(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Synapsis: Philadelphia Campus"

D 



0. 



? 



\ 



% 



\q% c 

1/ ' ! i 



t rp 




P. C. 0. LIBRARY 



P. C. 0. LIBRARY 



/ot& 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/synapsisphiladel1930phil 



CONTENTS 

College 

Hospital 

Organizations 

Athletics 

Alumnae 

Advertisements 



| 



Foreword 



JT IS a moment of high importance in the 
development of the average human being when 
he discovers the futility of life without associa- 
tions and memories to mirror the efforts that have 
operated in his advancement. And so orientation 
toward these reflections, we believe, is the primary 
responsibility of this book. 

Its purpose is then, by the virtue of the personals 
ties and the activities portrayed, to stimulate an 
active interest in an acclaimed Osteopathic concept 
that, having endured from a fervent and an obscure 
beginning in the mind of Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, 
has now made possible the marvelous new edifice 
that marks the latest stride forward of our profes- 
sion and especially of the Philadelphia College of 
Osteopathy, our Alma Mater. 

And so, as the sands of time run slowly through 
life's hour-glass, may we gaze fondly upon this 
Synapsis as a perpetuation of ourselves in our 
enigmatical groping ever onward in Osteopathy. 







3 % SYNAPSIS^ 






Dedication 



\Z am a part of all I have met; 
Yet all experience is an arch where through 
Gleams that untravelled world whose margin fades 
Forever arid forever when I move." 

Alfred Lord Tennyson. 



VY 7ITHIN the hearts and minds of those who have 
V\/ the pleasure of association with one, whose 
effort is an integral and fundamental part of 
every advance made by the Philadelphia College of 
Osteopathy, is a reverent affection for the man who 
pioneers for the advancement of his profession, succeeds, 
and yet strives on, his labor never done. To such a one, 
we can only extend humble acknowledgment for his 
achievement in the conception and the consummation 
of the idea for our new college and hospital. 

So it is with much affection and regard that we, the 
Class of 1931, dedicate this Synapsis to our friend: 

A gentleman, a scholar, a philanthropist. 

Dr. C. D. B. Balbirnie. 






















Dr. C. D. B. BALBIRNIE 









SYNAPSIS 



n 




5--J.X>cichelmatt 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



13. K Adams" 

ART EOITORj 







Tl.H.l?icHdrd5- 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 




PHOTO. EDITOR, 




\U Ellis" 

ATHLETIC EDITOR, 



%*$ J 



\ 



% t 



E.aheiler 

BUSINESS MGfc. 



A. Jewell 

HUMOR, EDITOR, 



ff SYNAPSIS^ 

Board of Directors 



Alfred P. Post 
President 

Robert A. Baur 
Vice-President 

Edgar O. Holden 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Gustave C. Aberle 

C. D. Balbirnie 

Henry F. Darby, Jr. 

Rev. Charles B. Dubell 

Henry H. Savage, Esq. 

Russell Duane, Esq. 

George L. Markland, Jr. 












% synapsis^ : 



Our Jilma VYiater 










/"^STEOPATHY, we are here ! The new home of our profession, so long visioned, 
^-^ desired, and planned is now a reality, completely established, already function- 
ing in the erudition of its neophytes. 

With our eyes ever looking ahead, peering into the future of college and 
hospital, the handful of institutions that have housed us since the first Philadelphia 
College of Osteopathy was founded in 1899, would soon fade into shady memories, 
were it not for the fact that every move Osteopathy has made in Philadelphia, has 
been surrounded by an aura of effort and purpose and each marked a step up in the 
ladder we arc climbing. 

Much can be said of our present structure as to its architecture and ac 
modations for at least 500 students by the mere contrast with the recently evacuated 
site. But a new note has now entered. This edifice with it^ long, cool corridors, and 
busy, well equipped laboratories, lends a long needed academic background and 
atmosphere which we hope will lead to interest in scientific thought, intellectual 
discussion, and significant research. 













A CLASSROOM 




I'HYSIOI.OOY LABORATORY 







CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 







PATHOLOGY LABORATORY 




SYNAPSIS % 













PfW;«P 



BACTERIOLOGY LABORATORY 




C( >LLEGE Al FDITORIUM 















-rfjgjj 




FACULTY 




synapsis^ : 









DEAN EDGAR O. HOLDEN, A.B., D.O. 

Was graduated from Central High School; A. B., University of 

Pennsylvania 1916; D. O. Philadelphia College of Osteopathy 

1922. 

During the World War served as Sergeant Major, 538 Engineers, 

for one and a half years A. E. F. 

Appointed head of the Department of Natural Sciences at the 

Philadelphia College of Osteopathy in 1915. In 1924 became 

Dean and later was made Secretary and Treasurer of the Board 

of Directors of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy and the 

Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelphia; also Superintendent of 

the Hospital. 
























A, 



.N EMINENT, signally outstanding figure 
in the world of Osteopathy, a man that challenges and 
secures respect wherever Osteopathic principles and 
enterprises are involved, a fervent, zealous devotee to 
the Osteopathic concept, an inspired leader imbued 
with visions for the advancement of his profession, 
and an energetic, tireless worker in the judicious ad' 
ministration of our School and Hospital — such a man 
is our Dean, Dr. Holden. 


















SYNAPSIS^ 




EDGAR O. HOLDEN, A.B., D.O. 
Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Anatomy 






3 % SYNAPSIS^ 






















CHARLES J. MUTTART, D.O. 

Professor Gastroenterology and Proctology, and Professor of 
Osteopathic Diagnosis and Technique 






M SYNAPSIS^ 






f 




























D. S. B. PENNOCK, D.O., M.D. 

Professor of Surgery 






ff SYNAPSIS^ 










J. IVAN DUFUR, D.O. 
Professor of T^eurology and Psychiatry 






4 SYNAPSIS^ 









1 

j 

A 







ARTHUR M. FLACK, D.O. 
Professor of Osteopathy and Professor of Pathology 


















ff synapsis^ : 










EDWARD A. GREEN, A.B., D.O. 
Professor of Physiology and Professor of Descriptive Anatomy 









jg^ 



% synapsis ^: 




























EDWARD G. DREW, D.O. 

Pro/essor 0/ Obstetrics and Gynecology 







% SYNAPSIS^ 




PETER H. BREARLEY, D.O. 

Professor of Osteopathic Technique 






synapsis^ : 










H. WILLARD STERRETT, D.O. 
Professor of Dermatology and Gemtc-Urinary Diseases 



ff SYNAPSISl S^i 













WILLIAM OTIS GALBREATH, D.O. 
Professor of Laryngology, Rhinology, Otology, and Of>lulia!oiology 



g SYNAPSIS^ 






& 







H. WALTER EVANS, D.O. 

Pro/essor 0/ Bacteriology and Hygiene, and Clinical Professor 

of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

































SYNAPSIS^ 










IRA W. DREW, D.O. 

Professor of Pediatrics 



u 












% synapsis! ^ 




C. D. B. BALBIRNIE, Ph.G., D.O. 
Professor of Clinical Osteopathy and Lecturer on Coynparatm 
Therapeutics 






S % SYNAPSIS^ 

(Professors 




WILLIAM S. NICHOLL, D.O. 
Professor of Principles of Osteopathy 










RALPH L. FISCHER, D.O. 

Professor of Physical Diagnosis, Cardio-Vascular and 
Respiratory Diseases 




CHARLES W. BARBER, D.O. 

Professor of Clinical Osteopathy 






(Professors 



MARY PATTON HITNER, D.O. 
Professor of Acute Infectious Diseases 




SARAH W. RUPP, D.O. 

Professor of Anatomy of the Nervous System 




FRANCIS L. SMITH, D.O. 

Professor of Clinical Osteopathy, and Lecturer on 
Anesthesia 




ff SYNAPSIS^ 

Professors 




JOHN H. BAILEY, Ph.G., D.O. 

Professor of Special Osteopathic Therapeutics 




RUSSELL C. ERB, B.S., M.S. 

Professor of Chemistry and Associate in 
Bacteriology 






'4 






^ SYNAPSIS^ 



'Professors 



WALTER F. CLAYTON, Ph.D., M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Pathology and Associate Professor 
of Bacteriology 




FOSTER C. TRUE, D.O. 

Associate Professor of Cluneal Osteopathy and Associate 
in Surgery 




PAUL T. LLOYD, D.O. 

Associate Professor of Hygiene and Lecturer on 
Roentgenology 



















-Associate 'Professors 



ELIZABETH R. TINLEY, D.O. 
Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

J. EARNEST LEUZINGER, D.O. 

Associate Professor of Clinical Osteopathy and 
Demonstrator of Oto -Laryngology 

FREDERICK A. LONG, D.O. 

Associate Professor of Principles of Osteopathy 

CHARLES H. SODEN, D.O. 
Associate Professor of Osteopathic Technique 

DR. EMANUEL JACOBSON 
Director of Laboratories and Hospital (Pathologist 






-Assistant Professors 

Roy K. Eldridge, D. O., Assistant Professor of Comparative Therapeutics 

William J. Furey, D. O., Assistant Professor of Osteopathic Technique 

Wilbur P. Lutz, D. O., Assistant Professor of Physical Diagnosis 

Carlton Street, D. O., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Joseph F. Py, D. O., Assistant Professor of Clinical Osteopathy and Associate in Bacteriology 

George S. Rothmeyer, D. O., Assistant Professor of Osteopathic Technique and Associate in 

Anatomy 
Ruth H. Winant, D. O., Assistant Professor of Therapeutics 
William G. Minich, A. B., M. A. 



ASSOCIATES 

James B. Eldon, D. O., Associate in Osteopathic Technique 

Harmon Y. Kiser, D. O., Associate in Suppleynentary Therapeutics and Instructor in Surgery 

Marion A. Dick, D. O., Associate in Thero peutics and Instructor m Neurology 

Mildred Fox, D. O., Associate in Pediatrics 

George L. Lewis, D. O., Associate in Clinical Osteopathy and Demonstrator of Anatomy 

J. Francis Smith, D. O., Associate of Heuro- Anatomy and Demonstrator of Neurology 

Howard Stoertz, B. S., Associate of Chemistry 

Ernest A. Johnson, D. O., Associate of Physical Diagnosis 



DEMONSTRATORS 

George H. Tinges, D. O., Demonstrator of Otolaryngology 

William D. Champion, D. O., Demonstrator of Osteopathic Technique 

D. E. Stombaugh, D. O., Demonstrator of Osteopathic Technique 

Harry A. Stegman, D. O., Demonstrator of Osteopathic Technique 

Enrique Vergara, D. O., Demonstrator of Clinical Laboratory Methods and Instructor in 

Proctology 
J. Rowland Dey, D. O., Demonstrator of Pediatrics and Clinical Osteopathy 
Edwin H. Cressman, D. O., Demonstrator of Histology and Instructor in Surgery 
Francis E. Gruber, D. O., Demonstrator of Anatomy and Instructor m Surgery 
Herman Kohn, D. O., Demonstrator of Anatomy and Instructor in Surgery 
J. Walter Larkin, D. O., Demonstrator of Therapeutics 
William C. Weisbecker, D. O., Demonstrator of Clinical Osteopathy and Instructor in 

Physiology 
Leo C. Wagner, D. O., Demonstrator of Clinical Osteopathy and Instructor in Pediatrics 






ff synapsis^ : 



Associate Professors 













INSTRUCTORS 

Julius B. Apatoff, D. O., Instructor in Chemistry 

D. George Nelis, D. O., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis 

Howard Drewes, A. B., D. O., Instructor in Anatomy and Physical Diagnosis 

H. Mahlon Gehman. D. O., Instructor in Therapeutics and Assistant in Surgery 

William J. Nairn, A. B., M. A., Instructor in Biology and Embryology 

Otterbein Dressler, D. O., Instructor in Clinical Laboratory Methods 

Jean L. Sheperla, D. O., Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Guy W. Merryman, B. S., Instructor in Chemistry 

Henrietta Feterson, A. B., Instructor in Biology and Embryology 

Elizabeth A. Toomey, D. O., Instructor in Ophthalmology 

James W. Day, D. O., Instructor in Bacteriology and Hygene 



ASSISTANTS 

Antonio Abeyta, D. O., Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Donald Acton, D. O., Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

I. Jay Baker. D. O., Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy 

Gladys P Clayton, A. M., Assistant in Pathology 

Helen B. Conway, D. O., Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy 

William F. Daiber, D. O., Assistant in Physical Diagnosis 

Edgar Fiestal, D. O., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Benjamin Gross, D. O., Assistant in Gastroenterology 

Harry C. Hessdorter, D. O., Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy 

W. Dale Jamison, B. S., Assistant in Chemistry 

Robert C. McDaniel, D. O., Assistant in Pediatrics and Therapeutics 

Bruce Thomas, D. O., Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy 

Kenneth Scott, A. B., Assistant in Biology 

John McHenry, D. C, Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy 



r 















% SYNAPSIS^ 



T5he Faculty 



'They stand as silhouettes against the sky, 
Like guardian shepherds that care by day 
For rebel flocks, lest one by chance should stray 
And wander from their ever-watching eye. 
They march alone, these men of mighty mind; 
Their foot-tracks do not waver on the sand. 
Nor do they, from their fellowmen demand 
Naught but that which they return in kind. 
They stand there like a beacon in the night — 
The master's hand is free to point the way — 
And may they shine, from time to time, we pray, 
Into some lives and spread their truth and light." 












R. H. R 













19 



SYNAPSIS 



Alma VYCater 



Hail, Alma Mater, dear, 
To thee our love declare; 
To us be ever near, 
Through all the years. 
Help us thy truth to see; 
Teach us staunch sons to be, 
Striving continually, 
P. C. O. for thee. 

When we depart from thee, 

Serving where need we see, 

Strengthen our loyalty, 

Our trust in thee. 

Guide us in all aright; 

Give us through wisdom, sight; 

Grant us to ever fight, 

P. C. O. for thee. 

And when our work complete, 
Our course on earth is ceased, 
Judge just thy sons and mete 
Our task well done. 
Increase from day to day, 
Daughters and sons, we pray, 
To serve and live for thee, 
P. C. O. for thee. 







ff synapsis^ 
























Greetings to the Qlass of 1930 

TS MY office there hangs an artist's conception of the new college and hospital building 
A foretelling that architectural charm and beauty were to be delineated in stone and brick — 
a shrine, a physical immortality of osteopathy. This exquisite portrayal is a never-ending 
source of fascination to its meditator and suggests almost a romantic reality. 

And now the actual creation towering majestically at Forty -eighth and Spruce Streets — 
the sight of which sends a thrill of joy and pride into the hearts of her subjects — infused 
with osteopathic incident and colour, reveals a glowing vividness beyond the fanciful paint- 
ing of the artist. 

The architect's work done, the engineer and builder gone, — what then of the life within? 
What purposes to be filled, what sentiments to be served, what facts and deeds to be con- 
secrated? Is it safe to venture that the key to osteopathic dominion hangs inside the walls? 

Judge Edwin O. Lewis in his commencement address to the last graduating class re- 
marked: "Nothing is subjected to severer test than is the skill of osteopathy." Again 
from the pen of Carl McConnell we read : "Probably in no other practice than the osteo- 
pathic does personal therapeutic ability count for so much." It has been written too that a 
fact is worth little unless it can be applied; and it cannot be applied unless the one who 
knows the fact has vision enough to see when it fits in. 

With these essentials in mind we are prepared to venture the opinion that the destiny, 
the success or failure of osteopathy, lies within the walls of the college in the hands of teacher 
and pupil — and so into the field, its teachings to be respected and practiced or pawned and 
rejected with wanton unfaithfulness. 

With the march of time it becomes increasingly manifest that the young graduate enters 
the field of practice better prepared than the hundreds which preceded him. He should 
the more easily find the path to opportunity and success. But it will be well for him to 
regard the road his predecessor has travelled and the progress made. Reflection upon earlier 
graduates and their life work, to a degree, tells the story of osteopathy and the college. The 
spirit which animated these students passed down through the decades bears testimony to the 
real worth of the school of their devotion and love. The history of this osteopathic college 
is written in the deeds of its many sons and daughters, who have lived through the thirty 
years, since its doors were first swung wide to receive the earliest matriculants. 

Thus in suggesting to the present graduate a factor for success in life we would empha- 
size the wisdom of indefatigable allegiance and adherence to fundamental osteopathic concepts 
and facts, — as courageously employed by earlier noted sons of the school. With A. H. 
Clough we would admonish: 

"Say not the struggle nought avaikth 
The labour and the words are vain, — ■ 1 

Too evident are the successes of these pioneer promulgators. The remarkable rise of 
osteopathy as a separate and distinctive school of practice reflects their courage and tenacity 
of purpose and attests the virtue of this steadfastness. 

The young graduate will be wise to follow in the footstep of his elder brother mindful 
of the teaching of the philosopher who reasoned: "Whatever you are from nature, keep to 
it; never desert your own line of talent." 

Dean E. O. Holden. 













ALLAN FELLOWS 
Vice-President 



LILLIAN BARTON SCOTT 
Secretary 



Senior Qlass Officers 





OARI. J. ISMAN 
Treasurer 



RONALD AMBLER 
Historian 







RONALD E. AMBLER 
"Ron" 

CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa. 

Conshohocken High School; Bucknell University. 
Class Treasurer, 3; Junior Prom Committee, 3; 
Class Historian 4. 



ROBERT D. ANDERSON 
"Andy" 

Worcester, Mass. 

North High School; University of New Hamp- 
shire. 

Atlas Club. 





DAVID L. BROWN 
"Dave" 

S\VEDESBORO, N. J. 

Swedesboro High School; George School Prep.; 
Syracuse University. 

Atlas Club; President of the Inter fraternity 
Council, 4. 









^GOHSSSl? 









ALICE CHASE 

New York City, N. Y. 

Rhodes Preparatory School; Hunter College. 
Drew Obs. Society; Physiological Chemisty Society. 











MYER COHEN 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown Prep.; Temple University. 
Physiological Chemistry Society. 












EDWARD A. CRAPSER 

"Edclie" 

Columbia Cross Roads, Pa. 

Troy High School; Temple University. <■-'• 

: l'liy-:i(jlngic;il Chemistry Society. 




3 % SYNAPSIS^ 













JOSEPH B. CULBERT 

New York City, N. Y. 

Atlantic City High School. 

Atlas Club; Basketball. 2-3-4; Chairman of Junior 
Prom Committee. 









A. RICHARD DAVIES, Jr. 

"Dic\" 
East Orange, N. J. 

East Orange High School. 

Atlas Club; Tennis, 1-2-3-4; Assistant Manager, 
2; Captain and Manager, 3-4; Chairman Frosh Dance 
Committee; Junior Prom Committee; Editor-in-Chief, 
Synapsis, 3; Neo Senior Society, 4; Class President, 
4; Vice-President, A. A., 4; Physiological Chemistry 
Society, 3-4. 











VINCENT DIRENZO 

"Mussolini" 

Ardmore, Pa. 

Royal Technical School "Michelangelo Buonarroti," 
Rome; Pittsburgh University; Hahnemann Medical 
College. 



V, 









RICHARD J. DOWLING 

■■Dtc\" 

Norwood, Mass. 

Norwood High School. 

Phi Sigma Gamma; Newman Club; President, 
Newman Club, 3, 4; Class President, 1; Student 
Council, 1; President of Student Council, 4; Inter 
fraternity Council, 4. 





H. ALLEN FELLOWS 

"A!" 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Syracuse Central High School; Syracuse University. 

Atlas Club; Axone, 2; Class President, 3; Student 
Council, 3; Vice-President, 4; Drew Obs. Society, 4; 
Physiological Chemistry Society, 3, 4. 



NATHAN MORTON FYBISH 

"Hat" 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Montpelier Hi^h School. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma; Assistant Editor, Synai" 
sis, 3; Assistant Editor, Axone, 3; Drew Obs. 
Society, 4; Inter-fraternity Council, 4; Treasurer 
Junior N. Y. Osteopathic Society, 4. 





KENNETH K. GAHRING 

"Ken" 

Union City, Pa. 



Union City High School. 
Phi Sigma Gamma. 



i 



CLARENCE O. GASKILL 

"Gus" 

West Burke, Vt. 

Montpelier Seminary; St. Johnsburg Academy; 
Mass. College of Osteopathy. 

Iota Tau Sigma; Interne Dr. Drew's Sanitarium; 
Physiological Chemistry Society, 3, 4. 





CARL E. GETLER 

New York City, N. Y. 

Utica Free Academy. 

Drew Obs. Society; Physio- logical Chemistry So- 
ciety. 




SYNAPSIS % 






J. WILSON HUNTER 

-\Yils" 

Pitman, N. J. 

Pitman High School. 

Atlas Club; Drew Obs. Society; Physiological 
Chemistry Society; Photographic Editor, Synapsis, 3. 




F 







CARL J. ISMAN 

"Iz" 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Central High School; Clayton High School; Temple 
University. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma; Associate Editor Ax- 
one, 1; Advertising Manager, Axone, 2; Business 
Manager, Synapsis, 3; Junior Prom Committee, 3; 
Treasurer Neurone Society, 4; Class Treasurer, 
4; Vice-President Drew Obs. Society, 4; Physiolog' 
ical Chemistry, 3, 4. 



( HARLES D. JAMESON 

"Dan" 

Rochester, N. Y. 

West High School. 

Theta Psi; Advertising Manager Synapsis, 3; N. 
Y. Junior Osteopathic Scoiety. 







.■-. -. .*f&t 



2 % SYNAPSIS^ 










CHARLES M. J. KARIBO 

"Chia}(' 

Bellefontaine, Ohio 

Bellefontaine High School; Chicago College of 
Osteopathy. 

Iota Tau Sigma; E. G. Drew Obstetrical Society; 
Newman Club. 






M 









SHERMAN T. LEWIS 

"Sherm" 

Hallstead, Pa. 



Keystone Academy. 
Atlas Club. 





HAROLD O. LYMAN 

"Bruno" 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

West Philadelphia High School; Temple Uni- 
versity; University of Pennsylvania. 

Phi Sigma Gamma; Class President, 2; Cheer 
Leader, 1, 2, 3; Coach Cheer Leader. 4; Art Editor, 
Synapsis, 3; College and Hospital Artist. 1. 2. .V 4. 









GEORGE S. MAXWELL 

"Stan" 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Manual Training High School. 

Iota Tau Sigma;' Drew Obs. Society, 4; Phy 
siological Chemistry Society, 3, 4; Junior N. Y. 
Osteopathic Society. 





HELEN GATES MELLOTT 

"Redhead" 

Cranford, N. J. 

Clifton High School; Pratt Institute. 
Secretary Drew Obs. Society, 4; Physiological 
Chemistry Society, 3, 4. 



LESTER R. MELLOTT 

"Les" 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tarentrim High School; Penn State College. 
Class Treasurer, 2; Vice-President Physiological 
Chemistry Society, 3, 4. 





GUY W. MERRYMAN 

COLLINGSWOOD, N. J. 

Steelter High School; Penn State College. 
President Physiological Chemistry Society. 



MARGARET S. NICHOLL 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frankford High School; Linden Hall Seminary. 
Kappa Psi Delta; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Inter-fra- 
ternity Council, 4. 





VIRGINIA NORMENT 

"Gm" 

Middle Falls, Pa. 

Western High School, Baltimore; A.B. Goucher 
College. 

Axis Club; Varsity Basketball. 1. 2. 3, 4; 
Synapsis Stall", J; Drew Obs. Society, 4. 
























g SYNAPSIS^ 



RICHARD T. PARKER 

"Red" 

Highland Park, N. J. 

Rutgers Prep. School; Rutgers College. 

Atlas Club; Basketball, 1, 2, 3;Captain Basketball, 
4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Neo Society; Class Vice-Presi' 
dent, 1. 





HENRIETTA S. PETERSON 

"Henri" 

New York City, N. Y. 

St. Agatha High School; New Rochelle High 
School; A.B. Connecticut College; Columbia College. 
Axis Club. 



ALLEN S. PRESCOTT 

"Bi" 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Syracuse Central High School; Syracuse University; 
Chicago College of Osteopathy. 

Atlas Club; Physio'ogical Chemistry Society, 3, 4. 










3 % SYNAPSIS^ 




LILLIAN BARTON SCOTT 

~ur 

Providence, R. I. 

Clarrical High School; Mass. College of Osteopathy. 

Axis Club; Class Secretary, 2, 4; Axone, 3; Secrc 
tary, A. A., 4; Drew Obs. Society, 4; Inter fraternity 
Council, 4; R. I. Junior Osteopathic Society. 






w 



RALPH B. SECOR 



WlLKINSBUKG, Pa. 



Ridgway High School; B.S. Allegheny College. 

Atlas Club; Coach of Athletics; Vice-President of 
A. A., 3; President of A. A., 4; Inter-fraternity 
Council, 3; Neo Society, 4. 














ELWOOD SLINGERLAND 
"S/mgie" 
Troy, Pa. 



Troy High School. 
Iota Tau Sigma. 









BERTHA C. SMITH 
"Bert" 

Holyoke, Mass. 

West High School. 

Axis Club; Junior N. Y. Osteopathic Society. 





GEORGE T. SMITH 

"Torchy" 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Holyoke High School. 

Iota Tau Sigma; Drew Obs. Society, 4, N. Y. 
Junior Osteopathic Society. 









I I 'WARD M. STAFFORD 

"£d" 

Rome, N. Y. 

Rome Free Academy. 

Thetsi Psi; Inter-fraternity Council, 4. 





KARNIG TOMAJAN 

"Tom" 

Worcester, Mass. 

North High School; Clark College. 

Iota Tau Sigma; Freshman Dance Committee; Drew 
Obs. Society, 4; Physiological Chemistry Society, 3, 
4; Inter-fraternity Council; Class Vice-President, 3. 



NATHAN WATTENMAKER 
"HaC 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lambda Omicron Gamma. 





J. LESTER WINELAND 
"Fat" 

CURRYVILLE, Pa. 

Morrison Cove High School; Franklin and Marshall 
College. 

Phi Sigma Gamma; Baseball. 1. 2. 3, 4: Manager 
Basketball, 4; Neurone Society; Vice President. 
Neo Societv, 4. 






I g SYNAPSIS^ 






HOWARD E. WISTERMAN 

"Wisty" 

Toledo, Ohio 

Scott High School; Chicago College of Osteopathy. 
Theta Psi. 




Senior Directory 



Ronald E. Ambler — 14 Cedar Ave., Conshohocken, 
Pa. 

Robert D. Anderson — 59 High St., Germantown, 
Pa. 

David L. Brown — Swedesboro, N. J. 

Alice Chase — 66 Barrow St., New York City, N. Y. 

Meyer Cohen — 3129 W. Westmont St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Edward Crapser — Columbia Cross Roads, Pa. 

Joseph B. Culbert — New York City, N. Y. 

A. Richard Da vies — 31 Lenox Ave., East Orange, N. J. 

Vincent DiRenzo — 129 E. Spring Ave., Ardmore, Pa. 

Richard J. Dowlinc — 12 Warren St., Norwood, 
Mass. 

Paula Ellis— 724 S. VanBurenSt., Bay City, Mich. 

H. Allen Fellows — 527 Claredon St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Nathan Morton Fybish— 2013 Wallace St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

I H K. Garhrinc — 67 South St., Union City, Pa. 

Clarence O. Gaskill — West Burke, Vt. 

Carl E. Getler— New York City, N. Y. 

J. Wilson Hunter — 40 Kenton Ave., Pitman, N. J. 

Carl J. Isman— 1727 N. 33rd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

C. D. Jameson — 227 Jefferson Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

Charles J. Karihc— 208 N. Park St., Bellefontaine, 
Ohio. 

Sm p. man T. Lewis — Hallatead, Pa. 

' I Lyman 1420 N. Edgewood St., W. 
Philadelphia, I 

' S Maxwell 52 Fullei PI i 

I ' I , i M 1 1 ',: (09 S I Won Ave , ' Iran- 
N. J. 



Lester R. Mellott — 118 Jarrett Ave., Rockledge, Pa 
G. W. Merryman — 2 Lake Shore Drive, Collings 

wood, N. J. 
Richard C. Moore — 552 Lincoln Highway, Coates- 

ville, Pa. 
Margaret S. Nicholl — 5038 Griscom Ave., Frank- 
ford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Virginia Norment — Middle Falls, N. Y. 
Richard T. Parker — Adelaide Ave., Highland Park, 

N.J. 
Henrietta S. Peterson — 4582 Parkway, New York 

City, N. Y. 
Allen S. Prescott — 205 Clarke St., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Lillian Barton Scott — 144 Ohio Ave., Providence, 

R. I. 
Ralph B. Siicor— 415 S. Trenton Ave., Wilkenshurg, 

Pa. 
S. Elwood Slingerland — 316 E. Main St., Troy, 

N. Y. 
Bertha Camp Smith — 45 Nonatuck St., Holyoke, 

Mass. 
Georoi T.Smith — 45 Nonatuck St., Holyoke, Mass. 
Edward M. Stapford — 220 Elm St., Rome, N. Y. 
Karnig Tomajan — 272 Burncoat St., Worcester, 

Mass. 
Nathan Wattenmaki'u 48th and Locust Sts., 

I'llll.ldrlphla, IV 

J. Lester Wineland — 243 Boulevard Ave., Curry- 

ville, Pa, 
Howard Wistekman — 2465 Lawton Ave., Toledo, O. 




ff synapsis^ : 



Senior History 






HAIL, and Farewell! Seems but a day since as freshmen we crowded 
into Dr. Green's lecture hall to get our first view of the clavicle, 
and learn that the lateral one-third thereof was to be the first mile- 
stone in our progress through Osteopathy. Yet, here we are, already 
preparing to leave our Alma Mater and launch ourselves as physicians (with 
the grace of God and state board examiners!). Let us for a moment review 
the most important of the many events that were crowded into the life 
of the class of 1930 in the past four years. 

Of course, the first thing was the election of officers, back in the fall 
of 1926. Fields was elected president just in time to depart for Mexico 
and leave Dick Dowling as our Freshman president, in which capacity he 
served with honor and distinction. A full quota of other officers assisted 
him, and our classic ship of state sailed over the reefs of dissection, weathered 
the gale of chemistry lab, passed through the torrid zone of histology, and 
approached the harbor of Sophomorism. Under Dr. Green's erudite guid- 
ance we climbed anatomy from pinnacle to pinnacle — beg pardon, from 
clavicle to clavicle, waltzed along the floor of the nasal chamber, gazed at 
the Pyramidalis, swung on the Trapezius, scaled the scala tympani, and 
shinned along the tibia. We learned to distinguish perineal from peroneal 
structurers, and both from peritioneal tissues. And of course we enjoyed 
the various social events that enlivened the intense busyness of lab and 
lecture. Near the end of the Freshman year we elected Harold Lyman 
president in a closely contested match in which one vote decided the battle, 
and Bruno fought our Sophomore campaign for us nobly and well. 

As Sophomores, the class of 1930 inaugurated the now accepted policy 
of welcoming Freshman as fellow-warriors in the cause of osteopathy in- 
stead of hazing them as strangers in our midst. Then we settled down 
to a consideration of Physiology, Pathology, and other subjects of entrancing 
interest to osteopathic students, not forgetting the thrilling mysteries of 
Nervous Anatomy and the occultries of Biochemistry. Who can forget 
the dreary travels through the thermogenous system, the perspiring journey 
through the sudorific glands, the breathless rush through the respiratory 
tract, and the merry-go-round through the circulatory system, from big 
toe to heart to bunion again. Not to mention the hasty trip through 
the digestive tract, from mouth to , er — er through the digestive tract, 
that is. (Whew, that was some course!) Anyway, we finally became 






Juniors, and with Allan Fellows for President got set for a hectic year. 
And we got it! 

We found the third year as long and arduous as the second, due to a 
rearrangement of class schedules by the powers that be, but the compara' 
tively pleasant tasks of a lab-less semester gave us renewed interest in 
studies, which in themselves w r ere more interesting, more directly appealing, 
and we prepared diligently for the second semester's ordeal of entry into 
the general clinic. The clinic was the first real contact with the future 
life work of the osteopathic physician, it was life in the raw, figuratively 
speaking, I mean, of course, and we found it most interesting. Then, 
too, the campaign for a greater osteopathy was waged in that semester; 
tracking the evasive contribution through the pathless mazes of defensive 
prevarication, we got a priceless education in psychology, and learned to 
discount subjective bankruptcy by nothing carefully the symptoms of 
objective opulence; through intensive application we learned how to relax 
spastic contractions of pocketbooks by allopathic doses of "sapo mollis ,1 
in synergic combination with logical explanation of the great value of a 
new hospital and college to the osteopathic profession. And lo, over a 
million dollars was subscribed! 

The Junior Prom was the social event of that year for us. A good time 
was had by all (who attended) and the year ended in a blaze of glory and 
good fellowship, during which the officers for the ensuing Senior year 
were elected, as follows: 

Richard Davies, President; Allan Fellows, Vice-President; Lillian 
Barton Scott, Secretary; Carl J. Isman, Treasurer; Paula Elias, Prophet; 
Ronald Ambler, Historian. 

(Not elected at that time, but drafted willingly in the latter part 
of the Senior year was Ye Scribe as Acting Historian, N. M. F.) Then 
the class adjourned for a short vacation to prepare for our Senior year. 

The Seniors are now almost ready to emerge into professional life, 
after passing through the final stage of training in clinic, laboratory, and 
hospital. Thinking over the events of the past four years, we, who have 
been the liaison battalion between the old and new, who have witnessed 
the rapid progress of P. C. O. from good to better, and from better to best, 
who have freely criticized the while we loyally supported our institution, 
feel grateful to the faculty and directors whose faithful efforts contributed 
so largely to the pleasant tenor of our history. We go forth enthusiastic 
protagonists of Osteopathy, pledged to practice and propagate it as our 
life work. 

Which reminds us to assist the chronicle with a list of the members 



of the class of 1930 who committed matrimony since the class began its 
organized existence in September, 1926, with appropriate chronology: 



Ronald E. Ambler, Oct., 1928 
Robert D. Anderson, Sept., 1928 
Lillian Barton Scott, Sept., 1929 
Nathan M. Fybish, Aug., 1929 
Helen Gates Mellott, Dec, 1929 



Lester R. Mellott, Dec, 1929 
Guy Merryman, Dec, 1926 
Bertha Camp Smith, Jan., 1929 
George Smith, Jan., 1929 
Wisterman, September, 1928 



Jane Price was with us till her marriage to Morgan Von Lohr, after 
which our class had to relinquish her to her Jersey paradise. 

Unconfirmed report has it that Richard "Red" Parker is also a benedict: 
direct interrogation elicits no denial, so history records his capitulation to 
cupid. 

Considering that 10-46th of our Senior class were married in only 
four years, it were no encroachment on the province of the Class Prophet 
to add with similar percentages obtaining for prognosis for the rest ot us, 
there promises to be no dearth of recruits for, say, the class of 1955, P.C.O. 
Herewith closes the history of the class of 1930. 

N. Morton Fybish, 

Acting Historian 





K synapsis"^ 



'Prophecy 







AFTER this morning's five-hour tramp through 
Wissahickon Valley, topped off with a picnic "steak 
fry," the arm chair before the fireplace exerts upon 
me (successfully) a powerful chemotactic influence. 
The light of the woodfire chases the shadows around 
the room over my pictures, my flowers, my books — 
that brings to mind tomorrow's assignments to be 
covered. Think of it, June with its finals, its fare' 
well programs, state boards, etc., is just around the 
corner, and then? 

WOR announcing a rare treat to music lovers, 
Wagner's master work, Tristan and Isolde, to be presented by the Phil- 
harmonic Symphony Orchestra of New York City at four o'clock. Guess 
I'll have time to glance over today's news columns — (That static! like the 
roar of a thousand German batteries !) 

FUTURE OF HOOVER DEPENDS ON TARIFF. 
THIRTY AIRMEN TO SEEK WEALTH IN ARCTIC. 
NEW OBSERVATORY OPEN TO PUBLIC TODAY. 

Progress of science on earth far beyond that of neighboring 
planets. Private lives of Uranians frequently in the field of 
observation of celestial ultra-microtelescope — 

NEW SURPRISES FOR RADIO FANS 

We dwell in a world of radiations. According to the 
theory of sensorial equivalents we may regard ourselves as 
capable of transforming into sight any sense of the human 
system hearing — 

A turn of the dial . . . station ZXC2 ... A noise came faintly, 
increased and expanded until it seemed to fill the air with a siren-like note of 
warning. It was the voice of an airplane, droning in from the deepening 
violet of the overcast eastern sky. Another "Lone Eagle," Dr. "Gyn" 
Norment hurrying out to keep an appointment at her office in Miami, Fla., 
and just in from Havana, Cuba, so I hear her tell a loitering pilot. 







~S j SYNAPSIS^ 



1 



Another turn of the dial . . . Staggering, marvelous scenery slips 
past. Mexico City, its park, flowers, children, a tiny lake over which 
waterfowl of all sorts sail, dive and scurry. On a sunny bench near by I 
see Drs. R. Dowling, A. S. Prescott and C. J. Kanbo. A finer adjustment 
brings in their familiar voices. "Yeh . . Dick and I are on our way home 
to Los Angeles from the International convention of Osteopathic Physicians 
and Surgeons held in Paris, France. Dick you know is Associate Dean at 
the Los Angeles College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons, and I 
run their X-ray Department. Say, you missed something by not being at 
that convention. About thirty-five of our 1930 bunch were there. Dr. 
G. Merryman of Columbus, Ohio, presented a very good paper on "Behaviour 
of blood sugar in fever and at very low temperature." Dr. Alice Chase of 
Denver, Colorado on "The child who will not eat." Dr. R. T. Parker 
gave us some good foot technique. Dr. A. R. Davies, Industrial Physical 
Appraiser of Pittsburgh, Pa., produced statistics to show that by means of 
scientific Osteopathic service the "sick leave" period is reduced, the in- 
jured saved from being branded as "unemployable" and the average work- 
man's years of industrial productivity are materially increased to the benefit 
of himself and society . Dr. Florenz Smith, Obsteotrician to Queen Charlotte's 
Maternity Hospital, London, England, gave an interesting talk on "De- 
terminants of Character." 

During the Convention, Drs. D. Brown and Margaret Nicoll Brown 
threw a big dinner and theatre party for our crowd. The Browns have 
a home in Philadelphia, not to live in but to refer to. Most o( their time is 
spent in Paris where their oldest son is studying French as a part of his 
preparation to eventually enter Foreign Osteopathic service. 

I hear that Dr. E. A. Crapser of Witchita, Kansas, has done special 
work on cancer and has written extensively on various aspects of the sub- 
ject. You remember Dr. J. L. Wineland? He is Director of Information 
and Statistics for the A. O. A. He also established a Bunion Clinic m 
Milwaukee, Wis., for the care of bunions by the "Bloodless Surgery" method. 

Last year while in Bangor, Me., it was my pleasure to visit Dr. Edward 
Stafford who for seven years had been engaged in general practice in that 
city. He is now devoting exclusive attention to the study and treatment 
of backward and nervous children. 

Dr. Robert Anderson is still in Philadelphia devoting all of his studies 
and investigations to the discovery of that "unknown something" which 
must be operative in the human body before the manifestation of recognisable 
symptoms. He gave me this clipping —"Dr. Allen S. Prescott who five years 
ago was called to Mexico City by the Government Health Department as 






^ r 






an expert on tropical diseases has done important research work on clima' 
tology and infectious tropical diseases, especially yellow fever and sprue. 
. . . "Listen, I always knew your brain had an extra convolution. . . " 
"Cut the static, "Chuck, 1 let's have more news about the rest of our class." 
"Dick," I'll expect you to help me out on this . . . "Check and double 
check! I'll have to make it short and snappy in order to catch the next 
Air Liner for California." 

Dr. Lillian Barton Scott is assistant in Gyn. Clinic Outpatient Depart' 
ment ot the Providence, R. I. Osteopathic Hospital and for the past five 
years she has been connected with the Clinical Research Bureau of the 
International Birth Control League. Her hobbies are cross-word puzzles 
and darning socks. 

While in London, England, we met Dr. Richard C. Moore. He 
urged us to stay over to witness the Derby at Epsom Downs, in which he 
will as usual have a much fancied candidate. 

Dr. Helen Gates Mellott, originator, owner and maker of the "Gates" 
Binder and Abdominal Supporter is physical inspector of girls in the Public 
Schools of Passaic, N. J. Her husband, Dr. Lester R. Mellott, Otologist on 
the staff of the Osteopathic Hospital of Passaic, spent last summer in Pro- 
fessor Neuman's Clinic at the University of Vienna, Austria. 

Dr. Carl Isman, I was told, has recently opened his fourth bank in 
Brazil, South America. 

Dr. Harold O. Lyman, practicing in Seattle, Washington, gives much 
time and cheerful unflagging energy to children of the slums, to cure ills 
that poverty and ill housing bring to them from the time of their birth. 

A few months ago Dr. Ambler assumed the duties of Assistant Director 
of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy Research Laboratories. 

Dr. N. Wattenmaker is making a financial success of his Physiotherapy 
Institute in Atlantic City, N. J. 

You should see the new Osteopathic Hospital in Buffalo, N. Y. Dr. 
George T. Smith is Director of its Cardiovascular Department. Dr. Bertha 
C. Smith is actively interested in the nursery school movement for children 
from one to five years of age toward which movement the U. S. Senate has 
given legislative encouragement (thanks to the efforts of Senators Richard T. 
Parker, D.O., and Nathan M. Fybish, D.O.). 

One career is all the most of us can hope for but Dr. Fybish managed 
an extra. He is Consulting Neurologist to the Neurological Institute and 
Psychiatrist to the Juvenile Court of New York City. He has made several 
contributions on his specialty to various osteopathic journals. Due to his 
untiring efforts, many favorable changes have taken place in Osteopathic 



£ 



% SYNAPSIS^ 






standing, New York, recognitions, laws, numbers, etc. His favorite pastime 
is walking in the fields, woods, and parks. His hobby is symphonic music. 

Dr. L. E. Slingerland is lecturer in the Des Moines Osteopathic College 
on diseases of the stomach. He has invented instruments and apparatus 
widely used in gastroenterology. 

Dr. J. Wilson Hunter is a member of the Chicago Board of Health. 
Just recently moved into his new home on Michigan Blvd. 

I suppose you know that Dr. G. S. Maxwell, prominent in professional 
organization work, had for several years served as President of the Inter- 
national Osteopathic Association. He also holds the position of Third 
Vice-President of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. 

A prominent Osteopathic Physician of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 
Dr. Myer Cohn, has been elected Coroner of Huron County by an over- 
whelming majority over his Democratic and Prohibitionist opponents. 

Dr. C. Getler is chairman of the North Carolina Osteopathic Board of 
Examiners. He is also corresponding member of the Deutsche Gesellschaft 
fur Urologie. His hobbies are music, and brunettes. 

On his way to the Paris convention, Dr. A. Fellows, who by the way is 
Clinical instructor of neuropsychiatry and Clinical Osteopathy in San 
Francisco College, stopped over in Omaha, Neb., to see Dr. R. B. Secor. 
He found him in the Harney Osteopathic Hospital recovering from a minor 
operation. Dr. Secor is greatly interested in student life, takes care of 
athletic teams, renders service that is keenly appreciated, majoring strong 
for the profession he represents. 

Dr. V. DeRenzo is engaged in general practice in San Antonio, Texas. 
His book on "Causes, Comforts and Costs of Obesity," is just off the press. 

Last May, Dr. K. Tomajan of Brussels, Belgium, officially operated in 
Hospital St. Louis, Paris, France. He is the first Osteopathic Surgeon to 
demonstrate before European specialists in Paris. 

Dr. C. Gaskell is Professor of Principles of Osteopathy and Chief 
Resident physician at the Philadelphia Osteopathic Hospital. 

Have you ever heard of the Sulphur Mud Baths in New Orleans? 
It is a private institution for treatment of gout, gall bladder and liver troubles, 
opened several years ago by Dr. J. Culbert. Lm told he is coining money 
now. 

Dr. H. Peterson continues as physician and physical director to a 
girls 1 camp in New England. She finds time to broadcast on health topic-. 
hunt big game in Africa and contributes generously to various Osteopathic 
periodicals on Phychology and Morals. 

Dr. S. T. Lewis is mainly interested in traumatic surgery and has 







K SYNAPSIS^ 












charge of the Industrial Clinic at the Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelphia. 

I have an invitation to visit Dr. K. Gehring next month, in Detroit, 
Michigan. He is Chief of Clinic at the Detroit Osteopathic, Out-patient 
Department. They say he has one of the largest and most modern equipped 
laboratories in the Middle West. 

Dr. Wisterman is Director of the Bureau of Communicable Diseases of 
Erie, Pa., Department of Health. 

Dick, look at that sky to the south! Beginning to rain, I believe. 
No chance of making California tonight . . . Pse regusted ! 

Inky darkness, shrieking winds . . . lightning darting through the 
heavens, a crash! . . . 

WOR announcer commenting on the inspired interpretation of Wagner's 
selection just presented. The light of the woodfire chases the shadows 
around the room over my pictures, my flowers, my books — That brings 
to mind tomorrow's assignments to be covered. 

















'- 










Warren Baldwin 






Benjamin F. Adams 

The spirit of the plastic age, 
So smooth, he \noc\s 'em 

aid, 
He seems in fact to be the 

rage 
Among fat and thm, young 

and old. 

Boston has given us 
beans and "Ben." Hurray 
for Boston and hurrah for 
"Ben." He is number one 
on the roll and number one 
in the hearts of his friends 
and schoolmates — because 
he is a darn good fellow. 



Concentration in wor\ or 

play, 
Steady progress day b> day. 
Then those nights when she 

is there — 
Who said "Bald/' couldn't 

float on air? 

Mysterious "Baldy" — 
the quiet man, seems to 
be able to take care of a 
multitude of things and 
never to get ruffled — at 
least externally. He is 
earnest in his endeavors 
— in fact a student; but 
nevertheless a certain lady 
occupies some of his time. 



Harlon Bartholomew 

Js[ew Tor\ is Osteopathic 
From there many students 

depart, 
The legislation is obnoxious, 
But that does not discourage 

Bart. 

"Bart" is Binghamton 
bound as soon as school 
lets out. He is a very lik- 
able chap — even his wife 
thinks so. He has worked 
diligently during his col' 
lege career, both inside 
and out and deserves com' 
mendation. 



68 






















Martin Beeman 

Marty, smart-he, smooth 

and dapper, 
Seems to move but at the 

snail's pace, 
And lo! with not a single 

capper. 
He always places in the race. 

See for yourselves, ladies 
and gentlemen, just what 
the tailors do for the well 
dressed man about town. 
If people stepped from a 
bandbox "Marty" would 
be easily catalogued at a 
glance. Most amiable, too, 
this ambitious son of Os- 
teopathy. 



Frank Oscar Berg 

We don't \now much of 

Maiden, 
We do \now edema Fran\, 
However objects to Oscar 
Must be a superative cranky. 

"Swede" has sticking 
qualities — "let's stick to- 
together" is his favorite 
slogan. Like all New Eng- 
enders he has good poten- 
tial propensities. Some of 
which showed up in the 
Junior year — any one want 
to know a nurse? — see 
"Swede". 



E. Campbell Berger 

The P. C. O. melodians 
In music are not lax, 
The etiological factor 
Is Berger and his sax. 

"Ed" hails from a large 
family of Osteopaths — it is 
estimated that he has 25 
relatives in the profession. 
We have no fear as to his 
success. He's a city slicker 
from N. Y. C. and a good 
student with initiative for 
rese;i re h. 






69 




SYNAPSIS^ -^a^ 1 

























Joseph M. Bowden 

Nsw Jersey sends a product 
We'll never want to see go, 
He's crazy over horses, 
This sturdy "Horseback 
Joe." 

"Joe" is from Trenton, 
but regardless of this, we 
might say volumes on his 
fairness in all dealings, 
his unbiased opinion in 
settling all disputes, and 
his unfailing support of 
his friends. 



Girard W. Campbell 

Long Island ma\es a dona- 
tion, 

Who tries to abet good laws, 

We support the Junior 
meetings, 

With "Soup" as a probable 
cause. 

"Soup" went on a Life 
Guard's job last summer 
and took unto himself a 
wife. This probably ac- 
counts for the change in 
his shaving days. He has 
been quite active in the 
Junior N. Y. Society; if 
he is as enthusiastic with 
his practice, he'll sure be a 
success. 



Angus Cathie 

The shores of Massachusetts 
In history have a place; 
They send us Angus Cathie, 
What need for further grace? 

Angus, as the name im- 
plies, is Scotch, a good 
student, despite the name, 
and characterized by a dry 
and subtle humor. Ac- 
curacy and precision are 
his slogans and as an added 
quality, has a remarkable 
amount of patience. 





















SYNAPSIS K ^ 





James C. Christian 


















Gwyneth Chapman 

£>met, unassuming, and re- 
luctant 

Are the outward signs of 
"Gwyn." 

We wonder i{ she acts that 
way 

When she is out with him. 

"Gwyn" is like a clear 
unclouded sky that radiates 
little beams of sunshine 
wherever she goes. And 
this is the reason that 
more than one young man 
likes to bask in the magic 
of her smiles. 



To be a good physician 
Was "Jimmy's" honest aim, 
So now he's taking 

Osteopathy 
On a Pennsylvania tram. 

"Jim" is one ot the 
prodigies that can study 
for a final "exam" in the 
time it takes to go from 
East Orange to Philadel- 
phia on a fast express. And 
if "Jim" should get a 
mark below 90 — why the 
course is flunked. Still 
"Jim" is an ace of fellows 
and a wonderful triend. 



Foster D. Clark 

Famous men we're sure 

have told him 
As we circle 'round and 

'round: 
"Please, Foster, have a care 
Lest that mustache pull you 

down.' 

Here comes the Connecti- 
cut Yankee! Foster is one 
of the boys that is soaking 
up Osteopathy by the 
earful these days. "Dry 
den" we hope will be a 
future president of the 
New England Osteopathic 
Association. 















g % synapsis^ : 




LeRoy Conklin 






Eugenia Coffee 

"]ean" is always present on 

time, 
In clinic, church, or classes; 
Though mee\ and sort of 

bashful. 
She is one of our favorite 

lasses. 

"Jean," in attempting to 
continue her father's suc- 
cess, has a very hard task 
to accomplish. Neverthe- 
less we feel sure that she is 
capable of going far in the 
Osteopathic profession. 



His girls are — that's the 

question, 
His dates are — Oh, 50 fast, 
His ways are so bewitching, 
Oh baby, hew can he last? 

"Chester" must have 
been a star reporter, sent 
out to "cover" Osteopathy 
— -his work with the pen 
can be only described as 
miraculous, and his way 
with women makes us say : 
"Now, Chester." 



Agatha Crocker 

If lyrics were written 
By this "gal," we \now 
The theme song would be 
"Just me and my Joe." 

"Gat" is cheeriness it- 
self and wins her way by 
the light of her smile. 
This is especially indicated 
in clinic where she com- 
bines this good nature with 
proficient professionalism 
and does much good work 
thereby. 



-v / 



SYNAPSIS K 
















Frederic S. Dannin 


















Fred Brown Cushman 

We thin\ of Maine as farm 
land, 
But Si stands in its 
defense. 
He still things it is Elysian. 
And were sure that it's 
no pretense. 

"Si" is a remarkable 
fellow in that his is a won- 
derful persistency. He be- 
lieves in sticking to a thing 
until it is done. And 
furthermore "Si" has little 
time for women and their 
whims. Stick to that "Si" 
and success is yours. 



Great things in small pack- 
ages come 
Is a saying, both good and 
true; 
So Fred, if you are quite 
short, 
Don't worry, 'cause we 
\now you'll come thru. 

Fred is one of the few 
chosen-an honor student- 
that has made the grade by 
being a plugger in the true 
sense of the word. This 
summer Fred goes to Indian- 
apolis, to put his tech- 
nical knowledge into prac- 
tical use in assisting his 
brother in practice. 



Merritt G. Davis 

A go/den horn, a good strong 

lung, 
A sense of humor, a \nac\ 

for fun, 
A serious purpose, a family 

too, 
A real good man, he'll get 

his due. 

To know "Mert" is to 
enjoy the acquaintance of a 
real fellow, and to be his 
friend is indeed a joy. 
His famous 'Rasp-berry" 
tongue does not hurt us, 
but prevents us from taking 
ourselves and lite too seri- 
ously. We might learn 
much from "Mert". 









3 % SYNAPSIS^ 







William Desotnek 



Stephen Deichelman 

With the girls, Steve s far 
from slow, 
He's broken many a fair 
heart; 
For when he things its time 
to go, 
Says he: "The best of 
friends must part." 

Aside from being a heart 
thrill to the fair sex, Dike 
has many qualities that 
mark him as a leader, 
gather around him hosts of 
friends, and assure him of 
rapid and merited success 
in his chosen field of 
Osteopathy. 



Bdl is from Rhode Island 
The smallest state of all, 

But both respond imme- 
diately 
To Osteopathy's call. 

Bill almost became a 
sandwich-maker by begin- 
ning in Pharmacy. How- 
ever his trusty (not rusty) 
mind soon convinced him 
of his mistake and now 
Bill is straying around in 
clinic like an old-timer. 



William Ellis 

In basketball he is a star, 
In baseball he k.nows his 
stuff; 
He's going to start on 
checkers, 
If the player doesn't get 
rough. 

All joking aside — "Red" 
carries more than a major 
share of the athletic honors 
for the Junior class. He 
is an all around athlete 
from West Philadelphia, 
that is on the job for 
P. C. O. and plays also 
in the American League for 
Kennett Square. 




synapsis^ : 







Fredrich H. Fechtig 

He has learned to treat the 
symptoms, 
And how to use the \nife; 
J^low he's treating causes. 
Combine them — here's to 
longer life. 

Fred with his long and 
brilliant medical education 
has nevertheless a good 
reliable background in that 
he comes from a famous 
Osteopathic family — now 
he reverts to type. And 
while Phi Beta and having 
passed his National Boards 
— still he's a good fellow. 



Jack Fields 

Jac\ (Spratt) could eat no 
fat 
J^pr could he eat any 
lean, 
For he's on fruit and more 
fruit, 
And fruit covered u>ith 
cream. 

Jack is the other end of 
the act from "Chi" and a 
merry lad for a' that. So 
he has made us like him 
despite his occasional flights 
of fancy back to the wilds 
of Canada. These for- 
eigners are human after 






B. T. Bailey Flack 

Here is a lad that's happy 
While taking a bit of gaff; 

He's going to be a snappy 
Honesttojohn Osteo- 
path. 

A smile inclined to be 
infectious and a heart we 
know is big — that's B. T. 
Bailey. Of course many 
have attempted to kid him 
about faculty pull but it 
seems to bother him not at 
all. Perhaps he has a clear 
conscience. 









^ SYNAPSIS^ 




Charles J. Gajewav 

Charles is such a quiet lad, 
But when all is said and 
done 
His avocation is awful bad; 
He draws such a speedy 
gun. 

Despite the fact that he 
came from Locust Valley, 
he's the sunny h'd that 
everyone likes. He too, 
is said to like "bells" — 
one day in the freshman 
anatomy class they found 
an alarm clock under 
Charles' chair. 



John Glenn 

Johnny never seems to hurry, 
If he wor\s or plays a 
game, 
And what stn\es our atten- 
tion 
Is — he gets there just the 
same. 

Although quiet in man- 
ner — sometimes — John is 
imbued with an earnest 
and real desire to secure 
the most from Osteopathy. 
Already he has taken ad- 
vantage of summer clinic 
work and now looks ahead 
to a summer internship. 



ISADORE GOLDNER 

Hailing from the wonder city 

The metropolis of the 

ivorld, 

Ed will also soon do wonders 

That will mdk? A/ 

Smith's hair curl. 

Another honor man. 
Sharp, alert, quick answer- 
ing Ed. That's the way 
is "Iz". Ed is still suffering 
from the shock that he 
received when his former 
roommate and partner in 
crime decided to go to 
Chicago. 









M, SYNAPSIS^ 













,.; 






William Guinand 






Harold Gorham 

A cut-up, with a sense of 

humor, 
That's always out for sport 

or fun; 
But with his feet, decidedly 
Says he does not choose to 

run. 

Very few men in the 
professional world possess 
a business mind, a profes- 
sional mental attitude, and 
a mind for humor. With 
these qualities plus a pica? 
ing personality "Binkie" 
no doubt will put Osteop- 
athy on the map in th it 
little sea town of oysters 
and clams, Norwalk, Conn. 



Bill, our friend, your awful 

hobby, 
This Buk\ complex, drives 

us wild; 
Of course we \now they're 

awful nobby, 
But please, we pray, iust 

ta\e it mild. 

"Bill" certainly does like 
to take the venerable fac- 
ulty for the proverbial 
"ride", and so he will 
argue about everything, 
especially Buicks. Regard- 
less, he is a likeable chap 
and so accomplished — 
speaks two langu i\ • 
ently, English and super- 
latives. 



Wayne Hammond 

Here's the gent with a Ford 

coupe, 
Which he drives to school 

every day. 
At even-tide, so u>e are told, 
It is the steed for this Romeo 

bold. 

Wayne hails from Spring 
Run, wherever that is. and 
15 striving earnestly to 
acquire that smooth pro- 
fessionalism and adequate 
knowledge that will enable 
him to top the Osteopaths 
in the community and 
we're sure he is making a 
■ it. 



~ 









^YNAPSIS^ 











Dale Jamison 



r 









Leonard Heech 

He ta\es some singing 
lessons 

A bit of elocution too; 
With a touch of Osteopathy 

He, any cure can do. 

Leonard aptly combines 
the power to enter into all 
enterprises with energy 
and to do them very well. 
Now Leonard seems to be 
doing things for the Axone 
between times. 



Dale comes from Grove 
City, 

A city it is indeed, 
Ten thousand population. 
What more does an 
Osteopath need? 

Jamie is still putting 
people on their feet as the 
class foot specialist. He 
has a more than an average 
interest in his profession 
and we feel sure that some 
day Jamie will be one of 
the big lights in the Bash' 
line Hospital. 



Arthur Jewel 

Here^s a lad of nimble wit 
That scorns the serene 
graces, 
Woe and sorrow are surely 
hit 
When he smiles into their 
faces. 

Art is the college "cut- 
up" that dispells our gloom 
between classes. His in- 
genious pranks are indica- 
tive of wit without malice 
and his smile is as ingeiv 
uous as his mischievous 
tricks. 



> M 



g SYNAPSIS^ 













Wilbur Kell 






Isabel Johnson 

Izzy we're always glad to see 

She smiles at all so cheer- 

fully; 

Toothing seems to bother her, 

T^or any tas\ her course 

deter. 

No one I'm sure has ever 
seen Izzy in anything but a 
cheerful frame of mind — 
she's not that type. Her 
slow and lazy smile has 
won her many friends in 
P. C. O. and we hear there 
is some reason for going up 
to New York. 



Lewistown sends its greet' 
ings. 
We likewise give response 
Why not smo\e out in the 
tower 
And hear the rave of 
Alphonse? 

Kell's extra-scholastic in- 
terest in the freshman year 
was mainly that of basket- 
ball. The second year, 
the nation's reproductive 
system required much of 
his attention, and this year 
he is doing outside work 
plus his studies. 



Beatrice M. Kratz 

Bee, an Osteopath would be 

And of course that is not 

all 

She has the ghastly hobby, 

Of chasing an elusive 

golf-ball 

It early purpose has 
anything to do with it, Bee 
will be a successful Osteo- 
path, cause we find this 
has been her ambition since 
the tender age of ten. May 
you find it and fix it. Bee, 
and may the patients never 
leave you alone. 









79 



X SYNAPSIS^ ^A' 







Robert Kring 

There came from out of the 
west 
A man tall, lean, and 
spare, 
Prepared to do his very best 
As the answer to a 
maiden s prayer. 

Bob hails from the land 
of rubber plants and rubber 
tires - Dayton, O-hi-O. 
Now he is acclaimed as the 
premier "sheik" of the 
iid works his won- 
ders wherever female 
hearts can be found to 
flutter. Perhaps Bob, you 
better move your seal 
year. 



LeRoy LOVELIDGE, Jr. 

Osteopathy certainly had a 
flare 
When he first came to 
school. 
Of course it was his curly 
hair 
That gave the added fuel. 

LeRoy thanks us for not 
using tinted pictures. 
You're welcome Red. Also 
this chap is a violin player 
of note and what's more — 
his scholastic record is good 
and we look to his pro- 
fessional success. 



James C. Luker 

Calm, cool, and collected 
Derided with no effect, 

He has his aberrations 
Within the realm of sex. 

Luker, the ciass debater 
and the class arbiter in 
questions of parliamentary 
law, has in the course of 
years debated much but to 
date has had little success 
in having his decisions 
accepted. We, however, 
admire his tenacity and 
wonder at his originality. 













SYNAPSIS^ 



"'Vjl'"'" f'_^ 




William D. Lumley 

A wicked music master 
That strums a tune Jul 
\ey 
And fills our "pep" meet- 
ings 
With pungent melody. 

Bill came to school to 
assimilate Osteopathy and 
how he does. Of course 
in his spare time he man- 
ages an Ice Cream Co. so 
we realise that even ice 
cream has its uses. 



Arthur McKelvie 

Mac is oh so softly spoken, 
The girls all thin\ him 
nice; 
Yet the fellows visibly 
shudder 
When Mac pulls out his 
dice. 

Smiling "Mac" from the 
realms of the DuPont's 
brings his rich smile into 
our midst and calmly 
smiles our troubles away. 
Nothing bothers him, least 
of all tough courses. And 
we shall hold in our mem- 
ories for a long time the 
recollections of his fidelity 
and good fellowship. 


























Alfhonso Merola 

He loo\s as strong as a lion, 
And yet seems loath to 
depart 

From daily examination 
Of his valvular heart. 

"Al" is always good for 
at least a smile because of 
his great interest in cardio- 
vascular. Well, "Al" may 
all your murmurs be little 
ones. And please tell us 
the secret ot that automatic 
pin wheel of yours. 


















~s j synapsis^ : 




William Minor 






George Miller 

A sturdy son of old John 
Bull, 

Who comes far from over the 
sea, 

And plugs along day by day 

For his vegetables and Oste- 
opathy. 

George is the quiet, re- 
fined type of individual 
that is admired by the 
unior class — perhaps be- 
cause there is so few of 
them. He should well 
succeed in "Deah Old 
1 ", and so hope we 
all. Who will ever forget 
that resonant "Heah" at 
roll call? 



Bill raises a wic\ed rac\et 
And flourishes it with a 

shove, 
Then blushes most decidedly 
When the score is forty-love. 

The Beau-Brummel of 
the Junior class is pictured 
above. Sartorially per- 
fect, popular to the nth 
degree, scholastically well 
established, and possessing 
an efficient technique, 
rather inadequately de- 
scribes this man. 



David W. Morrison 

The Massachusetts moun- 

tains 
To Morrison gave rise; 
This fellow, as a student, 
Is one big, lan\y prize. 

"Dave" is among the 
leading students in the 
class. He descends from 
good Scotch stock, and 
consequently has landed 
several jobs as treasurer 
during his stay at P. C. O. 
He is out for the knowledge 
and from the marks he gets, 
we should say he is getting 
it. 















s % synapsis^ : 










Stephen Nayior 

Always wording day and 
night, 
Steve cant help but win; 
Be it "rubbing", boo\s, or 
sports 
All seem easy to one h\e 
him. 



William Nairn 

If you hear a lot of clapping. 
And then an awful dm; 

It's but an indication 
That Bill has happened 



Bill is one of the men 
that does things about the 
school to make it run more 
smoothly. And in addi' 
tion to this he teaches, so 
it is no wonder that we 
look to him as a shining 
example of what endeavor 
can do toward achieve- 
ment. 



One can picture the 
enthusiasm of the popu- 
lace of the town as they 
point to Steve and say 
"the D. O. from Camp 
Hill". Gone is the geo- 
graphical obscurity of this 
territorial subdivision, for 
Steve has put it on the 
map. 



Samuel J. Otto 

Hailing from a little burg 
In the northern part of 
Jersey, 
Sam soon made us realize 
The beauty of that 
country. 

Sam is the dietition of 
our class, and he sure 
knows his vegetables. 
Combining his dietetics 
with his Osteopathy, Sam 
should soon be one ot the 
outstanding physicians of 
upper New Jersey. 



A 






M, SYNAPSIS^ 







Frank Randolph 









A. Jay Pekow 

Abe is at his very best, 
This lad so hale and merry, 
When throwing out his 

barrel chest 
And handing us the royal 

"berry" . 

A. Jay (notice the 
French accent) has such a 
good nature that we refuse 
to tell all we know about 
him -i i id his many and 
varied talents. In other 
words, Abe, you stand in 
with us, even as you do 
with the faculty. 



Randolph comes from Pitts- 
burgh, 
A good natured boy is he; 
A journey out to }{arberth, 
He takes whenever free. 

Frank gets a big kick out 
of life by taking it easy and 
letting the other fellow 
worry. Frank spends plenty 
of time at Narbeth and 
nobody blames him either. 
Say, old chappie, why 
don't you marry the girl? 



James Reid 

Njzw Tor\ State is surely 

noted 
For politicians that shake 

the hand, 
So Jimmie should next be 

wted 
To help A! Smith lead his 

band. 

The politician from Ro- 
chester, even to the old 
campaign derby, which he 
donned in '27. Although 
"Jim" is not a member of 
the Shaker Club he has the 
ceremony down to a 
science. See Jimmie for 
information on all bills and 
good cigars. 



84 



^ SYNAPSIS^ 



















Aram Renjilian 

Endowed with the "try" 

Of any ten men 
Aram's sure to succeed 

More than most of them. 

Unfortunately not many 
of us can claim the stick-to- 
it-tiveness that is Arams'. 
With this admirable quality 
of conscientious ability and 
a logical questioning mind, 
Aram shall go very far. 



Raymond H. Rickards 

There was a young fellow 

who lived in a school 
Who had so many duties he 

didn't \now what to do, 
So he got some assistants 

and gave them all parts 
Then rode them and rode 

them; bless his dear heart. 

Rick has been seen writ- 
ing material for the Synap- 
sis with his right hand, 
typing something for the 
Axone with his left hand 
and shaving himself with 
his feet and he didn't cut 
his chin. That's his type. 
We think, moreover, that 
some day he will be an 
Osteopath. 



Walter Rohr 

Tod comes from northern 
K T. 
A calm and reasoning lad 
His will is a realm of 
compulsion 
Why push this psychology 
fad? 

Here is a fellow that 
stuJies hard and knows bis 
stuff. Yet far be it from 
him to be ahead of time. 
Tod has done considerable 
collateral reading on psy- 
chology and perhaps this 
explains the letters from 
Ravena in the feminine 
hand. 













g SYNAPSIS^ ^agg^^ 



















Charles Sauter 

They said: "It's Daddy 
Sauter, 
All filled with pride and 

joy; 

Receive our congratulations. 
As father of a bouncing 
boy." 

Having something to 

'.Ut, V.'i: ..'.III- 

not blame Charles for say- 
ing a word now and then — 
it is the way of all fathers. 
And we, too, on say much 
for the industry and ability 
of this young man, who 
strives every day in Oste- 
opathy. 



WlLLARD A. ShACKLETON 

From New Tor\ state one 
day he came, 
His D. O. degree to win, 
And now we're sure of his 
success, 
'Cause nothing worries 
him. 

"Merrily we roll along" 
is the favorite song of 
"Shack" while out riding 
in the "can". Of course 
everyone knows this ap- 
plies only going down hill. 
Credit should also be given 
as Willard was the first 
man able to make the Class 
of '31 come across »vith its 
dues. 



Joseph Sikorski 

Wilmington has two people, 
Two persons whom we 
want 
To watch their progress 
daily — 
That's Sil{ors\i and 
DuPont. 

Joe lives within commut- 
ing distance but says that 
this particular form of wast- 
ing time is against his poli- 
tics; he therefore, only goes 
to the big city in the little 
state once a week. And 
he won't cut surgery clinic 
to go a day earlier — nice 
work Joe. 







f\l 












M SYNAPSIS^ 




Robert Snow 



the 



Bob the worker, Bob 

thinner, 
A composite man is he, 
He has his boo\s, he has his 

pipe, 
And he has his family. 

"Bob", always smiling 
infectiously, has the ability 
to say the right thing at 
the right time, edging it 
with a bit of his own subtle 
wit and jovial good nature, 
so that he is a heralded 
blues chaser and above all 
a staunch friend. More- 
over he plays quite well on 
the piano. 



Troy Stratford 

That Troy is quiet and 

perhaps shy, 
You have heard no doubt; 
But explain then the loo\ in 

his eye 
That the "femmes" rave 

about. 

Troy has one great sin, 
and that is the fact that he 
belongs to the last four 
"Rows of Disgraces". Of 
course Troy that is a handi 
cap to overcome, but sleep 
ahead and we're sure that 
you will be rested by the 
time that you are ready to 
set the home town on fire. 
Best luck and good fortune. 



Harry Sweeney 

At/antic City's pride and 

joy, 
Harry sure is quite the boy; 
Of his success there is no 

doubt, 
The native people there do 

shout. 

After a somewhat tem- 
pestuous Freshman year, 
among the pirtalls of Em- 
brvology. Harry went con 
servative and now holds 
several tin badges for his 
professional attitude and 
we're sure that he will one 
of these days be an out' 
standing figure in Jersey. 















M , SYNAPSIS^ 




Edward Theiler 



Samuel E. Taylor 

Sam's long, lengthy legs 
Should rightly bring him 
fame, 
If he didn't spend all his 
time 
Running to and from the 
train. 

Smiling always cheerily, 
he is ever ready to jump in 
and help when things are 
doing. He'll even sing 
bass on Tuesdays, and of 
course he hails from Ches- 
ter but we Gin't hold that 
against him. 



Here's Ed the student wise, 

That always \nows his 

stuff, 

And while the way is dreary 

For him it never is too 

tough. 

Lessons or extra-curric- 
ular activities, mean little 
trouble to Ed. All are 
accepted and finished with 
slow and consummate ease. 
Never hurrying and always 
poised means a lot, we 
feel, in drawing success 
his way. 



D. DeLand Towner 

J^ew Tori; will surely get a 
brea\ 
When Doc is found loose 
there, 
With his results and miracle 
cures 
He '11 ma\e all others stare. 

Doc is one of the chief 
technicians of the class. 
He is getting as much sleep 
as possible during lectures 
because he expects to be a 
busy Dr. when he grad- 
uates. 















SYNAPSIS^ 







Robert Cooper Warner 









Norman Warburton 

And now he is our president 
For better or for worse. 

He shoulders all our troubles 
And officiates as class 
nurse. 

The Class knew what it 
was about when it 
picked "Norm" — with his 
sunny disposition, diplo- 
matic manner, high I. Q. 
and qualities of a leader for 
the nervcracking job of 
president. May your pro- 
fessional career be sucessful 
"Norm", even as has been 
your term in office. 



To reach the pinnacle of 
success 
Is "Bob's" greatest ambi- 
tion; 
And we are sure that he'll 
get there 
As an osteopathic physi- 
cian. 

Bob is one of the school's 
greatest assets as an athlete 
and as a leader in the 
various phases of extra-cur- 
ricular activity. His win- 
some personality makes him 
well liked by everyone of 
his classmates and then 
again he's a student. 



Harold Weber 

Here's a man who came 

from the west, 
Who thought he wasn't 

getting the best; 
He's been with us a year. 
And we're glad that he's 

here, 
For as an "Osteo" he rides 

the top crest. 

Weber, of Weber and 
Fields, the famous team 
from the land of gangsters, 
has turned out to be a very 
good egg: ever since being 
relieved of the arsenal 
which he claims is p.irt oi 
the ordinary citizen's 
equipment. 
























ff SYNAPSISX ^ 




i93i 

JJunior 

Class 







Robert Wilson 

'Twas the night before finals 
And all through the 
house 

The men were all cramming 
But Joe — He was out. 

Yes, we have all seen 
Bob go to the movies the 
night before an exam — 
long before we felt self 
assurance — and he hasn't 
been caught often either. 
He claims a calm mental 
attitude is half the battle. 



Kenneth Zwicker 

There was a young doctor, 

named Zwic\er 
Who oumed a carl li\e some 

city slic\er. 
But people with ills 
Didn't ta\e pills 
'Cause Zwic\er could mal^e 

them well quicker. 

Kenny is the man with a 
purpose — when there are 
important points about a 
course to be learned and a 
case to be diagnosed, 
Zwick can be found burn- 
ing much mid-night oil 
until results are secured. 
Also his natural person- 
ality is the kind that .it 
tracts people and we expect 

Id lie, II ill In:, mii ( ess l.ltrl 





SYNAPSIS^ 



Junior Qlass History 



(*7*"*HE Class of 1931, although still making history, presents, since its 
\^y organization, a group of individuals with but one objective, to 
help place Osteopathy in its true status — the most sound and 
greatest of the healing arts. With Harry Wiesbecker, President; Angus 
Cathie, Vice-President; Evangeline Avery, Secretary and Edwin Gants, 
Treasurer, we commenced our organized career in the fall of 1927. 

How we struggled through those first few weeks, with their infra- 
lateral and postero-superior aspects. Gradually the light of dawning knowl- 
edge was to be seen on the horizon, in recognition of which we sponsored a 
Dance at the Oak Lane Revue Club, to which the Class of 1930 came in 
goodly numbers. A few weeks more and our first semester in preparation 
to practice Osteopathy had been completed. 

The second semester was shorter, it seemed, than the first had been. 
The environment took on a different aspect; under Dean Holden"s guidance 
we learned of the "Old Doctor's" struggle with antagonistic forces, which 
finally yielded to this new school of therapeutics whose slogan and firm belief 
is that "the rule of the artery is Supreme." The day finally came when 
we were no longer the "Frosh" of dear old P. C. O. Although the year 
had been a trying one on all of us, still, with few exceptions, we returned in 
the fall of '28, determined, more than ever before, to learn of this, our pro- 
fession. 

The class officers, as is the custom, were replaced by an election: 
"Art" German, President; Girard Campbell, Vice-President; Evangeline 
Avery, Secretary; Arthur McKelvie, Treasurer. With the exception of a 
very enjoyable dance, given us by the Class of 1932, the year passed rather 
uneventfully until the call for volunteers to solicit funds for a new P. C. O. 
was sent out by the board of directors of the college. We answered in a 
manner that was exceeded by no other class in raising funds from our in 
dividual incomes as well as aiding the project by participating as solicitors 
in the general campaign. 

Today, under a third set of class officers having Norman Warburton 
as President, "Bob" Warner as Vice-President, Agatha Crocker as Secretary, 
and Willard Shakelton as Treasurer, we are enjoying the advantages of 
a beautiful new college, designated to promote a diffusion of Knowledge in 
all branches of the healing art, with stress placed upon those subjects more 
clearly pertaining to the field of Osteopathy. 

[ames Christian 



% SYNAPSIS^ 



-^- 










92 



B £ SYNAPSIS^ 









-< 







Sophomore Qlass Officers 









J. H. ElMERBRINK 

President 

James Frazer 
V ice'President 

Frank Beidler 
Treasurer 

Dorothea Willgoose 
Secretary 









94 



A 



% SYNAPSIS> 



History of the Qlass of '32 



THE SOPHOMORE SCENIC RIDE 

LL aboard ! This train goes out at once ! Ready?" 
At the starters cry on September 17th, the members of the class 
of '32 embarked on their scenic ride. 
When we took our seats in the little Sophomore car, we thought we 
were very big and mighty, especially when we saw the poor Freshmen — but 
the Juniors and Seniors soon let us know that we were still lower classmen. 
The first few weeks of our ride was very pleasant, but no sooner did we 
get to the top than we found ourselves slipping downward. And then 
we knew that we must live up to the reputation we made for ourselves as 
"little greenies," and start climbing up again. 

Our sport car seemed rather crowded while we were Freshmen and 
has remained thus so far. Basketball is our hobby — and how the boys 
swarmed over that sport! Even the girls tried to put their game across. 
Tennis, baseball and bowling also found class representatives. 

The nicest car of all our train was one that has been on the track since 
the "Frosh" year — our Campaign Car. The chief engineer was President 
Ferren, assisted by Vice-President Rowe, and Secretary Redding who lead 
us to the fore as a class of "wee willing workers" for the cause. Our clever 
Treasurer Fish, moreover, juggled the coins around so that we had an extra 
$100.00 to give the Osteopathic campaign and a peppy "Shindig" at the 
Rittenhouse Hotel. 

Then came the great, dismay producing dip — mid-year exams. Many 
dropped from the cars, but most survived and came on up to the top again, 
happy and ready to go on their way. 

After a few more breath taking plunges, and death defying curves, 
we, the worn out Sophs, cheered on by the President Eimerhnnk and the 
glory of our new college, came to the end of our ride. Most ot us jubilant 
over the fact that we can ride as Juniors next year. 



Beth Keitsch, 

Historian. 



^ 









B £ SYNAPSIS> 















Sophomore Qlass c Rgll 

Axrell, Walter Deposit, N. Y. 

Barnhurst, William Philadelphia, Pa. 

Beach, Onn L West Hartford, Conn. 

Beall, Francis Syracuse, N. Y. 

Beidler, Frank Birdsboro, Pa. 

Bennett, Lawrence West Medford, Mass. 

Berry, James Islip, N. Y. 

Boone, Emily East Orange, N. J. 

Bradford, William Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brett, Earle Wollaston, Mass. 

Burget, Richard Altoona, Pa. 

Calmar, Joseph E. Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Casey, Eugene Johnson City, N. Y. 

Coles, Charlesanna Merchantville, N. J. 

Croman, Bernard Norwood, Mass. 

Davis, Harry Morristown, N. J. 

Dealy, Frank Philadelphia, Pa. 

DeMelfy, Frank A Hazleton, Pa. 

DuBell, Mildred Camden, N. J. 

Dunleavy, Thomas Barre, Vt. 

Early, John Lansford, Pa. 

Eimerbrink, John Philadelphia, Pa. 

Eldon, William Altoona, Pa. 

Evans, Dorothy New Bedford, Mass. 

Evans, Francis New Bedford, Mass. 

Evarts, Wallace Williamsport, Pa. 

Ferren, Edwin Camden, N. J. 

Fish, R. Arthur Flushing, N. Y. 

Frazer, James Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gagen, Claire Ashmont, Mass. 

German, Arthur C Camp Hill, Pa. 

Gormley, Gerard Atlantic City, N. J. 

Gregory, Paul Kingston, N. Y. 

Hahn, Arnold Toledo, Ohio 

Hartzell, Willard Souderton, Pa. 

Hershey, Lloyd Ronk, Pa. 



S % SYNAPSIS^ 







Hoffman, Linford Yeadon, Pa. 

Holbrook, C. Tyler Boston, Mass. 

Kaiser, Walter Atlantic Highlands, N.J. 

Keitsch, Elizabeth Noble, Pa. 

Kilburn, Robert Lowville, N. Y. 

Leavitt, Henry Stoneham, Mass. 

Leonard, H. Monroe Harrisburg, Pa. 

MacDonough, Charles Philadelphia, Pa. 

McQueen, Douglas Middletown, N. Y. 

Miller, Edwin Newport, Mon., England 

Mulkin, Kenneth Venus, Pa. 

CTRahilly, Neall Dublin, Ireland 

Ostermayer, A. Earl Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Petri, Hanford Rochester, N. Y. 

Pettapiece, M. Carman Ottawa, Canada 

Prescott, Edward Syracuse, N. Y. 

Redding, Barbara New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Reigner, Horatio Royersford, Pa. 

Richardson, Carrol Newark, N. J. 

Robinson, George Lynnfield Centre, Mass. 

Rowe, Stanley Auburn, Maine 

Sailer, Eric Bernerdsville, N. J. 

Schlacter, Alfred Orange, N. J. 

Schneider, Lewis Philadelphia, Pa. 

Seyfried, Lloyd Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Shuman, David Philadelphia, Pa. 

Smith, Robert Pitman, N. J. 

Spence, Helen Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Stineman, George Harrisburg, Pa. 

Stippich, Harold Meriden, Conn. 

Struse, Tolbert, B., Jr Roxborough, Pa. 

Szymanski, John Philadelphia, Pa. 

Talmage, Norman Morris Plains, N. J. 

vanRonk, Marion Philadelphia, Pa. 

White, Frank Wilmington, Del. 

Willgoose, Dorothea Needham, Mass. 

Williams, Howard New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Wilson, William Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Zea, Paul Brooklyn, N. Y. 












g synapsis !^ 























g SYNAPSIS^ 





Freshmen Class Officers 

Kenneth A. Scott 
President 



William E. MacDougall 
Vice-President 

Henry Goldner 
Treasurer 



Lucille Lumsden 
Secretary 



M synapsis! ^ 



Freshman Qlass c Rgll 



Adams, Everett, Jr Rochester, N. Y. 

Adams, Henry B N. Providence, R. I. 

Alleman, Rachel Middletown, Pa. 

Bartz, Frank ............. Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Beach, Arnold Lakeville, N. Y. 

Beam, Herbert Harrishurg, Pa. 

Black, Russell .... Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bowden, Alice Westover, Pa. 

Bowers, Frederic ............. Providence, R. 1. 

Boynton, George Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brown, Arnold ............ S. Portland, Maine 

Campbell, Reginald Rochester. N. Y. 

Champion, John Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chapman, Eunice ............. Holyoke, Mass. 

Christensen, Harold . Summit. N. J. 

Cohen, Theodore ............. Trenton, N. J. 

Costello, Frank ... ......... Providence. R. I. 

Craver, Lloyd ...... ....... Syracuse. N. Y. 

Crowley, Jeremiah ....... . . . . E. Providence, R. I. 

Dash, Hugh . . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Davis, Ralph Ocean City. N. J. 

Dunstan, Hugh Elyria, Ohio 

Eisen, Harry Philadelphia. Pa. 

Eisenhart, Marie .... Philadelphia, Pa. 

Eshelman, Russell ............. Rochester, N. Y. 

Fagan, Leonard C. . Philadelphia. Pa. 

Farley, Louis .......... ... Syracuse, N. Y. 

Farrand, Adelaide .... Tyrone, Pa. 

Flack. Arthur M. J Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frey. Stephen ... Elizabeth, N. J. 

Frison, George W Rome, N. Y. 

Garland, Earl ............. East Greenwich. R. I. 

Garland, Leroy ............. Providence. R. 1. 

George, Henry .......... New York City, N X 

Gcrbcr, Solomon ............. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Goldner, Henry Cleveland. Ohio 

Grimes, William Dayton, Ohio. 

Hartman, Herman ............ Philadelphia, Pa, 

Heaslip, Charles .......... Toronto. Ont., Canada 

Hendricks, Ralph ..... Lewistown, Pa. 

Higgins, Charles ..... Lawrence, Mass. 

Hilborn. Roscoe ..... Portland. Maine 

Hill, Laurence Cincinnati. Ohio 

Hoffman, Alfred Newark, N. J. 

Howe, Harold ....... Portland. Maine 

Joslin, Milton .... Webata 

Kaufman, William ..... Syracuse, N. Y. 















% SYNAPSIS^ ^a^ 









Keebler, Augustus 
• » - 3a 
Kurt:. Morris 
Ladd, Lincoln 
Leeiy. Richard . 
Levine, Julius 
Levy. Moe 
Lovitt. Harry 
Lumsdun. Lucille 
Markey. Ernest 
Martin, Basil 
McCroary, Stanton . 
McDougall. William 
Miller, Lawrence 
Miller, Paul . 
Mohler, Malcolm 
Murphy. Paul 
Nicholl, Jane . 
Nicholl, Robert 
Noeling, George 
Nordstrom, Ray 
Ogden, Irving 
Pratt, Warren . 
Price, Morton 
Purse, Munro 
Ramsay, Wayne 
Rapp, Jack 
Riley, Harold . 
Roberts, Manton 
Root, Joseph . 
Rosenthal, Ellis . 
Rothman, David 
Schantz, Lois . 
Sauter, Frank 
Scott, Kenneth 
Shaffer, Bernhard 
Shaw, M. St. Clair 
Shaw, Stanley 
Smingler, Frederick 
Smulian, Nathan 
Snyder, ( !] 
Stearns, Mary 
Steele, Robert 

I lowett 
Surfiel I, Ruth . 
Tapper, ' 

Toomey, Timothy 
Wiley, Kei 

hby, Hugh 
Woodhull, John . 

Y'jimg, William 



Skaneateles, N. Y. 

. Fairfield, Mass. 

New York City, N. Y. 

Frankfort, N. Y. 

Youngstown, Ohio 

New York City, N. Y. 

. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Runnemede, N. J. 

Ashland, Va. 

. York, Pa. 

. Bellefonte, Pa. 

. Pittsfield, Mass. 

. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

S. Portland, Maine 

Allentown, Pa. 

Lewistown, Pa. 

Iowa Falls, Iowa 

. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Providence, R. I. 

Providence, R. I. 

. Oneonta, N. Y. 

Lynbrook, N. Y. 

. Narberth, Pa. 

. Philadelphia, Pa. 

. Philadelphia, Pa. 

. Trenton, N. J. 

Lake Falls, Fla. 

. Philadelphia, Pa. 

. Troy, N. Y. 

. Philadelphia, Pa. 

. Souderton, Pa. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Providence, R. I. 

. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bridgeton, N. J. 

. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Trenton, N, J. 

Trenton, N. J. 

. Schenectady, N. Y. 

Lynbrook, L. [., N. Y. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Tremont, Pa, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

, Coatesville, Pa. 

. Boston, Mass. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

New York City, N. Y. 

Middletown, N. Y. 

Philadelphia, Pa, 


























3 % SYNAPSIS^ 





THE HOSPITAL 

Oy^ARKING the latest step forward in Osteopathic 
^ " " progress and being the last word in therapeutic 
efficiency and modern care for the ill, is the double mark of 
distinction that the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy 
boasts. It is well able to care for twice the former number 
of patients, with its new and improved equipment and to 
offer exceptional care in the obstetrical and surgical depart' 
ments. 

Due to increased capacity, there is opportunity for intern- 
ship for more members of the graduating class and also provi' 
sion for the training of a greater number of nurses. Associated 
with the hospital is a home for the nurses, at a convenient 
distance. 









...M 



\l 









rf 

! 4 



5 % SYNAPSIS^ 







HOSPITAL LOBBY 










A PRIVATE ROOM 










g SYNAPSIS^ 




DELIVERY ROOM 




NURSERY 



I0<5 



^ SYNAPSIS^ 







^ 










OSTEOPATHIC NURSES 

CTZY\E Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelphia maintains a Training 
School for Nurses. All phases of general nursing are covered 
in accordance with the training course required by the Pennsyl- 
vania Board for the Registration of Nurses. The training course 
consists of three years of regular classroom work, supplemented 
by practical work, under excellent supervision, in our Hospital. 
The Nurses Home, recently acquired, is a large, comfortable build 
ing, located on Spruce Street, within a short distance of the School 
and Hospital. 


















^SYNAPSIS> 






















f 



CLINIC 









<T^HE Osteopathic Clinic of P. C. O. is one of the most modernly 
equipped and systematically organised clinics in the city and 
among Osteopathic clinics the country over. Besides the forty'odd 
treating rooms, each of which is furnished with a treating table, a 
stool, toweling and ample light, there are special rooms for examina' 
tion and treatment. 

The special departments include the following: Obstetrics and 
Gynecology; Genitourinary; Gastroenterology; Ear, eye, nose 
and throat; Pediatrics; Cardiovascular; Neurology; Physiotherapy; 
Osteopathic diagnosis and many others. Each of these is furnished 
with the latest developments in diagnostic and therapeutic appliances. 
Associated with the clinic is a complete laboratory suited 
for all types of laboratory diagnosis. 





ORGANIZATIONS 



g synapsis^ 



Sororities and Fraternities 



Dr. Emanuel Jacobson 









JT IS said that money is the root of all evil. The late Dr. Con well brought 
out forcibly that this was not so. He said that the love for money is 
the root of all evil, because money means power and the love for power 
can become a tremendous force. This force is either destructive or con' 
structive, and so it is with sororities and fraternities in college life. If 
their power be misused it is destructive but the constructive power of 
these societies is most welcome in any institution. 

A group of students within these organizations come together for 
the common good of sisterly and brotherly companionship; not politics. 
But untortunately, the inquisitive nature of the beast, projects itself into 
the business which is not theirs, and as a result — there is gossip. Let me 
tell of the young man who one day besmirched the character of a woman. 
He was severely criticized for this by his friends. As a result he felt sorry 
and wished to repent. He told this to a wise old monk who then said, 
"Young man, get a bag full of down and go to every door step in this vib 
lage and place a feather upon it and come back." When the young man 
had done this, he was so happy in telling the monk of his repentence. 

"Not by a long shot," said the monk, "Now go back and pick up every 
one of those feathers." "But," said the young man "they must have all 
blown away by this time, and I cannot get them back." "So it is with 
gossip," said the monk, "Carried away by the lashing tongue, never to be 
returned again." 

This destructive power is the root of all evil. This institution is 
concerned for the future of osteopathy and the maintaining of its great 
traditions — if any. Traditions are the backbone of an institution. Students, 
by their constructive program, and everlasting devotion to the profession 
and their Alma Mater, build a foundation of tradition, making it secure 
to reap the benefits thereof not only for their own future, but as well for 
those to follow, — might I say, for generations. 

Sororities and fraternities in this institution represent also their national 
affiliations. More power- for greater good. Concern yourselves with 
unity in purpose, so that there will be no bickering; no hatred; no envy; 
but rather helpfulness, to your deans, faculties, and colleges throughout 
the land to enhance your profession. Let this be your ideal. 

Lastly, keep in mind that your sojourn is this institution is to obtain 



S £ SYNAPSIS^ 



an education, not necessarily understanding. Education may be the founda' 
tion, but many people without it, with great understanding, have made 
everlasting names for themselves and their institutions. This under' 
standing is better obtained among yourselves by application of your 
education. 

Sororities and fraternities, may you be ever guided in your wisdom, 
and helpful, not only to yourselves, but to each student within this in' 
stitution, so that you and your faculty maintain accordance in education 
and understanding. 







Sue Sorotity to Fred Fraternity 






















SYNAPSIS 




Osteopathic Fraternities at C P. Q. O. 

Fraternity — Chapter 

Kappa Psi Delta — Beta 

Established 1908 

Iota Tau Sigma — Delta 
Established 1909 

Phi Sigma Gamma — Zeta 
Established 1917 

Axis Club — Mastoid 
Established 1919 

Theta Psi — Gamma 
Established 1923 

Atlas Club — Styloid 
Established 1924 

Lambda Omicron Gamma — Caduceus 
Established 1924 









In order of establishment 



^M 






ff SYNAPSIS^ 




i 













INTER FRATERNITY COUNCIL 









<T^HE Inter-Fraternity Council was formed to better promote a 
panhellenic spirit among the organizations in our college. It 
is composed of a representative from each fraternity and sorority, 
who decide upon the rules and regulations that govern rushing 
and pledging, to the end that fraternal organizations maintain an 
unquestioned position in our academic life as moderators of the 
Osteopathic concepts and promotors of the Osteopathic principles. 






S & SYNAPSIS^ 


















Kappa Psi Delta 

BETA CHAPTER 

Established November 7, 1908 

Sorores in Facilitate 
Sarah W. Rupp, D. O. Mary Patton Hitner, D. O. 



Marion Dick, D. O. 



Helen Conway, D. O. 



Gwenyth Chapman 

Mildred DuBell 

Helen Spence 

Alice Bowden 



Sorores in Collegio 
Class of "30 

Margaret Nicholl 
Class of "31 

Class of "32 

Class of "33 
Ethel Sacrey 



Beatrice Kratz 

Beth Keitsch 
Marion vonRonk 

Jane Nicholl 



Ml 



ff synapsis! ^ 









' 













ROLL OF CHAPTERS 

Alpha Chapter .... Los Angeles, Cal. 

Beta Chapter Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gamma Chapter Chicago, 111. 

Delta Chapter . . . . Des Moines, Iowa 
Epsilon Chapter .... Kirksville, Mo. 


















ff SYNAPSISX ^ 



Axis Club 







MASTOID CHAPTER 
Founded 1899 Established 1919 

Sorores in Facilitate 
Elizabeth R. Tinley, D. O. Ruth H. Winant, D. O. 

Mildred Fox, D. O. 






Paula M. Ellis 

Virginia Norment 



Agatha Crocker 



Emily E. D. Boone 
Charlesanna Coles 
Dorothy Evans 



Rachael Alleman 
Eunice Chapman 
Marie Eisenhart 



Martha Bailey 



Sorores in Collegio 
Class of "30 



Bertha C. Smith 
Class of '31 

Class of '32 

Class of "33 

Mary Stearns 
Pre* professional 



Henrietta Peterson 
Lillian B. Scott 



Isabel Johnson 



Claire Gagen 
Barbara Redding 
Dorothea Willgoose 



Adelaide Farrand 
Lucille Lumsden 
Lois Shantz 



Mary Ellen Cooper 



m 






^ SYNAPSIS^ 









15 i 










▼ 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 









Odontoid Chapter . . . Kirksville, Mo. 

Hyoid Chapter Chicago, 111. 

Sphenoid Chapter . . . De Moines, Iowa 
Mastoid Chapter .... Philadelphia, Pa. 
Arachnoid Chapter .... Boston, Mass. 
Ethmoid Chapter . . . Los Angeles, Cal. 



117 


















ff SYNAPSIS^ 




Iota TBciu Si&na 




DELTA CHAPTER 



Founded May 21, 1903 



Fratres m Facilitate 



Edgar O. Holden, A.B., D.O. 
Edward A. Green, A.B., D.O. 
C. D. B. Balbirme, Ph.G., D.O. 
Edward G. Drew, D.O. 
H. Walter Evans, D.O. 
Francis J. Smith, D.O. 
H. Willard Sterrett, D.O. 
Ira W. Drew, D.O. 
Peter H. Brearley, D.O. 
Leo. C. Wagner, D.O. 



Established 1909 

William S. Nicholl, D.O. 
Charles Barber, D.O. 
William O. Galbreath, D.O. 
George L. Lewis, D.O. 
John H. Bailey, Ph.G., D.O. 
James B. Eldon, D.O. 
William J. Nairn, A.B., MA. 
Mahlon Gehman, D.O. 
Harmon Y. Kiser, D.O. 
Earl H. Gedney, D.O. 



Joseph Py, D.O. 



Edward A. Crapser 
Clarence A. Gaskell 
Charles M. J. Karibo 

Martin Beeman 
Harold W. Gorham 
William Guinand 
Arthur G. Jewell 
Robert B. Kring 

Frank A. Beidler 
Harry H. Davis 

P. Dunleavey 
R. Arthur Fish 
Gerald Cormley 

George lioynton 
L'.ovd Graver 
V i :1 Eshelman 



Fratres in Colkgw 
Class of '30 
Karnig Talmajan 
George S. Maxwell 
L. Elwood Slingerland 

Class of '31 
Arthur J. McKelvie 
George Miller 
William W. Miner 
William J. Nairn 
Steven G. Naylor 

Class of '32 
Walter Kiser, Jr. 
Henry F. Leavitt 
Douglas McQueen 
M. Carmen Pettipiece 
Monroe Purse 

Class of '33 

I' - I lill - ii ii 

Richard Leedy 
George Tapper 



George T. Smith 
John H. Watson 



Willard A. Shackelron 
Harry A. Sweeney 
Edward R. Theiler, Jr. 
Daniel Deland Towner 
Robert C. Warner 

George S. Robinson 
Eric A. Sailer 
David Shumen 
George B. Stineman 
Norman E. Talmage 

Robert Steele 
John Woodhull 
William Young 






rf-~*7- 



M, SYNAPSIS^ 






4- 1 ft-' Ar* 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 

Alpha Chapter .... Kirksville, Mo. 
Beta Chapter .... Des Moines, Iowa 
Gamma Chapter .... Los Angeles, Cal. 

Delta Chafter Philadelphia, Pa. 

Epsilon Chapter Boston, Mass. 

Zeta Chapter Chicago, 111. 

Eta Chapter Kansas City, Mo. 





















% synapsis^ : 



Phi Sigma Gamma 




Founded June, 1915 

Edwin H. Cressman, D. O. 
James E. Day, B. S., D. O. 
J. Rowland Dey, D. O. 
George H. Iinges, D. O. 
Ralph L. Fischer, D. O. 
Arthur M. Flack, D. O. 
Paul F. Lloyd, D. O. 
Ernest Leuringer, D. O. 
Frederick A. Long, D. O. 
Ernest A. Johnson, D. O. 



ZETA CHAPTER 

Established September, 1917 
Fratres in Facuhate 

Harry C. Hessdorfer, D. O. 

John J. McHenry, D. O. 

Charles J. Muttart, D. O. 

David S. B. Pennock, D. O., M. D. 

George S. Rothmeyer, D. O. 

Charles H. Soden, D. O. 

G. Carlton Street, D. O. 

C. Paul Snyder, D. O. 

Foster C. True, D. O. 

Enrique Vergara, A. B., D. O. 






Fratres in Colkgio 
Class of '30 



Earl Gordan Hersey, D. O. 
Richard Dowling 



Kenneth Gahring 
Class of '31 



Harlon Bartholomew 
Frank Berg 
E. Campbell Berger 
Joseph Bowden 
Girard Campbell 
Augus Cathie 
Fred Cushman 
Edwin Gants 

Walter Axtell 
William Barnhurst 
Richard Burget 
C. Wallace Evarts 
James Frazer 

Clarence Baldwin 
Ralph Hendricks 



Class of '32 



Class of '33 



Augustus Keller 



Harold Lyman 

J. Lester Wineland 



W. Dale Jamison 
William S. Kell 
David Morrison 
Frank Randolph 
William Rees 
Walter Rohr 
Joseph Sikorski 
Troy Stratford 

E. Willard Hartzell 
Kenneth Mulkin 
Joseph Root, 3rd 
Charles Snyder 
Tolbert Struse 

Ernest Markey 
Kenneth Wiley 



f 









f/ 



^STOAPSIS lE 

























ROLL OF CHAPTERS 

Alpha Chapter .... Kirksville, Mo. 
Beta Chapter .... Los Angeles, Cal. 

Gamma Chapter Chicago, 111. 

Delta Chapter .... Des Moines, Iowa 
Epsilon Chapter . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Eta Chapter Boston, Mass. 

Zeta Chapter Philadelphia, Pa. 

































g SYNAPSIS"^ 



Thctd Psi 



















GAMMA CHAPTER 

Founded May, 1903 Established November 17, 1923 

Fratres in Facilitate 

Francis E. Gruber, D. O. 

Fratres in Collegio 
Class of '30 
Charles D. Jameson Edward M. Stafford 

Howard Wisterman 






Foster D. Clark 
Charles R. Gajeway 



Class of "31 



Samuel E. Taylor 



Leroy Lovelidge, Jr. 
William D. Lumley 






Class of "32 



Jos. T. Calmar 
Bernard Cronon 
Arnold H. Hahn 
Linford Hoffman 
Robert P. Kilburn 



George W. O'Sullivan 
A. Earl Ostermayer 
Carrol E. Richardson 
Horatio Reignor 
Frank White 



Frank Bam 

Harold W. Christensen 
Frank Costello 
William Grimes 



Class of '33 



C. Judson Heaslip 
Stanton J. McCroary 
Irving S. Ogden 
Warren A. Pratt 



Manton B. Roberts 



122 






% % synapsisI ^ 







ROLL OF CHAPTERS 



Alpha Chapter Kirksville, Mo. 

Beta Chapter Chicago, 111. 

Gamma Chapter .... Philadelphia, Pa. 












ffSYNAPSISfe 



Atlas Club 

























STYLOID CHAPTER 



Founded at Kirksvilie, 1$ 



Established, Philadelphia, 1924 



Fratres in Facilitate 



J. Ivan Dufur, D. O. 

Charles J. Muttart, D. O. 

D. S. B. Pennock, D. O., M. D. 



D. F. Stombaugh, D. O. 
Howard Drewes, A.B., D. O. 
Otterbein Dressier, D. O. 



Robert D. Anderson 
David L. Brown 
Joseph B. Culbert 



Benjamin F. Adams 
Warren E. Baldwin 
James C. Christian 
Merritt G. Davies, B. S. 



James T. Berry 
Earle H. Brett 
William D. Bradford 
John W. Earley 
Edwin T. Fernn, A. B. 



Everett H. Adams 
Herbert Beam 
Arnold C. Bro ' tl 
Ralph Davis 



J. Francis Smith, D. O. 
Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1930 
A. Richard Davies 
H. Allen Fellows 
J. Wilson Hunter 
Sherman T. Lewis 



Richard T. Parker, Jr. 
Allen S. Prescott 
Ralph B. Secor, A. B. 



Class of 1931 

Stephen J. Deichelmann Robert R. Snow 
Frederick H. Fechtig, A.B., M.D. Robert E. Wilson 

W. John Fields Kenneth R. Zwicker 

B. T. Bailey Flack Harold Weber 
Raymond H. Rickards 

Class of 1932 

Paul D. Gregory Lewis B. Schneider 

Lloyd Hershey Robert P. Smith 

Charles Q. MacDonough Harold W. Stippich 

Hanford Petri William B. Wilson 

Edward S. Prescott Paul H. Zea, Jr. 
Stanley H. Rowe, B. S. 



Class of 1933 
Hugh Dunstan 
Louis R. Farley, A. B. 
Henry Goldner, A. B. 
Earle L. Jackson 



L. W. Ladd 

William E.McDougall.A.B. 
Lawrence P. Miller | 
Kenneth A. Scott, A. b. 



t 































































Q % SYNAPSIS^ ^" 




ROLL OF CHAPTERS 



Axis Chapter 
Hyoid Chapter . 
Mastoid Chapter 
Xiphoid Chapter 
Cricoid Chapter 
Styloid Chapter 



Kirksville, Mo. 

. Chicago, 111. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 





















J | SYNAPSISX ^ 






Lambda Omicron Gamma 




CADUCEUS CHAPTER 
Established November 10, 1924 

Fratres in Facilitate 
Julius Apatoff, D.O. Herman Kohn, D.O. 

Fratres in Collegio 
Class of '30 
N. Morton Fybish Carl J. Isman 

Nathan N. Wattenmaker 






William Desotnek 
Edward I. Goldner 



Paul H. Davis 



Theodore Cohen 
Solomon Gerger 
Alfred Kraus 
Morris E. Kurtz 



Class of '31 

Class of "32 
Class of '33 

Nathan Smulian 



Samuel J. Otto 
Abraham J. Pekow 



Julius Levine 



Moe Levy 
Morton F. Price 
Ellis A. Rosenthal 
David Rothman 









% SYNAPSIS^ 






m 













l 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 



Caduceus Chapter 
Astra Chapter . 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Los Angles, Cal. 









I 















127 



g SYNAPSIS 




Honorary Society 







NEO SENIOR SOCIETY 




l T^HE Neo Senior Society was founded at the Philadelphia 
College of Osteopathy in 1924 by ten members of the Class 
of '25. 

The purpose of the society is to promote student activities, 
interest in athletics, and a generalized feeling of good fellowship 
among the student body. Thus members are elected on the basis of 
extra curricular endeavors and personal concern in the active phases 
of school life. 

The membership is limited to ten men, necessarily of the 
senior class, and formal announcement of the selection of new mem' 
bers for the ensuing year is made at the Junior Prom. 



% SYNAPSIS^ 



















T3he J^eurone Society 









K SOCIETY for the stimulation of good fellow- 
ship between the classes of the student body, 
and to systematically induce and promote a spirit 
of organisation among individuals socially, by 
inauguration of dances, socials and outings, the 
chief of which is given annually at Dufurs, due to 
the kind invitation of Dr. and Mrs. Dufur. 

The officers are appointed by student election. 









ff SYNAPSIS^ 










THE AXONE 



<T^HE Axone is published by the Student Body and presents such 
expressions of student opinion and formulated ideas as may 
express the tone of our collegiate activities and interests. Scientific 
thought, humor, verse are all set down for our perusal and acclama' 
tion. This year The Axone has undergone a rejuvenation and has 
stirred greater interest by the addition of newly incorporated 
features. 


































X SYNAPSIS^ 










THE STUDENT COUNCIL 



(7%HE personnel of the Student Council is composed ot a Presi' 
dent elected by the student body and the presidents of the 
four classes as class representatives. This group functions as a 
point of contact between the faculty and the student body in 
advancing matters of student opinion and interests. 





















ff synapsis^ : 







E. G. Drew Obstetrical Society 



<T^HE Drew Obstetrical Society was founded in 1925 to give the 
student body an opportunity to gain an added knowledge in 
the art of Obstetrics and by so doing to foster an increased interest 
in this branch of the medical science. The sponsor was Dr. E. G. 
Drew, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, in honor of whom 
the society was named. 

Dr. Drew, still maintaining his keen interest in the society, 
attends many of the meetings and gives the members and guests 
the benefit of practical experience gained during the years of his 
wide and varied practice. At these meetings obstetrical treatises, 
prepared by students, are read to the society for the purpose of 
dissemination of facts relative to the art. In addition to the efforts 
of the students and Dr. Drew, many interesting and valuable 
talks have been delivered by outside lecturers. 

The roll call is composed of the names of those seniors who 
have qualified by submitting theses on Obstetrical work and have 
been elected during the second semester of the Junior year on a com' 
petitive basis. Undergraduates are cordially invited to attend the 
monthly open meetings. 






% SYNAPSIS^ 





OFFICERS OF THE DREW OBSTETRICAL SOCIETY 

Charles M. J. Karibo President 

Carl J. Isman Vice-President 

Helen Gates Mellott Secretary 

J. Wilson Hunter Treasurer 

Karnig Tomajan Custodian 












% SYNAPSIS> 



Physiological Qhemistry Society 



- 



GO" W. MERRYMAN, B.S V 

Allen S. Prescott, "30 
Angus G. Cathie, '31 

ISADOR E. GOLDNER, '31 

Leonard G. Heech, '31 



Active Members 
"30 W. Dale Jamison, '31 

James C. Luker, '31 
David W. Morrison, '31 
Raymond H. Rickards, '31 
Edward R. Theiler, Jr., '31 



Arthur M. Flack, Jr. 



Norman W. Warburton, '31 

Associate Members 
A.B. H. G. Hartman, B.S. 



c7^HE Physiological Chemistry Society, founded by the class of "1930" is now in active 
^^ operation. The representatives of the class of "1931" were duly elected to membership 
after having obtained an average of at least ninety per cent in the subject of Physiological 
Chemistry and after having shown record of acceptable research work in the interest of the 
organization. 

The purpose of the society is to promote and stimulate scientific thought and research 
in physiological chemistry as related to Osteopathic principles. 

With the completion of our new college a special laboratory with complete equipment 
was provided for our work. It is due to this fact principally that the society has been 
enabled to enjoy a signally active year. Under the leadership of Professor Russel C. Erb, 
a definite program of research has been organized. Three principal problems are being 
investigated. 

The first problem, that of blood chemistry, is being considered with special emphasis 
placed on the elements calcium and phosphorus. 

The second problem undertaken is that of a thorough and systematic investigation 
of the chemical tests used in urinalysis. The most accurate tests are to be selected, due 
consideration being given their practical and economic values. These are to be standardized 
and used in the chemistry department as well as in the clinical laboratory. Dr. Vergara, in 
charge of the clinical laboratory, has announced his full concordance with this project. 

The third investigation, that of gastric content and its analysis, is being conducted 
under the advice and the guidance of Professor Stoertz. Latest reports show that dis' 
crepancies have been found in several of the tests previously accepted as standards. All 
indications point toward interesting as well as valuable disclosures. 

Working on the properties of nerve tissue, Luker is attacking the problem in a manner 
which has, as far as we know, never been essayed before. The field being an original one, 
progress is of a necessity slow. However, definite results will in all probability be an' 
nounced before the conclusion of this semester. 

It is not the intent or the desire of this society to make spectacular discoveries; rather 
it is the purpose to carry on research in the true scientific manner. Data are being kept 
of all work attempted, successes as well as failures and positive as well as negative results 
are being recorded. To follow this plan our scope must be limited, our efforts focused on 
a definite objective. New facts exposed will come after thorough, systematic, and exhaustive 
research. 

In concluding let us say that the foundation from which all attempts will arise, shall 
be the desire to further advance the principles upon which is based Osteopathy. 




134 



I 



synapsis^ : 



















RESEARCH GROUP 

THE PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY SOCIETY 

W. Dale Jamison, B. S President 

Norman W. Warburton Vice-President 

Edward R. Theiler, Jr Secretary and Treasurer 

Professor Russell C. Erb, B. S., M. S. Faculty Advisers 

Professor Howard Stoertz, B. S. 

Dr. Enrico C. Vergara, B. S., D. O. . . . Honorary Member 

Angus G. Cathie Active Member 

David W. Morrison Active Member 

Arthur M. Flack, Jr., A.B Active Adviser 

Leonard Heech Active Member 

Raymond H. Rickards Active Member 






% SYNAPSIS^ 






~Njewman Qlub 
Philadelphia Qollege of Osteopathy 

rj^ HE first Newman Club was founded in 
\f_J 1S93 at the University of Pennsylvania in 
honor of Cardinal Newman. At the 
present time there are more than two hundred 
clubs in the various universities and colleges in the 
United States and Canada. The purpose of this 
organisation is to band the students of the Catholic 
taith together in an endeavor to further the ideals of 
Catholicism, to encourage scholastic achievement 
in the student body, to bring about good fellow- 
ship and understanding between the students of 
the Catholic faith and those of other beliefs, and 
to provide, in a measure, a means of social activity 
for the members. 

The Newman Club of the Philadelphia College 
of Osteopathy was founded March 22, 1927, and 
numbers among its members many alumni as well 
as students. 



OFFICERS 









Richard U. Dowling 
Charles Karibo 
Claire Gsgen 
Joseph Sikorski 
Father Canney 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

. Chaplain 









yl 






S % SYNAPSIS^ 






■ 



it 1 1 


















THE JUNIOR PROM COMMITTEE 



HE Junior Prom is the outstanding social event of the college 
year. The 1930 Prom is to be the best ever due to the efforts 
of the very active committee and somewhat to the more business 
like method of establishing financial integrity. It will be held at the 
Ritz-Carlton Hotel on Friday evening, April the 25th. The Seniors 
and the Faculty are guests of the evenings. 



T5 



The Committee 



William N. Minor, Chairman 
Warren E. Baldwin 
Foster Clark 
Abraham Pekow 
Agatha P. Crocker 



Beatrice Kratz 
Frank Randolph 
James C. Luker 
Norman Warburton 
Williard Shackelton 




synapsis^ : 



Honor\ Society 



SIGMA ALPHA OMICRON 









A CTL ATED by the desire to promote academic interest 
and to elevate the quality of scholastic attainment 
among the Osteopathic student body, in 1924 a non'secret, 
honorary fraternity was established. 

Any senior student, having attained a general average 
of 90 during the first three and a half years of his study, and 
having attended 90 per cent of all classes is eligible. The 
names are voted upon by a Faculty committee and those 
elected are announced at Commencement at which time these 
new members are presented with a gold key and a certificate. 
The following are the honorary students of the Society: 



Charles W. Cattaneo 

Alexander Levitt 



Class of "25 



Wilbur P. Lut? 
Solomon E. Yoder 












Irma Amanda Davis 
Anna Minerva Seiders 



Marion A. Dick 
H. Mahlon Gehman 
William A. Ketner 



James M. Eaton 



S. Gilbert Corwin 



Class of '26 



Class of "21 



Joseph Francis Py 
Samuel Getlen 



Henry S. Leibert 
D. George Nelis 
George S. Rothmeyer 



Class of "28 

Gladys Smiley 

Class of '29 

Robert Chase McDaniel 



William F. Daiber 



Beatrice Blowis 






~S j SYNAPSIS^ 
























Letter I len. 



/~ 



Captain, DR. PARKER 

DR. WARNER 

MR. FERRON 

HARTZEL 

MILLER 

L. GARLAND 



BASEBALL 

Manager, DR. SCHACKELTON 

DR. ELLIS 
BEIDLER 
BROWN 
E. GARLAND 
TOOMEY 
WILLOUGHBY 



BASKETBALL 



Captain, DR. WARNER 

DR. PEKOW 
BIEDLER 
PURSE 
CHRISTENSON 

X. 



Manager, DR. WINELAND 

MR. DAVES 
ROAT 
TOOMEY 
BROWN 



/ 











1/ 



i& 









X 









^ SYNAPSIS^ 

















% SYNAPSIS^ 




BASKETBALL 



Season~l929-'30 



Vv HEN the first call for candidates was 
issued, it looked mighty bright for P. C. O. on 
the court. What a wealth of material — and 
everything was progressing beautifully, when 
like a bolt from the blue, or from Christianson's 
elbow, Harry Davis lost two teeth. This put 
him out of the game for a few weeks, and on 
returning he sprained his ankle in the Delaware game. Not to 
be outdone Purse and Hartzell sprained theirs also, in an epidemic 
of sprains. And then "Red" Ellis was debarred on account of 
professionalism. Thus was the prophetic brilliance of a season 
somewhat clouded. 

Yet the season was not without success. The boys regis' 
tered seven victories to nine defeats, the latter being mostly by 
the single point or single goal method. Victories were chalked 
against Germantown Y. M. C. A., Alumni, South Jersey Law, 
Delaware, P. M. C, Moravian, and Eliz,abethtown. 

The team this season was chiefly composed of under classmen 
and so the outlook for '30-31 looks good — if we may predict. 
Toomey and Brown lead the team scoring, as freshmen aces and 
some say that with a little more experience Toomey will prove 
another Charley Hyatt, of Pittsburgh fame. 









3 % SYNAPSIS^ 





















» it 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Game Opponents Osteopathy 

Germantown Y. M. C. A 18 42 

Alumni 19 65 

South Jersey Law School 19 42 

St. Joseph College 28 26 

Lafayette 37 28 

Delaware 18 25 

Temple 52 28 

Swarthmore 34 31 

P. M.C 38 43 

Villa Nova 32 23 

Juniata 35 33 

Washington College 59 41 

Drexel 35 30 

Moravian 23 40 

Elizabethtown 35 39 

Juniata 32 27 












143 









3 % SYNAPSIS^ 










Baseball 



TF A bad start foretells a good ending, the 
■*■ Osteopathic Wanderers are sure of sensational 
success the remainder of the baseball season. This 
can be said because they opened decidedly on the 
bad side of the ledger, when they lost to Washing- 
ton College, Chestertown, Md., on April the 
fifth, by the score of 7 to 2. And the chief reason 
to be given for the defeat was the evident lack of 
practice, noted especially in the battery. In the 
first inning, 3 Washington College men were 
walked and then an error made, netting the opposi' 
tion 3 runs on a subsequent hit. In the 6th inning 
another error, after two walks and a hit, netted 
two more runs. Yet after these two bad innings 
the team played mighty good ball. Each team garnered 4 hits, and for our side the attack 
was led by Bobby Warner with two singles. Ferron collected a two-bagger, and E. Garland 
a single. 

The line-up for Osteopathy includes many veterans from last year and also some mighty 
promising material from the Freshman class. The lost stars of the aggregation due to gradua- 
tion in "29, are "Speed" McKevitt, Bruce Thomas, and Cy Corwin. At the present time the 
battery is composed of Ferron, pitcher, who hails from Gettysburg College, and who has the 
ability to throw them where they can't be hit and to hit them where they can't be caught. 
On the receiving end of the combination is "Red" Ellis, he of West Philly High fame. Captain 
"Red" Parker holds down second base in major league style, lending, by his playing, the 
snappy punch necessary to make a well functioning infield. The infield has Beidler and 
Miller at first base; Brown at short-stop; Warner at third, where he scintillates in the usual 
Warner flashy style. In the field are Hartzell and Toomey on the left; E. Garland at center; 
and R. Garland to the right, all endeavoring to outshine each other. 

With such a wealth of material, and with the coaching of Coach Secorand Dr. Champion 
we hope and expect much in this sport. 







5^ 



3 % SYNAPSIS^ 






'4 







BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

April 5 Washington College 

April 16 P. M. C. 

April 19 Penna. Athletic Club 

April 23 Haverford 

May 1 St. Joseph College 

May 7 Moravian 

Games are pending with Drexel, Juniata, Swart h 
more, Ursinus, and Rider College. 










SYNAPSIS^ .-^sc 



13 



ennis 













<T^ENNIS, another major sport, surrounded 
by manifest interest on the part of the 



student body, will open its outdoor season on 
the 19th of April with a scheduled match 
with P. M. C. The tennis prospects look 
good in that there is a veteran team back with 
us in: Captain Dick Davies, "Bill" Minor, 
Harry Davis, and Fagan. Furthermore al 
efforts are being made to secure nearby courts for practice so that a 
selected group of players may be had from which to choose a rep' 
resentative team. This team will be selected by tournament 
elimination. Many new men are out and so :t looks as though the 
chances are better for a strong team than they have been since 
the time of Dr. Carl Fischer. Some of those who are trying to 
break into the limelight this year are: Ramsey, Christenson, Rapp, 
McDonough, Sherman, Fish, Goldner, and Adams. 

The indoor season, with its background of little or no practice 
was hardly a success. Two matches were played with Penn. A. C. 
The first was lost to them, 4 to 1, on December first, and the second 
by the score of 5 to on January 28th. Yet a word of explanation 
might be said in defense of the team in that all of those playing on 
the Penn. A. C. are rank.ng players in the Middle Atlantic area. 







— i£L 



^ SYNAPSIS^ 



1 



'dk 












m 
















TENNIS SCHEDULE 

April 19 P. M. C. 

April_23 Drexel 

May 10 Moravi n 

|Ht[_Game3 are pending with: Juniata, Haverford, and 
Temple. 






147 



g SYNAPSIS^ 



Bowling 







ROWLING, another new sport 
. at P. C. O., was started 
rather late this year, so that at 
present only one match has been 
played, and that with Villanova. 
Due to the fact that the three 
highest rolling bowlers were un' 

able to play the match was lost. 

The tryouts for the team were held at the Colonial 

Alleys, 52nd and Sansom Streets soon after mid-years 

with marked success on the part of the players in making 

good scores. 

A return match with Villanova has been arranged 

and games are pending with such teams as Temple, 

Optometry, Drexel and Pharmacy at the present time. 

Several industr al teams and the Germantown Y. M. 

C. A. have been written to and Dale Jamison, the 

manager, is leaving no stone unturned in an effort to 

secure games. 







148 



3 £ SYNAPSIS^ 










BOWLING SCORES 

Adams 182 2-3 

Ellis 178 

Warner 182 

Secor 166 

McKelvie 164 

Merola 161 

Hahn 158 2-3 

Shackelton 156 

Naylor 155 2-3 









149 







K SYNAPSIS^ 



Golf 






OUR infant prodigy, golf, took its driver in 
hand and with a mighty swing drove off 
the first elusive ball of the spring season at 
the Valley Forge Links, on April 5th. What a 
startling galaxy of be-knickered golfers unearthed 
their mash'e-niblicks and answered the call of 
Dr. McDanials in hope of making the team. And 
many were their efforts as they dug in sand'traps 
and killed snakes in the rough on their pilgrimage 
to the 18th green. Those that survived the day 
and saved the $2.50 green fee are prospects for the final selection of the 
team. All the members of last year's team were lost by graduation and 
so an entirely new team will necessarily have to be organised. 

We hope that the efforts of Dr. McDanials in organizing this new form 
of sport will not be in vain this year and that the team will merit our 
hearty support by ts action and develop into a standard integral part of 
our athletic department. 

















< 









(£\ 



M SYNAPSIS^ 



















GOLF SCORES 

Ladd 90 

O'Rahilly 91 

Woodhull 92 

McKelvie 93 

Naylor 93 

Hillborn 100 

MacDougall 92 

Hahn 104 

Reed L10 









M SYNAPSIS^ ^^' 







t* 






THE CHEER LEADERS 

C?"^ HE coterie of "hip-hippers", a part of 
^_ythe collegiate atmosphere was organ- 
ized by "Bruno" Lyman, that pep 
promoter, for the purpose of ca rying cheer 
to the fighting teams of P. C. O. They func 
tion during athletic meetings and school 
meetings, and on the field wherever the colors 
of our Alma Mater are seen. 




% SYNAPSIS^ 



Alumni Association of the Philadelphia Qollege 
of Osteopathy 

(7% HE expressed objects of this Association are to promote the interests 

of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy: offering of prizes; endow' 
ment of free beds in the Hospital; the collection of anatomical and patho' 
logical specimens for the College Museum; maintenance and cultivation 
of good feeling among the Alumni; and, above all, the advancement of the 
interests of osteopathic education and diffusion of sound osteopathic knowh 
edge and training. 

The members of the Association are the graduates and professors of 
the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy. The Trustees of the College and 
the Alumni of other recognized institutions are eligible to honorary mem- 
bership. The membership fee is Two Dollars a year and is payable any 
time during the year. 

Many of our Alumni are coming back to see our new and spacious home 
and all return with a great inspiration and I am sure they are proud of this 
temple of Osteopathy. The Alumni Endowment Fund is steadily growing, 
and each year members of the graduating class have volunteered to carry 
on this great work. 

The Alumni Register is in the Hospital lobby and all Alumni members 
and visitors are urged to register. 

OFFICERS— 19294930 

Ira Walton Drew, D. O., Tl, Philadelphia President 

George Gerlach, D. O., '25, Lancaster, Pa. . . . First Vice-President 
R. M. Tilley, D. O., '23, Brooklyn, N. Y. Second Vice-President 

Lois Goorley, D. O., "24, Trenton, N. J. ... Third Vice-President 

J. Ernest Leuzinger, D. O., "24, Philadelphia Secretary 

Paul Turner Lloyd, D. O., "23, Philadelphia Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 
Clifford Symmington, D. O., '28, Westfield, Mass. 
Ralph Champion, D. O., '24, Elmira, N. Y. 
Donald Watt, D. O., '26, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Henry Liebert, D. O., '27, Richmond, Va. 
Foster C. True, D. O., '22, Haddon Heights, N. J. 
Arthur M. Flack, D. O., , 06, Philadelphia 
D. George Nelis, D. O., '27, Bethlehem, Pa. 
H. Walter Evans, D. O., 17, Philadelphia 



154 



ADVERTISERS 




Loo\ Us Over 















^ SYNAPSIS^ ^a^' 



Osteopathic Physicians everywhere are sending new 
students to Osteopathic Colleges 




New College and Hospital buildings now occupied at 48th and Spruce Sts., Phila., Pa. 

Philadelphia 

The Great Medical Center 

Is Proud of Its 

College of Osteopathy 



We invite the attention of the OSTEOPATHIC PROFESSION 
and PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS to— 

The new million dollar college and hospital buildings 
The progressive and devoted faculty 

The modern laboratories and their equipment 

The busy clinic crowded every day 

The large loyal student body who are maintaining a high grade of 
scholarship 

The minimum entrance requirement is an approved four 
year high school course. 



/'or catalog and Information, address - 

The Registrar 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY 



48ni and Spruce Streets 



Philadelphia, Pknna. 












4 















% SYNAPSIS^ 











^^ss^ 






157 



ff synapsis^ 












Compliments 
of 

KAPPA PSI DELTA 



^ag 







-..^ 






» 












k% 



I 



■4 









ff synapsis^ : 



White Coats and Trousers 
Jurnished by 

Linen Service Co. 

We Rent Washable Work 

Garments to Doctors and 

Nurses 



605 NORTH 2 1ST STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Phone, Pop. 4088 



The New 

COLLEGE OF 
OSTEOPATHY 

is equipped throughout with the 

Johnson System 

of 

Temperature Regulation 

This magnificent building is typi- 
cal of the standard wherein lead- 
ing Architects and Engineers 
specify JOHNSON CONTROL. 



Johnson Service Company 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



"Fve got the first manuscript Van Scribbler ever wrote." 

"That's nothing. Fve got the cuffs he passed his first examination with. 












"Heard the new Ford song yet, Petronius?'" 
"Nay, Tan'ac, but out w th it." 
"Moan in low, scurvy." 









WHERE? 
"Which would yes rather be in, Pat, an explosion or a collision?" 
"A collision," was Pat's reply. 
"But why?" asked Mike. 

"Becas in a collision," explained Pat, "there yes are — but in an explo- 
sion, where are yez?" 
















synapsis^ : 



PC 

. 32 


Compliments 
of 

AXIS 












I 









SYNAPSIS^ 



THE NEW HOME OF OSTEOPATHY 



DESIGNED 

AND 

CONSTRUCTED 

B Y 




Wm. Steele &L Sons Co. 

124 NORTH FIFTEENTH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 















SYNAPSIS^ ^^' 



























Complimen ts 
of 

IOTA TAU SIGMA 










v A 









- 

i 









% synapsis! ^ 



A FROSH TALKS IN HIS SLEEP 

AFTER ATTENDING TOO 

MANY FRATERNITY 

SMOKERS 

T AM not trying to sell you this particular 
■*■ fraternity but will say that at this college 
. . . meet the beautiful girls who will 
always be . . . willing to give you the 
best time they can in . . . .any jail in the 
country was Jack's hotel while he was 
hitch-hiking to . . . where the angry hus- 
band said to the ice man ... if you ever 
need a friend, you can always count on a 
fraternity brother for ... being a mem- 
ber of the faculty, I am in a position to 
say that . . . you will feel that you be- 
long to a certain group that is considered 
... a gang of roughnecks who drink, 
gamble and pet are not wanted in this fra- 
ternity. Our boys have a good time . . . 
at night when everybody is asleep is not the 
time for studying. In our house you will 
have plenty of . . . trouble to see how 
you are doing in all your . . . debaucheries 
have no place in our college for we have the 
finest . . . liquor does not do you any 
good. We realize this and if you should 
ever get drunk and ... make up your 
mind you want to join us, for after all these 
are the boys who will be your friends and 
will prod you on . . . with a pin that will 
symbolize ... a good kick in the pants 
if you deserve it. 



FRATERNITIES TEACH US: 

That the other fellow's gin is the cheapest 
— to drink. 

That you can like some of the brothers 
all the time, all the brothers some of the 
time, but you can't like all the brothers all 
of the time. 

That the lass is always greener in the 
freshman class. 



That one can wear any size shirt in an 
emergency. 

That house janitors are the world's worst 
philosophers. 



Despondent Surgeon (cutting throat) '"Ye 
gods! I forgot to sterilize this knife!" 



DORMITORY EDITION OF THE 
TEN COMMANDMENTS 

I shalt study only upon special occasions. 

I shalt not permit my roommate to study 

when I am in the room. 
I shalt borrow anything I may require. 
I shalt forget to return all borrowed articles. 
I shalt sing, whistle or play the phonograph 

whenever I please, be it midnight or day- 
break. 
I shalt leave all the doors wide open while 

doing the above mentioned. 
I shalt leave in ruins every room that I 

enter into. 
I shalt break the neck of anyone who ruins 

my room. 
I shalt attend the movies every night in 

order to further my education. 
I shalt, when there is nothing else to do, 

pound upon the walls or stamp upon the 

floor. 



Phil — "What do you do when you dream 

of bikes all night?" 

Refill — "Have yourself cycle-analyze J. 



Bus Driver — "Madam, that child will 
have to pay full fare. He is over five years 
of age." 

Madam — "But he can't be. I have only 
been married four years." 

Bus Driver — "Never mind the true con- 
fessions; let's have the money." 













163 



3 % SYNAPSIST^ 



?£& 



Complimen ts 
of 

PHI SIGMA GAMMA 




SYNAPSIS 









Screens on the New Hospital Building 
Jurnished by 

THE DUER-GROSS COMPANY 

Insect Screens Weather Strips 



1615 SANSOM STREET, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
Rittenhouse 1761-1762 



THE WORLD ON WHEELS 

Cars are getting lower and lower and 
maybe the time will come when pedestrians 
can jump over them. 



A million new telephone poles are set 
up each year. This assures raw material 
for the most popular sport among young 
motorists. 



The old theory that wars are essential 
to kill off the surplus population fails in face 
of the fact that Sunday automobiling is 
doing a thorough job in a large way. 



Wrecked Motorist (opening his eyes) — "I 
had the right of way, didn't I?" 

Bystander — "Yeh, but the other fellow 
had a truck." 



"Did you enjoy the scenery?" 

"We missed the best of it," said Mrs. 
Chuggins. "Our new car travels so fast 
that we had to give most of our attention 
to gas tanks and police stations." 



The motorist had knocked down a tele- 
graph pole and was found in an unconscious 
state entangled in the wires. 

As several passersby rushed up to render 
help a smile swept over his face, and he was 
heard to murmur as he fingered the wires, 
"Thank heaven, they've given me a harp!" 



Looking Ahead 

The young man was very cheery. 

"I believe she cares for me after all," 
he confided to a friend. 

"Splendid," said the friend, "but surely 
it was only yesterday that you told me you 
weren't making much headway." 

"I didn't think I was then," replied the 
one in love, "but this afternoon she asked 
me if I snored." 



New Funeral Home 




Andrew J. Bair & Son 

3925 Chestnut Street 

Established 1822 
Chas. S. Bair Andrew J. Bair, 2n 

Evergreen 7700 

Free Use "I Our Service Rooms 









ff SYNAPSIS^ 



Complimen ts 
oj 

THETA PSI 































n 









Fred'k Godshall & Co. 


Engineers 


and 


Contractors 


T 


HEATING, PLUMBING 


POWER PLANTS 


T 


1313 FAIRMOUNT AVE. 


PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


fred'k godshall 




&L Frick CC 
jgMK Compressor 
Installed ..t 
( Isteopathic 
1 [ospitali 
Phil;,.. Pa. 



REFRIGERATION 

Oyer one hundred hospitals are equipped 
with Frlek Refriueratlne Machinery. Annuo 
nla and Carbun-dloiide systems Installed. 




Distributors: 

Mack Machine Co. of Pennsylvania 

1708-12 N. Front Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 















Boll 'Phone. STEvenson 1874 

QUAKER CITY ROOFING COMPANY 

REGISTERED 

GENERAL ROOFING CONTRACTORS 

ARCHITECTURAL CORNICES SKYLIGHTS 



M \ix Office 

1029-51 Parrisii Street 



Shop and Warehouses 
mis 20 Myrtle Street 



PHILADELPHIA 



SERVICE SATISFACTION COOPERATION 

Erection oj the Stone Work In this Building 
was done by 

NATIONAL ERECTION CORPORATION 
CONTRACTORS 

STONE SETTING RIGGING STEEL ERECTION 



dl4 PeNFIEI D Bull DING 

Chestnut & Juniper Sts. 
Philadei I'm i v, Pa. 



Telephones: 
Hell Keystone 

Pennypacker 0651, 0632 Race 9534 









167 






ff SYNAPSIS^ 



Complimen is 
of 

ATLAS CLUB 







~3^ 



168 



(0i 















SYNAPSIS^ 





Dufur Osteopathic Hospital 

J. Ivan Dufur, D.O., President 
WELSH ROAD AND BUTLER PIKE : : AMBLER, PENNA. 



CITY OFFICE 
WITHERSPOON BUILDING 



Telephones: 

Hospital. Ambler 741 

City Office, Pennypacker 1585 



This hospital was organized jor the purpose oj caring jor 
andjor the Osteopathic Treatment oj 

NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES 

Its location on 50 acres of highly developed ground, with lawns, terraces 
and expansive gardens, gives that quietude, freedom, fresh air, sunshine 
and restful atmosphere so necessary to the cure of these states. 

The building is modern, complete in every detail; all rooms are cheerful 
with expansive views. There are accommodations for the most fastidious 
and exacting as well as for patients of moderate means. 

The Hospital has a present capacity of 82 patients and represents, with 
buildings, ground and equipment 

AN INVESTMENT OF ABOUT $500,000.00 

A corps of competent nurses, physicians and attendants is always at 
the service of patients. 

Diagnostic and X-ray laboratories are complete. 

Patients are supplied with fresh vegetables in season, fresh eggs and 
milk and a guaranteed supply of artesian water from our own wells. 



For jurther Information Address 

DUFUR OSTEOPATHIC HOSPITAL 






169 



w 



SYNAPSIS^ 



■m 






Compliments 
of 

LAMBDA OMICRON GAMMA 




SYNAPSIS % 



n£& ?- 



XI 



/% 





(L^Nft^S 



Compliments of 

DR. and MRS. CHARLES F. BANDEL 

303 Lexington Avenue 
New York 




171 



ff synapsis^ : 



'4 










®rj? 







Gout 

Definition — gout is a "metallic" disorder of European 
tendency. Statisticians tell us it is found chiefly 
among the Germans who have been working in metals 
for ages and among the Jews who have been working 
the Germans for a similar length of time. And for 
those who believe in signs, it can be said that the 
signs point to the fact that heredity plays a most 
important role in the perpetuating of a select line of 
"goutees". In fact some cases are on record that the 
said disease has visited the same joints even unto the 
third and fourth generations. 

Many years ago, "when Remi etait un petit enfant de dix ans", and our 
native land belonged to the Democrats, we are told that every authorised 
bar-tender has the privilege of talking about his "gout" instead of his "opera- 
tion". However, we suppose that, due to the fact that bar-tenders are out 
of style, and due to the fact that the disorder is characteristic of the joints 
of the leg this is the reason those so indisposed call themselves "boot- 
leggers". 

At this point, if I may, I will hasten to correct any erroneous impres- 
sions concerning this disease being a rich man's disease just because it makes 
deposits. 

Etiology — scientific investigation by Lots and Moore traces the cause 
to retention of urine and other "putrid" bases. It seems the urine distends 
the bladder — of course we should not talk about it — but the urine subse- 









172 



SYNAPSIS^ 






'M 



1 



quent'y makes a sudden rush to the kidneys who resent it very much 
They think it is a lot of brass on the part of the urine so they spill it into 
the blood stream, where the phagocytes bundle it into fagots and carry it to 
some joint — and folks here 'tis. 

Symptoms — there is marked swelling and th's again is misleading to the 
"populus mundi" who always did consider the rich a bunch of "swells". 
And let me tell you, this swelling is a mighty serious matter. It forces the 
contiguous tissues into liquidation — imagine their dismay. Their Repara- 
tion Conference immediately encroaches upon the nerves and causes rheu- 
matica spondylitis ossificans ligmentosa, hemorrhagica subdermalis, elevation 
of the hyoid bone, hookworm and fallen arches, to say nothing of pain in 
the joint. And finally there is loss of skin and everyone recovers, except the 
Scotchman who dies of a broken heart. 

Prognosis — Some say it is very grave — but personal 'y I think this is 
a little too pointed. 

Treatment — Primo — hold up the joint. We recommend sawed off 
shot-guns, machine guns, and hand grenades as proficient instruments. 
Yet since the enrollment shows some Chicago students, they may be listed 
for consultation. 

Secundo — since alcohol is prohibited, fraternity dances, house parties, 
and football games are contra indicated. 

Ditto — Special attention to the diet — read Mrs. Brown's Home 
Cooking Course of Dignified Diet for Every Day. 

Osteopathic Treatment — study and steady the spinal cord, especially 
the lumbar and the sacral areas. It must be so it is in the notes. Then trace 
out the nerve supply to the joint with tracer bullets and correct the lesions. 

One method of correction is with the patient prone on his face. The 
operator stands with both feet on the patient's back and directs a corrective 
force on the lower of the two vertebrae in lesion so that the plane of force 
extends at right angles to the articular facets and in the general direction 
of the Broad Street subway. A "counter force 11 is developed by buying a 
necktie at Snellenburg's and paying close attention to the salesman. 

Examine the feet and soothe the kidneys, then play 18 holes of golf 
before supper and call it a day. 



We hear one of the faculty is suspected of being a "Big Heart Man 
from the Chest". 



SYNAPSIS^ 




testimonials 



I have, for years and years, visited doctors the whole world over, 
the medical physicians of our own dear country, the medicine men of South 
Africa, and have even on one occasion attended a Medicine Ball, in Gymna' 
sium, Hungary, but to no avail. My condition has been diagnosed, neurosed, 
and hokused'pokused as "gangrenous stomatitis of the lobar pachy dermal 
fold of Nutmeg 11 by the most special specialists of the world. I have taken 
hydrotherapy, including Murphy drip, up and down enemas, water on the 
brain, and water in the milk, to say nothing of sun treatments on the back, 
the front, and the Riviera; I have taken photos in Camberia, Japan, and 
Upper Darby, two necklaces and a pair of ear muffs in Wanamaker's, but my 
condition kept getting worse. 

Finally, one evening while passing through Culnel's Corners, Ark., 
a place where they have corduroy roads instead of trousers, I was prevailed 
upon by an acquaintance, one M. Ule Skinner to try a bottle of your Still's 
Osteopathy, 98c size. And ever since I have been that smiling, confident 
woman at all times. 

Now I'm not a wall flower, have learned to play any instrument and 
dance gracefully in six lessons that new, easy way, can speak French, possess 
that womanly charm, and have a baby in my own home. 

I feel I owe it all to your marvelous remedy and I can't say enough to 
my friends about its many virtues. 

Sara O. Burn. 



r 



Someone has said that if all the Freshmen were to stand in a straight 
line, hand in hand, they would reach halfway across the Delaware River. 
We sometimes wonder if that would not be a good thing. 



.*._. ^SSU 




174 




HX 



r 



4 



synapsis^ : 



M;y Op'er'd'tion 



I was sickly, 

So I went quickly 

To my Doctor who said: 

'Tm afraid you're gonna die, 

We can't hesitate, I must operate, 

If I don't you'll be Dead. 

There's not a doubt 

Your appendix must come out." 

So the nurse took off my clothes 

And put ether on my nose 

Oh! ! My Op-er-a-tion! ! 

As I lay there on the slab 

With the knife he took one jab 

Ouch! ! my incision. 

And then he told me when he finished that 

day 
That my appendix was perfectly O. K. 
It was only a Tummy ache, 
I was opened by mistake — 
Oh! ! my Op-er-a-tion! ! 

As I lay theie on my bed 

In my pain I tossed and said 

Oh! Oh! my operation. 

He said I must cut again 

I've mislaid my watch and chain 

Ooh! ! — ouch! my incision. 

So he cut and cut and found nothing out 

I got so nervous, that I began to shout 

If there's anything else that's gone 

You'd better sew a button on. 

Oh ! that's my operation. 

When my sweetie calls at night 

And he squeezes me too tight 

I just look at him and shout — 

Ouch! ! my incision. 

And when I think that he has gone far enough 

I simply tell him — "My dear, you're getting 

rough." 
If he pouts and asks me why 
I've a darn good alibi 
Oh! Oooh! ! my op-er-a-tion! ! 



DR. JOHN H. BAILEY 

Osteopathic Physician 

Special Attention Given to Ear, Eye, 
Nose and Throat Cases 
Coagulation of Tonsils 

1623 SPRUCE STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



DR. ARTHUR D. MAYER 

Osteopathic Physician 



135 West 81st Street 
New York City, N. Y. 



DRS. J. F. SMITH 

AND 
MARION A. DICK 

Osteopathic Physicians 



5041 SPRUCE STREET 
PHILADELPHIA PENNA. 



Complimen ts 
of 

DR. CHARLES W. BARBER 

Ardmore, Penna. 







175 



















g SYNAPSIS^ 




Compliments 
of 

DR. GEO. L. LEWIS 

140 West Luray Street 
Germantown, Pa. 



So That's How It is 

"Have you seen my girl anywhere?" 

"What's she look like?" 

"She's got brown hair, gray eyes and a 
nice mouth." 

"Haven't seen her." 

"She was wearing a blue dress and had 
my fraternity pin on it." 

"Don't know what you mean." 

"She stands about five feet four and is of 
medium weight." 

"Nope. She doesn't register." 

"She had a run in her left stocking." 

"Sure ! Sure ! She was standing over there 
just a minute ago. Why didn't you tell 
me whom yoa meant?" 



What men like to see most in a daring dress 
is a daring woman. 



Lord knows there is no sex appeal in a 
lamp post with a "Wet Paint" sign on it. 



DR THEODORE J 


. BERGER 


% 




77 Park Avenue 


NEW YORK 


CITY 



T. R. THOMSON 

Student Stationer 



252 NORTH 16TH STREET 



Questionnaire! 

All college seniors are being more or less 
deluged with questionnaires of every descrip- 
tion. Here is ours, all filled out: 

Have you pursued any remunerative occu' 
pation while at college? — Yes. Wrote home 
constantly. 

What is your favorite course? — Roast 
beef. 

Have you broken any records at college? — 
Yes, the "Rhapsody in Blue." 

Where? — On my roommate's head. 

Have you done any philanthropic work? 
— Yes. Had four blind dates. 

Are you married? — No! 

Children? — Aren't we all? 

Have you done any work during summer 
vacations? — Yes. 

What line? — The same old one about 
loving her more than anyone else in the 
world. 

Do you intend to continue studying next 
year? — Heh, heh, heh! 



Dr. George S. Van Riper 
OSTEOPATH 



51 East 42nd Street 
New York 

/Hurray Hill 2390 Bj/ Appointment 



i 



SYNAPSIS 



DR. RUTH H. WINANT 

1711 Spruce Street 
Philadelphia 



Pennypacker 
5879 



By 
Appointment 




DR. JOSEPH D. TREACY 

Osteopathic Physician 

horn building 

16th and Chestnut Streets 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



"Why so downcast, o'd man?" 

"I've found out that I can't neck my girl any more." 

"How's that?" 

"My college has severed all athletic relations with her college." 



1st Mexican General — "So! You will not join our revolution." 

2nd Ditto — "No, no, Senor, I would rather be tight than president." 



Lecturer — "Out of every ten children born of cigarette-smoking mothers, 
six of them are feeble-minded." 

Co-ed — "No woman ought to have that many children!" 



Heard on a Windy Day 
"Look at those yellow bloomers!" 
"Where?" 
"Can't you see those dandelions?" 



"I'm afraid," said mother, thoughtfully, 'we shall have to stop the 

Osteopath who is treating Dick." 

"Why?" exclaimed father, anxiously, "isn't he doing him any good?" 
"Well, he slid down the banisters ten times this morning, broke a 

lamp, two vases and a jug, and kicked a football through the kitchen window, 

and I don't feel I can stand much more." 



177 



















g synapsis^ : 



T5he Business of Being a Cow 

By Mrs. Bull Durham 

JAM a cow. I am a bony brown cow with two horns. I'm a regular 
devil-gambo ing in the meadows. I have a long tail that I use to shoo 

the dirty flies away from me. I am often abused by farmers. My nails 
are never kept manicured. In fact the manure is so thick on my tootsie' 
wootsies that sometimes I wonder if my toes are still with me. 

You folks who read my sad tale are sitting in luxury with beautiful rings 
on your fingers and bells at your front doors. I have my bell around my neck 
and my poor husband, who most people say, is full of bull — well he has his 
ring in his nose. But so life is. My poor life is punctuated with quarts. 
If I miss my punctuation marks or get too old or get sick — Swift and his 
gang of murderers get me. No coroner sits on me when I'm killed but many 
people sit around me and recite snappy dinner jokes. 

Everybody has a purpose in life. My husband's purpose is to chase 
red flannel shirts, red stocking garters, red haired flappers and other red 
things off my playground. My husband is a jealous sort of a fellow and sees 
red all the time. He'd be right at home in Russia where the bewhiskered 
communistic bulls hold forth. 

My purpose in life is entirely different. My biggest function is to manu' 
facture rich milk for milk dealers who become rich. While my husband's 
aim was red things, my aim is to keep milk dealers alive, fat and happy. 
But other than that mine is a noble work. I keep the babies alive who 
have "society 1 '' mothers, the mothers who would rather fondle a Pekinese 
lap dog than press their own flesh and blood to a breast of motherhood. I 
rent my bosom to such unfortunate babes. Yes, my work is a noble one and 
I'm sure of happiness after the carving knife is dulled on me. For isn't 
Jerusalem with "milk and honey" blest. And that admits me. 

And now let me make a true confession of the crimes milk dealers 
commit in the barn, in my very presence. It is a well-known fact that no 
sooner have I manufactured a little milk than some rude milk man or a 
poetic milk'maid, "sir-she-said", comes along with a bucket from which straw 
and flies have been hastily brushed out, and rob me. The very idea! Some 
day, I'll get mad and tell my husband and you bet he'll knock the poetry 
out of any milk-maid that attempts to rob me again. 

Well so far so bad. My sister, who lives in a barn near Camden, 
told me that there they don't milk by hand — or foot either. Now I don't 

{Continued on Page ISO) 



- ■ — 



^cs^^^r 



178 




SYNAPSIS F 






Dr. Fletcher H. Burdett 

The Graynor Building 

Suite 417 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 



DR. S. P. ROSS 

Gynecologist 

so 

1133 Land Title Building 
100 South Broad Street 

philadelphia pennsylvania 



VULGARINA 

She's only a simple Russian maid 
Who lives by the Volga of Fame. 
She pets with Vulgar boatmen, 
Then they never are the same. 

Though she seeks the ardent lovers 
To croan love notes in her ears, 
All vagrant rumors tell, she's 
Not so simple as she appears. 

She went out boating yester eve, 
With the captain of a ship, 
And had to jump right overboard 
To give this "Salt" ham the slip. 

Now she's safe, and still she's pure 
For she carried her water wings — 
And how could a girl be simple 
And think of such naughty things. 



R. H. R. 



Geo. S. Rothmeyer, D.O. 


Corrective Foot Work 


Specialty 


m 


1529 West Lehigh Avenue 


Philadelphia Penna. 



Dr. Charles J. Muttart 
PROCTOLOGIST 

1813 Pine Street 
Philadelphia Penna. 




179 



: 



SYNAPSIS 




THE BUSINESS OF BEING A COW 

(Continued from Paije ITS) 

know myself, but it seems that there they hook some sort of a vacuum cleaner 
arrangement unto my poor imprisoned sister and that does the rest. Oh, 
it's awful ! I often sigh a deep l moo" to myself and pray for the butcher to 
come along. 

But dear folks, don't think that the white stuff you get in milk bottles 
is my exclusive product. Like Wrigley's chewing gum, no milk is genuine 
unless it bears my signature, and no milk dealer ever asks me for that. Milk 
dealers don't only water the horses. They are bad men. They practice all 
sorts of mathematics on my milk which I make free of charge for you dear 
people. Their mathematics are bad. They substract something from my milk 
and call it skimming. They add lots of things, but the words are so big I 
don't remember them. 

Pity me, people, it's true I have two stomachs, but I can't stomach all 
the things they do to me. Some day I'll spit my cud in one of their milk 
pails and run away from home. 

Pity me, people. Look at the leather shoes on your feet. I'm even 
punished after death. Pity me! Moo — moo! 

Russell C. Erb. 



r 



&feU 






180 



s % synapsis^ : 






T>£ 



T5he Convict of the Vertebral Column 



m 












Said Atlas to Axis, "Get off my arch. 

I'm tired of having you around." 
And Axis responded as stiffly as starch, 

"Such ingratitude I never found." 

"Who is the one that gives you support, 

And makes your existence a fact?" 
But before Atlas had a chance to retort, 

Axis continued his act. 

"It is I, Epistropheus, the second in line 

In the Vertebral Column, 'tis true, 
But if I should step out of this place of mine, 

Tell me, what would become of you?" 

Don't think because you are the shape of a ring 
With arches posterior and ant, 
That you can encircle everything; 
Because, let me tell you, you can't." 

"And don't think because you hold up the head 
And forward and backward let it bob, 

That you can fill old Axis with dread, 
And think you are the boss of this job." 

"You act just as if you were the whole cheese 

And had control of us all; 
Why, if I were to take as much as a squeeze 

You'd experience a terrible fall." 

"Where is your body, Mr. Mighty and High, 
There's something I never could see; 

If you were as strong as your name would imply, 
Then why did you wish it on me?" 

"Your colossal conceit is decidedly odd, 
And I've borne it both early and late. 

You may be the King in the Land of Nod; 
But not in the realm of Rotate." 

"When it comes to movements upward and down 

I admit 1 have nothing to say; 
But Occiput must be an awful clown 

If he lets you have your own way." 

"Of course, I admit your assistance is slight, 
When those sideward movements we make; 

When the old Caput swings from left to right, 
But don't try all the credit to take." 

"Now, while I've been connected with you 

It's been fairly present I've found, 
Of course, I've been in a lesion or two; 

But just now I feel pretty sound." 

"But if you really feel that you want to quit 

Being partners with me, forsooth. 
You can easily make an end of it 

By letting go of my tooth." 

Then came a cry and a shriek at this junction, 

As from a fair maiden distressed, 
In fear, it would seem of an imminent puncture, 

Miss Medulla had come to protest. 



Yes, Medulla it was, or Chorda Spinalis, 

By which name she is also known, 
Who, in this conflict of Column Vertebralis 

An interest now had shown. 

"Please, Gentlemen, please, I beg you desist 
From this course you propose to take; 

For if in this act that's so rash you persist 
The liver of us all are at stake." 

But then up spoke Transversum Atlantis, 

A ligament, stalwart and brave, 
"You just don't mind what they try to hand us, 

For that tooth there in question's my slave." 

"Just let them talk all they want of releasing 

This process Adontoid, you know, 
For while I adhere to my place unceasing, 

Toward you, dear, it can never go." 

Then the Column Spinalis just shook with emotion 

From Sacrum and Coccyx above, 
Vibrating applause at this show of devotion. 

Pouring forth on the hero their Love. 

Then from down the Cavernum Thoracic 

A paean of joy was heard, 
For the auri-ventricular masses 

By the news was deeply stirred. 

For the good, old reliable Nodum Kieth Flackus 

Had passed the word along. 
To Tiwara, who told it to Bundle of His, 

Who expanded and burst into song! 

And then the poor heart just started to flutter, 

And beat at a terrible rate. 
It murmured at first, and then couldn't utter 

A sound, its joy was so great. 

The lapse seemed to fill the old heart with remorse. 

So it started to beat anew. 
And the Cycle Cardiacus resumed the course 

That all normal cycles do. 

When the auricles were in their next systole 

Tricuspid dropped below, 
And told a Pulmonary Artery 

Who carried it on with his flow. 

As a matter of course, all the veins Pulmonic, 

Heard it and took it around 
To the Heart on the left with a cyclonic, 

When it pursed through the Mitral and down. 

Thru the Aorta, artery, and capillary, 

Thru Veins and to every part, 
The news went along and never did vary 

Until it returned to the Heart. 

Then all of the organs through the whole system 

Pealed with a hymn of praise. 
For Trans' nobles act they couldn't resist him 

From that time till the end of their days. 

A. G. J., '31. 









I 









g SYNAPSIS^ 









Dr. Mary Patton Hitner 

4024 Spruce Street . 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone, Baring 7351 



Dr. Emanuel Jacobson 
INTERNIST 

9 A. M.-l P. M. 
2 P. M.-6 P. M. 

Osteopathic Hospital 

1623 Spruce Street 
Philadelphia 



"Gee, Ma, Moses sure must have suffered with that stomach of his." 
"Why, no, Jimmy, you shouldn't get that idea of him." 
"What! And him always getting all those tablets." 









Fritz; — "Dad, you are a lucky man." 
Father — "How is that?" 

Fritz — "You won't have to buy me any school books this year. I have 
been left in the same class. 



you. 



Daughter — "As you were so late, Dad, I told Mother Fd wait up for 

Father — "I was detained at the club, — er what's your mother like?" 
Daughter — "Like an accident looking for somewhere to happen." 



The absent-minded professor had been killed. He jumped from an 
airplane and didn't open the parachute, because it wasn't raining. 

— Annapolis Log. 



Highwaymen and chiropractors become more alike every day we are 
told. Both knock their victims unconscious before taking their money. 



"The Cock-Eyed World" is reported showing in England under the 
title of "The Astigmatic Universe". 



182 



w 



SYNAPSIS % 



■** &$ ?- 



Dr. Traviss D. Lockwood 

Osteopathic Physician 

33 We!st 42nd Street 
NEW YORK 



Compliments 
oj 

A FRIEND 



NOTABLES OF THE CLASS OF '31 

Diplomat "Norm" Warburton 

Bad Boy Harry Weisbecker 

Teacher's Pet Jim Reid 

Cut-up'twins Weber and Fields 

Sheik Chester Conklin 

Clean Sweepers . Snow and Zwicker 

Cynic Luker 

Brooklyn Shamrock "bay" Goldner 

Athlete Bob Warner 

Missionary Miss Coffee 

Former Dean's son B. T. Baily Flack 

Baby Face Bee Kratz 

Buttercups "Ed" Gants 

English Duke Geo. Miller 



AMEASSADORs STUDIOS 

Photographers oj Distinction 

1535 CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

Phone: Rittenhoust 0570 

Official Photographer jor the 1930 Synapsis 

PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES IN THE EAST 







B TSYNAPSISl S 



EDWARD A. GREEN, D.O. 



20 W. Montgomery Ave. 
Ardmore Pennsylvania 



Ruth Elizabeth Finley, D.O. 

1318 Wakeling Street 
Philadelphia 



Phc 



Jefferson 2972 




"CADMUS 

the Chemist" 

Sells Everything of the 
Highest Grade 

"no substitution" 



Robert C. Cadmus 

CHEMIST 

Spring Garden and 20th Sts. 
Philadelphia 

Phones : 

Bell: Keystone 

Poplar 1808 Race 9050 



f 












Ed. Gants — "When I dance with you I feel as though I were treading 
on the clouds. 1 , 

Miss Dubell — "Don't kid yourself; those are my feet." 






Dr. Drew (visiting the Drs. Geo. T. and Bertha C. Smith) — "Everything 
is perfectly fine, but why did you take an apartment with such a tiny kitchen' 
ette, Torchy?" 

Torchy — "Well, Dr., you're the first person I've told so keep it quiet. 
It's so small I can't get in there to help my wife when she's washing dishes." 






The more we see of g'rls — the more we believe in clothes. 



He — "Do you know the gorilla song?" 
She — "Why no, I don't believe-- 
He — "Gorilla my dreams I love you — ". 






184 



A 1 ' 



SYNAPSIS^ 



DR. EDWARD G. DREW 

Surgery, Obstetrics 
and Consultation 



1408 Spruce Street 
Philadelphia 



Phone. Waverly 5313 

DR. ROBERT C. McDAMEL 

Osteopathic Physician 

Oflice Hours 
4:00 to 600 P. M. 
7:00 to 9:30 P. M. 

Sundays by Appointment 

6008 OGONTZ AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA 









- 






FAMILIAR QUOTATIONS 

"I want you should know — " — Dr. Green. 

"If I ever catch you doing that in the clinic I'll g^ve you both barrels.'" 1 
— Dr. Soden. 

"For Maumday take the next 70 paages.'" — Dr. Dufur. 

"I feel better all ready, Doctor!" — Dr. Flack. 

"Push the button and watch the monkey jump!" — Dr. Rothmeyer. 

"In the Edinburgh School— "—Dr. E. G. Drew. 

"According to Gray on page 1032, it reads as follows— —Dr. Frank 
Smith. 

k You act like a bunch of wild asses colts!" — Dr. Balbirnie. 

"Give enema twice daily — " — Dr. Hitner. 

"Reed de boook — " — Dr. Vegara. 

"Take it from me, I know!" — Dr. Jacobson. 

"Students, I (still) have a thought for you." — Dr. Holden. 

"Tonight, read Dacosta — " — Dr. True. 

"Don't blame me, the Dean says so — " — Dr. MacDaniels. 

"Today, class, we have a case of our old friend 'lues' !" — Dr. Fischer. 

"As a member of the faculty — " — Dr. Lutz. 

"Today we are going to have an examination — no talking — but you 
can communicate!" — Dr. Clayton. 

"Oout in Miszoora — " — Dr. Day. 

"The Jun.'or Class, A Shakespearean comedy— —Dr. Winant. 


















SYNAPSIS K 






THE 
ARCADIA RESTAURANT 

The Home of Good Food 



Telephone. Poplar 2372 

22nd and SPRING GARDEN STS. 

John Theodore, Prop. 



DR. LILLA LANCEY 

Osteopathic Physician 

Office Phone, Rit. 9210 

Perry Building 

1530 Chestnut Street 

Philadelphia 



\1 



The folks hadn't been married over a fortnight until mother noticed 
father was acting rather queer. He would sit on the floor and pout for hours 
at a time. Finally mother says, "Jap, what's eating on you?" 

"Well, that's what I'd like to know," father replied. 

Mother, having been a trained nurse, asked pop several questions of a 
personal nature. She persuaded him to take off his shirt and she saw that he 
was all broke out. 

"Why, you've got the measles," she shouted with delight. It was an 
opportunity to show dad that she could save a doctor bill. 

Dad says, "Daphne, I hate to disagree with you, but I think it's the 
hives." 

"Why, what on earth ever gave you that silly notion?" says mother. 

Well, they argued about it off and on over a week and then called in an 
osteopath. 

He diagnosed the case as blister rust. 

Dad confessed to the doc when mother was out of the room that he had 
used a blacksmith's rasp to remove a tattooed mermaid that had been frolick' 
ing on his chest prior to the nuptials. 

Mother still tells of how their honeymoon was ruined by measles. 






Complimen is 
oj 

DR. JOSEPH PY 



Bell Phone: Rillenhouse 3995 

DR. MORRIS G. REIGART 

Diseases oj the Rectum 

Hours 9 to 3 
Other Hours by Appointment 

Suite 308, Perry Building 

16th and Chestnut Streets 
Philadelphia 







..-* 



synapsis^ 



DR. W. C. WEISBECKER 

4818 North Camac Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



"Is she modest?" 

"I'll say. I took her to dinner once and 
she ordered bosom of chicken." 



Rainy weather is like a girl's stocking. 
We like to see it clear up. 

— Columbia Jester. 



Then — "What no women? What kind 
of party is this?" 

Now — "What, no party? What kind 
of woman is this?" 



"That tunnel we just went through cost 
a mint of money," said the college boy to 
his girl friend. 

"Really?" she replied, repairing her lip' 
sticked mouth. "It was worth it, wasn't it?" 



She — "Well, where've you been for the 
last week?" 

He — "Talking to the flower girl down 
in the lobby." 

She — "And what did she say?" 

He— "No!" 



DR. CHARLES S. GREEN 

Osteopath 



51 East 42nd Street 



The Collegiate Vocabulary 

Sheepskin — A receipted bill for a four-year 
rest cure. 

Prof — A grad who can't make good at 
selling bonds. 

Dormitory — Experimental quarters with- 
out heat or janitor service. Generally a 
home for kleptomaniacs and incendiaries. 

Co-ed — A female child who can't get 
into a girl's school. 

Snap — A course used in curing in- 
somniacs. 

Roommate — A mendicant with a weak- 
ness for money, clothes and tobacco. A 
person utterly without gratitude. 



The Early Start 

"It's a boy !" exclaimed the doctor. "And 
what are you going to call him?" 

"Percival Archibald Reginald," said the 
proud father. 

"That's an odd combination, isn't it?" 

"Yes, but I want him to be a boxer." 

"I don't see the connection." 

"No? Well, think of all the practice 
he'll get when he goes to school with that 
name." 




That reminds us of the professor who gave 

He — "I love you. I can't live without his finger nails an examination and then 

you." cut his class. 
She — "Would you go through hell and 

fire for me?" And now we have the absent-minded 

He — "I'd even go through P. C. O. for professor who scrubbed off the ring on his 

you. wife and kissed the bathtub goodnight. 






„<=^^i^ ^y-^— » 



1S7 




SYNAPSIS fe 



WESTOVER APARTMENTS 

FOR DISCRIMINATING TENANTS 

4750 Pine Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone, Allegheny 3350 



m 









Mitzi has an idea that a postage stamp is 
a dance! Well, letter! 



"Go," said the outraged landlady, "and 
never darken my tub again!" 



"Your quarrel with your wife last night 
was an awful funny thing." 

"Wasn't it though? When she threw 
the ax at me, I thought I'd split." 



Credit Should be Given 

Mrs. Brown — "I hear your husband has 
bought a car." 

Mrs. Smythe — "No, he hasn't got the 
car yet, but he's getting ready for it." 

"Putting the garage up, I presume?" 

"Not yet, but he's studying a book on 
motor repairing, and he's bought a tow 
ing rope and an ambulance outfit, and we've 
both been insured." 



He — "May I have the pleasure of this 
dance?" 

She — "Sure, sit down." 









Mrs. Duffy — "Isn't your Julia growing 
fast?" It's easy to pick out superior folk. They 

Mrs. Huffy — "Indeed, I don't believe she's are the people who don't leave their car 

worse than other girls !" parked in the driveway used by two homes. 



DR. SARAH W. RUPP 

1201 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone, Rit. 2919 



Complimen ts 
oj 

A FRIEND 






^p^ ^g^^,^ ..^gp^z: 



w 



M 












SYNAPSIS^ 



DR. ARTHUR M. FLACK 

Consultant and General 
Practitioner 

"Every Case a Specially" 

Dean of the Philadelphia College of 
Osteopathy, 1911-1924 

3414 BARING STREET 
PHILADELPHIA PENNA. 



DR. FRANCIS J. SMITH 

Osteopathic Physician 



Residence 
Woodlawn Ave., Glenside, Pa. 



Cor. York Road and Rockland St. 
PHILADELPHIA PENNA. 




JONES HOLSUM 

and 

KLEEN-MAID SLICED 

BREAD 



Philadelphia 
Home Made Bread Co. 

Stevenson 2525-26 

1441 NORTH 12TH STREET 

Philadelphia Penna. 



"But surely," cried Jean, "you didn't tell him straight out that you 
loved him? 1 '' 

"Goodness, no," Mildred said calmly. "He had to squeeze it out of 
me." 






"What is your religion?" the recruit was asked. 
Promptly and smartly came the answer, "Militia, Sir." 
"No, no, I said "religion 1 ." 
"Oh, 'religion, 1 sir, I beg your pardon. I'm a plumber." 



Doctors say there is a considerable amount of chicken pox available 
among children in town. 



synapsis^ : 



w 









/J^jXE of the points of interest in the modern armamentarium of the new Osteo- 
^-^ pathic Hospital is the splendidly equipped and modern in every respect X-ray 
department, under the direct and personal supervision of Dr. Paul Lloyd. This 
department is specially constructed with primary consideration to efficiency in 
Roentgen studies, and also in regards to safety factors, an explosion chamber 
being furnished for the storage of X-ray plates and material. 

© 

The primary consideration of minute detail and refined technique enable the 
department to produce studies of high standard and excellence. 

© 

The X-ray rooms comprise special units for X-ray, fluorescopic, and stereo- 
scopic examination. The X-ray table, with concavemetal top is convertible into 
a flat top by means of extra sections and consequently is suitable for fracture studies. 
A modern Bucky attachment further increases efficiency bj' eliminating secondary 
rays and emphasizing the detail of the plates. An upright Bucky is employed for 
the study of viscera, the patient in the erect position, and is especially valuable 
in the study of ptosis and lumbar conditions. 

© 

An automatic plate changer is another facility for chest examination and 
stereoscopic work, making possible the visualization of the thorax in all three planes. 



A therapy outfit, composed of table and tube stand, adjustable to any posi- 
tion or distance is used for treatment of skin diseases and malignancies indicated 
therapeutically. 






Another feature is the fluorescope, with motor-driven table, adjustable to 
position, and shock proof, for the visualization of bony structure, and also radio- 
logical examination of the gastro-intestinal and cardio-pulmonary tracts. 

© 

This equipment is the latest production of the Victor X-ray Corporation of 
Chicago and was selected as the most practical from many other standard makes. 
In addition, the electric control room was designed and equipped under Victor 
supervision and with Victor materials. Many thanks must be acknowledged for their 
cooperation and interest. 









m 



ff SYNAPSIS^ 




WESTBROOK PUBLISHING COMPANY, at the Terminus of the New Broad Street Subway 
5800 North Mervine Street, Philadelphia 



••••0-|eS3>ll!l@3H." 

STMAPSIS 

is another Tearboo\ 
printed by 

WESTBROOK 

Publishing Company 



Most of the School Periodicals in 
Philadelphia and Vicinity are printed here 












ff SYNAPSIS^ 






. ■ . 
















192 



J % synapsis^ : 



-Acknowledgments 

Y\ 7E, THE Staff, of this the 1930 edition of the Syn- 
VV apsis, do hereby take the opportunity to render 
public acknowledgment and thanks for the assist- 
ance given us by various individuals in divers ways in the 
compilation of the book. 

To the Westbrook Publishing Co. we are indebted for 
their hearty cooperation, ready assistance, ingenious ideas 
and talent that has, we hope, enabled us to edit a book expres- 
sive of the latest trend in collegiate publications. 

To our dean, Dr. Holden, we extend appreciation for 
his keen interest, constructive criticism, and valuable sug- 
gestions; and also to other members of the faculty who have 
assisted by advice or contributions. 

We further express our gratitude to Miss Slip, Miss Ford, 
Miss Varner, and Mrs. Nairn for their willing aid at all times. 

And lastly, a statement of fact. No one thing has given 
us the incentive for achievement, the desire for accomplish- 
ment as has the marked interest on behalf of the Student 
body, and the commendable support that they have evinced 
in regards to this, the endeavor of the Class of '31. 






193 



M SYNAPSIS^ 






Autographs 



Name 



Address 
























194 



SYNAPSIS 






Autographs 



Name 















3% SYNAPSIS^ 



~T? 5= 






Autographs 



Name 



Address 






1% 






ff synapsis^ 



-Autographs 

Name Addi 



W7 









SYNAPSIS g 

Autographs 



Name 



Address 















ft 






synapsis^ 

-Autographs 



NAh 



199 


















^SYNAPSISX ^ 



-Autographs 



Name 



Address 



P. C. 0. LIBRARY 



P. C. 0. LIBRARY 



m 



m*