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Full text of "Synthetic organic chemicals : United States production and sales"

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Given By 
U. S, SUPT. OF DOCUMEK'l, 



t 



fU...!^ ""A-^^^^n^^A^iy 



UPgJED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 
WASHINGTON 



Tariff Information Series— No. 22 



CENSUS OF DYES AND 
COAL-TAR CHEMICALS 

1919 




P a B L I C ;' 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1921 




BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06317 175 3 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 
WASHINGTON 



Tariff Information Series — No. 22 



CENSUS OF DYES AND 
COAL-TAR CHEMICALS 

1919 




WASHINGTON 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1921 



M. i. wu. ^ ^nDent of documents 

UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION. 

Office: 1322 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C. 
COMMISSIONERS. 

Thomas Walker Pagk, Chairman. 
David j. Lewis. 
William S. Culbertson. 
Edward P. Costigan. 



John F. Bethune, Secretary. 



ADDITIONAL COPIES 

OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PKOCURED FROM 

THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASUINGTON, D. C. 

AT 

20 CENTS PER COPY 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



United States Tariff Commission, 

Washington, Deceniber (?, 1920. 
To THE President : 

The Tariff Commission transmits herewith a report showing the 
results of the census of production of dyes and related coal-tar 
chemicals for the year 1919. This census is taken in conformity with 
your letter of October 27, 1917, requesting the Tariff Commission to 
secure the information on the relation between the domestic pro- 
duction and the imports of dyes and other coal-tar chemicals, re- 
quired by section 501 of the act of September 8, 1916. 
Very respectfully, 

Thomas Walker Page, Clmlrinan. 
David J. Le-svis. 
William S. Culbertson. 
Edward P. Costigan. 
The President, 

The White House, Washington. 



U. s. su?£a;wr:ND£NT of documents 

UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION. 

Office: 1322 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C. 
COMMISSIOJSTERS . 

Thomas Walker Page, Chairman. 
David J. Lewis. 
William S. Culbertson. 
Edward P. Costigan. 



John F. Bethune, Secretary. 



ADDITIONAL COPIES 

OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PEOCUKED FROM 

THE SUPEEmTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

GOVERNMENT FEINTING OFFICE 

■WASHINGTON, D. C. 

AT 

20 CENTS PER COPY 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



United States Tariff Commissiox, 

Washington, December 6, 1920. 
To THE President : 

The Tariff Commission transmits herewith a report showing the 
results of the census of production of dyes and related coal-tar 
chemicals for the year 1919. This census is taken in conformity with 
your letter of October 27, 1917, requesting the Tariff Commission to 
secure the information on the relation between the domestic pro- 
duction and the imports of dj^es and other coal-tar chemicals, re- 
quired by section 501 of the act of September 8, 1916. 
Very respectfully, 

Tho]Mx\.s Walker Page, C limrinan. 
David J. Lewis. 
William S. Culbertson. 
Edward P. Costigan. 
The PRESiDEisnD, 

The White House, W ashington. 

3 



INTRODUCTION. 



This report is a survey of the domestic dye and coal-tar chemical 
industry in 1919, and presents the results of a special investigation 
made by the United States Tariff Commission. The report is di- 
vided into four parts, as follows : 

Part I, a simmiary of the deveXopmentH in the coal-tar chemical in- 
dustry^ 1919^ describes the progress made in the various branches of 
the American industry. The relation of export trade to the in- 
dustry is briefly shown. 

Part II, a census of dyes and coal-tar cheimccds^ 1019^ gives a de- 
tailed discussion of the significant facts in the production of crude, 
intermediate, and finished coal-tar products during 1919. Dyes are 
classified by their methods of api^lication, and imports in 1914 are 
compared with production in 191Y, 1918, and 1919. The number of 
employees, rates of pay, and cost of research in the coal-tar chemical 
industry are shown. 

Part III, a cefisus of dyes imported into the United States from 
July /, 1919^ to June 30.^ 1920, shows the quantity and value of im- 
ports of individual dyes. 

Part IV, an appendix^ gives the imports and exports of coal-tar 
dyes and chemicals and of natural dyes since 1917. A list of manu- 
facturers whose production during 1919 was reported to the Tariff 
Commission is also shown. 



In the preparation of this report the Tariff Commission has had 
the services of A. R. Willis, Warren N. Watson, C. R. De Long, 
and Grinnell Jones, of the chemical division, and others of the com- 
mission's staff. 
4 



CONTENTS. 



Pago. 
Letter of transmittal 3 

Introduction 5 

Part I. 

Summary of the developments in the coal-tar chemical industry, 1919: 

Introductory 9 

Important developments in the domestic industry — 

Crudes , 10 

Intermediates 11 

Dyes ^ 12 

Export trade in dyes 13 

Part II. 

Census of dyes and coal-tar chemicals, 1919: 
Ci'udes — 

Introductory 15 

Sliortage of naphthalene 17 

The anthracene situation 17 

Intermediates — 

Introductory 18 

Intermediates used for military purposes 19 

Intermediates consumed in large quantity 20 

Toluene derivatives 20 

Intei'mediates derived from anthracene 20 

Intermediates used in dyeing and printing 29 

Dyes and otlier finished prodxicts — 

Introductory 32 

Dyes 43 

Other finished coal-tar products 50 

(Color lakes, photographic »chemicals, medicinals, flavors, 
perfume materials, synthetic resins, synthetic tanning 
materials. ) 

Employees and rates of pay 52 

Research w^ork 54 

Notes on the dye industry of other countries 55 

Part III. 

Census of dyes imported into the United States from July 1, 1919, to 

June 30, 1920 59 

Part IV. 

Appendix : 

Statistics of imports and exports — 1917-June 30, 1920 84 

Directoi'y of manufacturers of coal-tar products, 1919 94 

5 



Part L— SUMMARY OF THE DEVELOPMENTS IN THE COAL-TAR CHEMICAL 

INDUSTRY DURING 1919. 



INTRODTJCTOKT. 



The Tariff Commission, in several earlier reports/ has described 
the importance of a well-developed dye industry to the industrial 
system of the country. These reports have also shown in detail the 
progress of tlie American industry during 1917 and 1918. The com- 
mission has also presented information relating to the cost of produc- 
tion of certain important intermediates and dyes. The commission - 
has analyzed the existing tariff law on djes and related chemicals of 
coal-tar origin and on the raw materials from which these products are 
obtained and has made suggestions for such a redrafting of this law 
as would give effect to the intent of Congress in passing the act of 
September 8, 1916. The present report is, therefore, confined to a 
discussion of the progress which has been made in the American in- 
dustry during the calendar year 1919. This report also presents the 
available information on the condition of the dye industries of Ger- 
many, England, Switzerland, France, and Japan. 

The account of the progress of the industry, as given in the follow- 
ing pages, is based upon detail reports from 214 manufacturers, and, 
it is believed, that the canvas includes every manufacturer of dyes 
and other coal-tar chemicals in the United States. The investiga- 
tion was carried out in conformity with a request of the President 
to secure information necessar}^ to administer section 501 of the act 
of September 8, 1916. The production reports of individual manu- 
facturers were collected by the Bureau of Census and transmitted 
to the Tariff Commission for tabulation and interpretation. 

In the tariff act of September 8, 1916, the coal-tar chemicals are 
divided into three groups, which conform in general (although not 
in every detail) with commercial practice. Group I, the crudes, 
exempt from duty, which are contained in and separated from crude 
coal tar; Group II, intermediates, dutiable at 15 per cent and 9rk 

1 Census of Dyes and Coal-Tar Chemicals, 1917 ; Report on Dyes and Related Coal-Tar 
Chemicals, 1918 ; Census of Dyes and Conl-T.ir Chemicals, 1018 ; and Costs of Produrtion 
in the Dye Industry, 1918 and 1919. 

«DTe3 and Other Coal-Tar Chemicals, Dec. 12, 1918. 

7 



8 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



cents per pound, which are produced from the crudes by chemical 
j^rocesses, and which, with some exceptions, are used only for the 
manufacture of dyes or other finished products by further chemical 
treatment ; Group III, dyes and other finished products, now duti- 
able in part at 30 per cent and in part at 30 per cent and 5 cents 
per pound. This grouping is adhered to in the following discussion 
of the industry. 



IMPORTANT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE DOMESTIC INDUSTRY. 

The development in the production of coal-tar chemicals in this 
country during 1919 is shown by comparing the production of that 
year with the production during 1918. 

Table 1. — Suiumari/ of the prodtiction of coal-tar client icals, J'JIS and 1919. 





1918 1 1919 




Num- 
ber of 
manu- 
fac- 
turers. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber of 
manu- 
fac- 
turers. 


Quantity. 


Value. 




35 

128 


Pounds. 


$22,474,075 
124,382,892 
83,815,746 


24 
116 


Pounds. 


$17,657,750 
63,210,079 


Group II. — Intermediates 


357, 662, 251 
76,802,959 


177.362.426 




155 82,532,390 


84,585,544 








Dyes: 

Dutiable at 30 per cent plus 




63,825,677 
4,638,769 


.58,255,391 
3, 770, 991 


52,310,482 

11.091.712 


59,950,522 


Dutiable at 30 per cent. 




7,648,333 










Total of dyes 


78 


58, 464, 446 


62,026,390 


90 1 63,402,194 


67,598,855 






Color lakes, dutiable at 30 per 
cent plus 5 cents per pound. . 

Photographic chemicals, dutia- 
ble at 30 per cent plus 5 cents 
per pound 


29 

6 
31 


9, 590, 537 

316,749 

3,623,352 

458,256 

1 4,233,356 
116,263 


5,020,023 

823,915 

7,792,984 
4,925,627 

2,642,120 

584,695 


34 

10 

31 
9 

{ i 

6 


7,569,921 

335, 509 

6,777,988 
610,825 

1 3,794,534 

41,419 


4,179,964 
1,059,340 


Medicinals, dutiable at 30 per 
cent 


7,883,071 


Flavors, dutiable at 30 per cent. 

Synthetic phenolic resins, du- 

"tiable at 30 per cent plus 5 


1,318,654 
2,381,358 


Tanning materials (synthetic). . 


164,302 







1 Production of coal-tar distillers does not include production of crudes at by-product coke ovens, which 
was reported to United States Geological Survey. 

Crudes. — One of the outstanding developments during 1919 which 
is of significance in considering the future of the coal-tar chemical 
industry is the increase of 17.2 per cent in the productive ca- 
pacity of by-product coke ovens in the United States. The pro- 
duction of coke in by-product ovens was 56.2 per cent of the total 
production, and thus for the first time exceeded the output of the 
wasteful beehive ovens. There is no question that, Avitli the possible 
exception of anthracene, adequate supplies of fundamental raw ma- 
terials are now available from domestic sources for the future growth 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 9 

and expansion of the coal-tar chemical industry in the United States. 
In 1919 considerable progress was made as to supplies of anthra- 
cene, the output of this important material being about three times 
the production of 1918. Moreover, a larger proportion of it was 
refined. Although this shows encouraging progress, a much greater 
increase in output must be secured before there will be a sufficient 
supply of anthracene for alizarin and vat dyes. It may be roughly 
estimated that the 1919 production contained about one-fifth the 
amount of pure anthracene required for American needs. The diffi- 
culty in securing adequate supplies of anthracene is the most im- 
portant and fundamental problem awaiting solution in the dye 
industry. Important work is under way which points to the solu- 
tion of this problem in the near future. When a sufficient supply of 
anthracene is secured an adequate production of alizarin and vat 
dyes will soon follow. 

The value of the crudes produced during 1919. as shown in Table 
1, does not represent the total production in the United States, as 
those crudes produced at by-product coke ovens were reported 
to the United States Geological Survey and are not available at the 
present time. Complete information is therefore not at hand for 
an accurate analysis of the production of these raw materials in the 
United States during 1919. 

Inter?nedk(tes.- — From Table 1, it is apparent that the total produc- 
tion of intermediates decreased from 357,662.251 pounds in 1918 to 
177,.3G2,426 pounds in 1919. This falling off was due to decreases in 
the output of certain intermediates which were used during 1918 in 
the manufacture of explosives and poison gases, or which were made 
during 1918 with the expectation of future military demands. The 
signing of the armistice left on hand large stocks of these interme- 
diates and during 1919 they were diverted to the manufacture of dyes 
or other finished products. The most conspicuous example of this kind 
is phenol, which decreased from 106,794,277 pounds in 1918 to about 
1,543.659 pounds in 1919. At the signing of the armistice about 
35,000,000 pounds of phenol were on hand awaiting conversion into 
explosives. Other similar cases include benzene sulphonic acid, 
monochlorobenzene, dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, nitronaphthalene, 
and dimethylaniline, all of which were used in substantial amounts in 
making military explosives as well as in dye making. If these inter- 
mediates are eliminated from consideration, those remaining show 
a gain of over 10 per cent in production in 1919 as compared with 
1918. However, this gain in gross output does not measure the 
progress of this branch of the industry. Of much greater impor- 
tance was the appearance of about 76 intermediates that were not 
made during 1918, and many substantial increases in the amount 



10 CEl^SUS OF DYES AjS^D COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

produced of certain intermediates wiiich are comparatively difficult 
to make, but which are needed for dyes of high quality. 

Dyes. — During 1919 the total output of dyes was 63,402,194 pounds, 
valued at $67,598,855, an incresise of about 8 per cent in quantity 
as compared with 1918, The production in 1919 exceeded by 38 per 
cent in quantity the imports during the fiscal year 1914. The increase 
in total output by no means measures the whole improvement in the 
situation. An analysis of the figures for 1919 shows many instances 
of substantial decrease in those dyes which are relatively easy to make 
and also of those needed in large amounts during 1918 for Army and 
Navy uniforms. Decreased output of these particular dyes has been 
more than offset by the increased output of dyes of better quality, 
many of which were made for the first time in the United States 
during 1919. 

The domestic industry has been especially successful in the produc- 
tion of those colors for which there exists a large and constant de- 
mand. Sulphur black, which is consumed in the United States in 
larger amounts than any other color, was produced to the extent of 
14,504,770 pounds by 13 manufacturers. Some of the American 
brands are superior in quality to the best products imported from 
vlermany before the war. Another notable achievement was the 
production during 1919 of indigo in amounts exceeding our prewar 
ijoaport. This dye, which ranks second in consumption by the United 
States, ranks first in world consumption on account of its large use 
in China. 

As has been pointed out in earlier reports of the commission, during 
1915 and 1916 the new American dye industry naturall}^ sought the 
line of least resistance by making the d3^es which were easiest to make, 
and the consumers used whatever dyes they could get instead of 
the varieties they preferred. As a result there were many cases of 
enforced substitutions of both German dyes (available from stocks) 
and American dyes. This substitution in early years of the war 
materially damaged the reputation of American dyes. During the 
succeeding y<?ars there has, been a stead}^ and progressive improve- 
ment in the situation. Although consumers were better supplied 
with the particular dyes they desired in 1919 than they were in 1918, 
there were still needed certain types of dyes which could not be sup- 
plied from American sources in the quantity desired. Thus in 1919 
there was an insufficient domestic output of vat dyes which, on ac- 
count of their extreme fastness and beauty of shade, are important 
for cotton shirtings, ginghams, and calicos. Considerable j^rogress 
has been made, however, toward supplying these much-needed 
colors. There is also a demand for many individual dyes of other 
classes which are not yet a vaiLal^Le at all or only in inadequate amounts. 



CEITSUS OF DYES AISTD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 11 

This is particularly true of alizarin derivatives and of certain other 
specialties. 

Export trade in dyes. — The domestic production of certain dyes 
has developed to a point beyond the quantity necessary for domestic 
consumption, and a large surplus has been available for export to 
foreign markets, particularly Japan and China. During the calendar 
year 1919 the United States exported " dyes and dyestuffs '' to the 
value of $17,084,435, of which $10,724,071 represented aniline dyes, 
.$1,355,936 logwood extract, and $5,004,428 other dyes. For the 
nine months ending September 30, 1920, the domestic exports of dyes 
and dyestuffs amounted to $26,032,389, of which $17,038,235 was 
aniline dyes, $2,321,090 was logwood extracts, and $6,673,064 was 
other dyes. This sum for the nine months of 1920 is more than double 
the exports during the same period in 1919 and also exceeds the value 
of total imports during the. fiscal year 1914. The actual quantity ex- 
ported, however, is smaller than the prewar import, and the in- 
crease in value is due to a higher value j)er pound. During 1919 
and 1920 (nine months) Japan and China took about one-third of our 
total exports of dyes. 

In estimating the significance of this achievement of the domestic 
industry in the exportation of dyes it should be remembered that 
domestic manufacturers during 1919 and 1920 have met little com- 
petition in foreign markets from German dyes. It should also be 
pointed out that any deductions as to the competitive strength of 
the domestic industry which are based on exports of dyes do not take 
into consideration the fact that the domestic industry is still deficient 
in the important group of vat and alizarin dyas. 

The coal-tar dj-es exported include sulphur dyes, chiefly blacks 
and browns; direct cotton dyes, chiefly blacks, greens, blues, and 
reds; indigo (synthetic) ; acid dyes, chiefly scarlets and oranges: and 
basic dyes, chiefly malachite green, methyl violet, and magenta. 
The export trade in dyes is an important factor in producing dyes 
at a low cost to the domestic consumer. German}^, in order to 
minimize her costs of production, made every effort to develop and 
dominate foreign markets. 



Part II.— CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS, 1919. 



CRUDES. 



Introductory. — The production of coal-tar crudes by distillers of 
coal tar, crude light oils, and drip and holder oils is shown in Table 2. 
Those firms engaged primarily in the operation of coke ovens and gas 
houses, and operating distilleries for the production of crudes, re- 
ported their output to the Geological Survey. Unfortunately the 
production of crudes by these firms has not yet been tabulated, and 
complete figures on the production of coal-tar crudes during 1919 are 
therefore not available. It should be remembered that the figures 
for individual commodities in Table 2 represent only a part (in some 
cases a small fraction) of the total quantity of crudes available to 
the dye industry in 1919. These figures must be considered in con- 
nection with those for crudes at by-product coke ovens and gas 
houses, to be published at a later date by the United States Geological 
Survey. 

There are, however, available facts showing that there exists, 
so far as crude materials are concerned (anthracene excepted), an 
adequate supply for the future growth and development of the coal- 
tar chemical industry in the United States. For example, the Geo- 
logical Survey has reported that the productive capacity of the by- 
product coke ovens during 1919 increased 1T.2 per cent over that of 
1918. During the war the military demand for the by-products of 
coal distillation, especially toluene and ammonia, caused the War 
Industries Board and the War Department to aid in the erection of 
by-product coke ovens. The completion of many of these ovens 
during 1919 is responsible for this increase in productive capacity. 

During 1919 the output of coke decreased sharply as compared 
with 1918 because of strikes in the steel and coal industries. But the 
reduction was almost entirely accounted for by the output of the 
wasteful beehive ovens. The production of coke in by-product ovens 
in 1919 was only 3.2 per cent less than in 1918. As a result the out- 

13 



14 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



put of coke from by-product ovens exceeded for the first time that of 
the beehive ovens, which do not recover the valuable by-products.^ 
It would appear, therefore, that there was only a slight decrease in 
the quantity of coal tar available during 1919. Transportation diffi- 
culties interfered with shipments of coal tar to distillers. This is 
reflected by decreases in output as shoAvn in Table 3. Shortage of 
coal due to strikes in coal mines also caused considerable quantities 
of tar to be burned as fuel. These factors resulted in less tar being 
distilled. In general the conclusion may be drawn that there was 
a reduction in the output of crudes in 1919. 

Table 2.: — Production of coal-tar crudes dnring 1919, hif pnns not primGrUy en- 
gaged in the operation of eokc-oven plants and gas houses. 

The numbers in the second column refer to the numbered alphabeticallist ofmanufactnrersgivenonp.94. 
An X indicates that tlie corresponding i)roduct was made by a manufacturer who did not consent to the 
publication of his name in connection there\vith. Blanks in the third and fourth columns indicate that 
there v.'as actualproduction of the corresponding article but that the figures can not be published without 
revealing the output of individual firms.] 



Name. 



Manufacturers' identification; 
No. 



1919 



Quantitj'. 



Value. 



Value 
per 
unit. 



Tota 1 crudes o 

Benzene gallons . 

Toluene do — 

Xylene do . . . 

Naphthalene, crude pounds . 

Anthracene, less than 25 per cent pure 

Carbazol 

Cresol 

Pyridine 

Solvent naphtha 

Dead or creosote oil gallons . 



15, 16, 41, 53, 110, X, X 1, 826, 373 

15,16,53 610,957 

15,53 

12, 15,10,28,91,97,115, 130, X. 12,612,203 
15, 136 



817,657,750 
560, 547 
235, 321 



SO. 31 
.46 



327,201 



Anthracene oil 

ritch of tar short tons . 



other distillates gallons . 

Refined tar barrels . 



15,30 

15,111 

15, 53, 136, X 

12. 15. 16. 28. 30. 45, 53, 67, S3, 
91, 97, 110, 115, 129, 136, 
164, x,x, X. 

91,13G,x 

15. 16. 25.28. 30. 46, 53, 67, 83, 
97, 110, 115, 129, 136, 170, 

X, X, X. 

15, 16, 25, 28, 41, 46, 83, 97, 

115, 138, 164, X. 
15, 25, 28, 30, S3, 83, 97, 115, 

136, X, X, X. 



266,013 
,434,059 



78, 817 
4,264,594 



.30 
.10 



283,066 

,867,001 
, 3*4, 047 



3,619,339 

1,461,500 
6, 540, 778 



12. 79 

.21 
4.73 



o The instructions sent to manufacturers were as follows: 

Include under "dead or creosote oil " only products which may be used for creosoting. Include under 
"otherdiitillates" shingle stain oils, disinfectant oils, and flotation oils which do not contain over 6 per 
cent of phenol. Include under "refined tars" those tars which are used for road treatment, saturating 
felt, and for protective coatings. 

Phenol and all distillates which, on being subjected to distillation, yield in the portion distilUng below 
200° C. a quantity of tar acids equal to or more than 5 per cent of the originaldistillate, are not to be included 
hure but are to be placed in Group II. 

Cresol, for the purpose of the schedule, is defined as a distillate, containing not more than 5 i>er cent of 
phenol and at least 50 per cent of the isomeric cresols. 

1 The following table shows the fraction of the United States oxitput of col^e produced 
in by-product oven.s, as compiled by the Geological Survey : 



1S90 

1900 5. 3 

1905 10. 7 

1910 17. 1 

1915 33. 8 



191G 35. 

1917 38. G 

1918 4G. 

1919 56. 2 



CE]SrSUS OF DYES AXD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



15 



Tamle S. — Comparison of production of coal-tar crudes, 1918 and 1919, by firms 
not primarily engaged in tJie operation of coke-oven plants and gas liouses. 



Name. 



Total crudes 

Benzene, gallons 

Toluene, gallons 

Naphthalene, ci-ude, pounds. 

Solvent naphtha, gallons 

Dead or creosote oil , gallons . , 

Pitch of tar, short tons 

Other distillates, gallons 

Refined tar, barrels 



Quantity. 



3,015,848 

1,596,353 

40, 138, 092 

772,489 

44,712,012 

356,612 

7,034,204 

1,398,049 



Value. 



?22,474,075 
994, 161 
3,044,890 
1,281,440 
164, 068 
4,428,046 
3,966,341 
1,460,363 
0,227,748 



Value 
per 
unit. 



SO. 33 

1.91 

.03 

.21 

.10 

11.12 

.21 

4.45 



Quantity. I Value. 



Value 

per 
unit. 



1,826,. 373 

510,957 

12,612,203 

266,013 

43,434,059 

283,066 

6,857,001 

1,384,047 



317,657,750 

560, 547 

235,321 

327,201 

78, 817 

4,261,594 

3,619,339 

l,46l..5C0 

0, 540; 778 



«0.31 
.46 
.03 
.30 
.10 

12.79 

.21 

4.73 



Shortage of naphthalene. — The output of crude naphthalene by 
tar distillers during 1919 was 12,612,203 pounds valued at $327,201, 
as compared with 40,138,092 pounds valued at $1,281,410 in 1918 
by the same group of m^anufacturers. (These figures are not total out- 
put, as previously explained.) This large reduction in output by 
tar distillers was due to several causes, among which was the de- 
creased distillation of tar. At the time of the signing of the armis- 
tice there were on hand large stocks of crude naphthalene which had 
accumulated as a by-product in the effort to secure maximum sup- 
plies of toluene for making explosives. As a consequence, producers 
of crude naphthalene expected an oversupply and therefore di- 
minished their production by leaving considerable naphthalene in 
the creosote oil, thereby increasing the yield of creosote oil then 
in great demand. When export restrictions on dyes were removed 
there developed an unexpectedly large export demand for dyes and 
intermediates made from naphthalene. This quickly exhausted the 
accumulated stocks and resulted in an acute shortage of naphtha- 
lene toward the end of 1919 and in the earl}^ x^art of 1920. Imports 
of crude naphthalene from England during 1919 were not as large 
as was anticipated, owing to English export restrictions and trans- 
portation difficulties. During the first nine months of 1920, however, 
imports of naphthalene amounted to nearly 11,000,000 pounds. 

The anthraceve situation. — ^Considerable progress was made during 
1919 in the production of anthracene, but the problem of securing 
adequate supplies is still unsolved. In 1918 the actual anthracene 
contained in the crude anthracene produced was about a quarter of a 
million pounds, but verj^ little of the crude product was refined. In 
1919 the output of actual anthracene was about three times the 1918 
production, and a much larger fraction of it was refined than in 
1918. NoLAvithstanding this encouraging progress a much greater 
increase in output must be secured before there will be enough 



16 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

anthracene available from domestic sources to supply the demand 
for alizarin and vat dyes which are so important to a well-developed 
industry. It may be roughly estimated that the 1919 production of 
crude anthracene contained less than one-fifth of the amount of 
anthracene required for domestic needs. The fundamental difficulty 
is not primarily an actual lack of anthracene in the tar, nor are there 
purely technical difficulties in its recovery, but rather the fact that 
its removal leaves the pitch so hard that it does not find a ready 
market in this country. Any method of recovering anthracene which 
seriously disturbs the marketing of the other larger fractions of the 
tar, especially the jDitch, would make the anthracene so expensive 
that the dyes derived therefrom could not be made on a competitive 
basis. In England and Germany large amounts of hard pitch were 
used for the briquetting of coal dust and coke breeze, but this industry 
is little developed in the United States. England shipped con- 
siderable amounts of crude anthracene to Germany before the war. 

The securing of supplies of anthracene adequate in amount and at 
a cost which is not prohibitive is perhaps the greatest difficulty con- 
fronting the industry. Whether the problem will be solved by the 
tar distillers or by the development of a synthetic process for mak- 
ing anthraquinone (the most important intermediate made from 
anthracene) from raw materials now available in adequate quantity 
can not be determined at the present time. Active work along both 
lines is well under way and important progress has been made during 
1920. 

Production of carbazol was reported in 1919 by one firm. It is 
obtained as a joint product in the separation of anthracene from coal 
tar. The development of a demand for carbazol would facilitate an 
increase in the production of anthracene from coal tar. 

INTERMEDIATES. 

Introductory. — The production of intermediates in the United 
States during 1919 is shown in Table 4 in as great detail as possible 
without revealing the output of individual manufacturers. During 
1919 there was produced a total of 177,362,426 pounds of intermedi- 
ates, valued at $63,210,079 — a decrease of about 50 per cent from the 
output in 1918 of 357,662,251 pounds, valued at $124,382,892. Not- 
withstanding this large decrease in quantity the number of indi- 
vidual intermediates produced in 1919 was 216, as compared with 140 
in 1918. The 1919 output, with the exception of many of the anthra- 
cene derivatives which are still not produced, more nearly represents 
domestic requirements under peace-time conditions. In addition to 
these intermediates, there were produced on a laboratory scale 
119 intermediates or oriranic coal-tar chemicals for research and 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 17 

8xi3erimental purposes. These totaled 2,291 pounds and were valued 
at $23,333, as compared with an output in 1918 of 645 pounds, valued 
at $7,843. 

Intermediates used for military purposes. — The decrease in quan- 
tity of intermediates can be traced dir£ctly to the cessation of mili- 
tary requirements. There was a marked decrease in those inter- 
mediates used in making explosives and in those required for dyes 
for military uniforms. If the intermediates used mainly for 
explosives be eliminated from consideration, the remaining ones show 
an increase in output of about 10 per cent during 1919 as against the 
corresponding intermediates in 1918. The most striking example of 
a decrease in intermediates used for explosives is phenol. 

The enormous output of phenol (106,794,277 pounds) in 1918, made 
almost entirely in synthetic phenol plants, left large stocks of this 
product on hand when the armistice was signed. Consequently, the 
jDrice of phenol declined sharply — from about 45 cents per pound to 
6 cents — but soon rose again to about 15 cents per pound. The surplus 
stock of Government phenol on hand at the signing of the armistice, 
about 35,000,000 pounds, represented nearly three times the normal 
annual consumption. The Monsanto Chemical Co., of St. Louis, 
Mo., was made the agent of the War Department for its sale. 
The synthetic phenol plants responsible for the huge output shut 
down promptly after the signing of the armistice, and many of them 
were later entirely dismantled. It is probable, however, that the 
present and future consumption of phenol will be in excess of the 
output of natural phenol obtained by separation from coal-tar dis- 
tillates, and that when the surplus stocks have been consumed some 
of the synthetic plants will necessarily resume production. 

Other intermediates used both for war purposes and for dye manu- 
facture which showed a striking decrease in 1919 include mono- 
chlorobenzene, witli a decrease of 80 per cent; nitronaphthalene, 36 
per cent; dimethylaniline, 16.5 per cent; diplienylamine, and 
dinitrotoluene. It is probable that the production of all of these in 
1919 was below the amount used during the year for d^^e making, and 
that stocks on hand November 11, 1918, and intended for military 
uses were diverted to the dye industry. It may therefore be assumed 
that the production of these intermediates during 1919 was some- 
what less than actual requirements. 

Intermediates required in the manufacture of dyes used for mili- 
tary uniforms also showed a decrease corresponding to the decreased 
output of such dyes. Among these may be mentioned: m-dinitro- 
benzene and m-nitraniline vrhich are used in Alizarin Yellow GG and 
R — dyes used on wool cloths for army uniforms — and m-toluylene- 
diamine, used for sulphur browns on cotton cloths for khaki uniforms. 
2281G°— 21 2 



18 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS, 

Intennediates consumed in- large quanttty. — As a rule the inter- 
mediates for which there is the largest normad consumption and the 
manufacture of which liad been well established by 1918, showed com- 
paratively little change during 1919. Examples of th«se are nitro- 
benzene, aniline, paranitraniline, and betanaphthol. On the other 
hand, there are also many examples of a large increase in the pro- 
duction of intermediates difficult to make but which are required for 
dyes of the best quality. A good example of tliis land is amidonaph- 
thol sulphonic acid 2:8:6 (gamma acid). This was made in 1918 
by a single firm, but in 19,19 by five firms, Avith a combined output 
of 155,025 pounds, valued at $667,360, which is many times the 1918 
output. These five firms used gamma acid to make nearly a half 
million pounds of Oxamine Black — an important direct black which 
•can be developed on the fiber. Moreover, gamma acid is also re- 
quired for other important direct cotton dyes of a fast type, and in 
the manufacture of Zambesi Black, a very important dye for union 
hosier}^ 

Toluene deriiiotwes. — There was a notable increase in output and 
a marked decrease in price of those intermediates derived from 
toluene. Benzoic acid, U. S. P., for example, increased in output from 
172,896 pounds in 1918 to 699,108 pounds in 1919, and the price 
dropped from $3,07 to $0.77 per pound. Orthotoluidine and parato- 
luidine, important intermediates, doubled in output with about a 50 
per cent reduction in value. The general increase in output of toluene 
derivatives and the decrease in value are due to removal of war-time 
restrictions on toluene and the lessened demand for it. 

Intermediates derived from anthracene. — During 1919 the actual 
anthracene content of the antliracene produced amoimted to 813,318 
pounds, or over three times the output in 1918. In 1919 three firms, 
as against only one firm in 1918, reported a production of refined an- 
thracene of more than 80 per cent purity suitable for the manufac- 
ture of vat and alizarin dyes. The total quantity of refined anthra- 
cene produced was several times the output of the previous 3'ear. It 
may be roughly estimated that over 4,000,000 pounds of pure anthra- 
cene would be required to manufacture alizarin and vat dyes to the 
amount of the average annual im.port from 1912 to 1914, inclusive. 

The progress among the anthracene derivatives is of especial inter- 
est. Here, unfortunately, definite figures can not be given without 
revealing the production of individual firms. In 1919 there were 10 
intermediates produced from anthracene, as against only 5 in 1918. 
The output of anthraquinone, which is the most important because it 
serves as the raw material for the manufacture of nearly all other 
intermediates derived from anthracene, was about ten times as great 
in 1919 as in 1918. Recent information indicates that several firms 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL,-T.\E, CHEMICALS. 



19 



are experimenting on the production of anthraquinone synthetically 
from benzene and phthalic anhydride. One firm is now (December, 
1920) known to be manufacturing synthetic anthraquinone in com- 
mercial quantities. The production of anthraquinone in adequate 
quantity either from natural anthracene or synthetically from other 
coal-tar materials already available will mean much to the future 
development of a u'ell-rounded and permanent d3^e industr}- in the 
United States. 



TA3XE 4. — Production of iyitermcdiates durinr/ 1919. 

[The intermediates are arranged in tliis table according- to chemical structure. They are 
listed under the follovs-ing five classes : Benzene compounds ; toluene compounds ; xylene 
compounds : naphthalene compounds ; and anthracene compounds. Each class of com- 
pounds is further divided into 10 numbered subclasses, leased on the following arbi- 
trary order: (1) Halosen, (2) nitro. (3) amino, (4) sulphonic acid. (.5) hydi-oxyl, 
(G) alcohols. (7) aldehydes, fS) carboxylic acids. (0) ketones, and (lOi all others. 
If a compound contains two or more radicals, it is arbitrarily classed under the sub- 
class of the highest numerical order. For example, the compound nitrophenolsulphonic 
acid is listed under the henzene compounds, subclass (5), hydroxyl. since the hydroxyl 
radical is of higher numerical order than the (2) nitro and (-1) sulphonic radicals. 

The numbers in the second column refer to the niimbered alphabetical list of manu- 
facturers printed on p. 94. An x signifies that the corresponding intermediates -were 
made by a manufacturer who did not consent to the publication of his name in con- 
nection therewith. Blanks in the third and fourth columns indicate that there was 
actual production of the corresponding intermediates in the United States during 1019, 
but that the figures can not be published withaut reveaHng information in regard to 
the output of individual firms. The details thus concealed are, however, included in 
the totals. Reports have been received from all firms known to be manufacturers.] 



C,'>ini:ion n^po. 


Manufacturers' identificEtion 
numbers according to list on 
page 94. 


Total prcdaetion, 1919. 


Average 
price 


Quantity. 


Value. 


per 
poimd. 


Total intermediates 




Po7inds. 
177,362,426 


$63,210,079 


^ 36 




53, C4, 76, 92, 118, 132, 151 

76, 118, 132 




BENZENE COMPOUNDS. 

Halogen: 

ClilorohenKene (mono) 


4,116,666 
130, 864 


623,875 
8,746 


15 


D-Dichloro benzene 


.07 


feromolsenzoue (mono) 


52 




Nitro: 

Nitrobenzene (oil ofmyrbanc) 

Nitrochlorohenzene(ortho and para") 


16, 24. 27, 53, 04, 104, 112, 113, 

116,151, x,x,x,x. 
13. 53, 109, 112, 136, X 


42,544,017 
2,520,991 


5,899,&37 
739,117 


.14 
.29 


p-Dichloronitrobenzene 


116 




Dinitrobenzene 


23, 21, 53, 66, 112, 116, 156, x... 
13, 53, 64, 92, 109, 151, 166 

16, 24, 27, 53, 64, 66, 104, 109, 
112, 113, 151, X, X, X. 

24, 27,66, 112, 113 


2, 280, 282 
4,428,730 

24, .345, 786 

1,446,909 


548,302 
907, 794 

5,932,536 

359,2% 


.24 


r/initrociilorobenzene 


21 


Amino: 

Aniline oil 


.24 


AniSne salt (and sulphate) 


.25 


Aniline far red 


112 




Dime thy lani lino 


24, 53, 112 


3, 559, 654 
195,161 
30,000 


1,941,152 


..■W 


Ethvlariiline (mono) 


31,53, 112 

31,74,143 

31, 53, 112 


305 520 1.57 


Diethylaniline 


26, 500 .88 


Ethvlbenzvlonilinc 




Dibenzvlaniline 


Ili2 




1 


Nitrosodtmethvlaniline 


8, 40, 53, 64, 66, 68, 92, 112, x. . . 
23, 31, 53, 64, 109, 112, 116, 136, 

X, X. 

23, 116, 136, X 


592,663 
1,934,125 

699,658 


364,091 .61 


Acctanilide, technical 


797, 151 
4S4,606 


.41 


p-Nifroaoetanilidc 


.09 


Ethvlacetanilide 


112 . . 




Gal lanilide 


112 








T>-ChloroauiIine 


X 








Dichloroanitino 


116 








m-Nitranili;ie 


53, 156, X 


68,600 

1,310.658 

609; 789 

234,332 
62, 5(« 


104,322 

1,388,627 

617,379 

568,396 
103, 750 


1.52 


p-NitranilLne and sulphate 


23, 53, 92. 112, 116, 1,36, x, x. . . . 
5, 8, 23, 53, 58, 04, 69, 112, 116, 
156, x, X. 

10,0-1,112, 136, 146, 171, x,x 

23, 112, 116, 136, X 

112,x 


1.06 


Di-Phcnylenediamine 


1.01 


p-Phenvlenodi:^Imue 


2.43 


Acet-p-phen vleeediamine 


1.66 


DiphpHvlaminr 




Phonal ine 


92 








Phenylglj-euie, sodium salt 


112 










20 



CENSUS OF DYES Als^D COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 4. — Production 


of intermediates during 1919 — Coj 


tinued. 




Common name. 


Manufacturers' identification 
numbers according tolist on 
page 94. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 
price 


Quantity. 


Value. 


per 
pound. 


BENZENE COMPOUNDS— Con. 

Sulphonic acid: 

Sulphanilic acid 

Mctanilio acid 


24, 27, 53, 66, 69, 92, 101, 112, 

156, X, X. 
53, 54, 64, 112, X 


Pounds. 
1,023,861 

453,137 


S243,656 
266,172 


$0.24 
.59 


o-Chloromef anilic acid 

p-Chlorometanilic acid 


136 




136 








Nitrobenzcncsulphonic acid 


136 








Ethylbenzylaniline sulphonic acid. 


31 








Ethylbenzylanilinedisulphonie acid 

Dinitrophenol sulphonic acid 

Dinitrochlorobenzenesulphonicacid 


116 








23 








23 








Amino-azo-benzene and sulpho- 


27,54,69,92, 112, X 


82,755 
1,543,659 


59,847 
155,624 


.72 


nate. 
Hydroxyl: 

Phenol (U. S. P. and tech.) 


15, 24, 30, 41, 101, 134 


.10 


Nftronhenol 


116 




o-Niffophenol 


8 23, 116 156 


18,373 
76, 191 


16,497 
76,464 


.90 


p-Nitrophenol 


8, 13, 23, 53, 66, 109, 116, 151, 156. . 
53,57 


1.00 


Nitre sodium phenolate 




Dinitrophenol, and sodium salt 


13, 53, 64, 112 


230,771 


65,050 


.28 


Nitroaminophenol 1:2:4 


64 




Indophenol 


13, 45, 92, 112, X 


130,001 


131,229 


1.01 




112, 116, X 






116 








o-Amidophenol 


8, 112 








Diethyl ni-amidophenol 


53 ..... 








p-Amidophenol and sulphate 

o-Amidophenol p-sulphonic acid . . . 
Nitroamidophenol sulphonic acid . . 
Diamidophenol 


16, 19, 24, 53, 57, 64, 89, 92, 104, 

145, X. 
23, 112 


128,627 


282,970 


2.20 


23 . 








163 








Nitrosophenol 


13, 40, 45, 92, 112, 116, X 


155,273 


82,833 


.54 


Nitrophenetol (ortho and para) 


53 ; 




109 










23 










23 








Picramic acid 


23,24, 53, 112, x 


150,458 
96,397 

15,678 

518,634 


130,388 
402,491 

33,770 

403, 109 


.87 


Resorcin (tech. and U. S. P.) 


66, 112, X 


4.20 


Alcohols: 

Benzyl alcohol 


61,65,66,141, 155, x,x 

20, 24, 31, 37, 53, 61, 65, 134, 

141, 155, X, X. 
112 


2.15 


Aldehydes: 

Benzaldehyde 


.78 








112 








Carboxylie acids: 


53, 61, 65, 135, 155 


21,212 
699, 108 


46,554 
534,832 


2.19 


Benzoic, U. S. P 


20, 53, 77, 134, 135, 141, X 

51 


.77 








20,76,77, 135, x,x 


610, 150 


536,194 


.88 






o-Amido benzoic (arithranilic) 


109, 136, 150, 168, x,x 

136 


22,976 


98, 602 


4.29 


Salicylic, tech ' 


23, 24, 63, 104, 109, 134, x, x, x. 
20, 24, 44, 52, 53, 104, 109, X, 

. X, X. 

24, 92, 112 


3,467,055 
2,619,726 

37,769 

2,502 


1,009,462 
918,832 

44, 144 
10,305 


.29 


Salicylic, U. S. P 


.35 
1.17 




61, 141, X .1 


4.12 


Ethyl p-aminobenzoate (not me- 
dicinal). 
o-Sulphobenzoic and ammonium 
salt. 

Chloride of o-sulphobenzoic acid 

Ketones: 

Tclramethyldiaminobenzophenonc 
(Michler's ketone). 
Diphenyls; 






81 








81 








23, 53, 64 


281, a57 

1,084,922 
234, 707 


488,553 

1,370,393 
224,283 


1.74 


5, 23, 31, 53, 66, 112, 116, x 

3,23, 31, 53, 112, X, x 


1.26 




.96 


o-Nitrobenzidin and sulphate 


68 116... 




116 










53, 112, 116 


107,441 


488, 114 


4.54 




112 




Other lienzcnecompoiuids: 


112, 113, 134, X, X, X 


2,268,375 


802,575 


.35 




103 






47, 103, X 


6,944 
3,341 


117,288 


16.89 


Nitrophenolarsenic acid 


47,103,x 


147,023 1 44.01 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 21 

Table 4. — Production of intermediates during 1919 — Continued. 



Common name. 



Manufacturers' identifleation 
numbers according to list on 
page 94. 



Total production, 1919. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



price 

per 

pound. 



TOLUENE COMPOUNDS. 

Haloeen: 

Chlorotolnene 

Benzylchloride 

Benzalchlo'lde 

Benzoylchloride 

Nitro: 

Nitrotoluene 

o-NitrotoUienc 

m-Nitrotoluene 

p-Nitrotolnene 

Dinitrotoluene 

Chloronitrotoluene 

Amino: 

Tnluidine 

o-Tolnidine 

p-Toluidine 

Methylorthotoluidine 

o-Chlor p-toluidine 

o-Acetotoluidine 

p-Acetotoluidine 

o and p-Nitrotoluidine 

m-Nitroparatoluidine 

m-Toliiylenediamine 

Tolidin'e 

Tolidine sulphate 

Sulphonicacid: 

o-Chlorotoluene sodium sulphonatc 

p-Nitrotoluene sulphonic acid 

o-Toluidine sulphonic acid 

p-Toluidine sulphonic acid 

o-Chloro p-toluidine m-disulphonie 
acid. 

Toluylenediamine sulphoni c acid . . . 

o-Toluene sulphochloride 

p-Toluene sulphochloride 

o-Toluene sulphamide 

p-Toluene sulphamide 

Hydroxyl: 

Refined cresol 

Creosote oil (containing more than 
5 per cent tar acids). v 

Stilbenes: 

Dinitrostilbene disulphonic 

Diamidostilbene disulphonic acid. . . 
Other toluene compounds: 

Amino-azo-toluol 

Hydrazotoluol 

Dehydrothio- para-toluidine sul- 
phonic acid. 

XYLENE COMPOUNDS. 



Pounds. 



20, 23, 31, 61, 65, 134, 141, 15.5 . 

61, 65,141, X 

61,65 



720,953 



$166, 182 



31, .53, .54, 62, 112, 116, 147, x, x . 

,53,112, 116,x 

.53,69 

31, .53, 62, 112, 116, U7,x 

31,. 53, .54, 64, 69, 112, 116, x 



6,211,775 
1,360,599 



1,049,522 
312,416 



1,263,0.56 
746,266 



704, 750 
264,388 



31,. 53, 112, 147, x,x 

.53, 66, 112, 116, 147, X 

.53, 62, 66, 112, 116, 147, x. 
92 



806,210 

1,002,982 

575,841 



309, 894 
503,020 
600,267 



136 

136, X 

147, X 

.53,136,x,x 

31,.53,.54,64,69,112,116. 

.53. 66, 112, 116, X 

116 



.58, 454 
439, 544 
143,012 



210,307 
504.063 
264^ 861 



109 

.53, 112, X. 

69 

l,x 



32,338 



29,464 



Nitroxylol 

Xylidine 

Xylidine salts 

Dehydrothio m-xylidinebase. 
Cuniidinc 



NAPHTHALENE COMPOUNDS. 

Naphthalene, solidifying 79° Cor above 

(refined, flake). 
Halogen: 

Cliloronaphthalene 

Nitro: 

Nitronaphthalene 

Dinitronaphthalene 

Amino: 

a-Naphthylamine 

Phcnylalphanaphthylamine 

b-Naphthylamme, crude 

Ethylbetanaphthylamine 



112 

26, 109.... 
26, 109, X. 
26, 109, X. 
26, 109... . 



116. 



58,932 



6,148 



112 

112, X, X. 



64,69, X.... 
112 

18, 54, X, X , 



27, 112, x,x 

5, 24, 27, 53, 112, 147, x, x. 

24, X 

68, X 



112, X. 



15,30,53,91,97, 134, 164. 



15,53, 116, X. 
112 



15,53, 116, X. 

23,53 

53, 124, X.... 



5,021 
4,836 



19,082 

7,871 



293,219 
386,635 



17,625,235 



1,552,828 
"99,'597 



53,449 
206,797 



1,160,.S15 



368,500 



632,587 
'i67,'596' 



22 



GE1S"SUS OF DYES AifD GOAL-TAR CHEMICALS, 



Table 4. — Proihiciion of intcrniediatcs iJuring 1919 — Continued. 



Common name. 



Manulacturers' identification 
nuni)x;rs according to list on 
page 94. 



Total production, 131S 



Quantity. ^'alue 



NAPTHALENE COMPOUNDS— 

Continued. 



icid 



Sulphonic acid: 

(o) Naphtbaleno disiil phonic 
2:7. 

-"Taplithaleno trisulDhonie acid 
1:3:6. 
('j) Sulplio (alpha) animo com- 
pounds— 
Naphthylamine snlphonio 1:2.. 
Naphthylamine suiphonic 1:4 

(naphthionic acid). 
Naphthylamine sulphonic 1:5 

(Laurent's acid). 
Naphthyiamme sulphonic 1:6.. 
Naphthylamine sulphonic 1:8. . 
Phenylnaphthylamine sul- 
phonic 1 : S. 
Tolvlnaphthvlamine Sulphonic 

1:8. 
Naphthylamine disulphonic 
1:3:6." 
. Naphthylamine disulphonic 
1:3:8. 
Naphthylamine disulphonic 

1:4:8. 
Naphthylamine trisulidionic 
1:3:6:8. 
{c) Sulpho (beta) ainino com- 
pounds — 
Naphth ylamine sulphonic 2: 1-. 
Naphthylamine sulphonic 2:6 

(Bronner'sacid). 
Naphthylamine sulphonic 2:8. 
Naphthylamine disulphonic 

2:4:8. 
Naphthylamine disulphonic 

2:5:7. 
Naphthylamine disulphonic 
2:6:8." 
Hydroxyl: 

Alpha naphthol compormds— 

a-Naphthol 

Alpha naphthol sulphonic 
acids— 
Naphtholsulphonic l:4(Ne- 
ville & Winther.s). 

Naphthol sulphonic 1:5 

Naphthol disulphonic 1:3:6 
Naphthol disulphonic 1:4:8. 
Naphthol trisulphonic 
1:3:6:8. 
Beta naphthol compounds — 

b-Naphthol, tech 



b-NaphthoI,U. S. P 

Nitroso beta naphthol 

Beta naphthol sulphonic acids— 

Naphtholsulphonic 2:1 

Naphthol sulphonic2:6 

(SchacfTcr'sacid). 
Naphthol sulphonic 2:7 
(monosulphonicaeid F). 

Naphtholsulphonic 2: 8 

Naphthol disulphonic 2:3:6 

(Racid). 
Naphthol disulphonic 2: 5: 7 
Naphthol disulphonic 2: 6: S 

(Gacid). 
Naphthol disulphonic 2: 3: 6 
and 2:6:8 (Rand Gsalt). 
Naphthol trisulphonic 
2:3:6:8. 
Dihydroxyl: 

jDioxynaphthalcne 1:5 

Dihydro.xy naphthalene disulpho- 
nic aciii ]:H:3:G (chromotrope 
acid). 



13(3, -X. 

136.... 



Founds 



3, 24, 27, 43, 53, ( 

x,x,x. 
53,112 

53,112 

53,112 

53,112 



2,112,115, 



2, 008, 1S9 



1,23.-), 742 



112. 



116 

116 

112,116.... 
frl,112,n6. 



124, 136, X. 
136,x 



1,4j8,.'j6!> 



84,260 



867, G05 



174,420 



X 

116 

112 

112, U6. 



66, 77, 112, X 



3,24,27, 53, 92, 112, 116, X. 



112 

116, 136. 

116 

112, X.. 



135, 025 
344, 449 



13f5, ^33 
629, S57 



2, 24, 27, 69, 112, 124, 136, 169, 
x,x, X. 

24, 121, X 

40136 



4, 835, 778 
33, 633 



36.-,, ST-i 
24, 050 



5,54,112, 136, x. 
136, x 



146, Ul 



3,'5, 24V27,'53,' 92,'ll2Vii6,' 136", 

X, X, X, X. 

112 



1,008,007 



•21,341 



3, 5, 24, 27, 92, 112, 116, 13S, x, x 

I36,x 

27 



602, 949 



112 

5, 112, 116. 



164, 65- 



380,344 



CENSUS OF DYES AN^D COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 23 

Table 4. — Production of intcnncdiatcs (luring 1919 — Coutinued. 



' Common narae. 


Manufactiu-ers' identification 
numbers according to list on 
page 94. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 
price 


Quantity. 


Value. 


per 
pound. 


NAPHTHALENE COMPOUNDS— 
Continued. 

Other naphthols: 

Amidonaphthol sulphonic acid 

1:2:4. 
Amidonaphthol sulphonic acid 


23, 27, 53, 54, 64, 92, 112, 136, 

152, X, X, X. 
5, 53,92, 112, 116 


Pound.s. 
837,384 

155,025 


S808, 894 
667, 360 


SO. 97 
4 30 


2:8:6 (gamma acid). 
Amidonaphthol disulphonic acid 


53, 116 




1:8:2:4 (Chicago acid). 
Amidonaphthol disulphonic acid 

1:8:3:6 (H acid). 
Chloronaphtho! disulphonic acid 


53, 64, 105, 108, 112, 116, 152, 

160, X, X, X. 
112 


3,837,534 


5,081,463 


1.32 


1:8:3:6 (chlorH acid). 
Diazonaphthol sulphonic acid 1:2:4. 


23, 92, 112 


419,349 


417,815 


1 00 


Nitrodiazo naphthol sulphonic 


23 




acid 8:1:2:4. 
Carboxylic acids: 

Hydroxy naphthoic acid 2-3 


X 








Other naphthalene compounds: 

Phthalic anhydride 


23, 66, 109, 162, 168, x 

150, X 


290,677 


290,037 


99 


Phthalamide 




o-Cresolphthalciu 


81 


1 1 


o-Cresolsulphophthalein 


81 


1 •" •■ 


Dibromcresolsulphophthalein 


81 


i.. . 1 


Dibromsulphophthalein 


81 


1 


Tetrabromphenolsulphophthalein.. 


81 








Thymolsulphophthalein 


81 








ANTHRACENE COMPOUNDS. 
Anthracene, purity of 25 per cent or 


11, 15, 91, 112, X 


1,381,944 
234,260 


208,977 
547,787 


.22 


more. 
Anthraquinones : 

Anthraquinono 


2, 11, 53, 112 


1 86 


Dinitroanthraquinone 


112 




Betaaminoanthiaquinone 


53 








Anthraquinono 2 sodium sulphon- 


53, 112 









ate (silver salt). 
Anthraquinoncdisuiphonate 1 :5 


112 








Antliraqumone disulphonic acid 2:7. 


112 








Dihydroxy anthraquinone 1:5 an- 


112 




1 


thrarufin. 
Nitrosu! foantlirarufin 


112 




1 


Benzanthrone 


53 




j 


Chloroljcnzanthrono 


53 




1 


CARBAZOL COMPOUNDS. 
Carbazol, purity of 25 per'cent or more. . 


1.5,53 








All other intermediates 


23, 112, 116, X, X 

















CHEMICALS FOR SALE FOR RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTAL PURPOSES. 



Total 




Pounds. 
2,291 


S23,333 


$10 18 




57,153 




BENZENE COMPOUNDS. 

Halogen: 

lod obenzene 








o-Dichlorobenzcne 




;:'i 




Amino and relalcd derivatives: 
.Vniline redistilled 




















p-Chloroaniline 


57-153 








o-Chloroanilnic 


ira 








p-Bromoaniline hydrochloride 

Dichloroaniline 2:4 


57 








57. . 






Methylaniline 










p-Bromoacctanilidc 


57 








Methylaeetanilidc 










p-Nitrocthylacetanilide 


57. . 


:::;:::;:: :;:: :: ;:::; 




p-Aminodimcthylauiliue hydro- 
chloride 


57 








Benzylamine 


1S3 








Phenylhvdrazinc 


57-66-x 









24 



CEiSrSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 4. — Production of intcriitediatcs during 1919 — Continued. 
CHEMICALS FOR SALE FOR, RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTAL PURPOSES — Con. 



CoTnTnon name 


Manufacturers' identification 
number? according to list on 
page 94. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 
price 


Quantity. 


Value. 


per 
pound. 


BENZENE COMPOUNDS— Con. 

Amino and related derivatives— Con. 
p-Bromophenylhvdra^iu e 




Pounds. 






Methylphenvihydrazinc 


57 








p-Br6mophe"nyihydra?ine hydro- 
chloride ' .• 


57 








Acotyiphenylhydrazine 


57 








Carbanilide 


57 








Oxanilide 


57 








Diphenvlcarbamine chloride 


153 








Benzaniiide 


57. 








Sulphonic acids: 

o-Dichlorobenzene sulfonate 


57 








Benzene sulfonyl chloride 


153 








Benzene sulpho chloride 










Hydroxy 1: 

Sodium phenolate 


X 








p-Bromophenol 


l.>3 








Dibromophenol 2'4 


153 








Acetyl p-meth ylaminophenol 

p-Ben;:al aminophenol 


57 








57 








Acetyl p-anisidine ... . 


57 








p-Dimethylaminophenoisulphonate 
p-Anisidine 


57 








57 








Anisol 


57,153 








Nitroanisol 


57 








Phenetol 


57 ,. 








o-Dihydroxybenzene (Catechol) 

HydrOnUinonedimethylethor 


57 








57 








o-Dimethoxybenzene (Veratrole) 


57 


















Resorcinolm onomcthvl ether 


57 










57. 








Resorcinoldiacctate 


57 








Aldehydes: 

p-Chlorobenza Ideh vde 


57 










57 








Sahcvlaldehydp. ... 


57, X 










57 








Carboxylic acids: 


P7 










57 . 










57, 153 . . . 










57 . . 








f^odiiira m-nitrobenzoate 


57 . 








p-Nitrobenzoic acid 


153 .. . 










57 










57 










57 










57 










57 










57 










.57 t 


1 




57 1 


i 




57 . 


1 




57 


i" 




57 


1 




57,153 


1 




153, X 


1 




57 




1 




57 




i 




153 . 








Ketores: 


57 








Ethers: 


57 










57 








Other benzene compounds: 


57 











57 










57 ]5;< 




1 




57 153 








57 






Dinitrobenzoylurea 


57 







CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 25 

Table 4. — Production of intermediates during 1919 — Continued. 





Manufacturers' identification 
numbers according to list 
on page 9-1. 


Total production,. 1919. 


Ayer- 
ase 


Name. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


price 

per 

pound. 


BENZENE COMPOUNDS— Con. 

Other benzene compounds— Continued. 
Phthalimide 


57 








Benzouitriie 


57 








Benzyl cyanide 


57 


1.. 




Phenvlisocyarate 


153 


1 




Thiophenol 


153 ' 


Potassium hydrogen phttialoi 

Quinone 


67 






57 




.. 


Chloroanil 


57 






Quiuhydvone 


57 




1 


a^Benzildio.xime 






1 


Ethylphenvl acetate 


153 




1 












Diphenylpiperazine hydrochloride - 
p-I>imethylaminoazobenzeue 

TOLUENE COMPOUNDS. 

Halogen: 


57 








57 








153 










153 










153 









Amino: 

Acetyl p-toluidjne 


57 










57 








Su-lDhonicacid: 


57 








p-Toluene5iilphonyl hydrochloride . 

Phenyl p-tolucnesiilptionate 

p-Toluenesulphonylaniline 


57 








57 








57 








p-ToIuenesulphonyl methylaniline . 
Hydroxyl: 


57 
















o-C^esol methyl ether 












57 










57,153 *. 








XYLENE COMPOUNDS. 


57 








m-Xylene 










p-Xylcne . . . 


57 










57 










57 










153 








NAPHTHALENE COMPOUNDS. 
Halogen: 


57, X 










57 








Hydroxyl: 

Nitroso b-naphthol 


57, X 








QUINOLINE COMPOUNDS. 
Quinoline 


57 










67 










57 153 








b-Naphthaqiiinaldinc ... 


57. 



















26 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



Table No. 5 is a comparison of the production in 1918 and 1919 
of those intermediates for which figures can be published. 

Table 5. — Produetiov of intermediates, WIS and 1919. 



Total interraediates 

BENZENE COMPOUNDS. 

Halosen- 

Chlorobenzene (mono) 

Nitro: 

Nitrobenzene (oil of myrbane) 

Dinitrobenzene 

Amino: 

Aniline oil 

Aniline salt and sulphate 

Dimcthylaniline 

Diethylanilino 

Nitrosodimethylaniline 

Acetanilide, tocli 

p-Nitroacetanilide 

m-Nitranilinc 

I)-Nitraniline and sulphate 

m-Phcnylcncdiamine 

p-Phenylenediamine 

Acet-jHphenylenediamine 

Sulphonic acids: 

Sulphanilic acid 

Metaniiic acid 

Aminoazobenzone and sulphonate. 
Hydroxvl: 

Phenol (U. S. P. and tech) 

o-Nitrophenol 

p-Nitrophcnol 

]>Amidophenol and sulphate 

Picramic acid 

Alcoiiols: 

Benzyl alcohol 

Aldehydes: 

B enzaldehy de 

Carboxy lie acids: 

Benzoic, tech 

Bcmoic, U. S. P 

Sodium benzoato 



Production, 1918. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 
357,662,251 



$12-l,3S2,se2 



o-Amidobenzoic (anthranilic) 

Salicylic, tech 

Salicylic, U. S. P.. 

Cinnamic 

Ketones: 

Teframethyldiaminobenzophcnone. 
Diphcnj'ls: 

Benzidine, base 

Benzidine sulphate 

Other benzene compounds: 

Thiocarbanilide. 



TOLUENE COMPOUNDS. 



Halogen : 

Benzylchloride 

Nitro: 

Nitrotolucne 

o-Nitroto!uenc 

l)-Nitrotoluenc 

Amino: 

Toluidine 

o-Toluidine 

p-Tdluidine 

m-Nitroi)uratoluidine. 

m-Toluylenediamine . , 



XYLENE COMPOUNDS. 



Nitroxylol. 
Xylidine... 



20,530,639 

3R, 250, 3.32 
4,115,269 

24,102,129 
1,765,359 

4,203,4.58 
4S, 048 
851,821 

2,085,088 
Ml, 552 
C30, 802 

1,320,064 
641,299 
215, 148 
177,990 

1,247,478 
249,922 
171,594 

106, 794, 277 
143,277 
192,259 
113,428 
235, 655 

13,950 

3C0, 591 

109,316 
172, 896 

255,667 

11,826 

1,395,6.30 

3, 270, 462 

1,486 

73, 208 

1, 565, 139 
• 936,748 

1,. 326, 236 



690, 930 

3, 420, 670 

1, 240, 499 

670, 615 

308, 667 
038, 874 
205, 852 
24,415 
612,163 



639, 835 
534, 8:i4 



Value 



Price 

per 

pound 



5,6.59,991 
1,148,309 

6,572,084 
591,542 

2,412,820 
122, 673 
454,465 

1,105, .546 
415,956 
040, 318 

1,722,319 
703,436 
791,191 
382,017 

361,153 
1.32,214 
1S3, 169 

37,270,284 
215, 788 
210, 127 
320,562 
462,158 

87, 138 

S65, 251 

155, 207 
530,472 
658,879 

67, 287 

799, 337 

2, 700, 171 

13, 842 

256, 032 

1,577,466 
427, 180 

622,454 



1, 



463,071 

027, 629 
8.50,343 
747, 086 

250,125 
612,765 
380, 257 
117,309 
862,702 



338, 059 
291, 187 



Production, 1919. 



Quantity. 



Founds. 
177,362,426 



S63, 210,079 



.18 4,110,066 



.15 

.28 

.27 
.34 
..57 
2.55 
.53 
..53 

l!02 
1.30 
1.10 
3.68 
2.15 

.20 

.53 

1.07 



1.51 
1.09 
2.83 
1.90 

0.25 

2. 40 

1.42 
3.07 
2.58 

5.69 
.57 
.83 

9.31 

3.50 

1.01 

.45 

.47 



.66 

.30 
.69 
1.11 

.81 

.90 

1.85 

4.80 

1.41 



42,544,017 
2, 28r>,282 

24,345,780 

1,446,909 

3,559,654 

30,000 

592, 063 

1,934,125 

699, 658 

68, 600 

1,310,6.58 

e09, 789 

234,332 

62, 567 

1,023,861 

453,137 

82, 755 

l,543,r59 
18,373 
76, 191 
128, 627 
150,458 

15, 678 

518,634 

21,212 
699, 108 
610, 150 

22, 976 

3,467,055 

2,619,726 

2,502 

281,057 

1,081,922 
234,707 

2,268,375 



720, 953 

6,211,775 
1,360,599 
1, 203, 056 

806, 210 

1,002,982 

575, 841 

58, 454 

439, 544 



293,219 
386, 635 



^"aluc . 



G23, 875 

5,899,837 
548,302 

5,932,536 
359, 296 

1,941,1,52 
26,500 
364,091 
797, 151 
484, 666 
104,322 

1,388,627 
617,379 
568, 396 
103, 750 

243,656 

266. 172 

69,847 

1.55, 624 

16,497 

76,464 

282,970 

130,388 

33,770 

403, 109 

46,554 
.534,832 
536, 194 

98,602 

1,009,462 

918,832 

10,305 

488,563 

1,370,393 
224, 28:3 

802,575 



166, 182 

1, 049, 522 
312,416 
704,750 

309, 894 
503, 020 
600, 207 
210, 307 
504,063 



53, 449 
206,797 



CENSUS OF DYES AISTD COAL-TAE CREMICALS. 27 

Table 5. — ProdiK-fion of iiitcrmediates, 191S and 1919 — Coutiaued. 



Name. 



NAPHTHALENE COMPOUNDS. 

Naphthalene, solidifying 79' C. or 

above (reflned, flake) 

Nitro: 

Nitronaphthaleno 

Amino: 

a-Naphthylamine 

b-Naphthylamine, cnide 

SrJphonic acids: 

Sulpho(alpha)amino compounds — 
Naphthylamino siilphonic 1:4 

( Naphthionic) 

Hydroxyl: 

Alpha naphthol compounds — 

a-Naphthol 

Alpha naphthol sulphomc 
acids — 
Naphthol sulphonic 1:4 

(Neville & Winthers) 

Beta naphthol compounds — 

b-Naphthol, tech 

Beta naphthol sulphonic 
acids— 

Naphthol sulphonic 2:6 a . . 
Naphthol disulphonic 

2:3:6 (R acid) 

Other naphthols: 

Amido naphthol sulphonic acid 

1:2:4 

Amido nanhthoi disulphonic acid 

1:8:3:6 (H acid) 

Other naphthalene compounds: 

PhthaUc anhydride 



Production, 1918. 



Production, 1C19. 



Quantity. Value 



ANTHRACENE COMPOUNDS. 

Anthracene, purity of 25 per cent or 
more 



Pounds. 
28, 112, 165 

4,340,eiQ 

2,671,001 
31,317 



1,462,261 
136, 723 

340,074 
5, 117, 683 

169, 383 
712,033 

169,999 
2,883,228 

227,414 

25, 552 



52,102,618 
1,439,052 

1,327,740 

45, 747 

959,291 
102, 032 

421, 589 
3,009,773 

127, 693 
572, 401 

210,478 

4,879,351 

648,650 

80,679 



Price 

per 

pound. 



Quantity. 



.33 



.50 
1.46 



.60 
.75 

1.24 
.59 

.76 
.80 

1.S4 
1.69 
2.85 



Pounds. 
17,625,235 

2,774,516 

1.552,828 
99,597 



2, 008, 189 



Value . 



SI, 160, 815 
308,600 
632,687 



Price 

per 

pound. 



C-0.0^ 
.133 
.407 



167, 590 1. 083 



.615 



135,025 136,833 1.013 



4,835,778 

148, 111 
1,008,007 



629,857 
2,365,804 

102, 975 
721,341 



837,384 808,894 

3; 837, 534 I 5,081,409 

290,677 290,037 



1,381,944 



238.977 



1.829 
.488 

.705 
.716 

.066 
1.S24 
.997 

.216 



a 1918 figures include naphthol sulphonic 2:8. 
IKTERMEDL^TES USED IN DYEIXG AXD PRIXTINO. 

In many cases the last chemical step in the manufacture of dyes 
can be advantageously performed on or Avithin the fiber to be dyed 
rather than in a dye factory. In this way an insoluble dye can be pre- 
cipitated within the fiber, and thus secure a high degree of fastness. 
As a conseciuence, textile mills and other dye consumers have been 
purchasers of intermediates. The German dye makers made a prac- 
tice of selling intermediates for this purpose to textile mills under 
special trade names designed to conceal the chemical nature of the 
product. German firms were thus enabled in mam' eases to charge 
prices to the consumers above the market prices of the intermediates 
when sold under their true chemical names. 

In Table 6 are given the trade names under which these products 
were sold b3' German firms before the war, with the corresponding 
scientific chemical names, the imports (when available) during the 
fiscal year 1914^ and the American production during 1919. The 

1 Norton, Thomas H. : " Artificial Dyestuffs Used in the United States," Dept. of Com- 
merce, Sp. Agents Series. No. 121 ; and Pickrell, Dr. E. R. : " Chemicals and Allied Products 
Used in the United States," Deut. of Commerce. Misc. Series No. S2. 



28 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



identification, of course, can not be guaranteed since it has not been 
possible to make a critical laboratory examination of authentic 
samples. It is based upon a careful search of the scientific and 
technical literature and correspondence or consultation with a num- 
ber of experts in this field. It is especially interesting to note the 
extent to which these needs are being met by American manufac- 
turers of intermediates. It is hoped that the publication of this 
information will enable American consumers to purchase these ma- 
terials under their own proper names at more reasonable prices, and 
will also help American intermediate makers to supply those not yet 
made in the United States. 

Table 6. — Intermediates used in dyeing and printmg. 



Trade name. 



Chemical name. 



Imports, 

1914 
(Norton- 
Pickrell). 



United 

States 

production 

1919. 



Uses. 



I. BENZENE DERIVATIVES. 



Developer J 

Yellow developer, Dve 

salt VII. 
Developer F, Dye salt VI . 
Orange developer 

Para 



lT»,nr,^i /1 1,715, 465 

fP^^ol -^ 1109,146 



Ptesorcin . 



Azogen red 

Azophor red PN 

Benzonitriol 

P-nitraniline, extra paste 
N. 

Nitrazo! C 

Nitrosamine red 



Paranitraniline 

p-nitrodiazo benzene 

p-nitrodiazo with stabilizer 

do 

do 



161,624 

S18, 175 

1 771, GS2 

$109,374 



1 1,543,659 
8155,624 

1 96, 397 

S402, 491 

' 1,310,6.58 

■SI, 388, 627 



-do. 



Parazol F. B 

Azcphororange MN. 
Reserve salt O 



Nitrosamine is the sodium 
compound of diazotized 
nitraniiine. 



/Meta-nitraniline 

\Diazo compound of above. 
m-Nitro benzene siiJpEoiiic 
acid. 

Aniline 



Azotol C, or Prague ice 
black. 

Developer A. D ..fast blue 
developer A. D. 

Diphenyl, black base 

Diphenyl black oil D. O . . 



Developer H 

Developer G for brown, 

Dye salt V. 

Oxamincdev. N. X 

"Paramine," Paramine 

Extra, B. A. S. F. 

Diamine B. B 

Nerogene D 



I 3, 527 
$1,037 



UOO 
.S39 



A symmetrical dialkylated 
de - p - amidoazo-ljenzene 
or amido-ehrysoidine. 

>AmidodiphenyIamine 

P-amidodiphenylamine. . .[ 

r-aniidndiphenylamine in 

aniline. " j 

M-phenylenediaraine 'i «j i , ,?q 



Developer N. B 

Solvenol, Solution Salt 

B, Solvenol O, Algosol. 

Fuscamine G 



>P-phenylenediamine 

A chlorinated diamine 

Chloro-m-phenylenedia^ 
mine. 

Nitro-benzidin 



Sodium-salt of benzyl sul- 

phanlicacid. 
M-aminophenol 



^o-Nitro-ben 
\Benzidin.. 
3 4,000 



n. TOLUENE DERIVATIVES. 

Diamine developer C; 
H (powder), E (solu- 
tion;. — Diamine B. 



1 11, OSS 
$3,414 



1 Meta toluylene diamine or 
I metaphenylenediamine. 



' Pounds. 

2 Produced during 1919, but figures not puljlishable. 

3 Pounds, estimated. 



1 133,355 

$25,582 



1 68, 600 
$104,322 

/i24,345,786 
\$5,932,536 



1439,544 
$804,063 
1 609, 7S9 
$617,379 
1 234,332 
$568, 396 



700 
966 



1 439, 644 
$804,063 



[•Developing direct dyes. 

I Do. 

1 For para reds and as a 
/ developer. 



Insoluble azo dyes. 



insoluble azo colors. 
/Insoluble azo black. 



yOxidation black. 

Insoluble azo dyes. 
Gives black on b-nap- 
thol prepared goods. 

Developing direct colors. 

For oxidation black. 
Do. 



^Developing direct colors. 

•Oxidation brown. 

■Developing direct colors. 

I Do. 
Silk printing. 

Oxidation brown. 
JDcveloping direct dyes. 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAK CHEMICALS. 
Table 6. — Intermediates used in dyeing and printing — Continued. 



29 



Trade name. 



n. TOLVZEN'E DERIVA- 
TIVES — continued. 



Resen^e salt.W -j 

Nitrotoliiidine G 

Base HR, piginent fast 

red base HL 

Fast red G base 

Helio fast red base H L . . . 
Lithol fast scarlet RW 

base. 



Nitrosamine Rose B X; 

Azorosa N A, Nitroani- 

sidine A; Tuscalin red 

base. 
Azophor Rose A, Naph- 

thol Rosa. 
Tusca'-iuorange base G . . . 
Chloranisidiiie salt M, or 

chtoranisidine P. 

.^zoDliorrose A 

Blue red O 



Chemical name. 



Para toliiidine , 

p-Nitro-toluene sulphonic 
acid. 



m-Nitro para toluidine. 



o-Nitro p-toluidine. 

p-Nitro o-toluidine. 
p-Nitro-o-anisidine . 



Imports, 

1914 
CNorton- 
Piclorell). 



I 24, 686 

?4,764 



diazo compound of above. 



m-Nitro-o-anisidine. 
p-Chlor-m-anisidine . 



Stabilized diazo-o-auisol. 
o-Nitro-p-phenetidin.e. . . 



Benzidine. 
Toluidine . 



10,513 
.$4:200 



1 65, 647 
S17,S14 



{ 

Azophor blue D {^ bmzer!^'^""°' """'^^ '^^' { 



Ortamin I o-Diani.sidin. 



m. XYLENE DERIVATIVES. 



IV. NAPHTHALENE DE- 

RrvAn\T:s. 
Maroon developer 



Xylidine. . 
Cumidine. 



1 55, 243 

816,991 

• 5, S74 

?3, 763 

110,656 
?4,217 



Crimson developer 

Developer A (Sodium 
salt) for red or Dye 
salt II. 

NaphtholD 



Naphthol AS. 
Naphthol AC. 



Alpha-naphthol. 

JAlpha-naphthol 
\ phonic acid. 

•B-naphthol 



p-sul- 



121,836 

?2, 657 
16,617 
$1, 169 



1403,317 
S53, 600 



Shading salt, "Mono 

acid." "Facid." 
Naphthol R 



B-naphthol DC. 



Developer ES. 



Developer G 

Blue developer AN 

Developer E for brow-n. . 

Gam ben R 

Paradurol 



B-oxy-naphthoic acid 

B-oxy-naphthoic anilide. . . 

B-oxy-naphthoic toluide 
or aniside, phenetide, 
xylide. 

B-naphthol sulphonic acid 
F (2:7). 

B-naphthol 90 per cent 
ana B-naphthol mono- 
sulphonic acid F. 

Molecular mixture — B- 
naphthol, B-oxy-naph- 
thoic acid, B-naphthol 
sulpho acid E, or dioxy- 
naphthalin 2:3, 2:6, or 2:7. 

2:3 dioxy-naphthalene- 

sulphonicacid. 
\Amido naphthol sulphonic 
/ acid (1:2:4?). 

|Nitroso B-naphthol 

Naphthalene trisulphonic 
acid. 



'1,2.33, 4.5s 
$112,007 

1 2, 647 
$1, 029 
11,997 
§1,218 



121,253 
S5, 563 



11,153 
$445 



United 

States 

production 

1919. 



1 575, 841 
?600, 267 
1 32, 338 

S29, 464 



1 58, 454\ 
.S201,307/ 



i24,125\ 
S4, 82.5/ 
(') 



Uses. 



Insoluble azo colors. 



Do. 



11,084.922 

Si, 370, 393 

1806,210 

S3Q9, 894 



* 107, 441 



1386, 

$206, 

116, 

$36, 



1135, 

!=136, 

r 1344, 

I 5629, 

1 4, 825, 
$2, 356, 



(-) 



123, 
$51, 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



1837, 

5 ?808, 

124, 

$11, 

(2) 



Do. 
With B-uaphthol gives 

scarlet red. 
Insoluble azo dyes. 
For shading para red 

(bluish) shades. 

^Insoluble azo colors. 
Do. 

[Insoluble azo colors, with 
< copper salts to give 
( blue. 
Oxidation red brown. 



►Insoluble azo colors. 
Do. 



Developing direct dyes. 



Para red. 

Insoluble azo dyes. 
Do. 

>For para reds. 
Para red bluish shade. 

Insoluble azo dyes. 



Developing direct colors. 
^Developing direct dyes. 



Organic stabilizer in pro- 
duction of para reds. 



1 Pounds. 

* -Actual production during 1919 but figures not publishable. 
8 Estimated pounds. 



* "Dianisidin. 
£• 1:2:4. 



30 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS, 

Table 6. — Intermediates used in, dyeinn and printmn — Continuetl. 



Trade name. 


Chemical name. 


imports, 

1914 
(Norton- 
Pi ckrcllj. 


United 

States 

production, 

1919. 


Uses. 


IV. NAPTHALENE DE- 
RIVATIVES— Colltfl . 

Amidonanlitliol B D and 


Amido naphthol 1:6 or 
1:7. 

f A naphthylamine 






Insoluble azo dyes. 


3B. ^ 


f 1 112, 226 
\ SIO, 620 
f 1610 
\ S.318 
f 110,698 
\ S3, 404 

1 3,282 
.? 1,749 


[11,552,828 
f ?632,587 

1 99, 597 
SI67, 590 

/ 1140 
\ $705 




I'-'Sulnhate" 


llnsoluble azo colors. 








1 Do. 


Developer B for Bor- 
deaux claret dev. B. 
dsv. 

V. MISCELLANEOUS. 

Nighrophor, B. A. S. F.. 


lEthyl B naphthjdamin-e.. 

Sodium, salt of p-nitro 
benzene, 5 sulpho, 1 
amido, 8 naphthol azo, 
2:5 dichlobcnzene. 

1 : S naphthylen diamine 4- 
sulphouic acid and ace- 
tone. 

Mixture of tctrazo-dianiscl 
with other diazo com- 
pounds as m-nitranilin, 
etc. 

AmidonaDhthol ether 


j-Developing direct dye.-^. 
Insoluble azo black. 


Nigro^en 






Insoluble azo black. 


Asophor hlaek S 






Do. 


Naphthvlamine other 







Dovclopin.T direct dves. 


Developer Z 


Phenyl methy] pryrazolcne / ' '•.??Z 


\ 


Do. 


Solidogen 


Formaldehvdo condensed 


\ Sa/7 


J 


Developing direct colors 


Para brown salt G 

Para broTra salt R 

Leucotrop 


p and toluidine. 
The dye "Vesuvine " 

The dye " Chrysoidine " . . . 

Dimethyl-phenyl benzyl- 
ammonium chloride 
(other alkyl or acyl 
groups ma.y be used).. 

(Ditto)-sulphonated, Ca 
salt. 

Dimethylplienyl benzjd- 
ammonium (sulphate) 
disulphonica<"id, Ca salt. 

Leucotrop W and rongal- 
ite C. 

Leucotrop AV and hydro- 
Sulphite NF. 

Leucotrop W H,nd hydral- 
iteA. 


f 1 27, 576 
\ 85, 352 
/ 1105,946 
\ 816, S52 


1412,574 

S417,276 
1220,542 
$246, 977 


1 Insoluble azo brown T'dth 
j p-nitranihne. 


Leucotrop W 






Indigcdischarpc in print- 
ing. 


Discharce salt W 






Disrharre printing. 


Ronc:aliteCL 






Do. 


HvdrosulpWtc CL 






Do. 


HvdraliteCL 






Do. 


Anthraquincne 


f 129,850 
I 80,360 


1294,260 

8547,787 

(2) 


JDischarge catalyzer. 

1 Nitroso blue by Conden- 


Tannosvphenol R 


Tajinin and resorcin 


Nitrose base JI 50 per cent. 


Nitro.so dimethyl aniline 

hydrochloride' 
Nitro-anthraqiiinone sul- 

phonic acid. 




/ 1592,663 
\ $304,091 


Liidifol 




Organic oxidizing agent 
for preventing the re- 
duction of vat dyes in 
the kicr. 







1 Pounds. 

2 See Resorcin. 



DYIIS AND OTHER FINISHED PRODUCTS, 



I vfroductory . — Tke finished products of the coal-tar chemical in- 
dustry are many and diverse. They include (1) dyes, (2) color 
lakes, (3) iDliotojiTaphic chemicals (developers), (4) medicinals, 
(5) flavors, (6) perfume materials, (7) synthetic phenolic resins, 



CEXSITS OF DYES AIsTD COAL-TAE, CHEMICALS. 31 

(8) synthetic tanning materials, and (9) explosives. There are many 
other substances belonging to all of these classes (except the synthetic 
resins and synthetic tanning materials) that are not derived from 
coal tar and that do not need to be considered for the present purpose. 

A few minor uses of coal-tar products hardly deserve separate 
classification for the present purpose. For example, sodium benzoate 
and sodium salicylate are used as food preservatives as well as for 
strictly medicinal purposes, but these uses are so closely allied that 
it does not seem proper to set up a separate class of food preservatives. 
Many dyes and lakes are used as inks or ink powders, either pure 
or mixed with gum or other vehicle. A separate classification would 
therefore result in the overlapping of the two classes of products. 
Some coal-tar chemicals, usually and pro]3erly classified as inter- 
mediates, are used for accelerating the vulcanization of rubber, the 
most important being aniline, thiocarbanilide, phenylenediamine, and 
nitrosodimethylaniline. As the substances used for this purpose 
belong to tb-C class of intermediates and are so classified in the tariff 
law, it seems inadvisable to set up another class of finished products. 

The technical and generic relationship of these different classes is 
exceedingly close. To a large extent they use the same intermediates. 
Phenol enters into the manufacture of some representatives of each of 
the nine classes of finislied products. Aniline is used for making dyes, 
lakes, medicinals, photographic chemicals, and explosives. Numerous 
other examples showing this close relationship could be cited. 

In previous reports^ the commission has pointed out the close 
relation of dyes to explosives and poison gases and the ease with 
which a dye factory can be converted into an explosive or poison- 
gas plant in an emergency. Since the signing of the armistice cer- 
tain plants in the United States which were erected for the manu- 
facture of explosives have been used for the manufacture of inter- 
mediates and dyes. 

A close relation also exists between the dye industry and the 
manufacture of flavors, perfume materials, photographic chemicals, 
and color lakes. A well-rounded, and matured dye industry would 
inevitably be accompanied by these smaller offshoots, which in many 
cases would furnish an outlet for by-products obtained in making 
the intermediates needed for the dye industry. Tlie synthetic 
phenolic resin industry and the synthetic tanning material industry 
are not so closely related to the dye industry as are the other cases 
cited. They are dependent chiefly uj)on phenol and formaldehyde, 
and therefore furnish an outlet in times of peace for the material, 
phenol, which is of sucli vital military importance. 

^Census of Dyes aud Coal-Tiii- Chemicals. lOlS; pp. .Ifi .ind HS. 



32 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



In general, the products derived from coal tar are treated alike 
in the tariff act of September 8, 1916. There are, however, excep- 
tions to this generalization which the commission has pointed out 
in previous reports.^ 

Table 7 shows in as great detail as is permissible, without revealing 
the output of single firms, the production of finished coal-tar prod- 
ucts during 1919. Table 8 compares the production in 1918 and 1919 
of products for which output could be published. The outstanding 
developments in the various classes of dyes and other finished coal- 
tar products is discussed in detail beginning on page 43. 

Table 7. — Production of finished coal-tar products during 1919. 

[The number in the first cohimn identifies the dye according to the 1914 edition of the Schultz tables. 
The second eolurtm gives the common name of the dye. The numbers in the third column refer to the 
numbered alphabetical list of manufacturers printed on p. 94. An x sipoiifics that the corresponding 
product was made by a manufacturer who did not consent to the publication of bis identification num- 
ber in connection therewith. Blanks in the fourth and fifth columns indicate that there was actual 
production durine; 1919, but that the fissures can not be published without revealing in formation in regard 
to the output of individual firms. The figures thus concealed are, however, included in the totals.] 



Sehultz 
No. 



23 



Common name. 



Total finished coal-tar 
products , 



NTTROSO DYES. 

Naphthol green 

NITEO DYES. 



Picric acid 

Naphthol yellow. 
Pigment chlorine. 



STILBENE DYES. 



Direct yellow R 

Chloramine orange G . 



PYRAZOLONE DYES. 

Tartrazine 



Monoazns. 

Pigrncnt fast yellow G. 

Spirit yeilow 

Butter yellow 

Chrysoidinc Y 

Ohrysoidine R 

Sudan I 

Croccine orange 

Orange G 

Ponceau G 

Chromotrope 2 R 

Fast acid fuch.sine B . . . 
Amido naphthol red G 
Alizarine yellow GG. . . 



Para nitranilin red. 
Chromotrope 2 li . . 
Alizarine yellow R. 



Wool violets.. 
Victoria violet. 
Lana fuchsine . 



Manufacturers' identifica- 
tion numbers. 



5,54,66. 



66, 77, X. 



5,53, 58, 112, 116, 123, x, x, 
5,58 



24, 112. 



69, 112, 121, X, X 

27, .53,64, 66, 69, 112, x. 
27,53,54,64,69,112... 

69, 112, 1.52, X 

54. 92, 112, 136, X 

27,112,136 



112, 116 

27,40,112,116 

64, 112 

5, .53, 64, 92, 112, 120 152, 
167, X, X. 



23, 116 

5, 23, 24, 40, 53, 64, 75, 78, 
92, 116, 120, 136, 152, 167, 



136 

40, 112, 110. 
116, 136, X.. 



Total production, 1919. 



Quantity. Value, 



Pounds. 
82,532,390 



34,646 



440, 924 



584,585,544 



38,831 



117,172 



767,674 



31, 1-56 
314,581 

220,542 
75, 868 
17,274 



26,699 



163, 170 



130, 424 



105,086 
15, 272 



47,964 

326, 223 

246, 977 

97,286 

15.273 



45,222 



116,906 



110,152 



239, .594 
30, 793 



Average 
price per 
pound. 



?1.02 



1.12 



1.17 



1.74 



1. .54 
1.04 
1.12 

1.28 



1.69 
"".'72 



.84 



2.98 
2.02 



» Cen.sus of Dyes and Coal-Tar Chemicals, 1918 ; pp. 36 and 38. 



CEXSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 33 

Table 7. — Production of finished coal-tar products duriny 1919 — Continued. 



Schultz 


Common name. 


Manufacturers ' identifica- 
tion numbers. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 


No. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


pound. 


65 


Azo DYES— continued. 

J/o«oa2o.s— Continued. 

Azo coralline 


64 


Poirnds. 






66 


Amido naphthol red 6 B 

Chromotrope 6 B 


64 








67 


5, 112, 116 


77,481 


S154,526 


$1.99 


68 


Spirit Yollow R 


112,x 


70 


Brilliant orange O 


X 








73 


Helio fast red 


X 








76 


Sudan II 


69, 112, X 








79 


Xvlidine orange 2 R 


136, X 








81 


Brilliant cochineal 


X 








82 




5,24,27,68, 112, 136, x,x.. 
75, 112, X 


552, 680 
24, 152 


439, .515 
128, 201 


.80 
.5.31 


83 


Ponceau 3 R 


88 


Acid anthracene brown R 

Metachrorae brown B 


112 


89 


53 








94 


Azo Eosino 


116 








102 


Diamond flavine G 


23, X 






li'5 


S udan brown 


X 




106 


A ut o! red 




1 


107 


SulphamLne brown A 


136 




109 


Palatine red A 


136 




lU 


Fast red BT 

Bordeaux B 

Chromotrope 10 B 

Erica2GN 

Geranine 

Diamine rose 


136, X 






il2 
114 


5,24,27,68,92,112, 136, x. 
116 


161,862 i 146,810 


.91 


117 


5s 






118 


58 






119 


112. 123 








120 


Salmon red x. 









121 


Erica B 


58, 68. A 








132 


Lake red P 


136 








134 




50 53, 54, 64, 112, x . ..... 


477,143 


787,110 


1.65 


138 


jfethyl orange 


57, 121 


130 


Orange IV 


X 








141 


Azo yellow 


112 








143 


Tropaeolino 


69 









144 


Orange I 


112, X 








145 
151 


Orange II 

Orange R 

Permanent red 4 B 


5, 24, 27, 53, 57, 64, 69, 112, 

117, 120, 136, X, X, X. 
69 


1,133,925 


717,199 


.63 


152 


X 







153 


Lake red C 


X 


1 




154 


Palatine chrome Ijrown 


23, 112 








155 


Acid alizarine garnet R 


23 '. 








156 


Palatine chrome violet 


23, 112 








159 


Acid alizarine l)lack R 


23 








160 


Fast brown N i 6-1 








161 


Fast red A 


5,27,53,69,92,112,116,120, 

136, X. 
5, 27, 43, 64, 92, 112, 116, x. 
112 


267,582 
187,264 


280,974 
267, 129 


1.05 
1.43 


163 


Azo rubine 


164 


Fast red VR 


166 


FastrrjdE 


5, X 








167 


Crocein scarlet 3 BX 











168 


Amaranth 


24,27,92,112,116,136,158, 

X, X, X. 

5,24,27,92.112, 136, x 

112 136, 150, X 


294,416 

231,519 
269, 169 


877,491 

305,445 
103,926 


2.98 
1 32 


100 


Cochineal red 


173 


1 ,ithol red R 


39 


177 


Mordant yellow 


136 




180 


Eriochromo blue black B 

Saliciue black U 


152 








181 


27, 53, 54, 64, 92, 112, 116, 

136, 152. 
23 


739,372 


923,888 


1 25 


183 


Erioehrome black T 




184 


Eriochromo black A 


23, 64, 92, 112 . 


686, 710 


933,677 


1 36 


188 


Sulphon acid lilue R 


112 




189 


Sulphon acid 1 >luc B 


112 








190 


Benzo l)rown5 R 


123 








193 


Stanley red 


123 






194 


Thiazine rod R 


116 








195 


Rosophenine SG 










196 


Titan red 










197 


Thiazine red G 


64, 123, X 


11,886 


14,266 


1.20 


198 


Mimosa C 


1Z3 




200 


Lake red D 


136,150 








201 


Pigment scarlet G 


150 









22816°— 21- 



34 



CEIS'SUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



T^VBLE 7. — Production of finished coal-tar products during .1919 — Continued. 



Common nam.o. 



Manufacturers ' identiflca- 
tion num.bers. 



Total production, 1919. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Azo DYES— continued. 
Monoazos — Continued. 



Palatine chrome red B . 
All other monoazodyes. 



Total monoazo dyes . 

Disazo dyes. 



Ijcather brown. . . . 
Resorcin brown . . . 

Fast brown 

Algama black 10 B . 



Sudan ITI 

Cloth red G 

Brilliant croceine 

Ervthrine P 

Sudan IV 

Cloth red B 

Croceine 3 B 

AVoolred B 

Neutralgray G 

Coomassie wool black S. 

Clotli scarlet G 

Scarlet E C 

Sulph ocyanine 

Buffalo black 10 B 

Fast sulphon black F. . . 
Sulph ocyanine black B . 
Nanhthvlamine black . . 

Brilliant black B 

Diamond black 

Benzofast scarlet 

Bismark brown Y 



Bismark brown 2 R 

Palatine chrome black S . 

Paper yellow 

Chrysophenine G 

Congo red 

Orange TA 

Congo Corinth G 

Bordeaux 

Trisiilplion violet B 

Diamine violet N 

Diamine brown V 

Oxamine Ijlack BHN 

B enzo blue 2 B 



Benzo orange R 

Crumpsall direct fast red R. 

Chrysaminc G 

Diaminefast red F 

Diamine brown 

Cresotine yellow 

Direct violet R 

Anthracene red 

Oxy diamine orange 

Benzopurpurine 4 B 

B en zopurp urine B 

Congo Corinth B 

Azo l)lue 

Trisulphon blue R 

Benzo blue BX 

Benzo blue 'AH 

Toluylone orange G 

Benzopurpurine 10 B 

Benzazuriiie G 

DianilbluoG 

Ct! icago ()lue R W 

Chicago Iilue6 15 

lienzamine pure blue 

All other disazo dyes 



Total disazo dyes. 



112,136,150,x 

23, 24, 40, 53, 57, 64, 69, 75, 
92, 112, 116, 121, 136, 



Pounds. 
28,081 
939,9.35 



■S79,928 
1,190,7.53 



8, 881, 810 



11, 560, 384 



136 

112 

112 

5, 27, 40, 53, 64, 7.5, 92, 112, 
116, 120, X. 



1,877,8C0 



2,757,443 



5,27,112. 
27 



157, .509 



379, 494 



69, 112, X. 
92,x 



112. 
116. 
1.30. 
69.. 



54, 112. 

112 

112 



112 

5 

116 

92, 112, 167. 
58 



27,53,58,64,66,74, 112, 116, 
X. 

27,53,54,64,69,112 

40 



112,116,x,x,x 

58, 112, 116, 165, X.... 
43, 112,116, 120, x,x. 
n2,x 

5, 43, 112, 116, X 



112-x.. 
92,112. 

58 



5,53,92,112,116 

5, 13, 27, 40, 43, 53, 58, 75, 

112, 116,120, 154, 165, x,x. 

43,116,x,x,x 



40,112,x,x,x,x 

92,112,116 

92,112,116 

43,112 

116 

68,110 

112 

13, 53, 75, 92, 112, 116, 154, X.. 
5,112 



92 

116 

112,116, x,x 

5, 13, 27, 92, 112, 116, 154, x,x 

112 

112,116 

53,112,116 

116 

116 

116 

53,75,112,116,154 

23,53,69,112,116,x,x,x.... 



222, 938 



329,989 



412,574 
631, 308 



417,276 
659,332 



48, 723 
86, 795 

873, 734 



61, 711 
219,215 
979, 285 



137, 704 



266, 770 



485,046 
1,380,335 

42,807 



1,321,362 
1,380,291 

37,820 



54,279 
56,864 
15,959 



73,723 

1.54; 789 
35,067 



517,706 



92,214 
182, 046 



150,589 



192, 350 
491,321 



9,307,768 



162,745 
309,066 



479,460 



378, 537 
732, 951 



14,401,615 



CE2JSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 35 

Table 1.— Production of finished coal-tar products duriny iP/P— Cuntinuecl. 



SchuJtz 


Common uame. 


Manufacturers' identifica- 
tion numbers. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 


No. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


per price 
pound. 


436 


Azo DYES— continued. 

Trisazo dyes. 

Coliunbia black FF 


112 


Pounds. I 




441 


Diazo blue Mack RS 


116 








450 




X. 








462 




5,40,43,53,112,116,165,x,x 
112,116 


7,250,007 


$7,521,343 


$1.04 


463 


Cotton black E 




464 




43,l]2,x 


69,700 


134,408 


1.93 


469 




116 




470 




116 




1 


ill 


Chloramiue blue 3 G 


116 








474 




5,53,75,112,116,x 


305,854 
136,638 


565,873 
291,758 


1.85 


475 


O.xamine green GX 

Bonzamine brown 3 GO 


13,43,53,x,x 


2.14 


476 


43, 112, X 




477 


5,112 












76, 112, X, X, X 


131,960 


198,846 


1 51 












8,829,578 


10,217,788 


1 Ifi 




TetraliUiazo dyes. 


13,43,x 




485 


S3, .506 


102,-336 


1 23 






IIG 






All other azo dves 


13, 58, 92, 123, X 


81,472 


124,493 


1 53 












27,191,371 


30,416,702 


1 34 




DIPHENYLMETHANE DYES. 

Auramlne 

TRIFIIENYLMETH.4.NE DYES. 
Mftlarbifp fippn 


23, 53, 66 




493 


127,567 
.560 .■^01 


392,744 
81,827,474 


3 08 


495 


40,50, 53, 95, 112, 166, x, x, x . 


3.26 


499 


Brilliant green 


95, X 1 '. 




502 


Guinea green 


31, 112 ' 






503 


BrilLiant milling green B 

Light green 


112 : 






505 


158 1 




506 


Erioglaucine 


112 




511 


Para-fuclisine 


112 






512 


Magenta 


13, 33, 50, 53, 66, 69, 80, 86, ] 155, 830 

112, 125, 130, X, X, X. 1 
112, 140 1 


712,086 


4 57 


513 


New fucbsine 

Methyl violet 




535 


27,49,53,66,69,74,112,117,, 574,436 1 i.i6;j,i79 
146, 171, X. i 

23 1 


2.41 


516 


Crj'stal violet. 




521 


Aniline blue 


69, 136, X 1 ' 


528 


Fast acid violet 10 B - . 


116 . 1 1 1 


530 


Acid violet 


31, 112 . . 




535 


Methvl alkali blue 


136 


1 


536 


Alkali blue 


50, 69, 80, 112, 136, 146, x, x . 77 79fi 


494 1.^q ! fi..'.5 


537 


Methyl blue for silk 


50,80 




539 


Soluble blue 


50,69, 112 

23, 112 


16,315 1 S0,613 1 5.55 




All ther triphenylmethaue dyes. 

Total triphonylmethane 
dyes. 

DIPHENYI.-NAPHTnYL-METH.A.NE 
DYES. 

Victoria blue B 






1 




1,761,742 1 6,494,720 ; 3.69 




23 


1 i 


559 






560 


Night blue 


X 







566 


Wool creen S 


5, 23 






573 


XANTHONE DYES. 

Rhodamine B 


53 


1 




580 


Fast acid violet B 


95 








585 


Uraniue 


53 69 








587 


Eo.sine 


53,66,69, 117 

09, X 


121,303 


764, 179 


•6. 30 


592 


Ervtiu-osinc B 




h93 


Phlo.xine P 


53 








597 


Rose Bengale B 


69 








.599 


GaUiene 


150 169 








(00 


Coerulein B 


169 .... 


. ■ . ..i: 




COl 


Coerulcin S 


1.50 


j 






Total xanthouc dves 




1 






190,138 1.235.526 


6.50 
















36 CENSUS or dyes and coal-tar chemicals. 

Table 7. — Production of finished coal-tar products during i9i9— Continuecl. 



Schultz 


Common name. 


Manufacturers ' identifica- 
tion numbers. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 


No. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


poimd. 


602 


ACKIDINE DYES. 


112 


Pounds. 






606 




69 72, 112 


14,648 


$56,588 


$3.86 






72 




615 


THIOBENZENYL DYES. 

Thioflavine S 


123 








616 




18, 112,123, X, X, X, X 

18, 54, 112, 116, 123, X 

123 


271,338 
54,077 


464,870 
143,831 


1.71 


617 




2.66 




Other thiobenzenyl dyes 

INDOPHENOL DYES. 




619 


77 112 151 


126,611 


201,737 


1.59 




Otlier indophenol dyes 


92 






OXAZINE AND THIAZINE DY'ES. 

Delphine blue B . 


40 112 152 








622 


43,827 
365,243 


164,184 
1,105,346 


3.75 


626 




5 24 40 64, 112, X. .. . 


3.03 


631 




112 




649 




92 X 








656 




64 








659 




24,27,40,53,66,98,112,127, 

159,166.x,x. 
92 112 X 


465,992 
2,435 


1,410,760 
11,684 


3.03 


660 


Methylene green 


4.80 


667 


Brilliant alizarine hlue 


64 






Other oxazine and thiazine dyes . 












Total oxazine and thia- 
zines. 

AZINE DYES. 












904, 755 


2,754,677 


3.04 




53 68 




672 








679 




29 66, 74, 112, 127 


131,042 

28, 458 


527,231 
48,544 


4.02 


681 




68,116,x,x 

112 


1.71 


683 






697 


Induline (spirit soluble) 

Ni;;rosine (spirit soluble) 

Induline (water soluble) 

Nigrosine (water soluble) 

SITLPHUR COLORS. 


18 64, 112, X 


436, 201 

346, 167 

130, 704 

1,660,149 


231,233 

245,508 

87,494 

987,457 


.53 


698 


24 27,64,69,112 


.71 


699 


18,53,64,69 


.67 


700 


18,24,64,66,69,112,152 

13,40,53,64,73,92,112,114, 

151,166,x,x,x. 
13, 17, 40, 45, 53, 64, 74, 92, 

112, 116, 151, X. 
5, 40, 53, 58, 64, 74, 92, 112, 

114, 116, 144, 148, 151, x, 

X, X. 


.59 


720 


14,504,770 

1,622,762 

805,861 


4,141,124 

1,797,469 

378,129 


.29 




Sulphtir blue 


1.11 




Sulphur lirown 


.47 


713 


Thiophor bronze , . 






Sulphur green 


40, 64, 112, 116, 144, 151, x, x . 
40 53,112,116 


277, 641 
276,400 


279, 149 
228,441 


1.01 




Sulphur yellow and orange 

Sulphur maroon 


.83 




40 58 






Sulphur tan 


144,X,x 

112 


81,905 


27, 567 


.34 




Sulphur colors (various shades) . 
Total sulphur colors 
















17,624,418 


6,901,734 


.39 




ANTHRAQUINONE DYES. 

Indanthrene green B 


53 




"^65 








76B 


Indanthrenc violet R 


53 








778 


Alizarin 


112 








779 




112 








782 




40,150,169 


40, 426 


63,674 


1. .58 


784 




112 




803 


Alizarin blue WX 


112 








842 




53 . ... 








849 




53 








858 


Alizarin saphirol B 


112 









CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICAL-S. 3? 

Table 7. — Production of finished coal-tar products during J919 — Continued. 



Schultz 


Common name. 


Manufacturers' identifiea- 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 


No. 


tion numbers. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


pound. 


874 


INDIGO AND ITS DERR'ATIVES. 


52,53,112 


Pounds. 

8, 863, 824 
1,699,670 


55,233,719 
1,093,724 


80 59 


877 
881 


Indigotine or indigo extract 

Bromo- indigo 


5, 14, 53, 112, 116, 146, X 


.64 


922 


ANILINE BLACK GROUP. 

Picjment aniline black paste 

Ursol DB 


40 








923 


130 1 1 








Unclassified dyes of imknown 
composition. 

Total dyes 


33, X 


















63,402,194 


07,598,855 


1.07 




COLOR LAKES. 

Alizarin lakes 


x,x,x 












Blue 


10, 21, 34, 40, 48, 53, 56, 60, 
70, 102, 133, 138, 150, x, x, 

X, X, x, X, X, X, x, X, X, X, 

x,x,x,x 
133,x,x,x,x 

10, 21, 34, 48, 53, 56, 70, 96, 
102,138, x,x,x,x,x,x, 
X, X, X, X, x,x. 

10,21, 34, 48, 53, 56, 70, 
133, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 

X, X, X, X. 

10, 21, 34, 133, 150, x, x, x, 

X, X, X, X, X, X, X. 

40, 102, 161,x,x, x 


543, 201 

74,625 
466,977 

697,699 

246,710 

484, 3r6 

6,561 

2, 101, 527 

865, 536 

259,378 

610,445 
524,030 

565,316 


391,210 

9,812 
214,697 

260, 769 

92,291 

148, 152 

4,519 

9S6,765 

361,904 

34.5,078 

238,324 
530,804 

570,687 


72 




Brown 


13 




Green 


46 




Maroon 


37 




Orange 


37 




Para red 


31 






69 




Ked. 


10,21,34,48,53,56,70,96, 
102, 138,161, x,x,x,x,x, 
x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x. 

10,21,34,48,53,56,60,70, 
96, 133, 138, 150, x, x, x, 
x,x,x,x,x, x,x,x,x,x, 

lo', 21 '34, 40, 48, 53, 56, 60, 
70, 96, 133, 137, 138, x, x, 
x,x,x, x,x,x,x,x,x,x, 

X. 

10. 34, 48, 53, 60, 70, 102, 
138, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X. 

10, 21, 34, 48, 53, 56, 60, 70, 
96,102,133, 138, 150, x,x, 

X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 

10, 21, Voj 48, 53, 60, 70, 82, 
96, 102,133, x,x,x,x,x, 

X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X. 
X 


47 




Scarlet 


42 






1 33 




Yellow 


39 




Eosine 


1 01 






1 01 




All other color lakes 






Total color lakes 












7,569,921 


4,179,964 


55 




PHOTOGRArinC CHEMICALS. 

Hydroquinone 


104, 112, 131, 169, X 

7, 57, 112,131, 139, x,x.... 

121,139 






272,329 
59,024 


552,087 
508, 434 


2 03 




Methyl ]i-amidophenol sulphate 

(metol). 

cals. 

Total photographic chem- 
icals. 

MEDICINALS. 

Acetanilidej U. S. P 

Acetphenetidine 


8.61 














335, 509 


1,059,340 


3.16 




24,104, 109, 136, x,X,X.... 
109 






918,795 


440,066 


.48 




Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)... 
Ammonium salicylate 


44, 52, 79, 107, 109, x, x, x, x. . 


1,777,105 


4,034,400 


2.27 




Amy 1 salicylate 


X 









38 CEIS'SUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Table 7. — Production of finished coal-far products durinci 1919 — Contiiined. 



Schultz 


Common name. 


Manuiacturers' identifica- 
tion numbers. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 


No. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


pound. 




MEDiciNALS — Continued. 

Anesthesins (ethyl p-amino 
benzoatel. 


1, X 


Pounds. 








47, 103 












72 












61,155 












104, X 










Bismuth tribromphenol 


104 








1,24, 109 


40,907 $37,881 


SO. 95 




CmchoDhen (phenylcinchoninic 

acid). 


1 2J . . . . . 






101 










116 ... . . . 










24 116 








Dibrom oxy mercury fluorescin. 

Dioxyquinoline sulphate 

Dichloramine T 


81 








59 










1,24,109 










Disinfects nt 


30,164,170 


2, 103, 101 


91,670 


.04 






63 






Guaiaeol crystals, U. S. P 


53,110 










53,116 










Halazone 


1, 21, 109 


459 


848 


1. 85 






24 


















Methylsalicylate 


36, 104, x,x 

24,61, 104, 121 


879, 833 
36, 701 


332, 123 
156,562 


.38 






4.27 




b-NaphthoI salicylate 


121 








47, X . . 












1 .... 










Phenolphthalein 


109,168 










Pheuolsulphonates 


1, 104, X 


33,711 


16,333 


.48 




Phenolsulphonephthalein 

Procaine 


81 






1, x,x 


3,448 
124,034 
301,518 


330,334 
112,359 
169,508 


95.8 




Salol 


104, 109, X 


.91 




Sodium salicylate 


44, 61,104, 109, x,x 

101 


.56 




Sodium sulphocarbolate 






X 












101 










Total medicinals 












6,777,988 


7,883,071 


1.16 




FLAVORS. 


109, X 
















61 












61 










Methyl salicylate (see medici- 
nals). _ 












24, 26, 109,131, X, X 


547,988 


1,017,091 


1.86 






61 


















610,825 


1,318,654 


2.16 




PERFUME MATEKIAL.S. 


61, X 
















65, 141, 155, X 


17,01'J 


39,137 


2.30 






141,155 








61 
























61, X 












61 












61, 141,155 
























61 












141, X 












61 - . 
























61,155, X 












61, 155, X 


695 


8,260 


11.89 






61, 155, X 






Methyl phlhalol 


X 










b-Naphthol ethyl ether (nero- 

lin). 
b-Naphthol methyl ether (yara 

yara). 






















61, 155 










Phenyl othylacetato 


61, X 









CEI^SUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 39 

Table 7. — Production of ftnisiied coal-tar products during 1919 — Continued. 



Schultz 


Common name. 


Bfanufacturers' identifica- 
tion numbers. 


Total production, 1919. 


Average 


No. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


pound. 




PERFUME MATEKIAL— COntd. 

Phenyl acetic acid 


X 


Pounds. 








Phenyl ethyl alcohol 


X 










Salicylic aldehyde 


X 











Total perfumes 












41,419 


§164,302 


S3 97 




SYNTHETIC PHEI.rOLIC RE.SIITS. 

Derived from eresoL 


39, 126, X 














Derived from phenol 


39, 126, X 










Derived from solvent naphtha. . 


X 










Derived from p-coumarone 

Total resins 


15,53 




















3,094,534 


2,311,358 


.75 




SYOTTHETIC TANNING M.VTERIAL. 

Liberty extract 


92 

















The following table shoTvs a comparison of the published figures 
for 1918 and 1919: 

Table S. — Co)U[mrison of production of finished coal-tar products, 1918 and 1919. 



32 

33 

34 

36 

3/ 

48 

58 

82 

112 

145 

161 

163 

168 

173 

181 



217 
227 
283 
284 
303 
304 
307 



Name of dye. 



Total finished coal-tar 
products 

Naphthol green 

Direct yellow R 

mONO.VZO DYES. 

Butter yell oiv 

Chrysoidine Y 

Chrysoidiae R 

Sudan I 

Croeeine orange 

Alizarin yellow GG... 

Alizarin "y ellow E 

Ponceau 2 R 

Bordeaux B 

Orange II 

Fast red A 

Azo rubine 

A maranth 

I.ithol red R 

Salicine black U , 

Total monoazo dyes 

DISAZO DTE3. 

Algama black lOB 

Brilliant croeeine 

Bismark brown Y 

Bismark brown 2R 

Paper yellow 

Chrysopheniue G 

Congo red 



Production, 1918. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 
76,802,959 



22,465 
307, 702 



27^069 

376,495 

137,035 

29,670 

30,824 

2,233,208 

385,910 

1,189,054 

200,415 

916,890 

242, 215 

79,779 

73,539 

353,104 

469,159 

8,531,763 



1,158,309 

84, 643 

378,208 

295,080 

1,664 

41,663 

5.S7, 153 



Value. 



383,815, 74G 



54,013 

804,378 



30, 
290, 
166, 

37, 

27, 
1,525, 
352, 
937, 
205, 
619, 
249, 
120, 

64, 
838, 
758. 



9,228,280 



1,463,043 
162, 875 
305,417 
386,664 
5,668 
238,012 

1,178,589 



Price 
per 

pound. 



si.og 



2.40 
2.61 



1.12 

. 77 

1.22 

1.25 

.89 

.68 

.91 

.79 

1.02 

.68 

1.03 

1.51 

.88 

2.38 

1.62 



1.07 



1.26 
1.92 
.81 
.97 
3.41 
5.71 
2.01 



Production, 1919. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Pounds. 
82,532,390 584,585,544 



34,646 
440,924 



31,156 

314, 5S1 

220, 542 

75,808 

17, 274 

163,170 

130,424 

552,680 

161,862 

1, 133, 925 

267, 582 

187, 264 

294, 416 

269, 169 

739, 372 



8,881,810 



1,877,860 
157, 509 
412,574 
631,308 

48, 723 

86, 795 

873, 734 



38,831 
767,674 



47, 964 
326, 223 
215.977 
97,288 
15,273 
116,906 
110,152 
439, 515 
146,810 
717, 199 
280, 974 
267, 129 
877, 491 
103,926 
923,888 



11,560,384 



,757,443 
379,494 
417,276 
659,332 
61,711 
219,215 
979, 285 



Price 
per 

pound. 



SI. 03 



1.121 
1.741 



1.54 
1.037 
1.12 
1.282 

.884 
.717 
.845 
.795 
.907 
.633 
1.05 
1.427 
2.98 
.386 
1.25 



1.3016 



1.468 
2.409 
1.011 
1.044 
1.266 
2.525 
1.120 



40 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Table 8. — Comparison of production of finished coal-tar products, etc. — Contd. 



6 


Name of dye. 


Production, 1918. 


Production, 1919. 


'A 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Price 

per 

poimd. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Price 

per 

pound. 


337 


DisAzo DYES— continued. 
BenzQ blue 2B 


Pounds. 

1,523,985 

.50, 422 

28, 846 

356, 522 

99,645 


S2, 084, 036 

78, 722 

44, 159 

875,645 

221,771 


$1. 37 
1.56 
1.53 
2.46 
2.23 


Pounds. 

81,380,335 

42, 807 

54,279 

288,021 

182,946 


$1,386,291 

37,820 

73, 723 

517, 706 

309,066 


$1. 004 


340 


Benzo orange R 


.883 


^4?, 


Chrvsamine G 


1.358 


363 


Benzo purpurine 4B 


1.797 


3P1 


Benzo blue 3B 


1.689 




Total disazo dyes 






7,459,601 


12,705,048 


1.70 


9,307,768 


14,401,615 


1.55 




TRISAZO DYES. 

Oxamine green B 




474 


295, 147 
29,118 


649, 125 
60,860 


2.20 
2.16 


305,854 
136,638 


565,873 
291,768 


1.860 


475 


Oxamine green GX 


2.135 




Total trisazo dyes 






7,518,099 


8, 106, 563 


1.08 


8,829,678 


10,217,788 


1.157 




Total azo dyes 






24,931,566 


32,039,232 


1.28 


27,191,371 


36,416,702 


1.34 




DIPHENYLMETHANE DYES. 

Auraciine 




4'>3 


45,634 


171,807 


3.76 


127,567 


392,744 


3.078 




TRIPIIENY^LMETHANE DYES. 

Malachite green 




4^5 


290,416 
71,675 

632, 198 
43, 184 


1,626,466 
553,359 

1, 756, 775 
359,897 


5.60 
7.72 
2.78 
8.33 


560,301 
155,830 
574,436 

77, 796 


1,827,474 
712,088 

1,403,179 
494, 133 


3.261 


51? 


Magenta 


4.692 


515 


Methyl violet 


2.442 


536 


Alkali blue 


6.362 




Total triphenylmethane 
dyes 






1,262,704 


5,791,588 


4.59 


1,761,742 


6,494,720 


3.69 




XANTHONE DYES. 

Eosine 




587 


161, 153 


1,258,549 


7.81 


121,303 


764,179 


6.30 




THIOBENZENYL DYES. 

Primuline 




616 


72,788 
123,816 


221, 154 
440, 250 


3.04 
3.56 


271,338 

54,077 


464,870 
143,831 


1.713 


617 


Columbia yellow 


2.66 




OXAZINE AND THIAZINE DYES. 

Oallocyanine 




6?6 


435,460 
312,572 


2,231,827 
873,804 


5.12 
2.80 


365, 243 
465, 992 


1,105,346 
1,410,760 


3.026 


f ■.'>£) 




3.03 




AZINE DYES. 

Safranine 




67Q 


106,591 

16,746 

8,589 

314, 151 

• 91,724 

1,191,343 


623, 560 

19,662 

12,551 

■ 222,986 

64,495 

755,846 


5.85 

1.17 

1.46 

.71 

.70 

.63 


131,042 
28,458 
436, 201 
346, 167 
130, 704 
1,660,149 


527,231 
48,544 

231, 233 

245,508 
87,494 

987,457 


4.023 


681 


New fast gray 


1.706 


PQ7 


Induline (spirit soluble) 


.530 


G98 
6QP 


Nigrosine (spirit soluble) 

Induline (water soluble) 


.709 
.669 


700 


Nigrosine (water soluble) 

SULPHUR DYES. 

Sulphur black 


.595 


7?1 


12,385,130 

1,056,691 

5,309,044 

364,698 

521, 421 

337,549 


4,427,507 

1,525,762 

2, 558, 995 

296, 840 

667, 060 

219,280 


.37 
1.45 

.48 

.81 
1.09 

.65 


14,504,770 

1,622,762 

805, 861 

277,641 

276, 400 

81,905 


4,141,124 

1,797,469 

378, 129 

279, 149 

228,441 

27,567 


.286 




Sulphur blue 


1.108 




Sulphur brown 


.47 




Sulphur green or olive 


.941 




Sulphur yellow and orange 

SuliJhur tan 


.83 
.337 




INDIGO AND ITS DERIVATIVES. 

I ndigo, synthetic . . 






23,698,826 


10,812,686 


.46 


17,624,418 


6,901,734 


.392 


874 


3,083,888 
1,434,703 


2,724,134 
883,668 


.88 
.62 


8,863,824 
1,699,670 


5,233,719 
1,093,724 


.591 


877 


Indigotine or indigo extract 

Total dyes 


.644 




68,464,446 


62,026,390 


1.07 


63,402,194 


67,598,855 


1.07 




COLOR LAKES. 

Blue 






753,244 
1,042,803 


416,131 
278, 168 


.50 
.27 


543,201 
406,977 


391,210 
214,697 


.72 




Green 


.46 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAK CHEMICALS. 41 

Table 8. — Comparison of production of finished coal-tar products, etc. — Contd, 



Name of dye. 



COLOR LAKES— continued. 



Maroon 

Orange 

Para red... 

Red 

Scarlet 

Violet 

Yellow 

Eosine 

Lithol red. 



Total color lakes 

PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMIC.VLS. 



Hydroquinone 

Methyl p-amidophenol sulphate 
(Metol) 



Total photographic chemi- 
cals 



Production, 1918. 



Production, 1919. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 
632,826 
694, 3.50 
165,039 

1,828,942 

1,258,364 
245,017 

1,913,123 
303,511 
632,663 



9,590,537 



305, 774 
10,975 



316,749 



:vIEDICIN.\LS. 

Acetanilide, U.S. P 

Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) 

b-Naphthol benzoate 

Phenolsulphonates 

Salol 

Sodium salicylate 



939,062 
961,113 
13,975 
55, 913 
271,945 
547, 117 



Total medieinals 

FLAVORS. 

Saccharin 

Total flavors 

PEP.FUME MATERIALS. 

Benzyl acetate 

Total perfume materials. 



3,623,352 



425, f 



458,256 



30, 193 



116,263 



Value. 



Price 

! per 
I pound. 



S237, 322 
374,456 
141,857 
844, 450 
720, 640 
233, 196 
626,922 
312,352 
801,765 



SO. 38 
.54 
.86 
.46 
.57 
.95 
.33 
1.03 
1.27 



5,020,023 



.52 



659,488 
164,427 



2.16 
14.98 



823, 915 



2.60 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Pounds. 
697,699 
246,710 
484, 306 

2,101,527 
865,536 
259, 378 
610,445 
524,030 
565,316 



7,569,921 



272,329 
59,024 



335,509 



615, 158 
3,130,640 
96, 144 
40,013 
408,072 
469, 804 



7,792,984 



4,489,617 



4,925,627 



.66 
3.26 
6.88 

.72 
1.49 

.86 



2.15 



10.55 



10.75 



I 
101,284 3.35 



584,695 



5.03 



918, 795 
1,777,105 
36,701 
33,711 
124, 034 
301, 518 



6, 777, J 



547,988 



610, 825 



17,049 



41,419 



.S260, 7C9 
92, 291 
148, 152 
986, 705 
361,904 
345, 078 
238,324 
530,804 
570,687 



4,179,964 



Price 

per 

pound. 



552, 087 
508,434 



1,059,340 



440,066 
4,034,400 
156, 562 
16,333 
112,359 
169, 508 



7,883,071 



1,017,091 



1,318,654 



39, 137 



164,302 



10.37 
.374 
.306 
.47 
.42 
1.330 
.39 
1.01 
1.01 



.55 



2.03 
8.61 



3.16 



.479 
2.27 
4.266 

.485 

.906. 

.562 

1.16 



2.16 



2.296 



3.966 



DYES. 



In Table 9 the dyes have been arranged according to the method 
of application on the fiber into the following classes: (1) Direct 
dyes; (2) vat dyes, further subdivided into indigo and other vats; 
(3) acid dyes; (4) sulphur dyes; (5) mordant dyes; (6) basic dyes; 
(7) color lake and spirit soluble dyes; (8) unclassified dyes. The 
available information on dyes including imports during the 1914 
fiscal year and domestic production from 1917 to 1919 inclusive has 
been arranged in this manner and the totals for each group are shown 
in Table 9. 

Although the distinction between certain groups is not clear cut, 
particularly between acid and mordant dyes, still it is believed that 
this grouping more nearly reflects the progress in the industry than 
does that of Tables 7 and 8, which classify the dj^es according to 



42 



CE]>TSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



chemical structure. This is especially true from the consumer's 
standpoint, as he is directly concerned with the application of the 
dye on the fiber. This same information is also shown graphically 
in figure 1, page 45. 

Table 0. — Comparif<on of imporis, 1914, u-itJi the proclucfion of dyes hii classes, 

1917, 1918, and 1919. 





1914 


1917 


1918 


1919 


Class. 


Imports. 


Per 

cent of 
total. 


United 

States 
production. 


Per 
cent of 

total. 


United 

States 

production. 


Per 

cent of 
total. 


United 

States 

production. 


Per 

cent of 
total. 


nirect 


Pounds. 
10,264,757 
10,3.52,663 


22.34 
22. 53 


Pounds. 
11,181,761 
289,296 


24.32 
.63 


Ptmnds. 
12,28.5,683 
3,281,337 


21.01 
5.61 


Pounds. 

14,444,934 

9,252,982 


22.78 


at (including indigo) 


14.59 


(s) Indigo 

(6) other vats... 


8,407,359 
1,945,304 




274, 771 
14, 525 




3,053,888 
197,449 




8, 863, 824 
359,158 




Acid 


9,286,501 
7,053,879 
4,4.50,442 
3,002,480 

1,512,605 
27, 558 


20.21 
15.35 

9.69 
6.53 

3.29 
.06 


9,372,121 

15,588,222 

4,164,902 

2,0<^,043 

934,360 
2,368,541 


20.38 
33.91 

9.06 
4.52 

2.03 
5.15 


9,799,071 

23,698,826 
5,447,192 
2, 879, 639 

1,068,466 
4,232 


16.76 

40.53 

9.32 

4.93 

l.,?3 
.01 


12,195,968 
17,624,418 
3,985,050 
4,036,532 

1,813,199 
49,111 


19.24 


Sulphur 


27.80 


Mordant . . 


6.29 


Basic 


6.37 


Dyes for color lakes 
and spirit soluble 
dves 


2.86 


Unclassified 


.07 






Total 


45, 950, S&a 


100.00 


45,977,246 


100.00 


53,464,445 


100.00 


63,402,194 


100.00 







Direct dyes. — From a study of Table 9 and figure 1 it is seen that 
in 1917 the domestic production of direct dyes slightly exceeded the 
1914 import. There has been a small but steady increase each suc- 
ceeding year culminating in an output of oter 14,000,000 pounds in 
1919. This is an increase of about 40 per cent over the prewar ini- 
IDorts and of 17.5 per cent over the 1918 output. This class of colors 
ranked second in quantity of output in 1919 and accounted for 
about 22 per cent of both the 1911 import and 1919 productio3i. 
Of more importance than the increased output was the decrease in 
quantity of the dyes of lesser importance in this group, which was 
more than offset by an increased output of the better dyes and the 
appearance of new dyes of a faster type. Thus there was a greater 
A'ariety of direct dyes from which the consumer could make his 
selection for dyeing cotton, half wool, and half silk goods. 

Direct Deep Black EW with a total output in 1919 of 7,250,007, 
pounds valued at $7,521,343, an increase over 1918, accounted for 
over 50 per cent of the production of direct dyes. Benzo Blue 2B 
ranked second in this group with an output of 1,380,335 pounds 
valued at $1,386,291, a slight decrease from 1918. 

Other important dyes in this class which showed an important 
gain in quantity produced in 1919 were as follows: Congo Eed, in- 
creased by 50 per cent ; Primuline, by 300 per cent ; Benzo Blue 3B, 
by 100 per cent; and Chrysamine G, by 100 jxir cent: and Oxamine 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



43 



1 i 1 1 1 1 




1 




I 




i 


1 1 1 1 


§ ^ ? ^ S s 



soNnod Noniii/^ 




9QNnOd NOllim 



44 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Black B. H. N., Oxamine Green B, Benzazurine, and Oxamine Green 
G, also showed large increases over the output of 1918, which could 
not be published. 

The following direct colors made their first appearance in 1919: 
Those produced in considerable quantity include Chloramine Black 
N, Diamine Fast Red F, Chloramine Blue 3G, Cotton Black E, 
Chicago Blue 6B, Dianil Blue B, Chloramine Green B, Diamine 
Violet N, Oxycliamine Orange R, Chicago Blue R and W, and Erica 
B ; others produced in smaller quantities than those already men- 
tioned include: Erica 2GN, Diazo Blue Black RS, Congo Corinth, 
Benzo Black Blue R, Diamine Brown, Benzo Fast Scarlet, Titian 
Red 3B, Azo Blue, Brilliant Hessian Purple, Salmon Red, Benzo 
Brown 5R, Roseplienine lOB, Thio-flavine S, Benzo Blue R, and 
Geranine. Several other important direct dyes were produced in 
large quantities. These could not be identified according to Schultz 
but are included in the total for this class. . 

Indigo and other vat dyes. — It is in this class of dyes that the 
domestic industry has been particularly backward, and in 1919 the 
quantity of vat dyes, with the exception of indigo which is the most 
important, was still inadequate for domestic needs. 

The production of indigo (20 per cent paste) during 1919 of 
8,863,824 pourtds, a slight increase over 1914 imports, may be 
regarded as the most important development of the American 
dye industry in 1919. The output exceeded the domestic demand 
and large quantities of indigo were exported. Of all the dyes 
produced in this country indigo ranks second only in quantity to 
sulphur black, but exceeds it by over $1,000,000 in value. Brom- 
indigos, which are of great value for cotton dyeing and printing, 
were manufactured in considerable quantity in 1919. 

The manufacture of vat dyes, not including indigo, is less de- 
veloped and the output more inadequate for our domestic needs 
than any other class. During 1919 four vat dyes (yellow, blue, green, 
and violet) were placed on the market during 1919 by one firm, but 
the output was only a small fraction of the domestic demand. A sec- 
ond firm announced the production of three vat dyes in 1920. 
Other concerns have also worked on vat colors, several of which, 
including two yellows and a red, have already been offered for sale. 
This indicates that fundamental developments in this field are under 
way and an increased output of vat colors during 1920 may be ex- 
pected. The manufacture of these dj^es has required the highest 
technical skill, long research, and a large investment of capital. 
On account of the present small domestic production they are prob- 
ably the most needed of alJ, although the normal quantity consumed 



CENSUS OF DYES AIsTD COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 45 

annually is smaller than that of other classes of dyes. They are used 
for dyeing and printing fast colors on cotton and. to a lesser extent, 
on silk. 

Vat dyes, other than indigo, were imported during 1914 to the ex- 
tent of nearly 2,000,000 pounds or about 4 per cent of the total for 
that year. The production of these djes in 1919 was about 390,000 
pounds or only one-fifth of the pr•e^Yar requirements. The future 
development of a balanced industry will necessitate a greatly in- 
creased output of these dyes. This will be possible only when an 
increased output of anthracene or synthetic anthraquinone has been 
attained. The development of a variety of vat colors should also 
include the manufacture of thio-indigoids. 

Acid dyes. — The prewar imports of acid dyes were equaled by the. 
domestic output in 1917. Since then the production has increased 
each year, amounting in 1919 to 12,000,000 pounds, Avhich is an in- 
crease of nearly one-fourth the 1918 output and about 30 per cent in 
excess of the 1914 import. Acid d3^es rank third in the c[uantity pro- 
duced in 1919 and accounted for about 19 per cent of the total output 
of dyes. This group of dyes ranks next to sulphur dyes, in being the 
most fully developed in the domestic industr3^ The consumer should 
have no trouble in securing a good variety and quantity of acid dyes. 

In quantity produced during 1919, the most important dyes in this 
class were Algama Black 10 B, with a production of 1,877,860 pounds, 
an increase of 62 per cent over 1918 ; Indigotine, or indigo extract, 
1,699,670 pounds, an increase of 18.5 per cent; and Xigrosine (water 
soluble), 1,660,149 pounds, an increase of 39 per cent over 1918. 
Other dj'^es in this class which showed an important gain in 1919 
as against 1918 were : Metanil Yellow, which increased by 100 per 
cent; Cochineal Red, 400 per cent; and Alizarin Saphirol B, Fast 
Kcvd A, Aza Rubine, Brilliant Crocein, and Victoria Violet also 
showed marked increase over 1918 figures which would not be pub- 
lished. 

Eosine, Bordeaux B, and Ponceau 2 R showed a marked decline 
in output during 1919. 

Among other important dj^es of this class are the following: 
Naphthol Yellow, Alkali Blue, Tartrazine. Amaranth, Guinea Green, 
Scarlet EC, Fast Red VR, Resorcin Brown, Azo Yellow and Violet, 
Sulphonic Acid Blue R, Buffalo Black 10 B, Wool Red B, Chromo- 
trope 6 B, Fuchsine B. 

Among the acid dyes produced for the first time in 1919 there may 
be mentioned Uranine, Sulphonic Acid Blue B, Chromotrope 10 B, 
Brilliant Cochineal, Wool Green S, Erio-glaucine, Erythrine B, 
Cloth Red G, Crocein 3 B, Neptune Green, Light Green, Fast Sul- 
phon Black F. Ponceau G. 



46 CENSUS OF DYES AlsD COAL-T.iTv CHEMICALS. 

8ulphu7' dyes. — In quantity output the sulphur dyes have ranked 
first each year beginning with 1917, althougli they ranked only 
fourth in prewar imports. The domestic output in 1917 was over 
15,000,000 pounds, or more than double the imports of 1914. There 
was an increase to a maximum in 1918 of more than 23,000,000 
pounds. During 1919 the output decreased by one-fourth— to 17,- 
624,418 pounds, which is still two and one-half times the prewar im- 
port. This reduction is more than accounted for in a decrease of over 
8,000,000 pounds in sulphur olives and khakis required in cotton 
uniform cloth. 

Of the total production of dyes in 1919, 28 per cent was sulphur 
colors; in 1918, 40 per cent, and of the 1914 imports 15 per cent. The 
i^roduction of Sulphur Black is larger than that of any other indi- 
vidual color. In 1919 it was 14,504,770 pounds, an increase of 17 per 
cent over 1918. This output was 260 per cent greater than the 1914 
import of sulphur blacks. The production of Sulphur Blue increased 
over 50 per cent, to 1,622,762 pounds. Several new sulphur colors — 
maroon, bronze, orange, and blues — were added to the list in 1919. 
The sulphur dyes xoroduced in 1919 were of greater purity and higher 
concentration than those of the previous year. The production of 
this class is the most highly developed of all classes of colors, and is 
in excess of the domestic needs so that large quantities have been ex- 
ported. Sulphur Corinth was practically the only sulphur dye for 
which no production was reported in 1919. In the absence of vat dyes 
sulphur dyes have been of special value to the cotton trade. 

Mord-ont dyes. — As is shown in Table 9 this class of dyes in 1917 
had reached an output only slightb; less than the 1914 import and 
in 1918 increased to about 5,600,000 j^ounds, or about 22 per cent 
in excess of the prewar import. During 1919 the production de- 
clined nearly 27 per cent to slightly loss than 4,000,000 pounds. This 
decrease is accounted for by a reduced output of those dyes used in 
military uniforms — chiefly by Alizarin Yellow GG and Alizarin 
Yellow E (not true alizarin derivatives) used for khaki shades on 
woolen cloth and, to a lesser extent, by Gallocyanine used for blue 
Navy uniforms. Of these dyes the largest decrease in production was 
that of Alizarin Yellow GG, from over 2,000,000 pounds in 1918 to 
160,000 pounds in 1919. If the dyes of this group used for military 
uniforms are eliminated, then the remaining mordant dyes shov^^ a 
substantial increase. 

Marked progress has been made during 1919 in solving the diverse 
technical problems involved in the manufacture of mordant dyes, 
particularly tliose made from anthracene. Probably the most im- 
portant development in mordant dyes is the large increase shown in 
the output of Alizarin. The availability of this dye, which is one 



CEIfSUS OF DYES AXD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 47 

of the fastest loiown, filled an important requirement of dye con- 
sumers. Mordant dyes which appeared for the first time in 1919 in- 
clude Alizarin SX, Galleine, Brilliant Alizarin Blue, Alizarin Green 
B, Alizarin Orange, Alizarin Garnet, and Coerulein, all of which are 
important in arriving at a complete dye industry. The successful 
production of several of these dyes represents intensive research work 
over an extended period and the investment of a large amount of 
capital for their commercial output. 

Considerable increase was made in those dyes the manufacture of 
which had been previously established. The most important of these 
include Salicine Black U, which increased 57 per cent; and Erio 
Chrome Black A, and Diamond Black, which showed a large increase 
over 1918. 

As previously pointed out the production of mordant dyes of the 
faster tyi>es derived from alizarin is entirel}^ dependent upon an 
adequate supply of anthracene or synthetic anthraquinone. 

The production of mordant dyes for 1919, grouped by color, was 
as follows: 

Pounds. 

Blacks 1, 991, 064 

Yellow.s 570, 663 

Blues 473, 367 

Browns '. 462,342 

Reds 249, 093 

Greens 214, 336 

Violets 24, 185 

Color lake and spirit soJuhJe dyes. — This class of dyes, as can be 
seen by referring to Table 9, in quantit}^ produced are the least im- 
portant, amounting in 1919 to less than 3 per cent of the total. But 
their importance can not be estimated by cpiantitative production, as 
they are used largely in the manufacture of color lakes, a very im- 
portant class of pigments for paint, lithographic ink, and other 
industries. 

The output of these dyes has doubled from 1917 to 1919, or from 
934,360 pounds to 1,813,199. The 1919 output is 20 per cent in excess 
of the 1914 imports. Induline spirit soluble and nigrosine spirit 
soluble, with an output of 436,201 and 346,167 pounds, respectively, 
account for 43 per cent of the total production of these dyes. Im- 
portant spirit soluble d3'es also include Sudan I, Butter Yellow, 
Sudan Brown, Oil Red, Sudan II, Sudan IV, Spirit Yellow R and G. 

There Avere three important dyes used for color lakes produced 
for the first time in 1919, namely — Lake Bed C, Permanent Red 4 B, 
and Pigment Chlorine. 

Dyes used in color lake manufacture include Lilhol Red R, with an 
output in 1919 of 269,169 pounds valued at $103,926. Other impor- 



48 CEIifSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

tant dyes of this class include : Para Red, Helio Fast Eed, Lake Eed 
D, and Pigment Scarlet G. 

, Decreased consumpt'ioR of natural dyes. — In 1916 the scarcity of 
coal-tar dyes led to an abnormal consumption of natural dyes. Since 
then the steady increase in the domestic output of coal-tar dyes has 
caused a marked decrease in the use of natural dyes. This forced 
use of natural dyes demonstrated their merits for certain purposes 
and has extended their field of application. Competition between 
natural and synthetic dyes results largely, but not entirely, in a vic- 
tory for coal-tar dyes. 

Imports of the more important natural dyes have shown a gen- 
eral decrease from 1916 to 1919. The total imports of crude logwood 
for consumption for the calendar year 1919 were 29,022 tons, as com- 
pared with 33,168 tons in 1918, and 40,921 tons in 1914. Logwood, 
the most important natural dye, is used chiefly for the production of 
blacks on silk, leather, and wool. It has advantages for black dyeing 
on silk and leather not possessed by artificial dyes. It also has ex- 
tensive use for the production of black on avooI. Natural indigo 
imports for consumption also declined from 1,637,914 pounds in 1918 
to only 234,991 pounds in 1919, and in all probability will soon be 
negligible as was the case prior to the war. 

Quercitron, the most important natural dye of domestic origin, is 
prepared from the bark of the black oak {Quercus tinctoria). It 
has extensive use in the dyeing of yellows, olive, and khaki shades. 

OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS. 

Color lakes. — The coal-tar products included in this group are a 
class of pigments used for paints, lithographic inks, and many other 
purposes. They are made by " fixing " a coal-tar dye on an inert 
base material, such as aluminum hydroxide, or barium sulphate 
(blanc fixe). 

The total output of coal-tar color lakes in 1919 was 7,569,921 
pounds, or a decrease of 25' per cent from 1918. Eed lakes were first 
with an output of 3,151,149 pounds, or 42 per cent of total lakes. Of 
this quantity about 17.9 per cent was Lithol Eed and 15.3 per cent 
Para Eeds. The other important lakes in order of production in 
1919 were scarlet, maroon, yellow, blue, eosine, green, violet, and 
orange. 

Photographic chemicals. — The total output of coal-tar products 
used as developers in photography increased from 316,749 pounds in 
1918 to 335,509 pounds in 1919. Hydroquinone, the most important 
product in this group, decreased 11 per cent in output to 272,329 
pounds. Methyl p-amidophenol sulphate (metol), another impor- 



CEI^SUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 49 

tant photographic developer, showed more than a 400 per cent in- 
crease in production in 1919, as against that of 191S. 

Medicinals. — The production of coal-tar medicinals in 1919, exclu- 
sive of deducting 2,103,101 pounds of disinfectants— a product not 
reported in 1918 — showed an increase of 1,051,535 pounds, or 29 per 
cent more than the 1918 production. The total output, including 
the disinfectants, was 6,777,988 pounds, valued at $7,883,071. 

Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in 1919 accounted for over one-half 
of the total value of medicinals, the quantity produced being 1,777,105 
pounds, or nearly double the 1918 output. 

A large increase was reported in the production of acetphenetidine, 
chloramine T, phenolphthalein, neoarsphenamine, l)-naphthol ben- 
zoate, guaiacol crystals U, S. P., and guaiacol liquid ; while the follow- 
ing products showed a decrease in output : Arsphenamine, bismuth 
b-naphthol, bismuth tribromphenol, dichloramine T, phenolsulphoph- 
thalein and phenolsulphonates. 

The following are among the medicinals which were reported in 
1919 for the first time : Anesthesine (ethyl p-amino benzoate), cincho- 
jjhen (phenylcinchoninic acid), dibromoxy-mercury-fluorescin, cop- 
per sulphocarbolate, sodium sulphocarbolate, zinc sulphocarbolate, 
creosote carbonate, guaiacol carbonate, b-naphthol salicylate, amyl 
salicylate, and ammonium salicjdate. The progress made during 
1919 in the production of a greater variety of coal-tar medicinals is 
an important addition to the American coal-tar industry. 

Flavors and 'perfume materials. — Further progress was made dur- 
ing 1919 in the manfacture of flavors and perfume materials derived 
from coal tar. There is no sharp difference between these products, 
many of them being suitable for both flavors and perfumes. One of 
them, here considered as a flavor, is the substance saccharin, which 
in recent years because of the scarcity and high price of sugar, has 
had extensive use as a sugar substitute, and also as a sweetener in 
chewing tobacco. The output of saccharin was 547,988 pounds, 
valued at $1,017,091, or an increase of nearly 29 per cent over 1918. 
This increase was made possible through the release from military 
control of toluene, the raw material. The average price of saccharin 
decreased to $1.86 per pound as compared with $10.55 in 1918. 

Coumarin, used both as a flavor and as a perfume in scented soaps, 
has more than doubled in output from 1917 to 1919. Synthetic 
coumarin has practically replaced the natural product derived from 
tonka beans. 

Benzyl benzoate and benzyl acetate, ordinarily considered as per- 
fume materials, were used in large quantities as solvents in the manu- 
facture of varnish for aeroplane wings. Recently benzyl benzoate 
has been used with considerable success as a nonnarcotic antispas- 
22816°— 21 4 



50 CENSUS OF DYES AlS^D COAT.-TAR CHEMICALS. 

modic. The output of both products decreased in 1919. The output 
of benzyl benzoate in 1919 was less than one-twelfth the 1918 pro- 
duction, while benzyl acetate decreased nearly 50 per cent. Perfume 
materials whose output increased in quantity during 1919 include : 
Bromstyrol, cinnamic alcohol, methyl acetophenone, methyl anthra- 
nilate, and methyl phenylacetate. Several perfume chemicals were 
reported in 1919 for the first time. 

Synthetic resins. — Although the total 1919 output of synthetic 
resins was about the same as in 1918, the production of individual 
resins differed widely. Those resins, derived from phenol by 
condensation with formaldehyde and hexamethylenetetramine in- 
creased in quantity as compared with the 1918 figures. As a direct 
effect of this increase there was a decrease in output of resins ob- 
tained from cresol, a subsittute for phenol during the war. Resins 
made by condensation of solvent naphtha and paracoumarone showed 
an increased output in 1919. The synthetic phenolic resin industry, 
the products of which have many different uses, was created by inven- 
tions of American chemists. The development in the last few years 
has been achieved by laborious and painstaking research conducted 
with an intimate knowledge of the requirements in other industries 
in which these products are now used. 

Synthetic taniiing nuiteriols. — Synthetic tanning materials are of 
comparatively recent origin, having come into commercial use in 
Germany and England since 1912. They are made by the condensa- 
tion of certain coal-tar derivatives and formaldehyde in the pres- 
ence of an acid. They have proved their value for tanning, but 
they are sometimes sold in combination with a small amount of 
natural tanning extract. Their use results in (1) great economy of 
time required for tanning; (2) a satisfactory leather of light color, 
and (3) a reduction in the quantity of natural tanning extracts re- 
quired. As the supply of domestic natural tanning materials is de- 
creasing, the domestic tanning industry is becoming more and more 
dependent upon natural tanning materials of foreign origin. These 
synthetic products, therefore, promise to be of great importance in 
the future of the domestic industry. A single firm in this country 
reported the manufacture of these materials in 1919. 

EMPLOYEES AXD RATES OF PAY. 

Employees and rates of fay. — Each of the 214 firms reporting 
the manufacture of coal-tar chemicals was asked to report the num- 
ber of its employees receiving specified rates of pay on Decem- 
ber 15, 1919, or the nearest representative date for which records 
were available. Twenty-four firms found it impracticable to giv? 



GElSrSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



51 



the information. In most of these cases the primary products were 
;iot derived from coal tar and the departments were not separately 
organized in such a way that the number of men engaged in the 
manufacture of any one class of products could be definitely stated. 
Certain other firms had gone out of business during 1919. 

One hundred and ninety-one firms reported a total of 24,736 em- 
ployees engaged in the manufacture of coal-tar products, of which 
2,605, or 10.5 per cent, were chemists or engineers. This is probably 
a larger proportion of technically trained men than will be found 
in any other important manufacturing industry in the United States. 
Employed in the main under the immediate or general direction of 
these technically trained men were 22,131 skilled artisans and un- 
skilled laborers. This is an increase over 1918 of 369 in number of 
the first group, but a decrease of 2,861 in the number of employees 
without technical training. 

Table 10 shows the number and percentage of employees engaged 
in manufacturing operations receiving specified rates of pay in each 
of the groups of technically trained and untrained men; and the 
percentage of the total of each group of employees recei^dng each 
specified rate of pay or more. The proportion of technically trained 
men receiving the higher rates of compensation is much greater than 
the proportion of untrained men. For example, 57.4 per cent of the 
technically trained men receive $40 or more per week, whereas only 
12.7 per cent of the employees without technical training received 
$40 or more per week. Thirty-two per cent of the technically trained 
m.en received $50 or more per week, whereas only 2.6 per cent of the 
men without technical training received that sum. 

Table 10. — Employees and rates of pay. 



Wages per week. 



Number ot employees at 
each specified wage en- 
gaged in manufacturing 
operations. 



Chemists 
and tech- 
nically 
trained 
men. 



Men 
without 
technical 
training. 



All em- 
ployees. 



Percentage receiv- 
ing each speci- 
fied wage. 



Of all 
chemists 
and tech- 
nically 
trained 
men. 



Of all 

men 
without 
teciuaical 
training. 



Percentage receiv- 
ing each speci- 
fied wage or 
more. 



Of all 
chemists 
and tech- 
nically 
trained 
men. 



Of all 

men 
■v^ithout 
technical 
training. 



Under SIO 

810, but under $15 
815, but under S20 
S20, but ur.der ?25 
$25, but under $.30 
$30, but under R35 
S35, but under S40 
840, but under SIS 
S45, but imder 850 
$50, but under 875 
875 and over 

Total 



1 
6 
95 
lf)8 
251 
312 
277 
440 
220 
505 
330 



120 

440 

1,177 

5,221 

5,407 

4,042 

2,922 

1,4.57 

761 

554 

30 



121 

44l> 
1,272 
5,389 
5, 658 
4,354 
3,199 
1,897 

9S1 
1,059 

360 



0.04 

.23 

3.65 

6. 45 

9. &3 

11.97 

10.63 

16.89 

8.45 

19.39 

12. 67 



0.54 

1.99 

5.32 

23.59 

24. 43 

18.27 

13. 20 

6. 58 

3.44 

2.50 

.14 



100.00 
99. 96 
99. 73 
96.08 
89. 63 
80.00 
08. 03 
57. 40 
40. 51 
32.06 
12.67 



100.00 

99.46 

97.47 

92.15 

OS. 56 

44. 13 

25. 86 

12.06 

6.08 

2.64 

.14 



2,605 



22,131 i 24,736 



100.00 



100.00 



52 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



A comparison with the corresponding figures for 1918 shows that 
wages during 1919 were substantially higher than in 1918. Espe- 
cially was this true of employees without technical training, and 
technically trained employees who received less than $50 per week. 
For example, during 1918, 15.4 per cent of all employees without 
technical training received less than $20 per week whereas in 1919 
only 7.8 per cent of such employees received less than $20 per week. 
Moreover in 1918, 5.9 per cent of all chemists or technically trained 
men received less than $20 per week w^hereas in 1919 only 3.9 per cent 
were receiving less than this weekly rate. During the same time the 
group of men without technical training receiving rates of pay 
greater than $20 per week increased by 7.6 per cent whereas chemists 
and technically trained men increased by only 2 per cent. At the 
high rates, however, this increased percentage is quite reversed. For 
example, there was an increase of 6.3 per cent in the group of techni- 
cally trained men receiving $40 per week or more as compared with 
an increase of 0.5 per cent of employees without technical training. 

In Table No. 11 a comparison is made of the percentages of techni- 
cally trained men and men without technical training for 1918 and 
1919. There was little change in 1919 as compared with 1918 in the 
percentages of both classes of men receiving the higher rates of pay 
($50 and more per week). 

Table 11 shows very clearly the great dependence of the industry 
on its technically trained employees. 

Table 11. — Comparison of employees, rates of pay, 1918 and 1919. 



Wages per week. 



$10, but under SI 5 
815, but under 820. 
820, but under S25, 
825, but under .130. 
$30, but under S35. 
$35, but under S40 
$40, but under S45. 
S45, but under $50 
850, but under 875 
875 and over 



Percentage receiving eaqh specified wage or more. 



Of all chemists and 
technically trained 
men. 



1918 



1919 



99.7 
9S. 4 
94.1 
SO. 1 
76.9 
62.9 
51.2 
40.4 
32.6 
16.9 



99.9 
99.7 
96.1 
89.6 
80.0 
68. 
57.4 
40.5 
32.1 
12.7 



In- 
creased 

per- 
centage. 



0.2 
1.3 
2.0 
3.5 
3.1 
5.1 
6.2 
.1 
1 .5 
' 4.2 



Of all men without 
technical training. 



1918 



98.2 

94.6 

84.6 

63.6 

43.0 

22.3 

12.2 

6.5 

2.6 

.1 



1919 



In- 
creased 

per- 
centage. 



99.5 

97.5 

92.2 

68.6 

44.1 

2.5.9 

12.7 

6.1 

2.6 

.1 



1.3 
2.9 
7.6 
5.0 
1.1 
3.6 
1.5 



iDecrcase. 



RESEARCH WORK. 



Of the total of 214 firms, 65 had separately organized research 
laboratories for the solution of technical problems in the manufacture 



CE^^SUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. • 53 

of their products and for the discovery of new products. During 
1919 the net operating expenses of these research hiboratories, to- 
gether with the cost of research work done in the laboratories not 
separately organized for research, was $4,274,247. This includes 
salaries, apparatus, and materials, after deducting the value of 
salable products made in research laboratories. This figure is prob- 
ably an understatement of the real cost of experimental work, since 
it does not include in all cases the cost of experimental work done 
as a part of m.anufacturing operations and not shown on the books 
of the companies as a charge against research. 

NOTES ON DYE INDUSTRIES IN OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Germany. — About 90 per cent of the productive capacity of Ger- 
man dye factories is located within the territory occupied by the 
allied and American troops. Inspection by the military authorities 
has disclosed the fact that during the war plants which formerly 
had manufactured dyes were engaged in a large scale production 
of explosives, and of poisonous gases. An inventory of the stocks 
of dyes on hand as of August 15, 1919, showed that the total was 
approximately 20,000 tons, which is probably about one-tenth of 
their annual prewar production. 

Production of dyes in Germany during the first j^ear after the 
signing of the armistice was practically negligible compared with 
the prewar output. Beginning with February, 1920, detailed state- 
ments of one-quarter of the monthly production (this portion is 
required to be reserved for optional purchases of the allied and asso- 
ciated Governments by the peace treaty, Annex YI, Part II) of every 
dye in each factory were made to the Separations Commission. 
Copies of these monthly statements through October, 1920, have been 
received by the Department of State, which has given permission for 
their publication by the Tariff Commission. A summary of these 
reserved stocks in German dye plants is shown in Table 12. 

During February, 1920, the quantity of dyes reserved by German 
plants totaled 876,449 pounds, indicating a total output of over 
3,500,000 pounds for that month. A progressive increase is shown 
in each succeeding month to a maximum of 3,026,247 pounds in 
August, which indicates a total output of over 12,000,000 pounds 
monthly. Since August there has been a slight decline in reserved 
stocks to 2,779,132 pounds in October. The rate of production from 
July to October inclusive is only about one-third of Germany's 
prewar output. 



54 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS, 



S'^ 



O tC O '^ C CC 00 O '^' O T-H o t^ 
CO a: lO (N i-H O Lt' CO t- OO -^ O CO 
00C4OC<J»C0i(MI>-OC>lt--"^C0 



CO-^C^OCt-'QOOOSCOCOQO'— lOi 
OGCC«wO(M»OiO0':»-0O'— <c<o 

T^Z^ ^ CO "-T CN —I 



(NOiOCO-^COOCOtC-n^-n'O 
O O CO T-* rj* c^ O .-H O '-I t- o 

Ca Tj^ O --H T?< (N .-H C« 



CMOJ<yDcocir:'-*c:r>-OT-HTfO 

COOlOrriOOico^OcOOO 

cc'(>rc^"^c<rcc'»<rc'rofrco "^co 



DC' n^ CO o (M '^i CO cr- xt^ i^ c^ oc 
c-i r- cni I"- •— I o f- oc o Oi CO CO 

Dtt'-QCCOCDOOU^iCOOOOO 



CD t-- --H CO o "^ cr- -— I 

O i^ -^ C-J 1-i CJ T-H 



i-<f'-»cO'--tOco''J'ccc:)00 
crrco'or'^co""^cd^(>r«o"'^ co CO 

O "^ ^- r-l CO CV 0"i 1— I O O'l C ! CO 
CMC CDi— (lOi— ti— tOO'-H 



• -n- CO CT: CI -"-f" r-i C 1 r-- O Oi (M 



o^o-.c/: c\o\ '. 



J CO -^ '^' CO t-- ^ 



< cj i^ CO o ic T-^ QC <y:; O en r* 



( r-H ,-i t-HCI t 



'f-<03"<^C0*-i00CNOI>. 



i-.COc^OlCOCOt^tMt-irriO^'M 

O r-i of CC' '^ CO QC oi ^-C' O 1-H gr r- 

■^ CO ,— i "^ CD f-< CD^i— < CJ lO iC O CD 



'^c<;oi05-*-H'^0(Mcoooo 

CJOtiCD iOiQ-^COCCOOHOCC 
^CC "^ CO'^'— ''-♦tH 



LTi 3i CO CO t>- 



Oi-tt^t^Cli—CO-^i 

t- r-- t"» o (M CJ oc o c— ^. i.-< -;^ '^ 

OCO^OCOCOCMiOCcCO* "**«'-'» 



o; o o CO o C 



uo CI IT; CO »5 



i> o 1— I -^ c *o CD Ci r- CO to CO 



t^COT-l 

*t» »0 CD 
CO C-l C-'S 



ooco-^soc^co-^cio 



CO tM i-H 1-1 



0-- CO «:5 lO O CO CM t- CO CI C^l CO o 
CI O ■^ CO "^ C» O O-J «-< t-H C-l O CO 

ocsco'-Hdi-H'^oocooccoiL':? 
CO c-f'irT CO t^c^'^c^'c^r^oTco co" p-T 



o 
























^ 








0) 








; D 
















.e 








! a 
















■c 




■^, 














rrl 




. a 


5§ 


i :8 






■ PS 






' X. 




. 





^ Qj aj 5_o ! 



c ft^ -g _g 



. 0*0 

3=a 



;= >; cs>;3- 



t; aj P ti o 2 

I c ^ cj'a el's 



*~'SS^I>^^S>'2^!^Phh!- 



CENSUS or DYES AND COAL-TAK CHEMICALS. 55 

England. — At least six English firms were manufacturing dyes in 
1914, and in addition two other factories at Ellsmere Port and Brom- 
borough Port were operated by the Germans in order to comply with 
the patent act of 1907. 

It has been estim_ated that these firms produced about 10 per cent 
of the dyes used in the United Kingdom in the j'ear immediately 
preceding the outbreak of the war, witli a total output not exceeding 
2,000 tons annually/ The production included a fairly wide range 
of acids, direct, basic, and sulphur colors, and in addition a limited 
variety of alizarin derivatives. With the exception of indigo, vat 
dyes were not produced in England. Development since tlie war 
has been chiefly in the faster dyes including vats and alizarin deriva- 
tives, and has resulted in the production of a considerable variety 
in this field. The output, however, has not been sufiicient to meet 
the domestic demand. Eecent estimates indicate that the present 
production of fast dyes is about 25,000 tons annually.^ The range of 
dyes produced, hov.ever, is limited. In January, 1920, the advisory 
committee of the British Color Users Association visited Gennany, 
and arranged for the purchase of 140 tons of dyes to relieve the short- 
age of certain types in England. 

Switzerland. — Although hampered by a lack of intermediates and 
other raw materials, the Swiss dye industry developed during the war 
to a remarkable degree, owing to the absence of German competition 
in the dye markets of the world. 

Since 1915, the Swiss dye manufacturers have been under contract 
to supply English dye consumers with a large proportion of the dyes 
made from English intermediates and other English raw materials. 
England has therefore received more Swiss dyes than any other 
country. In 1918, the value of the exports of Swiss colors to Eng- 
land was over three times the value of those exported to the United 
States. Switzerland has also imported intermediates and other raw 
materials from the United States, France, and Italy. 

The leading (Xyo. manufacturers of Switzerland have recently been 
consolidated into a single company. This company controls a branch 
in England and has purchased control of the dye factory of Ault 
& Wiborg, at Norwood, Ohio. 

^ ranee. — The development of a dye industry in France has been 
slower than in the United States, England, or Switzerland. Several 
plants maintained by German firms before the war have been taken 
over and operated by French interests. They were located at Neuilly- 
sur-Saone (Phone), Creil (Oise), Flers (Nord), Lyon, St. Eons 
(Rhone), and Tourcoing (Nord). These factories were probably 
established mainly for the purpose of evading the high French duty 



1 London Chemical Trade .Toninal, Mar. G, lOiIO. 



66 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

on manufactured dyes by importing the intermediates from Ger- 
many at a lower duty. By the establishment of these factories in 
France the Germans were able also to avail themselves of the free 
entry accorded goods of French manufacture by French colonies. 

Japan. — Before the war, Japan annually imported, mainly from 
Germany,^ dyes to the value of about $4,000,000. In 1915 a law was 
passed providing for subsidies to companies engaging in dye manu- 
facture. The subsidies were to be in amounts sufficient to enable the 
companies to pay 8 per cent dividends upon their invested capital, 
and were to continue for 10 years. It is reported that at least three 
companies are thus subsidized. 

Many companies went into the business and at one time there were 
more than 100 firms, with an estimated capital of about $7,500,000. 
But many of these new enterprises proved short lived. Of the 72 
firms reported as manufacturers in the spring of 1920, 46 had dis- 
continued by the end of July. The number making sulphur colors 
was reduced from 33 to 7. Those firms still operating are reported 
to be working only part time. It is reported that the range of dyes 
now made in Japan includes direct cotton dyes, basics, and mordants, 
oxidized colors and sulphurs. The Mitsui Mining Co. is making 
various anthracene colors and synthetic indigo. The Japan Color 
Co. produces Sulphur Blacks, which have been exported chiefly to 
China. 

1 British Trade Journal, May 9, 1918. 



Part Hi. CENSUS OF DYES IMPORTED INTO THE UNITED STATES FROM 
JULY 1, 1919, TO JUNE 30, 1920. 



Section 501 of Title V of the act of September 8, 1916, makes the 
specific chities on dyes and other finished coal-tar products after 
September 8, 1921, dependent upon whether as much as 60 per cent 
of the consumption of these products is being produced in the United 
States. Unfortunate!}', however, the provisions are not clear as to 
whether the domestic consumption is to be considered as the total 
consumption of each cLass of finished products or the consumption 
of individual items within the class. In either case tliere has been 
a lack of detailed information as to the importation of individual 
dyes, and therefore a census of imports was undertaken by the Tariff 
Commission. 

With the cooperation of the Treasury Department all invoices 
covering dye imports in the fiscal year 1920, with the exception of 
those of the port of New York, were sent to the commission for 
tabulation. The statistics of dyes imported through the port of 
New York were obtained by transcribing the necessary information 
direct from the invoices in the customshouse files of the collector of 
the port of New York. 

The dyes were classified according to their chemical composition 
and were tabulated according to the Schultz and Julius Tables, 1914 
edition. Various dj^es were also identified according to Norton's 
census^ as well, and from other sources of information in the files 
of the Tariff Commission. Dyes identified by Norton as a, b, c 
classes under a given Schultz number were included in that number 
in each case without special designation, although it is understood 
that such dyes are not always chemically identical with the original 
Schultz types. 

The Tariff Commission can not vouch for the accuracy of these 
classifications, as some identifications were supplied by dye experts 
and others by foreign manufacturers. Those dyes which could not 
be identified by Schultz numbers were classified according to their 
method of application as follows: Direct, vat (including indigo), 
acid, sulphur, mordant and chrome, basic and oil-soluble dyes. A 
small number of colors not classified by either method are listed by 
name under the heading " unidentified and unclassified colors." In 

5 Norton, Thomas U. : "Artificial Dyestuffs Used in the T'nit< d States," Dept. of Com- 
merce, Si>. Agts. Series No. 121. 

57 



58 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

addition, 9,352 pounds of dyes are included in " all other," as tlie 
trade or chemical name for the dyes was not given in the invoices. 

The published values of English dyes include c. i. f. charges, with 
the exception of a small charge for packing. In the case of Swiss 
dyes, however, all extra charges are included in every instance. 
The German invoices varied in the methods used, but in most cases 
the extra charges are not included in the invoice values. 

The date of the consular certification was taken as a basis in con- 
verting the foreign invoice value to United States currency. The 
rate of exchange used as a basis in conversions was the exchange 
value published by the Treasury Department for that quarter in 
which the consular certification dates occurred. 

SYMBOLS DENOTING MANUFACTTIREE. 

In the table of imports of dyes under the heading " manufacturer" 
is shown a symbol for each dye, which refers to the following list of 
manufacturers in foreign countries. 

1. THE SIX LEADING COMPAKIES. 

A Aclien-Gesellscliaft fur Anilin-Fabrikation, Berlin. Founded 1373. 

Branches in France and Russia. 
B Badische Anilin- und Soda-Fabrik, Ludwigshafen on tlie Ehino. 

Founded 18G5. Branches in France and Russia. 
By Farbenfabriken vorm. Firedr. Bayer & Co., Leverl^usen on the Rhine. 

Founded 1862. Branches in France, Russia, and the United States 

(Rensselaer, N. Y.). 
C Leopold Cassella & Co., Frankfort on the Main. Founded 1870. 

Branches in France and Russia. 
K Kalle & Co., A. G., Biebrich on the Rhine. Founded 1870. Branch in 

Russia. 
M Farbwerke vorm. Meister Lucius & Briining. Hochst on the Main. 

Founded 1862. Branches in France and Russia. 

2. THE SEVEN SJIAIXEE GERMAN COilPAKIES. 

BK Leipziger Anilinfab'rik Beyer & Kegel, Furstenberg near Leipsig. 

Founded 1882. 
CO Chemikalienwerk Griesheim G. in. b. H., Griesheim on the Main. 

Founded 1881. 

CJ Carl Jager G. m. b. H., Anilinfarbenfabrik, Dusseldorf. Founded 1823. 

GrE Cheaiische Fabrik Griesheim-Elektron, Offenbach on the Main. 

Founded 1842. 
L Farbwerk Muhlheim vorm. A. Leonhardt & Co., Muhlbeim on the Main. 

P"'ounded 1879. Branch in France. 
tM Chemische Fabriken vorm. Weiler ter Meer, Uerdingen on the Rhine. 

Founded 1877, 
WD Wiilfing, Dahl & Co., A.-G. Barmen. Founded 1842. 



GE]SrSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



59 



3. DUTCH, BELGIAN, AND FRENCH COMPANIES. 

FA Farbwerk Ammersfoort, Ammersfoort, Netherlands. Founded 18SS. 

NF Niederlandische Fai'ben- und Cliemikalienfabrik Delft, Delft, Nether- 
lands. Founded 1897. Branch in Russia. 

LG Lazard Godchaux, of Brussels. (These products are probably com- 
pounded largely from the dyes made by A. Wiescher & Co., of 
Haeren, Belgium.) 

P Societe Anonyme des Matieres eolorantes et produits chimiques St. 

Denis (formerly A. Poirrier), St. Denis, near Paris, France. 
Founded 1830. 

4. SWISS COMPANIES, ALL AT BASEL. 

DH Farbwerke vorm. L. Durand. Huguenin & Co. Founded 1871. Branches 

in Germany and France. 
G Anilinfarben- und Extract-Fabrikeu vorm. Joh. End. Geigy. Founded 

1764. Branches in France, Germany, and Russia. 
I Gesellschaft fur chemLsche Industrie. Foimded 1885. Branch in 

France. 
S Chemische Fabrik A-orm. Sandoz & Co. Founded 1887. 

5. ENGLISH COMPANIES. 

ClCo The Clayton Aniline Co. (Ltd.), Clayton, near Manchester. Founded 

1876. 

CR Clauss & Co. (formerly Clauss & Ree), Clayton, near Manchester. 

Founded 1890. 

CY Colnc Vale Chemical Co., Milnsbridge, near Huddersfield. 

RHS Read Holliday & Sons (Ltd.), Huddersfield. Founded 1830. (Pur- 
chased by British Dyes (Ltd.).) 

BD British Dyes (Ltd.). Founded 1915. 

Lev Levinstein (Ltd.), Crumpsall Vale, near Manchester. Founded 1804. 

Q Importations of unknown source, through dealers in colors. 

Table 13. — Siiminary of dyes imparted into the United States durin;/ the fiscal 
year 1920, classified by airplicatiwi. 



Direct. 

Vat (including indigo). 



(a) Indigo 

(h) Other vats. 



Class. 



Acid 

Sulphur 

Mordant and chrome 

Hasic 

Dyes for color lakes and spirit soluble dyos 
Unclassified : ". . . 



Total 3, 501, 147 



Quantity. 



Pound-^. 
694,757 
942, 145 



520,347 
421, 79S 



851 , 220 
270, 800 
447, 869 
230, 529 
l.i,51t) 
42,311 



Per cent 
of total. 



19.8 
20.9 



14.9 
12.0 

24.3 
7.9 

12.7 

6.7 

.4 

1.3 

100.0 



60 CEITSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS." 

Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920. 



Schultz 
No. 



91 



100 
107 



121 
122 
132 

134 



137 
139 

140 
141 

144 

145 



Name of dve. 



Naphthol greeu 

Naphthol green G 

Direct yellow R 

Afghan yellow GX 

Sun yellow 

Afghan yellow GX 

Dipheny 1 fast yellow G 

Diphenyl chlorine yellow FF 

Diphenvl chlorine yellow FF supra 

Fast light yellow 2G 

Fast light yellow 3G, concentrated 80/100 

Xylene yellow 

Xylene light yellow 2G 

Xylene light yellow R 

Tartrazine 

Tartrazine cone 

Tartrazine cone 

Tartrazine cone, pure 

Tartrazine DS cone 

Tartrazine X 

Pigment fast yellow G 

Pigment fast yellow G 

Pigment fast yellow G powder 

Chrysoidine R 

Cotton orange cone. 110 per cent 

Orange G 

Crystal orange 

Orange crystals 

Orange crystal 2G 

Orange crystals 2G 95 

Brilliant lake red R paste 

Alizarine yellow R 

Terracotta RRN powder 

Victoria violet 

Victoria violet 4BS 

Ethyl acid violet S 4BXX •. . 

Azo acid blue 

Azo acid blue B 

Lanafuchine SB 

Lanafuchine 6B 

Azo coralline 

Azo coralline L cone. 230 per cent 

Amide naphthol red BB 

Hello fast red RL pdr 

Tannin orange 

Tannin orange R 

Tannin orange R powder 

Acid anthracene brown RH extra 

Anthracyl chrome green D 

Anthracyl chrome green A cone. 150 per cent. 

Anthracyl chrome green A 

Eosamine B 

Sulphamine brown A 

Sulphamine brown A cone. 110 per cent 

Bordeaux B .' 

Bordeaux G cone. 110 per cent 

ErikaBN 

Erika GN 

Lake red P 

Lake red P paste 

Metanil yellow 

Metanil yellow 

Metanil yellow 77 cone. 120 percent 

Metanil yellow Y cone 

Acid yellow 

Fast yellow G cone. 120 per cent 

Orange IV 

Orange IV powder 

Orange IV jiowder 

Curcumeine 

Curcnmcine GG cone. dk. pdr 

Azo yellow 

ilelian thine G 

Orange I 

Naphthol orange cone. 130 per cent 

Orange II 

Orajige II 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Lev. 



RHS. 
G.... 
BD.. 



G.. 
G.. 
By. 
By. 



LG.. 
G.... 

S 

BDC. 
B.... 



WD. 



BD. 
LG.. 
WD. 
WD. 
M... 



G. 



WD. 
M... 
By.. 



Q.- 
C... 
By. 



WD. 
WD. 
A... 



WD. 



WD. 
A... 
A... 



LG.. 
WD. 
BD. 



WD. 



G... 

WD. 



BK. 
G.'.'. 



BK. 
CG.; 



Imports. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 
450 



1,840 



1,153 
'59,999' 



48,614 



400 



1,102 
'ii,i43 



723 



6,632 



9,222 
'374' 



6,194 



95 

1,001 

171 



51 
3,316 



800 
2,630 



7,882 



225 

146 

1,750 



8,456 



6,419 



661 
"3,'8i4' 



1,323 
'2,' 265 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 61 

Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 



Schultz 
No. 


Name of dye. 


Manu- 
facturer. 


Imports. 


Quantity. 


Invoice 
value. 


146 


Azo fiichsine G 


By 

By 


Poundf:. 
3,495 


'^79=; 




Azo fuchsine 4G extra 




152 


Lithol ru bine BN powder 


B 


1,471 






Permanent red B ex 


A 




153 


Lake red C lumps 


M 


15 

139 

2,734 




154 


Anthracyl chrome brown GO cone 


WD 




158 


Chrome brown RR 






Chrome brown RVV 


G 




159 


Acid alizarin black R 


M 


159 
948 


"■ 


161 


Fast red A 




117 




Fast red A 


WD 






Fast red AN cone. 135 per cent 


WD. 






163 


Azo rubine 




14, 425 


7 556 




Azo rubine S 


CG 






Azo acid rubine 2B cone. 160 per cent 


WD 






Azo acid rubine RV cone. 210 percent 


WD . 






Carmoisineconc 


g 






Carmoisine L 










Carmoisine L 


BD 








Chrome blue R 


LG. . 








Azo rubine S 


S .. . 






167 


Croeeine scarlet 3BX 


By 


450 
1,653 




176 








Scarlet 4R ex. cone. 145 per cent 


BK 




177 


Mordant 5'ellow 




10, 767 


2 249 




Milluig yellow 


WD 




Anthracene vellow C paste 


c 






Anthrai^ene vellow C powder '. 


c 








Mordant yellow O 


M 






180 


Eriochrome blue black B 




24,317 








G 




181 


Salicine black U 




2,001 






Chrome fast black P WRL cone 


I .. 




182 


Brilliant sulphonered 




4,632- 


6 900 






g 






Fast sulphone yiolet 5BS 


s 






183 


Eriochrome black T 


G ...... 


14,087 

41, 642 

2,317 




184 


Eriochrome black A 


G 




185 


Anthracene chrome black F 


C 

c 


301 




Anthracene chrome black PF extra 


198 




c 1 




Anthracene chrome black 5B 


c 








11,381 


8,933 


Mimosa Z 


G 




Titan vellow G 


BD 






Thiaz.ol vellow G cone 


S 

By 


si' 

1,648 





210 






211 


Resorcin brown 


1,641 






LG 

BK 




Resorcin brown cone. 150 per cent 






Resorcin brown F 


K 




""ii,'4ii' 




217 


Algama black lOB 


4,231 




Naphthvlamine black 4B 


LG 

BK 




Naphthbl blue black 6B 350 per cent 








CG 




221 


Anthracene acid brown G 




110 








c 




222 


.Tanus vellow G 


M .. . 


580 
2,618 




227 






1 216 




Brilliant croceme MOO 


WD 








WD. . 








Cotton scarlet extra 


B 






231 




By 


24 

551 




236 


Wool red B 








WD 




240 


Janus red B 


M 


216 

125 

99 

2,204 

360 




241 


Neutral gray G 


A 




2.55 


Croeeine scarlet 7B 






264 


Fast sulphon 1 ilack F 




266 


Naphthylamuie black 










C 




269 


Acid black 




220 








BK 




273 


Diaminogen blue 




2,639 


3,317 




Diaminogen blue N A 


C 

M 




Diazanil blue BE 





62 CENSUS OF DYES AJSTD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Table 14. — Iniijort^ o/ (Jijca for fiscal year 1920 — Cuatinued. 



Name of dve. 



Diaminogen 

Diaminogen extra 

Diazo indigo blue br. ex. cone. 70/100. 

Diazo indigo blue 2RL 

Diazo indigo blue 3RL 

Zamljcsi puie blue 4B 

Diamond black 

Diamond black .' 

Diamond black FB 

Chrome black PON 

Benzo fast scarlet 

Bcnzo fast scarlet 4BS cone 

Benzo fast scarlet 5BS 

Benzo fast scarlet 8BS 

Benzo fast scarlet GS 

Benzo fast scarlet 4BS 

Direct fast scarlet SE 

Anthracene yellow C paste 

Fast mordant yeUow G 

Cott on j^eRo w 

Cotton yeUow G 

Cotton yeUovv GI 

Benzo fast yellow 4GL extra 

Benzo fast yellow 5GL 

Benzo fast yellow RL 

Cotton yellow CH 

Benzo fast pink 2B L 

Paper yellow ^. 

Brilliant yeUow *. 

Paper yellow extra cone. 118 per cent . 
Chrysophenine - 

Clirysophenine 

Chrysophenine cone, pure 

Chrysophenine cone - 

• Chrysophenine G 

Pyramihe orange 3G 

Congo rubine. 

Congo rubine 

Congo rubine L 

Congo orange G 

Diamine scarlet 

Diamine scarlet 3B 

Diamine scarlet B 130 per cent 

Diamine scarlet HS 

Diamine scarlet 3B 

Chloramine red B 

Chloramine red 3B 

Trisulphone violet B 

Oxydiamine ^'iolet 

Benzo violet O 

Benzo violet R 

Oxamine violet 

Oxamine ^'iolet XX 

Zambesi brown 

Zambesi brown 4R F ■ 

Zambesi brown 2GF 

Zambesi brown 4R 

Benzo fast red 9BL 

Benzo fast red 8BL 

Oxamine black 

Chloramine black BH 

Chloramine black BH cone, double — 

Diamine black BH cone 

Direct black BH cone , 

Direct black BH 100 per cent 

Diamine black BH 

Mclantherine BH 

Benzo orange R 

Chrj'samine 

Chrysamine K 

Diamine fast red F 

Chloramine fast red F 

Diamine fast red SBL 

Diamine fast red 8BL 140 per cent 

Dianol fast red FG 

Dianol fast red FO 

Direct fast red F 

Diphenyl fast red B supra 



Manu- 
facturer. 



By. 
By. 

1': 



LG. 
LG. 
CG. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
LG. 
S... 

c. 

B.. 



B.. 

B.. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
I... 
By. 



Bv.. 
WD. 



S... 

s... 

LG. 
CG. 
B.. 



BD. 
BK. 
By.. 



LG. 
By. 
B.- 
B.. 



LG. 
LG. 
A.. 
By. 
By. 



S... 
S... 
Q.. 
S... 
CG. 
CG. 
I... 
S... 



s. 



s.... 

C— . 

c... 

BD. 
I^ev. 

S.... 
G... 



Imnorts. 



Quantity 



Pounds. 
11,479 



8,859 
'i6,'733 



358 



3,115 



800 
2,331 



3,661 



397 
4,859 



75 
11,340 



12,112 
992 



296 



990 
'46,'2G8 



220 
18,405 



Invoice 
value. 



SI. 074 



3, 130 



10,574 



, 050 



6,514 



6,021 



17,250 



528 



308 
33,583 



6,414 



12,331 



CENSUS OF DYES AND GOAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 63 

Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Ciuitinno<l. 



Name of dye. 



G.. 

By. 



Lev. 
BD. 
BD. 
BD. 
Lev. 
BD. 
BD. 



WD. 



CG- 
CG. 
B.. 
Bv. 



CG.. 
BK. 



S... 
By. 



Q. 



WD. 

By.. 



BK. 



Bv. 
A.. 

B.. 



By... 
A.... 
LG... 

S 

Lev.. 
BD.. 

I 

B.... 



CG- 
CG. 
C... 



BD. 
Lev. 



BD. 

Lev. 



99 
26, 47G 



1.113 



5, 762 
1,653 



7,243 



3,199 
1,^96 



5,586 



6,570 



1,124 



3,467 



Oxamine red 

Diamine bro%vn B 

Direct gray E 

Direct gray R paste 

Anthracene red 

Dianol brown 

Dianol brown GM 

Dianol orange brown 

Dianol orange brown 170 per cent 

Dianol orange brown 200 per cent 

Dianol orange brown X 

Dianol orange brown X 

Dianol orange brown X 200 per cent 

Dipheny Ired 

Diphenylred SC 

Pyramlae orange E 

Oxydiamine orange 

Toluyene orange Rconc. 166 per cent 

Benzopurpurinc 4B 

Benzopuipuime 4B 25 per cent 

Benzopurpurine 4B 250 per cent 

Cotton fast red 4BS 

Diazo brilliant black B 

Deltapurpuriue 5B 

Deltapmparine 5B 

Deltapurpiu-toe 5B cone 

BriUiaiit Congo 

Brilliant congo R 

Brilliant congo E 

Benzo blue BX 

ChloraiDine blue BXR 

Chloramine blue BXE cone 

Chlorine blue BX A 

Benzo blue 3B 

Diamine blue 3B 

Toluylcne orange - 

Toluylene orange G cone. 150 percent 

Toluylene fast orange GL 

Add anthracene red 

Milling scarlet 4R cone 

Acid anthracene red 3B 

Milling scarlet 4RO 

Diamine yellow N . pdr 

Benzo purpurine lOB 

Benzazurine G 

Benzoin blue EH cone. 300 per cent 

Brilliant azurme 5G- 

Brilliant azurine 5G cone. 30/100 

Chicago blue EW 

Oxamine lilac 3RXX 

Chicago blue 6B 

BriUiant benzo blue 6B 

Chicago blue 6B 

Chicago blue 6B extra 

Chloramine sky blue FF 

Dianol brilUant blue 6B 

Dianol brilliant blue OB - 

Direct sky blue 2,50 per cent (gr. shade) 

Oxamine pure blue 6B highly cone 

Bcnzamino pure blue 

Chloramine sky blno A 

Chloramine sky blue A cone. piu'C 

Chloramine sky blue A 400 per cent 

Direct blue B 

Direct blue GN 2.50 per cent 

Direct blue 4GN 2.50 per cent 

Diamine cutch 

Coomassic Navy biue 

CoomassicNavy blue 2RNX 

Coomassic Xa vy blue 2RNX 

Columbia black F F 

Diancl black BIX 

Diane! black FFX ^„ „ . 

Trisulphon browi j-;, I 69,986 

Trisulphon brown P< - - ^ 

TrisulT>hon brown MB IS 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Imnorts. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 
399 
24 
4,927 



Invoice 
value. 



1,8S3 



7S3 



150 

13 

14, 529 



2,970 



4,633 



49 
42,357 



1,360 



797 



1,651 



.767 



1,111 



457 



59,739 



12,505 



43,705 



1,860 



64 CENSUS OF DYES A]SrD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 



Name of dye. 



Trisulphon brown— Continued. 

Trisiilphon brown MB cone. 7:10. 

Trisulphon bro^^^l MB cone 

Trisulphon brown BR 

Benzo fast blue 4GL 

Benzo fast blue B 

Trisulphon brov/n C G 

Trisulphon brown GG 

Trisulphon bro\vn G G cone 

Dipheny 1 gi-een G 

Diphenylgreen KGW, supra 

Chloramine black N 

Chloramine black extra 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Imports. 



S... 

s... 
s... 

By. 
By. 



Chloramine blue 3G i S. 

Dianol green B G 

Direct green B 

Oxaminc green GX 

Direct green G 

Chloramine green G 

Alkali green D 

Congo brown G 

Naphthamine brown 3G 

Columbia green 

Direct green 21 

Direct green B 

Rosophenine 

Rosophenine 6B cone. 85 per cent 

Benzo brown G 

Auramine 

Auramine O 

Auramine cone 

Auramine cone 

Malachite green 

Malachite green crystals 50 per cent 

Setoglaucine 

Setoglaucine 

Setoglaucine 

Turquoise blue G 

Brilliant green 

Brilliant green 6B 

Brilliant green crystals No. 10 

Setopaline 

Acid green B 

Neptime green 

Benzyl green B 

Benzyl green K 

Brilliant acid green 6B 

Brilliant acid green 6B cone 

Erioviridine B , supra 

Light green 

Acid green cone. 250 per cent 

Acid green extra cone 

Acid green GG extra 

Erioglaucine 

Eriocyanine A 

Erioglaucine E P 

Erioglaucine supra 

Xylene blue VS 

X ylenc blue AS 

Magenta 

Magenta P powder 

Red violet powder 

Red violet 

Methyl violet 

Methyl violet 2B 

Methy 1 violet 3B 

Methy 1 violet 6BO 

Methy 1 violet RBM 

Crystal violet 

Crystal violet extra 

Crystal violet 61J 

Crystal violet powder 

Violet 5B0 

Violet 5 (50 powder 

Benzyl violet 

Benzy 1 violet 5 UN 

Aniline blue 

Aniline blue BCBII 



Lev. 

S.... 



S.... 

s.... 

WD. 



ClCo. 
By... 



S... 
LG. 
Q.. 



BD. 



S... 
G.. 
By. 



LG. 
CG. 
G.. 
C... 



I... 
I... 
Q.. 
By. 

G.. 



WD. 
C... 

By.. 



BD. 



tM 



WD. 
CG.. 
S.... 
WD. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 



150 



43, 751 



2,337 



1,102 



4,078 
2,460 



2,742 



6,282 



31 

48,879 



100 



3,329 



227 
3,418 



1,102 

278 

1,894 



CG. 



30,573 

7,309 

189 



750 



3,312 



1,836 



1,900 



5, 967 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 65 

Tai!i,e 14. — Iiiii)<>rt-s of dues for fixcul near I'.UO — Continued. 



Schultz 
No. 


Name of dye. 


Manu- 
facturer. 


Imports. 


Quantity. 


Invoice 
value. 


522 


Victoria blue 4R . . 


B . 


Pounds. 

24 

3,612 




523 


Fast light gret^n 


By 

By 


$4, 302 




Fast green extra 




Fast green extra bluish 


By 






524 


Acid magenta 




660 


312 




Acid magenta G 260 per cent . . . 


BK... 






Fuchsine S 


B 








Acid fuchsine 


M 






527 


Acid violet 4BN 




33,439 


77 643 




Acid violet 4BN 

Acid violet 4RNS 


B 






S 








Acid violet BW 


By 






528 


Fast acid violet lOB 


By 

By 


799 


995 




Fast acid violet lOB cone. 40/100 




530 


Acid violet 




1,814 


2 617 




Acid violet 4B extra 


LG 






Acid violet 4BS 


S .. 








Acid violet 4BL00F 


B 








Acid violet 4R0 


B 








Formyl violet S4B 


C 








Guinea violet 4B . . 


A 






531 


Eriocyanine 




4, .585 






Eriocj'anine A 


G 




534 


Acid violet 7B cone 


B 


51 
5,494 




536 


Alkali blue 




6,046 




Alkali blue II 


WI> . 




Alkali blue 3B 


C .. 






Alkali blue 3B 


M 








Alkali blue 2B 


A 








Alkali blue 4B 


A 








Alkali blue 4BK 


A 








Alkali blue 6B 


By . 








Alkali blue 6B 


c ; 








Alkali blue HHRROOO 


GrE 








Alkali blue R 


C 








Alkali blue 2R 


M 






537 


Methyl blue for silk 




3, 139 


13 540 




Methy 1 Lyons l>lue 


G 






Methy 1 silk l)lue new 


G 








Methylene silk blue 


G 






539 


Soluble blue 




4,374 


4 110 




Pure blue RT 


BK 






Soluble blue 2R 


BD 








Soluble blue 3R 1 


CG . 






Soluble blue 3M 


BD . 





543 


Patent blue 




OQ QQY 1 37 (jgj^ 




Acid blue V cone 


LG 






Acid blue VS cone 


BK 






Patent l)lue 


Q ... 






Patent blue B 


M 






Patent blue L 


M 








Patent blue V 


M 








Patent blue V 


CG .. 








Patent blue B cone 


M 








Patent marine blue LE 


M 








Tetracyanolo extra 


C 

M 


u 

26,709 




544 


Cyanine B 




545 


Patent blue A 


57 875 




Patent blue A 


M 

CG . 






Patent lilue A 






Patent blue H 


LG 

LG ... . 









Patent blue AN 






Brilliant acid lilue CB 


Bv 








Brilliant acid blue FF cone. 60/100 


By 






546 


Cyanole 




336 


139 




Cyanolo blue 


Q 






Cvanole extra 


C - 






548 


Acid violet6BN 




7,351 


18 530 






I 






Acid viole 1 B N 


LG 








Acid viole 1 6 BN 


B 






551 


Eriochrome azurol BC 




4, 365 






Eriochronie azurol BX 


G 




553 


Eriochrome cvanine RC 


G 


2,205 
771 




554 


Clu-onie azurol S cone 




2 697 




Chrome azurol SX 


G . 








G 







22810°— 21- 



66 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAB CHEMICALS. 

Table 14 — Imports of dyes for ftocal year 1920 — Continued. 



Sohultz 
No. 



555 
558 
559 



£62 
564 



665 



566 



570 
571 



572 
573 



576 

680 
681 

582 



584 
587 



690 
592 
599 



601 



603 
606 



Name of dve. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



By. 
By. 
Bv. 



BK... 

A 

A 

A 



Am'ine 

New victoria blue B 

Victoria blue B 

Victoria blue 

Victoria l^lue B 

Victoria blue B 

Victoria blue B base, dark shade 

Victoria blue B base 

Victoria navy lilue B 

Intensive blue B 

Wool blue SR extra 

Wool blue N extra 

NapMhaleue green 

Erio 2;reen B supra 

Naphthalene green V 

Naphthalene green cone, extra 

Naphthalene green V extra cone 

Acid blue B 

Acid blue BS cone 

AVool blue 5B 

Wool blue 2B A 

Wool blue G extra 

Wool green S 

Wool green BS 

Wool green 

Wool green cone. 200 per cent 

Wool green S cone, pure 

Wool green SC 

Wool green S extra cone, new 

Cyanol green B 

Cyanol green B 

Rhodamine S extra 

Rhodamine 6G 

Rhodamine 6G extra 

Rhodamine 6G extra cone 

Rhodamine 6G 

Rhodamine G 

Rhodamine B 

Rhodamine B extra. 

Rhodamine B extra 

Rhodamine B cone 

Rhodamine 3G 

Irisamine G extra 

Irisamine G extra - 

Fast acid violet R 

Past acid violet RGE 

Fast acid phloxtne A 

Fast acid eosine G extra 

Fast acid phloxine A 

Fast acid violet A2B 

Tiolamin R 

Violamin R cone j M . . . 

Fast acid blue R M . . . 

Eosme 

Eosine cone. 115 per cent WD. 

WD. 
B... 
Q... 



Bv 



Bv. 

S... 
S... 

s... 
s... 
c... 

s 



Eosine D. 

Fast eosine L paste.. 

Erythrosine B 

Gaileine 

Galleine 100 per cent 

Gaileine 10 per cent paste 

Galleine JRG paste 

Galleine L paste 

Coerulein S 

Coerulcin I paste 14 per cent 

Coeruloin MS powder 

Coerulein S powder 

Cooruloin S powder 

Coerulein S powder 

Coerulein S L jjowder 

Rhodulme orange N 

Euclirysine 3RX 

Phosphine" 

Acid phosphmo R 

Brilli-xnt phosphine 5G 300 per cent. 

Brilliant i)liosi)liiae 50 

Brilliant iJhosphine S G 



B... 
B... 
G... 
Lev. 



B.... 
DH.. 
DH.. 
BD.. 

B.... 
M.... 
Bv... 
B'..,. 



BD. 
I.... 
I.... 
I.... 



Imports 



Quantity. 



Pound-t. 

580 

97 

5,823 



9,242 



158, 360 



1, 673 



220 
4,917 



127 



500 
3,420 



720 

9 

7,460 



2,496 



'44^i8rr"l0i,'565 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 67 

Table 14. — Imporiti of (hjen for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 



608 
609 
61.3 



615 
616 



618 

624 
626 

631 
633 
63.5 

636 

637 
642 



653 

658 
659 



660 

661 
663 



Name of dye. 



rhosphine — Continued. 

Paraphosphine G extra 

Paraphosphine G 

Patent phosphine R 

Patent phosphine G cone. 300 per cent. 

Patent pho.sphine M 300 per cent 

Phosphine 3R 

Pho.sphine extra 

Phosphine I 

Saba phosphine GG 

Saha phosphine G 

Euehrysine RRO 

Flavophosphine 4G, cone 

Quinoline yellow, water soluble 

Chinaldine yellow, ord 

Chinoltne yellow 

Chinoline yellow 

Chinolrne yellow 

Quinoline yellow N extra 

Silk vellow , 

Thioflavine S 

Primullne 

Primuline 

Primuline E 

Primuline extra 

Primuline yellow 

Columbia yellow 

Chloramine yellow G 

Chloramlne yellow GG 

Diamine fast yellow 3G 

Thioflaviae T 

Thioflavine T 

Thioflavine T 140 per cent 

Rhoduline yellow 6G 

Violet moderne N 

Violet modeme powder 

Gallocyanine 

Brilliant chrome blue P 

Gallocyanine paste 

Chromocyanine V 

Chromoeyarune B paste 

Indalizarine R 

Indalizarine paste I 

Modern violet 

Ultra violet MO 

Ultra violet powder 

Prune. 



Prune pure 

Gallamine blue extra paste 

Phenocyaniue TC 

Phenoeyanine R paste 

Phenocyanine TV powder 

Phenoeyanine VS paste 

Cotton blue 

Meldola blue3R 

MeldolablueSRconc 

Nile blue A 

Gallopheuiae P 

Methylene blue 

Methylene blue 

Methylene blue 

Methylen e blue B B 

Methylene blue FZP 

Methylene blue OSF '. . . 

Methylene blue medicinal 

Toluidine l)lue 

Methylene green 

Methylene green G extra 

Methylene green W 

Thionineblue 

Thionine blue GO powder 

New methylene blue 

New niethylene blue N 

Methylene blue NNX 

Indochiomine 

Indochromine T 

Indochromine T cone 

Indochromine T cone, double. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



C... 
I.... 
I.... 
I.... 

A... 
M... 
LG. 
S... 
S... 
B.. 
M.. 



I... 
A.. 
By. 

M.. 
LG. 



Lev. 
Q... 
BD. 
LG. 
LG. 
S... 
By.. 
C... 



C. 
C. 

By. 



DH. 



DH. 



DH. 



S.... 
DH. 



DH. 
DH. 
DH. 



S... 

s... 

B.. 
By. 



Q... 
BD. 
S... 
Lev. 
Lev. 
Q... 
B... 



C^iantity. 



Import.s 



Pounds. 



Invoice 
value. 



999 : 

7 1 

33,437 346,032 



675 
13.481 



3,348 



2,425 
'27"676' 



1,259 
'"h'o'l 



5,950 



3,601 



13, 790 
2,940 



9, 846 



1,713 
3,122 



605 



330 



10, 750 



4,651 



917 



12,944 



2,091 



14,819 



7,737 



1,239 



443 53 

:::::::::::::::::: 

12, 752 31, 275 



68 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 



Schultz 
No. 



Name of dve. 



671 
672 



673 

679 

681 

684 
685 
687 

690 
692 

699 

705 



709 

734 
736 

747 

748 



759 
760 



761 



762 



763 

765 



766 
767 



768 



772 

774 



Induline scarlet 

Azo carmine GX 

Rosazine 

Rosazine cone 

Azo carmine B 

Rosinduline 2B bluish 

Safranine 

Safraniiie FF extra 

New fast gray 

Methylene gray ND 

Brilliant rhoduline red B 

Tannin heliotrope 

Rosolane O 

Rosolane B cone 

Diphene blue R 

Naphtazine blue 

Napthazine navy blue 

Induline (water soluble) 

Soluble blue 2R 

Indamine 6R 

Acidcyanine BF - 

Acid cyanine BF 

Indoeyanine B 

Pyrogene green 2G 

Pyrogene dark green yellow B shade 

Pyrogene green 3G 

Pyrogene yellow 

Pyrogene yellow O 

Katigene green 

Thional brilliant green GG 

Thional brilliant green G 

Thional red brown 

Thional brown G 

Thional brown GD 

Hydron blue 

Carbindol blue R 

Hydron blue G paste 20 per cent 

Hydron blue G paste 30 per cent 

Hydron blue G paste 40 per cent 

Hydron blue G powder 

Hydron blue R paste 20 per cent 

Hydron Idue R powder 

Anthraflavone G paste 

Anthraflavone GO paste 

Indanthrene golden orange G paste 

Indanthrene golden orange G powder 

Indanthrene golden orange G double paste 

Indanthrene golden orange G double paste, sand free. 
Indanthrene golden orange R paste 

Indanthrene golden orange R paste, sand free 

Indanthrene golden orange RRT paste 

Indanthrene golden orange RRT paste, sand free 

Indanthrene golden orange R double paste, sand free. 
Indanthrene scarlet G i^aste 

Indanthrene scarlet G paste , sand free 

Indanthrene scarlet G double paste 

Indanthrene scarlet G double paste, sand free 

Indanthrene dark blue BO paste, sand free 

Indanthrene dark blue B.O.S. powder 

Indanthrene green B paste 

Indanthrene green B powder 

Indanthrene green B double paste 

Indanthrene green B double paste, sand free 

Indanthrene violet Rex. paste 

Indanthrene violet R ex. paste, sand free 

Indanthrene violet RR extra 

Indanthrene violet RR extra paste 

Indanthrene violet RR extra paste, sand free 

Indanthrene violet RR extra powder 

Indanthrene violet RR extra double paste, sand free. 
Indanthrene black BB double paste 

Indanthrene black BB powder 

Galloflavine 10 per cent paste 

-Vlizarin black S paste 

.Ylizarin blacK WR 16 per cent paste 



Manu- 
facturer. 



K.. 
LG. 



M.- 
By- 
C. 
M.- 
M.- 
A.. 



WD. 
BD." 



A.. 
LG. 
A.. 



S.... 
BD. 



Lev. 
C... 
C... 
C.... 
C... 
C... 
C... 
B... 
B... 
B... 



Imports. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 

77 

330 



404 



386 
"56' 



24 
249 

42 



541 
2,249 



100 
5,675 



5,005 



3,307 
"ii,"855 



25, 078 
'21 ,"593 



1,353 
"2 '837 



15,208 



395 



906 
'3,"427 



842 

'ii,'i98 



25,027 



24 

14,703 



CEXSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 69 

Table 14. — Imports of fliK's for ffscal year 1920 — Continued. 



Name of dye. 



Alizarin (synthetic) 

Alizarin paste YC A 20 per cent 

Alizarin red paste IP 20 per cent 

Alizarin red paste YC A 

Alizarin red 1 B 20 per cent paste 

Alizarin red IB 40 per cent paste 

Alizarin orange R paste 

Alizarin red 

Alizarin red 1 WS 

Alizarin red S powder 

Alizarin red S W B pov/der 

Alizarin red W powder 

Alizarin brown 

Anthracene brown 20 per cent 

Anthracene brown 100 per cent powder 

A^nthracene brown \VL paste 

Alizarin l^rown G 

Alizarin bro\vn 20 per cent paste , 

Anthracene brown WLP paste , 

Alizarin SX , 

Alizarin paste SX 20 per cent , 

Alizarin GX 20 per cent paste 

Alizarin Bordeaux GG paste , 

[Mixture with 778.] 
Alizarin cyanine NS powder , 

Alizarine cyanine WRB powder 

Anthracene blue \V R paste 

Anthracene blue W R paste double 

Anthracene blue SWGG powder 

Anthracene blue S W G G powder 

Anthracene blue SWGG ex powder 

Anthracene blue SWR powder 

Anthracene blue SWB powder 

Indanthrcne olive G powder 

Cibanone orange R 

Cibanone green G paste 

Cibanone orange R paste 

Cibanone orange R paste 9 per cent 

Cibanone orange R paste 7 per cent 

Cibanone orange R paste 8 per cent (yellow shade) . 

f ibanone orange R paste 10 per cent 

Cibanone yellow R paste 10 per cent 

Cibanone yellow R paste 

Cibanone yellow R paste 

Cibanone yellow R paste 10 per cent 

Alizarin maroon paste, 10 per cent 

Alizarin cyanine G G powder 

Alizarin cyanine green G extra powder 

Anthracene blue W G paste 

Alizarin blue \VX 10 percent paste 

Alizarin blue JR powder 

Alizarin blue S 

Alizarin lilue SB 45 

Alizarin blue S powder 

Alizarin blue S powder 

Alizarin sky blue B cone. 70/100 powder 

Alizarin sky blue B powder 

Alizarin blue SB 45 cone. 50 per cent 

Alizarin green S paste 

Ilelindone yellow 3GN 

Ilelindone yellow CG 

Ilelindone yellow C AK powder and paste 

Helindone yellow 3GN paste and powder 

Ilelindone yellow 3GN 

Algole yellow 3GL paste 

Algole yellow 3 G powder 

Algole yellow 3 G L powder 

Indanthrene orange RT 

Indanthrene orange RT paste 

Algole yellow WF 

Algole scarlet G paste 

Algole scarlet G powder 

Algole red 5G paste 

Algole red 5G powder 

Algole yellow 3G paste 

Algole yellow R powder 



Imports. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Q.. 
Q.. 
Q.. 
M.. 
M.. 
By. 



M.. 

B.. 
B.. 
By. 



B... 
B... 

Ley. 
M... 
M... 

Lev. 



B.. 
By. 

By. 



I... 

S... 

I... 

B.. 
By. 
By. 
B.. 
B.. 

By. 



M.. 

By. 

B.. 
Bv. 
By. 
M.. 
B.. 



M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
By. 
By. 
By. 

B.. 
B.. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



Quantity. 



Invoice 
value. 



Pounds. I 

8,575 $2,762 



500 
5,072 



1,235 



2,289 



20 

187 



29,608 
""856 



11 

6,188 



15, 886 



70 
3,165 



49 
2,031 



12, 298 



2,997 
1,440 



By. 



3 
552 



146 

'm 



70 CENSUS or DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Table 14. — Imports of (7i/<?s for fiscal year 19B0 — Continued. 



Name of dye. 



Imports. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Quantity. 



Invoice 
value. 



Algole pink R paste 

Algole pink R powder 

Algole red FF extra paste 

Algole red FF extra powder 

Algole brilliant red 2B paste 

Algole red R extra paste 

Algole red R extra powder 

Algole brilliant violet R paste.. 

Algole brilliant violet RP powder 

Algole brilliant violet 2B paste 

Algole brilliant violet 2B powder 

Algole blue 3R paste 

Algole blue 3R powder 

Algole brilliant orange FR paste 

Algole brilliant orange FR powder 

Algole violet B powder 

Algole orange R paste 

Algole orange R powder 

Algole red B paste 

Algole red B powder 

Indanthreno claret B paste 

Indanthreue claret B extra paste 

Algole bordeaux 3B paste 

Algole bordeaux 3B powder 

Indantlu'ene red R paste 

Lndanthrenered R powder 

Indanthrenered R double paste 

Lndautlireue red R double powder 

Indantluenered R double paste, sand free 

Indanthrenered BN extra paste 

Ludantlirenered BN extra paste, sand free 

Indanthreue red BN extra powder 

Indanthreno violet RN extra powder 

Algole olive R paste 

Algole olive R pow^der 

Algole gray B powder 

Algolegray 2B powder 

Helindone orange GRN 

Helindone orange GRN paste 

HelLiadone bro^vn 3 GN paste 

Indanthrenablue RS 

Indanthreue blue RS for paper paste 

Indanthreue blue RS for paper trip, powder 

Indanthreue blue RS paste 

Indanthreue blue RS double paste 

Indanthreue blue RS paper paste, saud free 

Indantlirene Ijlue RS trip, paper 

Algole blue K powder 

Indanthreue blue 3G powder 

Indanthreue blue 3G paste 

Indanthreue blue GOD paste 

Indanthreue blue GCD paste, sand free 

Lridanthreneblue GCD powder 

Indanthreue blue GCD doublepaste 

Indanthreneblue GCD double paste, sand free. 

Algole blue 3G paste 

Indanthren e maroon R paste 

Algole '4reen B paste 

Algole green B powder 

Algole dark green B powder 

Indanthreue gray B paste 

IndiUithrene gray B powder 

Indanthreue gi-ay B double paste 

Indanthreno gray B double paste, sand free 

Indantlirciio yeUow G doul)le paste 

Indixnthrono yeUo w G paste 

ludanthrcno yellow G paste, sand free 

ludaiithi'iiu yellow R paste double 

Iiidiinthii'iic yellow R paste 

Indanthreue yellow R paste, sand free 

Jridanthreue yellow R double paste, sand free... 

1 lulu n threue yellow powder 

Indanthreue blue WB powder 

Alizarin direct blue B 

Alizarin cyanolo B 

Alizarin direct blue B 

Alizarm direct blue EB 



Bv. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By- 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 

§y- 

By. 

By. 

By. 
By. 

i!': 

B.. 
Bv. 
By. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.V. 

By. 



M.. 
M.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 

B.. 
B... 
B.. 



B.. 
B.. 

?": 

By. 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 



Pounds. 
1,113 



2,910 



3,016 



656 



449 



29 
373 



3,552 
'2,"72i 



61 
1,538 



2,916 



461 

"ioi 



10,010 



15, 000 
8,144 



121 
551 



22,812 



1,499 
213 



365 



10, 820 



2,970 



510 



355 
'5'477 



876 



1,466 



208 
'•490 



4,389 
1,559 



129 

54,478 I 92,' 20.5 



2,. 079 

46 

339 717 



66,903 



588 



CEA^SUS OF DYES Als^D COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 71 

Table 14. — Import a of dyes for fiscal year i.0.2()— Continued. 



Name of dve. 



Aizarin irisol DR 

Alizarin direct violot R 

Alizarin irisoie TX powder 

Anthraquinono violet powder 

Alizarin viridine FF paste 

Alizarin viridine FF powder 

Alizarin viridine F paste 

Alizarin asfei'ole B powder 

Alizarin rabinole 3G powder 

Alizarin rubinole R cone. 50/100 powder 

Alizarin rubinolc R powder 

Alizarin sapphiiole B powder 

Alizarin sapphirole SE powder 

Alizarin saiJphirole WSA powder 

Cyananthi-ol R powder 

Cyananthrol RBX 

Cyanantbrol RXO 

Alizarin blue black B powder 

Alizarin blue Hack 3B powder 

Anthraquinone blue green BXO 

Anthraquinoue giecn GXN 

Alizarin direct green G 

Alizarin direct green GC 

Alizarin cyaninegretenE powder 

Alizarin cyanine green G extra cone 70/100 powder. 

Alizarin cyanine green G extra powder 

Alizarin direct green G 

Leuco dark green B po'vder 

Indanthi'ene brown B double paste 

Indanthrene brown B powder 

Indanthrene brown B paste sand free 

Algole brown R paste 

Algole brown R powder 

Algole Corinth R powder 

A Igole Corinth R powder 

Helindone brown AN 

Helindone brown AN 10 per cent paste 

Indanthron e pink B paste 

Indanthrene pink B paste sand free 

Indanthrene pink BL powder 

Indanthrene red violet RRN paste 

Indanthrene red violet RRN powder 

Indigo (synthetic) 

Indigotine or indigo extract 

Indigotine 05120 

Indigotine eonc 

Indigo RB 

Helindone blue BB paste 

Indigo MLB 2B powder 

Indigo MLB 2B paste 20 per cent 

Helindone blue BB paste 

Brom-indigo 

Ciba blue 2B poM^der 

Ciba blue 2B powder 

Ciba blue 2BD paste 16 per cent 

€iba blue 2BD paste 

Ciba blue 2B 

Brom-indigo F B powder 

Indigo MLB 4B 20 per cent 

Indigo KG 

Indigo MLB 6B powder * 

Indigo MLB 6B paste 

Indigo MLB 6B paste, 40per cent 

Brilliant indigo B, 20 per cent 

Brilliant indigo B powder 

Brillian t indigo B paste 20 per cent 

Brilliant indigo 4G, 20 per cent , 

Brilliant indigo 4G paste 20 per cent , 

Indigo G paste 

Helindone green G 

Helindoae green G paste 

Helindone green G powder 

Alizarin indigo G paste 

Alizarin indigo B paste 

Alizarin indigo 3 R paste 

.Mizarin indigo 3 R powder 



Manu- 
facturer. 



M.. 
By. 
B... 
Bv. 
By. 
By- 
By. 
Bv. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By- 
By. 
B... 
B... 
B... 
By. 
By. 
B— 
B.- 



M.. 
By. 

Sy- 

By- 

M.. 
By- 
B.- 
.B.. 



B.. 

Bv. 

gy- 

By. 
By. 



Q.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 



WD. 
WD. 



S... 
I... 
T... 
I... 
I... 

By- 

M.. 



Imports. 



Quantitv. 



Pounds. 
251 



750 
4,422 



5,798 



22, 890 



529 



16, 884 



99 

98 

10, S18 



60 
1,676 



2, 687 
'"'"88 
"2,' 857 



520, 347 
5,512 



3,945 



49,646 



1,467 



452 
796 



798 

291 

1,673 



322 



72 CENSUS OF DYES AND (^OAL-TAR CHEMICALS, 

Table 14 — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 



Schultz , 
No. I 



S96 
901 



Name of dve. 



902 
904 



906 
907 



912 
91.5 

916 

918 

919 
920 



921 



923 



Manu- 
facturer. 



I... 
I... 
I... 
I... 
I... 
S... 
I... 
I... 
I... 
SA. 



Helindone hlne SON 

HeliiKlone l>luc SGN 

Helindone blue 3GN concentrated 

Ciba violet B 

Ciba violet B 

Ciba violet B paste 10 per cent 

Ciba violet R paste 10 per cent 

Ciba violet 2 B powder ; 

Ciba violet R 

Ciba violet R 

Cilia violet R powder 

Ciba violet B powder 

Ciba violet B powder 95 per cent 

Ciba violet B paste 10 per cent 

Helindone brown 2R 

Helindone brown 2R paste 

Helindone brown 2R powder 

Helindone brown G 

Helindone brown CR 

Helindone brown CR powder 

Helindone brown G powder 

Helindone brown G paste 

Thio i ndii;o scarlet G 

Ciba red G powder 

Ciba scarlet 

Helindone fast scarlet C 

Helindone fast scarlet C paste 

Ciba scarlet G paste 

Ciba scarlet G extra paste and powder 

Ciba scarlet G extra paste 

Ciba scarl ot G extra paste 20 per cent 

Helindone pink 

Helindone pink 

Helindone pink AN 10 percent 

Helindone pink BN 10 per cent 

Helindone pink BN 10 percent paste 

Thio i ndiso rose AN paste 

Thio indiijo rose BN paste 

Thio i ndiRO rod B paste 

Thio indi.1,'0 red 13 powder 

Helindone fast scarlet R 

Helindone fnst scarlet R powder 

Helindone fast scarlet R paste 

Helindone scarlet S 

Helindone scarlet S paste 

Helindone red .SB 

Helindone red 3B paste 

Helindone red 3B powder 

Ciba Bordeanx B paste 10 per cent 

Ciba Bordeaux 15 paste 

Ciba Bordeaux B powder 

Helindone violet 

Helindone \iolet B paste 

Helindone violet BB paste 

Helindone violet B powder 

Helindone violet BB powder 

Helindone violet R 

Helindone violet R paste 

Helindone violet R powder 

Helindone gray 2 B BR • 

Heli ndone gray B B paste 

Helindone gray BB powder 

Helindone gray liR powder 

Ursol D D 

Ursol 4R paste A 



M. 



Quantity. 



Imports. 



Founds. 

427 



40, 441 



155 



451 

'21," si 8 



11,122 



179 



Invoice 
value. 



$5, 574 
'ii8,'796 



290 



7,218 



24,908 



21,96& 



438 



838 



1,786 
'6,"869 



139 



100 



1,805- 



3, 492 
'27,'99i 



330 



UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES. 



.Mkali black J cone 

Alkali chrome black B 

Alkali chrome black D 

Alkali dark green 

Alkali orange G 




CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



73 



Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 

UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued. 



Name of dye. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Alkali pink G 

Alkali pink B 

Alkali riibin Gconc. 300 per cent 

Alkali scarlet 

Aminogene base RN 

Aminoscne blue RN 

Benzamineazoblue Geonc. 3.50 per cent 

Benzamineazoblue 3Rconc. 21.") percent 

Benzamine fast yellow 2G cono. 200 per cent 

Benzamiiie violet C 

Benzo Bordeaux 6B 

Benzo clirome hro^'STi G 

Benzo chrome brown CR : 

Benzo fast black 

Benzo fast black 

Benzo fast black L 

Benzo ft'st blue FFL 

Benzo fast blue G 

Benzo fast Bordeaux 6BL 

Benzo fast brown 3GL 

Benzo fast cosine BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope 4BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope 2R L 

Benzo fast orange S 

Benzo fast scarlet 4B A 

Benzo red r2B 

Benzo rhodulineSB 

Benzo rhoduline red B 

Benzoin black 

Benzoin blue black RH 150 per cent 

Brilliant lieiizo preen B 

Brilliant benzo violet B 

Brilliant benzo violet 2R 

Brilliant fast blue B 

Brilliant fast blue B cone. 50/100 

Hriliiant fast blue 2G 

Brilliant fast blue 2G cone. 60/100 

riiicafiored III 

Chloramine black 

Chloramine black HW 

Chloramine black I'^.X cone 

Chloramine Itrilliant red SB 

Chloramine brilliant red 8B cone 

Chloramine bro^vn 2R 

Chlorani ine fast red F 

Chloramine pink R 

Chlorazol pink R 

Chlorazol pink R '. 

Chloramine red XBS 

Chloramine violet R 

Chloramine violet WBX 

Chlorazol violet WBX 

Chloramine red BII 

Chlorazol brown G 

Chlorazol green B 

Chlorazol dark green FL 

Chlorazol green 

Chloramine dark green I'l./ 

Chlorazol dark green PO 

Chlorazol sky bl ue FFS 

Columbia brown RK 

Congo brilliant R 

Cotton blue 11 double 

Cotton yellow GI 

Cupranite brown G 

Cutch brown 2R 

Diamine azo blue R 

Thiamine Bordeaux S 

Diamine catechine B I C 

Diamine fast blue FFB | C 



WD. 

WD. 

WD. 

WD. 

I.... 

I.... 

WD. 

WD. 

WD. 

WD. 

Bv.. 

By.. 

Bv.. 

FG. 

By.. 

By.. 

By.. 

By.. 

By.. 

By.. 

Bv-. 

Bv.. 

BV.. 

Bv-. 

Bv. . 

Bv.. 

Bv.. 

Bv.. 

By.. 

BK. 

BK., 

Bv-. 

By.. 

Bv-. 

By.. 

By.. 

By.. 

By.. 

G... 



S.... 

s 

s.... 

s 

s.... 

BD.. 
RHS- 
BD.. 
Bv... 

By... 

BD.. 
BD.. 

S 

BD.. 
BD.. 
BD.. 
BD.. 
BD.. 
BD.. 
BD.. 
A.... 

f3 

M.... 
B.... 
I 

C 

C 



Imports 



Quantity. 



Invoice 
value. 



Pounds. 
510 



1, 675 

322 

661 

1,942 

2,197 



220 

236 

1,149 

2,398 

104 

1,572 



3, 377 
299 
800 

1,226 
176 
99 

1,.312 
112 
703 
450 
201 
600 
97 
150 

1,764 
287 
225 
351 
24 
4.50 
201 
100 
242 

2,205 
672 



1,102 
550 
625 



7,237 

397 

1,052 



220 

8,962 

256 

10,098 



1,028 

40 

200 

220 

1,102 
291 
500 

7,715 
51 
626 
417 

2,919 



$101 



1,467 



1,439 



855 



21,796 I 81,41» 



1,569 



1,397 



9,891 



174 



CENSUS OF DYES AXD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 14 — Twporfs of di/ea for fiscal pear 1920 — Continued. 
rj>iID£NTiriED DIRECT DYES— Continued. 



Schnltz 
No. 



Name of dve. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Imports. 



Quantity. 



Diamine fa?t browTi G 

Diamine fast brown R 

Diamine fast gray BN 

Diamine fast gi'ay BN 

Diamine fast gray G 

Diamine fast gray G 

Diamine fast Bordeaux 6BS 1 

Diamine fast Bordeaux 

Diamine fast orange EG 

Diamine fast scarlet lOBF 

Diamine fast scarlet GG 

Diamine fast scarlet SBN 

Diamine fast violet FFBN 

Diamine orange F 

Diamine orange B 

Diamine orange G 

Diamine scarlet B 

Diamine sky-blue FF 

Diamine violet red 

Diamine violet red K extra 

Diamineral blue CVB 

Dianil light red 8BW 

Dianol black F FX 

Dianol dark blue B 

Dianol dark blue B 

Dianol fast blue 2B 

Dianol fast blue G 

Dianol fast blue RB 

Dianol fast blue RB 

Dianol fast pink BK 

Dianol fast pink BK 

Dianol fast red K 

Dianol fast yellow ARX 

Dianol fast yellow ARX 

Dianol orange brown X 

Dianol violet R 

Dianol violet E 

Diazanil blue BB 

Diazenil pink B 

Diazo Bordeaux 7B 

Diazo brilliant green 3G 

Diazo briUiant orange GR extra 

Diazo brilliant orange 5G extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet B extra 

Diazo briUiant scarlet 2BL extra cone. 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 5BL extra 

Diazo brown 3G. „ 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 36 extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 6B extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet G extra 

Diazo brown 3G 

Diazo brown 3RB 

Diazo fast bordeaux BL 

Diazo fast red 5BL '. 

Diazo fast violet BL 

Diazo sky-blue 3G 

Diazo fast red 7BL 

Diazo fasl v iolct BL 

Diazo fasi, yellow G 

Diazo fast yellow 2G 

Diazo fast yellow 3RL 

Diazo geraiiuie B extra 

Diazo indigo blue 4GL extra 

Diazo olive G 

Hiazo rul)ine B 

1 )iazo ru'; )iue B cone. , 60/100 

L>jazo sky -i)luc 

Diazo sky-blue 3G 

Diazo Violet BL 

Diazo yellow R 

Diphcno bine R 

Diphciivl l.liic KFC 

DiphenVl \iolet B VC 

Direct black B cone 

Direct blue BXU 

Direct brown Ci 



C... 
€.-. 
C... 
C... 

c... 
c.... 
c... 
c... 
c... 
c... 
v.... 
c... 
c... 
c... 
c... 
c... 

BD. 
BD. 
Lev. 
Lev. 
BD. 
BD. 
Lev. 
BD. 
Lev. 
BD. 
Lev. 
BD. 
BD. 
BD. 
Lev. 
M... 
M... 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
BV.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
Bv.. 
By.. 
Bv.. 



Bv. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
Bv. 



Bv. 
By. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
By. 
By. 
Bv. 
Bv. 
A.. 



Pounds. 
2,665 



3,171 



99 

73 

99 

187 

9 

64 

13 

1,100 



137 

20 

2 

37 

51 

4 

1,080 

23,430 



4,034 

840 

1,814 



7,342 



120 
4,475 



5,0(i4 
5,480 



18 

543 

181 

2 

4 

4 

194 

818 

24 

289 

284 

30S 

317 

212 

4 

220 

11 

143 

443 

509 

88 

119 

9 

2 

511 

101 

4 

600 

99 

11 

953 

2 

2 

459 

1,587 

220 

200 

2, 803 

1,087 



CENSUS OF DYES Al^D COAL-TAK CHEMICALS. 



75 



Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 

UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued. 



Name of dye. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Imports. 



Quantity. 



Invoice, 
value. 



Direct brown 3GNC. 

Dir ect brown R 

Direct fast vellow CR 

Direct fast yellow GR 

Direct green 

Direct green B 

Direct sky-blue green shade 

Direct violet B 

Direct violet R , SCO per cent 

Heligoland black FFNA 

Heligoland black F FN extra 

Heligoland black BH 100 per cent . . 

Heligoland blue 6B 

Naphtamine fast green B 

Kaphtogene blue BM 

Napbtogene blue 2R 

Naphtogene bine 4R 

New yellow for cotton. 333 per cent 

New yellow for cotton, 335 per cent . 

New yellow for cotton 

Oxamine yellow 3G 

Oxydiamine brown G 

Oxydianune brown RN 

Oxydiaminogcn ED 

Oxydiaminogcne OB 

Polyiihenyl blue GNH cone 

Polyphcnyl orange RC 

Polypheny 1 orange SP 

Polypheny! yellow RC 

Pyrazol brown G 

Pyrazol orange G 

Rosanthrene Bordeaux B 

Rosanthrene R 

RosTnthrone R paste 

Rosan threne R 

Solomine blue FF 

Thionnl yellow R 

Tolnylcne fas! orange GL 

Toluvlone yellow G 

Triezol Bordeaux B 

Triazol brovni POOD 

Trisulphone lirouze B 

Zambesi blick D extra 

Zambesi black D extra 

Zambesi black D 

Zambesi lilack V 

Zambesi black V 



S... 
CG. 



Q-. 
CG. 
CG. 
I... 

S... 
CG. 
CG. 
CG. 
CG. 
CG. 
K.. 



A... 
A... 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
B... 
C... 
C... 
C... 
C... 
G. .. 
G... 
G... 
G... 



S 
I.... 

s.... 
s.... 
I.... 

LG.. 
S.... 
LG.. 
Bv. . 
GrE. 
GrE. 
S . 



LG. 
A.. 
A.. 
LG. 



Pounds. 
6(il 
2, 204 
1,729 
2,85.^, 
7,7150 



2,002 

1,981 

1,243 

21,089 



9,9.)1 
32o 

731 
2.221 

I2ii 
3,908 



40 

201 

2 

24 
•500 
4f;3 
908 



1,179 

1,984 

2.5,078 

500 

1,773 



t;oo 

4'^3 

597 

20 

65 

2 

972 

18.862 



S3, 540 



3,724 



1,036 



3,806 



UNIDENTIFIED VAT COLORS. 



Algole brown G powder 

Algolc yellow 3G L powder 

Calcdon blue R 

Chloranthrene Bordeaux R pa.ste. 

Chloranthrene red 5G 

Cibanone green B paste 10 per cojit 

Cibanone green B paste 

Cibanone green B 

Durindone Ijliie 4B 

Durindone blue 5B 

Durindone blue 5B 

Durindone blue 6B 

Diirindoue blue 6B 

i 'nrtndone blue 4B extra 

Durindone red B 

Durindone scarlet R 

Durindone scarlet R 

Helindone black 2R G paste (tor printing) 

Holindone black paste (for printing) 

Helindone fixst scarlet B powder 

Indanthrene bluish green BN paste, sand free. 



Bv. 
Bv. 
Q-. 
BD. 
BD. 
I... 
f 



S 

BD. 

BD. 

Lev. 

BD. 

lyev. 

Lev. 

Lev. 

BD. 

Lev. 

M... 

M... 

M... 

B... 



196 

33 

20 

10 

35} 

2,824 



4,802 



120 
1,050 



S5,%4 



6,182 



76 



CENSUS OF DYES Aj^D COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT COLORS— Continued. 



Sehultz 

No. 



Name of dye. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Imports. 



Quantity. 



Indanthrene blue RC powder 

Tndanthrene lirown RR paste 

Indanthrene brown RR 

Indanthrene violet BN extra paste 

Indanthrene ^iolet BN extra paste, sand free 
Indanthrene violet RRN paste, sand free 

Vat ^^olet R paste , 

Vat yellow R paste , 



Pounds. 

51 

739 

26 

3,007 



110 
440 



UNIDENTIFIED ACID COLORS. 



Acetyl red BB 

Acid blue RBF 

Acid Bordeaux 

Acid brilliant blue A 

Acid green 

Acid green 300 per cent 

Acid milling black B 

Acid rhodamine B G 

Acid rhodamine R 

Acid rhodamine 

Acid violet 4RN 

Acid violet 6B 

Acid violet R extra cone 

Alkali blue 2G 

Alkali blue 2R 1918 

Alkali fast green 3B 

Alkah fast green 3G 

Anthracyanine 3FL 

Authraeyanine 3FLi 

Anthracyanine 3FL 

Anthracyanine 3FL cone., 40/100. 

Anthracyanine FL cone, 50/100.. 

Anthracyanine 3 FL reddish 

Anthracyanine S powder 

Anthosine oB 

Azo acid blue B 

Azo crimson L 

Azo dark green A 

Azo geranine 3BN 

Azo geranine 3BN 

Azo rhoduie 

Azo rhodine OB 

Azo rhodine 2G 

Azo rhodine 2GN 

Azorubin 2B cone. 160 per cent 

Azo wool violet 7R 

Brilliant acid blue C B 

Brilliant acid carmine 6B 

Brilliant anthrazurol 

Bri'liant fast red L 125 per cent 

Brilliant milling red R 

Brilliant scarlet 4R cone 

Brilliant scarlet RN 

Brilliant scarlet PHT 

Brilliant silk blue lOB 

Brilliant sulphone red lOB 

Calcutta blue 

Cochinea I B extra 

Coomassie fast black BW 

Coomassie fast black B \V 

Cyananthrol BG A 

Cyananthrol BGAOO 

Cyananthrol R 

Cyananthrol RBX powder 

C'yaiianl liro 1 RX O 

l/ouiilo Kcailet S cone. 115 per cent 

EoshiP L paste 

Fast acid eo.sine G extra 

Formyl l)luc BX 

Erio fast fuchsine B Biv 

Erio (lavine SX 



B... 
I.... 

S.... 
LG., 
Q..: 
Q... 
G... 
B... 
B... 
I.... 
B... 
LG.. 
WD. 
M... 
M... 
By.. 
By.. 



LG . . 
Bv... 
By... 
By... 
LG... 
DH.. 

B 

S 

By... 

G 

BD... 
Lev . . 

S 

S 

s 

s 

WD... 

C 

By.... 
Gr. E . 
B 



BK. 
C... 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
A... 
S.... 
S.... 
G... 
BD. 
Lev.. 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
B... 
WD. 
B... 
M... 
C... 
G... 
G... 



201 
200 
220 
549 
76 



,146 

51 

4 

330 

2 

84 

77 

328 

207 

326 

300 

438 



,102 

22 

220 

249 

485 
,480 



2,811 



,680 
99 
110 
99 
11 
165 
99 
,179 



11 
664 

857 
214 
080 



75 
40 
26 
165 
602 
477 
146 
951 
213 
654 
535 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



77 



Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 

UNIDENTIFIED ACID COLORS— Continued. 



Name of dye. 



Erio green B cone 

Erio green B supra , 

Erio violet BC 

Erio violet AL supra , 

Erio violet RL supra 

Fast acid green BB extra 

Fast eyanine Navy blue extra cone 

Fast light blueB 

Fast light yellow 

Fast red AN cone. 135 per cent 

Fast red V 

Fast blue wool BL 

Fast wool blue R 

Green 21 

Guinea fast green B 

Guinea fast red 2R 

Jasmine high cone 

Jersey black B 

Kiton fast violet lOB 

Ki ton fast violet lOB 

Kiton fast yellow S 

Kiton yellow S 

Milling red' 4B A 

Milling yellow 3G 

Milling yellow 3G, 200 per cent 

Milling yellow O 

Milling yellow 00 

Naphthalene black 12B 

Naphthalene blue B 

Najihthylamine blue black 

Navy bfueA 

Navy blue 

New acid Inown 

Paiatin light yellow R 

I'atent blue E... 

PinkM 

Polar red G cone 

Resorcin havana brown 

Rosinduline GXF 

Special blue G 

Sulphone blue R 

Victoria navy blue B 

Wool blue RL 

Wool blue S cone. 333 per cent 

Wool brown 

Wool fast violet B, cone. 50/100 

Wool green NB ' 

Wool violet R 

Xylene fast green B 



Imports. 



Manu- 
facturer. 



G... 
G... 
G... 
G... 
G... 
M... 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
Q... 
LG.. 
LG. 



A... 
A... 
G... 
Q... 
S.... 
I.... 
I.... 
I.... 
A... 
C... 
C... 
C... 
C... 
BD. 
M... 
CG.. 
I.... 
Q... 
Lev. 
B... 
M... 
BD. 
G... 
BK. 
K... 
B... 
LG. 
By.. 
G... 
WD. 
WD. 

By.. 
Q... 
K... 

S.... 



Quantity. I^^^e 



Pounds. 
6,856 



7,914 



1,100 
1, 102 
187 
1,102 
2,569 



3, 857 



441 
500 
100 
4,1S9 
100 
601 



642 



100 

15 

243 

11 

60 

6,110 

110 

6, 658 

225 



00 

62 

300 

25 

1,543 

441 

20 

82 

3,022 

522 

2, 866 

1,489 

441 

55 

3,292 

94 

1,72) 



UNIDENTIFIED SULPHUR COLORS. 



Cross dye green B 

Cross dye green 2G cone. 
Cross dye green 2G . . . 

Cross dye yellow Y 

Eclipse brown BK 

Hydrosulphon green S . . 

Immedial olive B 

Immedial purple C 

Immedialdirect blue B . 

Pyrogene yellow O 

Sulphur l)iue 

Sulphur bhic extra. 
Sulphur Ijrown 

Sulphur brown cone 

Sulphur cutch 

Sulphur green 

Sulphur greon B 

Sulphur indigo 

Sulphur yellow 

Sulphur yellow 



BD. 
BD. 
BD. 
BD. 
G.. 
Q.. 
C... 
C... 
C... 
I.... 
Ci... 
Q... 
Q... 
Q... 
Q... 
Q.. 
BD. 
Q... 
Q.. 
BD. 



16,274 
7,056 



4,480 
5,952 

500 

201 
4 

450 
2,205 

300 



300 



400 
200 

3,178 
100 

3,600 



78 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Coatinued. 

UNIDENTIFIED SULPHUR COLORS— Continued. 



Name of dve. 



Sulphur yellow G 

Sulphurol dark brown 

Sulphurol dark brown G 

Sulphurol mdigo blue, cone 

Sulphurol indigo B . cone. . , 

Sulphurol indigo R . cone 

Sulphurol orange 

Thiamine green, 2G 

Thiamine brilliant green 2Y 

Thiazol yellow G cone 

Thiogene New blue 2RL 

Thional brilliant blue 6B 

Thional brilliant blue 6B cone. pure. 

Thional brilliant gi-een GG 

Thional yellow G 

Thional brilliant yellow G 

Thional brilliant yellow GG 

Thional bronze GV... 

Thional brown GD 

Thional b^o^^^l GD 

Thional blue BR 

Thional orange G 

Thional yellow 3RD 

Thional brilliant green 4GX 

Tliional brilliant green 4GX 

Thional brown R 

Thional browu R 

Thional eorlnth RBX 

Thional direct blue S 

Thional gi'een 3B 

Thional green 3B 

Thional green D Y 

Thional green DY 

Thionine green 2G 

Thional yellow GR 

Thional yellow GR 

Thional yellow 3RD 

Thional yellow 3RD 



Manu- 
facturer. 



S.... 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
Q... 
Q... 
S.... 
M... 
S.... 

s.... 



s.... 
s.... 
s.... 
s.... 
s.... 

BD. 
Lev. 
Lev. 
S.... 
S.... 
BD. 
Lev. 
BD. 
Lev. 
BD. 
BD. 
BD. 
Lev. 
Lev. 
BD. 



Lev. 
BD. 
BD. 
Lev- 



Imports. 



^,,„„n,. Invoice 
Quantity. ^.^j^jg_ 



Pounds. 

2,424 

992 



1,157 



?131 
"232 



441 

4,850 

2,381 

330 

500 

7,670 



386 

8,377 



220 

27,S87 



470 
1,638 
6,407 
9,186 



15,432 



10,970 
2,240 

7,840 



30,332 



11,647 

4,980 



27,618 



UNIDENTIFIED MORDANT AND CHROME COLORS. 



Acid alizarine black EN 

Acid alizarine black ENT 

Acid alizarine black ENT, cone 

Acid alizarine black SE , paste 

Acid alizarine black SET 

Acid alizarine SET paste 

Acid alizarine blue A 

Acid alizarine blue l)laek A 

Acid alizarine gray G 

Acid alizarine red B 

Acid chrome violet B 

Acid milling red G cone 

Acid milling red G cone 

Alizarineaoid blue 

Alizarine blue OCR cone 

Alizarine blue OCR cone, double 

Alizarine clirome green A 

Alizarine claret. ICfO 

Alizarine claret R paste 15 per cent 

Alizarine cyanine WRB paste 

Alizarine cyanine WRR paste 

Alizarine cyanine green G extra powder. 

Ali zari n e cyan i ii e N S powder 

Alizari n e cyan! lie W RB powder 

Alizari ne cy anole E F 

Alizari ne cyaiiole SR 

Alizarine dclpliinol SE 



M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
M.. 
By. 
G.. 



S.... 
S.-. 
M... 
M... 
Bv.. 
By.. 
By. . 
Bv.. 
By.. 
C... 

c... 

BD. 



6JM 



40 
59 

411 

201 

227 

2,424 



25 
1,332 



500 

15 

26 

2,401 

9,755 

'.500 

330 

330 



CEXSrS OF DYES AXD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



79 



Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued, 

UNIDENTIFIED MORDANT AND CHROME COLORS— Continued. 



Name of dve.. 



Alizarine delphinol bine SE 

Alizarine emeraldole G powder 

Alizarine saphirole WSA powder 

Alizarine sky blue 3R powder 

Alizarine uranole 2B powder 

Anthracene acid brown R - . 

Anthracene blue LG 

Anthracene blue SWB powder 

Anthracene bro-wn RD paste 

Anthracen e brown WLP paste 

Anthracene chrome blue 

Anthracene yellow 

Anthracyanine 3FL 

Anthracvanine FL cone. 60/100 

Anthracyl blue BT 

Anthracyl chrome blue D cone. 12.5 per cent. 

Anthracyl chrome brown G 

Anthranol black T douole cone 

Anthranol blue RD 

Anthranol Bordeairx 

Anthranol brown M 

Anthranol green D 

Anthranol orange 

Anthranol yellow 

Brilliant alizarine cyanineSG paste 

Brilliant chrome blue P 

Brilliant delphinebhie BS 

Brilliant milling olue B 

Cheshire chrome black R 

Cheshire chrome violet R 

Chromazurine G . powder 

Chrome black 

Chrome black G 

Chrome black PON 

Chrome brilliant bhie G 

Chrome brown DO 

Chrome brown RVV 

Chrome fast brown GR 

Chiome fast cyanine G 

Chrome green Y paste 

Chrome green Y 

Chrome green Y paste 

Chrome yellow BN 

Chromophenine FKN powder 

Chroraorhodine B extra 

Diadem chrome red BR 

Diamond Bordeaux R 

Diamond magenta crystals 

Era black J cone 

Era chrome dark blue G 

Erie alizarine blue G 150 per cent powder. . . 

Erio chrome azurol BX 

Frio chrome red PEI 

Erio chrome ^•iolct B 

Erio floxine 6B cone 

Erio llo^ine 2G ccrnc 

Fast violet 222 per cent. 

Gallo violet D 

Indalizarinc I naste 

Indalizarine I paste 

New Gallophenine R , 

Omega ehi'orae brovni PB 

Omega chrome brown P 

Omega chrome brown CPM 

Omega chrome bro-svn G 

Omega chrome green F 

Omega chrome red B 

Palatine chrome brown RX 

Salicine dark green CS 



Manu- 
facturer. 



Imports. 



Quantity. 



Q.-.. 
By.- 
By... 
Bv... 
By... 
C...., 
BD.. 
B... 
G.... 
BD.. 
G... 
G... 
Bv.. 
Bt.. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD- 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
Bv.- 



S 

G 

Q.... 
Q.— 
DH-. 
WD„ 
LG... 
CG... 
G..-. 
WD.. 
G..„ 
WD.. 

I 

Lev.. 
Lev.. 
BD.. 
CG... 
DH. 
DH. 
Q-... 
LG.. 
WD. 
Lev. 
Lev. 
G... 
G . . . , 
G... 
G... 
G... 



Pounds. 
300 
231 
994 
24 
«4 
115 
2,177 



684 

62 

20 

14.5 

«5 

165 

8,950 

556 

1,389 

926 

6,377 

311 

242 

381 

185 

500 

220 

90,838 

66 

100 

100 

661 

6,243 



WD. 
Bv.. 
D"H. 
Q... 

r:: 

s.... 

s.... 
s.... 
s.... 
s.... 

B... 



1,102 
8,434 



1,102 
15, 806 



Invoice 
value. 



4,562 
771 
110 
25 
597 
666 
120 

2,240 

1,984 

441 

441 

10,715 

4,431 



220 

51 

634 



222 
24.096 



1,873 
991 

4 
99 



80 



CENSUS OF DYES AXD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 14. — Imports of dyes for fiscal year 1920 — Continued. 

UNIDENTIFIED BASIC COLORS. 



Name of dye. 



Corn blue B cone. 143 per cent . 

Corn blue R 

Indocyanine B 

Pyrophosphine GG 

Rosazeine 6G extra 

Rosolane B cone 

Seto Blue VE : 

Tannin yellow GE 

Turquoise blue BB 

Rhoduline heliotrope B 

Rhoduline heliotrope 3B 

Victoria blue 4BS 



Manu- 
lacturer. 



WD. 
WD. 
LG.. 
WD. 
M... 
M... 
G... 
Q... 
By.. 
By.. 
By.. 



S. 



Imports. 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 

644 



441 

441 

220 

80 

1,651 

125 

201 

11 

24 

772 



UNIDENTIFIED OIL-SOLUBLE DYES. 



Oil-soluble dyes 

Olisol blue 

Olisolcarmoisine. 

Olisol yellow 

Spirit aurine 

Sudan 6 



WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
Q... 
WD. 



1,334 



UNIDENTIFIED DYES FOR COLOR LAKES. 



Brilliant lake blue G extra . , 
Helio Bordeaux BL powder 

Helio fast blue BL cone 

Lithol fast orange R paste . . 

Lithol Rubine G powder 

Pigment scarlet 3B 




UNIDENTIFIED UNCLASSIFIED COLORS. 



Bistre T 

Du Olive GL powder 

Ink Blue B JIB N 

Mounsey Olive brown 

New fast red GGL cone 

Nitro orange OT 115 per cent 

Nitro orange RR cone. 110 per cent. 

Paper black 

Paper red O 

Paper Red O cone 

Paper red 690 

Paper red R '. 

Parasulplione brown V 

Parasulpho ue bronze G S 

Peacock blue 

Red bluish CPBN 

Scarlet Z 

Tartrapherdne 

Thianine Brilliant green 2Y 

Tibet black F WN . . . , 

All other 



Total. 



Q... 

Lev. 
GrE. 



BK. 
BK. 
BK. 

M... 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
WD. 
S.... 

s... 

Q... 
Q... 
BK. 
Q... 
Q... 
WD. 



1,653 

2.240 

29 

too 

1,598 
6(J2 



1,146 
13, 701 



611 
110 

1,182 
1,102 
1,186 

720 
1,120 

882 
9,352 

3, 501, 147 



Part IV. -APPENDIX 



STATISTICS OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS OF COAL-TAR 
PRODUCTS 



22810°— 21 6 81 



82 



CENSUS or DYES AXD COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 15. — Imports of dyes entered for eousumption for 1917, 1918, 1919, and 
first 6 months of 1920 {calendar years). 





1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 
(6 months). 




Quantity 


Value. 


Quantity 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Alizarin: 

Natural, 30 per 
cent 


Pounds. 
6,899 

19,180 

7,062 
34 

53,205 

23, 146 

2,261,122 
1,379,349 

129,983 
2,257,476 


S12,216 
55, 179 

18,680 
75 

49,729 

11,326 

4,230,510 

871,267 

140,932 
2,574,363 


Pounds. 
108,711 


8158,816 


Pounds. 
6,684 


$8,612 


Pounds. 




Synthetic, 30 per 
cent 


58,810 

9,061 

17,777 

40,991 
29 275 


$18 785 


Colors or color lakes 
obtained, derived 
or manufactured 
from alizarin, 30 
per cent plus 5 cents 
per pound 


1,499 
6,446 

27,900 

12, 827 

1,637.914 
690,414 

3,37« 
1,799,467 


4,490 
13,399 

22,546 

20,087 

2,007,958 
342,589 

13,744 
2,161,799 


15,358 14,405 
1,920 3,364 

38,073 55,475 

7,162 7,772 

234,991 285,925 
537,697j 327,133 

34,049 82.779 

1,991,6871 2,848,294 

1 


7 387 


Dyes obtained, de- 
rived, or manufac- 
tured from alizarin, 


6,220 
42,122 


Colors or color lakes 
obtained, derived, 
or manufactured 
from anthracene 
and carbazol , 30 per 
cent plus 5 cents 
per pound 


Dyes obtained, de- 
rived, or manufac- 
tured from anthra- 
cene and carbazol, 
30 per cent . 


fin 7fio 


Indigo: 

Natural 


1 
20,574, 33,831 
99,419 115,672 

38,372 99.198 


Synthetic 

Indigoids, whether or 
not obtained from 


All other colors, dj-es, 
or stains, whether 
soluble or not, etc., 
30 per cent plus 5 
cents per poimd 


l,3S8,604 


1,813,211 



Table 16. — Imports of natural dyes and extracts of, entered for consumption, 

19-11 to June SO, 1920. 



Calendar year. 


Annatto. 


Cochineal. 


Cudbear. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


1917 


Pounds. 
660, 102 
655/2.50 
356, 432 
759, 117 


$77, 238 
62, 961 
19, 972 
31, 002 


Pounds. 
121, 879 
237, 402 
116,014 
106, 804 


1 

1 

$48,345 1 

116,660 

52,029 

•44,215 j 


Pounds. 
55, 897 
54, 447 


$7, 515 


1918 


9.411 


1919 

1920 (6 months) 


33,391 : 4,150 
17,924 : 2.842 









Calendar year. 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 (6 months) 



Dyewoods, diverse. 



Tons. 

7,565 

15, 966 

922 

1,539 



.$94, 029 
407, 190 
23, 286 
29, 913 



Fustic wood. 



Indigo, natural. 



Tons. 
10, 442 
11,866 
696 

829 



$289, 756 

280, 813 

15,091 

16,567 



Pounds. 

2, 261, 122 

1,637,914 

234, 991 

20, 574 



84, 230, 510 

2,007,958 

285,925 

33,831 



CE^SrSUS OF DYES AXD COAL-TilE CHEMICALS. 



83 



Table 16. — Imports of natural dyes and extracts of, entered for consumption. 
1917 to June SO, 1920— Continmd. 



Calendar vear. 


Logwood. 


Logwood (and other 
wood extracts). 


Madder, ground. 




Quantity. 


Value.' 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


1917 


Tons. 
61,714 
33, 168 
29,022 
30,585 


«1, 509, 878 
776, 735 
549,885 
874, 439 


Pounds. 
736,038 
277, 748 
539,252 
4.53,932 


S86, 672 
45, 895 
62,001 
28, 706 


Pounds. 
2,193 


$2,53 


1918 




1919 


7,875 
1,609 


1,545 


1920 (6 months) 


338 







Calendar j^ear. 


Orchil. 


Persian berries, extract. 


Safflower, saffron. 


1917 


Pounds. 


SaO.OOo 
56,284 
42,085 
30,207 


Pounds. 




Pounds. 


$105, 516 


1918 




:::::::.. 






70,032 


1919 


372, 606 
345,801 


5,209 
11,357 


$2,691 
3,631 


23,663 
6,692 


106,951 


1920 (6 months) 


80,990 





Calendar year. 


Turmeric. 


Gambler. 


All other extracts of 
vegetable origin. 


1917 


Pounds. 


$1,331 
11, 278 
68,852 
59, 071 


Pounds. 
12, 050, 848 
8,755,270 
4, 744, 651 
5,949,423 


$1, 138, 833 
949,971 
432,499 
476,418 

. 


Pounds. 
150, 078 

2, 889, 865 
443, 749 
253, 595 


$20,757 
234, 375 


1918 




1919 


1,2-30,229 
758, 782 


80,079 


1920 (6 months) . . 


43 397 







Note. — No imports of camwood and madder extract. 

Table 17. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption. Jan. 1, 1917- 

June 30. 1920. 



Calendar year. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Duty col- 
lected. 


Actual and 

ad valOTem 

rates. 


Acetanilid i (25 per cent) ^ 


Pounds. 






Per cent. 


Acetphenetidin (25 per cent):^ 

1917 


3,280 


$40,352 


$10,088 


25.00 


1918 




1919 










1920 (0 months) 










Acetylsalic^iic acid (25 per cent):* 

1917 


1,474 


4,670 


1,168 


25.00 


1918 




1919 


26 


76 


19 


25.00 


1920 (6 months) 




Antipvrene (25 per cent):' 

1917 


21 842 : 62 411 


15,603 

26,661 

33,891 

9 301 


25.00 


1918 


9,416 
13,736 
10, 653' 


106,643 
135, 565 
37 576 


25.00 


1919 


25.00 


1920 (6 months) 


25.00 


Aspirin s (25 per cent ) 2 






SaloU (25 per cent ) - . 


: : 




Phenol phthalein (25 per cent): 2 

1917 










1918 


100 


1,200 


300 


25.00 


1919 




1920 (6 months) 


200 
554 


726 
6,544 


181 
360 


25.00 


Saccharin (65 cents per poimd): = 

1917 ....r 


.55 


1918 




1919 








1920 (6 months) 










i 







1 No imports. 

- Dutiable imder the act of Oct. 3, 1913, rather than under the act of Sept. s, 1916, 

3 Included under acetvlsalicvlic acid. 



84 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 17a. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, Jan. 1, 1917, 
to June 30, 1920 {act of Sept. 8, 1916). 

GROUP I (FREE). 



Acids, carbolic, whicli on 
being subjected to distil- 
lation yield in the por- 
tion distilling below 200° 
C. a quantity of tar acids 
less than 5 per cent of orig- 
inal distillate pounds . . 

Anthracene oil gallons . . 

Benzol pounds. . 

Cresol do 

Dead or creosote oil, 
gallons 

Naphthalene having a so- 
lidifying point less than 
79° C pounds.. 

Pyridine and quinoline, 
pounds 

Coal tar, crude barrels. . 

Pitch coal tar do — 

Metacresol, orthocresol, 
and paracresol— purity 
less than 90 per cent, 
pounds 

Toluol pounds . . 

Xylol do 

All other products found 
naturally in coal tar 
whether produced or ob- 
tained from coal tar or 
other sources, n. s. p. f ., 
pounds 

All other distillates, which 
on being subjected to 
distillation yield in the 
portion distilling below 
200° C. a quantity of tar 
acids less than 5 per cent 
of the original distillate, 
pounds 



Calendar years. 



Quantity, 



151, 254 

61,200 

3, 598, 733 

7, 665, 442 

9,817,085 



5, 20S, 980 

12, 247 
6,780 
5,926 



20,708 



9,332 



Value. 



$9, 894 

3,105 

341,700 

532, 529 

786, 638 



175,554 

1,480 
10, 745 
12, 039 



1,404 



2,928 



1918 



Quantity 



155,236 



2, 673, 855 

8,873,271 

1,545,247 



3, 902, 731 

9,237 
13, 087 
14,029 



Value. 



$17,260 



87, 570 
779, 045 

162, 869 



130, 098 

1,036 
21,200 
29, 095 



1, 502 10, 473 104, 568 10, 548 



1919 



Quantity. 



1, 965, 289 

18, 699 

217, 865 

6, 435, 650 

11,268,379 



3, 230, 256 

165,064 
22, 339 
3,364 



11, 200 
1,195,706 



380, 525 



Value. 



S187, 788 

3,994 

5,617 

557, 214 

1,374,217 



92, 265 

20,543 

38, 476 

8,598 



1,221 
30, 768 



6,334 



1920 (Jan. 1 to 
June 30^. 



Quantity. 



69, 159 

5,180 

146,819 

5, 658, 649 

5, 239, 223 



4,713,067 

445,411 
11,439 
2,909 



50, 500 



Value. 



$6,318 

1,550 

1,836 

440, 745 

799,536 



124, 706 

50,314 

22, 291 

7,104 



1,369 



GROUP I, CRUDE (FREE). 



Anthracene, purity less 
than 25 per cent 

Acenaphtnene, ciunol fluo- 
rene, methylanthracene 
and methylnaphthalene. . 

Carbazol, purity less than 
25 per cent 



Pounds. 
(') 



(') 
(') 



(•) 

(•) 
(•) 



Pounds. 



Pounds'. 
82, 669 



15, 759 
112 



S2, 022 

946 
82 



Pounds. 
7,451 



Imports not available by ctilendar year. 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



85 



Table 17b. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, Jan. 1, 1917, 

to June 30, 1920. 

(Act of Sept. 8, 1916.) 

GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 15 PER CENT PLUS 2^ CENTS PER POUND). 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Duty. 



Not colors, dyes or stains, photographic chemicals, medic- 
inals, flavors, or explosives, and n. s. p. f.: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920- June .30, 1920 

Carbolic acid (phenol) which on being subjected to distil- 
lation yields in the portion distilling below 200° C. a 
quantity of tar acids equal to or more than 5 per cent of 
tne original distillate: 

Crystal- 
Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920- June 30, 1920 

Liquid — 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920- June 30, 1920 

Salicylic acid: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1. 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920. 

Anthraquinone: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dee. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Methylanthraquinone: 

.Tan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Binitrotoluol: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dee. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1 , 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-Jan.20, 1920 

Naphthalene solidifying at 79° C. or above: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Naphthol: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31 , 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1 , 1920-June 30, 1920 

Nitronaphthalene: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 191S-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 ; 

Nitrotuluol: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31,1917 

Jan. 1, 191S-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Phthalic anhydride: 

Jan. 1, 19i7-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31 , 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dee. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Naphthylamine: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 191.8-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 



Poundx. 

4,653 

1,791 

63 

250 



30,676 
148,261 



S20, 539 

14,060 

374 

1,087 



4,954 
47, 085 



$3, 190. 00 

2, 153. 78 

57.68 

169. 30 



1,510.00 
10, 769. 28 



314,. 585 

134,406 

2,061 

30 

26, 273 
117 



24,246 

15, 186 

264 

14 

23,575 
112 



11,502.00 

5, 638. 05 

91.13 

2.18 

4,193.00 
19.73 



3,147 
1,432 



2,643 
95 



375. 13 
50.00 



61,632 

22,635 

6,896 



10,471 
3,333 
1,331 



3,111.00 

1,065.83 

372. 05 



267, 057 
2,795 
7,650 

154, 281 

1,027 



12, 125 

171 

384 

7,700 

1,069 



8, 497. 00 

95.53 

248. 85 

5,012.00 

186.00 



7,758 



1,616.00 



542 

98 



452 

1,853 



81.35 



280.00 



5, 985 



1,192.00 



86 



CEXSUS OF DYES AiS^D COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 17b. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, Jan. 1. 1917, 
to June 30, 1920— Gont'mxxed. 

GROUP II (-DUTIABLE AT 15 PER CENT PLUS 2^ CENTS PER POUND)— Continued. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Duty. 



Actual 
and com- 
puted ad- 
valorem 
rate. 



Amidonaphthol; 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 , 

Amidophenol: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec.31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-Juiie 30, 1920 

Anthracene, purity of 25 per cent or more: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Benzaldehyde: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Dimethvlaniline: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-Jime 30, 1920 

Nitrobenzol: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-Jime 30, 1920 

Phenylenediamine: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec, 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-Jime 30. 1920 

Resorcin: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1 , 1919-Dee. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Anilin salt: 

Jan. 1 , 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Benzylchloride: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dee. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

,Tan. 1, 1920-June .30, 1920 

All distillates, n. s. p. f., which on distillation yield in the 
portion distilling below 200° C. a quantity of tar acids 
equal to or more than 5 per cent of the original distillate: 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31,1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Alhsimilar products obtained, derived, or manufactured 
in whole or in part from the products provided for in 
Group I (free): 

Jan. 1 , 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919- Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 



PouTids. 



Per cent. 



150 



$72 



814.55 



1,028 



2,417 



388. 25 



51,895 



8,011 



2, 499. 02 



24,472 
9.479 



17,790 
5,928 



3,280.30 
1,126.00 



1,120 



92.05 



21,513 
22, 110 



4,003 
3,219 



1, 138. 28 
1,036.00 



2,746 
2,429 

134 



1,769 

1,887 



672 



334. 00 

345. 00 



104.00 



5,159 



21,273 



2,642 
"3," 250 



525.00 



1,019.00 



1.00 



1,000 
150 



430 
22 



89.50 
7.05 



l-S-W 
3,170 
22,399 



19.3,021 
13,445 
51,214 
38,575 



2,008 
4,587 
18,423 



17,595 

8,640 

39, 861 

35,463 



339,95 

767. 30 

3,323.00 



7, 465. 00 
1,632.12 
7,259.50 
6, 284. 00 



CEXSUS OF DYES AXD COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



87 



Table 17b. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, Jan. 1, 1911\ 
to June 30, 1920 — Continued. 

GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 30 PER CENT AD VALOREM). 



TMien obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole or in 
part from any of the products provided for in Group I 
(free) or II, including natural indigo and their deriva- 
tives: 
Alizarin, natural- 
Jan. 1 , 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1 , 1918-Dec. 31 , 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31 , 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-Jime 30, 1920 

Alizarin, s\Tithetic— 

Jan. 1 ,'1917-Dec. 31 , 1917 

Jan. 1 , 1918-Dee. 31 , 1918 

Jan. 1 , 1919-Dec. 31 , 1919 

Jan. 1 , 1920-June 30, 1920 

Dyes obtained, derived, or manufactured from 
alizarin- 
Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1 , 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1 , 1919-Dec. 31 , 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Dyes obtained, derrt'ed, or manufactured from an- 
thracene and carbazol — 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31 , 1917 

Jan. 1 , 1918-Dec. 31 , 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31 , 1919 

Jan. 1, i920-jLme 30, 1920 

Indigoids, whether or not obtained from indigo- 
Jan. 1 , 1917-Dec. 31 , 1917 

Jan. 1 , 1918-Dec. 31 , 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31,1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Flavors- 
Jan. 1, 1917-Deic. 31 , 1917 

Jan. 1 , 1918-Dec. 31 , 1918 

Jan. 1 , 1919-Dec. 31 , 1919 

Jan. 1 , 1920-June 30, 1920 

Indigo, natural- 
Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June .30, 1920 

Indigo, svnthetic — 

Jan. i, 1917-Dee. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Mediclnals— 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 191S 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June .30, 1920 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 
6,899 
108, 711 



19,180 

'ss.'sio' 



31 
6,446 
1,920 

17,777 



23,146 

12,827 

7,162 

29,275 

129,983 
3,376 
34,049 
38, 372 

35 
160 



2,261,122 

1,637,914 

234,991 

20,574 

1,. 379,. 349 

690,414 

537,697 

99.419 



Value. 



Dutv. 



112,216 

158,816 

8,612 



.?3,665.00 

47,644.80 

2,583.60 



Actual 
and com- 
puted ad- 
valorem 
rate. 



Per cent. 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 



55,179 : 16,554.00 



18,785 5,636.00 



75 

13,399 

3,864 

6,220 



11,326 
20,087 

7,772 
60, 760 

140,932 
13,744 
82,779 
99, 198 

408 
816 



4,230,510 

2,007,958 

285,925 

33, 831 

871,267 
342,589 
327, 133 
115,672 

284,346 

301,074 

168,466 

63,813 



22.50 
4,019.70 
1, 1.59. 20 
1,866.00 



3,398.00 
6,026.10 
2,331.60 
18,228.00 

42,280.00 

4, 123. 20 

24,833.70 

29,759.00 

122. 00 
244. 80 



1,269,153.00 
602,, 387. 40 
85,777.50 
10,149.00 

261,380.00 
102,776.70 
98, 139. 90 
33,702,00 

85,304.00 
90,322.20 
50,539.80 
19,144.00 



30.00 



30.00 



30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 



30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 

30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 

30.00 
30.00 



30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 

30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 

30.00 
.3>).00 
30.00 
30.00 



GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 30 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 5 CENTS PER POUND). 



When obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole or in 
part from any of the products provided for in Group I 
(free) or II, including natural indigo and their deriva- 
tives: 
Colors, or color lakes obtained, derived, or manufac- 
tured from alizarin- 
Jan. 1, 1917-Dec.31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918 Dee. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919 Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920 -June 30, 1920 

Colors, or color lakes obliined, derived, or manufac- 
tured from antracene and carbazol — 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 , 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dec. 31, 1919 

J4n. 1, 192(>-Juae30,1920 



Poundx. 

7,062 

1,499 

15, 358 

9,061 



53.205 
27,900 
38,073 
40,991 



Dollars. 
18,680 

4,490 
14,405 

7,387 



49,729 
22,546 
.')5,475 
42, 122 



Dollars. 
5,957.00 
1,421.95 
6,089. 40 
2,669.00 



17,579.00 
8,158.80 
18,, 546. 15 
14,686.00 



Percent. 
31.89 
31.67 
35.33 
36.13 



35.35 
36.19 
33.43 
34.87 



88 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 

Table 17b. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, Jan. 1, 1917, 
to June 30, 1920 — Continued. 

GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 30 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 5 CENTS PER POUND— 

Continued. 



When obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole or in 
part from any of the products provided for in Group I 
(free) or II, including natural indigo and their deriva- 
tives—Continued. 
All other colors, dyes, or stains, whether soluble or 
not in water, color acids, color bases, or color lakes — 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Doc. 31, 1918' 

Jan. 1, 1919 Dec. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 

Phenolic resin, synthetic- 
Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dcc. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920 June 30, 1920 

Photographic chemicals — 

Jan. 1, 1917-Dec. 31, 1917 

Jan. 1, 191S-Dec. 31, 1918 

Jan. 1, 1919-Dee. 31, 1919 

Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 1920 



Quantity. 



Pounds. 
2,257,476 
1,799,467 
1,991,687 
1, 368, 604 
134, 702 



1,114 
1,530 

12,632 
14,550 
12,059 
9,918 



Value. 



Dollars. 
2, 574,. 363 
2,161,799 
2, 848, 294 
1,813,211 
11,596 



2,860 
949 

101,406 
108,537 
77,876 
32, 186 



Duty. 



Dollars. 
885,183.00 
738,013.05 
954, 072. 55 
612,394.00 

10,214.00 



913. 70 
361.20 

31,053.00 
33,288.60 
23,965.75 
10, 152. 40 



Actual 
and com- 
puted ad- 
valorem 
rate. 



Per cent. 
34.38 
34.16 
33.50 
33.77 
88.08 



31.95 
38.05 

30. 62 
30.67 
30.77 
31.54 



1 Does not include 110 pounds, valued at $322, duty $81.68, from Cuba. 



Table 18. — General imports of coal-tar products, hij countries, for calendar 

years 191S'-June 30, 1920. 

DEAD OR CREOSOTE OIL (FREE). 



Imported from— 


1918 


1919 


Jan. 1. 1920-June 30, 
1920. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


England 


Oallons. 




Oallons. 
8,934,045 
60, 756 
2,273,578 


$1,085,617 

10, 462 

278, 138 


Gallons. 

2,551,835 

63, 934 

608, 324 

2,015,130 


$318, 644 
9,476 


Scotland 


1,125 

1,543,660 

462 


$862 

161,693 

314 


Canada 


88, 541 


All other 


2 382, 875 








Total 


1,545,247 


162, 869 


11,268,379 


1,374,217 


5,239,223 


799, 536 







Imports not available for 1917 calendar year. 

CARBOLIC ACID. 



All from Netherlands. 





1918 


1919 


Imported from— 


CarboUc acid, free. 


CarboUc acid, duti- 
able (phenol). 


Carbohe acid, free. 




Pounds. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Pounds. Value. 

i 


England 


155,236 


$17,260 


208,037 
75, 300 


$54, 884 
7,613 


1, 619, 823 


$158,820 


Canada 




Scotland 






345, 466 


28, 968 














Total 


155, 236 


17,260 


283,337 


62, 497 


1,965,289 


187, 788. 







CENSUS OF DYES AXD COAL-TAK CHEMICALS. 



89 



Table 18. — General imports of coal-tar products, 6// countries, for calendar 
years 1918-Jimc 30, 1920 — Contiuued. 

CARBOLIC ACID— Continued. 





1919 


Jan. 1, 1920- June 30, 19 


20. 

icid duti- 
henol). 


Imported from— 


Carbolic acid, duti- 
able (phenol). 


Carbolic acid, free. 


Carbolic 
able (p 




Pounds. 


Value. 


Poimds. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


England . 


2,061 


$264 


55, 119 
14, 040 


$4,728 
1,590 


30 



$14 
















Total 


2,061 


264 


69, 159 


6,318 


30 


14 







ANILIN SALTS. 
( Free under act of 1909; dutiable imder act of Oct. 3, 1913, and under the act of Sept. 8, 1916.) 



Imported from- 


1918 


1919 


Jan. 1, 1920- June 
30, 1920. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 




Pounds. 
21,273 


$3,250 


Pounds. 




Pounds. 














Total. . 


21, 273 


3,250 





















INDIGO. 
(Free under act of Oct. 3, 1913; dutiable under act of Sept. 8, 1916.) 





1918 


1919 


Imported from— 


Indigo, natural, 
(dutiable). 


Indigo, sj-nthetic 
(dutiable). 


Indigo, natural 
(dutiable). 




Pounds. Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Poimds. 


Value. 


Switzerland 


25, 762 

264, 975 

1,138,176 

2.34,4.52 

83,709 


838, 719 
463,510 
1,284,434 
299, 554 
108, 150 


770,212 
6,817 


$410, 421 
5,587 


15, 796 
10, .584 
99, .597 
60, 940 
40, 557 


$29, 857 


England 


16,647 




99, 901 








67, 262 


All other 






46,448 










Total ... .... 


1,747,074 


2,194,367 


777,029 


416,008 


227, 474 


260, 115 









1919 




1920 (6 months) 




Imported from— 


Iudi,£C0, synthetic 
(dutiable). 


Indigo, natural 
(dutiable). 


Indigo, sjTithetic 
(dutiable). 




Pounds. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Switzerland 


726, 440 
1,468 
8,400 


$388,067 
1,970 
5,729 






119,551 
1,229 


$12,3,084 


England 


18,262 


829, 951 


361 








21,116 

4,326 

2,8.50 

324 


16,246 

5, 1.55 

7, 392 

405 


381,751 


156, 917 










India 










All other 


87, 570 


36,607 












Total 


823,878 


432,373 


46,878 


59,149 


502,531 


280,362 







^0- 



CEISTSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



Table 18. — General imports of eoal-tar products, ^y countnes, for calendar 
years 1918-June 30. 19^0— Continued. 

ALIZARIN AND ALIZARIN DYES. 
(Free iinder act of Oct. 3, 1913; dutiable tmder act of Sept. 8, 1916.) 



Imported from— 


1918 


1919 


Jan. 1, 1920-June 
30, 1920. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Switzerland 


Pounds. 

440 

4,310 

I 

15,141 

500 


$572 

3,739 

2 

58,948 

7,629 


Pounds. 

220 

23,417 

215 


$2,517 

21,084 

414 


Pounds. 

218, 539 

22,169 

80 


$73,084 
13 541 


United Kingdom 


Canada 


'soo 


Japan 




All other 


23 


265 


224 


534 






Total 


20,392 


70, 890 


23,875 


24, 280 


241, 012 


87 959 







COAL-TAR COLORS OR DYES (DUTIABLE). 





1918. 
value. 


1919 


Jan. 1, 1920-June 30, 
1920. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Belgium 




Pounds. 
36,968 
11,746 
143, 031 
1,284,199 
609, 703 
165, 7.50 


863, 119 

20,853 

83,563 

2,176,463 

664, 548 

160, 730 


Pounds. 
139, 524 
8,555 
305, 684 
801,265 
165, 734 
35, 416 


$101, 108 


IPrance 


$76,506 


19,023 


Germany 


267, 036 


S'sntzerlad 


1,762,688 

561,699 

68, 546 


1,412,044 


England 


166, 599 


All other . .... 


25,277 






Total 


2, 469, 439 


2,215,397 


3,169,276 


1, 456, 178 


1,991,087 







Table 19. — Domestic ewports of coal tar and of dyes and dyestuffs for calendar 

years 1918 ^-June 30, 1920. 





COAL TAR. 










Exported to — 


1918 


1919 


Jan. 1, 1920-June 
30, 1920. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 




Barrels. 

2,069 

54,149 

808 

198 

154 

1,176 


$12, 297 
139, 456 
6,288 
1,505 
1,739 
7,435 


Barrels. 

230 

71, 749 

2,759 

475 

45 

1,334 


$900 

158,205 

20, 166 

3,174 

301 

15, 757 


Barrels. 

214 

26,834 

2,470 

10 

34 

17 


$1,100 


North America i 


72, 749 


South America 


13,160 


Asia 


65 


Onfsut\f\. 


339 


Africa 


142 






Total 


58,554 


168,720 


76, 592 


198,503 


29, 579 


87, 555 







» Exports not available for 1917 calendar year. 



CENSUS OF DYES AI^TD COAL-TAE CHEMICALS. 



91 



Table 19. — Domestic exports of coal tar ami of dyes and dyestuffs for calendar 
years WlS-Jime 30, i920— Continued. 

DYES AND DYESTUFFS (VALUE). 



Exports to- 



Port ugal 

Belgium 

France 

Germanv 

Italy...: 

Netherlands 

Russia 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom. 

Canada 

Mexico 

Central America. . 

West Indies 

South America... 

Asia 

Oceania 

Africa 

Denmark 

Spain 

Sweden 

Norway 

Another 



Total 8, 529, 611 



Calendar year.'; 



191S 



Aniline 
dves. 



SI 76, 769 
""6,34.5' 
" '274,963" 



22, 500 

380, 181 

836, 445 

289,327 

5,617 

23,447 

719,408 

,248,367 

100, 490 

3,993 



518,895 



22.924 



Log^vood 

extracts. 



$10,541 

sesjeio' 
"76,' 237' 



7,728 

345,458 

82,292 

5,666 

400 

742 

128,645 

504,542 

20, 194 

715 



104, 748 



985 
4,877 

1.551,380 



All other. 



$131,280 



496, 875 



234, 238 



12, 825 

5,000 

524, 576 

724,522 

181,029 

5,498 

35, 473 

931,600 

2, 720, 399 

133, 493 

15, 534 

1,055 

472, 222 



4,529 
6,761 



6,636,099 



1919 



Aniline 
dyes. 



?70, 296 

90 

127,059 

150 

269, 130 

26,284 

8,570 

193 

413, 700 

1,015,334 

467, 806 

5,941 

34, 307 

1,651,872 

5, .565, 053 

177,964 

45, 566 

5, .334 

535,383 

22, 694 

13,663 

267,682 



10,724,071 



Log^vood 
extracts. 



?2,319 
34, 7S7 
596,042 
290 
58, 716 
21, 735 



22,824 

304, 686 

119,871 

17,438 

892 

137 

66,099 

48,063 

14, 041 

1,508 

9,671 

18,349 

8, 584 

1,300 

8,584 



1,355,936 



All other. 



836,063 

19, 193 

229,689 



180,359 
9,104 



423,719 

1,007,892 

230,359 

14,544 

40,900 

585, 127 

1,921,202 

143,223 

8, 281 

2,438 

84,544 

15,708 

7,303 

44,780 



5,004,428 



DYES AND DYESTUFFS (VALUE). 



E.xported to — 



Jan. 1-June 30, 1920. 



Aniline 
dyes. 



Logwood 
extracts. 



All other. 



Portugal 

Belgium 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Russia (European) 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom. . 

Canada 

Mexico 

Central America . . . 

West Indies 

South America 

Asia 

Oceania 

Africa 

Denmark 

Spain 

Sweden 

Norway 

All other 

Total 



$34, 789 

214,693 

369, 693 

404 

281, 249 

22,254 

100 

48, 334 

558,510 

888, 420 

527, 991 

7,03a 

22,183 

900, 829 

7,317,211 

96,410 

32,027 

6,620 

418, 878 

6,268 

1,710 

61, 139 



SI, 840 
92,200 

360, 773 
66 

166,255 
34, 1.33 



18, 965 

393, 117 

81,621 

4,021 

726 

2,914 

16,938 

187,609 

1,016 

1,350 

22, 574 

1,250 

1,110 

20,251 



$6,240 

30, 788 

2-30, 235 

7,369 

191,452 

44,659 



64, 592 

518, 599 

538, 836 

114,575 

6,642 

56,678 

277, 907 

2, 216; 568 

70, 762 

21,670 

2,130 

101,068 

12, 663 

9,964 

27, 962 



11,816,743 



1,415,709 



4,551,359 



92 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 



Table 20. — Inlcs and ink powders. 

(A) IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION, 19181-JUNE 30, 1920. 





Printer's ink. 


Writing and copying ink. 


All other, including ink 
powders. 


Calender year. 


Rate 

of 
duty. 


Value. 


Duty 
col- 
lected. 


Actual 
and 
com- 
puted 

ad val- 
orem 
rate. 


Rate. 

of 
duty. 


Value. 


Duty 
col- 
lected. 


Actual 
and 
com- 
puted 
ad val- 
orem 
rate. 


Rate 

of 
duty. 


Value. 


Duty 
col- 
lected. 


Actual 
and 
com- 
puted 
ad val- 
orem 
rate. 


1918 


Perct. 
15 
15 


S4,154 
199 


$623 
30 


Perct. 
15 
15 


Perct. 
15 
15 


$13,363 
15,116 


$2,004 
2,267 


Perct. 
15 
15 


Perct. 
15 
45 


$6,343 
8,143 


$951 
1,221 


Perct. 
15 


1919 


15 


1920 (6 months) 





























(C) DOMESTIC EXPORTS OP PRINTER'S INK AND ALL OTHER INKS, 1918 i-JUNE 30, 1920. 




Calendar years. 


1920 (6 months). 


Exported to— 


1918 


1919 




Printer's 
ink. 


All other 
inks. 


Printer's 
ink. 


All other 
inks. 


Printer's 
ink. 


All other 
inks. 


Europe 


$48,394 
256,507 
353,023 
224, 345 
116, 424 
42, 189 


$25,371 

206, 360 

100,833 

67, 736 

42,452 

5,429 


$210, 482 
320,008 
603,758 
435,664 
113,288 
29,726 


$68, 382 
297, 959 
210,212 
155, 420 
109,962 
14,282 


$118,174 

183, 910 

218, 626 

323,975 

79,574 

4,944 


$49,653 


North America 


158, &59 


South America 


90, 054 




101,525 


Oceania 


43,270 


Africa. 


4,354 






Total 


1,040,882 


448, 181 


1,712,926 


856,217 


929,203 


447, 715 







I Figures for 1917 not available. 

Directory of manufacturers of coal-tar products during 1919. 

[The list below includes all firms that reported to the Tariff Commission the production 
of coal-tai- products during 1919, except 56 that objected to the publication of their 
names. These 56 firms, almost without exception, are either out of business at the 
present time or manufacture coal-tar products for their own consumption and not for 
sale. Included among these 56 firms are firms engaged, primarily, in the manufacture 
of textile.s, soap, rubber goods, perfumes, and inks. Coke-oven plants and gas houses 
which reported to the Geological Survey and not to the Tariff Commission are not 
included. The list includes manufacturers of crudes, intermediates, dyes, lakes, medic- 
inals, flavors, photographic chemicals, synthetic phenolic resins, and synthetic tanning- 
materials.] 



No. 



Name of company. 



OfHce address (location of factory given in parentheses if 
not in same city as the office). 



12 



The Abbott Laboratories 

Acme DyestufT Co 

Agawam Chemical Works (Inc.) 

A Ithouse Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Amalgamated Dyestufl & Chemical 
Works. 

American Aniline Products (Inc.) 

American Chemical Works 

American Nitration Co. (Inc.) 

American Tar Products Co 

Ansbachcr & Co., A. B 

Anthrakone Dye Products & Chem- 
ical Co. (Inc.). 
Georgia Railway & Power Co 



4753 East Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

133 Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. (Metuchen, N. J.). 

531 Grosvenor Building, Providence, R. I. (North Attle- 

boro, Mass.). 
540 Pear Street, Reading, Pa. 
75 Hudson Street (New York, N. Y.) (Newark, N. J.). 

80 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Lockhaven, Pa.). 

1030 Folsom Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

River Road, Nutlcy, N. J. 

208 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. (St. Louis, Mo., 

Youngstown, Ohio, Woodward, Ala., Carrollville, Wis.; 

Follanshec, W. Va.). 
.527 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
1834 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Jersey City, N. J.). 

75 Marietta Street, Atlanta, Ga. 



CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 93 

Directorif of maunfacturers of coal-tar products during 1919 — -Continued. 



No. 



Name of company. 



OflRce address (location of factory given in parentheses if 
not in same city as tlie office). 



13 i Atlantic Dyestulf Co 

14 Atla.s Color Works (Inc.) 

15 I The Barrett Co 

16 Bay way Chemical Co 

17 Beaver" Chemical Co 

18 Beaver Manufacturing Co 

19 Bennett & Davis (Inc.) 

20 British- American Corporation of New 
Jersey. 

BrookhTi Color Works (Inc.) 

Bulls Ferry Chemical Co 

Butterworth-Judson Corporation 

Calco Chemical Co 

Philip Carey Manufacturing Co 

Carus Chemical Co 

, Central Dyestutf & Chemical Co 

Certainteed Products Corporation 

Certified Chemical Corporation 

Chatfield Manufacturing Co 

Chemical Co . o f America ( Inc. ) 

Chemical Products Laboratories 

Chemical Products Corporation 

Charles M. Childs & Co. (Inc.) 

Clifton Chemical Laboratories 

Color Co. of America 

Commonwealth Chemical Corporation 

Condensite Co. of America 

Consolidated Color & Chemical Co 

Coopers Creek Chemical Co 

Croton Color & Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Cumberland Chemical Corporation 

Davis Chemical Corporation, E verly M 

Denver Gas & Electric Light Co 

Dermatological Research Laboratories. 

Devoe & Ravnolds (Inc.) 

Dicks, David Co. (Inc.) 

Dicks, David & Heller Co 

Dissosway-Schad Co. (Inc.) 

Dow Chemical Co., The , 

DuPont de Nemours & Co., E. I 

Dye Products & Chemical Co. (Inc.) . . 

Eakins(Inc.), J. S. & W. R 

Eastman Kodak Co 

Essex Aniline Works (Inc.) 

E xedol Laboratories ( Inc. ) 

Fine Colors Co. (Inc. ) 

Florasynth Laboratories (Inc.) 

Gary Chemical Co 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 

Grasselli Chemical Co., The 

Haarmann-de-Lair-Schaefer Co 

Harmer Laboratories Co 

Helena Light & Railway Co 

Helkuhn Chemical Co 

Heller & Merz Co 

Morris Hermann & Co 

Heyl Laboratories, The (Inc.) 

Hind Harrison Plush Co., The 

Holland Aniline Co 

Holliday-Kemp Co. ( Inc. ) 

Hooker Electro-Chemical Co 

Hord Color Products Co 

Hub Dyestuff & Chemical Co 

Huron Chemical Co ^ . . . 

Hydrocarbon Chemical Products Co... 

Hynson, Westcott & Dunning 

Independent Coal Tar Co 

Industrial Chemical Co 

International Consolidated Chemical 

Corporation. 
Iridescent Dvestufl & Color Co 



88 Ames Building, Boston, Mass. (Burrage, Mass.). 

322 Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

17 Battery Place, New York N. Y. (refinery, Frankfort, 

Pa.). 
81 Fulton Street, New York, N. Y. (Elizabeth, N. J.). 
Damascus, Va. 
Ballardvale, Mass. 

327 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. 
109 Beekman Street, New York, N. Y. (Ridgefield Park. 

N. J.). 
601 Sackett Street. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Edgewater, N. J. (Shadyside, N. J.). 
61 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Newark, Lyndhurst, 

N. J.). 
Bound Brook, N. J. (Burlington, Newark, Jersey City, 

Woodbridge, N. J.). 
Lockland, Ohio. 
La Salle, 111. 

Plum Point Lane, Newark, N. J. 
1801 Boatman's Bank Building, St. Louis, Mo. (East St. 

Louis, 111.). 
246 Pl\Tnouth Street, BrookljTi, N. Y. 
Seventy-fourth and Lebanon" Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
176 Front Street, New York, N. Y. (Springfield, N. J.). 
Belleville, 111. 

104 Thirtv-second Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 
43 Summit Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CHfton, N. J. 

14 Cedar Street, New York, N. Y. (Valley Stream, N. Y.). 

15 Park Row, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.). 
Bloomfleld, N. J. (Wyandotte, Mich.). 

122 Hudson Street. N"ew Yoik, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.). 
West Conshohocken, Pa. 

293 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Croton, N. Y.). 
Bristol, Va. 

25 West Forty-fourth Street, New York, N. Y. (L'nion, 
N. J.). 

900 Fifteenth Street, Denver, Colo. 

1720 Lombard Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

101 Fulton Street, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.). 

19 North Moore Street, New York, N. Y. 

Chicago Heights, 111. 

830 Humbolt Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (55 Eckford Street, 

Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
Midland, Mich. 

Wilmington, Del. (Perms Grove, N. J.). 
200 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.). 
24 Wallabout Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
343 State Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

88 Broad Street Boston, Mass. (South Middleton, Mass.). 
Edgewater, N. J. 

21-29 McBride Avenue, Paterson, N. J. 
Unionport, N. Y. 

738 Broadway, Gary, Ind. (Chesterton, Ind.). 
Akron, Ohio. 

Cleveland, Ohio (Rensselaer, N. Y.). 
Mavwood, N. J. 

1704 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Helena, Mont. 

900 Jefferson Street, Hoboken, N. J. 
Newark, N. J. 

788 President Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.). 
437 Barretto Street, New York, N. Y. 
Clark Mills, N. Y. 
Holland, Mich. 
Betls Avenue and Queens Boulevard, Woodside, Long 

Island. 
40 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. 
Sandusky, Ohio. 

595 East Seventh Street, South Boston, Mass. 
100 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (51 Bergen Street, 

Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
35 Cottage Avenue, Lancaster, Pa. 
Charles and Franklin Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

26 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. (Taunton, Mass.). 
P. O. Box 12SS, Providence, R. I. 

11 East Thirty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Long Island 

City, N. Y.). 
326 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (587 Shccpshead Bay 

Road, Broo'klyn, N. Y.;. 



94 CENSUS OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 

Directory of manufacturers of coal-tar products during 1919 — Continued. 



Name of company. 



Office address (location of factory given in parentheses if 
not in same city as the office). 



K. & T. Chemical Corporation 

Kettle River Co 

Klipstein & Sons Co., E. C 

Koppers Products Co 

Lamie Chemical Co , 

Lasher & Co., F. G 

Lewis Manufacturing Co., F. J 

Lindsay Light Co 

McKesson & Robliins (Inc.) 

MaUinekiodt Chemical Worlcs ' 

Max Marx Color & Chemical Co 

Massachusetts State Department of 
Health. 

Merck & Co , 

Merrimac Chemical Co 

Metz Laboratories, H. A. (Inc.) 

MiUer, .1. Augustus 

Monroe Drug Co 

Monsanto Chemical "Works 

Montana Power Co 

National Ammonia Co. of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

National Aniline & Chemical Co 

Naugatuck Chemical Co— 

New England Chemical Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

New Haven (Jas Light Co 

Newport Chemical Works (Inc.) 

New York Color & Chemical Co 

Niagara Alkali Co 

Nitro Products Co., The 

Noil Chemical & Color Co. ( Inc. ) 

Organic Products Corporation 

Palatine Aniline & Chemical Corpora- 
tion. 

Peerless Color Co. (Inc.) 

Po Ambo Chemical Co 

Radiant Dye & Color Works 

Redmanol Chemical Products Co 

Reliance Aniline i^' Chemical Co 

Republic Creosoting Co., The 

Rhodia Chemical Co 

Rollin Chemical Corporation 

Philip Ruxton (Inc.) 

Semet Solvay Co 

Seydel Manufacturing Co 

Sherwin- WiUiams Co 

Sinclair & Valentine Co 

Special Materials Co. (Inc.) 

Staler Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Standard Chemical Co. 

Sunbeam Chemical Co :.. 

T. M. &. G. Chemical Co 

T. Taylor 

Thatcher Electrochemical Co 

Tower Manufacturing Co. (Inc.) 

Transatlantic Chemical Corporation. . 

Trico Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

PaulUhlich 

Ultro Chemical Corporation 

Union Dye ife Chemical Corporation. . 

United States Color & Chemical Co... 

University of Illinois 

Univeifel Aniline Dyes & Chemical 
Co. 

Van Dyk & Co. (Inc.) 

Verona Chemical Co 

Walker Chemical Co. , The 

WarntT-Jenkinson Manufacturing Co. 

Washington Dye A Chemical Corpora- 
tion. 

Waugh Chemical Corporation 

Western Dry Color Co 



100 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (HiUbum, N. Y.). 

Madison, 111. 

644 Greenwich Street, New York, N. Y. (Chrome, N. J.; 

South Charleston, W. Va.). 
Union Arcade, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Huntington, W. Va. 
104 Grove Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. , 
251.3 South Robey Street, Chicago, lU. (Chattanooga, Tenn.: 

Canal Dover, Ohio; Moline, ni.). 
161 East Grand ."V venue, Chicago, Hi. 
91 Fulton Street, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.). . 
3600 North Second Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
192 Coit Street, Irvington, N. .f. 
540 State House, Boston, Mass. 

45 Park Place, New York, N. Y. (Rahway, N. J.). 
148 State Street, Boston, Mass. (North Wobura, Mass.). 
122 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
44 Bergen Street, Brooldjm,' N. Y. 
Fouith and Oak Streets, Quincy, HI. 
1800 South Second Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

40 East Broadway, Butte, Mont. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

21 Burling Slip, New York, N. Y. (Bafialo, N. Y.; Marcus 

Hook, Pa.: Wappinger Falls and Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
1790 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Naugatuck, Conn.). 
North Billerica, Mass. 

80 Crown Street, New Haven, Conn. 

1112 First National Bank Building, Milwaukee, Wig. (Car- 

rollville, Wis.; Passaic, N. J.). 
98 .John Street, New York, N. Y. (Philadelphia, Pa.). 
Buflalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Eddy Building, Saginaw, Mich. 

i.'i2 West One hundred and eighth Street, New York, N. Y. 
301 Liberty Street, Schenectady, N. Y. 
176 Purchase Street, Boston, Mass. ( Poughkeepsie, N. Y.). 

Bound Brook, N. J. 

Matawan, N. .1. 

2837 West Twenty-first Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

63C West Twenty-second Sti-eet, Chicago, 111. 

15 William Street, New York, N. Y. (Poughkeepsie, N. Y.). 

1614 Merchants Bank Building, Indianapolis, Ind. (Seat- 

tie. Wash.; St. Louis Park, Minn.). 
135 Cedar St., New York, N. Y. (New Brunswick, N. J.) . 
Charleston, W. Va. 
•220 West Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (347 ' 

Water Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
Syracuse, N. Y. (SolvaV, N. Y.). 
66 Forest Street, Jersey City, N. J. 
Cleveland, Ohio. (Kensington, Chicago, 111.). 
611 West One hundred and twintv-ninth Street, New York, 

N. Y. (Edgewater, N. J.): 
140 Li\'lngstonc Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

81 Fulton Street, New York, >?. Y. (Newark, N. J.). 
West Fifth Street, Bayouue, N. J. 

Cable, Wis. 

517 Cortland Street, Bellex-iUe, N. J. 

Newman, Ga. 

254 North Tenth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

326 Broad wav, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.). 

192 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Linden, N. J.). 

.502 Iroquois Builduig, Buffalo, N. Y. 

11 Chff Street, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.). 

41 Union Square, Now York, N. Y. 

SO Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Kingsport. Tenn.). 
93-95 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. (Ashland, Mass.). 
Urbana, 111. 
1010 Wells Building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

4-6 Piatt Street, New York, N. Y. (Jersey City, N. J.). 

\^erona and Riverside Avenues, North Newark, N. J. 

P. O. 1145, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

2526 Baldwin Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Davidson Building, Washington D. C. (Alexandria, Va.). 

2 Rector Street, New York, N. Y. (Perth .\jnboy, N, J.). 
Fifty-second and Wallace Streets ,Chicago, 111. 



CENSUS OF Dr/ES AIs^D COAL-TAR CHEMICALS. 95 

Directory of manufactureys of coal-tar products during 1919 — Continued. 



No. 


Name of company. 


Office address (location of factory given in parentheses 
if not in same city as the office). 


162 


Western Reserve Cherr ical Co 


3434 East Ninty-third Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Owego, N. Y. 

56 Vesey Street, New York, N. Y. (Kearney, N. J.). 

100 South Second Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

230 Morgan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

342 Lexington Avenue, Clifton, N. J. 


163 
164 
165 
166 
167 


Wilbur White Chero'oal Co., The 

White Tar Co. of N. J. (Inc.), The 

Widder Dye & Ch^.nical Co. (Inc.).. . . 
Williamsburg Cheniical Co. (Inc.) 


168 


Youngsto^^^l Chemical Co 


Youngstown, Ohio. 
Hastings-on-the-Hudson, N. Y. 


16Q 


Zinsser & Co. (Inc.) 


170 


ZobelCo. (Inc.) Ernst 


112 Second Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 


171 


Zobel Color Works 


326 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.). 







[Total of 227 firms, including the 56 firms that did not consent to the publication of 
their names in the list above.] 



o 



It i