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Full text of "Synthetic organic chemicals : United States production and sales"





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Given By 
U. S. SUPT. OF DOCUMENTS 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

SYNTHETIC 
ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

United States Production 
and Sales, 1941-43 

Report No. 153 • Se<H>nd Series 




United States 

Qovernment Printing Office 

Washington: 1946 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

3 9999 06317 196 9 



m-. 21 1946 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Report No. 153 • Second Series • 1945 

SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

United States Production and Sales, 1941-43 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 1 

Summary, 1941-43 , 3 

PART I. PRODUCTION AND SALES, BY GROUPS, 1941-43 

Coal-tar and petroleum crudes 9 

Intermediates 14 

Dyes 21 

Lakes and toners , 36 

Medicinals 36 

Flavor and perfume materials . . . 45 

Plastics materials 50 

Rubber chemicals 56 

Elastomers 58 

Miscellaneous chemicals 58 

PART II. INDIVIDUAL ITEMS AND MANUFACTURERS, 1941-43 

Coal-tar crudes 67 

Intermediates 68 

Dyes 81 

Lakes and toners 97 

Medicinals 101 

Flavor and perfume materials 108 

Plastics materials 113 

Rubber chemicals 116 

Elastomers 119 

Miscellaneous chemicals Hg 

APPENDIX 

A. Imports of coal-tar intermediates and finished products 133 

B. Research workers and expenditures 134 

C. Directory of manufacturers 134 

TABLES 
Summary 

1. Tars and tar crudes: Summary of production and sales of specified products, 

average, 1936-40, annual, 1941-43 3 

2. Synthetic organic chemicals: Summary of United States production and 

sales, average, 1936-40, annual, 1941-43 4 



II CONTENTS 

Part I 

Page 
3. Tar: United States production and consumption, 19-41-43 9 

4A. Organic chemicals : United States production and sales of tars and tar 

crudes, 1941-43 12 

5A. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of cyclic 

intermediates, 1941-43 15 

6. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production of coal-tar dyes, 

" by class of apphcation, average, 1936-40, annual, 1941-43 22 

7. Synthetic organic chemicals : United States sales of coal-tar dyes, by class 

* of application, average, 1936-40, annual, 1941-43 23 

8. Synthetic organic chemicals : United States production and sales of coal-tar 

dyes, by chemical class, 1941-43 25 

9. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of azoic 

' dyes and their components, 1941-43 26 

lOA. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of coal-tar 

dyes, 1941-43 27 

11 A. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of lakes 

and toners, 1941-43 37 

12A. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of medici- 

nals, 1941-43 41 

13A. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of flavor 

and perfume materials, 1941-43 46 

14A. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of plastics 

' materials, 1941-43 52" 

15A. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of rubber 

chemicals, 1941-43 57 

16A. Synflietic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of elas- 
tomers (synthetic rubbers), 1941-43. . . .- 59 

17A. Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of mis- 
cellaneous chemicals, 1941-43 61 

Part II 

4B. Organic chemicals : Tar crudes for which United States production or sales 

were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 67 

5B. Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 

' production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 . . 68 
lOB. Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States pro- 
duction or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43. . 81 
IIB. Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United States pro- 
duction or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43. . . 97 
12B. Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 101 

13B. Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manu- 
facturer, 1941-43 108 

14B. Synthetic organic chemicals : Plastics materials for which United States 

production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43. . 113 
15B. Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber chemicals for which United States 

"production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43. . 116 
16B. Sjiithetic organic chemicals: Elastomers (synthetic rubbers) for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manu- 
facturer, 1941-43 119 

17B. Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
'States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1941-43 119 

Appendix 

18. Coal-tar intermediates and finished coal-tar products: United States im- 

ports for consumption, classified by uses, 1941-43 133 

19. SjTithetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers 135 



INTRODUCTION 

The last complete report made by the United States Tariff Commis- 
sion on production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals in the 
United States was the twenty-fourth annual report on this subject, 
issued for 1940. Although preliminary reports have been released each 
succeeding year, statistics on some of the most important chemicals 
were omitted because of the possible value of such information to the 
enemy. This report includes all data on production and sales of syn- 
thetic organic chemicals for the period 1941-43, except production and 
sales of chemicals manufactured at Ordnance plants. Data for 1944 
are not yet available. 

Many synthetic organic chemicals are of military importance and 
are also essential to civilian life and public health. Phenol and toluene 
are used in making explosives; acrylic ester, coal-tar acid, and urea 
plastics materials, in making airplanes, tanks, and naval vessels; and 
acrylonitrile, butadiene, chloroprene, and styrene, in making synthetic 
rubber. There are also chemotherapeutic agents of military and civilian 
importance, such as sulfathiazole and sulfapyridine, and the synthetic 
vitamins — ascorbic acid, nicotinic acid amide, and riboflavin. Finally 
there are synthetic insecticides and various solvents useful in ])oth 
civilian and military life. 

The chemicals in this report are grouped, as heretofore, according 
to use, into crudes, intermediates, dyes, lakes and toners, medicinals, 
flavor and perfume materials, plastics materials, rubber chemicals, 
elastomers, and miscellaneous chemicals. In accordance with industrial 
practice and the chemical literature, chemicals in each group are classi- 
fied as cyclic or acyclic according to their known chemical structure. 
This classification is of value since the two types are frequently pro- 
duced by different segments of the organic chemical industry, their 
properties are dissimilar, they move in different channels of trade, and 
they are usually produced from different raw materials. It is more 
accurate than a classification into coal-tar and non-coal-tar chemicals 
because a growing number of identical products are now derived from 
both coal-tar and non-coal-tar sources. Almost all chemicals of coal-tar 
origi-n are cyclic compounds. Not all the cyclic organic chemicals are 
derived from coal tar. Some are obtained from raw materials such as 
petroleum, wood distillation products, and natural-occurring sub- 
stances. Many of the acyclic chemicals also are made from petroleum 
and wood or produced by fermentation from grain and other agricul- 
tural products. Some cyclic organic chemicals have been further 
classified, as into benzenoid, alicyclic, and heterocyclic compounds; 
this additional classification provides more significant subtotals and 
also a greater flexibility in grouping the data. 

Since the report for 1940 was published, a number of chemicals have 
been reclassified from one group to another because of a pronounced 
change in use. As a result of this change, some of the totals given in 
the tables for these several groups in this report do not agree with the 



2 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

totals published in the preliminary reports for the same years. The 
classification of items within each group follows as closely as feasible 
the system of classification of chemicals used in Group 19 of the 
Standard Commodity Classification; ^ the American Chemical Society's 
system of nomenclature has been used as a standard. This has resulted 
in the elimination of much duplication of the same item under different 
names, which occurred in .earlier years when a designation commonly 
used by the producing company was inaccurate or insufficiently de- 
scriptive, and consequently a source of error in tabulating the data. In 
this report, most chemicals are listed by the standard name, and, where 
other former designations are dissimilar, these follow the standard 
name in parentheses. Statistics which might disclose operations of 
individual companies are not shown separately in the tables for in- 
dividual commodities but are included in the group totals. 

The data given in this report were compiled from schedules re- 
ceived by the Commission from 527 companies — nearly twice as many 
as reported before the war. A list of these companies is included in 
the appendix. 

The report includes also an analysis of coal-tar intermediates and 
finished products for 1941-43 imported into the United States under 
paragraphs 27 and 28 of the Tariff Act of 1930, and a. tabulation of 
expenditures for chemical research by the synthetic organic chemical 
industry obtained from data supplied the United States Tariff Com- 
mission by producing companies. 



1 Executive Office of the President, Bureau of the Budget, Standard Commodity Classification, 
vol. 1, Tech. Paper 26, 1943. 



i/v;'i!<fr«.f' 



j-*ldi*:i ^;'i-' 



SUMMARY, 1941-43 



Production and sales of crudes, intermediates, and finished jDroducts 
in the period 1941-43 continued, at an accelerated rate, the upward 
trend of the past 10 years. The total quantity of tar available in 1942 
and 1943 for the production of these commodities was about 100 
million gallons over the 1941 level, an increase of about 13 percent. 
This expansion was due to a 9-percent increase in production and a 
4-percent decrease in consumption of tar as fuel. No greater increase 
was possible, despite the heavy demand, without the installation of 
additional byproduct coke ovens. The Nation's coke production was 
maintained at well over 90 percent of potential capacity, but decreased 
yields of tar resulted from the shorter coking cycle at higher tempera- 
tures, which was the common practice. 

Production of water-gas tar, oil-gas tar, and coal tar combined, and 
the production and sales of the principal tar crudes, for 1941-43, are 
shown in table 1 . The large increase shown in the production of ben- 
zene was made possible chiefly by the preferential production of ben- 
zene at the expense of motor benzene, an automotive fuel. More 
toluene and naphthalene Were produced in response to demands for 
war purposes. 



Table l.— Tars 


%7id tar crudes: .Summary .of production and sales o 
average, 1936-iO, annual, 19Ifl-JtS 


/ specified products. 


CJ Chemical i 


Unit 

of 

quantity 


Average 
1936-40 


1941 


1942 


Increase (+) 

or 
decrease ( — ), 

1942 
over 1941 


1943 


Increase (+) 

-or 
decrease ( — ), 
1943 
over 1942 


Tar produced - 

Benzene: 


1,000 gal.. 
..do 


668,100 

26,196 

23,693 

3,169 

86,098 

83,350 

7.559 

22,318 

21,933 

5,305 

104,564 

93,578 

1,883 

105,408 
99,723 
11,800 


856,100 

44,812 

41,569 

4,912 

112,508 

104,402 

7,975 

35,587 

35,049 

8,691 

197,779 

163,501 

3,423 

143,503 
155,360 
18,998 


931,100 

85,257 
80,779 
10,487 

68,662 

66,698 

5,808 

43,292 
43,004 
11,630 

250,925 

220,291 

5,407 

175,297 

174,733 

23,779 


Percent 
+8.8 

+90.3 

+94.3 

+ 113.5 

—39.0 
—36.1 
—27,2 

+21.7 
+22.7 
+.33.8 

+26.9 
+34.7 
+58.0 

+22.2 
+ 12.5 
+25.2 


928,100 

142,047 

135,960 

17,864 

24,390 

24,530 

2,310 

96,342 
90,388 
28,635 

305,269 

235,305 

5,785 

175,186 

156,669 

21,714 


Percent 
—0.3 

+66 6 


Sales 


. . .do 


+68.3 


Sales value 

1 Motor benzene: 

Production 

Sales 


1,000 dol.. 

1,000 gal.. 
. do ... . 


+70.3 

—64.5 
— 63.2 


Sales value 

' Toluene: 

Production 


1,000 dol.. 

1,000 gal., 
do . 


—60.2 

+122.5 
+110 2 


Sales value 

Naphthalene: 

Production 

1 Sales 


1,000 dol.. 

1,000 1b... 
. ..do 


+146.2 

+21.7 
+6.8 


Sales value 

Creosote oil : 

1 Production 

Sales 


1,000 dol.. 

1,000 gal. 
. . .do 


+7.0 

—0.1 
—10.3 


Sales value . 

1 


1,000 dol.. 


—8.7 



1 For detailed explanation of data included in statistics shown in this table, see table 4A. 

^ Includes estimated production of water-gas and oil-gas tar. 

Source: Compiled from data reported to the U. S. Tariff Commission and Bureau of Mines. 

A preliminary survey of some of the chemical raw materials derived 
from petroleum is included in the report because of their increasing 
importance. At present the bulk of these materials are used in the 
manufacture of synthetic rubber. Organic chemicals produced under 

3 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



wartime conditions from petroleum for use as aviation fuels are con- 
sidered to be beyond the scope of this report and therefore are omitted. 
Table 2 summarizes production and sales of synthetic organic 
chemicals for 1941-43, by groups, and compares these statistics with 
the corresponding averages for 1936-40. 

Table 2. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Summary of United States production and 

sales, average, 1936-^0, annual, 1941-^3 

[Productien and sales in thousands of pounds; sales value in thousands of dollars] 



Chemical 


Average 
1936-40 


1941 


1942 


Increase (+) 

or 

decrease ( — ) , 

1942 over 

1941 


1943 


Increase (+) 

or 

decrease ( — ), 

1943 over 

1942 


ORGANIC CHEMI- 
CALS, CYCLIC 1 

Intermediates 


580,105 

244,376 

35,690 


1,007,426 

432,162 

63,833 

78 

806,954 
673,966 
314,667 

168,657 
176,801 
113,324 
45 

136,935 

143,580 

75,080 

14,935 
15,582 
19,635 

16,787 
17,639 
18,609 

26,272 

24,304 

18,773 

44 

31,303 

26,619 

.54,082 

56 

11,507 

10,854 

13,280 

29 

344,965 

261,680 

68,310 

75 

42,928 

32,823 

15,425 

11 


1,272,834 

698,991 

93,973 

96 

794.102 
676,198 
333,428 

151,878 

144.847 

99,431 

48 

117,204 

113,028 

62,791 

16,529 
15,464 
18,836 

18,145 
16,355 
17,804 

17,178 

15,243 

10,702 

44 

38,298 

34,944 

75,790 

84 

11,536 

10,041 

13,883 

35 

294,883 

248,751 

76,289 

77 

36,536 

31,309 

13,411 

11 


Percent 

+26 3 
+61.7 

+47.2 


1,637,275 

1,032,439 

134,988 

101 

1,398,342 

1,272,568 

484,881 

144,013 

145.499 

105,350 

46 

107,147 

108,724 

60,267 

20,098 
19,605 
25,041 

16,768 
17,170 
20,042 

16,317 

14,970 

10,358 

45 

51,633 

47,262 

120,869 

97 

9,559 

9.516 

11.920 

35 

380,523 

337.654 

76.761 

112 

61,710 

58,300 

23,628 

10 


Percent 

+28 6 


Sales 


+47.7 




+43.6 






Finished Products 


389,303 
320,857 
134,342 

114,310 
112,119 
65,610 


—16 
+0 3 
+6.0 

—10 
—18.1 
—12.3 


+76.1 




+88.2 


Sales value, total 

Dyes 


+45.4 
—5.2 




+0.5 




+6.0 


Number of manufacturers - 
Colour Index Group 




96,131 
94,846 
45,498 

(') 
(') 

18,179 
17,273 
20,112 

17,032 
14,770 
1 1 , 137 


—14.4 
—21.3 
—16.4 

+10.7 
—0.8 
—4.1 

+8.1 
^7.3 
—4.3 

—34.6 
—37.3 
—43.0 


—8 6 




—3.8 




—4.0 


Prototype Group 


+21.6 




+26.8 




+32.9 


Ungrouped 


—7 6 


Sales 


+5.0 




+ 12.6 


Lakes and Toners 


—5.0 


Sales 


—1.8 




—3.2 


Number of manufacturers 2 

Medicinals 




14,267 
11,779 
12,451 


+22.3 
+31 3 
+40.1 


+34.8 


Sales 


+35.2 




+59.5 


Number of manufacturers ^ 

Flavor and 
Perfume Materials 




4,502 
4,202 
3,954 


+0.3 
—7.5 
+4.5 

—14 5 
—4.9 
+ 11.7 


—17.1 




—5.2 




—14.1 






Plastics Materials 


153,706 
112,424 
21,971 


+29.0 


Sales 


+35.7 




+0.6 






Rubber Chemicals 


29,167 

21,225 

9,204 


—14.9 

—4 6 

—13.1 


+68.9 


Sales 


+86.2 




+76.2 : 




.... 











See footnotes at end of table. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 5 

Table 2. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Summary of United States production and 
sales, average, 1936-^0, annual, 19Jil-i3- — Contimied 



Chemical 



ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 

CYCLIC '—Continued 
Finished Products— Con. 

Elastomers 
(Synthetic Rubbers) 

Production 

Sales 

Sales value 

Number of manufacturers - 

Miscellaneous • 

Production 

Sales 

Sales value 

Number of manufacturers - 



ORGANIC CHEMI- 
CALS, ACYCLIC aN- 
TERMEDIATES AND 
FINISHED PRODUCTS) « 

Production, total 

Sales, total 

Sales value, total 



M edicinals 

Production 

Sales 

Sales value 

Number of manufacturers ^ 

Flavor and 
Perfume Materials 

Production 

Sales 

Sales value 

Number of manufacturers ^ 

Plastics Materials 

Production 

: Sales 

■ Sales value 

: Number of manufacturers - 

Ruhber'J^hemicals 
I Production 

■ Sales 

• Sales value 

; Number of manufacturers - 

I Elastomers 

(Synthetic Rubbers) 

Production 

Sales 

■ Sales value 

Number of manufacturers - 

Miscellaneous 

Production 

Sales 

Sales value 

Number of manufacturers - 



Average 
1936-40 



56,319 
44,338 
10,015 



2,789,660 

1,369,265 

161,254 



1,665 
1,399 
4,054 



1,823 
1,676 
1,238 



29,523 
26,636 
11,661 



'15,019 

'13,625 

'3,417 



2,756,649 

1,339,554 

144,301 



181,322 

140,885 

31,473 

55 



4,997,906 

2,693,717 

353 , 579 



2,896 
2,405 
4,685 

44 



3,117 

3,083 

2,982 

31 



107,206 

94,541 

51,170 

32 



16,762 

15,703 

4,495 

10 



27,745 

21,577 

12,126 

7 



4,840,180 

2,556,408 

278,121 

111 



1942 



(*) 



243 . 793 

191,063 

43,922 

65 



7,131,681 

3,639,396 

508,815 



2,883 

1,795 

7,658 

60 



3,861 

3,769 

4,122 

34 



145,116 

132,771 

75.262 

42 



15,188 

14.669 

3,591 

11 



59,101 

45,618 

27,450 

7 



6,905,532 

3,440,774 

390,732 

135 



Increase (+) 

or 

decrease ( — ) , 

1942 over 

1941 



Percent 



(*) 
(*) 
(*) 



+34 5 
+35.6 
+39.6 



+42.7 
+35.1 
+43.9 



—0 5 
—25 4 
+63 5 



+23.9 
+22 3 
+.38 2 



+35 4 
+40.4 
+47.1 



—9 4 

—6.6 

—20.1 



+ 113.0 
+ 111.4 
+ 126.4 



+42.7 
+34 6 
+40.5 



1943 



413,908 

401,056 

74,3.55 

14 



320,679 

2.'i8,311 

61,640 

92 



9,033,935 

5,029,043 

812,025 



4,062 

4, ail 

18,770 

67 



3.687 

3,. 573 

3,933 

34 



273,415 

2.30,179 

101,430 

65 



19,213 

18,975 

7,509 

14 



158,801 

151,. 560 

82,022 

12 



8,, 574, 757 

4,620,215 

598,361 

I 165 



Increa.sc ( +) 

or 

decrease ( — ) , 

1943 over 

1942 



+31 . 5 
+35 2 
+40.3 



+26.7 
+38.2 
+59.6 



+40.9 
+153.0 

+ 145.1 



—4.5 
—5.2 
—4.6 



+88.4 
+73.4 
+.34 8 



+26.5 

+29.4 

+109.1 



+ 168.7 
+232.2 
+ 198.8 



+24 2. 
+34 3 
+53.1 



1 Before 1941 this group included only cyclic organic chemicals derived from coal tar. The statistics 
shown for 1941-43 include alicyclic, heterocyclic, and terpenoid compounds, as well as benzenoid (coal-tar) 
chemicals. r j • 

- Number of companies engaged in the manufacture of these products, not the number of producing 
establishments or plants operated by a single company, except that separated divisions of large corpora- 
tions are considered as separate companies if their operations are practically independent of the parent 
organization. 

' Included with ungrouped dyes. 

* Combined with acyclic elastomers to avoid revealing confidential information, 
s Includes biological stains and chemical indicators, poisonous and tear gases, synthetic insecticides, 
surface-active agents, solvents, photographic chemicals, plasticizers, synthetic tanning materials, textile 
I chemicals, and other miscellaneous chemicals. 

j « Before 1941 this group included all synthetic organic chemicals not derived frorn coal tar and thero- 
I fore contained certain alicyclic and terpenoid compounds as well as acychc organic chemicals. In the 
statistics shown for 1941-43 only acyclic chemicals are included in this group. 

'2-year average, 1939-40. These data are included with miscellaneous chemicals for the 5-year 
I average 1936-40 and therefore are not considered again in arriving at the 5-year average totals for 
1 acyclic intermediates and finished products. 



6 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

The total value of sales of all intermediates and finished products; 
cyclic and acyclic, increased from 732 million dollars in 1941 to 936 
million in 1942 and to 1,432 million in 1943. The last amount repre- 
sents an increase of 333 percent over the average of the 5 years 1936-40, 
Avhich was 331 million dollars. These totals, however, involve a con- 
siderable duplication of values. 

In terms of quantity, sales of all synthetic organic chemicals 
amounted to 55 percent of the production in 1941 and 1942 and to 60 
percent in 1943; most of the rest was consvmied in further processing 
in the producing establishments. In 1941 and 1942, the value of sales 
Avas fairly equally divided between cyclic and acyclic chemicals, but 
in 1943 sales of acyclic chemicals were valued at 812 million dollars,'- 
compared with 620 million for the cyclic products. 

Production and sales of intermediates, cyclic medicinals, cyclic and 
acyclic elastomers, acyclic plastics materials, and miscellaneous chemi- 
cals increased in both 1942 and 1943. There .was a decrease in both 
years for dj^es, and for lakes and toners. Other groups were irregular 
in movement: production and sales of flavor and perfume materials 
increased in 1942 and decreased in 1943, whereas those of cyclic resins, 
cyclic rubber chemicals, and acyclic medicinals decreased in 1942, but 
were larger in 1943 than in 1941. 

Increased output in 1942 and 1943 over 1941 occurred chiefly in. 
those chemicals wdiose manufacture was pei^mitted because of their 
use for essential military or civilian purposes. Examples of these 
chemicals are monochlorobenzene, phthalic anhydride, nitrobenzene, 
styrene, and phenol among the intermediates; and urea-formaldehyde 
resins, synthetic rubber and polyvinyl elastomers, sulfa drugs, and; 
vitamins among the finished products. 

In 1941, only a few chemicals, principally formaldehyde, phenol, and 
toluene, were under general preference orders of the War Production 
Board. In 1942, forty chemicals and chemical products, such as; 
l)henolic and vinyl resins, chlorinated paraffins, aniline, and benzene, 
were allocated; and by 1943 most of the more important organic 
chemicals had been placed under allocation control. The output of 
dyes and of lakes and toners decreased in 1942 and 1943 and that of- 
flavor and perfume materials decreased in 1943, principally because' 
of the allocation of basic chemicals used in their production for more 
essential products and because of the limitation of dye j^roduction for 
use in civilian textiles. The shortage in phenol and formaldehyde' 
reduced the output of phenolic resms in 1942; in 1943, however, sup-j 
]ilies of these materials became more plentiful and the output ex-' 
paneled. Organic chemicals used in compounding rubber arc known as. 
rubl)cr chemicals. These chemicals were in less demand in 1942_ 
because of the shortage of rubber, but the demand for them increased' 
sharply in 1943 as the production of synthetic rubber gained momentum. 

Other factors influencing the relative output of the several kinds of, 
synthetic organic chemicals in the 3-year period were the variation in 
military demands for them, and the unusually, heavy inventories of 
some commodities accumulated in 1941 in anticipation of future 
shortages. Although this report does not include the production of 
chemicals at Government-owned Ordnance plants, it does include 
production of some of the basic organic chemicals used by these plants 
in manufacturing other products. Consumption of chemicals in- 
directly for military purposes is generally much larger than direct 
consumption at Ordnance plants. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 7 

The average unit sales value of all finished cyclic organic chemicals 
increased from 47 cents per pound in 1941 to 49 cents in 1942, but in 
1943 it decreased to 38 cents, or by 22 percent. This decrease reflects 
the increased importance of sales of synthetic elastomers at the low 
unit value of 19 cents per pound, and the declining unit value of tar- 
acid resins. On the other hand, the unit sales value of acyclic inter- 
mediates and finished products increased from 13 cents per pound in 
1941 to 14 cents in 1942, and to 16 cents in 1943, an increase of 33 per- 
cent over the average for 1936-40. This increase was due principally 
to the rising unit value of medicinals in 1942 and to the increased im- 
portance of rubber chemicals and miscellaneous chemicals in 1943. 
There was a decline in the unit value of acyclic elastomers, plastics 
materials, and medicinals in 1943 compared with 1942. It should be 
noted that changes in average unit values of a given group may reflect 
not only changes in prices of particular products, but also changes in 
the relative importance of different products in the group total. 

The foreign values of imports of intermediates and finished products 
in 1941-43 entering the United States under paragraphs 27 and 28 o^ 
the Tariff Act of 1930 are given in the appendix.^ These imports were 
valued at 5.6 million dollars in 1941 and dropped to 3.6 million in 1942 
and to 3 million in 1943, a considerable decrease from the 10-year high 
of 10.1 million dollars in 1939, when Germany was still a major source 
of imports. 



1 See table 18. 



PART I. PRODUCTION AND SALES, BY GROUPS, 1941-43 

COAL-TAR AND PETROLEUM CRUDES 

Crudes obtained from coal and so-called crudes obtained from petro- 
leum are the raw materials fon a vast number of chemicals. Although 
there is considerable overlapping of products in the several groups, 
coal crudes consist chiefly of light oil, containing mixtures of benzene, 
toluene, xylene, solvent naphtha, and coumarone; middle oil, con- 
taining the tar acids (cresols, phenols, and xylenols), pyridine bases, 
and naphthalene; and heavy oil and anthracene oil, containing an- 
thracene, fluorene, and naphthalene derivatives. These materials are 
recovered chiefly from the gases produced when coal is converted to 
coke in byproduct coke ovens. Crude coal tar usually consists of a 
mixture containing about 5 percent light oil, 17 percent middle oil, 
7 percent heavy oils, 9 percent anthracene oil, and 62 percent pitch. 
Light oil products distill below 200° C. ; middle oil, between 200° and 
250° C; heavy oil, between 250° and 300° C; and anthracene oil, 
between 300° and. 350° C. The distillates contain different proportions 
of the crudes depending in part on the type of coal and the coking 
temperatures used. 

Water gas is produced by the combustion of coal or coke in an at- 
mosphere of steam. Water-gas tar is made by carbureting water gas 
with oil and subsequently cracking the mixture; oil-gas tar is made by 
cracking petroleum with or without the use of coal or coke. Both are 
byproducts in the manufacture of fuel gas. They contain many of the 
same products as coal tar but less naphthalene and phenol, and their 
properties are intermediate between coal tar and petroleum asphalt. 

Chemical raw materials derived from crude petroleum are obtained 
by distillation, cracking, reforming, hydrogenation, or other chemical 
processes and are used to produce a wide variety of synthetic organic 
chemicals. Many of these products arc identical with those obtained 
from coal tar or other sources. 

Since coal tar is one of the byproducts recovered in the process of 
making coke and in making fuel gas for industrial and household con- 
sumption, the quantity produced depends on the demand for coke for 
the manufacture of steel and, to a lesser extent, on the consumption 
of fuel gas. No coal tar is recovered from beehive coke ovens. Pro- 
duction and consumption of tar during 1941-43 are given in table 3. 

Table 3. — Tar: United States production and consumption, 19ffl-JiS 
[In millions of gallons] 



Source and use 


1941 


1942 


194.3 


Produclion 
Tar, total 


856 


9.31 


928 






Coal tar.i total 


726 


761 


758 






Coal tar from coke-oven byproduct plants, total 


704 


740 


738 




658 
46 
22 

130 


692 
48 
21 

170 


689 


Plants owned by city gas companies (public utilities) 


49 
20 


Water-gas and oil-gas tar - 


170 



See footnotes at end of table. 



10 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Table 3. — Tar: United States production and consumption, 19^1-^3 — Continued 



Source and use 


1941 


1942 


1943 


Consumption 
Tar, total 


858 


920 


929 








571 


651 


682 






Coal tar distilled or topped by byproduct coke-oven operators i . 
Coal tar distilled by tar distillers ' 


184 
341 

46 
239 

154 


195 
388 

68 
210 


205 

408 


Water-gas and oil-gas tar distilled by producers and tar dis- 
tillers * • 


69 


Tar consumed chiefly as fuel tar, total 


204 






Coal tar sold or consumed as fuel by byproduct^operators ' 


98 


102 




3 
136 

1 
14 

85 
48 


1 

94 

\ 

112 . 
59 


o 


As fuel in open-hearth and affiliate plants 


85 


Sold as fuel by byproduct operators to affiliates ' 


1 


Sold as fuel bv byproduct operators to others 


14 


Water-gas and oil-gas tar consumed principally as fuel and in 
road tars * •. 


102 


Tar consumed otherwise than by distillation or as'fiiel, total .... 


43 


Coal tar consumed in coal-tar solution < 


6 

20 

20 


7 
20 

2 

30 


9 
20 


Coal tar consumed in byproduct plants ' (roads, upkeep, etc.) . . 
Coal tar, water-gas tar, and oil-gas tar processed at tar refinery 


4 
10 







1 Reported to the U. S. Bureau of Mines. 

2 Estimated. Production reported to the U. S. Tariff Commission currently represents about 65 
percent of the total production. This estimate is based on quantity of oil-gas and water-gas tar distilled 
(35 to 40 percent of production) and burned as fuel or otherwise consumed as reported to the Commission 
(60 to 65 percent). 

5 Represents coal tar purchased from byproduct coke-oven and retort i)lants and distilled by chemical 
companies operating tar-distillation plants as reported to the U. S. Tariff Commission. Tar purchased 
and distilled by corporations affiliated with the byproduct coke-oven operators is included in the quantity 
of tar distilled and topped by these operators. 

* Reported to the U. S. Tariff Commission. 

^ Estimated as -65 to 70 percent of production of water-gas and oil-gas tar. 

6 Estimated by the Bureau of Mines for 1941. Consumption of some of this coal tar may be in- 
eluded also in the data shown for tar distilled at tar refineries. 

'Partly estimated; includes crude tar used for refining, blending, and as such at refinery plants. 

In 1941-43, recovery of coal tar at byproduct coke plants not owned 
by city gas companies averaged 680 million gallons a year; at those 
owned by city gas companies, 47 million gallons; and at coal-tar retort 
plants, 21 million gallons, or a total of 748 million gallons. This 
average output was 33 percent higher than that of 1936-40, an in- 
crease owing principally to greater production to satisfy a marked 
rise in the demand for refined coal-tar products, a rise which began in 
1941 and continued through 1943. Production of coal tar increased 
only slightly in 1942 and hardly changed in 1943. Plants were already 
operating at about capacity in 1941, and, a,lth6ugh installed coking 
capacity expanded 3 percent in 1942 and 11 percent in 1943, the effect 
of these increases on the output of tar was offset to a certain extent 
by a decrease in tar yields from 8.4 to 8.1 gallons per ton of coke pro- 
duced, as a result of higher operating temperatures and shorter 
coking time. 

Complete data are not available on water- and oil-gas tar production 
in the years 1941-43, but an estimate can be made from the quantity 
of tar distilled, consumed as fuel, and used for other purposes. Pro- 
duction of water-gas and oil-gas tar increased from an estimated 130 
million gallons in 1941 to 170 million in 1942 and 1943. It accounted 
for from 15 to 18 percent of the total output of tar. 

The quantity of crude tar burned in 1942 and 1943 was about 35 
miUion gallons less than that burned in 1941; consequently more was 
available for conversion into coal-tar crudes or to be consumed for 
other purposes. The total quantity of tar distilled, including tar 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 11 

topped (partiallv distilled), increased from 571 million gallons in 1941 
to 651 million in 1942 and to 682 million gallons in 1943. Of these 
amounts, the coal tar distilled at byproduct coke-oven plants ac- 
counted for about 30 percent of the total, or 184 and 195 million 
gallons, respectively, in 1941 and 1942, and 205 million gallons in 
1943, of Avhich 104 million gallons in 1941 and 1942, and 113 million 
gallons in 1943, were topped. The remaining coal tar, amounting to 
60 percent of the total quantit}' of tar processed, was distilled by the 
tar distillers; water- and oil-gas tar, amounting to about 10 percent 
of the total, was distilled by both tar distillers and water- and oil-gas 
tar producers. 

The total calculated value of production of crudes obtained from tar 
was about 80 million dollars in 1941, and 138 million dollars in 1943. 
In addition, tar valued at about 10 million dollars was burned annually 
as fuel. Production and sales of these products in 1941-43 are given 
in table 4A, and the manufacturers are identified in table 4B (see 
part II). 

The most marked increase was in the output of toluene. Statistics 
of production of toluene from all sources, including petroleum, are 
combined in 1941 and 1942 to avoid disclosure of individual company 
operations, and in 1943 to preserve the continuity of the data. In 
normal times production ranges between 20 million and 25 million 
gallons annually. As toluene is the raw material for the manufacture 
of one of the most important explosives, trinitrotoluene, its production 
from all sources was pushed to the limit of the Nation's capacity. 
Production from coal tar, water-gas tar, and oil-gas tar was inade- 
quate to satisfy military demands for toluene; consequently its manu- 
facture from petroleum by a number of different processes was under- 
taken during 1941-43, chiefly with newly constructed facilities. Out 
of a total of 96 million gallons produced in 1943 at plants other than 
Ordnance plants, 'about 58 million gallons was from petroleum. If 
Ordnance-operated plants were included, the total output would be 
vastly larger. 

A striking decrease is shown in the production of motor benzene 
during the period covered by this report; output dropped from 113 
million gallons in 1941 to 69 million in 1942, and to 24 million in 1943. 
Motor benzene is a mixture of crude benzene and toluene, and in 1942 
and 1943 both of these products were in demand for indirect war uses. 
Although benzene is one of the basic materials needed in the production 
of cyclic intermediates for a large number of chemicals, the sharp in- 
crease in demand for high-grade benzene was due largely to its con- 
version to cumene and styrene. (The GR-S type synthetic rubber is 
made up of about 25 percent styrene, and cumene is used in aviation 
fuel.) Other major uses of benzene are in the manufacture of phenol, 
anihne, monochlorobenzene, acetanilide, and other benzenoid inter- 
mediates consumed in the plastics materials, explosives, dye, phar- 
maceutical, and other industries. At present it is practicable to obtain 
benzene from petroleum sources only in small quantities. 

Naphthalene, another coal-tar crude, finds important use in the 
manufacture of synthetic resins, dyes, and moth repellents. About 
one-third of the naphthalene is recovered at byproduct coke-oven 
plants, and the remainder, at tar-distilling plants; very little is re- 
covered at water- or oil-gas tar plants. The upturn in consumption of 
naphthalene, which became apparent in 1939 and has continued ever 
since, is due chiefly to the large increase in consumption of phthalic 



12 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



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SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 13 

anhydride, which is made from naphthalene. Phthalic anhydride, in 
turn, is used in making plasticizers and certain types of alkyd resins 
for protective coatings. In 1941, production of crude naphthalene 
was 198 million pounds, nearly twee as much as the average for 
1936-40. It rose to 251 million pounds in 1942 and to 305 million in 
1943. During this period facilities for producing naphthalene were 
expanded, and more efficient recovery methods were adopted. Never- 
theless, the demand for naphthalene continued to exceed productive 
capacity, especially in the latter part of 1943 after new capacity for 
the production of phthalic anhydride came into operation. Naphthalene 
and phthalic anhydride were placed under allocation control in 1942. 

Crude naphthalene is produced in several grades based on the 
solidifying temperatures, the better grades solidifying at the higher 
temperatures. In the statistics reported for naphthalene, some 
pyramiding of data results from the conversion of one grade to another 
by fractional distillation and blending. 

Crude creosote oil is a name somewhat loosely applied to a mixture 
of certain middle- and heavy-oil distillates. This mixture may contain 
some cresol, xylenol, and their homologues; naphthalene; and anthra- 
cene in various proportions. Frequently, creosote oil is made by 
blending middle and heavy oils after most of the tar acids and naphtha- 
lene have been removed; it is also blended from several distillate frac- 
tions to meet certain specifications or to satisfy customer preferences. 
The principal end use of creosote oil is as a preservative of wood. 
About 70 million gallons of domestic distillate creosote and 70 million 
gallons of creosote in coal-tar solution are used annually for this 
purpose; smaller quantities are used for insecticides and germicides. 
The output of creosote oil increased from 144 million gallons in 1941 
to 175 miUion in 1942 and in 1943, partly in response to the increased 
demand for treatment of railroad ties, wood piling, balks, and tele- 
phone poles. 

Production of pyridine at byproduct plants in 1943 was 586,000 
gallons, which was more than twice the 1941 production of 277,000 
gallons. This quantity is small compared with that of many other 
crudes; nevertheless pyridine is important as one of the raw materials 
for some sulfa drugs and the important vitamin niacin. 

Statistics on tar crudes combine the data furnished the United States 
Tariff Commission by distillers of coal tar and distillers and producers 
of water- and oil-gas tar with the data furnished the Coal Economics 
Division of the U. S. Bureau of Mines by coke-oven operators. 

Statistics of production and sales of chemical raw materials derived 
from petroleum were obtained for the first time in a general survey in 
1943. More than 1.5 billion pounds of these chemicals were produced 
in 1943, exclusive of fuel for aviation and other uses. Among them are 
toluene, to which reference has already been made, butadiene for 
synthetic rubber, and naphthenic and cresylic acids. A tabulation of 
the production of these crudes from petroleum, as reported to the 
Commission, follows: 

Production 
Product (1,000 pounds) 

Cresylic acid 13,916 

Naphthenic acid 17,341 

Butadiene 98,580 

Ethylene 166,id24 

Propanes 394,620 

Butanes 673,006 

All other 201,225 



14 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Important chemical raw materials included above in the "all other" 
class (to prevent disclosure of the operations of individual companies) 
were X3'lene, benzene, and tri-isobutylene. The total value of sales of 
the products listed above was reported as 34: million dollars, with an 
average unit value of 3.2 cents per pound. Crudes from petroleum 
will probably increase in importance, but the number of producing 
companies in 1943 was too small to permit disclosure of the results in 
iliuch detail. 

Huge quantities of pure chemicals are used as automotive and avia- 
tion fuels and are not included with those reported for further chemical 
conversion. Until the function of these chemicals as a part of the 
synthetic organic chemicals industry is more completely delineated, 
data for fuel products will be omitted from these reports. 

INTERMEDIATES 

The intermediates make up a large group of organic chemicals which 
are in general derived from crudes and which are in turn used to pro- 
duce finished products such as dyes, medicinals, explosives, synthetic 
resins, flavor and perfume materials, and elastomers. Originally the 
term was applied principally to chemicals of coal-tar origin used in the 
manufacture of dyes. Chemicals now considered as intermediates may 
be obtained from petroleum, wood, or grain, as well as from coal. 

In this report all cyclic organic chemicals which are chemically 
converted to finished products are included among the cyclic inter- 
mediates. Intermediates, however, are not confined to cyclic organic 
chemicals. Many acyclic chemicals are also used as intermediates in 
the manufacture of acyclic finished products. In this report these are 
included with acyclic miscellaneous organic chemicals as in previous 
reports. In later reports acyclic intermediates will probably be 
established as a separate class in accordance with the revised Standard 
Commodity Classification now in preparation. 

Nearly 1,000 intermediates are produced annually in the United 
States. Table 5A gives production and sales of intermediates for 
1941-43, and an alphabetical list of them with numbers which identify 
the manufacturers of each appears in table 5B (see part II). 

The prewar trend toward increased production of intermediates 
was accentuated after 1941. In 1943, production reached 1.6 billion 
pounds, or more than twice the average for 1936-40. Sales in 1943 
were 1 billion pounds, valued at 135 million dollars, compared with 
sales of 432 million pounds, valued at 64 million dollars in 1941. The 
decline in unit value of sales from 15 cents per pound in 1941 to 13 
cents per pound in 1943 was due to relatively greater increases in the 
sales of low-priced bulk intermediates, such as aniline, phenol, naphtha- 
lene, phthalic anhydride, and styrene. The ratio of sales to production 
for intermediates as a group is lower than the similar ratio of any othef 
group; in other words, a larger proportion of intermediates than of 
any other group is consumed within the plant where they are produced 
in the manufacture of other products. 

The greatest gain in volume of production in 1941-43 was recorded 
for intermediates which are used in the manufacture of products 
essential for military uses such as medicinals, plastics materials, and 
explosives. Large increases in the production of intermediates for the 
manufacture of high explosives and smokeless powder are not fully 
reflected in this report, since the considerable production of aniline, 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



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SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 21 

dimethyl aniline, and nitrobenzene at Government-owned and Ord- 
nance plants is not included. The most marked increases were in the 
production of acetanilide, aniline and dimethylaniline, chlorobenzene, 
0- and p-dichlorobenzenes, nitrobenzene, synthetic phenol, styrene, 
and phthalic anhydride. Production of the cresols, refined cresylic 
acid, and other tar acids and tar-acid derivatives did not increase 
greatly during 1941-43; the output of these intermediates was neces- 
sarily limited by the output of coal tar, which, as already shown, did 
not expand much beyond the 1941 level. 

Production remained stationar}'^, or declined for most of the inter- 
mediates that are normally used in the manufacture of dyes, with the 
exception of o-benzoylbenzoic acid, the intermediate used in the 
manufacture of vat dyes. Production of 8.9 million pounds of o-ben- 
zoylbenzoic acid in 1943 represented an 89-percent increase over the 
4.7 million pounds produced in 1941. 

The output of 181 million pounds of synthetic phenol in 1943 was 
a 100-percent increase over the 1941 output of 92 million pounds; 
sales were 163 million pounds in 1943 and 61 million in 1941. The 
output of natural phenol became of less importance, and decreased 
from 22 million pounds in 1941 to 14 million in 1943. The large in- 
crease in the output of synthetic phenol went chiefly into the manu- 
facture of phenolic resins. The increased production of chlorobenzene, 
from 129 million pounds in 1941 to 221 million in 1943, went chiefly 
into the manufacture of synthetic phenol and aniline, and into 
chlorodinitrobenzene, used chiefly -in the manufacture of the high 
explosives — tetryl and picric acid. The output of p-chloronitroben- 
zene for rubber chemicals, dyes, and gasoline inhibitors, and that of 
o-chloronitrobenzene for saccharin also increased. Production of both 
o- and p-dichlorobenzenes increased chiefly because these intermediates 
are byproducts of the manufacture of monochlorobenzene. p-Dichloro- 
benzene was used chiefly for large military requirements for moth- 
repellent agents and as a substitute for naphthalene. Styrene, one of 
the two principal ingredients of the GR-S type of synthetic rubber, 
was produced on only a limited scale in 1941 and 1942. In 1943, 
almost the entire output, which rose to 97 million pounds, went to 
plants of the Rubber Reserve Company. 

DYES 

The United States production of dyes amounted to 144 million 
pounds in 1943, a substantial decrease from the 169 million pounds 
in 1941. The record output in 1941 resulted from the increased demand 
for dyes to meet vital textile needs of _our rapidly expanding military 
forces; from unusually large exports as German supplies were shut 
off by the British blockade; from a heavy stock piling in the face of 
the impending state of war; and from a lively civilian market then 
unrestricted by Government controls. Lowered production in 1942 
and 1943 followed War Production Board Conservation Order M-103, 
which restricted deliveries of all dyes for nonmilitary purposes to 70 
percent of those in 1941. Also contributing to this decreased production 
was the restriction of the supplies of many basic raw materials (ben- 
zene, phenol, toluene, phthalic anhydride, aniline) needed for use in 
civilian dye production. 

In 1943, sales of dyes totaled 145 million pounds, valued at 105 
million dollars; and in 1941, 176 million pounds, valued at 113 million 



22 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



dollars. Sales were larger than production in two of these years chiefly 
because of changes in producers' inventories; few dyes are consumed 
at producing plants. Production and sales of dyes in the United States 
in 1941-43 by class of application (vat, direct, sulfur, acid, etc.) are 
s jmmarized in tables 6 and 7. 

After imports from Germany were cut off and those from Switzerland 
were substantially reduced, the domestic dye industry began producing 
a more comprehensive line of dyes. Intensive research was successfully 
directed toward the domestic production of superior-quality dyes of 
maximum all-around fastness, chiefly anthraquinone vat colors, which 
can be applied by simple and rapid continuous processes. War re- 
quirements accelerated the normal prewar trend toward the expansion 
of production of vat dyes other than synthetic indigo. 

In 1943, production of vat dyes other than synthetic indigo totaled 
36 million pounds, compared with an average output of 16 million 
pounds in 1936-40 and an output of 27 million pounds in 1941. The 
ratio of these dyes to all dyes produced rose from 15.8 percent in 1941 
to 25.3 percent in 1943. This large gain was achieved by a substantial 
expansion of the facilities necessary for their manufacture. 

The next most important classes of dyes were direct dyes, sulfur 
dyes, and acid dyes. Direct dyes accounted for 24 percent of the total 
output of dyes in 1941 and 19 percent in 1943; sulfur dyes, for 16 
percent of the total in 1941 and 14 percent in 1943; acid dyes, for 11 

Table 6. — Synthetic organic chemicals: United States prodvction of coal-tar dyes, by class 
of application, average, 1936-^0, annual, 19^1-^3 



Class of application 



Average 
1936-40 



1941 



1942 



1943 



Total 

Acetate rayon 

Acid 

Azoic 

Basic 

Direct 

Lake and spirit soluble 
Mordant and chrome . . 
Sulfur 

Vat, total 

Indigo 

Other 

All other 

Total 

Acetate rayon 

Acid 

Azoic 

Basic 

Direct 

Lake and spirit soluble 
Mordant and chrome. . 
Sulfur 

Vat, total 

Indigo 

other 

All other 



Quantity (1,000 lb.) 



114,928 168,657 151,878 144,013 



2,. 357 
15,579 
1 3,084 

5,863 
29,173 

3,071 

5,617 
18,584 

30,282 



14.213 

16,069 

1,318 



3,287 

19,324 

6,140 

8,449 

39,742 

5,220 

9,476 

27,059 

47,002 



20,. 386 

26,616 

2,958 



3,523 
16,753 

4,070 

6,811 
34,563 

4,410 
12,001 
20,629 

46,. 365 



18,9.33 

27,432 

2.753 



2,512 

14,512 

3,282 

5,502 

26,903 

7,123 

9,693 

19,561 

54,104 



17,770 

36,334 

821 



Percent of total quantity 



100 



2 

13 6 

2.7 

5.1 

25 4 

2 7 

4.9 

16.2 

26.3 



12 3 

14.0 

1.1 



100.0 



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11.4 

3.6 

5.0 

23.6 

3.1 

5 6 

16 1 

27.9 



12.1 

15.8 

1.8 



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2 3 
11.0 
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4.5 
22 8 
2 9 
7.9 
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12.5 

18.0 

18 



100 



1.7 
10 1 
2 3 
3.8 
18.7 
4.9 
6.7 
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37 6 



12.3 

25.3 

.6 



' 4-year average. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



23 



Table 7. 



-Synthetic organic chemicals: United States sales of coal-tar dyes, by class of 
application, average, 1936-^0, annual, 1941—43 



Class of application 


Average 
1936-40 


1941 


1942 


1943 




Quantity (1,000 1b.) 


Total 


112,701 


176,801 


144,847 


145,499 


Acetate rayon 

Acid 


2,191 
15,171 
12,915 

5,506 
28,332 

2,946 

5,450 
18,490 

30,434 


3,536 
21,986 

5,904 

8,650 
43,805 

5,500 
10,385 
27,398 

46,598 


2,916 
15,746 

4,110 

6,301 
33,513 

4,095 
10,786 
20,927 

43,833 


2,990 

15,456 

3 161 




5 365 


Direct 


28,822 
6 736 


Mordant and chrome 

Sulfur 


9,869 
19 542 


Vat, total 


52 684 






Indigo 


14,267 

16,167 

1,266 


19,368 

27,230 

3,039 


17,542 

26,291 

2,620 


18 284 


Other 


34 400 


All other 


874 








Percent of total quantity 


Total 


100 


100 


100.0 


100.0 


Acetate rayon 


2.0 

13 5 

2 6 

4.9 

25 1 

2 6 

4.8 

16.4 

27.0 


2.0 

12.4 

3.3 

4 9 

24 8 

3 1 

5.9 

15.5 

26 4 


2 

10.9 

2 8 

4.4 

23.1 

2.8 

7.4 

14.5 

30.3 


2 1 




10.6 


Azoic 


2.2 




3.7 




19.8 




4.6 


Mordant and chrome 


6 8 




13.4 


Vat, total 


36 2 




12 7 

14 3 

1.1 


11.0 

15 4 

1.7 


12 1 

18 2 

1.8 


12 6 


Other 


23 6 


All other 


.6 










Value (1,000 dollars) 


Total 


66,520 


113,324 


99,431 


105,350 


Acetate rayon 


2,259 
11,921 
14,548 
5,084 
15,690 
2,062 
2,735 
4,493 

16,573 


3,586 
18,272 
7,797 
8,115 
25,784 
4,366 
5,672 
7,115 

29,704 


2,795 
13,583 
5,648 
6,547 
20,803 
3,273 
6,305 
5,731 

32,506 


2,915 
13,579 
4,661 
5,449 
17,561 
5,478 
5,777 
4,956 












Sulfur 


Vat, total 


43,924 


Indigo 


2,285 

14,288 

1,155 


3,011 

26,693 

2,913 


2,894 

29,612 

2,240 


2,819 
41,105 


Other 


All other 


1,050 




Percent of total value 




100.0 


100 


100.0 


100 






Acid ' '..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.' 


3 4 

17.9 

6 8 

7.7 

23 6 
3 1 
4.1 
6.8 

24 9 


3.2 
16.1 
6.9 
7.2 
22.7 
3.8 
5.0 
6.3 

26.2 


2 8 
13 7 

5.7 

6 6 

20.9 

3 3 
6 3 
5.7 

32 7 


2.8 
12 9 


Azoic 


4 4 


Basic 


5 2 




16 6 


Lake and spirit soluble . 


5 2 


Sulfur 


5 5 

4 7 


Vat, total 


41 7 






Indigo 


3.4 

21.5 

1.7 


2.7 

23 5 

2 6 


2.9 

29 8 

2 3 


2 7 


Other 


39 


All other 


1 







1 4-year average. 



24 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

percent of the total in 1941 and 10 percent in 1943. Sales of vat, 
sulfur, and acid dyes did not differ greatly from production. Produc- 
tion of direct dyes in 1941, however, totaled 40 million pounds and 
sales totaled 44 million pounds. 

Table 8 shows dyes classified by chemical classes. The production 
of azo dyes was 49 million pounds in 1943, a sharp drop from 1941, 
when it was 69 million pounds. The output of most of the other groups 
also declined, except anthraquinone vat dyes and xanthene dyes. 
The output of anthraquinone vat dyes expanded because they were 
used in the dyeing of uniforms, canvas, and other textiles used by the 
military forces. 

Statistics of production and sales of azoic dyes are shown in table 9. 
Production amounted to 3.2 million pounds in 1943, a drop of 47 
percent from the output of 6.1 million pounds in 1941. Sales of azoic 
dyes were 3 million pounds, valued at 4.7 million dollars, in 1943 com- 
pared with 6 million pounds, valued at 7.8 million dollars, in 1941. The 
War Production Board limitation order, as well as shortages of raw 
materials, affected the production of these dyes, since they are of im- 
portance principally for civilian use. In general, producers of dyes 
chose to use their share of critical intermediates as well as their equip- 
ment, for the manufacture of the more widely used staple colors having 
more complete ranges of shade. Manpower considerations also favored 
the manufacture of staples, which are made in larger batches than the 
azoics. The same combination of factors also accounts for the war- 
time drop in production of those dyes for which statistics are not 
separately shown. Most of these dyes are normally made in small 
quantities for specialized uses. 

Statistics for individual dyes which are combined in summary tables 
6 to 9, are given separately in table lOA, and an alphabetical list with 
identity of manufacturers is shown in table lOB (see part II). They 
are grouped according to Colour Index number or Foreign Prototype 
number, or are listed as ungrouped dyes. In former reports the dyes 
classified by Foreign Prototype number and the ungrouped dyes were 
combined as unclassified dyes. 

In 1943, the output of dyes classified by Co.lour Index number was 
107 million pounds; sales were 109 million pounds, valued at 60 million 
dollars. In 1941, production of these dyes was 137 million pounds; 
sales were 144 million pounds, valued at 75 million dollars. Production 
of dj^es which have a recognized foreign equivalent (protot^'pe) 
amounted to 20.1 million pounds in 1943, compared with 14.9 million 
pounds in 1941. The increase of 35 percent for the group may be some 
indication that an increasing number of dyes, of kinds imported before 
the war, are now being made by domestic producers. 

The output of dyes listed as ungrouped increased in 1942 but 
declined in 1943. Production was 16.8 million pounds in 1943, 18.1 
million in 1942, and 16.8 million in 1941. Sales were 17 million pounds, 
valued at 20 million dollars, in 1943; and 17.6 million pounds, valued at 
18.6 million dollars in 1941. Acetate rayon dyes were the most impor- 
tant ungrouped dyes, followed by Developed black and Zambesi black. 

In 1941 the average unit sales value of all dyes was 64 cents per 
pound; in 1943 it was 72 cents. Appreciable increases occurred in the 
unit value of pyrazolone, triphenylmethane, and azoic dyes and their 
components. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



25 










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SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



27 



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SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



29 



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31 



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32 



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34 



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35 



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36 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

LAKES AND TONERS 

Lakes and toners are used to color paints and varnishes, wallpapers, 
printing inks, plastics, and other ^industrial products. Lakes are 
organic pigments prepared by precipitating a soluble dye on the 
surface of an inorganic compound, known as the substrate. Toners, 
or full-strength colors, are insoluble organic pigments. Reduced or 
extended toners are toners to which a solid diluent has been added. 
Table 11 A gives production and sales of lakes and toners, 1941-43. 
Statistics not publishable as individual items have been classified as 
far as possible in color groups. Phosphomolybdic acid and phospho- 
tungstic acid compounds, formerly classified as lakes, have been re- 
classified as reduced toners. An alphabetical list of lakes and toners, 
identifying the manufacturer of each, appears in table IIB, which is 
in part XL 

The production and sales of lakes and toners since 1941 has followed 
the same trend as those of dyes. Production in 1941 reached a record 
of 26 million pounds. In 1942, output decreased sharply to 17 million 
pounds; in 1943, it was 16 million pounds. Sales in 1941 were 24 mil- 
lion pounds, valued at 19 million dollars; in 1943 they were 15 million 
pounds, valued at 10.3 million dollars. The average unit sales value 
of lakes and toners was 77 cents in 1941 and 69 cents in 1943. 

The considerable increase in output of lakes and toners in 1941 was 
due in part to heavy stock piling by consuming industries, to greater 
civilian consumption caused by generally accelerated business activity, 
and to an increased consumption of pigments for military purposes. 
In 1942-43, the large military demand for munitions, dyes, and plastics 
made from such crudes and intermediates as benzene, toluene, naphtha- 
lene, anthracene, and phthalic anhydride tightened the supply of these 
chemicals normally available for use in the manufacture of lakes and 
toners. In order to insure equitable distribution of existing supplies, 
WPB Conservation Order M-53, issued in 1942, limited the use of 
organic pigments in printing inks to 70 percent of that in 1941, and 
Conservation Order M-103 limited the use of dyes and organic pig- 
ments in nonmilitary uses to 70 percent of that consumed in 1941. The 
growing shortage of paper contributed further to the decreased con- 
sumption of organic pigments in printing inks and wallpapers. The 
most marked decreases in production were shown by helio fast rubine, 
eosine and phloxine lakes, pigment scarlet, fast light j'ellow, maroon 
toners, and purple toners. 

MEDICINALS 

Production and sales of all synthetic organic medicinals are shown 
in table 12A, and an alphabetical list, with the identity of manufac- 
turers, is shown in table 12B (see part II). To avoid duplication in 
the figures, all data are given in terms of medicinals in bulk. The 
sales value of medicinals in the form of tablets, ampoules, perles, or 
other finished forms is much larger than the value of sales of the same 
medicinals in bulk form. 

In this report the statistics are divided into several subgroups: 
Cyclic benzenoid compounds (usually derived from coal tar) ; alicyclic 
and heterocyclic compounds (which may be derived from coal tar or 
from other sources, as terpenes from wood, hormones from cholesterol) ; 
and acyclic compounds (derived from natural gas, petroleum, coal, or 
grain by fermentation). The products of each group differ chemically 



i 



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and pharmacologically, and these statistical subdivisions provide more 
information concerning different classes of compounds than those pre- 
sented in former reports on these chemicals. 

Synthetic organic medicinals are essential to the militar^^ forces. 
The total output of all synthetic medicinals reached a record high of 
56 million pounds in 1943, compared with 34 million in 1941. Sales in 
1943 totaled 52 million pounds, valued at 140 million dollars; and in 
1941, 29 million pounds, valued at 59 million dollars. The average 
unit sales value of synthetic medicinals was 34 percent greater in 1943 
than in 1941, owing principally to increased sales of higher priced 
items. 

The record output of these war years resulted from a combination 
of factors — a large civilian demand for vitamin products, the flour- 
enrichment program, and purchases by the Army and Lend-Lease. 
Restrictions on the use of several of the raw materials (benzene, 
phenol, toluene) did not depress the total output of synthetic medici- 
nals, partly because most medicinals were rated high in the allocation 
program and sufficient crudes and intermediates for their manufacture 
were allotted. The output of medicinals was also raised by increased 
productive efficiency and the installation of new facilities. To supply 
the requirements of Latin American countries, production of several 
medicinal chemicals, formerly imported by them from Germany, was 
initiated in the United States, and substantial quantities were ex- 
ported to those countries. 

Cyclic medicinals accounted for approximately 93 percent of total 
production of all organic medicinals in 1941-43. Based on raw-material 
classification, benzene, its homologues, and phenol-derived compounds 
furnished between 60 and 68 percent of the total material for cyclic 
medicinals. 

The output of sulfa drugs in 1943 was five times that in 1941 and for 
the first time topped that of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin). In that 
year, production of the sulfa drugs totaled 10 million pounds; sales 
totaled 8.8 million pounds, valued at 36.7 million dollars. The average 
unit sales value gradually decreased from .^4.83 ])er pound in 1941 to 
$4.17 per pound in 1943. 

The total value of all bulk vitamins sold in 1943 was 61 million 
dollars, or more than twice the value in 1941. Consumption of nia- 
cinamide (nicotinic acid amide), which is the antipellagra vitamin and 
one of the three vitamins required in the national flour-and-l)read- 
enrichment program, showed tremendous growth. Sales increased 
from 21,000 pounds in 1941 to 214,000 pounds in 1943. With in- 
creased production, the unit sales value has gradually decreased from 
$19.35 per pound in 1941 to $6.41 in 1943. Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 
for human consumption is another vitamin produced on a large scale, 
in spite of a complex synthesis Avhich involves from 10 to 15 distinct 
steps. Output jumped from 3,000 pounds in 1941 to 72,000 pounds 
in 1943. In 1943, production of all acyclic vitamins reached 777,000 
pounds, and sales 782,000 ])ounds, valued at 15 million dollars. The 
vitamins included in this classification are principally ascorbic acid, 
pantothenic acid, and their salts. 

Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) was the single synthetic medicinal pro- 
duced in the largest quantity during 1941-43. Output totaled 8.1 
million pounds in 1941 and 8.7 million in 1943. The unit sales value 
dropped from 44 cents per pound in 1941 to 39 cents in 1943. Salicylic 
acid, the second most important single medicinal, slightly decreased 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



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SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 45 

in production from 5.3 million pounds in 1941 to 5.1 million in 1943, 

Alicyclic and heterocyclic medicinals, which increased in output 
from 8.3 million pounds in 1941 to 18.5 million in 1943, represent a 
classification used for the first time in the Commission's series of reports 
on synthetic organic chemicals. It includes compounds obtained by 
synthesis from heterocyclic raw materials such as pyridine, quinoline, 
and other products made from starting materials such as ox bile, 
cholesterol, and other natural-occurring substances. 

Quinacrine hydrochloride, commonly referred to by its trade-marked 
name "Atebrin," is the principal synthetic antimalarial used by our 
armed forces. Without this substitute for quinine, military losses from 
malaria would probably have been extremely serious. Data on pro- 
duction, which totaled 466,000 pounds in 1943, are shown for the first 
time in this report. Sales in that year were 504,000 pounds, valued 
at 6 million dollars. 

Barbituric acid derivatives represent an important subgroup of the 
heterocyclic chemicals. Production totaled 531,000 pounds in 1941, 
rose to 607,000 pounds in 1942, but dropped to 583,000 pounds in 1943. 
The most important of these derivatives were 5-ethyl-5-phenylbar- 
bituric acid and its sodium salt. 

Production of all acyclic medicinals totaled 2.9 million pounds in 
1941 and 4.1 million pounds in 1943. Ethyl nitrite, iodoform, and 
amino acids were the principal acyclic medicinals, other than the 
acyclic vitamins already mentioned. 

FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS 

The flavor and perfume materials included here are organic chemi- 
cals synthesized from natural crude materials or from cyclic or acyclic 
chemical intermediates; floral extracts or flavors obtained by extrac- 
tion or distillation from natural substances are not included. Statistics 
of production and sales of these artificial flavor and perfume materials 
are shown in table 13A. An alphabetical list of them, identifying the 
manufacturer of each, appears in table l^B in part II. 

In general, the products in this section do not reach the ultimate 
consumer as chemicals but are blended with solvents and fixatives, or 
are compounded according to various formulas by producers or dis- 
tributors. This group of synthetic chemicals comprises a larger pro- 
portion of chemicals derived from terpenes — wood-distillation prod- 
ucts — than any other group. For the first time in this series of reports, 
flavor and perfume materials are divided into three principal classes, 
benzenoid (generally of coal-tar origin), terpenoid (generally not of 
coal-tar origin), and acyclic (non-coal-tar) compounds. This classifi- 
cation allows the publication of statistics not heretofore available, 
showing totals of important classes of flavor and perfume materials. 
Since their major use is no longer as perfume materials, products such 
as dipentene, diphenyl oxide, and secondary capryl alcohol, which 
former reports included in the totals for flavor and perfume materials, 
have been reclassified and added to the total for other groups. Dipen- 
tene is now listed among the intermediates; and diphenyl oxide and 
secondary capryl alcohol are listed among the miscellaneous finished 
products. 

During 1941-43, production of flavor and perfume materials was 
hampered by lack of raw materials derived from coal tar, which were 
diverted to more essential uses. It was hampered also by lack of cer- 



46 



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tain imported raw materials. On the other hand, demand increased 
because of higher national income, a greater substitution of synthetic 
flavor and perfume materials for natural products, imports of which 
were limited by war conditions, and use of certain flavoring materials 
in military rations. 

Production of artificial flavor and perfume materials reached a 
maximum in 1942 of 15.4 million pounds; sales were 13.8 million 
pounds, valued at 18 million dollars. In 1943, production and sales 
both fell to 13.2 million pounds produced and sold, with sales valued 
at 15.8 million dollars. In both years, production and sales were 
double the average for 1936-40. Benzenoid, terpenoid, and hetero- 
cj'clic flavor and perfume materials made up over 70 percent of the 
total of this group, benzenoid compounds alone accounting for about 
50 percent. 

The most important of the benzenoid compounds was methyl 
salicylate, an artificial wintergreen flavor, used in confectioner^^ and 
pharmaceutical products. Production in 1941-43 averaged about 2.5 
million pounds and sales, 2.6 million, with a value of $798,000. Cinna- 
maldehyde, used to make artificial cinnamon, made important gains 
owing to the scarcity of imported cinnamon; sales of cinnamaldehj'de 
totaled 339,000 pounds in 1943, an increase of 122 percent over the 
1941 sales of 153,000 pounds. 

Production of the terpenoids, the next most important class of flavor 
and perfume materials, declined in 1943 to 50 percent of that in 1941; 
sales declined to 60 percent, or by 1.3 million pounds. Most of the 
decline occurred in 1943. These decreases were accompanied by an 
increase in average unit value from $1.59 per pound in 1941 to $1.98 
in 1943. These changes were undoubtedly due largely to the scarcity 
of imported citronella and lemon-grass oils. These are raw materials 
for producing items such as menthol, geraniol and its derivatives, 
citronellol, and numerous other aldehydes and ketones used as perfume 
materials. Production in 1942 was maintained to a certain extent by 
withdrawal of stocks imported in anticipation of shipping difficulties 
in the Pacific. 

Among the heterocyclic flavoring and perfume compounds of im- 
portance, synthetic coumarin had declined about one-third in output 
in 1943 as compared with 1941. Saccharin, a substitute sweetening 
agent, increased in output. 

The acyclic flavor and perfume materials consist chiefly of synthetic 
alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and esters. Statistics concerning the 
principal item, monosodium glutamate, cannot be shown. It is used 
to accentuate the flavor of meat and certain vegetables and at present 
is manufactured to a considerable extent for use in army rations. 

PLASTICS MATERIALS 

Plastics materials consist of synthetic resins and cellulose com- 
pounds, used to manufacture plastic products. During most of the 
period 1941-43, the output of plastics materials was principally for 
direct and indirect military purposes. The phenolic, urea, and mela- 
mine types are used in the construction of airplanes, tanks, trucks, 
and submarines, and their parts; acyclic resins go into airplane turrets, 
and instruments, windows, gages, and surgical appliances; vinyl 
polymers, into electrical equipment, cables, glass substitutes, and 
chemical-resistant tubing; and phthalic and other alkyd resins, into 
protective coatings to be used under extreme conditions. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 51 

Most of the synthetic resins, such as urea, melamine, phenols, 
acryhc, phthalic, polystyrene, polyvinyl resins, and ethyl cellulose, 
were subject to allocation by the War Production Board in 1943, and 
most of the raw materials used in their manufacture were also allo- 
cated in 1942 and 1943. The quantities of these materials produced 
were therefore determined by the essentiality of the products made 
from them and the availability of the raw materials from which they 
were made. 

Statistics of production and sales of plastics materials in this section 
are in terms of the net resin content and do not include materials used 
as additives or fillers. In plastics materials such as alkyd resins (poly- 
basic acid-polyhydric alcohol-oil combinations) the portion of the oil 
which is combined chemically with the rest of the product is considered 
part of the resin. Plastics materials converted to elastomers ^ by the 
addition of plasticizers, or possessing properties of an elastomer, are 
discussed in a subsequent section. Since statistics for some of the 
polj'vinyl elastomers were not collected separately in 1941 and 1942, 
they are combined with the totals for plastics materials in these years. 

Production and sales of plastics materials are shown in table 14A. 
The table groups these materials in two ways — by chemical composi- 
tion and by use. Table 14B (part II) lists plastics materials alpha- 
betically and identifies the manufacturers. 

The volume of production and sales of all plastics materials in 1943 
was the largest on record; production was 654 million pounds and sales 
were 568 million pounds, valued at 178 million dollars. Of the total 
produced, 381 million pounds represented cyclic (benzenoid) materials. 
In 1942, production of cyclic resins was 14.5 percent below the 345 
million pounds produced in 1941, owing principally to the shortage of 
phenol. Output of acyclic ^ plastics materials totaled 273 million 
pounds in 1943, or almost three times that in 1941. 

Sales of cyclic plastics materials for the 3-year period represented 
about 85 percent of production; those of acyclic plastics represented 
about 90 percent of production. Although the quantity of acyclic 
materials sold was much less than that of cyclic materials, their total 
value was nearly equal to that of the cyclic materials, owing to their 
higher unit value. The average unit value for the 3-year period was 
50 cents per pound for acyclic materials, compared with 26 cents for 
the cyclic materials. 

The phthalic alkyd resins are the most important of the cyclic group 
in terms of quantity, and the phenol-formaldehyde resins in terms of 
value. In 1943, the output of phthalic alkyd resins was 155 million 
pounds, compared with 101 million pounds in 1942 and 138 million in 
1941. The lower output in 1942 was due to a shortage of naphthalene 
in that year. The wartime demand for alkyd resins of all types, in- 
cluding the acyclic maleic anhydride type, has exceeded available 
supplies and productive capacity because of the extreme conditions 
of weather and temperature which surface coatings must meet in mili- 
tary uses. Sales of phthalic alkyd resins in 1943 were 125 million 
pounds, valued at 24 milHon dollars; in 1941, they were 68 million 
pounds, valued at 14 milHon dollars. The apparent increase in sales 
from about 50 percent of reported production in 1941 to about 81 per- 
cent in 1943 reflects not only more actual sales by producers but also 

1 An elastomer is defined as a material that will stretch repeatedly to at least 150 percent of its original 
dimension and will return rapidly and with force to its approximate original shape. 

5 Data for small amounts of heterocyclic and alicyclic plastics materials are included with those given 
for acyclic materials. 



52 



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SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 55 

more accurate reporting of intracompany transfers with sales, and 
the more complete reporting, under sales of alkyd resins, of the alkyd 
resin content of surface coatings sold by producers of alkyd resins. 

Phenolic resins, principally of the cresols-formaldehyde and phenol- 
formaldehyde types, and mixed phenolic resins, such as the cresols- 
and xylenols-alclehyde type and the phenol- and cresols-aldehyde type 
are capable of withstanding heat and shock. When used for molding 
and laminating, they usually contain considerable quantities of fillers 
or additives so that the weight of the resin also used would be con- 
siderably greater than the net resin content reported in table 14A. 

Tar acid (mixed phenolic) resins are less important, in terms of 
quantity produced and value of sales, than phenolic resins containing 
one phenolic constituent. In 1943, about 20 million pounds were pro- 
duced, compared with 148 million pounds of phenolic resins. The ap- 
parent decrease in output of mixed phenolic resins from about 49 mil- 
lion pounds in 1941 and 1942, as well as the decrease in unit value per 
pound from 56 to 21 cents, is due in part to the reclassification by 
producers of part of the material formerly reported as tar-acid resins 
(mixed phenolics) to phenolic condensation resins. 

Phenolic resins containing a single phenolic constituent consist 
principally of the phenol-formaldehyde type, which, in 1943, accounted 
for 125 million pounds out of the total of 148 million for all phenolic 
resins. This quantity represents a gain of 38 million pounds over 1942 
and of 26 million pounds over 1941. The decrease in 1942 may be ex- 
plained by the shortage of phenol for plastics materials, whereas addi- 
tional supplies of synthetic phenol in 1943 made possible the 1943 
recovery in production. Sales of phenolic resins each year averaged 
about 10 million pounds less than production. Sales were valued at 
43 million dollars in 1943, compared with about 31 million in 1942 
and in 1941. 

Of the cyclic polymerization resins, polystyrene and coumarone- 
indene resins are among the most important, in terms of value of trade. 
Polystyrene resins have unusually good optical and electrical properties 
and are used chiefly as special-purpose resins. The raw material for 
polystyrene resins is styrene, also used in the most important type of 
synthetic rubber. Production of polystyrene resins in 1941-43 was, 
therefore, limited by plant equipment and raw materials. Coumarone- 
indene resins are produced in large volume and are used to a consider- 
able extent for chemical-resistant coatings. 

Output and sales of all acyclic resins were in 1943 roughly three times 
those in 1941. The value, hoAvever, was only about twice that in 1941, 
owing to a drop in the average unit value. Production of 52 million 
pounds of acvclic alkyd resins in 1943 was 240 percent above that 
of 1941. 

The largest single use of plastics materials is in protective coatings; 
the next largest is for molding and casting. In 1943, about 50 percent 
of the production of the benzenoid type of resins was for protective 
coatings (largely alkyd resins); 20 percent for molding and casting; 
13 percent for laminating; and the remainder for adhesives, textiles, 
and miscellaneous uses. Of the acyclic type of plastics materials, 21 
percent was produced for protective coatings; 20 percent for molding 
and casting; 17 percent for adhesives; 7 percent for textiles; 5 percent 
for laminating; and the remaining 30 percent for miscellaneous uses. 
The large increase in the use of acyclic resins for adhesives in 1943 to 
nearly eightfold the 1942 figure, was probably due to its expanded use 



56 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

as a plywood adhesive. Since some resins sold for adhesive purposes 
may be used by purchasers for laminating, the distinction in use is not 
entirely clear. 

RUBBER CHEMICALS 

Synthetic organic chemicals are incorporated into rubber to control 
vulcanization (accelerators), to improve the aging properties (anti- 
oxidants), and to impart certain characteristics to synthetic rubber in 
order to make it more comparable to the natural product (tackifiers). 
All these are known as rubber chemicals. They do not include the 
basic materials for the manufacture of synthetic rubber. These ma- 
terials are dealt with in the section of this report on intermediates and 
on miscellaneous chemicals. Synthetic rubber is discussed in the 
section on elastomers. 

The quantity and kind of organic chemicals used in compounding 
vary with the type of rubber products made, the quantity and kind 
of rubber compounded, and advances in the techniques of compound- 
ing. Table 15A gives production and sales of rubber chemicals for 
1941-43, and table 15B (see part II) Hsts these chemicals alphabeti- 
cally, identifying the manufacturer of each. 

Production totaled a record 81 million pounds in 1943, an increase 
of 21 million pounds over the 60 million pounds of 1941 — the previous 
high. Sales also reached a record high of 77 million pounds, valued at 
31 million dollars, in 1943. The large gain in the manufacture of rubber 
products for direct military use, together with the larger use of syn- 
thetic rubber, accounts for the larger production and sales of these 
chemicals in 1943. The smaller production and sales of rubber chemi- 
cals in 1942 compared with 1941 reflected reduced production of rubber 
products in the United States during that year. Severe limitations 
had been placed on use of natural rubber, and the output of synthetic 
rubber was still low. 

Rubber chemicals derived from benzene and its homologues con- 
stituted 71 to 76 percent of the total production. Output of these 
chemicals, which include both cyclic accelerators and antioxidants, 
reached 62 million pounds in 1943, after a decrease in 1942 from the 
previous high of 43 million pounds produced in 1941. 

The cyclic accelerators are listed here according to subgroup head- 
ings for the first time in this series of reports. Data are shown for all 
the important subgroupings except for mercaptobenzothiazole and 
derivatives, which have been included under the designation "All other 
accelerators" to avoid disclosure of company operations. The output 
of cyclic accelerators was 24 millions pounds in 1943, compared with 
17 million in 1941. Sales were 22 million pounds, valued at 8.8 million 
dollars, in 1943 and 12 million pounds, valued at 5.5 million dollars, 
in 1941. 

Cyclic antioxidants did not follow the general slump in 1942. Output 
was maintained at approximately 25 million pounds during 1941 and 
1942; in 1943 it increased to 38 million pounds. 

Only accelerators are included among the acyclic rubber chemicals. 
Production of these chemicals did not vary so widely from year to year 
as that of the cycHc compounds. Production totaled 17 million pounds 
in 1941, decreased slightly in 1942, and then rose to 19 million pounds 
in 1943. Sales, which closely paralleled production, were valued at 4.5 
million dollars in 1941 and 7.5 million dollars in 1943. Tetramethyl- 
thiuram sulfide and disulfide, the only acyclic accelerators for which 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



57 



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58 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

statistics are given for all 3 years, dropped in unit value from $1.76 
per pound in 1941 to SI. 52 in 1943. 

ELASTOMERS 

An elastomer is defined as a material that will stretch repeatedly to 
at least 150 percent of its original dimension and will return rapidly and 
with force to its approximate original shape. The term synthetic 
elastomer is not limited to the true synthetic rubbers, but also in- 
cludes plastics such as the vinyl polymers, which are converted to 
elastomers by the addition of plasticizers and other compounding 
chemicals. Since the war began, elastomers have become one of the 
most important groups of synthetic organic chemicals. 

Production and sales of synthetic elastomers are shown in table 16A, 
and an alphabetical list of these chemicals, identifying the manu- 
facturer, appears in table 16B (see part II). Data for elastomers, other 
than sj'nthetic rubber, were not separately reported to the Commission 
before 1943. Production and sales of synthetic rubber shown in the 
group totals for 1941 and 1942 are not shown in detail according to 
types in these years to avoid disclosure of the operations of individual 
companies. , 

The statistics reflect the progress of the Government synthetic- 
rubber program. The production of 573 million pounds of all types of 
elastomers (chiefly synthetic rubber) in 1943 was nearly tenfold the 
production of 59 million pounds in 1942, which, in turn, was more 
than twice that of 28 million pounds in 1941. In 1943 the output of 
the butadiene-stj'rene (GR-S) general-purpose style of synthetic 
rubber — which is also a cyclic elastomer — amounted to 414 million 
pounds, or to 72 percent of the total production of elastomers. In 1941 
and 1942, production was exclusively in privately owned plants and 
consisted chiefly of acyclic elastomers of the types that are superior 
to natural rubber for numerous specialized applications. These were 
neoprene (polj^chloroprene), butyl rubbers (poljdsobutylene and 
polyisobutylene-isoprene mixtures), and thiokol types (polj^alkalene- 
sulfides). By 1943, considerable quantities of the special-purpose 
GR-A (polybutadiene-acrylonitrile) were also being produced. 

In 1943, the production of 6.4 million pounds of vinyl elastomers 
(polyvinyl alcohol-butyraldehyde types) also contributed to meeting 
the pressing demands for rubber substitutes. 

The average unit sales value per pound of all types of elastomers in 
1943, though less than in 1941 and 1942, was considerably above the 
price at which natural rubber was available before the attack on Pearl 
Harbor. 

Production of the GR-S type of synthetic rubber in 1943 repre- 
sented new production which took place almost entirely in Govern- 
ment-owned plants, erected as a part of the Government synthetic- 
rubber program. The average unit sales value of 19 cents per pound 
given for the GR-S type of rubber is the average book value per pound 
for 1943, as supplied by the Rubber Reserve Company. 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS 

Miscellaneous synthetic organic chemicals include those not classi- 
fied under anj'^of the previous specific groups. Among these chemicals 
are solvents, plasticizers, photographic chemicals, insecticides, and 
textile chemicals. Table 17A gives production and sales for 1941-43, 



1 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



59 



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60 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

and table 17B (see part II) gives an alphabetical list of these chemicals 
identifying the manufacturer of each. 

Production of these miscellaneous items was 8.9 billion pounds in 
1943, or 77 percent above the production of 5 billion pounds in 1941. 
Sales of miscellaneous organic chemicals were 4.9 billion pounds, 
valued at 660 million dollars in 1943, as against 2.7 billion pounds, 
valued at 310 million dollars in 1941. The average unit sales value was 
14 cents per pound in 1943 and 11 cents in 1941. Sales ranged between 
50 and 55 percent of production during 1941-43, the remaining output 
being consumed in the producing plants in the manufacture of other 
products. 

The cyclic organic chemicals included accounted for only 3 to 4 
percent of the total production of this miscellaneous group during 
1941-43. The output of miscellaneous cyclic chemicals was 321 
million pounds in 1943, as against 181 million pounds in 1941. The 
most important group was plasticizers, principally phthalates. The 
production of plasticizers in 1943 was 112 million pounds; in 1941, 
53 million pounds. The average unit sales value of plasticizers 
dropped from 25 cents per pound in 1941 to 23 cents per pound in 
1942 and 1943. About 40 to 45 percent of these cyclic chemicals were 
items for which the production statistics could not be disclosed. 

Acyclic chemicals accounted for 96 to 97 percent of the total produc- 
tion of miscellaneous organic chemicals. As yet no major group of 
acyclic intermediates corresponding to the group of cyclic intermediates 
has been established; therefore more of the acyclic chemicals fall into 
the miscellaneous group. Production of miscellaneous acyclic or- 
ganic chemicals totaled 8.6 billion pounds in 1943, an increase of 
about 80 percent over the 4.8 billion pounds produced in 1941. Ap- 
proximately half of the output of miscellaneous acyclic organics was 
produced for sale. Sales of these products were 4.6 billion pounds, 
valued at 598 million dollars in 1943, compared with 2.6 billion 
pounds, valued at 278 million dollars, in 1941. The average unit sales 
value in 1943 was 13 cents a pound, an increase of 2 cents above the 
value in 1941 and 1942. 

Production statistics are publishable for slightly more than half 
of the acyclic miscellaneous organic chemicals. Among these, the 
most important are acetic acid, acetic anhydride, acetone, carbon 
disulfide, carbon tetrachloride, formaldehyde, isopropyl alcohol, sjni- 
thetic methanol, butadiene, and cellulose acetate. Production of for- 
maldehyde (37 percent by weight), an important raw material for 
resin manufacture, was 523 million pounds in 1943, compared with 
310 million in 1941. Production of acetic anhydride, a basic chemical 
for cellulose acetate manufacture, averaged 445 million pounds over 
the 2-year period 1942-43; data for 1941 are confidential. The output 
of isopropyl alcohol was 376 million pounds in 1943, 352 million 
pounds in 1942, and 260 million pounds in 1941. Production of 
acetone was 348 million pounds during 1943, as against 259 million 
pounds in 1941. Isopropyl alcohol and acetone are important sol- 
vents. Only that part of the butadiene produced from ethyl alcohol, 
is included among the miscellaneous acyclic chemicals. Statistics for 
butadiene from petroleum are included with those given for chemical 
raw materials clerived from petroleum (see p. 13). Production of 
butadiene from alcohol increased from 6 million pounds in 1941 to 
260 million in 1943, which is not surprising since it was used as a raw 
material for the most important type of synthetic rubber. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



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646064—46—5 



66 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

One of the subgroups of miscellaneous organic chemicals which is 
increasing in importance is the surface-active agents — wetting, emul- 
sifying, and flotation agents. Production of these chemicals in 1943 
was as follows:* 27 million pounds of cyclic compounds, and 60 million 
pounds of acyclic compounds. Part of the increase in 1943 shown for 
the latter compounds is apparent only; the coverage of producers 
increased, and there were more accurate reporting and classification 
of the data. 

Important acyclic miscellaneous organic chemicals for which pro- 
duction statistics are not publishable are synthetic ethyl alcohol, 
tetrachloroethane, tetraethyl lead, and trichloroethylene. 



PART II. INDIVIDUAL ITEMS AND MANUFACTURERS, 1941-43 

COAL-TAR CRUDES 

Table 4B. — Organic chemicals: Tar crudes for ivhich United States production or sales 
were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jfl-43 

Coal-tar crudes for which separate statistics are given in table 4A are marked below with an asterisk (*) 
products not so marked do not appear in table 4A because the reported data are confidential and may 
not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing on p. 135. 
An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification number 
with the designated product.] 



Product 



Tari. 



Light oil and derivatives: 
*Crude light oil , . 

•Benzene (except motor benzene) 

*Motor benzene 

*Toluene, crude and refined 

•Solvent naphtha 

"Xylene 

•All other 

•Naphthalene, crude (solidifying at less than 79° C.) ; 

Anthracene, crude (less than 30 percent) 

•Cresylic acid, crude (less than 75 percent) 

Cumene 

'Pyridine, crude and refined - 

•Creosote oil 

'Crude tar acids 

•Coal tar sold or consumed in coal-tar solution 

'Tars, crude (used or sold for paints, pipe coatings, saturatings, etc.) 
*Tars, refined (used or sold for paints, pipe coatings, saturatings, etc.) 

•Tars, road 

•Other distillates . . ■ 

'Pitch of tar 

'Pitch of tar coke .".... 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.3) 



58, 88, 109, 110, 141, 265, 273. 
305, 312, 322, 3.53, 358, 369, 
381, 393, 406, 408, 431, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X. 

71, 109, 110, 116, 209, 2.36, 245, 

258, 358, 369, 384, 397, X, X, 

X, X. 
45, 72, 127, 328, 369, 40S, X, X. 
45, 369, 408, X. 
45, 72, 112, 127, 328, 342, 359, 

369. 408, 417. 421. 440. 441. 

468. 478. X. X, X. X. X. 
45, 72, 245, 328, 352, 369, 384. 

.387. 408. 
45. 72, 210, 328, 369, 408. 
45, 71. 72, 109, 116, 209, 328, 

352. 358, 369, 387, 408. 
45, 116, 1.35, 2.36, 245, 2.58, 328. 

352, 369, 384, 387, 397, 408. 
245, 384. 
45, 86, 135, 384. 
45. 

45, 245, 384. 
19, 45, 71, 72, 86, 115, 116, 135, 

209, 219, 224, 2.36, 245, 253, 

258, 328, 369, 384, .387, 397, X. 
19, 45, 72, 86, 115, 135, 209, 219. 

224, 236, 245, 253, 258, 384, 

387, 397, 431, X. 
19, 45, 135, 224, 236, 245, 258. 358, 

.384, 387, 397. 
116, 236, 245, 2.58, 384, 387, X. 
19, 45, 116, 209, 236, 245, 2.58, .369, 

384, 387, 397. 
19, 45, 135, 209, 224, 245. 258, .369, 

384, 387, 397, X. 
19, 45. 71, 115, 116, 209, 236, 245. 

258, 328, 384, 387, 397. 
19, 45, 71, 115, 116, 135, 209, 219, 

224, 236, 245, 258, 369, 384, .387. 

397 
19, 4.5, 135, 224, 245, 384, 387. 



' Only those manufacturers are identified by number who report production of oil-gas and water-gas 
tar to the U. S. Tariff Commission. 



67 



68 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



INTERMEDIATES 

Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Itl—.!t3 

[Cyclic intermediates for which separate statistics are given in table 5A are marked below with an asterisk 
(*); cyclic intermediates not so marked do not appear in table 5A because the reported data are con- 
fidential and may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list 
appearing on p. 135. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his 
identification number with the designated product.] 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



Aeenaphthylene (Acenaphthene) 

Acetamidoaminoanthraquinone 

5-Acetamido-2-aminobenzenesulfonic acid 

5-Acetamido-8-amino-2 and 3-naphthalenesulfonic acid (Acetyla- 
mino Cleve's acid). 

2-Acetamido-4-aminophenol hydrochloride 

4-Acetamido-2-aminophenol hydrochloride 

l-Acetamido-4-bromoanthraquinone 

3-Acetamido-N-butyl-4-methoxybenz6nesulfonamide 

2-Acetamido-3-chloroanthraquinone 

2-Acetamido-3-chloro-9,10-anthradiol-9,10-d isulfonic acid, 
diethyl ester. 

l-Acetamido-7-naphthol 

8-Acetamido-l-naphthol-3,5-disulfonic acid 

2-Acetamido-4-nitrophenol ^ 

5-Acetamidosalicylic acid 

*Acetanilide, tech 

o-Acetaniside (Acetyl-o-anisidine) 

p-Acetaniside (Acetyl-p-anisidine) .' 

Acetate leuco violet 

Acetoacetanilide 

o-Acetoacetaniside 

p-Acetoacetaniside 

o-Acetoacetochloroanilide 

p-Acetoacetochloroanilide 

Acetoaceto-4-chloro-l-naphthylamide 

p-Acetoacetophenetide 

7-(o-Acetoacetophenyl)acetoacetanilide 

o-Acetoacetotoluide 

2,4-Acetoacetoxylide 

o-Acetotoluide 

*p-Acetotoluide 

l-Acetyl-3-(4-amino-p-anisyl)urea 

Acetylsalicylic acid, methyl ester 

N-Acetylsulfanilic acid 

*N-Acetylsulfanilyl chloride 

Acridine yellow 

Alloxan 

m-Aminoacetanilide 

*p-Aminoacetanilide 

p-Aminoacetanilide sulfate 

3-Amino-p-acetotoluide .••■■. 

5-Amino-S-(p-aminophenylazo)-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (Black 
base V) . 

2-Amino-5-(p-aminophenyl)benzenesulfonic acid 

5-Amino-2-(4-amino-m-toluino)benzenesulfonic acid 

*.5-Amino-2-anilinobenzencsulfonic acid 

*6-(p-Aminoanilino)metanilic acid (Phenylene nerol acid) 

*2-(p-Aininoanilino)-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid 

6-(p-Aiiiiniianilino)-3-nitro-o-toluenesulfonic acid 

2-Amin():uitlirai|uinone 

*l-Aminuanthraquinone and salt 

*2-Aminoanthraquinone and salt 

l-Aminoanthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid 

4-Aminoantipyrine (Aminopyrazolone) 

*6-Amino-3,4'-azobis(benzenesulfonic acid) 

8-Amino-l,2-benzacridin-7(12)-one 

p-Aminobenzaldehyde 

l-Amino-5-benzamidoanthraquinonp 

S-[3-(m-Aminobenzamido)-4-methylbenzamido]-l ,3,5-ii a p h t li a- 

lenetrisulfonic acid. 
*6-(m-Aminobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-s ulfonic acid (m- 

Aminobenzoyl J acid). 
*6-(p-Aminobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-s ulfonic acid (p- 

Aminobenzoyl J acid). 
*2-Amino-p-benzenedisulfonic acid 

4-Amino-m-benzenedisulfonic acid 

o-Aminobenzencsulfonic acid 

o-Aminobenzenesulfon-p-toluide 

p-Aminobenzoic acid 

p-Aminobenzoic acid, ethyl ester 

7-(p-Aminobenzoyl)acetoacetic acid, ethyl ester 

m-Aminobenzoyl-m-phenylenediarnine 

p-Aminobenzoyl-m-phenylcnediamine 

m-A!ninobenzoyl-i)-tolylenediamine .■••■: 

'o-Aminobenzylsulfonic acid (o-Toluidine omega sulfonic acid) . . . 

2-Amino-4-biphenylsulfonic acid 



245, 384. 
13. 
176. 
313. 

X. 
X. 

176. 
176. 

176. 
176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

X. 

1. 

95, 127, 129, 176, 204, 290, .307, X. 

13. 

13, 204, 313, X. 

282. 

77, 470. 

176, 470. 

470. 

77, 470. 

470. 

357. 

470. 

470. 

77, 176, 470. 

176, 470. 

72, 313. 

129, 204, X, X. 

176. 

295. 

176. 

1, 72, 95, 294, 307, X, X, X. 

129, 176, 313. 

139. 

13. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

176, 204. 

95. 

13, 95. 

176. 

95, 176, 313. 

13, 55, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

13, 55, 95, 176, 313. 

176. 

129, 176, 313. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 313, X. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

176, 313. 

357, X. 

1.3, 89, 95, 176, 313. 

129. 

176. 

13. 176. 

176. 

13, 129, 176, 313, 357. 

13, 95, 129, 176, 313, 357, X. 

95, 129, 313, 357. 

313. 

176,357. 

176. 

129, 136. 

176, X. 

176. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

13,72, 9 :3, 357. 

357. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



69 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Ifl~Jf3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



*l-Amino-4-bromoanthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (Bromamine 
acid) . 

]-Amino-2-bromo-4-(p-toluino)anthraquinone 

p-Amino-N-(n-butyl) phenol 

3-Amino-N-butyl-p-toluenesulfonamide 

3-Amino-2-chloroanthraquinone 

.5-Amino-l-chloroanthraquinone 

8-Amino-l-chloroanthraquinone 

•2-Amino-5-chlorobenzenesuIfonic acid 

2-Amino-6-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid 

*3-Amino-6-chlorobenzoic acid 

o-(3-Aniino-4-chlorobenzoyl)benzoic acid 

2-Amino-4-chloro-6-nitrophenol 

2-Amino-4-chlorophenol 

2-Amino-4-chlorophenolsulfonie acid 

6-Amino-4-chloro-l-phenol-2-sulfonic acid 

*2-Amino-5-chloro-p-toluenesulfonic acid (Lake red C amine) . . . . 

6-Amino-4-chloro-m-toluenesulfonic acid 

6-Amino-3-chloro-2,5-xylenesulfonic acid 

2-Amino-p-cresol (m-Amino-p-cresol) 

l-Amino-2,4-dibromoanthraquinone 

4-Amino-2,5-dichloro-m-benzenedisulfonic acid 

*Aminodichlorobenzenesulfonic acid (2,.5-Dichloroanilincsulfonic 
acid). 

3-Amino-N,N-diethyl-p-toluenesulfonamide 

3-Amino-6-dimethylamino-2-methylacridinium chloride 

4-Amino-5-ethoxy-o-butyrophenetide 

5-Amino-6-ethoxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid 

9-Amino-2-ethoxy-6-nitroacridine 

2-(p-Amino-N-ethyIanilino)ethanol 

Aminodihydroxyanthraquinone 

3-AminoformaniIide .• 

3-Amino-2-hydroxyanthraquinone 

4-Amino-l-hydroxyanthraquinone 

3-Amino-4-hydroxybenzenearsonic acid 

3-Aniino-6-hydroxy-2-methylphcnazin(' (Tolazine base) 

n-Amino-N-isobutylphenol 

5-Aminoisophthalic acid 

4-Amino-4-methylacetanilide 

4'-Amino-5'-methyl-p-to!uenesulfon-o-aniside 

1-Aminonaphthalenedisulfonic acid 

2-Amino-l,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

*3-Amino-I,5-naphthaIenedisulfonic acid 

*3-Amino-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

*4-Amino-l,5-naphthalenedisuIfonic acid 

4-Amino-1.6-naphthalened!sulfonic acid 

4-Amino-l,7-naphthalpnedisulfonic acid 

*6-Amino-l,3-naphthaIenedisulfonic acid 

*7-Amino-l,3-naphthaleneclisulfonic acid (Amino G acid) 

*8-Amino-l,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

5-Amino-2,7-naphthalenpdisulfonic acid, sodium salt 

8-Amino-l,6-naphthalenedisulfonie acid, monosodium salt 

l-Amino-2-naphthalenpsulfonic acid (o-Naphthionic acid) 

*2-Amino-l-naphthaIpnpsulfonic acid (Tobias acid) 

4-Amino-2-nai)hthalpnesulfonic acid 

*-)-Amino-l-naphthalenesulfonic acid (Laurent's acid) 

*o-Amino-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid 

*5- and 8-Amino-2-naphthalencsulfonic acids (Cleve's acid) 

6-Amino-l-naphthalenesu!fonic acid 

*l3-Amino-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (Broenner's acid) 

7-Amino-l-naphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

*8-Amino-l-naphtha!enesulfonic acid 

*8-Amino-2-naphthalenpsulfonic acid 

7-Amino-l,3,6-naphthalenetnsulfonic acid 

*8-Aftiino-l,3,6-naphthalpnetiisulfonic acid 

4-Amino-l,3,.5-naphthalpnetrisulfonic acid-4,5-sultam 

8-Amino-l,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid-l,8-sultam (1-Naph- 
tham-4,6,8-trisulfonic acid). 

8-Amino-l-naphthoic acid 

8-Amino-2-naphthol 

8-Amino-l-naphthol-3,.5-disulfonic acid 

*8-Amino-l-naphthol-5,7-disulfonic acid, monosodium salt (Chicago 
acid). 

7-Amino-l-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid, monosodium salt (2R 

acid). 
*8-Amino-l-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid, monosodium salt (H 

acid). 
*l-Amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid 

6-Amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid 

*S-Amino-l-naphthol-.'J-sulfonic acid, sodium salt (S acid) 

*6-Amino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid, sodium salt (J acid) 

*7-Amino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid, sodium salt (Gamma acid). . 
*2-Amino-.5-nitrobenzcnesulfonic acid 

2-Amino-4-nitrophenol 



129, 176, 313. 

129, 313. 

129. 

176. 

176. 

129, 313. 

129. 

13, 9.3, 129, 176. 

176, 357. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

95, 176. 

95, 313. 

95, 129, 176. 

313. 

.55, 72, 206, X,X. 

129. 

13. 

95. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 357. 

13, 129, 282, 313, .3.57. 

176. 

357. 

357. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176, 313. 

1. 

95, 313. 

129. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129. 

X. 

95, 129, 176, 282,313. 

95, 176,313. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 313. 

129. 

13, 9.5, 129. 176, 313. 

13, 95, 129, 176, 313, X. 

95, 129, 313. 

176. 

129, 313. 

129, X. 

22, 72, 95, 129, 204, X, X. 

176. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

95, 129, 176, 282, 313. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 282. 

176. 

22, 95, 129, 313, X. 

313. 

72,89, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

95, 129, 176, 282, 313. 

313. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. ' 

129, 176. 

176. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 313. 

129, 176, .307, 313. 



9.5, 129, 136, 1.39, 170, 313. 

95. 

95, 129, 313. 

13, .5.5, 72, 89,9,5, 129, 176, 3i:' 

13, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 89, 129, 176, X. 



70 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 5B. — Synthetic orgunir chemical.'!: Cyclic intermediates for vhich United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jfl-Jf3 — Continued 



Chemical 



2-Amino-5-nitioplienol 

•4-Aniino-2-nitrophenoI 

2-Amino-4-nitro-l-phenol-6-sulfonic acid 

2-Amino-6-nitro-l-phenol-4-.sulfonic acid 

3-Amino-5-nitro-p-toluenesulfonic acid potassium salt 

*o-AminophenoI 

•p-Aminophenol and salts 

p-Aminophenol oxalate 

2-Amino-l-phenol-4-sulfonamide 

•2-Amino-l-phenol-4-suIfonic acid 

p-Aminophenylammonium hydroxide 

*p-AminophenyIazobenzenesuifonic acid 

*m-(p-AminophenyIazo)benzenesulfonic acid 

•p-(p-AminophenyIazo)benzenesuIfonic acid 

p-(p-Aminophenylazo) phenol (Azohydroxyaniline) 

4-Amino-a-phenyl-m-cresol hydrochloride 

2-(p-Aminophenyl)-6-methylbenzothiazole 

l-(m-Aminophenyl)-5-pyrazolone-4-carboxylic acid 

2-Aminopyridine 

2-Aminopyrimidine " 

5- Aminosalicylic acid 

Amino Schaeffer ether (5-Amino-6-ethoxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic 
acid). 

3-Amino-5-stearoylamido-p-toluenesulfonic acid 

2-Amino-p-sulfobenzoic acid 

*2-(4-Amino-3-sulfophenyI)-6-methylbenzothiazole 

l-(3-Aminc)-5-sulfo-o-tolyl)-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone 

*2-Aminothiazole 

]-Amino-4-toluenesulfonamidoanthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid. . . . 

Aminotoluenesulfonic acid 

•4-Amino-m-toluenesulfonic acid 

4-Amino-o-toluenesuIfonic acid 

,5-Amino-o-toluenesulfonic acid 

5-Amino-o-toluenesulfonic acid, isopropyl ester 

*4-(4-Amino-m-toIylazo)-m-toluenesulfonie acid and salt 
(o-Aminoazotoluenesulfonic acid and salt). 

16-Aminoviolan throne 

*2-Amino-3,.5-xylenesulfonic acid 

Amylbenzylcyclohexylamine 

Amylnaphthalenes 

o-Amylphenol 

p-tert-Amylphenol 

•Aniline (Aniline oil) 



Aniline disulfide 

Aniline hydrochloride and sulfate 

Aniline sulfate 

l-.\nilino-2-anthraquinonecarboxylic acid 

2-.'\nilinoethanol (Phenylethanolamine) 

•Anilinomethanesulfonic acid (Aniline omega sulfonic acid) and salt. 

6-Anilino-2-methoxymetanilic acid 

*8-.\nilino-l-naphthalenesulfonic acid (Phenyl peri acid) 

•6-Anjlino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid (Phenyl J acid) 

*7-.\nilino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid (Phenyl gamma acid) 

2-.\nilino-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid (4-Nitrodiphenylamine-2- 
sulfonic acid). 

Anisic acid 

o-.\nisidine 

'p-.Anisidine 

*o-.\nisidinomethanesulfonic acid, sodium salt (o-Anisidine omega 
sulfonic acid salt). 

2-(p-Anisidino)-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid 

-Anisoin 

2-(p-Anisyl)-4-chloroanthranilic acid 

2-(m-Anisyl)-4-chloroanthranilic acid, potassium salt 

2-(p-Anisyl)-4-chloroanthranilic acid, potassium salt 

n-(p-Anisyl)-p-methoxyacetophenone 

N-(p-.A.nisyl)-p-phenylenediamine 

Anthracene, refined 

Anthraflavic acid (2,6-Dihydroxyantliraquinone) 

-Anthranilic acid 

.Anthra (l,9]pyrazol-6(2)-one (Pyrazolanthrone) 

.'\nthraquinone, 100% 

N, N'-(l,.")-Anthraquinone)dianthranilic acid 

.Antliraquinone-l,5-disulfonic acid 

.\nthraquinone-l ,iH-disulfonic acid 

*.\nthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid 

Anthraquinone-l,8-disulfonic acid, potassium salt 

Anthraquinone-2,6-(lisuIfonic acid, salt 

a-.Anthraquinonchydrazinedisulfonate 

l-.\nthraquinoncsulfonic acid 

2-Anthraquinonpsulfonic acid 

2-AnthraquinoneRulfonic acid and salt 

•1-Anthraquinonesulfonic acid, sodium salt 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on j). 13.5) 

176. 

72, 95, 313, X. 

95, 176. 

176. 

176. 

129, 136, 150. 282, 480, 506, X. 

72, 129, 136, ,307, 313, 480, 506, X. 

139. 

95. 

55, 9.5, 129, 313, 357, X. 

X. 

13, 55, 72, 95. 129. 176. 313, 3.57 

13, 55, 95, 129, 313. 

72, 89. 176, 357. 

357. 

136. 

129, 313. 

129. 

1, 294, 379. 

1. 

13, 95. X. 

176, 282. 

176. 

176. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

72, 95, 282, 294, 307, X. 

176. 

136. 

72, 95, 129, 313, 357. 

176. 

95. 129, 176, 313, X. 

129 

13, 176, 313. 

176. 

13, 129, 176, 313. 

307. 

413. 

413. 

413. 

72, 127, 129, 176, 290, .307, 313, 

X, X. 
307. 
72, 282. 
294. 
129. 
77. 

.55, 72, 129. 176, 282, 313, 3,57. 
95, 176. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 
13, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, 357, X. 
13, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, .357. 
176. 

X. 

129, 307. 

129, 307, 313, X. 

89, 129, 313, 357. 



176. 

248, 200. X. 

.3.57. 

X. 

313. 

260. X. 

176. 

384. 

176. 

22. 127. 129. 

129. 176. 313. 

72. 176, 313. 

129, 176. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 176. 

72, 176. 

176. 

95, 176, X. 

176. 

1.37. 176. 

72. 129. 313. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



71 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales vere reported, identified by manufacturer, 191^1-^3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



*2-Anthraquinonesulfonic acid, sodium salt (Silver salt) 

3-(l-Anthraquinonylaniino)-7-benz[de]anthracen- 

7-one ("Benzamide"). 
*Anthranifin (1,5-Dihydroxyanthraquinonc) 

Anthra[l,9]isothiazoIe-2-carbonyl chloride 

Arsanilic acid 

Azobenzene 

•l.l'-Azobis(2-naphthol-4-sulfonic*acid) 

1 , 1 '-Azobis(8-nitro-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid) 

*.5,5'-Azobis(6alicylic acid) 

m,m'-Azoxydianiline 

Benzaldehyde, tech 

Benzaldehyde semicarbazone 

*l-(4-Ben2amido-l-anthraquinonylimino) -5-benzamidoanthraqui- 
none. 

l-Benzamido-4-cliJoroanthraquinone 

*l-Benzaniido-5-chloroanthraquinone 

2-[l-(4-Benzamido-2,5-diethoxyphenyl)-3-methyl-3-t ri a zene] 
ethancRuIfonic acid. 

2-[l-(4-Benzamido-2, 5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-methyl-3-triazene] 
cthanesulfonic acid. 

l-(4-Benzainido-6-methoxy-m-tolyI)-3-mcthyl-3-triazoBeacetic 
acid. 

6-Benzamido-4-methoxy-3-(p-toIuenesulfonamido) toluene 

*6-Benzamido-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid (Benzoyl J acid) 

*7-Benz(de]anthracen-7-one (Benzanthrone) 

Benzanthronedianthraquinonyldi-imide 

m-Benzenedisulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Bcnzenesulfinic acid, sodium salt 

Benzenesulfonamidc 

Benzenesulfonic acid 

Bcnzpnesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Benzenesulfonyl chloride 

Benzidine, base 

'Benzidine hydrochloride and sulfate 

Benzil 

ll-Benzo[a]carbazole-2-sulfonic acid 

2-Benzofuryl cyanomethj'l ketone 

'Benzoic acid, tech 



13, 129, 313. 
176. 



Benzoic acid, 2-naphthyl ester (Benzonaphthol) 

Benzoic anhydride : 

Benzoin 

a-Benzoylacetanilide 

*o-Benzoylbenzoic acid 

Benzoyl chloride 

2-BenzoyI-4-chloro-3-nitrobenzoic acid 

*Benzyl alcohol, tech 

Benzyl disulfide 

Benzyl ether 

*4-(N-Benzyl-N-ethylaniino)-o-toluenesulfonic acid 

*X-Benzy!-N-ethylaniline 

N-Benzyl-N-ethyl-p-nitrosoaniline 

X-Benzyl-N-ethyl-m-toluidine 

o-Benzylhydroxybenzoate, calcium salt 

Benzylidineaminopyrazolone 

p,p'-Benzylidinebis(N,N-diethylani]ine) (Tetraethyldiaminotri- 
phenylmethane) . 

p.p'-Benzylidinebis(N,N-dimethylaniline)(Tetramethyldiamino- 
triphenylmethane) . 

Benzyl polysulfide 

(3,3'-Bi-7-benz[de]ant.hracene)-7,7'-dione (13,13-D i b e n z a n - 
thronyl) . 

(4,4'-Bi-7-benz[de]anthracene)-7,7'-dione (2,2-Dibenzanthronyl) 

Bibenzyl 

(l,l'-Binaphthalene)-8,8'-dicarboxylic acid. 

Biphenyl 

o-Biphenylamine 

p-Biphenylamine 

\,N'-Bis(acetoacetyl)benzidine 

5,S-Bis(p-aminobenzamido)-2-naphthalencsulfonic acid 

l,3-Bis(4-p-aminobenzamido-3-sulfophenyl)urea 

l,.3-Bisf4-amino-.3-su!fophenyl)urea 

l,4-Bis(l-anthraquinonylamino)anthraquinone 

l,3-Bis''4-biphenylyl)-2-thiourea (s-Dixenylthiourea) 

p,p'-Bis('diethylamino)benzohydrol 

p,p'-Bisfdiethylamino)benzophrnone (Ethyl ketone base) 

2,7-Bis(dimethylamino)acridinehydrochloridc 

•p,p'-Bisfdimethylamino)benzohydrol (Michler's hydrol) 

*p,p'-Bis(dimpthylamino)benzophenone (Michler's ketone) 

Bis(p-dimcthylaminophonyl)methancsulfonic acid and salt 

N,N-Bis''2-hydroxyethyl)aniIine 

*N,N-Bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-m-toluidine 



95, 129, 176, 313. 

129. 

1, 248, 294, 297. 

313, 357, X. 

89, 95, 139, 176, 313. 

176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

176, .3.57. 

51, 197, X, X, X, X. 

139. 

72, 129, 176. 313. 

129, 176. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

55, 89, 95, 176. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 313, 349. 

176. 

129. 

176. 

307, 320. 

45, 136, 307. 

176. 

136. 

95, 129. 1.36, 313. 

72, 84, 95, 129, 136. 159. 176. 

313, X. 
1.36, 294. X. 
176. 
X. 
127, 129, 176, 197, 203, 207, 

294, 307, 476. 
304. 
13, 207. 

51, 136, 150, 294, X. 
X. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 
127, 203, 207, 460. 
176. 

51, 204, 207. 
159, 207. 
51. 

129. 176. 313. 
129. 204. 313. 
176. 

129. 313. 
1. 
X. 
132,282. 

132. 282. 

207. 
129. 176. 

129. 176. 

197. 476, X. 

176. 

127. 159. .307. 

307. 

307. 

357. 

176. 

357. 

357. 

176. 

307. 

176. 282. 

129. 132. 176, 204, 313. 

3.57. 

129, 176, 282, 313. 

129, 1.32, 176, 204, 313. 

313. 

176, 282. 

176, 282. 



72 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Ifl-!io — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



4,4'-Bis(p-hydroxyphenylazo)-2,2'-s tilbenedisulfonic acid, 
disodium salt (Distilbenediphenol). 

2,4-Bis(p-hydroxyphenyI)-3-ethylhexane 

4,4'-Bis [2-(l-o-anisyl-3-methyl-3-triazene)ethanesulfonic acid] . 
*X,N'-Bis-6-(l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid)urea (J acid urea) 

5,8-Bis(p-nitrobenzamido)-2-naphthalenesulfonicacid 

Bis(o-nitrophenyl)disulfide 

*3-Bromo-7-benz[de]anthracen-7-one 

Bromobenzene 

l-Bronio-4-(X-methylacetamido)anthraquinone 

*p-Bronio-methylaminoanf hraquinone 

6-Bromo-3-methyl-7-dibenz[f,ij]isoquinoline-2,7(3)-J i o n e (4- 
Bromo-N-methyl-1 ,9-anthrapyridone) . 

1-Bromonaphthalene 

p-Bromophenol 

2-Bromo-4-phenylphenol 

3-Bromophthalic acid 

N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 

N-ButyI-4-chloro-3~nitrobenzenesulfonamide 

6-tert-Butyl-2,4-dimethylacetophenone 

2-tert-Butyl-5-methylanisole 

1-(N-Butyl)naphthylamine .*. 

p-tert-ButylphenoI ' 

o-tert-Butyl-m-xylene 

Camphene 

Carbazole, refined 

Carbazole-ethoxypyrazolone 

Carbazoletetrasulfonic acid 

o,o'-Carbonyldioxydibenzoic acid, diethyl ester 

3-Carboxy-i-(3'-nitrophenyl)-5-pyrazolone 

7-(p-CarboxyphenyIainino)-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid 

Chloranil (Tetrachloroquinone) 

o-Chloroacetoacetanilide 

Chloroacetoamidonaphthalene 

m-Chloroaniline 

o-Chloroaniline 

p-Chloroaniline 

o-Chloroaniline sulfate 

4-ChIoro-o-anisidine 

l-(4-Chloro-o-anisyl)-3-methyl-3-triazeneacetic acid 

3-Chloro-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid 

5-ChIoroanthranilic acid 

* 1-Chloroanthraquinone 

•2-Chloroanthraquinone 

•l-ChIoro-2-anthraquinonecarboxylic acid 

3-Chloro-2-anthraquinonecarboxylic acid 

*o-Chlorobenzaldchyde 

"Chlorobenzene, mono 



ni-Chlorobenzenesulfonic acid 

p-Chlorobenzenesulfonic acid 

Chloro-7-benz(delanthracen-7-one 

*o-Chlorobenzoic acid 

in-Ch!orobenzoic acid 

]v-Chlorobenzoic acid 

'Chlorobenzoylbenzoic acid 

6-ChIoro-m-cresoi 

4-Chloro-X,N-diethyl-3-nitrobenzpnesulfonamide 

a-Chloro-3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone 

5-Chloro-2,4-dimethoxyaniline 

b-Chloro-],3-dimethoxy-4-nitrobenzene 

*l-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene 

4-Chloro-3,.5-dinitrobenzencsulf()nic acid 

4-Chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid 

4-Chloro-2,6-dinitrophenol 

0-Chloro-2,4-dinitrophenol 

!)-Chloro-2-ethoxy-6-nitroacridinc ^ 

fi-(2-Chloroethoxy)-2,4,6-trichloropiicnctoIc (Triclilorophenoxy- 
ethoxyethyl chloride). 

2-Chloro-X-ethyl-o-nitrobenzpnenulfonaiiilitlc 

•")-Chloro-2-formylbenzenesulfonic acid 

Chloro-4-hydrazinobenzencsulfonic acid 

.")-Chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline 

'5-Chloromctanilic acid 

•I-Chloro-2-methylanthraqiiinonc 

Chloronaphthalcnes 

.S-Chloro-l-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic ucid (Chloro II acid) 

*2-Chloro- 4-nitroaniline 

'4-Chloro-2-nitroani]ine 

]-Chloro-o-nitroanthraquinone 

l-ChIoro-8-nitroanthraciuinone 

Chloro-2-nitrobenzene 

Chloro-3-nitrobenzene 

Chloro-4-nitrobenzene 



313. 

402. 

176. 

13, 5.5, 72, 95, 89, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

13, 129, 176. 

127, 1.36, 159. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

136, 159 

127, X. 

127. 

149. 

307. 

176. 

X. 

X. 

307. 

127. 

X. 

129 

129, ,384. 

176. 

176. 

127. 

176. 

176. 

X. 

77. 

357. 

129, 307. 

307, 480. 

307. 

357. 

207, 313, 480. 

176. 

176. 

357. 

72, 129, 176, 313, X. 

72, 129, 176,313. 

129, 176, 313. 

176. 

129, 203, 204, 313. 

127, 129, 130, 1.59, 142, 207, .307 

425, 426, X, X. 
176. 
176. 
313. 

95, 129, 203, 313. 
176. 

176, 203. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 
45. 
176. 
248. 
176. 
176. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 282, .307, 313. 
176. 
176. 
95. 
176. 
176. 
127. 

176. 
176. 
176. 
95, X. 

,55, 95, 129, 313. 

13, 72, 129, 17G, 313. 

207, X. X, X. 

176, 313. 

13, 22, 72, 127, 129. 

127, 129, 313, 480. 

129, 313. 

129 

13,'l29, .307. 

129, 307. 

13. 129, 307, 313, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



73 



Table Uli. — Synfketic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United State-' 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, lO^l—^S — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



*2-Chloro-4-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid 

4-Ch!oro-2-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid 

2-Chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid 

2-Chloro-5-nitrobcnzoic acid 

5-Chloro-2-nitrobcnzoic acid 

Chloronitrodiphenyl ether 

4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol 

4-ChIoro-2-nitro-l-phenol-6-sulfonic acid 

2-Chloro-4-nitrotoluenc 

*4-ChIoro-2-nitrotoIuene 

6-ChIoro-2-nitrotoluene 

*Q-Chlorophcnol 

p-Chlorophenol 

4-Chloro-o-phcnylenediamine 

o-Chlorophenylhydrazine 

t-(o-Chlorophcnyl)-3-niethyl-5-pyrazolone 

2-Chloro-6-phcnylijhenol 

2-Chloro-6-phenylphenoI, sodium salt 

2-Chioro-6-phenylphenol and sodium salt 

2-(l-ni-Chlorophenyl-3-triazene)-4-sulfobenzoic acid. 

2-ChloroQuinizarin 

2-Chloro-5-sulfobenzoic acid 

l-(2-Chloro-4-sulfophenyl)-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone. . 

2-C'hlorotcrephthaloyl-o-benzoic acid 

Chlorotoluene 

*a-Chlorotoluene (Benzyl chloride) 

o-Chlorotoluene 

5-Chloro-o-toIuenesuIfonic acid 

3-Chloro-p-toluenesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

3-Chioro-o-toluidine 

3-Chloro-p-toluidine 

4-ChIoro-o-toluidine 

*.T-Chloro-o-toluidine (Red KB base) 

6-Chloro-o-toluidinc 

4-Chloro-o-toluidine iiydrochloride 

*Chlorotoluidincsulfonic acid 

o-(3-Chloro-p-tolyl) benzoic acid 

(4-Chloro-o-tolylniercapto)acetic acid 

l-(5-ChIoro-o-tolyl)-3-methyl-3-triazeneacetic acid . 

4-Chloro-a-trifluoro-3-nitrotoluene 

4-Chloro-a-trifluorotoluene 

6-Chloro-a-trifluoro-m-toluidine 

4-Chloro-m-xylenc (Xylyl chloride) 

Chloro-3,.3-xylenol 

Chrysazin (l.S-Dihydroxyanthraquinonc) 

m-Cresol 

*o-Cresol 

11-Cresol 

*Crcsol (meta, para) 

*Cresol (ortho, meta, para) 

Cresols, chlorinated 

2,3-Cresotic acid 

*Cresylic acid, refined 



Cumcne 

Cuniinyl chloride 

S-Cyano-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid 

Cyclohexane 

Cyclohcxylamine 

2-Cyclohexyl-4,6-dinitrophenol 

N-Cyclohexyl-N-ethylbenzamide 

p-Cymene 

Decylbenzene 

*Diaminoanthraquinone 

1,4-Diaminoanthraquinone 

*l,5-Diaminoanthraquinone 

2,6-r)iaminoanthraquinone 

4,8-Diaminoanthrarufin 

4,8-Dianiino-2,6-anthrarufindisulfonic acid 

3,3'-Diaminobenzanilide 

*2,4-Diaminobenzenesulfonic acid (m-Phenylenediaminesulfonic 
acid). 

2,5-Diaminobcnzenesulfonic acid 

Diamino-3,3'-bibenz[dc]anthracen-7-one 

*4,4'-Diamino-3,3'-biphenyldisulfonic acid 

*2,2'-Diamino-5,5'-bi-m-toluenesulfonic acid 

*4,4'-Dianiino-l,l'-dianthraquinonylamine 

1,4— Diamino-2,3-dihydroanthraquinone 

l,8-Diamino-4,5-dinitroanthraquinone 

1,4— Diamino-o-nitroanthraquinone 

2,4-Dianiinophenol 

N,N '-Di (m-aminophenyl ) oxamide (Oxalyl-m-phenylenediamine) 
*N,N'-Di(p-aminophenyl)oxamide (Oxalyl-p-phenylenediamine) . 

l,3-Di(m-aminophenyl)urea 



13, 55, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

95, 313. 

176. 

129, 176, 313. 

13, 95, 176, .357. 

357. 

95. 

95. 

313. 

13, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 313. 

127,307, 351. 

127, 129, 307. 

150. 

176. 

176. 

127. 

127. 

127. 

176. 

95, 313. 

176, 357. 

129, 176. 

176. 

129, 207, 313, X. 

51,204,207,307, X. 

129, 313. 

176. 

129, .307. X. 

129, 313. 

129, 313. 

176. 

13, 129, 176, 289, 313. 

176. 

129 

72, 95, 129, X. 

176. 

129, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

45. 

129, 176. 

45, 384, X. 

45, 72, 245, .363, 384, 387, X. 

45, 384, X. 

45, 72, 245, 363, 384, 387, X, X. 

45, 72, 245, 384, 387, X, X. 

45. 

127. 

45, 72, 86, 245, 384, .387, 416, 

440, X. 
127. 
69, X. 
176. 

45, 127, 129. 
307. 
127. 
307. 

201, 319. 
307. 

13, 95, 129, 176. 
95, 176. 

13, 127, 129, 176. 
72, 176, 313. 
129. • 
89. 
176. 
89,95, 129, 176, 313. 

95, 176. 

129 

13, 72, 89, 95, 1.36, 176, .357, X. 

13, 89, 95, 176, 313, 357, X. 

72, 129, 176, 313, X. 

176. 

129. 

176. 

176. 

129, 313, 3.57. 

129, 176, 282, 313. 

176. 



74 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table .5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United State 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, i94i-4-?— Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



2,6-Diaminopyridine 

*4,4'-Diamino-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid 

3,5-Diamino-p-toluenesulfonic acid 

2,4-Di-tert-amylphenol 

l,2-Di-p-anisyl-l,2-butanediol 

l,2-DianisyI-l,2-ethanediol 

2,4-Di(p-anisyl)-3-ethyIhexane 

2,4-Di(p-anisyI)-3-ethylhexene 

l,3-Di(p-anisyl)-2-ethyl-l-pentanone 

3,4-Di(p-anisyl)hexane 

3,4-Dianisyl-3-liexanol . 

»l,l'-DianthraquinonyIamine 

] ,5-Dibenzoylnaphthalene 

Dibenzylidenehydrazine 

Dibenzylsulfanilic acid, sodium salt 

l,3-Di-(o-biphenyI)thiourea 

3,9-Dibromo-7-benz[de]anthracen-7-one 

p-Dibromobenzene 

4,5-Dibromo-l,8-dihydroxynaphthalene 

2',7'-Dibroniofluorescein 

7,16-Dibromoindanthrene 

Dibromo-8,16-pyranthrenedione 

4,6-Di-tert-butyl-m-cresol 

Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol. . 

2,5-Dichloroacetoacetanilide 

*2,5-Dichloroaniline 

2,5-Dicldoroaniline hydrochloride 

1 ,5-Dichloroanthraquinone 

1,8-Dichloroanthraquinone 

4,5-Dichloro-l,8-anthraquinonedisulfonic acid . 

4,8-Diciiloro-l,5-anthraquinonedisulfonic acid . 

2.6-DichIorobenzaldehyde 

*o-Dichlorobenzene 



*p-Dichlorobenzene . 



*3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine 

2,2'-Dichorobenzidine hydrochloride 

3,3'-DichIoroben2idine sulfate 

*2,4-Dichlorobrnzoic acid 

Dichlorobenzyl disulfides 

l,8-Dichloro-4,5-dinitroanthraquinone 

*6,9-Dichloro-2-methoxyacridine 

Dichloronaphthalene 

2,6-Dichloro-4-nitroaniline 

•l,4-Dichloro-2-nitrobenzene 

2,4-Dichlorophenol 

2-[l-(2,5-Dichlorophenyl)-3-ethyl-3-triazene]-5-sulfobenzoic acid 

2,5-Dichlorophenylhydrazine 

•l-(2,5-Dichlorophenyl)-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone 

o-(3,5-Dichlorosalicyloyl)benzoic acid (Dichlorohydroxybenzoyl- 

benzoic acid). 
*l-(2,5-Dichloro-4-sulfophenyl)-3-metliyl-.'5-pyrazolone 

l-(2,5-Dichloro-4-sulfophenyI)-5-pyra2o!one-3-carboxylic acid. . . 

o,a-Dichloroto!uene 

*2,4-Dichlorotoluene 

2,6-DichIorotoIuene 

Dicresyl disulfide 

Dicyclohexylamine 

Dicyclopentadiene 

2,.5-Diethoxyaniline 

1,4-Diethoxybenzene. . 

l,4-Diethoxy-2-nitrobenzene 

X-(2,.'')-Diethoxy-4-nitrophenyl)benzaniide 

K-(2,4-Diethoxyphenyl)benzamide 

Diethylaminobenzaldehyde 

3-Diethylamimo-6-nitrosophenol 

m-Dietliylaminophenol 

*N,N'-Diethylaniline 

•N,N'-Diethylcarbanilide 

N,N-Diethylnietanilic acid 

N,N-Diethyl-3-nitro-p-anisolesulfonaiTiide 

N,N-Diethyl-p-nitrosoaniline 

N',N-DiethyI-4-nitroso-m-toluidin(! 

•N,N-Diethyl-p-phonylenedianiine 

N6,N'-Diethyl-2,r)-to!ylenediamine hydrochloride 

Diethyl-m-toluidine 

N,N'-Diformyl-2,.5-tolylenediamine 

3,4-Dihydroxy-o-dimethylaminoacetophenone . 

*4,5-Dihydroxy-2,7-naphthalenediSulfonic acid (Chromf>tropic acid) 
*4,.5-Dihydroxy-l-naphthalcnesulfonic acid (Dioxy S acid) 

6,7-Dihydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid 

3,.5-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid 

3,5-Di-iodo-4-oxo-l(4)-pyridineacetic acid (I'clviren acid) 



379 

129^ 176,313. 

176. 

413, X. 

248. 

X. 

402. 

402. 

402. 

295. 

248. 

129, 176, 313, X. 

176. 

1.39. 

357. 

307. 

176. 

127. 

1.36. 

22, 149, 204, X. 

129. 

129. 

245. 

X. 

77. 

95, 129, 207, ,307, 313, 480. 

207. 

129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176. 

176. 

176. 

313. 

127, 129, 130, 142, 207, 307, 425. 

426, 4.38, X. 
127, 129, 130, 142, 207, 307, 425, 

426, 438, X. 
84, 95, 129, 196, 204. 
313. 
X. 

203, 204, 207, 294, 313, X. 
X. 

129. 

204, 313, .357, .500. 
207. 

176. 

95, 313, 480. 

307. 

176. 

357. 

357. 

313. 



95, 129, 357. 

89, 357. 

203, 207. 

203, 294,313, X. 

176,313. 

X. 

307. 

X. 

129, 176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

129, 282. 

127, 129, 204, 313. 

95, 129, 204,413. 

1 29, 282. 

176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

1,36, 176, 313. 

136. 

129,313. 

95. 

248. 

13, 95, 129, 313. 

13, 95, 176, 129, 313. 

176. 

176. 

X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



75 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manvfacturer, 1941-4^3 — Continued 



Chemical 



16,17-Dihyflioxyviolanthroiie , 

2,5-Dimpf lioxyanilinp 

1,4-Diinrthoxybcnzeno 

3,3'-Dinicthoxybenzidine 

2,5-Dimethoxy-4-nitroanilinc 

l,4-Dimethoxy-2-niti-obenzenp 

N-(2,5-Dimcthoxy-4-nitrophcnyi)bonzainide 

N-(2,5-Diniethoxyphonyl)benzaiiiidc 

p-Dimethylaniinobenzaldchyde 

N,N-Diraethyl-3-aminophcnol 

*X,N-nimcthylanilinc 

*2,2'-Dimcthyl-l,l'-bianthiaquinonc 

2,2'-Dimpthyl-l,l'-dianthraqiiinonylamine 

Dimethyldiphonylurea 

2',7'-DimothyIfluoran 

2,8-Dimcthyl-13b-hydroxy-9(13b)-ccroxcnonc 

N'.N-DiniPthyl-a-naphthylaminc 

*N,X-Dimpthyl-p-nitrosoanilinc 

N,N-Dimethyl-p-phpnylenediaminc 

N,N-Dimethyl-p-phpnylenpdiamine hydrochloride 

N,N-DimPthyl-p-phpnylpnpdianiine sulfate 

p-a-DiniPthylptyrcne 

N.N-Diinpthylsulfanilic acid 

2,4-Dinitroanilinp 

*p-(2.4-Dinitroanilino)phpnol (Dinifrohydroxydiphenylamine) . . . . 

'2.4-DinitroanisoIp 

*Dinitroanthraqiiinone (1,5- and 1,8-) 

4,8-Dinitroanthrarufin (l,.5-Dihydroxy-4,8-dinitroanthraciuinonc) 

4,8-Dinitroanthrarufindisiilfonic acid, sodium salt 

*Dinitrobpnzpne 

m-Dinitrobcnzpne 

p-Dinitrobenzenp 

2,4-DinitrobpnzcnesuIfonic acid 

3,.5-Dinitrobpnzoic acid 

3,.5-Dinitrobpnzoyl chloride 

Dinitro-3,3'-bi(7-benz(de]anthraccn-7-one) 

4,4'-Dinitro-l ,l'-dianthraquinonylaminc 

2,4-Dinitro-X-rnethylanilinp 

Dinitronaphthalenp (1,5- and 1,8-mixturc) 

2,4-Dinitro-a-naphthol 

*2,4-Dinitrophpnol, tech 

N,N'-Di(p-nitroplipnyl)oxaniide (Oxalyl-p-nitro-aniiinp) 

'4,4'-ninitro-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid 

2,4-Dinitrotolupnp 

3,5-Dinitro-n-tolupnesulfonic acid 

1,.5-Dioxamidoanthraquinonc 

Dippntenp (dl-Limonpnc) 

1,.5-Diphpnoxyanthraquinone 

Diphenylaniinp 

2,4-Diphpnylaminp-l-hydroxyanthraquinone 

*S-DiDhpnylamino-l,6-naphthalpnpdisulf()nic acid 

1,5-Diphpnylcarbohydrazidc 

1,3-Dinhpnyltriazpnp (Diazoaminobpnzcne) 

l,3-Di(p-toluino)anthraquinonp 

l,4-Di(p-toluino)anthraquinonp 

Dodecylbenzenc 

6-Ethoxy-3-hydroxythianaphtheno 

2-Ethoxynaphthalcne 

6-Ethoxy-2-naphthaIenesulfonic acid 

2-Ethoxy-l-naphthyIamine 

2-Ethoxy-l-nitronaphthalene 

6-Ethoxy-m-phpnylpnediamine (Dianiinophcnctolc) 

3-Ethylamino-p-crcsol 

3-EthyIaniino-{>-toluenesulfonic acid (N-Ethyl-o-toIuidinc-p- 

sulfonic acid). 
*N-Ethylaniline, mono and di 

2-(X-Ethylanilino)ethanol (Hydroxycthylcthylaniline) 

'a-(X-Ethylanilino)-p-tolupnpsulfonic acid 

Ethylbpnzcnc 

X'-Ethylbenzenpsulfonamidp 

a-Ethyl-4,4'-dimpthoxychalconp 

2-[3-Ethyl-l-(,")-nitro-o-anisyl).3-triazpnp]-5-sulfobenzoic acid. . . 

2-(X-Ethyl-4-nitrosoanilino)ethanol ( N -Ethan ol-N-e thy 1-4- 

nitrosoanilinc). 
*Ethylphpnylmalonic acid, diethyl ester 

X-Ethyl-5-sulfoanthranilic acid 

N'-Ethyl-p-toluenediamine 

X-Ethyl-m-toluidino 

X-Ethyl-o-toluidinc 

Fluorene 

a-Fluorenone 

4-Formyl-m-benzcnpdisulfonio acid 

o-Formylbenzcnesulfonic acid (o-Sulfobcnzaldehyde) 

Furoic acid 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



129, 176. 

129, 176. 

13, 176, X. 

95, 129. 

176. 

13, 176. 

176. 

176. 

1.36, 159, 313. 

9g2 

72, 127, 129, 132, 204, 313 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

129. 

176, 498. 

176. 

1.36. 

13, 1.32, 176, 313. 

1.32, 136, 150. 

136. 

1.50. 

319. 

176. 

72, 204, 307. 

95, 176. 313. 

282, 480, X. 

13, 89, 129. 

129. 

13, 129, 176. 

72, 129, 313. 

72, 313. 

129. 

95, 176. 

1.36, 137, 150. 

136. 

129. 

129. X. 

72. 

176. 

1.59. 

129, 176,313. 

129, 282, 313. 

89,95, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

95, 176. 

176. 

129, 319, 409. 

13 129 

127, 129, 136, 1.59. 

95. 

95, 129. 313. 

1.36, 1.59. 

129, 313. 

129. 

129. 

307. 

129. 

176. 

282, 357. 

176. 

176. 

72. 

129, 282 

129, 282. 

72, 95, 127, 129, 176, 204, 313, 413. 

176, 282. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 204, 282, 313. 

127, ,307. 

.307. 

402. 

176. 

176. 

1, 51, 294, X. 

176. 

176. 

129, 313. 

129,313. 

245, 384. 

1.39. 

176. 

129, 176. .357. 

380. 



76 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for ichich United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-43 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



Furoyl chloride 

8-(3-Guanylguanidino)-2-naphthol hydrochloride 

Glycerolmonoethylaniline 

Heptachlorodiphenyl oxide 

Hexachlorobenzene 

Hexachlorodiphenyl oxide 

Hydrazinobenzenesulfonic acid 

m-Hydrazinobenzenesulfonic acid 

o-Hydrazinobenzenesulfonic acid 

*p-Hydrazinobenzcnesulfonic acid 

3-Hydrazino-5-nitro-p-toIuenesulfonic acid 

4-Hydrazino-m-toIuenesulfonic acid 

Hydrof uramide 

*Hydroquinone, tech 

3-Hydroxy-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid 

l-Hydroxyanthraquinone 

N-(3-Hydroxy-2-anthraquinonyIj-l-nitro-2-anthraquinonecar- 
boxamide. 

2-Hydroxy-ll-benzo[a]carbazole-3-carboxylic acid 

p-Hydroxybenzoic acid 

2-Hydroxycarbazole 

2-Hydroxy-3,6,8-carbazoletrisulfonic acid 

3-Hydroxydiphenylamine 

l-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-3-phenyl-2-thiourea . 

4-Hydroxy-l-methylcarbostyril 

2-Hydroxy-l-naphthoic acid 

*3-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid 

l-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, ethyl carbonate 

l-Hydroxy-2-naphthoyl chloride, ethyl carbonate 

(2-Hydroxynaphthyl)-3-thianaphthenol (/3-N aphtholthioin- 
doxyl). 

l-Hydroxy-4-nitroanthraquinone 

4-Hydroxy-3-nitro-l-phenylarsonic acid 

2-Hydroxyphenetolo 

p-Hydroxyphenylarsonic acid 

N-(p-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-naphthylamine 

3-Hydroxy-5-sulfo-2-naphthoic acid 

5-Hydroxy-m-toluenesulfonic acid 

l,l'-Iminobis(4-benzamidoanthraquinone) 

*6,6'-Iminobis(l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid) (I or J acid imide) 
(Rhoduline acid). 

Indene T 

*Indophenol (blue and green) 

Isatin 

Isobutylquinolinc 

Isophorone 

Isophthalic acid (1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid) 

p-Isopropylideneaminobenzenesulfonic acid, sodium salt (Dimeth- 
anil-4-sodium sulfonate). 

p,p'-Isopropylidenediphenol (p,p'-Dihydroxydiphenyldimethyl- 
methane). 

Isoviolanthrone (Isodibenzanthrone) 

Leuco l,4-di(methylamino)anthraquinone 

Leuco indophenol BCFN 

*Leuco quinizarin 

Leuco tctrahydroxyanthraquinone 

2,6-Lutidine 

Melamine 

*Metanilic acid 

p-jVJethoxy-a-(p-anisyl)butyrophenone 

1-Methoxyanthraquinone 

p-Methoxybutyrophenone 

3-Methoxydiphenylamine 

*5-Methoxy-m-phenylenediamine (m-Diaminoanisole) 

6-Methoxyquinoline 

3-Methoxysulfanilic acid 

6-Methoxy-m-toluidine (2-Amino-p-cresol methyl ether) 

N-Methyl-p-acetaniside 

•1-Methylaminoanthraquinone 

Methylaniline, mono 

2-(N-M('thylanilino)ethanol (Hydroxyethylmethylaniline) 

o-Methyl-o-anisidine (Cresidine) 

m-Methylanisole (m-Cresol methyl ether) 

N-Methylanthranilic acid 

2-Methylanthraquinone 

2-Methyl-7-benz[de]anthracene-7-one (2-Methylbenzanthrone) . . 

2-Methylbenzoxazole 

N-Methylcyclohexylamine 

3,3'-Methylenebis(l-o-anisyl-3-triazeneacetic acid) 

3,3'-Methylenebis(l-o-anisyl-3-triazenepropionic acid) . 

N,N'-Methylenebis[N-p-(5-chloro-o-anisylazo) phenylglycine] , 
disodium salt. 

3,3'-Methylenebis[l-(5-chloro-o-anisyl)-3-triazeneacetic acid]. . . 

2,2'-Methylenebis(4-chlorophenol) 



207. 

176. 

95. 

207. 

127, 142, 207. 

127, 207. 

357. 

176, 357. 

176, 357. 

176, 357, 446. 

176. 

176. 

380. 

83, 129, 480, X. 

176. 

13, 129, 313. 

176. 

176. 

203. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

307. 

176. 

129 

176; 313, X. 

176. 

176. 

95. 

129. 

1, 294. 

307. 

1, 294. 

176. 

176. 

260. 

72, 129, 176, 313, X. 

95, 129, 176, 313, 357. 

X. 

41, 129, 313. 

313. 

150. 

77, 207, 416. 

176, 313. 

176. 

127, 176. 



13, 

129 

129 

13, 

176 

245 

72, 

72, 

260 

13, 

402 

176 

72, 

176 

176 

95, 

X. 

72, 

129, 

176 

129 

286 

176 

72, 

313 

136 

307 

357. 

357. 

357. 

357. 
176. 



129, 176. 

72, 129, 282, 313. 

X. 

89, 95, 129, 176, 282, 313. 

, X. 

176. 

282, 480. 

313. 
129, 176. 

, X. 

129, 313. 

; 176. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



77 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, IdJ^l-JfS — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



3,3'-Methylenebis[l-(5-chloro-o-toIyl)-3-triazeneacetic acid] 

3,3'-Methylenebis[I-(5-chioro-o-tolyl)-3-tria2enepropionic acid] . . 
p,p'-Methylenebis(N,N-diethylaniline) (Te tract hyldiaminodi- 

ph cn>-I ni ot h ane ) . 
*p,p'-M<'thylc'npbis(N,N-dimethylaniline) (Tetramethyldiamino- 

diplicnylincthane). 
p,p'-Methylenebis(N,N-dimethyI-2-nitroaniIine) (Dinitrotetra- 

methyldiaminodiphenylmethane). 
p,p'-Methylenebis(N-ethylaniline) [Di(ethylamino) diphenylme- 

thane]. 

N,N'-MethyIenebi8(4-methylaminoantipyrine) 

5-Methylenebis-2,4-toluenediamine (Tetraaminoditolylmethane) . . 
4,4'-Metliylonebis(m-toIuidine) (4,4'-Diamino-2,2'-diniethyldi- 

phenylmethane) . 

p,p'-Methylenedianiline 

2-[3-Methyl-l-(4-methyl-5-nitro-o-anisyl)-3-triazenel-5-sulfo- 

benzoic acid. 

2-MethyInaphthalene 

N-Methylnaphtho[2,3-h]quinoline (N-Methyl-l,2-anthrapyridine) 

N-Methyl-p-nitroaniline 

5-MethyI-4-nitro-o-anisidine 

4-Methyl-o-nitroanisole 

N-(5-Methyl-4-nitro-o-anisyl)-p-toluenesulfonamide 

2-Methyl-l-nitroanthraquinone 

2-Methyl-6-nitrobenzoxazole 

2-Methyl-3-nitrodiphenylamine (4-Nitrotoluene anilide) 

3-Methyl-l-(3-nitro-5-sulfo-o-tolyl)-5-pyrazolone 

3-Methyl-l-p-phenetyl-3-triazeneacetic acid 

*3-Methyl-l-phenyl-5-pyrazolone (Phenylmethylpyrazolone) 

Q-Methylstyrene 

N-Methyl-5-sulfoanthranilic acid 

3-Methyl-l-(m-sulfopheny!)-5-pyrazolone 

'3-Methyl-l-(p-sulfophenyl)-5-pyrazolone 

5'-Methyl-p-toluenesulfon-o-aniside [3'-Aniino(p-toIuenesul- 
f one) methoxy toluene] . 

3-Methyl-l-p-tolyl-3-triazene acetic acid 

4-MethylumbelIiferone 

•Naphthalene, solidifying at 79° C. or above (refined, flake): 

From American crude naphthalene 

From imported crude naphthalene 

2-NaphthaIeneacetic acid 

1,5-NaphthaIenediol (1,5-IMhydroxynaphthalene) 

2,3-Naphthalenediol (2,3-Dihydroxynaphthalene) 

•1,5-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

'2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

1-NaphthaIenesulfonic acid 

*2-Naphthalenesulfoiiic acid 

•Naphthalenesulfonic acids, sodium salt 

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Naphthalenesulfonyl chloride 

2-Naphthalenethiol 

1,3,6-NaphthalenetrisuIfonic acid 

Naphthalic anhydride 

•Naphthionic acid (4-Amino-l-naphthalenesulfonic acid) 

Naphthionic acid, sodium salt 

•1-Naphthol 

•2-Naphthol, tech 

l-Naphthol-2-carboxylic acid 

l-Naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid 

l-NaphthoI-4,8-disulfonic acid 

*2-Naphthol-3,6-disuIfonic acid 

*2-Naphthol-6,8-disuIfonic acid 

*2-Naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid, disodium salt 

*2-Naphthol-6,8-disu!fonic acid, disodium salt 

l-Naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid, monosodium salt 

2-Naphthol, phenyl ammonium salt 

l-Naphthol-8-suIfamide 

l-Naphthol-3-suIfonic acid 

*l-Naphthol-4-sulfonic acid (Nevile & Winther's acid) 

*l-Naphthol-5-suIfonic acid 

l-Naphthol-8-sulfonic acid 

•2-Naphthol-6-suIfonic acid (SchaefTer's acid) 

*2-NaphthoI-7-sulfonic acid 

2-Naphthol-8-suIfonic acid 

l-Naphthol-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid 1,8-sultone 

1-8-Naphthosultoue 

•1-NaphthyIamine 

2-NaphthyIamine 

1-Naphthylamine hydrochloride 

l-(l-NaphthyIamino)-2-anthraquinonecarboxylic acid 

N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine hydrochloride 

1-Naphthyl isocyanate , 



127, 129, 176, 313, 357, 



357. 
357. 
176, 282. 

72, 129, 176, 282, 313. 

176. 

307. 

X. 

313. 
129, 313. 

176. 
176. 

245, 384. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

13, 72, 8 

X. 
127, X. 
176. 
95, 176. 

55, 72, 95, 129, 176, 357. 
176. . 

176. 
176, 351. 

45, 72, 116, 129, 245, 369, 384, 387 

416, 439, X. 
45, 72, 245, 439. 
X, X. 

129, 176, 313. 
176. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 
95, 129, 282, 313, X. 
176. 

95, 307, 313, X. 
72, 95, 176, 313, X. 
95. 
176. 
176. 
89, 176. 
136. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 313. 
129 

9.5, 129, 159, 176, 313. 
72, 95, 313, X. 
176. 

95, 313. 
95, 176. 

95, 129, 176, 313, X. 
95, 129, 176, 313. 
95, 129, 176, 313, X. 
95, 129, 176, 313. 
313. 
72. 
95. 
176. 

13, 95, 129, 313. 
95, 129, 176, 313. 
176. 

22, 72, 95, 129, 176, 282, 313. 
95, 129, 282, X. 
95. 
95. 

95, 176. 

129, 159, 176, 313. 
129, 282, 313. 
136, 159. 
129, 313. 
136. 
136. 



78 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table oB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, IQItl-JfS — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.3) 



2-Xaphthyl isocyanate 

*2-NaphthyImercaptoaoetio acid 

5-Xitroacenaphthene 

p-Nitroacetanilide 

*m-Nitroaniline 

o-Nitroaniline 

p-Xitroaniline 

*2-Xitro-p-anisidine 

*4-Nitro-o-anisidine 

*5-Xitro-o-anisidine 

5-Nitro-2-anisidinesulf onic acid urea 

o_(4-Nitro-o-anisidino)benzenesulfonic acid 

o-NitroanisoIe 

p-Nitroanisole 

9-Xitroanthral[l,9-de, 4,10-d'e']bis(l,2,3-oxathiazine)-2,7-bis- 
dioxide. 

1-Xitroanthraquinone 

l-Xitro-2-anthraquinonecarborv'lic acid 

5-Xitro-l-anthraquinonesulfonic acid 

2-(l-Xitro-2-anthraquinonyl)anthr[2,3]oxazole-5,10-dione 

6-(m-Xitrobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid (m-Nitroben- 
zoyl J acid). 

6-(p-Xitrobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid (p-Xitroben 

zoyl J acid). 
•Xitrobenzene 

2-Xitro-p-benzenedi8ulfonic acid 

•Xitrobenzenesulfonic acid. 

m-Xitrobenzenesulfonic acid (m-Xitrobenzoylsulfonic acid) 

o-Xitrobenzene,sulfonic acid 

p-Nitrobenzenesulfonic acid, potassium salt 

m-Xitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride 

m-X'itrobenzoic acid 

p-Xitrobenzoic acid 

5-[a-(p-Xitrobenzoyl)acetamido]isophthaIic acid 

p-Xitrobenzoylacetic acid . . t 

.y_(p_Xitrobenzoyl)acetoacetic acid, ethyl ester 

m-Xitrobenzoyl chloride 

p-Xitrobenzoyl chloride : 

Xitrobenzoyltoluenediaminesulfonic acid 

o-Xitrobiphenyl 

p-Xitrobiphenyl 

Nitrobutyrylaminodiethylhydroquinone 

2-Xitro-p-cresol 

2-XitrodiphenyIsulfonc 

5-Xitroisophthalic acid 

•Xitronaphthalene 

7-Xitro-l,o-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

S-Xitro-l-naphthalenesuIfonic acid 

S-Xitronaphthalenetrisulfpnic acid 

4-Xitronaphthalic anhydride 

7-Xitronaphth[l,2]oxadiazole-5-sulfonic acid, 

4-Xitro-oxanihde 

o-Xitrophenetole 

*o-Xitrophenol 

p-XitrophenoI 

2-Xitro-l-phenol-4-suIfonamide 

Xitrophenylenediamine 

m-Xitrophenylhydrazine 

p-(p-Xitropheny]mercapto)aniHne (Nitroaminodiphenyl sulfide) . 

Xitrophfnyl phenyl ether 

X'itropyrazolone 

Xitropyrazoloneearboxylic acid 

.')-Xitrosalicylic acid 

l-Xitroso-2-naphthol 

•p-Xitrosophenol .■■■•. 

3-Xitro-.5-stearoylamido-p-toluenesulfonic acid 

m-Xitrotoluene 

o-X'itrotoluene 

p-Xitrotoluene 

X^itrotoluene mixtures 

*3-Xitro-p-toIuenesulfonic acid 

*.3-Xitro-o-toluenesulfonic acid 

4'-Xitro-p-toluenesulfono-o-toluide 

3-X'itro-p-toluic acid 

Xitrotoluidine 

*2-Xitro-p-toluidine 

4-Xitro-o-toluidine ■ 

5-Xitro-o-toluidine 

3-Xitro-p-tolunitrile 

3-Xitro-p-tolyl chloride 

2-[3-Methyl-l-(4-nitro-o-tolyI)-3-triazone]-5-sulfobenzoic acid. 

4-Xitro-X-p-tolylnaphthalimide 

X-(4-Xitro-o-tolyl)-p-toluenesulfonamide 

16-Xitro\'iolanthrone 



136. 

"2, 129, 176, 313. 



176 
95, 
13, 
89, 
13, 
129 
129 
129 
176 
176, 
129 
129 
176 



129, 176. 

72, 9.5, 129, 282, 307, 313, 480. 

307. 

129, 204, 307, 313, 486. 

, 176, 204, 282, 289, 313. 

, 176, 289. 

, 176, 282, 289, 313. 



, 307, 313. 
, 159, 313, X. 



176. 
176. 
129. 
176. 
129, 176. 

129, 176, 357. 

72, 129, 176, 307, 313, X. 

95. 

95! 129, 176, 282, 313. 

13, 89, 95, 129, 176, 282. 

176, 313. 

72. 

137. 

129, 207. 

129, 207, 313, 357. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129, 207. 

129, 136, 207, X. 

176. 

307. 

307. 

357. 

1, 95, 129. 

176. * 

176. 

129, 176, 313. 

95, 176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129 

51, 129, 282, 307, 480. 

72, 129, 307, 480. 

95. 

176. 

1.36, 176. 

313. 

357. 

357. 

357. 

176. 

72, 1.39, 159. 

41,72,95, 129, 176,313. 

176. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

13, 89, 95, 176. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

357. 

176. 

1. 

72, 129, 176, 204, 351, X. 

129, 176, 3.57. 

129, 176, X. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

72, 176. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



79 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941--'t3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



*Nitroxylene 

2-Nitro-p-xyIene 

4-Nitro-m-xylene 

4-Nitro-o-xylene 

Pentachlorobenzene 

Pentachlorophenol, sodium salt 

Pentachlorophenol and sodium salt 

Phenazine 

o-Phenetidine 

p-Phenetidine 

Phenol: 
•Natural: 

From coal tar: 

U.S.P 

37° C. m.p 

39° C. m.p 

82-84 percent 

All other 

•Synthetic: 

Bv caustic fusion: 

"82-84 percent 

39° C. m.p 

U.S.P 

All other 

From chlorobenzene bv liquid phase hydrolysis: 

U.S.P 

39° C. m.p 

From chlorobenzene by vapor phase hydrolysis: 

U.S.P 

From benzol by oxidation: 

U.S.P 

From petroleum: 

U.S.P 

Other 

Phenol, sodium salt 

Phenolsulfonic acid 

Phenoxathiin (Phenothioxin) 

o-Phenoxyaniline 

2-Phenoxyethanol 

2-Phenylanthr[2,3]oxazoIe-5,lO-dione 

*p-Phenylazoaniline and hydrochloride (Aminoazobenzene and 
hydrochloride). 

N-Phenyldibenzylamine (Dibenzylaniline) 

'm-Phenylenediamine 

*o-PhenyIenediamine 

*p-Phenylonediamine 

•Phenylglycine, sodium salt 

Phenylhydrazine 

Phenylhydrazine and hydrochloride 

a,a'-Phenyliminobis(p-toluenesulfonic acid) (N-Phenyldibenzyl- 
aminedisulfonic acid). 

2,2'-Phenyliminodiethanol (Phenyldiethanolamine) 

Phenylisocyanate 

Phenylmalonic acid, diethyl ester .' 

N-Phenyl-2-naphthylamine ■ ■ • 

o-Phenyl phenol 

p-Phenylphenol 

o-Phenylphenol, sodium salt 

N-Phenyi-p-phenylenediamine 

l-Phenyl-5-pyrazolone-3-carboxylic acid 

Phenylthiourea 

Phthalamide 

Phthalic acid 

•Phthalic anhydride 

Phthalonitrile 

Phthaloyl chloride 

*2-Picoline (alpha) 

•3-Picoline (beta) 

4-Picoline (gamma) 

*3-and 4-Picoline (beta, gamma mixture) 

•Picramic acid and salt 

Picric acid (Trinitrophenol) 

2-PipecoIine 

3-(l-Piperidyl)-l,2-propanedioI 

•Piperidine 

1-Piperidinepropanol 

Polychlorobiphenyl 

Polychloronaphthalenes 

Primuline, base 

Primuline sulfonic acid 

Proflavine, base (3,6-Diaminoacridine) 

Propiophenone 

Pseudocumidine 

Pyrazole anthrone yellow 



95, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

95, 176. 

294. 

207. 

127, 307. 

127, 307. 

176. 

129, 307. 

129, 307, X, X. 



384, 387. 

72. 

45, 72, 245, 384. 

45, 245, 384. 

45, 72, 245, 384, 387, X. 



45. 

45. 

45, 86, 307. 

45. 

127. 
179. 

130. 

425. 

384. 

384. 

159 

127, 294, 351. 

127. 

357. 

77, 479. 

176. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

129. 

72, 89, 95, 129, 176,'313, 370, 480. 

136, 139, 150. 

13, 72, 480, 486, X. 

127, 129, 313. 

127. 

127, 136. 159, 176. 

176. 

77, 127, 129. 

136. 

1, 294, X. 

176, 307. 

127. 

127. 

127. 

129, 139. 

176. 

137. 

127, 129, X. 

X. 

16, 45, 129, 307, 313, .383. 

129. 

307. 

45, 245, 363, X. 

45, 245, 384. 

45. 

45, 245, 384, X, X. 
72, 129, 313. 

129, 313. 

307. 

295. 

129, 207, 307. 

260. 

307. 

207. 

95, 176, 313. 

176, 349. 

1. 

351. 

46, 313. 
129, 176. 



80 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jfl-Jf3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



•Pyridine, refined 

Pyridine, salts, bases, and residues 

•Quinaldine (2-Methylquinoline) 

Quinaldine yellow, base 

*Quinizarin (1,4-Dihydroxyanthraquinone) 

Quinizarinsulfonic acid 

Quinoline 

Quinoline, 2° 

Quinoline yellow, base 

Quinolinic acid 

Resorcinol, tech 

/9-Resorcylic acid 

'Salicylic acid, tech 

Styphnic acid (2,4,6-Trinitroresorcin) 

Styphnic acid, lead salt 

'Styrene (Vinylbenzene) : 

•Grade for rubber (elastomers) 

•Other grades 

p-Sulfamylbenzoic acid (p-Carboxybenzene-sulfonamide) 

•Sulfanilic acid and salt 

p-Sulfoanthranilic acid 

o-Sulfobenzoic anhydride. 

p-Sulfo-o-benzoylbenzoic acid (Sulfo BB acid) 

p,p'-Sulfonyldiphenol (4,4'-Dihydroxy-diphenylsulfone) 

l-(p-Sulfophenyl)-5-pyrazolone-3-carboxylic acid (Pyrazolone T) 

2',4',5',7'-Tetrabromofluorescein 

•1,4,5,8-Tetrachloroanthraquinone 

Tetrachlorobenzene 

Tetrachlorophenol, sodium salt 

a,a,2,6-Tetrachlorotoluene 

Tetrahydrof urf uryl alcohol 

•l,4.5.8-Tetrakis(l-anthraquinonylamino)anthraquinone 

•p,p'-Thiodianiline 

6-Thiodimetanilic acid (Thioaniline disulfonic acid) 

3(2)-Thiophanthrenone (Naphthoxythiophene) 

*o-Tolidine and salts 

2-(o-Toloxy)ethanol (Cresylglycol) 

o-Toluenesulfonamide 

p-Toluenesulf onamide 

Toluenesulfonic acid, tech 

p-Toluenesulfonic acid 

p-Toluenesulfonic acid, ethyl ester 

o-Toluenesulfonyl chloride 

l)-Toluenesulfonyl chloride 

• a-Toluic acid and ethyl ester (Phenylacetio acid and ester) 

m-Toluidine 

o-Toluidine 

*p-Toluidine 

Toluidine, mixed 

2-(m-Toluino)ethanoI ( Hydroxy ethyl-3-toluidine) . • 

6-(p-Toluino)metanilic acid (4'-Methyl-4-aminodiphenylamine- 

2-sulfonic acid. 
•g_(p_'roluino)-l-naphthalenesulfonic acid (Tolyl pe» acid) 

a-Tolunitrile (Beitzyl cyanide) 

p-Tolunitrile 

•4_(Q_T'olylazo)-o-toluidine (o-Aminoazotoluene) 

4_(o_ToIylazo)-o-toluidine sulfate (o-Amino-azotoluene sulfate) . 

*o-(p-Tolyl)benzoic acid 

*m-Tolylenediamine 

p-TolvIenediamine 

•m-Tolylenediamine sulfate 

p-Tolylenediamine sulfate 

Tribromophenol 

•Trichlorobenzene 

1 ,2,4-Trichloro-5-nitrobenzene 

2,4,.'J-Trichlorophenol, sodium salt 

•a-Trichlorotoluene (Bcnzotrichloride) 

1,2,4-Trihydroxyanthraquinone 

p,o,a-Trimethylbenzyl alcohol (Diniothyltnlylcarbinol) 

o-Vanillin (2-Hydroxy-3-methoxybinzal<l(liyde) 

o-Veratraldehyde (2,3-Dimethoxyb('iizal(li'liyde) 

9-Vinylcarbazole 

Violanthrene • • • 

♦Violanthrone (Dibenzanthrone) 

m-Xylene 

Xylene, ortho and para ,■ j \' 

2,4-Xylenesulfonanilide (2,4-Dimethylbenzenesulfonanilide) . . 

Xylenol, crystals 

Xylenola 

•Low b.p 

Medium b.p 

High b.p 



45, 245, 384. 

X. 

45, 282, 313. 

313. 

13, 33, 72, 95, 129, 176, 282, 313, 

511. 
13, 282. 
45, 245, 384. 
45. 
313. 
95. 

129, 320, 351. 
149. 

127, 129, 203, 307, 313. 
X. 
X. 

127, 307, 512, 520. 

45, 72, 319, X. 

307. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 159, 176, 204, 313, 

480. 
176. 

136, 348. 
129. 

176, 351. 
13. 176. 
22. 

129, 176, 313. 
127, 207. 
127. 
129. 

207i 380. 
129, 176, 313. 
72, 95, 129, 282, 313, 357. 
313. 
313 

95. 129, 176, 313, 348, X. 
176. 
307. 
307, X. 
307. 

129, 136, 307, X. 
1.36. 480. 
307. 
307. 

51.233, 294, X, X. 
129, 176, 313. 
72, 129, 159, 176, 313. 
129, 203, 313. 
72. 
176. 
95. 313. 

72. 129, 176, 313. 

51, 233, 286, X. 

176. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313, X. 

176. 

72. 129. 176.313. 

72. 95, 129, 176, 313. 

72, X. 

95, 129, 313. 

72, 176. 

127. 

127, 129, 207, 307. 

176. 

127. 

203, 207, 307. 

176. 

319. 

307. 

307. 

176. 

176. 

72, 129, 176, 349. 

129, X. 

45, 129, 176. 

176. 

45. 

45. 

72. 384, 387, X. 

72, 384. 

72. 384. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



81 



Table 5B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 191fl-lf3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



Xylidines: 

*XvIidine, ortho and para. 

*2,4-Xylidine (m-4-Xylidine) 

2,5-Xylidine (p-Xylidine) 

•Mixed Xylidines 

2,4-Xylidine acetate 

4-(2,4-Xylylazo)-o-tokudine (Aminoazoxylene-toluidine) 

4-(2,4-XylylaEo)-2,.5-xylidine (Aminoazoxylene) 

Xylyl disulfide 

Other intermediates 



13, 72, 129. 

13, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 176, 294, 313. 

282, 313. 

72, 313. 

13, 176, 313. 

207. 

129, X. 



DYES 

Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales ivere reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1— It3 

[Dyes for which separate statistics are given in table lOA are marked below with an asterisk (*) ; dyes not 
so marked do not appear in table lOA because the reported data are confidential and may not be pub- 
lished. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing on p. 135. An X 
signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification number with the 
designated product.] 



Colour 
Index 



Prototype 
No. 



Dye 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



10 
11 



15 
16 
17 
19 
20 
21 
24 
26 
27 
29 
30 
31 
32 
36 
40 
44 
52 
53 
54 
56 
57 
68 
69 
73 
79 
84 
88 
90 
98 
99 
101 
105 
110 
113 
114- 
117 
118 
119 
122 
126 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX NUMBERS 

Nilroso Dyes 



Fast printing green. 
Naphthol green B. . 



Naphthol yellow S. 
Amido yellow E . . . 



Nitro Dyes 



Azo Dyes 
Monoazo Dyes 

Spirit yellow G 

'Acid yellow G 

'Spirit yellow R 

'Oil yellow 

'Chrysoidine Y 

'Chrysoidine R 

'Sudan I 

Croceine orange G 

■Orange G 

Chromotrope 2R 

Fast acid f uchsine B 

'Amido naphthol red G 

Brilliant sulphon red 

'Chrome yellow 2G 

'Chrome yellow R 

Paranitraniline red 

*Azo alizarin yellow GP 

'Victoria violet 4BS 

Lanaf uchsine 

Chromotrope 6B , 

'Amido naphthol red 6B 

Fast scarlet G base 

Toluidine red RL 

Sudan II 

'Ponceau R 

Double ponceau 

•Fast red B 

Chromotrope lOB 

•Chrome brown R 

Chrome green 2G 

Chromate brown B 

Acid chrome brown R . 

Chrome flavine G 

Sudan R 

Azo eosine G 

'Fast red B base 

Azo orange NA 

Eosamine G 

Chrome yellow 5G 

Direct pink 2GN 



176. 
72. 



72, 95, 313. 
176. 



176. 

13, 72, 176. 

13, 72, 107, 163, 176, 313. 

13, 72, 107, 129, 163, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176, 313, 320. 

72, 176, 313, 320. 

13, 72, 107, 129, 163, 176, 313, X. 

95, 313. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

313 

13, 313, 510. 

13, 72, 95, 107, 129, 176, 313. 

510. 

13, 55, 72, 89, 95, 176, 282. 

13, 55, 72, 95, 176, 507, X. 

176, X. 

13, 95, 176, 313. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

95, X. 

95, 313. 

13, 72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

13, 176. 

422 

13, 72, 163, 176, 313. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313, 320. 

129, 176. 

72, 95, 176, 313. 

129. 

72, 95, 176, 313. 

176. 

72, 89, 370. 

129, 282. 

89, 176, 370. 

163. 

129, 176. 

13, 176, 282, X. 

13. 176, 282, X. 

129. 

95. 

129. 



646064—46—6 



82 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1~Jf3 — Continued 



Protot\Tie 
No. 




DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR 

INDEX NUMBERS— Continued 

Azo Dyes — Continued 

Monoazo Dyes — Continued 

Direct pink 

Direct fast pink EBN 

Janus black B 

♦Metanil yellow 

Methyl orange 

* Azoflavine RS 

*Azo yellow 

Resorcin yellow 

*Orange II 

Hansa rubine 

•Orange R '■ • • 

•Pigment rubine B 

Lake red C 

Acid chrome brown B 

•Acid chrome garnet R 

Acid chrome violet N 

Chrome black PV 

Acid chrome black R 

Naphthylamine brown 

•Fast red A 

•Azo rubine 

•Fast red VR 

Croceine scarlet 3BX 

Amaranth 

Cochineal red A 

Lake red R 

'Mordant yellow O 

Chrome yellow RN 

•Chrome blue black B 

•Chrome blue black R 

•Chrome black T 

•Chrome black A 

•Fast acid blue R 

•Fast acid blue B 

Lake red D 

•Acid chrome red B 

•Chrome flavine A 

Direct pink 2B 



DisazolDyes 

•Resorcin brown 

•Resorcin dark brown 

Chrome brown G 

Acid black lOB 

Azo dark green A 

Cloth red G 

Brilliant croceine M 

Ponceau SS ex 

Erj'thrine P 

Cloth red 3G ex 

Sudan IV 

•Cloth red B 

Neutral gray G 

•Milling orange 

•Cloth scarlet G 

Direct fast red 8BL 



•Scarlet EC 

•Fast acid cyanine G 

•Fast acid cyanine oR ex 

Naphthalene acid black 4B 

Acid chrome verdone A 

Acid black B 

•Acid chrome black F 

•Acid chrome green SS 

•Fast acid black 2BN 

Fast acid black F 

•Fast acid cyanine black B 

Naphthylamine black D 

Brilliant black B 

•Developed blue NA 

•Developed blue B 

Naphthylamine black V 

•Direct fast heliotrope 

Developed brilliant orange GR ex. 

Direct brilliant violet 

•Direct fast scarlet 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



176, 313. 

129. 

176. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

129. 

13, 95, 176. 

13, 176, 313. 

72, 176, 313. 

72, 95, 107, 176, 204, 313, 320,' 510. 

176. 

72, 129, 313. 

95, 129, 313. 

72. 

313. 

95, 176, 313. 

95, 129, 313, 370. 

176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

13, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 95, 176, 313. 

95. 

13, 95, 313. 

72, 95, 176, 313. 

422 

89, 95, 176, 313. 

13, 95, 176, 313. 

95, 176, 313. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

95, 176, 313. 

95, 176, 313, 370. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

422 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313,511. 

13, 95, 129, 176, 313, 357, 370. 

129, 349. 

13, 72, 95, 107, 129, 176, 313, 510. 

13, 72, 95, 176, 313, 510. 

129 313. 

13, 72, 9'o, 129, 176, 313, 510. 

95, 129. 

95. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

313. 

176. 

72 129. 

95', 107', 129, 163, 176, 313. 

13, 95, 176, 313. 

89, 129. 

13, 72, 95, 176. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 510, X. 

13, 55, 72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, 

357, 510, X. 
13, 176,313. 
72, 89, 95, 176, 313. 
72, 89, 129, 176, 313. 
176. 
72. 

176, 313. 

72, 95. 129, 176, 313. 
72, 129, 176. 
95, 129, 176. 
176. 

72, 89, 129, 176, 313. 
176. 
176. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 
95, 129, 176, 313. 
129. 

89, '95, 129. 176. 
89, 129, 176, 357. 
13, 176. 
13, 72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



83 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for u-hich United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-4.3 — Continued 



Colour 

Index 

or 

Prototype 

No. 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR 

INDEX NUMBERS— Continued 

Azo Dyes — Continued 

Disazo Dyes — Continued 

Direct fast scarlet 4BA 

'Bismarck brown G 

Bismarck brown R 

Acid chrome black SE 

'Chrome fast yellow C 

Direct fast yellow 5GL 

Direct fast yellow 4GL ex 

Para fast brown GR 

Direct fast pink 2BL 

Brilliant yellow 

Chrysophenine G 

Congo red 

Congo corinth G 

Congo rubine 

Direct orange G 

Direct scarlet B 

Direct violet 

Direct violet B 

Benzo violet O 

Direct violet N 

Direct black RO 

Direct brilliant Bordeaux R 

Developed black BH 

Direct cyanine R 

Direct blue 2B 

Brilliant orange G 

Chrysamine G 

Cresotine yellow G 

Direct orange R 

Direct fast red F 

Direct brown M 

•Direct brown B 

Polar red 

Acid chrome red 

Direct brilliant red SB 

■•Chrome fast yellow RD 

Milling red G 

Direct orange R 

Benzopurpurine 4B 

Direct blue 3R 

Direct blue 4R 

Direct blue BX 

Direct blue 3B 

Direct orange G 

Acid anthracene red 3B 

Benzopurpurine lOB 

Fast blue B base and salt 

Direct azurine G 

Direct brilliant blue G 

Direct blue RW 

Direct blue B 

Chicago blue B 

Direct sky blue FF 

*Direct pure blue 

Trisazo Dyes 

Direct fast blue FR 

Naphthogene blue 4R 

Direct fast black FF 

Pluto black 5BS 

Plutoform black 

Diazo blue black RS 

Direct bronze G 

Direct brown BT 

Direct fast blue R 

Direct fast blue B 

Chlorazol brown 2G 

Direct black EW 

Direct black RX 

•Direct green ET 

Chloramine green B 

Direct steel blue G 

•Direct green B 

•Direct green G ;;;;:::;;; 



13, 95, 176. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

72, 89, 95, 282, 313, 357. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

89. 

176. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 313. 

13, 55, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313, 510. 

95.x. 

176, 313. 

13, 55, 72, 95, 176, 313, 510, X. 

95. 

95; 129, 176, 510. 

176. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

13. 

313. 

72, 95, 129. 176. 3l3, 510. 

313. 

13. 72, 95, 107, 129, 176, 313, 510. 

95, 129, 176. 

129. 

95, 313. 510. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

13, 55, 72, 89, 95. 129, 176, 313, 

510. 
13, 55, 72. 95, 129, 176, 313. 510. 
72. 95. 510. 

72, 89, 95, 129, 176. 313. 510, X. 
129. 
95. 

176, 313. 357. 
13, 72, 89, 95. 
13,313. 
95. 129. 313. 
129. 

95. 313. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 
13. 95. 107, 129, 313. 
13, 95, 313. 

13,' 72! 89, 95, 176. 313. 357. 
95. 129, 313, 510. 
172, 176, 313, X. 
13. 95, 129, 176, 313, 510. 
129 

13, 55, 95, 129, 176. 313. 
313. 
176. 

13. 55. 95. 129, 176. 313. 
55, 95, 129, 176, 313. 



13, 72, 95, 129. 

176. 

72, 95. 129. 176. 313. 

176. 

72, 89, 95. 

129, 313. 

176. 

13, 55, 95, 129, 176, 313. .357, 510, 

X. 
95. 

95, 129. 313. 
72. 

72. 95. 129, 176, 313, 510. 
72, 95, 129, 176, 313, 510. 
13, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 510. 
72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 510. 
55 129 
13', 72, 89. 95. 129, 176, 313. 370, 

510. 
95. 129. 113. 510. 



84 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for ichich United States produc- 
tion or sales icere reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-^3 — Continued 



Dye 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR 

INDEX NUMBERS— Continued 

Azo Dyes — Continued 

Trisazo Dyes — Continued 

Direct olive G 

♦Direct brown 3G0 

*Congo brown G 

Congo brown R 

Tetrakisazo Dyes 

'Direct brown G 

Naphthamine fast black RS 

Stilbene Dyes 

'Direct yellow R 

'Chloramine orange G 

'Stilbene yellow 

Diphenyl catechine G 

Diphenyl chrysoine G 



Pyrazolone Dyes 



'Fast light yellow G . 
'Xylene light yellow. 



'Tartrazine 

Polar yellow 

Dianil yellow 3G 

Pigment fast yellow G . . . 

'Chrome red B 

'Pyrazol orange 

Developed fast yellow 2G . 



Ketonimine Dyes 

*Auramine 

Triphenylmethane and Diphenylnaphthylmethane Dyes 

"Malachite green 

*Rhoduline blue 6G 

"Brilliant green 

Setocyanine 

*Acid green B 

"Fast acid green B 

Acid light green 

*Aeid glaucine blue 

*Para f uchsine 

"Magenta 

"Methyl violet B and base 

"Crystal violet 

"Ethyl violet 

Benzyl violet ? 

Spirit blue 2B 

Victoria blue 4R 

Fast green bluish 

Acid magenta 

Fast acid violet lOB 

"Acid violet 

Acid fast violet BG 

Alkali blue 6B 

Methyl blue 

Methyl cotton blue 

"Soluble blue 

Brilliant sky blue 5G 

•Patent blue V 

"Patent blue A 

"Acid chrome azurol B 

"Acid chrome cyanine R 

Aurine 

Victoria blue R 

"Victoria blue B 

"Naphthalene green V 

"Wool green S 

Xanlhene Dyes 

Rhodamine B, 20% 

Rhodamine B cone. 100% 

Rhodamine 6G cone. 100% 

Fast acid violet A2R 

"Fluorescein and salt 

"Tetrabromofluorescein (Eosine) 

Ery throsine bluish 

Phloxine 

1 Rose bengale B 



176. 

13, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313, .510. 

13, 55, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

129. 



72, 176, 510. 
176. 



72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176. 

313. 

95. 



13, 129, 176, 313, 357. 

13. 55, 72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, 

357. 
13, 72, 176, 204, 313, 357. 
95, 176, .357. 
176. 
176. 

72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313. 
13, 55, 95, 313, 357. 
129. 



72, 129, 282, 313. 



72, 132, 282, 313. 

129, 132, 176, 204, 282, 313. 

72, 132, 282, 313. 

129, 176. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 204, 282, 313. 

72, 129, 176, 282, 313. 

129, 176. 

72, 129, 176, 204, 282, 313. 

72, 320, X. 

72, 95, 176, 320, X. 

72, 129, 132, 176. 313, X, X. 

129, 132, 176. 204, 313. 

129, 132, 176. 

132. 

176. 

176. 

13. 

176. 

129, 282. 

72, 89. 95. 129, 176, 204, 282, 313. 

313. 

176, 320. 

176, 320. 

72, 320. 

72, 176, X. 

176. 

176, 204, 313. 

72, 176, 204, 313. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

129 

129,' 176, 204. 

129, 176, 204, 313. 

129, 176, 282, 313. 

72, 129, 176. 



129, 282. 

129, 282. 

129. 282. 

X. 

22, 72, 204, 313. 320. 

13, 22, 72, 204, 227. 313, 320. X. 

72, 320. 

320. 

72, 320. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



85 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1~43 — Continued 



Prototype 
No. 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR 

INDEX NUMBERS— Continued 

Acridine Dyes 

Acridine orange NO 

•Phosphine 

Phosphine 2G 

Euclirysine 2G 

Quinoline Dyes 

Quinoline yellow, spirit soluble 

•Quinoline yellow 

Quinoline yellow KT 

Thiazole Dyes 
'Primuline 

Direct pure yellow M 

'Direct fast yellow 

ThioflavineT 

Direct brilliant flavine S 

Azine Dyes 

•Wool fast blue 

*Safranine 

Methylene violet 

Safranine MN 

Acid cyanine 

'Induline (spirit-soluble) 

'Induline (water-soluble) 

'Nigrosine (spirit-soluble) 

'Nigrosine (water-soluble) . .* 

Aniline Black and Allied Dyes 

Diphenyl black base 

New fast gray 

Fur black . ." 

Oxazine Dyes 

Gallocyanine 

'New blue R 

Nile blue A ■ . 

Thiazine Dyes 

'Methylene blue 

Methylene green B 

New methylene blue N 

Brilliant chrome blue 

Sulfur or Sulfide Dyes 
Derivatives of Carbazole 

Carbazole vat blue R 

Carbazole vat blue G 

Other Sulfur or Sulfide Dyes 

'Sulfur black 

'Sulfur blue 

'Sulfur brown 

'Sulfur green 

'Sulfur maroon 

'Sulfur olive 

'Sulfur orange 

'Sulfur tan 

'Sulfur yellow 

Anthraquinone Dyes 

Alizarin VI 

'Alizarin red S 

Alizarin brown 

Alizarin SX 

Pseudopurpurine 

'Acid alizarin blue SE 

'Acid alizarin blue B 

Anthracene blue SWGG 

Anthracene blue WR ■. 

Anthracene blue SWX 

'Alizarin irisol R 

Alizarin astrol B 

Cyananthrol R 



129, 176, 357. 

72, 95, 129, 176, 313, 357. 

357. 

176, 357. 



282. 

129, 282, 313. 

282. 



95, 129, 313. 

129. 

95, 129, 176, 313, 349. 

129. 

349. 



95, 129. 176, 313. 
72, 129, 176, 313. 
176. 
313. 

129, 176. 
72, 176, 313. 
72, 176, 313. 
72, 176, 313. 
72, 176, 313. 



176. 
72, 357. 



72, 313,511. 
13, 72, 313. 
176. 



72, 129, 132, 176, 313. 

72. 

72. 

176. 



129, 176. 
129, 176. 



41, 72, 129, 176, 313, X. 

41, 72, 95, 129, 176, 215, 313, X. 

41, 72, 95, 114, 129, 176, 215, 313, 

X. 
41, 72, 129, 176, 215, 313. 
41, 72, 129, 176,313. 
41, 72, 95, 114, 129, 176, 215, 313, 

X. 
95, 129, 176, 313. 
41, 72,95, 129, 176,215. 
41, 72, 95, 114, 129, 176, 215, 313, 

X. 

13, 72, 176, 313. 

13, 72, 176, 313. 

313,511. 

313. 

176. 

33, 72, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

33, 72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, 511. 

33 

89^ 176, 313. 

33. 

33, 129, 511. 

129, 176. 

129. 



86 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, iP^i-^^— Continued 



Prototype 

No. 



Dye 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR 
INDEX NUMBERS— Continued 
.4 nihraquinone Dyes — Continued 
'Alizarin cyanine green 



Acid anthraquinone violet . . . 
'Anthraquinone blue black B . 



*Acid anthraquinone sky blue B. 

Anthraquinone blue SR 

Acid alizarin rubine 



Anthraquinone Val Dyes 

vat yellow GC, 12i-^% 

vat golden orange G, 12% 

vat golden orange R, 12% 

vat scarlet G, 16%% 

vat dark blue BO, 25% 

vat navy blue G 

vat jade green, 6% 

vat green B and black B, 123^%. 

vat violet R, 25% 

vat violet 2R, 12}^% 

vat violet B, 25% 

vat blue RS, 10% 

vat blue 3G, 10% 

vatblueGCD, 8}^% 

vat blue BCS, 20% 

vat yellow G, 12H% 

vat brown B, 22% 

vat pink R, 121^% 

vat yellow GK, 12!-^% 

vat red FF, extra, 12"^% 

vat brilliant violet 2B, 12i^% . . . 
vat brilliant violet RK, 12J^%. . 

vat olive R, 12J^% 

vat brown R, 12}^% 

vat brown G, 12J^% 

vat red violet RRN, 12H% 

vat red BN, extra, 12>^% 

vat violet BN, 25% 

vat vellow R, 12>^% 

vat blueSG 



'Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 
•Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 
'Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Indigoid and 7^hioindigoid Dyes 
'Indigo, svnthetic, 20% 

Indigo white, 20% 

Indigotin lA 

Tribromindigo RB, 20% 

'Broniindigo blue 2BD, 16% 

Vat blue 5B, 20% 

Brilliant indigo B 

Ciba pink B, 20% 

Vat red B, 12^% 

'Vat red 3B, 20% 

'Vat orange R, 10% 



Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Dyes 

■Blue*l 

■Blue* 2 

'Green * 1 

'Green *2 

Green «3 

'Orange * 1 

Orange * 2 

'Red * 1 

'Red #2 

•Red #3 

Red *4, *32 

Yellow « 1 

Yellow « 3, * 4 

'Yellow * 5 

'Yellow *6 

Yellow *22, *61 



Drug and Cosmetic Dyes 

Black * 1 : 

Blue «1, *4, *6, *9 

Brown * 1 

Green *1, «5, #6, *7 

Orange *1, «3, «4, *o, « 10, *11, *14, *15, *17. 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



13, 33, 72, 89, 129, 176, 313, 511, 

X. 
33, 129. 
13, 33, 72, 89, 95, 176, 282, 313, 

37p, 511. 
129, 176, 313. 
33. 
176. 



72, 129, 176. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 313. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 313, 349. 

72. 

129, 176. 

72, 129, 176, 313, 349. 

176. 

13, 129, 176, 313. 

176. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

129. 

72, 129, 176,313. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 313. 

176. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 313, X. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 313. 

129,313. 

129, 349. 

176. 



127, 129, 176, 313. 

313. 

129, 313. 

127, 313. 

127, 176, 313. 

127. 

313. 

127. 

313. 

72, 127, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 



46, 313, 
46, 244, 
46, 313, 
46, 313, 
487. 
46, 244, 
313. 
46, 244, 
46, 244, 
46, 244, 
313,487 
244. 
1.33,313 
46, 244, 
46, 244, 
313. 



487. 

313,446, 487. 
487. 
487. 

313, 446, 487. 

313,446. 
313, 446, 487. 
313, 446. 



313, 446, 487. 
313, 446, 487. 



313. 

244,313. 

244, 313. 

244, 313. 

22, 244, 313, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



87 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales ivere reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1—^3 — Continued 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR 

INDEX NUMBERS— Continued 

Drug and Cosmetic Dyes — Continued 

Red «1, «2, «3, *5, *7, «8, #9, *10, «11, * 12, *16, 

*17, *1S, *19, #21, *22, «24, *28, *29, *30, *31, 

*33, *34, *35, «36, «37, *3S, *39. 

Violet * 1 

Yellow *1,*5, *6, #7, ijSS, iJflO, *11 

Drug and Cosmetic Dyes, External 

Blue * 1 

Green #1 

Orange * 1 

Red*l, «3, *8, *10, *11, «13 

Violet *2 

Yellow *1, *5 

DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS 

Acid alizarin flavine R 

Acid anthracene brown B .' 

Acid anthracene brown 3B 

*Acid anthracene brown PG 

Acid chrome blue 2R 

Alizarin direct blue A2G 

Alizarin direct blue AR 

Alizarin supra blue A 

Alkali fast green lOG 

'Anthracene chromate brown EB 

•Artificial silk black G 

*Benzo Bordeaux 6B 

*Benzo chrome black blue B 

Benzo chrome brown BS 

Benzo copper blue B 

Benzo dark brown ex 

*Benzo fast black L 

♦Benzo fast blue 4GL 

Benzo fast blue 8GL 

Benzo fast brown 3GL 

Brilliant acid blue 3B 

Brilliant benzo violet B 

Brilliant milling blue B 

Brilliant wool blue FFR 

Cellitazol B 

*Celliton orange GR 

Chlorantine fast blue 2GL '. 

*Chlorantine fast brown BRL 

Direct fast red 5BL 

Chlorantine fast yellow 4GL 

Chlorantine fast yellow RL 

Chrome yellow DS 

Chrome yellow G 

Cibacete diazo black B 

Cibacete sapphire blue G 

Cotton black 3G 

Diamine azo Bordeaux B 

Diamine Bordeaux B 

Diamine catechine G 

Diamine catechine 3G 

♦Diamine fast blue FFB 

♦Diamine fast orange EG 

♦Diamine fast orange ER 

Diaminogen blue N2B 

♦Diazo Bordeaux 7B 

♦Diazo brilliant green 3G 

♦Diazo brilliant scarlet 2BL ex 

Diazo brilliant scarlet ROA 

Diazo brown NR 

Diazo brown 3RB 

Diazo fast red 5BL 

Diazo fast red 7BL. 

Diazo indigo blue 4GL 

♦Diazo rubine B 

Diazo sky blue B 

Diazo sky blue 3GL 

Fast mordant blue'B 

♦Fast scarlet 2G base, salt 

Fastusol brown L3R 

Fastusol gray R 

Fastusol orange L5G 



22, 176, 227, 244, 313, X, X. 



244, 313. 
22, 244, 313. 



313. 
313. 
244. 

244, 313. 
244. 
244, 313. 



313. 

72. 

95 

IS, 89, 95, 176, 357, 510. 

95, 176. 

176. 

176. 

129, 176. 

129, 176, 313. 

13, 72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, 510. 

95, 176, 313, 510. 

13, 95, 176, 313. 

95, 129, 176, 313. 

72, 176. 

176. 

176. 

13, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

89, 176, 357. 

357. 

176, 313. 

13. 

13, 95. 

129, 176. 

176, 313. 

72. 

72, 129, 176, 360. 

95. 

95, 176, 313, 357. 

95. 

95, 357. 

95, 357. 

95. 

72. 

95. 

95. 

176. 

313. 

13, 313. 

13,313. 

13, 72, 313. 

13, 95, 176, 313. 

72, 89, 95, 176. " 

72, 89, 176, 215. 

13 313 

13! 89, 129, 176, 357. 

176, 313, 357. 

89, 129, 176, 313. 

176, 357. 

176. 

176, 313. 

89. 

89, 129, 3.57. 

129, 176. 

89, 176, 357. 

176. 

176. 

511. 

13, 176, 282, 313, .357, X. 

176. 

176. 

176. 



88 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthitic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941—43 — Continued 



Colour 

Index 

or 

Prototype 

No. 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.5) 



99 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
108 
109 
112 
116 
118 
121 
122 
123 
124 
128 
134 
135 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
151 
152 
155 
163 
164 
165 
166 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
176 
178 
180 
181 
182 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
197 
198 
199 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 

NUMBERS— Continued 

Fastusol yellow L5G 

'Guinea fast red BL 

Guinea fast red 4BL 

Hansa yellow G 

Hansa yellow 5G 

Hansa yellow lOG 

Helindone pink B ex 

Helindone pink R ex 

Helio red RMT 

Indanthrene brilliant orange RK 

Indanthrene brown BR 

* Indanthrene brown RRD 

•Indanthrene khaki 2G 

Indanthrene pink B 

Indanthrene rubine R dbl 

Indocyanine B 

Metachrome Bordeaux R 

Metachrome red G 

Milling orange G 

Mining yellow H5G 

Milling yellow O . 

Monochrome blue black B 

Naphthol blue black S 

Naphtogene blue B 

Neolan black WA 

Neolan blue GG 

Neolan Bordeaux R 

Neolan orange R 

Oxydiaminogen OB 

Paper red A ex 

Polar orange GS 

Polar orange R 

Polypheny] dark blue SR 

Rapidogen blue BN 

'Rapidogen blue D 

Rapidogen Bordeaux R 

Rapidogen brown GN 

Rapidogen red GS 

Rapidogen red RS 

Rapidogen .scarlet RS 

Rapidogen yellow G 

'Rosanthrene fast Bordeaux 2BL 

Rosanthrene orange R 

Setacvl direct orange 2R 

Silk black 4BF 

Sudan brown 5B 

Sudan orange 2R 

Sudan orange RT 

Sudan red BB 

Sulphon orange G 

'Sulphon yellow R 

Supra light rubine BL 

Supramine black BR 

Supramine blue R 

Supramine Bordeaux B 

Supramine brown R 

Supramine red 3B 

Supramine red 2G 

Supramine yellow R 

Victoria fast violet 2R ex 

Victoria pure blue B 

Victoria violet RL 

'Zambesi black D 

'Zambesi black V 

Acid anthracene brown KE 

Acid anthracene brown LE-CF 

Acid anthracene brown WSG 

Alizarin supra sky R 

Alphanol brown B 

Amido naphthol brown 3G 

Anthralan red B-CF 

Azosol fast orange G 

Azosol fast orange RR 

Azosol fast red 3B 

Azosol fast scarlet CR 

Azosol fast scarlet CGG 

Azosol fast yellow GR 

Benzo fast Bordeaux 6BL 

Benzo fast brown RL 



176. 

72,89, 129, 176, 313. 

89. 

72. 

129. 

129. 

72. 

72, 129, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

72, 95, 129, 176, .'{.J?. 

72, 129, 176, 313. 

129. 

129, 176. 

176. 

89. 

511. 

13. 

13. 176. 

313. 

95. 

13, 313. 

95. 

95. 

95, 176. 

95. 

95. 

13, 176,313. 

176. 

95 

95, 176, 313. 

95. 

176. 

129, 176, 3.37. 

176, 357. 

176. 

176, 357. 

129, 176, 357. 

176, 357. 

176, ,357. 

13, 89, 95, 129, 176, .357. 

95, 176, 357. 

72. 

95.. 

176. 

72 . 

176. 

176. 

13, 176. 

13, 72, 95, 176, .357. 

176,313. 

13, 176. 

176. 

176. 

13. 

13, 176. 

176. 

176. 

72, 313. 

176. 

95 

95,' 176, 313. 

95, 176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



89 



Pable lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for ichich United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by mannfacturer, 191(1-43 — Continued 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS— Continued 

Benzoform blue BBL 

Benzo new blue 5B 

Brilliant indocyanine 6B-CF 

Brilliant indocyanine G 

Brilliant sulpho tiavine FFA 

Celliton blue G 

Celliton fast blue B 

Celliton fast blue FR 

Celliton fast blue FFR . .* 

Celliton fast blue green B 

Celliton fast brown 3R 

Celliton fast brown 5R 

Celliton fast navy blue B 

Celliton fast navy blue BR 

Celliton fast pink B 

Celliton fast pink FF3B 

Celliton fast red GG 

Celliton fast red violet RN 

Celliton fast rubine B 

Celliton fast rubine 3B 

Celliton fast violet B 

Celliton fast violet 6B 

Celliton fast yellow G 

Celliton fast yellow RR ; 

Celliton scarlet B 

Celliton yellow 5G 

Chrome fast orange 3RL 

Diazo brown 3R 

Diazo fast yellow 2G 

Diazo fast yellow 3G 

Fast black B salt 

Fast black K salt 

Fast black LB base 

Fast blue BB base, salt 

Fast Bordeaux BD salt -. 

*Fast Bordeaux GP base, salt 

Fast Corinth X salt 

♦Fast garnet GBC base, salt 

Fast garnet GC salt 

Fast orange GC base, salt 

Fast orange GR base, salt 

Fast orange RD salt 

Fast red AL salt 

Fast red GL base, salt 

Fast red 3GL base, salt 

♦Fast red KB base, salt 

Fast red RC base, salt 

Fast red RL base, salt 

♦Fast red TR base, salt 

Fast violet B base, salt 

Fast yellow GC base, salt 

Fastusol orange LGGL 

Fastusol red violet LRL ...........': 

Fastusol turquoise blue LGL 

Hansa yellow GA 

Hiinsa yellow 3R 

Heliogen blue B 

Heliogen green G 

Indanthrene brilliant orange GR 

Indanthrene direct black RB 

Indanthrene golden orange 3G 

Indanthrene golden yellow GK 

Indanthrene golden j'ellow RK 

♦Indanthrene olive green B 

Indanthrene red FBB 

Monochrome black blue G 

Monochrome red FG 

Monochrome violet FB 

•Naphthol AS 

•Naphthol .4.S-BO 

♦Naphthol AS-BR 

'Naphthol AS-BS 

•Naphthol AS-D 

Naphthol AS-DB 

Naphthol AS-E 

Naphthol AS-G 

Naphthol AS-ITR 

♦Naphthol AS-OL 

Naphthol AS-RL 



176. 

510. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

72, 176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

176, X. 

176. 

176. 

13, 176, 313, 357, X. 

176. 

13, 176, 282, 313, X. 

176. 

13, 176,313. 

176, X. 

176. 

176,313. 

13, 176, 282, 357, X. 

13, 176, 357, X. 

13, 72. 176. 

13, 176, 313. 

176. 

13, 176, 313, X. 

176. 

176, 282, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

13, 72, 176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

13, 72, 176, 313. 

13, 176, 313, X. 

13, 129, 176, 313. 

13, 72, 176, 313. 

13, 72, 176, 313, 357 

176. 

17G. 

13, 176. 

176. 

176, 313, 357. 

13, 176, 313. 



90 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jtl-Jf3 — Continued 



Colour 
Index 



Prototype 
No. 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



313 

314 
315 
316 

318 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
356 
357 
358 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS— Continued 

Naphthol AS-SW 

Naphthol AS-TR 

Neolan orange G 

Neolan j'ellow GR cone 

Palatine fast blue BN 

Palatine fast claret RN 

Palatine fast green BLN 

Palatine fast marine blue REN 

Palatine fast orange GEN 

Palatine fast orange GN 

Palatine fast orange RN 

Palatine fast pink BN 

Palatine fast red RN 

Palatine fast violet 3RN 

Palatine fast violet 5RN 

Palatine fast yellow ELN 

Palatine fast yellow GRN 

Rapid fast orange RH 

Rapid fast red FGH 

Rapid fast red RH 

Rapid fast scarlet ILH 

Rapid fast yellow GGH 

Rapidogen black MG 

Rapidogen black brown IT 

Rapidogen blue N 

Rapidogen blue R 

Rapidogen brown IB 

Rapidogen brown IPT 

Rapidogen golden yellow R 

Rapidogen golden yellow 3R 

Rapidogen green B 

Rapidogen orange G 

Rapidogen orange R 

Rapidogen red violet RR 

Rapidogen violet B - . . . 

Rapidogen yellow G 

Rapidogen yellow 2G 

Solamine blue FFG 

Variamine blue BD salt 

Variamine blue RT salt 



UNGROUPED DYES 
Acetate rayon dyes: ' 
*Black III, IV, IV ex., AS, AZO, AZZ. B, BG, BN, 
END, BNF, BNS, BZA, BZS, 2G, 3G, 3GNF, GS, 
J, NAZ, NBZ, NS, NSJ, NZD, ONS, ONSW, RB, 
SD, SN. 
♦Blue III, IV, 2B, 2BA, BBN, BNN, FFR, 2G, 3G, 
GBC, GGN, GR, R, 3R. RTG. 

Blue black 

Bordeaux, FJA 

•Brilliant blue, B, R 

Brilliant Bordeaux 3B 

Brilliant orange G 

Brilliant red 

Brilliant vellow FF 

Brown BR, R, Y 

•Developed black AD, AS, B, 3B, BBN, BDN, BGD, 
CB, FL, GA, GFS, MBD, NS, SOL. 

Developed na\^ SD 

Developed yellow GN 

Developer I 

Direct black, GN 

Direct blue S : 

Direct orange R 

Direct red BP, YC 

Direct scarlet GP 

Direct yellow GN 

Discharge blue R 

Fast black B, BTN 

Fast blue 3BFV 

Fast blue green BG 

Fast Bordeaux B 

Fast red 

Fast violet RL 

Fast yellow GL, GR, 4RL 

Fluorescent yellow HEB 

Golden yellow VIII, IX, XI, XII, XIII, F, FSI. . . . 

Gray NBN 



13. 72, 176, 313, X. 

13, 176, X. 

95. 

95. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129, 176. 

129, 176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129, 176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129, 176, 357. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

129, 176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 



13, 129, 176, 313, 510, X. 



13, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, X. 

313. 

72. 

13, 72, 129, 360, 511. 

72. 

89. 

129. 

176. 

89, 129. 

72,89, 129, 163, 176,360. 

13. 

95. 

13. 

95. 

72. 

89. 

72, 95. 

95. 

95. 

13. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

89. 

511. 

511. 

129, 176. 

72. 

13, 72. 

13. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



91 



Table lOB. — S_i/nthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1—^3 — Continued 



Colour 

Index 

or 

Prototype 

No. 



UNGROUPED DYES— Continued 
Acetate rayon dyes ' — Continued 

Green blue I, II, II ex 

Heliotrope I 

liight orange FSI 

Monocel orange II 

Monooel rubine G 

Monocel scarlet B, G 

Navy blue B, BP, BX, BXN, R 

•Orange, I, II, III, BL, GF. GFN, GR, GRN, JER, 
R, 2R, 2RN, 3R, 4R, TF. 

Pink II, B, BR 

Printing blue 

Pure blue B, BR, BR ex 

Pure yellow I, II, III 

Purple 

♦Red I, III, V, VI-X, VII, VIII, B, 2B, .3B, 6B. BF, 
BM. BR, FSI, GG, NB, R, RN, RP, Y, 2Y. 

Red violet R 

♦Rubine IX, B, C, G, R 

Saphirole blue FFG , 

•Scarlet, III, B, BG, BN, BR, BS, CSB, GY 

Skv blue B 

Turquoise G, MG 

♦Violet II, B, 4B, BA, CB, 2R, 3R, 4R 

Violet blue FSI 

♦Yellow *8, #38, C, G, 5G, 6G, 3GA. 3GM, 6GN, 
6GN ex., GR, GS, GX, JT, N, R, 3R, RN cone. 

Acid anthracene yellow GR ex 

♦Acid black AR, 3G, GRF, GRF cone, R, RB, RCW, 
RYC. 

Acid black jet 

Acid blue, D, R, RS 

Acid blue black RC 

Acid brilliant blue RR 

Acid brilliant red 4BL, G 

♦Acid brown, B, G, FN, MF, N, R, R cone, RB, RGO, 

ROO. 

Acid chromal brown AEB 

Acid chrome blue .3G, .3GN, 2RL 

Acid chrome brown DKL, RLL 

Acid chrome olive BL 

Acid chrome yellow ME 

Acid dark green B 

♦Acid fast blue BN, G, 2GA, IB 

Acid fast brown CGS 

Acid fast orange LW 

Acid fast red CA, CY 

Acid fast yellow JY, N 

Acid fuchsine 

Acid garnet BG 

Acid golden yellow R 

Acid green A, BL, GR, S 

Acid lake red 

Acid leather brown EBR 

.4cid light red 4BL 

Acid light rubine BL 

Acid milling orange R, 4R 

Acid milling yellow GN, 2GX 

Acid naphthol blue black 

Acid navy FN 

Acid navy blue, B cone 

Acid neutral red 3G ex 

Acid olive G 

Acid orange 2R, 4R, 4RN, YF 

Acid pink BA, N 

♦Acid red. A, B, 3B, 3B ex., 3BX, GL, OA 

Acid sapphire G 

Acid scarlet G, Y 

Acid spirit black 

Acid spirit orange R 

Acid spirit yellow G, 2R 

♦Acid violet A, B, 2R, RNL 

♦Acid yellow, BE, G, 2G, 3G, GOO, GR, R 

Alizarin, oil soluble 

Alizarin blue GS 

Alizarin fast blue RB 

Alizarin fast gray 

Alizarin gray DG 

Alizarin orange RA 

Does not include acetate rayon dyes grouped under Colour Index 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



13. 

13. 

13. 

510. 

510. 

510. 

13. 72, 129, X. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 313, 360, 510, X. 

13, 313, X. 

13. 

13, 129. 

13. 

129. 

13, 72, 129, 163, 176, 313, 360, X. 

129. 

13, 129, 163, 510, X. 

89. 

13, 72, 129, 163, 313, 510, X. 

129. 

13, 176. 

13, 129, 176, 313, X. 

13. 

13, 72, 89, 129, 163, 313, 360, X. 

89. 

55, 129, 313, 510. 

176. 

357, 370. 

129. 

129. 

129, 313. 

55, 72, 357, 370. 

95. 

95, 176. 
95. 
95. 
95. 
95. 

72,' 89, 129, 313. 
129. 
13. 

72, 129. 
72. 
89 
37Cf. 
357. 

129] 357, 370. 
72. 
176. 
129. 
176. 
72, 129. 
129, 357. 
95. 
510. 
72, 510. 
13. 
72. 

72, 357. 
72, 95. 

55, 95, 129, 357. 
X. 
357. 
72. 
72. 
72. 

129, 357, 370, 510. 
55, 72, 95, 357. 
X. 
313. 
313. 
176. 
313. 
13. 
ind Foreign Prototype numl era. 



92 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jtl-.k3 — Continued 



Colour 
Index 



Prototype 
No. 



Dye 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



UNGROUPED DYES— Continued 

Alizarin supra blue C 

Amido brilliant red BB 

Anthracene blue SWN 

Anthracene chrome brown RL 

Anthracene indigo blue 

Anthraquinone blue EGA, 3G, 5R, SWB, WSA 

Anthraquinone vat black 2G, J, R 

Anthraquinone vat black brown V 

♦Anthraquinone vat blue CLX-RCX, GR 

Anthraquinone vat blue green B, FFB, Y 

Anthraquinone vat Bordeaux GRR 

Anthraquinone vat brilliant green 4B 

Anthraquinone vat brilliant red B 

Anthraquinone vat brilliant violet 3B 

Anthraquinone vat brilliant yellow 4G 

Anthraquinone vat brown XR, RRD, VR 

Anthraquinone vat dark blue BOR 

Anthraquinone vat dark brown R 

Anthraquinone vat dark olive B 

Anthraquinone vat direct black, 3G 

Anthraquinone vat flavine GC 

Anthraquinone vat golden orange YL 

Anthraquinone vat golden yellow GO 

'Anthraquinone vat gray GD, R, RL, M 

Anthraquinone vat green 2BL, Y 

Anthraquinone vat khaki OG, V 

♦Anthraquinone vat navy blue, BN, BR, G, 3G, NRD. 

Anthraquinone vat olive, G, GGL, T 

Anthraquinone vat olive green 3B 

Anthraquinone vat orange A 

Anthraquinone vat printing black B, R, TL 

Anthraquinone vat printing green B, BG 

Anthraquinone vat red brown, DBL, R 

Anthraquinone vat red violet RRN, 6RN 

Anthraquinone vat scarlet BBN 

Anthraquinone vat violet FFBX 

Anthraquinone vat yellow 8G, 3RD 

Azoanthrene dyes; 

Black N, NV 

Blue G, RL, RS 

Brown DW, R 

Claret S 

Golden orange R ex 

Green G 

Navy BR, CW, LN 

Red 3BW 

Rubine B ex., S 

Scarlet O, Y ex 

Turquoise B 

Violet O, OC 

Yellow G, GSB, S ex 

Azo Bordeaux BL, 4BL 

Azo brilliant green, B 

Azo brown BY, DB, RN 

Azo ceresine 

Azo cosine 2B 

Azo fast blue B cone, 2R 

Azo fast brilliant red B 

Azo fast orange GRN '. 

Azo fast red B 

xA.zo fast violet 

Azo fast yellow G 

Azo green OL 

Azo oil black 

Azo oil blue black B. .,, 

Azo olive green BL 

Azo orange GCW, GN, GR, RG, 2RG, RNC, 3RP, RS 

.4zo red DP, R, RP 

Azo scarlet, 2BLL, G, RB, RBN 

Azo seal brown 

Azo violet B, R 

Azo yellow GG, N 

*Azoic dyes and their components: - 
Dyes : 

Rapid fast: 

Blue B 

Brown IRII 

Orange, G 

RedGL 

Scarlet RII 



176. 

176. 

313. 

511. 

176. 

33, 129. 

72, 313. 

176. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

129. 

129. 

129 

13, 129, 313. 

13. 

129. 

13. 

129, 313. 

313. 

129. 

176. 

72, 129, 313. 

129. 

X. 

13, 72, 129, 176. 

13, 129, 176. 

176. 

129. 

13, 176. 

176. 

13, 313. 

13. 

176. 

176. 

129, 176. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

3.57. 

176. 

357. 

72. 

129. 

313. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

313. 

176. 

357. 

313. 

313. 

357. 

357. 

176. 

3.57. 

357. 

357. 

176. 



176. 
176. 

72, 357. 
176. 
176. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



93 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941~If3 — Continued 



Colour 

Index 

or 

Prototype 

No. 


Dye 


Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 




UNGROUPED DYES— Continued 
*A2oic dyes and their components ^ — Continue 
Dyes — Continued 
Rapidogen: 

Black DM 


d 


129. 




Blue, MGC, MSG 

Bordeaux, MR 


129, 357. 
129, 357 




Brown, FFIB, GRNN 
Corinth DR 


IRF. . . 




176, 357 








129. 




Dark brown AR, R 


129, 176. 




G, double 


176. 




Golden yellow MRS, N, RNW. 
Navy blue FFR 




129, 176, 357 






176. 




Orange FFR 


176. 




Pink FITRW 


176. 




*Red, BB, FFBB, FFG 
•Scarlet FFG, FFR, R, 
Yellow, FFGG, GP . . 


FFR, G 
RBY . . . 


IP, M2B 


72, 129, 176, 357. 
72, 129, 176, 357. 








176, 357 




Components: 

Fast color bases: 


172. 




Garnet GC 


13, 176. 






13. 




Red GGN, PDC 


176. 




Scarlet R 


13, 176, X. 




Fast color salts: 

Black G 


176. 




*Blue B, K 


13, 172, 176, 357 


"• 


'Orange 


13, 176, 282, 313, 357. 
13. 




•Red B, FG, FR, G, 3G 
Rubine FG 


, 2GS, KBN, RC. . 


13, 176, 282, 313, 357, X. 
172. 




•Scarlet R 


13, 176, 282, 313 357 X 




Yellow G, 3GL 


13. 




Naphthols: 

AS-BG 


13, 176. 




AS-GR 


176. 




AS-KR 


176. 




AS-L4G 


13. 




AS-MX 


176. 




AS-OP 


357. 




AS-PH 


176, 313. 




AS-PN 


72. 




AS-SR 


176. 




Benzoform dyes: 

Black RR 


176. 




'Blue BNL, GG, GS 


176. 




Blue green B 


176. 




Bordeaux 7B, 7BAN0 


176. 




Brown LG, L3R 


176. 




Gray N 


176. 




Orange FGL 


176. 




Red 7B, G 


176. • 




Rubine B 


176. 




Violet BB, R 


176. 




Yellow 3G, GR 


176. 




Black BDN, NAP 


72, 176. 




Brilhant acid blue 3B, 6BN 


313. 




Brilliant benzo green B 


176. 




Brilliant benzo violet B, 4B 


129, 176. 




Brilliant blue 5B 


313. 




Brilliant milling blue FFR 


176. 




Brilliant wool blue G ex , N 


313. 




Carbolan blue B 


129. 




Chroniate brilliant brown RL 


89. 






511. 




•Chrome black EA ex., 3G, P2B, SW, 

Chrome blue ATX 

Chrome brilliant orange 2R 


T cone. 


WSE... 


89, 129, 313. 

129. 

13. 




•Chrome brown 2AB, B, B ex., EBL, HN cone. 
RB, 4RC, VR. 


O, PG, 


72, 89, 95, 129, 176, 313, 357. 
511. 




Chrome fast red 2RL 


129. 






129. 






129. 




Chrome green B, CB, G 


95, 313. 




Chrome leather fast black SG 


176. 



2 Does not include azoic dyes and their components grouped under Colour Index and Foreign Proto- 
type numbers. 



94 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 191fl-Jt3 — -Continued 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to liet on p. 135) 



UXGROUPED DYES— Continued 

Chrome orange 3R, RL 

Chrome red G 

Chrome violet B 

'Chrome yellow A, AS, B, FTL, 2G, 2GN, ME, SW. . . . 

Chromolan blue 3R 

Ciba blue BR 

Ciba red R 

Ciba scarlet 

Ciba violet 

Cloth red Y 

Cotton black 3G 

Cotton red D 

Croceine scarlet FP cone 

•Developed black G, NS, OT, ZV cone 

Developed blue B, 6G, 5GL, GR, 4RL 

•Developed Bordeaux 2BL, 7BL, RB 

Developed brilliant blue BBL 

Developed brilliant orange GR, GR ex., GRS, ex., RAS 

Developed brilliant scarlet .5BL, GL 

Developed brown CBS, 6G, R 

Developed dark brown B 

Developed fast black PG ex 

Developed fast blue B 

Developed fast Bordeaux BGL, BTL 

Developed fast brown RK 

Developed fa.st green GFL , 

Developed fast orange 6R 

Developed fast turquoise 8GL 

Developed fast violet BL 

Developed fast yellow 2G 

Developed garnet RD 

Developed green BL, 2GL, GW 

Developed indigo blue BRR, 3GL 

Developed orange, DD, GR, R, 2R, 3R, RFW, WD. . 

•Developed red 2B, 7BL, lOBL, BFW 

•Developed scarlet A, AE, FW, GFW, 2BLN ex., N. R. 

Developed violet BRD, RR 

Developed yellow 4G 

Diazophen red BTB 

Diazophen yellow BTB 

•Direct black CW, 3G, 5G, NCW 

•Direct blue A, 2B, 5B, BR, FF, 2G, .3G, oG, GL, GR, 
NR, NRS, RL, RDW, VRS. 

Direct blue green GW 

Direct Bordeaux 6BP 

Direct brilliant blue BFL 

Direct brilliant cerise 

Direct brilliant green VB 

Direct brilliant orange RS 

Direct brilliant red 12B cone 

•Direct brilliant violet B, 4B, R 

JDirect brilliant yellow 8G 

•direct brown BRLL, CSW, CWR, FW, GB, G2R, 3GS, 
K, KRS, N. R, RB, RRF, RY, S, VG. 

Direct catechine 

Direct chrome black blue BNL 

Direct chrome blue black B 

Direct chrome navy blue B 

Direct copper blue GL, RRX 

•Direct fast black AM, FAM, FOR, FTC, G, PG ex.... 
•Direct fast blue, FFE, 6GKS, GL, 8GL, R, RL, 3RL, 
SFGL, SRL. 

Direct fast Bordeaux 2B, 5B, BLL, 6BLN 

•Direct fast brown BRL, BRLN, 4GL, LBR, R, 4R, 
2RL, 3YL. 

Direct fast catechine G\ 

•Direct fast gray BL, GL, 2GL, LVGL, LVL, RLN. . . 

Direct fast olive brown RL 

Direct fast olive drab LH 

•Direct fast orange EG, E3G, ER, ERS, G, 2G cone, 

4G cone, 5GC, GL, 2GL, R. 6R, SRL, 2RN, RT, S 
♦Direct fast red 3BL, 8BLN, 8BLSW. FA. R 

Direct fast rubine B cone, 2B, LB 

Direct fast scarlet 4BA, 8BD, G 

Direct fast turquoise 8GL 

Direct fast violet 5BL, 2RL 

•Direct fa.st yellow, G, 4GL, 5GL, 4GLP, LR, RL 

Direct golden vellow R, R spec 

Direct grav BBC. LVL, Z 

•Direct green B, G, 3G, GB, 5GSC, 2Y 



129, 313. 

313. 

89. 

72, 89, 95, 129, 313, X. 

313. 

127. 

127. 

127. 

127. 

95. 

72, 510. 

95. 

313. 

55, 72, 95, 129, 176. 

13, 95, 129, 360. 

13, 129, 313. 

313. 

89. 176. 

89, 129. 

129, 176, 313. 

89. 

129. 

95. 

176. 

129. 

89. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

89, 313. 

13. 

129. 

176. 

13, 129, 313. 

13, 95, 129, 313. 

13, 129, 313. 

13, 129. 

129. 

72. 

72. 

95, 176, 313, 510, X. 

13, 72, 89, 129, 313, 360, X. 

313. 

176. 

313. 

72. 

313. 

95. 

313. 

13, 72, 313. 

313. 

13, M, 72, 89, 95,'_107, 176, 313, 

510, X. 
129, 313. 
176. 
313. 
13. 

129 313. 

13, 89, 129, 176, 313, 510. 
95, 129, 313, X. 

176, 313. 

89, 129, 176, 313. 

89. 

129,313, X. 

13. 

13. 

72, 89, 95, 129, 313, X. 

13, 89, 313, X. 

13, 313. 

13, 89, 176, 313. 

129. 

13, 313. 

89, 95, 129, 176, 313. 

357. 

X. 

13, 72, 129, 176, 313. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



95 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-^3 — Continued 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



UNGROUPED DYES— Continued 

Direct green black 

Direct indigo blue 

Direct light yellow RL 

Direct navy G, R, 4R 

♦Direct navy blue B, BFN, BW, DB, R, RY. 

Direct neutral blue G 

Direct new blue 5B 

♦Direct orange B, R; RT 

Direct red 3BL, MC, MU 

Direct reseda green 

Direct rhoduline red B 

Direct royal blue 

Direct rubine G 

Direct sapphire B 

Direct scarlet G 

Direct silk blue NR 

Direct sky blue B 

Direct speck dye red SW 

♦Direct violet B, 2B, BOW, BRL, 2R 

Direct violet black 

Direct viscose blue GG, GS, RS 

Direct yellow B, FR, S3G, S5GP cone 

Ergan yellow RNC 

Fast acid blue WF 

Fast acid brown RG 

Fast acid light red B 

Fast acid orange RW 

Fast acid red BBL 

Fast acid violet ERR ex 

Fast acid yellow GS 

Fast black G 

Fast blue BN, 5RN 

Fast brown FN, MF 

Fast catechine G A 

Fast chrome brown RB 

Fast crimson R 

Fast light red 4B, BL 

Fast light violet B 

Fast olive brown G 

Fast orange 4RN, YF 

Fast pigment violet RP 

Fast pink N 

Fast printing yellow G 

Fast spirit black R 

Fast spirit brown G 

Fast spirit orange R 

Fast spirit yellow 2R 

Fast yellow 2G, N 

Fat orange 4A 

Fluorol 5G, 5GR 

Fluoroleum supra 

Fluorescent purple 2G 

Formaldehyde black B, GR, ex 

Formaldehyde fast black GR ex 

Formaldehyde red B 

Formaldehyde scarlet Y 

Formalide brown RD 

Formalide deep blue R 

Formanol black RW 

Formyl black G 

Formyl blue B 

Formyl brown 

Fur colors (other than Colour Index No. 875) 

Gasoline blue 

Gasoline yellow, 2G 

Hansa yellow G 

Heliogen blue G 

Heliogen green B 

Hydroform navy blue 

Igenal brown CRT, IIG, PGM 

Indigo vat black 

Indigo vat brown, G, 2R 

Indigo vat scarlet 2GN . 

Indophenol black 

Indophenol blue 

Induline base, black . 

Ink fast black G 

Jet black APX 

Lake brown BC 

Lake fast blue BL cone 



95. 

13. 

95. 

13, 72. 

72, 95, 129, 313, 510. 

357. 

95. 

13] 95, 176, X. 

176, X. 

13. 

129. 

13. 

13. 

X. 

13. 

176. 

95. 

313. 

13, 72, 176, 313, 360. 

95. 

176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

313. 

313. 

95. 

95. 

176. 

129. 

313. 

72. 

72, 176. 

72. 

89. 

357. 

313. 

176, 313. 

313. 

72. 

72. 

313. 

72. 

313. 

72. 

72. 

72. 

72. 

72. 

95. 

176. 

129. 

133. 

55, 95. 

55, 95. 

95. 

95. 

510. 

510. 

X. 

72. 

72. 

72. 

89. 

72. 

72. 

129, 176. 

176. 

176. 

349. 

176. 

127. 

72, 313. 

313. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

176. 

129. 

129. 

129. 



96 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 — Continued 



Dye 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



UNGROUPED DYES— Continued 

Lake fast orange G, R 

Lake fast yellow G 

Lake orange OTP 

Lake pink RL 

Lake red 2B, BP, CPS, DP, RP 

Lake scarlet 2YL 

Lake yellow G, GNP, PL 

Leather brown 2R, 5RT 

Levelling brown B 

Lithol yellow G, 2G, GTR 

Metalized azo gray G 

Methyl red 

Methyl violet crystals 

Mining black B 

Milling fast garnet R 

Milling fast red FF, GD 

Milling fast yellow DOM, 5GL 

Milling navy blue 4B 

Milling orange G 

Milling red B, 2G 

Milling yellow 2G ex., 3G, 2GCW, 2GX cone, NGS. 

RG, XN. 

Monaetral fast blue B, G, 2RP 

Monastral fast green G 

Mordant green SN 

Mordant yellow 

Naphthalene green B 

Naphthanil scarlet for printing 

Naphthol navy blue M 

Neutral blue G 

•Neutral brown R, RD, 2RS, RX 

Neutral silk brown RHS, RWA 

Neutral silk yellow CGA 

Neutral yellow SX 

New f uchsine 

Nirodole JPG 

Oil bronze 

Oil brown *69, *79, #102, D, M, R, Y 

Oil fast blue R 

Oil fast yellow EG 

Oil orange, « 30, * 67, MT 

Oil pink B 

■Oil red, *322, EG, EGN, N-1700, O, OB, RO. XO, 

Y-292. 

Oil scarlet 

Oil soluble azoic yellow 

Oil yellow, PHW 

Orange TR 

Palatine fast blue 5RN 

Paper white GDC, GDX 

Patent blue B cone, RRG 

Permanent red FBL, GG 

Phenoform orange G 

Phosphine HB, R, PB 

Pigment blue GNL, WNL 

Pigment khaki CW 

Pigment rubine 3G 

Poly form dyes: 

Blue BRF, 2RF 

Bordeaux RF 

Dark brown 3BF 

Dark maroon GF 

Orange RF 

Scarlet 2GF, RF 

Yellow GF 

Printsol orange GNR 

Pyrazol fast orange GL 

Pyrazoline dyes: 

Black, 

Blue R 

Gray GL 

RedBLW 

Yellow 4GLP 

Rayon dyes: 

Bordeaux B 

Brown B, 2BL, G, M 

Navy blue N 

Orange RB 

Red BX 

Violet 3B 



129. 

129. 

129. 

313. 

129, 176. 

129. 

129, 176, 313. 

129, 176. 

13. 

176. 

72. 

X. 

313. 

313. 

89. 

89. 

89. 

313. 

357. 

313, 357. 

313, 357. 

129. 

129. 

72. 

176. 

176. 

129. 

95. 

357. 

95, 129, 313, X. 

89. 

89. 

X. 

72. 

176. 

129 

107i 163,'313. 

13. 

129. 

72, 163. 

313. 

13, 72, 163, 313. 

72. 
X. 

72, 176, 511. 

149. 

176. 

176. 

176, 313. 

176. 

176. 

72, 176. 

176. 

176. 

176. 

l29. 
129. 
129. 
129. 
129. 
129. 
129. 
313. 
95. 

357. 
357. 
357. 
357. 
357. 

129, X. 
129, X. 
129, X. 
129, X. 
129, X. 
129, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



97 



Table lOB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-^3 — Continued 



Colour 

Index 

or 

Prototype 

No. 




Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



UNGROUPED DYES— Continued 

Resin brilliant orange 2R 

Resin brilliant red R 

Resin brown Z 

Resin violet B 

Resorcine brown 3R 

Rosanthrene A, R 

Rosanthrene Bordeaux 2BL 

Rosanthrene orange 

Rubber colors 

Silk brown G, R 

Silk fast blue 3G 

Silk red 2B, 4B, lOB 

Solventol yellow 

_Spirit brown G 

"Spirit soluble blue 

Spirit soluble fast black 

Spirit soluble fast blue B 

Spirit soluble fast orange A cone 

Spirit soluble fast red M, Y 

Spirit soluble fast yellow 3G 

Spirit soluble green 

Spirit soluble violet 

Spirit yellow 

Stilbene brown 3GXL 

StUbene orange EG, E3G 

Sudan corinth B 

Sudan orange FL 

Sudan red IT 

Sulfonal orange R 

Toluvlene fast brown 3G 

Vat khaki OG 

Vat printing black G 

Victoria blue BGO 

Visco blue RS ' 

Vulcan fast orange G, GR, GRN 

Vulcan fast red B, BA 

Vulcan fast yellow G, GR 

Vulcan vellow GN 

Wool blue CGG 

Wool navy B 

Wool red, special 

Yellow, medium 

'Zambesi black 

Miscellaneous mixtures, etc 



313 

313 

313 

313 

107, 

129 

95. 

129 

129 

X. 

129 

95, 

313 

72. 

511, 

313 

313 

313 

313 

313 

511 

511 

176 

72. 

72. 

176 

176 

176 

176, 

176, 

349 

313 

204, 

95. 

176. 

176, 

176. 

176 

313. 

313 

357. 

X. 

95, 

129 



176, 313. 
, X. 



LAKES AND TONERS 



Table llB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jfl—JfS 

[Lakes and toners for which separate statistics are given in table ll.\ are marked below with an asterisk 
(*) ; those not so marked do not appear in table 1 l.A. because the reported data are confidential and may 
not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in thealjjhabetical list appearing on p. i:<."i. 
An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification number 
with the designated product.] 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.^) 



FULL-STRENGTH LAKE COLORS 
'Alizarin lakes 

•Black lakes 

*Bhie lakes: 

Heliogen blue 

Indanthrene blue 

'Peacock blue 

.MI other 



646064— 4G— 7 



22, 129, 134, 239, 244, 293, X, X, 

X, X. 
93, 103, 129, 193, 244, 285, 466, 

469, 511, X, X. 

229, X, X. 

129, 236. 

6, 22, 62, 74, 93, 103, 129, 134, 153, 
168, 196, 204, 206, 227, 229, 244, 
256, 285, 383, .395, 422, 451, 466, 
469, 493, 511, X, X, X, X, X, X. 

22, 62, 93, 103, 129, 1.34, 153, 158, 
193, 196, 236, 2.39, 244, 285, .383, 
422, 451. 466, 469, 493, 497, 511, 
X, X, X. X, X, X, X, X. 



98 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table IIB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1— ]f3 — Continued 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



FULL-STREx\GTH LAIiE COLORS— Continued 
•Brown lakes 



*Green lakes: 

Naphthol green . 
All other 



•Maroon lakes: 

*Azo Bordeaux. 



*Helio fast rubine. 
•All other 



•Orange lakes: 

•Persian orange 



•AH other. 



Phosphomolybdic acid lakes. See Reduced Toners 
Phosphotungstic acid lakes. See Reduced Toners. 

•Red lakes: 

•Eosine and phloxine 

Lithol rubine. See Reduced Toners. 

Permanent red 2B 

•Pigment scarlet 

Red lakes C and D. See Reduced Toners. 

Rose and pink lakes 

•Scarlet 2R 

All other 



•Violet lakes: 

•Methyl violet 

•All other 

•YellowTakes: 

•Fast light yellow 

•Naphthol yellow 

•Quinoline yellow 

•Tartrazine 

•All other 

TONERS OR FULL-STRENGTH COLORS 
Black toners: 

Phosphomolybdic acid black 

Phosphotungstic acid black 

All other 

•Blue toners: 

•Alkali blue 

Permanent blue 

•Phosphomolybdic acid blue 

•Phosphotungstic acid blue 

•Phthalocyanine blue B 

Phthalocyanine blue G 

All other 



22, 93, 103, 129, 168. 244, 285, 466, 
511, X. 

493, X. 

22, 62, 93, 103, 129, 153, 158, 193, 
206, 236, 239, 244, 285, 383, 451, 
466, 469, 497, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X. 

22, 62, 129, 134, 206, 364, 383, 466. 

469, 493, X, X. 
22, 62, 103, 129, 134, 206, 236, 244, 

285, 383, 466, 493, X, X, X. 
22, 74, 93, 103, 129, 134, 193, 229, 

236, 244, 285, 293, 297, 493, 497, 

X, X, X. 

22, 74, 129, 153, 158, 204, 227, 229, 
244, 256, 285, 383, 395, 422, 451, 
466, 469, 493, X, X, X, X, X, X. 

62, 74, 93, 103, 129, 153, 158, 193, 
239, 244, 285, 422, 466, 469, 497, 
X, X, X, X, X, X. 



22, 62, 74, 93, 129, 134, 153, 158, 
193, 227, 285, 383, 422, 451, 469, 
X, X, X, X, X. 

129 

22, 62, 103, 129, 158, 206, 244, 285, 

383, 422, 466, 469, 493, 497, 511, 

X, X, X, X, X. 

103, 2.36, 244, 493, X, X. 

22, 62, 74, 93, 129, 134, 158, 193, 
236, 244, 364, 383, 422, 451, 466, 
469, 493, 497, X, X, X, X, X. 

22, 62, 74, 93, 103, 129, 1.34, 153, 
168, 193, 236, 239, 244, 285, 383, 
422, 451, 466, 469, 493, 497, 511, 
X, X. X, X, X. X, X, X, X. 

22, 62, 93, 103, 129, 134, 158, 193, 
206, 244, 285, 383, 422, 451, 466, 
469, 511, X, X, X, X, X. 

93, 103, 129, 193, 206, 239, 244, 
285, 493, 497, X. 

22, 129, 158, 204, 206, 244, 256, 

285, 451, 469, X, X. 
22, 153, 158, 244, 451, 469, 511, 

X, X. 
129, 204, 227, 229, 244, 256, 422, 

451, X, X. 
22, 74, 103, 134, 158, 169, 204, 206, 

227, 229, 244, 256, 285, 422, 451, 

469, X, X, X, X. 
22, 74, 93, 103, 129, 158, 239, 285, 

451, 469, 511, X, X, X, X. 



103. 
22, 103. 
422. 



72, 244, 256, 451, X, X. 

204. 

22, 62, 74, 103, 129, 134, 153, 158, 

204, 206, 236, 244, 256, 466, X, 

X, X. 
6, 22, 62, 103, 129, 153, 158, 196, 

204, 206, 244, 285, 383, 422, 451, 

466, 469, 493, 511, X, X, X, X, 

X X 
103, 'l96, 204, 493, X, X, X. 
493 
22, 153, 204, 206. 



I 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



99 



Table llB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which Uyiited States 
'production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-^3 — Continued 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 133) 



TONERS OR FULL-STRENGTH COLORS— Continued 
Brown toners 

'Green toners: . 

*Phosphomolybdic acid green 

*Phosphotungstic acid green 

Phthalocyanine green 

AH other 

•Maroon toners 

'Orange toners: 

'Permanent orange: 

*2, 4rDinitroaniline orange 

*o-Nitroaniline orange 

'Permanent orange, unspecified 

All other 

'Purple toners: 

'Phosphomolybdic acid purple 

'Phosphotungstic acid purple 

'Red toners: 

'Chlorinated nitroaniline red 

•Eosine and phloxine 

Flame red 

'Lithol (red and maroon) 

'Lithol rubine 

Lithosol red 2B 

'Para red 

Permanent red 

Phosphomolybdic acid red 

'Phosphotungstic acid red 

'Red lake C 

•Red lake D 

Scarlet 

'Toluidine red 

All other 

'Violet toners: 

'Methyl violet 

'Phosphomolybdic acid violet 

'Phosphotungstic acid violet 

'Yellow toners: 

Benzidine yellow 

'Hansa yellow , 

All other 

Other toners 



22, 103, 107, 469. 



22, 62, 74, 103, 129, 134, 153, 204, 
206, 236, 244, 256, 466, X. 

6, 22, 62, 93, 103, 129, 134, 153, 
158, 204, 206, 244, 285, 383, 422, 
451, 466, 469, 493, 511, X, X, 
XXX 

103, '196,493, X. 

22, 129, 196, 244, 493, X. 

22, 129, 196, 204, 236, 244, 364, 
383, 422, 466, 493, 497, 511, 
X, X. 



22, 511, X. X. 

153, 236, 466, 493, X. 

22, 72, 129, 153, 158, 204, 236, 244, 

511, X, X. 
22, 129. 153, 158, 204, 229. 383, 

451, 497. X. X. X, X. 

22, 62, 103. 129. 132, 134, 158. 204, 

206, 244, 256, 285, 383. 422, 451, 

466, X, X, X. 
22, 62, 103, 129, 204, 206, 244, 285, 

383, 422, 451, 466, 469, 493, X, 

X, X, X. 

22, 134,244,493,511, X, X. 

22, 103, 129, 153, 158. 204, 229, 

244, 256. 422, 451, 469, 511. X, 

X. X. 
204. 
22. 74. 103. 129. 153. 158, 204, 206, 

244, 256, 383, 395, 422, 466, 469, 

493,497,511, X, X, X. 
22, 62, 103, 129, 153, 158, 204, 

206, 236, 244, 383, 395, 422, 451. 

446, 469. 493, 497, X, X, X, 

X, X. X. 
422. 
22, 62, 74, 129, 134, 1.53, 196, 204, 

206, 236, 244, 256, 364, 383, 395, 

422, 466, 469, 493, 497, X, X, X. 

X, X. 
72, 204, X. 
22, 103, 451. 
22, 62, 103, 129, 153, 158, 204, 206. 

244, 285, 383, 422, 451, 469, 511, 

X, X. X, X. 
6, 22, 72, 74, 103, 129, 153, 158, 

204, 206, 227, 244, 256, 383, 419, 

422, 451. 466. 469, 511, X. X, 

X. X. X. 
74, 129, 158, 244, 256, 422, 511, X. 
22, 103, 204, 236, 422, 466, X. 
22, 74, 103, 129, 134, l.J3, 1.38, 196, 

204, 206, 236, 244, 256, 364. 383. 

395, 422, 466, 469, 493, 497, X, 

X, X, X, X. 
22, 62, 72, 103, 129, 134. 153, 158, 

204, 206, 244, 285, 383, 451, 469, 

493, 497, 511. X. X, X. X, X. X. 

6, 22, 62, 72, 103, 129, 132. 153. 
158. 193, 204, 206, 227, 244, 256, 
.383.451,466, 469, X, X. 

6. 22, 74, 129, 132, 206, 244, 285, 
466, X, X. 

153, 244, X. 



74, 196, 422. 451, 511, X, X. 

22, 74, 103. 129. 153. 196, 204. 206. 

227, 229, 244, 383, 422, 493, 511. 

X X X X 
22, i29', 153. 206. 244. 451. 469, 

511, X, X. 
62, 129, 153, 206, 256, X. 



100 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table llB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United States 
production or sales loere reported, identified by manufacturer ,, 19Jtl-Jt3 — Continued 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



TONERS, EXTENDED OR REDUCED 

'Reduced blue toners: 

Alkali blue 

•Phosphomolybdic acid blue 



*Phosphotungstic acid blue. 



*Phthalocyanine blue B . 



Phthalocyanine blue G 

Phthalocyanine blue, not specified. 
All other 



Phthalocyanine green. 

Pigment green 

All other 



*Reduced maroon toners. 



'Reduced orange toners 

'Reduced purple toners: 

*Phosphomolybdic acid purple. 

'Phosphotungstic acid purple. . 
All other 



•Reduced red toners: 

*Lithol (red and maroon) . 

*Lithol rubine 



*Para red. 



Permanent red 

Phosphomolybdic acid red. 
*Phosphotungstic acid red. . 



Pigment rubine C. 

Red 2B 

♦RedlakeC 



*Red lake D. . 
Red lake P.. . 
*Toluidine red. 



All other. 



Reduced violet toners: 

Pho.sphomolybdic acid violet . 
Phosphotungstic acid violet. . 

'Reduced yellow toners: 

'Hansa yellow 



Phosphotungstic acid yellow. 
All other 



Other reduced toners. 



206. 

22, 62, 72, 103, 153, 158, 193, 206, 

239, 383, 451, 469, X, X. 
22, 62, 72, 93, 103, 129, 153, 158, 

193, 204, 206, 229, 244, 285, 422, 

451,466, 469, 511, X,X,X. 
22, 103, 129, 134, 196, 236, 239, 

244, 466, 493, 497, X, X, X. 
493. 

22, 129, 206, 244, X, X. 
206. 



Reduced brown toners: 

Phosphomolybdic acid brown 239. 

•Reduced green toners: 

'Phosphomolybdic acid green 22, 93, 103, 129, 193, 206, 236, 285 

466, X, X, X 
'Phosphotungstic acid green 



22, 62, 72, 93, 103, 129, 193, 204, 
206, 229, 244, 285, 466, 469, 493, 
511, X, X, X, X, X. 

134, X. 

129, X. 

129, 134, 239, 244. 

22, 129, 193, 196, 244, 493, X. 
103, 196, 239, 285, 466, 493, X. 



22, 74, 103, 129, 158, 193, 206, 244, 

255, 285, 466, X. " 
22, 62, 74, 93, 103, 129, 193, 204, 

206, 285, 422, 451, 466, 469, 493, 

511, X, X. 
206. 



22, 62, 103, 129, 153, 158, 206, 244, 

383, 395, 422, 469, 493, 511, X. 
22, 62, 103, 129, 153, 158, 206, 

244, 383, 395, 422, 451, 466, X, 

X, X, X, X. 
22, 62, 74, 129, 134, 153, 206, 236, 

244, 364, 383, 395, 466, 469, 493, 

497, X, X. 
193, X. 

62, 103, 129, 206, 256. 
22, 62, 72, 74, 93, 103, 129, 153, 

158, 193, 204, 206, 229, 239, 244, 

285, 422, 451, 493, 511, X, X, 

X, X, X. 
129. 
206. 
22, 129, 153, 158, 193, 206, 229, 

244, 285, 395, 422, 451, 466, 469, 

493, 511, X, X, X, X. 
22, 129, 244, 383, 422, 511, X, X. 
2S. 
62, 129, 134, 193, 206, 229, 236, 

244, 383, 451, 466, 469, 493, 497, 

X, X, X, X, X. 
153, 193, 196, 239, 255, 493, X, X. 

X, X. 

193. 
X. 



56, 103, 129, 134, 206, 239, X, 

X, X. 
1.53, 285. 
22, 196. X. 

62, 74, 103, 129, 236, 255, 285, 466, 
X, X, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



101 



MEDICINALS 
Table 12B. — Synthetic orgaiiic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941— -'4^3 
[iMedicinals for which separate statistics are given in table 12A are marked below with an asterisk (*); 
medicinals not so marked do not appear in table 12A because the reported data are confidential and 
may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing on 
p. 135. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification 
number with the designated product.] 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC 

Benzenoid 

*Acetanilide 

Acetol salicylate (l-Hydroxy-2-propanone salicylate) 

*.\cetophenetidin (Phenacctin) 

•Acetyl-p-aminophenyl salicylate (Phenetsal) 

Acetylarsan 

.Acet.ylglycol salicylate 

*N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (Acetarsone) (Stovarsol) . . 

*Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) 

*Acetyltannic acid (Tannigen) (Tannyl acetate) 

3-Amino-4-acctoxyphenyl arsonic acid 

Amino acids: 

Di-iodotyrosine 

dl-Phenylalanine 

1-Tyrosine 

*p-Aminobenzoic acid derivatives: 

N-Amylaminoethyl p-aminobenzoate hydrochloride 
(Amylcaine) ' 

N-Butyl p-aminobenzoate (Bute.sin) 

Di(n-butyl p-aminobenzoate) trinitrophenol (Butesin picrate) 
3-Di~n-butvlaminopropyl p-aminobenzoate (Butacaine) 

fButyn). ■ 
3-Di-n-butylaminoprop.vl p-aminobenzoate hydrochloride. . . 

S-Di-n-butylaminopropyl p-aminobenz(jate sulfate 

2-Diethylaminoethyl p-aminobenzoate (Procaine) (Novocaine) 
*2-Diethylaniinoethyl p-aminobenzoate borate (Ethocaine 
borate) (Borocaine). 

*2-Diethylaminoethyl p-aminobenzoate hydrochloride 

3-Dimethylamino-l ,2-dimethy Ipropyl p-aminobenzoate 

hydrochloride (Tutocaine hydrochloride). 
2-Dimethylaminoethyl p-butylaminobenzoate (Tetracaine) 
(Pontocaine). 

*Ethyl p-aminobenzoate (Benzocaine) (Anaesthesine) 

Isobutyl p-aminobenzoate 

Isobutylaminoethyl p-aminobenzoate (Monocaine) 

Propyl p-aminobenzoate 

3-Amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsine oxide hydrochloride (Mapharsen) 

4-Amino-2-methylTl-naphthol hydrochloride (Synkaminj 

* Arsphenamine 

Arsphenamine base ■ 

Barbituric acid derivatives. See Alicyclic and Heterocyclic medic- 
inals. 

•Benzaldehyde 

Benzochrome 

Benzoic acid 

Benzoyltetramethyldiaminoethylisopropanol hydrochloride 

*Benzyl benzoate 

Benzyl succinate 

Bismethyl benzylidine . . . . ' 

Bismuth arsphenaniinesulfonate 

Bismuth betanaphthol 

Bismuth iodosubgallate 

Bismuth phenylarsenate salt 

Bismuth subbenzoate 

*Bismuth subgallate 

'Bismuth subsalicylate 

Bismuth tetrabromopyrocatechol 

Bismuth tribromophenate 

Bromocamphor, mono 

m-Bromoacetophenyl benzoate (Neoxyn) 

tert-Butyl cresol (Cresophan) 

Calcium benzylphthalate 

Calcium cresolsulfonate 

Calcium iodoxybenzoate 

p-Carbamidobenzenearsonic acid (Carbasone) 

Chloromercuri-4-nitro-o-cresol 

Chloiothymol 

Colchicine salicylate 

m-Cresyl acetate (Cresatin) 

Diacetylaminoazotoluene 

2,5-Diaminotoluene sulfate 

Dichlorophenarsine hydrochloride 

Y-Diethylaminopropyl cinnamate hydrochloride (Apothcsine) .... 

•Diethylstilbfstrol 

m-Dihydroxy-di-(sec)hcxylbenzene (Dihexylin) 

1,3-Dihydroxynaphthalene (Naphthoresorcinol) 

3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethylmethylamine (Epinine) 



97, 127, 290, 307. 

92. 

97, 127, 307, X. 

90, 159, 238, 304, X, X. 

92. 

X. 

1, 294, X. 

3, 127, 144, 1.59, 307, X, X, X. 

92, 159, 238, 249, 297, X. 

X. 

150. 
294. 
294. 

331. 

1, X. 

1. 
1. 

1. 

1. 

1, 51, 72, 173, 316, 331, 377, X, X. 

1, 412, X. 

1, 51, 72, 173, 316, 331, 377, X, X. 
X. 

500. 

1, 51, 173, 294, .331, 411, X, X. 

237, X. 

51, 331. 

X. 

346, 432. 

X. 

1, 124, 278, 294, 346, 432, 500. 

1 



197, 460, 476, X. X. 

401, 488. 

127, 129, 207, 294, 307, 476. 

X. 

233, 420, X. X. 

294,411. 

X. 

1. 

294, 321. 

92. 

297. 

294 

278! 294, 321, 356, 432. 

278, 294, 321, 432. 

297. 

294, X. 

127, 278. 

127. 

X. 

159. 

X. 

X. 

68, 260. 

1. 

294, 339. 

216, 294. 

412. 

1.39. 

1.36. 

X. 

X. 

1,68,260 

X. 

405. 

68. 



294, 295, 432, 483, X. 



102 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table liB. — Synthetic organic chemical.'!: Medicinah for uhich United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufaetiirer, 19il-JiJ — Continued 



Chemical 


Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.5) 


MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Benzenoid — Continued 

0-(3,5-Di-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-a-phenylpropioriic acid 

l-Dimethylaniino-2-(diniethylaniinomethyl)-2-butanol benzoate 

hydrochloride (Alypin). 
dl-Dimethvlaniinoethanolcatechol (Methadren) 


400. 
X. 

248. 


Dimethylether of diethvlstilbestrol 


248, 260. 




] 


Diphenvlacetyldiethylaniinoethanol hydrochloride 


X. 


Diphenyleneglycolviurea sodium 


295. 


Disodium acetarsonate 


X. 


Disodium hydroxymercurisalieyloxy acetate (Mercurosal) 

Disodium-4-sulfaminophenyl-2-azo-7-acetylan)ine-l-hydroxy- 

naphthalene-3,6-disulfonate. 
*Dyes, medicinal: 

Acriviolet 


346. 
X. 

313. 


Brilliant green .' 


313. 


3,6-Diaminoacridine dihvdrochloride 


X. 


3,6-Diaminoacridine sulfate (Proflavine) 


1, 313. 




1,313. 


Dibromohydroxymercurifiuorescein, sodium salt (Mercuro- 

chrome). 
2,2-Dihydroxy-5,5-dichlorodiphenylmethane 


92, 213. 
X. 


2,2'-Dihydroxy-3,5,6,-3',o',6'-hexaclxIorodiphenylmethane 

Gentian violet 


X. 

313. 


Hexalet 


294. 


Methylene blue 


72, 313. 




313 




313. 




51, 136, 213, 348. 




379. 




313. 


Sulfosalicvlic acid . . . 


159, 294. 


Tetraiodophenolphthalein and sodium salt 


51, 68, 136, 159, 278, 294, 313, 34S. 




159. 


1-Ephedrine and salts, synthetic 


294. 




68. 




294. 


Ephedrinc derivatives: 

Ephedrine benzoate 


260. 




260. 




260. 


Xethamine hydrochloride (n-Ethylephedrine hydrochloride) . . . 


295. 
X. 


(Diasone). 


294. 
136, 278. 




500. 


Guaiacol (liquid) 

Hexamethyleneamine acetaminosalicylic acid (Salihexin) 


203, 307. 
1. 


Hexesterol (3,4-Di-p-hydroxyphenyl-n-hexane) 


295. 




412. 




412. 


p-Hydroxybenzoic acid esters: 


203, 294. 




203. 




. 203, X. 




203, X. 




92. 


Hydroxymercuri-4-nitro-o-cresol anhydride 


1. 




X. 




1, 139. 




136, X. 




X. 




92, X. 




X. 




92,411. 




1, 278, 294. 




1, 260, 278,294,379,432. 
294, X, X. 




1, 278, 294. 




278, 294. 




286, 500. 




286. 


Mcthyl-m-amino-p-hydroxybenzoate (Orthoform) 


500. 
295. 




X. 




346. 




295. 


2-Methyl-I,4-naphthoquinone 

•p-Methylphenylcinchoninic ethyl ester (Xeocinchophen) 

2-Naphthol, U.S.P 

2-Naphthoxyacetic acid 


1 . 294. 
1, 51, 72. 
159. 
294. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



103 



Table 12B. — Syjithetic organic chemicals: M edicinab for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-^3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Benzenoid — Continued 

5-Xaiihthyl benzoate 

2-XapJith.vl salicylate 

'Xcoarsphenamine 

Xeo-silver arsphenamine 

Xeo-synephrin hydrochloride 

Phenacaine hydrochloride (Di-(p-ethoxyphenyl)-acetamidine) .... 

Phenarsine hydrochloride 

*Phenolphthalein 

*Phenolsulfonates (calcium, sodium, zinc, etc.) 

2-Phenylisopropylamine and sulfate (Benzedrine) 

Phenylmercuric acetate 

Phenylmercuric benzoate 

Phenylmercuric borate 

Phenylmercuric chloride 

Phenylmercuric nitrate 

Phenylmercuric salicylate 

Phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride (Propadrin hydrochloride) .... 

Phenylsalicylate (Salol) 

Phenylsemicarbazide and salts 

Potassium hydroxyquinoline sulfate 

Propenylmethylguaethol 

Resorcinol 

*Resorcinol monoacetate 

•Salicylic acid U.S.P 

•Salicylic acid salts: 

Ammonium salicylate 

'Calcium salicylate 

Lithium salicylate 

•Magnesium salicylate 

•Sodium salicylate 

Strontium salicylate 

Salicylsalicylic acid 

Silver arsphenamine 

Sodium p-aminophenylarsonate 

Sodium antimony III bis-catechol-2,4-disuIfonate (Fuadin) 

Sodium arsanilate (Atoxyl) 

Sodium ethylmercurithio-benzene sulfonate 

Sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate 

Sodium o-iodohippurate 

Sodium methylenesulfonaminohydroxy phenyl arsenate (Aldarsone) . 

Sodium p-toluenesulfonchloramine (Chloramine T) 

Stilbamine glucoside (X'eostara) 

•Sulfa drugs: 

Acetylsulfathiazole 

p-Benzylaminobenzenesulfonamide 

4'-Dimethylsulfamylsulfanilanilide (Diseptal A) 

Phthalylsulfathiazole 

Succinylsulfathiazole 

Sulfa-acetimide (N-acetylsulfanilamide) 

Sulfadiazine .• 

Sulfaguanidine 

Sulfamerazine (2-Sulfanilamido-4-methylpyrimidinc) 

•Sulfanilamide (p-Aminobenzenesulfonamide) 

Sulfapyrazine (2-Sulfanilamidopyrazine) 

Sulfapyridine (2-Sulfanilamidopyridine) and salt 

•Sulfathiazole (2-Sulfanilamidothiazole) and salt 

Sulfanilate, zinc .■ 

•Sulfoarsphenamine 

4-Sulfonamido-2,4-diaminoazobenzene 

p-Sulfondichloramidobenzoic acid 

Tannin albuminate (Tannalbin) 

Tannin-formaldehyde (Tannoform) 

Tetrachlorophenol 

X.X.X'.X'-Tetraethylphthalamide (Neospiran) 

p-Thiobenzenesulfonic acid 

Thiosalicylic acid 

•Thymol 

•Thymol iodide 

Thymolphthalein 

p-Toluenesulfondichloramine (Dichloroamine T) 

a-Toluic acid (Phenylacetic acid) 

Trichlorophenol 

Trisodium sulfoarsphenamine. . . . r 

Tryparsamide 

Vinethene (Divinyl ether) 

Vitamins: 

*K (Menadione) (2-Methyl-l,4-naphthoquinonc) 

K (2-Methyl-l,4-naphthoquinone)-diphosphoric ester, tctra 

sodium salt. 
Ki (2-Methyl-3-phytyl-l,4-naphthoquinone) 



90 

159 

1, 1 

1. 

X 

173 

X. 

307, 

127, 

139 

52 

192 

52, 



159,294. 

, 297. 

24, 278, 294, 432, 500. 



,491. 



52, 

52, 

52. 

412 

127, 

139 

51. 

X. 

129 

136 

127 



, 356, X. 
, 278, 294. 
, X. 
139, 192, 



192. 
192. 
139, 192. 



351. 

159, 294,411. 
, 203, 295, 307. 



X. 

203, 278. 

203, 278. 

203, 249, 294, 295, 307. 

203, 278. 



127, 

127, 

X. 

127, 

127, 

127, 

294. 

500. 

68. 

500. 

68. 

260. 

260. 

278. 

1. 

307. 

68. 



307, X. 
294. 
X. 
307. 

307, 348. 
72. 
1, 72. 
72. 
72. 

68. 72, 97, 294, 307, 500, X. 
294 

1, 72, 294, X. X. 
1, 72, 95, 196, 260, 294, 307, 432 
500. 509, X. X. 

1, 124, 294, 432, 500. 

X. 

1. 

92. 159, 249, 297. 

92. 159. 

127. 

297. 

260. 

260. 

339. X, X. 

278. 294, .321. 

1.36, 159. 

307. 

232, 294. 

127. 

1. 

294, 4.32. 

294. 

1, 16. 146. 175, 294, 295, 4.32, 483, 

.500. X. 
205. 



104 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 12B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 191fl~!fS — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

Alicyclic and Heterocyclic 

Adenine sulfate 

Allantoin (5-Ureidohydantoin) 

AUylcamphoramic acid and mercurial salts 

Amino acids, alicyclic and heterocyclic: 

Histidine monohydrochloride 

l(-)-Hydroxyproline 

l(-)-Proline 

1-Tryptophane 

dl-Tryptophane 

2-Aminothiazole 

Antipyrine 

•Antipyrine s ^icylate 

Atropine, synthetic, and salts 

Atropine amineoxide hydrochloride 

•Barbituric acid derivatives (Salts included with corresponding 
acids) : 

5-Allyl-5-cyclopentenylbarbituric acid (Cyclopal) 

5-Allyl-5-isopropylbarbituric acid (Allonal) (Alurate) 

.5-Allyl-5-(l-methyl-n-butyl)barbituric acid (Seconal) 

5-Allyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid (Alphenal) 

Aminopyrine diethylbarbiturate (Veramon) (Peralga) 

Barbituric acid 

5-n-Butyl-5-ethylbarbituric acid (Neonal) 

.5-sec-butyl-5-ethylbarbituric acid 

5-(l-Cyclohexenyl)-l,5-dimethylbarbituric acid (Evipan) . . . 

.5-(l-Cyclohexenyl)-5-ethylbarbituric acid (Phanodorn) 

.5,.'3-Diallylbarbituric acid (Dial) 

Dibromobarbituric acid 

/J.S-Diethylbarbituric acid (Barbital) (Veronal) 

.5-Ethyl-5-n-hexylbarbituric acid (Ortal) 

o-Ethyl-o-isoamylbarbituric acid (Amytal) 

5-Ethyl-5-isopropylbarbituric acid (Ipral) 

5-Ethyl-5-(l-methyl-l-butenyl)barbituric acid (Delvinal) . . , 
•5-Ethyl-5-(l-methyl-n-butyljbarbituric acid (Pentobarbital) 
(Nembutal). 

5-Ethyl-5-(l-methyl-n-butyl)-2-thiobarbituric acid (Pen- 
tothal). 

5-Ethyl-l-methyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid (Mebaral) 

*5-Ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid (Plienobarbital) (Luminal) . . 

5-(l-methyl-n-butyl)barbituric acid 

•Bile acids and salts: 

Cholic acid 

Cholic and desoxycholic acids, mixed 

•Dehydrocholic acid 

Dehydrocholic acid sodium salt 

Dehydrocholic and dehydrodesoxycholic acids, mixed. 

Desoxycholic acid 

Desoxycholic acid, sodium salt 

Other bile acids and salts 

Bismuth camphocarboxylate 

2-Butyloxycinehoninic acid diethylethylenodiamide and hydro- 
chloride. 

2-Butyloxy-2,6-diamino-5,5-azopyric'iine (Niazo) 

•Caffeine (from Theobromine) 

Caffeine derivatives: 

Citrate 

Hydrobromide 

•Sodium benzoate 

Sodium salicylate 

Tri-iodide 

Camphor, synthetic, U.S.P 

Camphoric acid 

Camphoric anhydride 

•Camphosulfonic acid and salts 

ChaulmooKric acid, ethyl ester 

Cholesterol . . . : 

Cinchophen hydroiodide 

Desox.vcorticosterone acetate (Cortate) 

3,4'-Di(acetylamino)-4-hydroxy-2'-phonoxyacetic acid arseno- 

benzene, sodium salt (Salusalvarsan). 
N-Diethylaminoisopentyl-8-amino-6-iiu'tliuxyiiiiin(iliiic ( I'l a s- 
mochin). 

Dihydroeodcionono bitartrate 

3,o-Di-iodo-N-methyl-4-pyridoxyl-2,()-ilicarboxylic acid, (iiso- 
dium salt (Neo-iopax). 

3,.5-Di-iodo-4-pyridon-N-acetic acid diethanolaminc 

4-Dimcthylaminoantipyrine (Aminopyrine) 

Diphenylhydantoin, sodium salt 

Emetine h.vdrochloride, synthetic 

Eserine amineoxide salicylate 



136. 

1, 139, X. 

159. 

205, 348, 355, 474. 

294. 

294. 

294, 355. 

294. 

X. 

127, 159, 294. 

92, 127, 1.59, 294, 297 

216, 294. 

118. 



173. 

205. 

260. 

173. 

92. 

1. 

1. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

173, X. 

X. 

1, 173, 205, X. 

346. 

260. 

X. 

294 

1, 173, 260, ,331, 372, X. 

1. 



1, 51, 173, 174, 2.33, 260, 278, 294, 

X. 
260. 

146, 248, 288, 474, 499, X. 

146. 

146, 238, 248, 474, 499, X. 

474. 

146. 

248, 474, 499. 

238, 474. 

146, X. 

1. 

X. 

400. 

14, 159, 180, 290, 307. 

294, 307. 

294 

92, 278, 294, 321. 

278, 294, ,321. 

297. 

129, 319. 

159. 

159, 278. 

92, 1.36, 159, 249, 297. 

159, X. 

15, 27. 
260. 
400. 
X. 



X. 

146. 
400. 

X. 

3i:!, 

X. 

294. 

ns. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



105 



Table 12B. — Si/nthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States produc- 
tion or sales were reported, ident'fied by manufacturer, 1941— JfS — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

AHcyclic and Heterocyclic — Continued 

Eserine salicylate 

Estradiol 

a-Estradiol-3-benzoate 

o-'Estradiol-3,17-dipropionatc 

Estrone (Ketohydroxyestrin) 

2-Ethoxy-6,9-diaminoacridine and salts 

Ethynyltestosterone 

Eucatropine hydrochloride 

Hexamethylenetetramine 

•Hcxamethylenctetramineanhydromethylene citrate (Helmitol) . . . . 
•Hcxamethylenetctramincmethylenc citrate 

Hexamethylenetetramine tetraiodide 

Histamine base 

Histamine phosphate 

Homatropine and salts 

Homatropine methylbromide (Novatropine) 

Homomenthyl sahcylate 

S-Hydroxyquinoline (Oxyquinoline) 

8-Hydroxyquinoline benzoate 

8-Hydroxyquinoline citrate 

8-Hydroxyquinoline hydrochloride 

8-Hydroxyquino)ine sulfate 

8-Hydroxyquinoiine tannate 

8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-8ulfonic acid 

Iodochloro-8-hydroxyquinoline 

*7-Iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline-o-sulfonic acid (Yatren acid) and salt 

lodopyrine 

Lysidine bitartrate 

Menthyl ethoxyacetate (Coryfin) 

Menthyl sahcylate 

Menthyl valerate (Validol) 

b-Mercurial allylcamphoramic acid 

o-Mercurial allylcamphoramic acid, sodium salt (Mercurin) 

*2-Methoxy-6-chloro-9-diethylaminopentylaminoacridine hydro- 
chloride (Atebrin) (Quinacrine hydrochloride). 

Methylcholanthrene 

7-(2~Methylpiperidino)-propyI benzoate hydrochloride 

^lethyltestosterone (Oreton M) 

'Nikethamide (Niacin diethylamide) (Coramino) 

Nucleic acid (from yeast) 

Nucleic acid salts 

Papaverine, synthetic 

l-PhenyI-2,3-dimethyl-4-mcthylamino-5-pyrazolone formalde- 
hyde bisulfite (Novaldin). 
2-Phenyl-4-cjuinolinecarboxylic acid (Cinchophen) (Phenylcin- 
choninic acid). 

Piperazine, anhydrous 

Piperazine derivatives: 

Piperazine hcxahydrate (Piperazine hydrate) 

Piperazine salicylate 

Piperazine tartrate 

Piperidinopropanedioldiphenylurethane (Diothane) 

Piperidinopropanedioldiphcnylurc thane hydrochloride (Diothane 
hydrochloride). 

Progesterone 

Pyramidon and trichloroethyl alcohol urethane compounds 

Quinine bismuth iodide 

Scopolamine amineoxide hydrobroniide 

Sodium diphenylhydantoinate (Dilantin) 

Sodium succinate 

*Terpin hydrate 

Testosterone 

Testosterone propionate 

Theobromine derivatives: 

Theobromine calcium gluconate 

Theobromine calcium salicylate 

'Theobromine sodium acetate 

'Theobromine sodium salicylate 

'Theoph.vlline (1, 3-Dimethylxanthine) and derivatives: 

Theophylhne base 

'Theophylline ethylencdiamine (Aminophylline) 

Theophylline methylglucamine (Glucophylline) 

Theophylline monoethanolamine (Theamin) 

Theophylhne sodium acetate 

Theophylline sodium salicylate 

'Vitamins: 

A acetate, concentrate 

A acetate, crystalline 

A palmitate, crystalline 



216, 294. 

400. 

400. 

400. 

81. 

X. 

400. 

491, X. 

129, 203. 

139, 159, 238, 297, X. 

159, 297, X. 

92, X. 

474. 

474. 

216, 294. 

X. 

X. 

51. 294. 

51, 294. 

294. 

51. 

51, 294. 

51. 

51,294. 

X. 

1, 51, 57, 68. 297, X. 

92, 278. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

1.59. 

159. 

1, 196, 294, 313, 500, X, X. 

137. 

260. 

400, X. 

1, 146, 150, 173, 2.38, 249, 288, 294, 

297, X, X, X, X. 
405. 
405. 
294. 
X. 

51, 72. 

288, 367. 

139, 159, 288. 

367. 

60, 288, 367. 

295. 

295. 

146, 184, 248, 400, X, X. 

159, X. 

139, 238, 297. 

118. 

51, 294,346. 

278, 294. 

129, 201, 294, 411, X. 

400. 

400, X. 

X. 

92, 372. 

278, 294, 321, X. 

92, 278, 294, 321. 

51, 173, 278. 

18, 51, 57, 128, 173, 248, 277. 294 

372, X, X. 
1. 

260. 

173, 278, X. 
278. 

125. 
125. 
125. 



106 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 12B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States produc- 
tion or sales ivere reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jtl~i3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Alicyclic and Heterocyclic — Continued ^ 

•Vitamins — Continued 

Bi (Thiamin chloride and hydrochloride) 

*B2 (Riboflavin, for human consumption) 

*B2 (Riboflavin, for animal and poultry consumption) (100%) 

Bo (Pyridoxine) 

*D8 (Irradiated ergosterol) (Viosterol) 

D3 (Irradiated or activated animal sterol) (Delsterol) 

E (a-Tocopherol) 

E (a-Tocopherol acetate) 

E (a-Tocopherol calcium succinate) 

Inositol 

Inositol hexaphosphate, calcium magnesium 

*Nicotinic acid (Niacin) 

'Nicotinic acid amide (Niacinamide) 

MEDICINALS. ACYCLIC 

Acetylcholine bromide 

Acetylcholine chloride 

Acetyl- ^-methylcholine bromide 

Acetyl-|3-methyIcholine chloride 

AUylisopropyl acetylurea 

Allylurea (Thiosinamine) 

•Amino acids, acyclic: 

i8- Alanine 

dl-a-Alanine 

Aminoacetic acid (Glycocoll) (Glycin) 

Arginine and hydrochloride 

dl-Aspartic acid 

•Cysteine hydrochloride 

1-Cystine 

Cystine monohydrochloride 

1( +)-Glutamic acid 

dl-Glutamic acid 

Glutathione 

dl-Isoleucine 

1-Leucine 

dl-Leucine 

d- Lysine monohydrochloride 

1-Lysine monohydrochloride 

dl-Methionine 

dl-Norleucine 

dl-Serine 

dl-Threonine 

dl- Valine ; 

*Amyl nitrite (Isoamyl nitrite) 

Auro-thioglucose (Solgenal-B oleosum) 

Azochloramide . 

Barium hexose diphosphate 

Bismuth albuminate 

Bismuth octyl oxyacetate (Lipo bismol) 

Bismuth tri-a-ethyl caproate (Lipobin) 

Bromodiethylacetylcarbamide 

Bromoisovalerylurea (Brornural) 

•Caeodylic acid and derivatives: 

Bismuth cacodylate 

Caeodylic acid chloride 

Calcium cacodylate 

•Iron cacodylate 

•Guaiacol cacodylate 

Magnesium cacodylate 

Manganese cacodylate 

•Sodium cacodylate 

Strychnine cacodylate 

Calcium hexose diphosphate 

Calcium iodobehenate 

Calcium lactobionate 

Calcium lactophosphate 

•Calcium levulinate 

Calcium saccharate 

Chloral hydrate 

Choline chloride 

•Disodium methylarsonate (Arrhenal) 

Erythrol tetranitrate (Erythrityl tetranitrate) 

Ethyl carbamate (Urethan) 

Ethyl di-iodobrassidate 

Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride 

Ethyldiamine di-iodide 

Ethylenediamine mandelate 



205, 294, X. 

106, 205, 94, 356. 

106, 356, 374, 470, X. 

205, 294. 

1, 129, 175, 180, 181, 291, 333, 432, 

436, 483, X, X. 
129. 

205, 294. 
294. 
294. 
355. 
92, X. 
1, 45, 72, 83, 177, 205, 294, 321. 

379, X. 
1, 72, 173, 175, 177, 205, 248, 28S, 

294, 297, 321, 379, X. 



136. 

238, 294. 

294. 

294. 

205. 

139, 248, X. 

1.294, X, X. 

294. 

51, 127, 355. 

292, 294, 474. 

294. 

1.59i 348, 474, 355. 

1.59, 3.55. 

474. 

294. 

294. 

405. 

294. 

294, 355. 

294. 

294. 

294, 474. 

294. 

294, 355. 

294. 

294. 

294. 

136, 278, 294, X. 
400. 

X. 

405. 

297. 

X. 

248. 

90, .304, X. 

90. 

137. 
297 
137', 249, 297. 

137, 2.38, 249, 297, 418, X. 
1.37, 294, 297. 

1.37, 249. 

249. 

137, 2.38, 249, 297, 375, 418, X. 

249, 297. 

405. 

1.59, X. 

1.59. 

92, 238, 278. 

68, 92, 159, 348, 355, X, X. 

60, 356, X. 

294, 307. 

106, 1.36, 294. 

238, 249, 297. 

294. 

470. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



107 



Table 12B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Mcdicinals for which United States produc- 
tion or sales ivere reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 — Continued 



Chemical 



MEDICINALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

♦Ethyl iodide. 

Ethyl mercui'ic chloride 

Ethyl monhuatc 

♦Ethyl nitrite 

Gluconic acid salts: 

Calcium gluconate 

Copper gluconate 

Potassium gluconate 

Glycerophosphorjc acid 

Glycerophosphoric acid salts: 

Calcium glycerophosphate 

Iron glycerophosphate 

Magnesium glycerophosphate 

Manganese glycerophosphate 

Potassium glycerophosphate 

Sodium glycerophosphate 

Other glycerophosphates 

Hcxamethyldiaminoisopropanol di-iodide 

Hcxamethylenemethjl iodide 

Humic acid and salts 

Iodized castor oil (Riodine) 

Iodized fatty acids 

♦Iodoform 

lodomethanesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Isobutanolaminc hydrochloride 

Lactic acid salts: 

Calcium lactate 

Copper lactate 

Ferrous lactate 

Magnesium lactate 

Strontium lactate 

Lithium lactate 

Mecholyl bromide 

Mecholyl chloride • 

Magnesium hexosediphosphate 

Met hoxyoximercuripropylsuccinyl urea (Mercuhydrin, Urolake) 

Methylocholine chloride urethane 

Methylenccitric acid and salts 

Methylene iodide 

♦Methyl iodide 

Potassium bisaccharatc 

dl-Ribosc 

Saccharic acid (. . 

Silver preparations, colloidal: 

Silver protein, mild 

Silver protein, strong 

Silver preparations, colloidal, n.e.s 

Sodium aurotliionialato (Myochrysine) 

Sodium bismuth thioglycolate (Thiobismol) 

Sodium ricinoleate 

Sodium succinate 

Sulfonethylmcthane (Trional) 

Sulfonmethane (Sulfonal) 

Tartaric acid salts: 

Antimony and potassium tartrate 

Bismuth potassium tartrate 

Bismuth sodium tartrate 

Potassium bitartrate 

. Potassium sodium bismuth tartrate (Bismosol) 

Potassium sodium tartrate 

tert-Tribromobutvl alcohol (Brometone) 

2,2,2-Tribromoethanol 

Tribroniomethane (Bromoform) 

Trichloroacetic acid 

♦tert-Trichlorobutyl alcohol (Chloretonc) (Chlorobutanol) 

L'rea nitrate 

Urethane 

n-Valerie acid salts: 

Ammonium valerate 

Zinc valerate 

♦Vitamins: 

Bi (Panthothenic acid) 

Calcium panthothenate, racemic 

Calcium d-panthothenate 

Other B4 derivatives 

C (Ascorbic acid) 

♦C (Ascorbic acid, sodium salt) 

Iso-ascorbic acid 

Bismuth ascorbate 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 1.35) 



136, 139, 27S, 294. 

260. 

159. 

278, 294, 350. 

278, 356, X. 
356. 
3.56. 
307. 

203, 307. 

203, 307. 

203, 307. 

203, 307. 

203, 307. 

203, 307. 

203, 307. 

X. 

297. 

159. 

X. 

260. 

278, 294, 321. 

X. 

295. 

17, 24, 415, X. 

415. 

278, 415. 

415. 

278, 294. 

223. 

294. 

294. 

405. 

248. 

294. 

159, X. 

1.36, 137, 294, X. 

1.36, 139, 249, 278, 294, 297. 

60. 

405. 

60. 

203, 412, 4.32, X. 

203. 

297. 

294. 

.346. 

295, X. 

294, X. 

27S. 

278. 

356. 

1. 

60, 248. 

356. 

294. 

356. 

346. 

X. 

127, 298, X. 

127, 1.36. 

51, 294, X, X, X, X. 

1.59. 

470. 

92 

92," 150. 

175. 

1. 

1,294, X. 

294, X, X. 

205, 294, 356. 

205, 294, 297. 

205. 

X. 



108 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS 

Table 13B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1- JfS 

[Flavor and perfume materials for which separate statistics are given in table 13A are marked below with 
an asterisk (*) ; those not so marked do not appear in table 13A because the reported data are confi- 
dential and may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list 
appearing on p. 135. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his 
identification number with the designated product.] 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.)\ 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, CYCLIC 
Benzenoid 

*Acet(>phenone • 

*AmyI benzoate 

*a-Amylcinnamaldehyde 

a-Amylcinnamyl acetate 

a-Amylcinnamyl alcohol.- 

Amyl-p-cresol 

• Amyl salicylate 

Amyl a-toluate (Amyl phenylacetate) 

Anethole 

*Anisaldehyde (Aubepine) 

Anisole (Methyl phenyl ether) 

Anisyl acetate 

*Anisyl alcohol 

Anisyl formate 

Anisylideneacetone 

Anisyl propionate 

•Benzophenone 

Benzylacetal 

*Benzyl acetate 

•Benzyl alcohol 

•Benzyl benzoate 

Benzyl butyl phthalate 

•Benzyl butyrate 

Benzyl cinnamate 

Benzyl ether 

•Benzyl formate 

•Benzylideneacetone 

Benzylideneglycerol 

Benz.yl isoamyl ether 

Benzyl isobutyrato 

•Benzyl isoeugenyl ether (Benzyl isoeugenol) 

Benzyl ketone 

•Benzyl propionate i 

•Benzyl salicylate 

Benzyl a-toluate (Benzyl phenylacetate) 

Benzyl valerate 

•Bromostyrene 

Butyl anthranilate 

Butyl a-toluate (Butyl phenylacetate) 

•Cinnamaldehyde 

•Cinnamic acid 

•Cinnamyl acetate 

•Cinnamyl alcohol 

Cinnamyl anthranilate 

Cinnamyl butyrate 

♦Cinnamyl cinnamate 

Cinnamyl formate 

•Cinnamyl isobutyrate 

Cinnamyl isovalerate 

Cinnamyl propionate 

Cinnamyl valerate 

♦p-Cresyl acetate 

p-Cresyl benzyl ether 

p-Cresyl caprylate 

p-Cresyl ethyl ether 

p-Cresyl isobutyrate 

•p-Cresyl methyl ether 

p-Cresyl phenyl ether 

m-Cresyl a-toluate (m-Cresyl phenylacetate) 

p-Cresyl a-toluate (p-Cresyl phenylacetate) 

p-Cresyl valerate 

Cumaldehyde (p-Isopropylbenzaldehyde) 

3,4-Diethoxybenzaldehyde 

2,4-Dimethylacetophenone 

(3,/3-Dimethylphenethyl acetate 

S,/3-Dimethylphenethyl alcohol 

Dimethylphenylpropyl alcohol 

2,6-Dinitro-3-tert-butylcymene 



169, X, X, X. 

156, 473, X, X. 

156, 233, 286, 409, 473, 479, 

480, X, X, X. 
479. 
479. 
479. 

286, 290, 420, 475, X, X. 
156, 286, X. 
319, X, X. 

129, 340, 479, X, X, X, X. 
159. 

129, X, X. 
129, X, X. 
156, X. 
479. 
409, X. 

169, 233, 286, X. 
X. 
233, 286, 340, 420, 476, 479, 

X, X, X. 
207, 233, 286, 420, 473. 475, X, X. 
233, 286, 420, 475, X, X. 
475. 

156, 286, 473, 475, X, X, X. 
51, 473, 475,479, X, X. 
420. 

156, 286, 290, 473, 475, X, X, X. 
286, 290, 340, 473, X. 
X. 

129, X. 

150, 156, X, X. 
479, X, X. 
479, X, X. 
129, 156, 286, 290, 340, 409, 

473, X, X, X. 
169, 286, 475, X, X. 
473, X. 
156, X, X. 
51,473,475, X. 
156. 

479, 480. 
207, 233, 286, 409, 420, 476, X, X, 

X. 
51, 169, X. 
156, 286, .340, 473, 479, X, X, X, 

X. 
169, 286, 290, 473, 475, X, X, X. 
156. 
156. 

475, 479, X, X. 
156, 473, X, X. 
156, 409, X. 
156, 409, X. 
156, 409, X, X. 
409, X. 

156, 473, 475, X, X. 
X. 

156, 473. 
480. 

156, 473, X. 
129, 480, X. 
X. 

X, X. 

156, 473, 479, X, X. 
156. 

129, 156, X, X. 
X. 
X. 

473, 479. 
473. 
X. 
X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



109 



Table 13B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941— 4S — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, 
CYCLIC— Continued 
Benzenoid — Continued 

Diphenylmethane 

p-Ethoxybenzaldehyde 

Ethyl anisate 

'Ethyl anthranilate 

*Ethyl benzoate 

Ethyl cinnamate 

•Ethylmethylphenyl glycidate 

Ethylphenyl glycidate 

•Ethyl salicylate 

Ethyl a-toluate (Ethyl phenylacetate) 

Ethyl-p-tolyl glycidate 

Ethylvanillin 

Eugenol 

Eugenyl acetate 

Eugenyl formate 

Eugenyl a-toluate (Eugenyl phenylacetate) 

Guaiacyl acetate 

Hexylcinnamaldehyde 

Hydroquinonc dimethyl ether (Dimethyl hydroquinone) 

Hydroquinone monomethyl ether 

Isoamyl cinnamate 

*Isobutyl benzoate 

Isobutyl cinnamate 

Isobutyl salicylate 

•Isobutyl a-toluate (Isobutyl phenylacetate) 

•Isoeugenol 

•Isoeugenyl acetate 

Isoeugenyl a-toluate (Isoeugenyl phenylacetate) 

Isopropyl-o-cresol (Carvacrol) 

Isothymol, hydrogenated 

Menthyl anthranilate 

p-Methoxyacetophenone 

*p-Methylacetophenone (Methyl p-tolyl ketone) 

•Methyl anthranilate 

*N-Methylanthranilic acid methyl ester (Dimethyl anthranilate) . 

p-Methylbenzaldehyde (p-Tolualdehyde) 

•Methyl benzoate 

*a-Methylbenzyl acetate (Styralyl acetate) 

*a-Methylbenzyl alcohol (Methylphenyl carbinol) (Styralyl alcohol) 
•Methyl cinnamate 

Methyl p-cresol 

•Methyl eugenyl ether 

p-Methylhydratropaldehyde (p-Methyl-a-phenylpropionaldehyde) 
•Methyl isoeugenyl ether 

a-Methyl-p-isopropylhydrocinnamaldehyde 

p-Methylphenylaeetaldehyde 

Methyl phenylpropionate 

•Methyl salicylate ( Wintergreen oil) 

•Methyl a-toluate (Methyl phenylacetate) 

Musk ambrette 

Musk ketone 

•Musk xylene 

•Phenethyl acetate 

•Phenethyl alcohol 

Phenethyl anthranilate 

Phenethyl benzoate 

•Phenethyl butyrate 

Phenethyl cinnamate 

•Phenethyl formate 

Phenethyl isobutyrate 

Phenethyl isovalerate 

Phenethyl phenylisobutyrate 

•Phenethyl propionate 

•Phenethyl salicylate 

•Phenethyl a-toluate (Phenethyl phenylacetate) 

•Phenethyl valerate 

/3-Phenoxyethyl isobutyrate 

Phenyl benzoate 

l-Phenyl-2-propanone (Benzyl methyl ketone) (Phenylacetone) . . 
•a-Phenylpropionaldehyde (Hydratropaldehyde) 

3-Phenyl-l-propionaldehyde (Hydrocinnamaldehyde) 

•3-Phenyl-l-propyl acetate (Hydrocinnamyl acetate) 

•3-Phenyl-l-propyl alcohol (Hydrocinnamic alcohol) 

3-Phenyl-l -propyl cinnamate (Hydrocinnamyl cinnamate) 

3-Phenyl-l-propyl formate 

3-Phenyl-l-propyl propionate 

Propyl cinnamate 

Salicylaldehyde 

a-Tolualdehyde (Phenylacetaldehyde) 

a-Tolualdehyde dimethylacetal 



X. 

479. 

X. 

150, 156, 286. 

330, 470, 473, X, X, X, X. 

473, X, X. 

156, 409, 473, 480, X, X, X. 

480, X. 

127, X, X, X. 

1. 51, 233, 286, 473, X. 

409. 

290, 307, X. 

X, X. 

479, X. 

479. 

X. 

156, 479, X. 

129, X. 

129. X. 

X. 

X. 

156, 290, 473, X. 

156, X. 

479, X, X. 

156, 286, 290, 473, X, X. 

156, X, X, X, X. 

340, 479, X, X. 

X. 

339, X. 

207. 

X. 

X. 

169, 319, X, X, X, X. 

127, 129, 290, X, X. 

129, 156, 286, 475, X. 

X X 

203, 207, 286, 330, 473, 476, X, X. 

169, 473, X. 

169, 207, 473, X. X. 

51, X, X, X, X, X. 

156, X. 

156, X, X, X. 

480, X. 

156, X, X, X. 

129, X. 

X. 

X. 

127, 159, 203, 295, 307, X, X. 

51, 169, 233, 286, 473, X, X, X. 

286, X. 

286, X. 

129, 286, X. 

1, 51, 233, 290, 409, 473, X, X, X. 

127, 233, 473, 480, X. 

479, X. 

479. 

156, 290, X, X. 

156, 479, X. 

156, 340, 473, 479, X, X. 

150, X, X. 

X, X, X. 

473. 

156, 286, 290, 473, 479, X, X. 

129, 473, 479, X, X. 

156, 473, X, X. 

156, 409, X. 

X. 

X. 

169, 479, X, X. 

156, 169, 473, 480, X, X. 

479, X. 

156, 286, 473, 479, X, X. 

169, 207, 473, X. 

X. 

X. 

156, 473. 

156. 

127, 129. 

169, X, X. 

156, 169, 340, X. 



no 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 13B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which United 
States production or sales loere reported, identified by manufacturer, lO^l-JfS — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13o) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, 
CYCLIC— Continued 
Benzenoid — Continued 

*a-Toluic acid (Phenyla'cetic acid) 

Tol vl acetate 

Tolylaldehyde 

Triciiloromethylphenylcarbinyl acetate (Rosetone) 

l,3,4-Trimethyl-5-tert-butyI-2,6-dinitrobenzene 

* Vanillin 

Veratraldehyde bisulfate 



Terpenoid 



Bornyl acetate. . . . 

Bornyl isovalerate. 

Carvomenthol 

*Cedryl acetate. . . . , 

Cedryl butyrate. . . 

Cedryl formate . . . . 

Cedryl propionate. 
*Citral 



Citral acetate. 
•Citronellal 



•Citronellol. 



*Citronellyl acetate 

*Citronellyl butyrate 

Citronellyl formate 

Citronellyl isobutyrate 

Citronellyl propionate 

Cyclamene alcohol 

Cyclogeraniol 

Cyclogeranyl acetate 

Dihydrocitronellol (3,7-DimethyI-l-octanol) . 

Dihydrocitronellyl acetate 

Farnesol 

Geralin, synthetic 

*Geraniol 



Geraniol, hydrogenated. 

Geraniol residue 

*Geranyl acetate 



•Geranyl benzoate 

*Geranyl butyrate 

*Geranyl formate 

Geranyl i.sobutyrate 

Geranyl isovalerate 

Geranyl a-toluate ■ 

Geranyl propionate 

Hexahydropseudoionone. . , 

'Hydroxycitronellal 

*Hydroxycitronellol dimethylacetal 

Hydroxycitronellol 

Hydroxy citronellylidene-o-aminobenzoic acid, methyl ester(Aurania) 
*o-Ionone 



*i8-Ionone 

*Ionone n.e.s 

Isobornyl acetate 

Isobornyl alcohol (Isoborneol) . 

'Isopulegol 

*Isopulegyl acetate , 

Isosafrol 

•Linalool 

*Linalyl acetate 



Linalyl anthranilate 

Linalyl benzoate 

•Linalyl butyrate. 

Linalyl cinnamate 

•Linal.vl formate 

Linalyl isobutyrate 

•Linalyl propionate 

Linalyl salicylate 

Linalyl valerate 

Menthocitronellol 

Menthol, hydrogenated . . . 
•Menthol, synthetic, tech. . . 

Menthol, synthetic, U.S.P. 

Menthone 



51, 169, 233, 286, 473, X, X. 

X. 

203, X. 

X, X. 

X. 

290, 307, 399, X, X. 

129. 



156, X. 

X. 

207. 

473, 479, X, X. 

479. 

479. 

479. 

70, 129, 156, 269, 340, 473, 475, 

X, X, X, X, X. 
479. 
129, 156, 269, 286, 329, 340. 

409, 461. 473, 479, X, X, X, X. 
129, 156, 169, 269, 286, 340, 409, 

461, 473, 475, 479, X, X, X. 
1.56, 286, 473, 479, X, X. 
156, 479, X. 
156, 286, 479. 
150, X. 
156. 473, X. 
479. 
479. 
479. 

156, 409, 473, X. 
479. 
479. 
X. 
129, 156, 169, 269. 286, 340, 

409, 461, 473, 475, 479, 480, X, 

X, X, X, X. 
207. 
409. 
129, 156. 169, 233, 286, 340, 

409, 473, 479, X, X, X, X, X, X. 
150, 479, X. 
1.56, 473, 475, 479, X. 
156, 286, 473, 475, 479, X, X. X. 
150. 473. 
156. X. 

156, 479, X, X. 
156. 286, 473, 479, X. 
X. 

129, 340. 409, 461, 473, 480, X, X. 
129. 156, 340, 409, X. 
409, 480, X. 
156. 
129, 286. 290, 409, 473, 480. X, 

X X 
129, '290, X, X. 

129, 290, 340. 473, 480, X, X, X. 
129, 156. 
129 

129', 169, 409. 473, X, X. 
129, 473, X. 
X, X. 

156, 286, X, X, X, X, X, X. 
156, 340, 473, 475, 479, X, X, X, 

X, X, X, X. 
475, 479. 
1.50, 479, X. 
150, 156, 479. X, X, X. 
479, X. 

150, 156. 340. 473, 479, X. X. X, 
150, 473, X, X. 
156, 473, 479, X, X. 
479. 
479. 
X. 
207. 

286, 329, X. X, X, X. 
286, X. 
286, 329, 479, X, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



111 



Table 13B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which United 
States production or sales ivere reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-^3 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, 
CYCLIC— Continued 
Terpenoid — Continued 

Menthyl acetate 

Menthyl anthranilate 

Metahomomenthol 

Methylhomojasmone 

*Methylionone 



•Nerol, pure 

Neryl acetate 

Neryl propionate 

•Rhodinol (2,6-Dimethyl octene(2)ol) , 



Rhodinol rose 

•Rhodinyl acetate. . . . 
*Rhodinyl formate. . . 

Sagyl acetate 

Santalal 

Santalyl acetate 

Santalyl a-toluate. . . 

•a-Terpineol 

•/3-Terpineol 

Terpineol, n.e.s 

•Terpinolene 

•Terpinyl acetate 

Terpinyl formate. . . 

Terpinyl a-toluate. . , 

Terpinyl propionate. 

Vetivenol 

• Vetivenyl acetate . . . 



Heterocyclic 
*Coumarin, synthetic 

Dihydrocoumarin (Melilotin) 

Dihydromethylcoumarin (Methyl melilotin) 

6-Hydroxy-3-methyl-5(l'-metho-ethynyl) coumarone. 

Indalone (Pyrone) 

•Indole 

Isobutylquinoline 

Isopropylquinoline 

3-Methylcoumarin 

6-Methylcoumarin 

*Piperonal (Heliotropin) 

Saccharin 

Saccharin, sodium salt 

Skatole 



Naphthalenoid 

Ethyl /3-naphthyl ether (Nerolin) 

Methyl /3-naphthyl ether (Yara yara) . . . 

Methyl ^-naphthyl ketone 

/3-Naphthyl anthranilate 



Ali cyclic 



Cyclopentanone . 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, ACYCLIC 
Acetal . 



'Allyl caproate 

Ally! caprylate 

Allyl enanthate 

Allyl heptoate 

Allyl isothiocyanate (Synthetic mustard oil) 

Allyl myristate 

Allyl propionate 

Allyl urea 

Amyl butyrate 

Amyl caproate 

Amyl ethyl ketone 

Amyl formate 

Amyl laurate 

Amyl propionate 

Amy! valerate 

2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) 

n-Butyl butyrate 

n-Butyl capryl ether 

Butyl isoValerate 

Butyl sulfide 

Capryl butyrate ^ 

1-Carbomethoxyheptme (Methyl heptine carbonate) . 
Cetyl alcohol 



286, 329, 479, X. 

286, X. 

X. 

479. 

129, 286, 290, 473, 479, 

X, X. 
156, 473, 479, X. 
479. 
479. 
129, 156, 269, 340, 473, 

479, X, X, X, X. 
479. 

156, 340, 473, 475, X, X, 
156, 340, X, X. 
479. 

156, 473, X. 
156, 479, X. 
X. 

201, 319. 
319. 

129! 319, 475, X, X. 
129, 201, X. 

129, 156, 340, X. X, X, X. 
150. 
479. 

129, 479, X, X. 
479, X, X, X. 
1.56. 340, 473, 475, 

X, X, X. 

127, 129, 290, 307, 479. 
X. 

X. m 
351. m 

470. — 

127, 129, X. 

150. 

150. 

290. 

X. 

X, X, X, X. 

307. 

307. 

129, 150. 



169, 233, 479. 
169, 233, X. 
169, 286, X, X. 
156. X. 



475, 
, X, X. 



479, X. X, 



479. 



409, 

150 

150 

150 

150 

139 

409 

156 

248 

156 

409 

479 

156 

409 

156 

156 

51, 

156, 

150, 

156, 

479, 

150, 

286 

329 



X. 

156, 409, X, X, X, X. 
409. 
. X. 
409. 
X. 



X. 
, X. 
, X. 
■ X. 

,x. 



150. 479, X. 
, 330, X. 



, X. 

, 479, X. 



112 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 13B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-43 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.j) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, 
AC YCLIC— Continued 

Decyl acetate (Cio) T . 

n-Decvl alcohol (Cio) 

*Decyl aldehyde (Cio) 

Diamyl ketone 

Dibutylcarbinol 

Diethyl succinate 

Dipropyl ketone 

Dodecyl acetate (C12) 

*Dodecyl aldehyde (Cij) 

Dodecyl formate (Cij) 

'Ethyl butyrate 

•Ethyl caproate " 

*Ethyl enanthate 

Ethyl isovalerate 

Ethyl laurate 

Ethyl myristate 

•Ethyl pelargonate 

Ethyl sebacate 

Glutamic acid, sodium salt 

Glyceryl tributyrin 

Glyceryl tricaprin 

Heptaldehyde (C7) 

Heptaldehyde diglyceryl acetal 

2,3-n-Heptanedione (Acetylvaleryl) 

n-Heptanol (Enanthylol) 

n-Heptanyl acetate (Enanthyl acetate) 

Heptyl methyl ketone 

Hexyl methyl ketone 

Hexadecyl aldehyde (Cu) 

2,3-n-HexanediQne (Acetylbutyryl) 

Hexyl methyl ketone 

•Isoamyl butyrate 

•Isoamyl caproate 

•Isoamyl formate 

•Isoamyl isovalerate 

Isoamyl propionate 

•Isobutyl acetate 

Isobutyl butyrate 

Isobutyl caproate 

Isopropyl caproate 

Isopropyl pelargonate 

Lauryl formate 

Methylheptenone 

Methylheptyl acetaldehyde 

Methyl noneoate 

•Methyl nonylacetaldehyde 

Methyl nonyl ketone 

4-Methyl-2,3-pentanedione (Acetyl isobutyryl) 

Methyl imdecylenate 

Myristyl alcohol 

•Nonalactone 

Nonyl acetate (Cs) 

Nonyl aldehyde (C») 

1-OctadecanaI (Cis) 

1-Octanol (n-Capryl alcohol) i 

Octvl acetate 

•Octyl aldehyde (C«) 

Octyl butyrate 

•Pelargonic acid 

2,3-n-Pentanedione (Acetylpropionyl) 

n-Propylacetal 

Propyl propionate 

Tetradecyl aldehyde (Cm) 

n-Tridecyl aldehyde (C13) 

•Undecalactonc 

Undecyl alcohol (Cii) 

Undecylenic alcohol 

Undecvlenic aldehyde (Cii) 

Other 

CHEMICALLY MOD.IFIED ESSENTIAL OILS 

Citral citron, synthetic 

Citronella, acetylated 

Citronella, hydrogenated 

Citropene 

•Ethyl oxy hydrate 

Isobergamone 

Lemon-grass oil, hydrogenated 

Peppermint oil, synthetic 

Shiu oil acetate 



156, 409, 479. 

409, X. 

156, 473, 479. 

479. 

409. 

150, 409, X. 

409. 

129, 156, X, X. 

156, 473, 479, X, X, X. 

156. 

156, 165, 330, 350, X, X. 

156, 330, X, X. 

156, 330, 475, X, X, X. 

156, 330, X, X. 

156, 237, X. 

237, X. 

70, 1.56, X. 

156, X. 

21, 181, 211. 

479. X. 

479. 

156, X, X. 

156. 

150. 

207, 479. 

479. 

479. 

388, X, X. 

156. 

150. 

388, X, X. 

156, 165, 330, 350, X, X. 

156, 330, X, X. 

156, 330, X, X. 

165, 330, X, X. 

156, 165, X, X. 

156, 330, X, X. 

330, X. 

156, X. 

156. 

156. 

X. 

409, X. 

479. 

X, X. 

156, 409, 473, 479, X, X. 

156, 473, 479, X, X. 

X. 

473, X, X, X. 

156, X. 

156, 473, X, X. 

409, 479, X. 

159. 409. 

409, 479. X. 

156, 409, 473, 

479, X. 

143, 156, X. 

150. 

X. 

156. 

156, X. 

479. 

473, 479, X, X, X, X, X. 

77, X. 

X. 

156, 473, 479, X, X. 

156. 



479. 

X. 

207. 

409. 

156, 269, 473. X. 

366. 

207. 

330. 

X. 



479, X, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



113 



PLASTICS MATERIALS 

Table l-lM.— Sj/ittlidic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-Jf.3 

[Plastics materials for which separate statistics are given in table 14A are marked below with an asterisk 
(*) : products not so marked do not appear in table 14A because the reported data are confidential and 
may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing on 
p. 13o. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification 
number with the designated product.] 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



Plastics Materials, Cyclic 
Condensation Resins, Benzenoid 
*Alkyd resins, phthalic anhydride: 

•For molding and casting 

For laminating 

*For protective coatings 



*For adhesives 

♦For textiles 

All other, unspecified 

•phenolic resins: 

•Cresols (cresylic acid) -formaldehyde: 

For molding and casting 

•For laminating 



•For protective coatings. 



For adhesives 

All other, unspecified . 

•Phenol-formaldehyde : 

•For molding 



'For casting. ... 
•For laminating. 



•For protective coatings. 



•For adhesives. 



All other, unspecified. 



Phenol-f ormaldehyde-abietic acid : 

•For protective coatings 

*Xylenol-f ormaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

p-tert-Amylphenol : 

For protective coatings 

p-tert-Butylphenol : 

For unspecified use 

Diamylphenol-hexamethyleneamine: 

For molding and casting 

Diphenylol-propane: 

For protective coatings 

Phenol-aniline-formaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

Phenol-furfural: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

p-Phenylphenol : 

For protective coatings 

Phenol-terpene (rosin) : 

For protective coatings 

•Tar acid (mixed phenolic) resins: 
•Cresols- and xylenols-aldehyde: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating . ■ • 

For protective coatings 

All other, unspecified 

•Phenol- and cresols-aldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

•For laminating 



•For protective coatings. 

For adhesives 

All other, unspecified . . . 



12, 100, 179, X, X, X, X. 

179, X, X. 

4, 8, 16, 26, 65, 74, 76, 129, 151, 
157, 164, 179, 183, 184, 201, 218, 
221, 228, 230, 232, 266, 267, 311, 
327, 332, 341. 344, 364, 383. 388, 
445. 449. 450, 472, 504, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X, X. 

16. 179. 201. 

12, 140. 179. X, X. 

X, X, X. 



86, 130, 179. 384, X. X, X. 
86. 131, 152. 179, 251. 317, 343. 
X, X, X, X. X, X, X. 

130, 131, 383. 384, 427, 458, X, 
X, X. X. X. X, X. 

179. 251. X, X. 

86, 130, X. X. X. X. 

86, 100, 104. 130, 131. 179. 202. 

221. 276. 307. 384. X, X, X, X, 

X, X. X. X. 
86, 130, 179, 226, 243, 280, 307, 

384. X. 
16,86. 111,117.152.179.220,221, 

251, 307, 343. 383, X, X, X, X, 

X, X. 
16, 130, 164, 184. 201. 202. 246, 

307, 332, 383, 388, 427, 450, 458, 

X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X. X. 
86, 220, 251. 252. 307, X, X, X, 

X, X, X. 
85, 86, 130. 131, 201. 202, 220, 252, 

307, X. X. X. X. 

164, 246, X. 

Ill, 179, X. 

111. 

179, 383, X, X. 

X. 

202, 383, 221. 
X. 

8, 129. 
179. 

131, 179, 221. 
221. 

383. 



X, X. 



179, X. 
131, 179, X. 
131, 179, X, X. 
X. 

5, 86, 179, X, X, X, X. 

86. 111. 179. 271. 307. 384, 458. 

X. X. 
179. 384. X. X. X, X. X: 
307. X. 
5. 152, 307. 388. X. 



646064—46—8 



114 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 14B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, lO^l-JfS — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



Plastics Materials, Cyclic — Continued 
Condensation Resins, Benzenoid — Continued 
•Tar acid (mixed phenolic) resins — Continued 
Phenol-, cresols-, and xylenols-aldehyde: 

For laminating 

Cashew-nut oil resins: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

All other, unspecified 

Coumarone-indene-cresols : 

For protective coatings 

Petroleum hydrocarbon resins: 

For molding and casting 

All other, unspecified 

Resorcinol : 

For molding and casting 

For adhesives 

All other tar acid (mixed phenolic) resins, unspecified 

Aniline-formaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

p-Toluenesulf onamide : 

For unspecified use 

Polymerization Resins 
Coumarone-indene : 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

All other, unspecified , 

•Polystyrene: 

♦For molding and casting 

For protective coatings , 

For adhesives 

All other, unspecified 

Polystyrene-carbazole : 

For molding and casting 

Polystyrene, diolefin: 

For molding and casting 

Polystyrene indene: 

For protective coatings 

Polymerized petroleum polymer: 

For protective coatings 

All other, unspecified 

Vinyl-carbazole 

Plastics Materials, Acyclic^ 
Condensation Resins, Benzenoid 
•Alkyd: _ 

•Abietic acid and abietic acid-maleic acid: 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

All other, unspecified 

Adipic acid: 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

Adipic acid-maleic acid: 

For adhesives 

Azelaic acid: 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

Citric acid: 

For molding and casting 

•Fumario acid: 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For textiles 

•Maleic anhydride: 

For laminating 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For textiles 

All other 

•Sebacic acid: 

For protective coatings 

For textiles 

'Includes small amounts of aUcyclic and heterocyclic resins, 



X, X. 

131, 221. 
221. 
221. 
221. 

317, X. 

384. 
X. 

131. 

85. 

5. 95, 388. 

95. 

307. 



317. X. 
45, 317, X. 
45, 317, X. 

86, 127, 307, 317, X. 

408. 

86, 467. 

X. 



442. 

408. 

478. 
478. 
X. 



164. 

4, 8, 16, 76, 164, 184, 201, 230, 
246, 267, 332, 449. 450, X, X, 
X, X, X, X, X, X. 

201. 

X. 

383, X. 

179. 

X. 
X, X. 

X. 

X. 

16, 179, 450, X, X. 

179. 

X. 

129. 

X. 

8, 16, 74, 76, 151, 188, 201, 228, 
230, 246, 266, 267, 332, 383. 388, 
449, 450, X, X, X, X, X. X, X, 
X, X. X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, X. 

179, 201. 

X. 

201. 

16, 230, 383. 449, 470, X, X. 

5, 230, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



115 



Table 14B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United States 
production or sales iccre reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941— JfS — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



Plastics Materials A cyclic ' — Continued 
Condensation Resins, Benzenoid — Continued 
Succinic acid: 

For protective coatings 

Miscellaneous, unspecified: 

, For protective coatings 

For laminating 

Organic nitrogen resins: 
*Urea-f ormaldehyde : 

*For molding and casting 

*For laminating 

♦For protective coatings 

*For adhesives 

For textiles 

*A11 other, unspecified 

Guanidine-f ormaldehyde : 

For adhesives 

Melamine-f ormaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

All other, unspecified , 

Melamine-^urea-f ormaldehyde : 

For laminating 

For adhesives 

Miscellaneous: 

For adhesives 

All other, unspecified 

Polymerization Resins 

•Alcohol (allyl or furfuryl), aldehyde, and ether resins: 
Allyl alcohol resins: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

Furfural resins: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

Miscellaneous, unspecified 

Ethyl cellulose: 

For unspecified use 

Methyl cellulose: 

For unspecified use 

Polyvinyl resins: 
'Polyvinyl alcohol— aldehyde resins: 
Polyvinyl acetal: 

For adhesives 

Polyvinyl acetal and polyvinyl butyral: 

For molding and casting 

•For laminating 

For protective coatings 

All other, unspecified 

Polyvinyl butyral : 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For textiles 

All other 

Polyvinyl formal: 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

•Polyvinyl alcohol, ester, and halide resins: 
Polyvinyl alcohol: 

For molding and casting 

For adhesives 

For textiles 

All other 

Polyvinyl acetate: 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

All other, unspecified 

Polyvinyl acetate-chloride: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating. 

For protective coatings 

For textiles 

All other, unspecified 



16, 383, X. 



5, X. 

281. 



16, 179, 221, X, X. 

16, 179, 252, 388, X, X, X. 

16, 129, 383, 388, X. X. 

16, 85, 252, X, X, X, X, X. 

276, 388, 394. 

16, 85, 252, 276, 388, 394, X, X, X. 

X. 

16, 307, X. 
86. X. 
388, X. 
X. 
X. 

86. 
X. 

467. 
X. 



X. 

281, X. 

5, 221. 
221. 
127. 
X. 
5, 221. 

127, 221. 

127 



77, X. 

77, X. 
77, 129, X. 
77, X. 
77, 129, X. 

77, 129, X. 
X. 

129, X. 
77, 129. 
129. 

X. 
X. 
X. 



129. 
129. 
129. 
129.x. 

77. 

76, 77, X, X. 
129. X. 

129. 221. X. X. 

77. 

77. 127. 
77, 221. 
77. 

77, 186, 221. 



116 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 14B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19il-43 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 1.3") 



Plastics Materials, Acyclic i — Continued 
Polymerization Resins — Continued 
Polyvinyl resins — Continued 
•Polyvinyl alcohol, ester, and halide resins — Continued 
Polyvinyl chloride: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For textiles 

All other 

Polyvinyl chloride-poly vinylidene chloride: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

All other 

Polyvinyl ethers: 

For adhesives 

Polyacrylate and methacrylate resins : 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For textiles 

All other 

Polyamide (adipamide) 

Polyolefin (polyethylene) : 

For molding and casting 

All other, unspecified 

Polymerized petroleum resins: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

All other 

Polyterpene resins: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating . • • ■ 

For protective coatings 

All other, unspecified 

Miscellaneous polymerization resins: 

For protective coatings 

For textiles 

All other, unspecified 

1 Includes small amounts of alicyclic and heterocyclic resins 



77. 
127. 
77. 
186. 

127. 
127. 
X. 

X. 

129, 394. 
394. 

388,' 394. 
129, 394. 
129, 394. 
129. 

77. 
129. 

440. 
376. 
376, X. 
376, X. 

X. 

317. 

X. 

207,221, X, X. 

77, 246, 383, 442. 

129. 

129, 179. 



RUBBER CHEMICALS 

Table 15B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber chemicals for which United States 
production or sales icere reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jf.l—]tS 

[Rubber chemicals for which separate statistics are given in table 1.5A are marked below with an asterisk 
(*) ; chemicals not so marked do not appear in table 15A because the reported data are confidential and 
may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing on 
p. 135. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification 
number with the designated product.] 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



RUBBER CHEMICALS, CYCLIC 
•Accelerators: 

•Aldehyde-amines; 

* Acetaldohyde-aniline 

*n-Butyraldehyde-aniline 

Crotonylidine-aniline 

a-Ethyl-|3-propylacrolein-aniline 

Heptaidehyde-aniline 

Methylene-aniline (Anhydroformaldehyde-aniline) 

Methylene-p-toluidine 

Urea-butyraldehyde-aniline 

•Dithiocarbamates: 

Carbon disulfide-methylenedimethylcyclohexylamine 

Carbon disulfide-methylenedipiperidine 

Bcnzal dimethyldithiocarbamate 

Dibenzyldithiocarbamic acid, dibenzylaniine salt 

Dimethylcthylene fiiphenyl dithiocarbamic acid, lead salt. . . . 

Dimethylethylene diphenyl dithiocarbamic acid, zinc salt. . . . 

2, 4-Dinitrophenyl (liiiictliyl (lithiocarhaiiiate 

Diphenylcarbamyl dimethyl dithiocarbamate 

l-Methylene-0-naphthyl dimethyl dithiocarbamate 

Piperidine pentamethylene dithiocarbamate 

Piperidine pentamethylene dithiocarbamic acid, potassium salt 

Trie (diphenylcarbamylmethyl) amine 



129, .307, X. 

129, 186, 307, X. 

X. 

91. 

X. 

129, 307. 

129. 

X. 

307. 

307. 

X. 

X. 

91. 

91. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

129, X. 

186. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



117 



Table loB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber chemicals for which United States 
production or sales icere reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-43 — Continued 



Chemical 



RUBBER CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

'Arpelerators^— Continued 
*Guanidine derivatives: 

*Diphenylguanidine 

Diphenylguanidine oxalate 

Diphenylguanidine phtiialate 

Di-o-tolylguanidine '. 

Di-o-tolylguanidine zinc chloride 

Triphenylguanidine 

'Guanidine mixtures: 

Diphenylguanidine acetate and 2-(2,4-dinitrophenyhnercapto) 
benzotliiazole. 

Diphenylguanidine acetate, diphenylguanidine phthalate, 
and 2,2'dithiobenzothiazole. 

Diphenylguanidine and 2-(2,4-dinitrodiphenylniercapto) 
benzothiazole. 

Diphenylguanidine, diphenylguanidine phthalate, and 2-(2,4- 
dinitrophenylmercapto)thiazole. 

Diphenylguanidine and di-o-tolylguanidine 

Diphenylguanidine phthalate, dibenzothiazyldimethylthiol- 
urea, and anhydroformaldehyde aniline. 

Diphenylguanidine, zinc chloride, and 2-mercaptobenzo- 
thiazole. 
Thiazole derivatives: 

Alkylated 2,2'-dithiobisthiazole (Alkylated 2-thiazyI di- 
sulfide). 

.\lkyl 2-mercaptothiazole 

Aminobenzothiazole 

2- (2-Aminoethylmercapto) benzothiazole (Benzothiazyl-2-sul- 
phenethylamide) . 

Benzothiazole 

Benzothiazyl ethyl chlorbcarbonate 

Bis-N,N'-(2-benzothiazylthiomethyl)urea 

2-(2,4-Dinitrophenylmercapto) benzothiazole 

2,2'-Dithiobisbenzothiazole (Benzothiazyl disulfide) 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole benzoate (Benzothiazole thioben- 
zoate). 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, benzylhexamethylenetetramine salt. 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, cyclohexylamine salt 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, lead salt 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, sodium salt 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, zinc salt 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazolemethylene aniline 

2-MercaptobenzothiazoIemethylene-o-toluidine 

2-Mercaptothiazoline 

Methylenemercaptobenzothiazole 

Phenylmercaptobenzothiazole 

Reaction product, mercaptobenzothiazoleforriialdehyde-cre- 
sylic acid-hexaniethylenetetramine. 
Miscellaneous: 

Chloronaphthaxanthate 

p, p'-Diaminodiphenylmethane 

Dibenzylamine 

Di-N-pentamethy!enethiuramtetrasulfide 

Di-o-tolylthiourea (Thiocarbtoluide) 

p-Quinonedioxime 

*Thiocarbanilide (Diphenylthiourea) 

'-Antioxidants: 

Aldehyde and acetone amines: 

Aniline-acetone 

Aniline-acetone, acid derivatives 

p^Aminodiphenyl-acetone 

Butyraldehyde-aniline 

Crotonylidine-a-naphthylaniine 

Diphenylamine-acetone 

Diphenylamine-acetone formaldehyde 

Diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine and p-aminodiphenyl acetone. 

Diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine and aniline acetone, acid de- 
rivatives. 

Phenyl-/3-naphthylamine-acetone . . -. 

'Phenols or primary amines: 

2,4-Diaminodiphenylamine 

p, p'-Diaminodiphenylmethane 

^-Di-p-hydroxyphenylpropane 

Hydroquinone, monobenzyl ether 

p-Hydroxydiphenylamine 

Hydroxyphenylmqrpholine 

Methylene di-^-naphthol 

(3-Xaphthol, aniline salt 

/3-Naphthol, p-phenylenediamine salt 

/3-Xaphthol, polyethylenepolyamine salt 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



16, 127, 129, 307. 

X. 

307, X. 

129, X. 

X. 

313. 

307. 

307. 

307. • 

307. 

X. 

307. 



186. 

186. 
186. 
X. 

307. 

X. 

307.- 

307. 

307, X, X, X. 

307, X, X, X. 

307. 

129. 

307. 

129. 

307, X. 

129, X, X, X. 

X. 

X. 

129. 

307. 

307. 

X. 



307. 

X. 

X. 

129. 

129, 313. 
X. 

16, 129, 307, 313. 



307. 

307. 

307. 

129. 

186. 

X. 

X. 

129, 307. 

307. 

X. 

307. 

X. 

127, X. 

186. 

129, 186. 

129. 

X. 

129. 

186. 

X. 



118 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Tablk loB. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber chemicals for vkich United States 
production or sales %cere reported, identified by manufacturer, IGlfl-^S — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



RUBBER CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
•Antioxidants — Continued 
Secondary amines: 

Alicylated diphenylamine 

Dimethoxydiphenylamine 

Diphenyletliylenediamine 

*Diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine 

Ditolylamines 

Di-o-tolylethylenedianiine 

Isopropoxydiphenylamine 

p-Methyl-p-tolylsulf onamidodiphenylamine 

Phenyl-a-naphthylamine 

Phenyl-/3-naphthylamine 

ThiopIienyl-/3-naphtliylamine 

p-(p-Toluenesulfonamido)diphcnylaniine . 

Miscellaneous: 

Dicatechol borate, di-o-tolylguanidine salt 

Cashew oil polymers 

Phenol-cyclohexanone 

Phenyl-/3-naphthylnitrosamine 

Tetrahydroglyoxaline sodium acetate mixture 

2',2',4-TrimethyldihydroquinoHne polymers 



RUBBER CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC 
Accelerators: 
*Aldehyde-amines : 

Aldehyde-ammonia 

Butyraldehyde-butylamine 

Butyraldoxime • • • ■ 

Triethyltrimethylenetriamine (Formaldehyde aniUnc) 

*Dithiocarbamates : 

Dibutyldithiocarbamic acid, zinc salt 

Diethyldithiocarbamic acjd, diethylamine salt 

Diethyldithiocarbamic acid, sodium salt 

•Diethyldithiocarbamic acid, zinc salt 

Dimethyldithiocarbamic acid, amylamine zinc salt 

Dimethyldithiocarbamic acid, dimethylamine zinc salt 

Dimethyldithiocarbamic acid, lead salt 

Dimethyldithiocarlsamic acid, zinc salt 

Dithiocarbamic acid, hexamethylenetetramine salt 

Tetrabis(diethyldithiocarbamyl)selenium (Selenium diethyl- 
dithiocarbamate) . 

Tetrabis(diethyldithiocarbamyl)tellurium 

Thiuram derivatives: 

Tetra-amylthiuram monosulfide 

Tetrabutylthiuram monosulfide 

Tetraethylthiuram disulfide 

' *Tetramothylthiuram sulfide and disulfide 

Xanthates: 

Di-n-butyl xanthodisulfide 

Di-isopropyl xanthodisulfide 

Potassium amy] xanthate 

Potassium butyl xanthate 

Potassium ethyl xanthate 

Potassium isopropyl xanthate 

Potassium pentasol xanthate 

Sodium butyl xanthate 

Sodium ethyl xanthate .". 

Sodium isopropyl xanthate 

Zinc butyl xanthate 

Miscellaneous: 

Dioctyl disulfide 

Dodecyl mercaptan 

Fatty acid amides, mixed 

Keryl mercaptan 

Organic mercaptans 



186. 

129. 

91. 

129, 186, X. 

186. 

91. 

186. 

X. 

129, 313. 

129, 176, 1S6, X. 

X. 

X. 

129. 
X. 
307. 
X. 

91. 

186. 



129, 307. 
129. 
313. 
X. 



506, X. 

X. 

506. 

413, 506, X, X. 

X. 

307. 

506. 

307, 413, X, X. 

129. 

413, 506. 

506. 

X. 
X. 

129, 307, 413, .506. 
129, 307, 413, X, X. 

X. 

186. 

127, 307. 
16, 127, 307. 
127, 307. 
127, X. 
127. 
X, X. 
127, X. 
X. 

x,x. 

X. 

207, 307. X. 

195. 

313. 

207. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



119 



ELASTOMERS 

Table 16B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Elastomers (synthetic rubbers) for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 

[Elastomers (synthetic rubbers) for which separate statistics are given in table 16A are marke d below with 
an asterisk (*); products not so marked do not appear in table 16A because the reported data are 
confidential and may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical 
list appearing on p. 135. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his 
identification number with the designated product.] 



Product 


Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 


ELASTOMERS, CYCLIC 
•Polybutadiene-styrene (GR-S) 


122, 127, 202, 212, 443, 513, 515, 


ELASTOxMERS, ACYCLIC 
Polyalkylene-sulfide (Thiokol type) 


516. 517, 518, 522, 526, 527, 
X, X. 

514. 


•Polyalkvlene-sulfide (Thiokol FA) 


127. 


'Polybutadiene— acrylonitrile (GR-A type) 


127, 160, 202, 212, 443, X. 




127. 


•Polychloroprene (Neoprene) 


129, 514. 
77. 




524, X. 


•Polyisobutylene-isoprene (Butyl type) 

Polymerized rubber chloride 


524. 
201. 
X. 




129. 


•Polyvinyl alcohol-butyraldehyde elastomers 


77, 129, 307. 
129. 


Polyvinyl chloride-acetate elastomers 


77, X. 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS 

Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for ivhich United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1— 43 

[Miscellaneous chemicals for which separate statistics are given in table 17A are marked below with an 
asterisk (*) ; chemicals not so marked do not appear in table 17A because the reported data are confi- 
dential and may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list 
appearing on p. 135. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his iden- 
tification number with the designated product.] 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC 

Abietic acid esters 

p-Acetamidophenol 

2-Aminobenzothiazole 

tert-Amylphenol sulfide 

Benzoic acid salts: 

Ammonium benzoate 

*Sodium benzoate 

a-Benzoin oxime 

Benzoyl peroxide 

Benzylated phenol (Santophen) 

'Biological stains 

Bis-tert-amylphenol sulfide 

Bis-tert-amylphenol sulfide, calcium salt 

Bis-iso-octylphenol sulfide, barium salt 

Bis-tetramethylbutylhydroxyphenyl sulfide 

n-Butylcatechol 

p-tert-Butylcatechol 

3-(tert)-Butyl-p-cymene 

Camphocarboxylic acid 

Camphor-lO-sulfonic acid 

Caprolactam 

p-Carboxybenzenesulfondichloramide (Halozone) 

Chemical indicators: 

o-Cresolphthalein ; 

o-Cresolsulfonphthalein (Cresol red) 

m-Cresolsulfonphthalein (m-Cresol purple) 

*Dibromo-o-cresolsulfonphthalein (Bromocresol purple) 

♦Dibromothymolsulfonphthalein (Bromothymol blue) 

Dichlorophenolsulfonphthalein (Chlorophenol red) 

•Phenolsulfonphthalein (Phenol red) 

Tetrabromo-m-cresolsulfonphthalein (Bromocresol green) . 

Tetrabromophenolsulfonphthalein (Bromophenol blue) .... 

Thymolphthalein 

Thymolsulfonphthalein (Thymol blue) 

All other, unspecified 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



307, 460. 



1.36, 199, 250, 313, 348, X, X. 



201. 
139. 
139. 
413. 

207, 307. 

83,91, 127, 129,203,207 

136, 150, 159. 

268. 

307. 

101, 

443. 

443. 

X. 

443. 

307. 

127. 

X. 

1. 

1. 

129. 

307. 

4.53. 

136, 250, 453. 

136, 250, 453. 

136, 250, 348, 453. 

136, 250, 348, 453. 

453. 

136! 213, 250, 348, 453. 

136, 250, 453. 

136, 348, 4.53. 

136, 159,250,453. 

136, 250, 453. 

250, X. 



120 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic cheviicah: Miscellajieous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 — Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

Clieiiiical reagents: 

p-Aniinodiphenylaniine diazosulfate 

Aurintricarboxylic acid 

l-Diazo-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid 

2,6-Dibromoquinone chloroiniidc 

Diphenylthiocarbazone (Dithizone) 

a,a'-Dipyridyl (2,2'-Bipyndine) 

N-(l-Naphthyl)-ethylenedianiine ilihydrochioridc 

Nitranilic acid 

Nitrosophenylhydroxylamine (Cupferron) 

Potassium biphthalate reagent 

Quinhydrone 

Sodium-2,6-dichIorobenzenoneindophonol 

Sulfosalicylic acid ^ 

*Cyclohexanol ' 

Cyclohexanone 

Cyclohexyl phosphite 

Cyclonol 

♦Cyclopropane 

Decahydronaphthalene (Decalin) 

Diamylhydroquinone 

Dibenzyl disulfide 

Dichlorobenzyl disulfide 

Diethylaminohydroquinone 

Diethylene oxide (Dioxan) 

2,2'-Dihydroxy-5,.5'-dichlorodiphenylmethano 

2,2'-Dihydroxy-3,5,6,3'5'6'-hexachlorodiphcnylmethane 

2,4-Di-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-3-ethylhexane 

Di-isopropylbenzenesulfonic acid 

6,12-Dimethylceroxenyl acetate 

Diphenylethane polymer 

Diphenylthiocarbazone (Dithizone) 

Ergosterol, crystalline 

Ethyl benzoylacetate 

Ethyleneglycol monosalicylate 

Furan derivatives: 

Furfural 

Furf uryl acetate 

Furfuryl alcohol 

Furf uryl mercaptan 

Nitrofurfuryl propionate 

•Gallic acid, tech 

Gases (poisonous, tear, etc.) : 

Bromobenzyl cyanide (Bromo-o-tolunitrilc) 

Chloroacetophenone ; . . 

Diphenylchlorarsine 

Diphenylaminechlorarsine 

Diphenylcyanarsine 

Phenyldichlorarsine 

•Gasoline antioxidants and inhibitors 

Glycol terpenyl ether 

Guanine 

•Insecticides, synthetic: 

Benzyl thiocyanate 

4,4'-Dichlorodiphenyl-l,l,l-trichlorocthane (DDT) 

2,4-Dinitroanisole 

4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol 

4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol, sodium salt 

Laurie acid ester of colaminoformylmethylpyridinium chloride 

Phenothiazine 

Xanthone 

All others, unspecified 

Luric acid 

p-Menthane 

Menthyl carbinol 

Methylcyclohexane 

•Methylcyclohexanol (Methyl hexalin) 

Methylcyclohexanone 

4-Methyl-5-(b-hydroxycthyl)-thiazole 

Morpholine 

Naphthalene and chlorinated paraffin condensation product 

Phenyl ether (Diphenyl oxide) 

Octylphenol 

Phenyl mercuric derivatives: 

Phenyl mercuric acetate 

Phenyl mercuric borate 

Phenyl mercuric chloride 

Phenyl mercuric hydroxide 

Phenyl mercuric nitrate 

Phenyl mercuric phosphate 

All others, unspecified 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



139. 

453. 

10, 1.39. 

136, 139. 

1.36, 159. 

136, 150. 

1.36. 

1.39. 

136. 

294. 

83, 136, 294. 

136. 

1.36, 159, 294. 

45, 129, 207. 

45, 129. 

45. 

129. 

278! 335, 432, X. 

129. 

307. 

207. 

207. 

207. 

77. 

77. 

X. 

X. 

37. 

498. 

X. 

1.36, 159. 

.308, 436. 

470. 

X. 

.380. 

X. 

207, .380. 

139. 

136. 

136,278, 511. 

51, 247. 

1.39. 154,247, 351. 

247, X. 

154, 204, 247, 351. 

247. 

247. 

129, 210, X. 

201. 

292. 

207. 

95, 129. 

480, X. 

313, 434. 

434. 

145. 

127, 129. 

127, 178. 

254, 394, X. 

137. 

319. 

319. 

45, X. 

45, 129, 207. 

45, 129. 

294. 

77. 

441, X. 

127, 245, X. 

388, X. 

52, 192. 
52. 

52, 192. 
52, 192. 
52, 139. 
52. 
52. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



121 



Table 17B. — Hynthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jtl-J^3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

Phenylsemicarbazide and salts 

Phenylphosplioric acid, disodiuni salt 

Phloroglucinol 

•Photographic chemicals: 

p-Aniinophenol hydrochloride 

p-Aniinophenol oxalate 

p-Aminophenol sulfate 

•Benzotriazole 

Catechol (Pyrocatechin) 

Chlorobenzotriazole 

Chlorohydroquinone ■. . . . 

p-Chloro-o-phenylenediamine 

2,4-Dianiinophenol dihydrochloride (Amidol) 

*Hydroquinone (Hydroquinol) 

'p-IIydroxyphenylglycine 

*p-Methylaniinophenol sulfate 

Methylbenzoxazole 

Phthalide 

Plant hormones: 

Indole-3-acetic acid, crystals 

a-Indole-3-n-butyric acid 

N'aphthaleneacetic acid (Parmone) 

•Plasticizers: 

Camphor, synthetic 

Castor oil phthalate 

^-Chloro-^'-(2-xenoxy)-diethyl ether 

Coumarone-indene plasticizer 

o-Cresyl-p-toluenesulfonate 

Cyclohexyl-p-toluenesulfonaniide 

Diallyl phthalate 

Diallyl succinate 

*Di-n-amyl phthalate 

Di-(butylcellosolve) phthalate [Di-(butoxyethyl) phthalate] 
*Dibutyl phthalate 



Di-(p-teit-butylphenyl) mono-(.5-tei t-butyl-2-xcnyl) phos- 
phate. 

Di-(p-tert-butylphenyl) monophenyl phosphate 

Dicapryl phthalate 

Dicarbitol phthalate [Bis-(diethylene glycol monoethyl ether) 
phthalate]. 

Dicellosolve phthalate (Diethoxyethyl ]>hthaIato) 

Dicresyl dithiophosphate, sodium salt ■ 

Dicyclohf.xyl i.lithalate 

Diethylbutoxycthyl phthalate 

Diet liyleni'gly col dibenzoate 

I)i-2-ethylhexyl phthalate 

* 1 )i('t hy 1 phthalate '. 



Dimethylcarbitol phthalate [Bis-(diethylene glycol mono 

methyl ether) phthalate]. 
Dimetlnlcollosolve phthalate [Di-(methoxyethyl) ijhthalate] 

Di-(methvlcv(lnlipxyl) phthalate 

♦Dimethyl phthalate 



Di-n-octyl phthalate 

Diphenyl mono-o-xenyl phosphate 

Diphenyl phthalate 

Di-o-xenyl monophenyl phosphate 

Ethyl o-benzoylbenzoate 

N-Ethyltoluenesulfonamide, o, p mixture. 

CJlyceryl tris (monobutyl phthalate) 

Glycolic acid phthalate alkyl esters 

Ilydrogi-nated castor oil phthalates 

MorplidhiK' stearate 

PhciKjlir coumarone-indene plasticizer. . . . 

Sodium butyl phthalate 

Sodium ethyl butyl phthalate 

Tetrahydiof urf uryl oleate 

Tetra-wax phenyl phthalate 

Toluenesulfonamide, o, p mixture 

Tri-(p-tert-amylphcnyl) phosphate 

Tri-(i>-tert-butylphenyl) phosphate 

•Tricresyl phosphate 

Triphenyl phosphate 

All others, unspecified 

Polyglycerol-abietic acid compound 

Potassium acid urate 

Propenylpyrocatechol butoxymethyl ether. . . . 



139. 
348. 
139. 

136. 

139. 

139. 

136, 

136, 

150, 

139, 

150 

36. 

83, 

129, 

129 

150 

129 



139, 1.30. 
139, 307, 351. 



511. 



136, 480. 

129, 136,480, 511, X. 

, 136, 139, X. 

, 136, 480, 511, X. 



294. 
294. 
127i 178, X. 

129, 319, X. 

129. 

127. 

317. 

307. 

307. 

X. 

139 

45, 129, 470, X. 

129 3.34. 

16, '45, 106, 129, 204, 2.33, 237, 

307, 317, .334, 470, 475, X, X, 

X, X. 
127. 



127. 

45, 388, X, X. 

X. 

334. 
X. 

45, 129. 

334. 

X. 

77, 334. 

16, 106, 129, 233, 307, 470, X, X, 

X. 
.334. 

129, 334. 

129. 

16, 129, 168, 233, 307, 329, 475, 

498, X, X, X, X. 
207. 
127. 
307. 
127. 
X. 
307. 
X. 
307. 

129, 207. 
195. 
317. 
129. 
129. 
207. 
307. 
307. 
307. 
127. 

.307, .308, .3.34, X, X. 
127, 307, X. 
3.34. 
307. 

1.39, 355,' X. 
X. 



122 



UNITED STATES TAMFF COMMISSION 



Table 17B.— Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941—^3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Continued 



Propylcyclohexanol 

*PyrogalIol (Pyrogallic acid) 

Quinhydrone 

Quinoidine, sulf urized 

Quinone • 

Research chemicals 

Salicylanilide (Shirlan) 

Sulfonated tliiocarbaniUde acetaldehyde ammonia compounds. 
Surface-active agents: 

'Quaternary ammonium compounds: 

Benzyl phenyl ammonium chloride 

Cetyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride 

Cetyl pyridinium chloride 

Lauryl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride 

Lauryl pyridinium chloride 

Stearoxymethyl pyridinium chloride 

Trimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride 

All other 

•Sulfonated alkyl aryl compounds: 

Sulfonated alkyl benzene and salts 

Sulfonated alkyl diphenyl and salts 

•Sulfonated alkyl naphthalene and salts: 

Amylnaphthalencsulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Butylnaphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Dilaurylnaphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt. . . 
Isopropylnaphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt. . 

All others, unspecified 

Sulfonated alkyl naphthyl ethers, and salts 

Sulfonated alkyl phenyl ethers, and salts 

All others, unspecified 

Sulfonated naphthenic compounds and salts: 

Sulfonated naphthenic acid, aluminum salt 

Sulfonated naphthenic acid, calcium salt 

Sulfonated naphthenic acid, sodium salt 

•Tanning materials, synthetic 



Tetrahydroglyoxaline 

Tetrahydronaphthalene (Tetralin) 

•Textile chemicals, other than surface-active agents: 

Derived from anthracene 

Derived from biphenyl 

Derived from benzene 

•Derived from naphthalene . . 

Derived from pyridine '. . . 

Derived from tar acids 

All others, unspecified 

Thiophene (Thiofuran) 

Tin sulfurized tri wax phenolate 

o-Tolylbiguanide 

Triamyl phenyl phosphite 

Tricresyl phosphite 

Triphenyl phosphite 

Uric acid 

Veratyl aldehyde bisulfite compound 

Waxes, synthetic 

o-Xenylbiguanide 

All others, unspecified 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC 



•Acetaldehyde 

Acetamide 

•Acetic acid: 

•Synthetic (100%) 

•Recovered (100%) 

Acetic acid salts: 

•Aluminum acetate 

Copper acetate 

Manganese acetate 

P«tassium acetate 

•Sodium acetate 

•Acetic anhydride: 

From acetylene (100%) 

From ethylene (100%) 

From ketene (100%) 

From recovered acetic acid by the vapor phase process (100%) . 
From acetic acid (other than recovered) by the vapor phase 
process (100%). 
•Acetone 



207. 

136, 278, 511. 

136, 294. 

129. 

136, 511. 

68, 136, 139, 159, 292, 396. 

129, X. 

307. 



507. 

254, 394. 
139, 295. 
389. 
207. 
489. 
106. 
159. 

37, 307, 313. 
307. 

309, 314, 389, 507. 

176. 

314. 

16, 28, 176, 313, 507. 

309, 437. X. 

89. 

254, 394. 

37, 313. 

441. 

468. 

441, 468. 

16, 28, 45, 95, 119, 129, 176, 254, 

307, 313, 394, 507, X. 
91. 
129. 

437. 

307. 

28, 307, 313, 507. 

28, 129, 176, 309, 313, 437, 507. 

28, 129. 

28, 313. 

89, 176, X- 

1.36. 

307. 

307. 

307. 

X, X. 

307. 

139. 

X. 

307. 

307. 

176, 306, X, X. 



96, 129, 323, 374, X, X, X. 
323. 

77, 106, 129, 323, 374, 470, X, X. 
129, 268, 294, 307, 460, X, X, X, 

X, X, X, X, X. 
129, 294, 323. 
323. 
323. 
323 
91, 'l27, 129, 204, 278, 294, 307, 

323, X. 
129. 
77. 
77. 
X, X. 

X, X. 

35, 77, 106, 374, 416, 435, 470, 
X, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



123 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for ivhich United 
States production or sales icere reported, identified by manufacturer, 191^1— It3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Acetonitrile 

Acetonylacetone 

Aeetylacetone (2,4-Pentanedione) 

•Acetyl chloride 

Aconitic acid 

•Acrylonitrile 

Adipic acid 

Adiponitrile 

Aldol (3-Hydroxybutyraldehyde) 

Allyl alcohol 

•Allyl bromide 

Allyl chloride 

Allyl mercaptan (2-Propene-l-thiol) 

]-AllyI-3-succinylurea 

Allyl sulfide 

Aluminum alkoxides: 

Aluminum tert-butylate 

Aluminum isopropylate 

•Amines: 

Allylamine t 

2-Aminoheptane 

Amylamines 

Butylamines: 

Mono 

Di 

Tri 

Iso 

Diethylenetriamine 

Dioctylamine 

Dipropylenetriamine 

Ethylamines; 

Mono 

Di 

Tri 

Monoethylamine hydrochloride 

•Ethylenediamine, tech 

Fatty acid amines 

Hexamcthylenediamine 

•Hexamethylenetetramine, tech 

Laurylamine and hydrochloride 

Methylamine: 

•Mono ■ 

•Di 

Tri 

1-Methylhexylamine (2-Aminoheptane) 

Polyethylene amines 

Propylenediamine 

Tetraethylenepentamine 

Triethylenetetraniine 

Aminoacetic, tech. (Glycine) 

2-Amino-l-butanol 

Aminocapronitrile 

2-Aniinoethanol sulfite (Monocthanolamine sulfite) 

2-Amino-2-ethyI-l,3-propanediol ^ 

Aminoguanidine sulfate 

Aminoisobutanol (2-Amino-2-methyl-l-propanol) 

2-Amino-2-methj'l-l,3-propanediol 

*Amyl acetates: 
Primary: 

•Normal (90%) 

Active (90%) 

•Isoamyl (90%) .• 

Secondary (90%) 

Not specified 

*Amvl alcohols: 

•Crude (Fusel oil) (100%,) 

•Refined: 

Primary: 

xXormal (n-Butylcarbinol) (lOOS't) 

Active (2-Methyl-l-butanol) (100%) 

Isoamyl (3-Methyl-l-butanol; (100%) 

Secondary: 

2-Pentanol (Methylpropylcarbinol) (10 0%) ( 1 
Methylbutanol). 

3-Pentanol (Diethylcarbinol) (100%) 

Tertiary: 

Amyl (2-Methyl-2-butanol) (100%) 

n-Amyl chloride 

Amylenes, mixed 

Amyl ether 



45, 294, 323. 

77. 

136, 139. 

178, 207, X. 

176. 

16, 127, 129, 394. 

129. 

129. 

323. 

139, 416. 

127, 139, 298. 

416. 

139. 

248. 

139. 

136. 
136, 139. 

139. 
307. 
413. 

77, 413, X. 

77, 413. 

413. 

129. 

54, 77, 119. 

77. 

54, 119. 

413. 

413. 

413. 

413. 

54, 77, 119. 

29, 176, 437. 

129 

129', 130, 203, 276, X, X, X. 

129. 

106, 129, 254, 394. 

106, 129, 254, 394. 

106, 129, 254, 394. 

307. 

77. 

54, 77, 119. 

77. 

77. 

51. 

106. 

129. 

278. 

106. 

176. 

106, 295. 

106. 



106, 129, 374, 413, 470. 

129 413 

129! 165', 237, 330, 350, 413, 470, 

X, X. 
413. 
129, 413, X. 

106, 129, 300, 470. 

165, 374, 413, 470. 

129, 413. 

165, 350, 413, 470, X,'.X. 

77, 207, 413, 435. 

413. 

± 

413. 
413. 
413. 



124 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for tvhich United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941~43 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



, MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Amyl mercaptan (Pentanethiol) 

Amyl methyl ketone (2-Heptanone) 

Amyl propionate 

Amyl sulfide 

Anhydromethylenecitric acid [^-(Hydroxymethyl) tricarballylic 
acid lactone]. 

Azelaic acid 

1-Bromobutane 

2-Bromobutane 

l-Bromo-3-chloropropane 

o-Bromoisovaleryl urea, mono 

2-Bromo-octane (sec-Octyl bromide) 

2-Bromopentane 

'Butadiene 

•Butyl acetates: 

♦Normal (90%) 



Iso 90%) 

Secondary (90%) 

*Butyl alcohols: 

Primary: 

♦Normal (n-Propylcarbinol) (100%) 

Iso (Isopropvlcarbinol) (100%) 

Secondary (Ethylmethylcarbinol) (100%) 

Tertiary (Trimethylcarbinol) (100%) 

n-Butyl ether 

tert-Butyl hydroperoxide 

Butyl lactate 

Butyl methyl ketone (2-Hexanone) 

Butyl propionate (100%) 

n-Butyraldehyde 

n-Butyric acid 

Butyric anhydride 

Butyryl chloride 

*n-Caproic acid 

*Carbon disulfide 

♦Carbon tetrachloride '..... 

Cellulose esters: 

♦Cellulose acetate 

Cellulose acetate butyrate 

Cellulose acetate propionate 

Cellulose nitrate 

Cellulose ethers: 

Ethyl cellulose 

Methyl cellulose 

Cetyl bromide 

Cetyl chloride 

Chemical reagents: 

Girard's reagent PI 

Chlorinated solvents 

Chloroacetic acid: 

Mono 

Di 

Tri :... 

Chloroacetamide 

Chloroacetyl chloride 

1-Chlorobutane 

2-Chlorobutane 

/3-Chloro-o-diethylaminoethane hydrochloride (Novolid salt). 

2-Chloroethanol (Ethylene chlorohydrin) 

♦Chloroform 

♦Technical 



"U. S. P. 



Chlorokerosene, sulfurized 

Cliloromaleic anhydride 

2-Chloro-2-methyIpropane (tcrt-Butyl chloride) 

♦Chloroparaffin 

3-Chloro-l,2-propanediol (Glyceryl o-chlorohydrin) . . . 

l-Chloro-2-propanol (Propylene chlorohydrin) 

3-Chloro-l-propanol (Trimethylene chlorohydrin) 

Chromium acetylacetonate 

Citric acid: 

Crude, fermentation 

♦Refined, fermentation 

Refined, natural 

Cobalt acetylacetonate 

Coconut oil fatty acid chloride 

Crotonaldehyde 

Cyanoacetamide 

Cyanoacetic acid 

♦Diacetone alcohol (4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pcntanone) . 



413. 
77, X. 
156, 470. 
413. 
139. 

143. 

1, 136, 139, 298. 

136, X. 

127, X. 

304. 

1.39. 

260. 

127, 359, 416, 512, .520, X, X. 

77, 106, 129, 159, 165, 350, 374, 

470. 
129. 
416, 435. 



35, 77, 106, 374, 470. 

77, 129. 

416, 435. 

416. 

77, 106. 

467. 

106. 

435. 

165, 470. 

77, X. 

77, .3.30, X. 

77, X. 

207. 

77, 286, 330. 

127, 338, 447, 457, 495, X. 

127, 325, 409, 457, 495, X. 

201, X, X, X, X, X.' 

X. 

X. 

201. 

127, 201. 
127. 

1.39, 295. 
295. 

248. 
50, 328. 

127. 

127. 

127. 

294 

127! 145, 169. 

77, 413. 

136. 

413, X. 

77.- 

50. 

64, 127, 129. 

64, 127, 129. 

X. 

313. 

136, X. 

11, 201, 204,207, 440. 

413,416. 

77. 

1.36, 260. 

139. 



356. 

97, 294, 356, 447. 

447. 

1.39. 

176. 

323, X. 

51,233. 

51, 127. 

77, 106, 307, 416. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



125 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-^3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Diaminobimalonic acid, sodium salt (Ethylenediamine tetrasodium 
carboxylate). 

Diaminodiacetic acid 

Dibromochlorobutane 

1 ,2-Dibromoetliane (Ethylene dibroniide) 

Dibromomethane (Methylene dibromide) 

1 ,3-Dibromopropane (Trimethylene bromide) 

Dibutylaminoethanol 

Dibutyl oxalate 

Dichlorodiethyl ether [Bis(2-chloroethyl)etherJ 

*1,2-Diohloroethane (Ethylene dichloride) 

Dichloroethyl acetate 

Dichloroethyl formal 

Dichloroisopropyl ether 

Dichloromethane (Methylene dichloride), crude 

*Dichloroniethane (Methylene dichloride), grade not specified 

Dichloropentane (Aniylene dichloride) 

1,2-Dichloropropane (Propylene dichloride) 

*l,3-Dichloro-2-propanol (Glycerol dichlorohydrin) 

Dichlorostearic acid 

Dicyandiamide 

*l-Diethylamino-4-aminopentane (Novoldiamine) 

l-Diethylamino-4-aminopentanone (Novol ketone) 

Diethvlaminoethanol 

Diethyl butylethylmalonate (n- and sec-) (Butylethylmalonic 
ester). 

Diethyl carbonate (Diatol) 

Diethyl chloromaleate 

'Diethyl diethylmalonate (Diethylinalonic ester) 

Diethylone glycol (2,2'-Oxydiethanol) 

Diethylene glycol diethyl ether (Diethyl carbitol) 

Diethylone glycol monobutyl ether (Butyl carbitol) 

Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether acetate (Butyl carbitol acetate) . 

Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (Carbitol) 

Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate (Carbitol acetate) 

Diethylene glycol monolinoleate 

Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (Methyl carbitol) 

Diethyl ethylisoamylmalonate 

Diethyl ethylisopropylmalonate (Ethylisopropylmalonic ester) 

Diethyl ethyl-1-methylbutylmalonate (Ethyl-1-methylbutylma- 
lonic ester). 
♦Diethyl malonate (Malonic ester) 

Diethyl monoethylmalonate (Monoethylmalonic ester) 

Diethyl sec-octylmalonate (sec-Octylmalonic ester) 

•Diethyl o.xalate 

Diethyl sulfate (Ethyl sulfate) 

Di-isobutylene 

Di-isobutylene, S, CI, derivative (Sulfalene) 

Di-isobutyl ketone (2-4-Dimethyl-4-heptaiione) 

Di-isopropanolamine 

Dimethyl chloromaleate 

Dimethyformamide 

Dimethylglyoxime 

Dimethyl maleate 

Dimethylolurea 

Dimethyl sulfate 

Dimethylurea 

Dioleyl malate 

Dipropylene glycol [Bis(2-hydroxy-l-propyI)ether] 

1-Dodecanol (Lauryl alcohol) 

Dulcitol 

Epichlorohydrin (l-Chloro-2,3-epoxypropane) 

Ergosterol (unirradiated) 

Erueie acid 

Ethanethiol (Ethyl mercaptan) 

Ethanolamine: 

Mono 

Di 



Tri 

Mixed 

Ethanolamine sulfite, mono. 
•Ethyl acetate (85%) 



Ethyl acetoacetate 

Ethyl alcohol, synthetic 

•Ethyl bromide 

Ethyl bromoacetate 

2-Ethylbutyl acetate 

2-Ethvlbutvl alcohol 

2-EthyIbutyraldehyde 

a-Ethylbutyric acid (Diethylacetic acid) . 



119. 

357. 

148. 

127, 148, 298, 495. 

127, 136. 

1, 127, 335. 

77, 413. 

106, 470. 

77, 95, 127. 

77, 127, 394, 470, X. 

95. 

77. 

77. 

50, 127. 

50, 127, 129, 482. 
413. 

77, 127. 

413, 416, X. 

207. 

X. 

204, 413, X. 

413, X. 

77, 413. 

X. 

470. 

313 

1, 51, 139, 173, 205, X. 

77, 127, 470. 

77. 

77. 

77. 

77. 

77. 

.505, X. 

77. 

260. 

X. 

1, 260. 

1, 51, 127, 173, 260. 

1, 260. 

139 

51, 165, 350, 470. 
77. 

443. 

207. 

77. 

77. 

313. 

129. 

136. 

313. 

129. 

129. 

51, 173, .389. 

.307. 

77, 127. 

X. 

39. 

127, 207, 410. 

X. 

139, X. 

278, 423, 440. 

77, 127, 413. 

77, 127, 413. 

77, 127. 

413. 

X. 

77, 106, 129, 162, 165, 307, 350, 

374, 470, X, X, X. 
77, 294, 470. 
72, 77, 129, X, X. 
1, 127, 148, 173, 298. 
127, 1.36. 
77, 129. 
77. 
77. 
77. 



126 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-^3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Ethyl chloride: 

Technical 

U.S.P 

•Ethyl chloroacetate 

Ethyl chloroformate (Ethyl chlorocarbonate) 

Ethyl cyanoacetate 

•Ethylene (from ethyl alcohol) 

Ethylenebis(imino acetic acid) 

•Ethylene glycol 

Ethylene glycol bori-borate 

Ethylene glycol diacetate 

Ethylene glycol diethyl ether (Diethyl cellosolve) 

Ethylene glycol diformate 

Ethylene glycol dinitrate 

Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (Butyl cellosolve) 

Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (Cellosolve) 

Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate (Cellosolve acetate) 

Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (Methyl cellosolve) 

Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (Methyl cellosolve 
acetate). 

Ethylene oxide I 77, 127, 



127, 129, 147, 298. 

127, 174. 

127, 156, 294, X, X. 

470. 

51 127 233. 

127, 148, 263, 335, 394, 470. 

357. 

77, 127, 129, 470. 

X. 

77. 

77. 

77. 

201. 

77. 

77. 

77. 

77. 

77. 



•Ethyl ether . 

Technical 

U.S.P 

Absolute 

•Ethyl formate 

Ethyl glyceryl ether 

2-Ethylhexanal 

2-Ethyl-l,3-hexanediol 

2-Ethylhexanol 

2-Ethylhexoic acid 

2-Ethylhexyl acetate 

Ethylidene diacetate 

Ethyl iodide 

Ethyl lactate 

Ethyl methyl ketone (methyl acetone) (2-Butanone) . 

Ethyl N-nitroso-N-methylcarbamate 

Ethyl propionate 

Ethyl sodium acetone oxalate. 

•Fatty acid esters, except plasticizers: 

Amyl esters of linseed oil 

Amyl esters of soybean oil 

Butyl linoleate 

Butyl palmitate 

Butyl tallow 

Diglycol monolinoleate 

Ethyl palmitate 

Glyceryl ester of linseed oil 

Glyceryl tri tallow 

Propylene glycol monolinoleate 

Tall oil esters 

All others, unspecified 



Fatty alcohols (containing more than 8 carbon atoms) . 

Fenchone 

•Formaldehyde (37% HCHO by weight) 



Formamide 

Formic acid (90%) 

•Formic acid salts: 

Aluminum 

Chromium 

Nickel 

•Sodium 

Fumaric acid 

•Gases (poisonous, tear, etc.): 

Bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (Mustard gas) . 

Carbonyl chloride (Phosgene) 

*Chloropicrin 

Chlorovinyl dichloroarsine (Lewisite) 

Gluconic acid, crude 

Glyceric acid 

Glyceryl monoisoline 

Glyceryl tributyrate 

Guanidine carbonate 

Guanidine nitrate 

Guanylnitrosaminoguanyltetrazene 

Heptadecanol 

Heptane 

•Hexachloroethane 

Hexadecanol, crude 

Hexaldehyde 



77, 278, 294, 470, X, X. 

77, 201, X, X. 

278, 432, 470. 

470. 

106, 165, 278, 330, 350, 470, 

X. 

77. 

77. 

77, 207. 

77. 

77. 

X. 

139. 

106', 470, X. 

77, 409, 416, 435, X. 

136. 

129, 156, 165, 470, X, X. 

470. 

505. 

505. 

X. 

237, 314. 

237. 

237. 

237. 

505. 

237. 

237. 

314, 505. 

48, 195, 237, 314, 389, 437 

X, X. 
129, 156. 
319, X. 
96, 106, 129, 203, 233, 234, 

X, X. 
129 
129^203, 481. 

129,481. 

176. 

198, 481. 

129, 203, 278, 294, 481, X. 

313, 356. 

247. 

207, 324. 

23, 127, 217, X. 

247. 

356. 

159. 

237. 

479. 

317, X. 

X. 

X. 

77. 

77. 

127, 129, 207, X. 

195. 

77. 



507, 
394, 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



127 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19Jfl~i3 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Hexamethyldiaminoisopropyldi-iodide 

Hexamethylenediammonium adipate 

Hexamethylenetetramine nitrate 

n-Hexyl alcohol 

n-Hexyl ether 

Higher alcohols (containing more than 5 carbon atoms) 

Higher ketones 

Higher methacrylates (above methyl) 

Hydracrylonitrile (Ethylene cyanohydrin) 

Hydroxyacetic acid (Glycolic acid) 

Hydroxyalkylene glucosides 

Hydroxyethyl ethylenediamine 

Insecticides: 

Indalone 

Isobutylundecylenamide 

Organic thiocyanates 

*Iodomethane (Methyliodide) 

Iron (ferrous) oxalate 

Isoamyl chloride (l-Chloro-3-methylbutane) 

Isobutylene 

Isobutyl methyl ketone (4-methyl-2-pentanone) 

Isobutyl propionate 

Isobuty raldehyde 

Isobutyric acid 

Iso-octane cutting oil 

Iso-octane, hydrogenated 

Iso-octyl sulfide 

Isoprene 

Isoprene-piperylene, crude 

Isopropyl acetate 

*Isopropyl ale ohol (Isopropanol) 100% 

Isopropyl bromide 

Isopropyl chloride 

*Isopropyl ether 

Isovaleric acid 

Kerosene disulfide 

Lactic acid: 

♦Edible (100%) 

Medicinal (100%) 

♦Technical (100%) 

Lauroyl peroxide 

Lauroyl chloride 

Lauryl chloride 

Levulinic acid (/3-Acetylpropionic acid) 

Maleic acid. . 

♦Maleic anhydride 

Malic acid 

Malonic acid 

Mannitol 

Mannitol hexanitrate .-•••. 

Mercaptoacetic acid and salts (Thioglycolic acid and salts) 

3-Mercapto-l,2-propanediol (l-Mercapto-2,3-dihydroxypropane) 
(a-Thioglycerol). 

Mercury disinfectants: 

Seed 

Other 

•Mesityl oxide (Isopropylidene acetate) 

Metaldehyde 

Methacrylates, above methyl 

Methacrvlic acid 

Methallyl alcohol (2-Methyl-2-propen-l-ol) 

Methallyl chloride ._ 

♦Methanol (synthetic) ' 

Methoxymethoxyethanol 

♦Methyl acetate 

Methyl acetoacetate 

Methyl acetone-acetol 

Methylaminoacetic acid (Sarcosine) (N-methylglycine) 

Methylaminodiethanol 

Methyl borate 

♦Methyl bromide 

1-Methylbutyl bromide 

Methyl chloride, crude 

Methyl chloride, crude and refined 

Methylenebis (iminoacetic acid) 

Methylenebis (iminopropionic acid) 

Methyl ether 

Methyl formate 

Methyl glutarate 

Methyl glycolate (Methyl hydroxyacetate) 

Methyl isobutyl carbinol (4-Methvl-2-pentanol) 



159. 
129. 
X. 

77. 

77. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

39. 

77. 

470. 

129. 

129, 394. 

10, 139, 294. 

60. 

260. 

443. 

77, 416. 

129. 

129. 

129. 

207. 

207. 

207. 

319, X, X. 

X. 

77, 106, 129, 416, 435, 470. 

77, 416, 435, X. 

127, X. 

207, X. 

77, 416, 435, X. 

330, X, X. 

207. 

17, 24, 98, 129, X. 

24 129 

17! 24, 98, 129, X. 

268. 

295. 

129. 

433. 

16, 313, 355. 

16, 77, 307, 313. 

313. 

127, X. 

39. 

39 

136, 137, 139. 150, 159, 284, 357, 

X, X. 
X. 



129, X. 

129 

77, 106, 416. 

106. 

129. 

129. 

416. 

416. 

72, 77, 96, 106, 129. 

129. 

77, 129, 162, 323. 

77. 

96. 

176. 

77, 176. 

129. 

127, 129, 298, 362. 

1. 

50, 129. 

127, 362, 482, X, 

357. 

357. 

129. 

106, 129, 233. 

129. 

129. 

77, 416. 



128 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 13.5 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Methyl isobutyl carbinyl acetate 

Met hyl lactate 

Methyl methacrylate 

2-Methyl-2,4-pentanediol 

Methyl propyl ketone (2-Pentanone) 

Methyl succinate 

N-Methyltaurine 

Methyl terpinyl ether 

Mucochloric acid (Dichloroformylacrylic acid) 

Nitrohydroxy compounds: 

2-Nitro-l-butanol 

2-Nitro-2-ethyl-l,3-propanediol 

2-Nitro-2-methyl-l,3-propanediol 

2-Nitro-2-methyl-l-propanol 

Tris-(hydroxymethyl)-nitromethane 

Nitroparaffins: 

Nitroethane 

Nitromethane 

1-Nitropropane 

2-Nitropropane • • • • 

Nonenoic acid 

Nonyl alcohol 

Nylon polymers 

l,i2-Octadecanediol CDiolin) 

1-Octanol (N-Capryl alcohol) 

2-Octanol (sec-Capryl alcohol) 

Octanoyl chloride (Capryloyl chloride) 

Olefinepersulfides (Thialkenes) 

Oleoyl chloride 

Oleyl polyether alcohol 

Oxalacetic acid, sodium salt 

•Oxalic acid, crude and refined 

Oxalic acid salts: 

'Ammonium oxalate ' 

Calcium oxalate 

Copper oxalate 

Ferric ammonium oxalate 

Ferric sodium oxalate 

Ferrous oxalate 

Potassium binoxalate 

Potassium oxalate 

Sodium oxalate 

Palmitic acid 

Palmitoyl chloride 

Paracetaldehyde 

Paraformaldehyde 

Pelargonyl chloride 

Pcntachloroethane ." , 

•Pentaerythritol 

Pentaerythritol tetranitrate 

2,3-Pentanedione 

Phorone (Di-isobutylene ketone) (2,6-Dimetliyl-2,5-heptadien- 
4-one). 

Phosgene (10%) in carbon tetrachloride solution 

Phosphorus derivatives of high molecular weight hydrocarbons. . 

Pine oil, synthetic 

Piperylene (1,3-Pentadiene) 

•Plasticizers: 

Acetyltri-n-butyl citrate 

Acetyltriethyl citrate 

Amyl stearate 

n-Butyl acetylricinoleate 

Butyl acetylricinoleate, polymerized 

Butyl cellosolve oleate (Butoxyethyl oleate) 

Butyl cellosolve stearate (Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether 
stearate) (Butoxyethyl stearate). 

Butyl laurate 

Butyl oleate 

Butyl palmitate 

Butyl ricinoleate 

'Butyl stearate 

Cellosolve stearate (Ethylene glycol nionoethyl ether stearate) 
(Ethoxyethyl stearate). 

Di(butyl cellosolve) sebacate 

I)i (butyl cellosolve) tartrate 

• Dibutyl sebacate 

'Dibutyl tartrate 

Diethylene glycol dipelargonatc 

Diethylene glycol diproijionatc 

Diethylene glycol distcarate 

Diethylene glycil iiionoChydroxystearate) 

Diethylene glycol nionolaurate (mono and di) 



77. 

98, 106. 

129, .394, 479. 

106. 

435. 

X. 

176. 

201. 

X. 

106. 
106. 
106. 
106. 
106. 

106. 

106. 

106. 

106. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

129. 

129, 314. 

195, 388. 

207. 

112. 

176. 

176. 

470. 

60, 178, 337, .356, 481. 

60, 178, 198, 278, 294, 356. 

60. 

60. 

60, 356. 

60, 356. 

60, 356, X. 

60. 

60. 178, 3.56. 

60, 178, 278, 294, 481. 

1.59. 

176. 

.323. 

129, 203, X. 

207. 

129. 

201, 323, 388, 462, X, X, X. 

201,462. 

1.39. 

77. 

247. 
X. 
201. 
X. 



356. 

3.56. 

237. 

44, 106 

44. 

334. 

195, 334. 



237. 

106, 237,'314, 334. 
314, X. 
44, X. 

106, 129, 237,'314, X. 
129. 

129. 

129 

lOel 129,' 195, 388, X, X. 

106, 129, 237. 

143. 

334. 

237. 

314. 

237, 314, X, X. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



129 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for tvhich United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manvfacturer, 19Jtl-.'t3 — Continued 




MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 
*Plasticizers — Continued 

*Diethylene glycol mono-oleate (mono and di) 

Diethylene glycol monopalmitate 

Diethylene glycol monoricinoleate 

Diethylene glycol monostearate (mono and di) 

*Diethylene glycol stearate, not specified 

Diethyl sebacate 

Di-isobutyl adipate 

Dimethoxytetraglycol 

Dimethylcellosolve adipate [Di-(methoxyethyl)adipate) 

Dimethyl sebacate 

Ethyl acetylricinoleate 

Ethylene glycol mono-oleate 

Ethylene glycol stearate 

Ethyl oleate 

Ethyl ricinoleate 

Ethyl stearate 

Fatty acid nitriles 

Glyceryl diacetate (Diacetin) 

Glyceryl diacetyltartrate mono-oleate 

Glyceryl monoacetate (Acetin) 

Glyceryl mono(hydroxystearate) 

Glyceryl monolaurate 

Glyceryl mono-oleate - 

Glyceryl monoricinoleate 

*Glyceryl monostearate 

♦Glyceryl triacetate (Triacetin) 

Glyceryl triacetylricinoleate (Castor oil, acetylated) 

Glyceryl tri(hydroxystearate) 

Glyceryl trioleate 

Glyceryl tripropionate 

Glyceryl tristearate 

Methyl acetylricinoleate 

Methyl cellosolve acetylricinoleate (Methoxyethyl acetylricin- 
oleate). 

Methyl cellosolve oleate (Methoxyethyl oleate) 

Methyl cellosolve ricinoleate 

Methyl cellosolve stearate 

Methyl dichlorostearate 

Methyl oleate 

Methyl pentachlorostearate 

Methyl ricinoleate 

Methyl stearate 

Pentaerythritol tetra-acetate 

Polyethylene glycol 

Polyglycerol 

Polyglyceryl oleate 

Polyglyceryl stearate 

Polyglycol monostearate 

Polyglycol oleate 

Polypropylene glycol 

1,2-Propylene glycol monolaurate 

1,2-Propylene glycol mono-oleate 

* 1,2-Propylene glycol monostearate. . ; 

Sucrose oeta-acetate 

Tetraethylene glycol 

Tributylcellosoive phosphate [Tii-(ethylene glycol monobutyl 
ether) phosphate]. 

Tributyl citrate 

Tributyl phosphate 

Triethyl citrate 

Triethylene glycol di-2-ethylhexoate 

Triethylene glycol di-n-hexoate , . , . , 

Triethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate 

*Triethyl phosphate 

Trioctyl phosphate 

Other acyclic plasticizers 

Polyglycol akyl amine sulfate 

Propenyl methyl anaethol 

Propionaldehyde 

Propionic acid 

Propionic acid salts: 

Calcium propionate 

Sodium propionate 

Propionic anhydride 

Propionyl chloride 

n-Propyl acetate 

n-Propyl alcohol (Propanol) 

Propylene 

Propylene glycol 

Propylene oxide 

Propyl mercaptan (l-Propanethiol) 



14.-,, 

237. 

314. 

237, 

145, 

106, 

129. 

77. 

129, 

129. 

44. 

195 

237, 

237 

295 

X. 

29. 

237 

145 

176 

314 

X. 

48, 

314 

145 

204 

44. 

129 

195 

X. 

X. 

44. 

44, 



195, 237, 314, X. 



314. 

237, 314, 389, X, X. 



,237. 



195, 237. 

, X, X. 

, 195, 237, 314, 437, X, X. 

, 237, 268, 314, X, X, X. 



, 237. 



334. 



334. 

44. 

334. 

207. 

314. 

207. 

44. 

195, 207, X. 

X. 

77. 

307, X. 

145. 

145. 

39. 

176. 

77. 

39, 237. 

39, 237. 

39, 145, 237. 

.323. 

77. 

334. 



106, 

106, 

356, 

77. 

77. 

77. 

106, 

334, 

.39, 

176. 

X. 

129. 

106, 



356. 
307. 
X, X. 



307, X, X. 
207, 221, 237, 334, 475', 507 



129, X. 



129. 
129. 
77, X. 

207. 

129, 156, 159. 

129. 

129. 

77, 127, 129, 237. 

77, 127. 

423. 



646064—46—9 



130 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 19^1-43 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Protalbinic acid 

Pyruvic acid 

Refrigerants: 

Chlorodifiuoromethane 

Dichilorodifluoromethane 

Dichloromonofluoromethane 

Dichlorotetrafluoroethane 

♦Methyl chloride 

Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) •. 

Trichioromonofluoromothane 

Trichlorotrifluoroethane 

Research chemicals 

Ricinoleic acid 

Sebacic acid 

Semicarbazide hydrochloride 

Sodium glycerophosphate 

Sodium hydroxyethane sulfonate 

*Sodium lactate 

Sodium methylate 

Sodium oleate 

Sodium oxalacetate 

Sorbitol 

♦Stearic acid salts: 

♦Aluminum stearate 

Ammonium stearate 

Barium stearate 

•Calcium stearate 

Cupric stearate 

* Magnesium stearate 

*Zinc stearate 

Stearoyl chloride 

♦Succinic acid and anhydride 

Succinic acid salts: 

Ammonium succinate i 

Sodium succinate 

Succinimide 

Sulfoacetic acid 

Sulfonated thiocarbanilide acetaldehyde ammonia compound 

♦Surface-active agents: 
♦Amides: 

Diethanol lauramide fN,N-Di(2-hydroxyethyl)lauramide] 

Ethanol hydroxystearamide 

Ethanol lauramide 

Ethanol oleamide 

Ethanol ricinoleamide 

Ethanol stearamide 

Oleic, linoleic, and rosin acids, mixed 

Stearamide and palmitamide, mixed 

All other 

Amines: 

Amidazoline 

Dioctadecyl 

Hexadecyl, tech 

Isopropanolamines 

Mixed fatty alcohols and fatty acid alkylamine 

Octadecyl 

Hexose derivatives: 

Anhydrohexitol ester polyglycol ethers 

Anhydrohexitol esters 

Hydroxyalkyleneglucoside, cotton seed fatty acid ester. . . 

Hydroxyalkyleneglucoside stearate 

Substituted ammonium compounds: 

Butylamine oleate 

Ethanolamine hydrochloride (2-AminoethanoI hydrochlo- 
ride) fatty acid esters. 

Cetyl trimothyl ammonium bromide 

Ethanolamine soaps, not specified 

Diethyleneglycol laurate sulfate, ethanolamine salt 

Diethylene glycol oleate sulfate, ethanolamine salt 

Fatty acid amine acetates 

Quarternary ammonium, not specified 

Salts of fatty acids: 

Potassium laurate 

Sodium laurate 

♦Sulfated and sulfonated fatty and alkyl acids and salts: 

Hydroxyethane oleate sulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Monostearine sulf oacetate, sodium salt 

♦Sulfonated oleic acid (Sulfonated red oil) 

Sulfonated ricinoleic acid, sodium salt 

Trihexylsulfotriearballylic acid, sodium salt 

Sulfated and sulfonated fatty and alkyl acids and salts 
not specified. 



89. 
72. 

241. 

241. 

241. 

241. 

2,3, 127, 129, 307, 362, 482. 

50, 127, 129. 

241. 

241. 

68, 136. 348, X. 

44. 

195, 314, 388. 

139, 150, 159. 

145. 

176. 

24, 98, 204, 278, 294, X, X. 

129, 287. 

91. 

470. 

39, 355, 356. 

48, 166, 278, 314, 455, 489, 503. 

198, 204, 314, X. 

166. 

48, 166, 198, 278, 314, 455, 489. 

489. 

48, 166, 278, 314, 455, 489. 

48, 166, 278, 314, 455, 489, 503. 

176. 

16, 136, 307, 313, 348. 

X. 

278, 294. 
313. 
129. 
307. 



314. 

314. 

314, 505. 

314, 505. 

314. 

314. 

195. 

29 

200, 507. 

389. 

29. 

29. 

77. 

389. 

29. 

.39. 
39. 
39. . 
39. 

413. 

145. 

137, 295. 
437, 507. 
145. 
145, 
29. 
254, 394. 

309. 
91. 

176. 

145. 

176, 403, 489, 507. 

403, 437. 

314. 

95, 176, 437. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



131 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941-43 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

'Surface-active agents — Continued 

•Sulfated and sulfonated alcohols and salts: 

Cetyl sulfate, sodium salt 

3,9-Diethyl-6-tndecyIsulfate, sodium salt 

7-Ethyl-2-methyl-4-undecylsulfatc, sodium salt 

2-Ethylhexylsulfate, sodium salt 

Isopropylsulfonic acid 

Lauryl sulfate, sodium salt 

Octyl sulfate, sodium salt 

Oleyl sulfate 

Sulfated and sulfonated alcohols and salts, not specified. . 

•Sulfated and sulfonated amides and salts: 

Ethanololeamide sulfate, sodium salt [N-(2-Hydroxyethyl) 
oleamide, sodium salt]. 

Monoethanol-lauramidesulfonic acid, potassium salt 

Oleylamidehydroxyethane sulfonate, sodium salt 

Sulfoacetoethanolamide laurate, potassium salt 

Sulfated and sulfonated amides and salts, not specified. . . 
•Sulfated and sulfonated esters and salts: 

Diamyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Dibutyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Dihexyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Distearoyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Lauryl sulfoacetate 

Monostearine sodium sulfoacetate 

n-Octadecyl disodium sulfosuccinate 

n-Octadecyl nickel 2-dicarboxethyl-sulfosuccinate 

Sulfated butyl ricinoleate, sodium salt 

Sulfated butyl oleate 

All other 

•Sulfated and sulfonated oils, fats, waxes, and their salts : 

*Castor oil, sulfonated 

Corn oil , sulfonated 

Peanut oil, sulfonated 

Sperm oil, sulfonated 

Tallow, sulfonated 

All other, unspecified 

•Sulfonated paraffinic petroleum compounds and salts: 

Petroleum sulfonate, ammonium salt 

Petroleum sulfonate, sodium salt 

All other, unspecified 

Xanthogen derivatives: 

Butylxanthogen ethyl formate 

Ethylxanthogen ethyl formate 

Other acyclic surface-active agents, unspecified 

Tanning chemicals, synthetic: 

Calcium sulfide dicyandiamide 

All other, unspecified 

Tartaric acid 

Tartaric acid salts: 

Calcium tartrate 

Potassium bitartrate 

Potassium sodium tartrate 

Tetrabromoethane (Acetylene tetrabromide) 

sym.-Tetrachloroethane (Acetylene tetrachloride) 

•Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 

1-Tetradecanol (Myristyl alcohol) 

Tetraethyl lead 

Tetraethyl orthosilioate 

•Textile chemicals, other than surface-active agents 

Thioglycerol 

•Thiourea 

Tribromoacetaldehyde (Bromal) 

Tributyl borate 

Tributyl phosphite 

1,1,2-Trichloroethane (Methyl chloroform) 

Trichloroethylene •. 

Triethanolamine phosphate 

Triethykne glycol 

Triethylene glycol dichloride (Triglycol dichloride) 

Triethyl orthoformate (Ethyl orthoformate) 

Triethyltin bromide 

Tri-isobutylene 

Tri-isopropanolamine 

Tris(hydroxymethylamino) methane 

Turpentine sulfide 

Undecylenic acid 

Urea (solid) 

Urea in solid fertilizer 

Urea in urea-ammonia solution 



507. 
77. 
77. 
77. 
X. 
129. 
145. 
389. 

77, 95, 129, 176, 195, 309, 389, 
437, 489, X, X, X. 

314. 

489. 

176, 437, 505. 

145. 

200, 309, 507, X. 

X. 
X. 
X. 

X. 
X. 

313. 
313. 
X. 
X. 

507. 
389. 
176, 309, 313. 

176, 200, 489, 507, X. 

489. 

489. 

200. 

489, 507. 

200, 309, 389, 437, 489, 507, X. 

210. 

129, 210, 417. 

440, X- 

306. 
306. 
29, 176, 309, 437, 454, 537. 

X. 
X. 

60. 



60. 

60. 

60. 

127, 

127, 

127, 

77. 

147, 

77. 

39, 

X. 

72, 

X. 

106, 

129 

77, 

127 

77. 

77, 

77. 

233 

247 

443 

77, 

106 

207, 

44, 

129, 

129, 

129, 



159. 

129, 495. 
129, X. 



129, 309, 437, 489, X. 
136, 282, 294,.307, 355. 



127. 

, 129, 495. 

127. 



. X. 

156, X, X. 



132 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



Table 17B. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1941--i-3 — Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Vinyl acetate: 

Monomer 

Vinyl chloride: 

Monomer 

Vinyl ether: 

Monomer 

Vinylidene chloride: 

Monomer 

Waxes (synthetic) 

Other miscellaneous acyclic chemicals 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list on p. 135) 



129, 323. 

77, 127, 129, 186. 

176. 

127. 
X. 

39, 96, 129, 139, 159, 207, 350. 



APPENDIX 

A. IMPORTS OF COAL-TAR INTERMEDIATES AND FINISHED PRODUCTS 

Before 1942, the United States Tariff Commission cooperated with 
the U. S. Department of Commerce in compiling data from original cus- 
toms documents on coal-tar intermediates and finished coal-tar prod- 
ucts entering the United States under paragraphs 27 and 28 of the 
Tariff Act of 1930. These statistics were formerly released semi- 
annually by the Department of Commerce in Import Statement No. 
2865. This statement shows imports of dutiable coal-tar products in 
greater detail than in the annual publication, Foreign Commerce and 
Navigation of the United States. Since 1941, the United States Tariff 
Commission has compiled these statistics principally for use of the 
war agencies. A summary of these data is shown in table 18. 

Table 18. — Coal-tar intermediafcs, and finished coal-tar products: United States imports 
for consumption, classified by uses, lOil-^S 





1941 


1942 


1943 


Product 


Quantity 


Foreign 
invoice 
value 


Quantity 


Foreign 
invoice 
value 


Quantity 


Foreign 

invoice 

vahie 


Intermediates, total 


1,000 
pounds 

3,149 


1,000 

dollars 

1,176 


/ , 000 
pounds 

3,243 


1,000 
dollars 

.564 


1,000 
pounds 

4,424 


1,000 
dollars 

651 


Finished coal-tar products* total 


6,601 


4.446 


6,109 


3,051 


1,283 


2.334 


Dyes, total 


2,230 


3,. 596 


1,127 


1,905 


607 


1,318 


Acid 

Vat '. 


.535 

380 

252 

663 

142 

191 

17 

37 

13 

25 

11 

4,335 


1,069 

622 

379 

1,060 

218 

152 

10 

84 

2 

67 

112 
671 


219 
297 

147 

291 

78 

*? 

27 

17 

3 

1 

4,978 


447 

413 

260 

473 

120 

76 

5 

108 

3 

21 

33 

1,092 


169 
36 

100 

170 

96 

22 


449 
115 


Mordant and chrome 

Direct ' 


210 
318 




156 




40 


Sulfur 

Color-lake and spirit-soluble 

Other 




9 

206 
467 


28 
2 




IS 


Medicinals and pharmaceuticals . . 


862 
136 







1 Includes rapid fast dyes. 

Source: Compiled from records of the L'. 8. Bureau of Customs. 



Large imports of dinitrotoluene from Canada for further processing 
in the United States and of trinitrotoluene from Canada and Mexico 
made up the bulk of the imports, accounting for 6.2 million pounds out 
of a total of 9.7 million pounds in 1941 ; and 6.5 million pounds out of 
9.4 million in 1942. There were no imports of dinitrotoluene in 1943, 
and imports of trinitrotoluene dropped to 397,000 pounds. Styrene, 
a raw material for synthetic rubber, was imported for the first time 
in 1943; imports, entirely from Canada, amounted to 3.7 milllion 
pounds. Other important chemicals imported in 1943 were tetryl, 
an explosive, and sulfapyridine, a medicinal. 

133 



134 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



In terms of value, dyes were the principal imports of dutiable 
coal-tar chemicals in the period 1941-43. From 85. to 90 percent of 
the dye imports were high-priced dyes classified as noncompetitive. 
These imports originated chiefly in Switzerland and were largely 
withdrawals from warehouse of goods which had previously entered 
the country. The ratio of the value (foreign invoice value) of imports 
to the value of domestic production of coal-tar intermediates and 
finished products (such as dyes, flavor and perfume materials, and 
medicinals) was less than 1 percent in 1943 and 1942 and less than 2 
percent in 1941. 

B. RESEARCH WORKERS AND EXPENDITURES 

The Tariff Commission has from time to time collected some general 
information concerning research expenditures in the synthetic organic 
chemical industry. Because of the difficulty in segregating research 
work on synthetic organic chemicals in a plant from research work on 
other chemicals, the figures reported by the industry are only approxi- 
mate. They are, nevertheless, of value in indicating trends and pro- 
viding information not available elsewhere. 

A summary of the data reported is shown below: 



Year 


Companies 
reporting 


Technically 
trained 
research 
workers ' 


Salaries 
paid 


Cost of research 


Gross 


Xet - 


1941 


Number 

153 
183 
236 


Number 

2,957 
3,839 
5,086 


1,000 

dollars 

8,966 
11,541 
20,816 


1,000 

dollars 

18,425 
23,440 
28,723 


1,000 
dollars 

17,137 


1942 

1943 


20,768 

28,470 





1 For the years 1941-43, a technically trained research worker was defined as a person with technical 
training engaged in research work and earning not less than $2,000 per year. 

2 The net cost figure is obtained by deducting from gross cost, the credits for salable products 
obtained in the course of research. 



The average annual salary paid to research workers was approxi- 
mately $3,000 per year for 1941 and 1942 and $4,100 in 1943. The 
higher figure in 1943 probably indicates in part an increase in the num- 
ber of older and more experienced men employed. The increase in the 
total number of workers and the net cost of research in 1942 and 1943, 
compared with the other years, is a result of an expansion of research 
activity directly or indirectly connected with the war. In 1943, ex- 
penditures for research were 38 percent greater than in 1942, which, 
in turn, was substantially (21 percent) greater than those in 1941. 
In 1941 and 1942 the net cost of research amounted to 2.3 percent of 
the value of sales of all synthetic organic chemicals, but the ratio de- 
clined to 2.0 percent in 1943. This ratio, however, was appreciably 
lower than in the years immediately preceding the war: correspond- 
ing ratios in 1938, 1939, and 1940 were 4.3, 3.5, and 3.3 percent, re- 
spectively. 

C. DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS 

The directory of manufacturers of synthetic organic chemicals 
included in this report consists of companies on the list of producers re- 
porting to the United States Tariff Commission and companies listed 
in other directories and pubhcations available to the public. The 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 



135 



name of each manufacturer listed in the directory is preceded by an 
identifying number. Companies which manufacture each chemical 
Hsted on the series B tables of part II of this report are identified by 
these numbers, except those which have requested the Tariff Com- 
mission to withhold this information concerning specific items; the 
latter manufacturers are indicated by the letter X. Firms designated 
as producers of a given item did not necessarily produce that item 
during all 3 years covered by this report. 

More than 500 producing companies reported to the Commission 
in 1943 compared with 380 in 1942 and 335 in 1941. Part of this 
increase is due to more complete coverage of existing manufacturers. 

Not all the firms listed in the directory produce organic chemicals 
for sale; many consume their entire production in further processing. 

This directory is given in table 19. 

Table 19. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers 

[Names of synthetic organic chemical manufacturers who reported production and sales to the United 
States Tariff Commission, 1941-43, or who are listed as manufacturers of synthetic organic chemicals 
in other directories or publications available to the public. These companies do not necessarily produce 
synthetic organic chemicals for sale; some consume their entire production in further processing.] 



Number 



Name of company 



6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 

46 
47 
48 



Abbott Laboratories 

Academy Laboratories, Inc 

Acme Chemical Co., Inc 

Acme White Lead & Color Works 

A. C. Spark Plug Division General Motors 
Corp. 

Ad-Co Color Corp 

Advance Paint Co 

Alkydol Laboratories, Inc 

Althouse Chemical Co 

Altis Chemical Co 

Amecco Chemicals, Inc 

American Alkyd Industries, Inc 

American Aniline Products, Inc 

American Chlorophyll Co., Inc 

American Cholesterol Products, Inc 

American Cyanamid Co , 

American Alaize-Products Co 

American Pharmaceutical Co., Inc 

American Tar & Chemical Co 



American Viscose Corp 

Amino Products Division, International Min- 
erals & Chemical Corp. 
Ansbacher-Siegle Corp 



Ansul Chemical Co 

Apex Chemical Co., Inc 

Appleton Coated Paper Co 

Arco Co 

Arista Oil Products Co 

Arkansas Co., Inc 

Armour Chemical Division, Armour & Co. . . . 

Armstrong Cork Co 

Armstrong, C. M., Inc 

Armstrong Paint & Varnish Works 

Arnold, Hoffman & Co., Inc 

Ashland Oil & Refining Co 

Asociacion Azucarera Cooperative Lafayette 

Associated Chemists, Inc 

Atlantic Refining Co 

Atlas Oil and Refining Corp 

Atlas Powder Co 

Atlas Wall Paper Mills, Inc . 

Augusta Chemical Co 

Ault and Wiborg Corp 

Bakelite Corp 

Baker Castor Oil Co 

Barrett Division, Allied Chemical & Dye 
Corp. 

Bates Chemical Co 

Bayer Co. Division, Sterling Drug Co 

Beacon Co 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office). 



14th St. and Sheridan Rd., North Chicago, 111. 
5049 49th St., Woodside, Long Island, N. Y. 
410 East 32d St., New York 16, N. Y. 
8250 St. Aubin St., Detroit 11, Mich. 
1300 North Dort Highway, Flint 2, Mich. 

66 Lister Ave., Newark 5, N. J. 

545 West Abbott St., Indianapolis 7, Ind. 

3242 South 50th Ave., Cicero 50, 111. 

540 Pear St., Reading Pa. 

136 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y. 

75 Rockwood St., Rochester 10, N. Y. 

Broad and 14th St., Carlstadt, N. J. 

50 Union Square, New York 3, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 431, Alexandria, Va. 

Milltown, N. J. 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

100 East 42d St., New York, N. Y. 

525 West 43d St., New York 18, N. Y. 

423 Canada Cement Bldg., Montreal, Canada. 

(5910 Freemont St., Duluth, Minn.) 
Delaware Trust Bldg., Wilmington 99, Del. 
20 North Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111. 

92 Chestnut Ave., Rosebank, Staten Island 5, 

N. Y. 
Box 231, Marinette, Wis. 
225 West 34th St., New York, N. Y. 
1200 North Meade St., Appleton, Wis. 
7301 Bessemer Ave., Cleveland 4, Ohio. 
135 Front St., New York, N. Y. 
185 Foundry St., Newark 5, N. J. 
1355 West 31st St., Chicago 9, 111. 
Lancaster, Pa. 

9 East 46th St., New York, N. Y. 
1330 South Kilbourne Ave., Chicago 23, 111. 
55 Canal St., Providence 1, R. I. 
1409 Winchester Ave., Ashland, Ky. 
342 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
North Collins, N. Y. 

260 South Broad St., Philadelphia 1, Pa. 
619 Market St., Shreveport 94, La. 
9th and Market Sts., Wilmington 99, Del. 
Coal City, III. 

P. O. Box 660, Augusta, Ga. 
1754 Dana Ave., Cincinnati 7, Ohio. 
30 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 
120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 
40 Rector St., New York 6, N. Y. 

Scottdale Road, I,ansdowne, Pa. 
170 Varick St., New York 13, N. Y. 
97 Bickford St., Boston 30, Mass. 



136 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Table 19. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of maniifacturers — Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office). 



Beaudry Wall Paper Corp 

Belle Alkali Co 

Benzol Products Co 

Berk, F. W., & Co., Inc 

Berry Brothers, Inc 

Bersworth, F. C., Laboratories. 

Bick & Co., Inc 

Birge Co., Inc 

Bischoff, Ernst, Co., Inc 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. . . 

Bridgeport Gaslight Co 

Brocker Chemical Co , 

Brooklyn Borough Gas Co 



Brooklyn Color Works. . 
Brooklyn Union Gas Co. 

Brown Co 

Brown, Andrew, Co 



Bryant Electric Co 

Burkart-Schier Chemical Co 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co., Inc 

Bush, Burton T., Inc. (Givaudan-Delawanna) 

Bush, W. J. & Co., Inc 

Cabot, Samuel, Inc 

Calco Chemical Division, American Cyana- 
mid Co. 

California Flaxseed Products Co 

California Ink Co., Inc 



Cambridge Gaslight Co 

Capital Paint & Varnish Works, Inc 

Carbide & Carbon Chemicals Corp 

Carlsen, John G., & Co 

Carlson, John P., Inc 

Carnegie-Illinois Steel Corp 

Carnrick, G. W., Co. 

Carroll Dunham Smith Pharmacal Co 

Carus Chemical Co 

Carwin Co 

Casein Co. of America, Division of Borden 
Co. 

Catalin Corp. of America 

Celanese Corp. of America 

Central Hudson Gas & Electric Cori) 

Chemical Manufacturing Co., Inc 

Chemical Specialties, Inc 

Chemico, Inc 

Chemo Puro Mfg. Corp 



Childs Pulp Colors, Inc 

Ciba Pharmaceutical Products, Inc. 
Cincinnati Chemical Works 



Cities Service Oil Co 

Citro Chemical Co 

Clinton Co 

Coastwise Petroleum Co 

Colasta Co., Inc 

Coleman & Bell Co 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 

Collway Colors, Inc 

Colt's Patent Fire .^rms Manufacturing Co. . 

Columbus Varnish Co 

Commercial Solvents Corp 

Commonwealth Color & Chemical Co 

Connecticut Power Co 

Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc. . 
Consolidated CJas Electric Light & Power Co. 

Continental-Diamond Fibre Co 

Continental Oil Co 

Cook P<.int & Varnish Co 

Cooks Falls Dye Works, Inc 

Coopers Creek Chemical Corp 

Crown Tar Works 

Daystrom Corp -. . . . 

Debruille Chemical Corp 

Dennis, Martin, Co 

Delta Chemical Maimfacturing Co 

Detroit Ellison Co 

Dewey and Alniy Chemical Co 

Diamond Alkali Co 

Diarsenol Co., Inc., 

Distillation Products, Inc 



46 Elm St., Cortland, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 615, Belle, W. Va. 

237 South St., Newark .5, N. J. 

Railroad Ave., Wood-Ridge, N. J. 

211 Leib St., Detroit 7, Mich. 

609 Waverly St., Framingham, Mass. 

1820 North 12th St., Reading, Pa. 

390 Niagara St., Buffalo 1, N. Y. 

Ivoryton, Conn. 

100 Arlington St., Boston 16, Mass. 

815 Main St., Bridgeport 1, Conn. 

Morgan ville, N. J. 

West 17th St. and Mermaid Ave., Brooklyn 24, 

N. Y. 
Morgan and Norman Aves., Brooklyn 22, N. Y. 
176 Remsen St., Brooklvn 2, N. Y. 
650 Main St., Berlin, N. H. 
5431 South Riverside Drive, Los Angeles 22, 

Calif. 
1421 State St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
1202 Chestnut St., Chattanooga 2, Tenn. 
9 East 41st St.. New York 17, X. Y. 
109-201 Delawanna Ave., Delawanna, N. J. 
11 East .38th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
141 Milk St., Boston 9, Mass. (Chelsea, Mass.) 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 



3135 East 26th St., Los Angeles 23, Calif. 
545 Sansome St., San Francisco 1], Calif 

(Berkelev, Calif.) 
354 Third St., Cambridge 42, Mass. 
47-55 Rodney St., Brooklvn 11, N. Y. 
30 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 
1446 West Kenzie St., Chicago, III. 
420 Carroll St., Brooklyn 15, N. Y. 
Carnegie Bldg., Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 
20 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark 4, X. J. 
350 Scotland Road, Orange, N. J. 
1.335 8th St., La Salle, III. 
1310 West Elizabeth Ave., Linden, N. J. 
350 Madison Ave., New Nork 17, X. Y. 



Meadow Road, Fords, N. J. 

180 Madison Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 

South Road, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Ashhmd, Mass. 

151 Xorth Centennial St., Zeeland, Mich. 

1745 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 

48th Ave. and 5th St., Long Island Citv 1, 

N. Y. 
43 Summit St., Brooklyn 31, N. Y. 
Lafayette Park, Summit, N. J. 
P. O. Box 20, Evanston Station, Cincinnati 7, 

Ohio. 
Masonic-Empire Bldg., Bartlesville, Okla. 
Mavwood Ave., Maywood, N. J. 
P. 6. Box 340, Clinton, Iowa. 
1127 Munsey Bldg., Baltimore 2, Md. 
1 Mechanic St., Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 
4101 Main St., Norwood, Ohio. 
105 Hudson St., Jersev Citv 2, N. J. 
15 Market St., Paterson 1, N. J. 
17 Van Dyke .^ve., Hartford, Conn. 
95 West Long St., Columbus 15, Ohio. 
17 East 42d St., New York 17, X. Y. 
■ 223 Nevins St., Brooklyn 17, N. Y. 
31 Union St., New London, Conn. 
4 Irving Place, New York 3, N. Y. 
T;exington Bldg., Baltimore 3, Md. 
70 S.iuth Chapel St., Newark, Del. 
1000 South Pine St., Ponca City, Okla. 
P. O. Box 389, Xorth Kansas City 10, Mi'. 
Cooks Falls, X. Y. 

River Road, West Conshohocken, Pa. 
900 1.5th St., Denver ^, Colo. 
FrankUn St., Olean, N. Y. 
1841. Broadway, New York 23, N. Y. 
8.59 Summer Ave., Newark 4, N. J. 
2100 Wa.-ihington Blvd., Baltimore, Md. 
2000 Second .\ve., Detroit 26, Mich. - 
62 Whittemore Ave., Cambridge 40, Mass. 
.535 Siiiilhtielil St., Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 
72 Kiiif-'slev St., Buffalo 8, X. Y. 
755 Hidge Road West, Rochester 13, X. Y. 



svnthb:ti(' organic chemicals, 1941-43 137 

Table 19. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacfnrers — Continued 



126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 

139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 

loO 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 

165 

166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 

177 
178 
179 
180 
181 

182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 

189 
190 
191 

192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 



Name of company 



Dodge & Olcott Co 

Dow Chemical Co 

Dubin. H. E., Laboratories, Inc 

duPont de Nemours, E. I., & Co 

Diirez Plastics & Chemicals, Inc 

Durite Plastics, Inc 

Dye Specialties Corp., Inc 

Dykem Co 

Eakins, J. S. & W. R., Inc 

Ea.stern Tar Products Corp 

Eastman Kodak Co 

Edcan Laboratories 

Edison, Thomas A., Inf., Medical Gas 
Division. 

Edwal Laboratories, Inc 

Electro Technical Products, Inc 

Elizabethtown Consolidated Gas Co 

Elko Chemical Works, Inc 

Emery Industries, Inc 

Empire Chemical Co., Inc 

Emulsol Corp 

Endo Products. Inc 

Ethyl Corp 

Ethyl-Dow Chemical Co 

Factor, Max, & Co 



Fairmount Chemical Co., Inc 

Falk & Co 

Farley & Loetscher Manufacturing Co. 

Federal Color Laboratories, Inc 

Federal Laboratories, Inc 

Federal Varnish Co 

Felton Chemical Co., Inc 

Ferbert-Schorndorfer Co 

Fine Colors Co 

Fine Organics, Inc 

Firestone Tire & Rubber Co 

Forbes Varnish Co 

Ford Motor Co 

Foster-Heaton Co 

France, Campbell & Darling, Inc 



Franco-American Chemical Works 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office). 



Franks Chemical Products Co., Inc 

Fries Bros., Inc 

Fries & Fries, Inc 

Fries, George G., & Co., Inc 

Fritzsche Bros., Inc 

Fuller, W. P., & Co 

Fulton Aniline Corp 

Ganc's Chemical Works, Inc 

Gebauer Chemical Co 

Gelatin Products Co 

General Aniline Works Division, General 

.\niline & Film Corp. 

General Biochemicals, Inc 

General Chemical Co 

General Electric Co 

General Foods Corp 

General Mills, Inc., Special Conmiodities 

Division. 

George, P. D., Co 

Gilman Paint & Varnish Co 

Glidden Co 

GIvco Products Co., Inc 

Goodrich, B. F., Co. 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Corp 

Grand Rapids Varnish Corp 



Gulf Oil Corp 

Guvan Color & Chemical Works 

Halowax Products Division, Union Carbide 
& Carbon Corp. 

Hamilton Laboratories, Inc 

Hampden Color & Chemical Co 

Harbor Plvwood Corp 

Hardesty, W. C. Co., Inc 

Harmon Color Works, Inc 

Harris Chemical Co., Inc 

Harshaw Chemical Co 

Hartman-Leddon Co., Inc 

Hart Products Corp ". 

Hercules Powder Co 

Heresite & Chemical Co 



180 Varick St., New York 14, N. Y. 
Midland, Mich. 

250 East 43d St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Wilmington, Del. (10th and Market Sts.) 
Walck Road, North Tonawanda 4, N. Y. 
5000 Summerdale Ave., Philadelphia 24, Pa. 
924 Bergen Ave., Jersey City 6, N. .1. 
2307 North 11th St., St. Louis 6, Mo. 
55 Berry St., Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 
Lexington Bldg., Baltimore 1, Md. 
343 State St., Rochester 4. N. Y. 
10 Pine St., South Norwalk, Conn. 
P. O. Box 45, Bloomfield, N. J. 

732 Federal St., Chicago 5, 111. 

113 E. Centre St., Nutley 10, N. .1. 

16 West Jersey St., Elizabeth 4, N. J. 

60 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

4300 Carew Tower, Cincinnati 2, Ohio. 

399 Cod wise .\ve.. New Brunswick, N. J. 

59 East Madison, Chicago 3, III. 

84-40 101 St., Richmond Hill 18, N. Y,_ 

405 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Midland, Mich. 

1666 North Highland Ave., Los Angeles 28, 

Calif. 
600 Ferry St., Newark, N. J. 
P. O. Box 1075, Pittsburgh 30. Pa. 
7th and White Sts., Dubuque, Iowa. 
4633 Forest Ave., Norwood 12, Ohio. 
185 4Ist St., Pittsburgh 1. Pa. 
.333 South Peoria St., Chicago 7, 111. 
599 .lohnson Ave., Brooklyn 6, N. Y. 
12815 Elmwood Ave., Cleveland 11, Ohio. 
21-29 McBride Ave., Paterson, N. J. 
211 East 19th St., New York 3,.N. Y. 
1200 Firestone Parkway, Akron 17, Ohio. 
3800 West 14.3d St., Cleveland 11, Ohio. 
3000 Schaefer Road, Dearborn, Mich. 
16 East 5th St., Paterson 4, N. J. 
Michigan Ave. and Monroe St., Kenilworth, 

N. J. 
(Amalgamated with Pennsylvania Alcohol & 

Chemical Co. in 1943.) 
55 .3.3d St., Brooklyn 32, N. Y. 
92 Reade St., New York 13, N. Y. 

13 East 37th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
11-25 44th Road, Long Island City 1, N. Y. 
76 9th Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

.301 Mission St., San Francisco 19, Cahf. 
91 Oliver St., Boston, Mass. 
43 West 16th St., New York 11, N. Y. 
9410 St. Catherine Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
9425 Grinnell Ave., Detroit 13, Mich. 
435 Hudson St., New York 14, N. Y. 

Laboratory Park, Chagrin Falls, Ohio. 

40 Rector St., New York 6, N. Y. 

1 River Road, Schenectady 5, N. Y. 
250 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
400 South 4th St., Minneapolis 15, Minn. 

5200 North 2d St., St. Louis 7, Mo. 

West 8th and Pine Sts., Chattanooga 1, Tenn. 

11001 Madi,son Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio. 

148 Lafavette St., New York, N. Y. 

500 South Main St., Akron 18, Ohio. 

1144 East Market St., Akron 5, Ohio. 

.565 Godfrey Ave., SW., Grand Rapids 2, 

Mich. 
Gulf Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
P. O. Box 1088, Huntington, W. Va. 
.30 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

120 Patton Ave., Asheville, N. C. 
161 Armory St., Springfield, Mass. 
Hoquiam, Wash. 

41 East 42d St., New York, N. Y. 
P. O. Box 11.58, Paterson, N. J. 

14 Mill St., New Haven, Conn. 

1945 East 97th St., Cleveland 6, Ohio. 
6010 Haverford Ave., Philadelphia 31, Pa. 
1440 Broadway, New York 18, N. Y. 
900 Market St., Wilmington 99, Del. 
822 South 14th St., Manitowoc, Wis. 



138 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Table 19. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers — Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office). 



Heyden Chemical Corp 

Hilton-Davis Chemical Co 

Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc 

Holland Color & Chemical Co. (formerly Hol- 
land Aniline Dye Co.) 

Hooker Electrochemical Co 

Huber, J. M., Inc 

Huggins, James, & Son 

Humble Oil & Refining Co 

Huron Milling Co 

Hycar Chemical Co 

Hynson, Westcott & Dunning, Inc 

Imperial Paper & Color Corp 

Industrial Dyestuff Co 

Inland Alkaloid Co ; 

Innis, Speiden & Co 

Inter-Coastal Paint Corp 

Interlake Chemical Corp 

Ironsides Co 

Irvington Varnish & Insulator Co 

Jamestown Paint & Varnish Co 

Jamieson, C. E., & Co ^- • • • 

Jennison-Wright Corp \ . . . 

Jersey Central Power & Light Co 

Joanite Corp 

Johnson, Charles Eneu, & Co 

Johnson, S. C, & Son, Inc 

Joliet Wall Paper Mills 

Jones-Dabney Co. Division of Devoe & Rey- 
nolds Co., Inc. 

Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp 

Kay & Ess Co 

Kay-Fries Chemicals, Inc 

Keery, Thos., Chemicals Co 

Kennecott Copper Corp., Chino Mines Divi- 
sion. 

Kentucky Color & Chemical Co 

Kessler Chemical Co., Inc 

Keto Chemical Co., Inc 

Keystone Color Works, Inc 

Keystone Varnish Co 

Kinetic Chemicals, Inc 

Kings County Lighting Co 

Knoedler, A., Co 

Kohnstamm, H., & Co., Inc 

Koppers Co 

Krumbhaar Chemicals, Inc 

Lake Erie Chemical Co 

Lakeside Laboratories, Inc 

Lamon Chemical Corp 

LaMotte Chemical Products Co 

Laucks, I. F., Inc 

Lauxite Corp 

Lehigh Briquetting Co 

Lennig, Charles, & Co 

Lever, C, Co., Inc 

Levey, Fred'k H., Co., Inc 

Lewis, John T., & Bros. Co 

Lewis Tar Products Co 

Lewistown Corp 

Eli Lilly & Co 

Lilly Varnish Co 

Lion Oil & Refining Co 

Liquid Carbonic Corp. (formerly Cheney 
Chemical Co.) 

Looto Co 

Long Island Lighting Co 

Long, Chas. R., Jr., Co., Inc 

Lucas, John, & Co., Inc 

Lucidol Corp 

Lueders, George, & Co 

Maas & Waldstein Co 

M & M Wood Working Co 

Macher, Wm., & Son 

Madison Gas and Electric Co 

Magnolia Petroleum Co 

Magruder Color Co., Inc 

Makalot Corp 

Mallard, A. E., Laboratories 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 



50 Union Square, New York 3, N. Y. 
2235 Langdon Farm Rd., Cincinnati 12, Ohio. 
324-424 Kingsland Rd., Nutley 10, X. J. 
R. F. D. «4, Holland, Mich. 

Buffalo Ave. and 47th St., Niagara Falls, X. Y. 

460 West .34th St., New York, N. Y. 

239 Medford St., Maiden 48, Mass. 

Humble Bldg., Houston, Tex. 

9 Park Place, New York, N. Y. 

335 South Main St., Akron 8, Ohio. 

1030 North Charles St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Massasoit'Ave., East Providence 14, R. I. 

Tipton, Ind. 

117 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y. 

1248 Walnut Ave., East St. Louis, III. 

1900 L^nion Commerce Bldg., Cleveland 14, 

Ohio. 
Box 1999, Columbus 15, Ohio. 
6 Argyle Terrace, Irvington 11, JN'. J. 
Jamestown, Pa. 

1962-1980 Trombly Ave., Detroit 11, Mich. 
2463 Broadway, Toledo 1, Ohio. 
501 Grand Ave., A.sbury Park, N. J. 
10-02 44th Drive, Long Island City, N. Y. 
10th and Lombard Sts., Philadelphia 47, Pa. 
1525 Howe St., Racine, Wis. 
225 Logan Ave., Joliet, 111. 
1481 South 11th St., Louisville 8, Ky. 

3d Ave. and Ross St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

825 Kiser St., Dayton 1, Ohio. 

180 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

Cadosia, N. Y. 

Hurley, N. M. 

600 North 34th St., Louisville 12, Ky. 

State Road and Cottman Ave., Philadelphia 

35, Pa. 
40-33 23d St., Long Island City, N. Y. 
151 West Gay Ave., York, Pa. 
71 Otsego St., Brooklyn 31, N. Y. 
duPont Bldg., Wilmington 98, Del. 
6740 4th Ave., Brooklyn 20, N. Y. 
717 North Prince St., Lancaster, Pa. 
87 Park Place, New York 7, N. Y. 
430 Seventh Ave., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
24 Jacobus Ave., South Kearny, N. J. 
.3650 East 93d St., Cleveland 13, Ohio. 
1707 East North Ave., Milwaukee 1, Wi.*. 
551 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
McCormick Bldg., Baltimore, Md. 
911 Western Ave., Seattle 4, Wash. 
116 South Niagara St., Lockport, N. Y. 
First National Bank Bldg., Dickinson, N. Dak. 
222 West Washington Square, Philadelphia .'>, 

Pa. 
Howard and Huntington Sts., Philadelpliia 3.'>, 

Pa 
41 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 
910 Widener Bldg., Philadelphia 7, Pa. 
P. O. Box A, Lyons, III. 
221 West 57th St., New York, N. Y. 
740 South Alabama St., Indianapolis 6. lad. 
666 South California St., Indianapolis 7, liid. 
Exchange Bldg., El Dorado, Ark. 
2929 East 67th St., Cleveland 4, Ohio. 

791 Hampden Ave., St. Paul 4, Minn. 

250 Old Country Road, Mineola, N. Y. 

1630-44 West Hill St., Louisville 10, Ky. 

Haddon Ave., Gibbsboro, N. J. 

1740 Military Rd., Buffalo 5, N. Y. 

427 Washington St., New York 13, N. Y. 

438 Riverside Ave., Newark 4, N. J. 

2301 North Columbia Blvd., Portland, (^reg. 

1533 West Clearfield St., Philadelphia, Pu. 

100 North Fairchild St., Madison, Wis. 

P. O. Box 900, Dallas 1, Tex. 

2385 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island 2, 

N. Y. 
262 Washington St., Boston 9, Mass. 
.3021 Wabash Ave., Detroit 16, Mich. 
3600 North 2d St., St. Louis 7, Mo. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, 1941-43 139 

Table 19. — Syyithctic organic chemicals: Directory of maniifacfvrers — Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office). 



Maltbie Chemical Co 

Marblctte Corp 

Marco Chemicals, Inc 

Marietta Dyestuffs Co 

Marietta Paint & Color Co 

Martin Laboratories 

Marx, Max, Color & Chemical Co. 

Maschmeijer, A., Jr., Inc 

Mathieson Alkali Works, Inc 

IMaxim Chemical Co., Inc 

May, Otto B., Inc 

Maywood Chemical Works 

Mead, Johnson & Co 



Mearl Corporation 

Mepham, Geo. S., Corp 

Merck & Co., Inc 

Merrell, Wm. S., Co 

Metropolitan Edison Co 

Mever, Herman, Drug Co., Inc. (Hema Drug 
Co.) 

Michigan Chemical Corp 

Midland Industrial Finishes Co 

Midwest Solvents Co 

Mid-West Tar Products Corp 

Miles Laboratories, Inc 

Millergum Products Co 

Millmaster Chemical Co 

Milwaukee Gas Light Co 

Minerec Corp 

Monsanto Chemical Co 

Montrose Chemical Co 

Morton Chemical Co _ 

Murphy Varnish Co " 

Nason, R. N., & Co 

Nassau & Suffolk Lighting Co 

National .\nilinc Division, Allied Chemical & 
Dye Corp. 

National Oil Products Co 

Naugatuck Chemical Division of V . S. Rub- 
ber Co. 

Neo-Quest Chemical Co., Inc 

Neville Co 

New Bedford Gas & Edison Light Co 

Newport Industries, Inc 

New York Color & Chemical Co., Inc. (Divi- 
sion of American Dyewood Co.) 

New York Quinine and Chemical Works, Inc. 

New York & Richmond Gas Co 

Niacet Chemicals Corp 

Niagara Chlorine Products Co 

Niagara Smelting Corp 

Niagara Wall Paper Co 

Nonweiler, A. P., Co 

Nord & Co., Inc 

Norda Essential Oil & Chemical Co., Inc 

Northwestern Chemical Co 

Novocol Chemical Mfg. Co., Inc 

Nubian Paint & Varnish Co 

Nutrition Research Laboratories 

Ohio-Apex, Inc 

Ohio Chemical & Mfg. Co 

Ohio Oil Co 

Oldbury Electro Chemical Co 

Old Hickory Chemical Co 

Orbis Products Corp 

Organic Products, Inc 

Osborn, C. J., Co. 

Pan-American Refining Corp 

Panelyte Corp 

Paraffine Companies, Inc 

Paramet Chemical Corp 

Parke, Davis & Co 

Patent Chemicals, Inc 

Paul-Lewis Laboratories, Inc 

Peerless Color Co 

Pennsylvania Alcohol & Chemical Corp 

Pennsylvania Coal Products Co 

Pennsylvania Industrial Chemical Corp 

Pennsylvania Power & Light Co 

Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co 

Pfanstiehl Chemical Co 

Pfizer, Chas., & Co., Inc 

Pharma Chemical Corp 

Philadelphia Gas Work? Co 



240 High St., Newark 2, N. J. 

37 30th St., Long Island City 1, N. Y. 

Sewaren, N. J. 

401 Peoples Bank Bldg., Marietta, Ohio. 

Greene and Acme Sts., Marietta, Ohio. 

2.51 East 1.39th St., New York 51, N. Y. 

192 Coit St., Irvington 11, N. J. 

43 West 16th St., New York 11, N. Y. 
60 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

44 CHff St., New York 7, N. Y. 
196-214 Niagara St., Newark 5, N. J. 
100 West Hunter Ave., Maywood, N. J. 

St. Joseph .Ave. and Pennsylvania St., Evana- 

ville 21, Ind. 
153 Waverly Place, New York 14, N. Y. 
2001 Lynch Ave., East St. Louis, 111. 
Lincoln Ave., Rahway, N. J. 
Amity Rd., Cincinnati 15, Ohio. 
412 Washington St., Reading, Pa. 
66-38 Clinton Ave., Maspeth, N. Y. 

500 North Bankson St., St. Louis, Mich. 

East Water St., Waukegan, 111. 

1300 Main St., .\tchison, Kans. 

332 South Michigan Ave., Chicago 4, 111. 

1127 Myrtle St., Elkhart, Ind. 

6450 North 66th Place, Chicago, 111. 

.551 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

626 East Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 

1700 South 2d St., St. Louis 4, Mo. 

120 Lister Ave., Newark 5, N. J. 

2110 High Point Road, Greensboro, N. C. 

224 McWhorter St., Newark 1, N. J. 

151 Potrero, San Francisco 3, Calif. 

250 Old Country Road, Mineola, N. Y. 

40 Rector St., New York 6, N. Y. 

First and Essex Sts., Harrison, N. J. 
12.30 6th Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

2 Albany St., New York, N. Y. 
Neville Island, Pittsburgh 25, Pa. 
693 Purchase St., New Bedford, Mass. 
P. O. Box 911, Pensacola, Fla. 
374 Main St., BelleviUe 9, N. J. 

99 North 11th St., Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 

691 Bay St., Staten Island, N. V. 

4700 Pine Ave., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

North Transit Road, Lockport, N. Y. 

420 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Walnut Ave. and 2d St., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 1007. Oshkosh, Wis. 

Broadway and Clark St., Keyport, N. J. 

601 West 26th St., New York 1, N. Y. 

1263 North 70th St., Wauwatosa 13, Wis. 

2923 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn 7, N. Y. 

1856 North LeClaire Ave., Chicago, 111. 

4210 Peterson Ave., Chicago 30, 111. 

P. O. Box 98, Nitro, W. Va. 

1177 Marquette St., Cleveland 14, Ohio. 

539 South Main St., Findlav, Ohio. 

P. O. Box 346, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 1480, Richmond 12, Va. 

215 Pearl St., New York 7, N. Y. 

Springdale, Conn. 

1.32 Nassau St., New York 7, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 401, Texas City, Tex. 

Enterprise Ave., Trenton 4, N. J. 

47.5 Brannan St., San Francisco, Calif. 

10-17 44th Ave., Long Island City 1, N. Y. 

Foot of McDougall Ave., Detroit 32, Mich. 

.57 Wilkinson Ave., Jersey City 5, N. J. 

918 North 4th St., Milwaukee 3, Wis. 

521-535 North Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 

Berry Ave., Carlstadt, N. J. 

P. O. Box C, Petrolia, Pa. 

120 State St., Clairton, Pa. 

9th & Hamilton Sts., AUentown, Pa. 

122 South Michigan Ave., Chicago 3, 111. 

104 Lakeview Ave., Waukegan, 111. 

81 Maiden Lane. New York 7, N. Y. 

175 .5th Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 

1800 North 9th St., Philadelphia 22, Pa. 



140 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Table 19. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of vianufacturers — Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office). 



Phillips Petroleum Co 

Phoenix Color & Chemical Co., Inc 

Pitman-Moore Co., Division of Allied Labora- 
tories, Inc. , 

Pittsberg Chemical Co 

Pittsburgh Coke & Iron Co 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co 

Plaskon Division, Libbey-Owen-Ford Glass 
Co. 

Polak & Schwarz, Inc 

Polychemical Co 

Pontiac Varnish Co 

Portland Gas & Coke Co 

Poughkeepsie Dyestuff Corp 

Pratt & Lambert Inc 

Premo Pharmaceutical Labs., Inc 

Pruett-Schaffer Chemical Co 

Publicker, Inc 

Pure Chemicals Mfg. Corp 

Pure Oil Co 

Purocaine Chemical Co., Inc 

Pylam Products Co., Inc 

Pyridium Corporation 

Quaker Oats Co 

Queens Borough Gas & Electric Co 

Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc 

Reichhold Chemicals, Inc 

Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp 

Reliance Varnish Co., Inc 

Remington Arms Co., Inc 

Republic Creosoting Co 

Resinous Products & Chemical Co 

Richards Chemical Works, Inc 

Richardson Co 

Richfield Oil Corp 

Richmond Department of Public Utilities. . 

Rochester Gas & Electric Corp 

Rohm & Haas Co 

Roosen, H. D., Co 

R. S. A. Corp 

Ruberoid Co 

Saint Louis County Gas Co 

Salvo Chemical Corp 

Schering Corp 

Schering & Glatz, Inc 

Schieffelin & Co 

Scholler Bros., Inc 

Schuylkill Chemical Co 

Schwarz Laboratories, Inc 

Scranton-Spring Brook Water Service Co. . . 

Searle, G. D., & Co 

Seattle Gas Co 

Seeley & Co. , Inc 

Sepin Laboratories 

Seydel Chemical Co 

Sharp & Dohme, Inc 

Sharpies Chemicals, Inc 

Shawinigan Resins Corp 

Sheffield Farms Co., Inc 

Shell Chemical Co. (Shell Union Oil Corp.) . 

Shell Oil Co., Inc 

Sherman Laboratories 

Sherwin-Williams Co 

Simons, Harold L., Inc 

Sinclair Refining Co : 

Sinclair & Valentine Co 

Skelly^Oil Co 

Smith, Kline & French Laboratories 

Solvay Process Co 

Solvent Chemical Co., Inc : 

Sonoco Products Co 

Southern California Gas Co 

Southern Dyestuff Corp 

Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc 

Springfield Gas Light Co 

Squibb, E. R., & Sons 

Staley, A. E., Manufacturing Co 

Standard Agricultural Chemicals, Inc 



Bartlesville, Okla. 

24 1/2 Van Houten St., Paterson, N. .1. 

120() Madison Ave., Indianapolis 6, Ind. 

3100 East 26th St., Los Angeles 23, Calif. 
Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
2000 Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
2112 Sylvan \ve., Toledo 6, Ohio. 

667 Washington St., New York 14, N. Y. 
1938 Park Ave., New York 35, N. Y. 
30 Brush St., Pontiac 12, Mich. 
Public Service Bldg., Portland 4, Oreg. 

77 North Water St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
75 Tonawanda St., Buffalo 7, N. Y. 

443 Broadway, New York 13, N. Y. 

Head of Tabor St., Pittsburgh 4, Pa. 

1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Pa. 

26-02 4th St., Long Island City, N. Y. 

35 East Wacker Drive, Chicago 1, 111. 

9-20 38th Ave., Long Island City 1, N. Y. 

799 Greenwich St., New York 14, N. Y. , 

21 Gray Oaks Ave., Yonkers 2, N. Y. 

141 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 

250 Old Country Road, Mineola, N. Y. 

61 Willett St., Passaic, N. J. 

601 Woodward Heights Blvd., Detroit 20, 

Mich.. 
500 .5th Ave., New York 18, N. Y. 
915 East Kentucky St., Louisville 4, Ky. 
939 Barnum Ave., Bridgeport 2, Conn. 
1615 Merchants Bank Bldg., Indianapolis 4, 

Ind. 
222 West Washington Square, Philadelphia 5, 

Pa. 
Warren and Morris Sts., Jersey Citv 2, N. J. 
27th and Lake Sts., Melrose Park, III. 
555 South Flower St., Los Angeles 13, Calif. 
Room 317, City Hall, Richmond 19, Va. 
89 East Ave., Rochester 4, N. Y. 
222 West Washington Square, Philadelphia .", 

Pa 

78 2dth St., Brooklyn 32, N. Y. 
Ardsley, N. Y. 

.500 .5th Ave., New York 18, N. Y. 

231 West Lockwood Ave., Webster Grove, Mo. 

Rothschild, Wis. 

2 Broad St., Bloomfield, N. J. 

113 West 18th St., New York 11, N. Y. 

16-30 Cooper Square, New York 3, N. Y. 

Collins and Westmoreland Sts., Philadelphia 

34, Pa. 
2346 Sedgley Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
202 East 44th St., New York 17, N. Y. 
30 North Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
P. O. Box 5110, Chicago 80, 111. 
1511 4th Ave., Seattle 11, Wa.sh. 
136 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y. 
Box 185, Station A, San Diego, Calif. 
225 Mercer St., Jersev Citv 2, N. J. 
640 North Broad St., Phila(leli)hia 1, Pa. 
123 South Broad St., Philadelphia 9, Pa. 
644 Monsanto Ave., Springfield 2, Mass. 
,524 West 57th St., New York 19, N. Y. 

100 Bush St., San Francisco 4, Calif. 
50 West 50th St., New York 20, N. V. 
14600 P^ast Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

101 Prospect Ave., N. W., Cleveland 1, Ohio. 
11-25 44th Road, Long Island City 1, N. Y. 
630 5th Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

611 West 129th St., New York 27, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 1650, Tulsa 2, Okla. 

105 North 5th St., Philadelphia 5, Pa. 

P. O. Box 271, Syracuse 1, N. Y. 

341 Commercial St., Maiden, Mass. 

Hartsville, S. C. 

Box 3249, Los Angeles 54, Calif. 

P. O. Box 1045, Charlotte 1, N. C. 

310 Wheeler St., Tonawanda, N. Y. 

35 State St., Springfield 2, Mass. 

745 5th Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 

Decatur, 111. 

1301 Jefferson St., Hoboken, N. J. 



SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICLAS, 1941-43 141 

Ta9LE 19. — Sytithetic orgaixic chemicals: Directory of vianufacturers — -Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as oflBce). 



Standard Alcohol Co 

Standard Brands, Inc 

Standard Chemical Products, Inc 

Standard Chlorine Chemical Co 

Standard Naphthalene Products Co 

Standard Oil Co. of California 

Standard Oil Co. of Indiana 

Standard Oil Co. of Louisiana 

Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey (Stanco Dis- 
tributors, Inc.) 

Standard Ultramarine Co 

Standard Varnish Works 

Stange, Wm. J., Co 

Stauffer Chemical Co., Inc 

Frederick Stearns & Co 

Stresen-Reuter, F. A., Inc 

Stroock & Wittenberg Corp 

Sun Chemical & Color Co., Division General 
Printing Ink Corp. 

Sun Oil Co 

Synthetical Laboratories 

Synthetic Chemicals, Inc 

Synthetic Products Co 

Swann Chemical Corp 

Taylor Chemical Corp 

Taylor Fibre Co 

Tennessee Eastman Corp 

Tennessee Products Corp 



Todd, A. M., Co 

Trojan Powder Co 

Trubek Laboratories 

Tubize Rayon Corp 

Ugite Sales Corp 

Uhlich, Paul, & Co., Inc 

LTnion Bay State Co., Inc 

Union Oil Co. of California 

United Color & Pigment Co. (American 
Cyanamid Co.) 

U. S. Industrial Chemicals, Inc 

Utah Copper Co 

Valentine & Co., Inc 

Van Ameringen-Haebler, Inc 

Van Camp Laboratories 

Van Dyk & Co., Inc 

Van Schaack Chemical Works, Inc 

Varcum Chemical Corp 



Velsicol Corp 

Verley Chemical Co., Inc 

Verona Chemical Co 

Victor Chemical Works 

Virginia Smelting Co 

Vitamins, Inc 

Vita-Var Corp 

Wallace & Tiernan Products, Inc 

Wannamaker Chemical Co., Inc 

Warner- Jenkinson Manufacturing Co 

Warner, William R., & Co., Inc 

Warwick Chemical Co 

Watertown Manufacturing Co 

Werner Drug & Chemical Co 

Western Condensing Co 

Western Dry Color Co 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 

Westvaco Chlorine Products Corp 

Wetherill, Geo. D., Varnish Co., Inc 



Wilhelm, A., Co., Division of the Glidden Co. 

Wilmot & Cassidy, Inc 

Wilson Laboratories 

Winthrop Chemical Co., Inc 

Wisconsin Power & Light Co 

Wisconsin Public Service Corp 

Wishnick-Tumpeer, Inc 

Witte, John H., & Sons 

Woburn Chemical Corp 

Wolff-Alport Chemical Corp 

Wolf, Jacques & Co 

Worchester Gas Light Co 

Wyeth, John, & Bros., Inc 

Young Aniline Works, Inc 

Zinser & Co., Inc 



26 Broadway, New York 4, N. Y. 
595 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 
1301 Jefferson St., Hoboken, N. J. 
Jacobus Ave., South Kearny, N. J. 
Jacobus Ave., South Kearny, N. J. 
225 Bush St., San Francisco 20, CaUf. 
910 South Michigan Ave., Chicago 80, III. 
P. O. Box 551, Baton Rouge 1, La. 
26 Broadway, New York 4, N. Y. 

24th St. and 5th Ave., Huntington 18, W. Va. 
2600 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island 3, N.Y. 
2536 West Monroe St., Chicago 12, 111. 
420 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. V. 
6533 East Jefferson Ave., Detroit 31, Mich. 
2113 Medill Ave., Chicago 47, 111. 
60 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 
309 Sussex St., Harrison, N. J. 

1608 Walnut St., Philadelphia 3, Pa. 

5558 Ardmore Ave., Chicago 30, 111. 

57 Wilkinson Ave., Jersey City 5, N. J. 

1798 London Road, Cleveland 12, Ohio. 

205 South 32d St., Birmingham, .\la. 

600 North Broad St., Phillipsburg, N. J. 

P. O. Box 470, Norristown, Pa. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

American National Bank Bldg., Nashville 3, 

Tenn. 
1717 Douglas Ave., Kalamazoo 99, Mich. 
17 North 7th St., Allentown, Pa. 
State Highway 17, East Rutherford, N. J. 
2 Park Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 
1401 Arch St., Philadelphia 5, Pa. 
90 West St., New York 6, N. Y. 
50 Harvard St., Cambridge 42, Mass. 
617 West 7th St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
158-178 Mt. Olivet .Ave., Newark 5, X. J. 

60 East 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Kearns Bldg., Salt Lake City 12, Utah. 

11 East 36th St., New York 16, N. Y. 

315 Fourth Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 

Terminal Island, Calif. 

57 Wilkinson Ave., Jersey City 5, N. J. 

3430 Henderson St., Chicago 18, 111. 

East Falls and Portage Rd., Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
120 East Pearson St., Chicago 11, 111. 
100 Maine St., Belleville 9, N. J. 
26 Verona Ave., Newark 4, N. J. 
141 Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 
Jefferson and Third Sts., West Norfolk, Va. 
809 West 58th St., Chicago 21, 111. 
46 Albert Ave., Newark 5, N. J. 
1 Mill St., Belleville, N. J. 
79 East Russell St., Orangeburg, S. C. 
2526 Baldwin St., St. Louis 6, ^lo. 
113 West 18th St., New York, X. Y. 
100 Pulaski St., West Warwick, R. I. 
Echo Lake Road, Watertown, Conn. 
914 Race St., Cincinnati 2, Ohio. 
935 East John St., Appleton, Wis. 
600 West 52d St., Chicago 9, III. 
306 Fourth Ave., Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 
405 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
Haddon Ave. and White Horse Pike, Camden, 

N. J. 
3d and Bern Sts., Reading, Pa. 
292 Freeman St., Brooklyn 22, X. Y. 
4221 South Western Ave., Chicago 9, 111. 
170 Varick St., New York 13, X. Y. 
122 West Washington Ave., Madison 1, Wis. 
1029 Xorth Marshall St., Milwaukee 1, Wis. 
295 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
Burlington, Iowa. 

1200 Harrison Ave., Harrison, N. J. 
1127 Irving Ave., Brooklyn 27, N. Y. 
356 Lexington Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
240 Main St., Worchester 8, Mass. 
1600 Arch St., Philadelphia 3, Pa. 
2731 Boston St., Baltimore 24, Md. 
Hastings on Hudson, N. Y. 



142 UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Table 19. — Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of ■manufacturers — Continued 



Number 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office). 



512 
513 
514 
515 

516 
517 
518 

519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 

527 



United Slates Government plants 
operated by Rubber Reserve Company 

Carbide & Carbon Chemical Corp 

Copolymer Corp 

E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co 

Firestone Tire & Rubber Co 

General Tire & Rubber Co 

B. F. Goodrich Co 

Goodyear Synthetic Rubber Corp 

Humble Oil & Refining Co 

Koppers Co., Inc 

Lion Oil Refining Co 

National Synthetic Rubber Corp 

Shell Chemical Co 

Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey 

Sun Oil Co 

U. S. Rubber Co 

Polymer Corp 



Institute, W. Va.; Louisville, Ky. 

Baton Rouge, La. 

Louisville, Ky. 

Akron, Ohio; Lake Charles, La.; Port Xeches, 

Tex. 
Baytown, Tex. 

Borger, Tex. ; Louisville, Ky.; Port Neches, Tex. 
Akron, Ohio; Houston, Tex.; Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
Baytown, Tex. ; Ingleside, Tex. 
Kobuta, Pa. 
El Dorado, Ark. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Torrance, Calif. 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Institute, W. Va.; Los Angeles, Calif., 

Naugatuck, Conn. 
Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. 



•if U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1945—646064