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Full text of "The Terrapin"

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Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



1993 Terrapin 
University of Maryland 
College Park MD 20742 




2 1 Table of Contents 



Artwork by Matilde Ott 



Breaking Our Backs... 




Artwork bv Matilde Ott 



Staff 



Through the Pictures 

Edited by Krista Parker 




Photo bv Tvrone Brooks 



4 J Divider Page 




If a "picture is 
worth a thou- 
sand words," 
then to describe 
the University of 
Maryland 
through words 
would take a 
dictionary. This 
section /'UM in 
Pictures," was 
created in an at- 
tempt to show the 
numerous different aspects 
of life in , on and around campus 
throughout the year. It would 
undoubtedly be a considerable task 
to try and picture every single part 
and person that comprise the 
University of Maryland. However, 
we hope that in this section we 
succeeded in portraying the spirit 
of the University of Maryland. 
Enjoy and remember UM in pic- 
tures. 



"I hope that 

ten years 

from now, I 

can look back 

and reahze 

that the years 

I spent at 

Maryland 

were actually 

pretty good 

years." 

Anonymous 
Terp Grad 



Divider Page 



UM 

in 

Pictures 









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oio by: Tyrone Bruoks 



Photo by: Paul Vieira 



UM in Pictures ( 7 








Photo top left by Tyrone Brooks; photo top right by Ashish Bagai, 
photo above by Allison Chang. 



8 1 UM in Pictures 



Photo by: Tyrone Brooks 








UM ^ 



in 
Pictures 



All photos this page 
by Paul Vieira. 



UM in Pictures 




10 1 UM in Pictures 



Photob on this page; top by-Tyrone Brooks 
bottom by- Ashish Bagai 




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UM in Pictures | 17 




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18 ) UM in Pictures 



Photos this page: top photo by Tyrone Brooks; bottom photo 
by Ashish Bagai. 




Photos this page: top photos by Paul Vieira; bottom left 
by Ashish Bagai; bottom right by Paul Vieira 



UM in Pictures ( 19 




m 
Pictures 



Photos this page: top 
photos by Tyrone 
Brooks; left and above 
right by Paul Vieira. 



UM in Pictures ( 21 




Photos this page: top left by Suzy Aug; top 
right by Allison Chang; bottom left by Tyrone 
Brooks; bottom nght by Allison Chang. 



22 ) UM in Pictures 




Photos this page; top and bottom 
nghl by Tyrone Brooks; bottom left 
bv Paul Vieira. 



UM in Pictures ( 23 




spring 
Break 



Photos this page by Gina Dugan 



24 1 UM in Pictures 




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UM in Pictures ( 25 




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Photos this page: top 
left by Tyrone Brooks; 
top right by Suzv Aug; 
left by Ashish Bagai; 
above by Paul Vieira, 



UM in Pictures 




UM in Pictures 




Photos this page: lai top and above 
by Tyrone Brooks; left by Paul Vieira. 




Photos this page: top left by Tyrone Brooks; top right and bottom 
photos by Paul Vieira. 



32 1 UM in Pictures 



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UM in Pictures ( 33 



Breaking Through 

Edited by Jennifer Christman & Krista Parker 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



34 1 Student Life 





This year, 
student life at 
the University 
of Maryland 
meant something 
different for every 
one who was a part 
of it. With 34,623 
students from all 50 states 
and many different countries, UM 
held its own world of opportunities 
and experiences. 

For those new to the University, 
it meant breaking away from home 
and adapting to a new setting. 
Student life involved meeting 
people and learning from them. 

Many other students found 
themselves breaking into activities. 
Involvement was the meaning of 
student life for members of the 
over 300 campus organizations and 
of the Greek system. 

And for some students. Univer- 
sity student life only meant party- 
ing and breaking the rules! 

No matter which path a student 
chose at the University of Mary- 
land, they all shared one common 
bond; they were all BREAKING 
THROUGH to their futures. 



"Being a part of the 
university of Mary- 
land doesn't have to 
mean being just a 
nmumber. There 
are so many facets to 
the University that 
you just have to find 
what aspect fits you 
and your tastes, and 
then go with it. It is 
possible to make a 
big, impersonal 
university seem 
smaller . It just 
takes some time." 
Matilde Ott, 
sophomore. 



Student Life 




35 




All Nighter offers opportunity to stay. 



Out All Night 



By Deanna Miller 

"I didn't go there planning to spend 
money," said one freshman of the All 
Nighter held at the stamp Union of 
Friday, September 18th. "It wasn't much 
fun unless you spend money or you 
stayed late." 

Still, for underclassmen without fake 
id's or upperclassmen tired of the bar 
scene, the All Nighter offered a fun 
alternative to the usual college night life 
agenda. Sponsored by the Stamp Student 
Union, the event attracted a steady flow of 
students with its variety of activities. 

One of the first places people flocked to 
was the indoor carnival in the Grand Ball 
room. There, campus organizations 
promoted themselves with information 
tables and games that, with tickets, could 
be played. Adrenaline Productions 



Ail photos this page by Ashish Bagai 



enticed onlookers by playing a video of 
its' members going bungee jumping. 
Ethnic organizations like the Caribbean 
Club lured students to their tables with 
the aroma of exotic foods. Students could 
also get their faces painted or their 
caricatures drawn. 

Every floor offered something different 
for students. Across from Citizens Bank, 
students could make a tape of themselves 
singing to their favorite tunes from inside 
a plexiglass sound studio. In the smokers' 
lounge, they could gamble $2500 worth of 
play money on blackjack, roulette, or 
craps, using their winnings to bid on 
College Park paraphernalia at an auction 
held later. Anyone who ventured as far as 
the third floor could dance to reggae 
music while watching a laser light show. 

One or the most entertaining attrac- 
tions was mentalist/ illusionist. Bob 
Garner's magic show at the Hoff. "It was 
worth a dollar— very much so," said one 
sophomore, "He read my mind!" 




36 J AU-Nighter 





All photos this page by Ashish Bagai. 



AIl-Nighter ( 37 




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All photos this page by Carlos Dopazo 



38 Shuttle UM 





i By Kara Hatton 



The University of Maryland Shuttle 
Bus System celebrated its' 20th anniver- 
sary this past year. The red and white 
buses have become legendary over the 
past two decades. November 14 signified 
the 20 years that the system has been in 
operation, according to shuttle coordina- 
tor Mike Adams. The yellow anniversary 
stickers were put on all the buses to let the 
student body know the reason for the 
celebration. 

Shuttle drivers also were a breed of 
their own. Robert Weir, a UM grad 
student said, "I love it, I have flexible 
hours that work around my school 
schedule, I can pick my own shifts and I 
enjoy the people I work with!" He added, 
"It's great because I'm not cooped up 
behind a desk, in an office, I get to get 
out. " 



Weir said that driving the shuttle 
enabled him to meet a lot of new people. 
He also gained a lot of responsibiUties and 
through his experiences learned to juggle 
a job and course load. 

Training to drive the shuttle bus was 
not very difficult, according to Weir. The 
sessions lasted for two weeks in the 
winter and about three and a half weeks 
in the summer. "The most difficult thing 
was to adjust to driving something three 
times the size of my car." 

Whether you were driving the shuttle 
or a passenger on it, UM students got to 
see a variety of different things. Weir said 
that the funniest thing he has ever seen 
were the drunk circuit riders coming 
home from a night on the Route. 




AH photos this page by Carlos 
Dopazo. • 



Shuttle UM 



Terps Celebrate 100 Years of Maryland Football 



By Amy Hamilton 




Homecoming '92 was special because it 
marked one hundred years of Maryland 
Football. Students, faculty, and staff, 
along with visiting families showed UM 
spirit by participating in a variety of 
different events. 

On Sunday, October 11th, the week's 
events began with the Terrapin Trot 5K 
run for homeless shelters, which was 
sponsored by the SUPC. Monday Oct. 12 
was brought to life with the sounds from 
the popular musical group. The Spin 
Doctors, who performed to a sold-out 
crowd at Ritchie Cohseum. 

Tuesday and Wednesday had various 
groups and organizations that partici- 
pated in the volleyball tournaments. The 
Korean Student Union came away victori- 
ous in the finals. Other sporting events 
included flag football and the Olympics. 
Thursday night showcased the talents of 
various Greek groups during the talent 
show, also held at Ritchie Coliseum. 

On Friday the 16, the First Annual 
Maryland Showcase Fair was displayed 
near the South Campus Dining Hall. This 
showcase had demonstrations from 
various campus organizations and 
involved College Park's shop merchants. 
The fair included carnival rides, live 
entertainment and the Greek Banner 
Competition. Continuing the spirit of 
Homecoming there was a pep rally and 
bonfire to cheer on the football team. 

Saturday was the climax of the weeks' 
festivities. Throughout the morning and 
early afternoon, the University sponsored 
a family weekend brunch which about 300 
people attended. At 1 :30 it was game 
time. Our Terps battled the Wake Forest 
Demon Deacons. About 31,000 Terp fans 
saw the Terps fall to Wake by a score of 
30-23. 



riioto bv Ashish Bagai 



Homecoming 




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Photo by Ashish Bagai 



Homecoming 




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All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



42 ) Step Show 




Step Show '92. . . 



Steppin' to the Beat of the 
Same Drummer 






By Kara Hatton 

On Saturday, October 17, 1992, the 
Homecoming Step Show was held. The 
theme of this years' show was "Steppn' to 
the Beat of the Same Drummer" to signify 
unity, and that is what was displayed on 
the stage. 

The ladies of Sigma Gamma Rho 
Sorority Inc. opened the show with a 
bang. Followed by the men of Kappa 
Alpha Psi Fraternity. 

They entered the stage through a cloud 
of smoke and clad in white shirts, polka 
dot ties and dress pants, dazzled the 
audience with their high stepping moves. 
Keeping with tradition, the red and white 
striped canes were used in the routine. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. was 
the next group to take the stage. The 
AKA's , dressed in green, gave stepping a 
new twist. They mixed fancy stepping 
withe a touch of daintiness and came up 
with an incredible combination. 

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. came 
next and just about stopped the show. 
The ladies, in black top hats, red leotards, 
black pants and suspenders and black 
jackets, strutted onto the stage through a 
cloud of smoke and stepped with a 
vengeance, showing that women could 
step just as well, if not better then the 
men. 

In blue chiffon jackets and black pants 
this sorority put on an exhibition. Puffs of 
smoke and swirling purple and white 
lights covered the stage. 

The final act was the men of Phi Beta 
Sigma, Epsilon Psi Chapter. They 
emerged from the back with something to 
prove. They were ruthless, as they 
entertained the crowd by parodying the 
other acts of the night. 

By far, the Step Show continued in the 
great tradition of years past. 



Step Show 




Homecoming 1992 



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Photo by Tyrone Brooks 






Photo by Paul Vieira 




Photo bv Pau\ Vi( 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



Homecoming ( 45 




By Amy Hamilton 

With a campus as large and wide- 
spread as the University of Maryland at 
College Park, there are many means of 
travel. Besides the UM and Metro shuttle 
buses, campus residents found their way 
to classes by walking, hitchhiking, biking, 
moped riding and roller blading. Com- 
muters, usually forced to park in Lot 4 
("Lot Far") , had their cars, but still had to 
make the long journey to class. 

Parking on campus, was a problem. 
With approximately 35,000 undergrad 
students, graduate students, faculty and 
staff, there was not enough room for 
everyone. For this reason, freshen and 
sophomores could not have their vehicles 
on campus without the proof of an off- 
campus job. 



All photos this page by Maggie Saladay 



Walking about UM's hilly terrain 
allowed student to get some extra exer- 
cise. 

Roller blading became a popular way 
to get around campus in a hurry. Mike 
Etkin, a freshman undecided major, said, 
"Roller blading is a quick, hin, and cool 
way of getting to class. It presented 
challenges when moving fast downhill or 
getting up and down stair steps while 
avoiding pedestrians and vehicles." 

Riding a bike could be convenient 
transportation for students in a rush. 
Some disadvantages also came with 
keeping a bike on campus. Many bikes, 
got stolen, even when chained or locked 
to a bike rack. 

Kevin Joyce, a sophomore Business 
major said that the major obstacle when 
riding a bike around campus was, "... 
there were too manv pedestrians on the 
sidewalks and there wasn't enough room 
to ride a bike out of the way of traffic." 




46 ) Getting Around 





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All photos this page by Maggie 
Saladay 



Getting Around ( 47 




AH photos this page by Celia Escudero-Espadas 



48 I First Look Fair 



Clubs Try to Recruit New Members at the 






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'hoto by Celia Escuder-Esp^das 



First Look Fair 49 



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Nightlife on the Route takes you 





By Deanna Miller 

Ask anyone to point you in the direc- 
tion of College Park's night life and you'll 
soon find yourself walking down Route 1, 
the aorta of the university's social blood- 
stream. No matter what day of the week, 
'the Route' always offers study-sore 
students something to do. 

Monday nights are popular at the 
Cellar. Students pay a five dollar cover 
and get pizza for free and watered-down 
pitchers for a quarter each. Featuring 
dance music and a dance floor, the Cellar 
is known as one of the easiest places to get 
into. One freshman said, "I know a girl 
who got in with her meal card. "Upstairs at 
the Paragon, they don't serve pitchers, but 
they feature popular bands like Blue 
Miracle and Bad Fish. 

Tuesdays are for Santa Fe's bar and 
restaurant. Located next to Ratsie's 
restaurant also a favorite hangout, Santa 
Fe cards strictly day or night. The crowd 
also tends to be older. Wednesday nights 
are ladies' nights at Bentley's Bar and 



Restaurant. Described by many as ';aid 
back', Bentley's offers dollar drafts for 
everyone on Wednesdays. 

The 'Vous attracts a lot of students with 
its Thursday night special. Student who 
frequent the bar say it is very 'Greek', very 
segregated, and elbow-to-elbow crowded. 
The 'Vous plays good music and has no 
dance floor, but that doesn't stop people 
from improvising on the tables. 

After the bars close, people head for 
restaurants like Cluck-U-Chicken which 
stays open late and is highly praised as "a 
good place to go when you're drunk." 
The new Penquin Pizza is also growing in 
popularity. 

Whatever your tastes, the 'Route' 
always had something for everyone. 




All photos this page by 
Paul Vieira 



Night Life 




UM Students Showcase Talents in. 



Campus Star Search '93 



All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 




52 ) Campus Star Search 




Al Gore 



"It is our turn, here in tlie United States, 
for change.." 



Al Gore Voices Clinton 
Policies to Students 





By Jennifer Christman 

"It is our turn, here in the United States, 
for change," said Al Gore, Democratic vice 
presidential candidate, at the University 
of Maryland on Friday, September 18. 

To an audience of 9,500 people outside 
the Lee Building, Gore addressed the 
issues of the economy, college aid and the 
environment. 

Gore outlined the college aid program 
supported by bill Clinton. 

"Under the current program, ... if your 
family is in the middle income category, 
you're not eligible for the full-range of 
student aid programs," Gore said. 

"Bill Chnton and I believe that we 
ought to create a national service trust 
and that we ought to open the doors of 
college education to every young person 
qualified to go, who wants to go." 

Students would be able to borrow 
money from the national service trust to 
finance their education. After graduation, 
student could then pay off their loan by 




working two years with their home 
communities throug the "Domestic Peace 
Corp," Gore explained. 

"Pay off your loans while building up 
this country in health care, cleaning up 
the environment, police work. That 
would be one of the greatest successes we 
ever made in America," Gore stated. 

Gore said that Clinton's policies, unlike 
those of Bush, encourage progress while 
representing the needs of the average 
people. 

"It is time for some backbone in this 
country. It is time we had some backbone 
in the White House with somebody who 
is willing to fight for the average families 
in this nation, and Bill clinton is that 
person," Gore stated. 



Photo by Ashish Bagai 




Al Gore 




"The destin]/ of our country is in the ballots. " 



Jackson Speaks of 
Elections 



By Christie Huston 

"The destiny of our country is in the 
ballots," the Reverend Jesse Jackson, a 
noted civil rights activist, told an audience 
of students and reporters on October 13. 
Jackson talked about the presidential 
debates, the country's priorities and the 
need for young people to vote. 

Jackson said he supported the Clinton- 
Gore ticket because they focused on issues 
such as putting America back to work, 
giving women the freedom to have and 
abortion, prenatal care and guaranteed 
college education. 

After seeing the performances of Gore, 
Quayle and Stockdale during the debates, 
Jackson said he thought Gore looked 
"bigger and greater" than the others. 

To demonstrate the strengths of 
Clinton and Gore and the weaknesses of 
the Bush-Quayle ticket, Jackson summa- 
rized the distinctions between the two. 
He said that the Clinton-Gore ticket 
supported cutting the military budget, 
enforcing equal rights and choices for 
women and guaranteed college education. 

Jackson also spoke of the importance of 
adolescents showing leadership by voting 
in the 1992 national elections and by 
choosing not to do drugs. He spoke out to 
young Americans when he said, "When 
you choose hope over dope, you choose to 
go forward by hope and not backward by 
fear." To African Americans he said, 
"Twenty-nine years ago, we couldn't use 
toilets, hotel rooms or water fountains, 
now we have the right to vote." 

One of the students in the audience 
asked, "Can we get out of our current 
problems?" 

According to Jackson, we are in a 
society of racial and sexist bashing and 
homophobia, yet he "believes in his heart 
and head that this can be overcome, but 
not overiught." 




56 I Jesse Jackson 



All photos this 
page by Paul 
Vieira. 





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Jesse Jackson ( 57 




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58 ) Police Protest 



Police Protest Concert and Artist in an effort to 



Break Through the Bias 




By Jennifer Christman 

On Tuesday, November 24, rap artists 
Public Enemy and Ice-T performed at 
Ritchie Coliseum. Ice -T with his group 
Body Count was originally supposed to 
open for Public Enemy, but what he did 
was succeed in opening up a large contro- 
versy. 

The Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) 
Lodge 23 organized an anti-violence rally 
outside the coliseum to coincide with the 
concert. The protest of campus police was 
in response to Ice-T's song 'Cop Killer, ' 
which was about police brutality. The 
rally showed local support for the na- 



tional boycott organized by the FOP 
against the Time Warner Company, which 
produced the song. 

About 60 people took part in the rally 
and the candlelight vigil. The names of 80 
police officers killed in the line of duty 
since 1980 were read. 

Ice-T, who signed a contract with SEE 
Productions, the sponsors of the concert, 
that he would not play the song, broke the 
contract and performed 'Cop Killer' 
anyway, with Public Enemy. 

Ice-T commented, "I'm not against all 
cops, I met a few of you good ones out 
there tonight." 




Photo by Paul Vifir.i 



Police Protest ( 59 




As the thermometer mched 
higher and higher, more and more 
UM students became restless and 
not at all concerned with the daily 
grind of going to class. 

The hotter it got the more that 
they flocked to the Mall to get their 
fair share of premium tanning time 
while the rays were at their 
strongest. Others streamed 
toji Chapel Field or Byrd 
Stadium in an effort to get a 
head start on their summer 
look. Wherever you went, 
baking bodies were found. 
Face it, every once in a while 
every one needed to TAKE a 
BREAK. 






Photo bvAshi^h H.ii;,! 




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60 ) Fuf i" th^ Sun 




I'hoto bv Ashish Baga 





All photos this page by Paul Vieira 




62 ) Miss Black Unity 



Pageant Showcases "Women of Destiny" 



Tracy Blizzard Crowned 1992 
Miss Black Unity 





All Photos this page by Paul Vieira 



By Kara Hatton 

In the continuing quest to "promote 
unity among black students and student 
groups on campus," the Nyumburu 
Cultural Center sponsored the 15th 
annual Miss Black Unity Pageant, on 
Saturday, December 5. The theme Women 
of Destiny, was a collective way to sum up 
the effect that the twelve contestants 
would eventually have on the future. 

The contestants next displayed their 
talent during the talent competition. With 
a comical rendition of a town gossip 
entitled "1 Don't Gossip," LaRonda Miller 
had the crowd out of their seats with 
laughter. Miller said she got the idea 
from her aunt. "Originally, my aunt did it 
in a pageant and I revised it . I wanted to 
do something that no one else was doing 
because 1 knew that everyone was doing 
something seriovis," said Miller. 

Dione Mebane, who won the Best 
Talent Award, tap danced her way onto 
the stage. After tearing up the stage 
Mebane exclaimed, "I'm more than just a 
performer," and she began to perform her 
interpretation of Langston Hughes' 
"Displace the Stereotypical Beliefs of 
African Americans." 

After the talent competition, the ladies 
were escorted to a sound proof room 
where they prepared for the question/ 
answer segment of the competition. Each 
contestant was asked "If chosen to serve in 
President-Elect Bill Clinton's administra- 
tion, what position would you choose and 
why?" 

To cap off the evening, Tracy Blizzard, 
the only freshman in the pageant, was 
chosen as the new Miss Black Unity. 

December 5, 1992, was a evening when 
some of the most beautiful, intelligent and 
talented African-American women on the 
Maryland campus came out to show their 
stuff, proving that they were The Women of 
Destiny. 



Miss Black Unity ( 63 




Student Improv Group Erasable Inc. 




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Top: Alan Mingo, a member of the ensemble cast of Quilt, A Musical 
Celebration, sings an ode to the fictional person on the quilt patch that he is 
holding. Above: Other member of the Quilt cast remember others who have 
died from AIDS. Right: Member of the cast of Qmlt. 



AU photos this page by CeUa Escudero-Espadas 



66 



Quilt 




Neiv Show Brings Quilt to Life 



Quilt, A Musical Celebration 




By Krista Parker 

On October 1, 1992 a new show pre- 
miered on stage at Tawes Theatre. The 
new production Quilt, A Musical Celebra- 
tion, was inspired by the NAMES Project 
AIDS Memorial Quih. It was based on 
real people and situations and was 
written by jim Morgan, Merle Hubbard 
and John Schak, with lyrics by Morgan 
and music by Michael Stockier. 

Directed by theatre professor Ronald 
O'Leary, Quilt, A Musical Celebration had a 
cast that combined professional actors 
with University students and professors 
to portray a poignant view of people 
infected with the AIDS virus, and well as 
those who were affected by friends and 
loved ones who had struggled with AIDS. 

The new production was a learning 
experience for just about everyone 
involved with it, including the audience. 
"I think that the show moved everybody," 
said cast member Christine Asero, "It (the 
show) helped a lot of people deal with 




their own individual situations and biases 
concerning the AIDS virus." 

Members of the cast were encouraged 
to go to Washington D.C. to view a 
display of the NAMES project -panels and 
to attend workshops pertaining to the 
quilt. Most cast members said that 
working on this production was an 
intense experience as well as an eye- 
opening one. 

"While working on the show the AIDS 
virus became more personal to me," said 
Asero. "I really don't know anyone with 
AIDS so it brought the virus a lot closer to 
me," she added. Asero also said, "Prior to 
working on this show I felt very removed 
now I feel like no one is completely 
unaffected." 

After opening at Tawes, the production 
moved to Baird Auditorium in Washing- 
ton D.C. before returning to Tawes. 




JT.'i^..^ -d.^'w^A. 



All photos this page by Celia Escudero-Espadas 




University Theatres' Spring Productions Bring. 



Diversity on Stage 



By Krista Parker 

The Spring Season at University 
Theatre brought a diverse program to the 
stage. Everything from British farce to a 
feminist adaptation of a largely masculine 
script was presented. 

University Theatre opened the season 
with Ma' Raiim/'s Black Bottom. This play 
with music, by August Wilson, portrayed 
the emergence of blues into 1920's 
America, as well as the emergence of the 
great Ma' Rainey. This play followed the 
career of Ma' Rainey as she struggled to 
break into the music business as well as 
keeping complete control of her own 
music. 

The season continued in the Pugliese 
Theatre wit the presentation of The 
Faustus Project, an adaptation of 



Christopher Marlowe's Dr. Faustus. 
Adapted and directed by Theatre depart- 
ment professor, Catherine Schuler, The 
Faustus Project transformed Marlowe's 
satirical view on many Renaissance beliefs 
into a satiric, if not somewhat feminist, 
look at women in the work place, abortion 
and sexual harassment. 

Schuler also had an all female cast, 
which made for some very interesting 
rehearsals. 

"One time she (Schuler) told us to act 
like we thought men would. So we (the 
cast) went wild. It was all the stereotypes 
of men that we could think of. It was 
really funny," said Tina Castaldi, who 
played the leader of the Bad Angels and 
Simpson. 

As far as working with an all female 
cast Castaldi said, "It was great! We had 
the best time." 

From racism to feminism, University 
Theatre offered great entertainment over 
the past year by tackling some of todays' 
most controversial subjects. 




Right: The Devil, played by Sarah 
MacDonald, tries to entice Faustus to 
stay with her. 



AH photos this page by Celia Escudero-Espadas 



68 jMa'Rainey/ Faustus 





Top Left: One of the Gooci Angel's, played by Christina Pedriera, tries to convince Faustus 
to stay with them. Top Right: Bad Angel Tina Castaldi and Good Ange! Lori Lentner fight 
over Faustus. Bottom Left: The band of Bad Angels watch as the Good Angels try to steal 
Faustus to their side. Bottom Right: Ma' Rainey (played by UM Alumna Chaudra 
Cameron) confronts her manager. 



All photos this page bv Ceiia Escudero-Espadas 



Ma'Rainey/Faustus ( 69 





University Theatre Brings Issues to Life with 



Ferainism and Farce 



By Christie Huston and Krista 
Parker 

The spring season at University 
Theatre ended with the hilariously funny 
British farce Noises Off. This play within a 
play, directed by theatre professor, 
Mitchell Patrick Hebert, chronicled the 
production of a play by an acting troupe 
that was big on themselves, but short on 
talent. 

There were several standout perfor- 
mances by student actors in this produc- 
tion. Jeff Binder played the drunken 
Selsdon Mowbray. The audience was 
treated to some outstanding comedy as 
they watched Selsdon try to retrieve his 
bottle of liquor that was consistently just 
out of his reach, thanks to the help of 
other cast members. 

The set of the play was as remarkable 
as the play itself. The set was built on 
wheels and was taken apart and turned 
completely around during each intermis- 
sion. This allowed the audience to get 
both a view of the action from the front as 
well as the back of the set. This situation 
did prove rough at times for the set crew 
who had to move it in less than ten 
minutes. 

Audiences however, appreciated the 
effort of both the cast and crew and as a 
whole had a great time watching Univer- 
sity Theatre's production of Michael 
Frayn's farcical Noises Off. 

University Theatre's production of Tlie 
Heidi Chronicles, written by Wendy 
Wasserstein and directed by Mary Hall 
Surface, helped to define the true meaning 
of feminism both physically and emotion- 
ally in the fall seasons' theme 'Voices of 
Diversity.' With the aid of unique props, 
lighting and costumes, the show traced 
the life of character Heidi Holland, who 
strove to sustain her independence from 




the tender age of 16 to her present age of 
40. 

The cast showcased many bright 
student actors in the character of Heidi, 
played by Michelle Burd, her best friend 
Susan, played by Colleen McCarthy; 
friend Peter Petrone, hysterically por- 
trayed by Steve Hadnagy; and Scoop the 
love of Heidi's life, played by Michael 
Naleszkiewicz. 

The two most significant men in her 
life were Scoop and Peter. Although 
Heidi loved Scoop, she felt that he was 
taking away her independence and that 
she could not love Peter in any way other 
that through friendship. 

The Heidi Chronicles was a very chal- 
lenging play to perform because the cast 
was tracing the life of the characters 
through three different decades. 

Anyone who missed University 
Theatre's production of this show truly 
missed a wonderful effort by these 
talented student actors. 



Noises Off 





All photoi this spread by Celia Escudero-Espadas 



Heidi Chronicles ( 71 





All photos this spread by Paul Vieira. 



72 ) Art Gallery 




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Kwanzaa 1992 





Kwanzaa ( 75 





AIDSWALK and AIDS Awareness Week look to create 



Bridges to Understanding 



By Jennifer Christman 

According to the National Center for 
Disease Control, Acquired Immune 
Deficiency Syndrome, is the medical 
diagnosis for a person who experiences a 
total breakdown in the immune system 
and catches the AIDS related virus. The 
virus which suppresses the immune 
svstem and leads to AIDS is HIV or the 
Human Immunal Deficiency virus. 

The statistics are frightening. The CDC 
estimated that while there were 242, 146 
reported cases of people with the HIV 
virus, there were one million total sus- 
pected carriers of the virus in the nation. 
As of September 1992, a total of 160, 372 
people who died of AIDS, the CDC 
predicted that bv the end of 1993, there 
will be approximately 390,000 to 480,000 
people diagnosed with AIDS and 285,000 
to 340,000 cumulative deaths caused by 
the virus. 

Over the last several years, AIDS has 
become an issue of national as well as 
campus concern. The week of November 
9 marked the third annual 'AIDS Aware- 
ness Week.' This years' theme was 
"Bridges to Understanding." 

Different events featuring panel 
discussions and guest speakers took place 
to raise awareness and understanding of 
the speakers took place to raise awareness 
and understanding of the virus. Hoff 
Theatre showed films that focused on 
AIDS related topics throughout the week. 
There was an on-going Food Drive and 
Blood Drive during the week as well. 
There was also an AIDS Awareness 
Benefit Concert given by folk singer Karen 
Goldberg in the Student Union. 

One special event was the AIDS Re- 
membrance Program. Holding candles, 
students marched from the Sundial on 
McKeldin Mall to the Chapel where a 
program in memory of people who died 
of AIDS was held. 



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All photos this page by Celia Escudero- 
Espadas 




76 I AIDS Awareness 







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AIDS Awareness [ 77 



Nation Divided Debates. 




By Krista Parker 

A women's right to choose. This topic was hotly debated over the past year, espe- 
cially in Maryland where on Election day, Question 6 was the hottest topic around. 

Pro-Choice activists came to Washington D.C. earlier in the year to support the Roe 
V. Wade decision with a march on the mall. People from all over the country came to 
partake in the march, celebrities included. 

Women and men alike banded together to make the statement that no one, not the 
government, the church or even the President, had the right to tell a women what to do 
with her own body. This faction met with another protest staged by the Pro-Life group 
who vehemenantly opposed the Pro-Choice beliefs. 

Pro-Choicers beUeved that regardless of the law there will always be abortions, but 
keeping them legal would ensure the safety of the women that was terminating her 
pregnancy. On the other hand Pro-Lifers argued that abortion was an easy way out for 
women that got pregnant and found it to be an inconvenience, or as a form of birth 
control. 

Regardless of the way the law is written and interpreted, the debate over abortion 
will continue to rage for years to come. 



All photos this spread by Celia Escudero-Espadas 



78 1 Abortion 




te. 












Abortion 



79 



Student's Celebrate Clinton Win as He. Was 






By Deanna Miller 

Cheers could be heard all over campus 
after the announcement of Governor Bill 
Clinton's victory over President George 
Bush on election night, November 3, 1992. 
The student body's ecstatic reaction was 
no more surprising than the election 
results. A few days earher, Clinton had 
earned 150 votes in the campus mock 
election while Bush, Perot, and Marrou 
gained, respectively, 60, 38, and one of the 
leftover votes. 

Clinton supporters said his win gave 
them a lot to look forward to. "Now I'm 
not as worried about graduating at a time 
when the jobs are scarce," said one senior. 
"1 think Clinton will make it much easier 
for us to find work." 

Bush and Perot champions, however, 
saw a different future. One sophomore 
Bush supporter commented, "1 think it's a 
bad sign when someone like Saddam 



Hussein celebrates Clinton's win. He 
wouldn't have celebrated if Bush had won 
because he knows very well that Bush 
won't let him get away with anything." 

"People keep saying that Clinton will 
give us lower health care costs and 'free' 
educations with the accumulation of 
community service hours," one freshman 
Perot supporter explained. "With the 
huge deficit and the bad economy, 
where's all the money going to come 
from? I'll tell you where: from our own 
pockets." 

Yet no niatter who they voted for, most 
students were quick to wish President- 
elect Clinton good luck - and most agreed 
that he would definitely need it. 




AH photos this page by Celia Escudero- 
Espadas 



Election 




81 



These two pages are dedicated to the new 
President and the outgoing administra- 
tion. As the country stood on the verge of 
a new era, the old administration spent its 
final days dealing with the renewed crisis 
in the Gulf caused by Saddam Hussein. 
Meanwhile, Clinton began his sojourn to 
the White House by stopping at 
Monticello, in Virginia, before making the 
final journey into Washington D.C. and to 
the White House. The United States 
hoped that Chnton could turn things 
around and with this hope things seemed 
to brighten all over the country, as a sense 
of confidence and faith exuded from 
places that before seemed dim. With this 
new feeling of hope in mind people all 
over the country came to D.C. to take part 
in the inaugural festivities which ranged 
from simple free concerts on the Mall to 
Grand Formal Inaugural balls that were 
invitation only. No matter what the 
occasion, America seemed to feel that the 
best is yet to come. 





All photos on this spread, provided by the 
Associated Press. 



82 



Election 



Top Photo: Bill Clinton and Al Gore show their strength at the Democratic National Convention. Bottom 
Photo: Clinton appeared on the Arsenio Hall show in June of 1992 and belted out his version of Heartbreak 
Hotel." This appearance helped to get him better known to the 18-32 age group. 



The U.S., Looking Toward New Leadership , Elects 



Bill Clinton Next President 






Top Left: Democratic delegates cheer to show their support to 
the Clinton/Gore ticket at the Democratic National Convention. 
Top Right: George and Barbara Bush enjoy a happier moment 
at the Republican National Convention. Left: The Quayles 
celebrate their re-nomination at the Republican National 
Convention. 



Election 




83 





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84 Sleep Out 



students Brnve the Cold Damp Night to. 



Sleep Out for the Homeless 





I 



By Robin Solomon 

If you passed the Chapel Fiel on the 
cold, drizzly evening of November 19, 
1992, you might have seen people 
huddled over steam vents or sleeping in 
cardboard boxes. Those were the Univer- 
sity of Maryland students who were 
homeless for the night. No, their dorm 
had not burned down and they were not 
kicked out of their rooms. These students 
voluntarily joined in the Sleep Out, which 
was sponsored by MaryPIRG and UMCP 
Habitat for Humanity as an event during 
Hunger and Homelessness Week. 

The event was designed to allow 



students to experience what it was like to 
be without shelter for one night. Fresh- 
man Brandi Hackett went because she 
wanted to meet the people who were 
trying to help the homeless and see what 
their group was about. The activities 
began at 7 p.m. and included speakers, 
discussions, and a candlelight vigil. \ 
All in all, the Sleep Out was a very 
positive experience and at the some time 
provided proceeds for a good cause. 
Hackett's final thoughts of the event were, 
"Though the discussion and sleeping on 
the cold hard ground, it really made you 
think and brought you a lot closer to the 
problem and introduced you to a world 
you weren't aware of. " 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



Sleep Out 85 




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DAVID LETTERMAN 



WIDE LEG PANTS 



PEARL JAM 



GRUNGE 



SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE DEMOCRATS 



HOWARD STERN 




BABY BOOMERS 



KELLY 



MALCOLM X 



RIDDICK BOWE 



ANDRE AGASSI 



CHARLES BARKLEY 



SHAQUILLE O'NEAL 



NANCY KERRIGAN 



MONICA SELES 



SPIN DOCTORS 



BRIDGET FONDA 



MARK DUFFNER 



BANKRUPTCY 



86 1 BREAKING IN 




'B'R^e^'KI'HG out 



LENO/HALL 



ROLLED CUFFS 



IN LIVING COLOR 



BEVERLY HILLS 90210 



TOM CRUISE 



BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 



BRENDA 



RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS MARTIN LUTHER 

KING JR. 

CONSERVATIVE EVANDER 

HOLYFIELD 

REPUBLICANS JOHN MCENROE 



HEAVY METAL 



THE GREASEMAN 



POTATOE 




SMOKING 



HOUSE MUSIC 



DAN QUAYLE 



DOMINO'S PIZZA 



PINK 



LA LAW 



OLD FARTS 



RTVF 



ON CAMPUS HOUSING 



BREAKING OUT ( 87 




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Breaking Through [ 89 



Breaking Records 



Edited by Jodi Douglas 




Xi 





Photo by Nick Wass 



90 ) Sports Divider 



m 




I ! ' Ni 




Jubilant songs rang out 
from the pep band. Encour- 
aging roars echoed from tlie 
enormous crowd. M-A-R-Y- 
L-A-N-D was shouted by the 
cheerleaders. The commenta- 
tor, barely overpowering the 
cheers from the gallery, an- 
nounced that Maryland just 
scored. From Byrd Stadium to Shipley 
Field to Cole Field House, this excitement 
can always be found at the University of 
Maryland sport arenas. The athletic 
events are reminiscent of the tradition, 
teamwork, and record breaking achieve- 
ments that have always been a part of 
Maryland athletics. 

Faced with increased expenses and 
reduced revenue in the last two years, the 
1991-1992 athletic teams, with their 
experience, courage, motivation, coopera- 
tion, and hard work came together to 
triumph over the many challenges that 
faced them. 

Competing in one of the strongest and 
most competitive intercollegiate confer- 
ences in the nation, each athletic team set 
goals, aimed high, and achieved their 
potential. 

Maryland was led by the women's 
lacrosse team who ended their successful 
season with the title, "The 1992 NCAA 
Champions!" The women's basketball 
team was also a source of strength making 
it to the national championship 
quarterfinals. 

The following pages will take you to 
the highlights of the 1991-1992 seasons, 
including the men's basketball team's 
ciefeat over the tenth ranked University of 
North Carolina. 

Each page signifies Maryland athletes 
working together in a gallant effort to 
break records, to better their previous 
records, and to be the best that they can 
be. Each page takes us back to the victo- 
ries, the happy times, the successes, and 
yes, even the defeats. 

But as you turn the pages, the amount 
of successes and defeats will become 
insignificant, because you will see that 
Maryland athletics achieved the greatest 
success of all. ..the success of an unde- 
feated spirit! 





"To accom- 
plish great 
things, we 
must not only 
act, but also 
dream, not 
only plan, but 
also believe!" 

-"JR" 

Devoted 
Terp Fan. 





Sports Divider 



91 




Pholo by Nick Wass 



Top Left- Freshman Kesha Camper shoots over the top 
of two defenders. Top Right- Swimmer Trent McNichol 
swims hard for the finish Une. Above- Diver Cara 
Woodman concentrates in preparation for her back 
dive. 



J- 



M 



l'h,.l..h\ \Kk \\,i 



92 I Winter Sports 




Top-Jdmes Brdco moves in tor the kill. Above- Terp gymnast Nicole Lefcourt 
shows her strength on the balance beam. Right- Kevin McClinton goes up strong 
to the hoop against two Georgia Tech defenders. 



Photo bv Nick VVass 



Winter Sports ( 93 



Women's 

basketball 

Results 



History in the Making 



MD. 


OPP. 


101 


Howard 


43 


74 


Richmond 


56 


107 


Towson Statt 


51 


100 


Loyola 


53 


85 


Penn State 


58 


99 


Coppin State 


45 


77 


Temple 


59 


90 


Old Dominion 


58 


84 


St. Josephs 


59 


60 


Auburn 


69 


78 


Rutgers 


72 


79 


Florida State 


64 


73 


Wake Forest 


47 


67 


Virginia 


65 


72 


North Carolinr 


68 


63 


Clemson 


59 


80 


Duke 


54 


75 


Georgia Tech 


54 



99 N.C. State 90 

101 Florida State 70 

92 North Carolina 78 

74 Virginia 75 

55 Clemson 72 

71 Georgia Tech 63 

74 Duke 69 

83 N.C. State 86 

66 Wake Forest 47 

67 Georgia Tech 68 
73 Toledo 60 
64 Purdue 58 

70 Western Kentucky 75 




Front Row- Snellen Vickers, Manager; Karon Ferguson, Mary Barnes, Estelle Christy, Katrina Colleton, Malissa Boles, 
Monica Bennett, Limor Mizrachi, and Alisa Scott, Assistant Coach. Back Row- Sandy Worth, Head Trainer; Theresa 
Gernatt, Assistant Coach; Dafne Lee, Michele Andrew, Bonnie Rimkus, Jessie Hicks, Monica Adams, Sue Panek, Kesha 
Camper, Boe Pearman, Assistant Coach; Chris Weller, Head Coach. 
Top- The Maryland Bench erupts as the Terps score some well needed baskets. 



94 



Women's Basketball 




Photo by Haul Hbin Lee 



Lady Tarps Eraak NCAA 
A-t-tendance Record 

By Kara Schmidt 

As the Maryland Women's Basketball team opened up their 1991-1992 season, they 
found themselves nationally ranked number fifteen in most of the preseason polls. But, 
as always the case with Head Coach Chris Weller, being content with the status quo 
just isn't acceptable. So, the Lady Terps set out on a season that, as it turns out, they 
will never forget. It was the journey to the most coveted position in Division I NCAA 
athletics— being Number One. 

The season began without a real challenge as the Lady Terps posted victories over 
Howard, Richmond, Towson State, and Loyola. Maryland scored 100-plus points in 
three of the first four games. The first test came in State College, Pennsylvania. The 
Terps were to face the Lady Lions of Penn State, ranked seventh nationally. With upset 
on their minds, Maryland came away with a convincing 85-58 victory. By no means 
did the winning stop there. The Terps continued on to victory in sixteen of their next 
seventeen games, being upset only by Auburn in the Hilton Head Shootout in Hilton 
Head, South Carolina. 

Part of this winning span included the match-up of ACC rivals Virginia and Mary- 
land in Charlottesville. With the Terps ranked third nationally and the Cavaliers 
ranked number one, Marylands' Terps went south to face the cocky Cavaliers. In this 
season of challenges, the fierce rivalry with UVA was the greatest one the Terps faced. 
In dramatic fashion, with time running down. Coach Weller's squad came through and 
the scoreboard in Charlottesville lit up with the score: Maryland 67, Virginia 65. The 
following Monday, the Lady Terps of the University of Maryland found themselves at 
the top of the Associated Press NCAA Division I Poll. Number One at last. 

The Terps lost only five more times the remainder of the season, including a heart- 
breaking loss to UVA at Cole Field House. Successive victories in the NCAA Tourna- 
ment against Toledo and Purdue landed Maryland in the Final "Elite" Eight in the 
country. The Terps season ended in a 75-70 loss to a young Western Kentucky team. 

The season, however was a great success. The Terps set a Women's Basketball 
Attendance record by selling out Cole Field House to over 14,500 fans against UVA, 
and they held the number one spot in the country for over a month. The motto for the 
Maryland Women's Basketball Team was "Make it Happen"- and that is exactly what 
they did. 





Top Left- Head Coach Chris Weller tries to get her 
team focused against Toledo in the First Round of 
the NCAA Tournament. Left- Junior AU-American 
Candidate, Jessie Hicks fights the Duke defender for 
the rebound. 



Women's Basketball 



95 



Reaching Hew Haighte 




Photo by Nick Was: 




96 I Women s Basketball 



Top Left- Bonnie Rimkus steals the ball away from a North Carolina player. 
Top Right-Malissa Boles skies over the other players and shoots for two. 
Above- Jesse Hicks fights two Coppin State players for the rebound. 





By Kara Schmidt 

Originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Malissa Boles attended Sullivan Junior 
College in Lexington, Kentucky and earned her Associate's Degree in Business while 
aringing women's basketball to new heights. Malissa was a first team Kodak All- 
American selection as a sophomore and led Sullivan to a 28-4 record in 1990, averag- 
ing 23.5 points, eight rebounds and three assists per game on the way. Boles was also 
3 first team all-Conference selection, first team All-N.J.C.A.A. Ail-American, Confer- 
ence Co-MVP and finished as Sullivan's all-time leading scorer with a total of 1,153 
joints. 

The Terps' newest forward emerged in the '91 -'92 season as one of the key perform- 
ers. Boles averaged 13.6 points and 3.9 rebounds per game. In addition, her physical 
3lay, although not measured in numbers, was an important contribution to the Lady 
Terps' success. Boles finished the season as the team's second leading scorer with 421 
:otal points and 120 rebounds. 

The most notable accomplishment of the '91 -'92 Women's Basketball Team was 
:heir four week stronghold of the number one ranking. Boles said that this was a very 
special time for the team and for Maryland. She said that it didn't really hit her until 
:he second week, when the media started showing up in vast numbers and the team 
was gaining notoriety at a lightening pace. 

One of Boles' most educational and exciting experiences this far occurred last 
summer as Malissa and teammate Katrina Colleton were invited to travel to Colorado 
springs, Colorado and participate in the 1992 U.S. Olympic Trials. Although not 
selected. Boles and Colleton did play for the developmental team which played eight 
^ames in Taiwan throughout the summer months. 

Boles stressed that the rich tradition of the Maryland basketball program was one 
3f the main reasons she decided to play her final two seasons of eligibility for the 
Ferps. 



1 op Lett-Cuard, Limor Mizrachi looks for the open player under the 
basket against N.C. State. Top Right- Katrina Colleton gets the steal 
then looks for the outlet pass. Above-Guard Eslelle Christy goes for 
the lay-up. 



Ail photos this page by Tyrone Broolcs 



Women's Basltetbail 



97 




Photo by Nick Wass 



Above-Terp Dafne Lee goes strong to the basket against Florida State. Top Righl-Limor 
Mizrachi, Terp Guard, skies above the rest of the players and heads towards the basket in the 
game against N.C. State. Right-Terp Forward, Michele Andrew shoots over the Loyola 
defender and scores two points. 




Photo bv Nick Wass 




98 I Women's Basketball 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




DOWN 




Queene of the Court 



Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 

Top Left- Jesse Hicks fights for the rebound. Top Right-The Terps bench 
cheers on the team against N.C. State. Above- Malissa Boles takes a free 
throw. Right-Head Coach Chris Weller fires up the crowd at a pep rally 
before the Terps game against UVA. 



Women's Basketball ( 99 




Basketball Results 

MD OPP. 

83 Mt. St. Marys 53 
115 MD. Eastern Shore 60 



93 


American 


68 


76 


Providence 


66 


101 


West Virginia 


91 


79 


Louisville 


96 


83 


Towson State 


76 


83 


Rider College 


69 


79 


Rutgers 


95 


64 


Evansville 


75 


67 


Georgia Tech 


92 


66 


Duke 


83 


88 


N.C. State 


94 


76 


North Carolina 


96 


83 


Florida State 


91 


76 


Wake Forest 


86 


84 


Clemson 


71 


75 


Virginia 


82 


93 


Florida State 


85 


65 


Georgia Tech 


67 


77 


N.C. State 


74 


89 


Duke 


91 


70 


Clemson 


82 


84 


UNC Greensboro 


55 


82 


North Carolina 


80 


77 


Wake Forest 


66 


74 


Virginia 


76 


81 


Clemson 


75 


First 


Round ACC Tournament 



87 Duke 94 

Second Round ACC Tournament 




On Tha Move 

Terp Hoopsters Reach for New Heights 

By Jodi Douglas 

The '91 -'92 Men's Basketball team began their season with strength, winning their first five 
games. With talent and teamwork, the Terps bound together and each player contributed their 
best to achieve a 14-15 season record. 

The Terps hoped for a winning record, but the competition was tough and being placed 
under NCAA sanction, which restricted television coverage, made recruiting difficult. 

Under coach Garv Williams who has completed three years at Maryland, the Terps worked 
hard, displayed commitment and reached many of their team goals. An obvious strength for 
the Terps was their scoring ability. Maryland's final season scoring average of 81.0 points per 
game was the seventh best season average in school history. 

The Terps had upset wins over North Carolina State and the University of North CaroUna, 
which was played in Cole Field House. The UNC game was the high point of the season for 
most of the team, and the fans. Before a crowed of 13,224, Senior Walt Williams tipped the ball 
in with 1.3 seconds remaining in the game to give the Terps an 82-80 victory over then Num- 
ber 10 North Carolina. After the game, ecstatic Terp fans rushed onto the court in celebration 
with arms raised to high five the players. 

Walt Williams, was the star' for the Terps. Throughout the season, he achieved a 26,8 point 
per game average, while junior Kevin McClinton made it to the Maryland Top 10 assists list for 
a single season and career totals with a team high 154 assists this season alone. Evers Burns 
also contributed much to the team, averaging 15.9 points and 7.1 rebounds per game last 
season. These stats earned him the title of Most Improved Player in the ACC. 

The Terps said good-by to seniors Walt Williams, Matt 'Cougar' Downing, defensive wizard 
■Vince Broadnax, and Garfield Smith, but with the outstanding class of incoming freshman, 
Terp fans far and near were looking forward to once again returning to their winning way and 
to the NCAA Tournament. 



Artwork hv Matilde Olt 



100 Mens Basketball 








Front Row (L-R): Todd Davis, manager, Chris Kerwin, Evers Burns, John Walsh, Vince Broadnax, Walt Williams, Kurtis Shiiltz, Garfield Smith, Geno Soto, Alan 
Rainge, Matt Morin, manager. Back Row (L-R): Art Perry, assistant coach, Jim Patsos, assistant coach. Bill Savior, trainer, Joe Wootten, Mike Thibeault, Frank 
Horton, Kevin McClinton, Wayne Bristol, Matt Downing, Billy Hahn, assistant coach, Peter Sauer, administrative assistant, Gary Williams, head coach, Corey Gavitt, 
assistant coach. 

Top Left: Evers Burns slams the ball through the hoop to finish off a fast break. Top Right: Point Guard, Kevin McClinton brings the ball up the court and sets up 
the play, all the while looking for an opening for an easy two. Opposite Page: Freshman Wayne Bristol fights the Wake Forest defender in an attempt to grab the 
rebound. 



Mens Basketball 101 



Bottom Left: Senior, Vince Broadnax concentrates on shooting foul shots. 
Bottom Right: Kevin McClinton defends the shot from the American 
player. 





photo bv Ashish Ba^ai 



Photo bv Huai Hsin Lee 



Maryl-gnd'6 Wizard GraduaX.ee to King^ 

Wfl/f Williams Bids Farewell to University of Maryland 

By Jodi Douglas 

Loyalty, talent and dedication were few of the many words that were often used to describe the University 
of Maryland's resident Wizard, Walt Williams, the 6'8" guard from Temple Hills, Maryland who held a special 
place in the hearts of all true Maryland Basketball fans. His amazing athletic skills and unselfish playing style 
made him one of the most versatile players in the history of Maryland basketball and quite possibly the nation. 

Williams played at Maryland for all four years of his college eligibihty, and in that time broke many records 
while achieving national notoriety. Williams earned the admiration of many fans along the way. With NCAA 
sanctions placed on the Terps after his sophomore season at Maryland, Willianis faced the option of foregoing 
his final two years of eligibility to turn pro or to transfer to another school. Luckily for Terp fans, Williams 
remained loyal to Maryland and stayed on for his final two years. 

In his final season at Maryland, Williams set the school record for points in a season with 776 and for 
scoring average with 26.8 per game. He had the nations best in games of scoring 30 or more points with seven 
and his 19 game, 20 points or better was also the nations longest. Williams was the leading scorer for the Terps 
in 26 of the 29 games and finished his career as the sixth highest scorer in school history with 1,704 points. He 
achieved national recognition as well. He was a first team Ail-American by Scripps-Howard News Service, 
Los Angeles Athletic Club, and Basketball Times , and second d team selection of the Associated Press. 

At the University of Maryland, Williams led in steals with 175, was fourth with 410 assists, and seventh with 
81 blocked shots. In 1991, he was selected to represent the United States as a member of the U.S.A. National 
Team that competed in the Pan American games. 

Williams once again excited fans as he was selected in the 1992 NBA Draft. To no Terp fan's surprise 
Williams was the 7th pick overall by the Sacramento Kings. Now Williams, is enjoying a great rookie season 
and has taken the NBA by storm. 



102 1 Mens Basketball 



N?^« 




Top Right: Senior.guard, Waif Williams amazes the crowd with a reverse slam dunk 
against Georgia Tech. Top Left: Junior, Chris Kerwin takes the outside jumper in a game 
against Wake Forest. Bottom: Mike Thibeault, Chris Kerwin, and Garfield Smith show off 
their new hair styles at Midnight Madness. 



Mens Basketball ( 103 



Swim Team Membere Make National Splash 

By Jodi Douglas 

Under third year head coach Steve Mahaney, the Terrapin swim team completed a 1991-1992 
season filled with highlights to be remembered. The men's team finished with a winning record of 
9-4 and the women ended the season with a 5-8 record. The biggest victory for the men was an 
exciting win over Atlantic Coast Conference opponent Clemson, who Maryland had not beaten in 
18 years. The men also won big over LaSalle and Villanova. The women showed their strength 
over Navy, handing them their only loss of the season. 

Both the men's and women's teams finished sixth at the ACC Championship meet. For the past 
few years, Maryland has maintained a fifth place finish but this year were pushed back by ACC 
newcomer, Florida State. Following the ACC meet, the women's team went on to place 27th at the 
NCAA Championships, where they were represented by diver April Tassi. Tassi was a three time 
NCAA All-American in the one and three meter board diving events and also in the ten meter tower 
event. 

Superior season performances were turned in by many swimmers marked by exceptional indi- 
vidual victories and points and placement at the ACC Championships. Junior Trent McNicol was a 
hero for the men's team. Hailing from Ontario, Canada, the talented McNicol finished in the top 
eight at ACC's in the 200 Individual Medley, the 200 yard freestyle, and the 200 yard butterfly. On a 
national level, McNicol was ranked 30th in the 200 yard butterfly at the conclusion of the season. 

Sophomore Geoff Wilcox was the star sprinter for the Terps throughout the year. He placed in 
the top eight at ACC's in the 50 and 100 yard freestyle events, anci was a record breaker in both 
events. Nationally, Wilcox's best time put him 26th in the 50 yard freestyle. 

Also achieving national notice were the teams' top breaststrokers. Senior Dori Miller finished the 
season with the 34th fastest time in the 100 yard breaststroke and sophomore Scott Elliot earned 
27th in the same event on the men's side. 

For the women's team, recognition was also earned outside of the pool. The women were named 
an All- Academic team for the third straight year with a team GPA of 3.1 . 




Front Row (L-R): Vince Carmosino, Scott Madill, Dori Miller, April Tassi, Kellv D'Agostino, Lara Woodman, Ed Teter, and 
Mike Walter. Second Row: Vicky Brennan, Kori Wyngaard, Stefanie Fichthorn, Anne Winterkorn, Christina Burch, Tara 
Brickley, Terri Messesnger, and Mary Ellen Wydan, assistant coach. Middle Row: Julie Brandt, Anna Malakates, Nikke 
Braendlin, Jodi Douglas, Wol Hee Gibb, Maribeth Schorn, Jim Wenhold, assistant coach, Steve Mahanev, head coach. Fourth 
Row: Jonas Seeburg, Mike Goodison, Trent McNicol, Mark Dereska, Rob Fox, Yoshida, Mike Burchill. Fifth Row: Todd 
Washburn, Frank O'Toole, Rolf Stottmann, Ron Wadel, Jeff Griesbauer, Mark Matuszak. Back Row:Kevin King, Rob 
VanGraafeiland, Scott Elliott, Bill Schwacke, Mike Noonan, Chris Benedick and Geoff Wilcox. 




Artwork bv Matilde Ott. 



Swimming/Diving I 105 




Wrestling 
Record 



MD OPP. 


9 


Lock Haven 25 


23 


MiUersville 11 


18 


Rider 15 


16 


George Mason 16 


16 


Oklahoma 17 


29 


Liberty H 


30 


Old Dominion 7 


13 


Minnesota 25 


20 


Syracuse 19 





Penn State 45 


49 


Coppin State 


47 


American 3 


6 


N.C. State 33 


13 


Navy 22 


33 


Duke 6 


11 


North Carolina 23 


25 


Clemson 1 1 


39 


Howard 3 


20 


Virginia 17 


41 


James Madison 5 


ACC Tournament- 4th 




Place Team Finish 


47.5 


North Carolina 79.75 




N.C. State 72.50 




Clemson 55.0 




Virginia 29.5 




Duke 17.5 


NCAA Championships 




21st Place 




MD. 14.5 points 

. - ! 




Artwork by Matilde Ott. 



Taking Down The Competition 

Three Terp Wrestlers Make NCAA Appearance 




Photo bv Huai Hsin Lee 



106 



Wrestling 



By Jodi Douglas 

The Maryland Wrestling Team took down their competition and earned an overall winning 
season record of 12-7-1 and a 3-2 record in the Atlantic Coast Conference for the 1991-92 year. The 
Terps crushed many of their opponents such as American, Duke, Clemson, and James Madison and 
had exciting but narrow victories over Syracuse, Oklahoma, and Virginia. 

At the ACC Tournament at North Carolina State University, the Terps wrapped up a fourth place 
beating both Virginia and Duke. 

Quite a few Terp wrestlers had successful seasons as well. They included junior, Keith Burgess 
who ended his season with a record of 20-8-0 in the 134-pound weight class; freshman, Jim Brasco 
who had an extremely successful rookie season finishing with an 18-12-1 record in the 167-pound 
weight class. 

Other successful seasons were turned in by junior, Kevin Brown who wrestled at 190 pounds and 
ended the season 17-9-3 and junior. Bill Ferencz who finished with a record of 19-13-4. 

Terp wrestlers Tom Miller, Dave Land, and Steve Woods turned in exceptional performances en 
route to qualifying for the NCAA Tournament, which was held in Oklahoma City. Senior co- 
captain Miller, ended the season with an individual record of 27-3-2 and defended his ACC title in 
what many consider the toughest weight class. Miller capped off his collegiate career by taking a 
third place at the NCAA Tournament. 

Sophomore, Land, who wrestled at 118 pounds, garnered a record of 22-8-2 and placed third in 
the ACC Tournament and eighth at the NCAA's. Meanwhile, Woods, a junior, finished at 12-10-2 in 
the 115 weight class and qualified for NCAA's for the first time in his college career. At the ACC 
Tournament, he finished with only one loss. 

The Terps achieved a 21st place finish at the NCAA Tournament, improving from the previous 
year's 58th place finish. Both Miller and Land earned All-American honors at the NCAA Champi- 
onship. 

With experience and youth on their side, the Terp wrestlers look forward to next year and 
improving on an already great record. 




Wrestling 



107 



Gymnastics 
Record 



183,60 North Carolina IMS? 



178.80 William & Marv 18O05 



183.15 Pennsylvania 180.25 

Bndgeport 180.15 

William & Marv 179.40 

Yale ■ 179.30 

Indiana (PA) 175.35 

George Washington 187.45 

Temple 183.75 




108 ) Gymnastics 



From Back: Kristen kunn, Ginger Collins, Betty Cortequera, Diane Wilpe, Sarah Kriniin;., Kara Ivlaus, Bonnie Bernstein and 
Nicole Lefcourt. 



Small ^ut Mighty 

Gymnasts Celebrate Winning Season 




^c\ 




Photo bv Nick Wass 




By Jodi Douglas 

The Maryland Gymnastics team may 
have been a small nine member team, but 
achieving a 1992 winning season record of 
10-9 proved that mighty v^^as their middle 
name. 

With only seven athletes returning 
from last year, the team welcomed 
freshmen Kristin Konn and Ginger 
Collins. Konn earned the season high 
score on the balance beam while Collins 
showed strength on the floor routine. 

The seniors were Bonnie Bernstein, 
who competed on the vault, the beam and 
the floor, and Diane Volpe and Betty 
Corteguera who were all-around com- 
petitors. 

Corteguera had a very successful 
season leading the team in overall perfor- 
mances and scores. On the uneven 
parallel bars, Corteguera won first place 
at five of the seven meets that she com- 
peted in. She also achieved the top 
individual season high scores in the all- 
around competition. Volpe was the 
teams' top scorer on the vault and sopho- 
more Nicole Lefcourt was the teams' high 
scorer on the beam and the floor routine. 

The team dominated teams such as 
Pennsylvania, Willliam and Mary, Yale, 
Temple and Navy. Against ACC rival 
North Carolina, the Terps came close but 
fell by only one point. 

At the ACC Invitations at N.C. State, 
the Terps finished fifth, facing two of 
regions top teams. Corteguera earned 
first place on the uneven bars. 

The Terps completed a season of hard 
work and dedication on an upswing, and 
are looking forward to an even better 
season next year. 



\ 



/ 




X 



k 



Ph,.l,.|n \nk \\,i- 

Top: Jennifer Lorian competes in the Floor Exercise 
against George Washington University. Right: Bonnie 
Bernstein concentrates on her beam exercise. Above: 
Nicole Lefcourt shows her strength on the balance 
beam. 



Gymnastics 



^mp 




PhoLu by 1 iudi Hbin Lee 

(top right) Senior, Jon Schoenweitz works away from 
a C.W Post defender, (top) Senior, John Rayne 
pitched a no-hitter against UVA. (right) Junior, Betsv 
Elder scores one of her six goals against Penn State. 



110 ) Spring Sports 



Photo bv: Nick Wass 




Photo by: Huai Hsin Lee 





(top)Members of the Terrapin 
Baseball team pull the tarp on the 
field before it started to rain after 
beating JMU 6-5 in the tenth 
inning, (left) Sophomore Julie 
Cady shows her strength on the 
court. Terps men's Lacrosse team 
head for the goal. 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



Spring Sports (111 




Photo by: Paul Vieira 



A Solid Gold Victory 

Women 's Lacrosse Seize the 1992 NCAA 
Division I Championships 

By Kara Schmidt 

It is the dream of every athlete in team sports to win "the big one". 
Whether it is the Superbowl, the World Series, or a collegiate Na- 
tional Championship, everyday, sights are set on attaining the 
ultimate goal. The 1992 University of Maryland Women's Lacrosse 
team set out on the journey of their upcoming season with high 
expectations, and hopes of winning the coveted National Champion- 
ship. After having lost three Ail-Americans to graduation, what 
seemed as if it could be a tough struggle turned into a virtual cake- 
walk. Fourteen victories and only one loss later, a new National 
Champion had been crowned. . . and she was a Maryland Terrapin. 

During the regular season, only four of Maryland's 12 victories 
were decide by three goals of less. Powerful domination was the key 
to success for the Terps as they posted convincing victories over 
opponents such as James Madison University (13-3), the University of 
Richmond (17-0), and the University of Pennsylvania (17-6). But the 
Terps, like any quality team, proved they could prevail in the close 
contests as well. Maryland edged rival Virginia 5-4 and clipped the 
Lady Lions of Penn State 9-6. 

As the season commenced, the Terps were looking for strong 
performances from many returning players and hoping for some of 
the new players to show their talents. Tri-captains Leigh Frendberg 
(home), Kerstin Manning (cover point), and Kim Terhorst 
(midfielder)_, in addition to All-American Chris Macko (defensive 
wing), goalie Mandy Stevenson and freshman attackman/midfielder 
Laura Harmon all contributed banner years. 

Individual contributions all added up to team victory for the '92 
Terps. Harmon's 42 goals and .477 shooting percentage, Frendberg's 
31 goals and .356 pet. and Jennifer Fink's 43 ground balls only begin 
to tell their story of success. Stevenson was again strong at goalie, 
allowing only 74 goals while saving 110 shots, for a .598 pet. 

May 16, 1992 brought the semifinals of the NCAA Tournament 
and the chance to play for the National Tittle. An 8-7 victory over 
Virginia brought the dream one step closer to being a reality. After a 
hard-fought overtime victory over Harvard University the dream 
was now a reality. The 1992 Maryland Women's Lacrosse Team were 
the champions of the Division 1 Collegiate Lacrosse World. Their rise 
to the top was complete, they were there. And, as the team tri- 
captians' held their National Championship Trophy to the sky, you 
could not help but notice those beautiful Terrapin smiles! 





112 I Women's Lacrosse 



(top) Junior, Kerstin Manning defends a 
Westchester opponent, (above) Maurenn Scott and 
Jennifer Fink celebrate the championship. 




fii-:'%^ ^ 







•vi-,'|U4'^ /f 




<'.,r 



f.,.^ **''*'*i»'A ii 



1992 Women's Lacrosse Team: Back Row- Cailen Mullins, Jen Budka, Pam Althoff, Krissy Edell, Susan Cartier, 
Kerstin Manning, Laura Harmon, Hillary Kukor, Liz Perlstein and Mandy Sevenson. Middle Row- Chris 
Macko, Lori Stone, Erin Delaney, Jennifer Fink, Kim Terhorst, Amy Zink, Ann Krumbiegel, Marueen Scott, 
Patty Parichy. Front Row- Tami Goss, Nadine Holder, Lisa Gates, Betsy Elder, Theresa Ingram, and Leigh 
Frendberg. 



Women's 

Lacrosse 

Results 



ME 


> OPP. 


12 


Delavare 5 


5 


Virginia 4 


13 


James Madison 3 


13 


Old Dominion 2 


9 


Temple 1 


15 


Towson State 4 


5 


Harvard 7 


15 


Vermont 4 


17 


Richmond 


9 


William & Mary 6 


17 


Pennsylvania 6 


13 


Loyola 12 


9 


Penn State 6 


8 


Virginia 7 
NCAA Semifinals 


11 


Harvard 10 
NCAA Finals 



top right Head Coach Cindy Timchal lays out the 
game plan. 



Women's Lacrosse ( 113 



Look Out for #1 





Photo by Nick Wass 



{above right) Memberrs of the Lacrosse Team prepare to do battle against Perm 
State, (above) Laura Harmon fights off and ODU player, (right) Head coach 
Cindy Timchal and captain Leigh Frendbergh celebrate the victory over UVA. 



114 ) Women's Lacrosse 



l^hutu h\- Tyrone Brooks 




Photo bv Nick Wass 




(top right) Jen Fink concentrates on catching the ball 
in the game against Penn State, (above) Chris Macko 
takes off towards the goal against UCSB. (right) 
Maureen Scott prepares for the game agains Penn 
State. 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



Women's Lacrosse ( 115 



On a Mission 

These Guys Have a License to Kill 

by Jodi Douglas 

"All out for glory" seemed to describe the 1992 Maryland Men's Lacrosse team who strongly believed in putting 110% effort into 
every game and as a result, finished with an impressive 9-4 record. 

With 11 seniors, seven juniors, 11 sophomores, and seven freshman, the Men's Lacrosse team proved to be the most talented 
lacrosse team in Maryland history. The Terps were led by tri-captains Brian Burlace, an outstanding defensive player who was 
elected captain for his second consecutive year, Dave Willard, one of the most versatile midfielders to play for the Terps, and Craig 
Bullen, and offensive player with one of the hardest shots on the team. 

Head coach Dick Edell returned for his ninth consecutive season and was selected as the Atlantic coast Conference "Coach of the 

Year. " 

Also returning to the lacrosse team were all-star players Steve Kavovit, Danny Robbins, and Andy Claxton, as well as virtually 

the entire group of 1991 midfield players. 

Among the player not returning to the men's lacrosse team was the pair of All-American attackmen, Mark Douglas and Rob 
Wurzburger, who in 1991, accounted for 128 of the team's total 283 points. With the loss of these two talents, offensive production 
was a large concern at the start of the season. This concern quickly proved to be inconsequential as many players stepped up into 
the spotlight at many different games. With the capability there, the loss Douglas and Wurzburger opened up opportunities to the 
men behind the scenes. According to Junior, Scott McMahon, having many different stars as opposed to the same two stars every 
game, was a boos to the player's self-confidence and to the overall team morale, closing the gap of the offense made the 1992 Mary- 
land Lacrosse team one of deep versatility. 

With such and adaptable and talented team, the dual mission of the men's Lacrosse team was to win both the ACC and NCAA 
tournaments. Disappointingly, the Terps fell short of accomplishing this mission by only one point in both competitions. In the 
ACC tournament, hosted by Maryland, the Terps defeated the Duke Blue Devils 8-6 advancing to the final round in which they lost 
to North Carolina 11-10. The NCAA tournament painted a similar picture. The Terps, with a five point deficit after the first half, 
came back with a six goal third quarter to beat the Blue Devils 13-11. Advancing to the quarterfinals match, Maryland was defeated 
11-10 by Princeton. 

A phrase often heard by the lacrosse players from Coach Edell, was, "We can beat anyone on a given day, but we can lose to 
anyone on a given day." Despite these two upsetting defeats, the lacrosse players understand this and are happy knowing that they 
gave more than a 100% effort. 

Many accomplishments contributed to the success of the Maryland Terrapins' 1992 season. Senior Chris Dail led the Terps in 
points with 25 goals, followed by junior Dan Reading who had 18 goals. Rob Chomo led with 24 assists and also contributed 16 
goals. Senior goalie Steve Kavovit completed his season with 175 saves. Andy Claxton led the league in ground balls and faceoffs 
and was named to the All-ACC team. 

The 1992 season was one of overall success. The team represented on of camaraderie, support, respect, teamwork, and closeness. 
"We were really tight as a team, " said junior midfielder Eric Elfstrum, "This closeness and respect for one another made it easier to 
play on the field." 




116 I Men's Lacrosse 



Sophomore Sean Craw for 
and senior Dave Willard 
congratulate each other for -a.^ 

a great play. ^ 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




Photo by Huai Hsin Lee 



(top)Senior, Chris Dail goes for the goal at the first round of the 
NCAA Tounament against Duke, (above) Senior Andy Claxton 
looks for someone to pass the ball to (left) Craig Bullen fights off 
the UVA defender to make the shot on goal. 



Men's Lacrosse f 117 




Photo bv Nick Wass 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




'''^SSS 



Photo by Nick Wass 

(top left)Bob Huggins out maneuvers this TSU player, (top 
right) junior Erik Elfstrum heads towards the goal (above) Head 
Coach Dick Edell yells instructions to his team (right) Freshman 
Greg Nelin reflects on a recent loss. 




riioU.bv Nick Wass 



118 I Men's Lacrosse 




fm\ ^ 



Photo bv Nick Wass 



Lacrosse 
Results 



MD 



OFF. 



14 Franklin & 5 
Marshall 

14 Duke 13 

18 Adelphi 8 

9 Towson 13 
State 

9 C.W. Post 5 

13 North 15 
Carolina 

12 Virginia 11 



Navy 



11 



13 Johns 9 

Hopkins 

8 Duke 6 

10 North 11 

Carolina 
ACC Semi-Finals 

20 UMBC 7 

13 Duke 10 
NCAA First Round 

10 North 11 

Carohna 



(top) Senior Blake Wynof tries to elude a Towson State Player (left) 
Senior goalie Steve Kavovit saves a Franklin & Marshall shot on goal 
(above)junior Dan Reading looks to pass against Duke. 



^- 



Photo bv Huai Hsin Lee 



Men's Lacrosse 



119 



Men'sTennis 
Results 



MD 



OPP. 



6 Old Dominion 3 
9 Mt. Saint Mary's 
9 James Madison 
9 Howard 

4 Richmond 5 

2 Georgia Tech 7 
9 Evansville 

1 Clemson 
8 American 

N.C. State 

5 Towson State 1 

7 GW 1 
Duke 6 

3 Wake Forest 6 

6 Georgetown 
6 Loyola 

2 Florida State 5 

3 Virginia 6 

4 Navy 5 

North Carolina 3 

1 N.C. State 5 



Moving In The Ri^ht Direction 




Team Photo: Back Row-Assistant Coach Kevin 
Lindlev, Dannv Cantwell Jaime Ashworth, Juan 
Coto, Marco Turra , Head Coach Jim Laitta. 
Front Row-Gardner Duvalsaint, Greg O'Conner, 
Jeremy Loomis, Anton, and Mike Wagner. 

Top Left-Senior Danny Cantwell shoots the 
return o\'er the net. Cantwell was the top 
performer for the Terps this past season. 
Top Right-Greg O'Conner prepares himself to 
return the shot. O'Conner spent the season as 
the Terps second seed, and finished with a 
record of 12-8. 



Men's Tennis 



Tennis Teams See Year of Improvement 

By Jodi Douglas ' 

The men's tennis team wrapped up a successful 1992 winning season with an overall 
record of 11-10. The season started out with a bang as the spirited Terps enjoyed victo- 
ries in their first four matches. The Terps celebrated another four game winning streak 
later in the season beating teams such as American and George Washington. 

Throughout the year, the team was led by the strong individual performances of 
several players. Senior top seed Danny Cantwell, dominated the court in most of the 
matches and overall compiled a fantastic record of 13-4. 

Second seed Greg O'Connor was another Terp player who took center stage in several 
performances. The talented senior concluded the season with an outstanding 12 wins 
and only 8 losses. Greg O'Connor also paired with junior teammate Jeremy Loomis in 
doubles competition and the dynamic duo consistently displayed amazing strength 
against their tough opponents. Their final record was a whopping 11 and 2. 

Against all the competition throughout the year, the most difficult confrontations of 
the season proved to be the Atlantic Coast Conference teams. The Terps managed to 
squeeze out only a single victory over North Carolina State, the team which they lost to 
in the ACC Championship at Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Looking toward next season, the loss of seniors who make up half of this years roster 
will cause a large void that will have to be filled. The Terps will continue to work hard, 
of course, but whether the Terps can fill this \'oid and achieve a second consecutive 
winning season is yet to be determined. 



Terpe Show Strong Desire 

By Jodi Douglas 

With talent, dedication and high hopes, the 
Maryland women's tennis team welcomed the 1992 
season. Faced with challenging competition, the 
Terps bound together in a year of hard work and 
high spirit and managed to double their record 
from 1991. New to the team and replacing lost 
seniors from last year's line were, freshmen Lisa 
Rosenburg, who was second seed and won six 
matches, Aleli Clemente, and Robin Spiegel. 

Although the Terps did not have a winning 
record, they enjoyed many victories over teams 
including Loyola, Mount St. Marys, American, 
Howard, and Georgetown. With strong desire, 
they did not only beat these opponents but did 
allow them to win a single match. 

The Terps saw the most powerful competition 
against the seven Atlantic Coast Conference teams 
such as Clemson And Duke. Against these teams, 
Maryland showed aggressiveness and determina- 
tion on the court but were unable to steal a victory. 
In a close game against Atlantic Coast Conference 
team Georgia Tech, Maryland lost by only a single 
match. 

For the 1992 season, the top seed Michelle 
Daigle, a junior from Gaithersburg, Maryland, won 
seven matches. The most individual wins came 
from third seed Julie Cady, who won a total of ten 
matches. Julie Cady also paired together in 
doubles with Lisa Rosenburg and the successful 
team came out on top with a 6-4 record. 

Losing only one senior after this season, the 
Terps hope to once again double their record next 
year. They are strong, and with the continued 
dedication of second year Head Coach Jim Laitta, 
they will continue to be strong in seasons to come. 





»* 



Photo bv P.iul \ Kin 




Women's Tennis 


Keeu ts 


MD OPP. 


8 Loyola 


Duke 9 


Richmond 9 


6 Howard 


9 Mt. Saint Mary's 


1 James Madison 9 


2 Rutgers 7 

1 

^ 5 George Mason 1 


Clemson 9 


4 Georgia Tech 5 


1 North Carolina 8 


2 VCU 6 


2 George Washington6 


6 Georgetown 


2 Pennsylvania 7 


Wake Forest 9 


9 American 


2 Virginia 7 


2 Georgia Tech 5 


1 ACC Championship 



Back Row- Assistant Coach KfVin Lindlev. Boukjf Vermeulen. Alvcia 
Katnnak, Robin Spiegel, Tily Dominitz, Head Coach Jim Laitta. Fronl- 
Aleli Clemente, Julie Cadv, Michelle Daigle, and Lisa Rosenburg- 



Top- Freshman Lisa Rosenburg waits to return the 
shot. Bottom-Top seed Michelle Daigle fires the shot 
back over the net. 




The Offensively Dominant Terps Swing Into Action 

Terpe 3park\e on the Diamond 



By Jodi Douglas 

Taking on a tougher schedule than in 
previous years, the offensively talented 
Terrapin baseball team, led by second 
year Head Coach Tom Bradley, finished 
w^ith a winning record of 27-26-1. The 
Terps achieved this record with the 
leadership of team captains, John Rayne 
and Charles Devereux. Losing only four 
seniors and gaining freshmen catcher Pat 
CoUiere, versatile fielder Jeff Wagner, and 
third baseman Matt Bailley, the Terps 
were ready to face the tougher competi- 
tion. 

They exemplified great strength 
throughout the 1992 season with memo- 
rable highlights, broken records, and 
individual and team achievements. 
Several team members dominated the 
spotlight including Rayne who threw his 
first career no hitter against Virginia. 
Rayne also earned Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence Pitcher of the Week and with 20 
career pitching wins, broke the old 
Maryland record of 19 wins. 

For many other Terps, spotlight 
appearances paid off in the Major League 
Draft in June. Senior Derek Hacopian was 
drafted by the Cleveland Indians, junior 
Dave Mysel was nabbed by the Detroit 
Tigers, and senior Gene Thomas was 
picked by the San Francisco Giants. Other 
Terps who signed as free agents included 
pitchers Chris Smoot, Shawn Knott, and 
Charles Devereaux. 

Having an exceptionally strong offen- 




sive team, the Terps primarily focused on 
hitting; and as a result, hitting streaks 
abounded. Centerfielder Todd Nutter 
and starting first baseman Chris Smoot 
each had a 23 game hitting streak, while 
rightfielder Derek Hacopian has a 21 
game hitting streak. Nine players ended 
the season with a batting average of .300 
or better. 

In Atlantic Coast Conference action, 
the Terps were able to snag only seven 
wins out of 22 games, but the intense 
competitiveness of the conference teams 
made those wins great. In the ACC, 
Maryland defeated Clemson for the first 
time in 30 years at Clemson's home field 
with a close score of 10-9. Against Geor- 
gia Tech, the Terps came from behind to 
force extra innings, in which the Terps 
stole the victory. Another highlight was 
Maryland's defeat over North Carolina 
State in two out of three games. 

Going into the 1992 ACC Tournament, 
not a single Terp on this years team had 
experienced a victory in ACC Tournament 
play. Once again, the Terps were unable 
to break this winless record. Despite this 
shortfall, numerous highlights gave 
Maryland a season to be proud of. Al- 
though they would have liked to have 
seen more victories, the Terp sluggers 
completed a year of tremendous indi- 
vidual and team achievements. 

Freshman Matt Bailey slides under the tag against 
George Mason. 



^ 



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■4-11 







122 



Baseball 



Front Row-John Rayne, Charles Devereux- Second Row-John Kuntv, Lance McEwan, Pal Colliere, Ross Moskowitz, Andy Wills. Ken Noe, 
Scoll Olson, Chris Cannan, Steve Begleiter, Todd Kilmer, Third Row-lared Savelson, Matt Kuntx, Scott Amsler, Jim Lambert, Chris Smoot, 
Mark Barrett, Danny Crosby, Luke Lappin, Eddie Mintz, Fourth Row-Will Oakley, Jason Ettenger, Todd Nutter, Gene Thomas, Derek 
Hacopian, Matt Bailey, Tim O'Neil, Mike Cakes, Shawn Knott. Back Row-Assistant Coach Kelly Kulina, Head Coach Tom Bradley, 
Assistant Coach Jim Flack, Sean Conroy, Matt Baumann, Chris Botulinski, David Mysel, Ed Ferko and Jeff Wagner, 




Senior slugger Derek Hacopian arrived in Mary- 
land in 1991 as one of the hottest hitters in the 
country, and in one season, proved his talent by 
filling a whole record book of his own. Leading the 
Atlantic Coast Conference in 11 of 17 offensive 
categories including batting average (.490), home 
runs (23), and RBIs (84), the legendary Hacopian 
wrapped up the Triple Crown. He was named the 
Eastern College Athletic Conference Player of the 
Year, and was the second Terp in Maryland history 
to be named the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of 
the Year. 

Nationally, Derek was selected 1st team Ail- 
American by the American Baseball Coaches Asso- 
ciation and by Collegiate Baseball Magazine. He 
finished 2nd nationally in batting average and RBIs, 
and finished 3rd in home runs. Derek is the first 
player in Terp history to earn National Player of the 
Week honors. In 258 plate appearances, this record 
breaking Terp struck out only 12 times. 



r^ 





Photo bv Nick Wass 




Above: Coach Tom Bradley tries to pump up the team during a 
time out. Top right- Derek Hacopian swings for the fences. Right- 
David Mysel dehvers a strike. 



Baseball 123 



They've Got a Mean 




# 



■*-"■ -■■:^m^ ' 




^ 



Baseball 



rhotu b\ \i^l^\\.i-- Photo by Tyrone Brooke 

(top left) Senior Chris Snioot tries to tag out an attepmpted base stealer, (above leftjthe Terps celebrate a 

victory (above right)junior Matt Baumann goes for the strikeout. 




Photo bv Tyrone Brooks Photo bv Muai Hsin Leo 

(top left) Junior Tood Nutter slides in safely at home barely beating the tag by the UVA catcher (top right)freshnian Matt Barly 
looks for the right pitch. (above left) junior Randy Dillingham goes for the strikeout {above right) the Terps turn the double play. 



Baseball 



€P 



Koadetere Return to Top Form 

Terp Track Teams Make a Run for the Top 




By Jodi Douglas 

With unlimited determination and spirit, the Maryland men's and women's track team com- 
pleted a season worthy of recognition. A person who played a large part in implementing this 
determination and spirit was the head coach. Bill Goodman. 

At the Atlantic Coast Conference Outdoor Championships, held at Florida State University, the 
Terp women brought home a sixth place finish, beating Wake Forest and Duke. Leading the 
women was junior, Marchelle Payne who won the Long Jump competition. For the men, the ACC 
Championship meet was very competitive, yet the Terps finished a disappointing eighth, finishing 
right behind Virginia and Georgetown. 

Although the Terps hoped to place higher against the difficult competition of the ACC, they did 
have many outstanding individual performances. Heading the list of strong performances was the 
4x800 relay team that was comprised of Greg Early, Cyril Gillman, Malcolm Drewery and Wes 
Neary. The foursome qualified for the IC4A's with a sixth place finishing time of 7:46.38 at the 
ACC meet. Team member Greg Early led the Terps in action and showed why he was one of the 
best long distance runners in the ACC. Early finished second in the 3,000 meter long distance run 
with a season's best time that qualified him for the IC4A's as well. 

Another quality performer for the Terps at the ACC Championships was John Holley, who 
established his best distance of the year in the triple jump and also earned the chance to compete at 
the IC4A's. Kelvin McQueen also qualified for the IC4A's in the 55m hurdles at meet at West 
Virginia University earlier in the season. 

The endurance and dedication of a track athlete is truly remarkable, and last year's Men's and 
Women's teams were true examples of both of these traits. For these Maryland Terrapin athletes 
the best is yet to come. 



Artwork by Matilde Ott. 



126 Track & Field 



Olympic Hopeful-Marchelle Payne 

By Jodi Douglas 

Junior triple-jumper, Marchelle Payne, from 
Richmond, Virginia put together one of the most 
outstanding individual track season in the history of 
Maryland, earning her a shot at the '92 Olympics. 

Her jump towards national recognition began 
with the indoor Atlantic Coast Conference Champi- 
onships at East Tennessee State University during 
which she accomplished a personal best jump of 43'9 
1/4", the ninth best jump ever by an American 
women. She won the event and was named the Most 
Outstanding Performer of the meet. 

Payne became the first Maryland All- American 
track star since Rosalind Taylor in 1989. 

With her triumphs in the long jump, Payne was 
given the chance to represent the United States at the 
Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. Although 
she did not qualify for the Olympic team, Payne was 
able to compete against and admire many of her 
childhood idols like Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Carl 
Lewis. 

Payne not only triumphed in the long jump, but 
academically as well. She maintained a 3.2 GPA 
throughout the season. 

Looking forward to next season, Payne has her 
hopes set on competing at the '93 World Champion- 
ships and eventually competing for the U.S. in the '96 
Games in Atlanta. 





Up 



Terp Golfers Drive 
Towards Success 



K. 




^ li ilmifi I II' gmmmi^- 




By Jodi Douglas 

The Maryland Golf Team began the Fall season 
strongly, winning first place out of the 20 teams at the 
ECAC Southern District Golf Championships. Thus, 
began an exceptional performance that lasted the 
entire fall season. In three more tournaments, the 
Terps were in the top six out of 19 teams that com- 
peted. Under fourth year coach Donald Slebodnik, it 
was one of the strongest fall seasons the Terps have 
ever seen. "Slebodnik is really well liked," said senior 
Tom Mensing, "He helped everyone out and knows a 
lot about the swing." 

In the spring season the golfers took first place 
finishes at the Navy Intercollegiate Spring Golf Tour- 
nament and the UMBC Golf Invitational. Despite 
these two victories, the Terps participated in five other 
spring tournaments and did not display the same 
strength as in the fall season, and did not return to 
winning form. 

Things did turn around at the ACC Tournament 
however, and it all came together again. The team's 
primary goal for the season was to play well in the 
tournament, and this goal was achieved. "We came off 
of a poor spring," said Mensing, "But it all came 
together at the conference championships." 

The Terps finished seventh in the conference, their 
highest finish ever. It was the first time that they did 
not finish last, and they achieved this goal by beating 
North Carolina State and Florida State. 

Two Terp golfersthat had exceptional seasons were 
Tommy Mensing, and Del Ponchock. Mensing, a 
junior, had a Tournament stroke average of 75.25 and 
tied for ninth at the ACC Championships with his 
season best score of 71-71-70. Ponchock, also a junior, 
had a stroke average of 75.11 and earned his first 
collegiate victory at the Navy Tournament. Ponchock 
also shot a hole-in-one at the NCAA District III match. 

Although the Terps lost five seniors at the end of 
the season, with returning players the golfers look to 
improve on a great year. 




Golf Record 




w 



ECAC Southern District Golf 
Championships- 
Team Score 296 

ECAC Championships- 
Team Scores 308-314-622 

James Madison Fall Golf 
Classic- 
Team Scores 300-302-602 
Second Place Finish 

Old Dominion/Seascape 
Golf Tournament- 
Team Scores 288-308-596 

Kiawah Island Intercolle- 
giate Golf Tournament- 
Team Score 896 

Sheraton-Emerald Intercolle- 
giate Golf Tournament- 
Team Scores 313-322-318 

Navy Intercollegiate Spring 
Golf Tournament- 
Team Score 629 
First Place Finish 
Furman Intercollegiate Golf 
Tournament- 
Team Scores 329-313-309 

UMBC Golf Invitational- 
Team Score 386 
First Place Finish 

NCAA District Ul- 

Team Scores 306-295-318 



'i^ Virginia Cavalier Classic- 
S Team Scores 306-312-314 

ACC Championships- 
Team Scores 295-289-287 



Golf Team (L-R): Joe Bonistalli, Donald Slebodnik, head coach, John Martin, Al Sutton, Wally Coulther, Christopher Cicolini, 
Brandt Ficken, Ron Thomas, Pete Regalia, John Ohly, Jason Rodenhaver, Tom Gimer, Dave Tacchetti, Timmy Schmidt, 
Thomas Mensing, Del Panchock, and Caret Post. 



Golf 



127 



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Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



Fall Sports Divider ( 129 



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Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 



130 Football 




Photo by Tyrone Bn nks 



Football ( 131 



Terrapin football Rin^s •* 
in a Hew Generation 




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Photo bv Tyrone Brooke 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




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Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 



132 Football 



Marcus 3ad^ett: Hi^h Catching Terp 




Terp Wide Receiver Leads Team 

By Rama Bassacali and Jodi Douglas 

Marcus Badgett, a senior from Elizabeth New Jersey set many standards for the next 
generation of Maryland wide receivers. In his four years at the University of Maryland 
he accomplished more than many wide receivers even dream of. Not only did he leave 
behind a legacy of great stats, but his academic accomplishments always comple- 
mented his athletics. 

In his final season at Maryland, Badgett compiled 1,240 yards in 75 receptions 
earning the school and ACC record. He also scored nine touchdowns, which set 
another school record. In the 11 games that he played in Badgett averaged 112.7 yards 
per game. Badgett was also named to the All-ACC First Team. 

Badgett was the only player in ACC history to have two 200 yard games in a single 
season. He accomplished this in the games against Pittsburgh and Duke. In the Duke 
game, Badgett compiled 87 total yards in just 13 seconds making two pivotal catches 
with no time-outs left. This performance might have been one of the best in Maryland 
Football history. His play helped carry the Terps to their last second two point win 
over Duke. 

At one point in the season Badgett was the nation's leading receiver. Badgett also 
ended the season the team leader with 1,240 all-purpose yards and was second on the 
team in total points scored with 54 total points, only four behind kick David DeArmas. 

Badgett achieved a cumulative 3.31 grade point average over his career as Terp. 

Although Badgett finished his career as a Terp he is sure to be remembered at the 
University of Maryland as the wide receiver that broke the standard of excellence on 
and off the field. 



Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 




Photo bv Tvrone Brooks 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



Football 



Terp Cheerleaders Help Sports Teams and Fans 

3reak Out the Spirit 








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Photo by Ashish Bagai 



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Cheerleading 



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New Coach and Coaching Staff Bring 

New Hopes as Terps Look to Improve 

on Losing Season 

Terp Football 

Celebratee 100 

Years With New 

Coach 



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The Terrapin Football team entered the season with a new quarter- 
back, a new coach and a new game plan. With so much going for them, 
the Terps looked forward to improving from a dismal 1992 season. 
Playing what was arguably one of the toughest schedules in the 
country, the Terps opened their '92 campaign against ACC rival, #25 
Virginia, playing them tough but losing by a score of 15-28. 

Maryland fared the same over the next three games, losing close 
games to #19 N.C. State (10-14), and West Virginia (33-34) before being 
blown out by then #9 Penn State by a score of 13-49. 

The next week, Oct. 3, the Terps found the winning touch by 
downing the University of Pittsburgh with a convincing score of 47-34. 
This game featured quarterback John Kaleo as he tallied 415 total yards 
and three touchdown passes. 

The Terps then dropped the next two games to #17 Georgia Tech (26- 
28) and to Wake Forest by a sore of 23-30 before returning to the win 
column with a hard fought win against Duke, 27-25. 

Again, the Terps dropped two straight to nationally ranked oppo- 
nents #22 North Carolina and the #6 Florida State by scores of 24-31 and 
21-69 respectively. 

The Terps did manage to finish the season on an up note as they 
surprised Clemson and most of the 25,000 fans at Byrd Stadium by 
dominating the Tigers and winning with a score of 53-23. 

Although the Terps finished with a 3-8 overall record, 2-6 in the 
ACC, many individuals turned in stellar performances on the season. 

Perhaps the most impressive was the one turned in by Kaleo. Kaleo 
broke school records in the first two games. He broke Scott Zolak's 
complete pass record by completing 32 passes against UVA. Kaleo also 
set a school standard for pass attempts with 56. He finished the year 
averaging a total 315.6 yards per game. 

Other outstanding Terp performers included Mark Mason who 
finished the season with a team high 104.6 rushing yards per game. On 
the receiving side, junior Frank Wychek broke the all-time Maryland 
career reception record in the game against N.C. State. 

On the defensive side, the Terps were once again led by Butkus 
award nominee, Mike Jarmolowich. Jarmolowich led the Terps with 
110 total tackles, three sacks and two interceptions. Jarmolowich had 62 
unassisted tackles and 48 assisted tackles. His 110 tackles this year 
added to 304 in his previous three seasons put him in third place on 
Maryland's all time tackle list. 

Although the Terps turned in a losing season, the new coaching staff 
and new attitudes hold a bright future for years to come in Terp 
football. 



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Football 






Football 
Results 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



Football 




137 



Han^in^ In 
There k 

Men 's Soccer Shows 
Solid Performances 

By Jodi Douglas 

The Terrapin Men's Soccer team 
entered the 1992 fall season with enthusi- 
asm and a positive outlook. With a great 
deal of talent, the terps put forth their best 
effort in every minute of play. They 
achieved a record of 5-12 overall against 
many challenging competitors. The final 
record however, was not an indicator of 
the talent that the '92 squad possessed. 

The Terps started slowly with three 
straight losses but eventually overcame 
the losses with positive attitude and went 
on to celebrate a few victories. The 
majority of the wins came late in the 
season when the Terps beat George 
Washington University, the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore County and James 
Madison University. 

The most challenging teams for Mary- 
land were the ACC teams. The Terps 
were 0-5 in the ACC but came close in the 
game against North Carolina State. The 
Terps' determination came through 
against the Wolfpack, but still could not 
overcome them for the victory. 

Despite the disappointing year, the 
Terps did have some outstanding perfor- 
mances turned in by individual players. 
Jeff Stroud was the leading scorer for the 
Terps with a total of ten goals on the 
season. George Petrow followed Stroud 
in total goals. 

Once again consistency was the word 
best used to describe Terp goalkeeper 
Carmine Isacco. Isacco garnered a total 
of 73 saves on the season and was consid- 
ered one of the strongest goalies in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. 

Although the team had a disappointing 
season, the Terps are looking forward to 
next year and a new start. 




Front Row (L-R): Yohan Habtegabr, Matt Assia, Malcolm Gillian, Rick Smedley, Carmine Isacco, Mike 
Kleinert, Jeff Stroud, Steve Campbell and Carlos Corona. Back Row: Shawn Long, Jason Lipka, Sean Wray, 
Ken Weinstein, George Petrow, Gavin Boyd, Jody Perrell and Greg McLaughlin. 



138 I Men's Soccer 




Men 's Soccer 
Record 



"^^, 



f 



Photo bv Carlos Dopazo 






MD 


OPP. 




1 


Howard 2 




1 


Old Dominion 2 




1 


Virginia 5 


n 


2 


American 1 


1 


1 


N.C. State 2 


1 


1 


Towson State 2 




1 


Duke 3 




2 


Lafayette 3 




3 


Mt. St. Mary's 1 







North Carolina 1 




4 George Washington 




4 


UMBC 1 




1 


LaSalle 2 




1 


Clemson 2 




2 


James Madison 1 







Loyola 2 




2 


N.C. State 5 




ACC Tournament 



Men's Soccer ( 1 39 



^Momen 's Socce^ 


I Record 


^^ 






1 


MD OPP. 




Duke 2 


1 


WUUam & Mary 2 


1 


4 Cincinnati 2 


1 


6 Davidson 


1 


12 Towson State 




4 LaSalle 1 




1 Temple 4 


1 


1 Virginia 4 


1 


1 James Madison 


1 


4 Delaware 


1 


2 George Mason 1 


1 


3 Loyola 




4 Villanova 




N.C. State 1 




4 American 




3 UMBC 1 




George Washington 





North Carolina 5 

Virginia 2 
ACC Tournament 

1 Monmouth 1 



Building a 5o\\d Foundation 

The Women's Soccer Team Continues To Improve 
By Jodi Douglas 

With the most successful recruiting year in the history of Maryland, the Terrapin Women's 
Soccer team began the 1992 season with great expectations and enthusiasm. The enthusiasm 
remained high throughout the season and was the source of inner power that helped the Terps 
achieve an 11-7-2 overall record, improving from their 7-12 record just a year ago. 

Third year head coach, April Heinrichs, with a wealth of talent at her fingertips, showed 
amazing dedication in striving for her goal of building a strong foundation for the future of 
Women's Soccer at the University of Maryland. 

Returning players to the '92 lineup included nine letter winners and seven starters. The Terps 
also welcomed seven freshmen to an already talent packed team. 

Kelly Amonte, from Massachusetts, was one such newcomer. Amonte proved to be an asset to 
the team by finishing the season as the team high scorer with 12 goals on the season. Sophomore, 
Audra Weber followed close behind Amonte with ten goals on the season and Randi Goldblatt, 
also a sophomore, tallied nine goals for the year. 

Midfielders Betsy Elder, junior, and Amy Kanjia, senior, were outstanding for the Terps as 
well. With their consistent play and experience they led the Terps towards new heights. 

Defensively the Terrapins were led by junior, Miriam Pagan and senior, Michelle LaFollette. 

Returning in the net, for her third consecutive season was junior, Cailin Mullins. Last year 
Mullins was outstanding. She played in 20 games, registering 96 saves throughout the season. 

At the Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament, the Terps faced perennial powerhouse Virginia 
losing by a score of 0-2. Although the Terps finished the season 0-4 in the ACC, their overall 
record was proof of the strength and young talent that this team had. A glimpse of what is yet to 
come was seen in games against Loyola, American and Villanova where the talented Terps 
prevented their opponents from registering a single goal. 

Although the Terps did not make a splash in the ACC, with youth and strength on their side, 
they were building a foundation of things to come in future years. 



P^^ 





140 I Women's Soccer 







:i 




il 








MAirUMo 




Back Row: April Heinrichs, head coach; Lori Walker, assistant coach; Kate McCabe, Julie Bortz, Stefanie Papageorge, Emily Blagg, 
Cailen Mullins, Miriam Pagan, Randi Goldblatt. Middle Row: Leslie Kerhin, Randall Goldsborough, Betsy Elder, Stephanie 
Magro, Tania Sheremeta, Kristin Owsiany, Terri Rich, Andrea Frankiewicz, Tami Riley. Front Row: Audra Weber, Michelle 
Urban, Danielle LaRoche, Michelle La Follette, Cecily Scarpelli, Amy Kanjian, Kelly Amonte. 



Women's Soccer 



€^ 



Field Hockey 
Resluts 




Stick It To 'Em 




r 




Photo bv Nick Wass 



Right: Boukje Vermeulen and 
Sabrina Salam celebrate after 
time runs out in overtime 
against UNV in the ACC 
Championships leaving the 
Terps victorious. Top: Amy 
Schubert tries to steal the ball 
away from the North Carolina 
defender 



Artwork by Matilde 
sOtt 



Field Hockey 




Maryland Figid Hockey 

ACC Champions!!!! 



By Kara Schmidt and Krista Parker 

The field hockey team set out on their 
'92 crusade aiming for the top and at the 
conclusion of the ACC Tournament, that 
is exactly where they found themselves— 
the 1992 ACC Champions. 

The Terps had a tough schedule and 
through their first nine games could only 
manage a 4-4-1 record, which included a 
double overtime win against American 
University and a 0-0 tie with rival Penn 
State. 

Then something sparked the Lady 
Terps and they went on a ten game 
winning streak. During this streak the 
Terps crushed teams like Georgetown 8- 
0, Towson State 6-0 and Pennsvlvania 5- 
0.. It was in the midst of this run that the 
Terps battled Duke and North Carolina in 
the ACC Tournament. 

In the first round of the tournament, 
the Terps looked to revenge a 1-2 over- 
time regular season loss to the Blue Devils 
from Duke. Although the score was the 
same, 2-1 in overtime, this time it was the 
Terps who were the victors. 



Then came the showdown that the 
Terps had been waiting for. It did not 
disappoint either, but in the end of the 
hard fought battle, the Terps were on the 
winning side once again 2-1 in overtime, 
winning on a penalty stroke off. 

The Terps scored 85 points overall, 
while allowing opponents only 41. This 
was due in large part to the goaltending 
expertise of Irene Horvat. Horvat allowed 
only 26 goals in 1,470 minutes of playing 
time and had a .836 save percentage. 

Highlighting the season with her 
performance was Boukje Vermeulen who 
finished her senior season with 13 goals 
and 17 points on 127 shots. Lisa Rowe 
had standout performances as well. Rowe 
finished off her collegiate career with 12 
assists and 17 points on 72 shots. 

Although the Field Hockey team came 
home, they were not down, for they had 
the ACC Championship and no one could 
take that away. 




Photo bv Nick Wass 




Front Row (L-R>: Melissa Sanders-Williams, assistant coach. Missy Meharg, head coach. Amy Schubert, .\icole Metz Boukje Venneulen, Gina Sikorskym manager, Tara 
Everly, Maber Malehom, Maureen Scott, A\'\'ey Feiler, Andrea Closkey, assistent coach, and Jessica Wilk, assistant coach. Middle: Shannon Petrick, Grethcen Beckel, Lisa 
Rowe, Katie Kauffman, Cheryl BoUonbacher, Devon Holcomb, Michelle Gallo. Tracy Hartnett and Laura Chestman. Back Row: Jill Jones, Katherine Balk, Mario Makela, 
Megan Callahan, Kristen Ketchum, Sabnna SaJam, Judy Finke. Laura Harmon, Joanna Ritcey, Elissa Beckman, Kelly P)ne and Irene Hor\-at. 



Field Hockey ( 143 



Endurance 3e\/ond Compare 

Cross CountryTeams Finish Strong in Fall Season 

By Jodi Douglas 

The Maryland Men's Cross Country team successfully defended its Maryland State Cross Coun- 
try Championship title at the second annual meet held at the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
County. The women's team took third place in the meet. This success was typical of the 1992 fall 
season for both Terp Teams. The men and women trained long and hard, and their diligence paid 
off. 

For the women, the most consistent Terp runner was sophomore Paula LaVorgna. This talented 
Terp runner placed in the top ten in every meet of the season. Junior, Dana Coligan was a strong 
finisher as well. She took a first place at the Gettysburg Invitational and consistently finished with a 
strong kick in all of her races. 

On the men's side, the athletes who played an important role in the team's success were seniors 
Rob DeFillippis and Chris Shelby and sophomore Jon Sushinsky. Sushinsky was the most consis- 
tent of the three, placing in the top ten at every meet he competed in. 

With the efforts of these talented individuals as well as amazing contributions by the entire team, 
the Maryland Cross Country Teams had a 1992 season to be proud of. With youth on their side the 
Terp runners have a bright future ahead of them. 




Artwork by Matilde Ott. 





144 ) Crosscountry' 







T 





*t 




All photos ThisPage By Paul Vieira 



Crosscountry ( 145 





^^I^p 



Photo bv Carlos Dopazo 



Photo bv Carlos Dopazo 




Top Left: Kelly Malins intensely awaits the return of 
serve against North Carolina. Top Right: Cindy 
Bauer and Andrea Oakes put up a wall at the net to 
block the Duke spike attempt. Bottom Left: Dini 
Fragas goes for the kill as Andrea Hudy prepares to 
defend the block. Bottom Right: Andrea Oakes gets 
one of her solo blocks against William & Mary. 




146 



Volleyball 




A Ti^am That \\Y\ovje No ^oundanee 

Volleyball Team Rebounds From Injuries 

By Krista Parker 

Continuing the strong tradition of winning women's sports teams at the University of 
Maryland, the 1992 Maryland Volleyball team began its season in search of an ACC Title and a 
NCAA Tournament bid. 

The Terps began ACC play with a record of 9-5. After downing an upstart Clemson squad in 
four games ( 15-11, 15-9, 8-15, 15-2) the Terps suffered and unexpected loss to Georgia Tech (2- 
3) on October 3. That was to be their final loss before going on a seven game winning streak 
that included a huge win over last years' ACC Champs, Duke (3-1) 7-15, 15-10, 15-9. 15-10. 

Maryland finished the season on an upswing, however, by beating Pittsburgh (3-2), a tough 
Baylor squad (3-0) and ACC rival Virginia (3-0). 

The Terps returned to the ACC Tournament at Cole Field House as the #3 seed behind 
Duke and Florida State. In the first round of the tournament, the Terps downed Clemson 3-1 
to advance to the second round, in which they were dropped again by Florida State in a tough 
five game match. 

The season ended but the Terps had a lot to be proud of, especially some outstanding 
individual play. Among the Terps' standouts were senior middle hitter Andrea Oakes and 
junior setter Nicole Lantagne. 

Oakes collected accolades this year at all but one of the tournaments that the Terps played 
in. She earned All-Tournament team honors at the Washington Metro Challenge, Hofstra 
Invitational and Maryland Invitational and Georgetown Invitational, in which she was also 
named Tournament MVP. In addition Oakes ended the season leading the Terps in kills with 
346 followed by senior Cindy Bauer (228) and sophomore phenomenon Kelly Malins (213). 

Lantagne also receive All-Tournament team honors at the Kentucky Conference Challenge, 
Georgetown Invitational and Maryland Invitational where she was also named the Tourney 
MVP. Lantagne also shattered Andrea Mandella's career assist record. Entering the season 
needing only 190 assists to surpass the previous mark, Lantagne amassed 1,090 assists and 
established herself as Maryland's all-time assist leader with one year of elegibility remaining. 

Other outstanding Terps included Bauer who led the team in digs with 392, followed 
closely by Lantagne (390). Bauer also finished third in solo blocks with ten and assisted blocks 
with 41. She followed leaders Oakes (24 solo, 77 assisted) and Malins (126 solo, 69 assisted). 

Although the Terps did not return to the glory that they had in 1990, they did achieve 
greatness and in doing so continued the winning tradition of Maryland women's sports teams. 



Maryland mi 
Volleyball Restdts 





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Drexel 





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George Mason 





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George Washington 3 





Arizona State 


3 


3 


Providence 





3 


Hofstra 





1 


Eastern Illinois 


3 





Kentucky 


3 


1 


Michigan 


3 


3 


Miami(Ohio) 


2 


3 


Cornell 





3 


Virginia Tech 





3 


George WashingtonO 


3 


Clemson 


1 


2 


Georgia Tech 


3 


3 


James Madison 





3 


Villanova 





3 


Georgetown 





3 


William & Mary 





3 


Duke 


1 


3 


North Carolina 


2 


3 


N.C. State 





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Fl.orida State 


3 


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Pittsburgh 





3 


Baylor 


1 


3 


Virginia 





3 


Clemson 


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ACC Tournament 


2 


Florida State 


3 




ACC Tournament 



Above: The Lady Terrapin's Volleyball team with 
head coach Janice Krueger, and assistant coach Ellen 
Dempsey. 




Volleyball 



147 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
C 






kJinsitiaa^ 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



Club Sports ( 149 



Breaking In 

Edited by Amy DeHoyas & Amy Ives 




Photo by Maggie Saiaday 



150 1 Resident Life 




Late nights, lots 
of friends, hall 
bonding. . . Each 
year thousands of 
students, new and 
old, flood through 
the campus gates 
ready to check into 
Resident Life. . . 

When an incoming 
or returning student 
chooses to be a part of the 
resident life at Maryland, 
they are entering another world. 
Dorm-hfe is a gigantic adjustment for any 
person, but it is an unforgettable experi- 
ence. 

Upon entering the dorms, you are 
greeted by your roommate, who with any 
luck will make life a little easier,. Classes 
begin and oh what a convenience it is 
when you have to make that 8:00 class and 
it is right outside of your dorm. Sopho- 
more Ana Hireta said, "When I commuted 
it was a real pain and I had a lot of trouble 
getting to class because of all the traffic. 
Now that 1 am living on campus, classes 
are right there." 

When asked what was their favorite 
part of resident life, most people said, "All 
of the new friends that you meet." The 
friends met in the dorms will most likely 
stay your friends throughout the years. 
Freshman, Kristine Chin likes living in the 
dorms because she has met a lot of new 
people and also because her dorm is coed. 

After all of the pressure and stress of 
the day, it is great to have a close place to 
crash with all of your friends. That is why 
many UM students choose to BREAK IN 
to campus through Resident Life. 



"When I com- 
muted it was a 
real pain and I 
had a lot of 
trouble getting to 
class because of 
all the traffic. 
Now that I am 
living on cam- 
pus, classes are 

right there." 

—Sophomore 
Ana Herita 



Resident Life 



151 



Breaking New Ground 



Life as a New Resident 



Story by: Stacey Brooks 

Every student who has attended the 
University of Maryland for a semester or 
more knows what it feels like to suffer 
from new student anxieties. As a fresh- 
man, or a transfer student, one may suffer 
from the nervous apprehension of the first 
day of classes, hoping you do not become 
lost and one may find themselves revert- 
ing to that scared kid that a mere four 
years ago was walking timidly into their 
first high school class. One also worries if 
they will make new friends, or be con- 
demned to eat alone forever in the Dining 
Hall. Many often worry if they will be 
able to keep from failing their classes. 

As a new student, one cannot help 
having worries and fears. Meeting new 
people, getting lost, and maintaining 
decent grades are probably the forefront 
of every new students mind. 
Of course these worries do not come 
without the positive expectations as well 
After all, one may be embarking upon the 



road to adulthood and responsibility. 
This was probably the first time many 
have been Hving away from home for any 
extended amount of time. Many miss 
their famiUes, but along with the home- 
sickness, comes more freedom than Mon 
and Dad ever allowed, and with the 
freedom comes the trials of time manage- 
ment. 

Many new students look upon this 
time as an adventure. They want to 
experience new and exciting thing, meet 
all sorts of interesting people, and visit 
daring new place (the most frequented 
being the 'Vous and Cellar). 

For new students, living on campus 
provides the worry about the type of 
roommate that you will receive. With any 
luck the roommate(s) turns out to be half 
way decent and the room is somewhat 
larger than your older sibling warned you 
about. 

Do not dwell on one's first impressions 
of the University of Maryland. Soon, 
classes, roommates and the dining 
situation are brought under control and 
the University isn't as large and imper- 
sonal as it first seemed. 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



152 ) New Residents 





js 







All photos this page by Paul Vietra 



New Residents ( 153 




Photo bv loanne Saidman 




154 ) North Campus 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



Breaking Into Campus Life 




By Stacey Brooks 

"Living in North Campus has been a 
great experience for me. One of the main 
reasons is because there are so many 
people and I have met some of the best 
friends," said north campus resident 
Kristine Chin. 

The North Campus area, housed the 
largest number of students this year in its 
three high rise communities. The Denton 
Community included Easton, Denton and 
Elkton Halls; the Ellicott Community 
contained Hagerstown, Ellicott and 
LaPlata Halls; and the Centreville com- 
munity (formerly Cambridge) consisted of 
Bel Air and Centreville Halls. 

This past year the Cambridge commu- 
nity was transformed into Centreville 
community. The low^er number of 
students choosing to live on campus 
forced campus officials to close several 
dorms in that community. Among those 
closed were Cumberland, Cambridge and 
Chestertown dorms. 

North Campus provided a unique 
living community for both freshman and 
returning residents. There were many 
opportunities to become involved in 
campus life and many resources for 
residents to take advantage of. Several 



students became involved in a subdivi- 
sion of the Residence Halls Association 
known as the hall council. Each hall 
council group planned several events to 
promote community and campus wide 
activities. "Our hall council sponsored a 
Halloween celebration and it was pretty 
successful," said Elkton hall president Eric 
Lasky. 

North campus also won big with its 
own convenience store that carried 
everything from telephone cords to string 
cheese. "The convenience store is great 
because it's close; we could get there 
without finding ways to get off campus," 
said freshman Jennifer Macleid. 

A disadvantage to living in one of the 
high rises was the late night fire alarms 
and quad yells, which were common 
during exam periods. "Someone always 
has to be the wise guy and pull the fire 
alarm late at night and it's no fun going 
out in your pajamas in December," said 
Marci Honstead. 

Although North campus reduced its 
population significantly by closing down 
three of its dorms, its wide variety of 
activities and resources remained in tact, 
right under its student's noses. 




Photo bv Paul V'ieira 



Photo by Paul Vieira 



North Campus 



155 




All photos this page by Maggie Saladay 



156 ) South Campus 




South Hill-Living in Style 

By Amy Ives 

Tired of the noisy, crowded dornis? Want privacy , yet still want friends close by? 
Then South Hill is a great place for you. 

Located by Knox Road, Route 1, and the South Chapel, South Hill was one of the 
most popular spots on campus for student living. South Hill mainly housed upper 
class undergraduate students, who had high priority numbers in the housing program. 
The South Hill quarters consisted of 13 suite/apartment buildings and one regular 
dormitory. The suite/ apartment buildings included: Allegany, Calvert, Charles, 
Garrett, Baltimore, Frederick, Harford, Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Prince George's, 
Talbot and Washington Halls. The traditional dormitory was Cecil Hall. 

In the suite style buildings, there were suites that housed from four to six people. 
The residents shared one to two bathrooms, and they shared a common living room 
area. The apartments had the same set-up, only the apartments also included a kitchen 
and living room area. Ron Carmel, a junior who resided in the Leonardtown commu- 
nity, liked the apartment life because it gave him "the opportunity to cook decent 
meals." 

There were many advantages of residing in the South Hill area. For most, with the 
exception of Leonardtown, most of the academic buikiings were right outside of many 
of the dorms. This was a convenience for those students who hated hiking halfway 
across the campus to get to class. Another advantage, in the warmer seasons, was the 
fact that the buildings were air-conditioned. One key advantage that stood out about 
South Hill was the greater amount of freedom and privacy that the residents had. 
"There is more privacy than in regular dorms, and even though there are still RA's, they 
do not breath down your back every second," said a junior South Hill resident, Craig 
Ackerson. 

South Hill proved for many to be an enjoyable and convenient place to live. Many 
underclassmen commented that they could not wait until they had a high enough 
prioritv number to move into a South Hill suite. 




Through the Heartland 



By Amy DeHoyos 

Diverse? You bet! This year North Hill 
expanded its Terp turf and took 100 new 
and returning students under its wings. 
Students of multi-cultural and ethnic 
backgrounds, athletic teams and honors 
programs considered North Hill their 
home away from home. 

Located almost in the center of campus, 
North Hill provided a short commute to 
classes, the Health Center, the Student 
Union and McKeldin Library. 

North Hill consists of Anne Arundel 
hall-the newly renovated honors dorm, St. 
Mary's hall - the language house, 
Dorchester hall - the international house. 
Queen Anne's Hall, Somerset and Worces- 
ter. 

Anne Arundel hall, the Living and 
Learning Center, is the first all honors 
dorm. It houses 100 students from the 
honors program. There were several 
committees that the students formed this 
year in order to become involved in the 
diverse living community. 

The honors center included a computer 
lab with nine IBM computers, a 24-hour 
study lounge and a small library. The 
house committee planned several events 
to get honors residents involved in dorm 



activities. Among the events sponsored 
were a Halloween dance, a cookie baking 
day called "Let's get gooey" and several 
guest speakers to promote diverse educa- 
tion. 

Sophomore Alissa Garber said she "was 
a little aprehensive about living in Anne 
Arundel, but it's beautiful, in a great 
location and the people are really 
friendly." 

The international house and the 
language house provided students with a 
unique living experience. 

Dorchester hall allowed American 
students to live with international stu- 
dents from over 40 countries. "1 liked 
getting to know all kinds of people, the 
atmosphere was very friendly. It felt like 
we were one big family. A lot of students 
didn't have families nearby," said Amy 
Robertson. 

St. Mary's Hall was an opportunity for 
students to live with other students who 
wished to speak a specific language. 
Residents shared a designated Spanish, 
German, Chinese, Hebrew, Italian or 
Russian speaking apartment. North Hill 
students were immersed in a diverse 
living and learning community to provide 
the experience of a lifetime. 




1 



i 



*y 






AH photos this page by Maggie Saladay 



North Hill 159 




All photos this page bv Paul Vieira 



1 60 ) Resident Assistants 



Not Enough Time 

RA's Juggle Dorm Life and Personal Life 

By Catherine Kerley 

Life as a Resident Assistant. A piece of cake right? Guess again. The positions of 
RA demands maturity, commitment and a lot of hard work. According to Kate Pearce, 
a fourth year junior and RA in Centerville South, this job is not for everyone. An 
individual needs to be able to meet the five basic requirements. They are expected to 
act as a peer counselor, a programmer, a model of positive student behavior, an admin- 
istrator, and a team member. For Kate, the hardest part about being an RA was time 
management. Not only did she have to look after the needs of her resident, she had to 
tend to her own life, and it was hard to balance the two. 

Another difficulty Kate sometimes had was that it was often times hard to be 
objective due to the fact that she had formed good relationships with her resident. 
When decisions had to be made, she had to take on the role of authority figure rather 
than friend which sometimes proved tricky. 

Jenna Miller, a sophomore Resident Assistant in Easton Hall, also found it hard to 
balance her time. 

She found it hard to separate her job as an RA from her own life. This was her first 
year as a resident assistant and she found the job challenging, yet rewarding. 

One of the obstacles Jenna had to deal with was the fact that she was only nineteen 
years old and some of her resident outranked her in age as well as in seniority. She 
found it hard to be an authority figure to an individual who was twice her size. 

Jenna had several unusual experiences within the first few weeks of the fall semester 
alone. One which included parents mistaking her for a maid. Miller just took it in 
stride as being part of the life as a resident assistant. 

Both Kate and Jenna agree that the chance to interact with other residents was on of 
the best aspects of the job. It was a good feeling to know that people look up to you. 
Though the job as a resident assistant was tough and demanding, most RA's will tell 
you that it was well worth the time and hassle. 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



Resident Assistants I 161 



Breaking Out of the Pack 

Making a Place for Yourself on Campus 




Photo by Maggie Saladay 




Photo by Maggie Saladay 



Resident Life 



163 





All photos this page by Pau] Vieira 



164 1 Roommates 




Breaking Down 
Barriers 

Roommates Find Time to Adjust and Compromise 

By Amy DeHoyos 

As the buzzer on the alarm clock echoes throughout the shoe-box sized room. 
Roomie #1 gets up to prepare for her 8 o'clock class. She tip-toes quietly around the 
dimly lit room, careful not to wake Roomie #2. This is a familiar scene to many campus 
residents and their roommates. 

Having a college roommate is an experience in itself. Depending on the individual, 
having a roommate can be the best or the worst experience of a college student's life. "1 
love having a roommate, I'd be lonely without one, " said Tom Martin, a sophomore 
from the Cambridge Community. 

Not everyone can succeed in building lifelong friendships as roonunates. Yet, if two 
people who share a room do succeed, it can be one of the richest experiences in a 
college student's life. "I like having a roommate because we are flexible with one 
another and we respect each others property and feehngs. Besides we're laid back and 
we can stay up late to talk and watch Hawaii Five-O together," said Aishish Parekh, a 
junior residing in South Hill. 

This year new residents as well as returning students were able to request a room- 
mate. "People always say that best friends shouldn't room together, but if they're good 
enough friends they know that they can deal with whatever crisis that comes up. I'm 
happy that I live with my best friend because 1 can get mad at her, and I know that 
she'll still love me," said Marci Honstead, a sophomore from Denton Community. 

Many roommates nurtured their relationships by eating together, attending campus 
events, and simply hanging out with one another. Whatever the route taken, room- 
mates learned to deal with many difficulties. As a result, friendships were built and 
strengthened, developed and nurtured, and hopefully, will last a lifetime. 



I 




.r 





i 



All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



Roommates 



165 




166 ) Night Life 




Taking A Break 



LUNG 
ATION 




By Diane Back 

Late night dining, movies at the Hoff 
theater, or just hanging out with friends... 
All these activities and more take place 
when the sun goes down on campus. 

One of the many advantages of living 
on campus is the night life. On top of the 
list of things to do for those who come out 
at night, is late-night dining. Late-night 
dining took place from 9-12 a.m., in South 
Campus and Ellicott Dining halls. As 
South Hill resident Anusha Rajapatirana 
put it, "People come out because they 
may have missed normal eating hours for 
dinner, need to spend extra meal card 
money, or they have the midnight 
munchies!" 

Located in the center of the campus, 
was another hot-spot for many campus 
residents- the Student Union. One of the 
most popular places in the Union was the 
Hoff theater. The Hoff, as it was more 
commonly called, offered second run 
movies at a reduced rate for students. "It's 
cheap, it's fun, and it's practically right 
outside your door," says Jack Flechner, a 
Leonardtown resident. Right down the 
stairs from the theater was the campus 



pool room and bowling alley. These too 
were run at a cheaper rate for those 
students who were watching their money. 
Another popular spot in the Union was 
the Roy Roger's Eatery area. Here, 
students could enjoy live entertainement 
provided by the SUPC and SEE produc- 
tions. 

Another haven for those who liked to 
hang out at night was Hornbake Library. 
As student Kristen Pugh said, " Eventu- 
ally everyone ends up at the library." 

From a different perspective, not many 
would think that a shuttle bus would be a 
hot-spot to meet people and have fun. On 
the contrary, most of the time the shuttle 
bus was jam-packed with people, espe- 
cially on the weekends. The shuttle bus 
was notorious for shouting crowds and 
singing groups. 

The obvious center of night-life around 
campus was all of the fraternity parties 
and floor parties. No one had to search 
far for something to do on campus. With 
the diversity and large number of people 
on campus no one could ever complain 
that there was nothing to do! 




Through the System 



By Diane Back 

Rape, theft and assault. What do these 
three things have in common? They were 
all crimes that occurred on a regular basis 
at the University of Maryland. 

In 1991 over 1,000 instances of theft, 1 1 
robberies, three cases of rape, and 32 
accounts of aggravated assault v^ere 
reported on campus, according to Lieu- 
tenant Smith of the UM Police Depart- 
ment. 

Campus crime was on the rise. Stu- 
dents, often took the 'it'll never happen to 
me' attitude and paid a high price. "I 
almost never lock my door, even when I 
go to sleep at night," said one student, 
who dechned to be identified. 

Crimes that could have been prevented 
often were not. Campus residents 
propped doors open, allowing 
unmonitored entrance to dorms; pulled 
false fire alarms to catch residents off 
guard who left their doors unlocked while 
leaving the building and were assaulted 
when walking alone at night around 
campus. 

Resident Life offered a series of pro- 
grams that addressed safety and security. 
Among these were self defense and sexual 
assault workshops. Student patrol 



Campus Crime on the Rise 

officers also inspected campus buildings 
and residence halls regularly to help 
ensure a safer campus. 

While crime could not be completely 
eradicated from campus, student aware- 
ness increased and more students fol- 
lowed the tips provided by the University 
of Maryland Police Department to ensure 
a safer campus. 

1. Use the buddy system 

2. Walk in well-lit and well-trav- 
elled areas 

3. Carry a whistle to alert others of 
assault 

4. Use the campus call-a-ride 
service if travelling 

alone. 

5. Lock bicycles with effective locks 
that cannot 

be cut or ripped off. 

Use a steering wheel lock on cars 

Lock rooms every time unat- 



lAKNIII 






6. 

7. 
tended 



8. Do not prop residence hall 
entrances open. 

9. Use Resident Life programs for 
awareness 

10. DON'T EVER BELIEVE THAT IT 
CAN'T HAPPEN TO YOU, IT CAN 
HAPPEN TO YOU!!! 





All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



168 ) Campus Crime 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



Campus Crime f 169 




Breaking the Standard 



Edited by Robin Solomon 




170 I Academics 





The stu- 
dents and 
faculty at the 
University of 
Maryland were 
once again "Break- 
ing the Standard" in 
all the academic realms 
here in College Park and 
around the world during the 1992- 
1993 academic year. Despite 
batteling the adversity of budget 
cuts and other distractions in the 
system, more and more faculty and 
students took the initiative to make 
a name for themselves and the 
university. In this year's academic 
section, the focus of each college 
will be on those outstanding pro- 
grams and individuals who took 
pride in BREAKING THE STAN- 
DARD of academics here UMCP. 



"When you get 

lost, keep 

w^alking." 

-Jennifer 

Molineaux, 

Senior 

philosophy 

major 



I'hoto bv Ashish bai;ai 



Academics 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Majors 



Agricultural 
Engineering 

Agricultural and 
Resource Eco- 
nomics 

Agronomy 

Horticulture 

Poultry Science 

Dietetics 

Food Science 

Agricultural 
Sciences, General 

Humian Nutrition 
and Foods 

Natural Resource 
Management 




172 J Agriculture 



BREAKING INTO NEW FIELDS 

By Latifa Jackson and Robin Solomon 

"The College of Agriculture was a close knit family that made new student feel welcome," 
noticed Lisa Carr, a first year Animal Science major. 

The College of Agriculture offered a diverse range of educational programs which prepared 
Maryland students with not only the scientific aspects of the field of Agriculture, but also the 
cultural aspects. The college considered it important to apply its agricultural knowledge to the 
solution of the worlds's most critical problems concerning adequate amounts of food resources and 
the environmental concerns that effect food production. 

Due to the dissolution of the College of Human Ecology, the College of Agriculture gained a 
food science program which enabled the college to expand the range of study that students could 
pursue. 

This past year, students were able to take courses that ranged from Crop Science to the Science 
of Food. 

As much as the curricula of the college was diverse, so was the student population that com- 
prised the college. There were rural, urban =, and suburban based students who each brought to 
the college a different perspective. In order to meet the needs of the Maryland student population, 
and the industrial production standards that the 'real' work! demands, the College of Agriculture 
had to stay dynamic and constantly improve to surpass the level of excellence that it has always 
been known for. 

This dynamic structure of the college has provided for many individuals to achieve success. For 
example William L Magette, agricultural engineering, was selected for a Fulbright Fellowship. He 
spent the year in Ireland studying research and education programs related to water quality and 
environment protection. 

The College of Agriculture, with its supportive and challenging atmosphere continued to break 
its own standard of excellence into the future. 

Photos this page by Latifa Jackson- 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 




By Robin Solomon 

In the School of Architecture, students were 
involved in a dynamic field and were instructed by a 
distinguished faculty. Both students and faculty 
members achieved success through their endeavors 
to break the standard of excellence in the school. 

Ralph D. Bennett, architecture, was named Com- 
missioner of the Housing Opportunity Commission 
of Montgomery County. David K. Donaldson and 
Bill Schillig, engineering and architectural services, 
designed, in accordance with the Americans with 
Disable Act, the Guardian Paver. Their paving 
product was created to help make the presence and 
location of areas such as crosswalks, curb cuts, ramps 
and entrances easier to detect. 

Amy Gardner, assistant professor of architecture 
Foundation. The prize was given to encourage 
personal investigative and critical studies of architec- 
tural composition completed in France between 1630 
and 1830. 

The School of Architecture was again pleased with 
its annual lecture series. The Fall lecture series 
focused on internationally known architects featured 
in the reference book Five Architects . 

The school also had reason to be proud of its 
students and faculty, who, while reaching out and 
touching the community with their work, also 
brought recognition to themselves and the school. 



Majors 




Architecture 



Architectural 
History 



Design 




Both photoji this p.if;t.' bv M.i^;.: 



Preservation 



Technology 



Architecture 




173 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 






Majors 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History 

Archaeology 

Classics 

Comparative Literature 

Dance 

English 

French and Italian 

Languages and 

Literatures 

Germanic and Slavic 
Languages 

Hebrew and East Asian 
Languages 

History 

Housing and Design 

Jewish Studies 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Radio, Television, Film 

Romance Languages 

Russian Area Studies 

Spanish and Portuguese 

Languages and 

Literat\ires 

Speech Communication 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 



By Robin Solomon 

In a college as diverse as the College of Arts and Humanities, there were bound to be many 
faculty and students who demonstrated the qualities which would bring them deserved recognition. 
That was the case during 1992-93. Both faculty and students were breaking the standard of excel- 
lence in all areas of the college. 

One faculty member who exemplified the kind of professor the University of Maryland strives to 
employ was Maynard "Sandy" Mack, Jr. Professor Mack was named the state of Maryland's 1992 
Professor of the Year by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Professor 
Mack provided UMCP students and students in the community with an invaluable service; his love 
of teaching. "What the students like more than anything," said Mack, "Is that I clearly love what I'm 
doing, and by the end of the semester, they all do, too." 

On November 5, 1992, the College of Arts and Humanities recognized the most distinguished 
undergraduates in the college who benefited from the teaching of a dedicated faculty. Awards were 
given to Freshman Scholars, now sophomores, who, during their freshman year, were in the top one 
percent of the freshman class. Freshman Scholar Jenny Gagne, Art major, said the awards was 
"encouragement for the future." 

The highhght of the evening came when the Senior Scholars were recognized. These five seniors 
were the most outstanding students from their respective departments. The Senior Scholars were 
Anne Brockett, Art History and Archaeology; Ana Restrepo, Dance; Eric Vesper, English; Jennifer 
Molineaux, Philosophy and Susan Garret, Spanish. Eric Vesper Said, "This is the capstone of my 
academic experience at this school." 

It was evident that the students and faculty in the college took great pride in their efforts to break 
the standard of excellence in the college of Arts and Humanities. 



^ Photo by Paul Vieir.^ 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



Photo by Maggie Saladay 



174 I Arts & Humanities 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 



BREAKING THROUGH TO UNDERSTANDING 

By Nicole Collins 

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences included an array of departments from Anthro- 
pology to the AfroAmerican Studies program. 

At the base of the behavioral and social sciences was the attempt to understand human beings, 
both individually and in groups. The departments shared a commitment to both applied and 
theoretical study, to interdisciplinary analysis of societal issues, and to developing in student the 
skills needed to participate in that analysis and study. 

Both students and faculty have benefited from the college's commitment to excellence. Clara 
Hill, psychology, was appointed editor of the journal of Counseling Psychology. Katherine Pedro 
Beardsley, Behavioral and Social Sciences, won the award for Outstanding Chapter Advisor of 
Alpha Lamda Delta Honor Society. The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences will continue its 
success due to dedicated faculty and students who care about breaking the standard of excellence 
in College Park. 





DEPTO^^I 






. i 


rS^^te.'^ 


I^^^X'^U 







:SS5f3® 





Majors 

Afro- American 
Studies 



Anthropology 



Criminal Justice 
and Criminology 



Economics 



Geography 



Government and 
Politics 



Hearing and 
Speech Sciences 



Psychology 
Sociology 



All photos this p.^--' 



* 



Behavioral and Social 
Sciences 



175 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT 



Majors 



Accounting 

Business and 

Management, 

General 

Business and 
Management, 
General/ Interna- 
tional 

Decision and 

Information 

Sciences 

Finance 

Management 
Science 

Marketing 

Human Resource 
Management 

Statistics 

Transportation 




Ph^itii b\ Tvrune Brooks 



BREAKING NEW GROUND IN BUSINESS 

By Robin Solomon 

The College of Business and Management at the University of Maryland at College Park had a 
great deal to be proud of this year. To start with, the Maryland Business School's MBA program 
was listed by both Forbes and Business Weekly Magazine as one of the 20 programs in the country 
that provides students with a cjuality education at an affordable cost. There are 680 students in 
Maryland's MBA program and 2,800 students currently enrolled in the Maryland Business School's 
undergraduate program. 

This year, these students got a chance to mo\'e into a new home on the College Park Campus. A 
new 127,000 square foot, four story building was built which houses state-of-the-art classrooms and 
laboratories that provide students and faculty with an excellent teaching-learning environment. 

Not only did the students get a new building , they also got a new dean. William E. Mayer was 
appointed bv President Kirwan as the new Dean of the College of Business and Management. Mr. 
Mayer, an alumnus of UMCP, brings to his position experience in the business world that will most 
definitely have a positive effect on the college and its students. 

The Business School had been making great strides toward excellence, and now with a new 
building with the facilities for students to produce great results and a new dean to implement ideas, 
the College of Business and Management will only have a bright future ahead. Indeed, the college 
is "Committed to excellence in teaching, research and service to the business community." 



Top left: New Dean of the College of Business and Management, William E. Mover took time out of his busy schedule to 
pose for a picture. Top right: The College of Business and Management was very proud of its new 127,000 square foot 
state-of-the-art building. 



2 7^ j Business & Management 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER MATHEMATICAL 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 



BREAiaXG THE BOUNDS 



By Robin Solomon 

The College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences (CMPS) was a 
technical institute within a large university. As scientists, students prepared to assume 
a leadership role and to make a contribution in developiiig the world of the future. 

The quality of the student was dependent, in part, on the quality of the education 
that the student received. In the College of CMPS, the Mathematics, Computer Science 
and Physics programs were rated among the top ten public universities in the country. 
The geology program was one of the few on the east coast, and the astronomy program 
was in the forefront in the modern approach to astronomy and astrophysics. 

Students and faculty of the college have taken advantage of their outstanding 
surroundings to bring acclaim to themselves and the college. Laveen Kanal, computer 
science, won the 1992 King-Sun Fu Award, the highest honor given by the Interna- 
tional Association for Pattern Recognition. Bernhard Leeb, Mathematics, received an 
Alfred P. Sloan Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. 

Many other students and faculty have achieved great success through the college 
and deserved to by recognized as people who have dedicated themselves to breaking 
the standard of excellence in the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences. 




Majors 




Astronomy 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 

Meterology 

Physics 



All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



CMPS 




COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



Majors 

Art Education 

Business Education 

Early Childhood 
Education 

Elementary Educa- 
tion 

English /Speech 
Education 

Foreign Language 
Education 

Home Economics 
Education 

Industrial Arts 
Education 

Industrial Technol- 
ogy Educaiton 

Mathematics 
Education 

Music Education 

Physical Education 

Reading Education 

Science Education 

Social Studies 
Education 

Special Education 

Theatre/English 
Education 

Vocational Educa- 
tion 




BREAKING THROUGH TO THE FUTURE 

By Robin Solomon 

The College of Education had many new and exciting programs initiated that brought great 
recognition to it during 1992-1993. One program that the College of Education was extremely 
proud of was the National Reading Research Center. The $7.7 million grant was awarded to a 
consortium of the university and the University of Georgia following a national competition. Dr. 
John Guthrie, a professor of human development in the College of Education serves as co- 
director of the center. 

The main goal of the center, developed through 41 research projects, was to find ways to 
motivate ypung students to read. Dr. Guthrie, quoted Mark Twain, "Literacy ain't no more use to 
the person who doesn't read than to the person who can't read." 

Another exciting endeavor for the College of Education was the relocation of The Center For 
Young Children. The center was designed to aide in teacher preparation through research and 
hands on experience in early childhood training. For five years, the center was located in Cam- 
bridge East Complex and accommodated 80 three to five-year old children in four classrooms. 
The new building plans to provide six state-of -the-art classrooms which will allow for the 
accommodation of 120 children. This new facility will Education majors to get more than ad- 
equate training for their future jobs. 

The College of Education had many outstanding people working on a great number of excit- 
ing projects to help better the college and the community. It is clear that the College of Education 
will continue to break the standard of excellence well into the future. 



Photo by; Paul Vieria 



Top photo: Celebrating their last Halloween before 
moving into their new building, Jennifer Stearns 
plays a spirited game with the children from the 
Center for Young Children 



Education 




"Becoming an 

Elementary 

school teacher 

has been a goal of 

mine since I was 

in elementary 

school." 
Heather Otis 



"I guess I'm an 

idealist but I 

want to be a 

teacher because I 

feel I have the 

ability to change 

and influence the 

next generation 

through my 
teaching. If I can 
have an impact 
on someone's life 
then I will feel 
that I've accom- 
plished some- 
thing in my 

career." 
Krista Parker 



Education 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 






Majors 



Aerospace 
Engineering 



Agricultural 
Engineering 



Chemical 
Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical 
Engineering 



Fire Protection 
Engineering 

Mechanical 
Engineering 

Nuclear 
Engineering 



BREAKING THROUGH THE BARRIER 

By Nicole Collins and Robin Solomon 

In the College of Engineering, studentsstudied any of 
eight academic departments ranging from Aerospace to 
Nuclear Engineering. Among the college's special 
facilities were subsonic and hypersonic wind tunnels, the 
fastest graphic simulators, and flexible manufacturing 
cells. 

The College of Engineering offered cooperative 
education programs with IBM, Ford, NASA, and DuPont, 
and PEPCO among others. The Cooperative Education 
program allowed students to interchange semesters of 
full-time paid employment with full-time study. Co-op 
gave students the experience needed in today's job 
market. 

The College of Engineering had a great many pro- 
grams and people it was proud of last year. Dr. Daniel 
Garber, Civil Engineering faculty member, won the 
Spring 1992 Excellence in Teaching award. Students in 
Civil Engineering took second place in the National 
Environmental Engineering Contest in Los Cruces, New 
Mexico in April. 

In August, students in the college placed in the Grand 
Solar Challenge in Japan with their solar powered car 
"The Pride of Maryland." The "Pride of Maryland 11" was 
under construction this past year. No doubt this and 
other endeavors will bring pride to the University of 
Maryland. 




Photo bv Ashish Bagai 




I'hoto by Ashish Bagai 



Photo by Ashish Bagai 



180 



Engineering 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 





^'f%fi. 




By Latifa Jackson 

The College of Health and Human Performance 
provided a strong foundation in the subjects of 
physical, health, kinesiology, and safety education. 
The college also provided a broad range of courses 
for the non-major students. The college also ran 
many valuable community programs including the 
Children's Health and Developmental Clinic, the 
Adult's Health and development Clinic, and the 
Physical Education Center. The college also offered 
special programs that are open on a university wide 
basis. On of these programs was Gymkana. Mem- 
bers of Gymkana pledged to keep themselves drug- 
free in order to show others that a clean lifestyle was 
beneficial. The troupe traveled throughout the 
United States performing at various universities, and 
culminated its activities with a gymnastic extrava- 
ganza at the University of Maryland. 

Another program that enhanced the level of 
excellence in the college was the Center on Aging. 
The center supported aging related activities for all of 
the colleges in the University of Maryland system. In 
addition to this, it provided valuable community 
education programs and offered technical assistance 
to practitioners who serve older adults. 

The courses worked together to provide the 
students with a well rounded education as well as a 
strong understanding of the physical side of health 
and human performance. 



Majors 



Health 
Education 



Kinesiology 



Recreation 



All photos 111 



Health & Human 
Performance 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 



Majors 



Advertising 



CREATING A MODEL PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL 

By Matilde Ott 

In 1985, the College of Journalism began a new challenge to be "one of America's two or three 
best by 1990." To achieve this goal, the college adopted a program designed for this challenge 
named— Toward 1990:Creating a Model Professional School. Some of the goals that the program hoped 
to fulfill were: increasing the number of faculty members, making the college into a limited enroll- 
ment program with a smaller undergraduate enrollment, increasing minority enrollment, replacing 
the broadcasting studio, and establishing a downtown reporting c enter in Washington and An- 
napolis, just to name a few. 

It is 1992 now, what ever became of the program? Over the last seven years since the program 
was initiated, the number of faculty members within the school; the college has established a 
limited-enrollment program; the number of undergraduates has decreased from 1,100 students in 
1985 to a mere 650 in the Spring of 1992; there was a 19 percent minority enrollment; a new state-of - 
the-art broadcasting studio was built in the Journalism building, and two news bureaus have been 
established; one each in Annapolis and Washington that submit over 800 stories in the region 
annually. 

The College of Journalism's goal to become number two or three in the nation was not fully 
completed, but the college has been names as one of the top eleven Exemplary Journalism Schools in 
the country designated by the Gannett Center for Media Studies. 



Broadcast 

News 



News Editorial 
Magazine 

News 



Public Rela- 
tions 




Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



1 o2 ) College of Journalism 




College of Journalism 

Welcomes 

Professor Eugene 

Roberts 

By Matilde Ott 

In the fall of 1991, former Executive 
Editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, 
Eugene L. Roberts, joined the faculty 
of the University of Maryland at 
College Park as a tenured journalism 
professor. During his 18 years of 
service at the Inquirer, Roberts led the 
newsroom to 17 Pulitzer Prizes. 

Before joining the faculty at Mary- 
land, Roberts was already involved 
with the University through his 
membership to the College of 
Journalism's Board of Visitors. This 
board was established to give recom- 
mendations to the college of how to 
prepare its students for careers in 
journalism. This board also played a 
major role in the development and 
enactment of the program; Toward 
1990: Creating a Model Professional 
School. 

Since joining the faculty a year ago 
Roberts has been impressed with the 
University as a whole. "The student 
are outstanding, there is a strong 
faculty and staff and the standards are 
improving," said Roberts. 

Roberts chose the University of 
Maryland over all the other universi- 
ties because he said he felt "it is one of 
the best journalism deparhnents in the 
country." 

Roberts taught two classes in the 
Fall semester and also chaired the 
national advisory board of the Knight 
Center for Specialized Journalism, as 
well as chairing the Pulitzer Prize 
Board for awards in journalism. 
Roberts was also the Senior Editor of 
the Washington Journalism Review 
that was based at the University of 
Maryland at College Park. 



I 



College of Journalism 



COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES 



Majors 



Botany 



Chemistry and 
Biochemistry 




■M. 





X 



Entomology 




r 



Microbiology 



Zoology 



Photos this page by Latifa 
Jackson 



BREAKING THE MOLD 

By Latifa Jackson and Robin Solomon 

The College of Life Sciences offered a broad range of courses for Maryland students in the 
subjects of living organisms, their interactions with one another and with their environment. 
Student were able to pursue academics in a specific area of scientific interest such as course on 
beekeeping or in the general area, like an introductory biology course titled the Principle of Biology. 
This was possible because the College of Life Sciences was concerned with the real world' applica- 
tion of scientific problems, not just the theoretical basis behind it. Whichever route that students 
took, it was equally assured that they would gain strong scientific foundation upon which to base 
their later knowledge. 

To help student in their quest for knowledge the university was awarded L3 million dollars by 
the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) to become part of the nation's largest privately 
funded effort to keep American students competitive in science and mathematics. 

Many students at the University of Maryland found that the College of Life Sciences prepared the 
students for the transition form and undergraduate position to that of dental, veterinary medicine, 
graduate or medical student. Potential science majors were also drawn to the University of 
Maryland's College of Life Sciences because of its proximity to the national government agencies 
and institutes for scientific research. Stacey Egerton, a second year Biology majors said she liked 
"the personal and prompt attention she received when she had a problem or question." She added, 
"the Dean and office staff were very resourceful as well." The caring atmosphere in the college was 
one of the reasons that it was so attractive to incoming students. 

Another drawing factor to the college was pointed out by William Higgins, associate Dean for the 
college and Director of HHMI, who said, "With this new award. College Park will have a biological 
sciences program that is one of the very best in the nation." 



1 o4 ] College of Life Science 



BREAKIX6 OUR BACKS 




—^ i / ^ — 



U'ii' 





Photo bv Paul \'ieir.i 



; r-:^ tlk^'^A'tt, 



By Robin Solomon 

As a rule, students try to live a stress free 
life. They achieve this stress free life style, 
student complete their assignments early, 
study in advance and alwrays keep on track 
with their daily planners. 

However, these students are a rare breed. 
Many students thrive on last minute pres- 
sure. They wait until their ulcers act up to 
know that it is time to start that 20 page 
paper that is due the next day They tell 
themselves that they will go to bed early so 
they can get up early to finish that project 
that is due tomorrow afternoon. Instead, 
they end up going to the Cellar and sleeping 
through their morning classes. But the work 
gets done because they are dedicated 
students. 

These students know that if they truly 
wanted to, they could live that stress free 
ife. But they want excitement. Waiting 
until the last minute is like playing chicken 
with time and one's own ability. Cramming 
is a way of life just as studying in advance is 
for some. This page is dedicated to those 
student who do not understand why others 
do not work better with two hours of sleep, 
a pot of coffee and a lot of nervous energy. 



"I usually end up 
waiting until the 
last minute be- 
cause I'd rather 
enjopy trhe week 
and just hate the 
last few hourts 
that 1 actually do 
work." 

-Liz Schwartz 



Yes I am a 
procrastinator." 
-Sean Kreiger 



"If I learned 
anything this 
semester, it's not 
to stick my head 
in the ground but 
to deal with 
things." 

-Anat Samid 



Photo by Tyrone Br. 



Finals 



185 



BREAKING THE BUDGET 



"The system kept 
increasing tuition 
but also insisted 
on removing and 
merging aca- 
demic depart- 
ments which is a 
major contradic- 
tion; especially 
when the Univer- 
sity of Maryland 
system wants to 

be a top ten 
institution aca- 
demically." 

Paul Vieira 




By Robin Solomon 

Once again , the University of Maryland at College Park was not immune to the declining 
American Economy. The state of Maryland's over $500 million budget deficit has caused some 
drastic changes at UMCP. Many programs and schools in the University have been hit hard. In 
fact, manv programs have been or were in the process of being eliminated altogether. 

The departments that were eliminated were the College of Human Ecology, the Agricultural and 
Extension Education Department, the Recreation Department, the Textiles and Consumer Econom- 
ics Department , the Industrial & Technological and Occupational Education Department, the Urban 
Studies and Planning Department, the Housing and Design Department and the Radio, Television 
and Film Department. 

Another effect felt by the budgets cuts was the lack of available staff to help run campus facilities. 
An example of this was the closing of the Gordon W. Prange collection; the world's most complete 
repository of publications produced by the Japanese during 1945-49. The collection was closed to 
help prepare the collection for preservation. The budget cuts prohibited any extra staff to be kept 
on to keep part of the collection open for use. 

The budget cuts also placed a direct burden on the finances of both students and parents. Out-of 
-state tuition was increased a substantial amount. Every student was also hit with a permanent $125 
tuition increase. A $50 charge was also added for each of the Fall 1993 and Spring 1994 semesters. 

Needless to say, the barrage of tuition increases and budget cuts that hit the institution recently 
cause students to become disgusted and accustomed to their presence. They only hoped the sacri- 
fices everyone made will keep UMCP running smoothly. 



186 



Budget 





All photos this spread by Maggie Saladay 



Budget ( 187 



BREAKING OUT OF THE CLASSROOM 



aas^iim^iih- ri'iV--^''-' -^'--'^^ai 



"The convience of 
I having the lecture 

series on campus 
[ makes going well 
I worth while." 

-Catherine Kerley 



"Ather having heard 
I Caroline Forche' read 
I her poetry, I felt very 

fortunate for having 
I gone.:" 

-Robin Solomon 




I'hotobv A^hish Bdgai 



COLLEGES HOST LECTURE SERIES 

By Robin Solomon 

The colleges and schools in the University of Maryland at College Park provided students and the 
community with great opportunities to see professionals from many fields lecture on a variety of 
topics. The School of Architecture has a fall lecture series entitled, "Five Architects: Twenty Years 
Later." The series focused on internationally known architects featured in the reference book Five 
Architects . The Graduate School's 92-93 Distinguished Lecturer Series focused on the environment. 
The series featured the perspectives of an atmospheric scientist, a botanist, a historian and a poet, 
the Decision and Information Sciences Group opened their new lecture series with a lecture titled, 
"An Architecture for Using the Global Information Network" by Gio Wiederhold, professor of 
computer science and medicine (research) at Stanford. 

Conferences were held on social issues as well as scientific and literature based lectures. The 
University's Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies sponsored a conference 
devoted to "Anti-Semitism: Historical Reconsiderations of an Ancient Prejudice." This conference 
was the 21st in a series of "Maryland Collocjuia in Jewish Studies." The Curriculum Transformation 
Project, the Office of International Affairs, Africa and the Americas, and the Women's Studies 
Program all sponsored a working conference entitled, "Crossing Boundaries: International Perspec- 
tives on Global Change and Gender Ecjuity." 

The conference was designed to open a dialogue on crucial gender issues. Deborah Rosenfelt, 
Women's Studies professor and conference coordinator, was excited about the conference and 
commented on the array of scholars and teachers who would be focusing on gender issues, "The 
boundaries we're crossing are both geographic and discipUnary," she said. 

Whichever building a person walked into on campus, a sign would be posted announcing the 
next lecturer(s) from any number of lecture series. Every school and college put forth the effort to 
bring in renowned professional from around the country to enlighten and entertain all who would 
take part in the informative lecture series. 



1 88 I Lecture Series 







™ 



Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 




Photo by Ashish Bagai 



Lecture Series ( 189 



Break Into Action 



Edited by Susan Arak 




Photo by Carlos Dopazo 



190 ) Organizations 




PROTeai 





The different 
opportunities 
college has to 
offer helps a 
student become a 
part of campus life. 

Getting involved in 
any of the 360 student organiza- 
tions at the University of Maryland 
gives students a chance to interact 
with others that share the same 
interests. 

"We try to form a well-rounded 
student by getting them involved 
in things other than academics." 
said Cissy Abell, who works in the 
office of campus programs. 

Being a part of a campus organi- 
zation can teach leadership and 
establish the ability to focus on 
interests while enjoying the extra- 
curricular activities. 

The diversity of the student 
organizations at the University of 
Maryland allowed students to 
BREAK INTO ACTION and lay 
back and forget about the academic 
world for a time. 

Story by Susan Arak 



"We try to form a 
w^ell-rounded stu- 
dent by getting 
them involved in 
things other than 
academics." 
-Cissy Abell 



Organizations 



[aryland Sailing Association 



m 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 



The Maryland Sailing Association 
provided opportunites for both the 
beginner and the expert sailor. The MSA 
was based at the Severn Sailing Associa- 
tion in Annapolis Bay- On weekends, 
members of the MSA could sail on the 
Capri and Laser II's. For teh more experi- 
enced sailor, the MSA participated in 
several intercollegiat regattas against such 
schools as Old Dominion, St. Mary's, and 
the Naval Academv. 



Candidn photo and copy proWded by the Man'land Sailing 
Association. 




192 I Maryland Sailing Assoc. 



R.J. Forghani and Tom DePaul enjoy some summer 
sailing on the Chesapeake Bay. 




P.A.C.E. 

People Active in Community Effort 



P.A.C.E. (People Active in Community 
Effort) was a student organization that 
volunteered at different homes in the 
community. We volunteer with homeless 
people from D.C. and we feel that giving a 
part of ourselves to help others was an 
important part of our lives. As Goethe 
once said, "Love is, above all, the gift of 
oneself." 

We will continue to sever our commu- 
nity for as long as we can, and when we 
graduate we will pass on our world of 
volunteerism to the future giving students 
of the University of Maryland. Remeber; 
"Never doubt that a small group of 
thoughtful, committed citizens can change 
the world, indeed it's the only thing that 
ever has. "-Margaret Mead. 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



Students for Clinton/Gore 





PACE/ Oinlon-Gore 




193 



Homecoming Committee 



^ 




Marc Tobias 

& 

Jennifer Storer 

Homecoming 

Chairpersons 



Marc Tobias and Jennifer Storer led the 40 person staff in making Homecoming 
'92 a classic. 

The Homecoming Committee planned and coordinated events that went on the 
week of October H-IS. 

Some of the events included in the busv weekend were, Greek Flag Football, 
Terrapin Trot 5K, Maryland Decathalon, Volleyball, Olympics, SGA Elections, 
College Park Clean-UP, a Talent Show, the Midnight Stree Run, President's Brunch, 
a Parent's Weekend, Maryland Showcase, the Senior Council at Maryland Auction, 
Cultural Group performance, a fightsong and banner contest, and a Pep Rally and 
Bonfire to cap off the week. 

"I think Homecomeing went so well this year because student groups were 
involved - not just the Greek organizaiton." said Marc Tobias, co-chairman of the 
Homecoming Committee. 




\ y4 1 Homecoming Committee 




Office of the Vice President for Student 

Affairs 

The Division of Student Affairs holds responsibihty for the coordination and direction of 
a variety of student services and student development programs. The vice president's 
office serves as an advocate for student issues and concerns within the administration of 
the campus and the university. The vice president, in conjunction with the departments 
in the division, promotes the individual development of all students, activities, campus- 
wide events and the addressing of environmental issues that affect campus life. 



m 




■-iW 






Richard Stimpson 
Assistant Vice President 




William L. Thomas, Jr. 
Vice President 



Drury Bagwell 

Assistant 
Vice President 




Sharon Fries-Britt 
Assistant to the Vice President 



Gretchen Vander Veer 
Assistant to the Vice President 



Janet Schmidt 

Assistant to the 

Vice President 




195 



1 




Maryland Media Incorporated 



^ ^ 



iHl 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



Maryland Media Incorporated is a non-profit organization that was established in 1971 by the Board of Regents to own and 
operate four student publication: the Diamondback, Mitzpeh, the Jewish View, Eclipse and the Terrapin. 

These publications were overseen by a Board of Directors that strove to provide a professional environment for students who 
were interested in the print media. The objective of the Board was not to censor or influence content of an publication but to 
provide guidance and advice when needed to the editors of these publications. 

Editors of all the publications must be full-time students and have complete control and maintain full responsibility for the 
publications that they produce. 

Members of the Maryland Media Board of Directors Include (from left) Michelle Kennedy, student at large; Nancy French, 
Secretary; Ira Allen, president; Michael Fribush, General Manager; Brian Schwartz, student at large; Elizabeth Cummings, vice- 
president, Diamondback editor; Chef Rhodes, faculty member; Rani Einzinger, Mitzpeh editor; Krista Parker, Terrapin editor; and 
Steve Lamphier, member at large. (Not Pictured- Shannon Murray, Eclipse editor, Michelle Singletary, member at large.) 



196 ) Maryland Media 



Eclipse 



Shannon Murray 
Editor in Chief 



The Eclipse, the black student 
newmagazine of UMCP, tried to capture 
the campus, state and world event that 
shaped and influence the African-Ameri- 
can community at College Park. 

The Eclipse, made a conserted effprt to 
reach out to surrounding communities of 
the University in and effort to promote 
unity. 





riHiluL'v I'riul Vieira 



Mitzpeh 





ti.' bv P.iiil V'li'ir,! 



Rani Einzinger 
Editor in Chief 

Mitzpeh, the Jewish View was 
the monthly student 
newsmagazine for the Jewish 
student population of the 
University of Maryland. This 
past year, Mitpeh expanded it's 
format and advertisers in an 
effort to capture the events that 
shaped and influenced the 
Jewish community, whether 
they centered on campus or in 
the world. 



Mitzpeh /Eclipse (197 




The Diamondback 




4 




Photo by Huai Hsin Lee 



Elizabeth Cummings 
Editor in Chief - Fall 



Alison Bennett 
Editor in Chief- Spring 



The Diamondback, the award-winning campus daily newspaper, provided 
students interested in the ins and outs of writing hard news copy, hands-on experi- 
ence. 

The paper covered topics that ranged from campus and local events to state and 
world news. This past year, the Diamondback production ec]uipment was updated 
with a new computer system and desktop publishing, which once again gave 
students the opportunity to work on equipment comparable to that of some national 
papers. 

The Diamondback held a circulation of over 20,000. Many former editors, writers, 
reporters and photographers have gone on to work for the top newspapers and 
magazines in the country. 



198 ) Diamondback 






I'hoto bv PjuI Vieira 



Terrapin Crier 




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Editor in Chief 
Tina Henry 



PRSSA/Terp Crier ( 199 





WMUC 




Photos this page by Paul Vieira 

200 1 WMUC 




Tau Beta Pi 



Tau Beta Pi, the National Engineering 
Honor Society, was founded in 1885 to honor 
engineering students who displayed distin- 
guished scholarship and exemplary character. 
The Universtiy of Maryland chapter, founded 
in 1929, was one of the largest chapters in the 
nation. The Maryland Chapter drew from all 
of the engineering disciplines to collect 
students who have shown an aptitude for 
engineering as well as the liberal arts. 




Photo bv P<iul Vieira 



Productions 





Pam Dzuiba 
President 



In 1992, SEE Productions 
continued their tradition of 
bringing concerts, lecture, and 
culutral event to the University of 
Maryland. 

SEE Productions was respon- 
sible for bringing such noted 
bancd as Alice in Chains, ICE-T, 
and Public Enemy to Ritchie 
Coliseum. SEE also sponsored 
Art Attack in an effort to provide 
students a greater appreciation for 
the campus diversity. 



SEE Productions/ 
Tau Beta Pi 




201 



Counseling Center 



Director: Dr. Vivian Boyd 

The Counseling Center 
provides comprehensive 
integrated services to meet the 
mental health and developmen- 
tal needs of students. It is 
considered one of the premier 
counseling centers in the nation, 
based on its quality services, 
research on student develop- 
ment issues, and its role in 
teaching and training. Over 
25% of the students who 
graduate from the university 
have used the Center. Counsel- 
ing services are free for stu- 
dents. Files are confidential and 
are not part of the university's 
educational records. 




Department of Campus Parking 



Director: J. David Allen 

The 
Department 
of Campus 
Parking is 
the place to 
go when 
students, 
faculty, staff 
and visitors 
want to park 
their vehicle 
on campus. 
This depart- 
ment pro- 
cesses 55,000 
permits in 
order to 

effectively manage the parking areas on campus. Upholding the UMCP Parking Rules 
and Regulations through education, engineering and enforcement is another function 
of DCP. The staff develops new programs and promotes current policies to help the 
campus community. Parking data is provided to students through a campus map, 
brochures, fliers, articles and advertisements in the campus newspaper and participa- 
tion in campus activities. 





202 



I Counseling CfukT ni'p.irlnn.- 




Dining Services 

Director: Matthew W. Sheriff 





The Department of 
Dining Services served 
over four million 
meals to the campus 
during the year, 
through 31 diverse 
restaurants and 
eateries all across 
campus. Umberto's, 
the Italian table service 
restaurant in the 
Stamp Student Union, 
became the students' 
favorite campus 
restaurant while The 
Rossborough Inn 

remained the faculty's choice for fine dining. 

One of the highlights of the year was Dining Services' participation in "A Day For 
Giving." In conjunction with SGA, and a coalition of student groups. Dining Services 
provided a picnin meal for 4,000 homeless people on the Upper Senate lawn next to 
the capital. The meal was served and entertainment was provided by student volun- 
teers. 



Adele H. Stamp Union and Campus Programs 

Director: Dr. James Osteen 



ims I 




The Adele H. Stamp Student Union serves as the center of 
campus life for the entire University community. Over its 40 
year history, the Union has grown from a small recreation 
center into the prominent source of social, educational, and 
recreational activity for the campus. Today, the Union provides 
a diverse range of programs and services used by over 19,000 
people daily. Campus Programs features services for student 
organizations, involvement and leadership development oppor- 
tunities as well as advising for campus fraternities and sorori- 
ties. The Union is also a source of education, with students 
gaining work experience and learning lifetime leadership skills 
through employment and service in the Union's many pro- 
gramming committees. 



student Union and 
Campus Programs 




203 



Campus Guest Services 



Director: Patrick Perfetto 



Campus Guest Services is the University's host to the 
thousands of guests and visitors who come to the Univer- 
sity each year. 

We greet about 12,000 visitors annually at the Visitor 
Center, located in "The Dairy" on Route 1. Forty-five 
percent of our visitors seek admissions information. The 
Visitor Center staff assures that these potential future 
students have a good first impression of the University. 

Every year we provide lodging, meals, meeting space 
and a variety of other services to about 30,000 guests who 
attend summer conferences, competitions, workshops and 
camps. About half of these guests are teens who may 
someday think of their summer experience at Maryland in 
deciding where to attend college. 

Finally, Campus Guest Services coordinates the Memo- 
rial Chapel and the hundreds of weddings that occur there 
each year. Many newlyweds are recent graduates. 

From when they first visit the campus, to attend a 
summer event or stop for information at the Visitor Center, 
to their "big event" (or a friend's) in the Chapel, we're 
pleased to be a part of making our student's years at 
Maryland just a little more special! 





Orientation Office 



Director: Dr. Gerry Strumpf 




The primary mission of the Orientation 
Office is to ease the transition of new 
students into the University Community. 
Orientation accomplished this mission by 
coordinating for all new students, orienta- 
tion programs that focus on advisement 
and registration, coordinating the "Dis- 
cover UMCP" program that is a campus- 
wide welcome for new students and by 
coordinating sections of EDCP 108-0, 
College and Career Advancement: Con- 
cept and Skills, which is an ongoing course 
for new students at College Park. 




204 




Office of Commuter Affairs 



Director: Dr. Barbara Jacoby 



It all began with only a shoebox full of 
cards listing housing and two vans, bought 
second-hand by the SGA to provide 
security service on campus. The 1992-93 
academic year marks the Office of Com- 
muter Affairs' 20th Anniversary of service 
to students who live off-campus. The 
shoebox has been transformed into a 
computerized off-campus housing referral 
service. The two vans have grown into the 
40-bus Shuttle-UM system. The familiar 
red-and-white buses provide reliable 
service to students on ten commuter 
routes, four evening security routes, and 
Call-A-Ride. In addition OCA provides 
students with information on transporta- 
tion alternatives and other commuter 
issues. 

OCA also sponsors a number of pro- 
grams to assist students in getting more 
involved in the life on campus. Some of 
these programs include S.H.O.W., "Good 
Morning, Commuters!" and UMaps. 





University Health Center 



Director: Dr. Margaret Bridwell 




The University Health Center (UHC) is committed to provid- 
ing high quality health care. They are an ambulatory care center 
offering professional medical care to treat illness and injuries, 
and health education programs to help you maintain and 
improve your health. They are accredited by the Association for 
Accreditation for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). The UHC 
provides the following confidential services: dental clinic, men's 
clinic, women's clinic, allergy clinic, sports medicine, physical 
therapy (located in the HHP building), nutrition education, 
mental health clinic, social services, substance abuse treatment, 
anonymous HIV /AIDS testing, radiology, a laboratory and a 
pharmacy. Individual and group health education programs are 
available on topics such as sexual health and contraception, date 
rape, stress management, substance abuse, dental health, eating 
disorders, and depression and suicide. All currently registered 
students are eligible for care. All students' medical records are 
strictly confidential and may only be released by the student's 
consent or through a court-ordered subpoena. 



Commuter AJtairs/ 
Health Center 




205 




Campus Recreation Services 



The Department of Campus Recreation Services is 
established to provide a variety of programs and 
services that will contribute to the health and well- 
being of the University of Maryland community. The 
mission of the Department is to educate participants 
on the responsible use of leisure by providing an 
atmosphere that fosters the development of lifelong 
patterns of recreational activity and by providing 
opportunities for participation for all members of the 
University community. This mission is realized by: 

-Offering structured competitive opportunities in 
a variety of individual and team sports (Intramural 
Sports Program). 

—Offering opportunities for individuals with a 
common sport interest to engage in organized club 
activity which may be instructional, competitive, 
social, or developmental (Sport Club Program). 

—Providing access to recreation facilities, equip- 
ment, and activities for convenient, informal partici- 
pation (Open Recreation). 

—Offering structured and non-structured opportu- 
nities for improving and maintaining physical fitness 
(Fitness /Wellness Program). 





Office of Judicial Programs 



Director: Dr. Gary Pavela 

The primary function of the Office of Judicial 
Programs (JPO) is to resolve disciplinary charges against 
students promptly and equitably. 

An integral component of this process is the Central 
Judicial Board. JPO supervises four student judicial 
boards involving approximately 40 undergraduate and 
graduate students. Each board consists of five to seven 
students; one of these students is trained to act as the 
presiding officer and graduate student acts as the board's 
advisor. The boards have the responsibilities of review- 
ing cases of alleged misconduct and recommending 
sanctions to the Director of JPO. 

The Office of Judicial Programs also supervises a 
newly formulated Student Honor Council which is 
comprised of 40 undergraduates and graduate students. 
This board has the responsibility of reviewing alleged 
cases of student academic dishonesty and recommending 
sanctions to the Director of JPO. 

In acidition, JPO trains and supervises 14 student 
Community Advocates who, under the direction of the 
Campus Advocate, represent the position of the Univer- 
sity in cases against student respondents. 



'yrifi \ othce ol Judicial 

" I Programs/Campus Rec, 






University Book Center 



Director: Paul Maloni 

The University Book Center serves the College Park 
Campus with a complete line of textbooks, general 
books, supplies, gifts, and Maryland insignia clothing. 
The official University book store is conveniently 
located in the lower level of the Stamp Union building. 

The staff is committed to providing the Campus 
with an attractive and interesting retail operation with 
their primary focus on service to the customer. 



Graduate Apartments 



Director: Dale L. Eppinger 





The Department of Graduate 
Apartments is organized as an 
auxiliary department, under the 
Division of Student Affairs at the 
University of Maryland. The organi- 
zation is charged to generate from 
established rental fees the revcenue 
necessary to meet daily operating 
expenses as well as provide funding 
to modernize the apartments through 
renovation. Within this framework, 
the Department strives to provide 
housing which is reasonably priced 
and maintained at accepted levels of 
quality, and is managed in a manner 
which is responsive to the diverse 
needs of th graduate students being 
served. The department provides 
housing for approximately 450 grad 
students and, when families are 
included, approximately 1200 per- 
sons. 



UBC/Craduale Apartments/ 207 





Department of Residential Facilities 

From the Department of Residential Facilities Staff 
who provide services to the residence halls at College Park 






Sincerest wishes for a successful future to those who have just graduated, 
and best of luck to those reniaining behind who are finishing their 

academic programs. 



Resident Life 



Director: Dr. Patricia Mielke 



The Department of Resident Life is responsible for management of the residence 
halls as well as for cultural, educational, recreational, and social programming activities 
in the residence halls. A staff of undergraduate and graduate employees helps to meet 
the needs of resident students. 

On-campus housing/dining is readily available for all undergraduate students in 35 
undergraduate residence halls near academic, cultural, social, and recreational re- 
sources of the campus. All-male, all-female, and coeducational living arrangements are 
available in the halls, which accommodate from 34-575 residents. Most new students 
will be assigned to traditional residence halls. Apartments for four to six students, and 
kitchenless suites for four to eight students are available for upper class students. 

All students are encouraged to live on campus. Freshman and transfer students will 
find housing accommodations and student interaction a benefit to the college experi- 
ence. Once accommodated, students may remain in residence halls throughout their 
undergraduate career. 




yf)Q \ Residential Facilities/ 
"" I Resident Life 




Organizations in Action 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira ' 



Organizations ( 209 




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210 1 Organizations 





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Organizations (211 




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212 ) Organizations 





Organizations in Action 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



Organizations (213 



Breaking the Mold 



Edited by Gina Dugan 




214 jGreek Divider Page 




As we 
move further 
into this de- 
cade, a trend is 
forming. Greek 
life is constantly 
changing, not only 
at Maryland, but across 
the country as well. Quickly 
fading into the past are the days of 
harsh hazing and out-of-control 
partying. Pledge programs are 
becoming shorter, and some pledg- 
ing programs have been elimi- 
nated. 

What will always remain, how- 
ever, are the days of fun, team- 
work, togetherness, and philan- 
thropy that everyone in the Greek 
community experiences. 

Whether it is Greek Week, 
Homecoming, or Rush, Greeks 
have continued to prove them- 
selves a steadfast, united group of 
unique organizations that have 
carried on the strong traditions that 
were set forth by their founding 
members as much as 150 years ago. 

Despite negative levels that have 
developed over the years, Greeks 
have continued to be strong sup- 
porters of such philanthropies as 
the American Heart Association, 
Alzheimer's disease research, and 
prevention of child abuse. The 
University of Maryland Greeks 
have started to prove that they are 
a strong asset to not only our cam- 
pus but our community as well. 

This section shows UM Greeks 
finally BREAKING THE MOLD. 



"My college 
experience 
would not be 
complete if I 
weren 't a 
Greek. " 

-Kimberly Blaine | 
President 
Sigma Kappa 



Photo bv Paul V'leira 



Greek Divider Page ( 215 



Greek 
Week 



Break Out 



By Gina Dugan 

In their annual custom of craziness, 
UM Greeks came out in full force for 
Greek Gods and Goddesses: Greek Week 
1992. In this week long celebration of 
'Greekness', brothers and sisters competed 
to find out whose matchup was most 
athletic, spirited, and strong. 

The weeks' activities included Olym- 
pics, Dance Contest, Lip Sync, sports 
competitions like volleyball and flag 
football, and the week was capped off by 
Festival on the Row. The UM Greek 
system also sponsored a project to raise 
money to keep the campus libraries open. 

In the Olympics, which took place over 
several days, different teams took place in 
races such as the Tricycle Race, the Leap 
Frog Relay, and Tug-of-War. Each 
matchup got points for placing in each 
individual event. 

Volleyball and Flag Football competi- 
tions were done single elimination 
tournament style, with the top teams 
getting points for their matchups for 
placing. 

The Lip Sync contest, held on the 
Thursday of Greek Week, involved 
matchups doing a skit with music that 
related somehow to their theme. The 
winners of this event. Phi Kappa Sigma- 
Sigma Kappa, performed a skit that 
involved the Greek god of Vanity, Narcis- 
sus. 

At the end of the week, all the points 
from all the competitions were added up 
to reveal a final Greek Week overall 
champion. The honor went to Beta Theta 
Pi-Gamma Phi Beta this past year. 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



(top) Pulling with all their might, these fraternity 
brothers try to help their team win the tug-of-war 
competition, (bottom) Members of various fraterni- 
ties and sororities chear on their brothers and sisters 
in the Olympic portion of the week. 



216 Greek Week 



The Spirit 




This sorority member practices for the tricycle relay. 



A member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon and a member of Kappa Delta 
leap frog their way towards the finish line, during the Leap Frog 
Relay contest. 



Greek Week 217 



Break Out 




218 ) Greek Week 



AU Photos this spread by Pau] Vieiera 



(top) Pi Kappa Alpha and Alpha Phi show their support and spirit at the Lip 
Sync contest, (bottom left) Dizzy Dee Gee? This Delta Gamma sister practices 
for the 'Dizzy Izzv' Relay, (bottom right) This fraternity brother flips over the 
greek Olympics. 



The Spirit 





Overall Greek Week 

Winners 



1st Place: Gamma Phi Beta 
and Beta Theta Pi 

2nd Place: Alpha Delta Pi 
and Sigma Nu 

3rd Place: Zeta Tau Alpha, 

Sigma Phi Epsilon and Pi 

Kappa Phi 

Honorable Mentions; 

Kappa Alpha Theta and 

Sigma Chi 

Delta Gamma, FIGI, and 

Kappa Alpha 




(top) A Zeta Tau Alpha sister and a Sigma Phi Epsilon brother show 
their moves at the Dance Contest, (bottom) Members of all different 
frats and sororities show their volleyball prowse at Festival on the Row. 



Greek Week 219 



Live It Up ! ! ! 




220 ) Formals 




There comes a time once every 
semester when you must pitch the 
jeans and sweatshirts... when it is 
time to let your hair down... when it 
is time to live it up... 
It is time for formal. 

By Gina Dugan 

A big part of Greek tradition continued this year as 
fraternities and sororities held their formals. Most formals 
were held in Wahsington, D.C. or Baltimore, but some 
chapters traveled as far as Virginia or stayed as close as 
their own houses. These posh events, usually held once 
every semester, were a chance for members to get out of 
College Park for a night with all their brothers or sisters and 
their dates and get a taste of the good life. 



All photos this spread donated by Sigma Kappa Sorority 



Formals 




221 



Greeks Lend a 




I'lioto b\- PuTul Vieira 



Opposite Page - Jennifer Borschow and Marc 
Solomon, Homecoming philanthropy co-chairs, 
sit among donations made by Greeks to the 
Hand to Hand cause. 
Above- The two finalists in Kappa Alpha 
Theta's "Twister on the Row" battle it out on a 
whipped-cream covered mat. 



Greeks have fun while 
helping those less fortunate 

By Gina Dugan 

When the community was in need, the 4,000-plus men and women of the Greek 
system responded in ways unequalled by most other campus organizations. 

Each house had their own individual philanthropies, including organizations like 
The American Heart Association, Inherit the Earth, child abuse prevention and 
helping the homeless and hungry. Houses sponsored projects and events such as 
Kappa Alpha Theta's "Twister on the Row" and Zeta Tau Alpha's "Marylandopoly," 
among many other sporting and game events. 

The Greek system as a whole joined together to make even more contributions to 
the community. During Greek Week, they raised money to keep the campus 
libraries open. 

During Homecoming, they pulled together once again to collect clothing, 
blankets and toiletries for Hand to Hand, a program for the homeless. Although the 
effort was intended to be campus-wide, the Greeks were the only people who went 
out and collected goods for the cause. And collect they did, donating a total of 
about 5,800 items to the cause. 



222 j Philanthropies 



Helping Hand 




Photo bv Celia Escudera-Espados 



Philanthropies ( 223 




FALL RUSH 



By Shelley Edsall 

For more than 500 girls this Fall, Rush 
was a word that evoked feelings such as 
excitement, anxiety, uncertainty, and 
exhilaration... all leading up to that final 
day of Rush when they received bids and 
chose to be part of the Greek system. 

After registering and meeting with a 
Rho-Chi (Rush Counselor), Rush groups 
began the week-long process. The first 
two nights were called "Tours", where 
rushees visited eight of the 17 houses the 
first night and nine the second. 

Next was "Set of 12." After receiving 
invitations after Tours, the rushees picked 
12 houses to go back to visit again. 

At "Set of 6," the same idea followed 
except this time it was more formal. Most 
girls wore nice pants or skirts. By this 
time, many rushees were starting to form 
opinions about which houses they 
wanted. 

Finally came the pinnacle of Rush: 
Preference. On that night, rushees got to 
know the more serious part of sisterhood 
at their top three choice houses. At the 
end of the night, the rushees ranked those 
houses in order from favorite to least 
favorite, hoping to get into their top 
choice house. 

The next day, September 21, was Bid 
Day, where the Rushees found out which 
houses they had been invited to pledge. 
And so began their Greek hves... 

For guys, the Rush experience was 
slightly different because it was much 
more informal. Each fraternity held 
several Rush events, like Monday Night 
Football and barbecues with sororities. 
Like sorority rush, each event got more 
selective , and fewer rushees got invited 
back to each one. Since the men are less 
formal, it is possible for a male rushee to 
get more than one bid. 

The Maryland Greek System is a great 
experience for everyone who decides to 
pledge. For all those who did not join the 
fun this year, remember there is always 
next year. Rush! 




Photo by Ashish Bagai 



Top - One girl takes a peek at Alpha Delta Pi's display at the Rush Expo on Hornbake Mall 
Above - A rushee meets the sisters of Delta Delta Delta at a Set of 12 party. 
Opposite page - Alpha Phi "welcomes aboard" the rushees. 



FaU Rush 



SEE THE 






^ 









Photo by Ashish Bagai 



Fall Rush 225 




Homecoming 
1992 



Maryland.. 




Above left - A Delta Gamma catches an egg in an attempt to win 

points for her matchup. 

Above right - A Pi Kappa Alpha "Slashing" out a tune at the 

Talent Show. 

Right - The Tau Epsilon Phi's win spirit points as they throw 

their Kappa Alpha Theta counterpart up in the air. 

Opposite page - Getting into the groove at the talent show. 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



226 ) Homecoming 



It's A Classic!!! 




"Classic" tradition continues 



Much like Greek Week, Homecoming 
was filled with events for Greeks to 
partake in. Although the events were 
open to all students, Greeks were the 
main participants. 

The week started on Sunday, October 
11 with an annual event known as "Terra- 
pin Trot." Greeks, students and faculty 
turned out in record numbers this year to 
raise money for the disabled. 

Following is a schedule of how the 
week went: 

Monday saw the start of the Flag 
Football competition on Fraternity Row 



and the Maryland Decathalon. 

Tuesday, the Volleyball tournament 
began at the Armory and the Olympics 
were in full swing on Fraternity Row and 
Chapel Field. 

Wednesday, Flag Football and Volley- 
ball continued. The Old Line Party 
carried the SGA elections. 

Thursday was a busy day, beginning 
with College Park Clean-up. Flag football 
finals were held, the talent show was held 
in Ritchie Colliseum and there was a 
"Midnight Stress Run." 

Friday was dubbed by the Homecom- 



ing committee as "Maryland Showcase." 
There was a fight song and banner 
competition, as well as a barbecue. A 
"Senior Class at Maryland Auction" was 
held. Later, there was a pep rally and 
bonfire on Chapel Field. 

Saturday kicked off with a family 
weekend brunch, followed by the big 
homecoming football game (Terps v. 
Wake Forest). The game was followed by 
an Alumni Tent Party. 

Sunday the President's Brunch was 
held. 



Homecoming ( 227 



CLASSIC 




Above - Phi Sigma Sigmas and Delta Sigma Phis 
break out the Spirit at the Talent Show. 
Right - A Gamma Phi Beta cheers on her team atop 
the shoulders of a Beta Theta Pi. 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



228 ) Homecoming 



SHOTS 




Homecoming [ 229 




Breaking Out 

Edited by Allison Chang 







Photo by Paul Vieira 



230 Divider Page 




•• 



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1 



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irilta 





All of us were 
initially sentenced 
to four years of 
hard work in this 
state institution 
known as the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 
Most of us arrived here still 
chained to our parents. Moin and 
Dad unlocked the handcuffs but 
we found that we were still shack- 
led-only now to USP or CORE 
requirements. At first, we disre- 
garded all of this and partied til we 
puked and (puked some more.) 
Then we realized that we had to go 
to class. 

Because of academic 'probation' 
we had to report to class several 
times a week in the promise that 
we would get something out of it. 
There wasn't much chance of 
getting out early for good behavior 
with the Route so close, but after 
being sentenced to a few extra 
semesters of hard labor we found 
the key to our escape-a diploma. 

For most of us it was probably a 
little more than four years since we 
first got here and we have paid our 
dues (not to mention the tuition). 
Our diplomas were ready to unlock 
the door and whatever the door 
leads to, come December, May or 
August, we were Breaking Outta 
this place. 





"After strug- 
gling for five 
and a half years 
to make it 
through col- 
lege, I can 
honestly say 
that I am glad 
to finally be 
graduating, 
and leaving the 
University of 
Maryland." 
—Anonymous 

Maryland 

Gradcuating 

Senior 





Divider Page 




231 



SENIOR SURVEY: ANY QUESTIONS 



? 



In October, while seniors were having 
their pictures taken, the yearbook staff 
conducted a very unscientific survey of 
the senior class. We wanted to find out 
some of their best and worst memories of 
the University of Maryland, what they 
have accomplished here and what they 
plan to do after graduation. 

Since we randomly surveyed only 
about 300 people, the results on the 
following pages are not a complete 
reflection of the entire senior class. They 
are the opinions of a cross-section of those 
who are graduating this year. Hopefully, 
some of their memories are similar to 
some of your own. 

We received completed surveys from 



150 females, 118 males and 16 people 
who did not indicate what gender they 
were. Some of them put their names on 
the surveys so we have included their 
names with their comments, while others 
chose to be anonymous. 

We asked questions such as "Are you 
graduating after 4 years or less of col- 
lege?", "Was college work as easy as you 
expected?", "Did you meet future hus- 
band/wife niaterial here?", "How many 
times have you changed your major?", 
"What are you doing after graduation?", 
"How big of a debt do you have?", and 
"What campus activities were you 
involved with?". On the following pages 
are the results. 



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Michael Abramowitz 


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Tarek Abu-Gharbieh 




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Gina Adams 


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GVPT 






Kemal Adnan 


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Studio Art 


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Emilv Agueda 


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Biology 


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Scott Aidlen 
Psychology 
Joseph Aiello 
IVSP 
Jeffrey Aiton 

ejus' 

Rana Al-Haj 
Business / Marketing 
Louis Alar 
Industrial Safety 



Glenn Alba 
Sociology 
Lisa Alexander 

ejus 

Jeffrey Albrecht 
Economics 
Shelton Alexander 
Toni Ali 
GVPT 



232 



Abramowitz-AUbaum 




Edward Alton 
Advertising Design 
John Amato 
Computer Science 
Sean Ambrose 
English 

Margaret Andrasik 
Finance 
Clarissa Ang 
Accounting 



Marc Anthony 
Criminology 
Arthur Antonelli 
Civil Engineering 
Gloria Aparicio 
EDIT 

Jennifer Apfelbaum 
MGMT/Consumer St. 
Marvellen Arias 
MGMT 



Kevin Arline 

ejus 

Yvette Armas 

MGMT 

Lisa Armstrong 

IVSP 

Brian Arnold 

Architecture 

John Arnold 

ejus 



Stephanie Arnold 

GVPT 

Megan Asdorian 

English 

Susan Ator 

Math Ed. /Spanish 

Theodore Au 

CCJS 

Richard Auer 

Astronomy 



Lori Avin 

Marketing 

Joan Awung 

Agriculture 

David Ayoroa 

GVPT 

Anita Baarns 

Fine Arts 

Rose Ann Badar 

ejus 



Marcus Badgett 
Sociology 
Fadi Bahou 
MGMT 
Damien Baker 
Biology 
Roberta Baker 
Education 
Diane Baldridge 
Education 



Alton-Baldridge 233 



Harry Balsamo 
CNEC 

Berhanemeskel Banko 
Electrical Engineering 
Daneen Banks 
GVPT 

Andrea Banton 
Accounting 
Derek Barnes 
Advertising Design 



Ivorine Bames-McGhie 

Dietetics 

Leita Barrett 

Sociology 

Norbert Barrion 

Studio Art 

Danielle Barth 

History 

Alex Batchelder 

Geography 



Jennifer Bates 
Accounting 
Hugh Battle 
Political Science 
Debra Bauman 
Individual Studies 
Kristen Baumgarten 
Mariangela Baxter 
Secondary English Ed 



Laura Bayon 
Biology 
Tom Beach 
Biology 

Stephen Beasley 
Accounting 
Sherri Beatty 
GVPT 
Joseph Beck 
Business 



Jeffrev Becraft 
RTVF 

Anita Bedrosian 
MGMT/Conumer St- 
Rachel BeU 
Accounting 
Moktar Bello 
French / Economics 
Pamela Belton 

ejus 



Marie Bendik 

Elementary Ed. 

Andrew Bensinger 

Sociology 

Allison Berg 

GVPT 

Steven Berhowits 

English 

Carley Berkman 

RTVF 





234 I Balsamo-Berkman 




Rosalind Berkowitz 

Eileen Berlin 

Journalism 

Julie Bernsohn 

HESP 

Bonnie Berry 

Gen.Bus.MGMT 

Douglas Bertelmann 

GVPT/BMGT 



Mojgan Besharat 
Biology 
Sameer Bhatti 
Stephanie Biddle 
lournalism 
lonathan Binstock 

ejus 

Henry Birckbichler 
History 



Berra Biricik 
Economics 
James Bitgood 
Economics 
Michele Blaile 
Early Childhood Ed. 
Scott Blair 
Engineering 
Adam Blank 
GVPT 



Jason Blatt 

GVPT 

Julia Block 

CCJS 

Michelle Blount 

KNES 

Wendy Blumson 

Elementary Education 

Michael Bolen 

Finance / Marketing 



Thomas Bonagura 

Biology 

Joseph Bonistalli 

GVPT 

Michele Booth 

Accounting 

Karen Bordner 

Economics 

Stephen Borger 

Business 



lennifer Borschow 

GVPT 

Kimberly Boulmetis 

Finance 

Tanara Bowie 

lournalism 

Glenn Bowman 

Theater 

Christine Braddish 

History 



Berkowitz-Braddish ( 235 




Jennifer Bragg 

Journalism 

Kimberly Braisin 

Art 

Kamla Branche 

CNEC 

Scott Branche 

EDIT 

Thea Brandhorst 

Psychology 



Darren Brandt 

CNEC 

Jill Brandt 

Journahsm /Spanish 

Julie Brandt 

MGMT/Consumer St 

Jennifer Brannon 

HESP 

Audrey Branson 

Education 



R ick Braunstein 

Journalism 

Byron Breland 

CNEC 

Denise Breland 

Psychology 

Victoria Brennan 

Criminology 

Ralph Brenner 

Electrical Engineering 



Derek Brent 

Accounting 

Elizabeth Brett 

Sociology 

Michael Brewer 

CCJS 

Elizabeth Briggs 

RTVF 

Jamie Bright 

RTVF 



Christina Brinson 
Romance Languages 
Stacv' Brinster 
Human Res. Mgmt. 
Jace Broadhurst 
GVPT 

Mark Brooks 
Early Childhood Ed. 
Steven Brower 
Marketing 



Brian Brown 

Finance/AAST 

Christy Brown 

Art/ Horticulture 

Denise Brown 

Psychology 

Kevin Brown 

KNES 

Scott Brown 

Fire Protection Eng. 





236 ) Bragg-Brown 



> 


't 




Scott Brown 

Finance 
Stanton Brown 
BMGT 
Zlia Brown 
Chem.Eng./Math 
Leslie Brownstein 
Accounting 
Paula Brumbelow 
Geography 



Laurie Beth Brunner 
English 

leffrey Buchoff 
Computer Science 
lennifer Buczek 
Hementary Education 
Beatrice Bugnosen 
English 
Jennifer Bulls 
Interior Design 



Lakisha Bullock 

ejus 

Keith Burgess 
Marketing 
Lisa Burgess 

ejus 

Wendy Burke 
Accounting 
Kristin Burks 
Business/Marketing 



Alison Burns 

journalism 

Denise Burns 

Psychology 

Chandra Burrows 

DIS 

William Burrus 

Fire Protection Eng. 

Wesley Butts 

Astronomy 



Patricia Buysse 
English 
Joe Byrnes 
Sociology 
Douglas Cain 

ejus 

Maria Calain 
Brian Calls 
English 



Corinne Calis 
Psychology 
Dennish Camlek 
Journalism 
Cinnamon Campbell 
I'ducation/Linguis. 
ioseph Campbell 

ejus 

Liqin Cao 
Computer Science 



Brown-Cao 



237 



Rebecca Caplan 

HESP 

Vincent Cappello 

Biology 

Christopher Carlson 

Marketing 

Cynthia Carlson 

Math 

Ana Paula Carmo 

Psychology 



Sheryl-Lynn Caroff 
Human Res.Mgmt. 
Dena Carpenter 
Consumer Econ. 
Daedra Carrio 

ejus 

Carlton Carter 
Finance 
Thomas Carter 
German 



Eric Carzon 
GVPT 

Jospeh Catania 

History 

Woody Catherwood 

Finance 

Kimberly Catlett 

Microbiology 

Anne Cavanaugh 

EDCl 



Stacy Cavooris 

Education 

Yijung Chae 

Interior Design 

Isabelle Chahpoori 

GVPT 

Michael Chamberlin 

RTVF 

Arvin Chan 

Accounting 




FOUR- YEAR PLAN!?! 



* 52.8% of the seniors we surveyed 
said they are graduating in four 
years or less of college(including 
transfers). 

* 46.1% of the seniors we surveyed 
said they had not changed their 
major at all. 

* 31.3% of the seniors we surveyed 
said they had changed their major 
at least once. 

* 22.2% of the seniors we surveyed 
said they had changed their major 
more than once. 



* 55.6 % of the seniors said they 
thought college work was just as 
difficult as they thought it would 
be. 

* 27.8% of the seniors said they 
thought college was more difficult 
than they thought it would be. 

* 14.8%> of the seniors said they 
thought college work was easier 
than they thought it would be 
(Of course, it depended on their 
chosen major.) 



* 52.1% of the seniors said they 
were involved in non-Greek activi- 
ties including everything from 
working for Maryland Images to 
being a member of a religious or 
ethnic organization to intramural 
sports. 

* 15% of the seniors surveyed were 
involved with fraternity /sorority 
activities. 

* 18% of the seniors were involved 
with both Greek and non-Greek 
activities. 



238 ) Caplan-Chan 



THIS IS NOT THE LOVE BOAT 



A pathetically huge 73.9% of the 
seniors we surveyed declared an 
emphatic "No!" when we asked 
them whether or not they had met 
the man /woman of their dreams 
here at the University of Maryland. 
18.3% said, in flowers and hearts, 
"Yes, and we're getting married the 
day after graduation, 1 love him/ 
her so much, blah, blah, blah." 7% 
gave us a coy "Maybe." 



Apparently University of Mary- 
land students aren't that compat- 
ible. Many commuters can attest 
to the fact that it is hard to meet 
people here unless you live on 
campus or are in a fraternity or 
sorority. Several of the seniors 
surveyed said that they had met 
that "special someone" at another 
schooKcollege or high school), at 
their job, or at home. 



My advice to those who are still 
"looking for love in all the wrong 
places"(Maryland being one of the 
worst) is to: 

a) Take out a personals ad in the 
"City Paper"(and don't forget to 
specify whether you want male to 
female or male to male, etc.) 

b) Try to get a spot on "Studs". 

c) Get out of the house more. 

d) Transfer to a different school. 




Amber Chaney 
International Business 
Cheng-Shien Chang 
Engineering 
Daniel Chang 
Architecture 
\ickie Chang 
Marketing 
Stacey Chantker 
I3ietetics 



David Chapman 

DIS 

Nitinar 

Chartsiriwatana 

Marketing 

Manju Chatani 

Economics 

Antonia Cheatham 

RTVF 

Bobby Cherian 

Marketing 



I^auren Chesnut 

Psychology 

Tae Chi 

Transportation 

> eong Chi 

MGMT/Consumer St. 

Dina Chin 

Architecture 

Lily Chin 

Elementary Education 

Peggy Chiu 
Engineering 
Anthony Cho 
Accounting 
Mary Cho 
Fashion Merch. 
Myungsook Cho 
Finance 
Sun Cho 
Plant Science 



Chaney-Cho 



239 



Sung Cho 

HESP 

A. Sean Cohen 

ejus 

Ngoc Chu 
Microbiology 
William Chu 
Mechanical Eng. 
Evan Chuang 
Accounting 



Jimmy Chung 
Math 

Kay Chung 
Accounting 
Linda Chung 
Apparel Design 
Susan Ciardiello 
Psychology 
Anthony Ciccarello 

ejus 



Nancy Cipolla 
Education 
Amy Clark 
Elementary Ed. 
Emily Clark 
Finance 
Cynthia Clarke 
Journalism 
Erin Clarke 
Speech 



Brian Classon 
Electrical Eng. 
Melissa Cleis 
Psychology 
WiUiam Clifford 

ejus 

Tina Clifton 
Theater 
Amy Cloth 
Accounting 



NeeU Clute 
Biology 
Mark Coates 
GVPT 

Nichole Cobbs 
Sociology 
Derrick Cobey 
Electrical Eng. 
Vivian Coburn 
Computer Science 



Lucinda Coddington 
Elementary ED. 
Elisa Cohen 
Psychology 
Kelly Cohen 
Education 
Marcie Cohen 
Speech Comm. 
Michael Cohen 
CNEC 




Cho-Cohen 



Stacey Cohen 

RTVF 

Stephanie Cohen 

Economics/Sociology 

Lisa Colaianne 

English 

Michael Colborn 

CCJS 

Kimberly Coleman 

Criminology 



Roslyn Coleman 
Family Studies 
Valerie Coleman 
Speech Comm. 
A Hyson Collins 
Ther. Recr. 
Sharyn Conlan 
English 

Michael Connelly 
AgriBusiness 




All candid photos this page by Paul Vieira 



Cohen-Courtney ( 241 




Sharen Cox 

Marketing 

Erin Craig 

Marketing 

Brian Crapeoff 

Electrical Engineering 

Osmund Crawford 

ejus 

Cynthia Cresser 
GVPT 



Natasha Criss 
Criminology 
Jennifer Crist 
English 
Jennifer Crock 
Advertising Design 
KeUie Cross 
Psychology 
Raymond Crowell 
Education 



Mary CuUather 
Elementary Education 
Dawn Curtis 
Microbiology 
Maura Curtis 

ejus 

Daniel D'Orazio 

Finance 

Kirsten Dahlberg 

Spanish 



Richard Daley 
Fire Protection Eng. 
Edward Danielian 
Journalism 
Sandip Dasgupta 
Electrical Engineering 
Melissa Dauby 
Electrical Engineering 
David Daughenbaugh , 
Marketing 



Mark Davenport 

Journalism 

Jennifer Davick 

Journalism 

Krista Davies 

History 

Paul Davilman 

Speech Communicatior 

Donna Davis 

Elementary Education 



Todd Davis 

Finance 

G. De Cea-Naharro 

Computer Science 

Asika De Silva 

Biochemistry 

Nishantha De Silva 

International Business 

Edward Debiasi 

Economics 




ii^^ti 



242 Cox-Debiasi 




Melissa Deboard 
Journalism 
Todd Defelice 
Biology 

Katherine Defoe 
AMST 

Christine Degnan 
Sociology 
Nichole Delafield 
Apparel Design 



Niroshan Derera 

Electrical Engineering 

Richard Desaussure 

Finance 

Austin Devereux 

History 

Eileen Devine 

KNES 

Cathy Deweese 

GVPT 



Donna Dewick 

Math 

Shwan Deyo 

Journalism/English 

Linda Di Camillo 

HESP 

Lee Diamondstein 

ejus 

Michele Dick 
Elementary Educ. 



Shannon Dickey 

ECE 

Melanie Dillon 

Speech Comm. 

Maria Dinenna 

Elementary Ed. 

Steven Dingledine 

GVPT 

Michelle Dinsmore 

ejus 



Vincent DiSandro 

Accounting 

Jennifer Dix 

Journalism 

Samantha Dix 

Biochemistry 

Binh Do 

Math 

Phuong Anh Do 

Accounting 



Tonya Doby 
Journalism 
Himanshu Dodhia 
International Business 
Michael Dolan 
Aerospace Eng. 
Glenn Donaldson 
Journalism 
Lisa Donaldson 
Comm. Dev. 



DeBoard-Donaldsonf 243 




lenrdfer Donnelly 


JHHBI 


Zoology/NMRT 


mj^^^^m 


James Donohue III 


W^ ^K 


CMSC 


MC^ "^ •! 


Brian Donoughe 




Elementary Education 


g,vdfll ■. Jlfe 


James Douglas 


H^^Hv_ ,^^HI 


Accounting 


^^^Hk^' I^^^K 


Jodi Douglas 


^^^^B j^^^Hi^ 


Public Relations 


^B^I^H 



James Doyle 
Psychology 
Scott Drennan 
Aerospace Eng. 
Malcolm Drewery 

ejus 

Darren Drozdov 

ejus 

Hung Du 
Electrical Eng. 



Nicholas Dubois 
CNEC 

Aaron Dudley 
Accounting 
Allison Dudley 
Human Res. Mgmt. 
Diane Duffy 
Journalism 
Felicia Duffy 
Microbiology 





I HAVE TO FIND A JOB 

NOW?! 



Amazingly enough, 43.6% of the 
seniors we surveyed said they 
have absolutely no debt-no credit 
card debt, no student loans, no 
money owed to parents, etc. 
(Somebody should beat them up). 
42.9% of the seniors said they have 
debts ranging from $1,000 to 
nearly $40,000!!!(These people 
need to start playing the lottery or 
start sending in those Publisher's 
Clearing House things.) 7.7% of 
the seniors owe so much they 
wouldn't even tell us. 

With all of this debt running 
rampant in the senior class, only 
25.7% of them have jobs lined up 
for after graduation. 31.6% are 
going to rack up more debt by 



going to graduate school. 16%- of 
the seniors surveyed are going to 
be scouring the classified ads and 
sending out resumes like they 
were pizza flyers after graduation. 
5% of those surveyed said they are 
going to work first and then go to 
graduate school. 13% of the se- 
niors we surveyed are going to 
either "sleep" or take a much- 
needed vacation by travelling (in 
India, Africa, South America, 
Europe as well as the United 
States) as soon as they get their 
diplomas. 7% don't have a clue as 
to what they might do after they 
leave the University of Maryland. 



I'hoto by Allison Chang 



244 Donnelly-Duffy 




Nadine Duhamel 

ejus 

William Dumayas 

Engineering 

Michael Dunlavey 

English 

Kirk EXinsavage 

CMSC 

Sean Durbin 

Mechanical Eng. 



Dionne Duren 
Economics/CJUS 
Bradley Dwin 

rtvf' 

Steven Dworkin 
Finance 
Pamela Dziuba 
Journalism 
Caroline Eames 
English 



Mary Edwards 

English 

Maureen Edwards 

Psychology 

Minako Ehara 

Art History 

Stacy Eichwald 

KNES 

Jennifer Eig 

GVPT 



Neil Eisenberg 
Accounting 
Amy Elam 
CMSC /Economics 
Basil Eldadah 
Biology 
Jami Elkin 
Psychology 
Timothy Endres 

ejus 



Fred Ensign 
Economics/ Finance 
Lauren Erickson 

ejus 

Reginald Escalante 
Accounting 
Albert Esposito 
Urban Studies 
Kimberly Estrada 
CIUS 



Ellen Estroff 

English 

Jeffrey Ettenger 

GVPT 

David Etzler 

Finance 

Nicholas Evageliou 

GVPT/English 

Tracy Everett 

Economics 



Duhamel-Everett 




245 



Rachel Exelbert 
English 
Kelly Eyler 
Education 
Joseph Faasen 
Geography 
Lisa Eager 
English 
Kevin Fallon 
Accounting 



Joseph Fanning 
GVPT 

Norma Faraco 
Marketing 
Jason Farrell 
Advertising Design 
Dorothy Fedis 
Zoology 

Jennifer Feldman 
HESP 



Michelle Feldman 

GVPT 

Nicole Fenchel 

Fashion Merchandisini; 

Amy Feng 

Journalsim 

William Ferguson 

Transportation 

Tanya Fernandez 

Biology 



Kelly Ferrar 
Family Studies 
FrarJc Ferrara 
GVPT 
Karen Fideli 
Marketing 
Tammy Fields 
Economics 
Aldo Figallo 
History 



Laurie Fine 

Psychology 

Melissa Fireman 

Sociology 

Debra Fisher 

RTVF 

Jennifer Fishman 

Journalism 

Michelle Fishman 

Family Studies 



Lorena Fister 
MGMT/Cons. Sts. 
Marc Fitzgerald 
Biochemistry 
Steve Fitzgerald 
Economics 
Frank Fitzmaurice 
Finance 
Elizabeth Flage 
Russian/GVPT 







PI 



^MJ^k 





246 ) Exelbert-Flage 




Caryn Flannery 

Education 

Tracy Flemming 

Finance 

Kelly Fleshman 

FMCD 

Bryan Flood 

CNEC 

Sonya Florance 

Consumer Econ. 



Edward Fluhr 

GVPT 

Alexis Fogel 

CCJS 

La tony a Fogle 

Accounting 

Kendra Foltz 

Nuclear Engineering 

Richard Forsythe 

Biological Sciences 



Matthew Forte 
English 
Crystal Foster 
Marketing 
Pamela Founds 
Marine Biology 
Daryl Fox 
KNES 

Jacqueline Fox 
Speech Comm. 



Steven Franklin 

CAPT 

\ icki Franz 

k\ES 

L li rrie Frazee 

HMCD 

Christine Frazee 

FMCD 

Kellv French 

Computer Science 



Kristen Friedman 

FMCD 

David Fries 

Engineering 

Jennifer Fuller 

Business 

Seth Funk 

Journalism 

Roni Gahardini 

Animal Sciences 



ii* Gislen Gadpaille 
Business 

Donald Gakenheimer 
Business/MGMT 
' Jennifer Gale 
Horticulture 
Eric Gallun 
Journalism 
Irving Gan 
Biology 



Flannery-Gan 




247 



Amit Ganani 
Mechanical Eng. 
Elena Garcia 
International Bus. 
Robert Garcon 
Engineering 
David Gardiner 

ejus 

John Garland 
Marketing 



Mahesh Gehani 

Economics 

Tanya Geiger 

Biology 

David Gelling 

RASP 

Marc Gentile 

Speech 

Carmen Gentry 

History 




Gail Garofalo 


^^L 


Psychology 


_^^^HHhl 


Susan Garrett 


-(.^.^^^^B^L "^^^^^V 


Linguistics/Spanish 


"Wg''*' '^^TB". 


Thembi Garrett 


j^r Jk 


Family Studies 


^^Bjl ' M^t 


Amy Gatton 


^^^H ..,- JIml 


Psychology 


^^^^ ^^^^HB 


Valerie Gay 


^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Accounting 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H[v 



lason Gaydovchik 


/Ik 


CMSC 


■ ^ll 


Charlene Gayle 


f ^ ^I 


Consumer Economics 


T -- <rf 


O. Gbemiye-Etta 


4 


Economics 


f 


Jennifer Geare 




Accounting 


'^ J£>. 


David Gearing 


# 


KNES 


1 



^t J! 






248 ) Ganani-Gentry 



Photo bv T)Tone Brooks 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 




Karen Gentry 

GVPT 

Saranto Georgopoulos 

Engineering 

Ivan Gerstein 

Accounting 

Suha Ghannam 

Marketing 

Vishva Gheewala 

Finance 



Sausan Ghosheli 
RTVF/GVPT 
Ernesta Gibbs 

ejus 

Andre Gibson 

ejus 

Susan Gillette 
Geography 
Delmar Gillus 
Mechanical Ene. 



Patrick Gilmore 
GVPT 

Patrick Gilroy 
eriminology 
Hope Ginsberg 
Business 
eharlene Glee 
Journalism 
Timothy Gleeson 
Finance 



Lonnie Glerum 
Electrical Eng. 
Howard Gobioff 
Computer Sci. 
Randall Godette 
GBS 

Rajiv Goel 
Biology 
Amy Goetting 
Studio Art 



Abigail Goines 

Early Childhood Ed. 

Alyson Gold 

Keith Goldan 

Finance 

Debra Goldman 

Psychology 

Lisa Goldman 

Speech 



Shari Goldstein 

Criminology /ejus 

M. Leticia Gomez 

Sociology 

Monica Gonzales 

Microbiology 

Eric Goodman 

Design 

D. Goonewardena 

Finance 



Gentrv-Goonevvardena I Z.^y 



BEST OF 
MARYLAND 

The question was "What was 
the best thing about the Uni- 
versity of Maryland?" 
"Monday nights at the Cellar." 
-Charles L. Ross III 
"The high-rise dormitories." 
-Gary T. Sampson(Was he being 
sarcastic?) 

"The ladies."-Phil White 
"Future top 20 basketball team" 
-Paul J. Hickey 



"All those fun-filled, zany cam- 
pus-sponsored activities." 
-Mark Griskey 
"Going to the Brickskellar" 
-Nicholas Dubois 
"Spring Break and summer vaca- 
tion '-Daneen Banks 
"The fountain in McKeldin Mall" 
-Jennifer Molineaux 
"The turtle in front of McKeldin" 
-Amy L. Elam 
"Tailgates"-Laura Woods 
"Gary Williams came" 
-James Douglas 




^ .p^-M '^"'^f^' 



,!''inii(iTin' 



David Goozman 

ejus 

Judith Gorden 
Sociology 
Raquel Gordon 
Electrical Eng. 
Robin Gordon 
RTVF 

William Gormley 
MGMT 



David Goto 
Computer Science 
Jeffrey Gottschalk 
Astronomy 
Wendy Grachik 
Sociology 
Michael Grant 
Economics/GVPT 
John Graves 
Marketing 



James Gray 
EDIT 

Padraic Gray 
Mechanical Eng. 
Susan Gray 
Accounting 
Thomas Gray 
Finance 

EUzabeth Grayson 
Education 



Gabrielle Grayson 

Spanish 

Kevin Grayson 

Zoology 

Eugeania Green 

Biology 

Eunice Greenaway 

Business Education 

Douglas Greenberg 




^^^^^^r^9 ^^ ^^^^^^H ^^^^^^^B*** ^^ 





W 




250 ) Goozman-Greenberg 




Marc Greenberg 
Accounting 
Jennifer Greene 
Intl. Bus/Transp. 
Jeffrey Greenfield 
Marketing 
Darrell Greenlee 
Electrical Eng. 
Andrea Gregor 
Studio Art 



Jennifer Gregory 
GVPT 

Michael Greigg 
Architecture 
Derek Griffith 
Psychology/ Afr. St. 
Glenn Griffith 
English 
Carv Grill 

ejus 



Mark Griskey 

Urban Studies 

Judith Grossman 

Psychology 

Darren Grove 

Engineering 

Donald Grove 

English 

llya Grozovsky 

Economics 



Emelda Guin 

AgriBusiness 

Miriam Gunsher 

Education 

Stephanie Gusow 

RTVF 

Raynette Gutrick 

Finance 

Dana Gyory 

Secondarv Education 



Matthew Haas 

GVPT 

Freweini Habteselasie 

Chemistry 

Csaba Hadas 

International Bus. 

Nidal Haddad 

.Accounting 

leffrev Haendler 

Mechanical Eng. 



Eva Hafiz 
English 

Tracey Hagerty 
Sociology 
Kimberly Hahn 
Daniel Hailu 
Engineering 
Katherine Hake 
Elementary Ed. 




Chauncey Hall 
General Bus./MGMT 
Shane Hallen 
CNEC 

Carol HambUn 
Special Education 
Monica Hamilton 
Speech /Pre-Nu. 
Lawonne Hamlin 
General Business 



Monica Hampton 
RTVF 

Dennis Hancock 
Marketing Ed. 
Sharon Haney 
Sociology 

Jugianto Hanggodo 
Chemical Eng. 
Kyla Hanley 
RTVP/Sttidio Art 



Tara Hanley 

Sociology 

Maieka Hansard 

AASP 

Christopher Hanzich 

Finance 

Pauline Harding 

English 

Andres Hardouin 

Marketing 



Michele Harper 
Lisa Harrell 
MGMT/Cons. St. 
Jason Harris 
Economics 
Jodie Harris 
Finance 
Mario Harris 

ejus 



Richie Harris 
AASP 

Wayne Harris 
Studio Art 
Meredith Hart 
Psychology 
Diana Harfstein 
Accounting 
Jill Haschen 

ejus 



Cheryl Haser 

Journalism 

Dana Haskins 

Journalism 

Nathan Haskins 

RTVF 

Naoko Hatayama 

GVPT 

Clarence Hatcher 

Safety Engineering 





252 Hall-Hatcher 




e 


\ 


m^ 


\ 


V 




r 







Ruth Hatcher 
Accounting 
Michael Hatfield 
Accounting 
Stephen Hauf 
General Bus./MGMT 
Steven Hawley 
Journalism 
Qaisar Hayat 
Civil Engineering 



Paula Hayden 
Special Education 
Joseph Hayden, Jr. 

ejus 

Danielle Haywood 
HESP 

Bonnie Heard 
Mechanical Eng. 
Tracy Hearne 
Animal Science 



Alyson Heichman 
Early Childhood Ed. 
Karen Heinle 
GVPT 

David Heissner 
Mgmt. Info. Sci. 
Susan Heller 
Advertising Design 
Suibel Helmig 
Elec. Eng./German 



BEST OF MARYLAND- 



continued 



"Everything was great!" 

-Melodie Kretetz 

"[It's] a whole diverse world within 

itself."-Lawrence Solow 

"The leaves are beautiful." 

-Leslie Streeter 

"The shuttle"-Wendy Henderson 

-"The Diamondback comes out 

daily" 

-"being on your own with friends" 

-"the 'Vous" 

-"women and partying" 

-"lots of things to do" 

-"The black student support and 

friendship!" 

-"very competitive" 

-"resources available" 

-"variety of majors" 

-"close to home" 

-"the clubs" 



-"too much to list" 

-"Greek life" 

-"I met my boyfriend." 

-"variety of classes" 

-"away from home" 

-"food co-op" 

-"living on campus" 

-"population size" 

-"beautiful campus" 

-"diversity" 

-"location" 

-"the feeling of accomplishment 

when you're done" 

-"a chance to meet people, grow up 

and learn a lot" 

-"Engineering School" 

-"Computer Science Department" 

-"College of Journalism" 

-"PHIL 447, ENGL 392" 

-"Business School" 



-"Accounting program" 

-"Study Abroad Programs" 

-"Criminal Justice Department" 

-"French Department" 

-"Psychology Department" 

-"Elementary Education" 

-"Free ice cream cone!" 

-"atmosphere" 

-"sports" 

-"I'm still waiting." 



Hatcher-Helmig ( 253 



Barry Henderson 

Computer Science 

Douglas Henderson 

GVPT 

Wendy Henderson 

Advertising Design 

Brad Hendrick 

CNEC 

Brian Hendricks 

Urban Studies 



Francoise Henriette 

French 

Robert Henriod 

Geography 

Lea Ann Hepler 

RTVF 

Alhson Herald 

Sociology 

Deborah Herendeen 

Zoology 



Angela Herring 

Sociology 

Troy Hershberger 

AgriBusiness 

Lisa Hershman 

English 

Paul Hickey 

Mechanical Eng. 

Rosalind Hill 

Family Studies 



Michael Hilliard 

Marketing 

Joel Hinzman 

English/RTVF 

Jennifer Hirsch 

Psychology 

Mindy Hirshburg 

Enghsh 

Philip Ho 

Finance 



Tat Chi Ho 

Chemistry 

Laura Hobson 

Psychology 

Krystell Hoffman 

Economics 

Michael Hofman 

GVPT 

James Holdemess 

Education 



Sabrieta Holland 

Zoology 

Soraya Homayouni 

Enghsh 

James Hook 

Knesiology 

Janna Hopkins 

Linguistics 

Mark Hopkins 

Fire Protection Eng. 




^^^1^ 



1^ (^ 





254 [Henderson-Hopkins 




Laura Hoppenstein 
Psychology 
Stephen Houff 
Civil Engineering 
Rebecca Hougnou 
General Business 
Tremelle Howard 
Sociology /A ASP 
Frederick Howarth 



Kimberly Howze 
English Literature 
Richard Huang 
FMCD 

William Huang 
Aerospace Eng. 
Tara Hudson 
Nat. Res. Mgmt. 
Kimberly Huffman 
FMCD 



Sabrina Huffman 
Apparel Design 
Miguel Hull 
G VPT/ Economics 
Dannielle Husinga 
Electrical Eng. 
Asif Hussain 
Engineering 
Mehjabeen Hussain 
Bus. Mgmt./Mktg. 



Marianne Hwang 

GVPT 

Allen Ingling, Jr. 

Economics 

Damani Ingram 

Education 

Tracy Inguanti 

Elementary Ed. 

IJnda Irvine 

Special Ed. 



Emily Irwin 
Microbiology 
Michelle Isemann 
Education 
liffry Ismail 
Biology 

Yoshitaka Iwasaki 
Recreation 
Jennifer Jablon 
Fashion Merch. 



Christopher Jackson 
Nuclear Engineering 
Ronald Jacob 
Finance 
Olaf Jaehnigen 
GVPT/German 
Sumita Jain 
Aerospace Eng. 
Shavonne James 

ejus 



Hoppenstein-James [ 255 




Stephanie James 
English/Afr. Sts. 
Tammy Jamison 
Biology 

Monika Jankowski 
Biology 
Rachel Jamiey 
Elementary Ed. 
John Jaques 
Education 



Daniel Jardeleza 
Art Education 
Joseph Jardina 
GVPT 

Michael Jarmolowich 
Speech Comm. 
Ann-Margaret Jean 
Industrial Tech. 
Aaron Jenkins 
Marketing/Finance 



Kelley Jenkins 
Journalism 
Daniel Jennings 

ejus 

Deirdre Jennings 
Mktg./lntl. Bus. 
Laura Jin 
Psychology 
Jung Joh 
History 




MOST DUBIOUS ACHIEVEMENTS 

OF MARYLAND 



The question was "What was the 
worst thing about Maryland?" 

"Parking tickets"-Kim Boulmetis 

"Utterly ridiculous requirements to 

be considered in-state" 

-Scott Branche 

'Dining hall selection" 

-Janna Patterson 

"It wasn't in New York." 

-Susan McSpedon 

"The dead worm smell after it rains 

near P.G. 2 "-Leslie Streeter 

"Hills, long walks"-Tom Meyer 

"Cramming for exams" 

-Claudia Rios 

"Group projects"- Alicia Marshall 



"The decline of the party system" 

-Marc Greenberg 

"I have to pay it back" 

-Shelton Alexander 

"The architecture"-Mark Griskey 

"Deadlines"-Soraya Homayouni 

"Books are so expensive" 

-Michelle Feldman 

"Fire alarms" 

-Jennifer Molineaux(she must live 

in the high-rise dorms) 

"Math 115"-Kimberly Watts 

"Rudeness of secretaries" 

-Neeli Clute 



-"my ex-roommate" 

-"budget cuts/tuition hikes" 

-"parking" 

-"attitude of people" 

-"the cost" 

-"long lines" 

-"bad advisors/advising" 

-"red tape/bureaucracy" 

-"large classes" 

-"difficulty getting classes" 

-"non-English speaking T.A.'s" 

-"work" 

-"being far from home" 

-"being close to home" 




256 ) James-Joh 





^V^' '^ vft' ^^Ir ^ 




Adrian Johnson 

Psychology 

Andrew Johnson 

GVPT 

Elduise Johnson 

Accounting 

Kristen Johnson 

CNEC 

Pamela Johnson 

ejus 



Brenda Jones 

ejus 

Camille Jones 
Biology 
Carmen Jones 
Economics 
Cornell Jones 
Accounting 
Luther Jones 
GVPT 



Monica Jones 
Consumer Economics 
Laura Jordan 
Finance 
Patrick Jordan 
Mechanical Eng. 
Tara Jordan 
English 

Michael Joseph 
Anthropology 



Sangeeta Joshi 
Journalism 
Stacie Jovner 
GVPT 

Karen Kaiser 
RTVF 
Lisa Kaiser 
Journalism 
Lori Kaiser 
Animal Science 



Sanjeev Kalanidhi 
Economics 
Pankaj Kalra 
Jodi Kam 
Elementary Ed. 
David Kaminsky 
CNEC 
Aaron Kane 
Gen. Bus. Mgmt. 



Jane Kang 
English 
Amv Kanjian 
■Accounting 
Annie Kao 
lennifer Kaplan 
Theater 
Cynthia Kassis 
Mgmt./Cons. Sts. 



Johnson-Kassis ( 257 



Kevin Kastner 

Economics 
Douglas Kaufman 
Psychology 
Laurie Kazinoff 
RTVF 

Christopher Keane 
Geology 
Marcia Keating 
Psychology 



Dawn Keer 
Speech Comm. 
Kevin Kelly 
Engineering 
Robert Kelly 
Agri-Econ. 
Matthew Kenneally 
Economics/CCJS 
Linda Kensicki 
Journalism /Bus. 



Matthew Kenyon 

BMGT 

Ron Keplinger 

Aerospace Eng. 

Shannon Kerns 

ejus 

Suat Keskin 
Economics 
John Travis Keyser 
Civil Engineering 



Alia Kholodnov 

GVPT 

Eunjin Kim 

GBS 

Jihee Kim 

DIS 

Jin Kim 

Apparel Design 

Stephen Kim 

Marketing 




WORST OF MARYLAND- 



continued 



- racism 
-"too big" 

-"hard to get things done on cam- 
pus" 

-"Resident Life policies" 
-"it's impersonal" 
-"stereotypes" 

-"not enough bars, my major being 
cancelled" 

-"scheduling / registration" 
-"financial aid" 



-"football team" 

-"parking meters" 

-"studying" 

-"faculty" 

-"price of fruit" 

-"no school spirit" 

-"the commute" 

-"distance between classes" 

-"construction" 

-"chicks" 

-"ending" 



-"the night life" 

-"8:00 class" 

-"the basketball team and the 

computer labs" 

-"parking in lot 4" 

-"service is terrible" 

-"Greeks" 

-"photocopying" 

-"wasted money on meal plan" 

-"cramming" 




258 



Kastner-Kim 



WORST OF MARYLAND 



-continued 



-"living with strangers as freshman" 

-"not being able to graduate in four years just because you can't get into 
classes before they close" 

-"They are experts at sucking the students dry of money" 

-"need more time between last day of classes and start of final exams" 

-"trying to balance work, social life, and school" 

-"probation of men's basketball" 



-"can't say anything was really that 
bad!" 

-"wasted money on the meal plan" 

-"Organic Chemistry Department" 

-"English Department" 

-"everything but the ice cream 
cone" 








#4 



^■H^i^^i^ 



V 




Sun Kim 
Zoology 
Young Kim 
Marine Biology 
Michele Kindsvater 
URSP Studies 
E. Kiotsekoglou 
Microbiology 
Jason Kirsch 
CNEC 



John Kittelton 
GVPT 
Amy Klein 
Education 
Cynthia Klein 
Finance 
Steven Klein 

ejus 

Raymond Kline 
General Business 



Gideon Kloze 
Sociology 

Lawrence Lee Klump 
Accounting 
Margaret Knapp 
Anthropology 
Erin Knight 
HESP 

Graham Knight 
Speech Comm. 



James Knight 

Electrical Eng. 

Ross Knoblauch 

Sports Info. 

Shawn Knott 

Sociology 

Glen Koepenick III 

RTVF 

Mila Kofman 

GVPT 



Kim-Kofman ( 259 




Eileen Kohler 


M. 


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BMGT/German 


A^"^ 




Mark Kohler 


I 1 


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Electrical Eng. 


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Takeshi Kojima 






GVPT 


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, 


Patricia KoUappallil 


^ 


English 


A Mi^^^ 


^^^ ^^^^ 


Jill Korman 


^^^^^^^■k ^^^^K^ 


^M^B . ^^^^H 


Speech Comm. 


HKhH 


MlA 



Karen Kostelnick 
DGC/Info. Sci. 
Mary Kowalchuk 
Accouting/Mktg. 
Sheryl Krakow 
Elementary Ed. 
Jennifer Krantz 
Art History 
Kristin Kraske 
Mechanical Eng. 



Melodie Krefetz 
Psychology 
Jennifer Kreiss 
Accounting 
Shelly Krejci 
Marketing 
Sarah Krimins 
Microbiology 
JuUe Krolicki 
American Studies 



Raymond Krouse 
Accounting 
Adam Krulewitz 
GVPT 

Marie Kuhns 
Elementar)' Ed. 
Victoria Kurfess 

ejus 

Yuksel Kumaz 

RTVF 



June Kurtz 
Journalism 
Sloane Kurtz 
Marketing 
Yoon Kwak 
RTVF 

Mary Labib 
Electrical Eng. 
Rosalie Lacorazza 
English 



Tina Lagana 
Recreation 
Roberto Lagdameo 
Economics 
Vasilios Lahanas 
GVPT 
Peter Lahny 
General Business 
E-Jiun Lai 
Finance/Intl.. Bus. 



Ah 





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260 



Kohler-Lai 




Andrea Lakin 

Psychology 

Kenneth Lambert 

Computer Science 

Stanley Lambert 

Biology 

Samuel Lamphier 

CMSC 

John Lanasa 

Journalism 



Charlene Land 
Intl. Business 
Victor Landa 
Computer Science 
Carlos Landau 
GVPT 
Enre Laney 

ejus 

Daniel Langdon 
Marketing 



Michael Lanier 
Mechanical Eng. 
Joseph Lapalme 
Geography 
Jennifer Laroche 
English Ed. 
Patricia Larsen 
Elementary Ed. 
Heather Laschewer 
Psychology 



Lincoln Lashley 
Agribusiness 
Danielle Laskey 
Psychology 
Tami Lass 
Zoology 
Vanessa Latham 
Journalism 
Monica Lathan 
Psychology 



Philip Latona 

Accounting 

Doris Lau 

GVPT 

Simone Laufer 

Education 

Daniel Lavner 

Architecture 

Anthonv Lawrence 

CCJS 



Erica Lawrence 

CMPS 

Andrew Lax 

Accounting 

Mark Lazo 

Fire Protection Eng. 

Luan Le 

Business 

Thuan Le 

Finance 



Lakin-Le 




261 



Jason Leadbetter 
English 
Dian Leake 
English Ed. 
Kimberly Leaman 
Elementary Ed. 
Stacey Lebowitz 
Psychology 
Darrell Lee 
Economics 



Deborah Lee 
Microbiology 
Dwuana Lee 
Family Studies 
Eun Joo Lee 
Elementary Ed. 
Linda Lee 
Journalism 
Liza Lee 
Chemistry 



Shinja Lee 
General Business 
Robert Lehman 

ejus 

John Lehr 

Transportation 
Monica Lehr 
Recreation 
Adamu Lemu 
Animal Science 



Walter Leon 
Arch. History 
Suzanne Lepofsky 
Journalism 
Pamela Lepp 
Architecture 
Joshua Lerman 
Finance 
Sean Lesane 
Psychology 



Maggie Leung 

Russian 

Melissa Leung 

Russian 

Yee-Fan Leung 

Electrical Engineering 

Corri Levine 

Business/Marketing 

Lisa Levine 

Early Childhood Ed. 



Lauren Levitan 
Elementary Ed. 
Michelle Lewis 
Psychology 
Toni Lewis 
Psychology 
Willie Lewis 
RTVF 
Su Liang 
Accounting 





262 jLeadbetter-Liang 










Stacee Lieberman 
Business 
Karen Liebowitz 
Elementary Ed. 
Michael Liebowitz 
Finance 

Christopher Light 
Criminology 
John Lind 
Agri-Business 



Ellen Lindenauer 
Fashion Merch. 
Jennifer Linkins 
Finance 

Ted Linnenkamp 
Electrical Eng. 
Jay Liwanag 
Vivian Llodra 
Journalism 



Joanna Locke 
English 
Jeremy Logue 
Sidara Lok 
BMGT 

Maurice London 
Psychology 
Michael Long 
Economics 



Wilbur Long 

Finance 

Kenneth Lord 

Urban Planning 

Lisa Losito 

Journalism 

Laura Lucian 

RTVF 

Eloisa Lumidao 

Engineering 



Donald Lundgren 

Finance 

Alan Lungen 

Finance 

Stuart Lustman 

GVPT 

Jennifer Lynch 

Early Childhood Ed. 

Marie Lynch 

Education 



Esther Lyons 

CNEC 

William Maas 

Biology 

Karen Mack 

Recreation 

Richard Mack 

ENEE 

William Maclaren 

Civil Engineering 



Lieberman-Maclarenf 263 




Ana Madarang 
Sociology 
Rita Madden 
Speech Comm. 
Chiaki Maehara 
Diane Mageau 
General Business 
Brett Magiet 
Sociology 



Jignesh Majmudar 
Electrical Eng. 
Antonette Malabey 
Chemistr\' 
Michael Mallard 
Transportation 
Robert Maloof 
American Studies 
Amit Manchanda 
Business 



John Mandish II 
Business 
Jeffrey Mann 
Electrical Engineering 
Victoria Manning 
Criminology 
Danielle Manouelian 
Consumer Economics 
Stephen Marcil 
Finance 



Philip Margolies 
Aerospace Eng. 
Joseph Marinelli 
Tech. Eng. 
Valerie Mark 
Psychology 
Alicia Marshall 
Finance/Mktg. 
Shawn Marshall 
Mgmt./Cons. St. 



Susan-Leigh Marshall 
Family Studies 
John Martin 
Earth Sci. Ed. 
Shelly Martin 
Apparel Design 
Lisette Martinez 
Speech Comm. 
Claudia Marx 
Civil Engineering 



Dawn Mask 

Zoology /IVSP 

Yolanda Mason 

GBS 

Charles Massey 

Physics 

Ty Massie 

Marketing 

Alok Mathur 

Biology 




di^ii^Kik 




264 ) Madarang-Mathur 




Lisa Mattare 

CCJS 

Keisha Matthews 

Apparel Design 

Robert Matthews 

Aerospace Eng. 

Thomas Matthews 

Finance 

Lori Mattingly 

History 



Todd Mayer 

Biology 

Michelle Mayers 

Journalism 

David Mayeski 

GVPT 

Kathleen McCabe 

Psychology 

Melanie McCall 

Biology 



Terri McClain 
Education 
\ Erika McClammy 
Economics 
Rebecca McClelland 
Marketing 
Alison McCloskey 
Speech Comm. 
Melissa McColligan 
Accounting 



Deborah McDonald 

Special Education 

Richard McDonald 

C\EC 

Stephen McDowall 

RTVF 

Brian McGahren 

Dance 

Kimberly McGee 

Criminology /ejus 



Wendy McGill 
Human Rez. Ed. 
Andrea McGinnis 

lESP 

\iul McGreen 

I ransportation 

Kevin McGuirk 

GVPT 

Karen Mclnnis 

GVPT 



Diahanna McLaughlin 

Sociology 

Judy McLaughlin 

Economics 

imela McLaughlin 
KTVF 

Renee McLean 
English 

Scott McMahon 
Consumer Ed. 



Mattare-McMahon ( 265 




Kevin McNamara 

ejus 

Carl McPherson 
General Studies 
Kelvin McQueen 
Speech Comm. 
Susan McSpedow 
Health Education 
Karen Medrow 
Criminology 




Praveen Meesarapu 
Electrical Eng. 
Denise Mehr 


^v 


CCJS 
Jaimini Mehta 


p^p^ 


Marketing 
Sharon Melson 




Human Res. Mgmt. 
Andrew Mendez 


^^^r^^ 


Finance 


j^^^^B 



Peter Meringolo 
Economics 
Sarah Merriam 
Economics 
Jeannine Merritt 
Elementary Ed. 
Brett Messina 
Acctg. /Finance 
Kirstin Mettler 
Business 







s,:-, . . ;:-, ..,., 


Amy Meyer 
Graphic Design 
Illana Mever 


-f^ 


Psychology 
Thomas Meyer 
Education 




Jessica Michaelis 


^^j|^^H|^ A 


Journalism 

Martha L. Middleton 


^^^^^^^P" ^m^ ^ki 


History 


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FAMOUS LAST WORDS 



"Before I came here, I didn't do any 

drugs; now I've been to rehab 

twice. "-Mark Griskey 

"It ain't over til it's over" 

-Timothy Gleeson 

"Life begins after graduation" 

-Kevin McGuirk 

"Utter Blische! "-Kevin Witt 

-"Phi AIpha"-Stephen Houff 



"Maryland is as wonderful as you 

make it."-KeIley Jenkins 

"Kilroy wuz here"-NichoIas Dubois 

"Prosper, have fun and then live 

Iong"-ArquilIa Ridgell 

"You should always reach for the 

moon but if you don't get there 

you will at least be with the stars." 

-Kesha Allen 



"Shit happens!"-Tom Meyer 

"Success, honor & compassion. 

Thanks Mom and Dad" 

-Vivian Llodra 

"Get me outta here!" 

-Kathleen McCabe 

"I did it in four years." 

-Carmen Jones 




266 1 McNamara -Middleton 




Stephanie Millard 
Accounting 
Donnesha Miller 

ejus 

Jeffrey Miller 
Merchandising 
Jodi Miller 
2js^ Sociology 
Torri Mills 
English 



bby Mills, Jr. 

ejus 

Gloria Minadeo 
Psychology 
Robert Minai 
Civil Engineering 
Doris Minikon 
International Business 
Felice Minkin 
Design 



Wilham Minkin 

ejus 

Andrea Miotto 
English 
James Mitchell 
Criminology 
Thomas Mitchell 
Management 
Velia Mitro 
Chemistry 

Ictfrey Moaney 
nterior Design 
\lanju Mohapatra 
IVrsonnel-Labor Rel. 
Icnnifer Molineaux 

iilosophy 

■th Anne MoUnes 
Art History 
Bradley Moore 
Piano 



Cassandra Moore 
Animal Science 
Lori Moorman 
Education 
Pomenic Morea 
Art History 
L .itherine Moroz 
Lriminology 
Brian Morris 
Consumer Economics 



Tawanda Morris 

Finance 

James Morrison 

Elec. Eng./Math 

Rebecca Morrow 

GVPT 

Dana Moscowitz 

FMCD/HESP 

Bruce Moser 

Math 



Millard-Moser 




267 



FAMOUS LAST WORDS- 



continued 



"Look Mom, I finally made it!" 

-Krista Parker 

"Ain't nothing to it, but to do it!" 

-Kimberly Watts 

"Thank God it's over" 

-Aaron Dudley 

"It's just another brick in the 

wall. .."-Howard Gobioff 

"1 bid you peace"-Brian 

Stumphauzer 



"Worship the sun and waves as a 
way of life. Enjoy life and don't 
let youth pass you by. "-Jay Chris- 
tian Liwanag 
"If you don't speak your mind 
when decisions are made, you 
may lose your right to complain." 

-Benita Stearn 

"Transferring to U of M was the 

best decision I've ever made in my 

hfe."-Cynthia Klein 



"That's four years and I'm outta 
here. "-Adam Sternberg 
"Relax, stay calm and always main- 
tain your composure."-Thomas 

Sudley 

"I'll never have to register again." 

-Paul Hickey 

"The amount of knowledge that you 

achieve is greater when you put in 

that much more effort to learn." 

-Kelvin McQueen 



Daniel Moss 
GVPT 

Donna Motley 
Marketing 
Gary Mullineaux 
Nat. Res. Mgmt. 
Timothy Munley 
Agriculture 
Kathleen Murphy 
RTVF 



Martin Musaerenge 

Finance 

Julius Myer 

AgriBusiness 

Carolyn Myers 

Journalism 

Kenneth Meyers 

ejus 

Tiffany Nalepka 
Family Studies 



Todd Nalley 

ejus 

Amy Narducci 
Psychology 
Mamdouh Nassr 
Prev. EDIT 
Stephanie Natter 
Art Therapy 
Eileen Naughton 
Education 



Christopher Neal 
Economics 
Vanita Neal 

ejus 

Shari Neiderman 
Marketing 
Paul Nekoranik 
Physics 
Adam Nelson 
Psychology 








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^^iTfc"A 




Erika Nelson 

Fashion Merch. 

Steve Neniecek 

Engineering 

Stephanie Neuben 

Enghsh 

Karl Neumann 

History 

Catherine Nevers 

English 



Corey Newman 
Economics 
Marvin Ng 

ejus 

Sam Oon-Soo Ng 

Microbiology 

Brian Nguyen 

GVPT 

Tonga Nguyen 

Business 



Charm Nichol 

GVPT 

Sheryl Nichols 

Psychology 

Catherine Nickle 

EE/BB 

Michael Nicoleau 

CNEC 

Jennifer NicoU 

Speech Comm. 



Matthew Nissenbaum 

Biology 

Kristen Noble 

Spanish 

Felipe Nogueira 

Mechanical Eng. 

David Nomm 

Electrical Eng. 

Jenna Norwood 

Journalism 



Nicole Norwood 
Sociology 
Kristin O'Connell 
English/Spanish 
Victoria O'Connor 
Studio Art 
Kathleen O'Neill 
Russian Studies 
Charles Obadia 
Mechanical Eng. 



Lara Obrien 

Early Childhood Ed. 

Amy Odhner 

RTVF 

Angela Ogburn 

Elementar)' Ed. 

Chaka Okadigbo 

Allison Olenick 

Psychology 



Nelson-Olenick 




269 



Catherine Oliver 

ejus 

Tanya Olsen 
Education 
Kimberly Ondick 
FMCD 

Ainisha Orton 
Psychology 
Isis Otero 
Chemical Eng. 



Michelle Owens 
Elementary Ed. 
John Padgette 
Mechanical Eng. 
Jane Paek 
Journalism 
Michelle Pakenham 
Human Res. Mgmt. 
Cyrus Pakravan 
Studio Art 



Shapna Pal 
Electrical Eng. 
Amanda Pantazis 
History 

George Papcun 
Electrical Eng. 
Jong Park 
Computer Science 
Denise Parker 
Psychology 



Krista Parker 

Theatre/ English Ed. 

Melisa Parker 

Business 

Adrienne Parquer 

English 

Felix Parrales 

GVPT 

Sascha Parsons 

Zoology 



Michelle Partilla 
Marketing/Transp. 
Jennifer Pascaran 
Journalism 
Lauren Pasekoff 
Human Res. Mgmt. 
Jeffrey Pasternack 

ejus' 

Steven Pasternak 
Psychology 

Kristina Pasteur 

Accounting 

Hina Patel 

Biology 

David Patrician 

GVPT 

Janna Patterson 

Chemistr\' 

Tia Patterson 

Recreation 




f[ 







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OUver-Patton 




Michelle Patton 

Electrical Eng. 

Camille Peart 

Zoology 

Pascha Peay 

Finance 

Kevin Peck 

Journalism 

Connie Pendergrass 

Economics 



Ricardo Perez 
Biology 
Audrey Pessin 
Psychology 
Cafhleen Peter 
Dietetics 
Christy Peters 
Education 
Dana Petranova 
Civil Engineering 



Christine Pham 
Microbiology 
Stephen Piekarz 
Accounting 
Rachel Pierce 

ejus 

Anne Pine 
Sociology 
Ivy Pivec 
Finance/ Marketing 



Laura Plantinga 
Zoology 
Amy Plett 
Business 
Jennifer Pochet 
Accounting 
Rosemary Polk 
Art History 
Kelly Poma 
GVPT 



Ron Pongrac 
Biology 
Kristin Pool 
Education 
Brian Poore 
Ind. Tech. 
David Portesi 
Microbiology 
Faith Potter 
Psychology 



Jason Potyk 

ejus 

Robert Poulin 
Business 

Dareya Pourhamidi 
Land Design 
Shane Powers 
Mechanical Eng. 
1 Wilson Prekker 
Business 



Patfon-Prekker 




271 



Steve Prescott 
Chemistry 
Sharma Price 
Business 

Derrick Prigmore 
Economics 
Latithia Price 
Economics 
Thomas Proctor 
Sociology 







Maria Psaromatis 






Elementar\' Education 


#■••- ' 


^ 


John Pullaro 


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Agronomy 


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Patrick Puzzuoli 


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3-- 


Accounting 


JR 


JrC 


Jason Quan 


^^HL 


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Urban Studies 


MB 


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Jeffrey Radcliffe 


^^^^^^^ 


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Economics 


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4t^ ^k^^ 



Edward Radwinsky 

Psychology 

Karen Rae 

Journalism 

Adam Raffel 

Economics 

Asif Rafi 

Biology 

Cameron Rahnama 

Kinesiology 



Suvama Rajguru 
GVPT 
Reem Raji 
Food Science 
Adil Rajput 
Computer Science 
Elyse Rallo 
Family Studies 
Meghan Rambo 
Accounting 



Vincent Rampersaud 

Biochemistry 

Elizabeth Rand 

Biology 

Bobby Rando 

RTVF 

Brian Rappaport 

GVPT 

Anuja Rastogi 

Biology 



Tanuja Rastogi 

Biology 

Robin Ratner 

Special Education 

Derek Ravenell 

Kinesiology 

Wendy Reddington 

English 

Elissa Redisch 

Business 





272 ) Prescott-Redisch 




Michelle Redman 

Zoology 

Marcelo Redoschi 

Math 

1 rica Reed 

GVPT 

Velma Reed 

Biochemistry 

Amy Reese 

Elementary Education 



Robert Rehwoldt 
Fire Protection Eng. 
Paul Repace 
Microbiology 
Ginger Replane 
English 

Michael Resner 
Aerospace Eng. 
Lisa Resnick 
Kinesiology 



Suzan Revah 
Journalism 
Diane Reyes 
Food Science 
Claudia Richmond 
Fashion Merch. 
Leila Ribeiro 
Accounting 
Russell Richards 
RTVF 



Lisa Ricchiuto 
Finance 

Barrie Richman 
Sociology 
Arquilla Ridgell 
Psychology 
Derek Ringers 

ejus 

Laurell Rinker 
Sociology 



Doris Rio 
Animal Science 
Claudia Rios 
Economics/Spanish 
Fernancio Rios 

ejus 

Susan Riser 
French/For. Lang. Ed. 
Catherine Rivera 
Math 



Tara Rivera 

Speech Comm. 

Aimee Robertson 

History 

Ronald Robertson 

Speech Comm. 

Christopher Robinson 

Economics 

Edith Robinson 

Family Studies 



Redman-Robinson ( 273 




Surlenza Robinson 

Economics 

Tina Rodriguez 

RTVF 

Renee Rogers 

Sociology 

Christopher Rohde 

Psychology 

Christopher Romano 

History 



David Rose 

Journalism 

Sara Rosen 

Journalism 

Judd Rosenberg 

Urban Studies 

Sam Rosenblatt 

Finance 

Craig Rosenfeld 

GVPT 



Melissa Rosenthal 
BMGT 
Charles Ross 
Economics/GVPT 
Julie Roth 
Accounting 
Tracev Rothman 

ejus' 

Ronald Roundv 
English 



Cynthia Rowse 
RTVF 

Daniel Ruark 
Product Mgmt. 
Dana Rubin 
GVPT 
Ian Rubin 
Mechanical Eng. 
Jamie Rubin 
Fashion Merch. 




FAMOUS LAST WORDS-continued 



"I may not have made it on time, 

but I made it on my time." - 

Shelton Alexander 

"Never forget your history because 

it plays a part in your future." - 

Devin White 

"I'm moving on." - Alicia Marshall 

"Don't lose faith, the team will 

win." - James Douglas 

"Make the best of every day." - 

Csaba Hadas 



"I want to wish the best of luck and 
love to my friends." - Tanya Skip- 
per 

-"Too much, too little, too late." 
-"Do I actually have to go to work 
now?" 

-"Have fun now 'cause life gets 
suckier." 

-"Play hard, work hard—in that 
order." 



-"I came, I saw and I don't owe no 

mo'." 

- "See ya, wouldn't wanna be ya!" 

-"No new taxes." 

-"I'm Audi." 

-"I came and conquered and now 

I'm gone." 

-"Integrity through action." 

-"I've got my hat and coat and now 

I'm gonna leave." 




274 ) Rodriguez-Rubin 




^MdM^ik 



Royce Ruby 

ejus 

Charles Rucker, Jr. 
Economics 
Jason Rudo 
Economics 
Mary Jo Ruggeri 
Special Education 
Carolyn Runco 
Psychology 



Rebecca Rund 

GVPT/Spanish 

Frances Runyon 

Speech Comm. 

Lauren Rutland 

HESP 

Daniel Ruttenberg 

Accounting 

Kristin Ruybalid 

Government 



Charlotte Rvn 
Elementary Ed. 
James Rzepkowski 
GVPT 
Rana Saad 
Electrical Eng. 
Avi Sabban 
RTVF 

Gregaulf Sabbat 
Marketing 



Jonathan Sablah 
Accounting 
Michele Sabulsky 
Geography 
Dena Sackstein 
Ther. Recr. 
Arash Sadati 
Information Science 
Thomas A. Sadler 
Finance 



Eric Saladino 

ejus 

Sabrina Salam 

Psychology 

Kim Salis 

Elementary Education 

Jennifer Salmons 

English 

Shari Saltzman 

Accounting 



Michael Salz 

Urban Studies 
Laura Sambataro 
Michael Samos 
Education 



Gary Sampson 
Economics 
Jay Samuels 
GVPT 



Ruby-Samuels ( 275 




Guillero Sanchez 
Journalism 
Rosalee Sanchez 
Journalism 
Shelly Sanfelice 
BMGT 

Katana Sanford 
Education 
Yvonne Sang 
Computer Science 



Jennifer Sankovvski 

Art History 

Paul Sappington 

Recreation 

Michael Sarlo 

Speech Comm. 

Aya Satake 

Studio Art 

Keya Sau 

Biology /Anthropolog\' 



Sean Savage 

Civil Engineering 

Rebecca Savard 

Music 

Vandana Sawhney 

Accounting 

Anita Saxena 

Finance 

Mikki Scarlotta 

RTVF 



Hope Schachter 

CNEC 

Elizabeth Schade 

GVPT 

Julanne Schiffer 

Speech Comm. 

Julie Schiffer 

Education 

Eric Schmidhausler 

Land Design 



Marcella Schneider 
Gen. Bus. Admin. 
Brian Scholder 
Marketing 
Trenna Schools 
Accounting 
Todd Schramm 
Electrical Eng. 
Rachel Schreiber 
Sociology 



Debra Schrier 

Psychology 

Steven Schriver 

Economics 

Elizabeth Schroeder 

HESP 

Kimberly Schroth 

Psychology 

Lisa Shuckman 

RTVF 





276 iSanchez-Schuckman 




Sharon Schultz 

HESP 

Bridget Schuma 

Speech Comm. 

Brian Schuppner 

Civil Engineering 

David Schwab 

Economics 

Ehzabeth Schvvack 

Textiles 



Heather Scott 
GVPT 
Janine Scott 
Accounting 
Douglas Scoville 
Journalism 
Richard Scutt 
Computer Science 
Mark Seaman 
Finance 



Lori Sebastian 
Kinesiology 
Mark Secrist 
NRMT 
Alyson Segal 

ejus 

Michael Segal 
Marketing 
Michael Seibert 
Architectural History 



Robert Seidman 

History 

Betty Selby 

Education 

Brian Seligman 

Marketing 

William Sell 

Electrical Engineering 

Stephen Sellman 

Kinesiology 

David Semple 

ejus 

Sandra Settlemyer 
Journalism 
Tara Seyfer 
Biology 
John Seylar 
Mechanical Eng. 
Helena Seymour 
Journalism 



Nabil Shaheen 
Electrical Eng. 
Parastou Shahpoori 
Bus. Admin./Mktg. 
John Shaibu 
Chemistr)' 
Zahid Shaikh 
Computer Science 
Sharon Shalvi 
Advertising Design 



Schultz-Shalvi 




277 



Lori Shamah 


• - 


HESP 




Elizabeth Shamash 




Math 


J^K^^ -wf ^B 


Heather Shannon 




Accounting 


^^^B '. . jS 


Kevin Shaplin 


^^^ttk—^^^^E 


Economics 




Nathan Shashoua 
Journahsm 




Ian Shavitz 


0^ 


GVPT 


WZ ^ 


Daniel Shea 




English 




Patricia Shea 


, 


GVPT/Chinese 


v 


Sandra Kay Shelton 


i^--- 


Architecture 


^ i^^ 


Stuart Shermaman 


^^ ^S 


Physical Science 


^^ mM 



Gary Sherman 

Pharmacy /Agri-Bus. 

Marissa Sherman 

Enghsh 

David Shonerd 

Government 

Stacy Short 

Finance 

Lori Shotlander 

Consumer Economics 



Eveline Shum 

Marketing 

Charles Shupe 

Finance 

Manisha Sikri 

Business 

Beth Silverman 

HESP 

Karen Silverman 

Microbiology 



Mitchell Silverstein 

ejus 

Kevin Simmons 
Mechanical Eng. 
Chris Simotas 
Finance 

Gregory Simpson 
Natural Res. Mgmt. 
Roscoe Sincere 
Chemical Engineering 



Gagan Singh 
Biochemistry 
Michael Sinsky 
Economics 
Pamela Sipe 
Human Res. Mgmt. 
Wannapa Siri 
Accounting 
Maggie Siu 
DIS 





278 I Shamah-Siu 





J 


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'^%'^ ^ 


^ 


/ 


■ "* 


1 


k^ 


ll 


■ 


mt 




hAt^^M 





Katherine Skalny 

Marketing/Trans. 

Tanya Skipper 

Sociology 

Jennifer Skonier 

FSAD 

Kate Slaugh 

History 

Evan Slepian 

Art 



Jennifer Smerz 

ejus 

Melinda Smialek 

ejus 

lanthe Smith 

ejus 

Jerome Smith 
Electrical Engineering 
Kevin Smith 
Finance 



Mark Smith 
Industrial Tech. 
Mark V.Smith 
Industrial Tech. 
Paul Smith 
Accounting 
Bryan Snell 
Urban Studies 
Cindy Soden 
English 



Darren Sodikoff 

Speech Comm. 

Greg Soergel 

GVPT 

Masoumeh Soheilian 

Biology 

Corina Sole 

ejus 

Sandi Solomon 
Marketing 



Steven Solomon 

Marketing/GVPT 

Lawrence Solow 

Economics 

Shannon Sothoron 

Marketing 

Stacye Spencer 

English 

Ben Spottheim 

Kinesiology 



Scott Spurgeon 

GVPT 

Tracey Squires 

History-Education 

Deep Sran 

GVPT 

Anne St. Martin 

Bisomess-HR 

Michael Stanislau 

ejus 



Skalny-Stanislau ( 279 




Tana Stanton 
Marketing 
Cynthia Stauffer 
Fashion Merch. 
Lawrence Stauffer 
Finance 
Benita Steam 
Psychology 
Katherine Stearns 
Computer Science 



Jacquehne Stem 
Management 
Adam Sternberg 
Electrical Engineering 
Robyn Stevens 
GVPT 

Judy Stewart 
Marti Stewart 
Psychology 



Dori Stibolt 
Psychology 
Laura Stiefel 
Biology 
Jennifer Storer 
Accounting 
Saranac Story 
Engineering 
Matthew Straiter 
Transportation 



Joyce Stratton 
Accounting 
Hallev Strauss 
Earlv Childhood Ed. 
Leslie Streeter 
Journalism 
David Stremmel 
Speech Comm. 
Jonathan Strickland 
Marine Biology 



Jeffrey Stroud 
Mechanical Eng. 
Brian Stumphauzer 

ejus 

Dana Sturm 

English 

Gina Subila 

Histor)' 

Suvir Sujan 

Electrical Engineering 



Sanjukta Sur 
Psychology 
Crystal Surber 
Journahsm 
Karen Surprin 
Mechanical Eng. 
Stacey Sussman 
Finance 
Maria Suwandi 
Architecture 





i 


mF^" ^' m 





280 I Stanton-Suwandi 






^^K 


Tracy Swann 


i 


MB| 


Finance/ Marketing 


i 


r ^ 


Vonda Sweit/er 


i 


r 1 


Elementary Ed. 
Shirley Swink 


) 


'i 


Marine Biology 
Julia Sybrant 
Psychology 
Diane Tamai 
Nuclear Engineering 


i 




Vincent Tang 






Finance 




jl 


George Tansill 
Aerospace Eng. 


' 




Alison Tarnofsky 
Family Studies 
Bradley Taylor 
GVPT 


tf 


la^ 


Lorenzo Taylor 11 


M 


Mechanical Eng. 




r^ 


Robin Taylor 




V* ^ ' 


Accounting 




•A 


Lisa Tenley 
Psychology 
Kimberly Terhorst 
Health Education 
Freweini Tesfaledet 






Chemistry 




**■ - ^/ 


Paul Tewksbury 


£^iu. 




Sociology 



FAMOUS LAST WORDS - continued - 



"Stay in college as long as you can, 
only if your parents are supporting 
you!" - Michelle Feldman 
"I w^ish I could go back to my 
freshman year because I enjoyed 
college so much." - Jacqueline Stern 
"No journey is too great when one 
finds what he seeks." - Dennis 
Camlek 

"Narrow minds follow narrow 
paths; how wide is the path you 
follow?" - Shanna Price 
"Get involved and get your priori- 
ties right! (Don't compromise your 
values.)" - Jennifer Borschow 
"Have fun, don't stress." - Erika 
Vorosmarti 



"Don't ever let anyone tell you that 
you're not the best." - Tracy Everett 
"Success goes to those who strive 
for it." - Corey E. Newman 
"When you get lost, keep walking. 
People need to hold each other 
up." - Jennifer Molineaux 
"College was the best." - Ivy Pivec 
"I am going to miss this damn 
place!!" - Claudia Rios 
"Enjoy it while it lasts; it can be 
done in four years." - Shari 
Goldstein 

"I will be graduating soon, really!" 
- Wendy Henderson 



-"Don't ever choose a science 

major." 

-"Live, life love." 

-"It has been a lot of fun but now 

it's time to move on to bigger and 

better bars (the 'Vous is no longer 

cutting it.)" 

-"I still need a date for Friday." 

-"I'll pull out." 

-"Get a clue, administration." 

-"Look out!" 

-"No goal is too high if you climb 

with care and confidence." 

-"Free at last, free at last, thank 

God almighty I'm free at last." 

-"I'll be back." 



Swann-Tewksburv ( 281 



Asmita Thakore 
Accounting 
Matthew Theurer 
Electrical Eng. 
Rosemary Thien 
Accounting 
Dana Thomas 
Bio-Physiology 
Renee Thomas 
Biology 



Shawn Thomas 
Elementary Ed. 
Julie Thompson 
Accounting 
Robert Thompson 
Fire Protection Eng. 
Shannon Thompson 
Criminology 
Stephanie Thomwall 
Family Studies 



Lori Thorpe 

Biochemistry 

Rebecca Tickton 

Journalism/Sociolog\ 

Cynthia Tidier 

GVPT 

Alyson Tilles 

RTVF 

Jennifer Tiu 

Accounting 



Marc Tobias 

rvsp 

Debra Todd 

Human Resources 

Marjo Toner 

Spanish 

Tara Topper 

GVPT 

Andrew Torgrimson 

Biology 



t^B 




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,f 




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\ 





FAMOUS LAST WORDS - continued - 

-'"One-time only tuition surcharge'-yeah!" 

-"If it smells like cologne, leave it alone." 

-"It's not what they think you know; it's what you know you know." 

-"My shoes looked great-before I went to the Cellar!" 

-"At least I graduated before my stepdaughter!" 

-"You get out of it what you put into it." 

-"Ididit, Ididit, Ididit!!!" 

-"Watch out ACC-our basketball team is on the rise." 

-"Carpe diem." 

-"Do what you can today-not tomorrow." 

-"All good things come to an end." 





Photo bv Paul Vieira 



282 jThakore-Torgrimson 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 













■m 




^^H'^. i 


„^~.-ji 








Joseph Toscano 

Italian 

Jennifer Townsend 

Speech Comm. 

Regina Tozzi 

Microbiology 

Mary Trageser 

Accounting 

Julie Travers 

Economics 



Janice Trawinski 
Early Childhood Ed. 
Kim Traynoff 
Human Res. Mgmt. 
Guy Tresente 
Spanish 
Myles Trewitt 
Finance 

Ericka Trotman 
Psychology 



Lvnne Trueheart 

Textile Marketing 

Robert Tseng 

Microbiology 

F. Tuboku-Metzger 

Math 

Amy Tucker 

Home Economics 

Becky Tully 

Pre-Vet 



Nancy Tunis 
Government 
Candice Tunkel 
Stvidio Art 
Timothy Turer 

ejus 

Karen TurnbuU 
Microbiology 
Steven Turner 
Physical Science 



Toscano-Tumer 



Keri Tuwiner 

GVPT 

len Tyioe 

Accounting 

Ting-Fai U 

Electrical Engineering 

Riki Ugai 

Art & Humanity 

Brian Ullman 

Journalism 



Da\vn Utara 

Biology 

Tracey Utter 

Finance 

Kimberly Valdez 

Journalism 

Denise Van Schalkw k 

ejus 

Pooja Varma 
Accounting 



Andre Vaughn 

AASP/CJUS 

Sharyl Vax 

Anthropology 

Ananthan Veluppillai 

Electrical Engineering 

Michael Venturi 

Finance 

Lynn Vicchiolla 

'riumalism 



Susan Vickers 

Biology 

Lorissa Villa 

Biochemistry 

Scott Vitale 

German 

Santiago Von Pieschel 

Economics 

Erika Vorosmarti 

HESP 



Noelle Wagenhoffer 
Journalism 
Margarite Waggoner 
GVPT 

Jennifer Wahlberg 
Advertising Design 
John Walker 
Computer Science 
John Walker 
Advertising Design 



Julie Walker 
Accounting 
Katrina Walker 
Finance 
Diane Wallace 
Elementary Education 
George Wallace 
Computer Science 
Michael Wallace 
Mechanical Eng. 








284 1 Tuwiner-Wallace 




Benjamin Wallberg 
Computer Science 
Karen Walls 
Government 
Lisa Walsh 
French 

1-Chuan Wang 
Psychology 
Constance Ward 
Sociology 



Mark Ward 

Biology 

Rachel Ward 

Marine Biology 

Laura Warnock 

Spanish 

Julia Warring 

Accounting 

Leah Warshawsky 

Consumer Education 



Tisha Washington 
Family Studies 
Eric Wasiuta 
Finance 

Deborah Wassertzug 
French /Italian 
William Waters 
Political Science 
Edward Watson 
Biology 



Patricia Watson 

Accounting 

John Watts 

GVPT 

Kimberly Watts 

GBS 

Shawn Wafts 

Architecture 

Tracev Wayne 

Psychology 



James Weaver 

History 

Tammy Weaver 

Accounting 

Theresa Weaver 

Biology 

Patricia Weber 

Recreation 

Christopher Wedding 

Accounting/Mktg. 



Jennifer Weicker 
Family Studies 
Jay Weiner 
Chemistry 
Lara Weingust 
Marketing 
Mindy Weinstock 
Speech Comm. 
Eric Weisberg 
RTVF 



Wallberg-Weisberg ( 285 



George Welsh il 
Math 
Jie Wen 

Mechanical Eng. 
Steven Wener 
General Biology 
Kelly Werkheiser 
Interior Design 
David Wheeler 
Government 



Brian White 
Marketing 
Devin White 

ejus 

PhiHp White 
Animal Science 
Stefan White 
Economics 
Curtis Whiteman 
Accounting 



Catherine Whittier 
International Bus. 
Tracy Wieland 
Psychology 
Wendy Wildfeuer 
journalism 
Maureen Wilhere 
English 

Tracy Wilkison 
History 



Tara Will 
Secondary Ed. 
Denise Wilhams 
Journalism 
Fred Williams 
Criminology 
Jacquelvn Williams 
Journalism 
Lori Williams 
Sociology 



Ophelia Wilhams 

Human Res. Mgmt. 

Wanda Wilhams 

Urban Studies 

Wendv Williams 

Biology 

Dawn Williamson 

Microbiology 

Barbara Willis 

Biology 



Andrew Wills 
Computer Science 
Dena Wilson 
Biology 
Hilary Wilson 
Education 
Daniel Wilt 
Computer Science 
Felicia Winkler 
RTVF 





286 I Welsh-Winkler 





4^iiJi41k 



Julia Winkler 

French 

Karen Winn 

Spanish 

Bradley Winnick 

GVPT 

Hallie Winter 

ejus 

Stephanie Winter 
English Lit. 



Leslie Wisan 

AMST 

Jennifer Lee Wiser 

Physical Science 

Bruce Witkin 

Electrical Eng. 

Kevin Witt 

Speech Comm. 

B. Wojcik-Betancourt 

Business 



Michael Wolf 
Marketing 
Barbara Wolfsdorf 
Sociology 
Harry Wolin 
Jewish Studies 
Glenn Wood 
Marine Biology 
Joseph Wood 
NRMT 



Kara Wood 
GVPT 
Rita Wood 
Sociology 
Laura Woods 
CJUS/SOCY 
Stephen Woods 
General Biology 
Gayll Worsley 
Architecture 



Alisa Wright 
Speech Comm. 
Danielle Wright 
Enghsh 

Meng-Shien Wu 
General Bio. Sci. 
Amy Wurster 
BMGT/Finance 
Maryann Wyatt 
DIS' 



Thomas Wynn 
Electrical Eng. 
Lori Yaag 
Elementary Ed. 
Matthew Yablunosky 
Economics 
Ethan Yankellow 
CJUS/GVPT 
Stephen Yates 
Chinese 



Winkler-Yates 




287 



Gee Yeon Yi 

Psychology 

Joon You 

Chemistry 

Dawn Young 

Sociology 

Roderick Younger 

AMST 

Wendy Yowell 

Psychology 



Hoon Dae Yu 
General Bio. Sci. 
Kelly Yu 
Mechanical Eng. 
Sung Yun 
Chemical Eng. 
Victor Zangla 
Accounting / BSD 
Scott Zanni 
Education 



Stefan Zastawski 
Architecture 
Humbeto Zeitler 
Agronomy 
Zhihao Zhang 
Math 

Michael Zhu 
Business 
Carolyn Ziffer 
Elementary Ed. 



Matthew Ziffer 
Speech Comm. 
Pamela Zimmerman 
HESP 

Dean Zoeffel 
Zoology 
Lori Zook 
Social Studies Ed. 
Amy Zullo 
Zoology 




GOOD LUCK TO THE 
CLASS OF 1993! 

-from the Terrapin yearbook staff 





Photo bv Paul Vieira 



288 Yi-ZuUo 




Candids f 289 



Democrats! ClilltOIl/Gore 



Usher in 
]\ew Era 

Presidential candidate Bill Clinton 
and his running mate. Senator Al Gore, 
held arms aloft and stood before a 
convention hall brimming with 
euphoria and confidence on July 17, 
1992, in New York's Madison Square 
Garder. Exhilaration swept throught 
the convention hall and the country as 
manv could see the light at the end of 
what had become a rather dim tunnel. 

In an emotional address to the 
convention, Clinton told delegated that 
he accepted the nomination "in the 
name of all the peopel who do the 
work, pav the taxes, raise the kids and 
play by the rules - the hard-working 
Americans who make up our forgotten 
middle class." 

The speech brought to a festive, 
footstomping close a four-day Demo- 
cratic convention that adopted a 
moderate platform reflecting the 
message of its baby-boomer ticket. 

"Jobs. Health carre. Education. 
These commitments aren't just prom- 
ises from my lips," Clinton said. "They 
are the work of my life." 

Then came the big day, Noveber 3, 
1992. The voter turnout nation wide 
was the best that it had been in some 
20 years, as many Americans could feel 
something was in the air. For quite 
some time the vote was very close, but 
as Clinton/Gore began to pull away 
the dreams and hopes of Bush/Quayle 
and Perot started to fade and many 
Americans knew that a new day was 
dawning. 

At about 11:30 est. it became official 
as the votes from Ohio came in. Bill 
Clinton would be the next President of 
the United State. 

The election sparked a spectrum of 
emotions as the Republicans claimed 
that Clinton would not be able to do a 
good job due to his down home' 
attitude and lack of experience in 
foreign affairs. 

Whether or not Chnton succeeds 
remains to be seen, but for now 
America seems to be in for a change 
and that is due to the Clinton/ Gore 
ticket. 



Win!!! 




290 j Presidential Election 



Top Photo;Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton celebr.ite his nomination as President at the Democratic 
National Convention in New York City. Bottom Photo: Al and Tipper Gore dance a little victory dance after 
I being confirmed as Bill Clinton's running mate at the Democratic .National Convention. (Photos provided by 
AP.) 



Perot 

Takes 

America 

by IStorm 



In May, Ross Perot was a potential 
president, then he was Hkely no more 
than potential spoiler, but nonetheless a 
wild card who could reshuffle the deck. 

The Perot Factor was reintroduced to 
presidential politics 11 weeks to the day 
after the Texas billionaire abandoned 
plans to run, saying he had concluded he 
could not win. 



With a personal fortune 
and no spending limits to 
worry about, Perot could 
easily affect the race if he 
decided to attack one 
candidate and leave the 
other alone. 

Perot came back, and 
affected the race even if he 
never left third place. 





Bush/Quayle 
Ousted 



President Bush appeared on large 
video screens as he accepted the 
presidential nomination during the 
Republican National Convention at the 
Houston Astrodome on August 20, 
1992. Bush struck a new defiant tone in 
his acceptance speech — a marked 
contrast to the 1988 oration in which he 
promised a "kinder and gentler nation." 

Bush and Quayle roused the GOP 
delegates to cheers as the accepted their 
party's nominations for a second term. 
Bush vowed to go to "every corner of 
this nation" in the political fight of his 
life to beat Bill Clinton. 



Presidential Elections! 291 



rSA Breaks Out 
the Medals 

The summer of '92 once again brought 
the Summer Olympics, held in Barcelona 
Spain, and they lived up to every Ameri- 
cans expectations. An era of amateurism 
passed into an age of professionahsm, and 
the Olympics v^'ere transformed forever, 
when professional athletes were allowed 
to compete for the first time ever in the 
1992 Games. 

The United States emerged from its 
two-decade Olympic funk, finishing only 
four behind in the closest medals race 
since America won in 1964 in Tokyo. . 

Some of the highhghts of the games 
included of course the Dream Team's 
dominating wins en route to the Gold 
Medal. American gymnast Trent Dimas 
surprised the world in capturing the Gold 
Medal in the Parallel Bar individual event 
final. His female counterpart. Shannon 
Miller racked up some six medals in 
becoming the first American woman 
gymnast to win so many medals in a non- 
boycotted Olympics. Finally, who will 
ever forget the Men's Volleyball team 
who, in support of teammate Bob Samuels 
shaved their heads in protest of a call that 
caused them their first victory over Japan. 

Copy provided by the Associated Press, supple- 
mented by Krista Parker. All photos this page 
suppHed by the Associated Press. 





Top right: Dream Teamers David Robii\sor\ and Michael Jordan fight for the 
rebound in the semifinal game agains Lithuania, while Magic Johnson looks on. 
Above: USA Volleyball team member Bob Samuelson celebrates with his 
teammates after beating Canada in a close match. Above right: Olympic 
gymnast Shaiuion Miller performs a split during her floor routine en route to 
winning her Silver Medal in the AU-Around Competition. 



292 I Summer Olympics 








Top: Stefan Edberg lunges for this drop volley and 
sends it back over the net, on his v\'ay to victory. 
Bottom: Monica Seles grunted her way to her second 
consecutive U.S. Open title by beating Arantxa 
Sanchez Vicario in straight sets. Photos provided by 
the Associated Press. 



Toronto Breaks Xk*adition 
Edberg Breaks Away From Pack 

There's a new flag flying over Canada--The World Series pennant. 

The Toronto Blue Jays took baseball's championship outside the United States 
for the flrst time ever, beating the Atlanta Braves 4-3 in 1 1 innings in Game 6 of 
the Series. 

After surviving more ninth-inning magic from the Braves, the Blue Jays won it 
all- and lost their loser's label forever-when Dave Winfleld's first World Series 
extra base hit scored two runs with two out. 

"It's been a long, hard battle," Toronto manager Cito Gaston said. "But I said 
from opening day, these guys have been focusing on this very thing." 

The Braves, meanwhile, became the first team to lose consecutive World Series 
since the 1977-78 Los Angeles Dodgers. 

A cheering, chanting delirious sea of humanity flooded Toronto's city center 
on October 25. The glow from this win probably kept Canadians warm all 
winter. 

"We stopped the chop," or "The chop stops here," shouted revelers referring to 
the Atlanta fans famihar Tomahawk Chop ritual. 

In other sports news, it was a new, improved Stefan Edberg who walked off 
the court in September with his second straight U.S. Open title, the world's No. 1 
ranking and $500,000. 

"1 feel very good about myself at the moment. I am playing good tennis and 1 
am fighting for my life out there, but I am coming through. I really earned it this 
year because I have worked very hard and 1 have had some unbelievably tough 
matches," Edberg said. 

Top-seeded Monica Seles also won her second straight U.S. Open women's 
singles title in September, defeating No. 5 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario 6-3, 6-3. It 
was Seles' seventh victory in 13 Grand Slam Events that she has played in. 

In other tennis news, it was a new and improved Andre Agassi, decked out in 
all white that took Wimbledon by storm this past year. The rebel toned down his 
clothes as well as his outspoken personality to storm to his first Grand Slam 
victory, and proving many critics wrong who had said that this rising star would 
never win a title. 




Above: The Toronto Blue Jays celebrate their L.ame 
h \ictory over the Atlanta Braves, and become the 
tirst non-US team to ever win a World Series. Photo 
provided by the Associated Press. 



■J 




^^t 

.^%,* 



%' 



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World Series, Tennisf 293 



1992 Movie 
Blockbusters 

"Home Alone 2: Lost in New York" 
opened right around Thanksgiving of 
1992, and brought the return of 
Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci, and Daniel 
Stern. This time Kevin accidentally 
ended up in New? York while his family 
went to Florida; of course you know who 
was there to reek havoc. This film was 
one of the biggest hits of the year. 

"Batman Returns" also came to the 
screen last year. Although loudly hyped, 
this installment did not bring about the 
same fervor as the first 'Batman'. It did, 
however, bring Michelle Pfeiffer much 
recognition as she portrayed the sultry 
'Catwoman.' 





Disney's "Beauty and the Beast" was 
brought to the screen last year as well. 
The genius of the Disney animators was 
once again proven as they brought to 
life everything from a coffee pot to a 
foot rest. 

"Beauty and the Beast" also made 
history as it became the first animated 
movie to be nominated for an Academy 
Award. 

This film used the talents of such 
noted actors and actresses as Angela 
Lansbury, Jerry Orbach, David Ogden 
Stiers and Robby Benson as the Beast. 

Home Alone photo courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox, Batman 
photo courtesy of DC Comics Inc., Beauty and the Beast photo 
courtesy of the Walt Disney Company. 





294 Movie Blockbusters 



"Wayne's World" created originally on "Saturday Night Live" came to the screen this year and became an 
instant hit. All over the country 'VVaynespeak' became the popular mode of communication. NOT! 

rhotocourtesy of Paramount Pictures. 



Academy Aivard ]\oiiiinees 



The 1992 Academy Awards were swept by "The Silence of the Lambs," which 
starred Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins and Scott Glenn. Foster played Clarice Starling 
who is assigned to track down a serial killer who skinned his victims to use the skins 
to make clothing. In order to 'get into the mind' of the serial killer Starling tried to get 
help from con\'icted killer, psychologist Hannibal 'the Cannibal' Lechter. The chilling 
story brought Academy Awards to both Foster and Hopkins as well as to director 
Jonathen Demme. 

Another film that racked up nominations, with the glaring exception of Best Direc- 
tor, was "The Prince of Tides. " Barbra Streisand and Nick Nolte starred in this touch- 
ing story of a man who becomes involved with his psychiatrist while trying to come to 
terms with his past. Most of the motion picture community were shocked when 
Streisand failed to receive the Best Directing nod. In a show of support, many of the 
presenters, most notably, Jessica Tandy, voiced their disapproval at the snub. 

Yet another film that garnered many nominations was Oliver Stone's "JFK." Stones' 
film portrayed many controversial theories surrounding the assasination of President 
Kennedy, as seen by New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, who was played by 
Kevin Costner. Although many did not believe Stone's portrayal, "JFK" was one of the 
biggest grossing movies of last year. It did however, fail to pick up any major Oscars. 

"A Few Good Men," was not released until December of 1992, but it was expected to 
garner many nominations for the 1993 Academy Awards. 




Photo courtesv of Colubia Pictures Industnes Ini. 




Hurricanes l^trike 
Florida and Hawaii 

Hurricane Andrew struck south 
Florida on August 24, 1992, with wind 
gusting to 164 miles per hour and a 12- 
foot tidal surge that flattened many 
homes, uprooted trees, flung boats into 
the streets and wrecked an entire Air 
Force Base. 

The hurricane continued on, carving its 
way throughout the plantation country of 
Louisiana, throwing tornadoes like darts 
at a 1 00-mile-wide target and pumping 
torrents of rain at storm-weary Louisian- 
ians. 

Fifty five deaths were directly or 
indirectly linked to the hurricane — 41 in 
Florida, 10 in Louisiana and four in the 
Bahamas. 

The hurricane's 54-hour U.S. rampage, 
the most expensive natural disaster ever 
in the country, caused an estimated $20 
billion in Florida, $1.5 billion in Louisiana 
and $250 million in the Bahamas. 

"It's like a bomb hit," said one Florida 
City resident, looking at the remains of 
the trailer park where he and his wife had 
lived. 

Tent cities were set up in Florida with 
room for 3,800 people. 

Because the damage was so extensive, 
relief efforts took up to three weeks to 
reach the storm ravaged areas. 



5 Tropical Storm 
^ Hurricane Andrew 




200 r-:ies 



MEXSCO 



so:- 



ham:- 




Hurricane Iniki dealt a direct blow to 
Kauai, one of the Hawaiian Islands, of 
September 11, 1992, with winds gusting to 
160 mph and torrential rain. It destroyed 
buildings and damaged many others on 
the island of more that 50,000 people, one 
official said. 

Twenty-foot waves crashed over 
coastal highways and the island lost all 
power and telephone service even before 
the worst of the storm hit. Afterward, 
early damage reports came to state 
officials via two-way radio. 

Iniki was the most powerful hurricane 
in the Hawaiian Islands this century, said 
Bob Sheets, Director of the National 
Hurricane Center. 



Top Right: This map tracked the path of the deadly 
Hurricane Andrew. Middle: Andrew ravaged most 
of south Florida, leaving many like these people, 
homeless and with few other possessions than the 
clothes on their backs. Bottom: Hurricane Iniki 
swept through the island of Kauai, lea\'ing a path of 
destruction in its wake. Photos courtesy of the 
Associated Press. 







296 



Hurricanes 




World ]\eivs in Revieiv 



I 




Somolia, Yugoslavia and 
Haiti Top Headlines 

1 







V vMm ii 





The territory of Yugoslavia for centuries was a battleground between the 
Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires. 

Of the 24 million people living there, Serbs account for about 36 percent and the 
Croats for about 20 percent of the population. This ethnic diversity has been a 
source or strife for centuries. 

President Tito, who ruled from 1945 until his death in 1980, kept a tight lid on 
these internal ethnic rivalries. Since his death, however, central power has been 
eaten away by the feuding republic. 

The war has left thousands dead, has sent more than a million fleeing and led 
to the creation of dreaded detention camps, likened to those of Nazi Germany. 

Three months after the world woke up to one of the worst famines in history, 
food started to reach hundreds of thousands of Somalis. Estimates of the dead 
range from 100,000 to half a million, but no one kiiows just how many have 
perished in the Horn of Africa nation 

More than a million Somalis have fled their homeland for refugee camps in 
neighboring countries, with the wealthier ones seeking safe haven in Europe, the 
United States, Canada and elsewhere. 

Many have died in the factional fighting that has driven the nations since 
former lead Siad Barre's ouster. Casualty estimates range from conservative 
figures of 10,000 to the 60,000 estimated by the human rights group Africa Watch. 

Was it a political persecution by the military or desperate poverty, as the Bush 
administration suggested that caused Haitians to flee their homeland and seek 
asylum in the United States. 

Initially, the Bush administration accepted the refugees at the U.S. naval base at 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and heard their request for asylum. On May 24, 1992, 
however. President Bush decided that Coast Guard cutters would intercept the 
Haitians at sea and immediately return them to their country. 

Lawyers representing the Haitians filed a lawsuit to challenge the policy while 
boat traffic from Haiti virtually stopped. The Supreme Court will decide in 1993 
whether the Bush administration was violating immigration law by sending 
Haitian boat people back to their country without a hearing. 



Top Left: This child was one of the many Yugoslavs 
that faced daily persecution in their own country. 
Bottom Left: The true face of the Somolian Famine. 
Above: President Bush turned away hundreds of 

Haitian Boat People. All photos courtesy of the Associated 
Press. 




World News 



United States 
Celebrates 
500th Anni- 
versary of 
Cliristoplier 
Columiius* 
Voyage 





Photos and text provided by the Associated Press. 




ZyO I Columbus Anniversary 



Escorted bv more than 1,000 private boats, replicas of Christopher Columbus' ships 
arrived in the United States on February 15, 1992, as part of the 500th anniversary 
celebration of his voyage to the New World. 

Miami, FL was the first stop in a 20-city U.S. tour where more than 5,000 people 
cheered from docks and waterfront roads as the wooden reproductions of the Nina, 
Pinta and Santa Maria sailed into its harbor. 

The ships, christened in Spain in 1990, were built with the same materials carpenters 
used to build the original ships. Hand-forged nails were modeled after some recovered 
from a 16th century shipwreck. The sails were made of linen, the closest natural fiber 
to the original hemp canvas. 











AID!^, Reeyeling 

and {Spelling 
Make Headlines 



A grim new vision of the world 
AIDS epidemic predicted that more 
than 25 milHon people will have the 
ciisease by the end of the decade, and 
up to 120 million will be infected. 
Marking losses in the U.S., people 
signed panels of the AIDS Memorial 
I Quilt in New York and across the 
country. 

William Figueroa, 12, a.k.a. the 
potato kid,' waited by a potato 
vendor's cart outside the NBC studios 
in New York prior to his appearance on 
the "Late Night with David Letterman " 
show . Figueroa and his family were 
basking in his new-found celebrity, 
gained in June, 1992, after he spelled 
"potato" correctly during a spelling bee 
and Vice President Dan Quavle did not. 



X 





More than 20 companies, including McDonald and 
Coca-Cola, launched a national campaign in Septem- 
ber 1992, to encourage U.S. business to buy recycled 
goods. The alliance would conduct programs around 
the country to show businesses how they can buy 
recycled goods and use them in daily operations. 

Photos and text by Associated 
Press. 



AIDS. Spelling, RecycUns ( 299 



CAREER GUIDE 



Where Productivity Is An Applied Science 



NYMA stands proudly as a leader In the Information 

systems Industry. We provide systems and software 

engineering services across a wide variety of applications 

with specialization In large real-tJme aerospace systems, 

NYMA supports Its customers with: 

♦ Systems Engineering 

♦ Software Development 

♦ Research and Development 

♦ Mission Operations 

♦ Range Instrumentation 

♦ Large Scale Integration 

♦ Hardware Development 

♦ Air Traffic Automation Support 

^fYMA's success Is based on a demonstrated ability to 

Implement Innovative and effective solutions. At NYMA, 

you can count on excellent benefits, a competitive salary, 

and outstanding growth potential. For consideration, send 

your resume and salary requirement to: 



I^^ 



Human Resources Department 
♦ 7501 Greenway Center Drive ♦ GreenbeU.MD 20770 ♦ 

(301) 345-0832 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Be part of a global 
enterprise with 
*-^^^COIVISAT 



' ^/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////, 



WHEN YOU MISS AN 

OPPORTUNITY, 
YOU MISS SUCCESS 

Opportunity doesn I knock twice So don t miss this ctiance to |Oin 
Watkins Jotinson Company, a designer and manufacturer ol the world s 
largest selection ol state-ol-the-art receiving equipment lor surveillance, 
direction finding, and countermeasures Our success in the industry is 
directly related to the professional achievements of our talented tech- 
nical professionals and we recognize and reward ttieir efforts 

Our engineers assist in the conception, development and production of 
the most advanced receivers and receiving systems available, covering 
frequencies in ELF, VLF, HF, VHF, UHF, and the microwave spectrum 

When you join us. you II be a direct participant on a protect team You II 
be trained to apply your special skills and knowledge to our diverse 
and challenging programs You II also have the opportunity to innovate 
our technology, an opportunity ttiat is found at few other companies 

Watkins-Johnson offers a thoroughly professional atmosphere, top 
management visibility, and a complete benefits package 

For immediate and confidential consideration, send your resume, 
including salary history, to Ms Kalhy Gonup, Watkins-Johnson 
Company, 700 Quince Orchard Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 or call 
Voice (301 ) 948-7550, Ext 7230 or TDD# (301 ) 963-4990 An equal 
opportunity employer US citizenship required 




WATKINS-JOHNSON 



m//m//////////m///////m//.07^'^////m 




The merger of com- 
munications and informa- 
tion technologies opens exciting 
' career paths for college graduates 
who want to work on the leading edge of 
technology. To learn more about career options 
with COMSAT, send your resume to Human 



^Ss 



^ COMSAT 



Resources, Dept. \MA. 



Laboratories 



At equal oopcumry efnpk-ve' 



22300 Comsat Drive 
Clarksburg IVID 20871 



Creative employees are think- 
ers and doers. They don't Just 
accept things because they've 
"always been done that way. " 
The resourceful worker knows 
that the competition is continu- 
ally looking for a way to do the 
Job better and that we need at 
all tim.es to be at least one step 
ahead of the other guys. 

J. Carter Fbx , President & CEO 



Chesapeake Corporation is a Fortune 400 inteiirated 
paper and forest products company based in Richmond. 
Virginia and operating in over 30 locations nationwide 
Chesapeake employs over 4.500 people and produces 
paper, tissue products and packaging 

Chesapeake is actively looking for qualified people in a 
wide variety of job descriptions If you feel qualiricd as a 
creative employee" who is looking for unlimited oppor- 
tunity please contact Jo Anne Buroughs 804-697- 1141 



?a 



Chesopeoke, 

Resourceful by nature. 



.J.iint-, ( 1 nil r II I 02 I K CjrvSl li[i\ 2.(50 Kit hmorul VA2:!2IK2350 
MO-1 f,i|7 I 000 




300 I Career Guide 



BG&E and the University of Maryland 
Partners in Excellence 



../Because e?(ce[[ence is not a destination; but a Hfelxmg journey 










^1 




BG&E IS a Fortune 50 utility providing safe, reliable and 
en\ironmentaiiy .st)und gas and electric service to Central Maryland. 
For consideration, send your resume in confidence to: Employment, 
Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, P.O. Box 1475, Baltimore, MD 
21203-1475, ATT: UMYB 




BG&E 



301 



Our commitment to 
excellence begins 

WITH YOU. 

OUR LOCATIONS: 



And al Chevy Chase ex- 
cellence begins long before 
a customer walks in the 
door. II begins wilh our 
employees, and wilh our 
commilmenl lo them. After 
all. their best means our 
best. ..and their eicellence is 
where our reputation 
begins. If you have an in- 
leresl in any of these areas, 
please call the appropriate 
location. 



8401 Connecticut Avenue 
Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815 (301) 907-5600 

Data Processing 
Finanace/Accounting 



7700 Old Georgetown Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-5600 

Savings Branches 

Consumer Lending 

B.F. Saul Mortgage Company 



6200 Chevy Chase Drive 
Laurel, Maryland 20707 (301) 953-8128 

Checking/Savings Operations 

5300 Spectrum Drive 
Frederick, Maryland 21701 (301) 620-8400 

Credit Card Operations 



ChevyChasefsb 

CCSP hi- i druc Uff *iirkplacf pcilicv EOE M F H V 





BASIC 
ECONOMICS. H 



Supph and demand Savings \alue Vihai cLsc do \(iu n«-d v 

111 know ' How aboui w here lo find itiem all— Pnnce Georges Pliyj / M 

Vlere alwayson top of whai's in demand, which IS wh\ miu A 

won I find a betier selection, or a wider vanei\ of merchandise i^\ 

an\ where else .And economically speaking, there s no betier ^i 

place for ouisunding values and incredible savings 



'^ 




PRINCE 



where ehoppers come first:. 

I Hechi's *T)od\iird & Loihrop The Marketplace and mon? thi/i 100 speaaJh iinresand ^e^uu^anl^ //j/ 
V^m fjsi Urtt HighM\, HvUbvdJe, MD ^^ 

Open Monda\-Saiurda\ lOani-9 ^Opm andSunda\, nonti dpni 



Ity Pt-opvclaa and Davalopfnant Cr 
equity Pr-op< 



tiig^r^ir^r:::::;:^:::^:;:^: 




Welcome 
to the 
REAL 
WORLD 



That's what everyone calls life 
after college, but we keep trying 
to change the "real" world. 

We want to make it better. 

We want safer workplaces. We 
want justice and dignity on the 
job for working men and women 
We want fair play in promotions 
and career advancement 

That's why we're Number One in 
the Washington metropolitan area 
when it comes to representing 
men and women who work in a 
wide variety of jobs, ranging from 
supermarket clerks to police offi- 
cers, nurses to social workers. 

We're Local 40n of the United 
Food & Commercial Workers, 
welcoming you to help us change 
the real world, for the better. 



^tO«W«C/4/. 




<i, 



THOMAS R. McNLITT 

President 






C. JAMES LOWTHERS 

Secretary' Treasurer 



302 1 Advertisements 



Physical and Life Sciences, Engineering 
Professionals and Future Graduates: 



=*A-(ffl 



rajBHaseEiaiSE; 




mm 



i3^ 



=F-4i€E 




If^^pplA^- 



t 



In A Challenging Career 
As A Patent Examiner 

We invite applications fi-om professionals and future 
graduates in the following ai'eas of specialization: 
Engineers - Aeronautical, Agricultui'al, Biomedical, 
Ceramic, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electiiciil , Engi- 
neering Physics, General, Industiitil, Mechanical, 
Metallui^cal, Nuclear, Petroleum, Polymer Science. 
Life Sciences - Biochemistry, Biology, Biomedical, 
Biotechnology, Botany, Horticulture, Microbiology, 
Pharmacology. Physical Sciences - Chemistiy, 
Physics. Design - Art, Architecttu-e, and Graphics. 
Textile Technology. 



For more information 
call (703) 305-8231. 

Send your resume or SF-171 to: 

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office 

P.O. Box 171 

Washington, DC 20231 







^Sade\)^^ 



U.S. Citizenship required for employment. 
An equal opportunity employer. 



U-S-Palent/Tradem.irk / 303 
Office ' 



SAFEWAY 




CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

The food industry offers many varied 
avenues for employment. ..from 
Supermarket Managers, to Real 
Estate, to Pharmacists, and 
Marketing. Safeway is a successful 
growing supermarket retailer 
continually searching for good people 
to help us progress in the years to 
come. 

If you are interested in joining the 
Safeway family, just give us a call at 
(301)779-6103. 



COME SEE THE DIFFERE\CE AT SAFEWAY! 



STAY IN YOUR SHELL 




You chose your major with care. With sights set high, you've endured 
'• nights of cramming, tough exams and tougher professors to earn 
] your degree. Now what? 

f That's entirely up to you. You can choose one of hun- 
.^^•^ dreds of nice companies that promise to bring you along ^ 
~^^'^" ' slowly. Or you can fly headlong into the global compe- '*^ 
tition of MCI's pace-setting telecommunications envi- '~ 

ronment. Enjoying meaningful assignments that will get your 
career off the ground. Fast. 

The choice is yours. And it starts with forwarding your resume 
and/or letter, in strictest confidence, to: College Relations/ Human 
Resources Dept. 0309/UMD, MCI Telecommunications Corporation, 
1801 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006. An equal opportunity 
employer m/f/h/v. 



MCI 



OR SOAR 





304 ) Safeway/MCl 



Genius is just an accident 
waiting to tiappen. 



/ 



^ 







You never know when a 
lucky accident and an 
educated mind will get 
together and change what 
we know about the world. 

That's why AT&T is involved 
in so many programs to 
educated young minds 
all over the country. By pro- 
viding scholarships, 
computers, laboratory 
equipment and visiting 
professors to the nation's 
students, we're helping 
to ensure that the next 
Sir Isaac Newton is capable 
of turning a coincidence 
into a major contribution. 

At AT&T, we know that the 
quality of life tomorrow 
depends on the quality of 
educations today. So you can 
rest assured that our com- 
mitment to education is 
no accident. 



AT&T 

The right choice. 






AT&T 



305 





Live 
on the edge. 

Push yourself to the brink of 
your mental and physical limits, two 
days a month and two weeks a year. 
Serve with the Army National Guard 
elite in an Adventure Training Unit. 
And put it all on the line for the thrill 
of a hfetime. 



CALL TOLL FREE l-80fM92-2526 

Maryland 



NATIONAL 

GUARD 



Army National Guard 



Americans At Their Best. 



19ASUMTE0 STATES QOVEFMieNT AS REPneSEMTED BY THE SECflETWY OF DEFENSE AU RIG ^S RESERVED WV4G-ftSM6 



TRW Systems 



Superior systems. 
Superior minds. 




TRW develops both. 

The mind can be iiii incredible kuil. Joining TRWs Sy^tenl^ 
Di\ ision will help make yours t'asl. sharp and powerful. We"ll 
leach sou to use systems and technologies that are among the 
industry's most ad\anced. And we'll gi\e you the opportunity to 
work with and learn Irom top professionals in software de\elop- 
nient and in systems integration and engineering. Soon, as you 
continue to dcxelop and grow, you'll actually be providing sup- 
port lor state-of-the-art technical solutions for complex problems 
of national impoilance. 

If vou ha\ e the \ ision. dedication and desire to succeed, we're 
currently seeking graduates in the following disciplines: 

• Computer Sciencf 

• Management Information Systems 

• Mathematics 

• Electrical Knginterin;; 

Positions are a\ail.ible in the following: 

• Systems Programming 

• Systems Engineering 

• Applications IVogramniing/Analysis 

• fommiinications 

• Man-Machine Interface and I ser Engineering 

• Computer Security 

• Software lest Engineering 

• Software Development 

• Database Management .Systems and Applications 

• Database Administration 

• Database and Systems Operations 

• Database Design 

• Configuration Management 

• Signal Processing 

• I nderwaler Acoustics/Oceanography 

Consider a career u ith TRW and enjoy an excellent benellts 
package, including llexible work hours, a stock savings plan, and 
a ycar-cnd holiday week shut-down. Build a future at TRW. 
Exercise vour mind. Send your resume lo: TRW Systems 
Division, Professional Placement, Department CMD, One 
Federal Systems Park Drive, EPI/61 Id, Eairtax, \ A 22033. 
lijiLiI (»p|ti>iiuim\ l-.inpl«<\ci 

One Smart Company. 




306 



Army National Guard / 

TRW 



BECHTEL 



# 



OUR PROJECTS SPAN TIIE GLOBE. 
llicrc's no limit to what you can accomplish. 



Innovative employees, a corporate commitment to excellence and 
diversified projects have long been the keys to Bechtel's competitive 
advantage. 

As a member of our teajn, you'll help us solve challenging and 
interesting projects. Bechtel's first-of-a-kind projects have significantly 
changed the power industry. When our customers are faced with unique or 
demanding problems, they turn to Bechtel's engineering group for workable, 
innovative solutions. Our engineers tackle these challenges using the latest 
computer-aided design and drafting technologies. The overall engineering 
effort is enhanced by individual contributions in all of the primary 
engineering disciplines: civil, controls, electrical, environmental, 
mechanical, nuclear, process, and systems. 

At Bechtel, we make every efTort to attract, develop, and retain 
committed, creative and motivated colleagues of diverse origin. We seek 
graduates with initiative, integrity, ability, determination to excel, and a 
willingness to help us expand the possibilities for engineering and 
technology. As a member of the Bechtel team, your ambition, 
determination, enthusiasm, flexibility and high work standards will enable 
you to grow both professionally and personally. 

Help us meet the challenges of the future and reach a new level of 
accomplishment by sending your resume to: 

Bechtel Corporation 
Human Resources Department 

9801 Washingtonian Blvd. 
Gaithersburg, MD 20878-5356 



Bechtel ( 307 



ANYTIME, 
ANYWHERE... 

...more than a slogan. 

The seven thousand people who are the Bendix Field 
Engineering Corporation are doing many fascinating things, 
In groups of two or three or a hundred or a thousand, at 
many Interesting places In the United States and overseas 
like Maryland, California, Texas, Bermuda, Europe, Africa . . . 

Our continuing growth, from only a dozen or so forty-one 
years ago, spells opportunity. Opportunity, in technologies 
such as communications, computers, tracking systems, 
space sciences, seismic Investigations, mathematical 
analysis, laser development. Opportunity, for professionals 
who want to do. 

We may have just the right opportunity for you In our 
diverse operations. 

If Interested, please write to the Professional Placement 
Manager. 

BENDIX FIELD ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 

One Bendix Road 
Columbia, Maryland 21045 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Hied 
Signal 



Bendix 



M 



STANDARD FEDERAL 
SAVINGS BANK 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 
CLASS OF 1993 

Standard Federal is one of Maryland's largest savings banks 
and among the nation's lop mortgage loan servicers. As a 
recent college graduate, we hope you will look to us not 
only for your banking needs, but also as a prospective 
employer. We can offer competitive starling salaries, 
excellent company benefits and a variety of entry level 
positions. Professional individuals are needed for our 
Corporate Offices in Frederick and Gaithersburg as well as 
in various branches throughout P.G. and Montgomery 
Coimties. 

Pan lime positions for existing studenis are also available. 
For consideration please send a resume and cover leller lo: 

STANDARD FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

P.O. BOX #9481 

DEPARTMENT #141 

GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND 20898-9481 

EOE M/F/V/H 



COME GROW WITH US! 

CHESAPEAKE DIRECTORY SALES COMPANY, a partnership 
between Bell Atlantic Corporation and GTE/Directories 
Corporation, and the official sales agency for the C & P Yellow 
Pages has career opportunities in our offices located in Maryland, 
Virginia and West Virginia. These positions will be responsible for 
functions in one of the foOowing areas 



• Inside Sales 

• Marketing 
» Training 

• Sales Production 
I Telemarketing 



' Facilities 



• Outside Sales 

• Accounting 

• Human Resources 

• Telephone Service 

• Systems 



These positions are exceptional opportunities offering a 
competitive starting salary and an outstanding benefits package 
including major medical, 401 (K) savings plan and tuition 
reimbursement. 

If you are interested in being part of our dynamic company, 
please call our job line number for available openings: 
(301) 306-1580 



?\ 




CHESAPEAKE DIPECTOPTY SAI_ES CO. 

Human Resources Department 

6404 IvvLane, Suite 100 

Greenbeh, MD 20770 

An EEO/AA Employer 
A BcU AOanUc/GTE Pajtner^ip 




G^XJl-BTT 



THE OUAUTY FOOD PEOPLE 



GlAHTfOOD 

Career 

Developmeht 

Program 



We want to recruit 
qualified people for our 

manager trainee program. If you are 
personable, ambitious, and want a 
career with a future, 

WE WANT TO TALK WITH 



YOU! 



Send Resume to: 

Ricki Cranston, Employment Manager 
P.O. Box 1 804 Dept 549, Washington D.C. 2001 3 



308 ) Advertisements 




TURN CLASSROOM ACHIEVEMENT 

INTO WORLD CLASS CHALLENGE! 

As one of the world's leading contenders in the 
tire industry.'Micheiin is dedicated to one goal: 
create and deliver the best to the customer. 
Clearly, it's what sets us apart in our competitive 
industry. But Michelin quality doesn't just hap- 
pen. It comes as a result of hard work, unyielding 
standards and commitment to 
innovation. 

It also comes from selecting, developing and 
rewarding the finest technical talent available. 
And that's where your hard-earned academic 
accomplishments can pay off. If you've already 
proven yourself as a quality-minded individual, by 
seizing every challenge and making every effort 
to out-perform your personal best, Michelin could 
provide you with the ideal base on which to build 
a future. 

Be part of our world class challenge. We have 
plenty to do: in further development of advanced 
technologies, in manufacturing systems design, 
in actual production, in research, and much 
more... projects that will stretch your imagination 
and expand your knowledge. 

Sound Interesting? 

Then be sure to see your college placement office 

for details! 

Or write to: 

Michelin Tire Corporation 
P.O. Box 19001 
Greenville, SC 29602-9001 



TT-rrMTT 



PUTTING CAREERS IN MOTION. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer. 



Michelin 



309 











/"^georgetown 
\ Veather design 




We are Washington's leading retailer of fine leather goods, offering superior quality 
and expert service. Our current expansion brings the need to seek new personnel. 

We are seeking management candidates, as well as both full and part-time sales 
personnel. The right candidate should have previous retail experience with a strong 
emphasis on personal selling and customer service skills. 

Our full-time employees are eligible to receive an outstanding benefits package which 
includes major Medical/Dental/Life insurance, vacations, and more, plus a compensation 
program that rewards individual effort. 

Enjoy a team atmosphere in a professional and entrepreneurial group. Don't miss a 
great opportunity! Send resume today to: 

Georgetown Leather Design 

10710 Tucker Street 
Beltsville, Maryland 20705 

Attn: Human Resources Director 



Kick-off Your Semester at 
Belcrest Plaza Apartments 

Start the season with 2 #1 ranked teams! 



Ava 




Small Pet buildings 
(but no one from Penn State!) 





Don't pass-up 
your chance for 




SeinesteT leases 



Optional HBO/Cable TV 



Buses to D.C. and campus 



Indioidual heating and AJC 



Cathedral ceilings (top letxls) 



Private balcony or patio — Pod 



Walking distance to Prince Georges Plaza Mall 

Efficiency, 1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apts., some with dens 

Modem, zixll designed kitchens (some iv/dishwasher) 

For more information call 559-5042 

Time's naming out, so make your move to 




BELCREST PLAZA 

APARTMENTS 

Hyatlsville, MaryUnd 



-^mmfma 



<^ 




310 



Georgetown Leather/ 
Belcrast Plaza 



Sverdrup 

CORPORATION 

Congratulations! As an architectural or engineering graduate, the 
advantage is yours. Now your biggest decision is to make your 
degree count, 

Sverdrup Corporation, founded in 1928, has become known for a 
variety of multi-million dollar capital expansion programs for 
Amencan business, industry and government; and for achieve- 
ments such as the Superdome in New Orleans; the Space Shuttle 
Launch Complex at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California; the 
Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore, Maryland; the World Wide US, 
Embassy Program; and design of the new Computer and Space 
Science Facility at the University of f\/laryland. 

Sverdrup provides total project management for capital facilities, or 
any combination of engineering, architecture, planning, constnjc- 
tion, operations, communications and security. To meet the 
widening capital facility and program needs of businesses, 
industnes, and governments around the world, Sverdrup has 
structured its professional services for flexibility, breadth of scope, 
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314 



W.L. Gore & Associates 



Congratulations Class of 1993 




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WHERE 

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316 



MITRE 



Jim Shepard and team bring insight to InSite, 




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317 



Congratulations 

to the 

Graduating Class of 1993 



NAOR U. STOEHR, M.D., RA. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



7610 Carroll Avenue, Suite 220 
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Takoma Park, Maryland 
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Best Wishes & Congratulations 

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319 




1992-93 Terrapin Yearbook Staff 



Editor in Chief 


Krista Parker 


Managing Editor 


Gina Dugan 


Photography Editor 


Paul Vieira 


Layout Editor 


MatildeOtt im 


Copy Editor 


Christie iH 




Huston 


Business Manager 


Tanya Olsen 


Office Manager 


Stacey Brooks 


Section Editors 




Student Life 


Jennifer 




Christman 


Sports 


Jodi Douglas 


Seniors 


Allison Chang 


Academics 


Robin 




Solomon 


Organizations 


Susan Arak 


Year in Review 


Ben Werner 


Resident Life 


Amy Ives 




Amy 




DeHoyos 


Greeks 


Gina Dugan 


UM in Pictures 


Krista Parker 


Photographers 




Ashish Bagai 




Rama Bassalaci 




Tyrone Brooks 




Allison Chang 




Carlos Dopazo 




Latifa Jackson 




Joamie Saidman 




Maggie Saladay 




Staff Writers 




Mark Aziz 




Diane Back 




Rama Bassalaci 




1 Stacey Brooks 




Ishelley Edsall 




HHHmy Hamilton 




^^Kara Hatton 




Latifa Jackson 




Deanna Miller 




Kara Schmidt 





The 1993 Terrapin staff started this edition with the idea that improvement over past 
books was the main goal. The editors set high expectations for the staff in an effort to 
achieve their goals of improvement. 

The first battle that the staff faced was the choice of a theme. Many were considered 
and turned down, but ultimately the staff decided to used 'Breaking Through' as the 
theme to signify the recent tough times that the University had faced and the fact that 
through it all the University of Maryland managed to excel in a variety of areas. 

Some minor changes occurred in this book from past years. In an effort to increase 
coverage in a variety of areas we added more candid photographs. The Greeks section 
was revamped in an effort to cover more houses and people. We also decided to 
include group photos in the Sports section, once again to allow for more 'faces' to 
appear in the book. 

The Terrapin staff hopes that our effort and high expectations have payed off. We 
have tried to include all aspects of University life and we hope that , in an effort to 
capture the diversity of the campus that we have not overtly omitted anyone. 

The staff would like to extend the greatest thanks to all of the hard working photog- 
raphers, who, without their help, dedication and hard work, this never would have 
happened. 

The '93 Terrapin staff would like to say thank you, good-bye, and good luck to the 
staff's graduating seniors. We have really had a memorable year and look forward to 
consistently improving and making next years' book even better than ever. 




Terrapin Editors. Back Row: Allison Chang, Seniors Editor; Matilde Ott, Layout Editor; Jennifer Christman, 
Student Life Editor; Krista Parker, Editor in Chief. Middle Row: Jodie Douglas, Sports Editor; Ben Werner 
Year in Review Editor; PauIVieira, Photography Editor; Robni Solomon, Academics Editor. Front Row: Gina 
Dugan, Managing Editor; Christie Huston, Copy Editor; and Amy DeHoyos, Resident Life Editor. (Not 
Pictured-Susan Arak, Organizations Editor; Amy Ives, Resident Life Editor; and Tanya Olsen, Business 
Manager.) 



320 Terrapin Staff 



Layout Editor 
Matilde Ott 



Photo Editor 
Paul Vieira 



Copy Editor 
Christie Huston 




Top Photo- Photography Staff-(From Back) Ashish Bagai, Rama Bassalaci, 
Carlos Dopazo, Tyrone Brooks, Joanne Saidman, Maggie Saladayu and Paul 
Vieira. 

Photo Left- Terrapin Yearbook Staff- (From Back Row L-R) Maggie Saladay, 
Joanne Saidman, Ashish Bagai, Paul Vieira, Carlos Dopazo, Amy DeHoyos, 
Robin Solomon, Matilde Ott, Allison Chang, Tyrone Brooks, Jodi Douglas, 
Rama Bassalaci, Ben Werner, Amy Hamilton, Stacey Brooks, Christie Huston, 
Jenn Christman, Gina Dugan and Krista Parker. 



Terrapin Staff 



Managing Editor 
Gina Dugan 



Colophon 




Terrapin 1993 marks the 92nd volume of the 
University of Maryland at College Park yearbook. 
Josten's Printing & Publishing Co. produced the 
328 page book with a trim size of 9x12. a press 
rim of 1,500 and 24 color pages. The cover 
artwork and design was conceived by Krista 
Parker, editor in chief; and created by layout 
editor, Matilde Ott, who also created the artwork 
for the table of contents page and all of the 
artwork included in the sports section. 

Eric Manto served as our Josten's Company 
representative with Linda Nolf acting as the in- 
plant consultant. Carl Wolf Studios of Sharon 
Hill, PA photographed the graduates and sup- 
plied the Terrapin photographers with photogra- 
phy supplies. Collegiate Concepts Inc. of Atlanta, 
GA sold the advertisements for the 1993 Terrapin. 

The body copy of the book was 10 pt. Palatino, 
with the captions set in 8 pt. and the photo credits 
in 6 pt. New Century Schoolbook was the 
typeface used for headlines in the Student Life 
section, Tekton in Sports, Juniper for Academics, 
Avant Garde for Resident Life, Times for Greeks, 
Courier for Organizations and Palatino for the 
Seniors section. All sub-headlines were set in 18 
pt. Palatino Italic. 

Groups pictured in the Organizations sections 
paid for their space. All sports team photos were 
provided by the Sports Information Office. 

In order to meet pre-set deadlines, coverage in 
the sports section contains photographs and 
information from the 1991-92 season for winter 
sports, and the 1992 season for spring and fall 
sports. 

Yearbooks could be pre-ordered at a reduced 
price of $26.00, or paid for when the books came 
in for a price of $32.00. 




322 ) Terrapin Staff 




-■^ ■■ « > I>«I « WM » 8PW BI I I !IW 




:m^mm; 



Maryland 

at CoJJeg-e Park 




To My Staff- 



It did not seem appropriate to give all of these 
mushy thank you's, so I decided to give my thanks 
in my own special way, I hope you enjoy them. 



^»c4 o^ <tit Itadea.-'R.ohva Solomon, you have done so much on 
this book this only seems fitting. 



SeSBer (ate timt Heve^-]oA\ Douglas. 1 hope that you know that 
this is all in fun. Your section looks great, it just took a while to 
get that way. 



'P^atttoMi Sta^^enrV>ex\ Werner. Who else deserves such an 
honor. Yes I know that sometimes it was my fault, but you must 
admit others. . . At least you made it for the group picture. 1 will 
truly miss your sense of humor. 



Soefien "THett tutd ^(»*«e«-Paul Vieira and the photographers. 
You guys are amazing! Paul, thanks for always saying O.K. 
whenever I needed a shoot. You saved me and deadlines 
innumerable times. Also thanks for being the token male, pretty 
much, of all the editors, we really appreciated it. 



"UA 7ie<f. liA ^^ ^«<!<«^-]enn, Gina, Christie, Matilde, Jodi, 
Allison and Robin. Thank you for catching on and allowing me 
to have so much fun in the office. You are great sports and 1 will 
miss the stimulating conversation that often flowed throughout 
the office. The depth of the topics was immense and of course I 
wish you all a wealth of 'Good Hair Days'. 



Thanks Guys for all the fun and laughs and most of all for 
putting up with my weird sense of humor. — Krista 



Editors Pa^e 



As I sit here and look back over the past 21/2 years since 
I first stepped foot onto the third floor of South Campus 
Dining Hall, scared to death of the job that lay before me, I 
never though that 1 would become so attached or that the 
yearbook would become such a big part of my life. 

There are so many people that I would like to thank. First 
of all to Michael Fribush and the MMI Board of Directors for 
having the confidence to hire me not once by twice and for 
all of the support and encouragement. 

Nancy French, what more can I say but thanks. I have 
really appreciated all that you have done for me over the 
past two years. The endless stream of supplies, support and 
encouragement have been extremely helpful. I will never 
forget all that you have done. 

To Robin, Craig, and Joan, thanks for all of the answers 
that you always had for me. Especially this year, with all of 
my stupid computer questions, you were always there to 
help. Thanks. 

To my staff, I don't know what to say. There are so many 
of you that I can't just single anyone person or thing out. 
What I can say is that none of this could have happened 
without you. 1 said this before but I have never had as much 
fun at the University of Maryland as I did with you guys. 
You are a great group, keep up the good work next year. 
And to those of you that have stuck around for two years 
with me (Ben, Gina, Paul, Kara), thanks for putting up with 
my constant demands and weird sense of humor. 

To my photography staff, you have far exceeded last 
years books quality. I can not express enough how much I 
have appreciated you guys being the eyes for our book. This 
years' book looks great! 

To Nick and Lee; thanks for all of the advice, help and 
great pictures. I have really appreciated all that you have 
done for me and my book over the last two years. Sports 
wouldn't have happened without you. Also thanks for 
hstening to me gripe all the time, I really appreciated it. 

Finally to Gina, who would have thought two years ago, 
that things would have gone so far. You have done so much 
this year I could never thank you enough. You have come so 
far since starting and I know that you will do great things 
and continue to carry the torch, so to speak, into next year. 
Good Luck, and I will miss you. 

If I have left anyone out, please forgive me. I have 
enjoyed working on this book for the past two years and I 
hope that I have left a part of me behind as I leave this 
institution. 

I guess all that is left to say is, I'm outta here, C-Ya! 



^lAx^teP HtLkJejL^ 



Terrapin Staff ( 323 




1 

9 
9 
2 



Breaking Through 





Photo by Ashish Bagai 




324 ) Closing Section 



A Year to Remember 





1 






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Photo bv Joanne Saidman 



Photo by Maggie Saladay 




Closing Section | 325 






A Year to Remember 



1993 




Photo by Tyrone Bro<.'kw 




326 1 Closing Section 



Breaking Through 




'-^oivot 




UNIV OF MD COLLEGE PARK 

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