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Full text of "Synapsis: Philadelphia Campus"

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DR. EDGAR O. HOLDEN 



FAREWELL TO DEAN HOLDEN 



After nineteen years as Dean of the College of Osteopathy, the 
pressure of ill-health and a desire to devote his entire time to his private 
practice has forced Dr. Edgar O. Holden to resign. 

Dr. Holden graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1916 
and in 1922 became a graduate of the Osteopathic College. 

In 1924, Dr. Holden became Dean and immediately plunged himself 
into educational work. For many years in addition to his work as Dean, 
he served as Superintendent of the Osteopathic Hospital, Chairman of 
the Board of Osteopathic Hospitals and also as National Hospital Inspec- 
tor of the American Osteopathic Association. 

In recognition of his nationally known work as author, lecturer and 
educator, Dr. Holden was given the Degree of Doctor of Letters by the 
College in 1940. 

To Dean Holden, we say good luck, good health and thanks for 
a good job, well done. 

Synapsis Staff. 



GREETINGS TO THE STUDENTS OF P.C.O. 



With the closing of the current year, P.C.O. will have rounded out 
forty-five years of teaching of the Osteopathic philosophy and my own 
private practice of that art and science parallels this period. I, accord- 
ingly, feel that I may be justified by virtue of my long experience in 
practice, in assuring you of a sense of security in the choice of your 
prospective profession. 

Forty-five years is a long time in the pursuit of one following or 
service. But it is not too long if one seeks to acquaint himself with the 
possibilities of an unfolding and evolving science or engagement. Every 
day new problems and involvements present themselves especially in the 
therapeutic field and if you are conscientious and sincere in solving them 
you will become more and more proficient in your service and correspond- 
ingly more and more a blessing to humanity. 

And to all of you who are conscientiously convinced that the great- 
est therapeutic truth lies in the Osteopathic philosophy, to you I say 
persevere to the end. Our Osteopathic Colleges have achieved a high 
degree of educational efficiency and I am pleased to advise you that a 
survey of the remuneration of the physicians of the several schools of 
therapy shows that the Osteopathic physicians' average from practice 
overtops the emolument of all others by 2 5 to 50 percent. 

Always keep in mind that the Osteopathic philosophy is founded 
upon the biological axiom that normal physiological life represents bio- 
logical cell response to normal environment conditions; that disease repre- 
sents biological cell response to abnormal environmental conditions; there- 
fore the cure of disease is to restore and the prevention of disease is to 
maintain normal cell environment. Also please remember that the Osteo- 
pathic therapeutic procedure embraces all such practices as help to restore 
normality without impairing vitality. 

Students of the P.C.O., — I salute you. I congratulate you on your 
choice of profession. I wish you Godspeed. After forty-five years of 
experience, and if I were to live my life over again, I would again choose 
to be an Osteopathic Physician. 

Sincerely Yours, 

Co-founder Dr. O. J. Snyder. 




\ 



DR. O. J. SNYDER 




STANLEY SCHIOWITZ 
Business Manager 



SALVATORE AQUILA 
Photographic Editor 




EDWARD J. ROPULEWICZ 
Editor-in-Chief 



RALPH FARRINGTON 
Art Editor 




CHARLES LODOWSKI 
Literary Editor 




DR. ANDREW TAYLOR STILL 



Founder of Osteopathy 



1828 



1917 



I do not claim to be the author of this science of osteopathy. No human hand 
framed its laws; I ask no greater honor than to have discovered it.— A. T. Still. 




Dr. Edgar O. Holden 

Dean 
A. B„ D. O., Litt. D. 



Dr. D. S. B. Pennock 

M. P., D. O., D. Sc. 

Professor of Surgery 



Dr. Edward G. Drew 

D. O.. D. Sc, F. A. C. O. S. 

Professor of Gynecology 

Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Professor Emeritus 



Dr. H. Willard Sterrett 

D. O., M. Sc, F.A.C.O.S. 

Professor of Uro'.ogy 



H. Walter Evans 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Professor of Obstetrics 



Ralph L. Fischer 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Prof, of Practice of Osteopathy 



Dr. Russell C. Erb 

B. S., M. S. in Chemistry 

F. A. 1. C, D. Sc, Professor of 

Chemistry and Toxicology 



Dr. Herbert V. Durkee 

D. O., M. Sc 

Prof, of Histology 



Dr. C. Haddon Soden 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Prof, of Osteopathic Therapeutics 



Dr. George S. Rothmeyer 
D. O., M. Sc. 
Prof, of Anatomy 



Dr. J. Francis Smith 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Prof, of Neuro-Psychiatry 



Dr. Francis J. Smith 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Prof, of Anesthesiology 



Dr. Paul T. Lloyd 

D. O., M. Sc. 
Prof, of Radiology 



Dr. Joseph F. Py 

D. O.. M. Sc. 

Prof, of Bacteriology-Hygiene 



Dr. J. Ernest Leuzinger 

D. O., M. Sc, F. I. S. O. 

Prof, of Otolaryngology 

Bronchoscopy 



Dr. Otterbein Dressier 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Prof, of Pathology 





Dr. Ruth E. Tinley 

D. O., M. Sc. 
Prof, of Pediatrics 



Dr. Edwin H. Cressman 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Prof, of Dermatology and 

Syphilology 



Dr. William Baldwin, Jr. 

M. A., D. O. 

Prof, of Physiology 



Dr. Antonio Abeyta 

B. S., D. O. 

Clinical Prof, of Ophthalmology 



£>r. Wilbur P. Lutz 
D. O. 

Clinical Prof, of Osteopathy 



Dr. Wm. C. Weisbecker 

D. O. 

Associate Prof, of Physiology 



Dr. John Eimerbrink 

D. O. 

Associate Professor of 

Osteopathic Therapeutics 



Di . Francis E. G ruber 
D. O. 

Associate Professor of Obstetrics 



Dr. Angus G. Cathie 
D. O. 

Prof, of Anatomy 



Carlton Street 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Associate Professor of 

Thoracic Surgery 



James M. Eaton 

D. O. 

Associate Professor of Orthopedic 

Surgery 



Earl F. Riceman 

D. O. 

Associate in Practice 

of Osteopathy 



William F. Daiber 

D. O. 

Associate in Practice of Osteopathy 



Leo C. Wagner 

D. O., M. Sc. 

Associate in Practice 

of Osteopathy 



Herman Kohn 

D. O. 

Associate in Obstetrics 



James A. Frazer 

JJ. O. 

Associate in Osteopathic 

Therapeutics 





Galen F. Young 

D. O. 

Associate in Surgery 



Guy S. Deming- 

A. B., D. O. 

Associate in Research 

and Instructor in Principles 



Joseph B. Rapp 

D. O. 

Associate in Bacteriology 



Arthur M. Flack, Jr. 

A. B., D. O. 

Associate in Gynecology 



Kenneth L. Senior 

B. S. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Blanche C. Allen 

A. B., B. E., D. O. 

Lecturer in Neuro-Anatomy 



Raymond Juni 

P. O. 

Instructor in Otolaryngology 

and Bronchoscopy 



Harold Brunei- 
t>. O. 

Assistant in Bacteriology 



F. Munro Purse, D.O. 

Clinical Assistant 

in Pediatrics 



Dewaine Gedney, D.O. 

Clinical Assistant 

in Gynecology 



William L. Tannenbaum 

Clinical Assistant 

in Osteopathic Therapeutics 



Victor Fisher, D.O. 

Assistant in 
Clinical Osteopathy 



Boyd B. Button, D.O. 

Instructor in Department of Pathology 

in Charge of Clinical Laboratory 



Joseph L. Root, III, D.O. 

Clinical Professor 

of Osteopathy 




Frederick Long, D.O., M.Sc, Professor of Principles & Research 

Marion A. Dick, D.O., Clinical Professor of Neurology & Psychiatry 

William Spaeth, D.O., Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

Harman Y. Kiser, D. O., Associate Professor of Surgery 

John L. Fuller, D.O., Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Kenneth L. Wheeler, D.O., M.Sc, Assistant Professor of Radiology 

Michael Coleman, D.O., Associate in Proctology 

Beryl Arbuckle, D.O., Associate in Pediatrics 

Clarence Baldwin, D.O., Associate in Pathology 

John J. McFIenry, D.O., Associate in Practice of Osteopathy 

M. Philip Lessig, D. O., Associate in Parasitology 

Joseph L- Hayes, D.O., Associate in Clinical Osteopathy 

Edward Thieler, Jr., D.O., Lecturer in Industrial Hygiene 

Robert C. McDaniel, D.O., Demonstrator of Clinical Osteopathy 

Enrique Vergara, A.B., D.O., Demonstrator of Proctology 

Lois Shantz, D.O., Demonstrator of Pathology 

H. Paul Bellew, D.O., Demostrator of Protobiology 

William McDougall, B.S., D.O., Instructor in Urology 

William Barnhurst, D.O., Instructor in Hematology 

David Schuman, D.O., Instructor in Osteopathic Theapeutics 

Lester W. Kent, D.O., Instructor in Physiology 

Helen Ellis, D.O., Instructor in Bacteriology 

LeMar Eisenhut, D.O., Assistant in Anatomy 

George Hylander, D.O., Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy 

Jacob L. Lebow, P.D., D. O., Assistant in Osteopathic Therapeutics 

Robert Whinney, D.O., Assistant in Anatomy 

William Morris, Jr., D.O., Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy 

Julian Mines, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics 

Ernest Ruzicka, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Podiatry 

Harriet Gosper, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics 

George Guest, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Otolarynology 

Theodore Loux, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Osteopathic Therapeutics 

Harry N. Kerr, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Urology 

Harry C. Hessdorfer, D.O., Director of Clinics 

Harry I. Stein, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Otolaryngology 

Harry Binder, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Practice 

David Cragg, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Dermatology 

John Sheetz, Jr., D.O., Clinical Assistant in Otolarynology 

Harry Breitman, D.O., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics 

Francis M. White, A.B., M.A., Instructor in Embryology 

Morton Greenwald, A.B., D.O., Fellow in Pathology 

Harry Kochman, D.O., Fellow in Pathology 

Samuel Brint, D.O., Fellow in Clinical Osteopathy 

Ailleen Corbin, A.B., D.O., Fellow in Bacteriology 

Nancy Court, D.O., Fellow in Pediatrics 

John Kelch, D.O., Fellow in Clinical Osteopathy 

Viola Kruener, B.S., D.O., Fellow in Principles of Osteopathy 

Alexander Mazerski, A.B., D.O., Fellow in Pathology 

Spencer Bradford, D.O., Fellow in Clinical Osteopathy 

Edward Holroyd, D.O., Fellow in Obstetrics 

Miss Mary L. Van Artsdalen, A.B., Librarian 



1 L 



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71 








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THESE GRADUATING 

SENIORS 




CLASS COUNCIL 

Arthur Eshenaur, Chairman 

Donald Briner $2T 

James Payson I T2 

Morris Stein, AOT 

Charles Norton, Independents 




GROVER F. ARTMAN 
Hellam, Pa. 

*2r 



LAWRENCE W. BAILEY 

Mechanicsville, N. Y. 

<f>2f 



ANNA BLACKSMITH 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



DONALD H. BRINER 

DREXEL HILL, Pa. 

*2T 



E. IVAN CHERASHORE 

Phila., Pa. 

AOT 



MORRIS CHERREY 
Phila., Pa. 




DALE F. CHRISTMAN 

Dayton, Ohio 

ITS 



STANLEY J. COLTUNE 
Phila., Pa. 



ANTHONY M. CONGELLO 

Lancaster, Pa. 

ITS 



RAYMOND E. DIETZ 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

AOT 





IRVING J. DUNN 
New York, N. Y. 



GEORGE ELANJIAN 
Phila., Pa. 




^1 





MELVIN ELTING 
Trenton, N. J. 

aot 



ARTHUR ESHENAUR 

West Lawn, Pa. 

ATLAS 



JOSEPH L. ESHLEMAN 

Florin, Pa. 

#2r 



DAVID FEINSCHIL 
Phila., Pa. 



JOHN M. FINNERTY 

Montclair, N. J. 

ITS 



ALBERT J. FORNACE 

Phila., Pa. 

ITS 




JACOB B. I REEDMAN 
New York, N. Y. 

aot 



DONALD HARPER 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

*2T 



DAVID HEILIG 

Phila., Pa. 

ATLAS 



GEORGE O. HOOVER 

Johnstown, Pa. 

4>ST 





CHARLES KAELBER 

Syracuse, N. Y. 
*2T 



THOMAS R. KASHATA 

Sayville, N. Y. 

$2T 




SEYMOUR G. KAUFMAN 
Highland Mills, N. Y. 

aot 



IRVING S. LEMPERT 
New York, N. Y. 

aot 



ROBERT J. LEONARD 
New York, N. Y. 

.\or 



HERBERT J. LIPK1N 
Phila., Pa. 

aot 



WILLIAM P. LONSINGER 

Phila., Pa. 



WILLIAM MAHON 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

ATLAS 




ELLIS L. MILLER, JR. 
Salix, Pa. 

$2r 



HARVEY N. MOGUL 

Phila., Pa. 

AOT 



HAROLD NEWILL 

Connellsville, Pa. 

ITS 



CHARLES K. NORTON 
Phila., Pa. 





ISADORE J. OBERMAN 
Phila., Pa. 

Aor 



NICHOLAS V. ODDO 
Norwalk, Conn. 

#sr 




EDWARD PARRIS 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

aot 



JAMES W. PAYSON, JR. 

Millis, Mass. 

ITS 



ALBERT S. REIBSTEIN 

Phila., Pa. 

AOT 



EDWIN L. ROSSMAN 

West Brighton, S. I., N. Y. 

ITS 



IRVING A. RUBIN 

New York, N. Y. 

AOT 



ROBERT SABER 
Newark, N. J. 




JOHN H. SCHALL, JR. 

Phila., Pa. 

ITS 



PAUL SCHERBA 

Phila.. Pa. 

ITS 



JAMES \V. SILLIMAN 

Bradenville, Pa. 

ITS 



BERNARD SINGER 

Phila., Pa. 

AOT 





SIDNEY SLOTKIN 

Haddonfkld, N. J. 

AOT 



MORRIS STEIN 
Phila., Pa. 

aot 




CHARLES STEINER 

Newark, N. J. 



H. WILLARD STERRETT, JR. 
Phila., Pa. 

ITS 



RALPH M. STOKES, JR. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

ITS 



B. BOYCE SWARTZ 

Erie, Pa. 

ITS 



Camera-shy 

SHIRLEY ROSENBLATT 

GEORGE SHEARER 



CARLTON R. van HOOK, JR. 

Camden, N. J. 

ITS 




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JUNIORS 



CLASS COUNCIL 

Walter Willis, Chairman 
Stanley Turner <&5T 
Stanley- Schiowitz, AOT 
Richard Borman, Atlas 
Irving Ontell, Independents 



When We Were Freshmen 

In September of 1941, our class assembled at the college. We were 
enthusiastic, full of ambition, and our one constant thought revolved 
about the question "What is Osteopathy all about?" Within a few days 
we began to learn the answer, and we became occupied with our study 
of Anatomy, Physiology, Chemistry, and our Freshman Year was well 
under way. 

The frogs and turtles in the Physiology laboratory, we found quite 
intriguing, especially when we tried to obtain kymographic tracings 
which were acceptable, and we were constantly being amazed at how 
much Anatomy one could forget over-night. Each bone just seemed to 
have too many borders and surfaces to remember! One thing we all could 
retain was that Fletman was using a Tenth Edition of Grays' when all 
of us were using the Twenty-third. 

We found Dr. Moody quite an interesting instructor in Embryology 
and Parasitology, although we frequently failed to comprehend the intri- 
cate details he presented. Who will ever forget his vivid description of 
the "dive-bomber" tactics of the Bed-bug? 

Then came December 7, 1941. The rape of Pearl Harbor impressed 
upon us the necessity for studying more assiduously than ever, and just 
a short time was to elapse before we learned that the Philadelphia Col- 
lege of Osteopathy was on a speeded-up curriculum in the interests of 
national welfare and defense. 

Our odd moments between classes, we spent trying to dodge a 
certain notorious cigarette chisler, "Waxy". Barron, Krieger, Carr, 
Mayer and Gagliano left us to enter the Armed Forces. The remainder 
of the class struggled on until before we realized it "Final Exams" were 
on hand; after the two-week long battle we emerged victorious but a 
little tired, sleepy and irritable. 

A recess of a few days, and we found ourselves, with a few excep- 
tions, on the Sophomore Class roll-call. 

C. L. 



Sophomore Year 

Little did we realize when we began our second year the many diffi- 
culties which were to confront us. We heard rumors from the upper- 
classmen about "how tough" it would be, but we were not convinced 
until we found ourselves in the midst of constant worries and troubles. 

Our curriculum was filled to overflowing with difficult courses. The 
warm Summer weather was not too conducive to studying, and the mos- 
quitoes would not permit us to sleep at night. Everyone was looking for- 
ward to the time when cooler weather would come to Philadelphia. 

There were some pleasant moments, however, in this second year 
too. One of these was associated with a Class Show and Dance known as 
FUNZAHOPPIN', directed and produced by Charlie Lodowski and Cy 
Cohen. The show consisted of a well presented and censored burlesque 
of life at P. CO. We were pleasantly surprised as well as amazed at the 
amount of talent we had in our class. The Class Glee Club offered sev- 
eral fine tunes some of which will always live in our memory. Who has 
forgotten "Missouri Waltz". "Tell Me Why", "Cannibal King"? Like- 
wise who will forget Goldinger as "Dr. Herb," Josephson as "Elsie," Fish- 
man as "Mr. Scatterlee", Ulanski's fireworks and LaCavera's portable OMT 
unit? 

Another big moment in our lives as Sophomores occurred on the day 
when we began Clinic Service. We were only assistants, of course, but 
it did swell our personal pride so pleasantly to enter the clinic with our 
white coats, our bags, and the greeting of "Hello, Doctor" from the pa- 
tients and our fellow classmen. 

Then again come the black shadow of final exams. We stayed up 'til 
the wee hours of the morning during these days and lo and behold, we had 
completed our Basic Science Training and another school year. 

C. L. 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





SALVATORE J. AQUILA 
625 Moore Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Salvatorious is South Philly's contribution to 
P.C.O. Shorty Sal, the personality kid from LaSalle 
College is a member ot" the Atlas Club, Newman 
Club and was the Photographic Editor of the Synap- 
sis. As a future aspiration, it's "to go out West and 
marry a certain someone." Among his hobbies are 
photography, stamp collecting, copying Al's notes 
and writing to Pip. 



WILLIAM J. BEIRN 
26 Larchmont Avenue, Larchmont, N. Y. 

"Bill," our clinician, hails from New York, receiv- 
ing his preparatory training at Holy Cross and Villa- 
nova. His hobbies are yachting, model boat building 
and to become the manager of Halinker's Tavern. 
His specialty will be that of good ole general practice 
in Larchmont. Bill, definitely interested in women, 
is a member of the Atlas Club and the Newman 
Club. 




BERNARD L. BERRY 
74 G\ston Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

Boston "Barney," who honestly announces his fa- 
vorite avocation "sleeping." Congenial, friendly, sin- 
cere, Barney will specialize in Osteopathy in the good 
ole state of Massachusetts. Barney-Berry, an active 
member of the Atlas Club and the Dig-On Society, 
came to us from Boston University. 





COLSON BLAKESLEE 
312 E. Scribner Ave., DuBois, Pa. 

"Coke"' expects to make general practice his spe- 
cialty in his home state — Pennsylvania. He attended 
Penn State before entering P. CO. "Coke" is busy all 
the time. He's active in the Atlas Club, Dig-On 
Society, and the OBS-GYN Society. Swimming is 
his hobby and he is definitely expert at it. 




SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





ALBERT BONIER 
2100 W. 6th Street, Chester, Pa. 

Temple's loss was certainly our good fortune, for 
"Chester" Al is one fine student and swell fella'. 
Everybody's friend, there's nothing he wouldn't do 
for you. When he's not indulging in sports — par- 
ticularly baseball, his other hobby is Anatomy (in 
vivo as well as in libro) . A member of GYN-OBS 
Society, Lambda Omicron Gamma, and Synapsis 
Staff, Al intends to be a General Practitioner in the 
Commonwealth of New Jersey, no less. 



RICHARD H. BORMAN 
Moodi.and Road, Roslyn, Pa. 

"Dick" Borman is as active a fellow as you'll ever 
find and with a very pleasing personality. He re- 
ceived his B.S. at Millersville State Teachers' College 
and then took graduate work at the U. of P. He 
excels in his hobbies — swimming, photography and 
craft work — as well as in his vocation. He's a mem- 
ber of the Atlas Club, Dig-On and OBS-GYN 
Societies and the student council. Dick also made 
a few drawings which are found in the Synapsis. 
Good luck to you in your general practice. 




WESLEY V. BOUDETTE 
207 Hanover Street, Claremont, N. H. 

"Slippery" Wes Boudctte hails from the University 
of New Hampshire. Quite an athlete, Wes' hobbies 
are sports, cards (socially), and walking. He ex- 
pects to practice in God's country — New England, 
and to make further studies in the field of Neurol- 
ogy. Wes, an executive of Phi Sigma Gamma, is a 
member of the Dig-On Society, and as for women, 
well — -her name is "June." 





HUBERT BROWN 
424 Hazle Street, Tamaqua, Pa. 

Quiet, unassuming and sense-of-humorish, that's 
Brownie. But still water runs deep, and this A.B. 
from Penn and Temple goes in for all sports — par- 
ticularly basketball, all types of music, and hiking. 
Brownie intends to settle down in Eastern Pennsyl- 
vania as a General Practitioner with a special interest 
in Cardiology. And he'll have his women tall, bru- 
nette, fair-complexioned and "good sports" — hmm, 
could that be K ? 



SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





BERNARD J. COHEN 
4943 N. 9th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

One of the quietest members of our class has been 
"Bernie", who took an A.B. degree at Temple be- 
fore joining us. For hobbies, he boasts of riding and 
pinochle. Bernie expects to do general practice in 
Philadelphia upon graduation. Women apparently 
are not a part of "Bernie's" extra-curricular activities 
but he does boast of membership in the OBS-GYN 
Society. 



SEYMOUR COHEN 
49 A Graham Street, Jersey City, N. J. . 

Cy "original idea" Cohen is P.C.O.'s contribution 
to the track world, holding the record of 228 ft. 
for throwing the javelin. Cy also coached the West 
Catholic High City Champions of the past track 
campaign. His future aspirations are an interneship 
and Osteopathy. He hails from Franklin & Marshall 
College where he obtained his B.S., and we will all 
remember him for his work in "Funzahoppin'." As 
for women — it's Charlotte. 




-■T^.:i~- 




% V 




DAVID COLLIER 
4729 Hazel Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

P.C.O. obtained Dave from Perm State and Frank- 
lin & Marshall where he received his B.S. degree. 
Dave's avocation is his vocation — swimming, and his 
specialty will be general practice. He has a lovely 
wife and her name is, yes, you guessed it — "Bea". 





HILTON L. CUTLER 
6211 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hilton L. Cutler is a man by himself. One has 
said that when you get to know Hilt he will be your 
friend forever. Hilt received his degree from Penc 
State after spending some time at St. Josephs' Col- 
lege. You will find him as a general practitioner in 
years to come. 



SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





MARTIN E. FARBER 
1453 W. Sparks St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Marty" came to us from Temple and wcais his 
professional manner with dash and abandon. He'll 
give anyone a close race for the title of "best dressed 
man" at P.C.O. As a G.P., Marty says it's a toss-up 
between Pennsylvania and California. His one big 
avocation — Jeanie. 



RALPH A. FARRINGTON 
3 85 Beale Street, Wollaston, Mass. 

R.A.F. Fangt'n, the quiet, conservative, unassum- 
ing type who couldn't be anything else but sincere, 
came to us from Boston University. His chief hobby- 
is calling Flack "in." Ralph is a member of the 
Atlas Club and Dig-On Society and expects to prac- 
tice "up home in Massachusetts." He participated in 
Soph's "Funzahoppin' ". 




MORRIS FISHMAN 
19 Manhattan Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Good things come in little packages, and surprise 
of surprises — he's from Brooklyn. Brooklyn Col- 
lege's gift to the women, and as prolific with humor 
as he is lacking in cephalic foliage, Morris will prob- 
ably be forgiven for his B.A., but he will never be 
forgotten for his parts in "Funzahoppin' " — singing 
in the Glee Club and "Mr. Scatterly." Practice — 
New York; Specialty — Endocrinology; Ambition — 
Research; Flobby — Genetics; what's the matter with 
him? Women? 





CHARLES B. FLACK 
5115 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Chuck" is the sleepingest jitterbug in captivity. 
Temple's loss, our heritage. C. Bailey goes in tor 
swimming, dancing and all female hepcats with 
blonde or brown hair who have a drape shape with a 
neat pleat. As a G.P. — Obstetrician, he'll settle in 
Philly. 



SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





HERBERT FLETMAN 
2845 D Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

La Salle's loss and P.C.O.'s gain — that's "Herpes" 
Herb Fletman, that genial wizard of finance who 
virtually shakes with laughter. Herb is a member of 
Lambda Omicron Gamma and expects to practice in 
good old Kensington, Philadelphia. In his spare time, 
Herb swims and goes horseback riding. Women? Ah, 
yes! — it's "the Good Old Gibson Girl." 



JUDAH A. GLAND 
15 17 W. York Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conscientious, studious Judy is another Temple 
man gone wrong — married. A Philadelphia boy, it 
will be "local boy making good" when he settles as 
G. P. with a flare for minor surgery. Member of 
Pediatrics and OBS-GYN Societies, he'll be remem- 
bered as "Throckpretzel" and the "Wasserman Kid" 
of "Funzahoppin' " fame. 




HAROLD S. GOLDBERG 

224 Vernon Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

"Artie", the man with "skirt fever", hails from 
Brooklyn, the home of the Bums. He expects to 
practice in Queens, N. Y., with pediatrics as a spe- 
cialty. He is on the Business Staff of the Synapsis 
and has as a hobby — women — what else? Artie got 
his B.A. at Brooklyn College. 




\p ^^^m ■iW"^ 








MAURICE GOLDINGER 

5 24 Montgomery Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Always pleasant, endowed with a fine brain with 
limitless capacity for humor is Maurry, another im- 
port from N.Y.U. Wearing his A.B. wisely, he wants 
only to be a good physician, enjoys photography as a 
hobby and belongs to the Neurological Soc'y- Texas 
and Los Angeles will have to fight it out for him — 
but Evelyn will be the winner. Remember him as 
the star of "Funzahoppin'," "Dean Herb"? 



SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 




f 1 

9 






^^BP^^H 




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WILLIAM A. GRIFFITH 
47th & Pine Sts., Garden Ct. Plaza, Phila., Pa. 

A smoothie if there ever was one, Griff is a real 
ladies' man. Willie got his A.B. at Penn, belongs to 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. He's a man of varied hobbies — 
bee-raising, card-playing, fresh-water fishing, golf, 
and — oh yes — don't forget, short redheads. He wants 
a comfortable practice and home in some small town 
anywhere but Philly, and he rather likes Roentgen- 
ology especially. Staff member of Synapsis and Mes- 
senger, Photographer and member of Glee Club in 
never-to-be-forgotten "Funzahoppin'." 



ALLEN H. H1NKEL 
392 3 6th Street, South Arlington, Va. 

Here's a lad who will practice either in the District 
of Columbia, Virginia, or Ohio, and it's none other 
than Al "Pinky" Hinkel who came to P.C.O. from 
Alfred University. Ext. American University. Al is 
treasurer of Phi Sigma Gamma and when not study- 
ing, reads, tinkers with the radio or takes a stroll in 
Fairmount Park. (Too bad, girls — Al is already en- 
gaged — boy! what a nurse!). 




ROYAL H. JOHNSON, JR. 
817 Main Street, Conneaut, Ohio 

Quiet, unassuming, honest and sincere all are 
necessary adjectives to adequately describe the char- 
acters of "Stud." He obtained his degree at West- 
ern Reserve University and upon getting his D.O., 
Royal will carry out a general practice in Conneaut, 
Ohio. A member of the Dig-On Society, the OBS- 
GYN Society, and Iota Tau Sigma, Stud's hobby is 
women — B.I.W. 





■0^t^^' 



SIMON JOSEPHSON 
147 St. Charles Pl., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Atlantic City High, Dickinson College and Temple 
Graduate School all combined their efforts to give us 
"Sy". Sy, who has a B.S. degree is a member of 
Lambda Omicron Gamma, the OBS-GYN Society 
and the Neurological Society. In his spare time Sy 
is busy catching up on his notes, and the burning- 
light of his life is a certain little woman — Sari. 




SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 




-j~--- — - - 





MELVIN I. KATZMAN 
5208 Drexel Rd., Phila., Pa. 

Mirthful Mel, one of the nicest guys in any class, 
will give you his right arm if you need it. He hails 
from Penn with his A.B. degree, lists Anatomy and 
Embryology as hobbies (?) and is a member of Cafe 
Society. Giving Aquila some "skin" is another pas- 
time. Easily the most ambitious member of the class, 
Mel intends to pursue General Practice in the U. S. 
Navy. Women have him definitely interested, as wit- 
ness his supraterrestrial portrayal of "Elsie" in "Fun- 
zahoppin'." 



SIDNEY KOCHMAN 
204 E. Allegheny Ave., Phila., Pa. 

Every class has its Thinkers, and "Kokey" is one of 
them. Quiet, reserved and friendly, Sid's one of the 
best informed men in the class. After three years 
at Temple, he came to us wanting to be a G.P. in 
Phila. Well-balanced interests — he likes tennis, base- 
ball and current events, has membership in Pediatrics 
and OBS-GYN Societies and Lambda Omicron Gam- 
ma. There's only one woman in his life — and that's 
Mrs. Eleanor K. 




JEROME H. KOHN 
5 208 Euclid Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

A top-notch student always willing to do you a 
favor is truthful, friendly, sincere "Jerry" Kohn who 
came to P. CO. from Saint Joseph's College. Jerry, 
who expects to practice right here in Phila., is a mem- 
ber of Lambda Omicron Gamma, the OBS-GYN So- 
ciety, Synapsis Editorial Staff, and will be remem- 
bered as Dr. Yung and Dr. Pruner of that Soph hit 
— "Funzahoppin'." He is also a rather efficient fen- 
cer. Sorry girls, he's already married — to Helen. 





GEORGE H. KOLANDER 
3 5 54 S. Fairhill Street, Phila., Pa. 

George is all around the place, and at any time you 
can find him either in the Junior room or in the 
Senior room. Since he has been one step ahead of 
us and one step behind them, we think that he has 
the right to wander and observe, which he does. 
That's why George will make a good general prac- 
titioner in the State of Pennsylvania. George at- 
tended Temple before coming to PCO. 




SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





HOWARD LaBARGE 
6 Withers Place, Middletown, N. Y. 

Presenting the President of the PCO "Wolf Club," 
Howie claims that his main interest in life centers 
around anything wearing a skirt, although we know 
from his scholastic record that his chief aim is the 
practice of Osteopathy. Howie received his Bache- 
lor's degree from Syracuse before he came to PCO. 
He expects to practice in the great outdoors of Maine. 



JOSEPH A. LaCAVERA, Jr. 
277 Central Ave., Norwich, Conn. 

Joseph Anthony LaCavera, Jr., says that he has no 
nickname but everyone calls him "Joe." His A.B. 
was conferred on him by the University of Penn- 
sylvania. He is a member of the OBS-GYN and the 
Synapsis staff. When asked what he thought of 
women, he said. "Sure, why not?" Joe expects to be 
a general practitioner somewhere in the United States. 




IRVIN J. LEBOW 
3400 F Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Introducing our Kensington Hill-billy of "You are 
My Sunshine" fame, lrv is quite an outdoor man, 
boasting of hobbies such as fishing, camping, swim- 
ming and horse back riding. His current interest is a 
red-head but future aspirations are in the specialty of 
Obstetrics. 





CHARLES H. LODOWSKI 
619 Freeport Rd., New Kensington, Pa. 

"Chuck" Lodowski would be an asset to any class 
and we're glad that he's part of ours. He received 
his Bachelor's degree at Villanova and his Master's 
degree at the University of Pittsburgh. But he is far 
from destined to be a bachelor — he says he loves all 

the women! His pet hobby telling stale jokes. He 

is now president of Iota Tau Sigma fraternity and 
has been the class chairman, instigator of "Funza- 
hoppin'," a member of the Student Council, has serv- 
ed as a member of the Synapsis Staff. Here's to an 
A-l future general practitioner who'll really under- 
stand and worry about his patients. 




SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





JAMES K. MELLOTT 
7100 York Rd., Phila., Pa. 

Serious Jim, one of the quiet boys in our class is 
a member of the Dig-On Society and the Phi Sigma 
Gamma Fraternity. Jim has a strong inclination 
for blondes, although he prefers brunettes theoretic- 
ally. Jim studied at Temple for two years before he 
undertook his work at PCO. He wants to practice 
in the country where he can indulge in his hobbies, 
hunting and fishing. 



IRVING ONTELL 
372 Kearney Ave., Arlington, N. J. 

"Irv" Ontell is, we believe, the local representative 
for Mum. He came to PCO with a B.S. in Pharmacy 
from Rutgers University. Popular with the students, 
Irv has been the Student Council representative for 
the Independents for the past two years. He is also 
a member of the Neurology and OBS-GYN societies. 
Obstetrics may be his specialty some day. When 
asked where he expects to practice, he said "New Jer- 
sey, of course." 




1RVIN A. PEARLSTEIN 
4074 Parkside Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pearly's main ambition is to "retire in some small 
town like Philadelphia." Before coming to PCO, 
Pearly took an A.B. degree at Temple U. In the way 
of hobbies and extra curricular activities, he offers 
Army nurses, fencing and the Lambda Omicron 
Gamma Fraternity. 





ALEXANDER D. PHETERSON 
24 Gorham St., Rochester, N. Y. 

Alex Phetcrson attended Ohio State University 
where he received his B.A. degree. He is a member 
of the Lambda Omicron Gamma Fraternity and the 
Neurological Society. When asked to comment on 
women, he just stated that he was a married man. 
Alex hopes to have a general practice in Rochester, 
New York. 




SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





RAY N. PORZIO 
101 S. Packard Street, Hammonton, N. J. 

Ray Porzio came to PCO after studying at Du- 
quesne and Marietta College where he received his 
A.B. in '40. Ray is a member of the Iota Tau Sigma 
Fraternity. He has nothing to do with women, just 
nurses. His other hobbies are reading and music. 
The fact that Ray wants to practice in Jersey makes 
one wonder if it might not be his home state. 



\ 



WILLIAM F. QUINLIVAN 
727 W. Brighton Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

"Bill" is one of the boys from Syracuse. His 
efforts at school have always been directed toward 
thorough insight into all problems. Bill's main am- 
bition in life is to be a happy general practitioner in 
New York State. Swimming and golf are the activi- 
ties which occupy him at his leisure in addition to 
those of the Dig-On Society and Phi Sigma Gamma 
Fraternity. 




ELEANOR J. REESE 
Lincoln Highway East, Lancaster, Pa. 

"E. J." is one of the most active members of our 
class. She attacks all problems with eager enthusiasm 
and is always willing to help others. Her activities 
include Pediatrics, Neurology Society and the JWOA 
(President 2, Vice-President 3) Student Council and 
the Synapsis Staff. Penn State is "E. J.'s" Alma Mater 
and Lancaster is her chosen site for a general practice. 




JOSEPH ROBIE 

41 Church Street, Plymouth, Pa. 

Joe is one of our "up state" physicians. "Mum" is 
the word at all times with Joe. His future aspira- 
tion is to get thru school while his present aspiration 
seems to center around women, especially on week- 
ends. Joe did three years of preparatory work at 
St. Joseph's college previous to matriculating at PCO. 
Joe's brightest saying: "I shoulda stood in bed." 



SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





EDWARD J. ROPULEWICZ 
293 Pleasant Street, Gardner, Mass. 

Introducing our genial Editor-in-chief of the 

Synapsis "Rip" earned his B.A. at American 

International College, where he tried his hand at ath- 
letics and found that Osteopathy helps build a win- 
ning team. His extra-curricular activities include Phi 
Sigma Gamma Fraternity, Newman Club, Student 
Council, "Funzahoppin'," Dig-On, Neurological and 
The OBS-GYN Societies. "Rip" expects to practice 
in New England in the company of his loving wife. 



LEOPOLD SA1.KIND 
618 S. 3rd Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

South Philly's contribution to PCO is one quiet 
amiable capable person known as "Blackie." His in- 
terests center about Obstetrics and Gynecology at 
school, and athletics on the outside. Blackie studied 
at Temple before coming to PCO. The Junior Prom, 
Synapsis and Lambda Omicron Gamma Fraternity 
are some of his extra-curricular achievements. 




STANLEY SCHIOWITZ 
36 Patchen Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

"Schwitz" has as his main future ambition the 
desire to marry, settle down, and be a good general 
practitioner in Brooklyn. "Schwitz" has been active in 
rhe lines of the Lambda Omicron Gamma Fraternity, 
Freshman Prom, Class Council, Synapsis Staff, and 
"Funzahoppln'." Pinochle and music appeal to him 
as hobbies. Before coming to PCO, he studied at St. 
Johns University. 





WILBUR SELTZER 
4704 Longshore Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wilbur "Blimpy" Seltzer, whose hobbies are fish- 
ing, horseracing and reducing diets, has a figure that 
stands out in any crowd. Wilby belongs to the 
Lambda Omicron Gamma Fraternity, the OBS-GYN 
Societies and has served on the Synapsis Staff, "Funz- 
ahoppin' " and the Freshman Dance committee. Just 
mention women and Wilby grins and murmurs, "Oh 
boy!" "Seltz" says that Tacony is a fine place and 
that's where he expects to practice, hoping to special- 
ize in obstetrics-gynecology. His A.B. is from 
Temple U. 



SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





ARTHUR. SNYDER 
5 006 D Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Presenting "Arty" Snyder, our genial Pinochle 
shark. Arty studied at LaSalle College before joining 
us. He is a member of the Lambda Omicron Gamma 
Fraternity with a yen for general practice in some 
small town. In addition to studying, Arty enjoys 
swimming, horseback riding and - - - - -women! 



ERNEST TALONE 
136 W. 11th Street, Conshohocken, Pa. 

The Conshohocken Kid, Ernie is affable, sincere 
and usually quiet except when indulging in his hobby, 
beer-drinking. Ernie's tastes for women have cen- 
tered about a certain Phoebe for six years whom he 
recently married. Member of Iota Tau Sigma Fra- 
ternity, the C-Y and OBS-GYN Societies. Ernie took 
a Bachelor degree at Villanova before joining us. 




JOSEPH B. TAUBMAN 
506 Claremont Parkway, Bronx, N. Y. 

Joe has attended CCNY, NYU, Manhattan College 
and the graduate school at Iowa State. He says his 
hobbies are fishing and traveling; traveling from 
campus to campus no doubt. Joe is a member of 
The American Association for Adv. of Science, Iowa 
Academy of Science, Psi Chi, OBS-GYN Societies 
and Lambda Omicron Gamma Fraternity. He has 
served on the Freshman dance, Charity Ball, and 
Sophomore dance committees. Joe prescribes women 
P.R.N, and wants to have a general practice. 





STANLEY J. TURNER 
9 5 Cooper Ave., Upper Montclair, N. J. 

"Dusty" hails from Duke University where he re- 
ceived his A.B. degree. His hobby is trying to grow 
hair on LaCavera's head. Psychiatry is a field which 
appeals to him strongly and he expects to specialize 
in this work in Texas. "Dusty's" extra curricular 
interests have centered about Phi Sigma Fraternity, 
Student Council, Interfraternity Council and the 
Dig-On Society. 




SYNAPSIS 1944 



SYNAPSIS 1944 





VINCENT I. WALSH 
45 3 3 N. 5th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Bishop" Walsh is a graduate of LaSalle College 
and is a member of the Phi Sigma Gamma Fraternity. 
He will be remembered for his diligence and his con- 
stant interruptions of lectures by his questions. Vince 
has been "sub rosa" about female companions. He 
expects to practice obstetrics in Philadelphia, Chicago 
and Los Angeles using a helicopter for rapid trans- 
portation. 



THEODORE WEINBERG 
2 509 S. 12th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Teddy" Weinberg received his A.B. from Temple 
U. where he was a familiar figure in Mitten Hall. He 
belongs to the OBS-GYN Society and also is much 
interested in C-V diseases. His time has been given 
to work on the Freshman Prom committee and the 
Synapsis staff. Ted is a member of the Lambda Omi- 
cron Gamma Fraternity. The diversity of his inter- 
ests is well illustrated by his hobbies, modern music, 
politics, reading and traveling. Teddy is expecting to 
do his practicing in Philadelphia. 




WALTER WILLIS 
4619 Cedar Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Our Junior class chairman studied at Wheaton and 
Penn. U. before coming to PCO. He has been active 
in the OBS-GYN, Dig-On Societies, Student Coun- 
cil and the Junior Prom. Walt expects to do a general 
practice in Pennsylvania after graduation. In this, 
he shall be accompanied by his attractive and capable 
wife. 





HAROLD YABLIN 
Watertown, N. Y. 

Harold Yablin got his B.A. at the Univ. of Buffalo 
and then attended their graduate school. "Yab" is 
serious and hard-working — seems to have no time 
for hobbies. He has served on the Gas decontamina- 
tion squad and is a member of the Lambda Omicron 
Gamma Fraternity and the Neurological Society. He 
hopes to set up a general practice in the state of New 
York. 



SYNAPSIS 1944 



Junior Year 



April 1943 was the date of a turning-point in our school careers. It 
marked the beginning of real all-out clinical training and experience in 
contrast to the previous didactic training. We were now spending our 
time with the techniques of Osteopathic Manipulation, Bedside Technique, 
Pediatric Feeding Schedules and the principles of management of disease. 

Pediatrics clinic was a very interesting and wonderful part of our 
eduction. It was a great thrill for us to see the little tots grow and thrive 
under our care, and it made us feel happy to know that we could he of help. 

Then came the big day that all of us were waiting for, . . . our 
first day as Student Internes in the Hospital. All of us had heard at some 
time or other that it was a hard thankless job and had also heard the adage, 
"vou get out of it just what you put into it." We were willing to take 
our chances, and lo and behold, we found that the student internship was 
a mass of interesting, valuable and educational experience just waiting for 
one to adopt it. Of course, there were times when we did become dis- 
couraged, but it was well worth the trouble. 

This year went by very rapidly, and before we knew it, we were on 
our way to the Junior Prom at the Stephen Girard Hotel. There was a 
happy crowd of persons at this affair, and as we looked about we could 
see the Seniors who were about to graduate and who were passing the torch 
of knowledge on to our class to foster for the coming year. We ourselves 
were on the home stretch, at last. 

C. H. L 



Senior Year 

We began our school year at the time when many cases of Pneumonia 
were breaking out in the vicinity of Philadelphia. This stimulated us to 
further study of such condition and it afforded us the opportunites of 
seeing these cases, studying the X-Ray findings and watching the progress 
of the conditions under the therapeutic regime in the Hospital. 

Our afternoon classes and laboratories were now things of the past. In- 
stead, we spent our time in the special clinics and we had many opportunities 
to invoke our knowledge in treating cases under supervision. 

Very shortly our thoughts turned to Hospital Internship, Comprehensive 
Exams, State Boards and Graduation. All of us were convinced of the 
great value of internship and graduate study, and by the time this has 
reached the press, practically all of our class will have received various ap- 
pointments towards the end of further study and training. 

And so, we close the history of the class of October, 1944, the first 
class to have graduated from P. C. O. under the speeded up curriculum oc- 
casioned by the National Emergency which flared upon that fateful day, 
December 7, 1941. 

C. H. L. 




CO 

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Sophomores 



SOPHOMORE COUNCIL 
Paul Young, <J>2f Chairman 
Harry Berberian, ITS 
William Kulik, Atlas 
Otto Kurschner, AOf 
Laurence Sturchio, Independents 



The Roll of the Student in the Administration 
Of Continuous Caudal Analgesia 

During the past year, continuous caudal analgesia has played an im- 
portant part in the management of the obstetrical patient in our insti- 
tution. 

The use of this method of painless childbirth, in our hands, has met 
with phenomenal success up to the present time. 

The student physicians in our institution are privileged to witness 
and assist in this procedure, under expert supervision. This is an oppor- 
tunity not given many students of other schools at the present time. 

No small measure of credit is due to student physicians who share 
the responsibility of "running a caudal" on our obstetrical patients. 

When the student reports for duty on the maternity floor, he re- 
ceives adequate instruction in the anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology 
relative to this method of obstetrical analgesia, along with his general 
obstetrical instruction. 

He is present at the time of the caudal induction, and from this time 
on stays with the patient, checking the levels of analgesia and assisting 
in the administration of fractional doses when required to maintain these 
levels. His also is the job of keeping the patient's mental attitude happy 
and her mind free from alarm during the sometimes lengthy period of 
analgesia. 

I believe that the primary reason for our hospital's extraordinary 
success with this dramatic method of pain relief is the excellent job that 
the student physician is doing today. 

Julan L. Mines, D.O. 



Student Internes 

For twelve weeks during his Junior and Senior years, the student has 
an opportunity to work in the Osteopathic Hospital as an under-graduate 
interne. His service is divided into two six-week periods, with a rotating 
service on the Osteopathic, Obstetrical and Surgical floors. He is assign- 
ed individual patients and it is his responsibility to give the osteopathic 
manipulative treatments as ordered and under the supervision of the 
Resident Staff. Each case is followed through from the time of admis- 
sion until the patient is discharged. During this time, opportunity is given 
for the student interne to study case histories, observe and assist in various 
diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and generally become familiar with 
the case of the acutely ill patient. Unusual cases are demonstrated by the 
Resident Staff and weekly classes are held for case history discussion and 
instruction in hospital procedures. 

Osteopathic technique and minor surgical procedures are demon- 
strated in special hospital class rooms with the use of hospital beds, manne- 
quins, and bedside equipment. Obstetrical mannequins are used in teach- 
ing positions for delivery and the student learns to "scrub" and assist in 
the operating room. Diagnosis is stressed with the use of case histories, 
physical and laboratory findings, roentgen films, pathological specimens 
and autopsy findings. 

This is the time when the student begins to develop a sense of bed- 
side manners and professional etiquette. It has been said that an adequate 
basic training plus stimulating professional environment, starts a man 
well in his chosen career. It may be said of our "student internes" that 
given a good basic training on the "college side" — and a white coat, 
several patients and a period of intensive hospital training, they emerge 
as more capable and confident professional men, reflecting credit to theii 
Osteopathic Institution. 

Barbara Redding, D. O., 
Supervisor of Student Internes. 




MAX ADELSTEIN 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



JOSEPH A. AMALFITANO 
Wilmington, Del. 
Phi Sigma Gamma 



ROBERT BABA 

Rutherford, N. J. 
Iota Tan Sivma 



JOSEPH BACK, JR. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



WILMER H. BATH 
Conshohocken, Pa. 
Phi Sigma Gamma 



MEYER BELKOFF 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



HARRY S. BERBERIAN 

Lancaster, Pa. 

lota Tan Sigma 



HOWARD D. CHERASHORE 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



JOHN A. CIFALA 

Washington, D. C. 

Iota Tan Sigma 



HERMAN COHEN 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



RUSSELL DANNER 
Audubon, N. J. 



ANTHONY DeMARCO 
Phi Sivma Gamma 



KENNETH W. EWING 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phi Sigma Gamma 



MICHAEL R. GALLO 
Norristown, Pa. 
lota Tan Sigma 



ALBERT S. HEYMAN 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



JOHN J. HUGHES 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Iota Tau Sigma 



GILMORE HYMAN 
New York, N. Y. 



OSCAR H. KATZ 

Bronx, N. Y. 

Lambda Omicvoti Gamma 



JAMES KELLER 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
lota Tau Sigma 



WILLIAM W. KULIK 
Allentown, Pa. 

Atlas 





OTTO KURSCHNER 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



NORMAN O. LA VET 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



john j. Mclaughlin 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
lota Tau Sigma 



CHARLES G. MARTIN 
Asbury Park, N. J. 



WILLIAM D. MILLER 

New York, N. Y. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



MAX MARCUS 

New York, N. Y. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



ARNOLD MELNICK 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



NICHOLAS MISCHENKO 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
lota Tau Sigma 



CHARLES NOLL 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
lota Tan Sigma 



SAM V. ORIGLIO 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
lota Tau Sigma 



JOSEPH PELLETIERE, JR. 

New York, N. Y. 

Atlas 



DONALD PINDER 

Atlas 



MARTIN RASKIN 

New York, N. Y. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



BENJAMIN RICHMOND 
Trenton, N. J. 



GEORGE ROEDELL 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phi Sizma Gamma 



JOHN G. SAUTER 

Athol, Mass. 

Phi Sigma Gamma 



FRANK A. SCHMIDT 

Springfield, Pa. 

Phi Sis ma Gamma 



ERNEST SCHNEIDER 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lambda Omicron Gamma 



JOSEPH SHANKIN 

New York, N. Y. 
Lambda Omicron Gamma 



GERARD C. SHAW 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Atlas 





MURRAY L. SOLOMON 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lambda Omicron Gamma 



BENJAMIN STEIN 

New York, N. Y. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



LEONARD H. STOLL 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



CARL STRAUSS 
New York, N. Y. 



HAROLD STRICK 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



HERBERT TEPPER 

Olean, N. Y. 

Lambda Omicron Gamma 



MORTON TERRY 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



WILLIAM TRACY 

Douglaston, L. L, N. Y. 

lota Tan Sigma 



ADOLPH WYSOCKI 

Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Iota Tan Sigma 



DeLENE YOCUM 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PAUL YOUNG 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Phi Sigma Gamma 



GEORGE SMITH 

Johnstown, Pa. 
Phi Sigma Gamma 




CAMERA-SHY SOPHOMORES 
Bernard Berman Martin Johnson 

Julian Blitz Eugene Pizzitola 

Saraphemas Candas Laurence Sturchio 

Daniel Cedrone 





FROSH 



The Clinic Doctor 

The man in white passes through the corridor, the patients wonder 
if this distinguished individual will be their physician while the lower 
classmen questioned their ability to attain such an enviable position. They 
note the doctor's bag and the cherished stethoscope poking from the rear 
trouser pocket. 

There are many, many nights of study for the freshman but all is 
considered worthwhile when, at the commencement of the second sopho- 
more semester, this not-so green student dons his newly starched coat, 
picks up the beloved stethoscope and struts past the waiting patients in 
the clinic. This is an observation period in which it is necessary to learn 
the routine of referring patients, making appointments and escorting pa- 
tients to the blood count laboratory. 

When sufficient time has elapsed, this progressive individual becomes 
a booth physician and is assigned an assistant who in turn observes. 
The booth physician is given a list of patients whom he treats to the 
best of his ability. This work is done under the supervision of Staff doc- 
tors. Physical examinations are given and histories are taken. It is in 
this way that the student doctor formulates ideas and a routine which 
will play a significant part in his own practice. 

When the student reaches the senior year, he is permitted to work 
in the special clinics under careful supervision. These special clinics have 
much to offer and the up-and-coming young doctor will seize every op- 
portunity to avail himself of additional practice and knowledge. 



Historical Sketch of the College 

The history of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy dates back to the 
earliest part of the year 189S when Dr. O. J. Snydei and Dr. Mason W. 
Priestley, in conjunction with a Mr. Riley, met to discuss the necessity and 
desirability of establishing an Osteopathy College in the City of Phila- 
delphia. They gave unsparingly of their time and labor in surmounting 
the many and difficult problems that confronted them in formulating the 
necessary plans of organization and personnel. They wisely decided to 
secure the services of the best instructors obtainable and likewise to en- 
deavor to obtain a suitable and central location. The new institution was 
incorporated under the laws of the State of New Jersey, as the Philadelphia 
College of Osteopathv and Infirmary, and was formally opened on January 
27, 1899. The first college occupied two rooms in the Stephan Girard 
Building, Twelfth above Chestnut. Later that year for the need of more 
room, the College moved to the Witherspoon Building at Juniper and 
Walnut. Here the first chemistry and biology laboratories were installed 
and equipped to fill the need of the course. In addition, Dr. Snyder pur- 
chased anatomical equipment, in the form of manikins, charts, and skeletons, 
etc. It was by the use of these that Dr. Snyder planned to make the course 
as practical as possible, supplementary to the didactic work with laboratory 
experimentation and the study of anatomical specimens. 

Again the college moved due to an increase in the size of the student 
body. This time to Thirty-third and Arch Streets. As the enrollment 
increased so increased the teaching personnel. It was but a short time 
when the school was located at 715 N. Broad street and it was found there 
from 1907 to 1911. Then in 1911, it was found at 832 Pine street and 
the students made their headquarters at this spot for the next six years. 
In 1917, former Mayor Reyburn's home on the southeast corner of 19th and 
Spring Garden Street found the presence of future osteopathic physicians. 
In the year 1918, the name changed to the Philadelphia College of Osteop- 
athy. As the school increased, there was an increase in the buildings and 
in 1922 the two adjoining buildings at 1818-20 Spring Garden Street 
formed an annex. 

The next move was made in 1929 and this location was found at 48th and 
Spruce Streets. The new building contained the college, hospital and clinic. 
This happens to be permanent because plans for enlarging are underway 
at the present time. The Philadelphia College and Hospital keeps building 
up osteopathy. 



The Anatomy Museum 

The continued increase in the number of museum specimens produced is 
one way of saying that the college is in possession of a more complete collec- 
tion of teaching aids than was the case when the last Synapsis was pub- 
lished. Since the first of June, three and one-half months ago, one hun- 
dred and forty-two new specimens have been added, nevertheless only a 
modest start has been made upon the plans for building a museum that 
will facilitate modern teaching methods for the benefit of both graduate 
and undergraduate. 

Only in so far as a museum keeps abreast of professional advancement 
can it serve by giving satisfactory anatomical instruction. Too many muse- 
ums become none too good "Old Curiosity Shops" diffusing a dusty atmos- 
phere of dampness and gloom with a moderate amount of mold. Their 
usefulness is strictly limited. The proper display of carefully prepared 
and clearly marked pieces assembled for the sole purpose of aiding those 
who seek to learn should be the aim of any professional museum. It should 
be of assistance in helping the student learn the body instead of the book. 

Restrictions placed upon us by the war have prevented the installation 
of additional museum cases. The return of normal times will remedy this 
difficulty. 

Plans for museum displays call for the exhibition of the normal, the 
variations within normal range, and the abnormal. A fourth and relatively 
new idea for anatomical museums will be a division of applied anatomy 
where specimens will be marked to indicate points of clinical importance. Dis- 
plays in this division will be subject to such frequent changes as will be in 
keeping with subject material being taught graduate and undergraduate 
students. 

Several organizations have already called upon the Department of Anat- 
omy to exhibit a collection of anatomical specimens and graduate physicians 
have visited the museum with requests to see specific studies. It is in 
such wavs that the Department can be of assistance to the osteopathic 
profession at large. 

Angus G. Cathie, D.O. 



Education and the War 

"Wars, conflagrations and deluges destroy nations, and with them 
all their monuments, their discoveries, and their vanities. The torch of 
science has more than once been extinguished and rekindled — a few indi- 
viduals, who have escaped by accident, reunite the thread of generations." 
This sounds like the optomism of Winston Churchill, but it is not; these 
are the words of Aristotle spoken more than two thousand years ago. At 
least one who calls himself Diedrich Knickerbocker tells us so. 

History repeats itself. Indeed, history repeats with a difference! 
Thank a Divine Providence for "the difference." We have every reason 
to believe, now as this war draws to a close, that our nation will escape 
destruction. Our educational system, however, has been profoundly dis- 
turbed. The impact of war has dislocated both students and faculties and 
it is most difficult to predict how long it will take to rehabilitate them. 

The accelerated program has been the "noble experiment" of educa- 
tion in this war. The telescoping of curricula into fewer calendar years 
yet trying to maintain academic content has been the objective. How 
well this has been accomplished time alone will tell. The inevitable fa- 
tigue of such a program has brought about great aggitation for its discon- 
tinuance. That a somewhat modified accelerated program is apt to con- 
tinue for considerable time to come is no shrewd guess. 

Remarkably short term programs of specialized training have intro- 
duced a new technique in education. Though frowned upon by educators 
these efforts seem to have served and satisfied a great and pressing need. 
There can be no doubt that it will require the wisdom of a Solomon to 
rationalize and evaluate these programs during the rehabilitation period. 
Their full impact on traditional education has not yet been felt. 

Each modern war has unearthed a wealth of useful knowledge. In 
medical science this is particularly and peculiarly true. It is regretable 
that it requires a war to serve this end but the war has been upon us. Let 
us now seek diligently to utilize this knowledge to the greatest advan- 
tage of all mankind. 

Ottcrbein Dressier, D.O. 




Freshmen 



Herman Poppe, Chairman <3>2r 

Anoelo Amadid ITS 

Joseph Cantor, AOT 

Clyde S. Saylor, Independents 



William L. Adams 
Joseph Cantor 
Daniel V. Friedman 
C. F. Konell 



Bernard Alper Robert Austin W. M. Baldwin 

Peter T. DePalma R. W. Disinger Chester Epstein 

Constantine H. Heleotos Edward Jaffe B. P. Katzen 
Eli Kremer 



Arnold Berger 
Italo Falcone 
Sam N. Kniazer 
M. B. Kroshinsky 




Louis Leibson Murray E. Levyn Robert Magrill George Mangold David Menza 

Henry Nemerofsky Joseph N. Ovadio S. Pisciotti Herman E. Poppe Herman I. Romm 

Clyde S. Saylor Alexander Siekierka Salvatore Sturchio Boris Turchinsky Arnold E. Weyman 




Angelo Amadio 
Vincent Cipolla 
Philip DiSalvo 
Daniel Finkelstein 
Joseph Zellis 



CAMERA SHY FROSH 

Harry Fontenova 
John Lavery 
Jane Morris 
Domer Newill 



Muriel Rusch 
George Smith 
Antoinette C. Spada 
Daniel Zarowitz 



A Plaque with the inscription: 



/;/ memory of 
ALBERT CLEMENT SHERMAN, Ph. G. 

deceased January 29, 1944 

Associate in Chemistry 

from 

January 1942 January 1944 

Erected by the Student Body 
In recognition of his unselfish devotion 
to their welfare 



was presented to Mr. Sherman's brother on September 20th, 1944 in an 
assembly at the college auditorium. The Student body made this possible by 
their generous donations. Also presented at this time was a set of books to be 
used for the Chemistry Classes. 



Fishman: 'I won't be highbrow beaten." 



Dr. William Osier, having been invited to inspect a famous London 
hospital, was proudly shown about by several physicians and surgeons. 
Finally the charts were reached, and he looked them over carefully, observ- 
ing the system of abbreviations: SF for scarlet fever, TB for tuberculosis, 
D for diphtheria and so on. All diseases seemed to be pretty well under 
control except one indicated by the symbol GOK. 

"I observe", said the famous doctor, "that you have a sweeping epidemic 
of GOK on your hands. This symbol is not in common use in American 
medical circles; just what is GOK?" 

"Oh!" one of his hosts lightly replied, "when we can't diagnose., God 
Only Knows." 

— Quoted by Walter Neale in "Life of Ambrose Biercc." 



The "Big Three" and a close fourth — Farber, Seltzer and Gland with Chase 
an "also ran". 



Did you ever see Jim Mellott snooze in class? Well, you missed something. 



Rothmeyer: What other symptoms may be present with Portal Cirrhosis? 

Walsh: You have Hemorrhoids, and 

Rothmeyer: Well, let that be a secret between you and me. 



Attention, Front Row Club 
"Pull yourself together, old top; it's past midnite and I hear your wife 
calling you." 

"Is she calling Archie or Archibald?" 
"Archibald." 
"Then I'm not going home." 



You're sure that you arc Right? How fine and strong! 
But were you ever just as Sure — and Wrong? 

A Poet's Proverb (Dutton) 



Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. 

— Marie Curie 



One man with courage makes a majority. 

— Andrew Jackson 



You cannot prevent the birds of sorrow from flying over your head, but 
you can prevent them from building nests in your hair. 

— Chinese Proverb 



? /^:® 



4 




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NY CLUB 



[ 50c ^Cife^J 



BACTfng\oG»CAL 




clue> 




^SL** 







/ 



m 







Back row L. to R — Lodowski, Reese. Schiowitz, Seltzer 
Front row — Aquila, Weinberg, Ropulewicz, Ulanski, Goldberg, LaCareva. 



SYNAPSIS STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Edward Ropulewicz 

Associate Editor Theodore Weinberg 

Business Manager Stanley Schiowitz 

Photographic Editor _ Salvatore Aquila 

Art Editor _. Ralph Farrington 

Literary Editor Charles Lodowski 

Literary Staff Business Staff 

Charles Lodowski Stanley Schiowitz 

Eleanor Reese Harold Goldberg 

Jerome Kohn Joseph LaCavera 

Albert Bonier Leopold Salkind 

Wilber Seltzer William A. Griffith 

Art Staff Photography 

Ralph Farrington Salvatore Aquila 

Richard Borman Seymour Ulanski 




Scherba 
Payson 



Bi'iner 
Oddo 



NEO SENIOR HONORARY SOCIETY 
Present Members 

SENIORS 
Donald Briner Nicholas Oddo James Payson, Jr. Paul Scherba 



NEWLY ELECTED MEMBERS 

Richard Bormnn Charles Lodowski Edward Ropulewicz 

Stanley Turner Walter Willis 



ATLAS CLUB 

I'OUNDED IN KIRKSVILLE 1898 IN PHILADELPHIA— 1924 



*%'t 




Pinder, Blakeslee, Barman 
Aquila, LaCavera, Heilig, Eshenaur, Mahon, Berry, Farrington 



OFFICERS 

Noble Skull _ Arthur Eshenaur 

Occipital Ralph Farrington 

Stylus-Receptaculum William Kulik 

MEMBERS 

Arthur Eshenaur Joseph LaCavera 

David Heilig Joseph Pelletiere 

William Mahon Donald Pinder 

Charles Norton Ralph Farrington 

Salvatore Aquila William Kulik 

William Beirn Gerard Shaw 

Bernard Berry Harold Finkcl 

Colson Blakeslee Martin Kreiger 

Richard Borman Witlaw Show 



IOTA TAU SIGMA FRATERNITY 



'AT 4642 SPRUCE ST., 
Chapter — Delta 



PHILA., PA. 
Date Founded — 1902 




Back row L. to R. — Lodowski, Rossman, Menza, Baba, Cedrone. Hughes, Amadio. Anzalone. Fornace, Noll. 

Origlio, Martin, Beberian. Middle row — McLaughlin, Porzio, Willis, Machenko, Traces', Gallo, Wysocki, 

Johnson, Cifala, Schall, Newill, Heliotos, Adams, Keller. Front row — Stokes. Sterrett, Swartz, Van Hook. 

Scherba, Christman, Payson, Congello, Finnerty, Silliman. 



OFFICERS 

President Charles H. Lodowski 

Vice-President William K. Tracey 

Treasurer Robert Baba 

Secretary John J. McLaughlin 



Seniors 

Dale Christman 
Anthony Congello 
John Finnerty 
Hal Newill 
James Payson 
Edwin Rossman 
John Schall 
Paul Scherba 
James Silliman 



MEMBERS 

William Sterrett 
Ralph Stokes 
Carlton Van Hook 
Albert Fornace 
Benjamin Swartz 
Juniors 

Charles Lodowski 
Ernest Talone 
Royal Johnson 
Ray Porzio 



Sophomores 

Robert Baba 
Harry Berberian 
James Hughes 
John McLaughlin 
Charles Noll 
Sam Origlio 
Adolph Wysocki 



LAMBDA OMICRON GAMMA 

Chapter — Caduceus Date Founded — 1924 

PHII.A., PA. 






^ 




« 



) err: 



l J 



iff" ^'fe^Ktlyfc 



v . V 



->_ 



Back row — L. to R. — Cantor. Alper, Fredman, Tepper, Berger, Berman, Miller, Kochman, Shankin, Austin 
Katz, Kurschner. Adelstem. Mangold, Lebow, Schiowitz. Third row — Tuchinskv. Ovadio, Marcus, Magrill 
Oberman, Mogul. Lipkin, Kaufman, Dietz, Reibstein, Feinchil, Ulanski, Pheterson. Josephson Lavet 
Jvremer. Second row — Parris, Salkind, Kohn, Rubin, Weinberg, Seltzer, Bonier, Singer, 
Front row — Levyn, Raskin, Solomon, Belkoff, Jaffre, Nemcrofsky. 



Leonard, Stein, 



SEMOKS 

E. Ivan Cherashore 
Melvin Elting 
Jacob Freedrffan 
Irving Lcmpert 

JUNIORS 

Albert Bonier 
Herbert Fletman 
Simon Josephson 
Edward Parris 

SOPHOMORES 

Meyer Belkoff 
Bernard Berman 
Otto Kurschner 
Norman Levet 



PRESENT OFFICFRS 

President Joseph Taubman 

Vice President Oscar Katz 

Treasurer Leopold Salkind 

Sub-Treasurer Herbert Tepper 

Corresponding Secretary Albert Bonier 

Recording Secretary William Miller 

sergeant-at-Arms Benjamin Stein 

Historian Sidney Kochman 

Chaplain Leonard Stoll 

MEMBERSHIP 

Raymond Dietz Jay Oberman Bernard Singer 

Seymour Kaufman Sidney Kochman Sidney Slotkin 

Robert Leonard Albert Reibstein Morris Stein 

Herbert Lipkin Irving Rubin 

Jerome Kohn Stanley Schiowitz Theodore Weinberg 

Irvin Lebow Wilbur Seltzer Seymour Ulanski 

Alex Pheterson Arthur Snyder Ha rold Yablin 

Leopold Salkind Joseph Taubman 

Max Marcus Lenny Stoll Oscar Katz 

William Miller Herbert Tepper Murray Solomon 

Martin Raskin Max Adelstem Alex, Siekierka 
Benjamin Stein 



PHI SIGMA GAMMA 

4616 LARCHWOOD AVE. 
FOUNDED 1915 



FRATERNITY 

PHILA, PA. 
ZETA CHAPTER 




Back row L. to R. — Demarco, Amalfitano, Hinkle. Hoover, Candas. Young. Schmidt. Sauter, Johnson. Bou- 
dette, Ewing. Middle row — Roedell. Bath, Poppe, Smith, Mellot. Walsh, Quinlivan, Turner, Ropulewicz, 
Front row — Artman, Miller, Kashata, Bail cy, Oddo, Briner, Eshelman, Kaelber, Harper. 



Grover Artman 
Lawrence Bailey 
Donald Briner 
Joseph Eshelman 

Wesley Boudette 
Rodney Chase 
Allen Hinkel 



Joseph Amalfitano 
Anthony Demarco 
Seraphemus Candas 
Kenneth Ewin? 



President - ... . Nicholas Oddo 

Vice-President Lawrence Bailey 

Treasurer Allen Hinkel 

Secretary _„__ Rodney Chase 

SENIORS 

Donald Harper Ellis Miller 

Charles Kaelber George Hoover 

Thomas Kashata Nicholas Oddo 



JUNIORS 
James Mellott 
William Quinlivan 
Edward Ropulewicz 

SOPHOMORES 

William Bath 
Martin Johnson 
John Sauter 



FROSH 



Stanley Turner 
Vincent I. Walsh 



Frank Schmidt 
Paul Young 
George Roedell 



Herman Poppe 



Frank Smith 




Rosenblatt Blacksmith 

Yocum Reese Brose Morris 

JUNIOR WOMAN'S OSTEOPATHIC ASSOCIATION 

President Lillian Brose 

Vice-President Eleanor Reese 

Secretary DeLene Yocum 

Treasurer Mary Jane Morris 

SENIORS 
Anna Blacksmith Shirley Rosenblatt 

JUNIORS 
Lillian Brose Eleanor Reese 

SOPHOMORES 
DeLene Yocum 

FROSH 
Mary Jane Morris Muriel Rusch Antoinette Spada 




Back Row L. to R. — Turner, Mellott, Quinlivan, Willis, Blakeslce, Borman, Farrington, Boudette, Berry. 
Middle row — Scherba, Johnson, Hoover, Heilig, Norton, Ropulewicz. Lodowski. Front row — Stokes, 
Payson, Swartz, Eshenaur, Briner, Mahon, Christman, Oddo. 



DIG-ON SOCIETY 



President 

Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Arthur Eshenaur 
.. Charles Norton 
._ William Mahon 



MEMBERS 



SENIORS 

Donald Briner 
Dale Christman 
Arthur Eshenaur 
David Heilig 
George Hoover 
William Mahon 
Charles Norton 
Nicholas Oddo 
James Payson, Jr. 
Paul Scherba 
Ralph Stokes 
Boyce Swartz 



JUNIORS 

Bernard Berry 
Colson Blakeslec 
Richard Borman 
Wesley Boudette 
Ralph Farrington 
Royal Johnson 
Charles Lodowski 
James Mellott 
William Quinlivan 
Edward Ropulewicz 
Stanley Turner 
Walter Willis 




The Mesdames Phetorson, Kelch, Artman, Shankin, Pinder, Candas, Lonsinger, Collier, 
The Mesdames Scherba, Ropulewicz. Dunn, Willis, Mahon, Sturchio, Norton. 



STUDENT WIVES' CLUB 



Mrs. Virginia Willis . 
Mrs. Anne Mahon ... 
Mrs. Esther Dunn ... 
Mrs. Helen Phetcrson 

Mrs. Dorothy Artman 

Mrs. V. Christman 

Mrs. Esther Dunn 

Mrs. Jane Eshleman 

Mrs. Margo Heilig 

Mrs. Mary Kaclber 

Mrs. Margaret Lonsinger 

Mrs. Anne Mahon 

Mrs. Edna Norton 

Mrs. Jean Scherba 

Mrs. Marian 



.. Presiden: 
.. Vice President 
Secretary 

.. Treasurer 
Mrs. Gloria Steiner 
Mrs. Beatrice Collier 
Mrs. Helen Pheterson 
Mrs. Alice Ropulewicz 
Mrs. Virginia Willis 
Mrs. Lee Sturchio 
Mrs. Gloria Candas 
Mrs. Lucia Pinder 
Mrs. Rose Shankin 
Mrs. Shirley Kelch 
Tracy 




Krylawicz, Gallo, Cifala, Hamburger, Johnson, Shaw, Ovadio, I'epperess, Cedroni, Briglia, Capista. 

Anzalone, Pelletiere, Sturchio, Cipola, Wysocki, Martin, Hughes, Roedell, 
Origlio, Boudette, LaCavera, Turner, Walsh, Aquila, Ortdo, Mahon. Finnerty, Ropulewicz, Fornace, 

McLaughlin. 



NEWMAN CLUB 

Nicholas V. Oddo .. — - President 

Vincent I. Walsh — .. -— Vice-President 

Salvatore Aquila Treasurer 

Stanley Turner Secretary 



MEMBERS 



Salvatore Aquila 
Wesley Boudette 
Sam Origlio 
Joseph LaCavera 
Stanley Turner 
Vincent Walsh 
Nicholas Oddo 
William Mahon 
John Finnerty 
Edward Ropulewicz 
Albert Fornace 
John McLaughlin 
John Capista 
Gerald Anzalone 



Joseph Pelletiere 
Salvatore Sturchio 
John Cifala 
Vincent Cipola 
Adolph Wysocki 
Charles Martin 
John Hughes 
George Roedell 
Eugene Hamburger 
Gerard Shaw 
Martin Johnson 
William Briglia 
E. Francis Krylowicz 
B. Robert Pepperess 




Back row L. to R. — Johnson, Talone, Seltzer, Freedman, Dietz, Rubin. Third row — Van Hook, Leonard, 

Kaelber, Rossman, Silliman, Borman, Kaufman, Ontell, Pheterson. Second row — Lodowski, LaCavera. 

Cherrey, Stokes, Eshelman. Miller, Christman, Coltuae, Lempert, Front row — Cherashore, Elan.iian, Ro- 

pulewicz. Parris, Reibstein, Stein, Slotkin, Salkind, Weinberg, Josephson, Oberman, Congello. 



Edward G. Drew Obstetrical- Gynecology Society 

President Morris Stein 

Secretary-Treasurer Sidney Kochman 



E. Ivan Cherashore 
Dale Christman 
Morris Cherrey 
Raymond Dietz 
Stanley Coltune 
Melvin Elting 
George Elanjian 
Jacob Freedman 



Albert Bonier 
Judah Gland 
Seymour Josephson 
Sidney Kochman 



SENIORS 

Joseph Eshleman 
Albert Reibstein 
Boyce Swartz 
Seymour Kaufman 
Charles Kaelber 
Nicholas Oddo 
Ellis Miller 



JUNIORS 

Jerome Kohn 
Charles Lodowski 
Irving Ontell 
Edward Ropulewicz 
Walter Willis 



Charles Norton 
Irving Rubin 
Jay Oberman 
Sidney Slotkin 
Morris Stein 
Ralph Stokes 
Carlton Van Hook 



Leopold Salkind 
Joseph Taubman 
Wilber Seltzer 
Theodore Weinberg 




F.reedman, Lempert, Dietz, Cherrey, Singer, Obeiman, 
Cherashore, Elanjian, Reibstein, Stein, Parris, Leonard, Slotkin, Congello. 



UROLOGICAL SOCIETY 

President '. Edward Parris 

Vice President Robert Leonard 

Secretary-Treasurer Morris Stein 

MEMBERS 

Morris Cherrey Robert Leonard 

E. Ivan Cherashore Harvey Mogul 

Anthony Congello I. Jay Oberman 

George Elanjian Edward Parris 

Albert Fornace Albert Reibstein 

Jacob Freedman Morris Stein 

Seymour Kaufman Bernard Singer 
Sidney Slotkin 




Freedman. Silliman, Kaufman. Lodowski, 
LaCavera, Ropulewicz, Talone, Singer, Ontell, Rubin, Reese, Stein, 
Pheterson, Reibstein, Parris, Dietz, Lempert, Leonard, Goldinger, Josephson, Ulanski 



NEUROLOGICAL SOCIETY 

Irving Lempert President 

Robert Leonard Vice President 

Irving Dunn Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 
SENIORS 
Raymon Dietz Albert Reibstein 

Jacob Freedman Irving Rubin 

Irving Lempert James Sillim.in 

Robert Leonard Bernard Singer 

Edward Parris Morris Stein 

Seymour Kaufman 

JUNIORS 

Maurice Goldinger Alexander Pheterson 

Seymour Josephson Eleanor J. Reese 

Joseph LaCavera Edward J. Ropulewicz 

Chailes Lodowski Ernest Talone 

Irving Ontell Seymour Ulanski 




Van Hook, Rossman, Harper, Miller, 
Kaelber, Finnerty. Eshelman, Kashata, Bailey. 



CARDIO-VASCULAR SOCIETY 

President Joseph Eshleman 

Vice President John Finnerty 

Secretary-Treasurer ... - Donald Harpei 



MEMBERS 



Lawrence Bailey 
Joseph Eshleman 
John Finnerty 
Donald Harper 
Charles Kaelber 



Thomas Kashata 
Ellis Miller 
Edwin Rossman 
Carlton Van Hook 




Payson, Kochman, Eshenaur, Eshelman, 
Finnerty, Miller, Reese, HeiHg. Stokes. Gland 



PEDIATRICS SOCIETY 

David Heilig President 

Ralph Stokes Vice President 

Eleanor Reese Secretary-Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Dale Christman 
Joseph Eshleman 
Arthur Eshenaur 
John M. finnerty 
Judah A. Gland 
David Heilig 



Sidney Kochman 
Ellis Miller 
James Payson, Jr. 
Eleanor J. Reese 
Edwin Rossman 
Ralph Stokes 




Turner, Mellott, Borman, Kulik, Kohn. 
Kashata, Soherba, Eshenaur, Rubin, Payson, Parris. 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Atlas 



Arthur Eshenaur 
Richard Borman 
William Kulik 



lota Tan Sigma 

Paul Scherba 
James Payson 
Charles Lodowski 



Phi Sigma Gamma 

Thomas Kashata 
Stanley Turner 
James Mellott 



Lambda Omicron Gamma 

Irving Rubin 
Edward Parris 
Jerome Kohn 




STUDENT COUNCIL 

Dr. Erb, Harry Elscon 
Angelo Amadio Clyde Saylor 



Martin Krieder 
Stanley Schiowitz 
James Payson Donald Briner 

William Kulik 
Joseph LaCavera 



Nicholas Eni 
Arthur Eshenaur Walter Willis Joseph Cantor 

Otto Kurschner Herman Peppe 

Morris Stein Irving Ontell 

Charles Norton Alex Marone 

Stanley Turner Richard Boiman 

Paul Young 

Arthur Eshenaur President 

Walter Willis .. ...... Secretary 

Dr. R. C. Erb ___ Adiisor 




Pip 

II 



in 



t.t-. ISM tea Bfj9 ii*. • I 





OUTSIDE THE HOSPITAL 




INSIDE THE HOSPITAL 




Internes 
Pathology Lab. 



HOSPITAL LOBBY 

Osteopathic Nurses 

and Doctors 

Children's Ward 



Chart Desk 
Scrubbing on 
Second Floor 



Farewell Tribute to Dr. Edward G. Drew, vet- 
eran surgeon, physician and educator, was held on 
June 21, 1943. After thirty-five years of service on 
the faculty of the college and the hospital staff, 
Dr. Drew has left to take over the direction of an 
Osteopathic hospital in Maine. 

As those at the banquet aptly put it, "He will 
be missed in the pit, at the bedside, and on the lec- 
ture platform and in the home." We fully believe 
that when the history of Osteopathy is written the 
permanent chronicles will show the name of E. G. 
Drew as a pioneer, educator, and physician of note 
in the City of Philadelphia. 



1. Lumbar Roll. 

2. Roll lumbars! 



1. Camera shy? 



1. Dr. Tinley 

2. Relax — Doctor. 




1. In search of the lesion. 

2. Bacteriologist & Segologists. 

3. Tomorrow's lecture. 



1. It won't hurt; did it? 

2. Upper dorsals. 



1. Within the body. 

2. Ewald's meal. 

3. Dr. Pcnnock. 




At it again! 
Baby talk. 
What's this? 



1. Dr. Purse, his Diapers. 

2. Where's Davis? 



1. Sponge, please! 

2. Plenty attention. 

3. Educated touch. 



NEW PRESIDENT 
GREETS STUDENTS 
George E. Letchworth, 
Jr., President of the Board 
of Trustees of the College 
and President of the Board 
of Directors of the Hos- 
pital, is caught by the 
camera as he addresses the 
student body shortly after 
his election to those 
offices. 




Thomas W. Anderson, 
Donald L. Hclffcrich 
George E. Letchwoi-th 
Dr. R. McParlane Tillcy 
Walter T. Andrews 



George E.. Letchworth, Jr., Esq. 
President of the Board of the Trustees 
Herbert P. Weierman 
Frank P. Will 

Dr. H. VanArdsdale Hillman 
Dr. Donald B Thorburn 
John G. Keck 



The Rev. Walter D. Kallenbach 

Dr. O. J. Snyder 

Dr. Francis A. Finnerty 

Dr. George W. Gerlach 

Dr. Carl Fischer 




L. G. Schacterle 
Director of Admissions 



J. St Geori 



Joyce 



Albert Taylor . 
Supt. of Hospital 



COLLEGE OFFICE 




MISS MARTHA SCOTT, Secretary 

DR. R. C. ERB. Associate Dean 



K. C. PROUD, Registrar 



IN THE COLLEGE 



ADMISSIONS OFFICE 



SECRETARIES TO THE DEAN 




Miss Ruth Giger, Campaign Secretary 

Mr. Schacterle, Director of Admissions 

Mrs. Virginia Willis, Secretary 



Miss Marearet Browers 



Miss Marv Clark 



YOU^* 



WEtf- 



BY SEE1^ G 




SMILING faces 



THE clinic 




MR S. HOLT2MAN 



D^- 



t^-tt 



' MR S.McCALL 




WORKING IN THE RESEARCH LABORATORY 
Dr. Redding Dr. Kruener 




Mrs. Holden 



Mrs. Eshleman 



Mrs. Holtzman 



CHECKING THE CLINIC LIST 




'INTERS FOR THE PRACTICAL? 





TOO MANY HANDS IN THE- 



K.NOWLEDGE OF THE BODY 




FROSH 
REMEMBER THESE BONES 
and DR. CATHIE 



NO ONE IN SIGHT? 









I 

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THE SOPHOMORE CLASS PRESENTS 

Funzahoppin' 

Master of Ceremonies.. Charles Lodowski 

Trumpet Solo Seymour Cohen 

GLEE CLUB 

Edward Ropulewicz Morris Fishman 

Raymond Rossa William Griffith 

William Tracy Jerome Kohn 

Seymour Ulanski Irvin Lebow 

Walter Willis Charles Lodowski 

Pianist Ralph Farrington 

Guitar Player ._ ,_~_Irvin Lebow 

Violinist Charles Lodowski 

PLAY 

A DAY AT P.C.O. 

or 

WHY DTD I EVER COME HERE 

Time Any old day (Sundays excluded) 

Act I — Dean Herb's Office 
Act II — Operating Room 
Act III — Dean Herb's Office 

CAST (In order of appearance) 

Secretary Simon Josephson 

Elsie (DAV. 0-1-2-3-oh!) Melvin Katzman 

Dean Herb . Maurice Goldinger 

Student Stanley Schiowitz 

Mr. Scatterly - .. Morris Fishman 

Dr. Pyles Robert Delaplaine 

Mr. Boyce William Griffith 

Dr. Pruner Jerome Kohn 

Throckpretzel (The Wasserman Kid) .. , . Judah Gland 

Messenger William Griffith 

Dr. Kildare Ferret (Surgeon) Stanley Schiowitz 

Dr. Gillespi Yung (Asst. Surgeon) . - Jerome Kohn 

Patient Seymour Ulanski 

Any relationship between these characters and any per- 
sons either living or dying is purely intentional. 
Produced and Directed by 
Seymour Cohen (Original Idea) 
Charles Lodowski 
Stanley Schiowitz 



Funzahoppin 



The comedy was over in a few short hours; not so the production. 
It is hard work and sometimes discouraging, but a great deal of fun too 
for both cast and audience. 

Funzahoppin' was not an "original idea" although claimed to be such. 
Charles Lodowski, class chairman, did the ground work and it is his knowl- 
edge of what the public likes that made our comedy a "hit". His request 
that each succeeding sophomore class present a similar type of entertain- 
ment has brought forth nothing to date. 

We all wish to let "dead dogs lie" but who can forget the way: 

Mel Katzman danced into Dean Herb's office? 

Dean Herb looked — man to man? 

The Glee Club sang — or didn't it? 

Jerry Kohn used the "butcher's knife"? 

Stan Schiowitz gave anesthesia? 

Bob Delaplaine cracked his jokes? 

"Throckpretzel" Gland imitated the patient? 

The surgery behind the sheet? 

The way "Oiv" Lebow played the gee-tar? 

"Maggie's Drawers" were shown along with the verse? 

And to top it off, all proceeds were given to the Osteopathic drive. 
To all who had any part in this affair, and especially to Charles Lodowski 
and Stan Schiowitz; a good job well done. 



WHERE? 



TREATMENT GRATIS. 




AT BUDD'S, WE- 



WHERE'S THE STUDENT INTERNE? 




OUR TRACK TEAM 
Cy "Original Idea" Cohen 



BLACK-MAIL! 





A SUMMER SESSION- 
Hold It, Joe! 




ACCIDENT? 
Which One? 



SHAKE, BONE-EER 





Results of dissection 
JUST BONES 



JUNIOR 

PROM 

December 3, 1943 

HOTEL STEPHEN GIRARD 






COMMITTEE 


Walter Willis 


Stanley Schiowitz 


Leopold Salkind 


Ralph Farrington 


William J. Beirn 


Charles B. Flack 


Ernest Talone 


Joseph La Cavera 



The Junior Prom 



One of the major events of the year is a dance held by the juniors in 
honor of the senior class. This year the affair took place in the Crystal Ball- 
room of the Stephan Girard Hotel on December 3, 1943. 

The transportation situation being what it is, dress was according to 
the individual's taste. Many donned their formal evening clothes while 
others appeared in street dress. 

It is at this dance that the new members of the Neo-Senior Honorary 
Society are announced. The chosen juniors included Richard Borman, 
Charles Lodowski, Edward Ropulewicz, Stanley Turner and Walter Willis. 
Dr. Munro Purse acted as announcer. 

The students eagerly await this year's Prom; see you there! 



Do You Know That. 



DO YOU KNOW THAT— "Salvatore" Aquila, our 
South Philadelphia rugcutter, has an idea of how 
to raise little "oranges" out of a "peach" in 
California. 

DO YOU KNOW THAT— Beirn's Tavern will not 
be open after October 14; new location will depend 
on interneship. 

DO YOU KNOW THAT— "Boston Barney" will 
auction Troc seat No. 606 following graduation 
to highest bidder. 

Kid Coke, lifesaver at G. C. swimming 
pool, was not seen leaving a Mellville Avenue 
apartment on "D Day." 

"Chester" Bonier, suffering from writers 
cramp, will give his right hand a rest following 
three years of overwork. 

"Brow" Borman, telephone operator, buss- 
boy, swimming instructor, pediatrician, lab-boy, 
admissions clerk, etc., etc., etc., etc., . . . Oh hum! 

"Chunky-nut" Boudette, will go to Bangor, 
in Maine . . . where he will marry. 

"Lanky" Lil is the best looking girl in our 
class. 

M. Hirsutism Fishman will interne under 
John Warner (hair specialist). 

"Pinky" Hinkel did not suffer recurrence 
of Infectious Mononucleosis; he married. 

"Delicatessen" George resigned from the 
Front Row Club, in protest of Fishman's action. 



Briefs 



"Blacky" Salkind denies Ethiopian ancestory. 

''Kcpsul" Pheterson accuses Kurschner of un-Am- 
erican accent. 

"Little Wilbur" denies positive Freedman. 

"Pearly" plans to understudy Rabbi Bubash. 

"Mohel" Quinlivan is interested in Jim Mellott's 
future. 

Kochman claims Sulfadenial best drug for disease. 

Dr. La Barge announces Hanson House offers new 
cure for radio-ulnar lesions. The Bishop plans in- 
vestigation. 

Snyder disclaims birth injury. The Bishop offers no 
explanation. 

Jumbo l'elephant died. Farber holds out on P. T. 
Barnum; says Jeannie needs him. 

"Smiling Jack" Morris refutes "neo" as cure for 

Shenker. 
"Oiving Oneil" will make pilgrimage to Eire before 

internship. Bishop questions sincerity! 
Johnson bought Brooklyn Bridge. Bishop reprimands 

Goldinger on price. 

Taubman sold periosteal elevator to a local hospital. 
Superintendent says stairways still crowded. 

"Chuck" Flack was caught red-handed tearing the 
master clock off the College wall. 

Anti-luetic Willis furious. Readers Digest announ- 
ces one day cure for Syphilis. 

"Paul De Kruif" Yablin announces discovery of 
"Yablin" murmur. 

"Will-you-repeat-that" Josephson recently had 
20 Gms of impacted cerumin removed at request 
of faculty. 



We've Heard it Before!!!! 

1. For 10 hours you've been telling him your most intimate and heart- 
rending problems so he says, "Don't worry about it." 

2. "Do you think Sex is here to stay?" 

3. "Of course I trapped him. How else?" 

4. "Yeah, I'm from Brooklyn." 

5. "What's da matter wit Brooklyn??" 

6. "1 still think Chester is better than South Philly!" 

7. "Suck it up, boys, it's important." 

8. "The other day — we had a patient come into the office " 

9. "Does she — Cook I mean." 

10. "It of necessity follows . . . Judas Priest, man!!" 

11. "Following inflammation, Dr. DaCosta says:" 

12. "I'll bet I've got more hair than you have." 

13. "It's my Idea! It's my Idea!" 

14. "Of course I like girls; but I think fellows are nicer." 

15. "My kingdom for a man!" 

16. "Fat, Hell. I'm just chubby." 

17. "Doctor, I have a few questions to ask." 

18. "There goes my shirt. I shoulda stood in bed!" 

19. "You mean zee kepsool?" 

20. "Lay that pistol down, Babe!" 

21. "Boys, I don't know a darn thing." 

22. "Did you read where they are using the wonderful sulfa drugs 

for * * *" 

23. "This is the most important subject of your career." 

24. "But how can you tell?" 

2 5. "You're not allowed to talk to Student internes." 

26. "They're coming every three minutes and lasting two minutes." 

27. "Now just a minute, Doctor, I'm getting to that point." 

28. "Yes, that's my brother." 

29. "It is Homeostatis that " 



Patrons 



Dr. 


Antonio Abeyta 


Dr. 


Phillip Lessig 


Dr. 


Clarence Baldwin 


Dr. 


Walter P. Lutz 


Dr. 


William Baldwin, Jr. 


Dr. 


Julian Mines 


Dr. 


Boyd B. Button 


Dr. 


D. S. B. Pennock 


Dr. 


Harold Bruner 


Dr. 


Munro Purse 


Dr. 


William Barnhurst 


Dr. 


Earl F. Riceman 


Dr. 


Edwin H. Cressman 


Dr. 


George S. Rothmcyer 


Dr. 


Guy Deming 


Dr. 


Raymond Ruberg 


Dr. 


Elliott Disbrow 


Mr. 


Kenneth Senior 


Dr. 


James M. Eaton 


Dr. 


C. Haddon Soden 


Dr. 


John Eimerbrink 


Dr. 


F. J. Smith 


Dr. 


H. Walter Evans 


Dr. 


Wm. Spaeth 


Dr. 


Ralph Fischer 


Dr. 


H. Willard Sterrett, Sr. 


Dr. 


Victor R. Fischer 


Dr. 


Harry Stein 


Dr. 


Arthur M. Flack, Jr. 


Dr. 


Wm. Tannenbaum 


Dr. 


James Frazer 


Mr. 


Albert J. Taylor 


Dr. 


Dewaine Gedney 


Dr. 


Enerque Vergara 


Dr. 


Harry Gosper 


Dr. 


William C. Weisbecker 


Dr. 


Francis E. Gruber 


Dr. 


Robert Whinney 


Dr. 


Harry Hessdorfer 


Dr. 


Galen Young 


Dr. 


Raymond Jrni 


Mr. 


George E. Letchworth, Jr 


Dr. 


Harry Kerr 


Dr. 


Edward G. Drew 


Dr. 


Harry Kochman 


Dr. 


Joseph Py 


Dr. 


Herman Kohn 


Dr. 


Jacob Rapp 


Dr. 


Harman Y. Kiser 


Mr. 


Louis G. Schacterle 


Dr. 


J. Ernest Leuzinger 


Mis: 


; Edith Miller, R.N. 




Miss 


Elsie Warbetz 





Sophomore Class 



Name Home Address 

Amalfitano, Joseph ...1900 W. Third Street, Wilmington, Delaware 

Baba, Robert 17 Ridge Road, Rutherford, New Jersey 

Bath, Wilmer 515 Ford Street, West Conshohocken, Penna. 

Becker, Leonard 614 Broadway, Long Branch, New Jersey 

Berman, Bernard 2124 69th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

Blitz, Julian 34-16 30th Avenue, Long Island City, N. Y. 

Candas, Saraphemas 703 Viand Street, Point Pleasant, West Virginia 

Cedrone, Daniel C. 522 N. 65th Street, Philadelphia 

Cifala, John 1924 First Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Herman 881 Main Street, Darby, Pennsylvania 

Danner, Russell 114 White Horse Pike, Audubon, New Jersey 

DeMarco, Anthony 512 Atlantic Avenue, Egg Harbor, N. J. 

Ewing, Kenneth 6303 N. 11th Street, Philadelphia 

Gallo, Michael -362 Moore Street, Norristown, Penna. 

Goldstein, Martin 503 8 Pine Street, Philadelphia 

Heyman, Albert 4518 Locust Street, Philadelphia 

Hughes, James 3456 Almond Street, Philadelphia 

Hyman, Gilmore 479 Empire Blvd., Brooklyn, New York 

Katz, Oscar 4700 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 

Kurschner, Otto 6719 N. 17th Street, Philadelphia 

Lavet, Norman 5 331 W. Berks Street, Philadelphia 

Marcus, Max 974 Lenox Road, Brooklyn, New York 

McLaughlin, John 1828 Champlost Avenue, Philadelphia 

Melnick, Arnold 513 5 Whitaker Avenue, Philadelphia 

Miller, William _ ...311 East 72nd Street, New York City 

Noll, Charles .. ......226 W. Linton Street, Philadelphia 

Origlio, Samuel 1331 S. 49th Street, Philadelphia 

Pinder, Donald Rochester, New York 

Pizzitola, Eugene 671 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

Raskin, Margin .. 240 E. 178th Street, New York City 

Richmond, Benjamin 42 E. Main Street, Freehold, New Jersey 

Rossa, Raymond 9 52 Pine Street, Trenton, New Jersey 

Sauter, John 317 Riverbend Street, Athol, Mass. 

Schmidt, Frank 224 Summit Road, Springfield, Del. Co., Pa. 

Schneider, Ernest . 710 Linden Blvd., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shankin, Joseph .. 1043 Stratford Avenue, Bronx, New York 

Shaw, Gerard 2247 Tiebout Avenue, Bronx, New York 

Solomon, Murray .. 1901 84th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

Stein, Benjamin 98-31 65th Road, Forest Hill, New York 

Stoll, Leonard 1192 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

Strauss, Carl 99 Stockholm Street, Brooklyn, New York 

Strick, Harold ...773 East 46th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

Tepper, Herbert 4901 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Terry, Morton 477 E. 52nd Street, Brooklyn, New York 

Tracy, William 5021 244th Street, Douglaston, L. I., New York 

Wysocki, Adolph 206 Page Avenue, Lyndhurst, New Jersey 



Freshman Class 



Name Home Address 

Adams, William 4650 Hazel Avenue, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Alloy, Paul 2548 W. Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Alper, Bernard M 4516 Old York Road, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Amadio, Angelo 120 Marlborough Road, Upper Darby, Penna. 

Austin, Robert 5509 Avenue "N" — Brooklyn, New York 

Back, Joseph M 953 N. Mascher Street, Philadelphia 

Baldwin, Wilbur 36 S. 42nd Street, Philadelphia 

Barsky, Howard 2508 S. 7th Street, Philadelphia 

Bell, Martin J 2195 E. 22nd Street, New York, N. Y. 

Berberian, Harry 120 E. High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Berger, Arnold 5200 Lebanon Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bienstoek. Joshua 1691 Fulton Avenue, New York. N. Y. 

Bontempo, Dominic R.D. No. 1, Bridgeport, Pennsylvania 

Briglia, William 1418 S. 8th Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Cantor, Joseph 4128 Leidy Avenue, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Capisto, John 1915 S. Hicks Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cipolla, Vincent '429 Morris Street, Philadelphia 

Connor, Joseph i869 Jasper Street, Philadelphia 

DeCaro, Matthew 1643 Latona Street, Philadelphia 

DePalma, Peter 116 Roosevelt Street, Roselle Park, N. J. 

Disinger, W. Roland 4605 Cedar Avenue, Philadelphia 

Doe, Stanley 2504 N. 5th Street, Harrisburg, Penna. 

Elston, Harry 4650 Hazel Avenue, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Eni, Nicholas 1525 S. 10th Street, Philadelphia 

Epstein, Chester 4916 Walnut Street, Philadelphia 

Falcone, Ita'.o 247 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Farancz, Milton 415 S. 4 3rd Street, Philadelphia 

Fcldmann, Leonard 1908 Roosevelt Blvd., Philadelphia 

Finkel, Harold 1952 N. 9th Street, Philadelphia 

Finkelstein. Daniel 1425 Townsend Street, New York, N. Y. 

Freeman, Leo '.IS W. Girard Avenue, Philadelphia 

Friedman, Daniel 6049 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 

Gams, Helen K 4423 Spruce Street, Philadelphia 

Gordon, Bernard 2 9 Chester Pike, Collingdale, Penna. 

Heleotis, Constantine 4642 Spruce Street. Philadelphia 

Jaffe, Edward 506 Bainbridge Street, Philadelphia 

Kamen, Max L 4 509 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 

Kamen. Robert E 4509 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 

Kirsh, Harold 758 Haddon Avenue, Collingswood, N. J. 

Knaizer, Morris J 435 N. 33rd Street, Philadelphia 

Konell, Charles 2230 S. 7th Street, Philadelphia 



Freshman Class (Continued) 

Kremer, Eli 4610 Penhurst Street, Philadelphia 

Kriegcr, Martin 4 650 Hazel Avenue, Philadelphia 

Kroshinsky, Milton 5151 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 

Krylowiez, Francis 500 S. Water Street, Philadelphia 

Kulik, William Route No. 60, Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Lavery, John 1335 W. Girard Avenue, Philadelphia 

Leibson, Louis 234 W. 49th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Levyn, Murray 1600 Mayland Street, Philadelphia 

Lucks, Abe H 343 Vernon Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

Magrill, Robert 4 817 Walnut Street, Philadelphia 

Mangold, George 131 S. 50th Street, Philadelphia 

Maron, Alex 603 Second Avenue, Asbury Park, N. J. 

Menza, David ' 4 64 2 Spruce Street, Philadelphia 

Mischenko, Nicholas 1416 N. Franklin Street. Philadelphia 

Morris, Matilda Jane 329 S. 46th Street, Philadelphia 

Neifeld, Martin 2034 Chelten Avenue, Philadelphia 

Nemerofsky. Henry 4928 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 

Newill, Domer 917 S. 48th Street, Philadelphia 

Ovadia, Joseph 131 S. 50th Street, Philadelphia 

Packer, Morton 4811 Gransback Street, Philadelphia 

Pisciotto, Salvatore 568 Crescent Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Polan, Harold 5912 Spruce Street, Philadelphia 

Poppe. Herman 7639 Rugby Street, Philadelphia 

Roedell, George Academy & Willetts Roads, Philadelphia 

Rusch, Muriel , 4618 Spruce Street, Philadelphia 

Savior, Clyde Coatesville, Pennsylvania 

Schreiber, Benjamin 891 Fox Street, New York, N. Y. 

Segal, Seymour 101 Division Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shapiro, Robert Croydon Apts., 49th & Locust Sts., Phila. 

Shlanta, Myra 225 S. 46th Street, Philadelphia 

Show, Whitlaw 4727 Hazel Avenue, Philadelphia 

Simon, Marvin 174 Columbia Avenue, Passaic, N. J. 

Smith, George 338 Highland Avenue. Johnstown, Penna. 

Spada, Antoinette Route No. 10, Whippany, New Jersey 

Stanley, Frank 2114 Franklin Avenue, Morton, Penna. 

Strong, Neale 4582 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tuchinsky. Boris 5457 Pine Street, Philadelphia 

Weingrad. Leon 125 N. 10th Street, Philadelphia 

Weyman, Arnold 4710 Locust Street, Philadelphia 

Yocum, DeLene 4618 Spruce Street, Philadelphia 

Young, Paul R.D. No. 1, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Zellis, Joseph 241 South 55th Street, Philadelphia 



Answers to 'We've Heard it Before!' 

1. Dr. Erb 

2. Mel Katzman 

3. Lil Brose 

4. Maurice Goldinger 

5. Morris Fishman 

6. Al Bonier 

7. Sal Aquila 

8. Dr. Galen Yoting 

9. Art Snyder 

10. Dr. Dressier 

11. Dr. Kiser 

12. Stan Turner to Joe LaCavera and vice versa 

13. Cy Cohen 

14. Barney Berry 

15. Eleanor Reese 

16. Wilber Seltzer 

17. Vin Walsh 

18. Joe Robie 

19. Alex Pheterson 

20. Anyone on second 

21. All "A" Students 

22. Sid Kochman 

23. Any teaching Doctor 

24. Miss Smith 
2 5. Miss Peeler 

26. Student interne on second floor 

27. Dr. Kohn 
29. Dr. Deming 



LAMBDA OMICRON GAMMA 



FRATERNITY 



FRATERNITY 



« 

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IOTA TAU SIGMA 



PHI SIGMA GAMMA 



FRATERNITY 



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PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE 
OF OSTEOPATHY 

Fiftieth Anniversary 



1892 1942 

Selective Admission of Students 

P. C. O. is mobilized for the duration. All our men, 
our women, our resources are out to help win abso- 
lute victory. This is our pledge to Osteopathy and to 
America. 



Applications for admission are now being received. 



Market 3400 

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MANUFACTURERS OF 
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Own Make 

A Full Line of Quality Confections 

257 South 45th Street 



HANSOM HOUSE 



4824 Spruce Street 



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3317 Walnut Street 



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EVErgreen 4700 



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Wholesale and Retail 

Floivers for All Occasions 

N. W. Cor. 52nd & Spruce Streets 

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COMPLIMENTS OF 

"OLD ORIGINAL 
BOOKBINDERS, Inc." 

125 Walnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Our Only Address 



ELLICK'S 
FISH & SEA FOOD 

Cooked Sea Food Our Specialty 

Sea Food Platters Served in our New 

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4806 Spruce Street 

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WOODINGTON 

Mail Advertising Service 

Broad Street Station Bldg. 

16th & Pennsylvania Blvd. 

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West Spruce Pharmacy 

Supplies for Osteopathic Physicians 

Spruce Street at Forty-Eighth 

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Telephone GRAnite 7100 

Delivery Service 




SUDORESIS may not be avoidable 
but unpleasant sweat odor is 



MUM, the snow-white cream de- 
odorant, effectively insures against 
malodorous perspiration by neu- 
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long hours. A great number of 
osteopathic physicians now habitu- 
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to their patients before treatment. 
MUM does not irritate ... it is 
easily and quickly applied . . . harm- 
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atmosphere, keep mum in every 
dressing room . . . and use it your- 
self regularly. Send for literature. 




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does not interfere with normal sweat gland activity 



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PHOTOGRAPHY 



In This Publication by 



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1010 Chestnut Street 



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—4 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Powers & Reynolds 



45th and Spruce Streets 



PHILADELPHIA, PA- 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

PENNSYLVANIA 
LAUNDRY CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



• 1 
I 



Bell, RITtenhouse 5989 



G. Emil Gefvert 



Manufacturers of 



Surgical and Orthopedic Appliances 



Trusses, Crutches, Elastic Hosiery, 
Supporters, etc. 



WALTER B. McCARTY 

241 No. 17th Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Griffith Nursing 
Home, Inc. 

West Philadelphia 
3729 CHESTNUT STREET 

Telephone, B'ARing 331 5 

Germantown 
4712 PULASKI AVENUE 

Telephone, Michigan 4347 

Specialize in Care of 
INVALIDS AND AGED PERSONS 



LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING 
PILLOW SANITIZING 

PENNSYLVANIA 
LAUNDRY CO. 

319 North 32nd Street 



I I 



De Luxe Diner 

4808 Chestnut Street 
GOOD FOOD IS GOOD HEALTH 



Air Conditioned 
For Your Comfort 

Full Course Dinners — 55c 
DINNERS— 55c 

Harold Johnson, Prop. 




viled on m 



S^r^-f^-- I If[ec(ia. fdlisJiinj Lcr. 



MEDIA 
PENNSYLVANIA 




&. 



'very book that wins its way to a 
place of safekeeping must possess either much wanted subject 
matter or great physical charm . . there is no reason why a 
book should not possess both . . it's all a matter of planning. 
Of course one must know about such things as pleasing layouts 
. . suitable paper and other materials, and particularly about 
securing the most effective engravings . . our help in such mat- 
ters . . and our experience . . insures added charm for any book. 



PHILADELPHIA WEEKS ENGRAVING 



COMPANY 



29 NORTH SIXTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.