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Full text of "Technala"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



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TECFlNflLd 

THE SUCCESSOR TO "CHIAROSCURO" 
n i ii i i — i r =i i ==ii i n 



1911 

VOLUME V 

THE ANNUAL RECORD 

of The Alabama Girls^ Technical Institute 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE SENIOR CLASS 




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TO 

THE FACULTY AND OFFICERS 

OF OUR SCHOOL, 

WHO HAVE GUIDED US PATIENTLY AND WELL 

ALONG UNTRIED PATHS, 

AND -HAVE GIVEN US THE PRICELESS 

TREASURE OF WHOLESOME INFLUENCE, 

WE, THE CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED ELEVEN, 

IN APPRECIATION OF THESE GOOD GIFTS, 

GRATEFULLY DEDICATE THIS, 

OUR ANNUAL. 



Foreword 




)HE advent on the broader field of life of our Class of 1911 has been 
characterized by changes in the names of our Annual and of our 
school- — both, we think, profiting happily thereby. If such whole- 
sale change of names seems to call for some explanation, please remember, 
kind reader, that this is a girls' school. 

To the class who christened our Annual " Chiaroscuro " we offer apolo- 
gies. We have two reasons for altering it : first, because we could not say 
" Chiaroscuro; " second, we wanted a name that would smack of our school 
and state — hence " Technala." 

We hope that " old girls " who have lived amid the scenes herein pic- 
tured, and all friends whose good wishes we possess, will find pleasure 
in the pages of Technala, and in the thoughts it will awaken of the Ala- 
bama Girls' Technical Institute. 



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THOMAS WAVERLY PALMER, A.M., LL.D. 

Thomas Waverly Palmer, A.M., LL.D., was prepared for col- 
lege in the rural schools of his native village, Furman, Ala.; stu- 
dent, Howard College, 1877-78; University of Alabama, 1S7S-82; 
received the degree of Master of Arts, 1881; Bachelor of Engi- 
neering, 1882; Doctor of Laws, 1906; Instructor of Mathemat- 
ics, 1881-82; Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1882-83; 
Professor of Mathematics, 1883-1907; Dean of the Academic 
Faculty, University of Alabama, 1905-1907; President, Ala- 
bama Girls' Technical Institute, 1907; graduate student, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, summer quarters, 1897, 1S98, 1S99; active 
member, American Mathematical Society, American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, National Education As- 
sociation, National Society for the Promotion of Engineering 
Education. 




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Editorial Staff of Technala, 1911 



COR1NNE NEELY -__-.._ _ _ _ _ Editor in Chief 

ELIZABETH HODGES / 

WINNIE DAVIS NEELY ^ ------ - Associate Editors 

LETTIE DAFFIN ' 

DAISY ROWE -------------- Art Editor 

BUNNIE WILLS ---------- Business Manager 

MAMIE MERONEY j 

FLETCHER DUPREE ,- -------- Class Editors 

GENE POWELL ) 

MATTIE CARGTLE -------- - Athletics Editor 

EVELYN PEYTON - - Advertisements 

MARY McMILLAN - _ - _ Novelties 

LESS IF. REYNOLDS - - - - Subscriptions 

NINA ALLISON ------------ Illustrations 

GRACIE BERRY - - .___-_---___ Jokes 

MAMIE ROSS --------------- Typist 




EDITORS IN CHIEF OF TECHNALA STAFF 




ASSISTANT EDITORS OF TECHNALA STAFF 



Board of Trustees 

4 

HIS EXCELLENCY, EMMET O'NEAL. Governor of Alabama, President, ex officio 

HENRY J. WILLINGHAM, State Superintendent of Education, ex officio 

HUGH S. D. MALLORY, State at large ------------ Selma 

VIRGIL BOULDIN, State at large ------------ Scottsboro 

HURIEOSCO AUSTILL, First District ------------ Mobile 

SOL. D. BLOCH, Second District -------------- Camden 

AUGUSTUS H. ALSTON, Third District ----------- Clayton 

JOSTAH THOMAS MANGUM, Fourth District -------- Enterprise 

MALCOLM A. GRAHAM, Fifth District ----------- Prattville 

WILLIAM E. W. YERBY, Sixth District ---------- Greensboro 

WILLIAM W. HARALSON, Seventh District -------- Fort Payne 

JAMES C. KUMPE, Eighth District ------------- Moulton 

SAMUEL WILL JOHN, Ninth District -_--_-_-__ Birmingham 
C. L. MERONEY, Secretary of Board ----------- Montevallo 

E. S. LYMAN, Treasurer _---_____-_____ Montevallo 

SOL. D. BLOCH, Land Commissioner ____-_-_-___ Camden 

COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Judiciary— MESSRS. BOULDIN, AUSTILL, HARALSON. 
Executive— MESSRS. MALLORY, KUMPE, YERBY. 
Educational— MESSRS. ALSTON. AUSTILL, MANGUM. 
Finance -MESSRS. BLOCH, GRAHAM, MANGUM. 
Building and Grounds— GOVERNOR O'NEAL, MESSRS. JOHN, 

MALLORY, GRAHAM, ALSTON, YERBY, MANGUM. 
School Lands— MESSRS. JOHN. BLOCH. BOULDIN, KUMPE. ' 



Officers of Instruction and Government 



MARY GOODE STALLWORTH, 

Mathematics. 

MARY MYRTLE BROOK, A.B., 
Psychology and Education. 

MERLE MARIE STEPHENS, 
Domestic Art. 

ALICE BOLTON, 

Assistant Domestic Art. 



ALICE SEARCY WYMAN, 
Librarian. 



MARY ELIZABETH HAYNES, 
Director of Music. 



LIDA INGE HATCH, 
Violin. 

ERNESTINE GROTE, 
Private Secretary. 



MRS. HARD1NIA B. HOWIE, 



>emor 



Class 



Colors: Brown and Orange. 

Flower: Nasturtium. 

Motto: "As ever in our great Taskmaster's eye." 

OFFICERS 

CORINNE NEELV ----- President 

GENE POWELL ------- Vice President 

IRENE CLEVELAND - - - - Secretary and Treasurer 

GLENNIE HAYMANS ------------ Historian 

WINNIE DAVIS NEEDY ---------------- Poet 

DAISY ROWE ----------------- Artist 

MERLE McWILLIAMS --------- Musician 

ELIZABETH HODGES ------- Prophet 

MATTIE CARGILE - Captain of Athletics 



CLASS OF 1911 



Allen, 11a Mary, Quito. 

Avant, Emma Cordelia, Tallassee, R. 2. 

Burns, Maud, Warrior. 

Burch, Louise, Midway. 

Cargile, Mattie, Stevenson. 

Cary, Phcebe, Auburn. 

Cleveland, Irene, Centerville, R. 4. 

Cocciola, Bianca, Birmingham. 

Collins, Donna Lou, Warrior. 

Cook, Alma, Auburn. 

Dale, Irma Brice, Oak Hill. 

Dowling, Claude, Cullman. 

Dowling, Luly Berry, Cullman. 

Dupree, Mary Fletcher, Dadeville, R. 1. 

Greene, Lucy Nora, Dadeville, R. 4. 

Haas, Elise Greenwald, Gainesville. 

Haymans, Glennie Izlar, Wilton. 

Hodges, Elizabeth, Ashville. 

Kelly, Sudie Lavinia, Lleadland. 

Young, Kate 



Meroney, Mamie Louise, Montevallo. 
McMillan, Mary Serena, Columbiana. 
McWilliams, Mary Elizabeth, Oak Hill. 
McWilliams, Merle, Oak Hill. 
Nash, Pansy Lavinia, Burnt Corn. 
Neely, Ida Corinne, Hillsboro. 
Neely, Winnie Davis, Hillsboro. 
Palmer, Minnie Lee, Carson. 
Parker, Eulette, Speigner. 
Peters, Ella Wilson, Montevallo. 
Peyton, Laura Evelyn, Selma. 
Powell, Genie, Greenville. 
Reynolds, Lessie, Jemison. 
Rowe, Daisy Morridean, Birmingham. 
Speigner, Katie Ruth, Prattville. 
Thigpen, Judith Elvie, Uchee. 
Tillman, Mary Lena, Clio. 
Wills, Bunnie, Alberta. 
Wimberly, Sallie Ethel, Belmont. 
Jones, Oak Hill. 



Senior Class Poem 



The Class of Eleven now hold out their hands 

To bid Montevallo good-by, 
With a lump in the throat, maybe, sobs in the voice, 

And perhaps a tear in the eye; 
For jolly good comrades, and closest of friends, 

And hosts of good times — we give up. 
Half afraid are we even to start on our way, 

For bitter, they say, is Life's cup. 
But if, Alma Mater, the trials we meet 

Seem heavy and hard to bear; 
If friends that we meet with are not friends at all, 

And sometimes we're weary of care, 
Then let us come back to thy walls for a day, 

Grow young with the mem'ries of youth. 
Forgetting the pain and the falseness of life, 

Rememb'ring the joy and the truth. 
'Twill sweeten our lives for many a day, 

And scatter the clouds from the sky; 
And we shall go on, with hearts fresh and strong, 
"As e'er in our Taskmaster's eye." 

WINNIE DAVIS NEELY 





('11). 



ILA MARY ALLEN 

Quito, Ala. 

Sophomore, 1908-9. 

Subscription Committee of Technala, 1910-11. 

NO Club, 1910-11. 



PHOEBE CARY 

Auburn, Ala. 

Junior Class, 1909-10. 
Tutwiler Club, 1909-10, 

1910-11. 
Junior Tennis Club, 1909-10. 
Critic of Emma Hart Will- 

ard Club. 1910-11. 
Junior Kodak Club. 1909-10. 
Social Committee of Y. W. 

C. A., 1910-11. 




Manager of Senior Basket 

Ball Team, 1910-11. 
Senior Walking Club, 1910 

11. 
Novelty Committee of Tech 

nala, 1910-11. 
Track Team, 1910-11. 
" Mint Master " of the Ram 

biers, 1910-11. 



IRENE CLEVELAND 

Centerville, Ala. 

Sophomore, 1908-9. 
St. Cecilia Club, 1908-9. 
Intercollegiate Committee 

1908-9. 
Musician Class, 1909-10. 
President of Castalian Society, 1910-11. 
Billiken Basket-Bail Team, 1909-10. 
Secretary of Y. W. C. A., 1910-11. 
Secretary and Treasurer of Class of 1910-11. 
Senior Basket-Bali Team, 1910-11. 
Schumann Society, 1910-11. 
Didonian Chapter, Vergilian Club, 1910-11. 



1910-11. 
1909-10. 
Annual, 



MATTIE ALLAN CARGILE 

Stevenson, Ala. 

Sophomore, 1908-9. 
White Basket-Bali Team, 1909-10. 
Devotional Committee of Y. W. C. A. 
Captain of Billiken Basket-Bali Team, 
Chairman of Athletic Committee, 

1910-11. 
Treasurer of Tutwiler Club, 1910-11. 
Senior Walking Club, 1910-11. 
Treasurer of Loafers' Club, 1910-11. 
Captain of Senior Basket-Bail Team, 1910-11. 
Treasurer of Emma Hart Willard Club, 1910-11 
y£nean Chapter, Vergilian Club, 1910-11. 



DONNA LOU COLLINS 

Warrior, Ala. 

Freshman, 1906-7. 
Secretarv of Philumathic 

Club, 1909-10. 
Senior Walking Club, 1910- 

11. 




Honorary Member of Alphi 

Phi Club. 
Tennis Club, 1910-11. 
Subscription Committee of 

Technala, 1910-11. 
NO Club, 1910-11. 



IRMA BRICE DALE 

Oak Hill, Ala. 

Sophomore, 1908-9. 

Tutwiler Club. 1909-10, 1910-11. 

Schumann Club. 1908-9. 

Emma Hart Willard Club. 1910-11. 

President of Thendora Club, 1910-11 

Walking Club, 1910-11. 

Chorus Club, 1910-1 

N O Club, 1910-11. 



CLAUDE DOWLING 
Cullman, Ala. 

Freshman, 1907-8. 

St. Cecilia Club, 1908-9. 

Critic of Castalian Literary Society, 1910-11. 

Senior Basket-Bali Team, 1910-11. 

Sophomore Basket-Bail Team, 1908-9. 

Schumann Society, 1910-11. 

Joke Committee of Teclinala, 1910-11. 

Subscription Committee of Technala, 1910-11. 

Senior Walking Club, 1910-11. 

N..O Club, 1910-11. 



FLETCHER DUPREE 

Dadeville, Ala. 

Freshman, 1907-8. 
Sophomore Basket-Ball 

Team. 190S-9. 
St. Cecilia Music Club, 

190S-9. 




Secretary of J. U. 

11. 
Schumann Society, 1910-1 
Tennis Club, 1910-11. 
Walking- Club. 1910-11. 
N„0 Club, 1910-11. 



NORA GREENE 
Dadeville, Ala. 

Sophomore, 1905-6. 

Membership Committee of Y. W. C. A., 1907-8. 

Bible Study Committee of Y. W. C. A., 1910-11. 

Tennis Club, 1910-11. 

Advertisement Committee, 1910-11. 

N„0 Club, 1910-11. 



ELIZABETH HODGES 

Ashville, Ala. 

Junior, 1909-10. 

Vice President of Class of 1909-10. 

Critic of Emma Hart Willard Club, 1909-10. 

Secretary of Emma Hart Willard Club, 1910-11. 

Tutwiler Club, 1909-10, 1910-11. 

President of Y. W. C. A., 1910-11. 

Missionary Committee of Y. W. C. A., 1909-10. 

Junior Kodak Club, 1909-10. 

Senior Walking Club, 1910-11. 

Literary Editor of Technala, 1910-11. 

Second Grand Loafer of Loafers' Club, 1910-11. 

Basket-Bali Team, 1910-11. 

Class Prophet. 1910-11. 

Manager of Track Team, 1910-11. 

N O Club, 1910-11. 



GLENNIE IZLAR HAY- 
MANS 
Gainesville, Fla. 



Freshman, 1906-7. 
Class Poet. 1906-7. 




Historian, 1910-11. 
Castalian Club. 1910-11. 
Emma Hart Willard Club. 

1910-1 
Senior Walking Club, 1910 

11. 
Senior Tennis Club, 1910-11 
NO Club, 1910-11. 



ELISE HAAS 
Gainesville, Ala. 

Junior, 1909-10. 

Senior Walking Club, 1910-11. 

Advertisement Committee of Technala. 19K 

Senior Tennis Club, 1910-11. 

N„0 Club, 1910-11. 



SUDIE KELLY 

Headland. Ala. 

Freshman, 1907-8. 
Art Club, 1907-8. 
Secretary of Art Club, 1907-8. 
Senior Walking Club, 1911. 
N.O Club, 1910-11. 



MARY McWILLIAMS 

Oak Hill, Ala. 

Junior, 1909-10. 
Tutwiler Club, 1909-10, 

1910-11. 
Schumann Society, 1909-10. 

1910-11. 
Intercc ■llegiate Committee. 

1909-10, 1910-11. 




Story-Tellers' League, 1910- 

11. 
Senior Basket-Bail Team. 

1910-11. 
Emma Hart Willard Club, 

1910-11. 
Track Team, 1910-11. 
Senior Walking Club, 1910- 

11. 



MERLE McWILLIAMS 

Oak Hill. Ala. 

Sophomore, 1908-9. 

Schumann Society, 190S-9. 

Story-Tellers' League, 1908-9. 

Tutwiler Club, 1909-10, 1910-11. 

Class Secretary, 1909-10. 

Emma Hart Willard Club, 1910-11. 

Musician Class, 1910-11. 

Chairman of Membership Committee of Y. W. 

C. A., 1910-11. 
/Enean Chapter, Vergilian Club, 1910-11. 



MAMIE LOUISE MERONEY 
Montevallo, Ala. 



1910-11. 



Sophomore, 1906-7. 
Tutwiler Club, 1908-9, 1909-10, 
Schumann Society, 1910-11. 
President of Junior Class, 1908-9. 
President of Subsenior Class, 1909-10. 

CORINNE NEELY 
Hillsboro, Ala. 

Sophomore. 1908-9. 
President of Story-Tellers 

League. 1908-9 
President 

1909-10. 
President 

1910-11. 
Chairman of Bible 

Committee of Y. 

A., 1910-11. 
Delegate to Students' Vol- 
unteer Convention, New 

York, 1909-10. 
T u t w i 1 e r Club, 1909-10. 
. 1910-11. 



of Junior 
of Senior 



Class, 

Class, 

Study 
W. C. 




Independent Order of Old 

Maids, 1909-10, 1910-11. 
Chairman of Missionary 

Committee of Y. W. C. A.. 

1910-1 
Senior Walking Club, 1910 

11. 
Didonian Chapter, Vergil- 

ian Club, 1910-11. 

WINNIE DAVIS NEELY 

Hillsboro, Ala. 
Sophomore, 1908. 
Secretary of Y. W. C. A.. 1909-10. 
Vice President of Y. W. C .A., 1910-11. 
Story-Tellers' League, 1908-9. 1909-10, 
Class Poet, 1908-9, 1909-10, 1910-11. 
Technala Staff. 1911. 
Tutwiler Club, 1909-10, 1910-11. 
Independent Order of Old Maids, 

1910-11. 
Delegate to Athens Conference, Y. W 

1910. 
Senior Walking Club, 1910-11. 
Glee Club, 1908-09. 
Didonian Chapter. Vergilian Club, 1910-11 



1909-10, 
C. 



" What is Ila Allen's future? " asked some one. 

" Teaching History at A. G. T. I." 

" Hope I won't be the only one. Shall I? " asked Ila. 

" Miss Kelly will assist." 

" What will Irma Dale be? " 

" Gentle housewife." 

" How about roommates Haymans and Haas? " 

" They will coach those deficient in Chemistry." 

Miss Haas was heard to groan. 

" What will Nora Greene be? " 

" Assistant dentist in Montevallo." 

A smile passed around the circle. 

" 0, we mustn't forget the town girls ! What is to become of Mamie and 
Ella?" 

" Both will soon marry." 

" What are we going to be? We just now heard what was going on," 
said Alma and Minnie Lee, coming in quite breathless. 

" Both will teach Domestic Science." 

" 0! " said Alma; but at that instant the lights " winked." 

" My! I'd no idea it was so late! " exclaimed Lessie. "And I have not 
written up my Sunday-school notebook, either." 

The last words heard of the meeting, Kate was calling over the banis- 
ters down to second floor : " You'd better be hurrying, Phoebe ! Miss Stall- 
worth will surely get you when you get to her hall, and you know the rest." 

Elizabeth Hodges ('11). 

* * * 

Acrostic 

All the little girlies who have ever striven here 

Loved thee, as we love thee, O Alma Mater, dear! 

And now, maidenlike, you have gone and changed your name. 

But not your great glory, nor yet your resplendent fame. 

All adown the long ages may thy praises roll; 

May thy story to new generations be told, 

And countless loves thy memory enfold. 

To them that would harm thee we will each be a foe; 
Every one of thy beauties and virtues we know. 
Can we think of thee ever, unless the tears start? 
Hard, 'tis so hard, that from thee must we part! 

GRACE GAST C12). 



The History of History 




> WO days each week the poor, miserable, weary, overburdened Sen- 
iors assemble for forty-five minutes of " intellectual " discussions 
of Civil Government, United States and Alabama Histories, accom- 
panying a few lecture courses along lines of moral and social training. 
Some few girls, reaching the room early, endeavor to get points they did 
not have time to look up the preceding night. The 7 : 55 gong sounds, and 
every one becomes silent. A gentle step is heard approaching the class 
room, where sits every Senior trying to get a peep at every word in the first 
paragraph. 

Miss Instructor enters, places all her " scratch " notebooks and texts in 
their particular places, and says: " This seems like Senior girls. I wonder 
if all of you have been this quiet ever since you came in." 

(Elizabeth's hand goes up.) 

Miss I. : " Miss Elizabeth has something to say, I believe." 

Elizabeth: " Miss I., I must confess that I have not, but I feel justified 
in saying all that I have." 

Miss I. : '* Well, Little Girls, I must ask you what you were talking about 
before I came in. How many were talking? Well, I believe Miss Mat- 
tie's hand went up first." 

Mattie C. : "I asked Irene what basket-ball team was going to play us 
this afternoon." 

Miss I. : " You Senior girls know that you should not be discussing ath- 
letics in the History Room. This is a place for more serious subjects. I 
believe there was a hand up over yonder — Miss Phoebe Cary. Miss Cary, 
pardon me for not seeing your hand sooner, but the little girl in front of 
you has such an immense bow of ribbon on her hair that I failed to see it. 
Will that little girl please change her position ? You would be better off if 
you would take more time for putting something in your heads instead of 
so much on them. Now, Miss Cary." 

Phoebe : " I just asked Lily what it was Miss Stream sat upon her for last 
night — was it for wearing low neck and short sleeves." 






Miss I. : " The idea of a Senior using such unbecoming language and look- 
ing after the matters of the Discipline Committee! But we mast hasten 
with the lesson ; we have taken too much time already. [Set 'tches her 
head and gives her watch charm its daily slide.] I wish to asK the class 
how far they have studied ; but will Miss Daisy close the blinds r us first? 
[Every girl looks toward the window.] Little Girls, Miss Daisy alone can 
attend to that; you show your thoughtlessness so clearly. I believe Miss 
Glennie had her hand up to tell us how far she had studied." 

Glennie: " Miss I., I studied the first four chapters and read the others 
over ; but I did not have much time for learning the last ones, since I have 
four tests to-day, and the lecture last night took up so much time that I did 
not have opportunity for either the library work or study of the text. I 
looked up the bills of the Legislature in all the back papers ; read Governor 
Comer's speech to the Legislature, which I outlined for my permanent note- 
book; looked up the national officers; read that article on moral training, 
taking notes on it ; looked up Charlemagne's life, and found his other name, 
' Charles the Great,' and why he was so called, also the life of Egbert ; but 
I did not find any connection between his work and that of the Crusades." 

Miss I. : " I hate to interrupt, but I wish to tell the class that I shall give 
them another day on that last point before we take it up in class ; but they 
must have a paper on Egbert before the work of this department is com- 
plete. Continue, please." 

Glennie: " I looked up those modern ideas on the gods in all the maga- 
zines you told us — " 

Miss I. : "I dislike so much to break into your answer, but I feel that I 
must take the time to ask if you did not look up what was said concerning 
the female goddesses, too." 

Glennie : " Yes'm, but I forgot to say so. I believe they are all the ref- 
erences I had time to read. 0, yes ! I copied sixty-six pages on my per- 
manent notebook, and found out all I could about the beginning of the State 
of Alabama." 

Miss I. : " Pshaw, pshaw ! You did not even look up about the sons of 
Noah." 

Glennie : " Miss I., I just did not have time." 

Miss I. : "I know you Little Girls have a great deal of work, but you 
should not try to carry so much that you cannot do justice to all of it. You 
are not Seniors if you cannot do the work assigned you. That is what I 
say about the girls in this school, especially in History, which is, without 



doubt, the weakest department in the school. You don't know how to study 
and use your time. I am afraid that I cannot recommend all of you for 
graduation. The Freshmen may be excused for not knowing all these 
things, so the other classes. Really, the best way I know to characterize 
the four classes is : The Freshmen don't know it, and think they do know 
it; the Sophomores don't know it, and know they do not; the Juniors know 
it, and don't know they know it ; and the Seniors know it, and know they 
know it. How many of you got as far as Miss Haymans? " 

(All hands go up but three.) 

Miss I. : " So much for that. I'll ask those three girls to stop and see 
me after class, since we have no time to discuss weak girls here. How 
many looked up those national officers? " 

(Several hands go up.) 

Miss I. : " Who is President? " 

All Together: " Dr. Palmer." 

Miss I.: "Little Girls, Little Girls! I am surprised! We are talking 
about national officers. You have all been asleep. Before I go further, 
though, I would like to say to Miss Pansy, before I forget, that she must 
not get loose in her work just because she has had measles. I believe Miss 
Nora's hand went up." 

Nora G. : " Well— er— Miss I— " 

Miss I. : " We have no time for Miss Nora's ' wells ; ' so if you can't go, 
sit down and let me pass you." 

Nora G. : " Miss I., I thought you were talking about the school, for I 
know the President of the United States." 

Miss I. : " Well, Little Girls, I guess I didn't make myself clear. Let me 
put my question to you again, and make myself more distinct. Who is 
President of the United States — not the state itself, but our own nation, 
country? Of course not the school! Let Miss Greene answer." 

Nora: " Roosevelt." 

Miss I. : " Miss Greene you are a little excited, and have your facts 
mixed. However, your work is usually very good, except your handwrit- 
ing. I'm afraid that will make your life a failure. I believe I will state 
my question again, since so many of you seem to think I did not make my- 
self clear. First, I'll ask Miss Winnie Davis Neely how she understood 
the question." 

Winnie 0.: "I understood you to ask who the present President of the 
United States is." 



(All hands go up a little uncertain.) 

Miss I. : " I'll ask Miss Winnie Davis to venture the answer." 

Winnie D. : "I think Taft is." 

Miss I. : " Very good, indeed. I am very proud of you, for you are the 
first to give any definite answer." 

(8: 45 bell rings.) 

Miss I. : " Well, I guess that is our bell ; but the period has been so short. 
0, I'm very sorry we didn't cover the ground ! I don't know what I am to 
do with this class." [Exit girls.] 



Dormitory Regulations 



1. Quiet need not be maintained during study hours, and girls may have 
frequent feasts after the lights are out at night. 

2. Running on the halls is to be indulged in at all times, freely and noisily. 

3. Tacks, pins, screws, or nails may be driven into the walls continually, 
and pictures be fastened to walls by mucilage. Every girl is urged to write 
on woodwork and walls. 

4. All trash must be thrown from the window ; trash baskets are too ex- 
pensive. 

5. On leaving the rooms, turn on steam and leave all windows wide open, 
so that " all of Shelby County may be kept warm." 

6. Talking from windows is encouraged. 

7. Lights must be kept on when occupants are not in the rooms, to keep 
" ghosts from circulating." 

8. Every girl is encouraged never to sleep in her own room at night. 

9. Any pupil who changes her room is paid the fee of fifty cents. This 
privilege is readily granted. 

10. Any glass broken by occupants of rooms must not be reported to the 
office, for all damages of this kind are paid out of the lecture fund. 

11. Girls may come to meals occasionally if they so desire. 

12. Friends and relatives are urged to spend the night in the Dormitory. 

13. Study hours may be used as a period of " permiscuous " visiting. 

14. When lights " wink," all conceivable noises must be made, and stu- 
dents must congregate on halls, always running on cross halls. 

15. Every girl must have a chafing dish to prevent eating at regular 
meals. 



Our Lone Professor 

* 

A man he was to all the Seniors dear, 

For him we never entertained a fear! 

Though late to class, he never did complain, 

And from harsh words he ever did refrain. 

Unpracticed he to keep in after school, 

A thing the other teachers made a rule. 

If some point in the text we did not get, 
" The text's to blame," he said, and did not fret. 

And if perchance he absent was from class, 
" Your notebooks, girls, will help the time to pass." 

The trait of his that always pleased us best 

Was that he strongly disapproved of tests. 

If feeling blue when we came into the room, 

With jokes and smiles he soon dispelled the gloom. 

And every member of the Science Class 

Was sorry when the hour ten-thirty had passed. 

Full many a lesson rare and rich he taught; 

A wealth of knowledge to our minds he brought. 

Now, in conclusion, I've a word to say 

To those dear friends who here expect to stay: 

If Chemistry's the thing you have in view, 

Our " lone professor " is the man for you. 

ELISE HAAS ('11). 

(Occasionally.) 



Some A* G. T. I. Recipes 



Brown Pudding 

30 pounds Whole-Wheat Flour. 
10 pounds Raisins. 

10 pounds Dates. 

5 pounds Butter. 

6 gallons Milk. 

16 cups Brown Sugar. 

11 cups Molasses. 

10 tablespoonfuls Soda. 
Steam three hours. 

Sauce for Brown Pudding 

10 pounds Butter. 
20 pounds Sugar. 
20 Eggs (whites). 



Fish Chowder 

20 pounds Boneless Cod. 
10 pounds Beef (juices from). 
Yi bushel Sliced Irish Potatoes. 
40 Onions. 
J4 cup Pepper. 
3 pounds Bacon. 
25 gallons Milk. 
x /y peck Flour. 
10 pounds Cracker Crumbs. 

Bread for Two Meals 

196 pounds Flour. 

120 pounds Water. 

1 pound Yeast. 

5 pounds Lard. 

6 pounds Sugar. 
3 pounds Salt. 



Problems for the Faculty to Solve 

* 

I. Divide two hours and a half into seven parts of one hour and a half 
each, said hour and a half necessary to prepare each lesson assigned. 

II. What is the discriminated wholeness in our immediate perception if 
the deductive reasonings, emotional impressiveness, and elemental tran- 
quallizing experiences of unsympathetic emotions are psychologically de- 
ducted by careful introspection? To be worked out by analytic-synthetic 
reasonings, with conventional language. 

III. Write a theme on " The Imagination of a Flea Sitting upon the Top 
of the Capitol at Washington." 

IV. How long does it take a Senior to review eight hundred and four 
lines of Latin for a test, if she has to bring up forty new lines written and 
read forty by sight ? How long would it take to find out said Latin lesson 
requires over forty-five minutes ? 

V. Name all the national officers, from the date of George Washington's 
inauguration to the present time, of the United States, England, France, 
Germany, Russia, Italy, Portugal, and all other countries, with dates and 
grandfathers of each. 

VI. Sketch from nature the entire globe as seen from the studio window, 
with a mule in the foreground. 

VII. Place the heels together, arms sideways, shoulder high, and, with- 
out moving the hands, raise the hair twenty times while ten is being 
counted. 

VIII. Why do the gongs keep such correct time? 

IX. How can a girl make her payment when she has only ten cents and a 
one-cent stamp, and can't hear from home? 

X. Discuss the following as a definition of the library : A place in which 
books are out. 

XL If two lines are going up and one line is coming down a stairway 
four feet wide, would it be more culpable for a fourth line waiting at the 
top to slide down the railing or to be ten minutes late for class ? 






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To Miss Poynor, wonderful to relate, we bequeath our forgiveness for 
having thus far continually annoyed us with Latin verbs. It is our wish 
that she may forget, as we have already done, not only the annoyance she 
has caused us, but also every rule in the Latin grammar, and every verb, 
except " amo." 

To Miss Moore we give our voices to have and to hold if she can hold 
them. 

To Mrs. Howie we give our stock of jokes to use instead of the one about 
Adam, Eve, and the toad. 

To Miss Leake we leave our collection of rag, coon songs, vaudeville 
snatches and variations. We would give her something more, but this is 
all we have that would interest her. 

To Miss Grote we leave our knowledge of electricity, provided that she 
will use the same in a successful repairing of the gongs. 

To Miss Bolton, our handbags. 

To Miss Stephens, our gray uniforms, dyed pink. 

To Miss Franklin, that better word for which she is continually search- 
ing, also Gene Powell's treatise on " The Proper Way of Drinking Water, 
Milk, or Coffee from a Large Soup Bowl." 

3. Having expressed our love for the Faculty, and desiring to do the 
most good with our property, we will the following-named articles to our 
friends among the undergraduates : 

To the Juniors, our Psychologies and sympathies. 

To the Sophomores, our prettiest dresses ; our highest-heeled slippers ; 
our paint, powder, and puffs ; our hair ribbons ; our frat. pins ; our U. of A. 
and Auburn College hats; and our love. 

To the Freshmen we give our measles, failures, defeats, losses, crosses, 
and worries, in order that they may know how sublime a thing it is to suf- 
fer. Furthermore, we bequeath to the aforesaid Freshmen all our mental 
capacity, to be placed at interest until 1913-14. We do hereby appoint 
Miss Henry as their guardian. [Seal] CLASS OF 1910. 

Pro Ila Allen et al. 

Signed, sealed, and declared by said Senior Class to be its last will and 
testament, in the presence of us, we, the witnesses, do subscribe our names 
hereto. (Witnesses) Nora Greene. 

Pansy Nash. 
Claude Dowling. 
May 23, 1911. Mattie Cargile. 



Organization of Class of 1912 



Motto: " Non pahna sine labore.' 
Colors: Black and Gold. 
Flower: Black-Eyed Susan. 



OFFICERS 

LETTLEDAFFIN ----------------- President 

AGNES HTTT --------------- Vice President 

V1NN PITTS ----------- Secretary and Treasurer 

MARY ANDERSON ------------ Historian 

IRMA DUMAS -------------- Poet 

MARY BREWER -"-_-_--_-- Musician 
IRENE SAVAGE ---------- Critic 

ALICE LONGSHORE - - - - - Artist 



CLASS OF 1912 



Agee, Myrtle Ellen, Sweetwater. 

Allison, Ida Nell, Springville. 

Allison, Nina Inez, Springville. , 

Alverson, Ruby Hawthorne, Coal City. 

Anderson, Mary Elizabeth, Selma. 

Bell, Dorothy Virginia, Birmingham. 

Bell, Ola Pauline, Repton. 

Berry, Gracie McPherson, Montevallo. 

Brantley, Eunice Loutitia, Atmore. 

Brewer, Mary Linda, Dadeville. 

Burns, Maud, Warrior. 

Bynum, Mary Elinor, Blountville. 

Capell, Mary Amanda, Louisville. 

Carlisle, Maude, Auburn. 

Caton, Bonnie Lee, River Falls. 

Chitwood, Mary Louise, DeArmanville. 

Cosper, Ada May, Alexander City, R. 3. 

Daffin. Lettie, Grove Hill. 

Daughdrille, Winifred Elizabeth, Gadsden. 

Douglass, Virginia, Brewton. 

Dumas, Irma Clyde, Arlington. 

Edwards, Glennie, Society Hill. 

Farr, Lola, Bessemer. 

Ferrell, Lou Vivian, Eutaw. 

Frazer, Annie Clay, Montevallu. 

Gast, Grace, Russellville. 

Gaston, Ruby, Gastonburg. 

Gay, Grace, Wadley.. 

Gay, Inez, Lineville. 

Gentry, Elizabeth, Tuskegee. 

Gilder, Minnie Lee, Mount Meigs. 

Gissendanner, Winona, Pinckard. 

Greene, Mary Edna, Dadeville. 

Hales, Eddie Mae, West Greene. 

Hanson, Ruth Rebekah, Waverly. 

Hatton, Ruth Delana, Sedalia, Mo. 

Haynes, Laura Elsie, Tyler. 

Henderson, Jennie Lee, Drewry. 

Herren, Maggie Annie, Tuscaloosa. 

Hicks, Lillian Grace, Columbiana. 

Hitt, Agnes, Herrick,. 111. 

Holcombe, Medora Lobelia, Birmingham. 

Kroell, Georgia Marie, Montevallo. 

Lazenby, Bessie Hope, Monroeville. 



Lazenby, Gertrude, Forest Home. 
Lazenby, Lois, Forest Home. 
Leatherwood, Bessie Mae, Brag'gs. 
Livingston, Elsie Mae, Kellyton. 
Longshore, Alice Virginia, Columbiana. 
Lyon, Marguerite, Shorter. 
Masse)', Velma Matilda, Wellington. 
Meadors, Sarah Frances, Cusseta. 
Meroney, Mildred, Montevallo. 
Moore, Lucy Brown, Sellers. 
Murphree, Ruth, Gadsden. 
McFaddin, Dorothy, Greensboro. 
McGee, Nell Louise, Bonita. 
McKenzie, Mary Pauline, Letohatchie. 
McMillan, Celia Anne, Columbiana. 
McMillan, Nannie Margaret, Columbiana. 
McRee, Jeffie Elizabeth, Brundidge. 
McWhorter, Virginia, Montgomery. 
Nelson, Ina Maude, Columbiana. 
Peterson, Mary Winifred, Montevallo. 
Pitts, Marion Calvina, Columbiana. 
Porter, Lois Anchors, Piper. 
Posey, Mary Montgomery, Harpersville. 
Powell, Mary, Greenville. 
Rainer, Olive Katherine, Elba. 
Ramey, Clara Ruth, Greensboro. 
Reynolds, Zada Davis, Selma. 
Roberts, Mamie, Talladega. 
Robinson, Sidney Ellen, Five Points. 
Ross, Mary Ellen, Fremont. 
Sanders, Helen Bertha, Montevallo. 
Saportas, Isabel Napoleon, Maplesvillc. 
Savage, Charlotte, Piedmont. 
Savage, Margaret Irene, Coal City. 
Selman, Alice Brown, Kellyton. 
Shelton, Leola Penn, Avondale. 
Thompson, Vera Gertrude, Goldville. 
Torbert, Carrie Elizabeth, Society Hill. 
Turk, Mollie Lee, Autaugaville. 
Walker, x\nnie Elmira, Rockford. 
Watson, Gertrude Angeline, Opelika. 
White, Clarice, Columbiana. 
Williamson, Lillian Judson, Uchee. 
Wright, Willie Eugenia, Birmingham. 



Junior Class History 

* 

THE JUNIORS' PROLOGUE 

Whan that school life with its nightes soote 

The Blisse of Ignorance hath perced to the roote, 

And hath brought every maide to Junior povv'r, 

Than feel we Time hath strncke the houre, 

Than smale girles maken melodye 

And slepen after ten with open eye: 

So priketh hem Nature in hir corages 

All longen to goon Turkey Pilgrimages, 

And form Litel Girlies into jollie bandes 

That loven to follow their own commandes. 

Specially thir energies not to bend 

From Science and Math, thir secretes to r.ende. 

Bifel that in that sesoun on that daye 

Came '12 to A. G. T. I. in great arraye, 

Ready to wenden on our pilgrimage 

To Juniordom, with ful devout corage. 

In Septembre was come into that Dormitorye 

Ful nigh eighty in that companye 

Of sondry girles, by aventure i- falle 

In feliow-and-scholarship weren they alle, 

That toward Seniordom woulde striven 

With mindes alle alerte and aliven. 

Evene as Freshmen weren atte beste 

When Aline Robertson led alle reste; 

And schortly came we to Sophomoricdom 

Whan we weren ledde by Marye Anderson; 

Than Lettye Daffyne came upon the ryse 

To Juniordom, as I now yow devise. 

But natheless, I have not time or space 

Any further in this tale to pace: 

Methought it accordant to resoun 

To sprinkle in this Historye, as seasoun. 

Such factes as it doth seme to me 

Will help telle you what is our degre, 

And eek what state Juniores are inne: 

And now this tale I here ende. 

MARY ANDERSON, 

Historian ('12). 



Junior Class Poem 



THE JUNIOR'S LAMENT 

The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the years. 

Of wailing sounds, and sad laments, and lessons that stir tears. 

Buried 'neath a load of care, our earlier hopes lie dead; 

A mournful strain they echo to Memory's silent tread. 

Those childish hopes and dreams are flown, and now we have to say 

Physics, Ethics, and Theorems throughout the livelong day. 

Where are the dreams, the fresh young dreams, that lately sprang and stood, 

In brighter light and softer airs — our Freshman sisterhood? 

Alas! they all are in their graves; the tender, soft, young dreams 

Are lying in their lowly beds, and dark the future seems. 

Those were happy, care-free days back in the Freshman Class; 

But now it's toil and troubles sad to win a decent pass. 

The Sophomores' love of finery — it perished long ago; 

The crown of puffs, the dear soft curls, and painted cheeks aglow; 

Aspiration to social claims was mania with us there. 

For we were gay and giddy, and had not a single care. 

Till time rolled on, and poor, harassed Juniors we became. 

And the brightness of our smiles was gone, as were our hopes to fame. 

When, after weary toiling", we Juniors were at last. 
Then there was no more turning, for our bitter fate was cast; 
For our troubles were only beginning, we learned with utter grief; 
And we wept that time so gay and glad could have a life so brief; 
Yet 'twas not unmeet, we knew, that joyous time should perish. 
For lessons learned through labor we shall forever cherish. 

Then welcome that day, long wished, that brings us to Seniority. 

When every one shall recognize our great superiority. 

Our highest hopes will be realized, though we seek for knowledge still, 

And we'll always keep our faces bright, come whatsoever will. 

No victory without labor," our motto none can surpass, 

Is dear to us as the Black and Gold, the banner of our class. 

IRMA C. DUMAS ('12). 



Organization of Class of 1913 



Flower: Violet. 

Colors: Lavender and White. 

Motto: "Nothing is impossible to labor." 

OFFICERS 

DAISY DALE --------- President 

KATHERINE HODGES ------- Vice President 

JIMMIE CLARKE -------- Secretary and Treasurer 

MABEL HITT ------------------ Historian 

META PHELPS ---------------- Poet 

ANNIE REYNOLDS ----------- Artist 

LAURINE LILES -------- Musician 




ft 
o 



CLASS OF 1913 



Anderson, Ethel Lucile, Choccolocco. 
Armistead, Edna Eenlah, Campbell. 
Arnold, Fay, Walnut Grove. 
Avant, Hester Mae, Tallassee, R. 2. 
Ballard, Jessie Elizabeth, Alexander City, 

R. 2. 
Bell, Nannie Ellenda, Repton. 
Bingham, Effie Lena, Montgomery. 
Bishop, Winnie, Marianna, Fla. 
Bryant, Ethel Pearl, Mobile. 
Cargile, Frances, High Ridge. 
Clark, Jimmie Helen, Lower Peachtree. 
Cosper, Nora, Childersburg. 
Cowart, Nellie Belle, Nauvoo. 
Cox, Zelma Mildred, Furman. 
Damn, John D., Grove Hill. 
Dahlberg, Dora, Suggsville. 
Dale, Daisy, Oak Hill. 
Darden, Ruby Elizabeth, Oneonta. 
Dison, Witherbv Elizabeth, Birmingham 
. R. 3. 

Donnally, Edwina, Billingsley. 
Drake, Mary Frances, Auburn. 
Duggan, Inez, Camden. 
Esslinger, Roxie Irene, Gurley. 
Faye, Mary Ellen, Prattville. 
Fuller, Mary Louise, Fredonia. 
Funderburk, Jonnie Bertha, Alexander 

City, R. 2. 
Fuqua, Leila, Blue Springs, R. 1. 
Garrett, Grace, Boaz. 
Garrett, Manta, Tallassee, R. 1. 
Gates, Sallie Lee, Mount Willing. 
Gentry, Beulah, La\vley, R. 1. 
Glasgow, Clara, Ensley. 
Hale, Emma Sophrona, Birmingham. 

R 3. 
Hale, Eunice Lee, Birmingham. R. 3. 
Hall, Helen Elise, Thorsby. 
Hall, Sallie, Thorsby. 
Hall, Sallie Bell, Fort Deposit, R. 1. 
Harper, Agnes Janette, Montevallo. 
Head, Walter Frances, "Wilton. 
Henderson, Nannie Ruth, Drewry. 
Hinesley, Ellie Beatrice, Acton. 
Hingle, Marjorie Jeanette, Talladega. 
Hinton, Mabel Lambertine, Troy. 



Hitt, Mabel, Herrick, 111. 
Hix, Elizabeth, Birmingham. 
Hodges, Katherine, Ashville. 
Hughey, Annie Schoola, Sprott. 
Jenkins, Margaret Bonham, Geneva. 
Jones, Erie, Clintonville. 
Jones, Lillie Matilda, Clintonville. 
Jones, Mattie Mary, Clintonville, R. 1. 
Jones, Minnie, Clintonville, R. 1. 
Joyner, Birdie Mae Belle, Pierce. 
Kelly, Allie Mae, Fairford. 
Kelly, Willie. Headland. 
Killingsworth, Norma, Montevallo. 
Krentzman, Rebecca, West Blocton. 
Lide, Kate Knox, M inter. 
Liles, Laurine, Albertville. 
Lindsay, Ruth, Headland. 
Lovvorn, Lillian, Newell. 
Lyman, Nina Nabors, Montevallo. 
Massey, Vera Rosa, Wellington, R. 2. 
Mathers. Julia Marie, Toinette. 
Mathews, Zelma Arden, Birmingham. 
Mellen, Helen Van De Graaf, Knoxvillc 

Tenn. 
Mixson, Pauline Walker, Ozark. 
Moore. Maggie Wilma, Perryville. 
Moore, Robie, Perryville. 
Morgan, Emma Frances, Honoraville. 
Morgan, Pearl May, Slocomb. 
McCaskey, Elizabeth, Birmingham. 
McEwen, Kate, Rockford. 
McFarland, Pauline Ella, Empire. 
McGowin, Lillie, Brewton, R. 1. 
McGowin, Lula Belle, Mason. 
Mclntyre, Katie Mae, Corona. 
McMillan, Jeannette, Pine-Barren, Fla. 
McRee, Annie Murphy. Brundidge. 
Nance, Ruth, Bessemer. 
Neely, Teressa, Orrville. 
Neighbors, Mattie Lillian, Goodwater. 
Nickerson, Mera, Siluria. 
Odom, Lucy Myrtle, Hillsboro. 
Page, Fannie, Pink. 
Parham, Mary St. Clair, Gainesville. 
Parker, Elaine Goodale, Billingsley. 
Parker, Lois Evelyn, Beatrice. 
Pearce, Julia Alvoid, Columbia, S. C. 



Phelps, Frances Meta, Montgomery. 
Pippin, Dora, Naomi, Fla. 
Poole, Mittie, Montevallo. 
Rawls, Antoinette, St. Stephens. 
Reynolds, Annie, Jemison. 
Ricks, Carrie Virginia, Vick. 
Roberts, Elizabeth, Bessemer, R. 5. 
Rodgers, Kathleen Colin, Grove Hill. 
Russell, Mattie, Tuskegee. 
Sands, Willie Belle, Five Points. 
Selman, Flora Chapman, Kelly ton, 
Sewell, Mary Ida, Knoxville. 
Shaffer, Olive June, Ensley. 
Sims, Ruth Lee, Renfroe. 
Smith, Gladys Lee, Randolph. 
Smith, Rosalie, Graceville, Fla. 

Yow, Clara 



Somerville, Annelee, Tuscaloosa. 
Spencer, Ora, Greensboro, R. 1. 
Stallworth, Katie Belle, Beatrice. 
Steele, Annie Norris, Boaz. 
Stephens, Mary Emma, Tuscaloosa. 
Stitt, Arrie, Wallace. 
Straughn, Annie Lou, Wehadkee. 
Thompson, Esther, Wadley. 
Waldrop, Bernice, North Birmingham. 
Waldrop, Lola, Goodwater, R. 3. 
Waldrop, Myrtle Splawn, North Bir- 
mingham. 
White, Lou Ellen, Salem. 
Williamson, Mattie Marie, Whatley. 
Woolley, Lizzie, Montevallo, R. 1. 
Worrell, Willie Branch, Tallassee. 
Lucile, Pine Hill. 



Organization of the Class of 1914 

Colors: Green and White. 

Flower: White Rose. 

Motto: ''We aim to reach the highest." 

OFFICERS 

ALLEEN McKENZIE ------- President 

LAURA MAY BAXTER ------- Vice President 

MARIE STEELE -----__-_-___. Secretary 

ALLEYNE WALLACE ------------- L- Treasurer 

ERIN WALKER --------------- Musician 

SADIE MURPHY ------------ Poet 

MABEL DOWLING ------- Historian 



CLASS OF 1914 



Alexander, Gladys Mae, Bessemer. 

Allen, Bertie Mae, Alpine. 

Allen. Ella, Dayton. 

Allen, Margaret Scott. Dayton. 

Allen, Mary Porter, Renfroe. 

Andrews, Enla, McWilliams. 

Armstrong, Alice Lula, Montevallo. 

Armstrong, Mary Lena, Montevallo. 

Atsinger, Naomi, Warrington. 

Baker, Etha Mae, Montgomery. 

Baker, Lavin, Goodwater. 

Baker. Rebecca Whitson, Plantersville. 

Barnes, Stella, Kymnlga. 

Baskin, Pearl, Murrycross. 

Baxter. Laura Mae, Vinegar Bend. 

Bean, Bessie. Montevallo. 

Billingslea, Willie Mae, Browns. 

Bordon, Belle, Cordova. 

Bowdon, Lillian. Selfville. 

Bowdon, Pearl, Selfville. 

Boyd, Mary Croft, Winter Garden, Fla. 

Brand, Ruth Ester, Randolph. 

Breithaupt, Eunice, Ackerville. 

Bryant, Dovie Estelle, Hollywood. 

Burgin, Clara Irene, Montevallo. 

Butts, Lena, Blue Springs. 

Bynum, Minnie, Oneonta. 

Caffee, Jennie, Woodstock. 

Caldwell, Bertha Irene, Montevallo. 

Caldwell, Pauline, Montevallo. 

Callaway, Georgia Lowe, Brooklyn. 

Christian. Ruth Elizabeth, Northport. 

Cogdell, Lena, Inverness. 

Collins, Mildred Estelle, Warrior. 

Comer, Ruth Estelle, Wilton. 

Cook, Jeanie, Nauvoo. 

Corley, Vida Eunice, Rockford. 

Cox, Alice Jackson, Randolph. 

Cross, Alva Madge, Pelham. 

Cross, Lillian Maylene, Montevallo. 

Cross, Lucy Pritchett, Letohatchie. 

Cross, Ola Hildred, Quito. 

Curry, Addie, Montevallo. 

Dabbs, Bertha, Bessemer. 

Darby, Annie, Chandler. 

Davis, Ada, McFall. 

DeFreese, Iva, Piedmont. 



Dennard, Clara King, Selma. 
Deupree, Clara Estelle, Renfroe. 
Dowling, Mabel Glenn, Cullman. 
Duncan, Ala Lou, Fleta. 
Dupree, Nannie Mae, Dadeville. 
Dyke, Mabel, Eden. 
Evans, Bonnie Alberta, Fulton. 
Evans, Callie, Biloxi. Mis.-,. 
Ferguson, Kathleen Earle, Birmingham. 
Franke, Bertha Aurelia, Birmingham. 
Foster, Velma, Luverne. 
Galatas, Ida May Elizabeth, Montgom- 
ery. 
Galloway, Louie Cecelia, Summerlield. 
Gayle. Leila Louise, Selma. 
Gayle, Margaret Marcella, Birmingham. 
Gentry. Mary Emma. Tuskegee. 
Gould. Jeanie Huldah, Boligee. 
Griffith, Margaret Louise, Blountville. 
Hallmark, Pauline. Pratt City. 
Harris. Edith, Eclectic. 
Harper, Annie Kathleen, Shelby. 
Harrison, Bessie Jane. Montevallo. 
Hayes, Mirtis Agnes, Langdale. 
Haynes, Pauline, Ashland. 
Hays. Eunice, Helena. 
Henson, Leska, Wilton. 
Hightower, Annie Euart, York. 
Holder, Sidney, Carlton. 
Horn, Lucile, Montevallo. 
Howard, Arinza, Sellers. 
Howard, Virginia Keene, Montgomery. 
Hughey, Martha Ollie Laura, Sprott. 
Hughey, Nellie May, Sprott. 
Hunter, Annie Lee, Equality. 
John, Maud, Coleanor. 
Johnson, Effie, Meltonsville. 
Johnson, Mattie Burgess, Slocomb. 
Johnson, Sarah Elizabeth, Nanafalia. 
Jordan, Beulah, Russellville. 
Kearley, Annie Belle, Scotland. 
Kearley, Fannie Alma, Franklin. 
Kelly, Ruth Evelyn, Society Hill. 
Keys, Maggie, Aldrich. 
Killian, Frances, Birmingham. 
Kirby, Addie Burgess, Collum. 
Kreutzman, Annie, West Blocton. 



Kunstler, Beatrice, Straven. 
Lacey, Annie Elizabeth, Maylene. 
Lathem, Exa Irene, Marvel. 
Johnson, Sallie, Birmingham. 
Lawley, Blanche, Montevallo. 
Lawley, Essie, Montevallo. 
Lewis, Grace Beatrice, Attalla. 
Martin, Alline, Nanafalia. 
Meroney, Ethel Gertrude, Montevallo. 
Miller, Josephine Dorothea, Sylacauga. 
Monts, Mary Suclie. Morgan Springs, 

R. 1. 
Moore, Marie Streit, Birmingham, R. 0. 
Moore, Nannie Lucile, Coleanor. 
Moore, Nina, Selfville. 
Morgan, Lnla May, Maplesville. 
Mullins, Veronica, Tallassee, R. 1. 
Murphy, Sadie Corrine, Montgomery. 
Murray, Annie, Adamsville. 
McGaughy, Agnes, Montevallo. 
Mc.Gee, Edith Belle, Bonita. 
McKehzie, Alleen Pelham, Thomaston. 
McKibbon, Elna, Montevallo. 
McKinnon, Minnie Coleman, Selma. 
McLane, Ellen Ethleen, Saginaw. 
McLeod. Lizzie, Evergreen. 
McMillan. Emmie Kate, Pensacola. 
McRae, Nancy Elizabeth, Tallassee. 
Nabors, Lucile, Oneonta. 
Nabors, Haseltine. Sylacauga. 
Owens, Martha Lizzie, Lineville. 
Ozley, Sudie Mary, Siluria, R. 1. 
Pacely, Frankie Lucile, Montevallo. 
Padgett, Ruth, Andalusia, R. 6. 
Parker, Berniece Miriam, Billingsley. 
Patrick, Ida Evelyn, Billingsley. 
Parsons, Lillie, Bessemer, R. 4. 
Patterson, Berenyece, Oneonta. 
Patton, Ethel Frances, Ralph. 
Payne, Pearl, Bessemer. 
Peaks, Mittie Mae, Evergreen. 
Peebles, Mary Emma, Aliceville. 
Peterman, Maggie Davis, Florala. 
Piper, Inez Elizabeth, Lafayette. 
Pitts, Bessie, Thompson, R. 1. 



Pitts, Janie Belle, Birmingham. 
Poindexter, Mamie Louise, Montgomery. 
Price, Bertha, Wilton. 
Puckett, Bettie, Springville. 
Quarles, Susie May. Vance. 
Reed, Mary Louise, Tombigbec. 
Reed, Ruby Eloise, Tombigbee. 
Reynolds, Winnie Davis, Clanton. 
Roberson, Edna Erline, Mount Hope. 
Rockwell, Ouida Mabel, Vinegar Bend. 
Rogers. Irma Lee. Dothan. 
Ross, Annie, Fremont. 
Salter, Martha Ann, Bessemer. 
Sands, Nina Lucile, Five Points. 
Sessions, Estelle, Montevallo, R. 2. 
Sessions, Lena Sarah, Maylene. 
Shaver, Mary Lou, Garden City. 
Shivers, Marion, Montevallo. 
Shortt, Annie Lorraine, Calcra. 
Slaughter, Elsie Leoline, Oxford. 
Slaughter, Nancy Nettie, Oxford. 
Smith, Janie, Evergreen. 
Stoudemire, Tensie Milliard. Alexander. 
Starr, Eilee, Montevallo. 
Steele, Marie Elizabeth, Selma. 
Stephens, Florence, Tuscaloosa. 
Straughn, Bessie Burt, Wallace. 
Strother, Bessie Lucile, Lineville. 
Sturdivant, Mary Frank, Selma. 
Swanson, Mary Sibley, Finchburg. 
Trimble, Susie Adella. Cullman. 
VanDerveer, Bessie, Clanton. 
Vines, Alice Mae. Bessemer. 
Waites, Mary Alphie. Rockford. 
VValdrop, Myrtle, Salem, R. 1. 
Walker, Erin Oslin, Selma. 
Wallace, Alleyne Vivian, York. 
Whiteside, Esther, Ohatchie. 
Williams, Annie Gertrude, Ensky. 
Williams, Blanche, Birmingham. 
Williams, Fannie Lillian, Ensley. 
Williams, Lizzie Mae, Eufaula. 
Wood, Gladys Gertrude. McFall. 
Woollevr, Gertrude, Stanton. 
Wooten, Lula Watson, Oneonta. 




o 



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Freshman Class History 



jfiNE afternoon in the month of September, 1910, we, one hundred and 
MywJ seventy-three classmates, met for the purpose of organizing our 
class. Not having yet been " through the mill," the accomplish- 
ments of the girls were not generally known, so the qualifications which 
won offices were ready wit and extreme good looks. It is said that our 
President won her office by a superior amount of back hair. We chose for 
our class colors green and white. We thought these colors very appro- 
priate. Green was chosen as a sign of freshness, of capacity for growth; 
white, as an emblem of the purity of our minds. 

Alleen McKenzie was elected President; Laura Mae Baxter, Vice Presi- 
dent; Marie Steele, Secretary; Alleyne Wallace, Treasurer; Erin Walker, 
Musician; Sadie Murphy, Poet; and Mabel Dowling, Historian. 

We were happy when our existence was first recognized on December 14, 
1910, when we celebrated Alabama Day. 

The Freshman Class is noted for its ambitious members. We long for 
the time when we can throw off that apologetic air that belongs to those of 
our years and experience. One of our great ambitions is to be treated as 
though we are not infants. That important, self-satisfied Senior look, 
which we so often see, is one of our longings. Some of our number have 
already achieved to some extent this much-to-be-admired air. Still an- 
other burning desire of our hearts is to grow accustomed to eating syrup 
with a spoon and looking natural meanwhile. Many other things for which 
we yearn are too sacred for expression. 

Our class has been saddened by the loss of two of its members, Georgia 
Lowe Callaway and Haseltine Nabors, who have been called to that land 
where problems are no more. We miss them. 

But we shall not always be Freshmen. In three more years we should 
enter the world equipped with all modern improvements. Meanwhile we 
trust that the outside world is awaiting us with proper anxiety. If the 
reader desires to keep informed of the doings of this class in years to come, 
he will do well to read diligently the writings of the future great minds, 
where doubtless our further acts will be honored. 

Mabel Dowling ('14). 



Freshman Class Poem 



THE FATE OF THE FRESHIES 

We Freshmen have an awful time 

In being hourly Sat Upon! 
'Tis common in our schoolgirl clime 

When we try to have some fun. 
We go to Math, a second late. 

We get Sat Upon right hard. 
O, ours is the saddest fate! 

(Words fail this limping bard.) 

In Science, and in every class. 

Our fate's always the same; 
So rapidly the questions pass. 

One hardly knows her name; 
And, missing, she is Sat Upon, 

Then Sat Upon some more, 
From peep of day till set of sun. 

Till it gets an awful bore! 

We try to snatch an extra nap. 

And find shut the dining-room door. 
In Study Hall an extra rap 

Will call forth teachers galore. 
Short sleeves in winter, or low necks. 

Call forth the same old thing. 
Until our nerves make of us wrecks, 

And " 14's hard luck," we sing! 

SADIE C. MURPHY ('14). 

(Maybe.) 



Subfreshman Organization 

* 

OFFICERS 

WINNIE BAILEY -------- President 

EDITH HAYES ------------ Musician 

MYRTLE MOSELY --------------- Poet 

VERA BYARS -------- _ _ _ Joker 

MARY STALLWORTH ------ Historian 



SUBFRESHMAN CLASS 

Able, Emma Leola, Gantt. Harrison, Ethel, Montevallo. 

Baker, Sarah, Annistpn. Moody, Lillie Lonise, Montevallo. 

Bailey, Winnie Myrtle, Talladega. Moreland, Lenna Armburg, Wilton. 

Bush. Mary Elizabeth, Birmingham. Mosely, Myrtle, Selma. 

Byars, Vera, Johns. Mulkey, Lillie, Montevallo. 

Cook, Marguerite, Cochrane. McDonald, Carrie Lee, Intercourse. 

Dison, Blanche, Birmingham, R. 3. Norris, Bessie, Sulligent. 

Galatas, Ruth Agnes, Montgomery. Payne, Gussie, East Lake. 

Gilbert, Cora, Warrior, R. 2. Sewell, Geneva Gertrude, Randolph. 

Hardaway, Minnie Carter, Montgomery. Shaver, Minnie, Garden City. 

Hayes, Edith Palm, Birmingham. Shaw, Agnes Gertrude, Montevallo. 

Herbert, Elizabeth, Birmingham. Stall worth. Mary, Repton. 

Wooten, Gertrude Alice, Oneonla. 




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Unclassified Organization 



•* 

OFFICERS 

BERTHA GILLAM -------- President 

MYRTLE CAFFEE --------- Vice President 

LILL IE ATKINS ------ _ _ - Secretary and Treasurer 

EDNA WALKER ----------------- Musician 

MAGGIE HUGULEY -------------- Artist 

MAUD PEGUES ------------- Joker 

SUSIE GALLAGHER __-_._- Poet 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Brand, Rebecca Smith, Randolph. Pegues, Maude, Scottsboro. 

Clifton, Lucile Ella, Holt. Quinn, Nannie Elizabeth. Montevallo. 

Dcasy, Ella Josephine, Mobile. Snowdon, Anna, Brooklyn. 

Lee, Mattie, Hayneville. Thackerson, Smirrah May, Seddon. 

Raiford, Mary Howard, Selma. Walker, Mary Edna Earle, Birmingham. 

Scarbrongh, Pearl, Montevallo. White, Alma, Salem. 

O'Donnell, Ellen Malissia, Chesson. Wooten, Leona, Siluria. 

Wright, Belma, Corona, R. 1. 

UNCLASSIFIED ROLL 

Allen, Cora Fannie, Eclectic, R. 1. Gillam, Bertha. Gadsden. 

Atkins, Lillie Lenora, Wellington. R. 2. Gunter, Vista, Reform, R. 1. 

Batson, Lallah Mae, Bessemer. Hamner, Alice Gertrude, Bankston. R. 1 

Brooks, Vicie, Chandler Springs. Hendricks, Jennie, Bessemer. 

Caffee, Myrtle, Woodstock. Huguley, Maggie, Pigeon Creek. 

Carr, Callie, Legrand. Knight, Doshia Catherine, Oakman. 

Couch, Lile, New Decatur. Mason, Genie Emma, Alexander City. 

Cruise, Elizabeth, Vida. Melton, Emma, Dickert. 

Frost, Ludie, Montevallo. McGehee, Mary Jennie, Goodwater. 

Gallagher, Susie Cecil, Blocton, Odom, Tdclla, Montevallo. 




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A Sonnet 



My face is laid against the windowpane; 
Without T see the tender grass, whose tips 
Just peep above the sod; and now there drips 

From eaves and tiny leaves a gentle rain; 

Tis silvering each budding thing. I'd lain 
All night to dream wide-eyed of one whose lips 
No more might call my name. How grief now grips 

The soul! How much in worth things lost do gain! 

But stay; no more shall I to bitter tears 

Give o'er. As after showers so the day 
But brighter grows, who knows but that my years 

Of life shall purer he because some gray 
And lonely days are known? And now my lears 

Relieved, 1 henceforth welcome clouds, alway. 

ELIZABETH HODGES ('11). 




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Organisations 



Y. W. G A. Cabinet 



Motto: " Not by might, nor by power, lmt by my Spirit, saith the Lord of hosts." 



OFFICERS 

FRANCES Y. SMITH - - - - General Secretary 

ELIZABETH HODGES -------- President 

WINNIE DAVIS NEELY --------- Vice President 

IRENE CLEVELAND __---_____ Secretary 

EULETTE PARKER ------- Treasurer 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

ETHEL HOUSER ------ Intercollegiate 

GENE POWELL --------- Finance 

MARY McMILLAN --------- Social 

CORINNE NEELY ------ Mission Study 

CLARICE WHITE ------- Membership 

MARY CAPELL -------- Bible Study 

IRENE SAVAGE ------ - Mission Boards 

ADVISORY BOARD 

*MRS. T. W. PALMER -------- Chairman 

MISS MYRTLE BROOKE ------ Vice Chairman 

MISS MINNA GROTE --------- Secretary 

MISS LILA McMAHON MISS VIRGINIA WITHERS 

MISS VETA FRANKLIN REV. J. T. MANGUM 



Julia Strudwick Tutwiler Club 



Motto: "Ail astra per aspcra." 
Colors: Red and White. 
Flower: Carnation. 

OFFICERS 

MARY McMILLAN ---------------- President 

PANSY NASH ------------- Vice President 

KATE YOUNG ------------ Secretary 

MATTIE CARGILE ------- Treasurer 

EULETTE PARKER - - - - - Critic 

HELEN SANDERS - - Historian 

MEMBERS 

Nina Allison. Mildred Meroney. 

Nell Allison. Celia McMillan. 

Mattie Cargile. Mary McWilliams. 

Phoebe Cary. Mary McMillan. 

Bonnie Caton. Merle McWilliams. 

Bianca Cocciola. Pansy Nash. 

Alma Cook. Ina Maud Nelson. 

Mac Chitwood. Corinne Neely. 

Tnna Dale. Winnie Davis Neely. 

Lucile Ellenburg. Eulette Parker. 

Marguerite Fisher. Ella Peters. 

Ruth Hatton. Evelyn Peyton. 

Agnes Uitt. Mary Peterson. 

Elizabeth Hodges. Vinn Pitts. 

Grace Hicks. Helen Sanders. 

Bessie Leatherwood. Katie Ruth Speigner. 

Alice Longshore. Clarice White. 

Alamie Meroney. Bunnie Wills. 
Kate Young. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Minna Grote. Miss Anne Moore. 

Miss Eida Hatch. Miss Julia Ann Poynor. 

Mrs. Hardinia Burley Howie. Miss Mary Goode Stallworth. 

Miss Truxie Lackland. Miss Virginia Reese Withers. 

Miss Alice Martin. Miss Helen Vickers. 



Castalian Club 



Motto: "Ad astra per aspera." 
Colors: Yellow and White. 
Flower: Daisy. 

OFFICERS 

LRENE CLEVELAND --------------- President 

VIRGINIA McWHORTER --------- Vice President 

ETHEL HOUSER ------- - - - Secretary 

MARGUERITE LYONS . - Treasurer 

LESSIE REYNOLDS - - - Historian 

GRACTE BERRY " - - - Critic 

MEMBERS 

Mary Anderson. Jnnia Franklin. 

Virginia Bell. Ruby Gaston. 

Mary Brewer. Inez Gay. 

Gracie Berry. Glennie Haymans. 

Mary Capell. Ethel Houser. 

Maude Carlisle. Marguerite Lyons. 

Irene Cleveland. Dorothy McFaddin. 

Lettie Daflin. Ruth Murphree. 

Virginia Douglas. Lucy Moore. 

Claude Dowling. Virginia McWhorter. 

Lillic Dowling. Lessie Reynolds. 

Irma Dumas. Daisy Rowe. 
Penn Shelton. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Brooke. Miss Leake. 

Miss Franklin. Miss Lull. 

Miss Higgina. Miss McMahon. 

Miss Kennedy. Miss Stephens. 

Miss Wyman. 







*~T"T"T11iii 



Emma Hart Willard Club 



Flowers: Roses. 

Colors: Red and Gold. 

Motto: "Evolution is necessary to expression." 

OFFICERS 

EVELYN PEYTON ---------------- President 

KATE YOUNG ---------- Vice President 

ELIZABETH HODGES - - Secretary 

MATTIE CARGILE --------- Treasurer 

PHCEBE CARY ------------------- Critic 

MEMBERS 

Mattie Cargile. Glennie Haymans. 

Phcebe Cary. Mary McKenzie. 

Irma Dale. • Merle McWilliams. 
Irma Dumas. Mary McWilliams. 

Elizabeth Hodges. Evelyn Peyton. 

Laura Haynes. Kate Young. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Higgins. Miss Lull. 

Miss Poynor. 



Schumann Society 



Colors: Lilac and White. 
Motto: " Poco a Poco." 
Flower: Lilac. 

OFFICERS 

LOIS LAZENBY ----------- President 

MARY CAPELL _-_•__--_-_ Vice President 

OLIVE SHAFFER -_-___ Secretary and Treasurer 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Hatch. Miss Leake. 

Miss- Haynes. Miss Moore 

Miss Franklin. Mrs. W. P. McConnaughgy. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Nell Allison. Mamie Meroney. 

Nina Allison. Maggie Moore. 

Edna Armistead. Robie Moore. 

Gracie Berry. Margaret McMillan. 

Mary Capell. Celia McMillan. 

Irene Cleveland. Merle McWilliams. 

Bonnie Caton. Mary McWilliams. 

Claude Dowling. Pansie Nash. 

Fletcher Dupree. Ina Maude Nelson. 

Marguerite Fisher. Viun Pitts. 

Ruby Gaston. Lessie Reynolds. 

Eunice Hayes. Winnie Reynolds. 

Emma Hale. Katie Ruth Speigner. 

Ruth Hatton. Olive Shaffer. 

Ethel Houser. Judith Thigpen. 

Nina Lyman. Bunnie Wills. 

Lois Lazenby. Lula Wooten. 

Laurine Liles. Erin Walker. 



The Ate-Hoo-Ate Club 



Colors: Chocolate and Egg. 

Motto: "Life's too short to worry." 

Flower: Sunflower. 

OFFICERS 

LET-TIE DAFFIN ------- President 

MAUDE CARLISLE - - - - - Vice President 

AGNES HITT - - - - Secretary and Treasurer 

IRMA DUMAS - - -____-- Critic 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Franklin. Miss McMahon. 

Miss Hatch. Miss Withers. 

Miss Wyman. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Mary Anderson. Alice Longshore. 

Virginia Bell. Dorothy McFaddin. 

Mary Brewer. Cclia McMillan. 

May Chitwood. Margaret McMillan. 

Virginia Douglas. Lucy Moore. 

Vivian Ferrell. Ruth Murphree. 

Inez Gay. Ina Maude Nelson. 

Emma Hale. Vinn Pitts. 

Grace Hicks. Annie Reynolds. 
Olive Shaffer. 




UNCLE REMUS CHAPTER, STORY TELLERS' LEAGUE 

Story-Tellers' League 



OFFICERS 
Poe Chapter 
AGNES II ITT - President, and Ex-Officio President of the League 



MARY ANDERSON 
IRMA DUMAS - 



Vice President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Wyche Chapter 

EMMA MAI. P. ___-.'_-_.-_-_.- President 

EUNICE HAYES ------------ Vice President 

META PHELPS --------- Secretary and Treasurer 

Uncle Remus Chapter 

ANNIE H1GHTOWER ------------ President 

MARIE STEELE ------------ Vice President 

BETTIE PUCKETT -------- Secretary and Treasurer 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Miss Broolce. Mrs. Palmer. 

Poe Chapter. Wyche Chapter 

Miss McMahon. Miss Reid. 

Miss Wyman. Miss Withers. 

Miss Higgins. 



Uncle Remus Chapter 
Miss Kennedy. 

Miss Lull. 




-A,tl)tetic5 




SENIOR BASKET-BALL TEAM AND SUBSTITUTES (MATTIE CARGILE, CAPTAIN) 




lull TRACK TEAM (ELIZABETH IlllDCES. CAI'TAIN'l 











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1191 WOULD-BE TENNIS CLUB 




.lUNKHf HANEBALI, TEAM (VIISCINIA BELL. CAPTAIN) 




WOULD-BE TENNIS PLAYERS OF 1911 




ON-PARADE QUOITS PLAYERS 





1913 WOULD-BE TENNIS CLUB 



CHICKTAW BASKET-BALL TEAM (PENN SHELTON. 
CAPTAIN) 




LOVE WOULD-BE TENNIS CLUB (ALMA COOK, CAPTAIN) 




ROMPERS BASKET-BALL TEAM (BONNIE CATON. CAPTAIN) 




SOPHOMORE BASEBALL TEAM (JULIA PIERCE, CAPTAIN) 




BABY BASKET-BALL TEAM (SUSIE QUARLES, CAPTAIN) 




AMAZON BASKET-BALL TEAM (LUCILE ELLENBURG. CAPTAIN! 




1914 CROQUET CLUB 




FRESHMAN BASEBALL TEAM (MARY EMMA GENTRY, CAPTAIN) 




IMPS (WHICH IS ANGLO-SAXON FOR "KIDS") 




Miscellaneous 




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MISS MARTIN, AS BETSY ROSS 



YE BIRTHDAY OF WASHINGTON 




YE COLONIAL SCHOOL 




YE WELL-KNOWN POCAHONTAS AND CAPTAIN JOHN SMITH, WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 




A MOCK FACULTY MEETING 




FEESHMAN KODAKEES 




THE MONTGOMEEY CLUB 




Y. W. C. A. DELEGATION OFF FOR MOBILE 




A DELICATE MOMENT 




'LITTLE MOTHER" AND HER BROOD 




1911 BROWN EYES ENTERTAIN BLUE EYES 






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THE N-'O CLUB, UNDER PROFESSOR CHESTNUTT II 




INDEPENDENT ORDER OF OLD MAIDS 




THE THENDORA CLUB 




THE LOAFERS' CLUB, AT HOME 




J. U. G'S (MOLASSES EATERS ALL) 




ALPHA GAMMA (MARIE STEELE, PRESIDENT) 



of Tobacco." The Indians thought that this star watched over their to- 
bacco patches. 

A strange thing noticeable about Francesyancey, one of the clearest stars 
in the entire group, is that near the Mardi Gras season it is observed to de- 
part from its path and go toward Mobile. 

A legend quite as pathetic as that of Kendymian is told of Overtona, a 
star of surpassing loveliness. She was, ages ago, a girl, and had a pet 
goose which she greatly loved. One day, as she was playing with her pet, 
it began to soar heavenward. As the astonished girl gazed, the goose grad- 
ually changed its form from a goose to an old man riding a hay fork, just 
as witches ride broomsticks. Greatly amazed, she could but look, anxiously 
and sorrowfully. Finally she could no longer see anything in the blue sky. 
Still she gazed, sad-eyed. Thus she sat for days, paying heed to no one. 
At last she felt herself lifted up, up, up, until she found herself a star 
among many others of a like kind. She had reached the Faculty zenith. 

"Thou art a lovely mystery, Flaming Star! 

Throughout the diamond-pointed, glittering sky, 
In beds of deepest, purest sapphire, lie 
Thy rolling orbs, which we see from afar." 

Another luminous star is Wills. This name ever brings to our mind the 
familiar verses : 

"Twinkle, twinkle, little Wills! 
How their heart with pleasure lills 
When the stars up in the sky 
See you drawing ever nigh! 

" But this wonder fills my heart: 
'Which star do you like the best?' 

For your vague, uncertain ' spark ' 

Keeps us strangely in the dark. 

" I fear I'll ne'er find out which one, 
For the bright and glorious sun 
Of this term is almost set. 
And I see no diamond yet. 

" So I ponder this all night: 
'When you show your little light. 

Which heart most with pleasure fills? ' 

Twinkle, twinkle, little Wills!" 

W. D. N. (11). 



I Remember, I Remember 

(A.D. 1921.) 



I remember, I remember 
The school where I was taught; 

Where I, with hard, unceasing toil, 
My stock of wisdom bought. 

And several things about that place 
1 never shall forget; 

Although my mem'ry's dimmed and blurred, 
They stand out clearly yet. 

T remember. I remember 
The 'bus that took me there — 

That rackle-shackle-shambly 'bus. 
The Kroell-Mulkey "coach and pair." 

But — O! — the joy in our young hearts 
At Christmas time and May, 

When those same old 'buses came to bear 
Us on our homeward way! 

I remember, I remember 
The soup — I guess I oughter; 

We had it every day for lunch; 
'Twas plentiful as water. 

If 1 had all the soup we drank, 
I'd make a swimming pool 

So cold and dark and deep and dank, 
And will it to the school. 

I remember, I remember, 
From nine o'clock till noon 

On Sundays, sermons — none too short — 
And " aniens " — none too soon. 

But lengthy sermons trained us for 
The lectures. O, my soul! 

We endured them both, thanks be to Sleep, 
' Beloved from pole to pole." 

I remember, I remember 
The gong's that ne'er worked right; 

They silent were, sometimes, all day, 
Then started up at night. 

When they began, we never knew 
When they would stop again. 

O. signals, shall I call you gongs? 
Or but a fitful din? 



I remember, I remember 
The Infirmary, 'cross the way, 

Where murky doses, capsules thick, 
Were handed out all da3'. 

If we had taken half that stuff, 
None were left the tale to tell. 

As 'twas, we threw it in the (ire, 
And got entirely well. 

I remember, I remember, 
Besides these, more details; 

But, notwithstanding all of this, 
A strange fact yet prevails: 

Although I studied long and hard 
To improve my mind so shallow, 

I've forgotten everything I learned 
In school at Montevallo! 

WINNIE D. NEELY (11). 




Consignments for Hallowe'en Caldron 



*§ISS KENNEDY'S watch slide; Mr. Wills' nose glasses; Miss Hog- 
gins' 4-o'clock matinees, also her " background ; " Long's Liter- 
ature, accompanied by Woolley; Miss Grote's Physics notebooks; 
the Discipline Committee, and all rules thereof ; all Laboratory apparatus ; 
Lectures, every one of them ; Recreation Period ; our lovely uniforms ; 
6-0' clock Whistle; the Gongs, always wrong; all rats and puffs; Mary Mc- 
Millan's little gray sweater ; Miss Poynor's 4-o'clock engagements ; sitting 
in chapel ; uniform inspection ; Soup ; all Dormitory Regulations ; all Latin 
verbs ; Miss Franklin's lavenders ; high shoes and long sleeves ; Miss Mel- 
lown's capsules; and all other things not herein specified that make our 
days hideous. 



Recipe for Soup 

(Excuse the meter.) 

* 

To make this soup I'd like for you to know 
The few things put in it to make it so: 
A bushel of potatoes, and left-over hash; 
Some outside bread crusts, and such like trash; 
Let onion atoms lurk within the pot, 
And then red pepper to make it hot; 
Leave out the salt (it costs too much a sack), 
And put in some flour so it won't look slack, 
Or else a little meal, just for a change; 
After that, you may just set it on the range: 
Pour in water, barrels at a time; 
Put in canned tomatoes, just worth a dime; 
Let it boil and boil until it is nice; 
Then take it up and set it on ice; 
Then when it cools as long as it is able. 
Take it in and put it on the table. 
O, great, glorious, heavenly treat! 
'Twould tempt an ancient hero to eat. 
Back to the world he'd turn his fleeting soul, 
And plunge his lips into our soup bowl. 
Serenely full, the epicure would say: 
"' Fate cannot harm me; I have dined to-day." 

* * * 

How it Happened 



The A. G. T. I. girls to meals are never, never late; 
The cause of this strange circumstance to one and all I'll state, 
ft happened just like this, at a time when all was gay, 
And the heart of each girl was light as a bird's in May: 
For days we had been late to breakfast, lunch, and dinner; 
So something must be quickly done, and woe to every sinner! 
'Twas then — alas! — we heard the words which forever sealed our fate: 
: Hereafter in this dining room no meals to students late! " 
Now this is just the reason we all now so promptly flock 
To the dining room at mealtime, al (he sounding of the clock. 

IRENE SAVAGE ('12). 



Laws of the Maids and Persecutors 



1. Take a cold or cough, for short sleeves and low shoes are not for 
thee. 

2. Wear heels on thy shoes, or bows on thy hair. 

3. Run down the halls, or cross thy feet in class. 

4. Be late to meals, or steal sugar from the dining room. 
o 5. " Monkey," " flirt," or " show thy affections in public." 

6. Cram for exams. " 

►J 7. Be afflicted with " Sunday sickness. 

< 

K 

m 

^ 9. Visit " promiscuously " after 9 : 30. 

§ 10. Sleep during lectures. 

11. Run the elevator, for thou mightest hurt thyself. 

12. Use the telephone, especially when teachers are around. 

13. Sit on the stone steps or " hot boxes." 

14. Be extravagant with thy " pin money." 

15. Grumble over going to lectures; they are more important far than 
thy lessons. 



1. Remember the monument to thy dear teacher who wastes her life 
" pouring water through a sieve." 

2. Be sat upon sixty seconds in every minute, and bear it cheerfully. 

3. Eat soup, for it is very fattening. 

4. Carry thy message to Garcia. 

5. Love thy teachers and let it be known. 
& 6. Learn the "A B C's of construction." 

2j j 7. Attend all dry lectures, and profit thereby. 
m ^ 8. Learn that the " longer thou leanest, the leaner thou gettest." 
§ 9. Report all thy wrongdoings to the Discipline Committee. 
£ 10. "Unlock." 

11. " Recreate," rain or shine. 

12. " By all manner of means," " be accurate." 

13. Do two hours of " reference " work, practice, and learn all thy 
many lessons in two and one-half hours. 

14. Hold thy peace in chapel. 

15. Always " keep in class." 



Miss Smith's " Mustard " Plaster 



Tlicre was a girl who had a pain 

That hurt her awful bad; 
She feared it would attack her brain, 

And that would be too sad. 

Then dear Miss Smith, so good and kind. 

Rushed in her pain to ease. 
O, Miss Mellown, what must I do? 

O, tell me quick; do, please! " 

' Go get the mustard on the shelf. 

And make a plaster thick." 

She hurried out and got the jar. 

And made the plaster quick. 

How Miss Smith in triumph stood! 

And how her heart did flutter! 
Alas! the plaster did no good; 

'Twas made of peanut butter. 

M. M. AND C. N. 



Hear the wild, chaotic gongs — 
Brazen gongs! 
What a mad confusion reigns because they will go wrong! 
How they jangle, jangle, jangle. 

In the awful dead of night, 
Or at break of early morning 
Ring out their unearthly warning, 

With a fiendish, mad delight! 
Out of time, time, time, 
Without reason, without rhyme, 
Causing wrath and consternation, causing maledictions strong 
On the gongs, gongs, gongs, gongs, gongs, gongs, gongs, 
On the clanging and the banging of that Gong! 
Always wrong!! 



Genuine Bits from a Genuine A. G. T, L Diary 



A. G. T. I., Friday, September 23, 1910.—" There would be no sunshine 
if there was no darkness." Perhaps that's why this past week has been 
so lonesome. Came to this place last Tuesday a week ago — September 13, 
1910. It seems as if I have been here over a year. My, but I'm homesick! 
Will I ever forget the night I came ? When I was shown to my room, there 
were about fifteen girls there to see my roommate. I shall always remem- 
ber the sensation I had on entering the room. Ginger Clang, my room- 
mate, came forward and introduced Sis and me to the girls. They were 
all so sweet and jolly I soon felt like one of them. Thought I was going 
to be delighted with this place, but I'm not. My roommate is just darling. 
She is the cutest thing ever. I haven't done much of anything but cry. 
I cry every night at about twelve o'clock. Last Tuesday mamma called 
me up, and I had hysterics. Every one in the school heard me and thought 
some one was dead. Hadn't cried since three to-day. Got a letter 
from sister, and she said Sarah couldn't come down Saturday. I was so 
disappointed I just had to shed a few tears. Mamma wrote me that Jim- 
mie Doodle came by home and didn't even ask about me. Don't I feel lit- 
tle?!!?! . 

Ginger and I have a time getting down to breakfast in time. It seems 
impossible to complete our toilet. Ginger never gets time to put on her 
hair, and my face is never clean. 

Our Dormitory is just great, and the campus is so nice with swings and 
benches under all the trees. The Infirmary is a dear, picturesque old place ; 
such a grand house to be sick in. We have a cracker jack tennis court and 
a fine basket-ball diamond out back of the Dormitory. I like all my teach- 
ers fine, and I know I shall be more content after I get over my homesick 
spell Well, good-by for this time. 

September 26. — I have just emerged from the bath room. What a bath 
I did have ! It was great. Have had the best time since last Friday. My ! 
Saturday night Mary and I put on our gym. suits. We slid down the fire 
escape after 8 : 30 and went all over the campus. We also danced, danced, 
danced that night. I was certainly ready for the bed at 10. 



Sunday morning went to church. Came back, and we took some kodak 
pictures in our uniforms. Finish this to-morrow; Ginger has something 
to eat. 

September 27. — My, it was good! Well, Sunday afternoon Mary Gay 
went home. How I wanted to go with her! Sunday night I went to see 
Eliza Herman, and met Mera Holder. Like her fine. 

Monday morning we put on our gym. suits and went kodaking. Had a 
dandy time. Mrs. H. and I went to town to-day. We had such a great 
time. About sixty girls went, and we were all in the drugstore at once. 
Came back in time for supper ; studied, and then started this ; but Ginger 
gave me something to eat, so that ended everything. Nothing doing so far 
to-day, Tuesday. So by-by. 

Friday, November 25. — 0, my! I haven't written my diary in such an 
age. I just can't find time. I went home and stayed sixteen days, and 
had the best of time. How many things have happened! Have been back 
to school about four weeks, and have been having some jolly times, but 
won't stop to enumerate them. Yesterday was Thanksgiving. I just hate 
to write this, but will spare a little of my time, anyway. Well, here goes : 

A few Sundays ago I started to church, and decided not to go ; so when 
I got to the corner in town, I took a rock and knocked the heel off my shoe. 
Of course I came back. The teachers didn't suspect me in the least. 

But I was certainly " stung " last week. Didn't know my lessons, so re- 
ported to Infirmary to stay all day ; but, instead, Miss M. gave me the most 
horrid dose of salts and made me report to classes. Horrid ! ! ! 

Sunday before last Ginger and I prepared some Xmas stockings and 
hung them on Kiti's and Mag's door during meditation. Miss 0. heard us, 
and said that whoever did that certainly would catch it. We denied hav- 
ing done it, so nothing happened. 

November 29. — Nothing doing Monday, 'cept I was homesick. To-day 
I confessed going to Crape's during meditation Sunday. Am in chapel 
now, and have finished all my lessons and this, so will stop and dream of 
Lops. Wonder what he'll be doing twenty years from now, and where I'll 
be? Good night. 



Wouldn't it Jar You To 



See Miss Franklin wear lavender? 

See Miss Kennedy without her watch chain, and the slide thereof? 

Not hear Mary McWilliams say, " I'm in a hurry? " 

Hear that Miss Stallworth has taken to something besides Math. ? 

See Judith hurry; ditto, telling jokes? 

See Dr. Palmer without his hands in his pockets ? 

Know how Miss Holbrook likes her " neighbors? " 

See the Faculty in uniform, at a lecture? 

Visit Faculty meeting, and hear ourselves discussed? 

See Miss Funk and Miss Putnam at a ball ? 

See Miss Vickers baldheaded? 

See Miss Moore " keepin' company? " 

Hear Mrs. Howie say " seven thousand ? " 

Do without soup for lunch ? 

See Miss Higgins scare some poor girl half to death by saying " Good 

night?" 
See Minnie Lee buy carnations? 
Have your cousin ( ? ) come to see you on Sunday? 
Hear Dr. Palmer say, " Let's govern ourselves accordingly? " 
Not to have to wear our uniforms to lectures? 
Hear that all of us " date our notes properly? " 
See Miss Moore blush? 

See Miss Withers wear rats and look solemn? 
See Miss M. Grote with a diamond ? 
See Daisy R. wear a hobble skirt? 
Not to have to recreate ? 
See Maude Carlisle wear her own dresses and stay away from Disc. 

Com.? 
See a Senior chaperon a Senior to the dentist? 
See Miss Wyman at chapel? 
See Miss Rembaugh without her keys? 



Hall Echoes 



Has the bell rang? " 

Lend me your hair to-day." 

Why does Bessie Mc. always wear her green coat to breakfast? " 

Do we have to wear our uniforms to the lecture? " 

Do we have to recreate this afternoon? " 

Child, I flunked flat in History." 

Were you in the Turkey Trot last year? " 

Please give me your picture." 

Are you going to the matinee at four o'clock? Miss Higgins said for 
all Freshmen to be there ! " 

Do you know any one who has any crackers ? " 

Hand me some candy! " 

Button my dress quick! The whistle has blown! " 

Lend me something to wear! " 

Throw a shoe at those rats ! " 

How do you like that new girl? " 

Don't laugh so loud ; Miss Blank will catch you ! " 

Has the mail come? Did I get anything? " 

Have you had the measles? " 

(Third Floor, West Wing, 5: 30 A.M.)—" Selections from Bach! " 
" I smell sausage frying in Miss Brooke's room." 

(9:50 P.M.) — "Good night. Come to see me. Don't forget what I 
told you." 
" Did you get any express? " 
" I sure did get squelched to-day." 
" Did you flunk on Spherical? " 
"Hello, 'Beautiful!'" 

" Have you written up your Physics notebook? Let me see it." 
" Any dancing in Gym. to-night? " 
" Maggie, can us go to the dressmaker? " 
" You better not go up on Miss Kennedy's hall in that kimono! " 



To Capsules 

(With apologies to Robert Burns.) 



O, were I in the Infirmary 

I yonder see, I yonder see. 
Upon the ground, you Capsules Dread, 

I'd scatter thee, I'd scatter thee! 
Or did Miss Mellown's white-capped form 

Above me stand, above me stand, 
I'd choose the wild of any storm, 

Had she thee in hand, had she thee in hand. 

When thy dread selves before me rise, 

I pull my hair, I pull my hair. 
This school would be a paradise 

Without thee here, without thee here. 
O, were I monarch of the globe. 

With realms about, with realms about, 
The day I donned my queenly robe 

I'd blot thee out, I'd blot thee out! 

M. M. AND N. A. 



Measles 

(With more apologies to Burns.) 



O, my face's like a red, red rose 

That's newly sprung in June! 
O, my face is a perfect sight, 

And I feel like a perfect loon! 

As fair as thy face, my measly friend, 

So deep in hue is mine; 
And I will look the same, my dear, 

So long as I here recline. 

Until the weather gets dry, my dear, 

And the earth warms with the sun, 
I must stay in my room, my dear, 

Till the course o' measles is run. 

My classes leave me far behind. 

And bid me farewell for a while; 
But I will catch up soon, my dear, 

Though it were ten thousand mile. 

SENIOR VICTIMS. 



Jokes and Pokes 

Miss K. : " Now, girls, be very sure that you can name all the female 
goddesses." 

Instructor: " What important fact does Carlyle tell us about Webster? " 
Mattie C. : li That he had a tan complexion." 

Elaine P. : " I wonder if the ' ark of the covenant ' is the same as Noah's." 

Hope L. (kneeling to say her prayers) : " 55 B.C., Roman invasion; sec- 
ond century, Christianity ; 449, Saxons — 0, pshaw ! " 

Girl (to Miss R.) : " Please give me a plate; Miss Grote has a fish in 
class." 

Miss R. : " Miss Grote has a fit! Where is she? " 

Maude C. : " Inez, I know that Chaucer was born in 1340 and died in 
1600." 

Girl (with perplexed frown) : " I don' see why they call Dr. Palmer 
doctor. I never hear of his practicing medicine." 

Ethel: " Merle, what is circumstantial evidence? " 

Merle: "For goodness sake! I'm studying Harmony; don't bother me 
with Psychology questions." 

Girl: " Hawthorne was born in 1804; but feeling it would not be a suc- 
cess, he moved to Salem." 

Mary A. (to Lucy Moore) : " Look here, Lucy; this Literature lesson for 
to-morrow says Swift didn't like the curriculum at Dublin University. 
Who wrote that?" 

Lucy: " Law, child, I don't know! I just can't remember all these books. 
' Curriculum ' — it sounds to me kinder like Bacon." 



In 



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1 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE H 



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AUBURN 



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For catalogue and further information, address 

CHAS. C. THAGH, M.A., LL.D., President, Auburn, Ala 



THE OLDEST SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE SOUTH 

64 Professors and Instructors 20 well-equipped Laboratories 

SESSION BEGINS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1911 

Location high and healthful Attendance last session 761 students 



NEW BUILDINGS 

Smith Dining Hall, Carnegie Library, Agricultural Hall, Broun Engineering 
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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINES 

B.S. degree (4 years), professional degree (5 years) — Civil, Electrical, Mechan- 
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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES 

B.S. degree (4 years), M.S. degree (5 years) — Agriculture, Animal Industry, 

Botany, Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Etc. ; Chemistry and Metallurgy; 

Pharmacy— Three-year course in Pharmacy, Ph.C. ; 

Two-year course in Pharmacy, Ph.G. 

ACADEMIC COLLEGE 

B.S. degree (4 years), M.S. degree (5 years) — History, English, Mathematics, 

Latin, German, French, Physics and Astronomy, Political 

Economy, Psychology, Etc. 

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

D.V.M. degree (3 years). Only college in the South conferring this degree. 

EXPENSES 

There is no charge for tuition to residents of Alabama; only $20.00 to non- 
residents. Board in dormitory and with private families; cost reasonable. 



[=10 



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THE 

PARAGON 

PRESS 



V- 



PRINTERS and PUBLISHERS 

W. PIERCE CHILTON, President 
A.D. 1897 

Montgomery, Alabama 



Spring 1911 Greetings 



1 



UR study of Fashion's dictates 
enables us to offer you in 
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Pumps, Ties, and Oxfords in 
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Prices, S3.00 to 15.00 



We invite you to make our store your headquarters 
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ROWELL SHOE CO., Inc. 

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J. L WIKLE DRUG CO. 

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The Largest Retail Store in Northeast Alabama 

Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, 
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Perfumery, Stationery, Toilet Soaps, 
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NUNNALLY'S FAMOUS CANDIES 




Prescriptions and Recipes Cai'efully Compounded 



The Selma National Bank 

Selma, Alabama 



Capital and Surplus, 
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E. C. Melvin, President A. W. Cawthon. VicePrest. 
R.P.Anderson, Cashier J. W. Craig, Asst. Cashier 



THE REXALL STORE 

We acknowledge with many thanks the past patronage of 
both teachers and students of the A. G. T. L, and in asking 
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Nunnally's delicious candies, fresh by express every week. 
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Our prompt and polite service delight our many patrons. 
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"THE CONVENIENT STORE" 
Phone 41 :-: :-: Next to Post Office 


MORGAN BROS. 

MERCANTILE COMPANY 

DEALERS IN 

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Montevallo, :-: Alabama 


Clearing House for all Home- 
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JSP" We handle everything in 
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Builders and Rebuilders of 

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Correspondence Solicited. Any Suggestions 
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Headquarters for 

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WE FINISH YOUR SNAPS 


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Shipments of Cotton Solicited — Personal Attention 
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Artistic Hand-Pierced Monograms for Fobs, Purses, Etc., in 
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Class and L Frat " Pins at 
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6 FRATERNITY STATIONERY— We will furnish Stationery stamped with your " Frat " or Sorority emblem A 

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MOORE-HANDLEY 

HARDWARE COMPANY 

BIRMINGHAM, :-: ALABAMA 



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rp»n— iiii-^iin— iin^— liii-^iis 

! GEORGE KROELL 



I 



I GENERAL MERCHANDISE I 



hi— —mi™-ii!!<=— mi— mi— n«qq 
HUGH WALKER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



All kinds of Household and Kitchen 
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FRESH FRUITS A SPECIALTY 



I LIVERY STABLE 

| Everything from the " Bus " to 
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General Practice and Collections 

I Corner 11th and Noble Streets 

_, ANNISTON, :-: ALABAMA ,1 

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DENTIST 

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Traveling Passenger Agent 


G. SCHIRMER (Inc.) 


Southern Railway Company 


3 East 43rd Street NEW YORK 


ALBERT HOTEL BUILDING SELMA, ALA. 


MUSIC DEALERS 


Write me for any information desired 




ORR & LANNING 


Established 1892 

STEPHEN LANE FOLGER 


CARRIAGES AND LIGHT LIVERY 


MANUFACTURING JEWELER 


Telephone 1062 


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Box 707 KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 




Catalogs upon request 


J. H. Fried, Pres. L. Klein, Treas. 




M. Frenkel, Sec. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


Alabama Storage & Ice Co. 


F. W. DEVOE 


Wholesale 


AND 


FRUITS AND PRODUCE 


C. T. RAYNOLDS COMPANY 


MONTGOMERY, :-: :-: ALABAMA 




USE GAS FOR COOKING 




THE YEAR AROUND 


THE 

ALABAMA TECHNICAL GIRLS 


issitiW 


Should call at the Fount of 


MONTGOMERY LIGHT & WATER 


J. E. WILKINSON 


POWER COMPANY 


PRATTVILLE, :- :-: ALABAMA 


PHONE 2720 





G. F. PETER, President 



C. F. HUNTER, Secretary 



SOUTHERN COAL & COKE CO. 



MAYLENE, 



ALABAMA 



Miners and Shippers of 



? GLEN CARBON high-grade cahaba steam coal \ 



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Exquisite Creations in 
our Spring Slippers 

Make the Inspection of them a real pleasure 
ALL THE NEWEST SHAPES 

HOSIERY 

Our Hosiery Department is complete in every detail 

SILK HOSIERY 50c TO $1.50 

Prompt and careful attention to mail orders 

YOUNG SHOE COMPANY 



In BROAD STREET 

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SELMA, ALA. 




The Skilled Mechanic Requires Good Tools 
The Skilled Cook Should Also Have Good Tools 



Every modern convenience and labor-saving device — 
in fact, everything needed in the kitchen — is sold by 



SPIRO HARDWARE COMPANY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



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C'T* A D]l is the leading high-grade piano bought 
^^^^^^^^^_ by the prominent Colleges throughout 



DESCRIPTIVE CATALOG the IT^ed States> 



THE STARR PIANO COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 



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1921 Third Avenue, Birmingham, Ala. 



J. H. HOLCOMBE, Manager 



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| shippers of VEGETABLES, FRUITS, POULTRY, | 
EGGS, ETC. 



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Will do well to get in touch with us. We have 
an excellent outlet for such commodities and 
always command the very highest market 
prices. + t t t X t t 



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DOUGLASS BROTHERS, Commission Merchants 

1 BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



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FLORENCE HOTEL 


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EUROPEAN PLAN 


THE BEST AND MOST UP-TO-DATE CAFE IN THE CITY 






AFTER-THEATER SUPPERS A SPECIALTY 


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H. 
IHCZ 


M. 


BURT, Manager Birmingham, 

11 llll Illl II 


Ala. 
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MILTON BRADLEY CO. 

ATLANTA, GA. 
Full lines of ART MATERIALS, KINDER- 
GARTEN GOODS, MANUAL TRAIN- 
ING SUPPLIES 


Don't Fail 

When buying a Composition Book, Thesis 
Tablet, Notebook, or Scratch Pad, to get a 
" Blue Ribbon." 

It's the Tablet with the horse's head in blue. 

MONT AG BROS. 

ATLANTA, - - - GA. 


CATALOGUES FREE 


It is Better to Have 
BRANNON 

doyour PRINTING 

than to wish you had 
brannon printing co. 

Talladega, Ala. 


Hofmayer TDry Goods Co. 

Albany, Ga, 

Importers and Jobbers 

Dry Goods, Notions, and Men's 

Furnishings 

Newest Styles Prompt Deliveries 


THE PICKWICK CAFE 

Fred Ridolphi, Proprietor 
103 COMMERCE ST. MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

American Service for Ladies and Gentlemen 


YOUNG LADIES OF THE A. G. T. I. 

When in need of Kodaks and Supplies, 
Newest Popular Books, McKinley 
Music, Visiting Cards, and Wed- 
ding Invitations, write the 

SELMA STATIONERY CO. 

SELMA, ALA. 


Special Rates to Theatrical Companies 


Open Day and Night 


CHAS. F. DOUGLASS 
Lawyer 

Anniston, Ala. 


L. G. PlERSON 
dentist 

902i Broad St. Selma, Ala. 


D. R. McMillan J. J. Haynes 

McMillan & Haynes 

Attorneys at Law 
Columbiana, - - Alabama 


Scarbrough Drug Co. 

THE "REX ALL" STORE 


ANNISTON, ALA. 


Special Attention Given Mail Orders 



L N. NABORS L. C. ELLIOTT 

Nabors & Elliott 

Gents' Furnishings 

We also carry a full line of 

Ladies' High-Grade 
Shoes and Hosiery 

CALL and be CONVINCED 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 


Merchants 
and Planters Bank 

montevallo, ala. 

Your Account 
Will be Appreciated 


W. B. Howard, Pres. A. G. Bunk ley, See. andTreas. 

Brock Grocery Company 

CASH GROCERS and 

COFFEE ROASTERS 

Packers of 

Montala 

'V ure-Food Goods 

Montgomery, Alabama 


W.B. Strong £? Son 

Druggists 

Dealers in DRUGS, DRUG SUN- 
DRIES, STATIONERY, TOILET 
ARTICLES, ETC. 

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Agents for 

Steere's Candies — the Best 
Phone 21 Montevallo, Ala. 









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