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Full text of "Synthetic organic chemicals : United States production and sales"

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UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

SYNTHETIC 
ORGANIC CHEMICALS 

United States Production 
and Sales, 1945 

Report No. 157 • Second Series 




BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

, illinium 

3 9999 06317 198 5 



RECENT REPORTS OF THE UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



SECOND SERIES 

No. 155. Synthetic Organic Chemicals, United States Production and Sales, 

1944, 250 
No. 156. Short Harsh Cotton (in press) 

WAR CHANGES IN INDUSTRY SERIES 



No. 


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2. 


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6. 


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7 


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Raw Wool 
Industrial Alcohol 
United States Stock-Pile 

Wools 
Mercury 

Dehydrated Vegetables 
Rubber, 200 
Pottery Tableware 
Red Cedar Shingles 
Sheet (Window) Class 
Magnesium 
Cigarette Paper, 100 
Refractory Magnesia (Magne- 

site), 150 



No. 13. Hides and Skins and Leather, 

250 
No. 14. Aluminum, 250 
No. 15. Iron and Steel, 300 
No. 16. Potatoes, 150 
No. 17. Petroleum, 300 
No. 18. Edible Tree Nuts, 200 
No. 19. Dyes, 250 
No. 20. Watches, 400 
No. 21. Mica, 250 
No. 22. Newsprint, 150 
No. 23. China Clay or Kaolin, 250 
No. 24. Grapes and Grape Products 

(in press) 
No. 25. Softwood Lumber (in press) 



Mexico, 150 
Nicaragua, 100 
Panama, 100 



TRADE PROBLEMS OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

Economic Controls and Commercial Policy 

Bolivia, 100 Ecuador, 100 Haiti, 100 

Cuba, 150 El Salvador Honduras (in 

Dominican (in press) press) 

Republic, 100 Guatemala, 100 

Mining and Manufacturing Industries 

Mexico, 250 Nicaragua, 100 Paraguay, 100 

Agricultural, Pastoral, and Forest Industries 

Argentina, 250 Brazil, 200 Cuba, 200 

Recent Developments in Foreign Trade 
Colombia, 150 



NOTE.— The reports followed by a price may be purchased from the Superintendent of 
Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. See inside back cover 
for other available reports. These and other reports issued by the U. S. Tariff Commission 
may also be consulted in the official depository libraries throughout the United States. 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 



SYNTHETIC 
ORGANIC CHEMICALS 



United States Production 
and Sales, 1945 



UNDER THE GENERAL PROVISIONS 
OF TITLE III, PART II, SECTION 332 
OF THE TARIFF ACT OF 1930 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1947 



Report No. 157 • Second Series 



ocr 17 134J 
UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

Oscar B. Ryder, Chairman 

LYNN R. Edminster, Fice Chairman 

Edgar B. Brossard 

E. Dana Durand 

George McGill 

John P. Gregg 

Sidney Morgan, Secretary 



Address all communications 

UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION 

WASHINGTON 25, D. C. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

In the preparation of this report the Commission had the 

services of James H. Hihben, Martin L. Peller, II. Deborah Keistcr, 

Bertha M. Robertson, and others of its staff 



For sale t>y ih<- Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Oflice 
Wimliington 25, D. C. - I'rice 45 cent* 



CONTENTS 



Page 



Introduction ~ — — 1 

Summary — 3 



PART I. PRODUCTION AND SALES OF TARS, TAR CRUDES, AND CRUDES 
DERIVED FROM PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS 

Crude products from petroleum and natural gas — — — 14 



PART II. PRODUCTION AND SALES OF INTERMEDIATES AND FINISHED 
SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, BY GROUPS 

Intermediates 24 

Lakes and toners - .-■■-. 43 

Medicinals — — — ■ 48 

Flavor and perfume materials 54 

Plastics materials — — 58 

Rubber-processing chemicals — - 68 

Elastomers (synthetic rubbers) ■.—.- - — — — — 70 

Surface-active agents —— ■■ — — ■ ! 72 

Miscellaneous synthetic organic chemicals 77 



PART III. ALPHABETICAL LIST OF INDIVIDUAL PRODUCTS, 
BY GROUPS, AND MANUFACTURERS 

Tar crudes ■ ■ ■ ■ ~ -— 83 

Crude products from petroleum and natural gas 85 

Intermediates 86 

Lakes and toners — -— 127 

Flavor and perfume materials ■ ■ I46 

Plastics materials ■ > 153 

Rubber-processing chemicals ■ 162 

Elastomers (synthetic rubbers)— ■ 165 

Surface-active agents 166 

Plasticizers ■ . — 172 

Miscellaneous synthetic organic chemicals 176 

Directory of manufacturers -— 194 



APPENDIX 

A. Imports of coal-tar intermediates and finished products 211 

B. Research workers and expenditures 213 

iii 



CONTENT S — Continued 



TABL ES 



Summary 

Page 
1.- Synthetic organic chemicals and their raw materials: 

United States production and sales, 1944 and 1945 — -— 4 

Part I 

2.- Tar: United States production and consumption, 1944 and 1945- 8 
3»- Tar and tar crudes: Summary of production and sales of 

specified products, average, 1939-43, annual, 1944 and 1945 10 
41.- Organic chemicals: United States production and sales of tar 

crudes, 1945 12 

5A.- Organic chemicals: United States production and sales of 

crude products from petroleum and natural gas for chemical 
conversion, 1945 16 

Part II 

6.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Summary of United States pro- 
duction and sales of intermediates and finished products, 

average, 1939-43, annual, 1944 and 1945 20 

7A.~ Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of cyclic intermediates, 1945 25 

Sa.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of coal-tar dyes, 1945 31 

9»- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of coal-tar dyes, by chemical class, 1945 38 

10.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production of 
coal-tar dyes, by class of application, average, 1939-43, 

annual, 1944 and 1945 39 

11.- Synthetic organic chemical s: United States sales of coal-tar 
dyes, by class of application, average, 1939-43, annual, 

1944 and 1945 40 

12.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of azoic dyes and their components, 1945— 42 

13A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of lakes and toners, 1945 44 

14A«- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of medicinals, 1945 ■ ■ , —,- 49 

15A*- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of flavor and perfume materials, 1945- - - 55 

16a.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of plastics materials, grouped according to chemical 

composition, 1945 60 

17.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 
sales of plastics materials, grouped according to 

classes, 1945 — 64 

18.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of plastics materials, grouped according to use, 1945 67 
19A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of rubber-processing chemicals, 1945 69 

20A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of elastomers (synthetic rubbers), 1945 — ■ --■•- 71 

iv 



CONTENT S — Continued 

Part II — Continued 

Page 
2lA«- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of surface-active agent6, 1945 73 

22A. - Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of plasticizers, 1945 ■ 76 

23A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 

sales of miscellaneous chemicals, 1945 — - 78 

Part III 

4B.- Organic chemicals: Tar crude6 for which United States pro- 
duction or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

5B.- Organic chemicals: Crude products from petroleum and natural 
gas for chemical conversion for which United States pro- 
duction or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified 

by manufacturer, 1945 ■ — 86 

8B.- Synthetic organic chemicale: Coal-tar dyes for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by 
manufacturer, 1945—— ■— ■ 105 

13B.- Synthetic organic chemicale: Lakes and toners for which 

United States production or sales were reported, identified 

by manufacturer, 1945 — ■ 127 

14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by 
manufacturer, 1945 ■ • 134 

15B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials 
for which United States production or sales were reported, 
identified by manufacturer, 1945 . 146 

16B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which 

United States production or sales were reported, identified 

by manufacturer, 1945 ■ ■ ■ — ■ ■ 153 

19B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber-processing chemicale for 
which United States production or sales were reported, 
identified by manufacturer, 1945 162 

20B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Elastomers (synthetic rubbers) 
for which United States production or sales were reported, 
identified by manufacturer, 1945 165 

21B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Surface-active agents for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified 
by manufacturer, 1945 ■ 166 

22B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Pla6ticizers for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by 
manufacturer, 1945 172 

23B.- Synthetic organic chemicale: Miscellaneous chemicals for 
which United States production or sales were reported, 

identified by manufacturer, 1945 176 

24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 

1945 ■ 194 



CONTENT S — Continued 

Appendix 

Pa^e 
25.- Coal-tar intermedia tea and finished coal-tar products: 

United States imports for consumption, classified by uses, 
1943, 19M, and 1945 212 



INTRODUCTION 



This is the United States Tariff Commission's twenty-ninth annual 
report on production and sales in the United States of synthetic organ- 
ic chemicals and the raw materials from which they are made. The 
report gives statistics on crude organic chemicals derived from coal 
tar and petroleum, on intermediates, and on finished chemical products 
produced and sold in 1945 • The statistics were compiled from informa- 
tion supplied by about 575 producing companies, a list of which is given 
in part III. 

The contribution of the synthetic organic chemical industry to 
the national economy and welfare is of great significance both in war 
and in peace. The large-scale production of synthetic rubbers, and of 
penicillin, are outstanding examples of the importance of this industry. 

The raw materials covered by this report are obtained from coal, 
cruae petroleum, natural gas, and certain other natural sources. 
Thermal decomposition of coal yields coke-oven gas, light oil, and tar 
from which coal-tar crudes and other raw materials are obtained. Crude 
organic chemicals are derived also from petroleum and natural gas by 
cracking and distillation processes, and from other natural sources by 
fermentation. Production of crude organic chemicals is the first 
step in the manufacture of synthetic organic chemicals. From these 
crudes, intermediates are obtained by synthesis or refining; most of 
the intermediates are converted into finished chemical products such as 
elastomers (synthetic rubber), plastics materials, and dyes. These 
products are not usually sold directly to the ultimate consumer but are 
used by industrial concerns in their manufacturing processes. In 
general, organic chemicals obtained by simple extraction or distilla- 
tion from animal or vegetable materials are not covered by this report. 
Excluded also are explosives and chemicals produced at Government- 
owned Ordnance plants. 

The chemicals in this report are grouped according to use into 
the following categories: Crude organic chemicals, intermediates, dyes, 
lakes and toners, medicinal s, flavor and perfume materials, plastics 
materials, rubber-processing chemicals, elastomers, plasticizers, 
surface-active agents, and miscellaneous chemicals. This classifica- 
tion of chemicals is based upon the system used in group 19 of the 
Standard Commodity Classification. & Data are given in terms of 
undiluted materials unless otherwise noted; an exception is dyes, 
which, are reported in terms of usual commercial concentration. As far 
as possible the system of nomenclature used in this report for organic 
chemicals follows the system employed by Chemical Abstracts , a publica- 
tion of the American Chemical Society. 

Production of chemicals in this report includes chemicals made 
and consumed in the producing plant in the manufacture of other products) 
as well as production for sale. Production, therefore, usually exceeds 
sales. Sales of organic chemicals reported to the Commission include 
the value of transfers between plants under the same ownership, as well 

T/ Executive Office of the President, Bureau of the Budget, Standard 
Commodity Classification, vol. 1, Tech. Paper 26, 1943. 



as sales to the trade; such transiers, however, are not large compared 
with total sales. Average unit values of sales of the groups shown in 
the tables reflect not only the unit value of individual products but 
also the relative quantitative importance of products having different 
unit values. 

Statistics on tar and tar crudes include data furnished the 
Commission by distillers of coal tar and distillers and producers of 
water-gas and oil-gas tars, together with data furnished the Coal 
Economics Division of the United States Bureau of Mines by coke-oven 
operators. 

In the tabular presentation of statistical data in this report, a 
dash is used to indicate either that the reported data are confidential 
or that no data were reported to the Commission. 

Imports in 194-5 of coal-tar intermediates and finished coal-tar 
products entering the United States under paragraphs 27 and 28 of the 
Tariff Act of 1930 are given in the appendix of the report, which also 
includes a tabulation of the number of technical research workers and 
the cost of research in the synthetic organic chemical industry. 



SUMMARY 



Production of tar crudes and crudes from petroleum and natural gas 
was slightly larger in 1945 than in 1944. The output of tar and 
synthetic organic chemicals, however, decreased slightly. The 
combined production of all synthetic organic chemicals and their raw 
materials was 37.4 billion pounds in 1945, a decline of 52 million 
pounds from that of 1944. Sales totaled 24.9 billion pounds, valued 
at 2.2 billion dollars, compared with 24.6 billion pounds, valued at 
2.4 billion dollars, in 1944. The output of synthetic organic chemi- 
cals alone in 1945 was 2 percent less than in 1944, and the quantity 
and value of sales was about 8 percent less. Since these totals 
represent several successive steps, they necessarily include consider- 
able duplication. 

Production of all tars in 1945 was 899 million gallons (8,993 
million pounds) , or 72 million gallons under the peak production of 971 
million gallons (9,714 million pounds) in 1944, owing entirely to 
decreased production of coal tar. Consumption of tar for all purposes 
in 1945 was 915 million gallons, a decrease of 59 million gallons from 
the amount consumed in 1944, largely because of a decline in tar 
consumed for miscellaneous uses. Consumption of coal tar as fuel by 
coke-oven operators decreased sharply in 1945 partly because of strikes 
and partly because of greater availability of fuel oil, but consumption 
of water-gas and oil-gas tar as fuel was 24 million gallons larger in 
1945 than in the preceding year. 

Production of benzene declined by 12 percent from the peak output 
of 178 million gallons in 1944 to 156 million gallons in 1945 owing to 
the reduced operations of byproduct coke ovens, which cut down the out- 
put of crude light oil, containing benzene. Most of the benzene was 
consumed in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, isopropylbenzene, and 
phenol. Production of motor benzene was even lower in 1945 (32 
million gallons) than in 1944. Excluding production of toluene at the 
Baytown Ordnance plant, the output of toluene in 1945 totaled 132 
million gallons, a decrease of about 1 percent compared with the pre- 
ceding year. The Baytown Ordnance plant provided about 70 million 
additional gallons for military purposes, according to published 
allocation data. Crude naphthalene continued to be in heavy demand in 
1945 as a raw material for the manufacture of phthalic anhydride. 
Production of 288 million pounds was only slightly greater than the 
output in I944, when plants were operating at nearly maximum capacity. 

Production of chemical raw materials derived from petroleum and 
natural gas continued to advance in 1945, totaling 3.3 billion pounds 
compared with 2.8 billion pounds in 1944 and 1.5 billion in 1943. 
These totals include some duplication in the statistics. The most 
important hydrocarbon derived from petroleum was butadiene ueed in the 
manufacture of synthetic rubber (GR-S type). In 1945 production from 
petroleum amounted to 780 million pounds compared with 468 million 
pounds made from alcohol. Most of the xylene produced in 1945 was 
derived from petroleum; out of a total 1 roduction of 403 million 
pounds, 334 million pounds was derived frost petroleua sources. 



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Production and sales of all synthetic organic chemicals (inter- 
mediates and finished products) decreased slightly in 1945 compared 
with 1944 owing to a decrease in output of dyes, plasticizers, 
halogenated hydrocarbons, and other miscellaneous chemicals. The 
total output in 1945 was 14*7 billion pounds; sales were 9.4 billion 
pounds, valued at 1.86 billion dollars. Production of many of the 
important synthetic organic chemicals would have been larger in 1945 
were it not for the fact that during most of the year output was 
limited by Government controls and distribution was under allocation. 
About 36 percent of the total production reported was consumed in pro- 
ducing plants in the manufacture of other finished products. 

In 1945 the output of cyclic intermediates from both coal-tar and 
petroleum crudes was 2.3 billion pounds, an increase of 184 million 
pounds over that in 1944. This increase was due chiefly to (1) re- 
classification of certain chemicals from other groups to intermediates 
because of a change in prevailing use pattern, (2) an increase in the 
production of styrene (a constituent of synthetic rubber), which 
totaled 362 million compared with 349 million in 1944, and (3) an 
increase in the production of intermediates for use in plastics mate- 
rials and surface coatings, which was several million pounds greater. 
Wartime demand for intermediates used in military dyes, smoke signals, 
and explosives, though strong in 1945, was slightly lower than in the 
preceding year. 

Although Government restriction on dyes for civilian consumption 
was considerably less in 1945 than in 1944, the output of all dyes 
declined because the industry was unable to convert plant operations 
from military to civilian production quickly. The demand for dyes 
far exceeded the supply. Total production of dyes was 145 million 
pounds compared with 152 million in 1944. Vat dyes continued to be 
the leading individual class of dyes, accounting for 33 percent of the 
total production in 1945* 

The output of 23 million pounds of organic pigments (lakes and 
toners) in 1945 was 21 percent greater than the output in 1944 of 19 
million pounds. This sharp rise in production resulted from lessened 
Government control over dyes and a greater demand for inks, paints, and 
wallpaper, in which organic pigments are used. 

Production of medicinals in 1945 amounted to 44 million pounds, an 
increase of more than 13 percent over that in 1944. Sales totaled 40 
million pounds, valued at 161 million dollars. The increase of 44 
percent in the value of sales in contrast with an increase of only 11 
percent in the quantity of Bales, when compared with 1944, was due 
chiefly to the inclusion, in 1945, of data for penicillin. Production 
and sales of penicillin were small in quantity, but large in dollar 
value. Sales of penicillin alone amounted to 46 Bill ion dollars, and 
accounted for 29 percent of the total value of sales of all medicinals 
in 1945* Production of all synthetic vitamins was 2.9 million pounds; 
sales were 2.5 million pounds, valued at 49 million dollars. 

In response to increased civilian demand and more plentiful supply 
of some of the raw materials, production of flavor and perfume materials 
reached 18 million pounds, 2 million pounds greater than that of the 
preceding year. Production of monosodium glutamate, an important 
flavoring material, increased by about 1 million pounds in the same 
period. The output of synthetic menthol and of synthetic oil of 
wintergreen, however, was less in 1945 than in 1944. 



In 1945 the output of all plastics materials (chiefly synthetic 
resins) was the largest on record, amounting to 818 million pounds, 36 
million pounds greater than in 1944. Sales were 762 million pounds, 
valued at 269 million dollars. Of the total production of synthetic 
resin6, 310 million pounds was for protective coatings and 161 million 
for molding and casting. The most important single group of synthetic 
resins was the alkyd resins, production of which totaled 192 million 
pounds. 

Production of all rubber-processing chemicals amounted to 101 
million pounds in 1945, an increase of 9 percent over that of 1944. 
The increase is approximately in proportion to the increese in output 
of elastomers (including synthetic rubber) in the same year. 

Elastomer production was 1.9 billion pounds in 1945, an 8-percent 
increase from the 1944 level of 1.76 billion pounds. This output was 
the largest of all the classified finished products. In 1945 sales of 
elastomers were 10 percent greater than in 1944; but, because of 
lowered prices, the increase in value was only 2 percent. 

The manufacture of surface-active agents, including detergents, 
wetting agents, and emulsifying agents, continued at an accelerated 
rate in 1945, when production was 21 percent greater than in the pre- 
ceding year. This was due in part to a greater use of emulsifying 
agents in the production of synthetic rubber, in mining processes, and 
as a substitute for soap. 

The output of plasticizers showed the greatest decrease of any 
individual group of synthetic organic chemicals in 1945* Production 
dropped to 170 million pounds, a 9-percent decrease from the quantity 
reported in 1944. Production of tricresyl phosphate decreased by 7 
million pounds, and dimethyl phthalate by 24 million pounds owing to 
lessening demands for military purposes. 

The output of 8.97 billion pounds in 1945 of miscellaneous chemi- 
cals was 6 percent below the 9.59 billion pounds produced in 1944. 
The decrease was more apparent than actual and was partly due to the 
shift from ethyl alcohol to petroleum as the principal source of raw 
material for the manufacture of butadiene. Statistics on butadiene 
made from petroleum are included with those for petroleum chemicals; 
whereas those on butadiene made from ethyl alcohol are included in the 
miscellaneous group of chemicals. Production of halogenated hydro- 
carbons also decreased by 300 million pounds from the output of 1.8 
billion pounds reported in 1944. Certain miscellaneous chemicals were 
reclassified in 1945 as intermediates. 



PART I. PRODUCTION AND SALES OF TARS, TAR CRDDES, AND 
CRUDES DERIVED FROM PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS 



Tars 

Coal tar is recovered chiefly as a byproduct in the manufacture of 
coke by the steel industry. Water-gas tar and oil-gas tar are by- 
products of the fuel-gas industry. Production of coal tar, therefore, 
reflects the demand for steel, and that of water-gas and oil-gas tar 
reflects the consumption of industrial and household manufactured gas. 
Water-gae and oil-gas tar have properties intermediate between those of 
petroleum asphalts and coal tar; petroleum asphalts are not considered 
raw materials for chemicals. 

It is estimated that the quantity of .tars recovered from all 
sources in 1945 was 899 million gallons =/ compared with a corresponding 
output of about 971 million in 1944 and a prewar average (1937-41) of 
698 million gallons. Coal-tar proauction in 1945 at coke-oven plants 
was 696 million gallons; at coal-tar retort plants, 20 million gallons; 
and at low- temperature coal-carbonization plants, 3 million gallons. 
The remaining 180 million gallons was water-ga6 and oil-gas tar produced 
at fuel-gas plants. The decrease in recovery of tar in 1945 was caused 
chiefly by the decline in production of coke after VJ-day. Statistics 
on production and consumption of tars in 1945 are given in table 2. 

Apparent consumption of all tars slightly exceeded production in 
1945 and totaled 915 million gallons — 625 million gallons of which 
represented tar consumed by distillation, 233 million gallons consumed 
chiefly as fuel, and 57 million gallons consumed at refineries in 
blending for road and plant upkeep, end for miscellaneous purposes. 

Of the 625 million gallons of tar distilled in 1945, 179 million 
gallons of coal tar was distilled or topped by coke-oven operators, and 
406 million gallons by tar distillers. The remaining 40 million 
gal Ions was water-gas and oil-gas tar which was distilled by producers 
and tar distillers. The total tar distilled in 1945 was 1.4 percent 
less than in 1944. Tar consumed as fuel in 1945 was 15 million gallons, 
or about 10 percent, less than in the preceding year. This decline 
resulted chiefly from 39 million gallons less of coal tar being consumed 
as fuel by coke-oven operators; but was partly offset by 2U million 
gallons more of water-gas and oil-gas tar being consumed as fuel because 
of the shortage of coal tar in the fall of 1945. A decrease, in 1945, 
of tar consumed for blending and other miscellaneous purposes to 57 
million gallons from the 92 million gallons reported in 1944 
partly reflected a decrease of 24 million gallons in the output of 
blended tars for coatings and saturating. Although some of the 
figures on production and consumption of tars are estimated, they are 
believed to be reasonably accurate inasmuch as they are based on in- 
formation received from a large segment of the industry. 



y The quantity reported was 880 million gallons, or 19 million 
gallons less than the estimated total because of incomplete coverage 
(98 percent) of producers of water-gas and oil-gas tar. 



8 



Table 2.- Tar: United States production and consumption, 1944 and 1945 
(In thousands of gallons) 



Product 



1944 



1945 



Production of tar, total- 
Water-gas and oil-gas tar i/ 

Coal tar £/, total 

Coal tar from coke-oven byproduct plants, total — 

Plants not owned by city gas companies 

Plants owned by city gas companies (public utilities)- 

Coal tar from coal-tar retort plantB 

Low and medium temperature carbonization tar- 
Consumption of tar, total- 



971,420 



899, 344 



180,000 
791,420 



180,000 
719,344 



767,807 

719,145 

48,662 

19,719 

3,894 

974,057 



696,307 

652,106 

44,201 

19,837 

3,200 

914,654 



Tar consumed by distillation, total — 



633,428 



624,854 



Water gas and oil-gas tar distilled by producers and tar 

die tillers U 

Coal tar distilled or topped by coke-oven operators 2/ 

Coal tar distilled by tar distillers U 

Tar consumed chiefly as fuel, total 

Water-gas and oil-gas tar consumed as fuel .5/ -- 

Coal tar sold or consumed as fuel by coke-oven operators Z/~ 

As fuel under boilers 

In open- hearth or affiliated plants 

Sold as fuel by coke-oven operators to affiliates — 

Sold as fuel by coke-oven operators to others 

Tar consumed otherwise than by distillation or as a fuel, 

total 

Coal tar from retort plants sold for consumption & 

Coal tar consumed at coke-oven plants for roads and upkeep- 
Coal tar, water-gas tar, and oil-gas tar processed at tar 
refineries and crude tar consumed for upkeep and for roads 
at such refineries 1/ — — 



35,709 
200,570 
397,149 

248,365 



40,175 
178,575 
406,104 

233,268 



74,915 

173,450 

863 

156,736 

688 

15,163 



92,264 



98,845 

134,423 

575 

107,219 

4,600 

22,029 



56,532 



^19,067 
5,166 



68,031 



9,056 
3,633 



43,843 



i/ Estimated. Production reported to the U.S. Tariff Commission in 1944 
(150 million gallons) estimated to represent between 80 and 85 percent of the 
total production; production reported to the U.S. Tariff Commission in 1945 
(175,653,000 gallons) estimated to represent about 98 percent of total production. 

2/ Reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Department of Interior. 

2/ Reported to the U.S. Tariff Commission. 

jj Represents coal tar purchased from coke-oven and retort plants and distilled 
by chemical companies operating tar-distillation plants as reported to the U.S. 
Tariff Commission. Tar purchased and distilled by corporations affiliated with 
the coke-oven operators is included in the quantity of tar distilled or topped by 
these operators. Includes small quantity of low temperature carbonization and 
lignite tar distilled by the producers in 1945. 

$J Reported to the U.S. Tariff Commission for 1945. Data for 1944 reported to 
the Federal Power Commission. Consumption of water-gas and oil-gas tars, as fuel 
for 1944 reported to the U.S. Tariff Commission (63 million gallons) and estimated 
to represent between 80 and 85 percent of total consumption. 

6/ Consumption of some of this coal tar from coal-gas retorts may also be 
included in the data shown for tar distilled at tar refineries. 

2/ Includes crude tar used for refining and blending at refinery plants, 
and crude tar consumed in upkeep of plants and roads and for other 
purposes at tar refineries. Data for 1944 partly estimated. 



Tar Crudes 



Benzene, motor benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and creosote oil are 
the principal tar crudes derived from coke-oven gas and coal tar. 
Before the war, production of these tar crudes was sufficient to supply 
the synthetic organic chemical industry with most of its raw material 
for products derived from these sources — benzenoid, alicyclic, and 
heterocyclic compounds. During the war, supplies of tar crudes from 
these sources were not sufficient to meet civilian and military needs. 
Successful efforts were therefore made to increase the output of certain 
of the tar crudes from petroleum sources, from natural gas, and from 
water-gas and oil-gas tar compared with prewar years. 

Production ana sales of all the principal tar crudes, except 
naphthalene, decreased in 1945 compared with 1944 {see table 3). Most 
of these products were under allocation by the War Production Board for 
the greater part of 1945. 

The output of benzene declined by 12 percent from the peak output 
of 178 million gallons in 1944 to 15 6 million gallons in 1945 owing to 
the reduced operations of byproduct coke-ovens, which cut down the out- 
put of crude light oil, containing benzene. production of styrene, 
principally for synthetic rubber; phenol, for plastics materials; 
ieopropylbenzene (cumene), which is a fuel additive; explosives; and 
dyes — all continued to create a heavy demand for benzene in 1945 • As 
the domestic supply of benzene was insufficient to satisfy essential 
civilian and military requirements, it was materially supplemented by 
the importation and distillation of 33 million gallons of crude 
benzene, principally from the United Kingdom. Owing to the shortage 
of higher grade benzene, production of motor benzene (a mixture of 
crude benzene and toluene) continued at a low rate in 1945 » totaling 
32 million gallons, or about 11 percent less than in the preceding year. 

Production of toluene in 1945 continued to be large although some- 
what less than in 1944* The output at byproduct plants and tar refin- 
eries was 34 million gallons and at petroleum refineries, 98 million 
gallons, excluding production from petroleum at the Baytown Ordnance 
plant. The output of this plant was at the rate of about 70 million 
gallons annually during 1944 and most of 1945. The peak output of 
toluene during the war from all sources was reached in 1944, when the 
total production exceeded 200 million gallons, or about 8 times the 
average annual prewar production. Although production at Government 
Ordnance plants for the manufacture of explosives decreased sharply in 
1945 compared with 1944, the decrease is not completely reflected in 
the statistics on production of toluene since data on production at 
such plants are not included in the totals shown. 

Naphthalene continued throughout 1945 to be in great demand as a 
raw material used in the manufacture of synthetic resins, plasticizers, 
dyes, moth repellents, and other products. The output in 1945 of 288 
million pounds was 1.4 million pounds greater than that of the preceding 
year but was limited by available production facilities. 

Creosote oil, usually consisting of a mixture of cresols and 
xylenols and their derivatives, anthracene oil, and some phenol, is 
used principally for the preservation of railroad ties, pilings, and 
telephone poles. Production of creosote oil as a wood preservative 



10 

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continued its downward trend in 1945 from the peek output (175 million 
gallons) in 1942. The output in 1945 of creosote oil was 158 million 
gallons, a drop of 4 percent from that of 1944. This decrease was due 
partly to the diversion of some of the tar acid content of creosote oil 
to the manufacture of plastics materials as a result of General 
Preference Order 27 of the War Production Board, and partly to dimin- 
ished supplies of tar. 

Detailed statistics on production and sales of tar crudes and 
residua] tar crude products, such as pitch and tar coke, are shown in 
table 4A- 1/ 

Greater activity in road construction stimulated the production of 
road tar, which increased to 178 million gallons in 1945 from 161 
million gallons in 1944. Recovery of crude tar acids, a mixture of 
crude phenol, cresols, and xylenols, was 19.6 million gallons in 1945 » 
about the maximum amount obtainable from the raw materials available. 
Production of pitch, particularly the medium grade, in 1945 was 1.7 
million tone compared with 1.3 million in 1944* 

No totals are given in table 4A since some of the products covered 
are derived from others, resulting in considerable duplication in the 
statistics shown. By eliminating as much duplication as possible, the 
value of the total output of these products and of tar burned as fuel 
can be estimated at 157 million dollars in 1945 compared with 147 
million in 1944 and 138 million in 1943. 



y See also table 4B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 

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Crude Products from Petroleum and Natural Gae 

In general, crude products from petroleum and natural gas are 
related to chemical raw materials or intermediates, and finished prod- 
ucts derived from them in about the same fashion as coal-tar crudes are 
related to coal-tar intermediates and finished chemical products. 
Many of these crude products derived from petroleum, however, may be 
used economically both as a fuel and as a chemical raw material. Since 
the scope of this report does not include fuels, every effort has been 
made to exclude production and sales of chemicals consumed chiefly as 
fuels. It is probable, however, that a comparatively small amount of 
crudes sold for conversion into more advanced products may be used 
finally for fuel.* On the other hand, a somewhat larger quantity may 
be sold as fuel by the producer and subsequently converted to more 
advanced products by the purchaser. Production and sales of these 
advanced products would be correctly reported to the Commission by the 
manufacturer; but the production and sales of the raw materials from 
which they were derived would then be inadvertently omitted from the 
report of the producer of the war materials. As in the statistics on 
crudes derived from tar, there is also considerable duplication in the 
data on crude products from petroleum and natural gas: one crude is 
frequently converted into another by the same or different companies 
and the output of both reported to the Commission. Notwithstanding 
these difficulties, the totals are considered sufficiently accurate to 
indicate general trends, and the accuracy of the data for most of the 
specific chemical products reported is comparable with that of the tar 
crudes. 

Statistics on these petroleum-derived chemicals have been available 
only since 1942. Production and sales in 1945 of all crude products 
from petroleum and natural gas for chemical conversion are given in 
table 5A. y The total production reported in 1945 for all these 
products wa6 3»3 billion pounds compared with 2.8 billion pounds in 
1944 and 1.5 billion pounds in 1943. Sales in 1945 were 2.8 billion 
pounds, valued at 214 million dollars. 



\J See algo table 5B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 



15 



Of the aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons produced from petroleum 
in 1945, toluene was the most important. Production from this source 
(excluding Baytown Ordnance production) was 98 million gallons; sales 
were 90 million gallons, valued at 31 million dollars. 1/ The output 
of naphthenic acid in 1945 was 30 million pounds compared with 28 
million in 1944* Production of cresylic acid from petroleum and tar 
combined was 26 million pounds in 1945 > a decline of 3 million pounds 
from that of 1944* fv Naphthenic acid is consumed chiefly in the 
manufacture of antimildew agents and paint driers, whereas cresylic acid 
is consumed largely in the manufacture of plastics materials and 
plasticizers. Another of the more important hydrocarbons made from 
petroleum sources was butadiene used in the manufacture of synthetic 
rubber (GR-S type). The output in 1945 of butadiene (excluding 
butadiene made from ethyl alcohol) was 780 million pounds, an increase 
of 291 million pounds over the amount reported for 1944; salee in 1945 
totaled 770 million pounds, valued at 162 million dollars. Production 
of butadiene from all sources was 1.25 billion pounds in 1945. Some 
of the other C4 hydrocarbons produced from petroleum and natural gas 
were used in the manufacture of other types of synthetic rubber, sol- 
vents, and hydrocarbon derivatives. 



1/ Statistics on toluene from petroleum are included with those on 
toluene from coal tar (see table 4A) . Production in peacetime will 
probably be largely from coal tar owing to the higher cost of 
synthesizing toluene from petroleum sources. Production of toluene 
from tar and crude light oil was 34 million gallons in 1945 and from 
petroleum at Baytown about 70 million gallons. 

2/ Statistics on production and sales of cresylic acid from petro- 
leum and tar cannot be shown separately without disclosing operations 
of individual companies. 



16 



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19 



PART II. PRODUCTION AND SALES OF INTERMEDIATES AND FINISHED 
SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS, BY GROUPS 



General 



The synthetic organic chemicals included in this report are grouped 
according to their principal uses as intermediates and as finished prod- 
ucts. The finished products, in turn, are grouped as dyes, lakes and 
toners, medicinals, flavor and perfume materials, plastics materials, 
rubber-processing chemicals, elastomers, plasticizers, surface-active 
agents, and miscellaneous chemicals. Each of these groups are subdi- 
vided according to chemical classes into cyclic and acyclic compounds. 
This classification roughly parallels the distinction between chemicals 
of coal-tar and non-coal-tar origin followed in earlier reports. The 
cyclic and acyclic classification is more accurate because important 
products which formerly were exclusively of coal-tar origin are now 
obtained from non-coal-tar sources. 

In 194.5 production of all synthetic organic chemicals (intermedi- 
ates and finished products combined) was 14.7 billion pounds, a decline 
of 1.5 percent from the quantity produced in 1944. Sales totaled 9.4 
billion pounds, valued at 1.9 billion dollars, a decrease of 6.7 per- 
cent in quantity and 7.5 percent in value from sales in 1944. 

The output of all cyclic synthetic organic chemicals in 1945 
amounted to 5 billion pounds, an increase of 4.5 percent over that In 
1944. Although the production both of intermediates and of finished 
products continued to increase, the rate of increase was appreciably 
less for finished products than for intermediates, largely because of a 
considerably smaller production of certain types of dyes, plasticizers, 
and miscellaneous products immediately after the war. This decrease, 
however, was partially compensated for in the statistical totals by 
slight increases in the production of other groups. 

Production of 9.7 billion pounds of acyclic compounds in 1945 
represented a decline of 4.4 percent compared with 1944. Data for 
acyclic intermediates have been included with the acyclic miscellaneous 
chemicals because there is no generally recognized class of acyclic 
intermediates, at present, which would enable them to be classified 
separately. This problem arises from the use of many important acyclic 
compounds as both intermediates and finished products. 

Detailed statistics on production and sales of intermediates and 
finished products, average, 1939-43, and annual, 1944-45, by groups, 
are given in table 6. 

Individual groups of finished products that gained in output in 
1945 over the preceding year were lakes and toners, medicinals, flavor 
and perfume materials, plastics materials, rubber-processing chemicals, 
elastomers, and surface-active agents ', groups that declined were dyes, 
plasticizers, and miscellaneous chemicals. Curtailment of orders for 
chemicals for military purposes, and delay in converting to civilian 
production were largely responsible for the decreases. Important gains 
were in the groups containing rubber-processing chemicals and synthetic 



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-24 



rubber, for which demand continued large after the cessation of hostili- 
ties. The relaxation of strict wartime controls permitted increased 
production of lakes and toners and of flavor and perfume materials. 



Intermediates 



Cyclic intermediates are chemicals that are advanced in condition 
beyond the crude state, and are used in manufacturing finished products. 
They are derived chiefly from the byproducts produced by the destructive 
distillation of coal, but in recent years increasing amounts of cyclic 
intermediates have been derived from petroleum raw materials. Inter- 
mediates may be converted chemically to products such as dyes, medici- 
nals, explosives, plastics materials, elastomers (synthetic rubbers), 
or flavor and perfume materials; or they may be sold without further 
processing. For example, refined naphthalene may be used as a raw 
material for the manufacture of p-naphthol or phthalic anhydride} or 
it may be packaged and sold as a moth repellent or a deodorant, both of 
which are finished products. In general, the manner in which most of 
a given intermediate is consumed determines its use classification in 
this report. About 46 percent of the total output of intermediates in 
1945 was consumed in the producing plants in the manufacture of other 
products. 

Production and sales of cyclic intermediates in 1945 are shown in 
table 7A. 2/ Intermediates for which individual statistics are shown 
represent 80 percent of the total produced. 

In 1945 the output of intermediates totaled 2.3 billion pounds, 
an increase of 9 percent over that in 1944. This percentage increase 
is small compared with the 31-percent increase reported in 1944 and rep- 
resents a break in the sharp upward trend of the five previous years. 
The output would have been still less but for the transfer into this 
group of a number of items that were formerly classified elsewhere. 
The break in the trend in 1945 was caused partly by reconversion from 
a wartime to a civilian economy, and partly by shortages of both raw 
materials and processing chemicals, especially inorganic chemicals. 
Reported sales of 1.3 billion pounds in 1945 represented 54 percent of 
the total quantity produced, compared with a much larger proportion in 
1944. Decreased sales of intermediates in 1945 relative to production 
resulted chiefly from increased consumption of ethylbenzene, in produc- 
ing plants, for the production of styrenej in 1944 producers sold con- 
siderable quantities of ethylbenzene as an additive for fuel. Produc- 
tion of ethylbenzene, which is shown for the first time in these reports, 
amounted to 428 million pounds in 1945. 

In 1945 the greatest increase in output occurred in the intermedi- 
ates used in the manufacture of synthetic resins, elastomers, and, to 
a lesser extent, medicinals. The output of styrene, an important 
constituent of GR-S synthetic rubber, amounted to 362 million pounds 
compared with 349 million in 1944, an increase of 4 percent. Produc- 
tion of monochlorobenzene, used chiefly in the manufacture of phenol, 
showed the largest proportionate increase — 238 million pounds compared 
with 213 million in 1944, an increase of 12 percent. Production of 

1/ See also table 7B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 



25 



Table 7A.- Synthetic organic chemicals; United States production and sales 
of cyclic intermediates, 1945 

(Listed below are all cyclic intermediate synthetic organic chemicals for which 
any reported data on production or sales may be published. (Leaders are used 
where the reported data are confidential and may not be published or where no 
data were reported.) Table 7fi in part III lists alphabetically all cyclic 
intermediate synthetic organic chemicals for which data on production or sales 
were reported and identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Total- 



1.000 
pounds 

2,326,921 



1,000 
pounds 

1,256,625 



1.000 

dB5a 



143,042 



pound 

$0.11 



Chemicals for which separate 
statistics may not be shown 

Chemicals for which separate 

statistics are shown below—- — 



Ace tan Hide, tech. 
p-Acetotoluide— — 
N-Acetylsulfanilyl chloride 

(p-Acetamidobenzenesulfonyl chloride) 
p-Aminoace tanilide 



2-(p-Aminoanilino)-5-nitrobenzene- 
sulfonic acid)> 



1-Aminoanthraquinone and Bait 
2-Aminoanthraquinone and salt- 



6-Amino-3 , 4 1 -azobis ( benzenesul fonic 
acid)- 



6- ( m-Aminobenzamido ) -l-naphthol-3- 

sul fonic acid (m-Aminobenzoyl J acid) 
6-( p-AmAnobenzamido ) -l-naphthol-3- 

sulfonicaacid (p-Aminobenzoyl J acid) 
2-Aaino-5-chlorobenzenesul fonic acid— 
3-Amino-6-chloro ben zoic acid (5-Amino- 

2-chlorobenzoic acid). — 

2-Aminc— 5- chloro-p- toluene sul fonic 

acid (Lake red C amine)- 
l-Amino-2 ,4-dibromoan thraquinone- 



3-Amino-l,5-naphthalenedisul fonic acid 
3-Aaino-2,7-naphthalenedlsul fonic acid 
6-Aminc— 1,3-naphthalenedisul fonic acid 
7-Amino-l,3-naphthalenediBulfonic acid 
(Amino G acid) 



8-Amino-l,6-naphthalenedlBulfonla acid 
2-Amino-l-naphthalene sulfonic acid 
(Tobias acid) 



5-Amino-l-naphtbalene sulfonic acid 
(Laurent's acid)- 



5-Amino-2-napbthalenesul fonic acid — 
5- and 8-Amino-2-naphthalenesul fonic 

acids (Clove's acid)- ■ ■--- — 

6-Amino-2-naphthalene sulfonic acid 

(Broenner's acid)- 



8-Amino-2-naphthalenesul fonic acid— 

8-Aminc-l,3 ,6-naphthalene trisul fonic 

acid 



3- Arainc—l-naphthol- 5, 7-di sulfonic acid, 
aonoBodiua salt (Chicago acid) 

8-Amino-l-naphthol-3,6-disul fonic acid, 
monosodium malt (B acid) 



l-Amlno-2-naphthol-4-sul fonic acid- 



468,775 

1,858,146 

6,361 
627 

6,809 
258 

39 

1,536 

968 

48 

22 

62 

14 

112 

408 

21 

161 

7 

1,106 

1,447 
94 

2,113 

U2 
92 

270 

67 
79 

3,283 

M9 

3,923 
1,120 



445,704 

810,921 



66,357 
76,685 



.15 
.09 



120 



94 



.78 



937 



485 



.52 



26 



Table 7A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of cyclic intermediates, 1945 — Continued 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit Talue 



6-Amirto-l-naphthol-3- sulfonic acid, 
sodium salt (J acid) — 



7-Amino-l-naphthol-3-sul fonic acid, 
sodium salt (Gamma acid)- 



2-Amino-5 -nitrobenzene sulfonic acid— 
2-Amino-4-nitrophenol- 



p- Amino phenol and salts — 

2-Amino-l-phenol-4-sul fonic acid 

m-( p-Aminophenylazo ) benzenesul fonic 
acid- 



p- ( p-Aminophenylazo ) benzenesul fonic 
acid ■ ■ ... " .. 



4-Amino-m-toluenesul fonic acid- 
Aniline (Aniline oil)- 



Anilinome thane sulfonic acid (Aniline 
omega sulfonic acid), sodium salt 

8-Anilino-l-naphthalene sulfonic acid- 
6-Anilino-l-naphthol-3- sulfonic acid 
(Phenyl J acid) 



7-Anilino-l-naphthol-3-sul fonic acid 
(Phenyl gamma acid)- 



c—Anisidinomethanesulfonic acid 

( o- Anis id ine-omega- sulfonic acid)— — 
Anthraquinone-l,5-di sulfonic acid— — 
Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid and 

salt- 



1 -An thraquinone sulfonic acid and salt 
Anthrarufin (1,5-Dihydroxyan thra- 
quinone)' 



Benzaldehyde, tech.— — — — — — — 

l-Benzanido-5-chloroanthraquinon o - 
6-Benzamido-l-naphthol-3-6ul fonic acid 
7-Benz^ie/anthracen-7-one 



Benzidine hydrochloride and sulfate 

Benzoic acid, tech, ■ -■■---■ . - ■ 



-Benzoylbenzoic acid- 



4-(N-Benzyl-N-ethylamino) -o-toluene- 
sul fonic acid- 



p,p' -Bis (dimethylamino)benzohydrol 
(SUchler's hydrol)- 



p,p , -Bis(dimethylamino)benzophenone 
(Michler's ketone) - 



3-Bromo-7-benz^le/anthracen-7-one — 
3-Carboxy-2(and 4)-hydroxybenzene- 

diazonium sulfat e- ■■ .... . 
4-Chloro-o-anisidine 



1-Chloroanthraquinone- 
2-Chloroan thraquinone- 
o-Chloroben zaldehyde 
Chloro benzene, mono- 



o-Chlorobenzoic acid- 
o-(m-Chlorobenzcyl) benzoic acid- 
l-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene — 



Chlorometanilic acids (4-, 5-, and 6-) 
l-Chloro-2-methylanthraquinone- 



Chloronitroanilines (2,4- and 4,2-) — 
2-Chloro-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid — 
Q-Chloro toluene (Benzyl chloride) 



1.000 
Pounds 



691 

1,018 

69 

215 

857 

65 

107 

41 
152 
87,195 

131 

193 

92 

59 

20 
547 

228 
3,730 

167 

2,661 

87 

5 

894 

1,878 



7,665 

17 

17 

102 
144 

54 

123 

348 

976 

199 

237,667 

168 

1,335 

14,123 

48 

275 

350 

267 

5,054 



1.000 
pounds 



69 



1.000 
dollars 



137 



P££ 
pound 



11.98 



768 



462 



.60 



41,422 



4,258 



.10 



759 



317 



.42 



263 



U9 



.57 



4,392 



789 



.18 



27 



Table 7A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United State6 production and sales 
of cyclic intermediates, 1945 — Continued 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



3-Chloro- p-toluenesulfonic acid, 
sodium salt 



4-Chloro-o-tolylmercaptoacetic acid 

Cresole, total 1/- 
c— Cresol- 



Cresol (meta, para)- ■ ■ ■ — 

Cresols (meta), (para), and (ortho- 

meta-para)- 

Cresylic acid, refined i/ & — 
2,6-Diaminoanthraquinone — 



2,4-Diaminobenzenesulfonic acid 

2 , 2 ' -Diamino-5, 5 • -bi-m-toluenesul fonic 

acid U^'-Eiamino^jS'-dimethyl- 

5,5' -bisbenzenesul fonic acid) 

4 , 4 ' -Ciaminodipheny lamine-2- sul f bni c 

acid—————— 

N,N ' -El (m-aminophenyl) oxamide 

(Oxalyl-m-phenylenediamine ) 

4,4* -D i amino-2 , 2 * -e tilbenedisul fonic 

acid- ■ - .-■ — ■■-■- —■ ■ 



4,5 , -Dibenzamido-l,l* -iminodianthra- 

quinone 
2' ,7'-Cibromofluore6cein- 



2,5-Dichloroaniline and hydrochloride— 
o-Pi chlorobenzene 

p-Dichloroben zene 

3,3'-Eichlorobenzidine and sulfate— 

1 , 4-Dichlorc~2-ni troben zene 

1- ( 2 , 5-Pichlorc-4-sul f ophenyl ) -3- 

methyl-5-pyrazolone- 
2,5-Dichlorosulfanilic acid- 

Dicyclopentadiene 1/ a • 

N,H-Dimethylaniline- 



2,2 , -Dimethyl-l,l , -bianthraquinone — 

4,4' -Dinitro-2, 2' -stilbenedieul fonic 

acid— 



N-Ethylaniline, refined 

G-(N-E thy lanilino) -p-toluenesul fonic 



Ethy lben zene ■ 

Ethylphenylmalonic acid, diethyl ester 

p-Hydrazinobenzenesul fonic acid 

Hydroquinone, tech. 



1 , 1 ' -Iminobi s ( 4-ben zamidoan thraqu inone) 
6, 6 , -Iminobis(l-naphthol-3- sulfonic 
acid) (I or J acid imide) (Rhoduline 

1,1' -Iminodi-4-aminoan thraquinone 

1,1' -Iminodlan thraquinone 

Leuco quinizarin (1,4,9,10-Anthrate- 
trol) 



Metanilic acid- 

1-Me thy laminoan thraquinone 

p,p»-Jfethylenebis(¥,N-diaethylaniline) 
(Tetramethyldiaminodiphenylme thane)— 



747685 O - 47 - 3 



1,000 
pounds 



249 
72 

17,291 
2,362 
7,318 

7,611 

20,896 
116 
153 



25 

28 

13 

230 

228 
7 

296 
11,8^3 
26,545 

233 

629 

93 

47 

3,775 

7,529 

156 

479 

1,062 

498 
427,932 
264 
111 
3,404 
308 



43 

412 
378 

62 
530 
725 

1,465 



pounds 



17,932 
2,343 
8,005 

7,584 

21,3a 



6 

263 

11,773 

25,609 

179 



3,519 
3,002 



2,836 



1.000 
flgJ^ars 





236 
627 



1,554 



386 



851 



Per 



$0.10 
.15 
.09 

.10 

.08 



3.04 
.43 
.06 
.10 

1.19 



.07 
.21 



.55 



2.20 



28 



Table 7A.- 



Synthetic organic chemicals! United States production and sales 
of cyclic intermediates, 1945 — Continued 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



3-Methyl-l-phenyl-5-pyrasolone 
(Developer Z)- 



3-Methyl-l-( p-sul fo phenyl) -5-pyrazolont 
Naphthalene, solidifying at 79° C. 

or above, refined, flake 

1,5-Haphthalenedisulfonic acid 

2, 7-Naph thai en edi sulfonic acid- 



2-Naphthalenemercaptoacetic acid- 
Naphthalenemono sulfonic acids and 

salts (1- and 2-)- --■ •--■■ 

p-Naphthionic acid U-Amino-1- 

naphthalenesulfonic acid) and salt — 
1-Naphthol (a-Naphthol) 
2-Naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid and salt 
2-Naphthol-6,S~dieulfonlc acid and salt 
l-Naphthol-5-eulfonic acid 



2-Naphthol-6-sulfonic acid (Schaeffer'c 

Naphtholsulfonic acids, other (1,4-, 
1,8-, 2,7-, and 2,8-J 

Naph th^T, 27oxadlazole-5-eul fonic acid— 
l-Naphthylanine— — 

p-Nitroacetanilide- 

m-Nitroaniline- 



2-Nitro-p-anisidine- 
5-Ni tro-o-an i s idine- 
Ni troben zene 



m-Nitrobenzene sulfonic acid— 
1-Nitronaphthalene 

o-Nitro phenol — — '• — - 

p-NitroBophenol -■■■•-• — 



3-Nitro-p-toluenesulfonic acid — 
5-Nitro-o-tolueneeulfonic acid— 
2-Nitro-p-toluidine— 



Phenol, total l/- 



Natural, from coal tar- 

p-Phenylazoaniline (Aminoazo ben zene) 

and hydrochloride — ■ — — — ■ -■ 

m-Phenylenediamine- 



Phenylglycine and salt — -■■■■■ 

2,2 , -Phenyliminodiethanol (Phenyl- 

diethanolamine) 

Phenylmalonic acid, diethyl ester 

Phthalic anhydride 

Picolines I/- 

Picramic acid and salt 

Pyridine, refined' 



Quinaldine (2-Methylquinoline) 

Quini zar in ( 1 , 4-Dihydroxyan thr aquinone ) 

Styrene (Vinylbenzene) 



Sulfanilic acid and salt— 



1,4, 5,8-Tetrachloroanthraquinone— — 

1,4,5, 8-Tetrakis(l' ,1' » ,1» » ' ,1» » • •- 

an thraqulnonylamino ) an thraquinone 

( Pen ta-an thr amide) — — — 



1.000 

pounds 



87 
40 

77,811 

215 

1U 

96 

663 

1,737 
661 
594 

1,361 
70 

195 

257 
485 

4,294 
127 
265 
136 
131 
116,203 
722 

5,968 
254 
194 
333 

1,074 
857 

205,112 

23,472 

181,640 



140 
1,010 
4,412 

118 

148 

125,825 

751 

145 

1,863 

24 

1,092 

362,160 

2,225 

314 



922 



1.000 

pounds 



27 



1.000 



E&x 

pound 



37,225 



406 



762 



3,504 



26 


10.98 


2,805 


.07 














206 


.51 


229 


.30 


261 


.07 








693 

166,588 

24,116 

142,472 



709 

15,141 

2,021 

13,120 



1.02 

.09 

.08 
.09 



85,829 

611 

105 

1,748 



10,784 

110 

75 

673 



.13 
.18 
.71 
.38 



468 
374,896 



692 
27,465 



1.48 
.07 



29 



Table Ik.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of cyclic intermediates, 1945 — Continued 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



1.000 
pounds 



o-Tolidine and salts 
2,4-Toluenedlamine- 



c-Toluic acid, tech. (Phenylacetic acid) 
l-( p-Toluino) naphthalene-8-sul fonic 

acid (Tolyl peri acid) 

4- ( o-Tolyla 20 ) -o- toluidine 

(o-Aminoazo toluene) 

o-(p-Tolyl) benzoic acid — — 

Trichlorobenzene (1,2,3- and 1,2,4.-) 

G-Trichloro toluene (Benzotrichloride) — 
6,6 , - n reylenebis(l-naphthol-3- sulfonic 

acid) (J acid urea) 

o-Veratraldehyde (3,4-Dimethoxybenzal- 

dehyde) 

Violan throne (Dibenzan throne) 
■-Xylene 



Xylene, o- and p- — 



Xylidines, total- 
2,4-Xylidine — 
2,5-Xylidine- 
All other 



349 
591 
98 

30 

449 

649 

3,106 

211 

306 

64 
303 
215 

75 

495 
92 
17 

386 



1.000 
Dounds 


1,000 
dollars 










67 


77 










2,188 
156 


152 
24 


72 


178 

























Per 
pound 



$1.14 



.07 
.15 



2.46 



1/ Includes data for coke-ovens reported to the Coal Economics Division, 
U.S. Bureau of Mines. 

2/ Includes production from petroleum. 



30 



phenol, for use mainly in the manufacture of synthetic resins, was 3 
million pounds greater than in 1944. Increases were also recorded for 
phthalic anhydride, used in alkyd resins, plasticizers, and dyestuffsj 
acetanilide, used in the manufacture of N-actylsulfanilyl chloride 
(p-acetamidobenzenesulf onyl chloride) , an intermediate for the manufac- 
ture of sulfa drugs; and a-chloro toluene (benzyl chloride), used in 
organic synthesis and in the manufacture of flavor and perfume materials. 

On the other hand, the production of cresylic acid, used in syn- 
thetic resins, plasticizers, and disinfectants, decreased markedly, to 
21 million pounds from 30 million pounds in 1944 and 38 million in 1943. 
The decrease was due largely to the continued shortage of coal-tar acids. 
The output of l-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, used in the manufacture of 
many dye intermediates, was 14.1 million pounds, or 24 percent lower 
than in 1944. Decreases, as shown in parentheses, were also recorded 
for refined naphthalene (3.8 million pounds), nitrobenzene (2.7 million 
pounds), and aniline (1.9 million pounds). 



Dyes 



United States production of all types of dyes totaled 145 million 
pounds in 1945, a decrease of 4 percent from the 152 million pounds 
produced in 1944* This decrease was caused by a number of factors. 
Producers in 1945 began to build up supplies of intermediates necessary 
to the production of civilian dyes that had been curtailed or discon- 
tinued during the war. The greater variety of shades and colors de- 
manded by the postwar civilian economy, as well as many style changes, 
resulted in a return to smaller batches and slowed up production. 
Shortages in both raw materials and inorganic chemicals necessary to 
the dye-manufacturing processes were acute, and many producers were 
repairing and rebuilding plants and equipment worn out during the war. 
Furthermore, the time required to put complicated dyes such as anthra- 
quinone vat dyes into production (from crude to finished dye) often 
amounted to several months, which resulted in a temporary loss in out- 
put. 

In 1945 sales of all dyes totaled 138 million pounds, valued at 
104 million dollars, compared with 150 million pounds, valued at 111 
million dollars, in 1944. 

Statistics on production and sales of individual dyes are shown in 
table 8A. -1/ Dyes for which separate statistics are shown represent 
78 percent of the total tonnage of dyes produced. 

The dyes are grouped according to Colour Index number or Foreign 
Prototype number, or are listed as ungrouped dyes. As in previous 
years, dyes grouped by Colour Index number accounted for the greater 
part (75 percent) of all dyes produced in 1945. Production in 1945 
of Colour Index dyes amounted to 109 million pounds compared with 110 
million pounds in 1944. The output of dyes having a recognized foreign 
prototype declined by 5 million pounds from the output of 26 million 
pounds in 1944. Dngrouped dyes accounted for 14.7 million and 15.5 
million pounds, respectively, in 1945 and 1944. As in previous years, 
acetate rayon dyes were the most important of the ungrouped dyes. 

for an alphabetical list of dyes in 



ESee also table 8B, part III. for a 
h the manufacturers are identified. 



31 



Table 8A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, 1945 

(Listed below are all coal-tar dyes for which any reported data on production or 
sales may be published. (Leaders are used where the reported data are confi- 
dential and may not be published or where no date, were reported.) Table 8B 
in part III lists alphabetically all dyes for which data on production or sales 
were reported and identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Colour 

Index or 

Prototype 

Ho. 



Itye 



Produc- 
tion 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



17 

20 

21 

24 

27 

30 

31 

36 

40 

52 

53 

57 

73 

79 

88 

138 

H5 

146 

151 

161 

168 

169 

176 

179 

180 

185 

195 

197 

201 

202 

203 

204 

208 



Grand total- 



1.000 
pounds 

145,213 



1.000 
pounds 

138,248 



1.000 
dollars 



103,489 



Per. 

pound 

$0.75 



Dyes for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Dyes for which separate statistics 
are shown below 

DIES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDET 
NUMBER 



Total- 



32,175 
113,038 

109,407 



29,615 
108,633 

102,565 



32,680 
70,809 



60,002 



Azo Dyes 

Monoazo Dyes 

Spirit yellow R 

Chrysoidine I 

Chrysoidine R 

Sudan I 

Orange G 

fast acid fuchsine B 

Amido naphthol red 
Chrome yellow 2G — 



Chrome yellow R 

Azo alizarin yellow GP — 
Victoria violet 4BS 



Amido naphthol red 6B- 

Sudan II 

Ponceau R- 
Fast red B — 

Metanil yellow 

Azoflavir.e 
Azo yellow- 
Orange II — 
Orange R — 
Acid chrome garnet R- 
Acid chrome violet N- 

Fast red A 

Azo rubine 

Fast red VR 

Cochineal red A — 
Mordant yellow 0- 
Chrome yellow RN — 
Chrome blue black E 
Chrome blue black f 

Chrome black T 

Chrome black A 

Fast acid blue R — 



46 

444 

94 
357 
263 

17 
703 
341 

72 
252 

56 
238 
164 
353 

93 
377 

31 

50 

1,366 

214 

50 

253 
168 

65 
159 

55 



206 

1,593 

682 

129 



53 
450 
121 
333 
293 

15 
623 
299 

75 
196 

58 
222 
172 
358 

77 
343 

28 

46 

1,357 

224 

62 

12 
244 
144 

70 
139 

37 

138 

178 

1,644 

720 

89 



40 

166 

44 

165 

134 

7 

191 

145 

44 

82 

33 

106 

144 

147 

36 

181 

37 

28 

371 

65 

45 

9 

128 

78 

37 

67 

13 

55 

74 

475 

249 

44 



1.10 
.65 

.59 



.76 
.37 
.36 
.49 
.46 
.48 
.31 
.48 
.59 
.42 
.58 
.48 
.83 
.41 
.46 
.53 
1.31 
.61 
.27 
.29 
.72 
.78 
.52 
.54 
.53 
.48 
.36 
.40 
.42 
.29 
.35 

.49 



32 



Table 8A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 

Index or 

Prototype 

No. 



Dye 



Produc- 
tion 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



1.000 



209 
216 
219 



234 

235 

246 

252 

262 

274 

278 

289 

299 

304 

307 

317 

324a 

326 

331 

332 

346 

349a 

353 

364 

365 

375 

382 

387 

394 

401 

406 

411 

415 

419 

420 

430 

487 

495 

502 

512 

518 

520 



533 
539 



DYES GROUPED BI COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBER — Con tinued 

Azo Dyes — Continued 

Monoazo Dyes — Continued 



fast acid blue & 
Acid chrome red 
Chrome flavine A 



Disazo Dyes 



Resorcin brown—— 
Resorcin dark brown- 
Acid black 10B 

Brilliant croceine M- 
Cloth red B 



Milling orange 

Direct fast red 8BL — — — 

Fast acid cyanine 5R ex 

Acid chrome black F— — — — 

Fast acid black 2BN 

Fast acid cyanine black B-- 
Developed blue B- 

Ro san threne 

Direct fast scarlet-—— — — — 

Bismarck brown G — 

Bismarck brown R 

Direct fast yellow 5GL 

Direct fast yellow RL 

Direct fast pink 2BL 

Brilliant yellow 

Chrysophenine G 

Congo corinth G ___— 

Direct scarlet B— 

Direct violet B — — — — — 



Direct violet N 

Developed black BH 

Direct blue 2B 

Cresotine yellow G — — — 

Direct orange R — — — 

Direct fast red F 

Direct brown M — — 

Polar red- 
Acid anthracene red 3B- 



Benzopurpurine 10B- — — 

Direct azurine G 

Direct blue PA" 

Direct sky blue FT 

Direct pure blue 



Trisazo Dyes 



Direct fa6t blue FR— 
Direct fast black FT- 



44 
435 



588 

190 

1,431 

256 

49 

62 

191 

372 

141 

175 



990 
86 

839 

41 

46 
193 
805 
264 
145 

43 



2,531 
994 

79 
410 
567 
182 

83 

144 
118 
652 
260 



110 



1.000 
pounds 



1.000 
dollars 



21 

64 

328 



565 

196 
1,564 

242 
57 
51 

199 

437 

154 
26 

201 
59 
33 

883 
89 

883 
39 
30 
48 

201 



288 

166 

34 

67 

2,611 

1,048 

14 

97 

389 

570 

175 

82 

16 

155 

142 

630 

246 



105 
315 



13 

36 

321 



303 

141 

626 

210 

33 

24 

387 

241 

90 

17 

135 

54 

33 

916 

34 

378 

65 

57 

85 

151 



Per. 
pound 



206 

142 

27 

65 

869 

245 

5 

35 

234 

286 

147 

77 

15 

97 

107 

527 

125 



140 
150 



$0.62 
.56 
.98 



.54 

.72 

.40 

.87 

.58 

.47 

1.95 

.55 

.58 

.63 

.67 

.92 

.99 

1.04 

.38 

.43 

1.67 

1.88 

1.77 

.75 

.71 
.85 
.78 
.97 
.33 
.23 
.37 
.36 
.60 
.50 
.84 
.94 
.88 
.63 
.75 
.84 
.51 



1.33 
.48 



33 



Table 3A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, 1945— Continued 



Colour 

Index or 

Prototype 

No. 



Dye 



Produc- 
tion 



SaleB 



Quantity 



Value 



545 
561 
581 
582 
583 
589 
593 
594 
596 
598 



620 
621 
622 



636 
639 
640 
642 
652 
653 



655 



657 
658 
662 
666 

667 
671 
677 
680 
681 
698 
707 
714 
720 
722 
729 
737 



DIES GROUPED BI COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBER— Con tlnued 

Azo Dyes — Continued 

Trisazo DyeB — Continued 



1.000 
22Und£ 



Pluto form black 

Direct brown BT 

Direct black EH 

Direct black RX 

Direct green ET 

Chloramine green B 

Direct green B — 

Direct green G- — — — — •— 

Direct brown 3GO 

Congo brown G— 

Stilbene Dyes 

Direct yellow R 

Chloramine orange G — 

Stilbene yellow — < 

Pyrazolone Dyes 



Fast light yellow 

Xylene light yellow— — - 

Tartrazine— — — 

Polar yellow 

Chrome red B — — — 

Pyrazol orange — — — 



Ketonimine Dyes 



Auramine- 



Triphenylme thane and Diphenyl- 
napnthylme thane Dyes 



Malachite green-—- 
Rhoduline blue 6G — — — — — — 

Brilliant green — — — 

Acid green B- ■ - — — — — 

Fast acid green B 

Acid glaucine blue 

Magen ta 

Methyl violet B and base—— 

Crystal violet 

Acid violet — 

Soluble blue 

Patent blue A- 

Acid chrome azurol B 

Acid chrome cyanine R — 
Victoria blue 
Wool green S — 



295 
8,327 

494 
168 

656 

864 
138 



433 

155 

85 



64 
186 
678 

33 
122 

67 



1,572 



212 
10 
71 
79 
35 

793 

1,310 

1,033 

197 

107 

86 

107 

24 

158 

135 



1.000 

pounds 



312 
280 
8,933 
536 
182 

32 
559 

89 
892 
144 



560 

165 

81 



84 
206 
658 

38 
135 

55 



1,449 



215 
13 
73 

113 
34 

781 

68 

1,016 

905 

208 
97 
92 

127 
29 

152 

121 



3, .000 

teUia 



142 

345 

2,233 

156 

63 

11 
210 

35 
305 

64 



334 

106 

52 



87 
189 
445 

u 

115 
74 



1,170 



260 

42 

124 

73 

80 

515 

128 

611 

1,608 

200 

203 

149 

201 

61 

269 

70 



34 



Table 8A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, 194-5 — Continued 



Colour 

Index or 

Prototype 

No. 



Dye 



Produc- 
tion 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



768 



801 



8U 



333 
8U 
361 
864 
865 



922 



1034 
1053 
1054- 
1073 
1078 
1035 
1088 



1095 



DIES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBER — Continued 



Xanthene Dyes 

Te trabromo fluore scein 

Quinoline Dyes 

Quinoline yellow 

Thiazole Dyes 

Direct fast yellow 

Azine Dyes 



1.000 

pounds 



Wool fast blue— 

Sa franine 

Induline 1 water-soluble 

Nigrosine } spirit-soluble 

Nigrosine, water-soluble 

Thiazine Dyes 

Methylene blue 

Sulfur or Sulfide Dyes 

Total 1/ 

Sulfur black 

Sulfur blue 



281 



34 



345 



139 

177 

33 

2,567 

1,116 



332 



17,164 



Sulfur brown 

Sulfur green 

Sulfur maroon 

Sulfur olive 

Sulfur tan 

Sulfur yellow 

All other 

Anthraquinone Dyes 

Alizarin red S 

Acid alizarin blue SE 

Acid alizarin blue B 

Alizarin irisol R 

Alizarin cyanine green 

Anthraquinone blue black B 

Acid anthraquinone 6ky blue B— 

Anthraquinone Vat Dyes 

Anthraquinone vat yellow GC, 
12 1/2* H 

See footnotes at end of table 



11,652 

1,741 

1,747 

261 

384 

951 

133 

248 

47 



32 
523 

17 
565 
591 

21 



1,165 



1.000 

Eounds 



1.000 
dollars 



Per 
pound 



231 



256 



$1.11 



367 



167 



2,324 
1,130 



322 



16,365 
10,376 



1,731 
1,691 
306 
464 
934 
103 
235 
25 



66 

35 
478 

15 
513 
504 

28 



•1,025 



319 



264 



739 
413 



294 



4,096 



1,915 

826 

472 

241 

217 

300 

31 

84 

10 



110 
86 

800 

46 

1,190 

730 
93 



=1,055 



35 



Table 8 A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, 194-5 — Continued 



Colour 

Index or 

Prototype 

No. 



Dye 



Produc- 
tion 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



1096 

1097 

1099 
1102 

1104 

1106 
1113 
11U 
1150 
1151 
1152 



1177 
1134 
1212 



DISS GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBER— Con tinued 

Anthraguinone Vat Dyes — Con tinued 



Anthraquinone vat 

12? 

Anthraquinone vat 

12? 

Anthraquinone vat 
Anthraquinone vat 

B, 12 1/2? 

Anthraquinone vat 

12 1/2* 

Anthraquinone vat 
Anthraquinone vat 
Anthraquinone vat 
Anthraquinone vat 
Anthraquinone vat 
Anthraquinone vat 



golden orange G, 

golden orange R, 

dark blue B0, 25? 
green B and black 

violet 2R, 



blue RS, 10? 

blue GCD, 3 l/3?- 
blue BCS, 20? i/- 
olive R, 12 1/2?- 
brown R, 12 1/2?- 
bro?m G, 12 l/2?- 



Indigoid and Thioindigoid Dyes 



Indigo, synthetic 20? i/ 

Bromindigo blue 2BD, 16? 3/- 
Vat red 3B, 20? 



Food. Drug, and Cosmetic Dyes 



Food, drug, and cosmetic colors, 

Blue #1 - 

Blue #2 

Green #1- 

Orange #1- 

Red #1- 

Red #2 

Yellow #5 

Yellow #6 



All other- 



Drug and cosmetic colors, total {J- 
Orange #1, #3, #4, #5, #11, #14, 

#15, #16, #17 

Red #1, #2, #3, #5, #6, #7, #8, 
#9, #10, #11, #12, #13, #U, 
#17, #13, #19, #21, #22, #28, 
#29, #30, #31, #33, #34, #35, 

#36, #37, #38, #39 

Yellow #1, #5, #6, #7, #8, #io 

All other U 

All other Colour Index Dyes 

Total 



1.000 

pounds 



493 

519 
677 



1,664 
695 
1,193 
3,336 
1,670 
1,123 



13,390 

1,201 

198 



1.000 
dollars 



957 

794 



17 

3 

1 

94 

48 

216 

9 

209 

106 

91 

163 



14 



117 

24 



15,983 



172 

216 
558 

564 

136 

744 
1,151 
3,000 
1,520 
1,082 



11,738 

1,143 
183 



893 



740 



13 

2 

1 

92 

52 

190 

9 

139 

84 

108 

153 



208 

238 
713 

234 

251 

463 
1,610 
3,356 
1,359 
1,275 



1,395 
365 
192 



2,537 
2.122 



135 
28 
11 
202 
223 
455 
135 
465 
199 
269 

415 



12 



110 

24 

7 



42 



273 
57 
33 



14,066 11,740 



.83 



36 



Table 8A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 

Index or 

Prototype 

No. 



Dye 




1 
4 

u 

19 

20 

24 

26 

35 

40 

43 

47 

53 

54 

64 

67 

70 

71 

72 

73 

79 

80 

85 

94 

101 

121 

122 

144 

147 

152 

164 

169 

170 

172 

187 

138 

197 

201 

206 

244 

260 

260 

262 

264 

269 

271 

273 

275 

293 

302 

305 

306 

326 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBER 

Total 

Acid alizarin flavine R- — — 

Acid anthracene brown PG — — » 

Anthracene chroma te brown EB 

Benzo Bordeaux 6B - - — — 

Benzo chrome black blue B 
Benzo fast black 

Benzo fast blue 4GL 

Brilliant benzo violet B- 

Brilliant wool blue FFR 

Celliton orange GR— — — 

Chlorantine fast brown BRL 

Chlorantine fast yellow 4GL 
Chlorantine fast yellow RL 

Cotton black 3G 

Diamine Bordeaux B. 

Diamine catechine 3G 

Diamine fast blue FEB 

Diamine fast orange EG — • 

Diamine fast orange ER - 

Diazo brilliant scarlet 2BL ex 

Diazo brilliant 6carlet ROA 
Diazo fast red 7BL — 
Fast scarlet 2G salt 
Guinea fast red BL — 
Indanthrene brown RRD— — ■ 

Indanthrene khaki 2G — 

Neolan blue GG 

Oxydiaminogen OB- — — — — 
Polar orange R 
Rapidogen blue 



Rapidogen red RS 

Rapidogen scarlet RS 

Rosanthrene fast Bordeaux 2BL- 

Sulphon yellow R 

Supra light rublne BL — 

Victoria fast violet 2R ex 

Zambesi black D— — 
Alizarin fast gray BBLW— 
Celliton scarlet B — 

Past Bordeaux GP base 

Fast Bordeaux GP salt 

Fast garnet GBC base, salt- 
Fast orange GC base, salt— 

Fast red 3GL salt 

Fast red RC base, salt —— 

Fast red TR base, salt 
Fast yellow GC base, salt 

Indanthrene olive green B 

Naphthol AS 

Naphthol AS-BS-— 

Naphthol AS-D 

Palatine fast pink BN 

All other dyes grouped by Foreign 
Prototype number 



37 



Table 8 A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 

Index or 

Prototype 

No. 



Dye 



Produc- 
tion 



Quantity Value 



Sales 



Unit 
value 



ONGROOPED DYES 

Acetate rayon dyes, total ( see 

tables 10 and 11 for total of a^l 
acetate rayon dyes) m 

Black, No. 25, IV, IV ex., AD, AZO, 
B, BAM, BDN, BGD, BRF, G, 2G, 3G, 
GFS, 3GNF, GS, GY, J, JF, LNB, 
NS, PL, RB, S, SN, SOL, SS 2/ 

Blue, IV, XII, B, B ex., 2B, BGF, 
BNN, BP, BXN, FFG, FFR, GG, GR, 
NR, R, 3R 2/ 

Orange, I, III, BL, FSI, G, GR. 
GRN, JER, R, 2R, 3R, RB, TF 2/ 

Red, III, VII, VIII, VIX, IX, B, 
2B, BF, BG, BS, C, CSB. FSI, G, 
GY, NB, R, RP, VOL, Y 2/ 

Yellow #8, #38, VIII, IX, XI, XII, 
XIII, FFA, FSI, G, 5G, 6G, GL, 
GLF, 3GBI, GN, 6GN, GR, GS, GX, 
HEB, JT, L3G, 4RL, RN 10/ 

All other 

Acid red A-100, 3BX, G, OA, RB 

Anthraquinone vat navy blue BN, BRA, 

NRD, NTP 

Azoic dyes and their components, 
total (see table 12 for 
data on all azoic dyes and their 

components) AA/ 

Chrome green B, CB, G 

Chrome yellow FTL, 2G, 2GN, SSN, Sl»— 
Direct black CAM, CW, 3G, 5G, NCW, 
RW, URL 



Direct blue 2B, BR, 5G, 6G, NR, RDW, 

Direct brown CWR, FW, GB, GKA, G2R, 

3GS, fi, R, 4R, RB, RBA, RY, VGA/CF- 

Direct fast black AM, FOR, G, PG 

Direct fast blue 6GKS, GL, 6GL, 8GL, 

8GLN, 3GDF, R, RL, SRL 

Direct fast gray BL, GL, 2GL, LVL, 

LVGLA, M 

Direct fast orange G, 2G, 4G cone, 

GL, 2GL, R, RGL, 4RL, 5RL, RT 

Direct fast red 3BL, 3BLN, SBLSW, WL- 

Direct navy DSU, G, R 

Direct navy blue B, DB, RY — 

Oil orange #30, MT 

Oil red #322, SGN, I-U71, N-1700, 

OB, Y-292 

All other ungrouped dyes 



1.000 
pounds 

14,730 



1.000 
pounds 



lfOOO 



14,355 



16,349 



pound 



n.u 



3,115 

1,705 

773 
125 

241 



154 
117 

31 

408 



1,640 

27 

102 

203 

12 

70 
137 

80 

56 

99 
77 
18 

40 

224 
8,391 



3,147 

1,885 

649 
132 

238 



168 
75 



322 



1,539 
29 

83 

196 

19 

71 
109 

99 

47 

87 
80 

22 
47 
42 

238 
8,178 



2,627 

1,171 

831 
126 

196 



194 
109 



283 



2,049 
16 

34 

94 

15 

58 
61 

165 

74 

133 

118 

14 

28 

25 

201 
10,354 



.83 

.62 

1.28 
.95 

.82 



1.15 
1.45 



.88 



1.33 
.55 
.40 

.48 

.81 

.82 
.55 

1.67 

1.57 

1.52 

1.47 

.61 

.60 

.61 

.84 
1.27 



X 



Does not include derivatives of carbazole (Colour Index Nos. 969 and 971). 
Combined with Prototype No. 9 to prevent the disclosure of the operations 



38 

of individual companies . 

2/ Includes some leuco esters. 

4/ Includes drug and cosmetic colors external, data on which are confidential. 
$/ Excludes acetate rayon dyes that appear under "Dyes grouped by Foreign 
Prototype number." 

6/ Includes developed black and diazo black. 

2/ Includes brilliant blue, navy blue, pure blue, and saphirole blue. 
%/ Includes golden orange and light orange. 
2/ Includes rubine and scarlet. 

10/ Includes brilliant yellow, fast yellow, fluorescent yellow, and golden 
yellow. 

11/ Excludes azoic dyes and their components that appear under "Dyes Grouped 
by Colour Index Numbers," and "Dyes Grouped by Foreign Prototype Numbers." 



Table 9»- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of coal-tar dyes, by chemical class, 1945 



Chemical class 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total- 



Azo 



Anthraquinone vat A/ — 



Indigoid and thioindigo id- 
Sulfur or sulfide— 
Triphenylme thane and diphenylnaphthyl- 

me thane — — 

An thraquinone 

A zine 

Ke tonimine 

Xan tbene 

Pyra zolone— — 

Stilbene 

Thiazole 

Thia zine - 



Quinoline- 
Acridine — 
Oxazine- 



All other 2/- 



1,000 
^oundg 

145,213 



1.000 
pounds 

138,248 



1.000 
dollars 



103,489 



56,580 
31,190 
17,412 
17,309 

5,461 

5,071 

4,113 

1,572 

1,418 

1,367 

861 

758 

333 

290 

163 

62 

1,253 



56,849 
28,768 
15,509 
16, 514 

4,693 

4,119 

3,948 

1,449 

1,291 

1,375 

928 

759 

324 

274 

190 

53 

1,205 



38,646 

34,015 

4,901 

4,239 

6,086 

5,549 

1,792 

1,170 

1,778 

1,432 

648 

677 

296 

485 

205 

68 

1,502 



Per 
pound 

$0.75 



.68 

1.18 

.32 

.26 

1.30 

1.35 

.45 

.81 

1.38 

1.04 

.70 

.89 

.91 

1.77 

1.08 

1.28 

1.25 



1/ Includes carbazole vat dyes. 

2/ Includes nitroso, nitro, indophenol, aniline black and allied dyes, rubber 
colors, and miscellaneous mixtures; these groups cannot be published separately 
without disclosing confidential information. 



39 



Table 10.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production of coal-tar 
dyes, by class of application, average, 1939-43, annual, 1944 and 1945 



Class of application 



Average , 
1939-43 



1944 



1945 



Total 

Acetate rayon 

Acid 

Azoic 

Basic 

Lake and spirit-soluble- 

Mordant and chrome 

Sulfur- 
Vat, total — 

Indigo — 

All other 

All other- 



Total 

Acetate rayon- 

Acid- 

Azoic- 

Lake and spirit-soluble 

Mordant and chrome 

Sul fur 



Vat, total 

Indigo- 
All other 

All other 



Quantity (1,000 pounds) 



142,515 



2,891 

17,094 

4,088 

6,821 

33,102 

4,788 

8,673 

21,492 

a, 516 



16,139 

25,377 

2,050 



151,653 



3,473 

17,236 

3,805 

6,758 

29,880 

4,352 

8,438 

17,990 

58,174 



17,287 
40,887 

1,547 



145,213 



3,865 

18,562 

5,125 

7,202 

29,335 

4,804 

8,557 

17,309 

48,5a 



13,390 
35,151 

1,913 



Percent of total quantity 



100.0 



2.0 

12.0 

2.9 

4.8 

23.2 

3.4 

6.1 

15.1 

29.1 



11.3 
17.8 



1.4 



100.0 



2.3 

11.4 

2.5 

4.4 

19.7 

2.9 

5.6 

11.9 

38.3 



11.4 
26.9 

1.0 



100.0 



2.7 

12.8 

3.5 

4.9 

20.2 

3.3 

5.9 

12.0 

33.4 



9.2 

24.2 



1.3 



40 



Table 11. -Synthetic organic chemicals: United States sales of coal-tar dyes, by 
class of application, average, 1939-43, annual, 1944 and 1945 



Class of application 



Average, 
1939-43 



1944 



1945 



Total 

Acetate rayon 

Lake and Bpirit-soluble 

Mordant and chrome 

Vat, total 

Indigo 

All other 

All other 



Total 



Acetate rayon 

Acid 

Azoic — — ~ — 

Basic 

Dire c t — — — — — 

Lake and spirit-soluble 

Mordant and chrome — — 



Vat, total- 



Indigo 

All other 



All other- 






Acetate rayon — — — 

Acid 

Basic 

Direct 

Lake and spirit-eoluble- 

Mordant and chrome 

Sul fur 

Vat, total 



Indigo 

All other- 
All other — 



Quantity (1,000 pounds) 



140,864 



2,865 

17,238 
3,971 
6,505 

33,437 
4,629 
8,519 

21,239 

40,458 



15,831 
24,627 

2.003 



150,049 



3,150 

17,029 

3,930 

6,378 

29,356 

4,309 

8,425 

17,874 

58,090 



17,434 
40,656 

1.508 



138,248 



3,740 

17,787 

4,777 

6,651 

30,302 

4,510 

7,939 

16,514 

44.210 



11,787 
32,423 

1.818 



Percent of total quantity 



100.0 



2.0 

12.2 

2.8 

4.6 

23.8 

3.3 

6.1 

15.1 

28.7 



11.2 
17.5 

1.4 



100.0 



2.1 

11.3 

2.6 

4.3 

19.6 

2.9 

5.6 

11.9 

38.7 



11.6 
27.1 

1.0 



100.0 



2.7 

12.9 

3.4 

4.8 

21.9 

3.3 

5.7 

12.0 

32.0 



8.5 
23.5 

1.3 



(Value (1,000 dollars) 



92,952 



2,760 
14,361 
5,596 
6,282 
19,599 
3,618 
4,7a 
5,561 

28,546 



2,489 
26,057 

1.888 



110,748 



3,164 
13,293 
5,577 
6,449 
17,109 
2,944 
4,621 
4,488 

50,193 



2,856 
47,337 

2,910. 



103,489 



3,627 
14,287 
7,045 
6,804 
17,428 
2,832 
4,772 
4,239 

38,825 



1,895 
36,930 

3,630 



Table 11.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States 6ales of coal-tar dyes, 
by class of application, average, 1939-43, annual, 19U and 1945--Continued 



Class of application 



Total- 



Acetate rayon 

Acid 

Azoic-- ■ — — — - 

Basic 

Direct — 



Lake and spirit-soluble — 

Mordant and chrome 



Vat, total 



Indigo 

All other- 

All other — 



Average, 
1939-43 




1945 



Percent of total value 



100.0 



3.0 
15.4 
6.0 
6.S 
21.1 
3.9 
5.1 
6.0 

30.7 



2.7 
28.0 



2.0 



100.0 



2.9 
12.0 
5.0 
5.8 
15.5 
2.7 
4.2 
4.0 

45.3 



2.6 
42.7 

2.6 



100.0 



3.5 
13.8 
6.8 
6.6 
16.9 
2.7 
4.6 
4.1 

37.5 



1.8 
35.7 

3.5 



u 



Table 12.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States 
of azoic dyes and their components, 



production and sales 
1945 



Foreign 

Prototype 

No. 



Dye or component 



Produc- 
tion 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



164 

169 

170 



260 

262 
264 
271 
273 



275 



260 
269 

94 

302 
305 
306 



1.000 



Grand total l/- 



Dyes and components for which 
separate statistics may not be 
shown 

Dyes and components for which 
separate statistics are shown 
below- 



DIES 



Rapidogen, total- 
Blue D 

Blue 



Brown- 
Red RS- 
Red 



Scarlet 

Yellow 

All other- 



C0MP0NENTS 



Fast color bases: 
Bordeaux GP— — 
Garnet GBC 2J — 

Orange GC 2J 

Red RC 2/ 

Red TR 2/ 

Red 



Scarlet- 



Yellow GC 2/ 

Fast color salts: 
Blue 



Bordeaux GP- 

Red 3GL 

Red 



Scarlet 2G 

Haphthol6, total— 
Naphthol AS- 



Naphthol AS-BS — 

Naphthol AS-D 

All other 



DYES AND COMPONENTS 
All other 2/ 



5,125 



££uad£ 
4,777 



969 

4,156 

907 



103 

78 

47 

87 

184 

108 

147 

153 



21 

34 
32 
38 
161 
381 
20 

146 
191 
125 
184 
196 
1,720 



806 

194 

91 

629 



969 



.000 
dollars 

7,045 



Per 
pound 

$1.47 



750 
4,027 

892 



803 
6,242 

2,174 



97 

92 

39 

94 

185 

97 

124 

164 



21 

180 
35 
25 
47 
116 
344 
19 

154 
184 
95 
240 
202 
1,473 



745 

183 

45 

500 



750 



256" 
294 
112 
200 
375 
207 
319 
411 



55 

122 

40 

29 

67 

278 

486 

25 

179 
138 
60 
195 
115 
2.279 



717 

308 

89 

1,165 



803 



1.07 
1.55 

2.44 



2.64 
3.20 
2.87 
2.13 
2.03 
2.13 
2.57 
2.51 



2.57 

.68 

1.14 

1.19 
1.41 
2.39 
1.41 
1.31 

1.16 
.75 
.63 
.81 
.57 

1.55 



.96 
1.68 
1.98 

2.33 



1.07 



\/ Totals shown represent all azoic dyes and their components. 
in table 8l represent ungrouped dyes and their components only. 
2/ Base and salt combined. 
2/ Includes rapid fast and fur dyes. 



Totals shown 



43 



Although dyes, as a whole, showed a slight decrease in output in 
1945 1 some of the less important dyes showed significant percentage 
increases in production over 1944, and the output of certain dyes pro- 
duced in large volume either remained constant or declined appreciably . 
The output of Direct black EW (Colour Index No. 581) remained at the 
same level in 1945 as in 1944 — 8 million pounds; whereas that of 
Indanthrene khaki 2G (Foreign Prototype No. 122) declined by 6 million 
pounds, totaling 7 million pounds in 1945; and that of Indigo (Colour 
Index No. 1177) decreased by 4 million pounds, totaling 13 million. 

Production and sales of dyes by chemical classes in 1945 are shown 
in table 9» Four classes of dyes accounted for about 85 percent of 
the total production of all dyes: Azo and anthraquinone vat dyes, 
which accounted for 39 and 22 percent, respectively, of the total; and 
the sulfur or sulfide dyes, and the indigo and thioindigo dyes, each of 
which accounted for 12 percent of the total. 

Production of dyes by class of application in 1944 and 1945 and 
the average during 1939-43 are given in table 10. Corresponding data 
for sales are shown in table 11. Production of all dyes, except the 
vat dyes, showed relatively small gains or losses. Total production 
of vat dyes declined to 49 million pounds in 1945 from a peak of 58 
million pounds in the preceding year; even so, it was still about 7 
million pounds over the average annual output in the period 1939-43. 
Direct dyes, the next most important class, accounted for 20 percent 
of all dyes produced in 1945 » and the acid and sulfur dyes accounted 
for 12.8 and 12 percent, respectively, of the total production. 

Production and sales of azoic dyes (ice-developed or ingrain colore) 
and their components are shown in table 12. Dyes and components for 
which separate statistics are shown constitute 81 percent of the total 
production and 84 percent of the total sales. 

In 1945 production of azoic dyes and components increased 34 per- 
cent from a total of 3.8 million pounds in 1944 to 5.1 million pounds 
in 1945. The production of rapidogens decreased from 1.2 million 
pounds to 907,000 pounds during the same period. 



Lakes and Toners 



Lakes and toners are synthetic organic pigments used in printing 
inks, paints and varnishes, wallpaper, plastics, and other industrial 
products. The lakes are prepared by precipitating a soluble dye on 
the surface of an inorganic compound, known as the substratum. Toners, 
or full-strength colors, are insoluble pigments; and reduced or extended 
toners are toners to which a soxid diluent has been added. 

Production and sales of lakes and toners in 1945 are shown in table 
13A. i/ Statistics not publishable as individual items have been 
classified as far as possible in appropriate color groups. 

For the first time in this series of reports, an individual lake 
or toner is identified, whenever possible, with the Colour Index number 
or the Foreign Prototype number of the dye from which it may be made. 

1/ See also table 13B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 

747685 O - 47 - 4 



u 



Table 13ft.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of lakes and toners, 1945 

(Listed below are all lakes and toners for which any reported data on production 
or sales may be published. (Leaders are used where the reported data are 
confidential and may not be published or where no data were reported.) Table 
13B in part III lists alphabetically all lakes and toners for which data on 
production or sales were reported and identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total -— 

LAKES OR LAKE COLORS 

Products for which separate statistics 
may not be shown —- — 

Products for which separate statistics 
are shown below — — — — — 



1.000 
poundB 

23,177 



Black lakes 



Blue lakes, total 

Indanthrene blues (C.I. 1106 and 1113) 

Methylene blue (C.I. 922) 

Peacock blue, nonpermanent (Patent 

blue) (C.I. 671) 

Victoria blue B lake (C.I. 729) 

Turquoise blue (C. I. 661) 



Brown lakes, total- 
Bismarck brown — 
All other — 



Green lakes, total — 

Acid green B (C.I. 669) 

Brilliant green lakes — 

Malachite green lake (C.I. 657)- 
All other — — - - 



Maroon lakes: 

Alizarin maroon (C.I. 1041)- — 

Amaranth (C.I. 184) 

Azo Bordeaux (C.I. 38) 

Helio fast rubine— — 



Orange lakes, total 

Acid orange R (C.I. l6l) 

Persian orange (Acid orange Y) 

(Orange II) (C.I. 151) 

All otner 



Red lakes: 

Alizarin red B (C.I. 1027) 

Eosine lake (Bromo acid lake) 
(C.I. 768) 

Pigment scarlet 3B (C.I. 216)— 



6,316 



1,056 

5,260 

140 

1,889 



53 
10 

1,540 

38 

22 

226 

2L 



3 
28 

269 



15 

13 

2U 



16 

32 

269 

36 

413 



306 
101 



110 

19 

617 



1.000 
pounds 

21,756 



1.000 

dollars 



17,310 



5,541 



2,610 



1,015 

4,526 

126 

1.352 



43 
11 

1,080 

37 

6 

175 



238 



3 

16 

13 

206 



16 

36 

274 

38 

331 



233 
92 



107 

25 
564 



294 

2,316 

60 

906 



93 
4 

707 

24 

4 

74 



109 



2 
11 
11 
85 



9 
12 
85 

58 

131 



105 
24 



170 



22 
181 



Per 
pound 

$0.80 



.47 



.29 
.51 

.48 

..67 



2.14 
.36 

.65 
.65 
.58 
.42 



.85 



.46 



T60" 
.70 
.80 

.42 



.58 

.34 

.31 

1.50 

.40 



.34 

.45 

.26 



1.59 

.88 
.32 



45 



Table 13A._ Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of lakes and toners, 194-5 — Continued 



Product 



LAKES OR LAKE COLORS— Continued 

Red lakes — Continued 

Rhodamine B lake (C.I. 749) 

Scarlet 2R (C.I. 79) 



Violet lakes, total — — 

Acid violet (C.I. 698) — 
Methyl violet (C.I. 680)- 

All other 



Xellow lakes, total 

Fast light yellow (C.I. 636). 
Naphthol yellow S (CI. 10)- 
Quinoline yellow (C.I. 801)-- 

Tartrazine (C.I. 640) 

All other 



TONERS OR FULL-STRENGTH COLORS 
Total 



Production 



1.000 
pounds 



Products for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Products for which separate statistics 
are shown below 

Blue toners, total 

Alkali blue (C.I. 704)— 

Peacock blue G (C.I. 658), PMA and 
PTA 

Peacock blue G (C.I. 658), PTMA 

Peacock blue R (C.I. 664), PTMA 

Phthalacyanine blue B- 

Victoria blue B (C.I. 729), PMA 

Victoria blue B (C.I. 729), PTA 

Victoria blue B (C.I. 729), PTMA 



Green toners, to tal- 



i-Ben toners, wwu- — ______________ 

Brilliant green (C.I. 662), PMA 

Brilliant green (C.I. 662), PTA 

Brilliant green (C.I. 662), PTMA — 

Malachite green (C.I. 657), PTA 

Malachite green (C.I. 657), PTMA — 

Thioflavine greens 

All other 

Maroon toners: 

B-Hydroxynaphthoic maroon (B.O.N. 

Maroon) (Lithol maroon) 

C.I. 82, a-Naphthylamine maroon 

Toluidine maroon 



Orange toners: 

2,4-Dinitroaniline orange 

o-Nitroaniline orange — 



11 

953 



202 
7 

240 



27 

9 

10 

130 
64 



11,715 



182 

11,533 

1.411 



Sales 



Quantity 



766 

1 

22 

2 

253 

26 

73 

50 

218 

J2__ 



19 
26 
33 
3 
U 
17 
285 



193 
77 



1.000 
Pounds 



10 

984 



212 



T 

197 
9 

208 



28 

9 

9 

125 

37 



11,133 



Value 



1.000 
dollars 



13 

297 

__3_5_ 



3 

127 

5 

124 



26 

6 

8 

73 

11 



11,665 



160 

10,973 

1,231 



2 

24 

2 

275 

16 

70 

59 

783 

J69_ 



13 
25 
32 
3 
U 
17 
265 



61 
4 

22 



192 
86 



197 

11,468 

2,314 



Unit value 



6 

82 

12 

799 

52 

168 

179 

1,016 

907 



29 
83 

105 

9 

34 

57 

590 



85 
3 

72 



194 
69 



Per 
pound 



H.30 
.30 

.. ,64 



.60 
.64 
.53 

.60 



.94 
.67 
.87 
.59 
.29 



1.04 



1.23 
1.05 
1.68 



3.75 
3.40 
5.27 
2.90 
3.21 
2.40 
3.03 
1.72 

2.46 



2.18 
3.34 
3.25 
2.75 
2.47 
3.35 
2.22 



1.40 

.83 

3.24- 



1.01 
. .80 



46 



Table 13A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of lakes and toners, 1945 — Continued 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



TONERS OR FULL-STRENGTH C0L0RS~Con. 

Red toners, total 

o-Chloronitroaniline red (Chlorinated 

Eosine toner (Bromo acid toner) 

(C.I. 768) 

C.I. 68, Fast scarlet G toner 

( p-Ni tro-o-toluidine red ) 

Lithol red R toners (C.I. 189), total 

Barium toner 

Calcium toner 

Sodium toner 

Lithol rubine B (C.I. 163)' 
C.I. 44, Para red, light — 

Para red, dark 

Permanent red 2B 

Red lake C (C.I. 165) 
Red lake D (C.I. 214) 
Rhodamine B (C.I. 749), PMA and PTA— 

Rhodamine B (CI. 749), PTMA 

Rhodamine Y, PMA and PTA 

Rhodamine Y, PTMA 

C.I. 69, Toluidine red 

All other > 

Violet toners: 

Methyl violet B (C.I. 680), PMA 

Methyl violet B (C.I. 680), PTA 

Methyl violet B (G.I. 680), PTMA 

Methyl violet B .(C.I. 680), other 



Yellow toners, total- 
Benzidine yellow- 



Pr. 103, Hansa yellow G— 
All other 



EXTENDED OR REDUCED TONERS 
Total 

Products for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Products for which separate statistics 
are shown below 

Blue toners, reduced, total 

Peacock blue G (C.I. 658), PTMA 

Peacock blue R (C.I. 664), PTMA 

Phthalocyanine blue B 

Victoria blue B (C.I. 729), PMA, PTA, 

and PTMA 

All other 

Green toners, reduced: 

Brilliant green (C.I. 662), PTA and 
PTMA 



1,000 
pounds 



8,106 



1.000 

pounds 



7,855 



1.000 

dollars 



504 



290 



5,146 



1,673 
3,473 
1,486 



~2T 
7 

1,065 

136 
257 



63 



6,302 



524 



190 



419 



223 



158 


156 


152 


3,933 


3,882 


2,323 


2,402 


2,314 


1,395 


969 


946 


556 


562 


622 


372 


134 


187 


193 


435 


444 


309 


468 


432 


299 


70 


76 


110 


434 


370 


331 


6 


4 


3 


7 


3 


15 


15 


17 


69 


U 


14 


58 


29 


27 


110 


1,145 


1,114 


1,166 


414 


415 


517 


77 


77 


89 


12 


17 


29 


49 


49 


99 


108 


69 


51 


983 


941 


1,254 


552 


533 


710 


192 


174 


231 


239 


234 


313 



5,082 



3,035 



1,531 
3,551 
1,584 



1,052 
1,983 
1,153 



24 

7 

1,216 

108 

229 



52 



"33" 
12 

747 

61 
295 



29 



47 



Table 13A. 



Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of lakes and toners, 1945 — Continued 



Produc t 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity Value Unit value 



1.000 

pounds 



EXTENDED OR REDUCED TONERS— Continued 

Orange toners, reduced, total 

o-Nitronaniline orange 

Red toners, reduced, total 

Lithol red R toners (C.I. 189) 

Lithol rubine B (C.I. 163 ) 

C.I. 44, Para red, light 

Para red, dark 

Rhodamine B (C.I. 749), PMA, PTA, and 

Rhodamine 1, PTA and PTMA 

C.I. 69, Toluidine red 

All other 

Violet toners, reduced, total 

Methyl violet B (C.I. 680), PMA- 
All other 



1.000 
pounds 



22 



1.00Q 

dollars 



10 



18 



1,054 



22 



1,011 



129 
194 
137 
148 

29 

55 

139 

223 

617 



115 
210 
120 
151 

28 

50 

138 

199 

588 



5 

612 



Yellow toners, reduced: 

Benzidine yellow 

Pr. 103, Hansa yellow G 



235 



4 

584 



44 
250 



10 



394 



33 
96 
15 
20 

22 

27 

32 

149 

304 



2 
302 



U 

79 



Per 

pound 



$0.44 



.44 



.40 



.29 

.46 
.13 
.13 

.78 
.54 
.23 
.75 

.52 



.50 

.52 



.32 

.32 



Note.- The C.I. and Pr. numbers stand for the Colour Index and Foreign Prototype 
numbers of the dyes from which the lakes or toners may be produced. When the 
number precedes the name of the toner, it signifies that the toner is the same as 
the dye described in the Colour Index or Foreign Prototype listing. 

The abbreviations PMA, PTA, and PTMA stand for phosphomolybdic, phosphotung- 
stic, and phosphotungstomolybdic acids, respectively. 



48 



Production of lakes and toners in 1945 totaled 23 million pounds 
compared with 19 million pounds in 1944. This increase, the largest 
reported since 1941, resulted from lessened Government control over the 
dyes and raw materials used in the manufacture of these pigments, and 
less control over inks, paint, wallpaper, and other articles in the 
manufacture of which organic pigments are used. Sales also increased 
in 1945, totaling 22 million pounds, valued at 17 million dollars, 
compared with 18 million pounds, valued at 14 million dollars, in 1944* 

As in former years, full-strength colors were the most important 
group of organic pigments, accounting for 51 percent of the total pro- 
duction and sales in 1945* Production of these colors increased to 
12 million pounds from 10 million pounds in 1944, sales increased to 
11.1 million pounds in 1945 from 9.6 million pounds in the preceding 
year. The red toners were the most important group of colors produced, 
and Lithol red R (C.I. 189) and Toluidine red (C.I. 69) were the indi- 
vidual toners produced in largest quantity. 

In 1945 lakes accounted for slightly more, and reduced toners for 
slightly less, than one-fourth the total production of organic pigments. 
Percentagewise, the greatest increase was in the reduced toners, the 
production of which rose 43 percent, reaching 5*2 million pounds com- 
pared with 3.6 million pounds in 1944. Production of lakes increased 
from 5.7 to 6.3 million pounds, or about 11 percent. The lakes and 
reduced toners produced in greatest quantity were Peacock blue (Patent 
blue) lake and Phthalocyanine blue B reduced toner. 



Medicinals 



Production of 44 million pounds of all medicinal chemicals in 1945> 
though 14 percent higher than in 1944, was less than the peak output of 
56 million pounds in 1943. Sales of 40 million pounds in 1945 were 
valued at 161 million dollars. This value was 44 percent greater than 
the corresponding value in 1944 owing to the inclusion for the first 
time, in 1945, of statistics on production and sales of penicillin. 
Eliminating the data on penicillin for purposes of comparison, the value 
of sales in 1945 increased only 2.5 percent oyer that in 1944. Statis- 
tics for medicinals are shown in table 14A. ■» 

As in past years, the medicinals are divided into two groups, cyclic 
and acyclic. The cyclic group is divided into benzenoid compounds 
(usually derived from coal tar) and alicyclic and heterocyclic compounds 
(derived from coal tar or other sources, such as terpenes from wood, 
cholesterol from animal tissue, and theobromine from vegetable products). 
The acyclic group includes synthetic compounds derived from natural gas, 
petroleum, or grain by fermentation. The products of each group are 
characterized by specific types of chemical and therapeutic reactions. 

The data as given in table 14A represent the quantity and value of 
the medicinals in terms of the pure product. All diluents or other 
material used in mixing or compounding tablets, solutions, suspensions, 
or other forms for consumer use are excluded. This practice has been 
followed in the Commission's reports beginning with that for 1942. 

1/ See also table 14B, part III, for an alphabetical list of the 
products in which the manufacturers ere identified. 



49 



Table 14A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of medicinals, 1945 1/ 

(Listed below are all synthetic organic medicinals for which any reported data on 
production or sales nay be published. (Leaders are used where the reported 
data are confidential and may not be published or where no data were reported.) 
Table 14B in part III lists alphabetically all those medicinals for which data 
on production or sales were reported end identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Product 



Production 



Sales Zl 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



Grand total- 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC 



Total- 



Chemicals for which separate statisticc 
may not be shown' 



Chemical 6 for which separate statistics 
are shown belo w- — — — - 



Benzenoid 



Total- 



Ac etanilide- 



Aoetyl-p-aminophenyl salicylate 
(Phenetsal) —— ■• -~— ■ — — 

N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-aroanillc acid 
(Acetaraone) (Stovarsol) 

Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) 

Acetyltannic acid (Tannigen) 



p-Aminobenzoic acid derivatives, total' 
p-Diethylarainoethyl p-aminobenzoate 

hydrochloride (Procaine 

hydrochloride) 

Ethyl p-aminobenzoate (Benzocaine) — 
All other—- 



Benzaldehyde 



Benzyl benzoate, medicinal »- 



Bismuth compounds, total- 
Bismuth subgallat c 
Bismuth subsalicylate— 
Bismuth tribromophenate- 
All other ■ — 



Desoxyephedrlne hydrochloride (all 
isomers)- 



Diethylstilbestrol 

3,4-Di-p-hydroxyphenyl-n-hexane 
(Hexestrol)- 



Dyes, medicinal 

Mandelic acid salts- 
B-Naphthyl benzoate- 
Neoarsphen amine—— 



Phenolsulfonic acid salts, total- 
Sodium phenol sulfonate- 



1.000 
pounds 

44,085.1 



1.000 
pounds 

40,024-6 



160,972.1 



39,107.3 



35,305.6 



U3,218.2 



8,560.6 
30,546.7 

31,807.9 



8,218.7 
27,086.9 

28,540.3 



20,541.2 
122,677.0 

39,944.3 



245.7 



7.9 

10,941.2 
4.1 

137.5 



355.2 

5.9 

7.9 

10,120.4 

4.5 

140.1 



105.7 

22.9 

153.9 

3,770.1 

14.1 

848.3 



108.3 
29.2 

307.9 
800.8 

174.5 



31.8 

98.5 

9.8 

289.5 
350.6 

174.0 



172.3 
294.3 
381.7 

212.1 
344.9 

397.2 



57.8 

112.8 

3.6 

.3 



.7 
.4 

.2 

59.9 
11.7 
43.9 
10.8 

1,067.6 
467.6 



54.C 
117.3 

2.3 
.4 



.5 
•4 

.2 
44.7 

9.2 
34.7 

7.0 

1,235.7 
505.1 



77.2 

280.2 

12.1 

27.7 



16.6 
58.6 

22.9 

692.1 

38.7 

55.7 

240.4 

323.8 
112.8 



Per 
pound 

14.02 



4.06 



2.62 

4.53 

1.40 



.30 

3.88 

19.43 

.37 

3.13 

6.05 



5.42 

2.99 

38.95 

.73 
.98 

2.28 



1.43 

2.39 

5.26 

69.25 



33.20 
146.50 

114.50 

15.48 

4.21 

1.61 

34.34 

.26 
.22 



50 



Table L4A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production end 
of medicinals, 194.5 i/ — Continued 



sales 



Product 



Production 



Sales 2/ 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

Benzenoid — Continued 

Phenolsulfonic acid salts — Continued 
All other 



Salicylic acid- 



Salicylic acid salts, total- 
Sodium salicylate 

All other 



Sulfa drugs, total- 
Sulfathiazole 



Sulfathiazole, sodium- 
All other 



Sulf oar sphenamin ... 
Tannin albuminate (Tannalbin)- 
Thymol- 



Vitaraina: K (all forms)- 



AU other 

All cyclic and Heterocyclic 
Total 



Amino acids 

Antipyrine salicylate- 



Barbituric acid derivatives, total- 
5-Ethyl-5-(l-racthyl-n-butyl) 
barbituric acid, sodium salt 
(Pentobarbital sodium) - 



5-Ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid 
(Phonobarbital) (Luminal) - 



5-Ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid, 

sodium salt (Phenobarbital sodium)- 
All other — 



Bile acids and salt3, total- 



Dehydrocholic acid and sodium salt 

All other 



Bromocataphor . . , — - 

Caffeine, from theobromine- 



Caffeine derivatives, natural and 

synthetic, total 

Caffeine citrate 



Caffeine sodium benzoate and caffeine 
sodium s nli cylat o - 



Camphosulfonic acid and salts- 



1.000 
pounds 



600.0 
5,411.8 
1,4-06.7 



1,363.4- 
38.3 

5,883.2 



1.000 
pounds 



730.6 
3,653.6 
1,351.0 



1.000 

dollars 



211.0 



1,021.3 
623.6 



2,036.4- 



1,320.4 
30.6 

5,671.7 



3,301.3 

.3 

2.9 

U3.0 

.9 



5,139.3 



7,299.4- 



1,932.1 

32.0 

3,657.6 

.1 

4.5 

142.6 

.7 



4,935.6 



6,765.3 



.9 
3.7 

582.1 



1.0 
4. 5 

556.5 



52.9 

255.3 

24.. 3 
24.9.6 

115.5 



52.9 

279.5 

32.0 
192.1 

101.1 



25.3 
90.2 

21.6 

727.4 



55.8 



"53TS 
2.2 
5.3 



25.2 
75.9 

22.3 
603.7 



54-. 6 



52.0 
2.6 
4.2 



590.7 
32.9 

20,313.7 

4,869.3 

88.7 

15,355.7 

6.6 

15.7 

347.5 

73.4 



10,224.-5 



103,273.9 



Per 
pound 



).29 
.23 
.46 



129.7 
9.7 

3,025.0 



508.3 
994.4 

123.5 

1,398.3 

469.1 



282.2 
136.9 

61.7 
1,616.2 



112.4 



103.6 

8.3 

18.6 



.45 
1.08 

3.53 
2T46 - 
2.77 
4.20 

66.00 

3.49 

2.44 

104.86 



2.07 



15.27 



129.70 
2.16 

5.44 



9.62 

3.56 

3.36 
7.28 

4.64 



11.20 
2.46 

2.77 
2.63 



2.06 



1.99 
3.38 
4.43 



51 



Table 14A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and 
of nedicinals, 1945 » — Continued 



sales 



Product 



Production 



Sales 2/ 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Alicyclic and Heterocylic — Con tinued 

Hexame thylene te tramineanhydromethylene 

citrate (Helmitol) 

7-Iodo-S-hydroxyquinoline-5-sul fonic 

acid (Yatren acid) and salt 

2-Me thoxy-6-chloro-9-die thylamino- 

pentylaminoacridine (Atebrin) 

p-Methylphenylcinchoninic ethyl ester 

(Neocinchophen) 

Nikethamide (Niacin diethylamide) 

Penicillin (in terms of billion Oxford 

units)- 
Terpin hydrate 



Theobromine derivatives, total 

Theobromine and sodium salicylate 

All other 

Theophylline ethylenediamine 

(Aninophylline) 



Vitamins, total 

Bi (Thiamin chloride and hydro- 

B2 (Riboflavin) for human consumption 

B£, (Pyridoxine) — 

D2 (Irradiated ergosterol) 1/— 

Niacin and niacinamide 

All other 

MEDICINALS, ACYCLIC 

Chemicals for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Chemicals for which separate statistics 
are shown below — 



Amino acids 

Cacodylic acid salts 

Calcium levulinate 

Gluconic acid salts 

Hexame thyldiaminoisopropanol di-iodide- 

Methyl iodide 

Thiosinamine (Allylurea)- 



1.000 
pounds 



19. 4 
25.0 

442.7 

6.4 
22.1 

7,454.0 
57.8 

102.2 



u 



1.000 
pounds 



18.8 
26.8 

440.1 

8.8 
24.0 

^7,092.3 
47.2 

101.6 



1.000 

dollars 



53.6 

205.0 

3,969.9 

67.5 
382.6 

46,461.7 
29.1 

221.4 



Per 
pound 



12.85 

7.65 

9.02 

7.67 
15.94 

6.55 

.62 

2.18 



52.9 
49.3 



110.7 
1,579.5 



53.6 
48.0 



104.8 
1,362.2 



109.0 
112.4 



1,010.8 
35,113.2 



2.03 
2.34 



9.64 
25.78 



169.7 

68.9 

2.7 

316.4 

958.3 

63.5 

3,421.3 



4,977.8 



163.7 

60.0 

3.8 

318.2 

752.0 

64.5 

3,283.1 



4,719.0 



11,899.9 
5,463.4 
1,735.9 
1,774.5 
2,571.2 

11,668.3 

10,316.7 



17.753.9 



72.69 

91.06 

456.82 

5.58 

3.42 

180.90 

3.14 



3.76 



tert-Trichlorobutyl alcohol (Chloretone) 
(Chlorobutanol) 

See footnotes at end of table. 



2,517.4 

2,460.4 

176.0 
9.0 
4.6 

871.0 
.5 

5.4 
29.2 



2,366.9 

2,352.1 

187.7 

8.9 

4.6 

959.8 

.4 

9.3 

5.3 

.1 

22.7 



2,920.9 

14,333.0 

372.1 

82.7 

6.0 

511.9 

6.9 

39.0 

20.5 

.5 

46.7 



1.23 

6.31 

1.98 
9.29 
1.30 
.53 
17.25 
4.19 
3.87 
5.00 

2.06 



52 



Table L4A-- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and salee 
of raedicinals, 1945 V— Continued 



Sales 2/ 



Product 



Production 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit 
value 



MEDICINALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 



Vitamins, total- 



C (Ascorbic acid; Ascorbic acid, 
sodium salt; and Isoascorbic acid) — 



1.000 
pounds 



1,364.7 



1,000 
pounds 



1,153.3 



1.000 
dollars 



13,746.7 



111.92 



1,307.1 
57.6 



1,097.7 
55.6 



12,091.8 
1,654.9 



11.02 
29-76 



1/ Represents statistics on production and sales for bulk medioinals only. 
These statistics do not include the production of finished preparations, such as 
tablets, capsules, or ampoules , which are manufactured from bulk raedicinals. 
The quantity and value of sales are for bulk medicinals or the bulk equivalent of 
medicinals which are compounded into finished preparations. 

2/ Sales represent the combined quantity of sales to another company and the 
quantity of interplant transfers for consumption, i.e., the transfer within a 
company from the division which manufactures the bulk medicinal to another 
division which makes it into a finished consumer product. The value of sales 
represents the combined sales value and the value (usually at the prevailing 
market price) of interplant transfers for consumption. 

1/ Total United States production of benzyl benzoate was 2,065,000 pounds with 
sales of 1,490,000 pounds, valued at fl, 497,000. Benzyl benzoate used as a 
flavor and perfume is reported in table 15A and that used as a mitocide in 
table 23A. 

4/ Data for penicillin in terms of pounds are Included in data for "All other * 
alicyclic and heterocyclic medicinals. 

5/ In million U.S. P. unite, these data would be as followst Production, 
24,301,000; sales, 23,408,000, valued at $1,774,500. The unit value per million 
U.S. P. units is 7.6 cents. 



53 



Before that year, the figures given in these reports represented produc- 
tion and sales of medicinals which were partly in bulk form and partly 
in the form of finished products. 

The statistics on sales combine, for both quantity and value, 
direct sales and interplant and intraplant transfers for consumption* 
Intraplant transfers are those transfers within a company from the 
department manufacturing medicinal chemicals to the department convert- 
ing the products for consumer use. 

Cyclic medicinals accounted for nearly 90 percent of the total out- 
put of all medicinal chemicals in 1945. Benzenoid derivatives accounted 
for 81 percent of the cyclic compounds, and .alicyclic and heterocyclic 
derivatives accounted for the remainder. 

Benzenoid medicinals, of which nearly 32 million pounds was pro- 
duced in 1945, include acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin), sulfa drugs, 
salicylic acid, salicylic acid salts (principally sodium salicylate), 
and phenol sulfonic acid salts. 

The production of acetylsalicylic acid in 1945 set a new record 
of 11 million pounds; this was an increase of more than 1.5 million 
pounds over that of the previous year. Sales totaled 10 million 
pounds, valued at 3.8 million dollars. 

Production of Bulfa drugs, which totaled 5.9 million pounds in 
1945, was higher than the output in 1944 of 4.5 million pounds, but 
was still under the output in 1943 of 10 million pounds* Competition 
with penicillin, preferred in some clinical applications, tended to 
limit the demand for the sulfa drugs. Sulfathiazole continued as the 
principal drug of this type. 

The quantity of heterocyclic and alicyclic medicinals produced was 
slightly greater in 1945 than in 1944, but the value of sales was higher 
by 44 million dollars, owing almost entirely to sales of penicillin, 
which, though small in quantity, were large in value. 

Production of penicillin totaled 7.5 trillion Oxford units; sales 
were 7.1 trillion Oxford units, valued at 46 million dollars. 

In 1945 the output of barbituric acid derivatives totaled 582,000 
pounds, which was 23,000 pounds greater than in 1944* 5-Ethyl-5-phenyl- 
barbituric acid, known both as Pheno barbital and as Luminal, was the 
largest single derivative produced in 1945* Production of this 
derivative was 255,300 pounds; sales were 280,000 pounds, valued at 
♦994,000. 

Production of acyclic medicinals, which accounted for 11 percent 
of the total output, amounted to 5 million pounds in 1945. Sales were 
4*7 million pounds, valued at 18 million dollars. Acyclic vitamins 
were the leading acyclic medicinals. Gluconic acid salts ranked next 
in importance. The output of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) totaled 
1,307,000 pounds, a gain of about 130,000 pounds over 1944. Sales of 
this vitamin accounted for 12 million dollars but of a total sales value 
of 14 million for the entire group of acyclic vitamins. 

Production in 1945 of all synthetic vitamins, cyclic and acyclic 
combined, was 2.9 million pounds; sales were 2.5 million pounds, valued 
at 49 million dollars. 



54 



Flavor and Perfume Materials 

Organic chemicals which are used chiefly for their odoriferous 
and flavoring properties are classified within this group. Data are 
not included for compounds such as ethyl acetate and methyl ethyl 
ketone which, though possessing attractive odors, are used chiefly 
for other purposes. 

This group comprises chemicals synthesized from natural crude 
materials or from intermediates, both cyclic and acyclic. Statistics 
on natural products such as floral extracts and essential oils ob- 
tained by extraction or distillation of plant and animal substances 
are not included in this report. Statistics on production and sales 
of these synthetic flavor and perfume materials are shown in table 
15A. 1/ 

Although these chemicals are finished products, few of them reach 
the ultimate consumer in the form of the pure chemicals listed in the 
tables; instead, they are blended with essential and floral oils, 
fixatives, and solvents according to specific formulas. These blends 
or mixtures are then used to flavor foods, drinks, and medicines; to 
perfume toiletries, cosmetics, and soaps; and to modify objectionable 
odors. 

The individual flavor and perfume materials are grouped according 
to chemical structure as cyclic or acyclic. The cyclic compounds are 
further subdivided into (l) benzenoid (including naphthalenoid) , and 
(2) terpenoid and heterocyclic. The acyclic compounds include some 
chemically modified oils. 

In 1945 production of flavor and perfume materials totaled 18 
million pounds, an increase of 11 percent over the output of the 
previous year. This increase was chiefly in response to the larger 
civilian demand and a more plentiful supply of raw materials. It also 
reflected continued growth in substitution of totally synthetic and 
chemically modified compounds for natural products. Sales, totaling 
16 million pounds and valued at 20 million dollars in 1945, increased 
3 percent in quantity and 6 percent in value compared with 1944. 

About 7 million pounds of benzenoid flavor and perfume materials 
was produced in 1945, or 5 percent less than in 1944. The three most 
important benzenoid compounds for which statistics are given are methyl 
salicylate, vanillin, and anethole. The output of methyl salicylate 
(synthetic wintergreen oil) dropped in 1945 to 2.2 million pounds, 37 
percent less than the output of 3.4 million pounds in 1944. This 
decrease was probably due to the strong demand for phenol (the princi- 
pal raw material) for other uses. Production of vanillin totaled 
654,500 pounds; sales were 604,600 pounds, valued at 1.3 million 
dollars. Production of anethole totaled 558,700 pounds; sales were 
466,800 pounds, valued at $578,800. 

Benzyl benzoate, which before 1944 was considered solely a 
perfume material, is now also used as a medicinal and as a mitocide. 

1/ See also table 15B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 



55 



Table 15A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of flevor and perfume materials, 1945 

(Listed below are all synthetic organic flavor and perfume materials for which 
any reported data on production or sales may be published. (Leaders ere used 
where the reported data are confidential and may not be published, or where no 
data were reported.) Table 15B in part III lists alphabetically all those 
flavor and perfume materials for which data on production or sales were 
reported and identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Material 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total 

ILAVOR AND PERHJME MATERIALS, CYCLIC 
Total 



Materials for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Materials for which separate statistics 
are shown below 

Benzenoid 

Total 

Q-Amylcinnamalcehyde- 
Amyl salicylate — 



■Anethole 

Anistldehyde 

Anisole (Methyl phenyl ether) 

Benzyl acetate 

Benzyl alcohol 

Benzyl benzoate i/ 

Benzyl butyrate 

Benzyl cinnamate 

Benzyl formate 

Benzyl isoeugenyl ether (Benzyl 

isoeugenol) 

Benzyl propionate 

Benzyl salicylate 

Cinnamic acid 

Cinnamyl alcohol — 

p-Cresyl acetate 

Ethyl benzoate 

Ethyl a-toluate (Ethyl phenylacetate) — 
Eugenol — 



Methyl eugenyl ether (Methyl eugenol) — 

Methyl isoeugenol ether 

Methyl salicylate (Wintergreen oil) 

Musk xylene 

Phenethyl acetate 



Phenethyl alcohol (Phenylethyl alcohol) 

Phenethyl formate 

Phenethyl propionate 

All other benzenoid materials Zf 



1.000 
pounds 

18,116.8 



1.000 
pounds 

16,090.9 



1.000 
dollars 



20,226.6 



Per 

pound 

$1.26 



12,718.8 



11,025.0 



14,784.3 



1.34 



4,451.7 
8,267.1 

7,057.6 



3,493.3 
7,531.7 

6,775.2 



5,265.8 
9,518.5 

7,751.9 



1.51 
1.26 

1.14 



84.2 
228.9 
558.7 

61.8 

419.1 

332.8 

81.9 

1.9 

4.8 

.9 



12.5 
31.1 

5.0 
33.3 

1.0 



72.7 

245.8 

466.8 

57.7 

.5 

404.8 

333.7 

81.2 

1.6 

4.8 

.7 



10.0 
31.2 

1.7 

33.4 

.9 

4.0 



203.1 

68.0 

2.4 

3.9 

2,163.4 

168.2 

4.6 

297.7 

.1 

654.5 
1,633.0 



67.3 




151.4 

154.4 

578.8 

164.4 

.6 

276.1 

302.1 

81.5 

3.5 

27.3 

1.7 



22.2 

53.8 

3.3 

95. S 

1.8 

2.3 



178.6 



673.1 

233.0 

9.8 

571.9 

.4 

2.0 

1,296.0 

2,866.1 



2.08 

.63 

1.24 

2.85 

1.20 

.68^ 

.91 

1.00 

2.19 

5.69 

2.43 



2.22 
1.72 
1.94 
2.87 
2.00 
.58 

2.65 



.30 
1.44 
2.00 
1.89 
3.20 
3.33 
2.14 
1.72 



See footnotes at end of table. 



56 



Table 15A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of flavor and perfume materials, 1945 — Continued 



Material 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, 
CICLIC — Continued 

Terpenoid and Heterocyclic 

C edrol 

Cedryl acetate 

Citral 

Citronellol 

Citronellyl acetate 

Coumarin, synthetic — - ■ ■■■ 

Geranyl acetate 

Geranyl formate 

Hydroxy c i tronellal 

Ionone, other — ■ ■ ■ — 

Linalool, natural and synthetic 

Linalyl acetate 

Linalyl butyrate 

Linalyl propionate 

Menthol, synthetic, tech. and U.S.P. 

Methylionone 

Piperonal (Heliotropin) 

Rhodinol 

Rhodinyl acetate 

Santelol 

Terpineol, a and (3 

Terpinyl acetate 

Vetivenol 

Vetivenyl acetate 

All other terpenoid and heterocyclic 

FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, 
ACYCLIC U 



1.000 
pounds 



5,661.2 



1.000 
pounds 



4,249.8 



l r 000 
dojj,ars 



7,032.4 



Per 
pound 



$1.65 



Materials for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Materials for which separate statistics 
are shown below 



Allyl 
Allyl 
Cetyl 
Decyl 
Ethyl 
Ethyl 
Ethyl 
Ethyl 
Ethyl 



caproate 

enanthate 

alcohol 

aldehyde (Cio)- 

butyrate 

caproa te 

enanthate 

oxyhydrate- 
pelargonate- 



5.0 

10.4 

43.8 

33.0 

.7 

212.9 

56.1 

30.1 

.5 

69.8 

28.0 

67.2 

112.0 

176.1 

.1 

88.0 

145.6 

58.4 

13.1 

.2 

106.5 

.5 

1,332.8 

241.9 

1.0 

8.S 

2,818.7 



5,398.0 



5,137.5 
260.5 

1.6 

.7 

97.3 

2.3 
73.8 

1.3 
12.0 
37.8 



10.1 

41.5 

10.6 

1.1 

198.1 

23.6 

12.8 

.2 

T 

75.4 

39.9 

124.1 

.2 

.1 

83.7 

118.1 

52.1 

9.5 



102.8 

1,303.4 

206.1 

1.1 

8.4 

1,826.9 



5,065.9 



4,831.7 

234.2 
2.0 



91.8 
2.5 

67.5 
1.0 
8.6 

34.5 
.6 



28.1 

225.5 

82.3 

9.4 

495.1 

173.2 

65.3 

5.4 

~~ 17 
371.9 
298.5 
566.6 
2.5 
.5 
355.6 
674.7 
153.4 
29-4.6 



88.7 

305.7 

134.6 

68.8 

232.3 

2,399.7 



5,442.3 



5,087.0 

355.3 
10.5 



2.78 
5.46 
7.76 
8.45 
2.50 
7.33 
5.06 
27.00 

—y 

4.93 

7.48 

4.57 

10.25 

10.25 

4.25 

5.73 

2.94 

31.12 



.86 

.23 

.65 

63.50 

27.65 

1.32 



1.07 



150.0 

45.7 

49.6 

1.7 

8.6 

25.0 

2.9 



1.05 
1.52 
5.15 



1.63 
18.28 

.74 
1.70 
1.00 

.75 
4.83 



See footnotes at end of table. 



57 



Table 15A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of flavor and perfume materials, 1945 — Continued 



Material 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



1.000 



1.000 

flaUm 



JLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, 
ACYCLIC U— Continued 

Ethyl sebacate — — — — 

Isoamyl butyrate— — 

Isoamyl 1 so vale rate - 

Isobutyl butyrate 

Me thylnonylace taldehyde- 

Methyl nonyl ketone 

Undecalactone- 



1.0 
22.2 

5.3 



22.7 



Undecylenic aldehyde- 



1.0 
1.0 
2.2 
1.0 



.1 
.9 

2.0 



18.7 

.2 
26.7 

15.7 



Per 
pound 



10.82 

2.00 
26.70 

7.85 



i/ Total production of benzyl benzoate was 2,065,000 pounds with sales of 
1,490,000 pounds, valued at $1,497,000. Benzyl benzoate used ae a pharma- 
ceutical is reported in table 14A and that used as a mitooide in table 23A. 

2/ Includes data on production and sales for naphthalenoid compounds. These 
data are included in "All other benzenold materials" in order to prevent the 
disclosure of the operations of individual companies. 

2/ Included in "Ionone, other." 

lJ Includes data on production and sales for chemically modified essential 
oils. 



58 



In this report, the amount used for each of these purposes is shown 
separately for the first time. In 1945 approximately 800,000 pounds 
was used as a medicinal (see table L4A) , 82,000 pounds as a perfume 
material (see table 15A), and 1.2 million pounds as a mitocide (see 
table 23A). 

The total output of terpenoid and heterocyclic chemicals was 5.7 
million pounds; sales were 4.2 million pounds, valued at 7 mill ion 
dollars. This output was 32 percent higher than in 1944* Production 
of terpineol isomers (1*3 million pounds), was larger than that of any 
other terpenoid and heterocyclic compound shown in the table. Syn- 
thetic methol, which is also included in this group, showed a decrease 
in 1945 partly because of increased supplies of natural menthol from 
Brazil. In 1945 production totaled 88,000 pounds. Another important 
item, coumarin, declined in production to 213,000 pounds from 260,000 
pounds in 1944. Methylionone, used in raspberry flavors and in the 
manufacture of violet odors, increased 18 percent in output over 1944. 

Statistics on a number of items could not be published because 
release of such information would disclose the operations of individual 
companies. Among these, the most important were saccharin, citron- 
ellal, isobornyl acetate, isosafrol, and terpinolene. Production of 
saccharin, which always exceeded that of the other items, continued at 
a high level because of the shortage of sugar. 

Acyclic flavor and perfume materials consist chiefly of branched 
and straight-chain alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and esters. Histor- 
ically, this group is the oldest in the development of the synthetic 
flavor and perfume industry. In 1945 production of these materials 
increased 19 percent over 1944 (5.4 million pounds from 4.6 million 
pounds). Sales increased to 5.1 million pounds, valued at 5.4 million 
dollars, compared with 4.5 million pounds, valued at 4.5 million 
dollars, in 1944. 

Among the items for which statistics may be shown, the most im- 
portant are cetyl alcohol (97,300 pounds), the ethyl and isoamyl esters 
of butyric acid (73,800 pounds and 22,200 pounds), and ethyl oxyhydrate 
(37,800 pounds). 

Statistics reported to the Commission on the principal item in 
this group, monosodium glutamate, cannot be shown as they are confi- 
dential; but the War Food Administration estimates production at 4»5 
million pounds in 1945 and 3.5 million in 1944. 



Plastics Materials 



Plastics materials are semimanufactured products which are used 
in a wide variety of applications. Some are molded, cast, or fabri- 
cated into countless articles such as parts for electrical, automotive, 
and household equipment. Some are combined with paper, textile, or 
fiberglass to produce laminated materials from which products of high 
mechanical and electrical strength are made. Some are extruded into 
filaments for synthetic fabrics or use as brush fibers. Some are 
calendered into thin sheeting used in safety glass and rubberlike 
products. Others are used in such applications as protective coatings, 
adhesives, and resin-iapregnated fabrics. 



59 



Plastics materials are made from a wide variety of raw materials 
and combinations of such materials. Each formulation may impart 
special properties to the product, making it preferable for certain 
uses. Data on plastics materials in this report are almost entirely 
confined to synthetic resins. 1/ Production and sales of plastics 
materials are given in terms of the net resin content, that is, sol- 
vents, fillers, plasticizers, and other unreacted chemicals are not 
included in the weight reported. The weight of oil or rosin, however, 
when chemically combined, is included. Statistics on a net resin 
content basis are less influenced by variable methods of formulation 
than are statistics based on gross weight. The variations in formu- 
lation are different for each manufacturer and may change from year to 
year. Statistics on a gross-weight basis would not be comparable 
with the statistics shown in the other sections which deal with 
chemical products because they would represent data for physical and 
mechanical mixtures. In addition, information on a gross-weight basis 
could not be easily related to the intermediates which are consumed in 
the manufacture of the resins. 

There have been two noteworthy changes in this section of the 
report compared with earlier reports. One change involves reclassifi- 
cation and the other, the addition of another tabulation. In 1945, 
unmodified rosin esters (abietic acid-glycerol resins, abietic acid- 
pentaerythritol resins, and similar resins) are no longer listed under 
alkyd resins but are classified as a separate subgroup in tables 
16A 2/ and 17. The additional tabulation (see table 17) was arranged 
to show separately, as far as possible, production and sales of modi- 
fied and unmodified plastics materials. The modified resins are 
principally rosin-ester modified. 

In this report, data on plastics materials have been tabulated in 
three different ways: First, grouped according to chemical composition 
(see table 16A) ;2/ second, grouped according to selected classes (see 
table 17) as outlined above; and third, grouped according to use 
(see table 18). These groupings present the material in a manner be- 
lieved to be most convenient to the users of these data. 

In 1945 the production of plastics materials as reported to the 
Commission was 818 million pounds, the largest on record. Sales were 
762 million pounds, valued at 269 million dollars. The largest indi- 
vidual group of resins were the alkyd type (193 million pounds), used 
principally for protective coatings, closely followed by tar acid 
resins (188 million), used for molding, casting, and laminating. Pro- 
duction of unmodified rosin esters totaled 66 million pounds and that 
of polystyrene 22 million pounds, which was twice the output of poly- 
styrene in 1944. Production in 1945 of urea and melamine resins 
(74 million pounds) was slightly larger than in the preceding year. 

Plastic materials for protective coatings was the greatest single 
use for 1945 (see table 18), totaling 310 million pounds, followed by 



1/ Data on cellulose and certain protein plastics are published by 
the United States Bureau of the Census. Total production and sales 
of cellulose derivatives for all purposes, however, are shown in this 
report under miscellaneous chemicals (see table 23A) . 

2/ See also table 16B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 

747685 O - 47 - 5 



60 

Table l6A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of plastics materials, grouped according to chemical composition, 194-5 

(Quantities and value are based on net resin content only. A/ Listed below are 
all synthetic plastics materials for which any reported data on production 
or sales may be published. Table 16B in part III lists alphabetically all 
those products for which data on production or sales were reported and 
identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Material 



Production 



Sales 2/ 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total 

PLASTICS MATERIALS, BENZENOID 

Materials for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Materials for which separate statistics 
are shown below 

Condensation Resins 

Alkyd resins, total 2/ 

Saturated polyester type: 

Phthalic anhydride-glycerol 

Phthalic anhydride-glycerol, 
modified: U For protective 

coatings 

Phthalic anhydride-glycol 

Phthalic anhydride-pen taery- 

thritol 2/- 

Phthalic anhydride- and maleic 
anhydride-glycerol: £/ F or 

protective coatings 

Unsaturated polyester type 

All other alkyd resins 8/ 

Tar acid resins, total 

Phenolic resins, except mixed 

phenolics, total 

Unmodified, total 

p—tert-Amyl phenol- formaldehyde 

p-tert-Butylphenol-formaldehyde — 

Cresol- form aldehyde 

Phenol- formaldehyde, total 

For molding 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For casting^ for ion exchange; 
and for treatment of textiles, 

paper, and leather 

For miscellaneous uses 

Re sorcinol- formaldehyde 

All other unmodified 2/ 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1.000 
pounds 

818,020 



413,406 



62,742 
350,664 

329,668 



139,392 
123,895 



1,447 
293 

5,961 



597 

2/ 

7,199 

183,464 



147,266 

127,334 

1,296 

4,268 

10,606 

100,698 

50,942 

17,464 

3,573 

U,2S6 



5,297 
9,136 
1,220 
9,796 



1.000 

pounds 



1.000 

dollars 



762,440 



269,049 



385,141 



96,327 



62,442 
322,699 

302,361 



4,310 

92,017 

86,229 



116,779 
104,014 



1,365 
284 

3,376 



544 

2/ 

6,696 

133,792 



26,539 
23,508 



332 
S3 



905 



118 

u 

1,593 
58,350 



L44,467 


48,330 


125,982 


44,536 


1,231 


681 


3,690 


1.161 


10,613 


2,604 


99,321 


36,209 


51,047 


21,951 


17,266 


3,942 


3,035 


1,359 


U,216 


3,539 



5,416 
8,341 
1,211 
9,411 



3,152 

2,266 

894 

3,037 



61 



Table 16A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of plastics materials, grouped according to chemical composition, 1945 — Continued 



Material 



Production 



Sales 



2/ 



Quantity- 



Value 



Unit value 



PLAZTICS MATERIALS, BENZENOID— Con. 

Condensation Resins — Continued 

Tar acid resins — Continued 
Phenolic resins, except mixed 
phenol ic s — Con tinued 

Modified, total 

Phenol- formaldehyde, abietic acid 

ester (rosin ester) 

All other modified 12/ 

Mixed phenolic resins, unmodified, 

total 

Cresols- and xylenols- formaldehyde 
and cresylic acid formaldehyde — 
Phenols- and ere sols- formaldehyde- 
All other mixed phenolic resins IV 

Styrene copolymers: Polystyrene poly- 
esters 

All other condensation resins 12/ 

Polymerization Resins 

Polyaromatic resins: 

Polystyrene resins 

All other polyaromatic resins 

All other polymerization resins 14/ 

PLASTICS MATERIALS, N0NBENZEN0ID W 

Materials for which separate statistics 
may not be shown' 



Materials for which separate statistics 
are shown below 

Condensation Resins 

Total i£/ 



Alkyd resins (oil and solid types), 



Modified by rosin esters, total 

Abietic acid and maleic acid 

Abietic acid and other acids 12/ 

Unmodified by rosin esters, total 

Punaric acid 13/ 

Maleic acid or anhydride and maleic 

anhydride- terpene, total **/ 

For protective coatings 

For other uses 



1 ? 000 

pounds 



1.000 

pounds 



1.000 

dollars 



19,332 

17,812 
1,570 

a ,198 

4,904 

8,754 

27,540 



764 
1,048 



83,738 



18,4S5 

16,956 
1,529 

39,325 

4,527 

8,538 
26,260 



768 
1,022 



82,780 



4,294 

4,006 
2S8 

9,970 

839 
1,316 
7,315 



511 
329 



10,098 



22,044 

12/ 

61,694 



404, 614 

88,488 
316,126 

193,418 



21,360 

12/ 

61,420 



377,299 

85,374 
291,425 

130,648 



6,117 

12/ 

3,981 



172,722 

84,600 
88,122 

41,077 



53,227. 

33,491 

26,794 

6,697 

19,736 

423 

12,526 
8,794 
3,732 



51,455 

32,369 

25,438 

6,931 

19,086 

483 

11,802 
8,649 
3,153 



12,976 

6,396 
5,582 

1,314 

6,080 

US 

3,189 

1,731 
1,408 



Per 

pound 



SO. 23 

.24 
.19 

.25 

.19 
.15 
.30 



.67 
.32 



.12 



.29 

12/ 
.06 



.46 

.99 
.30 

.23 



.25 

.21 
.22 
.19 
.32 
.31 

.27 
.21 
.45 



See footnotes at end of table. 



62 



Table 16A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of plastics materials, grouped according to chemical composition, 194-5 — Continued 



Material 



Production 



Sales 2/ 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, NONBENZENOID— 
Continued 15/ 

Condensation Resins — Continued 

Alkyd resinB (oil and solid types) — 
Continued 
Unmodified by rosin esters — Con. 
All other alkyd resins. 

unmodified, total 20/ 

For protective coatings 

For other uses 



Rosin esters, unmodified, total- 
Abie tic acid-glycerol- 



Abietic acid-pen taerythritol— — — — 
Abie tic acid-other polyhydric 

alcohols 2m 

Urea-melamine resins, total 

Urea-formaldehyde retins, unmodified 
and modified, total — 
For protective coatings^ 
For adhesives 



For other uses- 
Melamine- formaldehyde, unmodified — 
Melamine-formaldehyde, modified 



All other condensation resins- 



Polymerization Resins 

Total 

Polyvinyl resins, total- 

Polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, 

and polyvinyl ether — 
Polyvinyl halides and copolymers 
Polyvinyl formal and polyvinyl 

All other polymerization resins, 



total 

For molding and casting- 
For other uses- 



1.000 
pounds 



6,787 

6,166 

621 

65,977 



47,347 

12,910 

5,220 

74,214 



a, 598 
5,613 
30,4H 
25,566 
10,27-4 
2,342 

22/ 



211,196 



122,708 



27,520 
84,023 

11,165 

88,488 



21,144 
67,344 



1,000 
pounds 



1.000 
dollars 



6,301 

6,166 

635 

56,539 



42,733 
9,212 

4,644 

72,604 



2,743 

2,402 

341 

6,339 



4,656 
1,320 

863 

21.262 



60,338 
4,679 
29,737 
25,372 
10,047 
2,219 



22/ ! 22/ 



196,651 131,645 



110,777 47,045 



20,930 
79,363 

10,484 

85,874 



20,416 
65,458 



9,339 
30,241 

7,465 

84,600 



22,629 
61,971 



Per 
pound 



10.40 
.39 
.54 

.12 



.11 

.14 

.19 
.29 



15,740 


.26 


1,477 


.32 


5,313 


.20 


8,450 


.33 


4,825 


.48 


697 


.31 



22/ 



.67 



.42 



.45 

.71 
.99 



1.11 
.95 



1/ Net resin content excludes all fillers, unreacted modifiers (such as ester 
gums), dyes, and plasticizers. Additives such as rosin (80 percent or more 
abietic acid) which are chemically combined with other resin-forming components 
are included in the data. 

2/ Sales of resins for protective coatings include certain intraplant trans- 
fers, as well as the usual interplant transfers, i.e., transfers from the estab- 
lishment or department synthesizing resins for surface coatings to the establish- 
ment or department of the same company which uses them in the formulation of 
protective coatings. 

2/ Includes anhydride-alcohol -oil chemically combined. 

jj Consists essentially of phthalic anhydride-glycerol modified by abietic 



63 



acid (or rosin), phenol- formaldehyde, congo, or a mixture of phenol- formaldehyde 
and abietic acid. 

£/ Includes some phthalic anhydride-pen taerythritol resin modified with 
abietic acid. 

6/ Includes some abietic acid (or rosin) modified resin as well as phthalic 
anhydride-maleic anhydride reacted with other polyhydric alcohols. 

2/ Confidential; release of data would disclose the operations of individual 
producers. Data are included with "All other alkyd resins." 

8/ Includes phthalic anhydride chemically combined with more than one poly- 
hydric alcohol, phthalic anhydride modified with other acids (except maleic 
anhydride shown separately), and phthalic anhydride modified with allyl alcohol 
cyclopentadiene copolymer resins. 

2/ Consists principally of substituted phenolic resins reacted with formalde- 
hyde and in some instances with furfural. The substituted phenols are bispheno], 
cashew-ant shell oil, p-cydohexylphenol, lignin, p-phenylphenol, and xylenol. 

10/ Includes phenol and substituted phenols modified with aniline, abietic 
acid, terpene, and coumarone— indene. 

11/ Includes phenol- and xylenols- formaldehyde and phenol-, cresols-, and 
xyl enols- formaldehyde . 

^2/ Includes aniline- formaldehyde, and organic sulfur resins. 

12/ Confidential; release of data would disclose the operations of individual 
producers. Data are included with "All other (benzenoid) polymerization 
resins." 

\lj Includes polyaromatic resins, coumarone-indene, petroleum polymer resins, 
and miscellaneous polymer resins. 

\5/ Includes alicyclic, heterocyclic, and acyclic re sine. 

16/ Total shown does not include certain condensation resins for which data 
could not be disclosed. The data for these resins are included with "All other 
(nonbenzenoid) polymerization resins." 

17/ Includes abietic acid modified with other acids, zinc, and oil. 

18/ Includes some oil- modified resin. 

19/ Includes some rosij-and oil-modified resins. 

20/ Includes adipic acid, citric acid, congo ester, sebacic acid, succinic acid, 
and several other miscellaneous nonbenzenoid alkyd resins. 

21/ Includes abietic acid-glycol, abietic acid-other alcohols, and abietic acid- 
mixed alcohols. 

22/ Confidential; release of data would disclose the operations of individual 
producers. Data are included with "All other (nonbenzenoid) polymerization 
resins." 

23/ Includes some nonbenzenoid condensation resins (polyamide resins and 
petroleum condensation resins), as well as nonbenzenoid polymerization resins. 
Nonbenzenoid polymerization resins include polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acid 
ester resins, allyl and furfuryl polymerization resins, polyterpene, silicone 
resins, and several miscellaneous resins. 



64 

Table 17.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of plastics materials, grouped according to classes, 1945 

(Quantities and values are based on net resin content only. i/ Listed below are 
all synthetic plastics materials for which any reported data on production or 
sales may be published) 



Class and product 



Production 



Sales 1/ 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total- 
Materials for which separate statistics 

may not be shown 

Materials for which separate statistics 

are shown below 

Rosin esters, total • 

Rosin esters, modified: 2/ 
Tar acid resins: Phenolic- 
formaldehyde resins, rosin-ester 

modified V 

Rosin esters, unmodified, total 

Abie tic acid-glycerol 



Abietic acid-pentaerythritol 

Abietlc acid-other polyhydric 
alcohols 5/ 

Tar acid resins, except rosin-ester 
modified, total 



Unmodified, total 

Phenolic resins except mixed 

phenolics, total 

Phenol- formaldehyde, total 

For molding 

For laminating — — 

For protective coatings 

For adhosives 

For casting} for ion exchange; 
and for treatment of textiles, 
paper, and leather- 



For miscellaneous uses 

All other phenolic resins except 

mixed phenolics total 6/ 

For molding and casting — 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For other uses———— — - — 

Mixed phenolic resins, total 2*— — 

For protective coatings — — — — 

For other uses —_ - — 

Modified: Phenol- formaldehyde %J 

Alkyd resins (oil and solid types), 

total 2/ 

Modified by rosin esters, total 

Phthallc type: 12/ For protective 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1.000 

pounds 

813,020 



1.000 
pounds 

762,440 



1.000 
dollars 



269,049 



151,953 

666,067 

83,789 



U9,027 

613,413 

73,545 



89,223 

179,826 

10,845 



17,812 
65,977 
47,347 
12,910 

5,220 



170,652 
169,082 



16,956 

56,589 

42,733 

9,212 

4,644 



166,835 



127,384 

100,698 

50,942 

17,464 

3,573 

14,286 



5,297 
9,136 

27,186 

1,925 
12,533 

1,340 
11,388 
41,198 

5,292 
35,906 

1,570 



192,621 



34,996 
1,505 



165,306 

125,981 
99,821 
51,047 
17,266 
3,035 
14,216 



5,416 

8,8a 

26,160 

1,370 
11,905 

1,332 
11,053 
39,325 

4,763 
34,557 

1,529 



168,234 



4,006 
6,839 
4,656 
1,320 

863 



54,344 



33, 644 
1,275 



54,556 

44,586 

36,209 

21,951 

3,942 

1,359 

3,539 



3,152 
2,266 

8,377 

425 
4,178 

9U 
2,833 
9,970 

838 
9,132 

288 



39,514 



7,217 
321 



Per 
pound 

$0.35 



.44 
.29 

.15 



.24 
.12 
.11 
.14 

.19 



.33 



.33 

.35 
.36 

.43 
.23 
.45 
.25 



.58 
.26 

.32 
.23 
.35 
.71 
.26 
.25 
.18 
.26 
.19 



t24_ 



.21 
.25 



65 

Table 17.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of plastics materials, grouped according to classes, 1945 — Continued 



Class and product 



Production 



Sales 2/ 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Alkyd resins (oil and solid types) 2/- 
Continued 
Modified by rosin esters — Continued 
Polybasic acid types except 

phthalic, total 

Abie tic acid-maleic acid 

Abietic acid-other polybasic 
acids ii/ 



Unmodified by rosin esters, total 

Phthalic type, total ; 

Phthalic type, unmodified, 

total 12/ 

For protective coatings 

For other U6es 

Phthalic type,, modified by 
acids: 13/ For protective 

coatings 

Phthalic type, modified by 

phenol-formaldehyde 

Polybasic acid types except 

phthalic, total 

Fumaric acid 

Maleic acid or anhydride and 
maleic anhydride- terpene, 

to tal 

For protective coatings 

For other uses ~ 

All other polybasic acid types 
except phthalic, total 15/ — 

For protective coatings — — 

For other uses - 

All other alkyd resins i£/ 

Urea and melamine resins, total 

Urea resins, unmodified and modified, 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For other uses 

Melamine- formaldehyde, unmodified 

Melamine- formaldehyde, modified 

Vinyl resins, total 

Vinyl alcohol, vinyl acetate, and 

vinyl ether 

Vinyl chlorides and copolymers 

Vinyl formal and vinyl butyral 



Styrene resins, total 

Polystyrene, unmodified — 
Styrene copolymers 



1.000 
pounds 



33,491 
26,794 

6,697 
156,900 
136,798 

135,980 

135,023 

957 



818 

w 

20,102 
423 



12,526 
8,794 
3,732 

7,153 

7,034 

119 

725 

74,214 



61,598 
5,618 
30, 414 
25,566 
10,274 
2,342 

122,708 



27,520 
84,023 
11,165 

22,803 



22, 044 
764 



l t 000 
pounds 



32,369 
25,438 

6,931 

133,380 
114,420 

113,681 
112,740 

9a 



739 

19,460 
483 



11,802 
8,649 
3,153 

7,175 

7,045 

130 

710 

72,604 



1.000 
dollars 



6,896 

5,582 

1,314 
31,985 
25,926 

25,742 

25,488 

254 



184 

U/ 

6,059 

148 



3,189 
1,781 
1,408 

2,722 

2,660 

62 

312 

21,262 



60,338 
4,679 
29,787 
25,872 
10,047 
2,219 

110,777 



15,740 
1,477 
5,813 
8,450 
4,825 
697 

47,045 



20,930 
79,363 
10,484 

22,128 



9,339 

30,2a 

7,465 

6,628 



21,360 
768 



"67TT7" 
511 



Per 
pound 



$0.21 
.22 

.19 
.24 

.23 

.23 
.23 
.27 



.25 

U/ 

.31 
.31 



.27 
.21 

.45 

.38 
.38 
.48 
.44 

.29 



.26 
.32 
.20 
.33 
.48 
.31 

.42 



.45 
.38 
.71 

.30 

.67 



See footnotes at end of table. 



66 



Table 17.- Synthetic organic chemicals; United States production and sales 
of plastics materials, grouped according to classes, 1945 — Continued 



Class and product 


Production 


Sales 2/ 


Quantity 


Value 


Unit value 




1,000 
pounds 

151,228 


1,000 
pounds 

M8.317 


1,000 
dollars 


Per 
pound 


All other resins, total i7/ 


88.911 


.60 




21,198 

414 

20,344 

109,272 


20,473 

405 

19,393 

108,046 


22,650 

96 

2,626 

63,539 


1.11 
.24 
.14 
.59 




For protective coatings 

For other uses 



±/ Net resin content excludes all fillers, unreacted modifiers (such as ester 
gum when not chemically combined), dyes, and plasticizers. Additives such as 
rosin (80 percent or more abietic acid) which are chemically combined with other 
resin- forming components are included in the data. 

2/ Sales of resins for protective coatings include certain intraplant trans- 
fers as well as the usual interplant transfers, i.e., transfers within a 
company, from the establishment or department synthesizing resins for surface 
coatings to the establishment or department using them in the formulation of 
protective coatings. 

2/ Other solid rosin ester resins, modified, are included with the alkyd 
resins. 

4/ Includes substituted and unsubstituted phenolic resins, rosin»ester 
modified. 

$/ Includes abietic acid-glycol, abietic acid-other alcohols, and abietic acid- 
mixed alcohols (e.g., mixture of glycerol and pentaerythritol) . 

6/ Consists principally of substituted phenolic resins reacted with formalde- 
hyde and in some instances with furfural. The substituted phenols are p-tert 
amylphenol and butylphenol, bisphenol, cashew nut shell oil, cresol, p-cyclo- 
hexylphenol, lignin, p-phenylphenol, resorcinol, and xylenol. 

2/ Includes ere sols- and xylenols- formaldehyde; cresylic acid- formaldehyde; 
phenols- and cresols- formaldehyde; cresols-, phenols-, and xylenols- formaldehyde; 
and phenols- and xylenol- formaldehyde resins. 

8/ Includes phenol- formaldehyde modified by terpene, aniline, rosin (abietic 
acid), and coumarone-indene. 

2/ Includes acid or anhydride-alcohol-oil chemically combined when oil 
modified. 

10/ Consists essentially of phthalic anhydride-glycerol resin modified by rosin 
or further modified by phenol- formaldehyde. 
11/ Includes abietic acid modified with other acids, zinc, or oil. 
12/ Includes phthalic anhydride reacted with glycerol, glycol, pentaerythritol, 
mixture of alcohols, or allyl alcohol. 

13/ Includes phthalic anhydride resins modified with maleic acid or anhydride, 
adipic, benzoic, and other acids and with male ic-abie tic acids. 

14/ Included in all other alkyd resins, to avoid disclosure of individual 
company operations. 

15/ Includes adipic acid, azelaic acid, citric acid, congo ester, sebacic acid, 
and cyclopentadiene-maleic anhydride resins. 

16/ Includes phthalic anhydride modified by phenol-formaldehyde and other 
unspecified alkyd resins. 

17/ Includes polyacrylic acid resins, polyacrylic acid ester resins, polymeth- 
acrylic acid ester resins, petroleum resins, polyolefin resins, furfural-acetone, 
toluenesulfonamide, polyamide resins, polyterpene resins, coumarone-indene, and 
silicone resins. 



67 



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68 



materials for molding and casting (161 million pounds) j adhesives 
(79 million) j laminating (45 million); treatment of textiles, paper, 
and leather (31 million); and miscellaneous uses (192 million). Pro- 
duction of most plastics materials in 1945 would have been signifi- 
cantly" larger if supplies of such raw materials as phenol, naphthalene, 
cresol, and styrene were more readily available. 



Rubber-Processing Chemicals 



Rubber-processing chemicals (formerly reported as rubber chem- 
icals) include those organic compounds which are added to rubber in 
order to control its vulcanization and aging properties. This classi- 
fication does not include chemicals (such as styrene and butadiene) 
used as raw materials in the manufacture of synthetic elastomers 
( synthetic rubbers) . 

The statistics on rubber-processing chemicals are divided into 
cyclic and acyclic groups. These are further divided according to 
use as accelerators, antioxidants, and peptizers. Table 19A gives . 
the statistics on production and sales of these chemicals in 1945* => 

Production of rubber-processing chemicals continued to increase in 
1945, reaching a new high of 101 million pounds, an increase of 8 
million over the previous peak of 1944. Sales in 1945 also reached a 
record high of 91 million pounds, valued at 44 million dollars, com- 
pared with 85 million pounds, valued at 42 million dollars, in 1944. 
This increase was due to two reasons: More synthetic rubber, and more 
rubber manufactures were produced; a larger amount of these chemicals 
is required to process synthetic rubber than to process natural rubber. 

The output of cyclic rubber-processing chemicals, chiefly acceler- 
ators and antioxidants, rose from 74 million pounds in 1944 to 80 
million pounds in 1945, an increase of 9 percent. Sales of these 
cyclic compounds totaled 69 million pounds, valued at 29 million 
dollars, representing an increase over 1944 of 5 percent in the 
quantity sold. 

Statistics on cyclic accelerators are shown in four chemical sub- 
groups — thiazole derivatives, guanidines, dithiocarbamates, and 
aldehydeamines. The thiazole derivatives were again the most im- 
portant. In 1945 production of this subgroup was 34 million pounds, 
one item in the subgroup, 2-mercaptobenzo thiazole, accounting for 
15 million. The output of guard dine accelerators was 3.8 million 
pounds, which was higher than the 1943-44 level of 3 million but 
slightly less than the peak of 4 million reached in 1941. Diphenyl- 
guanidine continued to be the leading guanidine compound. 

The output of cyclic antioxidants continued at the 1944 level of 
40 million pounds. 

Acyclic rubber-processing chemicals include both accelerators and 
peptizers. No data have been reported for acyclic antioxidants. Pro^- 



1/ See also table 19B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 



(8 

Table 19ft.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of rubber-processing chemicals, 1945 

(Listed below are all rubber-processing chemicals for which any reported data on 
production or sales may be published. (Leaders are used where the reported 
data are confidential and may not be published or where no data were reported.) 
Table 19B in part III lists alphabetically all those for which data on produc- 
tion or sales were reported and identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Chemical 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total 



ROBBER-PROCESSING CHEMICALS, CYCLIC 

Products for #hich separate statistics 
may not be shown 

Products for which separate statistics 
are shown below 



Accelerators, total- 



Aldehyde-amines, total 

n-Butyraldehyde-aniline 

All other 

Dithiocarbamates 

Guanidines, total 

Diphenylguanidine 

All other 

Thiazole derivatives, total- 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole 

All other — 
All other accelerators A/- 



Antioxidants, total 

N,N'-Diphenyl-p-phenylenedianiine 

All other antioxidants 

RUBBER-PROCESSING CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC 



Total- 



Products for which separate statistics 
may not be shown- 



Products for which separate statistics 
are shown below 



Accelerators, total- 



Dithiocarbamates, total — — — 

Dimethyl dithiocarbamic acid, zinc 

All other- 
Thiurams, total- 

Te trame thyl thiuram disul fide 

All other 

All other accelerators £/ 

Peptizers: Dodecyl mercaptan 



1,000 
pounds 

101,0^3 



1.000 

pounds 

91,240 



UBS 

dollars 

44,010 



Per 
pound 

10.43 



80,030 



69,435 



28,768 



.a 



37,656 
42,424 
39,970 



35,914 
33,571 
30,992 



13,617 
15,151 
13,556 



.38 

.45 
.44 



940 

490 

450 

407 

3,833 

2,943 

885 

34,279 

14,767 

19,512 

511 

40,110 



845 

450 

395 

381 

3,321 

2,562 

759 

26,293 



522 
268 
254 
358 
1,139 
873 
316 
11,298 



.62 
.60 
.64 
.94 
.36 
.34 
.42 
.43 



2,965 
37,145 



20,963 



152 
38.493 



189 



15,212 



1.24 
.40 



2,731 
35,762 



21,755 



1,784 

13,428 



15,242 



.38 



.70 



1,632 
19,331 

7,623 



2,430 
19,325 

8,142 



213 
15,029 

5,308 



.09 
.78 
.71 



731 

257 
474 
5,260 
2,009 
3,251 
1,632 

13,340 



652 

178 
474 
5,060 
1,937 
3,123 
2,430 

13,613 



793 

202 

591 

4,802 

2,190 

2,612 

213 

9,434 



1.22 

1.13 

1.25 

.95 

1.13 

.84 

.09 

.69 



1/ Includes statistics on production and sales of rubber tackifiers in order 
to make statistics publishable. 

2/ Includes statistics on production and sales of rubber-processing chemicals 
for other uses. These statistics have been combined in order to prevent the 
disclosure of operations of individual companies. 



70 



duction of acyclic rubber-processing. chemicals rose to 21 million 
pounds in 1945 compared with 19 million in 1944. Sales in 1945 totaled 
22 million pounds, valued at 15 million dollars. 

The production of acyclic dithiocarbamates, which has been 
irregular in recent years, showed an increase of 19 percent in 1945 
over the 1944 output of 612,000 pounds. 

Dodecyl mercaptan was the acyclic rubber-processing chemical pro- 
duced in largest quantity in 1945 (13 million pounds). It was used 
principally as a catalyst for control of the polymerization process in 
manufacturing synthetic rubber. The increasing output of dodecyl 
mercaptan was approximately proportional to the larger output of 
synthetic rubber. 



Elastomers 



Synthetic elastomers =* continued in 1945 to gain in production 
and sales, chiefly because of the mounting production of synthetic 
rubber. Production of synthetic elastomers in 1945 represented 15 
percent of the total production of all finished synthetic organic 
chemicals. Statistics on production and sales are shown in table 
20A. 2/ 

In 1945 production and sales of synthetic elastomers, including 
synthetic rubbers, was 1.9 billion pounds, or 8 percent greater than 
in 1944. Sales totaled 1.8 billion pounds, valued at 360 million 
dollars, in 1945, compared with 1.6 billion pounds, valued at 354 
million dollars, in the previous year. 

Production of the cyclic elastomers, chiefly the poly butadiene- 
styrene (GR-S type) synthetic rubber, totaled 1.62 billion pounds, or 
about 120 million pounds more than the output in 1944 of 1.5 billion 
pounds. In 1945, GR-S type synthetic rubber accounted for about 85 
percent of the total production of all synthetic elastomers. During 
that year this type of elastomer was substituted in varying amounts 
for natural rubber which was in short supply, and accounted for about 
75 percent of the total new rubber consumed by the rubber-manufacturing 
industry. 

Production of acyclic elastomers increased from 257 million pounds 
in 1944 to 284 million in 1945. 

The principal acyclic elastomers for which separate statistics are 
given in the report include polyisobutylene-diolefin (GR-I type) and 
polychloroprene (GR-M type), and polybutadiene-acrylonitrile (GR-A types^ 
The data for the GR-I and GR-M types represent production at Government 
plants only; those far the GR-A types represent production at both 
Government and private plants. 

1/ An elastomer is defined as a material that will stretch repeatedly 
at least 150 percent of its original dimension and will return rapidly 
and with force to its approximate original shape. 

2/ See also table 20B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 



71 

Table 20A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of elastomers (synthetic rubbers), i/ 1945 

(Listed below are all synthetic elastomers for which any reported data on produc- 
tion or sales may be published. Table 20B in part III lists alphabetically all 
those elastomers for which data on production or sales were reported and iden- 
tifies the manufacturer of each) 



Chemical 



Production 



Sales 



2/ 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total- 



1.000 
pounds 

1,90^,096 



1,784,126 



359,979 



Per 
pound 

$0.20 



ELASTOMERS, CYCLIC 



Total- 



1,620,062 



1,500,037 



278,577 



.19 



Polybutadiene-styrene (GR-S types): 
Produced at Government plants 2/— 
Produced at private plants A/ 

Polystyrene-isoprene 5/ 



ELASTOMERS, ACYCLIC 



Total- 



1,615,521 

4,322 

219 



284,034 



1,495,755 
4,114 

213 



284,039 



276, 714 
1,323 

40 



81,402 



.13 
.44 



.18 



.29 



Elastomers for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 3/ 



Elastomers for which separate statistics 
are shown below 



Polybutadiene-acrylonitrile (GR-A types): 

Produced at Government plants 

Produced at private plants 



Polychloroprene (GR-M type sol Neoprene)2/ 
Polyisobutylene-diolefin (GR-I type)5/2/ 
Polyisoprene m 



78,464 
205,570 



73 

17,878 

81,335 
106,234 



75,130 
208,909 



333 
13,277 

81,637 
108,657 

5 



34,301 
47,101 



104 
7,747 

22,408 

16,342 

8/ 



.46 
.23 



.31 
.42 

.27 
.15 
.19 



\/ An elastomer is defined as a material which will stretch repeatedly to 150 
percent or more and will return rapidly and with force to its approximate 
original shape. Synthetic elastomers, include synthetic rubbers. 

2/ Value of sales for some plants operated for the Rubber Reserve Company 
represent the value calculated from the quantity of sales and the average book 
value per pound for 1945 as supplied by the Office of Rubber Reserve, 
Reconstruction Finance Corporation. 

2/ In addition, plant operated for Polymer Corporation, Ltd., a Canadian 
Government corporation, produced 81,319,000 pounds and sold 82,673,000 pounds, 
valued at $15,295,000. 

fj Includes statistics for polystyrene-isoprene, polystyrene, and miscella- 
neous cyclic elastomers. 

$/ Data for Government plant only. 

6/ Includes statistics on some of the plastics materials reported in table 16A 
which have been converted by plasticizers into elastomers, such as polyvinyl 
chloride-acetate copolymer, polyvinyl acetate, and polyvinyl alcohol-aldehyde 
elastomers. Also includes statistics on polyalkylene-sulfide elastomers, poly- 
chloroprene elastomers, polyisobutylene elastomers, polymerized rubber chloride 
and hydrochloride, and silicone elastomers. All these elastomers were produced 
in private plants. 

7/ In addition, plant operated for Polymer Corporation, Ltd., produced 
20,209,000 pounds and sold 20,014,000 pounds, valued at $3,102,000. 

8/ Less than $1,000. 



72 



Production of polyisobutylene-diolefin (GR-I type) elastomers, all 
at Government-owned plants, was 2| times as great in 1945 as ^ 1944 
(106 million pounds compared with 42 million) . Because of its utility 
as a replacement for natural rubber in the manufacture of inner tubes, 
the demand for GR-I type elastomers necessitated allocation} maximum 
production was maintained throughout the year. 

The total output of polychloroprene (GR-M type) elastomers in 1945» 
as reported by the Office of Rubber Reserve, dropped about 25 million 
pounds compared with the 1944 output of 127 million pounds. 

There was very little production (73,000 pounds) of polybutadiene- 
acrylonitrile (GR-A type) elastomers at Government facilities, but 18 
million pounds was produced at private plants. Production of this 
elastomer was reduced drastically during the last half of 1945, result- 
ing primarily from the reduction in military demand. 

Important elastomers for which statistics are not separately shown 
are the polyalkylsne-sulfide elastomers and polymerized rubber chloride 
and hydrochloride. Data are also included but not shown separately 
for certain elastomers made from plastics materials such as polyvinyl 
chloride-acetate copolymer, polyvinyl acetate, and polyvinyl alcohol- 
aldehyde elastomers. 

Surface-Active Agents 



Surface-active agents continued to increase in importance in 1945. 
Output of surface-active agents was 184 million pounds, a 21-percent 
increase over that of 1944. Sales of surface-active agents were 158 
million pounds, valued at 41 million dollars, compared with 135 million 
pounds, valued at 30 million dollars, in the preceding year. 

Table 21A shows production and sales of surface-active agents in 
1945* -i/ Data are reported in terms of bulk surface-active agents, 
that is, in terms of 100-percent content of the surface-active agent, 
exclusive of all ingredients such as inorganic salts and water. 

Surface-active agents include detergents, wetting agents, and 
emulsifying and dispersing agents. Soaps are not included in these 
tabulations. In general, these chemicals contain a hydrophobic— or 
water-insoluble — radical and a hydrophylllc — or water-soluble — radical 
which enable them to be partly soluble in both aqueous and nonaqueous 
mediums. This property alters the interfacial tension between these 
two mediums, thereby improving their mi3cibility. Depending on the 
chemical activity of the molecule, surface-active agents may be divided 
into three groups: Anion-actJve, such as sulfonated oils) cation- 
active, such as quaternary ammonium compounds; and nonionic, such as 
polyhydric alcohol esters and ethers. Selection of the proper radicals 
or chemical groups results in products that are active in a variety of 
mixtures in which soaps would be quite ineffective. Special uses for 
surface-active agents include household and industrial cleansers, sham- 
poos, dyeing assistants, prepared textile specialties, and dentifrices. 
They are also used to improve the blending of other chemical products. 



1/ See also table 21B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 



73 



Table 21A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of surface-active agents, 1945 

(Listed below are all surface-active agents for which any reported data on 
production or sales may be published. Table 21B in part III lists 
alphabetically all those chemicals for which data on production or sales 
were reported and identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Chemical 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 






Grand total 

SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, CYCLIC 
Total 

Chemicals for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 1/ 

Chemicals for which separate statistics 
are shown below — — — p -»- — — — 

Quaternary ammonium compounds, total 

Lauryldimethylbenzylammonium chloride 

Sulfated and sulfonated surface-active 
agents: 
Naphthalene derivatives, sulfonated, 

total ■ 

Amylnaphthalenesulfonic acid and 

Monoisopropylnaphthalenesulfonic 
acid -and salt 

Petroleum sulfonates 

SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, ACYCLIC 

Total 

Chemicals for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 2/ 

Chemicals for which separate statistics 
are shown below 

Nitrogen-containing surface-active 
agents: 

Amide surface-active agents, total 

N-( Aminos thyl)-N-(hydroxyethyl) 
oleamide (Oleamide of aminoethyl- 

e thanolamine) — — — 

N-(Aminoethyl)-N-(hydroxyethyl) 
stearamide (Stearamide of amino- 

ethyle thanolamine) 

N- ( 2-Hy droxye thyl ) lauramide 

(Ethanol lauramide) 

All other 

Amine salts of fatty acids 

Salts of fatty acids 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1.000 

pounds 

184, 442 



76,754 



U, 717 

35,037 

3,023 



872 
2,156 



8,306 

300 

474 

7,532 

23,703 



107,633 



28,767 
78,921 

1,757 
132 



i/ 

195 

1,430 

228 

415 



1.000 
pounds 

157,530 



1.000 
dollars 



40,599 



63,880 



14,158 



41,629 

22,251 

2,336 



8,154 
6,004 
3,019 



859 
2,027 



8,472 

300 

465 

7,707 

10,893 



93,650 



1,322 
1,697 



1,578 

89 

144 
1,345 
1,407 



26,441 



28,327 
66,323 

1,120 

2/ 

110 

194 
816 
147 

415 



8,196 
18,245 

603 

2/ 



59 

47 

497 

61 

91 



Per 
pound 

$0.26 



,22 



.20 
.27 



1.05 



1.54 
.84 



.19 

.30 

.31 
.17 
.13 

.28 



.31 
.27 

.54 
If 

.54 

.24 
.61 

.41 

.22 



74 



Table 21A.- 



Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales 
of sur face-active agents, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



1.000 
pounds 



SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, ACXCLIC— Con 

Sulfated and sulfonated surface- 
active agents: 
Acids, sulfated and sulfonated, 

total 

Oleic acid, sulfonated 

(Sulfonated red oil) ~ 

All other 

Amides, sulfated and sulfonated, 

total 

Lauroyl taurine (Ethanol- 

lauramide sulfate), potassium 

and sodium salts 

All other 

Esters, sulfated and sulfonated 

Oils, fats, and waxes, sulfated 

and sulfonated, total 

Castor oil, sulfonated 

Corn oil, sulfonated 

Fish and marine-mammal oils, 
sulfonated, total- 



Cod oil, sulfona ted- 
All other 



Neat' s-foot oil, sulfonated- 

Peanut oil, sulfonated 

Soybean oil, sulfonated 

Tallow, sulfonated 

All other 



Petroleum sulfonates- 



2,250 

1,317 
933 

9,021 



600 

8,421 

10,972 



43,200 

15,000 

900 



14,000 

2,500 

11,500 

2,300 
2,300 
1,000 
5,500 
1,700 

11,078 



1.000 
pounds 



2,763 

1,606 
1,157 

8,501 



600 
7,901 
9,302 



34,900 

12,000 

700 



11,500 
2,000 
9,500 

2,300 
2,200 
800 
4,000 
1,400 

9,675 



1.000 
dollars 



530 

326 
204 

2,435 



320 
2,115 
8,314 



4,400 

1,800 

120 



1,170 
220 
950 

300 
350 
120 
400 
140 

1,311 



Per 
pound 



$0.19 



.20 
.18 

.29 



.53 
.27 
.95 



.13 
.15 
.17 



.10 
.11 
.10 

.13 
.16 
.15 
.10 
.10 

.14 



1/ Includes polyhydric alcohol esters and ethers, and sulfonated benzene and 
biphenyl derivatives. 

2/ Includes nitrogen-containing compounds other than amides and amine salts 
of fatty acids; polyhydric alcohol esters and ethers; and sulfated and 
sulfonated alcohols. 

2/ Included in "All other" amide surface-active agents. 



75 



Production of cyclic surface-active agents in 1945 "as 77 million 
pounds, an increase of 3 percent over that in 1944. Sales were 64 mil- 
lion pounds, valued at 14 million dollars. The most important group 
of cyclic surface-active agents, in terms of quantity, was the petro- 
leum sulfonates. Production of 24 million pounds was slightly less 
than that reported in 1944, partly owing to the reclassification of 
certain of these products as acyclic. Sales of 11 million pounds were 
valued at 1 million dollars. Quaternary ammonium compounds, which are 
effective germicides, had the highest average unit value of sales of 
any surface-active agents, amounting to fl.05 per pound. 

Output of acyclic surface-active agents totaled 108 million pounds, 
a 37-percent increase over that of 1944* Sales were 94 million pounds, 
valued at 26 million dollars, compared with 64 million pounds, valued 
at 18 million dollars, in the preceding year. The increase was due to 
a more complete coverage of producers of sulfonated fats and oils rather 
than to a larger output by those who reported data for both 1944 and 
1945. Production was limited by the available supply of fats and oils 
which are the raw materials for most of the acyclic surface-active 
agents as well as for soaps. The acyclic fatty acids obtained from 
these fats and oils may be hydrogenated, re-esterified, sulfonated, or 
converted to amides and other products. Sulfated and sulfonated fats 
and oils, the oldest type of acyclic surface-active agents, are pro- 
duced not only by firms primarily sulfating and sulfonating fats and 
oils, but also by firms producing a wide variety of synthetic organic 
chemicals. Output of this group in 1945 is estimated at 43 million 
pounds. Sales are estimated at 35 million pounds, valued at over 4 
million dollars. Production of sulfated and sulfonated esters amounted 
to 11 million pounds; sales of 9 million pounds were valued at 9 mil- 
lion dollars. Important acyclic surface-active agents for which data 
may not be published include nitrogen-containing compounds other than 
amides and amine salts of fatty acids; polyhydric alcohol esters and 
ethers; and sulfated and sulfonated alcohols. 



Plasticizers 



Plasticizers are relatively inert liquids having high boiling 
points or solids having low melting points which may be added to plas- 
tics materials to impart special properties such as workability, flex- 
ibility, or elasticity. Table 22A shows production and sales of plas- 
ticizers in 1945. y 

Production of plasticizers declined to 170 million pounds in 1945, 
a decrease of 9 percent from that of 1944. Sales of plasticizers were 
139 million pounds, valued at 34 million dollars, compared with 172 
million pounds, valued at 39 million dollars, in the preceding year. 

The output of cyclic plasticizers was 139 million pounds, or 21 
million less than in 1944. Sales of 121 million pounds amounted to 
27 million dollars, compared with sales of 153 million pounds, amount- 
ing to 32 million dollars, in 1944. The greatest declines in produc- 
tion of Individual plasticizers were those of tricresyl phosphate and 
dimethyl phthalate owing to lessening demands for military purposes and 

1/ See also table 22B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 

747685 O - 47 - 6 



76 



Table 22a.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of 

plasticiiers, 1945 

(Listed below are all plasticizers for which any reported data on production or 
Bales may be published. (Leaders are used where the reported data are 
confidential and may not be published or where no data were reported.) 
Table 22B in part III lists alphabetically all those plasticiters for which 
data on production or sales were reported and identifies the manufacturer of 
each) 



Chemical 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



Grand total- 



PLASTICIZERS, CYCLIC 
Total 



Chemicals for which separate 
statistics may not be shown- 

Chemlcals for which separate 
statistics are shown below- 



Phosphoric acid esters: 
phosphate- 



Tricresyl 



Phthalic acid or anhydride esters, 
total 



Dibutyl phthalate 
Diethyl phthalate — 
Dimethyl phthalate 1/- 
All other 



PLASTICIZERS, ACICLIC 
Total- 
Chemicals for which separate 

statistics may not be shown—-— — — 
Chemicals for which separate 
statistics are shown below- 



Azelaic acid esters- 
Citric acid esterst 
Laurie acid esters- 
Oleic acid esters- 



Triethyl citrate- 



Phosphoric acid esters 

Sebacic acid esterst Dibutyl sebacate- 



Stearic acid esters, total- 



Butyl stearate- 
Glyceryl monostearate- 
All other- 



1.000 
pounds 

170,225 



138,702 



26,^58 
112, 2U 

13,552 
98,692 



45,662 

9,700 

18,822 

24,508 



31,523 



15,170 
16,353 

37 

539 

1,009 

3,290 

2,160 
5,853 

3,465 



832 
1,351 
1,282 



1.000 
pounds 

138,952 



1.000 



33,885 



121,035 



26,843 



20,675 
100,360 

13,977 
86,383 



5,256 
21,587 

3,398 
18,139 



U, 507 

8,665 

16,724 

19,437 



17,917 



8,387 
1,638 
2,602 
5,562 



7,042 



7,142 

10,775 

31 



2,414 

4,628 

17 



936 

956 

1,675 

4,398 

2,779 



354 

339 

739 

2,199 

980 



659 

919 

1,201 



196 

419 
365 



Pex 
pound 

♦0.24 



.22 



.25 

.22 

.24 
.21 



.20 
.19 
.16 
.29 



.39 



.34 
.43 
.55 



.3S 
.35 

.44 
.50 

.35 



.30 
.45 
.30 



\J Includes dimethyl phthalate for use as an insect repellent. 



77 



scarcity of raw materials. Production of tricresyl phosphate was 14 
million pounds, a 36-percent decrease from that of 1944; production of 
dimethyl phthalate, which is used as an insect repellent as well as a 
plasticizer, was 19 million pounds, a 56-percent decrease from that of 
1944* The most important plasticizer was dibutyl phthalate, with a 
production of 46 million pounds and sales of 42 million pounds, valued 
at 8 million dollars. Dibutyl phthalate was used principally to plas- 
ticize smokeless powder. 

Acyclic plasticizers increased slightly in output but not enough 
to balance the decrease in the cyclic group. The output of acyclic 
plasticizers was 32 million pounds in 1945, or 19 percent more than in 
1944. Sales totaled 18 million pounds, valued at 7 million dollars. 
The most important acyclic plasticizer was dibutyl sebacate, of which 
6 million pounds was produced and 4 million pounds, valued at 2 million 
dollars, was sold. 



Miscellaneous Synthetic Organic Chemicals 



Miscellaneous synthetic organic chemicals consist of acyclic inter- 
mediates and finished acyclic and cyclic products not included in any 
of the previous use groups. 1/ Among these are chemicals such as sol- 
vents, refrigerants, flotation reagents, tanning materials, insecti- 
cides, plant hormones, photographic chemicals, and others. Table 23A 
shows production and sales of miscellaneous chemicals in 1945. £/ 

Production totaled slightly less than 9 billion pounds in 1945, a 
decrease of 6 percent from that of 1944, partly owing to a decrease in 
production of butadiene from ethyl alcohol, a decline in output of 
nalogenated hydrocarbons, and reclassification of certain miscellaneous 
chemicals. Sales of miscellaneous chtaicale were slightly less than 
5 billion pounds, valued at 661 million dollars. 

Cyclic organic chemicals accounted for less than 2 percent of the 
total production of miscellaneous chemicals in 1945. This small pro- 
portion is due to the fact that cyclic intermediates are grouped sep- 
arately (tables 7A and 7B) whereas acyclic intermediates are less 
clearly defined, many of them being used also as solvents. Output of 
miscellaneous cyclic chemicals totaled 147 million pounds; sales of 
134 million pounds were valued at 51 million dollars. The most impor- 
tant miscellaneous cyclic chemical was the new insecticide DDT, pro- 
duction of which reached 33 million pounds, or more than triple the 
production reported for 1944; sales of 32 million pounds were valued 
at 17 million dollars. 

Production of miscellaneous acyclic chemicals totaled 8.8 billion 
pounds, a 6-percent decrease from 1944. Sales were 4.8 billion pounds, 
valued at 610 million dollars, compared with 5.5 billion pounds, valued 
at 848 million dollars, in the preceding year. 

1/ At present, there is no generally accepted classification of acy- 
clic intermediates. In these annual reports acyclic intermediates are 
grouped with acyclic finished products. 

2/ See also table 23B, part III, for an alphabetical list of these 
products in which the manufacturers are identified. 



78 



Table 23A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of 
miscellar oous chemicals, 1945 

(Listed below are all miscellaneous chemicals for which any reported data on pro- 
duction or sales may be published. (Leaders are used where the reported data 
are confidential and may not be published or where no data were reported.) 
Table 23B in part III lists alphabetically all those chemicals for which data 
on production or sales were reported and identifies the manufacturer of each) 



Product 



Grand total- 



MISCELLAHEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC 
To tal 



Chemicals for which separate statistics 

nay not be shown 
Chemicals for which separate statistics 

are shown below 

Benzoic acid salts.: Sodium benzoate — 

Benzyl benzoate, mitocide grade i/ • 

Biological stains- 



Chemical indicator s ' 

Chemical reagents 

Cyclopropane : 

flotation reagents 

Hexamethylentetramine, tech. — 
Insecticides, synthetic, total- 



4,4 , -Dichlorodiphenyl-l,l,l-tri- 

chloroethane (DDT) — 

Phenothiazine 

Phenyl mercuric derivatives- 
Photographic chemicals: 
Benzotriazole- 



Hydroquinone (Hydroquinol) 

p-lle thy lamino phenol sulfate (Metol) 

(Rhodol) 

Plant hormones: 

2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid 

(2,4-D) 

Naph thai eneace tic acid 

Rosin acid salts 



Tanning materials, synthetic- 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC 



Total- 



Chemicals for which separate statistics 
may not be shown 



Chemicals for which separate statistics 
are shown below 



Acetaldehyde 

Acetic acid, synthetic (100%) — 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Production 

1.000 
pounds 

8,969,699 



146,773 



63,397 

83,376 

3,304 

1,182 

14 

4 

39 

42 

2,739 

11,430 

42,963 



33,243 

3,855 

5,865 

683 

4 
2,376 

504 



917 

33 

308 

16,834 



8,822,926 



2,692,934 
6,129,992 



267,518 



Sales 



Quantity 1 Value 



1.000 
pounds 

4,983,130 



133,781 



67,505 

66,276 

3,277 
1,058 

18 

4 

20 

37 



40,870 



31,595 

3,397 

5,878 

693 

4 
2,348 

576 



631 

436 
16,304 



4,849,349 



1,596,254 

3,253,095 

10,471 
97,558 



1*000. 
dollars 



660,810 



50,954 



20,313 

30,636 

1,000 

1,070 

171 

82 

84 

346 



21,903 



17,047 

1,479 

3,377 

997 

39 

1,453 

1,248 



631 

61 

1,551 



609,856 



270,834 
339,022 

774 

7,088 



Unit value 



Per 
pound 

$0.13 



.38 



.30 
.46 

.31 

1.01 
9.50 
20.50 
4.20 
9.35 



.54 



• 54 

.44 

.57 

1.44 

9.75 
.62 

2.17 



1.00 

.14 
.10 



.13 



.17 
.10 



.07 
.07 



79 



Table 23A.- Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of 
miscellaneous chemicals, 194-5 — Continued 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEKICALS, ACYCLIC— Con. 



Acetic acid salts, total- 



Aluminum acetate- 



All other 

Acetic anhydride, from all sources- 
Acetin: Tri 

Acetone: 

By fermentation 

Prom isopropyl alcohol 

Amine s- 



Amyl acetates 

Amyl alcohols, total- 



Fusel oil, crude and refined 

All other, refined -~. 

1,3-Butadiene, grade for rubber & 

Butyl acetate: Normal (90?) 

Butyl alcohols, total 

Primary: Normal (n-Propylcarbinol) 
(100$) 

All other 

Carbon disulfide 

Cellulose derivatives — 



Chloral (Trichloroacetaldehyde)— 
Diethyl malonate (Malonic ester)- 

Ethyl acetate (85?) 

Ethylene glycol 

Ethyl ether, all grades- 



Ethyl formate 

Ethyl monochloroacetate 

Ethyl oxalate (Diethyl oxalate) 

FatB and oils and fatty acids, 
chemically modified 



Fatty acid esters, not included with 

plasticizers - 

Flotation reagents 2/ 

Formaldehyde (37? HCHO by weight) 

Formic acid salts, total 

Aluminum formate 

Sodium formate, refined 

All other —. 

Gases (poisonous, tear, etc.) t* 

Halogenated hydrocarbons, total 



Butyl bromide: Normal 

Carbon tetrachloride 

Chloroform, tech. and U.5.P.- 

Chloro paraffin 

Ethyl bromide 

Methyl bromide 

Methyl chloride (Chlorome thane) , 

crude and refined ■ 

All other- 



See footnotes at end of table. 



14,885 



1.000 
pounds 



12,724 



1.000 



1,186 



Per 
pound 



$0.09 



990 

13,395 

524,748 

4,794 

42,417 
307,363 
26,203 
15,589 
13,773 



5,056 
42,498 



7,282 

12,036 

7,865 



1,405 

2,962 

3,757 
1,850 
1,111 



.28 

.07 

.52 
.15 

.H 



11,407 

2,366 

467,606 

67,461 
224,741 



6,227 

1,638 

471,496 

65,323 

143,290 



891 

220 

104,672 

9,684 

20,296 



.14 
.13 
.22 
.15 
.U 



129,364 

95,377 

335,056 

363,335 

3,116 

514 

105,314 

205,087 

76,598 

429 

23 

573 

35,053 

1,985 

18,956 

423,689 

5,461 



97,635 

45,605 

330,628 

113,086 



2,6^7 

15 

2,799 

2,625 

1>.?23,606_ 



6 

192,826 

9,216 

49,890 

403 

1,491 

29,702 
1,240,072 



300 
93,123 

48,897 

420 

15 



37,348 

1,658 

16,912 

282,051 

5,602 



2,637 

12 

2,953 

2,613 

756,365 



183,555 

8,716 

47,459 



16,341 

3,955 

12,296 

28,371 



171 
9,412 



4,810 

107 

17 



6,126 

654 

3,241 

9,228 

587 



233 
16 

338 

887 

66,878 



1,529 

27, 592 
487, 514 



7,497 
1,535 

4,807 

6L4 

4,234 
48,191 



.17 
.09 
.04 
.26 



.57 
.10 



.10 

.25 
1.13 



.16 

.39 
.19 
.03 
.10 



.09 
l.33 
.11 
.34 

.09 



.04 
.18 
.10 

.40 

.15 
.10 



80 



Table 23A. 



Synthetic organic chemicals: United States production and sales of 
miscellaneous chemicals, 1945 — Continued 



Product 



Production 



Sales 



Quantity 



Value 



Unit value 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Con. 

Isopropyl alcohol 

Lactic acid, total 



Technical 

Edible and medicinal 

Lactic acid salts: 

Sodium lactate 

Linoleic acid salts 

Maleic acid and anhydride- 

Methanol, synthetic 

Oxalic acid 

Oxalic acid salts: 

Ammonium oxalate 

Pent&erythritol 

Stearic acid salts, total- 



Aluminum stearate, di — 
Aluminum stearate, mono and tri — 

Calcium stearate 

Magnesium stearate 

Zinc stearate 

All other 

Thiogly colic acid and salts, total- 



Ammonium thioglycolate- 
All other 



1.000 
pounds 



490,997 
8,139 



1 P 000 

pounds 



272,104 
7,629 



1.000 

dollars 



13,320 
1,670 



3,467 
4,672 

143 
2,256 



493,110 
20,095 



13,224 
22,196 



3,207 
4,422 

124 

2,207 

7,759 

344,911 

20,054 



11,387 
22,009 



503 
1,167 

30 

388 

1,959 

11,689 

2,067 

4 
3,355 
5,696 



5,189 
4,098 
2,144 

730 
8,957 
1,078 

314 



267 
47 



5,178 
4,131 
1,969 

770 
8,881 
1,080 

286 



1,204 
955 
512 
190 

2,583 
252 
774 



266 
20 



709 
65 



Per 
pound 



10.05 
.22 



.16 
.26 

.24 
.18 
.25 
.03 
.10 

.50 
.29 
.26 



.23 
.23 
.26 
.25 
•29 
.23 
2.71 



2.67 
3.25 



1/ Total production of benzyl benzoate was 2,065,000 pounds with sales of 
1,490,000 pounds, valued at $1,497,000. Benzyl benzoate used as a pharma- 
ceutical is reported in table 14A and that used as a perfume material in table 15A. 

2/ Data shown refer to butadiene produced from alcohol. Total production 
of butadiene was 1,247,419,000 pounds; sales and transfers were 1,241,910,000 
pounds, valued at $266,706,000. Data for butadiene produced from petroleum 
are given in table 5A. 

2/ Includes fatty amine esters, quaternary ammonium compounds, dithiophosphateB, 
and xanthates. 

jj Includes carbonyl chloride, chloropicrin, and cyanogen chloride. 



81 



Production of butadiene from ethyl alcohol decreased from 724 mil- 
lion pounds in 1944 to 468 million in 1945, but production from petro- 
leum (see table 5A) increased from 439 million pounds in 1944 to 730 
million in 1945 so that the total production increased slightly. Data 
on production of ethylene from ethyl alcohol are included with data for 
ethylene from petroleum in table 5A. 

Halogenated hydrocarbons (bromides, chlorides, fluorides, and 
iodides) accounted for about one-sixth of the total production of mis- 
cellaneous acyclic organic chemicals. The output in 1945 of this sub- 
group of chemicals totaled 1.5 billion pounds; sales of 756 million 
pounds were valued at 67 million dollars. In 1944 the output of the 
same group was over 1.3 billion pounds. Important products in this 
group of solvents, refrigerants, and intermediates are carbon tetra- 
chloride, ethyl chloride, sym-tetrachloroethane (acetylene tetrachlor- 
ide), and trichloroethylene. 

Chemicals important to the* rayon industry are acetic anhydride (pro- 
duction, 525 million pounds), acetone (350 million pounds), and carbon 
disulfide (335 million pounds). Other chemicals produced in large 
volume were formaldehyde, an important intermediate in the manufacture 
of tar acid resins, and isopropyl alcohol, an important solvent and 
intermediate; production of these two chemicals totaled 424 million 
pounds and 491 million pounds, respectively. Important chemicals for 
which production statistics may not be published are synthetic ethyl 
alcohol ±/ and tetraethyl lead. 



1/ Statistics on the production of ethyl alcohol from natural sources 
by fermentation are not included in this report. They are, however, 
issued monthly and annually by the Alcohol Tax Unit, Bureau of Internal 
Revenue, 0. S. Treasury Department. 



83 



PART III. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF INDIVIDUAL PRODUCTS, 
BI GROUPS, AND MANUFACTURERS 



Part III of this report consists of a series of tables which supplement the 
statistical information given in parts I and II, and & Directory of Manufacturers 
(table 24) . Tables which include the letter 8 as part of the table heading are 
supplemental to the tables in part I or part II which are followed by the letter 
A; for example, table 8B in part III supplements table 8A in part II. 

Each tabl6 in part III lists alphabetically the individual items in each 
group for which data on production or sales were reported for 1945. In addi- 
tion, manufacturers of each product are designated by an identifying number given 
in the Directory of Manufacturers, except for a few companies which have specifi- 
cally requested the Tariff Commission to withhold such information on certain 
items. The latter manufacturers are indicated only by the letter X. 1/ 

Tar Crudes 

Table 4.B.- Organic chemicals: Tar crudes for which United States production or 
sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Tar crudes for which separate statistics are given in table A are marked below 
with an asterisk (*) ; products not so marked do not appear in table A 
because the reported data are confidential and may not be published. Manu- 
facturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in 
table 24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the 
publication of his identification number with the designated product) 



Product 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



♦Tar i/- 



*Crude light oil 



Light oil distillates: 

♦Benzene, except motor benzene 

♦Motor benzene 

Toluene: 2/ 
♦All grades, except aviation grade- 



* Aviation grade- 
See footnotes at end of table. 



7,31,32,55,56,58,60,62,73,85, 
86,87,109,110,111 ,112,123, 
124,150,162,170,171,172,199, 
209,212,220,228,240,241,247, 
261,275,287,288,294,317,323, 
330, 334,338,339, 340,341,345, 
353,374,376,378,379,381,382, 
386,387,393,399,400,401,406, 
407,415,430,432,437,439,440, 
450,452,475,476,481,507,508, 
515,538,545,550,562,563,564, 
565, 570,^. 

32, 55, 60, 62, 69, ?6, 110,111, 119, 
123,150,162,172,209,212,223, 
247,338,378,387,406,415,430, 
436,538. 

42,70,132,265, 513, 5U. 
42,399,452,513. 

42,70,114,131,132,200,224,265, 
295,325,351,364,399,408,452, 
461,462,466,487,489, 513, 5U, 
522,534. 

114,132,295,364,487,489. 



y An asterisk (*) preceding the name of an item in the tables in part III 
indicates that separate statistics are given for these items in tables in part I 
or part II. 



84 



Table 4B-- Organic chemicals: Tar crudes for which United States production or 
sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Light oil distillates— Continued 
*6olvent naphtha 

*A11 other 

^Naphthalene, crude (solidifying less than 79° C.) 



Anthracene, crude (less than 30$) 

Cresylic acid, crude (less than 15%) < 

Pyridine, crude and refined 

*Creosote oil — 



♦Crude tar acids — — — — -- — — — 

♦Coal tar sold or consumed in coal-tar solution- 
♦Tars, crude 



♦Tars, refined- 
♦Tars, road 



*Other di6tillates- 

♦Pitch of tar 

♦Pitch of tar coke 



42,70,264,337,375,399,424,452, 

513. 
42,70,265,399,452,513. 
42,111,112,337,351,375,514. 
42,119,237,264,280,337,375,399, 

420,436,452,513. 
264. 

42,420,424. 
42. 

42,420. 
17,42,69,70,117,119,143,223,237, 

246,264,275,280,321,399,420, 

424,436,X,X. 
17,42,70,117,143, 223, 237,246, 

264,280,321,337,420,424,436, 

X,X. 
42,143, 264,280,321,X. 
31,32,42,110,119,264,399,420, 

508. 
17,42,264,280,399,406,420,424, 

436,X. 
17,32,42,110,143,223,237,246, 

264,280,321,399,406,420,424, 

436,439,481,564,X. 

42, 69,117,223,246,264,280,337, 

420,424. 
17,42,69,117,119,143, 223,237, 

246,264,275,280,321,399,406, 

420,424,436,X. 
17,42,143,246,264,280,321,399, 

420,424,X. 



1/ Only those manufacturers are identified by number who report production of 
oil-gas and water-gas tar to the U.S. Tariff Commission. For production and 
consumption, see t*bie 2. 

2/ Includes producers of toluene from petroleum. 



Crude Products From Petroleum and Natural Gae 



Table 5B.- Organic chemicals: Crude products from petroleum and natural gas 

for chemical conversion for which United States production or sales were 

reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Crude products from petroleum and natural gas for chemical conversion for which 
separate statistics are given in table 5A are marked below with an asterisk (*); 
products not so marked do not appear in table 5A because the reported data are 
confidential and may not be published. Manufacturers are identified by 
numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in table 24. An X signifies that the 
manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his identification number 
with the designated product) 



Product 



Manufacturers' 



identification numbers (according 
to list in table 24) 



Aromatics and naphthenes: 

Cresylic acid, crude 

♦Naphthenic acid: 

*Acid number less than 200— 
*Acid number greater than 
200. 

♦Xylene, all grades 

All other 

Aliphatic hydrocarbons: 
Ci hydrocarbon: Methane — 
C2 hydrocarbons: 

E thane -. 

♦Ethylene 1/ 

♦03 hydrocarbons: 

Propane — 

Propylene 

C4 hydrocarbons: 
*1,3-Butadiene, grade for 

rubber. 
♦Butadiene-butylene 
fraction. 

*n-Butane 

Butanes, mixed — — — 

*1-Butene and 2-butene, 
mixture. 

Isobutane— — ~ 

*I sobu tylene 

C5 hydrocarbons: 

Amylene6, mixed 

Isopentane 

I soprene 

n-Pentane 

Pentanes, mixed 

Pentene-1 

Pen tene-2 — — ■ — 

C7 hydrocarbons: iBoheptene- 

Di-isobutylene — - — 

Methyl mercaptan (Methanethiol] 

Polybutene 

All other 



295,461,462,487,489. 

200,487,491, 500, 514, 522,X. 
487,490,491,1. 

224,364,408,487,489. 
477. 

4 76. 

76. 
76,131,132,325,491. 



76,388,408,500. 
76,131,388,491. 

76,97,131,224,336,388,389,459,460,467,488,491, 

501. 
283,477,511. 

76,388,408,461,500. 
29. 
225,388,408,491, 514. 

76,408,500. 
224,388,408,491. 

456. 
500. 
491. 
388. 
408. 
388. 
388. 
388. 
490. 
522. 
487. 
489. 



1/ Numbers for ethylene from alcohol and ether given in table 23B, p. 184. 



86 



Intermediates 

Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Cyclic intermediates for which separate statistics are given in table 7A are 
marked below with an asterisk (*); cyclic intermediates not so marked do not 
appear in table 7A because the reported data are confidential and may not be 
published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical li6t 
appearing in table 21*. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent 
to the publication of his identification number with the designated product) 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Abietic acid 

Acenaphthylene (Acenaphthene) 

5-Acetaaidc— 2-aminobenzenesulfonic acid 

5-Acetamido-8-amino-2 and 3-naphthalene sulfonic 

acid (Acetylamino Cleve's acid). 
2-A c e tamido-3-chloroanthraquinone- 



2-Ace tamido-3-chloro-9 , 10-dihydro-9 , 10-an thra- 
diol-9,10-disulfonic acid, diethyl ester. 

1-Ace tamido-7-naphthol 

5-AcetejEidosalicylic acid 

♦Ace tanilide, tech. 



o-Acetaniside (Acetyl-o-enisidine)- 
p-Acetaniside (Acetyl-p-anisidine)- 
Acetate leuco violet (l,4-Diamino-2,3-dihydro- 

anthraquinone) • 
Ace toac e tanilide 



o-Ace toace taniside 

Ace toac e to-1-naph thylamide- 

o— Ace toace to toluide 

c— Ace to toluide 

♦p-A c e to toluide- 



p-Acetphenetlide 

*H-Acetylsulfanilyl chloride (p-Acetamidobenzene- 
sulfonyl chloride). 

Acrid ine 

m-Aninoace tanilide 

♦p-Arainoacetanilide- 



5-Amino-2-anilinobenzenesulfonic acid 

6-(p-Aminoanilino)metanilic acid (Phenylene Nerol 
acid) . 
*2- ( p-Aminoanilino ) -5-ni troben zenesul f onic acid — 

*l-Aminoanthraquinone and salt 

*2-Aminoanthraquinone and salt 

l-Aminoanthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid 

4-Aminoantipyrine (Aminopyrazolone) 



*6-Amino-3,4 , -azobi6(benzenesulfonic acid) — 

8-Amino-l , 2-benzacridin-7( 12) -one 

p-Aminobenzaldehyde 

1-Amino- 5-ben zamidoan thraqu inone- 



*6-(m-Aminobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid 

(m-Aminobenzoyl J acid) . 

•6-(p-Aminobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid 
(p-Aminobenzoyl J acid). 

2-Amino-p-benzenedisulfonic acid 

4-Amino-m-benzenedisul fonic acid 

J-Aminobenzenesulfonanillde 

p-Aminobenzoic acid 

m-Aminobenzoyl-Bi-phenylenediaiiiine- 



l-Amino-4-bromo-2-anthraquinonesul fonic acid 

(Bromamine acid) . 
l-Amino-2-bromo-4- ( p-toluino ) anthraquinone 



513. 

264,420. 
184. 
136. 

184. 
184. 

184,331. 

1. 

95,131,136,184, 324yfc64^. 

217. 

217. 

184. 

76,523 

523. 

384. 

76,523. 

331. 

70,217,464. 

217. 

70,315,324,464. 

136,331. 

184. 

95,136,184,331. 

95,184,331. 

136. 

12,89,95,184,384. 

12,70,136,184,310,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

184,331. 

28. 

12,89,184,331. 

136. 

184. 

184. 

12,136,331,384. 

8,12,89,136,331,384. 

95,136,384. 

331. 

184. 

136,144,454. 

331. 

136,184,331. 

136,331. 



87 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945— Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



p-Amino-N- ( n-butyl ) phenol 

2-Amino-4-chloroace tanilide- 



l-Amino-5-chloroan thraquinone — 
l-Amino-5-chloroanthraquinone and l-amino-8- 
chloroanthraquinone (mixture). 

2-Amino-3-chloroan thraquinone 

*2-Amino-5-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid- 
*y~ku.- no-6-chlorobenzoic acid ( 5-Amino-2-chloro— 
benzoic acid). 

c— ( 3-Amino-4-chloroben zoyl ) ben zoic acid 

Aninochlorodiphenyl ether 

2-Amino-4-chloro-5-nitro phenol 

2-Amino-6-chloro-4-nitro phenol 

2-Amino-4-chlorophenol 

2-Amino-4-chloro-l-phenol-6-sul fonic acid 

*2-Amino-5-chloro-p-toluenesulfonic acid (Lake red 
C amine) . 
6- Amino-4-chloro-*- toluene sul fonic acid 

2-Amino-p-cresol 

*l-Aainc~2,4-dibromo an thraquinone 

2-ABino-l,3-dibromoanthraquinone 
3-Amino-5-(4,5-dihydro-3-«iethyl-5-oxopyrazolyl)- 
p-toluenesul fonic acid. 

4-Amino- 2» , 5 • -dime thoxyben zanilide 

U- Amino-2 ' , 5 ' -dime thoxyben zoni trile 

5-Amino-6-ethoxy-2-naphthalen.-;sulfonic acid 

3-Aminc—2-hydroxy an thraquinone 

3— Aminc—4-hydroxybenzenearsonic acid 

3-Amino-6-hydroxy-2-metbylphenazine (Tolazine 
base.) 

8-Amino-6-»ethoxyqulnoline (Am I chin) 

4-Amino-N-me thylace tanilide- 

4 • -Amino-6 • -me thylben zaniside 

3-Amino-7-methyl-2-phenazinol- 

4 * -Amino-5 * -me thyl-p-toluenesul fon-o-aniside 

2-Amino-l,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

*3-Amino-l,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

*3-Aminc—2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

4-Amino-l,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

4-Amino-l,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

*6-Amino-l,3-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

*7-Amino-l,3-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (Amino G 

acid) . 

*8-Amino-l,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

l-Amino-2-naphthalenesul fonic acid (c—Naphthionic 
acid) . 

*2-Aminc— 1-naphthalcnesul fonic acid (Tobias acid)- 
*5— Aminc—1-naphthalenesul fonic acid (Laurent* 6 

acid). 
*5-Aminc— 2-naphthalenesul fonic acid 



*5- and 8-Amino-2-naphthalenesul fonic acids 
(Cleve's acid). 
6-Aminc—l-naphthalenesul fonic acid- 



*6-Amino-2-naphthalenesul fonic acid (Broenner's 
acid) . 
8-Aminc— 1-naphthalenesul fonic acid- 
*8-Amino-2-naphthal6ne6ul fonic acid- 



7-Amlno-l , 3 , 6-naph thalenetrisul fonic >acid— 
8-Anino-l, 3, 5-naph thalenetrisul fonic acid— 



136. 
184. 
331. 
331. 

184. 

12,52,136,184. 

95,136,184,331. 

184. 

384. 

184. 

184. 

95. 

89,95,184,331. 

52,70,219,464,492. 

136,217. 

95. 

136,184,331. 

136. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

1,561. 

331. 

561. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

52,217. 

136,184,304,331. 

89,95,331. 

136,331. 

331. 

95,136,184,331. 

12,95,136,184,331,464- 

95,136,184,331. 
8,136. 

19,70,95,217,464,492. 
70,89,95,136,331. 

95,136,331. 
70,95,136,184,331,384. 

136,184. 
19,95,331,464. 

89,136,331. 
95,136,184. 
331. 
184. 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



*8-Aminc— 1,3,6-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid 

8-Amino-l-naphthoic acid — - ■ --■ 

5-Amino-l-naphthol 

8-Amino-2-naphthol 

8-Amino-l-naphthol-3, 5-disulfonic acid 

*8-Amlno-l-naphthol-5,7-disulfonic acid, mono- 
sodium salt (Chicago acid). 
7-Amino-l-naphthol-3,6-disul fonic acid, mono- 
sodium salt (2R acid). 
*8-Amino-l-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid, mono- 
sodium salt (H acid). 

*l-Amino-2-naphthol-4-sul fonic acid 

6-Amino-2-naphthol-4-sul fonic acid 

*6-Aminc— l-naphthol-3-sul fonic acid, sodium salt 

(J acid). 
*7-Amino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid, sodium salt 
(Gamma acid). 
8- Amino-1-naphthol- 5- sulfonic acid, sodium salt 

(S acid). 
3-Amlno-5-(m-nitrobenzamido)-p-toluenesulfonlc 
acid. 

»2-Amino-5-nitrobenzenesul fonic acid 

Aminonitrodiphenylsulfide 

*2-Amino-4-nitrophenol 

2-Amino-5-nitrophenol 

4-Amino-2-nitrophenol ■■■ • ■ 

2-Amino-4-nitro-l-phenol-6-sul fonic acid 

2-Amino-6-nitro-l-phenol-4-sul fonic acid 

p-Amino-oxanilic acid 

o-Aminophenol 

*p-Aminophenol and salts—————— 

2-Amino-l-phenol-4- sul f onamide 

*2-Amino-l-phenol-4-sul fonic acid 

*m-(p-Aminophenylazo)benzenesul fonic acid 

*p-(p-Aminophenylazo)benzenesulfonic acid 

4-Amino-o-phenyl-m-cresol hydrochloride 

2- ( p-Aminophenyl ) -6-me thylbenzo thiazole 

l-(m-Aminophenyl)-5-pyrazolone-3-carboxylic acid 
(m-Aminophenylpyrazolonecarboxylic acid) . 

2-Aminopyridine — — 

2-Aminopyrimidine 

5-Aminosalicylic acid 

2- ( 4-Amino-3- sul f ophenyl ) -6-me thyl- 5-benzo thia- 
zolesul fonic acid. 

2- Amino thiazole 

l-Amino-4-toluenesulfonamidoanthraquinone-2- 
sul fonic acid. 

*4-Amino-m- toluene sul fonic acid 

5-Aminc— o-toluenesul fonic acid 

4-(4-Amino-m-tolylazo)-m-toluenesul fonic acid and 
salt (o-Aminoazotoluenesul fonic acid and salt) . 

16-Aminoviolanthrone (Aminoviolanthrene) 

4-Amlnoxanthopurpurin 

Aminoxylenesul fonic acid (2,4-Xylidine sulfonic 

acid) . 
2-Amino-3,5-xylenesul fonic acid (m-Xylidine- 
sul fonic acid). 

Amylnaphthalenes ■" ■ 

o-Amyl phenol 



136,184,331. 

184. 

331. 

136. 

184. 

95,136,184,331. 

136,331. 

136,184,324,331. 

70,95,136,144,184,331,384. 

95. 

12,52,89,95,136,184,331. 

12,95,136,184,331. 

136,331. 

184. 

95,136,184,331. 

331. 

70,89,136,184,331. 

184. 

95. 

95,184,331. 

184. 

184. 

144,160,536. 

70,136,144,536,569. 

331. 

8,52,95,331. 

70,95,136,331. 

12,52,89,95,184,384. 

144. 

136,331. 

136. 

411,420. 
70,315,1. 

12,315,331. 
136. 

70,304,324. 
184. 

70,95,136,331,384,464. 

136. 

331. 

184. 
184. 
331. 

136,542. 

456. 
456. 



89 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



sec-Amy lphenol 

p-tert-Amylphenol 

*Aniline (Aniline oil) 

Aniline hydrochloride and salts 

2-Anilinoethanol (Phenylethanolamine) 

*Anilinomet.:.ane sulfonic acid, (Aniline omega 
sulfonic acid), sodium salt. 

*8-Anilino-l-naphthalenesulfonic acid 

*6-Anilino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid (Phenyl J 
acid) . 

*7-Anilino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid (Phenyl 
gamma acid) . 

2-Anilino-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid 

Anisic acid 

o-Anisidine 

p-Anisidine 

o-Anisidine nitrate 

*o-Anisidinomethanesulfonic acid (o-Anisidine- 
omega-sulfonic acid), 
2-p-Anisidino-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid 

N-(m-Anisyl)-4-chloroanthranilic acid, potassium 
salt. 

V-(p-Anisyl) ethyl-p-methoxyacetophenone 

a-(p-Anisyl)-p-methoxyacetophenone 

N-(p-Anisyl)-p-phenylenediamine 

Anthracene, refined 

Anthraflavic acid (2,6-Dihydroxyanthraquinone) 

Anthranilic acid 

Anthra^,9/pyrazol-6(2)-one (Pyrazolanthrone) 

Anthraquinone, 100/C 

N,N'-(l,5-Anthrequinone)dioxanic acid 

*Anthraquinone-l, 5-disulfonic acid 

Anthraquinone-l,8-disulfonic acid, potassium salt 
Anthraquinone-l,5-and 1,8-disulfonic acid, and 
salt. 

*Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid and salt 

Q-Anthraquinonehydrazinedisulfonate 

*l-Anthrequinone sulfonic acid and salt 

2-Anthraquinonesulfonic acid and salt (Silver 

salt). 
3-(l-Anthraquinonylamino)-7-benz£de/anthracen-7- 

one (Benzamide). 

6-An thra^,l/iso thiazole-3-carbonyl chloride 

♦Anthrarufin (l, 5-Dihydroxyanthraquinone) 

Arsanilic acid and salt 

Arsphenamine , tech. 

Azoxybenzene 

Azoxydianiline (Azoxybisaniline) 

♦Benzaldehyde, tech.- 

Ben zamide 

l-Benzamido-4-amino-snthraquifione 

l-Benzamido-4-chloroanthraquinone 

*l-Benzamido-5-chloroanthraquinone 

2- ( 4-Ben zamido-2 , 5-die thoxy-N-me thylphenyldia zoa 
amino) ethane sulfonic acid. 

2- ( 4-Ben zamido-2 , 5-dime thoxy-N-me thylphenyldiazo- 
amino)ethanesulfonic acid. 



456. 

456. 

70,131,136,324,331, 335,X,X. 

70,185. 

76. 

52,70,89,136,184,331,384. 

136,184,331. 
8,12,89,95,136,184,331,384. 

12,70,89,136,331,384. 

184. 

178. 

136,324. 

136,324,331. 

184. 

52,89,136,331,384. 

184. 
146. 

217,561. 

281. 

281. 

184. 

420. 

184. 

131,136. 

136,184. 

70,184. 

184. 

70,136,184,331. 

136,184. 

184,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

184. 

12,70,95,136,184,310,331. 

12,136,331. 

184. 

136. 

89,136,184,331. 

1,268,315. 

561. 

144,331. 

331. 

384. 

47,216,513,1. 

144. 

331. 

136,184. 

70,136,184,331. 

184. 

184. 



90 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



4-Benzamido-6-me thoxy-N-me thyl-m- tolyldia zoamino- 

acetic acid. 
6-Ben zamido-4-me thoxy-3- ( p- toluene sul f on amido ) 
toluene. 

*6-Benzamido-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid 

*7-BenZj/de/anthracen-7-one 

m-Benzenedisulfonic acid and sodium salt 

Benzenesulfonic acid and sodium salt 

Benzenesulfonyl chloride 

Ben zidine , base 

♦Benzidine hydrochloride and sulfate 

Eenzil 

2-Benzofurylcyanomethyl ketone 

♦Benzoic acid, tech. 

Benzoic anhydride 

Benzoin 

Eenzonitrile 

C-Benzoylacetanilide 

*o-Benzoylbenzoic acid 

Benzoyl chloride 

Benzyl alcohol, tech. 

Benzyl disulfide 

Benzyl ether (Dibenzyl ether) 

*4-(N-Benzyl-N-e thylamino) -o-toluenesulfonic acid 

N-Benzyl-N-ethyl-m-toluidine 

4-Benzylidineaminoantip;> line (Benzylidineamino- 

pyrazolone). 
p,p'-Benzylidinebis(N,N-dietbylaniline) (Tetra- 

ethyldiaminotriphenylme thane) . 
p,p'-Benzylidinebis(N,N-dimethylaniline) (Tetra- 
me thy ldiaminotriphenylme thane) . 

Benzyl mercaptan 

Benzylphenol (o- and p-) 

p,p' -Biace toace tanilide 

(3.3' -3i-7-ben z/de7a n thracen) -7.7' -dione ■ 

(4,4'-Bi-7-benz2de/anthracen)-7,7 l -dione 

ljl'-Binaphthalene-S^'-dicarboxylic acid 

o-Biphenylaraine (2-Arainobiphenyl) 

1 T 4-Bis ( 1-an thraquinonylamino ) an thraquinone 

3,9-Bis ( il-ant'nraquinonylamino) -7-benz/de/an thra- 

cen-7-one. 
p,p'-Bis(diethylamino)bcnzophenone (Ethyl ketone 

base) . 

2, 7-Bis( dime thylamino )acridine hydrochloride 

*p,p* -Bis (dime thylamino)benzohydrol (Michler's 

hydrol) . 
*p, p' -3is ( dime thylamino) benzophenone (Michler' s 

ketone). 
Bis(p-diraethylamlnophenyl)me thane sulfonic acid 

and salt. 

1,4-Bis (me thylamino) an thraquinone 

*3-Bromo-7-benz/de/ ? anthracen-7-one 

Bromobenzene 

l-Bromo-4-(N-me thy lncetamido)an thraquinone 

4-Bromo-l-mc thylaminoan thraquinone 



184. 

184. 

c 2 89 95. 

12)7o|l36,184,331,370. 

136. 

144,184,324. 

144,324,572. 

136,331. 

70,81,95,136,144,167,184,331. 

160,316. 

X. 

47,184,216,221,315,324,532. 

167,221. 

144,160,167,315. 

144. 

X. 

70,136,184,331. 

216,221. 

47,217,221,465. 

167. 

47,465,X. 

136,184,331. 

136,331. 

561. 

140,304. 

140. 

221. 

324. 

384. 

136. 

136,134. 

X. 

184. 

131,324. 

324. 

184.331. 

184. 

136,140,217. 

334. 
136,140,134. 

136, 140, 134,331. 

331. 

184. 

12,136,184,331. 

131. 

134. 

184. 



91 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 194-5 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers 1 identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



6-Bromo-3-methyl-7-dibenz/f,lj7isoquinoline-2, 
7( 3) -dione ( 4-Bromo-N-me thyl-1 , 9-an thrapyridone ) 

1-Bromonaphthalene 

p-Bromophenol 

2-Bromo-4-phenylphenol — 

3- tert-Bu cyl-p-cyraene 

6-tert-Butyl-2,4-dimethylace tophenone- 

2-tert-Butyl-5-methylanisole- 

Bu tylnaph thylamine- 



p-tert-Butylphenol— 

5- ter t-Butyl-m-xylene ( 1 , 3-Dimo thyl- 5- tert-butyl- 
benzene) . 

Carbazole, refined 

1,3,6,7-Carbazoletetrasulfonic acid 

o,o*-Carbonyldioxydibenzoic acid, diethyl ester 
(Ethyl salicyl carbonate). 
*3-Carboxy-2(and 4)-hydroxybenzenediazonium 
sulfate. 

Chloranil ( Tetrachloroquinone) 

o-Chloroace toace tanilide 

p-Chloroace tanilide 

m-Chloroaniline- 

o-Chloroaniii?ie 

p-Chloroaniline 

*4-Chloro-o-anlsidine 

l-(4-Chloro-o-anisyl)3-methyl-3-triazeneacetic 
acid. 

*l-Chloroanthraquinone 

*2-Chloroanthraquinone 

l-Chloro-2-anthraquinonecarboxylic acid 

*o-Chlorobenzaldohyde 

p-Chlorobenzaldehyde 

Chloro~7-benz^de/anthracene-7-one (Chlorobenzan- 
throne). 
*Chlorobenzene (mono) 

p-Chlorobenzenesulfonic acid 

*o-Chlorobenzoic acid 

p-Chlorobenzoic acid 

2-Chlorobenzothiazole- 
*o-(ra-Chloro benzoyl) benzoic acid— 

o-(p-Chlorobenzoyl) ben zoic acid— 

6-Chloro— m-cresol 

4-Chloro~N,N-diethyl-3-nitrobenzenesulfonamide — 

4-Chloro-2, 5-dime thoxyaniline- 



5-Chloro— 2, 4-dime thoxy aniline 

*l-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene 

2-Chloro-3 , 5-dinitroben zenesul fonic acid 

6-Chloro-2 , 4-dinitro phenol 

4-Chloro-3-hydrazinoben zenesul fonic acid 

5-Chloro-S-hydroxyquinoline 

*Chlorometanilic acid: 

^-Chloroaetanilic acid 

5-Chloroaetanilic acid 

6-Chlorometanilic acid 

*l-Chloro-2-me thylan thraouinone 

Chloronaph thalene s — 



8-Chloro-l-naphthol-3,6-dioUl fonic acid (Chloro 

H acid). 
4-Chloro-2-nitroace tanilide 



184. 

144. 
131. 
131. 

X. 

I. 

X. 

324. 
131. 
X. 

136,420. 

134. 

131. 

136,134,331. 

131,335. 

76,523. 

134. 

136,324. 

324,536. 

324. 

136,221,536. 

134. 

70,136,134,310,331. 

70,134,331. 

136,331. 

136,216,217,331. 

134,216,331. 

331. 

131,136,138,136,221,324,471. 

134. 

95,136,216. 

216. 

144. 

70,136,331. 

134. 

42. 

134. 

134. 

134. 

70,136,134,304,324,331. 

134. 

184. 

134. 

95. 

39,331. 

136. 

134. 

70,136,134,331. 

38,203,221. 

184,331. 

184. 



747685 0-47-7 



92 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



*Chloronitroanilines: 

2-Chloro-4.-nitroaniline 

4-Chloro-2-nitro aniline 

l-Chloro-5-nitroanthraquinone 

l-Chloro-5 and 8-nitroanthraquinone — 

l-Chloro-8-nitroanthraquinone 

Chloro-m-nitroben2ene 

Chloro-o-nitrobenzene 

Chloro-p-nitrobenzene 

2-Chloro-4-nitrobenzenesul fonic acid- 

*2-Chloro-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid- 
4-Chloro-2-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid- 

4-Chloro-3-nitrobenzenesul fonic acid 

2-Chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid- 
2-Chloro-5-nitrobenzoic acid- ■ 
5-Chloro-6-ni tro-2 ( 3 ) -benzoxazolone- 



19,70,131,136. 

131,136,536. 

136,331. 

331. 

136. 

136,324. 

12,136,324. 

12,136,324. 

95. 

52,39,136,134,331. 

95. 

331. 

12. 

95,331. 

184. 



o- (4-Chloro-3-nitrobenzoyl ) benzoic acid- 
Chloronitrodiphenyl ether- 
4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol — 
4-Chloro-2-nitro-l-phenol-6-8ul fonic acid- 

2-Chloro-4-nitro toluene 

4-Chloro-2-nl tro toluene— — 

6-Chloro-2-ni tro toluene 

o-Chloro phenol ■ ■ ■ - — — 

p-Chlorophenol ■ 

4-Chloro-o-phenylenediamine- 
o-Chlorophenylhydrazine- 



l_(o-Chlorophenyl)-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone 

2-Chloro-&-phenylphenol and sodium salt 

2-Q- ( m-Chlorophenyl ) tria zena/-4-sul f ©benzoic 

acid. 
2-Chloroquini zarin- 




2-Chloro-5-sulfobenzoic acid- 
ic 6-Chloro-3-sulfophenyl)-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone 

2-Chloroterephthaloyl-bis-o-benzoic acid ■ 

«0-Chloro toluene (Benzyl chloride) 

m-Chloro toluen o .-■■■-■- . ■ ■-.,., 
o-Chloro toluene——— 



p-Chloro toluene — ■ — 

*3_Chloro-p-toluenesul fonic acid, sodium salt 

3-Chloro-o-toluidine 

3-Chloro-p- toluidine 

4-Chloro-o-toluidine ( 2-Amino-4-chloro toluene ) 

(Red KB base). 

4-Chloro-c— toluidine hydrochloride — 

5-Chloro-o-toluidine (2-Amino-5-chlorotoluene) 

(Fast red TR base). 

o-(3-Chloro-p-toluyl)benzoic acid .___—__ 

*4-Chloro-o-tolylmercaptoacetic acid- ■-- — — 

l_(5_Chloro-o-tolyl)-3-methyl-3-triazenoacetic 

acid. 

4-Chloro-3,5-xylenol — r ^-.. 

Chrysazin (1,8-Dihydroxyanthraquinone)— 136,184. 



Coeren- 



m-Cresol- 

*o-Cre6ol- 

p-Cresol- 



- 331. 

184,334. 

136,184. 

134. 

47,216,221,324. 

134,221. 

136,216,217,331. 
-• 216. 

136,324,464. 

136. 

136. 

136,331. 

136. 
136,310,331. 

184. 
136,184,331. 

184. 

42. 



- 184. 
42,420. 

42,70,264,420,424. 
42,216,221,420,424,464. 



93 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicale: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con, 



Chemical 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



*Cresol Imeta, para) 
Cresol (ortho, meta, para) 

2,3-Cresotic acid 



Cresyldisulfide (Dicresyldisulfide) 

♦Cresylic acid (refined) 

8-Cyano-l-napr, chalene sulfonic acid 

Cyclohexane , . .. . , 

Cyclohexanecarboxylic acid (Hexahydrobenzoic 
acid). 

Cyclohexanol - — ■ -■■■ — ■- — - — — 

Cy clohexanone — — 

Cyclohexylamine — 



2-Cyclohexyl-4, 6-dini trophenol- 

Cymene- — 

Decylbenzene 



1 ,4-Diaminoanthraquinone 

1, 5-Diaminoanthraquinone— — 

1,5 and 1,3-Diaminoanthraquinone- 
♦2,6-Diaainoanthraquinone — 

4,3-Diaminoanthrarufin- 



4,4' -Diaminobenzanilide— — ~- 
*2,4-Diaminobenzenesul fonic acid- 
2, 5-0iaminobenzenesul fonic acid- 
Diaaino-(4,4. , -bi-7-benz/d^anthracen)-7,7 , -dione 

4 t 4 , -Diamino-3,3 , -bipbenyldisulfonic acid 

2,2' -Diamino-5 , 5 ■ -bi-m-toluenesulf onic acid 
(4,4 , -Diamino-3,3 ' -dimethyl-5 , 5 ' -bisbenzene 
sulfonic acid) . 
m,m'-Diaminocarbanllide - ■ ■ 

Diaminodiben zoylurea- 



*4,4'-Diaainodiphenylamine-2-sul fonic acid 
4,4*<-Diaminodiphenyl sulfone 
1 ,4-Dia*inohy s tazarin 



7,8-Diamino-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid 

6-Diamino-l-naphthol-3-sul fonic acid (Amino J 

acid). 
1 ,4,-Diamino-5-nitroanthraquinone- 



— T-* : ' . * 

"N^N'-Ditm-amlnophenylJoxamide (Oxalyl-m-phenyl- 

enediaaine) . 
N t ti • -Di ( p-aminophenyl) oxamide (Oxaly 1-p-phenyl- 

enediamine) . 

2 , 6-Diaminopy rid ine--- ■ ■■■■■-• — - — 

*4,4» -Diamino-2 , 2 ' -s tilbenedisul fonic acid 

2 ,4-Di-sec-aaylphenol— — — — — 

2,4-Di-tert-aaylphenol (Diamylphenol) 

1 , 5-Dianilinoan thraquinone-o , o ' -dicarboxylic 

acid. 

2 ,4-Dianillno-l-hydroxyan thraquinone 

3,4-Di(p- anisyl)hexane ■■■ 

1,5-Dlbentamidoan thraquinone 

*4, 5 •-Dibenzamido-l,l , -iminodian thraquinone 

Oibenzofuran (Diphenyl oxide) ■■■- ■ 

1, 5-Dibenzoylnaphthalene 

R,N-Dibenzylsulfanilic acid and sodium salt 

3,9-Dibromo-7— benz/de/anthracen-7-one 

p-Dibromoben zen o ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 

*2' ,7' -Dibromo fluorescein 

7,16-Dibromolndan threne ( 1 , 2-1 , 2-Hydrazinedibro- 

■oan thraquinone) * 



42,70,264,^20. 

42,70,420. 

131. 

335. 

42,70,264,420,424,462,487. 

134. 

42,131,136,388. 

221. 

136,221,324. 

42,136. 

324. 

131. 

X. 

324. 

184,331. 

136,134. 

12. 

70,136,134,331. 

136. 

134. 

95,136,134,331. 

39,95,184. 

184. 

12,134,334. 

12,89,331,384. 



39. 

384. 

12,52,89,95,184,331,384,574. 

331. 

95. 

184. 

12. 

184. 
89,136,331,384. 

136. 

411. 

136,184,331. 

456. 

456. 

136,134. 

95. 

316. 

184. 

70,136,134,331. 

420. 

134. 

134,384. 

184. 

131. 

19,217,318. 

136. 



94 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



2,6-Dibromo-l,5-naphthalenediol (2,6-Dibromo-l, 

5-dihydroxynaph thalene ) . 
Dibromopyran throne (Dibromo-8,l6-pyranthrene- 

dione) . 

4,6-Di-tert-butyl-m-cresol -■-■■■■ 

Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol- 



*2,5-Dichloroaniline and hydrochloride- 
1 , 5-Dichloroanthraquinone- 
1 , 3-Dichloroanthraquinone- 



1,5- and 1,3-Dichloroanthraquinone (mixture)- 
2,6-Dichlorobenzaldehyde ■ 

*o— Dichlorobenzene ■- ■ ■ ■ 

■*p-Dichlorobenzene- 



Dichlorobenzene mixture, o- and p- 
*3,3*-DichlorobenJ5idine and sulfate- 
2,4-Diehlorobenzoic acid— 



1 , 3-Dichloro-4, 5-dinitroanthraquinone 

2 , 5-Dichlorohydra zino benzene sul f onic acid 

2,5-Dichloro-4-hydrazinobenzenesulfonic acid- 
6 , 9-Dichloro-2-me thoxyacridine— — — — — — 

Dichloronaphthalene- 



2,6-0ichloro-4-nitroaniline- 
*1 ,4-Dichloro-2-nitrobenzene- 



Dichlorophenarsinehydrochloride 

2 , 4-Di chloro phenol 



2-2l-( 2 , 5-Dichlorophenyl)-3-e thyl-3-triazene7-5- 

sulfobenzoic acid. 
2, 5-Dichloro phenyl hydrazln o -- ■ — ■ ■■■-.. 
4 ,6-Dichlororesorcinol- 



-(3,5-Uichlorosalicyloyl)benzoic acid 
(Dichlorohydroxybenzoylbenzoic acid). 
*1- ( 2, 5-Dichloro-4-sulfophenyl) -3-me thyl-5- 
pyrazolone. 
*2,5-Dichlorosulfanilic acid- 



a,a-Dichlorotoluene (Benzal chloride)- 
2,4-Dichlorotoluen e ■ ... 

2 , 6-Dichloro toluene— — — 

Dlcyclohexylamln c 



•Dicyclopentadiene- 
2 , 5-Die thoxyaniline — 



2,5*-Diethoxybenzanilide 

p-Diethoxybenzen o - — ■■■ ■ 

2 • , 5 * -Diethoxy-4 • -nitrobenzanilide- 
l,4-Diethoxy-2-nitrobenzen o ■ - 



2 , 5-Die thoxy-2-nitrobenzene- 

Diethylaminobenzaldehyde — — — 

H-Diethylaminoi6opentyl-8-amino-6-methoxyquino- 
line base (Plasmochin base). 

m-Diethylaminophenol 

H,H-Die thylaniline ■ — 

Die thylbenzene- 



N,N-Diethylmetanilic acid- 
H , B-Oie thyl-p-nitrosoaniline 
If ,N-Oie thyl-p-phenylenediamin e- 



H,H-Diethyl-p-phenylenediamine hydrochloride 

2-£-( 5-0ie thylsul fanyl-o-anisyl) -3-ethyl-3-tri- 

asine/-5-sulfobenzoic acid. 
H5,H5-Diethyl-2,5-toluenediamine hydrochloride — 

S . N-Die thy l-»- toluid ine 



X. 



136. 

264. 

178. 

136,221,324,331,536. 

136,184. 

70,136,134. 

331. 

331. 

131,136,221,471,472,485. 

131,136,221,324,471,472,485. 

138,186,324. 

81,136,217,464. 

216,561. 

136. 

95. 

184. 

217,384,561. 

221. 

184. 

95,324,331,536. 

561. 

131,324. 

184. 

384. 
184. 
331. 

52,39,95,136,184,384. 

52,136,184,331,384. 

216,221. 

216,217,331. 

136. 

324. 

265,388,477. 

136,184. 

134. 

134. 

164. 

134. 

136. 

331. 

561. 

136. 

136,217,331. 

131. 

136. 

134. 

144,184,331. 

134,1. 

184. 

184,1. 
136,331. 



95 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, Identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

nunbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



NjK'-Difonjyl^, 5-toluenediaaine 

3 , A-Dihydroxy-a-dime thylamiioace tophenor 
-/D i ( 2-hydroxy e thy 1 ) amino/a c e tanil id e— 



A > 5-Cihydroxy-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

(Chronotropic add). 
4,5-Dihydroxy-l-naphthalenesulfoaic acid (Dioxy 

S acid). 
6,7-01hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonlc acid 
3,5-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid- 



16, 17-Dihydroxyvlolan throne (Dihydroxydibenzan- 
throne). 

2, 5-Plnethoayanlllne ■ ■■ ■ - 

p-Dlae thoxy b e n zene- 



3,3' -Diae thoxybengidlna ■ 

3,3 , -Diaethoxy-4.,A , -biphenylbi3(3-niethyl-3-tri- 

azine-e thane sulfonic acid). 
2,2'-(3,3 , -Dim3thoxy-N-S'-di«ethyl-i,4 , -biphenyl- 

bisdlazoaBinn)diethanesulfonic acid. 

2 , 5-Dime thoxy-A-ni trobenzonitrile- 



A-(p-Di*ethylaninoanilino)-l-naphthol- 
p-Dimethylandnobenzaldehyde- 



l,4-Dimethylamino-9,10-anthradiol- 

W,N-Di»etbyl-7-ej«ino-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid — 

F-(p-Dimethylaminophenyl)-l,A-naphthoquinoneiiiine 
*ff , N-Dime thy lanil in e- 



*2 t 2' -Dime thyl-1 ,1 ' -bian thraquinone- 
N,H-Diaethylcyclohexyla»ln c 

Dine thyldiphenylurea 

2» , 7* -Di»e thyl fLuoran- 



2 , 8-Dine thyl-13£-hydro*y-9 ( 130 ) -ceroxenone- 
Diae thy lnaph thai ene- 



H, N-Dime thy l-l-naphthyl&Biine- 
H ,N-Di»e thy 1-p-nitroaniline— 

N ,N-Dioe thy 1 -p-pheny la zoaniline- 



N,N' -Dime thy 1-p-phenylene diamine and hydro- 
chloride— —————— ————— —— 



331. 

<:Oo • 

184. 
12,136,331. 

12,331. 

184. 
184. 
136,184. 

136. 
136,184. 
95,136. 
184. 

184. 

184. 
136. 

144,331. 
136. 

331. 

136,331. 

70,136,140,217,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

324. 

136. 

184,559. 

184,559. 

420. 

144. 

184,331. 

144,160. 



p,c-BinethylBtyrene- 
2,4-Dinitroanlllne- 



p-( 2,4-Dinitroanilino) phenol ( Dlnitrohydroxydl- 

pheny lam in e ) ... .... --- 

2 , A-Dini troani sole- 



Dinltroanthraquinone (1,5 and 1,8-)——— 
4,8-Dlnitroanthrarufin (l,5-Dihydroxy-4,8-dini- 

t roan thraqulnone ) -■ ■ 

4,4 • -Dinltrobenaanllld o ■ ■ 

n-Dinltrobenzen o ■ -■ ■ .... 



2,4-Oinitrobenzenesulfonlc acid 

3,5-Dlnitrobenzoic acid 

3,5-Dinitrobenzoyl chloride- 



Dlnitro ( 3 , 3 ' -bl-7-ben*£de7anthracene) -7 , 7 ' dione 

(Dinitrodibenrantbronyl) 

2,4-Oinitro-N-Biethylaniline 

2, A-Dinitro phenol, tech.- 



N,N , -Di(p-nitrophenyl)oxamide (Oxalyl-p-nltro- 
aniline)- 



*4,4 • -Dinitro-2 , 2 ' -s tllbenedisul f onlc acid- 
Dinitro toluene 



2 ,4-Dini tro toluene— 



144,160,331. 

342. 

70,136,324. 

184,331. 

167,304,536. 

89. 

136. 

184. 

70,136,331. 

184. 

136,144. 

136,144. 

136. 

70. 

136,184,331. 

136. 

89,95,136,184,331. 

331. 

136. 



96 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945-Con. 



Chemical 



Dipentene (Limonene) — ■ -■■■ ■■ 
1, 5-Diphenoxyanthraquinone — 
Diphenylamin o— — ■ - - ---— 

8-Diphenylamino-l,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid 

6,8-Diphenylamino-l-naphthalenesulfonlc acid 

1, 5-Diphenylcarbohydrazide ■ ■-■ — 

Diphenyl silicon dichloride— — -— — 

1,3-Diphenyltriazine (Diazoaminobenzene) 

Disulfourea- 



Manufacturers 1 identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



1 , 4-Di ( p- toluino ) an thr aquinone — 

Dodecylbenzene — — — 

6-Ethoxy-3-hydroxythianaphthene— 
3-Ethoxy-4-methyldiphenylamine — 

2-E thoxynaph tha lene - 

2-Ethoxy-l-naphthylamine 

2-E thoxy-1-ni tronaph thalene 

i-Ethoxy-m-phenylenediamine 
3-Ethylamino-p-cresol 



3-Ethylamino-p-toluenesulfonic acid (N-Ethyl-o- 
toluidine-p-sulfonic acid). 

N-Ethylaniline: 



*Re fined 

2-(N-Ethylanilino) ethanol (Hydroxyethylethylani- 
line) 



«a-(N-Ethylanilino)-p-toluenesulfonic acid 

•Ethylbenzene ■.....■ ■ ■ ■■ — 

3,3 , -Ethylenebis^-(5-chloro-l-ani8yl)-3-tri- 

azineacetic acid/. 
2- ( N-E thyl-2-me thoxy-5-nit rophenyldia zoamino ) -5- 
eulfobenzoic acid. 

N-Ethylnaphthylamine ' ■ ■ 

p-E thylphenol 



N-Ethyl-N-phenylbenzylamine (N,N-Ethylbenzyl 
aniline). 

♦Ethylphenylmalonic acid, diethyl ester 

N-Ethyl-5-sulfoanthranilic acid ■■■■■ — — . . .. 

N2_Ethyl-2, 5-toluenediamine 

N-Ethyl-m-toluidine 

N-E thyl-o- toluidine 

Fluorene - — ■ ■ — ■ ■- — — —____- 



136,342. 

136. 

131,136,144. 

95,136. 

331. 

144. 

133. 

136,331. 

384. 

136. 

324. 

136. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

70. 

136. 

136,331. 

70,217. 
70,136,331. 

184. 

70,95,136,184,331,542. 
131,132,265,324. 
384. 

184. 



Formaniline- 



4-Formyl-m-benzenedieul fonic acid 

c—Formylbenzenesul fonic acid (o-Sulfobenzalde- 

hyde) ( Ben zaldehydemono sulfonic acid) . 
furfuryl alcohol — ■ — 
Hexachlorobenzene ..... - ■ . 



Hexachlorodiphenyl oxide 
Homovera try lamine- 



m-Rydrazinobenzenesul fonic acid — ■ -■ — ■ 

o-Bydrazinobenzenesul fonic acid ■■ ■ — — 

*p-Hydra zinoben zene sul fonic ac id - ■ ■ — • ■ — 

3_Hydrazino-5-nitro-p-toluenesul fonic acid— — 

4-Hydrazino-m-tolueneBulfonic acid 

Hydra zobenzene- — ■ - '■■ — • 

♦ Hydroquinone, tech. — — ■ — 

1 -Hydroxy -4-aminoanthraquinone-— — ■ -•-■■ — — — ■ 

1-Hydroxyan thraquinone ■ ■ ■ — 

N- ( 3-Hydroxy-2-an thraquinonyl) -1-ni tro-2-anthra- 
quinonecarboxamide . 



217. 
420. 
136,217,331. 

1,47,315,561. 

184. 

184. 

136,331. 

136,331. 

264,420. 

136. 

184. 

136,184,217. 

414. 

131,221. 

131. 

178. 

184,494. 

184. 

184,313,334,542. 

184. 

184. 

331. 

80,136,512,536,575. 

184,331. 

136,331. 

184. 



97 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



2-Hydroxy-ll-benzo-a-carbazolc-3-earboxylic acid 

p-Hyriroxybenzoic acid 

2-Hydroxycarb-cole— 

2-Hydroxy-3-carbazolecarboxylic acid 

2-Hydroxy-3 , 6, 3-carbazolc trisul fonic acid 

Hydroxy-3-dibenzo furancarboxylic acid 

4-Hydroxy-l-roethylcarbostyril 

8-Hydroxy-3-napth^l , 2/imidazole hydrochloride 

l-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid 

2-Hydroxy-l -naphthoic acid 

3-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid ■ 

l-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, ethyl carbonate 

l-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, methyl ester 

N - ( 7-Hydroxy-l-naph thyl ) ben zamide 

f _( 2-Hydroxynaphthyl) -3-thianaphthenol ( p-Naph- 

tholthioindoxyl) . 

l-Hydroxy-4-nitroan thraquinone ■ 

4-Hydroxy-3-ni tro-1-phenylarsonic acid 

l-Hydroxy-N-octadecyl-2-naphthamide 

2-Hydroxyphenetole 

p-Hydroxyphenylarsonic acid 

N-(p-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-naphthylamine 

£_(p_Hydroxyphenyl)-a-phenylpropionic acid 

(o,P-Phenyl-P-(^-oxophenyl) propionic acid) . 

n-Hydroxyphenylure a — 

8-Hyaroxyquinollne- 



3-Hydroxy-5-6ulfo—2-naphthoic acid ■- 

p-(&-Hydroxy-6-8ulf o-2-naphthylamino) benzoic 
acid. 

♦1,1' -Iminobi6(4-benzaraidoan thraquinone) 

*6,6'-lminobis(l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid) (I or J 
acid imide) (Rhoduline acid) . 

*l,l»-Iminodi-4-aminoan thraquinone 

♦ljl'-Iminodian thraquinone ~ 

1 1 1 • -Iminodi-4-ni troan thraquinone 

Iodobenzene- 

7-Iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-6ul fonic acid 

I satin 

p-Isobutylaminophenol- 

Isobutylquinoline 

Inophorone— 

Iaophorone , hydrogenated — — — . 

p,p'-Isopropylidenediphenol (p,p'Dihydroxydi- 
phenyldimethylme thane) . 

Isoviolan throne (Isodibenzanthrone)- 

*Leuco quinlzarin (1,4,9,10-Anthratetrol) 

Leuco te trahydroxyan thraquinone 

2,4-Lutidine- 
2,6-Lutldine- 

Melamlne 

Mesitylene- 



♦Metanilic acid 

1-Me thoxy an thraquinone- 

p-Me thoxy bu tyrophenone-— 

2-(6-Methoxy-N-mothyl-4-nitro-ni-tolyldiazoajnino)- 

5-aulfobenzoic acid. 
5-Methoxy-n-phenylonediamine (m-Diaminoaniaole) — 
5-MethoxyHB-phenylanediainine oxalate — ■--- 



134. 

216. 

134. 

134. 

134. 

134. 

134. 

134. 

134,331. 

136. 

134,331,464. 

134. 

134. 

134. 

95. 

136. 

1,315. 

184. 

324. 

1,144,315. 

134. 

178. 

184. 
47. 
134. 
184. 

70,136,184,310. 
70,39,95,136,134,331. 

70,136,134,310,331. 

136,134,310,331. 

136,310. 

144. 

561. 

331. 

136. 

160. 

76. 

221. 

131,134. 

136,134. 

420. 

52,39,95,136,331. 

134. 

264. 

420. 

70,324. 

144. 

89,136,134,331. 

134. 

146. 

146,134. 

70,536. 
304. 



98 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945— Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list 

in table 2i) 



6-Methoxy-m-toluidine (2-Amino-p-cresyl methyl 
ether). 

2-(N-Methyl-p-aminoanilino)ethanol ■ 

»l-lle thylaminoan thr aqu in one 

N-Methylaniline- 



2-(N-Methylanilino)ethanol ( Hydroxy ethylmethylant 
line). 

5-Hethyl-o-anisidine (Cresidine) 



m-Methylanisole (m-Cresyl methyl ether) 

1-Methylanthraquinone (Special violet CER)— 
2-Me thy 1 an thraquinone- 



2-Me thyl-7-benz£ie7an thracen-7-one ( 2-Me thyl- 

benzan throne) . 
Me thylbenzoxazole — 



3,3' -Me thylenebis ( l-o-anisyl-3- triazeneme thyl- 

acetic acid (3, 3* -Me thylenebis (l-o-anisyl-3- 

triazenepropionic acid). 
3,3' -Me thylenebis^l-( 5-chloro-o-anisyl) -3- 

triazeneacetic acid/. 

2 , <. ' -Me thylenebis (4-chlorophenol ) 

3 , 3 ' -Me thy lenebisA- ( 5-chloro-o-toly 1 ) -3- trl- 

azeneacetic ac id/ . 
3 , V -MethylenebisZL-( 5-chloro-o-tolyl) -3-tri- 

azene-methylacetic acid/ 
•pjP'-MethylenebistNjN-dimethylaniline) (Tetra- 

me thy ldiaminodiphenylme thane) . 
p,p'-Me thylenebis (N t N-dimethyl-2-nitroaniline) 

(Dinitrotetramethyldiaminodiphenylme thane) . 

NjN'-MethylenebistA-methylaminoantipyrine) 

5, 5'-Methylenebis-2,4-toluenediamine (Tetra- 

aminoditolylme thane) . 

N-Methyl-lI-(3-me thyl-o-anisyldiazoglycine) 

1-Me thylnaphthalene 

2-Me thylnaph thalene- 

Me thylnaphthalene, crude- 

N-Me thyl-p-nitroaniline — 

4-Me thyl-o-nitroanisole — 

N-( 5-Me thyl-4-nitro-o-anisyl)-p-toluenesulfon- 

amide. 
2-Me thyl-6-nitroben zoxa zole- 
2-Me thyl-5-nitrodiphenylamine- 



2-(N-Methyl-p-nitrosoanilino)ethanol- 
3-Methyl-l-m-nitrophenyl-5-pyrazolone 

2-/3-Me thyl-1- U-nitro-o-tolyl) -3-triazene/-5- 
sulfobenzoic acid. 

1-Methyl-l-phenylhydrazine ■- ■■• 

Me thylphenylpyrazolone- 



*3-Methyl-l-phenyl-5-pyrazolone (Developer Z) 

a-Me thy Is tyrene- 



N-Methyl-5-sulfoanthranilic acid- 
Methylsulfophenylpyrazolone, mixed- 

3-Methyl-l-(m-sulfophenyl)-5-pyrazolone 

*3-Me thyl-1- (p-sul f o phenyl ) - 5-pyrazolone — — 
3-Me thyl-1- ( 4-sul f c— c— toly 1 ) - 5-pyra zolone — 

5 ' -Methyl-p-tolnenesulfon-o-aniside 

4-Me thylumbelliferone- 



2-(N-Methyl-2,4-xylyldiazoamino)ethanesulfonic 
acid. 



95. 

184. 

28,70,95,136,184- 

95,136. 

134. 

136. 

308. 

184. 

70,136,331. 

331. 

144,160,134. 
384. 



384. 

184. 
384. 

384. 

136.184, 304,331,*. 

184. 

561. 
331. 

184. 

264,420. 

264,420. 

264. 

184. 

136. 

184. 

184. 
184. 
184. 
144. 
184. 

144. 

131. 

12,70,39,136,331,384,561. 

131. 

134. 

95. 

136,134. 

52,70,89,95,184,384. 

184. 

184. 

144,X. 

184. 



99 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic inteniediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



♦Naphthalene, solidifying at 79° C. or above 

(refined, flake/. 
1 , 5-Naph thalenediol ( 1 , 5-Dihydroxynaph thalene ) - 
2,3-Naphthalenediol ( 2,3 -Dihydroxynaph thalene )- 

*1, 5-Naph thalenedisul fonic acld- 

*2,7-Naphthalenedi sulfonic acid- 

*2-Naphthalenemercaptoacetic acid- 



*Naphthalenemonosulfonic acids and salts: 
2-Naphthalonesulfonic acid- 
Naphthalenesulfonic acids, sodium salt 

(mixture) . 
1-Naphthalenesul fonic acid, sodium salt- 
2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt- 
1,3, 6-Naph thalene trisul fonic acid- 
Naphthalic anhydride- 



3-«aphth^,27ijnidazole-3-sulfonic acid 

*p-Naphthionic acid (4-Amino-l-naph thalene sulfonic 
acid) . 

*p-Napthionic acid, sodium salt 

*l-Naphthol (a-Naphthol) 

2-Naphthol, tech. (f-Naphthol)- 

l-Naphthol-3,6-disul fonic acid, monosodium 6alt — 

l-Naphthol-3,3-disul fonic acid 



l-Naphthol-3,3-disulfonic acid sultone- 
*2-Naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid— 



*2-Naphthol-3,6-disul fonic acid, di6odium salt 

*2-Naphthol-6,3-disul fonic acid 

*2-Naphthol-6,3-disulfonic acid, disodium sail 

l-Naphthol-8-sulfamide 

*l-Naphthol-5-sul fonic acid- 



*2-Naphthol-6-sul fonic acid (Schaeffer's acid)- 
•Naphtholsul fonic acids, other: 

l-Naphthol-4-sul fonic acid (Nevile and 
Winther's acid). 

l-Naphthol-8-sul fonic acid 

2-Naphthol-7-sul fonic acid- 
2-Naphthol-S-sul fonic acid- 
1,8-Naphthosultone 



*Naphth£L,2/oxadiazole-5-sulfonic acid- 
*1-Naphthylamine- 

2-Naph thy lamine 

1-Naphthylamine hydrochloride- 

l-(l-Naphthylamino)-2-anthraquinonecarboxylic 
acid. 

1-Naphthyl isocyanate- 

2-Naphthyl isocyanate 

5-Nitroacenaphthene 

*p-Nitroace tanilide 

4-Nitrc—o-ace taniside- 
*ra-Ni troaniline 

o-Ni troaniline 

p-Nitroaniline- 



*2-Ni tro-p-anisidine- 
4-Ni trc—o-ani s idine- 

*5-Nitro-o-anisidine- 

O-Ni t roan i sole 

p-Ni troanisole 



9-Nitroanthra^L,9-de, 4,10-d'e^bis(l,2,3- 

oxa thiazine)-2, 7-bisdioxide . 
5-Nitrc—l-anthraquinonesul fonic acid— — — 



42,70,119,136,264,399,420,464, 

486. 
134,331. 
134. 

95,136,134,331. 
136,331,464. 
70,136,184. 

95,167,324,331. 
95. 

134. 

70. 

184. 

144. 

134. 

70,136,134. 

95,331. 

95,136,184,331. 

70,331,464. 

89. 

331. 

184. 

95,136,331. 

184,542. 

95,136,134. 

331. 

95,136. 

95,136,184,331. 

70,95,136,331,542. 

95,136,331. 

184,384. 

136,464. 

95. 

39,95,136. 

89,95,136,184,331. 

136,167,184,331. 

136,167,331. 

167,184. 

136. 

144. 

144. 

184. 

52,95,134. 

184. 

70,39,95,136,331. 

324. 

12,52,136,324,331. 

136,184,217,310. 

136,184,217,310. 

136,184,310. 

136,324. 

136,167. 

184. 

136,331. 



100 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



5(and 8)-Nitro-l-anthraquinonesulfonic acid 

6-(m-Nitrobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid 

(m-Nitrobenzoyl J acid) . 
6-(p-Nitrobenzamido)-l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid 
(p-Nitrobenzoyl J acid) . 
*Nitrobenzene- 



3-Nitrobenzenesulfonanilide- 
Nitrobenzenesulfonic acid- 
*m-Nitrobenzenesulfonic acid- 

p-Nitrobenzenesulfonic acid, potassium salt 

m-Nitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride 

m-Nitrobenzoic acid 

p-Nitrobenzoic acid — — 

p-Mitrobenzoic acid, ethyl ester (Ethyl p-nitro- 
benzoate). 

m-Nitrobenzoyl chloride 

p-Nitrobenzoyl chloride 

2-Ni trobiphenyl— 

4-Nitrobiphenyl — — 

2-Nitro-p-cresol- 
Nitrocresol— 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



*1-Ni tronaphthalene- 
3-Nitro-l,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid- 
8(and 5)-Nitro-l(and 2)naphthaletiesulfonic acid— 

4-Nitronaphthalic anhydride 

l-Nitro-2-naphthol-7-6ulfonic acid 

7(and 8)-Nitro-5-naphth(l,2)oxadiazolesulfonic 
acid. 

4-Nitro-oxanilide 

o-Nitrophenetole 

*o-Nitrophenol 

2-Nitro-l-phenol-4-eulfonamide ■ 

m-Nitrophenylhydrazine 

Kitrophenyl phenyl ether 

l-(m-Nitrophenyl) -5-pyrazolone-3-carboxylic acid 

3(and 5)-Nitrosalicylic acid 

l-Nitroso-2-naphthol 

5-Ni troso-o- toluene sul f onyl chloride 

m-Nitro toluene ■ 

o-Ni tro toluene- 

p-Nitro toluene 

Nitrotoluene mixtures- 
*3-Nitrc— p-toluenesulfonic acid- 
*5-Nitro-c— toluene sulfonic acid 

4' -Nitro-p-toluenesulfono-c— toluide- 

3-Nit.ro-p-toluic acid— 
*2-Ni tro-p- toluidine 

4-Nitro-o-toluidine— 

5-Nitro-o- toluidine- 

4-Ni tro-N-tolylnaph thalimide 

16-Ni troviolan throne 

Nitroxylene — 



5-Oxo-l-(p-sulfophenyl)-2-pyrazoline-3- 
carboxylic acid. 

Pentachlorophenol and copper salt 

Pentachlorophenol and sodium salt 

Phenanthrene— — 



331. 
136,384. 

136,334. 

70,136,184,324,331,335. 

184. 

89,304,331. 

12,95,136,184,331,1. 

70. 

184,331. 

136,221. 

136. 

5a. 

136,221. 

136,144,221. 

324. 

324. 

95,331. 

136. 

95,136,184,331. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

136,184,331. 

184. 
136. 

47,136,324,536. 

136,324,331. 

?5. 

144. 

384. 

334. 

184. 

70,144,167. 

37,70,136,184. 

184. 

136,184,331. 

136,184,331. 

136,184,331. 

136,184,331. 

12,70,95,184. 

89,95,136,184,331. 

384. 

184. 

70,136,217,464. 

136. 

136,384. 

184. 

70,184. 

136,331. 

184. 

324. 

131,324. 

420. 



101 



Table */B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for fthich United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



9,10-Phenanthrenequinone 

o-Phene tidir.e 

p-Phene tidine 

♦Phenol: 
♦Natural: 

From coal tar» 

U.S.P. 

39° C. m.p. 

82-8^. percent 

All other — 
♦Synthetic: 

By caustic fusion: 

U.S.P 

82-84 percent 

All other 

Prom chlorobenzene by liquid phase hydrolysisi 
U.S.F. 



331. 

136,324. 

136,324. 



420,424. 

264. 

42,264. 

42,70,264,420,424. 



From chlorobenzene by vapor phase hydrolysis: 
U.S.P. 



Phenol, sodium salt 

l-Phenol-2-sulfonic acid — 
l-Phenol-4-sulfonic acid— 

Phenoxyaniline (Aminophenylphenyl ether) 

2-Phenylanthra-/2,^/-oxazole-5,10-dione 

♦p-Phenylazoaniline (Aminoazobenzene) and hydro- 
chloride . 

p-Phenylazo-«,N-dimethylaniline 

N-Phenylbenzylamine- 
♦m-Phenylenediamine — 

o-Phenylenediamine- 

p-Phenylenediamine- 

Phenyl ether (Diphenyl oxide)— 
♦Phenylglycine — 
♦Phenylglycine, sodium salt- 

Phenylhydrazine- 

Phenylhydrazine hydrochloride- 
♦2,2' -Phenyliminodie thanol ( Pheny Id ie thanolamine ) - 

0,q ' -Phenyliminodi-p-toluenesul fonic acid 

Phenylisocyanate 
♦Phenylmalonic acid, diethyl ester 

N-Phenyl-1-naphthylamine 

N-Phenyl-2-naph thylamine 

o-Phenylphenol and eal 

p-Phenylphenol and salt — 

N-Phenyl-p-phenylenediamine 

l-Phenyl-5-pyrazolone-3-carboxylic acid, ethyl 
ester. 

Phenyl silicon trichloride 

Phthalcmide- 

Phthalic acid— 
♦Phthalic anhydride — 



Ph thaloni trile 

Phthaloyl chloride— 
♦Picolires: 

2-Picoline (a-Picoline) — 

3-Picoline (£-Picoline) 

4-Picoline ( -Picoline)- 
Ficoline (3,4-mixture)- 



42,324,419. 

42. 

42, 

131. 

138,186. 

167. 

167. 

131,324,X. 

131. 

384. 

184. 

12,70,89,136,184,331. 

331. 

136. 

70,89,95,136,184,331. 

146,160,401. 

70,464. 

131. 

131,331. 

136. 

131,144,217. 

144,167. 

76,131,136,184. 

184. 

144. 

1,315,561. 

136,331. 

136,184. 

131,186. 

131. 

136,184. 

184. 

133. 

131,136. 

18^. 

14,42,136,264, 324, 331,419,464, 

487. 
136. 
324. 

42,264,420. 
42,264,420. 
42,420. 
42,264. 



102 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



♦Picramic acid and salt- 
Picric acid (Trinitrophenol)- 
Piperidine- 



Piperidinopropanediol- 
Polychlorobiphenyl- 



Poly chloronaph thalene s- 

Primuline, base 

Primuline sulfonic acid- 

Proflavine, base (3,6-Biaminoacridine) 

Propiophenone 

Pseudocumidine 

Pyrazole anthrone yellow (Dipyrazoledianthrone)- 

Pyrazolone 

♦Pyridine, refined 

Pyridine, salts, bases, and residues 

2-Pyridlne-ethanol (2-Ethanolpyridine) 

*Quinaldine (2-Methylquinoline) 

*Quinizarin (1,4-Dihydroxyanthraquinone) 



Quinoline- 



Quinoline, 2°- 
Quinoline yellow, base- 
Quinolinic acid- 
Resorcinol, tech.- 



p-Resorcylic acid 

Salicylic acid, tech. 

Saligenin benzoate, calcium salt 
Styphnic acid (2,4,6-Trinitroresorcin)- 
Styphnic acid, lead salt 

♦Styrene (Vinylbenzene) : Grade for rubber 
(elastomers). 

♦Sulfanilic acid and salt 

p-Sulfoamylbenzoic acid (p-Carboxybenzenesulfon- 
anide) . 

4-Sulfoanthranilic acid 

c—Sulfobenzoic anhydride 

4-Sulfo-o-bensoylbenzoic acid (Sulfo BB acid) 

Pjp'-Sulfonyldiphenol U.^'-Dihydroxydiphenyl- 
sulfone) . 

Sul fophenyl-E-pyrazolone 

l-( o-Sul fophenyl ) -5-pyrazolone-3-carboxylic acid 
Te trabromo-8 ,16-pyranthrenedione- 

*l,<t,5,8-Tetrachloroanthraquinon c— --■■ 

1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene- 



Tetrachlorophenol, sodium salt- 
G,Q,2,4-Tetrachlcrotoluene- 



*1,4,5,8-Tetrakis(l' ,1* ' ,1» ' ' ,1* ' ■ ■ -anthra- 

quinonylamino ) an thraquinone (Pen ta-an threau.de ) . 

3-( 2) -Thianaph thenone 

4,4 , -Thiobis(3-sulfobenzenediazonium chloride) — 

p,p* -Thiodi&niline 

6,6 , -Thiodijnetanilic acid (pjp'-ThiobisU-amino- 

c— benzenesulfonic acid). 
3, 3 • -Thiobis ( 7-benz/de7anthracen-7-one^— — 

*c—Tolidine and salts 

Tolidlne and salts, other — — ■ 

2-(c—Toloxy ) e thanol- 
m-Toluenedi&mine 



m-Toluenediamine sulfonic acid- 

*2 ,4-Toluenedlamine 

2,4-Toluenediamine sulfate 



70,136,331. 

136,331. 

136,221. 

316. 

324. 

221. 

184,331. 

370. 

1. 

X. 

331. 

136,184. 

12. 

42,264,420. 

264. 

420. 

42,304,331,420. 

12,28,52,70,89,95,136,184,331, 

575,X. 
144,264,420. 
42. 
264. 
95. 

136,343,1. 
159. 

131,216,324. 

1. 

X. 

X. 

77,132,265,325. 

12,70,95,331. 
324. 

89,184. 
144,369. 
136. 
184,X. 

89. 

12,184. 

184. 

136,184,331. 

131. 

131. 

136. 

28,136,184,331. 

184. 
184. 

136,331. 
184,331. 

184. 

95,136,167,331. 

95. 

184. 

331. 

331. 

70,95,136,184. 

136. 



103 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers 1 identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 2A) 



2, 5-Toluenediamine- 



o-Toluene sul f onamide- 



p-Toluenesul fonamide- 



Toluene sulfonic acid, tech. 

p-Toluenesulfonic acid, ethyl ester 

p-Toluenesulfonic acid, isopropyl ester 

(Isopropyl p-toluenesulfonate). 
p-Toluenesulfonic acid, methyl ester (Methyl p- 

toluenesulfonate) . 

p-Tolueneeulfono-c— toluid o - 

o-Toluenesulfonyl chloride 

p-Toluenesulonyl chloride- 



*a-Toluic acid, tech. (Phenylacetic acid)- 

m-Toluidine 

o-Toluidine 



p-Toluldine 

Toluidine, mixed 

6-p-Toluinometanilic acid 

o-ToluinoKethanesulfonic acid- 



*l-(p-Toluino)naphthalene-S-sulfonic acid (Tolyl 
peri acid) . 

Q-Tolunitrile (Benzyl cyanide) 

*4-(o-Tolylazo)-o- toluidine (o-Aminoazo toluene) — 

*o-(p-Tolyl) benzoic acid 

2 , 2 ■ - ( m-Tolylimino ) die thanol 

2,4, 6-Tr ibromophenol - - ■■ 



♦Trichloroben zene- 

♦1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene — 

♦Trichlorobenzene (1,2,3-1, 2,4-mixture)- 

Trichlorocumene 

l,2,4-Trichloro-5-nitrobenzene 



Trichlorophenol, sodium salt — 
Trichlorophenoxyethoxychloroe thane (Trichloro 
phenoxyethoxy ethyl chloride) . 

*C-Trichloro toluene (Benzo trichloride) 

Trifluoro benzene 



1 , 2 ,4-Trihydroxy anthraquinone 

*6,6 , -Dreylcnebis(l-naphthol-3-sulfonic acid) (J 
acid urea). 

o—Vanillin (2-Hydroxy-3-aethoxybenzaldehyde) 

*o-Verctraldehyde (3,4-Dimethoxybenzaldehyde) , 
tech. 

Veratryl alcohol . ..... . ■ ■■ 

9-Vinylcarbazole ..-. , - 

2-Vinylpyridine 

♦Violanthrone (Dibenzan throne) 

Xenylamine (4~Aminobiphenyl) 

*m-Xylene — 

♦Xylene, o- and p- 

Xylenol, crystals 

Xylenolst 
Low b.p.- 
High b.p. 



Not classified as to b.p.- 



70. 

324. 

324. 

19,144,324,464. 

144,536. 

136. 

144,184. 

.384. 
324. 
324. 

47,253,315, 56l,X. 
136,331. 
136,184,331. 
136,216,331. 
70,264. 
95,331. 
331. 
136,184,331. 

47,253. 

12,95,136,184,217,331. 

70,136,331. 

184. 
131. 

131. 
136,221. 
324. 
221. 

lO. 

131. 

131. 

216,221,324. 

221. 

39,184. 

12,70,89,95,136,184,331. 

324. 
136,324,438. 

221. 

184. 

420. 

70,136,134,370. 

324. 

136,30S,X. 

42,136,134,308. 

42. 

420,424. 

420. 

70,264. 



104 



Table 7B.- Synthetic organic chemicals; Cyclic intermediates for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



*Xylidinesi 

2,3-Xylidine (o-Xylidine) 

*2,4-Xylidine (m-4-Xylidine) 

*2, 5-Xylidine (p-Xylidine) 

1,2,4-Xylidine 

1,3,4-Xylidine 

1,3,5-Xylidine 

o- and p-Xylidine — 

2,5-Xylidine hydrochloride 

4-(2,4-Xylylazo)-o-toluidine (Aminoazoxylenetolu- 

idine) . 
4-(2,4-Xylylazo)-2, 5-xylidine (Aminoazoxylene) — 
4-(3, 5-Xylylazo)-3, 5-xylidine 



331. 

136,315,331. 

12,136,331. 

420. 

420. 

420. 

70. 

136,134,331. 

331. 

70,331. 

12,331. 
134. 



105 
Dyes 

Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Dyes for which separate statistics are given in table 8A are marked below 
with an asterisk (*); dyes not so marked do not appear in table 8a because 
the reported data are confidential and may not be published. Manufacturers 
are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in table 24. 
An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of 
his identification number with the designated product) 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 

No. 



Dye 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24 ) 



10 
11 



15 
16 
17 
19 
20 
21 
24 
26 
27 
29 
30 
31 
32 
36 
40 
52 
53 
54 
56 
57 
73 
79 
64 
38 
90 
91 
98 
99 
101 
104 
105 
109 
110 
113 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX NUMBERS 
Nitroso Dyes 
Naphthol green B- 

Mitro Dyes 



Naphthol yellow S- 
Amido yellow E- 



Azo Dyes 



Monoazo Dyes 



Spirit yellow G- 

Acid yellow G 

*Spirit yellow R- 

Oil yellow 

*Chrysoidine Y— ■ 

♦Chrysoldlne R 

♦Sudan I — ....-■ . 



Croceine orange G- 
♦Orange G 



Chromotrope 2R— 

♦Fast acid fuchsine B- 
*Amido naphthol red G- 

Brilllant sulphon red- 
♦Chrome yellow 2G- 
*Chrome yellow R- 



♦Azo alizarin yellow GP- 
♦Victoria violet 4BS 

Lanafuchsine— — — — 

Chromotrope 6B- 



♦Amido naphthol red 6B- 

♦Sudan II 

♦Ponceau R 



Double ponceau- 
♦Fast red B 



Chromotrope 10B— — 
Acid chrome brown UN- 
Chrome brown R — 

Chrome green 2G- 



Chromate brown B— - — — — 
Metachrome olive brown G- 
Acid chrome brown R-- 

Mordant yellow GR0- 

Chrome flavine G— — — 
Sudan R-— — — — 



70,184. 



70,331. 
184. 



70,184. 

70. 

12,70,175,184,331. 

12,70,136,175,134,331. 

70,136,134,331. 

70,134,331. 

12,70,136,175,134,331. 

95,331. 

70,95,136,184,331. 

331. 

12,331,574. 

12,70,95,136,134,331. 

574. 

12,70,39,95,184. 

12,70,95,1S4. 

12,95,184,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

95. 

331. 

12,70,89,95,136,184,331. 

70,175,184,331. 

70,95,136,184,331. 

184. 

70,95,184,331. 

136. 

136. 

95,184,331. 

184. 

70,401. 

304. 

136. 

136. 

184,401. 

175 



106 



Tittle ®.- Synthetic organic chemicalas Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Dye 



114 

119 

122 

126 

128 

130 

134 

138 

142 

145 

U6 

US 

151 

161 

163 

165 

167 

168 

169 

170 

172 

173 

175 

176 

179 

180 

183 

184 

185 

195 

197 

201 

202 

203 

204 

208 

209 

211 

216 

219 

225 



234 
235 
238 
246 
247 
252 
253 



DIES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBERS — Continued 

Azo Dyes — Continued 

Honoazo Dyes — Continued 



Azo eosine G ■ ■ . 
Eosamine G -- ■ ■ 
Chrome yellow 50—— 

Direct pink 2GN 

Direct pink- 

Direct fast pink EBN- 
Janue black B— — — 

•tfetanil yellow 

Methyl orange — 

•Azoflavine RS 

*Azo yellow- 



Resorcin yellow— 

♦Orange II— — — 

♦Orange R 

Pigment rubine B- 
Lake red C 



Acid chrome brown B — 
■Acid chrome garnet R- 
*Acid chrome violet N- 

Chrome black PV 

Acid chrome black R— 

Hetachrome violet B— 

Naphthylamine brown— 

■Fast red A— — — — 

■Azo rubin e ■ 

■Fast red VR 



Croceine scarlet 3BX- 
Amaranth— 



■Cochineal red A— 

■Mordaat yellow 

■Chrome yellow RN- 

■Chrome blue black B- 
■Chrome blue black R- 

■Chrome black T— 

■Chrome black A— — 

■Fast acid blue R 

■Fast acid blue B- 

Methyl red 

■Acid chrome red B — 
■Chrome f lavine A 

Direct pink 2B 



Disazo Dyes 



■Resorcin brown- 

■Resorcin dark brown- 
Chrome brown - ■ - 



■Acid black 10B 

Azo dark green A 

■Brilliant croceine M- 
Ponceau SS ex 



Manufacture, -s ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



89,136,184. 

136. 

95. 

136. 

184,331. 

136. 

136,184,331. 

136. 

12,95,184. 

12,184,331. 

331* 

70,95,184,331,574. 

70,136,331. 

95,136. 

70. 

70,331. 

95,184,331. 

95,331,401. 

89,184,331. 

184. 

89. 

184. 

70,95,136084,331. 

12,95,136,184,331. 

70,95,136,184,331. 

95. 

95,331. 

70,95,184,331. 

89,184,331. 

95,184,331. 

95,184,331. 

95,136,184,331,401. 

95,136,184,331. 

95,184,331,401. 

70,136,184,331. 

136,184,331. 

410. 

70,95,136,184,331,575. 

95,136,184,331. 

136. 



12,70,95,136,184,331,574. 

12,70,95,184,331,574. 

136,331. 

12,70,95,136,184,331,574. 

95,136,574. 

70,95,136,184,331. 

331. 



107 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, Identified by manufacturer, 1945 Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
Ho. 



254 
258 
262 
267 
274 
275 
278 

280 

288 

289 

290 

294 

299 

302 

304 

306 

307 

306 

316 

317 

318 

319 

324 

324a 

325 

326 

327 

331 

332 

336 

343 

346 

349 

349a 

353 

364 

365 

370 

375 

376 

377 

382 

385 

387 

393 

394 

395 

400 

401 

405 



Dye 



DIES GROUPED BT COLOUR IHDEX 
NUMBERS — Continued 

A»o Dyes' — Continued 

Disaso Dyes— Continued 



Erythrine P 

Sudan 17 

•Cloth red B 

Neutral gray G- 

•tfllling orange- 



Cloth scarlet G 

♦Direct fast red 8BL- 



Scarlet EC- 



Fast acid cyanine G 

♦Fast acid cyanine 5R ex — 
Naphthaline acid black 4B- 
Acid black B 



♦Acid chrome black F- 
Acid chrome green 

♦Fast acid black 2BN- 
Fast acid black F — 



♦Fast acid cyanine black B- 

Naphthylamine black D 

Developed blue HA — 

♦Developed blue B- 



Naphthylamine black V- 
Direct fast heliotrope- 



Developed brilliant orange GR ex- 

*Rosanthren o ■ 



Direct brilliant violet- 
♦Direct fast scarlet 

Direct fast scarlet 4BA- 

♦Bismarck brown G 

♦Bismarck brown R- 

Add chrome black SE 

Chrome fast yellow C- -■■■ 
♦Direct fast yellow 5GL 

Direct fast yellow 4GL ex- 

♦Direct fast yellow RL 

direct fast pink 2BL 

♦Brilliant yellow 

♦Chrysophenine G 

Congo red 



♦Congo corinth G— 

Congo rubine 

Direct orange G— 

♦Direct scarlet B- 
Direct violet 

♦Direct violet B— 
Benzo violet — 



♦Direct violet N- 

Dlrect black 

Direct brilliant Bordeaux R- 
♦Developed black BH 

Direct cyanine R .... --- 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



184. 

95,136. 

95,184,331. 

136. 

12,70,95,184. 

12,70,574. 

8,12,52,70,39,136,184,331,384, 

574. 
12,184,331. 
184,331. 
70,136,184,331. 
184. 
331. 

70,136,184,331. 
70,184. 

95,136,184,331. 
184. 

70,89,136,184,331. 
184. 

95,184,331. 
95,136,184,331. 
136. 

95,136,184. 
184,384. 
136,184,331. 
12,184,331. 

8,12,52,70,89,95,136,184,331. 
95,184. 

70,136,184,331. 
70,95,136,184,331. 
184. 

70,89,136,331,384. 
8,52,70,136,184,331. 
89. 

89,184,331. 
70,136,184,331. 
70,136,184,331. 
136,184,331. * 
136,331. 

12,70,95,136,184,331,574. 
8,95. 
331. 

12,52,70,95,184,331. 
95. 

70,95,136,184,331. 
184. 

12,70,95,136,184,331. 
12. 
331. 

52,70,95,136,184,331,574. 
331. 



747685 O - 47 - 8 - 



108 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
. Proto- 
type 
No. 



Eye 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



406 
411 
415 
419 
420 
423 
430 
431 
436 
441 

443 
446 
448 
464 
471 
472 
477 
478 
487 
495 
499 
502 
508 
512 
515 
516 
518 
520 



533 
539 
545 
552 
559 
561 
567 
576 
581 
582 
583 
589 
590 
591 
593 
594 
595 
596 
598 
601 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBERS — Continued 

Azo Dyes — Continued 

Disazo Dyes — Continued 



♦Direct blue 2B 

♦Cresotine yellow G- 

♦Direct orange R 

♦Direct fast red F— 

♦Direct brown M 

Direct brown B 

♦Polar red 



Acid chrome red— — — 
Direct brilliant red 8 
Chrome fast yellow RD- 
Milling red G 



Direct orange R — 

Benzopurpurine 4B 

Direct blue 3R— — — — 
Direct blue 4R— — — — 

Direct blue BX 

Direct blue 3B 

Direct orange G 

♦Acid anthracene red 3B- 
♦Benzopurpurine 10B— — 

Fast blue B salt 

♦Direct azurine G 



Direct brilliant blue G- 

♦Direct blue RW 

Direct blue B 

Chicago blue B 

♦Direct sky blue FF 

♦Direct pure blue- 

Trisazo Dyes 

♦Direct fast blue FR 

♦Direct fast black FF 

♦Plutof orm black— 

Diazo blue black RS 

Direct bronze G - - — 



♦Direct brown BT 

Direct fast blue R- 
Direct fast blue B- 

♦Direct black EW 

♦Direct black RX 

♦Direct green ET 

•Chloramine green B— 

Direct steel blue G- 

Chloramine black' HW- 

♦Direct green B— — — 

♦Direct green G - — ■■-- 

Direct olive G— — — 

♦Direct brown 3G0 

*Congo brown G 

Congo brown R — ■ — — 



12,70,95,136,184,331,574. 

95,331,574. 

95,136,184,331. 

12,52,70,89,95,136,184,331,574. 

8,12,52,70,95,136,184,331,574. 

70,574. 

70,89,95,136,184,331,574. 

89,136. 

95. 

184,384. 

12,70. 

12,331. 

136,331. 

136. 

95,331. 

136,184,331. 

95,136,331. 

12,331. 

12,70,89,184,331,384. 

95,136,331,574. 

52. 

12,52,95,136,184,331,574. 

136. 

12,52,95,136,184,331. 

331. 

184. 

12,52,95,136,184,331. 

52,95,136,184,331. 



12,70,95,136,331. 

95,136,184,331. 

52,70,89,95. 

136,331. 

184. 

8,12,52,95,136,184,331,574. 

95. 

331. 

70,95,136,184,331,574. 

70,95,136,184,331,574. 

12,70,95,136,184,331,574. 

95,136,184,331,574. 

136. 

52. 

12,70,95,136,184,331,574. 

70,95,136,331,574. 

184. 

12,70,95,136,184,331,574. 

8,12,52,95,136,184,331. 

136. 



109 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicalst Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945— Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
Mo. 



606 
619 



620 
621 
622 
628 
631 



636 
639 

640 
642 
652 
653 



655 



657 

658 
662 
663 
666 
667 
670 
671 
676 
677 
678 
680 
681 
682 
683 
690 
692 
696 
698 
699 
703 
704 
705 
706 



Dye 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBERS — Continued 

Aao Dves — Continued 

Tetrakisazo Dyee 

Direct brown G- 

Naphth amine fast black RS- 



SUlbene Dyes 



♦Direct yellow R 

*Chloramine orange G- 
♦Stilbene yellow- 
Diphenyl catechine G- 
Diphesyl chrysoine G- 



Pyrazolone Dyes 



♦Fast light yellow 
♦Xylene light yellow- 

*Tartraz ine 

♦Polar yellow——— 
♦Chrome red B— — — 
♦Pyrazol orange 



Ketonlmine Dvee 



♦Auramine- 



Triphenylmethane an d DlphenylnaphthYl - 
methane Dyes 



•Malachite green — 
♦Rhoduline blue 6G- 
♦Brilliant green — 

Setocy anine— — - 
♦Acid green B- 
♦Fast acid green B — 

Aoid light green- 
♦Acid glaucine blue— — 

Para fucbaine 

•Magenta- 



New fuchsine- 



♦Methyl violet B and base 

♦Crystal violet 

Ethyl violet 

Benzyl violet 

Victoria blue 4R 

Aoid magenta- 



Fast acid violet 10B- 

♦Acid violet 

Acid fast violet BG— 

Alkali blue 6B 

Alkali blue 

Methyl blue- 



Methyl cotton blue- 



Manufacturers » identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



184,574. 
184. 



70,136,184,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

70,136,184. 

331. 

95. 



12,136,184,331,384. 

52,70,89,95,136,184,331,384. 

12,70,184,217,331,384. 

89,95,184,384. 

70,89,95,136,184,331. 

8,12,52,95,331,384. 



70,136,304,331. 



70,140,304,331. 

136,140,184,217,331. 

70,140,331. 

136,184. 

70,95,136,184,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

136,184. 

70,136,184,217,331. 

70,343,492. 

70,343,464. 

70. 

70,136,140, 184,217,331,492. 

70,136,140,184,217,331. 

136,140,184. 

140. 

184. 

184. 

136,304. 

70,95,136,184,217,304,331. 

136,331. 

343. 

492. 

184,343. 

184,343. 



no 



Table SB.- Synthetic organic chemicals * Coal-tar dyes for which Doited States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
Ho. 



lye 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



707 
710 
712 
7U 
720 
722 
724 
728 
729 
735 
737 



749 
749 
752 
758 
766 
766 
768 
768 

773 
774 
779 



788 
789 
793 
794 
797 



800 
801 
802 



812 
813 
814 
815 
816 



821 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBERS— Continued 

Trithenylmethane and Diphenylnaphtherl- 
methane Dyes — Continued 



♦Soluble blue- 



Brilliant sky blue 5G- 

Patent blue V 

•Patent blue A 



♦Acid chrome azurol B — 

♦Acid chrome cyanine R- 

Aurlne 



Victoria blue R 

♦Victoria blue B 

Naphthalene green V- 
♦ffool green S 



Ianthene Dyes 



Rhodamine B, 20% 

Rhodamine B cone, 100$ — 
Rhodamine 6G cone, 100%- 

Fast acid violet A2R 

Fluorescei n 



Oranine (Fluorescein, alkali salt) 

♦Tetrabromofluorescein — ■ - 

Eosin G (Tetrabromofluorescein, alkali 

salt). 
Erythrosine bluish- ■ 

Phloaine— — ■ 

Rose bengale B- ■ 



Acridine Dyes 



Acridine orange NO 

Brilliant phosphine G- 
Phosphine 



Phosphine 2G — 
Euchrysine 2G- 



Quinollne Dyes 



Quinoline yellow, spirit-soluble- 

♦Quinoline yellow 

Quinoline yellow KT 



Thiazole Dyes 



Primuline- 



Direct pure yellow U- 

♦Direct fast yellow 

Thioflavine T 



Direct brilliant flavihe S- 



Indophenol Dyes 



Indophenol- 



70,184,492. 

184. 

184,331. 

70,184,331. 

95,136,184,331. 

95,136,184,331. 

136. 

136,184,217. 

136,184,217,331. 

136,304,331. 

70,136,184. 



136. 

136. 

136. 

201. 

70,201,217,331. 

19,70,217,343. 

19,70,217,248,331,343,561. 

70,343. 



70,343. 

343. 

70,343. 



136,184,384. 

136. 

70,95,331,384. 

384. 

184,384. 



304,331. 

136,304,331. 

304. 



136,331. 

136. 

136,184,331,370. 

136. 

370. 



410. 



HI 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 

Proto- 
type 
Ho. 



Dye 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



833 

sa 

8^3 
853 
860 
861 
864 
865 



873 
875 



878 
883 
909 
913 



922 
924 
927 



969 
971 



1027 
1033 
1034 
1035 



DIES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBERS — Continued 

Azlne Dyes 



♦Wool fast blue 

♦Safranine— 

Safranine MN 

Acid cyanine 

Induline, spirit-soluble — 
♦Induline, water-soluble — 
♦Nigrosine, spirit-soluble- 
♦Nigrosine, water-soluble — 



Aniline Black and Allied Dyes 



New fast gray- 
Fur black 



Oxazine Dyes 



Delphine blue B- 

Gallocyanine 

New blue R 

Nile blue A- 

Thiazine Dyes 

♦Methylene blue 

Methylene green B 

New methylene blue N 

Sulfur or Sulfide Dyes 

Derivatives of Carbazole 



Carbazole vat blue R- 
Carbazole vat blue G- 



Other Sulfur or Sulfide Dyes 



♦Sulfur black- 
♦Sulfur blue— 
♦Sulfur brown- 



♦Sulfur green — 
♦Sulfur maroon- 
♦Sulfur olive— 

♦Sulfur tan 

♦Sulfur yellow- 
♦All other— 



Anthraqulnone Dyes 



Alizarin VI 

Alizarin orange AD- 

♦Alizarin red S 

Alizarin brown 



95,184,331. 

136,184,331. 

331. 

184. 

70,184,331. 

70,184,331. 

70,184,331. 

70,184,331. 



70. 
70. 



12. 
575. 
70,331. 
184. 



70,140,184,217,331. 

70. 

70. 



136. 
136,134. 



37,70,136,184,331,478. 

37,70,95,136,134,231,331,478. 

37,70,95,116,136,134,231,331, 

478. 
37,70,136,184,231,331. 
70,136,134,331. 
37,70,95,136,134,231,331,478. 
37,70,95,136,184,231. 
37,70,136,184,231,331,478. 
37,95,184,331. 



12,70. 

184. 

12,70,134,331. 

331,575. 



112 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Dye 



Manufacturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



1040 
1053 
1054 
1060 
1062 
1063 
1073 
1075 
1076 
1078 

1080 
1085 
1088 
1089 
1091 



1095 
1096 
1097 
1098 
1099 
1101 
1102 

1104 
1106 
1109 
1113 
11U 
1118 
1120 
1132 
1135 

1150 
1151 
1152 
1161 
1162 
1163 
1167 
1170 
1173 



1177 
1178 
1180 
1183 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBERS — Continued 

Anthraquinone Dyes — Continued 



Alizarin SX 

♦Acid alizarin blue SE 

♦Acid alizarin blue B 

Anthracene blue SWGG 

Anthracene blue WR 

Anthracene blue SHX 

♦Alizarin irisol R 

Alizarin astrol B 

Cyananthrol R 

♦Alizarin cyanine green 

Acid anthraquinone violet 

♦Anthraquinone blue black B 

♦Acid anthraquinone sky blue B- 

Anthraquinone blue SR 

Acid alizarin rubine- 



Anthraquinone Vat Dyes 



♦Anthraquinone 
♦Anthraquinone 
♦Anthraquinone 
Anthraquinone 
♦Anthraquinone 
Anthraquinone 
♦Anthraquinone 

12-1/2$. 

♦Anthraquinone 

♦Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

♦Anthraquinone 

♦Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

12-1/2$. 

♦Anthraqui none 

♦Anthraquinone 

♦Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 

Anthraquinone 



vat yellow GC, 12-1/2$ 1/- 
vat golden orange G, 12$ — 
vat golden orange R, 12$ — 
vat scarlet G, 16-2/3$- — 

vat dark blue B0, 25$ 

vat jade green, 6$ 

vat green B and black B, 

vat violet 2R, 12-1/2$ 

vat blue RS, 10$ 

vat blue 3G, 10$ 

vat blue GCD, 8-1/3$ 

vat blue BCS, 20$- 



vat yellow G, 12-1/2$ 

vat brown B, 22$ 

vat yellow GK, 12-1/2$ 

vat brilliant violet RK, 

vat olive R, 12-1/2$ 

vat brown R, 12-1/2$ 

vat brown G, 12-1/2$- 



vat red violet RRN, 12-1/2$ 
vat red BN, extra, 12-1/2$ 

vat violet BN, 25$ 

vat olive G 

vat yellow R, 12-1/2$ 

vat blue 3G, 12-1/2$ 



Indigold and Thiolndigold Dyes 



♦Indigo, synthetic, 20$- 
Indigo white, 20$- 
Indigotin IA- 
Tribromindigo RB, 20$- 



331. 

70,136,134,331. 

28,70,89,95,136,184,331,575. 

28. 

89,184. 

28. 

28,136,575. 

136,184. 

136. 

12,28,70,89,136,184,331,368, 

575. 
28,136. 

12,70,89,95,184,331,401,575. 
136,134,331. 
28. 
184. 



70,136,184. 

70,136,184,331. 

70,184,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

70,136,184,331,370. 

136,184. 

70,136,184,331,370. 

12,136,184,331. 

70,136,184. 

136. 

70,136,184,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

136,331. 

136. 

136,184. 

136. 

12,70,136,184,310,331. 

70,136,134,331. 

70,136,331. 

136,134,331. 

136,331. 

136,184. 

370. 

136,370. 

184. 



131,136,184,331. 

331. 

136,331. 

131,331. 



See footnotes at end of table. 



113 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



lye 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



1184 
1186 
1207 
1212 
1217 
1228 
1229 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 

NUMBERS.— Continued 

Indigoid and Thloindlgoid Dyes — Continued 



♦Bromindigo blue 2BD, 16%- 
Vat blue RG, 20%- 



Ciba pink B, 20$ 

♦Vat red 3B, 20% 

Vat orange R, 10% 

Vat fast scarlet G, 20%-- 
Vat red R, 10% 



Food, D ru g, and Cosm et ic Dyss 
Food, drug, and cosmetic colors: 

♦Blue #1 

♦Blue #2 

*Green #1- 

Green #2- 

Green #3- 
♦Orange #1- 

Orange #2- 

Red 

♦Red #1- 
♦Red #2- 



♦Red #3 

Red #4- 



Red #32 

Yellow #1 — 

Yellow #3— 

Yellow #4— 

♦Yellow #5— 

♦Yellow #6— 



Drug and cosmetic colors: 



Black #1- 
Blue— — 
Blue #1- 
Blue #4- 



Blue #6 

Blue #9 

Brown #1 — 
Green #1 — 
Green #5 — 
Green #6 — 
Green #7- 
Orange- 

Orange #1 

Orange #3 

Orange #4 

Orange #5 

Orange #11 

Orange #14 

Orange #15 

Orange #16- 



Orange #17- 
Red #1 



131,184,331. 

131. 

131. 

70,131,136,184,331. 

70,136,184,331. 

131. 

131. 



43,331,542. 

43,263,331,494. 

43,331,542. 

43,331,542. 

542. 

43,263,331,494,542. 

70,331. 

263. 

43,263,331. 

43,263,331,494,542. 

43,263,331,494. 

331,542. 

70,331. 

263. 

70,141,331. 

141,331. 

43,263,331,494,542. 

43,263,331,494,542. 



331. 

263. 

263. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

263,331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

263. 

263. 

331. 

19,263,331. 

19,70. 

331. 

159. 

19,263. 

331. 

19,263. 

263. 



iu 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Dye 



DYES GROUPED BY COLOUR INDEX 
NUMBERS — Continued 
Food. Drug, and Cosmetic Dyes — Con, 
Drug and cosmetic colors — Continued 

Red #2 

Red #3 

Red #5 ■ 

Red #6—— ■— 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 2U) 



Red #7 

Red #8 

Red #9- 

Red #10 

Red #11 

Red #12 

Red #L3 

Red #H 

Red #17 

Red #18 

Red #19 

Red #21 

Red #22 

Red #28 

Red #29- 



Red #30 

Red #31 

Red #33 

Red #34 

Red #35 

Red #36- 

Red #37 

Red #38 

Red #39 

Violet #1 

Yellow #1 

Yellow #5 

Yellow #6 

Yellow #7 



Yellow #8 

Yellow #10 

Yellow #11 



Drug and co6taetic colors, external: 

Blue #1 

Green #5 

Red #1 

Red #8 

Red #10 

Red #11 

Red #L3 

Violet #2- 

Yellow #3 

Yellow #5 



263,331. 

263. 

19,263. 

19. 

19,263. 

19,70,263. 

19,70. 

19,263. 

19,263. 

19,263. 

19. 

19,159. 

331. 

70,331. 

19,263,331. 

70,248,263. 

70,331. 

331. 

159. 

263. 

19,263. 

331. 

19,263. 

19,263. 

19,263. 

331. 

263. 

367. 

331. 

263,331. 

19,263. 

263. 

70,263,331. 

70,331. 

331. 

331. 



331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

263. 

19. 

19,263. 



115 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
7 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

26 

27 

28 

30 

31 

32 

33 

35 

37 

40 

42 

43 

45 

46 

47 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
56 
59 
61 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
77 



Bye 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGH PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS 



*Acid alizarin flavine R — 
Acid anthracene brown B — 
Acid anthracene brown 3B— 

*Acid anthracene brown PG— 
Acid chrome blue 2R 

2/ 

Alizarin direct blue A2G-- 

Alizarin direct blue AR- 



Aiizarin supra blue A 

Alkali fast green 10G 

♦Anthracene chromate brown F3- 
Artificial silk black G 

♦Benzo Bordeaux 6B- 



*Benzo chrome black blue 
Benzo chrome brown BS — 
Benzo copper blue B- 
Benzo dark brown ex- 

♦Benzo fast black L- 



♦Benzo fast blue 4GL 

Benzo fast blue 8GL 

Benzo fast brown 3GL 

Benzo red 12B 

Benzo rhoduline red B- 

Benzo rhoduline red 3B 

Brilliant acid blue 3B 

♦Brilliant benzo violet B 

Brilliant milling blue B 

♦Brilliant wool blue FFR 

Cellitazol B 

♦Celliton orange GR 

Celliton red violet R 

Chlorantine fast blue 2GL — 

♦Chlorantine fast brown BRL— 

♦Chlorantine fast yellow 4GL- 

♦Chlorantine fast yellow RL— 

Chrome yellow DS 

Chrome yellow G 

Cibacete brilliant blue 2B— 

Cibacete diazo black B 

Cibacete diazo black GH 

Cibacete red 3B 

♦Cotton black 3G- 



Manuf acturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Cross dye green B 

Diamine azo Bordeaux B 

♦Diamine Bordeaux B 

Diamine catechine B 

Diamine catechine G 

♦Diamine catechine 3G 

♦Diamine fast blue FEB 

♦Diamine fast orange EG 

♦Diamine fast orange ER 

Diaminogen blue R2B 

Diazo Bordeaux 7B 



70,136,184,331. 

70. 

95. 

12,70,89,95,136,184,384,574. 

95,184. 

184. 

184. 

136,184. 

184. 

70,89,95,136,184,331,574. 

95,184,331,574. 

12,95,184,331. 

95,136,184,331. 

70,184. 

184. 

164. 

12,70,95,136,184,331. 

89,164,384. 

384. 

184,331. 

136. 

136. 

184. 

12. 

12,136,184. 

136,184. 

136,184,331. 

70,136. 

70,136,184. 

136. 

95. 

8,12,52,89,95,136,164,331,384. 

52,70,95,136,384. 

8,95,136,384. 

95. 

70. 

52. 

95,136,574. 

95. 

136. 

12,184,574. 

70. 

331. 

8,12,52,184,331. 

136,331. 

12,136,331. 

12,70,136,331. 

52,70,95,136,184,331. 

70,89,95,136,184. 

70,89,136,184,231. 

136,331. 

12,136,184,384. 



See footnotes at end of table. 



116 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 

No. 



78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
93 
94 
94 
95 
96 
97 
99 
101 
102 
106 
107 
108 
109 
116 
118 
121 
122 
124 
126 
127 
128 
129 
134 
135 
137 
138 
139 
141 
143 
144 
145 
147 
148 
151 
152 
163 
164 
165 
166 
168 
169 



Dye 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS — Continued 



Diazo brilliant green 3G 

*Diazo brilliant scarlet 2BL ex 

*Diazo brilliant scarlet ROA 

Diazo brown 6G 

Diazo brown NR 

Diazo brown 3RB 

Diazo fast red 5BL- 
*Diazo fast red 7BL- 

Diazo indigo blue 4G 

Diazo indigo blue 4RL- 

Diazo olive G 

Diazo rubine B- 



Diazo sky blue B 
Diazo sky blue 3G: 
Fast mordant blue B — 

♦Fast 6carlet 2G salt — 
Fast scarlet 2G base — 
Fastusol brown L3R 
Fastusol gray 
Fastusol orange L5G- 
Fastusol yellow L5G- 

♦Guinea fast red BL- 




Guinea fast red 4BL — — 

Helindone fast scarlet B — 

Helindone fast scarlet G 

Helindone pink B ex 

Helindone pink R ex-- 

Indanthrene brilliant orange RK- 

Indanthrene brown BR- 

♦Indanthrene brown RRD 

♦Indanthrene khaki 2G— 

Indanthrene rubine R dbl 

Indo carbon CL- 

Indo carbon CLG cone 

Indocyanine B 

Katigen chrome blue 5C 
Metachrome Bordeaux R- 
Metachrome red G— -■ — 

rolling orange G 

Milling yellow H5G 

Milling yellow 0- 



Naphthol blue black S- 
Neolan black WA- 



♦Noolan blue GG — 
Neolan Bordeaux 

♦Oxydiaminogen OB 

Paper red A ex- 
Polar orange GS — 

♦Polar orange R 

Rapidogen blue BN 

♦Rapidogen blue D — 

Rapidogen Bordeaux 
Rapidogen brown ON — 
Rapidogen red OS 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



♦Rapidogen red RS • — 



184,331. 

12,136,184,331. 

12,136,184,384. 

184. 

184. 

184,331. 

89,136. 

12,89,136,384. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184,384. 

184. 

184. 

331. 

12,184,310,331,384. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

70,e9,136,184,331. 

89,136. 

136. 

136. 

70. 

70,136,184. 

184. 

70,184. 

12,70,95,136,184,384. 

12,70,136,184,331. 

136,184. 

184. 

184. 

136,184. 

184. 

89. 

89,575. 

12. 

12,184,384. 

184,331. 

331. 

95. 

70,89,95,184,384. 

95. 

12,52,184,331. 

136,184. 

95. 

89,95,136,184,331. 

184,384. 

136,184,384. 

184,384. 

184. 

70,136,184. 

136,184,384. 



117 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
Ho. 



170 
171 
172 
173 
17-4 
175 
177 
178 
181 
182 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
197 
198 
199 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 



Eye 



Manufacturers ' Identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



EYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS — Continued 



*Rapidogen scarlet RS- 
Rapidogen yellow G— 



♦Rosanthrene fast Bordeaux 2BL— — 
Rosanthrene orange R ■ ■ ■ — 

Setacyl direct orange 2R 

Setacyl direct violet B ■ 

Sudan blue G— — — 

Sudan brown 5B - ■■'-—— 

Sudan orange RT- -■ ■■■ ■ 

Sudan red BB -• ■ ■- 

Sulphon orange G— ■ ■ 

♦Sulphon yellow R— 



♦Supra light rubine BL- 
Supramine black BR— 
Supramine blue R- 



Supramine Bordeaux R— 

Supramine brown R 

Supramine red 3B 

Supramine red 2G- 



Supramine yellow R- 

•Victoria fast violet 2R ex- 
Victoria pure blue B 

Victoria violet RL 

♦Zambesi black D 

Zambesi black V— 



Acid anthracene brown KE- 



Aoid anthracene brown LE-CF 

Acid anthracene brown WSG— ~ — 

♦Alizarin fast gray BBLW 

Alizarin supra sky R 

Alphanol brown B— — — 

Amido naphthol brown 3G- ■ 

Anthralan red B-CF- 

Azosol fast orange G— — — — 

Azosol fast orange RR 

Azosol fast red 

Azosol fast scarlet CR — — 

Azosol fast scarlet CGG 

Azosol fast yellow GR- 
Benzo fast Bordeaux 6BL- 

Benzo fast brown RL 

Benzoform blue BBL— — — 
Benzo new blue 5B- 

ttyramine yellow R 

Brilliant indocyanine 6B-CF — 

Brilliant indocyanine G— 

Brilliant sulpho flavine FFA- 

Celliton blue G 

Celliton fast blue B 



Celliton fast blue FR— 



Celliton fast blue FFR- 
Celllton fast blue green B- 

Celliton fast brown 3R 

Celliton fast brown 5R 

Celliton fast navy blue B— 



70,136,184,384. 

136,184,384. . 

12,136,184,384. 

136,184,384. 

136. 

136. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

12,184. 

12,70,184,384. 

70,184,331. 

12,184. 

184. 

1S4. 

12. 

12,184. 

184. 

184. 

70,184,331. 

184,331. 

136. 

95,184,331. 

136,184,331. 

164. 

184. 

184. 

12,70,136,184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

52,184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

136,574. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

136,184. 

184. 

70,184. 

184. 

184. 

164. 

164. 



118 



Table SB.- Synthetic organic chemicals; Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



233 

234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 

2a 

242 
243 
244 

245 

247 

248 

249 

250 

251 

252 

255 

256 

257 

258 

259 

260 

260 

261 

262 

263 

264 

265 

266 

267 

268 

269 

270 

271 

272 

273 

274 

275 

276 

277 

278 

285 

286 

287 

288 

289 

290 

291 

292 

293 

296 

299 



Dye 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS — Continued 

Celliton fast navy blue BR 

Celliton fast pink B 

Celliton fast pink FF3B 

Celliton fast red GG 

Celliton fast red violet RN- 

Celliton fast rubine B 

Celliton fast rubine 3B 

Celliton fast violet B 

Celliton fast violet 6B 

Celliton fast yellow G 

Celliton fast yellow RR 

*Celliton scarlet B 

Celliton yellow 5G 

Chrome fast orange 3RI« 

Diamine orange F— 

Dianil yellow 5G 

Diazo brown 3R- 



Diazo fast yellow 2G- 
Dlazo fast yellow 3G- 

Fast black B salt 

Fast black K salt 



Fast black LB base- 
Fast blue BB base, sail 
Fast Bordeaux BD salt- 
*Fast Bordeaux GP base- 
♦Fast Bordeaux GP salt- 
Fast corinth V salt- 



*Fast garnet GBC base, salt- 
Fast garnet GC salt- 



*Fast orange GC base, salt- 
Fast orange GP salt 

Fast orange RD salt 

Fast red AL salt 

Fast red GL base, salt 

*Fast red 3GL salt 

Fast red KB base, salt 

*Fast red RC base, salt 

Fast red RL salt ■ 

♦Fast red TR base, salt 

Fast vioJ.et B salt — 



♦Fast yellow GC base, salt — 

Fastusol orange LGGL 

Fastusol red violet LRI/ 

Fastusol turquoise blue LGL 
Immedial new blue FBL ex 

Iramedial new blue 3GL ex 

Indanthrene brilliant orange GR 

Indanthrene brilliant violet 3B 

Indanthrene direct black RB 

Indanthrene golden orange 3G 

Indanthrene golden yellow GK 

Indanthrene golden yellow RK 

♦Indanthrene olive green B- 

Indanthrene red FBB 

Ilonochrome black blue G 



Manufacturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



184. 

184. 

184. 

70,184. 

184. 

70,136,184. 

184. 

136,184. 

184. 

136,184. 

52,184. 

70,136,184,574. 

184. 

1£4. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

134. 

184. 

12,70,136,184. 

12,184,310. 

184. 

12,136,175,184. 

1S4. 

12,184,304,310,331. 

184,310. 

184. 

184. 

12,184. 

12,134,310, 3S4. 

12,70,184. 

136,134,310. 

184. 

12,134,310,331. 

184. 

184,304,310. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

136,184. 

184,331. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

12,70,136,184,331. 

184. 

136,184. 



119 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945— Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



300 

301 

302 

303 

304 

305 

306 

307 

30S 

309 

310 

311 

312 

313 

3M 

315 

316 

318 

319 

321 

322 

323 

324 

325 

326 

327 

328 

329 

330 

331 

332 

334 

335 

336 

337 

338 

339 

340 

341 

342 

345 

346 

347 

348 

349 

350 

351 

352 

353 

354 

356 

357 

35* 



Eye 



DYES GROUPED BY FOREIGN PROTOTYPE 
NUMBERS — Continued 



Monochrome red FG 

Monochrome violet FB- 
♦Naphthol AS 

Naphthol AS-BO 

Naphthol AS-BR- 

♦Naphthol AS-BS 

*Naphthol AS-D 

Naphthol AS-DB 

Naphthol AS-E- 



Naphthol AS-G 

Naphthol AS-ITR 

Naphthol AS-OL 

Naphthol AS-RL 

Naphthol AS-SW 

Naphthol AS-TR 

Neolan orange G 



Neolan yellow GR cone 

Palatine fast blue BN 

Palatine fast blue RRN 

Palatine fast green BLN 

Palatine fast marine blue REN- 

Palatine fast orange GEN 

Palatine fast orange GN 

Palatine fast orange RN 

♦Palatine fast pink BN 

Palatine fast red RN 

Palatine fast violet 3RN 

Palatine fast violet 5RN- 
Palatine fast yellow ELN- 
Palatine fast yellor GRN- 

Pluto black G 

Rapid fast orange RH 

Rapid fast red FGH 

Rapid fast red RH 

Rapid fast scarlet ILH 

Rapid fast yellow GGH 

Rapidogen black MG- 
Rapidogen black brown IT- 
Rapidoger. blue N- 
Rapidogen blue R- 



Rapidogen golden yellow R- 
Rapidogen golden yellow 3R- 

Rapidogen green B 

Rapidogen orange G 

Rapidogen orange R 

Rapidogen red violet RR- 
Rapidogen violet B 



Rapidogen yellow G 

Rapidogen yellow 2G 

Rapidogen yellow GGP 

Soiamine blue FFG 



Variamlne blue BD salt- 
Tariamine blue RT salt- 



Manufacturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



184. 

184. 

12,70,136,154,331. 

12,154,310,331. 

12,154. 

12,70,136,154,331. 

12,70,136,184,331.384. 

184. 

184. 

12,184. 

184. 

184,331,354. 

12,154,331. 

12,70,136,184,331. 

12,184,310. 

95. 

95. 

70,184. 

184. 

184. 

89,184. 

184. 

134. 

184. 

70,89,184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

89,184. 

184. 

184,574. 

70,184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

154. 

184. 

184. 

136,184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

136,184- 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

136,184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 



120 



Table SB.- Synthetic organic chemicals t Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Dye 



Manufacturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



UNGROUPED DYES 

Acetate rayon dyes: 2/ 
♦Black Mo. 25, IV, IV ex. ,AD,AZO,B,BAU, 
BDN,BGD,BNF,G,2G,3G,GFS,3GNF,GS,GY, 

J,JF,LNB,NS,PL,RB,S,SN,SOL,SS. g 

♦Blue, IV,HI,B,B ex. ,2B,BGF,BNN,BP, 

BXN,FFG,FFR,GG,GR,NR,R,3R. 5/ 

Brilliant Bordeaux 3B 

Brown, #3,B,BG,G,Y 



Developed navy SD 

Discharge pink BR,GR — 
Fast pink RFA- 
Gray NBN- 
Heliotrope I- 



♦Orange, I,III,BL,FSI,G,GR,GRN,JER,R, 
2R,3R,RB,TF. 6/ 

Pink II,B,BA,BR 

Purple 

♦Red, III,VTI,VIII,VIX,IX,B,2B,BF,BG, 
BS,C,CSB,FSI,G,GY,NB,R,RP,VOL,Y. "Jj- 

Turquoise MG 

Violet II,3B,BGF,4R,5RLF 

Violet blue FSI 

♦Yellow #8,#38,VIII,IX,XI,XII,XIII,FFA, 

FSI,G,5G,6G,GL,GLF,3GM,GN,6GN,GR,GS, 

GX,HEB,JT,L3G,4RL,RN. 8/- 

Acid alizarin Bordeaux BLT— ■ 



Acid black AR,3G,GRF,GRF conc.,RB,RCW- 
Acid blue #23790 D,R 

Acid blue black #23779, FC 

Acid brilliant red 3B,4BL 

Acid brown R,R cone- 
Acid carmine 2B 



Acid chrome black blue G 

Acid chrome blue 3GNA, 2RL 

Acid chrome brown DKL, RLL 

Acid chrome olive BL— 



Acid chrome yellow HE 

Acid dark green B 

Acid fast brown CGS, RB, 

Acid fast orange Lff 

Acid fast red CA 



Acid fast yellow GOO 

Acid garnet BG cone 

Acid golden yellow R cone- 
Acid green S 



Acid leather brown EBR- 
Acid milling orange 4R- 
Acid milling yellow GN- 
Acid navy B cone. FN— 

Acid navy blue, M4B 

Acid neutral brown 2RS— — — — 

Acid pink BA 

♦Acid red A-100, 3BK, G, OA, RB- 

Acid sapphire G— — 

Acid scarlet G cone, Y— — — — 



12,52,70,89,95,136,175,184, 
331,512,574. 

12,52,89,95,136,184,331,512, 

575. 
70. 

8,70,136,512. 
12. 
184. 
184. 
12. 
12. 
8,12,70,136,331,512,574. 

12,331,512. 

136. 

8,12,70,136,175,184,331,512, 

574. 
184. 

12,136,331,512. 
12. 
12,70,95,136,175,184,331,512. 



184. 

136,331. 

384. 

136,384. 

331,384. 

3&4. 

136. 

95. 

95,184. 

95. 

95. 

95. 

95. 

52,136. 

12. 

136. 

52. 

401. 

384. 

401. 

184. 

70. 

136. 

X. 

70,136. 

136. 

95. 

52,95,136,384. 

8. 

384. 



See footnotes at end of table. 



121 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic cheraicalst Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Dye 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



UNGROUPED DYES—Continued 



Acid violet 2R, RNL 

Acid yellow BE, CW, G, 

Alizarin blue GS 

Alphazurine B conc- 



}R, R- 



Araido brilliant red BBA- 
Anthracene blue SWN 



Anthracene chrome brown RL- 
Anthra navy blue BRA conc- 



Anthraquinone blue BGA, 3G, SWB, WSA- 

Anthraquinone vat black 2G, J, R 

Anthraquinone vat black brown VA 

Anthraquinone vat blue GR- 



Anthraquinone vat blue green B, Y 

Anthraquinone vat brilliant green 4BA — 
Anthraquinone vat brilliant red B- ■ ■■■ ■- 
Anthraquinone vat brilliant yellow 4G — 

Anthraquinone vat brown NR, VR 

Anthraquinone vat dark blue 2G 

Anthraquinone vat dark olive 
Anthraquinone vat direct black 

Anthraquinone vat flavine GC 

Anthraquinone vat golden orange 4G, YL- 
Anthraquinone vat gray 2G, 4G, GGL, M, R 
♦Anthraquinone vat navy blue BN, BRA, 

NRD, NTP. 

Anthraquinone vat olive G, GGL, TA 

Anthraquinone vat red brown DBL 

Anthraquinone vat violet A-200 

Anthraquinone vat yellow 8G, 3R 

Azoanthrene dyes: 

Black NV 

Blue G- 

Golden orange R ex — 

Green G 



Navy BR, CW, LN- 
Red 3BTJ 



Royal blue L, S- 

Rubine B, S 

Scarlet Y 



Turquoise B 

Yellow G, GSB, S 

Azo Bordeaux BL, NR 

Azo brown BY 

Azo ceresin B 

Azo eosine 2B 

Azo fast blue B high conc- 
Azo fast brilliant red BA- 

Azo fast orange RA 

Azo fast yellow RLA 

Azo green OL 

Azo oil black 



Azo oil blue black B 

Azo olive green BL 

Azo orange BRS, GOT, GN, GR, RNC, RS- 
Azo scarlet RBN 

Azo violet B 



401,574. 

95,331,384. 

331. 

331. 

184. 

331. 

575. 

184. 

136. 

70,331. 

184. 

331. 

136,331. 

184. 

136. 

136. 

136,331. 

136. 

12. 

136. 

331. 

136. 

70,136,331. 

12,70,136,184. 

136,184. 
12. 
136. 
136. 

8, 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8. 

384. 

384. 

70. 

136. 

331. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

384. 

331. 

331. 

384. 

384. 

384. 

384. 



122 



Table ffi.- Synthetic organic chemicals* Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by Manufacturer, 1945— Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Ore 



UNGROUPED DYES — Continued 

Azoic dyes and their components: 2/ 
Dyes: 

Rapid fasts 
Blue B — — 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Brown IBH— 

Orange G — 

Scarlet RH- 

Bapidogen: 



Black Of, MB— — 

Blue GDHH, GNN, MSG 

Bordeaux BN, MR — — 

Brown FFIB, 2G, GGN, B 

Dark brown AB, B— — ■ 

Golden yellow MRS, B 

Ravy blue FFR 

Orange FFR — 

Red ARF, FFBB, FFG, FFR, GHH, IP, 
ITR, YN. 

Scarlet, FFG, FFR, RBY 

Seal brown — — 



Yellow, FFGG 

Components: 
Fast color bases: 
Black B 



Ponceau L 

Bed B, PDC, BC— 

Scarlet GG, RC- 

Fast color salts: 

Blue B 



Ponceau L— ■ — ■ 

Red salt B, 2G, ITBN 

Scarlet G, R — — 

Yellow GC 

Fur dyes: 

Nyanzol NZA, NZDA, NZDP, NZF- 
Nyanzol berry blue— — — — 

Byanzol fusion #M387 

Ryansol gray #602A, BCA 

Naph thole: 

Naphthol AS-BG- 



Naphthol AS-GR- 
Baphthol AS-KR- 
Haphthol AS-LB- 
Haphthol AS-MX- 
Haphthol AS-OP- 
Haphthol AS-PH- 
Baphthol AS-SG- 
Benzof orm dyes: 
Blue GGA- 



Blue green BA- 

Brown L3RA 

Bed 7B, G 

Bublne BA 

Violet BB- 



Brilliant acid blue 3B — 
Brilliant benzo green BA' 



184. 
184* 
384. 
184. 

136. 

136,384. 

136,184. 

184,384. 

136,184. 

136,384. 

184. 

184. 

136,184,384. 

184,384. 

384. 

184,384. 



184. 

12. 

12,184,310. 

12,184,304,310. 

12,184,310,384. 

12. 

12,184,310,331. 

12,184,310,331. 

12. 



89. 
89. 
89. 

184. 
184. 
184. 
184. 
184. 
384. 
184. 
184. 

184. 
184. 
184. 
184. 
184. 
184. 
331. 
184. 



See footnotes at end of table. 



123 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals* Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945— Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Dye 



UNGROUPED DYES — Continued 



N- 



Brilliant blue 5B 

Brilliant wool blue G ex. t 
Chronate brilliant brown RL- 

Chronate brown 

Chrome black 3G 

Chrome brown 2AB, E, DK, EB, 0, PD, PG — 

Chrome fast red 2RL 

*Chrome green B, CB, G- — — 

Chrome leather fast black S 

Chrome orange LC, 3R, RL 

Chrome red G- — ____ 



♦Chrome yellow FTL, 2G, 2GN, SSH, SW- 
Ciba blue BR- 
Ciba red 3BG, BW- 



Croceine scarlet FP cone- 
Developed black 



Developed blue B, 3G, 6G, 5GL 

Developed Bordeaux 7B cone, 2BL— 
Developed brilliant blue 2BLA, CF- 
Developed brilliant scarlet 
Developed brown R — 



Developed fast Bordeaux 2BL- 

Developed fast brown RK 

Developed fast red 8BL 

Developed fast violet BL 

Developed fast yellow 2G 

Developed green BL, 2GL, GW- 
Developed indigo blue BRRA- 



Developed orange DD, G3G, GR, RFW, RR, WD 
Developed red 2B, BFW, 7B 

Developed rubine B 

Developed scarlet FW, GFW, N 

Developed violet BRD, RR 

Developed yellow 2GL 

Dlazophen red 

Diazophen yellow BTP 



♦Direct black CAM, CW, 3G, 5G, NCW, RTV, 
URL. 

♦Direct blue 2B, BR, 5G, 6G, NR, RDW, VRS 

Direct blue green CW 

Direct Bordeaux B 

Direct brilliant blue BFL 



Direct brilliant cerise — 
Direct brilliant orange RS— — — 

Direct brilliant red L2B 

Direct brilliant violet B, 4B, R- 
Direct brilliant yellow 6G- 



♦Direct brown, CWR, FW, GB, GKA, G2R, 3GS, 
N, R, 4R, RB, RBA, RY, VGA-CF. 

Direct copper blue GL, RRX 

♦Direct fast black AM, FOR, G, PG 

♦Direct fast blue 6GKS, GL, 6GL, 8GL, 8GLN, 
8GUF, R, RL, SRL. 

Direct fast Bordeaux 2B 

Direct fast brown BRL, 4GL, R, 4R, 2RL, 
3YL. 



Manufacturers • identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



331. 

331. 

89. 

575. 

331. 

89,95,331. 

136. 

95,136,331. 

184. 

70,136,331. 

331. 

89,136,184,331. 

131. 

131. 

331. 

95. 

95,136. 

89,331. 

184. 

89. 

136. 

89. 

136. 

184. 

136. 

331. 

136. 

184. 

136,331. 

95,136,331. 

89. 

136,331. 

12,136. 

136. 

70. 

70. 

8,95,136,184,331,574. 

12,70,89,331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

70. 

95. 

331. 

12,95,331. 

331. 

8,12,52,89,95,184,331,574. 

136,331. 

12,136,184,331. 

8,136,331. 

331. 
136,331. 



747685 O - 47 - 9 



124 



Table SB.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 194.5 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Eye 



Manufacturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



DNGROUPED DYES— Continued 

Direct fast catechine GA- 
*Direct fast gray BL, GL, 2GL, LVL, 
LVGLA, M. 
Direct fast olive brown RL 



♦Direct fast orange G, 2G, 4G cone. , 
GL, 2GL, R, RGL, 4HL, 5RL, RT. 

*Direct fast red 3BL, 8BLN, 8BLSW, WL 

Direct fast rubine B, B cone, LB, WL — 

Direct fast scarlet G 

Direct fast violet 5BL 

Direct fast yellow 4GL, 5GL 

Direct formyl brown RB- 

Direct garnet RB— 

Direct golden yellow R 

Direct gray BBC 

Direct green B, 5GSC, 2Y 

Direct indigo blue- 



Direct light yellow RL 

*Direct navy DSU, G, R 

*Direct navy blue B, DB, RI 

Direct neutral blue 

Direct orange DB 

Direct red R 



Direct rhoduline BA cone, CF- 
Direct rubine G- 
Direct scarlet G- 

Direct silk blue NR 

Direct sky blue B 

Direct speck dye red SW- 
Direct violet black 



Direct viscose blue GGS, RS 

Direct yellow S3G, S5GP cone 

Fast acid blue WF- 
Fast acid brown RG- 
Fast acid light red B- 
Fast acid orange RW — 

Fast acid red BBLA 

Fast acid yellow GS — 

Fast black G 

Fast Bordeaux BN- 
Fast brown FN, MF— 
Fast crimson R 



Fast light red 4BA, BI 

Fast olive brown G- 

Fast orange 4RN, YF 

Fast pigment violet RP 

Fast spirit black R- 

Fast spirit brown G 

Fast spirit orange R 

Fast spirit yellow 2R- 
Fast yellow 2G, N- 

Fluore scent green 

Fluorescent purple 2G 

Fluorol 5GA- 
Fluroleura green- 
Fluroleum red 



89. 
8,136,184,331. 

12. 
8,89,136,331. 

8,12, 52,29,184,331, 574. 

136,331,574. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

70. 

331. 

384. 

8. 

70,136,331. 

12. 

95. 

12,70,X. 

95,136,574. 

384. 

136. 

12. 

184. 

12. 

12. 

184. 

95. 

331. 

95. 

184. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

95. 

95. 

184. 

331. 

70. 

70. 

70. 

331. 

184,331. 

70. 

70. 

331. 

70. 

70. 

70. 

70. 

70. 

559. 

331. 

184. 

136. 

136. 



125 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945— Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 

No. 



Dye 



UNGROUPED DYES—Continued 



Formaldehyde black B — 

Formaldehyde scarlet Y 

Formalide brown FD 

Formalide deep blue R 

Gasoline blue 

Gasoline yellow 

Hudson chrome fast green SP 

Igenal brown CRTA, ITGA, MI30, PGMA— 

Indigo vat black 

Indigo vat brown G 

Indigo vat printing black G 

Indigo vat scarlet 2GN 

Induline base 

Ink blue ASB, DCB 

Jet black APX 

Lake yellow PI 

Leather brown ET, 5RTA- 

Methyl violet 3RAE 

Milling fast red GD, FF 

Milling navy blue 4B 

Milling orange G 

Milling red B cone 

Milling yellow 3G, 2GCT, NGS, XN- 

Monochrome olive FBLA 

Mordant green SN 

Neutral brown GH, R 

Neutral silk brown RHS, RWA- 
Neutral 6 ilk yellow CGA, SX— 

Oil black 

Oil brown #79, #102, D, M, Y- 
Oil fast blue R- 
*Oil orange, #30, MT- 

Oil pink B 

*Oil red #322, EGN, I-H71, N-1700, OB, 
Y-^92. 

Oil scarlet X-9995 

Oil soluble azoic yellow 

Oil yellow, PHVJ 

Oxamine brilliant red BA, CF- 

Palatine fast blue 5RNA 

Palatine fast claret BNA cone, CF- 

Paper white GDC 

Polyform dye6: 

Blue BRF, 2RF 

Bordeaux RF 

Dark brown 3BF 

Dark maroon GF 

Orange RF- 
Scarlet 2GF, RF- 

Yellow GF 

Pyrazol fast orange GL 

Pyrazoline dyes* 

Fyrazoline black 

Pyrazoline blue CF, R, 2RCF- 
Pyrazoline gray GL 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



95. 

95. 

574. 

574. 

70,89. 

70. 

575. 

575. 

184. 

131. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

70. 

184. 

136. 

331. 

184. 

184. 

89. 

331. 

384. 

331. 

331. 

184. 

70. 

95,331. 

89. 

8,89. 

368. 

175,331. 

12. 

70,175,368. 

331. 

12,70,175,331,368. 

70. 

I64. 

70,368. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

136. 
136. 
136. 
136. 
136. 
136. 
136. 
95. 

384. 
384. 
384. 



126 



Table 8B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Coal-tar dyes for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Colour 
Index or 
Proto- 
type 
No. 



Dye 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



UNGROUPED DYES—Continued 

Pyrazoline dyes — Continued 
Pyrazoline orange LR- 

Pyrazoline red BLW 

Quinoline yellow P- 

Resin brilliant orange 2R- 

Resin brilliant red R 

Resin brown Z- 
Resin royal blue #51591- 
Resin sky blue #51590— 
Resin violet #51720- 
Rosanthrene orange- 
Rubber colors — 
Silk black 4BF— 
Silk brown G, R- 



Spirit soluble blue — 

Spirit soluble fast black 

Spirit soluble fast blue B 

Spirit soluble fast orange A cone — 

Spirit soluble fast red M, Y 

Spirit soluble fast yellow 3G 

Spirit soluble green 

Spirit soluble violet 

Stilbene orange E3G- 
Sudan corinth B — 



Sudan dark brown BG cone 

Supranol brilliant red BA/CF- 

Tolylene fast brown 3GA 

Visco blue RS 

Water black SR 

Wool blue CGG 

Wool green B 

Wool navy B 

Zambesi black BG 

All other- 



384- 
384. 

136. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

136. 

136. 

95. 

S. 

575. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

575- 

575. 

70. 

I84. 

184. 

184. 

184. 

95. 

70. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

95. 

136. 



2/ Includes Foreign Prototype Dye #9 algol yellow GC. 

2/ Included in Colour Index IO95. 

2/ Excludes acetate rayon dyes that appear under "Dyes grouped by 
Foreign Prototype number." 

ij Includes developed black and diazo black. 

5/ Includes brilliant blue, navy blue, pure blue and saphirol blue. 

6/ Includes golden orange and light orange. 

2/ Includes rubine and scarlet. 

8/ Includes brilliant yellow, fast yellow, fluorescent yellow, and 
golden yellow. 

2/ Excludes azoic dyes and their components that appear under "Dyes 
grouped by Colour Index number" and "Dyes grouped by Foreign Prototype 
number." 



127 



Lakes and Toners 



Table 13B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Lakes and toners for which separate statistics are given in table 13 A are 
marked below with an asterisk (*); those not so marked do not appear in 
table 13A because the reported data are confidential and may not be published. 
Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in 
table 24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publi- 
cation of his identification number with the designated product) 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification numbers (according 
to list in table 24) 



LAKES OR LAKE COLORS 

♦Black lakes: 

Logwood black 

Nigrosine (C.l. 864) 

All other 

*31ue lakes: 

Brilliant wool blue 

Indanthrene blue RS (C.I. 

1106). 
Indanthrene blue GCD (C.I. 
1113). 
♦Methylene blue (C.I. 922) — 
♦Peacock blue, nonpermanent 
(Patent blue) (C.I. 671). 

Phthalocyanine blue lake 

Setoglaucine lake (C.I. 658) 
♦Turquoise blue (C.I. 661) — 
♦Victoria blue B lake 
(C.I. 729). 

All other 

♦Brown lakes: 

♦Bismarck brown 

All other 

♦Green lakes: 

♦Acid green B (C.I. 669) 

Acid green G (C.I. 666) 

♦Brilliant green lake 
(C.I. 662). 

Light green SF 

♦Malachite green lake 
(C.I. 657). 

Naphthol green B (C.I. 5) 

Pigment green B lake 
(Pr. U9). 

All other 

Maroon lakes: 

Alizarin Bordeaux (C.I. 1045) 
♦Alizarin maroon (C.I. 1041)- 

♦Amaranth (C.I. I84) 

♦Azo Bordeaux (C.I. 88) 

♦Helio fast rubine 

Hypernic 

Quinizarine maroon 

All other 

♦Orange lakes: 

♦Acid orange R (C.I. l6l) 

Naphthol AS-OL (Pr. 311) 

♦Persian orange (Acid orange 
Y) (Orange II) (C.I. 151). 
All other 



263,568. 

36,205. 

93,105,307. 

258. 
136. 

229,255. 

105,136,142, 296,468,499. 

3, 19, 61,70, 72, 105, 142,205, 217,219, 229, 248, 263, 

278,296,307,434,464,468,499,549,575. 
136,258. 
61,105,499. 
45,142, 263,464. 
61,70,205,219,296,307. 

22,36,61,93,229,307,558. 

19,61,263,307. 
36,105,205,575. 

61,142,263,296. 

19,105,142. 

19, 61, 142, 263, 307. 

205. 
61,105,229,307. 

54. 

54,H2, 229,258,464,558. 

22,36,61,70,93,164,229,307,519. 

314. 

258,314,549,575. 

72,255,263,464. 

19,61,70,136,142,205,219,229,255,392,464,519,549. 

19,61,105,136,219,229,255,392,464,519,549. 

142,229. 

575. 

22,93,553. 

72,142,229. 

258. 

19,70,72,105,142,205,217,229,248,263,278,296,307, 

434,468,499,549,558. 
22,61,93,229. 



128 



Table 13B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United 

States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— Continued 



Product 


Manufacturers' identification numbers (according 
to list in table 24) 


LAKES OR LAKE COLORS- 






Continued 






Red lakes: 






*Alizarin red B (C.I. 1027) — 


19,45, 70,136,U2,229, 263, 307,392,464,468, 5-49. 


♦Eosine lake (Bromo acid lake) 


70,142,229,468,575. 


(C.I. 768). 










296. 
258. 
70. 


NAnhthnl AS ( Pr 1Q2) - 


Naphthol AS-BS (Pr. 305) 


— — 


Naphthol AS-D (Pr. 306)- 




258. 


*Pigment scarlet 3B (C.I, 


216) 


19,61,136,219,229,263,307,419,549,575. 


♦Rhodamine B lake (C.I. 7-49)- 


19,61,105,142,519. 






61,142,468,499. 
19,22,70,93,136,205,229,255,258,263,392,464,519, 

549. 
105,307. 


*&CAi»let PR (C, I 7Q) 






Vnt nink (C 1 1 71 \ ) 












22,36,61,70,72,136,229,464,468,558. 






♦Violet lakes: 






♦Arid vinlpt IC I M9)„ 




61,105,205,296. 

19,61, 70,105,136,142,205,219, 229,263, 296,307,492, 


*Methyl violet B (C.I. 680) — 






499,519,575. 


Mil other 





61,93,219. 


♦Xellow lakes: 










105,205. 
19,70,219,263,296,307,499. 


♦Fast light yellow (C.I. 


636) 


♦Naphthol yellow S (C.I. 


10)- 


19,205,229,263,296. 


Quercitron (FLavine) 




229. 


(C.I. 1251). 






♦Quinoline yellow (C.I. 801)- 


229,248,263,296,468,499. 


♦Tartrazine (C.I. 640) — 




19, 70, 72, U2, 217,219, 229, 248,263,278, 296,307,468, 
499. 






36,93,219,258. 


TONERS OR FULL-STRENGTi 




COLORS 






Rl A t*\c ^rtflAT*<l* PMA hi aplf-- 




105,519. 


♦Blue toners: 




♦Alkali blue (C.I. 704) — 




70,219,278,464,468. 


PMA Peacock blue G (C.I. 


653) 


61,229. 


PTA Peacock blue G (C.I. 


658) 


164,263. 


♦PTMA Peacock blue G 




70,105,136,217,219,229,307,468. 


(C.I. 658). 






♦PTMA Peacock blue R 




105,307,468. 


(C.I. 664). 






♦Phthalocyanine blue B — 




54,164,184,219,229,263,519,549. 


PVi Mini rtPVflm'np Vil no d 




136,164,229. 


i. il bIlU.X*J \-Jf OJ IXt IC U1UC VJ — — — 




Phthalocyanine blue SBL- 




136,184. 






184. 
61,72,136,142,229,278,296,519,549. 


♦PMA Victoria blue B 




(C.I. 729). 






*PTA Victoria blue B 




3,61,136,164,296,464,519,549,575. 


(C.I. 729). 






♦PTMA Victoria blue B 




19,61,70,105,219,229,263,296,468,499. 


(C.I. 729). 






PTMA Victoria blue R 




105,263. 


(C.I. 728). 







129 



Table 13B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United 

States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— Continued 






Product 


Manufacturers* identification numbers (according 




to list in table 24) 


TONERS OR FULL-STRENGTH 




COLORS — Continued 


. 


♦Blue toners — Continued 




PTMA Victoria pure blue B 


217,307. 


(Pr. 198). 






22,61,70,217,229. 


Brown toners: 




Havana brown 


72. 




217,259. 
136. 


Lithosol brown BC 




70. 


*Green toners: 


*PMA Brilliant green 


72,164,219,278,499,519. 


(C.I. 662). 




*PTA Brilliant green 


3, 22, 136,U2, 229, 263, 278,464, 549, 575. 


(C.I. 662). 




*PTMA Brilliant green 


19,61,70,105,164,217,219,296,464,468,499. 


(C.I. 662). 


• 


PMA Malachite green 


392. 


(C.I. 657). 




*PTA Malachite green 


3,61,229,263. 


(CI. 657). 




*PTMA Malachite green 


19,61,105,217,219,296,307,468,499. 


(C.I. 657). 




Ph thalocyan ine green 


136,184,219,229,549. 


Pigment green B toner 
(Pr. 149). 


136,229,464,549. 




*PMA, PTA. and PTMA 


105,229,307. 


Thioflavine plus malachite 




or brilliant green. 






61,70,184,219,229,464. 


Maroon toners: 




Helio Bordeaux (Lithosol 


229. 


Eordeaux 2BL) (C.I. 84) . 




*f-Hydroxynaphthoic maroon 


19,136,217,229,263,392,464,519,549. 


(B.O.N. Maroon) (Lithol 




maroon) . 




Lithol red 3G, manganese 


136. 


toner. 




Naphthol AS-D (Pr. 306) 


464. 


Naphthol AS-SW (Pr. 313) 


464. 


*C.I. 92, C-Naphthylamine 


229,255,392,549. 


maroon . 




*Toluidine maroon 


136,229,255,464,519. 


All other 


219. 


Orange toners: 






229. 






229. 




*2,4-Dinitroaniline orange 


19, 70, 229, 419, 464, 492, 549, 575. 


*o-Nitroaniline orange 


U2,164, 217,219,229, 255,464,492, 519,5a9. 




184,464,549. 






136,184,464. 


*Red toners: 




BONA-Arylamine 


492. 


*o-Chloronitroaniline red 


19,70,142,217,229,263,464,492,549,558,575. 


(Chlorinated para red). 




p-Chloronitroaniline red 


136,219,229,464,549. 



130 



Table 13B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United 

States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— Continued 



Product 



Manufacturers* identification numbers (according 
to, list in table 24) 



TONERS OR PULL-STRENGTH 
COLORS~Con tinued 

♦Red toners— Continued 
*Eosine toner (Bromo acid 

toner) (C.I. 768). 
♦C.I. 68, Fast scarlet G 

toner (p-Nitro-o-toluidine 
red). 
Helio fast pink RLA (Pr. Ill) 

Lithol red 2G 

♦Lithol red R toner6 
(C.I. 189): 
♦Barium toner 



♦Calcium toner- 



♦Sodium toner 

♦Lithol rubine B (C.I. 163) — 



Lithol scarlet 

Lithosol red 2B 

Lithosol red CSP 

PTA Magenta (C.I. 677) 

Naphthol AS 

Naphthol AS-BS 

♦C.I. 44, Para red, light 



♦Para red, dark- 



♦Permanent red 2B 

Pigment red 

Pigment rubine 

♦Red lake C (C.I. I65) 

♦Red lake D (C.I. 214) 

Red lake P 

PMA Rhodamine B (C.I. 749)-- 
PTA Rhodamine B (C.I. 749)-- 

♦PTMA Rhodamine B (C.I. 749)- 

PTMA Rhodamine 6G 

PMA Rhodamine I 

PTA Rhodamine I 

♦PTMA Rhodamine I 

Rubine 3G 

♦C.I. 69, Toluidine red 



All other 

Violet toners: 

PMA Crystal violet (C.I. 681) 

PTA Crystal violet (C.I. 681) 

♦PMA Methyl violet B 

(C.I. 680). 
♦PTA Methyl violet B 

(C.I. 680). 
♦PTMA Methyl violet B 

(C.I. 680). 
♦Methyl violet B toner 
(C.I. 680), other. 



70,72,164,217,229,248,278,468,499. 
142,217,219,519. 



184. 
464. 



19,70, 72,136,164,217,219,229,263,278,419,434,464, 

468,492,519,549,558. 
19, 70, 72,136,164, 205, 217,219,229,263, 278, U9, 434, 

464,468,492,549,558. 
19,70,72,136,164,217,219,229,263,464,468,492,549. 
19,61,105,136,164,217,219,229,255,263,296,419, 

434,464,468,492,499,519,549,558. 
136. 
136. 
136. 
468. 
70,464. 
464. 
19,61, 70,72,164,217,219,229,255,263, 278,392,419, 

434,492,519,549,558,1. 
19, 22,61, 70,72,136,U2, 164, 217,219, 229, 255, 263, 

278,392,419,434,468,492,519,549. 
136,164, 217,219,229, U9, 468. 
184. 
184. 
3,19,70,72,105,136,164,217,219,229,248,263,278, 

434,464,468,492,519,575. 
61,72,229,278,468,575. 
575. 

105,278. 
164,263,464. 

19,61,70,72,105,217,219,229,307,468. 
70. 

105,229. 

136,164,263,464. 

19,61,105,142, 217,219,229,307,468,499. 
229. 
19,22,70,72,136,142,164,219,229,255,263,392,419, 

434,464,468,492,549,558,1. 
136,184,229,464. 

519. 

136,519. 

3, 19, 61, 72,136,140,142, 229, 263, 278,307,392,464, 

468,499,549. 
61,105,136,164,229,263,464,499. 

19,61, 70,217,219,229, 307,468,499,549. 

3,61,140,217,219,229,263,278. 



131 



Table 13B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United 

States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

194.5— Continued 



Product 


Manufacturers' identification numbers (according 




to list in table 24) 


TONERS OB FULL-STRENGTH 




COLORS— Continued 




Violet toners — Continued 






296. 


*¥ellow toners: 




105. 

19, 70,136, a9, 229, 278,419, 464, 468, 499, 575- 






*Pr. 103, Hansa yellow G 


19, 70, 72,136,217,229, 24^8, 263, U9, 464, 468,499, 549, 




575. 


Hansa yellow 3G 


464. 


Pr. 10^, Hansa yellow 5G 


142,217,219. 


Pr. 105, Hansa yellow 10G 


263,464. 


Pr. 280, Hansa yellow 3R 


184. 


Lithol fast yellow GG toner 


184, U9. 


(C.I. U) (p-Chloro-o- 




nitroanillne yellow toner). 




Lithol yellow G 


184. 




136. 


Vulcan fast yellow G 


184. 


All other 


184,219,464. 


EXTENDED OR REDUCED TONERS 




♦Blue toners, reduced: 




♦PTMA Peacock blue G 


19,61,105,229,468. 


(C.I. 658). 




PMA Peacock blue R (C.I. 664) 


229. 


*PTMA Peacock blue R 


105,229,468. 


(C.I. 664). 






19, 136,M2, 255, 258, 263, 419, 549, 558. 


Phthalocyanine blue G 


142,549. 


Phthalocyanine blue SBL 


136,142,205. 


Phthalocyanine fast blue 2RP- 


136. 


PMA Victoria blue B 


61,105,205. 


(C.I. 729). 




PTA Victoria blue B 


61,136. 


(C.I. 729). 




PTMA Victoria blue B 


19,61. 


(C.I. 729). 




PMA Victoria blue R 


105. 


(C.I. 728). 




PTMA Victoria blue R 


105. 


(C.I. 728). 




All other 


61,229,250,277,296,519. 




Green toners, reduced: 




PTA Brilliant green 


136,U2,250. 


(C.I. 662). 




PTMA Brilliant green 


19,105,142,229. 


(C.I. 662). 




PMA Malachite green 


205,296. 


(C.I. 657). 




PTA Malachite green 


61, U2, 205. 


(C.I. 657). 




PTMA Malachite green 


61. 


(C.I. 657). 




Phthalocyanine green 


136,142,419,549. 


Pigment green B toner 


136,250,258,464. 


(Pr. M9). 





132 



Table 13 B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United 

States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945-- Continued 



Product 



EXTENDED OR REDUCED 
TONERS— Con tinued 

Green toners, reduced — Con. 

Shamrock green 

All other- 

Maroon toners, reduced: 
Relio Bordeaux (Lithosol 

Bordeaux 2BL) (C.I. 84) . 
6-Hydroxynaphthoic maroon 
(B.O.N. Maroon) (Lithol 
maroon) . 
C.I. 82, a-Naphthylamine 
maroon. 

All other 

♦Orange toners, reduced: 

Lithosol orange OTP 

*o-Nitroaniline orange 

All other 

Red toners, reduced: 

o-Chloronitro aniline red 
(Chlorinated para red). 

p-Chloronitoaniline red 

Eosine toner (Bromo acid 

toner) (C.I. 768). 
C.I. 68, Fast scarlet G 
toner (p-Nitro-o-toluidine 
red). 
*Lithol red R toners 
(C.I. 189): 

Earium toner 

Calcium toner 

Sodium toner 

♦Lithol rubine B (C.I. 163) — 
*C.I. 44, Para red, light 

♦Para red, dark 

Permanent red 2B 

Phloxine toner (C.I. 774.) 

Red lake C (C.I. 165) 

Red lake D (C.I. 214) 

PMA Rhodamine B (C.I. 749) — 

PTA Rhodamine B (C.I. 749) 

PTMA Rhodamine B (C.I. 749)-- 

PMA Rhodamine 1 

PTA Rhodamine I 

PTMA Rhodamine 1 

Rubine 3G 

*C.I. 69, Toluidine red 

All other 

♦Violet toner6, reduced: 
PTMA Ethyl violet (C.I 
♦PMA Methyl violet B 
(C.I. 680). 
PTA Methyl violet B 

(C.I. 680). 
PTMA Methyl violet B 

(C.I. 680). 
Methyl violc t B toner 
(C.I. 680), other. 



Manufacturers* identification numbers (according 
to list in table 24) 



464. 
61,105,229,307,549. 

54. 

205. 

549. 

136,549. 

136. 

54,464,549. 

I64. 

U2. 

136. 
468. 

54,U2. 



682) 



19,105,136,164,263,468. 

164,229,468. 

164,549. 

19, 61, 105, 136, 142, 229, 296, 468, X. 

61,229,255,392, 549,X. 

61,136,142,164,229,263,392,549. 

549. 

307. 

19,164,549. 

61,468. 

250. 

136. 

19,61,105,468. 

H2. 

54,105,136. 

19,61,105,307,468. 

19. 

136,142, 205, 229, 263, 392, 464, 549. 

61, 105, 136, 164, 250,258, 296,419,464, 519. 

105. 
61,105,142. 

61,164,229. 

19,61,105,468. 

M.,70. 



133 



Table 13B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Lakes and toners for which United 

States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— Continued 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification numbers (according 
to list in table 24) 



EXTENDED OR REDUCED 
TONERS— Continued 

Yellow toners, reduced: 

♦Benzidine yellow 

*Pr. 103, Hansa yellow G— 
Pr. 104, Hansa yellow 5G- 



70,229,^64. 

19,54,105,136,229,464. 

142,229. 



Note.- The abbreviations PMA, PTA, and PTMA stand for phosphomolybdic acid, 
phosphotungstic acid, and phosphotungstomolybdic acid, respectively. 



134 

Medicinals 

Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Medicinals for which separate statistics are given in table 14A are marked below 
with an asterisk (*) ; medicinals not so marked do not appear in table 14 
because the reported data are confidential and may not be published. Manufac- 
turers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in table 
24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication 
of his identification number with the designated product) 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC 

Benzenoid 

*Acetanilide 

Acetol salicylate (l-Hydroxy-2-propanone 
salicylate) . 

Ace tophene tidin (Phenace tin ) 

2-Acetoxymercuri-4-di-isobutylphenol 

*Acetyl-p-aminophenyl salicylate (Phenetsal) 

Acetylglycol salicylate 

*N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (Acetarsone) 
(Stovarsol). 

*Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) 

*Acetyltannic acid (Tannigen) (Tannyl acetate) 

3f-Amino-/+-acetoxyphenylarsonic acid 

Amino acids, derived from proteins: 

3 , 5-Di-iodo tyro sine 

(dl) -Phenylalanine 

(l)-Tyrosine 

*p-Aminobenzoic acid derivatives: 

n-Amylaminoe thyl p-aminobenzoate hydrochloride 
(Amylcaine) . 

n-Butyl p-aminobenzoate (Butesin) 

Di(n-butyl p-aminobenzoate) trinitro phenol 

(Butesin picrate) . 
3-Di-n-butylaminopropyl p-aminobenzoate 

(Butacaine base). 
3-Di-n-butylaminopropyl p-aminobenzoate sulfate 

(Butacaine sulfate). 
p-Diethylaminoethyl p-aminobenzoate, base arid 
derivatives: 

Procaine base (Novacain base) 

Procaine borate 

Procaine cinnamate 

^Procaine hydrochloride 

a-Dimethylamino-CL,{3-dimethylpropyl p-amino- 
benzoate hydrochloride (Tutocaine hydro- 
chloride) . 
Dime thylaminoe thyl p— butylaminobenzoate 
(Tetracaine). 
■*Ethyl p-aminobenzoate (Benzocuine) 
(Anaesthesine) . 

Isobutyl p-aminobenzoate : 

Isobutylaminoethyl p-aminobenzoate (Monocaine) 

Propyl p-aminobenzoate 

p-Aminohippuric acid 

3-Amino-4-hydroxyphonyldichloroarsine hydro- 
chloride (Dichlorophenarsine hydrochloride) 
(Chlorarsen) . 



98,131, 324, X. 
92. 

98,131,324. 
445. 

49,90,167,178. 

178. 

1,315,561. 

44,131,152,245, 324,X. 

92,167,257,269,561. 

561. 

160,416. 

315. 

226,315. 

355. 

1,409. 
1. 

1. 

1. 



1,409,561. 

1,455,561. 

416. 

1,70,178,409,561. 

561. 



561. 

1,47,178,182,315,409,454,561. 

178,409. 

355. 

178. 

331. 

482,561. 



135 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 Continued 



Chemical 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Ben zenoid — Continued 

3-Amino-4-hydroxyphenyl£rsine oxide hydro- 
chloride (Mapharsen). 

4-Amino-2-methyl-l-naphthol hydrochloride 
(Synkemin) . 

4-Amino-4 , -nitrodiphenylsulfone 

Anhydroxyprogesterone 

Arsphenamine base 

Atropine methyl bromide 

*Eenzaldehyde-- 

Benzochrome 

Benzoic acid salts: 

Lithium benzoate 

Magnesium benzoate 

Benzoylethyldimethyltmino isopropanol (Stovaine) 

Benzyl alcohol, medicinal 

♦Benzyl benzoate, medicinal 

Benzyl succinate and sodium salt 

♦Bismuth compounds: 

Bismuth arsphenamine sulfonate 

Bismuth iodosubgallate 

Eismuth-g-naphthol 

Bismuth subbenzoate 

♦Bismuth subgallate 

*Bismuth subsalicylate 

Eismuth tetrabromopyrocatechol 

*Bismuth tribromophenate 

m-Bromoacetophenyl benzoate (Neoxyn) 

tert-Butylcresol (Cresophan) 

Calcium benzyl phthalate 

Calcium cresolsulfonate 

Calcium iodoxybenzoate 

p-Carbamidobenzenearsonic acid (Carbesone) 

Catechol (Pyrocatechin) , resublimed 

Chloromercuri-4-nitro-o-cresol 

Chloro thymol 

m-Cresyl acetate (Cresatin) 

♦Desoxyephedrine hydrochloride (all isomers) 

Eiacetyleminoazo toluene 

3,4 , -Ei(acetylamino)-4-hydroxj'-2 , -phenoxyacetic 

acid arsenobenzene, sodium salt ( Solusalvarsan) 
PjP'-Diaminodiphenylsulfone-NjN'-diCdextrose 
sodium sulfonate). 

2,4-Diamino-4'-ethoxyazobenzene (Sereniurc) 

2, 5-Diamino toluene sulfate 

1,2,5,6-Dibenzanthracene 

V-Diethylaminopropyl cinnamate hydrochloride 
(Apothesine). 

♦Diethyl stilbestrol 

Diethylstilbestrol dimethyl ether 

Diethylstilbestrol dipalmitate 

Diethylstilbestrol dipropionate 

3 , 4-Dihyd roxyan thranol ( An thral in ) 

m-Dihydroxy-di-(sec)-hexylbenzene (Dihexylin) 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table zO 



367. 

367. 

331. 

94. 

315,561. 

1. 

416. 

178,216,513,532. 

444. 

324. 

92,X. 

92,454. 

396. 

X. 

167,17?, 253, 308, 465. 

167,315,454. 

1. 

92. 

315. 

315. 

298,315,344,383. 

127,298, 315, 344. 

92. 

92,167,315, 444, X. 

131. 

178. 

167. 

41,561. 

470. 

66, 213, 281, U6. 

X. 

1. 

315,362. 

455. 

57,66,155,178, 257,409, 4L6. 

146. 

561. 

367. 

263. 
144. 
145. 
367. 

1, 57,66,281, X,X. 

281. 

1. 

1,57,540,X. 

1. 

367. 



136 



Table 14B. -Synthetic orgenic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 194-5 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MEDICINALS, CICLIC— Continued 
Benzenoid — Continued 

2 , 4-Di ( p-hydroxy phenyl ) -3-e thylhexane 

(Benzestrol). 

*3 , 4-Di-p-hyroxy phenyl-n-h exane ( Hexe s trol ) 

1,3-Dihydroxynaphthalene (Naphthoresorcinol) — 
f3-(3,5-Di-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-a-phenylpropionic 

acid. 

5 , 7-Di-iodo-3-hydroxyquinoline 

1-Dime thylamino-2- ( dime thylaminome thyl ) -2- 

butanol benzoate hydrochloride (Alypin) . 

dl-Dimethylaminoethanolcatechol (Methadren) 

DiphenylEcetyldiethylaminoethanol hydrochloride — 

Disodium acetarsonate 

Disodium hydroxymercurisalicyloxy acetate 

(Mercurosal) . 
Disodium-4-sulfaminophenyl-2-azo-7-acetylejnino-l- 

hydroxy naph thalene-3 , 6-disul f onate . 
*Dyes, medicinal: 

9-Aminoacridine hydrochloride 

Brilliant green 

3,6-DiEminoacridine dihydrochloride 

3,6-Diaminoacridine sulfate (Proflavine) 

3,6-Diamino-lO-methylacridine chloride 

(Acriflavine) . 
Dibromohydroxymercurifluorescein, sodium salt 
(Mercurochrome) . 

Gentian violet 

Methylene blue 

Methyl violet 

Parafuchsine 

Scarlet red (Phenol red) 

Tetraiodophenolphthalein and sodium salt 

Trypan blue 

1-Ephedrine, synthetic, and salts 

Ephedrine, racemic. and salts 

Ephedrine derivatives: 

Ephedrine ethylmercurithiosalicylate 

pseudo-Ephedrine hydrochloride 

n-Ethylephedrine hydrochloride 

Ethyliodophenylundecylate (Pantopacue) 

Gallic acid 

Guaiacol (liquid) 

Hexylresorcinol 

Homoveratric acid 

Homoveratroylhomoveratrylamine 

Hydroquinone n-amyl ether (Amol) 

p-Hydrobenzoic acid esters* 

Benzyl p-hydroxybenzoate 

n-Butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (Butoben) 

Ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate-^ 

Methyl p-hydroxybenzoate 

Propyl p-hydroxybenzoate 

Hydroxymercuri-4-nitro-o-cresol anhydride 



X. 

3l6,540,X. 

449. 

X. 

396,416,451. 
561. 

268. 
94. 
561. 
367. 

561. 



331. 

331. 

331. 

1,298. 

1,298,331. 

1,331. 

92,227. 

331. 

70. 

331. 

331. 

331. 

66,298,315,331. 

331. 

315. 

315. 

281. 

66,182. 

316. 

144. 

298. 

561. 

216,324. 

167,213,257,396,416,455. 

173. 

178. 

455. 

216. 

216. 

178,216. 

178,216. 

178,216. 

1. 



137 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 194.5— Continued 



Chemical 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Ben zenoid — Continued 

(l)-a-Hydroxy-f-methylamino-3-hydroxyethylbenzene 
hydrochloride (Neo-synephrine hydrochloride). 

p-Hydroxyphenylisopropylamine hydrobromice 

o-Hydroxyphenylmercuric chloride (o-Chloromer- 
curiphenol) . 

o-Iodobenzoic acid 

o-Iodosobenzoic acid 

Lithium hippurate 

Mandelic acid 

♦Mandelic acid salts: 

Ammonium mandelate 

Calcium mandelate 

Sodium mandela te 

N-Methylacetanilid (Exolgin) 

1-Methylaminoethanol catechol (Epinephrine) 

4-(2-Methylaminoethyl)pyrocatechol (Epinine) 

Methyl m-amino-p-hydroxybenzoate (Orthoform) 

Methylene disalicylic acid derivative (Formadine) 
Monoethanolamine mandelete 

(3-Naphthoxyacetic acid 

*f-Naphthyl benzoate 

B-Naphthyl salicylate 

*Neoarsphenamine 

Octylresorcinol 

Phenacaine hydrochloride (^Di-p-e thoxyphenyi/- 
acetamidine). 

Phenarsine hydrochloride 

Phenolphthalein 

♦Phenolsul fonic acid salts: 

Ammonium phenolsul fonate 

Bismuth phenolsul fonate 

Calcium phenolsul fonate 

Copper phenol sulfonate 

Iron phenolsulfonate 

♦Sodium phenolsulfonate 

Zinc phenolsulfonate 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



B-Phenylisopropylamine and sulfate (Benzedrine 

sulfate) (Amphetatine). 

Phenylmercuric acetate 

Phenylmercuric benzoate 

Phenylmercuric borate 

Phenylmercuric chloride 

Phenylmercuric nitrate 

Phenylmercuric salicylate 

Phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride (Propadrin 

hydrochloride) . 

Phenyl salicylate (Salol) 

Propenyl methyl guaethol 

Resorcinol 

Resorcinol monoacetate 

Salicylamide 

♦Salicylic acid 

Salicylic acid salts.: 

Ammonium salicylate 

Calcium salicylate 



496. 

470. 
1,66,146. 

470. 
470.' 
367. 
298,315". 

482. 

298,315. 

298,315. 

269. 

308,409,561. 

66. 

561. 

216. 

281. 

167. 

144. 

49,90,167,315,X. 

167,213. 

1,127,315,482,561. 

167. 

182,547,561. 

1,482. 

324. 

131,315. 

315. 

298,315. 

131,298,315. 

315. 

131,298,315. 

131,298,315. 

409,416,470,X,X. 

146,204. 

204. 

204. 

204. 

204. 

204. 

455. 

131. 

178. 

136,X. 

LU, 167,454. 

185. 

131,216,315,324. 

92,131,298. 
92,131,298. 



138 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 194-5 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Benzenoid — Continued 

Salicylic acid salts — Continued 

Lithium salicylate 

Magnesium salicylate 

♦Sodium salicylate . 

Strontium salicylate 

Salicylsalicylic acid 

Silver arsphenamine 

Sodium p-aninophenylarsonate 

Sodium antimony III bis-catechol-2,4-disulfonate 

(Fuadin). 

Sodium benzyl phthalate 

Sodium p-ethylmercurithiophenylsul fonate 



Sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate 

Sodium o-iodohippura te 

Sodium me thylenesul fonaminohydroxyphenyl 

arsonate (Aldarsone). 
Sodium p- toluene sulf on chloramine (Chloramine 1)- 

Stilbamine glucoside (Neostam) 

♦Sulfa drugs: 

Acetylsulfathiazole 

Benzoylsulfanilamide 

p-Benzylaminobenzenesulfonamide 

Phthalylsulfathiazole 

Prontosil ( DiFodium-4-sul f amino phenyl-2-azo- 
7-ace tylamino-1-hydroxy-naph thalene-3 , 6- 
di sulfonate). 

Succinylsulfathiazole 

Sulfa-acetamide (N-Acetylsulfanilamide) 

Sulfadiazine sodium 

Sulfaguanidine 

Sulfamerazine ( 2-Sulfanilamido-4-methyl- 
pyrimidine). 

Sulfamerazine sodium ' 

Sulfanilamide (p-Aminobenzenesulfonamide) 

Sulfapyridine (2-Sulfanilamidopyridine) 

Sul fapyridine sodium 

♦Sulfathiazole 

♦Sulfathiazole sodium 

*Sulfoarsphenamine 

♦Tannin albuminate (Tannalbin) 

Tannin- formaldehyde (Tannoform) 

Tannin-yeast 

Tetrachlorophenol 

N,N,N' ,N'-Tetraethylphthalamide (Neospiran) 

Thiosalicylic acid 

♦Thymol 

Thymol iodide 

Trichlorophenol 

Tryparsamide 

Tyramine ethane sul fonate 

♦Vitamins: 

K (Menadione) (2-Methyl-l,4-naphthoquinone)— 



92 X. 

92|l31,298. 

131,185,216,324. 

92,131,298. 

315. 

561. 

66,92,213. 

561. 

167. 
281. 

281. 
298. 
1. 

324. 
66. 

324. 
324. 
315. 
324. 
561. 



324. 

70. 

70,X. 

70, X. 

70. 

448. 

70. 

70. 

66,70,315,324,561. 

70,315. 

70,315. 

70,281,315,324,482, 56l,X. 

70,315, 561.X. 

1,315,482,561. 

92,167,269,396. 

92,167,396. 

167,561. 

131. 

213. 

281,396. 

129,362,X. 

315, 344. 

131. 

315,482. 

66. 

- 1,70,133,316,540. 



139 



Table I4B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

Benzenoid — Continued 

*Vi tamin s — Con tinued 

K /^2-Me thyl-1 , 4-naph thoquinone ) -diphosphoric 
ester tetra sodium salj^ 7 (Thyloquinine) . 

Ki (2-!lethyl-3-phytyl-l, ^-naphthoquinone) 

Zinc sul fanilate 

Alicyclic and Heterocyclic 



Adenine base 

Adenine hydrochloride 

Adenine sul fate 

Adenylic acid 

Allantoin ( 5-Ureidohydantoin) 

Allylcamphoramic acid 

♦Amino acids derived from proteins: 

Histamine, free base 

Histamine dihydrochloride 

Histamine phosphate 

Histidine monohydrochloride 

(l)-Hydroxyproline — 

(1) -Proline 

(l) -Tryptophane 

(dl) -Tryptophane 

Aminopyrine bicamphorate 

Aminopyrine salicylate 



Antipyrine 

*Antipyrine salicylate 

Atropine amineoxide hydrochloride 

Atropine methyl bromide 

Atropine methyl nitrate 

Barbituric acid 

♦Barbituric acid derivatives: 

5-Allyl-5-cyclopentenylbarbituric acid and salt 

5-Allyl-5-isopropylbarbituric acid 

5-Allyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid and salt 

(Alphenal) . 
Aminopyrine diethylbarbiturate (Veramon) 

(Peralga) . 

5-n-Butyl-5-ethylbarbituric acid 

5-Cyclohexanyl-5-ethylbarbituric acid and salt- 

5, 5-Diallylbarbituric acid 

5,5-Diethylbarbituric acid (Barbital) 

5,5-Diethylbarbituric acid, sodium salt 

5-Ethyl-5-(sec)-butylbarbituric acid and salt — 
5-Ethyl-5-n-hexylbarbituric acid, sodium salt — 

5-Lthyl-5-isoamylbarbituric acid and salt 

5-Ethyl-5-isopropylbarbituric acid and salt 

5-Ethyl-5-(l-me thy 1-n-butyl) -barbituric acid 

(Pentobarbital) . 
*5-Ethyl-5- ( 1-me thyl-n-bu tyl ) -barbituric ac id , 

sodium salt (Pentobarbital sodium). 
5-Ethyl-5- ( 1-me thyl-n-bu tyl) - thiobarbi turic 

acid and salt. 

747685 O-47-10 



281,482. 

315. 
66. 



449. 

144, U9. 
144, U9. 
449. 

146,448. 
167. 

367,530. 

530. 

530. 

167,213,263,530. 

315. 

315. 

131,530. 

315. 

167. 

167. 

131. 

92,131,167,213,269,315,396. 

121. 

308. 

308. 

1. 

182. 

218. 
182. 

257. 

1. 
561. 

94,182. 

1,132,218. 

1,132,218. 

X. 

367. 

281. 

X. 

1,182. 

1,47,182,281,403,409. 

1. 



HO 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC-— Continued 
Alicyclic and Heterocyclic — Continued 

♦Barbituric acid derivatives — Continued 

*5-Ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid (Phenobarbital) 
(Luminal) . 
5-Ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid, calcium salt 
(Phenobarbital calcium) . 
*5-Ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid, sodium salt 
(Phenobarbital sodium) . 
N-Methyl-5-cyclohexenyl-5-methylbarbituric 
acid and salt. 

5-Methyl-5-ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid 

Methylpropylcarbinyl allylbarbituric acid, 
sodium salt. 
*Bilc acid and salts: 

Bilron (Iron bile salts) 

Cholic acid 

♦Dehydrocholic acid and salt 

Desoxycholic acid 

Xetocholanic acids 

Mixed bile acids 

Bismuth camphocarboxylate 

*Bromocamphor (mono) 

a-Butyloxycinchoninic acid diethylethylenediamide 
and hydrochloride. 

*Caffeine (from Theobromine) 

"Caffeine derivatives, natural and synthetic: 

♦Caffeine citrate 

Caffeine hydrobromide 

Caffeine sodium benzoate 

Caffeine sodium salicylate 

Camphor, synthetic, U.S. P. 

Camphoric acid 

Camphoric anhydride 

*€amohosulfonic acid and salts 



Cinchophen hydroiodide 

Desoxycorticosterone acetate (Cortate) 

n-Diethylaminoisopentyl-3-amino-6-methoxy- 

quinoline (Plasmochin). 

Dihydrocodeinone bi tartrate • 

3 , 5-Di-iodo-N-me thyl-4-pyridoxyl-2 , 6- 

dicarboxylic acid, disodium salt (Neo-iopax) . 
3 , 5-Di-iodo-4-pyridon-N-ace tic acid 

die thanolamine . 

4-Dimethylaminoantipyrine (Aminopyrine) 

2 , 6-Dime thyl thian threne 

Emetine hydrochloride, synthetic 

Eserine amineoxide salicylate 

Estradiol esters: 

O-Estradiol-3 benzoate 

O-Estradiol-17 benzoate 

Q-Lstradiol-3,17 dipropionate 



Estrone (Ketohydroxyestrin) 

Ethinyl androstenedlol 



1,^7,182,298,315,561. 
47. 

1,47,182,281,298,315,561. 
561. 

561. 

281. 



281. 

57,155,268,308,451,530,560. 

57,155,268,299,308,530,560. 

57,530,560. 

57. 

155. 

1. 

131, 298, X. 

94. 

187,324,X,X. 

213,298,315,324,344. 

315. 

213,298,315,344. 

213,293,315. 

136,342. 

167. 

167. 

92,144,167,213,269,396. 

281. 

94,X. 
561. 

155. 
X. 

5a. 

331,561. 

217. 

315. 

121. 

213,X. 

94,X. 

213. 

94,X. 

79,213. 
X. 



Ul 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Alicyclic and Heterocyclic — Continued 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Ethinyl estradiol 1 X. 

Ethinyltestosterone ■ X. 

2-Ethoxy-6-nitro-4-chloro acridlne 217. 

2-Ethoxy-6,9-diaminoacridine and salts 561. 

Ethyl-l-methyl-4-phenylplperidine 308. 

Ethyl-l-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine-4-carboxylate 56l. 

(Demerol) . 
Eucatropine hydrochloride 444 ,547. 

Guanine hydrochloride 449. 

Hexarae thyleneamine acetamidosalicylic acid 1. 
(Salihexin). 

Hexamethylenetetramine 

*Hexamethylenetetramineanhydromethylene citrate 
(Helmitol) . 

Hexamethylenetetramine camphorate 

Hexamethylenete tramine mandelate 

Hexamethylenetetramine methylene citrate 

Hexame thylene te tramine te traiodide 

Homatropine and salts 

Homatropine methyl bromide 

8-Hydroxyquinoline base and derivatives: 

8-Hydroxyquinoline base 

8-Hydroxyquinoline benzoate 

8-Hydroxyquinoline citrate 

8-Hydroxyquinoline hydrochloride 

8-Hydroxyquinoline sul fate 

8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate, potassium salt 

8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid 

8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-tannate 

Hypoxan thine — — 

Iodochlorohydroxyquinoline 

*7-Iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid 
(Xatren acid) and salt. 

lodopyrine . 

Menthol ethoxyacetate (Cory fin) 

homo-Men thyl salicylate 

*2-Me thoxy-6-chloro-9-die thylaminopen tylamino- 
acridine (Quinacrine hydrochloride) (Atebrin) . 
P-Me thoxy-8-hydroxyme rcuri-propylamide o f 
camphoric acid and derivatives. 

Me thyl andros tenediol 

Methylcholanthrene 

Methylcyclopropyl ketone 

*p-Methylphenylcinchoninic ethyl e3ter 
(Neocinchophen) . 

Methyl testosterone — 

Naphthylmethylimldozoline 

♦Nikethamide (Niacin diethylamide) 

Nucleic acid (from yeast) 

Nucleic acid salts 

Papaverine and hydrochloride, synthetic 



136,216. 

U6,167,213, 257,269,396, 561. 

92,213. 
411. 

167. 

390. 

232,308,315. 

155,385,416. 

47,315,396. 

47,315,396. 

315. 

47. 

47,315. 

47,396. 

47,315. 

47. 

449. 

94,396. 

47,66,315,396,416,451,561. 

293. 

561. 
178. 
1,217,231,315,561. 

167. 

X. 
144,145. 

523. 
1,47,70. 

94,X. 
94. 

94,132,213,257,263,269,396. 

449. 

449. 

281,315. 



142 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 
Alicyclic and Heterocyclic — Continued 



♦Penicillin 



Phenylazo-diaminopyridine hydrochloride 
(Pyridium) . 

l-Phenyl-2, 3-dime thyl-4-me thylamino-5-pyrcizolone 
formaldehyde bisulfite (Novaldin). 

2-Phenylquinoline-4-carboxylic acid (Cinchophen) 
(Phenylcinchoninic acid) . 

2-Phenylquinoline-4-carboxylic acid, sodium salt- 

Piperazine derivatives: 

Piperazine citrate ■ — 

Piperazine hexahydrate 

Piperazine salicylate — 

Piperazine tartrate 

sym-N-Te trame thylpiperazine di-iodide 

Piperidine propanediol dipheny lure thane base and 
hydrochloride* 

Proge s terone — 



Scopolamine amineoxide hydrobromide 

Sodium diphenylhydantoinate (Dilantin) 

Testosterone propionate 

♦Theobromine derivatives: 

Theobromine calcium gluconate 

Theobromine calcium salicylate 

Theobromine salicylate 

Theobromine sodium acetate 

♦Theobromine and sodium salicylate 

Theophylline ( 1, 3-dime thylxan thine), base and 
derivatives: 

Theophylline base 

♦Theophylline ethyl en ediamine (Aminophylline) — 
Thophylline methyl glucamine (Glucophylline)- 

Theophylline monoethanolamine 

Theophylline sodium acetate 

Theophylline sodium salicylate 

♦Vitamins: 

♦Bi (Thiamin chloride and hydrochloride) 

♦B2 (Ribofla vine, for human consumption) 

B2 (Riboflavin, for animal and poultry 
consumption) (100S&) . 

*B D ( Pyridoxin e ) 

*D2 (Irradiated ergosterol) (Viosterol) 



D3,3, 5-Dinitrobenzoate derivative 

D3 (Irradiated or activated animal sterol) 
(Delsterol). 

E (a-Tocopherol) 

E esters: 

a-Tocopherol ace tate 

a-Tocopherol palmitate 



1,59,107,120,216,218,27^,281, 
315,367,333,442,482,561,573, 
X. 

411. 

« 

561. 

70. 

47. 

213. 

396. 

396. 

213,396. 

416. 

316. 

X. 

94,192,367,X. 

121. 

315,561. 

92,136,454,X. 

X. 

94,X. 

299. 

92. 

213,315. 

298.315.344.561. 

92,213,298,315,344. 



47,298. 

47,134,182,268,297,315,403,451. 

1. 

281. 

298. 

298. 

449. 

146,396,448. 

213 315. 

107^ 218 ] 274, 31 5, 383. 

107,274,315,333,548. 

218,315. 
1,136,133,133,312,357,367,482, 

484,540,561. 
136. 
136,484,561. 

213,315. 

213,315. 
128. 



143 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



MEDICINALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

Alicyclic and Heterocyclic — Continued 

♦Vitamins — Continued 
E esters: — Continued 

O-Tocopherol phosphate 

C-Tocopherol succinate 

Inositol hexaphosphate . calcium, magnesium- 

Niacin (Nicotinic acid) 

Niacinamide (Nicotinic acid amide) 

Xanthine 

MEDICINALS, ACYCLIC 



Acetylcholine bromide . 

Acetylcholine chloride 

Acetyl-f-methylcholine bromide 

Acetyl-£-methylcholine chloride 

♦Amino acids derived from proteins: 

( dl) -a- Alanine 

Aminoacetic acid (Glycocoll) (Glycin)- 

(l) (+)Arginine monohydrochloride 

(dl)-Aspartic acid 

Cystine- 
(l)-Cystine- 



Manufaeturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Cystine hydrochloride- 
Glutamic acid- 
(l)(+)Glutamic acid- 

(dl) -Glutamic acid 

Glutamic acid, calcium salt 

Glutamic acid, hydrochloride 

Glutathione — 

( dl ) -I soleuc ine 

(l) -Leucine 

(dl) -Leucine- 
Leucine, other- 

(l)-Lysine monohydrochloride 

(dl)-Lysine monohydrochloride — 

(dl) -Me thionine 

(dl)-Norleucine — 
(dl) -Threonine- 
s-Valine 

Amyl nitrite (Isoamyl nitrite)- 

Auro-thioglucose (Solgenol-g oleum) 

Azochloramide 

Barium hexose diphosphate 

Betaine hydrochloride- 

Bismuth octyloxyacetate (Lipo bismol) 

Eisrauth tri-G-ethylcaproate (Lipobon) 

Bromodie thy lace tylcarbamide 
Bromoisovalerylurea (Bromural)- 

Cacodylic acid 

Cacodylic acid derivatives: 
Guaiacol cacodylate- 



Strychnine cacodylate 

♦Cacodylic acid salts: 

Bismuth cacodylate 

Calcium cacodylate 



128. 

128. 

92,94. 

42,315,411. 

230, 268,411, X. 

313,449. 



144,416. 

257,315, 416. 

315,416. 

315,416. 

70,183,315,367. 

131,315. 

47,131. 

313,315,530. 

315,331. 

226. 

530. 

167,369,530. 

226,239. 

167,188,315. 

315. 

226. 

188,239. 

167,449. 

315. 

315,530. 

315. 

226. 

315,530. 

315. 

315. 

315. 

315. 

315. 

144,298,315,367. 

X. 

X. 

449. 

239. 

367. 

268. 

49,90,561. 

49,90. 

145, 257,269. 

145, 257,269. 
257,269. 

145,269. 
145,269. 



144 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MEEICINALS, ACYCLIC — Continued 

♦Cacodyiic acid salts — Continued 

Iron cfacodylat o ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ — 

Magnesium cacodylat c - 
Sodiuu oacodylat e 

All other 

Calciun glycerate > 

Calciun hescse diphosphat e" 
Calciun iodobehenat o - ■ ■ 

Calcium lactophosphat o ■ 

♦Calciun levulinate 

Chloral hydrate 

Choline bromide 

Choline chloride 

Choline dihydrogen citrate 

Diallylnalonic aci d ■ ■ ■ 

Diethyl succinate- 

Disodiun aethylarsonate (Arrhenal) 

Erythri tyl- 

Ethane sulfonic acid ■ 

Ethyl chaulaoograte ■■ ■ ■ 

Ethyl di-icdobrassidate— — — — — — — — — — 

Ethyl en edi amine derivatives: 

Ethyl en ediamine dihydrochloride— — — — 

Ethyl en ediamine di-iodid o ■ ■ ■ .. 

Ethylene disulfonate ■ 

Ethyl iodide 

Ethyl aercuric chlcrid o ■ ' 

Ethyl morrhuat o ■■ ■ ■ - 

Ethyl nitrite 

Formaldehyde sodiun sulfosylate 

•Gluconic acid salts: 

Calcium borogluconate 

Calciun gluconat e 

Copper gluconat e ■ ■ ■ 

Manganese gluconate 

Iron (ferrous) gluconate 

Sodiun gluconate ■ 

Glycerophosphoric acid ■ ■■ ■■-,.,.. „ 

Cvlycerophosphoric acid salts: 

Calcium glycerophosphate 

Iron glycerophosphate 

Magnesium glycerophosphate 

Manganese glycerophosphate 

Potassium glycerophosphate 

Sodium glycerophosphate 

♦Hexaaethyldiaiainoisopropaiiol di-iodide 

Hexnaethyleneaethyl iodide 

Iodized fatty acids: 

Calciun salts of iodized fatty acids 

Iodized castor oil (Riodine) 

♦Iodoform 

Iodoaethanesulfonic acid, sodiua salt 

Isovaleric acid salts, aancniua isovalerate- 

Lithiura lactate 

Lysidina bi tartrate 

Magnesium hexose diphosphate 



145,257,269,367. 

145,269. 

U5, 257, 269, 367. 

269. 

167. 

449. 

167,561. 

257,298. 

66,92,167,178,269. 

92,315,324. 

416. 

70,107,315. 

70. 

416. 

167. 

269,396. 

315. 

66. 

167,561. 

94. 

390,396. 

390. 

480. 

144,140,315. 

281. 

167. 

293,315,372. 

315. 

167. 

281,2PS,383. 

92. 

92,383. 

296, 383,4^6. 

X. 

216,324. 

216,324. 

216,324. 

210,324. 

216,324. 

21o,324. 

216,324. 

167, 213,39b, 416. 

213,416. 

281. 

173. 

298,315,344. 

561. 

49. 

92. 

173. 

449. 



145 



Table 14B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Medicinals for which United States 
production or 3ales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



MBDECINALS, ACYCLIC~Con tinued 

Methoxyoximercurioropylsuccinyl urea 
(Mercuhydrin) . 

Methylsnecitric acid and salts •— 

Methylene iodide ■ — 

*Methyl iodide 

Morrhuic acid, sodium salt 



Silver preparations, colloidal: 

Colloidal silver 15% (Colloyol) 

Silver protein, mild 

Silver protein, strong- 



Sodium aurothiomalate (Myochrysine) 
Sodium bismuth thioglycolate (Thiobismol) 
Sodium ricinoleate 
Sodium succinate — 

1-Sorbose 

Sul f on o thylm e than e 
Sulfonmethane — 
Tartaric acid salts: 

Antimony potassium tartrate- 



Bisinuth potassium tartrate- 



Bismuth potassium sodium tartrate 

Bismuth sodium tartrate 

Potassium sodium tartrate (Bismosal) 

Potassium tartrate 



*Thiosinamine (Allyl thiourea) 

T rib roinom ethane (Bromof orm) 

*tert-Trichlorobutyl alcohol (Chloretone) 
(Chlorobutanol) . 

reth an e- — - — .„- 

n-Valeric acid salts: Zinc valerate 

Vinethene (Divinyl etlier) 

♦Vitamins: 

A concentrate, alcohol . 

A acetate, concentrate ~ 

A acetate, crystalline 



A alcohol crystalline 

C (Ascorbic acid) 

C (Ascorbic acid, sodium salt)- 
d-Calcium pantothenate 
(dl)-Calcium pantothenate- 

Isoascorbic acid 

Sodium d-pantothenate- 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



268. 

167,561. 

144,145,315,561. 

U4,U6,213,298,315. 

66,167. 

449. 

416. 

216,367,432. 

216,561. 

315. 

367,416. 

245. 

298. 

383,^9. 

298. 

298. 

383. 

1,315,416. 

416. 

263,451. 

383. 

92. 

146,178,29S. 

131,313,561. 

47,178,315,367. 

523. 
160. 
315. 

530,540. 

123. 

128. 

123. 

218,333. 

167,315. 

183,274,315. 

1. 

218. 

367. 



U6 



Flavor and Perfume Materials 

Table 15B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Flavor and perfume materials for which separate statistics are given in table 15 
A are marked below with an asterisk (*); those not so marked do not appear 
in table 15A because the reported data are confidential and may not be 
published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list 
appearing in table 24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent 
to the publication of his identification number with the designated product) 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUSE MATERIALS, CYCLIC 
Benzenoid 



Acetophenone 

Amyl benzoate 

*d-Araylcinnamaldehyde 

Q-Amylcinnamaldehyde dimethyl acetal 

Amyl cinnamate 

Q-Amylcinnamyl acetate 

a-Amylcinnamyl alcohol 

♦Amyl salicylate 

Amyl Q-toluate (Amyl phenylacetate) 

♦Ane thole 

♦Anisaldehyde 

♦Anisole (Kethyl phenyl ether) 

Anisyl acetate 

Anisyl alcohol 

Anisyl formate 

Anisyl propionate 

Benzophenone 

♦Benzyl acetate 

♦Benzyl alcohol 

*Benzyl benzoate 

Benzyl butyl phthalate 

♦Benzyl butyrate 

♦Benzyl cinnamate 

Benzyl ether (Dibenzyl ether) 

♦Benzyl formate 

Benzylideneacetone 

Benzylideneglycerol 

Benzyl isoamyl ether 

Benzyl isobutyrate 

♦Benzyl isoeugenyl ether (Benzyl isoeugenol) 

Benzyl isovalerate 

Benzyl methyl ketone (Phenylacetone) 

♦Benzyl propionate 

♦Benzyl salicylate 

Benzyl a-toluate (Benzyl phenylacetate) 

f-Bromostyrene - 

Cinnamaldehyde 

♦Cinnamic acid 

Cinnamyl icetate 

♦Cinnamyl alcohol 

Cinnamyl anthranilate 

Cinnamyl butyrate 

Cinnamyl cinnamate 

Cinnamyl formate 
Cinnamyl isobutyrate- 
Cinnamyl isovalerate- 
Cinnamyl propionate — 
Cinnamyl valerate 



178,180,X. 
X,X. 

166,253, 308, 335, 529, 535, 536,X. 

535. 

X. 

535. 

535. 

256, 308,465,531, X,X. 

X. 

67,362, X,X,X. 

129, 136,178, X,X. 

136,U6,167,178,X. 

136,X,X. 

178, X,X. 

X. 

X. 

173, 130, 253, 308, X. 

253,308,453,465, 532,535,X,X. 

47, 253,308,465, 531,X. 

253,308,531,X. 

531. 

166,131,308,X,X,X. 

131, 308,531, 535,X. 

308,465. 

131,308,529,X,X,X. 

X,X. 

453. 

136,X. 

X. 

181,535,X,X. 

X. 

146,130,470. 

136,131,308,535,X,X,X. 

130,308, 531,X. 

535. 

X. 

178,465, 532,X. 

47,130, 308,531,X,X. 

131,308,535,X,X. 

180, 131, 256,308, 535,X,X. 

166. 

181,X. 

X. 

166,131. 

X. 

453,X. 

535,X,X. 

453. 



147 



Table 15B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, CYCLIC—Con. 
Benzenoid — Continued 

*p-Cre syl ac e ta te 

p-Cresyl caprylate- 



p-Creeyl isobutyrate 

p-Cresyl isovalerate- 



p-Cresyl methyl ether 

p-Cresyl a-toluate (p-Cresyl phenylacetate) 

Cumaldehyde (p-Isopropylbenzaldehyde) 

3,4-Diethoxybenzaldehyde 

3,4-Dimethoxybenzaldehyde (Veratraldehyde) 

Dime thyl-£-phene thy 1 acetate 

Dime thyl-p-phene thy 1 alcohol (Dimethylbenzyl 
carbinol). 

2,6-Dinitro-3-tert-butylcymene 

Diphenylme thane 

Ethyl anthranilate 

♦Ethyl benzoate 

Ethyl cinnamate 

Ethyl methylphenylglycidate 

Ethyl phenylglycidate 

Ethyl salicylate 

♦Ethyl a-toluate (Ethyl phenylacetate) 

Eugenyl acetate- 



Eugenyl a-toluate (Eugenyl phenylacetate) 

Glycosin 

Guaiacyl acetate 

Hexylcinnamalaehyde 

Hydrocinnamic acid 

Hydroquinone dimethyl ether (Dime thy lhydro- 
quinone) . 

Hydroquinone raonomethyl ether 

Isobutyl benzoate 

Isobutyl cinnamate 

Isobutyl salicylate 

Isobutyl a-toluate (Isobutyl phenylacetate) 

Isoeugenol 

Isoeugenyl acetate 

Isoeugenyl a-toluate (Isoeugenyl phenylacetate) — 

I sopropyl-o-cre sol ( Carvacrol) 

Ico thymol, hydrogenated 

Menthylphenol 

p-Methoxyacetophenone (Nova tone) 

p-Me thy lace to phe none (Methyl p-tolyl ketone) 

Methyl anthranilate 

N-Methylanthrcnilic acid, methyl ester (Dimethyl 
anthranilate). 

p—Methylbenzaldehyde (p-Tolualdehyde) 

Methyl benzoate 

a-Methylbenzyl alcohol (Methylphenyl carbinol) 
(Styralyl alcohol). 

Methyl cinnamate 

♦Methyl eugenyl ether (Methyl eugenol) 

♦Methyl isoeugenyl ether 

a-Methyl-p-isopropylhydrocinnamaldehyde 

♦Methyl salicylate (Wintergreen oil) 

Methyl a-toluate (Methyl phenylacetate) 



131, X,X. 

166,529. 

529. 

X. 

136,131,X. 

x,x. 

136,X. 

178. 

136,178. 

529,535. 

529,535. 

X. 

X. 

166. 

178,216,354,X. 

166,178,181,531. 

178,X,X. 

173. 

131,181,X. 

1,47,253, 308,56l,X. 

324. 

129,166, 290, 335,X,X. 

131. 

529. 

178. 

166,535. 

535, X. 

178. 

136,178. 

178. 

166,X,X. 
535 
X,X. 

x,x. 

129, X,X. 

X. 

X. 

362.X. 

129,221. 

X. 

146,178. 

178,342,X. 

131, 136,173, 303, X. 

136,308,X. 

178. 

178, 216,221, 308, 354,X. 

529,X. 

173,131, 308, X,X. 
166,178,181, X. 
166,178, 531, X. 
X. 

131,216,324. 
47, 308, X. 



148 



Table 15B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, CYCLIC— Con. 
Benzenoid — Continued 



Musk ambrette 

Musk ketone 

*Musk xylene 

n-Octyl benzoate 

*Phenethyl acetate 

*Phenethyl alcohol (Phenylethyl alcohol) — 

Phenethyl anthranilate 

Phenethyl benzoate 

Phene thyl bu tyrate 

Phenethyl cinnamate 

Phenethyl dimethyl carbinol 

Phenethyl dimethyl carbinol acetal 

Phenethyl dimethyl carbinol isobutyrate — 

♦Phenethyl formate 

Phenethyl isobutyrate 

Phenethyl isovalerate 

Phenethyl methylethyl carbinol 

*?henethyl propionate 

Phenethyl salicylate 

Phenethyl a-toluate (Phenethyl phenylacetate) 

p-Phenethylurea (Dulcin) 

P-Phenoxyethyl isobutyrate 

Phenyl benzoa te 

Phenylglycol acetate 

Phenylglycol propionate 

Q-Phenylpropionaldehyde ( Hydra tropaldehyde ) 
Q-Phenylpropionaldehyde dimethyl acetal 
(Hydra tropaldehyde dimethyl acetal). 

3-Phenyl-l-propyl acetate 

3-Phenyl-l-propyl alcohol (Hydrocinnamic alcohol] 

Phenylpropylaldehyde 

3-Phenyl-l-propyl butyrate 

3-Phenyl-l-propyl propionate 

3-Phenyl-l-propyl a-toluate 

a-Tolualdehyde (Phenylacetaldehyde) 

Q-Tolualdehyde dimethyl acetal (Phenylacetalde- 
hyde dimethyl acetal). 

a-Toluic acid (Pheny lace tic acid) 

Trichloromethylphenylcarbinyl-acetate (Rose tone) 
1, 3, 4-Trimethyl-5-tert-butyl-2,6-dinitro benzene— 
♦Vanillin- 



Naphthalenoid 

Ethyl p-naphthyl ether 

Methyl f-naphthyl ether 

Methyl g-naphthyl ketone 



308,X. 

308,X. 

136, 308, X. 

X. 

221,308, 529, X,X. 

131,253, 529, 536,X. 

181. 

X. 

X,X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

529,X,X,X. 

529,X,X. 

X. 

X. 

529,X,X,X. 

535, X,X. 

529,535,X,X. ' 

416. 

X. 

X. 

535. 

535. 

X,X. 

180, 535, X. 

535, X,X. 

130,221, 535, X. 

X. 

535. 

529,535. 

535. 

131,136. 

180,X. 

166,130. 

308,315,X 

178. 

X. 

324,438, X,X. 



130,253. 
180, X. 
X. 



Terpenoid 



Bornyl acetate 

Cedrenal 

♦Cedrol 

*Cedryl acetate 

*Citral 



166. 
535. 

136,529, 535,X. 
166,529, 535,X,X. 
129,166,181,290,335,352,529, 
535,X,X. 



U9 



Table 15B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

194.5 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 2A) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, CICLIC— Con. 



Terpenoid — Continued 



Citral acetate- 
Citronellal 



♦Citronellyl acetate 

Citronellyl butyrate 

Citronellyl formate 

Citronellyl propionate 

Cyclamene alcohol 

Cy clohexanyl ace tate 

Dihydrocitronellol (3, 7-Dimethyl-l-octanol)- 
Dihydropseudoionone 

*Geraniol 



*Geranyl acetate 

Geranyl butyrate 

*Geranyl formate 

Geranyl isobutyrate 

Geranyl propionate 

Geranyl a-toluate (Geranyl phenylacetate) 

Hexahydropseudoionone 

*Hydroxycitronellal 

Hydroxycitronellol 

Hydroxycitronellal dimethyl acetal 

Ionone, all other 

Isobornyl acetate 

Isobornyl alcohol (Isoborneol) 



Isopulegol 

Isosafrol 

Linalool, natural — 

Linalool, synthetic- 
*Linalyl acetate- 



Linalyl anthranilate 

Linalyl benzoate 

*Linalyl butyrate 

Linalyl cinnamate 

Linalyl formate 

Linalyl isobutyrate 

Linalyl isovalerate 

*Linalyl propionate 

Menthol, synthetic, tech.— 
Menthol, synthetic, U.S.P.- 

Menthol, hydrogenated 

Menthone 

Menthyl acetate 

Men thy 1 anthranilate 

Metahomomenthol (Cyclonol)- 



535. 

181,352,531,535. 

136, 308, 352,453, 529, 531, 535.X. 

181,529,535,X,X. 

X,X. 

529. 

529,X. 

535. 

535. 

535. 

352. 

535. 

535. 

129,136,166,131,308,335,352, 

529 531 X. 
136,166, 13li308,352,529,X,X. 
535, X. 

166,181,308, 529, X,X. 
529. 
529. 
X. 
X. 

136,352, 529, 536,X,X. 
308, X. 
181, X. 

136,335, 529,X,X. 
136,352, 529,X,X. 
136, 529, 536, X. 
136. 
136. 

352,X. 

129,178,X,X. 

129,166,181,290,352, 529, 531, X, 

X. 
308,352. 
129,166, 290, 352, 529, 531, 535, X, 

X. 
160, 535. 
160,535. 
160, 166,181, X. 
160,535,X. 
181, 529, 535, X,X. 
160, 529, X. 
X. 

181, 529, 535, X. 
178,308,352,X. 
308, X. 
221. 

308,352,535. 
178,352. 
X. 
178. 



150 



Table 15B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: FLavor and perfume materials for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Material 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, CYCLIC— Con. 

Terpenoid — Con tinued 

♦Methylionone 

Vethyl linalyl anthranilate 



Nerol 

Neryl acetate 

♦Rhodinol (2,6-Dimethylocten(2)ol)- 



Rhodinol rose 

*Rhodinyl acetate 

Rhodinyl formate 

*Sa frol 

*San talol 

Santalyl acetate 

o-Terpineol 

f-Terpineol 

Terpin hydrate, tech. 

Terpinolene 

♦Terpinyl acetate- 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 2&) 



Terpinyl anthranilate 

Terpinyl propionate 

Terpinyl a-toluate (Terpinyl phenylacetate) 

Tetrahydrolinalool 

*Vetivenol 

*Vetivenyl acetate 



Heterocyclic 

*Coumarin, synthetic 

Indole 
Isopropylquinoline 



136,290,335,352, 529, 536,X,X,X. 

535. 

181, 529,531, 535, X. 

X. 

129,136,166,181,290,303,529, 

531.X. 
535. 
- 129,529,X. 
529,X. 

129, 290, 362, X,X. 
166,529,X. 
166. 

136,342,X,X. 
342. 
X. 

136,X. 

129,136, 166,^53, 531,X,X. 

535. 

136,X. 

535. 

X. 

181,535,X,X. 

181, 529, 535, X,X. 



3-Me thylcoumar in 

6-Methylcoumarin 

*Piperonal (Heliotropin) 

Saccharin 

Saccharin, sodium salt — 
Skatole 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, ACYCLIC 

Acetal 

*Allyl caproate 

Allyl caprylate 

Allyl chloro formate 

*Allyl enanthate (Allyl heptanoate) 

Allyl isothiocyanute (Mustard oil) 

Amyl butyrate 

Amyl caproate 

Amyl propionate 

2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) .(Biacetyl) 

n-Butyl bu tyrate 

n-Butyl isovalerate 

Capryl butyrate 

1-CarbomethoxyheDtine (Methyl heptine carbonate)- 

*Cetyl alcohol (C16) 

Decyl acetate (Ciq) 

n-Decyl alcohol 



131,136,324,X. 

178. 

131, 136, X. 

160. 

X. 

X. 

129,209,X,X. 

32A. 

32A. 

160. 



181. 

160,166,178,453, 535,X,X. 

160. 

221. 

160,178,453,X. 

146,178. 

166. 

453,535. 

X. 

X. 

47,160,178. 

372, X. 

354. 

160. 

308, X. 

352, 535, X. 

535,X. 

x,x. 



151 



Table 15B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for *hich 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



FLAVOR AND PERFutfE MATERIALS, ACYCLIC— Con. 



♦Decyl aldehyde (Cio)— 

Di-n-butylcarbinol 

Diethyl succinate 

Dihydrojasmone 

Di-n-propyl ketone 

Dodecyl acetate (Cj^)- 
Dodecyl aldehyde (Cjjj)- 

♦Ethyl butyrate- 



♦Ethyl caproate 

Ethyl caprylate 

Ethyl decylate- 

♦Ethyl enanthate 

Ethyl heptylate 

Ethyl isobutyrate 

Ethyl isovalerate 

Ethyl laurate 

Ethyl levulinate 

Ethyl myristate 

♦Ethyl pelargonate 

*Ethyl sebacate 

Glutamic acid, monosodium salt 
glutamate) . 

n-Heptaldehyde (C7) 

n-Heptanol 

Heptoic acid- 

Hexaldehyde (C6) 

Hexyl formate 

*Isoamyl butyrate — 

Isoamyl caproate 

Isoamyl formate 

♦Isoamyl isovaltrate 

Isoamyl propionate 

Isobutyl acetate — 

♦Isobutyl butyrate- 



fonosodium 



Isobutyl caproate 

Isobutyl isovalerate- 
Lauryl alcohol (Ci2) — 

Lauryl formate 

Methyl caproate 

Me thylheptenone 

Methyl homo jasmone 

Methyl nonenoate 

♦Methylnonylacetaldehyde 

Methyl nonylinate 

♦Methyl r.onyl ketone 

Methyl undecylenate 

Myristyl alcohol 

Nonyl acetate (C9) 

Nonyl alcohol (Co) — 

Nonyl aldehyde (69) 

1-Octanol 

n-Octyl acetate 

n-Octyl aldehyde (Cg) 

n-Octyl butyrate 

n-Octyl isobutyrate 

Pro py lace tal 



529,535,X,X. 

453. 

160,453,X. 

535. 

453,X. 

181,535. 

X,X. 

166,181, 354,372,X. 

160,181, 354,X. 

X. 

X. 

160,181,354,X. 

X. 

160, X. 

160, X. 

256,X. 

160 

453 

178,181, 535,X. 

160,166,X. 

188,226,239. 

39,221. 
221. 
X. 
535. 

181,354,372,X. 

354,X. 

181,354,1. 

181,35*,X. 

181,X. 

181,354,X. 

178,354,X. 

354,X. 

354,X. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

181, X. 

535. 

X. 

535,X,X. 

178,535. 

535,X,X. 

535,X. 

X. 

178,535,X,X. 

535. 

256,535. 

535,X,X. 

X. 

X. 

535,X,X. 

535. 

X. 

X. 



152 



Table I5B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Flavor and perfume materials for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945—Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 2A) 



FLAVOR AND PERFUME MATERIALS, ACYCLIC— Con. 



Tributyrin— 

Tricaproin- 
*V-Unde calac tone 

Undecylenic alcohol 

*Undecylenic aldehyde 

Undecylenyl acetate 

Undecylic acid, hydrogenated — 



CHEMICALLY MODIFIED ESSENTIAL OILS 



Citronella, acetylated- 

Citronella, hydrogenated 

♦Ethyl oxyhydrate 

Lemongrass oil, hydrogenated- 

Peppermint oil, synthetic 

Sassafras oil, hydrogenated — 
Ylangol ■ — 



535. 

535. 

178,335, 535,X,X. 

535,X. 

535, X,X. 

535. 

221. 



181. 

221. 

166,290,531, X. 

221,352. 

362. 

221. 

535. 



153 
Plastics Materials 

Table 16B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Plastics materials for which separate statistics are given in table 16A are 
marked below with an asterisk (♦); products not so marked do not appear in 
table 16a because the reported data are confidential and may not be published. 
Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in 
table 24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publi- 
cation of his identification number with the designated product) 





Manufacturers' identification 


Material 


numbers (according to list 




in table 24) 


PLASTICS MATERIALS, BENZENOID 




Condensation Resins 




*Alkyd resins: 




Saturated polyester type; 




Phthalic anhydride, adipic acid-glycol: For 


u. 


protective coatings. 




♦Phthalic anhydride-glycerol, unmodified type: 






102. 

4,6,14,23,24,50,64,71, 72,75,115, 


For protective coatings 




135, 136,149, 161, 173, 174,176, 




186,190,191,192,193,236,249, 




251,232,236,292,293,319,328, 




329,363,366,392,398,402,413, 




419,422, 425,431, 441, 447,464, 




493, 497,523, 528,544,555,571, 




A j A j A j A y A ^ A . A » 


For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 


24,413,523. 


For miscellaneous uses 


523, X. 


♦Phthalic anhydride-glycerol, modified type: 




Rosin (ester) modified type: For protec- 


14,193,464. 


tive coatings. 




Ro6in (ester) and phenol modified types: 




For protective coatings 


14, 186, 198, X. 


Congo modified type: For protective 


192. 


coatings. 




Phenol modified type: For protective 


192,282,363. 


coatings. 




♦Phthalic anhydride-glycol: 




For molding and casting 


33,267. 




14,252. 


♦Phthalic anhydride-pentaerythritol, modified 




and unmodified: 




Unmodified by rosin (ester): 




For protective coatings ■ 


6,14,251,232,319,419,425,464, 




523. 


For textile, paper, and leather treatment 


523. 


For miscellaneous uses 


523. 


Modified by rosin (ester): For protective 


464. 


coatings. 




♦Phthalic anhydride-malcic anhydride (or 




maleic acid) alcohol: 




Unmodified by rosin (ester): 




Phthalic anhydride - maleic anhydride 


192,464. 


glycerol: For protective coatings. 




Phthalic anhydride - maleic acid - glycol: 




For protective coatings 


14. 


Modified by rosin (ester): 




Phthalic anhydride - maleic acid - 




glycerol: For protective coatings 


14,193. 



154 



Table 16B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945— Continued 



Material 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, BENZENOID — Continued 

Condensation Resins — Continued ' 

♦Alkyd resins — Continued 

Saturated polyester type — Continued 
Phthalic anhydride - mixed alcohols: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 
For miscellaneous uses— 



Manu f ac ture rs * iden ti f ication 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Phthalic anhydride - succinic acid - glycol 

For protective coatings 

Phthalic anhydride unspecified: For protec- 
tive coatings. 
Unsaturated polyesters: 

Phthalic anhydride - allyl alcohol: For pro- 
tective coatings. 
Phthalic anhydride - benzoic acid - glycerol 

For protective coatings 

Cyclopentadiene - maleic anhydride - glycol: 

For protective coatings 

Cyclopentadiene - maleic anhydride-allyl 
alcohol: For protective coatings. 
Aniline- formaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

Furfural-acetone: For ion exchange 

*Tar acid resins: 

♦Phenolic resins, except mixed phenolics: 
♦Unmodified: 

*p-tert-Amylphenol - formaldehyde: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

For miscellaneous uses 

Bis-phenol- formaldehyde: For protective 
coatings. 
*p-tert-Butylphenol - formaldehyde: 
p-tert-Butylphenol: 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather 
treatment. 

For miscellaneous uses 

p-tert-Butyl- and amylphenol - formaldehyde: 
For protective coatings- 



H,192, 193,418, 419,431, 464, 523. 

523. 

523. 



14. 
566. 



186. 



14. 



p-tert-Butylphenol-polyvinyl resin: 
adhesives. 

Cashew nut shell oil type: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For miscellaneous uses 

*Cre6ol- formaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For miscellaneous uses 



For 



38,136. 
161. 



95. 

551. 

14. 



6,38, 53,176,192,419,425,464, 523, 

533,X. 
523. 
523. 
6,53,115,464. 



215. 

38,115,419,464,523,533. 
523. 



523. 

71. 
184. 



139,243. 
243. 
243. 
243. 

33,533. 

38,113,163,419,479,551. 

38,53,136,190,328,441,533. 

38. 

38. 



155 



Table 16B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, BENZENOID— Continued 

Condensation Resins — Continued 

♦Tar acid resins — Continued 

♦Phenolic resins, except mixed phenolics — Con. 
♦Unmodified — Continued 

Cresol - furfural: For protective 

coatings. 
Cyclohexylphenol - formaldehyde: For pro- 
tective coatings. 
Lignin- formaldehyde: For molding and 

casting. 
♦Phenol- formaldehyde : 
♦For molding — 



♦For laminating- 



♦For protective coatlngs- 



♦For adhesives- 



♦For casting; for ion exchange j and for 
textile, paper, and leather treatment. 

♦For miscellaneous uses ■ 

Phenol- furfural: 



For molding and casting— 
For laminating- 



p-Phenylphenol-formaldehyde: For protec- 
tive coatings. 
♦Re sorcinol- formaldehyde : 

For adhesives 

For miscellaneous uses 

Xylenol- formaldehyde: For protective 
coatings. 

♦Modified: 

Phenol- formaldehyde-aniline: For molding 

and casting. 
Phenol- formaldehyde-coumarone-indene: For 

adhesives. 
Phenol- formaldehyde-rosin (abietic acid): 

For protective coatings 

♦Phenol- formaldehyde and alkyl phenol - 

formaldehyde-rosin ester (abietic acid 
ester) type: 
Alky lphenol- formaldehyde, rosin ester: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather 
treatment. 

For miscellaneous uses 

Phenol- formaldehyde, rosin ester: 

For protective coatings 



For adhesives 

For textile, paper, and leather treat- 
ment. 

For miscellaneous uses 

Phenol- formaldehyde -terpene: For protec- 
tive coatings. 



252. 

441,533. 

300. 



38,102,106,113,139,136,215,237, 

324,^20,533. 
38,41, 83, 113,163,186,215, 237, 

324,419,479,551. 
38,41,71,83,186,192,233,266, 

366,425,474,533,X. 
38,82,83,206,237,242,271,272, 

324,425,533. 
41,33,135,262,301,419,425,474, 

533. 
27,38,83, 139, 237,324,506,X. 

139,243. 

243. 

38,419. 



32,139,425,*. 

139. 

186,285,464. 



186. 

337. 

14,192,419,555. 



523. 
523. 

523. 

14, 176, 214,2U, 266, 366,419, 

425,523, 555,X. 
394,419. 
214,523. 

214,523. 
419,533. 



747685 O- 47 - 11 



156 



Table 16b.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, BENZENOID— Continued 

Condensation Resins— Con tinued 

*Tar acid resins — Continued 
Mixed phenolic resins: 
♦Unmodified: 

♦Cresylic acid-, cresols-, xylenols - 
formaldehyde: 
Cresols - xylenols - formaldehyde: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 



For protective coatings 

For miscellaneous uses 

Cresylic acid- formaldehyde: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adheslves 

Cresols-, phenols - xylenols - formaldehyde 

For molding and casting- 

For laminating' 

For protective coatings 

For miscellaneous uses 

*Phenols-cre sols- formaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For miscellaneous uses- - 

Phenols-xylenols- formaldehyde : 

For molding and casting 



For protective coatings- ■ 

For adhesives 

♦Styrene copolymers: 

Styrene-ethyl acrylate: For textile, paper, 

and leather treatment. 
Styrene ■oleic anhydride: 

For laminating — 

For protective coatings 

Toluene sul f onamide : 
For lamina ting- 



For miscellaneous uses- 



Polymerization Resins 

Polyaromatic resins: 
Coumarone-indene : 

For protective coatings 

For miscellaneous uses 

Petroleum resins: 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For miscellaneous uses 

♦Polystyrene type: 

Dichloro styrene: For molding and casting — 
Polystyrene: 

For molding and casting 



186. 

139 136. 

139!l86*419,428,464. 
417. 

533. 

83,206,551. 
53,233. 
206. 

138. 

113,242,^20,428. 

138,533. 

138. 

2,533,546. 

186,441,510. 

328. 

291. 

2. 

533. 

533. 
533. 

14. 



38,335. 
76,190. 

14. 
324. 



42,337. 
42,X. 

408. 
408. 
337. 
408,534. 

4 324. 

38,33,131,324,521. 



157 



Table 16b.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or 6ales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945— Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, BENZENOID— Continued 

Polymerization Resins — Con tinued 

Polyaroaatic refine— Continued 

♦Polystyrene type — Continued 

Polystyrene — Continued 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment- 

For glazing, sheeting, and films 

For miscellaneous uses 

Polyvinyl carbazole: For molding and casting- 
Dnspecified: For miscellaneous uses 

PLASTICS MATERIALS, NONBENZENOID 

Condensation Resins 

♦AUsyd resins (oil and solid types): 
•Modified by rosin (ester): 
•Abietic acid - maleic acid: 

For protective coatings 



For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For adhesives 

For miscellaneous uses 

♦Abie tic acid and other acids and oils: 

Abietic acid - fumaric acid: For protec- 
tive coatings. 
Abietic acid - maleic - fumaric acid: For 

protective coatings. 
Abietic acid and other acids, unspecified: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

For miscellaneous uses 

Abietic acid, oil-modified: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

For miscellaneous uses 

•Unmodified by rosin (ester): 

Adipic acid: For protective coatings 

Adipic acid - azelaic acid: For protective 

coatings. 
Adipic acid - succinic acid: For protective 
coatings. 

Azelaic acid: For protective coatings 

Citric acid: 

For laminating ■ 

For miscellaneous uses 

Congo ester: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For miscellaneous uses 

•Fumaric acid resins: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 



16,^52. 

16. 

16,4.27. 

76. 

38,X,X. 

184. 

337. 



6,U,176,198,2U,251, 252,319, 
329,363,392,419,425,464,497, 
523,X. 

214,523. 

214. 

214,286,523,541. 

198,464,497. 
186. 



14,251,363,464,523,555. 
523. 

523. 

523. 
523. 

523. 

425. 
71. 

14. 

392. 

71. 
X. 

266,523,555. 

523. 

523. 

419,425,464,523,555. 
523. 



158 



Table 16B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945 — Continued 



material 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, NONBENZENOID— Continued 

Condensation Resins— Continued 

♦Alkyd resins (oil and solid types)— Continued 
•Unmodified by rosin (ester) — Continued 
♦Rimaric acid resins — Continued 
For miscellaneous uses- 



Linseed oil monoglyceride: For protective 
coatings. 

*Maleic acid or anhydride and maleic - terpene: 
For laminating- 



♦ For protective coatings- 



For adhesives- 



For textile, paper, and leather treatment- 
For miscellaneous uses ■ 

Neofat triglyceride: For protective coatings 

Sebacic acid: 



For protective coatings- 
For adhesives- 



For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For miscellaneous uses-' ■■- 
Sebacic - maleic acid: For protective 

coatings. 
Succinic acid: For protective coatings — 
Unspecified acids: 

For laminating' 



For protective coatings- 



Polyhexamethylenediamine-adipic acid (Nylon): 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

For miscellaneous uses- 



Polyhexamethylenediamine-sebacic acid: 

cellaneous uses. 
Olefin-dlolefin: 

For protective coatings 

For miscellaneous uses ■ 

Rosin esters: 
♦Unmodified: 

♦Abietic acid - glycerol: 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives — 



For mis- 



For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 
For miscellaneous uses 



♦Abietic acid - pentaerythritol: 
For protective coatings 



For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

For miscellaneous uses 



♦Abie tic acid - other polyhydric alcohols: 
Abie tic acid - glycol: 

For protective coatings 

For adhesive s 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment 
For miscellaneous uses 



523. 
365. 



14,71,249,324,392,394. 
4,14,75,115,186,192,214,251, 

266,305,392,419,425,441,464, 

497,523,544,555,X,X. 
2U. 

214,523. 

214. 

365. 

251,419,425,X. 

523. 

419. 

2. 

14. 

464. 

302. 
266. 

136. 
136. 
136. 
136. 



534. 
534. 



6,14,176,214,419,464, 523,X. 

214,523. 

214,523. 

214,523. 

6,176,198,214,244,319,392,419, 

464,X. 
214. 
214. 



214,419,523. 
214. 

214,523. 
214,523. 



159 



Table 16B.- Synthetic orgenic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945 — Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, NONBENZENOID—Continued 

Condensation Resins — Con tinued 

Rosin esters — Continued 
♦Unmodified — Continued 

♦Abietic acid - other polyhydric alcohols — 
Continued 
Abietic acid - mixed and other alcohols: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treat- 
ment. 

For miscellaneous uses — ' 

♦Urea - formaldehyde and melamine - formaldehyde 
type resins: 
♦Urea - formaldehyde type: 
Unmodified: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating- 



For protective coatings 

♦For adhesives 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For miscellaneous uses 

Modified: 

Urea - formaldehyde - phtballc anhydride - 
glycerol: 

For protective coatings 

Urea - formaldehyde - glycol: 

For protective coatings 

Urea- and thiourea- formaldehyde: 

For laminating — : — 

Melamine - formaldehyde type: 
♦Unmodified: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings ■ 

For adhesives 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment— 
♦Modified: 

Melamine-, urea - formaldehyde: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

Melamine - formaldehyde - phthalic 
anhydride - glycerol: 

For protective coatings 

Melamine - guanidlne - formaldehyde: 

For ion exchange 

Melamine-sulfanilic acid - formaldehyde: 
For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

Polymerization Resins 

Alcohol polymerization resins: 

Allyl alcohol: For molding and casting 

Furfural - furfuryl alcohol: For molding and 
casting. 



319,329, 392,419,464, 523,X. 
523. 

523* 



14,38,394,502. 

186. 

14,136,394,419,425. 

14,38, 82, 271, 272,394,425, X. 

14,237,394,413,419,425, 502,524. 

506. 



H. 
14. 

425. 



14, 324, 394. 

14. 

14,425. 

14. 

14. 



14. 

14,83. 

14,419. 

14,271. 



14. 
U. 
14. 



392. 
243. 



160 



Table 16B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 

States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945— Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, NONBENZEHOID— Continued 

Polymerization Resins — Con tinued 

Polyacrylic acid: For textile, paper, and 

leather treatment. 
Polybutyl methacrylate: 

For protective coatings 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

For miscellaneous uses 

Polyethyl acrylate: For textile, paper, and 

leather treatment. 
Polyethylene: 

For molding and casting 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

For miscellaneous use6 — — — 

Polyisoamyl and ethylmethylethyl acrylate: For 

miscellaneous uses. 
Polymethyl methacrylate: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment 

For glazing, sheeting, and films ■ ■ ■ . 

For miscellaneous uses 

Polyterpene: For miscellaneous uses 

Polytetrafluoroethylene: For miscellaneous uses- 
♦Polyvinyl resins: 

♦Polyvinyl acetal type: 
Polyvinyl butyral: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings '■ 

For adhesives 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 
For glazing, sheeting, and films- 

For miscellaneous uses 

Polyvinyl formal: 

For molding and casting 

For protective coatings 

For adhesives 

♦Polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, and poly- 
vinyl ether: 
Polyvinyl alcohol: 

For molding and casting 

For adhesives 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For miscellaneous uses 

Polyvinyl acetate: 

For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings — 
For adhesives ■■■ ■ — 



For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For miscellaneous uses 

Polyvinyl acetate - maleate: For miscella- 
neous uses. 

Polyvinyl - n-butyl ether: For adhesives 

Polyvinyl isobutyl ether: For adhesives — 
Polyvinyl isopropyl ether: For adhesives— 



16,136,433. 



16. 
136. 
136. 
U,16. 



76. 
76. 
76. 
X. 



136,433. 

433. 

16,136,433. 

136. 

136. 

243,375. 

136. 



76. 

76,457. 

136,457. 

76,136,457. 

76. 

136. 

136. 

457. 
457. 
457. 



136. 

136,457. 
136. 
136. 

76,136. 

16. 

16,75,X. 

16,76,136,457,X. 

16,136,427,X. 

136. 

X. 

184. 
184. 
184. 



161 



Table 16B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plastics materials for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945— Continued 



Material 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICS MATERIALS, NONBENZENOID-- Continued 

Polymerization Resins — Continued 

♦Polyvinyl resins — Continued . 
♦Polyvinyl halides and copolymers: 
Polyvinyl chloride: 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

for miscellaneous uses 

Polyvinyl chloride - acetate: 
For molding and casting 

For laminating 

For protective coatings^ 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For glazing, sheeting, and films 

For miscellaneous uses 

Polyvinylidene - chloride - polyvinyl- 
chloride: 

For molding and casting 

For textile, paper, and leather treatment — 

For glazing, sheeting, and films 

Silicone resins: For miscellaneous uses 



136. 
136,194. 

76. 

76. 

76,135. 

76. 

76. 

76. 



131. 
131. 
131. 

131,133. 



162 
Rubber-Processing Chemicals 

Table 19B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber-processing chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 

(Rubber-processing chemicals for which separate statistics are given in table 19 
are marked below with an asterisk (*) ; chemicals not so marked do not appear 
in table 19 A because the reported data are confidential and may not be 
published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list 
appearing in table 24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent 
to the publication of hi6 identification number with the designated product) 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



ROBBER-PROCESSING CHEMICALS, CYCLIC 

♦Accelerators: 
*Aldehyde-amine6 : 

Acetaldehyde-aniline 

*n-Butyraldehyde-aniline 

Q-Ethyl-P-propylacrolein-aniline 

Formaldehyde-aniline (Methylene aniline)- 
Formaldehyde-p-toluidine (Methylene-p- 

toluidine) . 
Heptaldehyde-aniline- 



Hexamethylenetetramine (Aldehyde-ammonia) 

Triethyltrimethylenetriamine 

Urea-butyr aldehyde-aniline — 

*Di thiocarbamates : 

Carbon disulfide-methylenedipiperidine 

Dibenzyl dithiocarbamic acid, zinc salt 

Dimethyl ethylenediphenyl dithiocarbamic 

acid, lead salt. 
Dimethyl ethylenediphenyl dithiocarbamic 

acid, zinc salt. 
2,4-Dinitrophenyl dimethyl dithiocarbamate — 
Piperidinium pen tame thylene dithiocarbamate- 
Piperidinium pen tame thylene dithiocarbamic 
acid, potassium salt. 

*Guanidines: 

*Diphenylguanidin 
Diphenylguanidine phthalate 
Di-o-tolylguanidine 

, Triphenylguanidine 

•Thiazole derivatives: 
Alkyl mercaptothiazole 



2,2-Benzothiazoledisulfide and sulfur- 
2-(Benzoylthio)benzothiazole- 



Bis-N,N , -(2-benzothiazylthiomethyl)-urea 

N-Cyclohexyl-2-benzo thiazole sulfenamide 

2- ( 2 •,4 , -Dinitrophenylthlo)benzo thiazole 

Disulfide alkylated 2-mercapto thiazole 

2,2»-Dithiobisbenzothiazole (2,2 , -Benzo- 

thiazyl disulfide). 

*2-Mercaptobenzo thiazole 

2-Mercaptobenzo thiazole, copper salt— 

2-Mercap to benzo thiazole, lead salt 

2-Mercaptobenzo thiazole, sodium salt 

2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, zinc salt — — 

Mercaptobenzothiazole-formaldehyde-cresylic 

acid hexamethylenetetramine. 
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole-methylene-aniline — 
2-Mercaptobenzo thiazole-methylene-o- 

toluidine. 



136,324,335. 

136,194,32^,335. 

91. 

136,324. 

136. 

335. 
136. 
335. 
335. 

324. 
335. 
91. 

91. 

335. 

324,335. • 
136. 



14,136,324. 
324. 
14,136. 
331. 

194. 
324. 
324. 
324. 
324. 
324. 
194. 
70,196,324. 

70,196,324,335. 

196. 

136. 

196,324. 

196,335,1. 

136. 

335. 
335. 



163 



Table 19B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber-processing chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



RUBBER-PROCESSING CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Con. 

*Acceleratora — Continued 
♦ Thiazole derivatives— Continued 
2-Mercaptothiazoline- 



-Phenylmercaptobenzo thiazole 

Thiurams: Di-N-pentamethylene thiuram tetra- 
sulfide. 

Miscellaneous compounds: 

p-Benzoquinone dioxime 

Diben zylaniine — • 

p-Quinone dioxime diben zoate 

♦Antioxidants: 

Aldehyde- and acetone-amines: 

Acetaldebyde-aniline-hydrochloride 

p-Aminodiphenyl-acetone 

Aniline-acetone 

Aniline-acetone, acid derivatives 

Butyr aldehyde-aniline 

Crotonilidine-a-naphthylamine 

Ciphenylamine-ace tone 

Phenyl-P-naphthylamine-acetone 

Amino or hydroxy compounds: 

Alkylated diphenylamine 

2,4-Diaminodiphenylamine 

p , p ' -Diaminodiphenylme thane 

2,4-Di-tert-butylhydroquinone 

p-Di-p-hydroxyphenylpropane 

2,2 , -Dimethylamylene-3 , -hydroquinone 

p,p'-Diinethoxydiphenylamine 

N,N'-Di-P-naphthol-p-phenylenediamine 

*N,N • -Diphcnyl-p-phenylenediamine 

Di-o-tolylethylenediamine 

Hydroquinone monobenzyl ether 

p-Hydroxydiphenylamine 

p-Hydroxy-N-phenylmorpholine 

p-Isopropoxydiphenylamine 

Phenol-cyclohexanone 

Phenyl-G-naphthylamine 

Phenyl-g-naphthylamine 

p-(p-Toluenesulfonamino)diphenylamine 

o-Tolyl-p-naphthylamine 

Guanidines: Dicatechol borate, di-o-tolyl- 
guanidine salt. 

Miscellaneous compounds: 

Diphenylnitrosamine 

2,2,4-TrijDethyldihydroquinoline — 

Tackifiers: Amylphenyl sulfide 

Other uses: 

2 -Hydroxycyclohexyl hydroperoxide 

tert-Perbenzoate 



70. 

324. 

136. 



335. 
335. 
335. 



335. 
324. 
324. 
324. 
136. 
194. 
335. 
335. 

194. 

324. 

335. 

324. 

196. 

324. 

136. 

194. 

91,136,194,324,335. 

91. 

194. 

136,194. 

136. 

194. 

324. 

136. 

136,194,335. 

335. 

196. 

136. 



335. 
194. 
456. 

521. 
521. 






164 



Table 19B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Rubber-processing chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



ROBBER-PROCESSING CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC 

♦Accelerators: 

Aldehyde-amine s : 

Butyraldehyde-monobutylamine 
Sulfurized monoethanolamine and acetone — 
*Dithiocarbamates: 

Dibutyl dithiocarbamic acid, zinc salt 

Diethyl dithiocarbamic acid, copper salt- 
Die thyl dithiocarbamic acid, selenium salt 

Diethyl dithiocarbamic acid, zinc salt 

Dimethyl dithiocarbamic acid, lead salt 

♦Dimethyl dithiocarbamic acid, zinc salt 

*Thiurams: 

Tetrabutyl thiuram monosulfide 

Tetraethyl thiuram disulfide 

Tetramethyl thiuram monosulfide 

♦Tetramethyl thiuram disulfide 

Tetramethyl thiuram tetrasulfide 

Xanthates: 

Di-n-butyl xanthodisulfide 

Di-isopropyl xanthodisulfide 

Zinc butyl xanthate 



Antioxidants: 

Methyl ethyl ketoxime 

♦Peptizers: Dodecyl mercaptan- 

Other uses: 

tert-Butyl hydroperoxide 

Dichloropentanes 

Zinc laurate 



136. 

324. 

335,X. 

X. 

569, X. 

196,335,X. 

569. 

136,324,335,X. 

335. 

136,569,X. 

136,32^,335. 

136,196,324,335,X. 

136. 

335. 

194,324. 

196,335. 



331. 
136,221,324,335,525. 

521. 
456. 

335. 



165 
Elastomers (Synthetic Rubbers) 

Table 20B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Elastomers (synthetic rubbers) for 
which United States production or sales were reported, identified by 
manufacturer, 194-5 

(Elastomers (synthetic rubbers) for which separate statistics are given in table 
20A are marked below with an asterisk (*) ; products not so marked do not 
appear in table 20 A because the reported data are confidential and may not be 
published. Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list 
appearing in table 24, An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent 
to the publication of his identification number with the designated product) 



Product 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



ELASTOMERS, CYCLIC 



o-Nitrodiphenyl and mixed tar acids 

♦Polybutadiene-styrene type elastomers: 

Butaprene S ■ 

Chemigum S- 
GP-S type— 
Hycar OS- 



Resin T-132 

Styraloy- 



♦Polystyrene-isoprene type elastomers— 



ELASTOMERS, ACYCLIC 

Polyalkylene— sulfide type elastomers; 

Thiokol A - 



Thiokol CA— 
Thiokol FA- 



*Polybutadiene-acrylonitrile type elastomers: 

Butaprene N series- 

Chemigum N- 

GR-A type 

Hycar OR 

Perbunan 

*Polychloroprene type elastomers: 

GR-M type- 



Neoprene GR-M10- 
Neoprene GR-CG— 



Polyisobutylene type elastomers: 

Vi st anex 

Polyisobutylene-diolefin type elastomers: 
*GR-I type- 



*Polyisoprene type elastomers 

Polyisoprene-acrylonitrile type elastomers- 
Polymerized polyisoprene 

Polyvinyl acetate type elastomers 

Polyvinyl alcohol-aldehyde type elastomers: 
Polyvinyl alcohol butyraldehyde 

Polyvinyl butyral (Butver) (Butacite) 

Polyvinyl halide type elastomers: 

Polyvinyl chloride (Koroseal) (Plioflex)- 



Pclyvinyl chloride- vinyl acetate type elastomers: 

Polyvinyl chloride-vinyl acetate (Vinylite)— 
Peaction products of natural rubber: 

Polymerized chlorinated rubber elastomers 

(Parlon) . 
Polymerized rubber hydrochloride elastomers 
(Pliof orm) . 
Silastic - silicon rubber 



324. 

168. 
196. 

118,169,189,195,197,333, 525,X. 

194. 

490. 

131. 

169,521. 



131. 
131. 

131. 

168. 
196. 
195- 
194- 

490. 

136,137. 

137. 

137. 



490,491. 

225,491. 

197. 

X. 

196. 

136. 

76. 
136,324. 

194- 

76,X. 

214. 

196. 

133. 



166 

Surface-Active Agents 

Table 21B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Surface-active agents for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Surface-active agents for which separate statistics are given in table 21A are 
marked below with an asterisk (*); products not so marked do not appear in 
table 21A because the reported data are confidential and may not be published. 
Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in 
table 24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publi- 
cation of his identification number with the designated product) 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, CYCLIC 



Polyhydric alcohol esters and ethers: 

Polyglycol diamylphenyl ether — ■ 

Polyglycol iso-octylphenyl ether- 
Polyglycol iso-octyltolyl ether- 
All other 



^Quaternary ammonium compounds: 

Cetyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride- 
Cetylpyridinium bromide- 



Cetylpyridinium chloride — - ■ ■ ■ ■ • ■■ 

Di sulfonated dime thy lphenylbenzyl ammonium 

chloride, sodium salt. 
2-Lauroyloxye thylcarbamylme thylpyridinium 

chloride (Lauryl ester of colaminoformyl- 

me thylpyridinium chloride) . 

♦Lauryldimethylbenzylammonium chloride 

Laurylpyridinium chloride 



Stearoxyme thylpyridinium chloride, mixture 

Triaethylbenzylammonium chloride 

Sulfonated alkyl benzenoid compounds: 

Butylbiphenylmonosulfonic acid and salt 

Butylphenylphenolmonosulfonic acid and salt 

5-Chlorobis ( 3 , 5-dichloro-2-hydroxyphenyl) -o- 

toluene sulfonic acid, sodium salt. 

Decylbenzenesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Dibutylphenylphenoldisulfonic acid and salt 

Di-isopropylbenzenesulfonic acid and salt 

Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Polyalkyl benzene sulfonic acid, sodium salt — 
^Sulfonated alkyl naphthalene and salts: 

* Amy lnaph thai en e sulfonic acid, and sodium salt- 
Benzylnaphthalenedi(and mono) sulfonic acid and 

salt. 

Butylnaphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt 

Dibutylnaphthalenesulfonic acid, and salt 

Di-isopropylnaphthalenesulfonic acid, sodium 

salt. 
Dilaury lnaph thalenesulfonic acid, sodium salt- 
Dime thylhexylnaphthalenesulfonic acid and salt 
Hexy lnaph thalenesulfonic acid 
♦Isopropy lnaph thalenesulfonic acid 



*Isopropy lnaph thalenesulfonic acid, sodium Bait 
Me thylhepty lnaph thalenesulfonic acid, ammonium 
salt. 

Oley lnaph thalenesulfonic acid 

All other 

Sulfonated alkyl phenyl ethers and 6alts: 

Aryl alkyl polyether sodium sulfate 

Aryl alkyl polyether sodium sulfonate 



184. 
184. 
184. 
276,433. 

276,426,433,561. 

146. 

146,316. 

568. 

154. 



167,221,426,427,561. 

221. 

543. 

107. 

324. 

324. 
184. 

324. 

324. 

324. 

324,331. 

33. 

5,10,332,413,543,568. 
184. 

89. 

184. 
184,211. 

332. 

5. 

5. 

331,520,X. 

14,427,504. 

21. 

X. 
136,X. 

276,433. 
276,433. 



167 



Table 21 B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Surface-active agents for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, CYCLIC— Continued 

♦Sulfonated petroleum compounds and salts: 

Acid layer type petroleum sulfonate, aluminum 

salt. 
Acid layer type petroleum sulfonate, sodium 

salt. 

Oil layer type petroleum sulfonate 

Oil layer type petroleum sulfonate, ammonium 

salt. 
Oil layer type petroleum sulfonate, calcium 

salt. 
Oil layer type petroleum sulfonate, sodium 

salt. 

Petroleum sulfonate, barium salt 

Petroleum sulfonate, calcium salt 

Petroleum sulfonate, sodium salt- — ■ 

SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, ACYCLIC 

Nitrogen-containing: 
* Amide surface-active agents: 

R- ( Aminoe thyl ) -U- ( hydroxye thyl ) -lauramide 

(Lauramide of aminoethylethanol&mine) . 
♦N-(Aminoethyl)-N-(hydroxyethyl)oleamide 

(Oleamide of aminoe thy lethanolamine). 
*N- ( Aminoe thyl ) -N- ( hydroxy e thyl ) s tearamide 

(Stearamide of aminoethylethanolamine) . 

N-( Aminoe thyl ) lauramide 

N- ( Aminoe thyl) oleamide 

N- ( Amino e thyl ) s tearamid e 

Coconut oil fatty acid amide 

Coconut oil fatty acid amide of diethanol- 

amine. 
N,N-Di(2-hydroxyethyl)lauramide (Diethanol 

lauramide). 
N,N-Di(2-hvdroxyethyl)oleamide (Diethanol 

oleamide) . 
N ,N-Di ( 2-hydroxy e thyl) s tearamide (Die thanol 

stearamide) . 
♦N-( 2-Hydroxye thyl) lauramide (Ethanol 

lauramide) . 
N_(2-Hydroxyethyl)oleamide (Ethanol 

oleamide) . 
N-(2-Hydroxyethyl)ricinoleamide (Ethanol 

ricinoleamide). 

N-(Hydroxymethyl) stearamide 

Stearamide of diethylenetriamine 

♦Amine salts of fatty acids: 

Diethanolamine laurate 

Ethanolamine laurate 

Ethanolamine palmitate 

Oleyl glyoxilidlne 

Stearyl glyoxilidine 

Triethanolamine laurate 

Triethanolamine palmitate 

Triethanolamine salt of coconut fatty acids- 
Nitrogen-containing, other: 

Castor oil emine, polyether alcohol 

Cetyldimethylethylammonium bromide 

Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide 



489. 

489. 

490. 
466. 

466. 

466,489, 500. 

33. 
33. 
33,473. 



10. 

5,211,332. 

5,10,211,332,568. 

332. 
332. 
332. 
413. 
350. 

211,332,350,520. 

350. 

543. 

21,504,543. 

332. 

332. 

184. 
21. 

10,327. 

10. 

10. 

520. 
520. 
154. 
10. 

154. 

184. 
426. 
316,426. 



168 



Table 21B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Surface-active agents for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Nitrogen-containing — Continued 

Nitrogen-containing, other — Continued 

Diethylaminoethanol fatty ester 

Ethanolamine hydrochloride, lauric acid 

ester. 
Ethylenedinitrilotetra-acetic acid, tetra- 
sodium salt. 

Nitrilotriacetic acid, trisodium salt — 

Oleoylsarcosine (N-Methyloleoylglycine) , 
sodium salt. 

Oleylamine polyether alcohol 

Stearoylsarcosine (N-Methylstearoylglycine), 
sodium salt. 

Stearylbiguanide hydro chloride 

Triethanolsmine, coconut oil fatty acid 
ester. 

Trihexylammonium tricarballylate 

Polyhydric alcohol esters and ethers: 

Anhydro hexitol dioleate 

Anhydro hexitol dipalmitate 

Anhydro hexitol glycerol monolaurate 

Anhydro hexitol glycerol propylene 

Anhydro hexitol glycerol propylene glycol 
ricinoleate. 

Anhydro hexitol monolaurate 

Anhydro hexitol monolaurate polyglycol ether — 

Anhydro hexitol mono-oleate 

Anhydro hexitol mono-oleate polyglycol ether- 

Anhydro hexitol monopalmitate 

Anhydro hexitol monopalmitate polyglycol ether 

Anhydro hexitol aonoricinoleate 

Anhydro hexitol monoricinoleate polyglycol 
ether. 

Anhydro hexitol monostearate 

Anhydro hexitol monostearate polyglycol ether 

Anhydro hexitol trioleate 

Anhydro hexitol trioleate polyglycol ether 

Anhydro hexitol triricinoleate 

Anhydro hexitol triricinoleate polyglycol 

ether. 
Anhydro mannitol monolaurate polyglycol ether- 
Anhydro sorbitol mono-oleate polyglycol ether 
Anhydro sorbitol monostearate polyglycol ether 
Glucose polyglycol ether - polyglycol 
di( cottonseed oil fatty acid) ester. 
Glucose polyglycol ether - polyglycol 

distearate. 
Glucose polyglycol ether - polyglycol oleate — 
Glucose polyglycol ether - polyglycol tetra- 

stearate. 
Glycerol mono (cotton seed oil fatty acid) ester 

phosphoric acid, sodium salt. 
Hexitol polyglycol ether - polyglycol 

dirlcinoleate. 
Hexitol polyglycol ether - polyglycol 

distearate. 

Hexitol polyglycol ether - polyglycol glyceral 
ricinoleate. 



21. 
154. 

184. 

184. 
184. 

184. 
184. 

184. 
350. 

184. 

34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 

34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 

34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 

34. 
34. 
34. 
34. 

34. 

34. 
34. 

154. 

34. 

34. 

34. 



169 



Table 21 B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Surface-active agents for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Polyhydric alcohol esters and ethers — Continued 
Hexitol polyglycol ether - poly glycol hexa- 

laurate. 
Hexitol polyglycol ether - polyglycol hexa- 

stearate. 
Hexitol polyglycol ether - polyglycol mono- 

laurate. 
Hexitol polyglycol ether - polyglycol tri- 

(linseed oil fatty acids) ester. 
Hexitol polyglycol ether - polyglycol tri- 

laurate. 

Polyglycol casein 

Polyglycol castor oil 

Polyglycol lauryl ether — 
Polyglycol monolaurate — 
Polyglycol mono-oleate- 
Folyglycol monoricinoleate- 
Polyglycol monostearate- 

Polyglycol olein 

Polyglycol oleyl ether — 
Polyglycol polyricinoleate- 



Propylene glycol-glycerol mono (cot ton seed oil 

fatty acid) ester. 
Propylene glycol monostearate polyglycol ether- 
All other 

♦Salts of fatty acids t 
Potassium laurate 

Sodium oleate 

Sodium ricinoleate- 



*Sul fated and sulfonated fatty and alkyl acids and 

salts: 

Sulfonated fish oil fatty acids 

Sulfonated fish oil fatty acids, hydrogenated — 

♦Sulfonated oleic acid (Sulfonated red oil) 

Sulfonated ricinoleic acid, sodium salt 

Sulfonated ricinoleic acid, potassium salt 

Sulfated and sulfonated alcohols and salts: 
Cetyl sulfate, sodium salt — 

3,9-Diethyl-6-tridecylsulfate, sodium sal 
7-Ethyl-2-n>ethyl-4-undecylsulfate, sodium salt- 

2-Ethylhexylsulfate, sodium salt 

Lauryl sulfate, sodium salt 

Lauryl sulfate, triethanolamine salt — 
N-Methyloleylaminopolyethoxyethylsulfuric acid, 
sodium salt. 

Oleyl sul fate 

All other 

♦Sulfated and sulfonated amides and salts: 
Coconut oil fatty acid amide, sulfonated, 

sodium salt. 
Coconut oil fatty acid isopropanolamide 

sulfate, sodium salt. 
Lauramidoisopropanolsulfate, (Lauroyl iso- 
propanolamide sulfate), sodium salt. 



34. 
34. 
34. 

34. 

34. 

184. 

184. 

34,184. 

10,211,332. 

34,256,332. 

34. 

34,256,332. 

184. 

184. 

34. 

34. 

34. 
X. 

327,332. 

10,520. 

39. 



222,303,332,557. 

446. 

10,184,211,303, 327,332,413,446, 

473,543,557,568. 
95,184. 
332. 

568. 

427. 

76. 

76. 

76. 

136,X. 

X. 

184. 

427. 
413,427. 

78. 

X. 

X. 



170 



Table 2lB.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Surface-active agents for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Con. 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

♦Sulfated and sulfonated amides and salts — Con. 
Laurie acid ester of potassium sulfoaceto- 

ethanolamide. 
*Lauroyl taurine (Ethanol-lauramide sulfonic 

acid), potassium salt. 
♦Lauroyltaurine (Ethanol-lauramide sulfonic 

acid), sodium salt. 
Methylene-diethanolamide of (stearic and 

coconut oil fatty acids) sulfate, sodium 

salt. 

N-Methyloleoyl taurine and salt 

N-Methylpalmi toy 1 taurine and salt 

N-Octadecyldisodium sulfosuccinamate 

N-Oc tadecyl te trasodium-N • -1 , 2-dicarboxy e thy 1- 

sul fosuc cinamate . 
Oleoyltaurine (Ethanol-oleamide sulfonic acid) 

and salt. 

Oleyl and stearoyl amide, sulfonated 

Ricinoleoyl taurine (Ethanol-ricinoleamide) , 

sodium salt. 

Spennacite amide, sulfonated ■ 

Stearoyl taurine (Ethanol-stearamide), sodium 

salt. 
Sulfated ethanolamide of mi*ed fatty acids, 

sodium salt. 
♦Sulfated and sulfonated esters and salts: 

Diamyl sodium sulfo succinate 

Dibutyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Eiethyleneglycol coconut oil fatty acid ester 

sulfate, ethanolsmine salt. 

Die thylene glycol oleate sulfate 

Dihexyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Bioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate 

Lauryl sulfoacet&te- 



Monostearin sulfoacetate, sodium salt 

Sulfated butyl acetylricinoleate, sodium salt- 

Sulfated butyl ricinoleate, sodium salt 

Sulfated butyl oleate 

Sulfated ethyl oleate 

Sulfated isopropyl oleate 

Sulfated methyl, ethyl, propyl oleate 

Sulfated monoglycerides of coconut fatty acidSj 

ammonium salt. 
Sulfated monoglycerides of coconut fatty acids, 
sodium salt. 
♦Sulfated and sulfonated oils, fate, and waxes: 
♦Castor oil sulfonated 



Coconut oil, sulfonated- 
♦Corn oil, sulfonated 



Cottonseed oil, sulfonated- 



15-4. 
211. 

10,U3,520. 
5. 



184. 
184. 
14. 
14. 

332,520. 

568. 
520. 

427. 
520. 

327. 



14. 
14. 

X. 

X. 

14. 

14. 

154,331. 

154. 

211. 

568. 

10,332,427. 

184. 

413. 

222,327,332. 

5,X. 

5,X. 



10,14,35,65,184,211,222,273, 
327,332,413,421,427,446,473, 
520,543,557,568,X,X,X,X,X,X, 

x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x, 

A. yh yh yl, yJ- yA y h y '■ yAyhykyhyhyhy 

AjkyKyKy}<yhyhy&yK* 

332,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X. 
10,14,222,273,332,413,520,543, 

568,X,X,X,X,X. 
332,413,X,X. 



171 



Table 21B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Surface-active agents for which United 
States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 Con. 



Chemical 



SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

OilB, fats, and waxes, sulfated and sulfonated- 
Continued 
♦Fish and marine- mammal oils, sulfonated: 
♦Cod oil, sulfonated 

Herring oil, sulfonated 

Sardine oil, sulfonated 

Seal oil, sulfonated 

Sperm oil, sulfonated 

All other 

Lard oil, sulfonated 

Linseed oil, sulfonated 

Mustard seed oil, sulfonated 

♦Neat's foot oil, sulfonated 

♦Peanut oil, sulfonated 

♦Soybean oil, sulfonated 

♦Tallow oil, sulfonated 



All other 

♦Sulfonated aliphatic petroleum compounds and 
salts: 

Petroleum sulfonate 

Petroleum sulfonate, ammonium salt 

Petroleum sulfonate, sodium sail 
Petroleum sul fonate-mineral oil blend- 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



35,273,303,332,421, 557,X,X,X,X, 

x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x. 

35,303,332,557. 
303,X,X. 
303,332,X. 

14,35,211,273,332,421,427,520, 
543,557,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X, 

A j A j A j A » 

35,303, 557,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X,X, 

327,520,X,X,X,X,X,X,X. 

303,557,X,X. 

332,427,X. 

35, 273, 303, 332,421, 427,X,X,X,X, 

AjAjAjAjAjA^Ai 

211,273,332,413,473, 543,X,X,X, 

AjAyAjAjAjAjAjAyA^A» 

10,211,273,303,413,421,427,557, 

A y A f A f 1\ j }> f A y A y A y A • 

10,14,35,211,222,273, 332,a3, 
421,427,473, 543, 557,X,X,X ,X, 

AjAjAyAyAjAjAjAjAyAjAjAyAyAj 

A y A j A y A y A y A j A | A y A y A y A * 

184,303,332,413, 557,X,X,X,X,X, 

A^AjA^AjAjAyAjA* 



224,461,462,514. 

224. 

136. 

327. 



747685 0-47-12 



172 

Plasticizers 

Table 22B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plasticizers for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

{Plasticizers for which separate statistics are given in table 22a are marked 
below with an asterisk (*)j products not so marked do not appear in table 22A 
because the reported data are confidential and may not be published. Manufac- 
turers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in table 24, 
An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the publication of his 
identification number with the designated product) 



Chemical 



Manufacturers • identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICIZERS, CYCLIC 

Phosphoric acid esters: 

Cresyl diphenyl phosphate 

Diphenyl mono-o-xenyl phosphate 

Di-o-xenyl monophenyl phosphate 

Tri(p-tert-butylphenyl) phosphate— 

♦Tricresyl phosphate 

Triphenyl phosphate 

*Phthalic acid or anhydride esters: 

Butyl phthalyl butyl glycolate 

Castor oil phthalate 

Castor oil phthalate, hydrogenated- 
Diallyl phthalate 



Di-n-amyl phthalate 

Di(butylcellosolve) phthalate (Dibutoxyethyl 
phthalate) . 
•Dibutyl phthalate — 



Dicapryl phthalate 

Dicarbitol phthalate (Bis(diethylene glycol 

monoethyl ether) phthalate). 
Dicelloeolve phthalate (Diethoxyethyl phthalate) 

Dicyclohexyl phthalate 

Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate- 
*Diethyl phthalate- 



Dimethylcellosolve phthalate (Di( ethylene 
glycol monomethyl ether) phthalate) 
(Dimethoxyethyl phthalate). 

Di(methylcyclohexyl) phthalate 

♦Dimethyl phthalate 



Di-n-octyl phthalate — 
Diphenyl phthalate- 
Ethyl phthalyl ethyl glycolate— 
Methyl phthalyl ethyl glycolate- 
All other cyclic plasticizers: 
Amylnaphthalene, monc 
Camphor, synthetic- 



P-Chloro-P'-(2-xenoxy)diethyl ether- 

Coumarone-indene plasticizer 

Cyclohexyl levulinate- 
Diamylnaphthalene- 
Dibenzyl sebacate- 



Ethyl o-benzoylbenzoate- 
Ethyltoluenesulfonamide- 



N-Isopropyl(benzene and toluene) eulfonamide- 

Methyl abietate 

Methyl abietate, hydrogenated 



Phenolic coumarone-indene plasticizer 



324. 

131. 

131. 

131. 

84,324,326,358. 

131,324. 

324* 

136. 

136. , 

136,358. 

523. 

136,358. 

14,42,107,136, 179,253,324,358, 

419,464,531,559,X. 
42,425. 
358. 

358. 

42,136,358. 

76,256,358. 

14,107,136,253, 324,1. 

136,358. 



136. 
14,18,136,179,214,253,324,419, 

523,559,X. 
358. 
324. 
324. 
324. 

456. 

136. 

131. 

337,X. 

324. 

456. 

425. 

14. 

324. 

324. 

214. 

214. 

337. 



173 



Table 24B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plasticizers for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945— Continued 



Chemical 



PLASTICIZERS, CYCLIC— Continued 

All other cyclic plasticizers — Continued 
Phenyl polyglycol 2-ethylhexoate- 



Phenyl polypropylene glycol propionate 

Polyamylnaphthalene 

Styrene, polymerized 



Tetrahydrofurfuryl oleate 

Toluenesulfonand.de, o, p mixture— 

PLASTICIZERS, ACYCLIC 

*Azelaic acid esters: 

Butylcellosolve azelate (Ethylene glycol 
monobutyl ether azelate) (Butoxyethyl 
azelate) . 

Di-isobutyl azelate 

Monomethyl azelate- 
Citric acid esters: 



Manufacturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Tri-n-butyl acetylcitrat 

Trl-n-butyl citrate 

Triethyl acetylcitrate — 
♦Triethyl citrate 



♦Laurie acid esters: 

Butylcellosolve laurate (Ethylene glycol mono- 
butyl ether laurate) (Butoxyethyl laurate). 
Butyl laurate 



Diethylene glycol dilaurate 

Diethylene glycol monolaurate 

Glyceryl raonolaurate- 



1,2-Propylene glycol monolaurate — ■ 

Triethylene glycol laurate 

♦Oleic acid esters: 

Butylcellosolve oleate (Ethylene glycol mono- 
butyl ether oleate) (Butoxyethyl oleate). 
Butyl oleate 



Diethylene glycol raono-oleate- 
Ethyl oleate- 



Glyceryl diacetyltartrate mono-oleate — 

Glyceryl mono-oleate—— 

Glyceryl trioleate- 



Methyl cellosolve oleate (Ethylene glycol 
monomethyl ether oleate) (Methoxyethyl 
oleate) . 

Methyl oleate- 



Polyethylene glycol mono-oleate- 
Polyglyceryl oleate 



1,2-Propylene glycol mono-oleate 

♦Phosphoric acid esters: 

Tributyl cellosolve phosphate (Tri(ethylene 

glycol monobutyl ether) phosphate). 
Tributyl phosphate — 



Triethyl phosphate 

Trioctyl phosphate 

Ricinoleic acid esters: 
n-Butyl acetylricinoleate- 
Butyl ricinoleate- 



Cellosolve ricinoleate (Ethylene glycol 
monoethyl ether ricinoleate) (Ethoxyethyl 
ricinoleate) . 



34. 

34. 

456. 

131. 

221. 

324. 



358. 



202,358. 
151. 

383. 

107,383,X. 
383, X. 
136,383, X. 

202,256. 

256,324. 

256,332. 

154,193,256. 

193,256. 

34,256. 

504. 

193. 

256,332,358. 

193 ,256, X. 

256. 

154. 

193,256,332,X. 

151,256. 

358. 



221,256,332. 

568. 

154. 

256. 

358. 

107,358. 
324,X,X. 
358. 

39. 

39,256. 

193. 



m 



Table 22B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Plasticizers for ldiich United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



PLASTICIZERS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Ricinoleic acid esters — Continued 

Ethyl acetylricinoleate - — ■- — 

Glyceryl monoricinoleate— — — — 

Methyl acetylricinoleate- 



Methylcellosolve acetylricinoleate (Ethylene 

glycol monomethyl ether acetylricinoleate). 

(Methoxyethyl acetylricinoleate). 
Methylcellosolve ricinoleate (Ethylene glycol 

monomethyl ether ricinoleate) (Methoxyethyl 

ricinoleate) . 

Methyl ricinoleate - ■- 

Sebacic acid esters: 

Dibutylcellosolve sebacate (Di(ethylene glycol 

monobutyl ether) sebacate) (Dibutoxy ethyl 

sebacate) • 
♦Dibutyl sebacate- 



Di(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate- 

Diethyl sebacate 

Dimethyl sebacate—— 
Dioctyl sebacate- 



Di(tetradecyl) sebacate- 
♦Stearlc acid esters: 
Amyl stearate- 



Manuf acturers ' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24 ) 



Butylcellosolve stearate (Ethylene glycol mono- 
butyl ether stearate) (Butoxyethyl stearate). 
♦Butyl stearate— — ■ — ■■-■ - ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ — 

Cellosolve stearate (Ethylene glycol monoethyl 
ether stearate) (Ethoxyethyl stearate). 

Methylene glycol distearate 

Diethylene glycol aonostearate 

Ethyl stearate- 



Glyceryl monohydroxystearate — 
♦Glyceryl monostearate- 



Methylcellosolve stearate (Ethylene glycol 

methyl ether stearate) (Methoxyethyl stearate|l 
Methyl dichlorostearate— — 
Methyl pentaehlorostearate- 
Methyl stearate- 



Polyethylene glycol monostearate- 
Polyglyceryl stearate- 



1,2-Propylene glycol distearate- 



1,2-Propylene glycol monostearate 

All other acyclic plasticizers: 

Dibutylcellosolve adipate (Di( ethylene glycol 

monobutyl ether) adipate) (Dibutoxyethyl 

adipate). 
Dibutylcellosolve tartrate (Di( ethylene glycol 

monobutyl ether) tartrate) (Dibutoxy ethyl 

tartrate). 

Dibutyl tartrate 

Diethylene glycol dipelargonate 

Diethylene glycol ester of mixed animal fatty 

acids. 

Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate 

Ethylene glycol mono(fish liver oil -fatty 

acid) ester. 
Glyceryl tripropionate 



39. 

193,256,332. 
39. 
39,358. 



39,358. 

39,332. 
136. 



107,136,207,425,X. 

136. 

256. 

107,136. 

425. 

136. 

256. 
256,358. 

107,2^6,332 ,X. 
136. 

193,256,427. 

154,178,256,531. 

256. 

332. 

154,178 ,193 ,256,332, 531 . 

193,256,X. 

221. 

221. 

178,221,256,332. 

531,568. 

154. 

256. 

34,154,256. 

358. 
136. 



107,256. 

151. 

151. 

136. 
34. 

X. 



175 



Table 22B.- Synthetic organic chemicals! Plasticizere for which United States 
production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers ■ identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



PLASTICIZERS, ACYCLIC — Continued 

All other acyclic plasticizers — Continued 

Octadecadiene nitrile 

Octadecene nitrile 

Oleamide 



Polyethylene glycol 

Sorbitan tetrapropionate- 
Sucrose octa-acetate 



Triethylene glycol diethylbutyrate- 
Triethylene glycol diethylhexoate — 
Vinylite plasticizer 



25. 

25. 

425. 

76. 

34. 

346. 

76. 

76. 

243. 






176 

Miscellaneous Synthetic Organic Chemicals 

Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 1945 

(Miscellaneous chemicals for which separate statistics are given in table 23A are 
marked below with an asterisk (*); chemicals not so marked do not appear in 
table 23A because the reported date, are confidential and may not be published. 
Manufacturers are identified by numbers in the alphabetical list appearing in 
table 24. An X signifies that the manufacturer did not consent to the 
publication of his identification number with the designated product) 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC 

l-Acetaminoethyl-2-aliphatic-3-acetylimidazc— 

lidine (Amidozaline). 

Ace tyl-p-emino phenol (p-Hydroxyacetanilide) 

Benzoic acid salts: 

Ammonium benzoate— — — — 

♦Sodium benzoate ■ • ■ ■ ■ ■ — -■ 

Q-Benzoin oxime 

Benzothiazole 



Benzoyl peroxide- 
*Benzyl benzoate, mitocide grade- 
♦Biological stains- 

p-tert-Butylcatechol- 

Camphene- 



p-Carboxybenzenesulfondichloramide (Halazone)- 
•Chemical indicators: 
o-C r e solph thale in- 



o-Cresolsulfonphthalein (Cresol red) - 

m-Cresolsulfonphthalein (m-Cresol purple) 

Dibrooo-o-cresolsul fonph thale in ( Bromocresol 

purple) . 

Dibromothymolsul fonph thalein (Bromothymol blue] 
Dichlorophenolsul fonph thalein ( Chlorophenol 

red). 

Phenolsulfonphthalein (Phenol red) 

Tetrabromo-m-cresolsulfonphthalein (Bromo- 
cresol green). 

Tetrabromophenolsul fonph thalein (Bromophenol 
blue) . 

Thymolph thalein 



Thymol sul fonph thale in (Thymol blue)- 
All other ■ 



♦Chemical reagents: 

p-Aminodiphenylamine diazoniumsulfate- 
Aurintricarboxylic acid- 



Barium diphenylamine sulfonate 

p-Diazodiphenylamlne, magnesium sulfate 

mixture. 
p-Diazodiphenylamine, zinc chloride double 

salt. 

l-Diazo-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid 

2,6—Dibromoquinone chloroimide- 

Diphenyl benzidine - - 

Diphenyl carbazone- 



Diphenylthlocarbazone (Dithizone)- 

Q,a-Dipyridyl- 

N-( 1-Naph thyl ) -e thylenediamlne dihydrochloride 

p-Nitrobenzeneazoresorcinol — . ...... » 



427. 

146. 

324. 

216] 221,324, 513. 

144,160,167. 

324. 

217,289. 

40,253,308,324,464,X. 

103,210,331. 

131. 

136. 

1. 

144,167,503. 
144,167,331,503. 
144,331,503. 
144,331,369,503. 

144,331,369,503. 
144,331,503. 

144,167,331. 

144,167,227,331,369,503. 

144,331,503. 

144,331,503. 

144,167,331. 
144,331,503. 
103,270,331. 

146,160. 

144,503. 

144. 

146. 

146. 

9,146. 

144,331. 

144. 

144,147,167. 

144,167. 

144. 

144. 

144. 



177 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Continued 



♦Chemical reagents — Continued 

Nitrosopbenylhydroxylamine (Cupferron)- 

Pota8sium biphthalate reagent 

Quinhydrone 

Sodium biphthalate- 



Sodium-2,6-dichlorobenzenoneindophei:ol- 

Sulfosalicyclic acid 

All other- 

N-Chlorobenzenesulfonamide, sodium salt- 

Cyclohexyl phosphite 

♦Cyclopropane- 

Decahydronaphthalene (Decal^n)- 

Diamylhydroquinone- 

Diazodinitrophenol- 

Dibenzyl disulfide- 



N,N » -Diethyldiphenylurea 

1,4-Diethylene oxide (Dioxane) 

2,2 , -Dihydroxy-5,5'-dichlorodiphenylmethane 

2,2'-Dihydroxy-3,5,6,3* ,5' ,6'-hexachloro- 

diphenylme thane . 
2,2* -Dlbydroxy-3 , 3 ' , 5 , 5 ' -te tra-amyldiphenylmono- 

sulfide, barium salt. 
Disulphide, liquid- 



Manufacturers • identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Ergo sterol, crystalline- 
Ethyl benzoylacetate- 



Ethylene glycol monophenyl ether 

Ethylene glycol monosalicylate— 

Ethylene glycol terpinyl ether — 

Fenchone 

♦Flotation reagents: 

Dicresyldithiophosphoric acid 

Dicresyldithiophosphoric acid, ammonium salt — 

Dicresyldithiophosphoric acid, sodium salt 

Diphenyl thiourea (Thiocarbanilide) 
Di-c—tolyl thiourea 

Furan derivatives: 
Fur fural 



Furfuryl acetate — 
furfuryl mercap tan- 
Hydro furamide- 



Tetrahydro furfuryl alcohol — 

Gallic acid, tech. 

Gases (poisonous, tear, etc.): 

Biphenylaminechlorarsine- 

Chloroace tophenon e- 
Gasoline antioxidants- 

Gasoline inhibitors 

Guanine — ■- ■■-■ 

♦Hexamethylenetetramine, tech.- 
Insecticides, synthetic: 

Benzene hexachlorlde 



Benzyl thiocyanate — 
♦4 ,4 ' -Dichlorodiphenyl-1 ,1 , 1-trichloroe thane 
(DDT). 
2,4-Dinitroanisole- 



4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol 

4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol, sodium ealt- 



144. 

40,144,185,315. 

144,315. 

185. 

1 /,/, . 

144,315. 

331, 416. 

572. 

42. 

298,359,482. 

136. 

144. 

2U. 

167. 

95,456. 

76. 

X. 

X. 

14. 

221. 

326,484. 

523. 

76. 

X. 

X. 

342. 

14. 
-X. 
X. 

14,136,324,331. 
136,1. 

412,413. 

X. 

146. 

414. 

414. 

144,298,575. 

X. 

165,X. 

136,224. 

512. 

313. 

38,136,138,216,546. 

221. 

221. 
40,95,136,185,221,304,315,318, 

324,326,335, 384,464,X,X. 
536. 

136,483. 
483. 



178 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

194.5 — Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CYCLIC— Continued 

Insecticides, synthetic— Continued 

Indalone (a,c-Dimethyl-c-carbutoxydihydro-v- 
pyrone). 

Isobomyl thiocyanoacetate— 

♦Phenothiazine- 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Sodium antimony lactophenate- 
Xanthone- 



Zinc nicotinyl flurosilicate- 

Mesoxalylurea (Alloxan) 

Methylcyclohexane 

Methylcyclohexanol (Methyl hexalin) 

4-Me thyl- 5- ( p-hydroxye thyl) - thiazole 

Methylphloroglucinol 

Methyl terpinyl ether 

Morphollne-' 

Naphthenic acid salts: 

Cobalt naphthenate — 

Copper naphthenate — 

Iron naphthenate 

Lead naphthenate 

Manganese naphthenate- 

Mercury naphthenate- 

Nickel naphthenate- 

Zinc naphthenate 

Octylphenol 

♦Phenyl mercuric derivatives: 

Mercurous chlorophenol 

Mercurous nitrophenol — 



Phenyl mercuric acetate 
Phenyl mercuric borate- 
Phenyl mercuric chloride 
Phenyl mercuric cyanamide- 

Phenyl mercuric hydroxide 

Phenyl mercuric naphthenate 

Phenyl mercuric nitrate, basic — 
Phenyl mercuric oleate- 
Phenyl mercuric salicylate- 
Phenyl mercuric stearate 

All other 

Phenylphosphoric acid, disodium salt— 

Phenylsemicarbazide 

Phloroglucinol 

Photographic chemicals: 

p-Aminophenol hydrochloride 

p-Aminophenol sulfate 

♦Benzotriazole- 



523. 

X. 

131,136,264,331,337. 

21. 

185. 

185. 

146. 

335. 

136,221. 

315. 

U6. 

X. 

76. 

356,497. 

208,356. 

356,497. 

356,463,497. 

208,356,463,497. 

356. 

208. 

356. 

X. 

136. 

136. 

48,14.6. 

48. 

48,204. 

X. 

48,146. 

356. 

48. 

136. 

48. 

48. 

48. 

369. 

146. 

14.6. 



Catechol (Pyrocatechin)- 

Chlorohydroquinone 

2,4-Diaminophenol dihydrochloride (Amidol) 

♦Hydroquinone (Hydroquinol) 

p-Hydroxyphenylglyclne — - — 

p-Methylominophenol hydrochloride 

*p-Methylaminophenol sulfate (Metol) (Rhodol) 

Phthalic acid, sodium salt 

Phthalide 

Plant hormones: 
*2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) 



144. 

146. 

144,146,160. 

x. 

K6. 

536. 

80,136,512,536,575. 

144,231. 
231. 

136,144,536,575. 

184 . 

136. 

13,40,131,134,324,464,553. 



179 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, CXCLIC— Continued 

Plant hormones — Continued 

Indole-3-acetic acid, crystals 

d-Indole-3-n-butyric acid 

Naphthaleneacetamide (N-Ace tylnaphthylamine) 

*Naphthaleneacetic acid (Parmone) 

2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid 

Polyglycol phenyl ether 

Propylcyclohexanol 

Protalbinic acid 

Pyridyl mercuric acetate 

Pyridyl mercuric chloride 

Pyridyl mercuric stearate 

Pyrogallol (Pyrogallic acid) 

Quinoidine, sulfurized 

Quinone 

Research chemicals 

-*Rosin acid salts: 



Aluminum resinate- 
Calcium resinate— 
Cobalt resinate — 
Copper resinate- 
Iron resinate- 
Lead resinate- 
Manganese resinate- 
Zinc resinate- 
Salicylanilide (Shirlan)— 
♦Tanning materials, synthetic: 

Bisphenol formaldehyde condensate, sodium salt 
Isopropylidinediphenolsulfonic acid, 

formaldehyde condensate. 
1 -Naphthalene sulfonic acid, formaldehyde 

condensate. 
1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, formaldehyde 

condensate, sodium salt. 
2-Naphthalene sulfonic acid, formaldehyde 

condensate, ammonium salt. 
2-Naphthalene sulfonic acid, formaldehyde 

condensate, sodium salt. 
g-Naphtholsulfonic acid, formaldehyde 

condensate. 
Phenolsulfonic acid, formaldehyde condensate — 
Styrene maleic anhydride interpolymer, partial 

sodium salt 

Te trahydronaph thalene ( Te tralin ) 

Te traphenyl tin 

Textile chemicals, other than surface-active 
agents. 

Thiophenol 

o-Tolylbiguanide 

Tri-tert-amylphenyl phosphite 

Tricresyl phosphite 

Triphenyl phosphite 

o-Veratraldehyde bisulfite — - — ■■ 

o-Xenylbiguanide- 



13. 

13,315. 

13,144. 

13,U,131, 135,^64, 553. 

13. 

34. 

221. 

39. 

293. 

298. 

293. 

144,298,575. 

136. 

575. 

144,147. 

208. 

14,208. 

208,463. 

14,203,463. 

208. 

14, 208,463,497. 

14, 208,463,497. 

14, 208, 497. 

136. 

568. 
184. 

276,433,568. 

276,433,568. 

X. 

324,331,X. 

X. 

95. 
136. 

184. 
136. 
221. 
136. 

144. 
324. 
324. 
324. 
335. 
136. 
324. 



180 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

I94.5 — Con tinued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACXCLIC 



*Ace taldehyde 

Acetaldol (Aldol) 

Acetaldol-hydrocyanic condensation product- 
Acetamide 

♦Acetic acid, synthetic (100%)- 

♦Acetic acid salts: 

♦Aluminum acetate 

Ammonium acetate- 
Barium acetate- 
Cadmium acetate- 
Calcium acetate — 
Chromium acetate- 
Cobalt acetate — 
Copper acetate — 
Lead acetate- 
Magnesium acetate- 
Manganese acetate — 
Mercuric acetate — 
Nickel acetate- 



Manufacturers' identification 
numbers (according to list 
in table 24) 



Potassium acetate- 
Sodium acetate 



Strontium acetate — 
Zinc acetate 



♦Acetic anhydride: 

From acetylene (100%)- 
Prom ethylene (1CX#) — 
Prom ketone (100%)- 



Prom recovered acetic acid by the vapor-phase 

process (100%). 
Prom acetic acid (other than recovered) by the 

vapor-phase process (100%). 
Ace tin: 

Di 

♦Tri- 



Acetoin (Methyl acetylcarbinol)- 

Acetone: 

♦From isopropyl alcohol 

♦By fermentation 

All other- 



Ace tonitrile 

Acetonylace tone 

Ace tylace tone (2,4-Pentanedione)- 
Acetyl bromide — 
a-Ace tylbutyrolactone- 
Acetyl chloride — 
Acetyl propyl chloride- 

Aconitic acid 

Acrylonitrile 

Adipic acid— 

Adiponitrile 

(3- Alanine, tech.- 
Alkyl mercaptans- 
Allyl alcohol 



Q-Allyl-P-succinylurea- 
Allylurea, tech.— — — 



96,136,346, 405,512,X,X. 

346,^05. 

136. 

346. 

76,107,136,346,405,512,523,X. 

14,136,135,315,346,568. 

14,135. 

135. 

185. 

135. 

U, 208, 568. 

185,208. 

185,346. 

136,185,464. 

135,208. 

346. 

135. 

208. 

185,346. 

136,135,298,315,324,346,464. 

135. 

135,208,346. 

136. 

76. 

76. 

512,X. 

512. 



184,256. 

256. 

179,214,256,289,512. 

160. 

76,459,490,512. 

107,405,523,X. 

X. 

315,346. 

76. 

146. 

144. 

523. 

135,221. 

523. 

184. 

14,136,433. 

136. 

136. 

1. 

388. 

76,459. 

268. 
268. 



181 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
, 1945— Con tinued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Con tinued 



Aluminum alkoxides: 

* Amines J 

Allylamine- 



Aluminum isopropylate — 



Amylaminest 
Mono— — 

Di 

Tri 



Butylamine8t 
Mono 
Di 



Tri- 
Iso- 



Decylamine __________ 

l-Diethylamino-4-aminopentane (flovoldiamine)- 

Die thylene triamine— — ■ . , ,- 

Dihexadecylamine 

Dio c tadecylamine 

Dioctylamine- 



Dipropylene triamine- 

Dodecylamine 

Ethylaminest 

Mono ■• ■ - 
Di 



Tri- 



Ethylenediamine, tech. 

2-Heptylamine (2-Aminoheptane)- 
Hexadecylamine- 



Hexame thylenediamine - 
Isopropylamine— — — 
Loroldiae thylamine — 
Me thy lam in et 

Mono 

Di 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Tri- 



Oc tadecadienylamine- 

Oc tadecenylamine 

Oc tadecylamine 

Octylamine- 



Polye thyleneamine s- 

Propylenediamine — 

Te tradecylamine- 
Aminoacetic acid, tech. (Glycine)- 
2-Amino-l-bu tanol 



Aminoguanidine sulfate- ■ - 

2-Amino-2-me thyl-1-propanol 

2-Amino-2-me thyl-1 , 3-propanediol- 
*Amyl acetates, primary t 

Normal (90*) 

Active (90?)- 

Isoamyl (90J?) 

Mixed isomers 

♦Arnyl alcohols: 

Fusel oil, crude- 



Fusel oil, refined 

Refined: 
Primary: 

Normal (n-Butylcarbinol) (100*)- 



U4. 

U6. 

456. 
456. 
456. 

76,456. 

456. 

456. 

136. 

25. 

217,561. 

51. 

25. 

25. 

76. 

51. 

25. 

456. 

456. 

456. 

51. 

324. 

25. 

136. 

324. 

217. 

107,136,276,433. 

107,136,276,433. 

107,136. 

25. 

25. 

25. 

25. 

76. 

76. 

25. 

47. 

107. 

184. 

107. 

107. 

107,136. 
136. 

131,354,372,523. 
456. 

107,136. 
320,405,456,523. 



456. 



182 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945—Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



—4 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACICLIC— Continued 

♦Amyl alcohols — Continued 
Ref in ed — Continued 
Primary — Continued 

Active (2-Methylbutanol-l) (100%) 

Isoamyl (3-Methylbutanol-l) (100%) 

All other 

Secondary: 

Pentanol-2 (Methylpropylcarbinol) (100%) 

Pentanol-3 (Diethylcarbinol) (100%) 

Tertiary: Amyl (2-Methylbutanol-2) (100%) 

Amyl ether 

Amyl mercaptan 

Azelaic acid 

♦Butadiene, from alcohol: 
(elastomers) . 
Butene- 



Grade for rubber 



Butyl acetates: 
♦Normal (90%) — 
Iso (90%) — 



Secondary (90%) 

♦Butyl alcohols: 

Primary: 

♦Normal (n-Propylcarbinol) (100%) 

Iso (Isopropylcarbinol) (100%) 

Secondary (Methylethylcarbinol) (100%)- 

Tertiary (Trimethylcarbinol) (100%) 

Butyl chloroacetate 

n-Butyl ethyl malonic ester- 
sec-Butyl ethyl malonic ester- 
Butyl lactate 

Butyl methacrylate 

Butyl vinyl ether 

n-Butyraldehyde ■ 

n-Butyraldoxime 

n-Butyric acid 

Butyric anhydride- 
Butyryl chloride— 

Capric acid (n-Decylic acid) 

n-Caproic acid 

Capryl chloride (Decanoyl chloride)- 

Caprylic acid 

♦Carbon disulfide- 



♦Cellulose derivatives: 
Cellulose esters: 
Cellulose acetate- 



Cellulose acetate butyrate — 
Cellulose acetate propionate- 
Cellulose nitrate- 



Cellulose propionate- 
Cellulose ethers: 
Ethyl cellulose- 
Methyl cellulose- 



Sodium carboxymethylcellulose 

Chemical reagents: Girard's reagent P 1 — 
♦Chloral (Trichloroacetaldehyde)- 

Chloroace tamide- 

Chloroacetic acid: 

Mono 



136,456. 

181,372,456,X. 

523. 

456,490. 

456. 

456. 

456. 

456. 

151. 

77,265. 

265. 

76,107,136,147,167,372,405, 523. 

136. 

490. 



76,107,265,405, 523,*. 

76,136. 

459,490. 

459. 

324. 

X. 

1. 

107. 

433. 

184. 

76. 

331. 

76,354,X. 

76,X. 

221. 

148. 

76,131,308,354. 

221. 

148. 

131,361,495,509,552,556. 

15,18,136,214, 512,X. 

X. 

X. 

214. 

X. 

131,214. 

131. 

131,214. 

268. 

136,147,185,304,324,552. 

131,315. 



H 



131. 



183 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United StateB production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 
1945— Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

Chloroacetic acid — Continued 

M. 



Tri- 
Chloroacetone- 



Chloroacetyl chloride — 

g-Chlorodiethylaminoe thane hydrochloride 
(Novolid salt). 

Chloromaleic anhydride, mono 

Chromium acetylacetonate- 

Citric acid: 

Crude, fermentation 

Re fined , fermentation — 

Citric acid salts: 
Ammonium citrate- 
Calcium citrate- 

Cro tonaldehyde- 

Cyanoace tamide- 

Cyanoacetic acid — 

Diacetone alcohol— 

Diallyl disulfides- 

Diallyl succinate— 

Diallyl sulfide 

Diamyl sul fide- 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Dibutylaminoe thanol 

Dlbutyl ether (n-Butyl 
Dibutyl oxalate- 



ither)- 



Dichiorodiethyl ether 

Dichloroethyl acetate 

Dichloroethyl formal- 



l,3-Dichloro-2-hydroxypropane- 

Dichloroisopropyl ether 

Dicyandiamide 



Die thylamlno e thanol 

l-Diethylamlno-4-peritanol (Novol alcohol) — 
l-Diethylamino-4-pentanone (Novol ketone) — 

Diethyl carbonate (Diatol) 

Diethylene glycol- 



Diethylene glycol chloroformate 

Diethylene glycol diethyl ether 

Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether 

Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether acetate 

Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (Carbitol) 

Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate 

Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether 

Diethyl maleate 

♦Diethyl malonate (Malonic ester)- 



Diethyl malonic ester (Diethyl diethylmalonate)- 

Diethyl silicon dichloride- 

Diethyl sulfate 

Di-isobutyl adlpate- 

Di-isopropanolamine- 

Di-isopropyl ketone* 

Dimethyl ether 

Dimethylformamide- 



Dimethyl glutorate- 
Dimethylglyoxime- 



n-Dimethyl-n-lorolainine 



131. 
131. 
1U. 
131. 
561. 

331. 

us. 

383. 
98,383. 

383. 

383. 

3-V6,X. 

253. 

47,131,308. 

76,107, 324,A59. 

388. 

U6. 

U6. 

456. 

456. 

76,107. 

523. 

76,131. 

304. 

76. 

167,459. 

76,131. 

14. 

76,456. 

561. 

523,561. 

523. 

76,131. 

392. 

76. 

76. 

76. 

76. 

76. 

76. 

107. 

1,47,131,281. 

1. 

133. 

76. 

136. 

76. 

136. 

136. 

136. 

136. 

144. 

217. 



184 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicelst Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 



Dimethyl maleate- 
Dimethylolurea- 



Dimethyl sulfate 

Dime thy lurea 

Dioleyl malate- 
Dioleyl tartrate- 



Dipropylene glycol 

Dithiophosphoric acid esters, not included with 
flotation reagents: 

Barium dilauryl dithiophosphate 

Di(amyl, hexyl, loryl) dithiophosphoric acid, 

barium salt. 
Di(decanyl, capryl) dithiophosphoric acid, 

barium salt. 
Di(lauryl, capryl) dithiophosphoric acid, 
barium salt. 

Epichlorohydrin 

Ethanolaminet 

Ethanolamine sulfite, mono- 
*Ethyl acetate (85*) 

Ethyl acetoacetate 

Ethyl acrylate 

Ethyl alcohol, synthetic- 
Ethyl bromoacetate 

a-Ethylbutyl acetate 

Q-Ethylbutyl alcohol (sec-Hexyl alcohol)- 

O-Ethylbutyraldehyde 

Q-Ethylbutyric acid (Diethylacetic acid) 

Ethyl chloroacetate 

Ethyl chloro formate (Ethyl chlorocarbonate) — 

Ethyl cyanoacetate 

Ethyl diethanolamine— -— - 

Ethylene (from ethyl alcohol and ether) - 



136. 

136,182,427,543. 

136. 

47. 

324. 

324. 

76,131. 



X. 



X. 



Ethylene chlorohydrin- 

Ethylene cyanhydrin- 

N ,N • -Ethylenediglycine— 

♦Ethylene glycol- 
Ethylene glycol diacetate — — — _____ 

Ethylene glycol diethyl ether— 

Ethylene glycol diformate 

Ethylene glycol dinitrate 

Ethylene glycol monoacetate 

Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether 

Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (Cellosolve)- 

Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate 

Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether 

Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate 

Ethylene oxide- 
Ethyl ethanolamine — 

♦Ethyl ether: 
Technical — 
U.S.P. 



459. 

76,131. 

76,131. 

76,131. 

298. 

76,107,136,174,324,354,372,405, 

457,512,523. 
76,523. 
14,433. 

70,76,136,491,1. 
144. 
76. 
76. 
76. 
76. 
324. 
523. 

47,131,253. 
456. 
131,132,157,265,284,359,433, 

523. 
76,131. 
14. 
384. 

76,131,136. 
76. 
76. 
76. 
214. 
144. 
76. 
76. 
76. 
76. 
76. 

76,131. 
456. 

76,214,265, 491, X. 
298,482,523. 



y Statistics shown in table 5A. 



185 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

♦Ethyl ether — Continued 

•Ethyl formate 

2-Ethyl-l-hexanal 

2-Ethyl-l , 3-hexanediol 

2-Ethyl-l-hexanol 

2-Ethyl-l-hexoic acid 

2-Ethyl-l-hexyl acetate 

5-Ethyl-5-n-hexyl barbituric acid 

Ethylidene diace tate 

Ethyl lactate 

Ethyl malonic ester (Ethyl ethylmalonate) 

Ethyl mercaptan 

Ethyl-1-methylbutylmalonic ester 

Ethyl monobromoacetate 

*Ethyl monochloroace tate 

Ethyl monoethanolamine 

♦Ethyl oxalate (Diethyl oxalate) 

Ethyl oxal propionate 

Ethylphosphoric acid 

Ethyl propionate 

Ethyl silicate 

Ethyl silicon trichloride 

Ethyl sodium potassium phosphate ; 

Ethyl stearoyl acetate 

♦Fats and oils, chemically modified: 

Castor oil, acetylated 

Castor oil, dehydrated 

Castor oil, hydrogenated 

Castor oil, triethylenetetramine 

Glyceryl tall oil ester 

Linseed oil, accelerated 

Linseei oil, conjugated 

♦Fatty acids, chemically modified: 

Castor oil fatty acids, dehydrated 

9,10-Dichlorostearic acid 

Linseed oil fatty acids, conjugated 

♦Fatty acid esters, not included with 
plasticizers: 

Butyl acetylricinoleate, polymerized 

Butyl palmitate 

Diethylene glycol mono-soybean fatty acid 
ester. 

Ethylene glycol mono-oleate 

Ethylene glycol monostearate 

Ethyl esters of linseed oil' 
Isopropyl laurate — 

Isopropyl myristate 

Isopropyl palmitate — — ■■■ 

Isopropyl stearate 

Methyl tallow 

Pentaerythritol linseed oil fatty acid ester — 
Pentaerythritol soybean oil fatty acid ester — 

Polyethylene glycol stearate (wax) 

Sorbitan dehydrated castor ester 

Sorbitan linseed fatty acid ester 

Sorbitan linseed fatty acid tetra ester 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



523. 

107,181,298,354,372,] 

76. 

76. 

76,221. 

76. 

76. 

367. 

136. 

14. 

182,X. 

298,469. 

1. 

131. 

131,178,216,X. 

456. 

47,372,523. 

523. 

324. 

181,372,X. 

76,133. 

133. 

324. 

184. 

39. 

39,567. 

39,136,221. 

184. 

332,567,X. 

39,567. 

567. 

39,567. 

221. 

567. 



39. 

332. 
256. 

154. 

256,332. 

256. 

154,X. 

X. 

154. 

25o. 

332. 

567. 

567. 

256,332,427. 

567. 

567. 

34. 



186 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic cnemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945__Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 



Fatty alcohols: 
n-Decyl alcohol 

Heptadecanol 

Hexadecanol 



Lauryl alcohol (l-Dodecanol)- 
Oc tade canediol- 



Octadecanol (Stearyl alcohol)- 



Oleyl alcohol (9-0ctadecen-l-ol)- 

Tetradecanol 

2-Undecanol 

All other- 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Fatty amido ammonium sulfate ester 
Ferric dimethyl dithiocarbamate- 
*Flotation reagents: 
Amine acetates: 

Decylamine acetate- 



Dodecylamine acetate——— 

Hexadecylamine acetate 

Octadecadienylamine acetate- 

Octadecenylamine acetate 

Octadecylamine acetate 

Octylamine acetate — — - 
Tetradecylamine acetate- 
Dithiophosphates: 

Ammonium di-sec-butyl dithiophosphate 

Sodium di-sec-butyl dithiophosphate 

Sodium diethyl dithiophosphate 

Sodium di-isopropyl dithiophosphate 

Quaternary ammonium compounds: 
Trimethyldecylammonium chloride — 

Trimethyldodecylammonium chloride 

Trime thylhexadecylammonium chloride—- 

Trimethyloctadecadienylammonium chloride 

Trime thyloc tade cenylaamonium chloride 

Trimethyloctadecylemmonium chloride 

Trime thy loctylammonium chloride 

Trimethyltetradecylammonium chloride 

Xanthates: 

Chloronaphtha xanthate 

Potassium amyl xanthate — 

Potassium sec-butyl xanthate- 

Potassium ethyl xanthate 

Potassium isopropyl xanthate- 

Potassium pentasol xanthate- 

Sodium n-butyl xanthate— 



Sodium sec-butyl xanthate 

Sodium ethyl xanthate 

Sodium isopropyl xanthate- 

•Formaldehyde (37% HCHO by weight) — 



Formamide 

Formic acid (90*)— 
♦Formic acid salts: 
•Aluminum formate- 
Chromic formate- 
Lead formate 

Nickel formate — 



136. 

76. 

136,207. 

136. 

136. 

136. 

136. 

76. 

76. 

136. 

21. 

136,324. 



25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 

X. 
X. 
X. 
X. 

25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 

324. 

131,324. 

131. 

131,324. 

131,335. 

131. 

X. 

X. 

14,131. 

X. 

38,84,96,107,136,216,253,433, 

516. 
136. 
136,216,537. 

136,216,537. 

184. 

136. 

208. 



167 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945-- Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

♦Formic acid salts — Continued 

♦Sodium formate, refined 

Sodium formate, tech. 

Fumaric acid 

♦Gases (poisonous, tear, etc.): 

Carbonyl chloride (Phosgene) 

Cyanogen chloride 

Gluconic acid, tech. 

Gluconic acid salts: Sodium gluconate 

Glucose polyglycol ether _______ 

Glyceric acid, calcium salt— 

Glycerol chlorohydrin, mono 

Glycerol epichlorohydrin 

Glycolic acid (Hydroxyacetic acid) 

Guanidine carbonate 

Guanidine hydrochloride 

Guanyl-nitro6amine-guanyl-tetrazene 

♦Halogenated hydrocarbons: (bromides, chlorides, 
fluorides. and iodides): 

Allyl chloride 

Allyl iodide 

Amyl chlorides, mixed 

2-Bromopentane 

Butyl bromides: 
♦Normal 

Secondary 

Tertiary 

Butyl chlorides: 
Normal- 
Tertiary 

♦Carbon tetrachloride- 

Cetyl bromide 

Cetyl chloride 

Chlorinated methane and homologs- 

Chlorinated oil 

Chlorinated propane, liquid (170) 

Chlorinated propane, wax (130 + 170) 

Chlorodi fluorome thane , mono 

♦Chloroform: 

♦Chloroparaffin 

Eichlorodi fluorome thane 

Dichloromono fluorome thane 

1,2-Dichloropropane (Propylene dichloride) T — 
Dichloro te tra fluoroe thane 

♦Ethyl bromide 

Ethyl chloride: 

Technical 

U.S. P. 

Ethylene dibromide (1,2-Dibromoe thane) 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



747685 O - 47 - 13 



185,298,315,561. 

216,537. 

331,383. 

324. 

221,347. 

131,234. 

14. 

383. 

383. 

34. 

167. 

X. 

178. 

136. 

184. 

14. 

167. 

X. 



131,318. 

459. 

144. 

131,144. 

456. 

281. 

1,131,144,318. 
131,U4. 

144, X. 
144. 

76. 

144, X. 

126,131,348, 552, X. 

144, 146. 

146. 

46. 

221. 

221. 

221. 

260. 

63,131,136. 

63,131,136. 

1,11,126,214,217,221,490. 

260. 

260. 

76,131. 

260. 

1,131,182,318. 

131,156,214. 

131. 
131,157,552. 



188 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

194 5 — Con tinued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 

♦Halogenated hydrocarbons (bromides, chlorides, 
fluorides, and iodides) — Continued 

Ethylene dichloride (l,2-Dichloroe thane) 

Ethyl iodide, tech. 

Hexachloro butadiene 

Hexachloroe thane 

Hexachloropropylene 

Isoamyl chloride 

Isopropyl bromide 

Isopropyl chloride 

Kerosene , chlorinated 

Methallyl chloride 

*Methyl bromide 

1-Methylbutyl bromide— 



♦Methyl chloride (chlorome thane): 

Crude — 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



76,131,156,433. 

298. 

221. 

131. 

221. 

281. 

131,X. 

131,221. 

221. 

459. 

131,318,391,552. 

1. 



- 46. 



Refined (refrigerant grade) 

Methylene bromide (Dibromome thane) 

Methylene chloride (Dichlorome thane): 

Crude- 



Refined (refrigerant grade) 

Methyl iodide, tech. 

Oc tachloropropane 

Pentachloroethane- 

n-Propyl bromide 

Tetrabromoe thane (Acetylene tetrabromide) 

sym.-Tetrachloroe thane (Acetylene tetra- 
chloride) . 

Tetrachloroethylcne (Perchloroethylene) 

1,1,2-Trichloroethane (Vinyl trichloride) — 

Trichloroethylene- 



Trichloromono fluorome thane 
Trichloro tri fluoroe thane — 
Trimethylene bromide- 



Trimethylene chlorobromide (l-Bromo-3-chloro- 
propane). 

Vinyl chloride, monomer 

Vinylidene chloride, monomer- 
Heptane 

Hexade caneamide 



Hexadecylamine oleate 

Hexamethylenediammonium adipate- 

n-Hexyl alcohol- 
n-Hexyl ether- 
Hydrocarbon mixture, high molecular weight — 

2-Hydroxyethanesulfonic acid 

Hydroxyisobutyronitrile (Acetone cyanhydrin)- 
12-Hydroxystearic acid salts: 

Aluminum (di) salt 

Zinc (di) salt 

Insecticides: 

Aliphatic thiocyanates- 

Cyclohexyl caprate 

l3obutylundecylenamide- 

Lorol rhodanate 

Isoamylethylmalonic ester- 
Isobutyl propionate- 



20,46,131,136,324,391, 539. 
131,144. 

46,131. 

46,131,136. 

416. 

221. 

136. 

131,144. 

131,167. 

131,136,552. 

131,136,552. 

76,131. 

131,136,552. 

260. 

260. 

131. 

131. 

76,131,136,194. 

131,194. 

76. 

25. 

25. 

136. 

76. 

76. 

X. 

184. 

136. 

233. 
238. 

433. 
256. 
136. 
136. 
281. 
136. 



189 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— -Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACXCLIC— Continued 

Isobutyl vinyl ether 

Isobutyraldehyde 

Isobutyric acid 

Iso-octane cutting oil - 

Isopropanolamine 

Isopropyl acetate 

♦Isopropyl alcohol (Isopropanol): 88$, 91$, and 
99$. 

Isopropyl e ther 

Isopropylethyl malonic 
Isopropyl vinyl ether— 

Isovaleric acid 

♦Lactic acid: 

Edible (100$) 

Medicinal (100$)- 
♦Technical (100$) 
Lactic acid salts: 

Calcium lactate 

Copper lactate— 

Ferrous lactate- 

♦Sodium lactate— 



ester 



Strontium lactate- 
Lauric acid salts: 
Aluminum laurate— 
Zinc laurate 



1&4. 

136. 

136. 

221. 

342. 

76,131. 

76,^90. 

76,459,490,491. 

76,459,490,491. 

X. 

184. 

49,X. 

21,26,99,136,458. 

21,136. 

21,26,99,136,458. 

26,458. 
458. 
298, X. 

- 21,26,136,135,217,298,315,458. 

- 298,315. 



Lauroyl peroxide- 
Linoleic acid — - 
♦Linoleic acid salts: 
Aluminum linoleate- 
Ammonium linoleate- 
Calcium linoleate- 
Calcium linoleate resinate- 

Cobalt linoleate 

Cobalt linoleate resinate 

Iron linoleate- 

Lead linoleate 

Lead linoleate resinate— 
Lead manganese linoleate- 

Manganese linoleate 

Manganese linoleate resinate- 

Zinc linoleate 

Zinc linoleate resinate 

All other 

Lorol chloride 

♦Maleic acid 

♦Maleic anhydride — 

Malic acid 

Malonic acid- 

Mannitol hexanitrate 

Mercaptans, alkyl mixed 

Mercury disinfectants and fungicides: 

Ethyl mercuric chloride 

Ethyl mercuric phosphate 

Mesityl oxide- 
Me taldehyde 



208. 
208. 
289. 
147. 

208. 
208. 
208. 



14, 208,463,497. 

88. 

208. 

463,497. 



14,208. 

14, 208,463,497. 

88. 

208. 

88. 

38. 

- 136,221. 
14,331. 
147,324,331. 

- 331. 

- 1,131,1. 
34. 

34. 
388,469. 

136. 
136. 
76,459. 
107,346. 



190 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 



Methacrylates, above methyl- 

a-Methacrylic acid 

*Methanol, synthetic — — 

Me thoxyme thoxye thanol 

Methyl acetate- 



Me thyl-ace tone-ace tal 



Methyl acrylate, monomer- 
N-Methylaminoacetic acid (Sarcosine)- 

Methyl amyl ketone 

1-Methylbutylethylmalonic ester 

Methyl chloroformate 

Methyl cyanoacetate 

Me thyldie thanolamine 

N ,N l -Me thy lenedialanine — 
N,N» -Me thy lenedigly cine- 
Methyl ethyl ketone (Methyl acetone) 

Methyl formate 

Methyl glycolate (Methyl hydroxyacetate) 

1-Methylisobutylcarbinol (4-Methyl-2-pentanol) 

1-Methylisobutylcarbinyl acetate (4-Methyl-2-amyl 

acetate). 

Methyl isobutyl ketone 

Methyl lactate 

Methyl methacrylate 

Methylmonochloroacetate 

2-Me thyl-2 , 4-pen tanediol 

Methylpropylcarbinylbarbituric acid 

Methyl propyl ketone — — 

Methyl succinate 

N-Methyl taurine 

Methyl triglycol acetate 

Methyl vinyl ether—————— 

Monoethyl-ethyl malonic acid 

Nitrohydroxy compoundet 

2-Ni tro-1-butanol 

2-Ni tro-2-e thy 1-1 , 3-propanediol- 

2-Nitro-2-methyl-l,3-propanediol- 

2-Ni tro-2-me thyl-1-propanol 

TriB-(hydroxyme thy l)-nitrome thane- 

Nitroparaf final 

Nitroethane- 

Nitrome thane — 

1-Ni tropropane- 

2-Ni tropropane- 
Nonene- 

Nonenoic acid- 
Nonyl alcohol- 
Octadecane amide— 
Oc tade caneni trile- 



Octadecenylamine oleate 

Octadecylamine oleate 

Octadecyl silicon trichloride— 

1-Octanol (Capryl alcohol) 

Octyl oleyl malate 

Oleic acid salts: 

Aluminum oleate 

Ammonium oleate 



136. 

136. 

70, 76, 34, 96, 107,136. 

136. 

76,136,346. 

96. 

433. 

134. 

76. 

231. 

523. 

253. 

76. 

384. 

334 

76,459, 490,X. 

136. 

136. 

76. 

76. 

76,459. 

99. 

136,433. 

131. 

107. 

281. 

490. 

181. 

184. 

76. 

184. 

1. 

107. 
107. 
107. 
107. 
107. 

107. 

107. 

107. 

107. 

114. 

X. 

X. 

25. 

25. 

25. 

25. 

133. 

136,207. 

324. 

14,208. 
208. 



191 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
Dnited States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945— Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC—Continued 

Oleic acia salts— Continued 

Barium zinc oleate 

Calcium oleate linoleate 

Copper oleate 

Lead oleate 

Oleoyl chloride 

Oxalic acid salts: 

♦Ammonium oxalate 

Ferric ammonium oxalate 

Ferrous oxalate 

Lithium oxalate 

Potassium binoxalate 

Potassium oxalate 

Sodium oxalate 

Palmitic acid salts: 

Aluminum palmitate 

Zinc palmi tate 

Palmitoyl chloride 

Paracetaldehyde 

Paraformaldehyde 

Pelargonic acid (Nonanoic acid) 

Pelargonyl chloride 

♦Pentaerythritol- 



Pentaerythritol tetranitrate 

Phosphorus derivatives of high molecular weight 
hydrocarbons. 

Piccolyte, hydrogenated 

Pine oil, synthetic 

Polyethylene 

Polyglycerol 

Polypropylene glycol 

Potassium acid acetylene dicarboxylate 

Propionaldehyde 

Propionic acid 

Propionic acid salts: 

Calcium propionate 

Sodium propionate 

Propionic anhydride 

Propionyl chloride 

n-Propyl acetate 

n-Propyl alcohol (Propanol) 

Propylene chlorohydrin 

Propylene glycol 

Propylene glycol glucoside 

Propylene oxide 

Propyl mercaptan 

Pyruvic acid 

Research chemicals: 

AUcane hydrocarbons 

Alkene hydrocarbons — — — 

Alkyl mercaptan— 

Alkyl thioe there 

All other 

Saccharic acid salts: Calcium saccharate 



Manufacturers* identification 
numbers (according to list 
in table 24) • 



208. 

203. 

14,208. 

14,208. 

154,184,543. 

185,360,383,537. 

185,298,315. 

383. 

298,383,X. 

416. 

185. 

185,383. 

185,298,315,537. 

332,554. 

332,554. 

184. 

346. 

136,216. 

151. 

221. 

214,216,517. 

214,517. 

X. 

221. 

214. 

136. 

324. , 

76. 

331. 

136. 

107,136,147,X. 

136. 

136. 

76,X,X. 

221. 

136, 167, 181, X. 

136. 

136. 

76,131. 

76,131,136. 

34. 

76,131. 

144,469. 

70,144. 

108. 

108. 

108. 

108. 

108. 

66,108,144,147,416. 

293,383. 



192 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

19-45 — Continued 



Chemical 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 
Sebacic acid 



Semicarbazide hydrochloride 

Silicones: 

Compounds and greases 

Fluids- 
Sodium ethoxide- 



Sodium ethyl oxalacetate- 
Sodium formaldehyde sulfoxylate- 

Sodium methylate 

Sodium sorbitol borate 

Sorbitol 

♦Stearic acid saltsl 

Aluminum monostearate 

♦Aluminum distearate 

Aluminum tristearate 

Ammonium stearate- 
Barium stearate — 
♦Calcium stearate- 



Manufacturers* identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



Cobalt stearate 

Cuprous stearate — 

Ferric stearate 

Ferrous stearate — 
Lead stearate- 

Lithium stearate 

♦Magnesium stearate- 

Sodium stearate 

♦Zinc stearate- 



Stearoyl chloride- 
Stearoyl peroxide- 
Succinic acid 



Succinic acid salts: Sodium succinate 

Succinic anhydride 

Succinichlorimide 

Succinimide 

Sulfonated thiocarbanilide acetaldehyde ammonia 
compound. 

Sulfur compounds 

Sulfurized thialkene wax olefines 

Tetraethyleneglycol 

Tetraethyleneglycol dimethyl ether 

Tetraethyl lead 

Tetranitrome thane 

Textile chemicals other than surface-active 
agents: 

Ethylaminoethylethanol-(fatty)-amide 

Me thylaminoethylethanol-( fatty) -amide 

Sorbitol polyglycol, ether polyethylene glycol 

All other 

Thioacetic acid (Sulfoacetic acid) 

Thioglycerol 

Thioglycolic acid (Mercaptoacetic acid) 

♦Thioglycolic acid and salts: 

♦Ammonium thioglycolate 



207. 
160,167. 

133. 

133. 

523. 

523. 

568. 

136,309. 

34. 

34,383. 

74,177,208,255,298,332,543,554. 
14,74,177,208,238,255,298,332, 

395,505,543,554. 
U, 74,177, 208, 255, 298, 332, 395, 

543. 
193,208,332. 
177,208,332,395. 
U, 74,177,208, 298, 332, 395, 505, 

543,554. 
208. 
208. 
543. 
208. 

208,332,543. 
395. 
14,74,177,208,298,332,395,505, 

543,554. 
208,332,520. 
14,74,177,208, 255,298,315,332, 

395,505,543,554. 
184. 
435. 
331. 
315. 

324,331,369. 
331. 
331. 
324. 

221. 

114. 

76. 

76. 

156. 

167. 



5. 

5. 

34. 

327. 

136,144. 

158. 

146,158,306,561. 

160,306,349,498. 



193 



Table 23B.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Miscellaneous chemicals for which 
United States production or sales were reported, identified by manufacturer, 

1945 — Continued 



Chemical 



Manufacturers' identification 

numbers (according to list 

in table 24) 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICALS, ACYCLIC— Continued 



♦Thioglycolic acid and salts — Continued 

Calcium thioglycolate — 

Sodium thioglycolate- 
Thiourea- 
Tributyl phosphite- 

Triethylene glycol 

Triethyl orthoacetate 

Triethyl orthoformate (Ethyl ortho formate) - 

Trie thyl ortho propionate 

Triglycoldi chloride 

Tri-isobutylene 

Trimethylene chlorohydrin 

Tris-(hydroxymethyl) -aminome thane — 

Undecyclenic acid 

Urea (solid) r 

Urea in feed compound 4 

Urea in solid fertilizer 

Urea in urea-ammonia solution- 
Vinyl acetate, monomer- 
All other 



21. 
144,306. 

70,324. 

136. 

76,131. 

144. 

253. 

144. 

76. 

178. 

144,231. 

107. 

39,X. 

136. 

136. 

136. 

136. 

136,346. 

114,136. 



194 

Directory of Manufacturers 



The Directory of Manufacturers consists of companies which report production 
of synthetic organic chemicals to the United States Tariff Commission. The name 
of each manufacturer listed in the directory is preceded by an identifying number. 

The Directory of Manufacturers for 1945 (table 24) was complied from about 
575 companies who reported production of synthetic organic chemicals to the 
Commission. This is about 50 more than the number reporting in 1944 and nearly 
300 more than the number reporting in the years preceding the war. Some of the 
companies reporting production of synthetic organic chemicals consume their 
entire output in further manufacturing. 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals! Directory of manufacturer s, 1945 

(Names of synthetic organic chemical manufacturers who reported production and 
sales to the United States Tariff Commission, 1945, or who are listed as 
manufacturers of synthetic organic chemicals in other directories or publica- 
tions available to the public. These companies do not necessarily produce 
synthetic organic chemicals for sale; some consume their entire production in 
further processing ) 



Num- 
ber 



Name of company 



Office addresB (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



1 

2 

3 
4 
5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 
11 

12 

13 
14 



15 
16 
17 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 



Abbott Laboratories- 



A. C. Spark Plug Division, 
General Motors Corp. 

Ad-Co Color Corp. 

Advance Paint Co.- ■■ - — ■ 
Alfraraine Corp. — 

Alkydol Laboratories, Inc- 
Allen town-Be thlehem Gas Co. 

Althouse Chemical Co.- 
Altls Chemical Co.- 

Amalgamated Chemical Corp.- 
Amecco Chemicals, Inc. — - ■■ 



American Aniline Products- 



American Chemical Paint Co, 
American Cyanamid Co.— — — 



American Molding Powder & 

Chemical Corp. 
American Resinous Chemicals 

Corp. 
American Tar & Chemical Co. — — 

American Viscose Corp. 



Ansbacher-Siegle Corp.- 
Ansul Chemical Co.- 



Apex Chemical Co., Inc. — 

Appleton Coated Paper Co.- 

Arco Co. — »•— 

Araitage, J. L.— — — 



14th St. and Sheridan Rd., North Chicago, 

111. 
1300 N. Dort Highway, Flint 2, Mich. 

66 Lister Ave., Newark 5, N. J. 

545 tt. Abbott St., Indianapolis 7, Ind. 

155 E. 44th St., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Paterson 4, N. J.). 
3242 S. 50th Ave., Chicago 50, 111. 
516-18 Hamilton St., Allentown, Pa. 

(Easton, Pa.). 
540 Pear St., Reading, Pa. 
136 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y. 

(Newark 3, N. J.). 
Rorer and Ontario Sts., Philadelphia 34, Pa 
60 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Rochester 10, N. Y.). 
50 Union Square, New York 3, N. I. 

(Lock Haven, Pa.). 
Brookside Ave., Ambler, Pa. 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

(Azusa, Calif.; Bound brook, Warners, 
and Aoodbridge, N. J.; Bridgeville, 
Pa.; Charlotte, N. C; and Wallingford, 
Conn.). 
44 Hewes St., Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 

103 Foster St., Peabody, Mass. 

2400 Sun Life Bldg., Montreal 2, Canada 

(Duluth, Minn.). 
Delaware Trust Bldg., Wilmington 99, Del. 

(Meadville, Pa.). 
92 Chestnut Ave., Staten Island 5, N. Y. 
P. 0. Box 231, Marinette, Wis. 
225 W. 34th St., New York 1, N. Y. 

(Elizabethport 1, N. J.). 
1200 N. Meade St., Appleton, Wis. 
7301 Bessemer Ave., Cleveland 4, Ohio 
245 Thomas St., Newark 5, N. J. 



195 



Table 24,- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945 

Continued 



Nufflr 

ber 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



25 

26 
27 
28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 
36 
37 
38 

39 

40 
U 
42 



Armour Chemical Division, 
Armour & Co. 

Armstrong, C. M., Inc. 

Armstrong Cork Co. 

Arnold, Hoffman & Co., Inc- 

Aehland Oil & Refining Co.— 

Asoci&cion Azuc&rera 

Cooperativa Lafayette. 
Atlanta Gas Light Co. 

Atlantic City Gas Co. 

Atlantic Refining Co. 

Atlas Powder Co. — 

Atlas Refinery, Inc. 

Atlas Wall Paper Mills, Inc. 

Augusta Chemical Co. — 

Bakelite Corp.- 



Baker Castor Oil Co.- 



Baker, J. T, Chemical Co, 

Baker Oil Tools, Inc. 

Barrett Division, Allied 
Chemical & Dye Corp. 



Bates Chemical Co. — — 

Bayer Co. Division, Sterling 

Drug Co. 
Beaudry Wall Paper Corp.— — 

Belle Alkali Co. 

Benzol Products Co.- 



Berk, F. W.,4 Co., Inc- 
Berkeley Chemical Corp.- 
Berry Brothers, Inc- 



Bersworth, F. C, Laboratories' 

Bick 4 Co., Inc. 

Bird & Son, Inc. 



Birge Co., Inc. 



Blackstone Valley Gas & 

Electric Co. 
Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 



Breon, Geo. A., & Co. 

Bridgeport Ga6 Light Co.— 
Bristol Laboratories, Inc. 



1355 W. 31st St., Chicago 9, 111. 

9 E. 46th St., New York 17, N. I. 
Lancaster, Pa. (Pittsburgh, Pa.). 
55 Canal St., Providence 1, E. I. (Dlghton, 

Mass.). 
A6hland Oil Refining Bldg., Ashland, Ky. 

(Catlettsburg, Ky.) 
342 Madison Ave.. New lork 17, N. I. 

(Arroyo, P. R.). 
243 Peachtree St., N. E., Atlanta 2, Ga. 

(Augusta, Waycross, Athens, and Valdosta, 
Ga.). 
80 Park PI., Newark 1, N. J. (Atlantic City, 

N. J.). 
260 S. Broad St., Philadelphia 1, Pa. 

(Port Arthur, Tex.). 
9th and Market Sts., Wilmington 99, Del. 

(Reynolds, Pa., and Atlas Point, Del.). 
142 Lockwood St., Newark 5, N. J. 
Coal City, 111. 

Glass Factory Ave., Augusta, Ga. 
30 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Bound Brook and Bloomfield, N. J.). 
120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. (Bayonne, 

N. J.). 
N. Broad St., Phillipsburg, N. J. 
6000 Boyle Ave., Lofa Angeles 11, Calif. 
40 Rector St., New York 6/ N. Y. 

(Bethlehem, Frank ford, and Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and 
Troy, N. Y.; Chicago, 111.; Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, Ironton, Toledo, and 
Youngstown, Ohio; Detroit, Mich.; 
Edgewater, N. J.; Fairfield,' Ala.; 
Maiden, Mass.; Minneapolis, Minn.: 
St. Louis, Mo.; and Savannah, Ga.). 
Scottdale Rd., Lansdowne, Pa. 
170 Varick St., New York 13, N. Y. 

(Rensselaer, N. Y.). 
46 Elm St., Cortland, N. Y. 
P. 0. Box 615, Belle, W. Va. 
237 South St., Newark 5, N. J. 

(Piscataway, N. J.). 
Park Place E., Wood-Ridge, N. J. 
942 Summit Ave., Berkeley Heights, N. J. 
211 Leib St., Detroit 7, Mich. 
609 Waverly St., Framingham, Mass. 
1820 N. 12th St., Reading, Pa. 
1934 E. Clark St.. E. Walpole, Mass. 

(Norwood, Mass.). 
390 Niagara St., Buffalo 1, N. Y. 
55 High St., Pawtucket, R. I. 

100 Arlington St., Boston 16, Mass. 

(Everett 49, Mass.) . 
2000 Baltimore Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 
815 Main St., Bridgeport 1, Conn. 
P. 0. Box 657, Syracuse 1, N. Y. 



196 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945- 

Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



Brooklyn Borough Gas Co. — 

Brooklyn Color Works, Inc- 

Brooklyn Union Gas Co. 

Brown Co. 



Brown, Andrew, Co. 

Burkhart-Schier Chemical Co. — 
Burroughs Wellcome & Co., Inc.- 

Bush, W. J., & Co., Inc. 

Bush, Burton T., Inc. 

Cabot, Samuel, Inc. 



Calco Chemical Division, 
American Cyanamid Co. 

California ELaxseed Products 
Co. 

California Ink Co., Inc. 

Cambridge Gas Light Co. 

Capitol City Products Co. 

Capitol Paint & Varnish Works, 

Inc. 
Carbide & Carbon Chemical Corp, 



Carbide & Carbon Chemical Corp. 
(R. R.) 

Carls tadt Chemical Co. 

Carnrick, G. W., Co. 

Cams Chemical Co. 

Carwin Co. 



Casein Co. of America Division, 
Borden Co. 

Catalin Corp. of America 

Celanese Corp. of America 



Central Florida Gas Corp. 

Central Hudson Gas & Electric 

Corp. 
Central States Electric Co. — 
Chase, W. S., Driers & 

Chemicals, Inc. 
Chemical Manufacturing Co., 

Inc. 

Chemical Specialties, Inc. 

Chemico, Inc- 

Cbemo Puro Manufacturing Corp.- 

Child6 Pulp Colors, Inc. 

Ciba Pharmaceutical Products, 

Inc. 
Cincinnati Chemical Work6, Inc. 



Mermaid Ave. and W. 17th St., Brooklyn 24, 

N. Y. 
Morgan and Norman Aves., Brooklyn 22, N. Y. 
176 Remsen St., Brooklyn 2, N. Y. 
650 Main St., Berlin, N. H. 
5400 District Blvd., Los Angeles 22, Calif. 
1202 Chestnut St., Chattanooga 2, Term. 
9 E. 41st St., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Tuckahoe 7, N. Y.). 
11 E. 38th St., New York 16, N. Y. 

(Linden, N. J.). 
201 Delawanna Ave., Delawanna, N. J. 
141 Milk St., Boston 9, Mass. (Chelsea 50, 

Mass.). 
Easton Turnpike, Bound Brook, N. J. 

(Newark, N. J., and Damascus, Va.). 
3135 E. 26th St., Los Angeles 23, Calif. 

545 Sansome St., San Francisco 11, Calif. 

(Berkeley 2, Calif.). 
354 3d St., Cambridge 42, Mass. 
W. 1st Ave. and Perry St., Columbus 8, 

Ohio. 
47-55 Rodney St., Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 

30 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. (South 

Charleston 3, W. Va.; Niagara Fall6, 

N. Y.; Whiting, Ind.; Texas City, Tex.; 

and Louisville 1, Ky.). 
P. 0. Box 2831, S. Charleston 30, W. V a . 

(Institute, W. Va.). 
430 13th St., Carlstadt, N. J. 
20 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark 4, N. J. 
1335 8th St., La Salle, 111. 
Stiles Lane, North Haven, Conn. 
350 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Bainbridge, N. Y., and Seattle, Wa6h.). 
Meadow Road, Fords, N. J. 
180 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

(Amcelle, Md.; Celco, Va.; Bishop, Tex.j 
Newark, N. J.; and Rome, Ga.). 
358 3d St., NW., Winter Haven, Fla. 
South Road, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. (Newburgh 

and Kingston, N. Y.). 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
3527 Small man St., Pittsburgh 1, Pa. 

Ashland, Mass. 

151 N. Centennial St., Zeeland, Mich. 
1745 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

(Akron 11, Ohio). 
48th Ave. and 5th St., Long Island City 1, 

N. Y. 
43-53 Summit St., Brooklyn 31, N. Y. 
Lafayette Park, Summit, N. J. 

P. 0. Box 20,Evanston Station, Cincinnati 7, 
Ohio (Norwood 7 and St. Bernard 17, Ohio). 



197 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945 

Continued 



Num- 
ber 




Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 

107 



108 
109 



110 
111 
112 

113 

1H 
115 

116 
117 
118 
119 

120 
121 
122 
123 

124 

125 
126 

127 
128 
129 

130 
131 

132 

133 

134 



Cities Service Oil Co.- 



Cities Service Refining Co. 
Citro Chemical Co.- 
Clinton Co. 



Coastwise Petroleum Co. 

Coca-Cola Co. 
Colasta Co., Inc. — 
Coleman & Bell Co., Inc.— 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 
Collway Colors, Inc. — 



Colt's Patent Fire Arms 

Manufacturing Co. 
Commercial Solvents Corp. 

Connecticut Hard Rubber Co.— 
Connecticut Light & Power Co. 



Connecticut Power Co. 



Consolidated Edison Co. of New 

York, Inc. 
Consolidated Gas Electric 

Light and Power Co. of 

Baltimore . 
Continental-Diamond Fibre Co. — 



Continental Oil Co. 

Cook Paint &. Varnish Co.- 



Cooks Falls Dye Works, Inc.— 
Coopers Creek Chemical Corp.- 
Copolymer Corp.- 



Crown Tar & Chemical Works, 

Inc. 
Cutter Laboratories- 
Debruille Chemical Corp. — 

Dennis, Martin, Co.-- — - 

Derby Gas & Electric Co. — 



Detroit Edison Co.- 

Dewey & Almy Chemical Co.- 
Diamond Alkali Co.- 



Diarsenol Co., Inc.- 
Distillation Products, Inc- 
Dodge & Olcott, Inc. 



Dominion Products, Inc- 
Dow Chemical Co. 



Dow Chemical Co., Styrene 

Division (R. R.). 
Dow Corning Corp. 



Dub in, H. E., Laboratories, Inc. 



Masonic -Empire Bldg., Bartlesville, Okla. 

(Tallant, Okla.). 
716 Hodges St., Lake Charles, La. 
Maywood Ave., May wood, N. J. 
P. 0. Box 340, Clinton, Iowa. 
1127 Munsey Bldg., Baltimore 2, Md. 

(Goodhope, La.). 
Wilmington, Del. 

1 Mechanic St., Hoosick falls, N. Y. 
4101 Main St., Norwood 12, Ohio. 
105 Hudson St., Jersey City 2, N. J. 
15 Market St., Paterson 1, N. J. 
17 Van Dyke Ave., Hartford 15, Conn. 

17 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. (Peoria, 

111.; Terre Haute, Ind.j Harvey, La.* and 

Agnew, Calif.). 
407 East St., New Haven 9, Conn. 
36 Pearl St., Hartford 1, Conn. (Norwalk, 

Putnam, Waterbury, Williamantic, and 

Winsted, Conn.). 
31 Union t>t., New London, Conn. (Stamford, 

Conn.). 
4 Irving PI., New Iork 3, N. Y. 

Lexington Bldg., Baltimore 3, Md. 



70 S. Chapel St., Newark, Del. 

(Bridgeport, Pa., and Valparaiso, Ind.). 
1000 S. Pine St., Ponca City, Okla. 
P. 0. Box 389, Kansas City 10, Mo. 

(Detroit 21, Mich., and Houston, Tex.). 
Cooks Falls, N. I. 
River Rd., West Conshohocken, Pa. 
P. 0. Box 1029, Baton Rouge t, La. 
608 Security Life Bldg., Denver 2, Colo. 

4th and Parker Sts., Berkeley 1, Calif. 

1841. Broadway, New York 23, N. Y. 

859 Summer Ave., Newark 4, N. J. 

33 Elizabeth St., Derby, Conn. (Shelton, 

Conn.). 
2000 2d Ave., Detroit 26, Mich. 

(Marysville, Mich.). 
62 Whittemore Ave., Cambridge 40, Mass. 
535 Smithfield St., Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

(Painesville, Ohio). 
72 Kingsley St., Buffalo 8, N. Y. 
755 Ridge Rd., W., Rochester 13, N. Y. 
180 Varick St., New York 14, N. Y. 

(Bayonne, N. J.). 
10-40 44th Drive, Long Island City 1, N. Y. 
Midland, Mich. (Pittsburg, Calif., and 

Freeport, Tex.). 
P. 0. Box 500, Gardena, Calif. (P. 0. Box B, 

Freeport, Tex.). 
P. 0. Box 592, Midland, Mich. 
250 E. 43d St., New York 17, N. Y. 



198 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945- 

. Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



Duorite Plastics Industries 

DuPont de Nemours, E. I., & 
Co., Inc. 



DuPont de Nemours, E. I. 

Co., Inc. (R. R.). 
Durez Plastics & Chemicals, 

Inc. 

Durite Plastics, Inc. 

Dye Specialties Corp., Inc. — 
Dykem Co. 



Eakins, J. S. & W. R., Inc.- 
Eastern Tar Products Corp.— 



Eastman Kodak Co.- 



Edcan Laboratories 

Edwal Laboratories, Inc.- 

Eimer & Amend 



El Dorado Oil Works- 



Electro Technical Products, 

Inc. 
Elizabethtown Consolidated 

Gas Co. 
Emery Industries, Inc. 

Empire Chemical Co., Inc. — 



Empire Varnish Co. 

Emulsol Corp, 

Endo Products, Inc. — 
Ethyl Corp.- 

Ethyl-Dow Chemical Co. 

Evans Chemetice, Inc. 

Factor, Max, & Co. 

Fairmount Chemical Co., Inc. 
Falk & Co. 

Fall River Gas Works Co. 

Farley & Loetecher 
Manufacturing Co. 



8564 W. Washington Blvd., Culver City, 
Calif. 

10th and Market Sts., Wilmington 98, Del. 
(Carneys Point, New Brunswick, Perth 
Amboy, Newark, Gibbstown, and Arlington, 
N. J.j Waynesboro and Martinsville, Va. ; 
Seaford, Del.; Leominster, Mass.; Belle 
and Moundsville, W. Va.; Niagara Falls, 
N. Y.j El Monte, Calif.; Wyandotte, 
Mich.; Barksdale, W'is.j Birmingham, Ala.; 
Carl Junction, Mo.; DuPont, Wash.; 
Louviers, Colo.; Seneca and Robinson, 
111.; Bradner, Ohio; Irvine Mills, N. I.; 
Bartlesville, Okla.; Howard Junction, 
Pa.; and Stanton, Tex.). 

Camp Ground Road, P. 0. Box 1378, 
Louisville 1, Ky. 

Walck Road, North Tonawanda, N. I. 

5000 Summerdale Ave., Philadelphia 24, Pa. 

924 Bergen Ave., Jersey City 6, N. J. 

2307 N. 11th St., St. Louis 6, Mo. 

55 Berry St., Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 

603 Lexington Bldg., Baltimore 1, Md. 

(Norfolk, Va.). 
343 State St., Rochester 4, N. Y. 

(Kingsport, Tenn.). 
10 Pine St., South Norwalk, Conn. 
732 Federal St., Chicago 5, HI. (Ringwood, 

111.). 
635 Greenwich St., New York 14, N. Y. 

(Edgerater, N. J.). 
311 California St., San Francisco 4, Calif. 

(Oakland 7, Calif.). 
113 E. Centre St., Nutley 10, N. J. 

16 W. Jersey St., Elizabeth 4, N. J. 

4300 Carew Tower, Cincinnati 2, Ohio 

(St. Bernard, Ohio) . 
399 Codwise Ave.. New Brunswick, N. J. 

(Newark, N. J.). 
2636 E. 76th St., Cleveland 4, Ohio. 
59 E. Madison St., Chicago 3, HI. 
84-40 101st St., Richmond Hill 18, N. Y. 
405 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Baton Rouge, La., and Deepwater, N. J.). 
Midland, Mich. (Wilmington, N. C, and 

Freeport, Tex.) . 
250 E. 43d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Waterloo, N. Y.). 
1666 N. Highland Ave., Los Angeles 28, 

Calif. 
600 Ferry St., Newark 5, N. J. 
P. 0. Box 1075, Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 

(Carnegie, Pa.) . 
155 N. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 
7th and White Sts., Dubuque, Iowa. 



199 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945-- 

Continued 



Num- 
ber 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



164 

165 

166 
167 

168 
169 

170 

171 

172 
173 
174 

175 
176 

177 

178 

179 

180 
181 

182 

183 
184 

185 



186 

187 

188 

189 

190 
191 
192 

193 
194 

195 



196 
197 

198 



Federal Color Laboratories, 

Inc. 
Federal Laboratories, Inc.— 
Felton Chemical Co., Inc. — 
Fine Organics, Inc- 

Fire stone Tire & Rubber Co. 

Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 

(R. R.). 
Fitchburg Gas & Electric 

Light Co. 

Florida Power & Light Co. 

Florida Public Utilities Co. 

Forbes Varnish Co. 

Ford Motor Co. 



Foster-Heaton Co.- 

France, Campbell & Darling, 

Inc. 
Franks Chemical Products Co., 

Inc. 
Fries Bros., Inc. 

Fries & Fries, Inc. 

Fries, George G., & Co., Inc- 
Fritzsche Brothers, Inc. 

Gane's Chemical Works, Inc. — 



Gelatin Products Corp. 

General Aniline Works Division, 

General Aniline & Film Corp. 
General Chemical Co. 



General Electric Co.- 

General Foods Corp.-- 

General Hills, Inc- 

General Tire & Rubber Co. 

(R. R.). 
George, P. D., Co.- 



Gilman Paint & Varnish Co.- 
Glidden Co. 



Glyco Products Co., Inc. 

Goodrich, B. F. , Chemical Co., 

Division, Goodrich, B. F., 

Co. 
Goodrich, B. F., Chemical Co. 

(R. R.) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 

Goodyear Synthetic Rubber Corp. 

(R. R.). 
Grand Rapids Varnish Corp. 



4633 Forest Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 

(Norwood, Ohio) . 
P. 0. Box 268, Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 
599 Johnson Ave., Brooklyn 6, N. Y. 
211 E. 19th St., New York 3, «. Y. (Lodi, 

N. J.). 
1200 Firestone Ptxkway, Akron 17, Ohio 
381 W. Wilbeth Rd., Akron 1, Ohio (Port 

Neches, Tax., and Lake Charles, La.). 
89 Broad St., Boston 10, Mass. (Fitchburg, 

Maes.) . 

25 S. E. 2d Ave., Yiarai 30, Fla. 

338 Datura St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 
3800 W. 143d St., Cleveland 11, Ohio 
3000 Schaefer Rd., Dearborn, Mich. (Iron 

Mountain and Kingsford, Mich.). 
16 E. 5th St., Paterson 4, N. J. 
Michigan Ave. ana Monroe St., Kenilworth, 

N. J. 
55 33d St., Brooklyn 32, N. Y. 

92 Reade St., New York 13, N. Y. 

(Bloomfield, N. J.) . 
13 E. 37th St., New York 16, N. Y. 

(Cincinnati 16, Ohio) . 
11-25 Uth Rd., Long Island City 1, N. Y. 
76 9th Ave., New York 11, N. Y. (Clifton, 

N. J.). 
43 W. 16th St., New York 11, N. Y. 

(Carlstadt, N. J.) . 
9425 Grinnell Ave., Detroit 13, Mich. 
435 Hudson £>t., New York 14, N. Y. 

(Grasselli, N. J., and Rensselaer, N. Y.). 
40 Rector St., New York 6, N. Y. (Buffalo, 

N. Y.; Marcus Hook, Pa ^ and Edgewater, 

N. J.). 
1 Plastics Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(Schenectady 5, N. Y.). 
250 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Hoboken, N. J.). 
412 Hodgson Bldg., Minneapolis 1, Minn. 

(Keokuk, Iowa). 
Baytown, Tex. 

5200 N. 2d St., St. Louis, Mo. 
W. 8th and Pine Sts., Chattanooga 1, Tenn. 
11001 Madison Ave., Cleveland 2, Ohio 
(Chicago, 111.). 

26 Court St., Brooklyn 2, N. Y. 

Rose Bldg., Cleveland 15, Ohio (Akron, Ohio; 
Louisville, K& and Niagara Falls, N. Y.X 

324 Rose Bldg., Cleveland 15, Ohio 

(Louisvilla, Ky., and Borgar and 

Port Neches, Tax.). 
1144 E. Market £>t., Akron 16, Ohio. 
L452 E. Archwood Ave., Akron 6, Ohio 

(Torrance, Calif.; and Houston, Tex.). 
565 Godfrey Ave., SW., Grand Rapids 2, 

Mich. 



200 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945— 

Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



Greenfield Gas Light Co. 

Gulf Oil Corp. 

Guyan Color & Chemical Works — 
Hall, C. P., Co. 

Halowax Products Division, 
Union Carbide & Carbon Corp. 

Hamilton Laboratories, Inc. 

Hampden Color & Chemical Co. — 

Harbor Plywood Corp. 

Hardesty Chemical Co., Inc. 

Harshaw Chemical Co. 

Hartford Gas Co. 

Hartman-Leddon Co., Inc. 

Hart Products Corp.- 

Haverhill Gas Light Co. 

Hema Drug Co., Inc. 

Hercules Powder Co.- 



Heresite & Chemical Co. 

Heyden Chemical Corp. ■ — 

Hilton-Davis Chemical Co., 
Division Sterling Drug, Inc. 

Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. 

Holland Color & Chemical Co. — 
Holyoke Gas & Electric Dept.— 
Hooker Electrochemical Co. 



Houghton, E. F., & Co. 

Huggins, James, & Son 

Humble Oil & Refining Co. 

Humble Oil & Refining Co. (R.Rj 

Huron Hilling Co. 

Hynson, Westcott & Dunning, 

Inc. 
Illinois Electric & Gas Co.— 

Imperial Paper & Color Corp.- 

Index Chemical Co. 

Industrial Dyestuff Co. 

Inland Alkaloid Co. 



Inland Steel Container Co.- 
Innis, Speiden & Co. 

Interchemical Corp.- 



Inter-Coastal Paint Corp. 

Interlake Chemical Corp. 

International Lubricant Corp.— 

International Minerals & 

Chemical Corp. 
Iowa Public Service Co. 



395 Main St., Greenfield, Mass. 

Gulf Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

P. 0. Box 1088, Huntington 13, W. Va. 

2510 1st St., Central Tower Bldg., Akron 

8, Ohio- 
30 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. I. 

(Wyandotte, Mich.). 
120 Patton Ave., Ashevilla, N. C. 
161 Armory St., Springfield 5, Mass. 
Hoquiam, Wash. (Aberdeen, Wash.) . 
P. 0. Box 110, Dover, Ohio. 
1945 E. 97th St., Cleveland 6, Ohio 

(Philadelphia, Pa.). 
233 Pearl St., Hartford 4, Conn. 
5819-21 Market St., Philadelphia 9, Pa. 
1440 Broadway, New York 18, N. Y. 

(Woodbridge, N. J.). 
63-67 Merrimack St., Haverhill, Mass. 
70-04 Grand Ave., Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. 
900 Market St., Wilmington 99, Del. 

(Parlin and Kenvil, N. J.; Mansfield, 
Mass.; Brunswick, Ga.: Hattiesburg, 
Miss.; Port Ewen, N.Y.; and Hopewell, Va.), 
822 S. 14th St., Manitowoc, Wis. 
393 7th Ave., New York 1, N. Y. (Garfield, 

Fords,and Princeton, N» J.). 
2235 Langdon Farm Rd., Cincinnati 12, Ohio. 

324 Kingsland Rd., Nutley 10, N. J. 

R. R. #4, Holland, Mich. 

70 Suffolk St., Holyoke, Mess. 

Buffalo Ave. and 47th St., Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
303 W. Lehigh Ave., Philadelphia 33, Pa. 
239 Medford St., Maiden 48, Mass. 
P. 0. Box 2180, Houston 1, Tex. (Baytown, 

and Ingle side, Tex.). 
P. 0. Box 1321, Baytown, Tex. 
9 Park PI., New York 7, N. I. 
1030 N. Charles St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

1015 Chestnut St., Murphysboro, 111. 

(DuQuoin, 111.). 
P. 0. Box 231, Glens Falls, N. Y. 
523 W. 6th St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
Massasoit Ave., East Providence 14, R. I. 
Tipton, Ind. 

6532 S. Menard St., Chicago 3S, 111. 
117 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y. 

(Niagara Falls, N. Y.) . 
1754 Dana Ave., Cincinnati 7, Ohio. 
1248 Walnut Ave., East St. Louis 211, 111. 
1900 Union Commerce Bldg., Cleveland 14, 

Ohio (Chicago 17, 111.). 
P. 0. Box 390, New Orleans 1, La. 

(Southport, La.). 
20 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago 6, 111. 

(Rossford, Ohio) . 
515-517 5th St., Sioux City 4, Iowa 

(Waterloo, Iowa) . 



201 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945' 

Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



Iowa Public Service Co. 



Ironsides Co. 

Irving ton Varnish & Insulator 

Co. 
Jamestown Paint & Varnish Co.- 

Jamieson, C. E., 4 Co. 

Jennison-Wright Corp. 

Jersey Central Power & Light 

Co. 

Johnson, Charles Eneu, & Co. — 

Johnson, S. C., & Son 

Joliet Wall Paper Mills 

Jones-Dabney Co., Division of 
Devoe & Reynolds Co. 

Kay & Ess Co. 

Kay-Pries Chemicals, Inc. 

Kennecott Copper Corp., Chino 

Mines Division 
Kentucky Color & Chemical Co.- 
Kessler Chemical Co., Inc. 

Keto Chemical Co., Inc. 

Keystone Color Works, Inc. 

Keystone Varnish Co. 

Kinetic Chemicals, Inc. 

Kings County Lighting Co. 

Knoedler Chemical Co. 

Kohnstamm, H., & Co., Inc. 

Koppers Co., Inc. — 



Koppers Co., Inc. (R. R.) 

Krumbhaar Chemicals, Inc. 

Lake Chemical Co. 

Lakeside Laboratories, Inc. — 

Lamex Chemical Corp. 

LaMotte Chemical Products Co. 

Laucks, Inc.- 



Laucks, I. F., Inc. 

Leatex Chemical Co. 

Lederle Laboratories, Inc. 

Lehigh Briquet ting Co. 

Lennig, Charles, & Co. 



317 N. 13th St., Centerville, Iowa. 
(Osceola, Grinnell, Burlington, 
Washington and Mt. Pleasant, Iowa). 
270 W. Mound St., Columbus 16, Ohio. 
6 Argyle Terrace, Irvington 11, N. J. 

Jamestown, Pa. 

1962 Trombly Ave., Detroit 11, Mich. 

2463 Broadway, Toledo 1, Ohio. 

501 Grand Ave., Asbury Park, N. J. (Long 

Branch, Belmar, Toms River, Ocean City, 

Wildwood, and Dover, N. J.) . 
10th and Lombard Sts., Philadelphia 47, Pa. 
1525 Howe St., Racine, wis. 
225 Logan Ave., Joliet, 111. 
1481 S. 11th St., Louisville 8, Ky. 

820 Kiser St., Dayton 4, Ohio. 

180 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

(West Havers traw, N. Y.) . 
Hurley, N. Max. 

600 N. 34th St., Louisville 12, Ky. 
State Rd. and Cottman Ave., Philadelphia 

35, Pa. 
40-33 23d St., Long Island City 1, N. Y. 
151 W. Gay Ave., York, Pa. 
71 Otsego St., Brooklyn 31, N. Y. 
duPont Bldg., Wilmington 98, Del. (Perm's 

Neck. N. J., and East Chicago, Ind.). 
6740 4th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
651 High St., Lancaster, Pa. 
83-93 Park PI., New York 7, N. Y. 

(Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
430 7th Ave., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. (Buffalo, 

and Dtica, N. Y.; Carroll ville, His.; 

Chicago, 111.; Everett, Mass.; 

Follansbee, W. Va.; Hamilton, and 

Youngstown, Ohio; Houston, Tex.; 

Memphis, Tenn.; New Haven, Conn.; 

Portland, Maine; East Providence, R. I.; 

Kearney, N. J.; St. Louie, Mo.; 

Morris town, Swissvale,and Kobuta. Pa.; 

Woodward, Ala.; and Savannah, Ga.). 
P. 0. Box 92, Monaco, Pa. (Kobuta, Pa.). 
24-30 Jacobus Ave., South Kearny, N. J. 
607 N. western Ave., Chicago 12, 111. 
1707 E. North Ave., Milwaukee 1, Wis. 
494 Hunts Point Ave., New York 39, N. Y. 
McCormick Bldg., Baltimore 4, Md. 

(Towson, Md.). 
116 S. Niagara St., Lockport, N. Y. 
911 Western Ave., Seattle 4, Wash. 
2722 N. Hancock St., Philadelphia 33, Pa. 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

(Pearl River, N. Y.). 
First National Bank Bldg., Dickinson, 

N. Dak. (Lehigh, N. Dak.). 
222 W. Washington Sq., Philadelphia 5, Pa. 

(Bridesburg, Pa.). 



202 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945 

Continued 



Num- 
ber 



Name of company 



277 
278 

279 

280 
281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 

238 
289 

290 

291 
292 
293 
294 
295 

296 

297 

298 
299 

300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 



306 

307 
308 

309 
310 
311 
312 

313 

314 
315 

316 
317 
318 
319 
320 
321 



Lever, C., Co., Inc. 

Levey, Frederick H., Co., Inc. 

Lewis, John T., & Bros., Co.— 

Lewis Tar Products Co. 

Lilly, Eli, & Co. ■ 

Lilly Varnish Co. 

Lion Oil Co. (R. R.) 

Liquid Carbonic Corp. 

Locto Co. 

Long, Charles R., Jr., Co. 

Long Lighting Co. 

Lowell Gas Light Co. 

Lucidol Division, Novadel-Agene 

Corp. 
Lueders, George, & Co. 



M & M Wood Working Co. 

McCloskey Varnish Co. 

Maas & Waldstein 

Madison Gas & Electric Co. 
Magnolia Petroleum Co. 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in 6ame city as office) 



Magruder Color Co., Inc. 

Mallard, A. E., Laboratories, 

Inc. 
Mallinckrodt Chemical Works — 
Maltbie Chemical Co. 



Marathon Corp. 

Marblette Corp. 

Marco Chemicals, Inc. 

Marden-Wild Corp. 

Marietta-Harmon Chemicals, Inc, 
Marietta Paint & Color Co. 

Division, American-Marietta 

Co. 
Martin Laboratories 

Marx, Max, Color & Chemical Co 
Maschmeijer, A., Jr., Inc. 

Mathieson Alkali Works, Inc. 

May, Otto B., Inc.- 

Maywood Chemical Works 

Mead, Johnson & Co. 

Mearl Corp. 

Mepham, Geo. S., Corp. 

Merck & Co., Inc. 

Merrell, Woi. S., Co. 

Metropolitan Utilities Co. 

Michigan Chemical Co. 

Midland Industrial Finishes Co 

Midwest Solvents Co. 

Mid-West Tar Products Corp. 



2601-31 N. Howard St., Philadelphia 33, Pa. 
41 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
910 Widener Bldg., Philadelphia 7, Pa. 
P. 0. Box A, Lyons, 111. (McCook, 111.). 
740 S. Alabama St., Indianapolis 6, Ind. 
666 S. California St., Indianapolis 7, Ind. 
Exchange Bldg., El Dorado, Ark. 
2929 E. 67th St., Cleveland 4, Ohio 
791 Hampden Ave., St. Paul 4, Minn. 
1630-44 W. Hill St., Louisville, Ky. 
250 Old Country Rd., Mineola, N. Y. (Bay 

Shore, N. Y.). 
22 Shattuck St., Lowell, Mass. 
1740 Military Rd., Buffalo 5, N. Y. 

427 Washington St.. Hew York 13, N. Y. 

(Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
2301 N. Columbia Blvd., Portland 3, Oreg. 
7600 State Rd., Philadelphia 36, Pa. 
438 Riverside Ave., Newark 4, N. J. 
100 N. Fairchild St., Madison 1, Wis. 
P. 0. Box 900, Dallas 1, Tex. (Beaumont, 

Tex.). 
2385 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island 2, 

N. Y. 
3021 Wabash Ave., Detroit 16, Mich. 

3600 N. 2d St., St. Louis 7, Mo. 

240 High St., Newark 2, N. J. (Morris town, 

N. J.). 
Rothschild, Wis. 

37-21 30th St., Long Island City 1, N. Y. 
Sewaren, N. J. 

500 Columbia St., Somerville 43, Mass. 
Peoples Bank Bldg., Marietta, Ohio. 
Greene and Acme Sts., Marietta, Ohio. 



251 E. 139th St.. Mew York 51, N. Y. 

(Newark, N. J.). 
192 Coit St., Irvington 11, N. J. 
43 W. 16th St., New York 11, N. Y. 

(Newark, N. J.). 
60 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 
198-214 Niagara St., Newark 5, N. J. 
100 W. Hunter Ave., Maywood, N. J. 
St. Joseph Ave. and Pennsylvania St., 

Evan6ville 21, Ind. 
153 Waverly PI., New York 14, N. Y. 

(Eastport, Maine) . 
2001 Lynch Ave., East St. Louis, 111. 
Lincoln Ave., Rahwav, N. J. (Elkton, Va., and 

Philadelphia, Pa.) . 
Amity Rd., Cincinnati 15, Ohio. 
18th and Harney Sts., Omaha 2, Nebr. 
500 N. Bankson St., St. Louis, Mich. 
E. Water St., Waukegan, 111. 
1300 Main St., Atchison, Kans. 
332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Hi. (East 

Chicago , Ind . ) . 



203 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945 — 

Continued 



Num- 
ber 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



322 
323 
32^ 



325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 

331 

332 

333 

334 



335 

336 

337 
338 

339 
340 



3a 

342 
343 



344 

345 
346 

347 

348 

349 
350 
351 
352 

353 

354 
355 



Miles Laboratories, Inc. 
Milwaukee Gas Light Co.- 
Monsanto Chemical Co. — 



Monsanto Chemical Co. (R. R.)- 

Montrose Chemical Co. 

Morton Chemical Co. 



Murphy Finishes Corp. — ■ 

Nason, R. N., ft Co. 

Nassau & Suffolk Lighting Co.- 

National Aniline Division, 

Allied Chemical & Dye Corp. 
National Oil Products Co. 

National Synthetic Rubber Corp 

(R. R.). 
National Utilites Co., of 

Mich. 



Naugatuck Chemical Division, 
United States Rubber Co. 

Neches Butane Products Co. 
(R. R.). 

Neville Co. 



New Bedford Gas & Edison 
Light Co. 

New Britain Gas Light Co. 

New England Power Association- 



Newport Gas Light Co.- 



Newport Industries, Inc. 

New York Color & Chemical Co., 

Inc. (Division of American 

Dyewood Co.). 
New lork Quinine & Chemical 

Works, Inc. 

New lork & Richmond Gas Co. 

Niacet Chemicals Division, 

U. S. Vanadium Corp. 
Niagara Chlorine Products Co.— 
Niagara Smelting Corp. 

Ninol Chemical Industries, Inc 

Ninol Laboratories 

Nord & Co., Inc. 

Norda Essential Oil & Chemical 

Co., Inc. 
Northern Indiana Public 

Service Co. 

Northwestern Chemical Co. 

Novocol Chemical 

Manufacturing Co., Inc. 



1127 Myrtle St., Elkhart, Ind. 

626 E. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee 1, Wis. 

1700 S. 2d St., St. Louis 3, Mo. 

(Monsanto, 111.; Nitro, W. Va.; 
Anniston, Ala.; and Everatt and 
Springfield, Mass.). 
P. 0. Box 1311, Texas City, Tex. 
120 Lister Ave., Newark 5, N. J. 
2110 High Point Rd., Greensboro, N. C. 
224 McWhorter St., Newark 1, N. J. 
151 Potrero St., San Francisco 3, Calif. 
250 Old Country Rd.. Mineola, N. Y. 

(Hempstead, N. Y.). 
40 Rector St., New York 6, N. Y. (Buffalo, 

N. Y.). 
1st and Essex Sts., Harrison, N. J. 

(Cedartown, Ga.). 
P. 0. Box 2068, Louisville 1, Ky. 

P. 0. Box 128, Coldwater, Mich. (Burton 
Harbor, Cadillac, Grand Haven, 
Hillsdale, South Haven, Sturgis. 
Traverse City, and Otsego, Mich.). 

1230 6th Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 
(Naugatuck, Conn.). 

P. 0. Box 1535, Port Neches, Tex. 

Neville Island, Pittsburgh 25, Pa. 
693 Purchase St., New Bedford, Mfcss. 

25 W. Main St., New Britain, Conn. 
441 Stuart St., Boston, Mass. (Athol, 

Gloucester, Green Mountain, Lawrence, 

Leominster, Maiden, Melrose, 

Narragansett, Northampton, Northern 

Berkshire, Salem. Spencer, and 

Worcester, Mass.). 
181 Thames St., Newport, R. I. 
P. 0. Box 911, Pensacola, Fla. 
374 Main St., Belleville 9, N. J. 



99-117 N. 11th St., Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 

691 Bay St., Staten Island 4, N. Y. 
30 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Niagara Falls, N. Y.). 
Mill St., Lockport, N. Y. 
420 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

(Niagara Falls, N. Y.). 
1719 S. Clinton St., Chicago, 111. 
1719 S. Clinton St., Chicago 16, 111. 
Broadway and Clark St., Keyport, N. J. 
601 W. 26th St., New York 1, N. Y. 

(Boonton, N. J.) . 
5265 Hohman Ave., Hammond, Ind. (South 

Bend, La Porte, and Fort Wayne, Ind.), 
1263 N. 70th St., Wauwatosa 13, Wis. 
2923 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn 7, N. Y. 



747685 O - 47 - 14 



204 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals» Directory of manufacturers, 1945"- 

Continued 



Same of company 



Nuodex Products Co., Inc. 

Nutrition Research 

Laboratories. 

Ohio-Apex, Inc. 

Ohio Chemical & Manufacturing 

Co. 
Oldbury Electro-Chemical Co. — 
Old Hickory Chemical Co. 

Orbis Products Corp. 



387 
388 

389 
390 

391 
392 

393 



Osborn, C. J., Co.- 



Pan American Refining Corp. 
Para f fine Companies, Inc. — 

Paramet Corp.- 



Parke, Davis & Co. 

Patent Chemicals, Inc. 

Paul-Lewis Laboratories, Inc- 

Peerless Color Co. 

Penick, S. B., & Co. 

Pennsylvania Alcohol & 

Chemical Corp. 
Pennsylvania Coal Products Co. 
Pennsylvania Edison Co. 



Pennsylvania Industrial 

Chemical Corp. 
Pennsylvania Power & Light Co 



Pennsylvania Salt 
Manufacturing Co. 

Peoples Gas Co. 

Peoples Gas Co.- 



Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co. — 

Peoples Water & Gas Co. 

Petersburg & Hopewell Gas Co.- 
Pfizer, Chas., & Co., Inc. 

Pharma Chemical Ccrp. 

Pharmedic Corp. 

Philadelphia Electric Co. 

Philadelphia Gas Works Co. 

Phillips Petroleum Co. 

Phillips Petroleum Co. (R. R.) 

Pitman-Moore Co., Division of 

Allied Laboratories, Inc. 

PittBberg Chemical Co. 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 

Pitts field Coal-Gas Co. 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



830 Magnolia Ave., 
4210 Peterson Ave, 



Elizabeth, N. J. 
, Chicago 30, 111. 



P. 0. Box 98, Nitro, W. Va. 

1177 Marquette St., Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Buffalo Ave., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
P. 0. Box 1480, Richmond 12, Va. (Old 

Hickory, Term.). 
215 Pearl St., New York 7, N. Y. (Newark, 

N. J.). 
132 Nassau St., New York 7, N. Y. (Linden, 

N. J.). 
P. 0. Box 401, Texas City, Tex. 
475 Brannan St., San Francisco, Calif. 

(Emeryville, Calif.). 
10-17 44th Ave., Long Island City 1, N. Y. 
McDougall Ave., Detroit 32, Mich. 
333 McLean Blvd., Paterson 4, N. J. 
918 N. 4th St., Milwaukee 3, Wis. 
521-535 North Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 
50 Church St., New York 7, N. Y. 

(Lyndhurst, N. J.). 
Berry Ave., Carlstadt 4, N. J. 

P. 0. Box C, Petrolia, Pa. 

1200 11th Ave., Altoona, Pa. (Huntingdon, 

Lewis town, and Shippensburg, Pa.). 
120 State St., Clairton, Pa. 

901 Hamilton St., Allentown, Pa. 

(Lancaster, Lititz, Mount Joy, Carlisle, 
Lehighton, Mauch Chunk, Tamaqua, 
Shenandoah, Shamokin, Sun bury, 
Bloomsburg, Williamsport, Wilkes-Barre, 
and Honesdale, Pa.). 
1000 Widener Bldg., Philadelphia 7, Pa. 
(Wyandotte, Mich., and Pittstown, N. J.). 

80 Park PI., Newark 1, N.J. (Glassboro.N.J.). 
101 S. Central Ave., Marshfield, Wis. 

122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 3, 111. 
1250 20th St., Miami Beach 39, Fla. 
22 S. Sycamore St., Petersburg, Va. 

81 Maiden Lane, New York 7, N. Y. 
(Brooklyn, N. Y.). 

175 5th Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 

(Bayonne, N. J.) . 
239 W. Broadway, New York 13, N. Y. 
1000 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 5, Pa. 

(Chester and West Conshohocken, Pa.). 
1800 N. 9th St., Philadelphia 22, Pa. 
Phillips Bldg., Bartlesville, Okla. 

(Borger, Tex.). 
Phillips Bldg., Bartlesville, Okla. 
1200 Madison Ave., Indianapolis 6, Ind. 

3100 E. 26th St., Los Angeles 23, Calif. 
2000 Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 

(Barberton, Ohio) . 
31 South St., Pittsfield, Mass. 



205 



Table 24.- Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945 — 

Continued 



Num- 
ber 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



394 

.395 

396 
397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
403 

404 

405 
406 



407 
408 

409 

410 

411 
412 

413 
414 

415 

416 
417 

418 
419 

420 



421 

422 
423 
424 



425 

426 
427 



Plaskon Division, Libbey-Owens-j 2112 Sylvan Ave., Toledo 6, Ohio 

Ford Glass Co. 
Plymouth Organic Laboratories, 

Inc. 

Poly chemical Co. 

Polymer Corp., Ltd. 

Pontiac Varnish Co. 

Portland Gas & Coke Co. 



Portland Gas Light Co. 

Poughkeepsie Dyestuff Corp. 

Pratt & Lambert, Inc. 

Premo Pharmaceutical 
Laboratories, Inc. 
Procter & Gamble Co. 



Publicker Industries, Inc. 

Public Service Electric & Gas 
Co. 

Public Service Co. of N. C. — 
Pure Oil Co. 

Purocaine, Inc. 

Pylam Products Co., Inc- 

Pyridium Corp. 



Q. 0. Chemical Co.- 



Quaker Chemical Products Corp. 
Quaker Oats Co. 



Queens Borough Gas & Electric 

Co. 
R. S. A. Corp.- 



Raybestos Division of 

Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 
Red Spot Paint & Varnish Co.— 
Relchhold Chemicals, Inc. 



Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp.- 



Reilly-Whiteman Walton Co.— 
Reliance Varnish Co., Inc.— 

Remington Arms Co., Inc. 

Republic Creosoting Co. 



Resinous Products & Chemical 

Co. 

Rhodes Chemical Corp. 

Richards Chemical Works, 

Division Onyx Oil & Chemical 

Co. 



59 Beekraan St., New York 47, N. I. 

(Brooklyn, N. Y.). 
1933 Park Ave., Hew York 35, N. I. 
Sarnia, Ontario, Canada 
30 Brush St., Pontiac 12, Mich. 
Public Service Bldg., Portland 4, Oreg. 
5 Temple St., Portland 6, Maina. 
77 N. Water St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
75 Tonawanda St., Buffalo 7, N. Y. 
443 Broadway, New York 13, N. Y. 

Gwynne Bldg., Cincinnati 2, Ohio 

(Ivorydale, Ohio). 
1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Pa. 
80 Park PI., Newark 1, N. J. (Harrison, 

Jersey City, Paterson, Rariton Township, 

Trenton and Camden, N. J.). 
119 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, N. C. 
35 E. Wacker Dr., Chicago 1, 111. 

(Cabincreek, W. Va.) . 
1410 Packard Bldg., Philadelphia 2, Pa. 

(West Chester, Pa.) . 
799 Greenwich St.. New York 14, N. Y. 

(Norwalk, Conn.) . 
21 Gray Oaks Ave., Yonkers 2, N. Y. 

(Harriman, N. Y.) . 
P. 0. Box 235, Hollywood Station, Memphis 8, 

Tenn. 
Liae, Elm, and Sandy Sts., Conshohocken, Pa. 
141 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 

(Cedar Rapids, Iowa). 
1610 Far Rockaway Blvd., Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

690 Sawmill River Rd., Ardsley 1, N. Y. 
P. 0. Box 1061, Bridgeport 2, Conn. 

110-114 Main St., Evansville 8, Ind. 
601 Woodward Heights Blvd., Detroit 20, 

Mich. (Brooklyn, N. Y.; Elizabeth. N. J.; 

Tuscaloosa, Ala.; and San Francisco, Calif.). 
500 5th Ave., New York 18, N. Y. 

(Newark, N. J.; Chicago and Granite City, 
111.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Belle and 
Fainnount, W. Va.; Cleveland and Dover, 
Ohio; and Chattanooga, Tenn.). 
P. C. Box 188, Conshohocken, Pa. 
915 E. Kentucky St., Louisville 4, Ky. 
939 Baraum Ave., Bridgeport 2, Conn. 
1615 Merchants Bank Bldg., Indianpolis 4, 

Ind. (St. Louis Park, Minn.; Mobile, Ala.; 

Norfolk, Va.; Ironton, Utah; Lima, Ohio; 

and Seattle, Wash.). 
222 W. Washington Sq., Philadelphia 5, Pa. 

(Bridesburg, Pa.). 
3225 Frankford Ave., Philadelphia 34, Pa. 
Warren and Morris Sts., Jersey City 2, N. J. 



206 



Table 24.- 



Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945" 
Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



Richardson Co. 

Richfield Oil Corp. 

Richmond, City of (Department 
of Public Utilities). 

Rinshed-Mason Co . 

Rochester Gas & Electric Corp. 
Rohm & Haas Co. 

Roosen, H. D., Co., Inc. 

Royce Chemical Co. 

Ruberoid Co. 

St. Louis County Gas Co. 

Salvo Chemical Corp. 

Savannah, Ga. Gas Co. 

Savannah-St. Augustine Gas Co. 
Schenectady Varnish Co., Inc- 
Schenley Laboratories, Inc. — 

Schering Corp. 



Schering &. Glatz, Inc- 

Schieffelin &. Co. 

Scholler Bros., Inc. — 



Schorndorfer, Ferbert, Co., 
Division American-Marietta 
Co. 

Schuylkill Chemical Co. 

Schwarz Laboratories, Inc. 

Scranton-Spring Brook Water 
Service Co. 

Searle, G. D., & Co. 

Seattle Gas Co. 

Seeley & Co., Inc.- 

Seydel Chemical Co.- 
Sharp &. Dohme, Inc.- 
Sharpies Chemicals, Inc.— 

Shawlnigan Re sine Corp. 

Sheffield Farms Co., Inc.— 



Shell Chemical Division of 
Shell Union Oil Corp. 

Shell Chemical Corp. (R. R.)- 

Shell Oil Co., Inc. 

Shell Oil Co., Inc. 

Shepherd Chemical Co. 

Sherwin-WilliauB Co. 



27th and Lake Ste., Melrose Park, 111. 
555 S. Flower St.. Los Angeles 13, Calif. 

(Watson, Calif.). 
Williamsburg Ave., Richmond, Va. 

5935 Mil ford Ave., Detroit 10, Mich. 

89 East Ave., Rochester 4, N. I. 

222 W. Washington Sq., Philadelphia 28, Pa. 

(Bristol, Pa.) . 
78 20th St., Brooklyn 32, N. X. 
Carlton Hill, N. J. 
500 5th Ave., New York 18, N. I. 

(Joliet, 111., and Erie, Pa.). 
231 W. Lockwood Ave., Webster Grove 19, Mo. 
Rothschild, Wis. 
114 Barnard St., Savannah, Ga. 
30 Cathedral St., St. Augustine, Fla. 
P. 0. Box 1046, Schenectady 1, N. X. 
350 5th Ave., NewXork 1, N. X. 

(Lawrenceburg, Ind.) . 
2 Broad St., Bloomfield, N. J. (Union, 

N. J.) . 
113 W. 18th St., New Xork 11, N. X. 
16-30 Cooper Sq., New Xork 3, N. X. 
Collins and Westmoreland Sts., 

Philadelphia 34, Pa. 
12815 Elmwood Ave., Cleveland 11, Ohio 



2346 Sedgley Ave., Philadelphia 32, Pa. 
202 E. Uth St., New Xork 17, N. X. 

(Brooklyn, N. X.) . 
30 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

(Scranton, Pa.) . 
P. 0. Box 5110, Chicago 80, 111. 
1511 4th Ave., Seattle 11, Wash. 
136 Liberty St., New Xork 6, N. X. 

(Farmingdale, N. X.). 
225 Mercer St., Jersey City 2, N. J. 
632-64O N. Broad St., Philadelphia 1, Pa. 
123 S. Broad St., Philadelphia 9, Pa. 

(Wyandotte, Mich.). 
6^4 Monsanto Ave., Springfield 2, Mass. 
524 W. 57th St., New Xork 19, N. X. 

(Norwich, N. X.). 
100 Bush St., San Francisco 6, Calif. 

(Martinez and Dominguez, Calif., and 
Houston, Tex.). 
19821 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

(Torrance, Calif.). 
50 W. 50th St., New Xork 20, N. X. 

(Roxana, 111., and Houston, Tex.). 

100 Bush St., San Francisco 6, Calif. 
(Martinez and Wilmington, Calif.). 

2803 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 12, Ohio 

101 Prospect Av«., NW., Cleveland 1, 
Ohio (Chicago, 111; Newark and 
Gibbsboro, N. J.; Oakland, Calif.} 
Detroit, Mich.; Dallas, Tex.; and 
Dayton, Ohio). 



207 



Table 24.- 



Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945-- 
Continued 



Num- 
ber 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



500 

501 

502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 

510 

511 
512 
513 



5U 
515 



516 
517 
518 
519 

520 
521 
522 

523 



524 
525 

526 
527 

528 

529 

530 
531 
532 

533 
534 

535 
536 
537 
538 



Sun Oil Co. 

Sun Oil Co. (R. R.) 



Sylvania Industrial Corp. 

Synthetical Laboratories 

Synthetic Chemicals, Inc. 

Synthetic Products Co. 

Synvar Corp. 

Tampa Gas Co. 

Taunton Gas Light Co. 

Taylor Chemical Division of 

J. T. Baker Chemical Co. 
Taylor Fibre Co. 

Taylor Refining Co. (R. R.)- 

Tennessee Eastman Corp. 

Tennessee Products Corp. 



Texas Co. 

Tide Water Power Co.- 



Treyz, Geo. I., Co. 

Trojan Powder Co. 

Trubek Laboratories 



Uhlich, Paul, & Co., Inc. — 

Ultra Chemical Works, Inc. — 
Onion Bay State Co., Inc. — 
Onion Oil Co. of Calif ornia- 

0. S. Industrial Chemicals, 
Inc. 

0. S. Oil Co. 

0. S. Rubber Co. (R. R.) 

Op John Co.- 



Otah Copper Co. — 

Valentine & Co., Inc. 

Van Ameringen-Haebler, Inc. 



Van Camp Laboratories -— 

Van Dyk & Co., Inc. 

Van Schaack Chemical Work6, 
Inc. 

Varcum Chemical Corp. 

Velsicol Corp.— — -—— — -. — 

Verley Chemical Co., Inc.— — 

Verona Chemical Co. 

Victor Chemical Works 

Virginia Electric &. Power Co. — 



1608 Walnut St., Philadelphia 3, Pa. 

(Marcus Hook, Pa.). 
Woodville and Bay Terminal Railroad, 

Toledo 1, Ohio. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
5558 Ardmore Ave., Chicago 30, 111. 
335 McLean Blvd., Paterson 4, N. J. 
1798 London Rd., Cleveland 12, Ohio. 
Front and Lombard Sts., Wilmington 99, Del. 
201 Madison St., Tampa, Fla. 
41 Taunton Green, Taunton, Mass. 
600 N. Broad St., Phillipsburg, N. J. 

(Perm Yan, N. Y.). 
P. 0. Box 470, Norristown, Pa. (Betzwood, 

Pa.). 
P. 0. Box 778, Corpus Christi, Tex. 
Kingsport, Tenn. 
404 American National Bank Bldg., 

Nashville 3, Tenn. (Chattanooga, and 

Wrigley, Tenn.). 
P. 0. Box 2332, Houston 1, Tex. 
Tide Water Bldg., Wilmington, N. C. 

(Fayetteville, Goldsboro, Kingston, 
Washington, and New Bern, N. C). 
Cooks Falls, N. I. (Horton, N. Y.). 
17 N. 7th St., Allentown, Pa. (Seiple, Pa.). 
State Highway #17, East Rutherford, N. J. 
90 West St., New York 6, N. Y. (Brooklyn 15, 

'N. I.). 
2 Wood St., Paterson 4, N. J. 
50 Harvard St., Cambridge 12, Mass. 
617 W. 7th St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 

(Wilmington, Calif.). 
60 E. 42d St., New York 17, N. Y. (New 

Orleans, La.; Pensacola, Fla.; Newark, 

N. J.; and Baltimore, Md.) . 
P. 0. Box 1345, Providence, R. I. 

(Phillipsdale, R. I.). 
1230 6th Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

(Naugatuck, Conn.; Charleston, W. Va.j 
and Torrance, Calif.). 
301 Henrietta St., Kalamazoo 99, Mich. 
Kearns Bldg., Salt Lake City 1, Otah 

(Garfield, Otah). 
11 E. 36th St., New York 16, N. Y. 

(Brooklyn, N. I.). 
315 4th Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 

(Elizabeth 2, N. J.). 
Terminal Island, Calif. 

Main and William Sts., Belleville 9, N. J. 
3430 Henderson St., Chicago 18, 111. 

P. 0. Box 476, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
120 E. Pearson St., Chicago 11, 111. 

(Marshall, 111.). 
11 William St., Belleville 9, N. J. 
26 Verona Ave., Newark 4, N. J. 
141 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago U, 111. 
7th and Franklin Sts., Richmond 9, Va. 

(Norfolk and Newport News, Va.). 



208 



Table 24.- 



Synthetic organic chemicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945- - 
Continued 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



Simons, Harold L. ( Inc- 
Sinclair Refining Co. — 



Sinclair Rubber, Inc. (R. R.)- 

Sinclair & Valentine Co. 

Skelly Oil Co. 

Smith, Kline & French 

Laboratories . 
Solvay Process Co. 

Solvent Chemical Co., Inc. 

Sonneborn, L., Sons, Inc. 

Sonoco Products Co. 

South Atlantic Gas Co. 

South Carolina Electric & Ga6 

Co. 
Southern California Gas Co. 

(R. R.). 
Southern Dyestuff Corp. 



Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc. 

Spicer-Gerhart Co. 

Springfield Gas Light Co. 

Squibb, E. R., &. Sons 

Standard Agricultural 

Chemicals, Inc. 
Standard Brands, Inc. 

Standard Chlorine Chemical Co.- 
Standard Naphthalene Products 

Co. 
Standard Oil Co., of 

California . 
Standard Oil Co. of 

California (R. R.). 
Standard Oil Co. of Indiana 

Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey 

(Stanco, Inc.). 
Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey 
(Louisiana Division). 

Standard Ultramarine Co. 

Standard Varnish Works 



Stange, Wm. J., Co. 

Stauffer Chemical Co., Inc- 



Stearns, Frederick & Co., 

Division Sterling Drug Co. 
Stresen-Reuter, F. A., Inc. — 

Summit Chemical Products Corp. 
Sun Chemical Corp. 



11-25 44 th Rd., Long Island 1, N. I. 

630 5th Ave., New York 20, N. Y. (Marcus 

Hook, Pa.). 
P. 0. Box 25&4, Houston 1, Tex. 
611 W. 129th St., New lork 27, N. Y. 
Skelly Bldg., Tulsa 2, Okla. (Eunice, N.Mex.). 
5th and Arch Sts., Philadelphia 5, Pa. 

P. 0. Box 271, Syracuse 1, N. Y. (Geddes, 
N. Y.). 

341 Commercial St., Maiden 48, Mass. 
88 Lexington Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

(Nutley, N. J., and Petrolia, Pa.). 
Hartsville, S. C. 
100 E. Central Ave., Orlando, FLa. 

(Sanford, FLa.). 
328 Main St., Columbia, S. C. 

P. 0. Box 3249, Terminal Annex, Los Angeles 

54, Calif. 
P. 0. Box 1045, Charlotte 1, N. C. 

(Sodyeco, N. C). 
310 Wheeler St., Tonawanda, N. Y. 
First Trust Bldg., Pasadena 1, Calif. 

(Sunlend, Calif.). 
35 State St., Springfield 2, Mass. 

25 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn 2, N. Y. 
(New Brunswick, N. J.). 

1301 Jefferson St., Hoboken, N. J. 

595 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 

(Peekskill, N. Y.). 
115 Jacobus Ave., South Kearny, N. J. 
115 Jacobus Ave., South Kearny, N. J. 

225 Bush St., San Francisco 20, Calif. 

(Richmond and El Segundo, Calif.). 
225 Bush St., San Francisco 20, Calif. 

(El Segundo, Calif.). 
910 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 80, 111. 

(Wood River, 111., and Whiting, Ind.). 

26 Broadway, New York 4, N. Y. (Linden, 
N. J.. and Bayonne, N. J.). 

P. 0. Box 551, Baton Rouge 1, La. 

P. 0. Box 850, Huntington 18, 1. Va. 
2600 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island 3, 

N. Y. 
2536 W. Monroe St., Chicago 12, 111. 
420 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
(Chauncey, «. Y.; Chester, Pa.; 
Monong&hela, Pa.; Roanoke, Va., and 
Perry, Ohio). 
6533 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit 31, Mich. 

2113 W. Medill Ave., Chicago 47, 111. 

(Bensenville, 111.). 
11 William St., Belleville 9, N. J. 
309 Sussex St., Harrison, N. J. 



209 



Table 24.- 



Synthetic organic cheiiicals: Directory of manufacturers, 1945-- 
Continued 



Num- 
ber 



Name of company 



Office address (location of plant given in 
parentheses if not in same city as office) 



539 

540 
541 
542 

543 

544 
545 
546 
547 
548 

549 
550 

551 

552 



553 
554 
555 

556 

557 

558 

559 
560 
561 

562 
563 

564 



565 
566 
567 
568 

569 
570 

571 

572 
573 
574 
575 



Virginia Smelting Co. 

Vitamins, Inc- 
Vita-Var Corp.- 
Warner-Jenkinson Manufacturing 

Co. 
Warwick Chemical Co. Division 

Sun Chemical Corp. 

Washburn, T. F., Co. 

Washington Gas Light Co. 

Watertown Manufacturing Co. — 

Werner Drug & Chemical Co. 

Western Condensing Co. 

Western Dry Color Co. 

Western United Gas & Electric 

Co. 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. — 

Westvaco Chlorine Products 
Corp. 



Westville Laboratories 

Westwell Chemical Co. 

Wetherill, Geo. D., Varnish Co, 

Wheeler, Reynolds & Stauffer — 

White & Hodges 

Wilhelm A., Co. Division of 
Glidden Co. 

Wilmot 4 Cassidy, Inc. 

Wilson Laboratories 

Winthrop Chemical Co., Inc. — 

Wisconsin Rial & Light Co 

Wisconsin Michigan Power Co.— 

Wisconsin Power & Light Co. — 



Wisconsin Public Service Corp. 

Witte, John H., & Sons 

Woburn Chemical Corp. 

Wolf, Jacques, & Co. 

Wolff-Alport Chemical Corp. 

Worcester Gas Light Co. 



Wornow Process Paint Co.- 
Wyandotte Chemicals Corp. 
Wyeth, Inc. 



Young Aniline Works, Inc. 
Zinsser & Co., Inc. 



Jefferson St. and 3d Ave., West Norfolk, 

Va. 
809 W. 58th St., Chicago 21, 111. 
1180 Raymond Blvd., Newark 2, N. J. 
2526 Baldwin St., St. Louie 6, Mo. 

100 Pulaski St., West Warwick, R. I. (Rock 

Hill, S. C, and Carolina, R. I.). 
2244 Elston Ave., Chicago 14, HI. 
1100 H St., NW., Washington 1, D. C. 
127 Echo Lake Rd., Watertown, Conn. 
914 Race St., Cincinnati 2, Ohio. 
935 E. John St., Appleton, Wis. (Adell, 

Wis.). 
600 W. 52nd St., Chicago 9, 111. 
50 Fox St., Aurora, 111. (DuQuoin and 

Lockport, 111.) . 
306 4th Ave., Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 

(Trafford, Pa.) . 
405 Lexington Ave., New lork 17, N. I. 

(South Charleston, W. Va., and Newark, 
Calif.). 
Monroe Center, Stepney, Conn. (Derby, Conn.). 
1234 Santa Gertrude Ave., Whittier, Calif. 
Haddon Ave. and White Horse Pike, Camden, 

N. J. 
636 California St., San Francisco 8, Calif. 

(Richmond, Calif.). 
2 Wellington Ave., Everett 49, Mass. 
3d and Bern Sts., Reading, Pa. 

292 Freeman St., Brooklyn 22, N. Y. 
4221 S. Western Ave., Chicago 9, Hi. 
170 Varick St., New York 13, N. Y. 

(Rensselaer, N. Y.). 
106 N. 8th St., Manitowoc, Wis. 
137 W. Mill St., Neenah, Wis. (Appleton, 

Wis.). 
122 W. Washington Ave., Madison 1, Wis. 

(Portage, Beaver Dam, Beloit, and Fond du 
Lac, Wis.). 
1029 N. Marshall St., Milwaukee 1, Wis. 
206 Jefferson St., Burlington, Iowa. 
1200 Harrison Ave., Kearny, N. J. 
P. 0. Box 839, Passaic, N. J. (Clifton, 

N. J.). 
1127 Irving Ave., Brooklyn 27, N. I. 
240 Main St., Worcester 8, Mass. 

(Framingham, Mass.). 
2489 Hunter St., Los Angeles 21, Calif. 
1609 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte, Mich. 
1600 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
2731 Boston St., Baltimore 24, Md. 
Hastings on Hudson, N. Y. 



211 



APPENDIX 

A. Imports of Coal-Tar Intermediates and Finished Products 

Statistics on United States imports of coal-tar products entered 
under paragraphs 27 and 28 of the Tariff Act of 1930 are summarized in 
table 25 for the period 1943-45 • The data were obtained by analyzing 
invoices covering imports through all customs districts and are given in 
detail in a separate report, if 

Imports of coal-tar intermediates which entered under paragraph 27 
in 1945 totaled 703,304 pounds, valued at $214,704, compared with a 
much greater total of 9,034,482 pounds, valued at $1,395,163, imported 
in 1944. The principal intermediates imported were anthraquinone, 
orthocresol and other purified cresols (principally from England), and 
ethylbenzene from Canada. The anthraquinone and ethylbenzene were 
imported free of duty by the United States Government to relieve a 
critical shortage of raw materials for military anthraquinone vat dyes 
and synthetic rubber. 

In 1945, imports of finished coal-tar products entered under para- 
graph 28 consisted of dyes, aedicinalB and pharmaceuticals, flavor and 
perfume materials, and miscellaneous finished coal-tar products. These 
comprised 341 items with an aggregate weight of 27,565,752 pounds, 
valued at 14,877,103. In 1944, imports of 332 products totaled 
5,545,906 pounds, valued at $2,593,037. 

In 1945, as in previous years, dyes continued to be the most 
important homogeneous group of finished coal-tar products imported, 
accounting for $1,626,750, or 33 percent of the total value of all 
imports entered under paragraph 28. Imports of flavor and perfume 
materials, valued at $31,278, and medicinals and pharmaceuticals, 
valued at $10,512, accounted for only about 1 percent of the total value 
of imports. Imports of "all other finished coal-tar products" 
accounted for 66 percent of the total value of all imports of finished 
coal-tar products. Imports consisted largely of the high explosive 
trinitrotoluene (TNT), which originated in Canada. 

The ratio of the value (foreign invoice value) of imports of coal- 
tar intermediates and finished products to the value of the domestic 
output of all coal-tar products was about one-half of 1 percent. 



V 8— U.S. Tariff Commission. Imports of Coal-Tar Products, 1945 , . 
1946, /processed/. 



212 





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213 



B. Research Workers and Expenditures 

Because of its general value to the synthetic organic chemical 
Industry, the Commission collects and publishes annually statistics on 
the number of technically trained research workers, their salaries, and 
the cost of research. No such information is available elsewhere. 
The data are approximate since many companies producing synthetic 
organic chemicals produce other items also. The assignment of research 
costs to synthetic organic chemicals is therefore at times somewhat ar- 
bitrary. Notwithstanding these limitations, the following statistics 
are of value in indicating trends: 



lear 



: Techni cally : Salaries : Cost of res earch 

Companies j trained : paid : Within the plant : Outside 
reporting : research : research: : : the 
workers j/ : workers : Gross : Net 3/ : plant 



Number 




Number 



2,957 
3,839 
5,0& 
5,118 
6,219 



1,000 
t dollars 

: 8,966 

: H,5a 

t 20,816 

: 22,428 

: 26,944 



1,000 
dollars 

18,425 
23,440 
28,723 
43,820 
55,046 



1,000 : 1,000 
dollars : dollars 



17,137 
20,768 
28,470 
40,946 
52,184 



J/ 

2,546 
4,023 



~ij For the years 1941-43, a technically trained research worker was 
defined as a person with technical training engaged in research work 
and earning not less than $2,000 per year; beginning with 1944, the 
minimum amount of earnings was fixed at $2,500. 

2/ The net cost figure is obtained by deducting from gross cost the 
credits for salable products obtained in the course of research. 

2/ Data for research outside the plant were not collected before 
1944. 



The number of companies reporting on research workers and expend- 
itures was 274 in 1945* Although this number probably does not 
include all the companies conducting research on synthetic organic 
chemicals, it is estimated that the data reported by them account for 
more than 80 percent of the total. 

The average salary of technically trained research workers In 
1945 was |4,300 compared with $4,400 in 1944, $4,100 in 1943, and 
$3,000 In 1942. The gross cost of research Increased from 44 million 
dollars in 1944 to 55 million In 1945, or about 25 percent. Total 
salaries paid Increased from 22 million dollars to 27 million in the 
same period, or about 22 percent. 

Research outside the plant consists largely of consulting serv- 
ices, research projects in universities, and privately endowed labora- 
tories. In 1945, about 4 million dollars was expended by companies 
for this type of research. These data are still incomplete but rep- 
resent a greater coverage than in 1944. 



U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 0—1947