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Full text of "Tennyson"

ALFRED TENNYS N 


. .. 


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LONDON: HODDER & STOUGHTON} 27, PATERl'iOSTER Row, E.c. 




ALFRED TENNYSON 


PhotoKraþh by 
The London StereoscoPic Co. 


\ 


\ 



TENNYSON 


BY 


G. K. CHESTERTON 


AKD 


l)R. RICHARD GARNET1", C.B. 


WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS 


LO
DON 
HODDER AND STOUGHTON 
27 PATERNOSTER RO\V 
19 0 3 



I'RINTED BY 
HAZFLL, WATSON AND VINEY, LD. 
LONDON AND AYLESBURY. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 


AI.FllED TI':xXYsOX 


'1'HE BIWOK AT 
(nIEHSR\' 


Ax EARLY POHTIL\IT OF 'l\:xXysOX 

O
n:HsnY Ih:(TOHY. LIXCOISsHlln: (where 
 \lfred Tennyson wa:o. born) . 
L(WTH . 


SO
I t-:HSßY lHnu'H. 
A LFItFD TEXXYSOX (from the painting In' Samuel Laurenl"c) 
TEXXYSOX's )loTHEH 
HAl; EXDEUßY CHnU'H 
AI.FUED TEXXYSOX, 1K3H 
()I.D GILUDL\.R 
CHOOI., LUCTH 
AUTHCR H. IL-\LLA
[ (from the bust b\' Chantrey) 
A LFHED 'l'J.:xxysOX (from HIP medallion In' Thomas "\>olner, H.Â.) 
THE LADY OF SlUI.Orr. 
THE P,U,M'E OF Åln' 
AU'RED TEXXYSUX (from the bust b\" 'l'homas \Yoolncr, ItA.) 
l\L-\RlAXA IX THE Sm'TH 
8'roCKwoUTH )1[1.1.. 
Cu:n.:nox CHI'JU'H 
GEUAIXT AXD EUYRX 


Ix )h:
IURLU[ (" )lan dies: nor Is there hope III dust ") 
Ix l\IE
[oULUI (.. Hing out, wild hells, to the wild sky") 
LAny TEXXYSOX 


IIORXCASTLE (the home of Emih' Sellwood). 


PAGR 


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LIST ()F JLLl
STR-L-tTI()XS 


Glu.snY CHnH'II 
CHAPEL IIOI-SE, TWH'KE"IL\. \I (Tcnnyson \ first hOlllc aftcr his Jll1uTiagc) 
ELAIXE. 


ALFRED TEXXYSOX (lHü7) 
ALFUEU TEXXYSOX (from a portrait 1)\' G. F. 'VaUs, Il.A., 183
)) 
ALFHEIJ TEXXYSOX (from the l"halk drawing hy :\1. Arnault) 
.F.\.UIUXC;FOlW (Tennyson's rcsidcnl"C' at Frcshwah'r) 
TEXXYSOX (ahout 1H71) 
)!J.:RI.IX AXH YIHEX 
}'.\.('SDIILE OF TEXXYSOX's ::\L\.X.-S(,HII'T, .. CUOSSIXC; THE B.\.H" 
GL\.HE AT FAlmIxca:C)J{f) (frolll a watcr-l"olour drawing hy )Irs. 
\llinghalll). 
FR I':SHW ATEß . 
}'u 1.:sHW .\.TEU HAY . 
GnXEYEUE 


ALFUEU TEXXYSOX 
l.'I-SXY:o.ox\ LAXE, IL\.sLE:\IEuE 
ALHWOHTH (Tcnnys(m's hOlue near IIa:o.lclllcrc) 
'l'I-:xxysOX'S ::\IE:\IOUL\.L, HEA('ox lIlLI., FHFSHWATEU 
ALFIU:U 'l'I-:xxysOX (from a portrait 1)\" G. F. 'Yatts, H.
\.) 


PAGE 



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TENNYSON 


I T was lllerch- the 
aeeident of his hour. 
the call of his age, ,,-hieh 
nuule Tennyson a philo- 
sophie poet. II e 'YHS 
naturally not only a pnre 
lo,yer of beant
r. but a 
pure lo,-er of beauty in a 
nluch nlore peculiar and 
distinguished sense e,-en 
than a nlan like I
eats. or 
a BULB like Itobert Bridges. 
I [e ga,ye us scenelo) of 
Xature that cannot easily 
he surpassed, hut he ("hose 
theln like a landscape 
painter rather than like :1 
religious poet. 1\hoye all. 
he exhibited his abstract lo,-e of the beautiful in one Inost personal 
and characteristic fact. He ,yas ne,-er 
o 
ucces
ful or so triulnphant 
as ,yhen he Wa"i describing not Xature. but art. I [e could describe 
:L statue as Shelley could describe a cloud. He ,yas at his ,-ery 
best in describing buildings, in their blending of aspiration and 
exactitude. He found to perfection the harIllony het,,-een the 
rhytlullic recurrences of poetry and the rhytlullic recurrences of 
architecture. His description, for eXaIllple, of the Palace of Art 
ilo) a thing entirely ,-ictorious and unique. The ,yhole edifice, as 


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From aþhoto by .Jlessrs. Carlton &- SOilS, H0r11Castle 


THE BROOK AT SO:\IERSBY 


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TEXX\
S()X 


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_\X EARLY 
PORTR.-\IT Of. 
TENXYSOX 


Rischgitz Collection 


described. rIses as lightly as a lyrie. it is full of the "urge of the 
hunger tor beauty: and yet a BUlB lllight ahl1ust build upon the 
deseription as upon the plan,; of an arc'hiteet ur the instruetiolls 
of a speculatiye builder. Such a lo,-er of beauty was Tennyson. 
:1 lo,"er of beauty I1l0:o,t e!-'peeially ,,-here it is I1lost to be found. in 
the ,vorks of Ulan. I Ie loyed heauty in its l'Olllpleteness, as we 
find it in art, not in itloj lllore glorious incolupleteness as ,ve 



TEXXYS()X 


s 


find it in Xature. There i
. perhaps. nlore loyelines"t in Xature 
than in art, but there are not so lllany lo\'ely things. The 
lo,-eliness is broken to pieces and 
eattered: the ahnond tree in 
hlossonl will lun-e a nloh of naIneless insects at its root. and the 
nlost pcrfeet eell in the great forest-hou
e i
 likely enough to 
snIell like a se,,'er. Tennyson lo,-ed beauty Inore in its collected 
forBl in art. poetry. and sculpture: like his o,,'n .. r .Jady of Shalott." 
it wa
 his offiec to look rather at the lllirror tlwn at the ohjeet. 
lIe "'as an artist, a
 it ,,'ere. at two renl0\-e
: he was a 
pleHdid 
ÏInitator of the 
plendid inlitations. I t i
 true that hi
 natural 
history was exquisitely exact. hut natural hi"itory and natural 


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From a IJkoto by Messrs, Carl/oil & Scm-, H0111castle 


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SO:\IERSBY RECTORY, IIXCOLXSHIRE 


\Vhere -\Ifred Tennyson ",as born, on Sunday, _-\ugust 6th, 1809 



religion are things 
that ('an he. under 
certain circunlstances, 
n10re unnatural than 
anything in the ,,'orld. 
In reading Tennyson's 
natural deseriptions 
"-e neYer seen} to be 
In physic.al contad 
_ with the earth. \ \T e 
learn nothing of the 
eoarse good - teillper 
and rank energy of 
lite. ,\,.- e see the 
,,-hule 
eelle aecurately, but "-e see it through glass. In Tennyson's 
,vorks "-e see X ature indeed, and hear X ature, but we do not sillell it. 
But this poet of beauty and a eertain luagnificent idlenes
 
Ii, ed at a tillle "'hen all lHen had to "Testle and decide. I t is not 
easy tor allY person ,,-ho li,-es in onr titHe, ,,-hen the dust has settled 
and the 
piritual 
perspecti ,-e has been 
l'estored, to realise 
what the entrance 
uf the idea of e,-oIu- 
tion Illeant fen. the 
lHen of those days. 
To us it is a disco,-ery 
of another link in a 
ehain ,,'hieh, howe,-er 
far ,,-e füllo,v it, still 
stretches hal'k into a 
di,-ine luystery. To 


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(Reproducerl from" The Laureate's Country," by kind pennis
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l\Ies!>rs. Seeley &.. Co., Ltd.) 


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From a þ/loto by lllcssrs. Carlton &- Sons, Horncastlc 


SO
IERSBY CHURCH 


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TEXX\
SOX 


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_-\LFRED 
TEXXYSON 


....... 


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From the þaÙltÙlg by 
Samuel Laurcllce 


" 


Rischgitz Collection 


I 
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l11any of the nlen of that tilne it ,,"ould appear ii'OIIl their 
\\Titings that it was the heart-hreaking and de
olatillg dis('{n-ery 
of the end and origin of the chain. To thenl had happened 
the luost black and hopele

 catastrophe eonceinLhle to hunuuI 
nature: they had found a logical explanation of all things. To 
theln it 
eelned that an ___-\pe had 
uddenly risen to gigantic stature 
and de
troyed the se'"en he:l\-ens. It i
 diÆcult, no doubt, for us 



TExx\rSON 


() 


in sOlne,,'hat subtler days to understand 
ho,,, anybody could suppose that the 
origin of species had anything to do 
wi th the origin of being. Tu us it 
appears that to tell a nUlll ,,'ho asks 
who nUlde his Jllind that e,-olution 
lllade it, is like telling a IHan ,,'ho 
asks ,,'ho rolled a cab-,,'heel o,-er his 
leg that re,-olution rolled it. To state 
the process is seareely to state the 
agent. Hut the position of those ,dlO 
regarded the opening of the "De';l'ent 
of .:\Ian ., as the opening of one of th
 
seals of the last' days, is a great deal 
sounder than people ha,-e generalJy 
allu\\ ed. It has heen constantly 
supposed that they "-ere angry 
with I)arwillislll hecause it 
appeared to do sOlnethillg or 
other to the Book of Genesis 
 
hut this ,,-as a pretext or a f:ul('Y. 
They fUlldalnentally rebelled 
against 1 )arwinisHl. not hecause 
they had a fear that it would 
affcet Seripture. hut heeau,;e 
they had a fear, 110t altogether 
unreasonahle or ill-t<HI11ded. that- 
it ,,'ould affe('t lllorality. .:\Ian 
II had heen engaged. through jll- 
j nunlerahle ages, in a struggle 
with ,;in. The eyil ,,-ithin hÏ1n 
was a
 strong as he could cope 


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BAG EXDERbY CHURCH 



,,'ith -it was as po"yerful as a cannonade 
and as enchanting as a song. Hut in this 
struggle he had ahnlYs had Xature on his side. 
He Inight he polluted and agonised. but the 
flowers ,,'ere innocent and the hillloj were 
strong. .All the arlllOury of life. 
the spears of the pine wood and 
the batteries of the lightning, ,vent 
into hattle he')ide hiBl. TennY
on 
li,-ed In the hour "yhen. to all 
nlortal appearance. the whole of 
the physieal ,,'orld de- 
serted to the de,-il. The 
uIli,-crse. goyerned hy 
,-iolence and death. left 
luan to fight alone. ,,'ith 
a handful of Illyths and 
nlenlorlCS. .:\Ien had BO\\. 
to ,nllulcr 111 polluted 
fields and lift up their 
e,'es to ahol11inahle hill
. 
They had to arlH thenl- 
scl ,yes again
t the eruelty 
of flowers and the erÏIlles 
of the grass. The first 
honour, 
OLD GRA:\IM.\R 
surely. is to SCHOOL, LOl.'TH 
tho,;e ,,'ho 
did Bot t
lÏllt 
in the t
Lee 
of that eOI1- 
founding 


Theoriginal building, 
now no longer ill 
e"istence, \\ here 
Tennyson \\as 
ent 
to school at the 
age of se\"en 
(Reproduced from 
"The Laureate's 
Country," by ki!lrl 
permission of 
l\Iessrs. Seeley & 
Co., Ltd.) 


TEXX\TS()X 


.-\LFRED 
TEN
YSON, 
IB3B 
From an early 
Daguerreotype 
(Reproduced 
from" Tennyson: 
a :\Iemoir," by 
kind permi"sion 
of l\I css rs. 
Macmillan & Co., L 
Ltd.) 


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From a drawing by E. Illlll 


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TEXX\
S()X 


eo,;u1Ïc hetrayal 
 to those ,dlo 
sought and found a ne,,' ,-antage- 
ground for the arnlY of 'Tirtue. 
()f the
e was Tennyson. and it 
is surely the nlore to his honour. 
"iillee he "'as the idle lo,-er of 
beauty of ,d101n "'e lHn
e spoken. 
Ire fclt that the tÏIne called hinl 
to he an interpreter. Perhaps 
he illight e,-en ha'
e been sonle- 
thing nlore of a poet if he had 
not "iought to be "ioluething 
Illore than a poet. l-Ie nlight 
Iun'e "Titten a nlore perfeet 
.L\rthurian epie if his heart had 
been H!-t ulueh buried in pre- 
historie sepulchres as the heart 
of l\Ir. "T. B. \r eats. He Inight 
Iun'e Illade luore of sueh poenls 
as .. The C;olden '
ear" if his 
luind had been as clean of III eta- 
physics and as full of a poetie 
rusticity as the u1Ïnd of \ \"ïllialll 
l\lorris. He Inight haye been 
a greater poet if he had been 
less a Ulan of hi"i dubious and nnllbling age. But there are SOUle 
things that are greater than greatness 
 there are SOllle things that IlO 
Ulall ,,'ith hlood in his body ,,'ouid sell t<.)r the throne of l)ante, and 
one of thelll is to fire the feehlest shot in a 'war that really await
 
deeision, or earry the Ineanest lllusket in an arIny that is really 
umrehillg by. TennY"ion may e,-en ha"e forfeited Ünulortality: but he 
and the Inen of his age ,"ere III ore than inunortal; they ,,'ere alh'e. 


" 


From the bust by Chantrey 
ARTHUR H. H.-\LLUI 


(Rt:produced from Hallam's" Remains," by kind 
permission of 
Ir. John Murray) 



TEXX\TSOX 


n 


TennY"ion had not a 
peeial talent for heillg a philo"iophie poet, 
hut he had a 
peeial \'oeation fÖr being a philosophie poet. This 
nlay 
eenl a eontradietion. but it is only heeause' all the Latin or 
(;reek ,,'ords "'e use tend endles"ily to lose their Hleaning. .A 
,'ocation is supposed to Illean nlerely a taste or faeulty. just as 
eeonOl11Y is held to nlean Illerely the act of s
l\.ing. Econoluy 
l11eans the nlanagenlcnt of a hou
e or ('onlnlunity. I f a nULn 
shUTes his best horse. or causes hi"i best worklllan to strike for 
1l10rè pay. he is not lnerely unwi,;e. he is uneconon1Ïcal. So it is 
with a yocation. If this euuntry "'ere "uddenly innuled by "olne 
huge alien and conquering populatioll. we "hould all he ealled 
t 0 bee 0 III e 
soldiers. \\T e 
should not think 
In that tinlc 
that ,,'e ,,'ere 


sacrificing 0 u l' 
unfinished "'ork 
on Cattle-Feed- 
ing or our hobhy 
of fi'ebn>rk, our 
hrilliallt career 
at the Bar ur 
our taste ifJr 
painting' in 
,,'ëlÌer - colours. 
"'" e "hould all 
ha ,'e a eall to 
a rin s . '\'" e 
should, ho\ve,'er, 
hy 110 lneans 
agree that "'e 


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ALFRED TE
NYSO
 


(Reproùuced from" Tennyson's Poems." hy kind permi"sion of 
Messrs, 
Iacmil\an &: Co., Ltd.) 



10 


TEXXYS()X 


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THE LADY OF 
SHALOTT 


From a drawing by 
II" I/olman HUllt 


(Reproduced from 
"Tenny>on's Poems," 
by kind permission of 
1\1 es"rs. 1\1 acmillan & Co., 
Ltd.) 


all had a ,'oeation for arnlS. \,.- et a ,'ocatiou IS only the [
atin tor 
a call. 
In a celebrated passage in 'J- :\Iaud," Tennyson praised the 
l110ral efleets of war, Hud declared that SOI11e great eonfliet lnight 
call out the greatnes
 e,'en of the paeific s,,'indlers and sweater
 
,,'hOl11 he 'ia'" around hinl in the Conllnercial age. He dremned, 
he said, that if- 
. . . The hattIe-bolt san
 from the three-de('ker out on the foam, 
.:\lan
 a smooth-ta('cd. sllub-nosed rogUt' would lcap frolll his ('ounter 
or till, 
And strike, were it hut with his ('heatin
 yard-wand, hOlllc. 
Tennyson li,-ed in the tÜne of a conflict Ulore crucial and fi"ightful 



TExx\rS():\T 


11 


.1 
j I 


THE PALACE OF 
.-\RT 


From a dra7l'Ùzg by 
Dante Gabriel Rossetti 


(Reproduced from 
.. Tennyson's Poems," 
by kind permission of 
:\Iessrs. :\Iacmillan & Co., 
Ltd.) 


I 
j 1 


than any European struggle. the eonfliet bet,veen the apparent 
artificiality of nlorals and the apparent iUllnorality of science. A 
ship nlore synIbolic and Inenaeing than any foreign three-deeker 
ho,ye in "tight in that tinle- - the great. gory pirate-ship of Xature. 
challenging all the ci ,-ilisations of the ,,'orId. 1\nd his suprelne 
honour is this, that he belunoed like his o'vn Î1naginary snub-nosed 
rogue. His honour is that in that hour he despised the flowers 
and eluhroideries of Keats as the counter-junIper n1Îght despise his 
tares and eottons. He ,vas by nature a hedonistic and pastoral 
poet, but he leapt froln his poetic eounter and till and struck, "'ere 
it but "rith his gilnerack Inandolin. honle. 



I:! 


TRXXY"SOX 


z 


Tenny
oll's influence 
on poetJoy lnay. f(w a 
tÏIlle, he lllodified. This 
is the fhte of e,-ery Ulan 
,,,ho thro".s hilllself into 
his own age. eatehe,,; the 
eeho of its tenlporary 
phrases. is kept busy in 
battling ".ith it
 te1l1- 
porary delusions. There 
are nUlny n1en ,dlonl 
history has f(n O a tÌJne for- 
gotten to ,,,honl it o".e
 
U10rc than it could count. 
But if Tennyson is extin- 
guished it ,,-ill be ,,-ith 
the nlO'jt glorious extinc- 
tion. There are t,,-o 
,,-ays in ,dlÌeh a Ulall 
1l1ay ,-anish - through 
heing thoroughly con- 
quered or through being 
thorougl1lythe Conqueror. 
I n the 1l1ain the great 
lJroad Chureh philosophy 
,,,hich Tennyson uttered ha
 been adopted by e,-ery one. This ".ill 
n1ake against his faIlle. }'or a lHan nlay yanish as Chaos ,-anished 
ill tl1(' thee of ereation, or he lllay yanish as (;od '.ani
hed in filling 
all things ,,-ith that ereated life. 


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ALFRED TEN
YSON 


A marble bust, copied by 1\Iiss Grant from the original, "culptured 
from life in 1857 by Thomas \Voolner, R..-\. 


Rischgitz Collection 


G. ]{. CHESTEUTOX. 



TENNYSON 
AS AN INTELLECTUAL FORCE 


] T is easy to exaggerate. and equally easy to underrate, the 
influence of TennysoIl OIl his age as an intelleetual ton
e. It 
will he exaggerated if we regard hilll as a great original nlind. a 
prodailHer or re,-ealer of no'"el truth. I t will be underrated if we 
o,"erlook the great part reselTed for hinl ".110 re,-eals. not new 
truth to the age. but tlte age to it..,elf. hy pre
ellting it .with a 


1\1 \RL\X.\ IX THE 
soerH 


F1011l a drawillg toy 
]1a'lfe Gabriel Rossetti 


(Reproduced from 
"Tenn}son'
 Poems," 
by 
inrl permi

ion of 
:\It:

rs. 1\Iacmillan &. Co., 
Ltd.) 


13 


2 



Ininiature of its own 
highest. and freq uently 
unconselous. tcndcJl- 
cles and aspiratious. 
X ot I )ryden or Pope 
were )}}()rc intinwteh r 
associated with their 
respeeti,"e ages than 
Tennyson with tlwt 
hrilliant period to 
whieh we now look 
haek as the age of 
'Tietoria. 1 I is figure 
eannot. indeed. be so dOlllinant as theirs. The \Tietoriau era was 
far IHore affluent in literary geni us than the periods of I)rydcn and 
Pope 
 and Tennyson appears as hut one of a splendid group. sonle 
of whonl surpass hilll in nati,"e f'ore(' of ulind and intellcctual 
clldowlliellt. BlIt wheJl we JlleaSUre thl'
t' illustrious nlen ,,"ith the 
spirit of their age. we 
percei ,'e that - ,,'ith 
the execptiou of 
] )iekens. who paints 
the IlUlnners rather 
than the Blind of the 
titue. and .:\Iaeaulay. 
who reproduces its 
a'-erage but not its 
higher 11100d - there 
IS sOlllcthillg as it 
,,-ere 
eetarian HI 


1-1< 


TEXX\TS()X 


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(Reproduced from" The Homes' and H.mnts of Alfred, Lord Tennyson," by kind 
pennission of :\Ir. George t;. Xapier and !\Iessrs. Jame
 l\I.ldehose &: Sons) 


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CLEVE(lO
 CHl"RCH 
\\'here the remains of . \rthur Hallam were finally laid to re
t on 
January 3nl, 1834 
(Reproduced from" The Homes and Haunts of .\Ifred, Lurd Tennyson," by kind 
permissiun uf !\Ir. Geurge G. X apier and :\Iessrs. James :\ladchuse & Sun,,) 


thenl ,yhieh pre'"cnt
 
their being aecepted 



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as Carlyle and 
Brownillg- al1d 
Thaekeray. thc 
eau
e nlaY he an 
exeeptiollal original- 
ity ,'crg-ing" upon 
c['celltri('ity; ill 
others. like (
eorge 
]1:liot. it ntHy he 
allcgiaIl{,c to SOIUC 
partieular SChellle of 
thought: in others. 
like It uskill and 
l\latthew .Arnold. 
exelusi "C de,'otion 
to SOlllC particular 
1l11

lon. In TCllIlY- 
son. and III hilll 
alone. we find the 
]uan who {'al1l1ot be 
identified with any 
Olle of the lllany 
tendcncies of the 
age. hut has afJini- 
tic
 with all. .Ask 
for the ('Olllpositioll 
,,'hich of all eontenl]>orary C"Olupositiolls hears the \"ietorian staIn)) 
nlost Ulllllistakahly, ,,'hieh tells us IHost respe{'tillg the age's thoughts 


IG 


TEXX'-SC)X 


From a dra7(1Ùlg by A. Garth jOJIL'S 


IX l\lE;\IORL\l\f 


.. ;\Ian die
: nor b there hope in du"t" 


(Reproduced from the CaJ\.ton Serie" Edition of Tenny!'on's .. In :\Iemoriam," 
by kind permi""ion of ì\I e!'sr". (;eorge N ewnes, Ltd.) 


as repre
entati ,'es uf 
their epoeh in thc 
fullest sense. In 
sonle ill
tanee
. sueh 



hcsitatioJl in natHing 
.. ]
o('ksley IIall.'. 
'I\'Jlnyson re- 
turns to his tillles 
what he has rCt"ci'-ed 
fl'Olll thenl. but in all 
exquisitely ('Ill bel- 
lished and purified 
('ondition: he is the 
Inirrol" in ",hic'h thc 
age eontenlplatcs all 
that i
 best ill itself: 
)Jatthew.l\I"J)old 
would perhap') not 
ha,'c been wrong ill 
dceJining to re('og- 
nise Tellnysoll as 
.. a grcat and po,,-er- 
ful spirit" if 
.. power" had heen 
the indispensable 
eondition of .. OTC:1t- 
M 
ne
s ": but he forgot 
thai thc re('cpti,'e 
poet UlUY he :1") 
potcnt a!o, the 
crcati ,-e. J I is ea \" i I 
11light ,,-ith cqual 
propriety ha,'e been aillled 
rests UpOll a sel'urer basis 


re
pe('ting it..,elf. and 
there will he little 


TEXXYS()X 


]7 


Ac;l 


From a drll7,'ing toy -1. C"arth /{1llt'S 


1:-': l\1E\IORL\1\I 


.. Ring out, wild bel]", to the \\ iJd 
ky" 
(Reproduced from the Caxton Series Edition of Tenlly
oll'
 .. III :\lemori,IlIl," 
by kind permission of ;\Ie
srs. George, Ne\\ne", Ltd.) 


at \Tirgil. In truth. Telluy,;oll 's f
lI11C 
than that of SOlne greater poets. for 



111 l
:llgIand. 
\ \That (;eorge 
..? \' Eliot and.. \ 11- 
thouy '1'1'01- 
lope are f<)r 
the lllanncrs 
of the period. 
11(' is for its 
lllind: all the 
idca
 \\'hieh 
In his day 
chicH y ll)oycd 
t 11 eel e e t 
spirits of 
EngIi
h so- 
eiety are to 
he t<HInd in 
hilll. e10thcd 
in the lllost exquisite language. alld cillhodied in the 1110st COllsullllllate 
fortH. That thcy did not originate ,yith hilll is of no ("onscquellee 
,dmte,-er. \\T e eaJlnot eonsider hinl. regarded nH..'J"ely as a poet. as 
quite UPOIl the le\'cl of his grcat illllllediate predceessors: hu1 the 
total disappearanec of any of' these, ex('ept '\T ord
,,'orth. would 
leaye a less painful h]ank In our intellectual hi"tOJ'Y than the 
disappearance of Tcnlly
on. 


18 


TEXX'
S()X 


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L.-\TJ\' TEN
\'SOX 


';1 

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acquaiJltmlce 
with hilll will 
al ways he iJl- 
di
pellsahI
 
to the history 
of thought 
and eulturf' 


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TEXX'
SOX 


IH 


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FUIIIl a t{rtl'i:(.illg by E. Hllll 


HORKC.\STLE 


The home of Emily Sellwood, afterwardo; Lady Tennyson 
(Reproduced from "The Laureate'" Countr}," by kind permission of Messrs. Seeky &: Co., Ltd.) 


Beginning. e,-en in his erudest attenlpts. with a nlanner di,;- 
tinetly hi,; own. he attained a style ,dlÏeh ('ould be nlistaken for 
. that of no prcdeeessor (though nlost euriously antieipated hy a few 
blank-,-erse lines of ,\rillianl Blake). and whieh no in1Ïtator has 
been ahle to ri,-al. "That is lIlost truh r relnarkahle is that while 
nlueh of his poetry is perhaps the nlost artitieial in eonstruetion of 
any in our language. and nluch again "-ears the aspect of bird-like 
spontaneity. the
e contrasted 11lanners e,-idently proeeed frOlll the 
saBle writer. and 110 onf' would think of aserihing thenl to different 
hands. .As a lllaster of blank ,Terse Tennyson, though perhaps not fully 
attaining the s"-eetnes
 of Coleridge or the occasional grandeur of 
'\
onI-;worth and Shelley. is upon the whole the third in our language 
after Shakespeare and :\Iilton, and. unlike Shakespeare and :\1 ilton. he 
ha,; Blade it difficult f()r his successors to "Tite blank ,Terse aftcr hill\ 



'Tcnnyson IS cs- 
sentiall y a ("o))lpositc 
poet. ] )rydcn's f:lJnou
 
,rcrscs, grand in ex- 
pression. hut question- 
ahle in their appliea- 
tion to 1\1 iltoll. are 
perfeetly appli('ahle 
to hinl ; sa\'e that. in 
Illakin,Q' hinl. X ature 
did not eOlll hi nc two 
poets. hut ulany. 
This IS a eOnlJllOn 
phcn0111enon at the ('lose of a great epoch; it is ahnost peculiar to 
Telln
'soll's age that it should thell h:1\.e heralded the appearance 
of a ncw era: and that. sinlultancously with the inheritor of the 
pa
t. perhaps the nlO"it original and sclf-sutfi('ing of all poets should 
IUl\"c appeared in the per"ion of Hohert Browning. 1\ (,OIllparison 
betwcell these illustriou
 writers "rould lead U"i too f:ll'; ,,'e lltl\"c 
already inlplied that 
Tellnyson occupies the 
Hlore ('onspi('uolls place 
in literary history 011 
account of his repre- 
serltati,'c ehara('ter. 
The nrst irllport- 
ant reeognitioll of 
T e Jl n y son's g e 11 i lJ 
 
('alne fronl Stuart 1\1 i II. 
.
 who. partly perhaps 
under the guidance of 
1\lrs. Taylor, e,"ineed 


20 


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1-10111 a photo ill the possession of the E"p. A. II". U'orI.:1IIall, /"icar of Cra.,by 


(;RASHY CHURCH 


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CH.\PEL HOUSE, TWICKENHA \I 
Tennyson's first settled home after hb marriage 
Rischgit/ Collection 



 



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EL.-\l 
 E 
tReproduced from" Illustrations to Tennyson's 'Idylls of the King,' ,. Ly kind permission of :\Iessr
. 
Ward, Lock &. Co.) 



I 



2:? 


TEXX\?S()"X 


ahout 183.3 a reluarkahle 
insight into Shelley and 
Brownillg a
 ,,-ell as 
Tennyson. In thf' course 
of his obselTations he de- 
dared that all t hat Tenny- 
son needed to he a great 
poet "'as a ,,;y,,;teI11 of 
philosophy. to ,,-hi('h Tinle 
,n)uld certainly conduct 
hinl. I f he only Bleant 
that Tenny
on needed 

. the years that hring the 
philosophie ulind:' the 
ohscrnttion "'as entirely 
just 
 if he expected the 
poet either to en)h-e a 
systenl of philosophy for 
hinl
elf or to fhl1 under 
the s,yay of sonle great 
thinker, he was IHistaken. 
Ilad Tenny,,;oll done either 
he Inight have been a 
very great alld ,.cry inter- 
esting poet 
 hut he e'Ould not IUl\-e heen the poet of his age: for 
the tenlper of the tilue. ,,-hcn it "'as not ,-iolently partisan. "'as 
liherally eeleetic. There "'as llO one great leading idea. such as 
that of en)lution in the last quarter of last century. so alHple 
and 
o characteristic of the age that a poet luight heeOllle its 
diseiple without yielding to party ,,,hat ,,-as nleant for Blankind. 
Two chief currents of thought there were: hut they were antag- 
onistic. e,.en though l\I r. (; ladstone has pr()\'ed that a yery 


From a þh"tograþll ill 1867 f,J' .}! n. J ItÜa .}! argarct Ca merOIl 


.\LFRED TENNYSON 


(Reproduced hy permission uf :\Ir. J. Cas wall Smith) 



TEXX\TS()X 



H 


exceptional Blind nlight 
find roonl for hoth. 
:\TothiJlg "'as Ulore char- 
aeteristic of the :lg'(' thaJl 
the reactioJl towards 
nlediR'nd ideas. head cd by 
X e"'Blan. exccpt thc rinll 
aJld seeJlliJlgly ]Jl('OJll- 
patihlf' gospel of .. the 
railway aud the ste:lnl- 
ship ,. aJld all their eorol- 
Jaries. It eanJlot be said 
that TeJlnyson. like 
(; ladstone. found equal 
rOOln f()r hoth ideals iJl 
his IlliJld, for until old 
age had nlade hinl I1li
- 
trustful and <luerulous he 
"'as esseJltially a nlaU of 
progress. But his choice 
of the .Arthurian legend <- 
for what he' inteJlded to 
he hi,,; ehief 'H)rk. and the 
seJltilneJlt of nlany of his 
nlost heautiful nlinor pOel1ls. show what attraetion the nledi
l"'al 
spirit also possessed f()r hinl; Jlor. if he was to 1)(' in truth the 
poetical representati,'e of his period. eould it haye been otherwise. 
I I e is not, IH)1ye,'er. like (; ladstone. alternately a ]}lcdia'\'al and a 
IHodern Ulan: hut he uses nledi
l"'al seJlti]}}cllt with exquisite 
judgnlent to 111 ell 0 '" ,,'hat nlay appcar harsh or ('rude in the ne\\. 
ideas of political rcfornl. difthsion of cduc:ltioJl, J1leeh:lJlic:l1 ill\'cJl- 
tioJl. free trade, aJld eoloni:ll expaJl,,;ion. The' Ïctori:lu. in f
lCt, 


1""(1/1/ tltc þ(lrtrait Ùz tlzc þ(lssaslmz (lí Lady flatlY.!)(I/l/osd, 
þaiJlit'd by C. j': 1ratts, /l.A., Ùz 1859 


.\LFRED TEN
YSO
 






 


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ALFRED TEXXYSON 
H.ischgit7 Collection 


24 



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From a þhoto b" ftlessrs. F. Frith &- Co., Reigate 
F_-\.RRI
GFORD 


Tenn)son's re!>idence at Fre!>hwater 


finds hitn"eJf nearly in the position of' the Elizahl'than. who also 
had a future and a past: and. exccpt in hi,,; own. there i" JlO age 
in which Tl'nny
on would IUl\'e felt hinl
clf' I 11 ore at hOI11e than in 
the age of Elizaheth. Ill' does. indl'cd. iJl .. 
Iaud" reaet ,'ery 
,'igorou!"'ly against certain tendeneics of the age which he disliked: 
hut this i!"' not in the interc!",t of the IHeditl'nll or an\" other order 
of ideas inc0111patihle ,,-ith the fulle'\t de\TlopJllent of the nine- 
teenth century. I f the utterance here appears passionate. it Blust 
he renlelllhered that the puet writes as a conlhatant. \\rhen he 
('on!",tructs. there i!"' nothing" l110re characteristic of hinl than his 
sanity. The \'iews on fen tall' education propounded in ., The 
Princcss" are so sound that good 
eJlSC has ,;upplied the place of 
the spirit of prophl'ey. whic'h did not tahcrnaeJe ,,-ith Tenny!"'OIl. 
,. In ':\!enH)rimll" IS a nlo,,;t perfeet expression of the a,'erag<' 
theological tenlpcr of J.:nglanù in the niJlctcenth century. ..,A s 
ill l'oinpusition, su In spirit. Tennyson's 'writings IUl\"e aU the 



:?f) 


'l'EXX\
S()X 


ad nultage... and all 
the di
a(h-alltage", of 
the golden IHean. 
Ih
 ,-irtue of thi
 
golden IBean Ten- 
n ,-...on renlailled at 
an equal di
tance 
frOln re,-olution and 
re<lctiun in hi.... idea..... 
and equally reHate 
fronl extnn-aganl"e 
and in...ipidity ill hi... 
'Hwk. He i... e\- 
sentialh" a nlan of 
the new titue: he 
begin... hi... C<lrecr 
\teeped in the in- 
tluenec of Shelle,r 
and ]
eat.... without 
wholll he ,,"ould 
ne,"er ha,-e attained 
rDm. IuJ D "J 
'Ir$. .I1J1/ia I/argar
 (am r<711 
1 F););Y
O
 (\
 T 1 71) the height he did- 
,Repruduced b peT"'IJ" >n of 
Ir" J. C." II 
mith) a height ne'-erthe- 
le

. in uur opinion. appreeiahly helow their.... if he i
 regarded 

inlply a
 H poet. But he i... H poet and luuch el
e: he i
 the 
interpreter of the \ 
ietoriHn era - tir
tly to it
elf. ...eeondly to the 
age
 to cOlne. Had e\ en any poet of greater geniu
 than hÏIu
elf 
ari
en in hi
 own day. whieh did not happen. he would ...till IUl\-e 
renlaiued the national poet of the titue in \-irtue of hi
 llni,"er.,ality. 

onle per...onal friend
 spklldidc /JICIId.ICls- -Iun-e hHiled hinl a
 our 
greate
t poet ...inee Shake"'peare. Thi... i... ah"'llrd: hut it i
 true 
that no uther poet 
inee Shake\pcarc ha
 produced a body uf 



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e,-ery 1l10Ye- 
IllC'nt of the 
ill tell e e t u a I 
litè> of the 

 L_
.. period. IT ad 
:
 his III {' 11 t a I 
balance been 
less aecu}'- 
atdy poised. 
h e ]11 i g h t 
h a ,. e b (' e n 
the laureate 
of a party. 
but he ("ould 
11 0 t h a ,. (' 
been the 
I a 11 I' cat e uf 
the nation. 
-'- \s an intel- 
lectual furce 
he I!',. we 
think, des- 
tined to he powerful and durahle. heeau,,;e the eharnl of his poetry 
will always keep his ideas hefore the popular ulind: and these 


2H 


TRXXYS()X 



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.\ F.\CSL\lILE OF TE
NYSOX'S M.\XUSCRIPT, "CROSSIK(-; TIlE lUR" 


(Rt:proùuc
d from" Tenn)'!>on: \ l\It:moir;' hy kind pt:rmi!>!>ioll of 
l\Ie
srs. :\Iacmillan K Co., Ltù.) 


poctry,,-hi("h 
('(HUeS so near 
to satisfying- 
all ta.,te
. 
ree 0 n e i I i n g- 
all tcndcn- 
e]es. a]I(1 
reg i s t e r i ] I g 



the cOllceptioll of 
Freedolll a.., sOJnething' 
that .. hroadens down. 
frOIIl precedent tu prc- 
cedellt ..: ,'cncratiol1 
for .. the Throne Ull- 
shaken stilL" 
o long a.., it continuc...; .. broad-hased 
wilL" which will always he the case so long as 


ideas will always he 
congenial to the solid. 
practical. rohust. and 
yet tell d era n d 
en}()tional lHind of 
England. They lllaY 
he bricfiy defined as 
the recognition of thc 
associatioll of ("011- 
tinuity with nllltahilit
. 
jn hunwn in,,;titutiolls : 
the utnlost re,-ercncc 
for thc ra-..t cOJnhined 
with the fulì mal not 
regretful a dill i..,.., ion 
that - 


The old order clumges, 
gi, ing placl' to ne\\", 
Awl (
od fulfils Himself 


In man, wa 'os: 


TEXXYS()X 


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Fr01lt a 'il'at.r-COI{111r dra7(.ing by .J/rs. .rllltnglla1lt 


THF. GL\DE .\1' F \RRI
GFORD 


(Reproùuced by k1l1ù permi
sion of the .-\rtist) 


upon the People's 


Stateslllell at the Coullcil llleet 
\Yho klHm the seaSOlls. 


Philosophically and theologically, Tellnyson is e'"en Illure eOI1- 

pi('uou..,ly the representati,'e of thc a,'crage }:nglish Iuilld of his 
:3 



da
'. X ot that he j" 
a fu"iou of conflicting 
tcndeneies. hut that 
he oeeupies a ('cntral 
position. equall
' rc- 
lliote fl'Olll the ex- 
cesses of scepticisnl 
and the ex('cssC" of 
d e ,- 0 t ion . T his 
positioll he is ahle to 
fill fi'on) his relation 
to Coleridge. the great 
exponent of the i.'Ùf 
media: not. as in tcu'ulei' days. beh,'ecn Protestantislll and HOlllan- 
iSJu. but between orthodoxy and ti'ee thought. Tennyson canJlot. 
indeed. he tenlled Coleridge's iutellectual heir. As êI thinker 
he is far belo"r hi') predecessor. and ahllost den>id of originality; 
but as a puet he tills up the Jueasure of ,,'hat "'as lacking in 
Coleridge. ,,'hose season of speeulation hardly arri,'ed until the 
seasun of poctr
r was 
! 
past. Tcnnyson "-as 
hut one of a band of 
auditors - it Jllig-ht be 
too ulueh to call thel1l 
di,;ciplcs -of the sage 
,,'ho. ('Ilriollsh r enough, 
had hinlself been a 
Caluhridge nlHn. and 
,,'ho. short and un- 
')atisf
tctory as had 
been his residence at 
that seat uf learning. 


:30 


l'EXX)
S( )X 


- 


,.; 


",.. r .... 
--. 


.' 


. \.;: 


, I 


From a þlloto by Jlcssrs. F. F
itll & Co., Reigate 


FRESH\L\TER 


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From a þllOto by Jlessrs. F. Fritli & Co. Rdgate 


FRESH\L\TER BAY 


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From a draztJÙzg by Gus/m'c Doré 


GUI
EVERE 
(Reproduced from the" Illustrations to T t:nny
on's . Idylls of the King,'" by kind permis
ion of 
:\Iessrs. \\"anl, Lock & Co.) 
3 1 



I 
II 


II 


'" I\c, 


From a þlzoto ry Barrnud 


_-\LFRED TE
XYSO
 


)2 



")eellled to hayc left 
hehind hini 
onle in- 
yi"iihle influen('e des- 
tined to gerIllinatc ill 
dut' tinie. for all hi"i 
lllost distinp.'uished 
f()llowers were Can- 
tah",. Such another 
sehool. only laeking a 
poet. had flouri ,hed at 
C 
lln h rid g e i nth c 
seycJtteenth ecntur . \y. 
From a pIlato by the (;raþlwlcJJle (0. 
and now eaJlle up TEXXYSOX'S L.-\NE, HASLEl\IERE 
again like long-huried seeds in a nc\dy di",turhed soil. The precise 
yalue of their idea"i lllay always he Jllatter f()l' discussion; but 
they exerted without douht a happy influence by 


TEXX\TSOX 


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TUl'l1i Il
 to S('OI'll with lips <Ii ,-j Ill' 
The falsl'hood of l''\.tn'lIll'S. 


pr<n-i ding re ligi 0 u s 
nlÏnds re,-erent of thf' 
past \\Tith an altern a- 
tiye to nicre Illedi- 
a'yalisni. and gently 
curhing Seienee in the 
charaeter she sOJnc- 
tÏ1ne'Ì as"ilHne"i of .. a 
wild Palla\; of thc 
brain." ""hen the 
natural nloodincs
 of 
Tennyson"s tenipera- 
lnent is considered, the 



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1111 I 
!III
 


From a photo by tILt: Craplwtollt! Co. 
ALDWORTH 


1";nny
on 
 home near Haslemere 



34 


TEXX\TS()X 


preyalent optillli
nl of his ideas, hoth 
as rcgards the indi,'idual and the 
State, appear"i infinitely creditable to 
hil11. The
t' art' ideas natural to 
sane and reflceting EnglisllJnell. nl1- 
ehallenged in quiet tilues, but ,,'hic'h 
luay be obscured or oyerwhehned in 
seasons of great popular exeiteluent. 
The inteHcetual force of Tennyson is 
perhaps chiefly sho,,'n in the art and 
attra('tiyeness with whieh they are 
set forth: e\'en HIU('h that Illight 
ha\'e appeared tmne or prosai(' is 
ÏJl\-ested with all the ehanns of 
inlaginatioll. and ('OH111lends itself to 
the poet equally with the "itatesnuul. 
Tenn YSOH is not the greatest of poets, 
hut appreeiation of hi
 poenls is one 
of the surest eriteria of poetieal 
taste 
 he is not one of the greatest 
of thinkers. hut agreelnent ,,'ith his 
geJlera] east of thought is an excel- 
lent proof of sanity: nHlny "iingers 
]ul\'e been Blore l)elphic in their 
inspiration. but few, hy nlaxinl
 of telnperate ,,-isdolll, haye pro\'ided 
their natiyc land ,,"ith 
lIch a Palladianl. 


')t. 


. 


. 



 


From a þhoto by Jlcssrs. F. Frith & Co., 
R cigatc 
TEN
TSO
'S :\IK\IOR L\L, BEACON 
HILL, FRESHWATER 


HI(,IL\HD (;.\HXETT. 


B [ () G H .. \ P II I C .i \ L X () T E 


Somersby 
Rectory, the 
birthplace of 
Alfred Tennyson 
Ji'e page 3 


.\lfn'tl '1\'III1Y
1I1I wa
 horu 1111 
IIIIIIay, .\I1g-I1
t lith, I BO!!, at 
ol))l,\'
hy. 
a ,'illagl' iu Xllrth Lillelllll
hi\'e hehn'plI IIl1rllea,.,th, alllI 
pil
hy. lIi
 t:tth.'r, 
thl' Rt'\", D\'. (;ellrg-e Clay tOil Tellup'"II, Redo\' IIf 
lIml'\'
hy, mal'ril:'lI ill I BO.; 
EEzahl'th Fytel I(' , dallghtl'l' of tIll:' \ïear of LOllth, ill the 
ame COUllty; alllI, 
c.t' their twe1\'c chilcIrl'll, .-\.lfred wa,., thl' fOllrth. 



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ALFRED TENXYSON 
Rischgit7 Collection 


35 



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Sö 


So:nersby Brook 
see pa/ie [ 


Tennyson's 
Mother 
fee pag_' 6 


Somersby 
Churc
 
see pa.r:' -t 


Bag Enderby 
Church 
see page 6 


Lou
h 
st'(' pa;e -t 


The Grammar 
School, Louth 


\l'l
 J">il 
t-' ï 


BI( )GJL:\PIITC_A L 


X()TE 


Ill' ah\'a)"
 
poke with affel.tiollate l"l'memhrallc(, of hi
 early hOl11e: of the 
wOOllhille traillell rOllllll hi
 lI11r
er)" willi low ; of the lHellia'\"al-lookillg- dillillg-- 
hall. with it,.. poillh'll ,..tailled-g-la

 ('a
e11Wllb; of thl' pll'a
allt tlrawillg'-I'oom, 
lilled "ith hook
heln'
 allli fllrlli
hed ,,-ith yellow llphol
tery, TIIP lawII ill 
frollt of the hOll
I'. ,,'hel'(' he I'ompo,..ed hi
 early },oem. ".\ 
pirit llal\lIt
 
the Y ear' 
 La
t 1l011r
," wa
 m-er
h:1I10weI1 Oil olle 
ide hy wy('h-elm
. Oil th(' 
other hy lan'h a 111 I 
Yl'amOl'e tree!'.. (hI the 
ol\th ,,'a,.. a path hO\1lll11'Il hy a 
tlmH'r-hcll"llel'. a 111 I he)"OIlIl .. a g-ardell hower'd 1'lo
I'" 
Iopillg- g-radllally to th(' 
fieM at the hottom of \\'hil'h rail the 
oml'l',..h)" Brook 
That 10\ es 
To purI o't>r matted cress and ribbed sand, 
Or dimplc in the dark of ru
h
 cO\e.:i, 
Vra\\ ing il1lo his narrow earthen urn 
In e\-erV elLow and turn, 
The filtered tribute of the ruugh woodland, 
TIll' ,,1mI'm a 1/11 heanty of thi... hl'llllh hallllh.tl t]\(-, poet throl1
dlol\t hi.. lifl'. 
allll to it he e
pl'l'iall)" Ill'llil'ate,1. .. Flm\ IIOWIl, ('oM rintll't. to the 
l'a." 
TellllY
OlI dilillot, hmn'n'r, attrihllte hi
 f:mlOl\'" poem, .. The Bmok," to thl' 

ame HlI1n'I' of ill
)liratioll. dl'darilll[ it wa
 1I0t :1I1Ilre

I'11 to allY 
tn'am ill 
I'artil'll]ar, 
T(,III1Y
OIl "W" ('xf't'ellilldy fOl'tllll<lh' ill the 1'll\'irOlIlJWllt of lli
 ..JlildhoOll 
amI the early illtlul'lIl'e exer('i
,'d h)" hi
 pal"l'llt
. I1i
 mother ,,'a,.. of a ,;;"-e..t 
allll g-elltle ,li
plì,
ltioll. awl d.'\"oh'll hl'r
elf elltil'ely to tl\(, wl'lfa n-' of her 
hll
hallli allli hl'r I'hiMl'ell. Iler 
Oll i
 
aid to han' takell her a
 a mmlpl ill 
.. 1'hl' Pl'ill('e,..
"; allll hI' I'ertailll)" g-an' a 1111))'1' or II'';;!' trllthfllllle
(,l'iptioll 
of thi
 .. I'enmrkahle awl 
ailltlr WOlnclll" ill hi
 poem" ]...ahe] " : - 
Locks not wide-dispre.ld, 
:\Iadonna-\\ise on either side her head; 
Sweet lips whereon perpetually did re;gn 
The summer caIrn of golden charity. 


1'ellllp'oll'
 filthel' wa.... a mall of mal'kl'd phy
i('al ,..trell
h awl 
tatlll"l', 
I'alled hy hi
 pal'i
hiOller
 .. 1'hl' 
terll Dodor," ] II !H07 hI' wa,.. appoillh'll 
to the li,'illp: of 
ollwr
h)". awl that of the :1I1.ioillillg- ,'illal!'l' of Bal[ I<:lIIlel'hy. 
awl thi... I'o
itioll hI' held nlltil hi
 Ileath, OIl )]al'l'h l1ith. IB:H, at the ag-l' of 
fifty-two. Ill' wa
 hllriell ill thl' 0111 1'1 11111 try ('hlll'('h)'<1l'I1. \\'hen' .. ah
olllh' 

tilhl('''''' rejg-II
." ],I'llI'ath the :-:h:uh' of the rllg'g'etl litt]p to\\'er, III hi:-: tillll' 
thl' roof of the I'hllr.'h wa:-: I'm'en',l with that('h. a:-: we 1'(' al:-:o tho
e of thl' 
I'ottag'e
 ill it
 illlllll'lliah' \"i('illity, 
The li,'illl[';; of 
omel'
"Y allli Ba
 1<:III1.'I'hy wen' heM (,OIl.iOilltly. ,..etTil'e 
hl'illtr (,OllllIH'ted at OlIP I'hllr('h ill the mOl'llillg' allli at the other ill the 
;lftPJ'JIOOll. ])1', 1'plJl\r
1I1I read hi
 R'l'mOlI
 at Bag' 1<:1II1erhy fmm du' 1111:Òlt 
hig-h-hllilt p"lpit. 
\lfh'dli
h'lIillg- to them from the 
(llliI'P'
 l'OOIllY 1'1'\\', 
.\t the ag'" of 
en:'11 Telllly
oll wa
 
ellt to 
dlOol at LOllth. a mal"kt:'t-tmnl 
whi('h lIIay f:lirly lay ('lailll to h;l\'illg' heell a f:ll'Ìor of 
OI111' illlpOl"talll'(' ill hi,.. 
early life. IIi,.. matl'l"lIa] g-rawllllothl'r lin'd ill "re4trah' Pla('e, hl'!' hOIl
(, 
IH'illtr a "'l'l'lIIul hOllle to thl' YOIIIIg- Tellllr
oll
. Thl' old (;ramlllar 
('hool 
wheJ'(' .\lfrell I'('('ein,.l tlll' l'al"ly portioll of hi
 elhwatillll i
 110\\ 110 llllll!el' ill 
e:\i4t'III'I'. T(-,1lI1Y
01l' 
 rel'ollt:'dioll
 of it awl of the Re\". IJ. "'aite. at that 
time tht:' ht:':1I1-ma
tt:'r, wt:'l"e 1I0t plt'a
allt, ., IIo\\" I did hate that 
I'htlol! 



Arthur Hallam 
(from the bust by 
Chantrey) 
see palie 8 


The Lady of 
Shalott 


Jee p{
!!{' 10 


BI<)(;IL\ PIIIC_A L 


x (yr J;: 


:Ji 


he \\Tote later. .. The ollly trOW 1 I trot from it wa.. tht' meHlory of the won I,.; 
Slll//1.... tI,.....ili,,/Ili.... (f(l'f(f', allll of all 0111 wall l"on'refl \\ ith willI Wl'I"I,.; (lppo,.;itl' 
the ,.;("hool \\ illllow,.;." 
TI-'III1Y";OIl\. fir
t C'Olllll'('Ü'11 poem!"' were l"omll11..l'll at LOllth, awl ill thi.. 
tcn\"ll al..o hi.. fir,.;t Pllhli,.;hl'll work ,.a\\ the lig-ht, appl'arillg- ill a \'olllmC' 
t'lItitlC'11 .. POl'm,.. hy Two B1'othl'1',..." i";,.;lIl'll ill 1 B:!7 hy 
Ir. .J. .JaC'k,,;oll, a 
hook..elh'r. The t\\ 0 h1'othl'l'''' Wl'n' ('hadl''' awl .\lf1'l'll TI'IIII y"oll. 
.\ftl'1' a ,..C'hooll"art'er whiC'h la,..tl'll fOil I" yea I''';. .-\lfl'C'II rl'tll1'lIell to :-O;omt'1'..hy 
to l"olltilllll' hi.. 4l1flil'.. 1111,11'1' hi.. filthl'1"" tllitioll. Thi.. ('lIlIr,.;e of ill,.;tl"lwtioll 
\\,1'" "'lIpplC'mC'lItC'II hy ("la,....il.,.. at the hallll,.. of a Romall ('atholiC' pril''';t. a 111 I 
HIII..il.-lc'''',..OIl,.; /..6n'lI him hy a tC'aC'hl'l' at II o rlll'a 4 II'. 
III IB:!B ('harle',.. awl .-\lfn'll TC'III1Y""OIl follcnH'l1 their elllC'r hI'Othl'I' 
FI'C'IIC'rit'k to Tl"illity ('olll,trC'. Camhritlg-l'. They hC'g-an their llllin.r..ity lift, 
ill 10clg-illg-,.. at 
o. 1:!, R"",l' ('n',..n'lIt. mo\"ÍlI
 latC'1' to Tl"IlIIlpilll!toll :-;t1'eet, 

o. .;7. ('orplI,.; Bllilllilw:,,;. Of hi,.; l'arly C':\pl'1'il'lIt'e,.; of lift' 'at ('amhritl
t', 

\lt'rt'11 \\TotC' to hi
 allllt: .. I am ,.;ittilll! tl\d-likt' allll ..olitary ill my room,.; 
(llothillg- hl't\\"eell me awl thl' ,.;bu'.. hilt a ,.;tmtllm of tile..). The hllof of 
tht' ,.;ìt't'll. the roll of till' wlll'l'1. thl' ..I 10 lit,.; of tlrllllkell (;OWII allll 1II"IIIIhl'II 
TO\\"11 ('fIIlll' up from helem' \\ ith a 
C'a-liht' murmllr. . . . The ('olllltry i.. ,..0 
,li,..g-II,.;tillg-ly lC'n'1, thl' ren'lry of thl' plan' ,.;0 mOllotoIlOIl";, the ,.;tllllie.. of the 
{"lIin'r,.;ity,.;o IIlIiIlÜ'n,,.;tillg-. :-:0 mudl matter of fa('t. 
OIll' hut ,I1'y-lll'allt',I, 
t'alC'lIlatillg-, allg-lIla1' little g-elltll'HWII C'all take mllC'h Ilt'litrht ill tht'm." 
It \\ a,.; at Trillity ('olIe
e that Tl'III1Y:-:OII fir,..t malll' the al"fl'laillbull"l' ot 
.\rthll1' lIallam. YOIIII
I',..t ..fill of thl' hi,.;tori:l1I. who:-:I-' fl'il'llIl:-:hip ,.;0 profolllltlly 
illt1ul'lIt'ell the pOl't':-: l"haral'Ìl'r alltl g-l'lIill", ,. Ill' wII1I111 ha\'e IIl'l'lI klllm II if 
he halllin',l." wrote Tl'IIIIY..OIl, .. a:-: a 
1'l'at mall, hut 1I0t a:-: a g-rl'at poet; he 
wa,.; a:-: lIear pl'rt't'dioll a.. mOl"talmall ("011111 he." 
III Fehrlla1'Y lB:H Tl'llIlY"'OIl left ('amhl'illgl' withollt takillg a ,ll'gn'l'. awl 
rl'turllell to :-O;oml'1'..hy. hi:-: filthe1' ,Iyillg- withill a mOllth of hi,.. arri,-al. From 
thi:-: time OIlwarll lIallam hel"aml' all illtimatl' \-i:-:itor at the Rl'dory, awl 
filJ"llll"l all attaC'hmellt for hi:-: fl"iewr:-: ,.;i,.;tl'r Emily. III .July lB:;:! TI-'III1Y,..11II 
:tIIII llall:tlH 
H'lIt tOIl1'ill.!! fill the Rhille, awl at the C'lo..e of the year appl'arell 
the \"Illllme of .. Poem,.; hy .\lfre,1 Telllly,,;oll," whit'h l"olltaille'1. amollg-,..t 
otht'r
. .. The Lally of :-;halott." .. The )Iilll'1""; })all
hter," .. The Palal'e 
of .\rt," .. Tht, Loto.. Eater,..:' awl ".\ Dream of Fair \\'omt'II." 
.. \\"l'll I reml'mhl'r thi,.; ptll'm." wrote Fit7g-l'ral,l. with rl'fl'n'w'e to .. The 
L:ltly of :-O;halott," .. reall to mI-'. hl'fon' I kllt'\\- tIll' alltho1', at ('amh1'i,I
1-' 0111' 
llig-ht ill 1 B:3:! 01' :30 a 1111 it,.; imatrl',.; pa..,.;illg- al"ro..,.; my heac1. a,.; al"J'()";
 the 
magiC' mirror, \\"hill' half a..ll'l']I Oil themail-(.oaC.ht o L o llc1oll.illthl.C.I.I.I.pilll!: 
l1awlI ' that fo11owl'll." 


There 
he weaves hy night and d,lY 
. \ magic \\ ch \\ ith colours ga). 
She has heard a \\hisper sa\', 
A curse is 011 her if she 
ta'\. 
To look do\\ n to CallJelot. 
She kno\\ 
 not what the curse may he, 
And so she \\-ea\-eth steadih, 
.\nd little other care hath she, 
The Lad} of Shalott. 
'I he illea of .. )Ia1'ialla ill the :-0;0 11th " l"aHll' to 1'l'lIl1y..OIl a,.. he \\ a,.. 



:JH 


" Mariana in the 
South .. 
sæ page 13 


Stockworth Mill 
Jet: page q 


The Palace of Art 
see page II 


Clevedon Church 
see page q 


" In Memoriam" 
see pages 16, 17 


The home of 
Emily Sellwood, 
at Horncastle 


fee page 19 


BI()GltAPHIC...\ L 


X()TE 


tran>llill{.!: hetweell 
arholllll' aIllI Perpig-llall. Hallam mterpreted it to he 
the" expn'
:-<ioll of Ile:-<olate 101lelille

." 
Till all the crimson changed, and past 
Into deep orange o'er the sea, 
Low on her knees herself she cast, 
Before Our Lady murmur'd she; 
Complaining, .. Mother, give me grace 
To help me of my weary load," 

-\nd on the liquid mirror glow'd 
The clear perfection of her face. 
()f tlw:-<e earlier poem:-< 1I0lle :uM,'1I mort' to Tt'lIny:-<oll\: {.!:rowing- reputatioll 
thall "The :\Iiller':-< ])allg-hter." It wa:-< pl"ohahly writtell at ('amhri,lge, a III I 
the poet Ilee1an'fl that the mill wa:-< 1111 partil"ular mill, or if he h,ul thou
!."ht 
of any mill it wa:-< that of Trumpingtoll, lIear ('amhridg-e. But \"arinu" 
tmwhe.... ill th,' poem 
eem to iIlllil"ah' that tIll:' haullt:-< of hi
 boyhollli were 
pre:-<ellt ill hi... milIll. 
:-itol"kwol"th :\1 ill \\"a:-< :-<ituah,1I ahollt two mile:-< along- tllP hank:-< of thl' 
:-iomer:-<hy Brook, the poet':-< t;l\'ollrite walk, alIll mig-ht n'ry \\'ell han' ill:-<pirPII 
the ...ettill/! of the
e hl'alltiful \'er:-<l':-<. 


I loved the brimming wave that swam 
Thro' quiet meadO\\s round the mill, 
The sleepy pool aum'e the dam, 
The pool beneat h it never still, 
The meal-sacks on the whiten'd floor, 
The dark round of the dripping wheel, 
Tlw very air about the door 

Iade misty with the floating meal. 
III the Hllume of IB:t!, "e\"pral :-<tanza:-< of "Th(' Palal'(, 
omittell, hel'allse Tl'llJIY:-<Oll thou{.!:ht the pOl'm wa
 too filII. 
of .-\rt,' " he wrote ill 1 m)o, "i:-< the emhllllimellt of my own 
(;OIllike life i
 with mall aIllI for mall." 
.\1110llg-
t tlll' "mal"\'elloll:-<ly l"ompl'e

(,11 word pil'tlln':-<" of thi... poem i" 
the heautiful one of Olll' illu:-<tratioll Oil pag-t' ] l. 
Or in a clear-wall'd city on the sea, 
X ear gilded organ-pipes, her luir 
\V ound \\ ith white roses, slept St. Cecily; 
An angel look'd at her, 
Oll the] .'"jth of 
eptem hl'r, IB:3:3, 
 \rth ur Hallam lIiell :-<l\Iltlelllyat Yielllm. 
IIi:-< n'maill
 were hroug-ht to Ellg-laIlll. aIllllail1 filially to re4 ill the oM alIll 
londy l'hllrl'h he
ilh' the :-<ea at Cle\"elloll, Oll Jalluary :31'11, La:).!. 
\\'hen on my bed the moonlight falls, 
I kno\\- that in thy place of rest 
By that broad water of the west 
There comes a glory on the walls. 
Telllly
on'
 whole thou
ht" \\"l're ah:-<orhell ill memOl'ie
 of hi
 frieIllI, aIllI 
ht' l'olltillually w\'llh' frag"m
lItary n'r
l'
 Oil tIlt:' olle tlll'nw whil'h filll'll hi
 
heart. mallY of them to he I'mll1l1liell :-<,'n'lIteell year
 lab>r ill the complete,l 
" I II )1 t'moriam. " 
In 18:10 Tl'llllY
OIl fir
t met Emily :-ipll\\"oOlI, who tWl'nty year:- late I' 
hel'anll' his wi fl'. Horll,'a
tle \\'a" the llt'arl':-<t to\nl to :-iomer
hy. aIllI ill the 
pil'ture:-<I]1H' 0111 market-:-<ll'larp 40011 the n'll-hril'k re:-<illelll'e of :\11,. Hellry 
:-iellwooll, a ,..olil"itor. 'I'll(' YOUII{.!: 
dl\\ 00l1
 heillg 111I11'h of th(' 
ame age a,;: 
the Tellny
oll:-<, a fril'IlI1
hip :-<l)\'all{.!: up hetweell the two thmilie:-<, which in later 


of Art" wen
 
" 'The Palal'e 
hdief that the 



Grasby Church 
Ste page 20 


Lady Tennyson 
st"C page 18 


Chapel House, 
Twickenham 
see page 20 


Farringford, 
Tennyson's 
residence at 
Freshwater 
see page 25 


The Glade at 
Famngford 
see page 29 


llIOC;RA PI) IC ...\J.J 


x (yrE 


Bn 


ypar
 rippllpll illtn a douhl.. matrimonial relation
hip. In lU:l(j, ('harlp
 
Tenlly
oll. thp popt'
 dfler hrother, married Loui
a. the YOUlIg-e
t ,laughter of 
IIpllry Splhnlllli. III thp IU'I'\'iou
 ypar he ha.! 
lll"l"eedl',1 to the e
tate allfl 
li\'illg- of (;ra
hy. taking- tlw "'nrllanw of Turllpr ullfll'r hi
 g-reat-unl'lp'", will. 
.-\t hi
 OWII expen
e he huilt the dl'aragp. the churl'h allfl thp 
('hool
 ; allfl 011 
hi
 Ileath, ill lBi!l, (;ra
hy flp
I'ellfll'd to the Popt Lallrl'atl'. It wa'" at hi,., 
hrothpr' 
 "pfMillg- that thp hrillp' '" 
i4pr, Emily, wa
 takplI illto ('h url'h hy 
.\lfrpfl Tplllly
on, hut IIfI plIg-ag-pmellt \\'a
 rel'ng-lIi
I'fl 111-,twl'l'lI them ulltil four 
or fin' ypar
 latpr, allfl thpir marriagl' llilll10t takp plal'p IIlItil lB.,)O. It wa
 

olpmlli
ed at 
hiplake ChuI"I'h 011 .fune I:Jth, the l'lergymal1 who offif'iatf',l 
hpillg- thp popt' 
 illtimatp fril'lIfl. the Itp\". Rohert RawlI
ley. 
III the '\I'ril of thp 
amf-' )"l'ar. 011 the death of "'orll
worth, TI'II1IY"OIl 
hall hl'l'lI otfen'fl the pOf-'t-laurpaÌl'
hip. to which po,.;t he wa
 al'l'oilltefl 
Oil :'\o\'emher Wth, "'\"ÍIIg- f'hil'tiy to Priw'p .-\lhert'
 :lflmiratioll for .. III 
:\Iemoriam. " 
Lally Tplllly",on hecame the pol't'
 :lfl\"i,..t'r ill literary mattpr
. .. I am 
IU'01lfl of her illtdlpl'Ì." he wrote. Shp, with her" tellfler. ",piritllal naturp," 
wa,.. alway
 hy hi
 ",illl', ('hl'l'rfll1. ('oura
pfHl
. allfl a "yml'athetif' cOUlI"dlor. 
:-:lll' "hidllpfl hi" "l'lI"iti\"p 
pirit from the alllloyalll'p", awl trial
 of lifp awl 
.. }J('r f:lÍth a" dear a
 thl' hpight,.. of the .fullp-hlup hpa\'ell " hl'lppll him ill 
hour" of dp}H'p",,,ioll awl 
orrow. 
('hapel IInu
p. Twiekl'lIham. \\'a
 till' popt'" fir"t "l'ttlpd homp aftpr hi
 
marriag-p. amI he rp"idpfl ill it for three ypar
. It wa
 here hi
 " (>.Ip Oil thp 
I )l'ath of the Dukp of ". d}ill
....ton " \\":J
 written, allfl the hirth of hi" "on 
IIallam took pla('p in thi" hou
f-' on Aug-u...t ] lth, lB.'):!. 
III [B.,):l, whil
t "tayill
 in the I"le of "'il!ht, Tenny"on hearfl that the 
rl'
iflpHl'e ('alll'fl Farring-fonl Wa
 to let at Frp
hwatpr. lIe 1l1'cillefl to take 
the place fill lea"e. hut Ì\\ 0 year" latpr purl'ha",pfl it Ollt of the procppll,.. 
rp
nltiBg- frmll ,. .:\Ianll," whil'h wa
 puhli"hpll in lB.').>, amI Farrillg-fcll"fl 
rpmailwll hi
 IHlnw durillg- thp g-rpater part of pal'h ypar tin' forty year", allfl 
hcrp hp \\Totp "'omp of hi", hl'"t-kBowl1 work",. 
.. T}Il' }IOU",..:1t F:uTillg-till"fI." "ay
 :\1 r". Ri('lmHlml Ritl'hil' in her RI'(,oJ'd.'<, 
c. 
ppmpll like a l'harnwd I'al:we, with g-reen wall
 without, allll 
pl'akillg 
wall
 within. There hUIIg- DanÌl' \\'ith hi" "olpmn 110"1' amI \\'reath; Italy 
I!leamefl (I\'pr the doon\'ay,..; fripllll
' f:H'e,.. lillpd the p;t
",al!p". hook,.. filll'fl 
the "hph'p", amI a g-low of l'l"im"on \\'a" pH'rywhen'; tlw oriel flrawillg-- 
rool1l willliow wa
 fnll of g-n'l'n allli g-oMpn lean'",. of the "'ollJlfl of hinl,.. alii 1 
of thp fli",tallt "pa." 
Thp g-roUllfl", of Farrillg-fonl are p\:l'pl'flillg-ly hpautiful a 1111 l'icturl',..fJue. 
011 the "outh 
ifle of the hOIl"p i
 the 
l:lfle, allfl do:;c hy 
The \\a\"ing pine which here 
The warrior of Caprera set. 
H('ferrill
 to Farringforfl ill hi,.. im'itatiun to .:\lauriCl'. Tl'II1IY"'OlJ \\'rote- 
\Yhere far from noise and smoke of town 
I \\ atch the twilight f.tIling hrown 
All round a careless order'd garden, 
Close to the ridge of a noble down. 
The ricl/!"e of tIll' flown in fjue,..tion ("flll
tituted the 1'0l't'
 f:lnmrite walk, alld 



40 


Freshwater Bay 
see page 30 


Freshwater 
Village 
see pa/:e 30 


Alfred T:!nnyson 
see paJ{es 22 alld 26 


.. The Idylls of 
the King" 
set' pagrs 15. 21, 
27,3 1 


Aldworth 
see page 33 


Tennyson's Lane 
see page 33 


Tennyson's 
Memorial, 
Be:lcon Hill, 
Freshwater 
see page 3-t 


Alfred Tennyson 
(from the paint- 
ing by Samuel 
Laurence) 
see page .=; 


Alfred Tennyson 
I from the paint- 
ing by G, F. Watts 
in U!69) 
see p",!,;e 23 


BI( )(; IL \PI-I I(
A T.I 


X()TE 


the "'I'e)lI-'rr \\"hich he l'Ill'lIullh'rl',l rllll\Hl Fl'l.:-<hwatl'r Bay l11i/!'ht wl'll ha'"t' 
hl'I'1I repr(,"'l'lItell ill the IIpellillg- n.)'...l' IIf .. Elloeh A rdl'1I "
 
J .ong lines of cl;ff breal,ing have left a chasm; 
Aud in the chasm art> foam and ) ellm
 sands. 
IlIlallll the rO:lIlll';1I1:-< tll the little \"illa!!l' of Fn':-<hwater, ill whi('h thl' l'rpdioll 
III' a Ilnl111)(-'r IIf lIew hon:-<t.... e\"llkell frol11 the plll't thl' lilll':-< - 
Yonder lies our young sea-\ illage-Art and Gr;lce are le'is and les
: 

cience grow" and Be,LUty d\\ indIes-roofs of slated hideousness! 
()ppll:-<ih' thl':-<l' \,illa:-< :-<tallll:-< all i'T-('la,l hou:-<e at that timl' tl(Tupied hy 
:\11':-<, ,J IIlia ('al11erllll. the el'h'hratl'll ];lIly art-phlltog-rapher. hnl of who
l' 
,.ffedin' portrait:-< ofTl'III1Y:-<OIl appear till pag-e:-< 

 allli 
Ii. 
111 thl' antnl1111 of lB.;!), .. Thl' ltlyl1:-< IIf thl' Killg''' \n'n' fir:-<t i:-<:-<nl'll ill thl'll' 
original form, heillg' filllr ill \lI1ll1hl'r: Ellitl. \ï\'il'lI. Elaille, allli (;nilll'n'n', 
a 1111 frol11 thl'ir pnhli('atioll nlltil thl' l'III1 of 1'l'III1Y:-<Oll'''' lifl' hi,.. f:ulle a 111 1 
popnlarity ('Olltilllll'll withont a ('heek. l)nrillg- the lIext few Yl'ar
 tIlt. poet 
:-<pl'lIt mu('h tinw ill tr;l\'ellill.!!. hnt ill 1BliB he laitl the ftllll Hlat i 01l-:-<t 0 Ill' d' a 
IlI'W l'l':-<illelll'e, WI 111 I'd 
\ldworth, ahllut two mile... from lIa:-<ll'ml'rl', whieh 
hl'('al1w hi" "l'l'1I1111 hClllll' - 


You came, and look'd and 1m'ed the \"ie\\ 
Long-known and lo\"ed by me, 
Green Susse:\. [Iding into blut>, 
\\ith one grey glimpse of sea. 
Oil the \\"ay from lIa:-<lt'l11l're to .\ldworth. it i:-< lI('(,l':-<,..;I1T to 1'\'0:-<:-< a ron!!h 
eOl11mOIl l'O\'erell \\'ith whill 111):-<he:-< to reaeh the 101lg' \\'illllillg- lalle \\"hi('h \\ a,.. 
1I:II1wIl Telllly:-<oll'
 Lalle, Thi:-< wa:-< the poet'
 f:l\'onritl' walk \\"hl'lI li\'illg ill 
till' Ill'ig-hhourhood. 
Telllly
oll dil.d 011 Thllr:-<Ilay. ()doher (ith, Iml
. a 1111 wa... hnriell ill the 
Poet:-<' ('orller, \\'l':-<Ìmill:-<Ìer .\hhey, Ilext to Rohert Brllwllillg-, allli Ileal' the 
Chaw'l'r mOlluml'lIt. 
\!!aill:-<t the pilla)' ('lo:-<e hy th,' g-ran' ha:-< heell plac'e,l 
\\'oohll'r'
 well-kllowlI bll:-<t. Th.. I1UIIllllllellt l'rl'dl'd to the memory of the 
plwt 011 Beaeoll Hill. 1l1'ar Fl'l.:-<hwater. wa:-< ull\'l'iled hy tlll' Dl'all of 
\rl'"tmill:-<ter Oil .\ng-n:-<t (ith, 1mli", 
\\ïth rl'!!arll to thl' portrait:-< of Tl'lIl1y:-<oll reprOlll1l'ed ill thl':-<e pa !!e,.. , 
Jll'rhap:-< tho",e of ('hief illtere,..t ill adllitioll tll thl' ('aml-'roll photog'ral'h:-< alre;uly 
rl'fl'rn'd to an' the pailltill!!"; hy :-:al11nl'l Laurl'lll'e. eXl'l'lItl'd ahollt ]B:
B. allli 
the thrl'e-I!lJarÌl')' ll'lIg-th hy (;. F. \,. att:-<. \111\\' ill tIll' p",..,....,..:-<iOIl of Lady 
I It'llry 
ol11er...,.t. ()f the forllll'r Fitz!!t'raltl wrote: 
.. \'I'ry illlperfl'l't a:-: Lalll'l'u(,l"'" portrait i
. it i:-< 1l1"'('rthele
:-< the 'w",1 
paiutl'd portrait I han' !"epu; allli I't.rtaillly the (J/I
II oue of old day:-<. 
, Bluhhl'r-lipt' 1]'('lIIelllhpr OW'I' _\lfl'l'd I'alll'd it; :-<0 it i...; hilt :-<till thl' ollly 
0111' of oM day". awl :-<till the hl'4 of all, to lilY thillkiug-." 
Thl' "'atb portrait, at'l"OI'(liug' to 
Ir. \"att:-<-Ihllltou, pO"'''I'...
e,.. .. a ('('rtaill 
11rl'al11illl''''
 whit"h 
1Ig-
'I'",b.. thl' pOl'tit" g-la III 0 III' of lIlooIl1ig-ht." Thc :-:alllc 
\\Titt'r a......et!t..; that" whill' 1II11...t f:II'I'''' g'aill hy thl' arti4ie halo whi('h a paillÌl.r 
of !!l'uill'" alway... ",hl'll", "'-er hi", work, thel'l' arl' :-<Ollll' fl'w, ,.;Ollle \"l'ry fl'W f:lI't.... 
that 110 uot, a 1111 of the...;1' Lorel l\'uuy...II1I'" i,.. thl' IHO...t 1I0tahll' that I han' 
1'\'1'1' :-<1'1'11 al1UIII!! 1111'11 of p:rl'at n'w 1\\'11 , " 



AN EXPOSITION OF DANTE'S INFERNO 


7/6 


EXILES OF 


NET. 


ETERNITY 


7/6 


NET. 


PREFIXED BY A LIFE OF DANTE 


By 


REV. J. S. CARROLL, M.A. 


[here may :-;eem to be some apology nece:-;sary for adding 
to the \"ast yolume of Dante literature. It i:-; true that 
there is no lack of Essays on i
ohlted points, general 
I ntroductions and detailed Commentarie:-ì ; but of simple 
and popular Exposition, of the COllllllcdia, canto by 
canto, there exists \"ery little in our language. To 
present such an exposition, bringing out the general 
bearing and scope of Dante's ethical teaching, i:-ì the 
chief purpose of this volume. 
Iere niceties and in- 
genuities of interpretation haye been avoided as far as 
possible. It is the author's belief that Dante's symbolisGl 
is not really so ob:-ìcure and intricate as it appears to 
a beginner, and that once the clue is gained, it leads 
to the broad high\\"ay of universal morality. His 
aim is to remo\"e the impression of arbitrariness 
\\"hich Dante's punishments leave on many minds, 
by showing that in the main they are, in material, 
\"isible and symbolic forms, the natural and inevitable 
moral and spiritual issues of the \"arious sins. 
In this exposition constant reference is made to the 
\uitings of Dante's great ethical authorities, Aristotle 
and Thomas Aquinas; but above all Dante is regarded 
as his O\\"n best interpreter. 


London: HODDER 6' STOUGHTON, 27, Paternoster Row, E.C. 



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r \. buyer and a book reader. 
,
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of these lines to become a reader of 
U THE BOOKMAN." If you 
are not acquainted with ff THE 
BOOKMAN/' will you kindly 
send a postcard to the Publishers 
for a specimen copy, which will 
gladl y be forwarded to all readers 
of this Booklet. 
"THE BOOKMAN" is 
edited by Dr. Robertson Nicoll, and 
is published during the first week of 
every month, price 6d. net. ff THE 
BOOKMAN" is the only monthly 
magazine devoted exclusively to the 
interests of book readers. ff THE 
BOOKMAN" is the only periodi.. 
cal which in any adequate way 
chronicles the literary life of the 
day in pictures as well as letterpress. 
ff THE BOOKMAN" has already 
the largest circulation of any purely 
literary paper published in the king.. 
dom, and its sales have increased 
enormously during the last twelve 
months. ffTHE BOOKMAN" is 
the best illustrated guide to the best 
books of the day. 
"THE BOOKMAN" makes 
appeal to everyone who is intereste:l 
in the literature of the day. ff THE 
BOOKMAN" is not a dry..as..dust 
magazine for specialists. Every line 
and every pic
ure it contains is of 
peculiar interest to the great and 
ever..increasing public that delights 
in books. ff THE BOOKMAN" 
is the periodical for those who want 
to keep in touch with the books most 
worth reading and with the authors 
most worth knowing. 



 



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"THE BOOKMAN" con.. 
tains each month a separate plate 
portrait, printed by the finest process 
of half..tone photogravure. These 
portraits, forming as they do a 
unique Gallery of Famous Modern 
Authors, have been immensely ap.. 
preciated, and many readers of 
ff THE BOOKMAN" have the 
complete series framed on their 
walls. Among the plates which 
have given greate'st satisfaction are 
portraits of Carlyle, Tennyson, 
Browning, Dickens, Scott, Thack.. 
eray, Robert Burns, Jane Austen, 
Ruskin, Robert Louis Stevenson, 
George Macdonald, Thomas Hardy, 
Alexandre Dumas, Tolstoy, Swin.. 
burnet]. M. Barrie, Herbert Spencer, 
A. Conan Doyle, George Eliot, 
Matthew Arnold, Rudyard Kipling, 
etc., etc. 


U THE BOOKMAN" con.. 
tains each month an article on some 
prominent author of the day, written 
by an eminent critic and magnifí.. 
cently illustrated throughout, articles 
on topics of literary interest by well.. 
known writers, reviews of the best 
new books written by the first 
authorities, several pages of the 
freshest literary news, reports as to 
the best selling b,ooks of the month, 
articles on new writers of promise, 
etc., etc. ff THE BOOKMAN" 
thus fulfils in a manner never before 
attempted the requirements of the 
great book..loving public. ff THE 
BOOKMAN" is published during 
the first week of every month, 
price 6d. net. 


HODDER & STOUGHTON, 
27, Paternoster Row, London, E.C. 




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