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1926 

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Alabama College 



MONTE.VALLO ALABAMA 







1 



When the years have rolled on to the fifties, and 

the College has changed with the times; 
And the maidenly curls which were once worn 

by girls, have been clipped for the masculine 

lines; 
We shall tremble, — and faith, we shall need to 

— when our men of long, long ago. 
Steal a glimpse in their dorin, while they are 

learning to sew. 



II 

And those who teach shall be happy, in their 
beds, — a broadcaster near. 

For their courses are offered to all those stu- 
dents tuning in, my dear! 

And football heroes! Scores of them! Mad- 
eline, Lucy and Jane; 

\\ hue the pretty, ruffled men their racquets 
wield in a graceful "love" game. 





Ill 



And the heart of a maid shall be braver, and the 
style in her dress transformed; 

Absent the frills and flares of today — in a cos- 
tume for service adorned. 

Men inherit — and pray why should we care! — 
our frilly things of laces and nets; 

And at their afternoon teas, we see poodles, 
fietsf 



IV 



So only the men shall wear ruffles, and even 

shall they be prim ; 
Nor shall any girl have a care — except wooing 

and winning her him; 
And each for the joy of seeking and finding her 

own fair Jim, 
Shall do these things as she sees fit, for our day 

lies mistily dim ! 





UUe need not span some fifty years to 
find a fulfilled dream of womanhood 
in its zenith which will come through 
capability and the realization of femi- 
nine power — but even today, in the 
prime of Woman as a leader we boast 
a noble personage whose presence radi- 
ates a warmth of ambition which en- 
tyndles us with, 

^opes not fears, 
Of future years. 

c%ui as our cup of love to her We 
honor this volume of the ^echnala by 
its dedication, 





/f CAMPUS 



THE CLASSES 



ORGANIZATIONS 



ATHLETICS 



FEATURES 




Jn iMmnriam 




E, the students and faculty of Alabama College, feel a great loss 
in the passing of Dr. Palmer. We knew him as a man of a lov- 
ing nature, kind to his immediate and to his college family, a true 
friend, a loyal citizen. "Good Cheer" was his motto on the campus 
where we were all encouraged by his smile and kindly words. So much 
did he sympathize with us even in our trivial worries as well as our 
larger ones, we failed to realize that he might have worries of his own. 
We look back now and see his schemes and plans for the upbuilding of 
our college — plans which sometimes to him must have looked like failure 
but which for us grew into better buildings, better equipment, better col- 
lege spirit, and bigger opportunities. When he first came to Alabama 
Girls Industrial School, he found it an unknown, unimportant, meagerlv 
equipped school — a none too well organized high school, like a rough 
and rustic girl, no opportunities, no bright future. He left Alabama 
College a four-year college, a member of the Southern Association, proud 
of her position among other colleges. The rustic girl grown into cultured 
womanhood with wisdom in her countenance faces the future with a sure 
and stately step because she follows a great leader. 

In these beautiful buildings on our campus. Dr. Palmer has left 
a monument which will endure and grow through many student genera- 
tions, and he has left a yet greater though more transient monument in 
all the young women who have entered Alabama College since 1907. 

We admired him for his abilities as an educator and executive; we 
esteemed him for his place in the community, church and state, and we 
loved him for his understanding heart and his fatherliness. 




DR. THOMAS WAVERLY PALMER 



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Our Debt to Mrs. Palmer 



Alabama College owes much to Mrs. Palmer. As wife of our President she has contributed in 
largo measure to the success of his undertaking's. In assuming' the major responsibility for the 
immediate family interests, in her ever ready graciousness toward the guests of the institution, in 
her constant watchfulness of Dr. Palmer's welfare, she has proven herself a helpmate in truth. 

Those of us who live on the campus and in Montevallo know how faithfully she has labored for 
the beautification of the campus. The many lovely and some rare plants and trees are a memorial 
to her thought of us. 

Too, Mrs. Palmer's interest in the education of women, and her ambition for the growth of the 
college have combined to keep her alert at all times for its well being. No one has ever been eon- 
neeted with the institution who has been more jealous of its good name, more eager for its advance- 
ment, more ready to work to help it come into its own, more concerned for the development of the 
students into true gentlewomen than Mrs, Palmer has been. Of dynamic temperament, of an unusual 
unci; (standing — a sort of clairvoyant vision — she has been able to detect tendencies often before the 
test! clear visioned would seo them. 

Sn much has been done, what has been done has been done so well; so firm are we fixed because of 
the sensible, sure and lone-visioned policy of Dr. Palmer, that we trust we may keep for all time 
Lhe love and helpful thought of his family. Our debt is a permanent one. We hope their affection for 
us will bu lasting. 




^he Qampus 



In the dim and distant future. 
When the campus you would cross. 
You will not go walking, running. 
But in subways or in airships, 

r brave descendants 
ur Campus 
11 its lore. 






'Wliere the cam has lies in sunshine or in shadow." 






^he (glasses 



In the dim and distant future 
When the Classes you explore, 





Robbie Andrews, A.B. 

FLORALA, ALA. 

Entered 1922; T. W. C A. Cabinet, 1922-23-2 4- 
25-26; President Y. W. C. A. Summer School, 
1924; Assistant Librarian. 1923-24-25-26; Presi- 
dent Student Government Association Summer 
School, 1924-25; Treasurer Senior Class, 1925-26; 
Vice-President League of Women Voters, 1924- 
25; Secretary Student Senate, 1925-26; Honor 
Roll, 1923-24-25-26. 

Surely Robbie must have kept the saying 
"Knowledge is Power" constantly before her 
for she has the knowledge and she is, in truth, 
a power here. She is earnest, thoughtful, de- 
pendable, capable, a live wire in student activ- 
ities; — in fact, she is everything it takes to 
make an ideal college citizen. To say that 
Alabama College will miss her is not enough 

■what will it do without her? 



Hazel Black, A.B, $JI 

ASHLAND, ALA. 

Entered 1923; Dramatic Club, 1923-24-25-26; Or- 
chestra, 1923-24-25-26; Scribbler's Club, 1924-25- 
26; Secretary Student Government, 1923; Secre- 
tary Y. W. C. A. Summer. 1924; Chairman 
Music and Social Committee Y. W. C. A. Summer 
1924; Executive Board Summer 1924: President 
Dramatic Club, 1924-25; Critic Scribbler's Club, 
1924-25; Philodendroi Reporter to Alabamian, 
1923-24: Assistant Business Manager Teehnala, 
1924-25; President's Council, 1924-25-26; College 
Night Leader, 1925; President Baptist Student 
Union, 1924-25; Forum, 1925-26; President Stu- 
dent Senate, 25-26. 

For three years Hazel's red head has been 
a shining light on our campus — in club work, 
in dramatics, and in every kind of work that 
she was asked to do. But she will be remem- 
bered longest at Alabama College for her 
bravery in taking the presidency and making 
a success of the Student Senate in its initial 
year. 

So here's to-you, Hazel, brave and beloved, 
red-headed, OCR PresideffT~of the Student 





Nina Faye Boxxer, B.S., A 77 Q 

LINEVILLE, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1922-23; Pub- 
licity Chairman Y W. C. A., 1923-24; Secretary 
and Treasurer Home Economics Club, 1924-25; 
Secretary Y. W. C. A., 1924-25; Executive Board, 
1925-26. 

Nina Faye has won our sincerest admiration 
and friendship by her quiet and lady-like 
ways. She never speaks unless something of 
value is to be said. Her four years at Ala- 
bama College have been profitably spent in 
the study of Home Economics. She has 
amassed a fortune in the knowledge of "Bake 
well in a moderate oven" and "Cream the 
batter, then add the sugar," etc. She leaves 
Alabama College with a host of friends. Nina 
Faye, we envy him, his future cook. 



Lena Boozer, A.B. 

SWEETWATER, ALA. 

Entered 1925. 

"There is no noble life 

Without a noble aim." 

We admire Lena for her intellect, level- 
headedness and perserverance, but we love 
her for her sincere, unselfish disposition. 



Sopliomore Sister — LAURYN Godbold 






Laura Alice Brown, B.S. 

BANKS, ALA. 

Entered 1921. 
Constant, trusty, ever fine, 
Far better this than Orient wine; 
Substantial, worthy, winning, true, 
Laura, we appreciate and all love you. 

Sophomore Sister — Elsie Bedingfield 




Maggie Elizabeth Burkett, A.B. 

DOTHAN, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Member of Life Saving- Corps, 
192L 

Many have wandered over hills today, Mag- 
gie! 

Hunting for a girl like you. 

There are vacancies in the minds of others 

Waiting to be filled by a girl that's good and 
true. 

Many have sung our Alma Mater, Maggie, 
Singing! Yes, Loud and true, 
But none have been more faithful, Maggie, 
than you. 

Soplwmore Sister — Thelma Pearson 






7 

k 





Wanda Burks, A.B. 

CULLMAN', ALA. 

Entered 1922; Glee Club, 1922-23; Senate. 192 

Patient and kindly, honest and true, 
Hair of dark chestnut, eyes of dark blue. 
She is a friend in more than the name, 
Ever you'll find her always the same. 



omore Sister — Mildred Rice 



Patty Cole, B.M., X .1 2 

OPP, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Treasurer Calkine Music Club, 
1924-25; Vice-President Castalian Club, 1924-25; 
Business Manager Technala, 1925-26; Scribbler's 
Club; Charter Member Student Senate. 

Calmness, intellectuality, sincerity — that's 
what her eyes tell you. Capability, independ- 
ence, broadmindedness, sympathy — that's what 
friendship with her shows you. And would 
you know what intimacy reveals? All of 
these, and more. She's a true friend at all 
times. Nothing describes her except — just Pat- 
tv. 






Y£«*/j 



Thrhssa ConawaYj A.B. 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

"Trrssa" 

Entered 192L'; Business Manager of Alabamian, 
1926; Advertising Manager of Alabamian, 1925- 
26; Vice-President of Class. 1925; Student Sen- 
ate, 1925-26; Forum, 1926; Glee Club, 1923-24- 

25-26. 

Thressa is neat and fair of face, 

Busy every minute ; 
Makes tilings hum around this place — 

.Vk the Senate! 

She has worked for the Alabamian, 

Helped put it across ; 
We love her smi'e, 'n sunny disposi- 
tion 

When she's gone — "loss." 



Ann Crossley, B.S., A II Q 

BREWTON, ALA. 

Entered 1921; Vice President of Alpha Pi Omega 
Club, 1923-24; Secretary Natan Club, 1923-24; 
.Student Senate. 1924-25. 

"She that was ever fair and never proud, 
Had tongue at will, and yet was never loud." 
— 'Shakespeare. 

Sophomore Sister — Catherine Ortman 





Sara Celia Cumbee, A.B. 

STROUD, ALA. 

Entered, 1922; Student Senate, 1925-26. 

Celia — everything that means goodness, loy- 
alty and brains. Celia possesses an attribute 
that will bring her success in every field of 
perserverance. That, with intellect, will al- 
ways reserve for her a place at the top of all 
things. 

Sophomore Sister — Lucile Fuller 



Pauline Faith Curry. A.B., 1ST 

MONTEVALLO, ALA. 

"Polly" 

Entered, 1923; Secretary Glee Club, 1924-25; 
Secretary Tutwiler Club, 1925-2(5. 

Being the smallest member of the Senior 

class is one of Polly's many distinctions. Her 

charming voice is another, and if you don't 

believe she's capable just ask any meir.ber of 

her math class. 

"Not just exactly stately or tall, 
But mighty cute and sweet; 
And when it comes to loveliness 
Pollv can't be beat." 















Sallie Mae Dalton, X .1 2 

OPP, ALA. 

"5a/" 

Entered 1H21; Cleosophic Literary Society; Vice- 
President Castalian club, 1925-28; Y. W. i '. A. 
Cabinet, 21-22-2:!; Executive Board, Summer 

1112;",. 

Well, I see in the papers that everybody's 
wanting to know "What's become of Sallie." 
We all wondered that, too, when she left us 
for a while, and those of us who knew her 
record at smashing hearts were afraid that 
she'd "met her Waterloo," so to speak! But 
now I'm pleased to report that she is safely 
back in the Senior class at Alabama College. 
Since she is one of the most beautiful and most 
charming girls we know, Sallie's going to 
leave a place in "our alley" that cannot be 
filled, and there'll ever be a place in all our 
hearts that will belong to nobody but Sa 



Helen Davis, B.S. 

FORT DAVIS, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Secretary Y, W C. A., 1923; Exe- 
cutive Board, 1:123-24-25; Mathematics Club, 
1923-24-25; Delegate to Student Volunteer Con- 
vention at Indianapolis; L'lnlei graduate Repre- 
sentative Y. W. C. A., 1924; Delegate to National 
Y, W. C. A. Convention at New York City; Dele- 
gate to Blue Ridge; Delegate to State Training 
Council Y. W. C. A. at Auburn; Delegate to S. 
I. A. S. G. at Tallahassee: President student 
Government, 1925-26; Delegate to S. 1, A S. G. 
at Weslyan. 

H-earts are happy when she's near. 
E-'er her name we'll love to hear. 
L-ovingly do we all obey her, 
E-ach one ever glad to praise the 
Name that we shall all hold dear. 







Rl-by Foster, A.B., II K A 

LUVERNE, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Member Monk Club, 11)22-23-24: 
Member Calkins Music Club, 1022-23-24-25; Pro- 
gram Committee of Music Club, 1923-24;' Pub- 
licity Committee Y. W. C. A., 1922-23; Art Club, 
1922-23-24; Member President's Council, 1924- 
25-26; President Pi Kappa Delta Club, 1924-2."i- 
26. 

Neat and sweet from head to feet, 
A lady quite complete; 
She's a mixture of all that's nice, 
A combination we rarely find. 
Friendly? Yes. She has never passed any- 
one without speaking. Maybe this accounts 
for her many admirers — and thev aren't a] 
girls either! 



Mary Dearmax, B.S. 

WARD, ALA. 

Graduate Livington State Normal, 1924; Entered 
1925. 

"We're glad, dear Mary; we won when 
she finished at Livingston. May her future he 
as bright and clear as she has made our's 
here." 






Elizabeth Granberry, A.B., A 

11(11 II XV, ALA. 



1 2' 



Granny 

Entered 1«22; Cl'itic Castalian Clul 
Bunbury Literary Society; Girts Si 
Club, 1924-25-26; Treasurer Art Club, 



1922-23; 
ut; Glee 



She reminds you of Lavender and Old Lace, 
or ul an old-fashioned bouquet, this exquisitely 
dainty litt'e person known as "Granny." Her 
soft draw] and her sunny disposition combined 
with loyalty and ability, makes her altogether 
adorable and charming. Possibly this is why 
she is loved by all — and especially by one. 
We are wondering how long it will be before 
some one else claims the whole of her warm 
heart. 



Carmenita Greene, B.S. 

1 AVETI EVII.LE, ALA. 

Entered 1923; Member of Home Economies Club. 
1924-26; Chairman Programme Committee of Y. 
W. A.. 1924; Member of Student Senate, 192l'>. 

You do not have to search a long, long 
time before you find one of the most generous 
hearted whole-spirited girls in our school — 
Carmenita, and with it all she's an enthusias- 
tic in everything she undertakes. 

Sophomore Sister — Phvliss Earle 






Ruth Griffin, A.B., // K J 

MOULTON, ALA. 

Entered, 1924; Secretary of College Orchestra, 
1924-25-26: Chairman of World Fellowship Y. 
W. A., 1925-20. 

She is not a "Comedy of Errors" 
Nor "A Midsummer's Night Dream," 
But take it "As You Like It," 
She is just what she seems. 
Happy when she should be happy 
And vet she's serious, too, 
A good, true friend upon whom 
You can always depend. 

Sophomore Sister — Mary Vinson 



Mary Willard Hall, B.S., <l> A 1' 

GENEVA, ALA. 

Glee Club. 1917-1S-19; Vice-President Philoden- 
droi, 1920; Vice-President Executive Board, 
Summer School, 1923; Y W. 0. A. Cabinet, 1919; 
Dramatic Club, 1925. 

Although Mary Willard's specialty lies in 
the arts of the home she has many talents in 
other lines. Not the least of her gifts is that 
pleasing personality. She's interested in all, 
she claims her friends by the score — in short, 
she's just "all-round." 







Lucy Holt, A.B. 

BUTLER, ALA. 

Entered 1923; Winner Alabama Power Co. Schol- 
arship, 1923; V. W, C. A. Program Committee, 
1923-24; V. W. C. A. Morning "Watch Committee, 
1924-25; Life Saving ''nips; Dramatic Club, 1923- 
24-25-26; Art Club, 1923-24-25; International 
League of Women Voters, 1924-25; Choral Club, 
23-24; Entertainment Manager of Alabama 
Players, 1925-26; Treasurer of Art Club, 192r,-2i>; 
Treasurer Math Club, 1925-26; B. S. U. Council, 
192">-2i;; President Y. W. A., 1925,26; .Student 
Senate, 1925-26. 

"Look thou nut down but up!" 

There has never been a more lovable, more 
sincere girl at Alabama College than Lucy. 
Since knowing her we feel that we have 
known a real girl, and her absence will he felt 
in the coming years. May your ambition 
always spur you on, "Lucy Dear," and lead 
.you to as noble things as your noble thoughts. 

Sn[>homore Sister — Margaret Tucker 



Juanita Houston. A.B. 

CLAY ION, ALA. 

What phrase could characterize Juanita 
better than "A smile will go a long, long 
way?" She will always be remembered by 
her classmates not only as an ideal girl, but 
one who executes duty to the fullest extent. 

Sophomore Sister — Ruby Morton - 






Myrtle Houston, A.B. 

CLAYTON, ALA. 

Member Cleosophie Literary Society. 

Although Myrtle is retiring and quiet her 
good disposition has made many friends who 
will ever be true to her. The high principles 
for which she stands will create steadfastness 
and loyalty, what more could he desired? 

Sophomore Sister — Eugenia Patton 



Olene Johnson, A.B., II K J 

BRUND1DGE, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Member Cleosophic Literary So- 
ciety, 1922-23; Basketball Class Team, 1922-23- 
24-25; Secretary and Treasurer Pi Kappa Delta 
Club, 1924-23; Critic Pi Kappa Delta Club, 1925- 
26. 

Just the right amount of frivolity and se- 
riousness are blended to make Olene a charm- 
ing girl. She wins the hearts of all who know 
her. 



Sophomore Sister — Rubie Jo Sxellgrove 






Mildred Keahey. B.S., <l> A - 

PLANTERSVILLE, ALA. 

"Kealiry" 

Entered 1922; Winner of Birmingham News 
Scholarship; Class Basketball Team, 1923; Var- 
sity. 1923-24-25-26; President Phi Delta Sigma, 
1924; Vice-President Phi Delta Sigma, 1925; 
ETome Economics Club; Member President Coun- 
cil, 1924; Member Senate, 1925-26; Treasurer 
Athletic Association, 192(i; "M" Club; Class Mar- 
shal, [924; Monk Literary Society, 1922-2:!; In- 
ternational League of Women Voters. i924-2f.. 

We do not wonder that Keahey holds a 
place in the heart of every Montevallo girl 
when we see her as she goes about her work 
and play with a smile for everyone. Behind 
this smile we find a real true character, one 
who is sympathetic, loyal and dependable. 
When Keahey leaves us our Alma Mater will 



Grace Kelly. A.B. 

HEADLAND, ALA. 

No one could have a better friend, 
She'll stick by you through thick and thin. 
Though she's jolly and full of fun 
She'll never stop 'till her job is done. 

Sophomore Sister — Eunice Parker 





Louise Latham, A.B., // .1 Z 

MONTEVALLO, ALA. 

"Buster" 

Entered High School 1921; College 1922; Honor 
Roll, 1921-22; Monk Literary Society, 1922-23; 
Class Basketball, 1921; Athletic Board, 1921-22; 
Class Vice-President, 1921-22; "M" Ciub, 1921-22 

Good ole Buster! She's really a genius be- 
cause, you know, she has managed to combine 
love and books with surprising success. We 
shall not soon forget the letters written in Dr. 
Bacot's history classes. No matter where you 
look, no matter what you find, a hundred 
adjectives won't describe her, for she's just 
that kind. 



Aleexe LeCroy, A.B., (/> J I 

ROCKFOR1), ALA. 

Entered 1922; Y. W. C. A. Committee, 1923-25; 
B, S. U. Council. 1925; Math Club. 1923-20; Y. 
W. A. Group Leader, 1923; Vice-President Math- 
ematics Club, 1925; Monk Literary Society; 
Treasurer Phi Delta Sigma; Secretary-Treasurer 
The Forum, 1926; Executive Board, 1926; Honor 
Roll, 1923-25. 

"A friend in need is a friend indeed." 
Who can see Aleene without thinking of 
"Math" and "Expression?" Her face beameth 
forth with an expression of triangles and 
cubes; yet underneath is an all-round girl, 
smiling and willing to lend a helping hand 
whether it be in athletics, debating or ex- 
pression. We are quite sure she will make 
success in whatever she undertakes. 










Mary Nette Loftin, B.S. 

ENTERPRISE, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Hall Chairman, 1924-25; Y. W. 
C. A. Committee, 1925-26; Senior Representative 
to Student Government, 11125-2(1; Home Eco- 
nomies Club, 

Mary Nette, an unusual combination of in- 
tellect and beauty. These two qualities plus ,i 
winning personality have won for her a host 
of friends at Alabama College. 

Sophomore Sister — Catherine Prentiss 



Amxe Kirtlev Long, B.M., Z U J 

MARION, ALA. 

Entered from Judson i ■ , . 1 1 . ■ - , 1922; Calkins 
Music Club, 1923-24-25-26; College Orchestra, 
1923-24-25-26; President Orchestra, 1924-25; 
Chairman Big-Sister Committee Y. W C A 
1024-25; President Y W. C. A., 1925-26; Presi- 
dent's Council, 1924-25-26; Zeta Pi Delta Club. 

_ The three years of Anne's Alabama College 
life have reached their climax this year while 
she has served us as the president of our Y. 
W. C. A. 

A synonym for kindness, gentleness, a good 
worker and a loyal friend is — Anne Long, and 
for all this she is enthronged in the hearts of 
all of us. 






Hattie Welton Lyman, B.S., X A — 

MOXTEVALLO, ALA. 

President Class, 1923-24-25-26; President Castal- 
ian Club, 1924; Home Economics Club, 1923-24- 
25-26; Student Senate, 1925-26; Technala Staff, 
1923. 

Hattie Welton Lyman: 

Theorem: That four years as class presi- 
dent mean pluck and wise guidance on the 
part of Hattie, and love for her on the part 
of all her classmates. 

Proof: If Hattie had no pluck she would 
not have undertaken to lead us. If she had 
not guided us wisely we would not be the 
Senior Class we are today. 

It Hattie had shown neither pluck nor wise 
guidance still would she be our class president, 
the love in our hearts would place her 
there. \ 

Therefore Hattie has shown pluck, she has 
showinvisey guidance and we can't te" 
here how we\ love her. 



Emma Louise AIarriot, 13. S. 

URIAH, ALA. 



Attended Judson College, 1922-23 
nomics Club. 



Home Eco- 



Emma Louise is the perfect proof that a girl 
can be both attractive and capable. Sincerity, 
cleverness, good looks, and winning ways 
are blended in the proper degree to make a 
fascinating personality. Her popularity is 
proved by the fact that she is admired by the 
"fair" and the "brave." There is only one 
reason why we fear that she will not rise to 
pinnacles of prominence in the realm of Home 
Economics — and that's a mighty good one, too! 
Maybe her knowledge of Home Economics cart' 
be utilized after all ! 

Sophomore Sister — True Marele 









Mildred McCorp, B.S. 

FOLEY, ALA. 

"Mid" 

Entered 1922; Class Team, 1925-26; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, i923-2fi. 

"Her pleasant smile and kindly ways 
Will live in our memories all our days." 

Sophomore Sister — Dorothy Boller 



Caroline Middleton, A.B., A II LI 

COLLIREKE, ALA. 

Vice-President Y. W. A., 1924; Treasurer Notan 
Club, 1923; Vice-President Notan Club, 1924; 
Personal Editor Alabamian, 1!»24: Art Editor 
Alabamian, 1925; Events Editor Technala, 1925; 
Art Editor Y. W. A., 1925; Chairman Decoration 
Committee for Golds, 1922. 

"To know her is to love her" is a saving 
that is often quoted, but it fits Caroline per- 
fectly. She may appear distant at first; win 
her friendship and you'll have a lasting one. 



Sophomore Sislrr — Edith Delciiamps 





Katherixe Miller. A.B. 

GADSDEN, ALA. 

Entered 1922. 

Is there anyone who doesn't love Katlierine? 
Of course not! She is always there with the 
goods and "help" is her middle name. We 
admire her pep and originality. She is good 
as the best and her modesty is untiring. We 
all want to be like you, Katherine. 

Sophomore Sister — Elizabeth Elliott 



Elma O'Neil, A.B. 

CALVSVILLE, ALA. 

Entered 1921; Vice-President H. S. Class, 1921- 
22; Glee Club, 1921-22-23-24; Business Manager 
Glee Club, 1922-23-24; Business Manager Ala- 
baniian, 1923-24; Secretary Scribbler's Ciub, 
1924-25; Editor-in-Chief Alabamian, 1925-26; 
President's Council. 1925-26. 

Elma O'Neil — "Nuf Sed" — yes, everybody 
knows her. Loyalty, originality, wisdom, and 
personality combined hardly compliment her 
justly . Her ability to do the right thing at the 
right time has given us the right to say, "She 
is an all-around girl," loved by all her class- 
mates. 





^ 








Leeta Orr. B.S., K 2 <I> 

HARTSELLE, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Home Economies Club, 1924-25- 
26; Secretary of Kappa Sigma Phi. 1923-24- 
Treasurer Kappa Sigma Phi. 1924-25; Vice- 
President Kappa Si?.ma Phi, 1925-36; Class 
Basketball Team, 1923-24-25; Senate Member 
1925- 2 6 . 

Leeta possesses pep, personality and "prin- 
ciples" and all of her undertakings are char- 
acterized by these three "p's". Perseverance, 
intelligence and lovableness added, go to make 
up a real pal. Montevallo will not be the 
same with Leeta elsewhere. 

Sophomore Sister — Elizabeth Graves 






ft ' 
ill 



Lilian Campbell Proit, A.B, 
// .1 2 

DEMOPOLIS, ALA. 

Entered 1922; class Marshal. 1922-23; Technala 
Staff, 1923-24; President Student Government, 
1924-25; President Scribbler's Club; Member Stu- 
dent Senate, 1925-26. 

Would you know a born writer? 

It's Lilian! 
Wou'd you know a splendid executive? 

It's Lilian! 
Would you know who'll put it through 
When there's something you can't do? 

It's Lilian ! 

As President of Student Government she did 
"worlds" for us and in the Scribbler's Club 
her worth cannot ever be estimated. Her in- 
fluence is great just because we know that she 
weighs every move thoughtfully, carefully. 

For what you did in creating the Student 
Senate and for all the many other ways you've 
lielped us— we thank you, Lilian, we appreci- 
ate you and?<iu'r College will miss you! 





V 

1 



Irma Reaves, B.S., Z II A 

CAMP HILL, ALA. 

"Red" 

Entered 1922; Monk Literary Society; Treasurer 
Athletic Board, Junior and Senior Class Ath- 
letic Board Representative; Class Basketball, 
1923-24-25; Home Economics Club; President 
League Women Voters; Treasurer Zeta Pi Delta 
Club; Alabama Players, 1923-24-25; Treasurer 
Alabama Players, 1924. 

Here's to you, "Old Red," and your clean 
sportsmanship — the best Alabama College has 
ever boasted. Though you leave her ha 
they will still ring with your merry laughter. 
Your presence here has been helpful both to 
your friends and your Alma Mater. May suc- 
cess be vours — now and always. 



Ernestine Robinson, A.B. 

MONTEVALLO, ALA. 



"Stine" 

Entered High School, 1921; 
Literary Society, 1922-23. 



College, 1922; Monk 



Lovable, capable, witty, a true friend, a 
good sport ; lots of poise and equally a* much 
tact. One who can hold her own in any dis- 
cussion, from the subject of the Aztecs to the 
newest thing in powder compacts — of course, 
it's Ernestine. 










Y 






Mary Erin Riley, 

SYLACAUGA. ALA. 



A.I). 



Monk Literary Society, 1922-23: Class Cheer 
Leader, 1922-23-24-25; President Y. W A., 1923; 
School Cheer Leader, 1923-24; Y. W. C. A. Cabi- 
net, 1923; B. S. U„ 1924-25; Glee Club, 1922-23- 
24-25; Leader tor College Night, 1923; Executive 
Board, 1924-25; Secretary and Treasurer Glee 
Club, 1925; Technala Staff, 1925; Vice-President 
class, lirjf,. 

Mary Erin — those two words immediately 
bring a mental image to "ye scores of acquain- 
tances" of all that one could tell in a volume. 
Wit — a made to order type to which is added 
a brand of Mary's mirth. Striking? I should 
say. Sincerity? Enough to lavish it on all 
her friends, whirl] are greater in numbers 
than the "Charleston" delegation! Ability? 
Scan her honors, then rub your eyes and read 
slowly. Charming? Could anything short of 
such result from the combination known as 
Mary Erin ? 



Sophomof 



Ruby Sanders., H.AI. 

TROY, ALA. 



Entered 192 
Choral Club. 






'alkins Music Club; 1922-2C; 



Blessed with all those qualities that are in- 
herent in a noble woman, she goes along life's 
way quietly, doing her task well and remain- 
ing ever loyal to herself and others. An alto- 
gether lovely girl is Ruby. 

Sophomorr Sistrr — Edith Gilchrist 







Fannie Jo Scott, A.B., X .1 2' 

VERBENA, ALA. 

"Jo" 

Entered 1322: Alabamian Staff, 1924-25: Math 
Club; Presidents' Council. 1925-26; Technala 
Staff, 1925-26; President Castalian Club. 1925-26. 

The term "ideal college girl" fits Fannie Jo 
to perfection. She's studious, ambitious, and 
always "among those present" on first honor 
roll, and is capable to the "Nth" degree. The 
most understanding of friends, she's always in 
a good humor — and her disposition didn't 
have to be cultivated! Pep, personality, and 
57 varieties of fun, and a personal attractive- 
ness peculiar to herself — that's Fannie Jo. 

Sophomore Sister — Aletha Louise Tente 



Marguerite Scroggin, A.R., IJ A — 

CENTRE, ALA. 

Class Basketball. 1920-21-22-23; Captain Class 
Basketball. 1922-23; Varsity Basketball. 1921- 
22; "M" Club, 1921; Student Government Asso- 
ciation, 1921-22-23; Class President, 1921-22-23; 
Re-entered, 1925; Student Assistant in English. 
1925. 

Uniquely popular! Unique, in that she un- 
assumingly and quietly steals into and claims 
each heart in turn — yea, boys, beware ! Pop- 
ular, in that her friends include ioo per cent 
of her acquaintances — "and thereby hangs a 
tale," for it goes without saying, that it could- 
n't be otherwise when she possesses personality, 
talent, and brains in what one may term the 
perfect combination and lo! — Marguerite!! 



~H"> H. 






Anny May Skinner, B.S., / 2 T 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 



5-26; Editor-in- 

President Glee 

Scribbler's Club, 

1923-24; General 

3-24; Presidents' 



"Ann" 

Editor-in-Chief "Technala," 19 

Chief "Alabamian," 1924-25; 

Club. 1924-25; Vice-President 

1924-25; Critic Tutwiler Club, 

Manager Alabama Players, 19 

Council, 1924-25-26; Secretarial Club; WTlo's 

Who, 1922-23; Class Poet, 1922-23-24; Tutwiler 

Club Reporter to Alabamian, 1923-24. 

"To those who know her not, no words can 

paint, 
And those who know her know all words 

are faint, 
No duty e'er oe'r tasked her, however great, 
Success and happiness is sure to be her fate. 
Good sense is hers — a gift of heaven divine; 
Sincerity — the gods blessed her in that line; 
Good looks — far, far more than her share. 
Determination, grit, and the will to dare. 
And men — be thev light or dark, or short or 
tall, 
She merely- looks their way and snares them 

a.!, 
But all these words are superfluous indeed, 
1'or names that dwell on many 
minstrels need." 

F. E. H. 
Sophomore Sister — Katherine Leath 



Bill Smith, A.B., X .1 2 

OPP, ALA. 

Entered 1922; Alabama Players, 1923-24-25-26; 
Monk Literary Society; Vice-President Alabama 
Players, 1926; Secretary-Treasurer Class. 1924- 
25-26; Class Basketball. 1923; Varsity. 1923-24- 
25-26; Calkins Music Study Club, 1923-24; Life 
Saving Corps, 1924-25-26; President Life Saving 
Corps, 1924-25; Athletic Board, 1923-26; Senate, 
1925-26; Class Marshal. 1924-26; T. W. C. A. 
Social Committee. 1923; Orchestra, 1923-24; 
Class Orchestra, 1926; League of Women Voters, 
1925-26; Art Club. 1923; Presidents' Council, 
1924-25; "M" Club, 1923-24-25-26; Hall Chair- 
man. 

In our search for an ideal college girl we 
found Bill, and our search was satisfying. 
She's a girl who loves and is loved, who works 
and plays, who laughs and cries, who knows 
how and what and when to do the thing that's 
needed most. Bill's all right! 





«4 



Florence Smith, A.B., A II Q 

DEMOPOLIS, ALA. 

Athletic Board; Class Marshal, 1922-23; Tech- 
nala Staff; President Alpha Pi Omega, 1924-25; 
Associate Editor Alabamian, 1925-26. 

"Drink to me only with thine eyes" 

and 

"On with the dance." 

Florence is a girl who needs no such limping 
tongue as mine to sing her praises. With a 
wit that is sparkling but does not sting, with 
a cleverness that never approaches clownish- 
ness, and with a personality that wins all with 
whom she comes in touch, she has gone 
through four years of college one of our best 
-Joved mate. When I think of her leaving 
Alabama College my eyes become tear- 
dimmed and my throat becomes dry. What 
will we do without the marrvmaker, "the life 
of the party?" 

We count .ourselves better for having known 
you, Florence,; and may all your years be as 
successful as your years at Alabama College. 

Sophomore Sister— Miriam Grecg 



Lucille Sxellgrove., B.S., Z II J 

BOAZ, ALA. 

"Skeat" 

Entered 1922; Bunbury Literary Society; Class 
Basketball, 1922-23-21; Captain of Class Team. 
1923-24; Varsity Basketball. 1925; Class Ath- 
letic Board Representative. 1922-23-24-2S ; Pa- 
trol Leader of Girl Scouts; Treasurer of League 
of Women Voters; Secretary of Zeta Pi Delta 
Club, 1924-25; Physical Education Club. 

"Skeat" has scintillated through her college 
career as a basketball player, a good student, 
and all around girl, and a real friend. In 
each of these capacities she has proven her 
worth and ability. She has the incomparable 
gift of making herself absolutely indispensable 
to those with whom she is associated and we 
wonder how we will do without her. 







• m 



Agnes Stewart, A.B., <l> 1 2 

WEOGUFKA, ALA. 

"Ag" 

Entered 1:12:1: President Phi Delta Sigma Club, 
1924-25; Scribbler's Club. 1924-26; Art Club, 
1923-24; President's Council, 1924-25; Studenl 
Senate, 1925-26, 

"Who doth ambition slum? 
Nut Agnes. 
Who is optimistic as the sun? 
"lis Agnes. 
Who makes win laugh when you're feeling 
blue? 
Who do you like to tell your troubles to? 
Ag-er-nes dear, 'tis you." 



Katherine Thomas, A.R. 

AS11BV, ALA. 

"Kat" 
Entered 1922; Class Basketball. 1924-25; "M" 
Club; Mathematics Club, 1925-26; Girl Scouts' 
V. W. A., 1925-26. 

Kat is the same Kat, wherever you put 
her, and although she's been put at Monte lo 
these many years, she has won a host of 
friends who will miss her heaps. 

Sophomore Sister — Ruin Hii.LMAN" 



Sophomore Sister — Pauline Day 








Helex Townsend, A.B., 

RUSSELVILLE, ALA. 

"Patz" 

Entered 1922; Cleosophic Literary Society: Class 
Basketball Team, 1923; Varsity, 1923-24-25-26; 
Captain Varsity, 1925; Life Saving Corps; "M" 
Club; Math Club: 1923-24-25-26; President Math 
Club, 1923; Scribbler's Club, 1924-25-26; Presi- 
dent Scribbler's Club, 1924; Class Orchestra, 
1926; Technala Staff, 1924; President Athletic 
Association, 1925-26; President's Council, 1923- 
24-25-26. 

Brains, pep, originality, ambition, efficiency, 
dependability — that's Helen! Impulsive, de- 
termined, temperamental, both shallow and 
deep — that's Helen! She's one of the ablest 
students on the campus, and one of the few, 
who attempting much, can do all with honor! 

Sopliomorc Sister — Julia Stroud 



Clyde Wainwright, A.B., -4 // Q 

ATMORE, ALA. 

Entered Alabama College, 1925; Entered Wom- 
an's College, 1922: Pianist for Ad Astra Literary 
Society. 1922-23-24-25: Class Musician, 1924-25; 
Secretary of Sigma Beta Alpha Club. 

"A dash of sparkling grey eyes, black curly 
hair and sunny smile — that's Clyde. Only one 
brief year has she been with us, but by her 
carefree disposition and peppy music she will 
hold a warm spot in the memory of all who 
know her. 





















Louise Ward, B.S. 

Home Economics Club; Hall Chairman, 1925-26; 
Senator, 1 !i 2 6 ; Vice-President Y. W. C. A., 1920; 
Chairman Tea Room Y. W. C. A., 1026; Blue 
Ridge, 1925. 

A friend and a student 

And a worker in all, 

A temple of good thoughts is 

Her heart to your call. 

Sophomore Sister — Maud Perrett 



Nellie White, B.S., K 2 <2> 

ASHLAND. ALA. 

Entered 1922; Home Economics Club, 1924-25- 
26; Secretary Kappa Sigma Phi, 1924-25; Presi- 
dent Kappa Sigma Phi, 1925-26; Alabamian 
Staff, 1924-25; Y. W. C. A. Committee, 1925-26; 
President's Council, 1925-26. 

"A little learning is a dangerous thing" Nel- 
lie has observed for she has drunk deep of the 
Pierian spring. She possesses one of the rarest 
elements known — good common sense. Shall I 
prove it? Her jnlliness and sound reasoning 
are proof enough. "Ole Monte," what will 
you do without her! 



Sophomore Sister — Dessie Johnson 





Bess Williams. B.S. 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

"Chicken little" 

Class Cheer Leader. 1922-23-24; Assistant School 
Cheer Leader, 1922-23-24: Athletic Board, 1923- 
24; Y W. C. A. Cabinet. 1925-26; Technala Staff, 
1923-24; Life Savers Corp. 

She can cook and she can sew, 
She can lead a veil to win a goal. 
Rah, Rah, Rah, here comes Chick, 
Wake up girls or she won't like you a bit. 



Sophomore Sister — Mary Kate Derby 



Annie Holt Young, A.B., <I> A - 

ONEONTA, ALA. 

Hiking- and Camping Councillor. 1924-25-20; 
Vice-President Physical Education Club, 1925-26; 
Treasurer Phi Delta Sigma Club. 1925-26; Life 
Saving Corp. 1924-25-26; Class Basketball. 1923- 
24-25; Captain Class Team, 1924. 

Dependable, honest, sincere, and true, 
Courage unbounded and will to do. 

Unparalleled loyalty — a thinker, too, 
Lover of God's outdoors. Annie Holt — this 
— to you ! 



Sophomore Sister — Lauretta Fort.ver 
















Margaret Butler, Z // I 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

"Turk" 

Zcla Pi Delta Club; Librarian; Glee Club; Pres- 
ident Alabama Players; Senate; Class Historian: 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Delegate to Student Volun- 
teer Conference at Indianapolis; Delegate to Y r . 
W. C. A. Conference Blue Ridge; President Y. 
W. C. A. Summer School, 1925. 

Sophomore Sister — Etoil Barnes 



Colene Nathaniel Hamilton 

WARRIOR, ALA. 

"Kid" 

Phi Delta Sigma Club; Alabama Players: Home 
Economies Club; Delegate to the Y'. \Y. C. A., 
Blue Ridge. 

"We wonder why your eyes open so wide 
and why you always run away when you see 
a man. Maybe some da}' you will change." 

Sophomore Sister — Gladys Ayers 





Nancy Savage, B.S. 

CORDO, ALA. 

Entered 1923; Honor Roll, 1924-25; Treasurer 
Life Saving Corps, 1924-25; President Home 
Economics Club, 1924-25; Class Basketball, 1925; 
Executive Board, 1924-25. 

"Hiking, swimming, ball playing, sewing 
and cooking hut the greatest of these is sew- 
ing." Just the kind of combination everyone 
admires — Earnest, steadfast and sincere, vet an 
all around girl and jolly good sport. Who 
could wish for more? 



Sophomore Sister — Nona H 



Inez Ray, B.S. 

HACKLEBURG, ALA. 

Entered 1923; Honor Roll, 1925; Charter Mem- 
ber Senate: Member Senate. 1925-2(1; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1924-25. 

It is in the field of Home Economics 

That Inez has chosen her work, 

And in this she is not excelled. 

She is pretty and jolly, and from her face 

beams 
A smile that will banish all care; 
In her eyes of brown there's a mischievous 
gleam. 
Girls like her are exceedingly rare. 




SL 






'M 








Miriam Harvey, A.B. 

ATM OR R, ALA. 

Entered High School 1921; Entered College 
1112::; Summer School 1924-25; Choral Club 1923; 
<liii Scouts 1921-25; Honor Roll 1924-25. 

Smiling, always helpful, kind, 
Not many like her do we find. 
Ever patient, gentle, sweet. 
Smoothing paths for weary feet. 
That's Miriam. 

Sophomore Sister — Marie Whatley 



Margaret Embry, A.B. 

ASHVTI.l.E, ALA. 

Sophomore Sister — Elean'or Hooper 




TECHNALA 





57 






TECHNALA 



J»j 



19 2 6 






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Junior Class 



MINNIE BACCUS 

WINFIELD, ALA. 



EUGENIA BARGE 

PINEAPPLE, ALA. 



MYRA BELL 

PRATTVILLE, ALA. 



HELEN BOYKIN 

CAMDEN, ALA. 



VERNA BRASHER 

CARBON' HILL, ALA. 



ESTELLE BROADWAY 

CECIL, ALA. 



RUTH BURNS 

TALLADEGA, ALA. 



RUTH BURTRAM 

SPRINCVILLE, ALA. 



JOY CAWTHON 

FLORALA, ALA. 



KATHLEEN CHESTER 

CAMP HILL, ALA. 



TECHNALA 







19 2 6 



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.«. ,<J # v fcS - _.. 



f '>:*1 a fr. 



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Junior Class 



LUCILE CLAY 

FULTON, ALA. 

STELLA CLIFTON 

BELLE ELLEN, ALA. 

ADD IE PEARL COLQUETT 

BRANTLEY, ALA. 

MAYBELLE CONNER 

ANDALUSIA, ALA. 

FAYE COTNEY 

LIXEVILLE, ALA. 

EDITH CREW 

GOODWATER, ALA. 

FRANCES CRUMP 

STEELE, ALA. 

ELLIE DREYSPRING 

WAUGH, ALA. 

GLADYS ELROD 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



ELIZABETH FENN 

DOTHAN, ALA. 



CLARA JONES 

GREENVILLE, ALA. 







59 









'LiT' / M 






■■> 



TECHNALA 






19 2 6 



c\ 












^ . ...... • 



\2>*x . ^ - ^ 



W^ j0^y^* 




Junior Class 



LOUISE FLEMING 

ENTERPRISE, ALA. 

MARY FLOURNEY 

LOUISVILLE, ALA. 

ANNIE LEE FLOYD 

ABANDA, ALA. 

SUE BROADUS FINKLEA 

MONROEVILLE, ALA. 

IDA GAILLARD 

PERDUE HILL, ALA. 

GERTRUDE GAINES 

HAYNES, ALA. 

BESSIE GARDINER 

GORUONSVILLE, ALA. 

HELEN GEORGE 

MOBILE, ALA. 

MILDRED GILCHRIST 

BRANTLEY, ALA. 

EPSIE GILCHRIST 

BRANTLEY, ALA. 

MARTHA GRANTHAM 

NEWBERN, ALA. 



60 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 



ff^m^A^ 



i v ?~ 






■^,^W* k *& cJ'tflRL )))s> _^__* 

Junior Class 

MARGARET GRAYSON 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

MELBA GRIFFIN 

MONTEVALLO, ALA. 

VERDICE GUNN 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 

FLORENCE GUYTON 

MONTEVALLO, ALA. 

NATHALIE HALL 

FLORALA, ALA. 

LORENE HANK1NS 

VERNON, ALA. 

MARION HANNA 

MARIAN, ALA. 

MARY HILL 

BENTON, ALA. 

ANNIE LOU HODGES 

HEADLAND, ALA. 

LUCIE LOFTON HOOD 

CARROLTON, ALA. 

ELOREE INGRAM 

LINEVILLE, ALA. 





61 







TECHNALA 





Junior Class 



HAZEL JACKSON 

GLENWOOD, ALA. 

ANNE JONES 

LINEVILLE, ALA. 

IBBIE JONES 

DALEVILLE, ALA. 

RUTH JONES 

DADEVILLE, ALA. 

ANNA MAE LANGSTON 

ASHBV, ALA. 

RUTH LITTLE 

MOBILE, ALA. 

NORINE MARTIN 

ENTERPRISE, ALA. 

LUCILE MORGAN 

ALBERTVILLE, ALA. 

ROBERTA NORTHRUP 

GREENSBORO, ALA. 

RUTH PARKER 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

LUCY PARKEY 

GALLATIN, ALA. 

MARY PARRENT 

OPELIKA, ALA. 




62 







S 






I 



TECHNALA 

Junior Class 

LUCY PICKENS 

GREENSBORO, ALA. 

GRACE POARCH 

NEW HOPE, ALA. 

ALICE PRICE 

IRONATON, ALA. 

ALICE QUARLES 

MOBILE, ALA. 

LOIS REYNOLDS 

CLIO, ALA. 

MARY ALLEN RHODES 

LINDEN, ALA. 

EDITH RICHARDS 

MOBILE, ALA. 

COLLIE ROAN 

THOMASVILLE, ALA. 

JUANITA ROGERS 

RUSSELLVILLE, ALA. 

MARY ELLEN SPINKS 

THOMASVILLE, ALA. 

ELIZABETH TAYLOR 

GADSDEN, ALA. 



VIRGINIA THOMAS 

ASHBY, ALA. 



19 2 6 




TECHNALA 




ELIZABETH WARD 

TUSCALOOSA, ALA. 



MONTEVALLO, ALA. 

ALLIE WATTERS 

SPROTT, ALA. 



DOROTHY WILLIAMS 

UNTIONTOWN, ALA. 

MARY K. WILLINGHAM 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

MARY NEF.LV WILLINGHAM 

EMELLE, ALA. 

HATTIE WILSON 

ROANOKE, ALA. 

MYRTIE WILSON 

ROANOKE, ALA. 



64 



TECHNALA 



% 



%^>j-»-v^»>>r vy * vv : ;Vj s <$$ 



^Va^ 






19 2 6 





'■5 






TECHNALA 



19 2 6 



fk^ 













v>' \s^;\:^..Ai-">' v*> 







Sophomore Class 



CARRIE LEE ABERCROMBIE 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

VIVIAN ALFORD 

ALBERTVILLE, ALA. 

MARY ANSLEV 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

GLADYS ARMSTRONG 

SYLACAUCA, ALA. 

ZADA BANKS 

jackson's cap, ai.a. 

ETOILE BARNES 

ALBANY, ALA. 

ROSALIE BARNETTE 

ROGERSVILLE, ALA. 

LUCY WOOD BAUGHMAN 

DOTHAN, ALA. 

ELSIE BEDINGFIELD 

ROGERSVILLE, ALA. 

RUBIE BENTON 

OPP, ALA. 

GRACE BERRYMAN 

TOWN CREEK, ALA. 



66 



TECHNALA 




Soph 



CL 



pnomore wass 

SARA BINION 

EVERGREEN, ALA. 

STELLA BLACK 

HARTFORD, ALA. 

DOROTHY BOLLER 

FOLEY, ALA. 

MARY WEIR BOOTH 

PRATTVILLE, ALA. 

EDNA BOYD 

NEW BROCKTON", ALA. 

MARY BRANTLEY 

BURNT CORN", ALA. 

MILDRED BRANTLEY 

BANKS, ALA. 

ALTA BROWN 

YANTLEY, ALA. 

RUTH BROWN 

DOZIER, ALA. 

WILL LACYE BROWN 

JASPER, ALA. 

MARY BRYANT 

E.VSLEY, ALA. 

LOITSE BRUNETT 

BREWTON, ALA. 




67 



TECHNALA 





Sophomore Class 

EMMIE STOVALL CARTER 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 



LILLIAN CHAPPELL 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 



MARY EVELYN CLARK 

RED LEVEL, ALA. 



FANNIE CLEVELAND 

SL'GGSVILLE, ALA. 

VIVIAN COBB 

LINDEN, ALA. 

MARGARET COLEMAN 

MOBILE, ALA. 

MILDRED CROOK 

ATMORE, ALA. 

LEONORA DAMRELL 

MOBILE, ALA. 

NINA B. DANTZLER 

EUFAULA, ALA. 

MARGARET DAVIS 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

MARY LOU BYRD 

OPP, ALA. 



TECHNALA 




Soph 



CI.- 



pnomore t^lass 

PAULINE DAY 

ALICEVILLE, ALA. 

EDITH DELCHAMPS 

MOBILE, ALA. 

MARY KATE DERBY 

YORK, ALA. 

REBA DUNKLIN 

SELMA, ALA. 

ELIZABETH ELLIOTT 

COLUMBIA, ALA. 

SARA ETHRIDGE 

CLIO, ALA. 

LYDIA FINKLEA 

MONROEVILLE, ALA. 

RUBYE FLOYD 

ABANDA, ALA. 

LAURETTA FORTNER 

SWEET WATER, ALA. 

UNA FRANKLIN 

GADSDEN', ALA. 

FRANCES FREELAND 

SELMA, ALA. 

LILLIAN FRENCH 

GORDO, ALA. 




fig 



TECHNALA 








Sophomore Class 



LUCILLE FULLER 

PERRYVILLE, ALA. 

EUDORA GATES 

MI. WILLING, ALA. 

ELSIE GIBBS 

AUBURN', ALA. 

EDITH GILCHRIST 

BRANTLEY, ALA. 

MARY GILLILAND 

GOOUWATF.R, ALA. 

LAURYN GODBOLD 

PINE HILL, ALA. 

ELIZABETH GRAVES 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 

MIRIAM GREGG 

DEMOPOLIS, ALA. 

LILLIAN HAIN 

SELMA, ALA. 

MARIE HAM 

ELBA, ALA. 

SALLIE MAE HARMON 

TROV, ALA. 



7 



: \ ^-^Sx S^^Q^^r^^ 



« TECHNALA 



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V /' 




Sophomore Class 

EUGENIA HARPER 

PIKE ROAD, ALA. 

ALICE HARRIS 

VINCENT, ALA. 

NAN HEATH 

GOLD, HILL, ALA. 

RUTH HILLMAN 

MOFFAT, ALA. 



MARJORIE HILL 

VERNON, ALA. 



DOROTHY HIXON 

GALLION, ALA. 

LILLIAN HIXON 

PEROTE, ALA. 

WILLIE DEANE HOLDER 

YORK, ALA. 

LEILA HOLLAND 

CASTLEBERRV, ALA. 

NANNIE MAE HOLLAND 

MOBILE, ALA. 

NONA HORSELY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 




71 










Sophomore Class 



MARY HOUSE 

PORTER, ALA. 

MARY HOWARD 

SVLACAUCA, ALA. 

DESSIE JOHNSON 

CARBON" HILL, ALA. 

MARGARET JOHNSON 

ANNISTON, ALA. 

VICTORIA JOLLY 

DOWNS, ALA. 

EMMA LOUISE JONES 

PRATTVILLE, ALA. 

MARY JORDON 

PIKE ROADS, ALA. 

ELIZABETH KELLER 

UNION SPRINGS, ALA. 

ANITA KING 

OPP, ALA. 

DOROTHY KNOWLES 

DOTHAN, ALA. 

MINNIE LAMHERTH 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 

INEZ LAMMON 

SLOCUMB, ALA. 




LUCY McARTHl'R 

SLOCOMB, ALA. 

HAZEL McCLESKY 

GADSDEN", ALA. 

TRUE MARBLE 

STONE MOUNTAIN, GA. 

ANNIE MARKS 

MOBILE, ALA. 

WILLIE C. MARTIN 

BESSEMER, ALA. 

SAIDEE MAYFIELD 

MOBILE, ALA. 

LOTTIE LEE METCALF 

HARTFORD, ALA. 



7> 



TECHNALA 





Sophomore Class 

LOIS MILLER 

THOMASVILLE, ALA. 

SHIRLEY MOORE 

THOMASVILLE, ALA. 

ALLENE MORRIS 

BESSEMER, ALA. 

RUBY MORTON 

MIDWAY, ALA. 

MARY NOBLE 

ANNISTON, ALA. 

BERTHA NULL 

DEMOPOLIS, ALA. 

MILDRED ORR 

LAFAYETTE, ALA. 

CATHERINE ORTMAN 

DEMOPOLIS, ALA. 

JOSEPHINE PACE 

MUXFORD, ALA. 

EUGENIA PATTON 

CORDO, ALA. 

CATHERINE PARKER 

COLUMBIANA, ALA. 

EUNICE PARKER 

ANDALUSIA, ALA. 



7+ 



.4 3f*J A. 




TECHNALA 




Soph 



phomore 



CI 



ass 



TIIEI.MA PEARSON 

MILLTOWX, ALA. 

PEARL PERDUE 

MINTER, ALA. 

MAUDE PERRET 

ANDALUSIA, ALA. 

BERA PHILLIPS 

INVERNESS, ALA. 

MYRTLE PLANT 

BOLLING, ALA. 

CATHERINE PRENTISS 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

ELEANOR PRUETT 

GANTT, ALA. 

ANNIE RAWLS 

ANDALUSIA, ALA. 

MILDRED RICE 

ALBER1VILLE, AI.A. 

THELMA RILEY 

ASHLAND, ALA. 

MARIE ROGERS 

AIMWELL, ALA. 

YALLIE ROGERS 

DOTHAN, ALA. 

WYNONA ROGERS 

GOODWATER, ALA. 







75 




TECHNALA 




Sophomore Class 



MORF.LL RYAN 

EXCEL, ALA. 

EVIE SAWYER 

MONROEVILLE, ALA. 

EUGENIA SELLERS 

M'CULLOUGH, ALA. 

LEILA MAE SHARPE 

BRIGHTON, ALA. 

KATHELEEN SIMMS 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

INEZ SMITH 

ANNISTON, ALA. 

PERMELIA SNELL 

DOTHAN, ALA. 

RUBIE JO SNELLGROVE 

BOAZ, ALA. 

LUCY STEVENS 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

MIRIAM STONE 

NANAFALIA, ALA. 

VERDIE STRICKLAND 

LINEVILLE, ALA. 

JULIA STROUD 

UNION SPRINGS, ALA. 



TECHNALA 



& W 



19 2 6 









• ■> Ok 



Sophomore Class 

LOUISE SWAIN 

GEICER, ALA. 

ANTONIA TOLBERT 

GOLD HILL, ALA. 

MARGARET TICKER 

UNION SPRINGS, ALA. 

MYRTLE TURBERVILLE 

CENTURY, FLORIDA 

MARGUERITE TYSINGER 

BESSEMER, ALA. 

HELEN VEITCH 

BESSEMER, ALA. 

MARY VINSON 

ROANOKE, ALA. 

SOPHRONIA WAPSWORTH 

PRATTVILLE, ALA. 

ELIZABETH WEATHERLY 

PINE HILL, ALA. 

MONA WHATLEY 

RAMER, ALA. 

LOUISE WILLIAMS 

MONROEVILLE, ALA. 









77 









TECHNALA 





Sophomore Class 



BERNICE WHEELER 

STROUD, ALA. 

ELIZABETH WILSON 

PRATTVILLE, ALA. 

JULIA WILLIAMS 

MONROEVILLE, ALA. 

LOUISE WATSON 

FLORALA, ALA. 

OUIDA WOOD 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

RUBY WORTHY 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 




//?<2. fill (IrounJ 
*5 i ucle: n i < — . 

4*- 



78 



TECHNALA 




up] 











Cortcnse Adams, Eura Adkinson, Louise Allbritton, Pearl Allbritton, Catherine Allen, Martha 
Allen, Alma Aim on, Carrie Inez Alston, Frances Apperson, Edna Armstrong, Margaret Armstrong, 
Dorothy Atkinson, Alma Baldwin, Julia Banks, Josie Barefield, Elhura Bargainier, Alcie Barnett, 
Louneal Barrow, Dorothy Baughman, Grace Bell, Estelle Blann, Rose Marie Boyd, Grace Bramlett, 
Hermine Brandt, Vera Brasher, Elizabeth Bryant, Anna Love Buntin, Mary Lucy Burkett, Louise 
Burn ham, Eva Byrd, Eliza < Saltan, Louise t'allan, Helena Carlisle, Lorraine Carmichael, Alice Mae 
i 'as! 1. -nian, A 1 ha Catanzana. Vivian Turner, Nancy Wilson, 



so 




TECHNALA 



6 



19 2 6 



,4 - . < #?■• -.^ >C- '-■ . " ** v 



g^^i^Ma** 





Mildred Chambers, Mildred Chancey, Fa.nnie Byars Chappell, Susan Chappell, Antionetta Christian, 
Charlotte Claybrooke, Est ell e Clemons. Sara Cloninger, Mary Cogswell, Sara Elizabeth Cole, Nettie 
.Lucille Coleman, Dixie Collier, Dorothy Collins, Mary Coons, Myra Courington, Rosalie Crelly, Martha 
Crew, Helen Croom, Edith Cunningham. Sarah t 'unningham, Helen Agnes Davis, Hilah Dennis, Gertrude 
Denton, Florence Dick, Sadie Drake, Willie Eieh, Helen Ellington, Annie Belle Elliott, Elizabeth Ellis. 
Lizzie Hearn Erwin, Gladys Faulk, Rebecca Ford, Viola Foster, Margaret Fountain, Dorothy Wynn, 
Emily Williams. 



81 



TECHNALA 






Sara Evans Powler, Mary Garlington, Frances Gay, Mozelle Givens, Cornelia Godfrey, Mary Cath- 
i riit.' Granade, Thelma Graves, < '.ussi.' Green, Lucy Green, Lous.- Griffin, Ethel Grimsley, Sara Paye 
Haines, Tommy Mall. Emily Hardy, Mildred Harp, Nell Harris, Myrtiss Heath, Ann Turner I litmus. 
Will a I'd Josephine Hillman, Flora Hint on, 1 1 -*!.■!) Hixon, Prances Virginia 1 i ood, Margaret Huey, Edna 
Huffman, Elizabeth Huff si utler, Lillian Hughes, Ruth Ingram, Prances Johnson. Helen Jones, Helen 
Kennamer, Lillian Gatha Kilgore, Daisy Pal Killian, Virginia Kirby, Martha Claire Kitchens, Willie 
Grace Kratzer, Mary Emma Zeigler. 



Sj 




TECHNALA 



19 2 6 




<w 






•j I* Hi l*rJ I" 

$ ^ w a' * 








Blanche Pauline Lazent.y. Eloise Leo, Nell Lewis, Velma Lewi*. Jewel Livingston. Ruth Lowe, 
Alice Lowery, Mabel] e Mr-Andrews, Martha Gerusia McBrayer, Mary Dell McCain, Ruth McConnico, 
Man,- McCord, Garbell McClurry. Emma McGowin, Mae McKenzie, Mary Agnes Mc-Kinnon, Gertrude 
McLain, Willie Pearl MeLendon, Edna Majors, Frances Marchman, Mary Marsh, Allene Martin, Doris 
Martin. Birdie Josephine Mason, Henrietta Matthews. Frances Meigs, Clyde Merrill. Catherine Metcalf, 
Willie Mason Miles, Mary Olivia Miller, Mayme Miller, Annie Mae Milner, Burlie Vines, Evelyn Vinson, 
Margaret Ward. Nell Ernestine Wells. 



•3 




3K. 



TECHNALA 







-A-* 








Florence Moore, Katie Belle Moore, Ida Mary Morrlsette, Virginia! Murphy. Ducile Nettles, Azile 
Morris, Aline Osborn, Elizabeth Owens, Ida Katherine Owen, Louise Owen, Evelyn Parker, Inez Parker, 
Cecil Lou Parsons, Hazel Grace Parsons, SaraJ Maude Pat ill o, Virginia Pearson, Louise Pettus, Lula 
Rea Pharr, Mozelle Phillips, Henrietta Piatt. Evelyn Pint; let on, Kathleen Pope, Evelyn Powell, Mae 
Prater, Elizabeth Prather, Lola Katherine Presley, Edith Prestwood, Polly Price, Gladys Purvis. Violet 
Ramsay, Odessa Reagan, Ora Nell Redden, Camilla Reeves, Velma Reynolds, Inez Wright, Sybil Wil- 
son, Annie Yaiborough. 



84 



TECHNALA 





Bess Rogers. Frances Rush. Mary Sanders. Bessie Savage, Mozelle Savage, Gladys Sealy, Mae 
Sharmon, Margaret Sims, Claudia Slade, Annie Louise Smith, Christine Turrentine Smith, Dorothy 
Smith, Janet Smith, Margaret Smith, Rebecca May Smith, Elizaheth Palmer Spiers, Gay Nell Sliradlin, 
Erin Stallworth, Mary George Stallworth, Evelyn Stapler, Annice Stapp, Frances Stephens, Avee 
Stewart, Gertrude Stockton, Katylene Stovall, Helen Stroud, Frances Suddith, Leila Virginia Summer- 
ville, Mary Clyde Swearinger, Carrie Lee Tatum, Velna Taylor, Louise Elizabeth Tennant, Mathilda 
Thomas, Mollie Mae Thomas. Rosa Tilson. 



85 



TECHNALA 





INTERMISSION FOR THE LADIES 



Sh 




Organizations 



In the dim and distant future 
When our Councils you would visit, 
You must sit among our women, 
Who are leaders of our Nation, 







A \ 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 



1 CjKjLl)\M.Ut\ KWS&Jpt -*>^fe ^ 












oz 



a 



DE( zinc 



3HI jnc 



Or^anijafions 



DO 



OC 



ini ->nr 



~>n i i nr 



8 9 



TECHNALA 









tu«* 



Executive Board 

Helen Davis President 

Mary Hill Vice-President 

Edith Delchamps Secretary 

Ibbie Jones Treasurer 



Senior Representatives 

Nina Fave Bonner 
Aleene LeCroy 
Mary Nette Loflin 
Mary Riley 



Junior Representatives 
Helen Boykin 
Ibbie Jones 
Mary Hill 

Sophomore Representatives 

Edith Delchamps 
Mary Kate Derby 

Honorary Members 

Ann Long 
Hazel Black 



90 



TECHNALA 




19 2 6 



ff>c 



xa ( * 







» Ao x v>, y 



STUDENT C0UNCIL 




91 




Student Senate 

Hazel Black President 

Collie Roan Vice-President 

Robbie Andrews Secretary 

Lucy Wood Bauchman Treasurer 



Annie Crossley 
Robbie Andrews 
Margaret Butler 
Patty Cole 
Thressa Conaway 
Celia Cumbee 



Seniors 

Margaret Embry 
Carmenita Greene 
Lena Harris 
Lucy Holt 
Mildred Keahey 
Mamie Kroell 
Sara Ganzmiller 
Hattie Lyman 



Leta Orr 
Lilian Prout 
Bill Smith 
Agnes Stew-art 
Louise Ward 
Wanda Burks 



Joy Cawthon 

Mabei.lf. Conner 
Mildred Gilchrist 
Martha Grantham 



Juniors 

Margaret Grayson 
Mary Hungerford 
Ann Jones 
Inez Ray 
Collie Roan 
Joyce Stapler 
Mary Katherine Willingiiam 



Fay Turner 
Dorothy Williams 
Norene Martin 
Estelle Broadway 



Sophomores 



Lucy Wood Bauchman 
Una Franklin- 
Sara Head 
Eleanor Hooper 
Annie Rawles 



Lucy Stevens 
Mary Vinson 
Elizabeth Weatherly 
Frances Loftin 
Lydia Finklea 



Verdie Strickland 







Ik,. 



,„•"'" / 






TECHNALA 



19 2 6 



%> 

"•>. 



s# J*' 



7) V"""^ ^S>¥?lT^ 



~«^lll BW-. // W f.^^^^^^j^'^y^^^^^^^ 



vzr>[&Jj 




STUDENT 
SENATE i 




93 



TECHNALA 





Presidents Council 



Officers 



Helen Davis . . . 
Alma Alman 



President 

Secretary 



Members 



Hazel Black 
Anne Long 
Helen Townsend 
Annv May Skinner 
Elma O'Neill 
Hattie Lyman 
Anne Jones 
Lucy Stevens 
Gladys Waldrop 



Lilian Prout 
Dorothy Williams 
Elizabeth Ward 
Nancy Savage 
Helen Bishop 

M^RY McCONAUGHBY 

Catherine Ortman 
Fannie Jo Scott 
Margaret Coleman 



Roberta Northrup 
Mary Noble 
Ruby Foster 
Minnie Barnes 
Florence Guyton 
Vivian Letson 
Nellie White 
Cricket Abercombie 



9+ 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 



,.-•'/ * '*. xV T ••'"'"" s i-'\ ivL i- ■ V --* w 








95 



TECHNALA 















lA.. 




Y. W. C. A. 



Officers 

JNE LON'G President 

Louise Ward Vice-President 

Ruth Little Secretary 

Laura Johnson Treasurer 

Alice Quari.es Undergraduate Representative 

Bess Williams Program Committee 

Eva Harcett Morning Watch Committee 

Mary Parrent Ramsay Morning Watch Committee 

Gage Morton Big Sister Committee 

Ruth Jones Publicity Committee 

Louise Ward Tea Room Committee 

Fannie Morton Social Committee 

Helen Bovkin Music Committee 

Ei.oree Ingram Home Service Committee 

Ruth Griffin World Fellowship 



96 



TECHNALA 




97 

• . ~ N \ 







TECHNALA 





Technala Staff 

Anny May Skinner Editor-in-Chief 

Joyce Jackson Associate Editor 

Patty Cole Business Manager 

Fanny Jo Scott Photograph Editor 

Mary Erin Riley Senior Section Editor 

Mary Wylie Organizations Editor 

Alice ALSABROOK Humor Editor 

Laura Johnson Art Editor 

Mary Noble Art Editor 

Fanny Morton Snapshots Editor 

Mildred Gilchrist Athletic Editor 

Katherine Leath Athletic Editor 

Dumpsy Barnes Feature Editor 

Helen Veitch Feature Editor 

Bobby Allen . . Feature Editor 

Ruth Little Typist 



98 



TECHNALA 19 2 6 





TECHNXIA 




99 




The Alabamian 

Elma O'Neill Editor-in-Chief 

Thressa Conaway Business Manager 

Una Franklin Front Page Editor 

Katherine Miller Circulation Manager 

Kathleen Simms Toke Editor 

Caroline Middleton Art Editor 

Minnie Barnes Cartoon Editor 

Kat Leath Social Editor 



fy**\ ^ w f 






TECHNALA 






THRESSA, CONAWAy 



EMYlA, UNA. 

O'NEILL FKANfCLlN, 



f 



STAFi* 




KATHLEEN <31MMg 






i^^ CAROLINE^ 

KATHARINE LEATH K.ATHEJ2IN& TflJLLER -TrtlDDLETON, 





-WsSJ^JMBfc 



MAJSy HUN.GER.FOK.D 



R.UBy FOSTEI5/ PER1Y1EL1A, 9NXLL 




Scribblers' Club 



Officers 

Lillian Prout President 

Collie Roan Vice-President 

Laura Johnson Secretary 

Robbie Allen Treasurer 



Members 



Robbie Allen 
Hazel Black 
Joy Cawthon 
Patty Cole 
Edith Delchamps 
Ellie Drevspring 
Laura Johnson 
Mary Hill 



Gage Morton 
Elma O'Neil 
Lillian Prout 
Collie Roan 
Annie May Skinner 
Helen Townsentj 
Fay Turner 
Dorothy Williams 






TECHNALA 



a ,* ! & 



19 2 6 






5 5,^ ^ ^ 



t^^H^^ 



*> ^f^^ Mg% W^ 




HYlARy HILL •pM.WfTaPJfQK.IIW.mz, \, 
DOROTHy WILLI A.-TflS : EL1Y1A. O'MEILL 



103 







TECHNALA 



»*::: 



(§ ^'^^^^^^ki^/^^^^^ex^) ^XT^^N. 



19 2 6 




<*U 



1 w // / 








Calkins Music Club 



Officers 

Frances Loftin President 

Helen Bishop Vice-President 

Frances Crump Secretary 

Myrtle Tuberville Treasurer 



Ml MISFRS 



Anne Long 
Patty Cole 
Ruby" Sanders 
Joyce Jackson 
Alice Quarles 



Miriam Ernst 
Frances Crump 
Lucy Stevens 
Mary Wylie 
Frances Loftin 



Althea Hughes 
Myrtle Tuberville 
Ruby McAllister 
Myrtle Plant 
Helen Boykin 



10.1 






TECHNALA 



Jl. *v^te 






fe> 










%c^ 






fa?**!? jL 






on 



^.- /l/ ; ? 







vw v,."v-:./C'.-'' V..,0 



1 9 2 6 






'o 







MUSIC 
CLUB 




105 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 





Mathematics Club 



Officers 

Dorothy Williams President 

Mildred Gilchrist Vice-President 

Mary Allen Rhodes Secretary 

Lucy Holt Treasurer 

JOY CAWTHON . . . Reporter In .1 labamian 

Members 

Estelle Broadway Fay Turner Emma Louise Jones 

Fannie Jo Scott Helen Townsend Marguerite Tysinger 

Melea Griffin Mary N. Willincham Ellie Dreyspring 

Mary Vinson Helen Davis Mary Gilliland 

Aleene LeCroy Joy Cawthon Collie Roan 

Lucy Holt Katherine Thomas Robp.ie Andrews 

Katherine McGuire Mildred Gilchrist Eudora Gates 

Dorothy Williams Lauretta Fortner Catherine Prentiss 

Mary Bryant Florence Smith 

Pauline Curry Louise Reynolds 

Sarah Head 

Honorary Members 

Miss Stallworth Mr. Kennerly 

Miss Decker Dr. Palmer 

Miss McMichael 



106 



^^^ cT^^^^^^v^^^^^ 



x id 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 



% * <\ ^/"/^^SP^^^JVx ^ 






> 



#f y^ „«««* 






. ' _A«- J SS-J 



l^g^^J^C^ 1 






Hfcy<JfoLL~3-r&as cloy ea.wt.non cTIIcom CcCroy ealncmic S>railLSS 



107 



TECHNALA 





v-N--*>#X» ^S 5 J ■■/■ 




Alab 



ama 



PI 



ayers 



Officers 

Gladys Waldrop President 

Bill Smith Vice-President 

Joy Cawthon Secretary and Treasurer 

Ruth Jones i dvertising Manager 



Members 



Robbie Allen 
Hazel Black 
Margaret Butler 
Jov Cawthon 
Lucile Clay 
Nina B. Dantzler 
Colene Hamilton 
Lucy Holt 
Eleanor Hooper 
Eloree Ingram 
Ruth Jones 
Katherine Leatii 
Frances Loutn 
Madge Page 
Value Rogers 



Irma Reaves 
Bill Smith 
Anny May Skinner 
Gladys Waldrop 
Frances Rush 
Katherine Allen 
Elizabeth Weatherly 
Elizabeth Ward 
Laureen Godbold 
Mary Garlincton 
Catherine Prentiss 
Mildred Gilchrist 
Mary W. Hall 
Pat Conner 
Ann Jones 



108 




-*5 M 










PLAYERS 1tf^| 





I /P 









109 



TECHNALA 









Glee Club 



Officers 

Helen Bishop President 

Mary Erin Riley Secretary and Treasurer 

Eleanor Hooper Business Manager 

Margaret Butler Librarian 



Members 



First Soprano 

Margaret Butler 

Minnie Peebles Johnson- 
Eleanor Payne 

Mildred Thompson 

Myrtle Tuberville 

Elizabeth Cranberry 

Ai.thea Hughes 

Anne Yarbrouch 

Altos 
Mary Erin Riley 
Etoile Barnes 
Midiline Vildibill 
Pattie Cole 
Ann Long 
Ann Jones 
Gladys Elrod 
Myrtle Plant 



Second Soprano 
Annie Lou Hodges 
Alice Quari.es 
Frances Crump 
Verna Brasher 
Mirian Ernst 
Ik inces Sayner 
K v] hleen Chester 








TECHNALA 








.s*S-^ 


rv, 




Jpfl ^V 


JK_ ... 










1 

4i^ 


^ ~w" ^4^PlG9i 


jH 





TECHNALA 





HGME 

EC gnomics! 

CLUB V' 

"I /i 




ETHEL DEAK.E, PEES. 





IBBIE JONE9", V. PRES. 










n 

HELEN. GEORGE 1MA,Ey HUN.GERFORD , - 




BENWIE- WALTON., SEC. 



■-- .,. 





NELLIL- WHITE- 





CA,PMEN,ITA, GREER LOUISE- WAKP 



■MILDRED iYieCOKD 



m 

LEN.A. HARRIS 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 





Secretarial Club 



Officers 

Catherine Ortman President 

Ruth Little rice-President 

Vivian Cobb Secretary and Treasurer 



M EMBERS 



Mary Noble 
Ruth Little 
Vivian Cobb 
Hermine Brant 
Helen Stroud 



Cornelia Godfrey 
Janet Smith 
Rebecca Ford 
Sara Cole 
Dorothy Baughman 



Aniece Stapp 
Ruth Ingram 
Odessa Reagan 
Alma Alman 
Evelyn Rose 
Anny May Skinner 



113 



TECHNALA 





Physical Education Club 



Officers 

Elizabeth Ward President 

Annie Holt Younc Vice-President 

Fay Turner Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 

Louise Albritton 
Pearl Albritton 
Myra Bell 
Leanora Damreli. 
Nina Dantzler 
Rubye Floyd 
Kate Gaillard 
Margaret Grayson 
Leila Holland 

Mary Watson- 



Anne Jones 
Tope Martin- 
Catherine Prentiss 
Edith Richards 
Bessie Savage 
Lucile Sneli.grove 
Rubie Jo Snellcrove 
Lucile Splawn 
Gladys Waldrop 



Honorary Members 

Miss Funk 
Miss Putnam 
Miss Early 
Miss Kent 



"1 




TECHNALA -f*MJL 



K. T 




19 2 6 



jy \^K.y.^^y %*j 








£U£»BETH WA.T2P 



A.MN1E HOLT VOUNG 



CLUB 




PAy TUENEE/ 




GLTlDyS 
WA-L.DT20P 



A^HME- cJOKES 



RUBy JO 
SN.ELLGROV& 



"5 



TECHNALA 





The Forensic Club 

Organized October, 1925, for the Purpose of Forwarding Intercollegiate Debates 



Officers 

Carrie Lhf. Abercrombie President 

Vircinia Thomas Vice-President 

Allene LeCrOY Secretary and Treasurer 



Charter Members 

Carrie Lee Abercrombie Una Franklin 

Hazel Black: Allene LeCroy 

Thressa Conaway Vircinia Thomas 

Elizabeth Ward 



in 



TECHNALA 






19 2 6 



JX3 



^l^^^Z^^^^^sJ ^X^Xx 



&> 







I 




CLUB 




i 









117 



:swn 






'^^ATi 



>> 






TECHNALA 




<D 



EDICATED to those of us who 
did not see ft to foster the 
spirit of the classes and stu- 
dent organizations by personal iden- 
tification sufifiort. May your faces 
realize their vital opportunity sooner 
than they have " annuahstic -fyleas. 




ii9 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 




H 






Castalian Club 

Established 1900 

Officers 

Fannie Jo Scott President 

Sallie Mae Dalton Vice-President 

Fannie Morton Secretary 

Permelia Snell Treasurer 

Class of UJ26 
Bill Smith Fannie Jo Scoit 

Sallie Mae Dalton Elizabeth Cranberry 

Patty Cole Haute Lyman 

Class of 1927 
Gage Morton Mary Watson 

Elizabeth Ward 

Class of it) 28 
Fannie Morton Permelia Snell 

Lucy Stevens "Julia Stroud 

Vivian Cobb 



Class of i()2<) 
Rebecca Ford *Velna Taylor 

Dorothy Baughman *Emily Hardy 

Mary McConauchy *Gracf. Bell 

Helen Stroud "Florence Dick 



"Pledges 






TECHNALA 






CASTXUAN 
CLUB 





/ 




TECHNALA 




CASTALIAN CLUB 






TECHNALA 




Tutwiler Club 
IOTA SIGMA TAU 

Founded 1901 

Officers 

Marcaret Coleman President 

Mary Wiley Vice-President 

» Alice Alsobrook Secretary 

Isma Long Treasurer 



Class of 
Pauline Curry" . . . 
Kathleen McCormick . 
LoLia Braxton Sanford 
Anny May Skinner . . 

Class of 
Alice Alsobrook . . 
Margaret Grayson . 
Ruth Little . . . 
Helen Grey McNeil 
Ruth Pardue . . . 
Frances Sayner . . 



*Alcie Barnett . 
Helen Elington . 
Elizabeth Ellis . 
Daisy Fay Killian 
*r0wena langley 



SORORES IN 
1926 
. Montevallo, Ala. 
. . Centre, Ala. 
Talladega, Ala. 
. Montgomery, Ala. 
1927 

. LaGrange, Ga. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Talladega, Ala. 
. Saginaw, Ala. 
. Mobile, Ala. 



COLLEGIO 

Class of JQ 
Margaret Coleman . . . 
Girlie Holland .... 

Isma Long 

{Catherine Leath . . . 
""Virginia Ledbetter . 
*Elizabeth Keller . . I 

True Marble 

Mary Elizabeth Moody . 
Aletha Louise Tente . . 
Mary Wiley ...'.[ 



. Mobile, Ala. 

Mobile, Ala. 

Hurtsboro, Ala. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

'nion Springs, Ala. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

. Piedmont, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

nion Springs, Ala. 



"Pledges 



Class of 1929 
Fitzpatrick, Ala. "Christine Mitchell . . Hurtsboro, Ala. 

. Opelika, Ala. Frances Rush Bessemer, Ala. 

. Marvel, Ala. Claudia Slade Mcintosh, Ala. 

. Straven, Ala. Dorothy Smith Mobile, Ala. 

Sylacauga, Ala. Marion Jones-Williams . Montevallo, Ala. 

High School 
^Frances Lewis .... Montevallo, Ala. 

123 






TECHNALA 




19 2 6 








TUTWILER CLUB 



13+ 



TECHNALA ^i k %^ 



7 9 2 6 



ki, C\ 



tn^A.' 









s* >s -•*■ 

.XT.* 






"51 I 







TUTWILER CLUB 



125 



TECHNALA 





Philomathic Club 

Founded iyoS 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



Class of 1 92 6 
Louise Latham .... Montevallo, Ala. 

Lillian Prout Demo foils, Ala. 

Marguerite Scroccins .... Centre, Ala. 

Class of 1927 
Roberta Northrup . . . Greensboro, Ala. 

•Marion Hanna Marlon, Ala. 

Joyce Jackson Oxford, Ala. 

Mary Parrent Ofelika, Ala. 

*Nan Nelle Frederick . . Ofelika, Ala. 

Mary Hill Benton, Ala. 

Mary Cola Hungerford . . . Selma, Ala. 

Helen Boykin Camden, Ala. 

Lucy Pickens Greensboro, Ala. 



Class 


of 


I92S 




Aimee Jack .... 


. Greensboro, 


I la 


*Myrtle Tuberville 


. . Century, 


Fla 


*Sara Binion . . . 


Evergreen, 


lla 


Kate Gaillard 






Evergreen, 


I la 


Pearl Perdue . 






. . Mlnter, 


lla 


Anne Johnson . 






Brundldge, 


lla 


Martha Orr 






Union Springs, 


lla 


"Althea Hughes 






Florala, 


lla 


*Emmie Carter 






. Montgomery, 


lla 


Elizabeth Latham 




. Montei/allo, 


lla 


Class of 


1929 




Elizabeth Spiers . . 


. Montgomery, 


lla 


Evelyn Stapler . . 


. . Mobile, 


lla 


*Erin Stallworiii 


Evergreen, 


lla 


*Editii Cunninch. 


1M 




Evergreen, 


lla. 



'Pledges 




126 










TECHNALA 





127 



•"N 



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#*& 



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Phi Delta Sigma 

Officers 

Florence Guyton President 

Eudora Gates Vice-President 

Mary Gillilaxd Secretary 

Annie Holt Younc Treasurer 



Members 
Bill Slone 
Hazel Black 
Annie Holt Younc 
Inez Ray 

Mitvlene Vildibill 
Aleene LeCroy 
Kataleen Stovall 
Odelle Stewart 

Mae Prater 



Phyliss Earle 
Mary Willard Hall 
Agnes Stewart 
Mildred Keahey 
Lena Harris 
Colleen Hamilton 
Alice Mae Castleman 
Thelma Riley 



Pledges 



Marjorie Hill 
lorene hankins 
Louise Watson 



Gatha Kilgore 
Virginia Kirby 
Katie Bell Moore 



Marie Boyd 



Honorary Members 



Miss Kemp 
Miss Tabor 
Miss Young 
Miss K. Stone 



Miss Stone 
Miss Blackiston 
Miss Decker 
Miss Sale 



Miss Ross 



128 




129 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 






rVi 












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PHILODEXDROI CLUB 



130 




Kappa Sigma Phi 

Established 1923 
Motto: "Dem vivimus vivamus" 



Officers 

Nellie White President 

Leeta Orr Vice-President 

Grace Bromlet Secretary 

Veride Strickland Treasurer 

Ibbie Jones Artist 

Members 
Leeta Orr Nellie White 

Ibbie Jones Faye Cotney 

Grace Bromlet Verdie Strickland 

Pledges 

Gladys Pervis Mary Frances Gay 

Elizabeth Graves Ethel Grimsley 

Esther Reagan Ruby Floyd 

Annie Lee Floyd Dessie Johnson 

Honorary Members 
Miss Lee Rev. P. G. Carmichael 

Miss Mallory Miss Anna Irvin 



131 



TECHNALA 





'32 




X'"0- ■ ^W^ S ':; ; ' ^W<f* 




KAPPA SIGMA PHI 



133 



TECHNALA 





Zeta Pi Delta Club 



Officers 

Mary Noble President 

Gladys Walorop Vice-President 

Lucile Snellgrove Secretary 

Irma Reaves Treasurer 



Members 



Elizabeth Taylor 
Anne Jones 
Anne Long 
Gladys Waldrop 
Irma Reaves 
Laura Johnson 
Eloree Ingram 
Helen Vietch 
Martha Grantham 
Mei.ba Griffin 



Lucile Snellgrove 
Claire Griffin 
Helen Davis 
Rosalie Crelly 
Fannie Byars Ciiappel 
Catherine Allen 
Alice Lyman 
Etoile Barnes 
Margaret Butler 
Mary Noble 



Pledges 

Mildred Thompson 
Dorothy Adkinson 



134 



TECHNALA 




19 2 6 



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135 



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19 2 6 



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ZETA PI DELTA CLUB 



136 



^H 







Ramsay Club 

(Beta Sigma Delta) 

Officers 

Vivian- Letson President 

Helen' Bishop Vice-President 

Vivian Alford Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 
Vivian Alford Vivian Letson 

Helen Bishop Henrietta Matthews 

Kathleen Chester Juanita Rogers 

Irelle Chambers Elizabeth Wilson 

Mable Jean Long 

Pledges 

Alma Almon Anne Higgins 

Sara Cole Mary Ruth Callaway 

Nelle Harris Velma York 



137 








133 







TECHNALA 






19 2 6 






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BETA SIGMA DELTA CLUB 



TECHNALA 




a»3 i » W 





Alpha Pi Omega 



Officers 

Minnie Barnes President 

Katherine Morrison Vice-President 

Catherine Ortman Secretary and Treasurer 

Katheryn Morrison Reporter 



Members 



Florence Smith 
Miriam Ernst 
Catherine Ortmann 
Annie Crossley 
Nina Faye Bonner 
Caroline Middleton 
Roberta Bailey 
Katherine Morrison- 
Minnie Barnes 

Clyde 



Eloise Lee 
Alice Lowery 
Elizabeth Huffstutler 
Annie Louise Smith 
Miriam Gregg 
Sue Broarus Finklea 
Lydia Finklea 
Maxine Priddy 
Nell Jackson 
Wainu right 



Edna Armstrong 
Margaret Armstrong 






I ,o 









19 2 6 



a TECHNALA 




141 



TECHNALA 




Pi K 



appa 



Del 



ta 



Officers 

Ruby Foster President 

Catherine Prentiss rice-President 

Hazel Jackson Secretary 

Frances Freeland Treasurer 

Members 

Class of ig>6 
Olene Johnson 
Ruth Griffin 
Ruby Foster 

Class of IQ2J 
Lois Reynalds 
Hazel Jackson 1 
Mary A. Rhodes 

Class of IQ28 
Catherine Prentiss Hazel McLesky 

Sara Etheridge Rubie Jo Snei.lcrove 

Carrie Lee Abercrombie 



Class of IQ2Q 
Mildred Chambers Louise Griffin 

Mae McKenzie Frances Marchman 

Raciiael Morgan Margaret Fountain 

Lorraine Carmichael Nettie Coleman 



• 






-' s 







TECHNALA ,*8J&3fe fc 192 6 




PI KAIM'A DELTA 




cAthletics 



In the dim and distant future 
When the teams for sports are chosen, 
Who will win the gridirons glory? 
Why, our granddaughters, of course! 
Who will win the balloon pants hurdles? 
Why, again, of course, our grandsons! 
Each shall win the fitting glory. 



s 



i 




TECHNALA 



19 2 6 







n k & 



Athletic Board 



Officers 

Helen Townsend President 

Lorene Martin Vice-President 

Marcaret Grayson Secretary 

Mildred Keahev Treasurer 

Councillors 

Annie Holt Younc . Hiking and Camping 

Ellie Drevspring Tennis 

Mildred Keahev Basketball 

Senior Representatives 

Bill Smith 
Lucille Snellcrove 

Junior Representatives 

Elizabeth Ward 
Estelle Broadway 

Sophomore Representatives 

Bill Weatherly 
Grace Berryman 

Freshman Representatives 

Louise Albritton 
Pearl Albritton 



147 




-■■< 



V"> 



TECHNALA 



•^-^^sV 19 2 6 






; ,.. ; 






■-> 













ATHLETIC BOARD 




7H 






y ( S 







VARSITY CHEER LEADERS 



H9 




CHEER LEADERS 



150 



TECHNALA 








151 



, ^y/50 ^ ^s^Kx. ... VIVl j^ycr^ ^~" ^^<<C*"^ i * ' "*€ 



TECHNALA 




. s-*9 



19 2 6 





FRESHMAN 
BASKETBALL SQ.UAD 



152 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 




XT. 







153 






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TECHNALA 





■ ;» 



TECHNALA 







19 2 6 







SPORTS 



THE BIRM 



SPORTS 



Vol. II. 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



No. 



Alabama College Takes Flying 

Colors From B'ham Southern 

SCORE 23-29— TOWNSEND AND SMITH STARS 



Playing their first game of 
the season did not stop the dash- 
ing forwards, the steady guards, 
or the swift pass work of the in- 
vincible Alabama College team. 
They were there, they were here, 
they were everywhere. Drib- 
bling, running, jumping, pivot- 




Margaret Grayson* 



ing, juggling until the final 
whistle blew; then they stood 
still with the score standing 23- 
29. Monrevallo's victory. 

Townsend, captain of the team, 
is one of the best bets on Monte- 
vallo's basketball quintet. It is 
a lucky forward who succeeds in 
finding the basket at all when 
Townsend is her opponent. She 
was in her best form Saturday 
afternoon when Howard team 
clashed with the Montevallo five 
on the home court. Time and 

time again of the 

Howard Co-eds made a desper- 
ate effort to reach the goal, only 
to find Townsend an invincible 
wall between her and her de- 
sire. There is no forward so 
swift that Townsend is not 
swifter, and when it comes to 
team work Townsend is hard to 
beat. Always steady and re- 
liable. 

Passing is a sure game and no 
balls ever go wrong when Town- 
send is behind them. 

The line-up for Alabama Col- 
lege has leaked out and the 
"Stone Wall," Smith, will begin 
the game as guard. Smith, re- 
liable coworker of Townsend at 
the guard end, showed all her 
marvelous ability to get the ball 
off the backboard and, by the 
clever passwork with partner 
guard and center, to get the ball 
into the hands of the Montevallo 
forwards; hence, into the basket, 
of course. Throughout all her 
basketball career, Smith has been 
known and dreaded as a sticker. 



Her own team members would 
rather be guarded by anyone 
else than Smith. 

All the opposing forwards who 
have ever encountered her cher- 
ish the same sentiments. With 
her pass work, her ability to 
keep with her forward, and to 




Lucille Snellgrove 



TECHNALA 







i 9 2 6 



it i_ \v> 



THE BIRM 




Elizabeth Ward 

relieve balls, she is one 01 the 
strong points of the Montevallo 
team. 

The crowds were thrilled by 
Kaehey's beautiful plays as for- 
ward. The steadiness of the lit- 
tle blonde in playing throughout 
the whole game was very re- 
markable. She was always right 
on the spot, and time and time 
again fooled the Pantherettes 
with a juggle into clear space on 
the floor and an unfailing shot 
for the goal. Keahey's light- 
ning speed made her guard look 
like slow motion pictures. Al- 
though a spectacular player, sel- 
fishness was not even intimated. 
Pass work with Jones, the other 
forward, and Ward, the center, 
was unfailing. With such a de- 
pendable forward, Montevallo's 
prospects this year are certainly 
very bright. 



Montevallo Co-Eds Down the 
Fast Jax Normal-Score 27-29 



Speedy Game Won by Alabama College with 

Jones and Grayson Rolling Up the 

Score to 37 



Jacksonville, Feb. 6. — Ala- 
bama College got the jump on 
Jacksonville Normal Co-ed Sat- 
urday night at the A. D. G. by 
copping their second victory of 
the season. The game was a 
thrilling encounter, made so as 
quitting time neared by a deter- 
mined rally on the part of the 
Normals. Both teams displayed 
a neat offensive and strong de- 




tense. Many sparkling plays fea- 
tured the game. Jones, under 
the basket, who escaped the at- 
tention of the normal back 
guards, scored several of the 
goals for the visiting team, one 
play used by Grayson several 
times — a dribble into Jackson- 
ville territory, a fake at the bas- 
ket and a swift pass to Ward 
under the goal scored a couple 




Melba Griffin 



Grace Berryman 



TECHNALA 




ft *^** 7 9 2 6 



%^1|f i^>^*^ 



THE BIRM 



c.......v ? 



two pointers for the winners. 
Berryman also made a beautiful 
play on a double pass, which 
she received under the basket for 
a speedy basket. Cawthon was 
the leading player on the Nor- 
mals' system, and played an ex- 
cellent game until she was forced 
out on account of fouls. 

"Skeet" Snellgrove, Monteval- 
lo's speedy forward, displayed an 
accurate eye for the goal in this 
afternoon's game when Monte- 
vallo's invincible five met the 
Howard Co-eds. "Skeet's" game 
was remarkable for speedy floor 
work. No matter what the tac- 
tics, none of Howard's guards 
could stop the whirlwind attack 
staged by this slight player of 
the Montevallo aggregation. 




"Alabama College team is in 
the best of shape for the game," 
so Coach Kent said. Ward is 
expected to lead the team to vic- 
tory. Ward, the nonchalant; 
Ward, the indifferent. How her 
height and her coolness, as she 
walks out on the floor, make 
cold chills chase up and down 
the backs of opponents. Her 
sureness at the tap-off, her abil- 
ity to cover the floor, her bril- 
liant goal work, her recovery 
balls at the opposing basket, her 
passwork with all the other team 
members, mark her, in all games, 
as a star player in the hardest 
place on the team, center player 
covering the floor. Ward's work 
thrills even the opponents. Imag- 
ine how Montevallo feels about 
her. 





Ruth Jones 



Bill Weatherly 



Helen Townsend 

Margaret Grayson makes her 
debut as forward in thrilling 
game with Jacksonville; chance 
came because of illness of other 
player. When the team went 
into action with a new forward 
we all wondered what the out- 
come would be — but after the 
first quarter all doubts as to 
Grayson's ability had vanished. 
Her long shots were sensational, 
and her ability to cover territory 
on a dribble made many of the 
39 points for Montevallo. In- 
deed, she displayed all the char- 
acteristics of a seasoned player, 
and we predict that the Jackson- 
ville game was only the begin- 
ning of her triumph. 



TECHNALA 




lit. 

THE BIRM 




Montevallo Whitewashes the 
Howard Quintet-Score 31-7 

Alabama College Wins in a Slow Game Over 

the Howard Team. Griffin as Guard 

Showed Her Ability 



Montevallo, Ala., Feb. 13. — 
The first half of the game was a 
drag; Howard running Monte- 
vallo a close race in points. Be- 
ginning the second half, Ala- 
bama five came hack with the 
fighting spirit. Guards standing 
as walls, holding their opponents 
to few goals; centers, here, there, 
shooting goals, getting the tip- 




MlLDRED KEAHEY 



off, passing from all angles of 
the field, while the forwards 
were sure of the goal any place 
on the field. 

The perfect guarding of Grif- 
fin Saturday was one of the fea- 
tures of the game. She played 
hard, she played fast, and she 
plaved fairly. The forward was 
helpless against such defense, 
while her own team was made 
stronger by her passing of the 
ball to the forward territory. 
The spectators were thrilled by 
her plaving, while her opponents 
were dumbfounded. Such swift- 
ness is not often seen along with 
accuracy and clean playing. 

Ruth Jones played a stellar 
role as forward in all games of 
the season. Her eye for the goal 
was ever accurate. Her floor 
work was always clever and she 
never failed to recover the ball 
from the backboard. In all 
games the best guard was put 
on Jones, but in vain, for her 
successful dodging, pirating and 
faking evaded the heaviest de- 
fense. If Freshman Jones played 
thus we wonder what Senior 
Tones will be like! 

Berryman, without a doubt, 
carried the team to victory. For 
the lanky Montevallian started 
the game as forward, she clev- 
erly played the triple role of 
forward, center, and guard. In 
the third quarter, Berryman as 
center instead of Ward, got the 
tip-off and with wonderful 
speed and accuracy completed 
beautiful passes with her for- 
wards, Keahev and Jones, which 
terminated in basket after bas- 
ket. During the second half, 
Berryman guarded Whisenhaut, 
the star forward of the South, 
and with this spectacular guard- 



ing as a check, not a single field 
goal was made. With such a 
guard, the Montevallo team has 
little to fear in the rest of her 
encounters of the season. 

With the Howard-Montevallo 
game will always be associated 
the notorious guarding of Weath- 
erlv. Slight of build — the big 
Howard forward expected a 
walk-away, but got the surprise 
of her life in the first minute 
of the game, when she found 
Weatherly an unsurmountable 
barrier. In toss-ups she got the 
tip-offs, in passes she was neat, 
and in speed she was lightning. 
Throughout the entire game she 
kept a smile on her face that 
was consistent with her even 
playing and that seemed to be- 
wilder her opponent. 




Bill Smith 





features 



distant future 
For the beauties of trie College, 
You will nave Derumea, fluted. 
Curly-haired, our precious hero! 
While for best sport you 11 be seeing, 
Straight-haired lassies, strong and slen- 
der, 
The honor easily they win. 




TECHNALA 




#f>^C~ 









19 2 6 



■ » ">W IN ^>D) IllK*« 



v*c 




/. Beauty 
II Who's Who 




161 



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162 



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165 



TECHNALA 





■^m09T ORIGIN. A.L 
LAAJteA> J0HN.9OK? 



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TECHNALA 



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19 2 6 
















I3U<yH 

CUT&/T 



/• ELIZABETH WARD 
BE-^T ATHLETE— 
BEVT KMOWN^OMTE/TAKT VOTE) 







TECHNALA 19 2 6 



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"V\\jy HELEN, DAW 



■ HA.ZEL BLACK? 
"T •ALL-ISOUN.D 



168 



TECHNALA 







19 2 6 













169 






TECHNALA 



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ret 




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T>je Si<^\xcho)<5WOM we 
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On CftUSes -* TfcsvMts ©Y , 



V-Ks>iory C)^5^ ( IS SO. 






%i 



Mary had a little lamb, 

Its breath ivas sivect and clean 
For every day around its hay, 

She sprinkled listerine. 

"Is this town dry? Say, boy, it's so dry you have to pin on your postage stamps.' 

"My boy, do you know where all bad children go?" 

"Aw, hell, lady!" 

"I know, I know, but don't speak so emphatically." 

"I can't see any of this stuff," said Milton as he dictated "Paradise Lost." 

"That tickles me," he said, pointing to his flannel nightie hanging on the line. 

"I'm in a class by myself," said the professor as he arrived eight minutes late. 



Null 
Void 
Null 



"I started out on the theory that the world had an opening for me." 

"And you found it?" 

"Well, rather, I'm in the hole now." 



Flea (to elephant getting off the ark) : "Don't shove me, big boy." 



i -a 




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TECHNALA 



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19 2 6 



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WILL 




' giNG 



FOR. 




Q ^MONTEVALLO 

b 



e* 

^^M 



*C— §L- rfT ^Tt TiMi 






171 



TECHNALA 





A FAIRY TALE 



173 



TECHNALA 




Toc3<ifty — - *=> He took <v\ft«y 



A*^tA C\rs"Rey»oUs T ° ^ 
PlLfl + e <iate_ iniTl, <^\ , si 

Tench __ ^fo^r,^ (Hr-Rmi, 

TklCen^Vy woy, The Jo., 



lifts* %*+uroV)f Mlt^>\.ss 



6e <jft^e Kn BtcloM' 
was Th & U TC =T Th< 



l s= 



"A sin is imagination plus action." 

"I made a hole in one." 
"One stroke?" 
"No, one sock." 

"What's a parable?" 

"An excuse for a story without any point." 




* mine »s rto telle 
+ a\e" said +l\e 
f re s H ma*. . 




...ik. 



TECHNALA 







^Pitrc is an old college 
Wlfiich stcivLds on, a kill, 

3^r JCwoiuLccige, tJiey drill. 




174 



At the glove counter, said one glove to another, "Are you dressed, kid?" 

You've all heard of the absentminded professor, who, poured catsup on his shoe- 
strings and tied knots in his macaroni, but how about the fellow who twisted the baby's 
ear and walked the floor with the phonograph ? 

"An apple a day will keep the doctor away." 
"So'Il a pound of cheese." 

"A little bit goes a long ways," said the keeper, feeding a handful of hay to a giraffe. 

Anyone taking a correspondence course in Charleston dancing ought to get a kick 
out of his mail. 



A Short Musical Comedy 
"Lend me a dollar?" 
"Aw, go to hell." 



Song: Give My Regards to Davy. 

_F/M/ORITE STUDIE<i„ 



"I'll now un- 
ravel a mystery," 
said the daring 
youth as he 
pulled at a thread 
in the girl's gown. 

"Pin money," 
said the guy hock- 
ing his fraternity 
pin. 

A Scotchman 
once gave a wait- 
ress a tip. Told 
her to wash her 
neck. 




fl Hard "Proposition* 



175 







TECHNALA 




A Hard Proposition 

Gertrude: "Hello, Miss Tillman, 
iw is my pal, Dimples, getting P 



Miss Tillman: "She's convales- 
cing!" 

Gertrude: "Oh, Gee! ain't that too 
bad!! And I thought she was getting 
better." 




She: "That was Mr. Kent. Don't you think he is good looking? He is so romantic. 
Everytime he speaks to me he starts off with "Fair-lady!" 

"He: "Ah — that is only a force of habit. He used to be a street car conductor." 




*■**■■■ ^ 5f 



176 



TECHNALA 




7^ ; 






Cs i 





WE BELIEVE IX GIVIN'G A FELLOW A CHAN'CE 



177 



-.«■/:. 






TECHNALA 





'Turn over, please, I want to get out" 



178 









TECHNALA 






19 2 6 



x^v\ i ^y* %X*^ 






A dwoRce, but on whft+ rtRoonds?'' 
AS HE Am+ MUwed on 'e rvi" 



SM 



~^yg-A 



Ikey: "I see they're charging fifty cents to see "The Ten Commandments." 

Jakey: "Oy, that's a nickel apiece." 

-#- -& -& 

"That's a good dive," said the swimming coach as he passed Breeze Inn. 

"Just cutting up a bit," remarked George Washington as his father spied him near 

the cherry tree. 

-x- & -& 

"I'll run circles around these guys," said the artists as he painted the halo-ed saints. 

* * * 
The universal watchword — Tick. 

The real decline of man — Falling in love. 

* * * 
"Do you love me?" 

"Why, honey, I'd go through fire to brimstone for you." 
"Will I see you tomorrow night?" 
"Yeah, if it don't rain." 



179 



TECHNALA 




MAV 
DAY 




i So 



TECHNALA 



, ft . 



ten 








The §>al -h, ft + vJ^tft l „ F an4er. 
lh CUVtleW bov^^h Nov, Cl.mbc, 
m Pi Fop;d Co ope ^ 



Famous Statements by Famous 
People 

i. "No matter how cold Venus de Milo is, 
she'll never knit a sweater." — Daniel Boone. 



"I hear that your dad smashed himself up 
pretty badly last spring." 

"Yea, he took Ma out driving to an old 
sparking place, said 'Whoa, boy,' to the car, 
and dropped the wheel." 



Our idea of a considerate professor is one 
who talks you to sleep, then wakes you up 
five minutes early so you won't be late for 
vour next class. 



He has been around lots, but they were 
11 cow lots. 



"Don't kiss me please," sweet Mary cried, 
"It isn't customary." 
And then, oh, you should have heard 
That fellow cus-to-Marv. 



Campus Hiccoughs 

Colleges expect every man to do his daddy. 
There is not much romance about a girl 
from your own town. 

It is too much to ask even a state univer- 
sity to make brain out of adamant. 

All the learning you get in college won't 
make the folks act right when you get back 
home. 

Heaven pity the college stomach. 

Eeternity is brief compared to a college 
play. 

(Jetting money from home is not always like 
taking candy from a baby. 

Summer positions but most are jobs. 

There is no possible way of having co-edu- 
cation without girls. 

Nobody ever worked his way through an 
educational engineering college with a laun- 
dry agency. 

Take care of the week-ends and the weeks 
will take care of thmselves. 

All the world loves a lover, except his own 
fraternity brothers. 

There is invariably one killing wit in the 
group at the photographers. 




,4 ' A. v i 




TECHNALA 






"Do you know the difference between a pig- 
skin and a skinned pig?" 

"No." 

"Well, wouldn't you make a swell football 
player?" 

"Ah, Prunella, your face reminds me of 
the poetry of Bobbie Burns." 

"Mean you that it touches the heart, be- 
loved?" 

"Nay, my wee bonnie heather blossom, it's 
full of hard lines." 

* * * 

COLLEGE GRAMMAR 

(As she is known) 

I pet. 
You pet. 
He pets. 

We pet. 
You pet. 
They pet. 
And who doesn't pet? 




Horace called on Estelle. They spent an 
enjoyable evening in intellectual conversation. 

They did not talk of the achievements in 
science, of the policies needed to solve the 
world's problems, of books, of travel, of art. 

They talked of none of these things. 

They talked of Horace. 

* ■* * 

When a woman looks her best she often does 
her worst. 

* * * 

A new girl came to town. 

They said she was too nice, too serious, nar- 
row, hypersensitive, strait-laced, underdevel- 
oped, unsophisticated, inexperienced, abnorm- 
al, cowardly, thin skinner — 

In other words, she was what is known as 
decent. 



Deans Office 



8 



- . '." I I IB! f I 1 

TJiG CoJ/eQ«TireDepa.rtme7?i 



TECHNALA 




CAMPS AND HIKES 




^fW 




Jack: "I see you have a stiff 
finger. What seems to be wrong 
with it?" 

Jill: "I can't bend it." 



Shes: "Why do rabbits have 
shiny noses?" 

Hes: "Because their powder 
puffs are on the other end." 



Jack: "They say that a stu- 
dent should have e'ght hours 
sleep." 

Mack: "True, but who wants 
to take eight classes a day?" 



Here I am, Paddle; I'm your 
little Freshman. 



She was only a customs man's 
daughter, but she was well ac- 
customed. 



"Odorono, a moth lives an awful life." 
"How come, Fauntleroy?" 
"He has to spend the summer in a fur coat 
and the winter in a bathing suit." 

* * * 

Two pints make one quart ; one quart makes 
one wild. 

# * * 

"Whither away, O Galloping Gregory, with 
you meat ax?" 

"Silence, Egg Bread, I hasten to cut my 
classes." 

* * * 

"Now that you've been abroad, do you know 
any French?" 

"Yes, an address book full.'' 



ALPHABETICAL TELEPHONE 
CONVERSATION 

'LO, that you, LN?" 

•ES, it's I." 

'How R U?" 

"O, I M O K, J." 

'G, that's good. 

"Y do U ask?" 

"I thought U and I could take a ride in 

• SX." 

•O I M Dlighted." 

"Can I" take T with me this evening?" 

"Sure thing, that L B EZ for me." 

"C U at seven.' ' 

"I L B ready." 

* * ■*■ 
"Have you much room in your new flat?" 
"Mercy, no! My kitchen and dining room 
e so small I have to use condensed milk." 



He: "Can you Charleston?" 

She: "No, but 1 can Philadelphia." 

He: "Meaning what?" 

She: "I'm a good little Quaker." 



"Give me a sentence with the word 'celery'." 
"Every time he goes down celery takes a 
drink." 



"Where does a man get fat after he's old?". 

"I'll bite." 

"At the butcher's, fool." 

Mr. Washington: "Oh, loolcy! Some darling 
kiddy has chopped down that nasty ole cherry 
tree and earned a shiny sovereign!" 

Lil Gawge: "I cannot tell a lie. 'Twas the 
kid next door." 



1 8+ 



TECHNALA 




Of all sad surprises, 

There's nothing to compare, 
With treading in the darkness 

On a step that isn't there. 



Her: ''Why don't you answer me?" 
Him: "I did shake my head." 
Her: "Well, I couldn't hear it rattle 
clear over here." 



Blonde: "Dear, don't you think col- 
lege boys have such manly voices?" 

Brunette: "Yes, my love; they get 
them from waving their handkerchiefs 
at the football games." 




nib 



'I 



<ky For A Date 



.87 



TECHNALA 

s 




ffif ! 








Heres Th ft + Wto^vpfEd *\h) of 
The -Hook tin 4 e V s pik,o4_ y)hosE h*t* 

but sue'?, omi* p fitto^i 



Book Agent: "Is the lady of the house in?" 
Marie: "Yes, but she ees in ze bath." 
Book Agent: "Well, tell her there is a 
gentleman out here would like t) see her." 



Curious old lady (to one-armed man get- 
ting off train) : "I notice you have lest your 
arm, young man." 

Young man: "So I have — hnv strange." 



Remember? — The good old 
days when he came over to help 
her with her lessons? And they 
both studied ? 



Water are stronger as fire, 
Water are lots more ruff, 

Bekuz you can blow a fire out 
If you blow hard enuf. 



Customer to girl pounding 
piano in Woolworth's: "Would 
you mind playing "Sometime?" 

Girl: "What d'va think I'm 



'J 



3^. "c*wv<u6T n \ 



a. 



big boy ? Sleepin' 



It isn't raining to me. It'; 
simply pouring down. 



Dei Yen Know the Type of College 
Yni th Who — 

Receives all information with skeptical leer? 
Wears his watchchain across his waistcoat, 
running northwest to southeast? Invariably 
knows the first name of every head waiter? 
Tells you that he can't understand why all 
women fall desperately in love with him? 
Always has a scheme of making a million 



dollars, but has never been known to have 
more than a couple of bones in his pockets? 
Pretends that he is someone else on the tele- 
phone? Begins all anecdotes with, "I'm not 
much at telling a story," and then proceeds to 
prove it? Wears spats over his rubbers? Al- 
ways opens the conversation with "Say, lis- 
ten!"? Phrases his farewells in such terms 
as "Olive oil," "Don't take any wooden money" 
and "Toodleoo"? 



l88 



TECHNALA 




,..-"""/ « A. 



4 : \ 4 

3KVrv r*rfi£__ !P <M 1 1 




t r^^#^^ 







OS lj a u ara to 




Jy 

Gran h , q. — , V \ a f~ 

V" <-! o *t / "AM V ' v ? "" 



y a -u r o p.i n so/f x 



7n^f C^'r 



C*~) a ho f f a. a. 




_ S. OJrX^hi 



Our ideal of the absent-minded prof is the 
one who walked into the room, put his cane 
in bed and stood in the corner; tied his spa- 
ghetti, and ate his shoe strings; washed his 
hands, threw the water in bed and jumped 
out of the window. 

* # *- 

"Sav, that man must be a magician." 

"Hawzat?" 

* # * 

Take Your Pick 

"Hello, how are you?" 

"Oh, I'm just as good as you are." 

"Hello, how are you?" 

"Pretty good." 

"Oh, you just think you are." 



Swede: "Aye want to take das book der 
library from." 

Librarian: "This one — Ben Hur?" 

Swede: ''Yah, das ban she." 

* * * 

"Night after night, he gazes up at the stars. 
It is his very work, his life interest." 

"I know a boy like that. He plays the 
piano in a movie." 



Physics Prof: "Give me an example ex- 
plaining the theory of like attracting like." 

Stude: "Pop drank some wood alcohol and 
it went to his head." 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 





n .. lx/l or \9 ) ' ,z??<2 * 

bv*ntuallyWtyMNow 

Hp (pas$ioiid"e/y)"SoTnc day y*on4 

Shff^&Sl5'15eTj Flour ' 



After seeing Gilda Gray in the movies 
we can truthfully say that they are motion 
pictures. 



"Be sheeted," said the Kleagle to the Klans- 
inen. 

A bird in the hand is bad table manners. 

* * * 

"I am half inclined to kiss you." 

"How stupid of me. I thought you were 
round shouldered." 

My idea of hard luck is the fellow who 
got to hell with a carload of ice and found 
hell frozen over. 

"What are your initials, madam?" 

"P. S." 

"But I thought your name was More." 

"It is, Adaline More." 

* * * 

What is it that has a long black tail, 600 
feet high and plays music? A cat, the Wool- 
worth Building and a phonograph, respect- 
ively. 

* * * 

"What's a pessimist?" 

"A man who won't milk a cow because 
he's afraid the milk's already sour." 



"He was carrying a valise a minute ago, 
and just now I saw him change hands." 



1 (JO 



TECHNALA 






19 2 6 




a^^i^.^. 



in 



- x< '■*% ««■*** 







rra 



^w'** v» 



^y 




JL ellfyes. saidfne devil as A- 
picKed up Tne Telephone. 



TECHNALA 






19 2 






Judge: "Pat, I wouldn't think you would 
hit a little man like that." 

Pat: "Suppose he called you an Irish slob?" 

"But I'm not an Irishman." 

"Suppose he called you a Dutch slob?" 

"But I'm not a Dutchman." 

"Well, suppose he called you the kind of a 
slob that you are?" 



"O, why worry? It won't make any dif- 
ference a hundred years from now." 

"Well, then, what difference does it make 
now that it won't make any difference a hun- 
dred vears from now?" 



Said Sally: "Oh — I think it is wonderful 
out tonight. Let's not go in and dance, let's 
sit out here, just you and I, and talk." 

Came the answer: "You may if you wish, 
I want to dance — see you later." 

You don't believe it — but it is true. Be- 
cause after all what fun is there for two girls 
to sit out in the moonlight together? 



Leopold: "Why do old maids wear cotton 
gloves?" 

Loeb: "Because they haven't any kids." 



The laziest man we can imagine is one 
who sits up all night to keep from washing 
his face in the morning. 



Twelve years old: "I gotta get an onion 
to get these cigarettes off my breath." 

Eighteen years old: "I gotta get a cigar- 
ette to get these onions off my breath." 



A traveling salesman ordered a chicken 
sandwich and as he devoured the very hammy 
looking sandwich he muttreed sadly: "One 
thing sure, this chicken made a hog of itself 
before it died." 



"I love pipes," she cooed. 

"Take a course in plumbing," he sniveled. 



"I blush every time I see the family wash 
in the back yard." 

"Do thev?" 



A girl to be popular today must powder 
her face and neck. 



Winters in Florida aren't so worse — with 
the warm mellow moon — the Spanish moss 
making everything just a trifle lazy. And a 
few girls were nicer than Sally. 



Glee Club Aspirant: "When I sing I get 
tears in ray eyes. What can I do for this?" 

Lvons: "Stuff cotton in vour ears." 



192 



TECHNALA 

k 1 c\ 



19 2 6 










ct>.d°Bfe 



serf 



Where yd all going; nid< 
jAhs being rusheto^Tw Kappa" 
Whatyoall TWea.^lr/iappa." 
KKK^itfo'er" 



Some men reduce by exercis- 
ing — others eat at fraternity 
houses. 



"I dined with Tiffany's last 
night." 

"Yes? What did vuh have to 



"Karats, dummy, karats." 

* * * 

Bible: "Why did Moses take 
the tablets?" 

Daze: "He had a headache." 

-* -# * 

Newly Wed : "I was a fool 
hen I married you!" 

Better Half: "Yes, but I 
thought you would improve!" 

* * * 



Imogene: "Isn't it nice. I 
hear that Archie spent his vaca- 
tion touring the country in a big 
red car. What kind was it? A 
Packard?" 

Eugene: "No, a Missouri Pa- 
cific." 



# * # 



"The funniest thing happened to me last 
night." 

"Yeah?" 

"I dreamed that I was eating shredded 
wheat, and when I woke up, half my mat- 
tress was gone." 



"I have a pain in my tummy, dear." 

Said the cannibal to his mate. 

"I know, I know," his wife replied, 

" 'Tis that sweet girl graduate." 



Phyliss: "Mother, did you know Moses 
had indigestion like you have? My Sunday 
school teacher told me the Lord gave him two 
tablets." 



193 



TECHNALA 






DJ^r 






C;M 




*i5$^|^!y 7^5 




Nasty! 



A funny thing, the cuspidor. 
It's always placed upon the floor. 
It's never, 
Nor never, hung above the door. 

It takes what comes its way, 
Thinking ever of a rainy day. 
Its nature is that way, 
And what goes in is in to stav. 



"Advertising is very like unto a woman," 
quoth the old sage, the prophet, the seer, a; 
he sat gently massaging his double chin, the 
while he allowed his beard, his wits, his bush, 
to drv in the sun. "It very often attracts uni- 



versal attention. It is often inclined to exag- 
gerate. It takes quite a bit of paint and is 
very expensive to keep up. It is sometimes 
prone to deceive, but, above all else, advert's- 
ing, like the woman, always pays." 



He: "I just got kicked off the gridiron." 
She: "Oh! you waffle failure!" 



Dot: "And you never loved any girl be- 
fore me." 

Dash: "Of course not. Never before any- 
body." 

* * * 

Father: "Do you know what time it is?" 

Suitor: "Ten to." 

Father: "Ten to what?" 

Suitor: "Your own business." 



"Don't you swear before me." 
"Pardon me — go ahead." 



19+ 







Ye Modern Dancing Master 

At dancing with me Jane would balk, 
Because I could not Camel Walk, 
And still I stumbled on. 



Mae would not be my hottentot 
Because I could not Turkey Trot. 
And still I stumbled on. 

Alicia gave me no high sign, 
I could not do the Clinging Vine, 
And still I stumbled on. 

Therice refused to come my way, 
I tangoed not the Spanish way, 
And still I stumbled on. 

I got the gate from Belle the Model, 
I could not get myself to Toddle, 
And still I stumbled on. 

But bow legs and St. Vitus Dance, 
At last have brought me vast romance, 
I CHARLESTON. 



There is no such thing as a "good time.' 
Any time is good. 



AND KIPLING- CALLED (T 

A ^ag,, 9. bone^D a. hank o^ hcxVr, 



"I'll never get over this," said the chicken 
as she ambled up to the ostrich egg. 



He: "Teach me the Charleston?" 

She: "If I can remember it. Let's see — 
it was one of those quaint old dances they 
were doing last summer, wasn't it? 



"Yassar, dat hoss ob mine am de fastest hoss 
in de worl ! He could run a mile a minute 
if it warn't fo one thing." 

"What's dat, Brudder?" 

"The distance am too long fo de shortness 
ob de time." 



"Just cutting up a bit," remarked George 
Washington as his father spied him near the 
cherrv tree. 



After all, what is home without another," 
said the shut-eye as he staggered off to the 
club. 



195 







N«.*S 



She never swam the channel 
Or made a hole in one, 

The winner of the tennis crown, 
Is a thing she hasn't done. 

She's not the athletic tvpe, 
More of the clinging vine, 

But a champion in a way, 
With her All-American line. 



"Bring the waiter here — there's a snake in 
my macaroni." 

"It'v no use, he's afraid of them himself." 
* * * 

Chorine: "Is this a broad-casting station?" 

Otfice Hoy: "No, this is a stage manager's 
office." 

Chorine: "That's what I mean; I want to 
join the show." 



* * * 
Little Algy hung his sister, 
But she was dead before we missed her. 
Algy's always up to tricks, 
Ain't hecute, he's only six? 
* * * 

We nominate for the hall of shame the girl 
that thought two alligators was an alligator 
pear. 



Medical Officer: "How did you meet with 
this accident?" 

C. M. T. C: "It wasn't an accident. A 
mule kicked me." 

Medical Officer: "But don't you call that 
an accident?" 

C. M. T. C. : "Naw, he did it on purpose." 



196 



TECHNALA 




Tho' the years have rolled on to the fifties, 

And the girls have swapped places with the men; 

Tho' they've clipped off their own crowning glory — 

And gone Charleston-ing round, now and then ; 

Someday they'll forget their own salary — cigarettes — neckties and flasks. 

And the end — wait and see o' my daughters, 

When this pleasure mad journey is through, 

If these wild, college flappers 

Don't pause at the altar meekly saying, 

I Do. 




THE EXD 



197 






19 2 6 












<*€*«« 



V"7J 



1 





198 



TECHNALA 




a 



TYLER'S BEST" 



When you put to practical use in the home what you have 
learned in Domestic Science at Alabama College, remember 
that good food must be pure, wholesome and of a high 
quality when it is prepared at the source of supply. 

"Tyler's Best" means the best that can be 
packed — whether it be peaches, cherries, 
apricots, pears, etc., for the dessert or a 
salad; or peas, lima beans, string beans, 
tomatoes, etc., as a vegetable, or coffee, 
syrup, and other good things to eat. 

For twenty-four years we have endeavored to give to food 
users the very best that careful selection and money will 
buy under the Tyler's Best Label. We use a Pointer Dog 
as a trade-mark, and our motto, "Tyler's Best — this dog 
stands for quality, we stand behind the dog" — means just 
that. 



TYLER GROCERY COMPANY 

Wholesale 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



TECHNALA 

K 




Among 
Technalists 



— the topic of dress is sel- 
dom discussed without ref- 
erence to the styles ideas 
emanating from this fa- 
mous style right store. 
Many commencements 
have had their beginning 
on our third floor. Phone 
or write Jennie Lee, your 
personal shopper. 

^LOUIS SAKS*- 

Second Avenue at Nineteenth Street 
BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



CURRY'S 

LADIES' 
READY-TO-WEAR 

MONTGOMERY. ALA. 
I > 

EXCLUSIVE IN 

STYLE AND DESIGN, 

YET 

INEXPENSIVE 



f&e 







SPECIALISTS 



IN 



NOBBY CLOTHES 

FOR THE 

COLLEGE MISS 



GARMENTS GLADLY 
SENT ON APPROVAL 



Compliments of 

WESTERN 

GRAIN 

CO. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



^%» £-<*? Jr% f£% 



TECHNALA 










I"'/* r*v_ 



THE ALABAMA 
BANK & 
TRUST CO. 

MONTGOMERY. ALA. 

Capital, $300,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided 
Profits, $70,000.00 



Member 
Federal Reserve System 



CAHEENS 

1924-1926 Second Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



A SPECIAL SHOPPING 

BUREAU FOR THOSE 

WHO LIVE OUT OF 

BIRMINGHAM 



BETTY BLAIR 

OUR PERSONAL SHOPPER 

WILL ATTEND TO YOUR 

WANTS 



I Wish I Were In Her Shoes! 




You'll Hear 

Many a Smart Woman 

Say That About You 

When You're Wearing 



YOUNG-PETERSON SHOE CO. 

Shoes for Women 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED DAY RECEIVED 

Box 3 Selma, Alabama 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF 

BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 

Capital $ 1.500.000.00 

Surplus 3.000.000.00 

Undivided Profits 583.000.00 

Total Resources over 46.000.000.00 

Trust Department Bond Department 

Savings Department 



Here Dwells Youth 

A BEAUTY AID FOR 
EVERY NEED 

Permanent Waving 

Facials 

Marcelling 

Scalp Treatments 

Water Waving 

Electrolysis 

Marinello Beauty 
Parlors 

BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



The Store of Individual Shops 

AUTHENTIC 
COLLEGE 
APPAREL 



For everyday school wear, com- 
mencement exercises or gradua- 
tion — the smartest apparel will 
be found at this store. 



ALEX RICE 



MONTGOMERY, ALA. 




*«MP" *$ 



YVS 






TECHNALA 




WE KNOW 
WHAT COLLEGE GIRLS WANT! 



New things — whether in apparel, accessories that mean 
so much to the costume, or dainty articles for their rooms. 

We have them, too. That's one of the best reasons we 
know why you should make Loveman's your shopping 
headquarters when in Birmingham. And when elsewhere 
— it's easy to write when you have the assurance that your 
mail orders will receive prompt and efficient attention. 



LOVEMAN, JOSEPH & LOEB 



KAUFMAN'S 



WOMEN and MISSES 



Ready-to-Wear and Furs 
of the better kind at 
prices no higher than in- 
ferior ones. 



Birmingham 
213 N. 19th 



Montgomery 
3 Court Square 



CREAGH & 
SMITH 

HOTEL ALBERT BUILDING 
SELMA. ALABAMA 

Everything for Your Car 

FIRESTONE 
TIRES AND TUBES 

"Right-Now Service" 
TELEPHONE 1294 



TECHNALA 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



KML 

LUMBER 
CO. 

BIRMINGHAM AlA- 



Birmingham, Alabama 



THE 

YOUNG 8 VANN 

SUPPLY CO. 

INDUSTRIAL 
SUPPLIES 

HEAVY 
HARDWARE 



1925-1931 First Avenue 

P. O. Drawer 24 3 1 
BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



DON'T TRUST 
TO LUCK! 






SEND IT TO 



BRANNON 
PRINTING CO. 

TALLADEGA, ALABAMA 



TECHNALA 

k, i, C\ 



,**J 






19 2 6 









BATSON-COOK COMPANY 

Building Contractors 

WEST POINT, GA. 



INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL AND 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



Builders of Ramsay Hall and President's Home for 
Alabama College 



These Are Featured in the View Section of This Publication 



CARTER DRUG 
COMPANY 

SELMA, ALABAMA 
"ON BROAD ST." 



We Are Always Glad 
to See You 



150— Phones— 186 



George Carter 



Cecil Mozley 



WELCOME 

TO 

BIRMINGHAM'S 
NEWEST STORE 

You can shop here by 
mail with the same 
assurance as though 
you were here in 
person. 

Herman Saks 
& Sons 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



TECHNALA 




WOMEN OF DISCRIMINATION 



INVARIABLY CHOOSE 

FINE FOOTWEAR 

At Our Store You Will 

Always Find the Latest Styles 

In Authentic Footwear 

For Women 



GUARANTEE 

5HDE C 



BESSEMER 



BIRMINGHAM 

ENSLEY 



ANNISTON 



TECHNALA 





Main Store: 1808 3rd Ave., North 



LOLLARS 

KODAK FINISHING 

AND AMATEUR SUPPLIES 

ENLARGING 

FRAMING 

WATER COLORS AND 

OIL PAINTINGS 

KODAK ALBUMS 

ETC.. ETC. 

Mail Orders Out Specialty 

Four Stores to Serve You 

Frank L. Lollar. Prop. 

Birmingham. Ala. 



HIRSCHS 

213-215 19TH ST. 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



LARGEST EXCLUSIVE 

MILLINERY STORE IN 

BIRMINGHAM AND 

ALABAMA 



New Styles are Shown 
Every Week 




HIGHLAND 



All Cream 



Ice Cream 



HIGHLAND 
ICE CREAM CO. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



ROTHSCHILD 
MERC. CO. 

SELMA. ALABAMA 







TECHNALA 



*#ji 6 



£ ■ 



19 2 6 




"Say It With Flowers" 



Whatever the purpose, we will present 
your flowers correctly, with great skill 
and originality. 



GRADUATION BOUQUETS 

GIFT BOXES 

GIFT BASKETS 

GIFT CORSAGES 

BRIDAL BOUQUETS 

BRIDESMAIDS BOUQUETS 



ROSEMONT 
GARDENS 

1 1 6 Dexter Avenue 
MONTGOMERY 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Kodak Finishing 

TRESSLAR 

The Store 

of Thoughtful 

Gifts 



Pi 

CO 



MONTGOMERY. ALABAMA 



FOR QUALITY 

BULLOCK 

SHOE 

CO. 

Montgomery, Alabama 



PICKWICK CAFE 



No. 103 Commerce Street 



FRED RIDOLPHI 



P<3 



Montgomery. Alabama 












TECHNALA 



Ills ** 



^ . '**& 



A Bank Book is a Sign Board That 

Is Found Only on the Road 

To Success 



CITY SAVINGS BANK OF SELMA 



SELMA. ALA. 



H. C. ARMSTRONG, President H. I. SHELLY. Vice-President 

B. H. PERRIN. Cashier 



THE CITY NATIONAL BANK 
OF SELMA 

SELMA. ALABAMA 

Oldest Bank in Central Alabama 



TOTAL RESOURCES OVER $3,500,000.00 



« — » 



H. C. Armstrong, President 

R. W. HUSTON, Assistant Cashier 



H. I. SHELLY. Cashier 
J. E. CARTER, Assistant Cashier 









19 2 6 












THE SELMA NATIONAL BANK 

SELMA, ALABAMA 

Capital Stock $200,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 200,000.00 

Depository of the United States and the State of Alabama 

conservative progressive 
Your Checking Account Solicited 



E. C. MELVIN. President 

R. P. ANDERSON. Vice-President 

J. W. CRAIG. Assistant Cashier 



SELMA TRUST 8 SAVINGS BANK 

SELMA. ALABAMA 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

Surplus and Profits (earned) over 100,000.00 

"THE BANK FOR SAVINGS" 
YOUR ACCOUNT. LARGE OR SMALL. SOLICITED 

4 Per Cent Compound Interest Paid on Deposits 

Large Enough to Serve You. Strong E.nough to Protect You. Small Enough to 
Know You. Largest Exclusively Savings Bank in Alabama 



E. C. MELVIN. President 
P O. THOMAS. Cashier 



R. P. ANDERSON. Vice-President 
R. L. SOMMERVILLE. Assistant Cashier 



TECHNALA 





TILLMAN DRUG 
COMPANY 



SELMA. ALA. 



Agents 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 

Spalding Athletic 

Goods 

Nunnally's and 

Gelpa Candies 

Garden and Flower Seed 



WELCOME 



WELCOME 



GIFTS 

FOR EVERY OCCASION 

Can Be Found in Our 

Attractive Stock of 

Jewelry 

DIAMONDS. WATCHES 
AND SILVERWARE 

We make a specialty of mail orders 
and can give prompt service on Jewel- 
ry and Optical repair work. 

Hobbs 8 McGill 

Jewelers and Opticians 

Established 185 9 Selma. Ala. 



BEWIG 
OPTICAL CO. 

SELMA. ALABAMA 



R. B. DAWSON 

Novelties 

Dry Goods and Notions 
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 

MONTEVALLO. ALABAMA 



THE NEW STORE 

Quality Store on 
the Corner 

We Expect to Cater to the 
College Girl's Trade 

PLEASE CALL 

J. I. GUYTON 

MONTEVALLO. ALABAMA 




S 



Ss 



TECHNALA 




> — o^' x #> %# ^ (k ■ F^yi v w k 

&ss>r<+z£*l *?... mmm^„ )Jb__5L_ 



i 9 2 6 







Compliments of 

STRAND THEATRE 

Montevallo, Alabama 




.■*>* WSJ 



BOOSTING ALABAMA 

"Alabama is the Pennsylvania of the South. Alabama 
is richest in natural resources and is destined to become the 
greatest industrial state." — Roger W. Babson. 

In Our Efforts to Tell the Outside World About Alabama's Mar- 
velous Natural Resources, We Earnestly Invite the 
Co-operation of Every Loyal Alabamian 

Our State Belongs at the Top in Industrial Development 
We Can, by Concerted Effort, Put it There 

ALABAMA POWER COMPANY 



MONTGOMERY 
FAIR 

A Great Store 

Over Fifty Years 



A GREATER STORE 
TODAY 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 



We Are Here to Serve 

EVERYTHING GOOD TO 
EAT 

WALKERS CAFE 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 



C L. MERONEY 
& COMPANY 

Merchants 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 



Thousands of Kingsbury Owners 
Endorse This Good Piano 

You will be proud to have a Kingsbury Piano in your 
home. No other instrument at its moderate price will give 
you so much genuine pleasure and satisfaction. 

Twenty-eight Kingsbury Pianos in daily use by Alabama 
College. 

Kingsbury Pianos are made in Grand and Upright cases. 
They may be purchased on convenient terms of payment. 



Write for Catalog and Price List 





— ^B 








IIIJJnI 


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CABLE-SHELBY- BURTON PIANO CO. 



18 18 SECOND AVENUE 
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



TECHNALA 







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Fraternity, College 
and Class Jewelry 

Commencement Announce- 
ments and Invitations 

Jeweler to Senior Class and 

Various Clubs of 

Alabama 

College 

L. G. BALFOUR 
COMPANY 

Manufacturing Jewelers and 
Stationers 

ATTLEBORO. MASS. 
ASK ANY COLLEGE GREEK 



H. E. LATHAM 

STAPLE AND FANCY 
GROCERIES 

Butter-Kist Popcorn 

Sunshine Cakes 
Extra Fancy Fruit 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HANNA MOTOR 
COMPANY 

FORD 
DEALERS 

BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



OUR 

ALABAMA COLLEGE 

INSTALLATIONS 

Ramsay Hall 

Bloch Hall 

Library 

President's Home 

MICHAEL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

TALLADEGA SYLACAUGA 
ALABAMA 

Plumbing Heating 

Wiring Roofing 



19 2 6 



sv? 















SERVICE WITH A SMILE 






AT 

WILSON DRUG 
COMPANY 

THE REXALL STORE 

ON THE CORNER 

( ) 

Agents foe 

NUNNALLY'S CANDIES 
TELEPHONE 41 





DOUGLASS BROTHERS 



WHOLESALE FRUIT 

AND 

VEGETABLES 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 
QUALITY 



Birmingham, Alabama 







TECHNALA 



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PIANOS 
RADIOS 

TALKING 
MACHINES 




£ac/? i/7 Its Class 
THE STANDARD OF THE WORLD 

CATALOGUES ON REQUEST 

CLARK 8 JONES 



T/?e Steinway House 



Birmingham, Ala. 



TATUM'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Careful and 

Courteous Service 

Here 



THE LATEST IN 
HAIR CUTS 



MONTEVALLO. ALABAMA 



Reid Motor Company 

Authorized Dealers 
Lincoln FORD Fordson 

Sales Agency and Service Station 
MONTEVALLO, ALA. 
Phone 77 



KENDRICKS 
BARBER SHOP 

We Serve 
The College Girl 

MONTEVALLO. ALABAMA 



TECHNALA 



k & e\ 



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19 2 6 















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«»* ^\\s\.*" V.-V^,* N v , v „.~' ~\v.S» 



Merchants & Planters Bank 

MONTEVALLO, ALA. 



I > 



BANK WITH US AND YOU CAN 
BANK ON US 



i i 



C. L. MERONEY, President 



J. C. SLONE, Cashier 



Moore-Handley Hardware Co. 

BIRMINGHAM 

Exclusively Wholesale 

HARDWARE AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 

SPORTING GOODS HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

BUILDING MATERIAL HARNESS-IMPLEMENTS 

MACHINERY 
MILL, MINE AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

"Serving the Trade Since 1882" 






Jts*\ 

pn] 1 






TECHNALA 




A DEPENDABLE STORE 



WHERE 

ITS A PLEASURE 

TO SHOP 



Burger-Phillips Company 

30 Years 
Of Faithful Service 






TECHNALA 




Wooley & Horn 

GROCERIES 

CANDIES 

FRESH FRUITS 

AND 
SANDWICHES 

And we assure you that we are 
always with the college girls, 
whether it be for great or small. 

MONTEVALLO. ALABAMA 



WE SELL 

Fancy Groceries 

Fruits, Produce, Candies 

Drinks, Lunches 

Hosiery 

Hardware, Notions 

Small Profit and Quick 
Turnover 

ASSURES YOU 

OF FRESH MERCHANDISE 

AT ALL TIMES 

Elliott Mercantile 
Company 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 



Jeter 
Mercantile Co. 

Dealers in 

Groceries 

Hardware 

and Furniture 
Shoes and Hose 

MONTEVALLO. ALABAMA 



TRADE AT 

PAT'S PLACE 

THE HOME OF ECONOMY 
PAT J. KROELL 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 



Yeager's Studio 



MONTEVALLO, ALA. 






v« 






STANDARD O^THE SOUTH j <^ 



THE BEST IS CHEAPEST 

IN THE END 
ORIGINAL - GENUINE 



MONTEVALLO 

TRADE MARK REO. 

COAL 



Is the standard of the South for home use. Its long lasting qualities 
put it in a class by itself. Original Montevallo Coal is clean — 
free from impurities. Will not clinker or coke, costs a little more 
per ton, but much less per season, for fewer tons are needed. 

BE CAREFUL 

The Original Genuine Montevallo Coal is produced only 
ar Aldrich, Ala., by Montevallo Coal Mining Co. Only 
authorized dealers sell it! There's one near you! 

Montevallo Coal Mining Company 

BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



TECHNALA 



19 2 6 






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READERS OF 

TECHNALA 

NINETEEN TWENTY-SIX 
ALABAMA COLLEGE 

WILL REMEMBER 

The New Williams 

WHEN IN BIRMINGHAM 

For our better styles and lower 
prices on Coats. Dresses, Hats, 
Shoes, Hose, Silk Undertbings. 

1911 (FASHION CENTER) 
THIRD AVENUE 



THE CITY 
MARKET 

MONTEVALLO, ALA. 



DAY AND BAKER 
GROCERY CO. 

Our Motto 
"Quality and Service" 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 



Foremost in Fashion 
Foremost in Value 

In Collegiate Apparel 

for Young Men and 

Young Women 






BLACH'S 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



SUNDAY 

DINNER 

PRODUCTS 

Satisfy Discriminating 
People 

SCHLOSS KAHN 
GROCERY CO. 

(Sole Distributors) 
MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 



Warren, Knight & Davis 



1603 Empire Building 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Architects for Alabama College 



Compliments of 



Hendricks Drug Company 



MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 



V i i^ y ^\; ;|i^^^|^^^ 



~>J£T 




^ALA&A M A« ENGR AVI NG » C O. 

BIRMINGH AAV 

To* llijoavs- COLLEGE £ HIGH SCHOOL ANMU1L SPECIALISTS. 




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THIS BOOK PRINTED BY BENSON 




«»/»«- 



LARGEST COLLEGE ANNUAL 
PUBLISHERS IN THE WORLD 

HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
SUPERIOR EXTENSIVE SERVICE 



ensonT 

PRINTING CO.; 
NASHVILLE, 
^J]"ENN. 

COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 



e^V,