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Full text of "Teen Age Dance Book"

113664 



Copyright, 1952, 1958, 1963, 
by David McKay Company, Inc. 

All rights reserved, 

including the right to 

reproduce this book, or portions 

thereof, in any form except 

for the inclusion of brief 

quotations in a review. 

Manufactured in the United States of America 

Eleventh Printing 



to 




A MESSAGE TO PARENTS AND EDUCATORS 

This book is the outgrowth of several years of instruc- 
tion in social dancing for teen-agers in the public schools 
of Westchester County, New York, under the sponsorship 
of the various Parent Teacher Association units. It was 
felt that a very definite need existed for extracurricular 
social dance projects in which the girls and boys could 
participate in a social group while acquiring the necessary 
skill for social dancing. 

That the projects have been eminently successful is 
due in no small measure to the efforts of the P.T.A. 
officers who had the generosity and spunk to sponsor the 
classes, and to the school principals who had the fore- 
sight and imagination to recognize the need for them. 

As the projects developed, however, it became ap- 
parent that an even greater need existed for a self- 
instruction teen-age manual on social dancing with the 
accompanying social skills. This book, therefore, is the 
first of its kind, and is intended for the beginner who 
needs to get going! 

The author, a trained dancer, has no illusions as to 
the limitations of a self-instruction manual, particularly 
in the field of social dancing where new dances and 
music are constantly evolving. However, if the author is 
able, within those limitations, to help the teen-ager take 
his first step, she will feel amply repaid. 

And finally, this book should at last provide the oppor- 
tunity for every boy and girl to participate in a skill that 
adds stature to the social life of the individual while 
uniting him with the group. 



CONTENTS 



Chapter Page 


1 . 
2 . 
3 . 


. FOREWORD TO THE TEEN ACER 
. GETTING STARTED 


1 
2 
3 

3 
4 
5 


. PREPARATION 


Moving in the Line of Direction 
Leading and Following 
Some Dance Definitions 




Music 


6 




Dance Records for Practice 


7 




Practice 


8 


4 . 
5 . 
6 . 


. POSITIONS IN DANCING .... 
FOXTROT 


10 
20 
33 


. WALTZ 



7 . . CHARLESTON 48 

8 . . LINDY (Rock'n'RoU) 60 

9 . . COLLEGIATE FOXTROT (One Step) 76 

10 . . RUMBA 87 

11 . . CHA CHA CHA 105 

12 . . TANGO 118 

13 . . VIENNESE WALTZ 131 



CONTENTS 

Chapter Page 

14 . . POLKA 136 

15 . . PARTY DANCES 150 

Virginia Reel 150 

La Raspa (Mexican Shuffle) 160 

Mexican Waltz 162 

Bunny Hop 163 

16 . . SQUARE DANCE 165 

17 . . AT HOME 178 

The Hostess 178 

The Guest 181 

18 . . PUBLIC DANCE 184 

Organization Committees 184 

Social Committee 188 

School Dance 189 

Prom 189 

Church Dance 191 

Dinner or Supper Dance 192 

Dance Hall 192 

19 . . DECORATIONS 194 

20 . . REFRESHMENTS 197 

21 . . IDEAS FOR ADMISSION .... 199 

Tickets 199 

Donations 200 

Personality Tie-ups 200 

Guessing 201 

Weighing In 201 

Class or Grades 201 



CONTENTS 

Chapter p a g e 

22 . . GRAND MARCH 203 

Platoons 206 

Serpentine 212 

Arch 214 

Tunneling 217 

The Star 218 

23 . . PLAY PARTY GAMES 219 

Thread the Needle 219 

In and Out 223 

Wind the Spool 224 

Roll the Barrel 225 

The Grapevine Twist 229 

Ladies* Choice 229 

24 . . ELIMINATION DANCES .... 230 

Lucky Number Dance 233 

Back Talk 234 

Spot Dance 234 

Flashlight Dance 235 

Balloon Dance 235 

Corners 236 

25 . . MIXERS 237 

MIXERS WITHOUT PROPERTIES 238 

The Single Circle 238 

The Double Circle 239 

The Basket 240 

Concentric Circles 241 

The Charge 241 

Back Up 241 

Personality Tie-ups 241 

Multiplication Dance 242 



CONTENTS 

Chapter Page 

MIXERS WITH PROPERTIES 243 

Pictures 244 

Cutting 245 

The Name Mixer 245 

Opposites 246 

Playing Cards 247 

Trinkets 247 

Broom Dance 248 

26 . . INVITATIONS 249 

27 . . DRESS 251 

Boy 251 

Girl 252 

28 . . INTRODUCTIONS 254 

29 . . AT THE DANCE 257 

Upon Arriving 257 

On the Floor 257 

Upon Leaving 259 

30 . . TRANSPORTATION 260 

31 . . SAYING GOOD-NIGHT 262 

32 . . POSTSCRIPT 263 



/ 




TO THE TEEN-AGER 

This is your book. Use it! Nothing has been included 
which has not proven of interest to you! 

If you know how to dance, check up on the second 
half of the book. Find out how to be a successful host 
or hostess what the guests 9 responsibilities are how to 
devise novel and exciting ideas for mixers, play party 
games, party dances, decor, and refreshments. In short 
everything that makes for a completely successful dance. 

Without a knowledge of dancing no fun I 

Without a knowledge of the social skills which make 
you part of the group no fun! 

So get going and good luck! 



2. Ctettina Started, 
^f 



Do you know how to dance? If you don't, let's do 
something about it right this minute! If you feel the need 
for getting up your courage, go into a huddle with your 
teen-age friends. Find out who is a "natural" or someone 
who has studied social dancing at an accredited school. 
Get him to go over the first step with you. As soon as you 
have learned one figure, go to a dance! Practice with your 
friends. If you feel the need to brush up on social be- 
havior, read through the second half of this book. 

Practice whenever you are free. Keep a copy of this 
book in your desk or even your locker room. Practice 
between classes, out on the field or in a corner of the 
"gym" during your lunch period. If you get stuck while 
practicing, get the coach or some member of the faculty 
to help you. (You'd be surprised how really good some 
adults can ~be at social dancing.) But practice! 

If the pressure of school activities does not allow 
sufficient leeway for "in-between" practice periods, prac- 
tice at home. Get your mother or your father or your 
sister or your brother or your cousins or your aunts or 
the girl or boy next door to help you anyone so you 
get going! 

And after you get going, don't forget to say "Thank 
You" you know to those who have helped you. 



3. I reparation 



MOVING IN THE LINE OF DIRECTION 

Before practicing a specific dance it might be well for 
you to become familiar with a few general rules for 
social dancing. 

In progressing around the floor, couples move counter- 
clockwise. 



Line of 

Direction 

around the 

Room 




And although the customary line of direction is counter- 
clockwise, a certain amount of freedom is permitted in 
moving about the floor. One may move either forward, 
backward, or sideward. 

Good posture should be maintained by both the girl 
and boy the torso easy but erect, the weight of the body 
over the balls of the feet while standing or practicing. 
A simple, natural style of dancing should be observed. 

At all times a boy should keep aware of his relation- 

3 



4 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

ship to other couples on the floor, since he assumes the 
initiative of leading and steering. If interruptions occur, 
apologies should be readily offered and acknowledged. 
He, in other words, assumes entire responsibility for his 
partner. He should, therefore, know how to dance and, 
what is equally important, what is good social custom 
while at a dance. 



LEADING AND FOLLOWING 

A boy should indicate his steps and leads sufficiently 
in advance so that a girl can follow with confidence. A 
girl, in turn, should keep relaxed so she can respond 
immediately to a lead. 

The technique for leading and following in the line 
of direction will be described in detail under the sec- 
tion "Positions in Dancing/* These positions are used in 
the so-called progressive dances, for example, the Waltz. 
In addition, however, to using forward or backward 
steps, most of these dances include side steps. It will be 
necessary, therefore, at this point to describe the side 
leads. 

To move the girl to the left (her right), the boy's 
right palm exerts a gentle but firm pressure against the 
left side of the girl's torso. 

To move the girl to the right (her left), the boy pulls 
the girl's torso gently to the right with the upper right 
arm and hand. 

The signal for changing from a forward to a side 
direction must be given in advance so that the boy and 
girl "push off* simultaneously. To indicate the lead for 
the side steps, the right hand is slipped from under the 
shoulder blade to the left side of the girl's torso. And the 
weight of the body should be kept well over the balls 



Preparation 5 

of the feet so that any change in direction can be made 
easily. 

And finally, to move backward (as the girl moves 
forward), the boy pulls the girl toward him with the 
right hand which is under her left shoulder blade. 

Eventually leads will become so automatic that you 
will not have to think of them. But until they do, remem- 
ber the right hand acts more or less as a rudder in steer- 
ing the girl in or out of any figure. Therefore, a gentle 
but firm pressure should be maintained by the right 
hand at all times. Most important! 



SOME DANCE DEFINITIONS 

It will also be necessary for you to become familiar 
with a few dance terms. 

A step involves a complete transference of the weight 
of the body from one foot to the other. 

A figure consists of a fixed number of steps done in 
succession. 

A lead is a pressure of the hand, shoulder, or entire 
body to indicate the beginning or end of a figure. A 
lead may also indicate a change of direction. 

Rhythm "Quick" or "Slow" is purely relative and 
refers to beats in music and the steps taken to those 
beats. 

"Quick" has a time duration of one beat and occupies 
approximately the length of time it takes to say the 
single word "Quick." 

"Slow" has a time duration of two beats and approxi- 
mates the length of time required to say the two words 
"Quick, Quick" in succession. 

Follow through is the principle of the feet remaining 
parallel to each other in passing from one step to an- 



6 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

other (inside edge of soles almost touching) and the 
drawing up of the active foot against the supporting foot 
on completing a step or beginning a new one. Dotted 
lines on the floor diagram will indicate this movement. It 
is the follow through principle which makes for a nar- 
row base. Most important. 

Floor diagram is a pattern of imaginary lines describ- 
ing the tracks made on the floor by the feet in stepping 
or following through. 

Style is the manner in which a dance is done. 



MUSIC 

Since TV, radio, and phonograph have already made 
you familiar with Foxtrot "vocals" known nationally as 
"top tunes/* you will find it easier to start practicing to 
Foxtrot music. 

Get yourself a good, standard dance album. And until 
you get going go easy on the crooners. They may make 
you feel good but they won't help you keep time. So 
get yourself an album that has a solid beat and which 
maintains a comfortable walking pace to dance to not 
too slow and not too fast. 

Listen carefully for the four beats in each measure in 
the Foxtrot. Usually the beats are accented by drums, 
"brushes/* or a bass fiddle. Tapping with the feet or 
clapping hands will help you keep time. If you find it 
easier to move around the room while listening do! But 
be sure to step on each beat. 

The same procedure will hold for the Lindy, Rumba, 
Tango, and Cha Cha Cha, since all of those dances are 
done in 4/4 time. And, of course, you know that there 
are three beats to a measure in a Waltzl 



Preparation 7 

DANCE RECORDS FOR PRACTICE 

The most practical source for obtaining current dance 
records, listings, catalogs, or even information pertain- 
ing to records which may be temporarily out of circu- 
lation, is through local retail stores and department 
stores. 

Furthermore, for the teen-age dance enthusiast or 
party-goer, there are thirteen record courses in social 
dancing, plus instruction manuals based on the Betty 
White dance books. The records are available at your 
local dealer or they may be obtained by mail order from 
Conversa-Phone Institute, Inc., 132 West 32 Street, New 
York, N. Y. They are: 

D-101 FOX TROT D-109 LINDY 

D-102 WALTZ D-110 MERENGUE 
D-103 CHA-CHA-CHA and SAMBA 

D-104 RUMBA D-lll SQUARE DANCE 

D-105 MAMBO D-112 PARTY DANCES 

D-106 TANGO (Bunny Hop, Virginia Reel, 

D-107 CHARLESTON Conga, Mexican Waltz, 

D-108 POLKA La Raspa) 
D-114 PACHANGA 



8 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



PRACTICE 

Before you start practicing a dance, glance over the 
descriptive material and floor diagram. 

Study the descriptive section carefully. Try to get a 
mental picture of what the step is like. If you find it 
easier, walk through the description while you read it 
or make yourself a diagram on the floor. If it is not 
possible to trace the diagram with a piece of chalk, get 
yourself a piece of wrapping paper and use a crayon to 
describe the diagram. Although you may not find it neces- 
sary to make floor diagra/'ns, use any method that enables 
you to practice with confidence. 

Take one dance at a time. 

Practice one figure at a time. 

Start practice from a loose, as shown in the diagram: 




BASE 



Feet parallel: Inside edge of soles touching, weight of 
body over the balls of feet, toes pointing straight ahead. 



Preparation 9 

Feet remain parallel at all times progressing forward, 
backward, sideward, and turning. (Remember railroad 
tracks remain parallel even on a curve. ) 

Call out a rhythm while you practice (for example: 
the Foxtrot slow, slow quick, quick). Practice a step 
until you get a feeling for what the rhythm is like. 

If it is easier for you to practice to music do so at once. 

As soon as you have learned a step start practicing 

with a partner immediately. But do not practice with a 
partner until you know your own step. 

When you really get going try making up your own 
combinations. Watch what the other boys and girls are 
doing and change partners occasionally. 

And don't forget. As soon as you have learned one 
step, go to a dance. Remember "practice makes perfectl" 



4- Po6ition& in Jouncing, 



There are four positions in dancing: 




1. The Closed Position 
10 



Positions in Dancing 



11 




. The Promenade Position 



12 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 





8. The Outside Position 





* m . Variation 

4. The Skaters Position (The Skater's Position) 



Positions in Dancing 13 

MOST IMPORTANT: We shall now describe in detail 
each of the four positions just illustrated. It is important 
for you to study these positions carefully so that you will 
be thoroughly familiar with them when they are used in 
the instructions for the individual dances. Be sure to 
give full attention, in studying each position, to the 
paragraphs headed "Leading the Girl" and "Following 
the Boy" (and also reread the earlier section on "Leading 
and Following" under "Preparation") so that you will 
master the principles of leading and following right from 
the start. 

After taking up the four basic dance positions we will 
illustrate and describe the positions of the hands for 
the various dances. And then we will proceed to the 
dances themselves. 

Remember to turn back to these preliminary pages on 
positions for reference whenever you need to review 
them. 

CLOSED POSITION 

Boy 

Stand in front of your partner, feet together, pointing 
straight in the line of direction (counterclockwise), 
weight of the body over the ball of the right foot only. 
Left foot parallel with right foot. Inside edge of soles 
touching. 

The right hand is held below the girl's left shoulder 
blade, palm facing in. The left hand clasps the girl's 
right hand with the arm extended in a curve, slightly 
below shoulder level. 

Although shoulders remain parallel, the head is turned 



14 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

slightly to your left. You do have to see where you are 
going, you know. Now, you are ready to lead. 



LEADING T.H K GIRL 



Moving forward in the closed position calls for a chest 
lead. That is, the upper torso pushes forward to back 
the girl into the line of direction. 



CLOSED POSITION 

Girl 

Stand in front of your partner, feet together, toes just 
clearing tips of boy s shoes, weight of the body over the 
ball of the left foot only. Right foot parallel with left 
foot. Inside edge of soles touching. 

The left hand rests gently but firmly on the boy's right 
shoulder. The right hand rests vertically in the boy's left 
palm palm facing in the right arm extending in a curve 
slightly below shoulder level. 

Although the shoulders remain parallel, the head is 
turned slightly to your left so that the boy can look 
straight ahead in the line of direction. Now, you are 
ready to follow. 



FOLLOWING THE BOY 

As soon as you have "sensed" the pressure of the boy's 
lead, to back you into the line of direction, reach back 
with the big toe in a straight line from the hip. Transfer 
the weight gradually. 



Positions in Dancing 15 

THE PROMENADE 

Boy 

With the left side facing the line of direction (coun- 
terclockwise) stand sideward with the girl on your right 
sidefeet together, weight of the body over the ball of 
the right foot only. Left foot parallel with right foot. 
Inside edge of soles touching. 

The right hand is held at the left side of the girl's torso, 
palm facing in. The left hand clasps the girl's right hand 
with the arm extended in a curve, slightly below shoulder 
level. 

The head and shoulders are turned slightly to your 
left so that you are looking straight ahead in the line of 
direction. Both you and the girl are now in a partially 
open position. 

LEADING THE GIRL 

Moving forward in the promenade position calls for 
a side lead. The right hand pushes gently against the left 
side of the girl's torso to indicate the forward movement. 
And since both you and the girl are facing the line of 
direction, the initial lead and step will be taken almost 
simultaneously. 

THE PROMENADE 

Girl 

With the right side facing the line of direction (coun- 
terclockwise) stand sideward on the boy's right side 



16 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

feet together, toes just clearing tips of boys shoes, 
weight of the body over the ball of the left foot only. 
Right foot parallel with left foot. Inside edge of soles 
touching. 

The left hand rests gently but firmly on the boy's right 
shoulder. The right hand rests vertically in the boy's left 
palm palm facing in-the right arm extending in a curve 
slightly below shoulder level. 

The head and shoulders are turned slightly to your 
right so that you are looking straight ahead in the line 
of direction. Both you and the boy are now in a partially 
open position. 



FOLLOWING THE BOY 



You will find it quite easy to follow through on the first 
step as soon as the side lead is given by the boy a gentle 
forward push against the left side of the torso in the 
line of direction. 



OUTSIDE POSITION 

Boy 

Stand with your partner on your right side, facing in 
the line of direction. (The girl is standing with her back 
in the line of direction so the position is right side to 
right side.) Feet together, weight of the body over the 
ball of the right foot only. Left foot parallel with right 
foot. Inside edge of soles touching. 

The right hand is held at the left side of the girl's 
torso, palm facing in. The left hand clasps the girl's 



Positions in Dancing 17 

right hand with the arm extended in a curve, slightly 
below shoulder level. 
Look straight ahead in the line of direction. 



LEADING THE G3BL 

Moving forward in the line of direction in the outside 
position calls for an initial lead from both the chest and 
upper right arm. A slight pressure of the left hand 
against the girl's right hand will help to maintain the 
lead. Note: The outside position may be done left side 
to left side by merely moving the girl from the right to 
the left side. 



OUTSIDE POSITION 

Girl 

With your back in the line of direction stand at the 
right side of the boy. (The boy is facing in the line of 
direction so the position is right side to right side.) Feet 
together, weight of the body over the ball of the left foot 
only. Right foot parallel with left foot. Inside edge of 
soles touching. 

The left hand rests gently but firmly on the boy's right 
shoulder. The right hand rests vertically in the boy's left 
palm palm facing in the right arm extending in a curve 
slightly below shoulder level. 

Look straight ahead. 

FOLLOWING THE BOY 

You will feel an initial lead from both the chest and 
the upper right arm as the boy backs you into the line 



18 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

of direction. A slight pressure of the boy's left hand 
against your right hand will enable you to continue fol- 
lowing. 



SKATER'S POSITION 

Boy and Girl 

Facing in the line of direction, stand side by side 
(boys right side against girl's left side), weight over the 
balls of the feet; cross arms, joining right hand with right 
hand, left hand with left hand. 

LEADING THE GIRL 

With the hands clasped, gently pull the girl forward 
in the line of direction. 

VARIATION OF THE SKATER'S POSITION 

Boy and Girl 

Facing in the line of direction, with the girl's left 
shoulder against the boy's right shoulder, stand with the 
weight over the balls of the feet. Arms bent at the 
elbows, hands held at shoulder level (the girl's hands 
held vertically palms facing out), join left hand with 
left hand, right hand with right hand, palms facing in. 

LEADING 1HE GIRL 

Push the girl into the line of direction from the chest. 



Positions in Dancing 



19 



POSITIONS OF THE HANDS 
1. The Vertical Hand Position 




The boy holds the girl's right hand in his left hand 
vertically, the palms facing in. (The vertical hand position 
is used in the following dances: fooctrot, waltz, tango, and 
collegiate -foxtrot.) 



2. Rumba Hand Position 




The boy holds the girl's right hand in his left, the 
thumb pressing vertically against the inside of her palm, 
with the second and third fingers clasping the back of her 
hand. (To pull the girl in after a "break" the fourth and 
fifth fingers are pressed down against her wrist.) 



3. Lindy Hand Position 




With the fingers crossed, facing in (the girFs fingers 
pointing down), the boy holds the girl's right hand in his 
left, the thumb pressing just below the girl's knuckles. 




Although there are several varieties of Foxtrots the 
medium-slow is still the most popular. And probably the 
easiest and most relaxing to do. 

The music calls for smooth, gliding movements, so try 
to cultivate long, continuous steps. Bands all over the 
country provide an opportunity for "dancing out," and 
for practice, ample opportunity will be found through 
the use of records. There are numerous recordings of all 
the old favorites as well as recent releases. Be sure, how- 
ever, to keep a smooth, easy style while dancing to 
America's favorite the medium-slow Foxtrot. 

THE BASIC RHYTHM 

The basic rhythm of the medium-slow Foxtrot is 4/4 
time with the first and third beats accented ^ J J j . 
We have an even more interesting rhythm, however, in 
the medium-slow Foxtrot, known as slow, slow, quick, 
quick. 

20 



Foxtrot 21 

Two half notes J J followed by two quarter notes 
J J give us J J J J our slow, slow, quick, 
quick rhythm. In counting the beats, however, we find 
an overlapping of the rhythm within a 4/4 measure. Here 
is what it looks like: 

i J J J J J J J J 



4 



PRACTICING THE FOXTROT 



Two slow steps are taken followed by two quick steps 
in dancing to the medium-slow Foxtrot. By merely chang- 
ing one's direction or position any number of fascinating 
combinations can be devised. 

We are starting off with the more basic figures, the 
Closed Position, the Promenade, the Dip, and the Turn 
Under (Promenade). Each of these figures is described. 

In learning the figures, start off with the Closed Posi- 
tion and progress to the Promenade. The Dip may follow, 
and for something a little tricky, you will find it easy to 
progress to the Turn Under. 

After you have practiced the individual figures you can 
begin to combine them. Progressing from the Closed 
Position to the Dip, for example, will be simple since 
you are already in Closed Position. And the transition 
from the Promenade to the Turn Under can be made 
just as easily. 

The transitions (moving from one figure into another) 
can be done quite readily on the quick, quick steps. The 
last quick of the figure you are doing is used for changing 
to a new figure. 

And be sure, after you get going, to try some combina- 
tions of your own. 



22 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




LD 



START 



4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count). 

3. Step to left side with left foot, quick (1 count). 

2. Step forward on right foot, slow (2 counts). (Draw 
left foot up to right follow dotted line. ) 

L Step forward on left foot, slow (2 counts). 

Boy 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT CLOSED POSITION 



Foxtrot 



23 



START 



LD 




Girl 

1. Step backward on right foot, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step backward on left foot, slow (2 counts). (Draw 
right foot back to left follow dotted line.) 

3. Step to right side with right foot, quick ( 1 count) . 

4 Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count). 

MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT CLOSED POSITION 



24 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




Soy 

1. Step forward on left foot. 

2. Step forward on right foot. 

3. Step to left side with left foot 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight. 

(Girl follows Boy.) 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT CLOSED POSITION 



Foxtrot 



25 



s/ovtr 




START 



Boy 
L Step sideways on left foot, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step across in front of the left foot with right foot, 
slow (2 counts). (Draw left foot up to right follow 
dotted line.) 

3. Step sideways on left foot, quick ( 1 count) . 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count). 



slow 




Girl 

1. Step sideways on right foot, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step across in front of the right foot with left foot, 
slow (2 counts). (Draw right foot up to left foot- 
follow dotted line. ) 

3. Step sideways on right foot, quick (1 count). 

4. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count). 

PROMENADE 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT 



26 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




Boy 

1. Step sideways on the left foot. 

2. Step across with right foot. 

3. Step sideways on left foot. 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight. 

(Girl follows Boy.) 

PROMENADE 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT 



Foxtrot 



27 



START 




LD 



* rig/if foof 

.J. 1 1 s''des feock 

/ on dip/ fhen 
* 



forward 



DIP 



Boy 

1. Step back on the left foot, bending at the knee, right 
leg extended, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step forward on the right foot, slow (2 counts), 
(Draw left foot up to right follow dotted line.) 

3. Step to left side with left foot, quick ( 1 count). 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count). 

DIP 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT 



28 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



left foot T/'\ 

slides 

forward 

on dip, 

then back 




START 



Girl 



1. Step forward on the right foot, bending at the knee, 
left leg extended, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step bade on the left foot, slow (2 counts). (Draw 
right foot back to left follow dotted line. ) 

3. Step to the right side with right foot, quick ( 1 count) . 

4 Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count). 

DIP 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT 



Foxtrot 



29 




Bog 

1. Step back on the left foot 

2. Step forward on the right foot 

3. Step to left side with left foot 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight. 

DIP 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT 



30 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




Boy 

1. Step sideways on left foot, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step across in front of the left foot with right foot, 
slow (2 counts), with hands clasped, raise the girl's 
right arm to prepare for the right turn. 

3. Step sideways on left foot, quick (1 count), turning 
the girl under her right arm and releasing your right 
hand. 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count), while bringing the right hand back 
to the left side of the girl's torso as she completes the 
turn; lower arms to shoulder level. 

THE TURN UNDER 

(PROMENADE) 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT 



Foxtrot 



31 



LD 




START 



Girl 



1. Step sideways on right foot, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step across in front of the right foot with left foot, 
pivoting slightly to the right, slow (2 counts), raising 
the right arm to prepare for the right turn. 

3. Step sideways, pivoting (turning) on ball of right 
foot (left foot follows through), making a complete 
right turn, quick (1 count), right fingers turning in 
boy's left hand, while releasing left hand from boy's 
right shoulder (keeping hands vertical while turn- 
ing). 

4. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight, 
quick (1 count), drop left hand to boy's right shoul- 
der; lower arms to shoulder level. 

THE TURN UNDER 

(PROMENADE) 
MEDIUM-SLOW FOXTROT 



32 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




Boy 

1. Step sideways on the left foot. 

2. Step across with right foot. 

3. Step sideways on left foot, tarn girl under. 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight. 

THE TURN UNDER 

(PROMENADE) 
MEDIVM-SLOW FOXTROT 




6. Walk 



The American Waltz with its sentimental, romantic 
melodies is in a class by itself. It is outstanding on two 
counts it is the oldest social dance done today and the 
only one in triple meter 3/4 J J *l time. 

Because the American Waltz is done slowly it is not 
difficult for a beginner to practice to. And the simple 
3/4 time will be found restful and easy. Listen for the 
three beats in each measure as you practice the accent 
on the first beat and cultivate a light, conservative style. 

33 



34 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

After a while you will find the American Waltz carrying 
you along with its easy rhythm and graceful, romantic 
melodies. 



THE BASIC WALTZ FIGURE 

Whether you are Waltzing forward or backward or 
turning, you will be using part of or an entire figure 
called a square. (Starting and returning to the same 
place, a square includes four directions forward, side- 
ward, backward, and sideward. ) See Pages 44 through 47. 



WALTZING FORWARD OR BACKWARD 

Although the Waltz consists basically of turns (squares 
done either to the left or right), we are going to learn the 
forward and backward half -squares first. 

Begin practicing a half-square in the line of direction 
(forward for the boy backward for the girl). The figure 
requires one measure of music 3/4 J 01 4! time. 
Continuing in the line of direction, repeat the figure. Two 
half-squares require two measures of music (six beats). 



THE SQUARE 

As soon as you have learned to Waltz forward or back- 
ward you may progress to the square. A square requires 
two measures of music (six beats). The square must be 
memorized before you progress to the turns. And under 
no circumstances should you proceed to learn either the 
left or right turn until you have mastered the square. 



Waltz 35 

TURNING 

The square can be turned either to the left or to the 
right (the boy and girl both turning left or right simul- 
taneously). Four measures of music are required to com- 
plete the figure (12 beats). 

The feet, head, and arms follow in the direction of a 
turn, the chest, as usual initiating the lead. For example, 
if you are doing a left turn, the feet, head, and arms point 
in the left direction. Similarly, the feet, head, and arms 
point in a right direction if you are doing a right turn. 



CHANGING DIRECTION 

As soon as you have learned to turn either left or right; 
you may wish to change from one direction to another. 
The transition can be made quite easily by doing a half- 
square. 

If you have just completed a left turn and wish to 
progress to a right turn, do a half -square (forward for the 
boy backward for the girl) in the line of direction so 
that your right foot (girl's left foot) will be released to 
begin a right turn. 

To change from a right turn to a left turn do one half- 
square in the line of direction and your left foot (girl's 
right foot) will be released to begin a left turn. 

While you are practicing, keep on the balls of die feet 
for good styling. And for the "follow through" principle 
in the Waltz, watch for the dotted lines. Most important. 



36 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




LO 



6. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

5. Follow through with the left foot and step to left side 
(1 count). 

4. Step forward on right foot ( 1 count ) . 

3. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

2. Follow through with the right foot and step to right 
side (1 count). 

1. Step forward on left foot (1 count). 

(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

Boy 

FORWARD HALF-SQUARES 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 



Waltz 



37 



GzrZ 
(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

1. Step backward on right foot (1 count). 

2. Follow through with the left foot and step to the left 
side (1 count). 

3. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

4. Step backward on left foot ( 1 count). 

5. Follow through with the right foot and step to right 
side (1 count). 

6. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

BACKWARD HALF-SQUARES 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 



38 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



LD 




6. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

5. Follow through with the left foot and step to left side 
(1 count). 

4. Step backward on right foot (1 count). 

3. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

2. Follow through with the right foot and step to right 
side (1 count). 

1. Step forward on left foot (1 count). 

(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

Boy 

THE SQUARE 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 



Waltz 



START 

and 
FINISH 




39 



LD 



Girl 

(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

1. Step backward on right foot (1 count). 

2. Follow through with the left foot and step to the left 
side (1 count). 

3. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

4. Step forward on left foot ( 1 count). 

5. Follow through with the right foot and step to right 
side (1 count). 

6. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

THE SQUARE 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 



40 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




START 

and 

FINISH 



TURN THE BOOK IN YOUR HAND TO CORRESPOND WITH THE 
DIRECTION IN WHICH YOU ARE TURNING. 



Waltz 41 



(You have now done a half -turn. To complete the 
turn repeat 1 through 6.) 

6. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

5. Follow through with the left foot and step to left side 
(1 count). 

4. Continuing to turn left, pulling the girl toward you, 
step backward on right foot (heel leading), toe 
turned in (1 count). 

3. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

2. Follow through with the right foot and step to right 
side (1 count). 

1. Chest lead, holding girl firmly with right hand while 
turning left, Step forward on left foot, toe pointing 
out (1 count). 

(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

Boy 

LEFT TURN 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 



42 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



START 

and 
FINISH 




TURN THE BOOK IN YOUR HAND TO CORRESPOND WITH THE 
DIRECTION IN WHICH YOU ARE TURNING. 



Waltz 43 



Girl 
(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

L Step backward on right foot (heel leading), toe in, 
chest turning left (1 count). 

2. Follow through with the left foot and step to left side 
(1 count). 

3. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

4. Continuing to turn left, step forward on left foot, toe 
out (1 count). 

5. Follow through with the right foot and step to right 
side (1 count). 

6. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

(You have now done a half -turn. To complete the 
turn repeat 1 through 6. ) 

LEFT TURN 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 



44 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




START 

and 
FINISH 



TURN THE BOOK IN YOUR HAND TO CORRESPOND WITH THE 
DIRECTION IN WHICH YOU ARE TURNING. 



Waltz 45 



(You have now done a half-turn. To complete the 
turn repeat 1 through 6.) 

6. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

5. Follow through with the right foot and step to the 
right side (1 count). 

4. Continuing to turn right, pull the girl toward you, 
step backward on left foot (heel leading), toe turned 
in (1 count). 

3. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

2. Follow through with the left foot and step to the left 
side (1 count). 

1. Chest lead, holding girl firmly with right hand while 
turning right, step forward on right foot, toe pointing 
out (1 count). 

(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

Boy 

RIGHT TURN 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 



46 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



START 

and 

FINISH 




TURN THE BOOK IN YOUR HAND TO CORRESPOND WITH THE 
DIRECTION IN WHICH YOU ARE TURNING. 



Waltz 47 

Girl 

(Follow dotted line for the follow through.) 

1. Step backward on left foot (heel leading), toe in, 
chest turning right (1 count). 

2. Follow through with the right foot and step to right 
side (1 count). 

3. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

4. Continuing to turn right, step forward on right foot, 
toe out (1 count). 

5. Follow through with the left foot and step to left side 
(1 count). 

6. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count). 

(You have now done a half-turn. To complete the 
turn repeat 1 through 6.) 

RIGHT TURN 
WALTZ CLOSED POSITION 




71 



Occasionally there is a request for the Charleston, and 
although the dance was at the height of its popularity 
several seasons ago, there may be times when the 
Charleston is done and you will want to kick up your 
heels to a Dixieland band. Anyway, here is your oppor- 
tunity. 

Start right off to learn the Charleston "kicks." The 
"twist step/' which is so characteristic of the Charleston 
rhythm, will come gradually. And don't underestimate 
the time required for practice. The Charleston isn't as 
easy as you think. After you get going try some combi- 
nations of your own. You'll probably stir up quite a 
breeze! 



BASIC RHYTHM 

THE MUSIC 

The Charleston is done in 4/4 J J J J time. 
And the most characteristic thing about the rhythm is its 
jerky, staccato quality. Here is what the Charleston 
rhythm looks like: 

JJ. 

48 



Charleston 49 

As you can see the rhythm is highly syncopated. The 
shifting of the accent from the first beat to the eighth 
note, tied to the third beat, is what gives punch to the 
rhythm. 

In practicing the steps to the music, however, you 
will find it easier to listen to the 4/4 4 j j 
time, which forms the background for the Charleston 
rhythm. And to make it even simpler, listen for an "and" 
before each beat. Here is what it looks like: 



; n n n 



AND 1 AND 2 AND 3 AND 



The "and" corresponds to the bending movement of the 
knee which is taken before each movement or step. And 
if s the "and" rhythm that gives the Charleston its charac- 
teristic bounce! 

THE DANCE 

The Charleston is such a flexible dance it can be done 
as a solo (alone), with a partner, or in a group (either 
in a straight line or in a circle), in which everybody has 
a chance to "get in the act/' Therefore, the boy and girl 
may use the same foot simultaneously since both will be 
facing forward. And while dancing the arms should be 
swung in opposition to the feet. For example, in stepping 
on the left foot, the arms swing across right. In stepping 
on the right foot, the arms swing across left. 



50 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

We are going to start by learning the following steps: 
the Point Step and the Kicks and progress to the Twist 
Step. Each figure will be fully described, the boy and girl 
using the same directions. 

PRACTICE 

TEDS STEPS 

You will find it easier to learn the Point Step first, 
progressing to the Kicks- After you have mastered these 
steps, try the Charleston Twist 

THE FIGURES 

Start right off by learning all the figures in place, in 
open position. Later you can progress to the promenade 
(moving forward or backward in the line of direction). 
After you have mastered the different steps you will find 
it fun to do them in closed position, the girl, as usual, 
stepping back on the opposite foot from the boy. 

The Charleston is done so informally that at any mo- 
ment partners may break away, continuing to dance as 
they face each other. Whatever you do, have fun! 




Charleston 



51 




PRACTICING THE CHARLESTON 

Boy or Girl 

I. Point Step: In place (alternating right toe forward- 
left toe back) 

Stand with feet together, the weight over the ball of 
the right foot. 

Bend right knee (count and). 

1. Step forward on left foot (count 1). 
Bend left knee (count and). 

2. Point right toe forward, straighten knees ( count 2) . 
Bend left knee ( count and) . 

3. Step back on right foot (count 3). 
Bend right knee (count and). 

4. Point left toe back, straighten knees (count 4). 

Repeat, continuing to point the right toe forward, the 
left toe back. 



52 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




II. Single Kicks: In place (Alternating right and left 
leg). 

Stand with feet together, the weight over the ball of 
the right foot. 

Bend right knee (count and}. 
L Step forward on left foot (count 1). 
Bend left knee ( count and ) . 

2. Kick right leg forward, straighten knees (count 2). 
Bend left knee (count and}. 

3. Step back on right foot (count 3). 
Bend right knee (count and). 

4. Kick left leg back, straighten knees (count 4). 

Repeat, continuing to alternate right kick forward, left 
kick back. 



Charleston 53 

III. Double Right Kick: In place. 

Stand with feet together, the weight over the ball of 
the right foot 

Bend right knee (count and). 

1. Step forward on left foot ( count 1) . 
Bend left knee (count and). 

2. Kick right leg forward, straighten knees (count 2). 
Bend left knee (count and). 

3. Kick right leg back, straighten knees ( count 3 ) . 
Bend left knee (count and). 

4. Step on right foot, bringing it to place, straighten 
knees (count 4). 

Bend right knee (count and). 

Double Left Kick: In place. 

1. Kick left leg forward, straighten knees (count 1). 
Bend right knee (count and). 

2. Kick left leg back, straighten knees (count 2). 
Bend right knee (count and). 

3. Step on left foot, bringing it to place, straighten 
knees (count 3). 

The figure (the Double Right Kick and Double 
Left Kick) is now complete. To continue, repeat 

(and 4 and) of the Double Left Kick, and continu- 
ing, by returning to the third count of the Double 
Right Kick. The figure may now be repeated in- 
definitely. 

Bend left knee ( count and) . 

4. Kick right leg forward (count 4). 
Bend left knee ( count and ) . 



54 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

Promenade Variation: (Double Kicks). 

To progress in the line of direction, step forward on the 
fourth count of the first half of figure number III (the 
Right Double Kick) and on the third count of the second 
half of the figure (die Left Double Kick). In other words, 
a forward step is taken after each Double Kick instead 
of bringing the foot back to place. 




IV. Single Diagonal Kicks: In place (Alternating right 
and left leg). 

Stand with feet together, the weight over the ball of 
the right foot. 

Bend right knee ( count and ) . 
1. Step sideward on left foot (count 1). 
Bend left knee ( count and ) . 






Charleston 

2. Kick right leg diagonally forward across left leg, 
straighten knees (count 2). 

Bend left knee (count and). 

3. Step sideward on right foot, straighten knees 
(countS). 

Bend right knee (count and). 

4. Kick left leg diagonally across right leg, straighten 
knees (count 4). 

Repeat, continuing to alternate the right and left leg. 



V. Double Diagonal Kicks: In place. 
RIGHT LEG: 

Stand with feet together, the weight over the ball of 
the right foot. 

Bend right knee (count and). 

1. Step sideward on left foot (count 1). 
Bend left knee ( count and) . 

2. Kick right leg diagonally forward across left leg, 
straighten knees (count 2). 

Bend left knee (count and). 

3. Kick right leg back diagonally, straighten knees 
(counts). 

Bend left knee (count and). 

4 Step on right foot, bringing it to place, straighten 
knees (count 4). 



56 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

LEFT LEG: 

Bend right knee (count and). 

1. Kick left leg diagonally forward across right leg, 
straighten knees (count 1). 

Bend right knee (count and). 

2. Kick left leg back diagonally, straighten knees 
(count 2). 

Bend right knee (count and). 

3. Step on left foot, bringing it to place, straighten 
knees (count 3). 

The figure (the Double Diagonal Right Kick and 
Double Diagonal Left Kick) is now complete. To 
continue, repeat (and 4 and) of the Double Diago- 
nal Left Kick, and continuing, by returning to the 
3rd count of the Double Diagonal Right Kick. The 
figure may now be repeated indefinitely. 
Bend the left knee ( count and ) . 

4. Kick right leg diagonally forward across left leg, 
straighten knees (count 4). 

Bend the left knee ( count and). 

Promenade Variation: (Double Diagonal Kicks). 

To progress in the line of direction, step forward on 
right foot on the fourth count of the first half of figure 
number V (the Right Double Diagonal Kicks) and on 
the third count of the second half of the figure (the 
Left Double Diagonal Kicks). In other words, a forward 
step is taken after each Diagonal Double Kick instead 
of bringing the foot back to place. 



Charleston 



57 




THE CHARLESTON TWIST 

The Twist consists of pivoting in and out on the balls 
of the feet. Before undertaking to learn a figure, practice 
the Twist in place. Read and practice the following sec- 
tion carefully: 

Stand with the weight on both feet, heels touching, 
toes pointing out. Bending the knees, pivot in on the balk 

of the feet (count and), pivot out on the balls of the feet, 
straightening the knees, lower the heels (count 1). Re- 
peat this exercise until the movement becomes automatic, 
remembering to bend, pivot pivot, straighten. 
Now you are ready to learn the Twist figures. 



58 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



I. The Twist: In place (alternating left and right leg). 

Standing in open position, heels together, toes pointing 
out, the weight on the right foot. 

1. Bending the right knee, pivot In on the batt of the 
right foot, bringing the left leg up, knee turned in 
( count and) , pivot out on the batt of the right foot, 
straightening knees, bring the left foot back to the 
heel of the right foot (toe pointed out), transferring 
the weight to the left foot (count 1). 

2. Bending the left knee, pivot in on the batt of the 
left foot, bringing the right leg up, knee turned in 
(count and), pivot out on the ball of the left foot, 
straightening knees, bring the right foot back to the 
heel of the left foot (toe pointed out), transferring 
the weight to the right foot (count 2). 



Repeat entire figure. 

As a general rule, the foot is in the air when the toes 
point in, and a step is taken as the toes point out. 

II. The Twist: In place (stepping forward and back). 

(This figure is really a variation of the point step in 
Figure I, except that one points forward and back with 
the batt of the foot.) 



Charleston 59 

Standing in open position, heels together, toes pointing 
out, the weight on the right foot 

L Bending the right knee, pivot in on the ball of the 
right foot, bringing the left leg up, knee turned in 
(count and), pivot out on the ball of the right foot, 
straightening knees, bring the left leg down, step 
forward on the left foot, transferring the weight 
(count 1). 

2. Bending the left knee, pivot in on the ball of the 
left foot, bringing the right leg up, knee turned in 
(count and), pivot out on the ball of the left foot, 
straightening knees, bring the right leg down, the 
ball of the right foot touching the floor no weight 
(count 2). 

3. Bending the left knee, pivot in on the ball of the 
left foot, bringing the right leg up, knee turned in 
(count and), pivot out on the ball of the left foot, 
straightening knees, stepping back on the right foot, 
transferring the weight (count 3). 

4. Bending the right knee, pivot in on the ball of the 
right foot, bringing the left leg up, knee turned in 
(count and), pivot out on the ball of the right foot, 
straightening knees, bring the left leg down, the 
ball of the left foot touching the floorno weight 
(count 4). 

You have now stepped forward on the left foot, point- 
ing with the ball of the right foot, followed by stepping 
back on the right foot and pointing with the ball of the 
left foot To continue, repeat the entire figure, pointing 
forward and back. 




& JLindu 



(ROCK >N> ROLL) 



The rock V roll Lindy the most popular dance in 
America among teen-agers is still the most (^diversified 
dance done today. Every school or region las. sits own 
version, and that's fine. 

Furthermore, the Lindy continues to lold its ; own as a 
standard attraction for the teen-age cros^d docspite the 
enthusiasm for such novelties as the Stroll 3 BristJtol Stomp, 
Madison, Hully Gully, Mashed Potato, etc. WTiile these 
fads appear only to disappear the Lindjr lexmjKus an all- 
time favorite inasmuch as new rhythms a_nd "bioreaks" are 
constantly heing evolved which add interest arod variety 
to the dance. 

In dancing the Lindy, a smooth, consrvative s style may 
he used or the rock V roll version dipping in _ the knees 
and rocking in the torso to the heavy, solid boeat of the 
rhythm-and-blues music. 

60 



Lindy (Rock >N> RoU) 61 

And don't get discouraged while learning the Lindy if 
you find the going rough. Although it is an exciting dance, 
it is the most difficult to coordinate. So take it easy. 

THE BASIC RHYTHM 

The Lindy is in 4/4 J J J J time. The basic 

rhythm is slow, slow, quick, quick. Two half notes 

^ J followed by two quarter notes J J give us 

J J J J (six counts). As you will see this rhythm 

results in an overlapping within a 4/4 measure. Here is 

what it looks like: 

-L j _ U ! 

SLOW SLOW QUICK QUICK SLOW SLOW QUICK QUICK 



In dancing the Lindy, a Dig-step (pushing the ball of 
the foot into the floor, followed by bringing the heel 
down, transferring the weight from the supporting foot) 
is done to a slow, *.nd repeated, followed by two quick 
steps (six counts). Here is the rhythm: 



DIG- STEP DIGSTEPSTEP STEP DIG-STEP DIG- STEP STEP STEP 

The breaks are also done to the slow, slow, quick, quick 
rhythm. (A break is a figure done close to or away from 
one's partner. ) And although the steps and breaks are an 
integral part of each other, we are going to start with the 
footwork and progress to the breaks. 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 
THE BASIC STEP 

Before taking up the basic step (slow, slow, quick, 
quick), we are going to practice the rhythm that underlies 
the Dig-steps. The following paragraphs should be read 
and practiced carefully. 

Boy or girl stand with the feet together, the weight 
over the ball of the right foot. Dig with the ball of the 
left foot, bending the knee (count 1), bring the left heel 
down, transferring the weight from the right foot to the 
left foot, straightening the left knee (count 2). You have 
now done one slow. 

Dig with the ball of the right foot, bending the knee 
(count 3), bring the right heel down, transferring the 
weight from the left foot to the right foot, straightening 
the right knee (count 4). You have now done two slows 
to the count of 1-2, 3-4. 

Practice the Dig-steps in place to the 1-2, 3-4 count. 
As soon as you have become familiar with this rhythm, 
practice the Dig-steps to slows, omitting the 1-2, 3-4 
count. Practice until the rhythm becomes automatic and 
keep a light, bouncy knee motion, which is one of the 
more characteristic things about the Lindy. We are now 
ready to proceed to the quick, quick rhythm. 

The quick steps are taken by bringing the ball of the 
foot in contact with the floor first, allowing the weight to 
roll onto the whole foot. Two steps are taken in succession 
(quick, quick). The knees should be relaxed so that the 
change of weight in stepping can be done quickly. 

Now, practice the entire basic step in place, Dig-step, 
Dig-step, step, step (slow, slow, quick, quick). 

You are now ready to tackle the Breaks. 



Lindy (Rock W RoU) 63 

BREAKS 

There are various ways of doing the Lindy breaks. They 
may be done in place, forward, sideward, backward, and 
while turning. 

Perhaps the most characteristic use made of the breaks 
is in traveling. This consists of moving from one place to 
another and is done quite freely the boy or girl exchang- 
ing places, backing away or around each other. Since one 
can do as one pleases in the Lindy, there are no transitions 
to worry about! Once the lead and follow through are in- 
dicated, one can really let go. 

The following breaks, with the accompanying footwork, 
will be described in detail: the wann-up break, the turn 
under, the elbow break and the hand-change break. 
Later, we will describe other breaks and additional Lindy 
footwork 



LEADING OR FOLLOWING 

After Vanning up" (doing the Dig-step in place), the 
boy begins to throw the girl out on the first break. After 
she is thrown out, the boy pulls the girl in. (This throw- 
ing out and pulling in is the most characteristic thing 
about the Lindy.) Both the boy's and girl's knees should 
be bent on the "pull in," the girl leaning out, keeping her 
arm firm but not rigid. 

The elbows should be kept dose to the body in a free, 
swinging movement. And since the right or left hand is 
used freely in starling breaks, the leads should be given 
PROMPTLY and QUICKLY. (Remember, the Lindy really 
moves! ) 

And finally, while holding the girl's right hand in the 
usual Lindy clasp, the boy's left hand should be suffi- 



64 



Betty WMte's Teen-Age Dance Book 




ciently relaxed so that the girl's fingers can pivot while 
making the transitions on the breaks. 



PRACTICING THE BREAKS 

The warm-up break will be described simultaneously 
for the boy and girl since both are doing the same figure. 
The steps, however, may be practiced alone, the boy, as 
usual, beginning on the left foot, the girl beginning on the 
right foot All other breaks will be described separately 
for the boy and girl. 

In learning the breaks start off with the warm-up, 
progressing to the turn under and on to the elbow break 
And be sure to master one break at a time. 



Lindy (Rock 'N' RoU) 



65 





WABMJDP BREAK 

Boy and Girl 

The warm-up break consists of the boy pushing the girl 
out to the right, both stepping back diagonally on the 
outside foot. 

Standing in promenade position, weight on the inside 
foot, hands joined in Lindy clasp. 

1. Dig-step with the outside foot, slow (2 counts). 

2. Dig-step with the inside foot, slow (2 counts). 

3. Pushing the girl away with the Lindy hand clasp, 
both step back diagonally on the outside foot, quick 
(1 count). 

4. Pulling the girl in, both step in place on the inside 
foot, quick (1 count). 

You are now in the original promenade position. 



66 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

THE TURN UNDER 

Boy 

This figure consists of turning the girl right under her 
right arm and turning her left while exchanging places 
with her. 

Standing in promenade position, weight on right foot, 
hands joined in Lindy clasp. 

RIGHT TURN: 

1. Dig-step with left foot while raising the girl's right 
arm to prepare for the turn under, slow (2 counts). 

2. With hands still raised in the Lindy clasp, turn the 
girl with your right hand under her right arm, dig- 
ging with the right foot, slow ( 2 counts ) . 

3. Step back on the left foot, quick (1 count). 

4. Step forward on the right foot, quick (1 count). 

(With hands still raised in the Lindy clasp, you 
are now facing your partner.) 

LJEFT TURN: 

1. Dig-step with left foot, pivoting a half turn to the 
right while turning the girl to the left with your 
left hand, slow (2 counts). 

2. Continuing to turn the girl left, Dig-step back- 
ward on the right foot, slow (2 counts). 

(You have now exchanged places with the girl.) 

3. Step forward on the left foot, quick (1 count). 

4. Step forward on the right foot, quick ( I count) . 

You are now back in the original promenade position 
with the right hand under the girl's left shoulder blade, 
the left band lowered in the Lindy clasp. 



Lindy (Rock W RoU) 67 

THE TntY VXDER 

Girl 

This figure consists of a right turn under your right arm 
and then a left turn while exchanging places with the 
boy. 

Standing in promenade position, weight on left foot, 
hands joined in Lindy clasp. 

EIGHT TURN: 

1. Dig-step with right foot, pivoting slightly to the 
right, slow (2 counts). 

2. Continuing to pivot to right, dig-step backward 
with left foot (right foot follows through J, slow 
(2 counts). 

3. Step back on the right foot, quick (1 count). 

4. Step forward on the left foot, quick (1 count). 

(With hands still raised in the Lindy clasp, you 
are now facing your partner.) 

LEFT TUBN: 

1. Dig-step with right foot, pivoting a half turn to 
the left, slow (2 counts). 

2. Dig-step backward on the left foot, slow ( 2 counts ) . 
(You have now exchanged places with the boy.) 

3. Step forward on the right foot, quick (1 count). 

4. Step forward on the left foot, quick ( 1 count). 

You are now back in your original promenade position 
with the left hand placed on the boy's right shoulder 
blade, the right hand lowered in the Lindy clasp. 



68 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 






THE ELBOW BREAK 

Boy 

The elbow break is done by snapping the girl in 
quickly toward your left side with the left hand, turning 
her quickly to the right with the right hand, and catch- 
ing her right hand on the recovery of her turn, snapping 
her about with a left turn. In other words, the girl pivots 
quickly to the right, followed by a quick pivot turn to 
the left 

Standing in promenade position, hands joined in Lindy 
clasp. 

1. Dig-step with left foot, pulling the girl toward 
you, slow (2 counts). 

2. Turning the girl quickly into a right pivot turn, 
dig-step with the right foot, slow (2 counts). 

3. Catching the girl at finish of her right turn, swing 
her around into a left turn, stepping on left foot, 
quick (1 count). 

4 Step on the right foot, quick (1 count). 

You are now in your original promenade position, the 
right hand under the girl's left shoulder blade, the left 
hand joined in a Londy clasp. 



Lindy (Rock W Roll) 69 

THE ELBOW BREAK 

Girl 

The elbow break consists of pivoting quickly to the 
right followed by a complete turn to the left. 

Standing in promenade position, hands joined in Lindy 
clasp. 

1. Dig-step forward with right foot, turning slightly 
to the left, slow (2 counts). 

2. Turning to right, dig-step with the left foot, pivot- 
ing on the left foot, slow (2 counts). 

3. Step across in front of the left foot, with right 
foot, pivoting quickly to left on ball of right foot, 
quick (1 count). 

4. Continuing to turn left, step on left foot, quick 
(1 count). 

You are now back in your original promenade posi- 
tion, the left hand on the boy's right shoulder, your right 
hand joined in the Lindy clasp. 



70 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

THE HAND-CHANGE BREAK 

The hand-change break is one of the more character- 
istic figures in the Lindy in which partners move about 
quite freely turning and exchanging places ad lib. 

Boy 

Standing opposite your partner, holding the girl's right 
hand in your left hand. 

1. Dig-step forward with the left foot, slow (2 
counts). 

2. Dig-step forward with right foot, pivoting a half 
turn to left while taking the girl's right hand in 
your right hand and transferring it to your left 
hand behind your back, slow (2 counts). 

3. Step back on the left foot, having exchanged 
places with your partner, quick (1 count). 
(You are now facing your partner.) 

4. Step forward on the right foot, quick (1 count). 

Girl 

Standing opposite your partner with your right hand 
in the boy's left hand. 

1. Dig-step forward with the right foot, slow (2 
counts). 

2. Dig-step forward with left foot, pivoting a half 
turn to right as the boy changes hands, slow (2 
counts). 

8. Step back on right foot, having exchanged places 
with your partner, quick (1 count). 
(You are now facing your partner.) 

4. Step forward on the left foot, quick (1 count). 



ADDITIONAL BREAKS 

So far the footwork in the preceding breaks consisted 
of the slow, slow, quick, quick rhythm. In practicing the 
following breaks, the slow or quick counts can be done 
quite freely and need not follow a set pattern. 

The footwork for the four-hand push-away figure may 
be done in two different rhythms: two quick steps to go 
backward and two quick steps to go forward, or, one 
triple step to go backward and one triple step to go for- 
ward. On the other hand, the push-away variation is 
done only to quicks. As for the snap figure the dig-step 
is the most suitable because of the in-and-out accented 
movement of the arms. 

Now, in the wrap-around position, the slow count is 
used in a pivot step as the boy swings the girl in place 
from side to side; or partners may do instead a triple 
step, forward and back. 

One thing more how about trying your own version 
of these breaks? Whatever you do, you'll find them quite 
a challenge* 




FOUR-HAND PUSH-AWAY 

The four-hand push-away figure consists of partners 
facing each other holding both hands, pushing away 
from each other, and pulling each other in with a back- 
ward and forward motion. The figure can also be done 
in a backward and forward motion turning to the right 

In addition to the four-hand clasp, the figure can be 
done in right-hand, right-hand clasp in a backward and 
forward motion, and circling to the right. 



72 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 





PUSH-AWAY: VARIATION 

Starting in semi-open position, the girl's right hand 
in the boy's left hand (Lindy clasp), the girl's left palm 
against the boy's right palm (elbows bent), partners push 
each other apart with the palms, the boy taking two 
steps backward in a circle to the right while the girl 
steps backward and in place, followed by partners pull- 
ing each other in with the opposite hands, the boy step- 
ping sideward and across the supporting foot to continue 
in a circle to the right while the girl steps across the 
supporting foot and to the side. 





Lindy (Rock '1ST RoU) 





73 



THE SXAP 

With partners facing each 
other, arms at the side (bent 
at the elbows), both hands 
clasped slightly below shoul- 
der level, the Snap consists 
of partners snapping the 
arms inward (down and up 
in a half circle), the hands 
meeting in front of the chest; 
followed by partners snap- 
ping the arms outward 
(down and up in a half 
circle), resuming the origi- 
nal position. 




WRAP AROUND 

With partners facing each 
other, both hands clasped, 
the boy turns the girl to her 
left under his left arm into 
the curve of his right arm 
into wrap-around position 
( arms clasped at the waist ) . 
To finish the figure, the boy 
releases the girl's left hand, 
turning her to her left into 
open break position. 



74 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

ADDITIONAL FOOTWORK 

The teen-ager who is really good may want to dress 
up the Lindy by learning one or more of the following 
steps: the Triple, the Sugar Foot and the Brush Step. 

These figures will add variety to your Lindy, and are 
especially useful for traveling in open breaks. At least 
they are worth a try! 

THE TRIPLE LINDY STEP 

Having mastered the footwork in the preceding breaks, 
you may now substitute the Triple Step for the Dig-step. 
This is done by taking three quick steps in time to the 
usual slow (dig step). 

Here is what the Triple Lindy looks like: 

SLOW SLOW 



r 



STEP STEP STEP STEP STEP STEP 



THE SUGAR FOOT 

The Sugar Foot consists of stepping diagonally and 
pivoting in on the ball of the foot. Here it is: 

Step diagonally forward on the left foot and pivot in 
on the ball of the left foot. Step diagonally forward on 
the right foot and pivot in on the ball of the right foot. 
Now, in dancing the Sugar Foot the step becomes a 
continuous motion, forward in the line of direction or in 
a circle. 



Lindy (Kock 'JV KoU) 75 

THE BRUSH STEP 

The Brush Step, as the name would indicate, consists 
of brushing the foot against the floor, extending the leg 
forward, and stepping back and closing. The step can 
be done in place or progressing. 

THE TWIST 

Strictly speaking, the Twist is in a class by itself but 
since it is still popular, we are going to include it as an 
extra dividend. 

The Twist consists of pivoting on the balls of the feet 
while twisting the hips from side to side in a circular 
motion. The Twist Step is done in place with the feet 
apart either left foot in front of right or the left foot 
to the side of the right foot. Although the Twist Step is 
usually done with the weight on one foot (the other 
foot following through with a twisting motion), you 
will find it easier to start practicing the Twist by keeping 
the weight over both feet. 

There are various ways of doing the Twist. For ex- 
ample, it can be done facing your partner while bend- 
ing forward and backward, and side to side while bending 
away and toward your partner. Occasionally, knee lifts 
and even deep knee bends are done in the Twist And 
for those who really get wound up there is the Whip! 
Partners face each other, swinging the arms wildly over- 
head in a circling, whipping motion. 

From here you are on you* own. 




ONE-STEP 

Since so many teen-agers today prefer to dance to the 
sentimental, "vocal" Foxtrots, which are too slow to 
dance to comfortably, here is an easy out the Collegiate 
Foxtrot. 

The Collegiate Foxtrot is a slower version of the 
original Foxtrot the one-step in which every beat in 
a 4/4 measure is accented. In dancing the Collegiate 
Foxtrot a step is taken to every beat in the music. We 
are going to describe the closed position, the pivot turn, 
the turn under, and the throw over. 

PRACTICING THE COLLEGIATE FOXTROT 

Start off by learning the closed position and progress 
to the pivot turn in the closed position. For variety, you 
might insert a dip at the end of either of these figures. 
Remember, there is nothing set about the progression of 
one figure to another so have fun making up your own 
combinations. 

After you have mastered the preceding figures try the 
throw over. To get into the open position from which 
you begin the throw over figure, start from a closed 
position and throw the girl to your right side. You are 
now both facing in the line of direction. The transition 

76 



Collegiate Foxtrot (One-Step) 77 

from a throw over to a closed position is made by the 
boy stepping in front of the girl. He is now backing in the 
line of direction. To progress forward again in the line 
of direction, a pivot turn may be inserted. Incidentally, 
it is not necessary to keep repeating the throw over from 
side to side as shown in the diagram. Occasionally, a 
half throw over figure may be done, for example, tossing 
the girl from the starting position to the opposite side 
and continuing in the line of direction. After practicing 
these figures you will find yourself moving from one 
position to another with the greatest of ease the Col- 
legiate Foxtrot being the simplest of all dances. 



78 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




LO 



START 



4. Step forward on the right foot (1 count). 

3. Step forward on the left foot ( 1 count) . 

2. Step forward on the right foot ( 1 count). 

1. Step forward on the left foot (1 count). 

Boy 
COLLEGIATE FOXTROT CLOSED POSITION 



Collegiate Foxtrot (One-Step) 



79 



START 



1. Step back on the right foot (1 count). 

2. Step back on the left foot (1 count). 

3. Step back on the right foot ( 1 count). 

4. Step back on the left foot (1 count). 

COLLEGIATE FOXTROT CLOSED POSITION 



80 



8. Step back on the right 
foot in the line of direc- 
tion (1 count). 

7. Step on the left foot, 
continuing to the right, 
pivoting slightly ( 1 
count). You are now 
facing in the line of 
direction. 

6. Step on the right foot, 
continuing to the right, 
pivoting slightly ( 1 
count ) . 

5. Step on the left foot 
to the right, pivoting 
(1 count). 

1-4. Walk forward left, 
right, left, right (4 
counts ) . ( The three 
pivot steps describe a 
complete turn to the 
right, the dotted feet 
indicating the direction 
of the pivot turn. ) 

TURN THE BOOK IN YOUR 
HAND TO CORRESPOND WITH 
THE DIRECTION IN WHICH 
YOU ARE TURNING. 

Boy 

RIGHT PIVOT TURN 
COLLEGIATE FOXTROT CLOSED POSITION 




Collegiate Foxtrot (One-Step) 



81 



Girl 



(The three pivot steps 
describe a complete 
turn to the right, the 
dotted feet indicating 
the direction of the 
pivot turn. ) 

1-4. Walk backward right, 
left, right, left (4 
counts ) . 

5. Step back on the right 
foot, turning to the 
right, pivoting slightly 
(1 count). 

6. Step back on the left 
foot, turning to the 
right, pivoting slightly 
(1 count). 

7. Step back on the right 
foot, continuing to the 
right, pivoting slightly 
( 1 count ) . You are now 
backing in the line of 
direction. 

8. Step forward on the left 
foot (1 count). 

TURN THE BOOK IN YOUR 
HAND TO CORRESPOND WITH 
THE DIRECTION IN WHICH 
YOU ARE TURNING. 




RIGHT PIVOT TURN 
COLLEGIATE FOXTROT CLOSED POSITION 



82 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



slow 




Boy 

1. Step sideways on left foot (1 count). 

2. Step across in front of the left foot with right foot 
(1 count), with hands clasped, raise the girl's right 
arm to prepare for the right turn. 

3. Step sideways on left foot (1 count), turning the girl 
under her right arm and releasing your right hand. 

4. Close right foot against left foot, transferring weight 
(1 count), while bringing the right hand back to the 
left side of the girTs torso as she completes the turn; 
lower arms to shoulder level. 



THE TURN UNDER 

(PROMENADE) 
COLLEGIATE FOXTROT 



Collegiate Foxtrot (One-Step) 



83 



LD 




START 



Gii* 

1. Step sideways on right foot ( 1 count ) . 

2. Step across in front of the right foot with left foot, 
pivoting slightly to the right (1 count), raising the 
right arm to prepare for the right turn. 

3. Step sideways, pivoting (turning) on ball of right 
foot (left foot follows through), making a complete 
right turn (1 count), right fingers turning in boy's 
left hand, while releasing left hand from boy's right 
shoulder (keeping hands vertical while turning). 

4. Close left foot against right foot, transferring weight 
(1 count), drop left hand to boy's right shoulder; 
lower arms to shoulder level. 

THE TURN UNDER 

(PROMENADE) 
COLLEGIATE FOXTROT 



84 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




COLLEGIATE FOXTROT OPEN POSITION 
THROW OVER SIDE TO SIDE 

The throw over figure is almost a continuous motion 
in which the initial lead for throwing the girl to the oppo- 
site side occurs on the second beat, the follow through of 
the arm swinging over the girl on the third beat. 



8. Step forward on the 
right foot closing right 
foot against the left foot 
(1 count). 

7. Step forward on left 
foot, catching the girl 
with your right hand 
(1 count). 

6. Step forward on the 
right foot, throwing the 
girl over to your right 
side (1 count). 

5. Step forward on left foot 
(1 count). 

4. Step forward on the 
right foot, closing right 
foot against left foot (1 
count). 

3. Step for- 
ward on 
left foot, 

catching the girl with 
your left hand (1 count). 
The left hand is now 
under the girl's right 
shoulder blade. 

2. Step forward on the 
right foot, throwing the 
girl over to your 
left side (1 count). 

1. Standing in open 
position, with the 
girl on your right side, 
the right hand under her 
left shoulder blade, the 
left arm at your side, 
step forward on the left 

foot (1 count). 

Boij 



85 



10 




THROW OVER 
SIDE TO SIDE 

COLLEGIATE 
FOXTROT 

OPEX POSITION 



86 




LD 



START 

THROW OVER 
SIDE TO SIDE 

COLLEGIATE FOXTROT 
OPEN POSITION 

Girl 



8. Close left foot against 
the right foot, transfer- 
ring weight (1 count). 

7. Step sideways on right 
foot, pivoting (turning) 
on ball of right foot (left 
foot follows through), 
making a complete right 
turn (1 count), dropping 
your left hand on boy's 
right shoulder, 

6. Step forward on left foot, 
pivoting slightly to right 
to prepare for throw over 
to right side (1 count). 

5. Step forward on right 
foot (1 count). 

4. Close left foot against 
right foot, transferring 
weight (1 count). 

3. Step across in front of 
left foot to left side, 
pivoting (turning) on 
ball of right foot (left 
foot follows through ) , 
making a complete left 
turn (1 count), dropping 
your right hand on the 
boy's left shoulder. 

2. Step forward on left foot, 
pivoting slightly to left to 
prepare for throw over to 
leftside (1 count). 

1. Standing in open posi- 
tion, on boy's right side, 
left hand on his right 
shoulder, right arm at 
your side, step forward 
on right foot (1 count). 




Here is a dance which is still a favorite with the all- 
around dancer. 

The Rumba, like the Cha Cha Cha, is essentially a 
"place" dance a dance which is done pretty much in one 
spot. And each requires loose, relaxed knee work. The 
Rumba, however, has its own characteristic rhythms and 
style. The delayed transference of weight in stepping, for 
instance, gives the Rumba its unique appeal. 

The music, however, will offer a greater challenge than 
the actual dance. But don't let the percussion instru- 
ments, with their syncopations and offbeats, throw you 
off. Listen for the insistent, steady beat of the claves, 
bongo drums, and maracas. And keep relaxed at all times 
while practicing this charming dance the Cuban Rumba. 

87 



88 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

BASIC RHYTHM 

THE MUSIC 

Like all the Latin-American dances, the Cuban Rumba 
shows the influence of the Negroid and Spanish rhythms. 
And it is the blending of these rhythms that gives rich- 
ness to the Rumba music. 

The music is in 4/4 [ J J J time, the accents 
occurring on the first and third beats. Here is what a 
basic Rumba beat is like: 



J J 



Because of the variety of percussion instruments, the 
drums for example, it is easier to think of the standard 
Latin- American rhythm of eight beats in a measure. Here 
it is: 



And just as "four beats J J J J in a bar" (meas- 
ure) is typical of American jazz, the eight beats in a 
measure are typical of the Rumba rhythm. The maracas 
(gourds shaken in the hands) will give you this rhythm. 
In dancing to the music, listen also for the claves and 
the bongo drums, which accent the rhythm. Both the 
claves (little sticks which are struck together) and the 



Rumba 



89 



bongo drums beat out a typical Charleston beat. Here 
it is: 



J-T J 



The Cuban Rumba music is so relaxing, and the per- 
cussion instruments make the accents of the different 
rhythms so easy to listen to, that you should have no 
difficulty in keeping time. 



TH K 



The basic step of the Rumba is done to music in 4/4 
J J J J time. The step consists of a quick, quick, slow. 
Here is what the rhythm looks like: 



QUICK QUICK SLOW 



Two quick steps are taken to the side, followed by a 
slow step. By repeating two quick steps to the side, fol- 
lowed by a slow step we have completed a figure. Two 
measures of music in 4/4 time are required to complete 
the basic figure. Here is what we have just described: 



QUICK QUICK SLOW QUICK QUICK SLOW 



90 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

We are going to learn the following figures: the square 
in closed position, the square turned to the left in closed 
position, and three breaks: the right turn under, the open 
break, and the back crossover. Each figure will be fully 
described. 

THE RUMBA MOVEMENT 

Before taking up the basic step (quick, quick, slow) 
we are going to discuss the rhythm that underlies the 
steps. 

In the progressive dances, for example the Waltz, the 
weight of the body is transferred as the step is taken. In 
the Rumba the opposite is done the weight follows the 
step. Actually, in the Rumba two movements are made 
on each step. The foot is placed (no weight) on the floor, 
the weight -following as the step is taken. It is really quite 
simple. But make no mistake, the step requires plenty of 
practice. Therefore, the following section should be read 
and practiced carefully. Boy or Girl stand with the feet 
together, the weight over the ball of the right foot. 

Place (no weight) the left foot flat against the floor, 
slightly to the side, bending the left knee (count 1). 
Transfer the weight to the left foot, straightening the 
knee (count and}. (The right knee is now bent forward, 
no weight on the right foot. ) 

Place (no weight) the right foot flat against the floor 
slightly to the side, bending the right knee (count 2). 
Transfer the weight to the right foot, straightening the 
knee (count and}. (The left knee is now bent forward, 
no weight on the left foot.) You have just taken two 
Rumba steps to the count of 1 and 2 and. Practice this 
rhythm, calling out "1 and" as you step left, "2 and" as 
you step right Practice until the steps become auto- 



Rumba 91 

matic, remembering always to place the foot before you 
step. That's all there is to the Rumba movement! 

Now that you have mastered the Rumba movement in 
place, begin stepping sidewards, moving to the left, first 
placing and stepping on the left foot, followed by placing 
and stepping on the right foot. Do several steps in suc- 
cession. Now practice moving sideward to the right, plac- 
ing and stepping on the right foot, and so forth. After you 
have become familiar with the steps moving sideward, 
practice moving forward and backward, remembering to 
place the foot before stepping. You are now ready to pro- 
gress to the basic step, 

THE BASIC STEP 

The basic step consists of two quick steps and a slow 
step. It may be done in a square, a turn, and a break. 
When partners are in an open break the so-called Cuban 
Walk is done to the same quick, quick, slow rhythm. 

THE RUMBA SQUARE 

Starting and returning to the same place, a square in- 
cludes four directions sideward, forward, sideward, and 
backward. See pages ' 94- 95 . 

Begin practicing a half -square in the line of direction 
(forward for the boy backward for the girl). The figure 
requires one measure of music in 4/4 J J J J time. 
Continuing with the second half of the square (back- 
ward for the boy forward for the girl), repeat the fig- 
ure. (Two half -squares require two measures of music, 
8 beats. ) You have now done two basic steps in the quick, 
quick, slow rhythm. The square must be memorized be- 
fore you progress to the left turn. 



92 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

THE LEFT TURN SQUARE 

The square can be turned to the left (the boy and girl 
both turning to the left simultaneously). Four measures of 
music are required to complete the figure. 

The f eet, head, and arms follow in the direction of a 
turn, the chest as usual initiating the lead. For example, 
in doing the left turn, the feet, head, and arms point in 
the left direction. 

THE BREAKS 

The Rumba, like the Lindy, has many delightful 
breaks. We are going to start by learning the simplest 
breaks first. 

The turn under is based on the Rumba square so it 
will be easy to learn this break. The boy, however, should 
keep his left hand sufficiently relaxed so that the girl's 
fingers may pivot in his easily, as she does the right turn 
under with her right arm. 




From here you may progress to the open break. Since 
the lead for this break results in an open position, the 
boy will have to draw the girl in to resume the closed 
position. The girl should lean away as she is drawn in. 



Rumba 93 

bending the elbow, while keeping the right arm firm but 
not rigid. After you have mastered the square, the left 
turn, and the open break, try the back crossover. It will 
add so much, style to your Rumba. The right and the left 
hand are used freely in moving the girl from side to side, 
so the leads will have to be given promptly and quickly. 
At all times, the elbows should be kept rather close to the 
body. And on all open breaks, the girl's arms should be 
bent at the elbows, the hands vertical, the fingers curving 
over naturally. 

Now, you are ready to do these fascinating figures and 
breaks. 



94 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




START 



Boy 

1. Place the left foot to the left side, knee bent, no 
weight, quick (1 count). 

2. Transferring the weight to the left foot, close the 
right foot to the left foot, right knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

3. Transferring the weight to the right foot, place the 
left foot forward, knee bent, no weight, sZoit? (2 
counts). 

4. Transferring the weight to the left foot, place the 
right foot to the right side, knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

5. Transferring the weight to the right foot, close the 
left foot to the right foot, left knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

6. Transferring the weight to the left foot, place the 
right foot back, knee bent, no weight, $Zoto (2 
counts). 

(To repeat the figure, transfer the weight to the right 
foot.) 

THE SQUARE 
RUMBA CLOSED POSITION 



Rumba 



95 



START 




LO 



Girl 

1. Place the right foot to the right side, knee bent, no 
weight, quick (1 count). 

2. Transferring the weight to the right foot, close the 
left foot to the right foot, left knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

3. Transferring the weight to the left foot, place the 
right foot back, knee bent, no weight, slow (2 
counts). 

4. Transferring the weight to the right foot, place the 
left foot to the left side, knee bent, no weight, quick 
(1 count). 

5. Transferring the weight to the left foot, close the 
right foot to the left foot, right knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

6. Transferring the weight to the right foot, place the 
left foot forward, knee bent, no weight, slow (2 
counts). 

(To repeat the figure, transfer the weight to the left 
foot.) 

THE SQUARE 
RUMBA CLOSED POSITION 



96 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




TURN THE BOOK IX YOUR 
HAXD TO CORRESPOND WITH 
THE DIRECTION IX WHICH 
YOU ARE TURNING. 



Boy 



1. Place the left foot to the left side, knee bent, no 
weight, quick (1 count). 

2. Transferring the weight to the left foot, close the 
right foot to the left foot, right knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

3. Transferring the weight to the right foot while turn- 
ing to the left, place the left foot forward, knee bent, 
no weight, slow (2 counts). 

4. Continuing to turn, transfer the weight to the left 
foot, placing the right foot to the right side, knee 
bent, no weight, quick (1 count). 

5. Transferring the weight to the right foot, dose the 
left foot to the right foot, left knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

6. Transferring the weight to the left foot while turning 
to the left, place the right foot back, knee bent, no 
weight, slow (2 counts). 

(You have now done a half turn. To complete the 
turn, transfer the weight to the right foot, repeating 
1 through 6.) 

LEFT TURN 
RUMBA CLOSED POSITION 



Rumba 97 



TlJRX THE BOOK IX YOUR 
HAND TO CORRESPOXD WITH 
THE DIRECTIOX IX WHICH 
YOU ARE TURXIXG. 




Girl 



1. Place the right foot to the right side, knee bent, no 
weight, quick (1 count). 

2. Transferring the weight to the right foot, close the 
left foot to the right foot, left knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

3. Transferring the weight to the left foot while turning 
to the left, place the right foot back, knee bent, no 
weight, slow (2 counts). 

4. Continuing to turn, transfer the weight to the right 
foot, placing the left foot to the left side, knee bent, 
no weight, quick (1 count). 

5. Transferring the weight to the left foot, close the 
right foot to the left foot, right knee bent, no weight, 
quick (1 count). 

6. Transferring the weight to the right foot while turn- 
ing to the left, place the left foot forward, knee bent, 
no weight, slow (2 counts). 

(You have now done a half turn. To complete the 
turn, transfer the weight to the left foot, repeating 
1 through 6.) 

LEFT THEN 
RUMBA CLOSED POSITION 



98 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 
THE RIGHT TURN UNDER 



Boy 

(The right turn under break consists of the boy turning 
the girl under her right arm, the girl walking in a circle 
close to the boy and resuming the closed position. ) 

Standing in closed position, the weight on the right 
foot. 

1. Do a complete Rumba square in the quick, quick, 
slow rhythm, raising the girl's right arm to prepare 
for the turn under as you step back on the slow. 

2. Continuing to do another Rumba square, push the 
left side of the girl's torso firmly with your right 
hand, turning her under her right arm; assuming 
the closed position as you step back on the slow. 

The right hand is released after the lead for the turn 
under. The arms are lowered and the right hand placed 
under the girl's left shoulder blade as you resume the 
closed position. 





Rumba 



99 



THE RIGHT TURN UNDER 

Girl 

(The right turn under break consists of the girl turning 
under her right arm, walking in a circle close to the boy 
and resuming the closed position.) 

Standing in closed position, the weight on the left foot 

1. Do a complete Rumba square in the quick, quick, 
slow rhythm, raising the right aim to prepare for 
the turn under as you step forward on the slow. 

You are now going to describe a circle to the right as 
you turn under your arm. 

2. Beginning with the right foot, take three steps for- 
ward in the quick, quick, slow rhythm, turning in 
front of the boy, and continuing forward in a half- 
square into closed position. 

The left hand is released after the lead for the turn 
under. The arms are lowered and the left hand placed 
on the boy's right shoulder as you resume the closed 
position. 




100 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




THE OPEN BREAK (CUBAN WALK) 

Boy 

(The figure consists of the boy pushing the girl into 
an open break, followed by the boy walking backward 
as he pulls the girl into closed position.) 

Standing in closed position, the weight on the right 
foot 

L Step to the left side on the left foot, quick (1 

count). 

2. Close the right foot to the left foot, quick (1 
count). 

3. Pushing the girl away with your right hand (palm 
at waist), step forward on the left foot, opening 
out to the right, slow (2 counts). 

(You are now standing in an open break, left arm ex- 
tended in the Rumba hand clasp, the right arm bent 
at the elbow.) 

You are now going to back in a circle to the right as 
you pull the girl toward you. (Keep shoulders parallel.) 



Rumba 101 



4. Beginning with the right foot, take several steps 
backward in the quick, quick, slow rhytihm (the 
Cuban Walk) until you have brought the girl into 
closed position. 

(The figure may be finished off by doing a square in 
place.) 



THE OPEN BREAK (CUBAN WALK) 

Girl 

(The figure consists of the boy pushing the girl into 
an open break, followed by the girl walking forward as 
the boy backs up, pulling the girl into closed position.) 

Standing in closed position, the weight on the left foot. 

1. Step to the right side on the right foot, quick (1 
count)* 

2. Close the left foot to the right foot, quick (1 
count). 

3. Backing away from the boy, step back on the right 
foot, opening out to the left, slow (2 counts). 

(You are now standing in an open break, your right 
hand in the boy's left hand, your left arm bent at the 
elbow.) 

You are now going to describe a circle to the right as 
the boy pulls you toward him. (Keep shoulders parallel.) 

4. Beginning with the left foot take several steps for- 
ward in the quick, quick, slow rhythm (the Cuban 
Walk) until you are back in closed position. (The 
figure may be finished off by doing a square in 
place.) 



102 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




BACK CROSSOVER 

The Back Crossover consists of the boy and girl open- 
ing out, stepping back and across from side to side. 



Boy 

Starting position, facing your partner, weight on right 
foot, holding your right hand under the girl's left shoul- 
der blade. 



Rumba J03 



Left crossover: 

1. Step back and across with the left foot while turn- 
ing the girl out to the right, quick (1 count.) 

2. Step forward with the right foot, quick (1 count). 

3. Swinging the girl with your right hand over to the 
left hand, step to the side with the left foot, slew 
(2 counts). 



Right crossover: 

1. Step back and across with the right foot while turn- 
ing the girl out to the left, quick (1 count). 

2. Step forward with the left foot, quick (1 count). 

3. Swinging the girl with your left hand over to the 
right hand, step to the side with the right foot, slow 
(2 counts). 

Note: Since the right and left hand are used consecu- 
tively in swinging the girl from side to side, the leads will 
have to be given promptly and quickly. 



104 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

BACK CROSSOVER 



Girl 

Starting position, facing your partner, weight on left 
foot, arms bent at the elbows. 



Right crossover: 

1. Opening out to the right, step back and across with 
the right foot, quick (1 count). 

2. Step forward with the left foot, quick (1 count). 

3. Step to the right side with the right foot, slow (2 
counts). 



Left crossover: 

1. Opening out to the left, step back and across with 
the left foot, quick (1 count). 

2. Step forward with the right foot, quick (1 count). 

3. Step to the side with the left foot, slow (2 counts). 

Note: It is important for the girl to keep her elbows 
bent in order to dear the boy as he swings her from side 
to side. 





<^r 



//. 






The Cha Cha Cha has a light, bouncy rhythm which 
appeals to everyone. And while the dance is done to 
Mambo music, it is easier to execute than the Mambo. 



THE BASIC RHYTHM 

The music is in 4/4 J J j J time, the accent oc- 
curring on the first beat and the secondary accent on 
the third beat. Here it is: 



n j 



> 

105 



106 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

THE BASIC STEP 

In dancing the Cha Cha Cha a step is taken forward or 
backward on the first beat, followed by a step in place on 
the second beat, followed by three steps (a ball change) 
forward, backward, or sideward on the third and fourth 
beats. Here it is: 



t J J 




J 



STEP STEP STEP STEP STEP 



We are going to learn the basic step forward and back- 
ward and sideward, and the front crossover. Each of these 
figures will be described in detail. In addition, we will 
describe the chase in half turns and later, in whole turns. 
Incidentally, the forward and backward and sideward 
steps can be done in closed position or away from your 
partner in opposite position. 

Having mastered the preceding figures, you can begin 
to vary them. For example, occasionally a back crossover 
(partners stepping back and across) may be substituted 
for the front crossover. And the sideward basic step may 
be made more interesting by partners moving from closed 
position sideways to the left-left hand-left hand-and 
sideways to the right right hand-right hand. Also, whole 
turns may be done quite freely following any figure in 
opposite position. 

And now that you have learned these delightful van* 
ations, try some combinations of your own. 



Cha Cha Cha 107 



THE BASIC STEP 

Boy 

Starting position, facing your partner, weight on right 
foot. 

Forward basic step: 

1. Step forward with left foot, slow. 

2. Step back in place on right foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with left foot, talce 3 steps backward 
(left, right, left), quick, quick, slow. 

Backward basic step: 

4. Step back with right foot, slow. 

5. Step forward in place on left foot, slow. 

6. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps forward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 



108 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance 



THE BASIC STEP 

Girl 

Starting position, facing your partner, weight on left 
foot. 

Backward basic step: 

1. Step back with right foot, slow. 

2. Step forward in place on left foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps forward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 

Forward basic step: 

4. Step forward with left foot, slow. 

5. Step back in place on right foot, slow. 

6. Beginning with left foot, take 3 steps backward 
(left, right, left), quick, quick, slow. 



109 



SIDEWARD BASIC STEP 

Boy 
Stand with feet slightly apart, weight on right foot. 

Left side: 

1. Close left foot to right foot, slow. 

2. Step in place on right foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with left foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(left, right, left), quick, quick, slow. 

Right side: 

4. Close right foot to left foot, slow. 

5. Step in place on left foot, slow. 

6. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



SIDEWARD BASIC STEP 

Girl 
Stand with feet slightly apart, weight on left foot 

Right side: 

1. Close right foot to left foot, slow. 

2. Step in place on left foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 

Left side: 

4. Close left foot to right foot, slow. 

5. Step in place on right foot, slow. 

6. Beginning with left foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(left, right, left), quick, quick, slow. 



Clia Cha 



111 




FRONT CROSSOVER 

Boy 

Starting position, facing your partner, weight on right 
foot, holding girl's right hand in your left hand. 

Left crossover: 

1. Pivoting on right foot to right, step with left foot 
across right foot, slow. 

2. Step in place with right foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with left foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(left, right, left), quick, quick, slow. 

Right crossover: 

1. Taking girl's left hand in your right hand, pivot on 
left foot to left, stepping with right foot across left 
foot, slow. 

2. Step in place with left foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 



112 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




FRONT CROSSOVER 

Girl 

Starting position, facing your partner, weight on left 
foot, right hand held by boy's left hand. 

Right crossover: 

1. Pivoting on left foot to left, step with right foot 
across left foot, slow. 

2. Step in place with left foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 

Left crossover: 

1. Placing your left hand in boy's right hand, pivot on 
right foot to right, stepping with left foot across 
right foot, slow. 

2. Step in place with right foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with left foot, take 3 steps sideward 
(left, right, left), quick, quick, slow. 



Cha 



113 





THE CHASE 

In the Chase the boy turns away from the girl, and she 
follows him. As the girl turns away from the boy, he fol- 
lows her. Partners continue chasing each other by taking 
half right turns and half left turns alternately. 



114 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

HALF TURNS 

Boy 
Stand opposite your partner, weight on right foot. 

Right turn: 

1. Step forward on left foot, pivoting to right, slow. 

2. Continuing to pivot to right, step in place on right 
foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with left foot, take 3 steps forward (left, 
right, left), quick, quick, slow. 

(You have now done a half turn.) 

Left turn: 

4. Step forward on right foot, pivoting to left, slow. 

5. Continuing to pivot to left, step in place on left 
foot, slow. 

6. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps forward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 

(You have now done a half turn.) 

The turns may be repeated several times. To resume 
the original position (facing your partner) it will be 
necessary for the boy to do a basic step in place while 
the girl completes her last turn. 



Cha Cha Cha 115 

HALF TVRXS 

Girl 

It will be necessary for the girl to do a backward basic 
step in place while the boy executes the right turn. 

Stand opposite your partner, weight on left foot. 
Backward basic step: 

1. Step back with right foot, slow. 

2. Step forward in place on left foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps forward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 

Right turn: 

1. Step forward on left foot, pivoting to right, slow. 

2. Continuing to pivot to right, step in place on right 
foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with left foot, take 3 steps forward (left, 
right, left), quick, quick, slow. 

(You have now done a half turn.) 



116 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

Left turn: 

4. Step forward on right foot, pivoting to left, slow. 

5. Continuing to pivot to left, step in place on left 
foot, slow. 

6. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps forward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 

(You have now done a half turn.) 



The turns may be repeated several times. To resume 
the original position (facing your partner) it will be 
necessary for the boy to do a basic step in place while 
the girl completes her last turn. 



WHOLE TURKS 

Occasionally, whole turns are used in the chase figure 
instead of half turns. The figure consists of the boy doing 
the whole turn while the girl does a basic step and vice 
versa. Since the footwork is the same for the boy and girl, 
although performed alternately, we will describe only the 
boy's part. (The girl as usual uses the opposite foot) 

Boy 
Stand opposite your partner, weight on right foot. 

Whole turn: 

1. Step forward on left foot, pivoting to right, slow. 

2. Continuing to pivot to right, step in place on right 
foot, slow. 

3. Continuing to pivot to right, step on left foot, com- 
pleting turn, quick. 

4-5. Step back on right and left foot, quick, slow. 

Backward basic step: 

L Step back with right foot, slow. 

2. Step forward in place on left foot, slow. 

3. Beginning with right foot, take 3 steps forward 
(right, left, right), quick, quick, slow. 




12. Janao 



For something different try a Tango! Its smooth, sleek 
style will add much to your social dancing particularly 
the American Foxtrot. The music is less complex than 
the Rumba; and since the Argentine Tango is done mod- 
erately slow, you will not find practice too difficult. 

The lovely, plaintive melodies of the Tango are most 
appealing and the strongly accented bass in the music 
will help you keep time. 

Long, smooth steps should be taken to maintain that 
sleek look so characteristic of the Argentine Tango. 

BASIC RHYTHM 

The basic rhythm of die Tango is slow, slow, quick- 
quick, slow. Two measures of music in 4/4 J *J J jl 
time are required to complete the rhythm. Here is what 
it looks like: 



J J J J 



SLOW SLOW QUICK QUICK SLOW 

118 



Tango 119 

Two slow steps are taken followed by two quick steps 
and a slow step, at the end of which figure the feet are 
brought together to form an arch, (Arching consists of 
drawing the foot slowly to the arch of the supporting 
foot, the weight remaining on the supporting foot). By 
merely changing one's direction or position any number 
of fascinating combinations can be devised. 

We are starting off with the more basic figures, the 
closed position, the dip, the outside position, and the 
promenade. Each of these figures is described. 



PRACTICE 

In learning the figures, start off with the closed posi- 
tion and progress to the dip. And for something a little 
tricky, try the outside figure. From there you may progress 
to the promenade. 

After you have practiced the individual figures you 
can begin to combine them. Progressing from the closed 
position, to the dip, and on to tie outside will be quite 
simple since you are already in closed position at the 
end of each figure. Be sure to keep the shoulders parallel 
while stepping into outside position. The transition to 

the promenade can be made by pivoting in the line of 
direction on the last slow of the preceding figure. You 
will then be in semi-open position to begin the prome- 
nade. And for variety, you might try the turn under 
(promenade) figure in which the girl pivots in place to the 
right, the boy continuing in the line of direction. And 
remember to try some new figures of your own, 



120 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




START 



5. Draw the left foot slowly to the arch of the right 
foot, weight remaining on the right foot, slow (2 
counts). 

4. Follow through with the right foot and step to the 
right side, quick (1 count). 

3. Step forward on the left foot, quick ( 1 count). 

2. Step forward on the right foot, the left toe remain- 
ing in place, slow (2 counts). 

1. Step forward in the line of direction on the left 
foot, the right toe remaining in place, slow (2 
counts). 

Boy 
TANGO CLOSED POSITION 



Tango 



LO 



START 



I 
t 



121 



ARCH 



Girl 



1. Step backward in the line of direction on the right 
foot, the left toe remaining in place, slow (2 
counts). 

2. Step backward on the left foot, the right toe re- 
maining in place, slow (2 counts). 

3. Step backward on the right foot, quick (1 count). 

4. Follow through with the left foot and step to the 
left side, quick (1 count). 

5. Draw the right foot slowly to the arch of the left 
foot, weight remaining on the left foot, slow (2 
counts). 

TANGO CLOSED POSITION 



122 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




START \ |f V. | righlfoo* 
slides bode 
on dip, fh*n 
forward 



LD 



5. Draw the left foot slowly to the arch of the right 
foot, weight remaining on the right foot, slow (2 
counts). 

4 Follow through with the right foot and step to the 
right side, quick (1 count). 

3. Step forward on the left foot, quick (1 count). 

2. Step forward on the right foot, the left toe remain- 
ing in place, slow (2 counts). 

1. Step back on the left foot, bending at the knee, right 
leg extended, slow (2 counts). 

Boy 

DIP 
TANGO CLOSED POSITION 



Tango 123 




START 



Girl 

1. Step forward on the right foot, bending at the knee, 
left leg extended, toe remaining in place, slow (2 
counts). 

2. Step back on the left foot, slow (2 counts). 

3. Step backward on the right foot, quick (1 count). 

4 Follow through with the left foot and step to the 
left side, quick (1 count). 

5. Draw the right foot slowly to the arch of the left 
foot, weight remaining on the left foot, slow (2 
counts). 

DIP 
TANGO CLOSED POSITION 



124 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




START 



5. Draw the left foot slowly to the arch of the right 
foot, weight remaining on the right foot, slow (2 
counts). 

4. Follow through with the right foot and step to the 
right side, quick (1 count). 

3. Following through, step forward and across with 
the left foot into closed position, quick (1 count). 

2. Step forward and across with the right foot, slow 
(2 counts). You are now in outside position. 

1. Facing in the line of direction, in closed position, 
step diagonally forward on the left foot, the right 
toe remaining in place, slow (2 counts). 

Boy 
TANGO OUTSIDE POSITION 



Tango 125 




Girl 

1. Backing in the line of direction, in closed position, 
step diagonally backward on the right foot, the left 
toe remaining in place, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step in back of and across with the left foot, slow 
(2 counts). You are now in outside position. 

3. Following through, step back and across with the 
right foot, quick (1 count). You are now in closed 
position. 

4. Follow through with the left foot and step to the 
left side, quick (1 count). 

5. Draw the right foot slowly to the arch of the left 
foot, weight remaining on the left foot, slow (2 
counts). 

TANGO OUTSIDE POSITION 



126 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



5. 



3. 
2. 

1. 




LD 



START 



Draw the left foot slowly to the arch of the right 
foot, weight remaining on the right foot, slow 
(2 counts). 

Follow through with the right foot and step to the 
right side, quick (1 count). 

Step forward on the left foot, quick (1 count). 

Step across in front of the left foot with right foot, 
swinging the girl into closed position in the line of 
direction, slow (2 counts). 

Facing in the line of direction, in promenade posi- 
tion, step sideways on left foot, the right toe re- 
maining in place, slow (2 counts). 

Boy 
TANGO PROMENADE 



Tango 




LD 



START 

Girl 

1. Facing in the line of direction, in promenade posi- 
tion, step sideways on right foot, the left toe re- 
maining in place, slow (2 counts). 

2. Step across in front of the right foot with left foot, 
pivoting into closed position, slow (2 counts). 

3. Backing in the line of direction, step back on the 
right foot, quick (1 count). 

4. Follow through with the left foot and step to the 
left side, quick (1 count). 

5. Draw the right foot slowly to the arch of the left 
foot, weight remaining on the left foot, slow (2 
counts). 

TANGO PROMENADE 



128 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



THE ROCK STEP (HABANERA) 

However interesting the slow, slow, quick, quick, slow 
rhythm is in the Tango, the dance would be incomplete 
without the so-called Rock Step (rocking the weight 
forward and back on the balls of the feet). The Rock 
Step rhythm is quick, quick, slow and requires one 
measure of music in 4/4 J J J J time. Here is what 
it looks like: 



QUICK QUICK SLOW 



The Rock Step is based on the traditional Habanera 
rhythm in 4/4 time. Here it is: 



t 



This rhythm shows the influence of the Spanish, Negroid, 
and South American flavor that is so characteristic of the 
Latin-American dances. 



PRACTICING THE ROCK STEP 

The Rock Step may be done forward and backward 
and in a turn. It may be done in closed or outside posi- 
tion. But before undertaking to practice these positions 
with a partner, it might be wise for you to learn the Rock 
Step alone. Here is a description of the step. 



Tango 129 

Boy 

1. Facing in the line of direction, step forward on 
the left foot, qfiick (1 count). 

2. Stepping back on the ball of the right foot, rode 
back, quick (1 count). 

3. Step forward on the left foot (the right foot follows 
through), slow (2 counts). 

Repeat figure, starting forward on the right foot. 

(Lead for the Rock: Pull the girl slightly toward you 
on the second count, releasing the pressure of your right 
hand on the third count.) 

Girl 

1. Backing in the line of direction, step back on the 
ball of the right foot, quick (1 count). 

2. Stepping forward on the left foot, rock forward, 
quick (1 count). 

3. Step back on the ball of the rigjht foot, allowing 
the weight to roll back on the whole foot (the left 
foot follows through), slow (2 counts). 

Repeat figure, starting back on the ball of the left foot. 

As a beginner you will find it easier to practice the 
Rock Step -first in outside position. After you have be- 
come familiar with the lead for the Rock Step in this 
position you will find it quite easy to progress to the 
closed position. The transition of moving from one figure 
into the other can be done on the slow of the preceding 
figure. 



130 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

TURNING 

By using the basic step quick, quick, slow, a quarter 
turn in closed position may be done to the left or right. 

For a more continuous turn, try stepping and rock- 
ing, using all quicks. For example, if the boy is turning 
left he steps forward on the left foot, quick, he steps 
back on the ball of the right foot, quick, three times in 
succession (6 counts), followed by a slow step, forward 
on the left foot (2 counts). The right foot is now released 
to begin the right turn. The figure may be repeated by 
stepping forward on the right foot and back on the ball 
of the left foot, three times in succession; followed by a 
slow step forward on the right foot as a transition to the 
left turn. Be sure to pivot as you turn either left or right 

In following the boy for the left turn, the girl steps 
back on the ball of the right foot and forward on the 
left foot. To follow the boy in turning right, the girl steps 
Back on the ball of the left foot and steps forward on 
the right foot. (To become familiar with the entire figure, 
read the preceding description for the boy.) 



13. Viennese \AJcLlh 



Now that you have learned the American Waltz, try 
something a little more giddy. The Viennese Waltz with 
its lilt and speed is fun to do, and the melodies are de- 
lightful. 

For a grand occasion like a prom, for instance there 
is nothing like a Viennese Waltz. It adds sparkle and 
gaiety and is worth that extra effort required to learn 
the pivot turn. 

PRACTICING THE VIENNESE WALTZ 

The most characteristic thing about a Viennese Waltz 
is its speed and the so-called pivot turn. (A pivot, as you 
know, consists of turning on the ball of the foot. ) 

It will be wise, therefore, for you to practice the for- 
ward and backward turns slowly. After you have mastered 
your own part, begin to practice with a partner. 

Be sure to lean away slightly from your partner as you 
turn. It will help both of you to maintain your balance. 
The boy should hold his right hand under the girl's 
left shoulder blade firmly while turning, and the girl 
should maintain a firm hold on the back of the boy's 
right shoulder blade. 

The basic figure of the Viennese Waltz is really quite 
simple so you should have no difficulty in mastering this 
dance. 

131 



132 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




START 



You are now backing in the line of direction. 

3. Pivot on the balls of both feet, making another 
quarter turn to the left, transferring the weight to 
the left foot as the left heel touches the toe of the 
right foot (1 count). 

2. Follow through with the right foot and take a short 
step to the right side (1 count). 

1. Chest leading, step forward on left foot, making a 
quarter turn to the left (1 count). 

Facing in the line of direction, feet together, the 
weight over the ball of the right foot. 

Boy 

FORWARD HALF TURN 
VIENNESE WALTZ 



Viennese Waltz 



133 



START 




Boy 

Starting position, weight on left foot, toe pointing 
out, the right toe behind the left heel. 

1. Chest leading, step backward with the right foot, 
making a quarter turn to the left (1 count). 

2. Step with the left foot in back of and across the 
right foot (1 count). 

3. Pivot on the balls of both feet, making another quar- 
ter turn to the left, transferring the weight to the 
right foot; bringing the left foot against the right 
foot (1 count). 

You are now facing in the line of direction. 

BACKWARD HALF TURN 
WALTZ 



134 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

START 




Backing in the line of direction, feet together, the 
weight over the ball of the left foot. 

1. Chest leading, step backward with the right foot, 
making a quarter turn to the left ( 1 count) . 

2. Step with the left foot in back of and across the 
right foot (1 count). 

3. Pivot on the balls of both feet, making another 
quarter turn to the left, transferring the weight to 
the right foot; bringing the left foot against the 
right foot (1 count). 

You are now facing in the line of direction. 

BACKWARD HALF TURN 
VIENNESE WALTZ 



Viennese Waltz 135 




START 

(To continue turning, the starting position begins 
with the weight on left foot, toe pointing out, the 
right toe behind the left heel) 
You are now backing in the line of direction. 

3. Pivot on the balls of both feet, making another 
quarter turn to the left, transferring the weight to 
the left foot as the left heel touches the toe of the 
right foot (1 count). 

2. Follow through with the right foot and take a short 
step to the right side (1 count). 

1. Chest leading, step forward on left foot, making a 
quarter turn to the left (1 count). 
Facing in the line of direction, feet together, the 
weight over the ball of the right foot 

Girl 

FORWARD HALF TURN 
VIENNESE WALTZ 



14. 




Sooner or later the Polka turns up. And it certainly 
c\ves its perennial appeal to its simple, gay rhythm 
usually in 2 4 time. 

Although there are numerous versions of the Polka 
the fcc hee! and toe and away we go" is by far the most 
popular as well as the easiest to execute. The more ener- 
getic will want to hop and slide. But whichever version 
is preferred, the lighthearted Polka will continue to be 
popular. 

It is as fresh today as it was a hundred years ago and 
will probably continue to hold its own as an old-time 
favorite. 

BASIC RHYTHM 

The basic rhythm of the Polka is 2/4 time /""""3 
4 . In counting the steps to the music, however, 
we are going to use a 4/4 rhythm J J J J . 

BASIC STEP 

The basic polka step consists of a hop, step-close, 
step, and requires one measure of music in 4/4 time 
J j J J . The hop is taken in place on a sixteenth note 
(a note added before the first beat). Think of the six- 
teenth note as an upbeat, calling it and. The hop is 

136 



Polka 137 

followed by stepping and closing (drawing: the foot to 
the supporting foot and transferring the wdsht : a step 
is repeated with a follow-through on the fourth beat. 
Here it is: 

J J J /. 



(AND) 1234 
HOP STEP CLOSE STEP F.T. 

This is the true Polka and we are going to learn it after 
we have studied the heel and toe Polka with slides. 
Because of the speed of the Polka, the hop-step rhythm 
is a little more difficult to execute. And as a matter of 
fact, teen-agers, as beginners, really prefer the heel and 
toe combination as a start. Every region has its own ver- 
sion of the Polka so that one needn't take the numerous 
variations too seriously! 

We are going to learn first the heel and toe Polka 
combination with slides in skater s position, a variation 
known as the crossover in skater's position, and the heel 
and toe combination in closed position. We are also go- 
ing to include the so-called two-step Polka (done with- 
out the hop), progressing in closed position; to be fol- 
lowed by the hop-step version, progressing and turning 
in closed position. Each figure will be described. 

Since the boy and girl both start on the same foot in 
skater's position, the steps will be described simultane- 
ously. In assuming the closed position, however, the girl 
will use the right foot, backing in the customary line of 
direction. The heel and toe in closed position and the 
various steps that follow will be described separately. 



138 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

POLKA SKATER'S POSITION 
(HEEL AND TOE) 

Boy and Girl 

Facing in the line of direction, stand side by side (boy's 
right side against girl's left side), weight over the ball 
of the right foot; cross arms, joining right hand with right 
hand, left hand with left hand. 




Heel and Toe: 

L With toes pointed up, place the left foot diagonally 
forward, heels touching floor (count 1). 

2. Bring the left foot diagonally back, toes touching 
the floor (count 2). 



Polka 139 

3. With toes pointed up, place the left foot diagonally 
forward, heels touching the floor (count 3). 

4. Bring the left foot diagonally back, toes touching 
the floor (count 4). 

(The figure requires one measure of music in 4/4 
time.) 



The Slides: 

1. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot (count 1). 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring 
the weight (count and). 

2. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot (count 2). 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring 
the weight (count and). 

3. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot (count 3 ). 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring 
the weight (count and). 

4. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot (count 4). 
The right foot follows through (count and). 



(The figure requires one measure of music in 4/4 
time.) 

The entire figure (the heel and toe and slides) may 
now be repeated to the right, beginning with the right 
foot 



140 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




*/ 

POLKA SKATER'S POSITION 
THE CROSSOVER (VARIATION) 

The crossover consists of the boy switching the girl 
from his right side over to his left side. 

Facing in the line of direction, the girl's left shoulder 
against the boy's right shoulder, the hands clasped verti- 
cally at shoulder level, the weight over the ball of the 
right foot. 

L Starting with the left foot, do the heel and toe 
combination twice in place (count 4). 

2. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot three 
times, closing with the right foot (count 3). 

3. Step diagonally forward on the left foot (count 1), 
while transferring the girl quickly from the right 
shoulder to the left shoulder, the girl stepping 
across and in front of the boy. 

(Two measures of music in 4/4 time are required for 
the entire figure.) 

The girl now has her right shoulder against the boy's 
left shoulder. 

The entire -figure (the heel and toe and slides) may 
now be repeated to the right, beginning with the right 
foot 



Polka 141 

POLKA CLOSED POSITION 
(HEEL AXD TOE} 

Boy 

In the heel and toe and slide combination in closed 
position the boy clasps the girl at the waist. 

Facing in the line of direction, feet together, the weight 
over the ball of the right foot. 

Heel and toe: 

1. With toe pointed up, place the left foot to the side, 
the heel touching the floor (count 1). 

2. Bring the left foot back, the toe touching the floor 
(count 2). 

3. With toe pointed up, place the left foot to the side, 
the heel touching the floor (count 3). 

4. Bring the left foot back, the toe touching the floor 
(count 4). 

(The figure requires one measure of music in 4/4 
time.) 

The Slides: 

1. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot ( count 1 ) . 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight (count and). 

2. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot (count 2). 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight (count and). 

3. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot (count 3). 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight ( count and ) . 

4. Slide diagonally forward on the left foot (count 4). 
The right foot follows through (count and). 

(The figure requires one measure of music in 4/4 
time.) 

The entire figure (the heel and toe and slides) may 
now be repeated to the right, beginning with the right 
foot 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

POLKA CLOSED POSITION 
(HEEL AXD TOE) 

Girl 

In the heel and toe and slide combination in closed 
position the girl places her hands on the boy's shoulders. 

Backing in the line of direction, feet together, the 
weight over the ball of the left foot. 
Hcd and Toe: 

1. With toe pointed up, place the right foot to the 
side, the heel touching the floor ( count 1. ) 

2. Bring the right foot back, the toe touching the floor 
( count 2 ) . 

S. With toe pointed up, place the right foot to the 

side, the heel touching the floor (count 3). 
4. Bring the right foot back, the toe touching the floor 

^ count 4). 

; The figure requires one measure of music in 4/4 
time. ) 
The Slides: 

1. Slide back diagonally on the right foot (count 1). 
Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight ( count and ) . 

2. Slide back diagonally on the right foot (count 2). 
Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight ' v count and ) . 

3. Slide back diagonally on the right foot (count 3). 
Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight v count and ) . 

4* Slide back diagonally on the right foot (count 4). 
The left foot follows through ( count and ) . 

(The figure requires one measure of music in 4/4 
tinie.) 

The entire figure (the heel and toe and slides) may 
now be repeated to the left, beginning with the left foot. 



Polka 143 

POLKA CLOSED POSITION 
(WITHOUT HOP} 

Boy 

Facing in the line of direction, feet together, the weight 
over the ball of the right foot, ~ 

1. Step diagonally forward on the left foot '"count 1\ 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight (count and). 

2. Step diagonally forward on the left foot f count 2). 
The right foot follows through , count and). 

3. Step diagonally forward on the right foot 'count 
3). Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring 
the weight (count and). 

4. Step diagonally forward on the right foot (count 
4). The left foot follows through ^ count and}. 

(You have just completed a Polka step to the left and 
to the right. The figure requires one measure of music 
in 4/4 time. ) 

The entire -figure may now be repeated to the left, be- 
ginning with the left foot. 

Girl 

Backing in the line of direction, feet together, the 
Weight over the ball of the left foot. 

1. Step back diagonally on the right foot (count 1). 
Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight ( count and ) . 

2. Step back diagonally on the right foot (count 2). 
The left foot follows through (count and). 

3. Step back diagonally on the left foot (count 3). 
Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight (count and). 

4. Step back diagonally on the left foot (count 4). 
The right foot follows through (count and). 

(You have just completed a Polka step to the right and 
to the left. The figure requires one measure of music in 
4/4 time.) 

The entire figure may now be repeated to the right, 
beginning with the right foot. 



144 Betty TOute's Teen-Age Dance Book 

POLKA CLOSED POSITION 
(WITH HOP) 

Boy 

Facing in the line of direction, feet together, the weight 
over the ball of the right foot. 

Hopping on the right foot and lifting the left knee 
(count and): 

1. Step diagonally forward on the left foot (count 1). 

2. Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight (count 2). 

3. Step diagonally forward on the left foot (count 3). 

4. The right foot follows through (count 4). 

Hopping on the left foot and lifting the right knee 
(count and): 

1. Step diagonally forward on the right foot (count 
1). 

2. Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight (count 2). 

3. Step diagonally forward on the right foot (count 
3). 

4. The left foot follows through (count 4). 

(You have just completed a Polka step to the left and 
to the right The figure requires two measures of music in 
4 4 time.) 

The entire figure may now be repeated to the left. 



Polka 145 

POLKA CLOSED POSITION 
(WITH HOP) 

Girl 

Backing in the line of direction, feet together, the 
weight over the ball of the left foot. 

Hopping on the left foot and lifting the right knee 
(count and): 

1. Step back diagonally on the right foot (count 1). 

2. Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight (count 2). 

3. Step back diagonally on the right foot (count 3). 

4. The left foot follows through (count 4). 

Hopping on the right foot and lifting the left knee 
(count and): 

L Step back diagonally on the left foot (count 1). 

2. Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight (count 2). 

3. Step back diagonally on the left foot (count 3). 

4. The right foot follows through (count 4). 

(You have just completed a Polka step to the right and 
to the left. The figure requires two measures of music in 
4/4 time.) 

The entire -figure may now be repeated to the right 



146 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

POLKA CLOSED POSITION 

Tl'RX 
(WITH HOP) 

Boy 

The Polka turn consists of doing a half right turn in the 
2:ne of direction and continuing to the right with another 
half right turn. 

Facing in the line of direction, stand with feet together, 
the weight over the ball of the right foot. 

Hopping on the right foot while turning to the right, 
and lifting the left knee (count and): 

1. Step to the side on the left foot (count 1). 

2. Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight (count 2), 

3. Continuing to turn right, step back on the left foot 
(count 3). 

4. The right foot follows through (count 4). 

Hopping on left foot while turning to right and lifting 
right knee (count and): 

1. Step to the side on the right foot (count 1). 

2. Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight (count 2). 

3. Continuing to turn right, step forward on the right 
foot (count 3). 

4. The left foot follows through (count 4). 

(The figure requires two measures of music in 4/4 
time.) 



Polka 147 

POLKA CLOSED POSITION 

TVRX 
(WITH HOP) 

Girl 

The Polka turn consists of doing a half right turn, back- 
ing in the line of direction and continuing to the right 
with another half right turn. 

Backing in the line of direction, stand with feet to- 
gether, the weight over the bail of the left foot. 

Hopping on the left foot while turning right, ana lifting 
the right knee (count and}: 

L Step to the side on the right foot (count 1). 

2* Close the left foot to the right foot, transferring the 
weight (count 2). 

3. Continuing to turn right, step forward on the right 
foot (count 3). 

4. The left foot follows through (count 4). 

Hopping on right foot while turning right, and lifting 
left knee (count and): 

1. Step to the side on the left foot ( count 1 ) . 

2. Close the right foot to the left foot, transferring the 
weight ( count 2 ) . 

3. Continuing to turn right, step back on the left foot 
(count 3). 

4 The right foot follows through (count 4). 

(The figure requires two measures of music in 4/4 
time.) 



148 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



PRACTICE 

Although the Polka, in closed position, may be done 
with the customary clasp, the Waltz, for example, it is a 
little safer while doing the Polka, for the boy to clasp the 
girl's waist, the girl clasping the boy's shoulders. And in 
order to get good leverage, while turning, partners should 
lean awav from each other. 




In changing direction, partners should look in the new 
direction before beginning the following figure. (You do 
have to see where you are going, you know. ) And because 
of the speed with which one moves while dancing the 
Polka, one will have to watch out for other couples on the 
fioor to avoid collisions. 



Polka 149 



VARIATIONS 

Now that you have learned the heel and tee, the slide 
and the basic Polka steps in the skater's and the closed 
position, try some other variations. For instance, in addi- 
tion to doing the skater's position with the crossover, 

which has been described, von miaht trv the throw over 

* * ^-. * 

(tossing the girl from the right side to the left side}. See 
Page 98. 

The Polka step (without the hop^ may also be varied 
by turning in closed position. And at intervals the girl 
may turn under her right arm. And for something even 
more giddy, the boy may Polka in place while swinging 
the girl around him with his right arm overhead, the girTs 
left hand clasped in his right hand. 

For those who really get wound up doing the Polka, 
there is a four hand variation. Two couples in open posi- 
tion join inside hands, the head couple (the couple in 
front) joining outside hands with the couple behind while 
progressing in the line of direction. At any moment the 
head couple may back up under the inside arms of the 
couple behind, the two couples continuing to progress in 
the line of direction. From here on you may try your otcn 
variations. But remember, while having fun ? to keep 
things under control. 



15. Party JbanceA 

VIRGINIA REEL 

Want to really dress up a party? Then try a modern 
version of the Virginia Reel. There is nothing like it to 
pull a dance out of the doldrums. If the guests are not 
already familiar with the figures, someone can call them 
out to get things under way. And if the more traditional 
Virginia Reel music is not available, a Polka or snappy 
March can be used in a pinch. 

By all means try a Virginia Reel at least once. If you 
haven't done so, you've really missed out! So get going. 

THE MUSIC 

As the name of the dance would indicate, reel music 
usually accompanies the Virginia Reel in 6/8 j j j 

time. But as has already been pointed out, music in 2/4 
* 4 time may be found equally satisfac- 
tory. 

THE DANCE 

We are going to do a modern version of the Virginia 
Reel in which everybody is active. And in order to keep 
the dance moving along it will be wise to confine the 
dance to six couples. When more than six couples join 
the dance, couples remain inactive for too long a period, 
for example, as the head couple reels while progressing 
down the set. 

150 



Party Dances 151 

The figures we are going to describe for the modem 
version of the dance may also be used fcr the traditional 
Virginia Reel the "Sir Roger de Coverley" in which 
the head lady and foot gent begin the dance, alternating 
with the foot lady and head gent. In our modem version 
all the couples begin the dance. And it is ranch more 
lively that way. 

A light, marching step is used throughout most of the 
figures and a sliding step the Chcsse , meaning cne foot 
chasing the other) is occasionally used. The following 
description of these steps and figures should enable you 
to get going. 

FORMATION 

The Virginia Reel is a longways formation consisting of 
six couples, the boys in one line, the girls in an opposite 
line, partners facing each other. 




152 



Betty Wliite's Teen-Age Dance Book 




Forward and Back 

Partners walk four steps forward, bow to each other, 
walk four steps back, returning to place (8 counts). 




Right Hand Around 

Partners walk forward, join right hands, turn once 
around and return to place (8 counts). 



Party Dances 




153 



Left Hand Around 

Partners walk orward, join left hands, tarn once around 
and return to place (S counts ). 




Both Hands Around 

Partners walk forward, join both hands, walk once 
around (clockwise) and return to place (S counts). 



154 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




Do-si-do (Back to Back) 



Party Dances 



155 




Down the Center and Back 

The head couple (couple number one) join hands and 
slide eight steps down center to the bottom of the set and 
slide eight steps up to the head of the set (16 counts). 

The slide step, chasse, consists of sliding sideward in 
the direction in which you are moving and dosing (trans- 
ferring the weight) with the opposite foot 



156 



Betty White's Teen- Age Dance Book 




Reel 

1. The head couple (couple number one) link right 
elbows in the center and swing once and a half around. 

2. The head lady links left elbows with gent number 
two and swings once around while the head gent links 
left elbows with lady number two and swings once 
around. 

3. The head couple (couple number one) link right 
elbows and swing once around. 

4. The head couple now travel to couple number 
three, the head lady swinging the number three gent with 
the left elbow swing, once around, the head gent swinging 
the number three lady with the left elbow swing, once 
around. 

The reel is continued, the head couple swinging in the 
center with right elbows, once around and alternating 
with each partner in the set with the left elbow swing, 
once around. The head couple swing each other half 
around as they reach the bottom of the set so that the 
lady finishes on the ladies' side and the gent on the gents' 
side ^48 counts approximately). 



Party Dances 



157 

















Up the Center 

The head couple join hands and slide eight steps up to 
the head of the set, and release hands (S counts). 



158 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




Cast off 

The head couple separate and march (cast off) down 
the outside, the head lady turning right, the ladies fol- 
lowing, the head gent turning left, the gents following, 
until the head couple meet at the bottom, followed by all 
the other couples (8 counts). 



Party Dances 



159 






no. 1 



: i f 

^y V X/ 
couple no. 6 <i^ "* 



couple no. 5 




couple no. 4 




Arch 

The head couple join hands, and raising arms, form an 
arch through which the couples pass toward the head of 
the set (8 counts). 

With couple number one now at the bottom, couple 
number two become the head couple, the dance is re- 
peated, each couple progressing to the head until the 
dance is finished. 



160 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

LA RASPA 
(MEXICAN SHUFFLE) 

Here is a dance which is guaranteed to liven up any 
party. La Raspa also known as the Mexican Shuffleis a 
traditional folk dance which can be done quite freely. 
Anyway it's worth a try! 

The Shuffle step, which is an integral part of the dance, 
consists of a leap on one foot as the other foot slides for- 
ward. The step should be mastered before you attempt to 
use it with other figures. Therefore, the following Shuffle 
steps, which are described below, should be practiced 
carefully. 

Boy or Girl 

1. Standing with weight on right foot, leap on to the 
left foot sliding the right foot forward, toe pointing 
(quick). 

2. Leap back on to the right foot sliding the left foot 
forward, toe pointing (quick). 

3. Leap back on to the left foot sliding the right foot 
forward, toe pointing (slow). 

4. Leap back on to the right foot sliding the left foot 
forward, toe pointing (quick). 

5. Leap back on to the left foot sliding the right foot 
forward, toe pointing (quick). 

6. Leap back on to the right foot sliding the left foot 
forward, toe pointing (slow). 

We have now completed one shuffle figure. 



Party Dances 161 

LA RASPA 
(MEXICAN SHLFFLE) 

Here is the dance as performed with couples in a circle. 

Partners standing opposite, holding hands, the boy faces 
the line of direction and the girl's back is toward the line 
of direction. 

Own partner: 

1. Boy and girl perform the shuffle figure as described 
4 times while jerking the arms back and forth, the 
arm following the sliding foot 

2. Hooking right elbow to right elbow, turning right, 
take 8 quick steps. 

3. Hooking left elbow to left elbow, turning left, take 
8 quick steps, 

XeiD partner: 

4. Moving on to the next partner, in circle, boy in the 
line of direction, girl against the line of direction, 
hook right elbows with new partner, turning right, 
taking 8 quick steps; hooking left elbow to left 
elbow, turning left, take S quick steps. 

1. Perform the shuffle figure with your new partner 
4 times. 

2. Hook elbows with the new partner turning to the 
right and hook elbows turning to the left 

The dance may be continued by moving on to the next 
partner, turning to the right and left, shuffling and turning 
to the right and left, ad lib. 



162 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



MEXICAN WALTZ 

For a change of pace from the other party dances try 
the Mexican Waltz. It is a charming little dance and you 
will find it easy to do and so relaxing as you dap out the 
rhythms. 

We are going to describe the footwork for the boy and 
girl simultaneously since both use the same foot 

Here is how it is done: 

Partners stand apart, holding hands, weight over right 
foot 

String across: 

1. Step to the left on the left foot and swing right leg 
across (3 counts). 

2. Step to the right on the right foot and swing left leg 
across (3 counts). 

3. Step in place on left foot (1 count), dap, clap (2 
counts). 

4. Holding hands, step to the right on the right foot 
and swing the left leg across (3 counts). 

5. Step to the left on the left foot and swing right leg 
across (3 counts). 

6. Step in place on right foot (1 count), dap, dap 
(2 counts). 



Party Dances 163 

The Sway: 

1. Holding hands, sway back on left foot (3 counts). 

2. Sway forward on right foot (3 counts). 

3. Sway back on left foot (1 count), clap, clap (2 
counts). 

4 Holding hands, sway forward on right foot (3 
counts). "" 

5. Sway back on left foot (3 counts). 

6. Sway forward on right foot (1 count}, clap, clap 
(2 counts). 

(The boy claps his hands behind the girl's waist while 
the girl claps her hands behind the boy's head.) 

The Waltz: 

Turning to the left, the boy begins to Waltz on his left 
foot, the girl changing to the left foot in order to follow 
him, starting with right foot; partners take 16 Waltz 
step (48 counts). 

The dance may now be repeated several times the 
clap, clap figures alternating with 16 Waltz steps. 

BUNNY HOP 

The Bunny Hop is a fun dance, and for those feeling 
particularly hilarious it is a sure-fire thing. 

The dance consists of heel and toe steps and Bunny 
Hops, done in single file around the room, led by one of 
the dancers. During the heel and toe steps the dancers 
have their hands clasped around the waist of the person 
in front of them in line. On the Bunny Hops they release 
hands from the waist and put the hands in front of them 
like bunny paws (hands hanging from wrists). 



164 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

Boy or Girl 

Heel and toe: 

1. With toes pointed up, place the left foot diagonally 
forward, heels touching floor (slow). 

2. Bring the left foot diagonally back, toes touching 
the floor (slow). 

3. With toes pointed up, place the left foot diagonally 
forward, heels touching the floor (slow). 

4. Bring the left foot diagonally back, placing the 
weight on it (slow). 

The entire figure may now be repeated to the right, 
beginning with the right foot, and ending with weight on 
right foot 

The hops: 

1. Hop forward on both feet releasing hands (slow). 

2. Hop forward on both feet (slow). 

3. Hop forward on both feet in bunny position 
(quick). 

4. Hop forward on both feet (quick). 

5. Hop forward on both feet (slow). 



16. 



'cuice 



For downright fun and sociability nothing can eqi:al 
a Square Dance. It is the one occasion which gives every- 
body a chance to "get in the act/' And it is as typically 
American as our free way of life. 

Like any social skill, however, which involves partici- 
pation with other people, some preliminary knowledge is 
necessary. And for the beginner in Square Dancing a 
knowledge and practice of the basic figures is an absolute 
must. Remember, Square Dancing really moves along, so 
it is important for you to know your otcn part in order to 
keep up with the "set" (four couples . It isn't enough 
to know the figures. One must be able to execute them as 
rapidly as the caller reels them off. The following figures 
will enable you to get going. 

165 



166 



Betty WWte's Teen-Age Dance Book 



head couple 




side 
couple 




THE BAND 



THE BASIC FIGURES 



A SET 



A set consists of four couples who face the center of the 
square. Each boy stands with the girl at his right side. The 
head couple at home base stand with their backs to the 
caller. 



Square Dance 




CORXERS 

For the boy the lady on your left is your corner. 
For the girl the boy on your right is your corner. 



covpUs 
no*. 1 &4 




coup!* 
no. 2 



TO PROGRESS IX A SET 

The word progress in a set means to go visiting. Couples 
travel in a counterclockwise direction. 



168 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

Couple number one begin the figure. They move to the 
right to visit couple number two. After dancing with cou- 
ple number two, couple number one move on to couple 
number three. (Couple number two remain in place.) The 
same procedure is followed with couples number three 
and four. After dancing with couple number four couple 
number one return to the home base. 

Each couple in turn go visiting, progressing around the 
set until the dance has been completed. 




HONOB YOUR PARTNER 

Honor your partner means to bow to your partner. 

The boy turns toward his right, bending slightly from 
the waist as he bows to his partner. 

The girl turns toward her left and curtsies to her 
partner. A curtsy consists of stepping on the left foot, 
bending the left knee while the right toe is tucked behind 
the left heel. 



Square Dance 169 




EIGHT HANDS AROUND 



Eight hands around is the call for circling to the 
The four couples join hands and walk around clockwise. 




BACK THE OTHER WAY 



Back the other way means to circle right. The four 
couples reverse the direction, walking counterclockwise. 

SWING YOUR PARTNER 

Swing your partner, as the call implies, means to turn 
with your partner in one spot in a clockwise direction. 

Position of the Boy and Girl 

Facing in opposite directions right side to right side, 
and with the feet slightly apart, stand with the weight 
forward on the right foot, outside edge of soles almost 



170 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

touching. The right arm circles the girl's waist. The left 
hand clasps the girl's right hand with the arms extended 
in a curve slightly below shoulder level. The girl's left 
hand rests on the boy's right shoulder. 




How to Swing Your Partner Boy and Girl 

Stand with the weight forward on the right foot. Step 
slightly forward on the ball of the left foot, raise the right 
heel and pivot (turn) on the ball of the right foot; lower 
the right heel. 

Repeat continuing to push with the left foot while 
pivoting firmly on the ball of the right foot, and you will 
have no difficulty in turning on one spot. Lean away 
slightly from each other as you turn and you will find it 
easier to maintain your balance. 



Square Dance 



171 




ALLEMAXDE LEFT 



Allemande left is a. left hand turn with corners. 

Boy and Girl 

Face your "comer." Clasp left hands, walk around 
counterclockwise making a complete turn, return to place. 



172 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




BIGHT AND LEFT 



Grand Right and Left 



The boys walk in a circle, counterclockwise, the girls 
walk clockwise, each clasping hands as they meet. 

How to Do It 

Partners face each other, clasp right hands, and walk- 
ing past each other, each gives the left hand to the next 
person; the right hand to the next, the left hand to the 
next until each returns to his original place. 



Square Dance 



173 




PROMENADE 

Promenade means to walk around the set. 
Boy and Girl 

Facing in a counterclockwise direction, standing side 
by side, cross arms, joining right hand with rightf hand, 
left hand with left hand (skater's position) and march 
once around the set until you reach your original place. 

PRACTICE 

There's bound to be a Square Dance enthusiast among 
your teen-age friends who can go over the basic "calls" 
with you. Better still, get a group together and form a 
set and walk through the figures. It's more fun that way 
and may even provide an opportunity for some teen-ager 
to do a little "calling" on his own. And be sure to wear 
light, porous clothing and comfortable shoes while you 
practice. 



174 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

THE MUSIC 

The customary music for Square Dancing is jigs 
and reels-usually in 2/4 /"""3 ^"""3 or 6 /8 
j j j j j ) time. The music accompanies the 
"calls." Frequently about eight measures of music are 
played as the "caller 9 announces the dance. And that will 
be your signal to join a set. 

Your cue for starting on time will be given by the caller 
about two measures in advance. By listening to the caller 
as you dance, you will automatically get through on time 
without having to count the beats in the music. Keep alert 
to the calls and you will be dancing in perfect rhythm to 
the music. 

USIXG ADDITIONAL FIGURES 

Having learned the basic figures that have just been 
described, you are now ready to go out on the floor and 
participate in any of the figures which go to make up a 
Square Dance. The following are among the most popu- 
lar with the average teen-ager: 

"BIRDIE IN THE CAGE" 
^CKASE THE RABBIT** 



"BUFFALO BOYS" 



AROUND THAT COUPLE AND TAKE A PEEK* 

"DIVE FOR THE OYSTER" 

"THE BASKET" 

"THE STAR" 

The easiest way to learn these figures is to get right in 
and do them. Some familiarity, however, with a Square 



Square Dance 175 

Dance book or record album before the dance can help 
considerably to get you through. Whatever you do to "get 
in the act" practice. 

And finally, for the teen-ager who is really zocd, here 
are a few pointers which should enable even him to be- 
come an expert Square Dancer. 

Wait for the caller. 

If you get behind on a call, slap that figure and 
catch up with the others. 

( The main thing is to stay with the caller. } 
If you get ahead, wait in place for the next figure. 
If you are a beginner, stick to side couples. 
(You can observe the head couple perform first.) 

Stay in a set until the caller is through. 

And, of course, you will remember to say "thank 
you" as you leave the set 



ORGANIZING A SQUARE DANCE 

You should decide right from the startwhether you 
are going to aim for a big jamboree or a small gathering. 
The number of sets will determine the size of the hall 
and the setup in the choice of caller and music, 

TH K CALXJER 

The caller is of first importance, for in addition to call- 
ing he may have to teach the figures and act as master of 
ceremonies. It is his job to hold the groups together and 
direct the band. However, if you can't budget for a 



176 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

professional caller and band, the next best thing is to 
settle for a person in the community who can handle the 
calls. And make no mistake experienced amateur callers 
can do a first-rate job. The caller will need, as a basic, 
minimum requirement a pianist to accompany the calls. 
If you are planning for more than thirty-two people 
(four sets) it will be necessary to have a microphone so 
that the caller can be heard. 



TEDS MUSIC 

The ideal setup for any Square Dance is to have 
calling and music but if that is not practicable records 
can be used. Beginners, however, will have some diffi- 
culty in following records on account of the speed of the 
calls and a certain amount of acoustical distortion. If you 
are planning for a large gathering amplifiers will have to 
be used. The great advantage of hiring a caller and 
musician is that the responsibility for running the pro- 
gram is in their hands. But if you are planning the 
program and records are to be used, some care will have 
to be exercised in the choice of calls. 

RECORDS 

You will need an all-around collection of slow, fast, 
easy and difficult calls to keep everyone happy. And it 
will be wise to have one set (four couples) familiarize 
themselves with the calls on the records for demonstra- 
tion purposes before the dance. Much time and effort 
can be saved at the dance if one set can walk through 
the different figures. And the process of helping beginners 
on the floor can be speeded up if the more experienced 
couples can join the less experienced sets. 



Square Dance 177 

THE DANCES 

Start off with slow, easy dances for warmins up. After 
the groups have gone into action they can progress to the 
faster, more difficult calls. And for variety an occasional 
"circle" or "longways" dance can be inserted; for example, 
the Virginia Reel. 

Occasionally a request is made for "round" dancing, so 
it might be wise to have a collection of Waltzes, Foxtrots, 
and Polkas on hand. Round dances, however, should be 
used sparingly. The purpose of a Square Dance, after all, 
is to give everyone a chance to dance with his friends and 
neighbors. And if round dances are introduced too fre- 
quently the dancers tend to pair cfi in couples. 

After you have organized your first Square Dance yon 
will find the going easy. And you will be amply rewarded 
by the results good fellowship and a sense of belonging 
through sharing. This is the spirit of the American Square 
Dance! 



17. -AtMome 



There is no better way of learning the responsibilities 
of a good host or hostess than giving dances in your own 
home. At all times, even when you are the host or hostess, 
you are still the guest of your father and mother. 

Try, therefore, to keep in mind the limitations of space 
and furniture in planning for decorations and refresh- 
ments. However enthusiastic the family may be regarding 
your plans, a dance at home means a certain amount of 
wear and tear for all concerned. So do be considerate in 
your demands. 

And since a dance is, after all, a reciprocal affair 
between the hostess and the guestit might be helpful for 
you to check the following. 

THE HOSTESS 

INVITATIONS 

Before making any final decision as to time and date, 
consult the family to be sure your plan will not conflict 

178 



At Home 179 

with family routine. The invitations may be extended by- 
word of mouth, telephone, or written note. 



DECORATIONS 

Since entertaining at home is a strictly private affair, it 
is your one chance to be as individual as you wish. But 
use some care in attaching decorations. Use a transparent 
tape or thumb tacks sparingly to avoid defacing the walls 
or furniture. 



BEFRESHMEXIS 

Try to keep refreshments simple and within the family 
budget. If you are not going to plan for homemade punch 
and cookies, refreshments will have to be ordered suffi- 
ciently ahead to allow time to store and prepare them for 
serving. And if you are going to request the use of the 
family icebox be sure to request a shelf in advance. It 
might be wise to use paper cups and accessories instead 
of using the family china. But you know best! 



MUSIC 

The phonograph should have a last-minute checkup 
and an adequate supply of records. If you do not have 
an all-around dance collection get a teen-age friend who 
is a disc jockey to lend you his. If the TV or radio is to 
be used, make a list of the programs broadcast for the 
periods during which you will be dancing. And keep a 
supply on hand of the more sentimental, croony numbers 
as "conversation pieces." After all, your friends will want 
to sit down once in a while. 



180 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



PLACE FOR WRAPS 

If you are one of those lucky teen-agers who has a 
rumpus room in the basement with a closet adjacent, your 
problem of where to hang wraps will be relatively easy. 
Failing that possibility, permission should be asked of the 
family for the use of a closet. And if even that space is at 
a premium the girls can leave their wraps in a bedroom. 
Whatever slight inconveniences may arise, the family will 
cheerfully accept. But traffic through the house should be 
kept to a minimum. 

SPOTS FOR GUESTS* CARS 

It is good planning to have a friend close at hand who 
can direct guests where to leave their cars as they arrive. 
Driveways both yours and the neighbors' should be left 
clear. And parking regulations for the roadway should be 
observed. 



INTRODUCTIONS TO OWN FAMILY 

Whenever a member of the family appears, friends 
should be presented. And that goes for small fry too! 

RESPONSIBILITY TOWARD NEIGHBORS 

It shouldn't cramp your style too much to remember 
the neighbors. So, keep noise down to a reasonable mini- 
mum. The radio or phonograph should not be played too 
loudlv. 



At Home 181 

PUTTING HOUSE IX OEDEH 

Since "many hands make light work" it will be easier 
and pleasanter to clean up and restore order with some 
of your friends than to try to do that chore after even-one 
has gone home. Naturally., the furniture will be put back 
exactly where it was and the rooms left spick and span. 

SEEING GUESTS OFF 

Since there is a deadline for even the best of parties, it 
will be wise for you to indicate that a little before closing 
time. A tactful reminder will round up even the "hangers- 
on/* After you have helped friends with their wraps and 
said "good nights'* it will still be your responsibility to see 
that they get off. 

THAXKIXG PARENTS FOR USE OF HOME 

Next to their knowing you had a wonderful time, noth- 
ing would give the family greater pleasure than to have 
you say "thank you" for the privilege and fun of giving a 
dance in your own home. Try it! It really works! 

THE GlEST 

RESPONSE TO ES^TTAITOX 

All invitations should be accepted or declined prompt- 
ly. And under no circumstances should a guest fail to 
attend a dance at the last minute without notifying the 
hostess. If an emergency arises that prevents you from 
calling personally, ask a member of your family to do so. 



182 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



PROPER DRESS 

Since a dance at home is usually informal, semif ormal 
dress is indicated. But if you are in doubt as to what to 
wear, call your hostess. 

LEAVE CAR IN CONVENIENT SPOT 

If you are in a dilemma as to where to park the car, ask 
your hostess. And if she is engaged, ask some responsible 
person who can indicate a convenient spot. 

ARRIVE OX TIME AND ACKNOWLEDGE HOSTESS 

As soon as you arrive and have disposed of wraps find 
your hostess at once and greet her. But do not detain her 
beyond expressing your pleasure for having been invited, 
since other guests will be waiting to greet her. 

PARnOPATEON IN GROUP 

Make yourself a part of the group as soon as you can. 
Since there is usually some visiting and small talk going 
on before the dance gets under away, use the opportunity 
to get acquainted. Keep conversation at a maximum! Try 
to co-operate with the hostess when "Mixers'* and play 
party games are on. And in general, keep a bird's-eye 
view" of everything that's going on. 

HELPING TO CLEAN UP 

One of the best ways to "end a party with a bang" is 
cleaning up. Not only do you have the pleasure of help- 



At Home 183 

ing your hostess but there's always the fun or comparing 
notes as to who did what! 



THANKING HOSTESS 

Of course, you wouldn't think of leaving a dance with- 
out saying "thank you" to your hostess. 



USAVE ON TIME 

Next to one who arrives on time, no guest is appreciated 
as much as one who leaves on time! 



COXSIDERA.TION FOR NEIGHBORS OX LEAVING 

Whether you are about to walk or drive home, remem- 
ber the neighbors. They will be grateful the following 
morning! 

MEETING THE FAMILY DEADLINE FOR GETTING HOME 

You do have a responsibility toward the family for get- 
ting back at the time agreed upon. But if you are detained 
or an emergency arises, phone the family at once. Let 
them decide the next move. 




18. 



A public dance is a much more complicated affair 
than a dance at home, so it will be necessary to go into 
some detail. A dance doesn't run itself, and unless it is 
well organized it will fall apart. You can be sure that 
any dance you attended that was really successful meant 
plenty of boning on the part of the committees as well as 
zip and imagination. 

There are two aspects to consider in setting up any 
good dance. First, the business or organizational end 
which forms the backbone for the "behind the scenes" 
work. Second, the social aspect choosing a social direc- 
tor, hostesses, ushers, etc. And both of these objectives 
must dovetail for a dance to run smoothly. 

As soon as you have decided on the kind of dance 
you will want, begin at once to appoint your committees. 

ORGANIZATION COMMITTEES 

TICKETS 

There is no more important aspect in organizing a 
dance than the handling of tickets. It is an exacting job, 
so some care will have to be exercised in choosing the 

184 



Public Dance 



185 



members for such a committee. Tickets will have to be 
printed, distributed, and collected upon admission, And 
a record should be kept of the entire sale of tickets. 

Before tickets are printed, a committee member should 
contact the local collector of internal revenue to obtain 
information about the federal admissions tax and to 
check the requirements for daiming a tax exemption. If 
all the proceeds of a dance are to go exclusively toward 
a benefit for the school or church an exemption may be 
claimed. Otherwise, an admissions tax will have to be 
paid in order to comply with the regulations c the 
federal tax law. 




MUSIC 



Hiring a Band 

If you are going to hire a band it will be necessary for 
the committee to shop around and get estimates. And 



186 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

keep in mind the style of the music the band plays since 
music is such an integral part of the dance. 

Juke Box 

It is good planning to have at least one or two disc 
jockeys to take care of the record situation. One mem- 
ber of the committee should be appointed to run the 
machine and possibly another to list the choice of records 
to be used. Finally, the machine and record collection 
should be checked before the dance gets under way. 

DECORATION 

Don't forget it takes more than a flair for decorating 
to function as a committee. Materials will have to be 
budgeted for and measurements taken of both the room 
and table before purchases are made. And if refreshments 
are to be served utensils and accessories should be pro- 
vided by the decoration committee. 



TTie committee members should decide what refresh- 
ments are suitable. If homemade snacks and punch are 
not to be provided it will be necessary to budget for out- 
side refreshments and to order well in advance. A few 
members should be appointed to serve refreshments and 
to keep supplies replenished. 

CHECKING WEAPS 

The committee should know in advance what equip- 
ment is available for disposing of wraps. If a checking 



Public Dance 187 

system is to be used, details such as check stubs* 
gratuities, etc., should also be arranged for. It Is go 3d 
planning to have the same members "check out" guests* 
wraps as well as "in." 



CLEAN UP 

Xo committee performs a more vital function than the 
cleanup squad. So appoint stable, responsible members 
with a flair for housekeeping. And try to recruit a mem- 
ber of the decoration committee to help take down 
decorations before cleaning up. 



PUBLICITY 

Every effort should be made to co-ordinate the various 
activities of the members of the committee. In addition 
to handling a mailing list the members may have to 
handle distribution of posters, printed or mimeographed 
announcements. And a follow-up group should see that 
announcements are posted. Every means should be used 
to publicize the dance including the school magazines, 
local papers, and word of mouth. Talk about it* In 
addition, each member of the committee should be re- 
sponsible for disposing of a certain amount of tickets. 
And if an advertising bill has to be met one person 
should be appointed to handle it 

Sounds like a "tall order," doesn't it, but it's the pub- 
licity and public relations job that sells a dance. Extra 
effort may mean the difference between a mediocre or a 
completely successful affair! 



188 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

Although the size of a dance determines how special- 
ized the functions are of the various members of a social 
committee, the members should be chosen for their social 
assetstact, a sense of humor, and a talent for getting 
along with other people. Chaperones, hostesses, and 
ushers will be required to keep the dance running 
smoothly, and a good social director is a must! 

A social director should know at a glance what is going 
on every minute. The most important asset is a sense of 
timing. Lightning decisions will have to be made at any 
moment to keep things moving. And "Mixers" and play 
party games will have to be run during the slack periods 
at a good, snappy pace in order to hold the group to- 
gether. Prizes and "Props" such as tickets for lucky 
number dances should be organized in advance. The 
director will also have to show when refreshments 
should be served. Altogether, it is an exacting job, so con- 
siderable thought should be given to the choosing of a 
social director. 

A few wisely chosen chaperones in the background 
will add prestige to a dance and be of assistance in 
meeting emergencies illness, for example. Invitations to 
chaperones should be extended in advance of the event, 
and for those who are not participating on the dance 
floor, suitable facilities should be provided in the way of 
self-entertainmentcards, tables, and chairs, etc. 

The chief function of hostesses and ushers is to receive 
guests, effect introductions, and smooth over difficult 
situations. By being in circulation on the floor at all times, 
they become an integral part of the dance. They should 



Public Dance 189 

also be ready to be on call at any tlrae the social director 
may need them. Ushers acting as ^stags" should keep 
girls without partners in circulation. However, relief of 
assisting "stags" should be provided for, 



SCHOOL DA3CE 

The school dance should be the easiest one of all to 
plan for since it is usually held on 'tome territory/* A 
committee will have to be organized, a date set. and 
permission requested for the use of the school building. 
Preparations for the dance, and, what is equally impor- 
tant, cleaning up afterward, should be planned for so as 
not to conflict with other school activities. Care will have 
to be exercised in using school equipment including the 
putting up of decorations. The custodian should be ad- 
vised of your plans and consulted if any problems arise. 
And some sort of acknowledgment should be made for 
his services. And, of course, you will remember to say 
"thank you" to the staff either during or after the dance! 



PROJ1 

The junior or senior prom is the high spot of school 
life. And while everyone looks f orward to it as the gayest, 
most glamorous occasion, it can also cause considerable 
anxiety if not properly organized or planned from a social 
standpoint. 

Whether the prom is to be held at school, a hotel ball- 
room, or a banquet hall will be pretty much determined 
by the pocketbook. The budget does have a sobering 
effect! But whatever degree of grandeur you decide on* 



190 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

stick by it! Make up your mind once and for all what 
you are going to wear and whom you are going to invite 
as escort. 

If the prom is to be held at school the affair can be 
relatively simple. There is the usual committee work, 
hiring of band, decorations, refreshments, etc., and 
corsages! Since dress is formal you can be as elaborate 
as you choose! However, if a big affair is in the offing, 
the following information will be found helpful. 

First of all an estimate should be made by a financial 
committee to determine a budget. The faculty can be 
helpful in this respect because of their past experience. 
By all means include them in the discussion! 

A committee member should get in touch with a 
reservation clerk to inquire about the cost of hiring a 
hall, orchestra, and banquet facilities. As soon as the 
committee has decided where the prom is to be held a 
date and hour should be set and a reservation made 
through the banquet manager's secretary. Such details 
as type of music, kinds of beverages and refreshments, 
decorations, photographer (if any), checking facilities 
should be discussed at that interview. If you are going 
to bring in your own decorations, the hotel should be 
notified, for if a hotel assumes responsibility for decor a 
fee will be involved. 

Gratuities are usually included in the bill when it is 
rendered. But if a hotel does not assume responsibility 
for gratuities for checkroom employees, each guest 
should be responsible for his own tipping. If a reception 
is to be arranged in the foyer that should be planned 
too. As usual, the social committee will provide chaper- 
ones, hostesses, and ushers to function during the entire 
evening. 



Public Dance \g\ 

Now if all these details connected with, a prom seern 
a little staggering, don't get discouraged. Remember that 
once the business of running a prom is out of yc'jr 
hands and that is why you have hired experienced hotel 
personnel you can afford to relax, look starry-eyed, and 
just dream about it all. A prom is the social climax of 
your school life, so for once you can aim high! 



CHIRCH DA3CE 

One of the nicest things about a church dance is the 
opportunity it provides for meeting friends and neigh- 
bors from other churches and schools. The church dance 
need not be confined to friends of immediate contact as 
is so often the case at school, but can be an excuse for 
rounding out one's social life. 

After a committee has been formed a member should 
contact the pastor or his secretary for permission to use 
the church. In setting a date the church calendar should 
be checked so as to avoid overlapping with other activi- 
ties including preparations for the dance. The sexton 
should be consulted as to use of church equipment. And 
if heavy demands are to be made on his time, some form 
of gratuity should be provided. Saturday nights should 
be avoided so as not to conflict with preparations for 
Sunday services. A certain amount of decorum should be 
exercised both on entering and leaving the premises and, 
naturally, while the dance is in progress. Finally, some 
member of the committee should be appointed to express 
appreciation for the privilege of using the church either 
verbally or through a written note. 



192 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

DINNER OR SUPPER DANCE 

Since both the dinner and supper dance fall under the 
classification of "dining out/' the procedure for either 
will vary little. 

The dinner dance is usually scheduled from 6 to 10:30 
P.M. 

The supper dance from 10:30 P.M. 

Inquiry should be made as to the type of orchestra, 
entertainment, time of show, cover charge (if any), and 
menu, when a reservation is made. The date and hour of 
arrival should be given to the reservation clerk as well as 
the number of guests to be provided for. Dress is optional. 

Upon arrival, wraps will be checked. The guests will 
then proceed to the dining room and be escorted to their 
tables by the headwaiter. If a large group is present it 
will be simpler for one person to handle the tipping 
situation as well as settling for the bill. The customary 
fee for tipping is 15 per cent. 

Upon leaving give check stubs to attendant or claim 
your own wraps. 

DANCE HALL 

A dance hall offers an excellent opportunity for the 
teen-age dance enthusiast to "go dancing" without the 
usual interruptions of "dining out." Since music and danc- 
ing are continuous, the opportunities for practice are 
unlimited. Tickets are purchased upon admission, but 
check the age requirements before setting out. Many 
dance halls will not admit anyone under eighteen years! 
And be sure the hall has a good reputation. (In certain 
regions dance halls are a part of the social life of the 



Public Dance 193 

community, and in other areas dance halls are not ac- 
cepted. Your parents, therefore, should be consulted for 
their approval) 

Since a dance hall is strictly a public affair, social con- 
tacts should be limited to one's own group. Seats are 
provided, however, for those who wish to sit it out. And 
most of the halls provide some simple refreshments in the 
way of beverages. 



Decoration can be a lot of fun or a nightmare. Every- 
thing depends on how carefully you have planned from 
a practical as well as decorative standpoint. 

The most important fact to consider in decorating is 
the size and shape of the hall in which the dance is to be 
held. Is the room long and narrow, square, large or small? 
And does the room include a stage, balcony, or overhead 
equipment? What about windows and lighting fixtures? 
Each of these areas should be checked so that accurate 
measurements may be taken. And if you are dealing with 
an unwieldy room a small scale model should be made; 
it will help visually and prevent wastage of material. 

Since the average school dance is held in a gymnasium, 
church auditorium, or hotel ballroom certain problems 
are bound to arise from a decorating standpoint. The 
gymnasium, however, will present the greatest challenge. 
There is frequently the problem of a too-high ceiling and 
overhead equipment ropes, ladders, and basketball 
stands. 

Crepe paper provides an easy way out in dealing with 
these trouble spots. A ceiling, for instance, can be low- 
ered and overhead equipment hidden by extending crepe 
paper horizontally from wall to wall. In addition, crepe 

194 



Decorations 195 

paper creates a soft, luminous lighting effect and disposes 
of the problem of what to do about overhead lighting 
fixtures. Streamers and balloons may also be hung ver- 
tically to give an even more intimate atmosphere. And 
some imagination can be shown in dealing with walls, 
oversize windows and the usual basketball nets. Seasonal 
flowers can be used as well as paper streamers and 
balloons to camouflage these areas. Be s-jre. however, to 
hang decorations sufficiently high to clear the dancers' 
heads. Balloons in particular become a hazard when 
hung within reach! 

Bunting may be used in the same manner to decorate a 
hall. It is especially suitable for draping a stage, balcony, 
or pillars. If bunting is used for overhead decorations, 
wire should be extended from wall to wall to help sup- 
port the weight of the material. 

For the more gala occasions a prcm or the usual round 
of holiday dances other materials may be substituted: 
cellophane, plastics, and paper with luminous coatings. 
These materials, however, should not be attached to any- 
thing which may prove to be a are hazard-lighting fix- 
tures, for example. 

When you are ready to decorate arm yourself with all 
the necessary implements: scissors, scotch tape, ham- 
mer, tacks, ladder, wire, string, etc. And be sure to al- 
low yourself plenty of time before the dance for deco- 
rating. There's nothing more narrowing than trying to 
beat the deadline for the opening of the dance, while 
still having to allow time for getting home for supper and 
sprucing up. 



196 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

BE ORIGINAL 

Even though you may be working with "leftovers" try 
experimenting with different kinds of materials. (Don't 
keep relying on the usual strips of crepe paper dangling 
from the ceiling.) Try to "tie in" accessories with the 
general decorating scheme: for example, tickets, tags, 
party favors, etc. The decoration of a refreshment table 
provides a grand opportunity for carrying out the general 
motif. 

DO SOMETHING DASHING 

For instance, you might consider a "dancing in the 
dark" motif using luminous paper for decorations, ac- 
cessories; flashlights or luminous flowers for "cutting in." 
You could achieve an equally dramatic effect by choosing 
a winter carnival as a theme, using all white decora- 
tions. Artificial snow or confetti could be used as back- 
ground material and a few well-placed spotlights add 
sparkle and glamour. Crepe paper snowballs could be 
used for accents and as props for "cutting in." 

Whatever the occasion, and however simple or elabo- 
rate your decorating scheme may be do use your 
imagination! 

Finally, be sure of your measurements before buying. 
Too little material is bad. 
Too much is wasteful 

Consult your local merchant for available stock. And 
whenever possible, buy fi reproof decorations. 



The type of refreshments to be served \vi!l be deter- 
mined by the formality of the dance. Refreshments on 
range from bottled soda taken on the ran ta sand- 
wiches, punch beverages, or ice crearn. Everything de- 
pends on the occasion and the budget! 

For an informal dance snacks or beverages, requiring 
no further preparation or handling after deliver}-, are 
ideal. Bottled soda and cookies will be found quite satis- 
fyingas a minimum and equally nutritious/'Hot dogs" 9 
and hamburgers can be fun if they are prepared on the 
outside. But stay away from hot snacks unless they are 
prepared outside. At best, they are a hazard. 

Sandwiches, punch, cake, and ice cream can be planned 
for the more formal dance. And allow plenty of time 
for preparations. Preparing mixtures or fillers for sand- 
wiches always takes more time than anticipated. And the 
ingredients that go into a good punch require some 
thought Refrigerators should be provided for all foods 
and beverages. But if it is not practicable to provide 
"cold storage/* last minute preparations will have to be 
made for icing the punch and getting the ice cream ready 
to serve. Better appoint a committee member to check 
last-minute deliveries ice cream or soda, for example. 

197 



198 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



Some member of the committee should check table 
decorations. The decorating committee has furnished, or 
should have, cups, plates, napkins-taep plenty on hand 
and spoons and forks, if required. 

Next to providing food that is appetizing and easy to 
handle, nothing is of greater importance than the manner 
in which it is served. There are two ways to serve refresh- 
ments: 

AT TABLES 

where the guests are seated and wall either be served or 
wait on themselves; 



BUEFET 



the guests visiting the buffet table at any suitable time 
to serve their partners or help themselves. 

The time at which refreshments are to be served 
should be indicated by the social director or head 
hostess. 

And don't forget to see that chaperones and faculty 
members are served first. 

The band will be glad to be remembered, too, 



21. JrdeaA f 




or 



Wouldn't you like to try some new ideas for admission 
to a dance instead of the usual "Tickets please at the 
door"? And since everyone attending a dance expects 
to pay his own way, how about making the price of 
admission a password or a slogan, etc.? 

We are going to offer some original suggestions for 
admission to help you plan an exciting program. The 
following suggestions will be fully described: tickets, 
donations, personality tie-ups, guessing, weighing in, 
and class or grades. 

We are sure your teen-age friends will be surprised 
and amused at what goes on upon admission. And after 
you have tried out our ideas, be sure to devise some 
stunts of your own. 

TICKETS 

Although printed tickets are customary for admission 
to a dance, why not try something new? How about 
varying the color and the shape of a ticket? 

The decorating scheme, a school dance following a 
ball game, for instance, or a holiday, offer a grand oppor- 
tunity for creating something novel For example, a heart- 

199 



200 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

shaped ticket could be used at a Valentine Dance. A 
ticket in the shape of a football could be used at a dance 
after a game. 

The possibilities for new ideas are endless, and carry- 
ing out these ideas will be found quite inexpensive. So 
set your imagination at work! 



DONATIONS 

Donations may take a variety of forms other than 
money. For example, refreshments may be offered as a 
donation and will help defray the expenses incurred for 
the dance. Each guest may bring a bottle of soda or a 
box of cookies. And the juke box collection can be en- 
larged by an occasional donation of a record. 

Prizes may also be donated to help make the lucky 
number dance more exciting. Lollipops, lemons, apples, 
or balloons could be donated to take care of the mixers. 

The preceding suggestions are offered to help stimulate 
some thought along these lines. So try thinking up some 
ideas of your own. 

PERSONALITY TIE-UPS 

For something really different in the way of a stunt 
we suggest personality tie-ups as a means of free ad- 
mission. And if the stunt is kept a secret until admission, 
the guests will be delightfully surprised. 

Guests may be chosen for admission on the basis of 
color of eyes or hair. And personal clothing offers an 
excellent opportunity for diversity in color. Ties, socks, 
and shoes, for instance, offer quite a wide latitude. 

The Committee, for example, could admit .blondes 
while penalizing brunettes for the price of admission (or 



Ideas for Admission 201 

the other way round). Boys wearing a certain color of 
tie or socks could also be admitted on this basis. Even 
jewelry, for example, a class pin or ring, could serve as a 
means of admission. 

Now that we have offered you these suggestions, what 
are your ideas on the subject? 

GUESSING 

Everyone likes to play a game of guessing. So you 
might try guessing the age or weight of your guests as 
a means of admission. By not guessing the right age or 
weight, the committee would be penalized by having 
to admit the guest without charge. 

Passwords or slogans could also be used, the Com- 
mittee agreeing in advance on what the words will be. 
The guest who flunked on guessing the password or 
slogan would be charged the price of admission. 

And, now, how about doing some guessing stunt on 
your own? 

WEIGHING IN 

If you can borrow the school scale, you can have fun 
weighing your guests upon their arrival at the dance. 
Those weighing above a specified number of pounds 
agreed upon by the committee could be charged for the 
price of admission. Guests whose weigjbt falls below that 
number could be admitted free. Or just the opposite. 

CLASS OR GRADES 

If the attendance for the school dance has begun to 
slump, you might try admitting a whole class or grade 
without charging admission. Naturally, the class or 



202 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

grade agreed upon by the committee will have to be 
kept a dark secret. And since everyone likes to "take a 
chance" you will probably end up by having a big turn- 
out. At least, it's worth a tiyl 





22. 



We now arrive at the Grand March the high spot of 
any dance. We are going to discuss the leader's role in 
organizing a Grand March and describe fully the various 
formations in the following order: platoons, the ser- 
pentine, the arch, and tunneling. Some mention will 
be made about the star formation. 

It is not necessary for a leader to use the Grand March 
formations in the order in which they will be described 
in the following section. A leader should feel perfectly 
free at any moment to make changes in the progression 
of the formations. And to add zest to a dance, some new 
formations should be tried. 

PRACTICING THE GRAND MARCH 

What's a dance without a Grand March! It's like a cake 
without icing. And the first thing a Grand March calls for 
is a good leader. Just as a band needs a drum major to 
keep time, a Grand March requires a leader who can 
call out and direct the various figures. The Grand March 
is after all the climax of any social affair so everyone will 
want to be in it. And what could be more fun than lode- 
ing arms with one's friends and just marching down the 
floor to a good, snappy tune? 

203 



204 



Betty WMte's Teen-Age Dance Book 

back of room 




front of room 

The time at which the March should be called will 
depend on the enthusiasm of the group. As soon as the 
guests request a Grand March the leader should follow 
through. If the leader is sufficiently lucky to have a 
group that is familiar with the Grand March figures, he 
can start with a bang. There's always some eager beaver 
who wants to head up the March. But failing a volunteer, 
the leader can appoint someone. If the guests, however, 
are not familiar with the various platoons or figures, it 
will be wise to coach about four couples in advance who 
can later help lead up the March. (There's always a 
nucleus of cheer leaders or band members to choose 
from who are familiar with March formations.) 

Before the leader announces the Grand March to the 



Grand March 2Q5 

guests a couple should be ready to head up the March. 
The band is informed in advance so that it is ready to 
start. As soon as the leader has announced the Grand 
March the band starts wanning up, the head couple 
rise and march in a circle, counterclockwise, and the 
guests follow behind. The leader at this point is in the 
center of the floor to hold the group together and to 
direct the head couple for the next figure. 

Since under even ideal conditions some guests will 
have missed the cue for the March, it will be necessary to 
keep marching in the circle until all the guests have 
caught up. Stragglers should wait until the line passes 
and drop in from behind. 

From now on the leader takes over, and his ability 
to anticipate the various calls and call them out clearly 
will determine the success of the March. 

Since the platoon formation marching abreast is the 
most spontaneous and natural way to continue the 
March, the leader will probably start off in the tradi- 
tional way with platoons. All such formations will 
shape up or begin at the back of the room although the 
call will have been given by the leader to the head 
couple at the front, where the lines usually divide to 
prepare for the following figure. Whether the leader 
prefers to remain at the front in one spot and call out 
the figure or march backward each time in front of the 
head couple is of little importance. Hie main thing is for 
the head couple to hear the next figure and keep alert 
to the various changes in calls. Any hesitancy on the part 
of the head couple will throw off the couples behind 
and result in confusion. And a Grand March that doesn't 
have a crisp, snappy look isn't worth the effort So here 
we gol 



206 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



PLATOONS 

FIGURE I 

The leader calls to the head couple, "Down the Cen- 
ter and Divide/' As the head couple, the line following, 
reach the center of the back of the room they make a 
sharp left turn, march forward and divide at the front 
of the room, the girls turning right, the boys turning 
left; the lines proceeding toward the back walL 



back of room 




front of room 



Grand March 



207 



FIGURE 



Continuing in single file up the room, the head ccuple 
meet in the center, clasp arms, and inarch cbv.n the 
floor, couples following two abreast. Or. reaching ike 
front of the room, the head couple turn right the sec- 
ond couple in line turn left, each couple alternating 
right and left; the lines proceeding toward the back 
wall 



back of room 




front of room 



208 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

FIGURE III 



Continuing in two columns up the room, the head 
couples meet in the center, clasp arms, and march down 
the floor, four abreast, couples following, and divide at 
the bottom, the head couple on the right turning right, 
the head couples on the left turning left, the line fol- 
lowing, couple in turn alternating right and left; the 
lines proceeding toward the back wall. 




FIGURE IV 

Continuing in two columns up the room, the head 
couples meet in the center, clasp arms, and march down 
the floor, four abreast, couples following. On reaching 
the front of the room, the head couples turn right, the 
couples in the second line turn left, the line following, 
couples alternating right and left; the lines proceed- 
ing toward the back walL 




Grand March 



209 



FIGUBE V 



Continuing in two columns np the room, the head 
couples meet in the center, clasp arms, and inarch dcv.n 
the floor, eight abreast, the line following, and divide 
at the bottom, the two head couples on the right turz> 
ing right, the two head couples on the left turning 
left, the line following, dividing right and left; the 
lines proceeding toward the back wall 




210 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

FIGURE VI 



Continuing in two columns up the room, the head 
couples meet in the center, clasp arms, and march down 
the floor, eight abreast, the line following. On reaching 
the front of the room, the four head couples turn right 
and the couples in the second line turn left, each line fol- 
lowing, alternating right and left; the lines proceed- 
ing toward the back walL 





0*0*0*01 



<>*o*o*o< > 



7 

^ * J\ 



*O*O*0< ' 



o 


o 
* 
o 



o 

o 


o 




o 
o 

o 



-o- 



o 
o 
o 


-o- 




Grand March 211 

Now that you have become familiar with the platoon 
formations, you may continue to build up even longer 
lines. For example, continuing from the end of figure 
VI, in which two columns, eight abreast, are marching 
up the room, the head couples may meet in the center, 
clasp arms, and march down the floor, sixteen abreast, 
the lines following, to divide at the bottom, the eight 
head couples turning right, the couples in the second 
line turning left, each line following, alternating right 
and left; the lines proceeding toward the bade wall 

Thirty-two people may march abreast down the floor 
by repeating the procedure of meeting at the back wall, 
clasping arms and marching forward. 

As a matter of f act, any number of persons may march 
abreast, in couples, but the lines will become unwieldy 
in dividing and turning if more than thirty-two are at- 
tempted. At all times, the couples initiating the turns 
will have to mark time while turning to allow time for 
the outer couples in line to make the turn. The couples 
toward the center of the turn will have to take small 
steps, the next couples graduating the length of their 
stride, the outermost couples taking the longest stride. 
(Remember the principle of spokes radiating from tihe 
hub of a wheel.) 

And finally, in turning, the elbows should be kept dose 
to the body in a firm dasp, to help keep the lines dosefy 
knit 



212 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

GRAND MARCH FORMATIONS 

SERPENTINE 

The Serpentine consists of a leader with the line fol- 
lowing him walking back and forth between the lines of 
a platoon formation, picking up a new line each time 
that line is passed. 

The Serpentine is an excellent figure to have up your 
sleeve for breaking up the platoon formation. However 
enthusiastic couples may feel while marching, even a 
Grand March must end sometime! And the Serpentine 
figure is the solution. 

Starting with a platoon formation, hands joined, the 
leader makes a sharp turn to his left, and drawing the 
line with him, walks across in front of the second line 
until he reaches the end person, makes a sharp turn to 
his right, and continuing, walks across in front of the 




Grand March 213 

third line. The leader, the line following, now makes a 
sharp turn to his left as he passes the end boy of the 
third line, and continues forward across in front of the 
fourth line (Figure A). As the end girl of line number 
one passes the end boy of line number two she joins her 
right hand in his left hand, thus joining the two lines 
(Figure B). 

The leader, continuing to draw the line with him, 
now makes a sharp turn to the right while passing the 
end girl of line number four, and continues across in 
front of line number five. In the meantime the end girl 
of line number two, in passing, has picked up the end 
boy of line number three (Figure C). 

The leader continues to draw the line through the 
remaining formations, the end girl each time, in passing, 
picking up the end boy of the line which has just been 
passed. 

Eventually all the lines will be picked up as the 
leader, the line following, moves back and forth, the en- 
tire group following in single file in a counterclockwise 
direction (Figure D). 





214 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

ARCH 

Arching (sometimes called the "Arbor") consists of 
couples facing in opposite lines, raising the arms, and 
joining hands; thus forming an arch. 

There are two methods of arching one, in which all 
the couples form an arch simultaneously, and two, in 
which each couple arch separately. We are going to 
describe the latter figure number two. 

Partners stand in opposite lines, facing each other. 
Couple number one (the head couple) form an arch 
(Figure A) and couple number two duck under to the 
opposite side of couple number one. 

Couples number one and two form an arch, and couple 
number three duck under the arch (Figure B), passing 
through to the opposite side of couple number two. 

Couples number one, two, and three form an arch 
and couple number four duck under, passing through 
to the opposite side of couple number three. Each couple 
in turn duck under the arch of the preceding couple, 
pass through the lines and arch at the head. The figure 
is repeated until all couples have passed through and 
formed in arch. Couple number one (the head couple) 
are now at the bottom of the line (Figure C). 



Grand March 



215 




THE ARCH 



216 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




TUNNELING 



Grand March 217 



TUNNELING 

Tunneling consists of couples passing under and 
through a tunnelsometimes called the arch. 

Tunneling is an excellent figure for breaking down 
the arch formation. The figure may begin at the head 
or at the foot of the line. We are going to describe the 
figure, beginning at the foot. 

Partners stand in opposite lines, hands clasped in an 
arch formation, couple number one at the foot of the 
line. 

Couple number one release hands, join inside hands, 
and ducking under couple number two, continue for- 
ward through the tunnel. As couple number one pass 
under the arch of couple number two, couple number 
two release hands, join inside hands, duck under the 
arch of couple number three, continuing forward behind 
couple number one (Figure D). 

Each couple in turn break the arch, join inside hands, 
duck under, pass through the arch of the couple ahead, 
continuing forward. 

Eventually couple number one become the head 
couple by passing through the entire line, and continue 
forward, the other couples following ^Figure E). 



218 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



THE STAR 

This formation consists of lines converging toward a 
center, the inside persons joining hands, thus forming 
the star. When the inside persons clasp wrists with those 
opposite (in the center), the formation is known as the 
wagon wheel. 

The trick of managing a good star formation consists 
of the inside persons marking time, while turning, the 
outer persons graduating the length of their stride. 

A leader, however, should not attempt to call a star 
formation until the dancers have become experienced 
with the platoon formations. 




23. 



The play party games are one of the most delightful 
customs carried over from the past. For generations 
couples have danced Threat the Needle, In and Out, 
Wind the Spool, Roll the Barrel, and The Grapevine 
Twist. And today these play party games are just as 
popular. 

We are going to describe all of these figures. In addi- 
tion to using these figures in social dancing, you will 
find them equally fitting for the Square Dances. In fact, 
the play party figures are early American folk dances 
and are exhilarating for whatever occasion they are used. 

Aside from a Grand March or Virginia Reel, there is 
nothing like a play party game to pull a dance out of 
the doldrums. So get going! 

THREAD THE NEEDLE 

Thread the Needle consists of a leader, the group fol- 
lowing, walking clockwise and through the end of a 
line, continuing forward in a circle so that each person 
is pulled into a right turn. 

Starting with partners facing in an open circle, arms 
raised, the hands joined, the girl standing on the right 

219 



220 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 




B 





Play Party Games 221 

side of the boy, the leader walks forward in a clock- 
wise direction (figure A), the line following, and ducks 
under the arms of the end couple (figure B). The 
leader continues forward in a clockwise direction, the 
line following pulling the boy of the end couple Into 
a right turn. Having snapped his right arm across his 
chest in turning, tihe end boy now holds his partner's 
left hand in Ms right hand over Bis shoulder (figure C). 
(The end girl remains in place in this position until she 
is joined by the leader toward the finish of the dance.) 

The leader, the line following, repeats the figure con- 
tinuing forward in a clockwise direction, ducking under 
the left arm of the end boy and the right arm of the 
girl on his left (the girl in front)* The line continues 
forward, pulling the girl into a right turn, and snap- 
ping her right arm across her chest, her right hand now 
clasping, at shoulder level, the left hand of the boy 
behind. 

The leader, the line following, continues to thread 
the needle (ducking under the arms of each couple) 
until each person has snapped about into a right turn, 
the right arm over the chest. To finish the figure the 
leader ducks under his own right arm, marches up to 
the end girl (the line following) and she places hat right 
arm across her chest, dasping her right hand in the 
leader's left hand at shoulder level. The circle is now 
closed and the group may march forward or backward* 

To resume a Circle in which att are f aeing in, partners 
bring arms overhead while turning to the right, and 
lower anus* Everyone is now in original position. 



222 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 





Play Party Games 223 



IK AXD OUT 

The in and out figure consists of a line weaving in 
and out between partners, each person fcmfng inside 
out as the line passes through, and continuing forward 
in a counterclockwise direction. 

Standing with partners in an open circle, arms slightly 
raised, hands joined, the girl on the right side c the 
boy, the leader, moving in a counterclockwise direction 
(figure A), ducks under the right arm of his partner, 
and continuing to move forward, pulls his partner inside 
out, the girl turning right under her right ami (figure B ). 
Continuing to draw his partner forward, the leader turns 
sharply to his left, ducks under the right arm of the 
next boy (figure C), pulling the boy inside out the bey 
turning left under his right arm (^figure D/. The line 
now continues, ducking under the right arm of the next 
girl, turning her inside out, the right arm of the next 
boy, turning him inside out. 

Ducking to the right and to the left continues until 
all partners have turned inside out. Eventually, every- 
one will be moving forward, the line facing out 



224 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



WIND THE SPOOL 



(In winding the spool the leader should be careful 
not to bring the lines forming the concentric circles too 
close together by winding too tightly. In order to be able 
to unwind., he will have to allow sufficient leeway be- 
tween the circles to allow him and the group following 
to pass between the lines.) 

Starting with partners facing in an open circle, with 
hands joined, the girl on the right side of the boy, the 
leader marches forward in a clockwise direction, the 
line following, and continues moving forward, making 
concentric circles until he reaches the center. The leader 
and the group have wound the spool and are now 
ready to unwind. 




Play Party Games 



225 



UNWIND THE SPOOL 



To unwind the spool, the leader turns sharply to his 
left, the inside group following, and passes between the 
lines in a counterclockwise direction until he resumes 
the single circle, all facing out. 

By doing a sharp turn to the right, the group follow- 
ing, the leader may march forward until att are facing in. 

ROLL THE BARREL 

Roll the Barrel consists of turning a circle inside out 
and reversing the figure by turning outside in, so that 
partners are facing in the original fonnation. 

Although any couple may Roll the Barrel, it will be 
simpler for someone to appoint a couple, naming an 
opposite couple who may Roll the Barrel in reverse. We 
will call the first couple "A" and the opposite couple "B,** 




226 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



BOLL THE BARREL 

Standing with partners in a closed circle, hands joined, 
the girl on the right side of the boy, couple "A" walk 
forward, drawing the group along in front of couple "B" 
who raise their arms to form an arch. Couple "A" pass 
through the arch, drawing the group forward, forcing 
couple "B* to turn inside out under their arms. Every- 
one is now facing out 




Play Party Games 



227 



BOLL THE BARREL IN REVERSE 

To Roll the Barrel in reverse couple "IT back up, 
drawing the group through the arch that has been formed 
by couple "A." The group continues to back up, forcing 
couple "A" to turn outside in under their arms. Everyone 
is now facing in, in the original formation. 

Now that you have learned to Roll the Barrel, try mov- 
ing in a circle while doing the figure. 

As tibe circle is turned inside out, keep moving in a 
circle to the right 

As the circle is turned outside in, keep moving in a 
circle to the left 




228 



Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 



couple no. 3 
picked up by 
couples nos. I S 2 



couple no. 4 
picked up fay 




couple no. 2 
picked up fay 
couple no. I 



THE GRAPEVINE TWIST 



Play Party Games 229 

THE GRAPEVINE TWIST 

The Grapevine Twist consists of a couple passing 
through a couple, circling around eadb partner, picking 
up the partners, by joining hands and moving on to the 
next couple. The leading couple continue (the others 
following) to weave in and out in the grapevine twist 
until all couples have been picked up. 

Couples stand in a cirde, slightly apart from each 
other, the girl on the right side of the boy. 

The leading couple, the boy holding the girl's left 
hand in his right and drawing her after him, move to 
the couple on his right, pass between the couple, tuna 
left around the lady, continuing left, pass between 
the couple, turn right around the gent, and continue to 
the right (both couples joining hands), to visit the next 
couple. 

The figure is repeated between and around each cou- 
ple, the "pick up" occurring at the end of each Grape- 
vine Twist. Eventually att couples will be drawn, with 
hands joined, into a circle. 

LADIES 9 CHOICE 

Although strictly speaking a Ladies' Choice is not a 
play party game, we are going to include it anyway 
because it's such fun* 

A Ladies* Choice consists of the girls asking the boys 
to be their partners at a dance. (After all, there is no 
reason why the boys should always do the choosing.) 
Once in a while the girls should have an opirtumty to 
show their preferences, too. So try a Ladies* Choice at 
your next dance* 



C^li 



tion, 



mna 



The elimination dance assumes an important role in 
any well-run dance. And everyone looks forward eagerly 
to the occasion. 

The elimination dance differs from the mixers or 
play party games in that couples are ruled out as the 
dance progresses. The process of elimination always 
creates an air of expectancy and suspense the guests 
wondering "who's next?" Awarding a prize to the last 
couple on the floor adds further excitement. So you can 
see the elimination dance is a dramatic event on any 
program. 

We are going to describe the following dances: the 
Lucky Number, Back Talk, the "Spot" (Prohibited 
Areas), the Flashlight, and the Balloon Dance and Cor- 
ners. Before proceeding to the dances, we are going to 
discuss the role of the leader, the organization of "props" 
that may be used (tickets, prizes, etc.), and the guest's 
responsibilities while participating in an elimination 
dance. 



LEADER 

Since there is always the element of the unpredictable 
even in an elimination dance, the leader will have to be 

230 



Elimination Dances 231 

ready for any emergency. The first problem he will have 
to face is the number of guests participating. With luck, 
he may start off with an equal number of couples, but 
as frequently happens, he may be faced with extra boys 
or girls. The only fair solution, in order to give every- 
one a chance to participate, is for the leader to give 
each extra boy or girl a number, in addition to the 
couples on the floor. As the first numbers are called, those 
couples surrender their number, and the extra boy or 
girl becomes the partner of the person just eliminated 
both using the new number. This means, of course, that 
persons already eliminated will participate twice. But 
under the circumstances, it is unavoidable, and at least 
the extra boy or girl is given an opportunity to compete 
for a prize. 

The running of an elimination dance requires expert 
timing on the part of the leader and a good, dear voice. 
A sense of humor helps, too! Hie leader can keep the 
dancers entertained while calling out the numbers. The 
most important thing, however, is the speed with which 
the dance is run. Naturally, the guests who have already 
been eliminated, will lose interest if the dance is run too 
slowly, Even the fun of watching other couples being 
eliminated wears off if one remains a spectator for keg* 
So the dance should be kept moving. 

If properties are to be used, as for example, prizes and 
tickets in the Lucky Number Dance, the leader should 
have them well organized in advance. There isn't a mo- 
ment in which the leader can fumble about once the 
dancers have been called out on tihe floor. Therefore* two 
sets of numbers should be made in advance; me set to 
be distributed to the dancers one number to a couple 
and the second set to be retained by tlie leader, which 



232 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

he will use in reading off the numbers for the elimination 
dance. 

If tickets (on which the numbers are written) are to 
be used the leader would do well to appoint an assistant 
to collect the numbers as the dancers are eliminated. 
An assistant can also see that the dancers do leave the 
floor after their number has been called. 

If a band is accompanying the dancers, a leader will 
find it quite simple to stop the music as a number is 
called, or turn down the volume, by a mere signal of the 
hand. Since records are so frequently used at school 
dances, however, the leader will be wise to appoint an 
assistant to handle the record machine. 

Although it is optional with the leader whether or 
not a prize is given at the end of an elimination dance, 
a prize is an absolute must for the Lucky Number Dance. 
It is the star occasion, calling for that extra touch. Two 
prizes will have to be given one to the girl and one to 
the boy. 

Records are usually the most rewarding of prizes. And 
the leader can check the preferences of teen-agers be- 
fore the dance. "Top Tunes," arranged for dancing, make 
the best choice and help to round out the teen-ager's 
dance collection for practicing at home or at school. 

GUESTS 

So far we have discussed the leader's role in the 
elimination dance. The guests, however, have an equal 
share of responsibility in helping make the dance a 
success. 

Noise should be kept to a minimum while the num- 
bers are called. And if a guest has any doubt as to whether 



Elimination Dances 233 

or not his number has been called, a check should be 
made at once with the leader. Much confusion can be 
avoided if this procedure is adopted. Likewise, a guest 
should hold on to his number. (If a number is lost the 
leader will have to stop to issue a new number and the 
dance will be slowed up.) 

Guests may also co-operate with the leader by leamng 
the floor as soon as they are eliminated There is always 
so much excitement, as the numbers are called, that 
spectators (those who have already been eliminated tend 
to crowd the dancers off the floor. Guests who have been 
ruled out should stand along the walls to keep the dance 
floor clear. 

Everyone will have fun, without hampering anyone 
else's freedom, if the preceding suggestions are followed* 
And we are sure you will find them helpf uL 



LUCKY NUMBER DANCE 

The Lucky Number is the most popular of all the 
elimination dances* And it certainly provides the most 
suspense, combined with plenty of action. 

The leader gives each couple a number, Everjrone 
dances and as the music stops (or is turned down in 
volume) the leader calls out the first number to be 
eliminated. As the first couple drop out, the dance is re- 
sumed. The leader may now stop the dance and call 
several numbers in succession. (If a large group is par- 
ticipating several numbers should be called in succes- 
sion. ) Couples continue to be eliminated until one couple 
remain on the floor. The last number is announced* the 
remaining couple becoming the winners. The Ledky 



234 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

Number couple dance briefly for the spectators, and after 
the applause, are awarded the prize. 



BACK TALK 

This dance is really a variation of the personality tie- 
up figure. A leader stands with his back to the dancers, 
calls out and eliminates couples on the basis of color of 
eyes or hair. The leader may call, for example, "All 
partners with blue eyes drop out." Clothes ties, socks, 
shoes, etc. may also be used as a tie-in, the couples 
dropping out as a call applies to them. 

Back talk is the easiest elimination dance of all to run 
and can be executed quickly. 



SPOT DANCE (PROHIBITED AREAS) 

Circles or squares are drawn on the floor as the dance 
gets under way. The leader, however, will have to draw 
a new circle or square as the dance progresses and cou- 
ples are eliminated. Naturally, couples will avoid pro- 
hibited areas if they can. Therefore, the leader will have 
to move fast to keep ahead of the dancers. Anyone found 
on a prohibited spot as the music stops is automatically 
eliminated. 

To make the Spot Dance even more exciting the leader 
can choose an area on the ceiling or use the overhead 
decorations as a focal point, without telling the dancers. 
As the music stops dancers found under those areas can 
be eliminated. The dance continues until all are ruled 
out 



Elimination Dances 235 

FLASHLIGHT DAXCE 

One or more flashlights may be used to eliminate the 
dancers from the floor. The room will have to be reason- 
ably dark before the Flashlight Dance gets under way. 
Any couple "spotted* drop out automatically. The dance 
continues until all are eliminated. 

The Flashlight Dance is one of the simplest to ma. A 
leader, however, will have to use some caution in check- 
ing encumbrances around the room before the dance gets 
under way since the dancers will be in seioidarkness. 

BALLOON DAXCE 

The Balloon Dance may be run in one of two ways. 
The balloons may be retained by the dancers as they are 
eliminated or the balloons may be broken as the numbers 
are called out. We are going to discuss the second method. 

Each couple are given a number and a balloon. (The 
balloon may be attached to the ankle or carried in the 
hand, ) While the dance is in progress the leader calls out 
a number. Everyone stops dancing to see whose number 
has been called. The unlucky couple begin to dodge as 
the other couples move in for the kill. As soon as the 
balloon is broken, that couple is eliminated. The leader 
continues to call one number at a time, each couple in 
turn being eliminated as their balloon is broken. 

The last couple have the privilege of retaining their 
balloon and may be given a prize. 
Reminder: In preparing for the Balloon Dance, the leader 
should make sure that the balloons are blown up and 
tied to strings in advance so that there will be no delay 
once the dance gets under way. A few spares (extra bal- 



236 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

loons) should be kept on hand in the event of an emer- 
gency. Even with the utmost caution, balloons have a 
way of blowing up! 

COMERS 

Here is an elimination dance which can be run at a 
fast, snappy pace inasmuch as several couples may be 
eliminated at a time. Before getting under way, however, 
the leader should explain in advance to the group how 
Comers is done. And it is especially important for him to 
point out that partners may run to any corner they choose. 

Each corner of the room is assigned a number-one 
through four-the leader holding the corresponding num- 
bers on four separate tickets. Now then, everyone dances 
and as the music stops (or is turned down in volume) 
partners make a mad dash for the corners. The leader 
then calls out the number of the first corner to be elim- 
inated whereupon the couples standing in that corner 
drop out The dance is resumed, the music stops and 
partners again run to the comers. The leader calls out 
the number of the next comer to be eliminated and so 
forth. 

Couples continue to be eliminated from the corners as 
the numbers are called, the last corner couple becoming 
the winners. 



25. m 



IxerS 



If a committee or social director desires to keep a 
dance moving it will be necessary to introduce an occa- 
sional mixer. (And as the word indicates, a mixer is a 
device for exchanging or meeting new partners.) 

Certain couples tend to pair off for an entire dance, 
and however much fun they may have, other couples 
become bored with the same partners, and the dance 
begins to slump. It is at this point that a good social 
committee or leader steps in to call a Mixer. 

Aside from serving as a means of breaking up and 
exchanging partners, a mixer has an equally useful role 
to play in pulling a dance together at the slack periods. 
At the beginning of a dance, between dances, and after 
refreshments couples tend to wander off, so a mixer is an 
excellent device for gathering the group together. 

Mixers, however, should be used sparingly. Too many 
mixers are as bad as too few. Guests, after all, have cer- 
tain preferences as to partners, and if they are moved 
about indiscriminately and at too frequent intervals, the 
dance tends to disintegrate as the guests lose interest 

Tliere are two types of mixers those done without 
properties and those done toff h properties. We are going 
to describe the ones most commonly used. And since the 

237 



238 Betty "Wliite's Teen-Age Dance Book 

mixers without "props" are the simplest to organize, we 
are going to describe them first. Here are the figures in 
order: circles, the basket (a variation of the double 
circle), concentric circles, the charge, back up, person- 
ality tie-ups, and the multiplication dance. 

The mixers with "props" will follow. They will be dis- 
cussed and described in the following order: pictures, 
cutting, the name mixer including a variation known as 
opposites, playing cards, trinkets, and the broom dance. 



MIXERS WITHOUT PROPERTIES 

CIRCLES 

The simplest and quickest type of mixer is the circle. 
Guests may form single, double, or even concentric cir- 
cles, if the group is large. 



7'HK SINGLE CIRCLE 

Partners form a circle, facing in, joining hands, the girl 
standing on the right side of her partner. At a signal 
the leader may say, "Boys dance with the girl on your 
left." After the new partners have danced together the 
leader may call, "Everyone back in the circle your new 
partner on your right" After the group assembles in the 
circle, the leader may add "Everyone grab your opposite." 
The dancers rush across the floor and grab a new partner. 
After a brief dance the leader may call "Everyone back in 
the circle with your original partner at your side now 
dance with your own partner." 

Any number of variations in the calls may be made by 
the leader to mix up the guests. 



Mixers 239 



THE DOUBLE CIRCLE 

Girls form a circle, facing in, and join hands. Hie boys 
form an outer circle, facing in, standing behind the girls 
with hands joined. 

At a signal from the leader the boys move sideward in 
a counterclockwise direction, the girls moving sideward 
in a clockwise direction. As the circles move in opposition 
the leader calls out, "Stop! 9 Girls turn around and face 
a partner, both circles coming to a halt. The leader fol- 
lows with the call, "Everybody dance.** 

As soon as the dancers have become familiar with the 
preceding routine, there is an even more iaterestirig way 
in which they may do the double circle mixer. It is a 
progressive mixer and is by far the most popular with 
teen-agers. The leader explains in advance that the 
girls will meet three different boys as they move in 
opposite directions, each of whom will become their 
partner in succession. No one dances with a partner until 
the signal "stop* has been called three times,, at the end 
of which signal the dancers scramble to find partners. 
After dancing briefly with partners number one ? the 
dancers proceed, at a signal from the leader, to find 
partners number two and dance again. Releasing partners 
number two, the dancers, at the signal, progress to part- 
ners number three and finish the dance. 

This progressive mixer is so well liked that longer 
periods of dancing may be done with a given partner 
instead of the usual brief episodes. Three dances may be 
done in succession without anyone losing interest. For 
example, the Foxtrot, Waltz, and Lindy make a good 
combination. The dancers themselves, however, are quite 
vocal about their preferences so any request for a given 



240 



Betty WMte's Teen-Age Dance Book 



dance should be followed through. In that way the pro- 
gram will not become too set or routine. And everyone 
will be happy. 



THE BASKET 

For variety the basket formation may be used while 
the dancers are in a double circle. 




At the signal Torm a basket" the boys raise their arms 
as the girls duck under to stand between and slightly 
behind the boys. The leader now calls to the boys, 'The 
first partner will be the girl on your right, the second 
partner the girl on your left. Now everybody dance!" The 
boys dance with partners number one and leave them to 
dance with partners number two at a signal from the 
leader. 



Mixers 241 

CONCENTRIC dBCLES 

Concentric circles may be formed when the group Is 
large. Several circles can be formed, facing in, the boys 
standing behind the girls. It is wise for the leader to keep 
the figures and signals simple. A large group becomes un- 
wieldy when the mixer becomes too involved. Depending 
on the size of the room, any number o dancers n:ay 
participate. 

THE CHARGE 

If the guests at a dance are beginning to get into a rut 
here is a mixer that will really wake them up. It's dyna- 
mite! 

The leader sends all the girls to one end of the hall and 
the boys to the other end of the hall, even-one facing in. 
At the signal, "Charge" the boys rush down the hall and 
grab the nearest girl and dance. 

BACK UP 

This is really a quieter version of the charge. The boys 
and girls, with their backs turned, stand at opposite ends 
of the hall. At the signal, "Go/* the lines slowly back up, 
the dancers bumping into each other. The person who is 
bumped first becomes one's partner for the dance. 

PERSONALITY TIE-UPS 

Teen-agers will have a great deal of fun doing this 
mixer in which one exchanges partners on the basis of 



242 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

the color of eyes or hair or even clothes. The leader may 
call out, for example, "Everyone with blue eyes dance with 
partners who have brown eyes/' Or the call may be, 
"Brunettes dance with blondes/* (Anyone who doesn't fall 
into this category, for example, a redhead, may grab 
anyone who has gotten lost in the shuffle. ) 

The periods of dancing should be kept brief so that the 
calls can be changed constantly. Everyone will enjoy 
being in a happy state of confusion while looking for the 
next partner. And the calls should be so varied that the 
dancers will be keyed up for the next stunt. By all means 
keep the dancers in a state of expectancyotherwise the 
personality mixer will fall flat. 



MULTIPLICATION DANCE 

The multiplication dance, as the name might suggest, 
consists of partners dancing and adding other couples to 
the floor, progressively. 

It is by far the most dramatic of all the mixers. And 
has real audience appeal. Each person enjoys having 
spectators look on as he or she is chosen, and it's always 
fun to "show off' one's dancing ability after one is chosen. 

In running the multiplication dance, the Leader should 
make the periods quite brief so that couples who are 
seated may join the dance quickly. If the dance is not run 
at a good, snappy pace the spectators lose interest. 

The multiplication dance begins with one couple danc- 
ing. At a signal from the leader the music stops, partners 
break away and each finds a new partner. (Only people 
who are seated may be asked.) Two couples now dance 
on the floor until the music stops when the signal is given 



Mixers 243 

for the next set of partners. Four couples now join the 
dance. Each time that the music stops partners break 
away and find new partners. As you can see, each time 
the dance is resumed the number of couples is doubled. 
The dance is continued until everyone is on the floor. 



MIXERS WITH PROPERTIES 

Trops" such as pictures, playing cards, names, etc., 
always dress up a dance and provide dramatic interest. 
They may be used as a device to pull a dance together, 
as a means of rotating and meeting new partners, and may 
even be used for "cutting/' 

A leader can have a wonderful time varying the mixers 
we are about to describe. And for a leader with imagina- 
tion, the possibilities for new and creative ideas are end- 
less. 

However gay and festive props may make a mixer, 
there is a practical side to be considered. The leader will 
have to organize or execute all props to be used before 
the dance. Teen-agers like to share an^ participate in get- 
ting the props ready so % wise leader will appoint a com- 
mittee from among the group. 

None of the property mixers we are about to describe 
entail any real expense. But make no mistake plenty of 
time is required to make up the ingredients for some of 
the mixers. Materials will have to be collected well in 
advance of the dance and sufficient leeway allowed for 
actually making the props. 

The mixers that require time are the picture mixer, 
opposites, and especially the name mixer. The leader 
or committee should have all the implements necessary 



244 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

for carrying out the scheme scissors, paper, crayons, bal- 
loons, etc. And everything should be so neatly tucked 
away that a leader can pull out props for use at a mo- 
ment's notice. 

The property mixers which are simple and easy to plan 
are playing cards, lemons, apples, flowers, lollipops, etc., 
and, of course, the perennial broom! 

If some care is used by the guests in handling the props, 
they may be stored away for future use. And by all means, 
the leader should see that the broom which has been bor- 
rowed is promptly returned. A smallish "thank you ' will 
not go amiss when the broom is returned. 

In running a property mixer the leader should make a 
careful count of the number of partners on the floor. The 
number of props to be distributed can then be allocated 
in advance. 

And now we are ready for these delightful mixers. 



PICTURES 

The most popular property mixer is the picture mixer. 
The leader distributes pictures that have been cut in 
half one half of the pictures going to the girls, the other 
half of the same pictures going to the boys. The object 
of the dance is to match up the pictures to find partners. 
As soon as all the pictures have been matched up, the 
dance gets under way. 

In making up the picture mixer the leader should use 
big, bold colored pictures. (Stay away from black and 
white prints. ) The pictures, before being cut up, should 
be marked across the back with a heavy crayon an "X* 
will do so that the dancers will not be confused as to 
which side is up on the picture. Try to tie up the subject 



Mixers 245 

matter in the pictures with the interests of a teen-aeer. 
Sports, outdoor scenes, celebrities-especially glamorous 
ones always go over with a bang. A generous number of 
pictures should be kept on hand so that the pictures can 
be rotated when in constant use. 

CUTTING (WITH PROPERTIES) 

If one has to give up a partner, it's easier to do so grace- 
fully if one is presented with a prop as amusing as a 
lemon, an apple, a lollipop or a surprise ball (crepe 
paper). And for something really fancy, the girls, in 
"cutting in" on other girls, could use flowers, and the boys* 
if they really want to go over in a big way in "cutting in** 
on other boys small corsages for the girls! 

All of the preceding props are handed to the extra girls 
or boys as a dance gets under way. At the close of any 
dance, the props should be returned to the leader in good 
condition. 

THE NAME MIXER 

The name mixer is especially appealing because of the 
personal touch of finding the name of a friend or, per- 
haps, someone else finding one's own name in an en- 
velope, a balloon, a lollipop, or even an apple the object 
of the mixer being, as usual, the finding of a partner. ( For 
the more formal dances, name cards may be inserted in 
envelopes or even tucked into paper flowers.) For ex- 
ample, the boys can be presented by the leader with the 
girls' names on slips of paper, which may or may not be 
tucked into a prop. As soon as the girl's name is discov- 
ered, the boy claims her as his partner. After all the names 
have been discovered, partners pair off for the dance. 



246 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

OPPOSITES 

The name mixer need not be confined to personal 
names. For variety, the names of celebrities, or slogans 
or popular songs could be substituted. "Opposites/* then, 
is a variation of the name mixer. 

When opposites is used as a mixer, two slips of paper 
are made for each couple one slip for the girl and one 
slip for the boy. Half of a name or slogan is printed on 
one slip, the remaining half on a second slip, for example, 
pepper and salt. If a boy receives "pepper" he looks for 
his opposite, the girl who has received "salt" She becomes 
his partner. Opposites continue to look for each other 
until all the couples are matched off. The dance then gets 
under way. 

Here is a partial list of "opposites 9 that have been 
found the most amusing: 

date bait 

hot dog 
beauty and the beast 
red riding hood the wolf 

coca cola 

seven up 

base ball 

home run 

pepper salt 

Cinderella glass slipper 

yo - yo 

rock V roll 

hot fudge sundae 
etc., etc. 



Mixers 247 

PLAYING CARDS 

Playing cards are always amusing when used as a 
mixer. Hie leader deals out the pack to the dancers, 
hearts and diamonds to the girls, clubs and spades to 
the boys. The object of the dance is to match up cards 
to find partners hearts and dubs matching, and similar- 
ly, diamonds and spades. For example, if a girl has a 
queen of hearts card, she pairs off with the boy who 
has a queen of dubs. Cards with corresponding numbers 
are also matched. The hunt continues until everyone has 
found a partner. 

At the condusion of the dance the leader collects the 
cards, making sure that all of the cards are returned. 
(You know the usual souvenir hunter who has a scrap- 
book!) Guests are usually co-operative, however, and 
realize that if a card is missing, the pack is useless for 
any future mixer. 

TRINKETS 

Here is a mixer that is so popular it is frequently re- 
quested by the teen-ager. The leader collects jewelry 
(trinkets) from the girls or the boys. (If a teen-ager 
is not wearing jewelry, a tie, bobby pin, or fountain pen 
will do in a pinch.) The object, as usual, is to find the 
person to whom the trinket bdongs who, in tuna, be- 
comes one's dancing partner. 

Since there is always a scramble to pick up the trinkets, 
it is wise for the leader to spread the objects several 
inches apart on a flat surface. This prevents confusion 
and rough handling of the trinkets* (Xobody, aftex all, 



248 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

likes to see a wrist watch pulled apart.) So, a reasonabk 
amount of care should be taken in handling the jewelry, 
At a signal from the leader the boys or girls line up, 
single file, to choose a trinket and rush about to find the 
owner until everyone has found a partner. 



BROOM DANCE 

The broom dance is still the favorite with all teen-agers. 
And it does add spice to any dance. The broom dance has 
a practical aspect, however, which is the sure-fire solution 
for that extra girl or boy. 

A leader gives the broom to the person without a 
partner as couples assemble on the floor. (The broom is 
carried in front with both hands clasping the handle.) 
The music begins and as the dance progresses, the leader 
signals to the dancer with the broom to drop it. (A 
reasonabk bang will do! ) As the broom falls to the floor 
everybody rushes to grab a new partner. The person left 
without a partner picks up the broom and dances with it 
as the other couples continue to dance. 

Once the dance has gotten under way, the person 
dancing with the broom may drop it at any moment 
However, the broom should not be dropped too fre- 
quently or the dance falls apart What is equally impor- 
tant, the broom should not be kept by one person for too 
long a period. Although the object of the broom dance is 
to get a partner, apparently the broom is more popular. 
So give everyone a chancel 



26. 



Invitations to a dance are usually offered through the 
medium of the telephone or written word. 

At all times, you, the recipient, are under obligation to 
accept or reject within a reasonable time. The type of 
invitation wQ indicate how to dress. (When in doubt, 
always inquire of your hostess. ) 

Informal written invitations may be handled through 
a name card or letter. If your mother is hostess her name 
card may be used. If you are hostess your name card, 
information indicating time, place, etc., written across the 
card. 

Informal Letter 

Date 



Dear_ 



Yours, 

The recipient can respond through: 

Telephone 
Own name card 
Letter 

249 



250 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

Formal Invitation 

The formal invitation is written, printed, or engraved, 
and written acknowledgment is customary. 

Miss Betty White 

requests the pleasure of 's 

company at a dance to be held at 



at o'clock in the evening, 

(Day of month) , 

(Spell out time and date) 

Reply 

Miss accepts with pleas- 
ure Miss Betty White's invitation 
to a dance to be held at 



at o'clock in the evening, 

(Day of month) _ 

(Spell out time and date) 



27. 



BOY 



Informal 



Sport coats and slacks: wool or corduroy. Colors: solid 

or mixtures 
Shirts: almost any type (Windbreakers, lumber jackets, 

heavy flannels are out.) 

Shoes: dark, moccasin type or oxfordswing tips 
Accessories: tie, handkerchief, socks. Harmonize with 

entire ensemble. 



Semiformal 

Blue Suit (Can substitute dark solid color.) 
Light-weight flannel, cheviots, etc. 
Shirt: white ( Can substitute pastels.) 
Handkerchief: white 

Socks: black (can substitute dark solid color.) 
Shoes: black (can substitute dark solid color.) 
Tie: solid color, small neat figure, or stripe 

251 



252 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

Formal 

Tuxedo: single- or double-breasted (white jacket for 

summer only) 
Shirt: dress (Can substitute regulation attached soft 

collar white broadcloth.) 
Tie: black bow 
Handkerchief: white 
Shoes: black 
Socks: black 



Foundation for good grooming 

Bath (Don't forget the ears.) 

Nails Clean and trimmed 

Hair-Trim 

Teeth-Clean 

Shoes-Polished 



GIRL 

Informal and Semiformal 

Dresses: cotton, velvet, taffeta. Colc?* T *;an be pastels or 

dark. 
Shoes: black patent leather, kid, suede with or without 

ankle straps 
Socks: white ( can substitute pastels.) 

or 

Stockings: neutral shade 
Gloves: "shorties* (optional) 



Dress 253 



Formal 

Dresses: long or ballerina length 

Shoes: slippers, pumps, sandals (medium heels), haZet 

"flats" 
Accessories: gloves, jewelry (strand of pearls always 

safe, no earrings), flowers 

Foundation for good grooming 

Bath (Dash of cologne if desired) 

Nails Clean and trimmed 

Hair-Neat 

Teeth Clean 

Shoes Freshly cleaned or brushed 




28. 



The word "presentation* seems like a much happier 
choice of word than "introduction.'* After all, you are 
presenting one person to another in order to make them 
acquainted. And some of our nicest friendships have 
been formed through this custom. 

As to which person's name is mentioned first, remem- 
ber that an introduction is a reciprocal affair. The person 
acknowledging the newcomer is mentioned -first. The per- 
son being presented second. 



Informal 



"Miss White, this is 



"Miss White, I'd like you to meet 
(Either fonn is acceptable.) 

Formal 



"Miss White, may I present _ .* 

"Miss White, I should like to present _ * 

(Either form is acceptable.) 

The "How do you doV should be followed by a con- 
versational cue some pleasantry about making the con- 

254 



Introductions 255 

tact or a subject of mutual interest touched upon lightly. 

If you become confused don't get flustered. There's 
always a teen-ager on the sidelines or even an adult who 
can come to the rescue. That's one of the rewards of 
being part of a group. There's always someone who can 
help in a difficult spot. 

Since there's usually a good deal of noise at any dance 
it is quite easy not to hear a name while being presented 
to a person or group. If you do miss out it is perfectly 
correct to say: 

*Tm sorry but I did not get your name," 

and much more sensible than being evasive, or what is 
worse, feeling an anxiety about renewing the contact. 

One thing more. If you become detached from your 
own group or become socially isolated in some manner, 
it is sensible to introduce yourself: 

Tm * 



or ask someone to present you to a new acquaintance or 
group. 

Finally, remember that common sense and a sense or 
humor will get you through any social situationeven 
introductions! 



PRESENTATIONS 

In general it is customary at a dance to present 
a boy to a girl 

a younger person to an older person 
a newcomer to a group 



256 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

If a group is large it is not necessary to mention each 
person's name. 
At a home dance 
Friends should be presented to the family including 

small fry. 

Faculty members to parents 
At a church dance 

Your family or friends should be presented to the 
pastor. 
If Priest: 

"Father , this is ." 

If Minister: 

"Mr , this is ." 

or "Dr. , this is " 

At a school dance 

Parents or friends who are visiting should be pre- 
sented to: 

members of the faculty 
teen-age friends to faculty and naturally, teen-agers 

to teen-agers! 

To avoid confusion, always bear in mind that the guest 
is presented to the person assuming the role of host or 
hostess, who in turn acknowledges the introduction 
whether at home, at school, or at churck 



29. ~dt tL 2), 



} a,t^ce 



UPON ARKRING 

Dispose of wraps as soon as you are admitted. 

If you are with an escort lie should wait for you at a 
suitable place until you are ready to enter the hall. 
(Girls and boys who arrive separately in groups observe 
the same procedure.) 

Find your hostess at once and greet her. 

ON TEDS FLOOR 

If the dance is not already in progress go visiting either 
singly or with your partner or your friends. 

When you are ready to begin your first dance (and it 
should be with your escort) the procedure is: 

"May I have this dance?* 

or "Will you dance with me?" 

(Either form is acceptable.) 

After you have finished a dance you should thank your 
partner, and she in turn should reciprocate with some 

257 



258 Betty White's Teen-Age Dance Book 

sort of pleasantry. If you are not going to stay with a 
girl you should return her to her own group or leave her 
comfortably seated with her friends. 

If you are going to remain with your own girl you 
may want to go visiting again. Remember introductions, 
recognition, and consideration of older people. And 
keep an eye out for what is going on in general. It will 
help considerably when the social director or hostess is 
ready to call a mixer or any other gathering of the group. 

Be a good sport during a mixer. (Maybe she isn't your 
dream girl. The chances are she may feel the same way 
about you. ) But you can be nice! 

If "cutting in" is permitted be sure to observe the usual 
customs: circulating on the outside of the dance floor, 
lightly touching the shoulder of the boy you are "cutting 
in" on, with the customary "May IP* and not "cutting 
back** on the same boy. 

As a stag be gracious if you are asked by the usher or 
hostess to help out. And don't worry about "getting 
stuck/* That is the function of the hostess or usher to see 
that you dont. 

If you really want to share refreshments with your own 
girl be sure to reserve the dance with her just before an 
intermission. 

As you know, refreshments are taken standing or sit- 
ting, but since it is more customary to sit, this is as good 
a time as any to discuss sitting. With the torso at ease 
but erect, the feet are held together or crossed, with the 
hands resting in the lap. Conversation of an easy, 
pleasant nature should be maintained, but controversial 
issues should be avoided. 



At the Dance 259 



UPON LEAVING 

Since it is customary to have the last dance with one's 
own girl you will naturally pair off for "good-nights." 
If your hostess is engaged you should single out at least 
one chaperone or a member of the social committee to 
whom you may express your appreciation for the success 
of the dance. Whereupon you will claim your wraps and 
leave. 



29* 



The usual methods for getting to and from a dance are 

WAIJKING 
BICYCLING 

BUS 
FAMILY CAR 

And since school life has already familiarized you 
with the procedure for the first three, we will discuss 
the use of the family car. 

You know that half the fun of attending a dance is the 
anticipation and excitement of getting there and back. 
Have a good time but 'keep your head! Don't over- 
crowd the car, keep noise down to a minimiim (re- 
member the neighbors arent going to that dance), and 
watch for traffic regulations. 

If you do not have a driver's license and will require 
the assistance of the family in transporting your friends 
be sure to make your request sufficiently in advance so 
your plans will not conflict with family routine. The 
friends to be picked up should be ready to leave for 
their point of destination. If the family is to call for them 

260 



Transportation 261 

at the end of the dance make that clear too so that no 
one will be inconvenienced. 

The same consideration would be shown neighbors, 
friends, or faculty members who offered to share their 
cars. 

And, of course, you and your friends will remember 
to say "thank you/' 



31. <^>ciu,inci Cjoocl- 





Make it short and snappy! 
That's All! 



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32. 



NEVER, NEVER, NEVER 

Chew gum at a dance. 

Slouch while sitting or sprawl legs. 

Remain seated while being presented to an older person. 

Cross a dance floor. (Go round the outside.) 

Leave a girl standing on the floor. 

Create a scene (in emergency request the assistance of a 

host > hostess, or chaperone). 
Indulge in "horseplay" sliding, or running. 
Be inattentive or unco-operative while the hostess runs a 

mixer. 

Slight one person in order to dance with another. 
Serve yourself with refreshments before looking out for 

others. 

"Court" or indulge in awkward "holds" while on the floor. 
Become a dance exhibitionist. 
Criticize your partners dancing. 
Doodle on the furniture or play with decorations. 
Join the dance without acknowledging hostess. 

Can you think of anything that was omitted? 



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