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Full text of "The Tate Gallery (The National Gallery of British Art)"

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IE YEOMAN OF THE GUARD. 



Sir J. E. Millais, Bart., PR. A. 




A portrait of John Charles ^^^^^^^J^S^ 

iGtb Lancers, was in i$47 appointed a Beet tater. r<ui 



THE GREAT GALLERIES OF EUROPE 
THE 

Tate gallery 

[THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF BRITISH ART] 



H. M. CALDWELL CO. 

Publishers 
Boston New York 



Uniform ivith this Work 

THE NATIONAL GALLERY 
THE LOUVRE 
THE LUXEMBOURG 



Stack 
Annex 



THE TATE GALLERY 

In 1842 Sir Francis Chant rev, the cele- 
brated sculptor, bequeathed the reversion of 
his estate to the Royal Academy for the 
purchase of works of British art, in his will 
expressing the " confident expectation " 
that when the collection became of sufficient 
importance the government would provide 
a suitable building. The bequest became 
effective in 1876 and the collection of works 
of British art increased yearly but the gov- 
ernment made no sign of fulfilling Chan- 
trey's expectations. Some of the pictures 
were temporarily hung in the South Ken- 
sington Museum and others were sent on a 
tour of the Provinces. In the meantime the 
National Gallery became more and more 
over-crowded but a separate building for 
British works of art. found no practical 



1546120 



THE TATE GALLERY 

favour m the eves of the government. In 
1890 Mr. Henry Tate (knighted on the 
Queen's birthday, 1898), a well-known sugar 
refiner of Liverpool and London, wrote to 
the Chancellor of the Exchequer offering not 
less than fifty-seven of his pictures by Brit- 
ish artists under the condition that the col- 
lection should be kept intact and placed 
under a separate administration. On the 
one hand the government objected to these 
conditions, and Tate objected to the works of 
art being housed in the " East and West 
Galleries " of the South Kensington Mu- 
seum. A long newspaper discussion ensued, 
when finally an anonymous correspondent, 
later proving to be Tate himself, offered 
£80,000 to build a gallery if the government 
would provide a suitable site. No agreement 
to a site could be reached and the matter 
gradually seemed to die out. Two years 
later when a new government came in Sir 
William Harcourt and Tate in a half hour 
conference decided on Millbank, where now 



THE TATE GALLERY 

stands the National Gallery of British Art, 
but in popular parlance it will probably 
always be called the Tate Gallery. Mr. 
Tate agreed to erect his own building and it 
was decided the management should be in 
the hands of the trustees of the National 
Gallery. The foundations were laid in Sep- 
tember, 1893, and the building was formally 
handed over to the government and declared 
open by the Prince of Wales on the twenty- 
first of July, 1897. The actual opening to 
the public, however, took place a few weeks 
later. 

The building designed by Sidney R. J. 
Smith is described by him as being " in a free 
classic style, with a Greek feeling in the 
mouldings and ornaments." The chief fea- 
ture of the front elevation is the lofty cen- 
tral portion with a portico of six Corinthian 
columns with pediment and at the extreme 
ends of the portico two pavilions. A figure 
of Britannia surmounts the main pediment, 
with a lion and unicorn on either side. The 



THE TATE GALLERY 

original cost of the building was £105,000 

and in 1899 the building was enlarged. 
Upon the base of one of the columns is en- 
graved the following: "This gallery and 
sixty-five pictures were presented to the na- 
tion by Henry Tate for the encouragement 
and development of British art and as a 
thanks offering for a prosperous business 
career of sixty years." 

The works of art in the Tate Gallery are 
from four sources. First, Tate's own collec- 
tion so judiciously chosen that from the re- 
fusal of sixty-six offered to the government 
sixty-one pictures were accepted. Later 
four more were added by Tate, making his 
total gift sixty-five. He also presented a 
few pieces of sculpture. With two or three 
exceptions these pictures are by living or 
recently deceased British artists, his favour- 
ites being Millais, Hook, Briton Riviere, 
Orchardson, and Waterhouse, these five 
numbering one-third of the whole Tate col- 
lection. Second, the Chantrey collection, the 



THE TATE GALLERY 

pictures purchased by the Royal Academy 
under the terms of the Chantrey bequest. 
From 1877, the year after the bequest became 
operative, the council of the Academy has 
in each year added some works of art to the 
collection. By the terms of the bequest the 
annual income of the £90,000 estate may 
not accumulate for more than five years and 
the pictures purchased shall be by artists 
who have " actually resided in Great Britain 
during the execution and completion " of 
the work. There are over sixty-two artists 
represented in the Chantrey collection, the 
average cost per picture being £615. Third, 
seventeen pictures by G. F. Watts, R. A., 
presented by him to the nation. Fourth, 
pictures loaned from the National Gallery, 
the general principle being that the works 
of all British artists born later than 1790 
are transferred to the Tate Gallery. Be- 
sides these four main sources there have been 
many gifts by private persons following the 
generous action of Sir Henry Tate. 



TATE GALLERY. 



INDEX TO ARTISTS. 





?AGE 


BONHEUR, ROSA 


.. 4 6 


BRAMLEY, F., A.R.A. 


.. 26 


BROWN, FORD MADOX 


21 


BURNE-JONES,Sir E. 


•• 7 


CALDERON, P. H., R.A. 


.. 55 


CLAUSEN, G., A.R.A. .. 


.. 61 


CROME, JOHN 


.. 54 


DAVIS, H. W. B., R.A. 


.. 29 


DYCE, W., R.A. 


32, 52 


DYCKMANS, J. L. 


■■ 5i 


EASTLAKE, Sir C. L., P.R. 


A. if, 


EGG, A. L., R.A. 


•• 49 


ETTY, W., R.A 


.. 60 


FAED, T., R.A 


•• 3i 


HERKOMER, H. von, R.A. 


12 


HUNTER, COLIN, A.R.A. 


.. 28 


LANDSEER, Sir E. 




43. 44, 45 


62, 63 


LAWSON, CECIL 


•• 37 


LEIGHTON, LORD, P.R.A. 


6 


LESLIE, C. R., R.A. .. 


.. 42 


LEWIS, J. F., R.A. 


.. 50 


LINNELL, J 


.. 18 


MACLISE, D., R.A. ' . . 


.. 48 


MacWHIRTER, J. R.A. 


•• 13 



PAGE 

MASON, G. H., A.R.A. .. 41 

MERRITT, ANNA LEA . . 30 

MILLAIS, Sir J. E., P.R.A. 

Frontispiece, 9, 22, 27, 39, 43 
MULLER, W. J. .. .'.19 

MULREADY. W., R.A. . . 59 



ORCHARDSON, W. Q., R.A. 20 

PARSONS, ALFRED, A.R.A. . . 58 

•• 57 

. . 14 



j PETTIE, J., R.A. 
I PHILLIP, J., R.A. 

! ROSSETTI, D. G. 



SADLER, W. DENDY.. 
SARGENT, J. S., R.A... 8 

STANFIELD, W. CLARKSON, 

R.A 

STONE, MARCUS, R.A. 
SWAN, J. M., R.A 



TURNER, J. M. W., R.A. 40, 53 



WALKER, F., A.R.A. .. 
WALLIS, HENRY 
WARD, E. M., R.A. . . 
WATTS, G. F., O.M., R.A. 
WEBSTER, T., R.A. .. 
WHISTLER, J. McNEIL 
WYLLIE, W. L., R.A. 

YE AMES, W. F., R.A... 



THE BATH OF PSYCHE. 

LEIGHTON, PR A 




" I.ik< a nymph to the bath addi 
Which unveiled the depth <>i her glowing breast, 
Till, fold after fold, to the fainting air 

lay bare." 



KING COPHETUA AND THE BEGGAR MAID. 

Sir E. Burne-Jones, Bart. 




For thou,' quoth he, ' shall be my wife, 
And honoured for my Queen.' " 



ELLEN TERRY AS 
" LADY MACBETH." 


John S. Sargent, R.A. 






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Painted in 



THE KNIGHT-ERRANT. 



Sir John E. Millais, Bart., P.R.a. 




The distressful maiden has been despitefully used by robbers, who have 
been dispersed by the gallant knight. Some of them can be seen in the 
right distance. This is the only nude female figure painted by the artist. 



BEATA BEATRIX. 



Dante Gabriel Rossetti. 




dream lovi ol Dant( . In the right distance is Dante, and 
< h looking at th<- other. A bird, 
with a poppy in its mouth symbol ol di ath flies into the lap of I ■ 



CARNATION. LILY, LILY, ROSE. 



John S. Sargent, R.A. 




garden or lilies, carnations, and roses, the two children illumine the 
fading day with the light of gaily coloured Chinese lanterns. 



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THE PRISON WINDOW. 



John Phillip, R.A. 




>t human nature in Spanish costume. " Stone walls do not 
a prisoo make" lor the natural affections and passions, even of a 

'1 criminal. 



THE SPIRIT OF CHRISTIANITY 



G. F. Watts, O.M., R.A 
■ 




The artist dedicated this work to " All the Churches." 

Under the ample robes of Christianity there is room for all 

the children of the world to dwell in peace and unity. 



ESCAPE OF THE CARRARA FAMILY FROM THE 

PURSUIT OF THE DUKE OF MILAN, 1389. Sir C. L. Eastlake, P.R.A. 




Francesco Novello di Carrara, last Lord of Padua, having heard of the Duke of 

Milan's intention to kill him, fled across the mountains to Monaco. His 

pursuers are in sight in the valley below. 



16 



AMY ROBSART. 



W. F. Yeames, R.A. 




Married to Sir Robert Dudley, Amy Robsart met a mysterious 
death at Cumnor Hall, near Oxford. She was found dead at the 
foot of a staircase. The incident is incorporated in Scott's 
" Kenilworth." 



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IL-Y-EN A TOUJOUR^ 
UN AUTRE. 



Mahcus Stone. R. a. 




"A Prior Attachment," the title under 

which this picture was engraved, at once 

explains the despondency of the present 

suitor. 



ECCE ANCILLA DOMINI." Dante Gabriel Rossetti. 




The Annunciation. After the Angel Gabriel had delivered 

his message, Mary replied, " Behold the handmaid of the 

Lord ; be it unto me according to thy word ! " 



rra 




LOVE LOCKED OUT. 



Anna Lea Merhitt. 




Love vainly knocks for admittance at the door of Gold. 

The lock is effectually turned against him. All delights 

- typified by the scattered roses -hive been discarded 

by the owner of this gold-gated heart. 



30 



THE SILKEN GOWN. 



Thomas Faed, R.A. 




"And ye sail walk in silk attire 
And siller ha'e to spare, 
Gin vi n consent to be his bride, 
Nor ilunk <ii I ton aid mair." 



"Oh ! wha would buy a silken gown, 
Wi' a puir broken heart ? 
( )r what's to me a sill< r crown, 
Gin frae my love I part ? " 



31 



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UNCLE TOBY AND WIDOW W/»DMAN 
IN THE SENTRY BOX. 



C. R. Leslie, R A. 




" 'I protest, madam,' said my Uncle Toby, 'I can see nothing 
whatever in your eye.' 'It is not in th<- white,' said Mrs. Wadman. 
My Uncle Toby iooked with might and main into the pupil." 
— Trktram Shandy 



AN EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT. 

Sir E. Landseer, R.A. and Sir J. E. Millais, Bart., PR. A. 




Commenced by Landseer as a portrait of Queen Victoria : he only painted 

the horse and the background. Millais completed it, and called it 

' Nell Gwyn." 



43 



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THE COURTYARD OF THE 

COPTIC PATRIARCHS HOUSE IN CAIRO. 



J. F. Lewis, R.A 




A characteristic Orient.: 



•pt that the female figures are not veiled; 



the house is tli.it <>t a Christian. 



50 



THE BLIND BEGGAR. 



J. L. Dyckmans. 




Painted at Antwerp in 1858, in which city the artist was born, lived, 
and worked. 




ss 




56 




5* 



"YOUTH ON THE PROW, AND 
PLEASURE AT THE HELM." 



William Etty, R.A. 




An illustration of Gray's lines in " The Bard " — 

" The giddy occupants of the gilded vessel go on their way 
Unmindful of the sweeping whirlwind's sway, 
That, hushed in grim repose, expects his evening prey." 

60 



THE GIRL AT THE GATE. 



George Clausen, A.R.A. 




Merely a peasant girl in form and surroundings, but with an expression 
suggestive of unutterable yearnings after some great " ideal." 



Sir Edwin Landsier, R A 




ound pampered, favoured, fortunate 



LOW LIFE. 



Sir Edwin LandSEer, R.A, 




A common tvpe of bull-dog, whose surroundings complete the contrast 
to the subject of the companion picture. 



OLD BATTERSEA BRIDGE. 



J McNeil Whistler. 





.4 



The "Id wooden bridge which oxisted until 1800. 



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