. stop your intriguing around that Woman's College." 

189 



Jim whistled softly and began to prepare for bed. As he pulled off his 
shoes, he broke forth into song : 

" We won't t^<j there any more. 
We won't go there any more — 
Until to-morrow night." 



* * 



"And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil," prayed 

As, to be Billy in chapel next day. He had his hand before his face, 

dreaded,— ^ u t between his fingers he had just caught a glimpse of prettv 

May Morton's bowed head. That may have been the reason why he uttered 

the last petition louder than usual ; at any rate, the other boys nudged each 

other. 

" I am glad to see you here, Mr. Straitlace. I am afraid you are 
Needs but to studying too hard ; I hardly ever see you except in the class- 
be seen; room." It was May Morton who addressed Billy thus cordially. 
As she spoke she deliberately turned her back upon Jim Butterball, who was 
hovering about her. 

It was the annual walk-around at the Woman's College on University 
Day, and even Billy considered it his duty to be there ; and, strange as it 
may seem, his sense of duty, or something, kept him there that day until 
almost the last man had gone. 

That night, when the chums had turned in, Jim broke an ominous silence 
with the remark : 

" You might have spent at least a little of the time with some one 
else." 

"What are you talking about?" 

" You know well enough what I am talking about ; you never took your 
eyes off her the whole afternoon." 

"Well, is that any of your business?" 

"Is it? You just go fooling around her and see," said Jim, ominously, 
and turned over to go to sleep. 

Billy was very quiet after that ; but he did not sleep. 

* -x- * 

# * * * . * * . 

"Ah, there! Changed room-mates, haven't you, Billy?" said Jack Tatler 

L90 



But, seen too m the Woman's College parlor one evening, a month or two 
oft— later : " did you have a scrap with Jim ? " 

"Yes." 

" You and Jim seem to have swapped places. I hear it's you who live 
mostly in this parlor nowadays, instead of him." 

Billy turned his back by way of reply ; but that may have been because 
of a light step on the stair. 

" Good evening, May," said he, in his tenderest tones. 

11 Good evening," replied Miss Morton, sweetly, and they were off for the 
Adelphic contest. 

"Mr. Butterball is one of the contestants, isn't he?" He belongs to 
your fraternity, so I hope he will win the prize," said May. 

Billy hoped so too, from that instant. 

But, seated by May's side in the crowded church, he was oblivious to 
Jim and his speech, and likewise to the audience and to everything else of 
such small importance. 

Poor Jim Butterball ! He started out brilliantly with his speech ; but 
suddenly his eye seemed to be fastened on something alarming in the audi- 
ence. He grew pale, forgot his speech, stumbled hopelessly, and retired in 

confusion and disgrace. 

* * # 

* * * * * * 

" Oh, you must come, May." 

"But how can I, Will? You know we were out at that frat party so 
late that the Dean has forbidden my going anywhere for a week." 

" Yes, but she doesn't need to know." 

"How can we avoid it?" 

" By the fire-escape, said Billy, jokingly. 

" Oh ! you wicked boy." 

" No, but, seriously, May, meet me at the side door this evening. 
Don't disappoint me; I'll be there at seven, sharp. The night is going to 
be glorious ; don't let the Dean cheat us out of such a treat, for the sake 
of some fiddling little rule." 

AVith that they left the room. So did Jim Butterball, who had been 
sitting behind the curtains in the bay window, out of sight. 



191 



"Did you hear the latest?" said Jack Tatler to his Kappa Upsilon 
Familiar with brethren next day. 
her face— "No; what?" asked a dozen voices. 

"That miserable Sigma Beta stick, Bill Straitlace — 'Missionary Bill,' yon 
know — smuggled his girl down the fire-escape at the Fern Sem last night and 
took her out boat-riding. 

"Just like the hypocrite; he's always preaching to others, you know," 
said one. 

" Who told you all this?" 

"Jim Butterball. He's a Sigma Beta himself; he ought to know," said 
Jack. He says, too, that he saw a fellow about Bill's size talking to Nellie, 
the Fern Sem door-girl, and saying : 

" ' There's five dollars, Nellie, to pay you for your trouble ; now you see 
that she gets out of the window all right, and let her in again when she 
comes back.' " 

" Ha ! ha ! that's a good one on Missionary Bill." 

" Jim said, too, that Straitlace was spending enough money on that girl 
to keep a missionary in China," continued the narrator. 

"Well," said one, "Jim must have become imbued with the missionary 
spirit very suddenly. He wasn't built that way the last time I saw him. 
We all know what's working Jim Butterball ; his chum has cut him out." 



"Well, preacher, who is disgracing the frat now?" said Jim to Billy a 
We first few mornings later, when they happened to meet upon the 

endure, campus. 

"Answer your conundrum yourself; I give it up," said Billy. 
" There's a pretty good answer to it," replied Jim, drawing from his 
pocket a copy of the Chicago Daily Blackmail, in which was the following 

item : 

" ALMOST DROWNED. — William Straitlace, of Northwestern University, while on a surrepti- 
tious boatride with Miss May Morton, on Lake Michigan, Monday night, managed to capsize 
the boat. The life-saving crew heroically fished out the truant couple. The whole story is 
fjuite romantic, as the fire escape in the rear of the Woman's College is said to have played a 
prominent part in the young lady's exit and entrance that night." 

" The man who wrote that is a liar ! " cried Billy, fiercely. 

v.n 



"Oh, your college work is adding to your vocabulary, isn't it?" sneered 
Jim. 

" Jim Butterball, you are at the bottom of this," said Billy, advancing 
threateningly. 

" Vou had better go to the newspaper office and examine the handwrit- 
ing, if you think so." 

" Nobody but you would concoct such a despicable lie." 

The angry snap of Billy's black eyes roused the jealous ire of his tor- 
mentor, who indiscreetly muttered : 

" I can prove that you took May out that night, and if you don't put 
a padlock on your mouth and keep away from her I'll print a little story 
that will ruin the reputation of both of you." 

A ringing blow on the side of the head was the answer he got. The 
two men grappled and rolled in the dust. When they stopped rolling neither 
was a beautiful sight to look upon, but Billy was on top. As he gave a 
parting kick to the prostrate form of his antagonist, he espied a letter which 
had dropped from Jim's pocket, addressed to the Chicago Blackmail. He 
reached for it, but Jim snatched it up. In an instant Billy was upon him 
again and tore it out of his hands. 



" Poor fellow ! He must have loved her, or he would not hate me so," 

Then pity, soliloquized Billy Straitlace, after he had reached his room, 

washed his face, and let his anger cool. Then he tore open the letter 

which he had wrested from Jim. An angry flush mantled his cheek again ; 

he took his hat and started for the President's office. 



Dr. Prex, President of Northwestern University, frowned angrily as Billy 
entered the office. " This is shameful," said he, touching a copy of a paper 
which lay upon his desk. " You and Miss Morton will both have to leave 
the college at once. No excuse can palliate such actions. I have sent word 
to the young woman, and — " 

Here May entered the room. She was in tears. 

" Doctor, before you do anything further, please read that," said Billy, 

193 



handing him the letter that had fallen from Jim's pocket. It read as 
follows : 

"Mr. Charles S/iarpscent, Office Chicago 'Blackmail* — DEAR CHARLIE: That little squib 
struck the mark exactly ; but if he is not fired by to-morrow night, I wish you would work the 
fake a little further — with a touch of scandal ; sabby ? He's got to go, and as for the girl, 
well, she went back on me, and I would as lief see her roasted a little, too. Jill. 

" Ahem ! Where did this come from, Mr. Straitlace?" asked Dr. Prex, 
excitedly wiping his glasses. 

" From the same source as the paragraph in the newspaper before you," 
answered Billy. 

" And— and who wrote it?" 

" It is in Mr. Butterball's handwriting, as you may see ; I took it from 
him by force less than an hour ago." 

"This is really too bad; you have both been wronged," said the Doctor, 
almost tenderly. Then something fogged his glasses, and he wiped them 
again. 

" Has Mr. Straitlace explained ? " asked May, tremulously ; " I did go out 
with him that evening without asking the Dean's permission ; but all the rest 
is false. We spent the evening at the observatory, as the professor in 
charge there will tell you." 

" I see it all now," said the Doctor. " I think the punishment has 
already been greater than the offense. I am heartily glad this vindication 
has come in time to prevent the severe action on which the faculty had 

determined." 

* * * 

* * * * * * 

Billy felt like shouting; but he didn't do anything so improper as that. 
Then embrace. He simply slipped his arm around May and kissed her right 
there, in the awful presence of the head of the Northwestern University. 

But Dr. Prex was already busily scratching off a letter which began, 
" Mr. James Butterball," and pretended to see nothing. 



11)4 



Honors and Events, 



1891-1892. 



Commencement Week, 

1891. 



Sunday, June 21. 

Baccalaureate Address, 10:30 A. M., .... Dr. HENRY Wade ROGERS. 

Sermon before the Students' Christian Associations, 7:45 P. M., Dr. Frank M. BRISTOL. 

Monday, June 22. 

Class Day Exercises, = 10:30 A. M. 



Programme. 

Presentation of Class, 

Class History, 

Poem, 

Oration. 

Prophecy, 

Presentation of Gifts, 

Pipe Oration, 

Class Dinner, French House, 

Annual Meeting of Alumni of the Conservatory of Music, 

Examinations for admission, 

Anniversary of Preparatory School, 



William Alden. 
Annie Vernon. 
Lina Kennedy. 
*John Haggertv 
Martha Smith. 
R. K. Nisbet. 
S. P. Johnson. 
1:30 p. M. 
3 •'• m- 
3 P- m. 

8 P. M. 



Tuesday, June 23 



Annual meeting of Hoard of Trustees, 

Field Day Exercises, .... 

Graduating Exercises of the Conservatory of Music, 

" Deceased. 



9 A. M. 
2 P. M. 
8 P. M. 



1 96 



Wednesday, June 24. 



Business Meeting of the Alumni Association, 



i:;o !'. M 



Thursday, June 25. 

Commencement Exercises, Consisting of Kirk Oratorical Contest, 10 A. M. 



Programme. 



John Wesley and His Influence, 

The Last Struggle of the Saracens, 

The Massacre of St. Bartholomew, 

Victor Hugo and French Liberty, 

The Great Commoner, 

Leo X. and Martin Luther, 

Hamilton and the Constitution, 

The Battle of Liitzen, 

The Power of Ideas, 

A New Civilization, 

The Heritage of the Pilgrims, 

Faust, 

Alumni Dinner, Avenue House, 

President's Reception, 



Fred M. Tisdel. 
John P. Adams. 
John A. Scott. 
Charles H. Zimmerman. 
Anna E. Robinson. 
Amary S. Haskins. 
Raphael R. Shuman. 
Martha C. Smith. 
Alfred H. Phelps. 
William B. Walrath. 
Ray C. Harker. 
Guy N. Power. 
1:30 P. M. 
8 P. M. 




l'.r 



Degrees Conferred, 

1891. 



Bachelor of Arts, 



John P. Adams. 
William D. Barnks. 
May L. Bennett. 
Frederick R. Corbin. 
Ray C. Harker. 
Myrtle E. Mattison. 
Thomas C. Moulding. 



Frank A. Reynolds. 
John A. Scott. 
Minnie R. Terry. 
Fred M. Tisdel. 
William B. Walrath. 
Myrtie V. Whitney. 
Charles H. Zimmerman. 



Bachelor of Philosophy. 



John N. Adee. 
William T. Alden. 
Rose M. Logerman. 
Mary A. Maltman. 
Guy N. Power. 
Ward B. Sawyer. 



Raphael R. Shuman. 
Eva G. Simmons. 
Martha C. Smith. 
Charles L. Stevens. 
William C. Van Benschoten. 
Sidney P. Johnson. 



Bachelor of Science, 



James G. Hensel. 
Mary B. Holderman. 
Livonia R. Kay. 
Stewart A. Maltman. 



Benjamin F. March. 
Robert K. Nisbet. 
Alfred H. Phelps. 
Harry F. Wakeman. 



Bachelor of Literature. 



Mary 0. Finley. 
Lina Kennedy. 



Anna E. Robinson. 
fl)A T. Staver. 



Luanna M. Vernon. 
198 



Prizes. 



Deering Essay Prizes. 

First, Ernest B. Hoag, '92. 

Second, Mary E. Gloss, '92 

Kirk Oratorical Prize, '91. 

William B. Walrath. 

University Scholarship, '91. 

Lulu Moore. 

Congdon Declamation Prizes, '91. 

First, E. Delight Sanborn. 

Second, W. M. EwiNG. 

Herbarium Prize. 

R. N. Holt. 

Bragdon Prize, '91. 

Martha C. Smith. 

Nisbet Prize. 

A. S. Mason. 



Union League Club Orator, 



(February 22, 1892.) 



Plymouth Congregational Church, Chicago. 



J. Lewis Alabaster, '92. 
Subject: "Washington and the New Generation." 

199 



Seventh University Day. 



Programme of Day. 



Assemble at University, . . . . . . . 1:40 r. m. 

Inspection of Buildings, ....... 1:40-2:30 e\ m. 

Programme of Exercises at M. E. Church, 3 P. M. 

Presiding Officer, ...... Prof. George A. Coe. 

Alexander Hamilton, ....... Fred L. Po< iiin. 

Law School. 

The Now, . . . . . . . . . H. M. Evans. 

Medical School. 

History of Women in Medicine, ..... Miss S. K. Sessions. 

Woman's Medical School. 

" U. I). C," ........ James L. Blish. 

Dental School. 

Select Reading, ........ Ruth Farwell. 

School of Oratory. 

Hard Knox, F. R. S., . . . . . . . R. B. Kester. 

School of Theology. 

Folly of Intolerance, ...... Jerome H. Raymond. 

College of Liberal Arts. 



200 



Joint Athletic Committee 



Alumni Members. 

C. B. TflWING, '88, Chairman. L. S. Rick, '83. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

University Secretary-Treasurer, HERBERT E. GRIFFITH. 

Base Ball. 

J. L. Alabaster. H. E. Leach. 

Foot Ball. 

William Karris. J. W. Arnold. 

Track. 

Edmund Ludlow. J. W. Dickey. 

Tennis. 

L. W. Beebe. H. T. Ricketts. 

Preparatory Members. 

II. L. Johnson. H. B. Merwin. 



202 



Base Ball Association. 



|. L. Alabaster, ......... President. 

H. E. LEACH, ........ Secretary-Treasurer. 

Irvin McDowell, ........ Captain. 

Annual meeting: First Monday in June. 



Foot Ball Association. 



William Karris. ......... President. 

T. \y. Arnold. ..... . Secretary-Treasurer. 

Captain not yet elected. 
Annual meeting: First Monday in winter term. 



Track Association. 



Edmund Ludlow, ........ President. 

|. W. Dickey, ........ Secretary-Treasurer. 

C. W. Li'CAS, .......... Captain. 

Jared W. YOUNG, ......... Scorer, 

Annual meeting: First Tuesday in June. 



Tennis Association. 



L. W. BEEBE, ......... President. 

H. T. Ricketts, ....... Secretary-Treasurer. 

R. R. Kendall, ........ Tourney-Marshal. 

Annual meeting : Second Monday in June. 
NOTE. — The new athletic organization as given above was perfected during the last winter. 
and will hereafter have control of all athletics in the university. The organizations given 
below are those which were in existence from the publication of the last Syllabus to the 
completion of the new organization. 

203 



Western 



College Base Ball League 



flembers of League, '92, 



Northwestern University. 

University of Illinois. 



Lake Forest University. 

Beloit College. 



Delegates to League Convention at Milwaukee. 



Captain Irvin McDowell. 



Edmund Ludlow 



Schedule for Season '92, 



April 30, 

May 6, 

May 7, 

May 9, 

May 21, 

May 21, 

May 27, 

May 28, 

May 30, 

June 4, 

June 4, 

June 8, 



N. W. 


U. 


vs. 


L. F. 


U., 


at 


Lake Forest 


U. of 


I. 


vs. 


N. W. 


u., 


at 


Evanston. 


U. of 


I. 


vs. 


Beloit, 




at 


Beloit. 


U. of 


I. 


vs. 


L. F. 


u., 


at 


Lake Forest 


N. W. 


u. 


vs. 


U. of 


I., 


at 


Champaign. 


L. F. 


u. 


vs. 


Beloit, 




at 


Beloit. 


Beloit 




vs. 


U. of 


L, 


at 


Champaign. 


Beloit 




vs. 


L. F. 


U., 


at 


Lake Forest 


Beloit 




vs. 


N. W. 


U., 


at 


Evanston. 


L. F. 


u. 


vs. 


U. of 


I., 


at 


Champaign. 


N. W. 


u. 


vs. 


Beloit, 




at 


Beloit. 


L. F. 


u. 


vs. 


N. W. 


U., 


at 


Evanston. 



20 4 



LIBRARY 
OF THE 

i-tvERsiTY of sur 



■■■ ■■ + JUKI 
■ 










f4wm ^mm* m 


' v. 


■ f j * fa 




"•: : '. 3E£&is§ 


yflKv 












i 




1U m r ^' 


< 




1 


?^ : > 





Additional Games. 



April 1 6, 


N. 


W. U. 


vs. 


Joliet 


at 


Joliet. 


April 23, 


1". 


of M. 


vs. 


N. W. V., 


at 


Chicago. 


May 14. 


X. 


W. V. 


vs. 


U. of M., 


at 


Ann Arbor 


May 27, 


"u. 


of W. 


vs. 


X. w. v., 


at 


Evans ton. 


June 6, 


N. 


\Y. U. 


VS. 


U. of \v.. 


at 


Madison. 



League Games of '91 



X. w. u. 



X. w. u 

U. of W 

Beloit 

L. F. U. 



5-9—3-5 



/ j 
10-17 



U. OF W. 



11-12 — 9-0 

3-20—6-I4 



Beloit. 



3-7—7-2 
12-11 — 0-9 



2-15—3-7 



L. F. U. 

1710— 11-3 

14-S— 20-3 

15-2—7-3 



Team of '91 



W. D. Barnes. Captain. 



T. C. Moulding. 
Irvix McDowell. 
R. K. Nisbet. 
J. K. Bass. 



R. Ht'BBART. 

T. E. McGrath. 

H. A. MOEHLENPAH. 

T. H. Lewis. 



205 



I nter= Fraternity Base Ball 

League 



Members in 1891. 



Sigma Chi. 



Phi Kappa Sigma. 

Beta Theta Pi. 

Phi Kappa Psi. 

Delta Upsilon. 



Summary of Games. 



Phi Kappa Psi . . . 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

Sigma Chi 

Delta Upsilon 
Beta Theta Pi. . . . 




Lost. 



207 



Class Nines. 



Class of '92. 

Arthur Flkagkr, ..... Captain. 

Team not yet chosen. 

Class of '93. 

J. Frank ( )ates, ...... Captain. 

Team not yet chosen. 

Class of '94. 

J. K. Bass, ...... Captain. 

Team. 

R. E. Kennicott, Pitcher. Charles Lucas, Short Stop. 

J. K. Bass, Catcher. T. K. Gale, Third Base. 

C. A. Kelley, First Base. Fred Charles, Center Field. 

Frank Lane, Second Base. R. R. Kendall, Left Field. 

II. T. Ricketts, Right Field. 

Substitutes. 

Theodore Sir awn. C. R. Latham. 

Class of '95. 

Grant Van Sant, ..... Captain. 

Ernest Everz, ...... Scorer. 

II. P. PEARSONS, ..... Business Manager. 

Team. 

('. II. Parkes, First Base. Irvin McDowell, Left Field. 

Frank Griffith, Pitcher. C. H. McWilliams, Second Base. 

J. \V. Moulding, Short Stop. C. Culhertson, Right Field. 

E. 1. Williams, Third Base. R. Arnold, Center Field. 

GRANT Van Sant, Catcher. 

Substitute. 

J. A. Dixon. 

208 



LIBRARY 
OF THE 



Foot Ball. 



(Fall of 1891.) 



Officers of N. W. U. Foot Ball Association 



G. W. Baker, '93. 
H. E. Leach, '92, 
William Dickey, '94, 
C. D. Wilson, '93, 
R. R. Kendall, '94, 
F. W. Hemenway, '93, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Corresponding Secretary. 

Recording Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Business Manager. 



Delegates to League Convention at Milwaukee. 

William Farfis and G. W. Baker. 

'Varsity Eleven. 

R. E. Kennicott, ..... Captain. 

Center. 

C. A. Kelley. 

Guards. 

S. Clark, Right. C. D. Wilson, Left. 

Tackle. 

Lewis C. Ehle. Right. C. E. Moore. Left. 

End. 

Frank Lane, Right. L. De Golyer, Left. 

Half. 

R. E. Kennicott, Right. J. H. Lewis, Left. 

Quarter. 

R. R. Kendall. 

Full Back. 

R. L. Sheppard. 

Substitutes. 

Holcomb. Fowler. Kennicott. Stebbincs. 

Oates. Banks. Singleton. 

Baker. Orchard. Moulding. 



209 



Western 



College Foot Ball League 



J. B. Kerr, U. of W., 
R. E. Kennicott, N. W. U., 
A. S. Thompson, Beloit, 
W. C. AEKINE, Lake Forest, 



Officers, 



President. 

First Vice-President. 

Second Vice-President. 

Secretary and Treasurer' 



League of 1891. 



Northwestern University. 

University of Wisconsin. 



Beloit College. 



Lake Forest University 



Games Played. 



Oct. 15, 




Lake Forest, 


; 








■N. 


w. 


u., 





Oct. 31, 




U. of W., 


: 








X. 


w. 


u., 





Nov. 12, 




Beloit, 


12 ; 








N. 


w. 


u., 


12 


Nov. 24, 




Lake Forest, 


20 ; 








X. 


w. 


u., 





Thanksgiv 


ing, 


U. of W., 
V. M. C. A. of C 


40; 
hicago, : 


X. 


w. u. 


20. 


X. 


w. 


u., 






211 



Tennis. 



Spring Tennis Tournament of '91 



Singles. 

F. Wilson and A. S. Mason, 
H. Smith and M. A. Clarkson, . 
W. Baker and W. W. Wilkinson, 

E. Patton and E. H. Towlk, 
N. Power and F. W. Perry, 
K. Bass and W. L. Wilson, 



W. 

K. 
G. 
II. 
G. 

J- 

C. H. Zimmerman and W. 
Smith and W. F. Wilson, 
Baker and Patton, 
Bass and Power, 
Moulding and Zimmerman, 
Baker and Smith, 
Moulding and Bass, 



A. Dempsey 



Moulding and Baker. 



Championship Round. 



Doubles. 



6-1, 
6-0, 

• 7-5, 

(Forfeit 

. IO-8, 

0-6, 5-7, 6-2, 

4-6, 6-2, 6-3, 

7-5, 12-10, 2-6, 

7-5, 7-5, 6-8, 

6-i, 

6-0, 

6-2, 

6-3, 2-6, 



6-2, 6-4. 

6-1, 6-2. 

6-0, 6-o- 

to Patton.) 

7-5, 7-5 

6-3, 6-2 

6-8, 6-2 

3-6, 6-3 

3-6, 6-4 

6-1, 6-3 

6-2, 6-1 

6-2, 6-0 

6-1, 6-1 



6-0, 6-1, 6-0. 



Dempsey-Zimmerman and Clarkson-Dickey, . . 6-0, 6-2', 6-1. 

Perry-W. L. Wilson and Ricketts-Bonnifield, . 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 6-1. 

Towle-Leach and Mason-Hayes, . . . 12-14, 6-2, 6-4, 6-3. 

Dempsey-Zimmerman and Wilkinson-W. F. Wilson, 6-4, 2-6, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2. 

Perry-Wilson and Baker-Smith, .... 6-0, 7-5, 6-3. 

6. Moulding-Bass and Power-Patten, .... 6-2, 6-3, 6-2. 

7. Dempsey-Zimmerman and Towle-Leach, . . 5-7, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2. 

8. Moulding-Bass and Perry-Wilson, .... 6-2, 6-0, 6-2. 



Championship Round. 



Moulding-Bass and Dempsey-Zimmerman, 

212 



6-4, 6-4, 6-3. 



Field Day of 1891 



Standing High Jump, .... 
Running High Jump, . 
Standing Broad Jump, 
Throwing Hammer, . 

Putting Shot, 

Four Hundred and Forty Yards Run, 
Throwing Base Ball, .... 
Mile Run, 

One Hundred Yard Dash, . 

Three-Legged Race, . 

Foot Bali Kick, 

Gun Club Shoot, .... 



W. \V. Wilkinson, '93, 
W. W. Wilkinson, '93, 
W. W. Wilkinson, '93, 
R. W. Haves, '94, 
Edmund Ludlow, '92, 
T. C. Moulding, '91, 
C. H. Zimmerman, '91, 
Mr. Riggs, '95, 

( T. C. Moulding, '91, 
j R. W. Hayes, '94, 

f R. R. Kendall, '94, ] 
1 Mr. Lane, '94, 

A. H. Phelps, '91, 
f First, T. L. Alabaster, 
I Second, F. W. Belknap, 



4 ft. S)/ 2 in. 

5 ft. 1 in. 

9 ft. 10 in. 

87 ft. 7 in. 

31 ft. 6 in. 

62 sec. 

299 ft. 

5 min. 40 sec. 

.11 1-5 sec. 



17 sec. 

150 feet 5 in. 
10 straight. 



218 




J. L. 


Alabaster, 




J. W. 


Dickey, 




H. T. 


Ricketts, 






E. II. 


TOWLE. 




H. T. 


Ricketts. 




F. W. 


Belknap. 




W. L. 


Wilson. 




G. W. 


Baker. 




R. K. 


Kendall. 




W. S. 


Young. 




C. H. 


Perrine. 



Officers. 



Members. 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



C. F. Shronts. 
H. E. Leach. 
L. H. Knox. 
J. L. Alabaster. 
A. W. Burton. 
William Farrls. 
Edmund Ludlow. 
). W. Dickey. 



211 



'Varsity Cycling Club. 



Officers, 



A. W. Burton, '92, 

P. B. KOHLSAAT, '94, 

W. G. Bergstrum, '94, 
F. L. Johnson, '94, 
Frank McElwain, '95, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

Captain. 

Lieutenant. 



Honorary Hembers. 









Prof. 


C. 


\V. 


Pearson. 




Prof. 


C. 


S. 


Cook. 








Prof. 


G. 


A. 


Coe. 




Prof. 


C. 


B. 


Atwell. 








Prof. 


E. 


H. 


Moore. 




Prof. 


C. 


B. 


Thwing. 














Prof 


. Henry Benner. 






















riembers 










A. 


W. 
W. 


Bu 
C. 


rton. 
Stowe 








R H. 
R. 


Smith. 
N. Hoi 


T. 










C. 


F. Shronts. 






George 


Bake 


r. 








W. L. 


Wilson. 




F. 


L. 


Johnson. 








G. 


P. 


Hills. 






P. 


B. 


Kohls a at. 










James 


Maillev. 








C. 


W. Lucas. 












E 


B. Fowler 










Frank McElwain 



21; 



Tug; of War Team, '92. 



W. W. Wilkinson, '94, Anchor 
J. G. Hensel, '91. 

J. E. BONEBRIGHT, 93. 

(Weight, 749K lbs.) 



F. J. Smith, '97. 
J. A. LoiNING, '94. 



Sixth Annual Tug of War Tournament. 

For the "Hub Cup" and Championship of the Northwest, Held March 4 in Idlewild Hall, Evanston. 

Events and Winners. 

The following teams pulled : Humboldt Park Athletic Club, Scottish Athletic Club, Lake 
Views, Northwestern, C. A. S. Turners, Laburnum, Pullman Athletic club (1), Pullman Ath- 
letic Club (2). N. W. U.— Winner. 
Standing Broad Jump ......... Walter Scott, '95 



Horizontal Bar 

Heavy Weight Wrestling 

Standing High Kick . 

Parallel Bars 

Indian Club Swinging (exhibition) 

Vaulting Horse .... 



Grant Van Sant, '95 

C. E. Moore, '97 

J. W. Patterson, '96 

Prof. Smith and Class, Chicago Y. M. C. A 

Mr. Edwards 

Bohemian Turners 

Mat Exercises . Messrs. Brown, MacFarland, and Kappelman, Evanston Y. M. C. A 

Light Weight Wrestling . Grant Van Sant, '95 

Running High Jump Edmund Ludlow, '92 



Northwestern Life Saving Crew. 



Lawrence O. Lawson, Captain. 
No. 1. F. M. Kindig, ex-'92 ('94 Medic.) 
No. 2. E. B. Fowi,er, '93. 

No. 3. W. M. Ewing, '93. 

No. 4. Jacob Loining, '95. 

No. 5. W. L. Wilson, '92 

No. 6. R. N. Holt, '93. 

No. 7. W. W. Wilkinson, '94. 



2 1 (i 



Preparatory 



C. D. Lee, 
E. B. Hunt, 
W. J. Kelley, 



L. N. De Golyer. 
J. S. Orchard, 
H. B. Merwin, 




W. M. Cook, 
F. R. Singleton, 



A. E. De Rimer, 

W. P. Kay, 

J. W. Patterson, 




Athletic 1 




Association 



Officers. 



Base Ball. 




Tennis. 



Track. 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



Business Manager. 

Captain. 

Official Scorer. 




Business Manager. 
Tourney Marshal. 



Business Manager. 
Field Marshal. 
Official Scorer. 



21' 



Grinds. 



"Without offense to friends or foes. 
We sketch the world exactly as it goes." 

Class of '94 — 

" Ommittamus studia ; 
Dulce est desipere ; 
Et carpamus dulcia, 
Juventatis tenerae." 
H. E. Gr-ff-th — 

"I divide my affections between the Junior and Senior classes." 

H. M. J-NN-NGS — 

" Her presence hath power to warm, soothe, nay, even bless." 
Dr. Sh-pp-rd — 

"Hood's Sarsaparilla cures that tired feeling." 
L-tt — H-y-s — 

" Sleep, love, and dream of me." 
C. A. Ph-ll-ps — 

"And woman draws us with a single hair." 
E. D. S-nb-rn (in history class) — 

" He was real handsome, a student, and — " Prof, (prompting) — " Curled 
his hair." 
J. S-ngl-t-n — 

" She locked her lips; she left me where I stood." 
M. Ch-ttl 

" She had a natural, nice sincerity, a simple truthfulness." 
L. H. Kn-x— 

" I awoke one morning to find myself famous." 

210 



Metaphysics, February 29 — 

Prof. C. : "How many pains are there, Mr. H-tf-ld, when you are 
disappointed in love?" Mr. H. : "Two." 
Miss G-rm-n— 

"A simple maiden in her flower, is worth a hundred coats of-arms." 
H. R. C-r-w-y— 

"A head that's to be let unfurnished." 
Miss S-g-r— 

"Juliet, she so light of foot, so light of spirit." 
H. A. Fr-s-r — 

'* I am not in the roll of common men." 
Miss H-w-rd — 

" Fresh, as is the month of May." 

A. W. B-RT-N— 

" When I was in Boston — " 
Miss M-r-d-th — 

"Ah, you sweet little rogue, you." 
J. W. D-CK-Y— 

" Kind hearts are more than coronets." 
Miss G-t-s — 

" I cannot flatter and speak fair." 

Room ii — 

"All hope abandon, ye who enter here." 
J. M. Er-cs-n — 

"Greater men than I may have lived, but I doubt it." 
Miss R-l-nd — 

"Such war of red and white within her cheeks." 
Prof. H-rsw-ll — 

"Wisdom personified and sawed off." 

Miss B-bc-ck — 

" Learn to read slow, all other graces will follow, in their proper 
places." 
F. Ch-rl-s — 

"Nice boy." 

220 



Miss F. St-v-ns — 

" With all her faults, we love her still." 
E. P. C— k — 

" None but himself can be his parallel." 
Class of '93 — 

"They have a plentiful lack of wit." 
Miss A. M-ll-r — 

" A dog rose blushin' to a brook 
Ain't modester nor sweeter." 

C-RT-R — 

" Oh, your sweet eyes." 
Prof. St-llh-ff-n to Mr. H-pb-rt — 

" Mein Gott ! can't you see I mean you?" 
Miss Y-ng — 

" Her stature tall, I hate a dumpy woman." 

W. F. T-ML-NS-N— 

"How long, O Lord, how long?" 
Miss M-ltm-n — 

" Lips and cheeks of ruby light." 

H. M. -CHL-N 

" No doubt you are the people and wisdom will die with you.' 
Miss Dr-w — 

" I can sing in many sorts of music." 

K-RR 

" Whose freshness has braved many a storm." 
Miss Wh-t- l 

" A sweeter woman ne'er drew breath." 
E. H. T-wl 

" I am to myself dearer than a friend." 
Miss Fr-m-n — 

" Such stuff as dreams are made of." 
W. B. D-bl 

" Man delights me not, nor woman either." 
Miss T-vl-r — 

" So fair, so fresh, so youthful, and so rosy." 

221 



C. K. Sh-rm-n — 

" Perfumed with myrrh and frankincense and all powders of the mer- 
chant." 
Miss J-n-s — 

" A brown-eyed maiden." 

C. R. H-RTM-NN 

" My love is like the red, red rose." 

Miss D-l 

" I study fashions to adorn my body." 
A. C. Ab-l — 

" A friend that sticketh closer than a brother." 
Miss B-rd— 

" For she was timid as a wintry flower." 
H. Wh-t-h-d — 

"A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse." 
Miss -m-ry — 

" One of those charming pug-noses, dear little knobs for men to hang 
their hearts, like hats, upon." 

Jno. D-ngl 

"Where is Abel, thy brother?" 
Misses H-ld-rm-n — 

"An apple cleft in two is not more twin than these." 
Wm. F-rr-s — 

" Vaulting ambition which o'erleaps itself and falls on the other side." 

Miss -rv-n 

" Divinely tall and fair, a perfect exponent of Delsarte." 
J. H. R-ym-nd — 

" I have bought golden opinions from all sorts of people." 
The A. B.'s of '92 — 

" A set of dull, conceited hashes, 
Confuse their brains in college classes. 
They gang in sticks and come out asses, 
Plain truth to speak. 

An' syne they think to climb Parnassus, 
By dint o' Greek." 

222 



Miss F. St-v-r — 

" Uncertain, coy, and hard to please:" 
W. E. M-rs 

" Time was, when a man lost his brains, he died." 
Miss S-rg-nt — 

" For she will sing the savageness out of a bear." 
H. P-rs-n — 

" What a fine man hath your tailor made you." 
Smith, '92, '92, '92, '94, '95 — 

" One of the few immortal names that was not born to die." 
J. R. D-ck-ns-n — 

" Young gent, thy spirits are too bold for thy years." 
Miss M-r 

" 'Cause I's wicked, I is ; 
I's mighty wicked, anyhow." 
Class '95 — 

" An infant crying in the night, 
An infant crying for a light, 
And with no language but a cry." 
Miss Sch-tt-nf-ls — 

" Phoebus ! What a name ! " 

B-CKS, -CHL-N, F-RR-S — 

" Gallia est omnes divisa in partes tres." 
Miss G-r 

" Those heavenly looks, those dear, deluding eyes." 
H. E. L— ch— 

" Beneath his hat lie schemes and deviltries." 
A. D-x-n— 

" So very green that cows will make cuds of him ere long." 
H. L. H-rv-y— 

" What we know is very little, but what we think we know is immense." 
A. Fl-g-r — 

" Confound it all, who says I'm bow-legged ? " 
Miss Sh-m-n — 

" Condensed sweetness." 

223 



Miss T-BfiS— 

" Impulsive, earnest, prompt to act, 
And make her generous thought a fact." 
Miss B-tch-ld-r — 

" Too fair to worship, too divine to love, I'd be a butterfly." 
School of Oratory — 

" One omnipresent, damned, eternal noise." 
Miss T-b-r — 

" How can you e'er propose, 
You who ken hardly verse from prose, 
To make a sang." 
The Choir — 

" Swans sing before they die. 
'Twere no bad thing 

Did certain persons die before they sing." 
W. C. St-w- — 

" He had only one idea, and that was wrong." 

MlSS W-K-M-N 

" As young, as beautiful, and as coy as young ; 
And gay as coy, and innocent as gay." 
C. C-lb-rts-n — 

" Pay that thou owest." 
Columbia Bakery — 

" The flies and I, its only customers." 
Miss P-rk-s — 

" Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low, an excellent thing in a 
woman." 
N. F. Sm-th — 

" How happy he would be sewing frills into his little girl's frocks, and 
how pretty he would look sitting in a parlor, with a rough man 
making love to him." 
T-u K-p-a P-i-s — 

" The would-be ' Dekes.' " 
Miss B-rtl-tt — 

" Lovely, fresh, and green." 

224 



C. D. W-LS-N — 

"The world knows nothing of its greatest men." 
T. K. G-l-- 

" As loquacious as a flock of geese." 
Prof. {Jo class) — 

" Whenever I go down to Rose Hill there is a fall in spirits." 
Overheard at Afuir's : 

Mr. M. — " Come on, let's go up to the Fern Sem." 

Mr. W. — " No, I can't ; my arm is lame." 
D-l-w-r — 

" Who thinks too little, and who talks too much." 
Miss H-nt — 

" To know her is a liberal education." 

H-DL-Y — 

" His equal lives not. Thank God for that ! " 

C. S -LDR-CH 

" I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come." 
Massasoits — 

" Requiescant in pacibus." 
St-v-r — 

"A man of unbounded stomach: a wandering abyss." 

F. W. H-M-NW-Y 

" While there's life there's hope." 
An envelope containing the following Valentine and a lock of Glossy hair 
was picked up in chapel Monday, Feb. 15. It is supposed that it was 
dropped by some Senior, but we can't imagine what one it was : 

A Valentine. 

O, Charley, Charley, red and fair, 
I send herewith a lock of hair ; 
It is a token of the love 
Which now inflames your little dove. 
Though bald and shiny is your pate, 
No baldness can my love abate. 
This is leap year, O come, be mine, 
And share my hair — Your Valentine. 

225 



Mother Goose Rhymes 

Hey diddle diddle, 

Johnny Hand on a fiddle, 

Played a waltz and the students joined in, 

The bibs were amazed, 

The Dean fairly dazed, 

And the faculty said what a sin, sin, sin, 

And the faculty said what a sin. 

Young woman, young woman, young woman, quoth I, 

whither, O whither, O whither so high ? 

1 live in the Fem Sem close to the sky, 

But the lift will be running, aye, some time in the dim and dis- 
tant future. 

Ride a cock horse through the whole college course, 
Just see Mr. Towle ride on a white horse ! 
With a book on his lap, and with notes on his cuff, 
He'll get through the "ex." that is certain enough. 

Goosey, goosey, gander, 

Whither did you wander ! 

All around the chapel to the southeast corner, 

There I saw some D.-G.'s who whispered during prayer, 

I told Professor Atwell and he got in their hair. 

Philosophy, osophy, Doc, 

Our Prof, runs like a clock", 

Large A, Roman three, 

In parenthesis (B), 

George Coe, philosophy Doc, 



220 




Alumni 



of the 



College of Liberal Arts. 




Alumni. 



Officers of the Association 



W. A. DYCHE, '82, 
GILES HUBBARD, '87, 
PHILIP R. SHUMWAY '89, 
MARIE H. WILDER, '68, 



President. 

Vice President . 

Treasurer. 

Secretary and Historian. 



Executive Committee. 

W. A. Dyche. Lewis S. Rice. 

Giles Hubbard. Mary M. Claff. 

MariE H. Wilder. 



Directors Until '92. 

M. C. Bragdon. F. M. Elliot. 

W. A. Dyche. 

Directors Until '93. 

Mary M. Claff. Giles Hubbard. 

Philip R. Shumway. 



Directors Until '94. 



Marie H. Wilder. Henry A. Pearsons. 

Lewis S. Rice. 



22S 



Alumni. 



QbBEY, CHARLES P., A. B., '89, $K*, 

/ Room 720, Chamber of Commerce, 
Chicago, 111. 

Ackerman, George E., A. M., D. D., '78, 
B 9 II, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Adams, Edward C, A. M., M. D., '79, 
$ K 2, Watertown, S. D. 

Adams, Isaac E., A. M., '79, B II, Room 
309, 205 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 

Adams, John P., A. B., '91, B9n, Teacher, 
Maywood, 111. 

Adams, John Q., A. B., '89, A T, 214 Fred- 
erick street, Berlin, Germany. 

*Adams, William H. H., A. M., D. D., '70, 

Adams, Zella F., M. L., '84, 425 Church 
street, Evanston, 111. 

Adee, John N., Ph. B., '91, Principal of 
Wheeling Public School, Wheeling, Cook 
County, 111. 

Alabaster, Francis A., A. B., '90, 4> K *, 
Teacher, Little Rock, Ark. 

Allen, Cora L., B. L., '88, A *, 215 East 
Capitol street, Washington, D. C. 

Allen, Jacob R., A. M., Rev., '69, 69 Oak 
street, Freeport, 111. 

Allen, Nathan R., C. E., '76, Business, 
Kenosha, Wis. 

Ailing, Kate M., A. M., '87, K K T, Princi- 
pal High School, Ft. Collins, Col. 

Ailing, Belle E., Ph. B., '88, K K T, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Ambrose, Jay B., A. B., '90, Teacher, Rock- 
ford, 111. 

Ambrose, Lodilla, Ph. M., '87, Librarian, 
N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 



Andrews, E. Wyllys, A. M., M. D., '78, 2 X, 
$ B K, 65 Randolph street, Chicago, 111. 

Andrews, Frank T., A. M., M. D., '81, 2 X, 
65 Randolph street, Chicago, 111. 

Andrews, Wilbur J., A. M., '87, $Kf, Law- 
yer, Evanston, 111. 

Annis, Thomas E., A. M., M. D., '59, 
National City, Cal. 

Antes, Howard R., A. B., Rev., '77, Flor- 
ence, Col. 

Appleton, Alanson S., A. B., '76, 2 X, 
Journalist, The Rookery, Chicago, 111. 

Arnold, Edwin C, A. B., Rev., '73, 4> K *, 
Pastor Ada Street Church, 13 10 West 
Adams street, Chicago, 111. 

Arnold, William S., A. M., '76, Professor. 
Willamette University, 367 Winter street, 
Salem, Ore. 

Atchison, Hugh R, A. B., Rev., '87, A T, 
Normal Park, 111. 

Atchison, Wilbur F., A. M., Rev., '84, A Y. 
Hyde Park, 111. 

RaBBITT, GEORGE A., A. B., '75, Re- 
porter, 618 West Monroe street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Babcock, Florence, Ph. B., '89, Kenilworth, 
111. 

Babcock, Mabel, A. B., '89, Kenilworth, 111. 

f Badger, Emeline, nee Green, Amboy, 111. 

Baird, Robert, A. M., '69, <i> K *, Professor, 
N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 

Bannister, Charles K., A. M., '69, <f> K *, 
South Evanston, 111. 

fBannister, Emma J., nee White, '73, South 
Evanston, 111. 



•Deceased. 

fLadies of classes previous to 1874 were gradu- 
ated at the Northwestern Female College. 



229 



& ) 



Jannister, John C, A. M., '83, H O II, 
Manufacturer, Kewanec, 111. 

Bannister, Henry M., A. M., M. I)., '63, 
Physician to Insane Asylum, Kankakee, 
111. 

Haines, George (). , B. S., '90, <f> A (), Law- 
yer, Washburn, 111. 

Barnes, Nellie A., nee Lewis, B. L., '80, 
Joliet, 111. 

Barnes, William I)., A. B., '91, B 6 II, 
Student, 52 Mt. Auburn street, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Bass, George A., Ph. B., '88, * K % Secre- 
tary Thwing Electric Co., Evanston, 111. 

Bass, Perkins B., A. B., '88, * K *, Real 
Estate, 149 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 

Bass, Stella, Ph. B., '89, A 4», Evanston, 111. 

Bassett, George M., A. M., B. D., Rev., '78, 
Lena, 111. 

Bates, Joseph H., A. B., M. I)., '75, 4> K 2, 
Neponset, 111. 

*Battey, Owen, A. B., '85, A Y. 

Bayne, Mary, B. L., '79, Warren, 111. 

Baxter, A. Lawson, A. B., '90, <J> K 2, 334 
Monroe street, Chicago, 111. 

Beal, Ellery H., A. M., Rev., '72, 2 X, 
La Salle, 111. 

*Beatty, Frank M., A. B., '73, * K 2. 

Beers, Forrest W., A. B., '89, A T, Lakeside 
Building, Chicago, 111. 

Beggs, George W., A. M., '59, $ A 9, Sioux 
City, la. 

Bell, James E., A. B., Rev., '76, 322 Camp- 
bell street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Bell, Leon E., A. B., Rev., '84, A Y, Youngs- 
town, N. Y. 

Benedict, Theresa, nee Ludlow, '89, K K T, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Bennett, Charles S., Ph. B., '88, * Y, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Bennett, May L., A. B., '91, A <J>, Evanston, 
111. 

*Bennett, Mary A., A. B., '84, A T. 

Bennett, John W., A. B., '80, 2 K, Lawyer, 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Benthall, Elizabeth D., nee Wilson, M. D,, 
Quasqueton, la. 

Bentley, Robert, A. B., D. D., Rev., '62, 
1015 Linden street, Oakland, Cal. 

f Bentley, Frances A., nee Harvey, '63, Oak- 
land, Cal. 



*Berry, Thomas S., A. M., '72. 

f Best, Fannie J., nee Stout, '69, Jacksonville, 

111. 
I '.est, William I)., A. M., Rev., '70, 865 East 

State street, Jacksonville, 111. 
Bickell, Edwin J., A. M., Rev., '77, editor 

Montana Christian Advocate, Helena, 

Mont. 
Bishop, Andrew B., A. M., M. I)., '69, <J> K *, 

San Jose, Cal. 
Bissell, John W., A. M., I). I)., Rev., "67, 

President U. I. University, Fayette, la. 
Black, Stanley P., Ph. B., M. D., '82, *K 2, 

Cook County Hospital, 28 Aldine square, 

Chicago, 111. 
Blanchard, Rollin P., Ph. B., '70, Lawyer, 

115 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 
Bloom, David H., A. B., LL. B., '75, B9n, 

Lawyer, Cherokee, la. 
Bloom, Ella, nee Sawyer, Ph. B., '85, A 4>, 

Cherokee, la. 
Bock, Helen H., Ph. B., '90 A T, Lincoln, 111. 
Boddy, Samuel L., Ph. B., '85, B 6 n, Law- 
yer, Cherokee, la. 
Booth, W T illiam M., A. M., '78, 2 X, Law- 
yer, 152 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 
*Booth, Charles H., Ph. B., '88, <J> K *. 
Botsford, Bennett B., Ph. B., '62, <J> A 0, 

Merchant, 95 Wabash avenue, Chicago, 

111. 
Boutelle, Her.ryS., A. M., LL. B., '74, BGH, 

Lawyer, Grand Central Passenger Sta- 
tion, Chicago, 111. 
f*Boyd, Celia E., nee Snow, '61. 
Boyd, Charlotte, nee Lyford, Ph. B., '89, 

r 4> B, Wyoming, 111. 
*Bradford, Smith S., A. M., Rev., '76. 
Bradford, Columbus, A. B., Rev., '88, A Y, 

Clifton Heights, St. Louis, Mo. 
Bradley, Timothy C, C. E., '77, Kansas 

City, Mo. 
Bragdon, Charles C, A. M., '65, 4> K *, 

Principal Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, 

Mass. 
Bragdon, Merritt C, A. M., M. D., '70, 

2 X, Evanston, 111. 
Bragdon, George E., Ph. B., '72, 2 X, 

Business, Pueblo, Col. 
*Brainard, Alex. D., A. B., '74. 
Brand, Charles H., B. L., '87, A Y, Insur- 
ance, 9 Groveland Park, Chicago, 111. 



230 



'82, Ben, Busi- 

B. D., Rev., '81, 
E. Church, San 



'89, Ben 



'67, Osh- 



C 



Breed, Ida, nee Stewart, A. B., '78, Teacher 

Belvidere, 111. 
Briggs, Alvah G., A. B. 

ness, Petaluma, Cal. 
Briggs, Arthur H., A. M. 

B6n, Epworth M. 

Francisco, Cal. 
Brjggs, Herbert F., A. B., Rev 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
f Bright, Frances J., nee Roberts 

kosh, Wis. 
Bristol, Frank M., A. M., D. D., '77, 4> K 2, 

Pastor Trinity Church, 2519 Indiana 

avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Brooks, J. Howard, A. B., Rev., '67, Wisner, 

Neb. 
Brown, Walter Lee, Sc. B., '76, Evanston, 

111. 
Brown, Jessie S., nee Cowles, Ph. B., '82, 

218 Woolworth avenue, Omaha, Neb. 
Brushingham, John P., A. M., '81, $Kf, 

Pastor M. E. Church, Ravenswood, 111. 
Burch, William A., Ph. B., Rev., '90, A Y, 

Argyle Park, 111. 
Burke, Edmund W., A. M., '68, 4> K *, 

Lawyer, 86 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 
*Burke, Charles H., A. M., '75. 
*Burke, James E., A. B., '72. 
Burr, Albert H., Ph. B., M. D 

State street, Chicago, 111. 
Butcher, John C, A. M., M. D. 

Missionary, Bijnour, India. 
Butterfield, Almus, A. B., '63, Commission 

Merchant, 182 South Water street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Butterfield, Lewis, A. B., '73, Business, 

Momence, 111. 
Butterfield, Willis, A. M., M. D., '69, 4> K *, 

Belvidere, 111. 
Byers, Fred M., Ph. B., '87, East Troy High 

School, Troy, 111. 



(pADDOCK, HENRY, A. B., '88, 2 X, 

^ Accountant, Wilson Bros., Chicago, 111. 

(si |Cady, Henry O., A. M., B. D., Rev., '83, 

I AT, Missionary, Chentu, China. VL^S^ 

Calkins, Harvey R., A. B., '88, Ben, 501 

Weber street, Colorado Springs, Col. 

*" Calkins, Helen, nee Pearsons, Ph. B., '88, 

A $, Colorado Springs, Col. 



'77, 279 
'81, A T, 



Campbell, Frank J., Ph. M., M. D., '87, 
*Kt Fargo, N. D. 

Caraway, Blanche, B. L., '89, A <£, 215 East 
Capitol street, Washington, D. C. 

Carr, William W., Ph. B., Rev. '77, Ben, 
210 Eliza street, Peoria, 111. 

*Carroll, William F., A. B., '82, Ben. 

Cartwright, Ira C, Ph. B., '88, Missionary, 
Pachuca, Mexico. 

Casseday, David, C. E., '74, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Casseday, Frank F., Ph. B., M. D., '77, 
<I> K 2, Kansas City, Mo. 

Castle, Curtis H., A. M. M. D., '72, Mer- 
ced, Cal. 

Chamberlain, William R., Ph. B., '81, A T, 
Lawyer, 87 Washington street, Chicago, 
111. 

Chase, William C, A. B., '85, Business, 
Quincy, 111. 

Childs, Rebecca, nee Roland, Ph. B., '74, 
Evanston, 111. 

Clapp, Eben P., A. M., M. D., '81, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Clapp, Mary E., nee Norton, Ph. B., '83, 
Evanston, 111. 

Clark, Abner, A 
ville, 111. 

Clarke, Mary E., B. I 
la. 

Cleveland, F. W., Ph. B. 
Park, 111. 

Clifford, Winchester E., A. M., '59, Insur- 
ance, Evanston, 111. 

Clifford, Chester C, Ph. B., '88, Business, 
Evanston, 111. 

Clifford, Caroline, B. L., '90, T^B, Teacher, 
Evanston, 111. 

Cochran, Leonard G., A. M., '76, Pro- 
fessor, Upper Iowa University, Fay- 
ett, la. 

Collins, Lorin C, A. B., Hon., '72, 2 X, 
Judge Circuit Court, Cook County, 
Norwood Park, 111. 

Collins, Frances, nee Towle, B. L., '87, A $, 
, r Evanston, 111. 

AW^CColman, Lucius C, A. B., '75, * K 2, Lum- 
ber, La Crosse, Wis. 

Comstock, Alice S., '66, Evanston, 111. 

Comstock, William C, A. M., '67, 4> K *, 
Commission Business, Evanston, 111. 

231 



I to 



B., Rev., '78, Morrison - 
'90, K K T, Algona, 
'73, 4> K 2, Oak 



^KJu^flAsiM^ 



^3 



Coniey, George L., A. 15., '88, * K t, Mor 

gan Park, 111. 
Conwell, James S., Sc. B., '82, * K 2, with 

Hirsch Bros., 10 Laurome street, San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Cook, Alfred, A. M., '77, Journalist, Piano, 

111. 
Cook, Charles E., A. B., M. I)., '79, Men- 

dota, 111. 
Cook, Frank, A. 15., '85, A T, Business, 

Geneseo, 111. 
Coombe, Joseph, A. B., Rev., '80, Ilal- 

stead, Kas. 
Coon, Henrietta M., Ph. M., '87, A <i>, 

Teacher, Hotel Clinton, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Cooper, Henry A., A M., Ph. B., '73, 2 X, 

Lawyer, Racine, Wis. 
Corbin, Frederick R., A. B., '91, with West- 
ern Electric Co., 227 South Clinton 

street, Chicago, 610 Hinman avenue, 

Evanston, 111. 
Cormack, Joseph M., A. M., Rev., '81, A T, 

Joliet 111. 
Cormack, Jane M., nee Marshall, B. L., '81, 

A 4>, Joliet, 111. 
*Corncll, Drayton L., C. E., '76, <I> K 2 

(1883). 
Cowles, Florence M., nee Call, B. L., '84, 

Algona, la. 
Craig, Alfred E., A. B., Rev., '90, Hillsdale, 

Mich. 
Crandon, Anna L., Ph. B., '83, A T, Evans- 
ton, 111. 
Crandon, Leila M., M. L., '84, A T, -Paris, 

Craven, Thomas, A. M., Rev., '70, Mission- 
ary, Nfti«- i - Tal, India * OAr^A^i^otv , *^-A • 

Crawford, William H., A. M., B. D./'84, 
<I> K i', Professor Historical Theology, 
Gammon School of Theology, Atlanta, 
Ca. 

Crist, John J., A. 15., Rev., '75, B 9 IL 
Monticello, Minn. 

Cross, Moses S., A. M., '81, B 6 EI, Stock- 
ton, Cal, 

Culver, Morton, A. M., '67, <I> K "f, Lawyer, 
159 Randolph street, Chicago, 111. 

Cumnock, Anna C, nee Webster, '72, Ev- 
anston, 111. 

*Cuncr, John, A. M., Rev., '76. 



( unier, Albert I)., S< . P., '84, 1 X, JIl 

First National Bank Building, Chicago, 

111. 
Curtis, Hiram A., A. M., Rev., '69, Juniata, 

Neb. 
Cushing, Cassie M., nee Scott, Ph. 15., '80, 

Highland Park, 111. 
Cutler, Frank II. , Sc. B , M. I)., '77, Cedar 

Rapids, la. 

^ANDY, JOHN M., A. B., '73, *K I, 

Journalist, 89 Clark stieet, Chicago, 111. 
Darrow, Charles W., Sc. B., '82, Lawyer, 

Glenwood Springs, Col. 
David, Mary E., Ph. 15., '87, A <J>, Joliet, 111. 
Davidson, Eric A., A. B., Rev., '88, Tacoma, 

Wash, 
f Davis, Anna L., nee Marcy, '70, Evanston, 

111. 
Davis, Ella V., nee Ambrose, B. L., '79, 

Clarence, la. 
Davis, Haskell C, A. B., '90, Business, P. O. 

Box 1600, Spokane Falls, Wash. 
Davis, Lewis P., A. M., D. D., Rev., '72, 

<J> K "$, 291 Hancock avenue, Detroit, 

Mich. 
Davis, Nathan S., Jr., A. M., M. D., '80, 

2 X, 65 Randolph street, Chicago, 111. 
Davis, Smith C, A. M., Rev., '87. Dowagiac, 

Mich. 
Dean, Nellie, nee Stewart, B. L., '90, A $, 

Palatine, 111. 
De Groff, Raymond V., Sc. B., '81, 2 X, 

Superintendent of Schools, Farmington, 

111. 
Demorest, Frederick C, A. B., '90, A T, 

Teacher, Box 1600, Morgan Park, 111. 
Demorest, William L., A. M., Rev., '78, 2 X, 

Walnut, 111. t 

Denman, Asahel H., Ph. B., '83, Lawyer, J #3 

£300 Walnut street, Des Moines, IaJ /^fcli *fc '- K*^»v3- 

Denny, Charles M., Ph. B., '90, A Y, 51 At*.kv. U-v£*» 

Clapp Block, Des Moines, la. fte^c dU 

Dickman, Adella G., nee Maltbie, M. L., '84, M^JiA 

A <J>, Fayette, la. y\r&4 

Dickson, John W., A. B., '75, <t> K S, Vera 

Cruz, Mexico. 
Dixon, George W., A. B., '89, * K *, 3131 

Michigan avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Donelson, Dexter P., A. B., '79, 2 X, Manu- 
facturer, 234 North Clark street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 






L>.'52 



Drake, Chester T., C. E., 2 X, '74, Manu- 
facturer, 160 South Clinton street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Dyche, Frank B., A. M., '80, <i> K 2, Law- 
yer, U. S. Express Building, Chicago, 
111. 

Dyche, William A., A. M., '82, $ K 2, 
Druggist, 65 Randolph street, Chicago, 
111. 

Carle, mary h., sc. b., '88, k a o, 

^» Teacher, Dixon, 111. 

Earll, Robert E., Sc. M., '77, Smithsonian 
Institute, Washington, D. C. 

Early, Albert D., A. B.', '77, 2 X, Lawyer, 
Rockford, 111. 

Eastman, Samuel L., A. M., Rev., '59, 
Sutherland, la. 

Edmondson, Stuart P., Ph. B., Rev., '86 
4> K *, Danville, Ind. 

Edwards, Arthur R., A. M., '88, B G n, 
Physician. 2816 Indiana avenue, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Edwards, John R., A. B., '78, Cortland, 111. 

Edwards, Robert B., A. B., '72, Lawyer, 
Lacon, 111. 

Eldredge, Byron H., C. E., '73, La Grange, 
111. 

Ellinwood, Charles M , Ph. M., '76, Pro- 
fessor, Nebraska Wesleyan University, 
University place, Lincoln, Neb. 

Elliot, Frank M., B. L., '77, 2 X, Real 
Estate, 123 La Salle street, Chicago ; 
Evanston, 111. 

Ellis, John, A. M., Rev., '67, <t> K *, Pastor 
Congregational Church, Maywood, 111. 

Elder, Anna A., nee Davis, B. L., '77, Glen 
Elder, Kas. 

Elder, E., B. L., A. M., Rev., 77, Glen 
Elder, Kas. 

Elmore, Arthur E., Ph. B., A T, '89, Busi- 
ness, Rockford, 111. 

Elmore, Eltinge, Ph. B., '72, 2 X, Busi- 
ness, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Emmett, Cornelia F., nee Winslow, '62, 
Sibley, la. 

Erickson, Edward W., A. B., '90, Student, 
G. B. I., 1334 Maple avenue, Evanston, 
111. 

Estes, William C, C. E., '74, <f> K 2, Bay- 
view, Wis. 



Evans, Walter A., A. M., B. D., '82, Rev., 
A T, 1730 Fletcher street, Chicago, 111. 

Evans, William G., A. B., '77, 2 X, Secre- 
tary of Denver Tramway Company, 
Denver, Col. 

FARLEY, SAMUEL S., A. B., Rev., '89, 
A T, Lake View, Minn. 

Ferry, Aurelia M., '63, Long Pine, Neb. 

Ferry, Cornelia S., '63, Long Pine, Neb. 

Field, Elizabeth, nee Edwards, M. L., '89, 
A <I>, Evanston, 111. 

Finity, Michael, A. M., '70, Missionary in 
Indian Territory. 

Finley, Mary Olive, B. L., '91, A $, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Fisher, Harriet A., nee De Coudres, '63, 
Honolulu, Sandwich Islands. 

*Fisher, Mary Ann, nee McKean, '67. 

Fisk, Aurora T., A. B., '90, A T, Teacher, 
Hardy Hall, Duluth, Minn. 

Fitch, Julia P., B. L., '88, Teacher, Aurora, 
111. 

Fitch, Louisa B., nee Bragdon, '61, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Fleming, Robert I., A. M., Rev., '86, A T, 
Batavia, 111. 

*Foote, Isabella S., nee Miner, '61. 

Foster, Amelia J., nee Conwell, '71, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Foster, George A., A. B., '81, B 6 IT, Busi- 
ness, 147 Fifth avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Foulkes, Charles A., Ph. M., M. D., '80, 
2 X, Surgeon, A., T. & Santa Fe Rail- 
road, Fourth street and Washington 
avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

Fox, Daniel O., A. M., Rev., '71, Mission- 
ary, India. 

Frake, James, A. M., '66, $Kt, Lawyer, 
132 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 

Frizzelle, J. Wellington, A. B., Rev., '88, 
$ T A, Box 296, Lexington, 111. 

Fullerton, William D., LL. B., '85, B 9 II, 
Lawyer, 121 La Salle street, Chicago, III. 

Furber, Harriet C, nee Wood, '62, 183 
Twenty-fifth street, Chicago, 111. 

CAINES, CHAUNCEY, A. M., '73, 
4> K ^, Business, Berkeley, Alameda 
County, Cal. 



233 



V 






dU>*-^ 






4^ - G»VtU>A£>*v 



^J 



*Gardner, Clarence A., Ph. B., '77,* K 2. 
Garnsey, Ellen E., »« Bradley, A. M., '66, 

Evanston, 111. 
Garst, nee Goodwin, Bertha G., B. L., '7s, 

Goon Rapids, la. 

Garst, Mary E., B. L., '78, Goon Rapids, la. 

Gaskell, Charles A., A. M., '75, Publisher, 
1024 West Adams street, Ghicago, 111. 

Gibbs, Josephine G., '71, South Evanston, 111. 

Gibbs, Oscar L., C. E., '74, Business, 
Phoenix, A. T. 

Gill, Joseph II., A. M., Rev., '70, Garhwal, 
India. 

Gillespie, Albert I)., Sc. B., '75, Draughts- 
man, 84 La Salle street, Ghicago, 111. 

Gloss, David PL, Ph. P., '87, Evanston, 111. 

Gloss, Janet C., Ph. JVL, '87, Teacher, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Goodenow, Cortez J., Sc. B.j '75, B II, 
Business, Granite Falls, Minn. 
J Goodsmith, Minnie R., nee Moulding, B. L., 
'83, A $, 9tfoClark street, Chicago, 111. 

*Gould, Edwin, A\ B., '71. 

Gradle, Fannie, nee Searles, '70, 604 East 
Division street, Chicago, 111. 

Graves, Charles S., A. B., '89, 4> K ^, Law- 
yer, 151 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 

*Green, Frances, '70. 

Green, Henry, A. B., '73, Lawyer, Sterling, 
111. 

Greene, Truman R., B. L. , Rev., '87, 4> T A, 
418 Watt avenue, Pullman, 111. 

Greenman, Almon W., Ph. B., Rev., '80, 

P. E. and President of Colonia Institute, 

P. O., 242 Calle Tacuarembo, Monte- 

video, Uruguay. c 

^Greenman, Emily, Ph. B., '83, MarTon.; -L«d. 

Greenman, Guy, Ph. B., '87, Wilson Bros., 
Chicago, 111. 
( Gridley, Martin M., Ph. B., '83, 4> K 2, Law- 
yer, 155 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 

Grier, James P., A. B., '90, <I> K ^, Student 
U. C. L., 243 Wabash avenue, Chicago, 
111. 

Groves, John E., B. S., '90, Cherokee, la. 



UaAGENSON, ANTON P., 

j Kenosha, Wis. 

Hall, Adele, nee Somers, B. I. 
Forest avenue, Chicago, 111. 



P. S., '90, 
, '82, 3318 



Hall, Eva K., B. L., '90, K A 9, Teacher, 

River Forest, 111. 
Hall, Winfield S., Sc. B., M. D., '87, * K fr, 

Professor, Haverford College, Pennsyl- 
vania. 
Hamilton, Charles II., Sc. P., '80, <l> K 1, 

Miller, Ottawa, 111. 
Hamilton, James R., A. B., '90, Evanston, 

111. 
Hamilton, William A., A. M., B 6 II, '79, 

Lawyer, Room 309, 205 La Salle street, 

Chicago, 111. 
Hamline, John H., A. M., '75, I X, Lawyer, 

60 Portland Block, Chicago, 111. 
Haney, Conrad, A. B., Rev., '78, 4> K 1, 

Chicago, 111. 
Haney, James W., A. M., D. D., Rev., '61, 

$ A 0, Kewanee, 111. 
Haney, Roxy, nee Doe. '72, Plankinton, 

S. D. 
Harker, Ray C, A. B., '91, A Y, Student, 

G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 
Harding, Mary E., nee Clifford, '62, Evans- 
ton, Hi. 
Harkness, Nathan J., Ph. M., Rev., '82, 

A T, Freeport, 111. 
Harris, Frank M., C. E., '75, 1 X, Business, 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Harris, William H., A. M., LL. B., '78, 2 X, 

Lawyer, 229 Broadway, New York. 
Harris, Sidney M., A. B., '80, <I> K 2, Her- 
man, Minn. 
Harrison, Edwin J., Ph. B., '72, 2 X, Busi- 
ness, Sauk Center, Minn. 
Harrison, Hugh, Ph. B., '79, Business, 209 

Oak avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Harrison, James L., A. M., Rev., '75, 

21 La Grange street, Worcester, Mass. 
Harvey, Clarence H., '78, Ph. B. 
Harvey, Ida M., A. M., '87, Teacher, 1024 

Wilcox avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Haskins, AmaryS., A. B., '91, AY, Student, 

G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 
*Hazelton, Emily G., nee Bishop, '65. 
Hatfield, James T. , '83, A. M. , Ph. D. , B II, ) fc °K 

Professor, N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 
Hathaway, William J., A. M., Rev., '77, 

Paw Paw, Mich. 
Ilawkes, Joseph M., A. B., '74, B II, 

Journalist, Globe Building, St. Paul, 

Minn. 



2.'54 



by (H"is, 



Helm, Walter B., Sc. B., M. I)., '81, Rock- 
ford, 111. 

Helmer, Bessie, nee Bradwell, A. M., '80, 
1428 Michigan avenue, Chicago, 111. 

*Hemenway, Lillie M., nee Bradley, B. L., 
'79. 

Hemenway, Henry B., A. M., M. D., '79, 
742 Chicago avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Henry, May, A. M., '85, A 4>, Paris, France. 

*Henry, Ira B., A. M., Rev., '70, Mason, Tex. 

Henry, Nellie, nee Case, '68, Mason, Tex. 

Hensel, James G., Sc. B., '91. 

Herben, Grace, nee Foster, '89, A. B., A $, 
Evanston, 111. 

Herben, Stephen J., A. B., '89, <i> K *, As- 
sistant Editor Epworth Herald, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Herrick, Horace N., A. M., Rev., '81, 
Anderson, Ind. 

*Hesler, Frank E., C. E., 2 X, '73. 

Hewitt, George W., A. M., '80, Lawyer, 
Orange City, la. 

Hill, Josephine, nee Day, '65, Ishpeming, 
Mich. 

Hill, Joseph H., A. M., '86, <f>K*, Professor, 
Kansas State Normal School, Emporia, 
Kas. 

*Hill, Devonia, '72. 

Hills, Frank A., A. B., '75, Farmer, Oregon, 
111. 

Alfred E., A. B., '83, A Y, Spicer, 
North Park, Col. 

Hilton, Theophilus B., A. M., Rev., '76, 
2 X, Omaha, Neb. 

Hilton, Jessie, nee Brown, A. M., '76, 
Omaha. Neb. 

Hitt, Isaac R., Sc.'B., '88, 4> A 9, Business, 
Evanston, 111. 

Hoag, Junius C, Ph. M., M. D., '78, 4> K 2, 
3100 Cottage Grove avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Hobart, William T., A. B., Rev., '79, Ben, 
Missionary, Pekin, China. 

Hobart, Emily M-, nee Hatfield, A. M., '82, 
Pekin, China. 

Hobbs, Richard G., A. M., Rev., '74, Ben, 
Paxton, 111. 

Holcomb, Amelia E., '66, Rockefeller, 111. 

Holden, Helen M., M. L., '87, Teacher, 
Baraboo, Wis. 

Holden, Robert H., A. B., '90, A Y, Re- 
porter, 346 Hoyne avenue, Chicago, jij 



Holderman, Mary B., Sc. B., '91, T 4> B, 
Morris, 111. 

fHolyoke, Cornelia A., nee Wheeler, '64, 
Evanston, 111. 

Hood, Thomas H., Ph. B., '79, B 9 U, Law- 
yer, 46 Marine Building, Chicago, 111. 

Horswell, George H., A. M., B. D., Ph. D., 
'79, 4> K *, Assistant Professor, N. W. 
U., Evanston, 111. 

Horswell, Charles, A. B., '84, <f> K *, Ad- 
junct Professor, G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 

Horswell, Helen, nee Redfield, Ph. M., '84, 
A T, Evanston, 111. 

Hostetler, Robert B., Sc. B., '75, <t> K 2, 
Decatur, 111. 

Howard, Otis McG., A. B., '89, 2 X, Editorial 
Staff, Farm, Field and Stockman, Chi- 
cago, 111. ; residence, Glencoe, 111. 

Howe, Lydia M., '61, Teacher, 215 South 
Peoria street, Chicago, 111. 

Howell, Harold R., Sc. B., '89, $A0, In- 
surance, Des Moines, la. 

Howell, Lizzie M., nee Brown, Ph. B., '90, 
K K T, * B K, Des Moines, la. 

Hubbard, Giles, A. M., '87, 2 X, Lawyer, 
55 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 

Hudson, Charles W., A. B., '76, Business, 
Waukegan, 111. 

Humphrey, Wirt E., Ph. B., '90, 4> K *, 222 
County Building, Chicago, 111. 

Hunt, Elizabeth R., M. L.,'77, A T, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Hunt, John E., Ph. B., '88, B n, Lawyer, 
Room 1, Borden Block, Chicago, 111. 

Hunt, Caroline L., A. B. '89, A T, Teacher, 
Minneapolis High School, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

fHuntoon, Louise, nee Gamble, '63, 212 
Noble street, La Porte, Ind. 

*Huntington, Fannie C, nee Lakin, '68. 

Huse, Frederic J., A. M., M. D., '68, Union 
Pacific Club, San Francisco, Cal. 

Hussey, Ella E., nee Badger, '70, Franklin 
Grove, 111. 

Husted, Fred M., A. M., '73, $Kt, Lawyer, 
528 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Huston, William H., A. M., '81, A Y, War 
Department, S. G. O., Washington, 
D. C. 

Hutchings, Frederic J., Ph. B., '64, Farmer, 
Northfield, 111. 



23: 



Hutchison, Matilda I'., Sc. M., '87, K K l\ 

Teacher, Mineral Point, Wis. 
Huxford, Edward D., Sc. J}., '85, B 6 II, 

Banker, Cherokee, la. 
Hyde, De Forest M., C. E., '74, * K 2, 

Lumber, Appleton, Wis. 

JACKSON, DOUGLAS V., B. L., '79, 
<J> K 2, Lawyer, Muscatine, Ta. 
James, Benjamin B., A. M., '81, Business, 

Chicago, 111. 
James, Emma P., nee Meserve, A. B., '81, 

A <I>, 6657 Harvard street, Englewood, 

111. 
Jarrett, Amy, Ph. B., '90, K K P, Hinsdale, 

111. 
Jessup, Robert B., Ph. B., M. I)., '80, 2 X, 

Vincennes, Inch 
Jewel, Anna, nee Cage, '68, Dowagiac, 

Mich. 
Johnson, John M., A. B., '72, Rev. 
Johnson, Frank S., A. M., M. I)., '78, 4> K 2, 

4 Sixteenth street, Chicago, 111. 
Johnson, Isaac, A. B., Rev., '88, Hortonville, 

Wis. 
f Jones, Julia M., nee Wood, '60, Marseilles, 

111. 
Jones, Emily M. nee Hall, '62, Greeley, Col. 
Jones, Lydia L., A. M., '82, K K P, Teacher, 

Lake View High School, Illinois. 
Jones, Minnie, A. B., '89, A <I>, Morgan 

Park, 111. 

l^AGEY, JACOB, A. B., '78, 147 West 

V Second street, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Karcher, Louis, Ph. B., '78, 4> K ^, Lawyer, 

163 Randolph street, Chicago, 111. 
Kaufman, Matthias S., A. M., Rev., '74, 

Pleasant street, New Bedford, Mass. 
Kay, Livonia R., Ph. B., '91, r * B, Wat- 

seka, 111. 
Kemble, Huston, A. M., B. I)., Rev., '80, 

Berea, O. 
*Kennicott, Albert C, Ph. B., '69, 4> K *. 
Kennedy, Lina P., B. L., '91, K A 0, Rock- 

ford, 111. 
Kidder, Henry M., 15. S,, '59, <l> A B, Board 

of Trade, RialtO Pudding, Chicago, III. 



Kimball, Arthur S., A. P., '77, « 8 II, 

Business, 644 Monroe street, Chicago, 111. 
Kimball, Harriet A., Ph. M., '83, A I, I 1 <^o 
Pmh, I'unc c. £ ktxk^^Umv^. jUL -» 

Kimball, Mather T., A. P., '72, Publisher, 
Kavenswood, 111. 

Kindig, Henry L., A. M., 2 X, Rev., '86, 
Covington, lud. 

King, Minnie E., A. B., '86, Evanston, 111. 

King, Mary E., nee Parks, B. L., '78, St. 
Lawrence, N. D. 

King, William, A. M., '73, Highland Park, 
111. 

Kinman, E. M., A. M., '78, Jacksonville, 111. 

Kinney, Margaret J., nee Shannon, '61, Cin- 
cinnati. O. 

*Kinsman, Ada S., nee Wanless, '67. 

Knapp, William C, A. M., '68, Abingdon, 
111. 

Knappen, Frank E., A. M., '77, 2 X, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 

Knox, William M., A. M., '74, 2 X, Jour- 
nalist, Press Club, 133 Clark street, 
Chicago, 111. 

Krantz, John, A. M., Rev., '76, Centen- 
ary, Jersey City, N. J. 

Kryder, fane E., nee Pattison, Ph. B., '76, 
Oregon, 111. 

*Kryder, Cyrus F., B. L., Rev., '78, B 9 II, 
(1884). 

Kuntzman, Gustav W., A. B., '89, A T, 
Journalist, Chicago, 111. 

I ACY, EMMA, nee Nind, Ph. M., '80, 

^^ Foo Chow, China. 

Lacy, William H., A. M., B. D., Rev., '81, 

4> K "f, Foo Chow, China. 
Ladd, JosephT., A. M., Rev., '78, Wheaton, 

111. 
Lambert, Charles E., A. M., '75, East Oak- 
land, Cal. 
Langworthy, Albert I)., A. B., 2 X, '70, 158 

Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 
Larash, George I., A. M., Rev., '87, A T, 

Bolton, 111. 
Leach, Charles, Ph. B., Rev., '74, Hueneme, 

Cal. 
Leach, William B., A. M., '79, Ph. D., 

Rev., 42 Mill street, Chicago, 111. 



236 



Lee, John. A. M., B. !>.. Rev.. '82, Galena, 
111. 

Leek. Lizzie A.. nee Hill, Ph. B., '87. A ♦, 
Port 'Washington. Wis. 

Leonard, H. G., Ph. B.. Rev., '89, A Y. 
Wilmette, 111. 

Leonard, Frances E.. nee Hubbell. A. B., 
"89, A 4», Wilmette, 111. 

Leslie, Mary, nee Richey, A. B.. "89. A T. 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 

♦Leslie, John R., Ph. B., '73. 

Lewis. Charles G.. A. M.. "87. B 17, 92 
Washington street, Chicago. 111. 

Lewis, Martin O.. A. M.. '74, Lawyer, 99 
Randolph street, Chicago, 111. ; resi- 
dence, Evanston. 111. 

Lewis, Robert, A. B., '75, Lawyer, 99 Ran- 
dolph street, Chicago, 111. 

Lewis, Spencer, A. M., Rev.. "79. Mission- 
ary, China. 

Light, William R., A. B., "85, Teacher, 
College Hill. Winfield, Kas. 

Linebarger, Charles E.. A. B.. '88. A Y. 
Teacher, Chicago, 111. 

*Linn, Alphonso C, A. B., '60, died in 
army, 1874. 

Linn, Ella S.. B. L.. '76. Bird City. Kas. 

Lindsey, Draper A.. A. M.. 73. Fargo. X. D. 

Lipps, John E., Ph. B., '80. I X, Silk Im- 
porter, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Little, Frank. A. B.. '88. <i> K *. River 
Forest, 111. 

Little, Mabelle, nee Thatcher, Ph. B., "88, 
K A 0, River Forest, 111. 

Logan, Charles L.. A. M.. B. 1).. Rev.. '77, 
Carson, New 

Logeman, Rose Minnie, Ph. B., '91, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Loiseaux, Annie M.. nee Roberts. "68, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Lord, William A., A. B.. '60. # A 6, III 
West Second street. St. Joseph, Mo. 

Lord, Frank W.. A. B.. M. D.. '76, Drug- 
gist, Piano, 111. 

83, BGII, Lawyer, 
Chicago, 111. 
Lott, Mary E., nee White, '66, 4045 Vin- 

cennes avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Ludlam, Mary E.. '61. Hinman avenue. 
Evanston, 111. 



gist, .Fiano, 111. 
^ jf 2 J Lord. Frank E.. A. B., 'J 
» 6o PuilIj t r1 Blo ck. C 



Lunt. George, Ph. B.. 1 X. '72. 102 Wash- 
ington street, Chicago, 111. 

/T\ AC ARD, FRANK, A. B., '78. Rev.. 
/ I Maltman, Maine, B. L.. "91. A 4>. 

Student, Northwestern Law School, 

1239 Halsted street, Chicago, 111. 
Maltman, Stewart A., Sc. B., '91. 4> K t, 

Student, Northwestern Law School, 

1239 Halsted street, Chicago. 111. 
Mann, Clausine, nee Borchsenius. '64, 

Orange. N. J. 
Mappin, Lucy I., nee Parsons, '67, Elgin. 

111. 
March, Benjamin F.. Sc. B.. '91, Student, 

Northwestern Law School, with Ela & 

Grover, Lawyers. 1 15 Dearborn street, 

Chicago, 111. 
March, Ellen F.. B. L. '88, Bristol, Wis. 
Mars, Gerhardt C. A. M.. B. D.. '85, <£> K t. 

Harvard University. Cambridge, Mass. 
•f*Marshall, Ada, nee Ward. '60. 
Martin, Norman A.. A. B.. '88. Rev., Ful- 

lerton, Neb. 
Martin. Riley P.. Ph. B., "90, Teacher. 

N. W. U.. Evanston, 111. 
Martin, William L., A. B.. 74. 4> K I. 

Business. Minneapolis. Minn. 
Matlack, Joseph A.. A. M.. B. D.. Rev.. 

*8l, 4> K f\ Pastor. Sacramento Avenue 

M. E. Church, Chicago, 111. 
Matthew, Winfield S.. A. M.. D. D.. "76. 

I X, Dean of University of Southern 

California, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Matthew, Marion L.. nee Pomeroy. Ph. B.. 

'77. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Mattison. Myrtle E., A. B., "91. Teacher 

in High School, Joliet, 111. 
May. Elizabeth C, nee McArthur, A. M.. 

'81, 716 Webster place, Milwaukee. 

Wis. 
+McCabe. Mary L., nee Martin. '72, 3607 

Ellis avenue, Chicago, 111. 
McCaskey, Isaac W.. A. M.. '62, Govern- 
ment Service. 790 Monroe street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
McClish, Eli, A. M., D. D.. Rev.. 74. 
Grace M. E. Church, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



28' 



McCool, Oliver P., A. M., '77, B II, 
Rogers Park, 111. 

McDermott, Eugene E., Sc. B., '85, A T, 
Professor, University of Minnesota, 1313 
Fifth street South, Minneapolis, Minn. 

McFadden, B. L., A. P., '89, 2 X, Business 
Manager Lever, Times Building, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

McGarry, Lafayette E., Sc. P., '76, Callao, 
Mo. 

McGarry, William L., Ph. P., '74, Lawyer, 
Davenport, la. 

McGuffin, John P., A. M., Rev., '67, <»Kf, 
St. Charles, 111. 

Mclntyre, Sanford H., '71, Negaunee, Mich. 

McKee, Margaret, '59, Patavia, 111. 

McLennan, William E., A. M., Rev., '87, 
<1> K "i~, South Pend, Ind". 

McNair, Rush, A. P., M. I)., '85, <J> K t, 
205 East South street, Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 

McPherson, Andrew W., A. P., '76, B B n, 
Teacher, Panora, 111. 

McPherrin, Jessie E., nee Moore, A. P., '79, 
718 Delaware street, Kansas City, Mo. 

McPherrin, Robert E., A. P., '82, A T, 
Oskaloosa, la. 

McPherrin, Samuel C, A. M., '76, Lawyer, 
718 Delaware street, Kansas City, Mo. 

*Meacham, Henry G., A. P., '62, died in 
army, 1863. 

Medlar, M. Louisa, nee Dake, '60, Wood- 
stock, 111. 

Merrick, George P., P. L., '84, 2 X, Law- 
yer, 108 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 

Merrill, Cora H., '71, North Ridge avenue, 
Evanston, 111. 

Merrell, Frank W., A. M., P. D., Rev., '82, 
* K t, Rock Island, 111. 

Merritt, George, A. M., P. D., Rev., '80, 
Trenton, N. Y. 

Merwin, Ella, nee Bannister, '70, Evanston, 
111. 

Metcalf, Harry K., Ph. M., Rev., '75, Elm- 
wood, 111. 

Michelet, Jules C, A. M., '80, Lawyer, 925 
Opera House Building, Chicago, 111. ; 
residence, Wilmette, 111. 

Middlekauff, Emma M., nee Prindle, Ph. P., 
'82, Ravenswood, 111. 



Middlekauff, Frank G., Sc. P., '87, A T, 

Evanston, 111. 
Middlekauff, Oscar, A. H.,'88, AT, Lawyer, 

Sioux City, la. 
Middlekauff, Peter D., Ph. P., '82, A T, 

Editor, Dee ring Farm Journal, 16 Ful- 

lerton avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Middlekauff, Samuel II., A. P., Rev., '88, 

Salix, la. 
MilKr, Amos II., A. M., Rev., '71, Lock- 
port, 111. 
Miller, Harry II., Sc. P., '82, B 6 II, 

Mining Engineer, Juancito, Honduras, 

Central America. 
Miller, Julia, nee Atkins, '60, Sheffield, Mass. 
Miller, Margaret J., nee McKean, '67, Plain 

field, 111. 
Miller, Nathan C, Ph. P., '81, A T, Lawyer, 

Colorado Springs, Col. 
Minium, Emily W., nee Wheadon, Ph. M., 

'75, Farmington, 111. 
Minium, William J., A. M., Rev., '73, Prim- 
field, 111. 
Mohler, Martin, A. P., '61, Secretary State 

Board of Agriculture, Topeka, Kas. 
Morgan, Charles IL, A. M., B. D., Rev., 

'77, Howell, Mich. 
Moore, Helen L., nee Miller, Ph. B., '80, 

Wichita, Kas. 
Moore, Mary E., M. L., '85, A 4>, Prescott, 

Arizona. 
Morse, Isabella R., Ph.. P., '90, KKT, 418 

Clark street, Evanston, 111. 
Moulding, Thomas C. A. P., '91, $ K ^, 957 

North Clark street, Chicago, 111. 
Mulfinger, G. A., A. B., Rev., '85, 506 

South Robey street, Chicago, 111. 
*Muller, Georgia A. Bryce, '61, Canton, O. 
Musgrove, James T., A. M., Rev., '79, 

B0II, 2356 Fifteenth street, Denver, 

Col. 
Musgrove, Lillie C, nee Casey, Ph. B., '79, 

Denver, Col. 

MASH, JOSIE B., nee Crandon, Ph. P., 

J ; 87, A r, Cherryfield, Me. 

Needham, Adolphus H., A. M., Rev., '73, 

«I>Kf, Grass Valley, Cal. 
Newcomb, W. II., A. M., '90, Merchants' 

Loan and Trust Company, Chicago, 111. 



238 



Xichol, James E., A. M.. Rev., 'Si, Scran ton, 

la. 
Nielson, Rasmus, A. B., '78. 
Nisbet, Robert K., Sc. B., '91, 4> K 2. 
Norland, Luther Anderson, A. M., '77, - X. 

La Jara, Col. 
Norton, Albert B., A. B., '71, Missionary, 

India. 
Norton, William B., A. M., B. D., Rev., '8o, 

B 6 II, Hinckley, 111. 
North, Harriet P., nee Linn, '67, 889 West 

Adams street, Chicago, 111. 
Northrop, Charles S., B. L., '78, Lawyer. 

Nordland, la. 
Noyes, Lizzie B., '89, Waupaca, Wis. 

QmELVLNA, WILLIAM, A. B., Rev., 

'74, Rockville, Ind. 
Odgers, Joseph H., A. B., '90, AT, Rev., 

5532 Sangamon street, Chicago, 111. 
Otjen, William, A. B., Rev., '82, Oregon, 

111. 

PAGE, EDWARD C, A. B., '88, Assist- 
ant County Superintendent, Oregon, 111. 

Palmer, Hiram H., A. B., '72, Editor, 3151 
Oak street, Kansas City, Mo. 

Palmer, Ella G., nee Judson, '66, 445 Broad- 
way, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Parkes, William R., Ph. B., '90, A T, Stu- 
dent, Rush Medical College, Chicago, 
111. ; Evanston, 111. 

Parks, Edward L., A. M., D. D., Rev., '73, 
4> K ^, Professor, Gammon School of 
Theology, Atlanta, Ga. . 

Parks, Isabella B., nee Webb, A. M., '79, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Patten, Amos W., A. M., D. D., Rev., '70, 
Berlin, Germany. 

Patten, Sarah E., nee Prindle, Ph. M., '79, 
Berlin, Germany. 

Patterson, Edmund B., A. B., Rev., '84, 
Benton Harbor, Mich. 

Pattison, Arthur, A. B., '88, A T, Teacher, 
N. 1). High School, Chicago, 111. 

Pattison, Mary, Ph. B., '76, Freeport, 111. 

Paul, Clarence R., A. B., '72, 2 X, Editor of 
The Illinois State Journal^ Spring- 
field, 111. 

*Pearce, Jennie M., nee Wheeler, '63. 



Pearce, Liston H., A. M., D. D., Rev., '66, 
318 West Church street, Elmira, N. Y/ 



Pearson, Charles W., A. M., '71, <1> K t, 

Professor, N. W. U., Sheridan road, 

Evanston, 111. 
Pearsons, Henry A.., A. M., '62, 2 X, Banker, 

177 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 
Peart, Ada M., Ph. B., '86, A <J>, Teacher, 

Braidwood, 111. 
Peck, Mabel Ella, A. B., '89, Teacher, 

Owatonna, Minn. 
Peet, Wilbur O., A. M., Rev., '72, W 7 est 

Webster, N. V. 
Penney, Arthur W., Ph. B.,'71, 161 La Salle 

street, Chicago, 111. 
Perley, Lyman O., Sc. B., '85, <l>Ki 805 

New York Life Building, Omaha, Neb. 
Peterson, Anna O., B. L., '86, Galva. 111. 
Phelps, Emma J., nee Kyle, '66, Rogers 

Park, 111. 
Phelps, A. Horace, Sc. B., '91, 2 X, Student, 

Yale Law School, Box 1404, New Haven, 

Conn. 
Phillips, William A., Ph. B., M. D., '83, 

4> K 2, Hinman avenue, Evanston, 111. 
Pierce, Ella L., nee Davis, '70, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
*Pingree, Melvin A., A. B., '65, 4> K t 

(1866). 
Piper, Charles E., A. M., '82, 4> K t, At- 
torney at Law, 185 Dearborn street, 

Chicago, 111. 
Pitner, Lee J., A. B., '73, Seattle, Wash. 
Place, Chester A., A. M., Rev., '86, Blue 

Island, 111. 
Plested, William A., A. M., '70, County 

Clerk, Trinidad, Col. 
Plimpton, Homer A., A. B., '60, <I> A 9, 

Perris, San Diego County, Cal. 
Plummer, Charles G., B. L., M. D., '84, A T, 

Wallace, Idaho. 
Pooley, Robert H., A. M., B. D., Rev., A T, 

737 Lawrence street, Appleton, Wis. 
Pooley, Martha G., nee Skelton, Ph. M., '81, 

737 Lawrence street, Appleton, Wis. 
*Porter, Frederick, A. M., Rev., '81, A Y, 

Rockford, 111. 
Potter, Earl F., C. E.. '76, 4> K 2, Chicago, 

111. 
Potter, Lorenzo T., B. L., M. D., '77, 4>K 2, 

144 Oakland boulevard, Chicago, 111. 



{ 1T 



£3 



239 



Potwin, Homer, A. I!., '70, 950 West Mad- 
ison street, Chicago, 111. 

Powell, Eliza, nee Thompson, '70, 478 East 
Broad street, Columbus, O. 

Power, Guy Neale, Ph. P., '91, Burlington, 
la. 

Purcell, Dolly V., nee Mesick, B. L., '80, 
Teacher of Painting, Plainville, Mich. 

Pryor, John IP, A. B., '80, <I> K % Creton, 
la. 

Pryor, Ella M., Ph. M., '80, Moline, III. 

QUEREAU, CHARLES H., A. M., '78, 
B 8 II, Aurora, 111. 
Quereau, Edmund C, A., B., '88, Ben, 
Wunder Chaussie 4, Gottingen, Ger- 
many. 



~/tfi (J 



Kichl, Daniel C, A. M., B. D., Rev., '74, 

,\ 2 X, Quincy, Mich. 

^Robinson, Anna P., B. P., '91, A <l>, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Robinson, James P., A. M., '72, Banker, 
Rock Island, 111. 

Robinson, Martin S., Jr., C. E., '77, 4> K 2, 
Cleveland, O. 

Robinson, William P., A. M , Rev., '74, 
\^ Port Allegany, Pa. 

Rose, William P., A. M., Rev., '62, Peca- 
tonica, 111. 

Ross, Isabella, Ph. B., '83, Music Teacher, 

Root, Charles?!.,. Ph. P>., '69, <I> K *, Bryant 
Ass., Twenty-ninth street South, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Root, Charles P., Sc. M., '78, <I> K ■*, Lyons, 
la. 



U3 



CHARLES S., Sc. M., '84, 
enson avenue, Evanston, 111. 
Raleigh, William PI. H., Ph. B., '60, * A 9, 

Baltimore, Md. 
Ray, John T., Ph. B., '75, Teacher, 808 

South Fifth street, Springfield, 111. 
Raymond, Alia M., nee Beveridge, L. S., '68, 

51 Cedar street, Chicago, 111. 
Raymond, Fred D., A. B.,'72, 2 X, 511 

Royal Insurance Building, Chicago, 111. 
Raymond, James H., A. M., '71, Patent 

Lawyei, 225 Dearborn street, Chicago, 

111. 
Raymond, William C, Sc. B., '87, Ogden, 

Utah. 
Raymond, William M., A. M., '69, <I> K % 

Davis street, Evanston, 111. 
Rice, Cornelius L., A. B., '77, Teacher, 

Sturgis, Mich. 
Rice, Frank L., Sc. M., '81, <I> K 2, Univer- 
sity place, Evanston, 111. 
Rice, Louis S., Ph. M., '83, $ K 2, Qwwg— v 

ton avenue, Evanston, 111. 
Rice, Mary E., nee Webster, B. L., '80, Uni- 
versity place, Evanston, 111. 
Richards, J. W., A. M., Rev., '74, Rock ford, 

111. 
Richardson, George O., Ph. B., Rev., '88, 

La Grande, Oro. 
Robinson, Albert R., A. M., '75, Principal 

Dore Public School, Chicago ; Hinsdaje, 

111. 

240 



/*3- 



Roys, Fernando, 


A. 


B., M 


. D. 


, '72, 


Rico, 


Col. 












Roys, Ozro, A. 


M., 


Rev., 


'71. 


Densonick 


Center, N. V 












Russell, Richard 


D. 


, A. 


M.. 


Rev. 


, '7L 


Milford, 111. 













SARGENT, 
* K 2, Hi 



WILLIAM D., A. M., '84, 
tinman avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Sawyer, Ward B., Ph. B., '91, Ben, Law- 
Student, Evanston, 111. 

Schell, Edwin A., A. B., Rev., '86, <i> K *, 
Pastor M. E. Church, 156 North Broad- 
way, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Schneider, John, A. M., Rev., '81, Ripon, 
Wis. 

Scott, Martha H., nee Huntoon, '72, 18 
South Tenth street, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Scott, Andrew J., A. M., '74, London, Tenn. 

Scott, Elvin E., Ph. B., '90, A T, Des 
Moines, la. 

Scott, Frank H., A. M., LL. B., '76, Ben, 
Lawyer, 60 Portland Block, Chicago, 111. 

Scovill, Henry T., A. M., Rev., '69, $ K % 
Pawnee City, Neb. 

Scott, John A., A. B., '91, Instructor, N. W. 
U., Evanston, 111. 

Scott, John W., A. M., M. D., '74, Eding- 
ton, Rock County, 111. 

Seaman, Robert B., A. M., Rev., "jy, 
Minonk, 111. 



Searle, Elhanon J., A. M., '59, Lawyer. 
Rock Island, 111. 

•Searle, Elmore Q., A. B., '6o. 

Sewall, May W., nee Wright, '66, 343 North 
Pennsylvania street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Sharp, Kate L., Ph. B., "85, K K T, 3 Park 
place, Albany, N. V. 
£~3 [sharer, Charles H., Ph. B., '83, Ben, Mt. 
I Morris, 111. 

Sheets, Fred H., A. B., Rev., 82, Ben, 
Joliet, 111. 

Sheets, Mary A., nee Hill, B. L., '84, A T, 
Joliet, 111. 

Sheldon, Mabel, B. L., '90, A T, Burling- 
ton, Wis. 

Shepherd, Alice G., nee Galloway, '70, 80 
New Insurance Building, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

Shepherd, Mary E., nee Bragdon, '61, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Shepard, Orlando, B. S., '89. 

Shipman, Elias F., A M., M. D., '80, Rem- 
ington, Ind. 

Shrader, Edwin R., A. M., '71, 144 South 
Main street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Shuman, Edwin L., Ph. M., '87, 2 X, Ev- 
anston, 111. 

Shuman, Jesse J., Ph. B., '90, - K, Illinois 
Steel Works, South Chicago, 111. 

Shuman, Raphael R., Ph. B., '91, 2 X, Re- 
porter, Chicago Tribune, Evanston, 111. 

*Shumway, Clara B., B. L., '79. 

Shumway, Philip R., A. B., '89, Ben, Ev- 
anston, 111. 

Simmons, E. Gertrude, Ph. B., '91, A <K Ev- 
anston, 111. 

*Simmons, Gilbert M., Sc. B., '74, 4> K 2. 

Simonsen, Nels E., A. M., B. D., Rev., '80, 
Principal Norwegian Theological Semi- 
nary, Evanston, 111. 

Simpson, Frances, B. L., '84, KKT, Church 
»-^_^ street, Evanston, 111. 
/?kelton, Leonard L., A. M., M. D., '85, AT, 
Kankakee, 111. 

Slichter, Charles S., Sc. M., '85, 2 X, As- 
sistant Professor, U. of W., 636 Francis 
street, Madison, Wis. 

Smith, Amos L., A. B., '72, Lawyer, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

Smith, Martha C, Ph. B., '91, A 4>, Evans- 
ton, 111. 



Smith, Etta L., A. M., '80, Clifton, 111. 

Smith, George H., A. M., Rev., '74, Gol- 
den's Bridge, N. V. 

Smith, Martha J., nee Stewart, '60, 1729 
Prairie avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Snyder, Vernette A., nee Forbes, '65, Float 
street, Freeport, 111. 

Solenberger, Amos R., Ph. M., M. D., '83,) A^t 
$Kt, Itasca, 111. / "-^ 

Spaulding, Melville C, A. B., '6o, 406 Oak 
street, Columbus, O. 

Spencer, Claudius B., A. M., Rev., '8i, 4> K 2, 
Preston, Mich. 

Springer, Frank A., A. B., '60, Teacher, 329 
Spruce street, Le Droit Park ; P. O. ad- 
dress, 309 Ninth street, Washington, 
D. C. 

Spencer, William A., A. B., D. D., Rev., '61, 
Secretary Church Extension Society, 
1633 North Fifteenth street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Springer, George W., B. S., '90, 4> K ^, 
Evanston, 111. 

Springer, Mary E., nee Ward, '65, Wilmette, 
111. 

-Springer, Milton C, A. M., '64, <I> K ¥. 

Springer, Ruter W., A. M., LL. B., '87, 2 X, 
Chief Clerk of Wajs and Means Com- 
mittee, Washington, D. C. 

Staver, Ida F., B. L., '91, A <I>. Portland, 
Ore. 

Starrett, David, A. M., '62, Lawyer, Wash- 
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Stevens, Charles L., Ph. B., '91, 2 X, Editor 
Lever, Times Building, Chicago, 111. 

Stevens, Mary E., nee Bishop, '63, Winona, 
Minn. 

Stewart, Caroline C, nee Bumann, B. L., '86, 

2827^ Easton avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
Stewart, Edward L., Sc. B., '79, 2 X, Room 

34, 184 Dearborn street. Chicago, 111. 
*Stewart, Hart L., A. B., '60, <f>A6. 
Stout, James F., A. M., Rev., '75, Ben, 

Pastor First M. E. Church, 516 Twelfth 

avenue South, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Stowe, Bond, A. M., M. D., '87, Ben, 4160 

Ellis avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Strobridge, George E., A. M., D. D., Rev., 

'64, 4> K °f, 124 West Seventy-sixth 

street, New York City. 
Strobridge, Thomas R., A. M., Rev., '76, 

<f> K *, Princeton, 111. 



241 



Sullivan, Elizabeth R., nee White, '70, South 

Evanston, 111. 
Sumner, Mary E., B. L., '88, A <l>, 232 Far- 

nam street, Omaha, Neb. 
Swenson, William, A. B., '90, McKeesport, 

Pa. 
Swift, Polemus IE, A. M., J 5. 1)., Ph. D., 

Rev., '81, A Y, 307 Forty-first street, 

Chicago, 111. 



\ 



APEIN, WARREN, A. P>., '61 
Taylor, Fred M., A. M., Ph. D., '76, 2 X, 
Professor, Albion College, Albion, Mich. 
^ \C\ I Taylor, Merritt E > ^ c - M., '83, Taylorville, 
^ "J \ 111. 

Terry, M. Ruth, A. P>., '91, A*, 814 Hin- 
man avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Thatcher, Frank H., Ph. M., '81, B 9 II, 
Lawyer, Aurora, 111. 

Thiers, Herbert M., C. E., '72, 77 Clark 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas, Joseph C, A. R., Rev., '66, Meth- 
odist Book Room, 805 Broadway, New 
York City. 

Thorns, Craigie S., A. B., '88. <I> K *, Mor- 
gan Park, 111. 

Thompson, Julia D., nee Watson, Ph. B., '80, 
328 Superior street, Chicago, 111. 

Thompson, Ella E., nee Horton, '72, Eanes- 
boro, Minn. 

Thompson, Ella M., nee Tarr, M. L., '82, 
A T, 765 Nineteenth street, Oakland, 
Gal. 

Thornton, Charles W., A. M., Rev., '77, 
Ben, Maiengo, 111. 

Thwing, Charles B., A. M., '88, 0> K *, In- 
structor, N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 

Tompkins, Delos M., A. M., Rev., '77, 
B9II, Galena street, Aurora, 111. 

Tisdel, Fred M., A. B., '91, Ben, Instructor 
in Elocution, Madison, Wis. 

Tomlinson, Clinton S., Ph. B., '86, Ben, 
Sioux City, la. 

"-Torrance, Elizabeth, nee Norton, '68. 

Tourtellotte, Frederick J., A. B., '88, 2 X, 
N. W. U. Law School, 3432 Vernon 
avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Towle, Anna C, Ph. M., '87, A <I>, Paris, 
France. 

Townsend, Ada, A. B., '89, Instructor, N. 
W. U., Ilinman avenue, Evanston, 111. 



Trewartha, James, A. !>., Rev., '74, Clark, 
S. I). 

Tucker, Clara, B. L., '90, K K I", Galva, 111. 

Turner, Charles W., A. B., '75. 

Tuttle, William H., A. B., '88, * K t, Law 
yer, Room 815, 84 La Salle street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Tyler, Frank E , Sc. B., '79, <J> K 2, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

^Inland, Herman ie, a. b., '75, 

<I> K 2, Beardstown, III. 

Wan benschoten, may e., b. l., 

'86, K K r, Chicago avenue, Evanston, 
111. 

Van Benschoten, William C, Student, Har- 
vard University, 1 1 Mellen street, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Vandercook, Robert O., Ph. B., '88, Church 
street, Evanston, 111. 

Van Fossen, Levi, Ph. B., '70. 

*Van Petten, Samuel E., A. B., '76. 

Van Scoy, Thomas, A. M., D. D., Rev., '75, 
Professor, Portland University, Portland, 
Ore. 

Vernon, Luanna M., B. L., '91, Teacher, 
319 Reed street, Pa. 

\\J AIT, WILLIAM H., A. M., '79, B6 H, 
Teacher, 403 North Jefferson avenue, 

Peoria, 111. 
Wakeman, Harry F., Ph. B., '91, 2 X, Lin- 
coln, 111. 
Wales, Albertine C, Sc. B., '87, A <J>, 528 

North Weber street, Colorado Springs, 

Col. 
Wallace, Belle, nee Deening, '64, Paris, 111. 
Walrath, W. B., A. B., '91, A T, Teacher, 

Chicago, III. 
Warrington, Francis M., A. M., Rev., '75, 

Ben, Bellevue, Cal. 
Warrington, Levi P., A. M., M. D., '80, 

Chariton, la. 
Warrington, Thomas C, Rev., A. M., B. D., 

'80, Wyanet, 111. 
Watson, Sidney, Sc. B., '85, 2 X, 19 Lizzie 

street, St. Paul, Minn. 
*Waugh, Lydia M., nee Hayes, '58, died in 

India. 



242 






^1 



Webster, Lily R., nee Winne, '70, 236 Chi- 
cago avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Webster, Parker S., A. M., '81, A T, Law- 
yer, Dubuque, la. 

Webster, Nelson P., Ph. B., '83, 1220 H 
street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Weeks, Nellie F., Ph. P., '85, Forest avenue, 
Evanston, 111. 

Weeden, Burr M., A. B., '89, 2 X, Student, 
G. B. I., Emerson street, Evanston, 111. 

Weir, Samuel, A. B., B. D., Rev., '89, 4>K L, 
108 East Eighteenth street, Cheyenne, 
Wyo. 

*Weller, Emma E., nee Parks, Ph. B., '76. 



M. 



M., Rev., '78, 

Rev., '06, Spring 

B., '65, 4) K L, 

'75, Professor, 



M., Rev., '76, 
'75, Minneapolis, 
, Rev., '79, Sher- 



Wheaton, James M., 

Rochelle, 111. 
Wheeler, Arthur J., A. 

Lake, Mich. 
Wheeler, Elbert B., Ph. 

Arlington Heights, 111. 
Wheeler, Emily F., A. M. 

N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 
Wheeler, Charles P., A. M., '76, 2 X, 1009 

Rookery Building, Chicago, 111. 
Wheeler, Frederick S., A. M., '81, Phoenix 

Building, Chicago, 111. 
Whipple, John A. J., A. 

<S> K 2, Mendota, 111. 
White, George FL, Ph. B., 

Minn. 
White, George W., Ph. B. 

man street, Milwaukee, Wis. 
White, Jane FL, Ph. M., '79, Teacher, High 

School, 218 Greenwood boulevard, Ev- 
anston, 111. 
-White, Sarah E., Ph. B., '82, A T. 
Whitehead, Frank Cole, A. B., '89, B G II, 

Business, Reed House, Erie, Pa. 
Whitney, Myrtle V., A. B., T $ B, '91, 

Teacher, Ripon, Wis. 
Wickman, Maurice L., A. B., '90, Student, 

Swedish Theological School, Evanston, 

111. 
Wicks, Hamilton S., Ph. B., '71, 2 X, Jop- 

lin, Mo. 
Wightman, Charles A., Ph. B., '85, 2 X, 

Insurance, Evanston, 111. 
* Wilcox, Alice A., nee Yaple, '71. 
Wilcox, Levi S., Ph. B., M. D., '71, Cham- 
paign, 111. 
Wilder, Marie H., nee Huse, A. M., '68, 418 

Church street, Evanston, 111. 



Wilkinson, Mary B., nee Swail, Ph B., '85, 

A <!>, Warren, 111. 
Wilkinson, William E., A. M., B. I)., Rev., 1 \ U 3 

■83, *K*, Warren, I... ^-^ Jrt %^^ 



fWillard, Frances E., '59, A <l>, Chicago 
avenue, Evanston, 111. 

*Willard, Mary E., '60. 

Willard, Mary B., nee Bannister, A. M., '60, 
Nettlebeck street, 21 III., Berlin, Prus- 
sia (American Home School for Young 
Ladies). 

Willits, Oscar W., A. M., '74, Rev. Mission- 
ary, Pekin, China. 

*Wilson, JohnC, Ph. B., '61. 

f Wilson, Martha W., nee Richardson, '65, 
Teacher, Potter, Neb. 

Winslow, Frederick C,, Ph. B., M. D., '70, 
2 X, Jacksonville, 111. 

Winslow, George W., A. M., Rev., '67, 
Morgan Park, 111. 

Wire, Melville C, A. M., B. D., Rev., '74, 
Mount Tabor, Portland, Ore. 

Wood, Francis A., A. M., '80, Professor, 
Chaddock College, Quincy, 111. 

Woodcock, Thomas L, Ph. B., '90, 81 Ash- 
land avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Woodruff, Herbert W., A. M., Rev.. '71. 

Woodson, Edmund B., A. B., '72, Reming- 
ton, Ind. 

Wright, Charles B., B. S., '89, 2 X, Broker, 
Woodstock, 111. 

Wright, Herbert P., M. S., '87, 2 X, 128 
West Sixth street, Kansas City, Mo. 

Wright, Sarah E., nee Holmes, '64, 341 Oak 
street, Binghamton, N. Y. 

Wyman, Ralph L., B. S., '90, 525 West 
Monroe street, Chicago, 111. 

Y APLE ' GEORGE L., A. M., '71, 2 X, 
Lawyer, Mendon, Mich. 

Yaple, Mary E., nee Hankinson, '71, Men- 
don, Mich. 

Young, John B., A. B., '90, B 6 II, 720 
Chamber of Commerce, Chicago, 111. 

Young, Louise, nee Swan, M. L., '90, A T, 
Chicago, 111. 

7lEGLER, THOMAS J., A. M., Rev., '74, 

Ben, 636 North Thirty-fifth street, 

Philadelphia, Pa3 
eublin, Charles N., Ph. B., B. D., '87, 

B0II, Evanston Hall, 143 West Division 
^ street, Chicago, 111. ^^ 

Zimmerman, Charles H., A. B., '91, B Q IV\ 

Instructor, N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 



-UJL 



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Leading Makers of Medium 
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University Extension. 



It is a noticeable fact that there are but a small number of 
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Franklin, Patrick Henry, Hamilton, Jefferson, John Adams, Clay, 
Calhoun, Jackson, Cass, Buchanan, Douglas, Stephens, Webster, 



Lincoln, and many others of our greatest and bes 



Vol. 
Vol. 
Vol. 
Vol. 
Vol. 
Vol. 
Vol . 



I. 171:0-1832 

2 1828-1846 

3. 1846-1850 

4 1850-1854 

5. . . . . 1854-1856, 

6 1856-1859 

7 1859. 1869 

Sold in Volumes or Sets by a 



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