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Full text of "Tenth Annual Report of the National Farm School November 1907"

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TENTH ANNUAL REPORT gf 

THE NATIONAL 
FARM SCHOOL 

Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 
NOVEMBER 1907 



X 



Philadelphia New York 

Buffalo Brooklyn 



OPFENHEIM&LLINSJ^& 



Direct Attention 

To their Extraordinary Showing of 

Ladies^ Tailored Suits 



Women of discriminating taste recognize that our 
garments possess a definite note of style authority and 
a standard of merit that distinguish them from the 
common place garments or the ordinary factory pro- 
duct seen elsewhere. 

It has become well known that we create and make 
fashionable garments from thoroughly dependable 
materials — in fact, they are the best that skilled arti- 
sans can produce — equal in every respect to the high 
class custom tailoring workmanship and superior in 
the perfection of fit for about one-half the usual cost. 



Chestnut and 1 2th Sts* 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 






The National Farm School 



FARM SCHOOL, BUCKS CO., PA. 




ADOLPH SEGAL HALL. 






November 1907 

Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 



vc 



zxxz 



TO THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



Bv JOSEPH LEISER. 



Strong arms have they who turn the turf, 

Whose plough-share cuts the grass-webbed sod; 

Self-poised and firm they walk the earth, 
The splendid instruments of God. 

The work they do is a daily need, 

Whereby the teeming millions feed. 

No weaklings they ! With face upturned, 
They sow the seed and reap the grain, 

And conscious of the wage they earned. 
They watch the seasons wax and wane — 

All joyful of the toll they paid 

For things that their own hands have ; . 

Allied to wind and storm and sun, 

The fields they measure with their eye, 

From morn they work till day is done 
To guard the wheat and corn and rye; 

And of their bounty do they bring 

A heart free, as their oflfering. 

A kinsman to the things that grow, 

And brother to the horse and ox ; 
Together toiling, fast and slow. 

They change the hard primeval rocks 
To smiling pa^rures and to fields 
That kindly to the sickle yields. 

They count in ^ain who leave him out! 

Behind the long and busy street 
The farmer stands and feeds the rout 

That beg from him their bread and meat. 
No fee he holds from sea or skies — 
In him the nation lives or dies. 



Kiiigslon, A'. )'., Jtnie 2, i<^oj. 



Officers of National Farm School. 

1907— 1908. 



President, 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, GermantowD. 

Vice-President, Treasurer, 

MORRIS A. KAUFMANN. ISAAC H. SILVERMAN. 

Secretary, 

ISAAC LANDMAN, 

334 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia. 

LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Joseph Krauskopf, Presideiit. Morris A. Kaufmann, Vice-President. 

I. H. S11.VERMAN, Treasurer. Isaac Landman, Secretary. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

(Having served consecutively for ten years.) 

Adolph Eichholz, Howard A. Loeb, I. H. Silverman. 

Albert J. Bamberger, S. Grabfelder, Arnold Kohn, 

Hart Blumenthal, Harry B. Hirsh, Leon Merz, 

W. Atlee Burpee, Abraham Israhl, Barney Selig, 

Harry Felix, Alfred M. Klein, Jos. N. Snellenburg. 
Simon Friedberger, 

NATIONAL AUXILIARY BOARD. 

Louis I. Aaron, Pitsburg, Pa. 

JULIUS AdlER Portland, Ore. 

Henry Beer, New Orleans, La. 

I. W. Bernheim, Louisville, Ky. 

Henry Frank, Natchez, Miss. 

Maurice Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. 

Bernard Ginsburg, Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Jacob HechT, Boston, Mass. 

A. HiRSHHEiMER, LaCrosse, Wis. 

M. HoRKHEiMER Wheeling, W. Va. 

Adolph Lewisohn, New York City. 

LEOJ^ Mandel, Chicago, 111. 

Louis Newburger, Indianapolis, Ind. 

E. Ra.\b Richmond, Va. 

Edw. E. Richards, Mobile, Ala. 

Alex. Sanger Dallas, Tex. 

SiGMUND SONNEBORN Baltimore, Md. 

David Sternberg, Memphis, Tenn. 

Harris Weinstock, Sacramento, Cal. 

Ferd. Westheimer, St. Joseph, Mo. 

A.YOUNKER, Des Moines, Iowa. 



OFFICERS OF NATIONAL 1-ARM SCHOOL. 



THE FACULTY. 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D., President. 

JOHN HOSE A WASHBURN, Ph. D. (Gottingen), 

Director and Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, 

WILLIAM H. BISHOP, B. Sc. (Mass. Agricultural College), 

Professor of Agriculture, Superintendent of Farm. 

E. MONROE BAKER, B. vSc. (Delaware College), 

Professor of Agricultural Physics and Mathematics; Governor of the Dormitories. 

WILFRID GORDON BRIERLEY, B. Sc. (Cornell University ), 

Professor of Horticulture. 

Mrs. CHARLES NIGHTINGALE, Instructor in English. 

W. G. BENNER, V. S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene. 

Miss HETTY ABRAHAM, Matron. 

HARMAN KRAFT, Farm Foreman. 

LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Associated with tiie Local Board. 
Mrs. Martha Fj^eisher, Chairman. Mrs. Harry M. Natha^'SOn, Treas.. 



Miss Linda Strauss, Secretary 

Mrs. a. J. Bamberger, 
Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, 
Mrs. Simon Friedberger, 
Mrs. Joseph Guckenheimer, 
Miss Frieda Jonas, 
Mrs. I. Katzenberg, 



Mrs. Joseph Kral'skopf, 
Mrs. M. F. Langfeld, 
Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, 
Mrs. R. B. Schoneman, 
Mrs. 1. H. Silverman, 
Mrs. Meyer Syclr. 



Mrs. Alfred M. Klein, 




At Work in the Greenhouse. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



Sixth Graduation at the National 
Farm School, 

June 9th, 1907. 

The Tenth Anniversary of the National Farm School attracted 
the largest attendance at the graduation of the sixth class. An ideal 
June day and an unusally distinguished number of men, prominent 
in professional and business life in Philadelphia and elsewhere, lent 
charm to an occasion which marked the first critical decade of that 
experiment represented by the Farm School. 

After an invocation by Rabbi Chas. Rubinstein, of Baltimore, 
the president and founder of the National Farm School, the Rev. Dr. 
Tos. Krauskopf, made the introductory address and 

,, , . ,, ,. , . 1 ^11- 1 Dr. Krauskopf's 

called attention to the motives which prompted him and Address, 

the ofiicers of the National Farm School in attempting 
the experiment. There were two imperative tasks which awaited 
the concerted efforts of large minded Jews in this country at the time 
the school was founded. One was the arduous undertaking, to train 
Jewish lads for Agricultural pursuits in which their fathers of yore 
labored so successfully, and the other to stem the obvious, and for 
that reason perilous, rush from the country to the city. These were 
the dominant motives behind the founding of the National Farm 
School. Despite detractors, the school has within the short period 
of its existence proved its usefulness. Moral support reinforced by 
the material assistance has created an institution that is to-day esti- 
mated at some $200,000. 

President Krauskopf then introduced the chairman of the ex- 
ercises. Hon. John Re3^burn, Mayor of Philadelphia. 

Mayor Reyburn acknowledged his appreciation of the privilege 
of being at the graduating exercises of a school which is training 
lads in a pursuit sure to make better citizens. The pri- 

. r 1 • ji • j_ ■ J. ^ Mayor Reyburn on 

mary need of every one born m this country is to be a ..^^ts of Peace." 
useful citizen. The condition of race and religion is 
secondary. The school, trained men for the arts of peace, and no 
better work can be done by any set of men than those trained in that 
art which feeds the teeming millions and which lends beauty and 
happiness to the lives of people. 

As chairman he introduced Dr. David Blaustein, who had been 
for ten years Superintendent of the Educational Alliance of New 
York, and is thus qualified, by his experiences on the Qp_ Blaustein on 
East Side of New York, to speak authoritively on "The New 
whatever concerns the Jewish people in 'that section of 
New York. His address was marked by several important observa- 



SIXTH GRADUATION AT THE NATIONAL I'ARM SCHOOL. 



tions bearing- on the Jew as a farmer and more particnlarly of the 
desire among- the yonnger people of the East Side to return again to 
the fields and pastures. It is only fear and uncertainty that faces 
eveiy imigrant Jew coming to America, he said, and makes the Jew 
settle in large cities. There he finds friends, economic opportunities 
and safety. But these large city settlements have created a new 
problem — the moral education of the child. The voluntary ghetto 
life makes home life as the Jew has known it impossible. The moral 
problems of the Jews can best be solved, Dr. Blaustein contended, 
by a return to modern methods of agriculture. Modern conceptions 
of agriculture are more socialized. The Jewish genius which has 
given the world its prophets will find a means of bringing these con- 
ceptions into full practice, because the Jewish mind is an organizing 
mind. The cry of the young is for nature. The subconscious ut- 
terances of the child bespeak that freedom which is of the fields. 
''Come let us go out into the fields" seems to have entered the being 
of the Jew. The National Farm School is equipping its students 
with practical and theoretical knowledge to make them again come to 
the source of sustenance and, therefore, to the source of all human 
happiness. 

The address of Arthur K. Kuhn, who followed Dr. Blaustein, 
centered on tree planting. It was an Arbor Day address, given in 
connection with the consecration of Memorial trees on 
oly Idtess.''""' the grounds of the Farm School. 

Tree culture, Mr. Kuhn held, was one of the noble 
passions of man. The destruction of forest lands has brought the 
nation to the verge of an unforseen and uncalculated peril. Loss 
of forests means a curtailment of the source of prosperity. Where 
there are trees there is water. And in the planting of a tree for those 
of our dear ones who have been laid to rest we perpetuate a memory 
which from year to year renews itself, and continues its work of 
creation. 

Among the trees consecrated, was one in memory of Martha 
Wolfstein, the Jewish authoress. A special tribute was paid to her 
by the Rev. S. M. Fleischman, Superintendent of the Jewish Foster 
Home and Orphan Asylum, who infoRned his hearers of her brave 
spirit and courage and faith in the Creator. Her life was full of 
pain and sorrow, but of her life she made joy to others ; and since 
the value of life is not measured by years, but by its fruits, the tree 
dedicated to her will be an inspiration to all who knew her. 

Rabbi Chas. Rubenstein, eulogized the memory of Dr. Samuel 

L. Frank, of Baltimore, who was one of those men whose life God 

glorified and exalted before all the people. Fie was a 

°^' ""'^"Eulogized. ^^Y^^ friend, devoted to his family, and though engaged 

in large activities, always mindful of the needs of 

others. 



SIXTH GRADUATION AT TIIP: NATIONAL FARM SCHGOIy. 



Mr. Joseph W. Saltis, President of District Grand Lodge, No. 
3, I. O. P>. B., spoke in memory of prominent B'nai Brith men whO' 
had. bN- their hves, made their names endeared to all who come after 
them. 

The g-raduation adtlress v, as delivered by George H. Maxwell^ 
President of the American PTomecraft Society, and Chairman of the 
National Irrig^ation Association. Mr. Maxwell was 

1 • 1 r .1 • . -1 . Baccalaureate 

warm m his approval ot the expermient carried on at Addreis. 

the Farm School. For. in the problem of the Jewish 
people is the problem of the nation. It was useless, he thought, for 
the Jews to look elsewhere for a national home, since in America 
they have eveiything they want. Many conditions in our country 
call for immediate remedy. Unless the nation copes instantly with 
the crowded conditions of cities, this proud people will be extermina- 
ted as great nations of the ancient world were. 

The popular cry, back to the soil, is to be interpreted not as a 
return of the people cii masse to the farms, but a return of every 
worker to a small portion of the earth, which he may 
use as a garden, whereon he may build his home, and Back to the som. 
where his children may live in freedom and sunshine. 
To give the people the largest share of activity out of doors, amid 
the sweetness and wholesomeness of nature, was the formost con- 
sideration of our times. 

The school is planting in the minds of the people the ideal of 
a pastoral existence, not a new thing for them, but a readaptation to 
an old ideal come down from antiquity. By encourag- 
ing bands of young men to go out among the Jewish This school pre- 
people, trained as the lads of the Farm School have P3'''"g ^^^ P^op'e- 
been in the science of farming, the Jews of this country 
are being unconsciously directed into^ those channels which will be 
of great value in making this country the land of promise. 

Judge Dimner Beeber and Dr. J. Madison Taylor, both spoke 
in praise of the farmer as a force working for the conservation of the 
nation's energy, and as a bulwark of the nation's physical strength. 

With a distribution of diplomas by Mr. Nathaniel Myers, of 
New York, and prizes by the Director, and the announcement of 
gifts donated during the year, the exercises were brought to a close. 

THE GRADUATES. 

Victor Anderson, Philadelphia. Irving B. Horn, Philadelphia. 

Benjamin Brown, Philadelphia. Marcus Leon, Iowa. 

Harry Frank, Jr., Mississippi. Abe Miller, Texas. 

Meyer Green, Philadelphia. Louis Rock, Philadelphia. 

Joseph Wiseman, Pittsburgh. 





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THE NATIONAL FARM vSCHOOL. 



Tenth Pilgrimage and Annual Meeting 

AT THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL, 
September 29th, 1907. 



Although the students of the school had erected an immense 
Succah, in which to hold the exercises of the Tenth Annual Pilgrim- 
age of Philadelphia Jews to the National Farm School, and of the 
Tenth Annual Meeting of the Institution, the continuous down-pour 
of the day before, and of the morning of September 2gth, caused the 
order of exercises to be transferred to the Auditorium of the Adolph 
Segal Plall. 

Mr. Robert Watchorn, United States Commissioner of Immi- 
gration at Ellis Island, New York, and Mr. Leonard G. Robinson, 
General Manager of the Agriciiltural and Industrial Aid Society 
of New^ York, were the speakers of the day. 

Two sessions were held. In the morning, after the exercises 
had been opened with prayer by Rabbi Gustav N. Hausman, of New 
York, Dr. Jos. Krauskopf , the Founder and President of the School, 
read his annual message, and Mr. Robert Watchorn delivered an 
address on the "Bearing of Agriculture on Immigration," both of 
which are printed in full in the Year Book. 

Lunch was served for the pilgrims and members by the Ladies 
xVuxiliary Committee in various parts of the Main Building; the 
rain having caused this transfer from the dining tent erected on the 
grounds of the School. Some time was spent by the visitors in 
viewing the fields and the grounds before the afternoon session was 
called to order . 

Mr. Robinson spoke on the "Jewish Agricultural Colonies in 
the United States." He reviewed the various attempts at coloni- 
zation from the, days of Major Mordecai ]\Ianuel Noah, in 1820, 
to the most recent -experiments in the East and West. Speaking of 
the Organization which he manages, and of the number of Jewish 
farmers in the L^nited States, Mr. Robinson said : 

Since its organization the Jewish Agricultural and Industrial Aid Society has 
steadily increased its usefulness in every direction, assisting in the past seven 
years some 700 farmers in eighteen States of the Union and in Canada, with 
loans aggregating about $400,000. The real property owned by these farmers 
represents a valuation of over a million dollars, exclusive of personal property 
valued at over $300,000. There is no better index of the prosperity of these farm- 
ers than the way in which they meet their obligations. Over $60,000 of the 
principal has been repaid, and when we consider that the delinquency on account 
of interest is less than 2 per cent., comment is unnecessary. 

How many Jewish farmers there are in this country it is difhcult to say. In 
the seven years of the existence of our Society we have come in touch with some 
1,500 Jewish farmers, but our attention is often called to Jewish farm- 
ers, individually or in groups, in various parts of the Union, who 



TENTH riLGRLMAGE AND ANNUAL INIEETING. 



have never heard of our Society, and of whom wc never would have learned 
except by accident. I do not think that I am stepping outside the bounds of 
conservatism when I place the number of Jewish farmers in this country at 
5,000. That it is not 25,000 or 50,000 is not the fault of the Jewish immigrant. 
The general run of immigrant, when landing on these shores, as my friend Mr. 
Watchorn will bear me out, is not overl^urdened with wealth, unless it is per- 
haps in the form of a good-sized family. He must make ends meet from the 
outset, and the only avenue to nine-tenths of our Jewish immigrants that is open 
to him is the shop. 

Sooner or later, however, the artificial life of the city makes itself felt; and 
when the immigrant has laid by a little money, he listens to the call of the 
open and begins to lay his plans — with or without outside assistance — for return- 
ing to the simpler and more natural life of the farm. In this way scores of New 
England homesteads lying deserted and abandoned, denuded of their brain and 
brawn by the irresistible current cityward, have again become abodes of indus- 
trious peace and plenty. Thousands of acres of virgin soil, which knew not 
the plow, have been made to contribute to the sum of human happiness and to 
our national wealth, by Jewish immigrants who, with the true spirit of the pioneer, 
have taken up Government homesteads in our Western States. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Phelps-Stokes, of Stamford, Conn., also 
made addresses. 

Mr. I. J-1. Silverman, Treasurer, read his report, and was 
followed by the Director's statement of the work done in the past 
year. Both of these are given in full in another part of the Year 
Book. 

The election of officers resulted as fohow^s : — 

The Rev. Dr. Jos. Ivrauskopf , President ; Mr. Morris A. Kauf- 
man, Vice-President; Mr. W. Atlee Burpee, of Doylestown, was 
elected a member of the Board in place of Mr. I. H. Silverman, who, 
by the fact of his having- served ten years, became an honorary 
member of the Board of Directors. Mr. A. J. Bamberger and Mr. 
Harry B. Hirsh, both of Philadelphia, were elected to succeed Mr. 
Jacob F. Loeb, wdio has removed from the city, and Mr. Jacob Car- 
tun, resigned, on the Board of Local Officers. 




A Class in Truck Gardening 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



The President's Message. 



To the Members and Friends of the Xatioiial Farm SchooF. 
Ladies and Gentlemen : — 

The Board of Directors, the facuhy and students of the Na- 
tional Farm School extend to you a hearty welcome to our Har- 
vest Festival and to the Tenth Annual Meetins: of the 

T • • Gr66tinrs 

Institution. We are happy for this opportunity to 

report to you the result of the year's work, and to congratulate you 

upon the progress that has been made. 

It has been customary hitherto for your President to intro- 
duce his annual message with an extended argument on the im- 
portance of agriculture in general, and of the work p^^^ 5^,^,^,^, 
of the National Farm School in particular. The time cospei widely 
has come when this feature of the annual message can preached, 
safely be omitted. Others, men \vhose words attract far greater 
attention than those of your President, men as prominent as the 
President of the United States, have begun preaching the "Gospel 
of the Farm," are sounding the call "Back to the Soil." Thanks 
to their aid, we may look for results little anticipated when we first 
raised our feeble voice in favor of the pursuit of agriculture as 'j 
cure of many of the present" day evils of our over-crowded cities. 

Truly may we say, in the spirit of the Psalmist, the stone which 
the builders rejected is becoming the chief corner-stone. The in- 
stitution, which ten 3^ears ago, met with but little popular favor, 
which was attacked as an unnecessary intruder into the field of 
charity, as a worse than senseless waste of time and means and 
labor, is to-day commanding wide-spread and respectful attention. 

Of course, by this is not meant that the support which the 
National Farm School receives is commensurate with the atten- 
tion it has awakened, else would the institution not crowded with 
have but fifty-two students, when it should have and students, and a 
could have five hundred, or even five thousand ; else wa't'"g-''st- 
would not a large number of desirable applicants for admission have 
been turned away, because of a lack of dormitory accommodations 
and lack of means of support; else would not twelve of our boys 
be obliged to occupy two small attic rooms for lack of dormitory ac- 
commodations ; else would there not be so large a waiting-list as 
now exists of lads impatiently awaiting their turn for admission to 
our school. 

Neither would it have been necessary to issue, as we were 
recently obliged to do, a Circtdar of Information, to show to the 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 



„ .,. i)ul)lic tlial with the exception of but $400 in all, paid 

Publ.c unaware ^ ^ ^^ ' J- 

that students bv three of our Students toward their board and lodg- 

taught and kept ji-,g-_ ^\\ |-|-,g forty-nine others receive their board and 
gra ui ous y. lodging and laundry and clothes and books free of all 

charge, that tuition is entirely free to all ; that an adecjuate faculty 
must be maintained, that a large number of horses, and a large 
herd of cattle must be kept; that a large supply of implements and 
tools must be furnished to answ^er the needs of an agricultural 
school ; that every student must be given every opportunity to learn 
practically and scientifically the trade for which he has matricu- 
lated; that every student must remain at the school at least four 
years, if he is to become fully weaned of city life, and acquire 
master}' in his chosen calling. 

Quite a number of other matters, concerning wdiich there 
seems to be considerable misunderstanding, it is hoped, may be 
cleared away b}' this Circular of Information. 

Very frecjuentl}- the question is asked, "Is the National Farm 
School self-supporting?" There is no doubt but that a farm as 
Why National Farm fertile and as suitably located as ours could yield a 
School not self- Splendid revenue to a skilled farmer, wdio employed 
-supporting. upon it three or four experienced farm hands. The 

National Farm School has no such experienced farm hands to draw 
upon. All its work is done by the inexperienced hands of lads, 
not a dozen of wdiom together can do as effective a day's work as 
can be done by one experienced farmer, and, to give each boy a 
chance to learn, there must be provided three times the number 
of horses that would ordinarily be recjuired on a farm of the size 
of ours. This means, of course, three times the expense for the 
care and keeping of the stock, and three times the amount of tools 
.and implements, and a large breakage loss besides, because used by 
inexperienced hands. And three times as large a crop could be 
raised had we experienced farmers, instead of mere learners; or, 
could our students remain with us after their graduation, and give 
us the benefit of the skill they have acquired, instead of giving it 
to those with whom they take positions. 

To the cost of inexperienced labor on our farm, and to the 
larger number of stock we must employ, and to the larger number 
of implements and tools we are obliged to use, add the cost of 
the instructors and care-takers we must pay salaries to, the number 
of domestics we must keep, and you will readily see wdiy a farm of 
the size of ours, wdiich could yield a splendid income to the ordi- 
nary w^ell-equipped farmer, cannot be made self-supporting wdien 
devoted to the purpose of a school. 

Yet another question there is concerning which there seems 
lo be considerable misunderstanding. Often the question is asked : 



THE PRESIDENT'S iMESSAGE. 13. 

Why do not the students a\ail themselves of the op- vvhy stale Coiiege 
portunity for an agricnkural training which is afford- can not take the 
ed by the Agricnltural Colleges of our respective s|fh"oi°' ^^™ 
States ? The fact seems to be wholly lost sight of that 
to matriculate in the Agricultural Department of a State College, 
the student nmst have graduated from a High School, must have 
acquired a knowledge of the practice and science of the funda- 
mental branches of agriculture, and must have means to provide for 
board, lodging and tuition while attending the State College; where- 
as, students who enter the National Farm School often possess no- 
more than a grammar school training, often not even that much, 
often are ignorant of the English language, nearly always have not 
the remotest knowledge of agriculture nor the means to pay for their 
board and clothes and other necessities while at the school. 

There is another matter upon which it is hoped this newlv 
issued Circular of Inforuiation will help to throw needed light, and 
that is the national character of our institution. Far National character 
too many people associate our institution with Phila- of Farm school 
delphia or with the State of Pennsvlvania, wdien, to '°^* tl^^* °^ ^^ 

"^ Ngw York. 

cite one striking illustration the number of our stud- 
ents hailing from the cit}^ and State of New York far exceed those 
coming from Philadelphia and Pennsylvania. It is the great and 
wealthy metropolis of our land which reaps the largest benefit from 
our institution, and yet contributes but an insignificant part towards- 
its maintenance. 

Considering the vast Ghetto of New York City, and the vast 
Jewish population of the State of New York, it is but natural that 
the number of applicants from that Qitj and State should be large. 
But it is unnatural that, notwithstanding the vast wealth that is 
centered among Jewish people of that city and State, the burden 
of educating and keeping a large number of their poor boys should 
be saddled on the people of this State. Were we Philadelphians 
free from other charity burdens, we might gladly take upon our- 
selves the responsibility of caring for the Farm School entirely 
by ourselves. But we have our hospitals, orphan asylums, homes, 
shelters and dozens of other institutions, as New York has them. 
The dift'erence is only in number. Our burden is as great if not 
greater considering our lesser wealth. 

Of all cities, New York should be the foremost in coming to 
the aid of our institution, cjuite aside of the fact that it has a larger 
number of pupils at our school than any other city. The work of 
the National Farm School promises greater relief to New York 
than to any other city. Agricultural and industrial colonization 
is the only solution of its Ghetto problems, which the constant in- 
flux of new immigrants is making more dangerous with each day. 
Its Ghetto cannot become much more congested. Refuges can- 
not forever make a bee line from Ellis Island to the East Side. If 



14 THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 



for no other reason than preventing a serious Jewish problem to 
arise in the United States, once hard times set in, and the sweat shop 
industry stagnate, large masses will have to be moved out of the 
Ghetto, or new arrivals will have to be shut out of the Ghetto and 
made to scatter over our broad and fertile acres, where there is 
room and work and welcome and prosperity for all. It is then that 
the work of this school will be duly recognized. It is then that 
the graduates of the National Farm School will be needed to locate 
r.nd establish these colonies, and to make prosperous settlements of 
them. 

And what is said of New York applies to a large extent to 
others of our cities, in whose midst Ghettoes have sprung up, whose 
By other large emptying is uot only to be devoutly wished for, but 
cities, notably also to be earnestly and intelligently labored for, in 
^^"^^^°- which work the National Farm School can render 

practical aid. Our school, being national, accepting students from 
all parts of our country, educating and keeping them free of charge, 
four years long, is entitled to consideration by those communities 
whence the pupils come. Their federated charities, when making 
up their annual budgets, should regard it their sacred duty to vote 
an annual allowance to our school. It is not just that a city like 
Chicago, for instance, that has three students at our school, should 
contribute annually but the small sum of $423.00. A few years ago. 
that city had as many as four or five at our school at one time, and 
its annual contribution was not an}" larger, if as large. 

To yet one other matter we would have the recently issued 

Circular of Information attract wide attention. That publication 

is one of many which we are every now and then 

Large expense in Q^^jo-ed tO isSUC for pUrpOSeS of propaganda, the ex- 
propaganda work. c5 1 i 1 i & ' 

psnse of which, for printing, maihng and office work 
is very considerable. 

Our income last year from all sources was $29,744.71. 

Of this amount, the sum of $6400, received from the Federa- 
tion of Jewish Charities, of Philadelphia, the sum of $6000 recei\-- 
ed from the Legislature of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 
$4,681 received as membership dues from different parts of our 
country; and the sum of $2,256.62 derived from the investment of 
our sinking fund of a little over $50,000, may be regarded as fixed 
and dependable. All the rest of our income has to be scraped to- 
gether, by all sorts of manners and means, at a large cost of time and 
labor and money. Pamphlets have to be issued, letters of appeal have 
to be sent out by the thousands, canvassers have to be employed. 
New members have to be found to take the place of the old ones 
dropping out. Those unacquainted with the trouble and expense 
involved in building up and maintaining a public institution such 
as ours, and those inexperienced in discriminating between differ- 
ent kinds of expenditures, charge the entire amount expended to 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 15 

the Students' account, and then unfairly make the per capita ex- 
pense of each student far in excess of what it legitimately is. 

The expense involved in our work of propaganda is not the 
■only one left out of account. Little cognizance is taken of amounts 
expended in permanent improvements and on addi- 
tions to our assets. It is seldom remembered that the ""^i" enlarge- 

. ment of our plant 

National Farm School started with nothing, and that, 
-conservatively estimated, it is worth to-day some $200,000, repre- 
senting a magnificent estate, a large part of wdiich has been built 
up by the closest care and economy and labor on the part of the 
managers of tlie institution. 

It must, however, not be forgotten, that expensive as our 
propaganda has been, it has yielded magnificent returns. But for 
it, we would not have been in existence to-day. But 
for it. we would not have had our annual revenue, Expensive as 

1 , r 1 r rs ,1 propaganda is, it 

nor an endowment fund of over $50,000, nor the con- has brought money 

siderable number of goodly buildings that grace our 

grounds. 

It was propaganda that w^on for us a host of friends in all 
parts of the country, even abroad, as in the case of Mr. !Max Schoen- 
fekl, of Rorschach, Switzerland. That gentleman has 
proven himself indeed a princelv supporter of our *?'' '* ^^® brought 

-, IT- 1 f I--- friends notably 

cause, in addition to the two farms adjoining our Mr. schoenfeia. 
school, and known as the Flora Schoenfeld Memorial 
Farms, donated by that gentleman to the Farm School seven years 
ago, and in addition to a number of contributions in money, that 
gentleman presented to the school, at the Graduation Exercises last 
spring, the Martin Farm, likewise adjoining our school, consisting 
•of 163 acres, and known to be one of the finest farms in this section 
of the country. This addition gives the Farm School an area of 
.363 acres of choice farm lands, suitably and picturesquely located, 
:and excellently fitted for diversified farming 

Other gifts, both large and small, were announced 
last graduation day, which will be duly recorded in our other tfiends^ 
forthcoming Annual Report. 

But there is one to which I desire to call your especial atten- 
tion, and that is the $10,000 gift of Mr. Nathan Snellenburg. That 
gentleman provided in his will a legacy of $10,000 ^ notable gift by 
to the National Farm School. But that he may de- Mr. Nathan snei- 
rive some satisfaction from his gift while living, he '^"''"'"s- 
has volunteered to pay to our treasury the interest of this legacy, 
i. e., S500 annually, during his life. It is a noble way of giving, 
quite out of the usual, and well deserves being recorded and recom- 
mended to other would-be-benefactors for imitation. 

Would that people who intend giving to charities would more 
frequently do their giving while living. ]\Iany a misappropriation 



i6 THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 



of Ijeqiiests would thus be avoided, many a man would 
Give while you live. x\ii^n bc the administrator of his own money, and thus 
prevent his last will from not being executed, owing 
to tricks of law or suits of heirs. An instructive instance of such 
a miscarriage of a last will was recently given us in the case of 
the late Chief Justice Paxson. He provided a very large sum of 
money for the training of youths in agricultural pursuits. He had 
appointed his executors, had frequently talked over with them his 
cherished plan, was of sound mind until the end, but having 
failed to have his signature attested by two witnesses, the will has 
been declared invalidated. When men of the prominence and legal 
acumen of the late Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Pennsyl- 
vania can have their wills set aside because of this or that accident- 
al omission or this or that neglect, it becomes more than a matter 
of choice, it becomes a duty of would-be-benefactors to do their 
giving wdiile living. 

Such a giver was the late Mrs. Sarah Eisner, the donor of a 
number of buildings consecrated to charity, among them our labora- 
such a giver the ^^U^ which to-day wears the signs of mourning by 
late Mrs. Sarah rcasou of licr rcccnt death. It was a source of infinite 
^'^"^''- satisfaction to her to have given of her means wdiile 

she lived, and to have enjoyed the sight of the good of her benefac- 
tion, while it was still in her power to see and to enjoy. 

There are many in our community who would bestow^ as much 
favor upon themselves as upon charity if they would imitate the 
noble example set by Mrs. Eisner. And they could find ample op- 
portunity, by remembering one or the other of the pressing wants 
of the National Farm School. 

We are in urgent need of an additional dormitory, to house 
at" least a part of the number of young men whose names are on 
Urgent need of a o^^i" Waiting list, and wdio are constantly importuning 
new additional US for an Opportunity to escape from the bondage of 
Dormitory. ^j-^^ swcatshops and from the over-crowded GhettO', 

by being given a training in practical and scientific agriculture. 

Our present dining-room and adjoining pantry and kitchen are 
no longer suited to the increased demands made upon them. They 
were built to ansvver the needs of a school of 25 stud- 
m a new Dining ^^^^^ . ^j^^ present inmates of the school are more than 
twice that number. The space these rooms occupy 
is needed for class rooms. We are, therefore, in urgent need of a 
new dining hall, one removed from the dormitories and class-rooms, 
fitted out with all the conveniences, and with the time and labor- 
saving devices necessary for a household as large as ours, and one 
that is destined before long to grow to much larger proportions. 

We are in need of a building in which a training might be 
eiven in a number of mechanical trades, such as blacksmithing, tin- 



THE PREvSI DENT'S MESSAGE. 17 



smithing, plumbing, carpentering, saddlering, wheel- of a building for 
wrighting, and the like. We need farmers, but we teaching iviechani- 
need mechanics as well. Some have fitness for the 
one calling, some for the other. As the primary object of the Na- 
tional Farm School is to encourage colonizations from the city to 
the country, and to provide the colonies with trained leaders, we 
must have }'Oung men fitted as much for skilled mechanical trades 
as for practical and scientific agriculture. These two callings must go 
hand in hand, if colonization is to succeed. And the mechanical 
trades must be taught in the country, if the young man is to be 
weaned from the city allurements and become accustomed to coun- 
try life. 

There is one other need which, if supplied, would prove a great 
boon to our plant. There is running through our grounds a small 
but never-failino- creek. Because of a lack of a dam, „ , . , , 
its waters are lost to us, which, if stopped and held in, 
would give us a lake of considerable dimensions, would enable us 
to obtain our ice from it in the winter, and in the summer would 
permit of extensive goose and duck raising, also allow a part of it 
to be set aside for a swimming pool for our boys. We have the 
water, we have a naturally fitted location for a lake, we have a 
promise of the donation of all the cement needed for the construc- 
tion of the dam, and of $100 toward the building of it. A few 
hundred dollars more would enable us to obtain the lake, which, 
besides filling many urgent needs, would add considerably to the 
landscape beauty of our plant.. 

Of the boys' work in the classes and fields, of the success with 
which the graduates are meeting, of the crops they have raised 
and of other points touching the internal workings of the school, 
the Director of the school. Dr. Washburn, will presently speak to 
you. 

There remains for me but to offer a word of thanks to those 
who, during the past year aided our work in diverse ways : 

First and foremost our thanks are due to Mr. Adolph Segal, 
who, in addition to his donation of a magnificent building, known 
as the Segal Hall, which contains a large lecture hall, 
a library, an administration office, a recreation hall, ^^^ friend's, 
a laundry, a shower room, a master's room, and 
twenty dormitory cubicles, also completely furnished it and made it 
possible for us to take possession of it last May. Besides the gift 
just mentioned, he furnished our entire plant with its present magni- 
ficent water supply. 

Our heartiest thanks are due to the Ladies' Auxiliary Com- 
mittee, who, together with the Ladies' Sewing Circle, under their 
charge, have greatly assisted our household, have provided mam^ of 
its wants, and, in various ways, have lightened the burden of our 
matron. 



THE PRESIDENT'vS MESSAGE. 



We desire to express our profound appreciation of the valuable 
service which Mr. Simon L. Bloch rendered in enabling us to put 
the much needed new floors in the first and second stories of the 
Main Building. 

Sincerely do we appreciate the helpful service rendered us by the 
recent Legislature of Pennsylvania in granting us an appropria- 
tion of $7500 annually, for the next two years; to the Federation 
of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia for its annual allowance of 
$6400; to the Jewish Hospital for its kindly care of pupils of our 
school when sick ; to the donors of various implements, tools and 
other wares; to Mr. Lubin for entertainments gratuitously furnish- 
ed our boys from time to time, and for the biograph machine and 
piano which he donated to the school ; to the Director, faculty and 
matron, to the Board of Directors and all others whose help and 
counsel have encouraged our labors and lessened our burdens. 

You will be called upon to-day to choose a new set of officers, 
and three new directors, one to take the place of Mr. I. H. Silver- 
man, w^ho, having faithfully served the National Farm School, for 
ten years consecutively, becomes to-day, in accordance with our 
law, an Honorary Board Member ; another to take the place of Mr. 
Jacob Loeb, who is obliged to resign by reason of his remoA^al to 
New York, and the other to take the place of Mr. Jacob Cartun, 
who is necessitated to sever his connection with the Board because 
of too great pressure on his time by his own business demands. 

While speaking of Board members, it is my sad duty to record 
the death of Mr. Angelo Myers, one of the founders of our school, 
M-urn the loss of at oue time one of its Board members, and at all times 
Angelo Myers. a liberal supportcr and helpful friend. 

Considering our humble beginning, the difficult road we had 
to travel with untried feet, the opposition and discouragements we 
had to encounter, it would have been success if we had 
brTgh'/*"''^''*^ merely continued to exist. But we have done better. 
We live and thrive and prosper. Each year marks 
signal growth. Each year we become better known and wider 
appreciated. We are full of expectancy of better things to come. 
The future promises great things unto us. May God turn promises 
into realization. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOS. KRAUSKOPF, 

President. 

National Farm School, 

Farm School, Bucks Co., 
September 29, 1907. 



A GRADUATE ON HIS OWN ACRES. 




Anderson, his father and their Russian Jewish farm laborer, in their Tomato patch. 




Anderson and his lather in their Corn held. 



Victor Anderson, formerly a cigar maker, a 1907 graduate, brought his father's whole 

family out of the ghetto, and hired another relative, to cultivate a farm of 40 

acres adjoining the Farm School lands. {See Director's Report, Page 21.) 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



The Director's Report. 



During the past twelve months the work of the School has been 
more satisfactory than ever before. This satisfaction has been ex- 
perienced by the Board of ^lanagers, the Faculty and the attending 
pupils. 

The causes for this improved condition are the increased facil- 
ities for instruction; namely, in the additions to the Agricultural 
Causes for im- books in our library, an increase in the number and 
proved conditions scope of our x\gricultural text books, additions of new 
at the School. apparatus to the laboratories of Agricultural Chemistry 
and Physics, and a very sensible increase in the facilities for in- 
struction along farm and horicultural work and management ; also 
hv the addition of many new implements, hand tools and horses for 
working the farm machinery. The increasing of both our arable 
land and the number of students, allows a more economic disposal 
of both the new, untrained labor as well as affording the opportunity 
of instructing the upper classmen in superintendence, by givmg 
scjuads of lower classmen to the more proficient upper classmen for 
instruction and guidance in their practical or technical exercises; 
This practice is equally valuable for both parties when closely super- 
vised by the professor in charge. We also attribute the increase of 
school spirit, exhibited by our students in their enthusiasm for both 
work and study, largely to the additional comforts afforded by our 
new dormitory and recreation building. The academic portion of 
our work has been strengthened by the appointment of a competent 
teacher, Mrs. Charles Nightingale, as instructor in English, to the 
Freshman and Sophmore classes. 

The Faculty constantly appreciate that the first duty of the 
School is to produce honest, earnest and industrious American citi- 
zens, trained in the principles of our Government ; and 
The faculty's goal. SO taught in the la^^'S of Nature that they may intelli- 
gently and profitably perform the duties of a farmer. 
Such intelligent producers make the most valuable citizens for any 
country. 

The School has given instruction to eighty-one (8i) different 
pupils during the past year : nine graduated last June from the reg- 
ular four year course, ten others will be ready for grad- 
Number "J^^^^^^^^ uation next June. Eighteen were obliged to leave the 
Institution, having attended the school for a shorter 
period, varying from a few months to two years. 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT. 



It is not infrequently asked if the School can make a good 
farmer of a Jew? The fact that all the farm work on our two 
hundred acre place, is performed by our pupils, oueht „ ,^ ^ 

I- ' >■ , ■' » 1 1 1 ''"fis the Farm 

to sufficiently answer such a question. Also the record school make a 
of our graduates, and many pupils leaving before they flood farmer of a 
graduate, will give additional evidence. The above 
question has been well answered in the affirmative by Victor Ander- 
son, one of our graduates of this year, wdio for the past two years 
has had charge of one of the Schoenfeld Farms. He certainly has 
done credit to himself and the School in the tidy appearance of his 
farming, the condition of his fields, farm animals, and crops, the 
yield of which has been good. His crops of tomatoes, potatoes, and 
corn, growai on larg'e areas, have been excellent, worthy of a much 
more experienced farmer. What is equally to his credit, he has 
taught his father, and also another Jew from Russia, a striking instance 
successful methods of American Agriculture. The farm Q^aduate teaches 
he occupies joins the School one thousand feet north agriculture to 
of the station along the Reading Railroad. We in- 9'''"° ^'*'- 
vite you to visit this farm and observe for yourself his success. 

The instruction given in the care of Greenhouses, during the 
past winter, was made more practical than usual, because the 
students had the opportunity of repairing the old house 

1 r • r 1 J- 1 • 1 i • Winter work In 

by means of reinforced cement, learning how to mix greenhouses, 
and use cement ; also how to reconstruct an old house 
into one that wall be tight and useful for many years. The winter 
work consisted of raising tomatoes, carnations, the bedding plants 
for Spring use in gardens, and material for the classes in Botany. 
The carnations and tomatoes were sold for over $250.00, which helps 
in a small degree to reduce the expense of instruction. 

The expense of an agricultural education is not appreciated by 
anybody not having given the matter thought and investigation. 
All of the w^ork perfomed on this farm is by our pupils, vy^y instruction 
but the moment they begin to be somewhat proficient in farming is ex- 
in currying horses they are set to feeding them, then to p^"®'^®- 
care for cattle, then to plowdng, mowing and sowing, on from one 
farm operation to another. While such a change is good, to teach 
the pupil, it is exceedingly expensive for the farm, because more than 
fifty per cent, of the efficiency of the animals is lost by constantly 
changing the milkers, feeders and care takers. The item of repairs 
of tools, machinery, and harness on a farm conducted for profit, 
should be very small. But on a farm conducted for the purpose of 
teaching as quickly as possible, inexperienced hands, to be proficient 
in the various duties of how^ to use our teams and tools, and the 
greatly increased number of both teams and tools that is required 
in order that the fifty pupils may have opportunity to perform all 
kinds of work, increases our repair bill many fold. 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT. 



Because we are a School with many regular duties, for in- 
struction, recreation and training, not in any way connected with 
those of the farm, the hours of labor for our pupils and consequently 
for our teams is only about one-half of that employed on the private 
farm of our neighbor. This explains another cause for the greatly 
increased team force, with the consequent expense. 

Our farm has produced crops which are not meagre for the 
acerage planted. We have picked and delivered : 

1600 bushels of tomatoes. what the Farm 

1000 bushels of potatoes. f;"";;;^' """"fl 

200 bushels of apples. 

Thrashed 750 bushels of w^heat and rye. 

Plowed 100 acres of land. 

Taken care of four acres of kitchen garden. 

Sawed wood for school use. 

Drawn to the fields 640 loads of manure. 

Raised.25 acres of corn, and 10 acres of silage. 

Put in the barn 113 tons of hay. 

Taken care of four acres of lawn, and a mile of roads. 

Raised all of the peas, beans, asparagus, spinage, beets, cu- 
cumbers, cabbage, green corn, melons, tomatoes, strawberries, cur- 
rants and other fruits, that the sixty-eight individuals at the board- 
ing house would require, and also enough to last through the winter,, 
or as long as they can be kept in this climate. 

Our dairy has given us a profit in butter and milk sold and de- 
livered, to the boarding department of $1262.00, after deducting 
what has been paid out for feed. The poultry gave a 
Pouitry^'pami. pi'ofit of nearly vSioo, the sheep of $150, profits from 
the swine amount to over $500. The keeping of an 
account of the profits of the different fields and animals, assists those 
who love Agriculture to chose their specialty. 

The addition of 160 acres to our present farm will afford oppor- 
tunity for a greater variety of crops, and it will very materially in- 
crease the efficiency of our practical Agricultural Education. 

"The Painswick Hall Farm" (Schoenfeld Farm Number 3) 

will contain the broad fields of wheat, rye, corn, potatoes and grass, 

allowing opportunity on the orignal farm for more ex- 

intensive farming tcusive gardening, in both truck and fruit. We will' 

and our brood , y % , , . . , . 

acres. then eudcavor to have a model of extensive and mten- 

sive farming. With blooded stock, orchards and smalt 
fruits that will round out and complete our courses in Agricultural 
Education, making them second to none offered by any instituton 
in the country. 

JOHN H. WASHBURN, Director. 

Farm School, Pa. September 29, 1907. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 23. 



Report of the Treasurer of the 
National Farm School 



September 20th, 1907. 



President, Board of Directors, National Farm School. 

In making- my report for the past year, I desire to call to your 
attention that little progress has been made in increasing our endow- 
ment fund. One year ago the fund amounted to $50,378. It now 
amounts to $52,921.80, and increase of $2543, 80, as compared with 
an increase of $25,000 the previous year. Some means should be 
taken to raise the endowment fund to $100,000, at least. 

The number of subscribers and members has materially grown 
and is at present the largest in the history of the Institution. As a 
result nearly $5000 of the indebtedness of a year ago has been paid. 
We still owe about $2500, and every ejffort should be made to pay 
this off by increasing the number of contributing members. 

Items are included in the operating expenses that might be 
termed improvements, but your Board has seen fit to include every 
possible charge in operating expenses in preference to showing a low 
cost of operation. 

I am pleased to state that the investments under the endowment 
fund have remained undisturbed. The entire amount of the fund 
is invested in first mortgages. 

Attached hereto you will find the several statements in detail. 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. H. SILVERMAN. Treasurer. 



24 REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

GENERAL FUND. 

Balance October i, 1906 $ 273.68 

RECEIPTS. 

Dues and donations, net receipts $1 1407-53 

State of Pennsylvania 6,375.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities, Philadelphia 6,400.00 

Interest on investments i>990-54 

Sale of farm products 1408.29 

Received account students' tuition and board 1.59743 

$29,178.79 

$29,452.4/ 

Cash in hands of Director $ 100.00 

Cash in hands of office 1500 

$ 115.00 

$29,567.47 
EXPENDITURES. 

Beds and bedding • $ 2.25 

Brooms and Brushes I443 

Conveyance, carfare, expressage, 'phone 396.37 

Dry goods 1,650.28 

Fuel • • • • • ■ • • • • i>26i.33 

Groceries 998.i6 

Lighting 636.95 

Painting 456.34 

Printing and stationery 1,549.34 

Plumbing AZ1-77 

Provisions 3-235-i6 

Rent (Office) 212.00 

Repairs 1,917-28 

Sundries ■ 816.70 

Student's Spending Money 180.00 

Railroad Fare loaned to Graduates to reach their positions ii5-25 

Commission 70.46 

Horticultural Department 105.78 

Insurance 190.78 

Taxes 47-93 

Water 35-o6 

Supplies : 

Educational 33626 

Farm 4.532.o8 

Medical 142.50 

Salaries : 

Officers 2,680.83 

Matron 625.00 

Teachers 5,260.07 

Wages 1.855-17 

$29,761.53 

Deficit Sept. 30, 1907 $ i94-o6 



RETORT OF THE TREASURER. 25 



ENDOWMENT FUND ACCOUNT. 

Balance invested as per previous report $ 628.97 

Received : 

Account Endowment Funds during 1907 $ 2,495 00 

Account of interest on deposits SO.33 

$ 2,545-33 

Total $ 3,174-30 

Disbursements account of Endowment Fund : 

Investments $ 1,920.00 

2.50 

$ 1,922.50 

Balance uninvested $ 1,251.80 

ENDOWMENT FUND INVESTMENTS. 

ist mortgage, 5 per cent., 23 17-23 19-2321-2323 York St. Phila.$ 8,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent, 2414 Sedgeley Ave., Phila 1,500.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 322 N. 6th St., Phila 3,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 323 Washington Ave. and rear 

318 League St., Phila 2,500.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 1323 N. 7th St., Phila 3,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 4-10 per cent., 611 Lombard St., Phila 2,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 4-10 per cent., 1837 S. 7th St., Phila 1,500.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 2C08-10 S. loth St., Phila 4,000.00 

1st mortgage, 6 per cent., 224 North Ohio iVve., Atlantic City. 3,500.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent, 117 Florida Ave., Atlantic City. .. . 2,600.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 814-830 Moyamensing Ave., Phila. . 8,400.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 775 South 3rd St., Phila 2,000.00 

I St mortgage, 5 per cent, 304 S. 6th St., Phila 2,700.00 

5,000 Market St. "L" 4's at loit* 5,050.00 

Philadelphia & Reading 4's at 4 per cent 1,920.00 

$51,670.00 

$52,921.80' 



FLORA 5CH0ENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS. 

Balance unexpended as per previous report. - $ 1,478.54 

Disbursements : 

Account furnishings 63.29 

Live stock 250.00 

Improvements 31338 

$ 626.67 

Balance on hand $ 851.87 

INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 
Original donation $10,000.00 



26 REPORT OF THE TREASCRI^R. 

I'lora Sc/ioe life III Memorial luirms. — Contiinied. 

FARM No. I. 

Real estate and luiildings $ 4,727.43 

Live stock 713-64 

Tools and implements 394-63 

Furniture and furnishings 59-97 

$ 5,895.67 
FARM No. 2. 

Real estate and buildings $ 2,528.02 

Live stock 491.60 

Tools and implements 190.00 

Furniture and fittings ... - 42.84 

$ 3,252.46- 

$ 9,148.15 

Balance unexpended $ 851.87 



BALANCE SHEET. 

ASSETS. 

Real Estate and Buildings $ 90,800.00 

Endowment Fund, Investment 51,670.00 

Endowment Fund, cash in bank 1,251,80 

Live stock 3,444 i? 

Implements and Machinery . 2,254.00 

Tools , 1,615.05 

Chemical Apparatus 205.69 

Furniture and Fittings 6,182.53 

Cash in Office 15.00 

Cash in Director's Office 100.00 

Inventory 526.12 

Net loss for year ending Sept. 30, 1907 56.62 

$158,120.98 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Account $144,585.88 

Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. i 5,895.67 

Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 3,252.46 

Flora Schoenfeld, balance unexpended 851.87 

H. F. Bachman, Cash 461.12 

Bills payable 2,600.00 

Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 (farm insurance) 460.73 

Library Fund 13-25 

$158,120.98 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 27 



Prizes to the Students. 



At the Graduation Exercises on June 9th, 1907, $105.00 were 
distributed in prizes to seventeen students for efficiency and progress 
in the various departments of the School. The money for these 
prizes was donated as fohows : — 

Dr. and Mrs. Jos. Krauskopf, individual garden prizes ;. .$25.00 

Samuel Grabfelder prizes, in horticulture and animal husbandry 25.00 

Mrs. Louis Loeb prizes, in dairy and poultry departments 25.00 

Ralph Blumenthal prizes, in deportment (by his parents) 10.00 

Ralph Blum prize, in agriculture 10.00 

Samuel D. Lit prize, detail duty 5.00 

The Herbert T. Heyman prize, endowed by Mrs. Bernard 

Sluizer, poultry department 5 00 

At the Annual Meeting on September 29th, 1907, $67.50 were 
distributed to twenty students, the money for which was contributed 
as follows : — 

The Members of Camp Arden $25.00 

Dr. and Mi'rs. Jos. Krauskopf 20.00 

1. L. Marks, Chicago 10.00 

Mrs. Viola M. Strauss, Philadelphia 5.00 

Mrs. Philip Goldsmith, Philadelphia 5.00 

Mrs. Benj. Beerwald, Philadelphia 2.50 

; Two Prizes were endowed during the past year : — 

, I. "The Joseph Louchheim Prize." The interest of $250.00 donated oy 

Harry Louchheim, New York, in memory of his father. 

2. "The Herbert T. Heyman Prize." The interest of $150.00 donated by 

Mrs. Bernard Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

The management of the Farm School finds that these prizes 
are of immeasureable value to the students from the point of view of 
striving for efficiency in all the departments of their work. The 
majority of the students have no source from which to draw for 
spending money. Many, therefore, strive diligently for the winning 
of these prizes. Friends of tlie School are, accordingly, urged to 
remember the Institution by donating money prizes. If enough 
funds should be available it is hoped, during the next year, to distri- 
bute these prizes at the close of the Fall Term as well as in June and 
September. 



NEW AND IMPROVED METHODS OF FARMING. 




Beginning to Thrash the Winter Wheat. 
"Students at work under guidance and instruction of members of the Faculty. 



THE NATIONAL FARM vSCHOOL. 29^ 



The Bearing of Agriculture on Immigration 



AN ADDRESS 

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Meeting of the National Farm School 
at Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa., Sept. 29th, 1907 

By ROBERT WATCHORN, 

Commissioner of Immigration, at Ellis Island, New York. 



I am greatly pleased to be at Farm School on this anniversary 
occasion of so important and commendable an instituton as the 
National Farm School. When Rabbi Krauskopf did 
me the great honor to invite me to particpate in this ^^^'^ schoo "" *" 
day's celebration, I was just perfecting arrangements 
for a much-needed vacation, after one of the hardest year's work 
of my life, and as the 29th of September was included in my holiday 
program, the temptation to decline the honor was very strong; but 
my interest in The National Farm School was stronger still, and 
after a brief period of hesitaton I accepted, and altered my holiday 
plans to suit. 

My interest in The National Farm School is not new, for I 
recall with most pleasureable satisfaction that I was permitted in a 
small way to contribute financially to the undertaking 
when it was in an incipient, or at all events, an experi- Necessity of such 

1 T-,1 ■ 1 T 1 1 .1 1 3 School at time 

mental stage, i hat was at a tmie when i had the honor of jts founding, 
to be at the head of a great and important industrial 
department of this Commonwealth ; i. e. — The Department of In- 
spection of Workshops and Factories, 1891-1895. My official duties 
at that time afforded me many ocular demonstrations of the neces- 
sity for just such an undertaking as The National Farm School, by 
the overcrowding of the ill-ventilated factory, the unsanitary work- 
shop, and the microbe laden air of the mercantile establishment, by 
women and children on whose physical and mental health, the future 
welfare of the State so largely depends,-all too many of whom were 
driven thither by the unremunerative conditions prevailng in agri- 
cultural callings. 

Since that time — 1895 — to date, I have been so employed as to 
have forced upon me from another and altog-ether different stand- 
point, an emphasis of that very need. Twelve con- 
secutive years in actual work of inspecting immig'rants, a"'' »* ^^'*^ '•^t^- 
is bound to impress upon one many important sociolog- 
ical and economic considerations. During these twelve years more 



30 THE BEARING OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 



than eight niiUuns tjf immigrants have entered this country, and for 
tlie most part, have been fairly well acclimated and are on a fair 
way to appropriate assimilation. But where have they sought 
abiding places, and what sort of labor have they sought to exchange 
, for that wherewith to be fed, clothed and sheltered? 

Ninety per cent, of ,^, . -hi • i i n- • • i 

immigration in i he factory, the mill, the muie and the callmgs nicident 
factories, mills to rapid transportation, have absorbed ninety per cent. 

of those able to perform renumerative service, and occu- 
pations incident to agriculture or horticulture less than ten per cent. 
Eighty per cent, of the total volume of immigration has found its 
way into seven States, leaving only twenty per cent, for all the other 
States and Territories. This has caused no little alarm on the part 
of a larg'e body of well-meaning, thoug'h not always a well- 
informed people, at any rate people who have reached conclusions 
from unsound premises, or partially considered information. J. D. 

Whelpley, in his very able and interesting work — "The 
^^"^?,«!,'n^^"lon. Immigrant Problem" — says something to this effect: 

among many. o jo 

"The stream is non-descript and endless, made up from 
countless sources, convergent to a given point, with one common 
destination in view — The United States of America. It is myriad 
tongued, and in dress, multi-colored ; it is without leaders, and 
apparently aimless, except for the vague and abstract notion that 
somewhere beyond the great and boundless ocean there is a land 
flowing- with milk and honey, which is their desired destination." 

All this is measureably true, but it will require modification. 
The entire stream is not without leaders ; much of it is lead by the 
beacon light, the lamp of experience, of loved ones who 
lea^ds ^th^imm^* have already braved the perils of a journey to the sea 
^rant. across a continent, part of which is justly noted for its 

incredible inhumanity to man ; and who have crossed 
the trackless waters to a veritable land of promise; not one of 
promise only, but of blessed fulfillment as well. That portion which 
is not led is ruthlesslessly driven, and in its bewilderment and anxiety 
finds itself in the groove of travel to the west, and yields to an un- 
resisting tendency to follow it to its logical destination, which, how- 
ever harsh, cannot fail to prove, by comparison with the conditions 
from which it has been ejected, a genuine emancipation. 

Thrice it has been my privilege and honor personally to inves- 
tigate the sources and causes of certain of our immigration. What 
I then learned intensified my interest in all such inteili- 
Personai investi- gQnt coutributous to the general weal of mankind, as 
of immigration The National Farm School. I say "general weal" be- 
cause you might as well try to limit the use of a candle 
in a public place to its actual owner and to the exclusion of all by- 
standers, as to confine the happy results of such efforts as The 
National Farm School is making, to its patrons and students. There 



THE BEARING OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 31 

will and there must nuliate irom it a lig'lit wliieli will ^^^ personal 
shine into dark and remote corners, dissipating evils interest in the 
which have tended to the depopulation of the health- " ' " 
g-iving- pastoral stretches and to the consequent overcrowding of the 
cities and towns. Actual conditons as I found them in Roumania 
for instance (and Roumania I regret to say, is not miserably isolated 
in this respect, but it is fairly representative of general conditions, 
in an all too large section of a very great continent) are as incredible 
as the remarkable tales of Jules Verne, and as amazing as any chron- 
icle of human annals relating to any period of time. 

I will not weary you with a verbatim fecital of the entire list of 
•disabilities under which a certain portion of the people of that king- 
dom labor ; but to afford you a passing glimpse of it, 
I may be pardoned for enumerating a few of them. It * ^"^^"Voumania 
Avas a most charming afternoon in the month of Sep- 
tember, 1900, a Jewish Sabbath day. I sat with a remarkable man 
■of that race, on a beautiful eminence overlookng a resplendent valley, 
on the opposite side of which was situated the summer residence of 
the royal family of Roumania. The matchless charm of the 
mansion and grounds lay not in their pretentiousness, as royal resi- 
•dences go, but in their exquisiteness and simple beauty. I always 
loved the grandeurs of God's great and good outdoors, and when 
•a landscape or mountain range of peculiar beauty or strength are 
the objects of admiration, my enthusiasm is very apt to glow ; so it 
was on this occasion. My friend remarked : 

"My silence must not be miistaken for lack of admiration of all 
that which stirs your soul, and finds vent in a delightful tribute to 
the natural beaut}^ of my native land. The pleasing prospects of all 
that we behold are clouded by injustices so galling that not only 
these delights but the resplendent heavens also seem to be obscurred." 

I replied : "Evils which impress you thus must be over- 
shadowing indeed." 

He continued : "So far back that it is untraceable, my fore- 
iDears were born — as I was — nearby. We have always taken a fore- 
most part in manufacture and civic interests, but be- 
■cause we are Jews we are barely tolerated, scarcely The Tragedy of the 
allowed to breathe. I am the largest employer in the Roumanian Jew, 
•community where I live, a heav}^ tax-payer, but I am 
-3.S alien as though I had just immigrated from China. I may not 
even vote for a ward policeman. My co-religionists who are not 
so fortunate as I in this world's goods are doubly disqualified, 
for the political restriction placed on me is borne by them also, plus 
the direful limitations respecting their daily avocations. In this 
latter respect I am precluded from rendering adequate aid, because 
I am compelled to employ two Christians before I may employ one 
Jew — a ratio which is interminable. No Jew may own land, lease 



32 THE BEARING OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 



land, or till or cultivate the soil in any manner. Almost every 
avenue of endeavor is closed to him, and the wonder is that he 
survives. Even those of my co-religionists who braved the perils 
of war and who recovered from wounds inflicted in the battle's 
brunt, from which oozed the very life blood — a crimson contribu- 
tion to the nation's existence — were denied not only the welcome 
given to returning conquerors, but were speedily divested of their 
blood-stained uniforms, and unscabbarded swords, and driven, with 
unspeakable ingratitude and unpardonable ignominy, into that 
compressed and contracted existence from which they had been 
called in the darkest hour of the country's life." 

I gazed into that sad and soulful face and beheld in those moist- 
ened eyes a study which has never ceased to engage my most earnest 

consideration. I came to regard him not merely as 
forTim^of'^N^^s ^ uoblc Specimen of mankind, but as an epitome of 

an outraged people, and I there and then redoubled 
my interest in The National Farm School, observing in it "a cloud 
as small" for the moment "as a man's hand," but destined to be- 
come a veritable token of deliverance not only for a community but 
for a race; and not only for a race but for a great and mighty 
nation. 

You will observe, no doubt, that to me The National Farm 
School is not merely a local institution in which Bucks County 

may enjoy the monopoly of pride, but it is w^hat its 
cuitur"e^o°n infmi- "amc impHcs — a "National" institution; and al- 
graUon makes though its bcneficiences may be manifold, there is 
ins^tiuitioi^'^""^^ ^^° topic engaging the earnest attention of the public 

on which it has a more direct and important bearing 
than on that of immigration, and it will be a great surprise and a 
greater disappointment to me if it does not serve the happy purpose 
of allying apprehension on the part of many of our ntellig'ent and 
patriotic citizens, and of facilitating the assimilation of the victims 
of religious persecution and economic misfortune, who will through- 
out the coming years find under our flag and in our institutions, 
those ideal conditions for which women have prayed and men have 
toiled, lo ! these many centuries. 

The flocking to the towns and cities of newly arrived alien- is 
one undesirable feature of the problem of immigration of which 

we hear most, and on which there is apparently a 
Flocking to cities o-eneral consensus of opinion, unvarvinglv one of 

cause of restricted ■^ . ^ i- • • i ' r • - 

immigration. alarm. i Uis fcchng IS neither new nor fruitless. 

]\Iore and more restrictive measures have, during the 
past twenty years, been passed, so as to comprehend a very large 
list of inadmissible aliens; and a \'ery distinguished and highly in- 
telligent commission is now conducting a painstaking and scientific- 
inquiry, with a view to still further restrictions, if necessary. 



THE BEARING OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 33 



This occasion appears to me to be one eminently well litted for 
or suited to the discussion of this important phase of this very in- 
teresting problem, for despite the generally expressed opinions, the 
townward flow of population is not all evil, and is not due to causes 
usually ascribed to it. 

No less an authorit}' than George Washington declared that 
''Agriculture is the most healthful, most noble and most useful 
calling of man." But no student of modern indus- 
trial conditions would agree with that eminently ex- markefrin^citie°s'! 
pressed opinion if its author had added "the most 
profitable" in the practical sense in which the term profitable is 
generally understood. If we admit that it is man's privilege and 
his right to exchange his labor, physical and mental, for the highest 
obtainable remuneration, on what ground are we logically to rail 
at the strang-er within our gates for seeking the most profitable 
market for the only thing he has for sale — his labor? It is not a 
scientific indictment and therefore not a just one, that is so in- 
variably brought against the immigrant. He is in quest of work 
and wages ; to blame him for going to a place which is already too 
congested, when nothing adecjuate is offered in a more sparsely 
settled place, is certainly unfair. 

The native born American boy has turned a deaf ear to that 
plaintive but unpersuasive melody "Stay on the farm, bo3^s, stay on 
the farm," and has g'one to the great metropolis with its multi- 
farious charms and attractions, where the chores are done by rote, 
and where organized labor has put an effectual ban on the doing of 
them at those inconvenient and yawning hours which make rural 
life appear as a term of bondage to be served, rather than a life of 
usefulness and pleasure to be lived. 

Man began in a garden, and his prophesied end is to be in a 
city. That there has been a steady and unhindered tendency in that 
direction for centuries, no student of sociology will 
care to deny ; nor is it at all clear that the tendency f^enerai trend 
has not been for the general good of mankind. The metropolis, 
country schoolhouse has contributed to the welfare of 
mankind without a doubt, but few rural districts can afford the 
school facilities and advantages that a great city can afford. For 
very many of the advantages which the country affords, the city 
affords more, not only to immigrants but to native artisans, 
mechanics, workers of all grades, and families as well, not the least 
of W'hich is the wage rate, which, as we all know, is the great lode- 
stone of attraction which cannot be discounted by abstract theories 
about the joys of farm life. I have a large number of requests 
always on my official desk, made by gentlemen farmers, for farm 
laborers in the spring of each year, at wages which w^ould have been 
very attractive ten or twenty years ago — thirty dollars a month. 



34 THE BEARING OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 



board, lodging" and washing", and free fare to destination — Ijut it 
is a rare thing Uj lind a man who will accept snch an offer. Almost 
a million and a quarter of immigrants entered through the station 
at which I am commissioner, last year, and I am cjuite within bounds 
in saying that less than ten accepted such places as those referred to, 
because they were going elsewhere to join loved ones, who were 
already domiciled, or had high hopes of earning" more than the sum 
offered. 

When the 19th century began, eighty per cent, of the people of 
Great Britian w'ere domiciled in rural settlements, and twenty per 
cent, in the cities. When the twentieth century began 
unabaTng. "* thcsc figurcs wcre diametrically reversed. What pro- 
duced this tremendous change ? Immigration ? No ! 
for the records show that a comparatively slig'ht immig"ration had 
entered Great Britian, until long after this condition had been 
brought about. The townward flow has been universal during the 
last half century, and was never more accelerated than now. The 
city of New York is increasing its population at the rate of sixteen 
persons per hour. If our immigration were cut off entirely, it is 
cjuite certain that the cities would not grow so fast, because tne 
industrial conditions would receive a setback which would be re- 
flected in a general decline, noticeable in city and country percisely 
in keeping wdth the decline in the Cjuota each has been receiving. 
Therefore we must look elsewhere for the cause, and few students 
of the subject will fail to find it, not in the migrations of men, but 
in the momentous changes wrought by agencies which were little 
more than Utopian dreams a century ago, and which received a- 
very limited application, until, say half a centuiy ago : — steam and 
electricity, engines and machines of all sorts. Truly a transforma- 
tion has been wrought which has made a new w^orld, changed con- 
ditions, altered envioronments, to the immense and incalculable ad- 
vantage of mankind. 

The whole of this State was sold to William Penn by a British 
King in settlement of an I. O. U. for fifteen thousand pounds — 
a sum far less than the value of one day's output of oil in the 
Pittsburg district at the present day. The State was just as valu- 
able then as now. Every asset by way of natural resources it has 
now, it had then, but invention, scientific discoveries, the application 
of steam and electricity, have so enhanced the value of the State as 
to make it impossible for the ordinary mind to grasp the magnitude 
of its wealth. 

The distribution of immigrants artificially will fail of attain- 
ment of the desired end. Distribution is no doubt a most desirable 
Artificial distribu- thing, but to be permanent it must be natural ; to 
tion fails, unless make it natural. The National Farm School will plav 

made natural ~.. . , , ^ • 

through a source ^ niore cfticacious part than a thousand costly and 
like the N. F.s. Sporadic eft'orts, aye, even than sustained efforts, un- 



THE BEARING OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 35 

less directed with equal intelligence and commendable disinterested- 
ness. 

"Righteousness exalteth a nation" is a Bibical declaration. 
What do we mean when we use this term? Paying our just debts, 
not being the aggressor in costlv quarrels, dealing „. ^, , . 

^ ^» 1 ' 1 1 • 1 Righteous treat- 

justly wath our neighbors, and acknowdedgmg our de- mem of soil to 
pendence on the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, etc. stem the townward 
But it means far more than all this. We need to lean" 
to deal intelligently with the soil, with the earth and all that therein 
is. Righteous treatment of the soil would so increase its fruitful- 
ness, that the townward flow would give place to a ruralward flow, 
and the farmers renumeration would compare so favorably with the 
earnings of the artisan in the urban communities as to bring about 
naturally that which all too many good hearted people have been 
trying to do artificially. 

The National Farm School will demonstrate what the possi- 
bilities of a given acre are and how best to obtain the best results 
therefrom. It will teach that proper rotation of crops 
is a necessity ; that soil is a factor to be understood as sch'oTrs aim! 
well as to be cultivated; that the more particles of 
earth or soil exposed to the sun and accommodated with the 
optimum of moisture, the more certainly will the labor of the hus- 
bandman meet with that encouragement which is reflected in profits 
derived from the sale of his crops. It will demonstrate that agri- 
culture is not onl}^ the nations greatest single asset, but that it is the 
only inexhaustable and restorable wealth. Its mines and forests 
are rich beyond calculation, but they are exhaustable and for the 
most part non-restorable. 

The National Farm School will also teach and prove that the 
only royal road to success is in the application of intellig'ent and 
loving labor to one's' chosen task; that intensive 
rather than extensive farming is best. It will make '*® teachings lead 

111 • 1 1 to love of hus- 

two or more bushels of marketable gram and other bandman life, 
products grow where less than one was yielded before. 
It will bring back from the allurements in the places where men 
accumulate, those natural born husbandmen who have been de- 
spoiled of their calling by a ruthless hate and a galling prejudice, 
and pave the way for the emancipation of enthralled millions, trans- 
forming them from the cow^ering, hunted, persecuted subjects of an 
ignorant and cowardly d^aiast}^ into the manly, upright citizens of 
a glorious Republic; and in this beneficent work it will be aided 
by intelligent lawmakers, who will devote less attention to machine 
politics and more and more to highminded, far-seeing-, and far- 
reaching politics — politics synon5aiious with true patriotism, that 
sees in every citizen a man w^orthy of the State's highest consider- 
ation, legislating for his secular and economic guidance and guaran- 



36 THE BEARIXC'r OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 

teeing- him miabridg-ed protection in his method or form of worship- 
ping his Maker, be his creed or form of behef what it may. 

An intehigent legislature, State or National, will encourage the 
building of highways on which farmers may transport themselves 

and their products with ease, cheapness and celerity, 
er's^profes'sion'^'"" Telephones ought to be as accessible and as cheap to 

every farmer as to the merchant or artisan in the city. 
The farmer's house will be put, so to speak, into connection with 
the city forum, church or theatre, as his taste may desire. The 
electric current will put him in instant touch with eminent medical 
skin in times of need. Then we may revive the old song which has 
inspired thousands of sturdy men and women to voluntarily leave 
the crowded sections of Europe, to find a home in this blessed land : 

"To the West! To the West! To the land of the free; 
Where the mighty Missouri rolls down to the sea; 
Where a man is a man who is willing to toil, 
And the humblest may gather the fruits of the soil." 

Not only to the West where the mighty Missouri rolls down to the 
gulf, but to the East also, where the majestic Hudson and the 

lordly Delaware blend their mighty waters with the 
t?rF!"s!"sCc'ess salted sea, knowing that a new and more equitable 

condition will insure to rural places urban advantages 
— city schools, postal delivery, cheap and accessible telegraph}^, tele- 
phones and good roads. Rural avocations are certain to become 
more alluring. These things are not Utopian; they are not dreams; 
they are attainable and ought to be attained; and no one single 
factor will contribute more efficaciously to that desirable end, than 
such institutions as The National Farm School. 

We shall watch your splendid efforts with unabated interest, and 
we confidently hope and firmly believe that you will emancipate the 
soil from its unprofitable condition, and the toilers from the un- 
renumerative and unattractive calling, which all too many have 
chosen, and thus add to the contentment and happiness of mankind. 
You will instill into the minds of the hundreds whom you 
teach, and the thousands whom they in turn will teach, that the law 

of intelligent kindness prudently enforced will yield 
and 'complacency^ thosc rcsults for whicli wc yearn, — profitable returns 
of mind, the fruit for our labor and a complacency of mind which is 
of the farm fori he ^^^^^. ^|j ^^^^^^,^ greatest assct.. Your students will 

individual. ' & 

learn that righteousness consoles the individual as well 
as exalts the nation; that what this school, the State and the 
Nation can do for them is to quicken their intelligence and aid 
their efforts. But when all is said and done, individuality must 
play its part. Solomon's exclamation has not lost one whit of its 
forcefulness during all the centuries passed since his time : "Seest 
thou a man diligent in his business, he shall stand before kings." 



THE BEARING OF AGRICULTURE ON IMMIGRATION. 



37 



The personal equation will always have to be taken into account, 
and every student will have to learn that being absolutely true. — 
intelligently true — means being successful, aye, triumphant; and 
that being untrue means failure, dismal and miserable. To quote 
a recent anonymous writer : 

One ship drives East, one ship drives West, 

By the self same winds that blow. 

But it's the set of the sails and not the gales, 

That decides the way they go. 

As the winds of the sea are the ways of fate. 

As we voyage along through life. 

It's the set of the soul that decides the goal, 

And not the calm or the strife. 




Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory. 



38 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOIv. 



Sundry Donations. 



The Board of the National Farm School, in expressing its sincerest thanks 
for these many donations, wishes to tender its appreciations for the strong moral 
support given in their cities in behalf of our Institution by 

Rabbi Louis Bernstein, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Rabbi Chas. Freund Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rabbi David I. Liknaitz, Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Dr. Leo Mannheimer, Chicago, 111. 

Rabbi Louis D. Mendoza, Norfolk, Va. 

Rabbi Jos. Rauch, Sioux City, Iowa. 

Rabbi F. L. Rosenthal, Baton Rouge, La. 

Rabbi Geo. Solomon, Savannah, Ga. 

Rabbi H. S. StoUnitz Tampa, Fla. 



American Fork and Hoe Co Farm Implements 

Atlee, Burpee & Co., Seeds to the value of $ 60.00 

Bamberger, Mrs. Albert • .............$ 5.00 

Baum, Adam & Sons i Case Whiskey for Medincinal Purposes 

Berg Co • • • • . Fertilizer 

Bloch, S. L., for Re-flooring of Main Building .$500.00 

Blum, Ralph, for Repairs to Green House $ 29.62 

Blumenthal, Solomon i Bureau 

Braun, John & Sons • • Lawn Mower 

Burgoyne-Bingham Co. Stationery 

In memory of Mrs. Brunswick, by her children $ I5-0O 

Cohen, Charles J Envelopes 

Cohen, Aaron, Pittsburg, Pa One Dinner Set 

Coane, William J Stationery 

Diligent Sewing Circle • Turkish Towels 

Dreyfus & Co Furniture and Dry Goods 

Eisner, Mrs. Sarah, for Repairs on the Zadok Eisner Memorial Laboratory. $200.00 
Farquhar, A. B., Co., York, Pa. — i 15-Tooth, Wheel and Lever Spring Tooth 
Harrow, i Root Double Spout Corn Sheller, i P. H. Extension Axle Rid- 
ing Cultivator, Complete, i No. 43 R. H. Farquhar Plow, Complete, with 
3 extra Shares. 

Frank, M!rs. Henrietta (In Memory of Her Husband) $ 10.00 

Franklin Institute Books and Periodicals 

Friedberger, Mrs. Simon 300 "Sanitary" Towels and Wash Cloths 

Friend, Mrs i dozen Salt Shakers, 2 Glass Pitchers 

Gimbel, Daniel • Hand Mangle 

Goldsmith, Mrs. George (In Memory of Father) $ 25.00 

Goldstein, William ......$ 10.00 

Goldsmith, G. M., for Medicines $ 5.00 

Gross, A. M. i Rubber Stamp for Office Use 

Guckenheimer, Mrs. J Books 

Hardie i\Ifg. Co., Hudson, Mich Part Donation of Spray Pump No. I2 

Hilbronner, Sidney (In Memory of Father) $ 2.00 

Hilbronner, Sidney (In ^Memory of Mother) $ 3.00 

Hirshheimer, A., LaCrosse, Wis 2 Cultivators and i Plarrow' 

Hoover-Prout Co., Avery, Ohio i Potato Digger 

Hoskins, William H., Co Stationery 

Israel, Abe Cement 

Jonas Bros 12 Dozen Handkerchiefs 

Jonas, Miss F 2 dozen Bath Towels 

Kaufman, Joseph 13 Pairs Lace Curtains 

Kelly, O. S., Western Mig. Co., Iowa City, Iowa Hardware 



SUNDRY DONATIONS. 39 

King, A. S Kitchen Utensils 

Kirshbaum, Mrs. J $ 2.00 

Klein, Leon . . • • ' $ 5.00 

Krauskopf, Dr. Jos., Repairs to Green House $29.62 

Krauskopf, Mrs. Jos 3 Coats and Trousers (not new) Kitchen Utensils 

Ladenburger, Mrs. Theo. (In Honor of Birth of Daughter) . $15.00 

Landman, Rabbi Lsaac Bible for Libr^iry 

Levy, Dr. and Mrs. H. H., Richmond Va 2 Uniforms (not new) 

Lewin, Mrs. Philip Furniture, Dishes and Books 

Lieberman. Mrs. L ,. . i Washstand 

Liveright Bros. . . • • Files and Rasps 

Liveright, Greenwald & Co i Case Candles 

Loeb, ]\Irs. INIichael $ 10.00 

Lubin, S Piano and Stool, Cineograph Apparatus, and' Entertainments 

Mann, William Co ■ . Stationery 

Marks, Albert S $ 20.CO 

McCarty & Witman .Bookstand for Office 

Medofif, Joseph : • • ■ . . -5 Copies Model Reader 

Merchant & Evans 3 Rolls Kismet Sheet Tin, 2 Rolls M. A. . S. Tin 

Merz, Mrs. Leon 13 dozen pieces Table Silver 

Morris, Joseph Sheet Music 

Needlework Guild of America Numerous Articles of Dry Goods 

Nixon, W. H . Paper for this Book 

North Bros. Mfg. Co i 14-Qt. Ice Cream Freezer 

Oppenheimer, Leon and Isadore (In Memory of Hulda Oppenheimer) . . . .$ 5 00 

Page, Mrs. (In Memory of her Daughter, Rose) $ i 00 

Pomerantz, A., Co Statione.ry 

Powdermaker, David (In memory of Mother) $ 10.00 

Price & Co., Thomas W Paper for Cover of this Book. 

Reinheimer, Mrs. L 3 Large Baskets 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. H 2 Dozen Teaspoons 

Rosenthal, A ) . ) I 10.00 

Rothkugel, Mr. and Mrs. Max (In Memory of Rita) $ 10.00 

Rubin, Mrs. Joseph (In Memory of Mother) $ 10.00 

Sanders Publishing Co i book 

Segal, Adolph Complete Furnishings for Segal Hall 

Shoneman, Mrs. R. R i Wash Ringer 

Silberman, Mrs. Ida . . • • $ 25.00 

Simon, Lee i case Whiskey for Medicinal Purposes 

Snellenburg, Joseph Cinders for Paths, and Freight on same, $ 13.00 

Snellenburg. Mrs. Nathan .4 Large Chairs, i dozen Camp Chairs 

Snellenburg, Samuel Furniture, etc., to the amount of $113.00 

Steifel, Jos. L., Albany N. Y $ 10.00 

Stern, Mrs. M i dozen each of Knives and Forks 

Stern, Mrs. S. M 2 Dining Room Pictures 

Sundheim, Mrs. C. (In Memory of Husband) $25.00 

Toch Bros., N. Y Quantity of Metallic 

Weber, H., & Son i Bureau 

Weil, Abr. (In Honor of Daughter's Marriage) $ 10.00 



40 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



Donations to Farm School Sewing Circle. 



The National Farm School Sewing Circle was organized for 
the special purpose of contributing needed materials for the house- 
hold of that school. There being over fifty students at the school, 
the demand on the household linens is very large, and the means of 
the National Farm School are not sufficient to supply all the wants. 

The good cause, for which the National Farm School stands^ 
appealed to a considerable number of Philadelphia ladies, and they 
met faithfully ever}^ Thursday afternoon in the Sewing Room of 
Temple Keneseth Israel, and labored diligently to supply the needs 
of the institution. The splendid showing which the linen room of 
the Farm School made on last Graduation Day, \vhen the winter's 
work was displayed, is the best proof of the good work that was 
done by this Circle. 

Following- are the donations received by the Circle : — 

Mrs. N. Snellenburg . . I piece Denim 

Mrs. R. A. Schoneman 6 dozen Napkins 

Mrs. Sterns i piece Linen 

Mrs. S. M. Levy • • i piece Outing Flannel 

Mrs. I. H. Silverman i piece Toweling 

Mrs. R. Schoneman 6 Sheets for jNIatrcn's Bed 

Mrs. Rohrheimer and Mrs. Goldsmith i dozen Cups and Saucers 

Miss C. Laub ^ dozen Cups and Saucers 

Mrs. R. Schoneman ^ dozen Cups and Saucers 

Mrs. Arthur Rosenberg i dozen Table Cloths 

Mrs. Oscar Klonower i Table Cloth for Faculty Table 

Mrs. S. B. Fleisher i piece Outing Flannel 

Misses Hilbronner i piece Towelmg 

Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf i dozen Bed Spreads 

Alexander & Berman 19 lbs. Coffee 

Mrs. Penrose Fleisher $5.00 

Mrs. Martha Fleisher, (Sewing Money) 2.10 

Mrs. Schoneman, (for Curtain Material) 2.10 

Mrs. Schoneman, (Sewing Money) 5.60 

Mrs. Thalheimer 2 00 

Mrs. Manasses 2.00 

yirs. Simon Loeb 2.00 

Through Mrs. H. Rosenthal 17.00 

In honor of birth of Robert B. Sax 25.00 

iNIrs. Martha Fleisher 20.00 

Mrs. H. M. Nathanson 10.00 

Mrs. Julia Nathanson . . . . 5 40 

Mrs. B. F. Teller 5.00 

Mrs. J. Guckenheimer 6.00 

Mrs. J. M. Berg i.oo 

Anonymous i.oo 

Mrs. S. Fleisher 5.00 

Isaac Sailer 5.00 

Dr. Krauskopf, (In honor of Heller-Ulman wedding) 10.00 

Mrs. Henrietta Dannenbaum 5.00 

Miss Frieda Jones 5.00 

Mrs. H. Blumenthal =00 



DONATIONS TO FARM SCHOOL vSEWING CIRCLE. 



41 



Miss Helen Langfeld 5 oo 

Through Mrs M. Fleislier . 5.40 

Through Mrs. Schoneman 5.40 

IMrs. Davidson, (In memory of Rebecca Fleisher) 5.00 

Through Mrs. L Katzenberg 2.50 

Through Mrs. M. A. Stern 2.50 

Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 10.00 

IM;rs. Albert Liveright 3. go 

Mrs. Moyer Fleisher 3.00 

Mrs. P. M. Sax 3.00 

Mrs. Alfred M. Klein 5.00 

Mrs. S. M. Levy, (For Flannel) 3.68 

In honor of Elizabeth H. Weil's birthday and in memory of Hulda Oppen- 

heimer 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Schwartz 5.00 

Mrs. M. Sycle . . 5.00 

A Friend .' 5 00 

Mrs. Benamin Siedenbach 5.00 

Mrs. M. Langfeld 5.00 

]Mrs. J. Raab 5.00 

From a euchre, (for Pillow Case Muslin) 7.00 

Mrs. M. Bash 5.00 

Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf 5.00 

The following- are the articles made by the Sewing Circle and 

sent to the Farm School : — 

158 sheets, 223 towels, 48 bath towels, 67 pillow-cases, 57 laundry bags, 204 
table napkins, 30 table cloths, 45 waiters aprons, 26 muslin night shirts, 87 flannel 
night shirts, 50 denim table covers. 

MRS. ROSA B. SCHONEMAN, 

Chairman. 



/ 


''*^#^'- ws&aJH 



EARLY MORNING 

Students receiving directions for the day's work at the Barns. 




Farms Donated 



In memory of Flora Schoenfeld, 

by her husband, Max Schoenfeld, 

of Rorschach, Switzerland. 



I. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 1, 

40 acres, in the Spring of 1904. 

II. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2, 

38 acres, in the Spring of 1905. 

III. Painswick Hall Farm, 

163 acres, in the Fall cf 1907. 



These farms all adjoin the original tract of 
Farm School land. 






.S^> f ® 
%0. 



I 



i 

P 

eifT®' 



I 



mm 



!s/|Ts)' 



ia/j \B 









Buildings Donated 



I. Theresa Loeb Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Theresa I<oeb, Ogontz, Pa , by her family. 

Erected 1S9S. 

II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel, 

In memory of Ida M. Bloch, Kansas City, Mo., by her hus- 
band and family. Erected 1S99. 

III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory, 

In memory of Zadok M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
his wife. Erected 1899. 

IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green 
House, 

In memory of Rose Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa., by her 
children. Erected 1899. 

V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron, 

Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1S99. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall, 

Containing I<ibrary, lyccture Hall, Administration Offices 
and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Erected 1906. 

VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing 
Green House, 

In memorj'of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband, (in course 
of construction.) 





yM 

'eJT®1 
sWsJ 

&i I® 

'e/TTs' 
'eSTfe' 






'eTTs' 
'If 






==1 



Legacies and Bequests 



Money received in legacies and bequests is placed 
Endowment Fund. 

Estate of — 

1905 — Moses Lichten 

1906 — Marx Wineland, Frostberg, Md., 

1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia, 

(For Bernard and Frances Seligman L,ibrary Alcove), . 

" — Fannie Houseman, Philadelphia, 

(In memory of her son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman), . 

" — Edward Popper, Greenville, Texas, .... 

" — Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia, . . . 

" — Fannie Simon, Philadelphia, 

" — Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia, 



in the 



$500 


00 


500 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


200 


00 


50 


00 


500 


00 



Memorial Trees 



Planted, Spring 1907, in memory of 



Moritz Aal 
Henrietta Ahrens 
Henry M. Ahrens 
William Baer 
Aron Baer 
Pauline Baer 
Herman Berg 
Isidore Brown 
Simon Brown 
Sarah Bamberger 
Eva Blumenthal 
David Blumenthal 
Jeanette Davidson 
Rachel Feldenheimer 
Sigfried Fischel 
Gussie Fliegelman 
Hanchen Frank 
Samuel L. Frank 
Dr. Samuel Leon Frank 
George Gunlefinger 
Albert D. Gunlefirjger 
Max S. Gerstle 
Helena Gerstle 



Henry Gerstley 
Samuel W. Goodman 
Gabriel Greenwald 
Harry L. Hart 
Isaac Hart 
Mrs. Clara Hahn 
Adolph Hyman 
M. C. Hirsch 
Jacob Holzner 
Arthur Houseman 
Benjamin Houseman 
Fannie Houseman 
Levi Isenberg 
Gustav Isenberg 
Eugene Isenberg 
Helene Isenberg 
Sarah Jessar 
Mabel Kaufman 
Getta Kaufman 
Walter Lazar 
Benjamin Labe 
Helene Leipheimer 



Adolph Lowenstein 
Minette Lowenstein 
August Nachman 
Rosa Nelke 
Moses Noar 
Fannie Pfeifer 
Kate Pollak 
Frank Pulaski 
Leopold Rheinstrom 
Rabecca Rheinstrom 
Ritta Rothkugel 
Ellen Rosenthal 
Herman Rosenthal 
Sarah Rawitch 
Louis Ravitch 
Fanny Simon 
Rachel Schoeneman 
Samuel Schwab 
Rebeka Schwab 
Kaufman Sondheimer 
Herman Sundheim 
Laura Wolf 






jS 



tn memory of 



itf& ®rt- 29. lanr. 



Whereas, the late Isaac Herzberg was identified 
throughout his life with many charitable movements in 
the city of Philadelphia, and 

Whereas, among the different charitable movements 
which have reason to feel grateful to his memory for the 
o-ood which he has done, was the National Farm School, 
of which he was an honored and useful member, serving 
on the Board of Managers as Chairman of the Schoenfeld 
Farms Committee, and 

Whereas, the Board of the National Farm School 
feels deeply the loss which has come to them by reason 
of his decease, be it 

Resolved, that the Board of Managers extends its 
sympathy and have its condolence spread on its minutes 
as expressive of its deep bereavement through the loss of 
so honorable a character and so sincere a worker for its 
cause, and be it 

Further Resolved, that this resolution be published 
in the Year Book of the National Farm School, in the 
Jezvish Exponent, in the Weekly Bulletin of Congre- 
o-ation Keneseth Israel, and in The Gleaner. 

Joseph Krauskopf, President. 
Isaac Landman, Secretary. 



46 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



Life Members 

One paj'inent of |ioo.oo, one time, into the Endowment Fund. 



ALABAMA 

Mobile. 

Bernheimer, Jlrs. L. 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield. 
Cohn, C. 

ENGLAND 

London. 

Meyer, Arthur 

ILLLNOIS 

Champaign. 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 

Kuhn, Florence L. 
Chicago. 

Mandel, Leon 

Stettauer, Mrs. D. 

LNDIANA 

Ligonier. 
Slrauss, Ike 
Strauss, Jacob 

IOWA 

Waver ly. 

A. Slimmer 
Sioux City. 

Wise, Mrs. Chas. 

LOUISIANA 

New Orleans. 

District Grand Lodge, 

No. 7, I. O. B. B. 
Newman, Isadora 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore. 
*Rayner, Wm. S. 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Bos to 71. 

Hecht, Mrs. Lina 
Shuman, A. 

MISSISSIPPI 

Natchez. 
Frank, H. 

MISSOURI 

St. Louis. 

■■Rice, Jonathan 

Stix, C. A. 

NEW YORK 
New York. 

Abraham, A. 

Blumenthal, Geo. 

Budge, Henry 

Guggenheimer, Wm. 

Krauskopf, INIary G. 

Lewisohn, Adolph 

I\Ieyer, Wm. 

Silberberg, G. 

Sidenberg, G. 



Niagra Falls. 

Silverberg, Bertha 
Rochester. 

Lo wen thai, M. 

Silberberg, M. 

SilberVjerg, G. 

Silberberg, G. 

OHIO 

Cincinnati. 

Block, Samuel 

Lowman, Leo. J. 

Meis, Henry 
Coluynbus. 

B'nai Israel Sisterhood 

Lazarus, Fred'k 

Lazarus, Ralph 

Miller, Leopold 

Zion Lodge No. 62, 
I. O. B. B. 
Young stown. 

Theobald, Mrs. C. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny. 

Rauh, ]\Irs. Rosalie 
Altoona. 

Henry, S. Kline 
Langhoryie. 

Branson, I. L. 
Philadelphia. 

Betz & Son 

Bloch, B. B. 

Blum, Ralph 
*Blumenthal, Herman 

Blumenthal, .Sol. 

Byers, Jos. J. 

Federation Jewish 
Charities 

F^lei-sher, Martha S. 

Grant, Adolph 

Harrison, C. C. 

Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
*Jonas, Herman 

Kaas, Andrew 

Kaufman, IMorris A. 

Kayser, Samuel 

Krauskopf, Harold 

Langfeld, A. M. 

LevT, Sol. 

Lit,'S. D. 
*Merz, Daniel 

Merz, Mrs. Regina 

Muhr, Jacob 
*Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
*Pfaelzer, Simon 

Reform Congregation 
Keneseth Israel 
*Rorke, Allen B. 



Rosenberg, Grace 

Rosenberg, Walter J. 

Rosenberg, Walter I. 

Schloss, I\Irs. Herman 

Schoch, Henry R. 

Silberman, Mrs. Ida 

Silverman, I. H. 
*Snel]enburg, J. J. 

Snellenburg, Nathan 

Snellenburg, Samuel 

Sternberger, Samuel 
*Teller, Benj. F. 

Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
*Teller, Joseph R, 

Trautman, Dr. B. 

Wanamaker, John 
*Weiler, Herman 

Wolf, I., Jr. 
Pittsburg. 

Browarsky, Max 

Cohen, Aaron 

Cohen, Josiah 

Dreifus, C. 
"'Frank, Samuel, by his 
son E'"3gar K. Frank 

Guckenheimer, Isaac 

Hamburger, Philip 

Hanauer, A. M. 

Kaufman Bros. 

Marcus, Aaron 

Solomon & Rubin 

W^eil, A. Leo 

Weil, J. 

SWITZERLAND 

L^orschach. 

Schoenfeld, Max 

TEXAS 

Dallas. 

Sanger, Alexander 
Sanger, Mrs. Philip 
Silberstein, A. 

VIRGINIA 

Norfolk. 

Ladies Hebrew Benevo- 
lent Association. 

Richmond. 

Milheiser, Gustave 
Milheiser, Mrs. Rosalie 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Wheeling. 
Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
WASHINGTON 

Seattle. 

Galland, Mrs. C. K. 



* Deceased. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 47 

THE SCHOOL AND ITS EQUIPMENT. 

History. — The National Farm School was opened in the sum- 
mer of 1897 for the purpose of affording young men an opportun- 
ity to study practical and scientific agriculture for agricultural 
careers. 

The special reason for its founding lay in the large influx of 
immigrants to our country, their settling in excessive numbers in 
our great cities, especially in our seaport +o\vns, and in the alarm- 
ing increase of social, economic and moral problems to which their 
■congestion gave rise. It was felt that one of the remedies lay in 
the removal of some of this surplus populace to the countr}-, and 
in the settling of them there as tillers of the soil, under the leader- 
ship of young men thoroughly trained in the practice and science 
of modern agriculture. 

The first graduation of the National Farm School took place 
in June, 1901. Besides giving a partial training in agriculture to 
3. large number, it has sent out fifty-tw^o young men fully equipped 
for agricultural life. From a plant of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres, the school has grown to about four hundred acres, and its 
three buildings to ten, in addition to the numerous buildings and 
out-houses on the four divisions of the farm. Some of the build- 
ings at the school, in point of architecture and equipment, would 
"be a credit to institutions much older and richer. 

Location. — The School is located about one hour's ride from 
Philadelphia, in the centre of one of the richest agricultural dis- 
tricts of Pennsylvania. It is reached by the Philadelphia & Read- 
ing Railroad. It has its own station and post office, named Farm 
School, Bucks Co., Pa. It may also be reached via Willow Grove 
trolley line from Philadelphia, connecting at Doylestown with train 
for Farm School, or it may be reached from Doylestown by foot, 
along a pleasant road of but 134 miles distance. 

In point of beauty, the Farm School is one of the most pictur- 
esque spots in Bucks County. It is distinguished for its rolling 
lands, its numerous shady groves, and it is surrounded by some 
of the most celebrated seed and stock farms of the country, such 
as the W. Atlee Burpee seed farm, a thoroughly equipped estab- 
lishment, conducted on the soundest business principles. The 
managers allow the students of the Farm School to study their 
methods of business. Such an object lesson, accompanying the 
instruction given, adds greatly to the educational equipment. 

The entire environment is that of an agricultural people, who 
live on and by their farms, and whose whole life and example show 
the profitable^ and enjoyable aspect of agricultural pursuits. 

General Equipment. — The land, being very fertile, makes it 

possible to carrv on diversified farming. The farm contains many 
acres of timber land, aft'ording opportunity for the study of forestry. 
It is well stocked with pure bred and grade cattle, with ample sup- 
ply of horses and mules for instruction in field work, and with a well 



48 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS EQUIPMENT. 



equipped poultry plant and sheep fold. The buildings for these are 
arranged according to modern sanitary principles. Two silos adjoin 
the dairy barn. The outfit of farm machinery is especially complete. 
The dairy building is thoroughly equipped with modern machinery 
for carrying on dairy operations. Vegetable gardens, orchards and 
nurseries, together with the greenhouses, make practical work in 
horticulture possible throughout the entire year. 

The Buildings. — In addition to the buildings on the various 
divisions of the farm, there are ten distinct buildings in connection 
with the instruction at the school. The Main Building; the recent- 
ly erected Segal Hall, which contains a library of three thousand 
volumes of well selected literature with special reference to agri- 
culture; the laboratory, dairy, greenhouses, poultry houses, barns^ 
implement and tool house, the water supply station, the Chapel. 

Capacity. — At the present time the dormitories accommodate but 
fifty students. It is hoped, however, that friends of the institution, 
and philanthropists in general, appreciating the purpose which the 
National Farm School subserves, will aid in enlarging its housing 
capacity, so that the benefits of the school may be extended to a 
larger number of students. 

Support. — The School, having been especially organized to 
afford an agricultural training to young men who are either not 
prepared to enter a State Agricultural College or who have not the 
means to pay their board and tuition fee at such institutions, affords 
education, board, lodging, clothes, etc., to its students, free of 
charge, excepting in cases where students are able to pay for these 
themselves. 

These funds are obtained from the interest of an endowment 
fund of $50,000, from appropriations received from the State, from 
the Federation of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia and small con- 
tributions received from the Federations of other cities, and from 
memberships, bequests and donations from all parts of our country. 




THE BARNS 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 49 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

1. An applicant for admission mnst be above fifteen years 
of age. (His mental and physical condition must be such as shall 
enable him to pursue the required studies and to perform the agri- 
cultural work.) 

2. He must accompany his application with a school certifi- 
cate as to his education. When such a certificate cannot be had, 
he must pass an entrance examination in his place of residence, 
before a person designated for that purpose, or be prepared to pass 
an entrance examination upon arrival at the Farm School, in the 
following subjects: 

Arithmetic. — -A thorough knowledge of Least Common Multiple, Greatest 
Common Divisor, Common and Decimal Fractions, Weights and Measures 
and Percentage is required. 

History. — The applicant is required to write a short sketch of import- 
ant events occurring in the United States, or in the country in which he was 
born or reared. This sketch must not exceed four pages in length. 

English. — The applicant is required to know the parts of speech, to be 
able to conjugate verbs, to decline nouns, to compare adverbs and adjec- 
tives, and to write examples of simple, compound and complex sentences. 

Geography. — The applicant is required to name the principal mountains, 
rivers, products, states or provinces of the country in which he was born 
or reared; the principal land and water divisions of the earth; the chief 
countries of the old and new world and their respective capitals. He must 
also be able to distinguish between autocratic, monarchic and republican 
forms of government and give illustrations of each. 

3. An applicant must be in good health. A practicing physi- 
cian must fill out the blanks designated for that purpose in the 
application. 

The Board of Managers reserves for itself the right to reject an 
applicant, who, upon examination by the physician of the National 
Farm School, is not eligible for admission to the school. 

4. When an applicant shall have been notified that his appli- 
cation has been favorably acted upon, he must come to Farm 
School, Bucks County, Pa., Philadelphia & Reading R. R., at the 
time specified, and must come provided with the following out- 
fit: One heavy overcoat, one school suit, two pairs of working 
shoes, one pair of gum boots, one pair of slippers, three suits of 
heavy underwear, three suits of light underwear, one dozen pairs 
of socks, one half dozen collars, two pairs cuffs, two bosom shirts, two 
pairs overalls, two jumpers, one hair brush and comb, one tooth 
brush, one umbrella, three neckties, one working hat, one half dozen 
napkins and a napkin ring. 

students raaj- purchase the required working shoes at the Farm School, where the proper 
Idnd and quality will be furinshed them at $i.8o per pair. 

5. The receptacle for a student's personal eft'ects must not ex- 
ceed in size that of an ordinary steamer trunk. 

6. All students must come to the school prepared to furnish 
their own uniform. The price is $12.50. 

7. Students are admitted only on six months' probation. If 
at the end of that time or at a later period, they prove themselves 
■unfit, the Board reserves for itself the right of sending them home 
at the students' expense. 



Application for Admission to National 
Farm SchooL 

(Applicants will answer following questions in own hand-writing and in ink. 

1. Name 

2. Residence: City Street State. 

3. Age Weight Height. 

4. Place and Country of Birth 

5. Religion. 

6. Parent's or Guardian's Name and Residence. 

7. State highest grade reached iu school i 

8. How far advanced are you in the following studies: I 

{a) English 

{d) Arithmetic 

(c) History 

{d) Geography , 

9. If not attending school, what is your present employment? 

10. Have you had any experience in agriculture? | 

ir. Do you expect to follow agriculture after leaving Farm School? | 

12. Have you means to pay for board and lodging? ^ 

13. Are you willing to abide by the rules of the School? j 

14. Give name and address of one or more prominent people for reference y) 



I 

I- 

Signature of Applicant q 

Signature of Parent or Guardian I- 

D 

— O 

CERTIFICATE OF PHYSICIAN. 

(To be tilled out and signed by Physician.) 

1. Name of applicant 

2. If parent deceased, state cause of death 

3. Age of applicant Height Weight 

4. Are all the functions and organs of the body in healthy condition ? 

5. If functions or organs abnormal, state their nature 



6. Has applicant ever suffered from nervous or hereditary troubles?. 



7. Give measurement of chest circumference of upper arm of thigh 

8. Has applicant any deformitj' of body? 

9. Is the applicant, in your opinion, fitted for hard out-door work and for close 

application to indoor studies? 

Signature and address of Physician 

g^" When the application is filled out, return it to 

MORRIS A. KAUFMANN, 

ChairmaJi Application Coinrniitee, 
Allegheny Ave. and Hancock St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 51 

STUDENTS AT THE SCHOOL. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Name. Residence. 

Condor, Louis Baltimore, Md. 

Feldman. Nathan Philadelphia 

Fleisher. Maximillian Doylestown, Pa. 

Lauchman. William Pittsburg. 

Lieb, Louis Philadelphia. 

Rudley, Samuel Philadelphia. 

Schulman, Harry New Orleans. 

Schlesinger, Alphonse New Orleans. 

Stabinsky, Julius New Orleans. 

Stern, Isaac New York. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Berg. Harry Boston. 

Friedman, Samuel New York. 

Ostroleuk. Lewis Gloversville, N. Y. 

Major. Edward New York. 

Ratner, Joseph New York. 

Wallman. Israel New York. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Aarons, Harry Milwaukee. 

Blackman. Morris Philadelphia. 

Coltun, Max Alliance, N. J. 

Glantz, Emanuel New York. 

Levy, Bennett Chester, Pa. 

Naum, Harry David Schenectady, N. Y. 

Rosenstein. Leonard Wabash, Ind. 

Snowvice, William Philadelphia 

Solomon, Emanuel Wilmington. Del. 

Spyer, Aaron Cleveland, O. 

FRESHMAN CLASS, 

Atkatz, Joseph New York. 

Berman, Abraham New York. 

Bogdauoff, Max Philadelphia. 

Cousin, Samuel Philadelphia. 

Einstein, Svlvan Philadelphia. 

Ginsberg, Bartiett New York. 

Grinstein, Benjamin Dallas, Texas, 

Halbert, Michael Norma, N. J. 

Horwich, Morris Chicago. 

Housman. Samuel New \ork. 

Kahau. Jacob St. Louis, Mo. 

Kotlikoff. Samuel Philadelphia. 

Landsman, Harrv New York. 

Lebeson, Hyman Philadelphia. 

Left, Isidor ^'f^' York 

Leiser, Monroe Chicago, 111. 

Lenik, Benjamin New York. 

Margolin, Louis New York. 

Michelson, Moses Indianapohs. 

Miller, Joseph Allegheney. 

Morris, Louis Cnicago. 

Nadelman, Harry New \ork. 

Rosenfield, Jacob Washington, D. C. 

Sarner, Joseph E^^^^^^ P^-^" 

Shapiro, Nathan Philadelphia. 

Silverstein, Hyman New York. 

Sobel, Solomon New ^ov)s^ 

Sparberg, Louis Superior, Wis. 

Steck. Frank ^i^.'^f ?S ^ •-/■ 

Silver, Charles Philadelphia 

Schwartz, Abram Elizabethport, N. J. 



52 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 



List of Members and Contributions. 

For the Year Ending September 30, 1907. 



ALABAMA. 

Alexander City 

Herzfeld, R $5.00 

Birmingham 

Adler, Morris 10.00 

Caheen Bros 5.00 

Congregation 

Emanu-El 5.00 

Gadsden 

Frank, Ferdinand.. 5.00 
Nadler, J 5.00 

Huntsville 

Damson & Abra- 
ham 5.00 

Ermann, Carrie & 

Gustav 5.00 

Goldsmith, Oscar .. 10.00 
Jacoby, J. Millin- 
ery Co 2.50 

Ladies' Temple Aid 

Society 25.00 

Lowentbal, H. J.. 5.00 
Marschutz, Leo. .. 10.00 

Marx, Gus 5.00 

Mihalovits, Geo. . . 2.50 

Scbiffman, 1 5.OO 

Weil, Mrs. Emma 5.00 

"Weil, H 5.00 

"Wind, J 5.00 

"Winter, Mrs. Laura 
M., (In memory 
of husband, Leon 
"Winter) 5. 00 

Livingston 
Levy, M 5.OO 

Mobile 

Forchheimer, M. .. 25.00 

Hess, Henry 5.00 

Kohlman, Benj. J. 5.00 
Shaari Shomayim 
Sabbath School .. 5.00 

Montgomery 

Bernheimer, L. ... 5.00 

Kahl, Montgomery 10.00 

Kahn, M 5.00 

Katz, Marcus 1.00 

Loeb, Jacques 3.00 

Rice, Alex 5.00 

Sheffield 

Goldman, Mr. and 
Mrs. H 10.00 

Selma 

Levy, D 5.00 

Ullman, Mrs. H. ... 5.00 



Uniontown 
Ernst, A. E., for 

Israelites of town 5.00 

Marks, Moses .... 5.00 

Meyer, F 5.00 

Pake, L. J 5.00 

Wetumpka 

Hohenberg, M. & Co. 10.00 

ARIZONA. 

Tucson 

Jacobs, M. Lionel. 5.00 

ARKANSAS. 

Fulton 

Rosenberg, Geo. . . 10.00 

Hot Springs 

Fellheimer, H. ... 5.00 

Mendel, Albert ... 5.00 

Meyer, S 5.00 

Huntington 
Mayer, H 5.00 

Little Rock 

Abeles, Chas. T... 10.00 
B'nai Israel Con- 
gregation 10.00 

B'nai Israel Sunday 

School 5.00 

Cohen, A. D 10.00 

Cohen, M. M 5.00 

Frank Laundry Co. 10.00 
Kahn, Herman & Co. 10.00 

Lacker, Mrs. A 5.00 

Mayer, Max 10.00 

Pfeifer, Albert ... 5.00 
Pfeifer, Jos., Cloth- 
ing Co 7.50 

Stifft, S. Chas 5.00 

W olsey, Louis, Rabbi 5.00 

Newport 
Goldman, T 10.00 

Pine Bluff 

Hebrew Rel. Asso. 5.00 

Rosenberg, F. M... 10.00 

Roth, L 10.00 

CALIFORNIA. 
Alameda 

Leffman, Mrs. L. D. 5.0!i 

Fresno 

Einstein, Louis & Co. 10.00 

La Jolla 

Lieber, W. S 5.00 

Lieber, Mrs. W. S. 5.00 



Los Angeles 

Cohn, Kaspard 10.00' 

Hecht, Rabbi S. (D.D.) 2.00 

Hoffman, Hugo .. 5.00 

Kalisher, Mrs. L. 5.00 

Meyer, Alex 5.00 

Newmark, Harris.. 25.00 

Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A 10.00 

Cohen, Isadore . . . 5.00' 

Jaffee, M. S 5.00' 

Weinstock, Harris. 25.00 

San Diego 

A. Klauber 5.00 

San Francisco 
Hirschfelder, Dr. J. O. 5.00 

Levi, Jac, Sr 10.00 

Schwabacher, Abe. 5.00 

Sloss, Mrs. M. C... 5.00 

San Joaquin Co. 

Bruml, Juliette.... 5.00 

Santa Monica 

Davidson, Mrs. H. l.OO- 

COLORADO. 

Colorado Springs 

Cahn, Isaac 5.00 

Hebrew Ben. Asso.. 5.00 

Oberndorfer, A 5.00 

Denver 

Eisner, Dr. J 5.00 

Eppstein, A. M 5.00 

Kubitshek, Henry.. 10.00 

Mayer, L 5.00 

CONNECTICUT. 

Hartford 

Lyons, Bernhard... 5.0O 

Meriden 

Weiss, Herman 2.00 

New Haven 

Adler, Max 5.00 

Friedman, L. H... 5.00 

Ullman, Isaac M... 5.0a 
Waterbury 

Chase, Isidor 5.0O 

DELAWARE. 

Seaford 

Greenebaum, E. . . 5.00 

Van Leer, Chas. .. 5.00 

Wilmington 

Faber, Jacob 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. D. L... lO.OO 

Levy, Morris 10.00 

Moses Montefiore 

Beneficial Society lO.OO 



FOR the; year ending SEPTEMBER 30, 1907. 



53 



DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA. 

Washington, D. C. 

Adler, V. E 5.00 

Augustine, Mrs. S. 1.00 

Auerbach, Carl . . 5.00 

Auerbach, Jos. ... 5.00 

Baer, A. M 5.00 

Baumgarten, J. . . 1.00 

Behrend, Mrs. A... 2.00 

Bebrend, Amnon .. 5.00 

Bensinger, S 2.00 

Berlawski, A 2.00 

Berliner, Emil .. 30.00 

Blout, Isaac L 5.00 

Blumenfeld, Mrs. M.. 5.00 
Burnstine, Mrs. Sarah 5.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Edw.. 10.00 

Cohen, Max 5.00 

"Council Jewish Wo- 
men 10.00 

Deborah Lodge ... c.OO 

Eisenmann, Jacob. 2.00 

Fisher, Max 2.00 

Friedlander, H. .. 5.00 

Goldenberg, M. .. 5.00 

Goldsmith, C 5.00 

Goodman, Henry J. 5.00 

Hahn, Wm 5.00 

Harper, Robt. W.. 1.00 

Held, Ben 5.00 

JHecht, Alex lO.OO 

.Herman, Mrs. Mon- 

nie 5.00 

Herman, Saml. ... 5.00 

Hillman, Joel 5.00 

Jackson Bros. 2.00 

Kahn, Adolph .... 3.00 

Kahn, Sigmund .. 5.00 

Kaufman, Dr. H... 1.00 

Kaufman, Mrs. Marx 1.00 

Kaufman, D. J. ... 5.00 

King, Mrs. Harry. 5.00 

Kohner, Max 5.00 

Lansburgh, Julius. 2.00 

Loeb, Mr. & Mrs.. 5.00 

Luchs, Mrs. Julia 2.00 

Luchs, Leopold ... 5.00 

Lynn, Mr 1.00 

"Marks, Mrs. A. D.. 2.00 

Mayer, Earnest ... 5.00 

Meyers, S 2.00 

Minster, A l.'^O 

"Minster, Harry ... l.OO 

Minster, Max 1.00 

Minster. Sam 1-00 

Minster. Sol 100 

Minster. Mrs. S. .. 1.00 

K'ordlinger, B 3.00 

Oppenheimer, Gus. 5.00 

•Oppenheimer, S — 5.00 

Trince, A. D 5.00 



Rich, M 3.00 

Salamon, B 1.00 

Saks, Joe 5.00 

Saks, S 2.00 

Salomans, Mrs. T. 2.00 

Shiffman, Jos 2.00 

Sondheimer, J. . . 5.00 

Spanier, Louis ... 5.00 

Tobriner, L 5.00 

Washingtonian, A 

Former 3.00 

Wallerstein, Mrs. G. 1.00 
Washington Hebrew 

Congregation 5.00 

Werber, Mrs. D. ... 1.00 

Wolf & Rosenberg. 5.00 

FLORIDA. 

Kissimmee 
Katz, M 5.00 

Miami 
Cohen, Isidore 5.00 

Pensacola 

Council Jewish Wo- 
men 5.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Ben. 
Society 5.00 

Jacoby, M 5.00 

Talahassee 

Hirschberg, Julius. 10.00 

Tampa 

Silverman, Isidore. 5.00 

Warrington 

Hirshkovitz, David 5.00 

GEORGIA. 

Atlania 
Council Jewish Wo- 
men 10.00 

Hebrew Benevolent 

Cong 10.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Ben. 

Society 10.00 

Hirschberg, Isaac A. 5.00 

Kaiser, Nat 5.00 

Kriegshaber, H. . . 5.00 

Albany 
Brown, S. B 10.00 

Dublin 

Weischselbaum S.&Co. 5.00 

Macon 

Wolff, Edw 10.00 

Wolff, Wm 5.00 

Waxelbaum, E 5.00 

Randersvllle 
Cohen, L 5.00 



Savannah 

Bluestine, L 10.00 

Cohen, Jacob 1.00 

Dryfus, M 5.00 

Levy, B. H 6.00 

Mohr, A 5.00 

Rosenheim, Jos. .. 5.00 

Solomon, A. W 5.00 

Solomon, Rev. Geo. B.OO 

Solomons, I. A 5.00 

West Point 

Hagedorn, J. J. . . 5.00 

Hagedorn, P 5.00 

Hagedorn, Z 5.00 

Herzfeld, Mrs. J... 5.00 

Herzfeld, S 5.00 

Heyman, Lee 5.00 

IDAHO 
Boise 

Ladies' Judith 

Montifiore Soc 5.00 

ILLINOIS. 

Athens 

Salzenstein, C. S... 10.06 

Bloomington 

Ladies' Aid Soc 5.00 

Chicago 

Adler, Mrs. D 5.00 

Alschuler, S 5.00 

Bauman, Edw 10.00 

Becker Bros. & Co. 10.00 

Binswanger, A 10.00 

Binswanger, J. ... 10.00 

Born & Co., M 10.00 

Davis, J .'^.OO 

Despres, Samuel . . 5.00 

Eisenstadt, I 10.00 

Foreman, Oscar G. 6.00 

Frank, Henry L... 10.00 

Friend, A. S 10.00 

Friedman, Mrs. Mina 5.00 

Gatz, John 5.00 

Gatzert, August . . 5.00 

Gimbel, C. A 10.00 

Greenebaum, Elias. 10.00 

Greenebaum Sons.. 5.00 
Guthman, Mrs. Chas. 3.00 

Harris, Mrs. S. H. 5.00 

Heyman, E. S 10.00 

Hartman, Jos 5.00 

Hiller, Gustave .. 5.00 

Hoenigsbursc. ^^Irs. R. 5.00 
Isaiah Sabbath School 10.00 

Katz, E 10.00 

Klee, Max 20.00 

Kohn, Isaac 5.00 

Lebolt, J. Y., mem- 
ory of Mr. and 

Mrs. L. E. Lebolt lO.OO 

Lederer, Mrs. S. .. lO.OO 



54 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 



Loeb, Emanuel ... 5.00 

Leppel, 5.00 

Mandl, Sidney .... 10.00 

Mandel, Simon .... 5.00 

Meyer, Jacob 5.00 

Orschel, Mrs. I. .. 5.00 

Phillipson, Mrs. F. 10.00 

Purcell, T. E. & Co. 5.00 

Reitler, Chas 10.00 

Richter, Simon 5.00 

Rieser, Mrs. Minnie 5.00 

Rosenwald, M. S... 5.00 

Rosentlial, Mrs. J. 5.00 

Rubovitz, Toby ... 5.00 

Rothschild, M. L... 5.00 

Strauss, A. L. ... 5.00 
Schanfarber, Rabbi T. 5.00 

Schlessinger, H. J. 10.00 

Schwabacher, M... 10.00 

Silberman, A 10.00 

Stein, A 10.00 

Stein, Ignatz 10.00 

Steele, H. B 5.00 

Stone, A. L 10.00 

Stolz, Rev. Dr. 

Jos 5.00 

Straus, A. S 5.00 

Subert, Mrs. B 5.00 

Weil, Julius E 5.00 

Wurmser, J 5.00 

Zallnger, B 5.00 

Galesburg 

Spear, S 5.00 

Lincoln 

Griesheim, Meyer.. 3.00 

Landauer, Jos. ... 3.00 

Lehrberger, Leo. .. 2.00 

Plant, Sam 2.00 

Moline 

Rosenstein, L. ... 2.50 

Peoria 

Anshai Emeth Sab- 
bath School 10.00 

Greenhut, J. B. .. 25.00 

Levi, Rev. Chas... 5.00 

Szold, Jos. & Son.. 5.00 

Wolfner, W. F 10.00 

Quincy 
Jewish L a d i e s' 

Bene Society 5.00 

Meyer, J 5.00 

Seeberger, Geo. .. 5.00 

Rock Island 

Kohn, Mrs. Mollie 5.00 

Simon, L 5.00 

INDIANA. 

Albion 

Steifel, Mrs. Louis 5.00 

Angola 

Steifel, Mrs. L. C. 3.00 



Attica 

Lever, Levi L. 



2.50 



Columbia 

Ladies' Hebrew Ben. 
Society 5.00 

Fort Wayne 

Ackerman, Abe ... 10.00 

Baum, Jos 5.00 

Falk, Chas 5.00 

Freiberger, Leopold 10.00 

Greensfelder, Josias 1.00 
Ladies' Hebrew Ben. 

Society 10.00 

Goshen 

Salinger, Nathan . 5.00 

Hartford City 

"Weiler, Mrs. Amy.. 5.00 

Indianapolis 
Federation of Jewish 



Jackson, J. W 

Kahn, Henry 

Newberger, Louis. 
Sommers, Chas. B. 


10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 


Kendallville 

Keller, Jacob 


5.00 


Kokomo 

Levi, I. S 

Schnewind, I 


5.00 
5.00 


Lafayette 

Jewish L a d i e s' 

Aid Society 

Loeb, J. Louis 


5.00 
5.00 


Lebanon 
Adler, Phil 


5.00 


Llgonier 

Strauss, Jacob ; 


60.00 


Logansport 
Wise, C. L 


5.00 


Muncie 


5.00 


Madison 

Sulzer, Louis 


5.00 


Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum, J & Lee 


5.00 


New Albany 

Newbergur, S. W... 


5.00 


Petersburg 
Frank, Sol 


5.00 


Portland 

Weiler, Morris 


5.00 


Summitville 
Wasner, Anna 


10.00 


Terre Haute 

Blumberg, Max ... 
Herz, A 


10.00 
5.00 


Wabash 

Hyman, Louis L.. 


5.00 



INDIAN TY. 

Chelsea 
Cohen, Isaac 5.0O 

IOWA. 

Charles City 
Hecht, J. B lO.OO 

Des Moines 

Brody, F 5.00 

Frankel, Mrs. B. .. 10.00 

Scheuerman, L 10. OO 

Youiiker, Isaac 5.00 

Decorah 
Baer B 5.0O 

Dubuque 
Levi, James 5.00 

Keokuk 
Weil, I. B 5.00 

Oskaloosa 

Baldauf, Saml. ... lO.OO 
Rosenblatt, A. ... 5.00 

Sioux City 

Davidson, Bros 10.00 

Mt. Sinai Cong. 

Sabbath School.. 5.00 
Trauerman, I. G. .. 2.0O 

KANSAS. 

Kansas City 

Holzmark Bros. .. 10.00 

Leavenworth 

Ettensou, Henry & 

Son lO.OO 

Flesher, B lO.OO 

Woolfe & Winnig.. 5.00 

Salena 

Stiefel, Moses 5.00 

Stiefel, S 5.0O 

Washington 
Ellinger, G 5.0O 

KENTUCKY 

Bowling Green 

Cristal, Sam 5.0O 

Friedlander, J. ... 15.00 

Nahm, Sam 5.0O 

Danville 
Lyons, S. & H 5.00 

Henderson 

Baldauf, Morris ... 10.00 

Lexington 

Shane, Miss R 5.00 

Speyer & Sons 5.0O 

Wolf, Simon 5.00 

Louisville 

Barkhouse, Louis. 25.00 

Bernheim, B 25.00 

Bernheim, I. W.... 25.00 
Bernheim, E. Palmer 10.00 
Bernheim, M. U. .. lO.OO 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 3°. i907- 



55 



Block, N. F 30.00 

Blum, S 5.00 

Brooks, Mrs. M... 5.00 
Couucil Jewish "Wo- 
men 10.00 

Dettelbach. A 5.00 

Ehrman, H 5.00 

Fl:iri5lieim, M. H. .. 5.00 

Greenebaum, L. ... 6.00 

Gutman, H. J. & Co. 5.00 

Haas, S 5.00 

Hilpp, H. Mayer.. 5.00 

Hyman, Jacob 5.00 

Kaufman, H 5.00 

Kern, Jos 5.00 

Kohn, A 5.00 

Lehman, B 2.00 

Morgenroth, Mrs. H. 5.00 

Sabel & Sons, M... 10.00 

Sachs, Morris 10.00 

Sachs, Edw. 5.00 

Sloss, Stanley E... 5.00 

Straus, Benj 5.00 

Straus, Mrs. Sarah 5.00 

Trost Bros 5.00 

Maysville 

Merz. Mrs. A. L... 5.00 

Merz, Eugene 5.00 

Merz, Millard 5.00 

Owensboro 

Hirsch, A 10.00 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. A. 10.00 

faducah 

Benedict, Mrs. J... 5.00 

Dreyfus, Sol 5.00 

Fels, Mrs. Y. E... 5.00 

Friedman, Herman 5.00 

Friedman, L. Jos... 10.00 

Israel Temple S. S. 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 

Shelbyvilie 

Samuel Leopold ... 5.00 

Sallinger, J 5.00 

LOUISIANA 

Abbeville 

Wise, Solomon . 



5.00 



Alexandria 

Posner & Fried .. 5.00 

Simon Bros 5.00 

Glnsburg, B 10.00 

Donaldsanville 
Netter & Co 25.00 

Jeannette 

Wormser, M. & Co. 5.00 

Monroe 

Gross, Mrs. Floren- 
tine 2.50 

Kern, Mrs. L 1-00 



New Orleans 

Aaron, Edw 5.U0 

Adlcr, Julius 5.00 

Aschaffenburg, A... 5.i0 
Association for Relief 
of Jewish Widows 

and Orphans 200.00 

Benjamin, E. V 10.00 

Bruenn, B 5.00 

Council of Jewish 

Women 25.00 

Godchaux, Mrs. P. . 5.U0 

Kohn, Jos 5. CO 

Kohlmann, Louis 10. dO 

Lazare, Levy & Co. 5.00 

Marks Ins. Agency. 5.L0 
Newman, Isidore, on 

70th birthday ... 200.00 
Relief Asso. of Jew- 
ish Orphans' and 

Widows 200.00 

Rosenthal Bros. .. 10.00 

Simon, Chas 10.00 

Simmons, IS'athan.. 5.0'^ 

Stern, Maurice 25.00 

Trautman, Jac. & 

Co 10.00 

Weinberger, Mrs. M. 20.00 

Weis, Julius 25.00 

Plaquemlne 

Kern, Dave 1.00 

Levy, H. J 5.00 

Uhry, H. & Bros.. 5.00 

Wolf, Simon 1.00 

Wolf, (grandchildren) 1.00 

Rayville 

Titche, Chas 5.00 

St. Francisville 

Dreyfus, Sam 2.50 

Teutsch, R 5.00 

St. Gabriel 

Moyse, Simon 5.00 

Shreveport 

Heilperin, H. L... 5.00 

Phelps, E. 5.00 

Walls P. O. 

Abramson, S 5.00 

MARYLAND. 
Baltimore 

Adler, Chas 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. S. J... 2.00 

Adler, Simon C... 5.00 

Bamberger, Elkan. 5.00 

Burk, Chas 5.00 

Cash 1.00 

Castelberg, J. & Son 5.00 

Drey, Elkan 10.00 

Eisenberg. A 5.00 

Epstein, Jacob . . 5.00 



Frank, Dr. Sam- 
uel L., Scholar- 
ship, given by Mrs. 
lieriha R a y n e r 

Frank 200.0a 

Frank, Solomon . . 5.00 

Gottshalk, Jos. .. 10.00 

Goldenberg, J 5.00 

Gottlieb, F. H 10.00 

Goldenberg, Mrs. R.M. 5.00 

Gutman, Mrs. Joel . 5.00 

Gutmacher, Rev. A. 5.00 

Gottschalk, Levi .. 5. Of 

Hamburger, Ph. .. 5.00 

Hamberger, M. J... 5.00 

Hochschild, Max .. 5.00 

Kraus, Henry 5.00 

Laupheimer, A. C. 5.00 

Levy, Wm 10.00 

Leopold, r 5.00 

Loeb, H. J 5.00 

Rayner, A 5.00 

Rosenau, Rev. Dr. W. 5.00 
Rayner, Wm. S., 
Scholarship given 
by his daughter, 
Mrs. Bertha Ray- 
ner Frank 200.00 

Rothholz, J. 5.00 

Rosenblatt, Sig. ... 1.00 

Sinsheimer F 5.00 

Skutch, Max 10.00 

Sonneborn, Henry. 30.00 

Sonneborn, Moses S. 5.00 

Sonneborn, Sig. B. 5.00 

Strouse, Isaac 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Ma- 
tilda 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Hennie 2.00 

Ulman, N'athan ... 5.00 

Ulman, A. J 5.00 

Van Leer, Hannah 5.00 

Walter, Moses R.. 5.00 

Weinberg, Mrs. C. 5.00 

Westheimer, H. . . 10.00 

Cumberland 

Rosenbaum, Simon 10.00 

Rosenbaum, Susman 10.00 
MASSACHUSETTS. 
Boston 

Baer, L 10.00 

Bayard, H 5.00 

Green, Jos 2.00 

Hecht, I. H 25.00 

Kaffenburgh, J. . . 5.00 

Koshland, J 5.00 

Levy, B 5.00 

Morse. Godfrey .... 5.00 

Ratcheskey, A. C. . 5.00 

Rosenthal, Jacob . . 5.00 

Shuman, Saml. . . 5.00 

Schoener, Jos. Z... 5.00 

Ziegel, L. 5.00 



56 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 



Brookline 

De Boer, David H. B.OO 

Roxbury 

Van Noorden, E... 5.00 

Worcester 

Coding, Jacob L... G.OO 

MICHIGAN. 

Alma 
Pollasky, M 5.00 

Au Sable 

Rosentlial, P 5.00 

Bay City 

Kohn, Jos. E 5.00 

Greenberg, Karl .. 1.00 

Charlotte 
Vomberg, M 5.00 

Detroit 

Butzel, H. M 5.00 

Fecliheimer, H. M.. 5.00 

Ginsburg, B 5.00 

Goldman, A 5.00 

Heinman, Sol. E. . , . 5.00 

Heavenrich, S. . . 5.00 

Rothman, B. M... 5.00 

Sloman, Eugene H. 10.00 

Schloss, Seligman.. 5.00 

ScblGss, M. 1 5.00 

Van Baalen, I. ... 10.00 

Wineman, Mrs. L. . 5.00 

Weineman, L. 30.00 

Elk Rapids 
Alpern, H 10.00 

Grand Rapids 

Pressburg, H. L... 2.10 
Wolf, G. A 5.00 

Greenville 

Jacobson, feSons, D. 5.00 

Hawks 

Horwitz, Harris .. 5.00 

Kalamazoo 

LUienfeld, Mrs. A. 5.00 

Lansing 
Beck, Louis 5.00 

Monroe 

Preidenberg, B. .. 25.00 

Wolverine 

Levis, Walter I. 5.00 

Mt. Clemens 

Ullmau, Morris 5.00 

MINNESOTA. 

Minneapolis 

Barnet, H. M 5.00 

Simon, D 5.00 

Weil, 1 10.00 

Duluth 

Hammel, Louis . . . 5.00 



St. Paul 

Bergman, D 10.00 

Goodkiod, Benj. .. 5.00 

Guiterman, A 5.00 

Hirscbman, A. & Co. 5.00 

Marx, B 5.00 

Recbt, S. H 5.00 

Straus, Chas 10.00 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Ashwood Sta. 

Cohen, Chas 2.00 

Brookhaven 

Cohn, David Z 10.00 

Cohn, Louis ]0.00 

Duncansby 

Friedberg, I. & Bro. 2.50 

Lorman 

Cohn Bros 5.00 

Kosciusko 

Lowenberg, Mrs. G. 2.20 

Lowenberg, Mrs. L. 1.00 

Simon, Mrs. M 5.00 

Meridian 

Moskovitz, A o.OO 

Threefoot, H. M... 10 00 

Natchez 

Contributions thro' 

Henry Frank .... 100.00 

Frank, Henry 5.00 

Friedler, Mrs. I... 5.00 

Cerkoviski, Chas... 5.00 

Campbell, A. G.... 10.00 

Samuels, Mrs. B... 5.00 

Zerkowsky, Sam 5.00 

Port Gibson 

Bock, David 5.00 

Cahr, Wm 10.00 

Shaw 

Weinberg, A 5.00 

Vicksburg 

Anshe Chesed Con- 
gregation 25.00 

Ladies' Hebrew 

Ben. Asso 10.00 

Yazoo City 

Wise, H 10.00 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas City 

Bloch, Sol 25.00 

Bernheimer G. Bros. 

& Co 10.00 

Benjamin, Alfred.. 5.00 

Benjamin, A. W. .. 5.00 

Benjamin, H. L. .. 5.00 

Feineman, B. A... 5.00 

Griff, T. W 5.00 

Hyman, A 5.00 

Levy, I. A 5.00 

Meyer, L 5.00 



Mayer, Rabbi Harry 

H 5.00 

Rothen berg& Schloss 10.00 

Shane, M 5.00 

Louisiana 

Michael Bros 5.00 

Lexington 

Sinauer, Henry . . . 5.00 

St. Joseph 

August, A. J 5.00 

Binswanger, Saml. 2.00 

Binswanger, Simon 5.00 

Block, Saml 2.00 

Burnett, C. & T... 1.00 

Cohen, Leopold .. o.OO 

Feffer, J. A 1.00 

Felsenstein, David. 2.00 

Fishmon, H. 1.00 

Hassenbush, Saml. 2.00 

Hirsch. Sol 5.00 

Levy, Gus 5.00 

Mund, Saml 5.00 

Phillip, Ben 5.00 

Rosenthal, Jacob.. 1.00 

Pallan, H 1.00 

Schloss, Moses A.. 1.00 
Westheimer, David F. 5.00 

Westheimer, F. Sons 25.00 

Westheimer, Saml. 6.00 

St. Louis 

Bettman, L 10.00 

Bry, N & L 5.00 

Bowman, S 10.00 

Dobsriner, C 5.00 

Biseman, B 10.00 

Eppsteiu, Dr. M. J. 5.00 

Frohlichstein, S. H. 5.00 

Green, L. B. & Son 5.00 

Joseph, Mrs. S. L. 5.00 

Kaufman, J 2.50 

Lippman, Jos. M... 5.00 

Littman, M jC.OO 

Landau, A 25.00 

Levis, Leo 10.00 

Meyer, 1 5.00 

Rosenberg, G 5.00 

Sale, Lee 5.00 

Scharff, A 5.00 

Schwab, Mrs. I.... 10.00 

Scharff, S 5.00 

Seelig, S 5.00 

Shroder, S. W. ... 5.00 

Singer, J. W. 5.00 

Stix, B. W 5.00 

Stix, Wm 10.00 

Straus, J. D 5.00 

Stromberg, Kraus 

& Co 10.00 

Waldheimer, A. . . 5.00 

Weil, Julius 5.00 

Weil, Saml 5.00 

Wolff, A. L. 10.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDINCx SEPTEMBER 30, 1907. 



Woolf, Morris 5.00 

"Wolff, Mrs. Sig. ... 5.00 

Wolff, Wilson, Drug ' 

Co 10.00 

Tipton 

Cohn, L 10.00 

MONTANA. 

Oreat Falls 
Wertheim, N 10.00 



NEBRASKA. 


Columbus 




Gluck, Israel . . 


... 5.00 


Lincoln 




Friend, Morris . 


5.00 


Mayer Bros. .. 


. . 10.00 


Weil, M 


5.00 


Omaha 






. . 10.00 




5.00 


Rosenthal, H. 


5.00 


Plattsmouth 




Pepperberg, J. 


.. 10.00 


NEW JERSEY. 


Camden 




Blank, J. Z. ... 


. . 5.00 


East Orange 




Back, Albert . . 


5.00 


Hoboken 




Weiss, Herman 


.50 


Jersey City 




Kauffman, Mrs. 


Herbert 


5.00 


Newark 




Bamberger, L. . 


.... 10.00 


Foster, Rev. Sol 


5.00 


Fuld, Felix 


... 25.00 


Goetz, Jos 


5.00 


Lehman, L 


5.00 


Michael, Chas. . 


5.00 


Michael, Oscar 


5.00 


Plaut, Moses . . . 


5.00 


Strause, Moses 


... 5.00 


Scheuer. Selig. 


5.00 


Scheuer. Simon 


5.00 


Stern, Mrs. C. S 


5.00 


Steiner, Jos. ... 


.. 5.00 


Plainfield 




Newcorn, Wm. . 


... 5.00 


Somerville 




Mack, Mrs. Louis 


C. 5.00 


Mack, Alex. W. . 


. . 5.00 


Mack, Adolph . . 


5.00 


NEW MEX 


ICO. 


Albuquerque 




Faber, A 


5.00 


Roswell 




Jaffa, Mrs. Nath 


an 5.00 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

Durham 

Kronheimer, B. F. 'S.OO 

Goldsboro 

Weil, Mrs. Henry.. 5.00 

Weil, Sol. 10.00 

Greensboro 

Cone, Julius W... 5.00 

Cone, Caesar JO.OO 

Wilmington 

Solky, J. M 5.00 

Tarboro 

Zander, Gustav . . 5.00 

NORTH DAKOTA. 
Fargo 

Stern, Max 5.00 

NEW YORK. 

Albany 

Albany Congrega- 
tion Beth Emeth. 25.00 
Brillman, Isaac ... 5.00 

Hydeman, S. M 5.00 

Laventall, Mrs. J. 5.00 

Lesser, Mrs. Wm. 5.00 
Mann, Mrs. Dinah 

J 5.00 

Mann, B. A 5.00 

Sporborg, Mrs. H. 

J 5.00 

Steefel, Jos. L 10.00 

Waldman, Louis I. 10.00 

Brooklyn 

Abraham, A 25.00 

Bamberger, I. L. ... 5.00 

Blum, Edw. C 10.00 

Henriques, Estelle. 10.00 

Henriques, Edw. . . 10.00 

Joachim, Chas. ... 20.00 

May, Moses 10.00 

Neuburger, Dr. J. B. 5.00 

Rothchild, S. F. .. 10.00 

Salit, M 5.00 

Werbelovsky, J. . . 5.00 

Werbelovsky, D. ... 5.00 

Buffalo 

Block, Adolph 5.00 

Block, Mrs. Jos 15.00 

Boasberg, E .^j.OO 

Fleishman, Simon. 5.00 

Jacobson, S 5.00 

Keiser, L 5.00 

Keiser, August ... 5.00 

Meyers, L 5.00 

Rothschild, S 10.00 

Shrader, M 5.00 

Wile, Herman 5.00 

Winters, A 10.00 

Binghampton 

Hirschman, Sig. J. 5.00 



Elmira 

Friendly, H 

Coiuncil of Jewish 
Women 



57 



3.00 



5.00 



Herkimer 




Schei'mer, Benj. .. 


2.00 


Mt. Vernon 




Samuels, Julius .. 


5.00 


Samuels, Moritz . . 


5.00 


Niagara Falls 




Desbecker, S. R. .. 


5.00 


Elbe, Mrs. H 


5.00 


Silberbei-g, Moses L. 


5.00 


Olean 




Marcus, H. W 


5.00 


Rondout 




Israel, A 


2.00 


Rochester 




Adler, A 


5 00 


Adler, I 


10.00 


Adler, Simon 


5.00 


Adler, Solomon .. 


5.00 


Adler, Mrs. Lewis 


5.00 


David, Marcus 


5.00 


Garson, J. L 


5.00 


Klrstein, Mrs. E. 


5.00 


Also special birth- 




day souvenir ... 


10.00 


Lowenthal, L 


20.00 


Michaels, Jos 


21.00 


Miller, Wm 


5.00 


Present, Philip . . 


10.00 


Rosenbloom, Max .. 


5.00 


Solomon, S. L 


B.OO 


Stern, Morley A... 


20.00 


Weil, K. M 


5.00 


Wile, Julius M.... 


10.00 


Syracuse 




Eisner, Henry ... 


5.00 


Jacobson, Dr. N. .. 


5.00 


Jalonack, S. H 


5.00 


Mitchell, Mrs. S... 


5.00 


Marshall, Jacob . . 


5.00 


Rubin, M. D 


10.00 


Tottenville 




Levinson, Henry . . 


10.00 


Warrensburgh 




Bauman, J. P 


5.00 


New York City 




Auerbach, Louis .. 


10.00 


Alexander, Arthur . 


5.00 


Appel, W. S 


5.00 


Arbib, Alex 


5.00 


Bauer, Abram 


5.00 


Benjamin, Geo 


5.00 


Benjamin, N. W.. 


10.00 


Bernheimer, Louis 


E.OO 


Bookman, Mrs. 




Jacob 


5.00 


Brand, Herman . . 


5.00 


Bijur, Nathan 


10.00 



58 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 



Bloomiugdale, J. B. 30.00 

Brown, Emil 5.00 

Bosky, Louis 10.00 

Bruecks, Wm lO.Oo' 

Buttenweiser, J. L. 10.00 

Clark, Louis, Jr... 5.00 

Colien, A 25.00 

Centennial Lodge, 

No. 763, F. & A.M. 10.00 

Cohen, H. Jos 10.00 

Conheim, H 10.00 

Danenbaum, C. . . 5.00 

Danenbaum, M. C. 5.00 

Einstein, I. D 10.00 

Emsheimer, Jos. .. 5.00 

Estrictier, Henry.. 5.00 

Friedman, Sol. & Co. 10.00 

Fleisher, K'athan.. 5.00 

Goldenberg, S. L... 5.00 

Gottheil, Paul 5.00 

Grossman, Rev. Dr. 

Rudolph 5.00 

Guinzburg, Victor. 25.00 

Goodhart, Mrs.P. J. 20.00 

Gibb, TV 5.00 

Goldman, M 5.00 

Goldsmith, Herman 5.00 

Hendricks, Mrs. C. 10.00 

Heidelbach, Louis. 5.00 

Holzman, Ascher.. 10.00 

Holzman, S. L 5.00 

Herman, Uriah ... 5.00 
Herman, Mrs. Esther 10.00 

Herman, Nathan . . 5.00 

Herzig, Leopold . . 5.00 

Jonas, Wm 25.00 

Kaufman, Jos. H. . 5.00 

Kaufman, Julius . . 10.00 

Klee, Benj 10.00 

Kahn, Louis 5.00 

Kleinert, J. B 10.00 

Kohn, Emil W. .. 5.00 
Kohnstamm, Leo, 

Edw. & Jos 25.00 

Krauskopf, Nathan 5.00 

Also 100.00 

Krauskopf, M r s. 

Henrietta 5.00 

Ladenburger, Theo. 25.00 

Lang, G 5.00 

Lauterbach, Edw.. 25.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Levi, Emil 10.00 

Loeb, Maurice 5.00 

Loeb, Louis 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Louis.. 10.00 

Loeb, Emil 5.00 

Levi, Emil S 5.00 

Levi, Henlein 5.00 

Levi, Mrs. Leo N. 5.00 

Lewisohn, Sam S.. 10.00 

Lowenstein, H. ... 5.00 

Loeb, Robt 5.00 



Lacey, E 10.00 

Mayer, Bernard . . 10.00 

Mayer, Mrs. Rachel 5.00 

Mendelson, Leon .. 10.00 

Mendelsohn, Lewis 5.00 

Mautner, Julius . . 10.00 

Morgenthau, H. . . 10.00 

Mack, Marc H 10.00 

Mack, Fred A 10.00 

Mayer, Otto L 10.00 

Meyer Harrison D. 
(in memory of 

Sophie Meyer) . . 20.00 

Modey, 1 3.00 

Moses, Rev. I. S. . . 5.00 

Oberfelder, M 10.00 

Oppenheim, Mrs. 

L 5.00 

OppenheLmer, H. E. 10.00 

Pulaski, M. N 10.00 

Pulaski, Leon 10.00 

Rice, S. M 25.00 

Rosenwald, Sigmund 10.00 

Rothchild, Jacob . . 5.00 

Sachs, Paul J 10.00 

Sanger, T 10.00 

Shoenberg, J. E... 10.00 

Schoenfeld, Mrs. D. 5.00 

Sicher, Dudley D.. 5.00 

Silvester, L. L. .. 5.00 

Steiner. Jos. & Bros. 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry. 10.00 

Stern, Leopold 10.00 

Stern, Leopold 5.00 

Strasburger, Louis. 10.00 

Strasser, W. W... 5.00 

Schoenfeld, Ma:x... 100.00 

Stroock, L. S 5.00 

Stroock, R. L. .. 5.00 

Sulzberger, Cyrus.. 5.00 

Schiff, Jacob H. . . . 100.00 

Schaffner, Abe 5.00 

Sinsheimer, Alice.. 5.00 

Scholle, Melville J. 5.00 

Sidenberg. Henry. . 5.00 

Sondheim, Max .... 5.00 

Speyer, James . . . 10.00 

Stern, Benj. 10.00 

Sutro, Lionel 5.00 

Toch, Henry M.... 5.00 

Untermeyer, C. S. 5.00 

Untermeyer, Henry 5.00 

Veit. B 5.00 

Vollter. A 5.00 

Wallach, Leopold.. 10.00 

Waterbury. John I. 25.00 

Weil. L 5.00 

Weinberg. A 10.00 

Weinman, Rita S.fQ 

Werner, Prof. 

Adolph 10.00 

Wolf. Louis 10.00 

Younker, H 10.00 



Zeckendorf, Louis. 10.00 

Zucker, Saml 5.00- 

OKLAHOMA 
Levy, N 1.00- 

OHIO. 

Akron 

Polsky, A 10. 00- 

The Akron Schwes- 

terbuud 5.00 

Archbold 

Hirsch, H lO.OO 

Bellaire 

Blum, Henry 5.00 

Blum, Isaac 5.00 

Chillicothe 

Schachne, Moritz.. 5.0O 

Cincinnati 

Ach, Samuel 5.00 

B e c k m a n, N. 

Henry 5. CO 

Bettman, Levi ]0.00 

Bettman, Morris .. 10. OO 

Bing, J. & S 5.00 

Block, Abe 5.00 

Block, Leon 5.00 

Block, Jos. E 5.00 

Deutsch, Dr. G.... 5.0O 

Dreifus, David S.. 5.00 

Ezekiel, H. C 5.00 

Englander, I. ... 5.00 

Fletcher, Victor .. 5.00 

Fox, Henry 5.00 

Fox, Sol 15.00 

Frazer, Isidore ... lO.OO 

Freiberg, Abr 10.00 

Freiberg, A. M... 5.00 

Freiberg. B 5.00 

Freiberg, J. W 5.00 

Freiberg, Maurice . . 5.00 

Freiberg. Sig 10.00 

Freiberg. S. J 5.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Grossman, Rev. Dr. 

L 5.00 

Greenbaum, Simon 5.00 

Guggenheim. Eli... 5.00 

Hahn, Henry 5.00 

Henle. S 5 00 

Hirschhorn. L. ... 5.00 

Hilb, Gus H 5.00 

Hilb. Wm. M 5.00 

Johnson, S. O. ... n.OO 

Jonas, H 5.00 

Kahn, B 10.00 

Kahn. Felix 5.00 

Kohn, Irwin M 5.00 

Kaufman. Eli B... 5.00 

Levi, Louis S 10.00 

Levy. Henry M 5.00 

Mack, Mrs. W 5.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1907. 



59 



Mayer, E 

Mayer, Simon 

Marx, Louis 

Meiss, Leon 

Mayer, Mrs. L 

Meudel, Henry 

Miller, E. L 

Mock & Weil .... 

Mack, M. J 

Marcus M 

Marks, Leslie V... 

May Bros 

Meis, Nathan 

Meis, Harry 

Nusbaum, M 

Newburgh, Louis.. 

Offrer, Alex 

Peyser, Sol. D 

Phillips, G. J 

Plaut, A 

Pollak, E 

Pritz, Carl E 

Pritz, Benj 

Pritz, Sidney E.... 
Rheinstron. Mrs. A. 

Roth, Chas 

Rheinstrom. Sigmund 
Rothschild, Lester. 
Rosenbaum, Sol. . . 
Rosenthal, Saml... 

Seasongood, A 

Seinsheimer, Mrs.S. 

Silverglade, M 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar. 

Sterne, E. M 

Shohl, Chas 

Trost, Carrie L 

Trost, S. W 

Ullman, Adolph . . 
Westheimer, L F. 
Westheimer, Leo... 
Westheimer, Morris 

Wildberg, L 

Wyler, Isaac 

Wildberg, A 

Winkler, Eli 

Cleveland 

Black, Morris .... 
Daughters of Israel 

Lodge, No. 1 

Einstein, L 

Eisenman, Chas. . . 
Forchheimer, B. ... 
Gries, Rabbi, M. J. 

Halle, Mrs. M 

Hays, Jos 

Hexter, K 

Hexter, Sol. M.... 

Hartman, Saml 

Joseph, Isaac 

Joseph, Sig 

Marks, Martin A.. . 
Mandelbaum, J 



10.00 


Peskind, Dr. G. A. . 


.10.011 


5.00 


Shlesinger, S. & Co. 


5.00 


10.00 


Sands L 


10.00 


5.00 


Shlesinger, H 


5.00 


5.00 


Schwab, Mrs. Flora 


5.00 


10.00 


Stearn, Abraham.. 


10.00 


5.00 


Weil, Meyer 


5.00 


5.00 






5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5 00 


Columbus 




Basch, Jos. 


5.00 


Lazarus, Fred, Jr. 


5.00 


Lazarus, Jeffery L. 


3.00 


Lazarus, Robt. ... 


3.00 


Lazarus Simon .... 


5.00 


Lazarus, Fred 


100.00 


Rieser, Max H 


5.00 


Rosenthal, C. M. .. 


2. On 


5.00 


Crestline 




10.00 


Reder, Jake 


5.00 


5.00 


Dayton 




10.00 


Ach, F. J 


20.00 


15.00 


Daneman, Mrs. Jacot 


( 1.00 


5.00 


Krohn, Stanley M. 


5.00 


5.00 


Lessner, Adam .... 


5.00 


5.00 


(In memory of Bro. 




10.00 




25.00 


5.00 


Stichler, P. K 


1.00 


5.00 


Gallon 




2.00 


Gottdiener, H. ... 


5.00 


10.00 






10.00 


Glenville 




Cleveland Council 




5.00 
10 00 


Jewish Women . . 


15.00 


10.00 


1 Lima 




5.00 


Michael, N'. L 


5.00 


5.00 


Marion 




10.00 


Barrow, A. 


5.00 


10.00 


Mt. Gilead 




5.00 




5.00 


5.00 


Mt. Vernon 




10.00 


Meyers, Mrs. Max. 


5.00 


10.00 






5.00 


Piqua 






Anshe Emeth Cong. 


5.00 


5.00 






5.00 


Plymouth 




5.00 


Billstein, M 


5.00 




Spear, Sol 


5.00 


10.00 


Portsmouth 






Horchow, S 


5.00 


5.00 


Mayer, Abe 


3 00 


5.00 


Sandusky 




5.00 


Kaplan, Saml 


5,00 


5.00 


Springfield 




10.00 


Jewish Thimble 




10.00 


Social 


5.00 


5.00 






5.00 


Toledo 




5.00 


Alex. Black Estate. 


10.00 


5.00 


Federation of Jewish 




10.00 


Charities 


.50.00 


5.00 


Landman, Otto .... 


5.C0 


5.00 


Wyoming 




5.00 


Pentlarge, Fred 


5.00 



Youngstown 

Grobsniaii, Dr. J. 

Guthman, Leo. ... 

Hirschbcrg, B. ... 

Strous, I 

Weil, Mrs. Saml.. 

Youngstown Hebrew 
Ladies' Benevolent 
Society 

Zanesviile 

Hebrew Relief So.- 

ciety 

Starr. A. E 



OREGON. 

Portland 

Boskowitz, I. A. .. 

Dautoff, I 

Dautoff, Victor ... 
Goldschmidt, I. L.. 

Ostrow, M 

Riceu, Jos. M 

Rogaway, Phil 

Rosenstein, A 

Selling, B 

Selling, P. H 

Sax, L 

Swett, Z 

Tilzer, Dr. A 

Wax, Meyer 

Independence 
Hirschberg, H. ... 

PENNSYLVAN 
Allegheny 

Sunstein, A. J 

Sunstein, C 

Wertheimer, Saml. 

Allentown 
Feldman, Chas. . . 
Feldman, Mrs. A. . 

Hess, Max 

Hess, Chas 

Kline, Chas 

Altoona 

Klein, Ignatz 

Ashland 

Sutto, E 

Bethlehem 
Fritz, John 

Braddock 

Katz, Leo A 

Bradford 

Council of Jewish 

Women 

Greenwald, David.. 
Leon. H 

Carlisle 

Livingstone, Jacob 

Chester 

Levy, Moses 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



5.00 



5.00 
5.00 



10.00 

2.00 

5.00 
10.00 

0.00 
10.00 

10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
10.00 
lO.OO 

15.00 

I A. 

10.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 



"6d 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 



Coatesville 

Braunstein, 1 5.00 

Ginns, J 5.00 

Easton 

Springer, E 5.00 

Erie 

Sobel, Isador 5.00 

.Harrisbui'g 

Astricti, H. 10.00 

Friedman, Saml... 2.0U 

Kuhn, S 5.00 

Jacobson, M. B 5.00 

Hazleton 

Friedlander, M 5.00 

Jenkintown 

Silberman, Max . . 5.00 

Johnstown 

Rothstein, M 5.00 

Kittanning 

Einstein, Jacob . . 5.00 

.Lancaster 

Cohen, B. M 5.00 

Jlecht, Mrs. H 5.00 

Moss, S. I. 10.00 

Hich, Israel A 5.00 

Rosenthal, Morris.. 5.00 

Selsel, S 5.00 

Luzerne 

Freedman, Max .. 5.00 

;iVlcKeesport 

Firestone, Henry . . 10.00 

Sunstine, I. 5.00 

JVIt. Carmel 

Grossman, Louis .. 5.00 

New Castle 

Feuchtwanger, Mar- 
cus 5.00 

Pittsburg 

Aaron, Mrs. Mina. . 5.00 

Aaron, Chas. J 5.00 

Aaron, Marcus 5.00 

Aaron, Louis J 10.00 

Adler, Louis J. ... 10.00 

-Aronson, J. L 5.00 

Council of Jewish 

Women 25.00 

DeRoy, Jos 5.00 

Dreifus, C 5.00 

Feuchtwanger, Jos. 10.00 

Floersheim, B 5.00 

Forst, Morris 5.00 

Trank, Isaac 5.00 

Frank, Sam ( i n 

memoriam) 5.00 

<iOldsmit, Louis 5.00 

Oross, Isaac 5.00 

'Guckenheimer, Mrs. 

A. 10.00 



Gusky Orphanage . . 50.00 

Hanauer, Mrs. H. 5.00 

Kann, W. L 5.00 

Kaufman, Henry .. 10.00 

Klee, W. B 10.00 

Lehman, A. C. 5.00 

Lehman, Leo^ 5.00 

Lippman, M. Harry 5.00 

Oppeiiheimer, A. M. 10.00 

Oppenheimer, M... 10.00 

Oppenheimer, W. .. 10.00 

Raphael, Rudolph. 5.00 

Rauh, A. L 5.00 

Rauh, Enoch 5.00 

Rauh, Marcus 5.00 

Rosesnbaum, C. H. 5.00 

Rosenberg, Hugo.. 5.00 

Rothchild, M. N... 5.00 

Solomon, Kaskel . . 10.00 

Stadfield, Jos 5.00 

Sidenberg, Hugo . . 25.00 
United Hebrew Re- 
lief Asso 100.00 

Weil, A. Leo 25.00 

Wertheimer, E 20.00 

Wertheimer, Isaac 10.00 

Wolf, Fred 5.00 

Weil, Jacques 5.00 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S 1.00 

Weitzenkorn, A. . . 5.00 

Weitzenkorn, M 5.00 

Reading 

Schweriner, S. S... 10.00 

RocFiester 

Rapport, H. T 5.00 

Scran ton 

Krotosky, Isidore.. 5.00 

Krotosky Bros 5.00 

Oettinger, Louis .. 5.00 

Roos, Dr. Ellas J.. 5.00 

Selin's Grove 

Weis, S 5.00 

Titusville 

Hershberg, H. S. ... 10.00 

West Homestead 

Glueck, B 5.00 

Wilkes-Barre 

Levy, Mrs. L 5.00 

Liebson, Jos 5.00 

Long, Mrs. Dora.. 5.00 

Marks, L. W 5.00 

Strauss, S. J 5.00 

Stern, Henry P. ... 5.00 

Williamsport 

Goldenberg, C. ... 5.00 
York 

Lehmeyer, Is'. 10.00 

Lebach, Mrs. L. .. 3.W 



Piiiiadeiphia 

Federation of Jewish 

Charities 6,400.00 

Abbott, George 5.00 

Acker, Finley 5.00 

Anonymous 1.00 

Baird, J. E 10.00 

Ballinger & Perrot 5.00 

ards 5.00 

Barthol, Emma 25.00 

Bash, H 20.00 

Baum, Saml 5.00 

Beckman, S 10.00 

Behal, Mrs. L 5.00 

Bromley, B. G. . . 5.00 

Delaney & Co 5.00 

Fabian Saml., 

(Memory of wife) 10.00 
Feustman, N. Maur- 

-ice 5.00 

Gans, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 

Graves, N. Z 6.00 

Grieb, J. B 5.00 

Hackenburg, A. (in 
honor of 70th 
birthday of Mr. 

Hackenburg 10.00 

Heebner, Saml 5.00 

Hensell, Colladay & 

Co 5.00 

Herzberg, Mrs. L.. 6.00 
Hirsh, Mrs. Gab... 10.00 
Hirsh, Eliz (in 
honor of confirma- 
tion) 5.00 

Jaquett, Saml. T.. 5.00 
Jessar, B. Z., LI- 

Lacey, Adin B 5.00 

Levi, Edgar A. (in 
honor of confir- 
mation) 10.00 

Lisberger, M. (In 
honor of confirma- 
tion 10.00 

Loeb, Ferd L 25.00 

Malish, Mr. and 
Mrs. (Library 

Fund) 10.00 

McCreary, Geo. D.. 5.00 
Members of Camp 

Arden 75.00 

Moore and White.. 5.00 

Moss, Dr. W 6.00 

Myers, Yetta 5.00 

Nachod, J 5.00 

Nelke, David 25.00 

Ostheimer, Wm. J. 5.00 

Paxson & Sons, J. W. 3.00 

Perrine & Son, J. . . 5.00 

Poth & Sons, F. A. 10.00 

Raff, A Raymond.. 5.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1907. 



6r 



Rolpb, Wm. T 5.00 

Rosenthal, Harry.. 10.00 
Schloss, Mrs. Louis 
Stern, Ida, and 
J. M. Koch (In 
memory of moth- 
er, Mrs. Lina 

Stern) 30.00 

Schwacke, J. H... 5.00 
Schwarz, Mrs. H., 
(In memory of 
Henry Schwarz) . 50.00 

Sharp, S. S 10.00 

Showell, E. B 5.00 

Smith & Co., E. B. 5.00 
Solomon, Mrs. B. .. 5.00 

Soulas, G. A 5.00 

Steinhardt, Mrs. F. 3.00 
Warburton, B. H. . . 5.00 
Wilson & Rich- 
arda 5.00 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Charleston 

Falk, B. David.... 10.00 
Hebrew Benelovent 
Society 5.00 

Florence 

Sulzbacher, S. I... 5.C0 

TENNESSEE. 
Columbia 

Lazarus, Benj 5.00 

Clarksville 

Adler, M 5.00 

Johnson City 

Silver, Wm 5.00 

Knoxvllle 

Finkelstein, Max... 2.00 

Rosenthol, D. A... 5.00 

Memphis 
Federation of Jewish 
Charities 100.00 

Nashville 

Edelmon, F. .'. 5.00 

Loveman, Adolph.. 5.00 
Rich, Schwartz, Jos. 
Co 5.00 

TEXAS. 

Austin 

Davis, Nelson 5.00 

Greenburg, S 2.50 

Beaumont 

Block, r 5.00 

Deutser, B. 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. L. R... 5.00 

Ladies' Bene. Soc'y 10.00 

Dallas 

Burk & Co 5.00 

Dreyfuss, G 5.00 

Dreeben, I. 5.00 

Dysterback, S 5.00 

Friend, Alex. M. 5.00 



Friend, H. M 5.00 

Goldstein, A 20.00 

Goodman, J 5.00 

Hexter, Victor .... 5.00 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J 5.00 

Landauer, H 5.00 

Linz & Bro., J 5.00 

Linz, Albert E.OO 

Linz, Benj 5.00 

Linz, Simon 5.00 

Marcus, S 10.00 

Mayer, Sigmund ... 5.00 

Metzler Bros. 5.00 

Michalson, L 5.00 

Myers, Seymour . . 5.00 

Oppenheimer, L. .. 5.00 

Ortlieb, Max 7.5n 

Sanger Bros 30.00 

Sigmund, Mayer . . 5.00 

Titehe, Ed 5.00 

El Paso 

Aronstein, S 5.00 

Kohlberg, E 5.00 

Krupp, Harris 5.00 

Goodman, A 5.00 

Stolaroff, 1 5.00 

Ft. Worth 

Alexander, M 5.00 

August, A. & L... 5.00 

August, Mrs. Leo.. 5.00 

Bath, Felix P 5.00 

Council of Jewisli 

Women 6.00 

Eppstein, M. L. ... 5.00 

Gross, Leon 5.00 

Gernsbacker Bros. . 5.00 

Levy, S 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. S 5.00 

Marx, H. 5.00 

Seligman, 5.00 

Galveston 

Cohen, R. 1 5.00 

Michael, Mrs. E... 5.00 

Mineola 

Bromberg, I. G. .. 5.00 

Midland 

Halff, Henry Mayer 5.00 

Palestine 

Maier, S B.OO 

Paris 

Frank, M 5.00 

San Antonio 

Cohen, A 10.00 

Halff, Mrs. M 25.00 

Halff, Mrs. Rachel. 5.00 

Halff, S 5.00 

Holzmark, Mrs. T. 5.00 

Joske, Alex 5.00 

Oppenheimer, D. . . 5.00 

Oppenheimer, J. D. 5.00 
Oppenheimer, M. L. 10.00 



Texarkana 
Schwartz, J 5.00- 

Victoria 

Levi & Co., A 10.00 

Waco 

Sanger, A. S 5.00 

Sanger, L lO.OO 

UTAH. 

Ogden 

Lewis, Hyraan ... 2.50 
Salt Lake City 
Barnett, Mrs. H... 5.0O 
Jewish Relief So- 
ciety 5.00' 

VIRGINIA. 

Alexandria 

Council of Jewish 

Women 10.00- 

Harrisonburg 

Oestreicher, S 1.00' 

Lynchburg 

Lazarus, L. 5.00 

Guggenheimer, Mrs. 
M 50.00 

Norfolk 

Abramson, I. V 5.00 

Hecht, Jos. B B.OO 

Hecht, Jacob S.OO- 

Hirschler, E 5.00- 

Margolius, Ben. .. lO.Ofr 

Seldner, A. B 5.00- 

Richmond 

Binswanger, H. S. . 5.00 

Binswanger, Helen 5.00 

Binswanger, M. I.. 5.0O 

Galeski, Dr. S 15.00 

Hutzler, H. S 5.00 

Kaufmann, 1 5.0O 

Milhiser, Emanuel.. u.OO 

Milhiser, Mrs. C... 5.00 

' Raab, B 5.00 

Wallerstein, H. S. . . 5.00 

Staunton 

Strauss, L. G 5.00 

WASHINGTON. 
Everett 

Hockstadter, B. .. 5.00 

Seattle 

Rabbi S. Koch.... 2.50 
Gross, A. S 5.00 

Tacoma 

Gi"oss. David 5.00 

Klaber, Herman.. 10.00 
Ladies' Montifiore 

Society 5.00- 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
Bluefield 

Heller, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Simon (in 
honor of birth of 
Evelyn Heller) .. 5.0O 



62 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 



Charleston 




Horkheimer, M. . . 


25.00 


La Crosse 




Baer, Ben 


10.00 


Horkheimer, B i 


10.00 






Frankenberger, M. 


5.00 


Horkheimer, Louis 


5.00 


Hirshheimer, A. . . 


25.00 


Frankeiiberger, P.. 


10.00 


Isenberg, I 


5.00 


Hebrew Ladies' Aid 




Clarksburg 

Adler, Philip 




Rice, A. M 


5.0O 




5 00 


5.00 


Rice, S. M 


5.00 






Paint Pleasant 




Sonneborn, M 


5.00 


Milwaukee 




Friedman, J 


10.00 
5.00 


Wolf, Leo 


5.00 


Aarons, Lehman... 
Cohen, Mrs. G 


10.00 


Friedman, M 

Wheeling 

Bloch, Samuel S... 




5.00 


5.00 


WISCONSIN. 




Heller, Simon 


10.00 


Baer, A. S 


5.00 


Appleton 




Miller, M 


5.00 






Baer, Ernest 


5.00 


Hammel. Jacob 


3.00 


Milwaukee Feder- 




Baer, Henry 


5.00 


Marshall Paper Co. 


5.00 


ated Jewish Chari- 




Emsheimer, Jos. ... 


5.00 
5.00 


Chippewa Falls 




ties 


100.00 


Hanauer, P 






Hebrew Cong. Les- 




Chippewa Valley 




Schuster, Chas. ... 


3.00 


hera Shomayim . . 


lO.CO 


Aid Society 


5.00 


Tabor. L. L 


5.00 



BENEVOLENT OKDEI^S. 

Independent Order B'nai Brith. 

ALABAMA. DISTRICT OF COLUM- KENTUCKY. 

Birmingham BIA. Lexington 

Birmingham, K'o. Washington Lexington. No. 289 

16S 5.00 Elijah, No. 50 5.00 „ , 

Paducah 

Demopolis GEORGIA. i Harmony. No. 149. . 
Marmgo, No. 283.. 10.00 

Mobile ^°T''h"%- " mnn ' LOUISIANA. 

BethZur, No. 84. ... 5.00 Columbus. No 10.00 

Savannah "^^^ Orleans 

Montgomery Joseph, No. 76 5.00. Crescent City. No. 

Alabama, No. 299. 5.00 ^ ' 2g2 

Emanuel, No. 103.. 5.00 ILLINOIS. ^ 

Ar,,xA,v,oAo Bioomington MICHIGAN. 
ARKANSAb. Abraham Lincoln, 

Little Rock No. 190 5.00 Kalamazoo 

Little Rock, No. rv,i..«„ Mishan, No. 247. ... 
Chicago 

'•'' '°-'' J Oriental, No. 189.. 10.00 MINNESOTA. 

CALIFORNIA. Ramah, No. 33.... 10.00 

/^ . . -■ ' cr.^\^r.f;^\ri Minneapolis 

Oak and Spr ngfield ,-. "^ .. ,. „-, 

varviaiivj C, =" ^^ ._ r nn Minneapolis. No. 2il. 

Oakland, No. 252.. 10.00 Ernes, No. 67 5.00 

San Francisco INDIANA. MISSISSIPPI. 

Montefiore, No. 51 10.00 Fort Wayne 

CONNECTICUT. j ^^,^^ ^^''^^■'^' ^°- ,0.,0 "^JIm^Ko. 181.. 

^A^rllZ'So. 89.. 3.00 ' Esther, ' No.' ' 323 ": : lO.'oo Greenville 

Muncie Deborah, No. 161.. 

^^^ r^xT®" 0- - nn Gas Belt, No. .527. 10.00 Jackson 

Horeb, No. 2o o.OO ^, ,, ^» ono 

Terre Haute Manasah. No. 202 .. 

COLORADO. i Gan Eden, No. 110 10.00 Natchez 

Colorado Springs ' inwA Ezt-a, No. 134 

Colorado Springs, m • 

No. 523 5.00 ^^^ Moines ; MISSOURI. 

Des Moines, No. 

Denver 330 5.00 st. Joseph 

Denver, N'o. 171.... 10.00 Joseph. No 73.... 

KANSAS. 

DELAWARE. Kansas City St. Louis 

Wilmington Beth Horon, No. Eben Ezra. No. 47 

Wilmington, No. 470. 5.00 599 5.00 Missouri, No. 22.. 



5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

2.00 

5.00 

3.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 
5.00 



FOR THE 

MONTANA. 
Butte 
Baron De Hirsh, 
No. 420 5.00 

NEBRASKA. 
Omaha 

Nebraska, No. 354. 5.00 

NEW JERSEY. 
Jersey City 

Hudson. No. 295.. 5.00 

Trenton 

Trenton, No. 319. ... 5.00 

NEW MEXICO. 
East Las Vegas 

J. E. Roseuwald. 
No. 545 10.00 

NEW YORK. 
Albany 

Gilead. No. 140 5.00 

Rochester 

Zerubbabel, No. 53 10.00 

IMew York City. 

Arnou Centennial 

No. 39 5.00 

Be'er Sehebba, No. 11 5.00 

Hebron, No. 5 5.00 

Henry Jones. No. 79. 2.00 

Washington, No. 19 5.00 

Zion, No. 2 10.00 



YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1907. 



OHIO. 




Cincinnati 




Cincinnati, No. 4.. 


10.00 


Cleveland 




Cleveland. No. 16.. 


25.00 


Dayton 




Esc'hol. No. 55 


10.00 



63 



OREGON. 
Portland 
Theo. Herzel, No. 

314 10.00 

Portland, No. 416.. 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Allegheny 

•Tericho, No. 44 10.00 

Saar Sholem, No. 
154 10.00 

Erie 

Erie. No. 620 5.00 

Hazleton 

Hazleton. No. 585.. 10.00 

Philadelphia 

District Grand 
Lodge, N'o. 3 (for 
memorial trees) . 30.00 
Har Sinai. No. S.. 5.00 

Josiah. N'o. 23 10.00 

Pittsburg 
Braddock, No. 516. . 10.00 
Iron City, No. 324.. 5.00 



Pottsville 

Union, No 124 5.00 

Scranton 

Amos. No. 136 5.00 

Uniontown 

Uniontown, No. 471 10.00 

RHODE ISLAND. 
Providence 

Haggai. No. 1.32.... 5.00 

TENNESSEE. 

Nashville 
Maimonides. No. 46 5.00 

TEXAS 
Ft. Worth 

Ellas Sanger. No. 519 10.00 

San Antonio 

Edar, No. 211 5.00 

UTAH. 
Salt Lake City 

B. F. Peixotto. No. 421 lO.Oo 

WASHINGTON. 
Seattle 

Hildesheimer, No. 503 5.00 

3pokane 

Geiger, Abr.. No. 423 10.00 

WISCONSIN. 
Milwaukee 

Gilead, No. 41 10.00 

Isaac, No. 87 5.00 



indep( 
CONNECTICUT. 

Norwich 

Norwich City. No. 62 5.00 

INDIANA. 

Indianapolis 

Rev. M. Messing, 
No. 137 5.00 


indent Order B'rith Abr< 

NEW YORK. 
Brooklyn 

American, No. 167 5.00 

Elmira 

Elmira, N'o. 272 3.00 

New York City. 

Ben. Harrison. N'o. 9. 3.00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Philadelphia 

Frimmel, No. 284.. 5.00 

Liberty. No. 6 5.00 

Pittsburg 

Hope. No. 210 4.00 j 


iham. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Providence 

Star of Rhode Is- 
land, No. 330 4.00 

TEXAS. 

Dallas 


MINNESOTA. 

IViinneapolis 

Graetz, Dr. No. 316. 5.00 
Minneapolis, No. 63 5.00 , 


Alex. Kohut, No. 247 5.00 

WISCONSIN. 

Milwaukee 

Wisconsin, No. 80.. 5.00 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Boston 

Moses Mendelsohn, 
No. 25 5.00 

MICHIGAN. 
Detroit 

Montefiore, No. 12 . . 5.00 



Independent Order Free Sons of Israel. 

MINNESOTA. PENNSYLVANIA 

Chester 
Chester. No. 119. .. 3.00 



Minneapolis 

Minneapolis. No. 93 



5.00 



NEW YORK CITY. 

Gad. N'o. 11 5.00 

Standard. No. 30 . . 5.00 



rORM A-S 

RABBI JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D. I. H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer, RABBI ISAAC LANDMAN. Secretary.. 

President, 605 Land Title Building, 334 Mutual Life Building, 

4715 Pulaski Ave., Philadelphia. Philadelphia. Philadelphia. 

Membership of The National Farm School. 

I, the Undersigned, being in sympathy with the objed of the National Farm 

School — the training of lads in the pradice and science of agriculture, for agricultural 
callings — do hereby agree to subscribe as one of the Maintainers of the institution, 
the dues of a 

LIFE MEMBER ($100.00) PATRON ($25.00) SUPPORTER ($5.00) 

FRIEND ^ ' ($50.00) MEMBER ($10.00) 

Name 

Address - — 

Date - 

NOTE — Underscore the class of membership you wish to join. Life Membership calls for but one (the first) payment. 
Make check payable to the NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



FORM OF LEGACY 
TO THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL, DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

''I give and bequeath unto the National Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa., 

near Doylestoion, the sum of. dollars, free from 

all taxes, to be paid to the Treasurer, for the time being, for the use of the 
institution.''' 



FORM OF DEVISE 
OF REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT. 

'''I give and devise unto the National Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa.y 
near Doylestown, fiere describe the property or ground rent), together with 
the appiirtenances in fee simple , and all policies of insurance covering said 
premises, ivhether fire, title or otherzvise, free from all taxes.'' 




■ m me you see, a 
very expensive 
luxuree. 1 threw 

in the shade 
whatever was made 
before my time and 
wasn't afraid — until 
there came the Welsbach 
Light, to scare me yellow 
instead of white, and humble 
my pride, as well as it might. 
Instead of cubic feet like gas, it's 
kilowatts that I amass. And now 
the Welsbach comes to swat my 
mystical term of kilowatt — a mystical 
term that like as not, sounds like a lot 
of tommy rot, — for what's a kilo, and 
what's a watt ? My standard light as peo- 
ple know is a sixteen candle power glow — 
the Welsbach gives a hundred or so, 
which won't give me a ghost of a show. It 
gives more light at quarter the cost — no 
wonder the wires in my head are crossed. 
And all I've done or hope to do, the 
Welsbach does, and better, too. Oh, 
what is the use of a kilowatt, 
when never a soul can 
tell what's what 

V 



A 
A 
A 

A 
A 




All genuine Welsbach mantles have the Shield of Quality stamped 

1 the box. Five kinds — I 5, 20, 25, 30 and 35 cents. Imitations, 

^^ no matter how cheap, aie expensive. The Genuhie for sale by 



ALL DEALERS 
and the 

WELSBACH STORE— 




922 Chestnut Street 



PHILADELPHIA 




Rabbi JOS. KRAUSKOPF, D. D. 



l;-:^"to~-j AN APPREici axiom: stsss 

The following letters, entirely unsolicited, attest the high 
character of all our work: 
'■My Dear Mr. Gutekunst; 

"Please accept my sincere thanks for the photographs you have 
made of me, and which have just reached me. They are certainly 
magnificent likenesses, and well attest the fact that the hand that 
has delighted Philadelphia with its art for the past half century 
has not yet lost its cunning. 

"Trusting that kind Providence may spare you to us and to your 
art yet many a year in health and good cheer, I am 

"Very appreciatively yours, "JOS. KRAUSKOPF." 
F. Gutekunst. Seattle, Washington, Jan. 27th, 1907. 

My Dear Sir: — Your letter has reached me here — you may 
surely use my sainted wife's letter to you about my picture, if you 
wish, for I know how she loved it. It hung opposite her bed, and 
almost the last thing she did in life was to smile and wave her hand 
at it. You gave her such pleasure b3' sending the picture that there 
is nothing I can do in return which [ would not most gladly do. 

Faithfully yours, JACOB A. RIIS. 



F. GUTEKUNST, 712 Arch SI, and 1700 North Broad St. 



^tcC^i^C-Ti^ SL<xt^' 






Ho 



SKINS FOR.. 

G) 



GIFTS OF LEATHER. 

INDOOR GAMES— for winter evenings. 

ARTISTIC AND UNUSUAL DESK SETS — (some 
imported). 

GOOD RAZORS— for steady hands. 

MODERN RAZOR— '' accident proof. '^ 

BOOK CASES—'' tliey grow with your library." 

FOUNTAIN PENS— ''that are always on duty." 

POST CARD ALBUMS— substantially bound. 

SOCIAL STATIONERY— (that gives prestige). 

CAMERAS— "the proven kind." 

POCKET KNIVES— "finest hardened steel." 

BAGS AND POCKET BOOKS FOR MEN AND 

WOMEN— all of perfect skin and hides. 

904906 CHESTNUT ST.. PHILADELPHIA 



X e. €aiawell ^ Co. 

JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 



Importers of Fine Watches and Clocks and 
European Objects of Decorative Art 

Sterling Silver for Weddings and Anniversaries 



New Art Room for the 

Display and Sale of the Artistic Productions 

of The Tiffany Studios 



m Cbestnut Street 



TH[ COMMONWEALTH TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY 

Northwest Corner Chestnut and Twelfth Streets 

CAPITAL, - ■ - $1,000,000 

SURPLUS, - - - 1,100,000 

Insures Titles Issues SeaPches 

Receives Deposits Iioans Money 

E5<Lecutes Trusts Becomes Surety 

flets as Hegistrar of Stoeks and Bonds 

Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent for $3.00 and upwards 

OFFICERS 

?^Tcfll^B^e^ste^^"Ff;it Vice-President gnS'i Mfca^r^A^s^Sec-y & Treas. 

Andrew T. Kaj', Title Officer 

DIRECTORS 

?;rSril^ster ^n^r^cJ^ ^J^"^ i^o^' P^nffiar^m 

Charlelcar^-er Joseph Savidge John H Sloan Isaac D. Yocum 

Henry MDechert Edward A. Schmidt Frederick Sylvester 



CRANS'S 

Ice CreaiUy Cakes 
Pastry and Candies 



Have stood the test of the PURE FOOD 
Z,AW. The requirement of same have 
ALWAYS been observed, so their pat- 
rons can rely upon their continuance. 



Stored Tea Room -ij J I Chestnut St. 





CHOCOLATES 
and CONFECTIONS 

"7^ it y 7^/^//^/4 ?" 

Fo?' sale %vhere the best is sold. 

STEPHEN F. WHITMAN <& SON. 
Established I842. 1316 Chestnut St., Phila. 



SCHREIBER 8 KERR 
Ladies' Tailors and Habit Makers 

t529 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



Top Coats Smart Walking Costumes Jackets 

Riding Habits . Automobile Garments 

THEO. F. S1EFEP.T 

FURRIER 

RUSSIAN SABLES [A][A][A] ^^^ ^'^^^ 

SEALSKIN ° ° ° REPAIRING 

GARMENTS BELL TELEPHONE A SPECIALTY 

1210 WALNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA 

A. F. BORNOT & BRO. 

FRENCH SCOURERS 
=AND DYERS=^ 

Seventeenth Street and Fairmount Avenue 



BRANCHES: 
1535 Chestnut Street N. E. Cor. 12th and Walnut Streets 

1714 N. Broad Street S. W. Cor. Broad and Tasker Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 

1224 F St., WASHINGTON, D. C. 716 Market St., WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Why not send us all your IMPORTANT CLEANING? 



(^Y . ) ^ aHa/Lin a 

1732 CHESTNUT STREET 

Habits, Gowns, Top Coats 

Waists, Lingerie, Corsets 



^>^S^N 



NO ADVANCE 

in the price of 

—A c k e r s^ 

" 39 ^^ and 60c. 



^^•N^N 



( oy ana ouc. s 

< Chocolates & Bon Bons > 

> 

:tn * 



\ FINLEY ACKER CO. 

J Chestnut at 1 2th Market at J 2th 

? 8th above Arch 



THE SILK STORE 

Horton and Company 

>J ovelties "' "°""' """ """ 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



SILK BY THE YARD. WAISTS. PETTICOATS AND SUITS 





TRNKA &■ KOLAR 


T>yer ^Brothers 


ICaJitfs' (Eatlora 


HATTERS 


1126 WALNUT STREET 




PHILADELPHIA 


J0J3 CHESTNUT STREET 







LADIES' TAILOK'MADE GAI\MENTS 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


exclusively for Walking, Calling, Driving, 




Kiding and Automobile wear. 




THE 


Stanley V. Mastbaum Alfred W. Fleisher 


HASTINgUMclNTOSH TRUSS GO. 




Manufacturers of all kinds of Hard Rubber^ 
Elastic and Leather-Covered 




TRUSS h:s 


MASTBAUM & fLEiSHER 


Sole Makers of the Celebrated 




DR. McINTOSH NATURAL UTERINE 


REAL ESTATE 


SUPPORTER 




For Home and Export Trade. 




Abdominal and Uterine Supporters. Shoulder 

Braces, Crutches, Elastic Hosiery 

and Body Belts 


733 Walnut Street Philadelphia 


912 Walnut Street, Pljiiadeipljia, U. S. A. 



CITY&TR0LL[YGUIDEfor1908 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

READY NOVEMBER 15th 



C. E. HOWE, 

Publisher Boyd's Directory 



Compilers of Lists-»^ 
c5-r-of all Descriptions 

HOWf ADDRESSING CO. 

208-210 S. FOURTH STREET 
PHILADL'LPHIA 



SELTZER BROS 



24T AND 249 S. "Third Streieit 



PHILADEILPHIA 



IF YOU NEED 



A Brass or Enameled BEDSTEAD 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR 

B. LEVIN'S 

OFFICE and WAREHOUSE: 251 S. SECOND STREET 

FACTORY, consisting of 5 acres of land, at WOODSTOWN, N. J. 




St^ntoi) H. H^cKett 

242 S. Second Street 

Cb^irs 
jind A\ission Furniture 




A Mattress That Invites Sleep 

For sleep-inducing' rc^t -^vhen OTertired, you 
need a mattress that g'ives and adjusts itself 
to every movement. That's the beauty of the 




ELASTIC FELT MATTRESS 

$12 at dspartment and furniture stores. 

As'i ^our dealer or write to 

Smith Bros. & Peirce, 310 Spruce St., Phila. 



GOLD SEAL BEER 



BREWED BY THE 



Continental Brewing Co. 

Made from the very finest 
quality of Malt, and the 
best growths of Hops = = = 



BREWERY 

21st Street and Washington Ave, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



V/AMPOLE'S 

FORMOLID 

(A.ntiseptic Solution) 

A CONCENTRATED, BUT HARMLESS, ANTISEPTIC 



FORMOLID, properly diluted, naay be used with perfect freedom 
in the treatment of diseased or inflamed conditions of the mucous 
membrane of the mouth, nose, throat, etc., and as a lotion in the 
treatment of cuts or other abrasions of the skin. 

Excellent as a mouth-wash or gargle. 



PREPARED SOLELY BY 



Henry K. Vv^ampole & Co. 

INCORPORATED 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS 

PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A. 



amaica 

ALAND that's many degrees cooler than Atlantic coast 
resorts ; a land where mosquitoes, tlies and fevers 
are unknown ; a land of beautiful tropical foliage, 
lofty mountains, interesting people, good hotels and modern 
transportation facilities. 

A DELIGHTFUL FALL OR WINTER TOUR 

on the magnificent appointed "ADMIRALS," the twin-screv/ 
U. S. Mail Steamers of the 

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY LINE 

Weekly sailings from Philadelphia and Boston. 
Special rates May to October. 

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY 

R. J. WATSON, Manager 



FOR BOOKLET AND FULL INFORMATION ADDRESS 

F. S. JOPP, General Passenger Agent or S. B. WILLS, Division Passenger Agent 

Long Wharf, Boston, Mass. Pier 5, North Wharves, Phila. 

§ A MODEL INSURANCE COMPANY § 



6 
6 
6 



T 



9 



HE close of the first half year of 1907 leaves the Mutual Benefit r^ 

of New Jersey about two million dollars of written business '{y 
ahead of its performance for the corresponding part of last 

^ year. This achievement is all the more remarkable when it >=^ 

°Cr is remembered that last year the company did a larger business (includ- \3 

0O5 ing revivals, etc. ) than it ever did before, and that at no time has it /D^ 

M" sacrificed its somewhat puritanical ideas of economy to the acquisition ^ 

Lj of large volumes of business. This company has been singularly for- \3' 

oO, tunate in its inquisition experiences. Investigators who found few /I2, 

M" things in the whole business to command their appro\-al, went so far as ]5 

Tj to cite the methods and rates of the Mutual Benefit as models of insur- ^T 

o^ ance equity, and even the standard provisions which they proposed in JZPo 

nT some cases fell short of what the Mutual Benefit, in its every day prac- ^ 

°Cr tice, had long since voluMitarily conceded. Few people will grudge the '{y 

oOj Mutual Benefit the success which it continues to reap. It is nothing Z^, 

M^ more than the result of sound, conscientious management carried out _Q 

LJ consistently in the days of strong temptation to extravagance as well as "{y 

o^ in those later days of compulsory economy. Its methods of manage- cQ, 

M^ ment received a splendid advertisement from the investigations, and j^ 

°Cr current events go to show that the company is taking full ad\'antage '{y 

oOj of the situation, as it has every right to do. fj^ 

04 — Life Insurance Independent, July, 1007. )^ 

^7 JAMES H GLENN, ' <(^° 

(SX General Agent for Eastern Pennsylvania. fIX 

^ 522 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. ^ 



Joseph G. Lynch Jacob a. I,ynxh Calvin Z. I,ync» 

IMembtrs of Master Builders' Excliange 

IvYNCH BROTTHERS 

Contractors anb 

Builbers 

6r2 to 615 I^IPPliNCOTX BUILDING 

46 N. Tw-elfth St. Pliiladelphia, Pa. 

Estimates Kurnislied Ooth Pliones. 



Lawrence Gas Fixtures Mfg. Co. 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

Qas, Electric and Combination 
Fixtures 

129, 131, 133 and 135 North Twelfth Street 

Corner Cherry Street PHILADELPHIA 



GEORGE L. SIPPS 
. . Carpenter, Builder and Contractor . . 



^i> 



907 WLNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA 

Both 'Phones SHOP, 912 LOCUST STREET 



OFFICE PARTITIONS 

All kinds of special Cabinet Wopk 

John E. Sjostrom 

Cabinetrr>akei^ 

1719 North Tenth Street, Philadelphia 

A. P. WILSON COMPANY 

MOSAIC TILES AND MARBLE DECORATIONS 

MANTELS, GRATES AND FIREPLACES 

MERCER TILES a Specialty 





"GIVE m WORLD M BEST YOU HAVE, 
AND THE BEST WILL COME TO YOU!" 

That's why we are doing the leading 
TILE BUSINESS in this section of the 
country Our work tells its own story! 
That's why the leading people of this 
section come to US. 

CONSULT US! 

Call, write, phone or wire! Think of 
a Toilet, Bathroom or Vestibule beauti- 
fully TILED, and at a COST so low 
that you will wonder why you did not 
have it done before. A REASONABLE 
PRICE and the HIGHEST QUALITY 
of workmanship. 

THAT'S US! 

We will either sell Tile direct to you — 
you to do the setting — or we will fur- 
ANDREW P. WILSON nish the Tile and set in place complete. 

414 Perry Building', 16th and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia 

Warehouse, 1510 Cuthbert Street 

J, SELLERS PENNOCK 
Sanitary Plumbing & Heating 

S. £". Cor. Se'benth and Filbert Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 



WILLIAM STEELE & SONS CO 



■-<^<i^ . 



B U I L D I N G 
CONSTR UCTION 



■^1^ 



1600 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA 

TELEPHONE Connections 



(T 




Wmmm 



T 




THE NEW EXPANDED 

PEK-DflR METAL LOCKERS 

Manufactured by 

Edmard Darby & Sons Co., 

Inc. 

Office, 233=235 Arch Street 

Factories, 113=115 Bread St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 



=^ 



Three-quarter Inch Opening 

JAPAN FINISH 

Our Lockers are Neat, Germ Proof, Secure, Econ= 
omical. Healthful 



Each Locker has Number Plate, Nickel Plated 
Coat Hooks, Single Shelf, Combination (Keyless) 
Rim Lock, 3-point Bolt, any size, any shape. 

WRITE FOR CATALOG AND PRICES 



No. 230 



y STANDARD LOCKERS 

12" X 12" X 60" AND 12" X 18" X 72" 



^. 



J 



^VM. R. DOUGHERTY 

BUILDEH 

1604 TO 1010 SANSOM STREET " 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



,JOBBI?^& WORK OF ALX. IvI^DS ATTENDED TO 



TIME-TESTED FOR 45 YEARS 

2)ii'on'6 Silica=(3capbite paint 

The proven shield for steel and woodwork, fences^ 
smokestacks, roofs and bridges. 

"Colors and Specifications," showing the four Dixon Standard Colors, sent free, 
upon application. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO. 

PHILADELPHIA BRANCH, J 020 ARCH STREET 

General Offices and Factory, Jersey City, N. J. 



Joseph S. Keen, Jr. H. Bayard Hodge, 

President and General Manager. Secretan- and Assistant Treas>. 
George M. Bunting, Wm. H. Roth, 

Vice-President and Treasurer. Assistant Secretary. 



Cbe Hmerlcan Pipe manufacturing Company 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS FOR WATER WORKS 

112 nortb Broad Street, Pbilaaelpbia 

J. W. IvEDOUX, M. AM. sec. C. E., Chief Engineer. 

JAMES H. DAWES, General Supt. Construction Department. 
HAROLD PEROT KEEN, General Supt. Operating Department. 

THE VULCANITE PAVING COMPANY 

LAND TITLE BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



General Contractors for Reinforced Concrete Construction, Asphalt 

Mastic Water-proofing, Insulation, Belgian Block, 

Asphalt Block and Vitrified Brick Paving. 

Asphalt Mastic and Cement Floors our Specialty. 

CHARLES I. KENT, President WM. L. GUENTHER, Vice-President 

LEON ROSENBAUM, Treasurer and Secretary 



9^* ^acoiy 3^ccKK0K V Cc)% 

1 744 Market ^tmt; fkitcUd^kio. 



ORIENTAL RUGS 



Ivins, Dietz dr Magee 

FLOOR COVERINGS EXCLUSIVELY 

Manufacturers Importers and Retailers 

1220 and 1222 Market Street, Philadelphia 

WM. G. BERLINGER. Manager 



CARPETS, LINOLEUMS, ^c. 



The Integrity Title Insurance 
Trust and Safe Deposit Co. 

S.W. Cor. Fourth and Green Sts., PHILADELPHIA 

Capital Stock, Full Paid . . . $500,000 
Surplus and Undivided Profits 800,000 
Deposits 3,600,000 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 

Receives moiiej^ on deposit, subject to check on 
sight, allowing 2 per cent, interest. Rents boxes 
for safe keeping of valuables in burglar and fire- 
proof vaults, for $3. 00 and upwards. Letters of 
Credit and International Cheques for Travelers is- 
sued, available everj'where. 

SAVING FUND DEPARTMENT 

Open from 9 A. M to 4 P. M. Mondays to 7 P. M Saturdays to 1 P. M. 

3 percent, interest allowed on deposits. 

TITLE AND REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

Examines and insures titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, interests, &c. Money 
loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends to all details pertaining to buying, selling 
and conveying of real estate. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

Transacts all Trust Company business and acts in the capacitv of executor, administrator, 
guardian or Trustee taking entire ch.irge of estates. All valuables received for safe keeping. 
Wills receipted and kept in safe boxes without charge. 




OFFICERS: 

President 

GEORGE KRSSLER 

First Vice-President 

JOHN G. VOGLER 

Second Vic-President 

PHILIP SPAETER 

Secretary and Treasurer 

HERMAN WISCHMAN 

Trust Officer 

PHILIP E. GUCKES 



BO\RD OF DIRECTORS: 



George Kessler Jno G Vcgler 

Philip Doerr John Greenwood 

Frederick Orlemann Fred'k Gaeckler 

Charles G. Berlinger George Nass 

Philip Spaeter C. J Preisendanz 

Charles Mahler William Roesch 

Wm. H. Rookstool Bernhard Ernst 



Albert Hellwis 



Daniel W. Graflv 



J. Edwin Rech 
August P. Kunzig 
Albert Schoenhut 
Charles W. Miller 
William G. Berlinger 
Charles Strickler 
Jacob Kramer 
I. P. Striltmatter, M.D. 



Die :ffieamten sprecben Dcutscb 



^e Maule Seed Book for 1907 

Contains everything' old or new, worth having in 

Seeds, Plants or Bulbs 

Write to-day for it to 

WM. HENRY MAULE 

1711 Filbert Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

O^ven Letter's Sons 

BeBt Coal 

YARDS: 

Xrenton Ave. and Westmoreland St. 
Coral St. and Ueliigli Ave. 




Baxter Lighting Co., Inc. 

HolophoDe Gas and Electric 

Globes and Reflectors Lighting Appliances 

121 North Thirteenth Street 
Philadelphia 



DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTING APPLIANCES 

HOUSES SCIENTIFICALLY FUMIGATED 

WE ARE EXPERTS IN THE LINE 

WEST DISINFECTING CO., Inc. 

THE LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF DISINFECTANTS AND 
DISINFECTING APPLIANCES IN AMERICA - 

MAIN OFFICE AND LABORATORY, NEW YORK 

PHILADELPHIA OFFICE, 262 NORTH 13th ST. 
CHARLES AUERBACH, Manager Both Phones- 



ESTABLISH KD ie37 

BAILEY'S PURE RYE 

Is used MEDICINALLY and SOCIALLY 



BEYOND 




COMPETITION 



Take in Moderation and grow old gracefully 
These goods are bottled in full quarts at 

$1.00, $1-25 and $1.50. Age alone controls price 

HUEY & CHRIST, 1209 Market St., Philadelphia 

THEOBALD & OPPENHEIMER CO. 



/ 




MAKERS OF 

=FINE= 
CIGARS 

PHILADELPHIA 
NEW YORK 
and TAMPA 



LA TOCO, Clear Havana 

WM. PENN and ROYAL LANCER 
Seed and Havana 



HOFFMAN^CORR MANUFACTURING CO. 



Ask your Dealer and insist on having your Awnings made from 

Hoffman Gold Medal Brand Awning Stripes 

Largest Rope and Twine House in the World 
CONTRACTORS TO THE GOVERINMENT 

PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



413 Market Street 



55 White Street 



TEL-EPHONES 



Keystone, main 390 



Beli-, Market 409 



NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. 

ANALINE COLORS, DYE STUFFS AND 

CHEMICALS == 



109 NORTH WATER STREET 



PHIL-ADELPHIA 



AGENTS FOR 

SCHOELLKOPF, HARTFORD & HANA CO. 
A. I_EE COMPANY 



Pbiladdpbia 
manufacturers mutual 
fire Insurance Company 



ARCADE BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA 



Edwtn I. AtIvEE, President 



or 



\ ^0. ^jialf 



laUcA 



421 ftOafuitt It. 



534 ^U!:d ft. 



6): 



in 



a mok 



4 9 Wlaltfi jFtftfi f tuct 



LOCKWOOD 
FOLDING BOX CO., Lim.ted 

Manufacturers of 

Folding Paper Boxes, Envelopes 
and Paper Specialties 

CHARLES L. LOCKWOOD, President 
251 South Third St., Philadelphia 



Bell Phone Keystone Phone 

W. BODEK COMPANY 

Importers and Jobbers in 

Hosiery, Notions, 

Underwear, ^c. 

527 MARKET STREET 



New York: :,45-3^7 Broatlway 

Boston: 67 Chauiicv Stret't 

Chicago: 605 Medinah 'J'cniple 



CATLIN & CO. 



YARN5 

206 CHESTNUT STREET 
Philadelphia 

COPS, SKEINS, CONES, TUBES, 
AND WARPS 




RICHARD A. BLYTHE 
Commission 
Merchant . . 

COTTON YARNS of Every Description 
114 Chestnut St., Phiia., Pa. 



BRANCHES: 

1018 Century Building, Atlanta, Ga. 

W. H. HARRISS, Representative 

HAWES BROS. & BLYTHE, Fall River, Mass. 



Jenckes Spinning Co. 

Cotton Yarns 

Main Office and Mills at 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

Philadelpliia Office 

Mariner and Merchant Building 

Third and Chestnut Sts. 



^. (HJ. 



oclilan 



and yittle //(Jtitidma 

^ ntiaact una, Jl a. 



FIRTH 5 FOSTER CO. 



Dyers and Finishers 



YORK, [MCRALD AND ADAMS STS. 
Philadelphia 

N[W YORK OfflC[ 
Exchange Bidg., Broadway and Broome St. 



ELECTRICAL WORK in all its branches ... We install and 
repair Electrical Incandescent Lights, Gas Lig-hting:, Bells, Burglar 
Alarms, Motor, Telephones, Dynamos, and Electrical Work of every 
description 

ALBERT GENTEL 
^ Electrical Contractor ^ 

Both Phones 1503 COLUMBIA AVE. Postal or Phone Us 

Branch Store: 4466 Germantown Avenue 

Pure Drugs Toilet Articles 

HARVEY A. FEiNNER 

Broad St. and Columbia Ave. 

Prescription Worlv a Specialty 

SODA, CANDIES, CIGARETTES AND CIGARS 

Yourself and friends are invited to a series of 

Exhibitions of the X- Ray 

and 
Operative Technique of Static Electricity 

To be Held in the Clinical Lecture Hall of 

DR. THOMAS EDWIN ELDRIDGE 

1639 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Upon all of the dates mentioned below, unique and interesting programs have been arranged, 
showing the X-Rav, Radium, Uttra-Violet Kay, High Frequency Coil. The Static Wave as seen 
through Geisler Tubes. The Static Spray or Shower, as well as the wonderful effect of Electricity 
on the voice in song and other interesting phenomenon. 

Program will commence each night at 8 o'clock 
No charges are made for admission 

Dates arid Subjects gf Lectures for Season 1907-1908 

1. Thursday, October loth, 1907. Why I 7. Thursday, Feb. 20th, 190S. Electricity 
champion the cause of Electro-Therapy. for Diseases of the Heart, I^ungs and Respi- 

2. Thursday, October 31st, 1907. Blunders ratory System. 

made in Electro-Therapeutic Practice. g. Thursday, March 12, 190S. Electricity 

3. Thursday, November 21, IC07. Blunders for Rheumatism, Paralysis aiid Locomotor 
made in Medical and Surgical Practice. Ataxia. 

4. Thursday, Dec. 12th, 1907. Electricity g. Thursday, April 2, 190S. Electricity for 
for Nervous Diseases. Spinal Curvature, Hip Joint Diseases and 

5 Thursdav, Januarv 9, 190S. Eleclricitv other Deformities, 

and X-Ray for Cancer, Tuberculosis and Skin ^^ Thursday, April 23, 1908. Electricity 

Uiseases. ^^^ ^-^^ Diseases of Women and Children. 

6. Thursday, January 30, 1908. Electricity 

or Asthma, Hypochondriasis, Melancholy 11. Thursday, May 14th, 1908. General 

and Insanity. review of our work. 



TELEPHONES 
Bell, Poplar 47=20 Bell, Poplar 35-4H A Keystone, Park 67-71 



NEVER CLOSED 



W. \Y. HA AG 

THE BAILEY STABLES 

i6th Street below Diamond 
Philadelplnia 



UP=TO=DATE EQUIPAGES: 



OPERA BU5SES BRIDAL COACHES VICTORIAS 

CABRIOLETTE HAN50MS BROUGHAMS CUT=UNDER5 

COACHMEN IN FULL LIVERY 



FRANKLIN TRUST COMPANY 

OF PHILADELPHIA 
Columbia Avenue and Tenth Street 

Capital ?{200,000.00 

Surplus 70,000.00 

TWO PER CENT INTEREST paid on accounts subject to check 

THREE AND ONE HALF PER CENT INTEREST 
allowed on Saving's Funds Deposits 

When dissatis^ed with your 
work try ^^ 

FORREST LAUNDRY 

1221-23-25 Columbia. Ave. 

Lace Curtains, Ploor Linens 
Both Phones a. Specialty : 




CCKct 



EARLY to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and -wise. 
That is providing the bed is comfortable. Our Bed Linens are sent home as 
fresh and sweet as from the loom — the best of soap and filtered water; 
together with the most satisfactory methods of laundering make this a possibility. 



fT 



^ 



EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY CO. 

19th St. and Montgomery Ave. 

WILL TREAT YOU RIGHT =^= 



-_J 




T^icjlTlCL ZQClkin^ ^Q'. 



Master St., 23d to 24th 

Bread, Rolls, Cakes, Pies, Macaroni, 

Spaghetti, Noodles, Soup Pastelles 



WM. F. SELLERS 

Practical ^ florscshocr 

614 and 616 Jefferson St. 

PHILADELPHIA 

nOrSeS onOU Law of Nature 

Interfering Horses a Specialty 

Particular attention paid to Road and Trotting 

Horses, Quarter Cracks, Corns, 

Contracted Feet, Etc. 



JOHN W. GRAHM 

31sT AND CHESTNUT STS. 



I\. E. W. W. 






BERGER BROTHERS CO. 

Tinners* H&.rdware 
and Roofers' Supplies 

No. 237 Arch Street 

PHILADELPHIA 



The GLASS & NAGHOD BREWING GO. 

Solitaire Beer ijgood 



BOTTLING BKER 
A SPECIALTY 



1720-38 Mervine Street 



Philadelphia 



WILLS— JONES 

OFFICE 

1202-04-06 Montgomery Ave. 



BRANCH 

603 North Eighth St. 

Milk and Cream 

Certified Milk Nursery Milk 

Thoroughbred Dairies telephone 



I. MAYER 

CATERER 

1643 NORTH BROAD ST. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Wm. R. Chapman & Sons 

BI 



RICKLAYER5 
UILDERS 



1215 South Broad Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



O^^URRMAN 
Vienna Ladies' Tailor^ 

995 North Sixth St. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



SPITZ'S 
Choice Meals & PouUr; 

SQUABS Our SpecialtN? 
Institutions Supplied 

M. E. Cor. 8th and Jefferson Sts. 

Philadelphia 



HARRY R. RUST 

Store and Office Fixtures, Etc. 

Contractor, Carpenter and Builder 

ROLLING STORE LADDERS 
Office and MiU 

724 and 726 Ludlow Street 
828 Filbert Street 

Telephones PHILADELPHIA 



Kej-stone and Bell 
Telephones 



l,ocal and Long 
Distance 



EDWARD REID 
Wholesale ^ Florist 

WE HANDLE CUT FLOWERS ONLY 

1526 Raustead Street, Philadelphia 





Wines and Liquors 


A. J. MARGOL M 


SUPERIOR QUALITY 
MODERATE PRICES 


532-54 South rourth St. 


J. CARTUN, 

401=3=5 South Street 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


ABE KOLSKY & CO. 


Keystone Telephone, Main 48-33 A 


Real Estate Brokers 


M HARRIS 


Conveyancers .... 


Dealer in FURNITURE 


Corner Passyunk Avenue 


CARPETS and BEDDING 


Fifth and Monroe Streets 


7t2 T'a.ssyunk c/lvenae 


Building Associations Philadelphia, Pa. 


ThiUdelphia., Ta., 



CHRISTIAN PFAFF 
Wholesale Wine and Liquor Dealer 

S. E. Cor. Passyunk Ave. and Catharine St. 
PHILADELPHIA 



H. GAYRAUD 


Bell and Keystone Phones 


French Steam Dyer 


H. C. MUNNS 


and Scourer 


PLASTERI NG 


614 Pine Street and 
J 506 Columbia Ave. 


^P" CEMENTING 
REPAIRING 


Philadelphia 


309 BUILDERS' EXCHANGE 


Gents' Clothing Neatly Repaired 


PHILADELPH lA 




Telephone 


A. PEPP 


CONKLING-ARMSTRONG 


Wholesale Grocer 


TERRA COTTA CO. 

MANUFACTURERS CF 


709 South Fifth St. 


Srehiteetural ^erra gotta 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


WORKS: Philadelphia 
OFFICE: Builders' Exchange, Phil?, 



Tjhi's SSook 

is a spscimen of our ivorktnans/iip 





^oth uelephones 



//6 9/orth Vhird Street, Philadelphia 



You may bring your own Materials 
We guarantee 2 Fittings, more if necessary 

Reliable Tailoring Co. 

LADIES' AND MISSES' 

Suits and Coats •"!"'! *^rdeV 

ST.SO up 

905 Market St., Philadelphia 

Bell Phone, Filbert 29=25 D 



EDWARD S. PARET COMPANY 
PRINTERS 



Specialists in Duplicating Typewriting 
Addressing and Mailing 

210 and 212 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 

Bell Telephone, Lombard 2066 

Keystone Telephone, Main 1696 PHILADELPHIA 



JUNGMANN'S 
Beef, Wine and Iron 



50c 



FULL PINTS 
None Better 



Jungmann's Drug Store 

Fourth and Noble Streets 

and 220 Vine Street 



Bei_i_ Phone, Spruce 52-89 A 

William Lyons 
Xa^tes ' Uailor 

ISO S. Fifteenth Street 

ABOVE WALNUT STREET 
PHIL.ADEI_PHIA 



RIDING HABITS 



TOP COATS 



Jerome H. Sheip, Asa W. Vandegrift, 
Sec'y and Treas. President 

Local and Long Distance Telephne 



SHEIP & VANDEGRIFT, Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CIGAR BOXES 

LOCK CORNER BOXES 
814 to 832 N. LawrenceSt. 817-21 N. Sth St. 
PHILADELPHIA 



F. BRECHT'S SONS 

Cigar Box 
Manufacturers 

109 and 111 
NORTH ORRIANNA STREET 

Telephone Connection . . . 



Bucks County Trust Company 



Insures Titles 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Pays Interest on Deposits Ji- 



Executes Trusts 



HUGH. B. EA.STBURN, President and Trust Officer 

JOHN S. WII^LIAMS, Vice-President 

T. O. ATKINSON, Treasurer GEO. H. MIIyLER, Assistant Treasurer 

GEORGE WATSON, Assistant Trust Officer 



John S. Williams 
Jacob Hagerty 
Samuel J. Garner 
Henry W. Watson 
Henry C. Moyer 



DIRECTORS 

Howard I. James 
Thos. C. Knowles 
Philip H. Fretz 
Hugh B. Eastburn 
Joseph Thomas 



Thos. O. Atkinson 
B. F. Shearer 
George Watson 
Thomas Ross 
T. Howard Atkinson 



E H. Buckman 



F. J. Gerlitzki 
Gen'l Partner 



E. H. BUCKMAN & CO. 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 

Brackets, Mouldings, Doors, Window Sash, 
Blinds Shutters, Window Frames, Etc. 

All kinds of Factory Work done to order 

DOYLESTOWN PA 



COLUMBIA 

STEAM 

LAUNDRY 

LACE CURTAINS 
A SPECIALTY 

A. F. DIETERICH 

72 and 74 WEST STATE STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA 



WM. P. ELY 

DEALER IN 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men, 

Boys and Children, Gent's Furnishing 

Goods, Hats and Caps, Boots and 

Shoes, Bicycles all kinds 

Opposite P. &. R. Depot 
DOYLESTOWN, PA 



R. C CLYIVIEFI 

DEALER IN 

Dry Goods, Groceries 
Notions 

AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Opposite P. & R. R. Depot 



Hart Building Pharmacy 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



C. Louis Siegler, D. D. S. 

Opposite New Heurt Building 
MAIN ST. DOYLESTOWN. PA. 

Standard Phone, No. 55 A 



JAIVIKS BARRETT 

Dealer in and Wholesale Agent for 

Iron, Steel, 

Building and Carriage Hardware 

Cor. Main & Ashland Sts., Doylestown, Pa. 



M. K. DUNC3AN 
House Painter &, Paper Decorator 
Paints, Oils, Glass, Picture Moulding, Etc. 

I,atest Designs in Wall Paper at City Prices 
45 and 47 W. STATE ST., DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Adam Scheldt Bre^^ing Co. 

NORRISTOW, PA, 

BrevJers of the Celebrated 

Lotos Export and Standard Beer 

Also Manufacturers of 

2oth Cenlurv Cream Ale, Porter, Brom Stoul and 
all Carbonated Beverages 

PHILADELPHIA BRANCH, 963-971 NORTH NINTH STREET 

Pine Grove Guernsey Stock Farm 

Both Importer and Domestic 
Registered Guernsey Cattle of Both Sex for Sale 

For full particulars and descriptive Catalogue, address 

GEORGE W. OTT 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

ROTZEL Sc RAIKE 
Lumber, Coal and Mill Work 

HEADQUARTERS FOR RED CEDAR 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

OPPOSITE BAPTIST CHURCH DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 

wvnne: jameis 

ATTORNEIV AT l_A\A/ 

ROOM D, HART BUILDING, DOY LEISTO W N , PA. 

All kinds Real Estate for Sale, Fire Insurance, Notary Public 



Wayne Junction 
Metal Cornice Works 



Thos* Gassner 

Slate, Tile and 

Metal Roofing 

Galvanized Iron and Copper 
Cornices^ Sheet Metal Work 
in all its branches .^ ^ 
Estimates furnished ^ J- 

WORKS 

(Rear of 4545 Wayne Ave.) 
Wayne Junction 

Telephone Connection Philadelphia 



"My What a Beautiful New 
Enameled Bathtub 
You Have!" 

That was the admiring exclamation 
of an observing lady visiting a friend's 
house. 

But it wasn't a new tub at all. 

Really, it was an old one — had been 
placed in the house some years ago. 

But it looked like new. 

Just as white as snow and with that 
perfect polish which only true enamel 
can give. 

The lady was soon informed why the 
bathtub looked so beautiful. 

Kleenatub 

had made tbat enamel look like new. 

It will do the same thing for your 
enameled tub; for your kitchen sink; 
for your cut glass (no matter how fine;) 
for your mirrors; for your enameled or 
brass bed — for any metal you may have 
in the house. 

Why Not Try It! Only 10c. Any Dealer 

Wrlgley Manufacturing Company 
Philadelphia 




W(\t il^totjsh iExpnnmt 



Devoted to the interests 
of the Jewish People 

Spprrsptttalibp of 3lphi'talf Jnatituttntta aiiii WpIromrU in 11|p 3lphiisli l^ome 
SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS ABLE CONTRIBUTORS 

Published every Friday. Subscription Price $3.00 Per Annum 

Philadelphia Office, 608 Chestnut Street Baltimore Office, 120 Aisquith Street 



Let Nde Estimate on Your Work:: 



A. P. FRAIM 
Carpenter and Builder 

Office and Shop: 319 JVIARKKT STREET 

Jobbing promptly attended, to 
Estimates furnislied rn^ir^zn^zr. 



Bell Phone, Vtarlcet SO'36 A 



Key-stone Phone, Main 14-50 



THE 

Packord end Buick 

AMERICA'S 
BEST AUTOIVIOBILES 

J^eystone JWotor ^ar Company 

238 N. Broad Street 
Philadelphia 



No Mass-^No Fass=-=No Dust 




Carpets cleaned on the 
floor at no more expense 
than the old method. 
Ordinary house cleaned 
in a few hours. 

Permanent air-sweep- 
ing plants installed in 
:S9 Churches, Office Build- 
ings, Hotels and private 
residences, etc. 



Send for booklet References famished 



Both Phones 



^anitary £)ast J^emoving (Jo. of Pa. 

518-519 "Perry building - TfiiUdelphia. "Pa, 



Free Electrical Exhibit. 

TN our new General Office Build- 
ing, Southwest corner 10th and 
Chestnut Streets, we are maintain- 
ing a free exhibit of all practical 
electrical appliances — Electric Port- 
ables, Electric Cooking and Heating 
Utensils ; applications of the Electric 
Motor for business and household 
use, and a great variety of the most 
recent electrical iaventions are here 
displayed ♦ 

A cordial invitation is extended 
to all those interested to visit and 
inspect our Show Rooms, Informa- 
tion will be freely accorded to all 
visitors. 

The Philadelphia Electric Co*, 

lOth and Chestnut Streets.