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Full text of "Synthetic organic chemicals : United States production and sales"

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UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 
WASHINGTON 



Tariff Information Series — No. 34 



CENSUS OF DYES 

AND 

OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC 
CHEMICALS 



? 



1925 




WASHINGTON! 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1926 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06317 181 1 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 
WASHINGTON 



Tariff Information Series — No. 34 



CENSUS OF DYES 

AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC 
CHEMICALS 

1925 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1926 



U. S. SUPERWTENOENT OF DOCUMENTS 

NOV 161926 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Office: Eighth and E Streets NW., Washington, D. C. 

rOMMI.SSIONERS 

Thomas O. Marvin, Chairman. 
Alfred P. Dennis, Vice Chnirmaii. 
Edward P. Costigan. 
Henry H. Glassie. 
Edgar B. Brossard. 
Sherman J. Lowell. 

John F. Bethune, Secretary. 



ADDITIONAL COPIES 

)F THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PBOCURKD KKOM 

THK SUPERINTENDKNT OF DOCUMENTS 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OKFICK 

WA.SHINOTON, D. C. 

AT 

:in CENTS PEH COPY 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction ix 

Part I 

Summary of census of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1925: 

Introduction 3 

Summary of domestic production, 1925 — 

Crudes 4 

Intermediates 4 

Dyes 5 

Statistics of production 7 

International dye trade in 1925 S 

Synthetic organic chemicals not derived from coal tar 9 

Part II 

Production of dyes and coal-tar chemicals, 1925: 

Coal-tar crudes . 13 

Record output of by-product coke 13 

Production of tars 14 

Production of crudes 15 

Increase in the use of creosote oil as a wood preservative 16 

Statistics of production 18 

Imports and exports of crudes 205, 217 

Coal-tar intermediates — 

Description 21 

Production 22 

Large production of synthetic phenol 22 

Aniline and its derivatives 23 

Cresylic acid 24 

Benzoic acid 24 

Rubber accelerators 24 

Naphthalene intermediates 24 

Special intermediates 25 

Naphthol AS 26 

Diphenylamine 26 

Tricresyl phosphate 26 

New intermediates 26 

Statistics of production and sales 26 

Dyes other than finished coal-tar products — 

Introduction 33 

Summary of production of dyes 33 

Increase in production 33 

Stocks on hand 34 

Decline in domestic dye prices ; 35 

Unit value of dyes produced, 1921-1925 37 

Progress of dye manufacture 38 

Relation of production to consumption 39 

Reduction in number of dye producers 39 

Tariff considerations — 

Effect of reduction in duty on imports 42 

III 



IV CONTENTS 

Production of dyes and coal-tar chemicals, 1925 — Continued. 

Dyes other than finished coal-tar products — Continued. Page 

Production of dyes by classes 43 

Acid dyes 46 

Basic dyes 47 

Direct cotton dyes 48 

S R A dyes 49 

Mordant and chrome dyes 49 

Sulphur dyes 50 

Vat dyes 51 

Color-lake and spirit-soluble dyes 53 

Food dyes 54 

Export trade records increase 54 

Other finished coal-tar products 55 

Color lakes 56 

Photographic chemicals 56 

Medicinals 56 

Flavors and perfume materials 57 

Synthetic phenolic resins 59 

Synthetic tanning materials 59 

Statistics of production 60 

Dyes not classified by color index 67 

Employees and rates of pay 73 

Research work 74 

Part III 

Cost of dyes in representative fabrics and garments: 

Introduction 77 

Factors which aff"ect dye cost 78 

Summary of dye costs 79 

General cost data 79 

Cost of dve in representative garments 80 

Cotton 80 

Woolen and worsted 85 

Silk and other 88 

Part IV 

Dyes imported for consumption in the United States, 1925: 

Introduction 93 

Summary of imports of dyes in 1925 94 

Import statistics 94 

Index to table of dye imports 129 

Part V 

Census of synthetic otgan,ic chemicals other than those of coal-tar origin, 
1925: 

Introduction 141 

Production increases 141 

Organic solvents 141 

Ethyl gasoline and tetra-ethyl lead 142 

Xanthates as flotation agents 143 

Methanol 143 

Other products 144 

Statistics of production, sales, and imports 144 

Part VI 
International dye trade: 
Introduction — 

Developments in 1925__:. 153 

World capacity still exceeds consumption 154 

Exports from producing countries 154 

Imports into consuming countries 155 

Increase in the German dye export trade 156 



CONTENTS V 

International dye trade — Continued I'ags 

The dye industry of Germany 157 

Developments in 1925 157 

New merger of dye firms 157 

Amalgamation of foreign sales agencies 158 

International agreements in 1925 160 

Extension of the I. G. interests 160 

Dividends of the I. G. in 1925 161 

Reparation dyes 164 

Payments in kind 165 

Receipts and payments under the Dawes plan 165 

The dye industry of Great Britain 166 

Reorganization of British Dyestuff s Corporation 167 

Imports and exports 172 

Position of dye makers other than the British Dyestuffs Cor- 
poration 173 

Scottish Dyes (Ltd.) taken over by the British Dyes Cor- 
poration 173 

Import regulation act and dye prices 173 

The dye industry' of France 174 

The dye industry of Italy 184 

Progress in 1925 . 184 

Production in 1925 184 

The dye industry of Japan 185 

Production 185 

Government measures to encourage dve manufacture 186 

The dye industry of Poland 188 

Production of dyes 188 

The dye industry of Russia 188 

The dye industry of Spain 189 

Dye license system for import control 189 

The dye industry of Switzerland 190 

Exports in 1925 191 

The dye trade of other countries — 

Argentina 193 

Austria 193 

Belgium 194 

Brazil 194 

Canada 195 

China 195 

Czechoslovakia 196 

Egypt 197 

India 198 

Netherlands 200 

Sweden ._.____. 201 

Part VII 

APPENDIX 

Statistics of domestic imports and exports of coal-tar products 205 

Directory of manufacturers of dves and other synthetic organic chem- 
icals, 1925 1 I 221 

Statistical Tables 

1. Summary of the production of dyes and coal-tar chemicals, 1918- 

1925- ' - 7 

2. Production and sales of S3'nthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar 

origin, 1921-1925 9 

3. Production of bv-product and beehive coke in the United States, 

1913-1925- ---■ - 14 

4. Production and sales of coke-oven, coal-gas, water-gas, and oil-gas 

tar in the United States, 1918-1925 15 

5. Production of coke-oven tar in the United States, 1918-1925 15 

6. Coal-tar bv-products obtained from coke-oven operations, 1923- 

1925--- J 18 



VI CONTENTS 

Page 

7. Production of coal-tar crudes, 1925, by firms not primarily engaged 

in the operation of coke-oven plants and gas houses 19 

8. Total commercial production of benzene, toluene, solvent naphtha, 

and naphthalene from all sources in the United States, 1918-1925- _ 20 

9. Production and sales of phenol, 1917-1925 22 

10. Domestic? sales price per pound of coal-tar intermediates, 1919-1925, 

and invoice price of same intermediates imported, 1914 26 

11. Production and sales of coal-tar intermediates, 1925 27 

12. Production of intermediates, bv groups, according to unit values, 

1922-1925 1 32 

13. Domestic production and sales of coal-tar dyes, 1914 and 1917-1925- - 34 

14. Stocks of domestic dyes on hand January 1, 1925 and 1926 34 

15. Weighted average sales price domestic dyes, 1917-1925 35 

16. Domestic sales prices of 100 dyes, 1920-1925, compared vi-ith invoice 

values of same dyes imported in 1914 36 

17. Production of dyes, by groups, according to unit values 37 

18. Imports of coal-tar dyes into the United States, 1920-1926 43 

19. Comparison of imports of dyes, by classes, fiscal year 1914 and cal- 

endar years 1920-1925, with domestic production, calendar years 

1917-1925 43 

20- Production, imports, and consumption of vat dyes other than indigo 

in the United States, 1914 and 1920-1925 53 

21. Domestic exports of dyes 54 

22- Domestic exports of dyes, bj' months, 1922-1926 (four months) 55 

23. Imports of synthetic aromatic chemicals of coal-tar origin, 1925 58 

24- Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 

1925 60 

25- Emplovees and rates of pav, dve and coal-tar chemical industrv, 

^ 1925 1_-_1 1- 73 

26- Employees and rates of pay, dye and coal-tar chemical industry, 1925, 

percentages receiving specified wages 74 

27- Imports of dves into the United States, bv countrv of shipment, 

1920-1925-1 .' 1 94 

28- Dyes im})orted into the United States, classified by method of appli- 

'cation, 1921-1925 94 

29- Dyes of each class, according to method of application, imported in 

largest quantity in calendar year 1925, compared with corre- 
sponding imports in 1924, 1923, 1922, and fiscal year 1914 95 

30. Dves remaining in bonded customs warehouse, January 31, 1925- 

April 30, 1926 ^ 97 

31. Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 98 

32. Production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals, 1925 (not de- 

rived from coal tar) 144 

33. Imports and production of certain synthetic organic chemicals (non- 

coal tar), 1924 and 1925 '. 149 

34. Production of dyes by chief producing countries, 1920-1925 154 

35- Exports of coal-tar dyes from chief producing countries, 1921-1925 — 155 

36- Imports of coal-tar dj^es into chief consuming countries, 1924 and 

1925 - 156 

37. Exports of coal-tar dyes from Germany, 1913 and 1920-1925 156 

38. Summary of balance sheets of I. G. Farbenindustrie, 1924 and 1925-. 161 

39. Germany: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 162 

40. Germany: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 - 163 

41. Germany: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 164 

42. Germany: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 164 

43. Production of dves in Great Britain, 1924 166 

44. Balance sheet. Great Britain, March 31, 1925 171 

45. The United Kingdom: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925- _ 171 

46. The United Kingdom: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 172 

47. The United Kingdom: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 172 

48. France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 175 

49. France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 175 

50. France: Imports of coal-tar dves, 1923 177 

51. France: Imports of indigo, 19i23 and 1924 179 

52. France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 179 



CONTENTS VII 

Page 

53. France: Exports of coal-tar dves, 1924 180 

54. France : Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1923 182 

54-a. France: Exports of indigo, 1923 and 1924 184 

55. Ital}': Imports and exports of synthetic organic dyes, 1925 185 

56. Italj': Imports of synthetic organic dyes by countries, 1925 185 

56-a. Japan: Production of dyes and intermediates, August, 1923, to 

September, 1924 185 

57. Japan: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes by classes, 1925 187 

58. Japan: Imports of coal-tar dyes (exclusive of indigo) by countries, 

1925 - 187 

59. Japan: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes by classes, 1924 187 

60. Japan: Imports of coal-tar dyes (exclusive of indigo) by countries, 

1924 _' . 187 

61. Poland: Imports and exports of synthetic dyes, 1924 188 

62. Spain: Imports of dves and intermediates, 1924 and 1925 190 

63. Switzerland: Exports of dyes, 1913 and 1920-1925 191 

63a. Switzerland: Imports and exports of coal-tar d.yes, 1925 192 

64. Argentina: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1923 and 1924 193 

65. Austria: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 193 

66. Belgium: Imports and exports of coal-tar dj'es, 1925 194 

67. Brazil: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 1 194 

68. Canada: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 12 months ended March 31, 1925- 195 

69. China: Imports of dyes, colors, and paints, 1924 195 

70. China: Imports of natural indigo, 1924 196 

71. Czechoslovakia: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, calender year 

1924 I--- 196 

72. Egypt : Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 197 

73. India: Imports of coal-tar dves and exports of natural indigo for fiscal 

year ended March 31, 1924 198 

74. India: Imports of coal-tar dves and exports of natural indigo for fiscal 

year ended March 31, 1925 199 

75. Netherlands: Imports and exports of synthetic organic dyes, 1924. _ 200 

76. Sweden: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 201 

77. United States: Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, 

calendar years 1922-1925 205 

78. United States: General imports of coal-tar products, by countries, 

calendar years 1922-1925 211 

79. United States: Exports of coal-tar and of dyes and dyestuflfs, calendar 

years 1922-1925 217 



INTRODUCTION 



This report is a survey of the domestic dye and synthetic organic 
chemical industry in 1925. It presents the results of a special 
investigation made by the United States Tariff Commission with 
respect to the production in the United States of coal-tar dyes and 
synthetic organic chemicals, both of coal-tar and of noncoal-tar 
origin. It includes a detailed tabulation of coal-tar dyes imported 
into the United States and official statistics of imports and exports 
of coal-tar dyes by the large consuming and producing nations of the 
world. There is also included a chapter on the cost of dye in repre- 
sentative fabrics and garments. 

The survey is divided into six parts, as shown in Table of Contents 
(pp. Ill to vii). 



In the preparation of this report the Tariff Commission had the 
services of Warren N. Watson and C. R. De Long, of the chemical 
division of the commission's staff, and of others. 
5919— 26t 2 

IX 



PART I 

SUMMARY OF THE CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER 
SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1925 



Part I 

SUMMARY OF THE CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYN- 
THETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1925. 



Introduction 



The United States Tariff Commission has reported annuall}^, 
beginning with 1917, the progress of the American dye and coal-tar 
chemical mdustry. In 1921 this annual census was extended to 
include synthetic organic chemicals other than those derived from 
coal tar.' 

In addition to production and sales figures for the domestic in- 
dustry the present report contains a detailed tabulation of coal-tar 
dyes imported into the United States, a discussion of the interna- 
tional dye trade, developments in the foreign dye-producing countries, 
and official statistics of exports and imports of the more important 
dye consuming and producing countries of the world in post-war 
years. A new feature of the present report is a section showing the 
cost of dye in representative fabrics and garments. 

The general grouping of coal-tar chemicals adopted in the present 
report follows that of the tariff act of 1922, which conforms in general, 
although not in ever}- detail, with common practice. Crudes, para- 
graph 1549, free, are contained in and separated from crude coal tar; 
intermediates, dutiable under paragraph 27 at 40 per cent and 7 
cents per pound, are produced from the crudes by chemical processes; 
with certain exceptions, tiiey are used only for the manufacture of 
dyes and other finished products by further chemical treatment; dyes 
and other finished products are dutiable under paragraph 28 at 45 
per cent and 7 cents per pound. The term "other finished products" 
includes color lakes, photographic chemicals, medicinals, flavors, 
perfume materials, synthetic resins, and synthetic tanning materials. 
Explosives derived from coal-tar materials, although dutiable under 
paragraph 28, are not included in this census. 

A summary of domestic production of coal-tar products from 1918 
to 1925, according to the classes given above, is contained in Table 
1, page 7. Production figures for 1925 were compiled from the 
returns of 18(i companies ^ and are believed to form a complete record 
of the manufacture of such prodiicts in that year. The quantity 

1 other reports prepared by the Tariff Commission relating to conditions in the dye industry include: 
(1) Costs of production in Ihe dve industry, 1918 and 1919, and (2) Dyes and other coal-tar chemicals, 
December 12, 1918. 

2 This census includes production returns of 215 firms, of which 29 made synthetic organic chemicals 
of noncoal-tar origin only and 18fi made synthetic organic chemicals of coal-tar origin or of both coal-tar 
and also noncoal-tar origin. Of the 21,'i firms, 185 granted permission for the publication of their names 
and 30 did not grant such permission. The names of the 185 firms are listed in the directory of manu- 
facturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, see appendix, p. 221. 



4 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

and value of each product are given in as great detail as is possible 
without revealing the operations of individual manufacturers. It 
has been the policy of the commission not to publish either produc- 
tion or sales figures unless at least three firms report a given product, 
and then only when production (or sales) is well distributed among 
the different firms. In many instances neither production nor sales 
figures are published, even where there are more than three producers, 
because of the fsict that one firm either produced or sold a large part 
of the total output. 

Summary of Domestic Production, 1925 

CRUDES 

The production of by-product coke — 39,452,000 tons — established 
a new record, according to the preliminary figures of the United 
States Geological Survey. This is a 16 per cent increase over 
1924. The output of beehive coke was 10,714,000 tons, which is 
less than one-third of the 1913 figure. Of the total coke production 
78.6 per cent was from by-product ovens, a record in the history of 
the industry, showing the trend toward an increased use of the 
by-product oven, which saves the valuable by-products, including 
ammonia, tar, and gas. By-product ovens are supplying an increas- 
ing quantity of gas for city consumption and coke is enjoying an 
increased popularity as a domestic fuel. 

Coal-tar production in 1925 totaled 528,000,000 gallons, a 12.5 per 
cent increase over 1924. On account of the production in excess of 
the requirements of the tar distilling and chemical industry, approxi- 
mately 60 per cent v\^as used as fuel. Because of the demand for 
partly refined products, such as motor fuel, solvents, and pitches, 
only a part of the 192,000,000 gallons distilled was converted into 
refined products, such as benzene, toluene, naphthalene. 

Creosote or dead oil, of great value as a wood preservative, is 
made in increasing but insufficient quantities. The 1925 production 
of 43,667,848 gallons was an increase of 6 per cent over 1924. About 
two-thirds of our consumption is imported. Imports in 1925 ex- 
ceeded, both in value and quantity, the total of all other coal-tar 
products imported into the United States. 

intermediates 

Intermediates are prepared from the coal-tar crudes by chemical 
treatment. They are further converted by complex chemical pro- 
cesses into finished coal-tar products, such as dyes, medicinals, per- 
fumes, flavors, photographic chemicals, synthetic resins, and tanning 
materials. Other uses for intermediates are as accelerators in the 
vulcanization of rubber, as camphor substitutes, insecticides, germi- 
cides, and i'A the flotation process of concentrating ores. 

The total production of intermediates by 92 firms in 1925 was 
210,690,779 pounds, as compared with 186,596,562 pounds in 1924. 
Sales in 1925 amounted to 86,066,651 pounds, valued at $19,756,200. 
There were notable increases in the production of those intermediates 
normally consumed in large quantities for djQ manufacture. Progress 
is evident in the production of specialty intermediates required in the 
manufacture of fast dyes. 



SUMMARY OF DOMESTIC PEODUCTION, 1925 5 

Conspicuous among the intermediates showing expansion in 
manufacture in 1925 were anthraquinone derivatives, synthetic 
and natural phenol, cresylic acid, and phthalic anhydride. The 
combined output of synthetic and natural phenol was nearly double 
that of 1924, and the production of phthalic anhydride was the 
highest yet reported. Owing to the commercialization of the syn- 
thetic process of obtaining anthraquinone from phthalic anhydride 
and benzene, refined anthracene production was reduced to only 
a small fraction of what it was in former years, and it doubtless will 
never again assume the place it once occupied in dye manufacture. 
Progress in the manufacture of rubber accelerators was notable. 

COAL-TAR DYES 

Production Increased '25 per cent. — The output of coal-tar dyes by 
75 firins was 86,345,438 pounds in 1925, as compared with 68,679,000 
pounds in 1924. The total sales in the two years were 79,303,451 
poimds, valued at $37,468,332, and 64,961,433 pounds valued at 
S35, 012,400, respectively. The increased output is in part due to 
the improvement in the export trade of which indigo and sulphur 
black are the principal items. About four-fifths of the total in- 
crease in all dyes may be attributed to the expansion in production 
of these two dyes alone. 

Decline in domestic dye prices. — The weighted average price of all 
domestic dyes sold was about 13 per cent less in 1925 than in 1924. 
The price in 1925 was $0.47 per pound compared with $0.54 in 1924, 
$0.60 in 1922, and $1.26 in 1917. Price recessions in 1925 were 
general, occurring in the low as well as the high-price dyes. They 
were largely due to severe competition between the domestic manu- 
facturers, and in the high-price colors to increased competition from 
imported dyes. 

Progress in dye manufacture. — The development of a domestic 
dye industry in the last 10 years is an outstanding feature in the 
history of the chemical industry of the United States. More than 
90 per cent of the total quantity of dyes consumed in the United 
States in 1925 were of domestic manufacture and certain dyes were 
exported in significant amounts. The growth of the industry is 
manifest not only in increased output but in the production for the 
first time in the United States of many vat dyes, direct dyes, alizarin 
derivatives, and special colors for dyeing rayon and certain mixed 
fibers. Many new dyes were placed on the market during the first 
six months of 1926. Research under way is expected to result in 
continued progress. 

Relation of production to consumption. — In 1925, imports of dyes 
were 6 per ceht of the total production by quantity and over 12 per 
cent by value. Assuming domestic consumption to be equal to 
the total sales plus imports, minus exports, imports measured quan- 
titively were nearly 9 per cent of consumption and dyes made in 
the United States were about 91 per cent. In terms of value, how- 
ever, domestic dyes supplied considerably less than 91 per cent of 
consumption for the reason that the price of imported dyes is much 
higher than the average of domestic dyes. 

Reduction in number of dye manufacturers. — Seventy-five firms 
reported production of dyes in 1925 (six of which made only bacterio- 
logical stains and indicators). In 1924, 78 firms reported and in 



6 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

1919, 90 firms. By the end of 1925 four of the 75 firms reporting 
had ceased manufacture, making seven fewer producers in December, 
1925, than in 1924. 

Severe competition resulting from the excess capacity to pro- 
duce will in the long run eliminate many of the existing firms. 
It is likely that some of the smaller ones w^ill be absorbed by the 
larger and that several others will amalgamate in order to lower 
manufacturing costs by a reduction of overhead, selling expense, 
and duplication. 

Record 'production oj vat dyes. — Vat dyes other than indigo attained 
their maximum production with a total of over 2,600,000 pounds, 
or an increase of 43 per cent over the 1924 figure. The total pro- 
duction of vat dyes, including indigo, was 31,730,178 pounds as 
compared with 21,818,022 in 1924. 

The increasing consumption of vat dyes is largely due to their 
demand by certain progressive textile manufacturers of fast-dyed 
fabrics. Although more costly than other colors, vat dyes are more 
economical in the long run, especially for cottons and fabrics sub- 
jected to the severe treatment of the modern laundry. Up to the 
present time (1926) these dyes have been used chiefl}" on cotton, but 
their application to silk is assuming more importance each year. 
The consumption of this group of colors in the United States has 
nearly doubled in the last three years. 

Imports oJ dyes increase. — The total imports of coal-tar dyes for 
1925 were 5,209,601 pounds, valued at S4,637,240, representing a 72 
per cent increase by quantity and a 59 per cent increase by value 
over the 1924 figure. Germany furnished 52 per cent of the imports, 
Switzerland, 32 per cent, and England, Ital.y, Belgium, Canada, and 
France the bulk of the remainder. Competition from imported 
colors, principally the higher cost dyes, has been pronounced; prac- 
tically all of these have come from Germany and Switzerland, and 
consist largely of vat dyes, alizarins, developed direct dyes, and 
dyes covered by foreign patents. 

Of the total ciuantity of dyes imported, 46 per cent were vat 
dyes, 14.5 per cent direct colors, 12.3 per cent mordant and chrome, 
and over 11 per cent each the basic dyes and the acid dyes. 

Effect of tariff reduction on dye imports. — As provided by the tarifl' 
act of 1922, the ad valorem rate on dyes and other finished coal-tar 
products dutiable under paragraph 28 was automatically reduced on 
September 22, 1924, from 60 per cent to 45 per cent; and the rate on 
intermediates, dutiable under paragraph 27, from 55 per cent to 40 
per cent; the specific duty remained at 7 cents per pound on both 
intermediates and finished products. 

Following this reduction in rates of duty there was a conspicuous 
increase in imports. As pointed out in the commission's report of 
1923, the specific duty was more effective on the low-priced dyes 
and the ad valorem rate on the high-priced dyes. Consequently the 
reduction more directly afl'ected the higher-priced dyes. The 
monthly average import of dyes in the first nine months of 1924, 
prior to the reduction, was 179,103 pounds valued at $182,515, as 
compared with 434,133 pounds valued at $386,437 in 1925, and 
385,763 pounds, valued at $365,721 for the first three months of 
1926. Imports have been mostly of German and Swiss manufacture. 

Dye exports. — Exports in 1925 totaled 25,799,889 pounds, valued 
at $6,694,360, an increase of 64 per cent in quantity and 19 per cent 



SUMMARY OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, 1925 7 

in value over 1924. China, Japan, Canada, British India, and the 
Central and South American countries are the principal foreign 
markets. Russia took some dyes in 1925. Indigo and sulphur black 
were the leading dyes exported; some direct dyes and a limited 
quantity of other types were sold abroad. Severe competition in 
world markets has resulted in price reductions in nearly every im- 
portant consuming country. 

STATISTICS OF PRODUCTION 
Table 1. — Summary of the production of dyes and coal-tar chemicals, 1918-1925 



Intermediates (total) 

Finished products (total). 

Dyes.- 

Color lakes 

Photographic chemicals... 

Medicinals 

Flavors 

Perfumes 

Tanning materials 

Synthetic phenolic resins. 



Number 
of manu- 
facturers 



Production 



Pounds 



357, 
76, 



Value 



.$124, 382, 892 

83, 815, 746 

62, 026, 390 

5, 020, 023 

823, 915 

7, 792, 984 

4, 925, 627 

584. 695 

2, 642, 120 



1919 



Number 
ofmami- 
facturers 



Production 



Pounds 



116 
155 
90 1 

34 : 

10 
31 

9 I 

6 

1 



{ .0 



177. 362, 426 

82, 532, 390 

63, 402, 194 

7. 569, 921 

335, 509 

6, 777, 988 

610.825 

41,419 



Value 



$63, 210, 7 

84, 585, 544 

67, 598, 856 

4,179,964 

1,059,340 

7, 883, 071 

1, 318, 654 

164, 302 



3, 794, .i34 I 2,381,358 



Intermediates (total) __ 
Finished products 

(total) 

Dyes 

Color lakes 

Photographic 

chemicals.- ._ 

Medicinals. _ 

Flavors 

Perfumes 

Tanning:materials_-. 
Synthetic phenolic 

resins .- 



Number 
of manu- 
facturers 



161 
82 
43 



Production 



Pounds 



Value 



Number 
of manu- 
facturers 



257,726,911 $95,291,686 

112,942,227 112,731,547 

8», 263, 776 95, 613, 749 

10, 983, 538 5, 871, 820 



440, 759 
5, 184, 989 

166, 884 

99, 740 

3,142,861 

4, 659, 680 



1,015,848 

5, 726, 776 

527. 493 

332, 008 

233, 674 

3,410,179 



108 

147 
74 
43 

5 
34 
17 
15 

4 



Production 



Sales 



Pounds 



Pounds 



70, 899, 912 33, 637, 326 



51, 457, ,565 

39, 008, 690 

6, 162, 187 

183, 798 

1.. 54,5, 917 

901,245 

1 19, 335 

1,902, .597 



60, 434, 009 

47, 513, 762 

6, 424, 612 

170, 221 

1, 876, 246 

933, 662 

119,691 

1,721,3.59 



1,643,796 1 1,674,456 1,352,166 



Value 



$8, 483, 463 

47, 996, 514 

39, 283, 956 

2, 863, 189 

248, 041 

2, 930, 324 

1,002,018 

175,816 

141,005 




8 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 1. — Summary of the productionof dyea (uid coal-tar chemicals, 1918-1925 — 

Continvied 



Intermediates (total) _ 
Finished products 

(total) 

Dyes 

Color lakes 

Photographic chem- 
icals 

Medieinals 

Flavors 

Perfumes 

Tanning materials. 

Synthetic phenolic 

resins 



1924 



Num- 
ber of 
manu- 
fac- 
turers 



Produc- 
tion 



Pounds 



186, 59fi, 562 

97,730,211 

68, 679, 000 

9, 343, 147 

316, 183 
2, 967, 944 
1, 750, 555 
1, 895, 267 

■12,778,115 



Sales 



Pounds 



76, 897. 521 

93, 636, 109 

64,901,433 

9, 281, 673 

321. 865 
2, 688, 329 
1, 691, 863 
1,945,488 

12,745,4.58 



Value 



$18, 164, 334 

55. 932. 580 
35, 012, 400 
4, 045, 799 

401.379 
5. 178. 099 
1,471,089 

945, 773 

8,818,041 



1925 



Num- 
ber of 
manu- 
fac- 
turers 



Produc- 
tion 



Sales 



Pounds Pounds Value 



210, 699, 779| 86, 066, 651 
I 

120. .554, 228 112, 671. 779 
86.345,438 79,303,451 
11.414,7.53 11,308,444 



I .( 



3. 237, 796 
2, 207, 102 
2. 335, 024 



327,041 348.842 47.5,095 



3, 294, 8, 
2, 148, 904 
2, 370. 728 



$19, 756, 200 

60,811,400 

37,468.332 

5, .544, 371 



6,331,918 

1.409,311 

883, 617 



14.687,0741 13.896, f 83 8.698,7:6 



International Dye Trade in 1925 

The commission's dye reports of 1922 to 1924, discussed pre-war 
conditions in the international dye trade and the status of now indus- 
tries established during and since the World War. 

The year 1925 was marked by energetic and organized efforts on the 
part of Germany to regain her former dominance of the world's dye 
markets. One of the agencies through which it is hoped to recover 
trade lost to foreign countries during the war, particularly to the 
United States, Great Britain, France, Japan, and Italy, is a super- 
trust formed in 1925 by the consolidation of six German dye pro- 
ducers. This consolidation, one of the most ambitious undertakings 
in the history of German fmance, is primarily intended to reduce 
manufacturing costs. 

A second project is the consolidation of foreign sales agencies. 
Amalgamations have been effected in Great Britain, the United 
States, Switzerland, Belgium, Holland, Japan, JVle.xico, Canada, 
Czechoslovakia, and Russia. The puipose of this combination is to 
increase the competitive strength of the German cartel in each of 
these foreign markets. 

In 1925 the export of German dyes amounted to 75,879,025 pounds, 
valued at $44,311,155, an increase of 24 per cent in quantity and 42 
per cent in value over 1924. Germany h^s been successful in ex- 
tending her export trade, particularly in the higher-priced dyes and 
has increased her shipments to both producing and nonproducing 
nations. In certain tonnage dyes, including indigo and sulphui", 
black, she has encountered competition from the United States, 
Great Britain, and France, as well as from her former comj^etitor, 
Switzerland. 

The world's capacity to produce dyes greatly in excess of demand 
continues and has brought about severe competition in the world's 
markets, with a dowmward trend in prices. The new producing 
nations, regarding dye manufacture as a key industry and essential 
to national defense, have adopted protective measures with a view 
to stimulating dye manufacture. Siicfi measures tend to maintain 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS NOT FROM COAL TAR 



9 



an excess capacity to produce above the normal requirements. 
Competition, however, will undoubtedly reduce capacity in coming 
years to a figure more nearly the pre-war level. 

Among recent technical developments has been a world-wide 
trend toward increased production and consumption of fast dyes, 
specialty dyes, and dyes of lower application cost, such as soluble 
vat dyes and colors for the dyeing of rayon (artificial silk). 

In Great Britain significant changes are taking place. The Gov- 
ernment has withdrawn from participation in the affairs of the 
British Dyestuft's Corporation, with the result that there has been 
a writing down of the assets of the corporation and a reduction in its 
capital. The Government stock, costing £1,700,000, was sold to the 
corporation for £600,000. In 1925 the corporation took over the 
Scottish Dyes (Ltd.), a concern that is preeminent in the production 
of vat colors. Its acquisition is considered a sound policy on the 
part of the British Dyestuffs Corporation. 

Italy has made progress in the manufacture of new dyes, especially 
synthetic indigo made on a commercial scale for the first time in 
1925. Spain has recently adepted a system of dye license import 
control for the protection of the home industry. Japan, following 
the system of dye import control adopted in June, 1924, and the 
subsidy act in March, 1925, has extended the provisions of the sub- 
sidy to firms producing certain high-class dyes. Russia, in an effort 
to establish a dye industry, is now producing certain crudes, inter- 
mediates, and dyes. The Swiss d^^e industry, which ranks second to 
the German, now operates branch plants in the United States, Great 
Britain, France, and Italy. The export trade of Switzerland in 
1925 shows a loss in tonnage of indigo shipments but a slight increase 
in both value and quantit}' for dyes other than indigo. 

Synthetic Organic Chemicals Not Derived from Coal Tar 

Expansion in this field is a signal feature of the progress made in 
1925 in the chemical industry. The output of 156,878,013 pounds 
is a 36 per cent increase over 1924. Sales reached the unprecedented 
total of 114,626,209 pounds, valued at $23,632,779. A number of 
products, heretofore made on a relatively small scale in the United 
States, were produced in commercial quantity in 1925. 

Products in the group include esters and solvents used by the 
pyroxylin plastic and the lacquer industries. Among those showing 
a conspicuous increase in production in 1925 are butanol, butyl 
acetate, ethylene derivatives, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde. 
Xanthates, used as flotation agents for sulphide ores containing 
copper, zinc, lead, silver, and gold, also showed a phenomenal increase 
in 1925. 



Table 2. 



-Production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin, 
1921-1925 



Year 


Production 


Sales 


1921 -. 


Pounds 

21,545,186 

79,202,155 

90, 597, 712 

115.817,865 

156,878,013 


Pounds 
16,761.C96 
60, 494, 494 
67, 727, 067 
85,933,461 
114, 626, 209 


Value 
$7,226,068 


1922 


11,964,074 


1923 . 


13, 875, 521 


1924 ■ . 


20, 604, 717 


1925- 


23, 632, 779 







PART II 

PRODUCTIONJ OF^ DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMI- 
CALS, 1925 



11 



Part II 
PRODUCTION OF DYES AND COAL-TAR CHEMICALS, 1925 



Coal-Tar Crudes 

Record output of by-product coJce. — The total domestic production 
of coke in 1925 was 50,166,000 ' net tons, of which 39,452,000 tons 
were obtained from by-product ovens. Since 1913 the trend has 
been steadily away from beehive coke to by-product until in 1925 
the ratios of the two to total production stood at 78.6 per cent by- 
product as against 21.4 per cent beehive — almost the exact reverse 
of the 1913 proportions, which were 27.5 and 72.5 per cent, respec- 
tively. The 1925 production of by-product coke is a 16 per cent 
increase over the 1924 output and is nearly 5 per cent in excess of 
production in 1923, foimerly the peak year. 

The beehive-coke industry serves largely as an auxiliary source of 
coke when the output of by-product ovens is insufficient to meet 
the demand of the steel industry. The anthracite coal strike from 
September, 1925, to February, 1926, increased the consumption and 
probably the permanent demand for coke as a house fuel. By- 
product coke ovens are supplying an increasing quantity of gas for 
city consumption, the coke having a local market for domestic fuel. 
The use of by-product coke-oven gas has a tendencj^ to check the 
use of water gas and is affecting the use of coal gas. 

In the conservation of national resources the replacement of bee- 
hive ovens by the by-product variety, which recover the tar, ammonia, 
and gas products entirely wasted by the old beehive type, is of great 
economic significance for the following reasons: (1) The by-product 
ovens increase the production of ammonia for fertilizer and other 
uses; (2) the gas produced in these ovens is used for municipal light- 
ing and industrial heating; and (3) the output of tar insures an abun- 
dant supply of coal tar for the preparation of crudes, which serve 
as a basis of the domestic coal-tar dye and chemical industry. 

Table 3 shows the production of by-product and beehive coke 
from 1913 to 1925, inclusive. The figures for 1925 are not final; 
those for by-product coke are taken from preliminary reports of the 
Geological Survey and those for beehive coke are estimates based 
upon the statements of producers as to the number of cars loaded 
for shipment by the railroads. 

1 U. S. Oeol. Surv. preliminary figures. 

13 



14 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table ^.—Production of hy-product and beehive coke in the United States in specified 

years, 1913-1925 



Year 


Net tons i)roduced 


Per cent of total 
output 


By-product 


Beehive 


Total 


By- 
product 


Bee- 
hive 


1913.. 


12, 714, 700 
14, 072, 895 
22, 439, 280 
25, 997, 580 
25. 137, 621 
30,833 951 


33, 584, 830 
27, 508, 255 
33, 167, ,548 
30, 480, 792 
19, 042, 936 
90 .=i1I nf)9 


46, 299, 530 
41,581,150 
55. 606, 828 
56, 478, 372 
44, 180. 557 
51.345,043 
25, 287, 622 
37,124,012 
.56, 977, 534 
44. 269, 605 
50, 166, 000 


27 5 


79 .•; 


1915. . - 


33 8 ' fiR ' 


1917.. 


40.4 
46.0 
.56.9 
60.0 
78.1 
76.9 
66.0 
76.8 
78.6 


59 6 


1918 . . 


54 


1919 


43 1 


1920 


40 


1921. 


19, 749, 580 5' 538' 042 


21 9 


1922. - 


28, 5f 0, 545 
37, 597, 664 
33, 983, 568 
39, 452, 000 


8, 573, 467 
19,379,870 
10, 286, 037 
10, 714, 000 


23 1 


1923 


34 


1924 "... 


23 2 


1925 2 . . 


21 4 







' Revised since last report. 



2 Preliminary. 



Production of tars. — The output of tars in 1925, according to pre- 
liminary figures, was 528,059,000 gallons, a 12.5 per cent increase over 
1924. Sales in 1925 amounted to 294,954,000 gallons, valued at 
$14,574,000, as compared with 253,000,000 gallons in 1924, valued 
at $11,772,000. Nearly 56 per cent of the combined production of 
coke-oven and coal-gas tar was sold, and over 52 per cent of the 
coke-oven tar. Reports submitted to the Tariff Commission by firms 
not primarily engaged in the operation of coke ovens indicate that 
approximately 183,000,000 gallons of tar were distilled in 1925. It 
is estimated that, in addition, about 9,000,000 gallons were distilled 
by other firms, making a total of 192,000,000 gallons, which is 
slightly less than the figure for 1924. Including about 100,000,000 
gallons of tar sold but not distilled, it is estimated that approximately 
60 per cent of the total production of coal tar was used as fuel. 

The use of tar as a fuel tends to increase as the price of crude 
oil or coal advances. Tar has at all times a certain fuel value, and 
the distiller must pay somewhat more than the fuel value. On 
account of the demand for such partly refined products, such as sol- 
vents and soft pitches, only a part of the tar is distilled into refined 
phenol, cresylic acid, naphthalene, and anthracene. Only a portion 
of the light oil obtained from the coke-oven gas is separated into 
benzene, toluene, and xylene, because of the quantity demanded for 
motor fuel and solvents. 

Table 4 shows the production and sales of coke-oven, coal-gas, 
water-gas, and oil-gas tar in the United States from 1918 to 1925, 
inclusive. Table 5 shows the production of coke-oven tar in the 
same period and the percentage used and sold each year. 



COAL-TAJ? CRUDES 



15 



Table 4^.— Production and sales of coke-oven, coal-gas, ivater-gas, and oil-gas tar in 
the United States, 1918-1925 

[Compiled by the United States Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines from reports of producers. The 
difference between production and sales is accounted for by tar used by the producer and by changes in 
stock] 





Coke-oven 
tar 


Coal-gas 
tar 


Total coal 
tar 


Water and 
oil gas tar 


Production (gallons): 

1918 .. ... 


263, 299, 470 
288,901,739 
360, 664, 124 
253,051,649 
327, 779, 734 
440, 907, 109 
422, 074, 326 
480,059,000 

200, 233, 002 
217, 707, 1.57 
174,363,696 
135, 293, 047 
162,204,417 
211,7,39,469 
209. 979, 999 
2.53, 954, 000 

$6. 364, 972 
6, 918, 549 
6, 378, 040 
5, 645, 309 
6,419,743 
9, 250, 552 
9, 623, 520 

12, 474, 000 


52, 694, 826 

(') 
51, 264, 956 

(') 
48, 082, 228 

0) 

(■) 

(•) 

47, 727, 839 

(') 
46, 604, 133 

(>) 
41,266,074 

(■) 

(') 

(') 

$1,863,580 

(') 
2,010,186 

(•) 
1,955,9.50 

(') 

(>) 

(■) 


315.994,296 
340, 900, 000 
411,929,080 
303, 000, 000 
375, 861, 962 
488, 900, 000 
470. 000, 000 
528, 059, 000 

247, 960, 841 
264, 900, 000 
220, 967, 829 
179, 200, 000 
203, 470, 491 
254, 700, 000 
253, 000, 000 
294, 954, 000 

$8, 228. 552 
8,800,000 
8, 388, 226 
7, 760. 000 
8, 375, 693 
11,400,000 
11,772,000 
14, .574, 000 


100, 985, 156 


1919... 


(2) 


1920 


116,073,907 


1921 


(') 


1922 . 


104, 555, 028 


1923 3.. 


(2) 


1924 3 


(2) 


1925 *. 


(2) 


Sales (gallons): 

1918 


55, 283, 484 


1919 


(2) 


1920 


59, 238, 730 


1921 


(2) 


1922 


47, 338, 489 


1923 3 


< 49, 990, 840 


1924 3 


(?) 


1925 «. . 


(2) 


Value of sales: 

1918 . ... 


$1,805,865 


1919- . 


(2) 


1920 . 


2,109,388 


1921 


(}) 


1922 


1,879,490 


1923 3 


' 2, 001, 363 


1924 3 . 


(^) 


1925'.. .. 


{■) 







' No report. Estimate included in total. 

2 No report. 

3 Revised since last report. 



< As reported by the Bureau of the Census. 
5 Preliminary figures. 



Table 5. — Production of coke-oven tar in the United States and percentage used and 

sold, 1918-1925 

[Compiled by United States Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines from reports of operators] 





Coke-oven tar 


Year 


Gallons pro- 
duced 


Per cent 
sold' 


Per cent 
used • 


1918 


263, 299, 470 
288,901,7;i9 
360, 664, 124 
253,051,649 
327, 779. 734 
440, 907, 109 
422, 074, 326 
480, 059, 000 


76.0 
75.4 
48.3 
.53.5 
49.5 
48.0 
49.6 
52.8 


24.0 


1919 _. 


24.6 


1920 


51.7 


1921 


46.5 


1922 


50. 5 


1923 2 


52.0 


1924 2 . 


50.4 


1925 3 


47.2 







' No account is taken of changes in stocks. ^ Revised since last report. 3 Preliminary figures. 

Production of coal-tar crudes. — Data on the domestic production 
of crudes are collected either by the Tariff Commission or by the 
Geological Survey. Crudes distilled from tar at the by-product 
coke-oven plants are reported to the Geological Survey; those made 
by firms primarily engaged in the distillation of tar are reported to 
the Tariff Commission. 

Firms engaged primarily in distilling coal tar distilled 182,749,066 
gallons of tar in 1925 — slightly less (0.7 per cent) than the quantity 
distilled in 1924. Among the crudes made by tar distillation those 



16 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

showing relatively large increases were light oil, motor fuel, and 
xylene. Pyridine, refined tar, and crude anthracene were also made 
in increased quantity, although the 1925 output of crude anthracene 
was only a small fraction of the peak production in 1920, when it was 
used extensively in the manufacture of anthraquinone for dyes. 
The big drop since 1920 is due to the preparaton of anthraquinone 
synthetically from phthalic anhydride and benzene. It is not 
likely that anthracene will ever again be a raw material of importance 
in the dye industrJ^ 

Crude naphthalene, the production of which was 34,135,175 pounds, 
showed a slight decrease from 1924. There was also a large drop 
in imports in 1925, but the figures for the early months of 1926 
indicate heavier shipments in the current year. 

Table 6 (p. 18) gives the quantity of by-products obtained in 
coke-oven operations from 1923 to 1925, inclusive, together with the 
quantity and value of sales. 

Table 7 (p. 19) shows the production of crudes by firms engaged 
primaril}'- in the distillation of coal tar in 1925. 

Table 8 (p. 20) gives the total production from all sources of 
benzene, ''motor benzol," tolueie, solvent naphtha, and naphtha- 
lene in the United States from 1918 to 1925, inclusive. Benzene, 
motor benzol, and toluene were made in greatly increased quantities 
in 1925; the output of solvent naphtha and naphthalene in slightly 
increased quantities. 

Imports and exports of crudes. — Imports are given in Table 78 
(p. 205) and exports in table 80 (p. 217). 

Increase in use of creosote oil as a wood preservative. — The use of 
creosote or dead oil as a wood preservative for railway ties, tele- 
graph poles, and mine and construction timber is increasing each 
year. Expansion in the industry is not confined to the United 
States but is world-wide. In the domestic industry there has been 
a steady gain in the number of wood-treatment plants and in the 
quantity of wood treated. 

The rate at which our standing timber is being consumed — four 
and one-half times - as fast as it is replaced by growth — makes the 
conservation of our forest reserves a vital problem in our national 
economy. Wood preservation by chemical treatment is one of the 
means by which the annual drain of 22.4 billion cubic feet on our 
forests can be reduced. It is estimated that the ecjuivalent of more 
than 4,000,000,000 cubic feet is each year lost through decay alone 
and that about 50 per cent of such loss could be prevented through 
the use of wood preservatives. This would mean a saving of 1^ 
billion cubic feet a year, or more than 7 per cent of our total loss. 
Recent estimates by the Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of 
Agriculture, distribute decay losses in forests products as follows: 

Eatimated annual production needed to replace that lot<t through decay each year 

Tor cent i 

Lumber and dimension material 15 

Railroad ties 50 

Fencing 50 

Mine timbers 20 

Poles 50 

Piling 25 

' Quantity of wood treated and preservatives used in the United States in 1923, 1924, and 1925. Forest 
Service, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 



COAL-TAR CRUDES 17 

The increasing use of treated timber is largely due to the dissemi- 
nation of knowledge as to its economic advantages. Consumers are 
learning through experience that the application of creosote oil to 
wood insures increased life to the wood and reduces replacement 
costs. 

In 1924 over 268,000,000 cubic feet of wood were treated, an 
increase of nearly 20 per cent over the previous year. The consump- 
tion of preservatives by the 162 plants reporting in 1924 was as fol- 
lows: Creosote, 157,305,358 gallons, nearly one-half of which was 
imported; zinc chloride, 33,208,675 pounds, of which over 14,000,000 
pounds were in the fused or solid form and nearly 19,000,000 pounds 
in the form of a 50 per cent solution. In addition to these two pre- 
servatives 11,000,000 gallons of petroleum were used in a creosote 
mixture; about 1,200,000 gallons of paving oil, a mixture of creosote 
oil and water-gas tar; and 473,207 gallons of mercuric chloride, 
sodium fluoride, proprietary preparations, and other miscellaneous 
preservatives. 

The 1925 output of creosote oil was 43,667,848 gallons, valued at 
$5,751,875, an increase of 6 per cent over 1924. Imports in 1925 
were 84,868,568 gallons, valued at $10,973,491, as compared with 
89,687,632 gallons in 1924 and 64,199,636 gallons in 1923. About 
one-third of our consumption is therefore supplied by domestic pro- 
duction. The 1925 import of creosote oil was the greatest single 
coal-tar product imported, exceeding all others both in quantity and 
value. 

In view of the large quantity of coal tar burned as a fuel in the 
United States— approximately 330,000,000 gallons in 1925— the pos- 
sibility of increasing the output of creosote oil raises marketing prob- 
lems. Several factors are involved in increased production — for one 
thing the simultaneous manufacture of other products, chief of which 
is pitch. A market for these coproducts is essential if creosote oil is 
to be sold at a reasonable figure. At the existing price level, the dis- 
tillation of tar for creosote oil alone is not feasible. In Europe and 
Great Britain there is a good demand for hard pitch for briquettes; 
in the United States the principal demand is for a soft pitch for road 
building. The separation of creosote oil gives a hard pitch for which 
there is relatively little demand. If a greater domestic demand for 
hard pitch could be created, the output of creosote oil could be in- 
creased; a decrease in the quantity of pitch used for road building in 
the event of macadam roads being generally replaced by a hard 
cement surface, would, on the other hand, lead to a decrease in the 
quantity of tar distilled and consequently to a smaller production 
of creosote oil. 

The use of wood-tar creosotes for wood preservation is relatively 
insignificant, largely because of their lack of uniformity, limited out- 
put, and higher price. They do not promise to be preservative 
agents of any great commercial value. 



18 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEB SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



STATISTICS OF PRODUCTION 

Table 6. — Coal-tar by-products obtained from coke-o»en operations, 1923-1925 
[United States Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines] 



Product 



Production 



1923 
Tar ...gallons. 

Light oil and derivatives: 

Crude light oil do... 

Benzol — 

Crude do... 

Refined do... 

Motor benzol do 

Toluol- 
Crude.. do... 

Refined do. . . 

Solvent naphtha do».. 

Other light oil products.. .do... 



Naphthalene: 

Crude i)ounds. 

Refined do... 



1924 
Tar gallons.. 

Light oil and derivatives: 

Crude light oil do 

Benzol, crude and refined ' do 

Motor benzol ' do 

Toluol— 

Crude, _ do 

Refined do 

Solvent naphtha do 

Other light oils do 



Sales 



Quantity 



440, 907, 109 



I 135,647,175 

4, 503, 428 
12, 3(54, 043 
80, 467, 883 

37, 777 

2,847,517 

4, 162.178 

439, 253 



» 104, 822, 079 



11,872,007 
1,139,922 



13,011,929 



422, 074, 326 



Naphthalene: 

Crude pounds. 

Refined do... 



1925 « 
Tar gallons.. 

Light oil and derivatives: 

Crude light oil do 

Benzol, crude and refined. do 

Motor l)enzoI do 

Toluol- 
Crude do 

Refined. _ do 

Solvent naphtha do 

Other light oil products do 



Naphthalene: 

C rude. pounds. 

Refined. do... 



3 128, 956, 955 
18.135,025 
73,768,831 

234, 244 
2, 951, 187 
4, 474, 220 
1, 364, 528 



'100,928,035 



8, 378, 666 
13, 302 



8, 391, 968 



480, 059, 000 



« 146, 443, 000 
24, 128, 000 
8],470,aK) 

127,600 
5, 330, 000 
4, 744, 000 
2, 377, 000 



'118,176,600 



9, 124, 000 
38,000 



9, 162, 000 



211,739,469 



6, .139, 368 

4. 348, 400 
12,375,782 
80, 480, 326 

6,097 

2, 628, 686 

3, 399, 904 

198, 098 



109, 976, 661 



10,047,427 
1,198,206 



11,245,633 



209, 979, 999 



7, 840, 582 
17,740,608 
72,921,244 

245, 079 
2, 986, 423 
3, 884, 586 
1, 077, 842 



106, 696, 363 



7,891,116 
327, 957 



8,219,073 



253, 954, 000 



10, 202. 000 
22, 020, 000 
79, 983, 000 

46,800 
5, 055, 000 
4, 016, 000 
1,266,000 



122, 588, 800 



9, 195, 000 
208, 000 



9, 403, 000 



Value 



Total 



9, 250, 552 



683, 545 

768, 486 
3, 070, 751 
13,145,833 

978 

765, 052 

608, 084 

10, 605 



19,0.'53,334 



174, 216 
65, 483 



239, 699 



9, 623, 520 



652, 467 
3, 736, 656 
11,066,652 

51, 041 
718,641 
724, 874 

78, 934 



17, 029, 265 



116,305 
11,903 



128, 208 



12, 474, 000 



1,0.'J3,000 
4, 938, 000 
13,231,000 

10, 100 

1.31.3,000 

769, 000 

99, 000 



21,413,100 



S6, 300 
5, 100 



91, 400 



' Refined on the premises to make the derived products shown, 132,517,389 gallons. 

' Total gallons of derived products. 

3 Refined on the premises to make the derived products shown, 125, .580,743 gallons. 

< Revised since last report. 

5 Preliminary figures. 

« Refined on the premises to make the derived products shown, 142,340,000 gallons. 



COAL-TAK CRUDES 



19 



Table 7. — Production of coal-tar crudes, 1925, by firms not primarily engaged in 
the operation of coke-oven plants and gas houses 

[The numbers in the second column refer to the numbered alphabetical list of manufacturers given on p. 221 . 
An X indicates that the corresponding product w;is niade by a manufacturer who did not consent to the 
publication of his name in connection therewith. A blank in the third and fourth columns indicates 
that there was actual production of the corresponding article, but that the figures can not be published 
without revealing the output of individual firms] 





Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on 
p. 221). 


1925 


Name 


Quantity 


Value 


Unit 
value 


Total crudes 






$22,334,307 




Anthracene (crude, less than 30 


)50. 






per cent) _lbs.. 

Anthracene oil ealls.. 


141, 150, X 










15, 21. 42, 135, X 


741, 576 


171,005 


$0,231 


farbolic or middle oil do 


33, 45__. 




Dead or creosote oil ..do 

Extracted crude tar acids do 


15, 21, 33, 42, 45, 95, 117, 141, 150, 

163,181, X. X, X. 
15, 42, 95 


43, 667, 848 


5, 751, 875 


.132 


Light oil do.. . 


33, 45, 117, 141, X.. 


745,439 


91,003 


.122 


Motor fuel--. do .. 


42, 135 




Naphthalene (crude) lbs. . 

Other distillates galls.. 

P itch of tar tons . . 

Psuedo cumene galls.. 


14, 15, 33, 42, 45, 95, ll7, 150, 163, 
X, X. 

15,33,42,95,141,163, X. X 

15, 21, 33, 42, 45, 95, 117, 141, 150, 
163, X, X, X, X. 

15 


34, 135, 175 

7, 837, 946 
404, 109 


519, 773 

965, 998 
7, 888, 651 


.015 

.123 
19. 521 


Pyridine do 


15, 113 








Refined tar. bbls.. 

Solvent naphtha galls.. 


15, 21, 33, 45, 95, 117, 150, 163, X, 

X, X, X. 
15, 42, 150, X.-. 


843,511 
397,055 


5,119,316 
97, 176 


6.069 
.245 


Toluene do 


15 




Xylene do 


15 



















The instructions sent to manufacturers were as follows: Include under dead or creosote oil only products 
which may be used for creosoting. Include under "other distillates" shingle stain oils, disinfectant oils, 
and flotation oils which do not contain over 5 per cent of phenol. Include under refined tars those tars 
which are used for road treatment, saturating felt, and for protective coatings. Phenol and all distillates 
which, on being subjected to distillation, yield in the portion distilling below 100° C. a Quantity of tar acids 
equal to or more than 5 per cent of the original distillate, or which, on being subjected to distillation, yield 
in the portion distilling below 215' C. a quantity of tar acids equal to or more than 75 per cent of the original 
distillate are not to be included here but are to be placed under intermediates. 



20 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 8. — -Total commercial production of benzene, toluene, solvent yiaphtha, and 
naphthalene from all sources in the United States, 1918-1925 

[Data for coke ovens and gas works from reports to United States Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines; 
for tar refineries and others to United States Tariff Commission] 





By-product 

coke plants 

(sales) 1 


Gas works 
(sales) 1 


Tar refiner- 
ies and all 
other estab- 
lishments 
(produc- 
tion) 


Total com- 
mercial pro- 
duction - 


Benzene (all grades except motor benzoic : 
Gallons— 
1918 


43,441,980 
3 63,077,463 

17,2.30,770 
6, 839, 021 

12.256,348 

16,724,182 
6 17, 740, 608 
' 22, 020, 000 

$11,966,367 

3 11,643,645 

4. 497, 823 

1.611,721 

3.435,381 

3, 839, 237 

3, 736, 656 

'4,938,000 


2,177,168 
(') 

(0 
(*) 
(') 
(0 
(<) 

$572, 9,50 
(<) 
(') 
(<) 
(') 
{') 
i*) 
(*) 


3.015.848 

1.826,373 

875. 561 

2.171,631 

5 774. 940 

394.906 

629, 934 

741.576 

$994,161 
560, 547 
287, 586 
463. 205 

' 215, 136 
118,505 
155,973 
171,005 


48 634 9% 


1919 


3 65,403,836 


1920 


18,141,337 


1921 


9, 045, 642 


1922 


13,071,288 


1923 


17,154,088 


1924 


18,417,542 


1925 


22,811.576 


Value — 

19)8 

1919,.. 

1920 


$13, 533. 47,S 
12, 296, 192 
4, 794, 409 


1921 


2, 082. 926 


1922... 


3. 664, 517 


1923 


3, 968, 742 


1924. 


3,901,629 


1925_ 


5,120,005 


Motor benzol : 
Gallons— 

1918 




1919 (included under benzene above) . .. 






(') 
(') 
(«) 
(11) 
(11) 
ni) 

(11) 


(*) 


1920 

1921 

19?2 

1923 


9 55, 764, 265 

.50, 022, ,573 

54,930,203 

80, 480, 326 

6 72,921.244 

'79,983,000 


467, 126 
1" 350, 000 
(11) 
(*) 
(0 


(*) 
55,622,482 
83, 664, 846 


1924. 


76, 072, 771 


1925. 


83,8)4,223 


Value— 

1918 




1919 (included under benzene above) 






C) 
(») 
(*) 
(") 
(11) 
(11) 
(11) 

1,596.3.53 
510, 957 

(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 

$8,044.s<90 
2:55, 321 

(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 


(') 


1920 


'$12,644,931 

8. 966. 686 

10,491,309 

13, 145. Ki'i 

6 11,066,652 

'13,231.000 

8.541,366 

1,. 353, 827 

2. 470, 364 

835, 493 

1,910,060 

2, 634. 783 

03, 231., 502 

' 5, 102, 000 

$12, 249, 702 
355, 990 
740, 722 
233,378 
,557.015 
.766.030 
6 769. 682 
' 1, 323, 000 


$112,849 
1070,000 

(") 
(0 
(<) 
('} 

3,965,518 
(0 

10 2, 000 
i« 1,000 

(12) 

10 2. 000 
10 2, 000 
10 2, 000 

$5, 597. 353 
(') 
10300 
10 270 

(12) 

10570 
10500 
10500 


i") 


1921:.. . . 


(*) 


1922 


$10, 657, 074 


1923 


13,851.704 


1924 


11,678,665 


1925 


14, 060, 324 


Toluene, all grades: 
Oallons— 

1918 


14, 103, 237 


1919 


1, 884. 784 


1920 


(12) 


1921 


(12) 


1922 


(12) 


1923 .. . 


(12) 


1924 . .. 


(12) 


1925 


(12) 


Value— 

1918.. 


$20,891,945 


1919 


596,511 


1920. 


(12) 


1921 


(12) 


1922 


(12) 


1923... 


(12) 


1924 


(12) 


1925 


('«) 



I Sales instead of production are here given to avoid double counting between production of crude and 
pure grades, and because such of the product as used in the coke plant or gas works is not available for 
commercial use. 

3 Totals include estimates for firms not reporting, or actual figures for Items that can not be shown sepa- 
rately without disclosing individual returns. 
3 Includes motor benzol and 13,000 sallons of gasoline used in blending. 

* Reports incomplete. Esi imat e includt^d in total. 

' Revised figure, tn eliminate duplication through certain plants reporting both to the 'I'arill (l^ommis- 
sion and to the Geological Survey. 
6 Final figures, revised since la.st report. 
' Subject to revision. 

* Data not collected from tar refiners i)rior to 1922. 

' Includes 1,333,000 gallons of gasoline used in blending. 
10 Estimate. 

II Included in total, but can not be show n separately without disclosing individual returns. 

12 A certain quantity of toluene was produced at gas works and at tar refineries, but the figures can not 
be given without disclosing individual returns. 



COAL-TAR CRUDES 



21 



Table 8. — Total commercial production of benzene, toluene, solvent naphtha, and 
naphthalene from all sources in the United States, 1918-1925— Continued 



By-product 

coke plants 

(sales) 



Solvent naphtha, crude and refined, including 
xylene: 

(lallons— 

1918 

1919 

1920 - 

1921 

1922 

1923.. _ - -_ 

1924. 

1925 

Value— 

1918 

1919 ...J... 

1920 

1921. 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 i 

Naphthalene, all grades: ! 

Pounds— I 

1918 I 

1919 1 

1920 

1921 I 

1922 _- I 

1923 

1924 

1925 

Value — 

1918 

1919... 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924.. _ 

1925 



13 3,284,037 
» 3, 649, 066 
4, 695, 464 
2,881,656 
2, 861, 482 
3, 399, 904 
3, 884, 585 
M, 010, 000 

13 $458, 689 
1 '557,416 
851,048 
510, 509 
538, 512 
608, 084 
724, 874 
• 769, 000 



15,890,447 
6, 702. 040 

14, 448, 702 
1,983,523 
4, 887, 935 

11,245,033 
8, 219, 073 

'9,403,000 

$050, 229 
191, 364 
487, 974 
.59, 335 
131,252 
239, 709 
128, 208 
7 91,400 



Gas works 
(sales) 



1,442,267 

(*) 

{*) 
(") 
(') 
(') 
0) 

$191,475 
(*) 
W 

(") 
(*) 

w 
(') 



896, 080 

w 

1, 760, 293 
(') 
(') 
16 1, 452, 463 
{*) 
0) 



Tar refiner- 
ies and all 
other estab- 
lishments 
(produc- 
tion) 



1* 965. 458 

CO 

(") 

(") 
(') (") 

(») 

812, 378 

530, 833 

It $232,003 

0') 

(") 
(11) 

C) (>') 

(") 

153,941 
148, 801 



40, 138, 092 
12,612,203 
26,393,411 
16, 949, 464 
19, 323. 393 
41,453,002 
34, 683, 803 
34, 135, 175 



$14,282 


$1,281,440 


(') 


327, 201 


63, 449 


791,403 


(*) 


380, 167 


{') 


352, 957 


« 45, 981 


652, 148 


(') 


441,333 


w 


519, 773 



I Total eom- 
I mercial pro- 
! duction 



5, 691, 762 
4, 128, 747 
5, 384, 560 
3, 027, 4S8 
3, 680, 811 
4,041,497 
4, 781, 963 
4, 631, 833 

$882, 167 
672, ( 85 
994, 205 
644, £48 
773, S36 
800,(98 
896, 815 
935, 801 



56, 924, 619 
20,114,243 
42, 602, 466 
19, 432, i 87 
25,411,328 
54, 151, C98 
44, 102, 876 
44, 738, 175 

$1.94,5,951 
542, 565 
1,342,826 
402, 502 
53f-, 209 
937, 838 
602, 541 
626, 173 



* Reports incomplete. Estimate included in total. 

« Revised figure, to eliminate duplication through certain plants reporting both to the Tariff Commis- 
sion and to the (Jeological Survey. 

7 Subject to revision. 

11 Included in total, but can not be shown sepa'-ately without disclosing individual returns. 

13 Includes 52,847 gallons of xvlene, valued at $9,937, and 107,375 gallons of crude heavy solvent, valued 
at $8,7f,9. 

" Includes 192,909 gallons of xylene, valued at $67,935. 

i« Includes 23,088 gallons of xylene, valued at $4,563. 

18 Census of Manufactures, 1923. 

Coal-Tar Intermediates 



DESCRIPTION 

Intermediates do not occur as such in coal tar, but are made from 
the crudes (benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and anthracene) by- 
chemical treatment with sulphuric acid, nitric acid, alkalies, chlorine, 
or other chemicals. From fewer than 10 coal-tar crudes, 200 to 300 
intermediates are prepared for use in the production of hundreds of 
dyes. The various chemical stages in the conversion of crudes to 
intermediates are (1) nitration, (2) reduction, (3) sulphonation, (4) 
caustic fusion, (5) chlorination, (6) alkylation, (7) liming, (8) conden- 
sation, (9) carboxylation, (10) oxidation, and (11) diazotization. 

Intermediates are in turn the raw materials which are converted 
by complex chemical processes into dyes, medicinals, perfumes, 



22 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



flavors, photographic chemicals, synthetic resins, and tanning ma- 
terials. They are also used as accelerators in the vulcanization of 
rubber, as camphor substitutes, insecticides, germicides, fungicides, 
in the flotation process for concentrating ores and for other uses. 
Certain intermediates are used in the direct production of dyes on 
the fiber and also for increasing the fastness of dyes on the fiber. 
When used for the latter purpose they are known as "developers." 
After purification many intermediates are used directly as drugs, per- 
fumes, and flavors. 

The relation between the heavy chemical industry and the inter- 
mediate and dye industry is an intimate one, as the latter industry 
is an important consumer of heavy chemicals and other products. 
The manufacture of intermediates and dyes requires large quantities 
of acids, alkalies, and other heavy chemicals, such as sodium nitrite 
and sulphide, salt, chlorine, bromine, sulphur, and in addition non- 
coal-tar organic compounds, such as methanol, formaldehyde, and 
acetic anhydride. 

The coal-tar chemical industry plays a conspicuous part in the 
industrial life of the Nation, (1) as consumer of raw materials in the 
chemical industry, (2) as a producer of essential products for textile, 
leather, paper, and paint factories, and as a producer of medicinals, 
synthetic tanning materials, and a wide variety of other products. 

PRODUCTION 

The production of intermediates is given in Table 11 (p. 27), in 
as great detail as is possible without disclosing the output of indi- 
vidual manufacturers. The total production in 1925 was 210,699,779 
pounds, as compared with 186,596,562 pounds in 1924. Sales in 
1925 amounted to 86,066,651 pounds, valued at $19,756,200, or a 
unit value of 23 cents per pound as compared with 24 cents in the 
previous year. 

Among the intermediates showing a marked increase in produc- 
tion in 1925 were those normally consumed in large quantity in dye 
manufacture, anthraquinone derivatives used in vat and alizarin 
specialty dyes, synthetic phenol, and rubber accelerators. Notable 
progress was made in the output of specialty intermediates required 
for a variety of fast and specialty dyes. 

Large production of synthetic phenol. — The combined production 
of natural and synthetic phenol by seven firms in 1925 was 14,734,065 
pounds, a 40 per cent increase over 1924. More than three-fourths 
of this production was synthetic phenol. Sales in 1925 totaled 
8,524,178 pounds, valued ' at $1,771,332. Table 9 shows produc- 
tion and sales figures from 1917 to 1925, inclusive: 

Table 9. — Production and sales of phenol in the United States, 1917-1925 



Year 


Production, 
pounds 


Sales 


Unit 


Pounds ( Value 


value 


1917 


64,146,499 

106,794,277 

1, 543, 659 


..J 1 $2:3, 715, 805 


$0.37 


1918 


. J 137,270,284 


.35 


1919. 


1 155,624 


.10 


1920 






1921 




292,645 1 41,617 
1,266,552 268,311 
2,180,244 589,822 
8,273,598 2,505,533 
8,524,178 1 1,771,332 


.14 


1922 , 


1,285.978 
3,310,911 
10,521,944 
14, 734, 065 


.21 


1923 ... 


.27 


1924 


.30 


1925 


.21 







> Values for 1917-1919 are for production. 



COAL-TAE INTERMEDIATES 23 

Phenol is used chiefly in the manufacture of synthetic phenolic 
resins for automotive insulation material, molded plastics, and 
radio parts. It is also used in the preparation of other intermediates 
and for dyes and pharmaceuticals. Natural phenol is derived from 
coal-tar by extraction and purification; synthetic phenol is now 
made by treating benzene with sulphuric acid and converting the 
resulting benzene sulfonate into phenol by fusion with caustic soda. 
Prior to the war the domestic production of phenol was from tar; 
war demands soon led to the manufacture of synthetic phenol for 
explosives on an enormous scale. In the peak year, 1918, produc- 
tion exceeded 106,000,000 pounds. Following the signing of the 
armistice, the Government stocks of "carry over" phenol amounted 
to approximately 35,000,000 pounds, which was believed to be 
sufficient for a four-year supply. This estimate, based upon the 
normal pre-war consumption of about 9,000,000 pounds per year, 
proved altogether too low, owing to the unanticipated demand for 
phenol in the preparation of synthetic phenolic resins. Stocks were 
soon exhausted and there ensued a shortage which had to be sup- 
plied by imports, the domestic industry not being in a position to 
expand immediately by reason of having scrapped plants constructed 
during the war. (The present consumption of phenol is estimated 
at 12,000,000 pounds per year.) 

Under the protection afforded phenol by the act of 1922 (40 per 
cent ad valorem and 7 cents per pound) there has been a large in- 
crease in the output of both the natural and synthetic phenol. In 
1923 one of the phenolic resin manufacturers constructed a phenol 
plant and since that year other synthetic plants have commenced 
production. Although of higher manufacturing cost, synthetic 
phenol has been a factor of increasing importance in supplying our 
growing consumption. A new synthetic method of recent develop- 
ment holds promise of a reduced production cost. With continuous 
operation on a large scale and lower costs, it is possible that the 
synthetic product may eventually undersell the natural. 

Domestic tar, more than one-half of which is now consumed as 
fuel, offers a possible supply of phenol in ample quantities for our 
needs. Stripping off the tar acids reduces only slightly the fuel 
value of the tar. 

Aniline and its derivatives. — Of the finished intermediates, aniline 
ranks first in quantity and is second in value only to phenol. It is 
used in the preparation of dyes of almost every class, whether the 
classification be based on the method of application or on the 
chemical constitution of the dye. Indigo, Direct black E. W, and 
Acid black lOB — three of the domestic dyes produced in largest 
quantities — require aniline in their manufacture. Indigo was made 
on a larger scale than ever before in 1925 and was the leading dye ex- 
ported from the United States. Not only dyes, but rubber accelera- 
tors, medicinals, and a variety of other products require aniline. 

The 1925 production of aniline by seven manufacturers was 
24,989,301 pounds — a 12 per cent increase over 1924. Sales totaled 
13,320,136 pounds, with a value of $2,140,824. The average sales 
price per pound was 16 cents. Aniline hydrochloride, the output of 
which was 872,294 pounds, showed only a slight increase over the 
previous year. 

Dimethylaniline, one of the leading intermediates derived from 
aniline, is required in the preparation of such important basic dyes 

5919— 26t- 3 



24 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

as Methyl violet, Methylene blue B., and Malachite green. Produc- 
tion in 1925 was 2,417,625 pounds, as compared with 2,830,798 
pounds in 1924. Sales in 1925 amounted to 1,330,113 pounds, 
valued at $403,521. The average sales price of 30 cents per pound 
was a decline of 4 cents from the previous year. 

p-Nitroaniline, another intermediate derived from aniline, is used 
in the direct preparation of Para red on the fiber or on cloth and 
in making color lakes. Direct green B and G, and Chrome yellow R, 
and certain sulphur dyes. Production in 1925 was 1,565,917 pounds, 
an increase of over 62 per cent over the previous year. 

Cresylic acid. — This intermediate, extracted from tar acids, was 
made in much larger quantity in 1925 than in 1924. Production 
figures can not be published, however, as one firm manufactured 
the total output. 

Cresylic acid has extensive use in the manufacture of synthetic 
phenolic resins, disinfectants, antiseptics, and germicides. A minor 
use is for tricresyl phosphate — a substitute for camphor in making 
pyroxylin plastics. 

A possible new source of tar acids that is being watched with 
interest, particularly by manufacturers of disinfectants, is the low 
and medium temperature distillation of coal. This process yields 
about five times as great a quantity of tar acids as the high-tem- 
perature coking process. The low-temperature tar acids contain 
the higher boiling analogues of cresol and are of great germicidal 
value. They would probably not, however, serve the phenolic resin 
industry, which requires a pure grade of cresylic acid. 

Benzoic acid. — The production of benzoic acid, USP, in 1925 
was 183,906 pounds, as compared with 148,467 pounds in 1924. 
The unit sales price declined from 64 cents in 1924 to 58 cents in 
1925. Benzoate of soda, used chiefly as a food preservative, showed 
a decline in production of nearly 7 per cent as com^pared with 1924. 

Rubher accelerators. — Progress in this group of intermediates used 
in the vulcanization of rubber has for several years been notable. 
Their total consumption can not be accurately measured, as not all 
of them are used exclusively in the rubber trade; certain ones are 
consumed in the manufacture of dyes and other products. New 
accelerators, possessing technical and other advantages over the 
existing products, rapidly find a market and in the course of a year 
show a remarkable increase in production; others fall into disuse 
and record a decline. Intermediates in this group showing increased 
production in 1925 were: diphenylguanidine, with an increase of 
16.5 per cent; triphenylguanidiue, with a gain of nearly 15 per 
cent; and formanilide with a more than doubled output. Other 
products showing increases were ditolylguanidino, ditolylthiourea, 
mercapto-benzo-thiazol, heptylidine aniline and ethylidine aniline. 
Intermediates for which a decreased production was reported include 
thiocarbanilide, with a decline of 30 per cent; anhydroformaldehyde; 
and p-toluidine. Statistics of pi'oduction for organic rubber accel- 
erators of non-coal-tar origin are given in Table 32, page 144. 

Naphthalene intermediates. — Measured quantitively, the principal 
intermediate derived from naphthalene is b-naphthol. It is con- 
sumed in large quantities in the manufacture of other intermediates, 
in dyes, color lakes, and in conjunction with p-nitroaniline in the 
direct production of Para red on cotton fiber or cloth. The output 
in 1925 was 5,141,903 pounds, as compared with 3,745,690 pounds 



COAL-TAK IKTERMEDIATES _ 25 

in 1924. Sales in 1925 were 4,194,893 pounds, valued at $849,377, 
an average price per pound of 20 cents, which is a decline of 2 cents 
from the 1924 figure. 

H acid (l-amino-8-naphthol-3:6-disulfonic acid), one of the 
principal intermediates consumed in the manufacture of azo dyes, 
recorded an output of 2,273,439 pounds — a slight increase over 1924. 
The sales price per pound, however, was a decrease of 5 cents per 
pound from the previous year. 

Phthalic anhj^dride, an intermediate made bj^ the catalytic oxida- 
tion of naphthalene, estaldished a new production record in 1925, 
with a total by four firms of 3,900,332 pounds. This was an increase 
of nearly 40 per cent over 1924. Sales were 3,560,429 pounds, valued 
at $701,840 — a unit value of 20 cents per pound, which is a drop 
of 4 cents from the 1924 figure. Price recessions have been constant 
since 1917, when the average selling price was S4.23 per pound. 
Year by year it dropped, until in 1925 it averaged 20 cents per pound. 
In 1914, when our entire consumption was imported, the invoice 
value of imports was 24 cents per pound; this, hovv-ever, was below 
the selling price to the consumer, as it excluded the importer's 
profits and certain other charges. 

Phthalic anhydride is a key intermediate for dye manufacture in 
that it is a basic raw material for anthraquinone required in the 
manufacture of many vat dyes, and in alizarin and alizarin deriva- 
tives. It is used directly in the preparation of fluoresceins, cosines, 
and rhod amine dyes. 

Anthraquinone, as already pointed out, is the basis for a large 
variety of fast dyes known as the vat and the alizarin colors. When 
first produced in the United States, anthraquinone was made by 
the old process based on the oxidation of anthracene. The successful 
commercialization of phthalic anhydride from naphthalene, together 
with the development of synthetic anthraquinone from phthalic 
anhydride and benzene, has, however, led to the preparation of 
anthraquinone almost entirely by the synthetic process, so what was 
for several years after 1919 a problem in supplying an adequate 
amount of anthracene has been solved. In other words, the alizarin 
and anthraquinone vat dyes, formerly made exclusively from 
anthracene, are now made from naphthalene. The manufacture of 
refined anthracene in 1925 was only a small fraction of the output 
of previous years. The supply of naphthalene is ample, as it con- 
stitutes from 5 to 10 per cent of coal tar. Production figures for 
anthraquinone in 1925 can not be published. 

Closely related to anthraquinone is the intermediate methylanthra- 
quinone, made synthetically from toluene, phthalic anhydride, and 
aluminum chloride. It is used in the preparation of certain yellow 
and orange vat dyes. Production in 1925 showed a large increase. 

Special intermediates. — A feature of special significance in the 1925 
production of intermediates was the increase recorded in the output 
of a large number required in the manufacture of many fast and 
specialty dyes. These are used exclusively in the preparation of the 
more complex and higher cost- dyes which heretofore have not been 
made on a scale sufficient to meet consumption. The trend toward 
a greatly enlarged output of such intermediates as derivatives of 
anthraquinone, J acid, pyrazolone, and a variety of others used 
almost entirely in the preparation of dyes, is a distinct mark of 
progress in dye manufacture in the United States. 



26 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Naphthol AS (b-hydroxy naphthoic anilide) is used in conjunction 
with certain intermediates for the production of a variety of bright, 
fast shades on cotton. Many of them compete with the vat dyes. 
The 1925 production of naphthol AS was a conspicuous increase over 
1924. The average selhng price was a 12 per cent dechne from 1924. 

Diphenylamine, used as a stabilizer in the manufacture of smoke- 
less powder, recorded a large increase in production in 1925. 

Tricresyl phosphate, used as a substitute for camphor in the manu- 
facture of pyroxylin plastics, is another intermediate showing a 
greatly increased output in 1925. 

New intermediates. — Of the 308 intermediates made in 1925, 34 
were not manufactured in 1924. Most of the 34 were made for the 
first time in 1925. These intermediates are used largely in the 
preparation of new dyes; a few of them go into accelerators for the 
vulcanization of rubber, medicinals, and certain other finished 
coal-tar products. Halowax, a new synthetic wax, was reported 
for the first time in 1925. 

Table 10 gives the weighted average domestic sales price of a fist 
of coal-tar intermediates from 1919 to 1925, together with the invoice 
price in 1914. The invoice price is below the cost to the consumer, as 
t does not include the profit to the importer and certain other charges, 
i Table 1 1 is a detailed record of the production and sales of coal-tar 
intermediates in 1925. 

Table 12 is an arrangement of intermediates in 10 groups of unit 
values and shows the quantity and percentage of the total produc- 
tion falling within each group, for the years 1922 to 1925, inclusive. 

STATISTICS OF PRODUCTION AND SALES 

Table 10. — Domestic sales 'price per pound of coal-tar intermediates, 1919-192-5,^ * 
and invoice price of same intermediates imported, 1914 



Intermediate 


Invoice 
p rice 




Domestic sales price 








1914 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 




2 $0. 15 

2.23 


$0.41 


$0.42 
1.23 
3.10 
1.81 

.28 
1.66 
1.15 

.10 


$0. 23 
.95 
2.10 
1.39 
.22 
1.59 
.85 
.08 


$0.21 
.73 
1.72 
1.10 
.15 
1.34 
.83 
.07 


$0.26 
.68 
1.51 
1.13 
.16 
.95 
.80 
.07 
3.69 
.15 
.48 
.38 

.06 
.22 

.40 
.69 
.27 
1.32 
.29 
.17 
.25 
.13 
.93 
.43 


$0.23 
.65 
1.18 
1.11 
.16 
.95 
.74 
.06 
3.34 
.16 
.40 
.34 

.05 
.22 
1.00 

.43 
.64 
.30 
1.27 
.24 
.17 
.23 
.13 
.86 
.39 


$0.22 


l-Araino-8-naphthol-3:6-disulfonicaeid (11 acid).. 
2-Amino-8-naphthol-6-sulfoDicacid (gamma acid). 


1.30 


p-AminophenoI and hydrochloride 


2.16 

2.08 

2.19 

2.313.55 
2.09 
2.40 
3.09 


"'."24" 
1.86 
1.26 
.15 
4.54 
.07 
.88 
.55 

.07 
.49 
1.83 

.62 

"".10' 
2.43 
.99 
.24 
.35 
.50 
1.15 
.54 


1.12 


Aniline oil . - - . 


.16 


Anthraquinone. _ . - . 






.72 




.06 


Dianisidine 




p-Dichlorobenzene. . 


.09 
1.36 
.71 

.08 
.47 
1.41 

.42 
1.17 

'".'46' 
.36 
.41 
.29 
1.20 
.47 


.16 
.97 
.54 

.06 
.39 
1.22 

.44 
.85 
.14 

1.70 
.39 
.24 
.42 
.25 

1.14 
.49 


.16 

"."32" 

.06 
.24 
.96 

.39 
.68 
.21 
1.39 
.35 
.19 
.27 
.18 
.94 
.33 


. 16 


Diethylaniline . 




Dimethylaniline - - - _ - - 


3.15 

3.018 
2. 07 3. 09 


.30 


Naphthalene, solidifying 79° or above (refined, 
flake) 


.05 


b-Naphthol, technical 

1-Naphthol-i-siilfonic acid (Nevile & Winther's) 


.20 


l-Naphthylamine-4-sulfonic acid (naphthionic 
acid) . 






p-Nitroaniline . -- . 


2. 13 3. 14 

.06 

'. 31 3. 44 

2.25 

2. 06 3. 16 




Phenol.- - 


.21 


p-Phenylenediamine -. 

Phthalic acid and anhydride - - 


1.16 
.20 


Sulfanilic acid __ _. _ 


.16 
.23 


o-ToIuidine -- 


2.09 3.10 
2.19 
3.12. 


.17 


m-Tolylenediamine 


.81 


Xylidinc and salt 









1 For the yf^ars 1919 and 1920 the value represents the weighted average of the total production; and for 
the years 1920-1925 the weighted average of the total sales. , 

2 Artificial Dyestuffs Used in the United States, Special Agents Series 121, Department of Commerce. 

3 Chemicals and Allied Products Used in the United States, Miscellaneous Series No. 82, Department 
of Commerce. 

* Figures for 1917 and 1918 were published in Census of Dyes and Other Synthetic Organic Chemicals, 
1924. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



27 



Table 11. — Production and sales of coal-tar intermediates, 1925 

The numbers in the second column refer to the numbered alphabetical list of manufacturers printed on 
page 221. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification 
number in connection with the designated product. A blank in the third and fourth columns indicates 
that the sales figures can not be published without revealing information in regard to the output of indi- 
vidual firms. A blank in the si.xth column indicates that the production of the corresponding product 
in the United States can not be published without revealing information in regard to the output of 
individual firms. The figures thus concealed are, however, included in the total] 





Manufac t u r e r ' s 
identification 
number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 
221) 


Sales 




Intermediate 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Total 
production 


Total . 




Pounds 
86, 066, 651 


$19, 756, 200 


$0.23 


Pounds 
210, 699, 779 


Acetaldehyde aniline 


X. 






9, 36, 53, 105, 150 












9. 53, 75, 114, 119, 

150. 
36, 53 .. 








56, 457 


noacetaiiilide). 
Acet vl-p-toluidine 












114 










b-Amino anthraquinone 


26, 53, X 












9, 31, 36, 53, 54, 79, 

114. 
114 








108, 668 


Aminoazobenzene disulfonic acid 










Aminoazobenzene sulfonate, sodium 


53 * 










salt. 
Aminoazotoluene. .- 


31, 36, 53, 54, 79, 

114, 116, 138. 
114 








80, 576 


Aminoazo.xylene 










p-Aminobenzoic acid 


53, 149, X 








17, 433 


Aminobenzoyl J acid 


53 










m-Aminocresol methyl ether 


36, 114 










p-Aminodimethylaniline 


73 








Aminodiphenylamine sulfonic acid 


180 










l-Amino-2-methylanthraquinone 

l-Amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid... 

l-Amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid 


X 










31, 36, 53, 75, 114, 

116, 128. 
36, 114, 119 









531, 928 








49, 863 


1- Amino-8-n a p h t h o I-2:4-disulfonic 


36, 53, 114, 119 








97,997 


acid (Chicago acid). 
l-Amino-S-n a p h t h o l-3:6-disulfonic 


53, 108, 114, 119 








2, 273, 439 


acid (H acid). 
2-Amino-5-naphthol-7-sulfonic acid 


36,53,114,116,119, 

X. 
36, 53, 114, 116, 119. 

119 X 








212.330 


(J -acid). 








320, 471 


(gamma acid). 
2-Amino-8-naphthol-3 : 6-disulf o n i c 

acid. 
o-Aminophenol 










71, 176, 180, X 








21, 826 


o-Aminopheuol-p-sulfonic acid 

p-Aminophenol and hydrochloride. .. 


53, 114, 180 










10, 53, 58, 71, 176, 

180, 185. 
119 


103, 400 


115,301 


1.12 


177,472 


acid (nerol acid). 
p-Aminophenyl-p-tolylamine s u 1 - 
fonlc acid. 


36 










8,9,36,53,75, 119. 
53 








47, 574 


Anhydroformaldehyde-p-toluidine. . . 










114, X 












27, 74, 79 








872, 294 


Aniline oil 


27, 53, 74, 105, HI, 

114, 115. 
79, 115, 134 


13,320,136 


2, 140, 824 


.10 


24,989,301 


Aniline sulfate 




o-Anisidine 


119, 180 












114 










Anthracene, refined (100 per cent).._ 


53 










52 111 










acid). 
Anthraquinone (100 per cent) 

Anthraquinone-2;l-acridone 


17, 53, 91, 114, 119, 

166. 
X 


















Anthraquinone-1 :5-dihydroxy (an- 

Ihrarufin). 
Anthraquinone-1 : 5-disulfonie acid.. 
Anthraquinone-2-sodium sulfonate 

(silver salt). 
Benzaldehyde 


75 114 










53 114 










17 53 119 










67, 103, 105, 124, 

148. 
53, 119 .. 


214, 637 


151, 348 


.71 


284, 658 






Benzidine base and salt 


3, 8, 31, 36, 53, 67, 
75, 114, X. 


257, 078 


184.291 


.72 


1, 182, 338 









28 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

TabIjE 11. — -Production and sales of coal-tar intermediates, 1925 — Continued 





Manufacturer's 
identification 
number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 
221) 


Sales 




Intermediate 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Total 
production 


Benzidine disulfonie acid 


Pounds 
69 ^ - 






Pounds 


Benzoate of soda 


53. 67, 82, 103, 124, 

149, X. 
105, 124 


865, 173 


$434, 602 


$0. 50 


800, 841 


Benzoic acid, tech.- . . . 




Benzoic acid, U S P . . 


53, 82, 103, 149, X.J 80,039 
124 


46, 257 


.58 


183,906 


Benzotrichloride . 


Benzovlbenzoic acid 


91, 114 








Benzoyl chloride 


16,82,103 








Benzyl chloride 


105, 124, 148, X 






573, 224 


Benzylamine.- 


115 








Broenner's acid (see 2-naphthyla- 

mine-6-sulfonic acid) . 
Carbazole, refined (100 per cent) 


53 










Chloroacetophenone 


58 




1 




p-Chloro-o-aminophenol- 


180 




1 




Chloramine T, tech . . . 


X 




j 




o-Chloroauilirie sulfonic acid . . . . 


180 




1 




p-Chloroaniline sulfonic acid . . . 


180 




1 




o-Chlorobenzaldehyde 


114 










Chlorohenzanth rone 


53 


• 








Chlorobenzene (mono) 


52,82,111,148 

114 


5, 903, 120 


322, 394 


.06 


8,687,989 


o-Chlorometauilic acid 


p-Chlorometanilic acid 


116 










6 - Chloro - 4 - mcthoxy - 3 - hydroxy 


X 










thionaphthalene 
Chromotropic aci d (see 1 :8 d ihydroxy 

naphthalene-3:6-disulfonic acid). 
Chloro-p-nitroaniline _ 


151, X 












53 .... 










acid. 
C hloro-m-phenylenediamine 


116 










Chloropyrazoloce-p-sulfonic acid 


53 










o-Chlorotoluene . 


114 










2-Chloro-5-toluidine-4-sulfonic acid 


8, 53, 104, 150, 153 












15 










Cresotinic acid ...... .. . 


81 










Cresvlic acid, refined (distillates 


15 










yielding below 215° C. tar adds 
equal to more than 75 per cent of 
the original distillate.) 
Cumidinc . ... 


114, X 










Dehvdrothio-p-toluidine, base. 


119 










Dehydrothio-p-toluidine sulfonic 


36, 59, 69, 119 . 

U'J 








50, 145 


acid. 
Dehydrothio-m-xylidine 










Diaminochlorobenzene -p-sulfonic 


116 










acid 
Diaminodimethyl acridine 


134 










Diaminostilbene disulfonie acid 


53, 59, 114, 119 








135, 581 


Dianisidine . . . 


36,53,114,119 








74, 154 


l-Diazo-2-naphthol-4-sulfomc acid 


31,36,114,116,128.. 








124, 892 


Diazo salicylic acid 


114 










Dibenzanthrone 


119 










Dibenzylaniline 


63 










Dichloroaniline 


36, 176, 180, X . . 










Dichloroaniline sulfonic acid . . . . 


116, 134 










o-Dichlorobenzene 


Ill 










p-Dichlorobenzcne 


52, 53, 82, 111, 119, 

120, 148. 
134 


1, 992, 253 


325, 887 


.16 


1, 988, 733 


Dichlorophenvlhydrazine sulfonic 




acid. 


48 










Dichlorosulfophenj'lpv; azolone 


3C, 116 










Dichlorosulfophenylmethylpyrazo- 

lone. 
Diolhvlamine 


134 










1, 125, 184 












125 










Dipthy)-m-aniinophenol 


48, 53 . 










Diethylaniline 


184 












53 










Diethyl-o-toluidino 


184 










Diforrayl-m-to!ylenediamine 


36, X 












X 










acid. 
5:5-Dihvdroxv-7:7-disu!fonic-2:2-di- 


53 










naphthylamine (Rhoduline acid). 













COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 29 

Table 11. — Production and sales of coal-tar intermediates, 1925 — Continued 



. 


Manufact u r e r ' s 
identification 
number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 
221) 


Sales 


• 


Intermediate 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Total 
production 


5;5-Dihydroxy-7:7-disulforiic-2:2-di- 
naphthyl urea (J acid urea). 

l:5-Dihydroxynaphthalene 

1 :8 - Dihydroxynaplithalene - 3:6 - di- 
siilfonic acid (chromotropic acid). 

Dimethvlaniline - 


53, 114, 119 


Pounds 






Pounds 


53, 75 










108,114,119 










9, 27, 53, 74, 114.... 
53 


1. .330, 113 


$403, 521 


$0.30 


2, 417, 625 






Dimethylphenazine (tolaziue) 

Dimethyl phenylbenzylammonium 

disulfonic acid, calcium salt (Leu- 

kotrope W). 
2:2 - Dinaphthylamino - 5:5 - dihy- 

droxy-7:7-disulfonic acid (I acid 

Imid). 


114 










X 










114 










75 












9, 53, 104 






■" 






114 










Dinitrobenzene . . . . 


27, 53, 114 . 








1, 606, 518 


Diiiitrochlorobenzene .. 


53, 75, 91, 114, X... 
36, 75 


893, 264 


124, 689 


.14 


7, 145, 798 


Dinitrohydrosydiphenylamine 




17, 119 










Dinitrophenol and sodium salt 


53, 75, 91, X 








33, 380 




53 








p-Dinitrostilbene disulfonic acid 


36, 69 










53, 54, 70, 74, 79, 

114, X. 
36 






















53 










Diphenylguanidine ._- . 


51, 53, 114, 143, X.. 
114 


i, 201, 827 


1.129.482 


.94 


1, 204, 780 










114 


1 








115 










o-Ditolylguanidine 


53 










114 












53, 73 










6-Ethoxy-3-hydroxy thionaphtha- 
lene. 


X 










X 












53 










Ethylaniline (mono) 


34, 53, 114, 184 








93, 746 


Ethylbenzylaniline_- 


34,53, 114, 184 

34, 36, 114 


69, 691 


71,884 


1.03 


188, 526 






Ethylbenzylaniline disulfonic acid... 


48, 53 










184 












53 










E thyl-o-toluidine-p-sulfonic acid 


53 










115, 143 












79 










Formaldehyde- p-aminoaniline 

Formanilide (anhydroformaldehyde 
aniline). 


73 










53, 143, 150, X 

114 


112, 275 


40, 325 


.36 


187, 678 


Gamma acid. (See 2-animo-8-naph- 
thol-6-sulfonic acid.) 


36 










n acid. (See l-amino-8-naphthol- 
3 : 6-disulfonic acid.) 


X 












115 












X 












36, 53 










b-IIydroxy naphthoic anilide (naph- 

thol AS). 
p-Hydroxy phenyl arsonic acid and 

sodium salt. 
m- tlydroxyphenyl-o-toluidine 


53 114 










102 










X 










39 












8 










J acid. (See 2-amino-5-naphthol- 

7-sulfonic acid.) 
Laurent's acid. (See 1-naphthyla- 

mine-5-sulfonic acid.) 


115 . 












114 












114 - . 










Mercapto-benzo-thiazol 


X 












30 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 11. — Production and sales of coal-tar intermediates, 1925 — Continued 



• 


Manufact u r e r ' s 
identification 
number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 
221) 


Sales 




Intermediate 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Total 
production 




36, 53, 75, 79, 114, 

116. 
X 


Pounds 






Pounds 
430, 042 


Methoxy amino azo benzene sulfo- 
nate, sodium salt. 

Methyl-a-aminoanthraquinone 

Methyl aniline sulfonic acid 










75 










69 










b-Methyl anthracjuinone 


91 












53 












X 










Methylhydroxynitrobenzoate 


X 










Michler's hydrol. (See tetramethyl- 

dianinobenzhydrol.) 
Michler's ketone. (See tetramethyl- 

diaminobenzDphenone.) 
Naphthalene, solidifying 79° C. or 

above (refined, flake). 

1 : 5-Naphthalene disulfonic acid 

2 : 7-Naphthalene disulfonic acid 

Naphtho-1 : 8-sultam-2 : 4-disulfonic 

acid. 
a-Naphthol - .. - 


15, 27, 119, 181 








17, 580, 683 


53, 114, 119. .. 










53, 150 










53 










9,31,36,53,79,114, 

165, X. 

27,36,79, 150 

3, 31, 36, 53, 114, 

119. 
36,53,108,114, 116, 

119. 
119 


14, 430 
4, 194, 893 


$9, 352 
849, 377 


$0.65 
.20 


187, 458 


b-Naphthol, tech 


5,141,903 


l-Naphthol-4-sulfonic acid (Nevile & 
Winther's acid). 


208, 441 








72,950 


l-Naphthol-3 : 8-disulfonic acid 










l-Naphthol-8-chloro-3 : 6-disuIfonic 

acid (chloro H acid), 
l-Naphthol-3 : 6 : 8-trisulfonic acid... 


114 










31, 114, 119 










53. -. 










2-Naphthol-6-sulfonic acid (Schaef- 
fer's acid). 


8, 31, 36, 53, 54, 75, 

114, 150. 
36, 53, 150 . 








77, 957 


25,425 


42, 912 


1.69 






36, X 




2-Naphthol-3 : 6-disulfonic acid 

2-Naphthol-6 : 8-disulfonic acid 


3, 27, 31, 36, 53, 75, 
114,119,150,151, 
178, X. 

31, 36, 53, 79, 114... 

15, 119 


117,586 
84, 106 


51,242 
37, 448 


.44 
.45 


510, 082 
326, 275 


b-Naphthylamine . . .. 


36. 53, 114 - 








562, 631 


l-Naphthylaminc-4-sulfonic acid 


9, 31, 36, 79, 114, 

119, X. 
31, 53, 75, 114, 116, 

119, X. 
X 








1, 180, 218 


(naphthionic acid). 
l-Naphthylamine-5-sulfonic acid 

(Laurent's acid). 

l-Naphthylamine-6-sulfonic acid 

l-Naphthylamine-6 and 7-sulfonic 

acid. 

l-Naphthylamine-8-sulfonic acid 

l-Naphthylamine-3:6-disulfonic acid. 
l-Naphthylamine-S:8-disulfonic acid. 
l-Naphthylamine-4:8-disulfonic acid. 
l-Naphthylamine-3:6:8-trisulfonic 

acid. 

2-Naphthylamino-l-sulfonic acid 

2-Naphthvlamine - 6 - sulfonic acid 








123,515 










36, .53, 114, 119. 








175, 131 


53, 75, 114, 116, X . 








277, 367 


75 










36 53 119 










36 h?i 114, 119 








214, 392 


53, 108, 114, 119 








2, 746, 183 


8,36, 53, 56, 150, X. 
8 36, 53, 114 


197, 197 


164,060 


.83 


296, 857 
32, 535 


(Broenner's acid). 
2-Naphthylamine4:8-disulfonic acid. 
2-Naphthylaminp-5:7-disulfonic acid. 
2-Naphthylamine-6:8-disulfonic acid. 

2-Naphthylamine-3 : 6 : 8-trisulfonic 


36 53, 119 








31,582 


36,53,114, 116, 119- 
31,36, .53, 114, 116, 

119. 
X 








357,949 








610,087 










acid. 
Nevile & Winther's acid. (See 1- 
Naphthol-4-sulfonic acid.) 


36 150 












54, 75, 116 










p-Nitro-o-aminophenol 

m-Nitroaniline . 


36 










9 53 176 












9, 69, 150, X 








1,565,917 


o-Nitroaniline-p-sulfonic acid 


180 










p-Nitroaniline-o-sulfonic acid 


8, 36, 53, 75, 150, 180 
36, .53, 111, 119, X. 
53 


8,649 


7,405 


.86 


25,472 
225, 104 












m-Nitrobenzaldehyde ..- 


114 











COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 31 

Table 11. — Production and sales of coal-tar intermediates, 1925 — Continued 





Manufact u r e r ' s 
identificat i on 
number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 
221) 


Sales 




Intermediate 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Total 
production 


Nitrobenzene (oil of mirbane) 

Nitrobenzene sulfonic acid 


27,74,114,115,119. 
69 


Pounds 
2, 898, 024 


$268, 264 


$0.09 


Po unds 
31,264,543 


Nitrohenzene-ni-sulfonic acid . . 


53 










p-Nitrobenzoic acid, sodium salt 


1, 53, 149 










o-Nitrochlorohenzene_ 


53. Ill 










o-Nitrochloro benzene sulfonic acid-. 


114 










p-Nitrochlorobcnzene 


.•^3, 69, 111, 114 










p-Nitrochlorobenzene-o-sulfonic acid . 


36, 53 










m-Nitro-p-oresol 


36 










8-Nitro-I-dirtzo-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic 


30,75 










acid. 
p-Nitrodichlorobenzene -- 


180 










3-Nitro4-livdroxyphenyl arsenic acid 


102, X 










Nitrouaphthalene - 


15, 119 










o-Nitrophenol 


176, 180, X 










p-Nitrophenol --- 


53, 111, 176 










Nitrosobetanaphthol 


128 










Nitrosodimethylaniline. - - -- 


27, 39, 75, 91, 114, 

119, 185. 
114 








120,669 


p-Nitrosodimethylaniline 










17, 53, 58, X, X 








117 558 




10, 36 










Nitrosulfoanthraufin - 


114 










Nitrotoluene 


53, 54, 79, 114, 119, 

X. 
74, 119 








5,574,193 


m-Nitrotoluene 








o-Nitrotoluene 


53, 70, 74, 114, 119, 

X. 
53,70,74, 114, 119, 

X. 
X 








3, 336, 648 
1, 748, 991 


p-Nitrotoluene 


81.423 


26,477 


.33 




p-Nitrotoluene-o-sulfonic acid 


36, 53, 70, 114, 116, 
119,180. 

36, 53, 150, X 

36, 53 








684,486 
259,749 


m-Nitro-p-toluidine . 


229, 232 


421, 753 


1.84 


p-Nitro-o-toluidinc 


Nitroxylene 


53,119 










Oxalylarsanilic acid 


X 




. 






Oxalyl-m-phenylenediamine 


53... 










Oxalyl-p-phenylenediamine - . _ 


,53 










Phenazinc 


,30 










Phenol 


15, 52, 53, 111, 132, 

155, X. 
53, 114 


8, 524, 178 


1,771,332 


.21 


14,734,065 


Phenyl-2-amino-5-naphthol-7-sul- 


fonic acid (phenyl J acid). 
Phenyl-2-amino-8-naphthol-6-sul- 


53 










lonic acid (phenyl gamma acid). 
Phenyl-a-naphthy lamine .- 


53. 










Phcnyl-l-naphthvlamine-8-sulfonic 


53, 75, 114, 116, X-. 
116 








227, 052 


acid. 
Phenyl pyrazolone 










m-Pheny!enediamine 


9,27,31,30,53,75, 
79, 114, 116, 119, 
128, 176. 

36 


14, 100 


12,443 


.88 


780,074 


m-Phenylenediamine sulfonic acid... 


p-Phenylenediamine 


71, 100, 150, X 

52, 53, 114 


317, 272 


369, 375 


1.16 


360,381 


Phenylslycine, sodium salt. 




Phenylhydrazine - . . 


69,134,162 










Phenylhydrazine-p-sulfonie acid 


27, 53, 114, 134 








140,396 


Phenylmethylpvrazolone 


69, 134 










Phenylmethylpyrazolone sulfonic 


134 










acid. 
Phenylmethylpyrazolone-p-sulfonic 


53 










acid 
Phthalic acid and anhydride... . . 


53, 111, 114, 147.... 
27, 53, 114 


3,560,429 


701.840 


.20 


3,900,332 


Picramic acid 




Primuline, base 


30, 114, 119, 131.... 










Quinaldine 

Quinazarin 

Resorcinol, tech 

Resorcinol, U S P 

Rosaniline... 


114 










9, X 










132, X 










48, 132, X 








45, 952 


79 










Salicvlic acid, tech.. 


52,81, 107 *.... 






2, 563, 102 


Salicylic acid, U S P 


,52,81,107, 111 

27, 31, 36, .53. 79, 

99, 114, 134, 170. 

X 


1,222,913 
169, 149 


375, 404 
26, 981 


.31 
.16 


2, 510, 876 


SulfaniJic acid... . 


1,407,470 


Sulfoaminobenzoic acid 





5919—261- 



32 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 11. — Production and sales of coal-tar intermediates, 1926 — Continued 





Manufact u r e r ' s 
identification 
number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 
221) 


Sales 




Intermediate 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Total 
production 


o-Sulfo-benzoio acid 


84 


Pounds 




Pounds 


o-Sulfo-benzoic acid, ammonium salt. 


84 








o-Sulio-benzoic acid, chloride .. 


84 








p-Su!fodichlorophenylmethylpyraz o - 


X 






1 


lone. 
Sul fo-phenvl-pyrazoione 


116 









Tetraaminoditolvlmethane 


53,134..... 


:::::::::::::::::: ': 




Tetrachlorofluorescin 


79. 








Tetrachlorophthalic anhydride 


48. 








Tetramethyldiaminobenzhydrol 


53 








(Michler's hydrol). 
Tetramethyldiaminobenzophenone 


53 










(Michler's ketone). 
Tetramethyldiaminodiphonylmeth- 


53, 75, 97, 114, X... 








499, 430 


ane. 
Thiocarbanilide.- 


53, 73, 114, 115, X.. 
36, 53, 114, 119 


1,898,996 


$438, 230 


$0.23 


2,352,006 
132, 988 


Tolidine and salts 




o-Toluene Sulfamide 


X 








p-To!uene sulfamide_. 


X 










p-Toluene sulfochloride. 


Ill 










p-Tolucnesulfonyl ethyl ester 


114 










Toluidine.- 


74, 114 










m-Toluidine 


53. 










o-Toluidine 


36, 53, 70, 74, 114, 

119, X. 
S3, 70, 74, 114, 119, 

X. 
53 . . . 


785,616 
220, 227 


135, 511 

125, 810 


.17 

.57 


2.031,899 


p-Toluidine 


941,927 


p-Toluidine-m-sulfonic acid 




O-Toluidine sulfonic acid_ 


63,79,114 








82,658 


p-Toliiidine-o-sulfonic acid 


9,36, 116 








Tolyl-l-naphthylamine-8-sulfonlc 


114, X 






! 


acid (tolyl-peri acid). 
m-Tolylenediamine .. . 


8, 9, 31, 36, 53, 54, 

75, 79, 114, 119. 

64 


180, 717 


145, 809 


.81 


770, 265 


p-Tolylenediamine 




m-Tolvlenediamine sulfonic acid 


114 






1 


Tricresylphosphate 


30 






1 


Triphenvlfiuanidine... 


53,114,115,143, X. 
53,114, 119_ 


390, 596 


254, 898 


.65 494,136 


Xylidine and salt. 




Zinc dithiobenzoate 


115 
















1 



Table 12. — Production of inter mediates, by groups, according to unit values, 

1922-1925 





1922 


1923 




1924 




1925 


Group 




















Pounds 


Per cent 
of total 


Pounds 


Per cent 
of total 


Pounds 


Per cent 
of total 


Pounds 


Per cent 
of total 


0-15 cents 


94, 688, 278 


57. 372 


104, 419, 268 


45. 127 


88, 160, 641 


47. 247 


89, 886, 885 


42. 566 


16-25 cents... 


26, 233, 604 


15. 894 


50, 233, 638 


21. 709 


37, 359, 904 


20. 022 


62, 801, 070 


29.806 


26-50 cents... 


24, 399, 085 


14. 783 


42, 656, 640 


18. 391 


37, 179, 993 


19. 925 


32,081,452 


15. 226 


51-75 cents... 


8, 289, 387 


5.022 


16, 486, 159 


7.125 


10, 588, 270 


6. 674 


13, 442, 218 


6.380 


$0.76-$l 


5, 918, 904 


3.586 


9,604,153 


4.176 


6, 246, 565 


3.348 


5,787,165 


2.747 


$1.01-$1.60.... 


3,957,355 


2.398 


5, 587, 436 


2.415 


4,112,686 


2.204 


3, 632, 570 


1.724 


$1.51-$2 


568, 339 


.344 


914, 837 


.395 


968, 676 


.519 


1,614,041 


.766 


$2.01-$3 


721,637 


.437 


951, 521 


.411 


1, 407, 047 


.754 


994, 224 


.472 


$3.01-$4 


197, 071 


.119 


136, 302 


.059 


303,938 


.163 


111,432 


.053 


Over $4 


74, 495 


.045 


443, 927 


.192 


268,943 


.144 


548, 722 


.260 


Total.. 


165,048,155 


100 


231, 393, 871 


100 


186,596,562 


100 


210, 699, 779 


100 



census of dyes and other synthetic chemicals 33 
Dyes and Other Finished Coal-tar Products 
introduction 

Finished coal-tar products may be divided into eight classes: 
(1) Dyes, (2) color lakes, (3) photographic chemicals (developers), 
(4) medicinals, (5) flavors, (6) perfume materials, (7) synthetic 
phenolic resins, (8) synthetic tanning materials. In previous reports 
the Tariff Commission has emphasized the close relationship exist- 
ing between the manufacture of explosives, poisonous gases, and 
dyes. The dye industry is now considered a key industry by the 
industrial nations of the world. Closely connected also with dyes 
is the manufacture of flavors, perfume materials, photographic 
chemicals, medicinals, and other coal-tar products, which, although 
produced in smaller quantities, use as raw materials many of the 
.by-products obtained in the manufacture of coal-tar dyes. 

The total production of dyes and other finished coal-tar products 
in 1925 by 151 firms was 120,554,228 pounds, as compared with 
97,730,211 pounds by 153 firms in 1924. Sales in 1925 amounted 
to 112,671,779 pounds, valued at $60,811,400, an increase over the 
previous year, when they totaled 93,636,109 pounds, with a value 
of $55,932,580. 

Table 24 (p. 60) shows the 1925 production of dyes and other 
finished products in as great detail as is possible without revealing 
the output of individual manufacturers. 

SUMMARY OF PRODUCTION OF DYES 

Increase in Production 

The output of dyes in 1925 by 75 firms was 86,345,438 pounds — 
nearly a 25 per cent increase over 1924. Sales totaled 79,803,451 
pounds, valued at $37,468,332, as compared with 64,961,433 pounds, 
valued at $35,012,400 for 1924. The increased production is due 
in large part to improvements in the export demand, especially for 
indigo and sulphur black. In fact, the increased output of these 
two dyes accounts for about 80 per cent of the total increase in 
all dj^es. 

The outstanding features for the year were (1) continued price 
recessions resulting largely from severe competition among domestic 
manufacturers; (2) conspicuous progress in the manufacture of fast 
and specialty dyes; (3) competition from foreign dyes as shown by 
increased imports (a 72 per cent increase by quantity and 59 per 
cent by value), more particularly the higher cost types since the 
tariff reduction of 15 per cent on September 21, 1924; (4) increased 
dye exports amounting to 61 per cent by quantity and 19 per cent 
by value over 1924; (5) reduction in number of manufacturers. 
Table 13 shows the quantity of coal-tar dyes produced in the United 
States in 1914 and in postwar years, and the quantity and value of 
sales in those years. 



34 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 13. — Domestic jiroduction and sales of coal-tar dyes, 1914 and 1917-1925 





Production 


Sales 




Pounds 


Value 


1925 


Pound* 
86, 345, 438 
68, 679, 000 
93, 667, 524 
64, 632, 187 
39,008,690 
88, 263, 776 
63, 402, 194 
58, 464, 446 
45, 977, 246 
6, 619, 729 


79,303,451 
64, 961, 433 
86, 567, 446 
69, 107, 105 
47, 513, 762 


$37, 468, 332 


1924 . 


35, 012, 400 


1923 - 


47, 223, 161 


1922 .. . . 


41, 463, 790 


1921 


39, 283, 956 


1920 . 


1 95, 613, 749 


1919 




1 07, 598, 855 


1918.. 




1 62, 026, 390 


1917 




1 57, 796, 228 


1914 




1 2, 470, 096 









' Value of production. 

Stocks on hand. — The Tariff Commission published for the first 
time in 1924 data concerning the stocks of dyes on hand. Table 
14 gives current data of the same kind for a greatly expanded list 
of colors — for 36 in 1925 as compared with 13 in 1924. 



Table. 14. — Stocks of domestic dyes on hand January 1, 1925 and 1926 



Color index 
No. 



Schultz 
No 



Name of dye 



Jan. 1, 1925 



Jan. 1, 1926 



20. 
31. 
79- 
138 
151. 
179. 
189. 
202 
208 
246. 
288. 
326 
332. 
365. 
401 
406 
448 
518. 
520. 
581. 
582. 
593. 
596. 
620. 
640. 
680. 
737. 
812. 
814. 
865. 



33 
42 

82 
134 
145 
163 
173 
181 
188 
217 
257 
279 
284 
304 
333 
337 
363 
424 
426 
462 
463 
474 
476 
9 

23 
515 
566 
616 
617 
700 



Total, all dyes. 



Chrysoidine Y 

Amido naphthol red Q... 

Ponceau 2R 

Metanil yellow 

Orange II. 

Azo rubine 

Lake red R 

Chrome blue black U 

Fast acid blue R... 

Acid black lOB.. 

Fast cyanine 5R 

Direct fast scarlet.. 

Bismarck brown 2R 

Chrysophenine Q. 

Developed black BHN... 

Direct blue 2 B 

Benzopurpurine 4B 

Direct pure blue 6B 

Direct pure blue 

Direct black EW 

Direct black RX 

Direct green B 

Direct brown 300.. 

Direct yellow R 

Tartrazine.- 

Methyl violet 

Wool green S 

Primuline 

Direct fast yellow... 

Nigiosine (water-soluble). 

Sulphur black 

Sulphur blue 

Sulphur brown 

Sulphur yellow 

Indigo, 20 per cent paste.. 
Zambezi blacks 



Pounds 
30, 337, 484 



130,311 

77, 345 
131,000 

83, 995 
338, 101 
92, 052 

78, 574 
211,515 

60, 415 
563. 349 

160. 267 
97,913 

203, 205 
162. 974 
238, 128 

355, 425 
183, 655 

69, 476 
80, 745 
755, 310 
219, 242 
120, 973 
289, 144 

161, 949 
176, 370 
138, 387 

39, 821 
45, 255 
45,971 
434, 746 
130, 851 

356, 868 
815, 219 
216, 977 
440, 997 
165, 299 



Pounds 
37, 382, 913 



252, 971 

83,419 

76, 817 

179, 376 

295, 236 

59, 281 
102, 298 
211,604 

57, 760 
462, 757 
127, 920 
112,081 
187, 278 
170, 929 
177, 492 
396, 828 
142, 370 

56, 105 

74, 518 

1,451,954 

152, 038 

72, 010 
275, 088 
171, 554 
214, 852 
118,439 

59, 142 

60, 848 
38, 780 

356, 263 
6, 267, 917 
356, 071 
792, 649 
297, 019 
15, 112,876 
131, 868 



Total of above listed dyes i 22,871,820 



29, 156, 408 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PBODUCTS 



Decline in Domestic Dye Prices 



35 



The weighted average price of all domestic dyes sold in 1925 was 
about 13 per cent less than the average sold in 1924. The decline 
in price was general, extending to the low as well as the high priced 
dyes. Table 15 shows the trend of prices in recent years: 

Table 15. — Weighted average sales price per pound of domestic dyes,^ 1917 and 

1920-1925 



Year 


Weighted 

average 

sales price 

of domestic 

dyes 


Year 


Weighted 

average 

sales price 

of domestic 

dyes 


1925 


$0.47 
.54 
.55 
.60 


1 
1921 


$0.83 


1924 


1920- 


1 08 


1923 


1917 


a 1 26 


1922 







> The total value of all dyes divided by the total quantity. 
» Unit value of production. 

Table 16 affords a comparison of the domestic-sales price of 100 
dyes for the years 1920 to 1925, inclusive, with the invoice prices of 
the same kinds of dyes imported in 1914. The colors for which 
statistics are given in this table constitute about 90 per cent of tho 
domestic production. Strictly speaking, domestic-sales prices can 
not, of course, be compared with invoice prices, for the reason that 
the latter do not represent the cost to the consumer, since they do 
not include the importers' profit and usually charges for containers, 
packing, freight, and insurance to seaport, consular certification, and 
minor shipping charges at point of departure and at seaport. 

The Colour-index number is indicated in the first column and the 
Schultz number (Farbstoft" Tabellen (dyestuff tables) by Gustav 
Schultz, 1914 edition) in the second column. The third column 
gives the type name of the dye adopted by the Tariff Commission 
for designating all dyes reported under a given color index or Schultz 
number. 

The invoice price (1914) shown in column 4 represents the weighted 
average of all dyes classified under a given Schultz number in "Arti- 
ficial dyestuff s used in the United States," Department of Commerce, 
Special Agents' Series No. 121. This weighted average price for all 
types is frequently higher than the invoice price per pound of the 
bulk of dyes imported under a given Schultz number. The indi- 
vidual dyes imported under given Schultz numbers in the Norton 
census show wide variation in price, frequently amounting to several 
hundred per cent. This is due chiefly to the great difference in 
concentration of the different dyes and also to the variation in prices 
of special and pure brands which are more costly than the ordinary 
brands. The figures in column 5, the domestic-sales price as reported 
to the Tariff Commission, represent the weighted average price of 
all dyes reported under a given color index or Schultz number. 



36 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 16. — Domestic sales prices of 100 dyes, 1920-1925, compared with invoice 
values of dyes of the same kind imported in 1914 





Schultz 
No. 


C onimon name 


1914 

invoice 

value 

imported 

dyes 

(weighted 

average 

of all 

types) 


Average price per pound 


Color 

index 
. No. 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


16 


137 

' 33 

34 

37 

38 
42 
48 
58 
66 
82 
112 
119 
134 
141 
145 
154 
161 
163 
164 
168 
169 
173 
177 
181 
188 
217 
227 
236 
257 
275 
265 
206 
283 
284 
304 
307 
327 
333 
337 
342 
340 
343 
344 
363 
391 
405 
410 
419 
424 
426 
462 
463 
474 
475 
476 
477 
485 
9 
11 
10 
23 
493 
495 
499 
502 
5)2 
515 
521 
530 
536 
559 
566 


Acid yellow G 


$0. 176 $0. 43 


$1.04 

.77 

.78 

.86 

.96 

1.46 

.53 

.69 

1.25 

.73 

.84 

3.89 

1.20 

1.85 

.51 

1.53 

.96 

1.26 

1.96 

3.23 

.99 

1.63 

.98 

.75 

1.67 

1.09 

1.56 

1.41 

1.74 

1.25 

1.48 

.94 

.78 

.85 

2.03 

.89 

2.17 

1.48 

.69 

.99 

.86 

2.09 

1.65 

1.20 

1.03 

2.33 

1.53 

1.67 

1.90 

1.39 

.79 

.71 

1.21 

1.03 

1.15 

1.45 

1. on 
1.07 
1.60 
1.22 
1.80 
2.02 
1.97 
3.68 
3.94 
3.28 
1.66 
2.91 
3.64 
3.42 
3.86 
1.88 


$1.03 
.63 
.63 
.77 
.58 
.83 
.50 
.61 
.66 
.61 
.75 
3.01 
.92 
1.30 
.38 
1.34 
.83 
.92 
1.50 
.86 
.76 
1.25 
.76 
.55 
.91 
.79 
1.09 
1.02 
1.21 
.94 
1.14 
.66 
.66 
.63 
1.70 
.65 
1.44 
.91 
.48 
.93 
.89 
1.39 
1.10 
.90 
.78 
1.64 
1.28 
1.45 
1.52 
1.22 
.42 
.61 
.92 
.98 
.73 
.88 
.93 
.88 
1.32 

i.'os' 

1.66 
1.22 


$0.87 
.58 
.57 
.58 
.59 
.71 
.52 
.61 
.78 
.58 
.73 

2.46 
.80 

1.06 
.37 

1.09 
.78 
.86 

1.27 
.71 
.73 

1.15 
.65 
.53 
.85 
.71 


$0."49" 
.50 


$1.11 


20 


Chrysoidine Y 


.136 
.165 
.133 
.148 
.150 
.077 
.154 
.604 
.095 
.159 
.411 
.164 
.249 
.081 
. 256 
.118 
.198 
.188 
.138 
.127 
.083 
.149 
. 156 
.252 
.134 
.165 
.143 
.166 
.172 
.110 
.144 
.186 
.183 
.270 
.179 
.255 
.133 
.041 
.189 
.231 
.362 
.194 
.133 
.209 
.234 
.267 
.222 
.275 
.440 
.144 
.139 
.174 
.230 

.'194" 

.170 

.178 

.239 

.162 

.200 

.240 

.241 

.221 

. 255 

.294 

.248 

.308 

.281 

.409 

.312 

.353 


.87 
.79 
1.04 
1.22 
1.78 
.63 
.86 
1.51 
.80 
.93 
5.33 
1.64 
2.08 
.62 
1.55 
1.04 
1.43 
2. 28 
2.11 
1.26 
1.52 
.81 
J. 10 
1.95 
1.29 
2.23 
2.64 
2.26 
1.55 
1.80 
.87 
.84 
.91 
2.81 
.86 
2.97 
2.49 
.88 
1.08 
1.07 
2. ,59 
1.99 
1.46 
1.67 
2.47 
1.98 
1.88 
2.11 
2.43 
1.03 
.99 
1.51 
1.20 
1.60 
1.58 
1.39 
1.49 
1.88 
1. .53 
1.86 
2.48 
3.32 
4.23 
5.22 
4.67 
2.39 
6.82 
5.20 
5.90 
5.14 
4.99 


.43 


21 


Chrvsoidine R 


.45 


26 


Croceine orange 




27 


Orange G 


55 
.57 
.49 
.54 
.70 
.55 
.62 


62 


31 


Amido naphthol red G 


53 


36 


Chrome yellow 2G 


.42 


40 


Chrome yellow R 


.45 




Amido naphthol red 6B 


.55 


79 


Ponceau 2R.. 


.51 


88 


Bordeaux B.. . 


.56 


128 


Direct pink.. ... 




138 


Metanil yellow... . 


.72 
.96 
.33 

1.11 
.71 
.79 

1.17 
.49 


.69 


146 
151 


Azo yellow 

Orange II.'. . 


.88 
.29 


167 


Acid chrome brown B. ... . 


.99 


176 


Fast red A . 


.69 


179 


Azo rubine 


.76 


180 


Fast red VR 


.87 


184 


Am.aranth... 


.63 


185 


Cochineal red 




189 


Lake red R 


.91 
.54 

.48 
.76 
.46 


.86 


195 


Mordant yellow 


.57 


202 


Chrome blue black U 


.44 


208 


Fast acid blue R 


.65 


246 


Acid black lOB . . 


.55 


252 


Brilliant croceine. 


.95 


262 


Cloth red 2B 


1.16 
.91 

.87 

■".'86" 
.60 
.58 

1.03 
.59 

1.39 
.73 
.41 

1.15 
.80. 

1.20 
.95 
.89 
.54 

1.67 


1.06 
.89 
.86 
.91 
.67 
.53 
.51 
.84 


.96 


289 


Fast cvanine 5R . 


.83 


299 


Chrome blnck P.. 


.81 


307 


Fast pyanine black B 


.84 


308 


Naphthylamine black D .. 


.72 


331 


Bismarck brown.. 


.47 


332 


Bismarck brown 2R 


.45 


365 


Chrysophenine Q .. 


.78 


370 


Congo red 




394 


Direct violet N.. 


1.28 
.65 
.37 
.81 
.72 

1.06 
.83 
.73 
.51 

1.42 


1.22 


401 


Developed black BHN 


.58 


406 


Direct blue2B.. 


.34 


410 


Chrysamine G._ 


.83 


415 


Direct orange R.. . 


.69 


419 


Direct fast red F_. 


.95 


420 


Direct brown M. . . 


.77 


448 


Benzopurpurine 4B . . 


.66 


477 


Direct blue 3 B 


.46 


495 


Benzopurpurine lOB .... 


1.32 


502 


Direct azurine G _ . 




512 


Direct blue RW ... 


1.51 

1.40 

.97 

.43 

.52 

.82 

.83 

.64 

.94 

.78 

.81 

1.22 

1.00 

.87 

1.72 

1.60 


1.19 
1.26 
.79 
.38 
.49 
.68 
.79 
.49 

"'."72" 
.66 
1.07 


.97 


518 


Direct pure blue 6B 


.97 


520 


Direct pure blue 


.67 


581 


Direct black EW. 


.34 


582 


Direct black RX. 


.45 


593 


Direct green B 


.61 


594 


Direct green G . . 


.70 


596 
598 


Direct brown 3G0 

Congo brown G 


.44 
.80 


606 


Direct brown G 


.72 


620 


Direct yellow R 


.61 


621 
622 


Chloramine orange G 

Stilbene vellow... 


.94 


640 


Tartrazine 


.76 
1.52 
1.70 


.67 


655 


Auramine 


2.00 


657 


Malachite green ... . 


1.54 


662 


Brilliant green 




666 
677 


Acid green B 

Magenta _ ... 


1.77 
2.26 
1.29 
4.56 
1.86 
2.42 


1.72 
2.08 
1.25 


1.61 
1.72 
1.13 


1.30 
1.81 


680 


Methyl violet... 


.99 


689 


Spirit blue 




698 


Acid violet 


1.86 
2.39 


1.72 
2.56 


1.49 


704 


-\lkali blue^ . 


2.24 


729 


Victoria blue B.. 




737 


Wool green S 


1.10 


.83 


.75 


.57 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



37 



Table 16. — Domestic sales prices of 100 dyes, 1920-1925, compared witK^invoice 
values of dyes of the same kind imported in 1914 — Continued _ -..i->,i 



Color 
ndex 

No. 


Schultz 
No. 


749 


673 


768 


587 


793 


606 


812 


616 


814 


617 


841 


679 


860 


697 


861 


699 


864 


698 


805 


700 


883 


626 


922 


659 


978 


720 


1027 


778 


1033 


779 


1035 


782 


1099 


763 


1113 


842 


1118 


849 


1177 


874 


1180 


877 



Common name 



Rhodamine B 

Eosine 

Phosphine 

Primuline 

Direct fast yellow.. 

Safranine 

Induline (spirit-soluble) 

Induline (water-soluble) 

Nigrosine (spirit -soluble) 

Nigrosine (water-soluble) 

Gallocyanine 

Methylene blue 

Sulphur black 

Sulphur blue 

Sulphur brown 

Sulphur tan 

Sulphur maroon 

Sulphur yellow 

Alizarin 

Alizarin orange 

Alizarin brown 

Anthraquinone vat dark blue BO. 

Anthraquinone vat blue QCD 

Anthraquinone vat yellow G 

Indigo, synthetic 

Indigo extract- 



1914 

invoice 

value 

imported 

dyes 

(weighted 

average 

of all 

types) 



$0. 415 
.418 
.352 
.144 
.136 
.359 
.198 
.258 
.126 
.149 
.347 
.390 
.100 



Average price per pound 



1920 



107 



.100 
.224 
.290 
.227 
.354 
.334 
.128 
.340 



$6.72 

4.19 

4.17 

1.59 

2.36 

3.88 

1.21 

1.03 

.88 

.72 

3.06 

2.94 

.25 

.98 

.35 

.47 

1.62 

.71 

1.45 

1.46 

1.68 

2.12 

2.40 

4.68 

.74 

1.00 



1921 



$2. 51 
3.70 
1.37 
1.59 
2.60 
.75 
.96 
.70 
.68 
2.44 
1.94 
.23 
.64 
.38 
.59 
.95 
.73 
.65 



1.32 
2.31 
2.41 
3.76 
.45 
.65 



1922 



$1.90 
2.05 
1.07 
1.29 
1.69 
.94 
.82 
.54 
.53 
1.92 
1.40 
.21 
.60 
.40 
.56 
.79 i 
.78 



1923 



1.86 
1.65 



$1.84 
1.93 
.70 
1.17 
1.45 
.93 
.83 
.52 
.46 
1.93 
1 47 
.20 
.50 
.39 
.48 
.77 
,73 
,55 



1.24 
2.00 
1.63 
1.24 
.23 
.58 



$1.85 
1.86 
.79 
1.09 
1.45 
.78 
.74 
.48 
.48 
1.86 
1.26 
.19 
.55 
.38 
.37 



2.08 
2.23 



.22 
.56 



$1.56 
.64 
1.06 



.45 
.42 
1.79 
1.11 
.17 
.55 
.35 
.35 
.56 
.46 



2.16 



.16 
.65 



Unit Value of Dyes Produced, 1921-1925 

Table 17 shows the domestic production of dyes for the years 1921 
to 1925 arranged according to eight value groups. The actual 
quantity is given for each group and the relation of each group to 
the total production. 

Table 17. — Production of dyes, by groups, according to unit value 



Unit values 



0-25 cents.. 
26-50 cents. 
51-75 cents 
.$0.76-$l.-. 
$1.01-$1.50. 
$1.51-$2... 
$2.01-$3..- 
Over $3... 



1925 



Per 
Pounds !eent of 
total 



45, 815, 
16, 134, 
9, 598, 

4, 851, 

5, 027, 
2, 578, 
1, 568, 

771, 



Pounds 



114 53 

929, 18 

483 11 

750, 5, 

117, 5 

233; 2 

458 1, 

354' . 



ORO 31. 

687,13, 
116, 9. 
6191 4, 
822 6, 
9861 1, 
817i 1, 
893' 



725, 
8.53, 
105, 
259, 
283, 
774, 
118, 
557, 



1923 



Per 

cent of I Pounds 
total 



194 '44, 
172 15, 
257 12, 
2031 8, 
149,' 8, 
584: 2, 
6291 1, 
812! 



Total 86,345,438100 j68, 679, 000 100 93,667, 



1922 



Per 

cent of Pounds 
total 



Per 

cent of 

total 



47.670128,728,401 44.449 

16.234:10,237,825 15.840 

13. .'5771 8.418,271 13.025 

9. 186; 6, 992, 018| 10. 818 

8.762' 6.833.577 10.573 

2.4751 2,010. 413| 3. Ill: 

1. 329' 838, 8491 1. 298' 

. 7671 572, 833' . 886: 



1921 



Pounds 



7, 832, 696 
7,941,977 
6, 843, 004 
4, 762, 791 
6, 329. 421 
3, 321, 581 
1, 220. 966 
756, 254 



524100 



1 64, 632, 187 100 



Per 
cent of 
total 



20, 079 
20. 300 
17.542 
12,209 
16. 226 
8.515 
3.130 
1.939 



39, 008, 690 100 



38 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



^INTERMEDIATES IBDYES 
AVERAGE PRICE 



l.ZO 



1.00 



.80 



.60 



.40 



.20 



(US. PRODUCTION) 
1917-1925 




923 1924 1925 



Progress of Dye Manufacture 

Within the last decade the United States has developed a dye 
industry that now supplies more than 90 per cent by quantity of 
domestic requirements and in addition a significant export trade in 
certain dyes. The industry first concentrated on bulk dyes and 
recently on many specialties not previously made. As a result of 
this specialization, the year 1925 showed marked progress in the 
manufacture of new dyes, including vat dyes, direct developed dyes, 
alizarin derivatives, and a variety of special colors for the dyeing of 
Rayon and for fibers other than Rayon in Rayon mixtures wherein 
the Rayon is left unstained. These new dyes, although not con- 
sumed in large quantity, meet special requirements of the textile 
and other dye-consuming industries. The complexity of their 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 39 

manufacture involves serious technical problems, which are gradually 
being solved. The increased use year by year of fast dyes has been 
an important factor in stimulating research and in developing new 
colors. 

Relation of production to consumption. — Imports ^ of coal-tar dyes in 
1925 were 5,209,601 pounds, with an invoice value of $4,637,240. 
Domestic production in 1925 was 86,345,438 pounds and sales 
amounted to 79,303,451 pounds, with a value of $37,468,332. Imports 
constituted 6 per cent of production by quantity and more than 12 
per cent by value. Assuming domestic consumption to equal total 
sales plus imports minus exports, consumption in 1925 was 58,713,163 
pounds. Since imports were nearly 9 per cent of consumption by 
quantity, dyes manufactured in the United States supplied about 
91 per cent of the apparent consumption. In terms of value, how- 
ever, they were considerably less than 91 per cent for the reason that 
imported dyes are on the average much higher priced than domestic 
dyes. 

Total exports in 1925 were 25,799,889 pounds, with a value of 
$6,694,360. As previously pointed out, this exportable surplus con- 
sists largely of indigo and sulphur black. 

Reduction in number of dye producers. — Of the 75 firms reporting 
the production of dyes in 1925, 6 made only bacteriological stains 
and indicators, 4 ceased manufacture during the year, and 1, the 
Kerin Manufacturing Co., was taken over by the Calco Chemical 
Co. By December 31, 1925, there were consequently but 64 manu- 
facturers of dyes exclusive of stains and indicators. In 1919,90 
firms produced dyes, and in 1924, 78 firms. 

At present (1925) the productive capacity of domestic plants is 
far in excess of consumption. Only a few of the large firms have 
been able to balance their domestic sales by exports. The severe 
competition resulting from sixty-odd firms struggling for a share of 
the market will inevitably lead to the elimination of many of the 
higher cost producers and to a reduction of capacity nearer our 
normal requirements. 

The number of dye producers in the United States offers an interest- 
ing contrast to the situation in Germany and Switzerland. In Ger- 
many six firms have been taken over by the Badische, now known as 
the I. G. Teerfarben Industrie, leaving two other large producers 
and perhaps four of minor importance. In Switzerland three of the 
four producers have a close affiliation of business interests. 

A survey of competitive conditions in the United States and of 
the trend of foreign trade indicates that the time is ripe for the 
amalgamation of certain small manufacturers. This is in fact a 
necessity if any substantial economy is to be effected in purchases 
and in sales, duplication eliminated, and a better range of products 
obtained. Such a fusion might well include manufacturers of 
intermediates and heavy chemicals. A group of small firms, con- 
centrating on a narrow field, can produce certain specialties at a 
lower cost than a large number of producers diffusing their efforts 
on a wide range of products. 

3 This total poundage is in excess of the actual quantity imported, because nearly all of the vat dyes, 
as well as the rhodamines, were reduced to a single strength basis in order to facilitate a comparison of 
imports and production. The invoice value is below the actual selling price to the consumer. 



40 CENSUS. OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

TARIFF CONSIDERATIONS 

The act of 1922 provides that the ad valorem rate of duty on any 
imported coal-tar product coming within paragraph 27 or 28 shall be 
based upon the American selling price (as defined in subdivision 
(f) of sec. 402, Title IV) of any similar competitive article manu- 
factured in the United States. A product is defined by the act as 
similar or competitive with any imported coal-tar product when it 
accomplishes results substantially equal to those accomplished by 
the domestic product when used in substantially the same manner. 

If a similar competitive article is not manufactured in the United 
States, the ad valorem rate is based upon the United States value 
(as defined in subdi\asion (d) of sec. 402, Title IV) which is the 
selling price in the United States of the imported article less certain 
statutory deductions, including profit, general expense, cost of 
insurance, transportation, and duty. 

The Commission's Dye Census of 1924 (pp. 41-45) discussed the 
American selling price as applied to coal-tar products, reviewed the 
principal features of the administration of these provisions by the 
Treasury Department, summarized the major regulations issued by 
that department, and gave important Treasurv Decisions up to 
G. A. 9004, T. D. 40925, of 1925. 

An abstract of important decisions up to May, 1926, follows: 

The constitutionality of the American selling price provisions was 
sustained by the Court of Customs xA^ppeals (T. D. 40313 of June 28, 
1924). 

The sole statutory test or criterion as to what constitutes a com- 
petitive product is whether the foreign product substantially equals 
the domestic in results accomplished and in manner of use. The law 
does not similarly require that the domestic product shall substan- 
tially equal the foreign in the particulars mentioned. (G. A. 8839, 
T. D. 40365, of 1924.) In determining whether the one accom- 
plishes the same result as the other no exact formula is prescribed. 
If by a slight change the imported article accomplishes substantially 
equal results as those accomplished by the domestic, it is competitive. 
(G. A. 8897, T. D. 40517, of 1924 and T. D. 40787 of 1925; affirmed 
in Metz v. United States, 13 Ct. Cust. Appls. — ; T. D. 41340 of 1926.) 

Delivery is not essential to establish the existence of similar com- 
petitive articles manufactured and produced in the United States if 
other necessary conditions exist, including ability to deliver, packed 
ready for delivery in the ordmary course of trade and in the usual 
wholesale quantities. (G. A. 8981, T. D. 40832, of 1925; affirmed in 
Sandoz Chemical Worlcs v. United States, 13 Ct. Cust. Appls. — ; 
T. D. 41365 of 1926; petition for writ of certiorari denied.) 

The Board of General Appraisers in reappraisement appeals under 
section 501 of the tariff act of 1922 must find the ultimate and essen- 
tial facts required by the issue, which must be supported by substan- 
tial evidence, although the correctness of the findings will not be 
inquired into, and, having found the imported dye (dutiable under 
paragraph 28 of that act according to American selling price as defined 
in section 402, subdivision (f), of any similar competitive article 
manufactured or produced in the United States) had domestic com- 
petition, it then became the board's duty to find the American selling 
price of the similar article. In order to do this, it was necessary to 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 41 

find out whether or not the ximerican product had been freely offered 
for sale. Kuttrqff v. United States, 13 Ct. Cust. Appls. — ; (T. D. 
40861, of 1925). 

The provisions of section 402, subdivision (f), have reference to the 
American product. Hence the determination of the principal market 
is governed entirely by the sale of the American product, and the 
determination of the usual wholesale quantities must be confined to 
a consideration of the sales which occur in such market. (G. A. 9004, 
T. D. 40926, of 1925); decision of Board of General Appraisers 
reversed May 29, 1926, by Court of Customs Appeals.) 

The operation and execution of paragraph 28 of the act of 1922 
made necessary to the finding of value thereunder by means of the 
American selling price provision is by the statute made part of the 
act of appraisement and as such is reviewable upon reappraisement 
appeal. Classification remains as before reviewable only by protest 
against the action of the collector on liquidation. (G. A. 9029, T. D. 
41049, of 1925.) 

Paragraphs 27 and 1549 of the tariff act of 1922 must be construed 
together. If a tar distillate answers either of the two distillation 
tests of paragraph 27, it is classifiable under it and not under para- 
graph 1549. Paragraph 27 embraces all distillates of the tars named 
which answer either of its two prescribed tests, and paragraph 1549 
embraces all distillates of the tars named which answer its prescribed 
test, except such as are embraced within paragraphs 27 and 28. A 
mixture of a coal-tar pitch provided for in paragraph 1549 with a dis- 
tillate (cresylic acid) provided for in paragraph 27 is not classifiable 
as one of the distillate and pitch mixtures of paragraph 1549, since 
this provision is expressly limited to distillates and pitches classifiable 
under paragraph 1549. Such a mixture is dutiable under the provi- 
sion of paragraph 27 for "all mixtures, including solutions, consist- 
ing in whole or in part of any of the foregoing products provided for 
in this paragraph." {United States v. Bdkelite Corporation, 13 Ct. 
Cust. Appls. — ; T. p. 41458, of 1926.) 

The method prescribed by the Treasury Department for determin- 
ing the solidifving point of naphthalene for the purposes of paragraphs 
27 and 1549 of the tariff act of 1922 is in T. D. 41515, of 1926. " 

Paragraph 28 of the tariff act of 1922 levies in addition to an ad 
valorem duty on coal-tar colors, dyes, or stains, a specific duty of 
7 cents per pound to be based on standards of strength to be estab- 
lished by the Secretary of the Treasury. These coal-tar products 
imported prior to the establishment of such standards are liable to 
the specific duty on only the weight imported. Levying on weights 
ascertained "on comparison with the lowest known commercial 
strength of the merchandise" was held to be ille2:al. United States v. 
Sandoz Cliemical For^.s, 14 Ct. Cust. Appls.— ; (T. D. 41542, of 1926). 

Imported merchandise is not usually entered at more than its 
dutiable value but when so entered it is at the importers' risk and 
the collector m.ust take it on not less than such entered value regard- 
less of the value returned by the appraiser, general appraiser, or Board 
of General Appraisers. G. A. 9106, T. D. 41449, of 1926; appeal 
pending in Court of Customs Appeals. 

By order of the President under section 316 (f) of the tariff act of 
1922, entry is temporarily suspended pending investigation of syn- 



42 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



thetic phenolic resin of form C and all other articles manufactured 
wholly or in part thereof except articles made by molding synthetic 
phenolic resin when mixed with other articles. T. D. 41512, of 1926. 
Cresylic acid, recommended method for the distillation of. (T. D. 
41735 of 1926). 

Effect of Reduction in Duty on Imports 

On September 22, 1924, under the provisions of the tariff act of 
1922, the ad valorem rate on dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 
paragraph 28, was reduced from 60 per cent to 45 per cent, while the 
specific duty remained at 7 cents per pound. In the commission's 
Census of Dyes for 1923 it was pointed out that the specific duty is 
more eft'ective on the low-priced dyes and that the ad valorem rate 



CURVE SHOWING IMPORTS OFCOfiL TftR DYES. BY MONTHS, 
ThROOSH THE PORT OF NEW YORK, 





(AD VALOneM DUTY QP 
eo7, KtcuctD ro *si 
on sspr zz lot.* 



I 1926 



is more effective on the high-priced dyes, and that consequently a 
reduction in the ad valorem rate would more directly affect the higher^ 
priced dyes. 

Since this reduction in the rate of duty became effective, imports of 
dyes have recorded a conspicuous increase. The total dye imports in 
1925 amounting to 5,209,601 pounds, with an invoice value of 
$4,637,240, represented a 72 per cent increase by quantity and a 59 
per cent increase by value over 1924. The average monthly import 
during 1925 was 434,133 pounds, valued at $386,437, as compared 
with 179,103 pounds, valued at $182,515 during the first nine months 
of 1924, prior to the tariff reduction (September 22, 1924). Increased 
activity in the textile trade during 1925 was a factor in the gain in 
imports. Pronounced competition from imported dyes has been 
manifest, particularly from the higher-cost types. These dyes have 
practically all been of German and Swiss manufacture. 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 43 

Table 18. — Imports of coal-tar dyes into the United States, 1920-1926 (3 months) 



Period 


Pouiids 


Invoice 
value 


Monthly average 


Pounds 


Value 


1926 — Total 3 months 


1,157,290 
5, 209, 601 


$1,097,164 
4, 637, 240 


385, 763 
434, 133 


$365, 721 


1925 


386, 437 






1924— 

First 9 months _ 


1, 611, 931 
1, 410, 608 


1.642,632 
1,266,146 


179. 103 
470, 203 


182,515 


Last 3 months 


422, 049 






Total 


3, 022, 539 
3, 098, 193 

3, 982, 631 

4, 252, 911 
3, 402, 582 


2, 908, 778 
3,151,363 
5, 243, 257 
5, 1.56, 779 
5, 763. 437 


251, 878 
258. 153 
338, 850 
354, 409 
283, 548 


242, 398 


1923 


262, 614 


1922 


436, 838 


1921 - - 


429, 732 


1920 


480, 286 







PEODUCTION OF DYES BY CLASSES 



The dyes produced in the United States in 1925 are classified 
according to method of application as follows: (1) Acid dyes, (2) 
basic dyes, (3) direct dyes, (4) lake and spirit-soluble dyes, (5) mor- 
dant or chrome dyes, (6) sulphur dyes, (7) vat dyes, subdivided into 
indigo and other vats, and (8) unclassified dyes. While in certain 
instances the classification is arbitrary, because a dye may have 
properties which permit of its application by more than one method, 
it is believed that the above classification facilitates a comparison 
of production and import figures. 

Comparative data for dyes produced in the United States from 
1917 to 1925, inclusive, and those imported in the fiscal year 1914 
and in the calendar years 1920 to 1925, inclusive, are arranged 
according to the classes given in Table 19. 

Table 19. — Comparison of imports of dyes, by classes , fiscal year 1914 and calendar 
years 1920-1925, with domestic production, calendar years 1917-1925 



Class of dye 



Acid 

Basic 

Direct _. 

Lake and spirit-soluble. 
Mordant and chrome- - 
Sulphur 

Vats (including indigo). 

k (a) Indigo 

^ (b) Other vats 

Unclassified 



Total 45,950,895 



1914 



Imports 



Pounds 
9, 286, 501 
3, 002, 480 

10, 264, 757 
1,512,605 
4, 450, 442 
7, 053, 879 

10, 352, 663 

8, 407, 359 

1,945,304 

27,568 



Per cent 
of total 



20.2 
6.5 
22. 3 
3.3 
9.7 
15.4 
22.5 
18.3 
4.2 
. 1 



100 



UfJJ^d pe, cent 

States - , , , 

production °' ^"^^^^ 



1918 



Pounds 
9,372,121 
2,073,043 I 
11,181,761 I 
934,360 I 
4,164,902 
15,588,222 
289,296 I 
274,771 i 
14,525 \ 
2,368,541 



20.4 

4.5 

24.3 

2.2 

9.1 

33.9 

.6 

.55 

.05 

5.0 



United 

States 

production 



45, 977, 246 



100 



Pounds 
9,799,071 
2, 879, 639 

12,28.5,683 
1,068,466 
5,447,192 

23, 698, 826 

3, 281, 337 

3, 083, 888 

197,449 

4,232 



58,464,446 



Per cent 
of total 



16.8 
4.9 

21.1 
1.8 
9.3 

40.5 

5.6 

5.3 

.3 



100 



44 



CENSUS OF Di'ES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 19. — Comparison of imports of dyes, by classes, fiscal year 1914 and calendar 
years 1920-1926, with domestic production, calendar years 1917-1925 — Con. 



Class of dye 



Acid 

Basic 

Direct 

Lake and spirit-soluble 
Mordant and chrome-. 

Sulphur 

Vats (including indigo) 

(a) Indigo 

(6) Other vats 

Unclassified 

Total--- ..-. 



United I 
States 
production 



Per cent 
of total 



Pounds 

12, 195, 968 

4, 036, 532 

14,444,934 

1,813,199 

3, 985, 050 

17, 624, 418 

9, 252, 982 

8, 863, 824 

389, 158 

49, 111 



19.2 
6.4 

22.8 

2.8 

6.3 

27.8 

14.6 

14.0 

.6 

.1 



63, 402, 194 



100 



1920 



United 

States 

production 



Pounds 
17, 741, 538 

4, 993, 001 
19, SS2, 631 

2, 205, 281 

3, 900, 209 
20, 034, 500 
19, 338, 099 
18,178,231 

1, 159,-808 
168, 517 



88, 203, 776 



Per cent 
of total 



20.1 

.5.7 
22.5 

2.5 

4.4 
22.7 
21.9 
20.6 

1.3 



Imports 



100 



Pounds 
733, 405 
192,103 
.571, 581 

17, 527 
709, 482 
229, 140 
932, 464 
171,101 
761, 363 

16, 820 



3, 402, 582 



Per cent 
of total 



21.5 
.5.7 

16.8 
.5 

20.9 
0.7 

27.4 
5.0 

22.4 
.5 



100 





1921 


1922 


Class of dye 


United 

States 

production 


Per 
cent of 
total 


Imports 


Per 

cent of 

total 


United 

States 

production 


Per 
cent of 
total 


Imports 


Per 
cent of 
total 


Acid - 


Pounds 

7, 843, 009 

1, 8.53, 094 

7, 053, 701 

720,406 

3,997,442 

10, 239, 255 

7, 019, 120 

6, 673, 908 

345, 1.52 

282, 603 


20.11 

4.75 

18.08 

1.85 

10.25 

20.25 

17.99 

17.11 

.88 

.72 


Pounds 

1,455,823 

163, 527 

537,664 

43, 553 

695, 961 

220, 938 

1,110,345 

70, 975 

1, 045, 370 

19, 100 


34.24 

3.84 
12.64 

1.02 
16.36 

5.20 
20.25 

1.66 

24.59 

.45 


Pounds 

9,880,014 

2, 937, 585 

11,931,737 

1, 009, 512 

3, 749, 701 

16, 913, 707 

16, 926, 744 

15, 850, 752 

1,075,992 

1, 283, 127 


15. 29 

4.54 

18.40 

l.,50 

•5.80 

26.17 

26.19 

24.52 

1.67 

1.99 


Potinds 

601,395 

155, 084 

671,621 

76, 853 

716, 790 

194, 883 

1, 549, 024 

505 

1, 548. 519 

16, 981 


15.10 
• 3 89 


Basic 


Direct 


16.88 
1.93 

18.00 
4 89 


Lake and spirit-soluble.. 
Mordant and chrome.- - 
Sulphur - 


Vats (including indigo), 
(o) Indigo 


38.90 
01 


(b) Other vats 

Unclassified... 


38.89 
43 






Total.- 


39,008,690 


100 


4, 252, 911 


100 


64, 632, 187 

■ 


100 


3, 982, 631 


100 







Class of dye 



Acid-.- 

Basic 

Direct 

Lake and spirit-soluble. 
Mordant and chrome... 
Sulphur 

Vats (including indigo) 

(o) Indigo 

(6) Other vats 

Unclassified and special 

Total. 



1923 



United 


Per 


States 


cent of 


production 


total 


Pounds 




12,498,817 


13.34 


4,157,373 


4.44 


10, 858, 387 


18.00 


1,171,854 


1.25 


4, 078, 504 


4.35 


21,558,469 


23.02 


30,113,642 


32.15 


28,347,259 


30.26 


1,766,383 


1.89 


3, 2.30, 478 


3.45 


93,667,524 


100 



Pounds 
544, 048 
210, 896 
527, 014 
23, 213 
453,415 
114, 023 
1, 207, 554 



1, 207, 554 
18, 030 



3, 098, 193 



Per 

cent of 

total 



17. 56 
6.81 

17.01 
.75 

14.63 
3.68 

38.98 



United 

States 

production 



Per 
cent of Imports 
total 



Pounds 

9, 187, 256 

3, 676, 997 

14, 662, 577 

967, 550 

2, 953, 987 

14, 561, 257 

21,818,022 

19, 996, 703 

1,821,319 

861,354 



68,679,000 



13.38 

5.35 

21.35 

1.41 

4.30 

21. 20 

31.77 

29.12 

2. 65 

1.24 



100 



Pounds 

324, 538 

249, 008 

421, 538 

17, 334 

413, 902 

87, 704 

1, 499, 322 

5.471 

1,493,851 

9, 073 



3, 022, 539 



Per 
cent of 
total 



10.74 

8.24 

13.95 

.57 

13.69 

2.90 

49.61 

.18 

49.43 

.30 



100 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



45 



Table 19. — Comparison of imports of dyes, by classes, fiscal year 1914 o,nd calendar 
years 1920-1925, with domestic production, calendar years 1917-1925 — Con. 



Class of dye 



Acid 

Basic 

Direct J 

Lake and spirit soluble. 
Mordant and chrome. _ 
Sulphur 

Vats (including indigo) . 

(a) Indigo 

(6) Other vats 

Unclassified and special 

Total 



Domestic 



Sales 



Pounds 



356, 726 
973, 526 
058, 071 
532, 793 
694, 876 
453, 834 
702, 741 
449, 938 
252, 803 
530, 884 



Value 



79, 303, 451 



Production 



Pounds 



37, 468, 332 



86, 345, 438 



Per cent 
of total 



11.8 

4.8 

17.1 

1.9 

2.9 

24.1 

36.7 

33.7 

3.0 



Imports 



Pounds 



589, 959 

607, 637 

759, 024 

57, 540 

642, 098 

122, 230 

2,418,842 

1,952 

2, 416, 890 

12,271 



5, 209, 601 



Per cent 
of total 



11.32 
11.66 
14. 57 

1.10 
12.33 

2.35 

46.43 

.04 

46.39 

.24 



100 



SO 



TOTAL OF ^LL DYES 



75 



60- 




/-V MILLIONS OF 
POUNDS 



"^^IM PORTS I9lk 

FISCAL YEAR 

IZZl PRODUCTION 
1917 25 CALENDAR YftS 



IMPORTS J9Z0-ZS 
CALENDAR YEAIfS. 



W 0» CTl CD ff^ C> ii< 






46 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Acid Dyes 

Description. — The acid dyes are commonly applied in an acid bath; 
they have acid properties and are usually sodium salts of a color acid. 
They constitute the most important group used in wool dyeing, being 
especially adapted to the dyeing of hosiery and carpet yarns, suitings, 
dress goods, and hat materials; they have, in addition, considerable 
application on silk. They are little used on cotton or linen because of 
their lack of affinity for vegetable fibers, but are of value in the dyeing 
of jute. In general they are used on goods not requiring repeated 
washings. 

Acid dyes yield clear, bright shades. They are superior to the 
direct and mordant dyes in purity of shade, but are not equal to basic 
dyes in this respect. They have a wide color range, and in fastness 
show great individual variation; as a rule they are fairly fast to light 
and acids, but have a tendency to bleed in washing. They yield 
faster shades on wool than on silk. Some of the more complex acid 
dyes, many of which are of recent origin, produce shades of good 
general fastness. Their method of application in an acid bath is 
simple and of low labor cost. A considerable part of this group is of 
the lowest priced dyes produced. 

The line of demarcation between acid dyes and certain colors of the 
direct and mordant groups is arbitrary. Certain acid dyes when 
" af tertreated " with sodium or potassium dichromate yield shades of 
good fastness to milling, light, washing, and other agents. Those 
known as acid chrome colors are used chiefly on wool, especially 
on loose wool yarns, and on piece goods such as men's suitings. 

Most of the acid dyes are chemically included in one of the follow- 
ing groups: (1) Nitro compounds, (2) azo compounds, (3) sul- 
phonated basic dyes (mostly triphenylmethane derivatives), and 
(4) alizarin derivatives. 

Production and imports. — Acid dyes ranked fourth in quantity pro- 
duced in 1925, with a total of 10,214,024 pounds, or 11.8 per cent of 
all dyes manufactured. This output is a 10 per cent increase over 
1924. Sales amounted to 10,356,726 pounds, valued at $8,376,020. 
In value of sales this group ranks second — namely, 22 per cent of total 
sales — the direct dyes holding first place. 

The leading acid dyes showed relatively small changes in produc- 
tion, a notable exception being Metanil yellow, with a 75 per cent 
increase. As was the case in direct dyes, the important develop- 
ments in this group were the increased production of the fast and 
specialty types and of a number of colors not heretofore made in the 
United States. 

Three acid dyes — namely. Orange II, Acid black lOB, and Nigro- 
sine (water-soluble) — were each produced in a quantity exceeding 
1,000,000 pounds. 

For the first time since 1917 Orange II was the ranking dye in this 
group in quantity of production. The output in 1925 was 1,359,304 
pounds and sales amounted to 1,402,169 pounds, valued at $405,852. 
Acid black lOB was second, with a production of 1,191,137 pounds. 
In volume of production the next largest were Nigrosine (water- 
soluble), Metanil yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 2R, Amido naphthol 
red G. In value of sales Acid alizarin blue B is one of the lead- 
ing colors. 



DYES AND OTHEE FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



47 



Among the dyes in this group showing notable increases in pro- 
duction were Wool green S, Resorcin brown B, Brilliant croceine, 
Scarlet E C, Fast light yellow, Acid green B, Acid violet, Patent 
blue, and Acid alizarin rubine. 

Imports of the acid dyes, the total of which was 589,959 pounds, 
comprised 11.32 per cent by quantity of all dyes imported. The 
15 imported in largest quantity were as follows: 



Pounds 

Erioglaiicine :_. 35, 295 

Patent blue A 31, 097 

Wool fast blue BL, GL 30, 248 

Polar red 28,584 

Patent blue V 24,892 

Fast green 18,967 

Acid milling black B 17, 635 

Indocyanine B 16, 521 



Pounds 

Naphthalene green 15, 299 

Azo carmine GX 15,166 

Erioviridine B.. 13,946 

Polar orange 13, 386 

Alizarine direct blue BGAOO. 10, 985 

Kiton fast yellow 10, 023 

Acid violet'6B M 10, 008 



Basic Dyes 

Description. — The basic dyes surpass all others in depth, brilliancy 
of shade, and purity of tone. They possess high tinctorial power, 
but as a class lack fastness, especially to light and washing. 

Basic colors are used on cotton in dyeing and in printing where 
bright shades or color tints are desired without special requirements 
for fastness. They also are used in the dyeing of paper and jute 
and for lithographic inks, typewriter ribbons, copy paper, and pencils. 
With the exception of Rhod amine B and a few others, they have 
little application on wool. They are chemicall}^ basic in character 
and are fixed on vegetable fibers with an acid mordant — namely, 
tannic acid — or more recently a synthetic substitute. 

Dyes of this class are historically the oldest of the coal-tar dyes. 
Mauve or Perkin violet, discovered by W. H. Perkin in 1856, was 
the first aniline dyestuff produced on a commercial scale. Basic 
dyes are not as important as formerly; for cotton dyeing they have 
been superseded by direct and sulphur dyes, which cost less to apply 
and many of which excel in fastness. The vat dyes are now being 
used on cotton for many applications where basic dyes were for- 
merly used exclusively. In wool dyeing the acid dyes have almost 
entirely displaced the basic colors. Chemically, basic dyes include 
a large number of the triphenylmethane derivatives and, in addi- 
tion, members of the following classes: (1) x\zines, (2) azos, (3) 
thioazines, (4) thioazols, and (5) acridines. 

Production and imports. — The 1925 output of basic dyes was 
4,121,735 pounds, or 4.8 per cent of all dyes produced; this is a 12 
per cent increase over the 1924 figure. Sales amounted to 3,973,526 
pounds, valued at $3,720,581. By value basic dyes made up nearly 
10 per cent of all dyes sold. 

Chrysoidine Y, with a production of 756,062 pounds, and Methyl 
violet with 649,900 pounds, both of which recorded substantial gains 
over 1924, were the leading dyes in this group produced in 1925. 
Methylene blue. Malachite green, and Chrysoidine R declined in 
production in 1925, while Auramine, Rhodamine B, and Phosphine 
showed a large increase in production. 

Rhodamine 6G and 6GDN, types which are consumed in large 
amounts in cotton printing, were reported in 1925. The latter is 
used for color discharge effects. 



48 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Imports of basic dyes in 1925 were 607,637 pounds, or 11.66 per 
cent of all dyes imported. The Rhodamines (B, 6G, and 6GDN, all 
single strength) made up nearly 70 per cent of this total import. 
The 10 basic dyes imported in largest quantity were as follows: 

Pounds Pounds 



Rhodamine B 228,105 

Rhodamine 6G 118,163 

Rhodamine 6GDN 75,700 

Phosphine 27, 760 

Methj'lene green 20, 045 



Acridine orange 17, 353 

Euchrvsine 1 5, 622 

Victoria blue B 13, 389 

Methyl Lyons blue 10, 882 



Direct Cotton Dyes 

Description. — The direct or substantive dyes have been intro- 
duced within the last 25 years. Their method of application is 
simple, as they d.ye vegetable fibers full shades in a neutral or a kaline 
bath "directly," without the use of mordants. Although their 
principal application is on cotton, they are of special value in dyeing 
fabrics containing both cotton and wool, or silk and cotton (union 
goods). They are also used on silk, linen, and paper and to some 
extent on wool, especially for knitting yarns, worsted and shoddy 
yarns, and loose wool. 

In fastness individual dyes of this group show a wide variation. 
On account of their high solubility, they have a tendency to run 
when washed. Many direct dyes, particularly those first intro- 
duced, are sensitive to acids and fade on exposure to sutilight; others, 
especially the newer ones, have good fastness to both acids and 
light, as well as to other agents. Certain direct colors are of good 
fastness, particularly to washing, after a treatment of the dyed 
fiber by ''coupling" with certain intermediates. The developed 
direct dyes are now manufactured in the United States on a large 
scale and in a good variety of types. They are becoming of greater 
importance each year for cotton and silk dyeing, in response to 
the growing demand of the public for wash goods. It is probable 
that the direct dyes which can not be developed or after- treated to 
increase their fastness will show a distinct trend toward a reduced 
consumption in the years to come, while the use of the so-called 
developed direct dyes will increase. An after-treatment with metallic 
salts or formaldehyde is another means of improving the fastness of 
certain direct dyes. 

With a few exceptions, the direct dyes are chemically "azo" com- 
pounds and are nearly all derivatives of benzidine, tolidine, diamino, 
stilbene, or a group closely similar to one of these. A small but 
valuable group of direct colors belongs in the thiazol class. 

Production and imports. — The direct or substantive dyes, with a 
production of 14,787,840 pounds in 1925, ranked third in quantity. 
Sales in 1925 amounted to 15,058,071 pounds, valued at S9,309,345. 
A comparison of production in 1924 and 1925 show relatively small 
change in output of the tonnage dyes. The significant feature, 
however, and one which represents progress in the industry, is the 
large gain in the production of the faster types of direct dyes and 
also an increase in the developed direct dyes. Examples in the 
first group are the direct fast oranges, blues, catechines, and violets; 
the second group, frequently known as the developed or diazo colors, 



Pounds 

BrilUant sky blue 22, 961 

Diphenyl fast brown GNC 17, 629 

Diamine scarlet 3B 16, 899 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 13, 453 

Chlorantine fast yellow 4GL__ 13, 002 

Diamine fast orange 12, 000 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 49 

are blues, blacks, and reds, or such as diazo fast blue and diazo fast 
red, developed black, and Zambezi black V. 

The Direct black EW, with an output of 5,142 147 pounds, led 
this group of dyes, comprising 6 per cent of all dyes manufactured. 
Sales were 5,527,264 pounds, valued at $1,862,514. The unit value 
of 33.7 cents represents a decline of 4.2 cents per pound. 

Direct brown 3G0 ranked second, with a production of 808,707 
pounds, and Direct blue 2B with 787,074 pounds, third. Other 
direct dyes with a large production include Chrysophenine G, 
459,595 pounds, and Direct yellow R with 413 432 pounds. 

Imports of direct dyes in 1925 amounted to 759,024 pounds, or 
14.57 per cent of all dyes imported. The twelve leading direct dyes 
imported in 1925 were: 

Pounds 

Chlorantine fast brown 34, 268 

Chlorantine fast violet 33, 941 

Diaminogene blue 31, 943 

Chlorantine red 8BN 28, 631 

Chlorantine fast blue 28, 435 

Trisulphon brown B 25, 815 

Pyrazol orange 25, 165 

SRA dyes. — These dyes were developed after exhaustive research 
work by the British Celanese Co. (Ltd.) (manufacturers of celanese 
silk), especially for the dyeing of acetate cellulose known as "acetate 
silk." They are sold in the form of a 10 per cent paste, consisting 
of a dispersion of the dye wdth a highly sulfonated castor oil — that is, 
sulforicinoleic acid. When mixed with water the dispersed colloidal 
solution is capable of dyeing cellulose acetate. In fabrics colored 
with these dyes the cotton is left unstained, as well as artificial 
silks other than acetate. They offer a good range of colors, are of 
easy application, and possess good general fastness. 

Eighteen SUA dyes were manufactured for the first time in the 
United States in 1925. The domestic production of these special 
dyes on a large scale is a development of high interest, in view of the 
remarkable expansion of the Rayon industry in the United States, 
and the rapid increase in the use of celanese or acetate silk. 

Mordant and Chrome Dyes 

Description.— These colors are used in conjunction with metallic 
mordants, such as salts of chromium, aluminum, iron, and tin, to 
dye both vegetable and animal fibers. The resulting shades are, 
in general, of exceptional fastness to color-destroying agents. On 
wool, the mordant dyes yield shades fast to light, washing, and other 
agents. They are also important in printing on cotton piece goods, 
but are little used on silk. 

The mordant dyes are frequently designated as chrome colors. 
As many of them are derived from alizarin they were formerly 
called alizarin dyes. Certain dyes may be acid, acid chrome, or 
chrome, according to the method of application. The true alizarins 
are generally used with a mordant; the new acid alizarins can be 
used either with or without a mordant, and constitute a valuable 
group in the wool trade. In the application of chrome dyes on 
wool, the mordant may be applied before, during, or after the dyeing 



50 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



operation. The labor cost of dyeing with mordant and chrome 
dyes is higher than for many other groups. 

Formerly the most important dye of this class was alizarin, used 
on cotton to produce the well-known Turkey red, one of the shades 
made in ancient times from madder root. Alizarin has for about 50 
years been prepared synthetically from anthracene. In the United 
States it has been replaced to a large extent for cotton by certain of 
the so-called ''ice" dyes, such as Para red and more recently by 
Naphthol AS red. 

Chemically, the mordant dyes are members of the following 
classes: (1) Anthraquinone, (2) azo, (3) oxazine, (4) triphenylme- 
thane, (5) nitroso, (6) oxyquinone, and (7) xanthone. 

Production and imports. — The output of mordant and chrome 
colors in 1925 was 2,543,292 pounds, or nearly 3 per cent of all 
dyes manufactured. This production is a decline of nearly 14 per 
cent from 1924. Sales in 1925 were 2,694,876 pounds, valued at 
$1,990,468. The change in production of the tonnage products 
were in most cases relatively small. Metachrome brown, however, 
recorded a sharp decline in production. A number of the alizarin 
derivatives, a valuable group used for wool dyeing, were made in 
greatly increased quantity in 1925. These have been heavily im- 
ported and their increased production is a notable development in 
dye manufacture. 

Chrome blue black U, with a production of 851,540 pounds, 
ranked first among the mordant and chrome colors. Sales were 
851,161 pounds, valued at $369,914. Other important dyes in this 
group include Alizarin, Acid alizarin blue B, Chrome black F, T, and 
Blue black B. Conspicuous increases were recorded in the produc- 
tion of Alizarin blue black B, Alizarin red S, Anthracene blue WR 
and Alizarin serge blue. 

Imports of mordant and chrome dyes totaled 642,098 pounds, 
which was 12.33 per cent in quantity of all dyes brought into this 
country in 1925, 24 per cent of domestic producton of the group. 
The twelve leading mordant and chrome dyes imported are: 



Pounds 

Alizarin (synthetic) 75, 174 

Alizarin blue black 51,066 

Gallamine blue 36, 021 

Alizarin sky blue B .34, 352 

Alizarin saphirol B 30, 425 

Purpurine 28, 281 



Pounds 

Eriochrome azurol BC 28, 093 

Alizarin orange 24, 450 

Alizarin saphirol SE 24, 382 

Alizarin viridine FF 21, 798 

Alizarin blue S 16, 359 

Alizarin YCA 15, 152 



Sulphur Dyes. 

Description. — These dyes are used largely in cotton dj^eing, es- 
pecially for uniform cloths, hosiery, gingham yarns, and cotton 
warps to be woven with wool and later dyed with acid d3'^es. They 
are used very largely for heavy shades of blue, green, brown and 
black. Their greatly extended use during the war served to in- 
crease permanently their application on cotton. Minor uses are in 
the dyeing of linen and artificial silk. 

The sulphur dyes possess excellent fastness to washing, fulling, 
alkalies, and acids in cross dyeing. With some exceptions, their 
fastness to light is good. As they are not fast to chlorine, they do 
not withstand the repeated bleaching action of hypochlorites in the 



DYES AND OTHEK FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 51 

modern laundry treatment. They are applied in a sodium sulphide 
solution with, in certain cases, after treatment with metallic salts or 
other agents to improve their fastness. "Cachou de Laval," the 
first of this group to be discovered, was made in 1867 by the fusion 
of sawdust with sodium sulphide and sulphur. Sulphur dyes are 
now prepared by the fusion of various intermediates (containing the 
nitro, amino, or imino groups) with sodium sulphide and sulphur. 
These dyes are not pure, distinct compounds, and the presence of 
other substances renders them of comparatively low^ color value. 
Recent developments, however, have greatly increased the tinctorial 
value and shade range of many of them. 

Production and imports. — This group, with an output of 20,760,512 
pounds, ranked second in quantity, constituting 24 per cent of all 
dyes manufactured. The 1925 production was an increase of 42.5 per 
cent over 1924. Sales in 1925 were 18,453,834 pounds, valued at 
$4,171,590. The sulphur dyes ranked fourth in sales value in 1925. 

As in 1.924, sulphur black ranked second in 1925 in quantity of all 
dyes produced. The 1925 output of 16,587,828 pounds was an in- 
crease of 41.5 per cent over 1924. Sales in 1925 were 14,505,404 
pounds, valued at $2,470,787. The average sales price per pound 
was 17 cents, a decline of nearly 11 per cent. Sulphur black is an 
important item in our export trade, ranking second to indigo. About 
80 per cent of the total increase in production in 1925 was made up 
by Sulphur black and Indigo. 

Sulphur brown, with a production of 1,832,364 pounds, ranked 
second among the sulphur dyes. Sulphur blue, with a production 
of 668,959 pounds, and Sulphur yellow, with a total of 594,193 
pounds, were produced in the next largest quantities. Sulphur green 
and Sulphur orange both recorded a conspicuous gain in output in 
1925. 

Imports of sulphur dyes were relatively small, amounting to 
122,230 pounds, or 2.35 per cent of all dyes imported. Cross dye 
green, with a total of 57,924 pounds led this class, and Thionol 
brown with 18,383 pounds and Thional brilliant blue, w^ith a total 
of 5,001 pounds, were second and third, respectively. 

Vat Dyes 

Description. — Vat dj^es as a class possess exceptional fastness to 
light, washing, acids, alkalies, and chlorine. Some of them are not 
fast to all of these agents. The consumption of vat dyes is increas- 
ing as a result of the increased demand for fast-dyed fabrics b}'^ the 
ultimate consumer of textiles. As cotton goods dyed with these 
colors withstand the severe treatment of the modern laundry, the 
increased cost of dye per yard is a minor factor compared with the 
increased life of the fabric. A European colorist, referring to the 
vat dyes, has said that Europe is too poor to afford anything but 
fast dyes, as he considers the loose or fugitive colors an extravagance. 
Their superior fastness and the variety and beauty of shades which 
they yield have been largely responsible for a steady increase in 
their use. They are applied on dyed and printed shirtings, blouse 
material, dress goods, ginghams, muslin curtains, and other cotton 
wash goods and have a limited application on silk and a still smaller 
one on wool. Because of their higher cost they have a limited use 



52 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

in solid or heavy shades, their chief use being for color stripesl'and 
small printed patterns on a white background. They possess tech- 
nical advantages in application over the alizarin mordant dyes. 

With the exception of Indigo, one of the oldest dyes known, vat 
dyes are of recent origin, having been developed since 1904. The 
Badische Co., of Germany, manufactured the first members of this 
class, known in the trade as the indanthrenes. This group was 
followed by the ciba dyes of the Society of Chemical Industry at 
Basle, Switzerland, and later by other series, including the .algols, 
heiindones, thioindigoes, and hydrous, produced by different Ger- 
man concerns. Prior to the war vat dyes other than Indigo were 
made exclusively in Germany and Switzerland. 

Following the outbreak of the war, the United States and Great 
Britain, two of the leading consumers of these dyes, began their 
manufacture on an extensive scale. 

Vat dyes are among the most complex of dyes, difficult to manufac- 
ture, and relatively high in cost. Chemically they consist of indi- 
goids (including thioindigoids), anthraquinone derivatives, and the 
carbazoie derivatives. 

In 1924 a water-soluble leuco derivative of Indigo, under the name 
of indigosol, was placed on the market by Swiss and German firms. 
Since then other indigosol types, including Indigosol black TB, Indi- 
gosol violet AZB, and a yellow HCG, have been made in commercial 
quantity. A similar derivative of Caledon jade green, known as 
Soledon jade green, was manufactured by the Scottish Dyes (Ltd.). 
The commercial production of water-soluble leuco derivatives, which 
can be used on animal as well as vegetable fibers, marks an advance 
not only in this group, but in the whole realm of dye manufacture. 
Their application by the "direct method" with subsequent oxida- 
tion is less complex than by the alkali hydrosulphite process generally 
used for the vat dyes. 

Extended use of these new derivatives will depend in part on their 
selling prices. 

Production and imports. — Expansion in the production of vat dyes 
is an outstanding feature of the domestic dye industry during the 
year 1925. The total production, including Indigo, was 31,730,178 
pounds, or 36.7 per cent of all dyes produced. This production rep- 
resents a 45 per cent increase over 1924. Sales in 1925 were 26,702,- 
741 pounds, valued at $7,105,849. 

Indigo (20 per cent paste) reached its maximum production in the 
United States in 1925, when 29,121,817 pounds were made. This 
was 34 per cent of all dyes produced in that year. Production in 
1924 was 19,996,703 pounds. Sales in 1925 amounted to 24,449,938 
pounds, valued at $3,805,518, or 15.6 cents per pound, as compared 
with 21.8 cents in 1924 and 23 cents in 1923. The current price of 
Indigo, May, 1926, was about 12 cents a pound. This is much below 
the pre-war price in 1913, when our entire supply was imported 
The principal reason for the increased sales of Indigo in 1925 was a 
gain in export demand rather than increased domestic consumption. 

Vat dyes other than Indigo, with a total of 2,608,361 pounds, showed 
an increase of 43 per cent over 1924. The increasing importance of 
this group of dyes to the textile industry is indicated by the produc- 
tion and consumption figures in Table 20. 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



53 



Table 20. — Production, imports, and consumption of vat dyes other than indigo in 
the United States, 1914 and 1920-1925 



Year 


Production 


Imports 


Consumption 


1925 


Pounds 
2, 608, 361 
1,821,319 
1, 766, 383 
1, 075, 992 
345, 152 
1, 159, 868 


Pounds 
2, 418, 842 
1. 493, 851 
1, 207, 654 
1, 548, 519 
1, 045. 370 
761,363 
1, 945. 304 


Pounds 
5, 027. 203 


1924 -- - 


3,315, 170 


1923 


2, 973. 937 


1922 


2,624.511 


1921 


1, 390, 522 


192.1 


1,921,231 


1914 


1. 945, 304 









There is undoubtedly a world-wide trend toward the use of vat 
dyes. In the United States their increased consumption is largely 
due to the progressive attitude of certain textile manufacturers and 
the realization on the part of the public that fast-dyed or printed 
fabrics are in the long run the more economical. A number of 
domestic textile firms have in the last few years introduced under 
various trade names a range of fast-dyed fabrics of silk, as well as 
of cotton, which are dyed almost entirely with the vat colors. Cer- 
tain lines of fabrics, such as men's shirtings, are dyed largely with 
vat colors. In Europe an even wider range of fabrics than in the 
United States are dyed with this group. In the Orient also, par- 
ticularly in India and Japan, the consumption of vat colors is rapidly 
increasing. 

Of the vat dyes other than Indigo, Anthraquinone vat blue GCD 
again led in quantity of production and in value of sales. Anthra- 
quinone vat yellow G ranked second. Anthraquinone golden orange 
G and R, Dibromindigo RB, vat pinks of the FF type, Anthrene 
jade green, and Anthraquinone blue BCS also showed notable 
increases. 

Imports of vat dyes other than Indigo totaled 2,416,890 pounds, 
which was 46.39 per cent of all dyes imported in the United States 
in 1925. The 1924 import was 1,493,851 pounds. The imported 
vat colors, in common with certain other high-priced dyes, have 
offered heavy competition to similar types manufactured in the 
United States. The following tabulation shows the leading vat dyes 
imported and the quantity brought in during 1925: 



Ciba violet B, R 

Indanthrene blue GCD 

Ciba scarlet 

Indanthrene yellow G, R 

Brilliant indigo 4B 

Indanthrene golden orange R- 

Ciba red R 

Anthraflavone GC 

Indanthrene red violet RH 

Helindone printing black RD. 



Pounds 1 


276, 


858 


139, 


876 


123, 


473 


111, 


713 


92, 


300 


90, 


730 


85, 


084 


73, 


816 


69, 


107 


68, 


000 



Hydron orange RF 

Hydron pink FF 

Indanthrene blue BCS 

Indanthrene brown R 

Indanthrene brown G 

Indanthrene golden orange G. 

Hydron brown G, R 

Cibanone yellow R 

Cibanone orange R 

Indanthrene black BB 



Pounds 
63, 608 
63, 052 
59, 814 
59, 033 
51,813 
46, 646 
36, 076 
34, 815 
33, 939 
,32, 706 



Color-Lake and Spirit-Soluble Dyes 



These dyes, constituting one of the smaller groups, are used in the 
preparation of a class of pigments known as color lakes, discussed 
in detail on page 55. The spirit-soluble dyes are insoluble in water, 
but dissolve in oils, fats, or various organic solvents; consequently 



54 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



they find application for coloring varnishes, fats, oils, waxes, and 
similar products. As many of the spirit-soluble dyes are converted 
by chemical treatment, such as sulphonation, into water-soluble 
dyes for use in textile dj^eing, they may be considered as partly 
completed dyes. 

The output of color-lake and spirit-soluble dyes in 1925 was 
1,606,795 pounds, or 1.9 per cent of the total output of all dyes pro- 
duced. This production is a 65 per cent increase over 1924. Imports 
of this group were 57,540 pounds, or 1.1 per cent of all dyes imported 

Food Dyes 

Dyes classified under this group include a limited number of selected 
dyes which meet the specifications of the Bureau of Chemistry, 
Department of Agriculture. The total production of food dyes in 
1925 was 263,005 pounds, with sales of 272,933 pounds, valued at 
$996,229. Production in 1924 was 264,178 pounds, and in 1921, the 
first year in which they were separately compiled, 50,709 pounds. 
The average value of the sales was $3.65 per pound in 1925, as com- 
pared with $3.48 in 1924 and $5.80 in 1921. 

EXPORT TRADE INCREASES 

Exports of coal-tar dyes in 1925 increased 64 per cent by quantity 
and 19 per cent by value over 1924 as shown in Table 21. The 
average value per pound was 25.9 cents. The principal markets are 
China, Japan, and Canada; British India, and the Central and South 
American countries are smaller purchasers. In 1925 Russia bought 
76,861 pounds for $57,895. Indigo and Sulphur black make up the 
bulk of the dyes exported; the remainder are largely the tonnage 
direct dyes. Exports of Indigo in 1925 reflect the peak production of 
this dye, namely, over 29,000,000 pounds. Total sales in 1925 
amounted to 24,449,900 pounds, of which only about 9,000,000 
pounds were consumed in this country. Following the big drop in 
our export trade in 1921 from the peak year 1920, there began a 
gradual improvement. Despite the severity of competition in world 
markets, domestic manufacturers have for several years been obtain- 
ing a share of the trade in Indigo and Sulphur black in China and 
other countries. 

Table 21 shows the total exports of dyes from the United States 
from 1920 to 1925. 



Table 21. — Exports of coal-tar dyes from the United States, 1920-1925 



Year 


Pound 


Value 


1920 




$29, 823, 591 


1921 




6, 270, 139 


1922 


8, 344, 187 
17, 924, 200 
15, 713, 428 
25,799,889 


3, 99t), 443 


1923.. 


5, 565, 267 


1924 


5, 636, 244 


1925 . . 


6, 694, 360 







Details as to the quantity and value of exports to the various 
countries are shown in Part VII. The Dye Census of 1924, Table 22, 
page 58, gives monthly exports from 1919 to 1924, inclusive, and the 
Dye Census of 1918 gives exports back to 1909. 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



00 



Table 22 shows by months the total exports of dves from the United 
States from 1922 to April, 1926, inclusive. 

Table 22.^Do)nestic exports of dyes, by months, 1922-1926 {four months) 



Month 



1922 



Color lakes 



Pounds 



Value 



other colors, etc. 



Pounds 



Value 



Total 



Pounds 



Value 



January I 5,059 

February. : 6,796 

March i 3,612 

April i 8,446 

May 401 

June , 282 

July I 356 

August { 593 

September : 341 

October I 576 

November : 1,702 

December 1 64 

Total 28,228 19, 



;4, 188 

5,124 

3,162 

2,105 

500 

361 

249 

411 

607 

890 

2,228 

103 



364, 971 
298, 364 
708, 792 
581, 367 
328, 733 
398, 975 
726, 624 
896, 701 
664, 348 
954, 922 
1,084,890 
1,307,272 



$325, 048 
230, 544 
405, 250 
271, 571 
227, 898 
222, 370 
364, 737 
383, 692 
304, 022 
399, 439 
395, 579 
446, 365 



370, 030 
305, 160 
712, 404 
589, 813 
329, 134 
399, 257 
726, 980 
897, 294 
664, 689 
955, 498 
1, 086, 592 
1, 307, 336 



$329, 236 
235, 668 
408,412 
273, 676 
228, 398 
222, 731 
364, 986 
384, 103 
304, 629 
400, 329 
397, 807 
446, 468 



8,315,959 3,976,515 



8,344,187 3,996,443 





1923 


1924 


19251 


1926 > 


Month 


Colors, dyes, and 
stains 


Colors, dyes, and 
stains 


Colors, dyes, and 
stains 


Colors, dyes, and 
stains 




Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


January 

February 

March 

April . . . 


821, 847 
1, 338, 395 
1, 606, 168 
1,690,402 
1, 830, 068 
1, 002, 256 
2, 915, 531 
1, 008, 878 
1,514.228 
1, 543, 869 
1, 390, 927 
1, 261, 631 


$332, 008 
443, 505 
513, 129 
498, 421 
539, 358 
383, 321 
778, 168 
388, 815 
402, 751 
474,215 
433, 892 
377, 684 


1,432,721 
1, 739, 400 
1, 244, 264 
1,014,824 

751, 152 
1, 288, 177 
1, 818, 873 
2, 083, 628 

970, 880 
1, 079, 935 
1, 267, 978 
1, 021, 596 


$494, 666 
571,776 
408,029 
344, 605 
323, 917 
410, 314 
555, 615 
667, 696 
437, 352 
538, 099 
505, 546 
378, 629 


2, 006, 681 
2,067,046 
1, 990, 398 
2, 172, 425 
2, 076, 516 
2, 127, 507 
2, 080, 588 
2,205,476 
2,511,898 
1,717,766 
1, 840, 426 
3, 004, 553 


$657, 919 
602, 316 
554,111 
674, 799 
491, 578 
527, 883 
488, 416 
535,093 
612,867 
466, 910 
401, 575 
680, 689 


1,552,335 
1, 610, 625 
2,924,695 
1,666,344 


$416,975 
403,949 
696, 538 
425, 792 


May 




June 






July 






August 






September.. 






October 






November 






December 












Total. - 


17, 924, 200 


5, 565, 267 


15,713,428 


5, 636, 244 


25, 801, 280 


6, 694, 156 













I Preliminary figures. 



OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 

Color Lakes 

Description. — A color lake is an insoluble color pigment. It is 
commonly made by precipitating a coloring matter (a coal-tar dye) 
on a carrier (the base). The desired properties of a color lake are 
good coloring power, easy workability, brightness, and fastness to 
weather, light, alkali, and acids. The precipitating agents used for 
coal-tar colors are barium chloride, lead salts, aluminum hydroxide, 
and tannin or tannin tartar-emetic. Among the more important 
carriers are aluminium hydroxide, zinc white, lithopone, barytes, 
whiting, China clay and certain native clays, and ocher. The 
principal requirements of a carrier are (1) ready reduction to a finely 
divided state and (2) absence of any deleterious effect on the shade 
of the finished lake. The coloring matter includes groups of coal-tar 

5919— 26t 5 



56 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

dyes known as acid dyes, basic dyes, and mordant dyes, as well as 
certain azo dyes produced directly on the carrier. An example of 
the latter is Para red produced from the intermediate p-nitroaniline 
and b-naphthol. Another group of color lakes is made by »the 
precipitation of a water-soluble acid dye, with the aid of a mineral 
salt to form an insoluble product. 

After precipitation the insoluble lake is filtered, dried, and ground 
with or without oil; it is then ready for use as a pigment in paints, 
lithographic inks, artist's colors, wall paper, rubber products, and 
for other coloring purposes. 

Production. — The total production of color lakes in 1925 was 
11,414,753 pounds, a 22 per cent increase over 1924. Sales in 1925 
amounted to 11,308,444 pounds, valued at $5,544,371. Production 
in 1923 was 13,079,115 pounds. 

Photographic Chemicals 

Because of their strong reducing properties, coal-tar chemicals of 
this class are used for developing photographic films, plates, and 
prints. They are popularly known as "developers," but are sold 
under a variety of trade names. 

The total output of photographic chemicals in 1925 was 327,041 
pounds as compared with 316,183 pounds in 1924. Hydroquinol, 
with an output of 208,857 pounds, continued to lead this group. 
Metol, produced in next largest quantity, recorded a slight decrease. 
p-Hydroxy phenylglycine and diaminophenol hydrochloride showed 
increases in production. The average selling price of each of the 
two last mentioned and of metol was lower in 1925 than in 1924. 

Medicinals 

Description. — Coal-tar products of this group include many com- 
pounds essential to the treatment of serious types of disease, and 
are therefore of the utmost importance to our national welfare. A 
notable feature in the recent history of the domestic coal-tar chem- 
ical industry is the development of new medicinals and new methods 
of utilizing them. Research now under way points to further dis- 
coveries of great value to humanity. 

Production. — The total production of coal-tar medicinals in 1925 
was 3,237,796 pounds, a 9 per cent gain over the previous year. 
Sales in 1925 were 3,294,827 pounds, valued at $6,331,918. 

Among the important synthetic medicinals made in the United 
States separate statistics may be given for the following: 

Neoarsphenamine (3-diamino-4-dihydroxy-l-arsenobenzene meth- 
anol sulphoxylate) is used for combating syphilis and other pro- 
tozoan infections. Six firms reported a total production in 1925 of 
3,289 pounds. Sales amounted to 3,470 pounds, valued at $1,125,143, 
which means that there were stocks on hand carried over from pro 
duction at an earlier period. 

There has been a drop in the output of arsphenamine each year 
since 1921; production in 1925 was 278 pounds as compared with 
555 pounds in 1924 and 865 pounds in 1922. Sales in 1925 were 
350 poimds, valued at $103,055. Sulfoarsphenamine, with a pro- 
duction of 734 pounds in 1925, showed a slight decline. Sales in 
1925 were 779 pounds, valued at $329,349. 



DYES AND OTHEE FINISHED COAL-TAE PEODUCTS 57 

Aspirin, the leading medicinal in quantity of output, with a total of 
1,499,166 pounds, showed an increase of nearly 10 per cent. Sales 
were 1,476,058 pounds, valued at $1,025,610 — a unit value of 69.5 
cents per pound. 

Sodium salicylate, with a production of 415,465 pounds, recorded 
a slight increase. Sales amounted to 443,961 pounds, valued at 
$163,514. 

Acetanilide, w^th an output of 158,756 pounds, registered a drop 
of nearly 63 per cent. Sales for 1925, however, amounted to 363,510 
pounds, valued at $112,751. 

Luminal and luminal sodium, useful hypnotics in nervous insomnia 
and in the treatment of epilepsy, were made in 1925 and 1924, but 
not in 1923. 

Notable increases occurred in the production of Aminopyrene, 
Benzocaine, Benzyl succinate, b-Naphthol benzoate, Phenolphtha- 
lein, Procaine, Salol, and certain salicylates. 

Among medicinals that were either reported for the first time in 
1925 or were not reported in 1924 are: Bismuth subsalicylate. Brilliant 
green, Bromeikon, Caffeine sodium benzoate. Copper sulfophenolate, 
o-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate, lodeikon, Mercurosal, Methyl-p-hydroxy- 
aminobenzoate, Para fuchsine, Stovarsol, Triphenylstilbene sulfide, 
Trypan blue, and Tryparsamide. 

Flavors and Perfume Materials 

Description. — There is no sharp line of demarcation between these 
two classes of coal-tar chemicals, many of them being used both as 
flavors for food products and perfumes for soaps and other toilet 
articles. Separate classification is therefore in certain cases purely 
arbitrary. 

Production oj flavors. — The total production of flavors in 1925 was 
2,207,102 pounds, a 26 per cent increase over the previous year. 
Sales in 1925 were 2,148,904 pounds, valued at $1,409,311, a unit 
value of 66 cents a pound as compared with 87 cents in 1924. 

Methylsalicylate, a flavor used largely as an artificial winter- 
green, again led this group in quantity and value. The output was 
1,819,822 pounds, which was a 42 per cent increase over 1924. Sales 
amounted to 1,802,669 pounds, valued at $711,502. 

Coumarin was reported by six firms in 1925. Production was 
104,363 pounds, a decline of 19 per cent from 1924. Sales in 1925 
were 104,054 pounds, valued at $309,596, or $2.98 per pound. All 
other flavors showed declines in production. 

Dulcin (p-phenetol carbamide), a sweet substance used as a sub- 
stitute for saccharin, was first reported in 1925. 

Production of perfumes. — The output of perfume materials of coal- 
tar origin in 1925 was 2,335,024 pounds, a 23 per cent increase over 
the previous year. Sales w^ere 2,370,728 pounds, valued at $883,617, 
an average value of 37 cents a pound, as compared with 49 cents in 
1924. 

Diethyl phthalate again led in quantity of production and in value 
of sales. The output in 1925 was 2,099,181 pounds, which was a 25 
per cent increase over 1924. Sales were 2,137,340 pounds, valued at 
$657,538. The average sales value per pound of 31 cents was a decline 
of 7 cents from 1924. 



58 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEB SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Dibutyl phthalate and phenylacetic aldehyde showed a large 
increase in production in 1925, and diphenyl oxide, benzyl benzoate, 
and benzylidine acetone a decline. 

Among the new products reported for the first time in 1925 were 
butyl phenylacetate, p-cresol methyl ether, ethyl anthranilate, and 
phenyl ethyl proprionate. 

Imports. — Table 23 shows imports for consumption of synthetic 
aromatic chemicals of coal-tar origin taken from the monthly lists 
of imports of items coming within paragraphs 27 and 28 of the tariff 
act of 1922. This list was prepared jointly by the chemical divisions 
of the Department of Commerce and the United States Tariff Com- 
mission. 

Table 23. — Imports into the United States of synthetic aromatic chemicals of coal- 
tar origin, 1925 



Acetophenone 

Acetyl butyl xylene 

Acetyl toluene 

Ambrogene 

Amyl phenylacetate 

Amyl salicylate,-. 

Anisic aldehyde 

Azo benzene 

Balsam Peru 

Benzaldehyde 

Benzophenone 

Benzoic acid 

Benzyl acetate 

Benzyl alcohol 

Benzyl benzoate 

Benzyl buty rate 

Benzyl cinnamate 

Benzyl formate 

Benzyl isoeugenol 

Benzyl propionate 

Benzyl salicylate. 

Benzyl valerianate 

Benzylidene acetone 

Bigaradine 

Bromstyrol 

Butyl ketone 

B utyl xylene 

Butyl xylene residue 

Centaurea crystals 

Cetone D 

Cinnamic acid ethyl ester..... 

Cinnamic aldehyde 

Cinnamol 

Coumarin 

Craetsegon 

Diethyl phthalate 

Dimethyl anthranilate 

Dimethyl benzyl carbinol 

Dimethyl hydroquinone 

Dimethyl phenyl carbinol 

Dimethyl phthalate 

Diphenyl methane 

Di phenyl oxide _ 

E thyl anthranilate 

Ethyl butylphenate residue... 

Ethyl chloroacetate 

Ethyl cinnamate 

Ethyl methylphenyl glycidate 

Ethyl phenylacetate 

Ethyl phenato residue.. 

Ethyl phenylacetic acid. 

Ethyl salicylate.. 

Gardenal 

Holiotropine crystals. : 

Hyacinth, absolute 



Pounds 



813 

5 

29 

1,102 

30 

1,708 

581 

5 

2 

10,802 

777 

125 

13, 596 

3,465 

10, 349 

48 

20 

21 

13 

114 

254 

2 

204 

3 

95 

1,186 

4,244 

5 

15 

110 

30 

4,333 

11 

1,083 

500 

3,254 

61 

1 

88 

14 

330 

111 

723 

8 

5 

661 

164 

26 

37 

25 

10 

5 

781 

3,116 

341 



Name 



Hyacinth, compound 

Indol 

Isobutyl butyrate 

Isobutyl phenyl acetate 

Jacinthe 

Jacinthe absolute 

Metacresol acetate 

Methyl acetate 

Methyl acetophenone 

Methyl anthranilate 

Methyl methyl anthranilate 

diethyl cinnamate 

Methyl nonyl acetic aldehyde 

Methyl paracresol 

Methyl phenyl acetate 

Methyl salicylate 

Musk ambrette 

Musk ambrette residue 

Musk ketone 

Musk tonkin 

Musk xylene 

INIusk xylene residue 

Neroline 

Oleo musk 

Paramino benzoic acid 

Paracresol acetate 

Paracresol methyl ether 

Paracresyl phenyl acetate 

Paramethyl tetra hydroquinoline 

Phenylacetic acid., 

Phenylacetic aldehyde. 

Phenylacetic aldehyde residue... 

Phenylethyl acetate 

Phenylethyl alcohol 

Phenylethyl benzoate 

Phenylethyl butyrate 

Phenylethyl cinnamate 

Phenyh'thyl formate 

Phenylethyl propionate 

Phenylethyl valerianate 

Phenylpropyl acetate 

Phen yl propyl alcohol 

Phenylpropyl aldehyde _ 

Phenyl propyl formate 

Phenylglycolmethylene acetate... 

Phenylol residue. 

Resin , artificial 

Rhodinol P 

Skatol 

Vanillin 

Vertena D.. 

Yara yara 

Total 



Pounds 



300 

40 

5 

75 

310 

122 

2 

20 

964 

5,009 

114 

137 

2 

97 

272 

1 

12, 674 
2,455 
5,226 

28 

22, 913 

105 

640 

1,541 

11 

110 

45 

10 

2 

743 

2,288 

25 

233 

13, 996 

2 
26 
2 
6 
137 
3 

35 

38 

5 

3 

2 

55 

200 

22 

73 

316 

17 

145 



137, 038 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 59 

Synthetic Phenolic Resins 

The commercial manufacture of synthetic phenolic resin is dis- 
tinctly an American achievement developed after years of careful 
research and engineering work. These resins are made by con- 
densing phenol or cresol with formaldehyde in the presence of an 
alkali, such as ammonia, or with hexamethylenetetramine. 

The uses for synthetic resins are so numerous that they have been 
popularly called "the material of a thousand uses." By far the 
largest use is as a binder in the production of molded insulation prod- 
ucts, such as laminated sheets and panels for automobile and radio 
parts. Their high dielectric constant renders them especially 
valuable insulating material. The clear or transparent phenolic 
resins are used as substitutes for amber in the manufacture of cigarette 
and cigar holders, pipe bits and sockets, and in the manuiacture of 
beads and other articles of personal adornment, mechanical pencils, 
fountain pens, and many other articles. Other uses are in the 
manufacture of varnishes and lacquers for insulating purposes and 
in the production of cements. 

The production of synthetic phenolic resins in 1925 increased 
greatly over that of 1924, which in turn was greater than the output 
in 1923. The publication of figures, however, would be a virtual 
disclosure of the production of an individual company. The com- 
bined output of synthetic resins and synthetic tanning materials in 
1925 was 14,687,074 pounds, as compared with 12,778,115 pounds 
in 1924. 

This industry is the principal consumer of phenol and is also one 
of the largest users of cresylic acid and formaldehyde. Its large 
consumption of phenol since the World War has resulted in a greatly 
increased output of phenol in this country. 

Synthetic Tanning Materials 

The synthetic tanning materials known as "syntans" have come 
into commercial use in Germany and England since 1912. As they 
have not yet been used extensively in this country, it is possible that 
they will be increasingly consumed in the tanning of leather in con- 
junction with natural tanning extracts. Production figures can not 
be published without disclosing the operations of individual con- 
cerns. The output in 1925 recorded a slight decline from 1924. 

Synthetic tans are made by the condensation of certain coal-tar 
derivatives, such as the sulfonated phenols, cresols, and naphthols, 
with formaldehyde in the presence of an acid. They are commonly 
used in conjunction with the natural tanning extracts. Their use 
is reported to result in (1) an economy of the time required for 
tanning, (2) a satisfactory leather of light color, and (3) a reduction 
in the amount of natural extract required. 



60 



CENSUS OF DYES AXD OTHEK SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



STATISTICS OF PRODUCTION 

Table 24. — Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 

1925 

[The number in the first column identifies the dyes according to the Colour index number and the number 
in the second column according to the 1914 edition of the Schultz tables. The third column gives the 
common name of the product. The numbers in the fourth column refer to the numbered alphabetical 
list of manufacturers printed on page 221. An X signifies that a manufacturer did not consent to the publi- 
cation of his identification number in connection therewith. A blank in the fifth and sixth columns 
Indicates that the sales figures can not be published without revealing information in regard to the 
output of individual firms. A blank in the eighth column indicates that the production of the corre- 
sponding dye in the United States can not be published without revealing information in regard to the 
output of individual firms. The figures thus concealed are, however, included in the total) 



6 




Common name 


Manufacturer's iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on 
p. 221) 


Sales 




Color Index I 
Schultz No. 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 


i 


Total finished coal- 
tar products. 

NITROSO COLORING 
MATTERS 

Naphthol green 

NITRO COLORING 
MATTERS 

Naphthol yellow S 

Pigment chlorine 

AZO COLORING MATTERS 

Monoazo coloring matters 
Acid vellow O.. _ 




Pounds 
112, 671, 779 


$60,811,400 


$0.54 


Pounds 
120, 554, 228 


S 


4 

7 
8 

T37 


8, 54. 




10 


79, 165.- 






i 


13 


X 






1 


16 


53, 54, 114.-- 


2,001 

54, 740 

26, 963 

633, 402 

179, 368 


2,228 


1. 11 


17 ! 68 


Spirit yellow R. 


9, 31, 38, 114, X 

9, 31, 38, 79, X. 


50.112 i .92 57.271 


19 ! 32 


Butter vellow 


23,474 ! .87 1 1.3.898 


20 33 


Chrysoidine Y _ . 


8, 9, 27, 31, 36, 53, 75, 

79, 114. 
8, 9, 31, 38, 53, 54, 75, 

79, 114. 
79. 


273, 389 
80, 205 


.43 1 756,062 


21 ' 34 


Chrysoidinp R 


.45 167,257 


22 


Oil yellow AB.. 




23 35 


Sudan Q 


31 








24 


36 
37 

38 


Sudani 


31, 38, 79, 114, 119, X.. 
9, 114, 150 


51,849 


39, 749 


.77 


42, 911 


?6 


Croceine orange 

Orange Q 




27 


27, 31, 53, 75, 87, 114, 

150. 
114, 116, 119 


137, 432 

8, 981 

29,031 

251, 580 


71, 825 
9,779 


.52 
1.09 


180, 113 


29 ' 40 


Chromotrope 2R 

Fast acid fuchsine B_.. 
Amido naphthol red O.. 

Brilliant sulphon red... 
Azo orseille R 




30 '• 41 

31 1 42 

32 182 


9, 31, 39, 114, 119 

8, 9, 31, 36, 38, 53, 69, 

75, 114, 128, 129. 
116 


16, 550 . 57 
132,269 1 .53 


33, 760 
257, 654 


34 


44 

45 
48 

58 

61 
64 
65 
67 
66 

63 

"70" 
72 
73 
76 

82 

106 

107 
109 


116 








3."i 


Brilliant lake red R 

Chrome yellow 2G. 

C hrome yellow R 

Victoria violet _. 


104 




[ 




36 
40 
53 


8, 9, 27, 36, 39, 46, 75, 
114, 122, 128, X. 

8, 9, 27, 36, 38, 39, 53, 
75, 128, 150, X. 

8, 36, 114, 119, 129 

116, 119, 150..- 


129, 090 
125, 962 
33, 840 


53,861 .42 
57, 017 . 45 
28, 660 i . 85 


92, 058 
117, 073 
25, 071 


54 


Lanafuchsine-. 




55 


Azo coralline.- .. 


69, 75 




- -- - r 




56 


Chromotrope 6B 

Amido naphthol red 6B. 

Azo acid blue 


114, 119 




! 




57 
59 


8, 9, 31, 36, 53, 69, 75, 

114, 119, 129. 
39 


156, 251 


86, 160 


.55 


161, 143 


fil 


Oil yellow OB 

Brilliant orange 

Pigment orange R 

Toluidinered RL 

Sudan II 

Ponceau 2R 


79 










63 


150 










68 


X 






- 




m 


60- 










73 
79 


9,31,38,53,79,114, X.. 
8, 9, 27, 31, 36, 75, 114, 

119, 150. 
31 


36, 777 
425, 877 


38, 186 i. 04 
216,625 1 .51 


34, 195 
371, 694 


82 


Naphthylamine Bor- 
deaux. 

Chrome brown A 

Acid claret B 




83 


150 








85 


150 




1 





DYES AND OTHEE FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



61 



Table 24. — Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 

1925 — Continued 



d 

6 
_c 

"c 

O 


d 

Is 

"3 
■g 


Common name 


Manufacturer's iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on ' 
p. 221) 


Sales 




Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 


88 


112 

114 
89 
88 

102 
93 
94 

100 

"iir 

119 
121 
134 

139 
141 
143 
W4 
145 

147 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
160 
161 

162 
163 

164 

166 
167 
168 
169 
173 
177 
178 
180 
181 

183 

184 
186 
188 
189 
200 
202 

190 
194 
195 
197 

211 

213 
221 

217 


AZO COLORING MATTERS— 

continued 

Monoazo coloring mat- 
ters— ConiinnGi 

Bordeaux B 


8, 9, 27, 31, 36, 38, 53, 

79, 114, 119, 150. 
119. . . 


Pounds 
122, 221 


$68, 570 


$0.56 


Pounds 
103, 604 


90 


C hromotrope lOB 

Metachrome brown B.. 
Acid chrome brown R.. 

Chrome flavine G 

Sudan R 


101 


8, 27, 53, 114, 128.. 

8, 53. 


99, 234 


62, 710 


.63 




105 




110 


75, 116 










113 


119 










114 


Azo eosine C 


119. 129 










119 


Eosamine G . 


119 








122 


Chrome vellow 5G 

Erica 2 ON . . 


54. 




1 




126 


119, 131 










128 


Direct pink 


59, 114, 131 . 










130 


Erica B 


119 










138 


Metanil yellow 


9, 36, 53, 54, 75, 79, 114, 

165. 
54, 128 


490, 926 


337, 212 


.69 


586, 307 


143 


Orange IV 




14fi 


Azo yellow . . . _ . 


9.31.53,54,75,114,165-. 
38, 79, 165 


128,215 
16, 556 


113,050 
13, 504 


.88 
.82 


128, 550 


148 


Resorcin yellow 

Orange I- 




150 


31 




151 


Orange II - 


9, 27, 31, 36, 38, 53, 79, 

114. 
53 


1, 402, 169 


405, 852 


.29 


1, 359, 304 


154 


Azo fuchsine 6B 

Orange R 




161 


53, 79, 114 


107, 421 
46, 734 


41, 347 
97, 451 


.38 
2.09 


133, 292 


163 


Lake red 4B 


9,36,53 


65, 739 


165 


Lake red C. . 


8, 53, 104, 150, 153 




167 


Acid chrome brown B.. 
Acid chrome garnet R., 

Chrome violet B 

Chrome black PV 

Fast brown N . _ . . . . 


39, 114, 116 


14, 197 


14, 131 


.99 




168 


114 




169 


53, 114, 116 


5,808 


7,432 


1.28 




170 


53, 114 




175 












176 


Fast red A - - 


27, 31, 36, 53, 79, 114, 

119, 128, 150. 
38 


137, 603 


94,880 


.69 


127, 823 


177 


Brilliant fast red G 

Azo rubine 




179 


8,31,36,53,75,91,114, 

119. 
8, 9, 36, 75, 114, 116, 

119, 129. 
8 


226, 201 
139, 068 


171, 822 
120, 587 


.76 

.87 


193, 430 


180 


Fast red VR 


115,394 


182 


Fast red E 




183 


Croceine scarlet 3B 

Amaranth 


36 










184 


31,36,79, 114, 119,150.. 
27, 31, 75, 114, 150 


29, 368 


18, 516 


.63 




185 






189 


Lake red R 


36, 56,60, 150, 153, X,X. 
8, 9, 36, 114 


278, 298 
17, 827 


238, 955 
10, 139 


.86 

.57 


302, 022 


195 


Mordant yellow 

Chrome yellow RN 

Chrome blue black B._. 
Chrome blue black U... 

Chrome black T 

Chrome black A 




197 


114 




201 


36, 75, 116 










202 
203 


8, 9, 31, 36, 53, 75, 114, 

116, 119, 128, 150. 
31, 36, 53, 75, 116 


851, 161 


369,914 


.42 


851,540 


204 
207 


36, 53, 75, 114, 116 

53 


143, 654 


79, 580 


.55 


98, 526 


208 
209 


Fast acid blue R 

Fast acid blue B 


8, 53, 75, 114, 116 

114 


205, 669 


133, 701 


.65 


203, 014 


214 


X 










216 




31, 36, 38, 53, 75, 114, 

119, X. 
131 


69, 848 


55, 112 


.79 




220 


Direct brown 5R 

Direct pink R 




225 


59, 119, 131 










227 


Direct scarlet SG 

Direct scarlet G 

Disazo coloring matters 

Resorcin brown B 

Resorcin dark brown... 
Acid chrome brown G.. 
Acid black lOB 


59, 116, 131, X 


8,477 


12, 595 


1.49 


8,817 


228 


69 131 




234 
235 


8, 36, 38, 53, 69, 75, 79, 

114, 122, 128, 129. 
8, 9, 31, 38, 114 


211, 602 


138, 421 


.65 


243, 420 


238 


53 










246 


8, 9, 31, 36, 38, 39, 53, 
75, 114, 119, 122, 128, 
129, 150. 


1, 291, 729 


704, 248 


.55 


1, 191, 137 









62 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 24. — Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products ■. 

1925 — Continued 



Common name 



Manufacturer's iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on 
p. 221) 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Aver- 
j age 
I price 
! per 
pound 



Production 



294 
296 
297 
303 
304 
307 
311 
312 

313 
319 
320 
322 
326 
327 

332 
333 

336 
337 

342 
351 
340 
341 
343 

344 

349 
355 
362 
363 
365 
378 
382 
385 



Azo COLORING MAT- 
TEES— Continued 

Disazo coloring mat- 
ters — Continued 



Azo dark green. .- 
Brilliant croceine- 



Ponceau 5R._ 
Cloth red 3G. 
Sudan IV 



Cloth red 2B 

Neutral gray G. 

Milling orange Q 

Cloth scarlet G 

Direct fast red 8 BL 

Scarlet EC 

Fast cvanine 5R 

Acid black B. _... 

Chrome black F 

Diamond green 

Fast acid black N2B.... 
Fast cj'anine black B..- 
Naphthylamine black 
D. 

Brilliant croceine 9B 

Diaminogen.- 

Direct fast scarlet— 

Bismarck brown 

Bismarck brown 2R 

Acid chrome black F-_. 
Acid chrome black SN . 
Chrome fast yellow C _ . 
Direct fast yellow 5GL 
Direct fast pink 2BL... 

Paper yellow 

Chrysophenine G 

i Congo red 

Direct orange TA 

Congo Corinth G 



Direct rubine 

Direct scarlet B. 

Bordeaux 

Direct violet B.. 
Direct violet O.. 
Direct violet N.. 



Direct fast red 9BL 

Developed black BHN. 



Direct cyanine R- 
Directblue2B... 



Chrysamine G 

Cresotine yellow G. 
Direct orange R-.. 

Direct fast red R 

Direct fast red F... 



Direct brown M. 



I Direct brown B 

I Chrome red 

I Direct orange R 

Benzopurpurine 4B. 
Benzopurpurine B.. 

! Direct blue R 

; Direct mauve B 

j Direct blue 3R 

1 Direct blue BX 



38 

9,31,36,53,75, 

150. 
31 



(9, 114, 



$176, 007 



53,54 _._ 

9, 31, 36, 38, 53, 79, 114, 

X. 
8, 36, 54, 114, 116, 128_ 

119 

116 

54,79 --- 

116 

9,54, 114, 116 

53,75, 114, 116 

8, 114, 116 

8,36, 53, 114, 119 

8,53 

36, 119 

53,75, 114,116 

53,75, 119 



26, 179 
30, 313 



25, 008 
29, 110 



23, 202 

274, 913 

15, 479 

98,205 



25, 465 

227, 127 

15, 804 

79, 282 



149, 412 
15, 510 



125, 832 
11, 134 



31-.. 

53 

36, 53, 114, 119 

31, 36, 53, 75,79, 114... 
8, 9, 31, 36, 38, 53, 54, 
75, 79, 114. 

116.... 

116 



242, 289 
146, 220 
493, 691 



395, 796 
68, 434 
224, 122 



53 

53 , 

53,114,119 

53,59, 114, 119 

63, 114, 119 

114. 

8,9,31,44,75,114,119, 

122. 

36, X 

53, 114, X 

8,36 

36, 114, 119 

116, 119 

9,31,36,53,91,114,116, 

119, 122, 129. 
53. 



75, 243 
451, 640 



102, 097 
351, 648 



140, 823 



128, 796 



32, 515 
'36," 255 
'68,'66i' 



50, 080 
"83," 524 



8, 9, 31, 36, 46, 53, 114, 

119, 122. 
114 

8, 9, 31, 36, 39, 46, 53, 
114, 119, 122, 129, X. 

9, 36,39, 53, 114, X... 
114 

36,39, 53,75, 119 

X. 



694, 577 



402, 858 



8,9,31,36,53,114,116, 

119, 122, 129. 
8,9,31,36,38,44,53,59, 

114, 116, 119, 122, 129. 

128 

119 

9, 114 

9,31,36,53, 114, 119... 

8,44 

119 

114 

114.... 

36, 114, 119 



761, 786 
9,035 



256, 111 
7,465 



64, 741 
"i37,"7i6 
144, 056 



44, 775 

"i36,"834 

111, 507 



438, 160 



288, 130 



35, 072 



24,454 



$0.95 



.96 



1.10 
.83 

1.02 
.81 



.84 
.72 



1.63 
.47 
.45 



1.36 

.78 



.91 



1.54 
"i."08 
"i.'22 



.58 



.70 



Pounds 



204, 629- 



23, 153 
25, 504 



22, 607 
242, 566 



117, 087 



145, 776 
18, 527 



256, 457 
158, 544 
477, 764 



87,504 
459, 595 



161, 408^ 



49, 389 
"§7," 227 



87, 532 



619, 447 
"787," 074 



82, 960' 
"117," 642 
123, 370- 



396, 895 



DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



63 



Table 24. — Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 

1925 — Continued 



Common name 



Manufacturer's iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on 
p. 221) 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 



Production 



436 
441 
449 
457 
456 
462 

463 
464 
469 
470 
471 
474 

475 
476 



Azo COLORING MAT- 
TERS— continued 



Disazo coloring mat- 
ters — Continued 



Direct blue G ..- 

Direct blue 3B 

Direct orange G 

Acid milling red 

Benzopurpurine lOB.. 

Direct azurine G 

Direct brilliant blue G. 

Direct blue RW. 

Direct blue B. 

Direct pure blue 6B 

Direct pure blue 



Pounds 



Pounds 



Trisazo coloring matters 

Direct fast black FF.... 

Diazo black RS.. 

Direct brown B 

Direct brown 2G 

Direct fast blue B 

Direct black EW 



53 

8,31,36,38,114,119.. 

9,114,119 

116, X 

9, 36, 53. 114, 119 

9,53,114,119 

119.... 

9,36,53,114,119 

114 

9,36,53, 114, 119 

8, 9, 36, 53, 114, 119, 
128, 129. 



8, 36, 39, 53, 114. 

114,119 -. 

8,119 



112, 954 



$52, 309 



$0.46 



115, 862 



32, 259 



42, 186 



1.31 



35, 854 



9,778 



87, 221 



.97 



89,438 



383, 186 
176, 120 



166, 487 



370, 475 
117,111 



116, 336 



.97 
.66 



.70 



370, 175 
169, 893 



173, 616 



Direct black RX 

Direct green ET 

Direct black N 

Chloramine green B. 
Direct steel blue 3G. 
Direct green B 



Direct green G 

Direct brown 3 GO. 



Congo brown G. 
Congo brown R. 



Tetrakisazo coloring mat- 
ters 



Direct brown O 

Direct brown B 

All other azo coloring 
matters. 



Total azo coloring 
matters. 



STILBENE COLORING 
MATTERS 



Direct yellow R 

Chloramine orange G. 
Stilbene yellow 



PYRAZOLONE COLORING 
MATTERS 

Fast light yellow 2G... 

Fast light yellow 

Tartrazine.- 

Chrome red B 

Pyrazol orange GR 



KETONIMINE COLORING 
MATTERS 



493 1 Auramine. 
5919— 26t- 



53,114 

8,9,31,36,53,114,119, 

122, 128. 
9,36,39,53,114,119... 
8,9,39,44,114,122.... 

119 

8,9,119 

9,119 

8, 9, 36, 44, 53, 59, 114, 

119, 122, 128. 
8,36,44,53,119,122, X 
8, 9, 31, 36, 38, 44, 53, 

59, 75, 114, 119, 122, 

X. 
36, 53, 75, 114, 119, 

131, X. 
8,53...- - 



5, 527, 264 



343, 255 
83,395 



1, 862, 514 

154, 175 
56, 259 



.45 
.67 



5, 142, 147 



276, 051 
94,970 



279, 458 

60, 920 
841, 636 



141,366 



171,290 



42, 317 
369, 926 



112,375 



31, 38, 44, 59, 119, 122. 
59,119.... 



43, 961 



2, 219, 828 



31, 629 
'2,'265,"92§' 



25, 539, 246 



15,498,783 



.61 

.69 

.44 

.79 



230, 495 

51,496 
808,707 



151,193 



30, 182 



1.02 



2, 293, 739 



25, 005, 444 



8,31,36,38, 59, 69,70, 

114, lis, 129, 131. 
8, 59, 70, 114, 119, 129. 
36,53, 59,69,70 



403, 554 
126,150 



244, 638 
119, 115 



9, 53, 114, 116, 134.. 

36,116, 134, X 

27, 75, 114, 134, 164. 

53,116 

9 



62, 069 



506, 836 



151,253 
'34i,'669' 



53,97,114, X 



528, 840 



538, 885 1. 02 



.61 
.94 



413, 432 
113, 086 



2.44 



59, 423 
'545,'3i8 



64 



CENSUS OP DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 24. — Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products f 

1925 — Continued 



d 

a 
O 


6 

CO 

1 

QQ 


Common Dame 


Manufacturer's iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on 
p. 221) 


Sales 




Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 


657 


495 
499 
502 
503 
505 
506 
512 

513 
515 

516 
517 
521 
528 
530 
531 
536 

538 
539 
543 

545 
548 
555 
558 
559 
562 
564 
566 

573 
571 
582 
585 
587 
592 
596 
597 

603 
604 
606 

613 


TRIPHENYLM ETHANE 
AND DIPHENYLNAPH- 
THYLMETHANE COLOR- 
ING MATTERS 

Malachite green 


53, 114, 183 


Pounds 
169, 431 


$260, 788 


$1.54 


Pounds 
178, 65a 


662 


183 




666 


Acid green B 


34, 36, 53, 114, 129 

114 


76, 101 


99, 225 


1.30 


75, 690 


667 


Brilliant acid green B_. 


670 


53 










671 


Erioglaucine 

Magenta 


114 










677 


36, 47, 79. 83, 114, 140, 

150, X. 
114 


62, 686 


113,585 


1.81 


60, 283 


678 


New fuchsine 

Methyl violet . 




680 


47, 53, 79, 87, 88, 114, 

119, X. 
53 


675, 873 


671,352 


.99 


649, 900 


.681 


Crystal violet . 




683 


Methyl violet 5B 

Spirit blue 


114 










689 


79, 140 










696 


Fast acid violet lOB 

Acid violet 


53 -- 










698 


34, 36, 53, 69, 114, 129.. 
114 


181, 275 


269, 772 


1.49 


191, 240 


699 


Acid fast violet B 

Alkali blue 




704 


36, 47, 79, 83, 87, 114, 

150. 
83 










706 


Methyl cotton blue 

Soluble blue 










707 


36,47, 79, 83, 114 

114 


77, 875 


190, 374 


2.44 


64,047 


712 


Patent blue 




714 


Patent blue A 


34, 114 










717 


Acid violet 6BN.. 


53 










724 


53 --- 










728 


Victoria blue R ..- 


53 










729 


Victoria blue B. 


53 










733 


Fast acid blue 


53 










735 


Naphthalene green V... 


53, 114 










737 


53, 69, 75, 129 . . . . 


219, 286 
74, 237 


124, 564 
79, 130 


.57 
1.07 


238, 607 
74, 332 




All other triphenylme- 
thane and diphenyl- 
naphthylmethane col- 
oring matters. 

Total triphenyl- 
methane and di- 
phenylnaph- 
thylmethane 
coloring mat- 
ters. 

XANTHONE COLORING 
MATTERS 












2,068,054 


3,031,914 


1.47 


2,083,447 




48, 53 


749 










752 


Rhodamine 6G 


53 --- 










758 


Fast acid violet A2R--. 


53 . . --- 










766 


79 










768 




9, 48, 79, 87 










773 


Erythrosine B 


9, 48, 53, 79 








2,170 


778 


Phlo.xine 


53, 79 .. 










779 




79 












All other .\anthone col- 
oring matters. 

Total xanthone 
coloring mat- 
ters. 

ACRIDINE COLORING 
MATTERS 

Acridine orange A 

Acridinc orange R 

Phosphine 






68, 747 


132, 753 


1.93 


68, 738. 










272, 434 


499, 324 


1.83 


351, 102 




134 . 




788 










792 


134 




[ 




793 


53, 79, 114, 134 


149, 544 


232, 583 



1.56 



166, 315. 


801 


QUINOLINE COLORING 

MATTERS 

Quinoline yellow 


26, 114 





DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



65 



Table 24. — Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 

1925 — Continued 



Common name 



Manufacturers' iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on 
p. 221) 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 



Production 



700 



923 



659 
C60 

667 



THIA?OLE COLORING 
MATTERS 



Primuline 

Direct pure yellow M _ . 

Direct fast yellow 

Thioflavine T 

Direct brilliant flavine 
S. 



AZINE COLORING MAT- 
TERS 

Azo carmine Q 

Safr ani ne 

Safranine 6B 

Kosolane O 

Induline(spirit-soluble) 
Induline(water-soluble) 
Nigrosine (spirit-solu- 
ble). 
Nigrosine (water-solu- 
ble). 
All other azine coloring 
matters. 

Total azine color- 
ing matters. 

ANIUNE BLACK AND AL- 
LIED COLORING MATTERS 



New fast gray- 
Fur black 



OXAZINE COLORING 
MATTERS 



Delphine blue B 

Qallocyanine 

Gallo chrome blue V- 
Cotton blue 



THL\ZINE COLORING 
MATTERS 



Methylene blue 

Methylene green B 

Brilliant chrome blue.. 



SULPHIDE COLORING 
MATTERS 

Carbazole vat blue R. 
Carbazole vat blue G. 

Sulphur black 

Sulphur blue 



Sulphur brown . 



Sulphur green,-. 

Sulphur maroon. 

Sulphur Olive 

Sulphur orange. . 
Sulphur purple.. 

Sulphur tan 

Sulphur yellow.. 



Total sulphide 
coloring matters. 



59, 114, 119, 131 

119, 131 ---- 

59, 69, 114, 119, 131. 

119 

131 -. 



Pounds 
191, 280 



$121,903 



$0.64 



197, 543 



208, 923 



53 

53, 114, 138 

114 

53 

31, 75, 79, 114 

75, 79, 114 

27, 31, 75, 79, 114. 



120, 327 
447, 939 



27,75,79,114 1,175,689 

71, 604 



27,119— 

71. 100, 150, X. 



39, 114 

9, 27, 114, 185. 

114 

9, 39, 91, 114.. 



27, 114, 183. 

114, 183 

69,75 



2, 026, 946 



83, 247 
201, 053 



497, 909 
78, 136 



.45 
.42 
1.09 



1, 098, 013 



,54 



72, 210 



35, 050 



53, 91 

53 

53, 75, 91, 114, X 

17,36,39,53,75,91,114, 

119, X. 
4, 9, 17, 36, 39. 40, 48, .'^3, 

74, 75, 91, 114, 169, X, 

X X 
8, 39' 40, 53, 75, 114,119, 

169. 
8, 9,39, 53, 75,91, X,X. 
39, 40, 53, 75, 119, 169_ 

36, 39,75, X, X 

39 

8, 36, 40, 75, 169, X, X 
4, 17, 36, 39, 53, 74, 75, 

114, X, X, X. 



(') 
(') 
14, 505, 404 
669, 753 

1. 927, 851 



129, 021 



59, 745 



, 470, 787 
368, 380 



679, 694 



220, 769 
129, 755 



213, 356 
513, 094 



18, 453, 834 



124, 317 
43, 477 



75, 476 
237, 732 



4, 171, 590 



1.79 



1.70 



Pounds 

206, 873 



190, 352 



147, 524 
515, 482 



1, 089, 298 

58, 948 



2, 024, 825) 



77, 095 



324, 343 



16, 587, 828 
668, 959 



1, 832, 364 



281,512 
131,037 



§92, 758 
.594, 193 



20, 760, 512 



1 Totals not included under sulphide coloring matters. In the dyes classified by method of application 
these 2 dyes are included in the vat dyes. 



66 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



TabIiE 24. — Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 

1 925 — Continued 



6 


d 
'A 

1 

02 


Common name 


Manufacturers' iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on 
p. 221) 


Sales 




X 

5 

O 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 


inw 


778 
779 
780 

782 
785 
784 

'858' 

"789' 
859 
865 
862 

760 
761 
763 

765 
767 
768 
838 
840 
842 

843 
849 
867 
831 

874 

§76 
877 
880 
881 


ANTRAQUINONE COLOR- 
ING MATTERS 

Alizarin 


17, 114.,- 


Pounds 






Pounds 


1033 


Alizarin orange (paste) . 
Alizarin red S (powder). 
Alizarin brown 


17, 114 










1034 


17, 119.. 










1035 


39, 53, 114, 185 


22, 954 


$49, 473 


$2.16 




1039 


Alizarin RG, GI 

Alizarin Y (yellow 

shade). 
Acid alizarin blue SE.. 

Acid alizarin blue B 

Acid alizarin green G... 
Anthracene blue WR... 

Acid alizarin blue R 

Alizarin cyanine green.. 
Alizarin blue black B... 

Acid alizarin rubine 

All other anthraquinone 

coloring matters. 

Total anthraqui- 
none coloring matters. 

ANTHRAQUINONE VAT 
COLORING MATTERS 

Anthraquinone vat 

golden orange G. 
.\nthraquinone vat 

golden orange R. 
Anthraquinone vat 

dark blue BO. 
Anthraquinone vat 

green B and black. 
Anthraquinone vat 

violet RR. 
Anthraquinone vat 

violet B. 
Anthraquinone vat 

blue RS. 
Anthraquinone vat 

blue3G. 
Anthraquinone vat 

blueGCD. 
Anthraquinone vat 

blue BCS. 
Anthraquinone vat 

blueGC. 
Anthraquinone vat 

yellow G. 
Anthraquinone vat 

brown B. 
Anthraquinone vat 

red BN. 
All other anthraquinone 

vat coloring matters. 

Total anthraqui- 
none vat color- 
ing matters. 

INDIGOID COLORING 
MATTERS 

Indigo synthetic, 20 per 

cent paste. 
Indigo vat I 


17 




1040 


17, 114... 








1053 


75 




' 




1054 


75, 114 .. 








1056 


75. 








1062 


55, 114... 








1076 


119.... . 








1078 


.34, 75, X 










1085 


34, 75, X 


55, 880 


114,674 


2.05 


80, 966 


1091 


75 








75, 872 


116, 544 


i.54 


76, 670 










719, 450 


1, 672, 970 


2.33 


775,914 




119 . 




1096 










1097 


53, 119 










1099 


53. 105, 119 










1102 


53, 105, 119 










1104 


53 










1105 


53 










1107 


53, 119 










1109 


53 










1113 


53, 119 










1114 


53 










1115 


119 










1118 


53, 119 . . 










11?0 


119 










1162 


119 


1 










352, 873 


801, 798 


2.27 


515, 795 










1, 820, 430 


2,980,109 


1.64 


2. 135, 852 




52, 53, 114 




1177 


24, 449, 938 


3, 805, 518 


.16 


29, 121, 817 


1178 


39, 114 




1180 


Indigo extract . 


53, 94, 114, X 


87, 749 


56,867 


.65 


96, 424 


1183 


Dibromindigo RB 

Bromindigo blue 2B, 
2BD. 


52 




1184 


52 




":::':::::::::::: 

















DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



67 



Table 24. 



-Production and sales of dyes and other finished coal-tar products, 
19 £5— Continued 



6 


d 

z 

3 
SI 

o 
CO 


Common name 


Manufacturers' iden- 
tification number 
(according to list on 
p. 221) 


Sales 




g 

a 

o 
"3 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 
per 

pound 


Production 




7 

"83" 

144 

168 

23 

502 


PHOTOCHEMICAL COLOR- 
ING MATTERS 

Dicyanine A 


58 


Pounds 






Pounds 




Kryptocyanine . 


58 












Neocyanine 


58 














58 ' 










Pinacyanole 


58. i 








10 


FOOD COLORING MAT- 
TERS 

Naphthol yellow S 

Yellow AB 


X 










22 


9, 56, 79, 114, 158 


8 iifl 


$15,419 

18, 071 

119,755 


$1.90 
1.92 
4.58 


2,547 


61 


YeUow OB 


9,56,79,114,158.. \ 9;4n 

9, 114, X 26.164 


4,478 


80 


Ponceau 3R 


28,598 


150 


Orange I 


9, 114, 178, X 




184 


.\maranth. 


9, 114, 178, X 


..... 

104, 656 
67,558 


317,013 
212, 031 


3.03 
3.14 


91,866 


640 
666 


Tartrazine 

Guinea ereen B 


9, 27, 114, 178, X 

9, 114, 178 


70,690 


670 


505 1 Light green SF (yellow- 
ish). 

592 1 Erythrosine 

877 j Indigo disulfonic acid... 


114, 178 










773 


9, 114, X 










1180 


9, 114, X 


3,028 


30,154 


9.96 














Total food dyes 1 


272, 933 


996, 229 


3.65 


263, 005 










Bacteriological stains ' 37. 58. 79. 84. 93. 114. 












and indicators. 

Research chemicals 

All other dyes 


137, 162. 
58, 162 < 












53 .- 
























Total dyes i 


79,303,451 


37, 468, 332 


.47 


86, 345, 438 







DYES NOT CLASSIFIED BY SCHULTZ OR COLOR INDEX NUMBER 

Manufacturers were requested to report separately, in terms of 
their familiar pre-war designations, the production of dyes not 
classified by Schultz or color index number. The following table 
is a list of such dyes, together with some new dyes of American 
development for which there are no foreign equivalents : 



Name of dye 


Manufac- \ 
turer's iden- 
tification 1 
number 
(according 
to list on 
p. 221) ' 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer's iden- 
tification 
number 
(according 
to list on 
p. 221) 


Acid anthracene brown B, RH ex 

Acid anthracene yellow OR 


75 

69 

116 

8 

36 
122 
119 

79 
185 
185 
185 

55 
8,114 
114 
114 
114 
9 
116 

38 

34 
116 
116 


Anthranol chrome violet EGBX 

Anthranol chrome yellow LSW. 

Anthrene blue GFC, paste.. 


116 
116 


Acid anthracene yellow GRX 


119 


Acid black BA 


Anthrene jade green, paste. 


119 


Acid naphthol blue black .. 


Artificial silk black O 


53 


Acid navv blue . 


Azanol brown N.. . 


X 


Acid red OTH 


Azanol red brown R 


X 


Acid yellow HM. 


Aze dark green 


119 


Alizarin black... 




119 


Alizarin blue (indigo shade)... 


.\ze fast blue B, G, 2R 


114 


-Alizarin brown 5R 


Aze fast violet 2R 


114 


Alizarin serge blue GS . . . 


Azo violet.. 


34 


Alizarol black 3G 


Azo violet BS, 2B, 2RL.. 


8 


.A.lizarol brown B 


Aze wool blue G . 


69 


Alizarol gray OG . . 




X 


Alizarol vellow 3Q 


Benzanol brown FW.. 


X 


Amanil black FTC 


Benzo chrome brown G 


9 


Amide naphthol red 2B. 


Benzo fast black L 


I 8, 9, 53, 75, 


Amide naphthol red X cone 


Benzo fast black LM . 


114,119 




69 






53 


Anthranol chrome brown EB.. 


Benze fast pink 2BLM 


69 



1 Sales of Benzo fast black L were 108,697 pounds, valued at $143,906, with production of 105,568 pounds. 



68 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Name of dye 



Benzo rhodiiline red B 

Brilliant Bordeaux S 

Brilliant croceine FL 

Brilliant developed scarlet B 

Brilliant milling blue 

Brilliant wool blue N 

Bromo fluorescein 

Buffalo black AR, RB, 8B.3G 

Buffalo chrome black NS 

Bulletin red 

Chloramine fast orange ER, QG, E3G. 

Clilorantine violet 

Chlorozol fast brown RK 

Chromate brilliant brown R 

Chromaven brilliant orange 2R 

Chrome black 

Chrome black SWR 

Chrome blue ATX 

Chrome green CB 

Chrome green SW 

Chrome green B 

Chrome red SW 

Chrome red brown III 

Chrome yellow 

Chrome yellow DS, 3Q 

Chrome yellow 5G 

Chrome yellow SS 

Cindiazo blue B 

Cloth Red R, 2R 

Corulein 

Cotton black 3G 

Cotton brilliant blue R 

Developed black 2B 

Diamine Bordeaux B 

Diamine catechine 

Diamine catechine B, 3G 

Diamine fast orange EG 

Diamond green 3GA 

Diamond green WLM 

Dianol dark blue B 

Diazine beta black 

Diazine black DM, V ex., VN ex., VZ 

Diazo Bordeaux 7B 

Diazo fast blue 2RW 

Diazo fast red 5BL, 7BL 

Diazo indigo blue M 

Diazo seal brown 

Direct black GX, GXR 

Direct blue 4R, 3RX-. 

Direct brown, B, R, AHP 

Direct brown G2R, G3R 

Direct dark blue ,. 

Direct diazo blue BL 

Direct fast black B 

Direct fast black HW 

Direct fast blue2B. 

Direct fast light blue FF 

Direct fast orange R, 2R, RCL 

Direct fast violet 4B 

Direct navv blue R 

Direct scarlet B, 3B, S 

Direct violet R cone 

Dyelene chromate brown EBN 

Empire fast violet AA 

Erie brown GB 

Erie fast gray M, R 

Erio chrome brown R 

Erio violet RL 

Fast acid violet ERR ex 

Fast brilliant blue EA 

Fast chrome brown R.. 

Fast crimson R i 

Fast mordant blue 

Fast mordant blue B 

Fast wool violet B 

Fnrol DB 

Gallein 

Gloss flux basic blue V : 

Gloss flux ba.sic orange 

Gloss flux basic yellow 

Gloss flux Persian rose 



Manufac- | 

turer's iden- ! 

tification 

number 

(according 

to list on 

p. 221) 



53 

36 

53 

116 

34 

114 

48 

114 

114 

150 

69 

114 

53 

34 

9 

27,39 

8 

53 

114 

46 

36 

46 

75 

27,119 

36 

8,36 

75 

36 

114 

185 

122 

122 

119 

53, 114 

53 

114 

53 

75 

69 

53 

114 

114 

53 

36 

53 

53 

X 

36 

36 

122 

36 

39 

8 

36 

122 

119 

36 

36 

131 

122 

122 

X 

54 

128 

114 

114 

36 

36 

53 

8 

119 

114 

39 

34 

114 

X 

185 

13 

13 

13 

13 



Name of dye 



Gloss flux red O 

Guinea fast red BL 

Hello Bordeaux BL 

Hydron orange R, paste 

Hydron pink FF, paste 

Indomine navy blue 2BM 

Jet black APX 

Lake orange B-_ 

Lake scarlet G.. 

Leather yellow 

Lithol fast orange 

Monochrome brown BC 

Naphthol green black B 

Niagara blue NR 

Niagara fast blue RL 

Nigrosine base B, N, NB, R, 2R.. 

Oil brown 

Oil brown H, I 

Oil brown M 

Oil maroon O 

Oil orange Y.. 

Oil orange 30 

Oil orange cone 

Oil red O 

Oil red 322 

Oil red C 

Oil red I 

Oil yellow 2625, F 

Oil yellow PHW 

Oxamine copper blue RRX 

Oxydiaminogcn OB 

Pacco direct fast gray BL 

Palaside green 

Paranol direct brown B-. 

Paranol direct orange GL 

Penetrating benzol brown R 

Permanent red R 

Phloxine 

Pontachrome brown R, SW 

Pontachrome yellow SW 

Pontamine blue GH cone 

Pontamine diazo black H 

Pontamine diazo blue 3G 

Pontamine fast orange 2G cone 

Resorcin brown D, YX cone 

Rosanthrene A, R 

Rhodamine 6GDN 

Rosanthrene orange 

Safranine 8B 

Seriochrome black WSE 

Serichrome green B 

Silk black 4BF 

Silk brown G, R 

Solamine blue FF 

Solamine blue FT 

Solantine red 8 BLN 

S R A fast blue III, IV, V 

S R A fast pure yellow, I, II 

S R A fast golden yellow, VIII, IX 

S R A fast orange I, II 

S R A fast golden orange I 

S R A fast red I, III, V 

S R Afast pink II 

S R A fast black III, IV 

S R A fast violet II 

S R A fast heliotrope I 

Sudan AT 

Sudan orange 

Sudan T 

Sulphon acid black N, 2BM 

Thianthrene pink FF, paste 

Trisulphon brown R 

Victoria fast violet 2R ex 

Wool black B 

Wool blue CB, CG 

Wool fast violet 2R 

Wool green B 

Wool navv B 

Zambezi black BG, PC 

Zambezi black D 

Zambezi black V 



Manufac- 
turer's iden- 

tifleation 

number 
(according 

to list on 
p. 221) 



2 Sales of Zambezi black V were 282,919 pounds, valued at $255,300, with a production of 238,981 pounds. 



DYES AND OTHEE FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 69 

Production and sales of dyes and other coal-tar products, 1925 





Manufacturers' identifi- 
cation number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 221) 


Sales 




Name of dye 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 
per 

pound 


Production 


COLOR LAKES 

Black lokes _._ 


39,80, 151, X 


Pounds 






Pounds 


Blue lakes 


12, 13, 22, 28, 35, 53, 57, 60, 
62, 77, 78, 80, 85, 87, 92, 
101, 146, 151, 152, 153, 
159, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
XXX 

28, 35, 62, 77, 92, 150, 151, 
153, 159, 170, X, X. 

12, 22, 28, 35, 57, 60, 62, 77, 
80, 85, 87, 92, 101, 146, 
150, 151, 152, 153, 159, 
170, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X. 

12, 22, 28, 35, 53, 57, 60, 62, 
73, 77, 80, 85, 87, 92, 101, 
146, 151, 152, 153, 159, 
170, 182, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 

12, 22, 28, 53, 56, 00, 62, 78, 
80, 85, 87, 89, 92, 101, 146, 
150, 151, 152, 153, 159, 
170, 182, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 

5, 12, 22, 28, 35, 53, 57, 78, 
80, 85, 89, 92, 101, 106, 
150, 151, 152, 153, 159, 
182, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 

12, 22, 28, 35, 57, 60, 62, 78, 
80, 85, 87, 92, 101, 146, 

150, 151, 152, 153, 159, 
170, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 

12, 22, 28, 39. 43, 53, 56, 57, 
60, 78, 80, 85, 87, 89, 92, 
101, 150, 151, 153, 170, 
182, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X. 

5, 12, 22, 28, 35, 43, 53, 57, 
60, 62, 77, 78, 80, 85, 89, 
92, 101, 106, 146, 150, 151, 

152, 153, 159, 170, 182, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
XXX 

5, 12, 22, 28, 35, 57, 62, 80, 
85, 92, 101, 106, 146, 150, 

151, 152, 153, 159, 182, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X. 

12, 22, 28, 35, 39, 57, 60, 62, 
77, 78, 79, 80, 85, 87, 92, 
101, 146, 151, 152, 153, 
159, 170, 182, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X. 

12, 28, 53, 60, 62, 77, 78, 80, 
85, 87, 92, 101, 151, 152, 

153, 159, 170 ,182, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X. 

53. . . . 


734, 659 

94, 267 
723, 928 

389, 962 

798, 202 

916, 307 

460, 200 

2, 434, 551 

2, 212, 561 

830, 209 
430, 099 
573, 965 


$412, 222 

12, 631 

585, 665 

151, 684 
525, 996 
312, 309 
134, 104 
1, 001, 787 
1, 123, 603 

279, 437 
382,113 
279, 453 


$0.56 

.13 

.81 

.39 
.66 
.34 
.29 
.41 
.51 

.34 

.89 
.49 


740, 494 

97,560 
735, 194 

405, 217 


Brown lakes . . . . . . 


Eosine lakes 


Oreen lakes.. 


Lithol red lakes 


797 766 


Maroon lakes 


935, 313 

464, 552 

2, 328, 113 

2, 300, 243 

854,000 
439, 954 


Orange lakes . 


Para red lakes 


Red lakes . 


Scarlet lakes . 


Violet lakes 


Yellow lakes 


576, 443 


.\11 other color lakes. 














Total color lakes 


11,308,444 


5, 544, 371 


.49 


11,414,753 




180 




PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS 

Diaminophenol hydrochloride 








(amidol). 
Hy droquinol 


107, 185, X 


224, 253 


251, 932 


1.12 


208, 857 


p-Hydroxy phenvlglvcine 


58 






58, 185, X .. .... 










(metol). 








1 




Total photographic 


348, 842 


475, 095 


1.36 1 


327, 041 


chemicals. 







70 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Production and sales of dyes and other coal-tar products, 1925 — Contd. 





Manufacturers' identifi- 
cation number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 221) 


Sales 




Name of dye 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 
per 

pound 


Production! 


MEDICINALS 

Acetanilide, USP 


105, 107, 118 


Pounds 
363, 510 


$112,751 


$0.31 


Pounds 
158, 756- 


Acetpheiietidin 


16, X 




Acriflavine and neutral acrifla- 


1, 114 










vine (3:6-diamino-10-methyl 
acridine chloride). 
Amidopyrine 


X 












149 










Ammonium salicylate 


81,99 










Anesthesine. (See Benzocaine.) 
Apothesine (hydrochloride of 


X 










diethylaminopropyl-cinna- 
mate). 
Arsephenamine 


1,50,99, 102, 136, 157, X... 
16, 52, 107, 111 


350 

1, 476, 058 

2,446 


103, 055 
1, 025, 610 

29,117 


294. 44 
.69 

11.90 


278 


Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid) 


1, 499, 166- 


Atophan. (See Cinchophen.) 
Benzocaine (anesthesine) 


1, 125, 149, X 


2, 446 


(ethyl p-amino benzoate). 
Benzvl succinate 


149, 158... 




Benzyl succinate, sodium salt 


149 










Bismuth betanaphthol 

Bismuth salicylate and sub- 


107, 118, 136 


1,035 


3,161 


3.05 


399' 


99 




salicylate. 


63, 107, 118 












114 










Bromeikon (tetrabromo- 


99 - . . . - 










phenolphthalein, sodium 
salt). 
Butyn (p-amino benzoyl gam- 


1 










ma di normal butyl amino 
propanol sulfate). 


99 












99 












16 












16 










Calcium sulfophenolate 


99 . 










Chloramine T (sodium p-tol- 

uene sulfochloramide). 
Chloroxyl (phenyl cinchoninic 


X 










96 










acid, hydrochloride). 
Cinchophen (atophan) (phenyl 
cinchoninic acid). 


1, 7, 19, 27, 96, X 


60, 015 


394, 130 


6.57 


60, 722 


99 






149 












124. 










Dichloramine T (p-toluene sul- 


111 










fone dichloramide). 


X 










cylic acid derivatiye). 


124 . 










o-Hydroxyquinoline base 


X 










X 










lodeikon (tetraiodophenolph- 
thalein sodium salt). 


99 










105 










Luminal (phenylethyl barbi- 
turic acid) (phenylethylma- 
lonylurea). 

Luminal sodium (phenylethyl 
barbituric sodium salt) (phe- 
nylethylmalonylurea sodium 
salt). 

Magnesium salicylate 


16 










16 










81, 99 - ... 










Mercurosal (disodiumhydroxy- 
mercurisalicyloxyacetate) . 

Mercury salicylate, USP 

Methyl-p-hydroxyamino ben- 
zoate. 

Methylhydroxymethyl ester of 
salicylic acid. 


X 










99 










X 










16 










114 










Methylene citryl salicylate 


16 










136 










Monoglycol ester of salicylic 

acid. 
b-Naphthol benzoate 


16 










63, 149. 











DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 71 

Production and sales of dyes and other coal-tar products, 1925 — Contd. 





Manufacturers' identifi- 
cation number (accord- 
ing to list on p. 221) 


Sales 




Name of dye 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 
per 

pound 


Production 


MEDiciNALS— continued 
Neoarsphenamine 


1, 50.99, 136, 157, X 

114 


Pounis 
3,470 


$1, 125, 143 


$324.25 


Pounds 
3,289 


Neocinchqphen. (SeeTolysin.) 




Peralga (l-diethylbarbituric-2- 


7 










ainidopyrene). 
Phenacaine (ethenyl-p-dieth- 

oxy-diphenylamidinehydro- 

chloride). 
Phenolphthalein 


X 










X. X 










Phenolsulfonates (calcium, so- 


1, 107, 130, 136 


141,256 


43, 268 


.31 


163, 723 


dium, zinc, etc.). 
Potassium acid phthlate 


99. 




99. 










Potassium sulfophenolate 

Procaine (p-amino benzoyl 

diethyl aminoethanol). 
Proflavine (3 : 6-diamino acri- 

dine sulfate). 
Proposote (creosote derivative) 


99 










1, 125, X 










1, 114 










X 










58, 162 












27 






1 


Salol (phenyl salicylate) 

Salophen (acetylparamino- 
phenyl salicylate). 


52, 81, 107. . 


75, 681 


58, 258 


.77 


118, 869 


16 




114 












X 












52, 81, 107, HI 


443, 961 


163,514 


.37 


415,465 




136 






81 , 99 . 










Sulfoarsphenamine .- 


1,99,102,136,157, X 

99 


779 


329,349 


422. 78 


734 






Tolysin (p-methylphenyl cin- 
choninic ethyl ester) (neocin- 
chophen). 

Triphenylstilbene sulfide 


1,27 - 










162 










114 












136 












99... .- 












162 






















Total medicinals 


3, 294, 827 


6,331,918 


1.92 1 3,237,796 


FLAVORS 

Anisic alcohol 


61 










Coumarin.-- . 


24,52,63, 103, 105,111 

58. 


104,054 


309, 596 


2.98 


104,363 


Dulcin 




Ethyl benzoate 


63, 67, 68, 103, 160, 172, X.. 










Ethyl cinnamate 


24,61, 63, 68 


457 


1,744 


3.82 


594 


Ethyl salicylate 


63, 68, 160, X 






Methyl cinnamate 


24,63.68, 160, X 


455 
1.802,669 


1,700 
711,502 


3.74 
.39 


534 


Methyl salicylate 


52, 81,107, 111,160, X 

X 


1,819,822 


Saccharin 




Total flavors 




2, 148. 904 


1,409,311 


.66 


2, 207, 102 


PERFUME MATERIALS 

Acetophenone 


24,63,68,86, 160, X 

61, 68 


1,215 


4,371 


3.60 


1,207 






Amyl salicylate 


24, 63, 67, 81, 86, 160, X, X. 
24 63 67 86 160 X 


13, 666 


16, 510 


1.21 


11,079 


Aubepine (anisic aldehyde) 
(see Part IV) . 




63, 68 










Rpn/.yl acetate 


24, 63. 67, 68, 86, 105, 160, 

X X 
24, 63, 67, 86, 105, 160, X, X. 
24, 63,68,86, 160, X, X.... 
61 


27,638 

12, 808 
15, 965 


32, 650 

14, 367 
22, 357 


1.18 

1.12 
1.40 


27, 661 


Benzyl alcohol... . .. 


10, 753 




13, 48a 








63, 68, 160, X.- 


171 
124 


1,482 
400 


8.67 
3.23 


181 




61, 68, 160 


129 




160 






160 












61, 68, 160 












i 160 










Benzylidine acetone . _ 


t 105, 160 











72 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Production and sales of dyes and other coal-tar products, 1925 — Contd. 





Manufacturers' identifica- 
tion number (according 
to list on p. 221) 


Sales 




Name of dye 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 
per 

pound 


Production 


Bromst yrol 


24, 160, X 


Pounds 

46 


$236 


$5.24 


Pounds 

57 


Butvlphenvl acetate.. . 


61,68 ..^ 




Butyl phthalate 


68. ." 










Cinnamic acid . 


24, 63, 67, 68, X... 


916 


2,756 


3.01 


2.728 


Cinnamic alcohol . . 


160 




Cinnamic aldehyde 


63, 67, 160, X . 










Cinnamyl acetate 


160. 










Cinnamvl alcohol 


63 










Cinnamvl ketone. 


63 










Cinnamyl valerate 


63 










p-Cresol methyl ether . 


68 .. . 










p-Cresyl acetate... 


61, 63 










p-Cresvlphenyl acetate.. 


61,63 










Diamvl phthalate . . . 


90 








. . 


Dibenzvl ketone 


63 










Dibutvl phthalate 


90, 130 










Diethyl phthalate. - 


20, 24, 63, 68, 86, 90, 130, 160, 

172, 175, X, X, X. 
63 


2, 137, 340 


657, 538 


.31 


2, 099, 181 


Dimethyl benzyl carbinol 




Dimethyl hydroquinone 


63 










Dimethyl resoreinol 


160 










Diphenvlmethane. 


68, 160, X... 










Di phenyl oxide.. 


24, 160 










Ethyl anthranilate 


61 










Ethyl fumarate 


172 










Quaiacol phenyl acetate . 


63 










H vdratropic aldehyde 


160 










Indol 


63 . - 










Isobutyl anthranilate. 


63 










Isobutyl benzoate 


61, 160... - 










Isobutyl indol. 


63 










Isobutyl salicylate 


160 










Isobutyl phenyl acetate 


63,68 










Methyl acetophenone. 


68, 160 . - . 










Methyl anisate. . 


160 










Methyl anthranilate . 


52,63, 86, 160, 167, X . ... 










Meth yl benzoate . . 


63,68, 160, X, X 










p-Methylbenzyl acetate 


63 










p-Methyl benzyl anthranilate.. 


63 










Methyl - p - cresol (p - cresyl 


160 










methyl ether) . 
Methyl guaiacol . 


160 










Methyl indol (skatol) . 


63, 160 










Methyl methyl anthranilate . 


61, 63, 160 . 












24, 63, 68, 86, 160, X, X, X.. 
63 


703 


3,367 


4.79 


586 


Methylpheny] glycidate 




p-Methyl quinoline 


63 








Methyl-p-tolyl ketone . . 


63 . . 






1 


b-Naphthol anthranilate 


63 










Nerolin (b-naphthol ethyl 


68, 160 










ether). 
Nonyl anthranilate . . . 


63 


1 






Phenyl acetate . . . 


63 






'" r "" " " " 




68 










Phenylacetic aldehyde . 


24,86,160, X 


527 


5,491 


10.42 


702 


Phenylacetic ketone . . - 


63 




Phenylethyl acetate.. . . 


24, 63, 86, 160 


40 
993 


424 
5,709 


10.60 
5.75 


144 


Phenylethyl alcohol . . 


24, 52, 63, 86, 160 


830 


Phenylethvl formate 


160 




Phenylethyl phenyl acetate. - 


160 . . 










Phenylethyl propionate . . 


61 












63 










Phenylyinylethylenemethyl 


160 








ketone. 


63 










Tetrahydroparamethyl quino- 


63 










line. 
Yara yara (b-naphthol methyl 


68,160 










ether) . 












Total perfume materials. 


2, 370, 728 


883, 617 


.37 


2, 335, 024 




X ... 




Synthetic tanning materials 


|l3, 896, 583 


8, 698, 756 


.63 




Synthetic phenolic resins 


15, X 











DYES AND OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



73 



Employees and Rates of Pay 

The nuinber of employees receiving specified rates of pay on 
December 18, 1925, or on the nearest representative date for which 
this information could be obtained, as reported by 154 of the 186 
firms manufacturing coal-tar products in 1925, is shown in Table 25. 
The 32 firms for which data are omitted either conducted a business in 
which coal-tar products were not the primary articles of manufacture 
or did not have separately organized departments dealing therewith. 

In 1914 there were but 7 firms in the United States manufacturing 
coal-tar colors and other products.* These gave employment to 528 
persons. In 1925 there were 154 firms with 10,971 employees. The 
number of employees in 1925 is a decrease of 1,598 from 1924, and of 
2,272 from 1923. 

Chemists and technically trained men in 1925 constituted 14.6 per 
cent of all employees, as compared with 13.4 per cent in 1924 and 
12.7 per cent in 1923. Of the 1,616 men of this group in 1925, 34.10 
per cent received between $50 and $75 per week, 27.54 per cent $75 
and over, 6.5 per cent between $45 and $50, and 6.37 per cent between 
$40 and $45. For men without technical training the scale of 
compensation was as follows: 26.95 per cent received between $25 
and $30 per week, 20.3 per cent between $30 and $35, 17.36 per cent 
between $20 and $25. In general, rates of pay were higher in 1925 
than in 1924. Table 26 compares specified rates of pay of technically 
trained men with those of men not having such training. 

Among the technically trained men the increase in terms of per- 
centages in the pay of each group was as follows: 6.59 per cent in the 
group received between $50 and $75 and 3.76 per cent in the group 
received $45 but under $50. Of men without technical training the 
increase was 4.2 pet cent in the group receiving $35 but under $40, 
2.51 per cent in the group receiving $40 but under $45, and 2.36 per 
cent in the group receiving $25 but under $30. 

As stated in previous reports, the dye and coal-tar chemical indus- 
try has probably a larger proportion of technically trained men than 
any other manufacturing industry in the United States. 



Table 25. — Employees and rates 


of pay, 


dye and coal-tar chemical industry, 1925 




Number of employees at each 
specified wage engaged in 
manufacturing operations 


Percentage receiv- 
ing each specified 
wage 


Percentage receiv- 
ing each specified 
wage or more 


Wages per week 


Chemists 
and 

techni- 
cally 

trained 
men 


Men 
without 
technical 
training 


All em- 
ployees 


Chemists 
and 

techni- 
cally 

trained 
men 


Men 
without 
technical 
training 


Chemists 
and 

techni- 
cally 

trained 
men 


Men 
without 
technical 
training 


I'nderSlO 




27 

200 

489 

1,624 

2,521 

1,900 

1,389 

580 

359 

241 

25 


27 

206 

517 

1,665 

2,609 

1,993 

1.545 

683 

464 

792 

470 




0.29 

2.14 

5.23 

17.36 

26.95 

20.30 

14.85 

6.20 

3.84 

2.57 

.27 




100.00 


$10 but under .$15. _ . . .. 


6 

28 

41 

88 

93 

156 

103 

105 

551 

445 


0.37 
1.73 
2.54 
5.45 
5.75 
9.65 
6.37 
6.50 
34.10 
27.54 


100. 00 
99.63 
97.90 
95.36 
89.91 
84.16 
74.51 
68.14 
61.64 
27.54 


99.71 


$15 but under .$20 


97. 57 


$20 but under $25 


92.34 


$25but under $30.. ..... 


74.98 


$30 but under $35 


48.03 


$35 but under $40 


27.73 


$40 but under $45 . . 


12.88 


$45 but under $50 


6.68 


$50 but under $75 


2.84 


575 and over.. 


.27 






Total 


1,616 


9,355 


10, 971 


100. 00 


100. 00 













* Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce. 



74 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 26. — Employees and rates of pay, dye and coal-tar chemical industry, 1925 



Wages per week 



Percentage receiving each specified wage 



Chemists and technically 
trained men 



1925 



1924 



Increase 



Men without technical 
training 



1925 



1924 



Increase 



Under $10 

$10 but under $15. 
$15 but under $20. 
$20 but under $25. 
$25 but under $30. 
$30 but under $35_ 
$35 but under $40. 
$40 but under $45. 
$45 but under $50. 
$50 but under $75. 
$75 and over 



100.00 
99.63 
97.90 
95.36 
89.91 
84.16 
74.51 
68.14 
61.64 
27.54 



100.00 
99.64 
98.28 
95.02 
89.44 
81.72 
74.00 
64.38 
55.05 
24.23 



10.01 

1.38 

.34 

.47 

2.44 

.51 

3.76 

6.59 

3.31 



100.00 
99.71 
97.57 
92.34 
74.98 
48.03 
27.73 
12.88 



.27 



100.00 

99.62 

97.52 

92.55 

72.62 

46.06 

23.53 

10.37 

5.28 

2.20 

.22 



0.09 

.05 

1.21 

2.36 

1.97 

4.20 

2.51 

1.40 

.64 

.05 



I Decrease. 



Research Work 



Of the 186 firms engaged in the manufacture of dyes and other 
coal-tar chemicals in 1925, 51 had separately organized research 
laboratories for the solution of technical problems and for the devel- 
opment or discovery of new products. The total cost of the research 
work carried on in these laboratories, together with that done in 
laboratories not separately organized for research, was $2,438,235. 
This figure is an increase of $289,311 over the expenditure in 1924. 
The Tariff Commission's census includes in 1925, as in 1924, not 
only the total cost of the research work carried on by the companies 
reporting, but the net cost of such work chargeable to coal-tar 
products alone. The $2,404,732 reported as the net cost in 1925 
is doubtless an understatement of the real cost of experimental 
work, since the figures do not include in all cases, the cost of research 
forming a part of manufacturing operations but not charged against 
research on the books of the companies. 

The total sales of the finished coal-tar products in 1925 was nearly 
$61,000,000. The high research expenditure, amounting to nearly 
4 per cent of the total sales, gives some indication of the large amount 
considered necessary for research work in this industry. Such 
expenditures are not only for the improvement of existing products 
and processes but for the discovery of new products. The constant 
introduction of new products calls for an active and extensive 
research work if the United States is to maintain a competitive 
position in world markets. 



PART III 



COST OF DYES IN REPRESENTATIVE FABRICS 
AND GARMENTS 



75 



Part III 

COST OF DYES IN REPRESENTATIVE FABRICS AND 

GARMENTS 



Introduction 

The effect that the imposition of a duty on an article may have on 
the consuming industry is an important tariff problem. Emphasis 
was laid upon this question in its application to coal-tar dyes during 
the hearings before committees of Congress framing the tariff acts 
of 1916 and 1922. As there were practically no official data at hand 
on which to base a conclusion the Tariff Commission in the latter 
part of 1925 collected special data from which to determine the 
costs of dyes in representative fabrics and garments. This was in 
accordance with provisions of the revenue act of September 8, 1916, 
which empowers the commission to gather information for use in 
future tariff revisions. 

Although coal-tar dyes are used in paper, leather, color lakes, 
and foodstuffs, the textile industry is by far the largest consumer and 
is more dependent upon dyes than other industries. The cost of 
dyes used by the domestic textile industry as set forth in this chapter 
is based on data obtained from 32 concerns. Practically all of the 
basic figures were taken directly from the books of records of the 
companies by representatives of the Tariff Commission. They 
represent the actual prices paid by the consuming mill and neces- 
sarily vary with the quantity purchased. In making this study the 
commission did not attempt to cover the entire range of textiles, but 
selected certain staple and specialty fabrics, which it considers fairly 
representative of woolen, cotton, and silk fabrics and in addition 
hosiery and hats. The cost data as here presented relate solely to 
the cost of the dye itself and do not include other costs of the dyeing 
operation such as chemicals, direct labor, steam, and other factory 
expenses. 

In recent years the textile industries have greatly increased their 
consumption of vat and other dyes that are exceptionally fast to 
sunlight and laundering or other destructive agents. Where possible 
the cost of these fast types has been compared with that of the more 
fugitive colors. 

Following a summary of the cost of dyes in typical garments, the 
cost of dyes in typical fabrics and articles is shown in the following 
order: (1) Wool fabrics, (2) cotton fabrics, (3) silk fabrics and unions. 

77 



78 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Factors Which Affect Dye Cosir 

The cost of dye per yard of fabric depends upon a number of 
factors, the most important of which are: 

1. The depth of shade. 

2. The weight of the goods per yard. 

3. The class of dye by method of appHcation and the type of dye 
within each class. 

4. The efficiency of the dyeing operation. 

5. The kind of machine used for the dyeing operation and the state 
of manufacture of the textile material when dyed — that is fiber, yarn, 
warp, or woven fabric. 

6. The quantity of material dyed. 

The quantity of dye used to produce light shades and tints as com- 
pared with heavy shades shows wide variation. As an illustration, 
many light shades on sUk and cotton, using the direct or substantive 
colors, require less than 0.1 per cent dye by weight of fabric as against 
4 to 6 per cent or more for navy blues and blacks. The cost per yard 
is usually in a corresponding ratio. In goods of mixed color, however, 
such as woolen fabrics, the cost of dye is sometimes less for the reason 
that not all of the fiber or yarns entering into the fabric are dyed — 
the proportion runs from 10 per cent or less to 90 per cent. 

The weight of goods per yard is a second factor determining the 
cost of dye per yard, as the dye consumed for a given shade depends 
largely on the weight of the material dyed. A silk crepe de chine 
39 inches wide may weigh only 10 pounds per 100 yards, or one- 
tenth of a pound (1.6 ounces) per yard, while men's woolen over- 
coating (54 inches wide) may vary from 22 to 30 ounces per yard. 

Whether a dye is acid, basic, direct (substantive), mordant, or 
chrome, sulphur or vat, and the type within one of these classes 
selected to produce a particular shade, will affect the dye cost very 
materially. The cost of certain vat dyed navy blue on cotton 
piece goods is about three times that of a direct developed dye. 
Other examples might be given to show an even greater cost variation. 
The choice of a proper dye or combination of dyes to meet a par- 
ticular requirement of fastness in the finished material and the 
conditions of application again results in a variation in cost. 

In common with other chemical processes, the efficiency of the 
operation varies with the plant. Correct technique of the dyeing 
operation results in a lower consumption of dye per pound of material 
dyed. 

While in general the stage of manufacture of the textile material 
to be dyed does not present a cost problem, there may be at times 
an advantage in dyeing in the piece or in the warp or in the yarn. 
Mills are not in agreement on this question, however, since it involves 
labor cost, the condition and appearance of the finished goods, and 
the class of color to be applied. 

The choice of the dyeing machine or apparatus, often determined 
by such factors as the stage of manufacture, labor cost, type of dye 
to be used, or appearance desired in the finished material, will also 
affect the cost of dye per yard of fabric. For light and medium 
shades on cotton the dyeing cost (including dye and labor) is less 
on the pad machine than on a jig machine. For solid shades the 



SUMMARY OF DYE COSTS 79 

fabric can be dyed in the piece at a lower cost than by dyeing the 
raw stock prior to manufacture into the fabric. 

Again, the cost of dye per yard of fabric will vary with the number 
of yards run. A continuous operation on piece goods can be handled 
with lower consumption of color per yard than small batches. 

For certain types of cotton dyeing a standing bath of the dye is 
used — that is, the dye liquor is used continuously adding propor- 
tionately less dye for the second and subsequent lots than is used 
for the first batch. This entails a smaller consumption of dye, when 
dyes are being used as do not completely exhaust, than would be 
the case if a fresh bath were used for each lot of goods dyed. 

Summary of Dye Costs 

General cost data. — The cost of dye is in general a very small frac- 
tion of the total cost of a yard of fabric. Because of the wide varia- 
tion between the cost of dye for light shades on light weight fabric 
and dark shades on heavy weight fabrics, the average costs of dyes 
per yard means little unless the weight of the goods is known, as well 
as the kind of dyes used and the depth of shade produced. Cost 
figures on the basis of a pound of fabric are more nearly comparable, 
but are less comprehensable to the layman than figures on the 
yardage basis. Figures from some of the largest plants in the 
country will serve to illustrate the general range of dye costs on the 
yardage basis. 

One of the largest dyers of cotton piece goods whose dye costs 
were representative of pre-war years shows for the period 1909-1914 
a variation from 0.18 cent per yard in 1910 to 0.15 cent per yard in 
1914.^ These costs are computed on an average of 50,000,000 yards 
of fabric dyed per year. 

Three other cotton piece-dyeing plants show for the 12 months 
ending July 1, 1914,^ an average cost of one-eighth of 1 cent a yard 
on more than 200,000,000 yards of dyed and printed cotton fabrics. 
During the calendar year 1918— a year of peak dye prices— the same 
three plants had an average cost of 0.5 cent a yard on a yardage of 
180,000,000; the estimated value of this cloth was $60,000,000 to 
$80,000,000. 

Cost data obtained by the Tariff Commission from three cotton 
piece-dyeing plants for 1924 and 1925 show an average dye cost of 
about one-third of a cent a yard. 

A large silk manufacturer stated in 1919 ^ that under war con- 
ditions the average cost of dyes on broad silks was about 5 cents 
the yard. The wholesale price of these fabrics would be from $2.50 
to $4 per yard. For very light shades the dye cost would be only 
a small fraction of a cent a yard, while for very dark shades on 
heavy fabrics, such as velvets and plushes, the cost of dye would 
run as high as 11 or 12 cents a yard. The same manufacturer 
reports an average cost of 1.5 cents per yard on broad silks in 1925 
as compared with 5 cents per yard under war conditions referred to 
above. 

1 statement of Mr. H. B. Thompson. See Hearings before the Committee on Ways and Means, H. R. 
702, p. 121. 

2 Statement of A. C. Imbrie. See Hearings before the Committee on Ways and Means, H. R. 2706 and 
H. R. 6495, pp. 215 and 57. 

3 Statement of Mr. Cheney. See Hearings before the Committee on Ways and Means, H. R. 2706 and 
H. R. 6495, p. 50. 



80 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Cost data obtained by the commission from four silk piece-dyeing 
plants show for 1924 and 1925 an average cost per yard of 0.65 of a 
cent for a yardage exceeding 112,000,000. Three silk-printing 
establishments show for the same years a dye cost per yard of 0.94 
cent for a yardage of 23,000,000. 

Cost of dye in representative fabrics and garments. — The following 
tabulation gives the cost of dye used in a variety of garments and 
goods. The costs are considered representative of the particular 
article for which they are quoted. There are, however, in any 
group certain fabrics showing a cost above, as well as below, the 
figures given. The basis on which costs are computed and detailed 
data entering into cost calculations are given by way of illustration 
of dye costs in several different types of 'garments and fabrics. 



Description of garment or suit 



Cost of dye in each 
garment or suit 



COTTON 

Men's overalls— denim, indigo dyed 

Men's working shirts — chambray, indigo dyed 

Men's shirts, woven striped madras dyed with — 

Vat dyes 

Sulphur dyes 

Men's shirts, cotton shirting printed with— 

Vat dyes 

Basic and chrome colors 

Soldier's cotton khaki suit, dyed with sulphur dyes 

WOOLEN AND WORSTED 

Men's suit, 14-ounce, blue serge worsted 

PoHce uniform, navy or police cloth dyed with indigo and alizarin 

Men's woolen suit, 14-ounce, mixed color 

Men's overcoat, 20-ounce, overcoating mixed color 

Women's fancy worsted, 10-ounce serge. 

Women's fancy worsted, silk stripe serge, 10-ounce 

Women's overcoat, Bolivia cloth, 21-ounce -_ 

SILK 

Silk dress, plain silk (9 yards per pound) _ 

Silk dress, georgette crfipe (18 yards per pound) 

HAT 

Men's felt hat 



1.7 cents per pair. 
0.2 cent per shirt. 

1 cent per shirt. 
0.25 cent per shirt. 

1.25 cents per shirt. 
0.25 cent per shirt. 
3 cents per suit. 



11 cents per suit. 

18 cents per suit. 

7 cents per suit. 

16 cents per overcoat. 

9 cents per suit. 

15 cents per suit. 

28 cents per overcoat. 



4 cents per dress. 
2 cents per dress. 



1.26 cents per hat. 



Cotton Fabrics and Garments 



OVERALLS 

Cotton denim, indigo dyed 

Fabric used, denim; weight, 2.2 yards per pound, warp dyed; 
width, 28 inches (filling white). Cost of dye per pair of overalls, 1.7 
cents. 

Basis: 41 yards of denim required per one dozen pair of overalls, 
or 3.4 yards per pair. Cost of dye per yard, 0.5 of a cent — 3.4 X 0.5 = 
1.7 cents. 

Calculation of dye cost: 1 yard denim (2.2 yards per pound) =0.454 
pound. Warp only is dyed, which is 66 per cent by weight of fabric; 
66 per cent of 0.454 = 0.2996 of a pound of dyed warp per yard; 100 
pounds of warp require 12 pounds of indigo (20 per cent paste), at 
$0.14 per pound = $1.68. Cost of dye per pound of warp = $0.0168; 
1 yard of denim contains 0.2996 pound of dyed warp — 0.2996 X 
$0.0168 = 0.5 of a cent. Cost of dye per yard = 0.5 of a cent. 



cotton fabrics and garments 81 

men's shirts 
Chamhray work shirts, indigo dyed 

Fabric used, chambray; width, 28 inches; weight, 4.3 yards per 
pound (warp dyed, fiUing white). Cost of dye per shirt = 0.2 cent. 

Basis: 2.9 yards required for one shirt; 1 yard = 0.231 of a pound; 
warp only is dyed equal to 55 per cent of the weight of the fabric; 
55 per cent of 0.231=0.1271 pounds — 0.1271 of a pound dyed yarn 
per yard. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of cotton warp require 4 
pounds of indigo (20 per cent paste); 4 pounds at $0.14 = 56 cents, 
or 0.56 of a cent per pound — 0.1271X0.56 = 0.071 cost of dye per 
yard chambray; 0.071 X 2.9 = 0.206 of a cent = cost of dye per shirt. 

Woven colored stripes, dyed with vat dyes 

Fabric used, blue striped madras; width, 32 inches; weight, 5 yards 
per pound. Cost of dye per shirt, 1.1 cents. 

Basis: Sj4 yards required for one shirt; 1 yard = 0.2 of a pound, 
314x0.2 = 0.65 of a pound per shirt; 30 per cent of warp is dyed, or 
15 per cent of total fabric — 15 per cent of 0.65 = 0.0975 of a pound 
of d3"ed yarn per shirt. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of yarn require 5 pounds of 
Anthraquinone vat blue GCD double paste, at $2.25 = $11.25, or 11.25 
cents, cost of dye per pound of yarn — 0.0975 (weight of dyed yarn 
per shirt) XI 1.25 = 1.097 cents. Cost of dye per shirt =1.097 cents. 

Note. — The narrow striped shirting contains less than 10 per cent of dyed 
warp, or under 5 per cent of the total fabric. This style has a dye cost per 
3'ard of under one-third the above sample, or less than 0.36 of a cent per shirt. 

Fabric used, pink striped madras; width, 32 inches; weight, 5 
yards per pound. Cost of dye per shirt, 0.59 of a cent. 

Basis: 3}4 yards required for one shirt; 1 yard = 0.2 of a pound, 
33^X0.2 = 0.65 of a pound per shirt; 20 per cent of warp is dyed, 
or 10 per cent of total fabric — 10 per cent of 0.65 = 0.065 of a pound 
of dyed yarn per shirt. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of yarn require 4 pounds of 
Vat pink FF paste at $2.25 = $9, or 9 cents cost of dye per pound 
of yarn — 0.065 (weight of dyed yarn per shirt) X 9 = 0.585 of a cent. 
Cost of dye per shirt, 0.585 of a cent. 

Fabric used, violet striped madras; width, 32 inches; weight, 5 
yards per pound. Cost of dye per shirt, 0.8 of a cent. 

Basis: 334 yards required for one shirt; 1 yard = 0.2 of a pound, 
334X0.2 = 0.65 of a pound per shirt; 20 per cent of warp is dyed, 
or 10 per cent of total fabric — 10 per cent of 0.65 = 0.065 of a pound 
of dyed yarn per shirt. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of yarn require 4 pounds of 
Anthraquinone vat violet RR paste at $3.10 = $12.40; 12.4 cents, 
cost of dye per pound of yarn — 0.065 (weight of dyed yarn per shirt) 
X 12.4 = 0.806 of a cent. Cost of dye per shirt, 0.8 of a cent. 

Fabric used, black striped madras; width, 32 inches; weight, 5 
yards per pound. Cost of dye per shirt, 1.5 cents.^ 

< Thecostofabov6shirtdyedwithsulphurblackinsteadofvatblaekisO.il of a cent. Calculation of dye 
icost: 100 pounds of yarn require 5 pounds sulphur black 2 B cone, at $0.33, which equals $1.65, or 1.65 
cents, cost of dye per pound of yam— 0.065 (weight of dyed yarn per shirt) X1.65=0.107 of a cent, cost of 
dye per shirt. 



82 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Basis: 314 yards required for one shirt; 1 yard = 0.2 of a pound; 
3ViX0.2 = 0.65 of a pound per shirt; 20 per cent of warp is dj^ed, 
or 10 per cent of total fabric — 10 per cent of 0.65 = 0.065 of a pound 
of dyed yarn per shirt. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of varn require 12 pounds of 
Indanthrene black B double paste at SI. 90 = $22.80; 22.8 cents cost 
of dye per pound of yarn — 0.065 (weight of dyed yarn per shirt) X 
22.8 = cost of dye per shirt, =1.48 cents. 

Fabric used, green striped madras; width, 32 inches; weight, 5 
yards per pound. Cost of dye per shirt, 0.76 of a cent.^ 

Basis: 33^ yards required for one shirt; 1 yard = 0.2 of a pound; 
33^X0.2 = 0.65 of a pound per shirt; 20 per cent of warp is dyed, 
or 10 per cent of total fabric — 10 per cent of 0.65 = 0.065 of a pound 
of dyed yarn per shirt. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of yarn require 5 pounds of 
Anthrene Jade green paste at $2.35 = $11.70; 11.7 cents cost of dye 
per pound of yarn — 0.065 (weight of dyed yarn per shirt) XI 1.7 = 
0.76. Cost of dye per shirt, =0.76 of a cent. 

Costs of dyeing cotton yarn with vat dyes show a variation on a 
range of colors of from 3 to 29 cents a pound (dyes only), averaging 
about 11 cents a pound. Certain shades, however, were outside of 
the above-mentioned limits. With sulphur dyes, dye cost per pound 
of yarn ranged from 1 to 8 cents a pound, averaging from 3 to 4 cents 
a pound. The sulphur dyes are not fast to the chlorine used in the 
modern laundry process, while the vat dyes withstand this treatment. 
It is greatly to the advantage of the ultimate consumer of cotton 
wash goods containing colors to use cloth containing vat rather than 
sulphur dyes, as the increased life of the colors in the fabric more 
than balances the added dye cost. 

PRINTED SHIRTINGS AND FABRICS 

For cotton shirting (goods 36 inches wide and running from about 
4 to 5 yards to the pound), printed with vat dyes, which withstand 
the severe modern laundry treatment, the actual cost of dye per 
yard necessarily shows a wide spread. It varies according to (1) 
the printed pattern which may have a small figured effect, narrow 
or a heavy stripe, or a heavy pattern in heavy shades covering a 
large part of the fabric, and (2) the price of the dye or dyes consumed. 

Data obtained from three print works for shirtings printed with 
vat dyes showed a dye cost (not including chemicals) ranging from 
0.1 cent per yard to 1 cent per yard for 1924 and 1925. Special 
lines, however, showed a cost below and above these limits. Rep- 
resentative samples of important styles showed a cost of 0.3 to 0.4 
cent per yard. 

Fabric used, cotton shirting printed with vat dyes; width, 36 
inches; weight, 4 yards to pound. Cost of dye per shirt, 1.25 cents. 

Basis: 3^ yards required for one shirt; 3 3^8 yards X 0.4 cent 
(average cost per yard of dyes) = 1.25 — 1.25 cents, cost of vat dyes 
per shirt. 

For cotton shirting printed with basic and chrome colors the dye 
cost ranged from 0.1 to 0.5 cent per yard. For printed heavy shades 

» The cost of above shirt dyed with sulphur green instead of vat green is 0.49 of a cent per shirt. Calcu- • 
lation of dye cost: 100 pounds of yarn require 5 pounds of Sulphur brilliant green 2Q at $1.50, which 
equals $7.50, or 7.5 cents per pound — 0.0G5 (weight of dyed yarn per shirt) X7. 5=0. 487 of a cent Cost of 
dye per shirt, =0.49 of a cent. 



COTTON FABRICS AND GARMENTS 83 

on such fabrics as cretonnes and crqDes the dye cost reaches 1.25 
cents a yard; for cretonnes and heavy weight fabrics printed with 
alizarin mordant dyes and vat dyes the cost amounted to several 
cents a yard, and for full patterns in heavy shades it exceeded 15 
cents per yard in some instances. 

COTTON DRILL 

Dyed with sulyhur dyes 

Fabric used, cotton drill; shade, olive khaki; width, 36 inches; 
weight, 2.6 yards per pound; method of dyeing, jig or machine. 
Cost of dye per yard of fabric, 0.45 of a cent. 

Average costs of three mills for khaki shades dyed with sulphur 
dyes was 0.45 cent per yard. The cost when dyed by the jig is 
higher than when dyed by a continuous machine. Between the 
light and the heavy olive shades of khaki there is considerable varia- 
tion in the cost of dye per yard because of the variation in the quan- 
tity of dye required and in its cost per pound. 

For olive khaki, dyed on the jig, a typical cost follows: 100 pounds 
■of drills (2.6 yards per pound) require — ?>\i pounds of sulphur dark 
brown GR at $0.23 = SO. 75; 1 pound of sulphur cutch O at $0.47 = 
$0.47; 1 pound of sulphur yellow GA at $0.45 = $0.45; total, $1.67. 
Cost of dye for 100 pounds of cotton drill = $1.67, or 1.67 cents per 
pound of cloth; 1 yard of drill (2.6 yards per pound) = 0.384 of a 
pound — 0.384 X 1.67 = 0.64 of a cent. Cost of dye per yard, = 0.64 
of a cent. 

COTTON BROADCLOTH, VAT DYED 

Fabric used, broadcloth, light blue; width, 36-37 inches; weight, 
4.8 yards per pound; count, 128X68; proportion dyed, 100 per 
cent. Cost of dye per shirt, 2.2 cents. 

Basis: 3^/^ yards required for one shirt; 1 yard = 0.208 of a 
pound — 31^X0.208 = 0.65 of a pound per shirt. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of broadcloth, equal to 480 
yards, require 13^ pounds of Indanthrene blue GCD double paste 
at $2.25 = $3.38 or 3.38 cents per pound equal to 0.705 of a cent 
per yard — 3^/8X0.705 = 2.2 cents per shirt. 

The same fabric dyed tan with vat dyes shows a cost of 1 cent 
per yard. 

Fabric used, broadcloth, violet; width, 36 inches; weight, 5.4 
yards per pound; proportion dyed, 100 per cent. Cost of dye per 
yard of fabric, 1.76 cents; cost of dye per pound of dye, Indanthrene 
brilliant violet RK paste, $1.60. 

Calculation of dye cost in fabric: 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 
537 yards, require 5.9 pounds of dye at $1.60 = $9.44— 144= 1.76 
cents. 

The same fabric "dyed navy blue shows a cost of 1.1 cents per 
yard, using 12 pounds of Sulphanthrene blue GR paste at $0.50 per 
pound for 100 pounds of fabric. 

COTTON PIECE GOODS 

The following tabulation shows the cost of dye per yard for a 
variety of cotton piece goods dyed with direct dyes, direct developed 
dyes, sulphur dyes, and vat dyes: 



84 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



COTTON FABRICS 
Cost of dye per yard 





Width 

in 
inches 


Num- 
ber of 
yards 
per 
pound 


Shade 


Cost per 


^ard of— 




Fabric 


Direct 

dyes 


Devel- 
oped 
dyes 


Vat 
dyesi 


Sul- 
phur 
dyes 




36 
36 
36 
33 
33 
33 
38 
37 
38 
38 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
27 
36 
36 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
31 
31 


4 

4 

4 

3.73 

3.73 

3.73 

4.2 

4.4 

4.3 

4.2 

4.75 

4.75 

4.75 

4.75 

4.75 

4.75 

4.75 

6 

7.6 

2.85 

2.85 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

4.45 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

5.37 

5.37 

5.37 

5.37 

5.37 

5.37 

3.1 

3.1 

3.1 

5 

5 


Gray 


Cents 
0.03 
.87 
.12 
.12 
.55 
1.06 
.035 
.41 
.96 
.42 
.03 


Cents 


Cents 

I 


Cents 


Do 


Seal brown 








Do 


Slate 










Tan 








Do 


Slate 










Navy 




1 






Pale blue .. 








Do 


Light brown 








Do 


Dark red 








Do - - 


Dark slate 

Blue- _ 








Plain 








Do 


Slate 


0.27 
.55 






Do 


Green.. . 








Do 


Blue 






0.68 


Do 


Slate 




.38 
.75 
1.60 
.90 






Do 


Blue... 








Do 


Seal brown 








Do 


Navy. 








Do 


Indigo 




0. 14 




Drill 


Olive khaki 






.47 


Do 


. do 








.43 


Broadcloth 


Pink... 


.03 
.08 
.16 
.22 




1.30 




Do 


Gray _. 




Do.-. — 


Rose 

Helio. 


""733" 


i. 86 
6.20 
5.50 




Do 




Do 


Light brown 


. 19 


Do 


Light blue . 


.07 




Do 


Blue 




5.20 




Do 




.15 


1.05 
.31 

1.18 




Do 


Navy_ 


1.30 




Do 


Tan 


. 11 




Do 


Green 


3.35 
4.30 
1.10 
2.20 




Do 


Red orange 




1.29 




Do _ 


Drab..-- 






Do 


Slate ... 









Do 


Violet. - 






1.05 


Plain - . 


Green 






3.35 
1.50 
4.30 
5. 10 
5.10 
6.20 
1.30 
1.12 

.88 
1.10 
1.76 
8.75 

.14 
6.25 

.39 
1.39 
3.10 
6.00 

.45 
1.90 




Do 


Old rose 








Do 


Deep orange. 








Do 


Brown.- 








Do 


Middy blue 








Do 


Helio 








Do 


Pink 








Do . - 


Blue.- 








Do 


Yellow 








Broadcloth 


Navy 








Do 


Purple 








Do 










Do 


Pink 








Do 


Green _. 








Do 


Blue 


















Do - — 


Tomato.. 








Do 


Deep brown .- 








Do 


Blue 








Do 


Violet 



















> The average cost for three plants for a range of vat-dyed cotton piece goods was from 3 to 4 cents per yard. 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER, SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 85 

Woolen and Worsted Fabrics and Garments 

men's suit 

Coat, vest, and pants 

Fabric used, blue serge; weight, 14 ounces per yard; width, 54 
inches. Cost of dye per suit, 11.1 cents. 

Basis: 3}/2 yards of blue serge required for one suit; cost of dye 
per yard, 2.31 cents^33^X 2.31 = 8.08 cents, cost of dye in serge. 

Add 3 cents for cost of dye used in cloth ^ for pockets, vest, and 
coat lining, sleeves, and vest back. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds, equal to 114.3 yards of 
serge, require 4 pounds of chrome blue-black B at $0.55 = $2.20; 
one-half pound of sulfon fast blue R at $0.85 = $0.43; total, $2.63. 
Cost of dye per pound of fabric = 2.63 cents; tt^ = 2.31 cents 
per yard. 

Men's blue serge is an important staple in the worsted industry. 
It is commonly piece dyed with chrome colors. Formerly the bottom 
chrome colors were used. At present, however, the after chrome 
dyes are in general use either alone or in conjunction with acid dyes 
for shading. Certain plants use bottom chrome dyes, which may 
be shaded with acid dyes. Acid dyes used alone find little applica- 
tion for men's wear, although they are widely used for women's 
wear. 

Fabric used, cadet serge or letter-carrier cloth; weight, 12 ounces 
per yard; width, 54 inches; method of dyeing, raw stock. Cost of 
dye per suit, 6.12 cents. 

Basis: 3^ yards of serge required for one suit; cost of dye per 
yard, 0.89 of a cent— 3^ X 0.89 = 3.12 cents. Add 3 cents for cost 
of dye in linings and pocket cloth; 6.12 cents cost of dye per suit. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of wool require 12.6 pounds 
of indigo paste at 14 cents = $1.76; cost of dye per pound of wool = 
1.76 cents; 1 yard of 12-ounce fabric requires 13.5 ounces of wool, 
of which 60 per cent is dyed, or 8.1 ounces — \^ X 1.76 = 0.89 of a cen]b, 
cost of dye per yard of fabric. 

POLICE UNIFORM 

Fabric used, navy or police cloth; weight, 16 ounces per yard; 
width, 54 inches; dyed in raw stock. Cost of dye per suit, 19.1 cents. 

Basis: 33^ yards for one suit; cost of dye per yard = 4.6 cents — 
4.6X33^=16.1 cents. Add 3 cents for cost of dye in linings and 
pocket cloths. 

Calculation of dye cost: 1 yard, or 18 ounces, of finished fabric 
requires 24 ounces of dyed wool; 100 pounds wool require 18 pounds 
indigo paste at $0.14 = $2.52; 1 pound ahzarin paste at $0.55 = $0.55; 
total, $3.07. Cost of dye per pound of wool = 3.07 cents — fl X3.07 = 
4.6 cents cost of dye per yard. 

Navy uniform cloth is dyed with an alizarin bottom and an indigo 
top. Police cloth, however, is frequently dyed with straight indigo, 
omitting the alizarin bottom. 

8 Figures from ready-cut suit manufacturers show, for pockets, l.'a yards of silesia (36 inches wide); sleeve 
lining, three-fourths yard (40 inches), printed sateen; vest back, three-fourths yard sateen or mohair (36 
inches wide); and for vest and coat lining, 24 yards of 30 to 36 inch goods, such as Venetian or mohair. 



86 census of dyes and othee synthetic chemicals 

men's overcoat 

Fabric used, milton; weight, 20 ounces per yard; width, 54 inches; 
rnethod of dyeing, raw stock. Cost of dye per coat, 19.2 cents. 

Basis: 3 yards used for one coat; cost of dye per yard, 5.4 cents — 
3X5.4 = 16.2 cents. Add 3 cents, cost of dye in lining and pocket 
cloth. Cost of dye in coat =19.2 cents. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds wool requires 6 pounds 
chrome black T, at $0.65 = S3. 90; one-fourth pound chrome yellow 
GN, at $0.60 = S0.15; total, $4.05. Cost of dye per pound of wool, 
4.05 cents; 90 per cent of fabric is dyed wool or 18 ounces per yard. 
Add 18 per cent for loss of dyed wool in manufacture — 3.24 + 18 = 
21.24 ounces dyed wool per yard; ^^2^X4.05 = 5.4 cents per yard. 

women's SUIT 

Fabric used, fancy worsted, gray; weight, 10 ounces per yard; 
width, 56 inches. Cost of dye per suit, 4.5 cents. 

Basis: 334 yards per suit — 3 3^ X $0.62 (cost of dye per yard) 
2.015 cents. Add 2.5 cents, cost of dye for pocket and lining cloth = 
4.515 cents. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of fabric, equal 160 yards, 
require 2% ounces fast light yellow 2G, at $2 per pound, $0.34375; 
13^ ounces fast light red BL, at $2.25 per pound = $0.2109; IM 
ounces alizarin saphirol SE, at $4 per pound = $0.4375; total, $0,992; 
-8j%f = 0.62 cents per yard. These are representative for light shades 
only which have been in recent vogue. 

Fabric used, silk stripe worsted; weight, 10 ounces per yard; 
width, 56 inches. Cost of dye per suit, 9.42 cents. 

Basis: 334 yards per suit — 33^X2.13 (cost of dye per yard) = 6.92 
cents. Add 2.5 cents, cost of dye for pocket and lining cloth = 9.42 
cents. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of fabric, equal 160 yards, 
require 2^ pounds Chrome violet S. W. at $1.30 = $3.41 — f|^ = 2.13 
cents per yard. 

Fabric used, silk stripe worsted, black; weight, 10 ounces per yard; 
width, 56 inches. Cost of dye per suit, 20.79 cents. 

Basis: 334 yards of fabric for one suit — 334 X 5.63 =cost of dye 
per suit= 18.29. Add 2.5 cents, cost of dye in pocket and lining 
cloth = 20.79. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 160 j^ards, 
require 6 pounds of chrome black S. W. at $1. 50 = $9.00— fi^ = 5.63 
cents, cost of dye per yard. 

women's overcoat 

Fabric used: Bolivia cloth, black; weight, 21 ounces per yard; 
width, 54 inches; piece dyed. Cost of dye per coat, 37.1 cents. 

Basis: 334 yards of Bolivia cloth for one coat; cost of dye per yard, 
10.2 cents — 334 ^ 10.2 = 33.1 cents. Add for dye in lining and pocket 
cloth, 4 cents. Cost of dye in coat, 37.1 cents. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of cloth (76.2 yards) requires 
12.5 pounds of acid black lOB at $0.62 = $7.75. Cost of dye per 
pound of fabric = 7.75 cents — f^'=10.2 cents. Cost of dye per 
yard, 10.2 cents. 



WOOLEN AND WORSTED FABRICS AND GARMENTS 



87 



WOOLEN AND WORSTED FABRICS 

Cost of dye per yard 



Fabric 


Width 

in 
inches 


Weight 
per 
yard 


Shade 


Acid 
dyes 


Chrome 
dyes 


Other 






54 

54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 

54 
56 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
56 

56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
55 

55 
55 

55 
55 
55 
56 
54 

54 

54 

54 

54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 


10 

14 

14 

14 

14 

12.5 

10 

12 

18 
15 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
11 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
18 

22 
16 

18 
20 
22 
30 
11 

11 

11 

20 

16 
21 
21 
18 
21 
21 
18 
21 
21 


Blue 


Cents 


Cents 
2.36 

2.4 

2.85 

4.50 

1.7 

8 


Cents 




Do . . . 


do 




with acid dyes. 
Do 


Do . ... 


do... .. 




Do 


Do 


do 




Do 


Do 


do 

do 




Do. 


Do 


Piece dyed. 
Do. 


Do 


do 

do . 


2.2 


Do . . 




0.9 
1.39 


Dyed raw stock* 60 


Do 


do 






per cent dyed in- 
digo, 40 per cent un- 
dyed. 
Do. 


Do 


Black 




7 


Piece dyed. 
Do. 




Slate... 


.85 
.66 

1.45 

1.27 
.28 

1.02 

1.4 

3.1 


Do 


Light brown.. 

Brown 

Blue... 






Do. 


Do... 






Do. 


Do 






Do. 


Do 


Pale green 

Gray. 






Do. 


Do 






Do. 


Do 


Brown 

Black 






Do. 


Do 






Do. 


Fancy worsted, silk 


Gray 


i.06 

2.84 
.61 
6 
8 
1.5 


"""."54" 

.66 
3.9 

4.35 
4.9 
7.4 
12.4 


Do. 


stripe. 
Do 


Slate 




Do. 


Do 1-. 


Light brown.. 
Navy. .. 





Do. 


Do 


Do. 


Do 


Black '.^ _ 


Do. 


Do 


Red 




Do. 




Cadet. 




Raw stock; 50 per cent 
dyed indigo, 50 per 
cent undved. 
Do. 


cloth. 
Do 


do 






Police cloth 


Navy.. 








Do 


do 






alizarin bottom in- 
digo top. 
Do. 


Do... 


do 






Do. 


Navy overcoating 


do 






Do. 


Do . 


do 






Do. 


Woolen suiting 


Light gi'ay 




.31 
.61 

2.6 

5 


Raw stock; 10 per cent 
dyed black, 90 per 
cent undyed. 

Raw stook; 20 per cent 


Do 


Dark gray. .. 




Do 


Brown .... 




dyed black, 80 per 

cent undyed. 
Raw stock; 50 per cent 

djed brown, 50 per 

cent undjed. 
Raw stock; 90 per cent 

dyed black, 10 per 

cent und:,ed. 
Piece dyed. 
Do 


Cloaking 


Black 




Women's cloaking 


Gray 


.75 
3.7 
5.7 
6 
9 

3.7 
12 

16.2 
10.2 


Do 


Brown 

do 

Red 






Do 






Do. 


Do 






Do. 


Do 


do .... 

Blue 






Do 


Do 






Do 


Do _. 


Navy 

do 

Black 






Do. 


Do 






Do 


Do... 






Do 











■ SILK AND OTHER FABRICS 

The silk industry, as compared with the cotton and wool industry, 
has been a small consumer of fast dyes. Brilliancy and purity rather 
than fastness to washing and light have been emphasized as the 
color requirements for silk. Until recently there has been little 
insistence on the part of the consumer for fast-dyed silks. It is true 

591&— 26t 7 



88 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

that silk fabrics are not as a rule subjected to such severe treatment 
as the laundry process for cotton goods, nor are they exposed to 
weather and light as are men's worsted and woolen suiting and over- 
coatings. The prevalence of silks for dress material, however, has 
resulted in a demand for wash silks with good fastness to light and 
perspiration. Silks with poor fastness to washing entail the more 
expensive dry-cleaning process. 

In response to the increasing demand for silk fabrics in fast colors 
for women's dresses and wearing apparel, a number of firms are now 
(1926) dyeing silk goods with colors that will stand washing, light, 
and perspiration. For these the direct developed and the vat dyes 
promise to have increasing use. The difference in cost between the 
fast and the fugitive colors is a relatively small percentage of the 
total value of the fabric, and the use of a fast color increases the life 
of the fabric. 

The following tabulation shows the cost of dye per yard in a variety 
of silk and silk mixed fabrics, most of which were dyed with direct 
and acid dyes. For some of them basic dyes were used. Many of 
the wash silks use developed direct dyes, and an increasing amount 
of vat dyed yarn is used for woven color effect in wash goods. 

Silk Fabrics and Garments 

silk dress 

Fabric used, plain silk; weight, 10 yards per pound; width, 36 
inches. 

Cost of dye per dress: Color — Light pink, 0.15 of a cent; French 
gray, 0.10 of a cent; light blue, 0.55 of a cent; navy blue, 2.48 of a 
cent; purple, 0.23 of a cent; brown, 1.44 of a cent. 
Basis: Four yards per dress. 
Calculation of dye cost: 

Light pink — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, 
require 2 ounces of direct fast red 8BL, at $3 per pound ^ 
$0.375 — f^5^ = 0.0375 of a cent, cost of dye per yard. 
French gray — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, 
require 2 ounces direct fast black L. N. at $1.30 per 
pound = $0.16; ^^ ounce direct fast orange S. at $1.65 per 
pound = $0.077 — ytw = 0-024 of a cent, cost of dye per 
yard, $0,241. 
Light blue — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, require 
l}4 pounds of direct sky blue FF at $1 per pound = $1.25; 
0.1 pound direct red R. T. at $1.30 per pound = $0.13; 
total, $1.38— tV?A = 0.138 of a cent per yard. 
Navy blue — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, require 
5.3 pounds of direct blue 3B at $1.10 per pound = $5.83 
one-half pound of direct green B at $0.80 per pound = $0.40; 
total, $6.23 — yViTV = 0.62 of a cent, cost of dye per yard. 
Purple — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, require 
10 ounces of methyl violet N at $0.92 per pound = $0.575 — 
tWTr = 0.057 of a cent, cost of dye per yard. 
Brown — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, require 

2 pounds direct fast scarlet S at $1.65 per pound = $3.30; 

3 ounces direct fast blue RL at $1.90 per pound = $0.36; 
total, $3.66 — r¥jy% = 0.36 of a cent, cost of dye per yard. 



SILK FABRICS AND GARMENTS 89 

Developed direct dyes: 

Red — 100 pounds of fabric equal to 1,000 yards, require 3 

pounds diazo red 7BL at $3 per pound = $9 — ja^ = 0.9of 

a cent per yard. 
Red — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, require 4 

pounds of diazo red 5BL at $2.50 per pound = $10 — {%%% 

= 1 cent, cost of dye per yard of fabric. 
Blue — 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 1,000 yards, require 43^- 

pounds of diazo blue BR at $2.50 per pound = $11. 25 — 

HM=^ 1.1 cents per yard. 

cr£;pe 

Fabric, silk wool crepe; weight, 3 yards per pound; width, 37 
inches; color, navy. Cost of dye per yard of fabric, 3.23 cents. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 300 yards, 
require 4.5 pounds direct sky blue FF at $1 per pound = $4.50; 6.5 
pounds direct blue RW at $0.80 per pound = $5.20; total, $9.70— 
U^ = 3.23 cents per yard. 

Fabric, silk cotton crepe; weight, 4.8 yards per pound; width, 38 
inches; color, brown. Cost of dye per yard, 0.7 of a cent. 

Calculation of dye cost: 100 pounds of fabric, equal to 483 yards, 
require 2.5 pounds of triazol yellow 2G at $0.90 per pound = $2.25; 
0.5 pound of direct fast black L at $0.95 per pound = $0.47; 0.4 
pound of direct fast brown GR at $0.60 per pound = $0.24; 0.2 pound 
of direct scarlet 3B at $2.25 per pound = $0.45; total, $3.41— 1|^ = 
0.70 of a cent per yard. 



90 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

SILK AND MISCELLANEOUS FABRICS 

Cost of dye per yard 



Fabric 


Width 

in 
inches 


Number 
of yards 

per 
pound 


Shade 


Cost per 

yard of 

dye 


Plain silk ._ 


36 
36 
36 
38 
39 
39 
40 
39 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
50 
36 
36 
37 
37 
40 
38 
38 
41 
41 
44 
40 
50 
50 
50 
50 
37-38 
37-38 
37-38 


10 
10 
10 

18 
18 
18 
17 
12 


Light blue. 


Cents 
0.15 


Do - -. 


Seal brown 


.99 


Do - 


Navy.. ... 


.62 






.03 6 


Do 


Slate 


.28 


Do - 


Brown 


.34 


Do 


Navy 


1.9 


Taffeta - . - . . 


do 


4.6 


Cr6pe - - 


Pink 


.016 


Do 






.03 


Do 




Red 


.32 


Do - - 




Brown 


.42 


Do --- 




Navy.. .... 


1.93 




6.25 
6.25 
6.25 
6.25 

8.8 
8.8 
8.8 
8.8 




.19 


Do - 


Blue 


.28 


D3 - -.- 


Tan 


.02 


Do - ..- - 


Seal brown 


2.87 


Satin - - 


Yellow 


.54 


Do - 


Brown . . . . 


3.27 


Do - 




5.37 


Satin (silk and cotton) 


Peach 


.20 


Do... 


Brown 


4.82 


Do 




Green . . 


3.08 


Do 


7.7 

7.7 

5.3 

5.3 

6 

4.8 

4.8 

4.8 


Light blue 


.038 


Do 




.50 


Do 


Bordeaux 


1.56 


Do 


Violet... 


2.8 


Rayon and cotton . ............ 


Lavender . . 


.32 




Navy . . . . 


1.52 


Do .- 




.7 




Yellow 


.69 


Do - . 


Purple . . . 


1. 14 






Brown. . . . 


2 73 


Do 




Dark brown . . 


6.45 


Velour (silk and cotton) 




Slate 


3.26 


Do 




Brown 


5.56 






Violet 


9.29 


Do 




Purple. . 


19.23 




3 
3 
3 


Slate - 


.49 


Do 


Blue 


2.8 


Do 


Navy 


3.2 









PART IV 

DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN THE 
UNITED STATES, 1925 



91 



Part IV 

DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN THE UNITED 

STATES, 1925 



Introduction 



Since 1919 the United States Tariff Commission has annually com- 
piled a detailed census of dye imports similar to that published by the 
Department of Commerce under the title "Artificial Dyestuffs Used 
in the United States (fiscal year 1913-14)," commonly known as the 
"Norton Import Census." 

The commission first compiled such statistics for use in the adminis- 
tration of section 501, Title 5, of the tariff act of September 8, 1916, 
which made the continuance of specific duties on coal-tar products, 
after September 8, 1921, dependent upon the production in the United 
States of as much as 60 per cent in value of the consumption of these 
products. As the information was found to be of direct value to 
manufacturers, consumers, and importers, as well as to the commission 
itself, in considering tariff aspects of the coal-tar chemical industry, 
the annual census of imports has been continued. 

Imports for consumption for the year 1925, including warehouse 
withdrawals for dyes and other products within paragraphs 27 and 28 
have been compiled and published each month under a cooperative 
arrangement between the chemical divisions of the Department of 
Commerce and the Tariff Commission. Certain discrepancies will 
be found to exist between the final figures published under this arrange- 
ment for the year 1925 and the preliminary figures published in the 
monthly reports for the reason that in checking the preliminary 
figures, minor errors were corrected and a few additions made. 

In tabulating the dye statistics the commission has followed in the 
main the "Colour Index," issued by the British Society of Dyers and 
Colourists, and the "Schultz Farbstofftabellen," and other sources of 
information in the files. 

Such dyes as could not be identified by Colour Index numbers are 
classified by the ordinary method of application, as follows: Acid, basic, 
direct, lake and spirit soluble, mordant and chrome, sulphur, and vat. 
The classification of a dye by its method of application is often purely 
arbitrary, as certain colors may be applied by either of two methods. 

The rate of exchange used in converting foreign invoice values to 
United States currency is either the rate given on the invoice, or, in 
comparatively few cases, the exchange value published by the 
Treasury Department for the month in which consular certification 
occurred. 

93 



94 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



SUMMARY OF IMPORTS OF DYES 



The total import of coal-tar dyes in 1925 was 5,209,601 pounds, 
valued at $4,637,240, as compared with 3,022,539 pounds in 1924, 
with an invoice value of $2,908,778. (For comparison of imports 
with domestic production and effect of change in duty on imports, 
see pp. 39, 42.) 



Table 27. 



-Imports of dyes into the United States, by country of shipment, 
1920-1925 1 



Country of shipment 



Germany 

Switzerland 

England 

Italy 

Belgium... 

Canada 

France 

Holland 

All other countries. 



Percentage of total quantity 



1925 1924 1923 1921 1920 



« 1922 omitted. 



2 Included in "all other countries." 



IMPORT STATISTICS 

Table 31, page 98, shows the quantity and the value (when publish- 
able) of individual dyes imported in 1925. Table 28 is a summary of 
dyes imported from 1921 to 1925, inclusive, classified according to 
method of application. Table 29 compares the volume of the 1925 
imports of the leading dyes in each class by application with corre- 
sponding imports in the period 1923 to 1924 and in the fiscal year 1914. 

Table 28. — Dyes imported into the United States, classified by method of application, 

1921-1925 





1925 


1924 


1923 


Class of dye 


Pounds 


Per 

cent of 

total 


Pounds 


Per 

cent of 

total 


Pounds 


Per 

cent of 

total 


Acid 


589, 959 

1,952 
2,410,890 


11.32 

.04 
46.39 


324, 538 

5,471 
1, 493, 851 


10.74 

.18 
49.43 


544, 048 


17.56 


Vat: 




(b) Vat (other than indigo) 


1, 207, 554 


38.98 


Total.- 


2,418,842 


46.43 


1,499,322 


49.61 


1,207,554 


38.98 






Mordant and chrome: 

(a) Alizarin. . . 


75, 174 
566, 924 


1.45 
10.88 


42, 695 
371,207 




27, 716 
425, 699 


.89 


(6) Mordant and chrome 


13.74 






Total. 


642, 098 


12.33 


413, 902 


13.69 


453,415 


14.63 






Direct 


759, 024 

122, 230 

607, 637 

57, 540 

12, 271 


14.57 
2.35 

11.66 
1.10 
.24 


421, .538 
87, 764 

249, 0f)8 
17, 334 
9,073 


13.95 

2.90 

8.24 

.,57 

.30 


527,014 

114,023 

210, 896 

23, 213 

18,030 


17.01 


Sulphur 


3.68 


Basic 


6.81 


Spirit-soluble and color-lake 

Unidentified, unclassified special 


.75 
.58 






Total 


5, 209, 601 


100. 00 


3,022,539 


100. 00 


3, 098, 193 


100.00 







DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 



95 



Table 28. — Dyes imported into the United States, classified by method of application, 

1921-1925 — Continued 



Class of dye 



Acid 

Vat: 

(o) Indigo 

(6) Vat (other than indigo).. 

Total 

Mordant and chrome: 

(a) Alizarin 

(6) Mordant and chrome 

Total 

Direct 

Sulphur -.- -. 

Basic ..■ 

Spirit-soluble and color-lake 

Unidentified, unclassified special 

Total 



Pounds 



601, 395 

505 
1, 548, 519 



1,549,024 



27, 086 
689, 704 



716, 790 



671,621 

194, 883 

155, 084 

76, 853 

16, 981 



3, 982, 631 



Per 

cent of 

total 



15.10 



.01 
38.89 



38.90 



.68 
17.32 



18.00 



16.86 
4.89 
3.89 
1.93 
.43 



100.00 



1921 



Pounds 



1,455,823 



70, 975 
1,045,370 



1,116,345 



136, 283 
559, 678 



695, 961 



537, 664 
220, 938 
163, 527 
43, 553 
19, 100 



4,252,911 



Per 

cent of 

total 



34.24 



1.66 
24.59 



26.25 



3.58 
12.78 



16.36 



12.64 

5.20 

3.84 

1.02 

.45 



100.00 



Table 29. — Dyes of each class, according to method of application, imported in 
largest quantity in the calendar year 1925, compared with corresponding imports 
in 1924, 1923, 1922, and in the fiscal year 1914 



Color 
Index 
No. 



Schultz 
No. 



Class and type name of dye ' 



1925 



1914 



671 
714 
833 
430 
712 
691 
307 

735 
828 
667 

1077 
645 
717 
32 

1087 
715 



1222 
1113 
1228 
1118 
1184 
1097 
1229 
1095 
1212 

1217 

1114 
1151 
1152 
1096 

1170 
1169 
1102 



506 

545 



543 
523 
265 

564 
672 
503 

860 



548 
182 
851 
546 



901 
842 
907 
849 
881 
761 
908 
759 
918 

913 



795 
792 
765 



ACID DYES 

Erioglaucine 

Patent blue A 

Wool fast blue BL, GL 

Polar red._ 

Patent blue V_.. 

Fast green 

Acid milling black B 

Indocyanine B 

Naphthalene green 

.\zo carmine GX 

Erioviridine B 

Polar orange 

Alizrarin direct blue BQAOO. 

Kiton fast yellow 

Acid violet 6 BN 

Brilliant sulphon red.. 

Alizarin direct blue B 

Cyanol 

Neolan blue 

Brilliant milling blue B 



V.\T DYES 

Ciba violet B, R 

Indanthrene blue GCD 

Ciba scarlet 

Idanthrene yellow G, R 

Brilliant indigo 4B 

Indanthrene golden orange R. 

Ciba red R 

Anthraflavone GC 

Indanthrene red violet RH 

Helindone printing black RD. 

Hydron orange RF 

Hydron pink FF 

Indanthrene blue BCS 

Indanthrene brown R 

Indanthrene brown G 

Indanthrene golden orange G_ 

Hydron brown G, R 

Cibanone yellow R 

Cibanone orange R 

Indanthrene black BB 



Pounds 
35, 295 
31,097 
30, 248 
28, 584 
24, 892 
18, 967 
17, 635 
16, 521 
15, 299 
15, 166 
13, 946 
13, 386 
10, 985 
10, 023 
10,008 
9,923 
9,400 
8,995 
8,813 
8,400 



Pounds 

28, 655 

10, 715 

4,940 

7,756 

23, 606 

30, 721 

9,484 

7,900 

4,357 

6,200 

4,796 

2,204 

7,817 

(^) 

700 

11,373 

3,310 

3,688 

220 

6,200 



82, 598 
68, 450 
40,200 
39, 771 
5,783 
112, 339 

17, 635 
35, 936 
29, 038 

8,300 
37, 077 
50,460 
39, 350 
71,313 

18, 155 
76, 046 
42, 681 
21,035 

9,704 
16, 739 



Pounds 

38, 254 

11,872 

2.264 

15,031 

66, 279 

17, 190 

15, 543 

3,500 

13, 328 

7,218 

8,825 

6,908 

4,618 

(2) 

957 

7,414 

240 

19, 979 

991 

8,540 



64,517 
70, 546 
37, 524 
87, 946 

6,417 
79, 717 

7.388 
27, 721 
21,916 



Pounds 

25, 852 
3,436 
11,484 
14, 926 
49, 136 
52, 498 
14,858 
2,800 

19, 298 
9,327 
1,661 
1,329 

20, 648 
(2) 

9,980 

9,557 

500 

20, 658 

330 

872 



131,661 
16, 802 
33, 246 
15, 507 

205, 582 
78, 145 
25, 188 
20, 594 
32, 819 



22, 571 

3 55, 428 

13, 040 

55. 081 

18, 074 

67, 265 

4,065 

8,373 

5,060 

40, 420 



9,240 

3 20, 250 

239, 505 

16, 778 

3,234 

73, 305 

754 

16, 367 

23, 136 

2,676 



1 The type name represents in most cases the principal color imported in 1925. 

2 Included in Schultz No. 19. 
8 Includes Hydron pink FB. 

5919— 26t 8 



Pounds 

66, 526 

63, 744 

19,238 

2,821 

196, 228 
14, 347 
69, 590 
23, 138 
22, 144 
17,500 
40, 868 
805 



3,157 
6,861 
4,871 



40, 015 



20, 836 

478, 980 

22, 265 

12, 683 

16,880 

50, 496 

1,001 

7,143 

27, 874 



14, 489 



1,596 



20, 092 
1,600 



96 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 29. — Dyes of each class, according to method of application, imported in 
largest quantity in the calendar year 1925, compared with corresponding imports 
in 192J^, 1923, 1922, and in the fiscal year 1914 — Continued 



Color 
Index 
No. 


Schultz 
No. 


Class and type name of dye 


1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1914 


1027 


778 
862 
637 
855 
858 
783 
551 
779 

854' 
804 
785 

780 

784 
865 
856 

635 

273 

358 

449 
319 

681 
457 

573 

571 

606 
660 
603 
608 
559 
538 
516 


MORDANT AND CHROME DYES 

Alizarin (synthetic) ... 


Pounds 
75, 174 
51, 066 
36, 021 
34, 352 
30, 425 
28, 281 
28, 093 

24, 450 
24, 382 
21, 798 

16, 359 

15, 152 
15, 000 

14, 402 

12, 506 

11, 276 
10, 124 

9,503 
8,705 
7,983 

34, 268 
33, 941 
31,943 
28,631 
28, 435 

25, 815 
25, 165 
22, 961 

17, 629 

16, 899 

13, 4,53 
13, 002 

12, 000 
11,933 
11,571 
10, 521 
10, 329 
10, 007 

9,920 
9,797 

' 228, 105 

7 118, 163 

' 75, 700 

27, 760 

20, 045 

17, 353 

15, 622 

13, 389 
10, 882 

9,377 
9,142 
8,200 
6,124 
5,741 
4,842 

57, 924 

18, 383 
5,001 
4,970 
4,830 
4,408 


Pounds 
42, 695 

78, 195 


Pounds 
27, 716 
70, 917 
29, 244 
9.132 
26, 615 


Pounds 
27, 086 
22, 277 
29, 237 
14, 993 
46, 596 


Pounds 

202, 392 

54, 706 


1085 


Alizarin blue black 


894 


Qallamine blue 


2,756 


1088 


Alizarin sky blue B 


20, 729 
40, 600 
271 
12, 664 
15, 202 

5,778 
8,152 
9,385 
9,500 
3,611 

11, 773 
7,636 

16, 117 


19, 471 


1054 


Alizarin saphirol B 


77, 148 


1037 


Purpurine 




720 


Eriochrome azurol EC 




43, 191 
15,523 


21, 060 
14, 239 

(5) 


1033 


Alizarin orange 


8,444 


1053 


Alizarin saphirol SE 


1084 


Alizarin viridine FF 


17.217 
7.948 

12, 528 
7,000 

25, 017 
8,206 

16, 241 

11, 224 


25, 910 
32, 916 

6,500 

3,251 
25, 872 

7,795 
11,669 

8,155 




1067 


Alizarin blue S 


21 231 


1039 


Alizarin YCA 


49 021 




Metachrome blue black 


399 


1034 


A lizarin red S 


53, 154 


1040 


Alizarin SX 




1078 


Alizarin cvanine green ... . . 


2,000 


1075 


Alizarin astrol 




Alizarin light gray BS 






Acid alizarin gray G . 


7, 025 
1,925 

30, 202 
4.849 

23, 970 
11,608 
17, 268 

24, 020 
« 17, 118 

4,735 
« 13, 781 
3,550 
4,601 
7 602 
11, 763 


13, 526 
990 

13, 558 

1,102 

88, 778 

21, 160 


7,555 
3,874 

7,715 

18, 188 

22, 420 

33, 945 

12, 898 

45, 697 

« 36, 920 

7,490 

9,797 

14. 137 

10,913 

9,808 

8,719 




892 


Modern violet 






DIRECT DYES 

Chlorantine fast brown 






Chlorantine fast violet 




316 


Diaininogene blue- 


8,308 


436 


Chlorantine red 8 BN 


14, 305 




Chlorantine fast blue 




561 


Trisulphon brown B 


26. 980 

« 14, 782 

8,458 

10, 126 
9,950 
7,032 
2,205 

17, 793 


16, 781 


653 


Pyrazol orange . 


1,256 




Brilliant skv blue 


4,002 
992 




Diphenyl fast brown GNC 


382 


Diamine scarlet 3B 


28, 887 




Diazo brilliant scarlet 


38, 909 


349 


Chlorantine fast yellow 4GL 






Diamine fast orange 


17, 387 




Diaminogene blue GG 






Chicago red III 


« 2, 305 
5,132 
6,801 

14, 754 
6,614 
1,700 

' 97, 254 

7 57. 375 

(') 

24. 300 

100 

4,031 

4,525 

4,533 


1,550 
325 

2,172 
16, 150 

5,407 
502 

29,083 
31, 242 

(») 
42, 176 
505 
9,349 
9,483 
1,722 


5,104 
859 

12, 608 
37. 648 

6,172 
1,744 

5,077 

13, 545 

51,711 
6,069 
711 
3,476 
3,442 


13, 195 




Diazo brilliant green 3G 




873 


Direct gray R paste 




577 


Trisulphon brown OG 


7,562 




Diazophenyl black V... . .. 






Diazo brown 


5, 134 


749 


BASIC DYES 

Rhodamine B 


59, 354 


752 


Rhodaniine 6G 


37, 515 




Rhodamine 6GDN 




793 


Phosphine 


168. 225 


924 


Methylene green 


30. 812 


788 


Acridine orange 


2,336 


797 


Euchrvsine 


15, 403 


729 


Victoria blue B 


127, 769 


706 


Methyl Lvons blue... 


55 


681 


Crystal violet.. 


4.239 

(') 

3,245 

1,306 

3,867 

6,842 

35, 246 
16,060 
6,001 


3. 738 

m 

6.443 

6,129 

3,498 

20, 283 

26, 242 
28,802 


4.331 

(») 

2,060 

2,746 

1,198 

6,765 

27, 834 

48,750 

3,757 

26, 682 


51, 872 


789 




66.3 


Patent pliosphine 


28, 627 


927 


New methylene blue 


30, 392' 


926 


661 
496 
618 


ThionineblueGO 


18, 618 


658 


Setoglaucine 




815 


Thioflavine T 


35, 224 




SULPHUR DYES 

Cross dye green 


lOO 




Thionol brown 






Thional brilliant blue 






Thionol yellow. 








Thionol direct blue S 










Pvroeene ereen OK.. 


(10) 



















* Included in Schultz No. 858. 
5 Included in Schultz No. 804. 

* Approximate figures. 
' Single strength basis. 



8 Included in Schultz No. 571. 
» Included in Schultz No. 606. 
'1 Included in Schultz No. 746. 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 



97 



The following table gives the stocks of coal-tar dyes and interme- 
diates remaining in bonded warehouse each month since January 31, 
1925, as published in the Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce 
by the Department of Commerce. 

Table 30. — Dyes remaining in bonded customs warehouse January 31, 1925, to 

April SO, 1926 



Date 


Coal-tar 

dyes and 

colors 


Coal-tar 
interme- 
diates 


Date 


Coal-tar 

dyes and 

colors 


Coal-tar 
interme- 
diates 


Jan. 31, 1925 


Pounds 
571,371 
566, 038 
653, 020 
668, 365 
734, 705 
825, 528 
775,916 
767,431 


Pounds 
952, 202 
961,406 
1, 050, 539 
1, 048, 334 
1, 087, 745 
1,171,383 
1,378,837 
1, 363, 760 


Sept. 30, 1925- . 


Pounds 
709, 381 
609, 750 
521,238 
633, 525 
703, 169 
596, 164 
447. 588 
359, 164 


Pounds 
1,359,717 


Feb. 28, 1925 


Oct. 31, 1925 - 


1, 056, 241 
746, 226 


Mar. 31, 1925- . .. 


Nov. 30, 1925 . .- 


Apr. 30, 1925-- 


Dec. 31, 1925-.. 


758,618 


May 31, 1925 


Jan. 31, 1926 


763, 409 


June 30, 1925 


Feb. 28, 1926 


855, 170 


July 31, 1925 . 


Mar. 31, 1926 


896, 530 


Aug. 31, 1925 


Apr. 30, 1926 . - 


928, 593 









Key To Abbreviations Used in Table 

1. THE leading GERMAN COMPANIES 

A Actien-Gesellschaft fiir Anilin-Fabrikation, Berlin. Founded 1873. 

B Badische Anilin-und-Soda-Fabrik, Ludwigshafen-on-the-Rhine. 

Founded 1865. 
By Farbenfabriken, vormals Friedr. Bayer & Co., Leverkusen-on-the- 

Rhine. Founded 1862. 

C Leopold Cassella & Co., Frankfort-on-the-Main. Founded 1870. 

K Kalle, & Co., A. G. Biebrich-on-the-Rhine. Founded 1870. 

M Farbwerke, vormals Meister-Lucius & Briining, Hochst-on-the- 

Main. Founded 1862. 
AG Actien-Gesellschaft fiir Anilin-Fabrikation, Berlin and Chemische 

Fabrik Griesheim-Electron, Ofifenbach-on-the-Main. 

2. THE SMALLER GERMAN COMPANIES 

BK Leipziger Anilinfabrik Beyer & Kegel, FUrstenberg, near Leipzig. 

Founded 1882. 
CJ Carl Jiiger G. m. b. H., Anilinfarbenfabrik, Diisseldorf. Founded 

1823. 
GrE Chemische Fabrik Griesheim-Electron, Offenbach-on-the-Main. 

Founded 1S42. 
L Farbwerk Miihlheim, vormals A. Leonhardt & Co., Miihlheim-on- 

Main. Founded 1879. 
tM Chemische Fabriken, formals Weiler ter Meer, Uerdingen-on-the- 

Rhine. Founded 1877. 

3. FRENCH COMPANIES 

CN Compagnie Nationale de Matieres Colorantes et Produits Chimi- 

ques. Founded 1917. 
StD Societe Anonyme des Matieres colorantes et produits chimiques 

St. Denis (formerly A. Poirrier), St. Denis, near Paris, France. 

Founded 1830. 



4. SWISS COMPANIES, ALL AT BASEL 

DH Farbwerke vormals L. Durand, Huguenin & Co. Founded 1871. 

G Anilinfarben-und-Extract-Fabriken, vormals Joh. Rud. Geigy. 

Founded 1764. 

I Gesellschaft fiir chemische Industrie. Founded 1885. 

S Chemische Fabrik, vormals Sandoz & Co. Founded 1887. 



98 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



5. ENGLISH COMPANIES 

Bro^ Brotherton & Co. (Ltd.), City Chambers, Leeds. 

B. A. C British Alizarine Co. (Ltd.), Manchester. 

B. C British Celanese (Ltd.), London. 

B. D. C British Dyestuffs Corporation (Ltd.), London. 

Lo Charles Lowe & Co., Manchester. 

SD Scottish Dyes (Ltd.) , Grangemouth. 

Q Importations of unknown source, through dealers in colors. 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1^25 



Color 


Schultz 
No. 


Name of dye 


Manu- 
facturer 


Imports 


Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 




2 

7 
"""137' 

38 
182 

58 

56 
61 
64 
73 

82 
83 
154 

96' 
94 
129 
118 

119 

121 

140 
141 
144 
132 

152 
153 
159 

iei" 

173 

177 

175 

194' 

211 
212 


Total 




Pounds 
5, 209, 601 


$4, 637, 240 




Fast printinpc green..- . _ ,. 




2 


1,173 






Fast printing green. _ . . 


By 






Nitrosine NN .. 


DH. 






10 


Naphthol yellow S... .-. 


!..._. 


66 
20 
60 




11 


Amido yellow E 


M 




16 


Fast yellow . _ 






Fast yellow extra 


By.... 






Hansa yellow lOG 


M 






27 


Orange crystals. _. . . . . . _ 


B . . 


. 180 
9, 923 




32 


Brilliant sulphon red . 




9,761 




Brilliant sulphon red B 


S.... . . 




Brilliant sulphon red 5B 


S 








Brilliant sulphon red lOB 


S-.., 






40 


Metachronie orange ... . 




225 






Alizarin yellow R . . . 


BDC 






Metachronie orange R 


A . 






44 


Nitrosaminc red paste . . 


B 


1,800 

44 

2.730 

2,032 




53 


Azo violet 4BS. 


StD. 

B... 




54 


Sorrel red X _ 




69 


Sitara fast red 








Helio fast red RL 


By 






Sitara fast red RL _. . . 


tM 






79 


Scarlet 2R . 


S 


500 

10 

100 




80 


Ponceau 3 R 


GrE 




98 


Palatine chrome brown .. . . 






Pilatus chrome brown QQX... . 


B 




104 


Metachronie olive brown G _ 


Bro 

A 


6,000 
100 
1,500 
2,524 
1,398 




112 


Chrome fast yellow 2 G 




114 


Guinea fast red 2R 


A 






124 


Chromazone red new cone . _ ..^ 




127 


Brilliant geranine 




1,650 




Brilliant geranine B 


By 








By 








Geranine G . __ 


By 






128 


Diamine rose 




200 






Diamine rose BD 


C 






Diamine rose GD .. 


C. 






130 


ErikaB 




, 700 






Erika B cone . 


S . 






Erika B extra _. ...... 


Ao: 






145 


Jasmine, highly cone 


G 


5,510 
44 
275 
20 
20 
20 

6,205 

500 

44 

65 




146 


Citronine 2AEJ 


StD 

B. 

M 




150 


Oranges ... .. . . .. 




158 


'Lake red P paste... .. 




163 


Brilliant carminogene 3B 


M.. 

M 

S 




165 


Lake red C . . . 




172 


Acid alizarin black R.. _. .. 




173 


Metachronie violet B paste 


AG 

StD 




176 


Roccelline. ... ... . 




189 


LithoIredR . .. 






Stone red R paste 


B 






Stone red R pdr. (Single strength). 


B . 






195 


Alizarin yellow QD . 


S... 


700 
1,872 




196 


Acid ponceau.. ... .... 








Acid ponceau E ,-..,... 









Silk ponceau _. 


StD 






219 


Eriochrome flavine A cone... .. 


Q. . 


3,306 
600 




226 


Thiazine red . ... 








Thiazinored RXX 


B 






Trident red RXX 


B 


■ 




234 


Resorcine brown . .,. 


A 


. 50 
15 




239 


Fast brown G 


GrE.'..... 





• DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 99 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Schulta 

No. 



220 
217 



227 
233 



247 
257 
2.57 



264 
265 
266 
273 



274 



279 



279 
284 
296 



306 

308 
3i3 
315 
319 



320 



326 
327 
332 



Name of dye 



Palatine black 

Pilatus black SF 

Naphthalene black 

Alaska black lOBX 

Naphthalene black 12B extra conc.. 

Cotton scarlet e.xtra 

Cloth red B 

Chlorantine fast red 

Benzo fast red 8BL 

Benzo fast rubine BL 

Chlorantine fast red 7BL 

Diamine last red 8BL 

Diamine fast rubine FB 

Fast cotton red 8BL 

Imperial scarlet 3B 

I'^ulphoncy&nine G 

Coomassie navy blue 

Cloth fast blue GTB 

Coomassie navy blue ONX 

Fast sulphcn black F 

Acid milling black B- 

Naphtliylamine black 4B 

Diaminogcne blue 

blue NA 

Developing blue 2R 

Diaminogene blue NA 

.Diazamine blue bR cone 

Diaminogene 

Black (Diaminogene) extra 

Diamine neron BB 

Diiizo fiist black MG 

Benzo fast heliotrope -. 

Benzo fast heliotrope BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope 2RL. 

Brilliant benzo fast violet BL 

Chlorazol fast heliotrope BK 

Diamine azo orange RR 

Diazo brilliant orange - -. 

Developed brilliant orange GR 

Diazo brilliant orange GR 

Diazo briliiant scarlet ROA 

Diamine brilliant violet B 

Brilliant benzo violet B.. 

Diamine brilliant violet B 

Diamine fast violet FFBN, FFRN. 

Naphthamine light violet 2B 

Benzo last orange 

Benzo fast orange S 

Benzo fast orange WS 

Benzo fast scarlet 5BS 

Benzo fast scarlet 8BS 

Benzo fast scarlet OS 

Benzo fast scarlet 4BS 

Vesuvine BLX -.- 

Cotton yellow G extra... 

Chlorantine fast yellow 4QL 

Pyramine orange 3Q 

Ignamine orange 3Q 

Developing black OT 

Congo rubine B 

gongo orange Q 
iamine scarlet 3B 

Benzo scarlet BC... 

Chloramine red B 

Chloramine red 3B. 

Chlorantine red 3B 

Diamine scarlet 3B 

Bordeaux COV 

Chlorazol violet R 

Benzo violet O 

Columbia violet R 

Dianil crimson B.. 

Diphenyl fast gray B 

Chlorantine fast gray B 

Diphenyl fast gray B 

Diphenyl fast gray BC 

Diamine orange B 



Manu- 
facturer 



B. 



B... 
StD. 
B... 
By.. 



By. 
By. 
I... 
C. 
C. 
A.. 
By. 
By. 



I 

BDC. 

S 

G 

B 



C. 
C. 

By. 



By.... 
By.... 
By.... 
BDC. 
C 



By. 
By- 
By. 



By- 
C. 
C. 
K-. 



By- 
By- 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
B.- 
B.. 
I... 



B.. 
C- 
K.. 
By- 



By-... 

S 

s 

I 

c 

A 

BDC- 
By.... 
AG... 
M 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
1,500 



300 

78 

,692 



100 

3,264 

220 



100 
17, 635 

200 
31, 943 



2,108 



9,359 



661 
2,395 



10, 239 



2,609 



1,166 

300 

200 

13, 002 

1,500 



50 

300 

31 

16, 899 



100 
600 
485 
100 
250 
,117 



9,201 



100 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table SI.— Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Schultz 

No. 



Name of dye 



Manu- 
facturer 



Imports 



Quantity 



344 
349 



3.58 



360 



363 
364 
366 
370 
373 



380 
385 



387 
391 
400 



404 
403 
418 
423 



424 



436 
436 



448 
449 
457 
462 
463 
469 
471 
472 
474 
476 



477 
11 
10 



Cutch brown 2R 

Pyrazol fast brown 

Diamine brown B 

Pyrazol fast brown B 

Polar red 

Polar red G 

Polar red R 

Polar red RS 

Chlorantine red 8BN 

A cetopurpurine 8B__ 

Chloramine brilliant red 8B conc-- 
Chloramine brilliant red 8BS conc- 

Chlorantine red 8BN 

Toluylene red 

Triazol light red 8BL 

Pyramine orange R 

Ignamine orange R 

Chromocitronine R 

Acid milling red G cone 

Cotton red 4BX 

Diazo brilliant black B 

Deltapurpurine 5B 

Brilliant congo R 

Congo orange R 

Congo orange R 

Congo orange R 

Diamine orange F 

Benzo new blue 5B 

Oxamine blue 4R 

M inaxo blue 4R 

Minaxo blue 4RX 

Columbia blue G 

Trypan blue 

Acid milling red R 

Acid anthracene red 3B 

Acid milling red R cone - 

Brilliant milling red R 

Milling scarlet 4R cone 

Wool fast red 3B 

Diamine yellow N 

Diamine black BO 

Diamine brilliant blue G 

Chicago blue B 

Diamincgeue blue NBB 

Diazo indigo blue BR 

Brilliant benzo blue 6B 

Brilliant benzo blue 6B cone 

Diamine sky blue FF 

Janus Brown B 

Brown JB 

Columbia black FB, FF 

Diamine brilliant Bordeaux R 

Diamine bronze Q 

Trisulphou brown B cone 

Trisulphon brown ?G cone 

Cotton black E extra cone 

Cotton black RW extra highly cone 

Chloramine black N 

Chloramine blue 3 G cone 

Chloramine blue HW cone 

Diamin? green B 

Cupranil brown G 

Benzo chrome brown G 

Cupranil brown G 

Dianil chrome brown G 

Cupranil brown R 

Benzo chrome brown R 

Cupranil brown R 

Congo brown G 

Congo brown G 

Diph^nyl brown GS 

Chlorazol fast orange D 

Chloramine orange O 

Chlorazol fast orange D 

Stilbene yellow 

Stilbone yellow OGP high, cone 

Stilbene yellow 3GX-. 



A.-. 
S..... 
By.. 

I 

GrE. 
OrE. 



B_.. 
DH. 
O— 
B... 
By.. 
By.. 
GrE. 



A.. 
By- 
C. 
By. 



By. 
G.. 
C-. 
M.. 
B.. 
C. 
C. 
C- 



C-. 
By. 



By. 
C. 



M.. 
AG. 
C... 
C... 

S.... 

s.... 

B... 
B... 



By. 
I... 

M.. 



By- 

I... 



AG. 
G... 



By... 
BDG. 



Pounds 
1,000 
2,949 



28,584 



28,631 



2. 540 



2.250 
5,635 
500 
6, 367 
1,393 
50 
4,441 



13 
1,100 



100 

21 
7,800 



100 

20 

500 

627 



800 



25 



10 
200 
300 

25,815 

10, 007 

100 

100 

100 

1,000 

' 9?8 

10 

2,393 



1, 1.50 



2,153 



7,046 
'2,'866 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 
Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



101 



Color 


Scbultz 
No. 


Name of dye 


Manu- 
facturer 


Imports 


index 

No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


628 


206 

207 

14 

19 

22 

23 


Diphenyl catechine G supra 


G 


Pounds 

8,817 
1,653 
3, 857 

7,774 




629 


Diphenvl fast brown OF 


G -. 




631 




G 




636 


Fast light vellow. 








Fast light yellow 2G 


By... . 






Fast liffht vcllowSG 


By 






639 


Supra light yellow. 




3,054 






Lissamine fast yellow 2G 


BDC 






Supra light yellow 2QL 


By.- 






640 


Tartrazine extra cone 


StD 


44 
10,023 




645 




Kiton fast yellow... ._ 






26 
29 

494 
496 

498 
499 
500 
501 
503 

505 


Kiton fast yellow 3G 


I 






Kiton fast yellow K.. 


I 






619 


Ti'iazogene orange R 


AG 

G 


312 

7, 820 

25, 165 




652 


Erioehromc red B . ... . 




653 


Pyrazol orange 




$26,289 




Direct fa.st orange K 


I 




P vrazol orange G 


S.... 








Pyrazol orange R 


S 






654 


Diazo fast yellow 2G . .. . .. 




4,382 






Developed light yellow 2G._ 


By 






Diazo fast yellow iG . .. .. 


By.. 






656 


.\uramine G ...." 


I 


1,102 
5,741 




658 


Setoglaucine . 




8,659 




Rhoduline blue 6G.. 


By 




Setoglaucine 


G 








Tannocvanine 3G. . 


M 






661 


Turquoise blue BB 


By 

AG 

G 


100 
18 
500 
100 
13,946 




662 


Brilliant green crystals 




663 


Setocyanine ... . 




664 


Acronol brilliant blue ._. .-. 


BDC 




667 


Erioviridine B... .... 


16 383 




Benzyl green B ._ _. .. 


I 






Brilliant acid green 6B. 


By 








Brilliant milling green B .. . ... . 


C . 








ICrioviridine B supra.. 


G 








Guinea fast green 3B 


GrE 










M 








Poseidon green SGX 


B 






670 


Light green (yellowish) 




1,867 






Light green SF yellowish XX. . 


B 






506 

507 
508 
511 
512 


T^ast light green SFX 


By 






671 


Erioglaucine . - . . _ . 




35, 295 






Erioglaucine AP 


G 






Erioglaucine X, high cone .. ... 


G 






672 


Xylene blue VS cone. 


S 


3,502 

3,001 

100 

2, 360 




673 


Xylene blue AS cone... 


S 




676 


Para rosaniline pdr . ... 


By 




677 








Magenta AB pdr 


B 






Fuchsine 


Q... 






678 


513 
514 

515 

516 

518 
522 


New magenta O. . . . 


M 


10 
33 




679 


Dahlia . 






Dahlia, bluish... . . . 


G 






Dahlia, violet .. ....... .. 


Q - 






680 


Methyl violet 




250 






Methyl violet base 


B ... 






Methyl violet NFBL .. 


B . 






681 


Crystal violet .. . -. _. 




9,377 


15, 980 




Crystal violet extra crystals.- . 


tM 




Crystal violet extra pdr. . 


B . 








Crystal violet P... 


By 






682 


Ethyl violet.- . 


B 


4,000 

1, 653 

18,967 




690 


Victoria blue 4 R - 


I 




691 


523 

524 
527 
528 

529 
530 


Fast green. - ...... . 








Fast acid green extra bluish. 


GrE 






Fast green, extra blue shade 


By . 






692 


Magenta S.:. . .-.. 


B ... -'" 


500 
100 

5,664 




695 


Acid violet 4BL0 


M 




696 


Kiton fast violet lOB 






Fast acid violet lOB... ....... 


StD 






Kiton fast violet lOB 


I 






697 




AG 


200 
3,056 




698 


Acid violet 


2,926 




Acid violet S4B 


C 






Acid violet 5BE .. 


StD 








Acid violet 6B 


tM 







102 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Color 


Schultz 
No. 


Name of dye 


Manu- 
facturer 


Imports 


index 

No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


699 


531 
534 
535 
536 

637 

538 
539 

541 

543 
545 

546 

548 

549 
551 

552 
553 
554 
555 
557 
559 

560 
562 


Eriocyanine AC. .. 


G 


Pounds 

7,672 

30 

10 

6,471 




70'' 




B 




•»03 
'04 


Alkali blue D - 


A 




Alkali blue 2B ' 


$9, 773 


Alkali blue 2B cone 


tM. 




Alkali blue 3R cone 


tM... 








Alkaline blue H 


GrE 








Alkaline blue HE 


AG 






705 






355 






Methyl silk blue new - 


G 






Methyl silk blue 3Q - 


tM 






706 


Methyl Lyons blue 


G... 


10, 882 
1,861 




707 






2,811 


Cotton blue cone. No. 2 


M 




Opal blue bluish 


M 








Soluble blue 4B extra 


StD 








Soluble blue 6B for silk 


StD 








Soluble blue 2BX cone - - 


tM 








Soluble blue T -.- 


B 








Water blue 


AG 






710 


Brilliant sky blue 5G --- 




1,217 


1,387 


Betamine blue 8BL . ,. 


AG 




Brilliant sky blue 5Q- 


By 








Brilliant dianil blue 6G 


M 








Direct brilliant blue 8B 


I 








Isamine blue 6B 


C 






712 


Patent blue V 




24, 892 


19, 482 




Brilliant acid blue V 


By 






Patent Blue V 


M 








Poseidom blue BOX cone . - 


B 






■'14 






31, 097 


29, 960 




Acidol blue A . 


tM 






By 








Guinea blue A 


A 










I... 








Neptune blue BR.. ..- 


B 








Poseidon blue BXX 


B 






715 


Cyanol . . 




8,995 


10, 501 




Blue extra --- 

Cyanol blue FF 


C 






C 










C .- 








Cyanol FF 


C 








Indigo carmine blue FF . ... 


AG .... 








Xylene cvanol FF ... ... 


S 






717 


Acid violet 6BN 




10, 008 


8,931 




Acid violet 6BN 


I 






Acid violet 6BNG 


G 








Acid violet 6BN00 


B 






718 


Brilliant chrome violet 4B . . - . 


DH 


881 
28,093 




720 


Eriochrome a7-urol . . 


40,443 




Brilliant blue G 


By 








By - 










G 










G 










AG. .... 










B 






721 


Chromal blue GC 


G. 


551 

5,511 

2,204 

560 

330 

13, 389 




722 




G.... 




723 




G. 




724 




Lo 

DH 




727 


Chrome violet CG . . ..... 




729 


Victoria blue B 


20, 611 






I 








B 










M 










B 










AG 










B 






731 






641 








B 








I . .J 






733 






575 








By 






Intensive blue B 


By 







DYES IMPOKTED FOE CONSUMPTION 103 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Schultz 
No. 



802 



564 



565 
568 
670 
579 
573 



Name of dye 



580 

582 



584 



587 



592 
593 



603 



606 



607 
608 



613 



Manu- 
facturer 



Naphthalene green 

Alkah fast green 3G - By. 

Alkahne fast green 3G M. 

Erio green B supra --- - G. 

Naphthalene acid green J cone --- -- StD. 

Naphthalene green cone. - - --- M. 

Poseidon green VGQX B. 

Xylene fast green B S. 

Wool blue G extra. GrE. 

Setacyl brilliant pink G G. 

Rhodamine S I- 

Sulphorosazeine B extra M. 

Rhodamine B extra (single strength)... 

Rhodamine B cone. G. 

Rhodamine B extra B. 

Rhodamine B extra By. 

Rhodamine B extra I- 

Rhodamine B extra base B. 

Rosazeine B extra _.. C. 

Rosazeine B extra M. 

Rosazeine B extra base M. 

Rhodamine CG extra (single strength) 

Rhodamine 6G extra G — 

Rhodamine 6G extra. I.. - 

Rosazeine 6G extra M... 

Rosazeine 6GD extra.. M... 

Fast acid violet B M... 

Erio fast fuchsine 

Acid violet 4RN00 B... 

Erio fast fuchsine BBL G... 

Fast acid violet R M... 

Fast acid blue R.. M.. 

Chromorhodine 

Chromorhodine BB DH. 

Chromorhodine BN DH. 

Chromorhodine BR DH. 

Eosine 

Eosine A B... 

Eosine Y CJ.. 

Erythrosine M.. 

Phloxine 

Phloxine M.. 

Phloxine BBN AG. 

Auracine G.._ _ G... 

Coriphosphine OX extra By.. 

Aciidine orange 

Acridine orange DHE DH. 

Brilliant acridine orange A DH. 

Euchrysine 3RX B... 

Rhoduline orange NO By.. 

Patent phosphine 

Brilliant phosphine 5G 

Patent phosphine G_ 

Patent phosphine GG 

Patent phosphine M. 

Patent phosphine R 

Phospine 

Phosphine O. M... 

Phosphine 3R AG.. 

Phosphine 3R GrE. 

Philadelphia yellow 2G.... GrE. 

Flavophosphine 

Flavophosphine O. M... 

Flavophosphine 4G M... 

Runic (Rheonine) AL cone B — 

Euchrysine I 

Euchrysine 2RX ..| B.... 

Euchrysine 2RDX M... 

Patent phosphine GRNTN B... 

Patent phosphine RRDX B... 

Quinoline yellow (water soluble) 

Quinoline yellow I 

QuinoMne jellow cone S 

Quinoline yellow extra B — 

Quinoline yellow KT extra cone B... 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
15, 299 



Invoice 
value 



$20, 404 



200 

55 

220 

870 

228, 105 



118, 163 



1,100 
6,530 



10 
5,068 



366 



88,837 



73,287 



6,903 



15, 295 



330 
2,823 
17,353 



9,142 



27, 760 



37, 192 



12,337 



31,068 



305 



3,000 
15, 622 



26. 272 



3,632 



3.374 



1,300 



104 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Schultz 
No. 



198 
617 



618 



671 

672 



687 



688 
689 
690 

'699" 
698 
700 



922 

681 



620 
621 
622 





Manu- 
facturer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Mimosa Z cone .... - ..... 


G 


Pounds 
1,768 
3,406 




Diphenyl chlorine yellow FF ... . 




$3,738 


Chloramine yellow FF cone 


S 




Diamine fast vellow FF 


c. 






Diamine fast yellow AGO 


c 






Diphenyl chlorine yellow FF supra 


G. 






Thioflavine T.. 




4,842 


9,987 


Basic yellow T. _. .. . 


C. 




Basic yellow TCN 


C 






Rhoduline vellow 6Q 


By 






Setoflavine T ... 


G. 






Thioflavine TCN 


C 






Induline scarlet . . 


B . 


196 
15, 166 




Azocarmine QX 




19,553 


Azocarmine G . . . 


B 




Azocarmine GX ... ...... 


B.. 






Azocarmine BX _ 




5,834 


8,063 


Azocarmine BX 


B 




Azo orseille BB 


C 






Rosinduline 2B bluish 


K . 






Rosinduline 2B blue shade ........ 


M. 






Wool fast blue BL, GL 




30,248 


44,046 


Acid blue AM 


By 




Benzyl fast blue GL 


I 






Fast blue WBL 


By 






Wool fast blue BL ... 


B 






Wool fast blue BL 


By . 






Wool fast blue GL 


By 






Wool fast violet B 


By 






Xylene fast blue GL cone. . 


S.. 








S 








s . 






Xylene milling blue GL cone 


s 






Methylene heliotrope 




1,630 




Methylene heliotrope extra strong . 


M 






M . 






Rosolane paste . 


StD 

C 


50 
10 
4,331 
500 
100 
200 
680 




Indazine (spirit soluble) 




Diphene blue R 


A.- 




Acid cyanine BF .... 


AG 

B 










B 




Nigrosine (water soluble) 






Nigrosine T 


B 






AG 








M 


1,500 




New fast gray 




Direct gray R paste . 


G. . . 


10, 329 

3,625 
10, 828 




Malta gray J.. ... 


StD 




Ursol 


10, 661 




stb 




Fur black DB, DG 


A 






Fur blue black, A, B, DB ... 


A. 






Fur blue black, SA, SB 


A 






Fur brown NZ, NZD, P, PR, PY 


A. 






Fur brown, 2R, 4R, SKQ, SP 


A.. 






Fur gray AL.\, B, G 


A 








4 






Fur olive DA, 6G 


A 








A 








A 








A... 








C. 






Nako B, DFIV, G, 2G, DMG 


M 






Nako, 3GN, M, RH, SB 


M 






Nako black DBB 


M 








M... 








L 


1(,0 

50 

3,481 




Brilliant cresyl blue 2BS 


L .. 




Delphine blue B 








S 






o . 






Delphine blue B 


I 










7,936 


18, 408 




DH 






DH. . .. 








I 






Chromazurine OR 


DH 







DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 105 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1926 — Continued 



Schultz 
No 



Name of dye 



Manu- 
facturer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



624 
627 



633 
635 



637 

641 



645 
648 
649 

659 

660 



663 



711 

752 
748 



748 
720 
746 
774 
778 



797 

779 



780 



Modern violet N 

Modern violet N 

Modern viclet N extra 

Chromacetine I'.lue S 

Anthracyanine S 

Chromacetine blue S extra 

Modern eyanine BGQ 

Modern eyanine N 

Modern eyanine RN 

Modern eyanine SR 

Modern eyanine V 

Modern royal blue 

Indalizaiin J paste 

Modern violet 

Blue ItOO TCD 

Chrome printing violet N. 

Gallo violet DF 

Modern violet 

Gallamine blue extra p:ste- 

Celestine blue 

Celestine blue B.. 

Coreine RR. 

Gallazine No. 90 pdr 

Fluorescent blue 

Cotton blue R _ 

Cotton tilue R e>tra cone 

Meldola's blue3R cone 

Methylene blue .-. 

Methvlene blue BGF high conc- 
Methylene blue BOX 

Methylene green 

Metliylene green G. 

Methylene green F 

Methylene green W 

Thionine blue 

Tljionine blue G 

Thinnine blue GO 

Methvlene blue HGG 



DH. 
DH. 



DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH- 
DH. 
DH. 



DH. 
I.... 
By.. 
DH. 
G... 



By_. 
DH. 
DH. 

S.... 



M.. 
B-. 
Rhoduline blue GO ! By. 

New methylene blue. 



By. 
C. 
By. 
A.. 
I... 
B.- 



New Methylene blue N.. 

New methylene blue N.. 

New methylene blue NS 

Thional oranee G cone 

Kurgan (Kryogene) direct blue GO 

Hydron blue R (single strength) 

Hydron blue R paste 

Hydron blue R pJr 

Hydron blue G paste 

Sulphur blgck T extra 

Pyrogene green 3G 

Alizarin black S paste 

Alizarin, synthetic 

Alizarin paste bluish 

Alizarin VI extra pure paste 

/ilizarin VI old paste j B 

Alizarin red paste M 

Alizarin red IB extra paste M 

Alizarin red IB extra paste By 

Alizarin red DIB paste. M 

Alizarin claret R paste M 

Alizarin orange. I 

Alizarin orange A paste ] B 

.\lizarin orange AO paste BAG. 

Alizarin orange AO paste BDG. 

Alizarin orange R.. M 

.\lizarin orange RP I By — 

Alizarin red S [ 

Alizarin red IWS pdr. j M 

Alizarin red S pdr ; B 

Alizarinred S pdr j BDC 

Alizarin red SU pdr B 

Alizarin red W pdr ' By — 

Anthracene brown (single strength) ' 

Anthracene brown R paste By — 

Anthracene brown RD paste O 

Anthracene brown SW pdr ' B 



Pounds 
551 



5 
7,983 



36,021 
10 



2,204 

28 

1,320 



400 



20, 045 



6,124 



8,200 



500 

100 

10, 054 



10 

10 

2,203 

1,398 
75, 174 



1,000 . 
24,450 I 



7,236 



$10, 381 



15, 997 



20, 226 



9,605 



13,211 



12, 127 



,680 



13, 807 



2,309 



106 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Color 

index 

No. 



Schultz 
No. 



Name of dye 



Manu- 
facturer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



1037 



1038 
1039 



1040 



1045 



1051 
1053 



1054 



1056 
1058 



1059 



783 



785 



784 



787 



858 



lOfiO 


790 


lOfil 


802 


1063 


790 


1064 




1065 




1066 


803 


1067 


804 



1071 
1073 

1075 
1076 
1077 
1078 



1080 
1081 



800 



852 

856 
859 
860 
865 



853 
864 



Purpurine i 

Alizarin red PS pdr 

Purpurine 

Brilliant alizarin Bordeaux R paste 

Alizarin YCA 

Alizarin GI paste 

Alizarin red SDG paste 

Alizarin red XGP paste 

Alizarin red YCA paste 

Alizarin red YCA paste 

Alizarin SX 

Alizarin SX paste 

Alizarin SX paste 

Alizarin SX paste 

Alizarin red SX paste 

Alizarin Bordeaux 

Alizarin Bordeaux B paste 

Alizarin Bordeaux BP paste 

Alizarin Bordeaux OP paste 

Alizarin Bordeaux GG paste 

Alizarm cyanine 2G pdr 

Alizarin saphirol SE 

Alizarin blue SAWSA pdr 

Alizarin blue WS pdr 

Alizarin light blue SE cone 

Alizarin saphire blue SE 

Alizarin saphirol SE pdr 

Alizarin saphirol WSA pdr 

Alizarin saphirol B 

Alizarin blue SAP pdr 

Alizarin light blue B 

Alizarin light blue B cone 

Alizarin saphire blue B 

Alizarin saphTOl B pdr 

Alizarin emeraldole green G 

Alizarin uranol 

Alizarin uranol BB pdr 

Alizarin uranol R pdr 

Anthracene blue 

Anthracene blue WB paste 

Anthracene blue WG paste 

Anthracene blue SWGG pdr 

Anthracene blue WG new 

Anthracene blue SWR pdr 

Alizarin cyclamine R paste 

Alizarin cyanine black G paste -__ 

Alizarin blue R 

Alizarin blue S 

Alizarin blue S pdr 

Alizarin blue S pdr 

Alizarin blue S pdr 

Alizarin blue SB pdr 

Alizarin green S 

Alizarin green S paste 

Alizarin green S paste 

Alizarm irisol 

Alizarin blue IR 

Alizarin blue JR 

Alizarin direct violet R 

Alizarin direct violet ER 

Alizarin irisol R 

Alizarin astrol 

Alizarin astrol B pdr 

Alizarin blue AS pdr 

Alizarin direct blue RXO 

Alizarin direct blue RXO pdr 

Alizarin light blue R cone 

Alizarin direct blue BGAOO 

Alizarin direct blue BGAOO 

Alizarin light blue BGAOO 

Alizarin cyanine green 

Alizarin cyanine green G extra pdr. 

Alizarin cyanine green 3G pdr 

Alizarin light green GS cone 

Erio fast cyanine green Q 

Anthraquinone violet pdr 

Anthraquinone green OXNO pdr 



By. 
By. 



By..-. 
BAC. 
BDC. 



B 

BAC. 
BDC. 
By... 



By. 
By. 
By- 
By. 
By. 



By. 
By- 
S... 
I... 
By. 
By. 



By- 

s... 
s... 
1... 

By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 
Q-- 



B.. 

By. 

M.. 
M.. 



B 

BDC. 



By. 
By. 
M.. 
B.. 
By. 



By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 
S... 
G.- 
B.. 
B.. 



Pounds 
28, 281 



200 
15, 152 



12, 506 



1,652 
24, 382 



30, 425 



10 
599 



3,790 



1,540 

840 

500 

15 

5 

74 
16, 359 



3,285 
"6,"838" 



10, 124 



3,700 



10, 985 
'n,"276' 



5,095 
874 



$3, 038 



1,925 



678 



59, 620 



44, 498 



19,299 



19,409 



26, 540 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 
Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



107 



Color 

index 

No. 



1082 
1084 
1085 



1087 
1088 

1091 



1092 
1093 



1095 



1096 



Schultz 
No. 



760 



Name of dye 



1097 


761 


1098 


762 


1099 


763 


1102 


765 


1103 


766 


1104 


767 



Anthraquinone blue green BXO pdr 

Alizarin viridine FF paste *. 

Alizarin blue black 

Alizarin blue black B pdr 

Alizarin blue black B pdr 

Alizarin blue black 3B pdi- 

Alizarin blue black 3B pdr 

Chrome blue black B pdr 

Alizarin direct blue B 

Alizarin direct blue B 

Alizarin leveling blue B 

Alizarin pure blue B 

Alizarin sky blue B pdr 

Alizarin blue SKY pdr 

Alizarin blue SKYpdr 

Alizarin rubinol 

Alizarin rubinal 3G pdr 

Alizarin rubinol .'>0 pdr 

Alizarin rubinol GW pdr 

Alizarin rubinol R pdr 

Anthra rubine B - 

Alizarin geranol B pdr 

Indanthrene blue WB 

Vat blue WB pdr _ 

Anthraflavone GC (single strength) 

Anthra yellow GC paste 

Anthra yellow GC pdr _ 

Anthra yellow OC paste fine 

Anthra yellow GC dbl. paste 

Anthraflavone GC pdr 

Ilclindone yellow AGC paste 

Ilelindone yellow AGC pdr 

Vat yellow G C paste 

Vat yellow GC pdr 

Indanthrene golden orange G (single strength) 

Ilelindone golden orange Ki dbl. paste 

Ilelindone golden orange IG pdr 

Indanthrene golden orange G dbl. paste 

Indanthrene golden orange G pdr 

Vat golden orange (i paste 

Vat golden orange G dbl. paste 

Vat golden orange G pdr 

Vat golden orange GL dbl. paste 

Indanthrene golden orange RRT (single strength) . 

Ilelindone golden orange IRRT paste 

Vat orange RRT paste 

Vat orange RRT paste fine 

Vat orange RRT pdr 

Anthra scarlet G (single strength)... 

Anthra scarlet O paste 

Anthra scarlet G pdr _ 

Indanthrene dark blue BO (single strength) 

Cibanone deep blue BO pdr 

Vnt dark blue BO paste 

Vat dark blue BO pdr 

Vat dark blue BOA paste 

Vat dark blue BOA paste fine 

Vat dark blue BOA pdr 

Vat dark blue BGO paste 

Vat dark blue BGO pdr 

Indanthrene black (single strength) 

Anthra green B dbl. paste 

Anthra green B pdr 

Ilelindone black IBB dbl. paste... 

Vat black BB dbl. paste 

Vat black BB dbl. paste fine 

Vat black BBpdr 

Indanthrene violet R (single strength) 

Vat violet R extra paste 

Vat violet R extra paste fine 

Vat violet R extra pdr 

Indanthrene violet RR (single strength) 

Indanthrene violet RR extra pdr — 

Vat brilliant violet RR paste fine 

Vat brilliant violet RR pdr 

Vat violet RR extra dbl. paste 

Vat violet RR extra pdr 

Vat violet IRR extra paste - 



Manu- 
factiurer 



B.. 
By. 



By. 

M.. 
By. 
M.. 
I— 



By. 
B.. 

By. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
K.. 
By. 



I... 
B.. 
B.. 
B-. 
B.. 
B.. 
By. 
By. 



Imports 



Quantity 



POUU'lS 

500 
21, 798 
51,066 



Invoice 
value 



9,400 



34, 352 



7,734 



2,891 
403 



73, 816 



46, 646 



90, 730 



3,200 



27, 961 



32, 706 



21, 736 



$45, 315 



97, 102 



14, 876 



75, 779 



46, 372 



102, 564 



19,919 



11,524 



68 



21,784 



108 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31.^ — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Color 


Schultz 
No. 


Name of dye 


Manu- 
facturer 


Imports 


index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


1105 


768 
838 

839 
840 






Pounds 

347 


$284 






B . 








B . 








Vat violot B pnste finp . 


B 






1106 






14, 077 


5,537 




Indanthrpne blue RS triple pdv - . _ _ - 


B . 






Vat blue RS paste 


B . . 








Vat blue RS pnste fine 

Vat blue RS dbl paste 


B 








B 








Vat blue RS dbl paste fine .---.--.- 


B . 








Vat blue RS triple odr . 


B ... 








Vat blue RSP paste 


B 








Vat blue RSP dbl paste 


B . 








Vat blue RSP odr - 


B . . 








Vat b'up RSP trin'lf^ pdr. 


B 






1108 






1,391 


992 






M 






Vat blup RK paste - - - 


By.- 








Vat blue RK pdr 


By 






1109 






10, 979 


6, 068 






B . 






Vat blue 3G paste - 


B 










B 








Vat blue 3G dbl naste 


B . 








Vat blUP 30 dbl p?ste fine . 


B . 










Vat blue 3 Cr pdr --- 


B - . . 






1110 


841 

844 
842 



843 

843 

847 
849 






2, 588 


1,529 




Vat blue GGSL dl;i paste 


B .. 






Vat blue GO SI- pdr . - . .. . 


B . 








Vat blue GGSNL dbl. paste... . 


B 








Vat blue GGSNP paste 


B 








Vat blue GGSNP dbl uaste . 


B 


. 




Vat blue GGSNP quintriple pdr 

Vat blue GGSP paste . 


B . 








B 








Vat blue GGSP dbl. paste 


B 








Vat blue GGSP triple pdr 


B 








Vat blue GGSZ paste 


B 








Vat blue GOSZ dbl. paste. ... . 


B... 








Vat blue GGSZ triple pdr 


B 






1111 


Indanthrene blue 5G (single strength) ._ 




15,811 


8,755 






B 






Vat blue 5G paste 


By 








Vatblup5Gpdr 


By.. 






1113 


Indanthrene blup GCD (single strength) . 




139, 876 


59,302 






By.. 






Cibanone blue G("!D dbl. paste. 


I 








Helindone blue IGGD dbl. paste.. . . 


M 








Heli''dono blue IGCD dbl. paste fine 


M 










M 








Indanthrene blue GCD dbl. paste. 


B 








Vat blue GCD dbl. paste.. 


B 








Vat blue GCD dbl. paste fine 


B 








Vat blue GCDN pdr 


B 






1114 


Indanthrene blue BCS (single strength) . 




59, 814 


25,230 




Helindore blue IBCD dbl. paste.. 


M 






Helindone blue IBCS pdr . 


M 








Indanthrenp blue BCS pdr.. . 


B 








Vat blue BCD dbl paste fine 


B 








Vat blue BCS pdr 


B... 






1115 


Indanthrone blue GC (single strength) 




788 


295 




Vat blue GC paste . . 


B 






Vat blue GC. paste fine 


B 






Vat blue GC dbl. paste.. . . . 


B... 






Vat bhie GC dbl. paste line 


B 








Vpt blue GCN pdr 


B 






1115 


Cibanone blue G 












I. 


441 

3,415 

400 








I 




1116 


Indanthrene green BB (single strength) 








Vat green BB paste 


Bv 






Bv. 






1118 


Indanthrene yellow G, R (single strength).. 




111,713 


81, 249 






M 






Indanthrene yellow G paste.. 


B 








B . 








Vat yellow G dbl. paste .. 


B 








Vat yellow Q dbl. paste fine. 


B 








Vat yellow Q pdr 


B-.::::::;:::: :::::::: ::::::. 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION" 1C9 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Schultz 
No. 



849 



Name of dye 



814 
818 
815 
816 
817 



822 



810 
830 



870 
834 



Indanthrene yellow Q. R. — Continued. 

Vat yollow R dbl. paste 

Vat yellow R dbl. paste fine 

Vat yellow R pdr 

Indanthreno hrown B (single strength) 

Anthia brown B paste 

Anthra brown B pdr 

Vat brown B pdr. 

Anthra gray B (single strength) 

Anthra. gray B dbl. paste 

Anthra gray B dbl. paste fine 

Anthra gray B pdr 

Anthra gray BL dbl. paste 

Leucol yellow G paste 

Algol pink R pdr. (single strength) 

Algol scarlet Q pdr. (single strength) 

Indanthrene red 5GK pdr. (single strength) 

Indanthrene yellow GK (single strength) 

Grelanone yellow RG paste 

Ilelindone yellow JQK pdr 

Vat yellow GK paste 

Vat yellow GK pdr 

Vat yellow RQ paste 

Algol red FF, R (single strength) 

Algol brilliant red 2B paste 

Algol brilliant rod 2B pdr 

Algol red FF extra paste 

Algol red FF extra pdr 

Algol red R extra paste 

Algol red R extra pdr 

Vat red FF paste 

Vat red R extra pdr 

Indanthrene brilliant violet BBK (single strength). 

Algol blue 3R paste 

Algol blue3R pdr 

Grelanone violet 3 B pdr . 

Vat brilliant violet BBK paste 

Vat brilliant violet BBK pdr 

Indanthrene brilliant violet RK (single strength).. 

Grelanore violet BR paste 

Grelanore violet BR pdr 

Vat brilliant violet RK paste 

Vat brilliant violet RK pdr._ 

Indanthrene orange RRK (single strength) 

Grelanone orange R paste 

Indanthrene orange RRK pdr 

Vat brilliant orange FR pdr 

Vat orange R paste 

Vat orange R pdr... 

Vat orange RRK pdr _. 

Indanthrene orange 6RTK (single strength) 

Vat orange R pdr 

Vat orange 6RTK paste 

Vat orange 6RTK pdr 

Helindone yellow 3GN 

Helindoue yellow 3GN paste.. 

Thioindigo yellow 3GN paste 

Indanthrene red R (single strength) 

Anthra red R pdr 

Anthra red RT paste 

Anthra red RT paste fine 

Anthra red RT dbl. paste 

Anthra red RT dbl. paste fine 

Anthra red RT pdr 

Vat red RT pdr 

Anthra Bordeaux R (single strength) 

Anthra Bordeaux R paste 

Anthra Bordeaux R paste fine 

Anthra Bordeaux R pdr 

Anthra claret R paste 

Vat Bordeaux B extra paste 

Indanthrene cori nth RK (single strength) 

Helindone corinth IRK paste 

Vat corinth RK paste 

Indanthrene gray K, GK (single strength) 

Helindone gray IGK pdr 

Vat gray K pdr 

Vat gray GK paste 

Vat gray GK pdr.. 



Manu- 
facturer 



B_. 
B.. 
B.- 
B-. 
By. 
By- 
By. 
By. 



GrE. 
M.... 
By.. 
By.. 
GrE. 



By. 
By- 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



By... 
By... 
GrE. 
By... 
By... 



GrE. 
GrE. 
By... 
By... 



GrE. 

M.... 
By... 
GrE, 
GrE. 
By... 



By. 
By. 
By. 



M.. 
By. 



M.. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 



7,904 



4,7S8 



5 

420 

200 

1,COO 

4,532 



16, 736 



9, 869 



9,048 



8,476 



945 



1,253 

"H.'eof' 



Invoice 
value 



$3, 334 



2,191 



7,623 



6,348 



5,735 



287 



9,287 



, 009 7, 633 



999 

,'381 'i '4,"545 



110 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Color 
index 
No. 



Schultz 
No. 



Name of dye 



Manu- 
facturer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



1146 



1150 



1151 



828 



873 



833 



1152 



1155 



1161 



1162 



831 



1163 



832 



1167 
1169 


791 
792 


1170 


795 


1171 


868 


1172 


794 


1173 
1174 
1177 


793 
793 
874 



Indanthrene Bordeaux B (single strength) 

Anthra Bordeaux B paste 

Anthra Bordeaux B paste fine 

Anthra Bordeaux B pdr 

Indanthrene brown OR (single strength) 

Ilelindone brown lOR paste 

Vat brown OR paste 

Vat brown GR pdr 

Indanthrene olive R (single strength) 

Helindone olive IR paste 

Vat olive B paste... 

Vat olive R paste 

Vat olive R pdr 

Vat olive IR paste 

Vat olive IR pdr 

Indanthrene brown R (single strength) 

Grelanone brown RR paste 

Grelanone brown RR pdr 

Helindone brown IR paste 

Helindone brown IR pdr — 

Vat brown R paste 

Vat brown R paste 

Vat brown R pdr. 

Vat brown IR paste 

Indanthrene brown G (single strength) 

Grelanone brown B paste 

Grelanone brown B pdr 

Helindone brown IG paste 

Helindone brown IG pdr 

Vat brown Q paste. 

Vat brown G paste 

Vat brown G pdr... 

Vat brown G pdr... -.. 

Algol red B (single strength) 

Algol red B paste 

Algol red B pdr 

Vat red BT pdr 

Indanthrene red violet RRK (single strength). 

Helindone red violet IRRK paste 

Vat red violet RRK paste 

Vat red violet RRK paste fine .. 

Vat red violet RRK pdr 

Vat red violet RRKP paste 

Indanthrene red RK (single strength) 

Duranthrene red BN paste 

Helindone red DIBN extra paste 

Helindone red DIBN extra pdr 

Helindone red IRK paste.. 

Vat red BN paste 

Vac red BN extra paste 

Vat red BN extra pdr 

Vat red RK paste 

Vat red RK paste fine -.. 

Vat red BK pdr 

Indanthrene violet BN (single strength) 

Helindone violet IBN paste 

Vat violet BN paste 

Vat violet BN paste fine.. 

Vat violet BN pdr 

Vat violet BN extra paste 

Vat violet BN extra pdr 

Indanthrene olive G pdr. (single strength) 

Cibanone orange R (single strength) 

Cibanone orange R paste 

Cibanone orange R pdr 

Cibanone yellow R (single strength) 

Cibanone yellow R paste 

Cibanone yellow R pdr 

Cibanone brown B (single strength) 

Cibanone brown B paste — 

Cibanone brown B pdr 

Cibanone black B (single strength) 

Cibanone black B paste 

Cibanone black B pdr 

Cibanone blue 3G paste 

(^ibanone green B pdr. (single strength) 

Indigo, dry, natural 



M... 
GrE. 
By.. 
B... 
M... 
M... 



GrE. 
GrE. 
M... 
M... 
B... 
By.. 
By.- 
M... 



GrE. 
GrE. 
M--. 
M... 
B... 
By.. 
B... 
By.. 



By.. 
By_. 

GrE. 



BDC. 
M.--, 
M--- 
M... 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 



Pounds 

487 



260 



$102 



22, 772 



14,617 



59, 033 



53, 173 



51, 813 



38, 695 



4,234 



2,731 



7,617 



9,724 



30, 267 



42, 366 



18, 911 



37, 147 



31 
33, 939 



34, 815 



9,238 



8,586 



4,517 
1,100 
1,952 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 
Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



111 



Color 
index 
No. 


Schultz 
No. 


1178 


876 


1184 


881 


1186 


883 


1187 




1188 
1189 
1190 
1196 
1198 
1199 


884 
887 
885 
890 
891 
892 


1200 
1201 
1202 
1207 


895 
894 
893 
912 


1208 


919 


1209 
1211 


917 
910 


1212 


918 


1213 


921 


1215 
1217 


914 
913 


1219 


920 



Name of dye 



Indigosol 

Indigo vat 

Indigosol _ 

Indigosol O 

Indigosol O 

Indigosol O 

Brilliant indigo 4B (single strength) 

Brilliant indigo 4B paste 

Brilliant indigo 4B pdr 

Bromindigo FBP paste.. 

Indigo MLB/4B paste 

Indigo MLB/4B pdr 

Indigo KG (single strength)... 

Indigo KG pdr 

Indigo MLB/6B pdr 

Ciba brown R (single strength) 

Ciba brown R paste 

Ciba brown R pdr. 

Brilliant indigo BB paste 

Brilliant indigo 4G pdr. (single strength) 

Brilliant indigo B paste. 

Ciba yellow G paste 

Ciba green Q paste. 

Helindone green G (single strength) 

Helindone green G paste 

Helindone green G pdr 

Alizarin indigo 3R paste 

Alizarin indigo B paste.- 

Alizarin indigo G paste. ..- 

Anthra red B (single strength) 

Anthra red B paste 

Anthra red B pdr 

Ciba pink B paste . 

Vat red B pdr. 

Ciba Bordeaux B (single strength) 

Ciba Bordeaux B paste 

Ciba Bordeaux B pdr. 

Helindone red B pdr. (single strength) 

Helindone pink (single strength) 

Anthra pink AN paste 

Anthra pink BN extra paste 

Helindone pink AN paste 

Helindone pink AN pdr 

Helindone pink BN paste 

Thioindigo pink BN extra paste 

Thioindigo pink BN extra paste ..- 

Indanthrene red violet RH (single strength). 

Ciba red 3B paste 

Ciba red 3B pdr 

Helindone red 3B paste. 



Manu- 
facturer 



B... 
By.. 
B... 
By.. 
DH. 



B_- 
B.. 
By. 

M-. 
M.. 



M.. 
M.. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



I.. 

I.. 

M. 

Helindone red 3B pdr | M. 

■ ■ M. 

M. 
K. 
M. 
B. 
M. 
B. 
B. 



Helindone reddish violet IRH paste. 

Helindone reddish violet IRH pdr 

Thioindigo red 3B paste 

Vat red 3B paste 

Vat red 3B pdr 

Vat red 3B pdr 

Vat red violet RH paste. 

Vat red violet RH pdr 

Indanthrene gray 6B (single strength) 

Vat gray 6B paste 

Vat gray 6B pdr. 

Helindone orange D pdr. (single strength). 

Hydron orange RF (single strength) 

Anthra orange RF paste 

Helindone orange R pdr 

Hydron orange RF paste 

Hydron orange RF pdr 

Thioindigo orange R paste 

Thioindigo orange R pdr 

Helindone violet (single strength) 

Helindone violet BB pdr 

Helindone violet R paste.. 

Helindone violet R pdr 

Thioindigo violet 2B pdr 

Thioindigo violet 2R pdr 

Vat violet BB paste 

Vat violet BB paste 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
7,007 



92,300 



8,070 



1,320 



2,091 
7,500 
12, 4.'-)5 
2,424 
7,048 
1,700 



1,199 

10 

1,490 

15, 624 



22, 696 



130 
26, 672 



69, 107 



56 



350 
63,608 



Invoice 
value 



$5, 551 



29,519 



12,188 



6,414 
'2i,"36i 



56,800 



54,367 



10, 687 7, 426 



112 CENSUS OP DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 



Color 
index 
No. 



1220 
1222 



1224 
1226 



1229 
1230 



Schultz 
No. 



899 
901 



902 



903 
906 



908 
911 



Name of dye 



Ciba gray O (single strength) 

Ciba gray G jiaste .-- 

Ciba gray O pdr 

Ciba violet B, R (single strength) 

Ciba violet B paste - 

Ciba violet B pdr 

Ciba violet R paste.. - 

Ciba violet R pdr 

Thioindigo brown R pdr. (single strength) . 

Helindone brown 2R pdr 

Thioindigo brown R pdr 

Thioindigo brown 3R paste 

Ciba red Q (single strength) 

Ciba red G paste 

Ciba red G pdr 

Helindone brown G (single strength) 

Helindone brown G paste. 

Helindone brown G pdr 

Thioindigo brown G paste 

Ciba scarlet (single strength) 

Anthra scarlet GG paste 

Anthra scarlet GO pdr 

Ciba scarlet G extra paste 

Ciba scarlet G extra pdr 

Helindone fast scarlet C paste.. 

Thioindigo scarlet 2G paste 

Thioindigo scarlet 2G pdr 

Vat scarlet 2G paste 

Ciba red R paste 

Ciba orange G paste 



Manu- 
facturer 



Imports 



Quantity 



PouTids 
2,312 



276, 858 



685 



25 
7,051 



8,027 



9,597 

71, 932 
14,000 

27, 944 

85, 084 
6,390 



Invoice 
value 



$S0, 479 



7,248 



102, 637 



UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYES 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Acid blue RBF 


I 


Pounds 
3,746 

no 

1, 500 
7,714 
7,547 




Acid brown RN 


O 

s.... 




Acid milling yellow G cone 




Acid pure blue R supra. 


o 




-Acid rhodaminc- 




$12, 276 




B 




Acid rhodamine BG. 


B 






Acid rhodamine 3R... 


I 






Acid violet 




270 


"§,"657' 


313 


Acid violet 8B 


By : 

C 

B 

By 

G.. 




Acid violet lOB . ... 




Acid violet CBB 




Acid violet 3R 




Acid violet RN 




Alizarin direct blue . ....... 


8,291 




M 




Alizarin direct blue A2G 


M 






Alizarin direct blue A3Q 


M 








M 








M.. 

M 

C 


110 
1,000 

900 
2,000 

110 




Alizarin direct vio'et E2B 




Alizarin levelling blue CA. 






By 




Alkali fast green. . . 




Alkali fast green 3B 


Bv 




- Alkali fast green 2BF . 


By. 






Alkali fast green lOG 


By 






Amido fast brown R 


M.. 

M 


100 

50 

1,862 








Anthosine.. 




Onis B 


B.. 




Onis 3B 


B 






Astra phloxine FF extra 


By 


400 





DYES IMPORTED FOB CONSUMPTION 



113 



Table 31. — hnporis of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Q"-tity I°£« 



Azo acid black B 

Azo brilliant violet BB 

Azo rhodine 2B 

Azo rubinol 30S cone 

Azo wool violet 7R 

Benzyl fast blue L 

Brilliant acid blue 

Brilliant acid blue EG 

Brilliant acid blue O 

Brilliant acid blue FF 

Brilliant milling blue 

Brilliant milling blue B 

Brilliant milling blue FG.. 
Brilliant milling violet R pdr.. 

Brilliant scarlet N 

Brilliant wool blue FFR extra. 

Bromofluorosic acid crystals 

Bromoflaorpscein A3G 

Cashmire black TN 

Cloth fast orange 

Cloth fast orange G 

Cloth fast orange R 

Cloth fast red 

Cloth fast red B 

Cloth fast red 3B 

Cloth fast red R 

Cloth fast yellow G 

Discharge black BF extra 

Discharge blue BG extra 

Eosine 

Eosine CPG pdr 

Eosine W extra 

Erio anthracene brown R 

Erio carmine 2BC' 

Erio fast yellow R cone 

Fast acid green BB extra 

Fast acid magenta G 

Fast acid marine blue HBBX. 

Guinea blue A4B, V4B 

Guinea brown R, 2R 

Guinea fast green B 

Guinea fast re<i BL 

Guinea light blue 

Guinea light blue A 

Guinea light blue A2G 

Indocyanine B 

Ink blue 

Ink blue BITBN 

Ink blue BITBNOO 

Ink blue BJTN.. 

Kiton fast red 

Kiton fast red BL 

Kiton fast red 4BL 

Kiton fast red R 

Kiton pure blue V 

Lanasol blue R 

Levelling silk blue B 

Metanil red 3B extra 

Milling brown R 

Milling orange G 

Milling orange G 

Milling orange O 

Milling red 

Milling red 6B 

Milling red 6BA 

Milling red GA 

Milling red GA 

Milling yellow 

Milling yellow O 

Milling yellow GA 

Milling yellow GA 

Milling yellow GA 

Neolan blue 

Neolan blue B 

Neolan blue Q.- 

Neolan blue GG 



By. 
I... 
By. 



C... 
C... 
DH. 
B... 
By.. 
M-- 
M-. 
Bv.. 



AG. 
B... 
G... 
G... 
G... 
M-- 
M.- 
B.. 
A... 
AG. 
A... 
A... 



A... 
AG. 
A... 



OrE. 
GrE. 
GrE. 



C. 
By. 

A.. 



Pounds 

500 

10 

100 

1,200 

2,700 

220 

3,256 



A... 
GrE. 



AG. 
AG. 
A... 
GrE. 



C... 
A... 
AG.. 
GrE. 



8,400 



220 
900 
6,376 
50 
395 
800 
425 



550 



7,494 
500 
500 
110 



110 

1,102 

110 

2,000 

25 

100 

8 

35 

100 

4,898 

1,710 



16, 521 
689 



2,640 



4,518 
220 

1,050 
541 
300 

1,000 



3, 250 



$3, 579 



1,265 



5,772 



286 



2,539 



12. 236 



114 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYEB— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Neolan gray B, old 




Pounds 
220 
992 
1,100 




Neolan green B 






Neolan pink 






Neolan pink G 






Neolan rose B 








Neolan red 




1,873 




Neolan red B 






Neolan red R 








Neolan violet R 




220 
1,872 




Neolan yellow 




$1,540 


Neolan yellow G 




Neolan vellnw GR 








Neolan yellow R__ 








Neutral violet O 


M ... 


50 

661 

220 

2,000 

700 




Novazol blue B... 


G 




Novazol violet B 


G.... 




Orthocyanine B. .. 


A 




Oxamine acid brown. 






Minaxo acid brown G. .. . 


B 




Palatine copper blue B 


B 


100 

220 

13,386 




Polar grav 


G_.. 




Polar orange 






Polar oranee GS cone 


G 




Polar orange R cone. 


G.. 






Polar red B cone 


G. 


660 

6,614 

200 

500 




Polar vellow 2G cone 


G. 




Radio black SB 


C 




Radio brown. •. 






Radio brown B 


C 




Radio brown S... 


C 






Radio green C 


C 


150 
1,000 










Radio red G 


C... 




RadioredVB 


C... 






Radio vellow R 


C... . . 


2.900 
.1,274 




Silk blue- 






Silk blue BSIC pdr 


AG 




Silk blue BToBOO extra cone. 


GrE 






Soluble carmine ... 


B.- 


1,100 
409 




Sulpho rosazeine ■. 






Sulphorosazeine BG.- 


M 




Sulpho rosazeine G extra . . 


M 






Sulphon orange G-.. 


By- 


2,366 
1,654 




Sulphon yellow.- 




Sulphon vellow 5G-. . . 


By 






By . 






Supra cvanine 




50 


50 




By-. 




SuDra cvanine DLA. 


By 






Supra eyanine FLA 


Bv- 






Supra cvanine 3FLA 


Bv . 








By.... . 






Supra eyanine brown 




20 




Supra eyanine brown GLA 


By 




Supra eyanine brown RLA 


By 








By-.. 

By 


10 

1,331 

821 




Supraniine black BR 








Supramine blue FB 


Bv 






By- 






Supraniine Bordeaux B 


By- .- 


200 
884 




Supramine brown 




Supramine brown G 


Bv 






Bv 






Supramine red 




3,034 


3,109 




Bv-. ... 




Supramine red3B_ 


Bv 








Bv . 






Supramine vellow 




2,028 


2,837 


Supramine yellow G.. 


Bv-. 




Supramine vellow 30 ... 


Bv 








Bv . 






Wool black 




4,100 






AG 




Wool black GRF 


AG 







DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 



115 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 




Wool blue 

Wool blue 2B .J A 

Wool blue5B ; A 

Wool blue R By_ 

Wool blue RR ex. pdr ; By_ 

Wool discharge cyanineSG i M 

Wool violet RC__. O. 

Xylene milling orange R cone S 

Xylene milling red B cone S 

All other acid dyes Various- 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
4,902 



5 

825 

1,000 

500 

12 



Invoice 
value 



$5, 351 



UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES 



Algol blue 3RP pdr^. 

Algol red 2G pdr. single strength 

Algol yellow WF pdr. single strength 

Alizarin indigo 

Alizarin indigo 7Q paste. 

Alizarin indigo 5R paste 

Alizarin indigo "R paste 

Alizarin indigo black B paste 

Alizarin indigo brown. _ 

Alizarin indigo brown B paste.. 

Alizarin indigo brown R paste 

Alizarin indigo green 

Alizarin indigo green B paste. 

Alizarin indigo green G paste, 

Alizarin indigo pink B paste 

Alizarin indigo violet B paste 

Anthra brilliant green 50- 

Anthra brilliant green 5Q paste 

Anthra brilliant green 5Q paste fine. . 

Anthra printing black 

Anthra printing black BO paste 

Vat printing black BQ paste 

Anthra scarlet B (single strength) 

Anthra scarlet B paste 

Anthra scarlet B pdr 

Anthra violet BB I'single strength) 

Anthra violet BB paste 

Anthra violet BB pdr 

Anthra wool black 

Anthra wool black 3B vat solid 

Anthra wool black R vat solid 

Anthra wool black T vat solid 

Anthra wool brown 

-Anthra wool brown CM vat solid 

Anthra wool brown CM pdr 

r Anthra wool brown CV vat solid 

Vnthra wool red ! 

Anthia wool red BB vat solid 

Anthra wool red CR vat solid 

Vnthra wool yellow 

Anthra wool yellow CO vat solid 

Anthra wool Yellow CG pdr 

Ciba blue 2BL pdr 

Ciba pink BG (single strength) 

Ciba pink BtJ paste 

Ciba pink BG pdr 

Ciba printing black B paste 

Cibanone blue 2G 

Cibanone blue 2G paste 

Cibanone blue 2Q pdr 

Cibanone blue GI- paste 

Cibanone brown R pdr. (single strength) 

Cibanone orange 3R 

Cibanone orange 3R paste 

Cibanone orange 3R pdr 

Cibanone orange 6R 

Cibanone orange 6R paste 

' Cibanone orange 6R pdr 

Cibanone red G paste 

Cibanone yellow 2G paste.. 



By. 
By. 
By. 



By- 

By- 
By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



B.. 
By. 



1,934 
800 

1, 100 
449 



409 
28, 307 



1,240 



5 

5 

4,584 



2,300 



209 



109 



206 



266 



22 ... 
22,971 - 



2,424 



220 
2,203 

110 
2,220 



220 
1.212 



220 

551 

220 

2,205 



19, 164 



116 



CENSUS OP DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Eridan brilliant scarlet B paste 

Eridan scarlet R paste 

Grelanone blue CG paste -. 

Qrelanone red 2B (single strength) 

Grelanone red 2B paste 

Grelanone red 2B pdr 

Grelanone scarlet G (siagle strength) 

Grelanone scarlet G paste 

Grelanone scarlet G pdr 

Helindone blue 3G cone. pdr. (single strength) .. 

Helindone blue 3R (single strength) 

Helindone blue 3R paste 

Vat blue 3R pdr 

Helindone brilliant green (single strength) 

Helindone brilliant green 5G paste 

Helindone brilliant green 5G pdr 

Helindone brilliant green D50 paste 

Helindone fast scarlet (single strength) 

Helindone fast scarlet B Paste 

Helindone fast scarlet B pdr-_ - 

Helindone fast scarlet BG paste 

Helindone printing black RD paste., 

Helindone violet BH pdr. (single strength) 

Helindone yellow CG vat 

Helindone yellovr (single strength) 

Vat yellow RK paste 

Vat yellow RK pdr 

Hydron Bordeaux B dbl. paste (single strength)- 

Hydron Bordeaux R dbl. paste (single strength). 

Hydron brown (single strength) 

Hydron brown G paste 

Hydron brown G pdr__ 

Hydron brown R paste -- 

Hydron brown R pdr. 

Vat brown R paste 

Hydron green paste 

Hydron green B paste 

Hydron green G paste... 

Hydron olive CiN paste 

Hydron pink FB (single strength) 

Algol brilliant pink FB paste 

Anthra pink B extra paste.. 

Anthra pink B extra pdr 

Helindone pink B extra paste 

Helindone pink B extra pdr 

Hydron pink FB paste 

Hydron pink FF (single strength) 

Algol brilliant pink FF paste 

Anthra pink R extra paste 

Anthra pink R extra pdr 

Helindone pink R extra paste 

Hydron pink FF paste 

Hydron pink FF pdr 

Hydron pink HY paste 

Thionidigo rose RN extra paste 

Thionidigo rose RN extra pdr 

Hydron scarlet (single strength) 

Hydron scarlet 2B paste 

Hydron scarlet 213 pdr ._ 

Hydron scarlet 3B paste 

Hydron scarlet ?B pdr.. 

Vat scarlet 3B paste. 

Vat scarlet 3B pdr 

Hydron sky blue 

Hydron sky blue FK paste 

Vat sky blue FK paste 

Hydron violet (single strength) 

Hydron violet B pdr 

Hydron violet R pdr 

Hydron yellow GG (single strength) 

Hydron yellow (JG paste 

Hydron yellow GG pdr.. 

Hydron yellow NF 

Hydron yellow NF paste 

Vat yellow NF paste 

Hydron yellow brown Q paste 



K._.. 
GrE. 



GrE. 
GrE. 



GrE. 
GrE. 
M..., 



By. 
By. 
C. 
C. 



By. 
B.. 
B.. 
M.. 

M.. 
C. 



By. 



Pounds 

1,150 

650 

112 

2,514 



2,569 



1,000 
615 



350 



1,500 



68, 000 
25 
10 
58 



100 

100 

36, 076 



200 



1,000 
"i,"682" 

26,859 

'"i,"683" 
60, 269 



1,100 
21,684 



6,729 



1.460 



3,150 



16,604 
"i,"450' 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 



117 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year ^5^5— Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



Hydron yellow olive GG paste 

Indanthrene black (single strength) 

Vat black BG pdr 

Vat black BGA dbl. paste,.- 

Indanthrene blue GODL paste. 

Indanthrene blue pdr 

Vat blue GGHZ pdr 

Vat blue WBO pdr 

Indanthrene blue RC (single strength) 

. Vat blue RC paste 

Vat blue RC dbl. paste 

Vat blue RC dbl. paste fine 

Indanthrene blue R (single strength) 

Vat blue RL paste 

Vat blue RL dbl. paste 

Vat blue RE/ pdr 

Vat blue RHZ pdr 

Vat blue RRZ dbl. paste 

Vat blue RSN pdr 

Vat blue RZ paste 

Vat blue RZ dbl. paste 

Vat blue RZ triple pdr 

Indanthrene blue green B (single strength) 

Ilelindone blue green IB dbl. paste 

Vat blue green B paste 

Vat blue green B paste fine 

Vat blue green B dbl. paste 

Vat blue green B dbl. paste fine 

Vat blue green B pdr 

Indanthrene brilliant blue R (single strength) 

Helindone brilliant blue IR paste fine 

Vat brilliant blue R paste 

Vat brilliant blue R paste 

Vat brilliant blue R paste fine 

Vat brilliant blue R dbl. paste 

Vat brilliant blue R dbl. paste fine. 

Indianthrene brilliant violet RRBA (single strength) 

Vat brilliant violet RRBA dbl. paste 

Vat brilhant violet RRBA pdr 

Indanthrene brilliant violet RRP 

Vat brilliant violet RRP pdr 

Indanthrene brown GG (single strength) 

Helindone brown IGO paste 

Helindone brown IGQ pdr 

Vat brown GG paste 

Vat brown GG pdr 

Indanthrene brown 3R (single strength) 

Helindone brown I3R paste 

Vat brown 3R paste 

Vat brown 3R paste 

Vat brown 3R paste fine. 

Vat brown 3R pdr 

Indanthrene brown RT (single strength) 

Helindone brown IRT paste... 

Vat brown RT paste 

Vat brown RT pdr 

Indanthrene golden orange 3G (single strength).. 

Helindone golden orange I 3G paste 

Helindone golden orange I 3G pdr 

Vat golden orange 30 paste 

Vat golden orange 3G pdr 

Indanthrene golden orange 3R (single strength) 

Vat orange 3R paste 

Vat orange 3R paste 

Vat orange 3R psste fine 

Vat orange 3R pdr 

Indanthrene gray 3B (single strength) 

Vat gray 3B paste 

Vat gray 3B pdr 

Indanthrene grav (single strength) e. 

Vat gray BTR paste.. 

Vat gray BTR pdr 

Vat gray RHH paste... 

Vat gray RRH paste fine 

Vat gray RRH pdr 



M.. 
B.. 
By. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 



M.. 
M_. 
By. 
By. 



M. 
B.. 
By. 
B.. 
By. 



M.. 
By- 
By- 



M.. 
M.. 
By. 
By. 



B.. 
By- 
B.. 
B.. 



By- 
By. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
B.. 
By. 



Pounds 
1,450 
114 



287 



3,224 



10, 780 



13, 190 



7,084 



10, 359 



3,399 



993 
21,872 



18, 842 



1,419 



6,015 



4,979 



6,100 



7,146 



2,081 



2,606 



212 
"i,'i97' 



851 



118 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31.— /mporis of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Indanthrene green Q (single strength) 

Vat ^een O paste. 

Vat green O dbl. paste 

Vat green G dbl. paste 

Vat green G pdr-_ _ •. 

Vat green G pdr 

Indanthrene green GO (single strength) 

Holindono green IGQ dbl. paste -. 

Vat green QG dbl. paste 

Vat green GG dbl. paste fine 

Vat green GG pdr 

Vat green GG pdr.. 

Indanthrene khiki (single strength).. 

H^lindone khaki IGQ pdr.. 

Vat khaki GG paste 

Vat khaki GG pdr 

Indanthrone orange 4R (single strength) 

Helindone orange I 4R pdr 

Vat orange 4R paste. _ 

Vat orange 4R pdr 

Indanthrene orange (single strength) 

Vat orange RRTIv paste 

Vat orange RRTS pdr 

Indanthrene pink B (single strength) 

H-ilindone pink IB dbl. paste. 

Vat pink B p-:iste 

Vat pink B dbl. paste * 

Vat pink B dbl. paste 

Vat pink B dbl. paste fine 

Vat pink B pdr 

Indanthrene printing black BR 

Helindone printing black IBR paste 

Vat printing black BR paste 

Vat printing black BR paste 

Indanthrene red GG (single strength) 

H?lindone red IGG paste 

Vat red GG paste 

Vat red GG paste 

Vat red GG paste fine 

Vat red GG pdr 

Indanthrene red brown R (single strength) . . 

Vat red brown R paste 

Vat red brown R paste fine 

Vat red brown R pdr 

Indanthrene red violet RR (single strength). 
Helindone reddish violet IRR paste 

_ Helindone reddish violet IRR pdr 

Vat red violet RHP paste 

Indigosol 

Indigosol 04B 

Indigosol 04B 

Indigosol 04B 

Indigosol OR 

Indigosol yellow HCIG pdr 

Thioindigo black B paste 

Thioindigo blue 2GD cone, (single strength). 

Thioindone brown B paste 

Thioindone olive B paste 

Vat black 2B paste 

Vat brown FFR (single strength) 

Vat brown FFR paste 

Vat brown FFR pdr.. 

Vat printing brown R paste 

Vat red RKL paste 

Vat vellow FFRK (single strength). 

Vat vellow FFRK paste 

Vat yellow FFRK pdr 

Vat yellow G K p Ir. (single strength)... 

Vat vellow GP pdr 

Vat ./I'.llow GT... 

Vat vellow QT paste 

Vat vellow GT dbl. paste.. 

Vat vellow OG pdr. (single strength) 

Vat vellow 3RT 

Vat vellow 12GL pdr... 

Vat yellow 12GDL pdr 



Manufac- 
turer 



B.- 
B.. 
By. 
B.. 
By. 



M.. 
B.. 
B.. 
B.. 

By. 



M.- 
By. 
B.. 
By. 
B.. 
By. 



M.. 
B.. 
By. 



M.. 
B.. 
By. 
B.. 
By. 



By. 
B.. 

By. 



B... 
Bv.. 
DH. 
DH. 
DII. 
K... 
K... 
K... 
K... 
GrE. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
B.. 



B.. 
B.. 
By. 
B.. 



B... 
By.. 
AG.. 
B... 
GrE. 
GrE. 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
13, 469 



22,717 



2,771 



2, 934 



44 
"27,129' 



2,744 



9,458 



2,551 



1,544 



640 



110 
500 
250 
100 
125 
850 
181 



4,000 
44 
72 



80 

2,303 

593 



80 

19 

224 

224 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION 



119 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — ^Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



Vat yellow brown (single strength) . 

Vat yellow brown 3G paste 

Vat yellow brown 30 pdr 

All other vat dyes (samples) 



By. 
By- 
By. 



Pounds 
981 



183 



$324 



UNIDENTIFIED MORDANT AND CHROME DYES 



Acid alizarin gray G 

Acid anthracene brown 

Acid anthracene brown KE 

Acid anthracene brown PG 

Acid anthracene brown WSG. 

Acid anthracene red.. 

Acid anthracene red 3BL 

Acid anthracene red 5BL 

Acid chrome yellow RL extra 

Alizarin astrol violet B pdr 

Alizarin blue G, R 

Alizarin cyanine MD 

Alizarin fast black SP paste.. 

Ahzarin fast blue BHO.. 

Alizarin fast gray 2BL pdr 

Alizarin fast light brown GL 

Alizarin light green 2QS cone. 

Alizarin light gray BS cone. 

Alizarin violet 3R 

Anthracene Bordeaux R pdr 

Anthracene brown RP paste 

Anthracene chromate brown EB. . 

Anthracene chrome blue RWN 

Autochrome olive B 

Autochrome olive brown G 

Brilliant chrome blue 

Brilliant chrome blue S 

Brilliant chrome blue 2B 

Brilliant chrome blue PR 

Brilliant chrome blue PV 

Brilliant chrome violet. 

Brilliant chrome violet B 

Brilliant chrome violet 3R 

Brilliant chrome violet 3RA--. 
Brilliant chrome violet 3RN-.. 

Chromanol black RVI 

Chromanol violet RI 

Chromazurine 

Chromazurine DN 

Chromazurine NS 

Chromazurine R 

Chromazurine RN 

Chromazurine RR 

Chrome blue BR 

Chrome brown VR 

Chrome deep brown RRN. 

Chrome fast blue FB.. 

Chrome fast brown TP 

Chrome fast green QL 

Chrome fast phosphine R 

Chrome green 

Chrome green BF 

Chrome green DC 

Chrome green GD extra 

Chrome olive JCS 

Chrome orange No. 1, No. 51, N... 
Chrome printing Bordeaux B pdr. 

Chrome printing green B pdr , 

Chrome printing orange 2R pdr 

Chrome printing red 

Chrome printing red B 

Chrome printing red B 

Chrome printing red Y 

Chrome red brown 3RD paste 

■Chrome yellow R L extra. 



M. 



By. 
By. 
By. 



By..- 
By.. 
By.. 
By.. 
BrC. 
By.. 
By.. 
By.. 
By.. 
By.. 
S.... 
S.... 
C... 
B... 
By.. 
C... 
C... 
M--, 
M... 



DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 



DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 



DH. 
DH- 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
AG. 
By.. 
I.... 
DH. 



DH. 
By.. 
DH. 
DH. 
I.... 
I.-.. 
I.... 



DH. 
I. 



DH. 
By.. 
By.. 



8,705 
5,515 



700 



399 

50 

152 

25 

899 

610 

7,518 

100 

500 

9,503 

663 

400 

5 

3,740 

100 

250 

50 

890 



780 



220 
495 
240 



5 
5 
5 
100 
100 
441 
440 
155 



5 

15 

551 

220 

330 

4,186 



5 
100 



5,900 



2,208 



1,331 



645 



368 



7,770 



5919—261- 



120 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1926 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED MORDANT AND CHROME DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Imports 



Manufac- 
turer 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



Chromochlorine E, EN 

Chromocitronine 3R pdr — 

Chromogene azurine B 

Chromogene violet B 

Chromophenine 

Chromophenine FKN 

Chromophenine RP 

Chroraophosphine EFN 

Chromopurpurine JJ -.- 

Chromorhodine 

Chromorhodine 6QN.- 

Chromorhodine 6GS extra 

Chromorhoduline B 

Chromorosamine BB pdr , 

Chromosafranine B 

Chromovesuvine 

Chromovesuvine J A '. 

Chromovesuvine RA 

Chromoxane azurol BD 

Chromoxane brilliant violet SB 

Chromoxane green 2Q 

Chromoxane pure blue 

Chromoxane pure blue B 

Chromoxane pure blue BLD 

Coerulein SIC 

Colonial blue R - 

Coreine MS... 

Eriochromal brown G 

Eriochromal gray 5G cone - 

Eriochrome black E 

Eriochrome blue 

Eriochrome blue S 

Eriochrome blue SE.. 

Eriochrome blue black G 

Eriochrome brilliant voilet B supra.. 

Eriochrome genanol R cone 

Eriochrome green L 

Eriochrome phosphine RR 

Eriochrome red 

Eriochrome red G 

Eriochrome red R 

Eriochrome violet 

Eriochrome violet B 

Eriochrome violet 3B 

Fast chrome green BN 

Foulard discharge blue B 

Foulard discharge green BL 

Gallo navy blue RD cone, paste 

Metacrhome black AG 

Metachrome blue... 

Metachrome blue DL 

Metachrome blue GFL 

Metachrome blue black 2BX 

Metachrome brilliant blue 

Metachrome brilliant blue BL... 

Metachrome brilliant blue 8RL.. 

Metachrome green 3G — 

Metachrome olive 

Metachrome olive B 

Metachrome olive 2G 

Metachrome red G 

Metachrome voilet 2R 

Modern brown 

Modern green E 

Modern gray... 

Modern grny DH 

Modern gray PS 

Modern gray RCN 

Modern olive JN 

Monochrome brown BC 

Naphthochroino violet R... 

Palatine chrome brilliant violet 

Pilatus chrome brilliant violet B. 

Radio chrome blue B 

Radio chrome green B 



DH. 
DH. 

M.. 
M.. 



DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH. 



DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH- 
DH. 



DH. 
DH. 

By.. 
By.. 
Bv.- 



By- 
By.. 
DH. 
DH. 
DH- 
G... 
G... 
G... 



G... 
G... 
DH. 
By- 
By- 
By.- 
A... 



AG. 
A... 
A... 



A... 
A... 
AG. 



A... 
A... 
A... 
A... 
DH. 
DH. 



DH- 
DH- 
DH. 
DH. 
By.. 
Ii... 



Pounds 

10 

1,100 

600 

1,300 

225 



5 

5 

1,107 



5 

55 

5 

550 



50 

2,450 

100 

4,600 



5 
110 

5 

110 

220 

661 

2,314 



2,204 
110 
440 
882 
108 

4,949 



3,603 



5 

50 

50 

5 

700 

211 



15, 000 
600 



60 
3,100 



900 
700 
5 
220 
892 



330 

641 

1,322 

1,000 



1,750 
160 



DYES IMPOKTED FOR CONSUMPTION 



121 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1926 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED MORDANT AND CHROME DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Special violet B. 

Ultra corinth B... 

Ultra cyanine RB 

Ultra orange R 

All other mordant and chrome dyes 



Manufac- 
turer 



B. 

S.- 
S... 

s.. 
By 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 

200 

200 

2,000 

500 

3 



Invoice- 
value 



UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES 



Benzo bronze, GC 

Benzo chrome brown B 

Benzo dark brown extra. 

Benzo fast black L 

Benzo fast blue 

Benzo fast blue FFL.,. 

Benzo fast blue 2GL 

Benzo fast blue 4GL 

Benzo fast blue 8GL 

Benzo fast blue RL.... 

Benzo fast Bordeaux 6BL 

Benzo fast brown I 

Benzo fast brown GL By. 

Benzo fast brown 3GL By. 

Benzo fast brown RL By. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By- 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



Benzo light brown SQL. 

Benzo fast copper violet B 

Benzo fast eosine BL 

Benzo fast gray BL 

Benzo fast heolitrope 

Benzo fast heliotrope 4BL.. 
Benzo fast heliotrope 5RH. 

Benzo fast light scarlet 4BL 

Benzo fast orange 

Benzo fast orange 2RL 

Dianil fast orange 2R 

Benzo fast red 6BL. 

Benzo fast violet 

Direct fast violet B pdr 

Direct fast violet BL pdr... 
Direct fast violet 2RL pdr.. 

Benzo fast yellow RL.. 

Benzo new blue G 

Benzo red I2B 

Benzo rhodulim- red B 

Benzo rhoduline red B 

Columbia red OB 

Benzo rhoduline red 3B 

Benzo rhoduline red 3B 

Columbia red 03B 

Direct fast red 3B 

Benzo rubine SC 

Benzoform blue 

Benzoform blue G extra 

Benzoform blue 2BL 

Benzoform Bordeaux R 

Benzoform brown 

Benzoform brown 4R 

Benzoform brown VL 

Benzoform green FFL 

Benzoform orange G 

Benzoform red 2GF 

Benzoform scarlet B 

Benzoform yellow 

Benzoform yellow GL 

Benzoform yellow R 

Brilhant benzo fast yellow GL. 

Brilliant benzo green B. 

Brilliant benzo violet 

Brilliant benzo violet 2BH. 
Brilliant benzo violet 2R. .. 

Brilliant congo blue 5R 

Brilliant congo violet R 

Brilliant copper blue GW 

Brilliant cotton blue 8B 

Brilliant fast blue 3BX 

Brilliant pure yellow 6G extra. 



By. 
By- 
By. 
By- 



By. 
By. 
By. 



By- 
M.. 
By- 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



By. 
A.. 



By.. 
AG- 
By.. 
By.. 



By. 
By. 
By- 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



By.. 
By.. 
AG. 
A... 
AG. 
K... 
By.. 
By.. 



305 

200 

827 

5,291 

4,531 



1,174 
9,004 



25 

299 

4,300 

4,839 



100 
4,665 



100 
3,499 



6,862 

6 

3,100 

900 



2,834 



500 

718 



400 
2,300 
60 
100 
900 
940 



$6,397 



10, 133 



4,561 



122 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Brilliant purpurine lOB 

Brilliant sky blue 

Brilliant sky blue B 

Brilliant sky blue G 

Brilliant sky blue 8Q 

Brilliant sky blue R 

Brilliant sky blue 2RM 

Direct sky blue 8Q 

Brilliant triazol fast violet 

Brilliant triazol fast violet BL.. 

Brilliant triazol fast violet 4BL_ 

Brilliant triazol fast violet 5RH. 

Brilliant triazol fast violet 2RL. 

Chicago red III.- 

Chloramine fast orange 

Chloramine fast orange G cone. . 

Chloramine fast orange R conc. 

Chloramine light gray R cone 

Chloramine light violet R cone 

Chlorantine brown Y 

Chlorantine fast blue 

Chlorantine fast blue 2GL 

Chlorantine fast blue 4GL 

Chlorantine fast blue SGI 

Chlorantine fast brown 

Chlorantine fast brown 3GL 

Chlorantine fast brown BRL... 

Chlorantine fast brown RL 

Chlorantine fast green B 

Chlorantine fast orange 2RL 

Chlorantine fast red 5BL 

Chlorantine fast violet 

Chlorantine fast violet 4BL 

Chlorantine fast violet 5BL 

Chlorantine fast violet 4BLN... 

Chlorantine fast violet RL 

Chlorantine fast violet 2RL 

Chlorantine fast yellow RL 

Chlorazol drab RH.. 

Chlorazol fast brown RK 

Chlorazol fast eosine B 

Chlorazol fast orange AG 

Columbia caterhine 

Columbia catechine A 

Columbia catechine 3B 

Columbia catechine G 

Columbia fast black V 

Cotonerol A extra 

Developing blue B 

Developing blue B 

Developing blue B 

Developing indigo blue R 

Diamine azo Bordeaux BL 

Diamine azo brown 

Diamine azo brown G 

Diamine azo brown 2G 

Diamine azo brown 3G 

Diamine azo fast Bordeaux B 

Diamine azo fast green G 

Diamine azo fast red 6B 

Diamine azo fast violet 

Diamine azo fast violet B 

Diamine azo fast violet R 

Diamine azo fast violet 3R 

Diamine azo violet BL 

Diamine azo yellow 2G 

Diamine brilliant scarlet S 

Diamine catechine 

IMamine catechine B 

Diamine catechine G 

Diamine catechine 3G 

Diamine fast blue 

Diamine fast blue F 

Diamine fast blue FFB 

D iamine fast blue F3B 

Diamine fast blue FFG 

Diamine fast blue F30 



AG. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



GrE. 
GrE. 
GrE. 
GrE. 
0-... 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC, 



A... 
AG. 
A... 
AG. 

A... 



A... 
AG. 
A... 
C... 



Pounds 
300 
22, 961 



1,036 



11,571 
1,000 



1,386 

500 

3,306 

28, 435 



34, 268 



5,400 

771 

110 

33, 941 



4,077 
800 

3,472 
100 

4,040 

2,340 



100 

500 

4,100 



200 

915 

3,115 



10 
6,008 

50 
3,898 



476 
2,387 
5,000 
2.230 



590 



DYES IMPOETED FOR CONSUMPTION 



123 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Diamine fast Bordeaux 6BS 

Diamine fast brilliant blue R .-- 

Diamine fast brown 

Diamine fast brown O 

Diamine fast brown 3G 

Diamine fast brown GB. 

Diamine fast brown OBB 

Diamine fast brown R -. 

Diamine fast gray BN 

Diamine fast orange 

Diamine fast orange EG 

Diamine fast orange ER 

Diamine fast rose G 

Diamine fast red violet, FR 

Diamine fast yellow R 

Diamine gray Q -. 

Diamine sky blue N 

Diamine steel blue L 

Diaminogene blue GG 

Dianil brown CG - 

Dianil fast blue GL 

Dianil fast violet BL 

Dianil light red 12BL 

Diazamine blue 4R cone 

Diazanil pink B -. 

Developed pink B 

Diazanil pink B 

Diazo black VG 

Diazo Bordeaux 7B - 

Diazo brilliant blue 2BL 

Diazo brilliant green 

Developed brilliant green 3G..- 

Diazo brilliant green 3Q 

Diazo brilliant orange 

Developed brilliant orange 5G extra, 

Diazo brilliant orange 5G extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet. - - 

Developed brilliant scarlet 2BL 

Developed brilliant scarlet 2BL 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 6B 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 3BA 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 5BL 

Diazo brilliant scarlet G 

Diazo brilliant scarlet S8B 

Diazo brown 

Developed brown 3G - 

Diazo brown G 

Diazo brown 3G -.- 

Diazo brown 6G -- 

Diazo brown 3RB 

Diazo fast black extra. 

Diazo fast blue_ 

Diazo fast blue 2BW 

Diazo fast blue 6GW 

Diazo fast blue 4RW 

Diazo fast Bordeaux BL 

Diazo fast green GF 

Diazo fast red 7BL 

Diazo fast violet..- - 

Diazo fast violet 2BL 

Diazo fast violet 3RL 

Diazo fast yellow G 

Diazo geranine B extra__ 

Diazo indigo blue 

Developed indigo blue4GL pdr 

Diazo indigo blue 4GL pdr 

Diazo red N8B 

Diazo rubine B 

Diazo sky blue 

Developed sky blue 3GL 

Diazo sky blue B 

Diazo sky blue 3G - 

Diazo sky blue 3GL 

Diazogene light violet BL.. 

Diazophenyl black V.. 

Diphenyl brown BBNC 



Manufac- 
turer 



M.. 
M.. 
I... 
By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 



By- 
By. 



By- 
C. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



I... 
I... 
I... 
By- 
By. 
By. 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



By- 
By.. 

CN. 
By-. 



By.. 
By.. 
By... 
By... 
GrE. 
G--- 
G--- 



Im ports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
267 
10 
2,360 



10 

12, ODD 



Invoice 
value 



• 45 

110 

10 

50 

500 

50 

11,933 

200 

100 

1,000 

300 

1,000 

1,744 



1,653 

661 

399 

10, 521 



2,402 
i3,"453" 



9,797 



25 
3,195 



494 

300 

100 

2,539 



400 

500 

5,918 



220 
1,662 
2,776 



394 
9, 920 
6,614 



$2,158 



13, 558 



26, 079 



12, 838 



7,573 



2,242 



124 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1926 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Diphenvl catechine ..- 




Pounds 
4,409 




Diphenvl catechine D supra . . . .... 


G 




Diphenvl catechine R supra 


G 






Diphenvl fast Bordeaux .._ 




460 




Diphenvl fast Bordeaux BC - -. ... 


G 






G 






Diphenvl fast bronze B 


G 


5,511 

17, 629 

55 

7,163 




X)iphenvl fast brown GNC . .... 


G 




Direct blue G pdr 


G 




Direct cutcti brown 






Direct cutch brown GR 


i 






I 






Direct fast orange R 


I 


101 
220 
500 
5 
415 




Direct red B pdr 


G 




Fast cotton blue 4GL .... .... 


A 




Fast cotton Bordeaux 6BL 


AG 




Fast cotton brown . . 






AG 




Fast cotton brown RL 


AG 






Fast cotton brown 4RL 


A 






Fast cotton catechine 3B, G, 0, R . 


AG 

AG 

A 


20 

30 

5,300 




Fast cotton corinth B 




Fast cotton gray 


$4,028 




A 




Fast cotton gray GL . . . . 


A 






Fast cotton gray VL 


A .- 






Fast cotton rose 2B 


A 


25 
200 




Fast cotton rubine . .. .. . .... 






Fast cotton rubine B 


A 






A 






Fast cotton scarlet 4BL . .... 


AG 

A 


5 
500 
641 




Fast cotton violet 4R.- 




Fast cotton vellow RL 






Fast cotton yellow RL .. . .. . 


AG 






By 






Formal fast black 




383 




Formal fast black O cone 


G . 




Formal fast black R cone. . . . .. 


Q 






Half-wool blue 3R 


By 

C 


100 
200 
1,536 
400 
150 




Isamine blue R 




Naphthamine light brown 2G . 


K 






K 




New Bordeaux RX 






New Bordeaux RX .. . .. . 


B 






B 






Paper red A extra ... . ... 


B 


300 

1,070 

10 

10 

500 

3,040 






B 




Paranil black 2B- 


AG 

AG 

S 




Paranil brown 2BX 




Parasulfon brown V 




Pluto black G 






Pluto black G-- 


By 




Pluto black G extra . . . 


By 






Pluto brown GG-- 


By 

By 


400 

10 

1,763 

1,322 

991 
4,850 

no 

110 
100 
300 
100 
224 

10 
112 

28 
441 

28 

5 

2,650 




Plutoform black BL . 




Rosanthrene RN. .^ 




Rosanthrene fast Bordeaux 2BL . 






Rosanthrene fast red 7BL . 






Rosanthrene orange R . 










Rosanthrene violet 5R 






Toluylene fast brown 2R. 


By 

By 

By 

AG 

GrE 

GrE. 

AG 

GrE 

GrE 

C 




Toluylene fast orange GL 




Toluvlene vellow Q 




Triazogene light vellow 2G pdr 




Triazol fast brown G 




Triazol light brown 3GL pdr 




Triazol light gray BL . . 




Triazol light orange 2RL 




Triazol pure green B pdr 




Universal blue black C 










Zambesi black D 


AG 




Developing black ED . ....... 


C 






Diazo fast black SD.. . 


By 






Zambesi black F 


AG 


3,200 





DYES IMPOETED FOR CONSUMPTION 



125 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 






Pounds 
2,530 


$1,507 


Diazo fast black V 


By 




Oxamine black BBNX . 


B 








AG.- 










400 

8 






Various... 









DYES FOR ARTIFICIAL SILK 






Artificial silk black . 




898 




Artificial silk black G 


By 




Artificial silk black R . 


By 






Azonine 




40 


38 




M 




Azonine RR - - 


C. 








C 






Azonine direct blue B paste 


C 


2,800 

1,700 

125 

1,800 

100 

50 

1,050 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

110 

110 

110 

110 

110 

110 

220 




Azonine direct red G paste . 


c. 






c 






c._. 




Blue extra paste. 


B.... 




Celatene black .. . 


SD 

SD 

SD 

SD 

SD 

SD 

SD 

SD 

SD 

SD 

By 

By 

By 

By 

By 

By 




Celatene blue 




Celatene brilliant violet B .. 




Celatene fast light brown . . 




Celatene fast light yellow . 








Celatene orange. . . . 




Celatene red 




Celatene red violet 




Celatene yellow 




Cellit fast blue R 




Cellit fast brown G 




Cellit fast orange G 




Cellit fast red B-. 




Cellit fast rubine B .. 




Cellit fast violet 2R 




Cellit fast yellow . 




Cellit fast vellow 20N 


By 




Cellit fast vellow R 


By. 






Dispersol vellow 3G . . 


BDC 

BDC 

BDC 

BDC 


176 
110 

1,341 
676 

1,816 




Duranol black. . 




Duranol blue G paste 








Duranol red. . 






BDC 




Duranol red Q paste 


BDC 








BDC 


180 
200 




lonamine. 






BDC 




lonamine L . 


BDC 






lonainine orange CB . 


BCD 

B 


120 

100 

100 

100 

5,000 

2,055 

550 

1,100 




Orange extra paste 






B 




Red violet extra paste 


B 




SRAbluelV. 


BC 

BC 

Q 




SRAred I, III.... 








Setacyl direct orange .. 








G 




Setacyl direct orange 2R pdr 


G 






Setacyl direct red B pdr 


G 


110 
550 
100 
100 
100 




Setacyl direct yellow R pdr . 


G 




Violet B extra paste . . 


B. 




Yellow G paste . 


B 






B 











RAPID FAST DYES 



Rapid fast blue B pdr 

Rapid fast Bordeaux B paste 
Rapid fast brown B pdr 



GrE 
GrE 
GrE 



376 

1,256 

20 



126 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
RAPID FAST DYES— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Rapid fast orange 




Pounds 
2,980 




Rapid fast orange BQ 


GrE 




Rapid fast orange RG 


GrE. 






Rapid fast pink.. 




1,410 




Rapid fast pink LB 


GrE 




Rapid fast pink LO 


GrE 






Rapid fast red 




8,593 


$4,66f 


Rapid fast red B. 


GrE 




Rapid fast red BB 


GrE 






Rapid fast red QL.. 


GrE 






Rapid fast red GZ 


GrE 






Rapid fast red 3GL 


GrE 






Rapid fast red RG 


GrE 






Rapid fast yellow G paste .. 


GrE 


100 









UNIDENTIFIED BASIC DYES 



Brilliant acridine orange 

Brilliant acridine orange R cone 

Brilliant acridine orange 3R 

Brilliant rhoduline blue 

Brilliant rhodamine blue 

Brilliant rhoduline blue R... 

Chrysophosphine 2G 

Diamond pbosphine R 

Diazine black G 

Euchrysine GX 

Japan black MBG 

Methyl violet 4B pdr 

Rhodamine 6GDN extra 

Rhodamine 6GDN extra (single strength). 
Rhodamine 6GDN extra (single strength), 

Rhodamine sky blue 

Rhodamine sky blue 3G 

Rhoduline sky blue 3G 

Straw blue G 

Tannastrol O 

Thionine sky blue 6B 

Toluidine blue 

Xantho acridine 

Xantho acridine GN extra 

Xantho acridine MO pdr 

Xantho phosphine M pdr 

All other basic dyes 



Q-- 
DH. 



StD- 
By-. 



C._. 
K... 
B... 
B... 
AG. 



B.. 
By. 



By. 
By. 
By- 
S— 
Q- 
B.. 



DH. 
DH. 
DH. 
By.. 



727 

"2^285" 



1,000 
665 
430 
800 
305 
75, 700 



95 
500 

10 

5 

330 



110 
2 



UNIDENTIFIED SULPHUR DYES 



Cross dye green 

Cross dye green B.. 

Cross dye green 2G cone 

Cross dye yellow Y 

Eclipse brown RRC 

Eclipse dark brown 

Immedial brown W cone 

Immedial direct blue 

Immedial direct blue B 

Immedial direct blue 4B. 

Immedial indogene GCL cone 

Indo carbon SN 

Katigone chrome blue 5Q 

Katigene deep black BC 

Katigone indigo 

Katigene indigo CLGG extra. 

Katigene indigo CL5G extra.. 

Katigone orange FR 

Kurgan violet 3RX.- 

Pyrugenc blue green B. 

Pyrogene brilliant blue 6B 

Pyrogene brown G.. 

Pyrogcne cutch 2R extra 

Pyrogene green GK 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 

G 

G 

C 



C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
By- 
By- 



By- 
By. 
By- 
B.. 



67, 924 



500 

110 

110 

2,000 

1,525 



2,000 

50 

584 

5 

2,750 



10 

1,000 

345 

550 

2,535 

551 

4,408 



DYES IMPORTED FOE CONSUMPTION 



127 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED SULPHUR DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Pyrogene pure blue 3GL 

Sulphide now blue BL 

Sulphide violet 

Sulphide violet B 

Sulphide violet V 

Sulphur blaclc 

Sulphur black CLB. 

Sulphur black FAG 

Sulphur brilliant blue CLB 

Sulphur gray G 

Sulphur yfllovsr G extra 

Thiogene black MA, highly cone 
Thional brilliant blue 6BS conc— 
Thional brilliant green 2G conc... 
Thionol brown 

Thionol brown O 

Thionol brown R 

Thionol direct blue S 

Thionol vellow.. 

Thionol yellow GR 

Thionol yellow R 



Manufac- 
turer 



A... 
AG. 
AG. 
AG. 
A... 
M-. 
S— . 
S— . 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC. 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
3,085 
551 
1,800 



35 



500 

5 

2,000 

300 

5,001 

1,000 

18,383 



4,830 
4,970 



Invoice 
value 



UNIDENTIFIED COLOR-LAKE AND SPIRIT-SOLUBLE DYES 



Autol orange pdr 

Brilliant helio blue FFR extra 

Brilliant holio green GG extra 

Brillianton orange R 

Brilllanton red RMT _ 

Ceres blue 

Ceres blue I 

Ceres blue III 

Ceres brown II... 

Ceres orange I 

Ceres red III 

Ceres yellow III 

Hansa green GS 

Hansa orange 

Hansa orange R paste 

Hansa orange R pdr 

Hansa red 

Hansa red B pdr 

Hansa red 2G paste 

Hansa yellow G 

Hansa yellow G paste 

Hansa yellow G pdr.. 

Hansa yellow OR paste 

Hansa yellow 5G pdr 

Helio Bordeaux BL (single strength). 

Helio Bordeaux BL paste.. 

Helio Bordeaux BL pdr 

Lake Bordeaux BL pdr 

Pigment Bordeaux BL pdr 

Helio chrome yellow GL lumps 

Helio fast carmine CL pdr... 

Helio fast red RBL pdr 

Helio fast rubine LBK pdr 

Helio fast violet 

Helio fast violet AL 

Helio fast violet 2RL 

Helio fast yellow pdr 

Helio fast yellow HG 

Helio fast yellow H5Q 

Heho fast yellow HIOQ 

Helio marine RL pdr 

Helio marine 2GL paste 

Helio red RMT 

Lake red 2GL pdr 

Lithol fast orange 

Stone fast orange R 

Stone fast orange RN... ._ 

Lithol fast yellow lumps 

Stone fast yellow OG lumps 

Stone fast yellow GN lumps 

Stone fast yellow GR lumps 



B... 
By.. 
By-. 
AG. 
AG. 



By- 
By. 
By- 
By- 
By- 
By- 
M.. 



M. 



By- 

By- 



By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 



By. 
By- 



By. 
By- 
By. 
By. 
By. 
By. 
G.. 



200 
700 
100 
200 
5 
66 



5 
107 
150 
105 
70 



2,000 

9,000 

125 

1,100 

27, 491 



5 
40 

5 
300 
200 



350 



303 

11 

931 

55 
800 



2,900 



$20 
10 



6,773 



3,434 



5919— 26t- 



-10 



128 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1925 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED COLOR-LAKE AND SPIRIT-SOLUBLE DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



Lithol fast yellow, paste. 

Stone fast yellow OR paste- 
Stone fast yellow 5Q paste— 

Lithol fast yellow, pdr.. 

Stone fast yellow 5Q pdr 

Lithol rubine BK pdr 

Oil green ALB lumps 

Oil red O paste.. 

Paper fast Bordeaux B... 

Permanent red 

Permanent red F3R extra.. 
Permanent red F5R extra.. 
Permanent red F6R extra.. 

Pigment deep black R 

Spirit fast blue R 

Spirit fast red. 

Spirit fast red B 

Spirit fast red 3B 

Spirit fast violet R 

Tero (Tvpophor) brown FR 

Tero (Typophor) yellow FR.... 
Wax red. 



Zapon blue G pdr 

All other color-lake dyes. 



B... 
B... 

K... 
BC. 
By-. 



AG- 

AG- 
A.- 
By- 

M-. 



B-- 
By- 



Pounds 
900 



500 



5 

15 

300 

2,779 

320 



300 
10 
20 



10 

10 

200 

5 



$405 



UNIDENTIFIED, UNCLASSIFIED DYES 



Blue 4830 

Brilliant alliance blue 

Dark brown 

Fine pink 

Fraise-- -- 

Green B 

Mandarin yellow 

Patent black N 

Rose color 

Silver gray 

Yellow C 

All other aniline dyes. 




$634 



Index to table of dye imports 



Name of dye 



Aceto purpurine 8B 

Acid alizarin black R 

Acid alizarin gray G 

Acid anthracene brown KE 

Acid anthracene brown PG 

Acid anthracene brown WSQ... 

Acid anthracene red 3B 

Acid anthracene red 3BL, 5BL- 

Acid blue AM --- 

Acid blue RBF 

Acid brown RN 

Acid chrome yellow RL 

Acid cyanine BF 

Acid milling black B. 

Acid milling red G cone 

Acid milling red R 

Acid milling yellow G 

Acid ponceau E 

Acid pure blue R supra 

Acid rhodamine B, BG, 3R 

Acid violet 4BL0 --. 

Acid violet 5BE 

Acid violet CB (A) 



Colour 
Index 
No. 



436 

172 



487 
"§33' 



853 
307 
443 

487 



695 
698 
697 



Page 



100 
98 
119 
119 
119 
119 
100 
119 
104 
112 
112 
119 
104 
99 
100 
100 
112 
98 
112 
112 
101 
101 
101 



Name of dye 



Acid violet 6B (tM)-- 

Acid violet 6BN, 6BN00. 

Acid violet 6BNG 

Acid violet 7B 

Acid violet 8B 

Acid violet lOB... 

Acid violet C 2B 

Acid violet S 4B.. 

Acid violet 311.. 

Acid violet RN. 

Acid violet 4 RNOO.. 

Acidol blue A 

Acridine orange DHE 

Acrouol brilliant blue 

AUxska black lOBX.-- 

Algol blue FB 

Algol blue 3R 

Algol blue 3RP 

Algol brilliant pink FB 

Algol brilliant pink FF 

Algol brilliant red 2B 

Algol gray GK 

Algol pink R 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



717 
717 
702 



758 
714 
788 
664 
246 
1113 
1134 



1133 
1145 
1128 



Page 



101 
102 
102 
102 
112 
112 
112 
101 
112 
112 
103 
102 
103 
101 
99 
108 
109 
115 
115 
115 
109 
109 
109 



INDEX TO TABLE OF DYE IMPORTS 



129 



Index to table of dye imports— Continued 



Name of dye 



Color 

Index 

No. 



1155 
1133 



1129 



1027 
1027 
1039 
1040 
1027 
1027 
1075 



1019 
1075 



1066 
1073 
1067 
1054 
1053 
10S8 
1053 
1085 
1045 
1045 
1032 
1051 



1065 
1078 
1064 



1087 
1077 



1076 



zarin paste bluish 

zarin, synthetic... 

zarin OI 

zarin SX paste 

zarin VI paste 

zarin VI old paste 

zarin astrol B 

zarin astrol violet B.. 

zarin black S.. .- 

zarin blue AS 

zarin blue G, R. 

arin blue R... 

zarin blue IR, JR 

zarin blue S, SB 

zarin blue SAP 

zarin blue SAWSA 

zarin blue SKY 

zarin blue WS.. 

zarin blue black B, 3B 

zariu Bordeaux B, BP 

zaria Bordeaux GG, GP 

zarin claret R 

zarin cyanine 2G 

zarin cyanine ND 

arin cyanine black G 

zarin cyanine green G, 3G 

zarin cyclainine R 

zarin direct blue A... 

zarin direct blue A 2Q 

zarin direct blue A 3Q 

zarin direct blue B.. 

zarin direct blue BGAOO 

zarin direct blue ESR... 

zarin direct blue RXO 

zarin direct red 2B 

zarin direct violet E, 2B 

zarin direct violet R, ER 

zarin emeraldole green G 

zarin fast black SP 

zarin fast blue BHG 

zarin fast gray 2BL 

zarin fast light brown GL 

arin geranole B... 

zarin green S 

zarin indigo B 

zarin indigo G 

zarin indigo 3R 

zarin indigo 7Q, 5R, 7R 

zarin indigo black B 

zarin indigo brown B, R 

zarin indigo green B 

zarin indigo green G... 

zarin indigo pink B 

zarin indigo violet B 

zarin irisol R 

zarin levelling blue B 

zarin levelling blue CA 

zarin light blue B 

zarin light blue BGAOO 

zarin light blue SE I 1053 

zarin light blue R ...j 1076 

zarin light gray BS I 

zarin light green GS i 1078 

zarin light green 2QS I 

zarin orange A, AO, R, RP 1 1033 

zarin red paste .' 1027 

zarin red DIB, IB 1027 

zarin red IWS ! 1034 

zarin red PS 1037 

zarin red SDG 1039 

zarin red S, SU, W 1034 

zarin red SX 1040 

zarin red XOP, YCA... i 1039 

zarin rubmol 3G, 5G, OW, R j 1091 

zarin saphire blue B ' 1054 

zarin saphire blue SE ..' 1053 



1073 
1056 



1092 
1071 
1201 
1202 
1200 



1073 
1087 



1054 
1077 



110 
109 
115 
109 
115 
105 
105 
K)fi 
106 
105 
105 
106 
119 
105 
106 
119 
106 
106 
106 
106 
106 
107 
106 
107 
106 
106 
105 
106 
119 
106 
106 
106 
112 
112 
112 
107 
103 
112 
106 
112 
112 
106 
106 
119 
119 
119 
119 
107 
106 
111 
111 
111 
115 
115 
115 
115 
115 
115 
115 
106 
107 
112 
106 
106 
106 
106 
119 
106 
119 
105 
105 
105 
105 
106 
106 
105 
106 
106 
107 
106 
106 



Name of dye 



1058 



1084 
195 
40 
704 
703 
704 



11 



1146 
1143 



1120 
1143 
1123 
11C2 
1217 
1211 



1211 



1207 



1142 
1091 



Mizarin saphirol B 1054 

.Mizarin saphirol SE, WSA 1053 

Mizarin sky blue B 1088 

Alizarin supra blue A 

Alizarin uranol BB, R 

Alizarin violet 3R 

Alizarin viridine FF.. 

Alizarin yellow QD 

Alizarin yellow R 

Alkali blue 2B 

Alkali blue D.. 

Alkali blue3R 

Alkali fast green 3B, 2BF, lOG... 

Alkali fast green 3G 

Alkaline blue H, HE... 

Alkaline fast green 3G 

Amido fast brown R 

Amido naphthol black 4B 

Amido yellow E 

Anthosine B, 3B 

Anthra Bordeaux B. 

Anthra Bordeaux R 

Anthra brilliant green 5Q... 

Anthra brown B. 

Anthra claret R 

Anthra gray B, BL.. 

Anthra green B 

Anthra orange RF 

Anthra pink .\N 

Anthra pink B 

Anthra pink BN 

Anthra pink R_ 

Anthra printing black BO 

Anthra red B. 

Anthra red 3B 

Anthra red R, RT 

Anthra rubine B. 

Anthra scarlet B 

Anthra scarlet G 

Anthra scarlet GG 

Anthra violet B 

Anthra violet BB 

Anthra wool black 3B, R, T 

Anthra wool brown CM, CV 

Anthra wool red BB, CR 

Anthra wool yellow CG 

Anthra yellow GC 

Anthracene blue SWGG.. 

Anthracene blue SWR 

Anthracene blue WB, WG 

Anthracene blue WG, new 

Anthracene Bordeaux R 

Anthracene brown R, RD 

Anthracene brown RP 

Anthracene brown SW 

Anthracene chromate brown EB 
Anthracene chrome blue RWN.. 

Anthracyanine S.. 

Anthraflavone GC 

Anthraquinone blue green BXO. 
Anthraquinone green OXNO — 

Anthraquinone violet... 

Artificial silk black G, R. 

Astra phloxine FF ' 

Auracine G I 786 

Auramine G [ 656 

Aurine 724 

Autochrome olive B 1 

Autochrome olive brown G j 

Autol orange pdr ■ 

Azo acid black B 

Azo brilliant violet BB 

Azo carmine BX 829 

Azo carmine G, GX 828 

Azo orseille BB \ 829 

Azo rhodine 2B 

Azorubinol30S. .| 

Azo violet 4BS | 53 

Azo wool violet 7R 

Azonine R, RR, S.... 

Azonine direct blue B 



Color 

Index 

No. 



1098 
1228 
1105 



1C95 
1060 
1063 
1059 
1061 



1035 



1035 



884 
1095 
1082 
1081 
1080 



Pag« 



113 
125 
125 



130 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



Color 
Index 
No. 



815 



Azonine direct red O 

Azonine direct violet R 

Azonine diiect yellow RR 

Basic yellow T, TCN 

Benzo bronze QC 

Beuzo chrome brown B 

Benzo chrome brown G 

Benzo chrome brown R 

Benzo dark brown extra.. 

Benzo fast black L 

Benzo fast blue FFL .. 

Benzo fast blue 2GL, 4GL, 8GL.. 

Benzo fast blue RL 

Benzo fast Bordeaux 6BL 

Benzo fast brown GL, 3GL, RL.. 

Benzo fast copper violet B 

Benzo fast eosinc BL 

Benzo fast gray BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope 4BL, 5RH-. 

Benzo fast heliotrope 2RL 

Benzo fast light brown 3GL 1 

Benzo fast light scarlet 4BL [ , 

Benzo fast orange 2RL ! , 

Benzo fast orange S, WS.. .j 326 

Benzo fast red 6BL I 



319 



319 



466 



Benzo fast red 8BL 

Benzo fast rubine BL 

Benzo fast scarlet 4BS 

Benzo fast scarlet 5BS, 8BS, GS 

Benzo fast violet B._ 

Benzo fast yellow RL 

Benzo new blue G 

Benzo new blue 5B. 

Benzo red 12B 

Benzo rhoduline red B, 3B 

Benzo rubine SC 

Benzo scarlet BC 

Benzo violet O 

Benzoform blue 2BL, G _ 

Benzoform Bordeaux R 

Benzoform brown 4R, VL 

Benzoform green FFL 

Benzoform orange G 

Benzoform red 2GF.. 

Benzoform scarlet B 

Benzoform yellow QL, R 

Benzyl fast blue GL 

Benzyl fast blue L 

Benzyl green B 

Betaniine blue 8BL 

Black extra .. . 

Blue 4830 

Blue 1900 TCD 

Blue extra 

Blue for artificial silk. . ... 

BlucNA 

Bordeaux GOV 

Brilliant acid blue A . I 714 

Brilliant acid blue EG, FF, G , 

Brilliant acid blue V 712 

Brilliant acid green 6B 667 

Brilliant acridine orange A 788 

Brilliant acridine orange R, 3R 

Brilliant alizarin Bordeaux R I 1038 

Brilliant alliance blue i 

Brilliant benzo blue 6B ' 518 

Brilliant benzo fast violet BL ..| 319 

Brilliant benzo fast yellow QL.. 

Brilliant benzo green B 



833 



Brilliant benzo violet B 

Brilliant benzo violet 2BIL 2R 

Bril'iant bhic G.. 

Brilliant carminogene 3B 

Brilliant chrome blue 2B, PR, PV. 

Brilliant chrome blue S 

Brilliant chrome violet B 

Brilliant chrome violet 4B 

Brilliant chrome violet 3R, 3RA... 

Brilliant chrome violet 3RN 

Brilliant congo R 



325 



720 
163 



456 



125 
123 
125 
104 
121 
121 
100 
100 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 

99 
121 

99 
121 
121 
121 

99 
121 

99 



121 

121 

121 

100 I 

121 

121 

121 

99 

99 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
104 
113 
101 
102 

99 
128 
105 
102 
125 

99 

99 
102 
113 
102 
101 
103 
126 
106 
128 
100 

99 
121 
121 

99 
121 
102 

98 
119 
119 
119 
102 
119 
119 
100 



Name of dye 



Brilliant congo blue 5R 

Brilliant congo violet R 

Brilliant copper blue GW 

Brilliant cotton blue 8B 

Brilliant cresyl blue BBS 

Brilliant delphine blue B. 

Brilliant dianil blue 6G.. 

Brilliant fast blue 3BX 

Brilliant geranine B, 2BN 

Brilliant green crystals 

Brilliant helio blue FFR 

Brilliant helio green GG 

Brilliant indigo B 

Brilliant indigo BB 

Brilliant indigo 4B 

Brilliant indigo 4G 

Brilliant milling blue B, FG 

Brilliant milling green B 

Brilliant milling red R 

Brilliant milling violet R 

Brilliant phosphiae 5G, 

Brilliant pure yellow 6G 

Brilliant purpurine lOB (A) 

Brilliant rhodamine blue R.. 

Brilliant rhoduline blue R 

Brilliant scarlet N... . 
Brilliant sky blue B, G.. 

Brilliant sky blue 6G. 

Brilliant sky blue 8G 

Brilliant sky blue R, 2RM 

Brilliant sulphon red B, 5B, lOB 

Brilliant triazol fast violet BL 

Brilliant triazol fast violet 4BL 

Brilliant triazol fast violet 5RH 

Brilliant triazol fast violet 2RL... . 

Brilliant wool blue FFR.... 

Brillianton orange R 

Brillianton red RMT 

Brom indigo FBP. 

Bromofluorescein A 30 

Bromofluoresic acid 

Brown JB 

Capri blue GON 

Cashmire black TN 

Celatene black 

Celatene blue 

Celatene brilliant violet B 

Celatene fast light brown 

Celatene fast light yellow 

Celatene gold orange 

Celatene orange 

Celatene red 

Celatene red violet 

Celatene yellow 

Celestine blue B 

Cellit fast blue R 

Cellit fast brown O 

Cellit fast orange Q 

Cellit fast red B 

Cellit fast rubine B 

Cellit fast violet 2R 

Cellit fast yellow 20N, R 

Ceres blue I, III 

Ceres brown II 

Ceres orange I 

Ceres red III 

Ceres yellow III 

Chicago red III 

Chloramine black N 

Chloramine blue 3Q 

Chloramine blue HW 

Chloramine brilliant red 8B 

Chloramine fast orange G, R 

Chloramine light gray R 

Chloramine light violet R 

Chloramine orange O 

Chloramine red B, SB... 

Chloramine red 8BS 

Chloramine yellow FF 

Chlorantine brown Y 

Chlorantine fast blue 2QL 



Color 

Index 

No. 



877 
878 
710 



127 
662 



1190 
11S8 
1184 
1JS9 



667 

487 



710 
"32" 



1184 



535 
876 



900 



590 
591 
436 



621 
382 
436 
814 



INDEX TO TABLE OF DYE IMPOSTS 
Index to table oj dye imports — Continued 



131 



Name of dye 


Color 
Index 
No. 


Page 

122 

122 
99 
122 
122 
122 
99 
100 

122 
122 
99 1 
122 
99 
122 
122 
122 
99 
122 
100 
99 
105 
102 
119 
119 
98 
119 
104 
119 
102 
119 
107 
104 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
98 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
105 
119 
102 
119 
120 
100 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 
103 
120 
120 
1 120 
120 
120 
120 
102 
120 
120 
120 
126 
115 
111 
111 
112 
111 
112 
111 
115 
115 


'Name of dye 


Color 

Index 
No. 


Page 


Chlorantine fast blue 4GL, 8GL 




ClbaredSB 


1212 
1226 
1229 
1228 
1222 
1196 
1172 
1115 


111 


Chlorantine fast brown BRL, 3GL, 




Ciba red G 


112' 


RL 


Ciba red R ... 


112 


Chlorantine fast gray B 


403 


Ciba scarlet G extra 


112 


Chlorantine fast green B ._ 


Ciba violet B, R 


112 


Chlorantine fast orange 2RL 




Ciba yellow G.. . 


111 


Chlorantine fast red 5BL 




Cibanone black B 


110 


Chlorantine fast red 7BL. 


278 
436 


Cibanone blue G. . 


108 


Chlorantine fast red 8BN 


Cibanone blue2G- 


116 


Chlorantine fast violet 4BL, 5BL 


Cibanone blue 3G- . 


1173 
1113 


110 


4BLN.__ „.. 


Cibanone blue GCD 


108 


Chlorantine fast violet RL, 2RL .. 


""349" 


Cibanone blue GL 


115 


Chlorantine fast yellow 4GL 


Cibanone brown B. 


1171 


110 


Chlorantine fast yellow RL 


Cibanone brown R. 


115 


Chlorantine red 3B. 


382 


Cibanone deep blue BO 


1099 
1174 
1169 


107 


Chlorazol drab RH 


Cibanone green B 


110 


Chlorazol fast brown RK 




Cibanone orange R 


110 


Chlorazol fast eosinc B._ 




Cibanone orange 3R, 6R 




115' 


Chlorazol fast heliotrope BK 


319 


Cibanone red G._ 




115 


Chlorazol fast orange AG 


Cibanone yellow 2G 




115> 


Chlorazol fast orange D . ._ 


621 

388 
884 
721 


Cibanone yellow R_ 


1170 
146 
289 


110 




Citronine AAEJ 


9S 


Chromacetine blue S 


Cloth fast blue GTB 


99 


Chromal blue GC 


Cloth fast orange G, R 


113 


Chromanol black RVI 


Cloth fast red B,3B. R . .. 




113 


Chromanol violet Rl..- 




Cloth fast vellow G 




113 


Chromazone red new cone - 


124 


Cloth red B 


269 


99 


Chromazurine DN ... . 


Coerulein SIC 


120 


Chromazurine E, G, GR . . 


879 
""723' 


Colonial blue R.. .. 




120 


Chromazurine NS, R, RN, RR 


Columbia black FB, FF 


539 
473 


100 


Chromazurol S 


Columbia blue G 


100 


Chrome blue BR 


Columbia catechine A, 3B, G 


122 


Chrome blue black B _ _ 


1085 
878 


Columbia fast black V. 




122 


Chrome brilliant blue G _ 


Columbia red OB, 03B . .. 




122 


Chronie brown VR ... 


Columbia violet R.. 


394 
598 
377 
459 
376 
289 


99 


Chrome deep brown RRN 




Congo brown G.. 


100 


Chrome fast blue FB... 




Congo orange G.. 


99 


Chrome fast brown TP 




Congo orange R . . 


100 


Chrome fast green GL 




CongorubineB 


99 


Chrome fast phosphine R 




Coomassie navy blue GNX 


99 


Chrom.e fast yellow 2G.. . . 


112 


CoreineMS 


120 


Chrome green BF, DC, GD . 


I Coreine RR 


900 
787 


105 


Chrome olive JCS 




Coriphosphine OX. . 


103 


Chrome orange il, ^51, N 




CotonerolA. . 


122 


Chrome printing Bordeaux B 




Cotton black E 


581 
582 
707 
909 
448 
252 
346 


100 


Chrome printing green B 




Cotton black RW 


100 


Chrome printing orange 2R 




Cotton blue No. 2 


102 


Chrome printing red B, Y . 




Cotton blue R 


105 


Chrome printing violet N . .. 


892 


Cotton red 4BX 


100 


Chrome red brown 3RD ... 


Cotton scarlet extra.. 


99 


Chrome violet CG. _. 


727 


Cotton yellow G... 


99 


Chrome yellow RL 


Cross dye green B 


126 


Chromochlorine E, EN 




Cross dye green 2G 




126 


Chromocitronine R 


441 


Cross dye vellow Y ... 




126 


Chromocitronine 3R 


Crystal violet 


681 
681 
596 
-.07 
420 
715 
715 
715 
679 
679 


101 


Chromogene azurine B .. 




Crystal violet P 


101 


Chromogene violet B 




Cupranil brown G 


100 


Chroraophenine FKN, RP 




Cupranil brown R 


100 


Chromophosphine EFN 




1 Cutch brown 2R cone... 


100 


Chromopurpurine .TJ ... 




Cyanolextra 


102 


Chromorhodine BB, BN, BR 


762 


1 Cyanol FF 


102 


Chromorhodine 6GN, 6GS 


; Cyanol blue FF .. . 


102 


Chromorhoduline B 




i Dahlia bluish 


101 


Chromorosamine 2B 




1 Dahlia violet 


101 


Chromosafranine B . 




Dark brown 


128 


Chromovesuvine JA, RA 




Delphine blue B 


878 
451 


104 


Chromoxane azurol BD 




Deltapurpurine 5B 


100 


Chromoxanp brilliant blue G 


720 


i Developed brilliant green 3G 


122 


Chromoxane brilliant violet SB 


1 Developed brilliant orange 5G. 




122 


Chromoxane green 2G ... . 




Developed brilliant orange GR 

1 Developed brilliant scarlet 2BL 


324 


99 


Chromoxane pure blue B, BLD 




122 


Chrysophosphine 2G 




: Developed brown 3G 




122 


Cibablue2BL ... 




Developed indigo blue4GL 




122 


Ciba Bordeaux B 


1208 
1187 
1220 
1198 
1230 
1207 


Developed light yellow 2G.- 


654 


101 


Ciba brown R 


Developed pink B 


122 


Ciba gray G 


Developed skv blueSGL 




122 


Ciba green G 


Developing black ED 




122 


Ciba orange G 


Developing black OT 


371 


99 


Ciba pink B. 


Developing blue B^ 


122 


Ciba Dink BG 


Developing blue 2R =.. 


316 


99 


Ciba printing black B.. 




Developing indigo blue R 


122 



132 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



Color 
Index 
No. 



Diamine azo Bordeaux BL 

Diamine azo brown G, 2G, 3G - 

Diamine azo fast Bordeaux B 

Diamine azo fast green G 

Diamine azo fast red 6B 

Diamine azo fast violet B, R, 3R 

Diamine azo orange RR 

Diamine azo violet BL 

Diamine azo j'ellow 2G -.- 

Diamine black BO 

Diamine brilliant blue G 

Diamine brilliant Bordeaux R 

Diamine brilliant scarlet S 

Diamine brilliant violet B 

Diamine bronze G 

Diamine brown B 

Diamine catechine B, Q, 3G -.. 

Diamine fast blue F, FSB, FFB 

Diamine fast blue FFG, F3G. 

Diamine fast Bordeaux 6BS 

Diamine fast brilliant blue R 

Diamine fast brown G, 3Q, GB, G2B. 

Diamine fast brown R 

Diamine fast gray BN 

Diamine fast orange EG, ER... 

Diamine fast red 8BL_ 

Diamine fast red violet FR 

Diamine fast rose G 

Diamine fast rubine FB 

Diamine fast violet FFBN, FFRN.. 

Diamine fast yellow AGG, FF 

Diamine fast yellow R 

D iamine griiyG... 

Diamine green B 

Diamine neron BB 

Diamine orange B 

Diamine orange F 

Diamine rose BD, GD 

Diamine scarlet 3B 

Diamine sky blue FF 

Diamine sky blue N 

Diamine steel blue L 

Diamine yellow N 

Diaminogene extra 

Diaminogene GG 

Diaminogene blue NA 

Diaminogene blue NBB 

Diamond phosphine R 

Dianil brown CG 

Dianil chrome brown G 

Dianil crimson B _-. 

Dianil fast blue GL 

Dianil fast orange RR 

Dianil fast violet BL 

Dianil light red 12 BL 

Diazamine blue BR 

Diazamine blue 4R 

Diazanil pink B 

Diazine black G 

Diazo black VG 

Diazo Bordeaux 7B..- 

Diazo brilliant black B 

Diazo brilliant blue 2BL 

Diazo brilliant green 3G 

Diazo brilliant orange 5G 

Diazo brilliant orange GR 

Diazo brilliant scailet 6B, 3BA 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 2BL, 5BL 

Diazo brilliant scarlet O, S8B 

Diazo brilliant scarlet ROA 

Diazo brown G,3G, 6G,3RB 

Diazo fast black MG 

Diazo fast black SD, VD 

Diazo fast blue 2BW, 6GW, 4RW.. 

Diazo fast Bordeaux BL 

Diazo fist fjreen OF 

Diazo fast red 7BL 

Diazo fast violet BL, 3RL 

Diazo f:ist yellow Q 

Diazo fast yellow 2G 

Diazo geranine B 



493 
511 
543 



325 
559 
423 



278 



278 
325 
814 



593 
317 
409 
459 
128 
382 
518 



488 
317 



316 
516 



596 
400 



316 



449 



324 



324 



654 



Page 



122 
122 
122 
122 
122 
122 

99 
122 
122 
100 
100 
100 
122 

99 
100 
100 
122 
122 
122 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 

99 
123 
123 



102 
123 
12G 
100 



100 



100 
123 
123 
100 
99 
123 
99 
100 
120 
123 
i.100 
99 
123 
123 
123 
123 
99 
123 
123 
126 
123 
123 
100 
123 
123 
123 
99 
123 
123 
123 
99 
123 
99 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
101 
123 



Name of dye 



Diazo indigo blue BR 

Diazo indigo blue 4GL 

Diazo red NSB... 

Diazo rubine B 

Diazo sky blue B, 3G, 3GL 

Diazogene light violet BL 

Diazopht'n>l black V 

Diphene blue R 

Diphenyl black base I 

Diphenyl brown BBNC 

Diphenyl brown GS 

Diphenyl catechine D... 

Diphenyl catechine G supra 

Diphtnyl catechine R 

Diphenyl chlorine yellow FF... 

Diphenyl chrysoine GC 

Diphenyl fast Bordeaux BC, G. 

Dipheynl fast bronze B 

Diphenyl fast brown GF. 

Diphenyl fast brown GNC 

Diphenyl fast gray B, BC 

Direct blue O 

Direct brilliant blue 8B 

Direct cutch brown GR, N 

Direct fast orange K 

Direct fast orange R 

Direct fastred3B 

Direct fast violet B, BL 

Direct fast violet 2RL 

Direct gray R 

Direct red B 

Discharge black BF 

Discharge blue BQ extra 

Dispersol yellow 3G 

Duranol black 

Duranol blue G 

Duranol orange G 

Duranol red BB, G 

Duranol violet 2R 

Duranthrene red BN 

Eclipse brown RRC 

Eclipse dark brown 

Eosine A 

Eosine CPG 

Eosine W 

Eosine Y 

Erika B 

Eridan brilliant scarlet B 

Eridan scarlet R 

Erio anthracene brown R 

Erio carmine 2BC 

Erio fast fuchsine BBL 

Erio fast cyanine green G 

Erio fast yellow R 

Erio green B supra 

Eriochromal brown G 

Eriochromal gray 5G 

Eriochrome azurol BC, BX 

Eriochrome black E 

Eriochrome blue S, SE 

Eriochrome blue black G 

Eriochrome brilliant violet B-. 

Eriochrome cyanine RC 

Eriochrome flavine A... 

Eriochrome geranol R 

Eriochrome green L 

Eriochrome phosphine RR 

Eriochrome red B 

Eriochrome red G, R 

Eriochrome violet B, 3B 

Eriocyanine AC 

Erioglaucine AP, X 

Erioviridine B supra 

Ervthrosine 

Ethyl violet 

Euchrysine GX.. 

Euchrysine 2RDX, 2RX 

Euchrysine 3RX 

Fast acid blue B 

Fast acid blue R-. 

Fast acid green BB 



Color 

Index 

No. 



851 
871 



598 



628 



814 
631 



629 



403 



710 



653 



873 



1162 



708 



768 
130 



758 
1078 



735 



720 



722 
219 



652 



699 
671 
667 
773 
682 



797 
788 
733 
760 



INDEX TO TABLE OF DYE IMPORTS 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



133 



Name of dye 



Color 

Index 

No. 



Page 



757 
696 
758 
833 
239 



278 



691 
670 
636 
2 
306 
16 



794 



Fast acid green extra bluish 

Fast acid magenta Q 

Fast acid marine blue IIBBX , 

Fast acid violet B.. -- 

Fast acid violet lOB. 

Fast acid violet R 

Fast blue WBL 

Fast brown G 

Fast chrome green BN 

Fast cotton blue 4QL 

Fast cotton Bordeaux 6BL 

Fast cotton brown QB, RL, 4RL.., 
Fast cotton catechine 3B, Q, O, R. 

Fast cotton corinth B — 

Fast cotton gray BL, QL, VL 

Fast cotton red 8BL 

Fast cotton rose 2B 

Fast cotton rubine B, 3B 

Fast cotton scarlet 4BL 

Fast cotton violet 4R- 

Fast cotton yellow RL 

Fast green extra bluish 

Fast light green SFX 

Fast light yellow 20, 3G 

Fast printing green 

Fast sulphon black F 

Fast yellow extra 

Fine pink 

Flavophosphine G, 4G 

Fluorescent blue 

Formal fast black O, R._ 

Foulard discharge blue B 

Foulard discharge green BL 

Fouramine A, AN, AT 

Fraise. 

Fuehsine 

Fur black DB, DG 

Fur blue black A, B, DB, SA, SB 

Fur brown NZ, NZD, P, PR, PY.. 

Fur brown 2R, 4R, SKG, SP 

Fur gray ALA, B, G 

Fur gray brown SLA 

Fur olive DA, 6G 

Fur red brown 6R 

Fur yellow 4Q 

Fur yellow brown A 

Gallamine blue 

Gallazine #90 

Gallo navy blue RD 

Gallo violet DF 

Geranine G 

Green B. 

Qrelanone blue CG 

Grelanone brown B 

Grelanone brown RR 

Grelanone orange R 

Grelanone red 2B 

Grelanone scarlet O 

Grelanone violet 3B 

Grelanone violet BR 

Grelanone yellow RG 

Guinea blue A 

Guinea blue A4B, V4B 

Guinea brown R, 2R | 

Guinea fast green B i - 

Guinea fast green 3B.. | 667 

Guinea fast red BL 



691 



875 



677 

875 

875 

875 

875 

875 

875 

875 

875- 

875. 

875 

894 

905 



892 
127 



1152 
1151 
1136 



1134 
1135 
1132 
714 



Guinea fast red 2R 

Guinea light blue A, A 2G 

Half-wool blue 3R 

Hansa green GS 

Hansa orange R 

Hansa red, B 2G 

nan.<;a yellow G, 5G. 

Hansa yellow lOG 

Hansa yellow GR 

Helindone black IBB 

Helindone blue 30 

Helindone blue IBGD, IBCS. 

Helindone blue IGGD 

Helindone blue 3 R 



114 



1114 
1113 



101 
113 
113 
103 
101 
103 
104 

98 
120 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 

99 
124 
124 
124 
124 
121 
101 
101 
101 



128 
103 
105 
124 
120 
120 
104 
128 
101 
104 
104 
104 
104 
104 
104 
104 
104 
104 
104 
105 
105 
120 
105 

98 
128 
116 
110 
110 
109 
116 
116 
109 
109 
109 
102 
113 
113 
113 
101 
113 

98 
113 
124 
127 
127 
127 
127 

98 
127 
107 
116 
108 
108 
116 



Name of dye 



1227 
1152 



1149 
1151 



1223 
1144 



1228 
1096 
1097 



1145 
1199 



1150 
1216 



1217 
1211 



1211 



1209 
1212 

iiee 



1162 
1212 



Helindone blue green IB 

Helindone brilhant blue IR 

Helindone brilliant green D 5Q.. 

Helindone brilliant green 5G 

Helindone brown G 

Helindone brown IG -.. 

Helindone brown lOG. 

Helindone brown lOR 

Helindone brown IR. 

Helindone brown I 3R, IRT -.- 

Helindone brown 2R 

Helindone corinth IRK.. 

Helindone fast scarlet B, BG 

Helindone fast scarlet C 

Helindone golden orange IG _.. 

Helindone golden orange IRRT 

Helindone golden orange I3G. 

Helindone gray IGK 

Helindone green G 

Helindone green IGQ 

Helindone khaki IGQ.. 

Helindone olive IR.. 

Helindone orange D 

Helindone orange I 4R 

Helindone orange R 

Hehndone pink AN 

Helindone pink B 

Helindone pink BN -.. 

Helindone pink IB --. 

Helindone pink R --. 

Helindone printing black IBR 

Helindone printing black RD 

Helindone red B 

Helindone red 3B 

Helindone red DIBN 

Helindone red IGG — 

Helindone red IRK 

Helindone reddish violet IRH 

Helindone reddish violet IRR 

Helindone reddish violet IRRK 

Helindone violet 2B, R... 

Helindone violet BH.. 

Helindone violet IBN 

Helindone violet R 

Helindone yellow AGO 

Helindone yellow CG vat 

Helindone yellow 3GN 

Helindone yellow IG... — 

Helindone yellow JGK 

Hello Bordeaux BL 

Hello chrome yellow GL 

Helio fast carmine CL 

Hello fast red RBL 

Helio fast red RL 

Helio fast rubine LBK 

Helio fast violet AL, 2RL 

Heho fast vellow HG, H5G, H lOG 

Helio marine 2GL, RL 

Helio red RMT. 

Hydron blue G... 

Hydron blue R 

Hydron Bordeaux B 

Hydron Bordeaux R 

Hydron brown G, R 

Hydron green B, G .--1 

Hydron olive GN ..' 

Hydron orange RF ! 1217 

Hydron pink FB.... ' 

Hydron pink FF, RF 

Hydron scarlet 2B, 3B 

Hydron sky blue FK 

Hydron violet B, R ' 

Hydron yellow GG 

Hydron yellow NF 

Hydron yellow brown G — 

Hydron yellow olive GO — 

Ignamine orange 3G I 368 

Ignamine orange R -- 440 

Immedial brown W ] 

Immedial direct blue B, 4B 

Immedial indogene GCL 



Color 

Index 

No. 



1161 
1219 



1163 
1219 
1095 



1138 
1118 
1132 



134 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



Imperial scarlet 3B. - 

Indaiizarine J 

Indanthrene black BQ, EGA 

Indanthrene blue BCS 

Indanthrene blue 3Q 

Indanthrene blue GCD 

Indanthrene blue GCDL.. 

Indanthrene blue RC, REZ, RHZ.. 

Indanthrene blue RK 

Indanthrene blue RL, RRZ 

Indanthrene blue RS 

Indanthrene blue RZ 

Indanthrene blue WB 

Indanthrene Bordeaux B 

Indanthrene brilliant violet BBK 

Indanthrene brilliant violet RK 

Indanthrene golden orange Q. 

Indanthrene golden orange 3G 

Indanthrene olive Q 

Indanthrene orange RRK.. 

Indanthrene red 5GK 

Indanthrene violet RR - 

Indanthrene yellow G.. 

Indazine (spirit soluble) .-. -. 

Indigo, synthetic 

Indigo vat --- 

Indigo MLB/4B 

Indigo MLB/6B 

Indigo KG 

Indigo carmine blue FF 

Indigosol --- 

Indigosol O -- 

Indigosol 04B, R 

Indigosol yellow HGG 

Indo carbpn SN 

Indocyanme B 

Induline NN - 

Induline scarlet 

Ink blue BITBN, BITBNOO, BITN 

Intensive blue B 

lonamine A, L 

lonamine orange CB 

Isamine blue 6B.._ 

Isamine blue R,. - 

Japan black extra -- 

Japan black MBG.. 

Jasmine, highly cone 

Katigene chrome blue 5G 

Katigene deep black BO.. 

Katigene indigo CLOG, CL5G 

Katigene orange FR 

Kiton blue A 

Kiton fast red BL, 4BL, R 

Kiton fast violet lOB - 

Kiton fast yellow 3G, R 

Kiton pure blue V 

Kryogene direct blue GO 

Kurgan direct blue GO 

Kurgan violet 3RX ... 

Lake Bordeaux BL. 

Lake red C - 

Lake red 2QL... - — 

Lake red P - 

Lanasol blue R 

Leucol yellow G 

Levelling silk blue B --. 

Light green SF yellowish -- 

Lissamine fast vellow 2G 

Lithol red R .-- 

Lithol rubine BK 

Magenta AB 

Magenta S 

Malta gray J.. - 

Mandarin yellow 

Meldola's blue 3R-- -.- --. 

Metachronie black AG 

Metachrome blue DL, GFL 

Metachronie blue black 2BX... 

Metachrome brilliant blue BL 

Metachrome brilliant blue 8RL .. 

Metachrome green 3G 



Color 

Index 

No. 



280 



1114 
1109 
1113 



1108 



1106 



1093 
1146 
1134 
1035 
1096 



1167 
1136 
1131 
1104 
1118 

849 
1177 
1178 
1184 
1186 
1186 

715 
1178 
1178 



861 
827 



733 

"no" 



714 



696 
645 



165 
'158' 



1126 



670 
639 
189 



677 
692 
873 



909 



Page 



99 
105 
117 
108 
108 
108 
117 
117 
108 
117 
108 
117 
107 
110 
109 
105 
107 
117 
110 
109 
109 
107 
108 
104 
110 
111 
111 
111 
111 
102 
111 
111 
117 
117 
126 
113 
104 
104 
113 
102 
125 
125 
102 
124 
104 
126 

98 
126 
126 
126 
126 
102 
113 
101 
101 
113 
105 
105 
126 
127 



113 
109 
113 
101 
101 
98 
128 
101 
101 
104 
128 
105 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 



Name of dye 



Metachrome olive B, 2G 

Metachrome olive brown G 

Metachrome orange R 

Metachrome red Q. 

Metachrome violet B 

Metachrome violet 2R 

Metanilred3B 

Methyl Lyons blue 

Methyl silk blue new 

Methyl silk blue 3G 

Methyl violet base.- 

Methyl violet 4B 

Methyl violet NFBL ,.. 

Methylene blue BGF, BGX 

Methylene blue HOG 

Methylene green, G, P, W 

Methylene heliotrope 

Milling brown R 

Milling orange G... 

Milling red 6B, 6BA, GA 

Milling scarlet 4R 

Milling yellow GA, O 

Mimosa Z cone 

Minaxo acid brown G.. 

Minaxo black BBNX 

Minaxo blue 4R, 4RX.._ 

Modern brown 

Modern cyanine BGG, N, RN, SR, V 

Modern gray DH, PS, RON 

Modern green E 

Modern olive JN 

Modern royal blue 

Modern violet 

Modern violet N 

Monochrome brown BC 

Nako B, DFN, DMG, G, 2G 

NakoSGN, M, RH, SB 

Nako black DBB 

Nako gray B 

Naphthalene acid green J 

Naphthalene black 12B 

Naphthalene green cone 

Naphtharnine light brown 2G 

Naphthamine light orange L 

Naphtharnine light violet 2B 

Naphthochrome violet R 

Naphthol yellow S 

Naphthylamine black 4B ..- 

Neolan blue B, G, 2G 

Neolan gray B 

Neolan green B 

Neolan pink B, G 

Neolan red B, R 

Neolan violet R 

Neolan yellow G, GR, R.. 

Neptune blue BR _ .- 

Neutral violet O.. 

New Bordeaux RX.. 

New claret RX 

New magenta O -. 

New methylene blue N, NS 

Night blue 

Nigrosine T 

Nitrosamine red paste 

Nitrosine NN 

Novazol blue B 

Novazol violet B 

Oil green ALB -.. 

Oil red G 

Onis B,3B 

Opal blue, bluish. .- 

Orange extra (for acetate silk) 

Orange crystals 

Orange S 

Orthocyanine B._ 

Oxamine black BBNX.. 

Oxychrome brilliant blue PB 

Palatine chrome brilliant blue B 

Palatine chrome brilliant violet B 

Palatine copper blue B 

Paper fast Bordeaux B 



Color 

Index 

No. 



104 
40 



706 
705 
705 



680 
922 
926 
924 

845 



487 

'sis" 



884 
892 
881 



875 
875 
875 
875 
735 
246 
735 



325 



10 
308 



678 
927 
731 
865 
44 
2 



707 



27 
150 



720 
720 



INDEX TO TABLE OF DYE IMPORTS 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



135 



Name of dye 



Paper rea a 

Paper yellow 2QX - 

Paranil black 2B 

Paranil brown 2BX 

Pararosaniline. 

Parasulphon brown V 

Patent black N 

Patent blue A 

Patent blue V 

Patent green AGL 

Patent phosphine Q, 2G 

Patent phosphine ORNTN 

Patent phosphine M 

Patent phosphine R (I) 

Patent phosphine RRDX 

Permanent red F3R, F5R, F6R. 

Philadelphia yellow 2G 

Phloxine -- 

Phlo.xine BBN 

Phosphine O, 3R 

Pigment Bordeaux BL 

Pign;ent deep black R 

Pilatus black SF 

Pilatus chrome brown QGX 

Pink R extra (for acetate silk) . .. 

Pluto black G 

Pluto brown GG 

Plutoform black BL 

Polar gray 

Polar orange GS, R 

Polar red B 

Polar red G, R RS 

Polar yellow 20. 

Ponceau 3R 

Poseidon blue BGX 

Poseidon blue BXX 

Poseidon green SGX 

Poseidon green VGGX 

Purpurine 

Pyrazol fast brown B 

Pyrazol orange G, R 

Pyrogene blue green B 

PjTogene brilliant blue 6B 

PjTOgene brown G. 

Pyrogene cutch 2R 

Pyrogene green 3G 

Pyrogene green GK 

Pyrogene pure blue 3GL 

Quinoline yellow cone 

Quinoline yellow extra 

Quinoline yellow KT 

Radio black SB 

Radio brown B, S 

Radio chrome blue B 

Radio chrome green B. 

Radio green C 

Radio red G, VB.... 

Radio yellow R 

Rapid fast blue B 

Rapid fast Bordeaux B 

Rapid fast brown B 

Rapid fast orange BG, RO 

Rapid fast pink LB, LG 

Rapid fast red B, BB 

Rapid fast red GL, 3GL 

Rapid fast red OZ. RQ... 

Rapid fast yellow G. 

Red violet (for acetate silk) 

Resorcine brown 

Rheonine AL 

Rhodamine B cone 

Rhodamine B extra. 

Rhodamine 6G 

Rhodamine 6GD 

Rhodamine 6GDN 

Rhodamine S 

Rhodamine sky blue 3Q 

Rhoduline blue 6G 

Rhoduline blue GO 



Color 

Index 

No. 



676 



714 
712 
667 
789 
797 
789 
789 
797 



793 
774 
774 
793 



241 



430 



80 
712 
714 
667 
735 
1037 
423 
653 



1006 



801 
801 
802 



234 

795 
749 
749 
752 
752 



743 



658 
926 



124 
124 
124 
124 
101 
124 
128 
102 
102 
101 
103 
103 
103 
103 
1Q3 
128 
103 
103 
103 
103 
128 
128 
99 
98 
125 
124 
124 
124 
114 
114 
114 
100 
114 
98 
102 
102 
101 
103 
106 
100 
101 
126 
126 
126 
126 
105 
126 
127 
103 
103 
103 
114 
114 
120 
120 
114 
114 
114 
125 
125 
125 
126 
126 
126 
126 
126 
126 
125 
98 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
126 
103 
126 
101 
105 



Name of dye 



Rhoduline orange NO... 

Rhoduline yellow 6G 

Roccelline 

Rosanthrene RN 

Rosanthrene fast Bordeaux 2BL 

Rosanthrene fast red 7BL 

Rosanthrene orange R 

Rosanthrene pink , 

Rosanthrene violet 5R , 

Rosazeine B extra 

Rosazeine 6G 

Rosazeine 6GD 

Rose color 

Rosinduline 2B, blue shade 

Rosinduline 2B, bluish 

Rosolane 

Rosolane paste ., 

Runic AL 

S R A blue IV 

S R A red I, III 

Scarlet RR 

Setacyl brilliant pink Q 

Setacyl direct blue K 

Setacyl direct orange G, 2R 

Setacyl direct red B 

Setacyl direct yellow R 

Setocyanine 

Setoflavine T 

Setoglaucine. 

Silk blue BSIC, BT5B00 

Silk ponceau 

Silver gray 

Silver gray P 

Sitara fast red RL.. 

Soluble blue4B, 6B.. 

Soluble blue 2BX, T 

Soluble carmine 

Sorrel red X.. 

Special violet B 

Spirit fast blue R 

Spirit fast red B, 3B. 

Spirit fast violet R 

Stilbene yellow GGP, 3GX 

Stone fast orange R, RN 

Stone fast yellow 2G, 5G 

Stone fast yellow, GN, GR 

Stone red R 

Straw blue G... 

Sulphide new blue BL 

Sulphide violet B, V 

Sulpho rosazeine B 

Sulpho rosazeine BG, G 

Sulphon cyanine G... 

Sulphon orange G-. 

Sulphon yellow 5G, R 

Sulphur black CLB, FAG 

Sulphur black T 

Sulphur brilliant blue CLB. 

Sulphur gray G.. 

Sulphur yellow G 

Supra cyanine BLA, DLA, FLA.. 

Supra cyanine 3FLA, 3GLA 

Supra cyanine brown GLA, RLA- 

Supra cyanine gray GLA 

Supra light yellow 2GL 

Supramine black BR 

Supramine blue FB, R.. 

Supramine Bordeaux B 

Supramine brown G, R 

Supramine red B, 3B, 2G 

Supramine yellow G, 3G, R 

Tannastrol O 

Tannocyanine 3G 

Tartrazine extra. -. 

Tero brown FR 

Tero yellow FR 

Thiazinered RXX 

Thioflavine TCN 

Thiogene black MA 



Color 

Index 

No. 



788 
816 
176 



749 
752 
752 



829 
829 
845 
846 
795 



79 
739 



663 
815 
658 



196 



865 
69 
707 
707 



622 



189 



748 
"288 



978 



639 



658 
640 



225 

815 



Page 



136 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 


Color 

Index 

No. 


Page 


Name of dye 


Color 
Index 
No. 


Page 


Thioindigo black B... 




118 
118 
112 
112 
112 
111 
111 
111 
116 
112 
111 
109 
118 
118 
127 
127 
105 
105 
126 
127 
127 
127 
126 
124 
124 
100 
124 
124 
101 
124 
124 
124 
124 
100 
124 
98 
100 
100 
100 
101 
128 
128 
121 
121 
121 
107 
118 
117 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
117 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
117 ! 
117 
117 1 
108 
117 
108 
117 
108 
117 
107 
117 
117 
109 
117 
109 
109 
109 
107 
117 
117 


Vat brown B 


1120 


109 


Thioindigo blu^ 2QD 




Vat brown FFR 


118 


Thioin>iigo brown Q . 


1227 
1223 
1224 
1217 
1211 
1212 


Vat brown G 


1152 


110 


Thioindigo brown R 


Vat brown GO. 


117 


Thioindigo brown 3R 


Vat brown OR. 


1149 
1151 


110 


Thioindigo orange R 


Vat brown IR, R.. 


110 


Thioindigo pink BN -- 


1 Vat brown R (C).. 


117 


Thioindigo red 3B 


Vat brown 3R, RT 




117 


Thioindigo rose RN 


Vat corinth RK.. . 


1144 
1099 
1099 
1096 


109 


Thioindigo scarlet 2G... 


1228 
1219 
1138 


Vat dark blue BGO.. 


107 


Thioindigo violet 2B, 2R 


Vat dark blue BO, BOA 


107 


Thioindigo yellow 3QN . 


Vat golden orange G 


107 


Thioindone brown B 


Vat golden orange 3G 


117 


Thioindone olive B 




Vat golden orange GL 


1096 
1097 


107 


Thional brilliant blue 6BS 




VaJ, golden orange RRT 


107 


Thional brilliant green 2Q 




Vat gray 3B 


117 


Thional orange G... 


949 
926 


Vat gray 6B . 


1213 


111 


Thionine blue G, GO 


Vat gray BTR 


117 


Thionine sky blue 6B 


Vat gray OK, K 


1145 


109 


Thionol brown O, R 




Vat gray RRH 


117 


Thionol direct blue S 




Vat green BB.. 


1116 


108 


Thionol yellow OR, R 




Vat green 0,GG 


118 


Toluidine blue 




Vat khaki OG.. 




118 


Toluylene fast brown 2R 




Vat olive B, IR, R. 


1150 
1136 
1137 


110 


Toluvlene fast orange GL -.. 




Vat orange R... .. 


109 


Toluylene red 


436 


Vat orange R (By)... 


109 


Toluylene yellow G 


Vat orange 3R 


118 


Triazogene light yellow 2Q 




Vat orange 4R 




118 


Triazogene orange R 


649 


Vat orange RRK 


1136 
1097 


109 


Triazol fast brown G. 


Vat orange RRT 


107 


Triazol li^ht brown 30L 




Vat orange RRTL.. 


118 


Triazol light may BL 




Vat orange 6 RTK... 


1137 


109 


Triazol light orange 2RL 




Vat orange RRTS... 


118 


Triazol light red 8BL 


436 


Vat pink B 




118 


Triazol pure green B 


Vat printing black BO . 




118 


Trident red RXX 


225 
561 
577 
477 
661 


Vat printing black BR 




118 


Trisulphon brnwn B 


Vat printing brown R 




118 


Trisulphon brown 20 


Vat red B... 


1207 
1212 
llfi2 
11.55 
1133 


HI 


Trypan blue. . 


Vat red 3B 


111 


Turquoise blue BB.-. 


Vat red BN 


110 


Typophor brown FR.. 


Vat red BT.. 


110 


Typophor yellow FR 




Vat red FF 


109 


Ultra corinth B 




Vat red OG 


118 


Ultra cyanine RB 




Vat red R . 


1133 
1162 


109 


Ultra oranee R 




Vat red RK 

VatredRKL 


110 


Vat black BB 


1102 


118 


Vat black BB (OrE)... 


Vat red RT 


1142 


109 


Vat black BO, BOA... 




Vat red brown R. 


118 


Vat blue BCD, BCS-. 


1114 
1109 

nil 

1115 
1113 
1113 
1115 


Vat red violet RII 

Vat red violet RHP 


1212 


HI 


Vat blue 30 


lis 


Vat blue 50_.. 


Vat red vioU-t RRK, RRKP 

Vat scariet 3B 


1161 


no 


Vat blue 00 


116 


Vat blue OCD 


Vat scariet GO. 


122s 

"nor- 

1?]9 
11 '■s 
1104 
1103 
1104 


112 


Vat blue OCDN 


Vatskv blue FK... , 

Vat violet B_. „ 


116 


Vat blue OCN 


108 


Vat blue OOnZ 


Vat violet BB 


111 


Vat hlun OOSL 


1110 
1110 
1110 
1110 
1110 


Vat violet BN 

Vat violet IRR 


110 


Vat blue OOSNL 


107 


Vat blue OOSNP.. . 


Vat violet R 


107 


Vat blue OOSP 


Vat violet RR. 


107 


Vat blue OOSZ 


Vat yellow FFRK.. 


118 


Vat blue RC. 


Vat yellow O 


1118 


108 


Vat blue REZ 




Vat vellow 60_ 


118 


Vat blue RTIZ... 




Vat yellow OC. 


1095 


107 


Vat blue RK 


1108 


Vat vellow OF 


118 


Vat blue RL, RRZ 


Vat vellow OK. 


1132 


109 


Vat blue RS 


1106 


Vat vellow 120L 12GDL 


118 


Vat blue RSN 


Vat yellow OP, GT 

Vat vellow R. 


""iiis" 

1132 


118 


Vat blue RSP 


1106 


109 


Vat blue RZ 


Vat vellow RO 


109 


Vat blue WB... 


1093 


Vatvellow3RT 


118 


Vat blue WBO 


Vat yellow brown 30 




119 


Vat blue green B 




Vesuvine BLX 


332 
729 
729 
(-90 
729 

'"'707 


99 


Vat Bordeaux B extra 


1143 


Victoria blue B 


102 


Vat brilliant blue R 


Victoria blue B base 

Victoria blue 4R 


102 


Vat brilliant orange FR 


1136 
1134 
1135 
1104 


101 


Vat brilliant violet BBK 


Victoria pure blue B, B0.._ 

Violet B extra (for artificial silk) 

Water blue 

Wax red 


102 


Vat brilliant violet RK 


125 


Vat brilliant violet RR_.. 


102 


Vat brilliant violet RRBA 


128 


Vat brilliant violet RRP 




Wool black 6B. QRF 




114 



INDEX TO TABLE OF DYE IMPORTS 
Index to table oj dye imports — Continued 



137 



Name of dye 



Wool blup 2B, 5B... 

Wool blue a 

Wool blue R. RR 

Wool discharge cyanine 3Q. 

Wool fast blue BL, GL 

Wool fast red 3B 

Wool fast violet B 

Woo! violet RC 

Xantho acridine ON, MO.. 

Xantho phosphine M 

Xylene blue AS cone 

Xylene blue VS 

Xylene cyanol FF extra 

Xylene fast blue OL.. 



Color 

Index 

No. 



833 

487 
833 



673 
672 
715 
833 



115 
103 
115 
115 
104 
100 
104 
115 
126 
126 
101 
101 
102 
104 



Name of dye 



Xylene fast green B.-. 

Xylene milling blue AE 

Xylene milling blue BL 

Xylene milling blue QL 

Xylene milling orange R 

Xylene milling red B 

Yellow C 

Yellow 30 (for acetate silk). 
Yellow R (for acetate silk).. 

Zambesi black D 

Zambesi black F 

Zambesi black V 

Zambesi pure blue4BG 

Zapon blue G 



Color 

Index 

No. 



735 
833 
833 
833 



Page 



103 
104 
104 
104 
115 
115 
128 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
12S 



PART Y 

CENSUS OF SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 



139 



Part V 

CENSUS OF SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS OTHER 
THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN, 1925 



Introduction 



Beginning with 1921 the Tariff Commission has compiled an annual 
census of synthetic organic chemicals other than those of coal-tar 
origin. This census has shown, wherever the figures could be pub- 
lished without disclosing operations of the individual producer, the 
quantity of production and the quantity and value of sales. 

As the Bureau of the Census collects data for the more important 
noncoal-tar organic compounds, the commission has not attempted 
to collect statistics on such, except on a few compounds where the 
importance of the industry or the conditions appeared to warrant a 
departure from this practice. The present report follows the prece- 
dent established in 1921 of omitting certain types of compounds 
classifiable in three groups: (1) Aliphatic compounds derived from 
natural sources by isolation, distillation, extraction, hydrolysis, or 
purification. Examples of these are alkaloids, constituents of 
essential oils, sugars, and acids such as stearic and tartaric. (2) 
Cyanides, cyanamides, or carbides of metals or of inorganic radicals. 
(3) Products obtainable from other sources. 

Production Increases 

The production in 1925 of synthetic organic chemicals other than 
those derived from coal tar was 156,878,013 pounds, an increase of 
35 per cent over the output of 115,817,865 pounds in 1924. Sales in 
1925 amounted to 114,626,209 pounds, valued at $23,632,779. 

Expansion in the manufacture of this group is the outstanding 
feature of the progress made by the American chemical industry in 
1925. In addition to the increased output of a number of the more 
important products, a large variety of chemicals made only on a 
relatively small scale prior to 1925 were produced in substantial com- 
mercial quantities. Among the synthetic chemicals of noncoal-tar 
origin showing large gains in production in 1925 were acetaldehyde 
and aldol products used extensively in the preparation of rubber 
accelerators. 

organic solvents 

The consumption of esters and solvents by the pyroxylin plastics 
and lacquer industry has assumed a heavy tonnage per year, largely 
in response to the use of lacquers for painting automobiles. Many 
automobile manufacturers are using nitrocellulose lacquers exclu- 
sively for finishing their cars. This new field promises to open a 
large market for pyroxylin lacquer. The Department of Commerce 
reports that the industry has increased several fold since 1924. 

141 



142 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Another use now being made of lacquers is for inside house and 
furniture painting. For automobiles the lacquer is applied by the 
spray method, and for furniture by the brush method. 

Ethyl acetate. — This ester leads in quantity of production and in 
value of sales. The output in 1925 by 12 firms was 26,678,737 
pounds, a decline of less than 2 per cent from the previous year. 
Sales in 1925 were 19,126,636 pounds, valued at $2,096,789, or 11 
cents per pound. Reduced consumption may be explained in part 
by a shift in demand. The present pronounced trend toward the 
closed automobile, which uses textile fabrics other than artificial 
leather, has lessened the demand for ethyl acetate for artifical leather 
coating. Reduced consumption for this particular purpose has, 
however, been in part offset by the increased consumption as a solvent 
for lacquer. 

Butanol. — Butyl alcohol, consumed as a solvent in the lacquer 
and pyroxylin industries, recorded a large increase in output in 1925. 
It is made by the controlled fermentation of corn. In the form of 
the ester, butyl acetate, the quantity produced in 1925 was an increase 
of 132 per cent over 1924. Butyl acetate has, on account of its lower 
price, displaced amyl acetate to a considerable extent. The uncer- 
tainty of supplies of amyl alcohol has been a factor in the increased 
use of butyl acetate. 

Butyl acetate. — The 1925 output of butyl acetate was 16,472,914 
pounds. Sales amounted to 6,205,920 pounds, valued at $1,673,632, 

Amyl acetate. — The 1925 production of amyl acetate was 1,338,456 
pounds, a decrease of nearly 12 per cent from 1924, and of 58 per cent 
from 1923. 

Butyl propionate and ethyl lactate. — These esters recorded conspicu- 
ous increases in 1925. Figures can not be published, however, 
without disclosing the output of individual concerns. 

ETHYL GASOLINE AND TETRAETHYL LEAD 

Ethyl gasoline is ordinary gasoline with a tetraethyl lead content 
of about 0.06 per cent and an ethylene dibromide (a halogen carrier) 
content of about 0.04 per cent. By decreasing the reaction velocity 
of gasoline combustion, this compound so reduces the "knock" of 
the engine that it is possible to use an engine of a higher compression 
ratio and thereby to obtain a greater mileage per gallon of gasoline 
consumed. 

Other efficient antiknock compounds to replace tetraethyl lead in 
time probably may be discovered. Iron carbonyl has been tried in 
Germany, but it is reported to have several disadvantages, chief of 
which is iron oxide residues in the combustion chamber. The 
"benzol blends" are special gasolines made from crude oils containing 
naphthenes, or by cracking and refining processes. 

Since the chief reason for using antiknock compounds is to increase 
the mileage per gallon of gasoline through higher compression motors, 
it would appear that tetraethyl lead or satisfactory substitutes offer 
the greatest possibility of improvement in efficiency of internal- 
combustion motors. 

Production figures for ethyl gasoline in 1925 can not be published. 
During the period, July, 1924, to May, 1925, production of tetraethyl 
.lead was reported to be one and three-fourths million pounds. From 



NON-COAL-TAR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 143 

the date of the introduction of ethyl gasoline, February 1, 1923, until 
May 5, 1925, about 300,000,000 gallons were distributed. Ethyl gas- 
is again being marketed under the name of "Esso." 

Tetraethyl lead. — The manufacture of tetraethyl lead was dis- 
continued from May, 1924, to May, 1925, pending the report of a 
committee appointed by the Surgeon General of the Public Health 
Service to investigate the health hazard involved in its use. On 
January 17, 1926, the report of the committee was submitted to 
the Surgeon General, H. S. Gumming. It stated as one of several 
conclusions reached that "there are at present no good grounds for 
prohibiting the use of ethyl gasoline of the composition specified as a 
motor fuel, provided that its distribution and its use are controlled 
by proper regulations." 

XANTHATES AS FLOTATION AGENTS 

Potassium xanthate, which has had a phenomenal increase in the 
last two years, has to a great extent displaced many other flotation 
agents. Xanthates are used in sulfide ores containing copper, zinc, 
lead, silver, and gold, and their application has brought about a 
fundamental change in flotation practice and a reduction in metal 
cost. With a frothing oil or a pulp conditioner they serve as a col- 
lecting agent for concentration by the flotation process. 

The production of xanthates in 1923 and 1924 was relatively small 
compared with 1925. The consumption of potassium xanthate/ 
in copper ores increased from 63,963 pounds in 1923 to 252,155 
pounds in 1924. It was not listed among the silver-lead or the zinc 
and lead-zinc ore flotation reagents. As the unenumerated reagents 
total a relatively small figure, it is probable that the above figures 
represent almost the entire consumption in the two years. The 
1925 production returns place the xanthates among the leading syn- 
thetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin. Figures can not be 
published, however, without disclosing the confidential operations of 
individual firms. 

INVESTIGATION OF METHANOL UNDER SECTION 315 

Under the provisions of section 315 of the tariff act of 1922 the 
Tariff Commission on July 24, 1925, instituted an investigation to 
determine the differences between the foreign and domestic costs 
of production of methanol. Cost data were obtained from domestic 
producers but not from foreign. The one manufacturer of synthetic 
methanol in Germany, the principal competing country, refused to 
submit cost data to representatives of the commission. 

A preliminary statement of the information secured by the corn- 
mission in its investigation was issued on May 15, 1926, and a public 
hearing was held on June 17, 1926, in the offices of the commission 
at Washington. 

Imports of synthetic methanol from Germany in 1925 amounted 
to 508,409 gallons, or to about 8.5 per cent of domestic production. 
Measured quantitively imports were larger in 1925 than in any 
year since 1906 and exports (408,185 gallons) were smaller than in 
any year since 1913. Exports to Europe have practically ceased. 

• Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, "Consumption of Reagents used in Flotation, 1923-24." 



144 



CENSUS OP DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Domestic production of crude methanol in 1925, as reported to the 
Department of Commerce, was 7,651,125 gallons. The productive 
capacity of the United States is about 14,000,000 gallons per year. 
Domestic consumption in 1925 was about equal to production. 



OTHER PRODUCTS 

Carbon tetrachloride. — This product is used in dry cleaning, as a 
filler for fire extinguishers, and as a solvent. The 1925 production 
was 16,163,104 pounds, which was a gain of 13 per cent over 1924. 
Sales amounted to 13,081,623 pounds, valued at $752,785 — a sales 
value of 5.75 cents per pound as compared with 6.5 cents in 1924. 

Ether.— The output of ether, USP in 1925 was 5,355,050 pounds 
of which 4,411,892 pounds were sold for $1,356,617. The combined 
output of USP and technical ether in 1924 was 5,314,928 pounds. 
The consumption of ether for pharmaceutical and surgical purposes 
is more stable than for technical purposes; the latter use, however, is 
increasing. 

Ethylene and ethylene derivatives. — Chemicals in this group, in- 
cluding ethylene chlorohydrin, ethylene dichloride, and ethylene 
glycol, registered large gains in production as a result of new industrial 
applications. 

Formaldehyde. — The increased production of synthetic phenolic 
resins and Indigo is largely responsible for the greater consumption 
of formaldehyde. Production in 1925 was 31,455,716 pounds, an 
increase of more than 20 per cent over 1924. Sales amounted to 
23,391,634 pounds, valued at $1,895,913, a unit value of 8.1 cents 
as compared with 9.6 cents in 1924. 

Vanillin. — In value of production and sales this flavor ranks first 
among synthetic flavors. Production in 1925 was 315,344 pounds, 
a slight decrease from 1924. Sales amounted to 294,814 pounds, 
valued at $1,933,494. 

Other products. — Notable increases were recorded in the production 
of furfural, isopropyl alcohol, proprionic acid, succinic acid, and 
bromocamphor. 

Tablk 32. — Production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals of non-coal-tar 

origin, 1925 

(The numbers in the second column refer to the numbered alphabetical list of manufacturers printed on 
page 221. An X indicates that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his name in con- 
nection with the particular product. A blank in the third and fourth columns indicates that these 
sales can not be published without revealing information in regard to the sales of individual firms. 
A blank in the sixth column indicates that the production can not be published without revealing 
information in regard to the output of individual firms. The details thus withheld are, however, in- 
cluded in the totals.] 





Manufacturers' 
identification num- 
ber (according to 
list on p. 221) 


Sales 


Production 


Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Quantity 


Total 




Pounds 
114,626,209 


$23. 632, 779 


$0.21 


Poxmds 
156, 878. 013 




29, 63, 99, 143 




Acetaldehyde 










Acotamide 


58 










Acetin (mono) 


90, 172, X 










Aldehyde ammonia 


143 










Aldol (acetaldol) (b-hydroxy butyralde- 


29 










hyde) 
Allylisothiocyanate 


32, 127 











NON-COAL-TAR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



145 



Table 32. — Production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals oj non-coal-tar 

origin, 1926 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 
identification num- 
ber (according to 
list on p. 221) 


Sales 


Production 


Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 
per 

pound 


Quantity 


Alphozone (disuceinyl peroxide) 

Amyl acetate and sec amy! acetate 

Amyl alcohol and sec amyl alcohol 


158 


Pounds 






Pounds 


53, 66, 90, 98, 110, 
123, 172, 174, X, 
X, X, X 

63, 66, 90, 110, 144, 
172, X 

139 


801, 416 
131, 575 


$343,855 

55, 685 


$0.43 
.42 


1, 338, 456 
164, 990 




99 .. .. 












63 










Amytal (isoamylethylbarbituric acid).. 
Aubepine (anisaldehyde) .. .. 


96 










24, 63, 67, 86, 160, X 
1, 16,63,99 

16 


6,686 
8,676 


22.498 
253, 181 


3.36 
29.18 


5,891 


Barbital (veronal) (diethylbarbituric 

acid) 
Barbital sodium (diethylbarbituric acid 

sodium salt) 


7,622 


119 










Brometone (tribromotertiarybutyl al- 
cohol) 


X 










52, 99 . 












16 










Bromural (bromoisovaleryl urea) 

Butanol (Sec n-butyl alcohol.) 

Butyl acetate (n and sec) 


125 










53, 63, 66, 68, 90, 
98, 110, 172, 174, 
X 

X X 


6,205,920 


1, 673, 632 


.27 


16,472,914 








29 












58 












139 












58, 162 












90, 180 












115 












123, 180 












99 












63, 99, 123 










Carbon tetrachloride . . 


23, 52, 58, i21, 179.. 
58 


13, 081, 623 


752,786 


.06 


16, 163, 104 








16 












107, 111 










Chloretone (trlchlorotertiarybutyl al- 
cohol) 


X 










52, 53, HI 












16 










(tannin yeast combination) 


16 










Chloroform _ 

Citronellal— 


18,23,52, X 

167 


1, 265, 432 


283,122 


.22 


1,305,868 


Citronellol... 


61, 63, 86 








676 


Citronellyl acetate 


61, 63, 160 










Crotonaldehyde 


29 












16 












63 










Decyl aldehyde 


63 X 












X 












16 












90 










n-Dibutylamine 


1, 58 












29 










Diethylacetic acid 


16 










Diethylbarbituric acid. (See Barbital.) 
Diethylbromoacetyl bromide (bromo 

acid). 
Diethyl malonate (malonic ester) 


16 










16 










1, 16, 162 










Diethyl sulfate 


29 










Diethylene glycol 


29 












63 












63 










Dihvdroxytartaric acid 


27, 134 .. 










Diiodohydroxypropane 


16 










Dimethylglyoxime 


58, 162 












16 










Dithrofuroic acid 


139 










Duodecyl alcohol 


63.""". I. '"."I. 











146 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 32. — Production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals of non-coal-tar 

origin, 1925 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 
identification num- 
ber (according to 
list on p. 221) 


Sales 


Productioi* 


Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Quantity 


Duodecyl aldehyde 


63 


Pounds 






Pounds 


Erucicacid 


16 










Ethoxyacetic acid 


16 










Ethyl acetate (85 per cent) ... 


53, 63, 64, 66, 98, 
110, 172, 174, X, 
X, X, X. 

172 


19, 126, 636 


$2, 096, 789 


$0.11 


26, 678, 737 


Ethyl acotoacetate 


Ethyl bromide 


16, 52, 53, 99, 184... 










Ethyl butyrate 


25, 66, 68, 123, 172, 

X, X. 
123 










Ethyl n-caproate. 










Ethyl carbonate 


172 










Ethyl chloride 


52, 53, 66, 67, 72, 
99, 143, 172, X, 
X. 

172 










Ethyl chloroacetate 










Ethyl ether, tech 


53, X 










Ethyl ether, USP... 


99, 136, 157, 172, X. 
63, 99, 123, 172, X.. 
139 


4,411,892 
3,058 


1,356,617 
2,211 


.31 
.72 


6, 355, 050 
3,446 


Ethyl formate. 


Ethyl furoate 




Ethyl glycolic acid ester of menthol 


16 










Ethyl heptoate 


68... 










Ethyl iodide 


58,99,107, 136,162. 

63,68, 123, X 

63, 68, 172. 


215 
281 


1,439 
837 


6.69 
2.98 


129 


Ethyl isovalerate 


360 


Ethyl lactate. 




Ethyl laurate 


63,68,162. 










Ethyl malonate (mono). 


1,63 










Ethyl nitrite.. 


66,99, 136, X. 

63, 123, X 


62, 738 


.32, 207 


.51 


69, 530 


Ethyl oenanthate 


Ethyl oxalate 


63,172 










Ethyl pelargonate 


25, 63, X 










Ethyl propionate 


63,66, X 










Ethyl n-valerate 


63,66 










Ethylene 


172 










Ethylene bromide 


99. 










Ethylene chlorohydrin 


29 










Ethylene dichloride 


29 










Ethylene glycol 


29 










Ethylene glycol methyl ether 


29... 










Ethylene oxide 


29 










Eugenol 


68 










Eugenol methyl ether. (See Methyl 

eugenol.) 
Formaldehyde 




49,81,124,143, X... 
177 


23,391,634 


1,895,913 


.08 


31,455,716 


Formic acid (65 percent) 




FuracrUate 


139 










Fm-furacetone 


139 










Furfuramide 


139.. 










Furfuran (furan) 


139 










Furfural 


139. 










Furfuryl chloride 


139.. 










Furoicacid 


139 










Furyl acetate 


139 










Furyl alcohol (furan carbinol) 


139... 










Gallic acid 


68,99,185 . . 








550, 604 


Qeranyl acetate 


24, 61, 63, 86, 160, 

X,X. 
61,63,86 










Qeranyl butyrate 


25 
29 


202 
171 


8.08 
5.90 


39 


Qeranyl formate 


61,63,86,160 

61,63 


37 


Geran vl propionate. 




Glycerol diacetate 


67 










Glycerophosphoric acid and salts 


111,124 










Glycol diacetate 


29 










Guaiacol acetate 


63 










Quauidine sulfate 


16 










Heliotropin 


24,63,67 










Heptadecyl aldehyde.. 


63 








Heptaldehyde 


63,68,115 










n-Heptyl alcohol 


68,63 












63 










Hexadecyl aldehyde 


63 . 










Hexadecyl ketone 


63 










Hexamethylenetetramine 


81, 124, 143, X 


1,606,286 


994, 458 


.66 


1, 657, 993 



NON-COAL-TAR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



147 



Table 32. — Production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals oj non-coal-tar 

origin, 1925 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 
identification num- 
ber (according to 
list on p. 221.) 


Sales 


Production 


Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

poimd 


Quantity 


Hexamethylenetetramineanhydro- 


16 


Pounds 






Pounds 


methylene citrate, 
flydroxycitronellbl 


167 










Jodobeheuate of calcium 


16 










lodobelienate of iron basic 


16 










lodobehenic acid 


16 










Iodoform 


99, 107, 118, 136.— 
24, 63, 86, 105, X... 
25, 63, 66, 68, 123, X. 
63,68, 123 


13,033 

17,805 
8,507 


$76,244 
84,126 
11,114 


$5.85 
4.72 
1.31 


12,425 
21 480 


lonone 


Jsoamyl butyrate 


Q 450 


Isoamyl formate-.. 




Isoamyl iso valerate.. 


63,68, 123. 










Isoamyl nitrite 


162. 










Isobutyl acetate 


63,68,123,172 

172... 


181 


335 


1.85 


210 


Isobutvl alcohol 




Isobutyl butyrate 


&3, 123 










Isobutvl formate 


63, 123 










Isobutyl propionate 


63 










Isobutyraldehyde 


63 










Isobutyric acid. 


123 










Isoeupenol 


24, 61, 63, 86, 176... 
118... 


2,644 


9.952 


3.76 




Isomenthol... 




Isopropanol (isopropyl alcohol) 


29, 127, 172, X, X-. 










Isopropvl acetate 


63, 68, 172 








43 


Isovaleric acid 


123, X. . 










Jasmone ketone. 


63 










Lactic acid 


53, X 










Lactic acid, edible 


53 










Linalvl acetate 


61, 63, 86, 160, X,X. 
63 


917 


7,233 


7.89 


954 


Linalyl butvrate 




Xinalyl formate 


61, 63,160... 










Linalvl propionate... 


63 










Linalvl valerate 


63 










Methvl acetate. 


24, X 










Methyl n-butyrate 


63,123 










Methyl chloride 


143 










Methvl eut;enol 


61,63,160.. 


33 


246 


7.45 


51 


Methvl formate.. 


172 




Methvl furoate 


139 










Methyl isoeugenol 

Methvl oxalate 


160 










63 










TVTethvl propionate.. 


63 










Methyl sulfate 


X 










Methylene citric acid , 


16... 










Methvlnonvlacetic aldehyde 


63 










Neonal (butyl ethvl barbituric acid) 


1 










Nerol 


175. - 










Nonvl alcohol 


63 










Nnnvl al'iehvde 


63.. 










sec-Octvl acetate 


63 










Octodecvl alcohol 


63 










OctodecA'l aldehyde 


63 










Octodecvl ketone 


63 










Octvl alcohol ,- 


160 










n-Octvl alcohol fcapryl alcohol). 


63 










sec-Octyl alcohol 


63, X 










Octyl aldehyde 

Octvl formate 


63, 86, X 


8 


435 


54.38 


12 


leo 




Oxalic arid. 


126,177 






\ 


Paracetaldehvde 


29 










Paraformaldehyde . 


81,143 










Piperonone (piperinic ketone) 


63 


l_. 






Piperonone vanillone 


63 










Propionaldehvde 


63 












180 











n- Propyl acetate 


63 












127,172 










Propyl furoate 


139 










Propyl oenanthate 


63 










n-Propvl propionate 


63 










Propylene chlorohvdrin 


1 29 










Propvlene dichloride .. .. 


! 29 










Propvlene plvcol 


29 










IPropylene oxide 


' 29 











148 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 32. — Production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals of non-coal-tar 

origin, 1925 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 
identification num- 
ber (according to 
list on p. 221) 


Sales 


Production 


Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Quantity 


Pyrogallol (pyrogallic acid) 


58,99,185 


Pounds 






Pounds 
174, 251 


Pyruvic acid 


27 










Research chemicals 


58,156. 










Rhodinol 


24, 61, 63, 86, 160, 

167, 175, X. 
63,160 


4,609 


74,524 


16.17 


5,184 


Rhodiny 1 acetate 




Rhodinyl butyrate 


63 










Rhodinyl formate 


160 










Succinic acid 


99,111 










Tannigen (tannyl acetate) (acetic acid 


16 










ester of tannic acid). 
Terpineol .- . 


24, 119, 154, X 

136,176 


157, 626 


47, 169 


.30 




Terpin hydrate 




Terpiny 1 acetate 


24, 63, 86, 160, X,X. 
63 


9,505 


11, 102 


1.17 


17, 16a 


Terpinyl butyrate 




s-Tetrachloroethane - - . 


29,143 










Tetradecyl alcohol 


63 










Tetradecj'l aldehyde 


63 











63 




i: 






53- 




1 """" 




Tetramethylthiouramsulfide 


115 




\ 




Tetramethylthiouramdisulflde 


115 










Triacetin 


90,172 










Trichloroethylene . . 


29,52,143 










Trieth y Itrimeth vlenetriamine 


115 












1 




:::::::::::::::::: 






58. 












63 










Vanillic alcohol 


63 










Vanillin 


24,67,105,111,176.. 
63. 


294, 814 


1,933,494 


6.56 


315,344 


Vanillyl vanillate . . 






61 












73,76, 115, X 










Zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate 


115 










All other synthetic organic chemicals . 


162 























NON-COAL-TAR SYNTHETIC OEGANIC CHEMICALS 



149 



Table 33. — Imports and ■production of certain synthetic organic chemicals of 
non-coal-tar origin, 1924 and 1925 



Name of chemical 



Aeetaldehyde 

Paracetaldehyde 

Aldehyde ammonia 

Chloral hydrate 

Formaldehyde solution (not more 

than 40 per cent) 

Hexamethylenetetramine-- 

Acetic or pyroligneous acid, con- 
taining by weight not more than 

65 per cent acetic acid 

More than 65 per cent acetic acid. 

Formic acid... 

Gallic acid.- 

Lactic acid, containing by weight 
55 per cent or more of lactic acid- 
Oxalic acid 

PyrogaUic acid 

Butyl alcohol 

Methanol 

Carbon tetrachloride 

Chloroform 

Glycerophosphoric acid, and salts 

and compounds 

Ethers and esters: 

Containing not more than 10 
per cent alcohol — 

Ethyl ether 

Ethyl chloride 

Amyl acetate 

Amyl nitrate 

Ethyl acetate 

Other n. s. p. f 

Containing more than 50 per 

cent alcohol 

Tetrachloroethane 

Trichloroethylene 

Urea 

Thymol 

Vanillin 



1924 



Imports 



Pounds Value 



132, 344 

680, 870 

20 

1 



3,826 



371, 732 
1, 202, 525 
1, 532, 798 



75, 018 

3, 135, 664 

11 

404, 882 

148 



45, 280 



73 
13, 016 



$22, 493 
120,346 



3,998 



27, 080 
143, 904 
121, 431 



17,523 
177, 641 

21 
97,861 

29 



101 
57,440 



Production 



Pounds 



278, 967 



26, 155, 175 
1,288,034 



550, 378 



238, 587 



1 6, 897, 589 

14,275,057 

1,301,492 



253 
15, 892 

22 

216, 585 

254, 743 

94,307 

13, 695 



109 5, 314, 928 
16, 626 851, 303 

1, 514, 123 



39 
8,438 

103 

7,079 

9,958 

12, 891 

34,424 



27, 222, 761 



320, 242 



1925 



Imports 



Pounds 



267, 023 

808, 049 

2,694 

3,097 



20,771 



362, 214 
2, 059, 185 
1, 487, 149 



119,396 
2, 569, 275 



2, 142, 092 
1 508, 409 

7 
15 

49, 528 



23 

9,174 

20, 534 

15 

12, 759 

111,169 

7,069 

375, 129 

77,602 

146, 438 

33, 039 

684 



Value 



$41,790 

124,363 

1,032 

3,147 

16 
10, 453 



29, 130 
232, 950 
105, 155 



37, 086 
117,639 



402, 770 

231,086 

2 

14 

54, 576 



43 
9,847 
7,160 

99 

2,150 

28, 148 

14, 122 
13, 740 

3,519 
15, 886 
88,490 

1,274 



Production 



Pounds 



31,455,716 
1, 657, 993 



550,604 



174, 251 



1 7, 651, 125 

16, 163, 104 

1, 305, 868 



5, 355, 050 
"i,'338,"456 
'26," 678," 737 



315,344 



> Oallons. 



PART VI 
INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 

5919— 26t 11 151 



Part VI 
INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 

Introduction 

Germany's domination of the world's dye trade prior to the Great 
War and pre-war conditions in the dye industries of Switzerland, 
Great Britain, France, and the United States have been reviewed in 
previous commission reports. As the war progressed German stocks. 
on hand in the various dye-consuming countries became exhausted^ 
and certain of the belligerent powers — Great Britain, France, and 
the United States — undertook the manufacture of dyes and inter- 
mediates on a large scale. Italy and Japan developed smaller indus- 
tries, and Switzerland expanded her dye manufacturing. Consider- 
ing the dye industry a key industry, certain industrial nations have.- 
enacted special tariff legislation and adopted other stimulative meas- 
ures to protect and encourage dye manufacture. 

As a result of the war-time stimulus to dye making and subsequent 
progress in the industry, the world's capacity to produce has nearly 
doubled since 1914, and severe competition has arisen in interna- 
tional markets as well as in certain home markets. Plants are oper- 
ating below capacity at increased costs, and it is likely that within. 
the next few years competition will eliminate many of them. 

Germany is now making every effort to win back dye markets 
which were lost to her during the World War and to that end has 
established branch plants, formed affiliations with existing plants in. 
foreign countries, and consolidated certain foreign sales agencies. 
She is attacking the export trade of the newer producing countries 
by price cutting in their home markets as well as in the markets of 
nonproducing countries. The factors which will eventually de- 
termine what countries are to survive this era of competition are (1) 
costs of production, (2) availability of raw materials, (3) cost and 
efficiency of labor and the maintenance of technical staffs, (4) ef- 
ficiency of selling organizations, (5) sufficient capital without excessive) 
capitalization, and (6) ability to give prompt and efficient technical 
service to consumers. In contrast to the close cooperation existing: 
among dye manufacturers in the home markets of Germany and 
Switzerland is the sharp competition in the new producing countries. 

DEVELOPMENTS IN 1925 

From an international standpoint, the principal developments in 
1925 were (1) the merger of six German dye firms into a supertrust,. 
(2) the consolidation of the foreign dye sales agencies of the German, 
firms, (3) a continuance of the large excess capacity to produce dyes,. 
(4) severe competition in world dye markets, (5) the adoption of" 
special protective measures by certain dye-producing countries, (6)i 
increase in the German export trade, (7) internal developments of 
interest in several of the new dye-producing countries, (8) a trend! 
toward lower prices in the world markets, and (9) additions in the 
variety of fast dyes and of dyes made specially for the dyeing of 
acetate silk. 

153 



154 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



WORLD CAPACITY STILL EXCEEDS CONSUMPTION 

As in 1924 the dye plants of all countries operated below their 
capacity in 1925.^ The world's productive capacity has been esti- 
mated to exceed 600,000,000 pounds, or nearly double the pre-war 
capacity. There has been, however, an increase in the world's 
requirements which is probably greater than is indicated by the 
increase in population, for there is a distinct trend toward an increased 
per capita consumption. The competitive situation resulting from 
this excess capacity has led to price reductions and to the elimination 
of a few "producers. Ultimately many firms will cease to compete, 
for they can not continue to operate under capacity on a profitable 
scale. The subsidies, embargoes, and other protective measures 
adopted by the various producing nations have enabled an appre- 
ciable number to continue operations beyond what would have been 
their normal life. Since dye manufacture is regarded by modern 
industrial nations as a key industry, fewer producers will not mean 
a return to pre-war capacity. 

Table 34 shows production data for dyes from 1920 to 1925, 
inclusive. 



Table 34. — -Production of dyes by the chief -producing countries, 1920-1925 



Country 


1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 




Pounds 
165, 000, 000 
86, 343, 348 
36, 000, 000 
18, 000, 000 
35, 000, 000 


Pounds 
159, 549, 096 
68, 679, 000 
33, 242. 704 
21, 000, 000 
33, 020, 499 


Pounds 
144, 859, 572 
93, 667, 524 


Pounds 
192, 806, 564 
64, 632, 187 
21, 000. 000 
18. 000, 000 
17, 782, 303 
10, 812, 824 


Pounds 
116,442,116 
39, 008, 690 


Pounds 
103, 368, 804 


United States ' 


88, 263, 776 




45, 000, 000 


Switzerland < 


20, 000, 666 
24, 180, 052 


12, 000, 000 
12, 938, 797 
7, 918, 972 
12,606,452 


26, 000, 000 


France ' 


15, 555, 657 


Italy' 


4, 458, 692 






18, 631, 000 


13,457,735 


8,016,879 











• From the monthly reports containing the one-quarter monthly German production of dyes made to the 
Reparation Commission. These reports covered the period February, 1920, to December, 1924, inclusive. 
1925 estimates from German Chemical Developments, 1925, Department of Commerce. 

' From annual Census of Dyes and Other Synthetic Organic Chemicals, by United, States Tarifl Commis- 
sion. 

» Estimates for year 1920, Report on Dyes and Dyestufls subcommittee appointed by the Standing 
Committee on Trusts, printed and published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921. For 1924, 
prepared by Dyestufls Industry Development Committee from voluntary returns of British dye firms. 
Taken from the Chemical Trade Journal and Chemical Engineer; Oct. 9, 1925, p. 417. For 1925, from the 
Chemical Age, Jan. 9, 1925, p. 4. 

« Production figures are calculated on the basis that the home market consumes 10 per cent of the output 
of Swiss dyes; exports consequently equal 90 per cent of the production. 

• L'Industrie Chimique April, 1924. Does not include output of Swiss plant at St. Fous, except for 1925 

• Trade Information Bulletin No. 234, Department of Commerce. 

' Trade Information Bulletin No. 217, Department of Commerce. 1924 estimate for 1 year August. 1923, 
to September. 1924 from Janan Advertiser Mar. 26. 1925. 

EXPORTS FROM PRODUCING COUNTRIES 

TaHe 35 shows dye exports from the chief producing countries 
for 1913 and 1921 to 1925. The German exports in 1925 show a 
43 per cent increase by value and a 24 per cent increase by quan- 
tity. By value they were 85 per cent and by quantity 32 per cent 
of the 1913 figure. This decline by quantity is accounted for by the 
loss of trade in the low-priced bulk colors and the relatively sniall 
decline in value is due to heavy exports of high-priced types, in which 
field she has encountered relatively small competition. 



« See Census of Dyes, 1923, Table 20, p. 124. 



INTEENATIOXAL DYE TRADE 



155 



The exports in 1925 of the United States show a 64 per cent in- 
crease by quantity and an increase of only 18 per cent by value. 
This is explained by the heavy exports of indigo and certain other 
bulk colors which comprise most of the dyes exported in that coun- 
try. The price levels for the bulk colors in 1925 were considerably 
lower than in the previous year. The exports from Switzerland, 
Italy, and Japan recorded a decline. In the case of Switzerland the 
exports of indigo show a conspicuous recession, while the exports of 
other dyes show a slight gain for that year. 



Table 35. 



-Exports of coal-tar dyes from chief producing countries, 1913 and 
1921-1925 



Exported from- 



Pounds 



Value 



1921 



Pounds 



Value 



Germanv 

United States. 
Great Britain- 
Switzerland... 

France 

Italv 



239, 598, 133 



$51, 689, 400 



48, 304, 991 



5, 451, 376 
19. 458, 902 
1. 152, 134 : 
117,725 I 



862, 566 

5, .549, 752 

275, 716 

22,458 



7, 621. 600 

10, 779, 612 

5, 947, 131 

607. 812 



$15, 935, 585 

6, 270, 139 

5, 033, 828 

11,654,516 

1, 608, 308 

274,128 



Exported from- 



1922 



Pounds 



Value 



1923 



Pounds 



Value 



Germany 

United States. 
Great Britain . 
Switzerland... 

France 

Italy 

Japan 



114, 213, 300 

8. 344, 187 

3, 860, 416 

16, 167, 655 

1, 502, 431 

372, 578 



$79, 826, 618 

3, 996, 443 

2, 300. 298 

13. 042, 635 

1, .586, 492 

254, 250 



73, 974, 473 

17. 924, 200 
9. 247, 504 

18, 282, 967 

4, 650, 382 

647, 712 

2, 296, 327 



$41,580,742 
17, 125, 528 
5, 565, 267 
3, 635, 058 
12, 253, 711 
3, 749, 442 
548, 481 
396, 397 



Exported from — 



1925 



Pounds 



Value 



Pounds 



Value 



Germanv I 61,033,911 

United States i 15,713,428 

Great Britain 6,622,896 

Switzerland I 19,015,998 

France... ' 10,604, 126 

Italy ' 541,009 

Japan 1 1,899,495 



$30,936,462 ' 75,879,025 



5, 636, 244 

3,052,911 

12, 138, 346 

7, 508, 787 

276, 793 

283,179 



25, 799, 889 

(>) 
16,161,041 
10, 784, 463 

426, 810 
1, 685, 704 



$44,311,155 

6, 694, 360 
(') 

11,979,718 

7, 469, 903 
295, 702 
214, 418 



• Board of trade returns, published Jan. 15, 1926, the Chemical Trade Journal and Chemical Engineer, 
p. 73, show for "Dyestufls, coal tar," 7,931,728 pounds in 1924 and 4,438,224 pounds in 1925. 

IMPORTS INTO CONSUMING COUNTRIES 



The new dye-producing nations show a big drop in imports in 
1925 as compared with 1913, when they were largely dependent 
upon Germany and Switzerland. The United States' and Great 
Britain's imports in 1925 were less than 12 per cent of the 1913 
figures, while Italy was less than 30 per cent. Comparing the 1925 
with the 1924 totals, however, the United States and Germany 
showed a conspicuous gain in imports, while Great Britain, Japan, 
France, Canada, Italy, and Austria showed a decline. Imports of 



156 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEK SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



coal-tar dyes into the important consuming countries are summarized 
in Table 36. 

Table 36. — Imports of coal-tar dyes into chief consuming countries in 1924 and 1925 



Imported into— 


1924 


1925 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


China. 


1 83, 820, 571 
3, 022, 539 

7, 931, 728 

2, 784, 851 
16. 420, 851 

6. 033, 770 

17, 564, 055 

786, 160 

5, 394, 653 

3, 502, 621 
2, 314, 435 

509, 483 
1, 938, 725 
3, 008, 426 

8, 765, 864 
5, 491, 659 


$31, 277, 498 
2, 908, 778 

5, 898, 957 
2, 752. 321 
7. 834, 399 
2, 373, 288 

6, 689, 552 
431, 142 

5, 987, 007 
2, 121. 705 
1, 450, 375 






United States 


5, 209. 601 
4, 438, 224 
1.954,818 

18, 460, 831 
4-, 856, 955 

6, 740, 449 
3, 689, 177 
3, 201, 519 
2, 343, 047 


$4, 637, 240 


Great Britain 


3, 123, 858 


Austria " - . 


949, 131 


British India ^ . . . . _ 


8, 359, 488 


Italy 


1, 985, 695 


Japan . 


3, 401, 3.53 




1, 918, 939 


France - 


2, 885, 144 


Canada 2 


1, 492, 909 


Sweden 




Spain 3 






Switzerland . . 


i, 155, 876 


1, 804, 906 


1, 218, 941 






Czechoslovakia . 


5. 012, 890 
2, 175, 482 






Netherlands. . . . 













' Exclusive of aniline dyes. 



2 Years ended March 31. 



3 First six months. 



INCREASE IN THE GERMAN EXPORT TRADE 

In view of Germany's supremacy in the world's export trade in 
dyes and the vital relation of this trade to her industrial life, the 
trend of her exports year by year is of the utmost significance. The 
1925 export of 75,879,025 pounds, valued at $44,311,155, represented 
an increase of more than 24 per cent by quantity and nearly 43 per 
cent by value over 1924. 

The world dye markets may be divided into two groups, namely, 
that of producing nations and that of nonproducing nations. The 
increased participation of Germany in the trade of both groups is 
notable, particularly in the United States, Great Britain, Italy, and 
Russia — nations that are classed as producing. Japan's embargo 
was effective in that it greatly reduced exports from Germany in 
1925. Germany has in general since the World War steadily in- 
creased her trade with the nonproducing nations, but on certain ton- 
nage dyes she is now encountering competition from the United 
States, Great Britain and France, as well as from her former com- 
petitor, Switzerland. To meet this competition she has reorganized 
her home industry and consolidated her foreign selling agencies. 

Table 37 affords a comparison of Germany's export trade since 
the war with its pre-war status. 

Table 37. — Exports of coal-tar dyes from Germany, 1913 and 1920-1925 





Year 


Pounds 


Value 


• 
1913 


239, 598, 133 
61,140,171 
48,304,991 

115,974.900 
73,974,473 
61, 033, 911 
75,879,025 


$51,666,168 


1920.. 


53, 002, 407 


1921 1. 


15,935,585 


1922.. 


80,781,892 


1923 


41,580,742 


1924 


30, 933, 368 


1925 


44,311,155 







» May to December. 



inteenational. dye tbadb 157 

The Dye Industry of Germany * 

developments in 1925 

The year 1925 was marked by an organized effort on the part of 
the German dye industry to regain the country's former prestige in 
the world's dye markets. The instrumentalities through which it is 
planned to wrest back from the new producing countries export trade 
lost during the World War are (1) a merger of six large concerns, 
with the object of reducing manufacturing costs, and (2) the con- 
solidation of foreign sales agencies — a further change in the inter- 
ests of economy. 

NEW MERGER OF DYE FIRMS 

After months of negotiations one of the greatest consolidations in 
the history of German finance was effected in 1925. This amalga- 
mation,^ the third of its kind in the industrial development of the 
country, had for its object the recovery of export markets, lost to 
the new dye-producing countries, particularly the United States, 
Great Britain, France, Japan, and Italy. The markets before the 
war were dominated by German dyes. The excess capacity to pro- 
duce, the high interest rates and taxes, reduction in profits, and 
costly duplication of effort were other factors which favored the 
German consolidation. The primary purpose of the new fusion was 
to reduce production costs, through the elimination of duplication 
in manufacture and research work and to permit a more favorable 
buying of raw materials and more advantageous selling of finished 
products. It is expected that the interests involved will be greatly 
strengthened and in a more favorable position to meet foreign 
competition. 

This merger is known as the Interessen Gemeinschaft Teerfarben 
Industrie A. G. It was approved at the stockholders' meeting at 
Frankfort-on-Main November 28, and is retroactive to January 1, 
1925. It affects the following six firms: 

Actien-Gesellschaft fiir Anilin-Fabrikation, Berlin. 

Badische Anilin-und-Soda-Fabrik, Ludwigshafen-on-the-Rhine. 

Farbenwerke, vormals Meister Lucius & Briming, Hochst-on-the- 
Main. 

Farbenfabriken, vormals Friedr. Bayer & Co., Leverkusen-on- 
the-Rhine. 

Chemische Fabrik Griesheim-Electron, Offenbach-on-the-Main. 

Chemische Fabriken, vormals Weiler ter Meer, Uerdingen-on-the 
Rhine. 

The Kalle and Cassella firms are not included in the consolida- 
tion, but it is reported that they will eventually be taken in. The 
stock of the former is, however, held by the Hochst Co., and the 
latter is controlled by the I. G. 

The new corporation is capitalized as follows: Common stock, 
641,600,000 gold marks; preferred stock, 4,400,000 gold marks. 
This is said to be the heaviest capitalization of any industrial enter- 
prise in Germany. The common stock capital of all firms was 

' See also Census of Dyes, 1922, pp. 151-157; Census of Dyes, 1923, pp. 126-133, 156-167; and Census of 
Dyes, 1924, pp. 145-147. 

3 Commerce reports, Jan. 11, 1925, pp. 89-91; Daugherty, W. T., trade commissioner, "Developments 
in the German chemical industry during 1925." 



158 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

acquired by the Badische, which becomes the Interessen Gemein- 
schaft Teerfarben Industrie, A. G., with headquarters at Frankfort- 
on-Main. The principal executives are Dr. Carl Bosch, former 
head of the Badische, and Geheimrat Duisberg, former head of the 
Bayer Co. 

It is expected that one of the ultimate consequences of centralized 
control will be a reallocation of production. The report is that the 
Badische will specialize on the manufacture of (1) fixed nitrogen, 
the output of which has been expanded to 400,000 tons per year, 
since the introduction of the Haber Bosch process at Oppau; (2) 
synthetic organic chemicals such as methanol, butanol, etc.; (3) 
certain heavy chemicals. The Farbenwerke, vormals Meister 
Lucius and Brlining, at Hochst, will probably produce dyes exclu- 
sively; the Bayer Co., pharmaceuticals; Agfa of Berlin, photo- 
chemicals with a joint interest in the new artificial silk plant (acetate 
silk) at Berlin-Lichterfelde ; the Griesheim plant, electro-chemical 
products, including industrial gases, in association with the Vereinigte 
Sauerstoff Werk of Berlin. 

AMALGAMATION OF FOREIGN SALES AGENCIES 

An important step in the interest of economy on the part of the 
German industry has been the amalgamation of the various branch 
offices into a single agency in each of the following countries: Great 
Britain, Belgium, Holland, Russia, Japan, Mexico, Canada, Czecho- 
slovakia, the United States, and Switzerland. 

In the United States. — The merger of the sales agencies of the 
I. G. into one concern — the General Dyestuff Corporation — which 
also handles the products of the plants of the Grasselli Dyestuff 
Corporation and the Consolidated Color and Chemical Co., will 
influence to a marked degree the competitive situation in the mar- 
kets of the United States. 

In Canada.* — The Consolidated Dyestuff Corporation (Ltd.) 
has been incorporated with an authorized capitalization of $1,000,000 
for the purpose of merging the business of six^ firms in Canada 
holding the exclusive representation of eight ^ German manufac- 
tures. 

The officers of the Consolidated Dyestuff Corporation (Ltd.) are: 
President, Alfred Pollack, who has been engaged in the dyestuff 
business in Canada for 35 years and is at present the head of the firm 
of Pollack Bros. & Co. (Ltd.), agents for Farbwerke vormals Meister 
Lucius and Briining, Hochst a/Main; vice president, John Irwin, 
formerly assistant manager of Brandram-Henderson (Ltd.) and now 
president of McArthur, Irwin (Ltd.), paint manufacturers and im- 
porters of and dealers in dyestuff s and chemicals; secretary-treasurer, 
Gustav Stoecker, who has been a director of Rubinovich and Haskell, 
importers and exporters; Otto Palm, a director and manager of the 

* Department of Commerce, World Trade Notes on Coal-Tar Products, No. 76-B. 

''Canada Colors and Chemicals (Ltd.), Toronto, Ontario; Grasselli DyestulT Corporation (Ltd.), 
Toronto, Ontario; *KuttrolI, Pickhardt & Co., Montreal; *McArthur, Irwin (Ltd.), Montreal; Pollack 
Bros. & Co. (Ltd.), Montreal; 'Rubinovich and Haskell (Ltd.), Montreal. '(Dyestuff department 
only.) 

Aktien-Gesellschaft fiir Anilin-Fabrikation, Berlin, Germany; Badische Anilin und Sodafabrik, 
Ludwigshafen a/Rhein; Farbcnfabriken, vorm. Friedrich Bayer & Co., Leverkusen; Leopold Cassella 
Co., G. m. b. H., Frankfort, a/Main; Chemische Fabrik Griesheim-Elektron, Frankfort a/Main; Kalle & 
Co., Bierbrich a/Rhein; Farbwerke, vorm. Meister Lucius & Briining, Hochst a/Main; Chemische 
Fabriken, vorm. Weiler-ter-Meer, Uerdinger a/Rhine. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 159 

Toronto office, formerly manager of the Grasselli Dyes tuff Cor- 
poration (Ltd.); Maj. R. R. Carr-Harris, a member of the Toronto 
advisory committee and general manager of Canada Colors and 
Chemicals (Ltd.)- 

The agreement between the German manufacturers and their North 
American representatives, now merged into the Consolidated Dye- 
stuff Corporation (Ltd.), conveys to the latter the sole right of im- 
portation into Canada and Newfoundland of dyestuffs, intermediates, 
and auxiliary products of these German concerns. 

The reasons given for the merger are: (1) It is a logical'sequence of 
the combination of the eight German manufacturers mentioned 
above; (2) it minimizes German competition; (3) it decreases over- 
head expenses; and (4) it makes possible the creation of a very 
efficient service to dyestuffs users. 

A complete stock of dyes will be carried in Montreal, where the 
head office of the organization will be located in the Road Building, 
A branch office has been established at 40 Colborne Street, Toronto. 
The laboratory will contain the latest scientific dyestuff testing 
apparatus. Its several divisions will specialize in textile, paper, 
leather, and lakes. 

In other countries. — The Teerfarben A. G. of Zurich, with capital 
stock of 500,000 Swiss francs, has taken over the representation of 
the I. G. in Switzerland. 

In Holland the I. G. interests are consolidated in the Defa Maat- 
schappy voor Verfstoffen Handel at Arnheim. 

In Italy the I. G. has acquired interests in dye production and is 
well entrenched. 

In Russia a sales contract has been made between the I. G. of the 
Russgertog for the delivery of 2,000,000 kilos of dyes to the Soviets 
and for the maintenance of stocks in warehouses and for the train- 
ing of native chemists. Although the terms of this agreement were 
not completed, it is reported that a commercial pact was made in 
1925 between Germany and Russia which will result in increased 
trade with Russia. German dye exports to Russia in 1913 were 
4,102,760 pounds, valued at $1,929,420. 

The different sales offices of the members of the German Dye 
Cartel, in Prague, Bruenn, and Reichenback, the principal textile 
centers, are said to have been reorganized and centralized. There 
are now three large sales offices handling the products of the German 
I. G. for the Czechoslovakian market. 

In Great Britain the I. G. has organized a limited company with 
headquarters at Manchester. This is considered an important 
preliminary in the plans of the I. G. to regain a share of their British 
trade lost during the war. 

In Australia the German dye trust is reported to have purchased 
a site for a factory at Sunshine, near Melbourne," and to have installed 
£26,000 worth of machinery. 

German dye manufacturers,^ heretofore represented by individual 
agencies in Mexico, have consolidated their dye-sales outlet in a new 
company, known as the Cia. General de Anilinas, with offices in 
Mexico City. The sales of industrial chemicals manufactured by 
the members of the German dye cartel has been taken over by the 

' Department of Commerce, World Trade Notes on Coal-Tar Products, No. 79-B. 
• Department of Commerce Reports, June 14, 1926. 

5919— 26t 12 



160 CEISTBUS OE DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Fabricas Unidas, up to this time the representative of the Agfa Co. 
Wescott y Cia., the former representative of Bayer, will handle all 
pharmaceutical preparations produced by companies in the cartel. 

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS IN 1925 

Little progress was made in 1925 toward concluding international 
agreements. Efforts to arrange terms between the I. G. and Japanese 
producers proved unsuccessful, and the proposed pact between the 
British Dyestuffs Corporation and the I. G. was vetoed in the last 
act of the MacDonald government. The veto privilege has been 
relinquished by the British Government, but in view of the opposi- 
tion of the smaller dye producers it is doubtful whether any effort 
will again be made to effect an agreement. Foreign sales agreements 
are possible in certain markets. 

The conclusion of trade agreements, including the adoption of a 
sales policy and the forming of affiliations, between German and cer- 
tain foreign manufacturing groups is of the utmost importance to 
the German industry. The Swiss industry has been eminently suc- 
cessful in establishing branch plants in the United States, Great 
Britain, France, Italy, and other countries. The forming of such 
affiliations and the establishment of branch plants are a natural con- 
sequence of the protective measures adopted by the new dye produc- 
ing nations. Recent reports indicate that the I. G. has been endeav- 
oring to arrange an agreement with the French dye producers, par- 
ticularly in regard to sales. 

EXTENSION OF THE I. G. INTERESTS 

During the last 10 years members of the I. G. have done extensive 
work on new chemicals in order to develop new markets, which will 
compensate for their lost export trade in dyes. In addition to syn- 
thetic nitrogen and acetate silk they are having conspicuous success 
in the development of synthetic processes for making acetic acid, 
methanol, butanol, and solvents, and motor fuels. 

The manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels alone promises to be a 
large industry in itself. Work on this group has proceeded in four 
directions: (1) The manufacture of "motalin," an antiknock motor 
fuel, the basic constituent of which is motyl, a concentrated solution 
of iron carbonyl in benzene. (2) The manufacture of synthetic meth- 
anol, by the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on a scale 
large enough to indicate that it is intended for use as a liquid fuel, 
either alone or in a mixture. (3) The manufacture of "synthol," a 
liquid mixture of alcohols and hydrocarbons made by a process for 
the catalytic reduction of carbon monoxide. This product is said to 
possess little or no advantage over methanol for a motor fuel. If 
this be true, the synthol process will be largely used as a source of 
butyl alcohol for nitrocellulose lacquers. (4) The hydrogenation of 
coal and heavy oils by the Bergius method. The granting of a num- 
ber of patents on the hydrogenation process to the I. G. in 1925 indi- 
cates -a close agreement between the original interests and the I. G. 
Development of one or more of these lines on a large commercial 
scale, particularly of methanol, is regarded as highly probable. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



161 



The I. G. has acquired an interest in Aceta Seide G. m. b. h., of 
BerHn, which is erecting a plant in Berlin Lichterfelde to produce 
acetate silk. The Agfa Berlin plant of the I. G. has been producing 
artificial silk by the viscose process at its central German plant at 
Wulfen bei Bitterfeld. 

When the Hugo Stinnes-Eiebeck Montan and Oilwerke controlling 
important lignite deposits in central Germany collapsed in August, 
1925, the Bayer Co. took over about two-thirds of its interests. This 
purchase insures an extended reserve of brown coal for the ''Leuna- 
werke" nitrogen fixation plant. The Badische has acquired an inter- 
est in the Erdoel and Kohle Verevertunge and a minor interest in 
the Bergen process of hydrogenating coal. 

DIVIDENDS OF THE I. G. IN 1925 

At a general meeting of the stockholders of the I. G. in May, 1926, 
the board of directors recommended a dividend of 10 per cent on the 
common stock of 641,600,000 marks for the year 1925, as against 8 
per cent in 1924. They also approved a, 3}/2 per cent dividend on 
the preferred nontransferrable voting stock amounting to 4,400,000 
marks. 

Table 38 is a summary of the balance sheets of the I. G. for 1924 
and 1925. 



Table 38. — Summary of balance sheets of I. G. Farbenindustrie ^ 
[In millions of gold marks] 



I. Q. Farbenindustrie 


Gross 


Costs 


Dedxic- 

tions 


Net 
profits 


1924: 

Badische Aniline -. - - 


39.08 
33.39 
34.57 
15.93 
4.81 
16.27 


8.58 
8.21 
9.19 
7.29 
3.04 
7.74 


15.61 
10.19 
10.67 

3.55 
.16 

4.60 


14.88 


Bayer -. . .. 


14.98 


Hoechster - 

A. G. f. Aniline 

Weiler ter Meer .. 


14.701 
5.07 
1.15 


Griesheim-EIektron--- 


3.91 






Total 1924 


144. 05 


44.05 


44.78 


54.69 






Total 1925 


168. 56 


45.19 


55.77 


67 59 







• Department of Commerce Reports, June 21, 1926. 



According to the 1925 statement of the I. G. there are 40 regular 
and 43 acting members of administrative boards, or a total of 83. 
The I. G., as formerly constituted, had only 32 regular and 37 acting 
administrators, or a total of 69. 



162 census of dyes and other synthetic chemicals 

German Export and Import Trade 

The following tables show in detail the export and import trade of 
Germany in coal-tar dyes for 1924 and 1925. 

Table 39.— Germany: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 ' 



Class and country 


Pounds 


Value 


Class and country 


Pounds 


Value 


Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes: 


40, 344 

54, 895 

295, 857 

408, 071 

5,952 

138, 890 

815,041 

1, 099, 434 

25, 794 

1,107,591 

331, 131 

1, 768, 751 

437, 834 

5, 888, 266 

942, 246 

525, 356 

13, 007 

36,817 

241, 404 

1, 001, 329 

3,117,966 

134, 040 

441, 581 

46, 958 

301, 148 

1, 027, 344 

1, 607, 815 

203, 925 

214, 948 

232, 806 

20, 062 

4, 324, 764 

55, 997 

15, 136, 784 

3, 389, 131 

431, 220 

67, 240 

345, 902 

62, 170 

478, 839 

243, 388 

153, 220 

53, 351 

14, 771 

39, 903 

413, 362 

100, 530 

38, 580 

27. 557 

533, 954 

20, 503 

25, 794 

81, 350 


$25, 249 

42, 638 

158, 879 

288, 222 

17, 389 
67, 649 

587, 401 
1, 084, 286 

21,676 

618, 129 

226, 052 

1, 256, 505 

284, 173 

3, 984, 133 

634, 803 

508, 557 

9,766 

25, 964 
110,525 
625, 990 
2,611,387 
104, 093 
486, 643 

38, 350 
265, 831 
816, 073 
888, 248 
174, 600 
126, 961 

98, 853 

21,914 
1,863,915 

22, 867 

3, 024, 902 

1, 879, 160 

272, 024 

36, 683 
213, 904 

55, 024 
517, 370 
161,500 
140, 776 

32, 633 

13, 577 

32, 872 
202, 946 

92, 898 

29, 537 

18, 818 
534, 759 

15, 245 
18, 341 
56, 692 


Alizarin dyes, variegated, 
from anthracene: 

Denmark.- 

Great Britain 


11,684 
63, 713 
91,491 
44, 312 
12, 566 

78, 925 
12, 346 

175, 266 
41, 887 
14, 550 

79, 145 
8,598 

51, 588 
34, 171 
11,464 

504, 633 
10, 141 

157, 188 
12, 787 
4,630 

118,828 
29, 983 


$16, 198 




36, 206 




Italy 


105, 523 




Netherlands. 


35, 730 




Norway 


18, 341 




Austria 


107, 666 




Jugoslavia 


14, 292 


Italy 


Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 


306, 087 




51, 928 




East Poland 


26, 202 




Russia 


143, 396 




Finland 


26,202 




Sweden 


84, 799 




Switzerland .... 


49, 069 




Spain 


40, 256 




British India. 


144, 826 


Upper Silesia 


Japan 


21, 438 


West Poland 


Dutch Indies 


69,554 


Portugal 


Brazil 


25, 487 


Rumania 


Canada 


4,526 


Russia 


United States 


131,248 


Esthonia 


Other countries. 

Total 


27, 870 






Lithuania 


1, 569, 896 


1, 486, 844 




Indigo, natural and arti- 
ficial: 
Bulgaria 




Sweden.. 


12, 786 
102, 955 
307, 762 

26, 896 
547, 182 
293, 212 

37, 037 
23, 369 

27, 337 
44, 312 
43, 210 
34, 833 
92, 373 
12, 125 
46, 958 

169,093 

200, 130 

6, 536, 639 

341, 272 

290, 346 

76,500 

4,189 

107, 805 




Switzerland.. . 




Spain . 


12, 148 


Turkey 


Netherlands 


29, 060 


Egypt.. 


Austria 


111,001 


British South Africa... 


Jugoslavia 


25,964 


British India 


Czechoslovakia. 

Hungary 


173, 410 


Malacca 


80, 273 


China 


East Poland 


21, 676 


Japan... 


Upper Silesia 


12, 386 


Dutch East Indies 


Portugal 


9,052 


Siam . 


Rumania . 


34, 301 


Argentina 


Russia.. .. 


45, 973 


Bohvia 


Sweden . 


19, 294 


Brazil 


Switzerland. .. 


29, 060 


Canada 


Spain . . 


14, 292 


Chile--.. 


Turkey 


42, 400 


Colombia 


Egypt.. 


107, 905 


Cuba.... 


British India.. 


169, 598 


Ecuador 


China 


1, 822, 945 


Mexico 


Japan 


382, 549 


Peru-- 


Dutch Indies 


179, 126 


Uruguay 


Persia 


65, 029 


Venezuela 


Canada . . 


1, 667 


United States 


Other countries... 

Total 


66, 220 


Union of Australia 

New Zealand. 




9, 384, 321 


3, 455, 329 


other countries 


Indigo carmine, color lakes 
and new blues from in- 
digo carmine: 
Jugoslavia . 




9,921 
21,164 
29, 542 
50, 044 
20, 282 
19, 401 




Total 


48, 564, 913 


25, 447, 382 








Alizarin (alizarin red): 


46, 076 
18, 519 
24, 471 
43, 431 
151, 236 
957, 017 
77, 381 
46, 296 


11,672 
20, 009 

26, 440 
47, 878 

27, 154 
205, 805 

26, 917 
35, 968 


13, 339 


Netherlands.. . 


Czechoslovakia 

Turkey 


25, 249 


Austria 


22, 867 


Czechoslovakia . 


Egypt ... 


48,116 


Russia 




18, 103 


Switzerland 


Other countries 

Total 


17, 390 






Dutch East Indies... 


150, 354 


145, 064 


other countries 






61,033,911 


30, 936, 462 


Total.. 


1, 364, 427 


401, 843 









I From foreign trade of Germany in the years 1923 and 1924 compared with 1913 and 1922. 
verted on basis of 1,000 reichsmarks ($238.20). 



Values con- 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 163 

Table 40. — Germany: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 ^ 



Class and country 


Pounds 


Value 


Class and country 


Pounds 


Value 


Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes: 


397. 710 
552, 693 

319, 226 
93, 475 

261. 906 

259. 702 

1, 282, 857 

1, 293, 659 
424, 826 
147, 929 

54, 233 

2, 056, 451 
269, 843 

1, 178, 359 
691, 803 
354, 500 
705. 031 

3, 902, 803 
920, 200 

1, 353, 845 
800. 931 

4, 373, 926 
572, 094 
172, 400 

4, 963, 877 

74, 956 

2, 751, 782 
1, 617, 735 
1, 274, 038 

237, 876 
227, 956 

320. 328 
49, 604 

614, 863 
471, 343 
110, 891 
203, 705 

31, 526 
747, 139 
123, 678 

39, 462 
1, 502. 876 

36, 376 
441, 584 




Alizarin color, variegated, 
from anthracene; 

Great Britain 


69, 048 
63, 792 

239, 860 
29, 321 
17,637 

141, 976 
88, 404 
85, 318 
59, 745 

192, 241 
16, 094 

911,823 
74, 515 

313, 715 
20,723 
33,510 

644, 405 

138, 890 








1 Italy 




Denmark 




j Netherlands 




Esthonia 




I Austria . 




Finland 




East Poland 




Greece . 




Russia.. i 








Sweden 




Italy 




Switzerland 




Jugoslavia 




Spain 




Latvia 




Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 




Lithuania . 






Netherlands - 




British India 








Japan. 








Dutch Indies 




East Poland 




Brazil 




Portugal. 




Canada 




Rumania 




United States 




Russia 




Other countries 

Total 










Switzerland 




3, 161, 617 


.$3, 579, 670 






Indigo, natural and arti- 
ficial: 
Netherlands 


Czechoslovakia 




621, 918 

163, 140 

158, 290 

127, 426 

56, 658 

318,344 

280, 206 

351, 634 

554, 677 

26, 396, 999 

1, 073, 640 

825, 843 

131, 174 

39, 242 

92, 152 

116, 182 

589, 511 




Hungary 






Egypt --. 






British India 




Austria 




Malacca 




Russia 




China. . 




Switzerland - 




Japan 




Spain . 




Dutch Indies 




Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 




Siam 






Turkey 




Egypt 




Argentina 




British India 








China .. 




Brazil 




Japan 




Canada _. 




Dutch Indies 




Chile 




Persia 




Colombia .... 




Turkey 




Ecuador 




Other Asiatic countries- 
United States. 




Mexico.. 






Peru 




Other countries 

Total 










United States . . 


1 


31, 897, 035 


9, 515, 61* 






Indigo carmine, color lakes 
and new blues from in- 
digo and indigo carmine: 

Czechoslovakia 

China. 


Other Countries 




51,588 
504, 853 
326, 060 










Total 


38, 281, 997 

98. 766 

29, 983 

751. 328 

369. 270 

406, 528 


$30, 099, 190 




Alizarin (alizarin red): 




Netherlands 




Russia 




Other countries. 

Total 














882, 601 


519, 752 


Other countries 








75, 879, 025 


44,311,155. 


Total 


1, 655, 875 


596, 929 









• From German foreign trade, official monthly reports; issue of December, 1925. 
basis 1,000 reichsmarks ($238.20). 



Values converted cm 



164 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 41. — Germany: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 ^ 



Class and country 


Pounds 


Value 


Aniline and other coal-tar dyes not elsewhere mentioned, sulphur dyes: 


85, 759 
47, 178 

317, 462 
44,313 
30, 203 

116, 844 

7,275 

79, 145 


$46, 211 


Italy - - 


25, 487 




170, 789 




23, 82C 




16, 198 




62, 885 




3,811 




44,067 






Total 


728, 179 


393, 268 








17, 857 


9.290 






Indigo, natural and synthetic: 


20, 944 
11,464 


16, 198 




9,051 








32, 408 


25, 249 






Indigo carmine, color lakes, and new blues from indigo and indigo carmine 


7,716 


3,335 




786, 160 


431. 142 







1 From foreign trade of Germany in the years 1923 and 1924 compared with 1913 and 1922. Values con- 
verted on basis of 1,000 reichsmarks ($238.20). 

Table 42. — Germany: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 ' 



Class and country 



Pounds 



Value 



Aniline and other coal-tar dyes not elsewhere mentioned, sulphur dyes: 

Netherlands 

Austria ..- - 

Switzerland.. 

Czechoslovakia.. 

British India 

Other - - 



545, 859 
214, 287 
934, 530 
624, 122 
80, 688 
1, 075, 184 



Total. 



3, 474, 670 



$1, 783, 403 



Alizarin colors, variegated from anthracene --- 

Indigo, natural and synthetic --- -. 

Indigo carmine, color lakes, and new blues, from indigo and indigo carmine. 



82, 452 

127, 646 

4,409 



40, 256 

93, 374 

1,906 



Grand total. 



3, 689, 177 



1,918,939 



> From German foreign trade, oflScial monthly report; issue of December, 1925. Values converted on 
basis 1,000 reichsmarks ($238.20). 

Reparation Dyes 

Under the terms of the treaty of Versailles provision was made for 
deliveries in kind by Germany. A detailed account of the agree- 
ments and of the deliveries of dyes and pharmaceuticals to the 
allied and associated powers under these agreements is given in the 
Census of Dyes and Other Synthetic Organic Chemicals, 1923, 
pages 156 to 167. The one-quarter production of the German dye 
plants reserved for purchase of the allied and associated Govern- 
ments, 1920 to 1924, was published in the Dye Census of 1924, 
page 146. 

Germany's receipts and her payments of the first annuity under 
the Dawes plan for the year ended September 1, 1925, and the 
cumulative total for the second year up to May 31, 1926, follow: 



INTEENATIONAL DYE TEADE 165 

PAYMENTS IN KIND 

In the first year deliveries of dyestuffs and pharmaceutical products 
amounted to 26.2 million marks, distributed as follows: Italy, 9.0; 
France, 5.2; England, 4.5; and Belgium, 3.7. France received 
chemical fertilizers valued at 19.7 million marks, and Belgium ob- 
tained similar material to the value of 0.3 million marks. 

In the first nine months of the second year (September 1, 1925, to 
May 31, 1926) deliveries of dyestuft's and pharmaceutical products 
declined to 7.9 million marks, of which Belgium obtained 3.7, Italy 
2.7, France 1.4, and the Serb-Croat-Slovene State, 0.09. Chemical 
fertilizers and nitrogenous products delivered during this period, 
valued at 42.6 million marks, were charged to France (39.7) and 
Belgium (2.9). France obtained an additional 1.7 million marks 
worth of coal by-products; Belgium 2.0. 

RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS OF GERMANY UNDER THE DAWES PLAN 

The first year, September 1, 1924, to August 31, 1925 

[From Frankfurter Zeitung, Sept. 17, 1925] 

A. Receipts: Million marks 

1. Cash from proceeds of German foreign loan of 1924 800. 

2. Cash received from the German Reichsbahn-Gesellschaft, 

interest on the reparation bonds for half j^ear to Feb. 

28, 1925 200. 

3. Interest received .3 

4. Differences in exchange .2 

Total receipts 1, 000. 5 

B. Payments: 

1. To or on account of — 

Great Britain 189. 9 

France 396. 6 

Italy 60. 4 

Belgium 93. 5 

Japan 3. 8 

Yugoslavia 30. 1 

Portugal 4. 7 

Rumania 7. 4 

Greece 2. 6 

Poland . 04 

Total payments to powers 789. 04 

2. For expenses for — 

Reparation Commission 5. 5 

Rhineland Commission 9. 4 

Military Control Commission 7. 8 

Xaval Control Commission .07 

3. European Danube Commission .2 

4. For the service of the German foreign loan of 1924 77. 5 

5. On account of the administrative expenses of the Bureau for 

Reparation Payments 3. 7 

6. Discount on payment of the German Reichsbahn-Gesell- 

schaft, made before maturity . 2 

Total payments 893. 4 



166 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



The second year, cumulative total to May 31, 1926 

[On cash basis, reduced to gold mark equivalents] 

A. Receipts: Gold marks 

1. Budgetary contribution 190, 000, 000 

2. Transport tax 1 168,925,066 

3. Interest on railway reparation bonds 400,000,000 

4. Interest on industrial debentures 62, 500, 000 

5. Interest received 1,869,916 

Total receipts 823, 294, 982 

B. Payments: 

1. Payments to or for the account of — 

France 403, 462, 161 

British Empire 166, 589, 521 

Belgium 84, 443, 242 

Italy 50, 057, 086 

Serb-Croat-Slovene State 27, 881, 037 

Rumania 6, 405, 404 

Portugal 4, 676, 795 

Greece 2,297, 208 

Japan 370, 781 

Poland 91, 955 

Total payments to powers 746, 275, 190 

2. Other payments 94,193,881 

Total payments 840, 469, 071 

The Dye Industry of Great Britain 

production — 1924 

The board of trade has received from the Dyes tuffs Industry 
Development Committee a statement showing the quantities of the 
main classes of dyestuffs produced in the United Kingdom during 
the year 1924. The statement was prepared from returns furnished 
voluntarily by the principal British dye makers, and although not 
complete, is fairly comprehensive as the few firms that did not 
make returns produced only relatively negligible quantities of dyes. 
The figures for all classes represent market types. 

Table 43. — Production of coal-tar dyes in Great Britain, 1924 ^ 



Category 



Pounds 

Direct cotton colors 2,017,314 

" " ■ " 1, 234, 398 



Blacks 



Acid wool colors 

Chrome and mordant colors (including 

alizarin) 

Basic colors 

Sulphur colors _ 

Vat colors (including indigo) 

Dyestuffs for lake making 

Ofl, spirit and wax, and miscellaneous 

colors 



Total. 



1, 060, 222 
U,809 

6, 608, 022 
67, 678 



506, 511 



11, 505, 954 



Blues 



Pounds 

934, 357 
1,043,242 

648, 129 

290, 422 

200, 510 

4, 632, 752 

127 

256, 478 



8, 006, 017 



Browns 



Pounds 
4)2,621 
92, 690 

909, 849 

135, 152 

679, 069 

8,915 



61,321 



2,299,617 



Greens 



Pounds 
134, 890 
339, 051 

113, 667 
111,109 
143,415 
2,253 
52, 702 

710 



897, 797 



Oranges 



Pounds 
178, 135 
519, 725 

550, 946 

125, 100 

8,378 

32, 051 



21, 349 



1,435,684 



1 The Chemical Trade Journal and Chemical Engineer, p. 417, Oct. 9, 1925. 



INTERNATIONAL. DYE TRADE 167 

Table 43. — Production of coal-tar dyes in Great Britain, 19^4 — Continued 



Category 



Direct cotton colors - 

Acid wool colors 

Chrome and mordant colors (including alizarin) . 

Basic colors... 

Sulphur colors _ 

Vat colors (including indigo) 

Dyestufls for lake making 

Oil, spirit and wax, and miscellaneous colors 



Reds and 
scarlets 



Pounds 

595, 561 

860. 705 

3,237,713 

337, 469 

105, 778 

69, 956 

697, 124 

21, 633 



Total - - - 5,925,939 



Violets 



Pounds 
46,447 

195,425 
14, 102 

352, 844 



108, 646 
""4,' 208' 



721, 672 



Yellows 



Pounds 

739, 759 

907, 238 

405, 635 

197, 495 

87, 737 

81, 462 

4,513 

26, 185 



2, 450, 024 



Total 



Pounds 

5, 059, 084 

6, 192, 474 

6, 940, 263 
1,561,400 

7, 832, 909 
5, 003, 713 

754, 466 
898, 395 



33, 242, 704 



REORGANIZATION OF BRITISH DYESTUFFS CORPORATION 

At a meeting held in Manchester on November 25, 1925, a scheme 
for the reconstruction of the British Dyestuffs Corporation,^ sub- 
mitted by its directors, was approved. The new articles of associa- 
tion adopted provide for a reduction in capital, a writing down of 
the assets, and a surrender of the shares owned by His Majesty's 
Government in exchange for cash, a virtual withdrawal of the Gov- 
ernment from the affairs of the corporation, with the restriction 
that not more than 25 per cent of the voting power of the corporation 
should be foreign or foreign controlled and that it keep in touch 
with the Government in all technical matters and research work in 
order that the Government might be fully informed for reasons of 
national defense. The following excerpt from the notice issued to 
shareholders shows the scheme of reconstruction: 

In considering a scheme of reconstruction the board recognized that it must 
inckide not only a suV^stantial writing down of the assets, but what was in their 
opinion of even greater importance, some arrangement with His Majesty's 
Government which would free the company from the powers of veto and control 
which the Government now has the right to exercise by means of its nominees 
on the board. 

History. — It is perhaps desirable to state briefly the circumstances under which 
the Government became so intimately associated with the company. Imme- 
diately following the outbreak of the war, and when the color-using trades 
were cut off from their principal sources of supply, their representatives, in col- 
laboration with the Government, took steps to secure the establishment of an 
efficient dye-making industry in this country, and as a result of their efforts 
British Dyes (Ltd.) was formed. Its share capital was wholly owned by color- 
using interests and the Government gave it financial assistance by agreeing to 
advance, by way of loan, certain sums in proportion to the amount of share 
capital raised. 

At that time Messrs. Levinstein (Ltd.) were also engaged in the manufacture 
of dyestuffs, and it was upon the efforts of these two undertakings that the 
color-using industries were very largely dependent for their supplies. In 1918 
it was suggested both b}^ the Government and by the principal color users that 
the rate of progress which was being made to render this country independent 
of foreign sources of supply of synthetic dyestuffs was not satisfactory, and it 
was determined that this object could better be secured by effecting a fusion 
of interests of British Dyes (Ltd.) and Levinstein (Ltd.). British Dyestuffs 
Corporation (Ltd.) was accordingly formed for that purpose and the majority 
of the shareholders of the two companies exchanged their holdings for shares 
in this corporation. 



• A dividend of 2J^ per cent was declared for the year ended Mar. 31, 1926. 



168 CENSUS OP DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

As stated in the prospectus, the company was formed by arrangement with 
the Board of Trade to concentrate, extend, and expedite the manufacture of 
dyestuffs in this country, and following the exchange of shares already referred 
to subscriptions were invited for £5,000,000 new capital which was required 
to discharge the existing obligations of the amalgamating companies and to 
provide for future developments. Much the larger part of this sum was sub- 
scribed by investors not interested in the business as color users, and thus the 
entire character of the undertaking was altered from that which was contem- 
plated when British Dyes (Ltd.) was formed. Apart from this public subscrip- 
tion the Government subscribed £1,700,000 (£850,000 in preference shares and 
£850,000 in preferred ordinary shares) in substitution for the loans which it 
had previously undertaken to advance to British Dyes (Ltd.). In view of 
affording this considerable financial support the Government stipulated that the 
following conditions should be inserted in the articles of association : 

GOVERNMENT CONDITIONS 

(a) The allotment to Government nominees of a special share carrying 
special voting rights, for the purpose of preventing any alteration in the com- 
pany's articles of association. 

(b) Restrictions on the allotment and transfer of shares to foreigners or per- 
sons under foreign control, and provisions under which it was necessary to 
secure the consent of the Board of Trade to any allotment or transfer of shares 
to such persons. 

(c) The nomination of two directors by the Government and the exercise by 
those directors of certain powers of veto and control over the company's affairs. 

These terms were accepted by the company and incorporated in the pros- 
pectus and articles of association, but the conditions under which the company 
carries on its operations are very different to those that were contemplated 
when this arrangement was made, and experience has proved that the restric- 
tions imposed seriously militate against the successful conduct of the com- 
pany's affairs. With a view to removing this disability the board entered into 
negotiations with the Government which were completed on the 3d instant, 
when the Government intimated that it would be willing — 

(a) To terminate its existing rights of veto and control, (b) to forego its right 
to nominate two directors, (c) to consent to the surrender of its 850,001 preference 
shares and 850,000 preferred ordinary shares, subject to the following terms: 

TERMS FOR SURRENDER OF GOVERNMENT SHARES 

(a) The payment of £600,000. 

(b) That no alteration be made in article 38 (1) of the articles of association 
which provides that not more than 25 per cent of the company's shares may 
be held by foreigners. 

(c) That the company should give an assurance that in all matters of technical 
information and research it will keep in touch with the Government in such 
manner as the president of the Board of Trade for the time being may direct. 

The board have advised the Government that they will recommend the share- 
holders to accept this offer as part of a scheme of reconstruction, and you will 
accordingly be asked to approve this arrangement and to sanction the conse- 
quential changes in the articles of association. 

Having made this arrangement, the board were in a position to proceed with 
the preparation of a plan of reorganization to provide for the adjustment of the 
capital of the company. 

SCHEME OF RECONSTRUCTION 

The book value of land, buildings, plant, and machinery on March 31, 1925, 
was £2,958,498, and it is proposed to write off £1,198,260, leaving £1,760,238 
as the amended value. 

FIXED ASSETS 

It will be remembered that the works were erected and equipped when costs 
of construction were abnormal and when it was anticipated that the output of 
dyestuffs would reach a much higher level than has actually been attained. A 
substantial reducton is therefore required to bring these assets to a figure more 
in accordance with their present-day utility value. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TEADE 



169 



The board in deciding the amount necessary for this purpose have had the 
advantage not only of the knowledge and the experience of the company's own 
staff of experts but of a report from Messrs. F. S. Airey, Entwistle & Co., valuers, 
Norfolk Street, Manchester. 

STOCKS 

Stocks stood in the books at £1,320,324, and although provision has been 
made from time to time to adjust their value it is proposed that a further sum of 
£280,982 should be set aside, reducing the value to £1,039,342. 

NONTANGIBLE ASSETS 

It is also proposed to write off entirely the preliminary expenses, £251,552; 
good will, patents, and trade-marks, £750,000; and the adverse balance on 
profit and loss account, £360,602. 

INVESTMENTS AND CASH 

The remaining items on the assets side of the balance sheet consist of sundry 
debtors, investments, and cash, amounting to £3,894,207. These require no 
writing off, but £600,000 will be utilized to cancel the 850,001 preference shares 
and the 850,000 preferred ordinary shares owned by the Government, and 
£980,136 to make a cash payment to the preference shareholders, as subsequently 
explained, making a total cash distribution of £1,580,136. 

To provide for these cash payments and for the amounts to be written off, 
which together total £4,421,532, it is necessary to reduce the issued share cap- 
ital from £9,197,112 to £4,775,580, which it is suggested be effected as follows: 

EEDUCTIONS IN CAPITAL 

(1) The cancellation of 850,001 preference shares and 850,000 preferred ordi- 
nary shares owned by the Government. 

(2) The reduction of the remaining issued preference shares by 6s. per share. 

(3) The reduction of the remaining issued preferred ordinary shares by one- 
third. 

(4) The reduction of the issued deferred ordinary shares by two-thirds. 

(5) The consolidation of the several classes of issued shares, viz, preference, 
preferred ordinary, and deferred ordinary, into one class of £1 ordinary shares . 

EFFECT ON SHARE HOLDINGS 

The effect upon the several classes of shareholders of this reduction in the 
issued capital may be summarized as follows: 

(a) The preference shareholders (other than the Government) wiU receive 6s. 
in cash and 14s. in £1 ordinary shares for each preference share held. 

(b) The preferred ordinary shareholders (other than the Government) will 
receive two-thirds of their present holding in £1 ordinary shares. 

(c) The deferred ordinary shareholders will receive one-third of their present 
holding in £1 ordinary shares. 

The following is a summary of the financial effect of the scheme: 

1. ASSETS 



Book value 

at Mar. 31, 

1925 



Amount to 

be written 

off 



Cash re- 
payments 



Value after 
reconstruc- 
tion 



Land, buildings, plant, and machinery 

Stocks 

Cash and investments 

Preliminary expenses 

Good will, patents, and trade-marks 

Profit and loss account deficit 

Sundry debtors £646,886 

Less sundry creditors 338,071 



£2, 958, 498 

1, 320, 324 

3, 247, 321 

251, 552 

750, 000 

360, 602 



308, 815 
9, 197, 112 



£1, 198. 260 
280, 982 



251, 552 
750, 000 
360, 602 



NU. 
2, 841, 396 



£1, 580, 136 



1, 580, 136 



£1, 760, 238 
1, 039, 342 
1, 667, 185 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 



308, 815 
4, 775, 580 



170 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

2. CAPITAL 



Issued 

capital at 

Mar. 31, 

1925 



Amount to 

be written 

ofl 



Cash re- 
payments 



New capital 

inordinary 

shares 



Shares held by His Majesty's Government: 

Preference shares £850, 001 

Preferred ordinary shares 850,000 

Other shareholders: 

Preference shares 

Preferred ordinary shares 

Deferred ordinary shares - - 



£1,700,001 

3, 267, 120 

3, 235, 797 

994,194 



£1,100,001 

Nil. 

1, 078, 599 

662,796 



£600,000 

980,136 

Nil. 
NU. 



NiL 

£2, 286, 984- 

2, 157, 198 

331, 398 



9, 197, 112 



2,841,396 1,580,136 



4, 775, 580 



It vyill be observed that under this scheme the issued capital of the company 
will be reduced to £4,775,580, but to avoid expense in the future it is proposed 
to retain the authorized capital at £10,000,000, although the articles wiU pro- 
vide that the capital actually issued shall not exceed £6,000,000 unless author- 
ized bv resolution of the shareholders. 



AMENDUEKT OF ASTICX£S 

The consent of the Government to forego its existing rights of veto and control 
and its representation on the board necessitates such extensive alterations in the 
articles of association that, on the advice of the company's soUcitors, the board 
have concluded that the best course would be to adopt entirely new articles of 
association, of which a copy can be inspected by any shareholder at the regis- 
tered office of the company, 70 Spring Gardens, Manchester, or at the office of 
its solicitors, Messrs. Slaughter & Ma\', 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 2, at 
any time during ordinary business hours, but for the convenience of the share- 
holders a summary of the more important modifications in the articles is shown 
in paragraph 14 of the scheme inclosed. 

FUTUEE PROSPECTS 

With regard to the future prospects of the company the board desire to point 
out that its financial position in regard to capital will undoubtedly be very sound 
and that a large part of this capital will be represented by liquid assets, which 
will be available not only for the purpose of providing the plant and machinery 
required in connection with any new processes and inventions but also for the 
purpose of enabUng the company to engage in the manufacture of other products, 
whereby the resources, the equipment, and the trained personnel of the com- 
pany's undertaking may be used to advantage. 

If the proposals which are submitted are approved there will be no obstacles 
to the ^ider and more efficient use of the company's resources, although some 
time must necessarily elapse before definite results can be obtained. The board 
therefore recommended the acceptance of the scheme to the shareholders in the 
belief that it will not only add to the stability of the company's undertaking, 
but afford to those intrusted with its management a fair opportunity to make 
it a success. 

The report of directors, together with the balance sheet, is given 
below : 

The trading results for the period of 17 months 

to March 31, 1925, after providing £437,832 £ s. d. 

for depreciation, show a profit of 88, 674 8 3 

The balance of loss brought forward being 449, 276 4 1 

There remains an adverse balance of 360,601 15 10 

The trading results have been adversely affected by the fall in prices of dye- 
stuffs and the increased competition in the home market, although the color- 
using trades show some improvement, and in recent months there has been an 
increa.sing demand for your company's products. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



171 



Substantial improvement has been made during the period under review both 
in the quality and range of colors marketed by your company, and considerable 
economies have been effected in the cost of manufacture. 

The subsidiary companies in which your company was interested having been 
liquidated, the assets of these companies have been transferred to your company 
and the necessary changes made in the form of the balance sheet. 

A scheme for reconstructing the capital and for removing certain restrictions 
under which your company now operates has been prepared by your directors, 
and meetings of the several classes of shareholders have been called for the pur- 
pose of approving this scheme. 

In May, 1925, Dr. E. F. Armstrong, F. R. S., was appointed managing director. 
As intimated in the notice convening the ordinary general meeting for July 6, 
1925, the directors to retire are Mr. G. V. Clay, Mr. G. P. Norton, the Right 
Honorable Lord Ashfield, the Right Honorable Lord Colwyn, and Dr. E. F. 
Armstrong. Since that date Mr. Clay has resigned his position owing to the 
pressure of other business, and the directors propose that the Right Honorable 
Sir Alfred Mond, at present a Government director of the corporation, should 
be elected in his place. The other directors retiring are eligible, and offer them- 
selves for reelection. 

Table 44. — Balance sheet March 31, 1925 



CAPITAL AND LIABIUTIES 

Share capital: 

Authorized— £10,000,000, di- 
vided into 4,500,000 prefer- 
ence shares, 4,500,000 pre- 
ferred ordinary shares, and 
1,000,000 deferred ordinary 
Shares, all of £1 each. 
Issued: 

Preference shares, 
4,117,121 shares 
fully paid. . .7. . . £4, 117, 121 

Preferred ordinary 
shares, 4,085,797 
shares fully paid. 4, 085, 797 

Deferred ordinary 
shares, 994,194 
shares fully paid. 



994, 194 £ 

9, 197, 112 



Sundry creditors 338,070 7 



Total 9,535,182 7 11 



ASSETS 

Land, buildings, plant, and ma- 
chinery as taken over from asso- 
ciated companies on Oct. 31, £ s. d. 
1923 3,273,731 11 3 

Freehold offices and equipment 
at that date 57,173 8 9 

3, 330, 905 
Additions (less sales) during 
period 65,425 1 9 

3, 396, 330 1 9 
Deduct provision for depreciation 
during period 437,832 10 6 

2,958,497 11 3 
Stocks (at cost or market price 

whichever is lower) 1,320,324 4 9 

Sundry debtors.. * 646,886 5 7 

Cash and investments.. 3,247.320 14 6 

Preliminary expenses 251,551 16 

Good will, patents, and trade 

marks 750,000 

Profit and loss ac- 
count: 

On Oct. 31, £ «. d. 

1923 449,276 4 1 

Less profit for 
the 17 months 

to date 88,674 8 3 

360,601 15 10 

Total 9,535,182 7 11 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 
Table 45. — The United Kingdom: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 * 



Imports and consumption: ' 

Alizarin 

Indigo, synthetic, other coal-tar dyes. 

Total 

Natural indigo 

Exports: 

Dyes and dyestuffs (except dyewoods and raw dyeing substances) and eX' 
tracts for dyeing and tanning, products of coal tar 



Pounds 



1, 243, 872 
3. 194, 352 



Value 



$361,002 
2, 762, 856 



4, 438, 224 I 3. 123, 858 
25,536 31,031 



11, 666, 032 4, 093, 201 



1 Accounts relating to the trade and navigation of the United Kingdom, issue for December, 1925. 
' An account of the principal and other articles of imported merchandise showing the consumption of 
certain dutiable articles in the year ended Dec. 31, 1925, £l=$4.8289. 



172 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 46. — The United Kingdom: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 192^ * 



Imported from— 


Pounds 


Value 


Alizarin: 

Germany _ 


1, 888, 096 

560 

1, 464, 288 

24, 528 


$617, 002 


Netherlands . . .. . . . .. 


1,391 


PVance - 


360, 446 


Other foreign countries. 


20, 667 






Total from foreign countries 


3, 377, 472 


999, 506 






Total imported 


3, 377, 472 


999, 506 






Other coal-tar dyes: 

Germany 


3,125,360 

35, 168 

1)9,168 

1,174,320 

2,688 

65, 744 


3, 084, 449 


Netherlands ... 


44, 590 


Belgium.. 


125,917 


Switzerland 


1, 525, 866 


United States 


4,492 


Other foreign countries ... . .. ..... ... 


82, 003 






Total from foreign countries 


4, 522, 448 


4, 867, 317 






Canada 


29, 120 
2,688 


31, 233 


Other British possessions 


901 






Total from British possessions 


31, 808 
4, 554, 256 


32, 134 


Total imported 


4, 899, 451 






Grand total 


7, 931, 728 


5,898,957 





* From annual statement of the trade of the United Kingdom with foreign countries and British posses- 
sions; values converted at average exchange rate, 1924, £1=$4.4171. 

, Table 47. — The United Kingdom: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 * 



Exported to — 



Alizarin: 

Java 

France 

United States. 

Brazil- 

Other foreign countries 

Total to foreign 
countries 

British India 

Other British posses- 
sions 

Total to British 
possessions 

Total exported 

Indigo, synthetic: 

Egypt 

China. 

Other foreign countries. 

Total to foreign 
countries 

Hongkong... 

Australia -.- 

Other British posses- 
sions 

Total to British 
possessions 

Total exported 

Other coal-tar dyes: 

Russia 

Sweden 

Norway 



Pounds 



103, 488 
40, 768 
16,016 
1,232 
14, 336 



643, 104 
8,176 



651, 280 



827, 120 



448 

1,333,920 

107, 408 



1,441,776 



70, 112 
75, 824 



3,696 



149, 632 



1,591,408 



365, 008 
113,232 
60, 480 



Value 



$32, 987 

17, 637 

5,945 

698 

16,608 



73, 875 



143,214 
5,239 



148, 453 



124 

399, 126 

30, 897 



430, 147 



20, 835 
22,889 



2,248 



45, 973 



476, 120 



424, 758 
74, 670 
46, 229 



Exported to — 



Other coal-tar dyes— Con, 

Denmark 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

France 

Switzerland 

Portugal-. 

Spain 

Italy.. 

Egypt 

China 

Japan ... 

United States 

Brazil 

Other foreign countries 

Total to foreign 
countries 

Irish Free State 

Union of South Africa 
British India — 

Bombay.. 

Madras 

Bengal, Assam, 
and Orissa 

Burmah 

Hongkong 

Australia 

New Zealand , 

Canada 

Other British posses- 
sions- 

Total to British pos- 
sessions 

Total exported 

Grand total 



Pounds 



43, 904 

57, 680 

166, 880 

193,312 

415,072 

421,904 

16,912 

40, 544 

90,944 

13,440 

263, 872 

39, 536 

106,512 

39, 200 

75, 040 



Value 



$35, 425 

5,901 

59, 962 

47, 960 

195,702 

101, 292 

5,658 

29, 740 

35, 655 

6,679 

106, 540 
18,083 
68,783 
35, 005 
43,230 



2,523,472 1,341,272 



191,072 
107, 184 

223, 216 
62, 272 

21,840 
11,536 
3,584 

698, 096 
97, 552 

227, 696 

36, 848 



109, 782 
83, 187 

127, 914 
28, 972 

14, 797 

7,650 

3,812 

443, 933 

66, 680 

94,662 

31,803 



1,680,896 1,013,191 



4, 204, 368 



6, 622, 896 



2, 354, 463 



3,052,911 



1 From annual statement of the trade of the United Kingdom with foreign countries and British posses- 
sions; values converted at average exchange rate, 1924, £1 =$4.4171. 



INTERNATIONAL. DYE TRADE 173 

POSITION OF DYE MAKERS OTHER THAN THE BRITISH DYESTUFFS 

CO«PORATION 

The reorganization of this corporation with a writing off of the 
preference and ordinary shares held by the Government, amounting 
to £1,700,000 in value for a cash payment of £600,000, has strength- 
ened its position. ^° The Government loss, on the other hand, is 
said to have been partly compensated by profits from the sale of 
German reparation dyes. It is the opinion, however, of some of the 
smaller dye makers that this subsidy places them at a disadvantage. 

These smaller dye makers, suffering from depressed business con- 
ditions, feel that as a group thej^ constitute a vital part of the dye 
industry and that they deserve the same treatment by the Govern- 
ment as that accorded to the British Dyestuffs Corporation. They 
will now be compelled to compete with a subsidized concern, the 
result of which will doubtless be to force some of them out of busi- 
ness, with a consequent loss of em.ployment to chemists and operators 
and a scrapping of plants. This will lead to a reduced capacity to 
make certain synthetic chemicals of importance in national defense. 

The small dye producers are also fearful that the British Dye- 
stuffs Corporation now free from government veto may make an 
agreement with the German I. G. which will endanger the small 
firms and that will ultimately affect the consumer adversely. 

SCOTTISH DYES (LTD.) TAKEN OVER BY THE BRITISH DYES CORPORATION 

In February, 1926, the British Dyes Corporation announced its 
acquisition of the Scottish Dyes (Ltd.) by the control of the majority 
of the capital stock, reported to be valued at about $1,700,000. 
Under the new agreement the Scottish Dyes will continue to be 
managed as a separate concern. 

At the Grangemouth works it is planned to concentrate on vat 
dyes, in which the Scottish Dyes (Ltd.) are preeminent. This ar- 
rangement is expected to reduce production costs. In Great Britain 
as in the United States the phthalic anhydride process is used in the 
preparation of anthraquinone instead of the anthracene process. 
The former gives vat dyes of greater purity. 

This consolidation, following the relinquishment of government 
control of the British Dyes Corporation, according to British tech- 
nical journals, indicates a sound policy for the future of the industry. 
The vat dyes are of high value on account of their rapidly increasing 
use in dyeing and printing fast-color fabrics. ^ 

IMPORT REGULATION ACT AND DYE PRICES 

The question of dye prices in Great Britain and their relation to 
the import regulation act has been one of interest to the consumer 
and manufacturer. Licenses ^^ for the importation of dyes are 
granted when the home market price exceeds two and one-half times 
the pre-war level, which is stated to give a protection of 150 per cent 
on the pre-war price for most colors and 200 per cent on other dyes, 
including the anthraquinone derivatives. This level maintains an 

10 The British Dyestuffs Corporation received in March, 1920, £100,000 for research. It also received 
as a commission on sales of reparation dyes up to October, 1925, a total of £81,800. Parliamentary Debates, 
House of Commons, Dec. 17, 1925, p. 1648. 

" Statement of Mr. H. Sutclifle Smith, chairman of the Color Users' Association. 



174 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

index figure of 250 for the oulk of dyes consumed as against the 
official Board of Trade wholesale price index figure of 155. In 1924 
indigo sold for 32 cents a pound, but, as a result of protests on the 
part of the consumers, the price was reduced to 20 cents a pound. 
Alizarin sold 60 per cent higher than the free market price. The 
Color Users' Association welcomes the reorganization of the British 
Dyestuffs Corporation, feeling that a reduced capitalization will lower 
overhead charges and permit price reductions. The continuance of 
research work by manufacturers for the development of new dyes is 
emphasized as essential to progress. The ability of the home indus- 
try not only to supply a variety of dyes but to offer them at prices 
low enough to permit the textile industry to compete in foreign mar- 
kets is a matter of great importance to the dye consumer. 

Dr. E. F. Armstrong, of the association of British Chemical Manu- 
facturers, says that a comparison of domestic with the foreign prices 
must take into consideration the difference between the internal and 
external purchasing power of depreciated currencies. On such a 
basis the French consumer is paying more than two and one-half 
times per-war prices, and the same situation exists- in Italy. The 
weighted average price of the dyes made by the British Dyestuff 
Corporation was 2.35 times the pre-war figure,. a ratio which corre- 
sponds with the increased cost of raw materials and labor. The 
ratios for wages and salaries have risen to nearly three times the pre- 
war figure. The British production of vat dyes, not including indigo, 
in the first six months of 1925 exceeded 500,000 pounds, as compared 
with an import of 93,000 pounds. One firm alone offers 23 vat dyes, 
showing that the country is not dependent on Germany for the finer 
dyes. The home production of all dyes in 1925 was about 35,000,000 
pounds, which is 85 per cent of consumption. 

Dye Industry of France 

Detailed information is not available as to the total production of 
dyes in France in 1925.^^ Reports indicate, however, that the home 
industry supplies about 75 per cent of consumption. 

The Kuhlmann Co.^^ produced 19,239,544 pounds (8,727 metrie 
tons) of dyes in 1925, a decline of 661,380 pounds (300 metric tons) 
from the total of 1924. The conspicuous decrease in production of 
indigo from 10,361,620 pounds (4,700 metric tons) in 1924 to 
8,157,020 pounds (3,700 metric tons) in 1925 was due to the loss of 
trade in the Chinese market. During 1925 this firm put on the market 
a series of brOminated indigoes. They now have under way the com- 
mercial manufacture of certain anthraquinone vat dyes, among which 
indanthrene blue and violet will be the first to appear. 

According to the Paris Journal de la Bourse, ^^ a trade agreement is 
being considered between the I. G. Farbenindustrie of Germany and 
the French dye manufacturers, including Kuhlmann, National de 
Matiere Colorante, and Bodnili Chinnipes de Saint Denis. This 
agreement is reported to relate to price regulation and the exchange 
of dyes between Germany and France, particularly imports from 
Germany. An arrangement between French and German dye manu- 
facturers in 1919 was later canceled as a result of conditions arising 
from the occupation of the Ruhr. 

» Berliner Tageblatt of June 1, 1926. 

'• Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, July, 1926, p. 445. 

'< For production 1920-1924, see Census of Dyes, 1924, p. 152. 



INTEKNATIONAL DYE TRADE 
Table 48. — France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 ^ 



175 



Class of dye 



Nitroso 

Nitro 

Pyrazolone 

Stilbeue 

Monoazo 

Polyazo 

Thiobenzenyl 

Sulphur 

Indophenol 

Azines 

Pyronines 

Eosines 

Diphenylmethane 

Acridin(?S_ 

Hydroquinones 

Indigotines 

Insoluble vat dyes other than indigo. 

Cibanones 

Indigo 2 



Total 2,706,587 2,571,087 494,932 314,057 



Dry 



Pounds Value 



3,086 

1,323 

129, 190 

43, 651 

563, 055 

517, 199 

30,423 

98, 105 

564, 378 

76, 941 

69, 004 

1,984 

371,916 

59, 304 

88, 184 

13, 228 

50, 044 

22, 266 

3,307 



$2,336 

620 

117,461 

42, 761 
348, 713 
451, 778 

38, 947 

77, 275 
520, 853 

53,010 

129, 570 

3,909 

395, 860 

77, 179 
146, 922 

10, 202 
124, 421 

27, 172 
2,098 



Paste 



Pounds Value 



441 



15, 432 

24, 912 

220 



13,228 
3,968 
12, 566 



2,205 

220 

211,862 

1,102 

169, 754 

39, 021 



$334 



5,673 

23,597 

95 



6,912 

1,192 

4,290 

477 

763 

143 

64,833 

1,144 

181, 150 

23,454 



1 From December, 1925, issue of monthly foreign commerce statistics of France, official; converted at 
average exchange rate for 1925, 1,000 francs =$47,671. 

2 Does not state whether dry or paste; probably natural indigo. 

Table 49. — France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 ' 



Class of dye and country of 


Dry 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Paste 


origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Nitroso: 

Great Britain. 


1,764 

1,323 

1,102 

661 




■ 

Stilbene: 

Switzerland 


441 




Germanv 






Switzerland 






Other foreign countries. 












Total 


4,850 


$2,880 








Nitro: 

Germanv 


5,291 

4,189 

441 






Switzerland 






Czechoslovakia 












Total 


9,921 


8,274 








Pyrazolones: 

Switzerland 


148, 590 
220 






Italy 












Total 


148, 811 


132, 543 








Stilbene: 

Great Britain 


220 

220 

60, 265 

661 






Germanv 




Total 




Switzerland 






Italy 












Total 


51, 366 


39,643 


441 


$262 




Monoazo: 

Great Britain. 




Monoazo: 

Great Britain. 


18,960 

14,110 

661 

2,866 

708, 999 

661 

6,173 




1,323 
22, 266 




Germany 




Switzerland 




Netherlands . 





Total 




Belgium. 






Switzerland 






Czechoslovakia. .. 






Italy.... 












Total 


752, 430 


491, 526 


23, 589 


11,207 









> From general tables of the foreign commerce and navigation of France, ofHcial; converted at average 
exchange rate for 1924; 1,000 francs=$52.368. 



176 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 49. — France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 — Continued 



Glass of dye and country of 


Dry 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Paste 


ongin 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Polyazo: 


18,519 
651, 680 
9,039 
3,748 
567, 905 
3,086 




Polyazo: 

Great Britain 


1,764 

31, 526 

220 

3,307 








Germany 




Netherlands 




Belgium. 








Switzerland— 




Switzerland 




Total 




Italy 












Total 


1, 253, 976 


$1, 489, 346 


36, 817 


$24, 037 




Thiobenzenyl: 

Great Britain- - 




Thiobenzenyl: 


441 

5,952 

29,542 




441 








Total 




Switzerland 












Total 


35, 935 


46, 974 


441 


262 




Sulphur: 

Great Britain 




Sulphur: 


13, 007 

441 

83, 554 

2,425 




2,866 




Germany 




Total 




Switzerland 






Other foreign countries... 












Total 


99, 427 


70, 854 


2,866 


576 




Indophenols: 

Great Britain- 




Indophenols: 


1,323 

1,217,821 

126, 324 

1, 322 




6,834 

76,279 

9,259 








Germany 








Switzerland 








Total 










Total 


1,346,790 


1, 279, 664 


92, 372 


54,882 




Azines: 

Switzerland 




Azines: 


20, 282 
21, 385 
42,990 
4,629 




1,102 




Germany 




Total.. 




Switzerland . . 






Other foreign countries... 












Total . - 


89, 286 


79, 547 


1,102 


367 




Pyronines: 

Switzerland _. 




Pyronines: 


12, 566 
441 

75, 397 




4,189 




Netherlands 




Total.- 




Switzerland . 












Total 


88, 404 


188, 996 


4,189 


1,571 




Eosines: 

Great Britain - 




Eosines: 


882 
5, 732 
4,189 




220 








Total.... 




Switzerland 












Total-- -.- 


10, 803 


20, 528 


220 


105 


Diphenylmethane: 


14, 771 

19,180 

574, 078 

5,511 




Diphenylemethane: 

Great Britain.- 


220 

220 

1,102 
















Switzerland 




Other foreign countries-. - 




Total 










Total 


613, 540 


655, 857 


1,542 


733 


Acridine: 

Great Britain -.. 


441 

661 

68, 563 




Hydroquinones: 

Great Britain 


63, 272 
8,598 
18,519 




Germany 






Switzerland 












Total 


69, 665 


105, 888 








Hydroquinones: 


7,275 

23, 810 

69, 886 

220 

220 










Germany 




Switzerland 




Switzerland 




Czechoslovakia 




Total 




Italy.. 












Total 


101,411 


166, 216 


90, 389 


38, 648 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 177 

Table 49. — France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 — Continued 



Class of dye and country 


Dry 


Class of dye and country 
of origin 


Dry 


of origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Indigotines: 

Great Britain 


32,409 

50,044 

220 




Indigotines: 

Germanv. 


5,511 

1,323 

441 




Switzerland 




Belgium 




Spain . .. 




Switzerland 








Total... 




Total... 


82, 673 


$78, 552 


7,275 


$4, 504 




Insoluble vat dyes, other 
than indigo: 
Great Britain.. 




Insoluble vat dyes, other than 
indigo: 
Germany 


83,995 

14,991 

1,543 




220 

167, 109 

441 

17, 857 




Switzerland 




Germanv 








Netherlands 








Switzerland 






Total 




Total 


100, 529 


170, 824 


185, 627 


198,422 




Cibanones: 

Switzerland 




Cibanones: 

Great Britain 


10, 362 
20,944 




48, 060 




Switzerland 




Total... 










Total 


31,306 


40, 899 


48, 060 


34, 249 




Grand total 




Grand total. . 


4,891,125 


5,609,013 


494,930 


936, 825 









Table 


50.— France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1923 ^ 




Class of dye and country 


Dry 


Class of dye and country 
of origin 


Paste 


of origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Nitroso: 

Germany 


882 

882 

3,086 




Monoazo: 

Great Britain 






Switzerland . . . 


















Total 


4,850 


$4,257 








Nitro: 

Great Britain.. . 


1,323 
661 










1 






1 


Total. 


1,984 


1,095 


j 






Pyrazolone: 

Switzerland ... 


133, 819 


84,892 


1 




j 


Total 


133, 819 


84,892 


1 






Stilbene: 

Great Britain.. . . . . . 


441 

1,102 

40,344 




j 


Germany . 






Switzerland 












Total 


41,887 


33, 507 








Monoazo: 

Great Britain 


13, 227 

2,205 

882 

1,984 

423, 944 

882 

4,189 




1,102 








11,023 




Netherlands 




Total. 






Belgium 






Switzerland 






Czechoslovakia . 






Italy 












Total 


447, 313 


283, 805 


12, 125 


$6, 385 




Polyazo: 

Great Britain ... 




Polyazo: 

Great Britain 


12, 787 
23,369 
2,425 
9,259 
461,202 
7,496 
1,102 


i 


1,102 






1 




441 




Netherlands 




Total 






Belgium 






Switzerland 






Italy 






United States 


] 










Total 


517,640 


428,353 


1,543 


1,338 









• From general tables of the foreign commerce and navigation of France, official; converted at average 
exchange rate for 1923; 1,000 francs=$60.811. 



178 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 50. — France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 192S — Continued 



Glass of dye and country 


D 


ry 


Class of dye and country 
of origin 


Dry 


of origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Thiobenzenyl: 


661 

1,323 

20, 723 




Thiobenzenyl: 

Great Britain. 


441 


$365 






Total 




Switzerland.- 












Total. . 


22, 707 


$31, 804 


441 


365 




Sulphur: 

Great Britain 




Sulphur: 

Great Britain 


3,306 

882 

114,419 




9,039 


2,128 


Germany.. . 




Total 
















Total 


118, 607 


81, 791 


9,039 


2,128 




Indophenols: 

Great Britain 




Indophenols: 
Great Britain 


1,984 

227, 735 

74, 956 




3,748 

91,491 

9.480 




Germany 




Germany 








Switzerland 









Total 




Total 


304, 675 


386, 576 


104,719 


92, 433 




Azines: 
Switzerland 




Azines: 

Great Britain.. 


40, 565 

32, 628 

1,102 

1,543 

882 




882 
4,409 




Switzerland 





United States. 




Italy . 




Total 




United States. 






Other foreign countries 












Total 


76, 720 


46, 460 


5,291 


1,277 




Pyronines: 

Switzerland 




Pyronines: 

Germany. 


1,764 

661 

441 

20, 723 

220 




661 


304 


Netherlands 




Total 




Belgium 






Switzerland . 






Italy 












Total 


23,809 


54,791 


661 


304 




Eosines: 

Great Britain.. . . 




Eosines: 

Great Britain 


882 
13, 448 
10, 141 

220 




441 


61 


Germany. - 




Total 




Switzerland 






Czechoslovakia 












Total . 


24, 691 


49, 014 


441 


61 




Diphenylmethane: 

Great Britain 




Diphenylmethane: 
Great Britain 


5,512 
9,921 
2,205 
405, 205 
2,204 




220 
220 




Germany 




Switzerland 

Total 




Netherlands 






Switzerland . 






Italy 












Total 


425, 047 


457,238 


440 


243 




Hydroquinones: 
Great Britain 




Acridines: 

Great Britain.. . 


441 

441 

50,706 

220 




73, 634 
2,204 




Germany.. 






Switzerland . 






Italy . . 












Total 


51,808 


82, 156 








HydroQuinones: 
Great Britain 


10, 803 
57, 760 

3,086 
55, 776 

2,646 










Switzerland.. .. . 




Belgium 




Total 




Switzerland . . 






United States 












Total 


130, 071 


187, 663 


75, 838 


33,689 




Indigotines: 




Indigotines: 


2,205 

220 

1,984 

2,205 

220 




661 
441 








Switzerland 




Switzerland 




Total 




Italy 






Other foreign countries... 






Total 


6,834 


6,203 


1,102 


912 



INTERNATIONAL. DYE TRADE 179 

Table 50. — France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 — Continued 



Class of dye and country 


Dry 


Class of dye ann country 
of origin 


Paste 


of origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Insoluble vat dyes other than 
indigo: 
Germany 


160, 715 
8,157 




Insoluble vat dyes other than 
indigo: 

Great Britain . . 


661 

206, 351 

29, 101 




Switzerland 




Germany 








Switzerland 






Total 




Total 


168, 872 


$279. 4S7 


236, 113 


$220, 805 






Cibanones: 

Switzerland.. 


Cibanones: 

Great Britain.. ... 


11,684 
16,535 




41, 667 


27,000 


Switzerland . . 




Total 








Total 


28, 219 


38, 858 


41,667 


27,000 











Table 51. — France: Imports of indigo, 1923 and 1924 



Imported from— 


1923 


1924 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Great Britain 


2,205 
1.323 
4,850 
18,298 
1,984 








Spain 








British-India 








San Salvador.. 




5,952 




French India 






Other foreign countries 




2,646 












Total 


28, 660 


$27,669 


8,698 


$8,169 







' Prom general tables of the foreign commerce and navigation of France, oflScial; values converted at 
average exchange rate for 1923 (1,000 francs=$60.811) and for 1924 (1,000 francs =$52,368). 

Table 52. — France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 ' 



Class of dye 



Nitroso. 
Nitro. 



Pyrazolone 

Stilbene 

Monoazo 

Polyazo.- 

Thiobenzenyl. 

Sulphur 

Indophenols.. 
Azines. 



Pyronines 

Eosines 

Diphenylmethane.. 

-\crid)nes.- 

Hydroquinones 

In(iigotines 

Insoluble vat dyes other than indigo. 



Dry 



Pounds Value 



Total- 6,664,065 



166, 668 

5,952 

1,764 

1,764 

152. 999 

671, 962 

882 

149,913 

17,637 

10,803 

360, 459 

5,732 

128, 541 

3,086 

20. 723 

361, 120 

604, 060 



$65, 405 

2,527 

1,049 

1,335 

36, 516 

219, 811 

334 

29, 747 

14, 206 

7,246 

385, 552 

8,581 

565, 611 

4,338 

23,263 

114, 452 

336, 694 



6, 816, 667 



Paste 



Pounds Value 



60,627 

882 

1,764 

1,543 

13,228 
9,039 



220 

1,102 

5,732 

220 

661 

160, 795 



882 

3, 863, 121 

10,582 



4, 120, 398 



$7,103 

191 

334 

286 

2,527 

1,192 



667 

1,764 

95 

191 

41, 283 



238 

589, 738 

7,627 



653, 236 



' From December, 1925, Issue of monthly foreign commerce statistics of France, oflBcial; values con- 
verted at average exchange rate for 1925; 1,000 francs=$47.671. 



180 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 53. — France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 19S4 ' 



Class of dye and country of 
destination 



Nitroso: 

Belgium 

Switzerland. 

Spain 

United States 

Canada 

Other foreign countries. 



Total. 



Nitro: 

Belgium 

Italy.. 

Greece 

Other foreign countries. 

Tunis. 

Morocco 

Senegal- 

Indo-China 

Guadeloupe 



Total. 



Pyrazolone: 
Switzerland. 

Total 



Stilbene: 
Belgium. 



Total. 



Monoazo: 

Belgium 

Saar region.. 
Switzerland. 

Algeria 

Tunis. 

Indo-China . 

Total 



Polyazo: 

Germany 

Belgium. 

Switzerland 

Other foreign countries.. 
French Somaliland 



Total. 



Thiobenzenyl: 

Belgium 

Switzerland. 

Total 



Sulphur: 

Saar region.. 
Switzerland. 

Total 



Indophenol: 

Great Britain. 
Switzerland... 

Syria 

Algeria... 

Morocco 

Madagascar... 



Total. 



Azines: 

Germany. 
Austria... 



Total. 



Dry 



Pounds 



131, 174 
220 
29, 542 
1,984 
12, 125 
22, 928 



197, 973 



882 
882 
661 
441 
441 
220 
441 
441 
441 



,850 



441 



441 



2,205 
2,205 



28, 660 

20, 503 

8,598 

441 

220 

220 



58, 642 



11,023 

1, 791, 458 

10, 141 

1,543 

4,189 



1, 818, 354 



221 
2,425 



19, 401 
16, 975 



36, 376 



661 
1,543 

882 
1,102 

882 

221 



5,291 



220 
220 



440 



Value 



Class of dye and country of 
destination 



$92, 220 



2,514 



314 



1,781 



17, 439 



Nitroso: 

Germany 

Saar region.. 

United States. 

Other foreign countries. 



755, 880 



1,309 



8,641 



5,656 



367 



Paste 



Pounds Value 



2,866 

2,425 

441 

882 



Total 


6,614 1 $1,047 






Stilbene: 

Belgium. 


9,480 








Total 


9,480 


2,461 






Monoazo: 

Germany 


220 
220 




Switzerland... 








Total 


440 


105 






Polyazo: 

Switzerland 


1,323 








Total 


1,323 


262 






Thiobenzenyl: 

Belgium 


661 








Total 


661 
441 


157 


Azines: 

Belgium 








Total 


441 


209- 



' From general tables of the foreign commerce and navigation of France, official; converted at average 
exchange rate, 1924; 1,000 francs=$52.368. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 181 

Table 53. — -France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 — Continued 



Class of dye and country of 


Dry 


. Class of dye and country of 
destination 


Paste 


destination 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Pyronines: 


73, 634 

919, 980 

15, 432 

21, 605 

220 




Eosines: 

Belgium 


441 
441 
















Other foreign countries 






Indo-China 












Total 


1, 030, 871 


$2. 203, 855 




Eosines: 

Great Britain 


3,528 

220 

9,259 






Belgium 








Switzerland 






Total 


13, 007 


24, 718 


1 Total 


$157 


Diphenylmethane: 

Great Britain 


35,274 
46, 738 

6,393 
34, 171 
75, 838 
79, 807 

7,275 
19,400 

9,259 

29, 762 

22, 928 

19, 400 

807, 325 

6,834 




Diphenylmethane: 

Germany 


104, 058 
1,102 
1,102 
2,205 
661 
6,173 








Saar region 




Netherlands 




Switzerland 




Belgium - 




Italy 




Switzerland 




Other foreign countries.. 
Indo-China.. 




Italy 










Total 
















Other foreign countries .- 






Tunis 






Morocco - 






Indo-China 






Other colonies and pro- 












Total 


1, 200, 404 


1, 140, 785 


115,301 


47,917 


Acridines: 


1,102 




Hydroquinones: 

Great Britain 


9,038 
159, 834 










Total- 


1,102 


1,676 




Hydroquinones: 

Great Britain 


1,764 
661 

5,733 
220 

1,984 






Belgium 




Belgium 








Total.. 




Other foreign countries... 


















Total 


10. 362 


14. 768 


168, 872 


56,138 


Indigotines: 


310, 628 
762, 571 

87, 523 
289, 905 

51,367 
198, 414 
102, 293 
139, 772 

18, 298 
5,071 

1,543 




Indigotines: 


969, 583 

123,017 

506, 397 

114,419 

89, 286 

1, 768, 089 

23, 309 

10, 803 

56, 878 

19, 180 

441 

6,834 




Belgium 




Switzerland 




Switzerland 




Italy 




Italy 




Egypt 




Spain . .. 




Dutch Indies 




China 




China 












Other foreign countries... 








Tunis 




Other foreign countries.. 

Tunis 




Senegal 






Other colonies and pro- 




French Indies . 














Total 




Total... 


1, 967, 385 


1, 869, 328 


3,688,296 


854, 227 


Insoluble vat dyes other 
than indigo: 


6,393 
81, 129 
26, 235 
8,157 
6,834 
18, 739 
10,803 
57, 761 




Insoluble vat dyes other 
than indigo: 


881 
2,205 
2,205 

441 




Great Britain 




Belgium 




Switzerland 








Portugal 




Other foreign countries.. 
Total 




United States 






Brazil - ... 












Algeria... 












Total.. 


216, 051 


358,511 


5,732 


6,446 


Cibanones: 

Switzerland 


1,102 
882 




Cibanones: 


1,102 




Czechoslovakia . 




Total 










Total. 


1,984 


3,770 


1,102 


1,047 


Grand total 


6, 568, 385 


6, 503, 532 




3, 998, 704 


969, 173 









182 CENSUS OP DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 54, — France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 192S ' 



Class of dye and country of 


Dry 


Class of dye and country of 
destination 


Paste 


destination 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Nitroso: 

Denmark 


11, 905 

16, 976 

441 

59, 524 

1,102 

4,189 

10, 141 

661 

661 




Nitroso: 

Saar region 


882 
882 
220 




Belgium 




Other foreign countries.. 
Algiers 




Switzerland 






Spain 




Total 




United States 






Other foreign countries 






Algeria 






Tunis 






Indo-China.. . . - . 












Total 


105, 600 


$52, 419 


1,984 


$304 




Stilbene: 

Belgium 




Nitro: 

Great Britain . . 


10, 362 

2,205 

1,764 

661 

661 

220 




7,496 




Belgium 






Portugal 






Egypt 






Other foreign countries... 






Madagascar and depend- 
encies - . - . 












Total 


15, 873 


8,757 








Pyrazolone: 

Netherlands 


220 
441 






Belgium . 












Total 


661 


486 








Stilbene: 

Belgium 


16, 975 


14, 534 


2,068 




Total 




Total 


16,975 


14, 534 


7,496 


2,068 




Monoazo: 

United States 




Monoazo: 

Belgium 


4,189 
16, 754 
1,984 
1,323 
1,984 
1,764 
1,323 
1,102 




661 


182 


Switzerland 




Total 




Portugal.. 






Argentine 






Other foreign countries... 






Morocco 






Indo-China. 






Other French colonies 












Total 


30, 423 


10,095 


661 


182 




Indophenols: 

Belgium 




Polyazo: 

Poland 


18, 519 

265, 213 

2,205 

1,102 




1,102 




Belgium 






Switzerland . 






Other foreign countries... 












Total 


287, 039 


126, 669 








Thiobenzenyl: 

Sweden 


1,543 
220 






Belgium 












Total 


1,763 


851 








Sulphur: 

Netherlands 


882 
5,071 
441 
441 
441 






Belgium 






Switzerland 






Tunis .... 






Morocco 












Total 


7,276 


1,885 








Indophenols: 

Belgium . 


4,409 
2,646 

882 
220 




1,034 


Switzerland 




Total 




Other foreign countries... 






Senegal 












Total 


8, 157 


9,426 


1,102 


1,034 









1 From general tables of the foreign commerce and navigation of France, official; values converter' at 
average exchange rate 1923; 1,000 francs=$60.811. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



183 



Table 54. — France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1923 — Continued 



Class of dye and country of 


Dry 


Class of dye and country of 
destination 


Paste 


destination 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Azines: 

Great Britain. . . 


4, 630 

2,425 

441 




Eosines: 


1,102 
441 




Belgium.. . . . . 


















Total 


7,496 


$7,054 








Pyronines: 
Belgium . 


554, 016 
10, 361 

1,764 






Other foreign countries 






Colonies and protecto- 












Total 


566, 141 


1,311,754 








Eosines: 

Sweden 


6,393 
6,173 
2,425 
1,323 






Great Britain 




Other foreign countries.. 
Total 






















Total 


16, 314 


32, 412 


1,543 


$608 




Diphenylmethane: 
Germany . 




Diphenylmethane: 

Netherlands 


5,291 

1, 223, 553 

82, Oil 

39, 462 

27, 998 

4,850 
10, 582 
21,164 
10, 362 
22, 707 
16, 314 

4,630 
240, 963 

1,764 




3,968 
441 
220 
441 

1,764 
220 

2,205 

220 

12, 566 




Bfilginm 








Switzerland 








Italy 








Spain 




Switzerland 




Egypt 




Austria 




China 




United States. 




Japan 
















Tunis 




Total 




Morocco 






Madagascar and depend- 






Indo-China . 






Other colonies and pro- 












Total.. 


1,711,651 


1, 888, 546 


22,046 


9,122 




Hydroquinones: 

Great Britain 




IHydroquinones: 
Netherlands 


441 

2,645 

220 

441 




441 
637, 791 




Belgium 








Spain . 




Total 




United States 












Total 


3,747 


5, 716 


638,232 


193,683 




Indigotines: 

Belgium . . . 




Indigotines: 

Belgium.. 


23,369 
43, 210 
14, 330 
6,393 
52, 029 
9,039 
4,850 
2,866 
3,748 




35,053 
12, 125 
12, 787 
82, 452 
49, 824 
20,503 
1,764 




Italy. . 




Austria 




Spain 




Egypt 




Egypt 




Dutch East Indies 

China . . . 




China 










Other foreign countries.. 




Tunis 






Morocco . 




Total 




Indo-China 






Total. - 


169, 834 


154, 338 


214, 508 


47,311 




Insoluble vat dyes other 
than indigo: 
Belgium 




Insoluble vat dyes other than 
indigo: 
Great Britain 


6,393 
21,164 
4,850 
1,984 
22, 707 
22, 487 
39,683 

1,323 




1,984 




Poland . - 




Total 




Netherlands 






Belgium 






United States... 






Other foreign countries 






Algiers 






Other colonies and pro- 












Total. 


120, 592 


209, 555 


1,984 


1,946 




Cibanones: 






3, 059. 542 


3,834,497 


441 






Total 






441 


365 




Grand total 




Grand total. 


889, 997 


256,623 









5919— 26t 13 



184 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 54a. — France: Exports of indigo, 1923 and 1924 ^ 



Exported to— 


1923 


1924 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Netherlands .-- 


13,669 

623,902 

50,044 

42,549 

35, 935 

151, 456 

34,612 

50,044 

6,614 

7,937 

21,384 

2,205 








Belgium . . . 












37,037 


$36,082 


[taly 






Egypt 








China 








Japan . . 








Other foreign countries 








Algeria 








Tunis --- 








Indo China 








Other colonies and protectorates 
















Total 


1, 040, 351 


$1,147,868 


» 37, 037 


36,082 



• From general tables of the foreign commerce and navigation of France, official; values converted at 
average exchange rate 1923; 1,000 francs=S60.811; 1924, 1000 francs=$52.368. 
' Apparently the export figures for indigo are included under "Indigotines." See p. 181. 

The Dye Industry of Italy 

progress in 1925 ^^ 

The Fabbriche Italiane Materie Coloranti Bonnelli, of Milan, in 
1925 announced an increase of capital from 40,000,000 lire to 45,000,- 
000 lire. The fiscal year 1924-25 closed with profits of 4,465,982 lire, 
which permitted the declaration of a 12 per cent dividend. All in- 
termediates now used in the company's dyes are manufactured in its 
own plants. Special developments in sulphur black and the produc- 
tion of synthetic indigo on a commercial basis are the important 
achievements of the year. 

PRODUCTION IN 1925 ^^ 

At a meeting of the Intellectual Corporation in Milan, July, 1925 » 
Dr. A. Lagana gave significant figures on the present Italian dye- 
stuffs industry. ^^ Before the war Italy was largely dependent upon 
Germany for dyes. At present the relation between consumption 
and production is as follows: 

Azo dyes. — Annual national requirement: 3,600,000 kilograms, of 
which 1,400,000 kilograms are direct blacks and acids and 2,600,000 
kilograms are azo dyes. National production: 1,800,000 kilograms, 
of which 1,200,000 kilograms are direct blacks and acids and 600,000 
kilograms other dyestuffs. 

Sulfur dyes. — Requirement: 3,600,000 kilograms sulfur blacks and 
1,200,000 kilograms other dyes. National production: 3,600,000 
kilograms sulfur blacks and 600,000 kilograms other dyes. 

Dyestuffs from triphenylmethane, basic dyestu^s, dyestuffs for var- 
nishes, etc. — Annual requirement: 600,000 kilograms. National pro- 
duction: 360,000 kilograms. 

The domestic production of intermediates has entirely displaced 
imports. Particularly is this true of benzidine and H acid, the annual 
production of which amounts to 600,000 kilograms each. The qual- 

" Department of Commerce, World Trade Notes on Coal-Tar Products, Nos. 86B, 90B. 
" See Census of Dyes, 1923, pp. 142-144, for production in former years. 
" Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, News Edition, Oct. 10, 1925. 



INTERNATIONAL DVE TKADK 



185 



ity of the national products is constantly improving. The High 
Royal School of Industrial Chemistry in Bologna has instituted a 
special course in the chemistry of dyestuffs. 

Table 55. — Italy: Imports and exports of synthetic organic dyes, 1925 ' 



Class of dyes 



Imports 



Pounds Value 



Exports 



Pounds Value 



Sulphur black.. 

Other sulphur dyes 

Account of Qerman reparations 

Other synthetic organic dyes, dry or containing less than 

50 per cent of water 

Account of German reparations. _ 

In paste, or containing 50 per cent or more of water 

Account of Qerman reparations 

Total 

Natural indigo 



39, 242 

148, 590 

9,259 

2, 155, 879 

1, 350, 318 

225, 090 

928, 578 



$10, 576 
108, 888 



46, 958 
4,189 



$7, 033 
2,789 



1, 780, 201 



350, 090 



261, 430 



86, 030 



25, 573 



24,450 



4, 856, 955 
8,377 



1, 985. 695 
8,582 



426, 810 



295, 702 



' From official statistics of domestic exports and imports for consumption, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1925; values 
converted at average exchange rate, 1925, 1,000 lires= $39,776. 

Table 56. — Italy: Imports of synthetic organic dyes, by countries, 1925 ' , 



Imported from- 



France 

Germany. _ _ 

Germany, account of reparations 

Switzerland 

Other countries 

Total 



Pounds 



350,311 

1, 553, 582 

2, 288, 154 

554, 457 

110,450 



4, 856, 954 



1 From official statistics of domestic exports and imports for consumption, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1925. 

The Dye Industry of Japan 

production 

The estimated production of dyes in Japan for the year August, 
1923, to September, 1924, is given in Table 56a. The production 
for this year amounting to 18,631,000 pounds, valued at $2,799,000, 
was the largest on record. Sulphur dyes, principally black, comprised 
93 per cent of this total by weight and 71 per cent by value. The 
domestic production of this group is almost sufficient to meet home 
needs. Production for the years 1918-1923, by class of application, 
is shown on page 145 of the Census of Dyes for 1923. Later figures 
follow : 

Table 56a. — Production of dyes and intermediates, August, 1923, to September, 

1924^ 



Dyes 


Pounds 


Value 


Direct . ..... 


602, 000 

295, 000 

354,000 

20,000 

17, 360, 000 


$240, 000 


Acid . 


223, 000 


Basic ... 


345, 000 


Alizarin 


18, 000 


Sulphur . 


1, 973, 000 








Total 


18, 631, 000 
6, 647, 000 


2, 799, 000 


Intermediates. 


1, 227, 000 









' Japan Advertiser, Mar. 26, 1925. 



186 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEK SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

The total consumption of dyestufFs in Japan '^ in 1924 was 7,179 
tons, valued at 34,172,000 yen. Imported colors constitute 27 per 
cent of this total in quantity and 50 per cent by value as compared 
with domestic colors which form 73 per cent by quantity and 50 
per cent by value. The home-produced dyestufFs include 268 tons 
of basic dyes, 12 tons of acid mordant dyes, 50 tons of other mordant 
dyes, 10 tons of vat dyes, and 3,430 tons of sulphide dyes. The 
imported colors include 115 tons of basic dyes, 151 tons of direct 
cotton dyes, 191 tons of acid dyes, 27 tons of acid mordant dyes, 
1,000 tons of artificial indigo, and 40 tons of vat dyes. During May, 
1924, the total quantity of dyestuffs and intermediates licensed by 
the Government for importation into Japan was 12,682 kilos, as 
against 21,666 kilos in April, 1925. 

GOVERNMENT MEASURES TO ENCOURAGE DYE MANUFACTURE 

The Japanese Government, regarding dye manufacture as a ke}'^ 
industry, has adopted several measures to stimulate dye production. 
Foremost among these measures was the license system for import 
control adopted June 7, 1924. For the purpose of putting an end 
to the flooding of the home markets with German dyes, it prohibits 
the importation of all types of dyes made in Japan and applies 
specifically to coal-tar dyes and derivatives, exclusive of carbolic 
acid and medicinals. Under the regulations of Japan's Department 
of Commerce (see pp. 181-182, Census of Dyes, 1924) the import 
restriction applies only to German dyes, the provisions of existing 
commercial treaties nullifying its application to dyes originating in 
the United States, Great Britain, France, and Italy. Foreign com- 
petition has become so keen that Japanese dye producers have 
recently been making efforts to shut out dyes from the United States 
and France. 

A second measure designed to encourage dye making was the 
passage of an act by the Japanese Diet, on March 31, 1925,^^ sub- 
sidizing the dye industry to the extent of 4,000,000 yen to be dis- 
tributed over a period of six years, the maximuiTi to be paid out in 
one year not to exceed 1,000,000 yen. 

The increase in import duty on coal-tar dj'^es n. o. p. f. imme- 
diately following the war from 7 yen per 100 kin ($3.49 per 132.25 
pounds) to 35 per cent ad valorem proved inadequate to protect 
the weaker firms, and it was to remedy this situation that the import 
control and state subsidy were resorted to. 

Imperial Ordinances Nos. 301 and 302, effective October 15, 1925, 
enumerate 20 dyes, the manufacturers of which are to be the bene- 
ficiaries of the subsidy act, and other lists have been issued. The 
funds made available by the new provisions of the dyestufts pro- 
duction encouragement act are expected to promote the manufac- 
ture of new and special dyes. The Japan Chronicle reports that 
the grant will cover the difference between the market price of dyes 
listed and the cost plus a profit of 20 per cent. 

Reports from Japan indicate that the measures thus far adopted 
for the protection of the dye industry are inadequate to establish 
it on a permanent basis. Two other projects are now under con- 
is Department of Commerce, Dyestuffs in Japan in World Trade Notes on Coal-Tar Products, No. 73-B, 
Dec 5 1925 

i» See Census of Dyes, 1924, p. 158. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



187 



sideration: (1) The purchase by the Government of existing plants 
to be operated by the War and Navy Departments, ^° (2) the adop- 
tion of a monopoly system whereby the Government will purchase 
the output of private plants. 

In view of the competition that Japan is encountering from Ger- 
many, France, Switzerland, the United States, and Great Britain, 
her movements are being watched with great interest. 

Tables 57 to 60, inclusive, show the trade of Japan in coal-tar 
dyes. 



Table 57. — Japan: Impoi 


ts and exports 


of coal-tar dyes, by 


classes, 


19:^5 1 


. Class of dye 


Imports 


Exports 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 




2, 148, 290 


■61. 074. 566 








4, 495, 054 2, 214, 077 
97,105 112.710 
























Total coal-tar dyes 


6, 740, 449 
72, 163 


3, 401, 353 
58, 249 


1,685.704 


$214,418 













1 From monthly return of the foreign trade of the Empire of Japan, issue of December, 1925. Value 
converted at average exchange rate, 1925, 1 yen = $0.41036. 

Table 58. — Japan: Imports of coal-tar dyes {exclusive of indigo), by countries, 

1925^ 



Imported from— 


Pounds 


Vi\Iue 


Imported from— 


Pounds 


Value 


Great Britain... .. 


47, 368 

198, 023 

2, .-,51, 086 

445, 375 


$15, 251 

91, 081 

1, 583. 867 

241, 906 


United States 


1, 347. 940 
2,366 


$393, 561 




other countries ... 


1,121 


Germany 

Switzerland. 


Total 




4, 592, 158 


2, 326, 787 







1 From monthly return of the foreign trade of the Empire of Japan, issue of December, 1925. Values 
converted ataverage exchange rate, 1925, 1 yen = $0.41036. 

Table 59. — Japan: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, by classes, 1924 ' 



Class of dye 


Imports 


Exports 


Pounds 


Value 


1 
Pounds Value 


Indigo, artificial 


3,295,015 

14,096,358 

172, 682 


$1,596,840 

4,924,671 

168,041 


1 














Total coal-tar dyes 


17,564,055 
106,021 


6, 689, 552 
92,583 


1,899,495 1 $283,179 


Indigo, natural, dry 









1 From monthly return of the foreign trade of the Empire of Japan, issue of December, 1924. Val ues 
converted at average exchange rate, 1924, 1 yen=$0.41186. 

Table 60. — Japan: Imports of coal-tar dyes {exclusive of indigo), by countries, 

192 J, « 



Imported from— 


Pounds 


Value 


Imported from— 


1 
Pounds 


Value 


Great Britain . 


13, 103 
111,443 
12,001,217 
759,533 j 


$8, ICO 

42, 336 

4.264,019 

358, 664 


United States.. . . 


1,349,530 
31,214 


$402, 446 


France 


other countries 


17, 147 




Total 




Switzerland 


14,269,040 j 


5,092,712 









" From monthly return of the foreign trade of the Empire of Japan, issue of December, 1924. Values 
converted at average exchange rate, 1924, 1 yen=^$0.41186. 

20 Department of Commerce, World Trade Notes on Coal-Tar Products No. 81-B. 



188 census of dyes and othee synthetic chemicals 
The Dye Industry of Poland '' 



PRODUCTION OF DYES 

The 1925 production of 1,320,000 pounds ^^ (600,000 kilos) is only 
30 per cent of the 1924 production. The decline may be attributed 
largely to depression in the textile industry. The developments of the 
year include the completion of processes for several dyes previously 
imported and their production in 1926 is expected. In 1923 pro- 
duction was reported at 4,303,379 pounds and in 1922, 2,142,871 
pounds. Pre-war consumption was 12,000,000 pounds per year. 



Table 61.- 


-Poland: Imports and exports of synthetic dyes, 1924 ' 




Country of origin 


Imports 


Country of destination 


Exports 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Austria 




10,803 
15, 653 
904,647 
38,360 
19,400 
9,039 


$8,492 
11,194 
715,644 
39, 951 
15,633 
7,527 


Czechoslovakia .. ... 


7,055 
20, 062 
22, 046 
31,967 
234, 569 
14, 991 


$4,439 


C zechoslovakia 


Danzig 


5,790 


Germany 


Lithunania . . 


13,124 


Switzerland 


Germany 


18, 914 


Italy . . . 


Russia__ 


148, 031 


other countries . . 


other countries 


8,685 






Total 




Total 


997, 802 


798,441 


330, 690 


198, 983 









1 From Foreign Commerce of the Polish Republic; values converted at exchange rate, par value 1 zloty= 
$0,193. 

The Dye Industry of Russia 

Prior to the war dye production in Russia was confined to assem- 
bling imported intermediates, chiefly of German origin, into a limited 
variety of dyes. Large quantities of intermediates were used by 
the textile industry for the production of the insoluble ice dyes on 
cotton, such as para red; many were also imported for color lakes. 

After the war when the Russians attempted to manufacture dyes 
they found themselves dependent upon imports for intermediates and 
for most crudes. Germany was at first apparently unfriendly toward 
Russia's attempts to establish a dye industry and evaded supplying 
the necessary intermediates. In 1923 she furnished a few, but they 
were so inferior in quality that the dyes made from them were unsal- 
able and, it is reported, are still in the Government warehouse. 

The Soviet Government intends to establish dye manufacture on a 
scale sufficient to supply the bulk requirements of Russia. With 
this end in view it has adopted a license import control system 
which permits the entry only of dyes not made satisfactorily by the 
home industry. A coke plant operating in Siberia ^^ is producing 
benzene and a few other ci'udes. Its first output of benzene was 
unfit for nitration, but with the installation of modern distillation 
equipment it is now making a high grade of benzene for the manufac- 
ture of aniline and synthetic phenol. Although Russia is buying 
intermediates and many dyes from Germany she has not permitted 
the Germans to establish dye plants in Russia. In 1925 certain prod- 

" For more detailed information on the Polish dye industry, see Census of Dyes, 1924, pp. 159-161. 

22 Department of Commerce, World Trade Notes on Coal-Tar Products, No. 89-B. 

23 The construction of coal-tar distillation plants at Kadiev and Stalein and an anthracene plant at Yu- 
zovka has been authorized by the Council of Labor and Defense. Department of Commerce, World Trade 
Notes on Industrial Chemicals, No. 94A. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TEADE 189 

ucts were bought from the United States. Prices of dyes are 
generally higher than in the United States. 

The president of the South Russian Chemical Trust (the "Chi- 
mugol") ^* gives the following details in regard to the manufacture 
of dyes and intermediates : 

Chimugol plans to expand the Rubeschnaja plant, where it is now 
erecting a laboratory for research work. The intention is to make 
such intermediates as beta naphthol, salicylic acid, paranitraniline, 
meta nitraniline, and chlorobenzene. The Russian dye industry 
has a few high-grade scientific men with practical experience in dye 
manufacture, but it needs to be organized to give the proper coordina- 
tion between crude and intermediate production. In other words, 
its future is dependent upon its ability to first make crudes and 
intermediates of sufficient purity and on a large enough scale to insure 
dyes of the right quality and in adequate quantity. 

The manufacturing program for 1925-26 set up by the Russian 
Aniline Trust is shown in the following tabular statement: 



Dye 



Pounds 1 



Direct dyes... 

Sulphur black 

Other sulphur dyes ..- _. 

Acid dyes 

Mordant dyes 

Basic dyes (principally Bismarck brown and chrysoidine) . 
Nigrosine 

Total dyes 

Intermediates for calico printing.-. 

Total dyes and intermediates 



31,464 
129, 600 
5,220 
6,840 
2,952 
3,744 
2,520 



182, 340 
72,720 



255, 060 



» Converted from poods at 36 pounds to a pood. 

Russia's consumption of dyes is far in excess of the quantity that 
the Aniline Trust is planning to manufacture in the coming year 
(1925-26). Pre-war imports of dyes— 4,835,647 pounds in 1913, 
valued at $3,701,186 — may be taken as a partial measure of her 
national requirements. Official figures give Germany's export of 
dyes and intermediates to Russia in 1913 as 10,092,658 pounds, 
of which 4,102,760 pounds were dyes and 5,989,898 pounds were 
intermediates. 

The 192,600 pounds of sulphur black that it is planned to manufac- 
ture in 1925-26 will supply only 25 per cent of Russia's needs for that 
particular dye, and the contemplated output of other dyes is even 
more inadequate. 

The sulphur dyes first produced were of poor keeping quality and 
lacked clearness, but improvement is reported in this group of colors 
important to the cotton textile industry. 

The Dye Industry of Spain 

dye license system for import control 

The Government protects the Spanish dye industry by a temporary 
prohibition, effective March, 1926, on the import of certain dyes. 
In the issuance of permits to importers the Government is guided by 
national considerations, available stocks, and prices. The following 

M The Chemical Trade Journal and Chemical Engineer, Jan. 1, 1926. 



190 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



colors are said to be made in Spain: Sulphur black, acid blacky 
orange II, benzopurpurine 4B, chrome black (F type), chrysoidine, 
Bismarck brown, acid red, and a few other direct and acid dyes. 

Production. — The present monthly production of dyes in Spain, 
equivalent to 1,491,600 kilos per year, follows (British Industries, 
July 15, 1926, p. 329): Sulphur black, 50,000 kilos; other sulphur 
dyes, 35,000 kilos; direct cotton dyes, 18,000 kilos; direct developed 
dyes, 1,000 kilos; basic dyes, 2,500 kilos; nigrosines (water soluble), 
400 kilos; spirit soluble, 200 kilos; acid dyes, 9,000 kilos; oil soluble 
dyes, 200 kilos; chrome dyes, 6,000 kilos; union dyes, 2,000 kilos. 

Table 62. — Spain: Imports of dyes and intermediates, 1924 and 1925 • 



Class of dye and country of origin 



1925 



1924 



Nitrated and chlorinated derivatives : Nitraniline, nitrobenzol, sulphanilic acid, etc.; 

Germany.. 

France 

United States 

Great Britain 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

Italy 



$49,646 

13, 802 

752 

458 

2,747 



19, 165 



$5, 705 
3,539 
2,043 
716 
3,017 
58 
18, 314 



Total. 



86, 570 



33, 392 



Paranitraniline, diphenylamine, alpha and beta naphthol, and anthraquinone: 

Germany 

France 

Great Britain 

Netherlands... 

Switzerland , '... 

Italy r 



7,823 

5,215 

62 



640 



8,953 
1,370 
274 
1,370 
91 
6,944 



Total. 



13, 740 



19,003 



Artificial organic coloring materials in powder or crystals: 

Germany 

Belgium 

France 

United States 

Great Britain. 

Netherlands 

Switzerland-. 

Italy... 

Other countries 



498, 491 
4, 352 
150, 645 
5,902 
28, 417 
25, 719 
79, 435 
10, 709 
2,323 



454, 174 

800 

64, 704 

8,713 

21, 430 

25, 810 

77, 842 

27,233 

7,617 



Total. 



805, 993 



688, 323 



Artificial organic coloring materials, in paste or solid form, containing at least 50 per 
cent water: 

Germany.. ._ 

France 

Great Britain 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 



9,781 
1,798 
3,860 



Italy 

Other countries. 



4,765 
323 



9,445 
1,428 
1,148 
790 
421 
160 
480 



Total . 



20, 536 



13, 872 



' From World Trade Notes on Coal-Tar Products, No. 95-B, Dept. of Com. Average value of 
1 peseta =$0.133375 in 1924 and $0.143443 in 1925. 

The Dye Industry of Switzerl.^nd 

Switzerland is unique in that without raw materials (except salt) 
she yet possesses a well-developed industry on an export basis. ^^ 
Before the war the Swiss dye industry ranked second to the German, 
producing about 7 per cent of the world's output, and with an export 
trade equal to more than 10 per cent, by value, of that of Germany. 

Three of the four dye producers at Basel have formed a combina- 
tion somewhat similar to the German I. G. Each firm retains its 



« See Census of Dyes, 1923 and 1924. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



191 



individuality, but the three exchange information about technical 
matters and commercial activities, pool their earnings, and share 
profits and losses in proportion to the capital they have invested. 
The Swiss control more than 15 per cent of the world's export trade 
in coal-tar dyes. They consume only about 10 per cent of their 
total output; the remainder goes to all important world markets. 
They make an excellent variety of the higher cost dyes as well as 
indigo, an important low-price bulk color. Branch plants which 
they have established in the United States, Great Britain, Italy, 
and France enable them to share the profits of these markets over 
and above an amount indicated by the actual exports from Switzer- 
land to the countries mentioned. 

Table 63 shows a trend of exports from Switzerland in 1913 and 
1920 to 1925.'« 





Table 63. 


— Switzerland: 


Exports of dyes, 1913, 


1920-1926 




Year 


Pounds 


Value 


1913 








19, 458, 902 
23, 739, 794 
10, 779, 612 
16,167,655 
18, 282, 967 
19,015,998 
16,161,041 


$5, 549, 752 


1920 


35,411,115 


1921 


11, 654, 516 


1922 


13, 042, 635 


1923 


12, 253, 711 


1924 


12, 138, 346 


1925 


1 1, 979, 718 







EXPORTS IN 1925 

Switzerland's export trade in 1925 showed two significant 
changes — (1) a conspicuous loss in exports of indigo, and (2) a small 
increase in the tonnage of dyes other than indigo. The total exports 
in 1925 were 16,161,041 pounds, valued at $11,979,718, as com- 
pared with 19,015,998 pounds, valued at $12,138,346, in 1924. 
Exports of synthetic indigo in 1925 totaled 5,270,096 pounds, valued 
at $1,904,270, a decline of 25 per cent by value and 39 per cent by 
quantity. This decrease may be attributed to the loss of trade in 
the Far East markets, particularly China, the world's largest con- 
sumer of indigo, where competition is offered by German, and to 
some extent, by American firms. The loss of this indigo trade has 
affected the Society of Chemical Industry, the sole manufacturer 
of indigo in Switzerland. 

The 1925 export of dyes other than indigo indicates progress in 
the industry. Swiss shipments for the year totaled 10,888,740 
pounds, valued at $10,075,061, an increase of 6 per cent by quantity 
and nearly 5 per cent by value, as compared with 1924. France, the 
principal consumer, took 2,027,130 pounds, valued at $2,099,470, 
which was a 26 per cent decline by quantity, attributable in part to 
the French rate of exchange. The United States, the second con- 
sumer of Swiss colors, bought 1,325,186 pounds, valued at $1,561,412. 
This is an increase of 127 per cent by value, an increase which may 
be attributed to several causes, chief of which are the ability of the 
Swiss to compete with the United States on the high cost dyes since 
the tariff reduction effective September 21, 1924, and to the increased 
activity of the textile industry in the United States during 1925. 
The dyes exported to the United States include a variety of high-cost 
specialties, the vat colors making up the leading group. 

'« For further details see Census of Dyes, 1922 to 1924. 
5919— 26t 14 



192 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



England and Czechoslovakia were large consumers of Swiss dyes 
in 1925, and Germany took an increased share. Through an arrange- 
ment between the German and the Swiss Governments, the German 
import restriction on dyes was relaxed to a certain extent. 



Table 63a. — Switzerland: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 * 




Anilin and other coal- 
tar dyes 


Indigo, indigo solution 


Alizarin, 


synthetic 




Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Imported from— 
Germany 


1, 245, 599 

661 

93, 475 

57, 320 

7,496 

4,850 

48, 722 

220 

14, 771 


$976, 197 

387 

79,047 

34.015 

5,025 

2,899 

34, 595 

387 

9,857 


106, 703 


$37, 687 


200,398 


$35, 175 


Austria.. 


France _ 


23, 369 


3,286 


882 


193 


Italy 




Belgium 










Holland... ._ 










Great Britain 










Czechoslovakia 










United States 










Egypt 


220 
220 








Japan 






193 
















Total 


1, 473, 114 


1, 142, 407 


130, 512 


41, 166 


201, 280 


35,368 






Exported to— 

Germany 


790, 790 

168, 431 

2,011,036 

508, 822 

586, 644 

302, 251 

1, 020, 509 

152, 558 

101,412 

138, 228 

35, 053 

341,713 

66. 579 

41, 667 

220 

121,473 

1, 079, 593 

29,983 

41, 667 

13, 228 

110, 450 

97, 002 

8,818 

882 

10, 362 

220 

661 

1,324 

2,205 

1,102 

492, 067 

1,764 

18, 298 

51, 147 

220 

158, 070 

367, 066 

203, 926 

1, 323, 642 

117,065 

661 

1,323 

209, 878 

8, 1.57 

115,521 

11.243 

5,291 

661 

12, 125 

5,732 


619,617 

124, 465 

2, 087, 101 

559,511 

358, 126 

217, 620 

1, 138, 735 

214, 334 

71,702 

116,734 

31,309 

287,390 

67, 064 

65, 660 

387 

128, 523 

773, 459 

32, 662 

22, 612 

10, 050 

75, 375 

68, 224 

11,210 

966 

8,890 

580 

773 

2,126 

5,412 

773 

335, 900 

1,546 

17, 974 

35, 561 


7,275 
64,154 
16, 094 
26,235 

2,425 

661 

20, 282 

220 

6,174 

3,527 


10,630 

15,268 

12, 369 

8,504 

966 

580 

17, 587 

193 

3,673 

4,252 






Austria 






France 






Italy 






Belgium 






Holland.. 






Great Britain 






Spain 






Portugal . 






Denmark 






Norway 






Sweden 


220 


193 






Finland 






Latvia and Esthonia 




193 






Lithuania . . 








Poland 


1,323 

441 

3,527 

3,307 


1,933 

387 

2,126 

3,092 






Czechoslovakia.. 






Hungary 






Jugoslavia 






Greece 






Bulgaria.. 


13, 889 
25, 353 


8,697 
8,890 






Rumania 






Russia 






Turkey.. 


661 
70, 988 


193 
34,208 






Egypt 






Algiers 






Morocco 










South Africa 










Mesopotamia . 










Svria 


6,834 
112,214 


3,479 
73, 828 






British India 


2.205 


387 


Siam 




Indo-China.. 










Dutch East Indies. 


115, 962 


45, 612 






Philippine Islands 






China ... .. 


102, 239 

315, 220 

144, 178 

1, 5.59, 866 

94, 701 

580 

966 

259, 752 

8,311 

77, 887 

10, 823 

4,832 

580 

8,310 

4,445 


4, 565, 065 
150, 133 


1,426,511 
198, 486 


! 


Japan 




Canada . 






United States 


1,544 
7,716 


1,546 
6.959 






Mexico . . 






Central America 






Colombia.. 










Brazil,. 


882 


773 




Uruguay 




Argentina 










Chile 


40, 124 


10.630 






Peru 






Ecuador 












2,866 


2.512 






New Zealand and South Sea 
Islands 














Total 


10, 888, 740 


10, 075, 061 


5, 270, 096 


1,904,270 


2,205 


387 







> From official statistics of the foreign trade of Switzerland, 
rate, 1925; 1 franc=$0.19327. 



Values converted at average exchange 



international dye trade 

The Dye Trade of Other Countries 
Table 64. — -Argentina: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1923 and 1924 ' 



193 



Class of dye and country of origin 



Anilin dyes; 

Germany 

Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Spain 

United States 

France 

Italy 

Netherlands 

United Kingdom- 
Sweden 

Switzerland- 

Uruguay 



Total. 



Indigo: 

Germany 

Bolivia 

Chile 

France 

English possessions. 
United Kingdom 



Total 

Grand total - 



1923 



Pounds Value 



704, 736 

6,720 

11 

6,475 

265 

3,761 

295, 641 

3,869 

23,971 

17, 462 

481 

22 

87, 576 

273 



1,151,262 



911 
15 



214 
57 
154 



1,351 



1, 152, 613 



$320, 431 

2,916 

6 

2,861 

118 

1,848 

123,614 

1,944 

11, 710 

8,402 

240 

12 

41, 525 

144 



515, 771 



Pounds Value 



841, 494 

8, 591 

20 

88 

18 

633 

186, 245 

6,111 

34, 874 

6,316 

482 



70, 203 
1,127 



1, 156, 202 



160 
45 
122 



1,056 



516, 827 



1,675 

no 

4 

272 



485 



2,546 



$520, 878 

5,827 

14 

62 

13 

212 

111, 242 

3,579 

22, 191 

3,806 

304 



46, 143 



715, 059 



1,740 

115 

5 

180 



394 



2,434 



1, 158, 748 



717, 493 



' From 1924 yearbook of the foreign commerce of the Argentine Republic. Values converted at exchange 
rate— one gold peso = $0.9648. 



Table 65. — Austria: Imports and exports of coal-tar dy 


SS, 1925 1 




Class of dye and country of origin 


Imports 


Exports 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


Coal-tar dyes other than indigo: 

Bulgaria 






8,157 
145, 724 

1,984 

661 

46, 958 

1,323 
47, 179 
39, 021 
69, 224 

2,646 


$4,781 


Germany 


i, 243, 6i5 
9, 921 
20, 723 


$715, 293 
2,812 
10, 827 


97, 725 


Italv- 


562 


Netherlands ._ 


422 


Rumania .. _ 


28,403 


Switzerland 

Serbia. ... . 


205, 247 

2,646 

43, 431 

28, 660 

14, 550 


118, 395 

3,406 

18, 842 

34,483 

8,156 


984 
30, 232 


Czechoslovakia -- . 


22, 357 


Hungary 


41, 059 


Other countries 


2,250 






Total 


1. 568, 793 


890, 214 


362, 877 


228, 775 






Indigo, synthetic and natural: 

Bulgaria 






882 
220 


703 


Germany 


225, 090 
75, 838 


40, 356 
11,952 




France 




Greece- - 


220 


141 


Italy- - 


220 






Poland .. 






141 


Rumania . . ' 




882 


281 


Switzerland - 


83,114 


6,187 




Serbia 


6,394 


3,515 


Triest- 


1,543 


281 




Czechoslovakia 


662 

8,818 


422 


Hungary.-. 


220 


141 


2,250 






Total 


386, 025 


58,917 


18, 078 


7,453 






Grand total 


1, 954, 818 


949, 131 


380, 955 


236, 228 




• 



' From official statistics of Austrian foreign trade for the year 1925. Values converted at average exchange 
rate, 1925—1 schilling=$0.140612. 



194 CENSUS or dyes and other synthetic chemicals 

Table 66. — Belgium: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, dry and paste, 1925 



Imports 


Exports 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Potmds 


Value 


Class of dye and country of 
destination 


Pounds 


Value 


Alizarin: 

Germany 


36, 402 

926 

2,676 

5 


$14, 866 

386 

869 

3 


Alizarin: 


7,482 


.<IiS74 


France. .. .. . - .. 


Other countries 

Total..- 




Great Britain 


24, 592 




tiler countries 


2 244 






Total___ 


40, 009 


16, 124 


32, 074 


2,618 




Alizarin dyes: 
Egypt 




Alizarin dyes: 

Germany 


90, 938 

397 

1,400 

3, 152 


27, 381 

484 

1,033 

450 


17,915 1 1 5Sfi 


France. 


Total 










Otiier countries. 








Total 


95, 887 


29, 348 


17, 915 


1,286 




.\nilin dyes: 
Egypt 




Anilin dyes: 

Germany- 


1, 787, 913 
499, 390 
437, 243 
435, 854 
458, 350 
162, 031 


808, 061 
132, 194 
125. 158 

81, 276 
241, 884 

45, 121 


127. 040 


18.504 


United States 


United States 


59,870 1 Sfi 187 


France.- - 


British India 


26, 233 
50, 031 
106, 242 
199. 496 


16 027 


Netherlands 


Japan 


20. 369 


Switzerland.. 


Netherlands 


30. 931 


Other countries. 




72. 944 




Total 




Total- 


3, 780, 781 


1, 433, 694 


568,912 


244, 962 




Indigo, synthetic: 
Tunis.. 


Indigo, synthetic: 

Germany 


233, 324 

114,500 

1,900 


28, 954 

17,413 

438 


2,712 
231 


1,603 


France 


Other countries 




Other countries 


213 




Total 




Total-.. 


349, 724 


46, 805 


2. 943 


1 816 




Others: 




Others: 

Germany 


21, 01« 
110,614 
330, 362 

11, 825 


6,223 
16, 223 
16, 552 

3,764 


21, 197 
35. 338 
52, 317 
23, 201 
6, 753 
21, 466 
63, 307 


1,915 
3,509 


France.. 


ChUe 


Netherlands .. 


Egypt 


2,669 


Other countries. 


Spain- 


1,731 




France 


4,595 




Netherlands 


1,589 




Other countries. 


5,449 




Total 




Total ... 


473, 817 


42,762 


223, 579 


21, 457 




Grand total - 




Grand total.. . 


4, 740, 218 


1, 568, 733 


845, 423 


272, 139 




Indigo, natural: 

Denmark . 




Indigo, natural: 

France- .-. 


18, 629 

5,254 

35 


1,074 
673 

85 


3,836 
13, 212 
3,796 
2,410 
13, 585 


2,141 


Netherlands 


Egypt - . 


1,913 


Other countries 


Dutch East Indies 

Netherlands 


2,209 




1,828 




Other countries 


1,011 




Total . 




Total-. 


23, 918 


1,832 


36, S39 


9, 102 









1 From monthly bulletin of the foreign commerce of the economic union of Belgium and Louxembiirg 
issue of December, 1925. Values converted at average exchange rate, 1925—1,000 franes=$47.5S0 

Table 67. — Brazil: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 ' 



Class of dye 


'Pounds 


Value 


Aniline or fuchsine dyes.. 


949, 834 

1, 188, S90 


$982, 623 


Indigo and ultramarine blue . . . . 


214, 866 








Total-- 


2, 138, 724 


1. 197, 489 







' From foreign trade of Brazil. Values converted at average exchange rate, 1924 — 1 milrois, paper= 
$0.1095. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 195 

Table 68. — Canada: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 12 months ended March 31, 1925 ^ 



Class of dye and country of origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Aniline and coal-tar dyes, soluble in water, in bulk or packages of not less than 
1 pound weight, including alizarin and artificial alizarins: 
United Kingdom . . . . - . 


299, 095 
1, 152, 625 
413,771 
126, 984 
19, 655 
138, 877 
39,550 


$111,479 




798, 813 




313,317 




119,692 




11,666 




90, 734 


ther countries - - - - 


15, 420 






Total 


2, 190, 557 


1, 461, 121 






Aniline and coal-tar dyes, n. o. p.: 


322 

14,853 

522 


339 




6,659 




587 






Total - - - - 


15. 697 


7,585 






Indigo: 


25 


59 








25 


59 






United States ...... 


37, 100 
99, 668 


5,761 




18, 383 








136. 768 


24, 144 








2,343,047 


1, 492, 909 







' From March, 1925, issue of monthly report of the trade of Canada. Values converted at average 
exchange rate, year ended Mar. 31, 1925^1 Canadian dollar=$0.9996. 

Table 69. — China: Imports of dyes, colors, and paints, 1924 ' 



Aniline 



Imported from- 



Value 



Indigo, artificial 



Pounds 



Value 



Dyes and colors 
unelassed 



Pounds 



Value 



Hongkong 

Macao 

French Indo-China 

Siam 

Singapore, Straits, etc 

Dutch Indies 

British India 

Great Britain 

Sweden... 

Denmark 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Belgium.. 

France. 

Switzerland 

Italy.. _ 

Russia and Siberia, by land frontiers. 

Russian Pacific ports 

Korea 

Japan (including Formosa) 

Philippine Islands 

Canada 

United States (including Hawaii) 

Turkey, Persia, Egypt, Aden, etc 

Portugal 

Australia, New Zealand, etc 



Total. 
Reexports.. 



Total net imports . 



$913, 322 

89 

7,538 

214 

60, 357 

62 

16, 299 

124,414 

57 

11,550 

2, 560, 824 

5, 477, 930 

66, 699 

86, 309 

45, 745 

6,284 

27 

424 

9,731 

246, 295 

2 

2,671 

196, 043 



1, 468, 630 
12,000 
4,533 



$636, 133 
5,466 
2,288 



9, 847, 620 
85, 865 
210, 661 



3,867 



1,618 



1, 913, 552 



575, 253 



945, 310 
23, 466 
24,799 

604,918 



8, 990, 175 

22, 469, 438 

770. 647 

3. 683. 108 

6, 334, 242 



3, 364, 858 
8,479,411 
216,361 
1, 175, 369 
1, 927, 316 



3, 048, 057 

1, 738, 490 

560, 252 

315, 459 



10,800 



533 
5,600 
109, 997 I 
1,333 I 



160 

2,007 

25, 826 



4,800 

859, 178 

9, 085, 640 



10,764,931 I 2,936,512 



785 



461, 455 
4,667 
5,333 
11,200 



, 832, 886 
390, 528 



56,532,587 i 19,349,076 
372, 124 I 140, 438 



27, 847, 970 
187, 862 



9, 442, 358 



56,160,463 ; 19,208,638 



$460, 887 
3,463 
5,760 



45, 500 

1,071 

3,305 

103, 252 



577. 207 

467, 931 

78, 803 

37, 793 



3,791 



1,850 

30, 089 

700, 959 



126, 059 

310 

1,455 

516 



2, 649, 981 
23, 48) 



27, 660, 108 2, 626, 502 



' From foreign trade of China. Values converted at average exchange rate, 1924; haikwan tael = .$0.8 



196 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 70. — China: Imports of natural indigo, 1934 * 



Imported from — 



Pounds 



Hongkong.. 

Macao 

French Indo-China 

Netherlands 

Spain (including Gibraltar) 
Japan (including Formosa) . 

Total 

Reexported 

Total net imports 



994, 375 


$64, 593 


4,533 


295 


133 


7 


13, 333 


12, 979 


10, 133 


7,981 


1, 867 


506 


1, 024, 374 


86, 362 


667 


626 



1, 023, 707 



' From foreign trade of China. Values converted at average exchange rate, 1924; haikwan tael= $0.8899. 
Table 71. — Czechoslovakia: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, calendar year 1924 ' 



Imports 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 

Alizarin, alizarin colors and 
synthetic indigo; 

Germany 

Switzerland 

France 

Poland 

Austria... 

Hungary 

Belgium. 



Total 

Azo and sulphur dyes 

Germany 

Switzerland 

Austria 

Netherlands 

Sweden 

France 



Total 

All other coal-tar dyes: 

Germany.. , 

Switzerland. 

Netherlands. 

France... 

Austria 

Poland 

Hungary 

Belgium 

Italy 

Jugoslavia 

Great Britain and Ire- 
land 



Total 

Grand total. 



Pounds 



465, 031 
71, 222 
52, 212 
752 
739 
147 
141 



590, 244 



586, 474 

150, 345 

35, 267 

2,725 

617 

309 



775, 737 



6, 435, 168 

837, 845 

47, 745 

41, 050 

22, 943 

8,106 

4.385 

1,356 

1,199 

55 

31 



Value 



$180, 950 

19, 335 

21, 398 

660 

626 

106 

20 



223, 095 



274, 054 

79, 730 

1,426 

983 

3,279 

115 



359, 587 



7, 399, 883 



8, 765, 864 



3. 861, 521 

497, 044 

27, 210 

21. 586 

13,838 

4,597 

2,448 

1.352 

520 

47 

45 



4, 430, 208 



5, 012, i 



Exports 



Class of dye and country of 
destination 



Alizarin, alizarin colors and 
synthetic indigo: 

Netherlands 

Russia 

Japan 

Hungary 

Austria 

Poland 

Belgium 

Sweden _ 

Rumania 

Germany 

Switzerland 

United States 

France 

Other foreign countries. 

Total 

Azo and sulphur dyes: 

Belgium 

Au.stria 

Germ any 

Hamburg 

Netherlands 

Sweden 

Italy 

Hungary 

Jugoslavia. 

Switzerland 

Poland 

Japan 

Norway 

Total 

All other coal-tar dyes: 

Germany 

Austria 

Hungary 

Jugoslavia 

Rumania 

Belgium 

Poland 

Sweden 

Russia 

Netherlands.. 

Italy 

France 

Switzerland 

United States 

Greece .. 

Triest 

Egypt 

Bulgaria 

Other foreign countries. 

Total 

Grand total 



Pounds 



48, 261 

12, 745 

8,781 

7,619 

6,005 

5,543 

3,777 

3,397 

2,246 

2,222 

694 

381 

368 

172 



102, 211 



25, 675 

11, 365 

3,857 

2, 648 

1,687 

L612 

1,210 

1,150 

1,008 

150 

68 

46 

7 



50,483 



66, 094 

52, 697 

46, 760 

14, 372 

11. 501 

10,644 

9,921 

7,612 

4,019 

3,422 

2,961 

2,420 

2, 332 

1,111 

769 

756 

745 

483 

1,709 



240, 328 



393, 022 



' From foreign commerce of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, official, 
exchange rate, 1924; 1,000 crowns=$29.541. 



Values converted at average 



INTEBNATIONAL DYE TRADE 197 

Table 72.— Egypt: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1925 ^ 



Imports 


Reexports 


Class of dye and country 
of origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Class of dye and country 
of destination 


Pounds 


Value 


Indigo, synthetic: 


73, 224 

502, 204 

80, 366 


$25, 053 
189, 433 
24, 910 


Indigo, synthetic 


1,964 
2,540 


$1, 284 
2,105 


France-. 




Germany . 


Total 










Total 


655, 794 


239, 396 


4,504 






Indigo natural -. 




Other coal-tar dyes: 

United Kingdom 


6,045 
7 
8,329 
171, 588 
11,633 
2,097 


2,190 

4 

3,070 

77, 036 
6,652 

857 


22 




Belgium 




France 




Germany ..... 




Switzerland .. ... 












Total ... 


199, 699 


89,809 








Indigo natural: 

British India 


61, 956 


48,890 


18 




Total 




Total 


61, 956 


48, 890 


22 


18 








Other dyes: 

United Kingdom 


4,974 
1,312 
10, 634 
2,230 
29 
2,857 


4,457 
808 

4,686 
624 
31 

1,306 






France 




Germany 




Italy 




United States. 












Total 


22, 037 


11,912 








Grand total... 


939, 486 


390,007 


4,526 


3 407 









' From December, 1925, issue of monthly summary of the foreign trade of Egypt. Values converted at 
average exchange rate, 1925; 1 Egyptian pound = $4.4882. 



198 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 73. — India: Imports of coal-tar dyes and exports of natural indigo, fiscal 
year ended March 31, 1924 * 



Imports of coal-tar dyes 



Class of dye and country 
of origin 



Alizarin: 

United Kingdom 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

France 

Italy 

C zechoslo vakia. -. 

Japan 

United States 

Total 

Aniline: 

United Kingdom 

Aden and dependencies.. 

Ceylon 

Straits Settlements 

Other British possessions. 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

France 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Austria 

China 

Japan 

United States 

Total 

Indigo, synthetic: 

Aden and dependencies.. 
Other British possessions. 

Germany 

Netherlands... 

Belgium 

Egypt 

United States 



Total. 



Other coal-tar dyes: 

United Kingdom 

Germany 

Belgium 

Borneo (Dutch) 

United States 

Other foreign countries. 

Total 



Pounds 



2, 431, 447 

2, 607, 221 

599, 122 

93, 552 

13, 700 

11,122 

38, 700 

335 

13, 669 



297, 446 

924 

437 

122 

132 

8, 531, 350 

665, 067 

173, 677 

6,443 

250, 420 

22, 112 

220 

9,180 

32,448 

819, 429 



10, 809, 407 



3,920 



92, 736 

15, 904 

5,600 

336 

19, 376 



137, 872 



2,544 

50,728 

500 

150 

3,370 
100 



57, 392 



Grand total 16,813,539 



Value 



$630, 860 

883,812 

152, 072 

23, 656 

3, 760 

2,598 

12, 078 

80 

1,527 



1,510,443 



233. 354 

1,089 

477 

193 

313 

5, 033, 281 

435, 487 

124, 010 

3, 269 

210, 831 

20, 879 

247 

11,287 

17,467 

345, 791 



6, 437, 975 



3,102 

2 

90, 777 

17, 507 

4,005 

296 

5,873 



121, 562 



981 

26, 535 

159 

709 

1,966 

40 



30, 390 
8, 100, 370 



Imports of coal-tar dyes 



Class of dye and country 
of destination 



Pounds 



Reexports: 

Alizarin 

Aniline 

Total 

Total net imports 



58,104 
334, 584 



392, 688 



16, 420, 851 



Value 



$23, 354 
242, 617 



265, 971 



7, 834, 399 



Exports of natural indigo 



To- 



United Kingdom 

Cyprus 

Palestine. 1 

Mesopotamia 

Ceylon 

France 

Greece 

Turkey, European 

Turkey, Asiatic 

Syria 

Armenia 

Maskat and Trucial Oman. 
Other native States in 

Arabia 

Persia 

Japan 

Egypt 

Tripoli 

Tunis.. 



Total. 



Pounds 



88,480 
9,520 
1,344 

71,680 



112 
7,056 
2,912 
2,800 
10,528 
5,488 
5,824 

2,576 

110,208 

245, 168 

182, 560 

1,456 

2,912 



750, 624 



Value 



$78, 170 

11, 182 

1,565 

73,542 

6 

108 

7,832 

3,229 

1,630 

10, 731 

5,974 

3,573 

2,847 

110,530 

187, 235 

134, 442 

1,589 

2,543 



636, 728 



1 From annual statement of the sea-borne trade of British India with the British Empire and foreign 
countries. Values converted at average exchange rate, 1924; 1 rupee=$0.3178. 



INTER NATIONAL DYE TEADE 



199 



Table 74. — -India: Imports of coal-tar dyes and exports of natural indigo, fiscal 
year ended March SI, 1925 ' 



Imports of coal-tar dyes 



Class of dye and country 
of origin 



Alizarin: 

United Kingdom.. 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Japan 

United States via At- 
lantic coast 

Total-- 

Aniline: 

United Kingdom 

Aden and dependencies. 

Straits Settlements 

Hongkong 

Other British possessions. 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

France 

Switzerland.. 

Italy 

Arabia 

China 

Japan 

United States via At- 
lantic coast 

Other foreign countries.. 

Total. 

Indigo, synthetic: 

Germany 

Netherlands 

France 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Total. 

Other coal-tar dyes: 

United Kingdom , 

Germany 

Total-- 

Grand total 



Pounds 



437, 642 

5, 326, 472 

1, 073, 757 

995, 115 

415 

3,248 

13, 225 

1,752 



7, 851, 626 



Value 



$88, 516 

1, 185, 115 

250, 978 

258, 832 

68 

488 

3,947 

338 



239, 387 

225 

221 

3,360 

224 

, 256, 318 

821, 754 

499, 780 

11, 762 

258, 376 

77,341 

600 

34, 343 

11, 689 

642, 911 
380 



1, 788, 282 



10, 858, 671 



35, 168 
7,280 
2,240 
9,856 

11, 424 

65, 968 



270 
1,120 



1,390 



18, 777, 655 



168, 600 

100 

98 

3,190 

169 

, 154, 775 

503, 606 

282, 962 

6,934 

194, 818 

69, 408 

398 

3,864 



311,615 
1,725 



6,711,256 



35, 960 

7,354 

1,489 

11,064 

12, 392 

68, 259 



403 

182 



586 



8, 568, 383 



Imports of coal-tar dyes 



Class of dye and country 
of origin 



Reexports: 

Alizarin 

.^.niline 

Total exported... 

Total net imports 



Pounds 



4,889 
311, 935 



316, 824 



18, 460, 831 



Value 



$2, 162 
206, 733 



208, 895 



8, 359, 488 



Exports of natural indigo 



Class of dye and country 
of destination 



Pounds 



United Kingdom... 

Cyprus 

Mesopotamia 

Germany 

France 

Greece. 

Turkey, European.. 

Turkey, Asiatic 

Syria 

Armenia 

Maskat Territory and 

Trucial Oman 

Other native States in 

Arabia 

Persia 

Japan 

Egypt 

SI li% . 

Total- 



Value 




1 From annual statement of the sea-borne trade of British'India with'the British Empire and foreign 
countries. Values converted at average exchange rate, 1925;^lirupee=$0.3317. 



200 CENSUS OP DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Table 75. — Netherlands: Imports and exports of synthetic organic dyes, 1924 ' 



Imports 


Exports 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Pounds 


Value 


Class of dye and country of 
destination 


Pounds 


Value 


Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes: 
German V . . 


2, 709, 453 

138, 890 

1, 091, 277 

46, 296 

8,818 

6,614 

6,614 

13, 228 

44,092 

341, 713 

2,205 


$1, 466, 884 

73, 000 

198, 744 

24, 079 

4,586 

3,058 

2,293 

13, 377 

8,408 

209, 063 

1,529 


Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes: 
Germany . ... 


385, 805 

451, 943 

22, 046 

11,023 

8,818 

28, 660 

44,092 

52, 910 

79, 366 

35, 274 

63, 933 

542, 332 

19,841 

15,432 

79, 366 

24, 251 

15, 432 

6,614 

4,409 

8,818 

19, 841 

6,614 

6,614 

6,614 

4,409 

55, 115 


$168, 550 


Belgium 


Belgium . . 


81, 409 


France - 




11,848 


Great Britain 


France 


11,084 


United States 


United States... 


8,026 


Sweden 


Dutch East Indies 

European Russia. — 

Sweden 


11,848 


Denmark. . ... 


18, 728 


Italy and Fiume 


34, 398 


Czechoslovakia . 


Denmark 


29, 812 


Switzerland 


Italy and Fiume 

Czechoslovakia . . 


21, 403 


Other countries 


33, 251 




China 


87, 524 




Hongkong 


5,351 




Japan and Korea 

India 


9,173 
18, 346 




Chile... 


9,173 




Norway 


7,644 




Poland 


3,822 




Greece . . 


3,058 




.\ustria 


2,675 




Portugal 


4,969 




Spain 


3,058 




Switzerland. 


3,822 




Union of South .\frica... 
Brazil 


2,675 
3,822 




Other countries .. 


17, 963 




Total 




Total 


4, 409, 200 


2, 005,^021 


1, 999, 572 


613, 432 




Indigo, synthetic: 
India . 




Indigo, synthetic: 

Germany 


787, 042 
35, 274 


156, 702 
6,880 


4,409 
2,205 


382 


France 


Other countries . 


764 




Total.. 




Total 


822, 316 


163, 582 


6,614 


1,147 




Other synthetic coal-tar dyes: 
Total 




Other synthetic organic dyes: 
Germany 


255, 734 
4,409 


5,733 
382 


2,205 




Other countries . 








Total 


260, 143 


6,115 






Grand total . 






Indigo, natural: 
» France.- 




764 










Grand total 


5, 491, 659 


2, 175, 482 


2, 008, 391 


614, 579 









1 From annual statistics of the foreign trade of the Netherlands, 
late, 1924; 1,000 florins=$38.22. 

Weights are gross. 



Values converted at average exchange 



INTERNATIONAL. DYE TRADE 201 

Table 76. — Sweden: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1924 ' 



Imports 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 



Alizarin dyes: 

Denmark 

Germany 

Netherlands, 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Other countries 

Total 

AnUine and other coal-tar 
dyes: 

Norway 

Denmark. 

Finland 

Danzig.. 

Germany 

Netherlands ., 

Belgium ., 

Great Britain 

France. 

Italy 

Switzerland.. 

Austria 

C zeehoslo vakia 

United States 

Total 

Indigo, synthetic: 

Denmark 

Germany 

Belgium 

Switzerland 

Total 

Other indigo dyes: 

Germany 

Switzerland 

Total 

Indigo, natural: 

Total... 

Grand total. 



Pounds 



606 
186, 326 
584 
736 
653 
214 



189, 119 



11,967 

33, 181 

3,117 

4,028 

1, 465, 481 

28,909 

59, 932 

75, 993 

31, 151 

1,124 

286, 999 

11 

5,935 

25,604 



2, 033, 432 



5,291 

80, 913 

1,404 

937 



88, 545 



3,291 
26 



3,317 



22 



2, 314, 435 



Value 



$583 
179,311 
562 
709 
628 
206 



181, 999 



7,198 

19, 958 

1,875 

2,422 

881,443 

17, 388 

36, 047 

45, 707 

18, 736 

676 

172, 621 

7 

3,570 

15, 400 



1, 223, 048 



1,592 

42, 394 

422 

372 



44,780 



495 
4 



499 



49 



1, 450, 375 



Exports 



Class of dye and country of 
destination 



Alizarin dyes: 
Norway... 
Denmark. 
Finland... 



Total. 



Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes: 

Norway , 

Denmark , 

Finland 

Netherlands.. 

Belgium 

Other countries 



Total. 



Grand tatal. 



Pounds 



9 
211 
331 



551 



Value 



$110 
522 

577 



40, 510 

17, 652 

7,866 

1,578 

441 

430 



8,477 



69, 028 



1,209 



44, 174 

15,703 

9,088 

1,138 

531 

326 



70, 960 



72, 169 



1 From official trade statistics of the Swedish Department of Commerce 
exchange rate, 1924; 1 kroner =$0.2652. 



Values converted at average 



PART VII 

APPENDIX 

STATISTICS OF DOMESTIC IMPORTS 
AND EXPORTS 



203 



STATISTICS OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

Statistical Tables 

Table 77. — Imports of coal-tar -products entered for consumption, calendar years 

1922-1925 

GROUP I. CRUDE (FREE) 



Benzene, pounds. 

Dead or creosote oil, gallons 

Naphthalene, solidifying at less than 79° 
C, pounds. 

Coal tar, crude, barrels. 

Pitch, coal tar, barrels 

Toluene, pounds 

Acenaphthene, fluorene, methylanthra- 
cene, and methylnaphthalene, pounds.. 

Anthracene, purity less than 30 per cent, 
pounds __ 

Anthracene oil, gallons 

Cumene, cymene, pounds 

Metacresol, orthocresol, and paracresol, 
purity less than 90°, pounds 

Pyridine, pounds 

Xylene, pounds 

All othen distillates n. s. p. f., which on 
being subjected to distillation yield in 
the portion distilling below 190° C. a 
quantity of tar acids less than 5 per cent 
of the original distillate, pounds 

All other products found naturally in coal 
tar, whether produced or obtained from 
coal tar or other sources, n. s. p. f., 
pounds 

Cresylic acid, pounds 



Year 



1923 



Quantity Value 



701, 857 
64, 199, 636 

20, 992, 439 

10, 131 

4,644 

194, 660 

23, 673 

869, 780 

31, 198 

2 

3,805 
764, 918 
136, 488 



$21, 902 
10,071,393 



Quantity Value 



363, 742 $12, 632 
89, 687, 632 13, 463, 689 



575,702 5,266,708 

31,671 14,579 

15, 154 2, 630 

7,928 



2,826 

23,925 

7,078 

24 



298, 022 
18, 259 



2,846 1,008 

266,184 604,235 

8,179 



5,761,011 489,824 



1,635,025 69,373 



1,573,250 $44,313 
84, 868, 568 10, 973, 491 



96, 491 

44, 586 

7,765 



8,759 
3,863 



454 
268, 782 



2,440,358 151,850 



2, 865, 954 
2, 327, 528 



151,083 
157,643 



Quantity j Value 



1, 979, 612 

13, 452 

1,948 

73,400 



470, 571 

13, 156 

499 



5, 994, 803 



1, 480, 792 
2, 163, 557 



26, 593 

49, 877 

8,361 

2,642 



7,582 

1,888 

135 



788, 979! 394, 337 
110,177 5,697 



367, 672 



21,029 
122, 742 



GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 15 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 2^, CENTS PER POUND; 
DUTIABLE AT 55 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 
1922; DUTIABLE AT 40 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 
21, 1924) 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


Not colors, dyes, or stains, photographic chemicals, 
medicinals, flavors, or explosives, n. s. p. f.: 
Acids— 

Arsanilic— 

1923 


223 


$3,345 


$1,856 


55.47 


1924 




1925 


1,092 

100 
100 


10,920 

365 
410 


4,444 

57 
233 


40.70 


Benzoic— 

1922' 


15.68 


1923 


56.71 


1924 




1925 


1 


!_. 



I Act of 1916. 



205 



206 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 77. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption., calendar years 

1922-1925 — Continued 



GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 15 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 2H CENTS PER POUND; 
DUTIABLE AT 55 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 
1922; DUTIABLE AT 40 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 
21, 1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


Not colors, dyes, or stains, photographic chemicals, 
medieinals, flavors, or explosives, n. s. p. f.— Contd. 
Acids— Continued. 

Carbolic (phenol) which on being subjected to 
distillation yields in the portion distilling be- 
low 200° C. a quantity of tar acids equal to or 
more than 5 per cent of the original distillate- 
Crystal- 

19221 


280, 224 
69,310 
126, 618 
176, 081 
256, 126 

1,702 

145, 375 

2,815 

62, 869 

378, 777 

98, 672 

112 


$30,414 
16, 102 
21, 389 
46,786 
58, 958 

1,801 
18,488 
257 
15,169 
29, 066 
23, 618 

389 


$11, 568 
13, 708 
20,627 
38, 058 
41,512 

313 
20,345 

338 
12,744 
38, 141 
16,354 

222 


38.03 


19222 


85.13 


1923 - 


96.44 


1924 - 


81.34 


1925 - 


70.41 


Liquid— 

19221 - 


17.36 


1922 2 


110. 04 


1923 --- 


131. 67 


1924 3 


84.01 


1924* -.- 


131. 22 


1925 


69.24 


Cinnamic— 

1923 


57.02 


1924 --- 




1925 . - -.- 










D ichlorophthalic— 

1923 


10 


8 


5 


63.75 


1924 




1925 .... 










Phenylglycine orthocarboxylic— 

1923 


17, 376 


74, 492 


42, 187 


56.63 


1924 - .- 




1925 . . 










Salicylic and salts of, not medicinal— 

1922' 


2,276 
1,107 


1,881 
854 


339 
547 


18.02 


1923 .... - 


64.07 


1924 




1925 


1,757 
16 


521 
19 


331 
12 


63.61 


Sulphanilic— 

1923 


60.89 


1924 




1925 . . . . 










Aniline oil and salts — 

19222 . . 


55 
30 


11 
220 


10 
123 


90.00 


1923 - 


55.95 


1924 




1925 -- 










Anthracene, purity of 25 per cent or more— 

19222 


2 


2 


1 


62.00 


1923 




1924 . . . 










1925^ 


10 

20 
200 


4 

11 
240 


2 

7 
146 


57.50 


Benzaldehyde (not medicinal) and nitrobenzalde- 
hyde— 
19222 


67.73 


1923 --- 


60.83 


1924 




1925 


2,204 

72 

7 


1,212 

56 
23 


639 

36 
13 


52.73 


Benzidine, benzidine sulfate— 

1922 2 


64.00 


1923 


57.13 


1924 




1925 










Beuzylchlori'le, benzalchloride, and benzoylchlo- 
ride— 
1922 2 


29 
10 


10 
22 


8 
13 


75.30 


1923. 


58.18 


1924 




1925 











' Act of 1916. 



2 Act of 1922. 



' Dimethylaniline. 



< Purity of 30 per cent or more. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



207 



Table 77. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, calendar years 

1922-1925 — Continued 



GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 15 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 2X4 CENTS PER POUND; 
DUTIABLE AT 55 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 
1922; DUTIABLE AT 40 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 
21, 1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


Not colors, dyes, or stains, photographic chemicals, 
medicinals, flavors, or explosives, n. s. p. f. — Contd. 
Carbazole, purity of 25 per cent or more— 

1922' 


8,820 


$3, 865 


$800 


20.70 


1922 2 




1923 - . . . . 










1924 










1925 5 


2,073 
23,565 


828 
3,828 


476 
1,163 


57.53 


Dimethylaniline and benzylethylaniline— 

19221.3 _ 


30.39 


1922 2 . 




1923 . 


1 


2 


1 


58.50 


1924 . . 




1925 










Diphenylamine — 

1924 3 .. .._ _ 


11 

23, 576 

33 

2,224 
1,008 
8,754 

15, 326 
1,000 

34, 874 


16 

8,134 

106 

107 

167 

5,410 

1,995 

663 

5,741 


10 

4,904 

45 

72 

162 

3,588 

2,170 

335 

4,738 


59.81 


1924 * 


60. 29 


1925 


42.18 


Metacresol, orthocresol, and paracresol, purity of 90 
per cent or more— 
1922 1 


66.96 


1922 2 . .... 


97.24 


1923 


66.33 


1924 3 


108. 78 


1924 4. 


50.56 


1925 


82.52 


Methylanthraquinone — 
1922 




1923 

1924 


977 


1,221 


740 


60.60 


1925 










Naphthalene soldifying at 79° C. or above — 


75, 680 


7,684 


3,045 


39.61 


19222 






9,605 
4,549 


194 
1,147 


779 
949 


401. 57 


1924 


82.76 






Naphthol, alpha and beta not medicinal— 
1922 ' . . . 


658 


799 


136 


17.06 


1922 2 _ 




1923 


13, 376 
10, 976 
4,310 


29, 569 

24,202 

1,135 


17, 199 
14, 079 

876 


58. 17 


1924 


58.17 


1925 


61.02 


Phenvlhydrazine — 




1925 


50 


475 


194 


40.74 


Resorcinol, not medicinal — 

1922 






12, 520 
2,240 
16,590 

396 
1,100 


16, 976 

3,360 

22,392 

935 
1,575 


10, 213 
2,005 
10, 118 

542 
707 


60.16 


1924 


59.67 




45.19 


Thiocarbanihde— 

1924< 


67.96 


1924 5 


44.89 


1925 




Tolidine— 

1923 


5 


6 


4 


00.83 


1924. 




1925 .. 


11,223 

328,601 
22, 163 
245, 119 
901 
662, 037 
252, 382 


2,071 

33,784 
9,128 

30,328 
1,491 

47,889 

15,441 


1,614 

13,283 

6,572 

33,839 

883 
65, 498 
23, 843 


77.93 


All distillates n. s. p. f., which on distillation jield in the 
portion distilling below 200° C. a quantity of tar acids 
equal to or more than 5 per cent of the original dis- 
tillate: 
1922 1 


39.32 


1922 2. 3 


72.00 


1923 3 

1924 3. 4 


111.58 
59.23 


1924 3. 5.... 


136. 77 


1925.... 


154. 41 



' Act of 1916 2 Act of 1922. 

< From Sept. 22 to Dec. 31, 1924. 



3 From Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 1924. 
' Purity of 65 per cent or more. 



208 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 77.- 



-Imports of coal-tar -products entered for consumption, calendar years 
1 922-1 9^ J— Continued 



GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 15 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 2'^ CENTS PER POUND; 
DUTIABLE AT 55 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 
1922; DUTIABLE AT 40 PER CENT PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 
21, 1924)— Continued 











Actual 


Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


All distillates of coal, blast-furnaces, oil-gas, and water- 










gas tar which on being subject to distillation below 










215° C. yield a quantity of tar acids equal to or more 










than 75 per cent of the original distillate: 










1922 2 


18, 257 


$4, 102 


$3, 534 


86.16 


1923 


195, 757 


36, 382 


33, 713 


92.66 


1924 < 


144, 971 


21, 046 


21,723 


103. 22 


1924 6 


233, 495 


17, 798 


23,464 


131.83 


1925 -.. 


135, 833 


29, 014 


21, 114 


72.77 


All similar products, obtained, derived, or manufac- 










tured in whole or in part from the products provided 










for in Group I (free): 










1922' --. 


389, 708 


153, 625 


32, 786 


21 ■: 


1922 2 __ 


187, 377 
1, 436, 982 


61,967 
330, 514 


47, 198 
282, 371 


76. : 


1923 


85. 


1924 ' - -- 


2, 104, 299 

158, 766 

1, 901, 203 


475, 136 

73, 973 

963, 925 


408, 626 
40, 703 
518, 654 


86. UO 


1924 < .- 


55.02 


1925 


53.81 


All sulfoacids or sulfoacid salts of Group II: 










1922' 


11,374 


12,058 


2,093 


17.36 


1923 . 




1924 - 








1925 

















GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 30 PER CENT AD VALOREM; DUTIABLE AT 60 PER CENT 
AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 1922; DUTIABLE 
AT 45 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 
21, 1924) 



When obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole or in 
part from any of the products provided for in Group I 
(free) or II, including natural indigo and their deriva- 
tives: 
Alizarin, natural— 

1922'-. 


28, 399 
1,547 
9,283 
6, 665 
5,137 

21, 614 
1,836 
3,002 


$63, 304 
3, 094 

18, 600 
9,335 

13, 243 

22, 190 
3,699 
12, 008 


$18,991 

1, 965 

11,810 

6,068 

6,319 

666 
2,348 
5,614 


30.00 


1922 2 


63.50 


1923 


63.49 


1924. 


65.00 


1925 


47.72 


Alizarin, synthetic— 

19221 _ 


30.00 


1923 ^ 

1924 . .." 


63.47 
46.75 


1925 




Dyes obtained, derived, or manufactured from 
alizarin — 
1922' 


293, 005 

79, 542 

56, 294 
274, 799 
68, 762 
4,671 
27, 391 

330. 129 

27, 535 

17, 697 

7,319 

1,043 

55 


468, 134 

62, 986 

82, 981 

379, 673 

98, 693 

4,830 

52, 769 

605, 187 

63, 102 

26, 002 

8, 126 

863 

490 




140, 440 

27, 077 

53. 729 

247, 040 

64, 029 

2,500 

25, 663 

181, 556 

20, 032 

16, 840 

5,388 

591 

224 


30.00 


Colors, or color lakes obtained, derived, or manufac- 
tured from alizarin— 
1922 ■ .. .. 


35.05 


Colors, dyes, stains, etc., obtained, derived, or 
manufactured from alizarin— 
1922 2 _ 


64.75 


1923 


65.07 


1924 3 _ 


64.88 


1924 * 


51.77 


1925 


48.63 


Dyes obtained, derived, or manufactured from an- 
thracene and carbazole — 

1922' 


30.00 


Colors, or color lakes obtained, derived, or manufac- 
tured from anthracene and carbazole — 
1922' 


31.75 


Colors, dyes, obtained, derived, or manufactured 
from anthracene or carbazole — 

1922 2. 


64.76 


1923 _ 


66.30 


1924 3 


68.46 


1924< 


45.79 


1925 





' Act of 1916. 

2 Act of 1922. 

3 At 190° C. instead of 200° 0. 



« From Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 1924. 
5 From Sept. 22 to Dec. 31. '924. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



209 



Table 77. 



-Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, calendar years 
1 922-1 926 — Continued 



GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 30 PER CENT AD VALOREM; DUTIABLE AT 60 PER CENT 
AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 1922; DUTIABLE 
AT 45 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 
1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


When obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole 

or in part from any of the products provided for in 

Group I (free) or II, including natural indigo and 

their derivatives—Continued. 

Indigoids, whether or not obtained from indigo— 

19221 .. 


184, 886 


$267, 059 


$80, 118 


30.00 


1923 




1924 










1925 


4,641 
14, 461 


5,079 
19, 074 


2,610 
5,722 


51 40 


Indigo, natural— 

1922' - 


30.00 


1922 2 




1923 


9,102 
3,863 


• 4, 149 
741 


3,427 
715 


73.70 


1924 


96.49 


1925 




Indigo, synthetic — 

19221... 


86, 585 


123, 702 


37, 111 


30.00 


1922 2 




1923 


356 
1,076 
1,040 

872 

13, 864 

220 

4,641 

2, 077, 712 
677, 849 

3, 059, 361 
1, 905. 219 
1, 357, 133 
5, 606, 827 

239 
4,263 
1,124 
2,906 

900 

762 
1,756 
3.183 
8,169 

587 
1,537 

3,287 
8,183 
10, 182 

2,868 

781 

9,889 

58 
13 
50 

25 
200 
100 

1 


117 
482 
466 

1,482 

18, 636 

544 

5,079 

2,941.773 
894, 844 
4, 154, 091 
2, 320, 712 
1. 865, 036 
6, 762, 764 

262 
3,635 
2,270 
1,521 

881 

1,404 
2,094 
10,512 
2,568 
1,615 
889 

4,465 
8,208 

28, 504 
9,612 
2,272 

31, 623 

82 

26 

112 

238 
720 
300 

7 


95 
292 
282 

950 

12, 152 

342 

2,610 

965, 640 

584, 356 

2, 706, 610 

1. 525, 793 

934, 266 

3, 435, 722 

174 
2,479 
1,441 

888 
459 

452 

1,379 

6,530 

2,113 

768 

508 

1,471 
5,498 

17, 815 
5,968 
1,077 

14,923 

53 
17 

54 

145 
338 
142 

4 


81.30 


1924 . . .. 


60.63 


1925 


60.62 


Colors, dyes, stains, etc., derived from indigo— 
1922 2 


64.11 


1923 


65.21 


1924 


62.83 


1925 


51.40 


All other colors, dyes, or stains, whether soluble or 
not in water, color acids, color bases, or color 
lakes— 

19221 __ 


32.83 


19222.. 


65.30 


1923 


65. 16 


1924 3 _ ___ _. 


65.75 


1924 < 


50.09 


1925 


50.80 


Color lakes— 

19222 


66.38 


1923 


68.21 


1924 3 


63 47 


1924* 


58. 37 


1925 


52.15 


Resinlike products prepared from articles provided 
for in pars. 27 and 1549 — 
1922 1 


32.17 


1922 2 _ . . . .. 


65.87 


1923 


62. 12 


19243 


82.27 


1924 < 


47.54 


1925 


57.10 


Photographic chemicals— 

1922 1 


' 32. 94 


1922 2. 


66 98 


1923 .... 


62 50 


1924 3 _ _ 


62.09 


1924 « 


47.41 


1925 


47.19 


Coal-tar medicinals: 
Acetanilid— ^ 

1923 


64.95 


1924 


63.50 




48.12 


Acetphenetidin— 

1923 


60.74 


1924 


46.94 


1925 


47.33 


Acetylsalicylic acid— 

1923... 


61.00 


1924 




1925 











1 Act of 1916. 

2 Act of 1922. 



3 From Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 1924. 
< From Sept. 22 to Dec. 31, 1924. 



210 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 77. — Imports of coal-tar products entered for consumption, calendar years 

1932-1925— Continued 

GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 30 PER CENT AD VALOREM; DUTIABLE AT 60 PER CENT 
AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 1922; DUTIABLE 
AT 45 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND AFTER SEPTEMBER 21, 

1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


Coal-tar medicinals— Continued. 
Antipyrene— 

1922 1 


12,604 
913 

14, 250 
3,080 
3,920 

12,540 

5 
85 

77 

571 
2,780 


$18, 468 
1,740 

20, 602 
3,650 
4,715 

12, 107 

211 
7,136 
6,790 

914 
4,059 


i $4, 617 
' 1, 108 
13, 359 
2,406 
2,396 
6,326 

127 
3,217 
3, 061 

588 
2,630 


25.00 


1922 2 


63.68 


1923 


64. 8» 


1924 3 


65.91 


1924 < 


50.82 


1925 --- 


52.25 


Arsphenamine (salvarsan) and neo-arsphenamine — 
1923-. 


60.17 


1924 


45.08 


1925 


45.08 


Benzaldehyde— 

1922 


64.38 


1923 


64. 80 


1924 




1925 .♦ 


1,924 

111 
100 

551 

1.102 
269 

5 


2,308 

168 

72 

364 

992 
470 

210 


1,173 

109 

39 

202 

672 
230 

126 


50.84 


Benzoic acid, medicinal— 

1924 * ... 


64.63 


1924 6 


54.72 


1925 


55.60 


b-Naphthol, medicinal^ 

1924.. 


67.78 


1925 


49.01 


Novocain or procaine — 

1923 


60.17 


1924 




1925 


5 

64 

1,487 

2,931 

220 

1,146 

7,840 
6,701 

40 

4 

330 

237 


610 

36 

8,877 

10, 891 

2.646 

1,763 

9,800 
9,124 

81 

55 

324 

1,620 

154, 620 
24, 410 

164, 238 

115, 937 
89, 953 

169, 365 

90 
13 
33 

15 
14 


275 

9 
5,430 
6,740 
1,206 

874 

4,959 
4.575 

51 
33 
169 
746 

46, 386 
15, 202 
101, 576 
71, 190 
43, 652 
79, 521 

56 
9 
15 

1 

8 


45.06 


Phenolphthalein (25 per cent)— 
1922 1... 


25.00 


1922 2.. 


61.17 


1923 


61.88 


1924 


45.58 


1925 . .. 


49.55 


Resorcinol, medicinal— 

1924 


50.60 


1925 


50. 14 


Salicylic acid and its salts, medicinal— 
1923. 


63 46 


1924 < 


60 51 


1924«.... 


52 13 


1925.. 


46 02 


Medicinals— 

1922'.-. 


30.00 


1922 2.3 _ 


7,937 
43, 325 
23, 257 
45, 333 
47, 238 

31 
11 
2 

1 
1 


62.27 


1923 3 


61.85 


1924 3,4... 


61.40 


1924 3,5 


48.53 


1925 


46 95 


Flavors — 

1923 


62.41 


1924 


65 92 


1925... 


45.42 


Saccharin— 

1922 1 


4 33 


1922 2. 


60 50 


1923 




1924. 


51 


17 


11 


66 00 


1925 




Explosives: Picric acid— 

1923 


1,980 


3,929 


2,496 


63 53 


1924 




1925 






1 




Ink powder «— 

1923 


201 

18 

100 

1,412 
1,643 
1,010 


308 

6 

172 

2,162 
3,926 
2.079 


203 ! 

5 ! 
84 

1,396 
2,471 
1,006 


65 93 


1924 


81.00 


1925 


49.07 


Synthetic tanning material— 

1923 


64 57 


1924. 


62 93 


1925 


48.40 



* From Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 1924. 



' Act of 1916. 2 Act of 1922. 3 other coal-tar medicinals. 

' From Sept. 22 to Dec. 31, 1924. 

» Imports for coal-tar ink powder first separately reported for 1923. In the Commission's 
1923, on page 194, were published the imports from 1918 to 1923, of "Ink and ink powders," 
ink," " Writing and copying inks," and "All other, including ink powders," and also exports of 
ink," and "All other inks." 



Census of 
" Printers' 
''Printers' 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



211 



Table 78. — General imports of coal-tar products, by countries, calendar years 

1922-1925 

DEAD OR CREOSOTE OIL (FREE) 





1922 


1923 


1924 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


United Kingdom 


Gallons 

22, 383, 535 

14, 471, 820 

2, 406, 364 

1, 537, 376 

768, 442 


$2, 235, 686 

1, 528, 941 

193, 804 

184, 485 

97, 533 


Gallow 
42, 352, 723 
9, 277, 700 
3, 094, 709 
8, 478, 364 
996, 140 


$6, 897, 368 
1, 422, 521 

470, 337 
1, 153, 750 

127, 417 


Gallons 
59, 594, 877 
10, 324, 675 

6, 634, 494 
11,064,665 

2, 069, 073 


$8, 992, 571 


Netherlands 


1, 611, 622 


Uermany -. .- 


828, 528 


Belgium. .. _ . 


1, 744, 817 




286, 151 




















Total 


41, 567, 637 


4, 240, 449 


64, 199, 636 


10, 071, 393 


89, 687, 784 


13, 463, 688 









Imported from— 


1925 




Quantity 


Value 


TInit,p(i Kingdom 


Gallons 
36, 649, 854 
30, 325, 455 
4, 200, 382 
10, 017, 631 
2, 505, 192 
355, 557 
914, 497 


$4, 692, 650 


Netherlands . ... 


3 973,994 


Germany . . . .. . 


512, 835 


Bplgiiim 


1, 317, 161 


France . . .. 


303, 843 


Mexico - .. - -- 


55, 794 




117, 214 














Total 


84, 868, 568 


10, 973, 491 







BENZOL OR BENZENE 



Imported from— 


1922 


1923 


1924 1 


1925 1 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Canada . . . 


Pounds 

172, 108 

420 


$1, 167 
66 


Pounds 

700, 157 

944 


$21, 732 
185 


Pounds 

362, 640 

1,102 


$12, 432 
200 


Pounds 
735, 403 

44 
911, 123 

80 


$23, 636 


Germany 


13 




23,298 


All other countries' 






800 


20 






8 














Total 


172, 528 


1,223 


701, 901 


21,937 


363, 742 


12, 632 


1, 646, 650 


46, 965 







' Includes toluene. ' From New Zealand. 

NAPHTHALENE 



Imported from — 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


United Kingdom... 
Belgium 


Pounds 
2, 488, 716 


$38, 619 


Pounds 

16, 991, 359 

501, 508 

395, 107 

1, 872, 457 

1, 276, 027 


$408, 584 

9,789 

6,591 

122, 831 

30, 768 


Pounds 
2, 707, 419 
281,834 


$56, 963 
5,238 


Pounds 
28,104 


$478 


Canada.. 


532, 935 

11, 316 

110,365 

1,000 


12,823 

446 

2,047 

94 


102, 840 
1, 848, 668 


755 


Germany 


2, 112, 049 
165, 406 


31, 146 
3,144 


25,360 


Netherlands 




All other countries. 




















Total 


3, 144, 332 


54,029 


21, 036, 458 


578, 563 


5, 266, 708 


96, 491 


1, 979, 612 


26,593 



212 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 78. — General imports of coal-far products, by countries, calendar years 

1922-1925 — Continued 

PYRIDINE (FREE) 



Imported from- 



1924 t 



Quantity Value 



Belgium 

France 

Germany.. 

Netherlands- 

United Kingdom- 
Canada 

Panama 

All other countries- 



Total. 



608,980 



'ounds 
24,075 


$9, 410 


14, 215 


7,018 


87,269 


33, 382 


22, 576 


10, 279 


452,611 


203, 743 


4,841 


3,208 


1,148 


447 


2,245 


1,295 



268, 782 



1925 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

24, 551 

25, 077 
90. 347 
19,009 

626. 313 



3,780 



789, 077 



$11,216 
11, 435 
47, 571 
11,484 

310,290 



2,341 



394,337 



J Included in "all other crudes" prior to 1924. 

TAR AND PITCH OF COAL 



Imported from— 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


United Kingdom 

Canada.. 


Barrels 

j 162 

\ 100 

24, 563 


$1, 241 

956 

56. 229 


Barrels 

} 72 

14,406 


$365 
44, 184 


Barrels 

1 21 

\ 282 

16,563 


$197 

1,295 

48, 427 


Barrels 

\ 770 

9,875 

4,453 

302 


$3,654 
29, 739 


Mexico 




23,167 


All other countries... 


.28 91 


297 


2,276 


343 


2,432 


1,678 


Total . .. 


24,853 1 58. .517 


14, 775 


46, 825 


17,209 


52, 351 


15,400 


58,238 













TOLUOL OR TOLUENE » 





Imported from— 


1922 


1923 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Canada.. 


Pounds 
143, 900 
337 


$6,044 

17 


Pounds 
194, 660 




$7,928 


Sweden 










' 


Total 


144, 237 


6,061 


194,660 




7,928 







1 Included with benzol in 1924 and 1925. 

ALL OTHER CRUDES 



Imported from— 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


France 


$308, 895 

f 54,943 

\ 1, 570 

8,199 

6,373 

142 


$929 
684, 774 
65, 102 
14,010 
18, 873 
6,370 




$2,160 


United Kingdom 


$373, 252 
73, 720 
7,326 
2,840 


\ 472, 537 
16,362 


Canada 


Germany _ _ .... 


23,595 


Netherlands.- 




Mexico. . 




11,482 


All other countries 




17,583 


14, 592 


5 








Total. - 


380, 122 


807,641 


471, 730 


526, 141 







STATISTICAL TABLES 



213 



Table 78. — General imports of coal-tar products, by countries, calendar years 

1922-1925— Continued 



CARBOLIC ACID 



Imported from— 


1922 1 


1923 1 


1924 » 


1925 J 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


England 


Pounds 

610, 789 

62, 715 

11,098 

1,702 


$87, 325 

12, 258 

898 

1,801 


Pounds 
61,541 


$14, 715 


Pounds 




Pounds 




Netherlands. 










Germany- 


20 


37 










All other countries 
























Total.- 


686, 304 


102, 282 


61, 561 


14, 762 





















• Dutiable. * Not reported separately in 1924 and 1925. 

ALL OTHER ACIDS 



Imported from— 


1922 


1923 


1924' 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


England 


Pounds 
60, 471 


$5,228 


Pounds 

100 

223 

1,125 

17,496 


$410 

3,345 

877 

174,885 


Pounds 
250, 257 


$64, 817 


France. 




Germany . . 


4,445 
8,943 


2,394 
9,939 






All other countries.. 


' 45, 024 


12, 606 






Total. 


73, 859 


17, 561 


18, 944 


79, 517 


295, 281 


77,423 







1 All other composed of 17,376 pounds, valued at $74,492, from Switzerland and 110 pounds, valued at 
$385, from Canada. 

2 All from Scotland. 

3 1924 includes carbolic acid. 

COAL-TAR ACIDS 



Imported from- 



England 

Netherlands 

France 

Germany 

All other countries 

Total- 

ALL OTHER INTERMEDIATES 



1925 



Quantity 



336, 809 



Value 



Pounds 




199, 743 


$46, 708 


40,098 


8,709 


1,533 


11,520 


93, 678 


25, 622 


1,757 


521 



93,080 



Imported from— 


1922 


1923 


1924 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


France 


Pounds 

45, 666 

514, 437 

83,998 

669, 475 

62, 261 

400 

329 


$31, 180 

83,397 

18,898 

124,632 

43, 856 

39 

308 


Pounds 

30, 174 

128, 707 

295, 939 

1, 700, 550 

284 

60 

48,022 

1394,545 


$45,070 

115,513 

59, 276 

236, 069 

1,758 

31 

8,166 

1 47, 809 


Pounds ' 

7,227 

1,964,349 

373,004 

1,421,393 

5,490 


$8, 937 


Germany 


507, 224 


Netherlands 


93, 359 


England 


102, 682 


Switzerland-.. 


7,437 


Japan 




Canada 


40,356 


9,978 


All other countries.. 












Total. . 


1, 376, 566 


302,310 


2, 598, 281 


513, 692 


3,811,819 


729, 617 







1 All other includes 394,487 pounds, valued at $47,752, from Scotland. 



214 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEB SYNTHETIC CHEMICAI^ 



Table 78. — General imports of coal-tar products, by countries, calendar years 

1922-1935— Continued 

OTHER COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 





Imported from— 


1925 




Quantity 


Value 


France . 


Pounds 

48, 976 

480, 600 

1,165,293 

523, 335 

21, 494 

141 

725 


$45, 382 




465, 690 




414, 259 


United Kingdom . ..._.. 


40, 447 


Switzerland . 


37,391 


Canada 


54 




1,569 








Total 


2,240,564 


1, 004, 792 









ALIZARIN AND DERIVATIVES 





1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Belgium 


Pour^s 
1,232 

1,560 

7,379 

323, 239 

46,340 

47, 791 

28, 672 

22, 758 

887 


$2, 359 

2,240 

10, 137 

498, 548 

57, 686 

61,043 

41,670 

28,002 

249 


Pounds 
275 


$457 


Pounds 
5,958 


$8, 802 


Pounds 
9,246 


$19,437 






France 


13, 206 

139, 144 

24, 046 

11,219 

73, 561 

17,792 

2,813 

8,074 


24, 630 

167, 728 

38, 190 

16, 024 

124, 831 

18, 165 

4,422 

9,165 


1,927 

90, 619 

4,189 

3,172 

30, 126 

15, 593 

25 


2,750 

117,816 

7,405 

5,994 

58,343 

13,086 

198 


220 

11,304 

864 


233 


Germany. .. 


852 


Italy 


2,133 








13,069 

11,996 

880 

4 


40, 620 


United Kingdom 

Canada 


9,101 
2,250 




209 












Total 


479, 858 


701, 934 


290, 130 


403, 612 


151, 609 


214,394 


47, 583 


74, 635 







ANTHRACENE AND CARBAZOLE COLORS AND DYES 



Imported from — • 


1922 1 


1923 


1924 2 


1925 » 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Germany.... 


Pounds 
11,900 
5,797 


$23, 128 
2,874 


Pounds 
4,434 


$4,692 


Pounds 




Pounds 














Italy 


3,885 


4,284 
























Total 


17, 697 


26,002 


8,319 


8,976 





















COLOR LAKES 





16 
223 


$23 
239 


88 
2,175 
2,000 


$162 

2,710 

763 












































Total 


239 


262 


4,263 


3,635 





















1 Beginning Sept. 22, 1922. 



' No report. 



•STATISTICAL TABLES 



215 



Table 78. — General imports of coal-tar products, by countries, calendar years 

1922-1925 — Continued 









INDIGO 


(DUTIABLE) 














1922 


1923 


1924 


192.5 


Imported from— 


Natural 


Synthetic 


i 
Natural Synthetic 


Indigo and 
derivatives 


Indigo and 
derivatives 




Quan- 
tity 


Value 


Quan- 
tity 


Value 


Quan- 
tity 


t 
Value^Q'ff^- lvalue 

1 


Quan- 
tity 


value Q-- 


Value 


1 

Pminds 
Switzerland 6,501 


$9,482 
2,904 


Pounds 

63, 355 

2,000 


$84,553 
818 


Pounds 


\ Pounds' 


Pounds 




Pounds 
1,465 


$1. 657 


England 4,413 


9,378 
900 


$4,624! . . 


5, 979!$1. 689 




Salvador. . . 


450i _ _ - 








France ..... 




5,324 
610 
929 


13, 920 

1,756 

401 






220 
220 


1671 439| 391 


Germany i 1,536 


1,462 








544 1 


Italy . 




275 


$341 
1117 




1,232 1,610 


All other countries.. - - 


195 


142 1 356 






Total 











! " 1 


12,45013,848 


72,218 


101,448 10,473 


5, 216 631 


458 


6,419! 2,400| 3,136] 3,658 

1 ! 1 



From China. 



INDIGO, DYES, COLORS, STAINS, ETC. (DUTIABLE) i 



Imported from— 


1922* 


1923 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


France 


Pounds 




Pounds 
2,522 
1,860 
5,411 
2,206 
1,810 


$2,614 


Germany .._ 


100 
772 


$752 
730 


2,676 


Italv . . ... 


7,035 


Switzerland 


2,548 


All other countries 






3,301 










Total -. 


872 


1,482 


13,809 


18, 174 







I No report for 1924 or 1925. ' Sept. 22 to Dec. 31. 

COAL-TAR COLORS OR DYES (DUTIABLE) 



Imported from — 



1922 > 



Quantity j Value 



Pounds 

Belgium \ 1,941 

France. -- 36,163 

Germany ! 1,138,951 

Switzerland i 1,109,301 

England- | 165,683 

All other countries.. 101, 537 



16, 038 

1, 662, 608 

1, 809, 778 

139, 577 

133, 991 



1922 «• ' 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 



15, 111 
2fi6, 255 
295, 470 

31, 374 
130, 149 



$17, 523 
344. ,569 
390, 457 
27,812 
226,563 



Total I 2,553,576 3,762,841 



738,359 1,006,924 



Imported from — 



Belgium 

France.- 

Germany 

Switzerland 

England 

All other countries. 



Total. 



1923 



Quantity Value Quantity 



Pounds 
17,269 
209, 865 

1, 580, 403 
857, 466 
106, 704 

« 480, 733 



$33, 667 

347, 596 

1,945,814 

1,331,075 

104, 965 

< 661, 194 



Pounds 

45, 063 

124, 958 

1, 652, 784 

1,118,215 

104, 113 

388, 813 



Value 



$55, 488 
183, 526 
2, 079, 059 
1, 523, 829 
98,427 
519, 127 



3,252,440 4,424,311 I 3,433,946 



4, 459, 456 



' Jan. 1 to Sept. 21. 

* Title changed to: Colors, dyes, stains, color acids, and color bases, n. e. s. in Act of 1922. 
•Sept. 22 to Dec. 31. 

• Includes 34B,526 lbs. valued at $490,717 from Italy. 



591&— 26t- 



-15 



216 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 78. — General imports of coal-tar products, by countries, calendar years 

1922-1926 — Continued 



Imported from— 



1925 



Quantity 



Value 



Belgium. 

France. 

Germany. -J 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom.. 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Canada 

All other countries 

Total 



Pounds 




109, 640 


$180, 416 


118,321 


166, 275 


2,932,216 


3, 757, 846 


1,970,951 


2, 260, 165 


170,443 


144, 621 


202, 752 


245, 859 


166,065 


241, 552 


111,845 


165, 659 


96 


284 



5, 782, 329 



7, 162, 677 



COAL-TAR MEDICINALS' 



1922* 



Imported from — 



Value 



France 

Oermany 

Italy 

Netherlands. 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom.. 
All other countries 

Total... 



$20, 089 
74, 983 
16, 953 
25, 462 
35, 473 
31,701 
4,009 



208, 670 



1923 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 
23, 117 
22, 087 
310 
3,611 
12, 802 
4,707 
1,494 



68,128 



$59, 600 
52, 766 
1,593 
46, 024 
36,113 
13, 579 
2,580 



212, 255 



1924 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

31,868 

10, 092 

271 

1,652 

41,351 

3,112 

3,857 



92, 203 



$63, 310 
33, 416 
1,214 
78, 755 
60, 477 
11,473 
7,330 



255, 975 



1925 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

67,545 

26, 867 

84 

1,310 

8,095 

3,681 

307 



107,889 



$106, 786 

58, 618 

1,406 

67, 674 

9,779 

8,532 

554 



253, 349 



' "Medicinal preparations, n. e. s.," to and including Sept. 21, 1922. 
» Sept. 22 to Dec. 31. 

EXPLOSIVES, 19221 





Quantity 


Value 


Italy - 


Pounds 
5,470 


$6, 843 







> None reported for 1923, 1924, or 1925. 

ALL OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



Imported from — 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




$430 

16, 658 

715 

2,157 

1 


Pounds 
1,110 
9,821 
2,372 
383 
3,241 


$11,459 

27, 856 

8,778 

973 

6,731 


Pounds 
394 
9,871 
928 
178 
709 


$1,506 

7,971 

2,411 

217 

1,979 


Pounds 

619 

11,145 


$1,993 




34,786 








1,815 
20 


2,130 


All other countries 


13 


Total 


19,961 


16, 927 


54,797 


12, 080 


14,084 


13, 599 


38,922 







STATISTICAL TABLES 



217 



Table 79. — Domestic exports of coal tar and of dyes and dyestuffs, calendar years 

1922-1926 

COAL TAR 



Exported to- 


1922 


1923 > 


1924 1 


19251 


Quantity 


Value 


Quail tity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




Barrels 

46 

101, 396 

580 

63 

57 

8 


$392 

209, 631 

3,142 

545 

245 

100 


Barrels 

348, 105 

149, 161 

844 

28 

13 

15,683 


$1, 299, 631 

337, 501 

5,677 

278 

161 

51, 346 


Barrels 

163, 825 

79, 767 

986 

88 

108 

24,241 


$666, 106 

236, 117 

8,374 

1,016 

2,247 

162, 343 


Barrels 

697 

105, 908 

1,961 

48 

169 

12 


$7,480 


North America 

South America 

Asia.. 


299, 893 

16, 249 

543 


Oceania 


2,650 


Africa . 


110 






Total 


102, 150 


214, 055 


513, 834 


1, 694, 494 


269, 015 


1, 076, 203 


2 108, 795 


326,925 



1 Crude tar and pitch. 

> The bulk of this trade is crude coal tar exported to North America. 

COAL-TAR DISTILLATES— BENZOL 





1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


Exported to — 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


France 


Pounds 
20, 158, 912 $738. 078 


Pounds 

25, 932, 540 

80, 899, 171 

80, 725 

14, 137 

740, 496 

92, 006 

23,240 

749 

44,777 

3, 508, 927 


$975, 152 

2, 415, 199 

3, 586 

1,021 

52, 230 

4,928 

2,066 

80 

1,629 

191, 769 


Pounds 

25, 160, 724 

31, 206, 248 

33, 221 

61, 993 

759, 301 

171, 956 


$690, 683 

936, 044 

1,730 

5, 527 

51, 254 

9,903 


Pounds 

24, 982, 548 

32. 887, 985 

120, 817 

22, 379 

475, 212 

179, 875 

13,424 


$834, 180 


United Kingdom 

Canada.. 


39, 649, 410 

2, 045, 994 

13, 405 

445, 136 

156, 251 

86, 350 

17. 312 

1, 529, 483 

638, 149 


1, 390, 924 

69,984 

1,048 

27, 464 

9,521 

7,067 

1,500 

68, 935 

48, 300 


852, 628 
6,734 


Mexico 


1,574 


Argentina.. . 


29,616 


Chile 


9,605 


Australia 


788 




2,418 


260 




Algeria and Tunis 

All other countries... 






496, 310 


44, 436 


207, 922 


12,909 


Total 


64, 740, 402 


2, 362, 821 


111,336,768 


3, 647, 660 


57, 882, 171 


1, 739, 837 


58, 890, 162 


1,748,034 











OTHER CRUDE DISTILLATES 



Exported to — 


19221 


19231 


1924 


1925 


France 


Value 

$995 

12, 849 

51,718 

15,454 

13, 691 

29,738 

2,561 

3,644 


Value 
$91 


Value 


Value 
$5, 183 








Canada . . .. . .. 


109, 770 
20, 797 
19, 102 
16. 569 
37, 675 
10, 316 
8,027 


$163, 559 
16, 794 
37, 383 

3.820 
66,544 
10, 083 

8,498 


233, 040 


Honduras.. . 


948 


Mexico 


58, 045 


Brazil 


619 


Cuba.- .. . 


60, 082 


Japan 


9,638 


United Kingdom 


77, 996 


Chile . ... 




75, 938 


Nicaragua 








47, 848 


A.11 other countries 


24,333 


79, 355 


147. 705 


71,260 






Total.- . 


154, 983 


301, 702 


454,386 


640, 597 







1 Includes toluol and solvent naphtha. 



21S 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 79.— Domestic exports of coal tar and of dyes and dyestuffs, calendar years 

1 9S2-1 925— Cout'mued « 

CARBOLIC ACID 





1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 3 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




Pounds 
15, 306 
50, 096 
7,009 
91, 073 
44,211 
15, 451 


$1, 143 
4,040 
694 
9,100 
4,563 
3,683 


Pounds 
2,808 


$344 


Pounds 
1,461 
17, 706 
7,539 


$93 

1,716 

711 


Pounds 






9, 545 1, 039 

8, 195 1, 461 

67, 250 17, 226 






Cuba 












KwangtuDg (leased territory). 










145,032 114,259 


2 24,658 


5,496 












Total 


223, 146 


23, 223 


232, 830 : 34. 389 


61, 364 


. 8,016 












1 



1 Includes 130.049 pounds, valued at $11,106, to Panama. 

2 Includes 8,563 pounds, valued at $2,116, to Panama. 



' Included in "Other intermediates.' 



ANILINE OILS AND SALTS 





1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Spain 

Canada 

Mexico 


Pounds 
10, 000 

211. 010 
26, 895 
29, 302 


$1, 450 

40, 919 

3, 575 

7 oon 


Pounds 




Pounds 




Pounds 




288, 043 
22, 196 
27. 885 

110 777 

2,122 

33, 134 


$57, 307 
5. 675 
4,693 
17, 384 
321 
6,279 


160, 756 
5,538 


$41, 838 
2,117 


229, 230 
114,747 


$46, 836 
21, 236 


.Tapan.- 


30, 600 6. 120 

17, 597 2 993 


165, 242 


40, 280 


312, 609 

18,449 

99, 587 

22, 000 

7,109 


49, 591 
3,761 


Australia 


9,012 


1,610 


36, 900 


9,403 


19, 195 
9,900 


All other countries 


6,804 


1,945 


13, 300 


3,364 


7,023 


7,799 


3,103 


Total 


341, 220 


65, 602 


497, 457 


95,023 


375, 459 


101, 437 


803, 731 


153, 622 



NAPHTHALENE 





1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 » 


Exported to— 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




Pounds 
6,000 

17, 542 
11, 558 
21, 127 
11, 853 
14, 610 

8,388 

18, 428 


$1, 600 
297 

1,044 

1,201 
770 

4,329 
739 

2,674 


Pounds 




Pounds 




Pounds 






10, 554 
7.247 
25. 500 
10, 294 
12. 529 
3,220 
25, 820 


$798 
1,322 
1,907 

672 
3,045 

406 
2,236 


25,004 

7,686 

1,464 

274 

10, 058 
1,860 

65, 850 


$855 
596 
128 
21 
3,520 
72 
'8,025 












Cuba 




































Total - - . 


109, 514 


12, 657 


95, 164 


10, 386 


112, 196 


13, 217 













> Includes 44,850 pounds, valued at $6,279, to Spain. ' Included in "Other intermediates. " 

NITROBEMZOLi 



Exported to — 


1922 


1923 


1924 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




Pounds 
26, 880 
5, 682 
3,203 
3, 040 
2,147 
2.028 


$2, 957 
683 
399 
608 
312 
337 


Pounds 




Pounds 














Cuba 


































1 














42, 980 


5,296 












1 





Included in "Other intermediates" for 1923. 1924, and 1925. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



219 



Table 79. — Domestic exports of coal tar and of dyes and dycstuffs, calendar years 

1922-1925 — Continued 

OTHER INTERMEDIATES 



Exported to — 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




Pounds 

28, 463 

65, 438 

5,054 

172, 186 
77,642 
10, 199 
42, 618 
12, 192 

314, 774 


$7, 2S0 

13,834 
1,500 

33, 695 
3,481 
1,636 
8, 275 
1,823 

65, 047 


Pounds 
9,503 

88, 868 
9,384 

149, 740 

130, 564 

8,684 

181,361 

100 

89, 336 
256, 373 

17, 600 


$2. 225 
15, 088 

4,311 
22. 578 
13, 258 

1,007 

34, 457 

9 

18, 802 

51. 407 

8,103 


Pounds 

23, 065 

45, 818 

2,024 

58, 971 

177, 290 
21, 949 

200, 526 

200 

15, 200 

505, 914 
26, 170 


.$4, 060 
7,423 
1,814 

23,641 

14, 395 
4, 546 

35,847 

32 

4,634 

74, 071 
5,821 


Pounds 

2,925 

7,730 

1,100 

125, 385 

271, 871 

46, 886 

340, 667 

400 

380 

594, 061 

38, 467 

43,111 

157, 840 

96, 644 


$760 


Spain - _ .. 


2,101 


Switzerland 


990 


Canada 


44, 035 


Mexico 


33, 383 


Cuba 


5,407 


Brazil.. 


45, 708 


Chile - 


160 


China 


22 


Japan 


54. 888 


12.910 


97, 934 


Australia -.. 


20,050 11.844 


6. 102 


Franre. 






30, 000 


Netherlands 














24,356 


All other countries -- 


31, 630 


6,277 


276, 670 


71,815 


1 480, 302 


64,129 


26, 564 






Total. 


835,134 167,602 


1, 218, 183 


243, 060 


1, 557, 429 


240, 413 


1, 727, 467 


317, 522 



Includes 409,880 pounds, valued at $28,550, to Russia in Europe. 

OTHER COLORS, DYES, AND STAINS 



Exported to- 



Belgiiun , 

France 

Greece- 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Portugal.- 

Spain 

United Kingdom 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

South America 

British India 

China 

Japan 

Philippine Islands... 

Australia 

New Zealand 

British South Africa. 

Russia in Europe 

All other countries.. 



Total. 



1922 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

107,712 

12, 100 

16,830 

25, 702 

16, 915 

24. 973 

87, 566 

16, 139 

1,861.255 

159, 857 

39,344 

425, 551 

753, 425 

3, 588, 563 

959, 409 

33,584 

58, 665 

36, 680 

28,542 



71, 397 



8, 324, 209 



$76, 

11, 

8, 

51, 

2, 

10. 

42, 

5, 

1, 108, 

87, 

27, 

323, 

311, 

924. 

844, 

8, 

31, 

21, 

31, 



19231 



Quantity 



Value 



50, 669 



3, 981, 217 



Pounds 

321,888 

15, 068 

2, 895 

104 

6, 667! 

1, 155] 

ll,598i 

32, 492! 

1, 616, 949| 

155, 302i 

63,832 

490, 619 

899, 989 

11.448, 849 

2, 463, 083 

63,906 

37, 227 

55, 147 

23,538 



214, 228 



$111,727 

6,340 

1,1 ' 

129 

5,855 

497 

12,500 

16, 68' 

927, 420 

78, 536 

38, 365 

352, 265 

349, 614 

2, 431. 421 

1, 035, 865 

23,234 

29, 59 

26, 313 

18, 335 



99,063 



17,924,536 5,565,371 



Quantity 



Pounds 

166, 988 

],137 

3,294 

2,344 

10, 945 

4,209 

10, 329 

2 10, 616 

1, 256, 284 

193. 394 
39,711 

508, 623 

408. 395 
9, 604, 760 
3,217,514 

56, 205 
50, 823 
27, 036 
17, 106 



123, 378 



Value 



740, 

87, 

37, 

345, 

216, 

2, 227, 

1, 703, 

33, 

42, 

15, 

10, 



,322 
704 
,964 
,069 
,647 
,650 
,643 
738 
903 
376 
305 
838 
320 
943 
831 
185 
862 



1925 » 



Quantity 



66, 730 



Pounds 

C80, 670 

1,909 

1,577 

11,607 

32, 646 

4,825 

17.888 

6,943 

1, 475, 856 

304. 850 

65, 321 

434. 122 

1, 886, 165 

18, 303, 513 

2,126,971 

101, 003 

33, 356 

18, 582 

24, 255 

72, 861 

194, 969 



15,713,091 5,635,064 25,799,889 6,694,360 



Value 



$200, 116 

3,057 

725 

7,255 

4,795 

2,048 

9,194 

10, 087 

726, 935 

150, 104 

57,943 

266, 265 

667, 483 

3, 299, 798 

1, 062, 613 

35, 681 

30,112 

11,117 

15,945 

67,895 

75, 192 



> Includes color lakes. 

COLOR LAKES, 1922 i 



' England. 





Quantity 


Value 


Canada 


Pounds 

16,900 

7,616 

100 

1,000 

135 

2,440 


$14, 627 


Cuba 


1,028 


Peru . . . . 


30 


China- 


800 


Hongkong 


86 


Japan 


3,298 


All^other countries 








Total 


28, 228 


19, 928 







Figures for 1923, 1924, and 1925 included in "Other colors, dyes, and stains.' 



220 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 



Table 79. — Domestic exports of coal tar and of dyes and dyestuffs, calendar years 

1922-1926 — Continued 

MEDICINALS 





1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


Exported to— 


Quan- 
tity 


Value 


Quan- 
tity 


Value 


Quan- 
tity 


Value 


Quan- 
tity 


Value 


Belgium 


Pounds 

3,040 

3,300 

297,223 

80, 540 

55, 874 

5,916 

37, 829 

11,375 

3,148 

3,330 

27, 575 

4,848 

20, 168 


$450 

850 

80,954 

31, 709 

13,001 

3,091 
30, 476 
16,122 

1,796 

3,107 
21, 135 

3,863 
17, 992 


Pounds 




Pounds 
965 


$1,320 


Pounds 
765 
100 


$1,090 


Greece. 






139 


Turkey in Europe 












United Kingdom... 


74, 169 

10, 926 
5,515 

33, 999 
3,147 
5,141 
2,667 

11,346 
931 

90,134 


$49, 301 
8,617 
5, 039 

30, 840 
3,681 
3,355 
1,458 
5,653 
988 

55,228 


31,641 
48,119 

9,378 
92, 097 

5,938 

1,768 

24 

16, 787 

2,064 
79, 624 


25,275 
31,553 

8,728 
133, 541 

7,825 

4,966 

121 

13, 861 

1,426 
93, 160 


409, 492 

22,512 

3,345 

78, 195 

13,258 

3,779 

13,617 

80,948 

579 

101, 500 


139, 162 


Canada ... . 


26,127 


Honduras 


3,863 


Mexico 


105, 478 


Cuba. 


12,480 


Venezuela 


6,742 

7,835 

29, 421 


British India 


Australia. 


British South Africa 

All other countries '. 


715 
114,091 






Total 


554, 166 


224, 546 


237, 975 


164, 160 


288, 405 


321, 766 


728,090 


447,143 







> All other countries include shipments to China, New Zealand, Philippine Islands, Chile, Japan, etc. 
SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC RESINS i 





Exported to— 


1922 




Quantity 


Value 


England. 


Pounds 

500 

121, 183 

2.50 

1,600 

4,620 


$69 


Canada. 


7,786 


Mexico 


43 


China 


1,762 


Japan . . _ 


3,523 








Total exports 


128, 153 


13,183 







1 Included in total "Other coal-tar finished products, n. e. s." for 1923, 1924 and 1925. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS 



Exported to- 



United Kingdom... 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Argentina 

Japan 

Philippines 

Australia 

New Zealand 

China 

All other countries. 



1922 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 
11, 274 
65,411 
15, 019 
16, 738 
24, 526 
39,815 
11,709 
10, 806 
13, 094 



39, 727 14, 690 



15,971 
7,228 
6,306 
9,124 

26, 809 
5,509 
9, 018 
4,302 



Total 248,119 ,103,853 214,160 



1923 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

2,205 

23, 427 

10, 349 

16, 223 

34, 344 

35, 894 
8, 862 

12,716 
22, 101 



48, 039 



$1, 054 
5,775 
5.079 
5,406 
9,834 

28,309 
5, 051 

12, 030 
5,363 



18, 416 



96, 317 



1924 



Quantity 



Pounds 
1,992 
20, 679 
14, 721 
18, 788 
5, 330 
10, 845 
10, 545 
13, 688 
14, 883 



66, 624 



173, 996 



Value 



$1,872 
6,583 
5,863 
7,261 
2,329 

1.5, 455 
4, 063 

12, 731 
3,230 



21, 364 



80, 761 



1925 



Quantity 



Pounds 

1, 351 

34,019 

40, 948 
35, 626 

41, 773 
7,694 

26, 136 
\ 067 
18, 906 
29, 626 
73, 345 



314, 491 



Value 



$1,700 
6,787 

13, 599 
8,258 

11,363 
3,339 
8,005 
2,478 
4,183 
8,879 

26, 858 



95, 449 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



221 



Table 79. — Domestic exports of coal tar and of dyes and dyestuffs, calendar years 

1922-1925 — Continued 

OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS, N. E. S. 



Exported to — 



1922 



Quantity Value 



1923 



Quantity Value 



1924 



Quantity Value 



1925 



Quantity Value 



Denmark... 

France 

Norway 

United Kingdom 

Canada 

Costa Rica 

Panama 

Mexico 

British West Indies. 

Cuba 

Argentina.. 

Brazil. 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Japan... 

Australia 

Philippine Islands.. 

Labrador 

British India 

All other countries.. 



Pounds 
37, 226 
80,800 
48. 767 

264, 009 

I, 797, 967 

28,262 

67. 434 

470, 344 
95, 545 

984, 063 

107, 043 
39, 692 
78, 574 
80. 661 
80, 470 
67, 948 
21,533 



$1,540 

2,560 

1,275 

33, 285 

63,908 

2, 655 

2,079 

26. 902 

5.401 

43. 497 

8,831 

2,598 

4,664 

13, 442 

13.415 

17, 550 

4,533 



Pounds 

4,174 

30, 893 



$3,193 
6,576 



Pounds 
1,000 



$680 



167, 822 

1, 128, 524 

6,017 

24, 809 

334, 479 

21,854 

868, 690 

207, 900 

1,510 

4,742 

103, 833 

202, 251 

154, 606 

26, 785 



37,292 

57, 663 

709 

2,920 
20, 560 

3,460 
38, 382 

9,200 
381 

1, 155 
18, 951 
27, 707 
38, 981 

5,166 



74, 137 

209, 457 

8,257 

11,420 
150, 729 

12, 769 
279, 141 
201,125 

22, 052 

1,134 

134. 398 

214. 821 

387, 275 

18, 038 



23, 539 

41, 520 

928 

1,485 
13, 724 

2,006 
26, 670 

9,051 

3,004 

136 

22, 625 

30, 975 

58, 253 

2,948 



194, 752 



24, 707 



'1,212,257 



206, 808 



2 421, 615 



67, 418 



Pounds 

8,036 

2,178 

2,807 

570, 456 

171,904 

11.994 

11, 522 

194, 460 

14, 971 

1, 342, 935 

28, 332 

36, 502 

3,227 

128, 777 

127, 484 

95, 697 

7,430 

143, 300 

44, 771 

17, 272 

138, 582 



$2, 102 

1,150 

1,150 

101, 279 

31,380 
1,677 
1,806 

25,620 
1.967 

38, 131 

5,234 

5,625 

886 

23,721 

20,542 

26, 124 
2,513 

10,280 
6,084 
7,101 

22, 878 



Total 5,545,090 1272,842 4,501,146 479,104 2,147,368 304,962 3,102,637 337,250 



1 Includes 768,236 pounds, valued at $140,077, to China. 

2 Includes 217,369 pounds, valued at $34,212, to China. 

Directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1926 



Vio. 



Name of company 



Office address flocation of plant given in parentbese 
if not in same city as office) 



Abbott Laboratories 

Acids Manufacturing Corporation 

Agawam Chemical Worlss 

Algon Color & Chemical Corporation 

Alston-Lucas Paint Co 

Althouse Chemical Co., The. 

Alyco Manufacturing Co. (Inc.). 

Amalgamated DyestuQ & Chemical Works 

(Inc.). 
American Aniline Products (Inc.) 

Amido Products Co 

Anderson Chemical Co 

Ansbacher & Co. (Inc.), A. B 

Atom Chemical Corporation 

Baird & McOuire (Inc.) 

Barrett Co., The 

Bayer Co. (Inc.), The _ 

Beaver Chemical Corporation 

Belle Chemical Products Co 

Benzol Products Co. (Inc.) 

Berghausen Chemical Co., The E 

Berkheimer Manufacturing Co., J. E 

Brooklyn Color Works (Inc.) 

Brown Co 

Bush (Inc.), Burton T 

Bush & Co. (Inc.), W. J 

Cable Chemical Works 

Calco Chemical Co., The 

California Ink Co. (Inc.).. 

Carbide & Carbon Chemical Corporation. 



4753 East Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, 111. (North 

Chicago, m.) 
Packer, Conn. 
531 Grosvenor Building, Providence, R. I. (North 

Attleboro, Mass.) 
132 Front Street, New York, N. Y. (Elizabeth, N. J.) 
1031 Currier Street, Chicago, 111. 
540 Pear Street, Reading, Pa. 
86 Orange Street, Bloomfield, N. J. 
Plum Point Lane, Newark, N. J. 

45 East Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. (Lock 

Haven, Pa.) 
132 Front Street, New York, N. Y. (228 Emmett 

Street, Newark, N.J.) 
148 State Street. Boston, Mass. (Everett, Mass.) 
527 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn. 

N. Y.) 
96 East Tenth Street, New York, N. Y. 
Holbrook, Mass. 
40 Rector Street, New York, N. Y. (Plants distributed 

throughout the United States.) 
117 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. (Rensselaer, 

N, Y.) 
Damascus, Va. 
Belle, W. Va. 

13 Margaretta Street, Newark, N. J. 
915 Carr Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
2928 South M Street, Tacoma, Wash. 
129 Cherry Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
404 Commercial Street, Portland, Me. (Berlin, N. H.) 
101 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Delawanna, 

N.J.) 
370 Seventh Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Linden, N.J.) 
1700 Elston Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Cable, Wis.) 
Bound Brook, N. J. 
Station A, Berkeley, Calif. 
30 East Fortv-second Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Charleston, W. Va.) 



222 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1925 — Con. 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in parentheses 
if not in same city as office) 



Celluloid Co., The 

Central Dyestuff & Chemical Co 

Central Specialty Co 

Certain-teed Products Corporation 

Chemical Co. of America (Inc.), The 

Childs Pulp Colors (Inc.) 

Cincinnati Chemical Works (Inc.) .- 

Coleman & Bell Co., The 

Commonwealth Color & Chemical Co 

Consolidated Color & Chemical Co 

Cooks Falls Dye Works (Inc.) 

Cooper & Co. (Inc.), Charles 

Coopers Creek Chemical Co 

Corona Chemical Division, Pittsburgh 

Plate Glass Co. 
Croton Color & Chemical Co 

Crown Tar Works 

Crystal Color & Chemical Works 

David Chemical Co., Albert 

Debrook Co. (Inc.) 

Delta Chemical & Iron Co 

Diarsenol Co. (Inc.) 

Dovan Chemical Corporation 

Dow Chemical Co., The 

duPont de Nemours & Co., E. I.. 

Dye Products & Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Dyes and Chemicals (Inc.) 

DyestufTs & Chemicals (Inc.) 

Eakins (Inc.), J. S. & W. R 

Eastman Kodak Co 

Esses Aniline Works (Inc.) 

Federal Color Laboratories (Inc.).. 

Felton Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Fine Colors Co. (Inc.) __- 

Florasynth Laboratories (Inc.) 

Ford Motor Co 

Foster-Heaton Co_- -.. _. 

Franco American Chemical Works 

Fries Bros 

Fries & Fries Co.. The 

Garfield Aniline Works (Inc.) 

Gary & Chesterton Chemical Co. (Inc.)... 

Gaskill Chemical Corporation, The 

Gebauer Chemical Co., The 

Goodrich Co., The B. F 

Granton Chemical Co. (Inc.).. 

Oras.selli Dysetuff Corporation 

Great Western Electro Chemical Co 

Hampden Paint & Chemical Co 

Harmon Color Works (Inc.) 

Heller & Merz Co., The_. 

Herrmann & Co. (Inc.), Morris 

Heyden Chemical Corporation 

Hooker Electrochemical Co 

Hydrocarbon Chemical Co 

Hynson, Westcott <fe Dunning 

Imperial Color Works (Inc.) 

Ising Corporation, The C. E 

Johnson & Co., Charles Eneu 

Kent Color Corporation. 

Kentucky Color & Chemical Co 

Kcssler Chemical Co., The.. 

Klipstein & Sons Co., E. C 

Kohnstamm &. Co. (Inc.), H. 



290 Ferry Street, Newark, N. J. 

Foundry Street and Roanoke Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

524 Delaware Street, Kansas City, Mo. 

100 East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (East 
St. Louis, 111.) 

40 Murray Street, New York, N. Y. (Springfield, 
N.J.) 

43 Summit Street, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Evanston Station, Box 20, Cincinnati, Ohio. (Nor- 
wood and St. Bernard, Ohio.) 

Main and Waverly Avenues, Norwood, Ohio. 

Nevins, Butler, and Baltic Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

122 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.) 

68 William Street, New York, N. Y. (Cooks Falls, 
N. Y.) 

194 Worth Street, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.) 

West Conshohocken, Pa. 

205 Lake Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

293 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Croton-on-HudsOD, 

N. Y.) 
418 Gas and Electric Building, Denver, Colo. 
Saugus, Mass. 
43 Summit Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Chicago Heights, 

111.) 
1105 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wells, Delta County, Mich. 
771 Ellicott Square, Buffalo, N. Y. 
30 Church Street, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.) 
Midland, Mich. 

Wilmington, Del. (Deep Water Point, N. J.) 
200 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (202 Vanderpool 

Street, Newark, N. J.) 
702 Court Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Eleventh and Monroe Streets, St. Louis, Mo. 

24 Wallabout Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

343 State Street, Rochester, N. Y. (Kodak Park Works, 

Rochester, N.Y.) 
88 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. (South Middleton, 

Mass.) 
Forest .\ venue, Norwood, Ohio. 
61 Taaffe Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
21 McBride .\ venue, Paterson, N. J. 
Olmstead and Starling Avenues, Unionport, N. Y. 

(Bronx, N. Y.) 
Iron Mountain, Mich. (Kingsford, Mich.) 
833 Magnolia Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Carlstadt, N. J. 

92 Reade Street, New York, N. Y. (Bloomfield, N. J.) 
1501 West Sixth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Midland Avenue, Garfield, N. J. 
Chesterton, Ind. 

355 Van Buren Street, Newark, N. J. 
669 Erie Building, Cleveland, Ohio. (9408 St. Catherine 

Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio.) 
Akron, Ohio. 

350 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (New Bruns- 
wick, N. J.) 
1150 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Grasselli, N. i., 

Rensselaer, N. Y.) 
9 Main Street, San Francisco, Calif. (Pittsborgi 

Calif.) 
161 Armory Street, Springfield, Mass. 
361 Harmon Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
338 Wilson Avenue, Newark, N. J. 
200 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.) 
45 East Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. (Gar- 

field, N. J.) 

25 Pine Street, New York, N. Y. (Niagara Falls 
N. Y.) 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Charles and Chase Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Flushing, N. Y. 

509 South Tenth Stret, Philadelphia, Pa. 

2 South Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Thirty-fourth and Bank Streets, Louisville, Ky. 

575 Nassau Street, Orange, N. J.' 

644 Greenwich Street, New York, N. Y. (Carteret, 

N. J., South Charleston, W. Va.) 
87 Park Place, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES 223 

Directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1925 — Con. 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in parentheses 
if not in same city as office) 



LaMotte Chemical Products Co., The 

Lee Co., A 

Lewis Manufacturing Co., F. J 

Lilly & Co., Eli 

Long Isalnd Color & Chemical Corporation 

Maas & Waldstein Co 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

Maple Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Miirx Color & Chemical Co., Max 

Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health. 

Mathieson Alkali Works (Inc.), The 

May Chemical Works - 

Maywood Chemical Works 

Mepham & Co., George S 

Merck & Co 

Merrimac Chemical Co 

Metz Laboratories (Inc.), H. A , 

Miner Edgar Co., The 

Monsanto Chemical Works 

Morana (Inc.) 

National Ammonia Co. of Pennsylvania, 

The. 
National Aniline & Chemical Co. (Inc.).. 

Naugatuck Chemical Co., The.. , 

New England Aniline Works (Inc.) 

New Haven Gas Light Co - , 

New York Quinine & Chemical Works 

(Inc.). 
Newport Co., The 

Niagara Alkali Co --- - 

Niagara Smelting Corporation.- 

Noil Chemical & Color Works (Inc.) 

Northwestern Chemical Co.. 

Norvell Chemical Corporation, The 

Novocol Chemical Mfg. Co. (Inc.).. 

Oldbury Electro Chemical Co 

Organo Chemico Co — 

Palatine Aniline & Chemical Corporation. 

Passaic Color Corporation. 

Peek Chemical Works (Inc.) 

Peerless Color Co 

Pennsylvania Coal Products Co — 

Pfizer & Co. (Inc.), Charles 

Pharma-Chemical Corporation — 

Portland Gas & Coke Co 

Powers-Weightman-Rosengarten Co 

Providence Chemical Laboratories 

Puritan Dye & Chemical Co 

Quaker Oats Co., The 

Radiant Dye & Color Works 

Republic Creosoting Co 

Rhodia Chemical Co.. 

Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Co., The. 

Rossville Co., The. 

Rubber Service Laboratories Co., The 

Ruxton (Inc.), Philip. 

Selden Co., The.. 

Semet-Solvay Co... 

Seydel Chemical Co 

Sherwin-Williams Co., The 

Siegle Corporation of America, G 

Siemon & Elting (Inc.). 

Sinclair & Valentine Co , 

Southern Aromatics Co 

Southern Dyestuffs Co 

Special Chemicals Co.. 

Squibb & Sons, E. R 



McCormick Building, 400 Light Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Lawrence, Mass. (Methuen, Mass.) 

2513 South Robey Street, Chicago, 111. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

22 Seventh Street, Long Island City, N. Y. 

45 John Street, New York, N. Y. 

3600 North Second Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

122 Maple Avenue, Rosebank, Staten Island, N. Y. 

192 Coit Street, Irvington, N.J. 

Room 540, State House, Boston, Mass. (Brookline. 

250 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. Y.) 
204 Niagara Street, Newark, N. J. 
100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, N. J. 
Twentieth Street and Lynch Avenue, East St. Louis, 

111. 
45 Park Place, New York, N. Y. (Rahway, N. J.). 
148 State Street, Boston, Mass. 
122 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, 

N. Y.). 
110 William Street, New York, N. Y. (Newark, N. J.). 
1724 South Second Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
61 Vandam Street, New York, N. Y. (Elizabeth, 

N. J.). 
Delaware Avenue and Van Kirk Street, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
40 Rector Street, New York, N. Y. (Buffalo, N. Y.). 
Naugatuck, Conn. 
Ashland, Mass. 

80 Crown Street, New Haven, Conn. 

99 North Eleventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 1582, Milwaukee, Wis. (Carrollville, Wis.; 

Passaic, N. J.). 
Buffalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
152 West One hundred and Eighth Street, New York, 

N.Y. 

99 John Street, New York, N.Y. (Perth Amboy, N. J.) 
2923 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Sandusky, Ohio. 

81 North Water Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

50 Eighth Street, Passaic, N. J. 

380 Williamson Street, Elizabeth, N. J. 

521 North Avenue, Plainfleld, N.J. 

Reiber Building, Butler, Pa. (Petrolia, Pa.). 

81 Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Bayonne, N. J.). 

Gasco Building, Portland, Oreg. 

916 Parrish Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

51 Empire Street, Providence, R. I. 
East Main Street, Northborough, Mass. 

1600 Railway Exchange, Chicago, 111. (Cedar Rapids, 

Iowa) . 
West Twentieth Street and Neptune Avenue, Brook- 
lyn, N.Y. 
1614 Merchants Bank Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

(St. Louis Park, Minn.; Ironton, Utah; Mobile, Ala.; 

Norfolk, Va.; Seattle, Wash.; Indianapolis, Ind.) 
21 Spruce Street, New York, N.Y. (New Brunswick 

N.J.) 
709 Sixth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Perth Amboy, 

N. J.; Niagara Falls, N. Y.) 
Lawrenceburg, Ind. 
611 Peoples Savings & Trust Building, Akron, Ohio. 

(Nitro, W. Va.) 
220 West Forty-second Street, New York, N. \ . 
339 Second Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
61 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Syracuse, N. Y.) 
86 Forrest Street, Jersey City, N. J. (Nitro, W. Va.) 
601 Canal Road, Cleveland, Ohio. (Chicago, 111.) 
Chestnut Avenue, Rosebank, Staten Island, N. Y. 
Linden, N J. (Irvington, N. J.) 
11 St. Clair Place, New York, N. Y. 
Brunswick, Ga. 
Nitro, W. Va. 

Waukegan, 111. (Highland Park, HI.) 
80 Beekman Street, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, 

N. Y.; New Brunswick, N. J.) 



5919— 26t- 



-16 



224 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS 

Directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1926 — Con. 



No. 



158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 

164 
165 
166 

167 
168 
169 
170 

171 

172 

173 
174 
175 

176 
177 

178 
179 

180 
181 

182 
183 
184 
185 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in parentheses 
if not in same city as office) 



Stearns & Co., Frederick 

Sun Chemical & Color Co 

Synfleur Scientific Laboratories (Inc.) 

Synthetics Products Co., The 

Synthetical Laboratories, The,. 

Tar Products Corporation 

Texdel Chemical Co.- 

TextUe Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Thatcher Process Co. (Inc.) 

Todd Co., A. M 

Tower Manufacturing Co. (Inc.) 

Trico Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Ullman Co., Sigmund 

Ultro Chemical Corporation 

U. S. Industrial Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Van Dyk & Co. (Inc.).. 

Van Schaack Bros. Chemical Works (Inc.) 
Vernon Synthetic Chemical Corporation 
(Inc.) 

Verona Chemical Co 

Victor Chemical Works 

Warner-Jenkinson Manufacturing Co 

Westvaco Chlorine Products (Inc.) 

White Chemical Co , The Wilbur 

White Tar Co. of New Jersey (Inc.), The. 

Wilhelm Co., The A 

Williamsburg Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Wolff- Alport Chemical Corporation 

Zinsser & Co. (Inc.) 



6533 Jefferson Avenue East, Detroit, Mich. 

309 Sussex Street, Harrison, N. J. 

Montieello, N. Y. 

1114 Center Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

5558 Ardmore Avenue, Chicago, 111 . 

99 Empire Street, Providence, R. I. (East Provi- 
dence, R. I.) 

136 Water Street, New York, N. Y. (Nutley, N. J.) 

90 Smithfield Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

203 Richmond Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. (523 Tracy 
Street, Syracuse, N. Y.) 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

85 Doremus Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

502 Iroquois Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Park Avenue and One hundred and forty-sixth 
Street, New York, N. Y. 

1 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. (236 Forty-sixth 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

110 East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Curtis Bay, Baltimore, Md.) 

4 Piatt Street, New York, N. Y. (Jersey City, N. J.) 

3338 Avondale Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

166 Vernon Avenue, Long Island City, N. Y. 

26 Verona Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

343 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. (Chicago 

Heights. 111.) 
2526 Baldwin Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
415 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (South 

Charleston, W. Va.) 
Owego, Tioga County, N. Y. 
56 Vesey Street, New York, N. Y. (Kearney, N. J.; 

Cincinnati, Ohio.) 
Third and Bern Streets, Reading, Pa. 
230 Morgan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
593 Irving Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



o