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Full text of "Tarboro, North Carolina, central business district study"

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North Carolina S'ala Liorary 
Ralsigh 






TARBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 




CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY 



North Carolina State Library 
Raieigh 



Do€. 



TARBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY 



The preparotion of this report, was financially aided through a 
Federal grant from the Urban Renewal Administration of the 
Housing ond Home Finance Agency, under the Urban Planning 
Assistance Program authorized by Section 701 of the Housing 
Act of 1954, as amended. 



PREPARED FOR: 

THE TOWN OF TARBORO 

MAYOR - DR. E. L. ROBERSON 
ENGINEER - B. F. HELMS 
MANAGER - W. B. HOWARD 

PLANNING COMMISSION 

CHAIRMAN - TOM B. GRAINGER 
SECRETARY - PEYTON BEERY 

MEMBERS - DR. JOHN W. WHALEY 
ROBERT McCRARY 
F. P. JENKINS 
J. C. MARROW 
WILLIE HARRELL 
STANLEY VICK 
JOHN LONG 
W. ERNEST PRICE 
RUDOLPH SEXTON 

TOWN COUNCIL 



MEMBERS - C. FRANK ALFORD 
A. B. BASS 
HERMAN CREECH 
GRAHAM HARRIS 
CURTIS B. LEGGETT 
C. W. MAYO, JR. 
L. C. SHOOK 
JOHN UMPHLET 

PREPARED BY: 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

DIVISION OF COMMUNITY PLANNING 

ADMINISTRATOR - GEORGE J. MONAGHAN 

SPECIAL PROJECTS SECTION 

HEAD - JOHN H. VOORHEES 

PLANNER - JERRY M. TURNER 
DESIGN PLANNER - GAY BRANTLEY 

DRAFTSMAN - LESLIE DELONG 

DRAFTSMAN - BOB JORDAN 

TECHNICIAN - JACKIE GURLEY 

SECRETARY - GLENDA YAR80R0UGH 

DATE _ September, 1964 

Rendering of County Courthouse Square by 

David Hall & Associates, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

PRICE $1.00 




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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 
INTRODUCTION 2 



THE CENTRALBUSINESS DISTRICT OF TARBORO TODAY 

Site Characteristics 3 

Trade Area 4 

Retail Sales 4 

Major Functions 6 

Traffic Characteristics 10 

Parking Characteristics 10 

Appearance 12 



THE CENTRALBUSINESS DISTRICT OF TARBORO TOMORROW 

Space Requirements 13 

Planning Objective 14 

Preliminary Plan 14 

Traffic & Parking 18 

Pedestrian Way 18 

Courthouse Square 19 

Tree Planting 21 

APPENDIX 

Consumer Survey 25 

Merchant Survey 32 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 



http://www.archive.org/details/tarboronorthcaroOOnort 



INTRODUCTION 




INTRODUCTION 

This report presents a Preliminary Plon for the future development 
of Torboro's central business district. In Tarboro as in nearly every 
city and town across the nation, the problems of revitalizing the central 
business district or CBD's os city planners refer to them, ore a matter 
of growing concern. 

Today, because of good highways and short distances, central business 
districts ore losing business to modern outlying shopping centers. In 
these shopping centers there are plenty of parking spaces, new buildings 
with attractive store fronts and well lighted interiors. Signs are con- 
trolled and relate to each other and to the building size. Often there 
are landscaped areas with trees, flowers, fountains and sculpture. 

On the other hand, most central business districts are a product of the 
past, with congested streets, old buildings, inadequate off-street 
parking, a run-down appearance and no landscaping. 

This study will analyze the characteristics of Torboro's central business 
district in order to determine their adequacy and to propose a preliminary 
plan for future development. 



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THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 

OF TARBORO TODAY 



SITE CHARACTERISTICS 
TRADE AREA 
RETAIL SALES 
MAJOR FUNCTIONS 
TRAFFIC CHARACTERISTICS 
PARKING CHARACTERISTICS 
APPEARANCE 




SITE CHARACTERISTICS 

In 1760 there was no system o( roads through North Carolina and no 
modern means of locomotion, so that when frontiersmen moved up the 
Tar River in order to find farmlands and establish homes, they built 
their town on the banks of the river. 

Today, Tarboro's central business district is still located close to 
the original site of the town on the banks of the Tor River. 



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The site is a flot area some 40 feet above the surface of the river so 
that except for the bridge at the end of Main Street there is no visual 
or functional relationship to it. The only place where the river is visible 
is from the bridge. 

The Tar River often floods during heavy rains, but the central business 
district is high obove this level. However, water does collect in the 
flood plain and in the two droinage creeks, Hendricks Creek to the 
west and East Tarboro Canal, which limit development in those districts. 

On the western side of the central business district running parallel to 
Albemarle Street is the Atlantic Coastline Railroad. 

Only o few of the streets in the central business district provide 
through access to other parts of the town because of the river to the 
south and the railroad and creeks to the west. 

As in most old cities, streets have been laid off in a gridiron pattern. 
Most of the traffic moves along Main Street (U.S. Highway 64) which 
corries traffic across the river and eost to the coast. 



Tarboro's major area of development has been to the north of the Tar 
River, north and west along U.S. 64, so that the central business district 
is not in the center of the town. The small town of Princeville has 
developed on the south side of the river. 



TRADE AREA 

A survey of Tarboro merchants indicated that 57 percent of their dollar 
receipts come from the 8,411 residents within the town limits. The 
remaining 43 percent comes from persons living within Tarboro's trading 
area. 

Assuming that people will usually trade in the largest place that is 
easily accessible to them, outlines a trading area for Tarboro which 
covers approximately half of Edgecombe County and small parts of 
Halifax, Martin and Pitt counties. This trading area includes such 
small communities os Conetoe, Speed, Pinetops, Palmyra, Hobgood, 
Hamilton, Oak City ond Hossell. This area is primarily agricultural 
and has an estimated population of 15,000 residents. 

Tarboro merchants in a recent survey estimated that 33 percent of 
their dollar receipts came from persons residing within Edgecombe 
County and 10 percent from the other counties. 

Persons living in Tarboro and within its trading area are attracted to 
shop in other neighboring cities where there may be a wider selection of 
shopping goods and specialty items not readily available in Tarboro. 

These larger cities are Rocky Mount, which has a population of 32,147 
and is locoted 16 miles west, Wilson with a population of 28,753 located 
26 miles southwest and Greenville with 22,860 persons located 25 miles 
southeast. 




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Tarboro customers indicated that they made approximately 75 percent 
of their purchases in Tarboro, but went to the larger cities primarily 
for clothes, automobiles, furniture and oppliances. Rocky Mount was 
the city mentioned most often where individuals shopped. 

A survey of customers indicated approximately 80 percent banked, went 
to doctors and lawyers and repaii shops in Tarboro. Tarboro was lowest 
in its ability to attract persons to the town for entertainment. 



tlOCRY /^OUNT 



-TAREOPjO 




C»«.tE>J\/lULE 



TARBORO RETAIL SALES (1»58) 



RETAIL SALES 

The volume of retail sales in Tarboro rose from 10.5 million in 1948 
to 12.9 million in 1958. Although this is a 23 percent increase, when 
adjusted for inflation it only represents an increase of 2 percent. 

During the some time Tarboro's share of the retail sales within Edge- 
combe County decreased from 40 percent in 1948 to 33 percent in 1958. 
This can be attributed to the nearby location of Rocky Mount, better 
roads, more cars and the continuing competition for the consumer's 
dollar. 




SALES AS A PERCENT OF TARBORO TOTAl 
Food Slotos 25.1% 



There were 110 retail trade establishments in Tarboro according to the 
1958 census of business or approximately 21 percent of all those within 
the County. These establishments accounted for approximately 33 percent 
of the retail soles which took ploce within the County. 

Establishments selling automobiles, drugs, other retail products and 
gasoline, accounted for sales above 33 percent. 



TARBORO SALES AS PERCENT OF 
COUNTY SALES BY CATEGORY 



Apparal 

Fumlturi 

Emlng 



27.6S 
49.ex 
45.8% 
31.5% 
35.2% 
48.7% 
17.1% 
14.5% 
19.2% 



TARBORO.N.C. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 



EXISTING. LAND USE 

PRIMARY TRADE ftgg WHOLESALE 8 STORAGE 

SECONDARY TRADE REPAIR 

CONVENIENCE TRADE MANUFACTURING & 

CONSUMER SERVICES INDUSTRIAL SERVICES 

ADMINISTRATIVE, TRANSPORTATION 

FINANCIAL, a ADVISORY RESIDENTIAL 

SOCIAL a CULTURAL [~~| VACANT BUILDING 







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MAJOR FUNCTION 

The central business district of Tarboro provides 4 generalized major 
functions or activities to the surrounding population - retail shopping, 
wholesale trade and storage, office and residentiol. These activities 
are contained by the open spaces of the Town Commons to the north 
and the river to the south. 

The retail shopping area is where customers may do comporison shopping 
for clothes, general merchandise and specialty goods. This area is 
located along Main Street from Church to Granville Street. 

The wholesale trode and storage area which includes agricultural 
supplies, and utilities is located on either side of Albemarle Avenue. 

Administrative, financial and odvisory services are located in a diagonal 
pattern across the north side of the central business district. This in- 
cludes the central offices of the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph 
Company in which 350 people are employed. 

Residences hove located in the area to the eobt along St. Andrew Street, 
but are gradually moving out of town. 

The mop on the opposite page shows how each building in the CBD is 
being used. These uses are defined ond total areas tabulated on the 
following page. 





PRIMARY RETAIL - Primary retail shopping areas are generally lo- 
cated in the Central Business District or in large regional shopping 
centers. These trade establishments sell low bulk comparison and 
speciality items. Primary retail establishments can be broken down 
into two categories: 1) stores which generate their own trade such as 
department stores and variety stores and 2) opparel shops, shoe stores, 
jewelry stores, and similar establishments which are economically 
dependent upon the pedestrian traffic generators -- department stores 
and variety stores -- (or supplying potential customers. 

SECONDARY RETAIL - Secondary retail establishments usuolly sell 
"high bulk" items such as furniture, appliances, home furnishings, 
automobiles, farm equipment, hardwore, lumber, building materials and 
similar goods. Merchandise in secondory trade establishments is 
relatively expensive and seldom purchased by the individual customer. 
Due to the expensive cost of secondary trade goods, the customer is 
generally willing to travel longer distances to compare merchandise 
between widely separoted competing establishments. As a result, 
secondary retail establishments do not have to locate in close proximity 
to each other; instead, they often locate at independent locations along 
major streets or highways. In many instances, these establishments 
locate in areas which adjoin the Central Business District. 

CONVENIENCE RETAII Convenience retail establishments merchan- 
dise goods commonly referred to as "convenience goods." They sell 
merchandise such as food, drugs, and gasoline which are purchased 
frequently. Establishments selling these goods generally serve a smaller 
market area than do either primary trade or secondary trade es- 
tablishments. They are frequently located in outlying neighborhood 
shopping areas in order to be as near as possible to their customers. 
Food stores and gasoline stations generally do not prosper in the 
intensively developed core of the CBD since they require locations 
with convenient access. 

ADMINISTRATIVE, FINANCIAL, AND ADVISORY SERVICES - Ad- 
ministrative, financial, and advisory services include offices or es- 
toblishments performing either the management or administrative duties 
of government, business, and welfare agencies or providing monetary and 
professional services for the community. These include doctors' offices, 
lawyers' offices, accountants' offices, banks, the city hall, the post 
office, and similar uses. 

CONSUMER SERVICES - Consumer services include establishments 
providing services to the person. Establishments such as restaurants, 
barber shops, theaters, pool halls, hotels, newspaper offices, telephone 
offices, and similar uses ore included. 



CULTURAL AND SOCIAL SERVICES - Culturol and social services in 
the Central Business District include churches, libraries, and similar 
uses. 

INDUSTRIAL SERVICES AND MANUFACTURING ~ Industrial service 
and manufacturing activities include all establishments engaged in 
manufacturing processes and all related industrial services. 

WHOLESALE TRADE, REPAIR SERVICES, STORAGE - This category 
includes all wholesole activities, mechanical repair services and 
enclosed storage. 

TRANSPORTATION - Transportation establishments provide for the 
conveyance of passengers and freight from ploce to place. 

VACANT FLOOR SPACE - The vacant floor space category includes 
all buildings or portions of buildings which were not being devoted 
to any use. Floor space being used only on a part-time basis was 
considered as occupied floor space. All storage space, either possive 
or active, was considered as occupied floor space. 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT FLOOR SPACE 



Adm., Fin., & Adv. Services 
Primary Trade 
Secondary Trade 
Convenience Trade 
Consumer Service 
Vacant 

Repair 



207,000 - square feet 

72,000 - square feet 

59,000 - square feet 

41,500 - square feet 

34,000 - square feet 

31,000 - squore feet 

16,500 - square feet 



Sub Total 



461,000 - square feet 



Manufacturing & Industrial Service 
Social and Cultural 
Wholesale and Storage 



27,500 - square feet 

23,000 - square feet 

219,000 - square feet 



Total 



730,000 - square feet 



TRAFFIC CHARACTERISTICS 

Since Main Street is the major street into which all traffic bound for 
the central business district flows and because it carries U.S. 64 traffic, 
it is usually filled with cars. Cars block traffic as they maneuver to 
back into parallel parking spaces on either side of the street and the 
general flow of vehicles backs up behind the traffic lights located at 
every intersection. Main street presently carries more than 7,000 vehicles 
during a 24 hour period. The generally accepted standard for such a 
street is only 6,000 vehicles. 

A new by-pass for U.S. 64 Is presently being programmed which will 
divert through traffic off Main Street. It is to be located outside the 
town limits to the west of Tarboro and there will be very easy access 
into the central business district on both St. James and Wilson Streets. 





TRAFFIC VOLUMES MAP 
(NUMBER OF CARS PER DAY) 



PARKING CHARACTERISTICS 

Finding a parking space in Tarboro is usually a problem. And often 
when a parking space is found it is not conveniently located. There are 
approximately 1,000 parking spaces in the central business district of 
which 575 are unmetered time controlled spaces along the curb, 241 ore 
for private use in off street lots and 227 for customer use in off street 
lots. There are no lots for public parking. A number of the existing 
spaces ore too far away from center of town to be desirable, while 
some of the others closer in are unpaved and unlighted, with clutter 
surrounding them. Who could expect these to be used by the lady 
shoppers of Tarboro. On the north side of town employees of Carolina 
Telephone and Telegraph absorb oil possible spaces. 




Modern methods of estimating parking requirements are by means of 
ratios of building floor space to parking space. Under this method there 
is presently about a 1 to 1 relationship. The Home Builders Council's 
standard for shopping centers is 1 square foot of floor space to 3 square 
feet of parking space so that under this ratio there would be a present 
deficiency of approximately 2,000 spaces. If it is assumed that the 
central business district needs half the parking spaces of a shopping 
center then there would still be an existing deficiency of 500 spaces. 





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APPEARANCE 




There is no consistent character or appearance to Tarboro's central 
business district. This is true even though there are a number of new 
buildings. The stimulating effect of the new courthouse, municipal 
building and one or two stores is lost because of their settings. The 
courthouse is a very large building which con never be seen as a whole 
because it is set so close to the street. In addition to this <t faces 
onto the back end of a parking lot and Main Street stores. Several of the 
newer stores find themselves surrounded by older buildings which are 
not attractive, with a wide variety of canopies or awnings, and signs. 
The visual image which remains in one's memory is not distinguishable 
in any positive way from any other North Carolina commercial district. 
It all comes out as a sort of nondescript gray area. However, there 
are several small assets, one of them being the few trees that line 
St. James Street, These add their natural beauty to soften the bleakness 
of the buildings. Unfortunately, the little area of ivy with the large 
oak tree next to the Post Office has disappeared. This was one of the 
most pleasant areas within the whole downtown, ond should have been 
preserved, not destroyed. 







THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 
OF TARBORO TOMORROW 



SPACE REQUIREMENTS 
PLANNING OBJECTIVE 

PRELIMINARY PLAN 

TRAFFIC & PARKING 
PEDESTRIAN WAY 
COURTHOUSE SQUARE 
TREE PLANTING 





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SPACE REQUIREMENTS 

Before designing the preliminary plon, it is necessary to estimate the 
omount of additional space which will be needed in the future for the 
expansion of existing businesses and establishment of new ones. 
Building space requirements for the future will be determined by a 
number of different variables such as the population and growth 
characteristics of the trading area, changes in income or shopping 
habits of consumers, changes in the patterns of retailing and the 
initiative and actions of businessmen to make Tarboro's central 
business district more competitive with neighboring cities. 

There are no specific locational trends for new development within 
the central business district. The new city hall and county courthouse 
are the newest building additions. The courthouse is generating 
building activity in the immediate vicinity for office space. In regard 
to commercial structures, Clorks Department Store on Main Street has 
expanded into another section of its building. Rose's Variety Store has 
a new building and there have been improvements in the post to Marrow- 
Pitt Hardware and Williams' Variety Store. These building activities 
do not indicate ony new trend of growth in Torboro except that Main 
Street is still the major street in the centrol business district on which 
commercial establishments wish to be located. 

Mony of these new structures have been built because of the ob- 
solescence of existing buildings rather than any large new demand being 
created by population. 

Past population trends indicate that Tarboro's population is not in- 
creasing significantly. However, since 1960 a number of industrial 
plants have moved into the planning area increasing the number of 
people employed in manufacturing. 

This report will assume that the growth of the central business district 
will be directly related to the population increase planned for In the 
Tarboro Lond Development Plon , which provided an estimated population 
for the Town and planning area of 13,000 people. Over a 10 year period 
this would approximate a 3 percent Increase so that this study will 
assume that floor space requirements should be planned for 138,000 
square feet. The merchants surveyed indicated they were presently 
planning on increasing floor space by 28,000 square feet. In direct re- 
lationship to this floor space requirement is the requirement for off- 
street parking which should be expanded to take care of the existing 
deficiency and keep up with future needs which means providing a 
minimum of 845 additional parking spaces or a total for the central 
business district of approximately 2,000 spaces. 



PLANNING OBJECTIVES 

Torboro's central business district should be planned so that it will 
become an integral part of the everyday life of the town. There is no 
reason to believe that Tarboro will be anything but a small town for 
many years to come. For this reason, it should plan it's growth ac- 
cordingly. To imitate large metropolitan techniques in its growth pattern 
would be out of character. 

One of the major ottributes of small cities is a sense of scale, in that 
buildings are related to man and that nature follows him right into his 
environment. For this reason, trees and planting should be developed in 
the central business district to provide o greater balance with buildings 
and to create a more intimate scale. Tree plantings would provide a 
sense of uniformity and help to visually tie the area together. Certainly 
the functional necessities of the automobile should be recognized but 
they should not dominate the development of the central business di strict. 
Automobiles should either be moving on the major streets or parked in 
off-street parking lots which are readily accessible to shopping areas. 

The central business district should be developed in an attractive 
manner. There should be improvements in store fronts, signs, street 
lighting and oil the other gimmicks which decorate stores. In small 
cities, signs have limited value as stores have regular customers and 
everyone knows where each store is located. 

And lost, Torboro's central business district should be so developed 
that it provides a specific identity in which local residents may hove 
pride and visitors will appreciate and remember. It should attempt to 
complement the traditional architecture and materials of the past with 
contemporary designs in order to make a richer visual environment. 






PRELIMINARY PLAN 

The preliminary plan for the future development of Tarboro is primarily 
concerned with providing a more efficient and attractive relationship for 
the different functions occurring in the central business district. 

The proposed improvements relate to those actions which the Town 
should initiate in contrast to decisions made by private property owners. 
The Town should be concerned about the development of the streets and 
the major circulation system for traffic, for the development of off-street 
parking in order to get congestion off the streets, for the construction of 
sidewalks, installation of street lights, trees and landscaped areas. 
The Town should also take the initiative to provide the guide lines and 
regulations along which private property owners might improve their 
store fronts, and provide complementing signs and possibly even 
canopies. 








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TARBURU.N.U. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 













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BUILDINGS TO BE REMOVED 



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^^ RETAIL SALES 

nZZA OFFICES 

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TRAFFIC AND PARKING 

There ore no major changes or re-routing of traffic in the proposed 
traffic circulation system for the central business district (with the 
exception of the closing of St. Andrews Street in front of the court- 
house). As already noted, the new bypass will toke through traffic off 
Main Street. However, in the future, it might be necessary to take 
parking off Main Street as it will continue to be the most heavily 
traveled street. 

Off-street parking has been proposed to the rear of the stores facing 
Main Street. Since most of the traffic will be moving along Main Street 
these areas will be easily accessible by side streets and entrances. 
Off-street parking areas hove been located so that they are convenient 
to all the different parts of the central business district. 

Attractive pedestrian walkways have been proposed in eoch block leading 
from the parking spaces to the shopping area on Main Street. 

PEDESTRIAN WAYS 

Except for the new brick sidewalks around the courthouse the standard 
concrete pavement throughout the centrol business district does not 
contribute to the Town's appearance. 

It is proposed that new standards for sidewalks be adopted throughout 
the downtown area, especially for Main Street. These sidewolks should 
be widened so that there is room to develop a landscaped setting for the 
area. The sidewalk itself could be constructed of concrete with a grid 
pattern of brick, quorry tile, or stone poving. The combination of these 
materials will provide o greater variety and help integrote the traditional 
brick with the modern concrete. 




Widening the sidewalk area will provide adequate space for landscaping 
and planting along the street edge. It is importont to have street trees 
and planting to soften the cold face of buildings and help bring the 
natural beauty of the Town right into the central business district. 




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MAJOR CIRCULATION SYSTEM 



SIDEWALK GRID 






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COURTHOUSE SQUARE 

One of the most important aspects of the preliminary plan is the proposed 
creation of "Courthouse Square". At. present time, the very beautiful 
new courthouse is located in such a manner that visitors passing along 
Main Street would never know it existed. Such an investment in time, 
money and talent should not be hidden on the back streets of Tarboro. 

It is proposed that "Courthouse Square" be created running from Main 
Street to the front of the courthouse. Unfortunately two large buildings 
would hove to be purchased and removed, but this would more than be 
worth the investment in creating a beautiful orea which would create a 
vista from Main Street to the entire front of the building. Also St. 
Andrews Street, for the one block in front of the courthouse would have 
to be closed to automobile traffic. 

"Courthouse Square" would have a number of advantages in addition to 
a beautiful site for the courthouse. It would provide a useful shopping 
and civic areo. The Squore could be used for many different community 
and county activities. There could be art shows in the Spring when 
people want to get outside; band concerts in the Fall when high school 
football is in the air and choir groups from local churches at Christmas. 

But most important "Courthouse Square" would become an identifying 
feature of Tarboro which people all over North Carolina would remember 
and many come to visit. 

The proposed plan for "Courthouse Square" is designed to help blend 
the traditional and the modern. Our lives ore filled with a rich heritage 
from the past and with the exciting explorations in contemporary design. 
There is no reason to isolate these facts, but to try and bring them 
together in such a manner that they complement each other ond thereby 
create a more exciting environment. We can not go back to the days of 
Williamsburg, but we can remember them. To attempt to construct all 
buildings in this manner would be only an act of poor imitation. It is 
necessary to preserve as much of the past which is valuable visually 
and to create new and modern building forms to complement them. 




TREE PLANTIKG 

A tree planting program for the Tarboro central business district should 
be adopted. The few trees that already exist there are very pleasant and 
all efforts should be made to preserve and add to them. 




Trees should be selected which fit the area in which they are plonted. 
Only certain small trees whose roots do not seriously affect utilities 
and whose size does not eventually cause danger to neighboring 
buildings and overhead utilities, should be used in street planting. 
Larger trees may be selected for planting within "Courthouse Square," 
or other open, larger areas. 



Trees may be planted in the ground within the sidewalk area by taking 
out a square (usually 4 feet) of the concrete paving. A neater more 
attractive planting is accomplished when the soil around the tree is 
covered with some material, brick, cobblestone, river pebbles - set in 
a sand base. The drawing below shows cobblestones around a tree . 
Trees may also be planted in large containers. These are available in 
many shopes and materials - concrete, wood, fiber gloss, all of which 
seem to work well. 



The accompanying list and illustrations provides a possible selection. 




PERSPECTIVE 



331 






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CONCRETTE PLANTING 
COMTA.)NCR 
21 







SMALL TREES 

A. Ilex cassine - Cassine Holly 

Height 15 - 20 feet, Spread 8 - 10 feet 

This pyramidal shaped tree is evergreen with fine textured foliage. 
Molti-trunked specimens should be used as they appear more 
interesting than the trees with single trunks. The Cassine holly has 
a medium growth rote. 

B. Lagerstroemia indico - Crepe Myrtle 
Height 20 - 30 feet. Spread 10-15 feet 

This handsome small tree has dull green foliage appearing in the 
spring, which turns a burnished copper in the fall. Throughout the 
summer, upright clusters of flowers, (pink, red and white) create a 
profusion of color. The sculpture- 1 ike appearance of the trunk and 
bark makes the crepe myrtle interesting oil year, even in the winter 
after the leaves are gone. The crepe myrtle is reosonobly fast 
growing, relatively free from disease and is long-lived. This is one 
of the best all round small street trees for eastern North Carolina. 

C. Prunus caroliniano - Carolina Cherrylourel 
Height 20 - 30 feet. Spread 15 - 20 feet 

This beautiful small tree has the advontage of being an evergreen, 
or holding its leaves all year round. The lustrous, dark evergreen 
foliage forms a small symmetrical tree with a heavy round crown. 
Numerous small white flowers form in the spring and black berry- 
like fruits develop later. The Cherrylourel is relatively free of 
insects and disease. 



LARGE TREES 

D. Acer florinanum ■ Southern Sugar Maple 
Height - 40 - 60 feet. Spread 20 - 30 feet 

The Southern Sugar Maple has medium-textured, dork blue-green 
foliage which turns a brilliant yellow in autumn. Lacy yellow flowers 
appear in the spring on this long-lived disease free tree. Although 
it is slow grower, it is an excellent street tree. 



A 




E. Ginkgo bilobo - Ginkge Maidenhair tree 
Height 50 - 75 feet. Spread 30 - 40 feet 

The spreading and drooping horizontal branches of the Ginkgo hove 
dull, green, leathery foliage which turns to a beautiful yellow in the 
autumn. The mole variety of the Ginkgo is preferred for ornamental 
plantings due to the ill-smelling green fruits dropped by the females 
in late summer. The long lived Ginkgo is rather slow growing but 
survives under almost any conditions. 

F. Quercus lourifolio darlington - Darlington Laurel Oak 
Height 60 - 80 feet. Spread 30 - 34 feet 

The Darlington Laurel Oak has lustrous, green leaves which create 
a brood, dense, round-topped crown. This oak is a rapid grower and 
makes an excellent street tree. It has the additional advantage of 
being evergreen, with small willow like leaves. 

G. Plotanus ocerifolio - London Plane Tree 
Height 50 - 100 feet. Spread 25 - 70 feet 

This tree is very similar to the sycamore and is a fine tree for city 
street plontings. The London Plone Tree is round-headed with wide 
spreading open branches. The trunk is creamy colored with mottled 
grey splotches; The large maple like leaves ore light green and 
create a very dense foliage. 





G 22 



DESIGN FEATURES 



T "T L I this new contemporary b 

^^Ij^^^^^^T^^l^J^ I f°' pedestrions are locot 

I flf/ I 11 I I II III t [_ parking to Main Street. 



"Courthouse Square" is not the only landscaped area which is provided 
within the plan. A small park-like area has also been provided adjacent 
to the municipal building which would help create a better setting (or 
contemporary building As mentioned earlier small walkways 
d within each block leading from the off-street 



At the end of Trode Street the present recreation facilities have been 
expanded to indicote a marina for the storage of local boats and a water 
front recreation area, with possibly a restaurant in conjunction with the 



-T I r 

'^ ^nf^^^ ^ [^"^^T^^ ^J I Kiosks or information 

II II taL/rt-a ll ' \_ throughout the Town, 

public. 



centers could be placed in strategic locations 
These could display notices of interest to the 




The Town for some years has been considering new lighting for Main 
Street. The Preliminary Plan proposes that the central business district 
be developed along two characteristics; 1) thot planting be developed 
so thot it will appear as a delightful town shopping area and soften the 
appearance of buildings and 2) that the traditional ond modern aspects be 
so related as to complement each other. 

If this is the recognized purpose then the Town should not consider 
putting the large mercury vapor lights which completely drown every- 
thing in light, but should attempt to select several different types of 
lights. In some areas there should be high standards so that lights 
would cover intersections, while along the sidewalks there should be 
lights at a lower level which would illuminate the sidewalks. 





23 




^ 



g: 



,aMiet«( 



.r 



APPENDIX 

CONSUMER SURVEY 
MERCHANT SURVEY 



f 




CONSUMER SURVEY 

APPENDIX A 

CONSUMER AND MERCHANT SURVEYS 

The Tarboro Planning Commission and Chamber of Commerce conducted 
a survey of people who shop in the central business district and of the 
merchants who have their stores located there. The purpose was to 
question a cross-section of the people who live in Tarboro and its 
trading area to learn their shopping habits and their opinions of the 
central business district's .effectiveness as a shopping and service 
center. These questionnaires were distributed during the Spring of 
1964, and the replies give some indication of favorable and unfavor- 
able conditions. There were 378 replies to the consumer questionnaire 
and 17 replies to the merchant questionnaire. 



Question 1 - Where do you buy most of the following items? 

Under each type of purchase, the four communities receiving the 
largest number of replies are listed. Besides Tarboro, as anticipated. 
Rocky Mount leads in nearly all categories. Convenience items such as 
food and drugs are purchased mainly in Tarboro. Fewer purchases of 
expensive, high bulk items such as automobiles and farm equipment are 
ma d e in Ta rbo ro . 

REPLIES 



Type of 






Number 




Type of 




N uir 


lb e r 


Pur cha s e 




0_f 


Replies 


Percent 


Purchase 


Of 


Re 


ip 1 i es 


GROCERIES 










FURNITURE AND 








Ta rbo ro 






305 


8 0% 


HOME FURNISHINGS 






Rocky Mount 




23 


67o 


Ta rbo r o 






256 


Wilson 






4 


1% 


Rocky Mount 






6 4 


G r e en V i 


He 







0% 


Wilson 






6 


Others 






48 


13% 


G r e en V i 1 1 e 
Others 






16 
32 



6 87c 

17% 

1% 

5% 

9% 

WEARING APPAREL HARDWARE AND AP- 

Tarboro 312 72% PLIANCES 

Rocky Mount 86 20% Tarboro 264 73% 

Wilson 8 2% RockyMount 60 17% 

Greenville 4 1% Wilson 7 2% 

Others 24 5% Greenville 2 1% 

Others 28 7% 

AUTOMOBILES FARM EQUIPMENT 

Tarboro 201 62% Tarboro 86 69% 

Rocky Mount 46 14% Rocky Mount 15 12% 

Wilson 7 2% Wilson 3 2% 

Greenville 4 1% Greenville 3 2% 



Others 


69 


21% 


Others 


18 


15% 


LUMBER AND BUILDING 












SUPPLIES 






MEDICINE AND DRUGS 






Tarboro 


217 


80% 


Tarboro 


287 


79% 


Rocky Mount 


22 


8% 


Ro cky Mount 


23 


6% 


Wilson 


4 


2% 


Wilson 


4 


1% 


G r eenv i 1 1 e 


3 


1% 


Greenville 


3 


1% 


Others 


24 


9% 


Others 
INSURANCE 


46 


13% 








Ta rbo r o 


279 


7 4% 








Ro cky Mo un t 


46 


12% 








Wilson 


6 


2% 








Greenvil le 


2 


1% 








Others 


42 


11% 



-25- 



Question 2 - Where do you visit the following people or places most? 

Services such as the hospital, bank, lawyers and repair shops are 
frequented most in Tarboro. Eating places and amusements are provided 
mostly in Rocky Mount. Only 46 percent of the replies indicated that 
persons visited Tarboro for entertainment reasons. 







REPLIES 






Type of People Number 




Typ e of Peop 1 


e Number 




Or Places Of 


Rep lies 


Percent 


Or Places 


Of Replies 


Percent 


DOCTOR 


DENTIST 




Tarboro 


302 


7 57o 


Tarbo ro 


288 


7 6% 


Rocky Mount 


46 


11% 


Rocky Mount 


45 


12% 


Wilson 


4 


1% 


Wilson 


22 


6% 


Gr eenvi lie 


9 


2% 


G r eenv i 1 1 e 


4 


1% 


Others 


43 


11% 


Others 


19 


5% 


HOSPITAL OR CLINIC 






EATING 6. DRINKING PLACES 




Ta rbo ro 


305 


80% 


Tarboro 


277 


68% 


Rocky Mount 


35 


9% 


Rocky Mount 


88 


22% 


Wilson 


6 


2% 


Wilson 


14 


3% 


Greenvil le 


7 


2% 


Gr eenvi lie 


12 


3% 


Others 


26 


7% 


Others 


18 


4% 


BANK 






ENTERTAINMENT 


PLACES 




Tarboro 


299 


82% 


Tarboro 


173 


4 6% 


Rocky Mount 


20 


5% 


Rocky Mount 


121 


3 2% 


Wilson 


5 


1% 


Wilson 


38 


10% 


Gr eenv i 1 1 e 


3 


1% 


Gr eenvi lie 


22 


6% 


Others 


41 


11% 


Others 


22 


6% 


LAWYER 






REPAIR SHOPS 






Tarboro 


213 


8 5% 


Tarboro 


267 


80% 


Rocky Mount 


18 


7% 


Rocky Mount 


45 


10% 


Wilson 


2 


1% 


Wilson 


5 


2% 


Greenvil le 


1 


1% 


Gr eenv i 1 1 e 


1 


1% 


Others 


17 


6% 


Others 


22 


7% 



-26- 



Question 3 



Do you live in Tarboro? 



Yes 

No 



Number o f 
Rep lies 

260 
118 



Percent of 
Total 

68% 
3 2% 



If you do not live in Tarboro, write the name of the community in which 
you live. 

REPLIES 



Commun i t y 

Ro cky Mo unt 

Wilson 

Gr eenvi lie 

Others 



Number of Replies 

18 

1 


90 



Percent of Iota I 

16% 

1% 

0% 
83% 



How many miles is this from Tarboro? 

REPLIES 



Distance 

Und er 5 miles 
5 to 10 miles 
10 to 15 miles 
15 to 20 miles 
Ove r 20 miles 



Number of Replies 

25 
25 
40 
12 



Percent of To ta 1 

23% 
23% 
3 6% 
11% 
7% 



The majority or 68 percent of the persons filling out the question- 
naires lived in Tarboro. As shown above, the largest number or about 
83 percent of those not living in Tarboro came from communities scatter- 
ed throughout Edgecombe and the surrounding counties. The majority of 
the persons included in this 83 percent came mainly from Bethel, Conetoe, 
Fountain, Macclesfield, Pinetops, Speight Forest, and surrounding rural 
areas. One person indicated he lived in Scotland Neck and two persons 
Indicated Rob er t sonv i 1 1 e . There were 19 other communities excluding 
Rocky Mount and Wilson from which 27 persons came. 

The third and final part of the question deals with the actual 
mileage or distance between these communities and Tarboro. There were 
110 replies to this portion of the question out of a possible 118. 
About half of these persons stated that they lived within 10 miles of 
Tarboro and 83 percent indicated they lived within 20 miles. 

Question 4 - How often do you come to downtown Tarboro? 

The greatest number of replies indicated they made daily visits to 
Tarboro probably because they worked there. Only 13 percent or 49 replies 
showed less frequent visits to Tarboro. No response indicated visits to 
Tarboro only several times a year. 



Frequency of Visits 

Daily 

2 or 3 times a week 

Once a week 

One e a mon t h 

Several times a year 

This is the first time 





REPLIES 






N 


umb er 


of Re 


Pl 


ies 






329 










31 










15 










3 





























Percent of Tota I 

8 7% 
8% 
4% 
1% 
0% 
0% 



Question 5 - How many years have you come to shop in downtown Tarboro? 

The majority or about 63 percent of the 378 replies have been 
shopping in Tarboro for ten years or longer, while 138 persons have 
shopped for either 5-10 years, 1-4 years, or 1 or less years. 



Number of Years 

10 years or longer 

5- 10 yea r s 

1-4 years 

1 or less years 



REPLIES 

Number of Replies 

232 

68 

53 

17 



Percent of Total 

63% 

18% 

14% 

5% 



Question 6 - Approximately what percentage of your total shoppin; 
spending, not counting groceries, do you consider that you do in 
Tarboro ? 



REPLIES 

Percentage of Shopping Spending Number of Replies 
Less than 25 percent 54 

Between 20 & 60 percent 118 

Over 60 percent 196 



Percent of Total 
15% 
3 2% 
53% 



Over half or 53 percent of the 368 responses to this question 
designated the respondents purchase over 60 percent of all their shop- 
ping goods except groceries in Tarboro. Thirty-two percent spend 
between 20 and 60 percent of their total shopping spending in Tarboro, 
Only 15 percent spend less than 25 percent of their shopping income 
in downtown Tarboro. 

Question 7 - Can you usually find the merchandise you need or are 
looking for? 



Number of Replies Percent of Total 



Yes 

No 



289 

75 



7 9% 
21% 



Of the 364 replies to this question, 289 or 79 percent of the 
respondents stated that they could find the merchandise they were 
s eek ing . 



Question 8 - How do you rate downtown stores with regard 

REPLIES 
Number of Replies 



WINDOW DISPLAYS 
Exce 1 1 ent 
Good 
Fair 
Poor 
No Op in io n 

STORE FRONTS 
Excellent 
Good 
Fa ir 
Poor 
No Op in ion 



18 

181 

135 

25 

15 



5 

116 

181 

64 

11 



5% 

48% 

3 6% 

7% 

4% 



1% 
31% 
48% 
17% 

3% 



-28- 



10 


3% 


175 


4 7% 


145 


3 9 7. 


29 


87o 


12 


3% 


1 


1% 


29 


87o 


79 


2 27o 


165 


4 67o 


82 


237o 



How do you rate stores from the standpoint of: 

Number of Replies Percent 

CLEAN, WELL LIGHTED INTERIORS 
Excellent 
Good 
Fair 
Poor 
No Opinion 

RESTROOM FACILITIES 
Exce 1 1 en t 
Good 
Fair 
Poor 
No Op in ion 

How do you rate sales personnel? 

COURTEOUS AND HELPFUL 
Excellent 
Good 
Fair 
Poo r 
No Opinion 

PERSONAL APPEARANCE 
Excellent 
Good 
Fair 
Poo r 
No Opinion 

KNOWLEDGE OF PRODUCTS 
Excellent 
Good 
Fair 
Poor 
No Opinion 

QUALITY OF MERCHANDISE 
Excellent 
Good 
Fair 
Poor 
No Op in ion 

SELECTION OR VARIETY OF MERCHANDISE 
Excel lent 
Good 
Fair 
Poo r 
No Opinion 



69 

208 

79 

12 

6 



47 
244 

67 
4 
7 



30 
187 
113 

30 
6 



30 

219 

89 

1 1 



15 
147 
129 

52 
6 



187o 

5 67, 

21% 

3% 

2% 



13% 

6 6% 

18% 

1% 

2% 



8% 

51% 

3 1% 

8% 

2% 



8% 

62% 

2 5% 

3% 

2% 



5% 
42% 
3 7% 
15% 

1% 



Only 7 percent rated downtown Tarboro stores, personnel, and 
merchandise as excellent. On the other hand, just 12 percent rated 
them as being poor and 4 percent had no opinion. The majority of 
the replies rated the downtown stores as "good" in regard to window 
displays, store fronts, clean, well lighted interiors, rest room 
facilities; the sales personnel as courteous and helpful, their per- 
sonal appearance or knowledge of products; and merchandise, both in 
quality and variety. Approximately 30 percent feel conditions are 
only "fair". 
-29- 



Question 9 - Of the improvements listed below which do you think 
should be incorporated in downtown? 

REPLIES 

Type of Improvement Number of Replies Percent 

More Parking 313 82.8% 

Improve Store Fronts 181 47.9% 

Provide Public Restrooms 177 46.8% 

Stores Open One Night 143 3 7.8% 

Pedestrian Mall 123 32.5% 

Covered Sidewalks 82 21.7% 

Shrubs Planted 45 11.9% 

Trees Planted 27 7.1% 

The majority of respondents checked those items with which 
they had experience with, parking being the almost unanimous choice. 
Improving store fronts, providing public restrooms, keeping the stores 
open one night, and having a pedestrian mall are the other improvements 
most frequently requested in that order. There was only limited inter- 
est in covered sidewalks, and planting shrubs and trees. This may be 
because they are unfamiliar with them in a downtown area and because 
they provide some of the more intangible values. 

Question 10 - Considering traffic congestion, your ability to find a 
parking place, the appearance of stores and the selection of merchan- 
dise in downtown Tarboro stores, what suggestions do you have for im- 
proving downtown Tarboro? 

Response to this question was very enthusiastic. Every possible 
kind of community improvement was indicated. In many instances, re- 
spondents took time to write a full page of comment concerning their 
thoughts and feelings about Tarboro. Many suggestions were indicated 
by more than one person. 

REPLIES 

Suggested Improvement Number of Replies 

Adequate Parking 54 

More Specialty Stores 55 

Downtown Cafeteria 49 

Modernize Downtown Stores 19 

More Recreational Facilities 19 

More Variety in Merchandise 19 

Occupancy of Vacant Stores 16 

Decrease in Loitering 14 

Clean up River Bridge Area and Put Up Lights 13 

Repair Sidewalks 12 

Downtown Grocery Store 11 

More Courteous Store Personnel 11 

Downtown Medical Doctor 7 

Better Quality of Merchandise 4 

Installation of Parking Meters 4 

Rerouting of Traffic Around Tarboro's CBD 4 

Lower Store Rent 3 

Downtown Dentist 2 

More Advertising 2 

Branch Post Office in North Tarboro 1 

Establishment of YMCA and/or YWCA 1 

Downtown Mortician 1 

No Op in ion 19 5 

Total 515 

-30- 



Some of the other suggestions of interest are as follows: 

Reduce the price of gas to 31. 9<; per gallon. - 

Use the Henry Ford idea, "find out what the people want and give it 
to them . " 

Better traffic control from city limits to city limits on Main Street. 

Better zoning for off-street parking. 

Continual planning to prepare for the forecasted 25% increase in vehi- 
cles in operation predicted by 1975- 

Change the name of Main Street back to the original name, that of St. 
George Street. 

Renovate from end to end or rebuilt it, especially the old "jottem 
down" type stores like those on Lum and Abner shows. 

Do something to Albemarle Avenue. 

Put a traffic light at the intersection of Wilson and Albemarle Streets 

Everyone should smile and speak when meeting another person on the 
street, whether they know them or not. 

A sign erected to welcome visitors and customers to Tarboro, 

Lower the prices of merchandise to compete with Raleigh and other 
places in eastern North Carolina. 

Washthewindowsinvacant stores. 

Provide restrooms for negroes. 

Establish book and music stores- 
No parking on Main Street. 

Arrange store counters so that they are not as close together. 

Implement city improvements by dealing with the "tight-fisted money 
bags in Tarboro." 

The words of one of the respondents summarizes the results of 
the Tarboro Consumer Survey. "These are not criticisms that are 
written here, only suggestions for improvement. Every town can al- 
ways stand improvement, just like people." 



-31. 



MERCHANT SURVEY „ . 

Results of the Merchant Questionnaire 

In addition to the use of a questionnaire to measure the con- 
sumers' opinion of downtown Tarboro, the Tarboro Plan-ang Board dis- 
tributed questionnaires prepared by the Division of Community Plan- 
ning to gauge the opinions of the merchants 

Question 1 - Do you own or lease your present business area? 

Number of Replies Percent of Total 



Own their building 



2 1 1 7o 



Leasetheirbuilding 15 897,, 

Question 2 - Estimate the approximate percentage of your total dollar 
receipts in 1963 received from customers living: 

Percent of Dollar Sales 

Within the Tarboro City Limits 57% 

Outside Tarboro but within Edge- 
combe County 33% 
Outside of Edgecombe County 



10% 



After averaging the percentages listed in each category by the 
merchants, the results showed an estimated 57 percent of the total 
dollar receipts received by the downtown Tarboro merchants came from 
within the Tarboro city limits, while 33 percent came from an area 
outside Tarboro but within Edgecombe County. Only 10 percent of the 
merchants' total dollar receipts were received from consumers outside 
of Edgecombe County. 

Question 3 - Number of employees working in store or office (includ- 
ing owner, clerks, salesmen, etc.) 

One hundred eighty-five employees worked in the 17 stores includ- 
ed in the survey . 

Question 4 ~ How many of these employees regularly drive a car to work? 

Ninety-four employees drove a car to work, or 51 percent of the 
total employedt. 

Question 5 - How many off-street parking spaces do you provide for? 

Owner and Employees 8 4 
Customers 103 

The 11 merchants responding to this question, 6 short of the num- 
ber answering questions 3 and 4, indicated they provide 84 off-street 
parking spaces for themselves and their employees and 103 spaces for 
their customers. 

If we assume the 6 merchants now answering this question do not 
provide any spaces, 10 of their employees automatically do not have 
off-street parking spaces which means some of these people will proba- 
bly park on Main Street, thus, contributing to the parking problem. 
One consumer stated, "it is very discouraging to drive down the street 
looking for a place to park and see someone run out of a store and 
either move a car upward or backward to hide the policeman's chalk 
mark." The same person even went so far as to say, "there would be no 
parking problem if the merchants and clerks would stop parking in front 
of their stores." Although this is an oversimplification of the park- 
ing situation in downtown Tarboro, it does indicate that the merchants 
should make available more off-street parking space for their employ- 
ees so that customers could more readily find a parking place- 



Question 6 - Do you feel that the present supply of parking spaces in 
the downtown area is adequate for present needs? Yes 1 No 1 6 

Only one of the merchants felt that there was currently suffi- 
cient parking space in the downtown area. The remainder, 16, stressed 
the need for more parking. 

Question 7 - How can parking be improved? 

There were 9 replies to this question. They are summarized as 
foil ows : 

1) More off-street parking and better control of the present parking 
spaces ; 

2) Installation of parking meters and establishment of municipal park- 
ing lots; 

3) Prevention of merchants, clerks^ lawyers, bankers, doctors, etc, 
from using controlled parking space all day; 

4) One hour parking on Main Street and for an additional two blocks 
on either side of Main Street. 

Question 8 - How much floor space do you presently occupy? 7 5,154 
s quar e feet. 

There were 16 replies to this question. A total of 75,154 square 
feet is the expanse of floor area occupied by the Tarboro merchants 
answering this question. 

Question 9 - Does your business have any plans for expansion within the 
next two years to five years? 

Yes 5 No 9 



How much additional floor space will you build? 28,500 square 
f eet . 

How many additional employees will you employ? 1 8 

Of the 14 replies to this question, five plan to build additional 
floor space, an estimated total of 28,500 square feet. This is an in- 
crease of approximately 35 percent. 

Question 10 - Would you be willing to contribute financially (in propor- 
tion to your direct benefit) to provide off-street parking for customers 
in downtown Tarboro? 

Number of Replies Percent of Total 

Yes 6 43 7o 

No 8 5 7% 

Question 11 - Would you be willing to form a special assessment district 
to provide off -street parking? 

Number of Replies Percent of Total 

Yes 7 587o 

No 5 427o 



■ 33- 



Question 12 - Who do you feel should provide off-street parking facil- 
ities? 

The City J_2 

Private Enterprise i.e., business establishments 6 

Merchant Cooperative Corporation 3 

Organization of a downtown assessment district 4 

There were 25 answers to this question. Many of the merchants 
felt that there were several methods of solving the parking problem. 
Twelve or 48 percent of the merchants indicated the city should 
provide off-street parking facilities whereas the remainder or 52 
percent Indicated either private enterprise, 6 merchant cooperation 
corporation, 3 or a downtown assessment district, 4. 

In questions 10, 11, and 12, there appears to be a genuine 
interest and willingness on the part of over half of the downtown 
Tarboro merchants participating to provide off-street parking facil- 
ities for their customers. 

Question 13 - Has the development of new shopping centers In the 
suburbs of Tarboro had an adverse effect on your business? 



Number of Replies 



Percent of Total 



Yes 

No 



4 
11 



26 
74 



Perhaps other shopping centers have not affected Tarboro mer- 
chants to a great extent yet, but with several of the consumers 
stating, "it's almost impossible to find a parking place, and when 
you do, one hour parking certainly does not allow enough time to 
shop, I had rather go to shop elsewhere than have to move my car 
every hour , " 

Question 14 - If you were establishing a business for the first 
time, would you locate where you are presently located? 

Number of Replies Percent of Total 



Yes 

No 



1 1 

4 



74 
26 



)uestlon 15 - When you do expand, will you do so: 

Number of Replies Percent of Total 



On the present site 

Downtown 

Community shopping center 

in Ta r bo ro 
Other 



29.4 
23 . 5 



5.9 
17.6 



There were 13 replies to this question, Nine or 69 percent 
Indicated they would either locate on their present site or on 
another lot downtown. 



Question 16 - Major problems that confront Tarboro's Centr.il Business 
District now. Check in the box to the right if you consider the factor 
a major problem. 



Lack of a full variety and 

selection of goods. 
Inadequate customer facilities 

such as restrooms, lounges, 

lunch counters, etc. 
Store appearance and facilities 

generally out of date and un~ 

appeal ing . 
Inconvenient opening and closing 

hours. 
Lack of effective leadership. 
Absentee ownership 
Uncooperative city government. 
Inadequate street lighting. 



Number of Replies Percent of Total 
4 23 .5 

6 35.3 



23 .5 
11 o8 
17.7 



There were 29 replies to this question. The majority felt that 
store appearance and facilities generally out of date and unappealinj 
contributed to the downtown area's problem^ 

Question 17 - Indicate what actions should be taken in downtown Tar- 
boro to best meet the needs of present and potential customers. 

Only 9 persons answered this question. The suggestions are as 
foil ows : 

1) A better merchant organization and more cooperation; 

2) More off-street parking; 

3) Installation of parking meters; 

4) Plant trees and shrubs; 

5) Use attractive garbage cans; 

6) Provision of public restrooms and restaurants for 

customers and visitors; 

7) Decrease loitering on Main Street; 

8) Have same opening and closing hours by all merchants; 

9) Occupy empty stores; 

10) Modernize old buildings; 

11) Enlarge selection of merchandise and have competitive 

prices to keep shopper in Tarboro; etc. 



Question 18 ~ Please indicate below your judgement or the major pro- 
blems that confront Tarboro's downtown shopping area. Check those 
factors you consider a major consideration. 



Numb er of Replies Percent of Total 



Physical deterioration of down- 
town buildings. 

Inadequate number of off-street 
parking spaces. 

Congested downtown streets. 

Congested street leading to down- 
town . 

Poor appearance of downtown build- 
ings and streets. 



16 
7 



7 0.6% 



9 4,1% 
41 .2% 



3 5.3% 

4 7.1% 



Similar to comments listed throughout both the consumer and 
merchants surveys, an inadequate number of off-street parking spaces 
were again indicated by 16 merchants, almost 100 percent, as the 
major problem confronting Tarboro's Central Business District. Next 
in order of frequency mentioned were the physical deterioration of 
downtown buildings and the poor appearance of downtown buildings and 
streets. Finally, traffic congestion in both downtown streets and 
streets leading to downtown was shown to present a major problem by 
13 me r chant s . 



It is to be noted that questions 16, 17, and 18, in the merchants 
opinion questionnaire have answers which correspond very closely to 
those dealing with similar aspects in the consumers' ques t ionnar ie , 
questions 8, 8, and 10. The correlation in replies of both the mer- 
chants and consumers indicated that there is a general consensus of 
opinion on the major problems confronting Tarboro's Central Business 
District. The following appear to be the major concerns: 

1) Inadequate number of off-street parking spaces; 

2) Store appearance and facilities generally out of date and un- 
app ea 1 ing ; 

3) Inadequate customer facilities such as restrooms, lounges, 
lunch counters, etc.; 

4) Lack of a full variety and selection of goods; 

5) Inconvenient opening and closing hours by the stores; 

6) Traffic congestion on downtown streets and streets leading 
to down town . 



-36- 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



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