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Full text of "Synthetic organic chemicals : United States production and sales"

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Given By 
.U. S. SUPT, OF DOCUJVlENT-b 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

WASHINGTON 



Tariff Information Series — No. 39 



CENSUS OF DYES 

AND OF 

OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC 
CHEMICALS 



1929 




BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06317 185 2 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

WASHINGTON 



Tariff Information Series— No. 39 



CENSUS OF DYES 

AND OF 

OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC 
CHEMICALS 



1929 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON: 1930 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. - - - - Price 30 cents 



mi ^ A^^^ 

UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Office: Seventh and E Streets NW., Washington, D. C. 



COMMISSIONERS 

Edgar B. Brossard, Chairman. 
Alfred P. Dennis, Vice Chairman 
Thomas O. Marvin. 
Sherman J. Lowell. 
Lincoln Dixon. 
Frank Clark. 



John F. Bethune, Secretary 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Introduction ix 

Part I 

Summary of census of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1929: 

Introduction 3 

Summary of domestic production, 1929 — 

Crudes 4 

Intermediates 4 

Coal-tar dyes — 

Production 5 

Prices 5 

Imports 6 

Exports 6 

Statistics of production 6 

International dye trade in 1929 7 

Synthetic organic chemicals not derived from coal tar 8 

Part II 

Production of dyes and coal-tar chemicals, 1929: 
Coal-tar crudes — 

Peak production of coke , 13 

Total production of tar 14 

Uses of tar 15 

Distillates of tar 16 

Production of crudes in by-product ovens 19 

Production of crudes by firms not primarily engaged in operation 

of coke-oven plants 20 

Coal-tar creosote 20 

Decline in production of naphthalene 21 

Pitch and other products 21 

Imports of crudes 22 

Exports of crudes 22 

Low- temperature carbonization of coal 22 

Coal-tar intermediates — 

Description 23 

Production — 

Diphenyl and derivatives 23 

Synthetic phenol 24 

Cresylic acid 24 

Tricresyl phosphate 24 

Rubber accelerators 24 

Aniline and derivatives 25 

Naphthalene 25 

Phthalic anhydride 25 

Anthraquinone 25 

Benzoyl peroxide 26 

Halogenated intermediates 26 

Organic metallic fungicides 26 

New intermediates 28 

Other intermediates 28 

Statistics of production and sales 28 

in 



rV CONTENTS 

Production of dyes and coal-tar chemicals, 1929 — Continued. 

Dyes and other finished coal-tar products — - Page 

Introduction 36 

Summary of production of dyes — 

Increase in production 36 

Stocks on hand 37 

Prices 38 

Unit value of dyes produced, 1925-1929-_-I.-~'IIII""I]I] 41 
Progress in dye manufacture — 

Relation of production to consumption 41 

Number of manufacturers 42 

Tariff considerations 42 

Court and Treasury decisions 43 

Imports of dyes, 1920-1930 43 

Production of dyes l>y classes 44 

Acid dyes 45 

Basic dyes 47 

Direct dyes 48 

Mordant and chrome dyes 50 

Sulfur dvQs 51 

Vat dyes 52 

Color-lake and spirit soluble dyes. 54 

Food dyes 55 

Export trade in dyes 55 

Other finished coal-tar products — 

Color lakes 56 

Medicinals 56 

Flavors and perfume materials 58 

Synthetic resins 59 

Photographic chemicals 60 

Synthetic tanning materials 60 

Employees and rates of pay _ 78 

Research work 80 

Part III 

Dyes imported for consumption in the United States, 1929: 

Introduction 83 

Summary of imports of dyes 83 

Statistics of imports 84 

Part IV 

Census of synthetic organic chemicals other than those of coal-tar origin, 
1929: 

Introduction 129 

Increasing importance of the industry 129 

Chemicals showing marked increases in 1929 — 

Acetic acid 131 

Formic acid 132 

Citric acid 132 

Methanol 132 

Ethyl alcohol 133 

Propyl, isopropyl, butyl, amyl alcohols 133 

Acetaldehyde 134 

Ethvl and methyl chlorides 134 

Tetfaethyl lead 134 

Ti'iethanolamine 135 

Products reported in 1929 for first time — 

Acetone . 135 

Isopropyl ether 136 

Synthetic resins '. 136 

Organic metallic compounds 136 

Chemicals for industrial fumigation 137 

Caffeine - 137 

Statistics of imports, pruduclion, and sales 139 



CONTENTS V 

Part V 

International dye trade: Page 

Introduction 147 

Developments in 1929 147 

World production of dyes 147 

Competitive conditions 148 

Exports from producing countries 149 

International imports 150 

International agreements 151 

The dye industry of Germany — 

Activities of the I. G 153 

The dye industry of Great Britain — 

Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd 158 

Regulation of importation of dyestuff s 158 

I. C. I.— f. G.— Patent litigation 159^' 

Production 159 

The dye industry of Switzerland — 

Imports and exports 162 

The dye industry of France 163 

Imports and exports 164, 165 

The dye industry of Italy 165 

Imports and exports 166 

The dye industry of Japan 167 

Imports and exports 168, 169 

The dye industry of Spain 169 

Imports and exports 170 

The dye industry of Poland and Russia 171 

The dye industrj- of other countries 171 

Part VI 

Statistics of domestic imports and exports 179 

Directorv of manufacturers of dyes and other svnthetic organic chemi- 
cals, 1929 ■. 188 

Statistical Tables 

1. Dyes and coal-tar chemicals: Summary of production, 1928 and 

1927-1929 6 

2. Svnthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin: Production and 

"sales, 1921-1929 9 

3. Bv-product and beehive coke: Production in United States 1913- 

"1929 14 

4. Coke-oven, coal-gas, water-gas and oil-gas tar: Production and sales 

in United States, 1918-1929 14 

5. Coke-oven tar: Production in United States and percentage sold 

and used, 1918-1929 15 

6. Total commercial production of benzene, toluene, solvent naphtha, 

naphthalene, and creosote oil from all sources in United States, 

1918-1929 16 

7. Coal-tar crudes obtained as bv-products in coke-oven operations, 

1927-1929 " 19 

8.. Coal-tar crudes: Production, 1929, by firms not primarily engaged in 

operation of coke-oven plants and gas houses 22 

9. Coal-tar intermediates: Domestic sales price per pound, 1923-1929, 

and invoice price of same intermediates imported, 1914 29 

10. Coal-tar intermediates, production and sales, 1929 29 

11. Intermediates: Production, by groups, according to unit values, 

1925-1929 36 

12. Coal-\jar dyes: Domestic production and sales, 1914 and 1917-1929-. 37 

13. Domestic dyes: Stocks on hand January 1, 1929, and January 1, 1930_ 37 

14. Domestic dves: Weighted avera.ge s?.les price per pound, 1917 and 

1920-1929 38 

15. Domestic sales price of certain dyes, 1925-1929, compared with invoice 

values of dyes of same kind imported in 1914 40 

16. Dyes, production bv groups, according to unit value, 1925-1929 41 

17. Coal-tar dyes: Imports into United States 1920-1930 (8 months) 44 



VI CONTENTS 

Page 

18. Coiiiparison of imports of dyes by classes, with domestic production, 

calendar years 1927-1929 44 

19. Production and sales of the five ranking acid dyes, 1928, 1929 46 

20. Production and sales of five ranking basic dyes, 1928, 1929 48 

21. Production and sales of eight ranking direct dyes, 1928, 1929 49 

22. Production and sales of six ranking sulfur dyes, 1928, 1929 52 

23. Vat dyes other than indigo: Domestic sales, imports, and apparent 

consumption in United States, 1914 and 1923-1929 54 

24. Coal-tar dyes: Exports from United States, 1920-1929 55 

25. Colors, dyes, and stains: Domestic exports by months, 1927 to 1929, 

and 1930 (6 months) _' 56 

26. Coal-tar medicinals: Production of selected list, 1922-1929 57 

27. Synthetic resins: Production and sales, 1927-1929 59 

28. Medicinals and pharmaceuticals: Imports into United Sifates, 1929__ 61 

29. Synthetic aromatic chemicals of coal-tar origin: Imports into United 

States, 1929 61 

30. Photographic chemicals, intermediates, and other coal-tar products: 

Imports into United States, 1929 62 

31. Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 64 

32. Employees and rates of pav in coal-tar dye and chemical industry, 

1929 1 79 

33. Employees and rates of pay in coal-tar dye and chemical industry, 

1929, as compared with 1928 80 

34. Dyes: Imports into the United States, by country of shipment, 1927- 

1929 84 

35. Dves imported into the United States, classified by method of applica- 

tion, 1924-1929 84 

36. Dyes of each class, according to method of application, imported in 

largest quantity during the calendar year 1929, compared with 

corresponding imports in 1928, 1927, 1926, and the fiscal year 1914, 85 

37. Dves and intermediates remaining in bonded customs warehouse, 

January 31, 1929, to March 31, 1930 87 

38. Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 88 

39. Noncoal-tar synthetic organic chemicals, production, and sales, 1921- 

1929 -- 130 

40. Certain synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin: Imports 

and production, 1927-1929 139 

41. Synthetic organic chemicals: Imports through port of New York, 1929, 

dutiable under paragraph 5, act of 1922 140 

42. Synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin: Production and 

sales, 1929 140 

43. Dyes: Production by chief producing countries, 1925-1929 148 

44. Coal-tar dyes: Exports from chief producing countries, 1925-1929 150 

45. Coal-tar dyes: Imports into chief consuming countries, 1913, 1928- 

1929 151 

46. Profits and losses of I. G., 1925-1929 154 

46a. Balance sheet of the I. G. Farbenindustrie, 1925-1929 155 

47. Consumption and production of coal-tar distillation plants in Ger- 

many, 1913, 1927, and 1928 155 

48. Coal-tar dyes: Exports from Germany, 1913, 1920-1929 156 

49. Germany, imports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 156 

50. Germany, exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 157 

51. Principal items of balance sheet of Imperial Chemical Industries (Ltd.) , 

1927-1929 158 

52. United Kingdom: Production of dyes, 1927-1929 160 

53. United Kingdom: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 161 

54. United Kingdon) : Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 161 

55. United Kingdom: Imports and exports of dveing and tanning ma- 

terials, 1929 1 161 

56. Switzerland: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 162 

57. France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 164 

58. France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 165 

59. Italy: Production of dyes and intermediates, 1921-1927 165 

60. Italy: Imports of synthetic organic dyes by countries, 1929 167 

61. Italy: Imports and exports of synthetic organic dj^es, 1929 167 

62. Japan: Production of natural crude and refined indigo 168 

63. Japan: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 168 



CONTENTS Vn 

Page 

64. Japan: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 169 

65. Japan: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 169 

66. Spain: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 170 

67. Australia: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1927-1928 171 

68. Belgium: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 172 

69. Canada: Imports of coal-tar dyes, year ending March 31, 1929 172 

70. China: Exports of indigo, 1928 173 

71. Czechoslovakia: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 173 

72. Denmark: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 174 

73. Egypt: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 174 

74. India: Imports of coal-tar dyes and exports of natural indigo, year 

ending March 31, 1929 175 

75. India: Imports of coal-tar dyes, calendar year, 1929 175 

76. India: Exports of natural indigo, 1929 176 

77. Sweden: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 176 

78. Coal-tar products: Imports entered for consumption, 1927-1929 179 

79. Coal-tar products: General imports, 1927-1929 _ 183 

80. Coal-tar products: Domestic exports, 1927-1929 185 



INTRODUCTION 



This report is a survey of the domestic dye and of the synthetic 
organic chemical industry in 1929. It presents the results of a special 
investigation made by the United States Tariff Commission with 
respect to the production in the United States of coal-tar dyes and of 
synthetic organic chemicals of coal-tar and of noncoal-tar origin. It 
includes a detailed tabulation of coal-tar dyes imported into the 
United States and official statistics of imports and exports of coal- 
tar dyes by the large consuming and producing nations of the world. 

The survey is divided into six parts, as shown in the Table of 
Contents (pp. iii to v). 



In the preparation of this report the Tariff Commission had the 
services of Dexter North, Wilbur F. Sterling, G. Raymond Webb, 
Florence Burlingame, and Bertha M, Robertson, of the chemical 
division of the commission's staff, and of others. The commis- 
sion is indebted to Warren N. Watson, former chief of the chemical 
division, for his valuable suggestions in the preparation of this report. 



rx 



PART I 

SUMMARY OF THE CENSUS OF DYES AND OF 
OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1929 



Part I 

SUMMARY OF THE CENSUS OF DYES AND OF OTHER SYN- 
THETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1929 

Introduction 

The United States Tariff Commission has prepared, beginning with 
1917, an annual report of the American dye and coal-tar chemical 
industry.' In 1921 the scope of this surve}" was extended to include 
synthetic organic chemicals not of coal-tar origin. This rapidly 
expanding branch of the American chemical industry has been covered 
in each succeeding census, including this issue. 

In addition to statistics of production and sales of the domestic 
industry, this report contains a detailed tabulation of coal-tar dyes 
imported into the United States in 1929; a discussion of the inter- 
national dye trade, including significant developments that have 
occurred in the principal foreign d3"e-producing countries since the 
last census; and official statistics of exports and imports of coal-tar 
dyes of the more important dj^e-producing and consuming countries of 
the world in 1929. The development of the organic-metallic fungicide 
industry in the United States is discussed under ''Intermediates." 

The general grouping of coal-tar chemicals in this report follows that 
of the tariff act of 1930, and conforms in general, although not in every 
detail, to common practice. Crudes, free under paragraph 1651, are 
prepared from crude coal tar; intermediates, dutiable at 40 per cent 
and 7 cents per pound and at 20 per cent and 3/4 cents per pound 
under paragraph 27, are chemically manufactured from crudes; and 
dyes and other finished coal-tar products, dutiable at 45 per cent and 
7 cents per pound ^ under paragraph 28, are prepared by chemical 
treatment from intermediates. "Other finished coal-tar products" 
include color lakes, photographic chemicals, medicinals, flavors, 
perfume materials, synthetic resins, and syntKetic tanning materials. 
Explosives of coal-tar origin, although dutiable under paragraph 28, 
are not included in this census. 

A summary of domestic production and sales of coal-tar products 
in 1918 and in 1927-1929, inclusive, appears in Table 1, page 6. 
The data for the years omitted are contained in the 1928 census. 
The figures for 1929 were compiled from returns of 199 companies^ 
and are thought to form a complete record of the manufacture of 
such products. Data for separate items are given in as great detail 

' other reports prepared by the Tariff Commission relating to conditions in the dye industry include: (1) 
Costs of production in the dye industry, 1918 and 1919, and (2) Dyes and other coal-tar chemicals, Dec. 12, 
1918. 

2 Except indigo and sulfur black, which are dutiable at 20 per cent and 3 cents per pound. 

3 This census includes production returns of 199 firms, of which 31 made synthetic organic chemicals of 
noncoal-tar origin only, and 168 iiiade synthetic organic chemicals of coal-tar origin or of both coal-tar and 
noncoal-tar origin. Of the 199 firms, 161 granted permission for the publication of their names. The names 
of the 161 firms are listed in the directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 
page 188. 

3 



4 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

as is possible without disclosing the operations of individual manu- 
facturers. The policy of the commission is to omit production and 
sales figures for a given product unless at least three firms report a 
substantial production. If the total is not well distributed among 
the three or more manufacturers, or if one producer reports the bulk 
of the total, production or sales figures are not published. 

Summary of Domestic Production, 1929 

CRUDES 

The total domestic production of coke in 1929 was 59,884,923 net 
tons, a decided increase over the previous year and the highest 
output on record. Of this total, by-product ovens reported 89.2 per 
cent and beehive ovens 10.8 per cent. In 1913 only 27.5 per cent 
was from by-product ovens. Since then the trend of the industry 
has been toward the increased use of the by-product oven, which 
permits the recovery of ammonia, gas, tar, creosote oil, and valuable 
phenolic products, heretofore lost in the beehive process of coking. 
By-product ovens are supplying increasing quantities of gas for urban 
consumption and of coke for domestic fuel. 

The total production of coke-oven and coal-gas tar in 1929 was 
736,864,366 gallons, an increase of 7 per cent over the output in 
1928. The production of American tar is greatly in excess of the 
requirements of tar-distilling and coal-tar chemical industries, and 
a large portion of the annual output is used as fuel. In 1929 tar 
distillers utilized 367,340,281 gallons of tar, or about 50 per cent 
of the quantity produced. The 367,340,281 gallons distilled were 
converted into partly refined products, such as motor fuel, solvents, 
and pitches, and into refined products, such as benzene, toluene, 
and naphthalene. 

Dead or creosote oil is one of the crudes of great commercial value 
and economic importance. It is extensively used as a wood preserva- 
tive. The production of 170,476,958 gallons of creosote oil in 1929 
was an increase of about 35 per cent over the output of the previous 
year. Imports declined from 88,385,074 gallons in 1928 to 77,100,896 
gallons in 1929. During 1929 a large number of new units for the 
recovery of creosote oil were installed. The United States now has 
an installed capacity sufficient to produce well in excess of the present 
domestic consumption. Of the coal-tar products imported in 1929, 
creosote oil is the largest single item both in quantity and value. 

INTERMEDIATES 

Intermediates, prepared from coal-tar crudes by chemical methods, 
are used in the manufacture of dyes and other finished products, 
and, to a lesser extent, directly as accelerators and antioxidants in 
the processing of rubber, as camphor substitutes, as insecticides and 
germicides, and in the flotation process of concentrating ores. 

The total production of intermediates by 77 firms in 1929 was 
354,487,718 pounds, an increase of 27 per cent over the 279,274,807 
pounds reported by the same number of firms in 1928. 



SUMMARY OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, 1929 5 

Intermediates used in the preparation of fast and specialty dyes 
showed increased production, and several new intermediates of this 
type were reported in 1929. The output of phthalic anhydride, 
used in the manufacture of anthraquinone, was above the record 
production of 1928. 

Phenol, an intermediate used in the preparation of synthetic resins, 
dyes, medicinals, and explosives, more than doubled in production in 
1929. The increase was largely due to the peak output of phenolic 
synthetic resins. A new synthetic process for manufacturing 
phenol from monochlorobenzene and caustic soda, now in large- 
scale operation in this country, is largely responsible for the unusual 
increase in the output of monochlorobenzene. 

The manufacture of synthetic organic chemicals for use in com- 
pounding rubber showed progress in 1929. It is estimated that 
accelerators reduce the time of vulcanization by about three-fourths, 
and that antioxidants increase the average life of tires about one 
year. Many of the existing compounds were used in increased 
quantity by the rubber trade, and several new products of this class 
were reported in 1929 for the first time. 

COAL-TAR DYES 

Production. — The output of dyes in 1929 by 54 firms was 111,421,505 
pounds, an increase of 14,796,054 pounds or 15.31 per cent over the 
production of 96,625,451 pounds in 1928. Substantially larger out- 
puts of direct, sulfur, and vat dyes (including indigo) accounted 
for 81.12 per cent of this increase in production. Sales totaled 
106,070,887 pounds, valued at $45,842,130, as compared with 
93,302,708 pounds, valued at $39,792,039, in 1928. 

Since the war the manufacture of dyes and finished coal-tar chem- 
icals has steadily developed, until now over $100,000,000 are invested 
in buildings and equipment and employees number 11,270, as con- 
trasted with 528 in 1914. During this interval hundreds of new 
dyes have been produced, and most of them for the first time in the 
United States. Of the 78,377,709 pounds of dyes apparently con- 
sumed in the United States in 1929, 91.79 per cent by quantity and 
77.80 per cent by value were made in American plants. 

Expenditures for research on dves and coal-tar chemicals bore 
the same relation to total sales in 1929 as in 1928. Nearly $3,000,000 
is reported as having been the net cost of research in 1929. That 
nearly four cents out of every dollar paid for dyes and coal-tar 
chemicals is spent on research work to improve quality and to meet 
competitive conditions in the industry attests to the importance 
which our dye manufacturers attach to research work. 

Prices. — The weighted average price per pound of all domestic 
dyes sold declined on an average of 8.7 cents per year during the 
period 1917 to 1927. Though there were general price recessions 
in 1928 and in 1929, the weighted average price per pound increased 
from 39 cents to 42.6 cents in 1928 and to 43.2 cents in 1929, largely 
because of an increase in the price of indigo and sulfur black in 1928, 
a further increase in the price of indigo in 1929, and increased 
production of higher priced dyes in both years. 



6 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Imports. — Imports of dyes in 1929, amounting to 6,437,147 pounds, 
with an invoice value of $5,374,085, represent an increase of 1,085,196 
pounds, or 20.28 per cent in quantity and of $1,052,218 or 24.35 per 
cent in value, over the 1928 imports of 5,351,951 pounds, with an 
invoice value of $4,312,867. Germany and Switzerland supply nearly 
all of our dye imports. Classified by method of application, 41.87 per 
cent of our imports in 1929 were vat dyes; 23.17 per cent, acid dyes; 
15.19 per cent, direct dyes; 8.47 per cent, mordant and chrome 
dyes; and the remainder, basic, spirit-soluble, and sulfur dyes. 

Exports. — Exports of dyes in 1929, amounting to 34,130,325 
pounds, and valued at $7,279,086, represent an increase of 6,306,061 
pounds or 22.66 per cent in quantity and of $747,467 or 11.44 per 
cent in value over the 1928 exports of 27,824,264 pounds, valued at 
$6,531,619. Sales to China, Hongkong, Belgium, Germany, British 
India, and South America increased appreciably in 1929, while those 
to Canada, Cuba, the United Kingdom, the Philippine Islands, and 
France decreased. Low-priced bulk dyes, such as indigo and sulfur 
black, direct blue and black, and acid black are the principal colors 
exported by the United States. 

STATISTICS OF PRODUCTION OF INTERMEDIATES AND FINISHED 

PRODUCTS 

Table 1. — Dyes and coal-tar chemicals: Summary of production, 1918 and 

1927-1929 



Number 
of manu- 
facturers 



Production 



Quantity 



Value 



Intermediates (total) 

Finished products (total) 

Dyes 

Color lakes 

Photographic chemicals 

Medicinals 

Flavors 

Perfumes.--- 

Synthetic tanning materials- 
Synthetic phenolic resins 



Pounds 

357, 662, 251 

76, 802, 959 

58, 464, 446 

9, 590, 537 

316, 749 

3, 623, 352 

458, 256 

116, 263 

4, 233, 356 



$124, 382, 892 

83, 815, 746 

62, 026, 390 

5, 020, 023 

823, 915 

7, 792, 984 

4, 925, 627 

584, 695 

2, 642, 120 



Intermediates (total) 

Finished products (total) 

Dyes - 

Color lakes 

Medicinals 

Flavors 

Perfumes,-- 

Photographic chemicals 

Synthetic tanning materials 
Synthetic phenolic resins 



Number 
of manu- 
facturers 



72 

130 

55 

40 

24 

16 

18 

6 

2 



Production, 
quantity 



Pounds 

240, 073, 184 

133, 357, 423 

95, 167, 905 

11,601,507 

3, 598, 839 

2, 205, 472 

1, 998, 987 

5, 332, 483 

13, 452, 230 



Sales 



Quantity 



Pounds 
92, 917, 439 
136, 206, 835 
98, 339, 204 
11,629,740 
3, 548, 556 
2, 235, 791 
2, 025, 614 

5, 352, 617 

13, 084, 313 



Value 



$20, 127, 459 

61, 272, 645 

38, 532, 795 

6, 446, 508 

6, 819, 487 

1, 435, 445 

991, 922 

951, 832 

6, 094, 656 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 7 

Table 1. — Dyes and coal-tar chemicals: Sumtnary of production, 1918 and 

1927-1929— Continued 



Intermediates (total) 

Finislied products (total) 

Dyes.-- 

Color lakes 

Medicinals 

Flavors 

Perfumes 

Photographic chemicals i 

Synthetic phenolic resins 

Synthetic tanning materials and miscellaneous 



Number 
of manu- 
facturers 



77 
125 
53 
38 
23 
14 
18 
5 



Production, 
quantity 



Pounds 

279, 274, 807 

143, 563, 099 

96, 625, 451 

12, 127, 242 

4, 088, 393 

1, 746, 350 

1, 577. 718 

478, 979 

20,411,465 

6, 587, 501 



Sales 



Quantity 



Pounds 

115,837,340 

140, 796, 814 

93. 302, 708 

12, 045, 435 

4, 00-1, 557 

1, 906, 467 

1, 619, 476 

493, 825 

20, 778, 856 

6, 585, 490 



Value 



$24, 126, 473 

65. 762, 945 

39. 792, 039 

6, 589, 166 

8, 650. 838 

1, 296, 034 

1, 000, 001 

696, 101 

7,211,958 

526, 808 



1929 



Number 
of manu- 
facturers 



Production, 
quantity 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Intermediates (total) 

Finished products (total)' 

Dyes 

Color lakes 

Medicinals 

Flavors 

Perfumes 

Photographic chemicals 

Synthetic resins 

Synthetic tanning materials. 

Research chemicals 

Miscellaneous products 



77 

120 

54 

37 

24 

10 

16 

5 

11 

2 

3 

1 



Pounds 

354, 487, 718 

167, 175, 703 

111,421,505 

13, 244, 676 

5. 000, 205 

2, 292, 450 

1, .599, 430 

580, 947 

33, 036, 490 



Pounds 

148, 711, 591 

158, 698, 300 

106, 070, 887 

12, 907, 914 

4, 745, 054 

2, 253, 414 

1, 480, 368 

580, 150 

30, 660, 513 



$28, 871, 572 
77, 247, 361 
45, 842, 130 

7, 262, 543 

8, 358, 626 
3. 517, 182 
1, 082, 602 

790, 981 
10, 393, 397 



1 Totals for synthetic tnnning materials, research chemicals, and miscellaneous products not included. • 



International Dye Trade 

Previous issues of the Census of Dyes have discussed trends in 
international trade during pre-war years and through the post-war 
period up to 1929. This issue of the census considers major develop- 
ments in 1929 of international importance and contains the latest 
available statistical data of exports and imports of the principal dye- 
producing and dye-consuming nations of the world. 

The dye-producing nations have an installed capacity sufficient to 
produce about 40 per cent more than the world's annual consumption 
of dyes. This condition has resulted in severe international com- 
petition, which has been somewhat checked, however, among European 
producers by cartel arrangements allocating the world's markets, 
limiting production, and stabilizing prices. Germany, France, and 
Switzerland have consummated an agreement regulating their 
collective dye trade. Negotiations between the German and British 
dye producers have failed. The United States is not a party to 
any international cartel or combination. 

The United States, Great Britain, Switzerland, and Italy extended 
their export dye trade in 1929, while Germany, France, and Japan 

114492—30 2 



8 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

exported a lesser quantity of dyes than in the previous year. The 
universal trend toward increased production and consumption of fast 
dyes and the higher-priced specialties continued during 1929. 

Official statistics of exports and estimates of production indicate 
that the German dye industry declined somewhat in 1929. These, 
however, do not present a complete picture of this nation's dye 
activities, because it either owns or controls dye plants in other 
countries, of which no exact appraisal can be made. The Interessen 
Gemei schaft Acktien Gesellschaft (hereinafter referred to as the 
I. G.) is the sole producer of dyes in Germany. The net earnings 
of this organization showed a decrease in 1929 as compared to the 
previous year. In addition to manufacturing coal-tar chemicals, the 
I. G. has expanded its production of fixed nitrogen, fertilizers, solvents, 
synthetic motor fuels, and other chemicals. 

In Great Britain the production of dyes in 1929 was 9.6 per cent 
greater than in 1928. The Imperial Chemical Industries (Ltd.) 
showed an increase in net earnings in 1929. This corporation, formed 
by the merging of a number of units, is the outstanding British 
producer of chemicals. The long-continued patent litigation between 
the Imperial Chemical Industries and the I. G. concerning certain 
azo and monoazo dyes was terminated in favor of the English. 

Switzerland increased her exports of dyes both in quantity and value 
in 1929. The increase in value was greater than the gain in quantity. 
This indicates further specialization in the high-priced specialty dyes 
by the Swiss manufacturers. 

Italy's export trade in dyes increased decidedly in 1929. The unit 
value of exports declined because more of the lower-priced dyes were 
exported than in previous years. 

Japan increased her production of dyes more than 8 per cent in 
1928 as compared with 1927. The nation is endeavoring to become 
self sufficient in the production of indigo. It is reported that the 
Government will subsidize the Miike factory to the amount of 195,000 
yen during the first calendar year. This establishment plans to 
make its own acetic acid and other chemicals used in the production of 
indigo. 

In Spain the Royal Order of March 9, 1926, restricting the impor- 
tation of dyes and certain other coal-tar chemicals, was revoked on 
March 5, 1930. A commission has been appointed to make a uniform 
interpretation of this revocation. 

Synthetic Organic Chemicals Not Derived From Coal Tar 

The production of synthetic organic chemicals other than those of 
coal-tar origin has developed into an industry of major economic 
importance owing to their use in several rapidly expanding industries, 
such as the lacquer and rayon industries, and to the increasing con- 
sumption of aliphatic chemicals in general. Since 1921 the production 
of these chemicals has increased from 21,545,186 pounds to 633,192,215 
pounds, and sales have increased from 16,761,096 pounds, valued at 
$7,226,068, to 405,185,980 pounds, valued at $65,117,651. As com- 
pared with 1928, the quantities produced and sold have increased 
64.65 and 57.61 per cent, respectively. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



9 



Solvents, such as butyl and amyl alcohols and acetates which are 
used in the manufacture of lacquers, are naturally the most im- 
portant items of the noncoal-tar group, although products derived 
from ethylene and acetylene are rapidly increasing in both import- 
ance and number. The high-pressure synthesis of certain aliphatic 
chemicals from gases is assuming an important role. By this means 
we are now obtaining methanol from carbon monoxide, ethyl alcohol 
from ethylene, isopropyl alcohol from propylene, higher alcohols 
from hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and acetone from propylene. 

Important chemicals showing marked increases in production in 
1929 include acetaldehyde, acetic acid, citric acid, ethyl and methy 
chlorides, ethyl propionate, formic acid, isopropyl alcohol, methanol, 
tetraethyl lead, and triethanolamine. 

New products of commercial value reported in 1929 for the first 
time include synthetic acetone from propylene, synthetic ethyl alcohol 
from ethylene, ethyl mercury chloride, isopropyl ether, and synthetic 
resins. 

Table 2 shows the remarkable expansion of the synthetic organic 
chemicals not derived from coal tar. 



Table 2.- 



-Synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-iar origin: Production and sales, 
1921-1929 



Year . 


Production 
(pounds) 


Sales 


Year 


Production 
(pounds) 


Sales 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


1921 

1922 

1923 

1924- 

1925 


21, 545, 186 
79, 202, 155 
90,597,712 
llf.Si7,865 
156,878,013 


16,761,096 
50, 494, 494 
67, 727, 067 
85, 933, 461 
114,626,209 


$7, 226, 068 
11, 964, 074 
13, 875, 521 
20, 604, 717 
23, 632, 779 


1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 


214,842,513 
280, 992, 825 
384, 564, 836 
633, 192, 215 


168, 712, 158 
201, 548, 089 
257,077,856 
405, 185, 980 


$29, 719, 270 
36, 600, 628 
45, 928, 945 
65,117,651 



PART II 

PRODUCTION OF DYES AND OF COAL-TAR 
CHEMICALS, 1929 



II 



Part II 

PRODUCTION OF DYES AND OF COAL-TAR CHEMICALS 

1929 

Coal-Tar Crudes 

Peak 'production of coke. — The total domestic production of coke 
in 1929 was 59,884,923^ net tons, an increase of 13.5 per cent over 
the output in the previous year. This aggregate consisted of 53,- 
411,923 tons of by-product coke, or 89.2 per cent of the total, and 
6,473,000 tons of beehive coke, or 10.8 per cent of the total. For the 
first time since 1921 the rate of increase in beehive coke production 
exceeded that of by-product, 45 per cent as against 10.5 per cent. 

Approximately 200 new by-product coke ovens were in operation 
in 1929. It was in the districts where these new ovens were added 
that production showed the highest rates of increase. The United 
States Bureau of Mines estimates- that 80 per cent of the total pro- 
duction of coke is used in blast furnaces; 12 per cent in domestic 
heating; 5 per cent in foundries; and 3 per cent in other industries. 
As coke is one of the best available substitutes for anthracite coal, 
it is in growing demand for household fuel. 

In addition to their output of coke in 1929, by-product coke plants 
produced 680,864,366 gallons of tar; 200,594,027 gallons of crude 
light oil; 884,306 short tons of ammonium sulfate, an important 
nitrogenous fertilizer material, used extensively in this country and 
exported in large quantities to the Orient; 858,815,000,000 cubic feet 
of gas, widely used in towns and cities throughout the country for 
heating and lighting. 

Prior to 1918 blast furnaces were fueled chiefly with beehive coke, 
but they have increased their consumption of by-product coke 
until now the beehive-coke industry is merely an auxiliary source 
of coke in the steel industry. 

Table 3 shows the production of by-product and of beehive coke 
from 1913 to 1929, inclusive. The figures for 1929 are not final. 
Those for by-product coke are taken from preliminary reports of the 
Bureau of Mines; those for beehive coke are estimates based on the 
number of cars loaded for shipment. 

* Preliminary figures. • Coke and by-products in 1928, Bureau of Mines. 

13 



14 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 3. — By-product and beehive coke: Production in the United States, 1913-1929 



Year 


Net tons produced 


Per cent of total 
output 


By-product 


Beehive 


Total 


By- 

product 


Beehive 


1913 


12, 714, 700 
11.219,943 
14, 072, 895 
19, 069, 361 
22, 439, 280 
25, 997, 580 
25, 137, 621 
30, 833, 951 
19, 749, 580 
28, 550, 545 
37, 597, 664 
33, 983, 568 
39,912,159 
44, 376, 586 
43, 884, 726 
48, 313, 025 
53,411,923 


33, 584, 830 
23, 335, 971 
27, 508, 255 
35, 464, 224 
33, 167. 548 
30, 480, 792 
19, 042, 936 
20,511,092 
5, 538. 042 
8, 573, 467 
19, 379, 870 
10, 286, 037 
11,354,784 
12, 488, 951 
7 207 417 


46, 299, 530 
34, 555, 914 
41,581,150 

54, £33, 585 

55, 606, 828 
56, 478, 372 
44, 180, 557 
51, 345, 043 
25, 287, 622 
37. 124, 012 
56, 977, 534 
44, 269, 605 
51, 266, 943 

56, 865, 537 
^^ nQ9 14S 


27.5 
32.5 
33.8 


72 5 


1914 . .. 


67 5 


1915 


fifi 2 


1916 


35 ! fi5. (1 


1917 


40.4 
46.0 
56.9 
60.0 
78.1 
76.9 
66.0 
76.8 
77.9 
78.0 
85.9 
91.5 
89.2 


59.6 


1918 


54.0 


1919 


43 1 


1920.. .. 


40.0 


1921 

1922 


21.9 
23.1 


1923. - . 


34 


1924 ... . . 


23 2 


1925___ 


22 1 


1926 


22.0 


1927 


14 1 


1928 1 


4, 492, 803 52; SOSJ 828 
6,473 000 59.884.923 


8.5 


1929 2 


10 8 






' ' 





1 Revised since last report. 



2 Preliminary figures. 



Total 'production oj tar. — The total production of coke-oven and 
coal-gas tar in 1929 was 736,864,366 gallons, an increase of 7 per 
cent over the output in 1928. Sales of tar from both sources in 1929 
were 384,057,501 gallons, or about 52 per cent of the amount 
produced. 

Table 4 shows the production of coal tar from all sources and the 
quantity and value of sales from 1918 to 1929, inclusive. 

Table 4. — Coke-oven, coal-gas, water-gas, and oil-gas tar: Production and sales 
in the United States, 1918-1929 

[Compiled by the Bureau of Mines from reports of producers. The difference between production and 
sales is accounted for by tar used by the producer and by changes in stock] 





Coke-oven 

tar 1 


Coal-gas 
tar^ 


Total coal 
tar 


Water and oil 
gas tar 


Production (gallons): 
1918 


263, 299. 470 
288, 901, 739 
360, 664, 124 
253, 051, 649 
327, 779, 734 
440, 907, 109 
422, 074, 326 
480,848,814 
529, 486, 374 
546, 859, 205 
631, 844, 767 
680, 864, 366 

200, 233, 002 
217, 707, 157 
174, 363, 696 
135, 293, 047 
162, 204, 417 
211,739,469 
209, 979. 999 
240. 160, 986 
277, 248, 522 
30,5,898,176 

332. ) 50, 270 

333, 557, 501 


52, 694, 826 
53, 146, 421 
51. 264, 956 

0) 
48, 082, 228 

(^) 

0) 

(*) 

(^) 

{') 

(*) 

(^) 

47, 727, 839 
49. 307. 852 
46, 604, 133 
51, 976, 307 
41. 266, 074 
47,840,512 

{*) 
49,175,979 

{') 
51, 266, 279 

(') 

{') 


315. 994, 296 
342.048.160 
411,929,080 
309, 051, 649 
375, 861, 962 
493, 407, 109 
475, 074, 326 
.534,848,814 
583, 486, 374 
600, 859, 205 
688, 344. 767 
736, 864, 366 

247, 960, 841 
267, 015, 009 
220, 967, 829 
187.269,354 
203. 470, 491 
259, 579, 981 
258, 479, 999 
289, 336, 965 
320, 248, 522 
357, 164, 455 
383, 150. 270 
384, 057, 501 


100 985 156 


1919 


~ 105 318 339 


1920 


116.073,907 


1921 .. 


(5) 
104. 555, 028 

(5) 


1922 . 


1923 


1924 


(5) 


1925 


(i) 


1926 .. 


(5) 
(i) 


1927 


1928 


(3) 


1929 9 


(5) 


Sales (gallons): 

1918 


55. 283, 484 


1919 


3 58, 557, 947 


1920 .. 


59, 238, 730 


1921 


3 .53, 432, 945 


1922 


47, 338, 489 


1923 


3 49, 990, 820 

(5) 


1924 


1925 


a 61,471,124 


1926 


(5) 


1927 


3 83. 479, 339 


1928... 


(5) 


1929 6 _-- 


(^) 



» Includes tar produced in by-product coke ovens operated by city gas companies. 

2 The figures here given for coal-gas tar include onlv the operations of coal-gas retorts. For 1918, 1920, 
and 1922 they are taken from .special studies by the U. S. Geological Survey. For 1919, 1921, 1923, 1925, 
and 1927 revised census figures are used, obtained by subtracting from the totals for the manufactured 
gas industry, as published by the Bureau of the Census, the tar produced at by-product coke ovens oper- 
ated by city gas companies. 

3 As reported by the Bureau of the Census. 

» Estimate included in total, based upon reported sales. 

« No data. 

s Preliminary figures. 



COAL-TAR CRUDES 



15 



Table 4. — Coke-oven, coal-gas, water-gas, and oil-gas tar: Production and sales in 
the United States, 1918-1929 — Continued 





Coke-oven 
tar 


Coal-gas 
tar 


Total coal 
tar 


Water and oil 
gas tar 


Value of sales: 

1918 


$6, 364, 972 
6,918,549 
6, 378. 040 
5, 645, 309 
6,419,743 
9, 250, 552 
9, 623, 520 
11, 903, 196 
14, 103, 760 
16,095,478 
17,544,797 
16, 982, 406 


$1, 863, 580 
2,156,471 
2,010,186 
2,811,728 

1, 955, 950 

2, 461, 691 
{') 

2, 750, 719 

(0 
2,923,819 

{*) 

^}) 


$8, 228, 552 
9, 075, 020 
8, 388, 226 
8, 457, 037 
8, 375, 693 
11,712,243 
12, 293, 520 
14,653,915 
16, 803, 760 

19, 019, 297 

20, 454, 797 
19, 862, 406 


$1,805,865 


1919 


3 2, 012, 723 


1920 


2,109,388 


1921 - 


3 2,192,015 


1922 - 


1, 879, 490 


1923 


s 2. 001, 363 


1924 


(°) 


1925 - 


3 2, 594, 025 


1926 


(") 


1927 


3 3. 708, 464 


1928 * 


(5) 


1929 « 


{') 







3 As reported by the Bureau of the Census. 

< Estimate included in total, based upon reported sales. 

5 No data. 

s Preliminary figures. 

Table 5 shows the ratio of sales to production of coke-oven tar from 
1918 to 1929, inclusive. 

Table 5. — Coke-oven tar: Production in the United States and percentage sold 

and used, 1918-1929 

[Compiled by United States Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines from reports of operators] 





Coke-oven tar 


Year 


Coke-oven tar 


Year 


Gallons pro- 
duced 


Per cent Per cent 
sold used ' 

1 


Gallons pro- 
duced 


Per cent 
sold 


Per cent 
used 1 


1918 


263, 299, 470 
288, 901, 739 
360, 664, 124 
253,051,649 
327, 779, 734 
440, 907, 109 


76.0 
75.4 
48.3 
53.5 
49.5 
48.0 


24.0 
24.6 
51.7 
46.5 
50.5 
52.0 


[ 
1924 


422, 074, 326 
480, 848, 814 
529, 486, 374 
546, 859, 205 
631, 844, 767 
680,864,366 


49.6 
49.9 
52. 4 
55.9 
52.6 
50.6 


50.4 


1919 


i 1925 


50.1 


1920 


1926 


47.6 


1921 . . 


1 1927 


44.1 


1922 


1928 - 


47.4 


1923 


1929 2 


49.4 









' The percentage " used " consists largely of tar consumed in steel furnaces; this percentage would be 
still larger if deliveries by the coke-oven company to a separate but afBliated corporation were included. 
Such deliveries are usually reported as "sales" but can not be accurately separated. From general infor- 
mation it appears that in 1929 they amounted to about 6 per cent of the total production. Were they 
counted as "used" the percentage would be 55.4 and the percentage sold would be 44.6. Since 1927, how- 
ever, a number of coke-oven plants have begun to treat their own tar for the recovery of creosote oil, and 
in 1929 a total of 43,000,000 gallons was refined on the premises. In computing these percentages no 
account is taken of changes in stocks. 

2 Preliminary figures. 

Uses of tar. — Tar is used in its raw state, or as raw material for many 
products having wide commercial uses. 

Raw or dehydrated tar is used chieflj^ for fuel, about 50 per cent of 
the total output in 1929 serving this purpose. Open-hearth steel 
manufacture consumes more fuel tar than any other industry. The 
quantity of tar burned is governed largely by the price of fuel oil and 
the demand from manufacturers of coal-tar chemicals. 

Minor uses of raw tar are: (1) In mixture with creosote oil as a 
wood preservative, (2) in stone work and road construction material, 
(3) as a waterproofing material for brick and other masonry, (4) as 
a dust settler, and (5) as a protective coating. Specially prepared 
pitch paints are more weather resistant than raw tar and, conse- 
quently, are better for surface coatings. 

Modified and refined tars are used in roofing felts and in tar paper. 



16 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Distillates of tar. — On distillation tar yields two general groups of 
products: (1) Complex fractional distillates commercially designated 
as light oil, dead or creosote oil, solvent naphtha, and anthracene oil; 
(2) coal-tar crudes, such as benzene, toluene, naphthalene, anthracene, 
and the less important cumene, carbazol, the cresols, and pyridine. 
After purification these crudes are used in the manufacture of coal-tar 
intermediates, which in turn are used in the preparation of dyes or 
other coal-tar chemicals, and directly as rubber accelerators. 

The domestic production of crudes at by-product coke-oven opera- 
tions is reported to the Bureau of Mines ; production by firms engaged 
primarily in the distillation of tar is reported to the Tariff Commis- 
sion. Where tar-distilling operations were limited to recovery of 
the simpler materials and were conducted in (5onj unction with coke- 
oven plants, under the same corporate name, the Bureau of Mines 
collected and compiled the statistics for 1929. Where distillation 
was carried on by a separate corporation, reports were made to the 
Tariff Commission. For certain plants equipped to produce a com- 
plete run of refined tar products in coke-oven operations, the Bureau 
of Mines gathered the data on the production of creosote oil and 
pitch, together with standard light oil products — benzene, motor 
benzol, toluene, solvent naphtha, xylene, and naphthalene, and the 
Tariff Commission, on the production of phenol and cresylic acid. 

Table 6 shows the domestic production of certain coal-tar crudes 
from all sources, 1918-1929, inclusive. 

Table 6. — Total commercial -production of benzene, toluene, solvent naphtha, naph- 
thalene, and creosote oil from all sources in the United States, 1918-1929 

Data for coke ovens and gas works from reports to United States Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines; 
for tar refineries and others to United States Tariff Commission] 





By-product 

coke plants 

(sales) 1 


Gas works 

not elsewhere 

included 

(sales) ' 2 


Tar refiner- 
ies and all 
other estab- 
lishments 3 
(produc- 
tion) 


Total com- 
mercial pro- 
duction * 


Benzene (all grades except motor benzol) : 
Gallons— 

1918 


43, 441, 980 
5 63, 077, 463 
17, 230, 776 
6, 839, 021 
12, 256, 348 
16, 724, 182 
17, 740, 608 


2,177,168 
(«) 
(«) 
(°) 
(«) 
« 

(6) 

(«) 

(S) 

(«) 
(«) 


3,015,848 
1, 826, 373 
875, 561 
2,171,631 
774, 940 
394, 906 
629, 934 
741,576 
377, 048 
370, 782 
474, 457 
546, 268 


48, 634, 996 


1919 


65, 403, 836 


1920 - 


18,141,337 


1921 - . 


9, 045, 642 
13,071,288 


1922 


1923 


17,154,088 


1924 


18,417,542 


1925 


21,816,386 


22, 607, 962 


1926 . 


21,987,790 
21, 193, 807 
21, 452, 973 
24, 558, 745 


22, 374, 838 
21, 579, 589 


1927 - 


1928' .. - 


21, 942, 430 


1929 8... 


25,119,013 



1 Sales instead of production are here given to avoid double counting between production of crude and 
pure grades and because such of the product as is used in the coke plant or gas works is not available for 
commercial use. 

2 In order to eliminate duplication, the figures for gas works are exclusive of by-product coke ovens oper- 
ated by city gas companies, which are included in the preceding column, and exclusive of recoveries from 
such tar-refining operations conducted by tlie city gas coniiianies as are included in the column headed 
"tar refineries." From time to time plants formerly includcii in the column headed "gas works" have been 
transferred to the column "tar refineries," hence the figures in the "gas works" column are not strictly 
comparable from year to year. The total commercial production shown in the last column contains no 
duplication and is comparable from year to year. 

8 See note 2. 

< Totals include estimates for firms not reporting, and actual figures for items that can not be shown sep- 
arately without disclosing individual returns. 
' Includes motor benzol and 13,000 gallons of gasoline used in blending. 
' Reports incomplete. Estimate included in total. 
' Final figures. 
8 Subject to revision. 



COAL-TAR CRUDES 17 

Table 6. — Total commercial production of benzene, etc. — Continued 






Tar refiner- 
ies and all 
other estab- 
lishments 
(produc- 
tion) 



Total com- 
mercial pro- 
duction 



Benzene (all grades except motor benzol)— Con. 
Value— 

1918 

1919 — 

1920 

192K 

1922 

1923... — . 

1924 

1925 

1926 — . 

1927 

1928 7 

1929 6 

Motor benzol: 

Gallons — 

1918 - 

1919 (included under benzene above)... 

1920. 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925. 

1926.... 

1927 

1928? 

1929 f 

Value— 

1918 

1919 (included under benzene above) ... 

1920 

1921 

1922 ._ 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928' 

1929 6 

Toluene, all grades: 

Gallons— 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 ....= .. 

1925 

1926. 

1927 

1928? 

1929 6 

Value — 

1918 

1919.. 

1920... 

1921..-. 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 f _ 

1929 6 



$11 

« 11 

4 

1 

3: 

3, 
3, 

4, 

4, 
4, 

5, 



, 966, 367 
, 643, 645 
, 497, 823 
611,721 
435, 381 
839, 237 
736, 656 
888, 240 
067, 693 
371, 519 
215, 752 
169, 743 



10 55, 
50, 
54, 



102, 
100, 



764, 265 
022, 573 
930, 203 
480, 326 
921, 244 
957, 983 
501, 212 
802, 745 
935, 995 
807, 852 



$572, 950 
(») 
(«) 

(«) 
(«) 
(«) 
f«) 
(«) 
(.') 
(«) 
(«) 
(«) 



467, 126 
" 350, 000 

(12) 

W 
(«) 
(«) 
(«) 
W 
(«) 



'0 $12, 
8, 
10, 
13, 
11, 
13, 
16, 
H, 
16, 
16, 



644, 931 
966, 686 
491, 309 
145, 833 
066, 652 
441, 422 
863, 109 
629, 999 
832, 646 
063, 285 



1, 
2, 

1, 
2, 
3, 
5, 
8, 
11, 
16, 
17, 

$12, 



541, 366 
353, 827 
470, 364 
835, 493 
910, 060 
634, 783 
231, 502 
038, 147 
650, 605 
784, 984 
181, 650 
064, 206 

249, 702 
355, 990 
740, 722 
233, 378 
557, 015 
766, 030 
769, 682 
310, 786 
914, 752 
999, 820 
513, 624 
580, 176 



$112, 849 
11 70, 000 

(12) 

(«) 
(«) 
« 
(«) 
(«) 
(«) 
(•) 



3, 965, 518 
(«) 

11 2, 000 
11 1, 000 

(13) 

11 2, 000 
11 2, 000 
"2,000 
"200 
11 1,000 
11 1, 000 
11 1, 000 

$5, 597, 353 

"300 
"270 

(13) 

"570 
"500 
"500 
11 170 
"300 
"300 
"300 



$994, 161 
560, 547 
287, 586 
463, 205 
215, 136 
118,505 
155. 973 
171,005 
105, 513 
100, 453 
111, 805 
137, 364 



W 
(») 
(IJ) 
(IJ) 
(IJ) 
(>') 

(12) 

(») 
(1') 

(12) 



(9) 
(») 
(«) 
(12) 
(12) 
(1«) 
(«) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(") 



1, 596, 353 
510, 957 

(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 

$8, 044, 890 
235, 321 

(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 



$13,533,478 
12, 296, 192 
4, 794, 409 
2, 082, 926 
3, 664, 517 
3, 968, 742 
3, 901, 629 
5, 070, 245 
5, 175, 206 
4, 474, 972 
4, 330, 557 
5, 310, 107 



(») 

(») 

(') 
55, 622, 482 
83, 664, 846 
76, 072, 771 
84, 789, 206 
92, 891, 995 
90, 160, 367 
106, 574, 289 
102, 810, 061 



(') 

(9) 
(») 

$10, 657, 074 
13,851,704 
11,678,665 
14,270,746 
17,578,255 
15.201,144 
17,388,166 
16, 407, 442 



14,103,237 

1,884,784 

(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 

$20, 891, 945 
596, 511 

(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 
(13) 



« Includes motor benzol and 13,000 gallons of gasoline used in blending. 

« Reports incomplete. Estimate included in total. 

' Final figures. 

' Subject to revision. 

« Data not collected from tar refiners prior to 1922. 

i« Includes 1,333,000 gallons of gasoline used in blending. 

11 Estimate. 

12 Included in total, but can not be shown separately without disclosing individual returns. 

>» A certain quantity of toluene was produced, but the figures can not be given without disclosing individ 
ual returns. • 



18 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table 6. — Total commercial -production of benzene, etc. — Continued 



By-product 

coke plants 

(sales) 



Oas works 

not elsewhere 

included 

(sales) 



Tar refiner- 
ies and all 
other estab- 
lishments 
(produc- 
tion) 



Total com- 
mercial pro- 
duction 



Solvent naphtha, crude and refined, including 
xylene: 

Gallons— 

1918 

1919... 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928' 

1929 8 

Value— 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925., 

1926 

1927 

1928' 

1929 8 

Naphthalene: 

Pounds— 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 - 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1926 , 

1926. 

1927 

192ST 

1929 s 

Vp.lue— 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 _ 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925- 

1926 

1927_ 

1928' _ 

1929 8 

Creosote oil:" 

Gallons— 1928 ' 

1929 8 _,_ 

Value— 1928' 

1929 8... 



3, 284, 037 
3, 649, 066 
4, 695, 464 

2, 881, 656 
2, 861, 482 

3, 399, 904 
3, 884, 585 
3, 993, 735 
3,546,117 
3, 661, 970 
4,471,141 
6,.')81,047 

$458, 689 

557, 416 

851,048 

510, 509 

538, 512 

608, 084 

724, 874 

805, 251 

1,035,870 

926, 787 

1, 047, 095 

1,591,333 



15, 890, 447 

6, 702, 040 
14, 448, 762 

1,983,523 
4, 887, 935 
11,245,033 
8,219,073 
9,900,517 

7, 723, 223 
7, 848, 224 

10,937.429 
19, 442, 381 

$660, 229 

191,364 

487, 974 

59, 335 

131,252 

239. 709 

128,208 

97, 493 

97,310 

86, 078 

135, 693 

319,037 

15 12,386,000 
26,730,126 

$2, 566, 092 



1,442,267 

(«) 
(«) 
(«) 

(12) 

(8) 
(«) 
(«) 
(6) 
(6) 
(«) 
(») 

$191,475 
(«) 
(6) 
(«) 

(12) 
(«) 
(«) 
(6) 
(») 
(«) 
« 



896, 080 

m 

1,760,293 

(') 

(«) 
1,115,563 

(6) 

1.266,037 

(«) 
(«) 
(«) 

m 

$14, 282 
(«) 

63, 449 
(«) 
C) 

42, 247 

(8) 

34, 751 

m 

(«) 
(«) 
(«) 



965, 458 

(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 

812, 378 
530, 833 

(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 

$232, 003 

(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 

153,941 
148, 801 

(12) 
(12) 
(12) 
(12) 



40. 138,092 
12,612,203 
26, 393, 411 
16,949,464 
19,323,393 
41,453,002 
34, 683, 803 
34,136,175 
45,165.957 
45, 298, 441 
35,179.996 
19, 501, 679 

$1,281,440 
327, 201 
791,403 
380, 167 
352, 957 
652, 148 
441,333 
619, 773 
494, 986 
470, 806 
396. 059 
366, 491 

122,074,126 

143, 746, 832 

$16, 894, 588 

17, 020, 595 



5,691,762 
4, 128, 747 
5, 384, 560 

3, 627, 488 
3,680,811 
4, 041, 497 

4, 781, 963 
4, 609, 568 
4, 688, 844 
4, 536, 967 
5, 616, 192 
7, 896, 802 

$882, 167 

672, 685 

994, 205 

644, 548 

773, 330 

800, 698 

896, 816 

972, 062 

1,174,297 

1,072.198 

1,201,882 

1,773,119 



56. 924, 619 
20,114,243 

42, 602, 466 
19, 432, 987 
26,411,328 
,53,814,195 
44, 102, 878 
46, 301, 726 
63, 059, 189 
63, 176, 660 
46,157,426 
38, 984, 060 

$1,945,951 
542, 566 
1,342,826 
462, 602 
536, 209 
934, 104 
602, 541 
662,017 
594, 296 
567, 884 
531, 762 
086, 528 

134,460,126 

170,476,958 

$17,507,588 

19, 586, 687 



6 Reports incomplete. Estimate included in total. 
' Final figures. 
8 Subject to revision. 

'2 Included in total, but can not be shown separately without disclosing individual returns. 
" Prior to 1928, all the creosote oil reported produced came from the ''Tar refineries, etc." Beginning 
with 1928 considerable quantities were recovered at by-product coke plants. 
" Figures represent production. 



COAL-TAR CRUDES 



19 



Production of crudes in by-product coke ovens. — The output of leading 
coal-tar crudes in by-product coke-oven operations in 1929 was as 
follows: Crude light oil, 200,594,027 gallons, an increase of 1 1,996,071 
gallons over the output in 1928; motor benzol, 105,923,762 gallons, or 
2,871,862 gallons more than were produced in 1928; crude and 
refined toluene, 18,343,295 gallons as against 16,097,856 gallons in the 
previous year. 

Motor benzol is a partly refined light oil, usually blended with 
gasoline or gasoline and alcohol for motor fuels. More than 95 per 
cent of the total quantity produced in 1929 was sold at an average 
value of 15.9 cents per gallon. 

In recent years several coke-oven plants have been recovering crude 
phenol from crude ammonia liquors by extraction with benzene and 
subsequent treatment with caustic soda. Four producers reported 
about 85,000 gallons so recovered in 1929. 

Through the installation of additional stills during 1929, this 
country is now able to produce creosote oil in excess of domestic 
demands. Many of the stills installed are of a new type, internally 
heated by coke-oven gases. Their output in 1929 is largely respon- 
sible for the increased production of creosote oil by coke-oven plants, 
amounting to 26,730,126 gallons, or more than twice the output in 
the preceding year. For every ton of coal coked by the new process 
the average yield of tar is reported to be 8 gallons, which will produce 
from 5)2 to 6 gallons of creosote oil. 

In the purification of coke-oven gas a finely divided, almost colloidal 
sulfur, valuable as a contact msecticide, is obtained as a by-product. 

Table 7 shows the production of crudes obtained as by-products in 
coke-oven operations, 1927-1929, inclusive. 



Table 7. 



-Coal-tar crudes obtained as by-products in coke-oven operations, 1927- 
1929 

[Bureau of Mines] 







Production 


Sales 


Product 


Quantity 


Value 




Total 


Average 


1927 
Tar --._ 


.gallons.. 

.._do.._. 
...do.... 
...do..-. 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 

pounds.. 


546, 859, 205 


305, 898, 176 


$16, 095, 478 


$0. 053 


Light oil and derivatives; 

Crude light oil 

Benzol, crude and refined 

Motor benzol. 

Toluol, crude and refined 

Solvent naphtha (including xylol) 
Other light oil products 


1 164, 488, 233 

22, 007, 760 

86, 995, 343 

12, 093, 590 

4, 979, 736 

3,155,031 


9, 265, 948 
21, 193, 807 
86, 802, 745 
11, 784, 984 
3, 661, 970 
1,393,876 


1, 077, 957 
4,371,519 
14, 629, 999 
3,999,820 
926, 787 
147, 017 


.116 
.206 
.169 
.339 
.253 
.105 




2 129,231,460 


134, 103, 330 


25,153,099 


.188 


Naphthalene, crude 


8, 302. 845 


7,848,224 


86, 078 


.011 



1 Refined on the premises to make the derived products shown: 1927, 161,072,729 gallons of crude light 
oil; 1928, 182,998,384 gallons; 1929, 192,759,303 gallons. 

2 Total gallons of derived products. 



20 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 7. — Coal-tar crudes obtained as by-products in coke-oven operations, 1927- 

i 9^9— Continued 







Production 


Sales 


Product 


Quantity 


Value 




Total 


1 

.Vverage 


1928 3 
Tar 


gallons-- 

do-... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

'lol)...do.... 
do.... 

pounds.. 

gallons.. 

.- do 

net t.nns_ 


631,844,767 


332, 150, 270 


$17, 544, 797 


$0. 053 


Light oil and derivatives: 

Crude light oil 

Benzol, crude and refined 

Motor benzol. 

Toluol, crude and refined 

Solvent naphtha (including xj 
Other light oil products 


I 188, 597, 956 
21,451,748 
103, 051, 900 
16, 097, 856 
5, 587, 370 
3, 114, 531 


10, 334, 813 
21, 452, 973 
102, 935, 995 
16, 181, 650 
4, 471, 141 
1, 388, 106 


1, 158, 846 

4, 215, 752 
16, 832, 646 

5, 513, 624 
1, 047, 095 

111,844 


.112 
.197 
.164 
.341 
.234 
.081 




2 149,303,405 


156, 764, 678 


28, 879, 807 


.184 


Naphthalene, crude and refined... 

Creosote oil 

Phenol - 


12, 182, 143 

12, 386/ 000 

57, 794 

54, 131 


10, 937, 429 

7, 377, 816 

66, 607 

1,725 


135, 693 
i 910,318 


.012 






Other products *. 






gallons.. 

do-.. 

do..-. 

-do...- 

do— - 

lol)...do.... 
do 

pounds. - 

gallons. - 

do..-. 

...net tons.- 








1929 3 5 
Tar -.- -- 


680,864,366 


333, 557, 501 


16,982,406 


.051 


Light oil and derivatives: 

Crude light oil 

Benzol, crude and refined 

Motor benzol- -.- 

Toluol, crude and refined 

Solvent naphtha (including sy 
Other light oil products 


I 200, 594, 027 
28, 832, 002 
105, 923, 762 
18, 343, 295 
7, 131, HI 
6, 684, 568 


11,090,709 

24, 558, 745 
100, 807, 852 

17, 064, 206 
6, 581, 047 
1, 886, 362 


1, 374, 527 
5, 169, 743 
16, 063, 285 
6, 580, 176 
1, 591, 333 
126, 183 


.124 
.211 
.159 
.386 
.242 
.067 




2 166, 914, 73S 


161, 988, 921 


30, 905, 247 


.191 


Naphthalene, crude and refined... 

Creosote 

Phenol (crude) 

Pitch or tar 

Other products * 


19, 595, 548 

26, 730, 126 

84, 683 

88, 158 


19,442,381 1 
23,938,431 • 
78, 869 
6, 599 


319, 037 

2, 296, 862 

28,347 

27, 273 

129, 848 


.016 

.096 

.369 

4.871 











> Refined on the premises to make the derived products shown: 1927, 161,027,729 gallons of crude light 
oil; 1928, 182,998,384 gallons; 1929, 192,759,303 gallons. 

2 Total gallons of derived products. 

3 Includes products of tar distillation conducted by coke-oven operators under same corporate name, 
excepting, however, phenol and other tar acids produced at Clairton, Pa., which are covered elsewhere 
by report of the U. S. Tariff Commission. 

< Sodium prussiate, carbolate, sulfur, smoke compound, textile covering, and tar paint. 
« Preliminaiy figures. 

Production of crudes hy firms not 'primarily engaged in the operation 
of coke-oven plants. — Returns to the Tariff Commission by firms en- 
gaged primarily in distilling tar show that 367,340,281 gallons of tar 
were distilled in 1929. This was approximately 50 per cent of the 
total production of tar in that year and about 31,000,000 gallons in 
excess of the quantity distilled in 1928. As in 1928, dead or creosote 
oil was the chief distillate produce?d in 1929. 

Coal-tar creosote. — The total commercial production of coal-tar 
creosote in 1929 from all sources was 170,476,958 gallons, valued at 
$19,586,687, or 11.5 cents per gallon, as against 134,460,126 gallons, 
valued at $17,507,588, or 13 cents per gallon in 1928. Of the 170,476,- 
958 gallons produced in 1929, tar refineries produced 143,746,832 
gallons, or 21,673,000 gallons more than they produced in 1928. 
The production of creosote oil reported to the Tariff Commission was 



COAL-TAR CRUDES 



21 



101,409,233 gallons of distillate as such and 42,337,599 gallons in coal- 
tar solution. 

Increased domestic production and reduced prices are largely 
responsible for the decline in imports from 88,385,074 gallons in 1928 
to 77,100,896 gallons in 1929. The average invoice price per gallon 
fell from 15.7 cents in 1928 to 13 cents in 1929. 

As a wood preservative, coal-tar creosote is finding increasing 
applications in the treatment of railway ties, telegraph poles, mine 
and construction timbers, and other wood products. Its major 
advantages are (1) high toxicity to wood-destroying fungi, (2) relative 
insolubility in water and low volatility which cause almost indefinite 
retention in the treated wood, (3) ease of application, (4) ease of 
measuring the depth of penetration, (5) general availability and 
nominal cost. 

Although there were six more wood- treating plants in 1928 than in 
1927 (193 as compared with 187) the volume of business was larger 
in 1927. The quantity of wood treated was 335,920,379 cubic feet 
or 9,765,425 cubic feet less than was treated in 1927. The decrease 
is attributed largely to a substantial reduction in the number of cross- 
ties treated in 1928. A total of 220,478,409 gallons ^ of creosote was 
used in wood treatment in 1928. It consisted of 48,805,428 gallons 
of distillate coal-tar creosote, 87,212,477 gallons of creosote coal-tar 
solution, 820,421 gallons of refined water-gas tar, 1,485,352 gallons 
of water-gas tar solution, and 82,154,731 gallons of imported creosote. 

Other materials used in wood preservatives in 1928 were: Petroleum, 
25,075,903 gallons; paving oil, 2,347,517 gallons; solid zinc chloride, 
23,524,340 pounds; miscellaneous salts, 443,308 pounds; miscellaneous 
liquid preservatives, 417,953 gallons. 

Decline in production of naphthalene. — The output of naphthalene 
decreased from 35,179,996 pounds in 1928 to 19,501,679 pounds in 
1929. Profits were low during 1929, as the limited demand forced 
producers to sell at a price near the actual cost of production. 

Pitch and other products. — Pitch is the residue from the distillation 
of tar. The total production in 1929 was 646,536 tons, of which 558,- 
378 tons, valued at $8,198,124, was produced by plants primarily 
engaged in the distillation of tar. Because of its resistance to at- 
mospheric conditions, particularly to moisture, pitch is extensively 
used as a waterproofing material in roof construction, building founda- 
tions, and railways, and as a protective coating for underground pipe 
lines. Extensive installation of new pipe lines has increased the 
consumption of pitch and other coal-tar materials for surface coatings. 
Soft pitch is used in large quantities for road construction. Metal 
paints consist of pitch dissolved in certain light coal-tar oils. 

Refined tar is the residue from the distillation of a varying propor- 
tion of the lower boiling products made from crude tar. Production 
in 1929 was 2,440,748 barrels, as compared with 1,640,282 barrels in 
1928. 

Other distillates showing increased production in 1929 were crude 
anthracene, anthracene oil, extracted crude tar acids, light oil, and 
solvent naphtha. Those showing decreased output were napthalene, 
motor fuel, pseudocumene, and xylene. 

' Quantities of wood treated and preservatives used in United States in 1928. Forest Service, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. 



22 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 8 shows the production of coal-tar crudes in 1929 by firms not 
primarily engaged in the operation of coke-oven plants and gas houses. 

Table 8. — -Coal-tar crudes: Production, 1929, by firms not primarily engaged in 
the operation of coke-oven plants and gas houses 

[The numbers in the second column refer to the numbered alphabetical list of manufacturers given on p. 188. 
An X indicates that the corresponding product was made by a manufacturer who did not consent to the 
publication of his name in connection therewith. A blank in the third and fourth columns indicates that 
there was actual production of the corresponding article but that figures can not be published without 
revealir.? the output of individual firms] 





Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list 
on p. 188) 


1929 


Name 


Quantity 


Value 


Unit 
value 


Total crudes 






$40, 310, 326 






134 






Anthracene, crude (less than 30 per 








cent) pounds. 

Anthracene oil gallons , . 


127, 134 J 










17, 24, 123, 127, X.. 


546, 268 
214, 574 


137, 364 
27, 060 


$0.25 


Carbolic oil or middle oil- .-.do --. 


45, 88, X, X 


. 13 


Cresol or cresylic acid, crude. .do 


17 




Dead or creosote oil: 

Distillate as such do 

Distillate in coal-tar solution 


12, 15, 17, 24, 43, 45, 85, 88, 127, 
134, 144, 154, 159, X, X, X, X, 
X, X,X, X. 

17, 85, X, X 


101, 409, 233 
42, 337, 599 


12, 789, 189 
4, 231, 406 


.13 
. 10 


..gallons. 

Light oil --- -gallons.. 


43, 45, 88, 127, 154, X, X, X, X... 




Motor fuel do . . 


17, 123 








Naphthalene, crude pounds.. 

other distillates gallons. - 

Pitch of tar tons.. 

Pseudocumene. gallons.. 


12, 16, 17, 88, 123, 134, X, X 

17, 24, 43, 88, 127, 154, X, X, X, 

X. 
12, 15, 17, 24, 43, 45, 85, 127, 134, 

144, 154, X, X,X,X,X,X, X. 
17 


19, 501, 679 
10, 00,7, 225 

558, 378 


366,491 
1, 322, 889 

8, 198, 124 


.02 
.13 

14.68 


Pyridine -. do. -- 


17 








Refined tars barrels.. 

Solvent naphtha gallons.- 


12, 17, 24, 45, 88, 123, 134, 144, X 

X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X. 
17, 134, X, X, X 


2, 440, 748 
1, 259, 904 


11,537,899 
157, 912 


4.73 
.13 


Toluene (toluol). do 


17, 123 




Xylene (xylol).. do 


17 



















The instructions sent to manufacturers were as follows: Include under dead or creosote oil only products 
which may be used for creosoting. Include under "other distillates" shingle stain oil, disinfectant oils, 
and flotation oils which do not contain over 5 per cent of phenol. Include under refined tars those tars 
which are used for road treatment, saturating felt, and for protective coatings. Phenol and all distillates 
which, on being subjected to distillation, yield in the portion distilling below 190° C. a quantity of tar 
acids equal to or more than 5 per cent of the original distillate, or which, on being subjected to distillation, 
yield in the portion distilling below 215° C. a quantity of tar acids equal to or more than 75 per cent of the 
original distillate are not to be included here but are to be placed under intermediates. 

Imports oj cri/^es.— Imports are given in Table 78, page 179. 

Exports of crudes.- — Benzol was the crude exported in greatest 
quantity in 1929. Foreign shipments were 33,346,381 gallons, valued 
at $8,536,878, an increase of 12,007,952 gallons over 1928. Of this 
total, Germany took 17,828,355 gallons, or 7,004,029 gallons more 
than in 1928; the United Kingdom, 9,251,276 gallons, or 2,692,090 
gallons in excess of the quantity bought in 1928; the Netherlands and 
Italy, neither a customer in 1928, took 1,921,733 gallons, and, 1,030,- 
387 gallons, respectively. 

Exports of crude coal tar declined from 138,153 barrels, valued 
at $580,629 in 1928 to 108,537 barrels, valued at $389,216 in 1929. 
Foreign shipments of coal-tar pitch were 9,805 tons, valued at 
$204,047. 

Low temperature carbonization oj coal. — A venture that has some 
promise but which has thus far not proved an economic success in 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 23 

this country is the low temperature carbonization of coal on a com- 
merical scale. Unforeseen technical difhculties in coking American 
coal, inability to produce a solid fuel for sale at a favorable price 
without briquetting, and failure to obtain a market for the tar at a 
price much above its value as fuel, are obstacles to be overcome before 
successful commercial production is possible. 

COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 

DESCRIPTION 

Intermediates are ordinarily transitional compounds used in the 
manufacture of dyes and other finished coal-tar chemicals from coal- 
tar crudes. They are, however, frequently used directly as such in 
rubber accelerators, in camphor substitutes, in germicides, in insecti- 
cides and fungicides, and in flotation compounds for the concentra- 
tion of ores. Others are used in the direct production of dyes on the 
fiber, and as developers for increasing the fastness of dyes. After 
purification many intermediates are used directly as drugs, perfumes, 
and flavors. 

Various chemical treatments are necessary to produce intermediates 
from the crudes (benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and anthracene). 
These conversion steps are: (1) Nitration, (2) reduction, (3) sulfona- 
tion, (4) caustic fusion, (5) chlorination, (6) alkylation, (7) liming, (8) 
condensation, (9) carboxylation, (10) oxydation, and (11) diazotiza- 
tion. 

The intermediate and coal-tar dye industry is an important con- 
sumer of heavy chemicals and other noncoal-tar chemical products. 
The conversion of coal tar into finished products requires large quan- 
tities of acids, alkalies, sodium nitrite and sulfide, salt, chlorine, bro- 
mine, and sulfur. Noncoal-tar organic chemicals used in large quan- 
tities are methanol, formaldehyde, and acetic anhydride. It is esti- 
mated that from 12 to 15 pounds of heavy chemicals are used in the 
manufacture of each pound of finished coal-tar products. Some of 
the anthraquinone vat dyes require 80 pounds or more of inorganic 
chemicals per pound of dye. 

PRODUCTION 

Statistics of production and sales of intermediates are given in 
Table 10, page 29, in as great detail as possible without disclosing the 
operations of individual manufacturers. The total production in 
1929 was 354,487,718 pounds, as compared with 279,274,807 pounds 
in 1928, or an increase of 27 per cent. Sales advanced in about the 
same proportion as did production. Total sales in 1929 were 148,- 
711,591 pounds, valued at $28,871,572, or 19.4 cents per pound, as 
against 115,837,340 pounds, valued at $24,126,473, or 20.8 cents per 
pound in the previous year. 

In general the intermediates normally consumed in large quantities 
in the manufacture of dyes showed a decided increase in 1929 over 
1928, and the intermediates used in the preparation of fast and 
specialty dyes were well above the 1928 level. 

Diphenyl and derivatives. — Production of diphenyl, first reported in 
1928, increased substantially in 1929. In addition to its use as a heat 
transfer agent, important applications for its chlorinated, nitrated, 

114492—30—3 



24 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

and sulfonated derivatives, and for diphenyl benzene or phenyl- 
diphenyl, are being developed. These uses include the manufacture 
of new intermediates for new types of dyes and provide new raw mate- 
rials for the established intermediates. The chlorinated diphenyls 
are being used for a new type of synthetic resin valuable for the manu- 
facture of varnishes and lacquers. Production of these derivatives on 
a semicommercial scale in 1929 is expected to be on a commercial 
basis in 1930. 

Synthetic phenol. — The combined production of natural and syn- 
thetic phenol in 1929 was 24,177,618 pounds,* as compared with 
10,227,489 pounds * in 1928. More than 80 per cent of total produc- 
tion was by synthetic methods. Sales in 1929 were 19,938,503 
pounds, valued at $2,248,288, or 11 cents per pound as against 
7,745,650 pounds, valued at $912,304, or 12 cents per pound in the 
previous year. 

This marked increase in the production and sales of phenol is 
largely due to the unusual increase in the output of synthetic phenolic 
resins, which require large quantities of phenol as a raw material. 
These resins are discussed under "Finished coal-tar products," p. 59. 
Other important uses of phenol are as an antiseptic and as a disin- 
fectant; as a raw material in the manufacture of picric acid; as an 
intermediate in the manufacture of coal-tar dyes, and as a constituent 
of certain pharmaceuticals. 

There are two methods of manufacturing phenol: (1) Either (a) 
from one of the fractions obtained in the distillation of coal tar, or 
(6) from the manufacture of coal gas; (2) synthetically from benzene, 
distilled from coal tar. The synthetic process has shown continuous 
expansion since 1923, when it was developed on a large scale. 

A new method of synthesizing phenol from mo'nochlorobenzene^ 
now developed on a large scale in this country, shows promise of 
further reducing production costs. This development was largely 
responsible for the unusual increase in the production of monochloro- 
benzene in 1929. 

Imports of phenol increased from 1,653 pounds, valued at $298, in 
1928 to 433,385 pounds, valued at $44,226, in 1929. Practically all 
of the imports in 1929 were entered during the first six months of that 
year. 

Cresylic acid. — Cresylic acid is obtained by refining the crude 
tar-acid fractions from the distillation of coal tar. It occurs with 
phenol and the two products are separated from the crude-tar frac- 
tion by extraction with caustic soda solution and fractional distilla- 
tion. A major use of cresylic acid is as a raw material in the manu- 
facture of synthetic resins. Other uses are in the preparation of 
tricresyl phosphate, a substitute for camphor in the manufacture of 
pyroxylin plastics; and in germicides, antiseptics, and similar products. 
Production of cresylic acid increased materially in 1929 over 1928. 

Tricresyl phosphate. — Tricresyl phosphate, used in the manufacture 
of pyroxylin plastics, increased in production, but declined in unit 
value. 

Rubber accelerators. — Intermediates for use as rubber accelerators 
were made in larger quantity in 1929 than in 1928, but their total 

* Does not include crude phenol reported to Bureau of Mines by certain coke-oven operators. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 25 

consumption in the rubber trade can not be accurately measured 
because some of the reported output was also used in dyes and other 
coal-tar products. 

Accelerators and antioxidants have played a conspicuous part in 
the advancement of rubber compounding. They reduce the time 
of vulcanization and increase the resistance of rubber and rubber 
products to ageing. This branch of manufacture is an important 
division of the coal-tar industry in the United States. New com- 
pounds are being constantly prepared and the older ones are either 
discontinued or improved to meet changing conditions in the rubber 
industry. 

The following compounds used as rubber accelerators are among 
those showing increased production in 1929 over 1928: Dimethyl- 
anihne, acetaldehyde, anihne and derivatives, diphenylguanidine, 
nitrosodimethylanihne, mercapto-benzo-thiazole, p-toluidine, di- 
methylamine, formanilide, thiocarbanilide, p-dimethylamino-butyli- 
dine aniline, and phenjd-b-naphthylamine. Some of the compounds 
showing decreased production are crotihdine aniline, o-ditolylguani- 
dine, triphenylguanidine, anhydroformaldehyde-p-toluidine, crotili- 
dine-a-naphthylamine, and dimethjd-p-phenylenediamine. 

Aniline and derivatives. — The production of aniline increased from 
29,770,194 pounds in 1928 to 33,743,270 pounds in 1929. The 
value of sales per pound dropped from 13K cents in 1928 to 13 cents 
in 1929. The output of aniline hydrochloride was slightly more in 
1929 than in 1928. 

Dimethylaniline increased in production in 1929 and the value of 
sales per pound was 21 cents as compared with 23 cents in 1928. 

Other aniline derivatives showing increased output in 1929 were 
aniline disulfonic acid, dichloro aniline, ethylaniline (mono), sulfanilic 
acid, acetanilide (technical), anrline sulfonic acid, methylene dianilide, 
and m-nitroaniline. Some of the aniline compounds showing 
decreased production during the same period were diethylaniline, 
diethylaniline-m-sulfonic acid, aniline sulfate, and dinitroaniline. 

Naphthalene. — The production of refined naphthalene was 
31,143,716 pounds in 1929 as against 24,992,092 pounds in the 
previous year. In general, the derivatives of naphthalene were 
manufactured in greater quantity in 1929 than in 1928. Among 
those showing increased production were phthalic acid and anhydride, 
a-naphthylamine, and most of the anthraquinone derivatives. 

Phthalic anhydride. — Phthalic anhydride, one of the most important 
of the intermediates, is made by the catalytic oxidation of naph- 
thalene. Its principal uses are as a raw material for anthraquinone, 
which is used in the manufacture of many vat dyes, alizarin, and 
alizarin derivatives; directly in making fluoroscein, cosine, and 
rhodamine dyes ; in the manufacture of such esters as diethylphthalate 
and dibutylphthalate, and as condensation product with glycerin to 
form the glyptal type of synthetic resin. 

Anthraquinone. — Anthraquinone is the basic raw material for 
certain vat dyes. The bulk of the supply in recent years has been 
prepared synthetically from phthalic anhydride and benzene. This 
synthetic product is of high purity and consequently gives dyes of 
purer shade than those made by the oxidation of anthracene. Im- 
provements in the method of deriving anthraquinone from anthra- 



26 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

cene promise to give a better product at lower cost. One of these 
improvements is the removal of heterocyclic and aliphatic impurities 
by catalytic oxidation; the other involves the use of furfural as a 
solvent. 

Benzoyl peroxide. — More benzoyl peroxide, used in bleaching 
flour, was produced in 1929 than in the previous year. Benzyl 
chloride, used in the preparation of benzoyl peroxide, showed decreased 
production. Stocks on hand of benzyl chloride at the beginning of 
1929 were, in all probability, used to supply the raw material for the 
increased output of benzo}^ peroxide. 

Haloqenated intermediates. — The halogenated products as a whole 
showed a decided increase in production in 1929 over 1928. Among 
the compounds of this class that showed greater output were chlo- 
ronaphthalene (halowax), monochlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, 
o-dichlorobenzene, o-chlorotoluene, and chloroanthracjuinone. 

Organic metallic fungicides. — ^The annual loss caused by fungus 
plant diseases amounts to hundreds of millions of dollars. It is esti- 
mated that stinking smut or bunt alone reduces the yield of wheat 
15,000,000 to 20,000,000 bushels annually. The losses attributed 
to this cause are largely due to (1) reduced seed germination, (2) weak 
and unhealthy plants, (3) reduced yields, (4) impaired quahty of 
the crop, (5) discounts and dockage when the crop is marketed. 
Many fimgus diseases are seed born; others are spread by air-carried 
spores and by mechanical contamination. 

Plant pathologists have been combating these fungus diseases for 
many years and have recommended treatment with various chemicals, 
notably formaldehyde, mercuric chloride, and copper sulfate. These 
treatments are sometimes effective, but unless applied under carefully 
controlled conditions are liable to damage the seed and so reduce 
germination as to cause a loss equal to that caused by the disease. 
Since the war, the chemist has furnished the pathologist with a class 
of organic metallic compoimds that give promise of being a decided 
aid in controlling these fungus parasites. These compounds are a 
combination of metal, usually mercury or copper, with an organic 
radical. The metallic radical continues to be effective against smut 
spores; the organic radical alters the toxicity so as to reduce or 
eliminate seed damage. 

Organic mercury compounds as an antidote to plant fungus dis- 
eases were first used in Germany during the war. Their use for this 
purpose was an application of the principles developed in the study 
of organic arsenicals and mercurials for the treatment of infections of 
the human blood. The first of these fungicidal compoimds to be 
used in this country was "Upsulun" or hydroxymercurichlorophenol, 
manufactured by the I. G. Farbenindustrie and distributed by the 
Bayer Co. Domestic manufacturers were quick to realize the 
potentialities of this development and soon began to experiment, 
but many of the compounds they made failed to meet the require- 
ments of practical tests. Only a half a dozen or more survived the 
experimental stage. They are being manufactured and distributed 
and are quoted to the consumer at $0.50 to SI. 50 per pound. They 
are sold in the dust form and contain 5 to 10 per cent of the active 
ingredient diluted with 95 to 90 per cent inert matter. Applied as a 
dust, a pound will treat about 5 bushels of grain; or applied as a 
liq\iid solution, about 10 bushels of seed. Although the dust method 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



27 



is more expensive it is generally applied to seed, because it is easier to 
use and has none of the deleterious effects of the wet treatment, 
such as fermentation and heating of moist seed, premature germina- 
tion of damp seed, freezing of moist seed, and drill clogging by seed 
that have not been thoroughly dried. Vegetables, flowers, and 
lawns are frequently treated by the liquid method. 

Organic copper compounds are a specific for stinking smut in 
wheat. They do not, however, have sufficient advantage over basic 
copper carbonate, the standard treatment, to justify their higher 
cost. Basic copper carbonate retails at about 16 to 30 cents a pound, 
whereas organic copper preparation sells at about 25 to 40 cents per 
pound. 

A partial list of organic metallic compounds that have been pro- 
duced experimentally, semicommercially, and commercially follows. 

Trade name Composition 

Mercury compounds: 

Ceresan Ethyl mercury chloride. 

Semesan Hydroxymercurichlorophenol. 

Semesan, jr Hydroxymercuricresol. 

Mercury C 

Sterocide A mercury furfural derivative. 

Containing not less than 3.5 per cent mercury. 

Merko Ethanol mercury chloride. 

Upsulun ^ Hydroxymercurichlorophenol. 

Bayer compound ^ Hydroxj-mercurienitrophenol sulfate. 

Germisan ^ A mercury cresol-sodium cyanide compound. 

Corona No. 620 ^ Mercuriated ortho-nitro-phenol. 

Corona No. 640 ^ Mercuriated acetaldehyde. 

Tillantin '' 

Agfa 5 

Copper compounds: 

Copper oxalate compound. 

Copper beta naphthol. 

Cupro-jabonite J 

Dupont No. 68 

Cuprobol 

Wa Wa Copper mercury compound. 

Hochst 5 Copper arsenic naphthol dust. 

The United States Department of Agriculture has materially aided 
in the development of organic metalhc fungicides. In its laboratory 
for the study of cereal diseases innumerable preparations have been 
treated under greenhouse conditions. Inefficient preparations have 
been weeded out and the usefulness of those surviving the experi- 
mental stage has been established. Investigation work has so far 
been largely confined to grain seed. The compounds recommended 
for the various grain crops are as follows: 



Grain 


Disease 


Specific 


Corn 


Seed-born, root, stalk, and ear rots 

Stripe and covered smut 

Stinlcing smut - - 


Semesan, jr., Sterocide, Merko. 




Ceresan. 


Wheat 


Ceresan. 


Oats 


Various smuts - 


Ceresan. 









These are not the only compounds that are effective against the 
parasitic smuts, but they have been tested and found efficient and 
are commercially manufactured. 



» German preparations. 



28 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Manufacturing companies are actively engaged in research, en- 
deavoring to produce a compound that will be effective against all 
fungus parasites and that can be manufactured at a cost low enough 
to insure general application. Progress has been made to the extent 
that many new fungicides have been discovered and others whose 
value has been conclusively proved have had their usefulness greatly 
extended. 

Experimental work with vegetable crops has shown that compounds 
of mercury in organic combination are effective in controlling such 
seed-born diseases as potato scab and various root and plant molds 
and rots. Semesan is recommended by the manufacturer as being 
effective against such diseases. 

Organic-metalhc fungicides are also being used to eradicate certain 
fungus growths on flowers and grass. Semesan is said to be effective 
in ridding lawns and golf greens of the famiUar "brown patch." 

Directly comparable statistics of production of these organic 
metallic fungicidal compounds are not available, but it is known that 
there has been a decided increase in production and consumption 
during the last two years. 

A^etv intermediates. — There were 362 intermediates made in 1929, or 
15 more than were made in 1928. Many of those reported in 1929 
but not in 1928 were manufactured for the first time during the latter 
year. These new products find use in the preparation of new coal-tar 
dyes, rubber accelerators, medicinals, and other finished coal-tar 
products. 

Among the intermediates reported in 1929 but not in 1928 were: 
Acetyl-o-toluidine, p-aminodimethylamine ; m-azo-a-naphthylamine ; 
chloro-m-phenylenediamine ; ethyl carbazole; l-naphthylamine-4:6- 
and 4:7- disulfonic acid; and p-sulfophenyl hydrazine. 

Other intermediates. — Some of the many intermediate^, used in the 
manufacture of specialty dyes, that showed increased production are: 
l-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid; methyl anthraquinone ; quinizarin; 
l-naphthylamine-5-sulfonic acid; aminoazotoluene; tetramethyldiami- 
nodiphenylmethane ; dichlorosulfophenyl pyrazolone ; 2-amino-8-naph- 
thol-6-sulfonic acid (gamma acid); ethylbenzylanihne; anthraquinone- 
1 : 5-dihydroxy ; anthraquinone-l:5-disulfonic acid; diaminostilbene 
disulfonic acid; dibenzanthrone; and dinitroanthraquinone. 

Among the intermediates showing decreased production were: 
Chromo tropic acid; l-amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid; xyUdine, and 
salt; aminonaphthylamine trisulfonic acid (T acid); chlorobenzanth- 
rone; ethylbenzylanihne sulfonic acid; and l-napthylamine-4-sulfonic 
acid. 

STATISTICS OF PRODUCTION AND SALES 

Table 9 gives the weighted average sales price of a fist of domestic 
coal-tar intermediates for the period 1923-1929, together with the 
invoice price of imports of the same compounds in 1914. The invoice 
price is below the cost to the consumer, as it does not include the 
profit to the importer and certain other charges. 

Table 10 is a detailed record of the production and sales of coal-tar 
intermediates in 1929. 

Table 11 is an arrangement of intermediates in 10 groups of unit 
values, showing the quantity and percentage of total production 
falling within each group, for the years 1925-1929, inclusive. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



29 



Table 9. — Coal-tar intermediates: Domestic sales price per pound, 1928-1929,'^ 
and invoice price of same intermediates imported, 1914 



Intermediates 


Invoice 
price, 
1914 


Domestic sales price 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


19217 


1928 


1929 


Acetanilide, technical 

l-Amino-8-naphthol-3;6-disulfonic acid (H acid) . 

2-Amino-8-naphthol-6-sulfonie acid (gamma 

acid) 


2 $0. 15 
3.23 


$0.26 
.68 

1.51 
1.13 
.16 
.95 
.80 
.07 
3.69 
.15 
.48 
.38 

.06 
.22 


$0.23 
.65 

1.18 
1.11 
.16 
.95 
.74 
.06 
3.34 
.16 
.40 
.34 

.05 
.22 
1.00 

.43 
.64 
.30 
1.27 
.24 
.17 
.23 
.13 
.86 
.39 


$0.22 




$0.21 
.41 

.75 
1.02 
.14 


$0.23 
.42 

.77 
.97 
.14 


'$0."43 


1.30 
1.12 
.16 


$1.02 
1.05 
.15 


.78 




2.16 

2.08 

2.19 

2. 31-3. 55 
2.09 
2.40 
3.09 


.95 


Aniline oil 


.13 








.72 
.06 

"'.li' 

'".30 

.05 
.20 


.73 
.06 
2.19 
.16 
.49 
.28 

.05 


.65 
.06 
2.17 
.15 


.63 
.05 

1.88 
.15 


.64 


Chlorobenzene (mono) 


.05 




1.59 


p-Dichlorohenzene 


.14 








3.15 

3.02 
2. 07-3. 09 


.26 

.05 
.19 
.83 

.36 

.47 
.15 

".'ir 

.14 
.21 
.22 
.69 
.35 


.23 

.05 
.19 
.70 

.34 
.47 
.12 
1.12 
.16 
.14 
.22 
.25 
.69 
.36 


.21 


Naphtlialone, solidifying 79° or above trefined, 
flake) 


.05 




.19 




.04 


l-Naphthylamine-4-sulfonic acid (naphthionic 
acid) . 




.40 
.69 
.27 
1.32 
.29 
.17 
.25 
.13 
.93 
.43 


"'.'21" 
1.16 
.20 
.16 
.23 
.17 
.81 


.40 
.45 
.18 
1.06 
.18 
.15 
.22 
.23 
.73 
.36 


.35 


p-Nitroaniline - 


2. 13-3. 14 

.06 

2. 31-3. 44 

2.25 

2. Ce-3. 16 




Phenol 


.11 


p-Phenylenediamine - 

Phthalic acid and anhydride 


1.08 
.15 


Sulfanilic acid 


.14 


Thiocarhanilide - 


.22 


0-Toluidine 

m-Tolylenediamine 


2. 09-3. 10 

2.19 
3.12 


.23 

.67 




.34 







1 Weighted average. For 1917 to 1921, see Census of Dyes and Other SjTithetic Organic Chemicals, 1924. 

2 Artificial DyestufCs Used in the United States, Special Agents Series 121, Department of Commerce. 

3 Chemicals and Allied Products Used in the United States, Miscellaneous Series No. 82, Department of 
Commerce. 

Table 10. — Coal-tar intermediates, production and sales, 1929 

[The numbers in the second column refer to the numbered alphabetical list of manufacturers printed on 
page 188. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification 
number with the designated product. A blank in the third and fourth columns indicates that the sales 
figures can not be published without revealing infoimation in regard to the output of individual firms. 
A blank in the sixth column indicates that the production of the coiresponding product in the United 
States can not be published without revealing information in regard to the output of individual firms. 
The figures thus concealed are, however, included in the total] 





Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (ac- 
cording to list on 
p. 188) 


Sales 




Intermediates 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 
(quantity) 


Total 




Pounds 
148,711,591 


$28,871,572 


$0.19 


Pounds 
354,487,718 




130, X 






Acetaldehyde aniline condensation 










products. 
Acetanilide, tech 


29, 38, 44, 52, 134 . . . . 










78, X 








Acetyl-p-phenylenediamine (p-amino- 

acetanilide). 
Acetvl-o-toluidine 


7,52,69,106,134 








112,491 


106 












38,52,134 










Acridine yellow 


106 - 











Aldehyde amine condensation prod- 
ucts. 
Aldol aniline derivatives 


52 










130 










Alkylbenzene 


32 










l-Amino-4acetylamino-6 and 7-naph- 
thylamine sulfonic acid (acetylamino- 
Cleve's acid). 

b- Amino anthraquinone 


106 










21,52,69,106,110... 








557, 386 



30 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 10. — Coal-tar intermediates, production and sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 


Sales 




Intermediates 


identification 
numbers (ac- 
cording to list on 
p. 188) 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 
(quantity) 


Aminoazobenzene 


8,38,53,69,79,106.. 
8,36,52,53,106,110 
106 


Pounds 






Pounds 
172,295 
59, 223 


Aminoazobenzene sulfonic acid 








Aminoazobenzene disulfonic acid 








Aminoazotoluene - .- 


8, 29, 36, 38, 52, 63. 

69, 79, 106. 
79,106 


21, 222 


$15,638 


.$0. 74 


191,436 


Aminoazoxylene and hydrochloride. 


p-Aminobenzoic acid 


52,133 










Aminobenzoyl J acid 


52 










m-Aniinocresol methyl ether 


.38 










p-Aminodimethylamine 


7 










l-Araino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid 


7, 21,36,38,52,69, 

106,117. 
36,38,106,110 








1,013, .'^23 


l-Amino-8-naphlhol-4-sulfoDicacid 








68, 413 


l-Amino-8-naphthol-2:4-disulfonic acid 


38,52,106,110 








129, 682 


(Chicago acid). 
l-Amino-8-naphlhol-3: 6-disulfonic acid 


52,69, 106, 110, X... 








2, 965, 637 


(II acid). 
2-Amino-5-naphthol-7-sulfonic acid (J 


7, 38, 52, 106, 110 
7, 38, 52, 69, 106, 110 
7,110. 








286, 550 


acid). 

2-Aniino-8-naphthol-C-sulfonic acid 








481, 125 


(gamma acid). 
2-Amino-8-naphthol-3: (i-disulfonic acid 










Aminonaphthvlamine trisulfonic acid 


69 










(Tacid). 
o-Aminophenol . __ 


29, 67, 152, 158 










0- Aminophenol-p-su!fonic acid 


106, 158 










p-Aminophenol and hydrochloride 

Aminophenyl tolvlamine sulfonic acid 


29, 44, 52, 56, 67, 1.52, 

X. 
38,110 


206, 662 


196, 102 


.95 


300, 482 


(nerol acid). 
Aminosalicylic acid 


8, 38, 52, 106, 1 10 








94,522 


Anhydroformaldchyde-p-toluidine 


52 










Aniline hydrochloride 


29, 52, 106 










Aniline oil 


29, 50, 52, 100, 105, 

106,107,110. 
79 


15.215,814 


1, 965, 893 


.13 


33, 743, 270 


Aniline sulfate .__ 


Aniline sulfonic acid. 


106 










Aniline disulfonic acid . 


38,52,106,110 








23,030 


l-Aniline-2-methylanthraquinone . 


52 








o-Anisidine 


38, 52, 105, 110 










0- Anisidine sulfonic acid 


106.- 










Anthranilic acid (o-arainobenzoic acid) . 


50 










Anthraquinone (100 per cent) 


20, 90, 100, 1 10 










Anthraquinone-1 : ri-dihvdroxy (anthra-. 


69 










rufin). 
Anthraquinone-l : 5- disulfonic acid 


20,69,110 










Anthraquinone-2 :7-disulfonic acid 


106 . 










Anthraquinone-2-sodium sulfonate (sil- 


8,20,52,106,110 








804, 714 


ver salt). 
Aroclor (See diphcnyl, chlorinated) 
m-Azo-a-naphthylaraine. 


36 










Benzaldehvde . 


65,80,99,128,138... 
69,106,110, 119 


381, 695 


216, 213 


.57 


345,212 


Benzanthrone . . . 


Benzidine base . 


38, 52, 69, 106 








1, 303, 728 


Benzidine disulfonic acid 


8, 36, 66, 69 








Benzidine sulfate and hydrochloride 


52,106 










Benzoat.e of ammonia 


X 










Benzoate of potash 


133 . 










Benzoate of soda 


33,52,80,82,99,133. 
33,80,133 


1,170,018 


480, 768 


.41 


1,121 569 


Benzoic acid, tech 




Benzoic acid, U. S. P 


.33,51,80,82,99,133. 
80 . 


128, 093 


64, 921 


.51 




Benzotrichloride 




Benzoyl chloride... 


19,80,82,99 . 










Benzoyl J acid 


36,110 










Benzoyl peroxide ... 


94 










Benzyl chloride . . 


80,82-. . 










Benzyl mercaptan 


106 










Broenner's acid (See 2-naphthylamine- 

6-sulfonic acid). 
Butylaldehyde aniline condensation 


74, 130, X --- 








OS, If 4 


products. 
Calcium malate 


106 










Chloramine, tech 


105 










p-Chloro-o-aminophenol 


158 . 










p-Chloroaniline _. 


8 











COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 31 

Table 10. — Coal-tar intermediates, production and sales, 1929 — Continued 



Intermediates 



p-Chloroaniline sulfonic acid 

Chloroanthraquinone 

b-Ciiloroanthraquinone 

o-Chlorobenzaldehyde 

Chlorobenzan throne 

Chlorobenzene (mono) 

o-Chlorobenzoic acid - 

Clilororaet anilic acid 

6-Chloro-4-niethoxy-3-hydroxy t h i o - 

naphthalene. 

C hloroineth ylanthraquinone 

C hioronaph t halene (halowax) 

Chloronitroaniinophenol 

o-Chloro-p-nitroaniline 

p-C hloro-o-nitrophenol 

Chlorophenol (mono, di, tri) 

Chloro-m-phenylenediamine 

o-C hlorot oluene 

o-C hlorotoluene-p-sulfonic acid 

o-C hloro-m-toluldine-p-sulfonic acid 

2-Chloro-5-toluidine-4-sulfonic acid 

C hlorotolylthiogly collie acid 

Chromotropic acid (Seel: 8-dihydroxy 

naphthalene-3: 6-disulfomc acid) . 

Chrysazine 

Cresidine 

Cresylic acid, refined (distillates yield- 
ing below 215° C. tar acids equal to 

more than 75 per cent of the original 

distillate). 

Crotilidine aniline 

Crotilidine a-naphthylamine 

Cumidine 

Dehy drothio-p-toluidine 

Dehydrothio-p-toluidine sulfonic acid.. 

Dehy drothio-m-xylidine 

Diaminochlorobenzene-p-sulfonic acid . 

Diaminodiniethyldihydroacridine 

Diaminodiphenyl thiourea 

Diaminophenol sulfonic acid 

Diaminostilbeue disulfonic acid 

Dianisidine 

l-Diazo-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid 

Diazosalicylic acid 

Dibenzanthrone -- 

1: 5-Dibenzoyldiaminoanthraquinone _. 
Dibenzoyldi aminoanthraquinonyl 

anthriraide. 
Dibenzoyldiaminodianthraquinonyl 

imide. 

D ibcnzylamine 

Dibenzylaniline 

Dibutyl phthalate 

D ichloroaniline 

Dichloroaniline sulfonic acid _-_- 

o-Dichlorobenzene 

p-Dichlorobenzene_. -.- 

p-D ichloronitrobenzene 

Dichlorophenylhydrazine sulfonic acid. 

Dichlorosulfophenylpyrazolone 

Dichlorosulfophenylmethylpyrazolone. 

Diethylamine 

Diethyl-ra-aminophenol 

Diethylaniline 

Diethylaniline-m-sulfonic acid 

1; 4-Dihydroxyanthraquinone (quini- 

zarin). 
5:5-Dihydroxy-7:7-disulfonic-2: 2-di- 

naphthylamine (Rhoduline acid). 
5:5-Dihydroxy-7 : 7-disulfonic-2 : 2-di- 

naphthylurea (J acid urea). 

l:5-Dihydroxynaphthalene 

l:8-Dihydroxy naphthalene-3: 6-disul- 

fonic acid (chromotropic acid) . 

Dimethylamine 

p Dimethylamino butylidine aniline. . 



Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (ac- 
cording to list on 
p. 188) 



8,38. 
lOfi.. 
69-.- 



106 

52, 106, 119 

50, 52, 82, 105, 138. 

106 

36, 52, 69, 106, 110, 
52 



106 

X 

38 

13, 29, 52, X. 

158 

52, 130 

36 

52, 106 

52 



29, 52, 134, 158, X. 
52 



69 -. 

52-- 

17, X, X. 



X 

74 

106, X 

110 

38,66,110 

110 

36 

121 

158 

69 

52, 106, 110.. 

38, 52, 106, 110 

36, 38, 52, 106, 117. 

69, 106. 

110 

52 

52 



89, 148, 151, X 

38, 52, 110, 152, 158. 

8, 121 

50, 105 

50,82, 105, 138 

38, 110 

121 

38 

121 

161 

52,97 

50. 106 

52 

8, 106 



52. 



36,38,52, 106, 110. 



52, 69, 106. 
52, 106, X. 



Sales 



Quantity 



Pounds 



5, 257, 306 



4, 251, 171 



5, 275, 248 



52,161. 

74 



Value 



Average 

price 

per 

pound 



$274, 627 



1, 074, 049 



761. 098 



$0.05 



Production 

(quantity) 



Pounds 



38, 205 



36, 478 



211,091 



14, 601, 534 



199, 960 
127, 753 



4, 749. 776 
83, 848 



5, 616, 475 



129,108 



32 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table 10. — Coal-tar intermediates, 'production and sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (ac- 
cording to list on 
p. 188) 


Sales 




Intermediates 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 
(quantity) 


Dimethylaniline^. 


8, 29, 52, 106 


Pounds 






Pounds 
3, 831, 006 


2: 2-Dimetiiyl-l: 1-dianthraQuinonyl 


52.. 








Dimethylphe nylbenzylammonium 


X 










disulfonic acid, calcium salt (leuko- 
trope W) . 
Dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine 


74 










Dimethyltetraaminodiphenylmethane. 


121.. 










b-b-Dinaphthylamine 


X 










Dinitroaniline 


8, 29, X 








37, 590 


Dinitroanthraquinone - 


36 










Dinitrobenzene -- 


29, 52, 106 ... 








1,831 167 


Dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid 


38,69 










Dinitrochloroanisole 


38 










Dinitrochlorobenzene 


52, 69, 106 








7, 317, 164 


Dinitrohydrox vdiphenylamine 


38, 69 








Dinitrophenol and sodium salt 


8, 52, 69, 90. 










Dinitrophenyl ester of dimethyldithio- 


X 










carbamic acid. 
s-Di-(b-naphthy 1) -p-pbe n y 1 e n e d i a - 


74 










mine. 
Dinitrostilbene disulfonic acid.- 


52, 106, 110 








40,481 


Dinitrotoluene.- 


29, 52, 79, 106, 110.. 








Diphenyl 


58 










Diphenyl, chlorinated (aroclor) 


58 










Diphenylamine. - 


52 










Diphenylethylenediamine.-- 


X 










Diphenylguanidine .... 


50, 52, 129, 130, X.. 
106 


2,191,538 


$649,485 


$0.30 


2,444,226 


DiphenyLmethane sulfonic acid. 


Distilbenediphenol... 


106 










o-Ditolylethylenediamine 


X 










o-Ditolylguanidine 


52, X 










Ditolylmethane 


106 










o-Ditolylthiourea 


52, 74, 130 










6-Ethoxy-3-hydroxy thionaphthalene.. 


52.... 










Ethyl-p-aminobenzoate 


104 










Ethyl-o-amino-p-cresol 


52 










Ethylaniline (mono) 


52, 106 










Ethylbenzene 


32 










Ethylbenzvlaniline 


52, 106.. 










Ethylbenzvlaniline sulfonic acid 


38,52, 106, 140 










Ethylbenzylaniline disulfonic acid 


52 










Ethyl carbazole 


52 










Ethyl-o-toluidine 


52 










Ethyl-o-toluidine-p-sulfonic acid 


52 










Ethylidine aniline and derivatives 


129.. 










Fluorescein 


47, 79 










Formanilide (anhydroformaldehyde 


52, 129, 130 










aniline) . 
Gamma acid {see 2-amino-8-naphthol- 

6-sulfonic acid). 
H acid (see l-amino-8-naphthol-3: 6- 

disulfonic acid) . 
Halowax [see chloronaphthalene) 
Heptaldehyde aniline condensation 


X 










products. 
p-Hydroxy benzaldehyde-o-sulfonic 


140. 










acid. 
P-Hydroxy benzoic acid 


104 










Hydroxy chlorocresol 


52 










HydroxjTnercurichlorophenol 


52 










b-Hydroxy naphthoic acid 


52 










b-Hydroxy naphthoic anilide (naph- 


52 










thol AS). 
Indamine ._ 


7 










Indophenol . 


7 










Isopropyl naphthalene sulfonic acid 


106... 










Iso violanthrone 


52 










J acid (see 2-amino-5-naphthol-7-sul- 

fonic acid). 
Laurent's acid (see 1-naphthylamine- 

5-sulfonic acid). 
Lead dithiobenzoate 


X 










Maleic acid.. 


106 








dl-Malie acid 


8, 106 1 










COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 33 

Table 10. — Coal-tar intermediates, production and sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 
identification 
number (ac- 
cording to hst on 
p. 188) 


Sales 




liitermediates 


Quantity 


Value 


.Average 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 
(quantity) 


Mercapto-benzo-thiazole - . - 


130, X 


Pounds 






Pounds 


Metanilic acid . ..... 


7, 3G, 38, 52, 69, 79, 

106, 110. 
66 








781,411 












Methyl anthraciuinone 


90, 110 










Methyl pyridine.. 


X 










2-Methyl quiuoline (quinaldine) 


106 










Methylene dianilide... 


52 










Methylene di-b-naphthol 


X 










Methylhydroxybenzoate .... 104 










Methvlhydroxvnitrobenzoate ... 


104 










Michler's hydrol (see tetramethyl- 

diaminobenzliydrol) . 
Michler's ketone (see tetramethyldia- 

minobenzophenone) . 
Naphthalene, solidifying 79° C. or 

above (refined, flake). 


17, 29, 110, 159, X.. 
69 .... 


21, 120, 049 


$1, 027, 094 


$0.05 


31, 143, 716 




134 . - 1 








1:5-Naphthalene disulfouic acid 


52, 69, 106 1 






189, 094 




52, 106, 134 1 










52 








(sultam acid) . 
a-Naphthol 


8, 29, 38, 52, 79, 106, 122, 425 

110, X. 1 
29, 38, 79, 134 ! 


68, 023 


.56 








l-Naphthol-8-chloro-3:6-disulfonic acid 
(chloro H acid). 


106 








38, 52, 106, 110 








174, 1C4 


■Winther's). 


7, 36, 38, 52, 69, 106, 
38 


110 






223, 746 


1-Naph thol-8-sulfonic-3-sultone 

l-Naphthol-3'8-disulfonic acid 










110 










l-Naphthol-3:0:8-trisulfonic acid 

2-Naphthol-l-sulfonic acid 

2-Naphthol-6-sulfonic acid (Schaeffer's 
acid) . 


106, 110 










52 










7, 8, 38, 52, 53, 69, 

106. 
38, 134 


8,99i 


4,182 


.47 


158, 567 




38 










2-Naphthol-3 :6-disulfonic acid 


29, 38, 52, 69, 106, 

134. 
38, 52, 69, 106, 134.. 

69, 106, 110 

8, 38, 52, 106, 110, 

134. 
110 


218, 301 

67, 343 
2, 625, 768 


85, 361 

27, 878 
639, 485 


.39 

.41 
.24 


755, 116 




748, 524 




3, 801, 144 






l-Naphthylamine-4-amino-6 and 7 
sulfonic acid. 

l-Naphthylamine-4-sulfonic acid (naph- 
thionicacid). 

l-Naphthylamine-5-sulfonic acid (Lau- 
rent's acid). 

1-Naphlhy lam ine-6-sulfonic acid 

l-Naphthylamine-6 and 7-sulfoinic 
acid. 

1-Naph thy lam ine-7-sulf onic acid 

l-Naphthy lam ine-8-sulfonic acid 

l-Naphthylamine-3:8-disulfonic acid . . . 

l-Naphthylamine-4:8-disulfonic acid 

l-Naphthylamine-4:6 and 4:7-disulfonic 
acid. 

l-Naphthylamine-3:6;8-trisulfonic acid . 

1-Naph thylamine-8:2:4-trisulfonic acid . 

2-Naphthylamine-l-suIfonic acid 

2-Naphthylamine-6-sulfonic acid (Bro- 
enner's acid). 

2-Naphthylamine-3:6-disulfonic acid. .. 

2-Naphthylamine-4:8-disulfonic acid... 

2-Naphthylamine-5:7-disulfonic acid... 

2-Naphthylamine-6:8-disulfonic acid... 

2-Naphthylamine-3:6:8-trisulfonic acid. 










7, 38, 79, 106, 

110, X. 
7, 38, 52, 69, 106, 

110. 
38 52 106 








1, 205, 283 








209, 104 








43, 368 


7 38, 52, 106, 110 


■ 1 




235, 080 


38 








7 38 52, 69, 106 






391, 414 


38 52, 110 


1 






38, 52, 69, 106, 110 






340,284 


110 










52 106 110 X 










69 










7,38,52, 134 

38 52, 106 


320, 941 


235, 578 


.73 


637, 367 
32, 023 


38 










38 52 106 110 








71, 653 


38 52, 106, 110 








444,288 


7 38 52 106 110 










110 




\ 






134 












8. 36, 69, 106 

38,52 




:::::::::::: 




50. 199 


p-NitroaminophenoL. 





34 CENSUS OF DYES A.ND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table 10. — Coal-tar intermediates, production and sales, 1929 — Continued 



Intermediates 



m-Kitroaniline .■ 

o-Nitroaniline 

p-Nitroaniline 

p-Nitroaniline sulfonic acid 

p-Nitro-o-anisidine 

o-Nitroanisole 

m-Niti obenzaldehyde 

Nitrobenzene 

Nitrobenzene sulfonic acid 

Nitrobenzene-m-sulfonic acid 

Nitrobenzene-2:5-disulfonie acid 

Nitrobenzidine 

p-Nilrobenzoic acid 

m-Nitrobenzoyl chloride 

Nitrochlorobenzene (ortho and para) _ _ 
p-Nitrochlorobenzene-o-sulfonic acid... 

Nitrocresol 

m-N itro-p-cresol 

Nitrocresol methyl ether 

Nitrocumene ._ 

6 - Nitre - ] - diazo - 2 - naphthol - 4 -sul- 
fonic acid. 
8 - Nitro - 1 - diazo - 2 - naphthol - 1 - 

sulfonic acid. 
3-Nitro-l-hydroxyphenyl arsonic acid.. 

N itronaph t halene 

2-Nitronaplithalene-4:8-disulfonie acid- 

o-Nitrophenol 

p-Nitrophenol _ 

Nitrosobetanaphthol 

Nitrcsodimethylaniline 

Nitrosop henol 

Nitrotoluene ..- 

m-Nitrotoluene 

o-Nitrotoluene 

o-Nitrotoluene sulfonic acid 

p-Nitrotoluene 

p-Nitrotoluene-o-sulfonic acid 

m-Nitro-p-toluidine --. 

p-Nitro-o-toluidine 

Nitroxylene 

0.\alyl-p-nitroaniline 

O.xaly l-m-pheny lenediamine 

Oxalyl-p-phen> lenediamine 

Phenazine 

Phenol 

Phenyl - 2 - amino - 5 - naphthol - 7 - sul- 
fonic acid (phenyl J acid). 
Phenyl - 2 - amino - 8 - naphthol - 6 - sul- 
fonic acid (phenyl gamma acid). 

Phenyl malonate. 

Phenyl-a-naphthylamine 

Phenyl-b-naphthylamine 

Phenyl - 1 - naphthylamine - 8 - sulfonic 
acid. 

Phenyldimeth ylam inopy razolone 

m-Pheny lenediamine 

m-Phenylenediamine sulfonic acid 

p-Pheny lenediamine 

p-Phenylenediarnine sulfonic acid 

Phenylglycine, .sodium .salt 

Phenylliydrazine and hydrochloride... 

Phenylli yiiiaz.ine-p-sulfonic acid 

Phenylnifthy] pyrazolone 

Phenylmethylpyrazolone sulfonic acid 

Phenylpy razolone 

Phthalic acid and anhydride 

Picramic acid. 



Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (ac- 
cording to list on 
p. 188) 



29, 52, 152 

105 

29, 44, 105 

38, 52, 66, 158. 
52. 



38, 52, 105, 110 

106 

29, 52, 105. 106, 107, 
110, X. 

33, 66, 69 

8. 52 

38 



110 

1, 52, 133 

121.. 

52, 105 

38, 52, 66, 106, 110, 
158. 

52 

38 



52.. 
106. 
38-. 



69, 106. 



104 

69, 110.. 

38 

152, 158 

52, 105, 152 

69 

29, 69, 90, 106, X.. 
21, 38, 52, 56, 69, 

106. 
29, 38, 52, 79, 106, 

110. 

110 

52, 106, 110 

8,36, 66 

52, 106, 110 

7, 38, 52, 106, 110.. 
29, 38, 44, 52, 69, 

120, 134. 

38, 52 

38, 52, 106, 110 

52 

52, 106 

52 

7 



17, 50, 105, 130, X. 
38, 52, 106, 110 



7, 8, 52, 110, 121. 



1 

52 

52, 74 

7, 36, 52, 69, 106, 

110. 
104. 

7, 8, 29, 36, 38, 52, 
69, 79, 106, no, 
117, 152. 

38, 69, 106 

8, 29, 44, 67 

36,38 

50, 52, 106 - 

52.66, 69, 121 

52, 69, 121 

66, 121 

121 

X 

52, 105, 106, 132... 
29,52, 106 



Sales 



Quantity 



Pounds 



2, 688, 957 



421,351 



19,938,503 



7, 450, 037 



Value 



$237, 025 



Average 

price 

per 

pound 



601,459 



2, 248, 288 



1, 147, 953 



% 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES d5 

Table 10. — Coal-tar intermediates, production and sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' 
identificati on 
number (ac- 
cording to list on 
p. 188) 


Sales 




Intermediates 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price 

per 

pound 


Production 
(quantity) 


Poly ethvleneamine b-naphthol con- 


X 


Pounds 






Pounds 


densation products. 
Priniuline, base 


21, 38, 106, 110 










Quinaldine {see 2-methylquinoline). 
Quinizarin {tee 1:4 dihydroxy anthra- 

quinone). 
Quinoline vellow base 


106 










Resorcinol, tech .. _ . _ .. 


120 










Resorcinol, USP 


120, X 












79 










Salicvlic acid, tech i... 


50,80, 105 










Salicylic acid, USP 


50,80, 105 


1, 577, 758 


$510, 711 


$0.32 


4,219,186 


Sulfanilie acid .. _ _ _ 


8, 29, 38, 79, 96, 106. 
83 


1 , 677, 077 


o-Sulfobenzoie acid 










p-Sxilfophenvl hydrazine 


.36 










Tetraaminoditolvlmethane 


52, 121 










Tetrachlnrofluorescein 


79 










Tetraniethvldianiinobenzhydrol 


52 










(Michler's hydro!). 
Tetranieth vldiaminobenzophenone 


52 










(Michler's ketone). 
Tetramelhyldiaminodinitroacridine 


121 










Tetramethyldiaminodihydroacridine . 


121 










Tetramethvldiaminodiphenylmethane. 


29, 52, 69, 97, 106.. 










TetramethyldiaminophenolhydroL .- 


69 










Tetramethyldiaminophenylacridine 


121 










Tetramethyldiaminophenyldihydro- 
acridine - . 


121 










Te t r a m e t h y 1 1 e t r a aminotriphenyl 
methane ... ... . , .- 


121 










Thioaniline 


7 










Thiocacbanilide 


52, 74, 106, 130 

38, 52, 106, 110 


442, 027 


97, 582 


.22 


923, 091 




129, 311 


Toluene sulfamide (ortho and para) 


105 










p-Toluene sulfochloride 


105 










p-Toluene-0-.sulfonic acid 


36 










p-Toluene .<^ulfonic acid ethvl ester 


152 










m-Toluenediamine sulfonic acid 


38 -. -. 










Toluidine 


29, 38, 106 


161, 798 


35, 636 


.22 




m-Toluidine - -.- .- --- _ . . -. 


52, 110 -,.. 




o-Toluidine 


29, 52, 106, 110 

52, 79, 106 


840,982 


192, 368 


.23 


2,339,436 


o-Toluidine sulfonic acid 


p-Toluidine . - . - 


52, 106, 110 

8, h2 


483, 308 


172, 174 


.36 


1,151,483 


p-Toluidine sulfonic acid 




Toluidine disulfonic acid-- .. 


8, 36 










Tolyl-l-naphthylamine-8-sulfonic acid 
(tolvl-peri acid) . - ._ . --. ._ 


7, 69, 106, 110 










m-Tolylenediamine 


38, 52, 53, 69, 79, 

106, 110. 
7, 106 


306, 591 


205, 501 


.67 


911,351 






p-Toh lenediamine sulfonic acid 


53 










Tribenzoate of soda 


133 












X 










Trinitriiplieiiol -- 


106 










Tripl enjiyuanidine 


52, 106 . 












50, 130 










Xyleneazotoluidine 


79 












38, 52, 106, 110 








269, 210 


m-Xvlidine - .- . _. .- .. .. 


52, 110 








m-Xylidine acetate 


106 










m-Xylidine sulfonic acid 


52 ... 












106 










p-Xylidine 


106, 110 










All other - - . 


8 























36 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 11. — Inlennediales: Production, by groups, according to unit values, 

1925-1929 





1925 




1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


Group 




Pel- 




Per 




Per 




Per 




Per 




Pounds 


cent 
of 


Pounds 


cent 
of 


Pounds 


cent 
of 


Pounds 


cent 
of 


Pounds 


cent 
of 






total 




total 




total 




total 




total 


0-15 cts.... 


89, 686, 885 


42. 566 


135,324,911 


58. 93 


150, 641, 892 


62.75 


172, 187, 886 


61.66 


229, 029, 120 


64.61 


16-25 Cts- - 


62,801,070 


29. 806 


47, 228, 385 


20.57 


34, 353, 105 


14.31 


39,099,559 


14.00 


44,865,731 


12.66 


26-50 cts... 


32,081,452 


15. 226 


24,130,013 


10.51' 29,973,693 


12.49 


40, 702, 440 


14.56 


50, 835, 573 


14.34 


51-75 cts... 


13, 442, 218 


6.380 


10, 571, 635 


4.60| 14,498,391 


6.04 


18,419,660 


6.60 


19, 910, 895 


5.62 


$0.76-$!..- 


5, 787, 165 


2.747 


7, 097, 246 


3.09 4,797,843 


2.00 


3, 049, 726 


1.09 


3, 279, 172 


.93 


$1.01-$1.50- 


3, 632, 570 


1.724 


2,621,011 


1. 14i 2,604,940 


1.08 


2,591,619 


.93 


4, 057, 157 


1.14 


$1.51-$2... 


1,614,041 


.766 


1, 434, 404 


.62| 2,022,746 


.84 


1, 252, 592 


.45 


1,286,595 


.36 


$2.01-$3.._ 


994, 224 


.472 


916, 665 


. 40, 763, 153 


.31 


1, 079, 646 


.39 


850, 330 


.24 


$3.01-$4.._ 


111,432 


.053 


144, 587 


.06 281,366 


.12 


699,843 


.25 


145, 953 


.04 


Over $4... 


548, 722 


.260 


184,945 


. 08 136, 055 


.06 


191,836 


.07 


227, 192 


.06 


Total--. 


210,699,779:100,000 

1 


229, 653, 802 


100.00 240,073,184 


100.00 


279,274,807 


100.00J354,487,718 


100.00 



Dyes and Other Finished Coal-Tar Products 
introduction 

Finished coal-tar products may be divided into eight classes: (1) 
Dyes, (2) color lakes, (3) photographic chemicals (developers), (4) 
medicinals, (5) flavors, (6) perfume materials, (7) synthetic phenolic 
resins, (8) synthetic tanning materials. In previous reports the 
Tariff Commission has emphasized the close relationship existing 
between the manufacture of dyes and that of explosives and poisonous 
gases. The dye industry is now considered a key industry by the 
industrial nations of the world. Closel}^ connected also with dyes are 
such coal-tar products as flavors, perfume materials, synthetic resins, 
photographic chemicals, medicinals, and others which, although 
produced in smaller quantities, use as raw materials many of the by- 
products obtained in the manufacture of coal-tar dyes. 

In 1929 a total of 167,175,703 pounds of dyes and other finished 
coal-tar products, exclusive of synthetic tanning materials, miscella- 
neous products, and research chemicals, was produced by 120 firms. 
Including these three items excepted in 1929, the production in 1928 
by 125 firms was 143,563,099 pounds. Sales in 1929 amounted to 
158,698,300 pounds, valued at $77,247,361. In both production and 
sales 1929 was a record year for the domestic industry. 

Table 31, page 64, shows the production of dyes and other finished 
coal-tar products in 1929 in as great detail as is possible without 
disclosing the output of individual manufacturers. 

Summary of Production of Dyes 



INCREASE IN PRODUCTION 



The output of dyes in 1929 by 54 firms was 111,421,505 pounds, an 
increase of 14,796,054 pounds, or 15.31 per cent, over 1928, when 
production was 96,625,451 pounds. Sales in 1929 totaled 106,070,887 
pounds, valued at $45,842,130, as compared with 93,302,708 pounds, 
valued at $39,792,039 in 1928. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



37 



The outstanding features of dye production in 1929 were: (1) A 
record production of vat dyes; (2) an increase in imports, especially 
of acid and vat dyes; (3) a notable increase in exports; (4) a marked 
increase in the production of dyes manufactured in foreign-controlled 
dye plants m the United States. 

Table 12 shows the production and sales of dyes in the United States 
in recent years as compared with the pre-war year 1914. 

Table 12. — Coal-tar dyes: Domestic production and sales, 1914 and 1917-1929 



Year 


Production 


Sales 


Year 


Production 


Sales 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


1914 


Pounds 

6, 619, 729 

45, 977, 246 


Pounds 


1 $2, 470, 096 
I 57, 796, 228 
• 62, 026. 390 
1 67, 598, 855 
I 95, 613, 749 
39, 283, 956 
41, 463, 790 


1923 


Pounds 
93, 667, 524 
68, 679, 000 
86, 345, 438 
87, 978, 624 
95, 167, 905 
96, 625, 451 
111, 421, 505 


Pounds 
86, 567, 446 
64, 961, 433 
79, 303, 451 
86, 255, 836 
98, 339, 204 
93, 302, 708 
106, 070, 887 


$47, 223, 161 


1917 




1924... 


35, 012, 400 


1918. 


.18. 464. 446 




1925 


37, 468, 332 


1919 1 63,402,194 




1926 


36, 312, 648 


1920 : 88,263,776 




1927 _- 


38, 532, 795 


1921 39,008,690 


47, 513, 762 
69, 107, 105 


, 1928 


39, 792, 039 


1922 fil fi32 187 


1929 


45, 842, 130 

















' Value of production. 



STOCKS ON HAND 



Commencing with 1924, the commission has annually published 
data as to the quantity of certain dyes on hand at the beginning of 
the year. Table 13 shows stocks on hand January 1, 1929, and 
January 1, 1930, for a selected list of dyes. 

Table 13. — Domesiic dyes: Stocks on hand January 1, 1929, and January 1, 1930 



Col- 




Jan. 


1— 


Index 
No. 


1929 


1930 


20 


Chrysoidine Y 


Pounds 
168, 300 
50, 150 

178, 057 

158, 907 

250, 587 

92, 030 

129, 146 

305, 859 

62, 775 

97, 045 

501, 955 

237, 441 

112,898 

147, 195 

312, 834 

602, 066 

345, 014 

570, 427 

153, 594 

189, 724 

124, 759 

2, 384, 776 

285, 492 

146, 757 

. 252, 612 

189, 228 

65, 520 

185, 909 

205, 624 

151, 680 

91, 689 

89, 479 


Pounds 
228, 317 


31 


Amidonaphthol red Q 


86, 726 


79 




190, 954 


138 




185, 891 


151 




400, 091 


179 




90.730 


189 




129, 794 


202 




353, 966 


208 




71, 665 


234 




128, 648 


246 


Acid black lOB 


430, 655 


289 




320. C63 


326 




189. 734 


332 




205, 976 


365 




332, 446 


370 




495, 101 


401 


Developed black BIIN 


342, 308 


406 


Direct blue 2B . 


774, 422 


448 




205, 439 


518 




208, 682 


520 




173,351 


581 


Direct black EW 


2, 357, 510 


582 


Direct black RX 


456, 244 


593 




183, 179 




Direct brown 3G0 


309, 718 


620 




185, 306 


640 




156, 140 


655 




323, 998 


680 




261, 126 


812 




209, 593 


814 




89, 598 


864 


Nigrosine (spirit-soluble) 


134, 286 



38 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 13. — Domestic dyes: Stocks on hand January 1, 1929, and January 1. 

19S0 — Continued 



Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 



Nigrosine (water-soluble) 

Sulfur blacks. 

Sulfur blue 

Sulfur brown 

Sulfur yellow 

Indigo, 20 per cent paste 

Anthraquinone vat dyes (single strength) 
Zambesi black 

Total 



Jan. 1— 



28, 273, 247 



1930 



Pounds 


Pounds 


356, 937 


444, 975 


5, 289, 388 


6,313,446 


541, 600 


509, 289 


578, 182 


737. 363 


265, 585 


272, 545 


10, 509, 873 


10, 448, 023 


1, 738, 503 


2, 414, 735 


104, 650 


92, 632 



31, 444, 664 



PRICES 

The v/eightcd average price per pound of all domestic dyes sold 
during the period 1917 to 1927 declined, on an average, 8.7 cents per 
year. In 1928 the weighted average sales price per pound was 42.6 
cents, an increase of 3.6 cents over 1927. Although the price trend 
was downward in 1929, especially for sulfur, basic, and mordant and 
chrome dyes, the net result of the increased production of high-priced 
dyes and the advance of 1 cent per pound in the price of indigo, of 
which over 29,000,000 pounds were sold, was an advance to 43.2 
cents in the weighted average price per pound. 

Table 14 shows the unit value of production in 1917, and the 
weighted average sales price per pound from 1921 to 1929, inclusive. 



Table 14.- 



-Domesiic dyes: Weighted, average sales price per pound,^ 191'. 
1921-1929 



and 



Year 


Weighted 

average 

sales price 

of domestic 

dyes 


Year 


Weighted 

average 

sales price 

of domestic 

dyes 


1917 


2 $1. 26 
.83 
.60 
.55 


1925 


$0.47 


1921 - 


1926 - . . 


.42 


1922 


1927 


.39 


1923 


1928. 

1929 


.43 


1924 


.43 









1 The total value of all dyes sold divided by the total quantity sold. 

2 Unit value of production. 

These price data on dyes, together with similar data on interme- 
diates, are shown in the graph on page 39. 

Table 15 shows the sales price of nearly 100 domestic dyes from 
1925 to 1929, inclusive, with the invoice price of the same types of 
dyes imported in 1914. The dyes for which statistics are here given 
constitute about 90 per cent of domestic production. Strictly speak- 
ing, domestic sales prices can not, of course, be compared with invoice 
prices, for the reason that the latter do not represent the cost to the 
consumer, since they do not include the importer's profit and the 
usual charges for containers, packing, freight, insurance to seaport, 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



39 



consular certification, and minor shipping charges at point of depar- 
ture and at seaport. 

In Table 15 the Colour Index number appears in the first column, 
and the type name of the dye adopted by the Tariff Commission for 
designating all dyes reported under a given Colour Index number, in 
the second column. The invoice price (1914) shown in column 3 

WEISHTEO AVERaSE PRICES, DYES 
P^HD INTERMEDIATES, 1917-1929. 



Cenf5 per 



nd 




■!■. 




;;ni^::|:.:1ii;:M:!!:'. i 








■"T" 


-p 






I.I 1 






! 










\ 






i • i 




---!-' ■ 




' ■■ 














\ 


















-J- 


t irs 






; 
















> 






y ' 












: 


-,.. 








1 












1 




\ ! 














Qn 


. 




1 








- 


i ; 




/-r»Yes. . . - [--- 




; 




1 


f^d 


. 1 1 




i frn^__ _ 










! 1 1 !V i i :. 
























■ 


' I" 








[ 


- \"--'-- 






___ i__ 










fid 




I 


^( 




[ 












-•-- 


— 


^ 


-— 


V 


" 




__;_' 




■ 1 

i 






1 












X 


■^ 






,., 




An 






' 






'^ 


-^-sJur-^ 




1 


1 




^ 












' 1_T 


--..i.... 


i 


^r 




1 


\ rlN 


rEf 


tt^m 


Dl« 


h°E£ 


;■ 1 . 


1 ■ 
1 


■ 1, 


■ 1'^ 

1 






. a_.._ 




\ ^ 


_- 


! 




1 


i ■ 


i 


-1 














-*>.^ 




"^••" 


; 






: 


' 


















i . 


"4"" 


rki 


/n 


1 


1 


1 






1 






o 







-Ji- 


-';:;: 


-'--- 


,-t- 


-f- 


-- 


--":■ 


.1' 


: 


m 



1917 19ia 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 19Z5 I92fe 1927 1926 1929 



Nofe: The prices indicated prior /o I92l repressnf ihe 
soles value of production. 

represents the weighted average of all dyes classified under a given 
number in "Artificial Dyestuffs Used in the United States," published 
by the Department of Commerce, as Special Agents Series No. 121. 
The figures in column 4, the domestic sales price as reported to the 
Tariff Commission, represent the weighted average selling price of all 
dyes reported under a given Colour Index number. 

114492—30 4 



40 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 15.- 



'Domesiic sales price of certain dyes, 1925-1929, compared with invoice 
value of dyes of the same kind imported in 1914 





Common name 


1914 in- 
voice 
value 

imported 

dyes 
(weighted 

average 
of all 

types) 


Average 


price per pound 


Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


20 


Chrysoidine Y 


$0. 136 
.165 
.148 
.150 
.077 
.154 
.604 
.095 
.159 
.164 
.249 
.081 
.256 
.118 
.198 
.188 
.138 
.083 
.149 
.156 
.252 
.134 
.165 
.143 
.166 
.172 
.110 
.144 
.186 
.183 
.270 
.255 
.133 
.041 
.189 
.231 
.362 
.194 
.133 
.209 
.234 
.222 
.275 
.440 
.144 
.139 
.174 
.230 


$0.43 
.45 
.52 
.53 
.42 
.45 
.55 
.51 
.56 
.69 
.88 
.29 
.99 
.69 
.76 
.87 
.63 
.86 
.67 
.44 
.65 
.55 
.95 
.96 
.83 
.81 
.84 
.72 
'.47 
.45 
.78 
1.22 
.58 
.34 
.83 
.69 
.95 
.77 
.66 
.46 
1.32 
.97 
.97 
.67 
.34 
.45 
.61 
.70 
.44 
.80 
.72 
.61 
.94 
.67 
2.00 
1.54 
1.30 
1.81 
.99 
1.49 
2.24 
.57 

"'i"56' 
.64 
1.06 

"".(}¥ 

.45 

.42 

1.79 


$0.34 
.36 
.44 
.46 
.50 
.58 
.54 
.48 
.56 
.64 
.78 
.27 
.92 
.62 
.71 
.66 
.58 
.85 
.55 
.37 
.63 
.46 
.84 
.98 
.74 
.73 
.80 
.61 
.44 
.42 
.55 
1.21 
.50 
.31 
.55 
.62 
.82 
.70 
.58 
.39 
1.27 
.87 
.77 
.59 
.31 
.35 
.51 
.66 
.39 
.68 
.74 
.49 
.81 
.58 
.90 
1.31 
1.13 
1.81 
.93 
1.36 
2.69 
.59 
1.80 
1. 52 
.54 
1.05 
.56 
.68 
.47 
.39 
1.85 


$0.33 
.35 
.49 
.43 
.49 
.61 
.54 
.41 
.53 
.58 
.75 
.26 


$0.31 


$0.31 


21 


Chrysoidine R 




27 


Orange G.. 


.54 
.40 
.49 
.54 
.49 
.42 
.61 
.56 
.73 
.26 




31 


Amidonaphthol red Q 


.34 


36 


Chrome yellow 2G... 


.47 


40 


Chrome yellow R 


.57 


57 


Amidonaphthol red 6B 


.48 


79 


Ponceau 2R 


.43 


88 


Bordeaux B 


.49 


138 


Metanil yellow 


.54 


146 


Azo yellow 


.70 


151 


Orange II 


.26 


167 


Acid chrome brown B 




176 


Fast red A 


.60 
.65 
.48 
.64 
.80 
.68 
.36 
.55 
.39 
.82 
.82 
.69 
.68 
.80 
.70 
.41 
.40 
.53 

1.05 
.42 
.26 
.85 
.57 
.76 
.64 
.49 
.40 

1.06 
.82 
.68 
.45 
.28 

'"'il' 
.53 
.37 
.64 


.69 
.63 
.64 
.54 
.79 


.57 


179 


Azo rubine 


61 


180 


Fast red VR 


.59 


184 


Amaranth.. 


.64 


189 


Lake red R._ 


.80 


195 


Mordant yellow.. 




202 


Chrome blue black U 


.36 
.66 
.37 
.81 
.80 
.67 
.64 
.72 
.70 
.39 
.40 
.60 
.99 
.39 
.25 
.72 
.56 
.72 
.61 
.48 
.39 
.94 
.77 
.62 
.54 
.28 
.32 
.38 
.50 
.36 
.01 


.30 


208 


Fast acid blue R.. 


.52 


246 


Acid black lOB 


.40 


252 


Brilliant croceine . 


.76 


262 


Cloth red 2B . 


69 


289 


Fast cyanine 5R 


53 


299 




61 


307 


Fast cyanine black B 


.66 


308 




.76 


331 


Bismarck brown 


.39 


332 


Bismarck brown 2R 


38 


365 


Chrysophenine G 


.49 


394 


Direct violet N 


96 


401 


Developed black BHN 


.35 


406 


Direct blue 2B 


26 


410 


Chrysamine G 


.61 


415 


Direct orange R 


67 


419 


Direct fast red F 


66 


420 


Direct brown M 


.58 


448 


Benzopurpurine 4B 


.46 


477 




39 


495 


Benzopurpurine lOB 


1 07 


512 


Direct blue RW 


.73 


518 


Direct pure blue 6B. 


.69 


.^20 




52 


581 


Direct black EW 


28 


582 


Direct black RX 


30 


593 


Direct green B 


37 


594 


Direct green G 




596 


Direct brown 3G0 


35 


598 


Congo brown O 


.194 
.170 
.178 
.239 
.200 
.240 
.241 
.255 
.294 
.248 
.281 
.409 
.353 
.418 
.3.52 
.144 
.136 
.198 
.258 
.126 
.149 
.347 


68 


606 


Direct brown G 




620 




.-10 

.78 

.64 

.81 

1.11 

1.04 

1.89 

.88 

1.20 

2.89 

.69 


.35 

.77 
.58 
.81 

1.20 
.99 

1.82 
.84 

1.08 

2.26 
. 75 


35 


621 


Chloranune orange G 


74 


640 






655 


Auramine 


78 


657 




1 24 


066 


Acid green B 


88 


677 




1 87 


680 


Methyl violet . 


76 


698 




98 


704 


Alkaliblue.- 




737 




73 


768 


Eosine 


1.77 


793 


Phosphine 


1.32 

.48 
.93 
.70 
.72 
.45 
.40 
1.87 


1.12 
.43 
.93 


1 07 


812 


Primuline 


.39 
91 


814 


Direct last yellow 


860 


Induline (spirit-soluble) 




801 




.69 

.43 

.35 

1.81 




864 


Nigrosine (spirit-soluble) . . 


37 


805 


Nigrosine (water-soluble) ... 


34 


883 


Gallocyaninc.. 


1.56 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



41 



Table 15. — Domestic sales price of certain dyes, 1925-1929, compared uith invoice 
value of dyes of the same kind imported in 1914 — Continued 





Common name 


1914 in- 
voice 
value 
imported 

dyes 

(weighted 

average 

of all 

types) 


Average price per pound 


Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


1925 


1920 


1927 1928 


1929 


922 


Methylene blue 


$0,390 
.100 


$1.11 
.17 
.55 
.35 
.35 
..56 
.46 
2.16 

"1^26" 
.16 


$0.94 
.15 
.54 


"$oa3" 


$0.93 
.14 
.51 
.32 
.31 


$0.84 




Sulfur black. _. 


.14 




Sulfur blue 


.51 




Sulfur brown _ 


.107 


.35 - 32 


.31 




Sulfur tan „ _ 


.30 

.53 

.40 

2.18 

1.68 

1.08 

.13 


.39 


.28 




Sulfiu" maroon . _ . 


.186 


.53 ! .52 
.41 i .41 

1 1 74 


45 




Sulfur vellow 


39 


1035 


Alizarin brown . . 


.290 
.227 
.350 
.128 




1099 


Anthraquinone vat dark blue B .. . . . 


1.64 
.92 
.12 


' ".78 
. .14 


1 41 


1113 


Anthraquinone vat blue GCD 


69 


1177 


Indigo, synthetic . .. 


15 









UNIT VALUE OF DYES PRODUCED, 1925-1929 

Table 16 shows the domestic production of dyes from 1925 to 1929, 
inclusive, arranged according to eight value groups. The actual 
quantity is given for each group and the relation of each group to the 
total production. 

Table 16. — Dyes: Production, by groups, according to unit value, 1925-1929 



1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


Group 

Pounds 


Per 

cent 

of 

total 


Pounds 


Per 

cent 

of 

total 


Pounds 


Per 

cent 

of 

total 


Pounds 


Per 

cent 

of 

total 


Pounds 


Per 

cent 

of 

total 


1-25 cents 45,815,114 

26-50 cents 16, 134, 929 

51-75 cents 9,598,483 

$0.76-$l 4,851,750 

$1.01-$1.50 5,027,117 

$1.51-$2 ! 2,578,233 

$2.01-$3 i 1,508,458 

Over$3 ' 771,354 


53.06 
18.09 
11.11 
5.62 
5.82 
2.99 
1.82 
.89 


43, 747, 262 
20, 666, 640 
8, 794, 368 
8, 045, 922 
2, 808, 457 
2,241,741 
1,402,063 
272, 170 


49.72 

23. t9 

10.00 

9.15 

3.19 

2.55 

1.59 

.31 


49, 314, 987 
23,450,835 
7, 470, 547 
7,570,480 
3,714,761 
2, 375, 625 
1,086,666 
184,004 


51.82 43,321,274 
24.64 26,624,686 
7.85: 9,432,458 
7.9fii 9,550,635 
3.90| 3,536,731 
2.50 2,707,054 
1.141 1,298,824 
. 19| 153, 789 


44.84 
27.55 
9. 70 
9.88 
3.66 
2.80 
1.35 
.16 


49, 919, 561 

30, 251, 786 

10,121,960 

10,072,975 

5, 683, 807 

3, 799, 793 

1, 366, 792 

204, 831 


44.80 

27.15 

' 9.09 

9.04 

CIO 

3.41 

1.23 

.18 


Total 86,345,438 


100.00 


87,978,624 


100.00 


95,167,905 


100.00 96,625,451 


100.00 


111,421,505 


100.00 



PROGRESS IN DYE MANUFACTURE 

Progress in dye manufacture in 1929 was in increased production 
and sales rather than in results achieved in the laboratory, although 
many new dyes were manufactured dm'ing the year. The total pro- 
duction of dyes increased 15.31 per cent as compared with 1.5 per 
cent in 1928, and the total quantity of sales, 13.68 per cent as con- 
trasted with a decrease of 5.12 per cent in the previous year. The 
ratio of quantity exported to quantity imported was almost the same 
in the two years, being 5.3 in 1929 and 5.2 in 1928. 

Relation of 'production to consumption. — Assuming consumption 'to 
equal total sales plus imports minus exports, the apparent consump- 
tion of coal-tar dyes in 1929 was 78,377,709 pounds, an increase of 



42 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

10.65 per cent more than in 1928. Of this quantity,^ 91.79 per cent 
was supplied by domestic producers; the remaining 8.21 per cent was 
imported. 

In terms of value, the ratio of imports to apparent consumption was 
slightly greater than in 1928. Three ratios are obtained, each depend- 
ing upon the evaluation of our imports. Taking the foreign invoice 
value as the value of imports, the ratio of imports to apparent con- 
sumption was 12.23 per cent. Basing imports on foreign invoice value 
plus the duty paid, imports equaled 19.86 per cent of apparent 
consumption. Assuming the value of imports to be the foreign 
invoice value plus the duty paid plus 15 per cent allowance for profits 
and expenses on the sum of the foreign invoice value and the duty 
paid, imports equaled 22.18 per cent of apparent consumption. 

Number of manufacturers . — The number of firms manufacturing 
dyes in 1929 (exclusive of those making only stains and indicators) 
was 49 as compared to 50 in 1928. The decrease from 90 firms in 
1919 to 49 in 1929 was undoubtedly caused by severe competition 
among the many small-scale producers of low-priced dyes and by 
the merging of others. The elimination of but one manufacturer 
in 1929 may be taken as an indication that duplication of products is 
being avoided and that productive capacity more nearly conforms to 
the demands of the home and export markets. 

TARIFF CONSIDERATIONS 

With the exception of synthetic indigo, "Colour Index No. 1177" 
and sulfur black, "Colour Index No. 978," which are dutiable at 3 
cents per pound and 20 per cent ad valorem, the rates of duty and 
the basis for valuation of coal-tar dyes are the same under the act of 
1930 as under the act of 1922 beginning September 22, 1924, when, as 
provided by law, the duty was reduced from 60 per cent to 45 per 
cent ad valorem (the specific duty remaining at 7 cents per pound). 
The act of 1930 provides that the ad valorem rate of duty on any 
imported coal-tar product coming within paragraph 27 or 28 shall be 
based upon the American selling price (as defined in subdivision (g) of 
section 402, Title IV) of any similar competitive article manufactured 
in the United States. As defined by the act, a product is similar or 
competitive with any imported coal-tar product when it accomplishes 
results substantially equal to those accomplished by the domestic 
product when used in substantially the same manner. 

On a similar competitive article not manufactured in the United 
States, the act provides that the ad valorem rate shall be based upon 
the United States value (as defined in subdivision (e) of section 402, 
Title IV), which is the selling price in the United States of the im- 
ported article less certain statutory deductions, including profit, 
general expense, cost of insurance, transportation, and duty. 

The Census of Dyes, 1924 (pp. 41-45), discussed the American 
selling price as applied to coal-tar products, reviewed the principal 
features of the administration of these provisions by the Treasury 

5 Imports of coal-tar dyes in 1929 were 6,437,147 iiounds with a foreign invoice value of $5,374,085. This 
pou iaag3 i .a excess of c,;e net quantity imported. It is, however, comparable with both domestic pro- 
duction and domestic sales as nearly all the vat dyes as well as the rhodamines have been reduced to a single- 
strenitii a is in order to facilitate comparison. The Department of Commerce reports the total dye 
imports (excluding natural indigo, natural alizarin, and color lakes) as 7,317,277 pounds, valued at 
$S, 155.019. The quantity as compiled in Foreign Commerce and Navigation represents the number of 
pounds on which specific duty of 7 cents was assessed. The value represents the dutiable value. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 43 

Department, summarized the major regulations issued by that depart- 
ment, and gave important Treasury Decisions up to G. A. 9004, T. D. 
40926, of 1925. Continuing this feature of the report, subsequent 
issues gave abstracts of decisions up to November, 1929. Decisions 
up to April 1, 1930, follow. 

COURT AND TREASURY DECISIONS, 1929 

Orders fixing the standards of strength of coal-tar products under 
paragraphs 27 and 28 of the act of 1922 signed by an Assistant Secre- 
tary of the Treasury have been held to be vaHd. Abs. (N) 9863, 9884. 

H3^dron violet was held dutiable on the basis of the actual weight 
imported. Ab. (N) 10063. 

Where merchandise is imported in metal drums which are sepa- 
rately assessable as articles of commerce, there are two articles 
imported within the purview of section 304 of the act of 1922 — the 
contents and the drums. Each is assessable with 10 per cent addi- 
tional duty if not marked when imported to indicate the country of 
origin, provided each is capable of being so marked. Coal-tar colors 
contained in drums are incapable of being marked. T. D. 43748. 

Where dyes "A" and "B" are offered for sale in the United States 
and the same dyes mixed together to form a new dye are imported, the 
ad valorem can not be derived from the American selling price of a 
comparable American article by taking the price at which dyes "A" 
and "B" are offered for sale in America and calculating from them 
in the proportions bj^ weight of the imported mixture what price a 
mixture which accomplishes the same results as the imported mixture 
would be sold for when no such comparable mixture has been offered 
for sale, or sold, in the United States market. T. D. 43775. 

Where dyes or chemicals are imported under paragraphs 27 and 28, 
tariff act of 1922, after the deduction in duty therein specified, so that 
they pay 45 per cent instead of 60 per cent ad valorem, the net 
United States value as defined in subsection (d) of section 402 is 
properly determined by deducting 60 per cent duty, if the selling 
price in the market in the United States from which the United States 
value is calculated from identical or similar merchandise sold in the 
American market which on importation paid 60 per cent duty. 
There is no evidence of a market here for the sale of such or simihr 
merchandise which on entry had paid only 45 per cent ad valorem. 
This decision is limited to the facts appearing in the record before the 
court. The selling price, which by deduction makes United States 
value under said subsection (d), is not the selling price of the mer- 
chandise whose dutiable value is in question. That merchandise 
may not be sold in America until some time subsequently. It is the 
value of such or similar merchandise sold in the United States at the 
time of exportation to the United States of the merchandise whose 
dutiable value is in cpiestion. T. D. 43927. 

IMPORTS OF DYES, 1920-1930 

Table 17 summarizes the quantity and invoice value of imports 
from 1920 up to and including August, 1930. 



44 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table VI .—Coal-tar dyes: Imports into the United States, 1920-19S0 {8 months) 



Period 



Quantity 



Monthly average 



Invoice 
value 



Quantity 



Value 



1920- 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 .._. 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 (8 months) 



Pounds 
3, 402, .582 
4,252,911 
3, 982, 631 
3, 098, 193 

3, 022, 539 
5, 315, 158 
4, 673, 196 

4, 233, 046 
5,351,951 
6, 437, 147 
2,811,466 



$5, 763, 437 
5, 1.56, 779 
5, 243, 257 
3,151,363 
2, 908, 778 
4, 791, 908 

4, 103, 301 
3, 413, 886 
4,321,867 

5, 374, 085 
2, 370, 212 



Pounds 
283, 548 
354, 400 
338, 850 
258, 153 
251,878 
442, 930 
389, 433 
352, 754 
445, 996 
536, 429 
351,433 



$480, 286 
429, 732 
436, S3S • 
262, 614 
242, 398 
399, 326 
341,941 
284, 490 
360, 15« 
447, 840 
296, 277 



PRODUCTION OF DYES BY CLASSES 

Dyes produced in the United States in 1929, classified according to 
method of apphcation, are: (1) Acid dyes, (2) basic dyes, (3) direct 
dyes, (4) mordant and chrome dyes, (5) sulfur dyes, (6) vat dyes, 
subdivided into indigo and other vats, and (7) color-lake and spirit- 
soluble dyes. Although the classification of a dye in any one of 
these groups must in certain instances necessarily be arbitrary, because 
a dye may have properties which permit of its application by more 
than one method, such classification facihtates a comparison of 
production and import figures. Overlapping the acid dyes are the 
food dyes, discussed on page 55. 

Comparative data for dyes produced in the United States from 
1927 to 1929, inclusive, and those imported in the same years are 
given according to classes in Table 18. 



Table 18. 



-Com-parison of imports of dyes, by classes, icUh domestic prodnctAon, 
calendar years 1927-1929 



' 


1927 




Domestic 




Class of dye 


Sales 


Production 


Imports 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Per cent 
of total 


Quantity 


Per cent 
of total 


Acid -. . 


Pounds 

11,805,905 

4,783,313 

17, 682, 399 

1, 559, 461 

3, 494, 169 

23, 183, 794 

35, 534, 646 

30, 609, 134 

4, 925, 512 

395, 517 


.$9, 137, 790 
3,917,711 
8, 681, 024 
1,380,746 

2, 100, 324 
4,392,641 
8, 421, 616 

3, 700, 192 
4,721,424 

500, 943 


Pounds 
11,104,533 

4, 548, 515 
16,265,497 

1,540,711 

3, 604, 095 
23, 404, 273 
34, 399, 854 
28, 438, 166 

5,961,688 
300, 427 


1 1 . 67 

4.78 

17.09 

1.62 

3.79 

24. 59 

36. 14 

29.88 

6.26 

.32 


Pounds 

654, 729 
334, 520 
721,342 
134, 778 
488, 605 
137, 864 

1, 730, 967 
6,057 

1,724.910 
30, 235 


15 47 


Basic. 


7 90 


Direct 


17 04 


Lake and spirit-soluble 


3.18 


Mordant and chrome 


11.54 


Sulfur... 


3 26 


Vats (including indigo) 


40 89 


(a) Indigo 


. 14 


(6) Other vats 

Unclassified and special 


40. 7.'^ 
.72 


Total 


98, 339, 204 


38, 532, 795 


95, 167, 905 


100. 00 


4, 233, 046 


100 00 







COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



45 



Table 18. — Comparison of imports of dyes, by classes, with domestic production, 
calendar years 1927-1929 — Continued 



Class of dye 



1928 



Domestic 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Production 



Imports 



Quantity 



Per cent 
of total 



Quantity 



Per cent 
of total 



Acid 

Basic 

Direct 

Lake and spirit-soluble. 
Mordant and chrome. . 
Sulfur 

Vats (including indigo). 

(a) ludigo 

(6) Other vats 

Unclassified and special 

Total 



Pounds 
12,632,917 

5, 085, 165 
18, 073, 537 

1, 797, 665 

3, 958, 973 
19, 969, 173 
31, 310, 768 
25, 556, 849 

5, 753, 919 
474, 510 



$8, 861, 206 

4, 218, 213 
8, 947, 838 
1, 495, 331 
2, 399, 961 
4. 107, 743 
9, 156, 995 
3. 585, 700 

5, 571, 295 
604, 712 



93, 302, 708 



39, 792, 039 



Pounds 
13,469,597 

5,374,099 
19,633,095 I 

1,821,492 I 

4,403,934 i 
19,001,910 I 
32,375.812 
25,861,680 I 

6, 514, 132 
545, 512 



6, 625, 451 



13.94 

5.50 

20.31 

1.89 

4.56 

19. 67 

33. 51 

26.77 

6.74 

..JC 



Pounds 

994, 201 

424, 968 

917, 728 

98,550 

476, 872 

125, 350 

2, 304, 104 

2,343 

2, 301, 761 

10, 178 



18.58 
7.94 

17. 15 
1.84 
8.91 
2.34 

43.05 
.04 

43.01 
.19 



100. 00 



5,351,951 



100.00 



Class of dye 



Acid 

Basic 

Direct 

Lake and spirit-soluble. 
Mordant and chrome . . 
Sulfur 

Vats (including indigo). 

(o) Indigo 

(b) Other vats 

Unclassified and special 

Total 



1929 



Domestic 



Sales 



Quantity 



Pounds 
13, 510, 356 

5, 565, 651 
20, 486, 890 

2, 606, 685 

4, 656, 901 
21, 214, 680 
37,501.167 
29, 382, 120 

8,119,047 
528, 557 



106, 070, 887 



Value 



$9, 381, 432 
4, 485, 160 

10, 170, 774 
2.190,511 
2, 597, 742 
4.113,233 

12, 223, 010 

4, 384, 189 

7, 838, 821 

680, 268 



45, 842, 130 



Production 



Quantity 



Per cent 
of total 



Pounds 
14, 196, 815 

5, 899. 970 
21, 622, 907 

2, 724, 712 

4, 846. 228 
22, 605, 799 
38, 784, 337 
29, 320, 270 

9, 464, 067 
740. 737 



12.74 

5.30 

19.41 

2.44 

4.35 

20.29 

34.81 

26.31 

8.50 

.66 



111,421,505 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
1.491,313 
367, 568 
977, 792 
204, 248 
545, 508 
142, 919 
2, 604, 901 



2, 694, 901 
12, 898 



100. 00 6, 437, 147 

I 



Per cent 
of total 



23. 17 
5.71 

15.19 
3.17 
8.47 
2.22 

41.87 



41.87 
.20 



100.00- 



(1) ACID DYES 

Description. — The acid dyes, usually the sodium salts of a color acid, 
are commonly applied in an acid bath. They constitute the most 
important group used in wool dyeing, especially for hosiery and carpet 
yarns, suitings, dress goods, and hat materials. Lacking an. affinity 
for vegetable fibers, they are little used on cotton or Unen; they are, 
however, of value in dyeing jute. Appreciable quantities are also 
used on silk. In general they are used on goods not requiring repeated 
washings. .w-^( 

Acid dyes yield clear, bright shades. In purity of shade they are 
superior to the direct and mordant dyes, but are not equal to the basic 
dyes. They have a wide color range, and in fastness show great 
individual variation; as a rule they are fairly fast to light and acids, 
but have a tendency to bleed in washing. They yield faster shades 



46 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



on wool than on silk. Some of the more complex acid dyes, several of 
which are of recent origin, produce shades of good general fastness. 

The method of applying dyes in an acid bath is simple and of low 
labor cost. Dyes of this group are for the most part the lowest priced 
dyes produced. 

The line of demarcation between acid dyes and certain colors of the 
direct and mordant groups is arbitrary. Certain acid dyes when 
''aftertreated" with sodium or potassium dichromate yield shades of 
g«od fastness to milling, light, washing, and other agents. Those 
known as acid chrome colors are used chiefly on wool, especially on 
loose wool yarns, and on piece goods, such as men's suitings. 

Most of the acid dyes are chemically included in one of the follow- 
ing groups: (1) Nitro compounds, (2) azo compounds, (3) sulfonated 
basic dyes (mostly triphenylmethane derivatives), and (4) alizarin 
derivatives. 

Production and imports. — Acid dyes constituted 12.74 per cent of our 
total output of dyes and ranked fourth in order of production. Com- 
parative data on total production and sales for 1929 and 1928 are 
shown below. 



Year 


Production 


Sales 


Quantity 


Value 


Price ' 


1929.- 


Pounds 
14, 196, 815 
13, 469, 597 


Pounds 
13, 510, 356 
12, 632, 917 


$9, 381, 432 
8, 861, 206 


69.44 


1928 


70.14 






Increase: 

Actual 


727, 218 
5.40 


877, 489 
6.95 


520, 226 
5.87 


-0.70 


Percent . . . 









' Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 



Production and sales data on the five acid dyes produced in greatest 
quantity are shown in Table 19. The combined output of these five 
dyes was 43 per cent of the total production of acid dyes. 

Table 19. — Production and sales of the five ranking add dyes, 1929 and 1928 





Production 


Sales (1929) 


Saks 


Name of dye 


1929 


1928 


Change from 1928 


Quantity 


Value 


price ' 




Increase 


Decrease 


1929 


1928 


Orange II - 


Pounds 
1,615,441 
1,517,171 
1, 433, 596 
831, 345 
707, 395 


Pounds 
1,419,416 
1, 625, 173 
1,917,132 
807, 671 
656, 352 


Pounds 
196, 025 


Pounds 


Pounds 
1, 465, 937 
1,429,133 
1, 564, 896 
748, 723 
680,411 


$382, 314 
488, 134 
620, 206 
396. 648 
368, 028 


26 
34 
40 
53 
54 


26 


Nigrosine (water-soluble'> 


108, 002 
483, 536 


35 


Acid black lOB 




37 


Fast cvanine 5R. .. 


23, 674 
51,043 


67 


Metanil yellow. 




56 











1 Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 

' Imports of acid dyes in 1929, amounting to 1,491,313 pounds, were 
greater by 497,112 pounds, or by 50 per cent, than in 1928. They 
constituted 23.17 per cent of our total imports of all dyes and 10.50 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



47 



per cent of our production of acid dyes, 
quantity were: 



The 15 imported in greatest 



Pounds 

Brilliant wool blue FFB, FFR_ 88, 858 

Indocvanine B 85,373 

Eriogiaucine 63, 769 

Patent blue A 54, 636 

Neolan blue 52, 675 

Novazol blue B 46, 296 

Wool fast blue BL, GL 44, 377 

Polar red, G, R, RS 42, 992 



Pounds 

Polar orange 39, 681 

Neptune green SG 39, 666 

Neolan pink 33, 665 

Xylene fast blue FF 33, 273 

Neolan vellow 31, 079 

Neolan JBordeaux R 29, 312 

Erie green B 27, 031 



(2) BASIC DYES 

Description. — The basic dyes surpass all others in depth, brilliancy 
of shade, and purity of tone. They possess high tinctorial power, 
but as a class lack fastness, especially to light and washing. 

Basic colors are used on cotton, Av^here bright shades or color tints 
are desired without special requirements for fastness. They are also 
used in the dyeing of paper and jute and for lithographic inks, type- 
writer ribbons, copy paper, and pencils. With the exception of Rho- 
damine B and a few others, they have little application on wool. 
They are chemically basic and are fixed on vegetable fibers with an 
acid mordant, such as tannic acid, or more recently with a synthetic 
substitute. 

Dyes of this class are historically the oldest of the coal-tar dyes. 
Mauve or Perkin violet, discovered by W. H. Perkin in 1856, was the 
first aniline dyestuft' produced on a commercial scale. Basic dyes are 
less important than formerly; for dyeing cotton they have been 
superseded by direct and sulfur dyes, costing less to apply and, many 
of them, excelling in fastness. The vat dyes are now being used on 
cotton for many applications where only basic dyes were formerly 
used. For dyeing wool, acid dyes have almost entirely displaced 
basic colors. Chemically, basic dyes include a large number of the 
triphenylmethane derivatives, and, in addition, members of the 
following classes: (1) Azines, (2) azos, (3) thiazines, (4) thiazoles, and 
(5) acridines. 

Production and imports. — Basic dyes constituted 5.3 per cent of 
our total output of dyes, in 1929, and ranked fifth in order of produc- 
tion. Comparative data on total production and sales for 1929 and 
1928 are shown below. 



Year 


Production 


Sales 


Quantity 


Value 


Price ' 


1929 

1928 

Increase: 

Actual 

Percent ..-._.._ .. . . 


Pounds 
5, 899, 970 
5, 374, 099 

525, 871 
9.79 


Pounds 
5, 565, 651 
5, 085, 165 

480, 486 
9.45 


$4, 485, 160 
4, 218, 213 

266, 947 
6.33 


80.59 
82.95 

-2.36 







J Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 



48 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Production and sales data on the five basic dyes produced in greatest 
quantity, and which constituted 66.40 per cent of the total production 
of basic dyes in 1929, are shown in Table 20. 

Table 20. — Production and sales of the five ranking basic dyes, 1929 and 1928 







Production 


■ S-ales (1929) 


Sales 


Name of dye 


1929 


1928 


Change from 1928 


1 


price 1 




Increase 


Decrease 






1929 


1928 


Auramine and base 


Pounds 
1, 224, 158 
805, 264 
788, 136 
567, 795 
532,400 


Pounds Pounds 
920, 821 303, 337 
736, 492 68, 772 
672,878 115.2.58 


Pounds 


Pounds 
1,083,878 
745, 247 
732, 634 
591, 597 
473, 619 


$848,343 
231, 961 
554, 122 
495, 174 
181, 462 


78 
31 
76 
84 
38 


81 


Chrysoidine Y . . 




31 


Methvl violet 




84 


Methylene blue 


575, 181 
491, 850 




7,386 


93 


Bismark brown 2R . 


40,550 


40 









1 Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 



Imports of basic dyes, amounting to 367,568 pounds, were 57,400 
pounds or 13.51 per cent less than imports in 1928. They constituted 
5.71 per cent of our total imports of all dyes and 6.23 per cent of 
our production of basic dyes. The 15 imported in greatest quantity 



were: 

Pounds 

Rhodamine 6GDN, 6GH 59,010 

Rhodamine B 41, 760 

Victoria pure blue BO 40, 299 

Crystal violet 29, 975 

Phosphine 27, 764 

Thionavine T IS, 080 

Patent phosphine 15, 415 

Magenta 14, 775 



Pounds 

Methvlene green W 12, 337 

Methvl Lvons blue 10,070 

Rheonine AL 9, 500 

Rhoduline blue 6G 8, 666 

Ethyl violet 6, 000 

Rhodamine 6G 5, 650 

NUe blue BX 5,520 



(3) DIRECT DYES 

Description. — The direct or substantive dyes were introduced 
within the last 25 years. Their method of application is simple, as 
they dye vegetable fibers full shades in a neutral or alkahne bath 
"directly," %\athout the use of mordants. Although their principal 
appUcation is on cotton, they are especially adapted to dyeing fabrics 
containing both cotton and wool, or silk and cotton (union goods). 
They are also used on silk, hnen, and paper, and to some extent on 
wool, especially for knitting yarns, worsted and shoddy yarns, and 
loose wool. 

On account of their high solubility, dyes of this group when washed 
have a tendancy to run. Many of them, particulary those first intro- 
duced, are sensitive to acids and fade on exposure to sunlight; others, 
especially the newer ones, have good fastness to both acids and Hght, 
as well as to other agents. Certain direct colors are of good fastness, 
particularl}^ to washing, after a treatment of the dyed fiber by "cou- 
pHng" ^^ith certain intermediates. The developed direct dyes are now 
manufactured in the United States on a large scale and in a variety 
of types. They are increasingly used for cotton and silk dyeing, in 
response to the growing demand of the public for wash goods. Prob- 
ably the direct dyes whose fastness can not be developed or increased 
by an after-treatment mth metallic salts or formaldehyde will in 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



49 



future show a distinct trend toward a reduced consumption, and the 
use of the so-called developed direct dyes will increase. 

With a few exceptions, the direct dyes are chemically "azo" com- 
pounds and are nearly all derivatives of benzidine, tolidine, diamino- 
stilbene, or a groap closely similar to one of these. A small but valu- 
able group of direct colors belongs in the thiazole class. 

Production and imports. — Direct dyes constituted 19.41 per cent of 
our total output of dyes in 1929 and ranked third in order of produc- 
tion. Comparative data on total production and sales for 1929 and 
1928 are shown below. 



Year 


Production 


Sales 


Quantity 


Value 


Price 1 


1929 


Pounds 
21, 622, 907 
19,633,095 

1,989,812 
10.13 


Pound'! 

20,486,890 

18,073,537 

2,413,353 
13.35 


$10, 170, 774 
8, 947, 838 

1, 222, 936 
13.67 


49.65 


1928. 


49.51 


Increase: 

Actual 


. 14 


Per cent 









Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 



Table 21 gives production and sales data on the eight direct dyes 
produced in greatest quantity, and which constituted 60.91 per cent 
of our total production of direct dyes in 1929. 

Table 21.- — Production and sales of the eight ranking direct dyes, 1929 and 1928 





Production 


Sales (1929) 






Name of dye 


1929 


1928 


Change from 
1928 


Quantity 


Value 


price • 




Increase 


Decrease 


1929 


1928 


Direct black EW. 


Pounds 

6,964,124 

1, 416, 659 

1,352,V32 

827, 861 

795, 972 

651, 232 

593, 831 

568, 070 


Pounds 

7, 252, 626 

1, 204, 098 

1, 268, 150 

797, 964 

483, 365 

599, 982 

519, 373 

455, 863 


Pounds 


Pounds 
288, 502 


Pounds 

6, 991, 390 

1, 418, 297 

1,148,729 

808, 249 

625, 220 

594, 126 

557, 409 

516, 225 


$1,975,762 
497, 252 
294, 002 
395, 979 
188, 441 
205, 822 
207, 038 
236, 195 


28 
35 
26 
49 
30 
35 
37 
46 


28 


Developed black BHN 


212, 561 
84, 582 
29, 897 

312, 607 
51, 250 
74, 458 

112,207 


39 


Direct blue 2B 




25 


Chrvsophenine G 




50 


Direct black RX.. 




32 


Direct brown 3G0 




36 


Direct green B 




38 


Beuzopurpurine 4B 




48 









1 AVeighted average selling price, cents per pound. 

Imports of direct dyes, amounting to 977,792 pounds, were 60,064 
pounds or 6.54 per cent greater than imports in 1928. They consti- 
tuted 15.19 per cent of our total imports of all dyes and 4.52 per 
cent of our production of direct dyes. The 15 imported in great- 
est quantity were: 

Pounds 

Trisulfon brown B cone 54, 967 

Benzo fast brown 42, 832 

Rapid fast red 37, 520 

Chlorantine fast violet 29, 865 

Chlorantine fast green B 26, 449 

Diazo pure blue 22, 480 

Diamine fast orange 21, 837 

Viscolan black B cone 21, 252 



Pounds 

Chlorantine fast brown 20, 937 

Setacyl direct blue 19, 166 

Benzo fast yellow RL 18,013 

Pyrazol orange 16, 967 

Brilliant sky blue 16, 280 

Rapid fast orange 16, 000 

Trisulfon brown 2 G cone 15,858 



50 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Acetate dyes. — These dyes, formerly known as S. R. A. dyes, were 
developed after intensive research w^ork by the British Celanese Co. 
(Ltd.), manufacturers of celanese silk, especially for the dyeing of 
acetate cellulose, known as "acetate silk." They are sold in the 
form of a 10 per cent paste, consisting of a dispersion of the dye with 
a highly sulfonated castor oil; that is, sulforicinoleic acid. When 
mixed with water the dispersed colloidal solution is capable of dyeing 
cellulose acetate. In mixed fabrics colored with these dyes, the 
cotton, as well as any artificial silk other than acetate, is left unstained. 

Acetate dyes offer a good range of colors, are easy to apply, and 
possess good general fastness. Twenty-three of these special dyes 
were manufactured in the United States in 1929. Their production 
on a large scale is a development of great interest and the large 
increase in production reported for 1929 is in keeping with the 
remarkable expansion of the domestic celanese and acetate rayon 
industry. 

(i) MORDANT AND CHROME DYES 

Description. — These colors are used in conjunction with metallic 
mordants, such as salts of chromium, aluminum, iron, and tin, to dj^e 
both vegetable and animal fibers. The resulting shades are, in general, 
of exceptional fastness to color-destroying agents. On wool the mor- 
dant dyes yield shades fast to light, washing, and other agents. They 
are also important in printing on cotton piece goods, but are little 
used on silk. 

The mordant dyes are frecjuently designated as chrome colors. 
Because of the derivation of many of them from alizarin, they were 
formerly called alizarin dyes. Certain dyes may be acid, acid 
chrome, or chrome, according to the method of application. The 
true alizarins are generally used with a mordant. The new acid 
alizarins can be used either with or without a mordant; they consti- 
tute a valuable group in the dyeing of wool. When used on wool, 
the mordant may be applied before, during, or after the dyeing 
operation. The labor cost of dyeing with mordant and chrome dves 
is higher than for many other groups. 

Formerly the most important dye of this class was alizarin, used 
on cotton to produce the Avell-known Turkey red, one of the shades 
made in ancient times from madder root. For 50 years, alizarin has 
been prepared synthetically from anthracene. In the United States 
it has been replaced, to a large extent, for use on cotton by certain of 
the so-called ice dves, such as Para red, and more recentlv bv Naph- 
thol AS red. 

Chemically, the mordant dyes are members of the following classes: 
(1) Anthraqinnone, (2) azo, (3) oxazine, (4) triphenylmethane, 
(5) nitroso, (6) oxyquinone, and (7) xanthone. 

Production and imports. — Mordant and chrome dyes constituted 
4.35 per cent of our total output of dyes and ranked sixth in order of 
production. Comparative data on total production and sales for 
1929 and 1928 are shown on the following page. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



51 





Production 


Sales 




Quantitj- 


Value 


Price 1 


:92!» 


Pounds 
4, 84f., 228 
4, 403, 934 

442, 294 
10.04 


Pounds 
4,656,901 
3,958,973 

697,928 [ 
17.63 \ 

i 


.$2, 597, 742 
2, 399, 961 

197, 781 
8.24 


55 78 


1928 


60. 62 


Increase: ♦ 

Actual. 


-4.84 


Ptr cent 









1 V\'eighted average selling price, cents per pound. 

Both Chrome black T and AHzarin registered greater gains in pro- 
duction than Chrome bhie black U, the ranlving dye of this group, 
whose production of 1,387,168 pounds was 112,019 pounds more than 
in 1928. Sales of Chrome blue black U amounted to 1 ,339,061 pounds, 
valued at S399,671. 

Imports of mordant and chrome dyes, amounting to 545,508 pounds, 
were 68,636 pounds or 14.39 per cent greater than iu-iports in 1928. 
They constituted 8.47 per cent of our total imports of all dyes and 
11.26 per cent of our production of mordant and chrome dyes. 
The 15 imported in greatest quantity were: 



Pounds 

Alizarin, synthetic 69,673 

Eriochrome aznrol BC 41,599 

Alizarin cvclamine R 30, 599 

Alizarin red S 26, 413 

Purpurine 16, 181 

Gallazine 16, 092 

Alizarin viridine FF 15, 922 

Eriochrome brilliant violet B_- 14, 883 



Pounds 

Eriochrome flavine A cone 14, 331 

Gallamine blue 12, 346 

Eriochrome red G 12, 127 

Eriochrome violet 3B 12, 125 

Modern violet 11, 796 

Eriochrome cvanine RC 11,024 

Ahzarin blue black B 10, 477 



(5) SULFUR DYES 

Description. — Sulfur dyes are used largely on cotton, especially for 
dj^eing uniform cloths, hosiery, gingham yarns, and cotton warps to 
be woven with wool and later dyed with acid dyes. They produce 
heavy shades of blue, green, brown, and black. Their greatly 
extended use during the war served to increase permanently their 
application on cotton. On linen and artificial silk they have only 
limited use. 

In cross dj'^eing, the sulfur dyes possess excellent fastness to wash- 
ing, fulling, alkalies, and acids. With some exceptions their fastness 
to light is good. As they are not fast to chlorine, they do not with- 
stand the repeated bleaching action of the hypochlorites used in 
modern laundries. They are applied in a sodium sulfide solution and 
sometimes an after treatment is given with metallic salts or with other 
agents to improve their fastness. Cachou de Laval, the first of this 
group to be discovered, was made in 1867 by the fusion of sawdust 
with sodium sulfide and sulfur. Sulfur dyes are now prepared by the 
lusion of various intermediates (containing the nitro, amino, or imino 
groups) with sodium sulfide and sulfur. These dyes are not pure, 
distinct compounds, and the presence of foreign substances renders 
them of comparatively low color value. Recent developments, how- 
ever, have greatly increased the tinctorial value and shade range of 
many of them. 



52 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Production and imports. — Sulfur dyes constituted 20.29 per cent of 
our total output of dyes and ranked second in order of production. 
Comparative data on total production and sales for 1929 and 1928 
are shown below. 



Year 


Production 


Sales 


Quantity 


Value 


Price 1 


1929 


Pounds 
22, 605, 799 
19, 001, 910 

3, 603, 889 
18.97 


Pounds 
21, 214, 680 
19, 969, 173 

1,245,507 
6.24 


$4, 113, 233 
4, 107, 743 

5,490 
0.13 


19.39 


1928 - - 


20.67 


Increase: 


-1.1& 











1 Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 



Production and sales data on the six sulfur dyes produced in greatest 
quantity, and constituting 98.23 per cent of the total production of 
sulfur dyes, are shown in Table 22. 

Table 22. — Production and sales of the six ranking sulfur dyes, 1929 and 1928 





Production 


Sales (1929) 


Sale^ 


Name of dye 


1929 


1928 


Change from 1928 


Quantity 


Value 


price ' 




Increase 


Decrease 


1929 


192S 


Sulfur black 


Pounds 
18, 121, 621 

1, 655, 316 
836, 289 
743, 210 
441, 405 
406, 926 


Pounds 

14, 354, 755 

1, 729, 647 

1, 002, 228 

617,729 

433, 767 

469. 777 


Pounds 
3, 766, 866 


Pounds 


Pounds 
17, 097, 563 

1, 496, 135 
868, 600 
613, 664 
355, 356 
397, 670 


$2, 349. 253 
461, 793 
441, 954 
274. 803 
317, 980 
154, 653 


14 
31 
51 
45 
89 
39 


14 




74, 331 
165, 939 


32 


Sulfur blue 




51 


Sulfur maroon 


125, 481 


52 


Sulfur green .. 


2,362 
62, 851 


93 






41 









1 Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 

The first three of these dyes have maintained their relative position 
since 1921. Sulfur black, the ranking dye of this group, is an im- 
portant item in our export trade, being second only to indigo. In 
1929, as in the five years preceding, it was second among all dyes in 
quantity produced. 

Imports of sulfur dyes, amounting to 142,919 pounds, showed an 
increase of 17,569 pounds or 14.02 per cent over 1928 imports. 
They constituted 2.22 per cent of our total imports of all dyes and 
0.63 per cent of our production of sulfur dyes. The six imported in 
greatest quantity were: 



Pounds 
Indocarbon 54, 639 

Pyrogene pure blue 25, 787 

Pyrogene green GK 22, 043 



Pounds 

Sulfide new blue 10, 000 

Thionol brown 4, 479 

Katigen chrome blue 4, 000 



(6) VAT DYES 



Description. — Vat dyes as a class are exceptionally fast to light, 
washing, acids, alkalies, and chlorine. Some of them are not fast 
to all of these agents. The consumption of vat dyes is increasing 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 53 

with the growing demand for fast-dyed fabrics. Since cotton goods 
dyed with these colors withstand the severe treatment of the modern 
laundry, the increased cost of dye per yard is a minor factor, as 
compared with the increased life of the fabrics. A European colorist, 
referring to the vat dyes, has said that Europe is too poor to afford 
anything but fast dyes — that the loose or fugitive colors are an 
extravagance. Their superior fastness and the variety and beauty 
of shades which they yield are largely responsible for a steady in- 
crease in their use. They are applied on dyed and printed shirtings, 
dress goods, ginghams, muslin curtains, and other cotton wash 
goods, and have a limited application on silk and a still smaller one 
on wool. Because of their higher cost they are used chiefly for color 
stripes and small printed patterns on a white background rather 
than for solid or heavy shades. They possess technical advantages 
in application over the alizarin mordant dyes. 

With the exception of indigo, one of the oldest dyes known, 
vat dyes are of recent origin, having been developed since 1904. 
The Badische Co., of Germany, manufactured the first members 
of this class, knoMm in the trade as the Indanthrenes. This group 
was followed by the Ciba dyes of the Society of Chemical Industry 
at Basle, Switzerland, and later by the Algols, Helindones, Thio- 
indigoes, and Hydrous, and other series produced by different 
German concerns. Prior to the World War, vat dyes other than 
indigo were made exclusively in Germany and Switzerland. 

Following the outbreak of the World War, the United States and 
Great Britain, two of the leading consumers of these dyes, began 
their manufacture on an extensive scale. 

Vat dyes are among the most complex of dyes, difficult to manu- 
facture, and relatively high in cost. Chemically they consist of 
indigoids (including thioindigoids), anthraquinone derivatives, and 
the carbazole derivatives. 

In 1924 a water-soluble leuco derivative of indigo, under the name 
of Indigosol, was placed on the market by Swiss and German firms. 
Since then other Indigosol types, including Indigosol red, orange, 
yellow, scarlet, pink, violet, and black, have been made in com- 
mercial quantity. A similar derivative of Caledon jade green, 
known as Soledon jade green, w^as manufactured by the Scottish 
Dyes (Ltd.). The commercial production of water-soluble leuco 
derivatives marks an advance not only in this group but in the 
whole realm of dye manufacture. These can be used on animal as 
well as vegetable fibers, and their application by the "direct method," 
with subsequent oxidation, is less complex than by the alkali hydro- 
sulfite process generally used for the vat dyej. Extended use of 
these new derivatives will depend in large part on their selling prices. 

The leucosol dyes — special types for calico printing — are vat dyes 
of the anthraquinone group. They were recently placed on the 
market by a domestic manufacturer and are now being produced on 
a commercial scale. Members of this group include a black, a light 
blue, and a navy blue. 

Production and imports. — Vat dyes, ranking first in order of pro- 
duction, constituted 34.81 per cent of our total output of dyes in 
1929. Comparative data on tot&l production and sales for 1929^ 
and 1928 are shown on the following page. 



54 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 





Production 




Sales 






Quantity 


Value 


Price I 


1929 


Pounds 
38, 784, 337 
32, 375, 812 


Pounds 
37. 501, 167 
31, 310, 768 


$12,22,3,010 
9, 156, 995 


32.59 


1928 .._ 


29.25 


Increase: 

Actual .._.__ ._- _ 


6, 408, 525 
19.79 


6, 190, 399 

19.77 


3,066,015 
33.48 


3.34 


Per cent . 









Weighted average selling price, cents per pound. 



Synthetic indio:o (20 per cent paste) is the rankine; dye of this group. 
Its output of 29,320,270 pounds, which was 3,458,590 pounds greater 
than in 1928, constituted 26.31 per cent of all dyes produced. Sales 
amounted to 29,382,120 pounds, valued at $4,384,189; the price per 
pound was 15 cents as compared to 14 cents in 1928. 

Of the vat dyes other than indigo, anthraquinone vat jade green, 
bromindigo blue 2B, 2BD, vat orange R, and anthraquinone vat 
violet RR, showed substantial increases in production; anthraquinone 
vat blue GCD showed a decrease in production of more than 175,000 
pounds. 

Imports of vat dyes other than indigo, amounting to 2,694,901 
pounds, were 393,140 pounds, or 17.08 per cent greater than in 1928. 
They constituted 41.87 per cent of our total imports of all dyes and 
equaled 6.95 per cent of our production of vat dyes. The 14 imported 
in greatest quantity were : 



Pounds 

Vat golden vellow GK 441, 238 

Anthraflavone GC 280, 240 

Brilliant indigo 4B 202, 375 

Vat prin ; ing black B 1 62, 800 

Algol orange RF 79, 290 

Brilliant indigo B 70, 488 

Brilliant indigo 4G 67, 448 



Pounds 

Indanthrene blue GCD 64, 230 

Ciba brown G 53, 562 

Indanthrene red-Violet 53, 305 

Cibanone blue 3G 52, 999 

Indanthrene black 52, 702 

Algol scarlet GGN 51, 600 

Hvdron pink FF 50, 450 



Table 23. — Vat dyes other than indigo: Domestic sales, imports, and apparent 
consumption in the United States, 1914 O'^d 1923-1929 



Year 


Domestic 
sales 


Apparent 
Imports consump- 
tion 


Year Domestic 
^"' sales 


Imports 


Apparent 
consump- 
tion 


1914 


Pounds 


Pounds Pounds 
1,945,304 1,945,304 
1,207,554 1 2,815,771 
1.493.851 3.051.931 
2, 418, SJ2 4, 671, 645 


1926 


Pounds 
2, 815, 241 

4, 925, 512 

5, 753, 919 
8,119,047 


Pounds 
1. 845, 208 

1, 724. 910 
2,301,761 

2, 694, 901 


Pounds 
4, 660, 449 
6, 650, 422 


1923 


1, 608, 217 

1, 558, 080 

2, 252, 803 


1927 

1928 


1924 


8, 055, 680 


1925 


1929 


10, 813, 948 







(7) COLOR-LAKE AXD i^PIRIT-SOLUBLE DYES 

These dyes, constitiitii g one of the smaller groups, are used in 
making a class of pigments known as color lakes, discussed in detail 
on page 56. The spirit-soluble dyes are insoluble in water, but dis- 
solve in oils, fats, and various organic solvents; consequently they 
find application for coloring varnishes, fats, oils, waxes, and similar 
products. As many of them are converted by sulfonation and other 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



55 



chemical treatments into water-soluble dyes for textile dyeing, they 
may be considered as partly completed dyes. 

The output of color-lake and spirit-soluble dyes in 1929 was 
2,724,712 pounds, or 2.44 per cent of the total output of all dyes 
produced. Imports of this group were 204,248 pounds, or 3.17 per 
cent of all dyes imported. 

(8) FOOD DYES 

Food dyes include a hmited number of selected dyes which meet 
the specifications of the Bureau of Chemistry, Department of 
Agriculture. 

"The total production in 1929 was 356,059 pounds, or 107.08 per 
cent more than in 1928. In 1921, the first year that figures for this 
group were separately compiled, production was 50,709 pounds. 
Sales in 1929 amounted to 324,497 pounds, valued at S908,132, which 
is an increase of 58.42 per cent in quantity and of 39.03 per cent in 
value over 1928. 

EXPORT TRADE IN DYES 

Exports of coal-tar dyes in 1929 amounted to 34,130,325 pounds, 
valued at $7,279,086, an increase of 6,306,061 pounds, or 22.66 per 
cent in quantity, and of $747,467, or 11.44 per cent in value, over 
1928. The weighted average price per pound was 21.3 cents, as 
compared with 23.5 cents in 1928; 20.5 cents in 1927, and 23.0 cents 
in 1926. 

China, Japan, Canada, Belgium, and British India were the prin- 
cipal markets for United States dyes in 1929. South American coun- 
tries were less important. 

Table 24 shows the total exports of dves from the United States 
from 1920 to 1929, inclusive. 

Table 24. — Coal-tar dyes: Exports from the United States, 1920-1929 



Year 


Quantity 


Value 


Year 


Quantity 


Value 


1920- 


Pounds 


$29, 823, 591 
6, 270. 139 
3, £96, 443 
5, 565, 267 
5, 636, 244 


1925 


Pounds 

25, 799, 889 
25,811,941 

26, 770, 560 

27, 824, 264 
34, 130, 325 


$6, 694, 360 


1921 




1926 


5, 950, 159 


1922 


8, 344, 187 
17, 924, 200 
15, 713, 428 


1927 

1928> 


5, 495, 322 


1923 


6, 531, 619 


1924 


19292.. 


7, 279, 086 









' Includes 264,986 pounds put up in packages for household use and valued at $195,441. 
2 Includes 298,242 pounds put up in packages for household use and valued at $223,295. 

Details as to the quantity and value of exports to the various 
countries are shown in Part VI, page 187. In previous issues of the 
Census of Dyes, monthly exports are shown back to 1909. Table 25 
shows, b}^ months,, the total exports of dyes from the United States 
from January, 1927, to June, 1930, inclusive. 
1 14492—30 5 



56 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 25. — Colors, dyes, and stains: Domestic exports, by months, 1927 to 1929, 

and 1930 {6 months) 



Month 



January 

February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September - 

October 

November. 
December.. 

Total 



1927 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 
1, 865, 021 

2, 951, 057 

3, 595, 342 
1, 226, 538 
1, 928, 170 

967, 908 

1, 525, 751 

2, 257, 139 

4, 469, 227 

1, 837, 742 
1, 920, 382 

2, 226, 283 



$404, 655 
586, 167 
701, 201 

375, 720 

376, 521 
292, 187 
331, 387 
527, 784 
614, 925 
399, 594 
456, 734 
428,447 



1928 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 
1, 715, 365 
2, 847, 846 
1, 734, 665 
1, 787, 715 
1, 897, 901 
1, 719, 979 
■3,841,016 
1, 350, 732 

1, 329, 834 
5, 194, 209 

2, 456, 927 
1, 948, 075 



26, 770, 560 '5, 495, 322 27, 824, 264 6, 531, 619 34, 130, 325 



$447, 984 
641, 697 
507, 723 
448, 441 
460, 306 
415, 103 
790, 662 
378, 858 
413, 179 
823, 693 
628, 879 
574, 844 



19291 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 
2, 923, 382 
2, 959, 703 

2, 331, 603 
2, 199, 079 

3, 765, 147 

4, 090, 145 
3, 197, 870 
3, 356, 022 
3, 562, 453 
3,342,311 
1, 475, 723 

926, 887 



$651, 
730, 
571, 
527, 
685, 
679, 
642, 
597, 
674, 
662, 
464, 
391, 



7,279,086 



1930 1 2 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 
2, 051, 907 

2, 320, 430 

3, 347, 440 
3, 348, 162 
2, 333, 887 
2,612,218 



$503, 344 
500, 265 
729, 784 
• 714,024 
575, 810 
515, 299 



1 Includes dyes put up in packages for household use. 



Preliminary figures. 



OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 

COLOR LAKES 

Description. — A color lake is an insoluble color pigment, commonly 
made by precipitating a coloring matter (a coal-tar dye) on a carrier 
(the base). The desirable properties of a color lake are good coloring 
power; easy workabihty; brightness; and fastness to weather, light, 
alkali, and acids. The precipitating agents used for coal-tar colors 
are barium chloride, lead salts, aluminum hydroxide, and tannin or 
tannin tartar emetic. Among the more important carriers are alumi- 
num hydroxide, zinc white, lithopone, barytes, whiting, china clay 
and certain native clays, and ocher. The principal requirements of a 
carrier are (1) ready reduction to a finely divided state and (2) absence 
of any deleterious effect on the shade of the finished lake. The color- 
ing matter includes groups of coal-tar dyes known as acid dyes, basic 
dyes, and mordant dyes, as well as certain azo dyes produced directly 
on the carrier. An example of the last-named is Para red, produced 
from the intermediate p-nitroanihne and b-naphthol. Another 
group of color lakes is made by the precipitation of a water-soluble 
acid d3^e, with the aid of a mineral salt to form an insoluble product. 

After precipitation, the insoluble lake is filtered, dried, and ground 
with or \vithout oil; it is then ready for use as a pigment in paints, 
Uthograpliic inks, artists' colors, wall paper, rubber products, and for 
other coloring purposes. 

Production. — The production of color lakes in 1929 was 13,244,676 
pounds, as compared to 12,127,242 pounds in 1928. Sales amounted 
to 12,907,914 pounds, valued at $7,262,543, as against 12,045,435 
pounds in 1928, valued at $6,589,166. 



MEDICINALS 



Prior to 1914 Germany was the leading producer of synthetic 
medicinals and the chief source of our imports. During the last 15 
years American chemists have built up an industry which to-day sup- 
plies a large part of our domestic requirements. Synthetic medicinals 



COAL-TAR INTEIIMEDIATES 



57 



contribute to the national welfare, both in the prevention and the 
cure of disease. A partial list of the medicinals developed in the 
last 10 years follows: 

General anesthetics. — Ethylene, propylene, butylene. 

Local anesthetics. — Apotheslne, butyn, butesin, butesin picrate, tutocaine. 

Benzyl esters. — Benzoate, stearate, fumarate, succinate. 

Chlorainines. — Chloramine, dichloramine, halazone. 

Antiseptics. — Dibromin, hexyl resorcinol. 

Hypnotics. — Neonal, amytal, ipral, dial, allonal. 

Arsenic compounds. — Siilfoarsphenamine, trj-parsamide. 

Mercury compounds. — Mereurochronie, mercurosal, metaphen. 

Bismuth compounds. — Tartrate, salicylate, and others. 

Dyes. — Tetraiodophenolphthalein, phenolsulfonphthalein, acriflavine. 

Production. — In 1929, 5,000,205 pounds of coal-tar medicinals were 
produced, or nearly a million pounds more than in 1928. Sales 
amounted to 4,745,054 pounds, valued at $8,358,526. The average 
sales value per pound was $1.76, as compared to $2.16 in 1928. 

Table 26 gives the production of certain coal-tar medicinals, and 
the total production of all medicinals from 1922 to 1929, inclusive. 
For many individual medicinals, production and sales figures can 
not be published vdthout disclosing confidential information. 

Table 26. — Coal-tar medicinals: Production of a selected list, 1922-1929 



Name 



1925 



1926 



1927 



1929 



Pounds 

Acetanilide 222,517 

Arsphenamine | 865 

Aspirin 11,482,998 

Benzocaine - 1,658 

Cincophen.. I 

Neoarsphenamine I 2,904 

Phenolsulfonates i 300,993 

Procaine j 

Salol... I 

Sodium salicylate ' 467,264 

Sulfoarsphenamine 



Pounds 

564, 498 

616 

1, 525, 795 

2,243 

32, 710 

3,365 

208, 902 



98, 597 

416, 382 

164 



Pounds 

425, 950 

555 

1, 366, 530 

2,080 

56,003 

3,220 

197, 644 

3,790 



Pounds 

158, 756 

278 

1, 499, 166 

2,446 

60, 722 

3,289 

163, 723 



Pounds Pounds 

458, 927 366, 842 

444 265 

1,823,748 1,715,686 

2,768 3,974 

79,632 ! 84,212 

4, 113 I 3, 889 



Pounds 
480, 273 



Pounds 
355, 019 



1,8 6,015 

6,300 

94, 330 

4,814 



2, 710, 374 



99, 53S 
5,525 



412, 707 
743 



118, 869 

415, 465 

734 



6,702 U... 

84, 182 i 51, 504 

469,345 I 492,558 

847 800 



Total coal-tar 
medicinals 12, 946, 347 



3, 273, 085 



2, 967, 944 



3,237,796 3,696,196 



7,952 



456, 195 
862 



455, 462 
792 



,3, 598, 839 '4, 008, 393 



5, 000, 205 



Aspirin, produced in larger quantity than any other medicinal 
during the 8-3^ear period covered bj^ the table, showed an increase in 
production of nearly 50 per cent over the 1928 output. 

Arsphenamine, used in the treatment of venereal diseases, is 
gradually being displaced by neoarsphenamine and other derivatives 
of arsphenamine. The sales of arsphenamine in 1929 were approxi- 
mately two-thirds of those in 1928 and amounted to 227 pounds^ 
valued at $49,370. The pre-war price, when this country was de- 
pendent upon Germany for its entire supply, was $3.50 per ampoule. 
The contract price to the Government in 1929 was 18 cents per 
ampoule. Production of neoarsphenamine was 5,525 pounds, and 
sales were 4,831 pounds, valued at $1,120,633; of sulfoarsphenanune,. 
792 pounds, with sales of 730 pounds, valued at $191,003. 

Cincophen, prescribed for acute gout and articular rheumatism, has- 
increased in production each year since 1923. Production in 1929^ 
was 99,538 pounds, and sales amounted to 94,392 pounds, valued at 
17,711. 



58 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Medicinals showing increased production in 1929 over 1928 include 
acetphenetidin, ampydin, aspirin, calcium sulfophenolate, cincophen, 
guaiacol liquid, luminal, magnesium salicylate, neocincophen, phenol- 
phthalein, and salol. Those showing decreased production are 
acetanilide, mercurochrome, phenolsulfonates, and zinc sulfopheno- 
late. 

In 1929 dyes were rendering assistance in determining the malig- 
nancy of cancerous tumors in the early stages of their development. 
A polychromatic stain, consisting of a mixture of aqueous solutions 
of the basic dye Azure A and the acid dye Erie Garnet B, has been 
developed in the Garvan cancer research laboratories at Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital and University at Baltimore, Md., where it is known as 
''Metachrome No. 136." This stain, when used on freshly excised 
tissue obtained by direct freezing and sectioning by the microtome 
without the employment of any fixative, gives color reactions closely 
simulating those of hematoxylin and eosin without overstaining and 
obscuring the finer detail of the cell. 

Assuming that a tissue diagnosis is made in the early stages of the 
growth of a cancerous tumor, a competent diagnostician can determine 
whether it is malignant or benign. This definite knowledge either 
permits immediate and radical procedure, which might otherwise be 
delayed or substituted by insufficient treatment, or it prevents un- 
necessary mutilating operations for cancer when the condition is 
benign. Although these dyes are of great value in microscopic tissue 
diagnosis, their value depends directly upon the pathologic skill of the 
diagnostician who interprets the microscopic findings. 

FLAVORS AND PERFUME MATERIALS 

There is no sharp line of demarcation between these two classes of 
coal-tar chemicals, many of them being used both as flavors for food 
products and as perfumes for soaps and other toilet articles. Sepa- 
rate classification is therefore in certain cases purely arbitrary. 

Production of flavors. — The production of flavors in 1929 was 
2,292,450 pounds, an increase of 31.27 per cent over 1928. Sales in 
1929 were 2,253,414 pounds, valued at $3,517,182. The weighted 
average selling price per pound increased from 66 cents in 1928 to 
$1.56 in 1929. 

Vanillin, one of the leading synthetic flavors, is made from guaiacol 
and also from oil of cloves. When derived from the latter, it com- 
monly requires a coal-tar chemical. The production in 1929 was 
337,083 pounds, as compared with 281,694 pounds in 1928. Sales in 
1929 amounted to 345,766 pounds, valued at $2,154,839, or $6.23 
per pound. 

Methyl salicylate, an artificial wintergreen, showed an increase of 
233,336'pounds over 1928. The output was 1,572,187 pounds, and 
sales amounted to 1,510,727 pounds, valued at $526,043. 

As in 1928, coumarin was reported by five firms. Production in 
1929, amounting to 108,326 pounds, represents a decrease of about 
13,000 pounds from 1928. Sales amounted to 120,617 pounds, 
valued at $396,212. 

Production of perfnmes. — The output of perfume materials of coal- 
tar origin in 1929 was 1 ,599,430 pounds. Sales amounted to 1 ,480,368 
pounds, valued at $1,082,602, or at 73 cents per pound. In 1928, 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



59 



sales were 1,619,476 pounds, valued at $1,000,001, or at 61 cents per 
pound. 

Diethylphthalate, made in greater quantity than any other per- 
fume material, showed decreased production in 1929. Other perfume 
materials made in appreciable cjuan titles in 1929 include: amyl 
phthalate, amyl salicylate, benzophenone, benzyl acetate, benzyl 
alcohol, benzyl benzoate, diphenyl oxide, and phenylethyl alcohol. 

Synthetic musks — ambrette, ketone, and xylene — w^ere made for 
the first time in 1926. Their production marks an advance in coal- 
tar perfume materials in the United States. Greater quantities of 
each of these three musks were produced in 1929 than in 1928. 

Perfume materials, other than those mentioned, showing increased 
production in 1929 include acetophenone, amyl cinnamic aldehvde, 
and dimethyl phthalate. Products in this group showing decreased 
output in 1929, as compared with 1928, include amyl phthalate, 
benzyl acetate, cinnamic aldehyde, and methyl phenyl acetate. 



SYNTHETIC RESIN.S 



The total production of 33,036,490 pounds ,of synthetic resins of 
coal-tar origin in 1929 represents more than 50 per cent increase over 
the production of 20,411,465 pounds in 1928. Sales in 1929 were 
30,600,513 pounds, valued at $10,393,397, as against 20,778,856 
pounds, valued at $7,211,958 in 1928. Production in 1929 con- 
sisted of 26,235,792 pounds of phenolic and cresylic resins, of which 
25,129,701 pounds were sold; and of 6,800,698 pounds of other types, 
including those derived from phthalic anhydride and from coumarone 
and indene, of which 5,530,812 pounds were sold. 

Table 27. — Synthetic resins: Production and sales, 1927-1929 



Year 


Production 


Sales 


Value 


Unit value 
of sales 


Number of 
producers 


1927. . . 


Pounds 
13, 452, 230 
20,411,465 
33, 036, 490 


Pounds 
13, 084, 313 
20, 778, 856 
30, 660, 513 


$6, 094, 656 
7,211,958 
10, 393, 397 


$0.47 
.35 
.33 


7 


1928- - . 


9 


1929 - 


12 







The increase in sales of synthetic resins during 1929 is attributed 
to greater demands from manufacturers of molded products, lami- 
nated sheets, and protective coatings. High dielectric strength, shock 
resistance, low heat conductivity, plasticity, and compatibility with 
many other materials are the properties that have extended the use 
of synthetic resins until now they are a component part of a wide 
variety of useful and ornamental objects. 

A major use of molded resinous products is in the manufacture of 
electrical insulators for the automobile, radio, telephone, and airplane 
trade. These industries also consume large quantities of resins in 
the production of dials, ornamental fittings, and noiseless timing 
gears. Other articles of everyday use, made from resins, are artifi- 
cial amber beads, costume jewelry, smokers' articles, such as pipe 
stems and cigar and cigarette holders, hardware, and handles for 
kitchen utensils. A new use is as a binder for abrasive materials in 
the formation of high-speed cutting and grinding wheels. 



60 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHE lIC ORGANIC CHEMICA LS 

Laminated sheets are widely used as panels for supporting other 
fittings such as in instrument boards. A familiar use is in radio 
panels, still used in table models. Panels for use in interior decorat- 
ing are now laminated so as to simulate the grain in various woods 
and in ivory. Resins in combination with wood flour have been used 
instead of wood in the manufacture of furniture. 

Lacquers composed of synthetic resins and a solvent are largely 
confined to insulating uses. In recent years there has been an increased 
use of these resins in other types of varnishes and in conjunction with 
other varnish materials. The spraying and brushing lacc{uers used 
on automobiles and on various small objects usually contain a syn- 
thetic resin to enhance the adhesiveness of the nitrocellulose film. 
The phthalic anhydride-gylcerin resins are being used in quick drying 
oil varnishes. They are frequently combined with rosin or with other 
natural resins. 

Declining prices of phenol, cresol, formaldehyde, and glycerin, used 
in the manufacture of synthetic resins, have favored the extension of 
these resins to other products. 

Synthetic resins other than those of coal-tar origin are discussed in 
Part IV of this report. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS 

Because of their strong reducing properties, coal-tar chemicals are 
used for developing photographic films, plates, and prints. They are 
popularly known as developers, but are sold under a variety of trade 
names. 

Photographic chemicals were made in considerably greater quan- 
tities in 1929 than in 1928. Production amounted to 580,947 pounds, 
and sales to 580,150 pounds, valued at $790,981. The production of 
liydroquinol, the leading chemical in this group, and of amidol was 
markedly greater than in 1928; that of p-hydroxy phenylglycine and 
metol decreased. 

SYNTHETIC TANNING MATERIALS 

The synthetic tanning materials known as syntans have come into 
commercial use in Germany and England since 1912. They have not 
yet bean used extensively in this country, but they probably will be 
used in the tanning of leather, together with natural tanning extracts. 
The output in 1929 was a large increase over 1928. Neither production 
nor sales figures can be published without disclosing confidential in- 
formation. 

Synthetic tans are especially satisfactory for producing light colors 
on leathers. They are made by the condensation of certain coal-tar 
derivatives, such as the sulfonated phenols, cresols, and naphthols, 
with formaldehyde in the presence of an acid, and are commonly used 
in conjunction with natural tanning extracts. Less time is required 
to tan with the synthetic than with the natural tanning materials. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



61 



STATISTICS OF IMPORTS, PRODUCTION, AND SALES 
Table 28. — Medicinals and pharmaceuticals : Imports into the United States, 1929 



Name 



Acetophenone, medicinal 

Acetphenetidin 

Acetyl salicylic acid 

Acrnieine 

Allylpheny Icinchon inie ester 

p-Aminobenzoyldiethyl hydrochloride- . 
p-Aminobenzoyldiethylaminoethanolhy 

drochloride 

Amino hydroxy arsinic acid 

Aminoplienyl salicylate 

Aminopyrine 

Antalgol 

Antifebrin 

Antipyrine 

Arsphenamine 

Benzaldehyde, medicinal 

Benzoylgiiaiacol _. 

Bismuth guaiacol carbonate 

Bismuth subsalicylate 

Camphro salyl 

Cardiazol powder 

Causy t h tablets 

Chinosol tablets 

Colchicine salicylate 

Croleine - 

Cyclohexatriensulfonic acid pyrazol 

Diethylaminoethylether - 2 - methoxy- 6 - 

allyi-phenol hydrochloride 

Diethylaminoisopentyl-8-amino-6-meth- 

oxy quinoline and salts 

Dimethylhydroxy quinizine crystals 

Dimol, pure 

Epinine hydrochloride i 

2-Ethoxy-6:9-diaminoacridin lactate 

Ethylbenzene sulfonate 

Eupthalmine hydrochloride. 

Fluorescein... 

Gaiarsine j 

Guaiacol carbonate ; 

Hexamethylenetetramine sul fosal icy late, j 

Homotropine hydrobromide USF 

p-Hydroxydiphenylmethane carbaminic 

acid ester 

b-Hydroxynaphthyl-o-hydroxy-m-toly- 

lic acid, pure 

o-Hydroxyquinolinesulfonate potassium 

salt 

lodohydroxyquinolinesulfonic acid 

(Quinoxyl) 

Isopropylbromophenylbarbituric acid. . . 
Leucotropine 



Pounds 

11 

112 

263 

15 

55 

5 

400 

1,102 

1,653 

8,827 

6 

8.5 

96, 082 

1 149 

1,464 

33 

88 

3 

147 

44 

79 

275 

25 

13 

11 

11 

376 

7,714 

45 

3.5 

2 

220 

2 

5 

9 

3,146 

551 

2.2 
32 



6 

300 

12.5 

37 

10 



Name 



Quantity 



Lucidol 

Mercury chlorophenolbarbituric acid... 

Methylaminopropiophenone 

Methylene blue. 

Methylphenylcinchoninie acid 

Monomethylaminoacetopyrocatechol 

hydrochloride 

b-Naphthol aluminum disulfonate ■. 

b-Naphthol compound 

Neoarsphenamine 

Neocaine , 

Neosil verarsphe.namine | 

Neumol _.| 

Nevral i 

Phenic acid j 

Phenobarbyl i 

Phenolphtlialein t 

Phenylethylbarbituric acid I 

Phenylethylbartiburic acid sodium salt. 
Phenylmethylaminopropanol hydro 

chloride 

Phloroglucinol 

Phloroglucinol diresorcinol 

Physostigmine salicylate 

Potassium sulfoguaiacolate 

Pyoktanin blue 

Pyrocatechine crystals 

Resorcinol, medicinal 

Salicylic acid methylhydroxymethyl ea 

ter 



Sodium-p-aminophenylarsinate 

Sodium phenyldimethylpyrazolon meth- 

ylaminomethane sulfate 

Sodium phenyldimethylpyrazolon meth- 

ylaminomethane sulfonate 

Sodium salicylate 

Sulfarsenol. 

Theocyl 

Toxinicon 

Triketohydrindene hydrate 

Uraseptine. 

Vigorit 

Vioform powder 

Viterol 

Yatren 

Zinc sulfanilate 

All other 



Total: 

Quantity 

Value 



Pounds 

220 

67 

no 

9 
110 

26 
22 

55 

8.6 

26 

•350 

99.5 

75 

198 

6 

1,984 

208 

5 

220 
157 

5.5 

174 

5,963 

25 

551 

9,002 

55 
134 



10 

588 

1200 

15 

3 

1 

160 

129 

22 

110 

27 

200 

154 



143, 942 
$201, 896 



Grams. 



2 Ounces. 



3 Ampoules. 



Table 29. — Synthetic aromatic chemicals of coal-tar origin: Imports into the 

United States, 1929 



Name 



Acetophenone 

Ambrogene 

Amyl cinnamic aldehyde 

Amyl salicylate... 

Anisic aldehyde 

Aurantiol 

Benzaldehyde, f. f. c 

Benzoic acid 

Benzophenone 

Benzyl acetate 

Benzyl alcohol 

Benzyl benzoate 

Benzyl butyrate 

Benzyl formate 



Quantity 



Pounds 
141 
13,815 
.01 
1, 321. 5 
2,076 
16.5 
50 
225 
41 
9,904 
1,160 
4, 227. 5 
78. 5 
45.5 



Benzyl isoeugenol 

Benzyl propionate 

Benzyl salicylate... 

Benzylidene acetone 

Bromstyrol 

Butyl ketone 

Butyl xylene 

Centaurea crystals 

Cinnamic acid ethyl ester.. 
Cinnamic acid methyl ester 

Cinnamic alcohol 

Cinnamic aldehyde 

Coumarin 

Coumarin extra 



Quantity 



Pounds 

37 

193 

542.5 

333 

710 

3,571 

14, 111 

10 

10 

100 

1,051 

3,423 

7,756 

150 



62 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 29. — Synthetic aromatic chemicals of coal-tar origin: Imports into the 
United States, 1929. — Continued. 



Name 


Quantity 


Name 


Quantity 


p-Cresyl acetate _ 


Pounds 

34.5 

75 

115 

47 

2 

100 

101 

2, 403. 5 

229 

22 

1.132 

2.359 

903 

80 

2,505 

345 

122 

30 

75 

35 

35 

33.5 
212.5 
10, 242 
450 
1,590 
132 
72 
520.5 
808 
22 
5 

4.5 
22.5 


Musk ambrette residue 


Pounds 
175 


p-Cresvl methyl ether . _ _ 


Musk ketone 


178.5 


p-Cresyl phenylacetate 


Musk xylene 


628 


Diethyl phthalate _.. . 


Musk xylene residue. .. 


364 


Dimethyl benzyl carbinoL- .. _ _ _ 


Nerolin .. . . 


1,917 


Dimethyl liydroquinone 

Diphenyl methane __ ._ . 


N i trod ibromobutyl-m-cresol methyl 
ether. . . .. ... . .. 


11 


Diphenyl oxide 


Phenylacetic acid. . 


825 


Ethyl cinnamate 


Phenylacetic acid methyl ester 

Phenylacetic aldehyde . ... 


100 


Ethyl methylphenyl glycidate 


3, 251. 5 


Ethyl phenylacetate 


Phenyl benzoate... . . 


19 


Ethyl vanillin _ . 


Phenylethyl acetate... _ . 


144.5 


Flosal 


Phenvlethyl alcohol.. .. 


27, 588 


Floxine _ 


Phenvlethvl hutvrate 


35 


Heliotropine . 


Phenvlethyl formate. . 


37.5 


Indol 




4 


Isobutvl benzoate. - 


Phenvlethvl propionate . . 


15 


Jacinthe.- _. ..- . . _.. 


Phenylethyl salicylate 


13 


Jacinthe compound ^ 


Phenvlethvl valerianate 


7 


.Jasmine aldehyde. ... 


Phenylglycol methylene acetal 

Pheny Igly col valerate 

Phenylpropyl acetate .. 


11 


Linalvl acetate . . 


2 


Linalyl benzoate.- . . 


70 


Methyl acetophenone .. . ... 


Pheny Ipropyl alcohol . 


29 


Methyl anthranilate . 


Phenylpropyl isobutyrate 


2 


Methyl benzoate .. 


Skatol 


1.25 


Methyl cinnamate . 


Vanillin 

Vertana D 


17, 506 


Methyl-p-cresol. .. . 


99 


Methyl methyl anthranilate 


Yara yara. 


501 


Methyl naphthyl lietone 


All other 


690.5 


Methvlplienyl acetate 


Total: 

Quantity . . 




Metliyiphenyl alcohol. .. . 




Methylphenyl carbinol acetate 


144, 349 


Muscogene.. ... ... 


Value 


$210, 562 


Mu.sk ambrette 









Table 30. — Photographic chemicals, intermediates, and other coal-tar products: 
Imports into the United States, 1929. 



Acetic acid compound (sulfureted chlo- 

rotolyl acid amide) 

Acetic acid compound (sulfureted 

phenetol carbonic acid amide) 

Aeeto-acetate-asymmetrical-m-xylidid. 

Acetyl m-cresotinic acid 

Activol 

Aeternol 

b- Aminoanthraquinone 

Aminoazobenzene 

Aminopy razolon 

o-Aminotoluene 

p-Anisidine . 

Anisidine hydrochloride 

Anthranilic acid 

Anthrapyridon 

.^nthraquinone . 

Antinonnin.. 

Benzaldehy de, tech 

Benzanthrone 

Benzanthrone sulfide 

Benzidine disulfonic acid 

Benzyl chloride 

p-Bromo-a-monomethylaminoanthra- 

quinone 

Carbazole 

C arbonal 

Cello.xane 

Chemicals for diazo type 

Chemical products (60 per cent ester 
of oxybenzoic acid: 40 per cent chlo- 
rinated phenols) 

Chloramine T 

Chloroaminophenolsulfonic acid 



Pounds 

28, 000 

41,053 

200 

100 

144 

441 

6, 819 

6,405 

1,120 

2,142 

2,498 

8,472 

2,000 

9,809 

100 

290 

9,300 

440 

6,614 

1,975 

2,293 

15, 137 

5,147 

70 

300 

496 



154 

104 

12, 377 



b-Chloroanthraquinone 

o-Chlorobenzaldehy de 

p-Chloro-m-cresol ... 

o-Chloro-p-nitroaniline 

m-C hlorotoluene 

m-C hlorotoluenethioglycolic acid 

Chloroxylyl-thioglycolic acid 

Coal-tar products, similar to naptha- 
lene, diluted with ethylene oxide.... 

Cresidine 

Cresol 

m-Cresol 

m-p-C resol 

o-Cresol 

p-Cresol 

Cresy lie acid 

Cyclohexanon 

Diamino-a-a-dianthrimid 

Diarainophenol hydrochloride 

1 ) iazo compound '. 

1) iazodipheny 1 ether 

2-2- Dibenzanthrony 1 

D ibenzoy lamino-1 : 1-dianthrimid 

Dibromo-a-aminoanthraquinone 

Dichlorohydroxythionaphthene 

Dichloroisatin 

Diethyl-m-tnluidine 

Dihydroxy phenyl indolinon 

Dimethyl phthalate 

Dinaphthyl dicarbonic acid 

Diphenyl black base I 

Dissolving salt B new 

Edinol 

Ethyl-b-naphthylamine 



Pounds 
72, 593 
550 
3,263 
200 
11,026 
12, 962 
2,696 

1,100 

1,238 

10, 316 

116,801 

1,102 

219, 249 

2,587 

1, 564, 224 

777 

14, 891 

438 

1,415 

441 

1,786 

4,264 

2,077 

3,518 

3,628 

5,996 

661 

441 

19, 218 

20, 300 
40, 602 

224 
750 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



63 



Table 30. — Photographic chemicals, intermediates, and other coal-tar products: 
Imports into the United States, 1929. — Continued. 



Name 



Eunaphtol K 

Fast black LB base 

Fast black salt B 

Fast black salt K 

Fast blue salt B 

Fast Bordeaux salt GP 

Fast garnet GBC base 

Fast orange GC base 

Fast orange salt GC 

Fast orange salt GG 

Fast orange salt GR_ 

Fast orange salt R 

Fast red B base ■_. 

Fast red KB base 

Fast red RL base 

Fast red TR base 

Fast red salt AL 

Fast red salt B 

Fast red salt GLA 

Fast red salt RC 

Fast red salt RL 

Fast red salt TR 

Fast scarlet RC base 

Fast scarlet salt GG 

Fast scarlet salt R 

Fast violet B base 

Fast violet salt B 

Fast yellow salt GC___ 

Feltron C 

Fur developer EG 

Fur developer ER 

Glycin 

Hertolan 

Hydroquinone 

a-Hydroxynaphthoic acid 

Hy grolit 

Indaphor A 

Irgatan 

Katanol LF 

Katanol O 

Katanol W 

Katanol \VL 

Kollamin 

Laventine BL 

La ventine KB 

Leonil S 

Leukorit ._ 

Ludigol 

Mercerol 

Methyl-p-aminophenol 

Methy lanon 

Methylcyclohexanon. 

Methyl-p-hydroxybenzoic acid, tech 

Methylphenyl pyrazolon 

Metinol 

Monomethyl-p-aminophenol sulfate. 

Mononitronaphthalene 

Naphthol AS 

Naphthol AS-BG 

Naphthol AS-BO 

Naphthol AS-BS 

Naphthol AS-D 

Naphthol AS-E 



Quantity 



Pounds 

925 

1,550 

32, 076 

7,500 

3,700 

35, 350 

550 

100 

19,440 

2,040 

1,150 

100 

1,700 

14,012 

2, 925 

2,450 

9, 950 
38, 300 

200 

200 

1,425 

3,900 

100 

23. 050 

39, 099 

25 

150 

2,150 

19, 000 

50 

100 

1.266 

708 

114 

150 

5,059 

200 

14,311 

500 

23, 066 

54, 856 

2,150 

1,657 

2,500 

4,800 

44. 500 

102 

4,600 

23, 003 

8,600 

7,196 

8,077 

386 

8,300 

24 

10, 683 
441 

3,634 
600 
440 
650 
11,936 
550 



Name 



Quantity 



Naphthol AS-G_ 

Naphthol AR-OL 

Naphthol AS-RL 

Naphthol AS-SW 

Naphthol AS-TR 

a-Naphthol 

Naphthol sulfonic acid 

b-Naphthol monosulfonic acid F 

Naphthosol K 

a-Naphthylamine sulfaminic acid 

Naphthvlamine sulfonic acid_ 

Nekal AEM 

o-Nitroaniline -.. 

p-Nitro-o-anisidine 

Nitrochloiotoluene 

p-Nitro-o-toluidine 

Paratol FF 

Perlano KB 

Phenanthrene 

Phenol 

Phenyl gamma acid 

Phenyl J acid 

Pheny Ihydrazine base 

Phenylketonehydroxynaphthalene 

Photographic chemicals, miscellaneous 

Photozylin 

Pinaey anol 

Pinakryptol green 

Pinakryptol yellow 

Piperidine piperidyl dithiocarbamate. 

Plastol C ir 

Quinone, pure 

Rapidogene G paste, double cone 

Resins, synthetic 

Resorcinol, tech 

Rodinal 

Setamol WS 

Silver salt, dry 

Soap solution, in coal-tar solvent 

Sodium alizarinsulfonate 

Sodium-p-toluolsulfochloramid 

o-Sulfobenzaldehy de 

Tanesco 

Tannin 

Tecetol 

Tetrachlorophthalic acid 

Tetralix, special 

Tobias acid 

o-Toluidine 

Toluidine disulfonic acid 

Toluidine sulfanilid 

m-Toluidine sulfonic acid calcium salt 

p-Toluolsulfochloramine, tech 

Tricresylphosphate M 

Tripheny Iphosphate 

Variamine blue salt B... 

Verdinol 

All other 

Total: 

Quantity ..- 

Value 



Pounds 

7,375 

550 

771 

2,200 

700 

17, 864 

5, 191 

2,750 

50 

4,072 

3, 500 

2,000 

200 

25 

40, 858 

1,350 

6,390 

2,000 

110 

168, 269 

1,294 

2,071 

25 

430 

205 

110 

125 

3.5 

350 

1,250 

1.997 

3, 306 

2,500 

119,235 

47, 760 

3,653 

1,250 

100 

200 

15 

551 

4,603 

882 

10, 650 

441 

4,654 

13, 575 

1,500 

13 

2,093 

2,567 

1,755 

551 

441 

9,110 

5,450 

37 

417 



3, 324, 930 
$947, 483 



1 Grams. 



64 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar -products: Production and sales, 1929 

[The number in the first column identifies the dyes according to the Colour Index number. The second 
column gives the common name of the product. The numbers in the third column refer to the num- 
bered alphabetical list of manufacturers printed on p. 188. An X signifies that a manufacturer did not 
consent to the publication of his identification number in connection therewith. A blank in the fourth 
and fifth columns indicates that the sales figures can not be published without revealing information 
in regard to the output of individual firms. A blank in the seventh column indicates that the produc- 
tion of the corresponding dye in the United States can not be published without revealing iuforniation 
in regard to the output of individual firms. The figures thus concealed are, however, included in the 
total]. 





Name of dye 


Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 


Sales 




Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 




Total flTiished coal-tar i 
products . . -. -- 




Pounds 
158, C98, 300 


$77, 247, 3f;l 


$0.49 


Pounds 
167, 175, 703 


5 


NITROSO COI-ORING MATTERS 

Naphthol green 


7, 53 . . 




10 


NITRO COLORING M.\TTERS 

Naphthol yellow S . 


29,38, 79 




■ 




45, 588 


14 


Lithol fast yellow GG 


29 












AZO COLORING MATTERS 

Monoazo coloring mntlers 
Acid yellow G. . 


8, .53, 79, 10l3 








in 










17 


Spirit yellow R 


8,21,40, 103, X 

8, 21, 40, 69,79, X... 

29, .52, 69, 79, 10') 

7,52,69,79, 108 


45, 050 

21,311 

745, 247 


38, 054 

16, 989 

231,961 


.84 
.80 
.31 


57, 038 


19 


Butter yellow 


20, 497 


20 


Chrvsoidine Y. 


805, 264 


21 


ChrysoidineR 




22 


Oil yellow AB 


79 










23 


Oil orange 


40 










24 


Sudan I 


840,69, 79, 106, 110, X 

8, 38, 106, 134... 

52, 69, 86, 106, 134 


,59, 372 
17, 568 


42, 192 
9,536 


.71 
.54 


64. 050 


26 


Croceine orange 


27, 397 


27 


Orange G .. _ 




28 


Ponceau G 


69_.-_ 










29 


Chromotrope 2R 

Fast acid fuchsine B 


106, 110 










30 


8, 106, 110, 113 - . 










31 
32 


Ami do naphthol red G 

Brilliant acid red B 


7, 8, 38, 40, 52, 69, 

106, 118. 
113 


241, 172 


82, 816 


.34 


277, 748 


35 


Brilliant lake red R- 


29, 69 ... 










36 


Chrome yellow 2G. 


8, 29, 38, 46, 69, 106, 

113, 117. 
7, 8, 29, 36, 38, 40, 52, 

69, 110, 117, 134. 
X 


133, 832 
02, 514 


62, 383 
35, 793 


.47 
.57 


140, 124 


40 


Chrome yellow R 


59, 118 


44 


Para red 




45 


Chromotrope 2B 

Mordant yellow 4G 

Victoria violet 

Lana fuchsine 

Azo coralline 


110 








52 


8 










53 

54 


7, 38, 69, 106, 110, 118 
52, 110, 134 


46, 192 


31, 696 


.69 


45, 657 


55 


66, 69 










56 


Chromotrope 6B... 

Amido naphthol red 6B 

Oil yellow OB.. .. 

Toluidinered RL 

Sudan 11... 


7, 106, 110 










57 
61 


7, 8, 38, 52. 69, 106, 

110, 117, 118. 

79 


171, 169 


81, 650 


.48 


173,416 


69 


X, X 










73 


8,40, 69, 79, 106 

7, 8, 29, 38, 52, 69, 

106, 110, 134. 

8 . . 


26, 535 
527, 923 


24, 932 
227, 457 


.94 
.43 




79 
81 


Ponceau 2R 

Oil brown 


541, 036 


82 


Lake claret 

Double ponceau R... 

Bordeaux B 

ChromotroDfi lOB 


40 










84 


52 










88 
90 


7, 8, 29, 38, 40, 52, 106. 
110 


110,616 


54. 740 


.49 


107, 301 


101 1 Chromate blown B .__ 

105 , Acid chrome brown R 

110 Chrome flavine G 

112 Chrome fast yellow 50. 

113 OilredS... 

114 ] AzoeosineQ 

119 ! Eosamine Q 

122 1 Chrome yellow 5Q 


29, 117 










7,52,69 

69, 117 


33, 695 


27, 252 


.81 


43, 770 


53 










110 










8, 110 










110 










7.... 











Totals for tanning materials, research, and miscellaneous products not included. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



65 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 

Continued 





Name of dye 


Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 


Sales 




Col- 
our 
Index 

No. 


Quantity 


Value 


.\ ver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Produc- 
tion 
(quaritity> 


126 


AZO COLORING MATTERS— Con. 

Monoazo coloring matters— Con. 
Direct pink E2QN 


110 


Pounds 






Pounds 


128 


Direct pink 

Direct pink EBN 

Metanil yellow .. 


106 - 










130 


110 










138 


8,38,52,69,79,106-- 
29,38 


680, 411 


$368, 028 


$0.54 


707, 395 


143 






145 


Azo llavine 2R 

Azo vellow. - - 


69 










146 


8,29.52,69,106 

40,79 


82, 456 


57, 321 


.70 


74. 978 


148 






151 


Orange IT 


29,38,69,79,106 

8 


1, 465, 937 


382, 314 


.26 


1,615,441 


156 


Permanent orange R paste 

Hansarubin 

Orange R 




160 


69 










161 


52, 79, 106 








163 


Lake red 4B 


8, 38, 52, 134 








165 
167 


Lake red C (100 per cent) 

Acid chrome brown B 


8, 29, 52, 69, 134, X 

69, 106 ... 


357, 097 


417. 583 


1.17 


364, 225 


168 


Acid chrome garnet R 

Chrome violet B 


7,69,106 - 


1 






169 


52,69,106,117- - 


1 






170 


Chrome black PV.. 


52,09,106 --- 


47, 758 


26, 738 


.56 


71, 778 


175 


Acid chrome brown N 

Fast red A 

Azo rubine . _ . .. 


69 




176 
179 


29,38,69,79,106,110, 
113, 117, 134, X. 

38,52,69,106,110 

7, 8, 38, 40, 69, 106, 
110, 113, X. 

7 


128, 209 

193, 218 
239, 197 


72,612 

117,947 
140, 591 


.57 

.61 

.59 


129, 376 
191,918 


180 


Fast red VR. . 


259, 462 


182 


Fast red E .. 




183 


Croceine scarlet 3BX 


38 - - 









184 




8,38,69.79,100 

38,69,106,113,134.... 
38,69,134,137, X,X.. 
7,8,38,106 


34. 276 
112,046 
714,076 


22. 064 

55. 560 

572, 881 


.64 
.50 
.80 


33. 191 


185 


Cochineal red 


125, 338 


189 
195 


Lake red R (100 per cent) 

Mordant yellow... .. 


724, 022 


197 




106 


j 






201 




8.21.38,52,69,106 


j 






202 




7,21,36,38,40,52,69, 

106. 117. 
38 52 69, 106, 117 


1,339,061 


399, 671 


.30 


1,387,168 


203 


Chrome black T 




204 


Chrome black A 


38,52.69,106,117 

7,52,69, 106,110 

7, 106, 110 


344, 623 
209, 468 


128, 190 
109, 913 


.37 
.52 


320, 858 


208 


Fast acid blue R ._ 


228, 358 


209 






214 




69 


j 






216 


Chrome red B . 


7, 8, 36, 38, 40, 52, 69, 

106, 117, X. 
66, 110 


73, 793 


47, 660 


.65 


48, 393 


225 






228 


Direct scarlet Q . . 


66 


j 1 




234 


Disazo coloring matters 
Resorcin brown B . . . 


7, 8, 38, 40, 52, 69, 79, 

106, 113, 117, 118. 
7.8,40,79, 106, 113.. 
52 


199, 386 
30, 563 


121,932 
21, 056 


.61 
.69 


230, 989' 


235 






238 


Acid chrome brown G 




245 


Chrome green SW . . 


46 1 1 ' 


246 


Acid black lOB 


7,8,38,40,52,69,106, 

110, 113, 117. 
40, 110 ... - 


1,564,896 


620, 206 


.40 


1, 433, 596 


247 


Acid dark green A 




248 


Sudan red . 


69 ! 1 






252 


Brilliant croceine 


8,38,52,69,79,106.. 
69 


335,488 


256, 198 


.76 


348, 270' 


254 


Ponceau 5R 




256 


Cloth red 3G 


52 






258 


Sudan IV 


8,38,40, 52, X 






262 


Cloth red 2B 


8, 21, 38, 69, 106, 117. 
66,110 . 


58, 945 


40, 829 


.69 


66, 302 


267 






271 


Fast acid black R . 


69 ! 






274 


Milling orange G 


7,8, 66 ' 




8, 229 


275 


Cloth scarlet G 


53,79 - - 






278 


Direct fast red SB L 


7, 29, 36 110, 113, 118. 

8, 53, 106 . 


37, 258 


67, 112 


1.80 


44, 222 


280 
288 
289 
294 
299 


Scarlet EC 






7 ; 




Fast cyanine 5R 


7, 36, 52, 69, 106, 110. 
106 


748, 723 


396, 648 


.53 


831, 345 


Acid black B 




Chrome black F 


7,8,38,52,69,106,110. 


267, 473 


163, 118 


.61 


299, 829 



66 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929 — 

Continued 





Name of d\e 


Manufacturers' 
i d e n t i fi c a t i n 
nu;nhers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 


Sales 




Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Value 


.\ver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 


302 


AZO COLORING MATTERS— COD. 

Disazo coloring matter/ — Contd. 

Chrome blue green B_ ^ 

Fast acid black N2B 

Fast acid black F 


7,52,69--. 


Pounds 
17,404 


$12, 396 


$0.71 


Pounds 


304 


38,110 




306 


69 










307 




7, 52, 69, 106 


233, 920 
4,687 


154, 943 
3,572 


.66 
.76 


287, 415 


308 


Naphthylamine black D 

Naphthol black 2B..__ 


52,69,110 


315 


40 




316 


Developed blue NA 


106,110 










317 


Developed blue B- _ - 


52,69,106 










319 


Direct fast heliotrope 2B 

Developed brilliant orange GR. 
Direct fast scarlet.. 


52,110 










324 


52 










326 


7,38,52,106,110 

52, 69, 79, 106 . 


342, 162 
121, 926 
473, 619 


381, 172 
47, 656 
181, 462 


1.11 
.39 
.38 


418, 998 
127,412 
532, 400 


331 


Bismarck brown 


332 




7,38,52,69,79,106.-.- 
8,69,X 


336 




343 


Chrome fast yellow C ._ 


7,69 










346 


Direct fast yellow 5GL 

Direct fast yellow 4QL 

Direct fast pink 2BL 

Paper yellow 


52,110 










349 


110 










353 
364 


7,36,52,66,106,113.-- 
8,29,52,106,110,118-- 

29,52,106,110 

52,106,110 


17, 937 
137,725 
808, 249 


34, 023 
108, 990 
395, 979 


1.90 
.79 
.49 


22, 160 
169 280 


365 


Chrysophenine G - _ _ . 


827 861 


370 


Congo red . ._. 




374 


Direct orange TA 

Congo corinth G 


106 










375 


8, 52, 69, 106, 110, 113 - 










376 


Direct rubine 


38, X 










3S2 


7, 8, 38, 53, 69, 106, 

113, 118, X. 
36,38- 


253, 978 


286, 523 


1.13 


278, 804 


385 


Bordeaux _ . . 


387 


Direct violet B. . 


7,38,106,110 


35, 936 


28, 942 


.81 


43, 210 


390 


Direct brilliant blue R 

Direct violet 


113 


393 


110 










394 


Direct violet N 


8,38, 52,69, 106, 110, 

113. 
8 


46, 053 


44, 149 


.96 


34, 962 


395 


Developed black RO 


400 


Direct fast red 9BL 

Developed black BHN 

Direct cyanine R 

Direct blue 2B 


52 










401 
405 


7,8,38,46,52,69,106, 

110, 113. 
40, 106 


1,418,297 


497, 252 


.35 


1, 416, 659 


406 


7, 8, 38, 40, 46, 52, 69, 
105, 110, 113, 117, 
118, X. 

110 


1, 148, 729 


294, 002 


.26 


1, 352, 732 


409 


Direct orange BD__ _ 

Chrvsamine G 


410 


8,38, 52, 106, X 

106 


1,267 


771 


.61 


1,526 


411 


Cresotine vellow G 




415 




7, 38, 52, 69, 110 

7, 8, 38, 40, 52, 69, 106, 

110, 113, 118, 
7, 8, 38, 40, 52, 69, 106, 

110, 113, 118. 
7, 113 


34, 060 
159, 248 

185, 477 


22, 797 
104, 659 

108, 384 


.67 
.66 

.58 


40, 139 


419 




141, 928 


420 


Direct brown M 


186, 978 


423 


Direct brown B_ 




431 


Acid chrome red .._ 


110 










436 


Direct brilliant red 8B. 

Milling red 2G _.._ 

Direct orange RT . 


38 










443 


8, 66 










446 


8, .'i2, 106- 










448 


Benzopurpurine 4B_- _. _ .- 


38, 52, 106, 110 

110 


516, 225 


236, 195 


.46 


568, 070 


464 


Direct blue R 




468 


Direct mauve B 


106- 










471 


Direct blue 3R _ . _ . 


106... 










472 


Direct blue BX 


38, 106, 110 


26, 386 


11,235 


.43 




473 


Direct blue G 


52 




477 


Direct blue 3B 


8, 38, 40, 106, 110 

8, 69, 106, 110 


106, 116 


41, 425 


.39 




478 






487 


Acid milling red B_._ ._. 


8, 66, 69 








15, 301 


493 


Developed black BO 


8 • 










495 


Benzopurpurine lOB . 


38, 52, 106, 110 

8, 38, 52, 106, 110 

110 


27, 351 
68, 446 


29, 249 
44, 486 


1.07 
.65 


45, 468 


.502 




81,918 


508 


Direct brilliant blue G 

Direct blue RW 




512 


8,38,52, 106, 110 

106 


193, 071 


141,000 


.73 


251, 144 


515 


Direct blue B 




518 


Direct pure blue 6B 


38, 52, 106, 110 

7, 38, 40, 52, 106, 110, 
118. 


517, 956 
193, 447 


307. 972 
100, 704 


.59 
.52 


546, 914 


520 


Direct pure blue. - 


242, 039 









COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



67 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 

Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufacturers' 
identifi cation 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



A ver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 



AZO COLORING MATTERS— COn. 

Trisazo coloring matters 

Direct fast blue FR 

Direct fast black FF 

Diazo black RS 

Direct brown BT 

Direct fast blue B 

Direct brown T2Q 

Direct black EW 

Direct black RX 

Direct green ET 

Chloramine green B 

Direct steel blue G 

Direct black H\V 

Direct green B 

Direct green G 

Direct brown 3QO 

Direct brown R 

Congo brown G 

Congo brown R 

Teirakisazo coloring matters 

Direct brown G 

Direct brown B 

All other azo coloring matters 

Total azo coloring mat- 
ters. 

STII.nENE COLORIXG MATTEFS 

Direct yellow R 

Chloraniine orange G 

Stilbene yellow 

All other stilbene coloring 
matters. 

Total stilbene coloring 
matters. 

PYRAZOLONE COLORING MAT- 
TERS 

Direct chrysoine O 

Fast light yellow 2G 

Fast light yellow 

Tartrazine 

Chrome red B 

Direct orange OR 

Developed fast yellow 2G 

Total pyrazolone color- 
ing matters. 

KETONIMINE COLORING MATTERS 

Auramine and base 

TRIPHENYLMETHANE AND DI- 
PHENYL NAPHTHYLMETHANE 
COLORING MATTERS 

Malachite green 

Brilliant green 

Acid green B 

Fast acid green B 

Acia light green 



52,69. 

7, 8, 38, 52, 69, 106_ 

106, 110 

7, 106, 110 

52, 106 



Pounds 



257, 389 



$132, 942 



.52 



7, 38,52,69, 106, 110, 
113. 

8, 38, 52, 69, 106, 110, 
113. 

7, 8, 38, 69, 106, 110, 

113. 

7, 8, 110, 113 

110 

113 

7, 8, 38, 52, 69, 106, 

110, 113, 117. 
7, 38, 52, 113 

7. 8, 38, 40, 52, 69, 
106, 110, X. 

8, 113 

38, 52,69, 106, 110, X. 
7, 52 



40, 69, 113- 
110 



7,29,38, 106, 110, 118. 
7, 29, 106, 110, 118-_._ 
29, 38, 52, 110, 118.... 
106 



3g 

8, 29r5276SVl66.'i2i! 

7,8.36,38, 110,121-. 

29, 69, 106, 121 

38, 52, 66, 69 

8,121 

52 



29, 52, 97, 106. 



29,52,79,106.. 

29, 106 

38,52,106,118. 

106 

52 



6, 991, 390 
625, 220 
92, 531 
60, 626 



557, 409 



594, 126 
130,435 



3, 270, 440 



35, 248, 950 



431, 722 



714, 821 



56, 848 



1, 083, 878 



235, 753 



76,045 



1, 975, 762 
188, 441 
44, 135 
30, 883 



207, 038 



205, 822 
"88,' 737" 



2, 997, 507 



17, 837, 854 



150, 879 



.35 



374, 339 



8, 153 



1.20 



755, 404 



,85 



848, 343 



78 1, 224, 158 



292, 562 



66,823 



68 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 

Continued 





Name of dye 


Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list oil p. 188) 


Sales 




Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Produc- 
tion 
((juantity) 


-671 


TRIPHENYLMETHANE AND DI- 
PHENYL NAPHTHYLMETHANE 
COLORING MATTERS— con. 

Acid glaucine blue 


62, 106 .. . 


Pounds 






Pounds 


'677 


Magenta 


38, 79, 134, X 

52, 79, 81, 86, 87, 106.. 
52 


32,067 
732, 634 


$60, 104 
554, 122 


$1.87 
.76 


35 990 


'680 
«8] 


Methyl violet and base 

Crystal violet and base. 

Spirit blue 


788, 136 


689 


79, 106 










696 


Fast acid violet lOB 


52 










698 


Acid violet .- ..-. 


36,38,52,69,106,118. 
106 


265,089 


259, 155 


.98 


251, 790 


699 


Acid fast violet BG 




704 


Alkali blue _. .- 


79, 86, 106, 134, X, X . 
79 










706 


Methyl cotton blue _ 










707 


Soluble blue 


79, 106, X 










712 


Patent blue -- 


106 










714 


Patent blue A 


106 










724 


Aurine 


52 .. 










729 


Victoria blue B and base 

Fast acid blue B 


52, 106 










733 


52 










735 


Naphthalene green V 


52, 106 










737 


Wool green S - 


52, 69, lO'e, 118 

106,134. 


99, 757 


73,154 


.73 


108, 662 




All other triphenylmethane 
and diphenylnaphthylnie- 
thane coloring matters. 

Total triphenylmethane 
and diphenylnaph- 
thylmethane coloring 
matters. 

XANTHENE COLORING MATTERS 

Rhodamine B and base 

Rhodamine 6G 


















2, 370, 333 


2, 786, 590 


1.18 


2, 502, 923 




52, 97, 110 




749 










752 


52 










758 


Fast acid violet A2R 


52 










766 


Uranine .. .. .. 


79, 86 










768 


Eosine 


47, 79, 86 


160, 105 
1,094 


283,943 
3,553 


1.77 
3.25 


160, 989 


773 


Erythrosine B . 


8, 52, 79 




778 


Phloxine 


52, 79 




779 




52, 79 . 












Total xanthene coloring 














761,056 


822,346 


1.08 


731,489 




matters. 

ACRIDINE COLORING MATTERS 

Acridine yellow R 

Coriphosphine 0. 


121 




785 










787 


121 










788 


79, 121 










789 




121 










793 
794 


Phosphine 

Phnsnhinp 90 


38, 52, 7P, 106, 121.... 
121 


170, 936 


183,307 


1.07 


174, 582 


797 F.nfhrvsinp 9f} 


121 










801 


OUINOLINE COLORING 
MATTERS 


28,106 










812 
813 


THIAZOLE COLORING 

MATTERS 

Primuline 


21,38,106,110 

110 


204, 753 


78, 942 


.39 






S14 




21, 38, 66, 106, 110, 

119. 
110 


235, 854 


213, 889 


.91 


233, 763 


815 


Thioflavine T 

Direct brilliant fiavine S 

INDOPHENOL COLORING 
MATTERS 




816 


119 










821 


79 - 


















1 ( 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



69 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar 'products: Production and sales, 1929 — ■ 

Continued 





Name of dye 


Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 


Sales 




Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 


841 
842 


AZINE COLORING MATTERS 

Safranine 

Methylene violet 


29,52,106 

81 


Pounds 
233, 321 


$291, 791 


$1.20 


Pounds 
263, 671 


843 


Safranine MN 

Induline (spirit-soluble) 

Induline (water-soluble) 

Para blue 


106 










860 


69,79,106 










861 


21,69,79,106 








324, 213 


862 


117 










864 
865 


Nigrosine (spirit-soluble) 

Nigrosine (water-soluble) 

All other azine coloring mat- 
ters. 

Total azine coloring mat- 
ters. 

ANILINE BLACK AND ALLIED 
COLORING MATTERS 


29,69,79,106 

29,69,79,106 

52,79,106-.. 


684, isi 

1, 429, 133 
168, 039 


256, 068 
488, 1.34 
118,041 


.37 
.34 
.70 


728, 937 

1, 517, 171 

167, 931 










2, 833, 143 


1, 347, 694 


.48 


3, 041, 003 




29,110 




873 










875 


Fur black 


29,67,69,134 










878 


OXAZINE COLORING MATTERS 


106 










883 




29, 106, X - 










909 




8, 90, 106 . . 










922 


THIAZINE COLORING MATTERS 

Methylene blue _ _ _ 


29, 52, 79, 106 

29, 106 


591, 597 


495, 174 


.84 


567, 795 


924 






926 




29 -- --- 










927 




29 .. 










931 




66,69 . 












SULFIDE COLORING MATTERS 


52 

52 

52,69,90, 108 

7, 20, 36, 38, 52, 69, 

106. 
2, 8, iO, 36, 38. 52, 69, 

81, 90, 106, 146, X. 
7, 20, 52, 69, 106, 146, 










969 


(0 

(') 

17,097.563 
868, 600 

1, 496, 135 

355. 356 








971 












Sulfur black . 


2, 349, 253 
441,954 

461, 793 

317,980 

274. 803 


.14 
.51 

.31 

.89 

.45 

.28 

.39 

.28 
.39 


18, 121, 621 




Sulfur blue 


836, 289 




Sulfur brown 


1,655,316 




Sulfur green 


441, 405 




Sulfur mi.roon 


X. 

7, 20, 36, 52, 69, 106. _ 613,664 


743, 210 




Sulfur olive 


21, 36, 52, 69, 106, 144.070 1 40.103 


146, 818 




Sulfur orange ^- 


146, X. 

20,38, 69, 106.. 

7, 36, 38. 09. 146, X.. 
2, 20, 36. 38, 52, 69, 

106, X. 


38, 301 
203,321- 
397, 670 


14, 967 
,57, 61-7 
154, 653 


45, 498 




Sulfur tan 

Sulfur veJlow. . 


208, 716 
406, 926 




Tot:;l sulfide coloring 
ran tiers. 

ANTHRAQUINONE COLORING 

MATTERS 






21, 214, 680 


4, 113, 233 


.19 


22, 605, 799 




20, 106 




10z7 










1033 




20, lOG 










1035 




20, 52, 106, 117, X 










1039 


Alizarin n I 


110 










1040 


100 


1 






1053 




C9, 110 


i 






1054 




69, 106, 110 


360, 437 


723, 458 


2.01 




1056 




69 




106'' 


Anthracene Mue WR 


36 106 










1075 


69 










1078 


Alizarin cyanine green E 


7, 36, 69, 106, 110, X.I 


40. 088 


103, 643 


2.59 


21,032 



' Tot.ils not included under sulfide coloring matters, 
those two dyes arc included in the vat dyes. 



In the dyes classified by method of application. 



70 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 

Continued 





Name of dye 


Manufacturers' 
identi 11 cation 
ininibers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 


Sales 




Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Value 


Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 


1080 


anthraqutnone coloring 
MATTERS— continued 

Acid anthraquinone violet B-_ 
Anthraquinone blue black B.. 
Acid anthrafiuinone blue B__. 
Acid alizarin rubine 


110 


Pounds 






Pounds 


1085 
1088 


36, 69, 106, 110, X.... 
69, 110 


87, 781 


$134, 580 


$1.53 


81,113 


1091 


69 












All other anthraquinone color- 
ing matters. 

Total anthraquinone 
coloring matters. 

anthraquinone vat color- 
ing MATTERS (single 

strength) 

Anthraquinone vat yellow GC. 
Anthraquinone vat golden 

orange G. 
Anthraquinone vat golden 

orange R. 
Anthraquinone vat scarlet G., 
Anthraquinone vat dark blue 

BO. 
Anthraquinone vat jade green. 
Anthraquinone vat green B 

and black. 
Anthraquinone vat violet R-._ 
Anthraquinone vat violet RR, 
Anthraquinone vat blue RS_-_ 
Anthraquinone vat blue 3G_.. 
Anthraquinone vat blue OCD. 
Antliraquinone vat blue BCS, 
Anthraquinone vat yellow 0__ 
Anthraquinone vat brown B.. 
Anthraquinone vat vellow 

OK. 

Anthraquinone vat red FF 

Anthraquinone vat Bordeaux 

B. 

Anthraquinone vat olive R 

Anthraquinone vat brown R__ 
Anthraquinone vat brown G._ 
Anthraquinone vat red violet 

RRN. 
Anthraquinone vat red BN.__ 
Anthraquinone vat violet 

BNX. 
Anthraquinone vat orange R._ 
Anthraquinone vat yellow 3G. 
All other anthraquinone vat 

coloring matters. 

Total anthraquinone vat. 


8,69, 110, 117, X 


20,276 


86, 294 


4.27 


34, 207 




1, 001, 354 


1, 693, 740 


1.69 


1, 005, 289 




110 


1095 










1096 


69, 110, X 








105 337 


1097 


52, X 










1098 


69 










1099 
1101 


52, 69, 106, 110, 119... 
110 


51, 448 


72, 396 


1.41 


58, 834 


1102 
1103 


52,69,106,110,119.... 
110 


249, 724 


138, 931 


.56 


300, 304 


1104 


52, 69, 106 








222, 634 
85, 624 


1107 


.52, 69, 110 


57, 309 


57, 675 


1.01 


1109 


52, 110 


1113 
1114 


52,69, 106, 110 

52, 69, 106 


782, 768 


538, 764 


.69 


674, 805 


1118 


52, 106, 110 


539, 069 


615, 680 


1.14 


590, 510 


1120 


110 




1132 


52, 110 










1133 


52. 110 










1146 


110.. 










1150 


52, 69, 110 


75, 445 
113,871 


111,598 
202, 237 


1.48 
1.78 


121 421 


1151 


52, 69, 110... 


125, 503 


1152 


69,110.. 




1161 


52,69, 110 








34, 476 


1162 


.52, 110 










1163 


110 










1169 


110 










1170 


110. 119 












52,69,110, X 
























4, 189, 501 


5,684,812 


1.35 


4, 917, 296 




coloring matters. 

indigoid coloring matters 

Indigo, synthetic, 20 per cent 

paste. 
Indigo white... _ 


50, 52, 106... - 


1177 


29, 382, 120 


4, 384, 189 


.15 


29, 320, 270 


1178 


106 




1180 


Indigo extract 

Tribromindigo RB 


36, 52, 106 










1183 


50 










1184 


Broniindigo blue 2B, 2BD 

Broniindieo (IB. _ .. ... 


8, 50, 69 










1186 


50 










1207 


Indigo vat red B... 


52- 










1208 


Vat Bordeaux B 


8 










1212 


Vat red 3B 


50, 52,69, 110 

52,69, 110, X 

50, 52 


102, 207 
374, 047 


132, 765 
590, 600 


1.30 
1.58 


178 217 


1217 


Vat orange R 


454 779 


1222 


Vat violet BR 




1228 


Vat scarlet G 


50 








1229 


Vat red R _ . 

All other indigoid and thioin- 
digoid coloring matters. 


50 


1 








52,110, X 


1 



















COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



71 



Table Sl.-Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 

Continued 



Col- 
our 
Index 
No 



Name of dye 



10 

22 
61 
SO 
150 
184 
640 
fi66 
670 
773 
1180 



PHOTOCHEMICAL COLORING 
MATTERS 

Dicyanine A. 

Kry pt ocyanine. - 

Naphthocyanole 

Neocyanine 
Orthochrome T 
Pinnacyauole 

FOOD COLORING MATTERS 

Naphthol yellow S 

Yellow AB 

Yellow OB 

Ponceau 3R 

Orange I 

Amaranth 

Tartrazine 

Guinea green B 

Light green SF (yellownsh) 

Ervthrosine 

Indigo disr.lfonic acid 
Brilliant blue FCF 
Fast green FCF. 
Ponceaux SX 
Sunset yellow FCF 



Brown Like? . . 
Eosine Lakes- 



Green lakes . 




Total food coloring n.at- 
ters. 

Bacteriological stains and in- 
dicators. 
All othei- dyes 



Total dyes 

COLOR LAKES 

Blaik lakes 

Blue lakes-- 



Litholred lakes - 



Maroon lakes. 



13, 25, 77, 1 

X 
4, 13. 25, 31, 37, SS, 
f0,77,78,81,8P,ei, 
9S, 135. !37, 142, 
10, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. X, X. 

13,25,37,(0,91,98, 
134, 137, 142, X, 
X, X. 

13, 25, 31, 37, 55, CO, 
77 78, 86, 91, 98, 
135, 137,142, X,X, 
X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 

4, !3, 25, 31, 37, 55, 
(0, 77, 79, 81, 01, 
98 134, 135, 137, 
142, 1 0, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, K 

4 13. 25, lO, 77, 78, 
SI 8f', 88. 91, 98, 
134, 137, 142, irO, 

x,x,x, x,x,x, 

X, X, X. X. 

4 13, 25, 31, 37, 55, 
'77 78, 81, 88, 91, 
10!, 122, 1.34, 135, 
137, 142, 156, 1 0, 
X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 



474, 065 



1, 440, 152 



1,446,676 



247, 4S9 



928, 932 



738, 653 



.51 



488, 251 



1, 424, 280 



1, 500, 869 



114492— 3C 6 



72 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 

Continued 



Name of dye 



COLOR LAKES— continued 
Orange lakes 



Para red lakes. 



Red lakes. 



Scarlet lakes . 



Violet lakes. 



Yellow lakes. 



Total color lakes - 



PHOTOORAPHIC CHEMICALS 

Diaminophenol hydrochloride 

(amidol). 
Hydroquinol 

p-Hydroxy phenylglyeine 

Methyl p-aniinophenol sulfate 
(metol) (rhodol). 

Total photographic 
chemicals. 

MEDICINAI.S 

.'Veetanilide, U5P..- 

.A.cetphenetidin 

.\cetyl m-cresotinic acid 

.\crifiaviiie and neutral acri- 

flavine (.'JiO-diaTnino-lO- 

methyl aeridine chloride). 
p-Aminobenzoyldi:nethylanii- 

no;nethylbu!anol. 
Ammonium o-iodoxybenzoate. 

Ammonium salicylate 

Ampydin (4-diii;ethyla-i.ino 

antipyrine) (amidopyrine). 
Anesthesine. {^^^ bemocalnc .) 
Apothesine (hydrochloride of 

diethylaminopropyl-cinna- 

mate). 

Arspheriamine 

Aspirin (acety! salicylic acid). 

Benzoate of a!u:iiinu:r> 

Benzoate of ammonia 

Benzocaine (anesthesi;ie) 

(ethyl-p-amino benzoate). 
Benzoi^nine benzoate 



Manufacturers' 
identiii cation 
numbers (accord- 
in?tolist on p. 188) 



4, 13, ?,■>. 37, 5.5, CO, 
77, 78, 86, 91, 98, 

134, 137, 14?, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X. 

4, 13, 2.5, 31, 55, 78, 
81, 80, 88. 91, 98, 
122, 137, 15fi. inO, 
X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X. 

4, 13, 25, 31, 37, 55, 
ro, 77, 78, 81, 88, 
91,98,101,122,134, 

135, 137, 142, 1.5f.. 

iro, X, X, X, X, 

X, X, X, X, X, 
XXX 

4, 13, 25,' 31, 55, PC, 
81, 91, 9S, 122, 134, 
137, 142, 1.50, 100, 
X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 

13, 25, 31, 37, 55, CO, 
77, 78. 79, 81, 80, 
87, 91, 08, 135, 137 
142, I'O, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X. 

13, 31, rO, 78, 81, 80, 
91,98,135,1.37,142, 
160, X. X, X, X, 
X, X. X. 



56, 158.... 

56, X, X. 

X, X 

X 



100, 105, 109. 

50, 105 

19 

1, 106. 



1 

80,96... 
104, 106. 



1,49, 9''>, 102, 104,139. 

19,50,80, 105 

133 

133-... 

1, 104, 115, 133 



133. 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Pounds 
718, 908 



1, 958, 745 



S44, 359 



3,064.112 I 1,713.008 



390. 183 



304, 320 



227 
2, 533, 958 



4,687 



116,665 



49, 370 

1, 991, 574 



38, 733 



A ver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 



$0.25 



.43 



Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 



Pounds 

738,088 



2, On3. 201 



3. 202. 213 



843, 153 



456. 859 



445. 728 



13, 244, 676 



1. 36 580, 947 



217. 49 
.79 



355, 019 



2, 710, 374 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



73 



Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 

Continued 





Name of dye 


1 

Manufacturers' 
identification 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 


Sales 




Col- 
our 
Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Value 


.Aver- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 


Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 




MEDiciNALS— continued 


102, 133 - 


Pounds 






Pounds 




Bismuth betanaphthol 

Bisnmth salicylate and sub- 
salicylate. 
Bismuth tribromophenoi . .. 


102, lt)9 












96 - 


• 










102, 109 . . 














106 










Bromeikon (tetrabromophe- 

nolphthalein, sodium salt). 
Butesin (n-butyl-p-aminoben- 

zoate) . 
Butesin picrate (di-n-butyl-p- 

a m i n b e n z a t e-trinitro- 

phenol) . 
Butvn (di-n-butvlaminopro- 


96 












1 












1 












1 












pyl-p-aminobenzoate). 

Caffeine sodium benzoate 

Caffeine sodium salicylate 

Calcium-cresol sulfona te 

Cnlr-imn -puaiacol sulfonate 


96 






. 






96 












19 












19 










1 Calcium sulfophenolate 

1 Chlnraminp T fsodiiim D-tolu- 


96 










105 












ene sulfochloramide) . 

Cinchophen (2-phenylquino- 
line-4-carboxylic acid) 
(phenyl cinchoninic acid) . 

Copper sulfophenolate --- 


1,29, 50,93, X,X,X 
96 


94, 392 


$407, 711 


$4.32 


99,538 




80 












Cyelohexenylethylbarbituric 

acid. 
Dichloramine T (p-toluene 

sulfodichloramide) . 
Formidine (methylene disa- 

licylic acid derivative). 
Guaiacol liquid 


19 - ... . 












105 












X 












80, 105 












Hydroxy quinoline sulfate 

lodeikon (antinosin) (tetraio- 
dophenolphthalein sodium 

salt). 


102... 






1 




56 96 






1 




100 -- 










1 Luminal (phenylethylma- 


19 . 










1 lonyl urea) (phenylethyl bar- 
bituric acid). 
Luminal sodium (phenylethyl- 


19 










malonyl urea sodium salt) 
1 (phenylethylbarbituric acid 
sodium salt) . 


50,80, 96 












Mercurochrome (dibromohy- 
droxy mercury fluorescein 
sodium salt) . 

Mercurosal (disodiumhy- 
droxymercurisalicyloxy ace- 
tate). 


83 











X 













96 












Methylhydroxy-p-amino ben- 
zoate. 

Methyl violet 

Methylene-citrylsalicylic acid. 
IMonoglycol ester of salicylic 
acid. 

b-N&phthol benzoate 

Neoarsphenamine 

Neocinchophen (p-methyl- 
phenyl cinchoninic ethyl es- 
ter) . 

Parafuchsine.-- 

Peralga 1-diethylbarbiturie 

acid 2-aminopyrene) . 
Phenacaine (efhenyl-p-die- 
thoxydiphenylTmidine hy- 
drochloride) . 
( 'henobarbit al 


104-.. 












106 . - ... 












19 








.. 




19 












133 












1, 49, 96, 102, 104, 139. 
1, 29, X 


4,831 


1, 120, 633 


231.97 


5,525 




106 - - 












X 












104-- - .- ... 












1.102 











74 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 31. — Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929 — 

Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufacturers ' 
identification 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 



Sales 



Quantity Value 



Aver- 



Produc- 

price j (quantity) 
per 
pound 



MSDiciNALS— continued 



Phenolphthalein 

Phenolsulfnnates (calcium, 

sodium, zinc, etc.). • 
Phenylethyl malonic methyl 
ethyl ester. 

Potassium acid phthalate 

Potassium salicylate 

Potassium sulfcphenolate 

Procaine (p-amino-benzoyl di- 
ethyl amiuoethanol). 
Proflavine (3:6-diamino acri- 

dine sulfate). 
Proposote (creosote phenyl- 
propionate). 

Resorcinol monoacetate 

Salol..-- 

Salophen (acetylparamino- 
phenyl salicylate). 

Scarlet red extra 

Silver arsphenamine 

Sodium salicylate 

StovarsoL. 

Strontium salicylate 

Sulfoarsphenamine 

Sulfophenolate sodium 

Trypan blue 

Tryparsamide 

Zinc benzoate 

Zinc salicylate 

Zinc sulfophenolate 



Pounds 



105, 130, X. 
102....:.... 



Pounds 



1.104,115. 
l.lOfi-..- 
X 



106 

104 _ 

50.80, 102, 105 

102 

80,96.._. 

1, 96, 102, 104, 139- 



513, 863 
730' 



$208, 023 



191, 003 



106. 
102. 
133. 
96- _ 



Total medicinal? _ 



FLAVORS 

Coumarin. synthetic. 
Ethyl anthranilate... 

Ethyl benzoate 

Ethyl cinnamate 

Ethvl salicylate 

Ethyl vanillin 

Methyl cinnamate. ._ 

Methyl salicylate 

Propyl cinnamate 

Saccharin.-- .- 

Vanillin 



^0, 61, 99, 100, 105- 
59 



61, 65, 143, X- 

61, 65 

61,65, 143 

99, X-— 

61,65 

50, 80, 105, X. 
59 



105 

61, 65, 72, 
152. 



3, 100, 105, 



Total flavors. 



PERFUME MATERI.\LS 



Acetophenone 

Amyl benzoate __ 

Amy] cinnamic aldehyde (bu- 

xine). 

Amyl phenyl acetate 

Amyl phlluilate 

Amyl salicylate 

Anbeiiine (anisic aldehyde). 

(See Part 'j!.) 

lienzophenone 

Benzyl acetate .- 

Benzyl alcohol 

Benzyl anihranilate 

Benzyl benzoate 

Benzyl butyrate 

Benzyl cinnamate 

Benzyl formate 

Benzyl isoeugenol - 

Benzy 1 j)ropionate 

Benzyl valerate..., 



61, 72, X - 

6ir"2. 143V149." 



59 

148 

59, 72, 136, 143, 149 , X 
61, G5, 72 



61, 72 

61, 100, 136, 149, X. 

82, 100, 136, 149 

61 



61, 136, 149. 
59 

61, X- 

59, 149 

59 

59^01, 149'"" 

59 



4, 745, 054 



8, 358, 526 



396, 212 



1, 510, 727 



526, 043 



345, 766 



2,154,839 



2, 253, 414 



3, 517, 182 



24, 174 



20, 625 



.40 455,462 



1. 76 5, 000, 205 



3.28 i 108,326 



.35 



1, 572, 187 



337, 083 



1. 56 2, 292, 450 



.85 



27, 765 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



75 



Table 31. 



-Dyes and other finished coal-tar products: Production and sales, 1929- 
Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufacturers' 
i d e n t i fl c a t i n 
numbers (accord- 
ing to list on p. 188) 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Av'er- 
age 

price 

per 

pound 



Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 



PERFUME MATERIALS — COntd. 

Benzylidine acetone 

Benzylplienyl acetate 

Bromstyrol 

Butylphenyl acetate 

Cinnamic acid 

Cinnamic alcohol 

Cinnamic aldehyde 

p-Cresyl acetate 

p-Cresylplienyl acetate 

Diethyl phthalate 

Dimethylhydroquinone 

Dimetlnihydroquinone ether. 

Dimeihylhenzyl carbinol 

Dimethyl phthalate 

Diphenylmethane 

Diphenyl oxide 

Guaiacol acetate 

Ouaiacol phenyl acetate 

Hvdrotropic aldehyde 

Indol 

Isobutyl anthranilate 

Isobutyl indol 

Isobutyl phenyl acetate 

Isobutyl salicylate 

Methyl acetophenone 

Methyl anthranilate 

Methylbenzoate 

Methyl cinnamate... -. 

Methyl-p-cresol (p-cresyl 

methyl ether). 
Methylmethyl anthranilate... 

Methylphenyl acetate 

Methylphenyl glycidate 

Methyl-p-toly ketone 

]\Iusk ambrette 

IVIusk ketone 

]\Iusk xylene 

b-Kaphthyl anthranilate 

Nonyl anthranilate. 

Phenylacetic aldehyde -.. 

Phenylacetic ketone 

Phenylethyl acetate 

Phenylethyl alcohol 

Phenylethyl butyrate 

Phenylethyl cinnamate 

Pheny let h yl formate 

Phenylethylphenyl acetate 

Phenylet hyl propionate 

Pheny let h yl valerate 

Phenylglycol acet ate 

Pheny Ipropyl acetate 

Phenylpropyl alcohol 

p-QuinoUne -.. 

Skatol (methyl indol) 

Tetrahydroparamethyl quino- 

line. 

Total perfume materials. 

SYNTHETIC RESIN.S 

Derived from phenol and 

cresol. 
Derived from other sources. . 

Total 



Synthetic tanning materials 
Miscellaneous coal-tar products 
Research chemicals 



Pounds 



149 

59 

65 

59 

65 

72, 143- 
65, 72.. 
59, 149- 
61 



23, 61, 72, 

61 

X 



148, X. 



61 

148, X... 

143 

50,72 

59 

61 

143 

61 

61 

61. _- 

61, 72 

59 

72, X 

50,61, X. 
61, 143.... 

72 

149 



59,61 

61, 72, 143, X. 



59, 61, 72, 143, 149. 

61, 72 

59 

59 



59 

59 

59^ 149. 

59 

61 

59, 143. 

143 

61 

61 

61 



1, 480, 368 $1, 082, 602 



9, 41, X, X, X, X, X. 
17, 52, 70, 108, X 



25, 129, 701 I 9, 869, 274 
5, 530, 812 j 524, 123 



30,660,513 10,393,397 



17, X. 
1 



10, 56, 124. 



$0.73 



1, 599, 430 



26, 235, 792 
6, 800, 698 



33, 036, 490 



76 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



DYES NOT CLASSIFIED BY COLOUR INDEX NUMBER 

Manufacturers were requested to report separately, in terms of 
their familiar pre-war designations, the production of dyes not classi- 
fied by Colour Index number. The following table is a fist of such 
dyes, together with some new dyes of American development for which 
there are no foreign equivalents. 



Common name 



Acetate(SRA) blacklV.IVHy.spl... 

Acetate (SRA) blue III, IV, V 

Acetate (celanthrene vat) blue R 

Acetate (celanthrene vat) brilliant red. 
Acetate (celanthrene vat) fast light 

yellow 

Acetate (SRA) golden orange I, III 

Acetate (SRA) golden yellow, VIII, 

IX, XI 

Acetate (SRA) heliotrope I 

Acetate (celanthrene vat) orange 

Acetate(SRA)orangeI, II, III 

Acetate (SRA) pink II 

Acetate (SRA) pure yellow I, II 

Acetate (SRA) red, I, III, V, VII 

Acetate (SRA) violet II 

Acid alizarin green... 

Acid alizarin irisol R 

Acid anthracene brown PG 

Acid anthracene red B 

Acid anthracene yellow GR 

Acid anthraquinone blue SAWSA... 
Acid (Buffalo) black AR,RB,8B, 3G, 

GRFconc 

Acid black DB cone 

Acid black J cone, 396, 640, 773 

Acid (amacid) blue black 2 BN cone. .. 

Acid (amacid) brilliant blue 3B 

Acid (amacid) brilliant red 5B 

Acid (azanol) brown N 

Acid chrome (palaside) black g cone . . . 

Acid chrome (palaside) brown B. 

Acid (erio) chrome brown R 

Acidchrome (palaside) green 

Acid (empire) coralline 

Acid (amacid) fast orange LW 

Acid (naphthol) green black B.. 

Acid (amacid) lake Bordeaux BL 

Acid (pontacyl) light red 4 BL 

Acid (amacid) milling brown R supra.. 

Acid (amacid) milling yellow extra 

Acid naphthol blue black — 

Acid navy blue. 

Acid (amacid) navy blue B 

Acid red OA 

Acid red OTH 

Acid (azanol) red brown R 

Acid (pontacyl) rubine BR 

Acid (amacid) yellow RS 

Acid (erio) violet RL 

Algol scarlet 3B -.-. 

Alizarin astrole, soluble in oil 

Alizarin black 

Alizarin blue N, oil soluble paste 

Alizarin hematite brown 5R , 

Alkali blue for ink ., 

Anthracene red ECB extra, 3B 

Anthraquinone vat blue 3BCS_ 

Anthraquinone vat blue G 



Manufac- 
turers' 
identifica- 
tion num- 
bers accord- 
ing to list on 
p. 188 



Common name 



110 
110 



110 



110 



X 

110 



66 
110 

106 
X 

40 



X 

117 

117 

38 

117 

117 

8 

38 

8 

52 



38 

113 
8 
38 

110 
X 
52 
8 
38 
69 
69 
X 
8 
X 

134 
36 
69 

110 



Anthraquinone vat blue RCX 

Anthraquinone vat brUliant orange 
RK 

Anthraquinone vat brilliant pink R... 
Anthraquinone vat brilliant yellow 4G. 
Anthraquinone vat brown GG, RT... 
Anthraquinone vat golden orange 

RRT 1 

Anthraquinone vat golden orange 4R.. 

Anthraquinone vat yellow 8G..- 

Artificial silk black G 

Azo eosine 2B 

Azo fast blue G high cone 

Azo fast violet 

Azo violet BS, 2B, 2RL 



B 

Basic (jet) black APX.. 
Brilliant milling blue B . 
Bordeaux BP 



Chromate (monochrome) blue black.. 
Chromate (monochrome) brown BC 

cone 

Chromate brown (anthracene chro- 
mate brown) EB 2 

Chromate brown (anthracene chro- 
mate brown) EBS 

Chromate brown R, 2R, 3R 

Chrome (alizarol) black 3G 

Chrome black DNW 

Chrome black SWR 

Chrome blue ATX 

Chrome brown B, O 

Chrome (alizarol) brown B, O, EBR, 

RH cone 

Chrome (chromaven) brown BG 

Chrome brown (anthracene chrome 

brown) RL 

Chrome (palachrome) garnet..... 

Chrome green 

Chrome (serichrome) green B, G 

Chrome green CB. .... 

Chrome (mordant) green SN. — 

Chrome (palachrome) maroon 

Chrome orange GR extra 

Chrome (alizarol) orange 3R 

Chrome (palizarin) red 

Chrome red SW _ 

Chrome yellow 

Chrome yellow DS 

Chrome yellow SS 

Chrome "(pontachrome) yellow SW 

Chrome (superchrome) yellow 2G 

Chrome (alizarol) yellow 3G 

Chrvsamine K-. 

Cloth red R, 2R 

Croceine scarlet DYP, FP cone 



Manufac- 
turers' 
identifica- 
tion num- 
bers accord- 
ing to list on 
p. 188 



52 



69, 110, X 
110 
52 
38 
110 
106 
105 



38 

69 

7,8,52,110 

36 
X 

7,106 
36 

52 
38 

106 



X 

117 
29 
38, 106 
106 
7 
117 
36 
106 
117 
46 
29 
38 
69 
52 
106 
106 
38 
106 
106 



1 Sales, 66,496 pounds; value, $105,885; production, 93,509 pounds. 

2 Sales, 27,559 pounds; value, $29,594; production, 27,621 pounds. 



COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



77 



Cominon name 



Developed 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 

OB 3_._. 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 
Developed 

R 



D 



(diazine) beta black N 

(zambesi) black BG 3 

(zambesi) black D 3 

(cindiazo) black G 3 

black 2BN3 

black (oxydiaminogen) 



(zambesi) black V 3 

(cindiazo) blue B 

blue R 

(diazamine) blue BR 

(diazo) Bordeaux 7B 

(diazine) Bordeaux 7B cone, 
(pontamine diazo) brown 



Developed (diazo) fast blue 2RW 

Developed (pontamine diazo) fast red 

5BL 

Developed (diazo) fast red 7BL 

Developed (pontamine diazo) green 

2GL : 

Developed (diazo) indigo blue -.. 

Developed (diazo) indigo blue 4GL.„. 
Developed (pontamine diazo) orange 

RR... 

Developed (cindiazo) red 2B 

Developed (pontamine diazo) scarlet 

2BL 

Developed diazo seal brown 

Developed (pontamine diazo) violet 

BL 

Dipyrazo orange cone 

Direct (benzanol) art black 

Direct (cotton) black G, 3G 

Direct black 3G, 3GR 

Direct (pluto) black JC. 

Direct (solamine) (solantine) blue FF. 

Direct (solamine) blue FFR 

Direct (solantine) blue R 

Direct (Niagara) blue NR . 

Direct blue 3RX 

Direct (diamine) Bordeaux B 

Direct Bordeaux BT 

Direct (benzo) Bordeaux 6B 

Direct (pontamine) brilliant violet B. 

Direct brown CN 

Direct (erie) brown GB 

Direct brown G2R, G3R 

Direct brown 3G 

Direct brown K 

Direct (diamine) catecliine 

Direct (erie) catechine G cone 

Direct (amanil), chrome brown OR.. 

Direct (benzo), chrome brown 5G 

Direct (amanil) chrome dark brown.. 
Direct (oxamine) copper blue RRX.. 

Direct (dianol) dark blue B 

Direct diazo blue BL 

Direct fast black B 

Direct (benzo) fast black L* 



Direct fast blue B, R 

Direct fast blue 2B 

Direct (fastusol) fast blue G 

Direct (Niagara) fast blue RL 

Direct (cblorantine) fast blue 2GL, 
4QL 

Direct (pontamine) fast blueSGL 

Direct fast brown B cone 

Direct (benzanol) fast brown FW 

Direct (chlorazol) fast brown RK 

Direct (erie) fast gray M 



Manufac- 
turers' 
identifica- 
tion num- 
bers accord- 
ing to list on 
p. 188 



lOG 

38 

38, 69, 106 

38 

110 

106 
38, 106, 110 
38,40 
40 
38 
52 
106 

f)2 
38 

52 

52 

52 

7 
52 

52 
38 

52 
X 

52 

121 

X 

113 

38 

7 

52,106,110 

7 

106 

106 

38 

106 

113 

69 

52 

113 

106 

38 

113 

7 

52, 106 

106 



52 

52 

7 

38 

7, 8, 52, 69, 

106, 110 

38 

110 

69 

106 

38 
52 
121 
X 
52 
. 106 



Common name 



Direct fast (fastusol) gray R 

Direct fast light blue FF 

Direct fast (rosanthreue) orange 

Direct (pontamine) (paranol) (dia- 
mine) fast orange ER 

Direct (paranol) (diamine) fast orange 

EG 

Direct (diamine) fast orange GG 

Direct fast orange GL 

Direct fast orange R, 2R, RCL 

Direct fast pink FB 

Direct fast red (rosanthrene) A, R 

Direct (erie) fast rubine B cone 

Direct fast scarlet 4BA 

Direct fast seal brown BB 

Direct fast violet F 

Direct (chlorantine) fast yellow 5GL, 

RL 

Direct gray G cone 

Direct (solantine) gray GL... 

Direct (chloramine) green Y 

Direct green special 

Direct (pontamine) light brown 4G... 
Direct (pontamine) light gray BL, GG. 
Direct (pontamine) light orange GG-. 

Direct navy blue R 

Direct (solantine) orange 4G 

Direct pink G 

Direct red SO 

Direct (solantine) red 8BLN 

Direct (benzo) rhoduline red B 

Direct scarlet 3B 

Direct (chlorantine) violet BB 

Direct (solantine) yellow 4GL 

Duraval colors . 



Fast acid blue CM 

Fast acid light red B 

Fast acid red B L (Guinea fast red BL) . 

Fast acid red GL 

Fast acid (supramine) red 2G, 3B 

Fast acid (supramine) yellow R 

Fast acid violet ERR extra 

Fast brilliant blue EA. 

Fast chrome brown PG , 

Fast crimson R 

Fast (sulfon) cyanine 2B 

Fast light red B 

Fast milling orange RN 

Fast milling yellow GN 

Fast wool red BL, GL 

Fast wool violet B 

Fuchsine azo b-naphthol 



H 



Hansa yellow 

Hansa yellow G 

Helio Bordeaux BL. 
Helio fast blue BL.. 
Helio red RMT 



Manufac- 
turers' 
identifica- 
tion num- 
bers accord- 
ing to list on 
p. 188 



Indigo vat (thianthrene) pink FB. 

Indigo vat (hydron) pink FF 

Induline (fat soluble) 



Lacquer maroon light. 

Lake scarlet G 

Leather yellow 



3 Total sales and production of Developed blacks are as follows: Sale?, 542,224 pounds; value, $348,112; 
production, 548,415 pounds. 
« Sales, 194,450 pounds $174,283; production, 224,584 pounds. 



78 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Common name 



Light fast blue 4QL 

Light fast brown R, 3YL 

Light fast wool red BL 

M 

Milling yellow X 

N 

Nigrosine base B, N, NB, R, 2R... 
Nigrosine (fat soluble) 

O 

Oil brown 

Oil brown D, M, Y 

Oil brown H, I 

Oil (penetrating benzene) brown R 

Oil brown 2R. 

Oil orange RR 

Oil orange Y 

Oil orange 30.. 

Oil pink B 

Oil red 

Oil red C, G 

Oil red F_... 

Oil red I, N,1700 

Oil red O, RO, GRO 

Oil (special fast) red mahogany 

Oil red 322 

Oil soluble yellow 

Oil yellow D 

Oil yellow X 



INlanufac- 

turers' 
identifica- 
tion num- 
bers accord- 
ing to list on 
p. 118 



110 
110 
110 



106 
79 



X 

106 
79 
40 
69 
40 
79 
X 

106 
69, 160 
40 
21 
79 

106 
40 
X 

160 
69 
21 



Common name 



P 

Paper red AP 

Patent blue (alphazurine) B cone 

Pentaway fast rubinol 

Pigment (permanent) Bordeaux 2BL.. 

Pigment (lithol) fast orange 

Pigment green B 

Pigment (permanent) orange LK paste 

Pigment (lithol) red RR 

Pigment (permanent) red R extra 

S 

Saf ranine 8B 

Scarlet 3B 

Scarlet ink 

Silk black 4BF 

Silk brown G 

Silk navy blue D 

Silk red isrown R _.. 

Sudan T 

T 
Thioindigo red 3B 

V 

Vat printing (leucosol) colors 

W 

Wool black B, GRF 

Wool blue CB, CG 



Manufac- 
turers' 
identifica- 
tion num- 
bers accord- 
ing to list on 
p. 118 



69 

106 

36 

8 

29, X 

69 

8 

134 

29, X 



106 
66 

134 
38 
X 

110 
X 
69 



110 
106 



• Employees and Rates of Pay 

The number of employees receiving specified rates of pay on 
December 18, 1929, or on the nearest representative date for which 
this information could be obtained, as reported by 131 firms manu- 
facturing coal-tar products in 1929, is shown in Table 32. The 37 
firms for which data are omitted either conducted a business in w^hich 
coal-tar products were not the primary articles of manufacture or 
did not have separately organized departments dealing with them. 

In 1914 only seven firms in the United States manufactured coal- 
tar colors and other products. These gave employment to 528 
persons. The 131 firms reporting in 1928 gave employment to 
11,270 persons. In recent years, with the exception of 1929, there 
has been a steady integration of plants and a decrease in employees. 
Comparative figures are as follows : 



Year 


Number 
of firms 


Number of 
employees 


Year 


Number 
of firms 


Number of 
employees 


1929 


131 
131 
133 
139 


11,270 
10,271 
9.893 
10, 142 


1925 


154 
158 
181 


10, 971 


1928 


1924 .- 


12, 569 


1927 


1923 


14,841 


1926.. 











COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES 



79 



Chemists and technically trained employees in 1929 constituted 
15.1 per cent of all employees, as compared with 15.3 per cent of all 
employees in 1928 and 14.2 per cent in 1927. Of the 1,701 employees 
in this group in 1929, 32.51 percent received $75 or more per week, 
24.51 per cent between $50 and $75, 8.7 per cent between $45 and 
$50, 9.76 per cent between $40 and $45, and 10.29 per cent between 
$35 and $40. For employees without technical training, the scale of 
compensation was as follows: 25.52 per cent received between $30 
and $35 per week, 22.14 per cent between $25 and $30 per week, 
and 17.18 per cent between $20 and $25 per week. In general, 
rates of pay were slightly lower in 1929 than in 1928. Table 33 
compares specified rates of pay of technically trained employees 
with rates paid to employees not having such training. 

Among the technically trained employees, the pay (in percentages) 
of each group was as follows: An increase of 1.25 per cent in the 
group receiving $30 to $35 per week, 1.33 per cent in the group 
receiving $35 to $40 per week, and a decrease of 1.52 per cent in the 
group receiving $40 to $45 per week. In the pay of the employees 
without technical training the decrease was 1.21 per cent in the 
group receiving $45 to $50 per week and 0.12 per cent in the group 
receiving $50 to $75 per week. Decreases in rates of pay were general 
for employees without technical training who received $35 or more 
per week. Higher salaried chemists and technically trained employees 
receiving $40 per week or more also suffered small decreases. 

As stated in previous reports, the dye and coal-tar chemical industry 
has probably a larger proportion of technically trained employees than 
any other manufacturing industry in the United States. 



Table 32. 



-Employees and rates of pay in the coal-tar dye and chemical industry, 
1929 





Number of employees at each 
specified wage engaged in 
manufacturing operations 


Percentage receiving 
each specified wage 


Percentage receiving 
each specified wage 
or more 


Wage per week 


Chemists 
and tech- 
nically 
trained 
employees 


Employees 
without 
technical 
training 


All em- 
ployees 


SdTecf Employees 
Sicam ^"hout 
trifned technical 

emXye^es| '-^^^^ 


Chemists 
and tech- 
nically 
trained 
employees 


Employees 
without 
technical 
training 


Under $10 


1 

4 

14 

30 

68 

125 

175 

166 

148 

417 

553 


27 

178 

476 

1,644 

2,119 

2,442 

1,239 

761 

322 

323 

38 


28 

182 

490 

1,674 

2,195 

2,559 

1,414 

927 

470 

740 

591 


0.06 

.24 

.82 

1.76 

4.00 

7.35 

10.29 

9.76 

8.70 

24.51 

32.51 


0.28 

1.86 

4.97 

17.18 

22.14 

25.52 

12.95 

7.95 

3.37 

3.38 

.40 


100. 00 
99.94 
99.71 
98.88 
97.12 
93.12 
85. 77 
75.49 
65.73 
57.03 
32.51 


100. 00 


$10 but under $15 

$15 but under $20 

$20 but under $25 

$25 but under $30 

$30 but under $35 

$35 but under $40 

$40 but under $45 

$45 but under $50 

$50 but under $75 

$75 and over. 


99.72 

97. 86 

92.88 

75.70 

53.56 

28.04 

15.09 

7.14 

3.77 

.40 






Total 


1,701 


9,569 


11,270 


100. 00 


100. 00 






1 



80 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC OEGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 33. — Employees and rates of pay in the coal-tar dye and chemical industry, 
1929, as compared loith 1928 





Percentage receiving each specified wage or more 


Wage per week 


Chemists and technically 
trained employees 


Employees without technical 
training 




1929 


1928 


Inrrease 


1929 


1928 


Increase 


Under $10 


100. 00 
99.94 
99.71 
98.88 
97.12 
93.12 
85.77 
75. 49 
65. 73 
57.03 
32. 51 




100. 00 

1.06 

1.23 

.17 

.68 

1.25 

1.33 

1 1.52 

1 1.57 

12.21 

1.82 


100. 00 

99.72 

97.86 

92.88 

75.70 

53.56 

28.04 

15.09 

7.14 

3.77 

.40 


100.00 
99.44 
96. 82 
90.85 
74.00 
52. 84 
29.70 
15.54 
8.35 
3.89 
.49 




$10 but under $15 


100.00 
99.94 
99.05 
96.44 
91.87 
84.44 
77.01 
67.30 
59. 24 
33.33 


6.28 


$15 but under $20 


1.04 


$20 but under !t;25 


2 03 


$25 but under .$30 . 


1.70 


$30 but under $35 


.72 


$35 but under .$40 .. ... _ 


11.66 


$40 but under .$45..-. 


1.45 


$45 but under $50 


1 1.21 


$50 but under .$75 


1. 12 


$75 and over 


1.09 



1 Decrease. 



Research Work 



Of the 168 firms manufacturing dyes and other coal-tar chemicals 
in 1929, 42 had separately organized research laboratories. The total 
cost of the research work done in these laboratories, together with 
that done in laboratories not separately organized for research, w^as 
$3,244,736. This figure is an increase of $567,854 over expenditures 
in 1928. The data obtained by the Tariff Commission include in 
1929, as in 1928, not only the total cost of the research work carried 
on by the companies reporting but the net cost of such work chargeable 
to coal-tar products alone. The $2,988,769 reported as the net cost 
in 1929, is doubtless an understatement of the real cost of experi- 
mental work, since the figures do not include in all cases the cost of 
research forming a part of the manufacturing operations but not 
charged against research on the books of the company. 

The total sales of the finished coal-tar products in 1929 exceeded 
$77,000,000. This high research expenditure, amounting to 3.8 per 
cent of the total sales, gives some indication of the large amount 
considered necessary for such work in this industry. 



PART III 

DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN THE 
UNITED STATES, 1929 



81 



Part III 

DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN THE UNITED 

STATES, 1929 



Introduction 



Beginning with 1919 the United States Tariff Commission has 
annually compiled a detailed census of dye imports. 

The commission first compiled such statistics for use in the admin- 
istration of section 501, Title V, of the tariff act of September 8, 1916, 
which made the continuance of specific duties on coal-tar products 
after September 8, 1921, dependent upon the production in the United 
States of as much as 60 per cent in value of the consumption of these 
products. As the information was found to be of direct value to 
manufacturers, consumers, and importers, as well as to the commission 
itself, in considering tariff aspects of the coal-tar chemical industry, 
the annual census of imports has been continued. 

Imports for consumption for the year 1929, including warehouse 
withdrawals for dyes and other products within paragraphs 27 and 28, 
have been compiled and published each month under a cooperative 
arrangement between the chemical divisions of the Department of 
Commerce and the Tariff Commission. Certain discrepancies will be 
found to exist between the final figures published under this arrange- 
ment for the year 1929 and the preliminary figures published in the 
monthly reports for the reason that in checking the preliminary 
figures, minor errors were corrected and a few additions made. 

In tabulating the dye statistics the commission has followed in the 
main the "Colour Index," issued by the British Society of Dyers and 
Colourists, and other sources of information in the files. 

Such dj'es as could not be identified by Colour Index numbers are 
classified by the ordinary method of application, as follows: Acid, 
basic, direct, lake and spirit soluble, mordant and chrome, sulfur, 
and vat. The classification of a dye by its method of application is 
often purely arbitrary, as certain colors may be applied by either of 
two methods. 

The rate of exchange used in converting foreign invoice values to 
United States currency is either the rate given on the invoice, or, 
in compa'rtively few cases, the exchange value published by the 
Treasury Department for the month in which consular certification 
occurred. 

Summary of Imports of Dyes 

The total import of coal-tar dves in 1929 was 6,437,147 pounds, 
valued at $5,374,085, as compared with 5,351,951 pounds in 1928, 
with an invoice value of S4, 321,867. The dutiable value in 1929 of 
coal-tar dyes imported for consumption, as reported by Foreign 

83 



84 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Commerce and Navigation of the United States, was $8,176,836. 
(For comparison of imports with domestic production and effect of 
change of duty on imports, see pp. 44 and 45.) 

Table 34. — Dyes: Imports into the United States, by country of shipment, 1927— 

1929 



Country of shipment 



Percentage of total quantity 



1927 



1928 



1929 



Germany 

Switzerland. 

England 

France 

Belgium 

Canada 

Italy. 

Netherlands. 



67.0 
28.8 
1.4 
.7 
.9 
.7 
.3 
.2 



IMPORT STATISTICS 

Table 35 is a summary of dyes imported from 1924 to 1929, inclu- 
sive, classified according to method of application. Table 36 compares 
the volume of the 1929 imports of the leading dyes in each class by 
application with corresponding imports in the period 1926 to 1928 and 
in the fiscal year 1914. Table 38, page 88, shows the quantity and 
value (when publishable) of individual dyes imported in 1929. 

Table 35. — Dyes imported into the United States, classified by method of applica- 

tion, 1924-1929 



Class of dye 



Acid , 

Vat; 

(a) Indigo 

(6) Vat (other than indipro) - . 

Total --- 

Mordant and chrome: 

(a) Alizarin 

(6) Mordant and chrome 

Total 

Direct 

.Sulfur 

Basic 

Spirit-soluble and color -lake 

Unidentified, unclassified special 

Total. 



1924 



1925 



Pounds 



Per cent 
of total 



Pounds 



324, 538 



589, 959 



5,471 
1, 493, 851 



1,499,322 



42, 695 
37!, 207 



413,902 



421, 
87, 

249, 
17, 



3, 022, 539 



.18 
49.43 



49.61 



13.69 



13.95 

2.90 

8.24 

.57 

.30 



100.00 



1,952 
2,416,890 



2, 418, 842 



75, 174 
.566, 924 



642, 098 



759, 024 

122,230 

607, 637 

57, 540 

12,271 



5, 209, 001 



Per cent 
of total 



.04 
40. 39 



46.43 



1.45 
10.88 



12.33 



14.57 
2.35 

11.66 
1.10 
.24 



100.00 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 



85 



Table 35 — Dyes imported into the United States, classified by method of applica- 
tion, 19S4-1 9 29— Continued 





1926 


1927 


1928 


Class of dye 


Pounds 


Per cent 
of total 


Pounds 


Per cent 
of total 


Pound.': 


Per cent 

of total 


Acid 


793,855 


16.99 


654, 729 


15.47 


994, 201 


18. 58 






Vat: 

(a) Indite - . 


2,806 
1, 845, 208 


.06 
39.49 


6,057 
1, 724, 910 


.14 
40.75 


2,343 
2,301,761 


.04 


(h) Vat (.other than indiso) 


43.01 


Total 


1,848,014 


39. 55 


1.730.907 


40.89 


2,304,104 


43. 05 




■ 




Mordant and chrome: 


86, 606 
413, 398 


1.85 89,210 
8.85 1 399,395 


2.11 
9.43 


102, 826 
374, 046 


1.92 


(h) Mordant and chrome 


6.99 


Totiil 


500,004 


10.70 { 488,605 


11.54 


476,872 


8.91 


Direct 


805. 8i8 

149, 723 

406, 732 

80, 106 

82, 914 


17. 24 
3.20 
8.70 
1.84 

1.78 


721, 342 
137, 864 
334, 526 
134,778 
30, 235 


17.04 

3.26 

7.90 

3.18 

.72 


917, 728 

125, 350 

424, 968 

98, 550 

10, 178 


17.15 


Sulfur 


2.34 


Basic . . 


7.94 




1.84 


Unidentified, unclassified .special 


.19 


Total -. 


4,673,196 


100.00 


4, 233, 046 


100. 00 


5, 351, 951 


100.00 













1929 


Class of dye 


Pounds 


Per cent 
of total 


Invoice 
value 


Per cent 
of total 


Acid 


1,491,313 


23.17 


1,. 521, 898 


28.32 


Vat (including indiw) 


..2,694,901 


41.87 


1, 825, 547 


33.97 








Mord'int and chrome: 


09, 673 
475, 835 


1.08 
7.39 


10, 574 
444,710 


.20 




8.27 






Total ... . - 


545, 508 


8.47 


455, 284 


8.47 






Direct 

Sulfur 


977, 792 
142,919 
3'.7, 568 
?04, 248 
12,898 


15.19 
2.22 
5.71 
3.17 
.20 


942, 261 

72, 2.50 

386, 851 

156, 522 

13, 472 


17.53 
1.35 


Ba^ic - 


7.20 


Spirit-snluble and color-lake _. . . 


2.91 


Unidentified, unclassified special 


.25 


Total- 


6, 437, 147 


100.00 


5, 374, 085 


100. 00 







Table 36. — Dyes of each class, according to method of application, imported in 
largest quantity during the calendar year 1929, compared with corresponding 
imports in 1928, 1927, 1926, and the fiscal year 1914 



Colour 
Index 

No. 


Class and type name of dye ' 


1929 


1928 


1927 


1926 ' 


1914 




ACID DYES 

Brilliant wool blue FFB,FFR 


Pou nds 
88, 858 
85, 373 
C3, 769 
54, 636 
52, 675 
46, 296 
44, 377 
42, 992 
39, 681 


Pounds 
4.5, 361 
49. 128 
85, 989 
.58, 010 
15,813 
22,2f9 
22, 868 
34, 176 
23, 812 


Pounds 
29, 073 
1.3, ,574 
.57, 684 
33, 037 
10, 139 
10,470 
22, 04 1 
19, 843 
12,236 


Founds 

,S, 681 
51,295 
71,. ^,02 ! 
29, 899 
16,090 

2, 425 
29,468 ! 
26, 145 ! 
11,021 


Pounds 
6, 579 
20, 741 


671 




66, 526 


714 


Patent blue A 

Xeolanblue 


63, 744 






833 
4,30 


Wool fast blue BL,G I 

PolariedO,R, RS 

Polar oranse 


19, 238 

2,204 

805 



1 The type name represents, in most cases, the principal color imported in 1929. 



86 



CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 36. — Dyes of each class, according to method of application, imported in 
largest quantity during the calendar year 1929, compared with corresponding 
imports in 1928, 1927, 1926, and the fiscal year 1914 — Continued 



Class and type name of dye 



ACID DYES— continued 

Neptune green SG 

Neolan pink 

Xylene fast blue FF 

Neolan yellow 

Neolan Bordeaux R 

Erio green B 

Polar yellow 2G, R 

Alkali fast green lOG 

Brilliant i ndoryanine 

Cloth fast yellow 

Brilliant milling red R 

VAT DYES - 

Vat golden yellow G K _ _ . 

Anthraflavone O C 

Brilliant indigo iB . 

Vat iirinting hlack B 

Algol orange RF 

Brilliant indigo B 

Brilliant iodiKO'lG 

Indanthreneblue GCD_ 

Cibn brown G__ 

Indanthrene red-violet 

Cibanonebliie30 

Indanthrene black, _ _ 

Algol scarlet GGN 

1 1 ydron pinkFF 

Indanthrene yellow G 

Indanthrene ornnge RRT 

Indanthrene brilliant violet 4R _ . . , . . 

Brilliant indigo 2B 

Indanthrene golden orange 3G _ 

Vat printing brown R 

MORDANT AND CHROME DYES 

Alizarin, synthetic 

Eriochrome azurol BC 

Alizarin cyclamine R 

Alizarin red S 

Pupurine 

Gallazine 

Alizarin viridine FF 

Eriochrome brilliant violet B 

Eriochrome flavine A cone 

Gallamine blue 

Eriochrome red G 

Eriochrome violet 3B 

Modern violet 

Eriochrome cyanine RC 

Alizarin blue-black B 

Alizarin orange 

Alizarin black S 

Eriochrome blue S _ 

M odern black 

Chromoxane brilliant violet. _ 

DIRECT DYES 

Trisulphon brown B cone 

Benzo fast brown. 

Rapid fast red 

Chlorantine fast violet.. 

Chlorantine fast green B 

Diazo pure blue 

Diamine fast orange.. 

Viscolan black B cone 

Chlorantine fast brown 

Setacyl direct blue 

Benzo fast yellow RL 

Pyrazol orange. 

Brilliant sky-blue ..... 

2 Single strength ba^is. 

' Separate figures not obtainable 



Pounds 
39, 660 
33, 605 
33, 273 
31,079 
29,312 
27, 031 
26, 667 
23, f SO 
23, 371 
21,049 
19,981 



1928 



411 

280, 

202 

162, 

79 

70 

67, 

04, 

53, 

53 

52: 

52. 

51 

5o; 

49, 
39, 
37. 
33, 
32, 
30, 



238 
240 
375 
800 
290 
488 
448 
230 
562 
305 
999 
702 
COO 
450 
658 
063 
764 
289 
990 
977 



69, 673 

41, 599 

30, 599 

26, 413 

16, 181 

16, 092 

15, 922 

14, 883 

14, 331 

12, 346 

12, 127 

12, 125 

11,796 

11,024 

10, 477 

9,584 

9,500 

8,818 

7,605 

6,791 



54, 967 
42, 832 
37, 520 
29,865 
26, 449 
22, 480 
21, 837 
21, 252 
20. 937 
19, 166 
18,013 
16, 967 
16, 280 



Pounds 

16, 908 

7, 880 

23, 000 

9, 30^; 

771 

23,431 

13,999 

7,375 

3,724 

11,296 

12, 720 



20.8, 765 
157, 742 
130,812 
OS, 800 
72, 053 
69, 700 
29, 022 
91.370 
17, 850 
82, 220 
25, 084 
56. 049 
' 564 
68, 500 
34,110 
43,449 
19, 747 
10,404 
21,848 
27, 859 



102, 826 

12,311 

20, 470 

23, 909 

6,413 

9,151 

25, 331 

3,857 

7,816 

13, 944 

6,612 

1,211 

11,751 

4,540 

10, 054 

17, 379 

5, 096 

4.408 

7, 275 

4,650 



1927 



Pounds 

10,111 

,551 

9,118 

771 

429 

17,137 

4,403 

2, 492 

100 

3,800 

7, 588 



05, 8S0 
74, 173 
96. 271 

2,410 
32, 740 
46, 863 

6,027 
82, 268 

02, 988 
18,682 
23, 887 



43, 150 

45, 442 

45. 562 

1.300 

6, 029 

14, 298 



89, 210 

19, 898 

20, 399 

14, 463 

10, 000 

1,874 

31,188 

3,114 

7,714 

29, 132 

6,612 

110 

5,618 

4,409 

11,078 

16, 662 

6,041 

2,997 

660 

6.30 



21,022 
21,308 
19,050 I 
23, 199 
10,912 
19, 996 
17, 957 



1926 



14, 700 
5, 399 

8, 985 
11,200 

9, 455 



Pounds 

14,977 

1 1, 548 
(i, 001 

12, 235 



18,539 
6, 614 
2,483 



2,091 
10,911 



1,000 
11,002 
65,71! 

7,679 
22, 740 
32, 920 



134, 832 



111,779 
18, 266 
14, 546 
500 
21,041 
03, 320 
53, 820 

n 

5,988 
7, 255 
14,822 



86, 606 
19, 886 

8,372 
11, 119 
19, 948 

2,646 

17, 634 
1,763 
4,408 

18, 197 
4,959 

8,315 
3.306 
18, 145 
7,098 
3,727 
2,204 



2,460 



18, .509 
17,496 

2, 850 
37, 576 

6,061 
22, 599 
11,938 



15,431 
6,907 
6, 667 
5,800 

20, 939 



* Figures incomT)lete. 

5 Includes brilliant sky-blue SO 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 87 

Table 36. — Dyes of each clans, according to method of application, imported in 
largest quantity during the calendar year 1929, compared with corresponding 
imports in 192S, 1927, 1926, and the fiscal year 1914 — Continued 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



Class and type name of dye 



1929 



1928 



1927 



1926 



1914 



577 
403 



749 
729 
681 
793 
815 
797 
677 
924 
706 
795 
658 
682 
752 
913 



DIRECT DYES— continued 

Rapid fast orange 

Trisulfon brown 2G cone 

Brilliant pure yellow 6G extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet..- 

Chlorantine fast gray B 

D iamine catechine 

Diazo brown 

BASIC DYES 

Rhodamine 6GDN, 60n« 

Rhodamine B^ 

Victoria pure blue BO 

Crystal violet .-. 

Phosphine 

Thioflavine T.. _ 

Patent phosphine 

Magenta 

Methylene green W. 

Methyl Lyons blue 

Rheonine AL 

Rhoduline blue 6G 

Ethyl violet 

Rhodamine 6G « 

Nile blue EX.... 

SULFUR DYES 

Indocarbon 

Pyrogene pure blue 

Pyrogene green GK 

Sulfide new blue 

Thionol brown 

Katigen chrome blue 



Pounds 
16, 000 
15, 858 
14, 492 
13, 630 
13, 005 
12,765 
12, 218 



59, 010 
41, 760 
40, 299 
29,975 
27,764 
18, 080 
15,415 
14, 775 
12, 337 
10, 070 
9,500 
8,666 
6,000 
5,650 
5,520 



54,639 
25, 787 
22, 043 
10,000 
4,479 
4,000 



Pounds 
46, 450 
3,675 
6,924 
11,328 
6,061 
8,200 
13, 615 



89,020 
109, 980 
34, 655 

19, 925 
18, 700 
12, 200 

20, 825 
17, 167 

4,441 
8,377 
5,000 
8,709 
3,500 
1,250 
5,501 



41, 794 
13, 445 



18, 284 
6,720 
6,746 



Pounds 
19, 350 
16, 002 
5,384 
2,215 
7,826 
4,100 
8,231 



36, 500 
102, 945 

19, 858 
6, 550 

17, 625 
7,485 

20,100 

11, 190 
1,440 
9,259 
5,300 
6,978 
8,100 
1,655 
3,250 



33, 901 
4,629 
1,103 
3,841 

11,289 
4,809 



Pounds 
700 
11,015 
2,942 
9,136 
1,655 
1,910 
4,815 



61,060 
133, 945 
18, 057 
4,190 
10, 250 
4,500 
18, 080 
12, 777 
21, 328 
7,716 
2,520 
5,750 
3,000 
5,000 
2,750 



9,950 
4,408 
5,511 
765 
18, 110 
1,752 



Pounds 



7,562 

849 

38, 909 

441 

66, 876 

5,134 



58, 339 

127, 769 

33, 653 

101, 858 

35, 224 

15, 403 

87, 102 

30, 812 

55 

19, 704 

597 

51, 933 

37, 460 

1.518 



(■) 



1,407 



* Single strength basis except 1914. 



' Included in Schultz No. 748. 



Table 37.- — Dyes and intermediates remaining in bonded customs warehouse, 
January 31, 1929, to March 31, 1930 



Date 


Coal-tar 

dyes and 

colors 


Coal-tar 
interme- 
diates 


Coal-tar 
Date 1 dyes and 
colors 


Coal-tar 
interme- 
diates 


Jan. 31, 1929 

Feb. 28, 1929 


Pounds 
513, 231 
541,002 
705, 392 
945, 312 

lOfiO. 19.'; 


Pounds 
2, 598, 317 
2, 276, 018 
2, 301, 100 
2, 288, 158 
2, 295, 090 
2, 120, 839 
2, 026, 258 
1,968,837 


j Pounds 

Sept. 30, 1929 . — l 895,316 

Oct. 31, 1929 1 795.756 


Pounds 
1, 999, 347 
2, 081, 241 


Mar. 31, 1929 


Nov. 30, 1929 


867, 781 


2, 198, 240 


Apr. 30, 1929 


Dec. 31, 1929 


891, 720 
808, 424 
694, 706 
782, 074 


2,110,561 


May 31, 1929 


Jan. 31, 1930 


1, 950, 799 


June 30, 1929 1 158 617 


Feb. 28, 1930 


1, 964, 504 


July 31, 1929 1 ni.-i 925 


Mar. 31, 1930 


1, 878, 173 


Aug. 31, 1929 


932, 120 







114492—30- 



88 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Key to Abbreviations Used in Table 38 



1. GERMAN companies 



IG Interessen Gemeinschaft Farbenindnstrie A. G. 

A Actien-Gesellschaft fur Anilin-Fabrikation, Berlin. Founded 1873. 

B Badische Ani!in-und-Soda-Fabrik, Ludwig,shafen-on-the-Rhine. Founded 1805. 

By Farbenfabriken, vormals Friedr. Bayer & Co., Leverkusen-on-the-Rhine. Founded 1862'. 

C Leopold Cassella & Co., Frankfort-on-the-Main. Founded 1870. 

GrE Chemisehe Fabrik Qriesheim-Electron, Offenbach-on-the-Main. Founded 1842. 

K Kalle & Co., A. G., Biebrich-on-the-Rhine. Founded 1870. 

M Farbwerke, vormals Meister Lucius & Briining, H6chst-on-the-Main. Founded 1862. 

2. FRENCH companies 

CN Compagnie Nationale des Matieres Colorantes et Produits Chimiques. Founded 1917. 

StD Societe Anonyme des Matieres Colorantes et Produits Chimiques St. Denis (formerly A. Poir- 

rier), St. Denis, near Paris, France. Founded 1830. 

3. SWISS companies, all at BASEL 

DH Farbwerke, vormals L. Durand, Huguenin & Co. Founded 1871. 

Q Anilinfarben-und-Extract-Fabriken, vormals Job. Rud. Geigy. Founded 1764. 

I Gesellschaft fiir chemisehe Industrie. Founded 1885. 

S Chemisehe Fabrik, vormals Sandoz & Co. Founded 1887. 

4. ENGLISH companies 

BAC British Alizarine Co. (Ltd.), London and Trafford Park. 

BC British Celanese (Ltd.), Spondon, near Derby. 

BDC British Dyestuffs Corporation (Ltd.), Huddersfield and Manchester. 

Bro Brotherton & Co. (Ltd.), Port Rainbow, Bromborough Port, near Birkenhead. 

CAC Clayton Aniline Co. (Ltd), Clayton, Manchester. 

LBH L. B. Holliday & Co. (Ltd.), Huddersfield. 

Lo Charles Lowe & Co., Manchester. 

SD Scottish Dyes (Ltd.), Grangemouth. 

5. source unknown 

Q Importations of, through dealers in colors. 

Table 38.- — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 

No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 




Total.., 




Pounds 
6, 437, 147 


$5, 374, 085- 




Naphthol yellow SXX.. . 


IG 

lO 

IG 


10 


12, 000 

100 

50 

5,601 




16 


Fast yellow S 




27 


Orange GG... 




32 


Brilliant sulfon red 


5,151 




Brilliant sulfon red B 

Brilliant sulfon red 5B ._ 


S 






S 








Brilliant sulfon red lOB.. 


s 








Polar brilliant red 3B cone 


G 






44 


Nitrosamine red paste 


IG 

IG.. 

IG 

S.. 


1,500 

3,250 

750 

484 

50 

8,000 

150 

500 

200 

1,750 

1,812 




54 


Sorrel red X 




58 


Azo wool blue SE 




59 


Azo acid blue B cone 




69 


Stone fast scarlet RN pdr 


IG 

IG 

IG.. 

S . . 




70 


Rapid fast red OL paste 




77 


Palatine scarlet A. 




79 


Scarlet 2R 




104 


Metachrome olive brown G 


IG 

IG 




105 


Acid anthracene brown R 




114 


Kiton fast red R .... 






Guinea fast red RR 


io 






Kiton fast red R-. 


I 






118 


Fast scarlet R 


IG 

G 


13 
331 
200 

947 




124 


Chromazone red new cone 

Geranine G . . 




127 


IG 




130 


Erika B extra 






Erika B cone 


S 






Erika B extra.. 


IG 






lal 


Erika GN 

Black JI (Janus black) 


IG 

IG 

IG.. 

CAC 

G 

G 


5,50 
3,200 

400 

5 

5,510 

4,630 




134 




135 


Blue JG (Janus blue G) 




138 


Orange MNO 




145 


Jasmine high cone 




157 


Eriochrome phosphine RR 





DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 89 
Table 38.- — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929- — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


167 


Pilatus (Palatine) chrome brown RX. 


IG 

IG 

IG 

S 


Pounds 

1,150 

2,500 

2,300 

500 

662 

330 

14, 331 

110 

800 

100 

400 

50 

150 

800 

40 

250 

50 

551 

10, 647 




172 


Acid alizarin black R 




173 


Metachrome violet B 




195 


Alizarin yellow GD 




196 


Acid ponceau E 


G 




202 


Chromanol blue NR 


DH 

G 




219 


Eriochrome flavine A cone 




224 


Stanley red 


CAC 

IG 

IG 

IG 

IG 

IG.. 

IG 

i IG 

IG 

IG... 

G 




225 


Thiazine red RXX 




234 


Resorcin brown F 




236 


Yellow JG (Janus yellow G) 




241 


Wool black 6B 

Cotton scarlet extra 

Cloth red 3G extra 

Cloth red 3B extra 

Red JB (Janus red B) 




252 




256 




257 




266 




267 


Neutral gray G 




273 


Diphenyl brown GS. 




278 


Chlorantine fast red 




$11, 980 




Benzo fast rubine BL 


IG 




Chlorantine fast red 5BL 


I 








Chlorantine fast red 7BL 


I 








Direct light red 8B 


StD.. 






288 


Sulfoncyanino G cone 


IG 


220 
310 




289 


Coomassie navy blue 






Cloth fast blue GTB 

Coomassie navy blue QNS 


I 






BDC 






292 


Eriochrome verdone S.. 


G . 


4,410 

700 

55 

4,700 




298 


Fast violet B__.. 


IG... 

G 




307 






315 


Brilliant black BX 








Brilliant black BX 


IG .. 






Naphthol black BD 


IG 






316 


Diaminogen blue 




4,300 






BlueNA- 


IG 






Diazo indigo blue BR extra. 


IG . 






317 


Diaminogen extra 




5,882 






Black extra 


IQ 






Diaminogen extra 


C 






319 


Benzo fast heliotrope 




11,346 


13, 636 




Benzo fast heliotrope BL 


IG. - 




Benzo fast heliotrope 2RL 


IQ 








Brilliant fast blue B 


IG... 








Chlorazol fast helio BK 


BDC 








Chlorazol fast helio BKS.. 


BDC 






321 


Diamine fast scarlet GG 


IQ. 

IG 


200 

200 

9,088 




324 


Diazo brilliant orange OR extra 




325 


Brilliant benzo violet B 






Brilliant benzo violet B 


IQ 






Direct fast violet B 


By 






326 


Benzo fast orange 




8,945 


5,609 




Benzo fast orange P 


IG 




Benzo fast orange S.. 


IG 










IG 








Benzo fast scarlet 5BS 


IG 








Benzo fast scarlet 8BS 


IG 








Benzo fast scarlet OS 


IG ... 








Chlorazol fast scarlet GS 


BDC 








Chlorazol fast scarlet 8GS 


BDC 






327 


Benzo fast scarlet 4BS 


IG... 

Q 


300 

55 

250 

250 

50 

2,600 

150 

3,500 

50 

1,700 

240 




331 


Bismarck brown 




346 


Cotton yellow GX extra 


IG 

IG 

IG 

IG 

IG 

IQ 

IG 

IQ 




349 


Benzo fast yellow 4GL 




353 


Fast cotton rubine B.. 




368 


Ignamine (Pyraraine) orange 3G 




369 


Ignamine (Pyraminej orange 2R. 




371 


Developing black OB 




377 


Congo orange G 




382 


Diamine scarlet 3B 




388 


Chlorazol violet 






Chlorazol violet R 


BDC 






Chlorazol violet RS.. 


BDC 






403 


Chlorantine fast gray B 




13,005 






Chlorantine fast gray B 


I 






Diphenyl fast gray BC 


G 






409 


Diamine orange B 


IG.. 

IQ 


9,180 
900 




425 


Minaxo (Oxamine) red 3BX ...: 





90 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 

No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


430 


Polar red.. 




Pounds 
42, 992 


$29, 716 




Milling red NJ 


CN. 




Polar red G cone -.. 


G.. 








Polar red R cone _. 


G. 








Polar red RS cone 


G 






436 


Chloramine red 8BS- 




4,412 


3,100 




Acetopurpurine 8B cone 


A 






Chloramine red 8BS- 


By. .. 








Chloramine red 8BS 


IG 






439 


Sulfonazurine D. . . 


IG 

IG 


450 
3,415 
3,211 




440 


Ignamine (Pviamine) orange R 




441 


Chromoeitronine R 






Chrome fast vellow RD 


IG 






Chromoeitronine R 


DH .. 






443 


Acid anthracene red G 


IG 


365 
1,834 




448 


Cotton red. 






Cotton red 4BFX 


IG 






Cotton red 4BXA.. 


IG 






449 


Diazo brilliant black B 


IG 

IG 


1,676 
900 

7,785 




451 


Deltapurpurine 5B 




459 


Congo orange R 






Congo orange R 


IG 






Diamine orange F 


IG 






487 


Acid milling red R. 




19, 981 


12,294 




Acid milling red R cone 


G 




Brilliant milling red R 


IG 








Milling scarlet 4R 


IG 








Wool fast red 3B 


IG 






488 


Diamine yellow N 


IG 

lO 

IG 

IG 

C 


300 
25 
250 
100 
448 
54,967 




503 


Benzoazurine 3G . . 




518 


Diamine skv-blue FF 




536 


Brown JR (Janus brown R) 




559 


Diamine bronze G. 




561 


Trisulfon brown B cone. . . 








Trisulfon brown B cone... 


S... 






Trisulfon brown BP cone 


s 






577 


Trisulfon brown 2G cone. 


s 


15, 858 

75 

75 

220 

2,204 

2,000 

1,250 

1,300 

400 

11,024 

551 

385 




581 


Cotton black E extra cone. 


IG 

IG 

s 




582 


Cotton black RW extra high cone 




588 


Chloramine black N 




590 


Polyphenyl blue GC... 


G . 




596 


Benzo chrome brown G 


IG... 

IG 

IG... 

IG 

Q 




597 


Benzo chrome brown R... 




621 


Chloramine orange G 




622 


Stilbene yellow SOX 




628 


Diphenyl catechine G supra 




629 


Diphenyl fast brown GF ._ 


G 




632 


Diphenvl fast yellow... 








Diphenvl fast yellow QL supra 


G . 






Diphenyl fast yellow RL supra 


G 






636 


Fast light yellow 




3,260 








IG 






Fast light yellow 2G ^ 


IG 






639 


Xylene light yellow ... 




2,547 


2,288 




Acid chrome yellow GL... 


IG 




Supra light yellow 2GL 


IG 








Xylene light yellow R cone. 


S. 






642 


Polar vellow 5G cone 


G 


1,102 

7,935 

400 

2,000 

16, 967 




645 


Kiton fast yellow 3Q 


I . . .- 




649 


Triazogene orange R 


IG 

s 




€52 


Omega chrome red B cone 




653 






13,637 




Pyrazol orange G cone 


S... - 




Pyrazo) orange R cone 


s 








Pyrazol orange RR cone 


s .. 








Direct fast orange K 

Diazo fast yellow GO 


I 






654 




3,451 






Diazo fast yellow GO 


lO 






Developed fast yellow 2Q 


By 






655 


Auramine.-. . 




13 






Auramine 


Q 






Auramine cone 


CAC.. 






656 


Auramine G 


G 


110 
8,666 




658 


Rhoduline blue 6G 




12,264 




Basic blue 6G... 


By 




Rhoduline blue 6G 


IG 








Setoglaucine cone 


G 







DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 91 
Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 

No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


661 






PouTids 
250 






Turquoise blue BB 


IQ 






Turquoise blue G 


IG 






663 


Setocyanine - .--. 




2,867 


$4,23* 




Brilliant silk blue B 


I... 




Setocyanine 


G 










Q 






664 


Acronol brilliant blue S 


BDC 


60 
39, 666 




667 


Poseidon green 


36, 398 




Benzyl green B.. .. 


I 






Brilliant milling green B. . 


C 


1 




Erioviridine B supra 

Erioviridine B supra I 


G . 


1 




G 






Poseidon green SGX 


IG. 




670 


Light green SF yellowish XX 


IG... 


6,424 
63, 769 




671 


Erioglaucine .. 


61,020 




Brilliant acid blue EG cone - - 


IG 




Erioglaucine AP _ 


G 






Erioglaucine EP 


G 






Erioglaucine supra cone - - 


G... 






Erioglaucine X high cone 


G 






Kiton blue L... 


I. 


1 - 


672 


Xylene blue VS 




7,976 






Kiton pure blue V 


I. 






Xylene blue VS cone. - 


S 




673 


Xylene blue AS. 




10, 248 






Brilliant acid blue NAS conc— 


CN 






Xylene blue AS cone..- _-- 


S 




677 


Magenta 




14, 775 


12,089 




Diamond magenta I 


IQ 






Magenta A pdr 


IG 


1 






IG 


1 


680 


Methvl violet - - 




4,200 


3,384 




Methyl violet base . . 


IG 






Methyl violet NFB 


IG 








IG 




681 


Crystal violet.-- . 




29,975 






Crystal violet base.. 


IQ„ 






Crystal violet extra pdr ... . ..... . 


IG 


1. 




Crystal violet crystals.. 


IG 




682 


Ethyl violet 


IG 


6,000 
2,470 




690 


Victoria blue 4R . 






Victoria blue 4R 


I 






Victoria blue 4R high conc . . . 


IG 




691 


Fast green extra blue shade conc 


IG 


i 1,334 
3,341 




692 


Acid magenta 


3,537 




Acid fuchsine 


Q - 




Acid magneta II ... ..... 


BDC 






Acid magenta IIS 


BDC 






Magenta S 


IG 




695 


Acid violet 4BL0 


IG 

I 


100 
1,984 

440 
4,408 

100 

105 
5,640 




696 


Kiton fast violet lOB- .... 

Benzyl violet 5BN - 

Eriocyanine .A.C 

Alkali violet A extra conc 




698 


I 




699 


G 




700 


IG 

IG 




702 


Acid violet 7B conc .... . 




704 




6,562 




Alkali blue 2B 


IG 






Alkali blue No 4 


IG 








I. 






Alkali blue 3R conc 


IG 


1 




Brilliant milling blue FG .... 


IG 




706 


Methyl Lyons blue . . 




10, 070 








G -. 








IG 




707 


Soluble blue .. . 




18, 635 


26,890 




Ink blue BITBN 


IG 






Silk blue BSIC 


IG 






Soluble blue I old 


IG - 


" 




Soluble blueSR 


IG 


1 




Soluble blue T 


IG 


--T- 


710 


Brilliant sky-blue 




10, 962 


16,164 




Brilliant dianil bluo 6G 


IG 






Brilliant sky-blue oG... 


IG 








Brilliant sky-blue 8G extra. . 


IG 








Direct brilliant blue 8B.. 


I 








Direct sky-blue 8G extra.. 


By 





92 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


712 


Patent blue V 




Pounds 
16, 489 


$10, 479 




Acid blue BO 


B . 




Acid blue V cone 


Q 








Patent blue V 


lo"..::.. 








Patent blue V cone. 


IG. 








Patent blue V extra. 


IG 






713 


Cyanine B - . 


lO 


75 
54, 636 




714 


Patent blue A . 


36,086 




Acid blue A cone - 


Q 




Acid pure blue A cone 


Q- 








Kitou blue A ,-, - 


i.::...-„ 








Patent blue A „. 


IG 








Patent blue A extra 


IG 








Poseidon blue BR cone .. 


IG 








Poseidon blue BR extra 


IG 








Poseidon blue BXX 


IG. 






715 


Cyanol 




18, 693 


20, 946 




Blue extra 


IG 




Blue FF 


IG 








Cyanol extra 


C . 








Cyanol FF 


C. 










S... 






717 


Acid violet.. 




5,639 


10, 390 




Acid violet 6BN 


i 




Acid violet 6BNG 


G 








Acid violet CBNOO 


IG 






720 


Eriochrome azurol BC 




41, 599 


49, 122 




Brilliant blue Q... 


By. .. 






Chrome pure blue B 


By 








Chromoxane pure blue B 


IG 








Eriochrome azurol BC... 


G 






721 


Polytrop blue 2B 


DH.. 

G. - 


882 

11, 024 

5,510 

448 

826 




722 


Eriochrome cyanine RC. 




723 


Chrome azurol S cone 


G 




724 


Aurine 


Lo... 




727 


Chrome violet 






Chrome violet 


G 






Chrome violet CG 


DH . 






728 


Victoria blue R 




615 






New Victoria blue B . 


IG 






Victoria blue R 


I 






729 






40, 299 


75, 539 




Brilliant Victoria blue RS cone 


S... 




Victoria blue B.. _ 


I 








Victoria blue B base. 


IG 








Victoria blue B cone 


CAC 








Victoria blue B high cone 


lO. 








Victoria pure blue BO 


IG 






731 


Night blue. 




526 






Night blue 


I 






Night blue... 


IG 






733 


Intensive blue B. 




1,197 






Intensive blue B 


By 






Intensive blue B 


IG 






735 


Erie green B.. ._. 




27, 031 


23,078 




Alkali fast green 30 . 


IG. 




Erio green B supra 


G 








Kiton fast green B.. 


I 








Kiton fast green V 


I 








Naphthalene green high cone .. . 


IG. 










CN 








Naphthalene green VN 


Q 








Sulfo rhodamine B 


S 






748 




4,704 


16, 516 




Acid rhodamine B extra 


MLB . . 




Brilliant kiton red B._-. 


I 








Siilfo rhodamine B extra 


IG 








Xylene red B cone . . 


S... 






749 


Rhodamine B extra (single strength) 




41, 760 


10, 723 




Rhodamine B extra 


I. 






Rhodamine B extra 


IG . . 








Rhodamine B extra base ... 


I 








Rhodamine B extra base... 


IG 








Rhodamine B extra cone ... .... 


I . . 








Rhodamine B extra special 


I 






751 


Rhodamine SB extra.. 


IG 


25 
5,650 




752 


Rhodamine 60 extra (single strength) . . . . . 






Rhodamine eO cone 


G 






Rhodamine 60 extra 


IG 






DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 93 
Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929- — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


758 


Erio fast brilliant fuchsine 




Pounds 
10, 228 


$11, 392 




Acid violet 4RNOO 


IG 






Fast acid violet ARR 


I.. 








Fast acid violet R . _ . .. . 


IG . . 








Guinea rubine 4R . 


IG 








Erio fast brilliant fuchsine BBL 


G 








Erio fast fuchsine BBL 


G 








Xylene fast violet R. 


S 






762 


Chromorhodine ..- 




1,432 


3,294 




Chromorhodine BB ... 


DH .. .. 






Chromorhodine BN .. . .. .. 


DH. 








Chromorhodine BR 


DH 






767 


Chrysoline A pdr 


IG 

IG.. 

IG.. 


650 
300 
350 
505 




768 


Eosine extra OFF 




773 


Erythrosine extra 




786 


Auracine Q ..... 


1,330 




Auracine G . ... . 


G.. 






Auracine G 


IG.. 










IG 






787 


Coriphosphine OX extra 


IG 


3,000 
1,260 




788 


Rhoduline orange 






Acridine orange P cone 


I 






Rhoduline orange NO . . 


IG.. 






789 


Patent phosphine M 




5,048 








I... 






Saba phosphine S cone 


S.... 






793 


Phosphine 




27, 764 


27,844 




Leather vellow A .... 


I. 






Leather vellow GC. . . . . . . .. 


G.. 








Phosphine . 


IG 








Phosphine 3R 


IG.. 






795 


Runic (Rheonine) ALconc 

Patent phosphine 


IG 


9,500 
15,415 




797 






Patent phosphine GRNTN 

Patent phosphine RRDX 


IG.. 






IG 






800 


Quinoline vellow (spirit soluble).. 




10, 002 


10, 573 




Quinoline yellow... 


G 






Quinoline yellow ... 


S 








Quinoline yellow base .. . 


I. 






801 


Quinoline yellow 




7.873 


5.671 






I 






Quinoline yellow cone 


S .- 








Quinoline yellow extra 


IG 








Quinoline yellow S extra 


IG 






802 


Quinoline yellow KT extra .. . .. 


IG 

S 


175 

1,653 

590 

18, 080 




813 


Mimosa Z cone. 




814 


Chloramine vellow QG. 


IG 




815 


ThioflavineT 


22, 537 




Basic vellow T ...... 


IG 








IG 








Rhoduline yellow 6GT 


By . .. 








Tannoflavine T 


s..::.:.. 








Thioflavine TCN 


IG 






828 


Azocarmine OX.. 


IG 


3,300 
1,500 




829 






Azocarmine BX 


IG.. 






Azo orseille BB 


IG. 






833 


Wool fast blue BL, QL 




44, 377 


55, 852 






I 






Wool fast blue BL 


IG 










IG 








Wool fast blue GL 


IG.. 










IG 








Wool fast violet B 


IG 










S 










S . . 










s 










s 






841 




CAC...... 

IG 


2 
250 
225 




842 


Methvlene violet 3RA extra 




845 










IG 








IG. 






846 


Rosolane paste . . ...... 


StD. 


50 
4,900 




851 








Diphene blue B 


IG. 






Diphene blue R 


ig:::: ..:::::::::: 





94 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table 38.- — Imports of dyes, caltndar year 1929 — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


853 


Acid cyanine 




Pounds 
4,260 






Acid cyanine BF 


IG... 






Acid cyanine G cone..- 

Induline NN 


IG 






861 




450 






Induline NN 

Solid blue, water soluble S 

Japan black extra . 


lO.. 






IG 






864 


IG 


150 
3,800 




865 


Nigrosine T 






Nigrosine T 


IG 






Silver gray P... 


IG 






873 


Malta gray J 


StD 

IG 


2,645 

200 

7,062 




873 


New fast gray... 




875 


Ursol 


$7,410- 




Fouramine OP 


StD... 




Fur blue-black, A, B, SB 


IG . 








Fur blue-gray 0. 


IG 








Fur dye SC 


IG 








Fur brown PR, PY, RR, SK, SO, SP 


IG 








Fur gray ALA, BC, DMO, Q, R, RB, Sp. I 


IG... 








Fur gray-brown SLA. 


IG 








Fur olive 30.. 


IG 








Fur yellow 4G 


IG.. 








Fuscamine G 


IG 






878 


Brilliant delphine blue B. 


S 


1,000 
2,093 




879 


Chromazurine. 




4,479 




Chromazurine E 


DH. . 




Chromazurine G... 


DH 










I 






882 


Modern heliotrope DH.. 


DH 


221 
5,843 




884 








Chromacetin blue S extra 


DH 






Modern royal blue 


DH 






888 


Chromocyanine BC paste 


DH 


624 
11, 796 




892 


Blue 1900 TCD 






Blue 1900 TCD 


DH 








DH... 






893 


Prune pure 




565 








S . 






Violet PDH 


DH 






894 




G 


12, 346 
16, 092 
2,055 




905 


Gallazine No. 90 . 


DH. 




909 




1,192 




Cotton blue R extra cone 


IG 






Meldola's blue 3R cone 


S. 








New blue RS 


I 










I 






913 


NDeblueBX... 




5,520 






Danubia blue BX 


IG.. . 






Nile blue BX 


IG.. 






922 


Methylene blue 




175 






Methylene blue B cone. 


IG 






Methylene blue BQF highly cone... 


IG. 






924 


Methylene green 




12, 337 


11, 63& 






S 






Methylene green G extra... 


I . . 








Methylene green W 


G... 






925 


Toluidine blue... 


IG 


25 
3,360 




926 


Thionine blue 






Thionine blue G 


I 






Thionine blue GO 


IG. 






927 


New methylene blue 




5,000 








IG.. 






New methylene blue NS cone 


S 






969 


Hydron blue R 










Cibablue2RH 


I 


440 
2, 334 
1,100 
1,213 
9.500 








IG 

IG 

I . 




971 


Hydron blue G paste 




1006 


Pyrogene green 3G 




1019 


Alizarin black S paste.. 


IG.. 




1027 


Alizarin, synthetic 


69, 673 




Alizarin paste bluish 


I 








Alizarin red IP pdr. (single strength)... 


BAC 








.\lizarin red VI extra pure paste 


IG . 








Alizarin red VI old paste 


IG . .. 






1032 


Alizarin claret red RL paste 


IG 


500 
9,584 




1033 


Alizarin orange 






Alizarin orange A paste 


IG 






Alizarin orange AO paste 


BDC 







DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 95 
Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


1034 


Alizarin red S . 




Pounds 
26, 413 


$21, 123 




Alizarin red S pdr .. 


BAG . 






Alizarin red S pdr . . . . . 


IG. ... 








Alizarin red S\V._ . 


I 








Alizarin red SWB 


IG 








Alizarin red SZ 


S 






1035 


Alizarin brown.- 






2,174 




Alizarin brown HD paste . 


IG 

IG 


150 
1 






Alizarin brown R pdr . . . 






Anthracene brown SW pdr. 








igi:""I" 


J 

1,102 
16, 181 






Anthracene brown RD paste : 




1037 










IG 








BAG 






1039 


Alizarin red XGP paste 


IG 


3,625 
6,165 




1040 


Alizarin red SX - . 






Alizarin red SX paste -. - 


IG . 






Alizarin red WR paste _.-. . 


IG 






1045 


Alizarin Bordeaux _ .. 




1,000 






Alizarin Bordeaux BD paste. . 


IG... 






Alizarin Bordeaux BP paste 


IG 






1050 




IG 


600 
262 




1051 










By 






Alizarin cyanine GG pdr. 


IG _. 






1053 


Alizarin light blue SE. 




9,256 


15, 669 




Alizarin light blue ESE cone - - . 


S 






Alizarin light blue SE cone 


S 








Alizarin sapphire blue G 


I 






1054 






19, 466 








s 






Alizarin light blue B cone 

Alizarin emeraldole G _ 


^ 






1056 


iG 


20 

175 

1,200 

1,850 

30, 599 

4,610 




1058 




IG.. 

IG 

IG 

IG 




1060 


Anthracene blue SWGG pdr 




1063 


Anthracene blue SWR pdr 




1064 






1067 








Alizarin blue S... 

Alizarin blue S pdr 

Alizarin green S 


I 






IG 






1071 




2,834 






Alizarin green S paste .. --. . 


BDC 






Alizarin green S paste 


IG 






1073 






7,660 


17, 384 






IG 






Alizarin irisol B pdr... 


IG 








Alizarin irisol R pdr 


IG 








Alizarin light violet RS cone 


s 






1075 


Alizarin astrol blue B . . . . 




520 






Alizarin astrol blueB 


By 






Alizarin light blue 3Q cone 


S 






1076 


Alizarin direct blue 




5,225 


14, 425 




Alizarin direct blue RBX 


IG 






Alizarin direct blue RXO _ . . .... 


IG 








Alizarin light blue R cone 


S 






1077 


Alizarin direct blue BGAOO 


IG 


6,000 
550 




1078 


Alizarin light green GS 








IG. . . 






Alizarin light green GS cone... 


S 






1080 


Special violet B pdr 


IG 

B 


4,250 

93 

560 

15, 922 




1081 


Anthraquinone green GXNO.. 




1082 


Anthraquinone blue green BXO pdr . . 


IG 




1081 


Alizarin viridine (single strength) .. 


6,900 






IG 






Alizarin viridine FF pdr 


DH 








Alizarin viridine FF pdr . 


IG- 






1085 






10, 477 








IQ 






Alizarin light gray BS cone 


s 






1087 


Alizarin direct blue BC . . .. .. .. . 


IG 

I 


80 

551 

5,250 

5,451 




1088 


Wool fast blue BR 




1089 


Anthraquinone blue SR extra pdr 


IG.. 




1091 


Alizarin rubinoL 


14,928 






By 






Alizarin fast rubine R 


I 








Alizarin light red R cone 


S. 






1092 


Alizarin geranol B pdr 


IG 


3,550 





96 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table 38.- — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 



Colour 


Name of dye 


Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Index 
No. 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


1093 


Indanthrene blue \VB pdr 


IG 


Pounds 
1,170 
280, 240 




1095 


Anthraflavone GC (single strength) 


.l;229. 064 




Algol yellow GC paste 


IG 






Algol yellow GC dbl. paste 


IQ 






Algol yellow GCN pdr 


IG 


j 




Anthra yellow GC paste . .. . 


B 






Anthra yellow GC dbl. paste 


B 






Anthra yellow GCN pdr.. 


B 






Vat vellow GC dbl. paste 


B 






Vat yellow GCN pdr 


B 




1096 


Indanthrene'golden orange G 






12, 765 




Cibauone golden orange GK paste 


I 


331 
551 

} 14, 388 

51, 600 






Cibanone golden orange OK pdr 


I 






Vat golden orange G dbl. paste fine (single strength).. 
Vat golden orange G pdr. (single strength) 


IG .- 

IQ 

IG 








1098 


Algol scarlet GGN paste ._ 




1099 


Indanthrene dark blue 






Vat dark blue BGO paste.. 


IG 

IQ... 


968 
1,964 






Vat dark blue BOA paste.. 




1102 


Indanthrene black BB 


16, 753 




Anthra green B pdr. (single strength) 


IG. 

I... 


i,600 
330 

} 48, 772 

2.000 






Cibanone black 2B pdr 






Vat black BB dbl. paste (single strength) 


IG 

IG 

IG 






Vat black BB pdr. (single strength) 






Vat black BGA dbl. paste (single strength) 




1104 


Indanthrene brilliant violet RR 




13, 109 




Cibanone violet R pdr 


I 


no 

17, 660 

488 






Vat brilliant violet RR paste 


IG 

IG 

B 






Vat brilliant violet RR pdr. (single strength) 






Vat violet RR paste 






Vat violet RR extra dbl. paste (single strength) 

Vat violet RR extra pdr. (single strength) 


B 

B 




1105 


Indanthren. violet B . 








Vat violet B paste . 


B 




1106 


Indanthrene blue RS (single strength) 




5,450 






Vat blue RS dbl. paste... 


IQ 






Vat blue RSN pdr 


IQ 








Vat blue RSP triple pdr 


IQ 






1108 


Indanthrene blue RK 




100 






Vat blue RK paste 

Indanthrene blue 3G (single strength) 


IQ 




1109 




1,750 






Vat blue3Q pdr.. .. . . . 


IQ... 




1110 


Indanthrene blue GGSL (single strength) 




9,350 






Vat blue GGSL pdr 


IG 






Vat blue (JGSNL dbl paste 


IG 








Vat blue GGSZ dbl. paste 


IG . 






nil 


Indanthrene blue 5G 






2,320 




Grelanone blue 3G pdr 


OrE 

IG. 

IG 


no 

} 4, 688 
64, 230 






Vat blue 50 paste 






Vat blue 5G pdr. (single strength) 




1113 


Indanthrene blue GCD (single strength) 


18, 147 






I 






Vat blue GCD dbl. paste 


IG 








Vat blue GCD pdr fine 


IG 








Vat blue GCDN pdr 


IQ 






1114 


Indanthrene blue BCD (single strength) _ 




17, 028 


4,794 




Vat blue BCD ilbl paste 


IG 






Vat blue BCS pdr 


B 








Vat blue BCSO pdr 


IG 






1115 


Cibanone blue G 






10,104 






BAC 

I 


200 
3,305 
2, 045 

220 
6,150 














I 








I. 




1116 












IQ 








IQ 






in8 


Indanthrene yellow G (single strength) .. 




49, 658 


31,415 






IG 








IQ 










IG 






1123 






3,600 








IQ 








IQ 






1128 






6,400 








IG 








IQ 






1129 






1,600 






Algol scarlet G pdr 


IG 





DYES EMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 97 



Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 



Name of dye 



Indanthrene red 5QK (single strength) 

Vat red 5GK pdr 

Indanthrene yallow OK (single strength) 

Cibanone yellow GK paste. 

Cibanone yellow GK pdr 

Vat yellow GK paste 

Vat yellow GK pdr 

Algol red R (single strength) 

Algol red R extra pdr 

Algol red BK pdr 

Indanthrene brilliant violet BBK (single strength). 

Vat brilliant violet BBK paste 

Vat brilliant violet BBK pdr 

Indanthrene brilliant violet RK (single strength)... 

Orelanone violet BR paste 

Vat brilliant violet RK paste 

Vat brUliant violet RK pdr... 

Vat violet BR paste 

Indanthrene orange RRK (single strength) 

Grelanone orange R paste 

Vat orange RRK pdr 

Indanthrene orange 6RTK 

Vat orange R 

Vat orange 6RTK paste 

Algol yellow 4GK pdr 

Vat (Algol) yellow 3G paste 

Indanthrene red R (single strength) 

Algol red GT pdr.._ 

Anthra rod RT dbl. paste 

.\nthra red RT pdr 

Indanthrene Bordeaux B extra (single strength) 

Algol Bordeaux RT pdr 

Indanthrene corinth RK (single strength) 

Vat eorinth RK pdr 

Indanthrene grav (single strength) 

Vat gray GK paste 

Vat gray GK pdr 

Vat gray K paste 

Vat gray K pdr 

Indanthrene brown GR 

Vat brown OR dbl. paste 

Vat brown OR pdr 

Indanthrene olive R (single strength) 

Vat olive R paste 

Vat olive R pdr.. 

Orelanone olive B pdr 

Indanthrene brown R (single strength) 

Vat brown BR paste 

Vat brown BR pdr 

Vat brown R paste 

Vat brown R pdr 

Indanthrene brown O (single strength) 

Grelf.none brown B pdr 

Vat brown G paste 

Vat brown G pdr 

Algol red B (.single strength) 

Algol red B paste 

Algol red BTK paste... 

Algol red BTK pdr 

Indanthrene red violet RRK (single strength) 

Vat red violet RRK paste... 

Vat red violet RRK pdr 

Vat red violet RRN new paste 

Vat red violet RRN new pdr 

Indanthrene red RK (single strength) 

Vat red RK paste 

Vat red RK paste fine 

Vat red RK pdr 

Vat red RKP pdr.. 

Indanthrene violet RN (single strength) 

Vat violet BN paste 

Vat violet BN pdr 

Cibanone brown B pdr 

Cibanone blaek 

Cibanone blafk B paste 

Cibanone black B pdr 

Cibanone black 20 pdr 

Cibanone bine 3G (single strength) 

Cibanone blue 30 paste 

Vat blue green B pa'^te 

Vat blue green B dbl. paste 

Vat blue green B pdr 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



IG- 



I... 
I... 
IG. 
IG. 



By. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



GrE. 
IG... 
IG... 
GrE. 



GrE. 
IQ... 



By. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
B.. 
B.. 



IQ. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG... 
IG.. 
GrE. 



IG. 
IG. 
By. 
By. 



GrE. 
IG... 
lO.. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG- 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
I... 



I... 

B.. 
IG. 
IG. 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



Pounds 
1,200 



15,600 



1,280 



2,400 
'i6,"024' 



4,345 



541 



100 
100 

5, 058 



1,000 
"i,"280 
'4,"786' 



5, 850 

450 

17, 444 



18, 141 



16, 140 



5,209 



17,390 



9,981 



220 



331 

220 

661 

52, 999 



98 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table SS.—Imporls of dyes, calendar yeor 1929 — Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Cibanone olive 

Cibanone olive B pdr 

Cibanone olive G paste 

Indigosol yellow HCG 

Indigosol yellow HCG 

Indigosol yellow HCG... 

Indigosol 

Indigo vat BASF 

Indigosol O 

Indigosol OR 

Indigo vat BASF/RR 

Indigosol OR 

Indigosol OR 

Indigo pure BASF/RB 

Brilliant indigo 4B 

Brilliant indigo 4B paste 

" Brilliant indigo 4B pdr (single strength).. 

Indigosol 04B. 

Indigosol OIB 

Brilliant indigo 2B (single strength) 

Brilliant indigo 2B paste 

Brilliant indigo 2B pdr_. 

Brilliant indigo 40 (single strength) 

Brilliant indigo 4G paste 

Brilliant indigo 4G pdr 

Brilliant indigo B paste 

Ciba yellow G paste 

Helindone green G (single strength) 

Helindone green G paste 

Vat green G dbl. paste 

Vat green G dbl. paste 

Algol blue 5R paste 

Indigosol AZG 

Indigosol AZG 

Indigosol AZG 

Algol red SB 

Algol rod 5B paste 

Ciba pink B paste 

Helindone red BB vat 

Algol rubine B 

-Mgol rubine B paste.. 

Algol rubine B pdr 

Algol pink B ("siugle strength) 

Algol pink B paste.. _ 

Algol pink BG paste 

Helindone pink BN pdr 

Vat pink BG paste 

Indanthrene red-violet RH 

Vat (Helindone) red 3B pdr. (single strength). 

Vat red-violet RH paste 

Vat red-violet RH pdr. (single strength) 

Indigosol red-violet IRH 

Algol orange RF 

.\lgol orange RF paste. 

.\lgol orange RF pdr. (single strength) 

Algol orange RF pressed cakes 

Vat orange R paste 

Indigosol orange HR... 

Indigosol orange HR 

Helindone fast searlet R (single strength). 

Vat scarlet R paste 

Vat scarlet R pdr 

Algol violet RR (single strength) 

Algol violet RR pdr 

.\lgcl brown 3R (single strength) 

Algol brown ?,R Tuir 

Ciba red G (single strength) 

Ciba red G pdr 

Vat printing brown GN paste 

Algol scarlet GO (single strength) 

Algol scarlet GG paste 

Algol scarlet GG paste cone 

.\lgol scarlet GG pdr 

Anthra scarlet GG paste 

Thioindigo searlet 2G paste 

Indigo, natural 



Pounds 



DH.. 
IG.. 



110 

220 

2,324 



IG.. 
DH. 



IG... 

DH. 

IG... 

IG... 



1,080 
'i,'C9G 



IG.. 
IG.. 
DH. 
IG.. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
I-. 



IG. 
M.. 
IG. 
IG. 



DH. 
IG.. 



IG. 
I... 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



M... 
IG.- 
IG.. 
DH- 



IG.. 
IG.. 
IG.. 
M... 
DH. 
IG.. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 



IG. 



I... 
IG. 



IG. 
lO. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



125 



13, 386 
33, 289 



07, 448 



70, 488 

5, 509 

11,594 



500 
1,302 



21, 688 



300 

225 

13,551 



53, 305 



75. 4C2 
} 3, 828 



500 
'735' 



1,100 

' 14,' 600' 



500 
2, 137 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 



99 



Table 38. — Im-ports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYES 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


I 
Quantity 


Invoice 
value 






Ponnds 
25, 265 




Acid black R --- 


"io":::::::' 




Acid black RR . _ --- -- 


IG 1 




Acid blue RBF - 


I 


13, 225 

662 

12, 250 






Q .... 








$10,119 


Acid leather brown EG .- 


IG 


Acid leather brown EGB 


IG 








IG 








DH 


6,946 
15, 955 








Acid milling yellow G 


S 






S 










6,612 




Acid pure blue BR supra .- 


G 




Acid pure blue R supra -- 


G 










1,211 






I 




Acid rhodamine 3R - 


I 






Acid violet . . 




2,815 


3,720 




S 




Acid violet BW -. 


By 


- -- - 




Acid violet 8B extra 


IG 








IG 








IG 








G 








IG 

IG 

IG 


850 

300 

25 

3,975 








Alizarin cvanol gray G . 










IG 






IG 








I 


330 

1,000 

75 






S 




Alizarin skv-blue - 








IG 






IG 






Alizarin supra blue 




4,613 




Alizarin supra blue A 


IG 






IG 








IG 

IG. 

IG 

IG 

IG 

IQ 

IG 

I 


2,450 

23, 550 

55 

400 

1,475 
100 
100 

1,653 
330 
100 

3, 065. 








Alkali violet lOB . . 








Amido naphthol brown 3G . ..- 








Azo acid blue BF 








Benzyl red B 


I 






IO 






3,228 


Brilliant acid blue FF 


IG 






By 








IO 






Brilliant acid blue 5G . . -. 


Q 








Q 


228 
23,371 












IO 




Brilliant indocyanine G .. . . . 


IG 








IG 

IG 


14,825 

25 

88,. 858 




Brilliant dulfo flavine FF 






73, 117 




IO 






By 






Brilliant wool blue FFR extra 


IO 








IO 


1,800 
880 




Cloth fast brilliant red ... ... .. 






I 




Cloth fast brilliant red 4B .. 


I 








I 


771 
1,.322 




Cloth fast orange . .. 








I 




Cloth fast orange R ... .. 


I 










5,.729 


7,631 


Cloth fast red B . 


I 




I 






Cloth fast red R 


I 







100 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYES— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Cloth fast yellow ... 




Pounds 
21,049 




Cloth fast yellow G 


I 




Cloth fast yellow 5G cone 


I.... 








CAC 

IG.. 


5 
60 

771 




Dark nut brown 




Erio carmine.. 




Erio carmine 2BC . 


G 




Erio carmine 2BF supra 


G 


i 


Erio fast black B 


G 


276 
551 
385 
380 




Erio fast brown R .. . .. .. 


G . 




Erio fast red G cone ... . . . 


G . 




Erioglaucine . . . .. 






Erioglaucine AFF 


Q 




Erioglaucine FL supra 


G 






Fast acid green BB extra 


IG 

G 


400 

11,023 

25 

100 

1,650 




Fast jasmine G cone . .... 




Fast silk yellow SQ... . . . .. 


Q 






ig::...... 








Guinea brown QRL 


IG 




Guinea brown RR . . . ... . . 


IG 






Guinea fast green B .... 


IG 


1,800 
85, 373 




Indocyanine B 






A 




Indocyanine B 


IG 








IG 

I 


1,000 
550 
992 

1,543 




Kiton fast green A .. . ... 




Kiton fast red 4BL 


I . . 




Lanasol violet 








I 




Lanasol violet R 


I 








DH 

IG 

IG 


331 
5,500 

200 
5,050 


. 


Metanil red 3B extra . 








Milling orange 




Milling orange G._ 


IG 




Milling orange GN ... . .... ... 


IG 






Milling red . . . . . . 




5,250 


$4, 515 


Milling red 4BA.. 


IG . .. 




IG . 






Milling red GA.. 


IG 






Milling yellow ._ 




11, 708 


10, 598 


Milling yellow HG 


IG . . .. 




Milling yellow H5G 


IG 






Milling yellow 


IG 








IG 






Minaxo (Oxamine) acid brown G. .. 


IG 

IG 


2,600 

750 

17, 192 




Naphthol blue-black FQ 




Neolan black 




Neolan black GG 


I 




Neolan black RR ... 


I . . 










52, 675 


49, 413 


Neolan blue B 


I 




Neolan blue BR 


I 






Neolan blue G ... . . . . . . 


I 






Neolan blue GG 


I 






Neolan blue GR 


I 






Neolan blue RR 


I . 






Neolan Bordeaux R . ....... 


I . - . 


29, 312 
441 
220 






I 




Neolan gray 








I 




Neolan gray RS . 


I 






.>Jeolan green LBN... 


I 


7,714 
18, 625 




Neolan orange .. . ...... .... ... .. 




26,220 




I 




Neolan orange GRE 


I 








I 






Neolan pink . .... . ...... 




33, 665 




Neolan pink B 


I 




Neolan pink G 


I 










991 




Neolan red B 


I 




Neolan red R. 


I 






Neolan verdone B 


I 


2,312 





DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 101 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Invoice 
value 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 



IG. 



IG. 



IG- 



IG- 



Neolan violet 

Neolan violet R - - 

Neolan violet 3R 

Neolan violet brown B 

Neolan yellow 

Neolan yellow G 

Neolan yellow GR 

Neolan yellow R 

Neotolyl black TL extra 

Neutral brown RX 

Neutral red BX 

Novazol acid blue 

Novazol acid blue BL supra 

Novazol acid blue GL supra 

Novazol blue B 

Novazol violet B 

Onis (AnthosLne) 

Onis B 

Onis3B --- 

Palatine black., 

Pilatus black SF 

Palatine fast black 

Pilatus fast black GG 

Palatine fast blue 

Pilatus fast blue BN.... 

Pilatus fast blue BR.... 

Pilatus fast blue G 

Pilatus fast blue GGN -.. 

Pilatus fast blue GR...., 

Pilatus fast blue X... 

Palatine fast brown 

Pilatus fast brown BRRNO 

Palatine fast claret 

Pilatus fast claret RNX 

Palatine fast dark green 

Pilatus fast dark green BNOO 

Palatine fast gray 

Pilatus fast gray B 

Palatine fast green 

Pilatus fast green BL cone 

Palatine fast orange 

Pilatus fast orange GN 

Pilatus fast orange R 

Palatine fast pink 

Pilatus fast pink B 

Pilatus fast pink BNOO.... 

Pilatus fast pink G 

Palatine fast red 

Pilatus fast red RN 

Palatine fast violet 

Pilatus fast violet R 

Pilatus fast violet 3RN 

Palatine fast yellow 

Pilatus fast vellow G 

Pilatus fast vellow GRN 

Pilatus fast yellow 3GN 

Polar blue G supra 

Polar brilliant red 

Polar brilliant red B cone 

Polar brilliant red 3B cone. 

Polar gray.- 

Polar maroon VC 

Polar orange 

Polar orange GS cone 

Polar orange R cone 

Polar red 

Polar red B cone 

Polar red 3B cone 

Polar yellow 

Polar yellow 2G cone 

Polar yellow il cone 

Polytrop blue- 

Polvtrop blue 3G 

Polytrop blue R I DH. 

Radio brown B. -.| IG.. 



IG. 



IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 



IG. 
IG- 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
G.. 



DH- 



Pounds 
5,067 



1,873 
31, 079 



9, 250 
2,149 
1,433 
7,714 



46, 296 
2,204 



450 



50 



4,600 



200 



1,100 



25 



600 



3,750 



475 



3,075 



100 



800 



3,250 



55 
13, 227 



6,062 
2,Z04 
39, 681 



26, 567 



102 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED ACID DYES— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Radio navy blue B 


IG 

IG 


Pounds 
250 
4,800 
66 




Selan printing brown 3R 




Sella acid brown,. 




Sella acid brown B 


G-. 




Sella acid brown G. .-..-. 


G.. 






Sella acid brown R 


G 






Silk vellow. _ . 




3,950 




Silk yellow GF .._.. 


IG 




Silk yellow R 


IG 






Sulfo rhodamine. 






$8, 79ft 


Sulfo rhodamine BG 


IG 

IG 

IG 

M . .. 


3,750 

25 

400 

110 

152 

16, 050 

2,250 


Sulfo rhodamine 3B extra . -..--.----.-. 




Sulfo rhodamine G extra 




Acid rhodamine BG extra . 




Acid rhodamine G __ 


M 




Sulfon orange G 


IG 




Sulfon yellow 




Sulfon yellow 5G _ 


IG 




Sulfon yellow R... .. -.-..--.. 


IG 






Supra light rubine BL . . . . . . 


IG 


25 
6,361 




Supramine black . . . . 




Acid black BR 


Bv 




Supramine black BR . 


IG 






Supramine blue 




5,400 




Supramine blue FB _.. 


IG 




Supramine blue R 


IG 






Supramine Bordeaux B . . . . ... . 


IG 


3,500 
4,290 




Supramine brown . . . .. 


6,403 


Acid brown G . 


By 


Supramine brown G . 


IG 






Supramine brown R 


IG 






Supramine green 




950 




Supramine green BL ...... -......,. 


iG."""':":' 






IG 






Supramine red. _.. . _. 




7,718 


9,052 


Acid red 2G . 


By 




Supramine red B 


IG 






Supramine red 2G .-. 


IG 






Supramine violet R 


IG 


350 
5,600 




Supramine vellow 


7,667 


Acid yellow R supra . 


By 




Supramine vellow G 


IG 






Supramine yellow 3G . 


IG 






Supramine yellow R . .--....-..-...... 


IG 






Wool black GRF.-.. 




8,624 




Wool black GRF 


A 




Wool black GRF 


IG 






Wool blue. . - 




2,558 


3,145 


Wool blue 5B f. f. s 


IG 






IG 






Wool blue R extra ......... .... 


IG 








A 






Wool fast orange G... 




1,784 






By 




Wool fast orange O. ........ ... . 


IG 






Wool fast vellow 5G.- 


By 

S 


1,102 

632 

33, 273 

500 

2,000 




Xylene brilliant blue FFRX cone 




Xvlene fast blue FF cone 


S 




Xvlene milling orange R cone .-...._.. 


s 




Xylene milling red B cone - . . . . . . - 


s 











UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES 



Algol blue 3RP pdr 

Algol blue 4R paste 

Algol Bordeaux B (single strength). 

Algol Bordeaux B pdr.. 

Algol printing violet RR extra 

Algol scarlet B 

Eridan brilliant scarlet B paste. 

P>idan brilliant scr-.rltt B pdr... 
Algol scarlet 3B (single strength) . . . 

Ilydron scarlet 3B pr.ste 

Hydron scarlet 3B pdr 



IG. 
IG, 



IG- 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



1,708 
2,500 
1,200 



6,200 

150 

21, 360 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 103 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Algol scarlet RB 

Ilvdron scarlet 2B paste 

Algol violet BBN 

Hydron violet BBF dbl. paste (single strength) . 

Hydron violet BBF pdr 

Algol violet R (single strength) 

Algol violet R pdr 

Algol yellow GR (single strength) 

Algol yellow GR pdr 

Alizanthrenc navy blue paste 

Alizanthrene yellow 6R paste 

Anthra yellow 8G paste 

Ciba blue BR paste 

Ciba brown G paste 

Ciba pink BG . 

Ciba pink BG paste -.. 

Ciba pink BG pdr l... 

Ciba violet (single strength) 

Ciba violet CR paste 

Ciba violet 6R pdr 

Cibanone black 

Cibanone black BA pdr 

Cibanone black EA pdr 

Cibanone brown R pdr 

Cibanone golden orange G pdr 

Cibanone golden orange 2R (single strength) 

Cibanone golden orange 2R paste 

Cibanone golden orange 2R pdr .- 

Cibanone green OG pdr 

Cibanone navy blue RA (single strength) 

Cibanone navy blue RA paste 

Cibanone navy blue RA pdr 

Cibanone orange 6R 

Cibanone oiange fiR paste 

Cibanone orange GR pdr 

Cibanone orange 8R (single strength) 

Cibanone orange 8R paste 

Cibanone orange 8R pdr 

Cibanone red 

Cibanone red 4B paste 

Cibanone red B pdr 

Cibanone red 4B pdr 

Cibanone red 3G pdr 

Cibanone red G pdr 

Cibanone red RK pdr 

Cibanone violet 

Cibanone violet 2R paste 

Cibanone violet 4R paste 

Cibanone violet 4R pdr 

Cibanone yellow - 

Cibanone yellow 3G paste 

Cibanone yellow 2GR pdr 

Grelanone red 

Grelanone red 2B paste 

Grelanone red 2B pdr 

Helindone black 

Helindone black 3B vat (in grains) 

Helindone black T vat (in grains) 

Helindone blue 3G pdr 

Helindone brilliant green 

Vat brilliant green 5G paste 

Helindone brilliant yellow G cone, pdr 

Helindone brown 

Helindone brown CV vat pdr 

Helindone brown CRD vat pdr 

Helindone green B vat.. 

Helindone red CR vat 

Helindone violet BBN dbl. paste (single strength)... 

Hydron blue BBF paste 

Hydron brown R (single strength) 

Hydron brown R pdr 

^'at brown R pdr 

Hydron pink FB (single strength) 

Vat brilliant pink B paste 

Vat brilliant pink B pdr 



IG. 



Pounds 
11,000 



IG_ 
IG. 



IG. 



400 
650 
800 



IG... 
BAC. 
BAC. 
IG... 

I 

I 



2,100 



IG. 

IG. 



IG. 
IG- 
IQ. 



M.. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
C. 



IG. 
IG. 



5,200 

200 

500 

441 

53, 562 



20, 232 
110 
990 



330 
441 
110 
210 
770 



110 
1,430 



993 

220 

1,870 



551 



220 
220 



1,212 
110 



882 
110 



4,850 
600 
400 



100 
4,861 



55 
300 



75 

150 

2,000 

50 
1,920 



11,384 



114492—30- 



104 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



lO- 



IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG- 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG- 



IG. 
IG. 



Hydron pink FF (single strength) 

Vat brilliant pink R paste I IG 

Vat brilliant pink R pdr. 

Hydron yellow olive GG paste 

Tndanthrene Blue 8GK (single strength) 

Vat blue 8GK paste... 

Vat blue 8GK pdr 

Indanthrene blue RZ (single strength) 

Vat blue RZ dbl. paste 

Indanthrene brilliant blue (single strength) 

Vat brilliant blue 30 paste 

Vat brilliant blue 3G pdr 

Vat brilliant blue R paste 

Vat brilliant blue R pdr. 

Indanthrene brilliant green GG (single strength) 

Vat briUiant green GG dbl. paste 

Indanthrene brilliant orange . 

Vat brilliant orange GK paste 

Vat brilliant orange GK pdr 

Vat brilliant orange RK paste 

Vat brilliant orange RK pdr 

Indanthrene brilliant violet (single strength) 

Vat brilliant violet 3B paste 

Vat brilliant violet 3B pdr 

Vat brilliant violet RRP 

Vat brilliant violet 4R paste.. 

Vat brilliant violet 4R pdr 

Indanthrene brown FFR paste 

Indanthrene brown GG (single strength) 

Vat brown GG paste 

Vat brown GG pdr 

Indanthrene golden orange 3G (single strength) 

Vat golden orange 3G paste 

Vat golden orange 3G pdr 

Indanthrene gray (single strength) 

Vat gray 3B paste 

Vat gray 3B pdr 

Vat gray RRH paste 

Vat gray RRH pdr 

Indanthrene green (single strength) 

Vat green GG paste 

Vat green GG pdr 

Indanthrene khaki (single strength) 

Vat khaki GG paste.. 

Vat khaki GG pdr...^ 

Indanthrene orange RRT (single strength) 

Vat orange RRT paste 

Vat orange RRTS pdr 

Indanthrene orange 3R (single strength) 

Vat orange F3R paste 

Vat orange F3R pdr 

Vat orange 3R paste 

Vat orange 3R pdr 

Indanthrene orange 4R (single strength) 

Vat orange 4R paste 

Vat orange 4R pdr 

Indanthrene pink B (single strength) 

Vat pink B dbl. paste 

Vat pink B pdr 

Indanthrene red (single strength) 

Vat red BK paste 

Vat red BK i)dr 

Vat red GG paste 

Vat red GG pdr._ 

Indanthrene red-brown (single strength) 

Vat red-brown R pdr 

Vat red-brown riRF paste fine 

Vat red-brown biiV pdr 

Indanthrene yellow FFRK (single strength) 

Vat yellow FFKK paste 

Vat yellow P'FRK pilr 

Indanthrene yellow RK (single strength) 

Vat yellow RK pdr 

Indanthrene yellow 3RT (single strength) 

Vat yellow 3RT paste i IG 

Vat yellow 3RT pdr I IG 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
50, 450 



100 
125 



12, 400 



7,053 



19,864 



1,000 

45 

7,713 

450 



1,100 

1,876 

37, 764 

225 
28, 850 



32, 990 



18, 014 



27, 070 



15,600 



39, 063 



27, 086 



3,625 



7,600 



14, 399 



2,380 



3,600 



375 



3,500 



Invoice 
value 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 105 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, cale7idar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED VAT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Indanthrene yellow-brown 3G (single strength). 

Vat yellow-brown 3G paste 

Vat yellow-brown 3G pdr 

Jndigosol 

Indigosol 06B 

Indigosol 06B 

Indigosol HB 

Indigosol black 

Indigosol black IB 

Indigosol black IB 

Indigosol golden yellow 

Indigosol golden yellow IGK 

Indigosol golden yellow IGK 

Indigosol green ■. 

Indigosol green AB 

Indigosol green AB 

Indigosol pink IR extra 

Indigosol red IIR 

Indigosol scarlet 

Indigosol scarlet HB 

Indigosol scarlet HB.. 

Indigosol violet.. 

Indigosol violet AZB 

Indigosol violet AZB 

Paradone gray B paste .' 

Thioindigo black B. 

Vat black B paste 

Vat blue green FFB paste 

Vat brilliant pink RF 

Vat brown 3GT paste 

Vat brown RRD paste 

Vat brown RT paste 

Vat direct black RB (single strength) 

Vat direct black RB paste... 

Vat direct black RB pdr 

Vat golden yellow QK (single strength) 

Vat golden yellow GK dbl. paste 

Vat green GT paste.. 

Vat navy blue (single strength) 

Vat navy blue R paste 

Vat navy blue R pdr ._ 

Vat olive 3G paste 

Vat olive GN (single strength) 

Vat olive GN paste 

Vat olive GN pdr 

Vat printing black B paste 

Vat printing blue B paste.. 

Vat printing brown R paste 

Vat printing deep black BD paste. 

Vat printing purple R paste 

Vat printing red G paste 

Vat printing violet... 

Vat printing violet BBF paste 

Vat printing violet RF paste 

Vat scarlet B 

Vat scarlet B paste 

Vat scarlet B pdr 

Vat violet (single strength) 

Vat violet FFBN paste 

Vat violet FFBN pdr 

Vat yellow (single strength) 

Vat yellow GF paste 

Vat yellow GF pdr 

Vat vellow 3GF dbl. paste 

Vat yellow 3GF pdr. 

Vat yellow NF paste 

Vat yellow oGK (single strength) 

Vat yellow 5GK dbl. paste 

Vat yellow 3R paste 



Manufac- 
turer 



IG. 
IG. 



DH. 
IG.. 
DH. 



DH. 
IG.. 



DH. 
IG.. 



DH- 
IG.. 
DH- 
DH- 



DH. 
IG.. 



DH.. 
IG- . 
LBH- 



K.. 
IG. 
IG_ 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
5,431 



1,310 



2,993 



1,826 



1,446 



2,670 

245 

2,465 



1,092 



1,102 



1,010 

778 
300 

5,450 
10,800 

9,154 



441, 238 



950 
3,625 



250 
5,600 



162, 800 

5,550 

30, 977 

2,609 

175 

300 

6,550 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



11,800 

400 

1,696 



IG. 

IG. 
IG_ 
IG. 
C. 



20,871 



13,064 



IG. 
IG- 



106 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 38. — Imports of dyes, caleniar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED MORDANT AND CHROME DYES 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Acid alizarin gray G.. 


IG 


Pounds 
5,150 
4,937 




Acid anthracene brown . . . 




Acid anthracene brown PG 


IG . 




Acid anthracene brown WSG 


IG 






Acid anthracene red.. 




5,258 




Acid anthracene red 3BL.. 


IG. 




Acid anthracene red 5BL. 


IG.. 






Acid chrome red B _ 


IG 

IG 


1,750 
2,150 
3,382 




Acid chrome yellow RL extra.. 




Alizarin blue-green 




Alizarin blue-green BB cone 


S 




Alizarin blue-green BBS cone 


S.. 






Alizarin carmoisine 


DH-. 

IG 

IG 

IG.. 


771 

1,550 

50 

500 
6,001 




Alizarin fast grav BBL pdr . 




Alizarin fast light brown GL pdr 




Anthracene blue SWG pdr 




Anthracene chromate brown... 




Anthracene chromate brown EB 


IG 




Omega chrome brown EB.. 


S.... 




...... 


Anthracene chrome blue G 


IG 

IG. 

IG 

IG 


40 
50 
25 
45 
551 




Azol printing Bordeaux B extra . 




Azol printing red R extra . . . 




Azol printing violet RR extra.. 




Brilliant chrome blue 




Brilliant chrome blue 2B 


DH. 




Brilliant chrome blue S .. . . 


DH . ... 






Brilliant chrome violet _ 




275 




Brilliant chrome violet 4B 


DH 




Brilliant chrome violet 6B 


DH 






Brilliant delphine blue NS ._ 


S 


1,000 
165 
331 
110 
440 
55 
110 
551 
100 
991 
110 

1,100 
77 
55 

1,761 
132 




Chromal violet RCX 


G ... . 




Chromanol black RVI . 


DH. 

DH 

DH 

DH 

I 




Chromanol violet RI.. 




Chromazurine DN 




Chrome deep brown RRN 




Chrome fast brown EB 






I 




Chrome fast orange RD pdr. . . .. .. 


IG 

DH 

DH. 

DH.. 

DH 

DH. 

DH 




Chrome fast phosphine B 




Chrome fast vesuvine BB 




Chrome fast xanthine 2R 




Chrome gray III 




Chrome green DC . .. .. 




Chrome olive JCS 




Chrome printing orange.. 




Chrome printing orange BW 


DH 






I 






Chrome printing red ... 




2,092 


$3, 599> 


Chrome printing red B 


DH 




Chrome printing red B 


I. 






Chrome printing red Y .. 


DH . 






Chrome violet CBD 


DH 

DH 


220 

220 

3,308 








Chromocitronine 




Chromocitronine 3R 


DH 




Chromocitronine V . ... 


DH 






Chromogene red BD . .. 


IG 

DH 

DH.. 

DH 


50 
55 

1,871 
331 

6,791 




Chromopurpurine JJ.. 




Chromorhodine CGN extra 




Chromovesuvine RA . . 








Chromoxane brilliant violet BD 


IG 




Chromoxane brilliant violet SB 


IG . 






Chromoxane pure blue BLD ... ... 


IG.. 

IG 

IG. 

IG 


1,650 i 

350 

300 

1,550 

6,174 








Diamond green BW 




Diamond red 3B 




Eriochromal brown . _ . . . 




Eriochromal brown AEB 


G 




Eriochromal brown G 


G 






Eriochrome blue S . . 


G 


8,818 
3,306 

14,883 

165 1 
2,204 

12, 127 




Eriochrome blue black O.. 


G 




Eriochrome brilliant violet B supra 


O 




Eriochrome flavine 2QL supra ... 


G 






Q 




Eriochrome red G 


G 





DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 107 



Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED MORDANT AND CHROME DYES— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Eriochrome violet .. .. . .. 




Pounds 
12, 125 




Eriochrome violet B 


G. 




Eriochrome violet SB 


G 






Oallazol fast brown. ._ _ 




275 




Gallazol fast brown B2R 


G 




Gallazol fast brown R 


G 






Gallophenine P .. . . .. . .. 


IG 

IG 

IG-. 


250 

60 

2,500 

1,900 




Isochrome green 3BF.. 




Metachrome blue-black 2BX . 




Metachrome brilliant blue ... 


$1, 287 


Metachrome brilliant blue BL 


IG.. 




Metachrome brilliant blue 2RL 


IG 






Metachrome brilliant blue 8RL . 


IG 








IG 

IG 

IG 

IG.. 


5,900 
2,550 
2,400 
1,900 
7.605 




Metachrome olive 2G 




Metachrome red G ^ 




Metachrome violet RR 




Modern black 




Modern black CVI .. . .. 


DH 






DH. 






Modern blue CVI 


DH 

DH 

DH. 

IG 

I 


220 

1,984 

441 

425 

6,612 

55 

5,941 




Modern gray PS 


















DH. 








Omega chrome brown G cone 


S 






S 






Omega chrome fast blue B cone 

Omega chrome violet B cone 

Polytrop blue 3G. 

Radio chrome blue B 


s 


4,500 

1,500 

110 

3,000 

50 

150 

400 

(350 




s 




DH 

IG 

IG 

IG 

IG 






Supranol Bordeaux B 














Supranol red BB 

Supranol red RX 


IG . 




IG 








IG 

s 


100 
500 
500 








Ultra cyanol B cone.. 


S 









UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES 



Benzo bronze E .. 


IG 

IG 


200 

900 

2,250 




Benzo chrome black blue B .. .. 










IG 






IG 






Benzo dark brown extra - . 


IG 

IG... 


250 
9,300 
7,250 










$8,034 


Benzo fast blue G . 


ig:::::.:: 




Benzo fast blue2GL 


IG 








IG 






Benzo fast blue 8GL . 


IG 






Benzo fast Bordeaux 6BL 


IG 


3,200 
42, 832 






37, 610 




IG 






IG 








By 








IG... 

IG 


250 
9,750 
3,600 








Benzo fast heliotrope 






io 






IG 






Benzo fast light scarlet 4BL . . 


IG 


3,000 
7,100 










io. 




Cotton fast orange 2RL . .... 


By 






Benzo fast red . ..... 




550 




Benzo fast red 6BL... . ... 


IG... 




Benzo fast red QL 


IG 








108 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Benzo fast scarlet 8BSN 


IQ 


Pounds 
200 
18, 013 




Benzofast yellow .,.. 




Benzo fast yellow RL... 


IG .... 




Cotton fast yellow RL 


By . 






Benzo pure yellow FF..- .. .. 


IG 


75 
1,539 




Benzo red 12B 




Benzo red 12B 


IG . 




Benzo red 12B.._ 


By . 






Benzo rhoduline red 




4,518 


$2,636 


Benzo rhoduline red B 


IG .. 


Benzo rhoduline red 3B.. 


IG 






Benzo rhoduline red SB 


Bv 






Direct fast red 3B_ 


By 






Benzo rubine SC 


IG. 

IG... 

IG 

IG 


100 
25 
100 
350 
661 




Benzoform blue BBL_ 




Benzoform orange G.. 




Benzoform scarlet B 




Brilliant benzo fast violet 




Direct fast violet 4BL 


By 




Brilliant benzo fast yellow GL 


IQ..:::::: 


3,117 
10, 178 




Briliant benzo green B 




Brilliant benzo green B 


IQ 




Direct brilliant green B 


By 






Brilliant benzo violet. . 




1,198 






IG 




Brilliant benzo violet 2R 


IG 







Brilliant congo blue 5R 


IG. 

IG 

IQ 


1,000 

2,300 

300 

14, 492 




Brilliant congo violet R 




Brilliant fast blue 3BX 




Brilliant pure yellow 




Brilliant pure yellow 6G extra... 


By 




Brilliant pure yellow 6G extra P 


IG 






Brilliant sliy-blue 




16, 280 


19,259 


Brilliant sky-blue G 


IG 


Brilliant sky-blue R 


IQ 






Brilliant sky-blue RRM 


IG 






Chicago red III 


G 


6,614 

2,500 

500 

6,200 




C hi oramine brown 2R cone 


S - -- 




Chloramine f;ist brown R cone 


S - . 




Chloramine fast orange... .. 






Chloraniine fast orange R cone. 


s 




Chloramine fast orange 2R cone 


s 






Chloramine light gray B cone 


s 


500 

1,000 

850 

551 

1,784 

8,264 

20, 937 




Chloramine light violet R cone 


s 




Chloramine violet FFB 


IG 




Chlorantine brown Y 




Chlorantine fast blue SQL 






Chlorantine fast Bordeaux 2BL 






Chlorantine fast brown.. 




20,590 


Chlorantine fast brown BRL 




Chlorantine fast brown 5GL.. 








Chlorantine fast brown 2RL 








Chlorantine fast brown 3RL 








Chlorantine fast brown 4RL 








Chlorantine fast green B 




26, 449 

1,544 

551 

992 

29, 865 










Chlorantine fast red 5GL 






Chlorantine fast rubine RL 






Chlorantine fast violet 




22, 539 


Chlorantine fast violet SBL 






Chlorantine fast violet RL 








Chlorantine fast violet 2RL 








Chlorantine fast yellow RL 




551 
3,011 










Chlorazol drab Rll 


BDC 




Clilorazol drab RUS 


BDC 






Chlorazol fast brown RKS 


BDC 


5,001 
5,560 




Chlorazol fast orange 




Chlorazol fast orange AG 


BDC 






BDC 






Chlorazol vellow 6GS .. 


BDC 

IG 


50 
4,000 
2,400 




Cotonerol A extra 




Cotton black ... 




Cotton black AC 


IG .. 




Cotton black A4G 


IQ 








I.... 


220 





DYES. IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 109 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Developing black 

Developing black ED. 

Developing black OT.. 

Developing blue B 

Diamine azo Bordeaux BL 

Diamine azo brown 3G 

Diamine azo green j 

Diamine azo green 3G - IG 

Direct azo green 3G- 1 C. 

Diamine brilliant rubine S i IG 

Diamine brilliant scarlet S -.. i IG 

Diamine bronze-brown PE IG. 

Diamine catechine 

Diamine eatechine B 

Diamine catechine G 

Diamine catechine 3G... 
Diamine fast Bordeaux 6BS. 
Diamine fast brown 

Diamine fast brown GB... IG. 

Diamine fast brown GBB | IG. 

Diamine fast brown GF j IG. 

Diamine fast brown R, R cone -| IG. 

Diamine fast orange - 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
C. 



Diamine fast orange EG 

Diamine fast orange ER, ER cone 

Sunfast orange EGL 

Diamine gray O 

Diaminogen GG 

Dianil yellow 5G 

Diazanil pink B •. 

Diazanil scarlet 3BA cone. 

Diazo brilliant blue 2BL extra 

Diazo brilliant green 3G 

Diazo brilliant orange 5G extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 

Diazo brilliant scarlet B extra. 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 6B extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 2BL extra cone. 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 3BA extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet ROA extra 

Diazo brilliant scarlet G extra , 

Diazo brilliant scarlet S4B 

Diazo brown 

Diazo brown BW 

Diazo brown G 

Diazo brown 3G 

Diazo brown 6G , 

Diazo brown 2GW. 

Diazo brown 3R ._ 

Diazo brown 3RB 

Diazo fast blue 

Diazo fast blue 6GW 

Diazo fast blue 4R\V 

Diazo fast Bordeaux BL 

Diazo fast green 

Diazo fast green GFL.. 

Diazo fast green GL 

Diazo fast red 7BL 

Diazo fast violet 

Diazo fast violet BL 

Diazo fast violet 3RL 

Diazo fast yellow 

Diazo fast yellow 3GL 

Diazo fast yellow 3RL 

Diazo green 3G 

Diazo indigo blue 4GL extra 

Diazo rubine B 

Diazo pure blue 

Diazo sky blue B. 

Diazo sky blue 3G.. 

• Diazo sky blueSGL 

Developed pure blue B 

Developed sky blue 3GL , 

Diazo yellow R 

Diazol brilliant orange NJN 

Diazol light red N8B 



IG. 
IG. 
Q.. 
IG. 
C. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG- 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
I... 
IG. 
IG. 



I... 
I-._ 
IG. 



IG. 
I... 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
I... 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG.. 
IG.. 
IG.. 
By.. 
By.. 
IG.. 
CN. 
ON. 



Pounds 
575 



2,000 

359 

1,211 

9,990 



50 

2,680 

480 

12, 765 



991 
7,550 



21,837 



100 

4,981 

900 

900 

700 

1,500 

10, 550 

2,663 

13, 630 



12, 218 



5,621 



1,500 
410 



2,000 
5,900 



1,050 

3,700 

2,300 

22, 480 



50 
1,102 

158 



110 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DIRECT DYES-Continued 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Diazophenyl black V 


G 


Pounds 
1,433 
6,615 
4,122 
1,324 
2,755 
11,024 
2,204 
4,187 




Diphenyl brown BBNC 


G 




Diphenyl catechine R supra 


G 




Diphenyl fast Bordeaux BC 


G 




Diphenvl fast bronze B 


G 




Diphenyl fast brown GNC . . . 


G 




Diphenyl pure yellow 5G cone .... 


G 




Direct cutch brown. 






Direct cutch brown BS 


I 




Direct cutch brown GR 


I 






Direct fast red 2B 





672 

1,477 

331 

110 

440 

1,075 

2,300 

225 

25 

1,725 




Direct gray R paste I 


G" .:.: 




Direct pink EG supra.. 


G 




Direct pure green B pdr... 


Q 




Direct safranine RW 


I 




Fast cotton blue FFG 


IG.. 

IG 

IG 

IG 




Fast cotton grav GL ... 




Fast cotton rubine SB 




Fastusol brown T.. 




Fastusol green 




Fastusol green BB 


IG 




Fastusol green BL 


IG 






Jastusol red violet BBL 


IG 

IG 

G 


25 
1,450 
3,198 
500 
220 
150 
750 




Fastusol violet BL 




Formal fast black G cone. 




Half-wool blue O 


IG 

A 




Naphthogene blue B 




New claret RX 


IG 




Oxamine black . . . . . 




Minaxo black BBNX 


IG 




Oxamine brilliant red 




100 




Minaxo brilliant red B 


IG 




Oxamine light brown ... 




60 




Minaxo light brown G ... 


IG 




Oxamine light pink 




1,700 




Minaxo light pink BBX 


IG 




Oxamine red 




400 




Minaxo red X. .. 


IG.. - 




Paranil brown 




775 




Paranil brown BBX . . . 


IG 




Paranil brown 0.. 


IG 






Parasulfon brown V. 


S 


500 

925 

1,700 

1,212 




Pluto black G extra 


IG 

IG 




Pluto brown 2G 




Rosanthrene . 


$1, 830 


Rosanthrene B 


I 




Rosanthrene R 


I 


1 


Rosanthrene RN 


I 






Rosanthrene Bordeaux B 


I 


2,424 
660 
772 

2,535 

1,872 

4,408 
400 
100 

1,550 
560 

1,500 
100 

3,948 




Rosanthrene brilliant orange 4R.. 


I 




Rosanthrene brilliant red BR 


I 




Rosanthrene fast Bordeaux 2BL 


I. 




Rosanthrene fast red 7BL 


I 




Rosanthrene orange R .. . 


I 




Sky blue N 


IG 

IG 

IG 

QrE. 

S 




Toluylene fast brown RR 








Triazol fast orange 2RL . . . 








Universal blue-black C 


IG 








Developed black D 


A 




Zambesi black F 


IG 






Zambesi brown IR 


IG. 

IG 


900 
300 




Zambesi pure blue 4BG 









UNIDENTIFIED DYES FOR RAYON AND OTHER SYNTHETIC TEXTILES 



Art silk black R . 


IG 


1,500 
330 




Artificial silk blue. 




Artificial silk blue G 


I 






I 






Artisil direct blue SAP cone 


S 


220 
220 




Artisil direct orange 2RP cone. 


S 





DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 111 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DYES FOR RAYON AND OTHER SYNTHETIC TEXTILES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Artisil direct violet BP cone 

Artisil direct yellow 3GP cone 

Cellit blue R 

Cellit fast red 

Cellit fast red B 

Cellit fast red 2B 

Cellit fast violet 4R 

Cellit fast yellow R 

Celliazol ST pdr 

Celliton blue extra 

Celliton blue extra paste 

Celliton blue extra pdr 

Celliton fast black 

Celliton fast black B paste 

Celliton fast black G paste 

Celliton fast blue 

Celliton fast blue B paste 

Celliton fast blue 2B paste 

Celliton fast blue B pdr 

Celliton fast blue-green B paste 

Celliton fast navy blue 

Celliton fast "navy blue B paste 

Celliton fast navy blue GT paste 

Celliton fast pink 

Celliton fast pink B paste 

Celliton fast pink F3B paste 

Celliton fast pink B pdr 

Celliton fast pink FSB pdr 

Celliton fast red violet 

Celliton fast red violet R paste 

Celliton fast red violet R pdr 

Celliton fast violet. 

Celliton fast violet B paste 

Celliton fast violet B pdr 

Celliton fast yellow.. 

Celliton fast yellow G paste 

Celliton fast yellow R paste 

Celliton fast yellow RR paste 

Celliton fast yellow G pdr 

Celliton fast yellow RR pdr 

Celliton orange 

Celliton orange R paste 

Celliton orange GR pdr. 

Celliton printing yellow 

Celliton printing yellow 3R paste 

Celliton printing yellow 3R pdr 

Celliton red 

Celliton red R paste... 

Celliton red R pdr 

Celliton yellow 3G pdr 

Cibacete black BN green shade pdr 

Cibacete blue 

Cibacete blue B paste 

Cibacete blue 2R paste 

Cibacete diazo black J pdr 

Cibacete navy blue BN green shade pdr. 

Cibacete orange 

Cibacete orange 2R pdr 

Cibacete orange 3R pdr 

Cibacete red 

Cibacete red 3B pdr 

Cibacete red GR paste 

Cibacete saphire blue G pdr 

Cibacete scarlet G pdr 

Cibacete turquoise blue paste 

Cibacete violet 

Cibacete violet B pdr 

Cibacete violet 2R pdr. 

Cibacete yellow 

Cibacete yellow 3Q paste. 

Cibacete yellow 3G pdr 

Cibacete yellow GN pdr 

Cibacete yellow R pdr. 



S... 
S... 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG- 



IG. 

IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 

IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 

IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG- 
IG- 
IQ. 
I... 



Pounds 
220 
220 
600 
250 



125 
200 
850 



1,740 
150 
552 



4,000 

125 

2,600 

302 



} 3, 800 

} 1, 575 



1,600 
600 



1,000 
50 



3,050 
} 1, 300 



1,350 
250 



175 
25 



3,350 

1,025 

50 

1,102 

275 



110 
991 
660 



551 
2,644 
3,635 
220 
881 
550 



8, 265 



112 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED DYES FOR KAYON AND OTHER SYNTHETIC TEXTILES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Manufac- 
turer 



Imports 



Quantity 



Disperse] yellow 

Dispersol yellow 3G paste 

Dispersol yellow CY 

Duranol black paste. 

Duranol blue 

Duranol blue CB paste 

Duranol blue 2B paste 

Duranol blue G paste 

Duranol brilliant violet B 

Duranol brown 

Duranol brown Q paste.. 

Duranol brown R paste 

Duranol orange G paste 

Duranol red 

Duranol red B 

Duranol red 2B 

Duranol red G 

Duranol violet 2R paste 

Icyl blue 

Icyl blue G.. 

Icyl blue GS. 

Icyl brown GS 

Icyl orange 

Icyl orange GS 

Icyl orange RS 

Icyl red G. 

Icyl violet BS 

lonamine 

lonamine AS 

lonamine BS 

lonamine LS paste --. 

lonamine blue BS 

lonamine red 

lonamine red GAS 

lonamine red KAS 

Setacyl brilliant pink Q 

Setacyl direct blue 

Setacyl direct blue Q pdr. 

Setacyl direct blue G new 

Setacyl direct blue 2GS pdr 

Setacyl direct blue 2GS supra I. 

Setacyl direct blue R pdr 

Setacyl direct blue RS cone 

Setacyl direct orange 2R pdr 

Setacyl direct pink 3B cone 

Setacyl direct red 

Setacyl direct red BN pdr 

Setacyl direct red GBN supra.. 

Setacyl direct red GN pdr 

Setacyl direct red GN supra 

Setacyl direct scarlet 

Setacyl direct scarlet G cone 

Setacyl direct scarlet G pdr 

Setacyl direct violet 

Setacyl direct violet B cone 

Setacyl direct violet R cone 

Setacyl direct violet R pdr 

Setacyl direct violet R supra 

Setacyl direct yellow 

Setacyl direct yellow GR supra. 

Setacyl direct yellow R pdr 

SRA black III paste 

Viscolan black B cone 



Pounds 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC- 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



BDC. 
BDC. 
Q 



G... 
G... 
BC. 

S.... 



970 

60 

720 



60 

495 

9,545 

60 

180 



480 
6,785 



180 
1,160 



780 
320 



360 



1,650 

120 
240 
540 



386 
19, 166 



9,920 
4,963 
5,086 



1, 950 
'5,"635' 



3,626 



50 
21, 252 



UNIDENTIFIED RAPID FAST DYES 



Rapid fast blue B paste 

Rapid fast Bordeaux B paste. 
Rapid fast orange RH paste.. 
Rapid fast red ._ 

Rapid fast red B paste 

Rapid fast red BB paste.. 
Rapid fast red RII paste. 

Rapid fast scarlet LH paste.. 

Rapid fast yellow 2Gn pdr... 



IQ. 
IG. 
IG. 



IQ. 
IQ. 
IQ. 
IG. 
IQ. 



6,100 

100 

16.000 

37, 520 



100 
250 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 113 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED BASIC DYES 





Manufac- 
turer 


Imports 


Name of dye 


Quantity 


Invoice 
value 


Acridine brown ON cone 


3h:::::;. 

IG 

IG 


Pounds 

110 

991 

1,377 

2,000 

4,222 




Acridine flavine RD 




Acridine red brown _ 




Astra phloxine FF extra 




Urilliant acridine orange ... . 






DH 




Brilliant acridine orange 3R 


DH 






Brilliant acridine orance 5R 


DH . 






Brilliant rhoduline blue R .. . 


IG 

B 


2, 560 

200 

1,500 

3,525 




Euchrvsine G ... 




Japan black MBG. . -.. 


IG 








Leather brown ET 


IG... 




Leather brown 5RTX . . . 


IG ... 






Methylene blue 3G . '... 


IG 

IG 


50 

150 

59, 010 








Ehodan ine (single strength) 




Rhodaniine 6GDN extra 


IG 




Rhodanune fiGH extra 


S -. 






Rhoduline blue 5B . . . 


IG 

IG 

IG 

IG 

S 


100 

25 

1,070 

100 

500 

22 

4 




Rhoduline heliotrope B. .. . .. 




Rhoduline skv-blue 3G 




Special blue G 




Tannastrol GO 




Thio violet 5R 


DH 

IG 













UNIDENTIFIED SULFUR DYES 



Eclipse brown BK. 

Immedial bro'mi W cone 

Immedial direct blue RL high cone. 

Immedial yellow olive 5G 

Indocarbon 

Indocarbon CL cone 

Indocarbon CL tine for printing. 

Indocarbon CLG cone 

Indocarbon SN 

Sulfur black CL 

Katigen chrome blue 5G..- 

Katigen indigo CLGG extra 

Kurgan (Kryogene) violet 3RX 

Pyrogene brown G 

Pyrogene cutch 2R extra 

Pyrogene green 

Pyrogene green GK 

Pyrogene green GGK 

Pyrogene pure blue 

Pyrogene pure blue 3GL 

Pyrogene pure blue 2RL 

Sulfide new blue BL 

Sulfide violet V. 

Sulfur brown CL4R 

Thional brilliant blue 6BS cone 

Thional red brown 5R 

Thionol black 

Thionol black XXN cone 

Thionol black XXS 

Thionol brown OS 

Thionol navy blue XXS 



G... 
IG.. 
DH. 
IG.. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
C. 
IG. 
IG. 
I... 
I... 
I... 



I... 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 

S... 

s... 



BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 
BDC. 



22 

2,600 

1,400 

175 

54, 639 



4, 060 
3,500 
500 
3,527 
1,984 
22, 043 



25, 787 



10,000 

450 

600 

1,500 

2,500 

1,500 



4,479 
500 



UNIDENTIFIED COLOR-LAKE AND SPIRIT-SOLUBLE DYES 



Alizarin light blue 3G (oil soluble) 

Baykanol blue 

Baykanol Bordeaux 

Baykanol rubine 

Baykanol yellow 

Brillianton orange R pdr 

Cero blue TA pdr 

Fat blue Z... 

Frobeno red G 



S.. 
IG 
IG 
IG 
IG 
IG 
IG 
IG 
G. 



,400 

950 

450 

150 

450 

200 

50 

25 

11 



114 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1929 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED COLOR-LAKE AND SPIRIT-SOLUBLE DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Frobeno yellow O 

Gasoline blue No. 2 

Qrasol blue 

Grasol blue G 

Grasol blue R. --- 

Grasol orange 2R 

Grasol red B 

Qrasol yellow 

Grasol yellow 2G 

Grasol yellow OR 

Grasol yellow 2R 

Hansa green GS 

Hansa oranpe GG pdr 

Hansa red B pdr 

Hansa yellow A 

Hansa yellow A supra transparent paste. 
Hansa yellow A supra transparent pdr.. 

Hansa yellow 

Hansa yellow .5G pdr 

Hansa yellow 3R pdr 

Lake yellow oQ pdr 

Hansa yellow lOG 

Hansa yellow lOG special quality 

Hansa yellow lOG pdr 

Helio Bordeaux 

Helio Bordeaux BL paste 

Helio Bordeaux BL. 

Helio Bordeaux BL pdr. 

Helio fast pink 

Helio fast pink BL paste 

Helio fast pink RL paste 

Helio fast rubine 

Helio fast rubine 3BL.. 

Helio fast rubine 4BL 

Helio fast rubine 6BL 

Helio fast rubine RL 

Helio fast violet AL 

Helio fast yellow RL paste 

Helio red RMT extra pdr.. 

Oil lake black LSO. 

Paper fast Bordeaux B 

Permanent Bordeaux PER paste 

Permanent red FRL paste - 

Pigment brown R special quality 

Pigment deep black R 

Pigment green B 

Pigment green B paste 

Pigment green B pdr 

Pigment green special quality 

Pigment lake red LC special quality 

Rotor black 2B 

Spirit fast red 5B 

Stone fast yellow.. 

Stone fast yellow G pdr 

Stone fast yellow GA pdr 

Stone fast yellow GG extra paste 

Stone rubine. 

Stone rubine BK special quality 

Stone rubine BN pdr 

Stone rubine G pdr 

Sudan black 

Sudan black B 

Sudan black G 

Sudan black RT.... 

Sudan brown RR 

Sudan red 

Sudan red 7B_ 

Sudan red GG... _ ..- 

Tero black... 

Tero black FB 

Tero black FT. 

Tero brown 

Tero brown FQ 

Tero brown FR 

Tero carmine FB 

Tero yellow FR 



Manufac- 
turer 



G.. 
G.. 
G.. 
IG- 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
M.. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG.._ 
IG... 
IG... 
IG... 
BDC. 
IG.... 



IG- 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG- 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 
IG, 



Imports 



Quantity 



Pounds 
11 
50 
2,952 



2,850 
100 
50 



17,500 
1.250 
3,029 



300 
1,050 



13,000 

75 

6,880 

60, 500 



32, 495 



800 

5 

1,000 

900 

3,900 

2,000 

25 

50 

425 



7,510 
500 
50 
50 
60 
50 



7,300 
25 



50 

950 

7,050 



150 
650 



1,675 



75 



200 
500 



Dyes imported for consumption in united states 115 

Table 38. — Imports of dyes, calendar year 1928 — Continued 
UNIDENTIFIED COLOR-LAKE AND SPIRIT-SOLUBLE DYES— Continued 



Name of dye 



Zapon fast blue G 

Zapon fast orange O.. 

Zapon fast red CB 

Zapon fast scarlet 

Zapon fast scarlet CG. 

Zapon fast scarlet CR. 
Zapon fast yellow GR 



Manufac- 
turer 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



IG. 
IG. 
IG. 



Imports 



Q-ntity i l™ 



Pounds 

100 

2,050 

400 

50 



1,650 



UNIDENTIFIED UNCLASSIFIED DYES 



Bronze blue G paste, R paste. 

Copying blue BB base 

All other dyes 




$5, 542 



Index to table of dye imports 



Name of dye 


Colour 
Index 
No. 


Page 


Name of dye 


Colour 
Index 
No. 


Page 


A 


436 

172 


90 
89 

106 

106 
88 

106 

106 

106 
90 

102 
99 
92 
92 

102 
99 
92 

102 
99 

106 
90 

106 
94 
94 
91 
99 
99 
99 
99 
91 
91 
89 
90 
99 
99 
89 
92 
99 
99 

102 
92 

102 

102 
99 
99 
99 
99 
91 


Acid violet 6BN 


717 
717 
717 
702 


92 




Acid violet 6BNG- 


92 


Acetopurpurine 8B 


Acid violet 6BN00 _ 


92 


.\cid alizarin black R 


Acid violet 7B cone 

Acid violet 8B extra 


92 


Acid alizarin gray G 


99 


.\cid anthracene brown PG 




Acid violet CI OB. 


99 




105 


Acid violet R extra 


99 


Acid anthracene brown WSG 


Acid violet RN 


99 


Acid anthracene red 3BL 




Acid violet 4RN00. 

Acid vellow R 


758 


93 


Acid anthracene red 5BL 




102 


Acid anthracene red G 


443 


Acridine brown ON cone .. j 


113 


Acid black BR supra 


Acridine flavine RD 


113 


Acid black 2R 




Acridine orange P.. 

Acridine red brown O 


788 


93 


Acid blue A 


714 
712 


113 


Acid blue BG 


Acronol brilliant blue S 


664 


91 


Acid blue 5B ... 


Algol blue 3RP. 


102 


Acid blue RBF . 




Algol blue 4R 


102 


Acid blue V . 


712 


Algol blue 5R 


1200 


98 




Algol Bordeaux B 


102 


Acid brown RN . . 




Algol Bordeaux RT 


1143 
1223 
1123 
1116 
1137 
1217 
1211 
1211 
1128 


97 


Acid chrome red B 




Algol brown 3R 

Algol gray R 

Algol green BB _ 

Algol orange R 

Algol orange RF _ 

Algol pink B 


98 


Acid chrome vellow GL 


639 


96 


Acid chrome vellow RL 


96 


Acid cyanine BF 


853 
853 
692 


97 


Acid cvanine G. ... 


98 


Acid fuchsine 


98 


Acid leather brown EG 


.\lgol pink BG 


98 







Algol pink R. 


96 


Acid leather brown ER 




Algol printing violet RR 


102 


Acid light green AEJ. 




Algol red B 


1155 
1155 
1207 
1142 
1133 
1209 


97 


'V.cid magenta II 


692 
692 
307 
487 


Algol red BTK 


97 




Algol red 5B... 


98 




Algol red GT 


97 


Acid milling red R 


Algol red R_,.. 


97 


Acid milling vellow G.. . ... 


Algol rubine B 

Algol scarlet B _ 


98 






102 




196 
714 


Algol scarlet 3B _ 


102 


Acid pme blue A 


Algol scarlet G 


1129 
1228 
1098 


96 


Acid pure blue BR supra 


Algol scarlet 2G 


98 






Algol scarlet GGN 


96 


.■Vcidred 2G 




Algol scarlet RB 


103 


Acid rhodamine B 


748 


Algol violet BBX _ 




103 




Algol violet R 




103 






Algol violet RR... 


1219 
1095 


98 


4.cid rhodamine R 




Algol yellow GC 


96 






Algol vellow GR _ 


103 


.\cid violet ACS ... . .. 




Algol vellow 3G 


1139 

11.38 
1115 


97 


.\cid violet B\V 




Algol vellow 4GK 


97 


Acid violet 4BL0 


695 


Alizanthrene blue RC 


96 



116 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



Alizanthrene navy blue 

Alizanthrene yellow 6R 

Alizarin astrol blue B 

Alizarin astrol violet B 

Alizarin black S paste _. 

Alizarin blue S 

Alizarin blue-black B 

Alizarin blue-green BB 

Alizarin blue-green BBS.. 

Alizarin Bordeaux BD 

Alizarin Bordeaux HP 

Alizarin brown HD 

Alizarin brown R 

Alizarin brown SW 

Alizarin carmoisine 

Alizarin clan^ red RL 

Alizarin cyanine G 

Alizarin cyanine GG.. 

Alizarin cyanine 2R 

Alizarin cyanine green 3G 

Alizarin cyanine green 5G 

Alizarin cyanol gray G 

Alizarin cyclamine R 

Alizarin direct blue A2G 

Alizarin direct blue AR 

Alizarin direct blue RC 

Alizarin direct blue BG.\00 

Alizarin direct blue R. 

Alizarin direct blue RBX 

Alizarin direct blue RXO 

Alizarin direct red 3G 

Alkarin direct violet ER 

An.aiin emeraldol O 

Alizarin fast gray 2BL 

Alizarin fast light brown GL 

Alizarin fast rubine R 

Alizarin fast violet R 

Alizarin geranol B 

Alizarin green S 

Alizarin irisol (oil soluble) 

Alizarin irisol B 

Alizarin irisol R 

Alizarin light blue B 

Alizarin light blue ESE 

Alizarin light blue 3G 

Alizarin light blue 3G (oil soluble). 

Alizarin light blue SE 

Alizarin light gray BS 

Alizarin light green GS... 

Alizarin light red R 

Alizarin light violet RS 

Alizarin night blue AG cone 

Alizarin orange A 

Alizarin orange AG 

Alizarin paste bluish 

Alizarin red IP 

Alizarin red S 

Alizarin red SW 

Alizarin red SWB 

Alizarin red SX extra 

Alizarin red SZ 

Alizarin red VI 

Alizarin red WR 

Alizarin red XGP 

Alizarin rubinol 5G 

Alizarin ruliinol R 

Alizarin sapphire blue G 

Alizarin sky-blue G 

Alizarin sky-blue NA... 

Alizarin supra blue A 

Alizarin supra sky-blue R 

Alizarin uranol BB 

Alizarin viridine FF 

Alizarin yellow GD 

Alkali blue 2[i..._ 

Alkali blue No. 4 

Alkali blue 3R 

Alkali fast green 3G.. 

Alkali fast green lOG 

Alkali violet A extra 

Alkali violet lOB... 



Colour 
Index 

No. 



1019 
1067 
1085 



1045 
1045 
1035 
1035 
1035 



1032 
1051 
1051 
1050 
1078 



1064 



1087 
1077 
1076 
1076 
1076 
1091 
1073 
1056 



Page 



1092 
1071 



1073 
1073 
1054 
1053 
1075 



1053 
1085 
1078 
1091 
1073 



1033 
1033 
1027 
1027 
1034 
1034 
1034 
1040 
1034 
1027 
1040 
1039 
1091 
1091 
1053 



1058 
1084 
195 
704 
704 
704 
735 



700 



103 
103 
95 
99 
94 
95 
95 
106 
106 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
106 
94 
95 
95 
95 
95 
99 
99 
95 
99 
99 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
106 
106 
95 
99 
95 
95 
113 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
113 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
99 
94 
94 
94 
94 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
94 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 



Name of dye 



Alphanol brown B 

Amido naphthol brown 3G 

Anthra green B 

Anthrared RT 

Anthra scarlet GG 

Anthra yellow GC 

Anthra yellow GCN 

Anthra yellow 8G 

Anthracene blue SWO _. 

Anthracene blue SWGQ 

Anthracene blue SWR 

Anthracene brown RD 

Anthracene brown SW 

Anthracene chromate brown EB. 

Anthracene chrome blue G 

Anthraquinone blue SR 

Anthraquinono blue green BXO. 

Anthraquinone green GXNO 

Art silk black R 

Artificial silk blue G 

Artificial silk blue R 

Artisil direct blue SAP... 

Artisil direct orange 2RP 

Artisil direct violet BP 

Artisil direct yellow 3GP 

Astra phloxine FF extra 

Auracine G 

Auramine G 

Auramine 0_ 

.\urine 

Azo acid black B 

Azo acid blue B 

Azo acid blue BF 

Azo alizarin carmoisine 

Azo carmine BX 

Azo carmine GX 

Azol printing Bordeaux B 

Azol printing red R 

Azol printing violet 2R 



Colour 
Index 

No. 



1102 
1142 
1228 
1095 
1095 



1060 
1063 
1035 
1035 



B 



Basic blue 6Q 

Basic yellow T 

Basic yellow TCN 

Baykanol blue 

Baykanol Bordeaux 

Baykanol rubine 

Baykanol yellow 

Benzoazurine 3G — 

Benzo bronze E 

Bonzo chrome black-blue B . 

Benzo chrome brown B 

Benzo chrome brown G 

Benzo chrome brown 50 

Benzo chrome brown R 

Benzo dark brown extra 

Benzo fast black L 

Benzo fast blue G 

Benzo fast blue 2GL 

Benzo fast blue 4GL 

Benzo fast blue 8GL 

Benzo fast Bordeaux 6BL.-. 

Benzo fast brown 3GL 

Benzo fast brown RL 

Benzo fast eosine BL 

Benzo fast gray BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope BL 

Benzo fast heliotrope 4BL. .. 
Benzo fast heliotrope 2RL... 
Benzo fast heliotrope 5RH... 
Benzo fast light scarlet 4BL- 

Bonzo fast orange P 

Benzo fast orange 2 RL 

Bonzo fast orange S 

Benzo fast orange WS 

Benzo fast red 6BL 

Benzo fast red GL 

Benzo fast rubine BL 

Benzo fast scarlet 4BS 

Benzo fast scarlet 5BS 



1089 
1082 
1081 



786 
656 
655 
724 



829 
828 



658 
815 
815 



503 



596 
"597" 



319 



326 



326 
326 



278 
327 
326 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 117 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 


Colour 

Index 

No. 


Page 


Name of dye 


Coloui 

Index 

No. 


Page 


Benzo fast scarlet 8BS 


326 


89 
108 

89 

89 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 

93 

93 

99 

99 

91 

99 

91 

91 

89 

89 

89 

88 

92 

92 

88 

89 

94 

91 

99 

99 

99 

91 

92 

91 

99 
113 
113 
113 

95 
108 

89 
108 
108 
108 
108 
108 

89 

92 
106 
106 
106 
106 
108 
108 

94 
106 

91 
108 

98 

98 

98 

98 

99 

99 

92 ' 

99 

91 ; 

91 1 

SO j 
108 1 
108 
108 
113 

91 
108 i 

91 1 


Brilliant sky-blue 8G 


710 


91 


Benzo fast scarlet 8BSN 


Brilliant sky-blue R 


108 


Benzo fast scarlet GS 


326 
349 


BrUliant sky-blue 2RM 




108 


Benzo fast yellow 4GL extra 


Brilliant sulfo flavine FF 




99 


Benzo fast yellow RL.. 


Brilliant sulfon red B . 


32 
32 
32 
32 

729 


88 


Benzo pure yellow FF . 




Brillmat sulfon red 3B 


88 


Benzo red 12B. _ 




Brilliant sulfon red 5B 


88 


Benzo rhoduline red B 




Brilliant sulfon red lOB 


88 


Benzo rhoduline red 3B - 




Brilliant Victoria blue RS 


92 


Benzo rubine SC --- .-. --. 




Brilliant wool blue FFB .. 


99 


Benzoform blue 2BL.- ... 




Brilliant wool blue FFR 




99 


Benzoform orange G 




BrDlianton orange R... 




113 


Benzoform scarlet B 




Bronze blue G . 




115 


Benzyl fast blue BL 


833 
833 


Bronze blue R 




115 


Benzyl fast blue GL 


Brown JR. . 


536 


90 


Benzyl fast blue 3GL 



Cashmire black TN 




Benzyl fast blue L 






Benzvl green B 


667 




Benzyl red B 


99t 


Benzvl violet 5 BN 


698 
710 
331 
331 
317 
134 
715 
715 
135 
316 
892 
671 


Cellit blue R .• 




111 


Betamine blue 8BL 


Cellit fast red B 




m 


Bismarck brown . . 


Cellit fast red 2B . . 




m 


Bismarck brown S . . 


Cellit fast violet 4R 




m 


Black extra . . . 


Cellit fast yellow R 




m 


Black JI. . 


Cellitazol ST 




m 


Blue extra.- ... 


Celliton blue extra 




111 


Blue FF... 


Celliton fast black B 




lU 


Blue JG... 


Celliton fast black G. 




m 


Blue NA 


Celliton fast blue B . . 




11], 


Blue 1900 TCD 


Celliton fast blue 2B 




in 


BrOliant acid blue EG 


Celliton fast blue-green B .. 




111 


Brilliant acid blue G 


Celliton fast navy blue B . 




m 


Brilliant acid blue FF 




Celliton fast navy blue GT 




lU 


Brilliant acid blue 5G 




Celliton fast pink B 




m 


Brilliant acid blue NAS 


673 
712 
667 


Celliton fast pink FSB . 




in 


Brilliant acid blue V . 


Celliton fast red-violet R 




111 


Brilliant acid green 6B 


Celliton fast violet B 




m 


Brilliant acid orange G 


Celliton fast yellow^ G 




111 


Brilliant acridine orange R 




Celliton fast yellow R 




in 


Brilliant acridine orange 3R . .. 




Celliton fast vellow 2R 




111 


Brilliant acridine orange 5R 




Celliton orange GR 




111 


Brilliant alizarin Bordeaux R 


1038 


Celliton orange R 




m 


Brilliant azurine 5R 


Celliton printing yellow 3R... 




in 


Brilliant benzo violet B 


325 


Celliton red R 




111 


Brilliant benzo fast violet 4BL... 


Celliton yellow 3G 




in 


Brilliant benzo fast yellow GL 




Cero blue TA 




na 


Brilliant benzo green B 




Chicago red III 




108 


Brilliant benzo violet 2BH 




Chloramine black N 


688 


90 


Brilliant benzo violet 2R.. . 




Chloramine brown 2R 


108 


Brilliant black BX 


315 
720 


Chloramine fast brown R cone 




10& 


Brilliant blue G 


Chloramine fast orange R cone. 




108 


Brilliant chrome blue 2B 


Chloramine light gray B. .. 




loa 






Chloramine light violet R cone.. . 




108 


Brilliant chrome violet 4B 




Chloramine orange G 


621 


90 


Brilliant chrome violet 6B 




Chloramine violet FFB 


loa 


Brilliant congo blue 5R 




Chloramine yellow GG... 


814 


93 






Chlorantine brown Y 


108 


Brilliant delphme blue B . 


878 


Chlorantine fast blue 8GL 




108 


Brilliant delphine blue NS 


Chlorantine fast Bordeaux 2BL. 




10& 


Brilliant dianil blue 6G. 


710 


Chlorantine fast brown BRL 




108 


Brilliant fast blue 3BX . 


Chlorantine fast brown 5GL 




108 


Brilliant indigo B 


1190 
1188 
1184 
1189 


Chlorantine fast brown 2RL . 




108 


Brilliant indigo BB . 


Chlorantine fast brown 3RL 




108 


BrOliant indigo 4B. 


Chlorantine fast brown 4RL 




108 


Brilliant indigo 4G . 


Chlorantine fast gray B 


403 


89 


Brilliant indocvanine 6B 


Chlorantine fast green B 


108 


Brilliant indocvanine G 




Chlorantine fast orange 2RL 




108 


Brilliant kiton red B 


748 


Chlorantine fast red 5BL... 


278 


89 


Brilliant milling blue B 


Chlorantine fast red 5GL 


108 


Brilliant milling blue FG.. 


704 
667 

487 


Chlorantine fast red 7BL 


278 


89 




Chlorantine fast rubine RL. .... 


108 


Brilliant milling red R 


Chlorantine fast violet 5BL 




108 




Chlorantine fast violet RL 




108 






Chlorantine fast violet 2RL 




108 






Chlorantine fast yellow RL 




108 






Chlorazol drab RH . 




108 


Brilliant ^ilk-blue B 


663 


Chlorazol drab RHS 




108 




Chlorazol fast brown RKS 




108 


Brilliant sky-blue 5G 


710 


Chlorazol fast helio BK 


319 


8d 



118 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



,Chlorazol fast helio BKS 

Chlorazol fast orange AG 

Chlorazol fast orange AGS 

Chlorazol fast scarlet GS 

Chlorazol fast scarlet 8GS 

Chlorazol violet R 

Chlorazol violet liS 

Chlorazol yellow 6GS 

Ohromacetin blue S 

Chromal blue GC 

Chromal violet RCX 

Chromanol black RVI 

Chromanol blue NR . 

Chromanol violet RI. 

Chromazone red new cone 

Chromazurine DN 

Chromazurine E 

Chromazurine G 

Chrome deep brown RRN 

Chrome azurol S 

Chrome fast brown EB 

Chrome fast garnet R. 

Chrome fast orange RD 

Chrome fast phosphine B 

Chrome fast vesuvine BB 

Chrome fast xanthine 2R 

Chrome fast yellow RD 

Chrome gray III_ 

Chrome green DC 

Chrome olive JCS 

Chrome printing orange BW 

Chrome printing orange 2R 

Chrome printing red B. 

Chrome printing red Y 

Chrome pure blue B.r 

Chrome violet 

Chrome violet CBD 

Chrome violet CG 

Chromochlorine G... 

Chromocitronine R 

Chromocitronine 3R 

Chromocitronine V 

Chromocyanine BC 

Chromorhodine BB 

Chromorhodine BN 

Chromorhodine BR 

Chromorhodine 6GN 

Chromovesuvine R A 

Chromoxane brilliant blue G 

.Chromoxane brilliant violet BD. 
Chromoxane brilliant violet SB. 

Chromoxane pure blue B_._ 

Chromoxane pure blue BLD 

Chromoxane violet B 

C hrvsohne A_-_ 

.Cibablue BR 

Ciba blue 2RH 

Ciba brown G 

Ciba pink B 

Ciba pink BG 

Ciba red G 

Ciba violet 6R 

Ciba yellow G_- 

Cibacete black BN 

Cibacete blue B 

Cibacete blue 2K.._ 

Cibacete diazo black J 

Cibacete navy blue BN 

, Cibacete orange 2R 

Cibacete orange 3R - 

Cibacete red 3B 

Cibacete red GR 

.Cibacete sapphire blue G 

Cibacete scarlet G..- 

Cibacete turquoise blue 

Cibacete violet B 

.Cibacete violet 2R 

Cibacete yellow 3G 

,Cibacete yellow GN_ 

,'"ibacete yellow R 



Colour 
Index 
No. 



319 



326 
326 
388 
388 



202 
124 



879 
"723" 



720 
727 



727 
"441' 



762 
762 
762 



720 
"726" 



767 
"969" 
1207" 
1226 
'ii96' 



108 
108 



89 
108 
94 
92 
106 
106 
89 
106 
88 
106 
94 
94 
106 
92 
106 
106 
106 
106 
106 
106 
90 
106 
106 
106 
106 
106 
106 
106 
92 
92 
106 
92 
106 
80 
106 
106 
94 
93 
93 
93 
06 
06 
92 
06 
06 
92 
06 
06 
93 
03 
94 
03 
98 
03 
98 
03 
98 



Name of dye 



1 Colour 

Index 

No. 



1175 



Cibanone blackB ; 1172 

Cibanone black BA ' 

Cibanone black BB I 1102 

Cibanone black EA | 

Cibanone black 2G ■ 1172 

Cibanone blue G 1 1115 

Cibanone blue GL J 1115 

Cibanone blue 3G j 1173 

Cibanone brown B ' 1171 

Cibanone brown R ' 

Cibanone golden orange G | 

Cibanone golden orange 2R 

Cibanone green GG 

Cibanone navy blue RA 

Cibanone olive B 

Cibanone olive G 1 1175 

Cibanone orange 6R j 

Cibanone orange 8R 

Cibanone red B 

Cibanone red 4B i 

Cibanone red G 

Cibanone red RK | 

Cibanone violet R ! 1104 

Cibanone violet 2R ! 

Cibanone violet 4R i 

Cibanone yellow GK 1 1132 

Cibanone yellow 3G 1 

Cibanone yellow 2GR 1 

Clofh fast blue GTB 289 

Cloth fast brilliant red 2B 

Cloth fast brilliant red 4B I 

Cloth fast green G ! 

Cloth fast orange R.. 

Cloth fast red B 

Cloth fast red 3B 

Cloth fast red R...- 

Cloth fast yellow G 

Cloth fast yellow 5G 

Cloth red 3G.._ 

Congo orange G 

Congo orange R 

Coomassie navy blue GNS 

Copying blue BB base 

Coriphosphine OX extra 

Cotonerol A extra ! 

Cotton black AC ! 

Cotton black A4G.. I 

Cotton black E \ 581 

Cotton black RW t 582 

Cotton blue R extra i 909 

Cotton fast orange 2RL 

Cotton red 4BFX 

Cotton red 4BXA 

Cotton scarlet _. 

Croceine scarlet A 

Crystal violet 

Crystal violet base_ 

Cupranil brown 3G 

Cyanine B ._ 

Cyanol extra 

Cyanol FF 



256 
377 
459 
289 



787 



681 
681 



713 
715 
715 



D 



Danubia blue BX.. 

Dark nut brown 

Deltapurpurine 5B 

Developed fast vellow 2G... 

Developing black ED 

Developing black OB 

Developing black OT. 

Developing blue B _.. 

Diamine azo Bordeaux BL- 

Diamine azo brown 30 

Diamine azo green 30 

Dianune brilliant rubine S.. 
Diamine brilliant scarlet S.. 

Diamine bronze G 

Diamine bronze-brown PE. 
Diamine catechine B 



451 
654 



371 



559 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 119 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



amine catechine O 

amine catechine 3G. _. 

amine fast Bordeaux 6BS 

amine fast brown GB 

amine fast brown QBB 

amine fast brown OF 

amine fast brown R 

amine fast orange EG 

amine fast orange ER 

amine fast scarlet 2G 

amine gray G.. 

amine orange B.. 

amine orange F. 

amine scarlet 3B 

amine sky-blue FF 

amine yellow N pdr 

aminogen extra 

aminogen GG 

amond green BW _. 

amond magenta I.. 

amond red 3B.. 

anil yellow 5G.. _. 

azanil pink B.. 

azanil scarlet 3BA cone 

azo brilliant black B _. 

azo brilliant blue 2BL extra 

azo brilliant green 3G 

azo brilliant orange 5G extra 

azo brilliant orange GR 

azo brilliant scarlet B 

azo brilliant scarlet 2BL extra cone. 

azo brilliant scarlet 3BA 

azo brilliant scarlet 6B extra cone. 

azo brilliant scarlet G extra 

azo brilliant scarlet ROA 

azo brilliant scarlet S4B 

azo brown BW 

azo brown G_ 

azo brown 3G 

azo brown 20W 

azo brown 3R 

azo brown 3RB 

azo fast blue 6GW 

azo fast blue 4RW 

azo fast Bordeaux BL 

azo fast green GL 

azo fast green GFL 

azo fast red "BL . 

azo fast violet BL. 

azo fast violet 3RL 

azo fast yellow 2G 

azo fast yellow 3GL 

azo fast yellow 3RL 

azo green 3G 

azo indigo blue BR 

azo indigo blue 4GL extra 

azo rubine B. 

azo sky-blue B_.. 

azo sky-blue 3G 

azo sky-blue 3GL 

azo yellow R 

azol brilliant orange NJN 

azol light red N8B 

azophenyl black V 

phene blue B 

phpiie blue K. 

phenyl brown BBKC 

phenyl brown GS 

phenyl catechine G supra 

phenyl cutpchine R supra 

phenyl fast Bordeaux BC 

phenyl f;,st bronze B 

phenyl fast brown GF 

phony! fast brown GNC 

phenyl fist gray^ BO 

phenyl fast yellow GL 

phenyl fist yellow RL supra 

phenyl jiure yellow 5G cone 

rect brilliant blue 8B 

rcct cutch lirown BS 

rect cutch brown GR-. 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



321 



409 
459 
382 
518 
488 
317 



677 



449 



324 



654 



316 



851 
851 



273 
628 



629 



403 
632 
632 



Page 



109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
89 
109 
89 
90 
89 
90 
90 
89 
109 
106 
91 
106 
109 
109 
109 
90 
109 
109 
109 
89 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
90 
109 
109 
109 
89 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
109 
110 
93 
93 
110 
89 
90 
110 
110 
110 
90 
110 
89 
90 
90 
110 
91 
110 
110 



Name of dye 



Direct fast brown 3GL 

Direct fast brown RL 

Direct fast heliotrope 2RL. 

Direct fast orange K 

Direct fast orange S 

Direct fast red 2B 

Direct fast scarlet 5BS 

Direct fast violet B 

Direct light red 8B 

Direct gray R 

Direct pink EG supra 

Direct pure green B. 

Direct safranine RW 

Direct sky-blue 8G 

Direct sky-blue 2RM 

Dispersol yellow CY 

Dispersol yellow 3G. 

Duranol black 

Duranol blue G 

Duranol brilliant violet B . 

Duranol brown G 

Duranol brown R 

Duranol orange G 

Duranol red B 

Duranol red 2B 

Duranol red G 

Duranol violet 2R 



E 



Eclipse brown BK 

Eosine extra OFF 

Eridan brilliant scarlet B 

Erika B... _. 

Erika G 

Erika GN 

Erie carmine 2BG.. 

Erio carmine 2BF supra 

Erio fast black B 

Erio fast brown R 

Erio fast cyauine SE.._ 

Erio fist fuchsine BBL 

Erio fast red G 

Erio green B 

Eriochrouial brown AEB 

Eriochromal brown GO 

Erioehrome nzural BC 

Eriochrome blue S 

FJriochrome blue-black G 

Eriochrome brilliant violet B supra. 

Eriochrome cyanine RC 

Eriochrome flavine A cone 

Eriochrome flavine 2GL supra 

Eriochrome grrannl R cone 

Eriochrome phosphine RR 

Erioehrome red G 

Eriochrome verdone S 

Eriochrome violet B_ 

Eriochrome violet 3B 

Eriocyanine A(^ 

Erioglaueine AFF 

Erioglaucine AP 

Erioglaueine EP 

Erioglaucine FL supra -- 

Erioglaucine X 

Erioviridine B supra 

Er vthrosine 

Ethyl violet 

Euchrvsine G 

Euchrysine RRDX. 



Fast acid green BB 

Fast acid violet .A.RR 

Fast acid violet R 

Fast cotton blue FFG 

Fast cotton gray GL 

Fast cotton ruhine B 

Fast cotton rubine 5B 

Fast green extra blue shade. 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



319 
653 
326 



326 

31:5 

278 



710 



768 



130 
131 
131 



1053 
758 



735 



720 



722 
219 



157 
"292 



6S9 



671 
671 



671 
667 
773 
682 



758 
758 



353 

'eoi" 



114492—30- 



-9 



120 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHEK SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



Fast jasmine G cone 

Fast light yellow K2G-.- 

Fast light yellow 2G 

Fast scarlet R 

Fast silk yellow SG 

Fast yellow S.. 

Fastusol brown T 

Fastusol green BB 

Fastusol green BL 

Fastusol red violet BBL. 

Fastusol violet BL 

Formal fast black G 

Fouramine OP 

Frobeno red G 

Frobeno yellow G 

Fur blue-black A 

Fur blue-black B.. 

Fur blue-black SB 

Fur blue-gray O-.- 

Fur brown PR 

Fur brown PY 

Fur brown RR 

Fur brown SK 

Fur brown SO 

Fur brown SP 

Fur dye SO 

Fur gray AIjA 

Fur gray BC 

Fur gray 1>MG 

Fur gray G 

Fur gray R 

Fur gray RB 

Fur gray Sp. I 

Fur gray-brown SLA 

Fur olive 3G.- ----- 

Fur yellow 4G 

Fuscaniine 



G 



GiiUaniine blue extra 

GallazineSO 

Gallazol fast brown B2R. 

Gallazol fuSt brown R 

Qallophenine 1' 

Geranine G -. 

Gloria yellow G 

Grisol blue G 

Grasol blue R 

Grasol orange 2R 

Grasol red B 

Grasol yellow 2G 

Grasol yellow G R - . 

Grasol yellow 2R 

Grelanoue brown B 

Grolanone olive B 

Gnlanone orange R 

Grelanone red 2B 

Orelanone violet BR 

Guinea brown GRL 

Guinea brown 2R 

Guinea fist green B 

Guinea fast red 2R 

Guinea rubine 4R 



II 



Half-wool blue G.._ -.-. 

Hansa gr en GS 

Hansa orange GG --- 

Hansa red B 

Ilansa yellow A ,-_ 

Hansa yellow 5G 

Hansa yellow lOG 

Hansa yellow 3R 

Helindone Mack 3B -. 

Helindone black T 

Helindonebliie30__ 

Hf Undone brilli.' nt yellow G-. 
Helindone brown CRD vat.-- 
Helindone brown CV vat pdr. 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



036 
G3f. 

lis 



875 



875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
8,5 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 
875 



894 
905 



1152 
1150 
1136 



1135 



114 

758 



Page 



110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 

94 
113 
114 

94 



94 
94 
107 
107 
107 
88 
100 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
97 
97 
97 
103 
97 
100 
100 
100 
88 
93 



110 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 



Name of dye 



Helindone green B vat... 

Helindone green G 

Helindone red BB 

Helindone red OR vat... 
Hi-lindone violet BBN... 

Helio Bordeaux BL 

Helio fast pink RL 

Helio fast rubine 3BL... 

Helio fast rubine 4BL 

Helio fast rubine RBL 

Helio fast rubine RL 

Helio fast violet AL 

Helio fast yellow RL 

Helio red RMT extra.... 

Hydron blue BBF 

llydron blue G 

Hydron blue R_ 

Hydron brown R 

Hydron pink FB 

Hydron pinlc FF._ 

Hydron yellow olive GO. 

I 



Icyl blue G 

lejd blue GS 

Icyl brown GS 

Icyl orange GS 

levl orange RS... 

Icvl red O 

Icyl violet BS 

Ignaminc orange 3G 

Ignaraine orange R._ .. 

Iinniedi d brown W cone 

Imniedi:d direct blue RL 

Imnicdinl yellow olive 5G 

Indanthrene black BB 

Indanthr(>ne blue BCD.. 

Indanthrene blue GCD 

Indanthrene blue GGSL 

Indanthrene blue 3G 

Indanthrene blue 5G 

Indanthrene blue 8GK.. 

Indanthrene blue RK 

Indanthrene blue RS 

Indanthrene blue RZ 

Indanthrene blue WB pdr 

Indanthrene Bordeaux B extra 

Indanthrene brilliant blue 

Indanthrene brilliant green OG 

Indanthrene brilliant orange 

Indanthrene brilliant violet BBK. 

Indanthrene brilliant violet 3B 

Indanthrene brilliant violet RK... 
Indanthrene brilliant violet RR... 

Indanthrene brilliant violet 4R 

Indanthrene brown FFR 

Indanthrene brown Q 

Indanthrene brown GG.. 

Indanthrene brown GR 

Indanthrene brown R 

Indanthrene brown RT 

Indanthrene eorinth RK 

Indanthrene dark blue 

Indanthrene golden orange G 

Indanthrene golden orange 3G 

Indanthrene gray B 

Ii!d;intlir(>ne gray 3B 

Indanthrene gray GK 

Indnnthrene gray RRH 

Indtinthrene green BB 

Indanthrene green GG 

Inilanthrene khaki GO 

Indanthrene olive R 

Indanthrene orange RRK 

Indanthrene orange RRT 

Indanthrene orange 3R 

Indanthri'ne orange 4R 

Indanthrene orange 6RTK 

Indanthrene pink B 

Indanthrene red BK 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



1199 
1L07 



971 
969 



368 
440 



1102 

nil 

1113 
1110 
1109 
1111 



1108 
1106 



1093 
1143 



1134 



1135 
1104 



1149 
1151 



1144 
1099 
1096 



1145 



1150 
1136 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 121 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 


Colour 

Index 

No. 


Page 


Name of dye 


Colour 

Index 

No. 


Page 


Indanthrene red BN 


1162 


97 

104 

97 

97 

97 

104 

98 

97 

96 

96 

97 

104 

96 

97 

104 

104 

105 

98 

98 

98 

98 

98 

105 

98 

98 

105 

98 

105 

105 

105 

98 

105 

105 

68 

105 

105 

98 

113 

113 

113 

100 

94 

91 

100 

92 

112 

112 

112 

112 

112 

112 

107 

88 
88 
90 
89 
94 
113 
88 

113 
113 

92 

91 
100 

92 

92 
100 

88 

91 

90 

91 
113 
113 1 


L 
Lake yellow 5G 






Indanthrene red GG 




Indanthrene red 5GK-- 


1131 
1142 
1162 




Lanasol violet 2B 






Indanthrene red R 


100 


Lanasol violet R 






Indanthrene red RK 




Leather brown ET 






Indanthrene red-brown R 


113 


Leather brown 5RTX 






Indanthrene red-violet RH.. 


1212 
1161 
1098 
1105 
1163 




Leather yellow A 


793 
793 
670 
670 




Indanthrene red-violet RRK 

Indanthrene scarlet G 


93 


Leather yellow GC 


93 


Light green SF yellowish 




Indanthrene violet B 


91 


Light green SF yellowish XX 

Lithol fast yellow 




Indanthrene violet RN... 


91 




114 


Indanthrene yellow O. 


"ills' 

1132 


Luxine orange R 




100 


M 
Magenta A 


677 
677 
692 
873 
909 




Indanthrene yellow GK . 


I 


Indanthrene yellow RK 




Indenthrene yellow 3RT. 




91 


Indanthrene vellow-brown 3G 




Magenta AB 


91 


Indigo (natural) 


1247 
11S3 
1178 
1182 
1202 


Magenta S 


91 


Indigo pure BASF/RB 


Malta gray J 


94 


Indigo vat BASF 


Meldola's blue3R... * 


94 


Indigo BASF/RR... 


Metachrome blue-black 2BX. 


107 


Indigosol AZQ. 


Metachrome brilliant blue BL 




107 


Indigosol HB 


Metachrome brilliant blue 2RL 




107 


Indigosol 


1178 
1184 


Metachrome brilliant blue 8RL 




107 


Indigosol 04B 


Metachrome brown 6Q. 




107 


Indigosol 06B.. 


Metachrome olive 2G 




107 


Indigosol OR 


1182 


Metachrome olive brown G . 


104 


88 


Indigisol black IB 


Metachrome red G. 


107 


Indigosol golden yellow IGK... 




Metachrome violet B. 


173 


89 


Indigosol green AR.. 




Metachrome violet 2R 


107 


Indigosol orange HR 


1217 


Metanil red 3B 




100 


Indigosol pink IR 


Methyl Lyons blue 


706 
680 
680 
680 
922 
922 


91 


Indigosol red IIR 




Methyl violet 


91 


Indigosol red-violet IRH 


1212 


Methyl violet base 


91 


Indigosol scarlet HB 


Methyl violet NFB 


91 


Indigosol violet AZB 




Methylene blue B cone... 


94 


Indigosol yellow HCG 


1176 


Methylene blue BGF high cone 

Methylene blue 30 


94 


Indocarbon CL... 


113 


Indocarbon CLG 




Methylene gray B new.. 




113 


Indocarbon SN.. 




Methylene green G... 


924 
924 
845 
842 


94 


Indocyanine B 




Methylene green W 


94 


Induline NN 


861 
707 


Methylene heliotrope 


93 


Ink blue BITBN 


Methylene violet 3R.'C extra 


93 


Ink fast black A... 


Milling brown Rjt 


100 


Intensive blue B 


733 


Milling orange G 




100 


lonamine AS 


Milling orange GN 




100 


lonamine BS 




Milling red 4BA 




100 


lonamine LS 




Milling red 6BA 




100 


lonamine blue BS 




Milling red OA 




100 


lonamine red GAS 




Milling red NJ 


430 
487 


90 


lonamine red KAS 




Milling scarlet 4R. 


90 


Isochrome green 3BF 




Milling yellow HG 


100 




134 
135 
536 
236 
864 


Milling yellow H5G 




100 


J 


Milling yellow 




100 




Milling yellow 00 




100 


Janus black 


Mimosa Z cone 


813 


93 


Janus blue G 


Minaxo acid brown G 


100 


Janus brown R 


Minaxo black BBNX 




110 


Janus yellow G 


Minaxo light brown O 




110 


Japan black extra 


Minaxo light pink BBX 




110 


Japan black MBG 


Minaxo red 3BX 


425 


89 


Jasmine, high cone 


145 


Modern black CVI 


107 




Modern black N 




107 


K 


Modern blue CVI 




107 




Modern gray PS . 




107 


Katigene chrome blue 5G 


Modern heliotrope DH 


882 
884 
892 


94 


Katigene indigo CLGG extra 




Modern royal blue 


94 


Kiton blue A 


714 
671 


Modern violet 


94 


Kiton blue L 


Monochrome black-blue G 


107 


Kiton fast green A 


N 
Naphthalene green cone 


735 
735 




Kiton fast green B.. ... 


735 
735 




Kiton fast green V 




Kiton fast red 4BL.. 


92 


Kiton fast red R 


114 
696 
645 
672 


Naphthalene green NV 


92 


Kiton fast violet lOB 


Naphthochrome violet R... 


107 


Kiton fast yellow 3G 


Naphthogene blue B ... . 




110 


Kiton pure blue V 


Naphthol black BD 


315 


89 


Kryogene violet 3RX.. 


Naphthol blue-black FG .. 


100 


Kurgan violet 3RX .'. 


j 


Naphthol yellow SXX 


10 


88 



122 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Xame of dye 


Colour 
Index 

No. 


Page 


Name of dye 


Colour 

Index 

No. 


Page 


Neolan black GO 




100 
100 
100 
100 


Palatine fast pink B 




101 


Neolan black RR . 




Palatine fast pink VNOO 




101 


Neolan blue B.. ... 




Palatine fast pink G 




101 


Neolan blue BR 




Palatine fast red RN... 




101 


Neolan blue G 




100 


Palatine fast violet R .... 




101 


Neolan blue 2G 




100 
100 
100 
100 
100 


Palatine fast violet 3RN 




101 


Neolan blue GR _._ 




Palatine fast yellow Q 




101 


Neolan blue RR 




Palatine fast yellovr 3GN 




101 


Neolan Bordeaux R 




Palatine fast yellow GRN 




101 


Neolan brown R 




Palatine scarlet A 


77 


88 






100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
101 
101 




105 


Neolan grav RS.- . 




Paranil brown BBX 




110 


Neolan green LBN cone 




Paranil brown O 




110 


Neolan orange G 




Parasulfon brown v.. 




110 


Neolan orange ORE 




Patent blue A. 


714 
712 
797 
789 
797 
793 
793 


92 


Neolan orange R 




Patent blue V 


92 


Neolan pink B 




Patent phosphine GRNTN. 

Patent phosphine M 


93 


Neolan pink G 




93 


Noelan red B a 




Patent phosphine RRDX 


93 


Neolan red R 




Phosphine 


93 


Neolan verdone B. . 




Phosphine 3R 


93 


Neolan violet R 




Permanent Bordeaux FFR 


114 


Neolan violet 3R 




Permanent red FRL 




114 


Neolan violet-brown B 




101 
101 
101 
101 
101 
101 
89 


Pigment brown R 




114 


Neolan vellow G ._ . 




Pigment deep black R 




114 


Neolan vellow GR 




Pigment green B 




114 


Neolan vellow R 




Pigment lake red LC. . 




114 


Neotolyl bl:'': TL 




Pilatus black SF 




101 


Neutral brown RX 




Pilatus chrome brown RX 


167 


89 


Neutral grav G . . 


267 


Pilatus fast black GG 


101 


Neutral red BX 




101 
94 


Pilatus fast blue BN 




101 


New blue RS 


909 


Pilatus fast blue BR . . 




101 


New Bordeaux RX.. 




110 
110 
94 
94 
94 
94 
94 
94 
88 


Pilatus fast blue G . . 




101 


New claret RX . , 




Pilatus fast blue GGN 




101 


New fast blue RS ... 


909 
S73 
927 
927 
865 
913 
44 


Pilatus fast blue GR 




101 


New fast grav 


Pilatus fast blue X 




101 


New methvlene blue N 


Pilatus fast brown BRRNO 




101 


NevF methvlene blue NS cone. 


Pilatus fast claret RNX 




101 


Nigrosine T 


Pilatus fast dark green BNOO 




101 


Nile blue BX 


Pilatus fast grav B . 




101 


Nitrosamine red 


Pilatus fast green BL cone . ... 




101 


Novazol acid blue BL 




101 


Pilatus fast orange GN . . . 




101 


Novazol acid blue GL 




101 
101 
101 
107 


Pilatus fast orange R 




101 


Novazol blue B . . * 




Pilatus fast pink B . . 




101 


Novazol violet B . ... .. 




Pilatus fast pink BNOO 




101 


Novochrome brown 3RD 




Pilatus fast pink G 




101 






Pilatus fast red RN 




101 







Pilatus fast violet R. _ . . 




101 






114 
106 
107 
107 
107 

90 
107 
101 
101 

8S 1 


Pilatus fast violet 3RN 




101 




Pilatus fast yellow G 














Pilatus fast yellow 3GN 














Pilatus fast yellow GRN . . 














Pilatus scarlet A 


77 










Omega chrome fast blue B cone 


Pluto black G extra 






652 




Omega chrome red B cone 


Pluto brown GG 










Omega chrome violet B cone. . . 


Polar blue G supra .... 














Polar brilliant red 3B... 


32 










Onis 3B 


Polar gray 






27 






Polar maroon VC . . . . 








138 1 88 
425 89 
















Oxamine red 3BX 


Polar orange R 












Polar red B 




101 






114 
101 
89 
101 
101 
101 
101 
101 


Polar red 3B 




101 


Paper fast Bordeaux B 


Polar red G cone . 


430 
430 
430 


90 


Palatine black SF 




Polar red R cone 


90 


Palatine chrome brown RX 


167 


Polar red RS cone. 


90 


Palatine fast black GG- - 


Polar yellow 2Q cone 


101 


Palatine fast blue BN.. 




Polar yellow 5G cone... 


642 


90 


Palatine fast blue BR 




Polar yellow R 


101 


Palatine fast blue G 




Polyphenyl blue OC 


590 
721 


90 


Palatine fast lilue GGN 




Polytrop blue 2B 


92 


Palatine fast blue OR 




101 
101 
101 
101 
101 
101 
101 
101 
101 


Polvtrop blue 3G 


101 


Palatine fast blue X. 




Poseidon blue BR .... 


714 
714 

667 
893 
706 
1037 
368 
440 


92 


Palatine fast brown BRRNO. 




Poseidon blue BXX 


92 


Palatine fast claret RNX 




Poseidon green SOX 


91 


Palatine fast dark green BNOO 




Prune pure . 


94 


Palatine fast grav B 


" 


Pure blue cone 


91 


Palatine fast green BL 




Purpmine . . . . 


95 


Palatine fast orange ON . . 




Pvraniine orange 3Q . 


89 


Palatine fast orange R 




Pyramine orange R 


90 



DYES IMPORTED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 123 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



Pyrazol orange G. 

Pyrazol orange R 

Pyrazol orange RR 

Pyrogene brown Q.l 

Pyrogene cutch 2R extra. 

Pyrogene green OK 

Pyrogene green OGK 

Pyrogene green 3Q 

Pyrogene pure blue 30L. 

Q 



Quinoline yellow 

Quinoline yellow (spirit soluble) 

Quinoline j'ellow base (spirit soluble) . 

Quinoline yellow extra 

Quinoline yellow KT extra cone 

Quinoline yellow S-._ 



Colour 
Index 

No. 



653 
653 
653 



1006 



R 



Radio brown B 

Radio chrome blue B 

Rapid fast blue B 

Rapid fast Bordeaux B 

R&pid fast orange RH 

Rapid fast red B 

Rapid fast red BB 

Rapid fast red GL 

Rapid fast red-RH 

Rapid fast scarlet LH 

Rapid fast yellow2GH 

Rheonine AL 

Rhodamine B extra 

Rhodamine B extra base 

Rhodamine 3B extra 

Rhodamine fiG extra 

Rhodamine OGDN extra 

Rhodamine 6GH extra 

Rhodamine sky-blue 3G.- -- 

Rhoduline blue 5B 

Rhoduline blue 6G.._ 

Rhoduline heliotrope B 

Rhoduline orange NO 

Rhoduline sky-blue 3G - 

Rhoduline yellow 6G 

Rhoduline yellow 6GT 

Rosanthrene B 

Rosanthrene R 

Rosanthrene RN 

Rosanthrene Bordeaux B 

Rosanthrene brilliant orange 4R- 

Rosanthrene brilliant red BR 

Rosanthrene fast Bordeaux 2BL- 

Rosanthreno fast red 7BL 

Rosanthrene orange R - 

Rosolane extra strong 

Rosolane paste 

Rotor black 2B 

Runic AL cone 



801 
800 
800 
801 
802 
801 



795 
740 
749 
751 
752 



658 



788 



815 
815 



Saba phosphine S cone 

Safranine G 

Scarlet 2R 

Selan printing brown 3R 

Sella acid brown B 

Sella acid brown G 

Sella acid brown R 

Setacyl brilliant pink G 

Setacyl direct blue G 

Setacyl direct blue 2GS 

Setacyl direct blue R - 

Setacyl direct blue RS cone. 

Setacyl direct orange 2R 

Setacyl direct pink 3B cone. 

Setacvl direct red BN 

Setacyl direct red GBN 

Setacyl direct red ON 

Setacyl direct scarlet G 



845 
846 



795 



789 

841 

79 



90 
90 
90 
113 
113 
113 
113 
94 
113 



101 

107 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 
88 
112 
112 
112 
93 
92 
92 
92 
92 
113 
113 
113 
113 
90 
113 
93 
113 
93 
93 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
93 
93 
114 
93 



93 
93 
88 
102 
102 
102 
102 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 
112 



Name of dye 



Setacyl direct violet B 

Setacyl direct violet R 

Setacyl direct yellow OR. 
Setacyl direct yellow R... 

Setocyanine 

Setoglaucine cone... 

Setopaline 

Silk blue BSIC 

Silk yellow OF... 

Silk yellow R 

Silver gray P... 

Sky-blue N 

Solid blue S 

Soluble blue3R 

Soluble blueT 

Sorrel red X. 

Special blue G 

Special violet B 

Spirit fast red 5B 

S R A black III 

Stanlev red 

Stilbene yellow 3GX 

Stone fast scarlet RN 

Stone fast yellow G 

Stone fast yellow GG 

Stone fast yellow G.^ 

Stone rubine BK 

Stone rubine BN pdr 

Stone rubine G 

Sudan black B 

Sudan black G 

Sudan black RT.. - 

Sudan brown RR 

Sudan red 7B.-. 

Sudan red GO.. 

Sulfide new blue BL 

Sulfide violet V 

Sulfo rhodamine B extra.. 

Sulfo rhodamine 3B 

Sulfo rhodamine BG 

Sulfo rhodamine G 

Sulfon azuiine D 

Sulfon orange G 

Sulfon yellow 5G 

Sulfon yellow R 

Sulfoncvanine G 

Sulfur black CL 

Sulfur brown CL/4R 

Sunfast orange EGL 

Supra light rubine BL 

Supra light yellow 2GL... 

Supramine black BR 

Supramine blue FB. 

Supramine blue R --- 

Supramine Bordeaux B... 

Supiamine brown G 

Supramine brown R 

Supramine green BL 

Supramine green G 

Supramine red B 

Supramine red 20 

Supramine violet R 

Supramine yellow G 

Supramine yellow 3G 

Supramine yellow R 

Supranol Bordeaux B 

Supranol brilliant red B.. 

Supranol orange RR 

Supranol red BB 

Supranol red RX 

Supranol scarlet GX 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



663 
658 
663 
707 



865 



861 

707 

707 

54 



1080 



224 
622 



748 



288 



639 



Tannastrol GO... 
Tannoflavine T... 
Tero black FB... 
Tero black FT... 
Tero brown FG.. 
Tero carmine FB. 
Tero yellow FR.. 



Page 



112 
112 
112 
112 
91 
90 
91 
91 
102 
102 
94 
110 
94 
91 
91 
88 
113 
95 
114 
112 



114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 
113 
113 

92 
102 
102 
102 

90 
102 
102 
102 

89 
113 
113 
109 
102 

90 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
102 
107 
107 
107 
107 
107 
107 



113 
93 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 



124 CENStrS OF DYES AND OTHEE SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



Name of dye 



Thiazine red KXX... 

Thio violet 5R 

Thioflavine TCN 

Thioindieto scarlet 2G 

Thional brilliant blue 6BS. 

Thional red-brown 5R 

Thionine i))ue G_. -. 

Thionine blue GO 

Thionol black XXN .- 

Thionol black XXS 

Thionol brown OS 

Toluidine blue 

Toluidine green 

Toluylene fast brown 2R 

Toluylene fast orange LX.. 

Triazogene orange R 

Triazol fast orange 2RL 

Trisulfon bronze BG conc- 
Trisulfon brown B cone.-. 

Trisulfon brown BP 

Trisulfon brown 2G conc-. 

Turquoise blue BB 

Turquoise blue G 

Typophor yellow 



Ultra coriuth B 

Ultra cyanol B 

Universal blue-black C . 
Ursol -. 



Vat black B-- - 

Vat black BB 

Vat black BGA 

Vat blue BCD 

Vat blue BCS 

Vat blue BCSO 

Vat blue GOD 

Vat blue GCDN.-- 

Vat blue GGS.- - 

Vat blue GGSL. 

Vat blue OGSNL 

Vat blue GGSZ.. -.- 

Vat blue 3G 

Vat blue 5Q 

Vat blue 8GK 

Vat blue RK 

Vat blue RS 

Vat blue RSN 

Vat blue RSP 

Vat blue RZ... 

Vat blue-green B 

Vat blue-green FFB 

Vat Bordeaux B extra 

Vat brilliant blue 30 

Vat brilliant blue R 

Vat brilliant green GG... 

Vat brilliant green 5G 

Vat brilliant orange GK.. 
Vat brilliant orange RK.. 

Vat brilliant pink B 

Vat brilliani pink R 

Vat brilliant pink RF 

Vat brilliant violet BBK. 

Vat brilliant violet 3B 

Vat brilliant violet RK... 
Vat brilliant violet RR... 
Vat brilliant violet RRP. 

Vat brilliant violet 4R 

Vat brown BR 

Vat brown FFR 

Vat brown G... 

Vat brown OR. 

Vat brown 2G. 

Vat blown 30T 

Vat blown R... 

Vat brown RRD 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



225 



815 
1228 



926 
926 



925 



561 
501 
577 
661 
661 



875 



1102 
1102 
1114 
1114 
1114 
1113 
1113 
1110 
1110 
1110 
1110 
1109 
1111 



1108 
1106 
1106 
1106 



1173 



1143 



1135 
1104 



1152 
1149 



1151 



Page 



113 

93 

98 

113 

113 

94 

94 

113 

113 

113 

94 

113 

110 

110 

90 

110 

110 

90 

90 

90 

91 

91 

114 



107 
107 

no 



105 
96 



96 

104 

96 

96 

96 

96 

104 

97 

105 

97 

104 

104 

104 

103 

104 

104 

103 

104 

105 

97 

104 

97 

96 

104 

104 

97 

104 

97 

97 

104 

105 

97 

105 



Name of dye 



Vat brown RT .• 

Vatcorinth RK 

Vat dark blue BGO 

Vat dark blue BO 

Vat dark blue BOA. 

Vat direct black RB... 

Vat golden orange G.. 

Vat golden orange 3G. 

Vat golden yellow GK 

Vat gray 3B 

Vat gray GK 

Vat gray K 

Vat gray RRH 

Vat green BB 

Vat green G... 

Vat green 2G 

Vat green GT 

Vat khaki GG._. 

Vat navy blue R.. _.. 

Vat olive B 

Vat olive GN... 

Vat olive R - 

Vat orange F3R_. 

Vat orange R (By).. 

Vat orange R (M).. 

Vat orange RRK 

Vat orange RRT 

Vat orange RRTS.. 

Vat orange 3R 

Vat orange 4R.. 

Vat orange 6RTK 

Vat pink B 

Vat pink BG 

Vat printing black B 

Vat printing blue B 

Vat printing brown GN 

Vat printing brown R.. 

Vat printing deep black BD. 

Vat printing purple R. 

Vat printing red G... 

Vat printing violet BBF 

Vat printing violet RF 

Vat red BK 

Vat red BTK. 

Vat red 3B 

Vat red 2G 

VatredJGK 

Vat led R... 

Vat red RK. 

Vat red RKP. 

Vat red-brown R 

Vat red-brown 5RF 

Vat red-violet RH_ 

Vat red-violet RRK 

Vat red-violet RRN 

Vat scarlet B.. 

Vat (Hydron) scarlet 2B 

Vat (Hydron) scarlet 3B 

Vat (Ilelindone) scarlet R... 

Vat violet B 

Vat violet BN 

Vat violet BR 

Vat violet FFBN 

Vat violet RR 

Vat yellow FFEK 

Vat yellow G.. 

Vat yellow GC 

Vat yellow GCN 

Vat yellow GF 

Vat yellow GK 

Vat yellow GP 

Vat yellow 3GF 

Vat yellow 5GK 

Vat yellow NF... 

Vat yellow RK 

Vat yellow 3R 

Vat yellow 3RT 

Vat yellow-browu 3G 

Victoria blue B. 

Victoria blue B base 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



1144 I 
1C99 I 
1099 
1099 



1096 



114„ 
1145 



lllfi 
1199 



1150 



1137 
1217 
1136 



1137 
'1211" 



1155 
1212 



1131 
1133 
1162 
1162 



1212 
1161 
1161 



1218 
1105 
1163 
1135 



1104 



1118 
1095 
lOO.") 



729 
729 



DYES IMPOETED FOR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 

Index to table of dye imports — Continued 



125 



Name of dye 



Victoria blue R 

Victoria blue 4R 

Victoria pure blue BO 

Violet (for ink pencil) BB. 

Violet PDH 

Viscolan black B cone 



W 

Water blue 

Wool black 6B 

Wool black GRF.... 

Wool blue5B 

Wool blue N 

Wool blue R 

Wool fast blue BL... 
Woolfastblue BR.. 
Wool fast blue GL... 
Wool fast oranee G. . 

Wool fast red 3B 

Wool fast violet B... 
Wool fast yellow G.. 
Wool fast yellow 5G . 



X 

Xylene blue AS cone. 
Xylene blue VS cone. 



Colour 
Index 

No. 



728 
690 
729 
6S0 
893 



707 
241 



833 
1088 
833 



487 
833 



673 
672 



92 
91 
92 
91 
94 
112 



102 
102 
102 
102 
93 
95 
93 
102 
90 
93 
102 
102 



Name of dye 



Xylene brilliant blue FFRX cone. 

Xylene cyanol FF cone 

Xylene fast blue FF cone 

Xylene fast green B cone 

Xylene fast violet R 

Xylene milling blue AE conc..__— 

Xylene milling blue BL 

Xylene milling blue GL 

Xylene milling red B cone 

Xylene milling violet B 

Xylene ligbt yellow R 

Xylene red B 



Yellow JG. 



Zambesi black D.. 

Zambesi black F 

Zambesi brown 4R 

Zambesi pure blue 4BO. 

Zapon fast blue G 

Zapon fast orange G 

Zapon fast red CB 

Zapon fast scarlet CG... 
Zapon fast scarlet CR... 
Zapon fast yellow GR... 



Colour 

Index 

No. 



715 



73.') 
758 
833 
833 
8.33 



833 
639 

748 



236 



Page 



102 
92 

102 
92 
93 
93 
93 
93 

102 
93 
90 
92 



110 
110 
110 
110 
115 
115 
115 
115 
115 
H5 



PART IV 

CENSUS OF SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 



127 



Part IV 

CENSUS OF SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS OTHER 
THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 



Introduction 



Beginning in 1921, the Tariff Commission has, each year, compiled 
and published in its Census of Dyes and Other Synthetic Organic 
Chemicals an annual survey of synthetic organic chemicals not of 
coal-tar origin. Each survey gives the total production and sales of 
the noncoal-tar synthetic organic chemical industry as well as pro- 
duction and sales data on as many specific items as is possible wthout 
disclosing individual operations. It also reviews notable achieve- 
ments occurring during the jear and contains statistics on imports 
and production of certain chemicals of the industry. 

As the Bureau of the Census collects data on the more important 
noncoal-tar organic compounds, the commission does not gather 
statistics on such products except where the importance of the 
chemical or conditions in the industry warrant a departure from this 
practice. This report follows the precedent established in 1921 of 
omitting certain types of compounds classifiable in three groups: 
(1) Aliphatic compounds derived from natural sources by isolation, 
distillation, extraction, hydrolysis, or purification; for example, alka- 
loids, constituents of essential oils, sugars, and acids such as tartaric 
and stearic; (2) cyanides, cyanamides, or carbides of metals or of 
inorganic radicals; (3) products obtainable from other sources. 

Increasing Importance of the Industry 

The production of synthetic organic chemicals other than those of 
coal-tar origin has developed into an industry of such economic im- 
portance that the scope of this year's census has been enlarged to 
present data regarding the growth of the industry since 1921, in 
addition to pointing out the general advances made in 1929. This 
industry, which prior to the World War was one of minor importance, 
has steadily grown, until to-day it is one of major importance. Its 
growth is due to the rapid expansion of several industries, such as the 
lacquer industry and the rayon industry, where aliphatic or noncoal- 
tar chemicals are used, as well as to their consumption in the manu- 
facture of medicinals, perfumes, flavors, rubber accelerators, photo- 
graphic developers, explosives, and as flotation agents. 

Since 1921, production of synthetic orga"nic chemicals of other than 
coal-tar origin has increased from 21,545,186 pounds to 633,192,215 
pounds; sales have advanced from 16,761,096 pounds to 405,185,980 
pounds; value of sales, from $7,226,068 to $65,117,651; and the sales 
value of production, from $9,285,975 to $101,943,947. 

129 



130 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 39 shows in detail the steady growth of the industry since 
1921, when the Tariff Commission compiled data on chemicals of 
this group for the first time. 

Table 39.^ — -Noncoal-tar synthetic organic chemicals: Production and sales, 1921— 

1929^ 







Production 




Sales 


Quan- 


























In- 




In- 




In- 




In- 




tity 


Year 




crease 




crease 




crease 




crease 




ratio, 
sales to 
produc- 
tion 




Quantity 


over 
pre- 


Value 


over 
pre- 


Quantity 


over 
pre- 


Value 


over 
Iire- 


Unit 
value 






vious 




vious 




vious 




vious 








year 




year 




year 




year 










Per 




Per 




Per 




Per 




Per 




Pounds 


cent 




cent 


Pounds 


cent 




cent 




cent 


l92l-._ 


21, 545. 186 




.$9, 285, 975 




16, 761, 096 




$7, 220, 068 




.$0. 431 


77.85 


1922:_. 


79, 202, 155 


276. 60 


15, 682, 027 


68.88 


60, 494, 494 


200. 92 


11,964,074 


65. 57 


.198 


76.38 


1923.-. 


90, 597, 712 


14.39 


18, 572, 531 


18.43 


67, 727, 067 


11.90 


13, 875, 521 


15.98 


.205 


74.76 


1924... 


115,817,865 


27.84 


27, 790, 288 


49.66 


85, 933, 461 


26.88 


20, 004, 717 


48.50 


.240 


74.20 


1925- __ 


156,878,013 


35.45 


32, 310, 871 


16.26 


114,020,209 


33.39 


23, 632, 779 


14.70 


.206 


73.07 


1926.-- 


214, 842. 513 


36.95 


37, 812, 282 


17.00 


168, 712, 158 


47.18 


29, 719, 270 


25.75 


.176 


78.53 


1927--- 


280, 992, 825 


30.79 


51, 140, 694 


35. 25 


201, 548, 089 


19.46 


36, 600, 628 


23.15 


.182 


71.73 


1928..- 


.384, 504, 830 


36.86 


68, 837, 106 


34. 60 


257, 077, 856 


27.55 


45, 928, 945 


25.49 


.179 


66.85 


1929... 


633, 192,215 


64.65 


101, 943, 947 


48.09 


405, 185, 980 


57.61 


65,117,651 


41.78 


.161 


63.99 



i Vanillin, previously listed in the noncoal-tar group, is included in 1929 under the coal-tar products. 

In 1929, the ratio (in pounds) of sales to production was 64 per cent. 
Except in 1926, this ratio has, each year, been less than for the preced- 
ing year, indicating that the proportion of chemicals consumed in 
the plants where they are produced is continually increasing or, in 
other words, that manufacturers are more and more each year produc- 
ing materials which they need for the manufacture of other products. 

In 1929 the average value of products sold was 16.1 cents per pound, 
as compared with 17.9 cents in 1928 and 18.2 cents in 1927. The 
decrease in unit value during 1929 is due almost entirely to greatly 
increased sales of cheaper products, such as carbon tetrachloride, 
formaldehyde, and methanol, at slightly lower average prices in 1929 
than in 1928. The combined sales of 9 of these cheaper products 
increased approximately 51,000,000 pounds in 1929, whereas combined 
sales of 54 of the more expensive products dropped off approximately a 
thousand pounds. 

Of the 240 products reported to the commission in 1929, 61 showed 
steady gains and 21 showed continuous losses since 1927. Fifteen 
products, such as acetone, synthetic caffeine, ethyl mercury chloride, 
furacrylate sodium, isopropyl bromide, isopropyl ether, e thy liso propyl 
barbituric acid, isopropyl ethyl malonate, oxalacetic ether, and syn- 
thetic resins are listed in this year's census for the first time. The 
total production of these 15 products amounted to 43,705,088 pounds, 
of which 32,780,782 pounds, or 75 per cent, sold for $4,870,077, or for 
14.9 cents per pound. These new products represent 6.90 per cent of 
the total 1929 production, 8.09 per cent of the total 1929 sales, 7.48 
per cent of the total 1929 value of sales, and 6.39 per cent of the total 
1929 sales value of production. Though included in the 1929 census 
for the first time, acetone made by fermentation, caffeine from 
theobromide, and citrate of lime by fermentation, were produced in 
the United States prior to 1929. 



CHEMICALS OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 131 

This year's census includes, in Table 41, a list of synthetic organic 
chemicals imported through the port of New York during 1929, and 
dutiable under paragraph. 5, act of 1922. 

Chemicals Showing Marked Increases In 1929 

Important synthetic organic chemicals showing marked increases 
in 1929 are: Acetaldehyde, acetic acid, citric acid, ethyl and methyl 
chlorides, ethylpropionate, formic acid, isopropyl alcohol, methanol, 
tetraethyl lead, and triethanolamine. Other chemicals showing in- 
creases in 1929 are normal and secondary amyl alcohol, butyl aldehyde, 
butylamine condensation products, carbon tetrachloride, chloracetic 
acid, citral, citronellol, diethylene glycol, diethylene glycol mono- 
ethyl ether, ethyl bromide, ethyl iodide, and ethyl oxalate, ethylene 
dibromide, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate, furfural, hydrox- 
ylamine, methyl acetate, pyruvic acid, sebacic acid, and research 
chemicals. 

ACETIC ACID 

Prior to 1928, when the Niacet Chemicals Corporation of Niagara 
Falls, N. Y., produced synthetic acetic acid from acetylene obtained 
by treating calcium carbide with water, most of our domestic supply 
was derived from calcium acetate and by importation of the acid. 
It is now also produced by the oxidation of ethyl alcohol obtained in 
the fermentation of molasses, and directly from pyroligneous liquors 
either by using a solvent for extraction of the acid or by employing 
a substance which forms a minimum boiling mixture with alcohol 
and water. Excepting its manufacture from calcium acetate, more 
acetic acid is now produced from acetylene than by all other methods 
combined; and the output in 1929, which was several times that of 

1928, represented a substantial percentage of our total production. 
Its commercial production from acetylene, though but a recent 
achievement, will probably continue to represent an increasing pro- 
portion of our total output and may constitute the major portion of 
our future increases in production. Of the acetic acid imported in 

1929, practically 100 per cent was synthetic acid made in Canada 
from acetylene. 

About 50 per cent of the total consumption of acetic acid is used 
in the manufacture of solvents for pyroxylin lacquers, from 15 to 20 
per cent is consumed in the manufacture of cellulose acetate rayon, 
and an equal amount is used in the dyeing and finishing of textiles. 
Large quantities are also consumed in the manufacture of dyes, 
white lead, drugs, pharmaceuticals, colors and pigments, and in the 
leather industry. 

Of interest to the acetic acid industry is the announcement ^ that 
a domestic manufacturer will erect a $500,000 plant at Peoria, 111., 
for the production of acetic acid at a cost well below the current 
market price, by the Langwell process — the fermentation of cellulose 
in the form of straw, cornstalks, corncobs, peanut shells, and the 
hulls of rice, oats, and cottonseed. It is reported that this initial unit 
will have a production of 10 tons per day, or approximately 25 per 
cent of the normal company demand. 

» Wall Street Journal, June 13, 1930. 



132 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

FORMIC ACID 

Formic acid, made synthetically by heating caustic soda with 
carbon monoxide under pressure, adding sulfuric acid to the resulting 
sodium formate, distilling off and subsequently purifying the formic 
acid obtained, resembles acetic acid in certain chemical properties, 
though it is more active chemically. It is the strongest of organic 
acids and is used principally in the dyeing of textiles and in the dyeing 
and tanning of furs and leather. Competing with acetic acid on a 
price basis, it is used in increasing quantities in the acetate rayon 
industry and in treating cotton fibers prior to acetylation. It has 
to a certain extent displaced acetic acid as a coagulant of rubber 
latex in the rubber plantations of the Dutch East Indies and Straits 
Settlements. As esters of various alcohols, it is used in perfumes 
and in solvents. 

In 1923 domestic produ.ction of formic acid was discontinued and 
was not resumed until 1928. In 1929 a second producer entered the 
field. 

Imports of fo inic acid, which were discontinued during the war, 
were resumed in 1919 and steadily increased to 3,214,642 pounds in 
1927. Since then they have dropped at the rate of about 965,000 
pounds per year. These decreases have been approximately com- 
pensated for by domestic production. 

CITRIC ACID 

The production of citric acid in the United States by the fermenta- 
tion of cane sugar with certain enzjanes was substantially greater in 
1929 than in 1928. The increasing output of this industry, together 
with that of the citric-acid industry, which was developed in Cali- 
fornia during the World War and in which cull lemons of the California 
citrus industry are used, has made the United States independent of 
the Italian monopoly on both citric acid and the raw material, citrate 
of lime. 

The Italian monopoly at present controls the European markets for 
citric acid and citrate of lime and has an interest in La Citric Beige, 
formed in Belgium in April, 1929, with a capitalization of 20,000,000 
francs "for the purpose of manufacturing, for all purposes and for 
the trade, calcium citrate, citric acid, and all the compounds and 
derivative products." ^ La Citric Beige plans the erection of a plant at 
Tirlemont, Belgium, having a capacity of 1,000 tons of citric acid per 
year and has absorbed Les Produits Organiques de Tirlemont, which 
manufactures calcium citrate and citric acid by biological methods 
and has limited its production to 300 tons per year. 

METHANOL 

Synthetic methanol, competing with the natural product obtained 
by distillation of hardwood, is produced by high pressure synthesis 
from carbon monoxide by the Commercial Solvents Corporation, the 
Carbide & Carbon Chemicals Corporation, and the Du Pont Am- 
monia Corporation. It is consumed chiefly in making formaldehyde, 
which is used as a raw material for indigo, synthetic phenolic resins, 
rubber accelerators, and other products. 

' Annex au Moniteur Beige, May 4, 1929. 



CHEMICALS OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 133 

Though its commercial synthesis is but two years old, it represents 
a substantial proportion of our total domestic output. Statistics of 
production can not be published; however, the production is esti- 
mated to have been over 4,000,000 gallons in 1929 ^ and to be 
10,000,000 gallons in 1930." The present (June, 1930) quotations 
on synthetic methanol are the lowest in the history of the industry. 

Not only has production of the natural product decreased from 
5,982,579 gallons in 1928 to 5,299,546 gallons in 1929, but imports of 
synthetic methanol for the last two years have been very small, as 
compared with production, amounting to 379,291 gallons in 1928, 
valued at $0,341 per gallon, and to 538,427 gallons in 1929, valued at 
$0,399 per gallon. Most of the methanol imported is later exported 
with benefit of drawback either as indigo paste or as formaldehyde. 

ETHYL ALCOHOL 

The first commercial production of synthetic ethyl alcohol in the 
United States was reported in 1929, when 48,000 proof gallons were 
made during a 1-month commercial test conducted at the Charleston, 
W. Va., plant of the Carbide & Carbon Chemicals Corporation, under 
a temporary permit granted in May by the Commissioner of Prohibi- 
tion. This alcohol, made from ethylene obtained from natural gas, 
was pronounced identical with alcohol obtained by fermentation and 
was denatured and used in the regular chemical processes of the 
company. Synthetic alcohol may also be made from ethylene ob- 
tained from blast-furnace gas and from acetylene obtained by the 
reaction of water on calcium carbide. 

It is reported that the synthetic alcohol plant of the Carbide & 
Carbon Chemicals Corporation, at Charleston, W. Va., has a produc- 
ing capacity of from seven to eight million gallons per year, was in 
operation early in 1930, and will operate under a production quota 
fixed by the Bureau of Prohibition based on orders the company will 
be able to show. 

PROPYL, ISOPROPYL, BUTYL, AND AMYL ALCOHOLS 

The production of isopropyl alcohol in 1929 was several times that 
of 1928. It is made on a commercial scale by high-pressure synthesis 
from propylene, which is obtained by the cracking of either natural 
gas or petroleum, or as a by-product in the manufacture of ethyl 
alcohol by fermentation. 

In June, 1930, the Du Pont Ammonia Corporation announced that 
its large plant for the production of higher alcohols by high-pressure 
synthesis from hydrogen and carbon monoxide obtained as a by- 
product in the synthesis of ammonia was nearing completion. The 
mixture of alcohols produced by this process is separated by frac- 
tionation; the first fraction containing butyl and amyl alcohols, the 
second containing propyl alcohol, and the third containing higher 
alcohols than 5-carbon alcohol. 

Isopropyl alcohol, being a tax-free substitute for denatured ethyl 
alcohol, is used in the manufacture of toilet preparations because it is 
nonpotable, has no odor, and its properties are similar to those of 

3 Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, January, 1930, p. fiO. 
* Chemical Markets, April, 1930, p. 432. 



134 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

ethyl alcohol. It may be used as a denaturant in certain industries 
where methanol or pyridine might not be used for ob\aous reasons and 
by manufacturers of barbers' supplies, perfumes, and toilet prepara- 
tions, in place of acetone as a denaturant of ethyl alcohol, though either 
is prescribed by the Bureau of Prohibition in formulas 39, 39A, and 40. 
It is also used, as is normal propyl alcohol, as a solvent. 

The Commercial Solvents Corporation produced ^ approximately 
67,500,000 pounds of butanol in 1929 by the controlled fermentation 
of corn, of which 45,000,000 pounds were consumed in the manufacture 
of butyl acetate. 

The production of anwl alcohols in 1929 was greatly in excess of 
that in 1928. Large quantities are made by the Sharpies Solvents 
Corporation bv chlorinating pentanes contained in natural gas and 
subsequently hydrolyzing these monocldor derivatives with, a caustic 
solution in the presence of a catalyst. 

ACETALDEHYDE 

Acetaldehyde was first produced in the United States from acety- 
lene obtained bj' treating calcium carbide with water in 1926 when 
the Niacet Chemicals Corporation — in which the Canadian Electro 
Products Co. of Shawinigan Falls, Canada, and two American firms 
have joint interests — began operations at Niagara Falls, N. Y. The 
follo\\ing year another company erected a plant at Charleston^ 
W. Va., for the production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. So rapidly 
has production from this source increased that in 1929 practically all 
the acetaldehyde produced in the United States was synthesized from 
acetv'lene. 

Acetaldehj'de is used chiefly as an intermediate in the manufacture 
of glacial acetic acid. Large quantities are consumed in the manu- 
facture of rubber accelerators, and smaller quantities in the manu- 
facture of s\Tithetic resins and in the organic syntheses of fruit 
essences and ingredients of perfumes. 

ETHYL AND METHYL CHLORIDES 

Ethyl and methyl chlorides have both shown steady increase in 
production since 1927. Of the two, ethyl chloride is produced in 
much greater quantity and the annual increase in its production has, 
since 1927, been approximately twice that of methyl chloride. This 
is due to the fact that ethyl chloride is used chiefly in the manufacture 
of tetraethyl lead, in gro%nng demand for antilvuock gasoline. It is 
also used as a refrigerant and as a local anesthetic. The use of 
methyl chloride is confined chiefly to that of a refrigerant, though 
small amounts are used in the manufacture of dyes. The increasing 
use of tetraethyl lead in the preparation of ethyl gasoline, as well as 
the growmg demand for automatic refrigerators, augurs well for the 
future of these tw<^ chemicals. 

TETRAETHYL LEAD 

The production of tetraethyl lead is continuing to increase, and the 
rate of increase during the i)ast year is even greater than during the 
year previous, when its production was twice that of the year before. 

» Wall Street Journal, June 13, 1930. 



CHEMICALS OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 135 

Its growing use in the production of ethyl gasoline is due to the 
fact that it greatly reduces the laiock in internal-combustion engines, 
through its ability to effect a slow-burning explosion of sustained 
pressure rather than one in which the initial pressure reaches a maxi- 
mum and then instantaneously decreases appreciably. Because of 
this characteristic of ethyl gasoline, internal -compression engines of 
high-compression ratio can be operated with a higher degree of effi- 
ciency than when a fuel is used which has not been "leaded." This 
increased efficiency, however, is not so noticeable in the older type of 
engines which had a low-compression ratio. 

TRIETHANOLAMINE 

Triethanolamme has made continuous gains in output since 1927,. 
although the gain registered during the past year was less than during 
the previous year. Ethanolamines as a class possess high penetrative 
powers. That the addition of a small amount of triethanolamine to 
various oily materials, such as creosote, markedl}^ reduces the time 
of its penetration of various kinds of woods, suggests a possible use of 
triethanolamine in the preservation of wood. Ethanolamines have 
other properties that give them commercial value. Their great 
hygroscopicity and their ability to combine with fatty acids to form 
soaps having excellent detergent properties make them valuable 
constituents of shaving soaps and facial creams. 

Products Reported in 1929 for the First Time 

Of the products reported in 1929 for the first time, the more im- 
portant are: Synthetic acetone from propj^'lene, ethyl mercury 
chloride, isopropyl ether, and synthetic resins of the vinyl and urea- 
formaldehyde type. Among those of lesser importance are isopropyl 
bromide, isopropyl ethyl malonate, and oxalacetic ether. 

acetone 

One of the outstanding achievements of the synthetic noncoal-tar 
industry in 1929 was the commercial production of acetone from 
propylene obtained from natural gas. Acetone produced by this 
method and by the controlled fermentation of corn, 1 bushel of corn 
yielding from 10 to 11 pounds of mixed solvents in the proportion of 
60 per cent butanol, 30 per cent acetone, and 10 per cent alcohol, 
accounted for practically all of our 1929 production. Prior to the 
World War, acetone was obtained only in the destructive distillation 
of hardwood, 1 cord of wood yielding about 180 pounds of acetate of 
lime, from which approximately 97 pounds of glacial acetic acid or 36 
pounds of acetone could be obtained. 

Had the lacquer industiy not demanded increased production of 
butanol, it is probable that no attempt would have been made to 
produce acetone by the fermentation of corn, since disposal of butanol 
produced simultaneously might have presented a serious problem, 
as it does now in Italy. But fortunately, the lacquer industry serves 
as an outlet for most of the butanol, with the result that the United 
States now has two sources of synthetic acetone. In 1929, two com- 
panies were producing synthetic acetone in the United States; one 
by the fermentation of corn, and one by synthesizing it from natural 

114492—30 10 . 



136 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

gas. Late in the year, a third concern began producing acetone 
commercially by the fermentation of corn. 

Acetone is used primarily as a solvent in the manufacture of cellulose, 
acetate rayon, pyroxylin plastics, photographic films, airplane dopes, 
patent leather, and artificial leather. It enters into the manufacture 
of laminated glass, chloroform and iodoform; and is also used as a 
solvent for fats, rubber, and other gums, paints, and varnishes, as well 
as for acetylene. When dissolved in acetone, acetylene may be safely 
transported under pressure and used without danger of explosion. 

ISOPROPYL ETHER 

Though formerly regarded as a fine chemical, isopropyl ether, 
which is a solvent for animal, vegetable, and mineral oils, certain 
waxes, and practically all natural and synthetic resins, is now being 
produced on a commercial scale in the United States. 

The properties of isopropjd ether are similar to those of ethjd 
ether with the added advantage of lower vapor pressure, higher flash 
point, higher boiling point, lower solubility in water, and a somewhat 
liigher solvent power. Its unique solvent properties and ease of 
recovery indicate, in addition to its use as a common solvent, its 
possible use in the extraction of acetic acid from pyroligneous liquors 
by methods similar to those employed in the Brewster process; or, 
when used in conjunction with ketones, alcohols, or other ethers, 
in the de waxing of oils or the deoiling of waxes. 

SYNTHETIC RESINS 

Vinyl, urea, and thiourea resins are the important synthetic 
resins of noncoal-tar origin. They differ from phenolic resins in 
chemical composition as well as in physical properties. Vinyl resins, 
which are polymers of vinyl chloride, vinyl acetate, or' mixtures of 
both, are water white and transparent to ultra violet light. The basic 
raw material for these vinyl compounds is acetylene, or ethylene 
contained in natural gas. Thiourea resins, which are condensation 
products of thiourea or its derivatives and an aldehyde, are translu- 
cent and do not darken on exposure to light as do phenolic resins. 

Vinyl resins can well be used in the lacquer industry since they not 
only possess greater flexibility and adhesion than does nitrocellulose, 
but they permit the production of surface-coating materials in which 
the film-forming constituents may be as high as from 50 to 60 per 
cent as compared to but 25 per cent in nitrocellulose lacquers. 

Thiourea resins are used chiefly in the plastics industry. As 
they can be molded in extremely thin sections, contain no phenol to 
impart taste or smell, and are less brittle than products molded 
from phenolic resins, they are used to advantage in molding dishes and 
similar articles. 

Vinyl resins were produced in the United States prior to 1929; 
but the domestic production of thiourea resins began in August, 1929. 

ORGANIC METALLIC COMPOUNDS 

Ethyl mercury chloride is one of several organic metallic com- 
pounds developed since the war for controlling fungus parasitic 
diseases that have caused losses amounting to hundreds of millions 



CHEMICALS OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 137 

of dollars annually. Other similar compounds are ethanol mercury 
chloride, hydroxymercuricresol, hydroxymercurichlorphenol, hydroxy- 
mercurinitrophenol sulfate, mercuriated orthonitrophenol, mercuri- 
ated acetaldehyde, copper beta-naphthol, and copper arsenic beta- 
naphthol. 

Contaming a metal (usually mercury or copper) in combination 
with an organic radical, these compounds, as a class, seem more 
satisfactory than certain chemicals such as formaldehyde, mercuric 
chloride, or copper sulfate, recommended by plant pathologists for 
years, in that the metallic radical is eft'ective against smut spores 
and in that the organic radical alters its toxicity so as to reduce or 
obviate seed damage. 

Although 1929 is the first year in which ethyl mercury chloride 
was produced on a commercial scale in the United States, the use of 
organic metallic compounds to combat plant fungus diseases is of 
several years standing;, having originated in Germany during the 
war. They are applied either in liquid form or as dust and though 
the former method is cheaper, the latter is easier and does not entail 
the several disadvantages attendant upon the liquid application. 
The first of these fungicidal compounds to be used in this country 
was hydroxymercurichlorphenol, marketed under the trade name of 
''Uspulun." 

Chemicals for Industrial Fumigation 

Certain sjnithetic organic chemicals, namely, ethylene oxide, 
ethylene dichloride, and carbon tetrachloride, are now being used in 
the commercial production of two new industrial fumigants to extermi- 
nate insects, vermin, and rodents, which have brought untold economic 
losses and have caused much human suffering. One, known as Car- 
boxide, is a mixture of carbon dioxide and ethylene oxide in the pro- 
portion of 9 to 1 by weight. The carbon dioxide markedly accelerates 
the respiration of insects and the ethylene oxide is mortally toxic 
except to human beings. The carbon dioxide also decreases the absorp- 
tion of the fumigant by the material being treated, which is impor- 
tant in the fumigation of grains and foodstufi's. The other is known 
as ethj'lene dichloride — carbon tetracliloride mixture. 

Both were evolved by scientists in the research laboratories of the 
manufacturer and of the United States Department of Agriculture 
working in cooperation. Both are claimed to completely eradicate 
all forms of insect life — eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults. Neither is 
dangerously toxic to man and both can be used safely for the fumiga- 
tion of grains, foodstuffs, textiles, and dwellings. They are said to be 
noninflammable and nonexplosive in all proportions with air, easy to 
handle, stable under all conditions, and to have no injurious action 
on the materials fumigated. 

Caffeine 

The principal source of caffeine now produced in the United States 
is theobromine, which is extracted from cocoa cake and used in the 
manufacture of synthetic caffeine. Natural caffeine is obtained both 
from tea waste and as a by-product in the decaffeinization of coffee. 
In the United States caffeine has been made from tea waste since 
1895, and theobromine has been extracted from cocoa cake since 



138 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

1911. In 1929 the production of caffeine synthesized from theobro- 
mine was far in excess of the production of natural caffeine, which;, 
based on imports of tea waste, was approximately 90,000 pounds plus 
that obtained in decaffeinizing coffee. Production of caffeine from 
all sources in 1927 was 399,002 pounds. The quantity of tea waste 
required to produce a pound of natural caffeine is approximately 
fifty-five times as much as the quantity of theobromine required to 
produce a pound of synthetic caffeine. 

Caffeine is an alkaloid used chiefly in the preparation of certain soft 
drinks. It has also been used to a certain extent in medical practice,, 
but recently theobromine, occurring in cocoa, and theophylUne, 
occurring in tea, are displacing it in a marked degree. These related 
alkaloids are, like caffeine, also produced synthetically. 



CHEMICALS OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 139 



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S ^-„-eo' CD-TI.-T,.- Icfco' !-<-„.- 1 lo" 1 co-criNiNoo-ifeo- 

S C^ CDOO^iO-^iCO^i i»0 1 00 t^ ^ ^ ^ 










P f-WlN ilNOO 1 t^ 1 1 . t^ 002 

Ud - . ^ 1 ^ 1 ,* 1 1 • -. 






8f 


^ cocoeo 1 rt 1 -H 1 1 1 10 

1 1 - : I : = 






!;M iiiiliiiiMii Miiiiiiii 
i N i N i N i i M i i i i 1 i i i M i i ! i ; 






1111 1 I 1 1== ; 1 1 1 1 1 I 1-3 1 I 1 1 1 ; 1 1 ; 1 






111 .2 1 J3 






Ill x3 ' 1 1 ' ' ' ' 1 1 ' ' ' 1 ' ' 






,11, 1 , 1 i ly 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 u 1 1 

1 ; ; : ; : : i« i ; i ; : i i i-s i : i ; i : : : : 












1111 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 a 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 






1 1 1 1 , 1 I 1 ; £ 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 § 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






weight— 
Qt or mo 

pounds, 
n 10 per 






by" 
lid.. 

rce: 

com 
tha 






' . 1 1 M " 1 ' 1 » 1 ' ■ ' ' ' ' (D ' ' ' ' ' 






inini 
tic a 
cid. 

55 'p 

and 
mor 














onta: 
t aoe 
Stic a 

ight" 

salts 
not 










Acetaldehyde , 

Paracetaldehyde , 

Formaldehyde, solution , 

Hexamethylenetetramine 

Acetic or pyroligneous acid, c 

Not more than 65 per cen 

More than 65 per cent ace 

Formic acid_ 

Gallic acid 

Lactic acid, containing by we 

Oxalic acid 

Pyrogallic acid 

Butyl alcohol 

Methanol 

Carbon tetrachloride 

Chloroform 

Diethylbarbituric acid 

Qlycerophosphorie acid, and 
Ethers and esters, containing 

Ethyl ether USP.. 

Butyl acetate 

Amyl acetate 

Ethyl acetate 

Other, n. s. p. f. 

Tetrachloroethane. 

Trichloroethylene 

Thymol 

Urea 

Vanillin »3 









5 » 



_C35"" 

.aeo'O 
■C"S =3 CO 

.SS*'g 

sa^a 

2SSSs8 



•3 

a g a — TS — ^ 
PLiOCsSO-o 

- -> » 2 S 3 -O 



eaiS 




— • 








t» § 




Q. 


■«"3 




3 
n 








•-.a 




em 


On 






t=c, 




cs 


2 a 




■3 


JS ca 







« 60 






"oO 




a 



o.a 




a 


oS 




(D 


S5 
•Sfc 


s 


a 


l> >, 






cam 


00 


<3a 








■05 


p. 





^O 


<J 




®'0 


•3 

c 


.a 






s«,ri 


O* 



a|s § "S 

g >"o3 H, *» 

^"S— S cuEo • 

a « 3^m"a 
.SJ3 S, • -5 

o « ° -tS •,* 



140 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 41. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Imports through the port of New York 
1929, dutiable under paragraph 5, act of 1922 ' 



Item 



Quan- 
tity 



Pounds. 
227 



Acetamide 

Aldehyde C-8 to C-14, inclusive--. 

Aldehyde C-14 -.- 

Allylbromide --- 2,207 

Allylisopropylbarbituric acid I 1, 102 

Allylisopropylacetylaminoforma' 

mide 

Allylisosulphocyanate 

Ammonium oxalate-- 

Ammonium valerate 

Amy] valerate 

Bromvalerylurea (powder) 



25 



331 

19, 292 

69, 167 

1,115 

100 

836 



Butyl lactate j 1,213 

Butyl phosphate- 



858 

Butyric acid -i 1,102 

61,687 

2,205 

1,103 

55 

1,983 

550 

1,619 

947 

82, 668 



Calcium lactate 
Calcium lactophosphate- 
Calcium lactosulphate--- 

Capryl alcohol 

Chlorbutanol 

Cinnamic alcohol 

Cirtonellol 

Diallylbartiburie acid 

Dichlorethylene (diolene) 

a-Dichlorhydrine i 2,252 

Diethylamine ---' 1,055 

Diethylaminoethanol-- -.| 7, 500 

Diethylbarbituric acid-- .\ 1, 763 

Diethylenediamine 

Dihydroxycitronellal-- 

Dimethylgyloxime 

Ethyl aceto acetate 

Ethyl diodo brassidate 

Ethyl laurate 

Ethylate--- 



44 

300 

198 

11,023 

71 

300 

1,267 



Value 



$222 

793 

181 

2,069 

5,817 

1,163 

21, 321 

8,141 

1, 740 

153 

4,613 

464 

303 

244 

12, 356 

680 

282 

142 

8,168 

786 

3,076 

13,344 

11, 631 

924 

1,923 

17,010 

14, 104 

317 

1,182 

851 

4,341 

389 

147 

734 



Item 



Quan- 
tity 



Value 



Ethyl chloride 

Geranoil 

Hexachloroethane 

Ilydroxy-citronellal 

a-Ionone 

Iron ammonium oxalate 

Iron cacodylate -- 

Iron sodium oxalate.- 

Isoeugenol 

Isopropylbromide - - 

Isopropylbromophenylbarbituric 

acid 

Leucine o-amino-isocapronic acid. 

Linalyl acetate -.- 

Menthyl valerianate 

Menthyl atropolin - 

a-Methylionone. - --. 

Methyl heptine carbonate 

Nucleinic acid - 

Pentachloroethylene 

Perchloroethylene- - 

Potassium binoxalate 

Sodium cacodylate 

Sodium nudeinatc- 

Sodium oxalate 

Sodium salt of allyl arsenic- 

Strontium lactate - 

Tetrachloroethylene 

Tetramethyldiaminoethylisopro- 

panol 

Thiourea - -- . 

Theophyllin 

Thymol chloride 

Tribromethanol solution 

Trichlor urethane 



Pounds 

83G 

3,513 

4,990 

100 

110 

90, 787 



13,218 

200 

2,216 

37 
6 
55 



12 

35 

11 

2,602 

2,654 

4,629 

18, 259 

4,265 

99 

10, 350 

331 

1,102 

200, 000 

312 

26, 763 

650 

55 



444 



$791 

3,827 

746 

309 

527 

16, 754 

1,363 

2,187 

528 

1,021 



563 
142 



876 
119 
100 
15, 307 
182 
331 

1,772 

58, 028 

729 

1,025 

1,545 
433 

1,577 

188 
10, 312 
9,979 

178 
1,037 
2,654 



1 Data in this table are taken from analyses of about 85 per cent of the total value of all imports through 
the port of New York coded under par. 5. Hence figures for individual items may or may not bo complete, 
but serve as an indication of the quantity and kind of these imports. Imports valued at less than $100 are 
not included. 



Table 42. — Synthetic organic chemicals of nonconl-tar origin: Production and 

sales, 1929 

(The numbers in the second column refer to the numbered alphabetical list of manufacturers printed on 
p. 188. An X indicates that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his name in connection 
with the particular product. A blank in the third and fourth columns indicates that these sales can not 
be published without revealing information in regard to the sales of individual firms. A blank in the 
sixth column indicates that the production can not be published without revealing information in regard 
to the output of individual firms. The details thus withheld are, however, included in the totals) 





Manufacturers' identi- 


Sales 


Produc- 
tion 

(quantity) 


Name of chemical 


fication numbers 
(according to list on 
p. 188) 


Quantity 


Average 
Value price per 
pound 


Total - - 




Pounds 
405, 185, 980 


$65,117,651 $0. 16 


Pounds 
633, 192, 215 




Acetaldehyde 

Acetamide - 

Acetannin (tannigen) 

Acetic acid (100 per cent purity)... 
Acetone. 

Acetylbromodiethylacetyl- 
carbamide. 

Aldehyde ammonia.. 

Aldol tacetaldol) 

Amyl acetate and sec amyl acetate. 

Amyl alcohol and sec amyl alcohol 


61, 112, 129, 130, X 








10 








19 








112, 148, X 




] 




32, X. . -..- 




1 




19 




- - |- 




129 








112 










62, 59, 61, 64, 89, 114, 
125, 148, 149, 151, X, 
X X 

64.89. lb.";. 14S. 151. X. 


5, 108, 737 


1, 138, 851 


.22 


5, 832, 145 


X, X. ' ' ' ' 











CHEMICALS OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 141 



Table 42. — Synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin: Production and 

sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' identi- 
fication numbers 
(according to list on 
p. 188) 


Sales 


Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 


Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


.'Average 

price per 

pound 


\mvl butvrate 


27 


Pounds 






Pounds 


Amvl nitrite - - 


96, 102 










Amyl oenanthate . 


61 












125 . - . 










Amytal (see ethvlisoamylbarbi- 












tiiric acid) . 
Anethol . .. 


59, 61 












61,65,72, X -- . 


































butyl alcohol). 
Bromo acid (.-^ee diethvlbromoace- 












tyl bromide) . 


50,96 










Bromodieth ylacet vlcarbamide. _ . . 


19 










Butvl acetate (n and sec) 


52, 59, 64, 89, 151, 158, 

X, X, X. 
X,X 


30, 667, 187 


$5, 341, 329 


$0.17 


38, 780, 656 






Butyl aldehyde- - 


X .. . 










Butyl aldehyde ammonia deriva- 


130 


:":":i '::":::"": 






tives. 


52 . 












1 . 




1 






1 




1 






126 




I 






59, 64, 89, 158 












X 












61,114 










Caffeine 


100,105 










d-Camphoric acid 


96 












96, 114, X 










Carbon tetrachloride.- 


32,50,X,X 

19 


30, 755, 158 


1, 613, 654 


.05 


34, 719, 934 


Chaulmoogric ester 




Chloral hydrate 


102, 105 






















butyl alcohol) . 


50 










Chloroarsenobehenolate of stron- 


19 










tium. 
Chloroform _ . ...... 


26,50,129 . 


2, 340, 198 


459, 154 


.20 


2, 767, 301 




59 




Cinnamvl alcohol 


61 












59 












59 










Cinnamyl ketone 


61 . . . 










Cinnamyl valerate 


61 










Citral 


27, 59, 61, 72, 143, 149, X. 
X .... 


5,737 


13, 040 


2.27 


6,041 






Citric acid 


X 













145 












61, 149, X, X 












61 










Citronellyl butyrate 


59 












112, 130 




1 






19 








Decyl alcohol and aldehyde 


61 


















Dibromomalonylurea (dibromin).. 
Dichloroethyl ether 


X 


. 






32 


i ! 






19 




j 




Diethylbarbiturie acid (veronal) 

(barbital) . 


1,19 




! 




19 




1 




(bromo acid) . 
Diethyl malonate (malonic ester).. 


1,19 




!' 




32 










32 73 








Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether 


32 




1 






32 










Dlethylene o.xide 


32 












61 












61 












36,121 












10 












X 












19 










tate. 













142 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 42. — Synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin: Production and 

sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' identi- 
fication numbers 
(according to list on 
p. 188) 


Sales 




Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Prod uc- 
tion 
(quantity) 


Duodecyl alcohol and aldehyde 


61 -. 


Pounds 






Pounds 


Erucicacid 


19 










Ethyl acetate (85 per cent purity).. 
Ethyl acetoacetate 


52, 61, 62, 64, 125, 148, 

151, 157, X, X, X. 
148 


55, 155, 247 


$6, 388, 361 


$0.12 


73, 895, 640 


Ethyl bromide 


19,50 










Ethyl butyrate 


27, 59, 61, 64, 114, X 










Ethyl n-caproate 


114 




::::. 




Ethyl carbonate . 


148 










Ethyl chloride 


50,52,64,65,68,96,129.. 










Ethyl chlorocarbonate 


148 1 








Ethyl ether, tech 


11, X 










Ethyl ether, US P.. 


11,96, 102. 139, 148, X... 

59,61,64,96, 114, X 

126 


5, 307, 575 
2,815 


1,680,852 
1,732 


0.32 
.62 


6, 147, 393 
3,437 


Ethyl formate . 


Ethyl furoate 


Ethyl glycolic acid ester of menthol 


19 










Ethylhydroxy butyrate 


X 










Ethyl iodide .' 


96, 102 










Ethylisoamylbarbiturie acid (amy- 
tal) 


93 










Ethylisopropylbarbituric acid 


X 










Ethyl isovalerate... 


59,61,X 










Ethyl lactate 


61, 148, X 










Ethyl laurate 


61 










Ethyl malonate (mono) 


1,61,143 










Ethyl mercury chloride 


52 










Ethyl nitrite 


11,64,96, 102 










Ethyl oenanthate... 


59,61, 114, X 










Ethyl oleate 


61 -. 










Ethyl oxalate . 


61, 148 










Ethyl pelargonate 


27,61,143 










Ethyl propionate.. 


61, 125, X... 










Ethvl n-valerate 


61,64, 114 








192 


Ethylene 


148 










Ethylene chlorohydrin 


32 










Ethylene dibromide 


30,50 










Ethylene dichloride. ... 


32,50 










Ethylene glycol... 


32 










Ethylene glycol derivatives 


73 










Ethylene glycol diethyl ether 


32 










Ethylene glycol monobutvl ether 


32 










Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether.. 


32. 










Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether 
acetate . ._ 


32,148 










Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether. 


32,73 










Ethylene oxide . 


32 










Formaldehyde (40percentpuritv) 


48, 80, 129, X 








51, 786, 422 


Formic acid (90 per cent purity)" 


153, X. . . . 










Furac II (zinc dithiofuroate) 


126 










Furac III (lead dithiofuroate) 


126 










Furacrylate sodium 


126 










Furfural 


126 










Furfuryl alcohol (furan carbinol) . 


126 










Furoic acid 


1 2fi _ _ 










Gallic acid, USP and tech 5fi.9r.. X_ _ 








458, 389 


Qeranyl acetate.. 


59,61,143 










Geranyl butyrate 


59,61 










Oeranyl formate 


59,61 










Geranyl propionate 


61. 










Glycerol diacetate (diacetin) 


65. 










Glycol diacetate . 


148 










Olycerophosphoric acid and salts of 


80, 105 










Guanidiue 

Ileliotropin... 

Heptaldehyde 

rieptadpcyl aldehyde 


19 










65,72 










X 










61 










ITexachloroethane . ... 


50 . . . 










Hexadecyl aldehvde 


61 










Hexamethylenetetramine 


80, 129, X 








2, 368, 020 


Hexamethylenetetramineanhydro- 
methvlene citrate 


19 










f lydrofuramide - 


126 










llydroxylamine . 


10 










lodobehenate of calcium 


19 










lodobehenate of iron, basic 


19 






1 


lodobehenic acid 


19 










CHEMICALS OTHER THAN THOSE OF COAL-TAR ORIGIN 143 



Table 42. — -Synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-tar origin: Production and 

sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' identi- 
fication numbers 
(according to list on 
p. 188) 


Sales 


Produc- 
tion 
(quantity) 


Xame of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 




96, 102, 109 


Pounds 






Pounds 


lonone 

Isoamyl butyrate..- 

Isoamyl formate.. ..' 


72, 100, 143, 149, X 

27, 59, 64, 114, X 

59, 114 


37, 227 
9,096 


$145, 656 
9, 881 


$3.91 
1.09 


40, 416 
16, 177 


59 114 X 












59 












59, 114 












61 












59,61 












61 












fil 










Isoeugenol . . ... ."19.(11.72.149 












109 










Iso propyl alcohol (isopropanol) 


32, X 










X 












32 












X 












114 












61 












61 










Lactic acid (100 per cent purity)... 
Linalvl acetate 


14, X 










59, 61, 72, 143 








764 




61 












59 












61 










Menthol, synthetic (see isomen- 
thol). 

Methaform (see trichlorobutyl al- 
cohol) . 

Methanol (methyl alcohol) 

Methyl acetate 












32, 51, X 










62, 148 - 










129 












143 












126 












102 










Methyl isoeugenol 


59 . 










61 - 












19 . 












102 












32 










Neonal (see butyl ethyl barbituric 
acid). 












61 










Nonyl aldehvde 


61 












61 












61 










sec-Octyl acetate 


61 











n-Octyl alcohol- 

sec-Octyl alcohol (capryl alcohol)... 
Octyl aldehyde 


61 










10,61 










61 










Octyl butyrate 


61 . 












148 










Oxalic acid 


116, 153, X 










Paracetaldehyde 


112 










Paraformaldehyde 


80, 129 












131 . 












130 












61 










Propionaldehyde 


61, 158 












158 












158. 












59,61 










n- Propyl propiorate 


61 - - - 










Propylene chlorohydrin 


32 










Protethyl 


61 










Pyrogallol (pyrogallic acid) 

Pyruvic acid 


56, 96, X 








134,994 


1, X 












10, 56 










Rhodinal 


X 












59, 61, 72, 143, 145, 149, 

X. 
59,61,143 








4,364 














59 












59 










Sebacicacid 


10 









144 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



Table 42. — Synthetic organic chemicals of noncoal-iar origin : Production and 

sales, 1929 — Continued 





Manufacturers' identi- 
fication numbers 
(according to list on 
p. 188) 


Sales 


Produc- 
tion 
(Quantity) 


Name of chemical 


Quantity 


Value 


Average 

price per 

pound 


Succinate sodium 


133 - - 


Pounds 






Pound) 


Succinic acid 

Succinic peroxide 

Synthetic resins (noncoal-tar) 

Tanrigen (see acetannin) 


96 








X 








73 X, X - 












( 




Terpineol 

Terpinyl acetate 

s-Tetrachloroethane 

Tetradecyl aldehyde 

Tetraethyl lead 

Tetrahydrof urfuryl alcohol 

Tetramethylthiouramsulfide 


59, 72, 143, X 










59,72, 143, 149, X 








3,857 


129. 










61 










52 










126 










52, X 










Tetramethylthiouramdisulfide 


161, X.. - . 










Thiobismoi (sodium bismuth thio- 


X. 










glycollate). 
Triacttin 


89 - 










Tribromotertiarybutyl alcohol 


X 










(brometone). 
Trichlorobutyl alcohol (methaform) 


X 










Trichloroethyleue . . 


129. 










Trichlorotertiarytiutyl alcohol 


X . 








(chlorttone). 
Triethanolarr.ine . . 


32 






1 


Tritthyltrimethylenetriamine 


X 










Trimcthylene bromide. 


1- . 










n-Valeric acid 


61 










Vanillic acid 


61 










Vanillyl vanillate. - - 


61 










Vinyl acetate. ... ... 


32 . - 










Vinyl chloride 


32 










Vinyl resins 


32 










Xanthates 


74, 75, 130 












X 










Zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate. . 


X 























PART V 
INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



145 



Part V 
INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



Introduction 



Previous issues of the Census of Dyes, published annually since 
1917, have discussed in detail trends in international dye trade during 
the pre-war years, through the war period (1914-1918), and through 
the post-war period. Many significant changes have occurred in 
international dye commerce during the years so far reviewed. Old 
alliances and trade customs have been broken down and new align- 
ments formed, and there has been a constant shifting in the source 
of supply by many of the dye-importing nations. This issue of the 
census brings the discussion up to date. 

Developments in 1929 

Outstanding developments in international dye trade in 1929 were: 
(1) Consummation of the agreement between German, Swiss, and 
French dye producers; (2) formation of the American I. G.; (3) 
increased exports from the United States, S-wdtzerland, Great Britain, 
and Italy; decreased exports from Germany, France, and Japan; and 
(4) increased imports into the producing countries, the United States, 
Great Britain, and Smtzerland, and into the nonproducing country, 
India; decreased imports into the producing nations, Germany, 
France, Italy, and Japan. 

World Production of Dyes 

Germany, Switzerland, Great Britain, France, and the United 
States are the leading dye-producing nations of the world. Italy 
and Japan are manufacturers on a smaller scale. Other nations that 
make coal-tar dyes in limited quantities are Russia, Czechoslovakia, 
Holland, Poland, Spam, and Sweden. 

The world capacity to produce dyes is estimated to be 600,000,000 
pounds. (See Census of Dyes, 1923, Table 20, p. 124.) Estimates of 
world production in 1929 indicate that more than one- third of this 
capacity was idle during that year. The inability of producers to 
utilize fully the installed capacity has resulted in severe competition, 
which has eliminated many weak manufacturers and prevented 
certain others from makmg an adequate return on the invested capital. 
In recent years the struggle for markets has become so intense among 
foreign manufacturers that international organizations have been 
effected, and there is evidence of a movement toward the fixing of 
world prices by European manufacturers. 

147 



148 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 43 shows the production of dyes by the chief producing 
countries, 1925-1929, inchisive. 

Table 43. — Dyes: Production by chief -producing countries, 1925-1929 



Country 



1925 



Germany ' 

United States 2. 
Great Britain ». 
Switzerland *... 

France * 

Italy 6 

Japan ' 



Pounds 
165, 000, 000 
86, 343, 348 
32, 693, 402 
18, 000, 000 
32, 065, 996 
13, 860, 000 



1926 



Pounds 
165, 000, 000 
87, 979, 000 
30, 297, 000 
19, 200, 000 
34, 419, 868 
15, 428, 000 



1927 



1928 



1929 



Pounds 
165,000,000 
95, 200, 000 
39, 551, 756 
22, 500, 000 
27, 590, 000 
13.621,000 
16, 856, 000 



Pounds 
165,000,000 
96, 625, 000 
50, 907, 000 
23, 857, 000 
30, 736, 000 
15,211,000 
18,221,000 



Pounds 
165, 300, 000 
111,421.000 
55. 785. 000 
24. 347. 000- 
36,114.000 



• The monthly reports containing the one-quarter monthly German production of dyes made to the 
Reparation Commission. These reports covered the period, February, 1920 to December. 1924, inclusive. 
The figures for 1925-1929 are estimated from U. S. Department of Commerce. 

2 Annual Census 0' Dyes and Other Svnthetic Organic Chemicals, U. S. Tarifl Commission. 

3 Estimates for 1921-1926 were prepared by Dyestufls Industry Development Committee from voluntary 
returns of British dye firms; 1927-1929 figures prepared by British Board of Trade. 

* Calculated on basis that the home market consumes 10 per cent of the output of Swiss dyes; exports 
consequently equal 90 per cent of production. 

« Official figures from French-owned plants in France compiled by tha Union des Producteurs des Con- 
sommateurs pour le developpement de I'industrie des Matieres Colorantes en France; 1927 and 192S figures 
from U. S. Department of Commerce; 1929 figures from Daniel J. Regan, assistant commercial attach^, 
U. S. Bureau of Domestic Commerce, Paris, France, July 1, 1930. 

8 Production figures for 1924 and 1925 compiled by Hon. Ernesto Belloni for International Economic 
Conference, Geneva, Switzerland, May, 1927, and those for 1926, 1927, and 1928 from U. S. Department of 
Commerce, World Trade Notes. 

' Figiu-es for 1927 and 1928 from "Chemical Trade Journal," London, Mar. 28, 1930; as reported by the 
Japanese Ministry for Industry and Trade. 



Competitive Conditions 

The dye-producing nations are equipped to produce dyes far in 
excess of their home requirements. Consequently, there is severe 
competition for foreign maikets, and many of the producing nations 
have adopted special measures to protect their industries. Among 
these governmental aids are concessions, special privilege, subsidies, 
and tariffs. The struggle for markets is most noticeable in the Far 
East, principally in China and India, both nonproducers and both 
large consumers of the cheaper dyes, such as indigo and sulfur black. 
The United States, Great Britain, France, and Italy are active in 
their endeavors to retain Far Eastern markets gained during and 
since the war period. Germany and Switzerland are making intensive 
efforts to regain their pre-war control of the dye trade of these im- 
portant consuming nations. 

Germany and Switzerland still dominate the international dye trade 
to the extent of exporting about 80 per cent by value of the dyes 
exported from all producing countries. This, however, is a decrease 
from their 85 per cent share of the world exports in 1928. 

The export trade of Germany dechned about 10,000,000 pounds 
and about $6,000,000 in value in 1929 as compared with 1928. This, 
ho^^'ever, does not present a complete picture of Germany's inter- 
national activities, since the I. G. controls or has an interest in dye 
plants in the United States, Japan, Spain, and Russia. In addition 
to a substantial production, these subagencies handle products not 
of their own manufacture. The I. G. is constantly expanding its 
activities, both in Germany and in other countries, and is making a 
determined effort to regain its position of preeminence in international 
chemical trade. By centralization, coordination, and efficiency in 
dye production, manufacturing costs have been reduced; by agree- 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 149 

ments with producers in Switzerland and France, the burden of selUng 
costs has been reduced; and by constantly increasing the number of 
chemical products, many of them the result of intensive research, sales 
have been increased throughout the world. 

Switzerland has long been an important factor in international dye 
trade, especially in the higher-priced products. Speciahzation in dyes 
requiring skill, experience, and trained workmanship has admi- 
rably fitted this nation for participation in this specialty field. The 
Swiss have a well-trained and efficient selHng organization throughout 
the world and own or have an interest in plants in the United States, 
France, Germany, Great Britain, and Italy. Crudes and interme- 
diates are imported from several neighboring nations. The manu- 
facture of specialty types reduces the amount of raw materials and 
effects a saving of transportation charges, both on the imported 
unfinished coal-tar products and on the outgoing dyes. It is esti- 
mated that 90 per cent of the Swiss production is exported, so the 
vital importance of foreign markets is apparent. 

In the United States domestic competition has been so severe that 
many of the weaker producers have been ehminated, and various 
mergers and consolidations have been effected. This trend will 
undoubtedly continue until productive capacity is not greatly in 
excess of domestic consumption and demands from foreign markets. 

The increase in the world wide preference for fast dyes and the more 
expensive specialty colors is a distinct advantage to nations develop- 
ing and producing this type of product, while nations restricting their 
output to the old type cheaper colors will have difficulty in main- 
taining their trade. 

The increase in the average price of dyes in some nations does not 
mean that specific dyes are becoming more expensive, but that more 
of the higher-priced dyes are being produced and consumed. Dye 
prices, in general, have decUned in international markets. 

The status of the United States' activities in the dye trade is fully 
discussed in Parts I-III of this census, and that of other countries is 
further treated in Part V. 

Exports From Producing Countries 

Table 44 gives comparative statistics of exports of dyes from the 
chief producing countries during the pre-war year 1913 and in the 
post-war period 1925-1929. 

There was a decided falHng off in both quantity and value of exports 
from Germany in 1929 as compared with the previous year. The 
dyes exported from this country were only 40 per cent by quantity of 
exports in 1913, but in value constituted 94 per cent of the 1913 
figure. This indicates the universal trend towards more expensive 
fast dyes and towards colors of greater concentration. 

Exports from Switzerland increased slightly in quantity and more 
noticeably in value. The value per pound increased from 70 cents 
in 1928 to 74 cents in 1929. The increase is due to the greater outgo 
of higher-priced colors, exports of the cheaper colors (indigo) remain- 
ing at about the 1928 level. In terms of value, Switzerland has 
more than tripled her export trade in dyes since 1913; in quantity, the 
increase has been much less — from 19,000,000 to 22,000,000 pounds. 



150 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

The export trade of the United States recorded a conspicuous gain 
in both quantity and value in 1929 over 1928. As the value p.er 
pound declined from 23 cents in 1928 to 21 cents in 1929, the rate of 
increase was greatest apparently in the cheaper colors, such as indigo 
and sulfur black. 

There was a large gain in exports from Great Britain in 1929. This 
increase was largely in the cheaper colors, since the value per pound of 
exports dechned from about 34 cents in 1928 to about 27 cents in 1929. 

Exports of dyes from France declined a,ppreciably in volume, but 
only slight^ in value. This may be indicative of a trend towards 
specialization in the higher-priced colors. 

The export trade of Italy increased decidedly in both quantity 
and value. 



Table 44.- 



-Coal-tar dyes: Exports from chief producing countries, 
1925-1929 



1913 and 



Exported from — 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

Germany 239,598,133 

United States. 

Great Britain --1 5,451,376 

Switzerland : 19,458,902 

France i 1,152,134 

Italy -I 117, 725 

Japan 



$51,689,400 



862, 566 

5, 549, 752 

275,716 

22, 458 



1926 



Quantity Value . Quantity Value 



Pounds 
75, 879, 025 
25, 799, 889 

7, 3i4, 608 

16, 161, 041 

10, 784, 463 

426, 810 

1, 685, 606 



$44,311,155 
6, 694, 360 
3,122,149 
1,979,718 
7, 469, 903 
295, 702 
214, 209 



Pounds 
81, 883, 253 
25, 811, 941 

6,014,288 

17, 287, 793 

10, 335, 827 

681, 221 

1, 046, 520 



$47, 134, 156 
5, 950, 159 
2, 428, 287 
11,971,452 
5, 902, 946 
453, 235 
152, 657 



Exported froni- 



Germany 

United States 
Great Britain 
Switzerland -- 

France 

Italy 

Japan 



1927 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

107, 593, 519 

26, 770, 560 

7, 600, 208 

20, 291, 498 

11,133,671 

620, 595 

1, 080, 968 



$55,413,142 
5, 495, 322 
2, 970, 266 
14, 571, 841 
3, 055, 030 
334, 575 
136, 545 



1928 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

104, 302, 492 

27, 824, 264 

a, 645, 404 

21, 471, 739 

8, 013, 280 

796, 963 

2, 570, 892 



$54, 830, 872 
6, 531, 619 
3, 924, 769 
15, JOS, 761 
2, 356, 717 
464, 659 
209, 602 



Quantity Value 



Pounds 

94, 695, 507 

34, 130, 325 

1 17, 570, 112 

21,912,538 

6, 601, 234 

1,325,846 

1, 788, 927 



$48, 518, 005 

7, 279, 086 

1 4, 780, 269 

16,123,693 

2, 182, 734 

608, 844 

170,411 



1 Accounts relating to Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom, December, 1929. 

Inteenational Imports 



As heretofore mentioned, the Far East is the principal battlefield 
of foreign trade in the cheaper dyes. Official data on imports into 
China in 1929 w^re not available at the time of preparation of this 
report, but export figures f om the major producing countries reveal 
an interesting trend. Exports from Gcrmanv to China decreased 
from 31,390,000 pounds in 1928 to 28,910,000 pounds in 1929; those 
from Switzerland declined from 4,270,000 pounds in 1928 to 3,480,000 
pounds in 1929. This falling ofi" may be partially due to unsettled 
conditions in China. During the same period exports from the 
United States to China increased from 18,970,000 pounds to 
24,530,000 pounds. The decrease in exports from German}^ was in 
indigo and sulfur colors; the decline in those from Switzerland w^as 
largely in indigo; and the gain in those from the United States was 
in both of these cheaper colors. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



151 



The trade of India, as revealed by comparative statistics of imports, 
showed less change dm-ing 1929. Imports from Germany increased 
more than 1,000,000 pounds. Great Britain recorded a slight gain 
and Italy showed a decided increase. Imports from the United 
States were slightly less in 1929 than in 1928, while those from Swit- 
zerland, France, and Japan showed a greater rate of decrease. Other 
nonproducing countries in general imported more dyes, both by quan- 
tity and by value, in 1929 than in 1928. 

Of the older producing countries, Germany imported a smaller 
quantity of dyes in 1929 than in 1928. The value of imports was 
about the same in both years. Switzerland imported slightl}^ more 
■colors, both by quantity and by value, in 1929 than in the year before. 
The new producing coimtries — the United States, Great Britain, 
France, Itah^, and Japan — considered collectively, imported only a 
fraction of their consumption. The United States imports increased 
by about 1,000,000 pounds and by $1,000,000 during 1929. This 
increase was almost entirel}^ in the high-priced colors. 

Table 45. — Coal-tar dyes: Imports into the chief consuming countries, 1913, 1928, 

and 1929 



Imported into— 



1913 



Quantity Value 



1928 



Quantity Value Quantity Value 



China 

British India ' 

Czechoslovakia 

Japan--- 

United States 

Italy 

Belgium 

Great Britain 

Netherlands 

Dutch East Indies. 

Germany 

France 

Canada ^ 

Egypt 

Austria.- 

Switzerland 

Sweden 

Spain 

Poland - 



Pounds 
'60, 696. 533 
16, 923, 607 



$11,673,779 
3, 741, 031 



9, 755, 260 
M5, 950, 895 
515, 542, 429 



2, 100, 255 
7, 537, 870 
3, 611, 705 



41, 203, 008 



9, 207, 684 



6 2, 073, 434 
7, 138, 495 
4. 706, 601 
2, 633, 516 



890, 366 
1, 682, 422 
1,416,316 

594, 414 



17, 168, 764 
2, 201, 292 
2, 376, 166 

' 2, 303, 709 



3, 616, 199 
431, 197 
699, 737 

1, 021, 368 



Pounds 
64,116,911 
17, 198. 385 
8, 370, 204 
5, 949, 007 
5, 351, 951 
4, 207, 920 
5,911,635 

4. 693, 696 
6, 479, 300 

5, 723, 448 
10, 371, 982 

3, 443, 365 
3,111,728 
1, 097, 597 



2, 252, 491 

2, 586, 774 

1, 038, 472 

771, 169 



2 $10, 985, 069 
6, 937, 139 
5, 050, 470 
4, 605, 831 
4,321,867 

3, 560. 278 
1, 962, 246 

4, 866, 291 
3, 294, 501 
1, 745, 590 

5, 142, 370 
3, 693, 660 
1, 679, 633 

344, 284 



Pounds 
19," 591,' 356' 



$8, 337, 026 



5, 778, 132 

6. 437, 147 
3, 751, 348 
6, 394, 222 
5, 677, 056 



4,122,246 
5. 374, 085 
3,940,019 
2, 092, 008 
5, 329, 821 



8, 903, 718 

3, 335, 560 

3, 250, 019 

950, 769 



5, 072, 469 

3, 814, 395 

1,816,461 

301, 771 



1, 586, 641 

1, 630, 534 

1, 936, 832 

797, 682 



2, 373, 186 



1, 626, 677 



' Exports to China, 1913, from France, Germany, and Switzerland amounted to 69,181,230 pounds, 
valued at $11,516,567. Chinese statistics show value but not quantity of aniline dyes, and include "un- 
classified dyes" which may contain other than coal-tar dyes. 

2 Exclusive of "aniline dves" and "dyes and colors unclassified" amounting in value to $3,761,981 in 1927 
and $5,876,182 in 1928. 

3 Years ending Mar. 31. Imports into British India for calendar year 1928, 20,138,441 pounds, valued 
at $8,966,385; calendar year 1929, 18.144,305 pounds, valued at .$6,568,600. 

< Fiscal year 1914; quantity from Special Agents Series No. 121, value from Commerce and Navigation 
Reports. 

5 Aniline dyes only in 1913. 

6 Quantity of synthetic indigo not shown for 1913. 
' 1914. 

International Agreements 



The agreement between the dye manufacturers of Germany, 
France, and Switzerland, consummated in April, 1929, covered 
fixation of prices, establishment of export quotas, periodical readjust- 
ment of the major markets, and exchange of technical information. 
A detailed report on the agreement was given in the last census. This 
plan has not been in force for a sufficient period to appraise results 
accurately. Although exports of dyes by the participating nations 



114492—30- 



-11 



152 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

decreased in 1929, as compared with 1928, progress has been satis- 
factory. According to European press estimates, the cartel now con- 
trols 90 per cent of the Continental, 80 per cent of the European, and 
70 per cent of the world production of dyes. The production of the 
three participating countries at the time of the conclusion of the 
agreement was estimated at about 165,345,000 pounds by Germany, 
33,000,000 to 44,000,000 pounds by France, and 22,000,000 pounds 
by Switzerland. 

The Department of Commerce reports that the allocated percent- 
ages of exports, under the agreement of the I. G. and the French 
and Swiss producers of dyes are Germany 70, France 20, and Switzer- 
land 10. Another version gives the ratios as 75, 17, and 8. Reports 
from Germany and Switzerland deny that division of territory has 
been contemplated or that price fixing is to be engaged in. The 
arrangement is rather an agreement not to cut prices. The purposes 
of the pact are stated to be : (1) To permit France (Kuhlmann & Co.) 
the use of certain German processes, (2) to reduce trade in competitive 
dyes between participants, (3) to reduce distribution costs by con- 
solidation of foreign sales agencies. 

In the Far East it is reported that French dyes will be disposed of 
by the German organization, while, in Southern Europe, France will 
take over the sale of German products, Switzerland also having some 
preference. The Swiss members of the cartel are reported to have 
retained existing foreign sales organizations. 

In October, 1929, an agreement was signed in Paris by the pro- 
ducers of benzol in Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, France, Belgium, 
Holland, Luxemburg, and the Saar. The reported object of the 
agreement is standardization of grades, propaganda for increas- 
ing the use of benzol, investigations on the improvement of benzol 
motor fuels, and a uniform system of prices. A central bureau is to 
be established in Paris. 

According to a German statement, the production of benzol by the 
participating countries in 1928 was as follows: 



Long tons 

Germany 320, 000 

Great Britain 150, 000 

France 70, 000 



Long tons 

The Saar 35, 000 

Belgium 30, 000 

Holland 25, 000 



Production in 1929 is estimated to be from 12 to 15 per cent greater 
for Germany and about 8 per cent for the other countries. 

At the December meeting of the conference in Paris it was dis- 
claimed that there was any intention of forming an international com- 
bination. Both British and German producers of benzol already 
have their separate sales organizations for marketing benzol. 

Negotiations are reported in course between the German benzol 
cartel (Bochum) and a Standard Oil-Royal Dutch association to pro- 
long a trading contract between the two groups that expii-es December 
31, 1930. The contract was effected January 1, 1928, committing 
the benzol cartel to take 225,000 metric tons of gasoline from the two 
import groups against deliveries of benzol to the latter of 25 per cent 
of the production of the German cartel. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 153 

The Dye Industry of Germany 
activities of the i. g. 

According to the annual report of the I. G. Farbenindustrie, the 
results of the activities of the I. G. during 1929 were considered satis- 
factory despite the manifold difficulties encountered during the year. 
A dividend of 12 per cent was declared on common stock; in addition, 
holders of common stock are to receive a bonus of 2 per cent from 
funds received from the United States Alien Property Custodian for 
property seized during the World War, and the eight firms associated 
with the I. G. are granted nonrecurring bonuses ranging from 0.8 to 
2 per cent. 

Becau3e of agreements existing between the I. G. and other impor- 
tant producing groups, the dye industry of Germany was not mate- 
rially affected by the world-wide economic depression. Although 
severe competition was encountered in certain branches of the dye 
industry, the results attained in 1929 were comparable with those of 
the previous year owing to rationalization measures enforced in manu- 
facturing and sales. The German production of dyes by the I. G. 
is estimated to have been 165,345,000 pounds, valued at $83,330,100 
in 1929. Germany produced 88.8 per cent of the apparent German 
dye consumption in 1929. The number of dyes manufactured were 
increased by the addition of a considerable number of new and, in 
practical application, valuable dyes. 

Sales of chemicals, intermediates, light metals, varnishes, solvents, 
softening agents, technical collodion wool, Glysantine (an antifreeze 
similar to ethylene glycol), biological products, veterinary medicinal 
preparations, and perfumes increased. Increased sales of pharma- 
ceutical products and of photographic materials necessitated an exten- 
sion of the Bayer-Meister Lucius plant for increased production of 
pharmaceuticals, and the erection of a new plant for the manufacture 
of photographic paper. Foremost in scientific interest were the new 
narcotic Avertin, the hay-fever remedy, Helisen, and the sweet-tasting 
synthetic carbohydrate Sionon for suft'erers of diabetes. Various 
Hormon preparations were also introduced to the medical world in 
1929 and numerous international agreements with respect to pharma- 
ceutical fine chemicals were concluded. Production of the more 
important specifics was led by Aspirin, Pyramidon, Gardon, Compral^ 
and Panfiavin. Although conditions in the artificial-silk industry 
were very unsatisfactory, those in the Vistra (staple rayon) improved. 

The production of artificial nitrogenous fertilizers was somewhat 
restricted during 1929 in order to prevent the accumulation of stocks. 
The production of new types of fertilizers was not attempted. The 
reconstructed and enlarged Norsk Hydro-Elektrisk Kvaelstofaktiesel- 
skab in Norway was put into commission, and increased production 
at lower costs is reported. The German Nitrogen Syndicate, which 
controls sales both at home and abroad, and which terminated on 
June 30, 1930, was renewed. The new syndicate is constituted to 
last for a term of seven years, but may be terminated after five years. 
Practically the entire German nitrogen production is incorporated in 
the Nitrogen Syndicate, and hereafter the sale of nitrogenous prod- 
ucts for technical purposes will be effected exclusively through the 
syndicate. 



154 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

As regards the hydrogenation of petroleum, by means of which fuel 
crudes and heavy resiiues of the ordinary refining process may be 
converted almost qiantitativel;' into gasoline or other more valuable 
petroleum products y the intioduction of hydrogen under pressures 
ranging from 100 to 300 atmosi 'icres in the presence of a catalyst, the 
outgrowth of the agreement rea hed in 1927 between the I. G. and the 
Standard Oil of New Jersey for jomt research on the Friedrich Bergius 
process of catalytic hydrogenation resulted in the formation, in 1929, 
of the Standard I. G. Co. To this company have been transferred the 
rights with respect to all I. G. patents regarding hydrogenation for 
the whole world except Germany. The Standard Oil of New Jersey 
ceded to the Standard I. G. Co. all patents with respect to hydrogena- 
tion which it owned. In 1930 the Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey 
announced it had brought 17 major oil refiners of the United States 
into association in one company — the Hydro Products Co. — which 
will control the process in the United States and, in return, pay a fixed 
and running royalty to the Standard I. G. Co., which owns the process. 
Other oil companies, not now associate members in the Hydro Prod- 
ucts Co., may later be allowed to use the process "when and if the 
process shall have been so far developed as to be capable of profitable 
application in plants of smaller size than those which now seem the 
minimum." The I. G. has reserved for itself exclusively the utiliza- 
tion of these processes in Germany, 

The American I. G. Chemical Corporation, a manufacturing and 
selling subsidiary for the German I. G., was formed on April 25, 1929, 
with a capitalization of $30,000,000 and ended 11 months of its first 
fiscal year on March 31, 1930, with net earnings of $3,556,772. After 
allotting interest payable on the 5K per cent debenture issued by the 
company and guaranteed by the parent company, there remained a 
net profit of $2,088,442, which has been carried forward to the new 
year. 

A r6sum6 of the earnings, assets, and liabilities of the I. G. for the 
years 1925 to 1929, inclusive, are given in tabular form below. 



Table 46. — Profits and losses of the I. G. Farbenindustrie, 1925-1929 
[Expressed in millions of marks] 





1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


Gross profits 


168. 56 
45.19 


186. 07 
42.12 


224. 30 

48.75 


257. 14 
51.90 
15.00 


256. 48 


General expenses 


66.80 


Interest - 


14.98 












Actual profits. 


123. 37 

55.77 


143. 95 
75.23 


175. 55 
74.74 


190. 24 
71.78 


174. 70 


Depreciation.- 


70.10 






Yearly net profits 


67.60 
.44 


68.72 
1.80 


100.81 
2.40 


118. 46 
4.43 


104. 60 


Brought forward 


5.46 






Dividend on Z\i per cent preferred shares.. 


.15 

64.31 

10 


.15 

66.15 

10 








Dividend on common shares 


95.59 
12 


95.92 
12 


96.92 


Dividends in percentage 


12 







INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



155 



Table 46a. — Balance sheet of the I. G. Farbenindusirie, 1925-1929 
[Expressed in millions of marks] 





Dec. 31— 




1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


Assets: 

Plants 

Outside holdings-- -. 


319. 19 
237. 11 
5.43 
208. 63 
299. 79 

} 115. 70 

641. 60 

4.40 

104. 03 

48.82 

10.38 

.72 


346. 90 

} 261. 13 

226.03 

384. 93 

r 14. 63 

\ 200. 73 

726. 89 

13.39 

173. 15 

48.82 

7.73 

.20 

83.41 

310. 25 


382. 46 

296. 14 

245. 91 

411.80 

25.44 

165. 83 

796. 63 

13.39 

176. 25 

49.24 

.96 

.37 

66. 77 

320. 77 


451. 92 

306. 26 

342. 13 
500. 47 
23.31 
227. 77 

799. 30 
13.39 

188. 29 
49.34 

250. 47 

.61 

82.10 

345. 48 


501.01; 


Securities... 

Stocks 

BOls receivable. 


288. 63! 

357. 99 
485. 88 


Cash, drafts 

Bank credits ,. 

Liabilities: 

Common shares A ' 


22.62 
136. 83 

799. 35 


Preferred shares B i.. 


13.39 


Reserves 


200. 00 


Welfare fund . ... 


.^3.00 




249. 71 


Uncollected dividends 


.29 


Rank dehts 


31.06 


Other liabilities.. 


307. 86 


321. 13 







« Amounts paid in; preferred shares A are 100,000,000 marks par. 

On the companv's balance sheet the stock capital in 1929 remained 
unchanged at 1,100,000,000 marks. 

The consumption and production of coal-tar crudes and interme- 
diates by German distillation plants in 1913, 1927, and 1928 are 
shown in the following table, furnished by Trade Commissioner 
W. T. Daugherty, in Berlin. 

Table 47. — Consumption and production of coal-tar distillation plants in Germany, 

1913, 1927, and 1928 



Item 



1913 



1927 



1928 



Quantity- 



Value 



Consumption: 

Half fabricates, total. 



Pounds 
214, 075, 478 



Pounds 
205, 686, 975 



Pounds 
251, 604, 384 



Crude benzols 

Heavy oils 

Light oils 

Crude naphthalene, etc 

Crude phenols 

Other products, including — 

Crude pyridines 

Gas (ammonia) water 

Production: 

Tar pitch 

Prepared tar, etc 

Heavy coal-tar oils... 

Naphthalene 

Crude and pure anthracene 

Pyridine bases 

Phenol, crystalline 

Cresols 

Crude phenols (for sale) 

Crude and pure benzol 

Toluol 

Xylol 

Cumaron rosins 

Other products 

Ammonia water under 10 per cent NH3- 

Ammonium sulphate 

Sal-ammoniac spirits 



2, 292, 784 

1, 342, 996, 023 
237, 755, 087 
885, 389, 406 
111, 160, 341 



16, 327, 268 



34, 821, 657 
'ii,'574,'i50' 



55, 721, 265 
64, 014, 970 
14, 570, 201 
31, 029, 745 
2, 654, 338 

37, 522, 292 
947, 978 

1, 453, 552, 304 

486, 914, 570 

941,478,839 

93, 999, 735 

26, 565, 430 

1,602,744 

7, 586, 029 

18, 203, 382 

932, 546 

53, 002, 993 

3, 485, 473 

14, 693, 659 

3, 624, 362 

55, 337, 665 

24, 257, 214 

2, 343, 490 

2, 052, 483 



81, 464, 379 
82,112,532 
18, 626, 665 
40, 209, 699 
3, 569, 247 

25, 621, 861 
767, 201 



1,524, 

537, 

952, 

108, 

27, 

1, 

8, 

17, 

3, 

67, 

4, 

16, 

5, 

61, 

23, 

4, 

1, 



141, 392 
704, 145 
235, 083 
153, 267 
312, 789 
430, 785 
505. 347 
945, 444 
487, 077 
791, 450 
484, 156 
049, 488 
577, 038 
671,480 
567,174 
012,372 
541,015 



$4, 258, 067 



1, 954, 249 

1, 205, 955 

225, 013 

395, 145 

188, 028 

289, 677 
33, 167 

10, 401, 184 

5, 777, 084 

12, 804, 504 

1, 696, 068 

467, 683 

180, 154 

960, 183 

1, 031, 767 

93, 537 

2, 179, 978 

184, 926 

445, 970 

203, 538 

713. 933 

20,282 

46, 768 

29, 588 



156 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

The 3-year agreement between the I. G. and the Soviet RepubHcs 
terminated in 1929 and has not been renewed. Under the terms of 
this agreement the I. G. was required to maintain certain specified 
quantities of dyes in stock in Russia and was given a guarantee for a 
certain annual amount of sales. The Soviet authorities accorded the 
I. G. a quota of 70 per cent of the Russian imports of dyes and phar- 
maceuticals. The Soviet was to receive technical assistance in the 
development of the Russian chemical industry. The agreement has 
not worked out satisfactorily and serious differences have arisen 
concerning the interpretation of the contract. 

Table 48. — Coal-tar dyes: Exports from Germany, 1913 and 1920-1929 



Year 


Quantity 


Value 


Year 


Quantity 


Value 


1913- 


Pounds 
239, 598, 133 
61,140,171 
48, 304, 991 
115,974,900 
73,974,473 
61,033,911 


$51, 666, 168 
53, 002, 407 
15, 935, 585 
80,781,892 
41, 580, 742 
30, 933, 368 


1925 


Pounds 
75, 879, 025 


!R44. 311.1.5.') 


1920 


1926 


81,883,253 1 47. 134. l-iifi 


1921 1 


1927 


107, 593, 519 
104, 302, 492 
94,695,507 


55, 413, 142 


1922 


1928 


54, 830, 872 


1923 


1929 


48, 518, 005 


1924 











1 May to December. 



Tables 49 and 50 show imports of coal-tar dyes into Germany in 
1928 and exports from that country in the same year. 

Table 49. — Germany: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 ' 



Class of dye and country of origin 



Quantity 



Value 



Aniline and other coal-tar dyes not elsewhere mentioned (sulfur dyes) : 

Belgium 

France. _ 

Great Britain 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Austria 

East Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Sweden 

Switzerland- 

Spain 

Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 

British India 

China 

Japan 

Dutch East Indies . 

Brazil.- 

United States 

Other countries 

Total . 

Alizarin (alizarin red); alizarin colors, variegated, from anthracene, total. 

Indigo natural and synthetic, total - - - 

Indigo carmine, color lakes, and new blue from indigo and indigo carmine, total 

Grand total.. 



Pounds 

127, 867 

654, 546 

199, 957 

160, 936 

1, 121, 260 

31, 526 

22,046 

24, 471 

45, 635 

34, 392 

4, 230, 848 

83, 334 

143, 519 

43, 431 

55, 556 

166, 006 

325, 619 

1,984 

42, 108 

909, 838 

128, 749 



, 553. 628 

147, 708 

201, 059 

1,323 



8, 903, 718 



4, 872, 619 

158, 165 

40,970 

715 



5, 072, 469 



' Monthly Review of the Foreign Commerce of Germany, December, 1929. Values converted at par 
rate of exchange. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 
Table 50. — Germany: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 ^ 



157 



Class of dye and country 
of destination 



Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes not elsewhere men- 
tioned (sulfur dyes): 

Saar District 

Belgium 

Bulgaria... 

Denmark 

Danzig 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Greece. 

Great Britain 

Italy 

Yugoslavia 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxemburg 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Austria 

East Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Russia 

Sweden. 

Switzerland 

Spain. 

Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 

Egypt 

British South Africa.. 

Canary Islands 

British India 

British Malay 

China 

Japan 

Dutch East Indies 

Persia 

Siam 

Turkey 

The rest of Asia 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Canada 

Chile 

Colombia. 

Ecuador 

Mexico.. 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

United States. 

Australian Federation 
Other countries 

Total 

Alizarin (red): 

British India 

Dutch East Indies 

Other countries 

Total 



Quantity 



Pounds 

11,023 

2, 918, 229 

428, 354 

438, 054 

14,771 

77, 161 

360, 452 

801, 372 

246, 254 

2, 470, 254 

1, 783, 742 

731, 486 

177,911 

80, 468 

55,115 

3, 223, 346 

375, 664 

1, 602, 744 

708, 338 

521, 388 

838, 409 

818, 348 

1,473,334 

2, 074, 529 

275, 134 

6, 599, 470 

755, 516 

196,871 

38, 360 

661 

6, 640, 035 

183, 864 

13, 858, 997 

1,992,518 

1,439,604 

52, 249 

247, 136 

196, 650 

195, 769 

474, 209 

80, 688 

381, 396 

729, 061 

186, 730 

151,677 

70, 327 

901,020 

173, 722 

58,201 

50, 485 

2,110,023 

141,976 

162,920 



Value 



0, 576, 015 



3, 409, 414 
503, 310 
229, 940 



4, 142, 664 



Class of dye and country 
of destination 



$33, 726, 023 



871, 336 



Alizarin colors (varie- 
gated) from anthracene: 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Great Britain. 

Italy 

Yugoslavia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Austria 

Poland 

Portugal 

Russia 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Spain 

Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 

British India 

China 

Japan 

Dutch East Indies.. 

Brazil 

Canada 

Mexico 

United States 

Australia 

Other countries 

Total 

Indigo, natural and syn- 
thetic: 

Belgium 

Great Brit.Jn 

Italy 

Yugoslavia. 

Netherlands 

Austria 

Portugal 

Russia 

Switzerland 

Spain 

Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 

Egypt 

British India 

British Malay 

China 

Japan 

Dutch East Indies... 

Persia 

Siam 

The rest of Asia 

Mexico 

United States.. 

Other countries 

Total 

Grand total 



Quantity 



Pounds 

170,636 
63, 713 
30, 203 

313,715 
20, 723 

858, 471 

325, 399 
18, 519 

298, 062 
26,235 

109, 128 
17, 857 
22, 487 
66, 358 

290, 346 

276, 457 
81,129 
84, 436 
74,956 

485, 453 
89, 066 

244, 270 
36, 376 
43, 871 
76, 500 
29,321 
1, 600, 540 
6,834 
83, 334 



5, 844, 395 



805, 561 

85, 538 
132, 937 

65, 036 
867, 069 
396, 167 

80, 688 
132, 496 
917, 775 

60, 406 
459, 218 
293, 212 
277, 339 
969, 363 
133, 599 
14, 959, 975 
967, 599 
1,014,777 
127, 426 
204, 807 
289, 905 
112,435 
410, 055 
369, 050 



24, 132, 433 



94, 695, 507 



Value 



$7, 870, 366 



6, 050, 280 



48, 518, 005 



•Monthly Review of the Foreign Commerce of Germany, December, 1929. Values converted at par 
rate of exchange. 



158 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

The Dye Industry of Great Britain 



IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES (LTD.) 

The Imperial Chemical Industries (Ltd.), the largest chemical 
organization in Great Britain, closed a profitable year in 1929. Its 
annual report states the the business showed a substantial increase 
compared with the previous year and that considerable advance was 
made in the development of new dyes. The gross profits for the year 
amounted to $31,643,642, from which $2,800,569 was transferred to 
the central obsolescence fund and $713,692 provided for income tax^ 
leaving a net profit of $28,129,382, which is an increase of $2,761,763 
over 1928. Assets totaled $529,485,731 at the end of 1929, as com- 
pared with $433,280,194 at the end of 1928. The directors have 
decided to transfer $2,574,476 to general reserves and to distribute 
$24,376,649 in dividends (as compared with $20,369,952 in the previ- 
ous year). During the year an additional $52,247,221 capital was 
issued, bringing the total issued to $372,198,480 out of an authorized 
capital of $462,317,500. 

Table 51 shows the various allocations and the principal items of 
the balance sheet for the years 1927-1929, inclusive. 



Table 51. — Principal items of balance sheet of Imperial Chemical Industries, 

1927-1929 1 



Item 



1927 



1928 



1929 



Net profit 2... 

To reserves 

Preference dividend... 

Ordinary dividend 

Deferred dividend 

Forward 

Issued capital 

Reserve funds 

Due to subsidiaries 

Creditors 

Investments 

Preliminary expenses.. 
Due by subsidiaries... 

Debtors.. 

Properties 

Furniture fittings, etc. 
Cash 



$21. 

1, 

5, 

12, 



283, 

3, 

27, 

4, 

286, 

6, 

40, 

3, 



616. 482 
990, 282 
574, 581 
826, 157 
823. 086 
402, 367 
083, 570 
406. 550 
235, 451 
119,395 
197. 410 
136. 428 
612, 067 
670. 232 



193, 730 
, 221, 209 



$25,367,619 

19, 466, 000 

5. 813, 278 

13, 687. 961 

868. 714 

533, 534 

319, 951, 259 

53, 575, 970 

36. 616, 427 

10, 237, 087 

333, 350, 057 



78, 753, 567 
13,081,979 

1, 532, 305 
498, 841 

6, 063, 440 



$28,129,382 

2, 574, 476 

7, 288. 825 

16, 468, 056 

1, 057, 753 

1, 707, 767 

372, 198. 480 

81. 392, 212 

42. 533, 716 

16.237.087 

335. 363, 533 



104, 351, 746 
34, 196, 321 

2, 605, 198 

28, 994, 544 



1 Source: Chemical Trade Journal, London, Apr. 25, 1930. 
' After taxation and providing for obsolescence fund. 



Conversion to dollars at par rate of exchange. 



REGULATION OF IMPORTATION OF DYESTUFFS 

Great Britain permits the import of synthetic dyes only under 
Ucense, under the provisions of the dyestuffs act of 1920. This act 
expires in January, 1931, unless new legislation is passed by Parlia- 
ment. Thus far no action has been taken for its renewal. The grave 
situation thus confronting the British dye industry was expressed by 
Lord Melchett at the annual meeting of Imperial Chemical Industries 
(Ltd.) in April, 1930, when he said: "We think the period has been 
too short for us to catch up to the long start our competitors have 
had." Proposals have been made for a conference of dye makers, 
merchants, and consumers to decide upon a common line of action, 
but thus far no concrete results have been attained. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 159 

I. C. I.-I. G. PATENT LITIGATION ^ 

The long-continued patent action in England relating to certain 
selection patents governing the manufacture of azo and monoazo 
dyestuffs between Imperial Chemical Industries and the I. G. 
Farbenindustrie ended March 30, 1930, in a judgment that all three 
German patents involved are invalid. The period of appeal expired 
May 1, 1930, without any appeal being entered, so the judgment 
became final. 

The I. G. sought to amend three of their patents of 1922 for the 
manufacture of azo dyestuffs by limiting them to the dyeing of 
cotton on the fiber. Imperial Chemical Industries (Ltd.) petitioned 
for the revocation of the patents on the grounds of prior publication, 
common general knowledge, and insufficiency of description, and 
alleged that by reason of these patents the German Dye Trust 
would be able to extend its monopoly in the manufacture of azo 
dyestuffs and greatly hamper the petitioning company in its business. 

PRODUCTION 

The British home production in 1929 represented 90 per cent by 
weight of the home consumption and 74 per cent by value. ^ Accord- 
ing to the statement of Lord Melchett made in April 1930, the 
British consumption of dyes was then little different from what it 
was in 1913, when it was estimated to be 51,520,000 pounds. With 
revived activity in the textile industry a consumption of about 
67,200,000 pounds may be reached. 

However, British production of dyes in 19 lo is estimated to have 
been only 11,200,000 pounds (of which 28 per cent was indigo, 36 
per cent alizarin red, and 36 per cent other colors), as compared to 
55,785,032 pounds in 1929. Production in 1929, entirely from 
British intermediates, exceeded consumption in 1913 when produc- 
tion was chiefly from imported intermediates. 

The production of dyes in Great Britain in 1929 was 9.6 per cent 
greater than in 1928. The increase is accounted for chiefly by 3,393,- 
000 pounds greater output of vat dyes, or 30 per cent more than in 
1928. Other increases were in acetate silk and direct cotton colors. 
Table 52, gives production figures for 1927, 1928, and 1929, as pre- 
pared by the Dyestuffs Industry Development Committee and issued 
by the British Board of Trade. Although the output of a few small 
firms is not included, the totals represent substantially the British 
output. 

> Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, April, 1930, p. 261. 
2 The Chemical Age, July 26, 1930, p. 72. 



160 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



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INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



161 



Table 53 shows imports of dyes into Great Britain by countries for 
1928; Table 54, exports by countries for 1928; and Table 55, imports 
and exports of coal-tar products and of dyeing and tanning materials 
for 1929. 

Table 53. — United Kingdom: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 * 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Quantity 


Value 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Quantity 


Value 


Alizarin: 
Germany 


Pounds 

89, 264 

224 

8, 736 

224 


$149, 682 

49 

16, 619 

102 


other coal-tar dyes— Con. 
United States 


Pounds 
16, 352 
12, 432 


$19,442 


France 


other foreign countries.. 

Total from foreign 
countries 


7,908 






Other foreign countries.. 


4, 572, 512 


4, 681, 568 




94, 448 


166, 352 


Total 


Canada 




Other coal-tar dyes: 

Germany 


3, 024, 000 
36,848 
48, 160 
71, 232 

1, 363, 488 


3,030,671 
30, 055 
52, 583 
48, 835 

1,492,074 


15, 120 
4,256 


16, 872 


Other British countries.. 


1,494 


Netherlands .. 


, . -^ . . , 






Belgium . . 




18, 366 




Total imported 




Switzerland 


4, 591, 888 


4,699,934 



' Annual Statement of the Trade of the United Kingdom with Foreign Countries and British Countries, 
1928. Values converted at par rate of exchange. 

Table 54. — United Kingdom: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 ' 



Class of dye and country of 
destination 


Quantity 


Value. 


Class of dye and country of 
destination 


Quantity 


Value 


Alizarin: 

British India 


Pounds 

938,448 

3,808 


$185,492 
2,209 


Other coal-tar dyes— Con. 
Switzerland 


Pounds 
108, 752 
36,624 
56, 672 
976, 976 
195, 328 
68, 656 
26, 992 
215, 264 


$46, 704 






55, 916 




Italy 


66, 710 




942, 256 
169,904 


187, 701 
102, 771 


China 


377, 271 




Japan 


78, 136 


Total to foreign coun- 
tries 


United States 


54,091 


Brazil 


22, 863 




Other foreign countries.. 

Total to foreign coun- 
tries 


112, 582 


Total exported 


1, 112, 160 


290, 472 


Indigo, synthetic: 


3,482,080 

797, 328 

1,680 


774, 265 

159, 207 

3,027 


2, 428, 272 


1, 137, 919 


Japan 


Irish Free State 


154, 560 
95, 424 

549, 472 
39, 760 

48, 160 
12, 544 

845, 712 
77,840 

162 400 


97, 242 


Other foreign countries.. 


Union of South Africa... 
British India- 
Bombay 


72, 579 


Total to foreign coun- 


4, 281, 088 
468, 944 


936,499 
173, 233 


315,685 


tries 




23, 958 

28, 810 


Total to British coun- 
tries ... - 


Bengal, Assam, 

Bihar, and Orissa.. 

Burma.. 




Total exported 


4, 750, 032 


1, 109, 732 


7,422 

440, 817 

41,638 


Other coal-tar dyes: 


224 
121, 408 
39,984 

7,392 
65,520 
240, 912 
267, 568 


127 
55, 463 
16, 906 

4,185 
24,727 
92, 176 
130. 062 


Australia 


Russia 




ins 9fi9 


Sweden . . 


Other British countries.. 

Total to British coun- 
tries 


102,256 i 63,863 




Denmark (includ- 
ing Faroe Islands) 


2,088,128 1,195,276 


Netherlands 


Total exported 


4, 516, 400 


2, 333, 195 
3, 733, 399 


France 


Grand total 


10, 378, 592 



1 Annual Statement of the Trade of the United Kingdom, 1928, Vol. III. Values converted at par rate of 
exchange. 

Table 55. — United Kingdom: Imports and exports of coal-tar products and of dye- 
ing and tanning materials, 1929 ^ 

Value 



IMPORTS 

Coal-tar products: 

Intermediates. , 

Finished coal-tar dye- 
stuffs- 
Alizarin. 

Other 

Extracts for dyeing: 

Cutch 

Other 

Indigo, natural... 

Extracts for tanning 



Quantity 



Pounds 
208, 208 



190, 400 
5, 486, 656 

5,815.712 

4, 128, 992 

35, 616 

92, 239, 616 



Value 



$119, 244 



291, 265 
5, 049, 091 

421, 225 

602, 721 

41,059 

4, 255, 516 



Coal-tar products. 
Other 



REEXPORTS 

Extracts for dyeing: 

Cutch... 

Other 

Indigo, natural 

Extracts for tanning. 



Quantity 



Pounds 
17,570,112 
10, 276, 896 



1, 841, 392 

299, 040 

9,968 

1, 468, 768 



$4, 789, 716 
500, 797 



133. 376 
103.910 

12, 088 
81, 670 



> Accounts Relating to Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom, December, 1929. 
verted at par rate of exchange. 



Values con- 



162 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

The Dye Industry of Switzerland 

The sales agreement concluded between the three largest dye man- 
ufacturers in Basle and the leading German and French producers in 
April, 1929 (see Census of Dyes, etc., 1928), has hardly been in ef- 
fect sufficiently long to judge results, but is reported to be working 
satisfactorily. 

Exports of dyes from Switzerland increased in value from $15,108,- 
761 in 1928 to $16,123,693 in 1929, or almost 7 per cent. The in- 
crease in quantity was only 2 per cent, indicating increased specializa- 
tion on the part of the Swiss makers in the higher-priced dyes such 
as the vat dyes. Since Switzerland is on an import basis with re- 
spect to the raw materials, the reduction in bulk is of importance in 
regard to savings in freight. 

Germany, as in previous years, took the largest share of Swiss 
dyes in 1929, although to a somewhat less extent than in 1928. 

In 1929 the United States displaced France as the second best 
customer for Swiss dyes. The increase of about 50 per cent in ex- 
ports of dyes to the United States is attributed to improved condi- 
tions in American silk trade. Decrease of exports to the United 
States during the last two months of 1929 was probably due largely 
to the effect of the New York StoCk Exchange crisis upon business 
in the United States. 

Great Britain's purchases of Swiss dyes in 1929 almost equaled 
those of France, and Italy also took increased quantities. 

It is reported that Switzerland's trade with the Orient in certain 
lines of dyes has the disadvantage of expensive packing requirements 
which German and British firms are better able to meet. 

Table 56. — Switzerland: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 ^ 

IMPORTS 



Class of (lye and country of 
origin or destination 


Quantity 


Value 


Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 


Quantity 


Value 


Alizarin: 

Germany . 


Pounds 
66, 601 
117 


$14, 964 
32 


Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes— Continued. 
United States . 


Pounds 
35 
183 




France 


$34 






163 


Total 


66, 718 


14, 996 


Total 






2, 248, 652 


1, 599, 385 


Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes: 
Germany 


2, 066, 094 

100, 193 

34, 006 

1,424 

45, 335 

1,382 


1,489,392 

70, 220 

10, 743 

1,719 

26, 453 

661 


Indigo, indigo solution: 


54,910 
2,906 


11, 760 


France - . -- 


France 


636 


Italy 


Total -. 




Holland 


57, 816 


12, 296 




Grand total 




Poland 


2, 373, 186 


1, 626, 677 









EXPORTS 



Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes; 

Germany 

Austria 

France 

Italy 

Belgium 

Netherlands 

Great Britain 

Ireland 

Spain 

Portugal 

Denmark 



3, 796, 520 


$2, 486, 221 


272, 559 


182, 155 


1, 452, 472 


1,716,258 


1, 090, 563 


1, 152, 443 


952, 052 


465, 273 


448, 640 


347, 782 


1, 490, 052 


1, 588, 586 


492 


996 


204, 393 


459, 293 


149, 534 


97, 789 


180, 790 


151.486 



Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes — Continued 

Norway 

Sweden 

Finland 

Latvia.. 

Lithuania 

Poland 

Czechoslovakia. 

Hungary 

Yugoslavia 

Greece 

Bulgaria 



80, 616 

534, 821 

78, 717 

74, 604 

15, 545 

282, 819 

1,083,510 

167, 384 

273, 485 

43,611 

157, 455 



' Statistik des Warenvorkungs der Schweiz mit dem Auslande, 1929. 
exchange rate, 1929, 1 franc =$0.192792. 



Values converted at 



$71, 702 

453, 247 

71, 756 

65, 583 

12, 875 

417,391 

677, 246 

116,978 

156,911 

32, 897 

111,482 

average 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



163 



Table 56.— Switzerland: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 — Continued 

EXPO RTS— Continued 



Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 



Quantity 



Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes— Continued. 

Rumania 

Russia 

Turkey 

Egypt-.- 

Algeria 

M orocco 

British Africa 

Occidental Africa 

Oriental Africa 

Mesopotamia- 

Syria 

British India 

Burma 

Siam 

Indo-China 

Dutch East Indies 

China 

Japan 

Canada 

United States 

Mexico.-. 

Venezuela 

Brazil 

Uruguay 

Argentina 

Chile 

Peru 

Ecuador 

Bolivia 

Australian Federation. 
Oceania 



Total. 



Indigo, indigo solution: 

Germany 

Austria 



Pounds 

341,314 

29, 91tj 

27. 833 

64, 088 

60 

3,049 

2.983 

33 

2,337 

7,817 

105,312 

548, 910 

500 

761 

32, 632 

123, 995 

41.5, 300 

573, 608 

309, 420 

1,833,187 

156. 443 

1,596 

126, 238 

5,461 

175, 640 

40, 785 

21, 365 

1,526 

1,914 

30, 992 

11,587 



Value 



17, 877, 236 



6,085 
212 



$223, ]?7 

60 <?S7 

21, 278 

38, 810 

133 

2,175 

2,191 

33 

681 

4,610 

39,841 

477,319 

892 

773 

20, 086 

106, 932 

242. .571 

525, 269 

200, 815 

2, 020, 485 

113,217 

1,150 

130, 257 

5,025 

108, 728 

30, 424 

16, 325 

1,350 

1,357 

30, 165 

6,502 



15, 268, 888 



5,565 
239 



Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 



Indigo, indigo solution — 
Continued. 

France 

Italy 

Belgium 

Netherlands 

Great Britain... 

Spain 

Portugal 

Denmark 

Norway 

Sweden 

Finland... 

Poland 

Czechoslovakia 

Hungary.. 

Yugoslavia.. 

Bulgaria. 

Rumania 

Turkey 

Egypt 

M esopotamia 

Syria 

British India 

Straits Settlements 

Indo-China 

Dutch East Indies 

Philippines 

China 

Japan.. 

United States 

Mexico 

Brazil 

Australian Federation. 
Other countries 



Quantity 



Povvds 

6,340 

132 

25, 919 

152 

4,409 

8,975 

287 

5,071 

154 

220 

220 

2,306 

390 

708 

3,186 

14, 370 

5,732 

11,777 

60, 219 

45, 190 

36, 069 

324, 122 

30, 677 

6,669 

25, 161 

6,504 

3,066,914 

305, 205 

2,072 

27, 337 

2,205 

306 

7 



Value 



Total ! 4,035, 302 



Grand total 1 21,912,538 



$2, 792 

230 

3, 836 

481 

1,701 

5,41» 

269 

4,531 

145 

202 

281 

1,190 

815 

315 

1,464 

6,70» 

3,482 

3,812 

15, 647 

17, 860 

12,117 

110, 157 

2,916 

1,930 

7,614 

2,475 

496, 086 

128, 226 

3,988 

10, 873 

868 

564 

14 



854, 805 



16, 123, 693 



The Dye Industry of France 

Official figures of the production of dyes ^ in French-owned plants 
in France are as follows: 



Year Pounds 

1920 16, 233, 000 

1921 12, 876, 000 

1922 17, 775, 000 

1923 24, 173,000 

1924 33,012,000 



Year Founds 

1925 32, 066, 000 

1926 34, 420, 000 

1927 27, 590, 000 

1928 30, 736, 000 

1929 36, 114, 000 



The dye industry of France developed in a fairly satisfactory man- 
ner in 1929, with production reported as sufficient to meet domestic 
consumption. In 1929 French production supplied 89.8 per centof 
the apparent French consumption. As regards foreign markets, 
France continued to export in the proportions agreed upon in inter- 



3 Figures for 1920-1926, inclusive, compiled by the Association of Dye Producers and Consumers; 1927 
and 1928, from the French Chemical Industry and Trade; 1928, U. S. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce, Bulletin No. 652; 1929, from Daniel J. Regan, assistant commercial attache, U. S. Bureau of 
Domestic Commerce, Paris, France, July 1, 1930, U.S. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 



164 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

national agreements concluded in preceding years, and which have 
been renewed by Germany, England, and Switzerland. Germany 
has continued to observe scrupulously the terms of her dyestuffs 
agreement with France. French dyes are exported chiefly to the 
Latin-American countries, few being marketed in the Far East. 

The Etablissement Kuhlmann practically dominates the French 
dye industry and manufactured approximately 68 per cent of the 1929 
production. The Soci^te des Matieres Colorantes et Produits 
Chimiques de Saint-Denis produced approximately 24 per cent, and 
the other companies: Sainte-Etienne, Nancy, and Saint-Fons pro- 
duced the remainder. Although the French manufacturers continu- 
ally regulate their production by careful scrutiny of the market, 
there was a fairly large surplus of dyes in various plants at the close 
of 1929 which, it is intimated, may tend toward decreased production 
in 1930. 

The output of azo, vat and indigo, sulfur, diphenyl and triphenyl- 
methane, and alizarin dyes has been increased. Improvement has 
been made in quality, especially in the vat dyes. Research work 
has been conducted on plastic materials, enamels, and artificial 
porcelain. 

Tables 57 and 58 show the foreign trade of France in the several 
groups of dyes in 1929. 

Table 57. — France: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 * 



Class of dye 



Dry 



Quantity 



Value 



Paste 



Quantity Value 



Nitroso. 

Nitro... 

Pyrazolone -. 

Stilbenes 

Monoazos..- «.- 

Polyazos 

Thiocarbenzyls- 

Sulfurs 

Carbazol derivatives 

Indulines, nigrosines... 

Azines 

Pyronines 

Phthaleins - 

Eosines 

Diphenylmethanes 

Acridine and quinoline. 

Hydroquinones 

Indigotines 

Insoluble vat dyes 

Synthetic indigo 

Alizarin 



Total. 



Pounds 

4,850 

8, 157 

104, 057 

46, 738 

616, 965 

800, 931 

31, 305 

46, 958 

82, 452 

156, 968 

41,446 

1,764 

78, 925 

11,023 

367, 507 

62,029 

162, 117 



168, 431 
12, 346 
7,716 



2, 791, 685 



$3, 460 

7,566 

105, 252 

41, 199 

517, 362 

642, 174 

54,762 

36, 338 

74, 598 

171, 225 

62, 485 

7,370 

183, 613 

17, 718 

394, 609 

75, 734 

309, 758 

.392 

086, 069 

4,077 

4,626 



Pounds 
20, 944 
4,189 
5,291 



182, 982 
1.323 

185, 627 

5,291 

43, 431 



3, 399, 267 



543, 875 



$6, 174 
1,999 
2,705 



49, 163 
8,377 


25, 598 
5,331 




39 






9,700 

220 

18, 078 

5,732 


5, 684 

118 

6,449 

1,450 


3,527 


1,646 



133, 368 
1,294 

213, 248 
2,706 
9,330 



415, 128 



> Statistique Mensuelle du Commerce Extferieur de la France, December, 1929. 
par rate of exchange. 



Values converted a 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 
Table 58. — France: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 ^ 



165 



Class of dye 



Dry 



Paste 



Quantity Value I Quantity Value 



Nitroso 

Nitre 

Pyrazolone 

Stilbenes 

Monoazos.- 

Polyazos 

Thiocar benzyls 

Sulfurs 

Indophenols 

Indulines, nigrosines... 

Azines, other... 

Pyronines 

Phthaleins 

Eosines 

Diphenylmethanes 

Acridine and quLnoline 

Hydroquinones 

Indigotines 

Insoluble vat dyes 

Synthetic indigo 

Alizarin 

Total 



Pounds 

44, 753 

9,921 

9, 480 

2.425 

441, 141 

1, 302, 698 

13, 889 

405, 206 

28, 439 

2, 205 

55, 115 

70, 988 

6,834 

11, 684 

1, 141, 321 

26, 235 

43, 210 

335, 540 

118, 387 

426, 590 

30, 424 



$12, 583 

8,154 

5,841 

1,137 

162, 523 

592, 194 

5. 175 

89, 650 

21,384 

4,900 

25, 676 

29, 674 

12, 309 

23,246 

390, 785 

24,892 

38, 690 

93, 688 

135, 906 

94,119 

6,194 



4, 526, 485 



1, 778, 700 



Pounds 

15, 653 

2,205 

3,748 

661 

86, 861 

236, 774 

7,937 

2,866 

11,905 

220 

2,645 

441 

1,323 



$4, 978 

1,411 

2,822 

196 

36, 456 

92, 159 

823 

1,137 

7,409 

39 

1,099 

470 

1,294 



135, 362 

3, 527 

12, 787 

362, 877 

23, 369 

1, 131, 180 

32, 408 



47, 197 
666 
3,567 
35, 868 
13, 877 
141, 590 
10, 976 



2, 074, 749 



404, 034 



' Statistique Mensuelle du Commerce Exterieur de la France, December, 1929. Values converted at par 
xate of exchange. 

The Dye Industry of Italy 

The coal-tar industry of Italy supplies about 90 per cent of the 
intermediates consumed by the domest'c dye industry. Production 
of intermediates, amounting to 10,000,000 pounds in 1927, is re- 
ported to have decreased in 1928. Production of aniline, the prin- 
cipal intermediate, exceeds 2,000,000 pounds annually. Other inter- 
mediates produced in large quantity are H acid, betanaphthol, 
benzidine, and paranitroaniline. Less important intermediates are 
aniline hydrochloride, tolidine, a-naphthylamine, and gamma, naph- 
thionic, and sulfanilic acids. 

The Aziende Cliimiche Nazionali Associate, the consolidation of 
which was the outstanding event in the Italian dye industry in 1928, 
has equipped a plant at Cengio for the production of phthalic anhy- 
dride, benzoylbenzoic acid, and anthraquinone. 

The following table shows the production of synthetic dyes in 
Italy from 1921 to 1927, inclusive. 

Table 59. — Italy: Production of dyes and intermediates ' 1921^1927 





Synthetic dyes 


Year 


Synthetic dyes 


Year 


Sulfur 
colors 


others 


Sulfur r^j-v,„„ 
colors Ot*^«'^s 


1921 - . 


Pounds 
6, 364, 680 
8, 487, 710 
8, 300, 319 
8, 730, 216 


Pounds 
1,556,448 

2, 328, 058 
4, 001, 349 

3, 714, 751 


1925- 


Pounds 
10, 824, 586 
10, 687, 901 

9, 402, 619 


Pounds. 

4, 409, 200 


1922.. 


1926 


4,717,844 


1923 . 


1927 


4, 177,717 


1924 











• Banca Commerciale Italiana; Movimento Economico Dell' Italia, p. 279. 



166 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



In 1928 Italy produced 15,200,000 pounds of d3^es, an increase of 
1,620,000 pounds or of 12 per cent over 1927. Production by groups 
in 1928 was as follows: 



Sulfur dves: Pounds 

Black 8,818,400 

Other 1,102,300 

IndiRO 1, 322, 800 

Direct dves 1, 984, 100 

Acid and chrome dyes 1, 322, 800 



Basic, for vats and special . Pounds 

dyes 264, 600 

Nigrosine 286, 600 

Vat, naphthol and bases_.. 110, 000 



Total 15, 211, 600 



The production of indigo in 1928 was less than half of the 3,960,000 
pounds estimated as the output in 1927. The capacity of the Cesano 
Maderno plant alone had previously been reported to be 13,000 
pounds of indigo daily. Production of sulfur dj^es showed an increase 
of 518,081 pounds, or dji per cent over 1927. 

According to a report prepared by the managing director of the 
A. C N. A., the principal Italian manufacturer, the production of 
dyes in Italy in 1929 was 16,314,040 pounds. The Italian dye 
industry is now producing the following vat dyes: Anthynol dark 
blue BO (corresponding to indanthrene dark blue BO) ; anthynol 
black BB (corresponding to indanthrene black BB); anthjmol gray 
B; anthynol yellow G for wool; anthynol brown GG for wool 
(corresponding to the helindones). 

It was reported that a new series of these dyes in orange, green^ 
olive, black, and violet will be put on the market shortly, and that 
during 1929 the anthynol violets, corresponding to the indanthrene 
violets, would be available. The A. C. N. A. is also reported to be 
planning the manufacture of aminoanthraquinone derivatives. 

The A. C. N. A. pubhshed its first annual report in 1929. The 
year 1928 closed with a net profit of about 7,000,000 lire and with 
the declaration of a dividend of 6 per cent. Sales in 1929 increased 
approximately 18 per cent over the previous year. Commercially 
and financially the year is reported to have been a difficult one 
because of the purchase of an outside plant, amortization expenses, 
purchase of raw materials, and other expenses. The company's 
floating debt, according to a recent estimate, was upward of 146,- 
000,000 lire. The board of directors is authorized to increase the 
capitalization of the company by December 31, 1931, from 95,295,200 
lire to 200,000,000 lire by a new stock issue (not carried through up 
to April 4, 1930). 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

For the year 1929 imports of coal-tar dyes into Italy decreased 18 
per cent in quantity. The decrease was due to smaller receipts of 
reparation dyes, which were 695,000 pounds less than in 1928. Im- 
ports from other sources showed a small net increase. Exports 
increased about 66 per cent in quantity and 31 per cent in value. 

The import trade of Italy in coal-tar dyes is shown by countries 
in Table 60 and by class of dye in Table 61; the export trade is 
shown in Table 61. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 167 

Table 60. — Italy: Imports of synthetic organic dyes by countries, 1929 ^ 



Imports from — 



Quantity 



France 

Germany 

German, account of reparations 

Switzerland 

Otber countries 

Total 



Pounds 

130, 733 

2, 285, 729 

28, 439 

1, 195, 555 

110, 891 



3, 751, 348 



1 Statistica del Commercio Speciale di Iraportazione di Esportazione, January-December, 1929. 
Table 61. — Italy: Imports and exports of synthetic organic dyes, 1929 ' 



Class of dye 


Imports 


Exports 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Sulfur black 


Pounds 
10, 362 
109, 569 

3, 404, 564 

2,866 

198,414 

25, 573 


$4,839 
100, 395 

3, 695, 900 


Pounds 
80,468 
31, 305 

1, 199, 743 


$15, 996 
17, 022 


Other sulfur dyes . . .- 


Other organic synthetic dyes: 

Dry (containine less than 50 per cent water) 


573, 830 


Account of German reparations _ .-. 




Paste (containine 50 per cent or more water) 


138, 885 


14, 330 


1,996 


Acconnt of German reparatinns 












Total 


3, 751, 348 
5,732 


3, 940, 019 
6,210 


1, 325, 846 
■ 5,071 


608, 844 


Natural indigo . . - . _ .-. . 


2,103 







1 statistica del Commercio Speciale di Importazione e di Esportazione, January-December. 1929. Values 
converted at average exchange rate 1929, 1 lira =$0.052334. 

The Dye Industry of Japan 

The total production of coal-tar dyes in Japan during 1928 was 
18,200,000 pounds, an increase of more than 8 per cent over 1927. 
Production by groups for 1927 and 1928 as reported by the Japanese 
Ministry for Industry and Trade * was as follows : 





1927 


1928 




1927 


1928 




Pounds 

14,462,176 

1, 124, 346 

617, 288 

396, 828 


Pounds 
15, 275, 673 

1, 455, 036 
617, 288 
595, 242 




Pounds 
185, 186 
70,547 


Pounds 
> 185, 186 


Direct colors 


Vat colors 


92,543 




Total 




Acid colors 


16, 856, 371 


18, 221, 018 









1 Or less. 

Sulfur black leads in the production of sulfur colors, followed by the 
blues. Production of HA^dron blue has been commenced. In 1928 
almost half of the production of direct cotton colors was represented 
by Nippon or Direct deep black. Other direct colors were Diamine 
blue 2B, Congo red, Pyramine orange. Diamine green, Benzopur- 
purine, Diamine browai, and Chrysoplir nine. Colors produced in 
1928 for the first time were Diamine Sv ar'. t B, Benzo copper blue, 
Chicago blue 6B, and Benzo fast black. 

The principal basic dyes produced in 1928 were Methyl violet, 
Bismarck brown, Auramine, Malachite green, Rhod amine, Methylene 
blue, Victoria blue, Chrysoidine, Crystal violet, and Safranine. 

* As reported in Chemical Trade Journal, London, March 28, 1930. 
114492—30 12 



168 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



The acid colors showed a larger percentage increase in production 
in 1928 than any other group. Naphthol blue black represented 
about 30 per cent of the 1928 output of acid colors. Other acid colors 
produced were Orange II, Roccelin, Acid scarlet 311, Silk scarlet, 
Quinohne yellow, Naphthol yellow S, Nigrosine, Metanil yellow, 
Eosine, and Phloxine. Production of Sulphocyanine was started 
during the year. 

The increased output of vat colors in 1928 was largely due to the 
increased demand for brominated indigos. The manufacture of 
anthraquinonoid vat colors did not reach a commercial scale in 1928. 
The Miike factory, to cost about 7,000,000 yen, made progress with 
its plans for the production of synthetic indigo. This factory will 
produce its own acetic acid and other materials used in the produc- 
tion of indigo. The Japanese Government will subsidize it to the 
amount of 195,000 yen during the first calendar year. Initial pro- 
duction will be at the rate of 36 tons annually and will be increased 
to 1,000 tons in five years. Ultimate expansion to 3,000 tons is con- 
templated, with a view to exporting the surplus to China. 

The production of crude and refined natural indigo in Japan from 
1925 to 1927 is shown in the following table. 

Table 62. — Japan: Production of natural crude and refined indigo, 1925-1927 



Year 


Crude 


Refined 


Pounds 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 


1925 


2, 199, 080 
1, 754, 853 
1, 827, 825 


$144, 886 
109, 31 8 
140, 048 


5, 769, 986 
3, 377, 723 
3, 577, 668 


$335, 512 
223, 293 


1926 -- 


1927... 


287, 654 



Production of the two principal intermediates in Japan in 1928 
were aniline oil, 5,202,800 pounds (4,409, 2Q0 pounds in 1927), and 
naphthol AS, 353,000 pounds (167,000 pounds in 1927). 

The foreign trade of Japan in coal-tar dyes is shown in Tables 
63 to 65, inclusive. 

Table 63. — Japan: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 ^ 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Quantity 


V'alue 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Quantity 


Value 


Indigo, synthetic: 

France.. 


Pounds 
104, 102 

1, 144, 328 

661 

222. 887 


$46,410 

512, 362 

464 

113,239 

104, 422 


Direct cotton colors: 

France . 


Pounds 

58, 599 

633, 871 

211,114 

605, 829 

16, 402 


$43, 625 


Germany.. 


Germany 


574, 086 


Italy 


Switzerland 


140, 621 


Switzerland ... 


United States 


212, 092 


North America other | 


other countries . 


13, 459 




Total 






*-i^, (jWi 


1, 525, 815 




Total _. 


1, 714, 839 


776, 897 


983, 883 


Acid colors: 
France 




Basic colors: 

France 


36, 773 
267, 464 
160, 452 

57, 276 
2,116 


58, 940 
534, 175 
188, 887 

42, 233 
1,856 


19, 180 
576, 728 
141, 272 

65, 212 
5,556 


17, 171 
478, 019 


Germany 


Germany... 


Switzerland 


Switzerland ... 


99, 781 


United States 


United States ... 


24, 133 


other countries.. 


other countries 


22, 741 


Total.... 




Total.. 




524, 081 


826, 091 


807,948 


641, 845 



I Annual Return of the Foreign Trade of the Empire of Japan, Pt. 1, 1928. Values converted at average 
exchange rate for 1928; 1,000 yen=$464.09fi. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 169 

Table 63. — Japan: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 — Continued 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Quantity 


Value 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Quantity 


Value 


Mordant colors: 


Pounds 

39, 815 

7,408 

403, 842 

136 774 


$51, 979 


Vat colors— Continued. 


Pounds 
30, 556 
265 


$28, 310 


France. 


5,105 
401, 443 

191 19Q 


United States. 




Germany 


Other countries.. 


928 










United States 


5li853 "l6'.243 ll Total 


373,418 


529, 533 






928 










Other synthetic colors: 
I France 


6,085 

104, 234 

5,688 




Total 


639,692 1 596.827 


6,961 










103, 958 
1.392 




154, 103 

50, 662 

6,481 


97,924 
18,100 
4,177 


Italy ^.. 




North America other 
than United States 




United States... 


33, 995 12. ma 


Other countries 


Other countries 


1,984 


3,249 








Total 


211,246 


120, 201 


Total 

Grand total 


151, 986 


128, 555 






Vat colors: 


20, 238 
322, 359 


43, 625 
456, 670 


5, 949, 026 


4, 603, 832 


Great Britain 






Germany ..... 













Table 64. — Japan: Exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 ^ 



Country of destination 


Quantity 


Value 


China 


Pounds 

2, 322, 652 

216, 934 

18, 122 

5,820 

7,408 


$238, 081 




23, 669 


British India 


6,033 


Dutch India . .... .. 


464 


Other countries - - _ ._ . 


928 








Total 


2, 570, 936 


269, 175 







1 Annual Retiu-n of the Foreign Trade of the Empire of Japan, Pt. 1, 1928. Values converted at average 
exchange rate for 1928; 1,000 yen=$464.096. 

Table 65. — Japan: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 ' 



Class of dye 


Quantity 


Value 


Synthetic colors: 
Indigo 


IMPORTS 


Pounds 
2, 073, 140 
459, 538 
1, 427, 463 
597, 891 
399, 770 
400, 194 
238, 705 
181,431 


$965, 798 






643, 214 






950, 829 


Acid colors 




485, 749 


Mordant colors 




374, 021 






249, 646 


Vat colors 




324, 718 




128, 271 








Total . 


5, 778, 132 
1, 788, 927 


4, 122, 246 


Coal-tar dyes, total 


EXPORTS 


170, 411 







1 Monthly Return of the Foreign Trade of Japan, December, 1929. Values converted at average exchange 
rate, calendar year 1929, 1 yen = $0.460997. 

The Dye Industry of Spain 

A royal order of the Ministry of National Economy, No. 124, dated 
March 5, 1930, abolished the restrictions which have been in force 
for the last four years governing; the importation of dyes and inter- 
mediates. 



170 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

A translation of the text of the royal order follows : 

His Majesty the King has been pleased to dispose: 

1. That the ro3^al order of March 9, 1926, by which was estabUshed u tempo- 
rary system of restricted, conditional, and prohibited importations for the 
intermediate products and artificial organic coloring materials combined in items 
793, 794, 795, and 796 of the existing customs tariff, is revoi^:ed. 

2. That similarly may be considered as revoked the dispositions complementing 
and clarifying the same which were later dictated, remaining therefore, from the 
date of publication of the present in the Gaceta de Madrid, reestablished the 
tariff regime governing the products mentioned which was in force before the 
dispositions which are now revoked. 

In the exposition preceding the actual text of the royal order it 
was pointed out that the action taken on March 9, 1926, was of a 
temporary character and that since further steps and studies indicated 
therein had not been followed by the detailed decisions envisaged, it 
was desirable to end for the present the restrictive system. It en- 
visaged the possibility, however, that the tariff section of the Council 
of National Economy might later undertake a study leading to the 
adoption of permanent methods for the protection of the national dye 
industry. 

The issuance of the royal order abolishing the restrictions on dye 
imports was received with considerable satisfaction by dye importers 
and consuming interests, and it marks a departure of the present Gov- 
ernment away from extreme intervention in commerce and industry. 
To avoid any confusion resulting from this order, a commission has 
been appointed to make consistent interpretations of the decree. 
Spanish import duties on synthetic organic dyes were increased by a 
royal decree, effective July 22, 1930. 

Table 66. — Spain: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 ^ 



Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 


Quantity 


Value 


Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 


Quantity 


Value 


Synthetic organic colors in 
powder or crystal form: 
Imported from— 

Germany .. 


Pounds 

473, 974 

8,018 

24 

7,077 

97, 443 

27, 553 

6,173 

14, 875 

156, 824 

77 


$1, 105, 967 

18, 709 

57 

16, 513 

227, 554 

64, 292 

14, 404 

34, 708 

365, 933 


Synthetic organic colors in 

paste or solid, containing 

50 per cent or over of 

water— Continued. 

Imported from — Con. 

United States 

France 


Pounds 

1,697 

33, 276 

24, 952 

1,689 

1,521 

21, 903 




Belgium 




Czechoslovakia 

United States 


$447 
8,767 


France . 


Great Britain. 

Italy - 


6,573 
445 


Great Britain 


Holland... 




401 


Italy - 


Switzerland 

Total 


5,770 


Switzerland 

Other countries 


120, 102 


31, 641 






Synthetic aniline: 
Imported from — 




Total 


792, 038 


1,848,137 


53, 373 

441 

48, 241 

55 

1,074 

23, 148 








Exported to— 


10, 769 

481 

3,713 


8,106 

362 

2,794 


24, 105 


Argentina 


United States 


199 


Colombia 


21, 787 


United States 


Great Britain 


25 
485 


Total 


14, 963 


11,262 


Switzerland 

Total 


10, 454 




Synthetic organic colors in 


34, 680 
384 


9,137 
101 


126, 332 


57, 055 


paste or solid, containing 
50 per cent or over of 
water: 


Total imports, all 
dyes .. -. 




1, 038, 472 
14, 963 


1, 936, 833 


Imported from— 

Germany 


Total exports, all 


11, 262 


Denmark 











• Estadistica del Comercio Exterior Espafia. 
$0.165942. 



Value converted at average exchange rate, 1928, 1 peseta = 



international dye trade 171 

The Dye Industry of Poland and Russia 

The annual production of coal-tar dyes in Poland amounts to 
approximately 1,650 short tons, valued at more than $1,681,350, 
and the total consumption is said to average 2,750 short tons. In 
1928 small quantities of American and Italian dyes made their ap- 
pearance, German and Swiss dyes having hitherto shared the Polish 
market almost exclusively. 

The dye industry of Poland is reported to have suffered from the 
general economic crisis of 1929. The depression in the Polish textile 
and tanning industries was responsible for unusually low sales of dyes. 
In an attempt to dispose of a part of the surplus production, small 
quantities of Polish dyes were exported during the first quarter of 1930. 

During 1929 the French dye works Etablissement Kuhlmann 
estabhshed a dye plant in Poland. It is understood that this plant 
will operate in close cooperation with the parent company. 

The production of coal-tar dyes in Russia increased from 7,541 tons 
in 1926-27 to more than 10,000 tons in 1927-28. Another report 
estimates the 1927-28 production as 12,000 tons. The demands of 
the textile industry are now largely supplied by domestic dyes. 

The Dye Industries of Other Countries 

Through unavoidable delay in publishing last year's census, tables 
for several countries that would normally appear in this year's issue 
were given. For the latest available data the reader is referred to 
last year's census for statistics on China, the Netherlands, the Dutch 
East Indies, and Poland. 



Table 67. — Australia: 


Imports of coal-tar dyes, 


year 


ended June SO, 


1928^ 


Country of origin 


Value 


United Kingdom.. 


$539,091 


West Indies . 


725 




3,835 




99, 841 


Switzerland 


12, 687 


United States 


3,192 


other countries. ... . - 


1,149 












Total 


660, 520 




17, 140 












Total net imports 


643, 380 







1 OflBcial Statistics, Commonwealth of Australia, Oversea Trade. Values converted at par rate of ex 
change. 



172 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 68. — Belgium: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 ' 



Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 


Quantity Value 


Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 


Quantity 


Value 


IMPORTS 

Alizarin: 


Pounds 
2,645 
7,937 


$2, 115 
1,614 


EXPORTS 

Alizarin 


Pounds 
1,102 


$863 








ther countries 












43, 657 

12, 855 

53, 841 

140, 014 


Total.. 


10, 582 


3,729 


British India 


50, 265 
83, 334 
575, 400 




Netherlands.. 


Alizarin dyes 


1,102 


668 






Aniline dyes: 


2, 626, 781 
654, 766 
795, 640 
522, 270 
453, 046 
202, 382 


1, 147, 578 
163, 471 
274, 019 

92,406 
218, 313 

69, 339 


Total 


824, 520 


250, 367 




Indigo, synthetic. 




United States 


3,087 


751 


France 


Other coal-tar dyes 




Netherlands 


51, 808 


5,593 




Grand total 


Other countries. 


880, 517 


257, 574 








Total 


5, 254, 885 


1, 965, 126 








Indigo, synthetic: 

Germany 


600, 092 

482, 587 


61, 159 
46, 412 




Other countries 








Total 


1, 082, 679 


107, 571 








Other coal-tar dyes: 
Germany 


221 
18, 739 
26, 014 


83 
3,701 
11, 130 




France. 




Other countries 








Total 


44, 974 


14, 914 








Grand total.. 


6, 394, 222 


2, 092, 008 









> Bulletin Mensuel du Commerce Spficial, Decembre, 1929. Values converted at average exchange rate, 
1929; 1,000 francs =$27 .8248. 

Table 69. — Canada: Imports of coal-tar dyes, year ended March SI, 1929 • 



Class of dye and country of origin 


Quantity 


Value 


Aniline and coal-tar dyes, soluble in water, in bulk or package of not less than 1 
pound weight, including alizarin and artificial alizarin: 
United Kingdom 


Pounds 

121, 644 
1, 713, 434 
25, 564 
797, 153 
363, 950 
1,405 


$80, 345 

985, 688 

11,314 


United States 


France 


Germany 


474, 678 

235, 656 

568 


Switzerland 


Other countries 






Total 


3, 023, 150 


1, 788, 249 




Aniline and coal-tar dyes, n. o. p.: 

United Kingdom 


3,541 
11, 973 


1,724 


United States 


4, 129 






Total 


15, 514 


6,853 






Indigo: 

United Kingdom 


442 
607 


188 


United States.. 


364 






Total... 


1,049 


552 






Indigo, paste and extract of: 

United States. 


197, 189 
13, 117 


20, 307 


Other countries 


1 500 






Total 


210, 306 


21, 807 




Grand total... ■ 


3,250,019 


1,816,461 





I Monthly Report of the Trade of Canada, March 31, 1929. Values converted at par rate of exchange. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 

Table 70. — China: Ex-ports of indigo, 1928 i 



173 



Country of destination 


Quantity 


Value 


Hong Kong 


Pounds 

69, 200 

9,600 

2,800 

99, 866 

3,067 


$3, 166 
448 


Macao-.- .... 


French Indo-China 


89 


Singapore, Straits, etc 


2, 749- 


British India _ _ ^ _ _ _ _ __ 


325 








Total 


184, 533 


6 777 







' Foreign Trade of China, 1928. Values converted at average exchange rate, 1928, 1 Haikwan tael=$0.7058. 
Table 71. — Czechoslovakia: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 ^ 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 



IMPORTS 

Anthraquinone dyes 

Germany 

Switzerland 

Great Britain 

Hamburg. 

Netherlands 

Austria 

Other countries.. 

Total 

Sulfur black: 

Germany 

United States.... 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

Hamburg 

Other countries.. 

Total 

Other coal-tar dyes: 

Germany 

Switzerland 

France 

Netherlands 

United States.... 

Hamburg. 

Great Britain 

Austria 

Italy 

Poland 

Hungary 

Other countries.. 

Total 

Grand total.... 

Indigo, natural: 

Germany 

France 



Quantity 



Pounds 

190, 257 

43, 210 

6,173 

3,307 

661 

441 

661 



244, 710 



981, 047 

29, 101 

25, 573 

6,173 

5,732 

3,748 



1, 051, 374 



5, 142, 230 

1, 362, 222 

242, 506 

179, 454 

54, 233 

40, 124 

29, 321 

18, 519 

3,527 

882 

661 

441 



7, 074, 120 



8, 370, 204 



872, 140 
55, 556 



Value 



$95, 274 
46,008 
800 
355 
267 
474 
148 



143, 326 



111,509 

3,436 

4,177 

1,629 

504 

385 



121, 640 



3, 790, 371 

730, 671 

122, 085 

78, 210 

13, 835 

24,144 

14, 516 

8,977 

948 

859 

444 

444 



4, 785, 504 



5, 050, 470 



107, 479 
16, 383 



Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 



IMPORTS— continued 

Indigo, natural— Contd. 

Belgium, 

Switzerland 

Greece 

Total 

EXPORTS 

Sulfur black: 

United States 

Germany... 

Total , 

Other coal-tar dyes: 

Germany 

Hungary 

Bulgaria 

Belgium 

Austria 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Yugoslavia 

Rumania 

Switzerland 

Brazil 

Sweden 

Japan 

Italy 

Turkey.. 

French Morocco 

Other countries. 

Total. 

Grand total 



Quantity 



Pounds 
22, 046 
2,204 
1,323 



953, 269 



61, 288 
661 



61, 949 



425, 929 

108, 466 

91,711 

80, 909 

73, 193 

54, 895 

23, 369 

18, 739 

13, 668 

12, 787 

6,614 

4,409 

1,543 

1,323 

1,323 

882 

3,086 



922, 846 



984, 795 



Value 



$1, 985 
2,725 



129, 620' 



2,677 
119 



2, 696 



211,433 
33, 239 
25, 714 
66, 242 
28, 055 
9,776 
17, 894 

7, 406 
5,451 

8, 650' 
3,229 
1,837 

830 

1,126 

978 

474 

1,866 



424, 200 



426, 896 



• From Foreign Commerce of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, 1928, Pt. I. Values converted at average 

exchange rate 1928, 1,000 crowns =$29,625. • 



174 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 
Table 72. — Denmark: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1928 ^ 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 



Indigo, natural and syn- 
thetic: 

Germany... 

Holland 

Belgium , 

Switzerland , 

Total 

Aniline and alizarin colors 
(blue or green): 

Germany 

Great Britain 

Sweden 

Holland 

Belgium 

France. 

Switzerland 

Total 



Quantity 



Value 



Pounds 

. 18, 739 

220 

220 

3,528 



22, 707 



134, 701 

3,968 

661 

1,764 

5,071 

441 

36, 376 



$18, 492 



4,288 



22, 780 



113, 900 

1,876 

804 

804 

2,948 

268 

36, 984 



182, 982 157, 584 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 



Aniline and alizarin colors 
(others) : 

Germany..- 

Great Britain 

Sweden ., 

Holland 

Belgium 

France 

Switzerland 

United States , 

Total.-.. 

Grand total 



Quantity 



Pounds 

372, 357 

18, 078 

3,307 

36, 155 

27, 998 

441 

86, 420 

882 



645, 638 



751, 327 



Value 



$287, 664 

7,604 

1,608 

15, 008 

11, 256 

268 

85, 760 



589, 332 



• Danmarks Vareindf0rsel Og-Udf^rsel, 1928, Values converted at par rate of exchange. 
Table 73. — Egypt: Imports of coal-tar dyes, 1929 ' 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 


Quantity 


Value 


Class of dye and country of 
origin 


1 
Quantity Value 


Synthetic indigo: 

France 


Pounds 

108, 100 

326, 861 

76, 417 

25, 688 


$19, 556 
75, 352 
16, 047 
9,125 


Natural indigo: 

British India 


Pounds 
16, 605 


$10. 697 




Grand total 




Switzerland 


961,521 307,950 




Reexports: 

Synthetic indigo 








Total 


536, 066 


119,079 


5,604 1 2,096 




Other coal-tar dyes 

Total 


5,148 4,083 


Other dyes: 

United Kingdom 


3,988 
11, 894 
2,921 


3,193 
11, 804 
2,190 


10, 752 


6,179 




Grand total imports 




Other countries.- 


960,769 


301, 771 






Total 


18, 803 


17, 187 








Other coal-tar dyes: 

Germany 


196, 139 

77, 986 
116, 922 


100,617 
32, 214 
28, 166 




Switzerland 




Other countries 








Total 


390, 047 


160, 987 













• Monthly Summary of the Foreign Trade of Egypt, December, 1929. Values converted at par rate of 
•exchange. 



INTERNATIONAL DYE TRADE 



175 



Table 74. — India: Imports of coal-tar dyes and exports of natural indigo, year 

ended March 31, 1929 i 



Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 



Alizarin; 

United Kingdom 

Germany. 

Netherlands- 

Switzerland 

Italy.- 

United States 

Other countries 

Total - 

Aniline: 

United Kmgdom 

Ceylon-. 

Germany.- 

Netherlands. 

Belgium 

France 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Persia 

Japan 

United States 

Other countries 

Total 

Other coal-tar dyes: 

United Kingdom 

Hong Kong. 

Germany 

Netherlands 

France 

Italy 

China..- 

Other countries 

Total 

Indigo, synthetic: 

Great Britain and pes 

sessions 

Italy 

Total.... 

Grand total 



Quantity 



Pounds 

1, 168, 137 

3, 660, 039 

730, 644 

17, 920 

37, 262 

49, 084 

22,960 



5, 686, 046 



507, 930 

35, 394 

9, 720, 174 

547, 608 

131, 489 

121, 125 

386, 754 

1, 020, 502 

3, 300 

15, 453 

1, 158, 903 

1,743 



13, 650, 335 



8,226 

1,372 

166, 538 

65, 776 

2, 464 

5,243 

4. 169 

920 



254, 708 



224 
29,008 



29, 232 



19, 620, 321 



Value 



$222, 857 

722, 986 

134, 948 

2,999 

7,836 

26, 949 

4,068 



1, 122, 643 



311, 828 

30, 529 

4, 755, 166 

302, 244 

73, 375 

125, 187 

315, 688 

549, 329 

1,886 

7, 576 

477, 020 

1,854 



6, 951, 682 



2,638 

1,002 

192, 421 

41. 494 

1,101 

4,273 

3,970 

552 



247. 451 



147 
15, 103 



15, 250 



8, 337, 026 



Class of dye and country of 
origin or destination 



REEXPORTS 

Alizarin: 

Ceylon 

Mauritius and depen 

dencies 

Germany 

Other countries 

Total 

Aniline: 

United Kingdom 

Ceylon 

Zanzibar and Pemba.. 

Kenya Colony 

Tanganyilia 

Germany 

Belgium 

Italy.. 

Musl^att Territory 

Other Arabian States.. 

Iraq 

Persia 

United States 

Other countries 

Total 

Other dyes: 

Ceylon 

Siam 

Total 

Total reexports 

Grand total 

E'^PORTS 

Natural indigo: 

Germany 

Austria 

Greece 

Turlsey (European)... 

Syria 

Iraq 

Persia 

Japan 

Egypt.. 

Other countries , 

Total....! 



Quantity 



Pounds 
2,821 

448 
112 
308 



3,689 



16, 063 

19, 723 
5,255 
1,698 
5,560 
6,774 

26,024 

721 

1,379 

3,196 

2,184 

55, 842 

426 

2,352 



147, 197 



1,624 
625 



2,249 



153, 135 



19, 438, 215 



1,232 
1,008 

33.824 
1,232 
5, 204 

12, 208 
2.016 
7, 168 
7,728 

27, 888 



99, 568 



Value 



$710 

146 
26 
86 



13, 779 

13, 840 
3,764 
1,214 
3,832 
4,449 

20, 422 

748 

1,051 

2,134 

1,551 

37,023 

178 

1,435 



105, 420 



2,373 
342 



109. 103 



, 227, 923 



343 

697 

30, 922 

1,062 

4,453 

13, 204 

1,632 

5,182 

5,642 

21, 791 



84,928 



1 Annual Statement of the Sea-borne Trade of British India, year ended Mar. 31, 1929, vol. 1. 
converted at average exchange rate, 1 rupee= $0.3650. 



Values 



Table 75. — India: Imports of coal-tar dyes, calendar year 1929 ' 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 



Alizarin: 

United Kingdom 

Germany. 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

Other countries.. 

Total 

Aniline: 

United Kingdom 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Belgium.. 



Quantity 



Pounds 
1, 206, 993 
3, 945, 903 

408. 938 
112 

181, 006 



5, 742, 952 



803. 578 

8, 242, 397 

172, 282 

71,464 



Value 



$211, 936 

699, 895 

67, 473 

81 
67, 782 



1, 047, 167 



445, 541 

3, 217, 456 

77, 934 

49, 528 



Class of dye and country of 
origin 



Aniline — Continued. 

France. 

Switzerland 

Italy 

United States.. 

Other countries 

Total 

Other coal-tar dyes 

Total coal-tar dyes 

Indigo, synthetic 



Quantity 



Pounds 

26, 209 

640, 969 

875, 165 

1, 189, 058 

23, 075 



12, 044, 197 



332. 891 



18, 120, 040 
55, 552 



Value 



$23, 333 
639, 476 
348, 650 
454, 743 
14, 368 



5, 271, 029 



225. 182 



, 543, 378 
25, 222 



• Accounts Relating to the Sea-borne Trade and Navigation of British India for the calendar year 1929, 
Values converted at average exchange rate, 1929, 1 rupee=$0,362020. 



176 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 76. — India: Exports of indigo, natural, calendar year 1929 ^ 



Country of destination 



United Kingdom. 

Iraq 

Persia 

Egypt 

Other countries... 



Total. 



Quantity 



Pounds 

30, 688 

(i, 944 

1,792 

9,184 

42, 224 



90, 832 



Value 



$24, 238 

7,334 

1,428 

7,311 

37, 148 



77,459 



1 Accounts Relating to the Sea-borne Trade and Navigation of British India for the calendar year 1929' 
Values converted at average exchange rate, 1929, 1 rupee = $0.362020. 

Table 77. — Sweden: Imports and exports of coal-tar dyes, 1928^ 



Class of dye and country 
of origin or destination 


Quantity 


Value 


Class of dye and country 
of origin or destination 


Quantity 


Value 


IMPORTS 

Alizarin dyes: 


Pounds 

1,036 

191, 300 

811 

3,331 

1,577 


$1,008 

186,041 

789 

3,240 

1,533 


IMPORTS— continued 
Indigo, synthetic: Ger- 


Pounds 
37,092 
430 


$8, 758 




Other indigo dyes 


66 




Grand total 






2, 586, 774 


1,630,634 




EXPORTS 

Alizarin dyes and other 
coal-tar dyes not men- 
tioned elsewhere: 
Norway 






12, 387 

2,308 

2,152 

15 




Total 


198,055 


192, 611 








Aniline and other coal-tar 
dyes: 


3,281 

8,966 

1, 642, 720 

83, 210 

62,000 

97, 807 

11,583 

18, 146 

415, 060 

6,984 

1,440 


1,994 

5,450 

998, 478 

50, 577 

37, 685 

59, 449 

7,040 

11,030 

252, 282 

4,245 

876 


9,813 




Denmark 


2,289 




Finland 


1,811 


Netherlands 


Germany 


11 




Total 




Great Britain 


16, 862 


13, 924 


France 






Italy 




Switzerland 




United States 




Other countries 








Total 


2, 351, 197 


1,429,105 









> Handel Berattelse for Ar 1928 AV KommerskoUegium. Values converted at par rate of exchange. 



PART VI 
APPENDIX 



STATISTICS OF DOMESTIC IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 



DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS OF DYES AND OTHER 
SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1929 



177 



Part VI 
STATISTICS OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

Table 78. — Coal-tar products: Imports entered for consumption, calendar years 

1927-1929 

GROUP I.— CRUDE (FREE) 

Year 



1927 



Quantity 



Value 



1928 



Quantity! Value 



1929 



Quantity 



Value 



Benzene, pounds 

Dead or creosote oil, gallons 

Naphthalene, solidifying at less than 79° 
C, pounds 

Coal tar, crude, barrels -- 

Pitch, coal-tar, barrels - 

Toluene, pounds. .-- 

Acenaphthene, fluorene, methylanthra- 
cene, and methyluaphthalene pounds 

Anthracene, purity less than 30 per cent, 
pounds -.- 

Anthracene oil, gallons 

Cresylic acid, pounds 

Pyridine, pounds 

Xylene, pounds.. 

All other distillates n. s. p. f., which on 
being subjected to distillation yield in 
the portion distilling below 190° C. a 
quantity of tar acids less than 5 per cent 
of the original distillate, pounds 

.\11 other products found naturally in coal 
tar, whether produced or obtained from 
coal tar or other sources, n. s. p. f., 
pounds 



2, 991, 729| $63, 962 
95,915,22l!l5,436, 574 



7, 268, 258 $166, Oil 
88, 385, 074 13, 928, 136 



18, 164, 952 $405, 029 
79,300,57510,119,379 



6, 576, 500 

12,9511 

3,74l! 

154! 



131, 436 

44,836 

8,584 

55 



19, 926, 289, 

10, 2571 

514! 



357, 679 
35, 434 

2,486 



35, 007. 419 

14, 473 

1,081 



66, 559 j 17, 658 



23,241 

10, 279 

, 136, 516 

135, 6921 

361, 200! 



68, 748 



37, 564 



589 135, 224 

2, 412 33, 665 

567, 802 10, 687, 109 

42, 021 54, 616 

15, 649 214, 260 



55, 205 15, 645 



7,405 



4,771 



539, 641 



340, 215 



3,788 
7,560 
678. 177 
9.008 
7,219 



26,001 



15, 882 



44, 360 

91, 766 

33, 283 

17, 856, 765 

40. 114 



298. 619 



160, 514 



598, 718 
34, 214 
3,320 



11,351 

1,890 

6,785 

952, 110 

5,991 



18, 845 



12, 705 



GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 40 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND 

AFTER SEPT. 21, 1924) 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


Not colors, dyes, or stains, photographic chemicals, 
medicinals, flavors, or explosives, etc., n. s. p. f.: 
Acetanilide, not medicinal— 

1927 


1,001 


$531 


$282 


Per cent 
53.20 


1928 




1929 










Acids- 
Carbolic— 

Crystal (phenol)— 

1927 


500 

1,653 

433, 385 

611,810 

976, 180 

2,343,529 

62, 155 
44,268 
11,100 

13, 740 
28,740 


100 

298 

44, 226 

38, 874 

70, 513 

183, 324 

58,673 
55, 569 
10, 671 

9,962 
19.083 


75 

117 

24,014 

29,505 
48, 269 
118,688 

27,820 

25, 326 

5,045 

4.947 

9, 645 


75.00 


1928 1 


39. 42 


1929 


54. 30 


Liquid (cresylic acid or cresol)— 

1927 2 


75.71 


19283 


68.45 


1929 


64.74 


Coal-tar acids, n. s. p. f.— 

1927 


47.42 


1928 


45.58 


1929 


47.28 


Aniline oil and salts— 

1927 .. 


49.65 


1928 . 


50. .54 


1929 -. 





1 T. D. 42423. 



2 T. D. 40519, 



3 T D. 42337. 



179 



180 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 78. — Coal-tar products: Imports entered for consumption, calendar years 

19S7-1939— Continued 

GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 40 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND 
AFTER SEPT. 21, 1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


Not colors, dyes, or stains, photographic chemicals, 
medicinals, flavors, or explosives, etc.— Continued. 
Anthracene, purity of 30 per cent or more— 

1927 - 








Per cent 


1928 - --- 


1,052 


$40.5 


$236 


58 18 


1929 -i 




Anthraquinone, aminoanthraquinone, and nitro- 
anthraquinone— 
1927 


16, 308 

28, 341 

100 

1,587 
3,845 


13, 731 

20,211 

39 

1,027 
2,494 


6,634 

10, 068 

23 

522 
1,267 


48 31 


1928 


49.82 


1929 


57.95 


Benzaldehyde, not medicinal, and nitrobenzalde- 
hyde— ' 

1927 ... 


50 82 


1928 - - 


50.79 


1929 




Benzanthrone, benzoquinone. benzidine, benzidine 
sulphate, and benzyl, benzal, and benzoyl chloride— 
1926 - 


137, 684 

321, 751 

194, 310 

4,567 

8.855 
3,900 


83, 841 

199. 112 

108, 980 

4,051 

5,652 
2,353 


43, 174 

102. 167 

57, 194 

1,940 

2,881 
1,214 


51.50 


1927 


51.31 


1928 


52.48 


1929 


47. 89 


Dihydroxy naphthi leae and dianisidine— 

1927 


50.97 


1928 


51. 60 


1929 




Dimethvlaniline and benzylethylaniline— 

1927 


2,383 


2,219 


1,054 


47.52 


1928 




1929 










Dinitrobenzene, dinitrochlorobenzene, dinitro- 
naphthalene, dinitrophenol, nitrophenol, and 
dinitrotoluene— 
1927 


150 


182 


83 


45. 77 


1928 




1929 










Diphenylaraine— 

1927 










1928 


13, 050 


14, 665 


6,780 


46.23 


1929 




Metacresol, orthocresol, and paracresol, purity of 90 
per cent or more— 


174, 094 
207, 897 
227, 974 


35, 054 
33, 638 
32, 098 


26.208 
28,008 

28,797 


74.77 


1928 


83.26 




89.72 


Methylanthraquinone — 

1927 




1928 - 










1929 


3,628 

18, 668 
27 


3,344 

3,077 
6 


1,592 

2,538 
4 


47.61 


Naphthalene solidifying at 79° C. or above— 


82.47 


1928 


71.50 






Naphthol, alpha and beta, not medicinal— 


41, 746 
40, 778 
34, 486 

853 
1,850 


65, 739 

102, 069 

78, 108 

1,016 
2,177 


29, 218 
43, 682 
33. 657 

466 
1,000 


44.45 


1928 


42.80 


1929 


43.09 


Napthvlamine and naphthylenediamine— 

1927 .. . . 


45.88 


1928 .. 


45.95 






Nitroaniline, paia and meta, nitrobenzene, nitro- 

thylaniline, nitrotoluene, and nitrotolylenedia- 

1927 


112, 012 
129, 275 


40, 027 
56, 789 


2.3, 852 
31, 765 


59.59 




55.93 


1929 




Phenylenediamine, phenylglycine, phenylhydrazine, 
and phenylnaphthylamine— 


7,746 

250 

55 


9,401 
294 
563 


4.303 
135 
229 


45.77 


1928 


45. 95 




40.67 



STATISTICS OF DOMESTIC IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 



181 



Table 78. — Coal-tar products: Imports entered for consumption, calendar years 

1927-1929— Contmned 

GROUP II (DUTIABLE AT 40 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND 
AFTER SEPT. 21, 1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


Not colors, dyes, or stains, photographic chemicals, 
medicinals, flavors, or explosives, etc— Continued. 
Resorcinol, not medicinal — 

1927 


33, 114 
47, 882 
31,497 

79, 650 
83, 380 
4, 863 

1,663 


$38, 046 
60, 352 
39, 351 

32, 526 

35, 283 

2,721 

1,569 


$17, 536 
27, 493 
17,945 

18, 586 

19, 950 
1,429 

744 


Per cent 
46.09 


1928 


45.55 


1929 


15.6a 


Tolidine, toluene sulfochloride, toluene solfonamide, 
toluidine, and tolylenediamine— 

1927 . -- . 


57.14 


1928 


56. 54 


1929 


52. 52 


All distillates of coal, blast-furnace, oil-gas, and 
water-gas tar which on being subject to distilla- 
tion below 215° C. yield a quantity of tar acids 
enual to or more than 75 per cent of the original 
distillate— 
1927 - -- 


47.42 


1928 




1929 


227 
540, 237 


23 
363, 914 


25 
183, 382 


109. 09 


All similar products, obtained, derived, or manufac- 
tured in whole or in part from the products pro- 
vided for in Group I (free)— 
1927 


50. 39' 


1928 




1929 










All similar products manufactured from the products 
provided for in pars. 27 and 1549 i — 
1928 - 


629, 687 
1,138,898 


412,948 
977, 255 


209, 257 
470, 625 


50.67 


1929 


48. 16- 



GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 45 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND 

AFTER SEPT. 21, 1924) 



When obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole or 
in part from any of the products provided for in Qroup 
I (free) or II, including natural indigo, and their deriv- 
atives: 
Alizarin, natural— 

1927 


374 


1,017 


484 


47.57 


1928 - 




l'929 -- . - 


17, 518 
25 


21,817 
48 


11,044 
23 


60.62 


Alizarin, synthetic— 

1927 -.- 


48.65 


1928 




1929 










Colors, dyes, stains, etc., obtained, derived, or manu- 
factured from alizarin— 
1927 


42, 779 

3,333 

102 

6,843 
1,528 


40, 470 

3,796 

163 

2,957 
185 


21, 206 

1,942 

80 

1,810 
190 


52.40 


1928 - --- 


51.15 


1929 


49.38 


Indigo, natural— 

1927 


61.2a 


1928 , 


102. 82 


1929 




Indigo, synthetic— 

1927 -.- . - - 


590 


610 


316 


51.77 


1928 




1929 










Colors, dyes, stains, etc., derived from indigo— 

1927 


5,960 

66 

550 

2,077,712 
677,849 
3, 059, 361 
1, 905, 219 
1, 357, 133 

5, 606, 827 
5, 101, 759 
4, 853, 745 

6, 089, 303 
7, 316, 605 


6,112 
228 
381 

2,941,773 
894,844 
4, 154, 091 
2, 320, 712 
1, 865, 036 
6, 762, 764 
5, 613, 847 
5, 368, 368 
6, 716, 566 
8, 154, 435 


3,168 
107 
210 

965,640 
584, 356 

2, 706, 610 
1, 525, 793 

934, 266 

3, 435, 722 
2, 883, 354 
2, 755, 528 
3, 448, 706 
4, 181, 658 


51.83 


1928 


47.03 


1929 -- 


55.10 


All other colors, dyes, or stains , whether soluble or not 

in water, color acids, color bases, or color lakes— 

19222 


32.83 


1922 3 


65.3a 


1923 - 


65. 16 


1924 * 


65.75 


1924 « -.- 


50.09 


1925 - 


5a 80 


1926 


51.36 


1927 . 


51.33 


1928 


61.35 


1929_ 


51.28 



1 Act of 1922. 3 Act of 1922. 

2 Act of 1916. * From Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 1924. 



• From Sept. 22 to Dec. 31, 1924. 



182 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 78. — Coal-tar products: Imports entered for consumption, calendar years 

1927-1 5^5— Continued 



GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 45 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND 
AFTER SEPT. 21, 1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


When obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole or 
in part from any of the products provided for in Group 
I (fne) or II, including natural indigo, and their deriv- 
atives—Continued. 
Color lakes— ■ 

1928. _ - 


155 


$169 


$87 


Per cent 
51.42 


1929 




Resinlike products prepared from articles provided 
for in par . 27 or 1549 «— 

1927 


11,359 
60, 547 
67, 529 

25, 923 
25, 313 
18, 709 

1,279 
500 
229 

52,111 

82, 294 
103, 277 

127 
39 
14 

667 
13 


4,266 
10, 984 

17, 503 

65, 803 

77, 539 
56, 785 

2,455 
700 
201 

47, 257 
69, 720 
108, 075 

4,904 

16,847 
5,973 

798 
132 


2,715 
9,181 
12, 603 

31, 426 
36, 664 
26, 863 

1,336 
350 
106 

24, 913 
37, 135 
55, 863 

2,216 

7,584 
2,689 

406 
60 


63.64 


1928 


83.59 


1929 - 


72.00 


Photographic chemicals— 

1927 . 


47.76 


1928 


47.29 


1929 - 


47.31 


Coal-tar meiicinals — 

Acetanilide, acetphenetidin (phenacetin), and 
acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)— 
1927 


54.40 


1928 


50.00 


1929 


52.98 


Antipyrine— 

1927 


52.72 


1928 


53.26 


1929 . . - 


51.69 


Arsphenamine (salvarsan), neoarsphenamine 

and similar arsenical medicinal compounds — 

1927 


45.18 


1928.. 


45.02 


1929... 


45.02 


Betanaphthol and benzaldehyde— 

1927 


50.85 


1928 


45.69 


1929 




Benzoic acid— 

1927 


236 
419 

225 

7,666 

6 
14 
25 

630 

4,409 

992 

5,202 

7,713 

24. 565 

209 

196 

2,535 

16 
5 

28, 642 
19, 884 
74, 376 


142 
256 
135 

9,451 

1,652 
6,711 
9,781 

810 
4,731 
1,091 

8,245 
12, 974 
35,009 

1,397 
1,343 
1,518 

100 

5 

165, 528 
87, 614 
224, 227 


80 
145 
76 

4,790 

744 
3,021 
4,403 

545 
/ M40 
\ 2, 438 

560 

4,074 
6,378 
17, 474 

643 

618 
861 

46 
A 

76, 493 
40, 818 
106, 108 


56.63 


1928 . 


56.46 


1929 


56.67 


Guaiacol and derivatives— 

1929 


50.68 


Novocain or procaine — 

1927 


45.03 


1928 


45.01 


1929 


45.02 


Phenolphthalein— 

1927 


67.28 


1928 


} 60. 83 
51.36 

49 42 


1929 

Resorcinol— 

1927 


1928 


49.16 


1929 _ . 


49.91 


Salicylic acid and its salts— 

1927 . 


46.05 


1928 


46.02 


1929 


56.69 


Salol- 

1923_ 


46. 12 


1929 


52.00 


Coal-tar medicinals, n. s. p. f.— 

1927 


46.21 


1928 - 


46.59 


1929 


47.32 



6 Bakelite prohibited. T. D. 41512. 



' Antidumping duty. 



STATISTICS OF DOMESTIC IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 



183 



Table 78. — Coal-tar products: Imports entered for consumption, calendar years 

1927~1929~Contumed 

GROUP III (DUTIABLE AT 45 PER CENT AD VALOREM PLUS 7 CENTS PER POUND 
AFTER SEPT. 21, 1924)— Continued 



Article and year 


Pounds 


Value 


Duty 


Actual 
and com- 
puted ad 
valorem 
rate 


WLen obtained, derived, or manufactured in whole or 
in part from any of ttie products provideii for in Group 
I (free) or II, including natural indigo, and their deriv- 
atives—Con tinued . 
Flavors and perfumes- 
Musk, artificial, benzyl acetate, benzyl benzoate, 
couniarin, diphenyloxide, methyl anthranilate, 
methyl salicylate, natural methyl salicylate, or 
oil of wintergreen or oil of sweet birch, phenyl- 
acetaldehyde, phenylethyl alcohol, and other 
synthetic odoriferous or aromatic chemicals not 
containing alcohol — 
1927 -• 


162, 303 
124, 388 
128, 965 

3,178 
18, 759 
20, 703 

682 
143 
165 

30 


$457, 644 
405, 759 
447, 082 

20, 961 
129, 917 
137, 579 

767 
196 
413 

8 


$217, 301 
191, 299 
210, 215 

9,655 
59, 776 
63, 360 

393 
98" 
197 

6 


Per cent 

47 48 


1928 


47.15 


1929 . ... 


47 02 


Vanillin— 

1927 


46 06 


1928 


46.01 


1929 


46 05 


Other flavors— 

1927.. 


51.22 


1928 


50. 11 


1929 


47.80 


Ink powder — 

1927... 


71.25 


1928. 




1929. 










Synthetic tanning materials— 

1927 


99 


336 


158 


47.06 


1928 




1929 

















Table 79. — Coal-tar products: General imports, 1927-1929 

DEAD OR CREOSOTE OIL (FREE) 



Imported from— 


1927 


1928 


1929 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


United Kingdom . . . 


Gallons 

38, 279, 105 

27, 975, 616 

4, 243, 931 

19, 034, 169 

1, 233, 933 

553, 249 

4, 169, 917 

425, 301 


$6, 230, 595 
4, 467, 225 
628, 452 
3, 203, 425 
193, 801 
85,028 
558, 309 
69, 739 


Gallons 
44, 009, 816 
18, 312, 329 

1, 158, 661 
21, 977, 802 


$6,854,025 

2, 916, 702 
212,711 

3, 537, 583 


Gallons 

S9, 383, 991 

20, 157, 187 

275 

17, 944, 092 


$5, 067, 042 


Netherlands 


2, 553, 870 




36 


Belgium 


2, 282, 456 














Canada 


i, 475, 9i9 
1, 450, 547 


188, 238 
218, 877 


1, 400, 249 
1 414, 781 


167, 031 


All other countries 


48,944 






Total 


95, 915, 221 


15, 436, 574 


88, 385, 074 


13, 928, 136 


79, 300, 575 


10, 119, 379 







' Japan only. 

1 14492—30- 



PYRIDINE (FREE) 



Germanv 


Pounds 

78, 978 


$23, 331 


Pounds 
49, 466 


$7, 532 


Pounds 
31, 167 


$4, 158 




3,946 
40,552 
12, 216 


1,915 
9,173 
7,602 
















4,340 
810 


1,172 
304 


8,947 


l,8o3 
















Total -. 


135, 692 


42, 021 


54,616 


9,008 


40, 114 


5,991 







-13 



1S4 CEXSrS OF DYES AXD OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGAXIC CHEMICALS 
T.iBLE 79 — Coal-tor products: General imports, 1927—1929 — Continued 

ALL OTHER CRUDES 



Imporied from— 


1927 192s 1929 

1 


BeleiuiQ 


$54,657 5:^.981 M9, 149 


Frai^ce . . 


13,707 30.023 19,747 


Inirpri VinpfinTri 


378, 912 524. 542 902, 838 


Canada 


83. 430 157. S16 411. 285 


GermaiiT ... . .. . . . 


275. 215 447. 995 612. 953 


"VprhprliTifi^ 


Z502 687 


Mesico 


45. 431 62. 793 48, 305 


All othw coantries.. 


18.590 11.462 






Total 


S7a 444 1. 313. 612 2, 044. 967 




1 



COAL-TAR ACIDi 



Imported from— 



Belgium 

United Kingdom-.. 

Xeiherlands 

France ^ 

Germany.'. 

AH other conn tries. 



Total- 



1928 



1929 



QoaniitT Valae Quantity 



Value 



Juantitv Value 



Pound* 



Pound* 



Pound* 

217.454 $14,364 

522.361 i 32,571 2,175,876 -5162,229 1.591.973 $126,051 

! 1.102 117 

40 143 

75.937 71.184 770.245 165,687 377.078 34. 12C 

ZS66 1.4S7 _ 



818.658 



119, 749 2, M6, 121 327, 916 1. 973. 153 



160.288 



OTHER COAL-TAR E^TERMEDLITES 



France.. 

nprmanv 


40,402 
L371,766 

95.225 

192. 875 

46,323 

15.185 

6.»4 


$44,473 
891,831 

7.095 

33,671 

37.360 

9.213 

3.1S3 


39,496 
1, 129, 132 

31, 58-5 

194.306 

48,752 

1,484 


-54Z903 

877,333 

10.496 

26.499 

40.627 

778 


4S.23S 
1. 707. 238 

9.737 

144.426 

70.030 

5. 021 

4.100 


$60,541 
1.J40.630 


Netherlands . 


14.618 




23.0&7 


Swiirerland-. 

Canada 

AD other conntries 


42. 181 
1.315 
3.465 






Total... _ 


1,768,010 


1,026,826 


1,444,755 


998,636 


1.988.790 


1,485,847 



ALIZARIN' .\ND DERIVATFVES 





81 $177 i 


Germany 

Switzerland . . 


2.105 690 1 ! 

1 17,620 $21,980 




1.939 1,571 1 3,333 $3,796 


Canada 


40 145 \ 


Total 


4.1V5 2.583 1 3.333 3,796 17.620 ■ ,21.980 



COLORS, DYES. STAIXS. COLOR ACIDS, AND COLOR BASES, N. E. S. 



• 

Belgium 

Franc* - 

- irrland 

-- ': KingdoTn 


'O. 124 : 

-i4.996 , 
3.238.040 
L493,4«6 

146.270 

112.475 
!7. -237 
71. 578 
2.647 


$242,419 

274,154 

3,426,848 

L 859. 124 

147,640 

130.-503 

2.5.936 

63,101 

2.070 


114,977 

74.284 

4,055,619 

1,638.662 

98,027 

64.954 

74.437 

131. 131 

66 


$136,966 

89,991 

4,249,849 

2,004,560 

95,507 

60.103 

8.5.549 

1.54,009 

72 


76. 259 

108.312 

4, 685. 326 

2,563.469 , 

9L957 

13: 8.54 

lN'y20 

.>-3. 5y4 

1.428 


$9.5.819 

16a012 

5.019.070 

3.000.159 
100.779 


I*a:T 


] 1. fi2fi 


Nethwlands. 

Canada 

.\11 other counirite 


21.446 

38,276 

8.50 


To-sl 


5. 496. 833 


6. ISl, 795 


6. 252, 157 


6. 876, 606 


7.593.119 


8,448.037 



STATISTICS OF DOMESTIC DIPORTS AXP EXTORTS 



185 



Table 79. — Coal-tar products: General imports, 1927—1929 — Continued 

COAL-TAS MEDICIXALS 



Imported from — 



France 

Germany 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom-.. 
.\11 other countries. 

Total 



1928 



Qnantity Value I Quantity , Valtie Quantity Val 



Pounds 



Pounds 



25,659 


.?61. 031 


34.496 


S66,351 


78.787 


121. 601 


30. 136 


70. 139 


693 


4,?J*7 


14-!« 


7V. 


•Hyi 


23.2S0 


5.070 


.". 193 


15. 419 


44,142 


25. 059 


3>. 74" 


7. 7S0 


19.275 


17. .500 


24. 371 


1,035 


3. lis 


284 


3.l>iS 



P<mTi43 

40,5oS 

56,606 

283 

l.fL36 



112.693 



15.3. 157 



$77. 414 
117.429 

2.168 
3.791 



332. 4*52 



ALL OTHER FIXISHED COAL-TAB PRODUCTS 



France 

Gprmanv 


15.3-58 
26,127 i 


514. r,55 

6«5,6C«4 


88.67, 
6,776 
2.359 
1.033 


i28. 599 


3t4 

101. 339 

5.349 

359 

706 


$2,176 

169.239 




31.774 




822 
52 


1.S67 
90 


727 




890 






Total . - 


42. 3.39 


83.219 


103. 917 


240. .543 


108.097 


204. SO-- 







Table 80. — Coal-tar products: Domestic exports, 1927-1929 
CRUDE COAL TAR AXD COAL-TAR PITCH 



192S ' 



1929 : 



Esported to — 



Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Valne 



Barrels 
Europe .- 585,119 .?2, 927, 929 



N orth America- 
South America. 

Asia 

Oceania 

Africa :- 



86,826 

1,281 

37 

127 



Total. 



315,791 
ia365 
363 

LlOo 
413 



Tons 

27, 971 $446. 441 

10.337 156,542 

44 1,882 



253 



673,419 3,255.966 38,354 608,118 



Tans 
1.481 
S.311 
13 



$44,211 
159. 168 

668 



204.047 



' Coal-tar pitch and coal-tar pitch coke. 

CRUDE COAL TAR 



- Coal-tar Ditch. 



Exported to — 



Quantity 



Value 



Quantity 



Value 



Barrels Barrels 

Europe 5LS82 -5258.023 2.&47 

North -America 84.472 308.267 104,028 

South AmMica... 1,729 13,230 1,818 

Asia ■ 1 

Oceania. 57 i 906 33 

Africa 13 ' 203 10 

Total 138. lo3 580.629 108,537 



20 

356 
103 



186 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 80. — Coal-tar products: Domestic exports, 1927-1929 — Continued 
COAL-TAR DISTILLATES— BENZOL 



Exported to— 


1927 


1928 


1929 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Germany 


Oallons 
11,918,240 
555, 544 


.$3. 010, 816 
149, 997 


Gallons 
10, 824, 326 

1, 380, 235 

2, 277, 075 


,$2,615,115 
333, 230 
637, 580 


Gallons 

17, 828, 355 

1, 326, 496 

1, 194, 059 

1, 921, 733 

9, 251, 278 

1, 030. 387 

34, 433 

733 

168, 915 

45, 433 

17, 212 

527, 349 


.$4, 459, 506 


France - - - 


344, 332 




333, 771 




4, 620, 862 
8, 396, 932 


1, 062, 798 
2, 342, 299 


422, 782 


United Kingdom 


6, 559, 186 


1, 271, 412 


2, 506, 768 


Italy 


214, 739 


Canada 


18, 125 
2,458 

106, 860 
7,433 
3.100 

164,012 


7,190 
1,297 

43,311 
2,764 
2,234 

42, 399 


14, 134 
650 
132, 090 
28, 830 
7,827 
114, 076 


4,871 
295 

54, 792 
9,808 
3,557 

32, 050 


13, 597 


Mexico - - - . 


407 


Argentina 

Chile 

Australia 

All other countries 


59, 642 

16, 119 

7,543 

157, 672 


Total _ 


25, 793, 566 


6, 665, 105 


21, 338, 429 


4,962,710 


33, 346, 381 


8, 536, 878 



OTHER CRUDE DISTILLATES 



Exported to— 


1927 


1928 


1929 




Value 

$144 

1,552 

192, 934 

114 

49, 422 

4,377 

9,861 

10, 806 

68, 918 

37, 708 

15, 507 

1 46, 706 


Value 
$30 


Value 








268, 004 

1.930 

40, 572 

411 

6,216 

20 

65, 072 

26, 114 

1.5, 610 

34, 127 


$394, 680 




230 




40, 010 






Cuba - 


12, 787 




1,179 




90, 703 


■Chile 


6,840 




1,583 


\11 other countries - . . 


2 77, 294 






Total 


438, 049 


458, 106 


625, 306 







» Includes $15,802 to the Netherlands. 2 Includes $26,944 to Australia. 

INTERMEDIATE COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 





1927 


1928 


1929 


Exported to— 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




Pounds 
69, 908 
78. 400 
263, 234 


$29, 902 
9,040 
47, 175 


Pounds 
9,232 

48, 174 

221, 553 

11,760 

1, 247, 063 

103, 912 

76, 449 

124, 581 

6,666 


$3, 869 

4,926 
26, 799 

2,242 

116.513 

12, 534 

2.377 
17, 301 

1,450 


Pounas 




Germany . 


17, 422 

179, 522 

6,725 

863, 158 

107, 575 

101. 780 

17,423 

89, 788 


$2, 152 


Netherlands 


26, 213 




1,220 




366. 110 

39, 709 

109. 487 

461, 521 

4,758 

94, 751 

613, 161 

113,281 

203, 419 


49, 120 
3, 225 
11, 9,59 
58, 874 
832 
15, 087 
84, 404 
24, 052 
14, 806 


107. 825 


Mexico - 


13, 367 


Cuba 


8,294 




2,893 


China 


17, 948 








652, 283 
90,227 
198, 538 


93, 449 

5,565 

28, 852 


979, 489 
109, 643 
335, 985 


168, 808 


Australia .- 


7,954 




61, 324 






Total 


2, 417, 739 


348, 476 


2,790,438 


315, 877 


2, 808, 510 


417, 998 







STATISTICS OF DOMESTIC IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 



187 



Table 80. — Coal-tar prolurts: Domestic exports, 1927-1929 — Continued 

FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 
COLORS, DYES, AND STAINS (PACKAGES FOR HOUSEHOLD USE) i 



Exported to- 



Quantity j Value 



Quantity Value 



United Kingdom 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

South America 

Japan 

Philippines 

British India 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Union of South Africa 
All other countries. .. 

Total 



Pounds 

1,503 
94, 357 
25, 516 
12, »93 
29, 160 
37, 122 

6,662 
858 

5,298 
11. 382 

8,403 
31, 732 



264, 986 



$1, 140 

35, 827 

18, 211 

13, 768 

25, 820 

54. 170 

5,721 

426 

4,360 

6,646 

4,849 

24, 503 



Pounds 
920 
41,469 
19, 749 

32, 085 

33, 586 
1,915 
6,455 

23, 338 
3,313 
38, 342 
11, 803 
85, 267 



$1, U7 

36, 017 

15,005 

24, 800 

32, 259 

1,916 

5, 436 

7,911 

1,810 

16, 216 

4,647 

76, 161 



195, 441 



298, 242 



223, 295 



1 Not previously reported separately. 

OTHER COLORS, DYES, AND STAINS 



Exported to— 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia - . 

France 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Soviet Russia in Europe. 

United Kingdom 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

South America 

British India 

China 

Hong Kong 

Japan 

Kwan tung 

Philippine Islands 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Union of South Africa 

All other countries 



1928 



Quantity 



Value 



Total -.. 26,770,560 



Pounds I 
709,807 
120,792 

8,354 i 
116,362 i 
26,835 I 
2,628 
12,605 I 
1,978,705 
285,302 1 
54,377 1 
395,189 
1,612,816 
17, 798, 509 
931, 348 
2, 266, 103 
67, 453 
135, 627 
6,659 
11,619 
12,864 
216, 606 



$166, 723 

37,664 

3,286 

31, 247 

62, 197 

1,275 

10, 672 

850, 257 

95, 383 

42, 380 

192, 076 

536, 525 

1, 884, 288 

145, 925 

1, 302, 526 

10, 342 

24,737 

5,028 

8,984 

8,014 

75, 793 



Quantity Value 



Quantity 



5, 495, 322 



Pounds 

1, 000, 592 

40, 102 

23, 714 

274, 215 

13, 344 



$240, 519 
9,657 



109, 600 
1,078 



50, 012 

2, 670, 079 

248, 298 

77, 049 

441, 152 

1, 307, 898 

18, 970, 388 

30, 721 

1, 650, 021 



7,699 

1, 022, 583 

95, 739 

59,929 

213,314 

569, 219 

2, 499, 400 

93, 304 

1, 245, 224 



229, 596 
2,900 
3,169 
4,349 

245, 196 



46, 650 

2,438 

2,840 

2,305 

104, 795 



27, 559, 278 



6, 336, 178 



Pounds 

1, 593, 928 

122, 135 

9,822 

455, 713 

13, 172 

67,247 

21, 668 

1, 870. 498 

177, 366 

42, 005 

578, 426 

1, 467, 512 

24, 614, 990 

645, 949 

1, 805, 016 



201, 292 

893 

1,879 

4,584 

237, 988 



33, 832, 083 



Value 



$340, 276 

28,295 

10, 437 

197, 578 

3,36 9 

55,236 

14, 854 

935, 995 

66, 819 

24, 295 

229, 966 

628, 723 

3, 215, 200 

150, 798 

1, 053, 516 



28, 798 
1,075 
1,095 
2,574 

66, 892 



7, 055, 791 



MEDICINALS 



Germany.. 

United Kingdom.. 

Canada 

Mexico. 

Cuba 

Argentina. 

British India 

Japan 

Australia 

All other countries 

Total 



Pounds 

59,451 

122, 315 

70, 187 

45, 833 

16, 363 

27,482 

2,110 

20, 223 

58, 170 

233, 175 



655, 309 



$27, 899 
27, 308 
17, 299 
59, 677 
11, 683 
11,289 
1,664 
10, 374 
32, 219 

129, 349 



328, 761 



Pounds 

21, 000 

137, 665 

353, 224 

44, 948 

5,053 

42, 939 

10,424 

8,220 

73, 359 

94, 783 



791, 615 



$11, 000 

36, 967 

41, 180 

63,916 

5,189 

18, 288 

6,654 

6,997 

42, 478 

88,444 



321, 113 



Pounds 



5,712 
65, 566 
23, 140 

6,269 
126 

8,436 
23, 758 

3,425 
46, 591 



183, 023 



$4, 448 
17, 967 
62, 207 

2,293 
510 

6,969 
20, 130 

3,131 
67, 199 



184,854 



188 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Table 80. — Coal-tar products: Domestic exports, 1927-19^9 — Continued 
OTHER FINISHED COAL-TAR PRODUCTS 



Exported to — 



Quantity 



Value 



1928 



Quantity 



Value 



Quantity 



Value 



Belgium 

France 

Germany . 

Italy 

Poland and Danzig 
United Kingdom... 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Peru 

China 

Japan 

Australia 

Philippine Islands. 
All other countries . 

Total 



Pounds 

328, 032 

372, 163 

52, 020 

385, 771 

95, 950 

974, 931 

409, 420 

56, 159 

578, 496 

83,418 

44, 216 

154, 674 

70, 302 

36,040 

37, 918 

116, 884 

37, 439 

300, 282 



$23,413 

27, 747 

5,848 

84, 899 

23, 740 

104,466 

52, 922 

9,720 

19, 813 

17, 919 
10, 062 
22, 965 
13, 772 

18, 545 
13, 713 
47,112 
13,422 
55, 136 



Pounds 

6,184 

31, 106 

3,842 

3,431 

2,400 

213, 924 

949, 698 

80, 818 

118,355 

28,382 

7,097 

105, 875 

120, 557 

50, 502 

159, 784 

57, 258 

44, 896 

221, 933 



$423 

3,521 

1,552 

863 

228 

24,399 

96, 722 

9,181 

13, 099 

9,271 

1,691 

20, 172 

20, 062 

38, 679 

20, 277 

9,621 

15, 771 

49, 376 



Pounds 



6,299 
3,075 
1,698 



$2,624 
952 
98 



681, 468 

325, 124 

79, 329 

51, 022 

25, 625 

9,894 

13, 495 

25, 754 

53, 489 

29, 665 

49, 542 

38, 789 

116, 054 



69, 959 

83, 662 

11,315 

11,114 

13, 041 

6,216 

4,384 

5,165 

48, 323 

10, 052 

7,945 

28,205 

36, 140 



4, 134, 115 



565, 214 



2, 106, 042 



334, 908 



1, 510, 322 



339, 195 



Directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1929 



No. 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in parentheses 
if not in same city as office) 



12 



Abbott Laboratories, The — 

Algon Color & Chemical Corporation 

Allied Tar & Chemical Corporation 

Alston-Lucas Paint Co., The , 

Althouse Chemical Co., The 

Alyco Manufacturing Co. (Inc.) , 

Amalgamated DyestufE & Chemical Works 

(Inc.). 
American Aniline Products (Inc.) 

American Catalin Corporation 

American Chemical Products Co 

American Solvents & Chemical Corporation. 

American Tar Products Co. (Inc.) 



Ansbacher-Siegle Corporation 

Apex Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Atlantic Creosoting Co. (Inc.) 

Baird Jk McGuire (Inc.) 

Barrett Co., The 

Bates Chemical Co 

Bayer Co. (Inc.), The 

Beaver Chemical Corporation 

Beaver Manufacturing Co 

Benzol Products Co 

Berghausen Chemical Co., The E 

Berkheimer Manufacturing Co., J. E 

Brooklyn Color Works (Inc.) 

Brown Co 

Bush Co. (Inc.), W. J_ 

Cable Chemical Works 

Calco Chemical Co. (Inc.), The 

California Chemical Corporation 

California Ink Co. (Inc.), The 



4753 East Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, lU. (North 

Chicago, 111.) 
132 Front Street, New York, N. Y. (Elizabeth, 

N.J.) 
535 Fifth .\ venue, New York, N. Y. (Bay way, 

Elizabeth, N. J.) 
1031 Currier Street, Chicago, 111. 
540 Pear Street, Reading, Pa. 
86 Orange Street, Bloomfield, N. J. 
75 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. (Newark, 

N.J.) 
45 East Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. (Lock 

Haven, Pa.) 
230 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. (College Point, 

N. Y.) 
7 Litchfield Street, Rochester, N. Y. 
122 East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Albany, N. Y.) 
Koppers Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Cicero, 111. 

Youngstown, Ohio; St. Louis, Mo.; Woodward 

Ala.; Carrollville, Wis.; Follansbee, W. Va.; Utica, 

N. Y.; Kearnv, N. J.; St. Paul, Minn.; Hamilton, 

Ohio.) 
91 Chestnut Avenue, Rosebank, Staten Island, N. Y. 
225 West Thirty-fourth Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Elizabethport, N. J.) 
P. O. Box 902. Norfolk, Va. (Burtons Point, Ports- 
mouth, Va.) 
Holbrook, Alass. 

40 Rector Street, New York, N. Y. (Plants dis- 
tributed throughout the United States.) 
lyansdowne. Pa. 
170 Varick Street, New York, N. Y. (Rensselaer, 

N. Y.) 
Dam.ascus, Va. 
Ballardvale, Mass. 

237 South Street, Newark, N. J. (Piscataway, N. J.) 
915 Carr Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
2928 South M Street, Tacoma, Wash. 

129 Cherry Street, Brooldyn,N.Y 

404 Commercial Street, Portland, Me. (Berlin, 

N. H.) 
370 Seventh Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Linden, 

N.J.) 
185 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Cable, 

Wis.) 
Boundbrook, N. J. 
Ill Sutter Street, San Francisco, Calif. (Newark, 

San Mateo, Chula Vista, Calif.) 
426 Batterv Street, San Francisco, Calif. (West 

Berkeley, Calif.) 



STATISTICS OF DOMESTIC IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 189 

Directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1929 — Con. 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in parentheses 
if not in same city as office) 



86 

87 



91 
92 

93 
94 
95 



100 
101 



Carbide & Carbon Chemicals Corporation... 



Carus Chemical Co 

Celluloid Corporation 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 



Chemical & Dye Corporation 

Childs Pulp Colors (Inc.) 

Cincinnati Chemical Works (Inc.)- 



Coleman & Bell Co 

Commonwealth Color & Chemical Co. 

Continental-Diamond Fibre Co 

Cooks Falls Dye Works, (Inc.) 



Coopers Creek Chemical Co 

Crown Chemical Corporation 

Crown Tar Works 

Crystal Color & Chemical Works 

DeBrook Co. (Inc.) 

Delta Chemical & Iron Co 

Diarsenol Co. (Inc.) 

Dow Chemical Co., The 

Du Pont Ammonia Corporation 

Du Pont de Nemours & Co., E. I 

Dye Products & ChemicalCo. (Inc.). 



Dvestuffs & Chemicals (Inc.) 

Eakins (Inc.), J. S. & W. R 

Eastman Kodak Co 

Federal Color Laboratories (Inc.) . . _ 

Federal Phosphorus Co 

Felton Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Fine Colors Co 

Florasynth Laboratories (Inc.) 

Ford Motor Co 

Foster-Heaton Co... 

Franco-American Chemical Works. . 

Fries Bros 

Garfield Aniline Works 

Gaskill Chemical Corporation, The. 

Gebauer Chemical Co., The 

General Aniline Works (Inc.) _ 



General Electric Co 

General Plastics (Inc.) 

Gi vaudan-Delawanna (Inc. ) 

Glvco Products Co 

Goodrich Co., The B. F 

Great Western Electro-Chemical Co. 



Hall Co., The C. P 

Hampden Paint & Chertucal Co. 

Harmon Color Works (Inc.) 

Heller & .Merz Co., The. 



Heyden Chemical Corporation. 



Holland Aniline Dye Co 

Hooker Electrochemical Co. 



Hynson, Westcott & Dunning. 
Imperial Color Works (Inc.)... 
Inland Tar Co 



Johnson & Co., Charles Eneu 

Kent Color Corporation 

Kentucky Color & Chemical Co 

Kessler Chemical Corporation, The. 
Klipstein & Sons Co. (Inc.), E. C... 



Kohnstamm & Co. (Inc.), H 

LaMotte Chemical Products Co... 

Lilly & Co., EU.. 

Lucidol Corporation 

Maas & Waldstein Co 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

Marietta DyestulTs Co... 

Mar.x Color & Chemical Co., Max. 
Mathieson .\lkali Works, The 



Maywood Chemical Works. 
Mepham & Co., Geo. S 



30 East Fortv-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(South Charleston, W. Va.: Niagara Falls, N. Y.) 

La Salle, 111. 

290 Ferry Street, Newark, N. J. 

100 East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(East St. Louis, 111.) 

Springfield, N. J. 

43 Summit Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Evanston Station, Box 20, Cincinnati, Ohio. (Nor- 
wood and St. Bernard, Ohio.) 

4101 Main Avenue, Norwood, Ohio. 

Nevins, Butler, and Baltic Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Newark, Del. 

81 Fulton Street, New York, N. Y. (Cooks Falls, 
N. Y.) 

River Road, West Conshohocken, Pa. 

128 Front Street, New York, N. Y. (Kevport, N. J.) 

900 Fifteenth Street, Denver, Colo. 

Cordaville, Mass. 

1105 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wells, Mich. 

771 Ellicott Square, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Midland, :Mich. 

Du Pont Building, Wilmington, Del. (Belle, W. Va.) 

Wilmington, Del. (Deep Water Point, N. J.) 

200 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Newark, 
N. J.) 

Eleventh and Monroe Streets, St. Louis, Mo. 

55 Berry Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

343 State Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

4633 Forest Avenue, Norwood, Ohio. 

Birmingham, Ala. (Anniston, .\la.) 

599 Johnson Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

21 McBride Avenue, Paterson, N. J. 

1513 Olmstead Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Iron Mountain, Mich. (Kingsford. Mich.) 

833 Magnolia .\ venue, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Carlstadt, N. J. 

92 Reade Street, N. Y. (Bloomfield, N. J.) 

P. O. Box 37, Garfield, N. J. (Wallington, N. J.) 

355 Van Buren Street, Newark, N. J. 

826 Hanna Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

1150 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Grasselli, N. J.; 
Rensselaer, N. Y.) 

1 River Road, Schenectady, N. Y. 
Walek Road, North Tonawanda, N. Y. 
Delawanna Avenue, Delawanna, N. J. 

Bush Terminal Building, No. 5, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Akron, Ohio. 

9 Main Street, San Francisco, Calif. (Pittsburg, 
Calif.) 

504 Akron Savings & Loan Building, Akron, Ohio. 

161 Armory Street, Springfield, Mass. 

361 Harmon Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

503 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. (Newark, 
N.J.) 

50 Union Square, New York, N. Y. (Garfield and 
Perth Amboy, N. J.) 

Holland, Mich. 

25 Pine Street, New York, N. Y. (Niagara Falls, 
N. Y.) 

1030 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Glens Falls, N. Y. 

38 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. (East Chi- 
cago, Ind.) 

509 South Tenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

2 South Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Thirty-fourth and Bank Streets, Louisville, Ky. 
575 Nassau Street, Orange, N. J. 

60 Park Place, Newark, N. J. (South Charleston, 

W. Va.) 
87 Park Place, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.) 
McCormick Building, Baltimore, Md. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
293 Larkin Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
438 Riverside Avenue, Newark, N. J. 
3600 North Second Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
410 Peoples Bank Building, Marietta, Ohio. 
192 Coit Street, Irvington, N. J. 
250 Park Avenue, New York, \". Y. (Newark, 

N.J.) 
Maywood, N. J. 
Twentieth Street and Lynch .\ venue. East St. Louis, 

III. 



190 CENSUS OF DYES AND OTHER SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

Directory of manufacturers of dyes and other synthetic organic chemicals, 1939— Con. 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in parentheses 
if not in same city as office) 



Merck & Co. (Inc.) 

Merrimac Chemical Co. (Inc.)-. 

Metz Laboratories (Inc.), H. A. 

Monsanto Chemical Works 



National Aniline & Chemical Co. (Inc.) 

Naugatuck Chemical Co., The 

Neville Chemical Co 

New York Quinine & Chemical Works (Inc.). 
Newport Co., The -. 



155 
156 
157 

158 
159 

160 
161 



Newport Chemical Works (Inc.).. 

Niacet Chemical Corporation 



Noil Chemical & Color Works (Inc.), 



Rahway, N.J. (Rahway, N. J.; Philadelphia, Pa.) 
148 State Street, Boston, Mass. (Woburn and Ever- 
ett, Mass.) 
170 Varick Street, New York, N. Y. (Brooklyn, 

N. Y.; Newark, N. J.) 
1724 South Second Street, St. Louis, Mo. (St. Louis, 

Mo.; Monsanto, 111.) 
40 Rector Street, New York, N. Y. (Buffalo, N. Y.) 
Naugatuck, Conn. 

1004 Diamond Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
99 North Eleventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
P. O. Box "M," South Milwaukee, Wis. (Carroll- 

ville. Wis.; Passaic, N. J.) 
P. O. Box "M," South Milwaukee, Wis. (New 

Brunswick, N. J.) 
Pine Avenue and Forty-seventh Street, Niagara 

Falls, N. Y. 
152 West One hundred and eighth Street. New York, 

N. Y. 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 

2923 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

77 North Water Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
50 Eighth Street, Passaic, N. J. 
521 North Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. 
Petrolia, Pa. 
233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Bayonne, N. J.) 

205 Pittsburgh Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. 

206 Sixth Street, Portland, Oreg. 
26 Custom House Street, Providence, R. I. 
260 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
1600 Railway Exchange, Chicago, 111. (Cedar 

Rapids, Iowa.) 
1615 Merchants Bank Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 
(Indianapolis, Ind.; St. Louis Park, Minn.; Mo- 
bile, Ala.; Norfolk, Va.; Ironton, Utah; Seattle, 
Wash.) 

Reynolds Chemical Corporation 1 Washington Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Co., The 10 East Fortieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Perth 

1 Amboy, N. J.; Niagara Falls, N. Y.) 

Rubber Service Laboratories Co., The ] Nitro, W. Va. 

Savell, Sayre & Co. (Inc.) ! Niagara Falls, N. Y. (Lewiston, N. Y.) 

Selden Co., The McCartney Street, West End, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Seydel Chemical Co 1 86 Forrest Street, Nitro, W. Va. 

Sherwin Williams Co., The -J 601 Canal Road, Cleveland, Ohio. (Chicago, 111.) 

Siemon & Elting 1 Irvington, N. J. 

Simons (Inc.), Harold L 11 Forty-fourth Road, Long Island City, N. Y. 

Sinclair & Valentine Co - - 11 St. Clair Place, New York, N. Y. 



Northwestern Chemical Co 

Novocol Chemical Manufacturing Co. (Inc). 

Oldbury Electro Chemical Co 

Palatine Aniline & Chemical Corporation.-. 

Passaic Color Corporation 

Peerless Color Co 

Pennsylvania Coal Products Co 

Pharma-C heraical Corporation 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co 

Portland Gas & Coke Co 

Providence Chemical Laboratories (Inc.) 

Publicker (Inc.) 

Quaker Oats Co., The 

Republic Creosoting Co 



Solvay Process Co., The 
Squibb & Sons, E. R 



Stange Co., Wm. J. 

Stokes & Smith Co 

Sun Chemical & Color Co 

Synfleur Scientific Laboratories (Inc.) 



Syracuse, N. Y. (Geddes, Onondaga County, N. Y.) 
80 Beekman Street, New York, N. Y. (Biooklyn, 

N. Y.; New Brunswick, N. J.) 
2549 Madison Street, Chicago, Hi. 
Summerdale .\ venue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
309 Sussex Street, Harrison, N. J. 
33 Oakley Avenue, Monticello, N. Y. 

Tar Products Corporation j Koppers Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Providence, 

1 R. I.; Hartford and New Haven, Conn.) 

Todd Co., \. M 1 Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Trico Chemical Co. (Inc.) ' 502 Iroquois Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Uhlich (Inc.), Paul.-.. ' 11 Cliff Street, New York. N. Y. (Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

United States Industrial Chemical Co. (Inc.). 'llO East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Baltimore Md., and Peoria, 111.) 

Van Ameringen-IIaebler (Inc.) i 315 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Elizabeth, 

, N. J.) 

Van Dyk & Co. (Inc.) .-1 4 Piatt Street, New York, N. Y. (Jersey City, N.J.) 

Van Schaack Bros. Chemical Works (Inc.)...i 3358 Avondale Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Verona Chemical Co [ 26 Verona Avenue, Newark, N.J. 

Victor Chemical Works | 343 South Uearoorn Street, Chicago, 111. (Chicago 

I Heights, 111.) 

I 17 Batterv Place, New York, N. Y. (Westfleld, 
N.J.) 
2526 Baldwin Street, St. Louis, Mo. 



Wailes Dove-Herniiston Corporation... 



Warner-Jenkinson Manufacturing Co. 

Western Dry Color Co 

Western Industries Co 



White Chemical Co., The Wilbur... 
White Tar Co. of New Jersey (Inc.)- 



Wllhelm Co., The A 

Wolf-Alport Chemical Corporation. 



Fifty-second and Wallace Streets, Chicago, 111. 
110 Sutter Street. San Francisco, Calif. ( 



Calif.) 

McMaster Street, Owego, N. Y. 
1201 Koppers Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

N. J.; Cincinnati, Ohio.) 
Third and Bern Streets, Reading, Pa. 
593 Irving .\ venue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Stege. 



(Kearny, 



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