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Full text of "The Terrapin"



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Many students came to Maryland 
because of its good reputation for aca- 
demic programs; others came because it 
was close to home (or far, far away). 
However, one of the factors in nearly 
every student's mind when they chose 
Maryland was the beauty of the campus. 

"I loved Maryland when I came here to 
visit my senior year of high school," said 
senior Gwen Werbowsky. "The campus 
was so beautiful. I felt at home here." 
And just when students started to feel lost 



Edited i^tf ^ina 'i>u<^aH 



in this university's mob of 23,000 students, 
all they had to do was walk outside on a 
fresh spring day... bask in the sun on 
Chapel Field, study or leisurely throw 
around a frisbee on McKeldin Mall, or 
have lunch outdoors on Hornbake Mall. 
The atmosphere just seemed to make 
everything alright for awhile. 

During blustery winter months, 
students had the rare thrill of snowfall, 
when they could steal trays from the 
dining hall in an attempt to create a 



makeshift sled. Sledding here had its 
share of challenges, though. First, it was 
hard to find a hill. Second, "My rear end 
never fit on the tray!" one juruor said. 

Yet no matter how beautiful the 
campus was, nothing was more beautiful 
than the diversity of students who popu- 
lated it, who made it come alive every 
day. And although our student body was 
not free from conflict and far from perfect, 
we were all very human, and very Mary- 
land. 




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Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




Photo bv Joanne Saidman 

Opposite page: 

Top left - A coke and a sort-of-smile in the McKeldin fountain. Top 
right - Entertaining the child prodigies at Maryland who will graduate 
before any of us do. Bottom - Rough day? 



^'■■^'■■x. 



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This page: 

Top - A tough rugby game. Bottom left - Stimulating intellectual 
conversation is at its finest here. Bottom right - Contrary to popular 
belief, love is not a lost cause in College Park. 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



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Photo by Paul Vieira 




Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 

Opposite page: 

Top left - Testudo, before he was cleaned and restored in the fall 
semester. Top right - A Terrapin offensive man runs the ball against 
Wake Forest. Bottom - The beautiful Maryland campus in the spring. 

This page: 

Top - The "M" welcomes all visitors who enter through the South Gate. 
Bottom left - "Ag Day" reminds Maryland of our roots as an agricultural 
school. Bottom right - Homecoming is a highlight of Greek life, 
especially the Talent Show, where match-ups could show their spirit. 



Photo b^ I '.nil \ icir,, 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



10 



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This Daee' Photo by Eric Amo-Gottfried 

Maya Angelou, the poet who spoke at President Chnton's inauguration, spoke at Maryland during the spring semester. 

Opposite page: 

Top left - This guy knows the tradition of celebrating a loss or win after a Maryland football game at the local bars. Top right - Women's head basketball coach Chris 

Waller looks on in disgust after a bad call by the ref . Bottom - Christian Stowe, a Computer Science and German double major, and a member of Alpha Phi Omega, 

plays Twister at the All Niter in the beginning of September. 



11 



This page: 

Top left - The Mighty Sound of Maryland stands at attention, ready 
to perform its halftime show. Top right - Players in "Not by Bed 
Alone." Bottom - A newly-cleaned sundial makes a brief appear- 
ance on campus, only to be later taken down for further repairs. 

Opposite page: 

Top - Competition gets fierce in the South Hill Classic 3-on-3 
basketball tournament. Bottom left - Students take advantage of the 
snow near McKeldin on a day off. Bottom right - One of College 
Park's finest takes time out to spend with students. 






Photo by Paul Vieira 



12 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



13 




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Plioto by P^ul Vieira 



Opposite page: 

Top left - Mike Schafer, senior business major, shoots hoops outside 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. Top right - This chap is about to create waves... with 
his face. Bottom - Not only is McKeldin Mall a place to play, it's a great 
place to study as well. 

This page: 

Top - The South Hill Classic basketball tournament offered a Saturday 
filled with healthy competition and socializing. Bottom left - Recognize 
this creature? Squirrels made a good living on campus between ubiqui- 
tous trash cans and charitable students. Bottom right - the tradition of 
serenading continued as fraternities asked sororities to be their partners 
for Greek week and homecoming. 

15 




Plioto by Tyrone Brooks 



16 




Photo by Dana Sears 

This page: 

Top - Students grooved at the All-Niter, an annual event held at the 

beginning of every school year in the Student Union. Left - Kim Paone, 

sophomore (left) and Olivia Crosby, freshman, enjoy a stroll to class 

together. Right - Now we know who gets the prime parking spots on 

campus. 



Photo by Dana Sears 



17 




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This page; 

During the homecoming activities during the fall, this lucky guy experiences the magic of velcro first hand. 

Opposite page: 

Top - A legacy ended... Pi Kappa Alpha lost their house and their charter this year for financial reasons. Their house, once filled with parties and brotherhood, now 

stands abandoned and empty. Bottom left - A C.A. at LaPlata is never too busy to show enthusiasm about her job. Bottom right - Music soothes the savage beast... 

This performer at Art Attack plucks his harp for the savage beasts at Maryland. 



18 




All photos tins spread by Paul Vieira 



19 



This page: 

Top left - President Kirwan discusses education matters before fall classes 
begin. Top right - Maryland women show their sense of cultural style at 
a CSA-sponsored event. Bottom - "Toolin' around" with the hybrid- 
electric car at the College of Engineering. 
Opposite page: 

Top - This Holocaust Memorial, displayed in April on Hornbake Plaza, is 
constructed with barbed-wire binding rocks painted with all the names 
of the concentration camps. Bottom left - "Defying Gravity 101" was 
taught on Hornbake Mall during Homecoming. Bottom right - Sharing a 
secret with Testudo. The Terrapin symbolizes the strength and determi- 
nation of all Maryland athletics. 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

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The D.J.'s view of a usual night at the 'Vous. Photo by Paul Vieira. 

23 



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The water sculpture in front of the Tawes Fine Arts Building. 



All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

25 



This page; 

Top left - The football wasn't the only thing being passed around at the 
football games. Top right - Williams is going down. Bottom - Hanging 
out in front of the Engineering building. 

Opposite page: 

Top - A band at the Concert on the Row, during Greek Week. Bottom 
left - Tanning at Byrd Beach. Bottom right - Trying to study on the mall 
can be difficult on a beautiful day. 




Photo by Joanne Saidman 



26 



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All photos this page by Joanne Saidman 



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All photos this page by Paul Vieira 
Opposite page: 
Terrapin quarterback Scott Milanovich shows his great determination and emotion for the game. 

This page: 

Top - The cheerleaders show off their spirit (and their new uniforms) at the Homecoming Pep Rally. Bottom 
left - These students are just settling into a relaxing Friday-night game of dominos after an intense week of 
classes. Bottom right - Human howling at the All-Niter. Imagine going ten frames inside that ball. 



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Photo by Tyrone Brooks 
Opposite page: 

Top left - This Santa Fe waiter is serious about racking up his tips. Top 
right - A view of the College Park Shopping Center from across Route 1 . 
Bottom - The College of Engineering, celebrating its centennial this year, 
receives a coat of snow during Spring Break. 

This page: 

Top - The football team begins another game, high-fiving Coach Duffner 
, j^ as they run by. Bottom left - A stilt walker gets a bird's eye view of the 
festivities on the mall during Art Attack. Bottom right - Coach Duffner 
lets the ref know what he thinks of that last call. 



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31 




This page: 

Left - A proud Delta Sigma Phi member shows his 
loyalty with a big smile and a cheer. Right - Who 
ever thought, when you came to college you could 
become a human bowling ball? Bottom - This guy 
didn't quite make it home after a night out. 





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All photos this page by Paul Vieira 

32 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



Photo by Maggie Soladay 



33 




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All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



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Edited ^ ^iha 'i>u^an and l^oUti (obttioa 



What does the University of Maryland 
have to do with "Creating Waves?" It may 
seem Uke a stretch; after all, we were far 
from any beaches, and the closest thing 
we had to a body of water on campus was 
the fountain on McKeldin Mall. Think of 
the words "Creating Waves" in a more 
figurative sense, though, and they de- 
scribe Maryland to the tee. 

Maryland was a place where people 
were individuals; they strived to meet 
higher goals not only for themselves, but 
for others as well. Undergraduates 
"created waves" in such areas as academ- 




Photo by l-'dul Vieirs 



ics, athletics and community service, not 
to mention sent a few Shockwaves 
through social scenes. 

A few examples: protests against 
racism, remembering the Holocaust, 
playing roller-blade hockey on the tennis 
courts, taking hold of the field hockey 
national championship, being ranked in 
the top ten in the nation in academic 
programs like engineering and business, 
holding our own against Florida State in 
football, raising tens of thousands of 
dollars for a myriad of charities, tutoring 
students in area secondary schools. 




becoming active in community elections, 
having great parties despite the "No- 
Knox-Parties" rule, giving alternatives to 
those who did not want alcohol as part of 
their nights out... the list could fill pages. 

At a campus as large as this, it was easy 
for students to get lost in their own 
struggles and forget they were a part of 
something phenomenal... that each of 
their small contributions were what made 
this school great. Let us not forget what 
we have learned here, so that we may in 
turn use our experiences to make the 
world great. 



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For the first time ever, the March of 
Dimes ' "Walk America" for Healthier 
Babies came to campus this year. Spon- 
sored by a public relations class in the 
College of Journalism, the walk had over 
600 participants. 

Students could v^alk alone or with 
teams. They started at Tawes Theater the 
morning of April 18 with free bagels for 
all the participants. Then, it was time to 
warm up for the several-mile walk by 
doing some aerobics. 

And off they went! The walkers 
strutted off campus, down and around to 
Calvert Road, past 94th Aerosquadron 
and College Park Airport, past the metro 
station (which was still under construc- 
tion at the time), back up through South 
Campus, and ending at Tawes again. 

Walkers were greeted at the end of the 
route by people cheering and a free lunch 
which included fried chicken and various 
chips, cupcakes and other snacks. 

The students who participated had a 
lot of good things to say about the 
fundraiser. "I had a really good time," 
said SGA South Campus Legislator Andy 
Nouraee. "It was a good way to spend 
two hours with people I normally would 
not have and talk to people. It was hke 
relaxing and accomplishing something at 
the same time." 

- Ginn Dugan 



This page: 

Top - Registration at Tawes, bright and early. 
Bottom - They were all so happy to be there, they 
broke into a round of aerobics before setting off. 

Opposite page: 

Top left - Nothing like a free bage! to boost the 
energy before walking. Top right - The Maryland 
Cavalry was on hand for the opening ceremony. 
Bottom - Hundreds of walkers set off together to 
raise money for healthier babies. 

All photos this spread by Maggie Soladay. 










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It was the list that rocked the campus: the 
list of "Potential Rapists" posted at Art At- 
tack 1993 in an effort to get more women 
focused on the dangers of potential crime. 
Instead, the list became the focus of an all- 
out "war" between the men on the list and 
the women who made it. 

And just who were the men on the list? 
Every identifiable male from the campus 
directory. Many of them were surprised 
and angered to the point that they not only 
ripped the lists off the kiosks and every 
other place they saw them, but some went 
as far as to retaliate against the professor of 
the class that started it all, by making their 
own sign in protest. 

The "Potential Rapists" list made its way 
into the nightly news, and even got a short 
spot on the weekly TV news program, "Eye 
To Eye with Connie Chung." But back on 
campus, the "List" caused both men and 
women to think long and hard about the 
issues that arose because of it. While most 
men were offended and upset, there were a 
few whom it did not bother. "I was slightly 
offended; I had to really think deeper to 
understand where they were coming from," 
said one student, Philip Kruer. 

Conversely, there were many women 
who disagreed with the way the list was 
done. "I can understand their frustrations 
over all the rape incidents. But that was not 
the proper way of handling the situation," 
sophomore Sun Kang said. 

Campus officials eventually ruled that 
although they disagreed with the "List," 
they would not reprimand the female stu- 
dents or the professor who started it. 

Because of all of the turmoil the list cre- 
ated, the reason it was invented nearly got 
lost in the bickering. The women who cre- 
ated the "Potential Rapist" list wanted to 
prove to women that in this day and age, 
anyone could cause harm to them. What the 
list actually ended up proving to everyone, 
not just women, was that if people are not 
careful of how they make a point, a lot more 
harm can come from that point than good. 

- Stacey Brooks 

Women dressed in symbolic costumes and painted 
their bodies when they displayed the notorious List 
at Art Attack to protest violence against women. 

43 




Photo by Dana Sears 



44 




buddies 



Photo by Maggie Soi,Tda\' 



45 



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Top left - Many students came out to the 
First Look Fair in September for the wide 
array of handmade clothing and craft 
items. Top right - The College of Engi- 
neering displayed a CMC truck. Bottom - 
Students had the chance to sign up for 
clubs and got to take a stab at many new 
activities like fencing. 

Opposite page - Hundreds of students 
lent their artistic abilities to the Diversity 
mural, one of the most popular First Look 
Fair exhibits this year. 

All photos this spread by Joanne Saidman. 




46 




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Photo bv Paul Vieir.1 



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Parking Lot 



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Valid Lot 1 Permit Required 
7am - 4pm, Mon.- Fri. 

You Are Welcome to Park 

Without a Permit 

Before and After 

Above Posted Hours 



Opposite page; 

Top - A new class, "Greek 101," was introduced to teach new pledges the ways and responsibUties of Greek 

life. Heather Kravitz (teacher, left) gives some personal attention to some of her students: (from left) Dan 

Epelta, Rebecca Winik, Bethany Blankley, and Hillary Cherry. 

Bottom - Taco Bell was all the rage in the College of Engineering after it opened in November. 

This page: 

Top and bottom - Crowded parking certainly was not a campus first (top photo is of lot 1 near Van Munching 

Hall) , but the amazing part was the more lax parking rules. 

Other firsts not pictured: 

Classes were held for the first time in Van Munching Hall (otherwise known as the new 

College of Business and Management). 

Students had to pay 10 cents per page to print in the computer labs (previously it was 

free). 

Residents living in the highrises could pay a fee to live in a guaranteed single. 

10,000 copies of the Diamondback got stolen (a new school record). 

"Cluckers" opened in South Campus Dining Hall. 



51 



The Year in College Park 



New fire house built on Route 1 



Just north of the Campus Drive en- 
trance to campus, students watched as a 



a common bathroom. This doubled the 
potential occupancy from the old fire 



huge new fire house was erected this^ea| "fmse. However, the station captain said 

dloV ^q[ v^n7#not fill all the vacancies right 



When construction began, it was.4wd 
imagine the beautiful structure ^^at^ 
would stand when the consii^jction was 
complete. Jf 

The fire fighters nee^^rtflTew fire 
house because "over the y*^i^ we've 
outgrown our quarters," a smtion captain 
said. So the state, in conjunction with 
Prince Georges County, ol,^«5ed to fund 
the construction of the iiejp*'Wlding, 
which began in July, 19^. 4^^ 

From Route 1 passers-by dm sg 
arched opening, which is the en 
the new lounge or "dayroom," where 
fighters wait out the time that passes 
between fire calls. The second floor has 12 
suites which fit two people each and share 



large 

reto-*- 

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away, -^e're going to take this slow and 
easy, one stepyHPtune," he said. The fire 
house offers jfermai^nt houseing for Fire 
Protection ma\ys on campus. 

There was al^^^joom built on the 
second floor foi v^^ tanent EMS person- 
nel, a room for paramedic team, and an 
additional rooj^o^!in-members who 
were visitin gJn^ N^house. 

WitMte/na^ fire house, the station 
captai^^Ad twfire department would 
of^aml^uffince service to the campus. 

^e facility next to Maryland Book 
Exchange was scheduled for renovation to 
be used as office space for the campus. 

- Giua Diigan 




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F!RE HOUSE 


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Top - The first fire house in College Park, which was used before the facility next to the book exchange. Bottom left - The new fire house, still under construction. 
Bottom right - This circular window will be filled in with a stained glass design containing the fire fighter symbol. 
All photos this spread by Joanne Saidman. 



52 




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Long-awaited Metro Station opens 



Better late than never... many students 
were excited to see the opening of the i^^w 
metro station in College Park on De'^m 
bern,1993. Located at the ei-»o 
Road near the College Par^Pol^ffice, it 
was the perfect location for^^h students 
and city residents. ^ 

The station is a rafl^Tefty walk for 
most campus students, ss^e university 
extended its Shuttle-Um service to include 
stops at the new station. This gave 
students direct access b^tal metro, since 
before they had to rid^^S^uttle to 
either New Carrolltoiror ^hj^Spring to 
catch the trains. Travelling<fnis i^^y, it 
took about an hour to get to th' 
Washington, D.C. Now that stuaen 
catch the metro right here in the cit 
trip was cut by about half. 

Students looked forward to the pros- 




pect of easier access to Washington, D.C. 
actions. Junior Robin Solomon said. 
Tie ofTikMetro is cool because we can go 
o%i^o^nore often." Senior Jason Hicks 
had a dmerent^ew. "I think it's a bad 
idea to have ijptroTtere. People are going 
to come fromlhe baje in D.C. and start a 
bunch of stuff\ere. It's going to bring a 
lot of crime in."^^N 

College Park>^J||/council members and 
residents hopedj he n ew metro stop, 
named "Colle^T'a^^^Jniversity of 
Maryland," wo™^itract new businesses 
and ne*<i^iy1^^rs to the area. College 
Park (osimiomm "shopping traffic" when 
rt ^ad was closed to start the 
uOTon. A new bypass road was 
promised by the county, but this year, the 
road was not yet completed 

- Ginn Diignu 



A Year to Remember 



53 



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Shakespeare's famous, tragic love story 
of "Romeo and Juliet" was brought to Ta vves 
Theatre in a modern-day version in Octo- 
ber. The actors were part of the National 
Players, the resident classical touring com- 
pany of the University of Maryland College 
Park. 

As the show began, strong pounding 
beats and the sound of wind chimes along 
with rhythmic, pulsating music took con- 
trol of the senses. The actors jumped out 
into view from all directions wearing every- 
thing from plaid shirts, sweat pants, worn 
vests and rags to suits and dresses, in this 
contemporarv interpretation of the play. 

Stephen Hadnagy, who played Romeo's 
friend "Mercutio, " commented on the up- 
dated costuming. "Viewing something as a 
museum piece loses its relevance for today. 
Couplets and hose obscure things for an 
audience who comes in to see a play with 
pre-conceived notions. " 

"Mercutio" was very animated, outland- 



ish and full of youthful energy. "1 feel my 
character translates a lot of feelings well 
from my generation and into the generation 
now, which is very violent and frustrated," 
Hadnagy said. 

Many in the audience said they could 
relate to the play's newer version. "A lot of 
people who mav not have been able to ap- 
preciate the traditional [version] would have 
been able to enjoy this version better, with 
the updated costumes and script," observed 
sophomore Brooke Courtney. 

"I think that by adapting [Romeo and 
Juliet] and making it more mainstream and 
modern, it served the function of introduc- 
ing an audience to Shakespeare," agreed 
junior Raphi Aronowitz. 

When asked how he felt about the play's 
modern-day twist, freshman Michael Watts 
wished the actors had left the original mean- 
ings intact. "1 usually enjoy modernized 
plays, but the connotation of some words 
should not have been changed" to suit to- 




day, he said. 

Freshman Victor Peters said, "The actors 
did a good job but instead of keeping the 
meaning and getting rid of the words, they 
did the opposite." 

Besides the planned changes, many last- 
minute changes occurred backstage just 
before the show began. The night before 
dress rehearsal, Scott Fortier, who played 
"Romeo," was in the midst of preparations 
when a platform fell on his leg, causing a 
hair-line fracture. "There were many physi- 
cal scenes that had to be changed in one 
afternoon, like the fighting scenes," ex- 
plained Hadnagy. 

Ned Canty, the company manager, said 
even Romeo's crutch was adorned to suit 
the character. Canty added that the show 
actually benefited because it helped them 
become aware of new ways of presenting 
scenes. 

- Giselle Goicochea 



hoto bv Dana Sears 



Alumni bring 



With the acting help of three alumni, the 
National Players presented two plays at 
Tawes Theatre for their 45th anniversary:' 
Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and a stage 
adaptation of George Orwell's novel, 1 984.. 

Justin Connor and Steven Hadnagy, 
both theater majors, graduated from Mary- 
land in 1993. Suzi Tasca, a journalism 
major, received her degree iin May 1992. 

Connor played "Tybalt" and "Friar John" 
in Romeo and Juliet and "First Guard" in 
1 984. "At first," he said, "I tried to get away 
from theater because I didn't feel commit- 
ted enough and I didn't know if I wanted 
that type of lifestyle." As time went on 
though, Connor said, "The harder I tried to 
get away, the stronger the attraction be- 
came." He had roles in two plays at Mary- 
land, "Marcellus" and "Lucianus" in Ham- 
let, and "Sidney Brustein" in To Be Young, 
Gifted and Black. 

Hadnagy did not have plans to concen- 
trate on theater coming into Maryland, 
either. It was not until he began audition- 
ing for plays that he realized theater was 
the field for him. "There was no point in 
pursuing something 1 wasn't interested in. 



Players adapt and present Orwell's 1984 



"Who controls the past, controls the 
future. Who controls the present, controls 
the past." These words served as the 
theme for the play adaptation of George 
Orwell's novel, 1984, at Tawes Theater. 



The play was presented by the resident 
classical touring company. The National 
Players. 

The play's setup was similar to that of 
Romeo and Juliet. The show opened with 




["■hoto bv Dana Sears 



National Players show home 



I also found it rewarding," he said. In his 
years at Maryland, Hadnagy performed in 
14 shows. 

Tasca said she dedicated most other time 
in college to the theater department. "There 
were two or three other journalism majors 
who chose to do theater, as well... besides," 
she said, "you didn't have to be a theater 
major to... give of yourself on stage." Tasca 
also performed in several plays here, in- 
cluding "Lady Britomart" in Major Barbara 
and "Mustardseed" in A Midsummer Night 's 
Dream. 

The first professional job Hadnagy had 
was during the summer three years ago 
with the National Players in Shakespeare's 
As You Like It. Later, he worked in a produc- 
tion of Major Barbara at the University with 
Tasca. Both actors then became acquainted 
with director James A. Petosa, who co-di- 
rected 1984 and Romeo and Juliet. 

Hadnagy said, "After working with 
[Petosa] in Major Barbara, I knew that imme- 
diately after graduating, I was interested [in 
being part of] the National Players." 

Auditions for this year's company were 
very competitive. Ned Canty, company 



manager and actor in both plays, said, "To 
go on tour, [a person] needs a certain kind 
of spirituality and a sense of generosity. 
We want to know why [people] are doing 
it. It's not just talent we're looking for, but 
the right spirit." 

As the three went on stage with their 
fellow actors, they did so as a family, 
Hadnagy explained, "We're a very posi- 
tive, dedicated group. A big part [of the 
experience] beyond the acting is the living 
arrangement that will exist for seven 
months." 

He added, "We're not 12 people that 
just act, we're a self-contained company. 
Everybody performs some technical as- 
pect. We are limited economically... it 
can't work if everyone doesn't do their 
part." 

This past year the company traveled to 
states as far as South Dakota, Kansas, Ten- 
nessee and Wisconsin. Hadnagy said he 
realized beforehand, "A lot of challenges 
lay ahead, but it is rewarding when you 
look at something you did and the struggle 
you had to go through to get it." 

- Giselle Goicochea 



many flashing Hghts and desks. Many 
electronic props created a sterile, con- 
trolled atmosphere, such as blinking 
lights, televisions and vocal background 
effects. 

Freshman Mark Hess observed, "The 
props fit the play and the actors did an 
excellent job." 

"The set was simple but effective. 
Although it was not high-tech, the props 
were clear in their intent," said freshman 
Anne Grauel. 

1984 was written in the 1970s. In it 
Orwell gives a chilling prediction as to 
what the world would be like if every- 
thing was technologically controlled, 
leaving no room for any emotions. In this 
world, all actions are controlled by "Big 
Brother," the supreme authority, who 
watches over everyone using televisions. 
Big Brother is greatly respected, and to go 
against his beliefs carries severe penalties. 

A new language was created, 
"NewSpeak," the only language whose 
vocabulary actually gets smaller as time 
passes. For example, instead of saying 
something is extremely horrific, 
NewSpeak would chop it to "double-plus 
bad." 

"The ultimate message the play relays is 
that modernization, to an extreme, is 
really the decay of society," said freshman 
Tamika Cobbs. 

Steven Hadnagy, who played "Martin," 
a guard in 1984, explained, "It was diffi- 
cult to bring to stage because the novel 
was very idea-oriented. We tried to make 
it more of a story about people, rather 
than ideas." 

Grauel added, "The stage adaptation 
was a quality performance that I thor- 
oughly enjoyed, conveying a genuine 
understanding of the novel and its pur- 
pose." 

Freshman Paul Murphy disagreed, 
"The play by the National Players lacks 
the intensity that made the book scintillat- 
ing." 

Hadnagy said the National Players 
chose to do Romeo and Juliet and 1984 
because of the similarities, "Both [intimate 
relationships] are similar because they 
have a secret love, in a society that tells 
them it's wrong." 

- Giselle Goicochea 



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This page: Top left - These students aren't just walking, 
they are raising money for healthier babies in the 
March of Dimes Walk-A-Thon. Top right - Bikes were 
one the fastest wa)'S to get around campus. 
Center - Bikes might be the fastest, but convertibles are 
more fun. Bottom - Cheap, economical and fun to ride, 
this motor scooter carried its owner to see the South 
Hill Classic Basketball tournament. 
Opposite page: Top left - Testudo does a high-flying 
stvmt on his scooter at a football game. 
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campus. Center - On snow days, walking is the best 
altemati\'e... especially to get to the "Vous. Bottom 
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The 80's has been remembered for a 
great many things, but one issue that 
played a crucial role in the lives of all 
people in the nineties as well as the 80's 
has increased in horrifying numbers and 
left no one untouched. One in 500 college 
students was infected. One in 250 Ameri- 
cans was infected. AIDS was an issue that 
could not be ignored. In order that the 
AIDS epidemic and understanding of 
AIDS be a continued part in the lives of 
Maryland students, the University held 
Bridges to Understanding, AIDS Awareness 
Week W during the week of November 1- 
5, 1993. 

The week consisted of a range of 
informative and provoking discussions 
and displays related to AIDS. Becky 
Bishop, who volunteered for the Health 
Center, helped run their table in the 
Stamp Union. "I hope this week will have 
some personal meaning for people and 
their behavior," she said. 

On November 3, about 110 students 
were present for the event "Express 
Yourself," where the campus community 
was given the opportunity to express their 
feelings about AIDS through a creative 
outlet. The turnout proved to be a large 
success compared to the previous year's 
program. This would hopefully indicate a 
sign of the enlightenment of the campus 



community and their need to communi- 
cate about the disease. 

Other events that took place included 
speakers and presentations given on the 
effects of AIDS on the Black and Jewish 
communities. A Personal Stories Panel 
was held where persons living with HIV 
and AIDS shared their experiences and 
answered questions. Opportunities were 
also available for people to volunteer at 
the Whitman- Walker Clinic of Suburban 
Maryland. A number of other moving 
events were held throughout the week to 
bring the plight of the AIDS epidemic 
closer to students who may yet to have 
had to personally deal with the brutal 
reality of AIDS and gave others a chance 
to share their experiences in dealing with 
AIDS. 

While the education process and arena 
for discussion about AIDS should con- 
tinue publicly for more than just one 
week. Bridges to Understanding served a 
very useful and life-saving purpose. 
Campus students were given the opportu- 
nity to become educated about a disease 
that will greatly affect their lives. Hope- 
fully the week long events provoked 
students to take action and continue the 
battle against AIDS with a greater under- 
standing. 

-Robin Solomon 





60 



AIDS Awareness Week IV 




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61 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

62 



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To be alternative was quickly 
becoming the popular activity on campus. 
More and more students were searching 
for other ways to spend their free time 
than hit the local bars on Route 1, or going 
to parties on Knox Road. These students 
often took advantage of on campus 
events, or traveled to the nearby District 
of Columbia. 

On campus, students searching 
for the alternative to bars, were provided 
with free comedy shows and concerts in 
the Stamp Student Union. Every 
Thursday night, the Roy Rogers fast food 
restaurant turns into a night club. 
Sometimes stand up comedians 
performed, and other times local bands 
appeared. Always the price was free. 
Also many dormitories offered free movie 



nights or parties for their residents to 
enjoy interacting with other people. 
These activities all were free to students 
and helped students meet other students. 

Just off campus, a popular 
alternative to the beer guzzling scene 
around the University, was Planet X, a 
coffee shop that caters to the alternative 
crowd around College Park. Planet X 
sponsors poetry readings and sometimes 
hosts bands to perform for the coffee 
sipping customers. 

For students that want a change 
of scenery, the District of Columbia is 
only a short drive away. In D.C. clubs 
like the 9;30 Club, the Fifth Column, the 
Roxy, Tracks, and the new Black Cat Club 
offer a wide range of music and dance for 
students. These establishments do serve 



alcohol, but unlike the College Park 
venues, the D.C. clubs admit 18 and over 
people thus giving underage students an 
alternative to using a fake l.D. in order to 
have a good time. 

Finally many students have 
resorted to creating their own hang outs 
on or about campus. Roller Bladers can 
be seen on virtually any evening, skating \ 
around, jumping many perilous obstacles. 
Another popular attraction apparently 
was the rail road tracks near the new 
Metro station. For people looking for an 
alternative to the old estabhshed beer 
ingestion joints, there exist many 
possibilities, only a little looking was 
needed to find them. 

- Ben Werner 




Opposite page: Top - the College Park Metro Station at 
night. This was a link for students to get to Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Bottom - Planet X was a great alternative hangout. 
Seated from left: Vidya Gopal, Apollo Nguyen, John 
Shukla. 

This page: The Inline Skating Club was spotted all over 
campus during all hours. 



63 



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64 



...UNITY 










All photos this spread by Gwen Elliott 

65 




This page: 

Top - Drew Weaver speaks at the NABJ forum. Panelists were {from left): Raja Mishra, editorial editor of Tlie Diamondback; Drew Weaver, editor-in-chief of The 

Diamondback; Mike Dunston, NABJ President; Shanon Murray, Eclipse editor-in-chief; and Corey Dade, Black E):plosion editor in chief. Bottom - Kelly Harvey of the 

College of Journalism gives her opinion on the pressing issues. 

Opposite page: Mishra, Weaver, Dunston and Murray enjoy one of the lighter moments of the discussion. 



66 



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QtVties 




Voices A^e 




Many events that came to a climactic 
head on campus during this year were seen 
as just a single incident sparked by nothing 
in particular. But those incidents, like a 
snowball crashing down to cause an ava- 
lanche, had tostarttheir journey somewhere. 
So can be paralleled the events involved 
with race relations on campus at Maryland. 

On campus this year, the snowball came 
hurtling down to the ground when 10,000 
copies of Tlie Dininondbnck were stolen on 
the night of October 25, 1993. The effects of 
the event were felt all over campus and even 
generated interest in the surrounding com- 
munity and media institutions. 

Donahue Tuitt, President of the Black 
Student Union, personally thought that the 
papers being stolen was a valid form of 
protest because it was productive, and the 
students got their point across. Tuitt, who 
provided the snowball metaphor, com- 
mented that this incident was not some- 
thing that just happened for one reason or 
another but that it had been building up. 
Tuitt pointed out that common campus stu- 
dents did not feel they had ample opportu- 
nity to get their opinions expressed in The 
Diamondback. Tuitt felt that newspapers 
and the media in general were a fourth 
branch of government, and he said it was 
their responsibility to be accurate in what 
they showed to the public. Because the 
media had such power and influence at 



many levels, people's lives were shaped by 
what they saw, he said. 

This year, Tuitt said Tlie Diivnoiuiback 
was doing a very good job, but there was 
always room for improvement. Tuitt 
pointed out the staff was not inherently 
racist, maybe just ignorant about what they 
were writing about. Because of the papers 
being stolen and the ensuing events, the 
paper was going to check and double check 
that they were accurate. 

Drew Weaver, editor-in-chief of The Dia- 
mondback, said the errors were not made 
with the intent to offend. He said The Dia- 
mondback was lucky enough to afford semi- 
nars on proper journalistic style and profes- 
sionalism, and that many papers. Diamond- 
back included, needed to be refreshed on the 
ethical aspects of news reporting periodi- 
cally. Weaver added that the paper made 
every effort to produce an upscale informa- 
tional newspaper for the student body. 

After the papers were stolen, the local 
media came out in force, contacting the BSU 
and Asian Student Union for their views on 
the incident and on racism at the University. 
Tuitt decided to coordinate a rally in front of 
the Union (pictured on pages 64 and 65) 
where representatives from many of the 
minority campus organizations came to 
share their opinions in an open mic format. 

The NABJ (National Association of Black 
Journalists) also organized a forum where 



the editors from several campus publica- 
tions sat on a panel to discuss how media 
coverage could improve on campus. 

As much interest as this whole series of 
events drew, there had to be a way to con- 
tinue keeping the forum open for discus- 
sion so that another snowball would not 
come rolling onto campus, producing dev- 
astating effects. Tuitt said he had been in 
contact with the Vice President of Student 
Affairs, and they worked on some long- 
lasting solutions. One such program dis- 
cussed was a mandatory class for freshmen 
about the history of people in general. The 
point of the class would be to get all the 
students to interact with each other and to 
learn about each other. "Minority students 
don't want to be tolerated, we want to be 
understood as people," Tuitt said. Students 
needed to have a means to communicate, 
and a mandatory class would encourage 
and force interaction, he said. 

Racism was far from being eliminated 
from this campus, but when the system was 
challenged and students stood up for what 
they believed in, a great deal could be ac- 
complished due to the Diamondbacks being 
stolen. From listening to Tuitt and other 
students, it was clear that we must be strong 
as individuals to work together to accom- 
plish unity. 

- Robin Solomon and Joainie Saidman 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

67 



vVS^Sii^(A«Si 






PRIME TIME AT UNIVE 



68 








All photos this spread by Dana Sears 

It was 8:00 PM on any Wednesday. A 
group of students gathered in the lounge on 
the fourth floor of Elkton Hall. One might 
think they were studying for a gargantuan 
mid-term, right? Wrong. These students 
were sitting comfortably on the sofas, gaz- 
ing at the television set, practicing a phe- 
nomenon known as TV Cults. The theme 
music for Beverly Hills, 90210 blared from 
the screen. The keen, interested students 
watching got prepared to share their com- 
ments. 

"Do you think Brandon Walsh (played by 
Jason Priestly) really wears Peep jeans?" 
asked a freshman, "Joe," referring to Priestly's 
blue jean advertisements. "It's Pepe jeans," 
corrected "Mary," a freshman from Villanova 
University who came to join in the festivi- 
ties. 

Right down the hall, freshman Kristen 
Walker was in her friend's room waiting for 



THEY ARE AS 
ADDICTIVE 
AS NARCOTICS, 

BUT YET THEY 

ARE 

LEGAL 



the others to come back from the conve- 
nience store. She had promised to update 
them on what they missed. Freshman Elise 
Johnson exclaimed, "Look at Andrea 
(Gabrielle Carteris), she's 33 years old, she 
doesn't even look like a college student." 
And later in the show, "Brenda (Shannon 
Doherty) is such a tramp... they just had 



"* *<w&i^- 



sex. 

"I wouldn't have sex with a guy if our 
parents were downstairs! Mine would have 
to be on Mars!" exclaimed Walker. Fresh- 
man Jennifer Ulrich pointed out, "We sit 
here and make fun of the show, but we still 
watch it." 

There were other trendy shows also be- 
ing watched in a group manner. Melrose 
Place, which immediately followed 90210, 
was popular as well. Freshman Liz Henkin, 
who lived in LaPlata, said, "A lot of people 
on my floor watch 90210 and Melrose, as 
well as The Oprah Winfrey Show and late- 
night shows and sports like Monday Night 
Football every week. She added the reason 
she believed these cults were popular was 
because "it's a good bonding experience. It's 
not boring if you watch TV with people on 
your floor, because someone always has 
something to say." 

- Giselle Goicochea 



RSITY OF MARYLAND 



69 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

70 





Laughin' Up a $tom 



Opposite page: 

Sue Kolinsky delights the audience with her witty 

humor. 

This page: 

Top - Kolinsky signs autographs after the show. 
Bottom - A representative from SEE productions gives 
out door prizes for the Addams Family Values promo. 



Nite Life started as an alternative to 
alcoholic events. It was sponsored by SEE 
Productions and student activities fees. The 
time and location has become a Thursday 
night ritual at the Roy's Eatery in the Stamp 
Student Union. The crowd sizes varied 
according to the entertainment. The talent 
ranged from poets to musical acts, with 
comedians filling in the voids. The big 
attractions were the local and not-so-local 
bands that were trying to make it (or trying 
to pay bills). 

The comedians were the ones that 
would liven up the joint with their satirical 
wit. One such comedienne performed on 
November IV^, 1993 and her name was Sue 
Kolinsky. She was a spunky gal with a 
mouth that touched many aspects of life, 
even student life. One such topic was about 
school mascots and how some towns 
bragged about their schools with slogans on 
billboards. One such sign was about the 

Gamecocks and it went a little like this 

"We Bet You Can't Lick Our 'Cocks." 



Needless to say when she asked what this 
school's mascot was, the reply gave her 
even more life and the audience roared. Of 
course the classic ritual of saying the mascot 
wasn't masculine enough came out with the 
expected laughs and agreements. 

At the close of her act approximately 
one hour after she started, the next feature 
of the night sailed by. This ooky and spooky 
feature was Paramount's promotion of the 
Addams Family Values movie giveaways. The 
drawing for the prizes was humorous 
because one person's name kept coming up 
just about every other selection. The prizes 
were movie passes, a T-shirt and not so 

classic Thing holding a snow scene in a 

glass ball. At the overall conclusion. Sue 
Kolinsky stuck around to sign autographs 
using either a pen or huge marker at the 
discretion of the recipients. 

It was this and other forms of 
entertainment that made Nite Life so 
successful and long-Uved. 

- Paul Vieira 



71 



University Theatre Presents 

Brighton 
Beach 

On November eleventh through the twentieth, the University 
Theatre players performed Neil Simon's play Brighton Beach Memoirs 
in Tawes Theatre. 

The house lights dimmed, the audience hushed, and out of 
the darkness a boy pretending to be a pitcher for the New York 
Yankees in the 1937 World Series throws a baseball against his 
backyard fence in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, New York. This thirteen 
year old boy, Eugene, played by David Marcus, hopes to play 
baseball and be a writer. 

In the course of the play, Eugene writes the manuscript of his 
family memoirs during September of 1937. Eugene's father. Jack 
(played by Charles Dawson) is a hard worker who takes on two jobs 
to support the seven people living the with the family. His mother 
Kate (Sharon Ammen) is the equally hard-working housewife. His 
eighteen-year-old brother Stanley (Doug Montequin) did not go to 
college but holds a job to help support the family. Eugene's immediate 
family took in Kate's sister Blanche and her family. Blanche (Colleen 
McCarthy) is a non-working widow with two daughters. The eldest 
daughter, Nora, is a talented sixteen-year-old who wants to be on 
Broadway and, as actress Jodi Rehmert explained, "wants her 
mother's love and is jealous of her younger sister." Laurie, the 
younger daughter, is pampered by her mother and aunt because she 
has a heart condition. Together with Eugene, we follow the family 
as they try to persevere while struggling over finances, codes of 
conduct, and sibling rivalry. 

In the words of director Kate Ufema, Brighton Beach Memoirs 
is a play "for all those who still believe in love, family, principles, and 
the positive potential of youth and the human spirit." 

Ufema, in addition to directing, was an assistant professor, 
actress, singer, musician and professional consultant, vocal trainer, 
coach, and therapist. Her work has taken her to lUinois, St. Louis, 
Philadelphia, and New York. The actors were no strangers to the 
theatre, either. David Marcus (Eugene) was a senior theatre major 
who appeared in another Tawes Theatre production. Not By Bed 
Alone. Charles Dawson, (Jack), performed most recently in Quilt — 
A Musical Celebration and earned his Master of the Arts in theatre 
from the University of Maryland. Arriving at Maryland as a Ph.D. 
Fellow, Sharon Ammen's (Kate) professional experience included 
performing as Emilia for the Colorado Shakespeare Festival and 
Joanne in Vanities at the King's Jester Theatre. Debuting in Tawes 
Theatre, Doug Montequin (Stanley), a junior theatre/pre-med major, 
had worked in productions in Olney Theatre, the Baltimore Lyric 




Top left - (from left) "Eugene" (David Marcus), "Nora" (Jodi Rehmert), "Kate" 
(Sharon Ammen), "Blanche" (Colleen McCarthy), and "Laurie" (Debbie Wirth). 
Top right - David Marcus in the spotlight. Bottom left - "Kate" consoles "Jack" 
(Charles Dawson). Bottom right - taking up for the baby of the family. 

Opera House, and on stage in Seoul, Korea. Also appearing for the 
first time this year on the Tawes stage, Jodi Rehmert (Nora) was a 
sophomore theatre major and a Creative and Performing Arts 
scholar who performed in dinner theatres from a very early age. 
Senior Colleen McCarthy (Blanche), also a Creative and Performing 
Arts Scholar, appeared in TJte Heidi Chronicles and Noises Off at 
Tawes Theatre. Another Creative and Performing Arts Scholar, 
junior Deborah Wirth (Laurie) acted last year in Hamlet and Not Bi/ 
Bed Alone. 

The group's talents shone brilUantly, and they really brought 
the characters to life. Rachel Kulansky, a freshman, explained that 
she enjoyed the play, "because 1 could relate to some of the characters 
— they reminded me of people 1 know." Indeed, Sharon Ammen 
portrayed "Kate" as the classic nagging, yet tender-hearted mother; 
the women in the audience could surely related to Jodi Rehmert as 
"Nora" and Colleen McCarthy as "Blanche," who bickered in the 
way so many teenage girls and their mothers do; and the male 
theatre-goers could certainly remember being so confused about 
themselves, like David Marcus' character "Eugene," while going 
through puberty. The characters were so vivid and true that they 
moved the audience. "You even felt their pain and the anxieties," 
freshman Michelle Cantave said after watching the performance. 

- Da)w Sears 



72 




AU photos this spread by Dana Sears 



73 



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It was a brisk rainy December night 
on Saturday December 4 when the 16* 
Annual Miss Black Unity Pageant was held. 

The theme of the Pageant was 
"Women of Color 'Bridging the Gap'... 
uplifting the Black Man." This event also 
honored and saluted twelve Black Men. 
They were: Muhammad Ah, John Johnson, 
Harry Belafonte, Nelson Mandela, Guy 
Bluford, Colin Powell, Ben Chavis, John B. 
Slaughter, Dick Gregor\', Percy E. Sutton, 
Jesse Jackson and Douglas Wilder. 

After the tribute. Mistress of 
Ceremonies and Miss Black Unity 1984- 
1 985 Gina House introduced Tracy Blizzard, 
Miss Black Unity 1992-1993, as the show 
opener. She performed a self- 
choreographed dance to the musical hit, 
Mariah Carey's "Hero," as a tribute to the 
Black Man. Then the twelve lovely 
contestants performed the opening dance 
routine and introduced themselves in 
traditional pageant style. 

The Pageant was divided into three 
categories which were talent, (35 points), 
evening gown and poise (25 points) and 
question and answer (40 points), for a total 
of 100 points in all. 

The talent portion of the 
competition ran in a random order. Kenya 
Freeman did a dramatic presentation w^hile 
Nadja Payne sang a Mariah Carey song. 
Amani Nuru-Jeter presented a dramatic 
reading about a pregnant teen who just lost 



the father of her baby to the violence of the 
"Hood." Her performance had the full 
attention of the audience, that would make 
anyone shed a tear. 

Then Nina Taylor danced, Emily 
Clark dramatically performed, Nicole Wade 
sang and Tammy Woodbury dramatically 
performed in turn. 

The next three contestants showed 
us what competition was all about. When 
that piano rolled out onto stage for the third 
time I was sure it was going to be another 
song performed vocally, but then House 
introduced Roz Anderson, who would be 
performing a piano selection. The audience 
and 1 were treated by a young lady with 
musical talent that flowed through her hands 
Hke a river cascading gently down from a 
mountain 's summit. 

Then the piano was returned to the 
site where the audience knew they were 
going to hear from another singer. But 
Tedra Chalmers gave us her soulful 
rendition of Vanessa Bell Armstrong's 
"Faith" in a natural style that reminded me 
of Anita Baker's video where she was a shy 
timid singer performing in front of a rowdy 
audience, a scene that turned out to be an 
overpowering one when the audience 
approved of her singing. Tedra's 
performance had the audience applauding 
and cheering their satisfaction to later land 
her the Best Talent award. 

Oh boy, there went that old piano 





towards center stage but with the keys facing 
the audience. We were entertained by Terrie 
Jones, showing us her dramatic qualities by 
portraying the late great Miss Billy Holiday 
at an interview with news reporters, 
excluding the Diamondback of course. The 
talent competition was finally closed out by 
Camelia Pierre and Kristen Walker. 

After the talent competition 
concluded, Otis Williams, Director of the 
Nyumburu Cultural Center, made 
acknowledgements to sponsors, judges and 
the audience for showing up. Then the old 
fish bowl appeared for the Door Prizes that 
turned out to be quite amusing when the 
winners just kept stumbling and tripping 
over ghosts. As the contestants got ready 
for the Evening Gown and Poise 
competition, the escorts were introduced. 
They showed the audience a thing or two 
while the contestants were about ready to 
parade the gowns before a romantic wishing 
well back drop. 

The final competition began with 
House reading the question, "What is the 
most serious problem facing the Black 
Community in America today?" This 
question left two contestants with two- 
sentence answers and another at the point 
of a nervous break down. But with some 



74 




encouragement from the audience in the 
way of applause, she pulled herself together 
and answered the question, ending it with a 
smile of relief. 

With the conclusion of the "Q and 
A" competition. Miss Black Unity 1992-1 993 
Tracy Blizzard conducted her final walk in 
the traditional manner and finally resided 
on the throne with six contestants on her left 
and the other six on her right. Before the 
winners were announced, the contestants 
were serenaded by Lorenzo Miller singing 
his rendition of that all-time favorite pageant 
song, "You Are So Beautiful." 

The title of Miss Congeniality was 
bestowed upon Kenya Freeman, Pageant 
Booster Award went to Nina Taylor and 
Best Talent went to Tedra Chalmers. Then 
the anxiety and nervousness had begun. 
House opened the first envelope to reveal 
the 3"^ Runner-Up as Amani Nuru-Jeter, 2'"^' 
Runner-Up as Terrie Jones and 1-' Runner- 
Up as Roz Anderson. With nine contestants 
left, the atmosphere was intensified by 
anxiety when the M. C. decided to give an 
inventory of the prizes that Miss Black Unity 
would receive. And finally she announced 

it Miss Black Unity 1993-1994 

was Tedra Chalmers! 

- Paul Vieira 




All photos this spread bv Paul Vieira 
Opposite page: Top - Roz Anderson mystifies the audience with her amazing musical talent. Bottom - Terrie Jones 
gives a dramatic presentation depicting the late great singer, Billie Holiday. 

This page: Top - (from left) 1 st runner-up Roz Anderson, 2nd runner-up Terrie Jones, 3rd runner-up Amani Nuru- 
Jeter, Miss Black Unity 1993-94 Tedra Chalmers and Miss Black Unity 1992-1993 Tracy Blizzard. 



75 



MARY 




Check out that 



76 



LAND 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



Maryland Spirit 



n 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

78 



^ 



G^" 



^e to Fo 
^1 



Ur 



h 



o. 



%xam ^- 



# 



It happened about four years ago. 
rhat four-letter word that spelled drinking, 
BARS, dropped on us like a ton of bricks. 
The time we were freshmen can best be 
explained as an anxiety of being under age 
but yet considered an adult. Well needless 
to say, life stunk. 

For breaking stressful periods and 
boredom, we could almost always count on 
getting into the Cellar... best known as the 
place in Downtown College Park that 
anyone with a fake I. D., good or bad, was 
guaranteed passage through its portals. The 
real high point of the Cellar was it had a 
dance floor. Although it may not have been 
the world's best, it certainly was filled to 
"sardine" capacity and when I say "sardine" 
it's no joke because you felt and smelled Uke 
one. The other high point was the Paragon 
just upstairs. This place housed a stage 
where up-and-coming bands (along with 
bands that should pack and go home) could 
display their "musical talents." 

Sophomore year the discovery of 
the 'Vous came to be a place to hang, 
especially if you belonged to the "Greek" 
system. Location was the real reason why 
the "Vous was better known as a "Greek 
Bar." This was the proverbial other side of 
the Route. The Fraternity and Sorority 



houses were located on the same side as the 
Vous, basically east of U. S. Route 1 . No one 
liked to risk their necks playing real-life 
"Frogger" as a drunk crossing this road! The 
major mystique of the 'Vous was that it 
could get down right ugly. This meant 
wearing the standard combat gear .... the 
infamous "Vous Shoes." These were 
basically shoes that you did not like or ones 
that became slimed from that somewhat 
vicious muck on the floor when last call was 
around the corner. 

Junior year was the discovery of R. 
J. Bentley's Filling Station, better referred to 
as Bentley's. This was one of the oldest 
restaurants in College Park. Here was a 
place of relaxing and chilling out before any 
night activities had begun. Bentley's also 
catered to the older group which were those 
so called "yuppies." The wall decor here 
had license plates and old automobile 
pictures, based on the fact that 'Filling 
Station' in the restaurant name came from 
the fact that this used to be a gas station and 
it has a gas pump as proof along with an old 
style garage in back. 

How many of those "I'm finally 21 
years old" celebrations could you 
remember? Well I remember too many .... 
Senior year was the acceptance to Santa Fe 




Cafe. This was the home of the serious carding, 
especially when Prince George's finest boys in 
uniform were there. The best feature was their 
famous Happy Hour that ran Monday through 
Saturday from 3:00 to 7:00 PM. But what really 
put Santa Fe on the College Park Bar Map was its 
$1 Bud Night that occurred on Tuesday nights 
from 9:00 PM until last call, 1:30 AM. 

Being of legal age to drink had its 
advantages, since every bar was easy access. So 
where was all the challenge of getting into a bar? 
94ih Aerosquadron was the relatively new bar on 
the block ... only two miles away near College 
Park Airport. This was the ultimate in restaurants 
because it completely separated the restaurant 
from the bar. The bar had a patio with fire pits for 
those daring to brave those brisk Fall nights. 94* 
housed the best dance floor in College Park. By 
now you are wondering where was the challenge. 
Well here it is.. . remember how you hated waiting 
in lines to register for classes, bars could create 
lines that rival registration especially when you 
started the night activities late. Unlike the other 
bars in Downtown College Park, 94"''s only 
neighbors were the airport and the park with only 
a fence as a boder between them. The only 
defensive weak point was on the west end of the 
patio, where bushes (some with thorns) were the 
only obstacle to sneaking in. And for all of you 
that made it in this way I have one thing to say .... 
'my o my ' those thorn bushes can be a real pain 
the next morning .... ouch! 

Sometimes for a change of pace there 
were two bars in College Park that could literally 
take all the money you had on you. The two bars 
were Town Hall, a bar inside of a liquor store, and 
the Starlite Inn, the equivalent to Al Bundy's 
Nudie Bar. But the ultimate and final experience 
was "Elbow Room at the 'Vous." This was a 
tradition that no UM student should have missed, 
The festivities would start with a line at the doors 
at 4:00 AM with a $5 entrance fee at 4:30 AM, 
Once inside with cups in hand the wait for quartei 
pitchers would last until 6:00 AM. After the 
National Anthem was played, the beer started tc 
flow in that tradition that was so ancient tc 
conclude our long journey in the pursuit of c 
college degree. 

- Paul Viein 



79 





80 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

81 



6 P«&E^ T",c 




Ike Vacate o| VkiOM 



Vince Lombardi once said, "The 
difference between a successful person 
and others is not a lack of strength, not a 
lack of knowledge, but lack of will!" And 
when the greatest coach of all time speaks, 
people hsten. Someone must have read 
the Maryland athletic program this c]uote, 
and boy did they ever listen. No game 
was too for out of reach, no game was too 
unimportant, and certainly no game was 
ever not worth a complete 110% effort. 
The success we achieved at College Park 
has less to do with brute strength on the 
field, but rather with the fact that every 
Maryland Terrapin athlete played from 
their hearts, fueled with the determination 
and fire that came from this will to win 
Vince Lombardi spoke of 50 years ago. 

This winning fever rubbed off on the 



fans who went ballistic during football 
games; who followed our basketball 
teams through the season and ensuing 
NCAA tournament, and who watched our 
lacrosse team all but take the national 
championship next to the roar and chants 
of the crowd. These Terrapin fans could 
be heard singing the Maryland fight song 
days after the last contest while several 
had taken the initiative to become the 
"Maryland Lettermen" and could be seen 
spelling messages of support in the stands 
during contests all across campus. From 
Byrd Stadium to Cole Field House to 
every other field or court on campus 
where Maryland athletics were on the 
prowl, the fans caught the excitement in 
the air and delivered the atmosphere of a 
Maryland game or contest: the experience 
of a lifetime. 



The proud Maryland athletic tradition 
was once again sustained in the gyms and 
fields all through campus. The Terps 
achieved their goals and overcame 
obstacles on the way to a triumphant 
season through precision teamwork, 
relentless effort, and the athletes' overall 
love of the game. Competing in the ACC 
was never an easy task, but with experi- 
ence, determination, and the drive and 
will to win, anything was possible. Led 
by their coaches, among them Mark 
Duffner, Gary Williams, Chris Weller, and 
the many other talented men and women 
on the coaching staff, the Maryland 
athletes took on the challenge of another 
momentous year. They were ready for 
good times and bad, victories and defeats, 
but most importantly , they were ready to 
play the game they loved. 




Spring Sports 



c, 



» ^. 



%ri 




84 




All photos this i>pixMd b\' T\riiiu' Bn«)k^ 



85 



Defending the NCAA XUte 



When the shadows of the suit crept 
over Byrd Stadium on the late afternoon 
of May 15, 1993, there was a deep feeling 
of disappointment and loss which could 
only cause one to cry. This represented 
the feeling of the 1993 Women's Lacrosse 
team as their season came to a sudden end 
with a loss to Princeton, 7-6, in the 1993 
NCAA Women's Lacrosse National Semi- 
Final game. 

"We can't let this loss overshadow the 
hard work and effort we put into this 
season," said head coach Cindy Timchal, 
about her team's season-ending loss. She 
was absolutely right, since the Lady Terps 
finished the season with a 12-2 record and 
a second place ranking in the national 
poll. This team showed plenty of enthusi- 
asm, leadership, and skill, helped by 
several key players. 

First team AU-Americans Kerstin 
Manning, Mandy Stevenson, and Betsy 
Elder provided the team with leadership 
by example as they led the way to a 
victorious season. Manning, named the 
National Defensive Player of the Year, 
and Stevenson, National Goalie of the 
Year, led a stingy defense that gave up 
only 88 goals all season. Betsy Elder 
sparked the offense leading the Terps in 
goals and points with 54 and 69, respec- 
tively. 

Thanks to a group of highly enthusias- 
tic recruited freshmen, Kelly Amonte, 
Karen MacCrate, and Patty Parichy, the 

Lady Terps gained top notch talent that 

(co)itiuui'd) 




86 





First row - Maureen Scott, Ann Krumbiegel, Kerstin Manning, Lisa Gates, Mandy Stevenson, Theresa 
Ingram. Second row - Cailm MuUin, Jennifer Budka, Amy Zink, Betsy Elder, Patty Panchy, Hillary Kuker. 
Third row - Nicole Cecere, Joan Natoli, Maureen Cunnmgham, Laura Harmon, Irene Horvat, Maureen 
Fallon, Jamie Brodsky. Fourth row - Kim Reardon, Elizabeth Downing, Rebecca Fink, Jenny German, Helen- 
Marie Meiser, Becca Slingoff, Hillary Sterner. Fifth row - Corey Harmon, Karen MacCrate, Kelly Amonte, 
Melissa Michaels, Randall Goldsboro, Tami Riley, Helena Herrmann, Kirstin Kruhm. Top row - Cmdy 
Timchal (Head Coach), Elisa Infante (Trainer), Paul Fezza (Trainer), Sandy Worth (Head Trainer), Mandee 
O'Leary (Assistant Coach). Not pictured: Lori Stone, Jessica Wilk (Assistant Coach). 



^O ^^Q^^»»» (conimued) 

came in immediately to make quite an 
impact. All three freshman started all 
fourteen games, including Amonte, a 
second team All-American, who finished 
first of the team in assists (28) and shoot- 
ing percentage (.609), and second in goals 
(39) and points (67). 

Other award winners included second 
team All-American Patty Parichy and 
third-team All American Laura Harmon. 
With Elder, Amonte, Parichy, Harmon 
and a group of upcoming talented players 
returning, the Lady Terps should be able 
to return to their usual form without the 
services of Manning and Stevenson, who 
will both be lost to graduation this year. 

- Tyrone Brooks 

Opposite page: 

Top - Laura Harmon fires away with power render- 
ing the defenders helpless. 

This page: 

Top - Kelly Amonte in a display of speed. 



87 



Women's 
Lacrosse 

UM Opp. 

21 Delaware 4 

9 Virginia 11 

15 Dartmouth 4 

16 Brown 2 

11 Harvard 10 
18 Towson State ' ' 7 
20 Old Dominion 6 

17 Temple 6 
16 William & Mary 5 

15 Pennsylvania „ 6 

16 Loyola 5 

12 James Madison 8 
14 Penn State 7 
6 . * Princeton 7 

* Denotes NCAA National 
Semifinals, College Park, MD 





88 



One Great Season 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 

89 



Determination and Desire 




1 1 ■ 



■♦n 



' WKW^^ " T-. ?T»S!a>N««P 















* 











_^ ..J. i«% .-^ i»». ,<*■ ^ ,^ ,^ '.a.^ * '•^^ 



^■#^^fflf«"i«i 



Front row - Jon Schoenweitz, Blake Wvnot, Steve Kavovit, Tri-C<ipt,iins Dave WiUard, Craig Bullen, Brian 
Burlace, Mike Kozak, Andy Claxton, Chris Dail, Shawn Marshall. Second row - Steve Weinress, Matt Back, Sean 
Crawford, Jay Pasko, Erik Elfstrum, Dave Goco, Scott McMahon, Dan Reading, Bob Muggins, Matt Ridder. Third 
row - Danny Robbins, Matt Parks, Neal Dupcak, Al Staker, Mike Bordi, Steve Haves, Tom Fichtner, Brian Yates, 
Brian McElhenny- Back row - Dick Edell (Head Coach), Tom McLelland (Asst. Coach), Dan Radebaugh, Jon 
Brothers, Greg Nelin, Rob Chomo, Dean Dardzinski (Undergraduate Asst.), Dave Slafkosky (Asst. Coach). 



90 



1 * 



\ 




/ 






Men 's Lacrosse: 

The little e^mf 

that COtitb 

On May 15, 1993, Men's Lacrosse took 
the field against Army, ranked number 10 
in the country, in the first round of the 
NCAA tournament. In a hard-fought 
game. Army came out on top 15-10. 
Maryland had ended its season. 

Maryland started off the season with a 
loss to #8 Duke and went on to enter the 
ACC tournament with a dismal record of 
1-5. In a first round match against Vir- 
ginia, the Terps came out determined to 
win. With outstanding efforts by Rob 
Chomo, Matt Back, Bob Huggins and 
Danny Robins, Maryland was able to pull 
out an incredible overtime victory by the 
score of 9-8. Advancing to the final 
round, Maryland was defeated by North 
Carolina. 

At the end of the season. Bob Huggins 
(midfield) and Danny Robbins (defense) 
were named to the All-Atlantic Coast 
Conference team. Bob Huggins also 
received third-team All-American honors. 
Rob Chomo lead the team with 29 overall 
points. Matt Back also had a great season 
with a 64% save average in the goal. 

- Willy Goodzvin 



^mr^;. mmm'!.''- ^-^p "HP 




I -^*— — ~ — » -^ 
All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



91 



Battle at the Net 



The men's tennis team was an 
athletic program that played from the 
heart with the will to win. With 
limited funding and no support from 
outside the University, this team 
comprised of eight young men still 
strove for victory during their spring 
matches. 

Jim Laitta performed in his third 
year as head coach, with assistant 
coaches Blake Starkey and Kevin 
Lindley. James Ashworth and 
Jeremy Loomis were named co- 
captains for the 1993 team. 

There were several standout 
players. In singles, Ashworth won a 
total of five matches for his team. 
Loomis was right behind him, 
winning four matches. In doubles, 
the best pairing was a combination of 
precisely these two singles players. 
They topped all with six victories 
during the season. 

-Fnrid Sinhntgnr 



Final Season Record; 2-14, 0-8 ACC 


UMD 




Opp. 


1 


James Madison 


5 


1 


Pennsylvania 


6 





N.C. State* 


5 





Florida State* 


7 





George Washington 


7 





Wake Forest* 


7 





Duke* 


7 


6 


Loyola 


1 





North Carolina* 


7 


5 


American 


2 


3 


Towson State ^ m 


4 





Georgia Tech* ▼ w 5 





Clemson* 


7 


2 


Navy 


5 





Virginia* 


7 


1 


Virginia (ACC tourn.) 
* denotes ACC Match 


6 




I'hulo bv Tyrone Brooks 




Photo by Lisa Helfert 

Front row - Brian Becker, Mike Lipitz, David Alire, Jaime Leal. 

Back row - Blake Starkey (Assistant Coach), Terry Schultz, Jamie Ashworth, 

Sam Krishnamurthy, Jeremy Loomis, Jim Laitta (Head Coach) 



''7p0l>t$ do not build charac- 
ter. They reveal it." 

-Heyivood Hale Brown 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



92 



For the Love of the Game 




The 1993 women's tennis team consisted of 
eight women. For their matches they traveled 
almost the entire east coast and all through the 
ACC. Throughout the '93 season these women 
played consistently hard and went to battle with 
other teams from the ACC as well as with 
schools outside their league from the east coast. 
Determination and a love for the game were the 
inner drives for these athletes during all their 
matches. 

Michelle Daigle was designated captain for 
the team and, as the only senior, she took the 
leadership role for the squad. In his third year, 
Jim Laitta coached the women's tennis team 
through their season with the help of assistant 
coaches Blake Starkey and Kevin Lindley. 

Many players had excellent performances. In 
singles, Lisa Rosenburg took five matches from 
her opponents in the course of the year. Subse- 
quently, she doubled with partner Julie Cady 
and was victorious in five additional matches. 
This combination in doubles, as well as her 

ngles results, proved to be the most prolific 
part of the women's team for 1993. 

- Fahd Siahatgar 




r'luiti.1 b\ T\Tune Brooks 



Front row - Julie Bortz, Lisa Rosenberg, Julie Cady, Michelle Daigle. 

Back row - Blake Starkey (Assistant Coach), Illy Dominitz, Lori Schechter, Robin Spiegel, Kristin 

Medvetz, Jim Laitta (Head Coach). 



Final Season Record: 2-13, 0-8 ACC 







Richmond 


9 





George Washington 


7 


2 


Rutgers 


6 


1 


N.C. State* 


7 


1 


Florida State* ww 


8 





Wake Forest* 


9 





Duke* 


9 


1 


Ij^ Penn 


8 





fil^ Virginia* 


9 


1 


mwmi' -^i^^^i*^^^ 


8 





Sf WWf cignison* ^-. 


6 


1 


Georgia Tech* 


5 


2 


North Carolina* 


7 


5 


Loyola 








N.C. State (ACC TOURN.) 


6 




* denotes ACC match 



93 



Diamonds are Forever 




Terp Baseball 

The 1993 Maryland baseball team completed its 53 
game schedule with a combined record of 24-29. The 
Terps scored in all but three of their games and fre- 
quently produced runs in double digits for a prolific 
final score. This can be attributed to their great hitting 
which was led by Steve Neuberger with a batting 
average of .311 with 57 hits on 183 ABs. Maryland 
pitching included Dale Lahr who went 3-0 with a 
combined ERA of 2.73 as well as Pat Baker who went 8-5 
with an ERA of 3.53. Scott Szymendera, a loyal fan, who 
attended more than 20 games during the season, said of 
the team and their games: "It's well played, exciting 
baseball, where you feel like part of the game because of 
the atmosphere and good seating in Shipley Field." The 
team and their fans are all looking forward to another 
exciting season of Terrapin baseball. 

- Farid Sinhatgar 




AH photos this page by Tyrone Brooks. 

Top left - Matt Floto shows his awesome pitch. Top right - Leading hitter Steve Neuberger 
struts his stuff. Bottom - Going. ..going. ..gone! 



94 




MD 




iS ,d^ ^ 4r^ vil 


Opp. 


3 




N.C. State 


15 


4 


^ 


N.C. State 


12 


2 




N.C. State 


5 


10 


Vii 


ginia Commonwealth 


2 


10 




Georgia Tech 


8 





I* 


d Winthrop 


8 


1 


Winthrop 


4 


1 




Winthrop 


6 


6 




Davidson 


5 


2 




North Carolina 


4 


5 




North Carolina 


10 


7 




North Carolina 


4 


1 


Virginia Contmonwealth 


9 


4 




Duke 


11 


4 




Duke ^ 


7 


2 




Duke % 


3 


1 


it 


Richmond - m% 


6 


6 




Howard 


3 


11 


•» 


" Coppin State 


1 


8 




Coppin State 


2 


8 




Plymouth State 


5 







Towson State 


5 


12 




Howard 


5 


16 




Coppin State 


5 


2 


-■^ 


Wake Forest 


6 


2 




Wake Forest 


8 ■ 


3 




Wake Forest 


8 


14 




James Madison 


11 


1 




George Washington 


6 


12 




James Madison 


4 


2 




Clemson 


6 


8 




Clemson 


4 


4 




Clemson 


22 


16 


" 


Towson State 


7 


7 




UMBC 


5 


5 


^ 


Virginia 


10 


4 




Virginia 


1 


5 




Virginia .A. 


11 


6 




Old Dominion 


1 


7 




West Virginia 


5 


5 


*£ 


West Virginia 


9 


14 




UMES 





7 




UMES 


3 


4 




Florida State 


10 


5 




Florida State 


2 


5 




Florida State 


13 


10 




George Mason 


8 


6 




Goerge Washington 


5 


2 




William and Mary 


5 


1 




William and Mary 


3 


7 




George Mason 


6 







Georgia Tech 


6 


4 




Duke 


5 



I'liolobv 1.1S.1 Helfcrf 

Front row (Left to right): Brian Dunn, Matt Kunst, Spencer Swartz, Jim Lambert, Jeff Wagner, Chris Cannan, 

Scott Amster. 

Second row; Chris Tutas, Matt Baumann, Guy Smith, Steve Neuherger, Chad O'Brien, John Davidson, Jason 

Ettinger, Todd Nutter, Kevin Schiavone. 

Third row: Mike Cole, Pat Baker, Dale Lahr, Ross Moskowitz, Dan Goucher, Luke Lappin, John Kuntz, Matt 

Bailey, Fella Dolby. 

Fourth row: Mike Oakes, Mike Conroy, Dave Wood, Mike Nelson, Randy Dilhngham, Pat Colliere, Jared 

Savelson, Matt Floto. 

Back row: Assistant Coach Jim Flack, Head Coach Tom Bradley, Assistant Coach Kelly Kulina. 



95 



TRACK AND FIELD 



Both the men's and women's track 
teams performed well throughout the 
spring 1993 season. On the women's side, 
Marchelle Payne was the "outstanding 
performer" as her coach. Bill Goodman, 
put it in an interview. Goodman added 
further comments; "Overall I was pleased 
with the effort this squad displayed. We 
ended up tied for 26th in the Division I 
national meet." 

The results of the women's track team 
demonstrated several very impressive 
outdoor track and field personal bests for 
Maryland that were also highly competi- 
tive on the national level. Marchelle 
Payne exhibited her talent with a personal 
best in the triple jump and long jump that 
were 4th and 3rd in the country, respec- 
tively. Other quality results included 
Jennifer Doyle in the 800 as well as 1,500 
meters, Kristen Maloney in the hammer, 
Sharon Scotland in the 400 meter dash, 
and finally Angela Smith in the triple 
jump. Bill Goodman ageed with this as he 
termed the effort and execution of ACC 
Championship winner Marchelle Payne "a 
truly outstanding performance." 

As for the men's team, they had many 
personal bests that were competitive on 
the national level as well. Basil Carter 
performed extremely well on the high 
jump, taking 1st place. Ed Condon was 
successful with the hammer, Malcolm 
Drewery on the 400 meter dash, and 
finally Kelvin McQueen on all his events: 
he was second in the 110 meter hurdles, 
6th in the mile relay, 6th in the 100 meter 
dash, and 4th in the 200 meter dash. His 
coach explained, "Kelvin ran very well for 
us and for his efforts, he qualified for the 
indoor national finals." Both track teams 
had impressive seasons and outstanding 
performances from their star athletes and 
many others. 

-Farid Sialiatgar 



r \ 




Front row (left to right): Pete Septoff, Kelvin McQueen, Aaron Barkley, Basil Carter. 

2nd row: Dan Cook, Ken Plasse, John Sushinsky, Ed Condon. 

3rd row: Brian Montgomery, Greg Muth, Carl Bencal, Larry Lockhart, Kirk Douglas. 

4th row: Assistant Coach Dan Rincon, Assistant Coach Roland Desonier, Assistant Coach Peppie Whitaker, 

Head Coach Bill Goodman. 




Front row (left to right): Sharon Scotland, Dana CoUigan, Marchelle Pavne, Tonya Ullery. 

2nd row: Dan Rincon, Stephanie Neumann, Kristin Maloney, Elizabeth Moreno, Michelle Bortle, Cindy 

Symancyk, Head Coach Bill Goodman. 

3rd row: Roland Desonier, Melissa Brennan, Valerie Cothran, Julie Bowers, Vouda Jones, Assistant Coach 

Peppie Whitaker. 



96 



Maryland Golf 




TOURNAMENT 

East Carolina Invitational 
ECU Sheraton 
Emerald Intercollegiate 
Emerald Golf Course 
New Bern, North Carolina 

24th Annual Furman thfercollegiate 
Golf Tournament 
Furman University 
Greenville, South Carolina 



%\ 



RESULT TEAM SCORE 

Tilth s,mm 934 



*c/ 



iU. ^^^ ^H H^ m 



') 



607 



UMBC Invitational 
Walden Golf Course 
Crofton, Maryland 



w^ 



5th 



40th Annual ACC 
Golf Tournament ^ 

Northgreen Country Club 
Rocky Mount, North Carolina 

Cavalier Classic 
Birdwood Golf Course 
University of Virginia * 
Charlottesville, Virginia 



m 



9th ^ 

17th ^ 

"*4 MtOW 



326 



921 



937 



26th Annual Palmettolntercollegiate 
Golf Tournament 

Charleston National Country Club 
Hosted by the College of Charleston 
Mount Pleasant, South Carolina 



T8th 



894 






Left to right:: Joe Bonistalli, Garrett Post, Jeff Daniels, 
Dave Tacchetti, Al Sutton, Coacfi Tom Hanna, Greg 
Nelson, Jason Rodenhaver, Pete Regala, Brandz 
Ficken. 

TERP GOLf 

The 1993 Terp Golf Team rode a season 
of ups and downs. Six tournaments 
proved good experience for the Terrapins, 
and something to build on for 1994. One 
of the season's high points occurred at the 
UMBC Invitational in Crofton, Maryland 
where the squad placed fifth with an 
overall score of 326. Maryland played on a 
versatile number of courses, too, traveling 
throughout Maryland, Virginia, North 
Carolina, and South Carolina. 

"Although it was a long season, I knew 
we had this year to look forward to, and 
I'm really excited about [1994]," senior 
golfer Jason Rodehaver said. 

As the Terps look forward to 1994, they 
will have four returning seniors to groom 
the four new freshman. Expectations are 
high, as ACC action is among the best in 
the country. A Terrapin golf tournament 
is one of the only places that you won't 
want to be quiet all the time, rather, show 
your Maryland pride and cheer on Terps 
Golf! 

-¥.ara Scliniidt 



All photos this spread by Lisa Helfert 



97 




98 




SPORTS 





All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 

99 



BUILD IT AND 




100 



THEY WILL COME 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 





MEN'S BASKETBALL 




MD 


^^ OPPONENT, y^ 


OPP. 


103 


UMBC 


80 


72 


@ West Virginia 


86 


94 


UMES m 


63 


98 


^ American ^M 


67 


93 


|t| @ La Salle i£^ 


76 


78 


Towson State ^^ 


68 


103 


Morgan State 


63 


72 


Louisville 


67 


109 


Howard 


69 


75 


Georgia Tech 


85 


73 


@ North Carolina 


101 


85 


@ Florida State 


105 


73 


Wake Forest 


86 


89 


Oklahoma 'm 
^ @ N.C. State ^* 


78 


70 


65 


72 


@ Clemson 


82 


62 


Duke 


78 


68 


Virginia 


70 


79 


@ Georgia Tech 


93 


63 


North CaroHna 


77 


84 


Florida State 


87 


64 


@ Wake Forest 


88 


88 


N.C. State 


71 


73 


Clemson » 


81 


79 


@ Duke % 


95 


74 


iU @ Virginia a wM 


88 


76 


1* N.C. State *"^ 


55 


66 


North Carolina 


102 




101 







All photos this page by 
Tyrone Brooks 



102 




GARYLAND 



"Build it and they will come." These 
words rang true in Cole Field House for 
every Terrapin basketball game. The 
crowd wildly chanted the Maryland fight 
song, exploded after every dunk by Exree, 
3-pointer by Rhodes, basket by Evers, or 
slicing drive by McClinton, and the 
"Maryland Lettermen" spelled out 
GARYLAND in honor and respect of 
coach Gary Williams. Every game was 
packed with enthusiastic fans who came 
to experience this excitement and feel part 
of the winning tradition at Cole Field 
House. They did build it and now forever 
they will come! 

Through the 1992-1993 season the 
Maryland Terrapins had a young squad of 
players who were anchored by three 
seniors: Evers Burns, Kevin McLinton, 
and Chris Kerwin. The heralded fresh- 
man class of last year consisted of Johnny 
Rhodes, 3 point specialist, Exree Hipp, the 
high flying flashy rookie, Mario Lucas, 
Duane Simpkins, and Nemanja Petrovic. 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




Front row (L-R): Aaron Dudley (Manager), Johnny Rhodes, John Walsh, Kurtis Shultz, Evers Burns, Kevin 
McLinton, Nemanja Petrovic, Exree Hipp, Mario Lucas, Todd Davis (Manager). 

Back row (L-R): J.J. Bush (trainer), Peter Sauer (Administrative Asst.), Jimmy Patsos (Asst. Coach), Duane 
Simpkins, Wayned Bristol, Mike Thibeault, Alan Rainge, Gary Williams (Head Coach), Billy Hahn (Asst. 
Coach), Art Perry (Asst. Coach) 



"We had a young team with four fresh- 
men who played a great deal for us," 
coach Williams said. "We did have three 
seniors... who went through tough times 
of probation." 

The Terps always played the heavy- 
weights from the ACC and almost every 
game came down to crunch time. The 
biggest wins came in upsets against 
Louisville and #12 Oklahoma during the 
season. In the ACC Tournament, the team 
handily beat the North Carolina State 
Wolfpack and then lost to the (eventual 
NCAA Champions) North Carolina 
Tarheels in the second round. But there 
was plenty to be proud of and plenty to 
learn from in this 1992-1993 season. "We 
had some great wins against Louisville 
and Oklahoma," Gary Williams con- 
cluded. "Our freshmen learned a great 
deal about the competition in the ACC 
and, as returning sophomores, will help 
us next season." 

- Farid Sialmtgar 

Top left - Gary Williams slows the tempo from the 

sidelines. 

Top center - Evers Burns and Kevin McLinton 

surrounding the opponent. 

Bottom left - Johnny Rhodes shields off the defender 

for an easy layup. 

Bottom center - McLinton brings the ball up the 

court. 



103 



GOOD LUCK SENIORS 



During the 1992-1993 season the 
Maryland Terrapins were anchored by 
their three seniors and let them lead the 
way to victory. The veteran group 
consisted of Evers Burns, Kevin 
McLinton, and Chris Kerwin. These 
players had to endure the probation years 
to get to the point they are now. To this 
Gar)' Williams said, "They did not have 
the same kind of careers as other seniors 
across the nation, for they had to pay for 
something they did not do. Yet they still 
worked hard in this rough year and gave 
a winning effort." This dedication made 
them crowd favorites during the season. 

Chris Kerwin was a good rebounder 
inside and led the team in rebounds in 
several games. He always worked hard 
and the Maryland fans appreciated that. 

Evers Burns was the man on the inside. 
When the team was in need of a key 
basket they went inside to this clutch 
performer. Burns competed against much 
taller players in Montross and Parks, but 
he always found a way to keep his 
opponent in check while still racking up 
his own numbers, he was high scorer for 
the Terps more than ten times during the 
season and high rebounder in more than 
20 games. He was a huge crowd favorite 
and frequently received a loud ovation he 
so clearly deserved. Evers Burns' leader- 
ship and work ethic will be missed next 
season as the Terps take the court. 

Finally, there was Kevin McLinton. He 
led the team in scoring in 10 games and 
was high rebounder for several more, but 



Top center - Johnnv Rhodes for three. 

Top right - Duane Simpkins goes for the shot. 

Bottom center - Maryland letter-people. 

Bottom left - Namanja Petrovic about to make the 

layup against Florida State. 

Bottom right - All is clear for Evers Bums. 

AU photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



that only tells half the story. Together 
with Evers Burns he was the heart and 
soul of the team. When in need of the 
final basket, the team cleared the court for 
Kevin and let him work his magic. 
Driving or slashing to the hole, Kevin 
McLinton always made the final play 
work with a buzzer beater or an unstop- 
pable lav-up. In an amazing game, 
McLinton had a battle for the record 
books with Florida State guard Bob Sura. 
He had 25 points in the second half and 32 
for the contest versus Sura's 34 for the 
game. They went back and forth one-on- 
one during the entire game, taking each 
other on, and one continually topping the 
other on offense. The crowd cheered in 
amazement and stared in awe as they 
took jumpers in the other player's face, 
they took the ball strong to the hoop, and 
controlled the game start to finish. 
Florida State managed to score last and 
this was the only factor in the eventual 
win in this marathon dual. No matter 
what the result the show put on by these 
two performers, especially by McLinton, 
won the hearts of all Maryland fans. All 
of the seniors came through in the clutch 
and led the Terps by their excellent 
example through the entire 1992-1993 
season. 

-Farid Siahati;ar 





-T«a^ 




104 





n<ztc(Ui', ^on^ t^etf, ^/^d to- 

p^^cf, pyi <M*Ket^c«t^ t^etf, 

did wxt cO^. '^pet t^t^ 

'UMCi^ cfe<w <^^ (^<^(AC a- 





105 



WOMEN'S 

BASKETBALL 



Once again the Maryland Lady Terrapins were a huge suc- 
cess. Throughout the season this basketball team knocked off 
ranked teams on their quest for another NCAA Final Four 
appearance. They upset #1 Tennessee, #8 Purdue, and #19 
Clemson in three consecutive weeks early in their season. They 
went on to dispatch of #23 Georgia Tech, followed by #5 Vir- 
ginia in an excellent game, and topped off this impressive string 
of victories by annihilating #14 North Carolina. After several 
more wins to close out the regular season came the ACC Tourna- 
ment. Eager and well prepared our team marched into the 
tournament led by their coach Chris Weller. 

Two easy victories in the first two rounds set up the historic 
matchup between Virginia and Maryland in the ACC Champi- 
onship game that was clearly destined for the record books. Both 
teams gave everything they had in a display of guts and deter- 
mination for the duration of the contest. In this evenly matched 
game Virginia finally emerged victorious in triple overtime but 
no one walked off the court a loser. They could all tell their 
grandchildren that they were part of the famous ACC Champi- 
onship game of 1993. Coach Weller was also impressed with her 
team's effort in this marathon contest as well as in the many 
upset victories during the season: "The triple overtime ACC 
Championship game and our upset win over #1 Tennessee were 
highlights of an outstanding season that demonstrated our 
team's commitment to excellence." 

Jessie Hicks was high scorer for the year averaging 17.6 points 
per game (ppg) and she got her main support from Malissa 
Boles with 14.0 ppg, Katrina Colleton with 13.1 ppg, Monica 
Bennett and Bonnie Rimkus with 9.0 ppg each. The 1992/1993 
season was a great one for our Lady Terrapins. They showed 
their grit and determination in the many upsets and hard fought 
battles throughout the season and did the University of Mary- 
land very proud. 

- Farid Siahatgar 

Top - Bonnie Rin-ikus tries the shot despite the closing-m defense. 

Bottom - Katrina Colleton shows great effort and determination to make this 

shot. 

All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 




106 




Left: The Terrapins come out on top. 
Bottom left; Monica Adams stretches 
past the defense. 

Bottom: Jessie Hicks debating her 
options on the court. 




107 




CONTINUES 



Photo bv Lisa Helfert 



Front row: Head Coach Chris Weller, Assistant Coach Joyce Jenkins, Karon Ferguson, Lena Patterson, Dawn 
Sloan, Monica Bennett, Assistant Coach Traci Gorman, Assistant Coach Boe Pearman, Trainer Phylhs Sanders. 
Back row: Manager Jennifer Vickers, Malissa Boles, Kesha Camper, Monica Adams, Jessie Hicks, Bonnie 
Rnnkus, Michele Andrew, Katrina Colleton, Head Manager Sueellen Vickers. 



108 




WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



MD 


OPPONENT 


OPP. 


121 
93 


Drexel*^^^JL 
American"' ' "*%r V^ V 


52 
54 


50 


Iowa 




53 


59 


Rutgers 




52 


83 


Old Dominion 


A 


54 


i <e4^ 


Loyola 

Howard 

Tennessee 


40U^ 


44 
46 
72 


73 


Purdue 




69 


64 


Clemson 


.^oU 


60 


61 

11 
82 


Florida State 

Georgia Tech 

Duke 


68 
66 
51 


70 


Virginia 




66 


80 


North Carolina 


A 


85 


74 


Florida State 




61 


i^C<l^ 


N.C. State 
Wake Forest 
Duke " 


.w. 


52 
67 
71 


75 


Georgia Tech 




70 


67 


Miami 


01^^ 


57 


im^' 


N.C. State 

Clemson 

North Carolina 


74 
73 
52 


73 


Virginia 




87 


80 


Wake Forest 




65 


91 


Florida State 




68 


i^tCi 


North Carolina 
Virginia 


OH 


61 
106 


82 ^ 


SW Missouri State 


86 



All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



Opposite page: 

Top left - Katrine Colleton overcomes the defense. Top right - And Katrina does 

it again. Bottom - The women's basketball team. 

This page: 

Top - Malissa Boles gets the rebound. Bottom - Kesha Camper sets up the perfect 

shot. 



109 



A Winning Tradition Continues 




110 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 
111 



TERPS ON THE MAT 




Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 



1993 Maryland Wrestling 

The Terp wrestlers fought their way to a 12-2 season and finished it off with a 
promising showing at both the ACC and NCAA championships. After placing first at 
the Millersville Belles, Maryland beat all but one of their ACC rivals. Resounding 
victories were also posted against Howard and archrival Virginia. 

"We had a great team this year finishing 20th in the country," explained coach 
McHugh. "Our team did a great job and 1 was very happy with our 12-2 record. 1 ended 
up Coach of the Year in the ACC and we had an All- American to top off the season. We 
did graduate five seniors, so the upcoming vear will be a rebuilding vear. But we feel 
confident following up this season and this top 20 finish nationally with another good 
year." 

As the Terps look ahead to 1994, they will depend on their returning seniors while 
anticipating strong performances from the transfers and freshman. The ACC should 
prove a challenge for the Terrapins, but judging from 1993: nothing they can't handle. 

-Kara Schmidt 



112 




MARYLAND 




WRFSTLING 


Midlands Championships^^ ^ ^ 


17th 


Millt 


;rsville Belles f M^ 


1st 


MD 


( 


Dpp. 


33 


Coppin State ^ 
Howard ^k 
k/. Pennsylvania irm 


6 


44 





27 


7 


25 


Frank, and Marshall 


13 


21 


Lehigh 


14 


29 


Old Dominion 


16 


20 


N.C. State 


16 


15 


Navy 


16 


18 


North Carolina 


16 


15 
40 


^§L Clemson /!% 

^^ Virginia 


16 
6 


27 


Duke 


9 


30 


American ^ 


15 


24 


Hofstra % 


17 


ACC 


. Championships MmJ 


4th 


NCAA Championships "'^ 


30th 



•:.ihy Lisa Helfert 



1992-1993 University of Maryland Wrestling Team 



Top pholo by Tyrone Brooks 



^<tfr^ ciAtt^ (um. t2-2 
%ec^yid. ^ elided ccfr^ 

tAe /4^^ <sutd cue ^uzd 

t9^ o^ t^ <ye<i^^M>. 



113 



^oib 



As the Terp gymnasts set out to begin a 
new season, they were filled with the 
traditional hopes of success and star 
performances from all members. In 
addition to facing ACC rival North 
Carolina on three separate occasions, they 
were to square off against local rivals such 
as William and Mary and George Wash- 
ington. The season started slow as the 
Terps got off to an 0-2 start, but they 
quickly picked up speed. By February 8, 
the Terrapins found themselves at 7-5. 
Including a season high mark of 185.4 
against Temple University, Maryland 
finished strong with a final record of 10-9. 

"There was a great sense of balance 
between our athletic goals and academic 
prowess," said Head Coach Bob Nelligan. 
"I will remember '93 as a year of no 
excuses and certainly no regrets, finishing 
with 20 wins and 12 losses. I applaud the 
efforts of these women and coaches." 
1993 should be a challenge for the 
Terrapins after valuable seniors who 
graduated, but seven new faces find the 
team aiming for the top. 

-Kina Schmidt 



GYMNASTICS 



! 




, -<."^ 



s«y 




jurt, Sarah Krimms, Marisa DiNatale, Stacy Eichwald, Jennifer Lorion, 



Front row (left to right): Nicule Lefc 

Lisa Ruderman. 

Back row: Kristin Konn, Kara Klaus, Hilary Jameson, Meridith Karp, Ginger Collins, Arousha Youssefi. 



114 





MD OPPONENT 


OPP. 


RECORD 


183.90 William and Mary 
183.10 Radford ,; 


iL/181.25 
|*tl81.05 


tl^ 


1-0 
2-0 


183.30 George Wash. 


185.85 






N.C. State 


184.25 






Temple 


181.95 


u \ 




^L Peiinsylvania 
P^Vt Yale 


|U ^178.55 
f* VI 78.40 


w 




Indiana (PA) 


172.75 




6-2 


182.00 Towson State 


186.25 


^ 




George Wash. 


186.15 


1. \ 




W ■■■ Naval Academy 


162.45 


ku 


7-4 


187.55" North Carolina 


183.95 


f**r 


8-4 


186.55 Towson State 


189.20 






North Carolina 


186.80 


▲ 




^ William and Mary 
^,: James Madison 
^ Temple 


185.35 


^ A 




184.70 


ku 




184.40 


"V^ 




Pennsylvania 


182.85 




12-6 


181.95 Temple 


181.40 


4 


13-6 


187.55 George Wash, 
9^1 N.C. State . 
^ Central Michigan 


L ^,190.55 
|fc|* 190.40 


1^0 




189.65 






James Madison 


188.65 






William and Mary 


187.40 


\ 




,^- North Carolina 


186.50 


L/1 


15-10 


188.55^^^^,^ Radford ., 
187.90 Towson State 


, ,179.40 


kU 


16-10 


191.25 






New Hampshire 


189.70 


^ 




William and Mary 


187.30 


\ 




^^ f Pittsburgh j 


jjUf 1^.10) 


kO 




lames Madison 


186.45 


V'W 




Vermont 


186.35 




20-12 




All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



^etciAce^ <Mn at^ietcc ^<»<«^ and 




W"^' 



115 




Photo bv 1 vrtuif Bri>i>k-. 



I'liuLu b\ Ur.'H^' P.r>H>k 



116 




SPORTS 



""^^H 



Photo by T\Tone Brooks 



mtt, 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 



117 



/ 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL 



The Maryland Terrapin football team was 
admittedly in a rebuilding process in the 
1993 season. But the record did not illustrate 
the hard work and shear determination these 
men displayed not only during games on 
Saturday but also off the field during prac- 
tices and workouts. They were overmatched 
in talent almost every game this year, but 
the Maryland Terrapins were never defeated 
in work ethic in a single contest. Coach 
Mark Duffner prepared his team well for 
each game and gave them the experience 
needed to improve for next season and be- 
come a factor in the ACC once again. 

"This has been a rebuilding season for us 
this year as we are building our team back to 
the top for the upcoming years," explained 
Coach Mark Duffner. When asked what to 
expect next season, he responded, "Improve- 
ment! We're taking a step by step improve- 
ment to get this team back to the top." 

This positive attitude was felt all across 
College Park. With one of the top offenses in 
the country the Terps could always count 
on scoring on critical drives and racking up 
points early and often. They could also rely 
on outstanding quarterback Scott 
Milanovich and wide receiver Jermaine 
Lewis. After three games Lewis had already 
caught six touchdowns and at that point in 
the season led the nation in receiving yards 
per game with 163 and was fifth in scoring 
with 38 points. All these achievements in 
the first three games put him on a pace to 
have an 81 -catch, 1,793-yard season. How- 
ever, he was slowed by injuries for basically 
the rest of the season. In the future one can 
expect great things from #4 in red. 

Scott Milanovich had a fantastic season 
setting an ACC record with 26 touchdown 
passes and setting school records for most 
touchdowns in a game (5), most yards pass- 
ing (3,499), completion percentage (.647), 
and punting average (43.8). In addition, 
Milanovich was at the helm of the 99-yard 
drive that pulled out a victory against Wake 
Forest in the last two minutes of the final 
game. On the final play with the game clock 
expiring, Milanovich found Russ Weaver 
wide open in the end zone for the 33-32 
final. The sidelines went wild as this thriller 
turned into an omen for things to come next 
season. 

-Farid Siahatgar 



118 




9 ^A ^'^Bi' 








All photoh Ihis piige by 1 yronu Brooks 




The University of Maryland Football Team, who had a rough season but came out fighting hard. 



Photo bv Lisa Hellert 



119 




MD 


OPPONENT 




OPP. 


29 


Virginia 


*4 


43 


42 


North Carolina 


4 


59 


37 


West Virginia 




42 


28 


Virginia Tech 




55 


7 


^ Penn State 




70 





Georgia Tech 




38 


26 


Duke 


iK 


18 





Clemson 


■w 


29 


20 
21 


Florida State 
N. C. State 


\ 


49 
44 


33 


Wake Forest 




32 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



120 





All pholos this page by Tyrone Brooks 
Top: Milanovich directing traffic 
Bottom: Cleveland Everhart with a 
punishing blow for a crucial sack. 
Before ... and after. 



cw^frn<wetHe(it to- 





121 



National Champions 



Introducing your 1993 NCAA Cham- 
pion University of Maryland Lady 
Terrapins. THEY DID IT ! In a spectacular 
weekend at Rutgers University, the 
Terrapin Field Hockey Team beat North 
Carolina in the NCAA Finals on penalty 
strokes 2-1 to earn the prestigious title 
1993 NCAA National Champions. 

"These are the seasons you dream 
about," explained Head Coach Missy 
Meharg, "a record of 17-2 in the regular 
season and undefeated in the ACC. We 
had great contributions from our seniors 
and they will be deeply missed. But we 
have a deep bench and are confident that 
we can continue the winning tradition 
established here in women's field hockey." 

Continuing the tradition could include 
a repeat performaiice for next season to 
make them back-to-back NCAA Champi- 
ons. This year the final tally of the season 
was a record of 21-3, one loss in the ACC 
to North Carolina in the ACC Champion- 
ship game, and a 2-1 victory for sweet 
revenge in the most important game these 
young women have ever played. Armed 
with a NCAA National Championship 
Title and a strong returning class of 
players for next season, everyone in- 
volved with the University of Maryland 
Field Hockey Team is eagerly awaiting 
next year to show their support for this 
team we are all so proud of. 

-Farid Siahatgar 



All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 

Top right; Lori Vile sprints down the sideline 
towards another goal. 

Bottom: Josephine Blauw and Mario Makela 
congratulate Lori Vile for scoring on the last play 
with high fives all around. 





122 




fop left: Elissa Beckman controls the ball running 

away from the opposition. 

Bottom left: Slap shot by Laura Harmon 

Bottom: Sabrina Salam ready to drive the ball all the 

way down the field. 



MD 




OPPONENT 




OPP. 


2 




Delaware 







2 




American 







2 




Iowa 




1 







Northeastern 




1 







Penn State 


W 


1 


3 




Virginia 




1 


4 




Wake Forest 







7 




Georgetown 







3 




Duke 







3 




Towson State 




1 


5 




California 







4 




North Carolina 




1 


2 




Rutgers 







3 


.i<f 


James Madison 




2 


2 


Old Dominion 




1 


9 




Bucknell 







4 




Pennsylvania 







2 




Temple 




1 


1 


L. 


Richmond 







2 




Duke (ACC) 










North Carolina (ACC) 


2 


2 




UMass (NCAA) 




1 


1 




Iowa (NCAA) 







2 


North Carolina (NCAA Final) 


1 




123 




Maryland 

Lady 
Terrapins: 










Photo by Lisa Helfert 

Front row (left to rij^ht): Caty E\ans, Cheryl BoUenbacher, Tara Everly, Katie Kauffman, Karin Freeswick, Elissa 

Beckman, Lori Vile, Kristen Ketchum, Tracy Hartnett. 

Center row: Asst. Coach Andrea Wieland, Head Coach Missy Meharg, Katv Balk, Shannon Petrick, Tricia 

Burdt, Eliza Knerr, Hillary Sterner, Josephine Blauw, Megan Callahan, Trainer Phyllis Sanders, Asst. Coach 

Michelle Brennan. 

Back row: Irene Hor\'at, Amy Schubert, Mario Makala, Maureen Scott, Laura Harmon, Kelly Pyne, Michelle 

Gallo, Alana EUiwatt (Not pictured: Sabrina Salam). 



124 




Top: Lori Vile shows off a move 
that fools opposing goalie and 
gives her an easy score. 
Bottom left: Nifty footwork 
displayed hv Mario Makela. 
Bottom right: All the way down 
the field, Terps, all the way 
down the field. 

All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



125 



n 

m. : 



w 











The men's soccer team had a difficult 
season this year and ended 1993 with a 
record of 3-14-1. They had a fantastic 
upset over #18 N.C. State, 2-1, and got 
incredibly close in three other contests 
against nationally ranked opponents. 
Early in the season they lost to #1 Virginia 
by one goal, then they lost to #9 Wake 
Forest by a score of 2-1, followed by a loss 
to #6 North Carolina by a single goal, and 
finally the Terps were just barely beaten 
by #4 James Madison 3-2 at the end of the 
season. Most of the best games they 
played were against ACC opponents like 
#18 N.C. State and freshman midfielder 
Shane Dougherty gave this explanation: 
"We're geared to play ACC games. We're 
always up for them." The team will learn a 
lot from the mistakes they made this year 
and the experience gained from that 
should prove very useful for a successful 
season next year. 

-Farid Sinhatgar 



All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks. 

Top: Malcolm Gillian shows off his moves during a 

soccer match. 

Top right: Shawn Long displays a powerful header 

with incredible hangtime. 

Bottom: Ready. ..aim. ..shot.. .save. 




'Jk f ^ 




n^^ 



i 



^''^Nmi 



m\i^%%ff, 




126 



^%t>xw^ss» r^ 



v^ H\mmw 






*% 





Ph(,ik' b\ T\Tone Brooks 



Just For 

KICKS 



Photo bv Lisa Helfert 

Front row (left to right): Carlo;, Corona, Andy Moore, Stephen Campbell, Matt Asia, Ken Weinstein, Russell 
Payne, Yohan Habte, Matt Larson, Shane Dougherty, Paul Jacobs. 

Back row: Head Coach Sasho Cirovski, Asst. Coach Bob Butehorn, Tod Herskovitz, Zach Kukoy, Sean Wray, 
Shawn Long, George Petrou, Jason Lipka, Serif Sisman, Malcolm Gillian, Trainer Bill Saylor, Asst. Coach 
Carmine Isacco. 



MD 


OPPONENT 


OPP. 


1 


JB f Akron 


4 


3 


^ Cleveland State 





1 


UMBC 


3 





Virginia A 


1 





American^ ^m 


2 


2 


N.C. State^^ 


1 


1 


"^ Towson State 


2 


2 


Duke 


3 


1 


Wake Forest 


2 


2 


Mt. St. Mary's 








^ North Carolina 


1 


3 


Campbell 


6 


1 


Clemson 


5 





George Washington 


1 


1 


Old Dominion 


2 


2 


James Madison 


3 



2 


j™, Loyola -^^^ 
^ Duke ' ^ 



3 



127 




WOMEN'S 
SOCCER 

1993 was an extremely successful and 
historic year for the Maryland Terrapin 
Women's Soccer Team. With a final 
record of 13-5-2 the Terps finished with 
the most outstanding record ever in 
school history. Their five losses came 
against #1 North Carolina, #10 Duke, #16 
George Mason, and finally against #20 
Virginia twice. Their regular season 
included an upset victory over #8 Will- 
iam and Mary and many comebacks from 
deficits of one, two, and even three goals 
behind. April Heinrichs created a power- 
ful team out of this young bunch of 
players and is clearly looking forward to 
building on this season that found them 
ranked as high as #14 in the nation. 
"We had an incredible year with 
upsets over UNC Greensboro, Arkansas, 
James Madison, and William and Mary," 
said Head Coach April Heinrichs about 
this season. "This young team has been 
developing in the three years I've been 
here and we are building on a platform 
that will catapult us right into next 
season which will hopefully include the 
NCAA Tournament." 

-Fnrid Sialiatgar 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



*J.i» 



F*cr> 




»»S''lf«___ «SRV.jUK 



if ijtff rf ^1 





Photo by Lisa Heltert 

Front row (left to right): Missy Price, Miriam Fagan, Kelly Amonte, Andrea Frankiewicz, Michelle Demko, 

Maureen McDonough, Stetanie Magro, Cailin MuUins. 

Center row: Randall Goldsborovigh, Audra Weber, Cecily Scarpelli, Terry Rich, Tania Sheremeta, Randi 

Goldblatt, Betsy Elder, Leslie Kerhin, Head Coach April Heinrichs. 

Back row: Volunteer Coach Lisa Petruccelli, Volunteer Coach Frank Komarek, Erin Taylor, Amber Escobedo, 

Stefani Papageorge, Ginette Chelius, Kim Ambruz, Tricia Taliaferro, Kristin Owsiany, Natalie Rich, Asst. 

Coach Lori Walker. 



128 




Attaining 
Higher 

GOALS 



OPPONENT OPP. 




3 
3 
5 
3 
1 

2 
1 
4 
2 
3 
6 
4 

1 
6 
2 
1 
1 



North Carolina 

Davidson 

UNC Greensboro 

LaSalle 

UMBC 

Wright State 

Duke 

James Madison , 

N.C. State 

Loyola 

William and Mary 

Arkansas 

George Washington 

Templt 

George Mason 

American 

Monmouth 

Princeton 

Virginia 

Virginia (ACC) 



7 

1 



6 
1 
1 
1 
1 

7 



Bottom left: Having fun before tlie game with smiles 
all around. 

All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks. 



129 



NET WORTH 

The 1993 women's volleyball team had a 
successful season finishing with a respect- 
able 15-10 record, playing their ACC oppo- 
nents to a 6-6 record. They were led by #16 
Moneach Surber, #13 Kelly Malins, #12 
Andrea Hudy, #10 Sherry Smith, #4 Nicole 
Lantagne, and #5 Duane Koester. Head 
Coach Janice Kruger led the Terps this year 
and she prepared her team well for the 
matches during the season. The team won 
many important matches and fell just short 
in their last home game which turned into a 
five set battle. 

This match between Maryland and 
Clemson was a game of streaks as the Terps 
played solidly and close to flawlessly in the 
opening set for the 1-0 lead. The second set 
saw the Tigers jump to an early lead but 
were then forced to go five game points 
before finally overcoming the pesky Mary- 
land defense. The third set saw much of the 
same as Clemson raced to an early margin 
before Maryland Came storming back to 
make it 1 4-1 3 Tigers. Maryland again staged 
off four set points before losing the set. The 
Terps controlled most of the fourth set and 
rode a streak of seven straight points to an 
easy victory to tie up the match at 2-2. In the 
fifth set Clemson once again pulled away 
from the Terps early yet this time yet this 
time they had run out of gas and could not 
come up with the miraculous comeback for 
the upset. 

"I'm glad that for our last match, we went 
out playing really strong. We had it taken 
away from us, but we played well and we 
have to be happy about that," said senior 
setter Nicole Lantagne. "We talked a lot 
about this week playing with heart and 
tonight our team had a lot of heart out 
there." 

This determination and spirit and an at- 
titude of "never say die" is what made this 
team so special. Fighting off set points and 
match points was only the beginning of the 
"heart" this volleyball team displayed on 
the court this season. 

- Fnrid Siahatgar 



All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks. 

Top and bottom: Maryland excelled in their net play. 
Whether spiking themselves or posing an insur- 
mountable block, the Terps always had the net well 
covered. 




130 




Pholo by Tyrone Brooks 



Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 




hol.iby Lis.i Ik'ltiTl 



Front row (left to right): Suzie Darnell, Nicole Lantagne, Andrea Hudy, Kim Mosley. 
Center row; Kelly Roberts, Daune Koester, Moneach Surber, Candice Seitz. 
Back row: Kelly Malins, Sherry Smith, Shannon Saltzman, Jennifer Boner. 



MD 


OPPONENT < 


DPP. 


3 


Delaware 





3 

3 


, ... Temple 

George Mason gjk 
George WashingtoiF^ 






3 





3 


Seton Hall 








Gal Poly 


3 


3 


UMBC A 


1 


3 


,_ DePaul ^k 





1 


Utah WW 


3 





Illinois a^ 


3 


3 


James Madison 





3 


N.C. State 


2 


3 


Virginia 


1 


3 


North Caroling 





i 


f0 Duke i%U 


3 


' I 


fW- Clemson^ 'ff^^ 


3 


1 * 


Georgia Tech 


3 


3 


Georgetown 





3 


N.G. State A. 


1 


3 


Florida State % 





3 


Virginia 


1 





Rhode Island 


3 





Florida State 


3 





Duke 


3 


1 


North Garolina 


3 



VOLLEYBALL 



131 



MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 



The 1993 men's cross country team had 
a season of constant improvement and full 
of promise for the years to come. This 
young squad had good finishes in many 
invitational and championship tourna- 
ments throughout the year and especially 
nearing the end of the season. They 
finished a solid 2nd in the Mount Invita- 
tional, 1st in the Maryland Colleges State 
State Championships, and finally 2nd in 
their own Maryland Invitational. 

"Other than our last meet, we improved 
continuously throughout the season," 
explained freshman Kevin Cody. "We 
frequently beat teams we had lost to 
earlier in the year when we played them 
for the second time. For a young team 
competing in the toughest conference, the 
ACC, and without team scholarships for 
this year, we did well. In addition, we 
have good young talent and almost 
everyone is on their way back for next 
season." 

This returning class is what everyone 
around College Park is excited about for 
next season. The experience gained from 
competing m the ACC will be very 
valuable next year. 

-Farid Siahatgar 





All photos this page bv 1 vivuc bRioivs 

132 



Jk 




Navy Invitational: 
MD OPPONENT OPP. 


47 Navy 
43 Penn 
41 Delaware 
16 _^^t St Mary's 


16 

19 
43 


UVA Invitational: 


95 (5th) 


Morven Park Invitational: 


286 (9th) 


Mount Invitational: 


-.50 (2nd) 


Maryland Colleges 

State Championship: ^ 35 (1st) 

Maryland Invitational: 44 (2nd) 



RRratf 



• ^ ~\SmmmSSSSmmMStSmi^^^S2^ k*^ '^ ■^"^^^SSHmtwrn^w^mmtmrnB^^m^mm 



iii'^'mii wh — M I I iJf ^ *rClLv4M«N ^' ^ap^^ 




riioh. hv Lisa Helfert 



Front row (left to right): Greg Muth, Ken Plasse, Ed Hogan, Michael Depry, Brian Montgomery, Pete Septoff, Larry Lockhart, Jon Shushinsky, Derrek Tucker, Dan Cook. 
Back row: Asst. Coach Dan Rincon, Asst. Coach Roland Desonier, Vernon Boyd, Jason Grant, Ed Coudon, Tim Rivenbark, Carl Bencal, Anthony Lee, Kevin Cody, Phillip 
Roach, Head Coach Bill Goodman, Asst. Coach Michelle Swope. 



133 



Navy Invitational: 


118 (5th) 


UVA jtovitational: ^ ^ 


'106 (4th) 


Morven Park Invitational: 


359 ( nth) 


At Navy: 

MD OPPONENT 


% 

OPP. 


40 Georgetown 


21 


44 Wake Forest 


19 


43 Navy 




Marylaritl (Alleges '^ "^ 
State Championship: 


u. . 

48 (2nd) 


Maryland Invitational: 


59 (2nd) 


Dual Meet: 

-iSk. >'^ .:^ '.- 


1 


MD K| OPPONENT 


OPP. 


22 Old Dominion 


37 



• 



*; 





I'lutto b\' rvrone Brooks 












^J''^J'*^^'=T»-Si; : ^4 




I'll., I, .In I ,s.. I I..|UtI 



Front row (left to right): Asst. Coach Dan Rincon, Cindy Symancyk, Stacey Beall, Kristin Maloney, Valerie Cothran, Paula La vorgna, Marchelle Payne, Dana Colligan, Kerrie 
Bowes, Tracey Terry, Melissa Brennan, Asst. Coach Michelle Swope. 

Back row; Asst. Coach Roland Desonier, Sharon Scotland, Renette Kirton, Vonda Jones, Simone Farrar, Angela Smith, Julie Bowers, Rosemary Owino, Angelica Broughton, 
Head Coach Bill Goodman. 



134 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 




The women's cross country team 
performed well in their 1993 season. The 
squad finished a strong second in the 
Maryland Invitational Tournament. As 
they improved throughout the year they 
grew more confident, achieved greater 
goals, and with this success came higher 
expectations from the coaching staff and 
everyone involved. 

"I am expecting both Paula [LaVorgna] 
and Brian [Montgomery: men's team] to 
provide solid performances this 
weekend," said Assistant Coach Dan 
Rincon referring to the third annual 
Maryland Colleges State Championship. 
"Based on their workouts, they should be 
prosperous competing against the good 
schools participating as well as the future 
Olympians." 

Paula Lavorgna led her teammates 
through the season with top performances 
in several invitational tournaments by 
finishing every race as the top lady terp. 
With returning more experienced runners 
next year's team should "prosper" as well. 

-Farid Siahatgar 



All photos this page by 
Tyrone Brooks 



135 



The MIGHTY Sound of Maryland 




Maryland Will Win 

From the fight song to the fifties 
renditions to the jazzy tunes, the march- 
ing band was on hand at every football 
game to cheer on the team and please the 
crowd. Even when the football team did 
not do so well, the marching band 
members never lost their sense of pride 
and spirit in our school, and students 
could always count on them to be their 
cheering and playing even in the worst of 
times. 

So we lost to Penn State 70-to-zip! 
That did not stop the marching band 
from putting on a great halftime show. 
And it did not stop them from practicing 
every single day on the chapel fields, 
either. If there was one thing a student 
could rely on at a game, it was the fact 
that the Mighty Sound of Maryland 
would definitely live up to their name. 







hoto by Tyrone Brooks 



136 




The drum line 



This page: 

Top - The "Mighty Sound of Maryland" is heard throughout Byrd Stadium as the Maryland 
Marching band performs their half-time show at a night game. Left center - Testudo watches 
the band perform. Center right - The drum majors lead the band around the field before the 
performance. Bottom left - The marching band members were among Maryland's biggest 
and most faithful football fans. 



Photo by Paul Vieira 



137 



In the Spirit of Things 



Cheerleaders at the University of Mary- 
land seem as traditional as the football team 
itself, yet they did not get the same kind of 
recognition. The change in uniforms this 
year went all but unnoticed and the cheers 
during a game were followed without un- 
derstanding the work put in by these men 
and women. The job of a cheerleader was to 
fire up a stadium crowd. Yet the crowd 
cheered and clapped for the team that was 
playing and not for the cheerleaders who 
got them all riled up. The work itself might 
have gone unnoticed, but the end result 
never did. 

"Maryland cheerleading is a terrific op- 
portunity for me at the University of Mary- 
land," explained freshman cheerleader 
Tanya Khararjian, "it gives me a chance to be 
directly involved with an activity here." This 
feeling was shared by many cheerleaders as 
they received little recognition but stayed 
on the cheerleading squad to experience 
this excitement firsthand. 

- Farid Siahatgnr 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 





Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



138 




Photu bv Pau] \ itira 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 



Photo bv Paul Vii 



139 




Pholo bv T\rt.>iif Brooks 



140 



DANCE 
TEAM 




I'luilo h\ r.iulVieira 



141 




142 



A Great Year for the Terrapins 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 

143 



Just a Little Healthy 
COMPETITION 



He dribbles between his legs, fakes left, 
rolls right, dodges the pick, dribbles twice 
through the defenders, jumps and jams the 
ball through the net. 

Meanwhile, in the Stamp Student Union, 
a quarter clinks into the machine, the lights 
flash, a little silver ball is launched into play, 
and the flippers frantically try to swat the 
ball away from the hole. 

And just downstairs, as she lines up her 
shot, she looks down at her cue stick and 
across the table, fires the stick into the cue 
ball, ricocheting one ball off another and 
into the corner pocket. 

Basketball, pinball and billiards were only 
a few of the activities provided by Campus 
Recreation Services. After a hard day of 
academic stresses, students and faculty 
could take advantage of the activities to let 
out some of that nervous energy. The activi- 
ties available across campus attracted ev- 
eryone looking for fun and games, because 
CRS always had something available. 

When asked why they participated in 



Campus Recreation activities, students gave 
several answers. One of the most popular 
responses was "stress relief." One student, 
Tony Demarco, said, " I would take an exam 
and immediately go to the arcade to play 
video games." 

Whether they enjoyed activities as chal- 
lenging as funk aerobics or something more 
leisurly like table tennis, students and fac- 
ulty could take part in any activity they felt 
would help them alleviate some of the day's 
stress. Although it may seem ironic, many 
students thought the best way to unwind 
was to get pumped up in a Campus Recre- 
ational sport. 

One student, "Rick," said Campus Recre- 
ation activities were "a nice thing to do to 
have fun since Maryland's collegiate athlet- 
ics are very competitive." 

For those who wanted to stay in shape 
and keep up their skills in a certain sport 
without committing too much time to club 
sports. Campus Recreation offered a full 
range of activities with flexible schedules. 



James Hancock was a regular at North Gym 
on Thursday nights to play volleyball. When 
asked why he continues to play with Cam- 
pus Recreation and not try out for club 
volleyball, he responded, " because I'm not 
good enough to play club." He simply 
enjoys playing the sport, he said. In Cam- 
pus Recreation activities, faculty and stu- 
dents cut out the cut-throat competition and 
filled each game with fun. 

The greatest aspect of Campus Recre- 
ation was that there was always something 
available. Every day from just before sun- 
up (6:00 A.M.) until hours after sun-down 
(11:00 P.M.) students and faculty partici- 
pated in these activities. Student Micah 
Reese, an employee with Campus Recre- 
ation at the Stamp Student Union, com- 
mented, "There are some pool regulars, dif- 
ferent people bowling, [but] someone is here 
everyday." There was always an opportu- 
nity to get involved, meet different people, 
and have fun with Campus Recreation. 




144 









All photo'- this spieaJ b\ Daiiii Soaib 



145 




Photo by Dana Sears 



C^atm^ ^ CoHihimittf 



September came once again and for 
most college students, this was the time 
for making adjustments. It was the time 
in which most students were in the 
process of packing their entire life into a 
station wagon only to find that their room 
was the size of a Pinto. However, it didn't 
matter if you were the "new kid on the 
block" or an "old timer", because at one 
time or another we all went through the 
same adjustments. 

For 5,000 students the adjustment not 
only dealt with class schedules and 
professors but also with the six to fifty 
other people who would be their neigh- 
bors for the next few months. Resident 



idited tif y^atitbc Ott 

Life offered a unique advantage to all who 
tried it out. Being part of Resident Life 
offered not only a place to hve, but people 
to meet. Not only could you meet the 
person of your dreams in your hall, but 
also your future best friend, a study 
partner, and all other walks of life. There 
were also Resident Assistants there to 
provide residents with any information 
and advice, or even just a friendly smile to 
make your adjustment to college a Httle 
easier. 

When students became a part of 
Resident Life, they also captured the 
atmosphere of the campus. Here at the 
University of Maryland, the atmosphere 
was one of diversity. Not only could you 



meet a person who lives half-a-world 
away, but you could learn from them and 
teach them and experience a whole new 
world with them. 

Last but not least, all residents got the 
opportunity to experience the tastes of the 
local dining hall system. The dining hall 
was not only the place where you could 
get food prepaid for, but also a social 
gathering of similar people trying to 
fiqure out what they were really eating. 

Resident Life offered this and so much 
more. For 5,000 students it was a choice 
to meet new people, to live close to classes 
and to create a community that they 
would never forget. 




rhoto bv Paul Viiira 





This page; 

Top left - Jordon Meyerowitz, a senior Criminal 

Justice major, pumps up at the new gym. 

Top right - Erik Swift, sophomore Animal Sciences 

major, pedals away fat and calories. Bottom - Jenn 

Reichwein, senior Government and PoUtics major, 

works out her legs. 

Opposite page: 

Left - Jenn Reichwein tries out another part of the 
circuit. Right - The new Annapolis Fitness Center 
accommodated many people at one time, maknig it 
an ideal place to work out. 




AH photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



148 



Working Out and Toning Up 



If someone on South Campus 
wanted to exercise, it was no longer a 
workout just to get to the gym. Campus 
Recreation Service (CRS) in cooperation 
with Resident Life opened two new gyms 
in September for the convenience of North 
Campus and South Campus residents. 

The South Campus gym, called the 
AnnapoUs Fitness Center, was furnished 
with the same popular machines as North 
Gym, but it was centrally located in the 
Annapolis Community Center. The fitness 



center had Cybex variable resistance weight 
training machines such as Lifesteps, Con- 
cept II rowers and other cardiovascular 
equipment. The Annapolis Fitness Center 
was open to all students. The new North 
Campus gym, the EHicott Weight Room, 
offered free weights for weight training and 
body building, but only for campus resi- 
dents. 

"The goal of the new gyms is to 
provide more well-rounded people and spe- 
cifically to provide a source of stress relief 



from classes," Jane Twomey, a CRS gradu- 
ate assistant, said. 

All students who wanted to use the 
new facilities including the existing North 
Gym had to complete an orientation session 
before using the equipment. Over 60,000 
students have already used the Health and 
Human Performance (HHP) Fitness Center 
in North Gym. With two more gyms, exer- 
cising was more convenient for everyone. 

- Matiide Ott 




149 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 



Creating an ^h^mo: Roommate Horror Stories 

When two different materials are combined in a new environment, the formula does not always mix well. 
Roommates are the perfect example of this. The horror stories learned and experienced with roommates are 
only one of the many aspects that makes college life unique. (Names withheld) 

--My roommate once got so drunk that when he came home he opened my closet and urinated on all 
my clothes. 

-My roommate would bring home a different guy each night and have sex with him on the top bunk while I 
was "sleeping" in the bottom bunk. 

--My roommate and the hall-mate next door hated each other, and once they had a donut-hole fight between 
the rooms. 

-My roommate once lost the condom her boyfriend used the night before. So the next morning she played a 
joke on me and placed an open condom on my pillow. She thought that this was a funny joke, however 1 
thought it was even funnier when she found the real condom a few days later— inside herself. 



150 



More 



~I came home drunk one night 
and my roommate dyed my black 
hair, orange. 

--My roommate my second year, 
had no sense of smell. I would 
find different things growing in 
his laundry pile and on our food 
each week. There was one time he 
was so drunk that he urinated on 
himself at his job. He then passed 
out and I could not revive him. It 
came to the point when I felt it was 
necessary to call an ambulance. 
After opening 12 ammonia cap- 
sules I remembered that he had no 
sense of smell and that he could 
not be revived this way. 




—My ex-roommate had sex in 
MY BED the first weekend before 
school started. 

-Compiled by Matilde Ott 



i-'hoto bv D^na Sear?. 



151 



Reptile World Hi 




This page: 

Top left - An iguana was one of the featured reptiles 
in the program "Reptile World, " organized for the 
residents of South Hill by Resident Assistant Steve 
Pandiledes. Top right - Michael Schwedick, a.k.a. 
"Rep Man," travels all over the east coast and other 
parts of the countri>' to exhibit his reptiles and 
educate humans about them. Shown here with 
"Tex," a five-foot long alligator. Bottom - Tex, up 
close and personal. 

Opposite page: 

Anne Arundel Hall, or the "honors dorm." 



i 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



152 



Creating a "CUah" Environment 



An alcohol-smoke free environment 
was a new housing option available for 
residents in the 1993-94 academic year. 
The Caring Coalition, a campus organiza- 
tion committed to strengthening alcohol 
and drug prevention activities, created the 
special housing option for students who 
wanted to reside in a substance-free 
environment. This option was made 
possible through funding by FIPSE, Funds 
for Improvement of Post-Secondary 
Education, a grant from the U.S. Depart- 



ment of Education given last year. 

Karla Shepherd, coordinator of pro- 
grams and orientation for the department 
of Resident Life, was quoted in the 
Diamondback as saying, "I think it's a 
great program. It creates a supportive 
environment for people who do not want 
to drink." 

There were 120 students residing in 2- 
1/2 substance-free floors on North 
Campus in the program's first year. The 
reasons for living in such an environment 



were as diverse as the residents them- 
selves. Some of the reasons were past 
alcohol abuse in the family, medical or 
religious reasons or just a simple change 
of environment. 

The alcohol-smoke free housing was 
only one of the many options available 
from Resident Life in the past four years. 
This was the latest addition to the diverse 
environments of the Language House, the 
International House and the Honors 
Dorm already offered by the campus. 

- Matilde Ott 




Photo hv Dana Sears 



153 



Wt PP 




Should they $Uif or should they ^o? 

The University of Maryland planned to sell the graduate apartments. Lord Calvert Apartments 
and University Hills Apartments, to the private sector in Fall 1993. Governor William Donald Schaefer and the 
state legislature claimed a mandate to host a meeting for prospective buyers. Interested developers were given 
a tour of the apartments and were able to ask conditions and details of the predicted sale. The deadline for the 
bids was October 25, 1993. 

The graduate apartments were the source of controversy concerning their up-keep and maintenance in 
recent years. The idea of renovations pleased some graduate students who had long complained about the 
living conditions. Complaints included peeling paint, cockroaches, scarce hot water and the recent crime 
waves that had hit the area. Most prospective buyers said they would not purchase the apartments and 
continue to maintain them in "as is" conditions. 

The Graduate Student Government (GSG) and a large number of faculty were concerned that if the buyer's 
proposal was accepted that apartments would not be available to graduates, but buyers claimed that with 
stringent anti-discrimination laws it would be difficult. 

-Matilde Ott 



154 





All photos this spread bv Paul Vieira 



155 



WAVING 400Hift TO ROOMMATES 



The first all-singles dorm opened its 
doors to residents in September for the 
1993-94 academic year. The new singles 
dorm, located in Centreville Hall, was an 
experimental project that guaranteed 
single rooms for an extra fee. For $400 per 
year in addition to existing housing fees, a 
student was guaranteed their own room. 

Centreville Hall was a traditional eight- 
story highrise that offered converted 
doubles with two dressers, two desks and 
two closets. There was an average of only 
10 people sharing the community bath- 



rooms per hall. This was less than half 
compared to the normal occupancy for a 
highrise. Centreville housed 295 residents 
and was completely filled for the aca- 
demic year. 

Resident Life offered this option in 
response to student requests and to the 
decreasing number of returning students. 
Jan Davidson, assistant to the director of 
Resident Life, told the Diamondback, "We 
have a limited number of new students. 
To increase on-campus occupancy, we 
need to increase the number of returning 



students." 

Judging by the fact that the dorm was 
filled the first semester, the experiment 
was a success even with the required extra 
fee. The $400 fee was the only rate 
increase in housing fees for the 1993-94 
academic year. 

However, the future of the singles 
dorm has yet to be decided. Resident Life 
may continue the program, expand it to 
other buildings or change the fee, depend- 
ing on the resident evaluations at the end 
of the year. 

- Matilde OH 



iz <-■ 


S3 rj r- 




<i*> ', -> 


OO - 


j 


-a =z 


a a o o o ^ 


[ 


' 


>■■« ^Of<>¥ 






«a o a aJjgs,^ 


^ 




Photo by Dana Sears 



Top left - Adrienne Smith hopes to find something good in her mailbox. 
Right - The ultimate individual expression: old glory. 




156 





Top left - These poor young creatures have not been fortunate enough to experience smgle-dorm lite yet 
(clockwise from top - Michelle Cantare, Rob Hershey, Farid Siahatgar, Seth Sternberg). Top right - Being in a 
single has advantages of privacy and peace and quiet for studving. Bottom left - Centreville is the messv 
person's dream come true. Bottom right - Little luxuries like watchmg TV or listening to your stereo any time 
you want are big advantages to the "single life." 



Photo bv Dana Sears 



157 




All photos this page by Aynat Ra\'in 




Top left - Freshmen Mandy Diamond, Lauren Terner and Lorren Diamond in Hagerstown Hall. Top Right - 
Andrew Feinberg, Sophomore Sports Administration major, studies in Hagerstown Hall Bottom Right - 
Lauren Kochar, sophomore journalism major, studies in Hagerstown Hal! lounge. 



158 



Dorm-Selection Process 
to be Reconsidered 

The dorm-selection process and the priority system, which determined the placement of residents in campus housing was 
overhauled in the fall semester after the controversial changes made in the spring semester. 

The new system, which eliminated the restrictions for housing in order to increase resident occupancy, enraged upperclass- 
men concerned with losing their priority to underclassmen. Under the old priority system, only students that had at least 56 credit 
hours and four consecutive semesters of living on campus could apply for on-campus suites and apartments. However, the new 
system ehminated all restrictions for suites and apartments enabling underclassmen to apply for them. Upperclassmen raised 
concerns that underclassmen would be pulled into the priority housing leaving the juniors and seniors with priority without 
housing. 

"To the juniors and seniors who were under the old priority system, the new changes were unfair. Upperclassmen who have 
waited four semesters to receive priority housing have received none of the benefits that they applied for when they first became 
residents," said Jennifer Trevor, junior RTVF major. "Resident Life did not take into consideration the consequences of 
impletmenting their actions. Campus housing is a business and must satisfy all of its customers. The new changes only consider the 
new and incoming residents but not those who have stayed with the system for over two years." 

The new campus system was implemented in order to stop the trend of campus residents moving off campus. The occu- 
pancy for Fall 1992 was at a 15-year low, with 6,272 residents, but increased by three percent for the 1993 academic year. Resident 
Life officials said the new system caused the increase of residents on campus. However, in order to accomodate everyone, a commit- 
tee of 12 to 15 students and three Resident Life staff members was appointed to re-evalute the priority system. The final decision 
was not available at press time but was scheduled to be released by the end of the year. 

-Mntilde Ott 





Left - Sophomores Mike Erdely and Tara Torchia in Hagerstovvn Lounge. Above - Lauren 
Terner works on a term paper. 



159 



Residents 

Experience 

Late Night Dining 




r 



'i> 



What happened when students' class ran past 7:00pm, the dining hall had just closed their doors, they had not eaten all day, and 
thev were flat broke? In a great manv cases, these students would try not to think about their grumbling stomachs and would wait it 
out until 9:00 pm when the Late Night Dining doors were opened to the starving student body. When asked why she attended Late 
Night Dining , South Hill resident Lisa Schwarts said, "Because I was hungry." While this was a common reason for many of the 
Late Night diners, still manv others came for the Late Night Dining experience itself. 

The Late Night Dining experience was unique. Where else on the campus could residents eat those ever-so-cheesy mozzerella 
sticks and drink creamy milkshakes made with a smile by the Bakery staff, while socializing with their friends and, most 
impoertantly, procrastinating. 

Those who had not experienced the thrill of Late Night Dining were missing a great deal. "As a resident of New Leonardtown, 1 
Trussed the experiences 1 shared when I went to Late Night Dining, " said Dimitris Geragas, junior Electrical Engineering major. 
"Memories of having grape wars and wrestling on the floor of the Dining Hall were some of my fondest.' 

From 9:00 pm to midnight, Mondav through Thursday, residents were able to get Dining Hall cusine in an atmosphere that could 
only be fully described by a personal visit and maybe a wrestle on the floor. 

-Robi)i Solomon and Matilde Ott 



160 




All photos this spread by Dana Sears 
Opposite page: Left - Enjoying the late-night cuisine. Right - A resident ponders over whether he should get some ice cream. 
This page: Top - Mike Healy and Chris Back enjoy fresh milkshakes with real Maryland Dairy ice cream. Bottom - Feasting and procrastinating. 



161 




Photo by Aynat Ravin 



Photo by Dana Sears 



162 



Creating A 
Community 




Photo by Aynat Ravin 

Opposite page: 

Top - Deb Roche and her friend Andrew 
find the benefit of living around so many 
other people... there is always someone to 
study with. Bottom left - Then again. Deb 
can study by herself. Bottom right - 
Campus residents take a break at 'Video 
Quarters " in the Student Union. 

This page: 

Top left - Robina Shaw, junior Criminal 
ustice major, enjoys a package from her 
parents. Top right - Scott Greenbaum, 
sophomore Go\'ernment and Politics 
major, has a snack in his room on North 
Campus. Bottom - Campus residents 
together at a football game. 



Photo by Dana Seari: 



163 



Activities Sponsored by Resident Life 



The South Hill 

Basketball 

Tournament 

The "South Hill Classic," the first 
resident-life sponsored event of its 
kind, was organized by Dunstan 
Macauley, Steven Pandelides and 
several other RAs. The tournament 
was open to all campus students. 

Hundreds of people turned out for 
the event in April, including WPGC- 
FM's "Streetjammer." Free pizza was 
served and a D.J. provided entertain- 
ment for the on-lookers. Although the 
afternoon was threatened by scattered 
rainfall and drizzle, the tournament 
saw its completion and reaped a 
winning team, known as "The Four 
Horsemen." 



All photos this spread are of the 
South Hill Basketball Tourna- 
ment. Bottom left, the winners of 
the tournament, "The Four 
Horsemen." 




All photos this page bv Tyrone Brooks 



164 




:a2s 



The South Hill Pose-down/ Bikini Contest 

The South Hill Pose Down/Bikini Contest was organized by Rich Mahee, one of the 
contestants in the Caring Coalition's spring "Party Challenge." The object of the Party 
Challenge was to come up with the best idea for a non-alcoholic party event. 

Both men and women competed (in separate categories) for prizes Mahee solicited from 
Santa Fe Cafe, Quigley's, and other area vendors. Although Mahee's event did not win the 
challenge, the party was a hit with over a hundred spectators. 

165 




I'hotu b\' Paul \ leira 



^Mmmtfei 



Entering a university the size of 
Maryland has caused many students to 
feel overwhehned at times. The Univer- 
sity was an academic institution inside a 
city, which had the capabiHty of pulling 
students in a multitude of directions. 
Despite those challenges, campus activi- 
ties, organizations, sports and the 
metropolitan local were some aspects that 
made UMCP such an outstanding institu- 
tion. At times students may have had 
difficulty setting their priorities in this 
environment and may have felt even more 



confused not knowing which activity to 
join. But in the midst of all this diversity, 
students shared a common ground in 
their quest for a higher education. "The 
diversity of people and programs in 
Maryland academics was one of the 
reasons that I transferred here," said Hope 
Morrow, a sophomore advertising major. 
Academics at Maryland were the center- 
piece for all other elements that went on 
here. 

Each college and school tried extremely 
hard to make students feel comfortable 



and welcome; offering a prime learning 
atmosphere in which to excel. The 
University as a whole provided many 
programs and services for the UMCP 
community. Even during finals week, 
brainwaves still may have been surging 
through students' heads, so in the spirit of 
the human mind and what it can accom- 
plish under any circumstances, the 
Academics section is devoted to the 
mental achievements produced at the 
University of Maryland at College Park. 




Photo by TyTone Brooks 



Photo by Tyront; Brooks 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT COLLEGE PARK 

OFFICE OF THE I-KESIDENT 

September 28, 1993 



Dear Students: 

This year's Terrapin Yearbook promises to be one of the best ever, so 1 am confident that 
for years to come it will be a wonderful way to revisit your days at College Park. 

These are exciting times on our campus. Despite severe cutbacks in state funding, we 
have been able to stay true to our plans for becoming one of the finest public universities in the 
country Each academic season brings a more talented group of students to our campus, and 
College Park students continue to garner honor upon honor in important fields of study. We have 
grown considerably as an international community and campus life is more vibrant than ever 
before, rich in opportunities for participating in the global community. Our students have set an 
exemplary record in community service and this summer. President Clinton chose College Park 
as the university to visit in order to launch his national service initiative. 

A highlight of the 1993-94 academic season is the institution's efforts to build an ever 
stronger undergraduate curriculum. A new academic program. First Year Focus, was launched 
this Fall- more than 130 special courses taught by full-time faculty, smaller classes, special 
courses linked with others along thematic lines, more opportunities for interacting with the faculty 
and fellow .students, and more opportunities for honors courses and other individualized research 
opportunities. Plans are already underway to extend this new interdisciplinary initiative to upper 
division courses. 

During this academic year, our College of Engineering will be celebrating its centennial 
year of research, instruction and service. Like so many of College Park's academic programs, 
the students and faculty of the College of Engineering have made us truly proud by their 
contributions and the national recognition they have achieved. 

It has been a privilege to have you as students during such an important time in our 
history. I hope the memories captured by this Yearbook will encourage you to stay in touch with 
your alma mater. Best wishes to each and everyone of you in the years ahead. 



Sincerely yours. 



'^Li/Z/'^-^^ 



William E. Kirwan 
President 



MAIN ADMINISTRATION BUILDING t COLLEGE PARK. MARYLAND 20742 . (301) 405-5803 FAX (Mil 314-9560 




Photo by D. Froehlich 

169 



College Of Agriculture 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



As the original college of the University of Maryland at College 
Park, the College of Agriculture has continued to grow and 
prosper since its conception in 1856. Agriculture was a field that 
continued its historical prominence, with Maryland's students and 
faculty leading the way into the future of agriculture. The college 
strove to provide its students with an education that would not 
only enrich upon them agricultural education, but made sure its 
curriculum would enable the students to meet today's world of 
agriculture with the scientific know-how to make vast improve- 
ments in the field. 

The College of Agriculture spent the year looking for a new 
dean, and Craig Oliver was appointed interim dean of the college 
as of October 11, 1993. Despite the lack of a permanent dean, the 
college was not held back in any way. In the spring, the College 
of Agriculture held its annual Agriculture Day, which gave the 
campus and community the opportunity to witness many pro- 
grams that the college was involved with. Allison Chang, a senior 
Studio-Art/Ancient History major, was very impressed with the 
activities that were held as well as the bond she saw between the 
College of Agriculture students. She said, "I did not even know 
that agriculture had an honor fraternity, but at Ag-Day, I saw a lot 
of guys wearing their fraternity shirts proudly." 

-Robin Solouioii 




Top Left: During Ag-Day, a member of the Equestrian Team rode for the 

public. 

Top Right: Acting Dean of Agriculture and Dean of Life Sciences Dr. Paul 

H. Mazzocchi 

Bottom: Participants of the Ag-Day festivities were rewarded for their efforts 



Programs of Study: 



Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural And Resource Economics 

Agricultural Sciences, General 

Agronomy 

Animal Sciences 



Dietetics 

Food Sciences 

Horticulture 

Human Nutrition And Foods 

Natural Resources Management 

Poultry Science 



170 



School Of Architecture 




The School of Architecture at the University of Maryland pro- 
\ ided students with yet another year of outstanding faculty and 
programs from which they could learn. The school was proud to 
have its students receive comprehensive instruction from faculty 
w ho not only taught as a profession, but who also were active in 
[Mofessional practice and research. 

William Bechhoefer was named one of the Distinguished 
Scholar-Teachers for the 1993-1994 academic year. With the school 
since 1970, Bechhoefer used his interest in international aspects of 
architecture to teach his students "the motivations people bring to 
the making of built environments, with examples taken from 
around the world." Other architecture faculty who excelled in the 
"real world" of architecture were Juan Bonta, who was the invited 
speaker at the Buenos Aires 1993 International Architecture Bien- 
nial, and Amy Gardner, who received a Merit Award in the Renais- 
sance Awards Program. 

With faculty so dedicated and a school eager to provide its 
students with programs and curricula that would greatly challenge 
them, it was clear to see why the School of Architecture continued 
building itself to new academic heights. 




Top Left: Associate Dean of the School of Architecture, Stephen F. Sachs 
Bottom Left: Greg Glasgow, Architecture Graduate Student 
Bottom Right: Working at her desk in the Architecture building was Ranmalie 
Ratnatarg, a senior Architecture student. 



Programs of Study: 



Architectural History 

Design 

Preservation 



Technology 
Urban Planning 



171 



College Of Arts And Humanities 






ARTS e HUMANITIES 




Photo bv M.Tggie '-•ukuin 



Photo bv Tyrone Brooks 



By being one of the largest and most diverse colleges on campus, 
the College of Arts and Humanities held a lot of potential coming 
into this year. 

Much recognition was given to the top students of the college. 
Five seniors were named Dean's Senior Scholars: Elisabeth 
Herschbach, Catherine Pierre, Jennifer Schwarz, Wendy Somera and 
Melissa Kaftarian. For freshmen, the college partook in a program 
called First Year Focus, which guarantees freshmen get at least one 
small class and offers classes in interdisciplinary clusters. 

As for distinguished faculty, the college's professors received 
numerous awards. Lawrence Moss, music, was chosen as an Ameri- 
can Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Award recipient. 
Andrew D. Wolvin, speech communication, and Carol Coakly, 
faculty research assistant, published Perspectives on Listening, an 
edited volume of essays on listening. 

Important accomplishments of this year included sponsorship of 
an international conference, beginning planning of a $97-million 
Marvland Center for the Performing Arts, and installation of an 
interactive, multimedia language classroom. 

Thanks to the academic achievements of the students, talent of the 
faculty and wealth of resources available to the college, this was a 
year in which the college maintained its strong reputation of excel- 
lence. 

-Gre^j'^ Weiss 




Top left - A scene from the play, "Not by Bed Alone." Top right 
Humanities student hurries to class. Bottom - Dean of Arts and 
Robert Griffith. 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 

- An Arts and 
Humanities, 



Programs of Study: 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History And Archaeology 

Classics 
Dance 



English 

French And Italian Languages And Literatures 

Germanic And Slavic Languages And Literature 

Hebrew And East Asian Languages And Literatures 

History 

Housing & Design 

Linguistics 



Music 
Philosophy 
Spanish And Portuguese 

Language And Literatures 
Speech Communication 
Theatre 
Woman's Studies 



172 



College Of Behavioral And 

Social Sciences 




Under the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, a diverse 
group of disciplines existed ranging from scientifically oriented sub- 
jects to the philosophical and experimental. The goal of the college 
v^^as aimed at the understanding of human beings both as individuals 
and in groups. 

Numerous departments achieved recognition for their accomplish- 
ments. The sociology department, in collaboration with the Michigan 
Survey Research Center and Westat, won a national contest for a 
National Science Foundation award to provide advanced instruction 
in Survey Methodology. 

In Government and Politics, Karen Dawisha won funding from the 
MacArthur Foundation, the State Department and the Pew Founda- 
tion for her work. Clarence Stone was also awarded with an NSF 
award. In economics, Mancus Olson and his team won $4 million to 
do research, while Katherine Abraham was nominated by President 
Clinton to lead the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

The assistant dean for student affairs named students Marc Solomon, 
Marty Zerwitz, Jennifer Rudick, Sue Frazier, Mike Leoffa, Jennifer 
Kelly, Alisa Tishler, and Adam Green as being highly successful 
within the college. 

- K.L. Piion 



Ins page by Tyrone Brooks 

Top - American Government Teaching Assistant Jonathan Morstein. Bottom left - Dean of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Dr. Iruin L. Goldstein. Bottom right - Chris 
Haga, a geography graduate student, instructs undergraduate Tilak Hettige. 



Programs of Study: 



Afro-American Studies 

Anthropology 

Crimanal Justice And Criminology 

Economics 

Geography 



Government And Politics 
Hearing And Speech Sciences 
Psychology 
Sociology 



173 



College Of Business 
And Management 




Pholo bv Paul Vieira 



The College Of Business and Management had an extremely busy year 
with the dedication of a new building and the continuance of a world class 
business curriculum among other feats. On October 16, 1993, the new MBA 
building was dedicated as Van Munching Hall in honor of alumnus Leo 
Van Munching, Jr. Lisa Stark, junior Accounting major commented on the 
building by saying, "Van Munching Hall, oh my God it's so nice!" Twelve 
undergraduate organizations pledged to keep the new building clean by 
adopting special areas. 

The impressive structure that housed the business school was not the 
only thing people commented on throughout the year. The business school 
was also busy making it's curriculum and relation with the students as 
positive as possible. The business school became the first of the University 
of Marvland Colleges to make available to the student's e\-aluations of 
faculty member's performances. The students were able to view the 
surveys and knew that their comments were being appreciated. 

The business school implemented a new curriculum and also provided 
undergraduate students with manv programs to enhance their education. 
One undergraduate student who benefited from the business school and his 
own abilitv was Alexander Tekie. The senior finance major placed 42nd out 
of 9,800 participants in the fifth AT&T Collegiate Investment Challenge, 
and ranked 1st from the state of Maryland. 

-Robin Sokvuon 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 

Top left - The new Van Munching Hall. Top right - Dean 
of Business and Management, William Mayer. Bottom - 
Business students taking advantage of their new study 
facility. 



Programs of Study: 



Accounting 

Business And Management 

General 
Business And Management 

General / International 
Decision And Information Sciences 



Finance 

Management Science 

Marketing 

Human Resource Management 

Production Managemeiit 

Statistics 

Transportation 



174 



College of Computer, Mathematical 
And Physical Sciences 




"The College of Computer, Mnthematicnl and Physical Sciences ivas actively engaged in 
preparing students to address the important societal problems of today and tomorrouK We 
look forward to finding new areas for the students and faculty to apply their knowledge. " 

-George Goldenbaum, associate dean of the College ofCMPS 

The Computer Science Department maintained direct contact with several 
independent research units of the university, such as the Center for Automated 
Research and Computer Vision Laboratory. 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy was one of the largest departments at 
the University of Maryland. Its programs were ranked number one nationally with 
experiments that were carried out all over the planet, on the moon and currently 
approaching Jupiter. 

The Department of Meteorology was aimed at areas of research concerning 
atmospheric, oceanic, and biospheric environments. Global, environmental obser- 
vations and climate modeling and prediction were a few of the areas of interest. 

The Department of Mathematics offered a rich and stimulating environment 
where the students were exposed to the most recent developments in mathematics. 
The department proved to be an effective research center. 

-Dimitris Geragas n)id Maltilde Ott 




Ml photos this page bv Paul \ leira 



Top - Students in CMPS are especially productive. Bottom left - Jenn Sampson, sophomore Civil Engineering major, works on a lab project. Bottom right - Dean of 
Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, R.H. Herman. 



Programs of Study: 


Astronomy 


Mathematics 




Computer Science 


Meteorology 




Geology 


Physics 



175 



College Of Education 





As it should have been, the College of 
Education was once again on the fore- 
front of new and exciting programs that 
sought to unite future educators and 
surrounding school systems so that 
together, they would be able to provide 
better services and better teachers to 
parents and students. 

One program that got under way this 
year was a joint program between the 
Coca-Cola Company and the College of 
Education to help area high school 
students. Coca-Cola awarded a grant to 
the Chair of Human Development, 
Robert Hardy, that would enable him to 
find assistance for high school students 
who otherwise would probably not 
attend college. 

Another program that the College of 
Education was working on in conjunc- 
tion with Prince Georges County was the 
Professional School Development Center 
at Regina High School. This program, 
funded by the county, would be a 



comprehensive deUvery system for Prince 
Georges County students and their 
parents. It would actually be a working 
high school, with P.G. faculty and Univer- 
sity of Marvland education majors 
working together for the benefit of the 
students. 

Although the College of Education 
suffered a loss with the planned elimina- 
tion of the Department of hidustrial and 
Technological Occupations in Fall 1994, it 
was still able to provide a great number of _ 
outstanding projects and programs, 
including providing the College with a 
new dean. Dr. Halley, who brought 
together the college and neighboring 
communities. 

All of the departments in the College 
had an outstanding year as well. Becky 
Bishop, a senior Special Education major, 
commented that "Maryland's Special 
Education program was a model program 
that produced graduates who were highly 
sought after." With all the momentum of 







i^r 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



a crashing wave, the College of Education 
was sure to continue its high standard of 
achievements for a long time to come. 

-Stacey Brooks 



Programs of Study: 



Counsehng AndPersonnel Services 
Curriculum And histuction 



Human Development 

Measurement Statistics And Evaluation 



Education Policy Planning And Administration Special Education 



176 



College Of Health And 
Human Performance 




In order to prepare the nation for tomorrow's health issues, the College of 
Health and Human Perfomiance was teacliing its students the skills today. 
Some of the techniques the college incorporated into its program were those 
listed in the government document Healthy People 2000. This was a specific set 
of objectives the government, in conjmiction with health educators, wanted 
to accomplish by the year 2000. These objectives not only included physical 
health issues, but also issues like the improvement of health status or the 
reduction of youth violence. Healtlnj People 2000 's goal was to move from the 
traditional medical model of health to a model of prevention. 

"hi reality, lifestyle factors are very important in temis of trying to help 
people reduce their risk to disease," said Sharon Desmund, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Health Education of coordinator of Undergraduate Community 
Health Program. 

"What Healtlnj People 2000 does is reinforces our curriculum and adds 
credibility to what we have been doing," said Dr. David Hyde, Health 
Education undergraduate advisor. 

Tlie college prepared its students for the future by providing field 
experience as well. All community health majors were required to take a 
semester-long internship. Thus, students took what they learned from their 
classes and applied it in the real world. 

- Matilde Ott 



Photo by Da\ id Lipsman 



Photo by Paul Vieira 



Programs of Study: 



Family Studies 



Health Education 



Kinesiology 



177 




b\ I^ana Sears 



A Century of Excellence 



For the last 100 years, the engineers of 
the University of Maryland have been creat- 
ing waves. From the sound waves of aero- 
space engineering, to the electromagnetic 
waves of electrical engineering, the College 
of Engineering exhibited its commitment to 
excellence in education, research and ser- 
vice to the state and the nation. 

"We are very proud of the faculty and 
students," said Dean George E. Dieter. In- 
deed, in the recent years, students have 
achieved significant recognition in national 
design competitions. The interdisciplinary 
teams of the solar and formula cars, and the 
civil engineering team of the concrete canoe 
have consistently excelled in such events. 
Innovative technologies were emerging 
from the college's research center and di- 
rectly transferred to the industrial commu- 
nity. Prestigious corporate and govern- 
ment supporters, like Martin Marietta, 



Rockwell International, the National Sci- 
ence Foundation, NASA and the Depart- 
ment of Defense, ensured the credibility of 
the department. 

According to Dieter, "one of the things 
that characterized our college was that we 
were both a very strong research oriented 
school without giving up the emphasis on 
undergraduate education." The research 
expenditures, in the past decade, have pre- 
sented a fivefold increase. Additionally, the 
design courses introduced to the first-year 
curriculum, as of fall 1992, reflected the 
college's concern on the undergraduate edu- 
cation. 

"We are committed to preparing the en- 
gineer of tomorrow," said the dean, "and we 
believe the college is going to be even better 
100 years from now." 

The Engineering Research Center was 
founded in 1983, with the purpose of in 




Y^\ 



Q 4M 



Photo by Dana Sears 



Programs of Study: 



Areospace Engineering 

Agrucultural 
Chemical Engineering 



Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Fire Protection Engineering 



Mechanical Engineering 
Nuclear Engineering 



178 



College of Engineering 



(continued from previous page) 
creasing interaction between the University 
of Maryland and the state of Maryland's 
business and industrial community and the 
Institute for systems Research (ISR). The 
ISR, formerly known as the Systems Re- 
search Center, at the University of Mary- 
land and at Harvard University, was estab- 
lished as one of the six original research 
centers funded by the National Science Foun- 
dation in 1985. Close collaboration with 
industry, government laboratories and in- 
ternational research institutes provides a 
rich environment in which to enhance aca- 
demic programs and train the new genera- 
tion of engineers. 

The College of Engineering maintained 
a number of sophisticated research and test- 
ing facilities on campus, including a small 
scale nuclear reactor of a fail-safe design 
suited for reactor-based research and nuclear 



reactor operator training. A hypersonic 
winci tunnel, in addition to the most ad- 
vanced, low speed wind tunnel of any 
American university was housed at Mary- 
land. Maryland also was home to a state-of- 
the-art bioprocess scale-up facility for the 
conversion of biomasss, a flight simulator, a 
robotics laboratory and a laboratory for 
plasma and fusion energy studies. 

Over a 1 00-year time span, the College of 
Engineering has grown from a one person 
faculty to a college that has continued to 
increase its faculty, programs and quest for 
being the best. The facilities at The Univer- 
sity of Maryland that have grown out of the 
College of Engineering have brought the 
University much attention and have pro- 
vided students with one of the best institu- 
tions for learning in the country. 

- Deinitris Geragas 








^^-mtu 



I iyii^^» 



"We are extremely pleased to 
be holding this centennial 
celebration of our College of 
Engineering. It has been a 
central part of the University 
for 100 years. It's a very 
distmguished college that 
has produced outstanding 
graduates and has made a 
very significant contribution 
to the state of Maryland and 
our nation." 



President William Kirwan 




College Of Journalism 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 



Photo by David Lip&man 



The University of Maryland College of Journalism was selected for the Hubert 
H. Humphrey Journalism Fellowship Program in which 17 international jour- 
nalists take part in a year-long academic and professional development pro- 
gram. The University was in competition with 11 other journalism schools 
nationally, and was selected to sponsor one of the two groups of journalism 
fellows coming to the United States. This was the first year for the program. 

The Humphrey Fellows were mid-career level journalists who were consid- 
ered outstanding in their profession. Reese Cleghorn, dean of the College of 
Journalism, said, "These were advanced journalism professionals who were out 
to strengthen their management and leadership skills and make professional 
contacts in the U.S. We can offer them a rich menu of experience and resources, 
and they will add a special international dimension to our student and faculty 
services." 

Robinson Makayi, one of the 17 Humphrey Fellows at Maryland, was a free- 
lance journalist, media consultant and president of the Press Association of 
Zambia. A journalist for five years with experience in both broadcast and print 
journalism, Makayi was especially interested in the freedom of the press issues 
and considered the location of the college of journalism to be very good. 

"Washington is the political center of the world. It is the best place to attain 
the on-hand experience of experience and the press," Makayi said. He also 
commented on the experience he had gained from the fellowship. "The Fellows 
consist of people from different countries with different backgrounds and 
experiences all coming together to share their knowledge." 

'Mnltilde Otf 




Photo by r^ul Vieira 

Top right - The Hubert H. Humphrey JournaUsm fellows gather 
for a meeting. Top right - Dean of the College of Journalism, 
Reese Cleghorn. Bottom - Karen Scrivo with coordinators and 
managers of the program. 



Programs of Study: 



Advertising 



Broadcast News 



News Editorial 
Magazine 

News 



Public Relations 



180 



College Of Life Sciences 




In the College of Life Sciences, students were given the opportu- 
nity to involve themselves with the most fundamental concepts of 
biology or the application of complex scientific processes intended 
to help with the improvement of life. 

The students in the college had the option of majoring in general 
biological sciences or the concentrations of Botany, Chemistry and 
Biochemistry, Entomology, Microbiology and Zoology. Pre- 
professional students had the opportunity to choose from fields 
such as pre-medicine or pre-veterinary medicine among others. 

Students and faculty in the college spent the year continuing 
with their research and production of scientific literature that was 
highly regarded. David Inouye, zoology, published a book titled 
Techniques for Pollination Biologists in June of 1993. Eugenie Clark, 
Zoology Professor Emerita, was bestowed with the 1993 President's 
Medal in recognition of her contributions to the university. 

Dealing with the ongoing phenomena of the field of science 
allowed for a great deal of variety to be achieved within the college. 
Faculty and Students were fortunate to be involved with a college 
that provided ample opportunities for success. 



All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 

Top - Scott Ruhreh, graduate assistant, does research for the college. Bottom left - Steve Crowe, senior biology major, shows his scientific stuff. Bottom right - (from 
left) Vernon Stewart, Ayana Colemane, Erin Taylor, Brian Layman and Kristin Sorenson dissect a cat in Anatomy and Physiology 201. 



Programs of Study: 



Biological Sciences 
Botany 



Chemistry And Biochemistry 
Entomology 



Microbiology 
Zoology 



181 



Creating College Success 



During the 1993-1994 academic year, 
many important events were taking 
place in the Colleges at the U:niversity 
of Maryland. UMCP's School of Public 
Affairs was named a member of the 
presitgious Association of Professioanl 
Schools of International Affairs, the 
only new school to be admitted this 
year. The College of Engineering 
celebrated its Centennial with a year of 
partying and recognition for the 
College. New buildings were under 
construction, such as the new Entomol- 
ogy and Horticlulture building. And a 
few new buildings were open to the 
public, such as the Center for Young 
Children. From every corner turned on 
campus or in a building, one could not 
help but be surrounded by new cre- 
ations and lots of success. 



This page; 

Top - Dean of Public Affairs, Michael Nacht. 
Bottom - The College of Engineering Admistrative 
Counci (from left): Front row - William K. Jenne, 
Dr. Herbert Rabin, Dr. George El Dieter, Dr. 
Marilyn Herman, Dr. Aris Christon, Ms. Rosemary 
Parker. 

Second row - Dr. Jayanta K. Sircar, Dr. James 
Colville, Dr. Steve Spivak, Dr. Evanghelos 
Zafirion, Dr. Davinder Anand, Dr. Larry Stewart. 
Third row - Dr. Horace Russell, Dr. William 
Destler, Dr. Richard Calabrese, Dr. Arnold Seigel, 
Dr. Davici Schmidt. 

Opposite page: 

Top - The new Center for Young Children. 

Bottom - Construction on the new entomology 

building. 



All photos this spread by Paul V 




182 




183 



A Wave Of Recognition 




It seemed like everyone knew a little 
something about the Greek Fraternities 
and Sororities, but when I mentioned that 
I was a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, I 
just encountered blank stares. As much as 
that may seem the typical college expres- 
sion, it showed also that many people did 
not know that Honor Societies existed at 
the University of Maryland. Those who 
did know were the proud members of over 
40 campus Honor Societies. 

Most Honor Societies at Maryland func- 
tioned to co-exist with the Colleges and 
Schools and enhance students' academic 
potential in a subject area. The Honor 
Societies also provided a social setting 
where students who shared a common 
academic interest could spend time with 
each other outside of a classroom setting 
while participating in a variety of activi- 
ties. Examples of such Honor Societies 
were Kappa Delta Pi for Education and 



Beta Gamma Sigma for Business and Man- 
agement. 

My own experience with Alpha Lambda 
Delta for Freshman Scholarship allowed me 
to better understand the purpose of Honor 
Societies at Maryland. The organization 
was designed to encourage all first year and 
transfer students to continue to excel aca- 
demically. As it was for me, I am sure that 
all the members of University Honor Societ- 
ies were truly gratified to be recognized for 
their abilities, whether they be academic, 
leadership, or service oriented. 

Academics were not the only element to 
these organizations. Leadership and ser- 
vice were significant factors as well. Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, for example, was estab- 
hshed "To recognize those who have at- 
tained a high standard of efficiency in five 
areas of collegiate activities..." Elizabeth 
Solomon, an alumni of ODK, claimed that 
her involvement with the Honor Society 



All photos this page by Paul Vieira 

had a very positive impact for her. She said, 
"My abilitv to have the positions in my 
career that 1 do have is thanks in large part 
to my involvement with Omicron Delta 
Kappa." 

I could only hope that at a University this 
large, with so many Honor Societies, that 
more students will realize the benefits of 
excelling academically and in all other areas 
that matter to them. And as a reward, the 
students should be truly honored to be in a 

Universitv Honor Society. 

- Robin Solomon 



^/^ve CO- Ma*t44- ut- t<VK!^ fuvit to- 



184 



Let The Truth Be Told 





mpi.-'^-'t"^^! 





- ■^*il..^i.i 









I love the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 
I couldn't have 
made a better 
choice. 
-Michelle Farrell 











0% o-ccccfrefca^^ 



The College of Journalism 
is one of the most out- 
standing in the country 
so of course I'd choose to 
go here. I'm going to be 
the next Connie Chung," 
-Diane Crespy 



185 



^pGANIZATlo^. 






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The Diamondback 




Back row (from left); Will Kuhns, Sandra Forester, Mike Berman, Tom Madigan, Drew Weaver. 
Middle row: Michael Morrison, Patricia Logue, Akweli Parker, Raja Mishra, Alexa Champion. 
Front row: Mara Stanley, Scott Silverstein, Dana Hedgpeth, David Breen, Chad Capellman. 



Plioto by Paul Vieira 



188 



Air Force ROTC 




"Leadership 

Excellence 

Starts Here " 

Air Force ROTC offers $4000 guaran- 
teed scholarships, $100 per month and 
$27,000 salary upon graduation. Benefits 
apply to qualified Junior and Senior year 
cadets. Other scholarships are available 
to cjualified students. 

Students can get information about 
ROTC programs by calling 314-3242 or 
visiting the office at 2126 Cole Field 
House. 



189 



Eta Kappa Nu 



I 



Eta Kappa Nu, The National 
Electrical Engineering Honor 
Society's 1993-1994 officers 
were: Heather Kovarik, Soma 
Sau, Geoffrey Boyers, Nilanthi 
Fernando, Steve Hong and 
Rodolfo Bonacci. 

Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) did 
community service projects 
such as tutoring and visits to 
the Mar\'land Food Bank. Plus, 
HKN promoted the goals of 
electrical engineering through 
aiding the dean's office and 
visiting local schools. 




PRSSA: 



In 1994, the University of Maryland 
saw the growth of a strong and active 
chapter of the Public Relations Student 
Society of America{PRSSA). 

This year's PRSSA gained hands-on PR 
experience and interacted with profes- 
sionals from the Baltimore-Washington 
area. Members were paired with PR 
professionals and visited various firms in 
the area. 

Back Row; Jenni Wallace-Journalism Council 
Rep., Michael Saks, Michael Nattel, Suzanne 
Frattaroli, Shelly Schiuartz, Holly Cass, Jennifer Mix. 

Caryn Sagal-President, Linda Hon-Faculty 
Advisor. 

Front Row: Jennie Swain-Vice President, 
Michelle Demma-National Liaison, Gina Jun- 
Secretar}', Eric Updegraff-Publicity, Amy Ewing- 
Membership, Kristen Johnson, Kristy Smith - 
Treasurer. 



Public Relations Student 
Society of America 




190 



Mitzpeh 



09k ^ 0^ ^ 




Eclipse 




Mitzpeh 1993-1994 staff- Top Row: Chris 
Layton, Managing Editor- Laurie Solomon, Mike 
Scheinberg, Mike Breitstein, Ed Shnekendorf. 

Middle Row: Barak Hamami, Editor-in-Chief- 
Dana Steinberg, Naomi Greengrass, Caryn Sagal. 

Bottom Row: Naomi Harris, Cheryl Sollars, Rani 
Einziger, Heather Schloss. 

Camera Shy: Wendy Schneider, Shana Myers, 
Mike Hetrick. 



ECLIPSE, the Black student magazine 
of the University of Maryland, aimed to 
uplift , awaken and intellectually provoke 
the African American community. We 
supported all that was positive and 
denounced all that impeded the progress 
of the Black community. 

Front Row: (from left) Leslie D. Hubbard-Copy 
Editor, Regina I. Murrell-Staff Writer 

Second Row: Vonda M. Jones-Staff Writer, Imani 
L. Panton-Staff Writer, Kera M. Ritter-Executive 
Editor, Shanon D. Murray-Editor-in-Chief, Derrick 
L. Jones-Photographer 

Third Row: Eric Amo-Gottfried-Photographer, 
Angela D. Saunders-Staff Writer, Eric E. Mavo- 
Photography Editor, Carlo T. Paul- Copy Editor 



All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



191 



Maryland Media, Inc. 




Photo by Paul Vieira 

Members of the Maryland Media Board of Directors (Back row, from left): Michael Fribush, Treasurer; Ira Allen, President; Steve Lamphier, Member-at-Large 
Dahrm Guruswamv,' Student-at-Large, Chet Rhodes, Faculty Member, Michelle Singletary, Member-at-Large. Front row: Drew Weaver, Dmmondback Editor: Eve 
Klindera, Student-at-Large; Dana Steinberg, Mitzpeh Editor; Gina Dugan, Tcrmpm Editor, Shanon Murray, Eclipse Editor, Maggie Levy, Secretary. 

Maryland Media marked its twenty-second year as the non-profit organization that owned and operated the Diamomiback, Terra- 
pin, Mi'tzpeh and Eclipse publications. These publications were overseen by a Board of Directors that strove to provide a professional 
environment for students who were interested in the print media. The objective of the board was not to censor or influence content 
of a publication, but to provide guidance and advice when needed to the editors of these publications. 

Editors of all the publications" had to be full-time students. They had complete control and maintained full responsibility for the 
publications they produced, and they also served on the Board of Directors. 



192 



Office of the Vice President for 

Student Affairs 



The Division of Student Affairs held responsibility for the coordination 
and direction of a variety of student services and student development 
programs. The Vice President's office served as an advocate for student 
issues and concerns within the administration of the campus and the 
university. The Vice President, in conjunction with the departments in the 
division, promoted the individual development of all students, activities, 
campus-wide events and the addressing of environmental issues that 
affected campus life. 

Top left - Dr. William L. Thomas, Jr., Vice President for Student Affairs. Top center - Dr. Drury 
Bagwell, Assistant Vice President. Top right - Dr. Richard Stimpson, Assistant Vice President. 
Bottom left - Dr. Janet Schmidt, Assistant to the Vice President. Bottom center - Sharon Fries- 
Britt, Assistant to the Vice President. Bottom right - Dr. Gretchen Vanderveer, Assitant to the 
Vice President. 




193 



Commuter Affairs 

Director: Dr. Barbara Jacoby 



It all began with only a shoebox full of 
cards listing housing and two vans, bought 
second-hand by the SGA to provide secu- 
rity service on campus. 

In 1993, over twenty years later, the 
shoebox had been transformed into a com- 
puterized off-campus housing referral ser- 
vice. The two vans grew into the 40-bus 
Shuttle-Um system. The familiar red-and- 
white buses provided reliable service to 
students on 10 commuter routes, four 



evening security routes, and Call-a-Ride. In 
addition, OCA provided students with in- 
formation on transportation alternatives and 
other commuter issues. 

OCA also sponsored a number of pro- 
grams to assist students in getting more 
involved in the life of campus. The S.H.O. W. 
(Students Helping, Orienting and Welcom- 
ing) program matched upperclass students 
with incoming freshmen to help the new 
students "learn the ropes." On Wednesday 



mornings, commuter students enjoyed cof- 
fee, doughnuts, and information at the 
"Good Morning, Commuters!" program. 
UMaps guided students in "finding them- 
selves" at UMCP by matching their interests 
with involvement opportunities. 

The newest addition to the office was 
Community Service Programs. Here, stu- 
dents learned about many opportunities for 
involvement in volunteer and community 
service individually or as part of a group. 




University Health Center 

Director: Dr. Margaret Bridwell 



The University Health Center (UHC) 
was committed to providing high quality 
health care. They were an ambulatory 
care center offering professional medical 
care to treat illness and injuries, and 
health education programs to help you 
maintain and improve your health. The 
UHC provided the following confidential 
services: dental clinic, men's clinic, 
women's clinic, allergy clinic, sports 
medicine, physical therapy, nutrition 
education, mental health clinic, social 
services, substance abuse treatment, 
anonymous HIV/AIDS testing, radiol- 
ogy, a laboratory and a pharmacy. 

Top left - Shuttle UM's Safety Training Manager Drew 
Venters and Coordinator Mike Adams receive the 
Neil E. Goldschmidt Achievement Award from the 
American Public Transit Association for the second 
year in a row. Top right - The staff of the Office of 
Commuter Affairs surround director Dr. Barbara 
Jacoby (third from left in front) at a celebration of 20 
years of ser\'ing UMCP's commuter students. Center 
right - Dr. Margaret Bridwell, Director of UHC. Bot- 
tom - The Health Center staff, ready to serve. 



Individual and group health education 
programs were available on topics such as 
sexual health and contraception, date rape, 
stress management, substance abuse, 
dental health, eating disorders, and 
depression and suicide. Services have 
been expanded this year to include 
massage therapy and a 24-hour hotline for 
survivors of sexual assault and rape. All 
currently registered students were eligible 
for care. 





194 



Campus Recreation Services 

Director: Mr. Jay Gilchrist 



The Department of Campus Recreation 
Services was established to provide a 
variety of programs and services that 
contributed to the health and well-being 
of the University of Maryland commu- 



nity. The mission of the department was 
to educate participants on the responsible 
use of leisure by providing an atmosphere 
that fostered the development of lifelong 
patterns of recreational activity and 




provided opportunities for participation 
for all members of the University commu- 
nity. 

Campus Recreation Services offered: 
an Intramural Sports Program, a Sport 
Club Program, Open Recreation, and a 
Fitness/Wellness Program. All of these 
programs were designed to offer an 
opportunity for students to participate in 
either individual or team sports, as well as 
an opportunity to improve and maintain 
physical fitness. 




Counseling Center 

Director: Dr. Vivian Boyd 



The Counseling Center provided 
comprehensive integrated services to 
meet the mental health and developmen- 
tal needs of students. The Center was 
considered one of the premier counseling 
centers in the nation, based on its quality 
services, research on student development 



issues, national standing based on its 
members assuming leadership roles in 
scholarship and national professional 
associations, and its role in teaching and 
advanced graduate student training. 
More than 25%. of each class of graduates 
from the University used the campus 




Counseling Center. Counseling services 
were free for students. 

State licensed psychologists provided 
counseling for students individually, in 
groups and through workshops. Counsel- 
ing was available to overcome depression, 
career indecisiveness, anxiety, loneliness 
and other problems experienced by 
students. 

For most students, the university years 
occur during a time of rapid personal 
growth in a context that by definition 
stresses exposure to new ideas, different 
world views, cultures, values and life 
styles. The Counseling Center enabled 
students to overcome learning blocks, 
anxieties, confusion and indecision, 
helping them to get the most of the 
university experience and to achieve their 
goals. 

Top left - The Campus Recreation staff. Top right - The 
successful UM Wa ter Polo Club is one of over 25 sports 
clubs sponsored by CRS. Bottom - The Counseling 
Center staff. 



195 



Department of Campus Parking 

Director: David Allen 



The Department of Campus Parking (DCP) was the place to go when students, faculty, 
staff and visitors wanted to park their vehicles on campus. This department processed 
55,000 permits in order to effectively manage the parking areas on campus. Upholding the 
UMCP Parking Rules and Regulations through education, engineering and enforcement 
was another function of DCP. The staff developed new programs and promoted policies 
to help the campus community. Parking data was provided to students through a campus 
map, brochures, fliers, articles and advertisements in the campus newspaper. 

Two new programs were offered this year. DCP introduced a new permit, the "Do It 
Yourself Permit." One or more permits could be purchased in advance and the user could 
fill in the dates when needed. DCP also initiated a program to benefit evening visitors to 
campus. This program allowed visitors to park without a permit between 4:00 PM. - 7:00 
AM Monday through Friday, and on weekends in many lots on campus. 





Judicial Programs Office 



Director: Dr. Gary Pavela 



The primary function of the Office of Judicial Programs 
was to resolve disciplinary referrals filed against students 
efficiently and equitably. The office staff determined disci- 
plinary charges and interviewed and advised all parties in- 
volved in disciplinary proceedings. The most serious cases 
were resolved by student judiciary boards which were com- 
prised of four groups: The Central Judicial Board, The Stu- 
dent Honor Council, Community Advocates, and Student 
Parking Appeals. Although each group differed sUghtly in 
their perspective, they worked to educate other students 
about their rights and responsibilities as members of the 
campus community. 

The Judicial Programs staff trained and advised the stu- 
dent judiciary, reviewed all decisions of the judicial boards, 
maintained student disciplinary records and conducted re- 
search and analysis regarding student conduct. Through 
honesty, respect, and sensitivity, the Office of Judicial Pro- 
grams served to maintain the educational mission of the 
University by designing policies, conducting programs, and 
offering instruction that contributed to the intellectual and 
moral development of the entire student body. 




196 



Resident Life 

Director: Dr. Patricia Mielke 




The Department of Resident Life was re- 
sponsible for management of the residence 
halls as well as for cultural, educational, 
recreational and social programming activi- 
ties in the residence halls. A staff of under- 
graduate and graduate employees helped to 
meet the needs of resident students. 

On-campus housing/dining was readily 
available for all undergraduate students in 
35 undergraduate residence halls. All-male, 
all-female and coeducational living arrange- 
ments were available in the halls, which ac- 
commodated from 34 to 575 residents. Most 
new students were assigned to traditional 
residence halls. Apartments for four to six 
students and kitchenless suites for four to 
eight students were available for upper class 
students. 



Top-Dr Patrica Mielke Bottom- Residential Facilities staff 



Residential Facilities 

Director: Mr. Jon Dooley 

Use wisely what you've learned here to build a better tomorrow for all people. 
With best wishes for success and good fortune. 




From the Staff of Residential Facilities 



197 



Dining Services 

Director: Matthew Sheriff 



The Department of Dining Services 
served over 4 million meals this year to 
the College park Campus community. 
This year students on campus consumed 
over 65,000 pounds of roast beef, a quarter 
of a million hamburgers, 333,000 dough- 
nuts and over a million cookies from 34 
restaurants and eateries across campus. 




Campus Guest Services 
Dr. Pat Perfetto 



Campus guest services was the 
University's host to the thousands of guests 
and visitors who came to the University this 
year. 

We greeted about 12,000 visitors at the 
Visitor Center, located in "The Dairy" on 
Route 1. 45% of our visitors sought admis- 
sions information; The Visitor Center staff 
assured that these potential future students 
had a good first impression of the Univer- 
sity. 

We provided lodging, meals, meeting 



space and a variety of other services to 
about 30,000 guests who attended summer 
conferences, competitions, workshops and 
camps. About half these guests were teens 
who may someday think of their summer 
experience at Maryland in deciding where 



to attend college. 

Finally, Campus Guest Services coordi- 
nated the Memorial Chapel and the hun- 
dreds of weddings that occured there this 
year. Many of our newlyweds were recent 
graduates. 




198 



k 

Top left - a chef prepares the dining hall feast. Top right - Matt Sheriff, Director of Dining Services. Center left - Enjoying the food. Center right - 
waitress serves the food. Bottom left - Pat Perfetto, Director of Campus Guest Services. Bottom right - Pat Perfetto, Director and Susan Warren, 
Assistant Director, with several new students. 



• •xmxnxix.tLi.ttlfffCC 
STUDENT UNION = 



Stamp Student Union and Campus Programs 

Director: Dr. James Osteen 

The Adele H. Stamp Student Union served as the center of 
campus hfe for the entire University community. Over its 40-year 
history, the Union grew from a small recreation center into the 
prominent source of social, education, and recreational activity for 
the campus. This year, the Union provided a diverse range of 
programs and services used by over 19,000 people daily. Such 
programs varied from comedy in Nite Life to guided weekend trips 
and campus-wide social events, such as the annual All-Niter. The 
Union housed the University Book Center and Campus Programs 

as well as the Hoff Theater, the Art Cen- 
ter, the Recreation Center, and shops and 
restaurants; all of which provided a wel- 
come relief from academic pressures. 
Campus Programs featured services for 
student organization, involvement and 
leadership development opportunities, 
and advising for campus fraternities and 
sororities. The Union was also a source of 
education, with students gaining work 
experience and learning lifetime leader- 
ship skills through employment and ser- 
vice in the Union's many programming 
committees and organizations. 




Orientation 

Director: Dr. Gerry Strumpf 



The Orientation Office was responsible 
for easing the transition for new students 
into our community at Maryland. The Ori- 
entation Advisors and PR staff were trained 
students who provided personal experi- 



ences and suggestions to incoming students. 
Through Orientation, students met other 
incoming students, registered for classes 
and were introduced to services and re- 
sources on campus. The Orientation Office 



served all undergraduates new to the cam- 
pus. The Locater Service, offered the first 
two days of class, and the one-credit orien- 
tation course EDCP 108-O were also coordi- 
nated by our office. 















iri 




'^^^ 




Top left - The Stamp Student Union. Top right - Dr. James Osteen, Director of the Stamp Student Union. Bottom left - The 1993-1994 Orientation 
Advisors. Bottom right - Dr. Gerry Strumpf, Director of Orientation. 



199 



Omicron Delta Kappa 



Omicron Delta Kappa National Leader- 
ship Honor Society was founded at Wash- 
ington and Lee University in 1914. Its pur- 
pose was to recognize leadership of excep- 
tional quality in five fields of endeavor; 
Scholarship; Athletics; Campus or Commu- 
nity Service, Social, Religious Activities and 
Campus Government; JournaHsm, Speech, 
and the Mass Media; and Creative and Per- 
forming Arts. ODK also worked to inspire 
others to strive for similar goals; to bring 
together the most representative students 
in all phases of collegiate life and create an 
organization which would help to mold the 
sentiment of the institution; to provide an 
ongoing relationship for the alumni mem- 
bers of ODK with the University; and to 
bring together members of the faculty and 
student body of the institution. 

Sigma Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa 
was founded on campus in 1927 and has 
initiated over 2,000 students and faculty, as 
well as many permanent honorary mem- 
bers. This year, the honorary initiate was 
Congresswoman Constance Morella .Sigma 
Circle's activities included raising money to 
construct the ODK Fountain on McKeldin 
Mall, sponsoring the Annual Awards Ban- 
quet, awarding the Sophomore Leader of 
the Year and Top Ten Freshmen, and grant- 
ing an annual scholarship to an incoming 
freshman who was an outstanding high 
school leader. 

Top - Initiatiates and members of ODK, including 
Congresswoman Constance Morella (front center). 
Center - ODK Fountain on McKeldin Mall. Bottom left 
- The ODK initiation ceremony. Bottom right - 1993- 
1994 ODK officers: (Front row, from left) Meg Crosby, 
Dawn Pisani, Jordan Goldstein, Tanya Jones, Mike 
Leotta. Back row - Drury Bagwell, Martin Zerwitz, 
Marc Solomon, Amy Laubach. 





Photo by Paul Vieira 



200 



Sigma Kappa 




Photo by Paul Vieira 

Sigma Kappa excelled in many ways this year both as a social organization and as a sisterhood. They received numerous awards 
for outstanding pledge education and rush. They also received many awards for being ranked number one in scholarship of all 
fraternities and sororities for the second year in a row. 

Such achievements were accomplished not by just a few key members, but by each sister working together to promote their 
strong organization. This teamwork was contagious, as they went on to win numerous Homecoming and Greek Week special events 
with their partners, Theta Chi and Phi Kappa Sigma, respectively. 

1993 proved to be a strong year for the sisterhood itself as well. As of the Fall semester, they were the largest house on campus. 
They staged many sisterhood events, such as a trip to Gennessee Valley ropes course, not to mention Spring and Fall formals. In all, 
Sigma Kappa achieved the excellence this year that it always strives for... excellence not only on the social plane, but also on the 
levels of sisterhood and academics. 



201 



German Club 




Organization of Arab Students 




All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



202 



Phi Eta Sigma 




Phi Eta Sigma is a national honor 
society which recognizes academic 
achievement during a student's first year 
in college. Our 1993-1994 season began 
with a successful initiation and reception 
ceremony of 149 new members, in which 
Dr. Daniel Fallon, University of 
Maryland's Vice President for Academic 
Affairs and Provost, was our keynote 
speaker, addressing the topic of service 
and education. Other events consisted of 
volunteering at community shelters and 
soup kitchens, as well as monthly meet- 
ings and other service projects. 

Left to right front row: Leslie Belloso, 
Eve Klindera, Eden Rome, Suzana Pereira 
(President), Christina Addabbo. Second 
row: Kate Roth, Jenn Sampson, Sundai 
LaGreca, Dr. Mary Cothran (Faculty 
Adviser), Rebecca Rodgers (Treasurer). 
Third Row: Stephen Kim, Ken LaSala 
(Vice President), Letitia Cavalieri, Bill 
Voshell (Secretary), Alison Smith. Last 
row: Robert Holsopple, Andrew Barto, 
Gregory J. Koeser. 



Diamondback Business Office 




Back row (from left) - I.lmIi Mooic, April sic\ enson, Maggie Levy, Elaine Gast. Front row - Patricia Shea, Ayse Tokbay, Tina Brown. 



Tau Beta Pi 



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Tau Beta Pi is the na- 
tional engineering honor 
cnriptv The Marland Beta 


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chapter has distinguished 
itself bv receiving the out- 


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standing chapter award 10 
times and honorable men- 
tions 13 times. The 1993- 
1994 officers included: 
Carol Hamner, Laura 


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Dennv, Dan Weile, Ofer 


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Cohen, Allison Rossi, 
Eleanor Hsu and Judy 
Goldman. 




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International Student Council 

ISC 




Above (from left) - Roshanti Wickramatillake, Tamanna Qureshi, Hoda Atia, Ahmad Mudallali, Helene Yan, Miguel Oliveira, Ghazaleh Zardoost. 
All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 

204 



Diamondback Advertising Staff 




Panhellenic Association 




Front row (from left) - Heather Kravitz, Lara Cooke, Jennifer Joyce, Yang Chang. Back row (from left) - Jenna Letzler, Dana Lowenstein, Jennifer Mix. 



205 



Interfraternity Council 



The Interfraternity Council 
was the governing body of all 
social fraternities at the 
University of Maryland. They 
saw to it that events like Rush 
and Rush Expo were success- 
ful, in addition to insuring that 
parties were held within 
regulations and monitoring 
non-alcoholic events. 

Back row (from left) - Heath Rodman, 
Keven McKenzie, Howard Soypher, 
David Bloch, Marc Greenburg. 
Front row - Mike Thornburg, David 
Stollman (president), an NIC 
Representative, and Eric Gallun. 




206 




207 




Photo bv Joanne Saidman 



^ ti(Ufe o| iihitu 



In the beginning... there were Greeks. 
Here at Maryland, the grand tradition of 
Greek life was over a century old, but still 
alive and well in 1993... offering its 
members a world of opportunity. The 
Panhellenic Association, the Inter-Frater- 
nity Council and the Panhellenic Council 
made up the three executive boards of 
social Greek-letter organizations. 

Fraternity and sorority life provided 
students with experiences they could 
never get in class. For example, Greeks at 
Maryland were involved in many differ- 



ent types of philanthropies. Some organi- 
zations that benefited from the help of the 
Greeks were the National Committee for 
the Prevention of Child Abuse, the 
National Kidney Foundation, the Ameri- 
can Heart Association and many more. 
Fraternity and sorority members worked 
hard through their chapters to help 
others. Throughout the year, members 
were seen participating in an array of 
various activities to help each other's 
respective philanthropies. 

Greeks participated in many events 



with other Greeks. The annual competi- 
tions of Homecoming and Greek Week 
were two highlights in the year's Greek 
calendar. During those two weeks, as 
well as at times throughout the year, 
members exibited the spirit and unity that 
was representative of Greek life. 

Greeks at Maryland continued to be an 
important part of the campus community. 
The tradition of Greek life was strong and 
the members of the fraternities and 
sororities have proven that they are a 
"Wave of Unity." 








Photo bv Paul Vieira 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



THE 



WAR BEGINS... 



GREEK WEEK 1993 

The "War Began" for Greek Week '93 as 
sororities and fraternities were matched 
up in competition. During the week of 
April 18 through April 24 the match-ups, 
along with their chosen super-hero 
mascots, competed and partied in tradi- 
tional Maryland fashion. 

Greek Week has always been a part of 
the spring semester, and this year Greeks 
participated in a series of exhilarating 
activities. The Greek Olympics, a lip sync 
contest and a dance competition were 
among the group competitions. Winning 
match-ups added points to their overall 
total scores during those activities. 
Match-ups also achieved points during 
the tournament style volleyball, softball 
and ultimate frisbee competitions. 

In Greek tradition, philanthropy played 
a large role during Greek Week '93. The 
week started with a 24-hour vigil to 
remember the Holocaust. Greeks read 
names of those who died and poems to 
remember for the duration of the vigil. 
The campus police also helped as the 
competed with a team made up of Greeks 
from all different houses in a basketball 

- continued next page 




210 




War continues... 

game for charity. The event, called "The 
Clash at Cole," benefited AIDS research. 
Also, all Greeks worked during the week 
to raise awareness for needy children. 
The week ended with a concert on 
Fraternity Row. Everyone just relaxed 
and listened to the music after the exciting 
week. The final scores were announced at 
the conclusion of Greek Week at the 
Rededication Ceremony, held at the Hoff 
Theater. The match-up of Zeta Tau 
Alpha, Sigma Phi Epsilon and Beta Theta 
Pi won the overall competition. 

- Joanne Snidman 




Opposite page: 

Top - Sigma Delta Tau, Phi Sigma Kappa and Delta 
Kappa Epsilon showing immeasurable spirit at the 
Lip Sync. Bottom left - An Alpha Phi getting down. 
Bottom right - Serving up a good time at the 
volleyball tournament. 

This page: 

Top left - Jonny Le moving in to score at the "Clash 
at Cole." Top right - hanging out on the row at the 
end of the week. Center - One of the bands that 
entertained hundreds of students at the "Concert on 
the Row." Bottom - "Hold On," it's Sigma Kappa's 
Gina Dugan, Tara O'Brien, Michelle Aloi and Julie 
Manning at the Lip Sync. 



Photo by Paul Vieira 



211 



Greeks Steppin' It Up 



It was a day that promised to be sunny, 
hot and full of fun, a day that promised to 
be perfect for the LaPlata Beach Step 
Show. Although it was on a Saturday, 
many students came out to enjoy the 
activities. Students were able to browse 
through book stands and tables that had 
been set up with purchasable items such 
as t-shirts, hats, purses and jewelry. And 
to top off the event, there was free food 
and drink for everyone. By the time the 
step show actually got started (a couple 
hours behind schedule), there was a 
considerable crowd of hot and anxious 
students waiting to see some serious 
stepping by the participating fraternities 
and sororities: Alpha Omega Alpha, 
Delta Sigma Theta, Alpha Kappa Alpha, 
Kappa Alpha Psi, Sigma Gamma Rho, 
Zeta Phi Beta, and Phi Beta Sigma. 

The step show opened with a religious 
message from the black-and-white 
adorned Alpha Omega Alpha. Amidst 
their steps, the audience could hear their 
message of brotherhood and faith. The 
organization's somber message was 
somewhat broken by the laughter of the 
audience after someone yelled, "It's not 
Sunday and we're not here to hear a 



sermon." But undaunted. Alpha Omega 
Alpha finished their steps, with much 
applause and appreciation from the 
audience. The sororities were all definite 
crowd pleasers, with their sharp outfits 
and rhythmic moves to their own rendi- 
tions of some of the more popular songs. 
Their songs were entertaining and got 
loud cheers of appreciation from members 
of the sororities who were there as 
support for the steppers. The brothers of 
Kappa Alpha Psi also received many roars 
of approval from the crowd. These 
steppers used decorative canes to help 
with their step, and for the most part, they 
were very accurate and skillful in the use 
of the canes throughout their routine. 
However, a couple of times the canes 
broke and one even tlew into the crowd, 
amidst some laughing and covered heads. 

Although the Step Show was late in 
getting started and the day was extremely 
hot, a large number of students came to 
the show. Of course, the nature of the 
student body being as it is, it would have 
taken a great deal more than heat to keep 
most students away from free food and 
free fun, especially when the fun included 
seeing some of the best steppers around. 

- '^iacey Brooks 





All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



212 



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213 



Panhellenic Association 's 



Sorority Rush: "Just Do It" 

Imffl 



Wliat is it in our nature 

that makes us YEARN to EXCEL? 

Wliat makes it so imfortant to 

HELP otJiers and stand out as 

INDIVIDUALS? 

WJiat is it that makes us desire 

acceptance, 

but still allows us to BE OURSELVES? 

As Women... It's important to 

CHALLENGE our HORIZONS 

and stand behind one another's 

DECISIONS, GOALS & BELIEFS. 

Wlmt offers us all of this? 



RUSH 



JUST DOIT 




Above - A reproduction of the design on the Rush 
promotional t-shirt, which was worn by every sorority 
member at Maryland to encourage freshmen and sopho- 
mores to become a part of Greek Ufe. 



This page: 

Top - The 1993 Rho Chi's (Rush Counselors) in front of the armory. Bottom left - Jennifer Hahn of Delta 
Phi Epsilon takes a break wliile she waits for her rush group. Bottom right - Rushees leaving Phi Sigma 
Sigma after Tours. 

Opposite page: 

Top - A Rho Chi had to clearly identify herself so her new rush group could find her. Bottom left - Some 
rushees took advantage of the ten-minute break between houses to find their way around. Bottom left - 
Making decisions at invitation pick-ups was slightly less difficult with a Rho Chi to help you. 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



214 




XkMu^k HIS iye(... 

It was the summer of '93, the 
campus and town seemed quiet, it was 
the week before classes and everywhere 
seemed Ufeless. Then classes began and 
one could sense tlie time was near. But 
the familiar chants and movements of the 
lawn dances... where were they? Banned 
or gone forever? The Fall of '93 saw a 
tradition vanish, but the spirit remained. 

I was among 640 plus young 
ladies all geared up for the arduous days 
ahead. Loaded with classes, these ladies 
made sacrifices to seek what Sorority Life 
entailed. The whole affair started with 
the Rush Expo, where all who were 
interested signed up. Then, the fun 
started. An hour before the Rushees 
came, the Panhellenic Association 
("Panhel") and Rush Counselors ("Rho 
Chi's") met to ready themselves for the 
massive undertaking. There on that 
fateful Saturday, the Rushees gathered in 
their respective groups headed by a Rho 
Chi. Before I knew it, they had arrived at 
the Armory to start the journey. 

Like an army readying for battle, 
the Rho Chis, in the role of^ lieutenants, 
lead their rush groups, like platoons, to 
Fraternity Row and the Graham Cracker. 
Meanwhile, Panhel, almost like generals, 
tendecl to their business and made sure 
that everything ran smoothly. We 
arrived at the Row and the first house to 
visit. The group waited, then the 
pounding at the door came and the Rush 
Chairwoman came out to invite the 
Rushees in. 

As the Rushees walked up the 
steps into the house they heard the 
sisters chant their Sorority song and then 
the door closed. What happened behind 
these closed doors shall remain a mystery 
except for those who have been through 
Rush. 

-Paul Vieira 



Photo by Joanne Saidman 



215 



Interfraternity Council Rush 

It Doesn H Get Any Better Than This 




jf 







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> r> 

TV <^ 

.'4 ^ 



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Creatmg Alternatives : 

dry rush 

When it came to secrecy, chaos was 
the best cover. UnUke Sorority Rush, 
Fraternity Rush had its own plan of 
attraction. The rules were simple, try 
anything to get guys to come... well, almost 
anything. 

Fraternity Rush never had any set 
organization as compared to its counterpart. 
Sorority Rush. In the Rush of years gone by, 
one could have counted on getting free 
liquor. But how the times did change. "Dry 
Rush" became a way of life; it clearly meant 
no alcohol at any Rush event. This gave 
every Fraternity an equal opportunity to 
come up with ingenious ways to attract 
Rushees besides their reputations of being 
"Party Animals." 

The whole affair started at the Rush 
Expo where all intrigued could sign up. 
Then, the 20 or so Fraternities posted their 
events in the Diamondback along with the 
Rush Chairman's name and number. The 
listed events ranged from theme nights to 
dinners with Sororities. Some of the 
programs were genuine covers to deceive 
(continued next page) 

216 




\ll phutu^ this pa^L' b> Juanne Saidman 




Photo bv Paul Vifir.i 




Photo by Joanne 5aidman 

(continued) 

any non Rushees. Some of the Rushees 
found out that ALCOHOL was not the only 
way to have fun. With no hard set rules any 
means possible were used... within reason. 

Rushees may have still gotten the 
chance to experience the infamous "Frat 
Parties," since they occurred on Friday and 
Saturday nights. These happened to be the 
two days of convenience that the Fraternities 
had no Rush events sponsored. Most 
fraternities used the parties to allow the 
Rushees the opportunity to get acquainted 
with the Fraternity system on a personal 
level. 

With all said and done, chaos could 
be considered to be part of the tradition; 
especially when Fraternities still exist and 
the Rush system has transformed into a 
"DRY RUSH." 

- Paul Vieim 

Opposite page: 

Top left - Alpha Epsilon Pi's Brett Le\inson and Lou 

Wing at the Rush Expo. Top right - ZBT's play soccer 

on the Row. Bottom - Sigma Phi Epsilon showing off 

their symbol of brotherhood. 

This page: 

Top left - a brother in Sig Ep shows off at a basketball 

tournament \vith rushees. Top right - Delta Tau Delta 

pledges learn what fraternity life is all about after rush 

when the\' pledge. Bottom - Rushees hanging out with 

some A-E-Pi brothers. 



Photo bv Geoffrey T. Chesman 



217 



Homecoming 1993: 

There's No Place Like 



"The Terp football game, the 
sporting events, the parties, the 
talent show - I could go on for- 
ever. Homecoming '93 was good 
old American fun!" exclaimed 
junior Kelli Rothman. 

Homecoming week was Oc- 
tober 10 through October 17. 
Many activities and a high par- 
ticipant turn-out characterized 
homecoming this year. The Big 
Wheel race peaked many stu- 
dents' curiosity, while others en- 
joyed the volleyball tournament 
and the pep rally. Many stu- 
dents joined the alumni that re- 
tvirned for the weekend at Santa 
Fe, Bentley's, and other restau- 
rants and bars on "the route." 
Compiled, these activities made 
the homecoming theme, "There's 
No Place Like Home," come to 
life. 

"Homecoming was amazing. 
Only one thing could have made 
it better," commented student Ed 
Walasik. "Can't they cancel 
classes that week?" 

- Laura Green 



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Sticde*tt 




liuto bv Ptiul Vieira 



218 




Photo by Paul Vieir<i 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



HOME 

RESULTS 

Overall Winners 

Alpha Omicron Pi and 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Tri-Delt, AZD and 

FIJI 

ZTA, KA and 

Phi Kappa Tau 

Phi Sigma Sigma and 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Sfirit 

Tri-Delt, AZD and 

FIJI 

Alpha Omicron Pi and 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Phi Sigma Sigma and 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Kappa Alpha Theta, 

Sigma Nu and Delta Tau Delta 

Talent Shozv 

Alpha Omicron Pi and 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Alpha Chi Omega, 

A-E-Pi and Pi Kappa Phi 

Alpha Delta Pi, ZBT and 

Delta Chi 

Phi Sigma Sigma and 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

tied with Sigma Delta Tau and 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Olympics 

ZTA, KA and 

Phi Kappa Tau 

Alpha Omicron Pi and 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Alpha Chi Sigma 

(Chemistry Fraternity) 

Kappa Delta and 

Sigma Chi 

tied with Delta Phi Epsilon, 

Phi Delta Theta and TKE 

Philanthrcipi/ 

Alpha Omicron Pi and 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Tri-Delt, AZD and 

FIJI 

ZTA, KA and 

Phi Kappa Tau 

Three-way tie: 

DSP and Gamma Phi Beta 

DG, Phi Kap, and Kap Sig 

Alpha Phi and TEP 



HM 



219 




Sororities and fraternities at The 
University of Maryland at College Park 
and at universities nationwide with Greek 
systems participated in raising money for 
philanthropies this year. The particular 
philanthropy was selected by the national 
Greek fraternity or sorority. Sigma Delta 
Tau's philanthropy, for example, was 
helping raise awareness and money for 
the prevention of child abuse. All chap- 
ters of Sigma Delta Tau represent this 
cause. 

Many different activities were done to 
raise money for the individual philanthro- 
pies. Volleyball tournaments, clothing 
drives, and holiday parties were just the 
beginning. All sororities and fraternities, 
as well as Maryland students took part in 
these activities. Many activities took place 
during Homecoming and Greek Week, 
but most were held throughout the year. 

Akeeba Saeedi, a junior in Alpha Chi 
Omega, commented, "philanthropies are a 
great part of the Greek system. I only 
wish this positive aspect would get more 
coverage on a media level. Chapters give 
a lot to these causes and the Greek system 
should get positive recognition for it. 
Everyone should participate though; 
sometimes all it takes is donating an 
outgrown skirt. Every little bit helps and 
it makes you feel great!" 

- ]oanne Saidman 



All photos this page by Paul Vieira 




CREATING HOPE FOR 

OTHERS 



220 












Photo bv Joanne Saidman 



Photo by Paul Vjeira 




Tfiilantfiropies are a 

great -part of the (jree(<i | 

system. I oniy zvisfi 

this -positive aspect 

would get more 

coverage on a media 

level. 

Junior j 
J^fpfia Chi Omega 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



221 



ALL 



Fraternity and sorority members ended 
both the fall and spring semesters with 
chapter formals. The tradition of formals 
goes back to when chapters first came to 
Maryland over 50 years ago, when 
members got all dressed up and took 
dates to a special, magical place for a 
grand evening. Although the old ball 
gowns were replaced with hipper (and 
shorter or tighter) dresses and the men's 
suits became more casual (some went as 
far as to wear shorts, a dress shirt, tie, and 
bucs) the tradition continued in full 
strength. 

Formals were a chance for sisters or 
brothers to be and look their best, to party 
hard and yet retain a little more class than 
the normal weekend parties would offer. 
Needless to say, thev still had plenty of 
good times and took home memories on 
those nights that thev will ne\'er forget. 





222 




All photos this page by Joanne Saidman 

223 




Greek life at the University of Maryland 
at College Park in the 1992-1993 school year 
offered members a lot. Not only did the 
Greeks participate in their own chapter ac- 
tivities and inter-fraternal events, they also 
excelled in academic and leadership are- 
nas. 

For example, The Order of Omega, the 
Greek Honor Society, inducted its new mem- 
bers in November. Fraternity and sorority 
members were eligible to be part of Order of 
Omega if they met several criteria: the 
student needed to be at least a junior, have 
a grade point average that was higher than 
the all-female or the all-male average in the 
university, and they had to display leader- 
ship in various aspects of student life. 

Greeks did well in the area of academics. 
The all-sorority GPA was higher than the 
all-campus women's GPA. Sigma Kappa 
Sorority had the highest GPA among all the 
sororities for the second year in a row. 

Athletics were the main type of inter- 
fraternal competition. During Homecom- 
ing and Greek Week there were the typical 
tournament competitions. Throughout the 
fall and spring semesters the Greek chap- 
ters competed in campus recreational and 
intramural sports such as soccer, volleyball 
and basketball. Sigma Chi Fraternity won 
first place overall athletic award for the 
Homecoming '93 athletic competitions. 

- Joaiiiic Sniiliiuiii 



standing Hj^ekf 





Photos this page by Paul Vieira 



224 




Outstanding Shots 



Photo by Eric E. Mayo 



225 



it's all greek... 




Photo b\' Paul Vieir,i 



Photo by Joanne Saidman 



226 




Photo by Joanne Saidman 



I'hut^ b\ I'jul Vjeira 



227 



^ V^Mi& (ioohUft 



^ited ^ ^tUfoa Ckant^ 



The last four (give or take two) years, what a blur. 

At new Student Orientation, you were kind of unsure. 
In a sea of strange faces on your very first day. 

You felt so undistinguished, like you would just fade away. 
Another drop in the ocean that is Maryland at College Park, 

You didn't think you'd ever be able to leave your mark. 
Classes began and you had to buy books. 

These publishers, you thought, what a bunch of crooks! 
Between parking tickets, tuition, books, rent and beer. 

Your summer savings account was wiped totally clear. 
Thank God football games at Byrd Stadium were free. 

Tailgate parties with cars as far as the eye could see. 
Basketball, too, always attracted a crowd. 

The Lady Terps especially left the Maryland fans wowed. 
Celebrating victories or partying on Route 1, 

Was a popular pastime, second to none: 
The Cellar, The Paragon, R.J. Bentley's, the 'Vous, 



Santa Fe, 94th Aerosquadron and Planet X too. 
Reading the Diamondback while sunning on McKeldin Mall, 

And hanging out with friends who didn't make you feel small... 
You started to feel less like another fish in the sea. 

And more hke a part of UMCP. 
You got used to advising, registration and waitlist. 

Even though the red tape made you clench your fist. 
Swept along on the tide of papers and tests. 

You had to restrain yourself from mid-week beer-fests. 
Fmally, senior year and you go with the ebb and flow. 

For luck, you rub the nose of good ol' Testudo. 
Those final credits are almost done. 

And college, despite classes, has been a lot of fim. 
Now it's time to receive your reward. 

Walking down the aisle wearing your gown and mortar board. 
Those left behind you, stand with a sigh. 

In the shadow of Cole field House, waving goodbye. 




CLJISS OT 1994 



Denise Abrams 

Family Studies 

Sidney Abrams 

Human Resource Mgml 

Douglas Abramson 

Kinesiology 

Michael Acker 

Cnmmologv 

Brad Ackerman 

English 



Eric Adcock 

Chemical Engineering 

Rajendra Adhikari 

Com puter Science 

Kimberly Adkins 

Natural Resource Mgml, 

Ryan Ahmed 

Afro-American Studies 

Case Ahr 

English 



Michael Ahr 

English 

Kamini Ahuja 

Accounting 

Kantesh Ahuja 

Electrical Engineering 

Funmilayo Akintade 

Finance 

Jeffrey Aiaimo 

Kinesiology 



Taslima Alam 

Urban Studies 

Timothy Aldridge 

Studio Art 

Elivira Alejandro 

Agribusiness 

Christopher Alion 

Geography 

Jennifer AUman 

Art History 




230 




Adam Altman 
Maria Alvarado 

Accounting 

Evonne Alvarez 

Criminology 

Muzzafar Alvi 



Kourosh Amin 
Aerospace Emgineering 



Georgene Ammon 

Business 

Eric Amo-Gottfried 

Sociology 

Mary Anagnostopoulos 

Elementary Education 

Kebret Andarge 
Eric Anderson 

Hconomics 



Michelle Anderson 

Secondary Education 

Monica Anderson 

Family Studies 

Kevin Angelone 

Aerospace Emgineering 

Comfort Anguah-Dei 

Finance 

John Ansell III 

Government & Politics 



Christine Anthony 

lourn.ilism 

Michael Antwerpen 

Marketing 

Cindy Anzel 

Sociology 

Paul Apostolidis 

Electrical Engineering 

Laurie Arena 

Accounting 



Alissa Arford 

Journalism 

Nilakshi Ariyaratne 

Marketing 

Jennifer Armiento 

Family Studies 

Jane Armstrong 

History 

Mark Armstrong 



Cheryl Arnt 

Dietetics 

Robin Aronson 

i'svchologv 

John Arthur 

Cio\ernmenl & Politics 

Jeffrey Arzt 

Aerospace Emgineering\ 

Julie Ash 

Family Studies/Criminology 



231 



Marni Askinazi 

Health Education 

Tara Aslaksen 

Geography 

Turan Atay 

Government & Politics 

Rachel Audi 

Spanish 
Cherie Ausby 

Economics 



Nabil Azar 

Speech Communication 

Maryam Azarion 

Biologv 

Darius Badie 

Economics 

Omid Badizadegan 

Computer Science 

Kunsoo Bae 

Transportation/intl Busmess 



Seung Baick 

DIS/Finance 

Elsie Baker 

Transportahon/Int'l Business 

Matthew Baker 

Math 

Sosi Balian 

Accounting 

Valerie Banko 

Anthropology 



Kimberlv Banks 

English 

Naela Barakat 

Criminal Justice 

Sharon Barnes 

Mechanical Engineering 

Ursula Barnes 
Criminal Justice 
Valarie Barnes 

Intl Business /Spanish 



James Barr 

Math 

Leita Barrett 

Sociology 

Brian Barrick 

Biology 

Jonathan Barron 

Business 

Shawn Bartley 

Speech Communication 



Ellen Bastio 

History 

Joanna Basuray 

Education 

Rana Batterjee 

Hearing & Speech 

Jeiuiifer Baum 

English 

Scott Baxter 

Speech Communication 




232 




Patricia Beal 

Psychology 

Danyell Beard 

Transportation/Logistics 

Amanda Beck 

classics 

Robin Becker 

Marketing 

fames Beckley 

Criminal justice 



Yvonne Bee 

Marketing 

Murjahan Begum 

\ccounting 
Anthony Bell 

Accounting 

Wendy Bell 

Fashion Merchandising 

Matalie Bendiuk 

Microbiology 



Christopher Benedick 

Physics 

Sean Benedict 

Kaciio, Television & Film 

Leslie Benfield 

Go\emmeni & Polirics 

John Benigno 

Mechanical Engineering 

Valerie Bennett 

Art History 



Kendyll Benson 

Electrical Engineering 

Mary Benton 
Mindy Beran 

Finance 

Michelle Berger 
Stacey Bergin 

loumalism 



Leonard Berkoski 

Electrical Engineering 

Shari Berman 

loumalism 

Stuart Berman 

History 

Harold Bernadzikowski 

Urban Studies 

Michelle Bernard 
History 



Bradford Bernstein 

Government & Politics 

Nicole Better 

Accounting 



Zt>^hM 



Denise Bezerra 

Portuguese 

David Biener 

Psychology 

Roy Biesecker 



233 



Sylvia Bigio 

History 

Daaiyah Bilal 

Biology 

Poppy Binder 

Psychology 

Stacey Bingman 

Crimintil Justice 

Cammie Biss 

Elemental-)' Education 



Genevieve Blackwell 

Criminal Justice 

Edmund Blaik 

Speecli Patliology/SpanisJi 

Michael Blesecker 

Busmess 

David Bloch 

Government & Politics 

Anne Bluthardt 

Art History 



Valerie Boccadoro 

Journalism 

Anthony BoUino 

Elementary Education 

Jeff Bonner 

Criminal Justice 

Bonnie Bos 

History 

Ashley Bostic 

Cnminology 



Kavita Boveja 

Biochemistrv 

Marsha Boveja 

Psvchologv 

Robert Bowlus 

Natural Resources Mgmt. 

Mary Ann Boyle 

Horticulture 

Anthony Bradford 

Economics 



Monica Brady 

English 

Matthew Bramlctt 

Sociology 

Bruce Breen 

Finance 

David Breen 

Jc^urnahsm 

Kimberly Brehon 

English 



Michael Breitstein 

Engjish 

Derek Brennan 

Mechanical Engineering 

John Brennan 

History' 

Christine Breslin 

Marketing 

Kelli Brickman 

Spanish 










a 



.^^.^ 




H^' 




234 




Nancy Broderick 

\nthropology 

Kimberly Brodsky 

lovernment & Tolilics 

Valencia Brooks 

-tudio Art 

C arlos Brown 

' ivil Engineering 

Oonald Brown 

1 .indscape Design/Mgmt. 



Kimberley Brown 

l-.imilv Studies 

Kimberly Brown 

[-lenient.iry Education 

Matthew Brown 

I'hvsical Science 

Yolanda Brunson 

^ .(ivernment & Politics 

Shannon Bryant 

l^ussian studies 



David Buckingham 

Engineering 

Christine Buckley 

Marketing/ Finance 

Jennifer Budka 

Finance 

Pearl Buenvenida 

\ conomics 

Kathryn BuUen 

Marketing 



Staci Bumpus 

English/lapanese 

Francine Burbridge 

Criminal justice 

Kimberly Burch 

Hearing & Speech 

Michael Burchill 
Katherine Burns 



Lisa Burns 

lienientarv Education 

Amanda Burrell 

English 

Kelli Burello 

Agribusiness 

Theresa Burroughs 

Art History 

jason Butler 

English 



Krista Butler 

Criminal Justice 

Marc Butler 

Mechanical Engineering 

Mark Caggiano 

Mechanical Engineering 

Stephanie Campbell 

Animal Science 

Julia Canchola 

Elementary Education 



235 



Cezar Canizales 

journalism 

Michelle Cannon 

journalism 

Suzanne Cantz 

Manne Biology 

Jill Caplan 
Adrian Carino 

Economics 



Fiorella Carmelino 

Consumer Economics 

Pascal Caron 

Fire Protection Engineering 

Brenda Carpenter 

Aerospace Engineering 

Abraham Carpio 

Government & Politics 

Anthony Carreras 

American Studies 



Allison Carroll 

Criminal Justice 

Leonard Carson 

Finance,' International Busine; 

Richard Carter 

Cnmina! Justice 

Holly Cass 

Journalism 



Kenya Cassel! 

Aci\ertising Design 



Laura Cawthorne 

History 

Deborah Chapman 

E!ementar\' Education 

Manju Chatani 

Economics 

Cassandra Chen 

English 

Cindy Chen 

Marketing 



David Chen 

Computer Science/ Math 

Lai Cheung 

East Asian Studies 

Shanti Chhetri 

Economics 

B. Joseph Childs 

Biology 

1-Chih Chin 

Computer Science 



Sook Chin 

Accounting 

Wing Chin 

Mechanical Engineering 

Kady Chiu 
Dong Choi 
Won Choi 
Dis 




236 



S'L9{I01{^SU1iyBy 1994 

While seniors were being photographed for their yearbook photos, our staff was 
conducting our 2nd annual senior survey. Out of 400 surveys given out, we re- 
ceived less than 200 completed surveys. On the following pages are the responses of 
those few who chose to participate in the survey. We conducted the survey to get a 
sense of who was in the Class of 1994, and though only about 40 people filled out 
the survey completely, just about anyone who has attended Maryland will be able to 
relate to what they had to say about their experiences here. 




Kathi Chun 

i's\chology 

Kah Leong Chung 

jij Electrical Engineering 

' Sheldon Chung 

Economics 

, Beth Ciangiulli 

Hearing & Speech 

Karen Clark 

English 



Jennifer Clarkson 

Go\'erinient & Politics 

Melissa Cleis 

I'svchology 

Julia Clements 

( iuman Resource Mgml. 

David demons 

l.ipanese 

Paula Clinedinst 

Criminology 



Donna Clore 

I. nminologv 

D. Michael Coakley 

KTVF/Cnminal fustice 

Rebecca Coddington 

Enghsh 

Carole Coe 

Chemistn' 

Anton Cohen 
Finance 



Dana Cohen 

loumalism 

Gregory Cohen 

Civil Engineering 

Jaime Cohen 

Marketing 

Joseph Cohen 

Psychology / Pre-Med 

Matthew Cohen 

Criminology 



237 



Meira Cohen 

Zoology 

Neil Cohen 

Accounting/ Finance 

Ofer Cohen 

Aerospace Engineering 

Sharon Cohen 

Advertising Design 

Robin Coleman 

Family Studies 



Colleen Colt 

Government & Politics 

Edward Condon 

Ph>'sic5 

Yvette Connell 

Microbiology 

Sarah Conord 

journalism 

Linda Conway 

Government & Politics 



Michelle Cook 




lb' 


Criminal Justice 




i'^R 


Lara Cooke 




JuJK. 


English 


HB^ *v 


Holly Anne Cooley 




Je 


Human Resource Managem^ 




■ Wk 


Karen Coperich 


ilUk 


^Bl 


Eiectncal Engmeering 


V ^m 


^^ 


Melissa Coppadge 


•' fjf 


M 


Education /Biology 


. '^ > 



Elizabeth Corderman 

Computer Science,' Math 

Samantha Correll 

Accounting 

Chad Cos 

Economics /Gov't & Politics 

Anthony Craig 

intenor Design 

Vanessa Cranford 

Linguistics 



Cvnthia Crisafulli 

journalism 

Catherine Crow 

Business 

Ryan Crowe 

Eamilv Studies 

Denise Cuffie 

Marketing 

Chet Curry 

Sociology 



Kimberly Cutright 

English 

Romeo Dacquel, Jr. 

Urban Studies 

Chih-Ju Dai 

Biology 

Richard Dalgetty 



Alice Daly 

Geology 




238 




J Daniel Daly 

Cnminal Justice 

Scott Daly 

I .ri.logy 

'iheeba Daniel 

\l,-,lh 

Maryam Darvish 

nminal Justice 

\nita Dashiell 



Bridget Davis 

history 

Tonya Davis 

•-\ chology 

lennifer Day 

'urnalism 

lyali De 

Kinancf 

Inosha De Silva 

Horti culture 



Terrence Dean 

Kadio, Television & Film 

Sharmain Deen 

Business 

Jennifer DeGroff 

Psvchologv 

Koorosh Dehghan 

Aerospace Engineenng 

Kimberly Deimel 

Government & Politics 



Mirla Del Rosario 

'^p.inish 

Robert DeLeon 

\i.k.ounting 

Stephen Dell 

Studio Art 

Ken Deng 

Computer Science 

Steven Dennis 

|i>umalism 



Maya Angelou's talk(Spring '93) ART AnACK(An YEAR) PearI Jam at RiiclniE CoHseum 

Al Gore & Bill Clinton on Chapel Field Pro-Choice March in DC 

"1984" play at Tawes theater Talks by Louis Farrakhan. Alex Haley & Betty Shabazz 

SoM>^it^Rad8idDa^ Football defeat by Penn State at Memorial Stadium 

Female basketball 2ame between UMCP and University of Virginia Spamfest 

Clemson football game(1992) Fratei-nitv/soroi-ity initiations Odyssey of the Mind 

All-Nighter "7^ eelC^vi a^e^ >U^ 1992 basketball game vs. UNC 

Ramones(at Art AnAck 95) TAilqATEs Maryland Leadership Conference 

"Agnes of God" play at Tawes Take Back the Night Gav/Lesbian Rights March in DC 

F,^aU>^,it^/SoMnt^io,m& Montecomiitg '93 SWIM5IIXG IX THE FOl'XTAIX 

AIDS Quilt play at Tawes Tanning on McKeldin Mall/Denton field/LaPlata Beach/Byrd Stadium 



239 



Laura Denny 

Chemical Engineering 

Kitt Der 
Catherine Desarno 

Governmenl & Politics 

Lisa Dewey 

Education 

Matthew Dewolfe 

Architecture 



Jeanne Dickey 

Government & Politics 

Douglas Dickman 
Markehng 
Kathleen Diemer 

Journalism 

Stephanie Dignan 

Psychology 

Amy Dilley 

Family Studies 



Lyiunarie Disavino 

English 

Debra Diviesti 

Marketing 

Richard Doherty 

Government & Politics 

Shelley Dolen 

English 

Wesley Doll 

Education 



Illy Dominitz 
Joseph Doniger 

American Studies 

John Donohue 

Cnminal Justice 

Shari Dordick 

Marketing 

Jami Dorf 

Hearing & Speech 



Jonathan Dorf 

Advertising 

Cynthia Dorsey 

Finance 

Juha Douglas 

Studio Art 

Lisa Doup 

Biology 

David Dowdy 

Criminology 



Cynthia Drake 

Elementary Education 

Eric Driscoll 

Zoology 

Rhonda Dudley 

Psychology 

Gina Dugan 

Journalism 

Jeremy Dukes 

Studio Art 









240 




Rosa Dunn 

Accounting 

Curtis Dupree 

i-,li'ClriCcil Enginuering 

Robb Durai 
Accounting 
Robert Dwarkin 

Electrical Engineering 

Pamela Dygus 

oiogy 



L heryl Edwards 

Biology 

Jocelyn Edwards 

Radio, Television & Film 

Kelli Edwards 

Criminology 

Shelley Edwards 

Actciunting/ Finance 

Kevin Ehrman 

I rmiinal Justice 



villi Einziger 

lournalism 

Sherri Eisenberg 

\LLOunting/DlS 

Devona Elgin 

kinesiology 

Crystal Ellerbe 

t -in ernment & Politics 

Suzanne Elliott 

'^ptech Communication 



Stephen Ellis 

English 

Josh Elvander 

Aerospace Engineering 

Nicole Emamali 

Go\ ernment & Politics 

Lee Emdur 

lournalism 

Thomas Endrusick 

Mechanical Engineenng 



Michelle Engle 

arlv Childhood Education 

Wanda Ennis 

Marketing 

Fred Ensign 

Business 
Kristin Erb 

Government & Politics 

brahim Erdogan 



Hce Ermec 

oxtile Marketing 

Oscar Escudero 

I'Usiness 

Canciice Eshleman 

(. riminologv 

Fric Esubach 
licia Everson 

logy 



241 



Amy Ewing 

Journalism 

Richard Ezra 

Criminal Justice 

Andrew Fabula 

Accounting 

Keith Pagan 

Journalism 

Timothy Pagan 

Industrial Education 



Khaldoun Faghum 

Civil Engineering 

Diana Fandino 
Psychology 
Timothy Farrell 
Margaret Farren 

Advertising Desn., Journalism 

Boris February 

Computer Science 



David Feifer 
Psycholog\- 
Jodi Feinsilver 
Economics 

Kathy Feldman 

Dietetics 

Lynne Perrante 

Kinesiology 

Angel Ferrell 

English 



Germaine Few 

Agribusiness 

Jennifer Fidler 

Elementar\' Education 

Samantha Figueira 

Accounting 

Stefanie Fine 

Criminal Justice 

Renate Finn 

Business 



Sarah Finn 
Psychology- 
Jennifer Fisher 

Kinesiology 

Jonathan Fishman 

American Studies 

Barbara Flaherty 

Aerospace Engineering 

Jack Plechner 
Marketing 



Nicole Fleet 

Government & Politics 

Sonya Florance 

Consumer Economics 

Salayne Formica 

Zoology 

Christopher Fowble 

Psychology /English 

Tracey Frank 

Family Studies 




242 




Linroy Freeman 

1 1 nance 

Angelo Fresco 

[■■uiiness 

Marc Fribush 

Electrical Engineering 

Kristine Fridell 

Accounting /Finance 

Kristen Friedland 

[ducation 



liana Fuchs 

Riolo^y 

Tamara Fuchs 

levvish Studies 

Kristin Fuehrer 

\nimal Sciences 

Roula Fuleihan 

t. omputer Science 

Daniel Funk 

Anthropology 



Rebkah Funk 

Radio, Television & Film 

Gabrielle Gaffke 

French 

Kirsten Gafney 

Advertising Design 

Craig Gagnon 

Criminology- 
David Galloway 

Russian/ English 



Shu Gan 

ins 

David Gannon 

English 

Donald Gannon 

Marketing 

lulie Ganz 

English 

Luz Garcia 

Psychology 



Karen Gardiner 

Dietetics 

Kathleen Garfield 

Marketing 

Kyeatta Garrett 

English 

Sharon Garrison 

Earlv Childhood Education 

Pamela Gary 

Criminology 



David Gayer 

Computer Science 

X'ictoria Geiger 

'j "Special Education 

David Gelb 

Economics .'Math 

Lori Geller 

Vccountint; 

jodi Gersh 

stKiology 



243 



Sara Gerstl 

Computer Science 

Joshua Gertz 

Speech Communication 

Zewdeneh Getachew 

Accounting 

Kimberly Giammerini) 
Tiffany Giddens 

Accounting 



Elizabeth Gilbert 

Secondarv' Education 

Gregg Gilden 

Accounting 

Raymond Glenn 

Electrical Engineering 

Michael Glick 

Historj- 

Elisa Glickman 

Special Education 



Adam Gnesin 

Accounting 

Donald Goddard 

Criminal Justice 

Rajiv Goel 

BID 

Martin Goggins 

Studio Art 

Keng Siang Goh 

Accounting 



Michael Goldberg 

English 

Robert Golden 

Fire Protection Engineenng 

Susan Golden 

Psychology- 

Jordan Goldstein 

Architecture 

Laura Goldstein 

Journalism 




BEST THINGS ABOUT UMCP: 

Beautiful campus Variety/number of courses available Diversity 

JL<uMU<Mct9^t«.Saiti*Hwe/V^/^^i*M^uUi^ "^he people Optional finals 

Testudo COMPUTER FACILITIES Large size of the campus and population 

FCCTBALL SAWSS Saturday nights at the Cellar Cluck-U Chicken Ratsies 

PrRPLE PIZZA iCatc-ntght bintng GRADUATINCi the MRFlS system 

"Women's room mIrror at MiichEll BuildJNq Basemem Because I look vERy ski NNy" -anonymous 

BasUetball qames iMMfpoUatioH pMtjkatH Opportunities 'Vous 

Santa Fe Cafe S^ac^ S*t^i*teen^ StxaeUf, Greek system Shuttle buses 

R.J. BentleyS ^^UAc^^4^<^^J^^ the paragon PLiXETX KNCXrAHTISS 



244 




Melissa Golub 

Philosophy 

Raquel Gomes 

Agribusiness 

Emelia Gonzales 

Secondary Education 

Luisa Gonzales 

(ntcrnat'l Business/Spanish 

Eric Goodman 
Business 



Andrea Gordon 

Accounting 

Benjamin Gotkin 

[Psychology 

[■{egan Gradet 

Advertising Design 

Matthew Graham 

Mechanical Engineering 

Jerry Granito 

Consumer Economics 



Colleen Grant 

Biology 

Ruth Graupera 

Biology 

NataUe Graves 

Speech Communication 

William Graves 

Economics 

Samsara Gray 

Economics 



Nina Green 

Finance 

Karen Greenawalt 

Cnminolog\' 

Eunice Greenaway 

Business Education 

Stacey Greenberg 

Speech Communication 

Aaron Greenfield 



Kevin Grieder 

Marketing 

Michael Grier 

Economics 

James Gurdineer 

Agribusiness 

Dharm Guruswamy 

L rban Studies 

,, Gabriela Guzman 

Studio Art 



Theresa Guzman 

Zoolog\' 

Jamal Gwathney 

Biologv 

Julie Haak 

Biochemistry- 
Eva Hafiz 
English 

Aric Hager 

Mechanical Engineering 



245 



Eva Hahn 

Economics 

Ermias Hailu 

Marketing 

Barry Hall 

English 

Theodoros Hallas 

Government & Politics 
Amy Halle 

Heanng & Speech 



Jennifer Halliwell 

Finance 

Peter Haloftis 

Electrical Engineenng 

Charles Halverson 

Historv" 

Karen Hamburg 

Transportation 

Amy Hamlin 

Histor>' 



Jenifer Hampsey 

Dietetics 

Marcus Handy 

Cnminology 

Sugianto Hanggodo 

Finance /Chemistrv' 

Leslie Hankerson 

Cnniinolog\' 

Raymond Hann 

Accounting 



Erika Hansen 

Family Studies 

Tracy Harding 

Accounting 

Michelle Harkum 

Criminal lustice 

Christian Harriot 

Elementary Education 

Christine Harris 

International Business 



Heather Harris 

Hearing & Speech 

Naomi Harris 

Psychology 

Carl Harrison 

Industrial Education 

Chris Harrison 

Technical Education 

Jill Harrison 

Psychology 



Heather Hartman 

Psychology 

Scott Hartsock 
Theatre 

Cookab Hashemi 

Government & Politics 

Joceljm Hassar\zadeh 

JoumaUsm 

Lynn Hasun 
Criminology 






' rm 




/ 




'% 






\ 


/i 






/ 







r 



* 





246 




Cina Hatemi 

rimin,il Justice 

lames Hayden 

business 

Erica Hayes 

Accounting 

Keith Hayman 

Consumer Economics 

Charles Haynes 



Leigh Hays 

i iL-mentary Etiucation 

Katherine Heffelfinger 

1 1 1 story/ Film 

Suibel Helmig 

\ kctncal Eng, German 

Sharon Henderson 

Microbiology 

larem Hendricks 

Economics 



Gerard Henry 

K.idio. Television & Film 
Karyl Henry 

Marketing 

Michelle Henry 

(_ rimmal Justice 

Stacey Herishen 

Criminal Justice 

Christin Herr 

I'usiness 



I ill Hershey 

Mechanical Engmeering 

Jennifer Hertzman 

Psychology 

Martin Hester 

Recreation 

Alan Hew 

Natural Resources Managemen 

Patrick Higdon 

History 



Kimberly Hightower 

Histor\- 

Jennifer Hill 

Elementan' Education 

Ross Hiller 

Marketing 

Susan Hippchen 

Dietetics 

Chia Ho 



Shelley Ho 

Computer Science 

Adam Hochman 

^ ,o\emment & PoUtics 

Svlvanie Hodge 

Inisiness Education 

Yvonne Hodgkins 

Biology 

Karen Hoff 



247 



Denice Hoffman 

Early Childhood Education 

Kali Holland 

Psychology- 
David Hollander 

Accounting 

Julia Hollenbeck 

Accounting 

Sharon HoUey 

English 



Kelly Hollis 

Journalism 

Adrian Hood 

Mechanical Engineering 

Andrea Hoots 

Journalism 

Don Hopkins, Jr. 

Fire Protection Engineering 

Karen Horrocks 
Astionomy 



Mary Horton 
Education 

Michele Horton 

Accounting 

Amy Hott 

Criminology 

Fred Householder 

Mechanical Engineering 

Orin Howard 

Family Studies 



Sasha Howard 

Speech Communication 

Wayne Howden 

Secondan' Education 

Susan Hsieh 

Zoology 

Eleanor Hsu 

Electrical Engineering 

YiHua 

ChemistTV 



Elaine Yan Huang 

DIS 

Leslie Hubbard 

Journalism 

Jordana Hughes 

English 

Daryl Inda 

Secondary Education 

William Inge 

Criminal Justice 



Theresa Ingram 
Psydiology 
Adrienne Inzer 

Advertising Design 

Jearme Marie lorio 

Dance 

Roya Iraimianesh 

Studio Art 

Britney Isle 

English 




248 



W^Sl WNQS moUl UHCP 



8 00 a m. classes Red tape Financial Aid office Sccr<ia7. <i a^^cce 

Female bathroom in Stamp Student Union PHASING OIT OF UTVF 

Parking/parking tickets Dining halt "Only 4 bars to choose from"(Kir6ten Gafney) 

nCCMMATSS/SUITSMATSS ^bi)iioki/abi)iiu^(^M<iiit^tiol^ FOOTBALL TEAM 

Being a social security number Too many people 5<ot enaugl] snofo days 

"Setect uninterested research-oriented enqineerinq facuttif" (Marc Butler) Racism 
Shuttle buses Campus was too large Eistng tutttott e&erg stmeaUv 

ExpEiNsivE books Commu+ii-vc) Lack of ATM machines at east end of campus 

Lack of school spirit Not enough interaction between students LCNS UriSS 

Chemistru beuartntent /Had /^e^u/'/^m&KC f)^^^^^^!^ -j*^4^e^K-w^ ^-i^^we^ w'/e^^ -ct vU^^ 

LOCATION NO BUSES ON THE WEEKENDS 




Martin Jack 

Computer Science 

Thomas Jackson 

Mechanical Engineering 

Dana Jacobs 

Indnidual Stuciies 

Francine Jacobs 

Psvchologv 

Tracy Jacobs 

Individual Studies 



Erica Jacobson 

oumalism 

Joshua Jakum 

Pu.logv 

AHab JaUl 

Computer Science 

Talitha James 

English 

Tracy James 

Dietetics 



Todd Jasno\v 

English 

Nanette Jasper 

Romance I-anguages 

Donna Jensen 

Education 

Lenox Job 

Mechanical Engineering 

Daniel Joe 

Finance/ International Business 



249 



Kelly Joe 
Jeff Joeckel 

History 

Barbara Johnson 
Russia 

Felicia Johnson 

Fashion Merchandising 

Jeffrey Johnson 

Criminal Jusdce/GVPT 



Lacretia Johnson 

English 

Marilyn Johnson 

Finance 

Mark Johnson 

English 

Sarah Johnson 

Zoology 
Erin Jones 
Biology- 



Frederick Jones 
Accounting 
Jeffrey Jones 

Govemmenl & Politics 

Tanya Jones 

journalism 

Rebecca Jubon 

Anthropology 

Robin Just-Buddy 

Marketing 



Tom Kadesch 

Mechanical Engineering 

Stuart Kafetz 

Speech Communication 

MeUssa Kaftarian 

Government & Politics 

Richard Kaiser 

Fire Protection Engineering 

Sharvn Kaltman 

Fashion Merchandising 



Namisa Kamara 

Accounting/ Rnance 

Kimberlv Kammerer 

Fashion Merchandising 

Jennifer Kampfe 

Sociology' 

Sook Kang 

Marketing 

Ruchi Kansal 

Computer Science/Business 



Sharon Kantor 

Marketing/Transportation 

Michael Kapol 

Finance 

Sharon Kass 

English 

Eric Katsov 

Computer Science 

Joe Kaufman 

Speech Communication 




250 



BEST NIGHTS OUT WHILE AT UMCP 

"A Monday night at the 'Vous with my best friends." 

Anonymous 

"Valentine's Day party in the Grand Ballroom '92." 

Sum Po Leung 

"The snow day in 1992 when there was a huge snowball fight on Fraternity Row and everyone went to the bars 
afterward." 

Deboriih Chapman i • . l i j i 

The first time ( went to a TKE crush party. \ was a freshman. 2 weeks into school and I 
had the sickest time. 

Danielle Salera 

"Going to Cluck-U Chicken and eating chicken wings hke animals with several of my 
friends." 

Budi Matondang 




sharanjit Kaur 

oumalism 

Carrie Kav 

[ inance 

Katherine Kayser 

Architecture 

Devonna Kee 

Business 

Konya Kegling 

■sociology 



Erica Keller 

Theatre 

Crystal Kelley 

Kadio, Television & Film 

Daniel Kelly 

En^neering 








Mike Kemp 

Accounting 
Daniel Ken- 
Economics 



Matthew Kesselhaut 

Psychology 

Dianne Kett 

Architecture 

Roxanne Keve 

Economics 

Mohanned Khan 

Economics 

Raed Khawaja 

Accounting/ Fmance 



Robert Kiesel 

Criminal Justice 

Katherine Kight 

Aerospace Engineering 

lae Kim 

IMS Finance 

long Kim 

Engineering 

Mi Kim 

Studio Art 



251 



BSST niCHTS OUT WHILS AT UMCf 



"My friend's 21st birthday when he threw up at Santa Fe." 

Jerry Granito 

"TwENiy^fivE CENT pJTchERS AT tIhe 'Vous anc] dANclNq AT T^E CeIIar \m\iU CUudE." 

Bobbi Riplev 

FRESmiAX HAR, ALLXIGHTER, ACTED LIKE A FOOL AND MET A LOT OF PEOPLE. 

Brian Walton 

"When I and a eouple of my friends went out to the Cellar 
and then Santa Fe Cafe, hit on some girls and then drank 
'til I passed out and walked out supported by one of the 
girls." 



Sunnv Yu 



Nina Kim 
Accounting 
Soo Kim 

Apparel Design 

Aubrohn King 

Economics 

Brian King 

Economics 

Laurie King 

Kinesiology 



Patricia King 

Radio, Television & Film 

Richard King 

Engineenng 

Stephanie King 

Consumer Economics 

Jeffrey Kinney 

Crimmal justice 

Jacqueline Kinsinger 

Business 



Shelley Kirchner 

Criminal justice 

Melanie Kirkman 

Theatre 

Laurie Kirsh 

Math 

Penny Klein 

Economics 

Michael Kleinert 

History 



Kerri Kliegman 
Kristel Kling 

Elementary Education 

Nicole Klurman 

Bioiogy 

Wendy Knee 

Criminal Justice 

Scott Kniffin 

Nuclear Engineering 





d^ ^^' ^^^^^^^^^^Bi 





Wi^--f\lUK 




252 




George Knight 

Geology 

Ross Knoblauch 

"^ ports Intormation 

Cory Knopf 

English 

Anita Ko 

English 

Crystal Ko 

Accounting 



Ue Ko 

Criminal Justice 

Susan Koch 

[-.nglish 

David Kocur 

Computer Science 

Richard Kolanowski 

landscape Architecture 

Catherine Kolwey 

Apparel Design 



KataUn Korossy 

English 

Sima Kostovetsky 

Government & Politics 

Michael Kotzen 

Ci\il Engineering 

juHe Kotzin 

journalism 

Heather Kovarik 

Electrical Engineering 



Reka Koves 

Apparel Design 

Evelyn Kramer 

Go\ernment & Politics 

Kristine Kramer 

Psychology 

Jason Kremus 

Recreation 

Deborah Kroggel 

Government & Politics 



Ann Krumbiegel 

Marketing 

Iskandar Kunaefi 

Transportation,' Business 

Danise Kurant 

Animal Science 

jumana Kurawadwala 

Biology 

So Lai 

International Business 



Chetna Lai 

Ci\'il Engineering 

Hon Lam 

Accounting 

Yiu Lam 

Econommics 

Michelle Lambert 

Nutrition 

Tara Lancaster 

Criminal Justice 



253 



Cesar Larrea 

Computer Science 

Dawn LasWey 

PsychoIog>' 

Andrea Laska 

Business 

Vanessa Latham 

ioumalism 

Jocelyn Lau 
Electrical Engineering 



Amy Laubach 

journalism 

Andrea Laughland 
Ajande Lawal 

Agribusiness 

Jeff Lawrence 

Spanish 

Luan Le 

Finance/Math 



Donald Leblanc 

Horticulture 

Catherine Lee 

Histor^' 

Emlyn Lee 

Speech Communication 

Hak Lee 

GovemmenI & Politics 

Inpyo Lee 

Finance 



Jennifer Lee 
Ju-Shin Lee 

Accoxinting 

Kin Lee 

Eiectrical Engineering 

Lujuana Lee 

Government & Politics 

Nancy Lee 

Secondarv' Education 



PULee 

Econonucs 

Ronald Lee 

Electrical Engineering 

Sang Lee 

Chemistn' 

Da\'id Lehrman 

Accounting 

Deborah Leiderman 

Journalism 



John Leila 

Criminology 

Michael Leotta 

Psvcholog>- 

David Lesnoy 

Computer Science 

Sum Po Leung 

Psydtolog\' 

Jacqueline Levasseur 

Psychologv- 




254 




Brian Levin 

soaolog\' 

Wesley Levine 

f.riminal Justice 

Lauren Levy 

Government & Politics 

Mark Levy 

History 

Sarah Levy 

Amencan Studies 



Monique Lewis 

Biotogv 

Heather Libman 

Criminal Justice 

Debra Liebman 

Hearing & Speech 

David Lige 

Sociology 

Leidi Lim 

DIS/Business 



Qiao Lin 

Finance 

Dariamia Lindley 

l^svchology 

Steven Linehan 

Xppare! Design 

Kristin Link 

Fashion Merchandising 

Esmeralda Liu 

Biology 



Florence Liu 

Accounting 

Henry Liu 

f inance 

Jeannette Liu 

Biologv 

Dionne Livingston 

Psychology 

Sherman Lo 

Aerospace Engineering 



Diane Lopez 

Business 

Megan Loudermilk 

Family Studies 

Holly Low 

Kinesiology 

Michael Lubitz 

Government & Politics 

Elise Lyles 

Philosophy 



Christopher Lvnch 

Fnqhsh 

laiikin Mack 
Kathleen Mack 

Psychology 

Paul Madachy 

English 

hTiad Madanat 

Biochemistry 



255 



BEST NIGHTS OUT 
WHILE AT UMCP 



"Got druiik^ lost my friends^ fell In a dlteh 
and slept there." 

Koorosh Dehghan 

"One of nnf best nights I had at UMCP n/as m(/ freshman 
i^ear attending Dancers Against Cancer alt da{f and then a 
party^ at the Vous. " 



Anonymous 



"This guy I was dying for walked me home one night 
in the rain and kissed me outside my door." 

Angela Smith 

"Elbow Room duRJNq HoMECOMiNq '92, fiNAlly went to bEd at 
1 1 :00 Aivi ANd tIhat NiqhT I hAd to qo to a pUy at Tawes ANd I 
ThouqhT I WAS qoiNq to pukE tIhe wIhoIe tIme!" 

Tracey Frank 

"Went to DC with a friend of mine and my 
cousin and we picked up 7 guys and had a little 
sleepover at their house." 

Dawn Lashlev 

"MY 2TST BIHTHCAT WHSK PEOPLE WEHE SIN8IKS 
TO ME AT BSNTLSYS. OH SWIMMING WITH 2 UA- 
KEC SUYS IK THE FOUNTAIN. 

Jennifer Muther 



256 






"Got really wasted and brought the wrong guy home(my 
roommate's friend!). 

Anonymous 

FIRST TIME AT THE VOUS IT WAS DISGUSTING AND MADE ME 
SICK AFTERWARDS. THE REER THERE IS INFECTED! 

Alan Hew 

"Being hit in the face while being an innocent by- 
stander." 

Bob Yaklich 

"Discovering that my car was stolen from Lot IC." 

Elsie Baker 

Getting lost in Northeast D.C." 

Eric Adcock 

"Pasis^ing out on the floor of the Cellar." 

Bobbi Ripley 

"70-7 toss against Penn State Um(Jersitif in football." 

Ross Hiller 

"I was picking a wedgie and a guy saw it, tapped me 
on the shoulder and said, 'Say no to crack.'" 

Allyson Matty 

"Engineering design project due. Computer labs down. Nitro- 
gen tank blew up on liquid natural gas truck. Test in the 



morning. 

Marc Butler 



M 



257 



W^Sl H\Qm OUT mi£ /IT 

ump 

"Breaking up with my first love. The first night 
lasted forever. But after many tears and a sleep- 
less night, the sun came up and shined on all the 
beautiful ladies of UMCP." 

David Patrician 

Poetry night at Planet X: the legend of underwear 
head. 

Matthew Bromlett 

"TRYING TO SLEEP WHEN THERE IS A FRA- 
TERNITY PARTY. I LIVE IN LEONARDTOWN." 

Anonymous 

"Trying to pick my roommate up off the floor of the 
shuttle after quarter pitcher night at the 'Vous." 

Barbara Schmidt 

"Evgry night spent cramming for another big test." 

Danise Kurant 

TH£ NISHT I FCUKC CUT I DISLOCATED MY DACK 
AND CCULD KCT CCMPSTSCTHACK) ANYMCHS. 

Angela Smith 

"Locking my keys in my car at P.G. Plaza late at night after hearing 
about shootings there." 

Stephanie Dignan 
Rani Einziger 



258 



'D^'?n'n<^ '^^oiR.non 




"/4 blind date. The ^uy u/as a ^ood friend of a friend's boy- 
friend. Bi0 mistake! The ^uy Was far from a gentleman. 
Nei/er date someone so far remoi/ed!" 

Sarah J. Finn 

"My date told me to play the quiet game' during the hus ride to my 
first formal of my pledging semester." 

Jennifer DeGroff 

"/ met a qirt at the Cellar. She told me that her birthdaif 
Was in a Week. She droUe on the date. At 1 1:30 she said, 
I ha(/e to ^0-1 am not off mi^ proi/isionat. " 

Henry Liu 

"Having a girl stalk me after I told her I didn't want 
to see her again." 

Jon Swichar 

"I got fixed up for a formal and when we went to pick up my 
date, I hear him ask if he should wear his glasses or not. Need- 
less to say, he came out of the room and looked like my 13-year 
old brother." 

Tracey Frank 

"Car breaks down on first date after many months of planning 
and cancellations due to snow storms and/or unforeseen cir- 



cumstances." 

Marc Butler 



Realizing ( was dating a professor who was younger. 

E. Gonzales(age 38) 



259 



SENIOR COUNCIL: 



If you are graduating this year, you miglit notice at tlie graduation ceremony 35 people 
wearing the traditional cap-and-gown uniform along with a red ribbon with a gold medal 
on it. They are the senior marshals, the cream of the top students selected by the col- 
lege deans, who lead the seniors into Cole Field House. These distinctive graduates are 
also members of the Senior Council. 

The Senior Council is basically a leadership organization, comprised mostly of people 
who are already active in other school organizations. According to this year's chairper- 
son, Jennifer Rudick, a journalism major, their mission is to "inform, unify and involve the 
senior class, to excite people about their senior year." To do this, they put out the gradu- 
ation handbook which tells seniors what they need to do to graduate, they put 



Maria Madarang 

Govemnienl & Politics 

Rodney Maestas 
Patrick Maggi 

English 

Louan Magi 

Interior Design 

Rohit Mahajan 

Electrical Engineering 



Kara Mahoney 

Elementarv Education 

Latricia Makle 

Speech Communication 

Deborah Malamud 

Journalism 

Laura Malinowski 

Business 

Elias Mallis 

Electrical Engineering 



Joan Maly 

History 

Jennifer Mangan 

Marketing/Transportation 

Michelle Maniez 

Criminology 

Melissa Mann 

Fashion Merchandising 

Julie Manning 

Textile Marketing 




260 









*i^l 







Aristotle Marantan 

Mechanical Engineering 

James Marcotte 

Human Resource Management 

Amy Margolius 

Business/Journalism 

Dean Markos 

Histon' 

Michelle Marshall 

DIS 



Rich Marshall 

Vlarketing 

Erika Martin 

Anthropologv 

Julie Martin 

Elementary Education 

Hazelyn Martin-Henry 

Microbiology 

Matthew Maschler 

Government & Politics 



Shiva Mashhadi-Shafi 

Zoology 

Lori Mathes 

Studio Art/Art History 

Budi Matondang 

Computer Science 

Edwin Matthews 

Biology 

Tiffany Matthews 

Finance 



WORKING FOR YOU 



on "Senior Nights" at the Santa Fa Cafe, started a liotline for seniors (314-GRAD), lield an 
auction during Family Weel(end wliere tliey raised money for tlie class gift (a 15-foot liigh 
monument to be placed on Adelphi Road near tlie National Archives), and held receptions 
for seniors at President Kirwan's house. 

The Senior Council started as the 1990 Class Gift Committee Senior Class Challenge. 
Their goal was to find out why UMCP graduates were not pledging money to the school. 
Rudicii says they have been fairly successful this year, with "over $33,000 in pledges, 
the most we've ever had." 

Anybody is welcome to participate in Senior Council activies. Rudick says, "In the past 
it was very Greel( but now it is generally very racially diverse" with a higher percentage 
of non-Greeks than before. 



261 



BEST ACADEMIC EXPERIENCES 



Getting As in any class S^tt^Mioto^ 205 Making dean's list 

WiiUA^ o{ tU QU^i^fuJU Eugenie Clark's shark class 

Graduating in 4 years (iettin^a4.o(iPA Dr. Pease (sociology) 

Health 377 with Dr. Sawyer "^ozM 2^5 Professor McCarrick 
£f^^£l^ Vjl M/^ $i*e OiM/^iM Dr. Siihl's hisiORicAl qEoloqy cIass 

GVPT lOOH Dr. SmithQoumalism) Dr. Larvdk^y(sociology) 
Microbiology 100 Usin^ a paper for more than one class 

getting accepted to the selective coiteges Psychology 301 

Passing statistics any AASP course Dr.EckSteinfhiStOryJ 



Seema Mattox 

Biochemistry 

David Mattox 

Electrical Engineering 

AUyson Matty 

Elementary Education 

Gayle Maurantonio 

Sociolobv 

Christina Mayne 

Zoology 



Patcharin McAllister 

Business 

Paul McAllister 

Marine Biology 

Catherine McClintock 

Psychology 

Janet McCroddan 

Accounting 

John McCusker 

History 



Shannon McCutchen 

Individual Studies 

Tracy McDonough 

History 

Scott McDougall 

Government & Politics 

James McGonigle 

Electrical Engineering 

Kerry McGrath 

Kinesiology 




262 









Dru McHenry 

Biology 

Jennifer McKeegan 

Covernmenl & Polilics 

Felicia McKelvin 

Biology 

Paul McKesey 

Chemical Engineering 

Michael McMahon 
Electrical Engineering 



Lizbeth McManus 

lournalism 

Karen McNamee 

Kinesiology 

Amy McPartland 

Enghsh/RTVF 

Shannon McRae 

English 

Barbara McZeal 

Business 



Ginger Medley 

Radio, Television & Film 

Ashish Mehta 

Electrical Engineering 

Jennifer Mendelis 

Marine Biology 

Sangeetha Menon 
Thomas Mensing 






^fe^^B 




^L. "^ ' ,^^Ihl. 




^E\ ^^I^Ih 



Stephen Metz 

Marketing/Transportation 

Din Mew 

Accounting 

Candice Mewshaw 

Accounting 

Russell Myers 

Mechanical Engineering 

Brian Michalowski 

Math/Computer Science 



Jeffrey Miller 

Physics 

Jason Mindus 

Economics 

Jennifer Minear 

History/English 

Jaime Misher 

Criminal Justice 

Michele Mital 

Psychology 



Amy Mitrani 

English 

Leah Moore 

lournalism 

Corinne Moriatis 

Finance/Transportation 

Catina Morris 

Fashion Merchandising 

Jacquelyn Morris 

GVPT/Criminal Justice 



263 



Michael Morrison 

Russian 

James Morrow 

English 

John Mortenson 

Spanish / Economics 

Sonali Motha 

Special Education 

Albert Moy 

Chemistry 



Mashiniia Mtei 

Computer Science 

Ruth Mukami 

Fashion Merchandising 

Jennifer Muther 

Elementary' Education 

Desiree Myrie 

Go\'emment & Politics 

Aida Najafi 

Microbiology 



Mai Naji 

Microbiology- 
Amanda Nanan 
Dis 
Stephanie Narva 

English 

Teresa Narvhez 

Computer Science 

Erica Nash 



Heather Neal 

English 

Charles Needle 

Geography 
Jeremy Neilson 

Aerospace Engineering 

Desiree Nelson 

Psychology' 

Faithpatrick Nelson 

English 



Martanya Nelson 

Cnminal lushce 

Alonzo Newby 

English 

Edward Newhart 

Urban Studies 

Jeffrey Newman 

Physics 

Lisa Newman 

Elementary Education 



Mohanwnad Neyzar 

Mechanical Engineering 

Gordon Ng 

Advertising Design 
Richard Ng 
Marketing 

Wanda Ng 

Advertising Design 

Trung Nguyen 

Mechanical Engineering 




264 




Tuan Nguyen 

Finance/ Accounting 

Xuan Nguyen 

Mectrical Engineering 

Quynh Ngyuen 

Vccounting 

Peter NichoU 

Accounting 

Linda Nielsen 

Economics 



Kenneth Ninala 

Cliemistry 

Momodou Alph Njie 

Klectncal Engineering 

Felipe Nogueira 

Engineering 

John Nolan 

Finance 

Paula Nolan 

Food Administration/Spanish 



Michelle Nolder 

Histc^rv 

Dawn Noren 

Marine Biology 

Shawn Noren 

Marine Biologv 

David Norman 

Physical Science 

Ralf Novizon 

Math 



Ernesto Nurse 

Psychology 

Rebecca Ochstein 

Speech Communication 

Chichi Okonjo 

Economics 

Dennis O'Leary 

Criminal lustice 

Christina Olson 

Chemistry 



Samuel Omwenga 

Go\emment & Politics 

Deborah Onanian 

Family Studies 

Patrick O'Neill 

Business 

Robin O'Neill 

Kinesiology 

Bibiana Onyekwere 



Kevin Orlando 

Business/' Economics 

Abdias Ortiz 

Computer Science 

Carrie Owen 

Accounting 

Tanja Owen 

Marketing 

John Owens 

Food Sen-ice Administration 



265 



Roderick Owens 

Economics 

Dawn Paccillo 

Family Studies 

Todd Pachkowski 

Kinesiology 

Rachel Pachter 

Elementary Education 

Miyong Pack 

Studio Art 



Erroll Paden 

Agn bus mess 

Patricia Pagal 

Cnminal lustice/Sociology 

Steve Panelides 

Electncal Engineering 

Joseph Parambil 

Criminology 

Martin Paredes 

Electrical Engineering 



Michael Paregian 

Biology 

Eun Park 

Textiles 

Jason Park 

Electncal Engineering 

Sang Park 

Agribusiness 

Adam Parker 

Speech Communication 



Richard Parkerson 

Business 

Nathan Parott 

Government & Politics 

Neil Parrott 

Civil Engineenng 

Michelle Parrish 

English 

Barbara Parthasarathv 

Geography 



Freddy Pasarihu 

Agribusiness 

Mark Pasetsky 

Journahsm 

Linda Pasqual 

Accounting 

Steven Pasternak 

Psychology 

Visvas Patel 

Studio Art 



David Patrician 

GVPT/German 

Simonida Paunovic 

Marketing 

Marchelle Payne 

Family Studies 

Ivye Pazornik 

Education 

Vicki Peckus 

Fashion Merchandising 




266 




Andrea Pekala 

Accounting 

Maria Pelaez 

lousiness 

John Penn 

Ciivernment &c Politics 

Lorraine Peralta 

Biology 

Jacques Pereira 

International Business 



Maria Perez 

History 

Mary Jane Perkins 

Psychology 

Brian Perlberg 

Government & Politics 

Jason Perlman 

Criminal Justice 

Julie Perlman 

Family Studies 



Elizabeth Peters 

Art History 

jimmy Peters 

Theatre 

Patricia Petersen 

Accounting 

Pauline Petitclerc 

Economics 

Thomas Pfister 

Education 



Aline Pham 

Biology 

Tuan Phamdo 

Electrical Engineering 

Lauren Philbert 

English 

Charles Philbrook 

Economics 

Antonio Pickford 

Marketing 



Catherine Pitts 

Bioiog\' 

Catherine Plummer 

Elementary Education 

Tara Pollard 

Family Studies 

Julie Polyanski 

Individual Studies 

Katherine Ponder 

Sociology 



Marlen Ponte 

Fmance 

Jamie Popkin 

Criminal Justice 

Sean Poris 

Biology 

Dechanta Porter 

Accounting 

Joanna Porter 

Education 



267 



David Portner 

Criminal Justice 

Neal Post 

Accounting 

Benita Poulson 

Economics 

Celeste Powell 

Chemical Engineering 

Ajay Prasad 

Fire Protection Engineering 



Cheryl Pratt 

Microbiology 

Lisa Press 
Sociology 
Margaret Prince 

German 

Sean Pryor 

Engmeermg 

Jennifer Przybocki 

Special Education 




Gonzalo Puig 


__ji»v 


Business 


^^^^HB_^ ^m 


Vandhna Puri 


^^HP^ i^ f 


Zoology 


^^^^^K s 


Katherine Pyburn 


^^^Hh^' 


Elementary Education 


H^^IHv^ 


Yue Qiu 


^^^^^^»»»» k. 


Computer Science 


^ ^^^^ 


Michelle Quagliarello 


'\^^^H g^ ^^^M 


Sociology 


iflifl 



Danyra Quinones 

Biology 

Doris Quinones 
Studio Art 
Luis Quinones 
Business 
Brian Rabin 

Criminal Justice 

Kimberly Rabner 



Angela Radaker 

Journalism/GVPT 

Robert Radicevich 

Electrical Engineering 

Victoria Ragin 

Ci\'il Engineermg 

Aarti Raja 

Microbiology 

Jason Randall 

Psychology 



Jennifer Randall 

Journalism 

Timothy Rauch 

Economics 

Stefani Reardon 

Psychology 

Megan Redmond 

Spanish / Linguistics 

Tiffini Regis 

Biology 




268 




Robert Rehwoldt 

Engineering 

Terrence Reid 

Radio, Television & Film 

Lesley Rein 

C rimina] Justice 

Robert Renner 

Accounting 

Kera Rennert 

Hnglish 



Kathy Rhine 

Sticiology 

Richard Rhoden 

Sociology 

Susan Ribe 

Economics 

Elizabeth Richards 

Theatre 

Michael Richardson 

Chemical Engineering 



Siobhan Ridgeway 
Helen Rigas 

International Business 

Linda Ringer 

Speech Communication 

Bobbi Ripley 

I'svchology 

Kevin Ritchie 

Mechanical Engineering 



Richard Roark 

Accountmg 

Lindsay Roberts 

Psychology 

Denean Robinson 

Eaniilv Studies 

Karrie Rodriguez 

(."jovernment & Politics 

Rafaela Rodriguez 

Accounting 



Shaney Rogers 

Education 

Krista Rohrer 

Business Education 

Andrew Rose 

Business 

Nicole Roseman 

Accounting 

Suzanne Rosenblatt 

Marketing/Transportation 



Lisa Rosenfeld 

Civil Engineering 

Tracy Rosenfeld 

English /Journalism 

Dana Rosenthal 

Elementary Education 

Danielle Rosten 

Hearing & Speech 

Bryan Roth 
Finance 



269 



Joanne Roth 

Nutrition 

Erica Rothstein 

Accounting 

Stacy Rubin 

Radio, Television & Film 

Andrea Rucker 

Marketing 

Dana Rucker 
English 



Lauren Rudder 

Family Studies 

Elisa Ruderman 

Accounting 

Jennifer Rudick 

Journalism 

Debbie Rudoff 
Sliawn Ruehl 

Aerospace Engineering 



John Ruff 
Business 

Carlos Ruiz 

Business 

Robert Ruiz 

Aerospace Engineering 

Aaron Rulnick 

Housing & Design 

Mark Rutherford 

Accounting 



Daniel Saathoff 

Agronomy 

Myrafe Sabalbaro 

Transportation 

Mitchell Sabale 

Accountint; 

Elan Sabban 

Economics 

Brett Sachs 

Biologv/Pre-Med 



Brian Safian 

Marketing 

Aparna Sain 
Danielle Salera 

Criminal Jusrice 

Jennifer Salerno 

Marine Biolog\' 

Lee Samson 

Finance 



Sunil Samuel 

Computer Science 

Sally Sanders 

Natural Resources Mgml. 

Roopika Saran 

Business 

Julius Sarkodee 

Agribusiness 

Hartley Saunders H 

Physical Science 




270 



WORST ACADEMIC EXPERIENCES 



PSYC 30 1 Unfair exams Losing a paper in the computer si^stem minutes before it's due 

Failing a classfespecially one in your majorj ecoH 20s Academic dismissal 

TEAchERs who cANNon TEAch T.A.'s who do not speak English 

ALL-NIGHTERS ECON 305 Dr. Spears M,,./eci EC0I\I430 

Honors Astronomy Organie elieiiiistry PM^e^sot^ R&imt^ s Accounting ff dass 

BMGT 364 MATH 002 'statistics FRESHMAN YEAR ZOOL 328V 

"Taking a final with a sick 6tomach"(5u5an Hsieh) Advising WM ^07 GVPT200 

"Entomology 100-bugs!"(anonymous) HONR138 mim Engineering 

Changing majors Physics 4lf iixtsl]tug a paper anb l^abtixg tl|c printer break bntun 




Larry Savage 

Special EduCiihon 

Laura Scannell 

Computer Science 

Kimberly Schaechter 

Art Education 

Amy Scharf 

lournalism 

Craig Schlenoff 

Mechanical Engineering 



William Schlichtig 

Criminal Justice 

Heather Schloss 

Journalism 

Marc Schlossberg 

Marlceting 

Lewis Schlosser 

Psvcliologv 

Barbara Schmidt 

Microbiology 



Wendy Schneider 

Journalism 

Lawrence Scholl 

Psycliology 

Jason Schulman 

Criminal Justice 

Brian Schuppner 

Civil Engineering 

Jennifer Schwanke 
Psychology 



Staci Schwartz 

1 Icaring & Speecli 

Stefanie Schwartz 

Psychology 

Todd Schwartz 

English 

Laurie Schwartzman 

American Studies 

Sharon Scotland 

Neurobiology 



271 



"C7 w^cks ai^iving a lafe (Sircuif and a passenger voKK\i++ec| 
orv ^rvy bus. vlJt was rvof fKaf ke just puked/ buf fke volunae 
of voj^if; fkere was so KKvuck fka+ if ran fro^r\ +ke^ naiddle of 
fke bus fo bofk fke |rorvf :/\]^l) fke back. ~Uke wkole ex- 
perience was c\mc\'z^\v\(^\Y korrible." 

MICHAEL RICHARDSON, JR 



Marcia Scott 
Maureen Scott 

Speecli Communication 

Steven Scott 

Crimmal justice 

Ann Searight 

Journalism 

Isatou Secka 

Electrical Engineering 



Michael Seelman 

Government & Politics 

Mindi Seidel 

Russian 

Magda Sejas 

Sociology 

Joni Senteio 

Accounting 

Sandra Settlemyer 

Journalism 



George Seymore 

Government & Politics 

William Shackleford 

Electrical Engineering 

Greg Shaffer 

Speech Communication 

Roopi Shah 

International Business 

Johanna Shalhouh 

Speech Communication 



Shaista Sheikh 

Chemical Engineering 

Adam Sheinhorn 

Technical Education 

Clifford Shepherd 

Psychology 

Uzma Sher 

Human Resource Mgmt, 

Eric Shermer 

Accounting 




272 




MiM^iM 





g 




1 


1 




t 


" 







v.% J> 


JHBr 




P^hl 








l^li^^H 


^^^1 


Ifl 



Tina Shields 

Criminology 

Shira Shiloah 

Biology 

Teresa Shirlen 

Education 

Folashade Shiyanbola 

Accounting 

Andrea Shorter 

Accounting 



Erika Shufelt 

Speecli Communication 

Erika Shuman 

Criminal Justice 

Everett Shupe 11 

Sociology 

Brian Shuster 

Consumer Economics 

Michael Siau 

Psychology 



Jenna Siegel 

American Studies 

Kruskaia Sierra-Escalante 
GVPT/Economics 

Jackie Silva 

speech Communications 
Jamie Silver 

Kinesiology 

James Simmons 

Mechanical Engmeering 



Katherine Simpson 

Accountmg 

Stephanie Simpson 

Go\'ernment & Politics 

Cynthia Slarb 

Accounting 
Howard Slutzky 

Psychology 

Nicole Smart 

Government & Politics 



Angela Smith 

French/ Linguistics 

Bradley Smith 

Economics 
Erin Smith 

Radio, Television & Film 

Jeffrey Smith 

History 

Keesha Smith 

lour nal ism 



Kristy Smith 

lournaiism 

Lori Smith 

English 

Lorrent Smith 

English 

Richard Smith II 

Architecture 

Robin Smith 

Journalism 



273 



Ryan Smith 

Architecture 

Tamara Smith 

Zoology 

Tammy Smith 
Psychology 

Wayne Smith 

Geography 

Wendy Smith 

Engineering 



Zillah Smith-Green 

Education 

David Smolar 

Hislon.- 

Angie Snow 

Accounting 

Maria Snow 

Marketing 

Teresa Snow 

Math/Linguistics 



Diana Soetrisno 

DIS 

Cher\'l Sollars 

Journalism 

Marc Solomon 

Economics 

Xianxiang Soong 

Kinesiology 

Jarune Soriano 
Accounting 



Marc Sours 

Mechanical Engineering 

Michael Souza 

Radio, Television & Film 

Stacey Sparks 

Elementary Education 

David Sparrock 

Engineering 

Tiffani Spiegel 

Government & Politics 



Jason St. John 

Government & Politics 

Annemarie St. Pierre 

Accounting 

Elizabeth Stajka 

Geographv 

Julianne Stallsmith 

Psychology 

Greg Star 

Marketing/Transportation 



Raymond Stattel 

Accounting/ Finance 

Ellen Stavely 

Education 

KeUy Steffen 

Government & Politics 

Beth Steinberg 

Dietetics 

Tina Stephens 

Apparel Design 





MM4iM£^ 



\-^<! 





274 




C. Antonio Steptoe 

Eleclrical Engineering 

Duncan Sterling 

journalism /Geography 

Kelly Stevanus 

Russian 

Suzanne Stipe 

Journalism 

Louise Stohlman 

Elementary Education 



Carl Stokes 

Chemical Engineering 

Traci Stoller 

Crimmal Justice 

David Stollman 

GVPT/Speech Comm. 

Mark Sturdivant 

Family Studies 

Joy Su 

Accounting 



Lisa Suggs 

Civil Engineering 

Brian Sullivan 

Advertismg Design 

Sari Summers 

Fashion Merchandising 

Rupinder Suri 

Business 

Jennifer Swain 

Journalism 



Michele Swartz 

Elementary Education 

Jonathan Swichar 

English 

Asher Swing 

Computer Science 
Stephen Swirnow 
Finance 

Michael Swisdak 

Math 



Kazu Takeda 

Radio, Tele\i5ion & Film 

Ajay Talwar 

Electncal Engineering 

Leray Tate 

Marketing 

Yvonne Tate 

Psych oIog\' 

Noel Tavano 

History / Engineenng 



Eric Taylor 

Radio, Television & Film 
Meredith Tcherniavsky 

loumalism 

Alexander Tekie 

Finance 

Elena Terminiello 

FamiU' Studies 

Louella Tham 

Linguistics /Studio Art 



275 



James Theimer 

Information Systems 

James Thorn 

DIS 

Joann Thomas 

Speech Communication 

Ngo Thong 
Frank Thome 
Agronomy 



Catherine Tidwell 

English 

Heather Tierney 

Fashion Merchandismg 

Melba Timmons 

Psychology 

Alisa Tishler 

Government & Politics 

Brian Tobin 

Go\'emment & Politics 



Richard Todaro 

Physical Science 

CharUe Todd 

Education 

Bahram Toghyani 

Electrical Engineering 

Jennifer Tolchinsky 

Joumahsm 

David Toung 

Japanese 



Mehssa Trocheck 

Landscape Architecture 

Monica Trover 

Education 

John Tsaknis 

Zoology 

Pei-San Tseng 

DIS 

Alexandra Tsonis 

Education 



Stacey Tucker 

Earlv Childhood Education 

Cherice Tyson 

Computer Science 

Yu-En Tzeng 

Electncai Engineering 

Miho Uemura 

Aerospace Engineering 

Irmina Ulysse 

Marketing 



Eric Updegraff 

Journalism 

Ece Uran 

International Business/Frenc 

Dana Urge 
Biology 

Katrina Van Cleave 

Elementary Education 

Paulo Vasoncellos, Jr. 

Electrical Engineering 




276 




^^B[b -^ '^"ij^^Hy 







Subramanian Venkata 
Electrical Engineering 

David Vincent 

Economics 

Karin Voellmer 

German/GVPT 

Allyson Volk 

Elementary Education 

Klaudia Wahyuni 

Neurophysiology 



Andrea Walker 

Afro-American Studies 

Thomas Walker 

Go\'ernment & Politics 

Katherine Wall 

Psvchologv 

Kelly Wallace 

Family Studies 

Latonya Wallace 

Psychology 



Brian Walton 

Criminology 

Daniel Wang 

Business 

Jerry Wang 

Finance/ Accounting 

Jin Wang 

Electrical Engineering/ Math 

Ting-Hsien Wang 

Microbiology 



Tashi Wangchuk 

Indu'idual Studies 

Gregory Ward 

History 

Mark Ward 

Psychology 

Lindsey Warren 

Health Education 

Rani Washington 

Mechanical Engineering 



Scott Washington 

Engineering 

Kimberly Watts 

Biologv 

Ron Weber 

International Business 

Daniel Weile 

Electrical Engineering 

Sharone Weinbaum 

Accounting 



Brett Weinstein 

Government & Politics 

Elaine Weiss 

GVPT/ Biology 

Geoff Weiss 

Computer Science 

Jeffrey Weiss 

Anthropology 

Melinda Weiss 

Marketing 



277 



Anthony Went 

Computer Science 

Gvven Werbowsky 

Government & Politics 

Benjamin Werner 

American Studies 

Paul Werner 

Studio Art 

Eric Wert 

International Business 



^d^kdiM 



Leslie Wiener 

Familv Studies 

Tara Wilhelm 

Government & Politics 

Clyde Wilkins 

Physical Science 

Algie Williams 

English 

Joseph Williams 

Kinesiology 




Trene Williams 

Human Resource Mgmt. 

David Williamson 

Afro-American Studies 

Keith Williamson 

Economics 

Kimberly Willis 
English 
Michael Wilson 



Michelle Wilson 

Biological Sciences 

James Wine 

Computer Science 

Jennifer Wipper 

Economics 

Eric Wit 

Marketing 

James Wojnicki 

Economics 



Larry Wolkow 
Radio, Television & Film 

David Wortman 

Criminology / Psychology 

Thomas Wright 

Fire Protection Engineerini; 

Richard Yablonsky 

Journalism 

Robert Yakhch 

Business 



278 




Lucie Yang 

Chemistry 

Susan Yang 

Accounhng 

Jason Yantorno 

lournalism 

Tomm Yariv 

Urban Studies 

Anna Yellin 

Anthropology 



Lisa Yellin 

Hearing & Speech 

JiYi 

International Business 

Adam Yomtov 

Economics 

Dirk Yoo 

Accounting 

Sungyeol Yoon 

Radio, Television & Film 



Angelique Youells 

Education 

Bella Younano 

Electrical Engineering 

Chou Young 

Accounting 

Faye Young 

Fashion Merchandising 

Lori Young 

Accounting 



Sunny Yu 

Advertising Design 

Janet Yuen 

Biology 

Jeffrey Zahringer 

Business /DIS 

Beverly Zarr 

Mechanical Engineering 

Michael Zaversnik 

Marketing 



Jennifer Zawatsky 

Family Studies 

Romana Zdenek 

Accounting 

Martin Zerwitz 

Finance 

Quan Zhang 

American Studies 

Stephen Zielke 

Architecture 



Criminal Justice 

Carole Zuniga 

Finance 

Claire O'Reilly 

Elementary Education 



279 







"Don't wony, have a homebrew." 

Alan Hew 

"To my fellow cosmetologist/barber-stylists, 'within this multi-cultured society, op- 
portunities for a higher career in this industry, longs for the nurturement of those 
seeking... deeper' degrees ...diplomacy." 

Carl Harrison 

"I had a bloody good time, bloody good!" 

Faithpatrick Nelson 

"By the grace of God, we can make a change in this generation." 

Richard Dalgetty 

"Rock on." 

Jason Schulman 

"The only person you have to answer to is yourself." 

Debbie Liebman 

"T^ANks w\ON\ ANd dAd foR All tIhe support! I lovE you." 

Kathy Rhine 

"^ever, ever again." 

Koorosh Dehghan 

7<* /^i^a^ i^ to- t<K*t^! 

David Lehrman 

"Live youk^ college days to +ke ful'^s+y +^^^y ^^^ ^"^^ ^^^"^ years of your life." 

Deborah Chapman 

"Welcome to the terrorzone." 

Dawn Lashley 

"Savor ii wMIe you're ^ere, you can never qo bAck." 

Jacqueline Levasseur 

**Education is great, but I am ready for tlie payclieck." 

David Patrician 

"Damn, I'm finished." 

Angela Smith 



280 







**There are no other Salaynes/* 

Salayne Formica 

Lioe cuet^y motnent to tke (dhit-ifou can t ^iioe you^ ckitdkood and ickoot ye^t^f. 

Stephanie Dignan 

'What qood doth It do {or a man to ^ain the ijOovid i^et lose his/her sout?" 

Marc Butler 

"This is not an end, but only a new beginning." 

Tracey Frank 

"When they said this is the best part of your life/ they weren't referring to engineering 
majors." 

Ofer Cohen 

SINK OR SWIM. 

Ray Hann 

"I finally learned to like Vous beer." 

Allyson Matty 

"^^ cd^ not <n^ eOied^ ^le^ean^^^, Cut cn^ <Me-tc«ne foert^on^puzuce OHl^—CixAC U ccfr. 

Jennifer DeGroff 

"It was great but I'll never do it again..." 

Eric Adcock 

I m innocent ( tell you! (nnocenti 

Thomas Walker 

"Don't try to rush through, the good times are over before you know 
it!" 

Sarah Finn 

"Make sure you know what you are getting into before you pick a science major." 

Barbara Schmidt 

"Don't come here." 

Robert Escalante 



281 







"Whatever happens, happens." 

Craig Schlenoff 

"In life, you've got to stand for something or you ivill fall 
for anything." 

Rani Einziger 

"You'll hear my famous last words with my dying breath." 

Matthew Bromlett 

"I'M GLAD I'M GETTING OUT OF THIS PLACE." 

Kantesh Ahuja 

"Bring on the night." 

Jonathan Dorf 

? (Indty mabe it. Xkaaki to alt tko^e t/ttxo <^aoe tae tke (uppoht, boe atid eMou^a^emmt to keep 
o\^ <^0M<^-4kii U (fikat put hie btket^e ? ^(h today. 

Susan Hippchen 

"Ya get what ya work for." 

Sunny Yu 

"I'lVI A SENiOR...AqAiN." 

Mindi Seidel 

I MADE IT IN 4 YEARS! 

Katie Ponder 
Kathleen Diemer 

**I*ni going to get a 4*o this semester*** 

Agribusiness major 

AUDI 5000 6. 

Anonymous 

"Don't eat the fish." 

Hartley Saunders II 

"I am the master of my faith, I am the ca'<^ta\Y\ of my soul." 

Adrian Hood 



282 







iiij_i 



It's not achieving the ^oal, but it's making the journey that makes you a better 
person." 

Michael Richardson, jr. 

"In life, we face many struggles, however, if we put God first in 
whatever we do, we shall do well." 

Linroy Freeman 

"Enjoy UMCP to the fullest, it's a lot of fun!" 

Maggie Sejas 

"Ail this jusT TO qET iNTO Iaw school?" 

Erica Jacobson 

Allroy sez Have a Green Day! 

G. Jason Randall 
Budi Matondang 

**Good luck to the class of 1994!** 

Terrapin yearbook staff 




283 



^ t^af t^Mftf 



A wave can be described as a rising 
and falling action common to liquid, air, 
or other such matter in motion. A wave 
rarely occurs alone; rather it is often part 
of a series of waves. The year 1993, like 
any other year, was made of a succession 
of high points followed by low points. 
The notion of peace in the Middle East 
rode a high crest, while the increasing 
anarchy in the once Yugoslavian state 
sank to a low valley. Many days of rain 
sent waves of water in a Noah's Ark 
fashion down the mighty Mississippi, 
flooding the heartland of America, while 
the East Coast broiled in a summer's heat 
wave. 

Aside from the weather, some mortal 
actions appeared to occur often as well. A 



Edited ^ ^eH picMtet^ 

wave of hypodermic needles supposedly 
being found in Pepsi Cola cans swept 
across the country, along with a mystery 
flu. Pennant fever took hold this summer 
as well, when it appeared both the 
National and American leagues were 
going to host close finishes for the Pen- 
nant race (even the Cubs were contenders, 
thus putting an extra bit of fear into 
believers that after the floods, Armaged- 
don was near). Most disturbing though of 
any wave to appear was the tsunami 
attack of MTV's Beavis and Butthead. At 
once the nation seemed drowned in the 
actions of two legal definitions of village 
idiots, and loved every prolonged second. 
Huh huh huh, he said prolonged, huh 
huh, huh. 



Finally though, many amongst us in 
1993 gave a final wave as they rode the 
tide out to that big wave pool in the sky. 
Those departed included Fantasy Island's 
"Tatu," Raymond Burr (Perry Mason), and 
under odd circumstances, Michael 
Jordan's father, James Jordan. A couple of 
television shows, "The Wonder Years," 
and "Cheers," both left the air waves this 
year. David Letterman waved goodbye to 
NBC and sailed to CBS, while NBC 
welcomed Conan O'Brian to the late night 
air waves. Even the Pope flew into 
Denver, Colorado, to send a wave to the 
young and faithfiil gathered for a youth 
conference of biblical proportion. 






Winds of Change 

Declaring that "The times are 
changing," Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 1993 
became the second woman to sit on the 
United States Supreme Court. At her 
swearing in ceremony at the White House 
on August 10, the 60 year old women's 
rights activist said that "In my hfetime, I 
expect there will be among federal judicial 
nominees... as many sisters as brothers in 
law." Ginsburg was President Clinton's 
first nominee to the high court, and was 
overwhelmingly confirmed by the Senate. 

An Amtrak train hurtled off a bridge 
into an inky bayou in Saraland, Alabama, 
early on the morning of Sept. 22, 1993, 
plunging its sleeping passengers into a 
nightmare of fire, water, and death. A barge 
had struck the bridge shortly before the 



wreck, which killed 47 people aboard the 
cross-country Sunset Limited. Some of the 
victims were trapped in a submerged, silver 
passenger car, others in a burned engine. It 
was the deadliest wreck in Amtrack's 23- 
year history. 159 people survived, many 
helping other passengers escape. 

It was the biggest, wettest story of 
the summer. The floods that washed across 
the Midwest may have been the worst in 
American history, and they captured the 
concern of people across the nation. The 
stage for disaster was set during the winter, 
when unusually heavy snow fell. There 
were no midwinter thaws, so the snow 
melted rapidly as spring arrived, enough to 
cause scattered record flooding. Then the 
rains came. The casualties ranged from the 




thousands left homeless to investors and 
consumers in every corner of the United 
States. Insurers had to pay out millions in 
compensation. 

In Russia, a political coupe started 
when President Boris Yeltsin disbanded the 
legislature on September 21. Many hard- 
liners barricaded themselves inside the 
parliament building in Moscow. Vice 
President Alexander Rutskoi, and others, 
tried to wrestle power away from Yeltsin. 
Following Yeltsin's orders, though, tanks 
and troops flushed out the defiant 
lawmakers. 




Top right: Ruth Bader Ghisburg is sworn in as the 107th Supreme Court Justice, and the second woman . Top middle; On September 22, 1993, the Sunset Lmiited 
Amtrak train went over a bridge that collapsed into the swamp below. Bottom left; Old-Line Communists tried to regain power in Russia by staging a coupe that 
ultu-nately was crushed. Bottom right: The Great Flood of 1993 wrecked the lives of many who live in the Midwest; causing people to lose their homes. 

All photos this spread by the Associated Press 



286 



Top right: The handwriting was on the wall in what once was Yugoslavia, as the civil war in Bosnia continued to rage on in 1993. Double page spread: 
Sandbaggers desperately try to keep the rising flood waters from swamping their town during the Great Flood of 1993. Right: The Pope visited Denver, Colorado, 

bringing his harsh anti-abortion message to a youth 
convention meeting there. 




War And Peace, Dual Messages In 

1993 

The civil war in what was once Yugoslavia moved through its second year at terrible human cost: as many as 200,000 people were 
dead or missing, including 10 United Nations relief workers who had died by October. The war began in 1992 when Serbs rebelled 
over a vote by the republic's Muslims and Croats to secede from Serb-dominated Yugoslavia and form two separate governments. 
Croatia and Mushm-dominated Bosnia-Herzegovina initially allied against the more powerful Serbs, but their alliance dissolved 
amidst bitter turf battles between Croats and Muslims in the second half of 1993. 

Pope John Paul II used some of the harshest rhetoric of his 15 year papacy to decry abortion and euthanasia during the four day 
trip to the United States in August 1993. The Pope went to Denver, Colorado to visit World Youth Day, the biennial pilgrimage of 
international youth convened by the Pope. The Pope conducted a huge outdoor Mass at a park outside of Denver. 



287 



The Last 

Year,1993 



In 1993, many of our heroes and cultural icons left, to ride the waves up in the sky. 
Among the departed were Reggie Lewis, Roy Campanella, Pat Nixon, Arthur Ashe, 
Conway Twitty, Raymond Burr, Herve Villechaise, and Don Drysdale. Most disturb- 
ing thought was the sudden death of the young promising movie star. River Phoenix, 
who collapsed outside of a night club in Los Angeles. 

Though Michael Jordan was in perfect health, he ended his illustrious career in the 
NBA in 1993, just after leading the Chicago Bulls to their third straight National 
Basketball Association championship. The NBA lost its most acrobatic and prolific 
scorer when Jordan announced his retirement on October 6, 1993. 

Also dead in 1993 was the hope that peace could be achieved in Somalia. The 
fighting in Somalia has shadowed the famine that caused the original U.N. involve- 
ment. The attempt to help the starving in Somalia turned into a prolonged military 
action, that through 1993 , continued to escalate. 

Finally in 1993, Americans witnessed the first major terrorist attack to occur by 
foreigners on American soil. On February 26, 1993, the World Trade Center, in New 
York City, was bombed. This incident ended the safety from such terrorist attacks that 
Americans previously felt. 



This page: Top right: On October 6, 1993, Michael 
Jordan, star of the Chicago Bulls, announced his 
retirement from the NBA. Top row, bottom: Reggie 
Lewis-basketball player; Roy Campanella-former 
catcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers; Pat Nixon-former 
first ladv; Arthur Ashe-tennis star. Bottom row: 
Conway Twitty-country singer; Raymond Burr-actor 
famous for playing "Perry Mason"; Herve 
Villechaise-actor famous for playing "Tattoo" on the 
T\'. show FANTASY ISLAND; Don Drysdale-former 
pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Next page: 
Top left: As the fighting in Somalia increased, U.N. 
forces relied more and more on armored vehicles to 
move about the country. Top right: Sheik Omar 
Abdel-Rahman was charged with being the 
mastermind behind the Feb. 26 World Trade Center 
bombing in New York City. Bottom left: Longtime 
enemies, the PLO and Israel signed an historic peace 
agreement at the White House on September 13, 
1993. Bottom right: A U.S. soldier, assigned to the 
U.N. peace keeping force in Somalia, stands guard 
over captured ammunition. 





288 




All photos this spread by Associated Press. 



289 



A Wave of 
Young Blood 

The year of 1994 was a year with many 
new arrivals on the American Pop Culture 
scene. Bands like Arrested Development 
and Nirvana were recognized at the 10th 
annual MTV Music Video Awards. 
.Arrested Development was a rap group 
that stressed to the African American 
communitv to support African American 
businesses. Nirvana was one of many 
grunge rock bands that overtook the rock 
scene by 1994. The grunge look, thrown 
together clothes that do not always match, 
became a mainstay of high fashion. 
Flannelwas in, along with Dr. Marten 
boots and old ripped blue jeans. 

On the television set, the upstart TV 
show Seinfeld became one of the most 
watched and popular sit-coms on the 
tube. Seuifeld has done well at the Emmy 
Awards and was by 1994, the big show 
on prime time TV. Other very popular 
shows included Beverly Hills 90210, 
Melrose Place, and Northern Exposure. 
Football fans late in 1994 received a 
surprising announcement when the Fox 
Television Network out bid CBS for the 
rights to air NFC games. CBS had carried 
the NFC for 40 years. 

The new President, Bill CUnton, in his 
first vear in office experienced a shaky 
ride, bringing issues like Gays in the 
militarv and Health Care Reform into the 
national spotlight. Clinton appointed his 
wife, Hillarv, to head a commission 
looking at Health Care in the U.S. 




J op - nawanan miiik) wrestler Salevaa Atisanoe, also 
known as "Meat Bomb", faces stiff opposition. Bottom 
left - Bill Clinton and Al Gore at a White House book 
fair. Bottom right - First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton 
heads a commission on Health Care Reform. 




290 




Top left: The cast of Seinfeld collects their Emmy 
Awards. Top right: Miss America pageant winner 
Kimberly Clarice Aiken waves to fans as she 
prepares to start on her year long reign. Middle: 
Grammy Awards "Newcomer of the year" Arrested 
De\'elopment, accepts their MTV Video award for 
best "Rap Video." Bottom: Grunge became a 
household word in 1994, thanks in part to the 
grinding hard rock sound of Seattle's Nirvana. 




ri> If 




All photos this spread by Associated Press 

291 



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(j^omejoin one of the nation's leading 
(O progressive grocery retailers! 

Safeway has a few management training openings for people who are 
interested in developing a diverse set of business leadership skills. 

Computers • Customer Relations • Marketing 
Managing • Accounting • Human Relations 

A management position offers: 

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• piiiti vacations • coiitiiitioiis career dcvclopiiiciit/traiiiiii^^ 

• ciiiploi/cc association • fricinili/ work cuvironiiiciit • credit iiiiioii 



Safeway 



It n m.magL'ment Ciireer with Sntuwdv is of interest to vim, 

submit n resume to the Siitewnv Mcinngement Tmining 

Coordinator at the tollo\\ ing location: 

Safewtiv Training School 

7700 Little Ri\'er turnpike 

Annandale, VA 22003 

SAR'VVAV IS A\ KQUAI 

OI'l'OKTL\ITV/Af-RKMATIVK 

ACTION HMI'ltntK 



TRW Systems 



The only limitations you v\ ill have are 
the limits of your own imagination. 

Localcd in ihe Norllicm Vlryinui ;iic;i. TRW\ .S>^lcnls i:)i\isioii 
is al llic lorclronl (ilsunc-ol-llic-art innmalisc syslcnis cnsziiiccr- 
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InlcgraLini; large inlelligenee soliuare systems llial process vol- 
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We re lookint: lor lalenlcd people like yon to jom our SD leam 
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Consider a career « itli TRW and enjoy a compeletive lienchls 
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Piolessional Placement. Department IMI). One IVderal 
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Equal OpportuniEy Hrntjloyei 

U.S Cilizenship may Oe required lor some positions 



Be part of a global 
enterprise with 
__COMSAT 



TmTm 




The merger of com- 
munications and informa- 
tion technologies opens exciting 
new career paths for college graduates 
who want to work on the leading edge of 
technology. To learn more about career options 
with COMSAT, send your resume to Human 
Resources, Dept. UM-1. 



1^0,' 



COMSAT 



Laljoratones 



An equal opportunity empkj/er 



22300 Comsal Drive 
Clarksburg. MD 20871 



294 



Giant food 

Career 

Development 

Program 



We want to recruit 
qualified people . ... for 

our manager trainee program. 
If you are personable, 
ambitious, and want a career 
with a future, 

WE WANT TO TALK WITH 



YOU! 



Equal Opportunity Employer 




Send Resume to: 

Ricki Cranston, Employment Manager 
P.O. Box 1804 Dept, 549, Washington D.C. 20013 



Genius is just an accident 
waiting to happen. 













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YOU ne\cr kno\A when j luck\ accideni and an 
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That's whs ,AT&T i.s in\oived in so nian> programs 
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,Ai -\uvi , 'AC Know iiiji the quality of life 
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So you can rest assured that our commitment to 
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AT&T 

The right choice. 



295 




CongratuCations 

1994 

University of MaryCand 

graduates 




Your Supplier of Quality 
Seating & Systems Furniture 



State Use Industries 



ia 



Division of Correction 

23 Fontana Lane. Suite 105 

Baltimore, Mar\land 21237 

(410) 780-4050 



1 



:> 







A SHANE GROUP COMPANY 

BOB RUSSELL 

President 



• SHELTERS 
• BLEACHERS 
SPECTATOR SEATING 
PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES 
• PUBLIC RESTROOMS 
CONCESSION STANDS 
' SHOWER BUILDINGS 
• SPORTS CENTERS 



P.O. Box 900 • Greenville, AL 36037 
205-382-7435 




Wood's 
orists, qnc. 




Family Owned and 
Operated Since 1938 



Fresh Flowers • Plants • Fruit Baskets 
Corsages • Balloons • Dish Gardens 

Open Mon. - Sat. 

Major Credit Cards Honored 

Please Call For Information and Prices 

9066 Baltimore Blvd • College Park 
(301) 474-7000 




Knoons College Park Ford 

The Customer Is Our Job" 



Largest Selection of New And Used Cars & Trucks, 
AAA Approved, Largest Parts inventory. Facilities 
Ford Rentol Cars , Sales & Leasing, Service Night 
Drop Available 



College Park 
(U.S^ 1)8315 Baltimore Blvd. 

474-5100 



Falls Church 
1051 East Broad Street 

241-7200 



McDonald 
Auto Body Works 

Complete Body & Fender Repairing & Painting 
• 24 Hour Wrecker Service • 

4801 Baltimore Ave. 

HyattsvUle, MD 

864-3858 



S. F. criAY 



N. StiACKLETTT 



At Marriott, Service Is The Ultimate Luxury. 



When you stay with 
us, you'll always be 
pampered. In our 
restaurants, in our 
lounges, at the 
pool, in your room. 
Because we take th 

word "guest" very 
seriously. That why 




Maniott people have 
gained the reputation 
of being the 
friendliest, best 
trained folks in the 
business. We know 
we're not only working 
to serve you today. We're 
workmg to bring you back. 



GAITHERSBURG 

Harriott 

WASHINGTONIAN CENTER 

9751 Washinglonian Boulevard, Gailhersburg, MD 20878 
(301) 590-0044 Fax; (301)212-6155 



296 



jl»^al nU. 456 • A7-^-6^G 



Wayne Adams, President 

Aruther Bridgett, Vice President 

Mark G. Greenfiled, Business Manager 

Emmett Gardner. Financial Secretary/Treasurer 

3217 fZtA^ Stxttt. nt.B. - "UkuA^K^to^i. Z>.e- 200 1 7 
635-^429 



DONOHOE 

CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

2101 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 

Washington, DC. 20007 

(202) 333-0880 



stamp Student Union 

"We're Here For You* 



o 



o 



,^P*'"^<5o,^ 



o. 



Roy Rogers 



Roy Rogers Restaurant 

1099 Winterson Rd., Suite 200 

Linthicum, Maryland 21090 

(410) 859-8618 



J. MILTON BAKER CO., INC. 



"THE CLEAN STOP" 



Extraction Machines 
Floor Machines 
Industrial Vacuums 



• Seminars 

• Janitor Supplies 

Cleaning Chemicals 



12371 Wilkins Avenue 

Rocl<ville, Maryland 20852 

301-881-8777 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 
CLASS OF 1994 



ff 



STANDARD FEDERAL 
SAVINGS BANK 



P.O. BOX 9481 

DEPARTMENT 0141 

GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND 20898-9481 

EOEM/F/V/H 



(^ompliments Of A priend 



297 




NASA's Mission to Planet Earth has identi- 
fied a crucial need: to improve our understand- 
ing of Earth's climate and the role humans play 
in affecting its changes. Loral AeroSys, as part 
of a cooperative effort lead by Hughes Informa- 
tion Technology Company, has been chosen to 
play a major role in building and operating key 
elements for the Earth Observing System Data 
and Information System (EOSDIS) project. 

Scheduled to last into the beginning of the 
next century, this unprecedented project is one 
of the largest information management systems 
ever created. It encompasses spacebased ob- 
servatories, traditional mission data processing 
facilities, sophisticated data archive centers and 
extensive networking capabilities for direct 
on-line electronic access by users to data and 
each other. 

On-going demands will offer college gradu- 
ates a wide variety of opportunities to be a part 
of this historic project. If your area of interest 
and education is in any of the following areas, 
we are interested in hearing from you: 

• Object oriented programs 

• Communications and networking 

• Open systems architecture 

• X-Windows/MOTIF user 
interface development 

• Data archive and distributions systems 

• Data communications and 
systems management 

• Database management systems 

• Systems engineering 

The data collected on EOSDIS is expected 
to have enormous potential for use in public 
and private research. Your involvement could 
launch your career to the foreft"ont of this evolv- 
ing field. If you are interested in this program 
or would like to explore other opportunities at 
Loral AeroSys, send your resume to: Loral 
AeroSys, Human Resources, Attn: TERP, 7375 
Executive Place, Seabrook, MD 20706. Loral 
Corporation is a high-technology company that 
primarily concentrates in defense electronics 
and space communications. A committed equal 
opportunity employer M/F/DA'. 



AeroSys 



298 



COME GROW WITH US! 

CHESAPF7\KF. DIF^ECTORY SALES COMPANY, the official 
bdlub dgt'm:y lor ihu C & P Ytllow Pages has career opportunities 
in our offices located In Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. 
These positions will be responsible for functions in one of the 
following firpas: 



• Inside Sales 

• Marketing 

• Training 

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Facilities 



• Outside Sales 

• Accounting 

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• Systems 



These positions are exceptional opportunities offering a 
competitive starting salary and an outstanding benefits package 
including medical, 401 (K) savings plan and tuition reimbursement. 

If you are interested in being part of our dynamic company, 
please call our job line number for available openings: 
(301) 306-1580 




CHESAPEAKE DIRECTORY SALES CO. 

Human Resources Department 

6404 Ivy Lane, Suite 100 

Greenbelt, MD 20770 

An EEO/AA Employer 
A Bell Alianlic/GTE Partnership 



DAMES & MOORE 



ENGINEERING EXCELLENCE 
ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY 

Dames & Moore Is an international environmental consulting 
and engineering firm providing services in the areas of 
planning, engineering, the earth and environmental sciences, 
waste management, hazardous waste site investigations, 
asbestos management and design and regulatory assistance. 

Our expanding business is creating opportunities for 
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relevant degree and experience in waste management, 
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Moore has offices in major metro areas throughout the United 
States. 



• Air Quality Engineers 

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• Civil Engineers 

■ Environmental Engineers 

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• Risk Assessment Analysts 

• Toxicologists 



Dames & Moore offers competitive salaries, flexible benefits 
{including 401K), and opportunities for growth. If you seek 
challenge and variety, please send your resume to; 

Sandra Smith 
DAMES & MOORE 

DepI Terrapin 
Suite 700, 7101 Wisconsm Avenue, Bethesda, N/laryland 20814 



We sre an equal opportunity employer. 
WOMEU S, MINORITIES ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY 




Even the sky^ not the limit. 



At Hughes Network Systems (HNS) we're not only reaching for 
the outer limits of new technology, we re helping to define them 
And as we work to create cutting-edge technologies for our 
clients worldwide, we create, for our employees, an environment 
that fosters ingenuity and growth 

Today Hughes Network Systems supplies 70 percent of the 
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and C-band satellite networks Were also involved in the devel- 
opment of some of today's most future-oriented technologies. 
Our success is reflected by our phenomenal compounded 
annual growth rate of 40 percent since 1987. 

If you stnve for a chance to apply your solid academic background 
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Engineering to a career that will enable you to fulfill your poten- 
tial, look into the opportunities we have in the following areas: 

• Satellite communications 

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• Networking theory and engineering 

• Real-time microprocessor software design and 
development 

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• Analog RF circuit design 

• ATM hardware development 

• Manufacturing technology 

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You'll work in an environment that welcomes and values 
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We offer an excellent compensation and benefits package 
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Lane. Germantown. MD 20876. An equal opportunity employer 

HUGHES 

NETWORK SYSTEMS 



Subsidiary of 
Hughes Aircraft Company 



299 




V' 



A Classic Symbol Of 

VISION 

At Chevy Chase, F.S.B. we are continuously moving toward the future^ If you have a desire to become part of this 

professional environment that allows you to excel please call the appropriate location of interest. 

We offer an outstanding benefits package and competitive salaries for both our full-time and part-time employees! 

OUR LOCATIONS: 



8401 Connecticut Avenue 

Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815 (301) 907-5600 

Hearing Impaired candidates please call 

our TDD number: (301) 907-5815 

Data Processing • Finance/Accounting 



7700 Old Georgetown Road 

Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-5600 

Hearing Impaired candidates please call 

our TDD number: (301) 907-5815 

Savings Branches • Consumer Lending 
B,F. Saul Mortgage Company 



5300 Spectrum Drive 

Frederick, Maryland 2 1 70 1 (301) 620-8400 

Hearing Impaired candidates please call 

our TDD number: (301) 620-8383 

m 

Credit Card Operations 

6200 Chevy Chase Drive 

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@ 

Checking/Savings Operations 

Telemarketing 




CHEWCHASEfsb 



CCSB has a diug-free workplace policy EOE M/F/D/V 



Congratulations 

to the 

Graduating Class of 1994 

From 

NaOR U. StOEHR, M.D., P.A. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



7610 Carroll Avenue, Suite 220 
(301)445-0400 



Takoma Park, Maryland 
(301) 891-6123 



Trick Trucks 



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300 




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FAX 202.296.9 1 03 E-mail: bool<s@reiters.coiii 



Welcome 
to the 
REAL 
WORLD 



That's what everyone calls life 
after college, but we keep trying 
to cfiange the "real" world. 

We want to make it better. 

We want safer workplaces. We 
want justice and dignity on the 
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^^^**imi. 




THOMAS R. McNUTT 
President 






C. JAMES LOWTHERS 
Secretary- Treasurer 



301 



Congratuiations Ciass oj 1993 




Advertising for this ijtarbook^tuas professionalCy mar(<:s-ted 6y Collegiate Concepts, Inc., 
AtCanta, Qeorgia. "We cordially invite inquiries from faculty adtnsors, editors and puSCisHers' 
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302 



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your Placement Officer today 
about opportunities with MCI. An 
Equal Opportunity Employer. 



303 



GEICO 



The Graduating 
Class Of 

1994 

We wish you every success in the future and hope that one 
day we may count you and your family among the mem- 
bers of GEICO's family of policyholders. As one of metro- 
politan Washington's largest employers, we're more than 
just a company that offers good rates and good service for 
good drivers. GEICO is a company that offers a challenging 
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reer choice in the years to come. 

For Employment Opportunities, Contact: 

Deborah Lipsey 

301-986-2954 




Government Employees Insurance Company 
Home Office: ^Mashington, DC 20076 



304 



•Y)oeSNT FIT ooR I MAGf. '-iSo 
^ ^A««^f rf's Not OOR 



llfAiT FOR rnecoMwitTeeT''DEciDe. 

'VST' 





We believe 

in developing ideas. 

Not excuses. 

It seems like some 
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them work. Maybe they're afraid of the 
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At Landis & Gyr Powers, we not only 
thrive on change, we create it by giving our employ- 
ees the power to continuously implement better ideas and better 
solutions. That's what sets us apart. That's what makes us the 
innovation leader in HVAC technology. 

Today, as we participate in landmark projects worldwide, 
you could join us in sales or engineering and help develop the 
systems that will run tomorrow's "smart" buildings. 

Get the facts. Send a resume to: Landis & Gyr Powers, 
Inc., Attn: Human Resources Dept. LM94, 1000 
Deerfield Parkway, Buffalo Grove, IL 
60089. Ecjual Opportiimty 
Employer WF/DA. 
Women and minorities 
are encouraged to apply. 




LANDIS & GYR 



EMJAY 



ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 



General and Mechanical Construction 



MICHAEL O. SCHERR 

President 



4205 MENLO DRIVE 

BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 21215-3372 

(410)358-3200 

Fax: (410)358-9514 



ConsrutuUtions and Best Wishes 

To The GradMHni Class of 1994 

From 

_|L/A\INI 1^ 



CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION 



965 EAST MAIN STREET 



MERIDEN, CT 06450 



Constructors of the College Park/ 
University of Maryland Metro Station 



305 



^IliedSignal 

^-^A EROSPACE 



The six thousand people who are AlliedSignal Technical 
Services Corporation are doing many fascinating things, in 
groups of two or three or a hundred or a thousand, at many 
interesting places in the United States and overseas. Lii<e 
Maryland, California, Texas, Bermuda, Europe, Africa 

Our continuing growth, spells opportunity. Opportunity, in 
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We may have just the right opportunity for you in our diverse 
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If interested, please write to the Professional Placement 
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ONE BENDIX ROAD 

COLUMBIA, MD 21045 



An Equal Oppoilvnily Enptoyer 




Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum, P.C. 

Architecture, Engineerng, Planning, 
Interiors, Facilities Consulting 



Congratulates 

to the 

University of Maryland 

Class of 1994 



O" 



^pWmeo/^ 



Q. 




First National Bank 

OFMARYLANOX 



Post Office Box 1596 • Baltimore, Maryland 21203 




CAfwi Construction Co., Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS & BUILDERS 



CAM Construction company wishes to express 
our sincere gratitude for tiie opportunity to build 
for the success of past and future generations. 



MATH BUILDING - U.M.C.P. 
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Suite 201 

Timonium, Maryland 21093-3116 



306 



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i2l 



Compliments 

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1883 Brightseat Road 

Landover, Maryland 20785 

301-386-3116 • FAX 301-386-3260 



CIANBRO CORPORATION 

Hunnewell Square 

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207-487-3311 • FAX 207-487-3734 



307 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

To The Graduating Class of 1994 

from 




TRIANGLE 
GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 




GENERAL CONTRACTING 



INC. 



CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 



INTERIOR DESIGN 



Constructors of the University of Maryland 
Computer, Space, and Science Building 



7504 Connelley Drive, Suite L 

Hanover, Maryland 21076 

(410) 760-8400 



308 



Physical and Life Sciences, Engineering 
Professionals and Future Graduates: 



^BBlSHEeiSSEi 



PA(BE:- 



mmm 





q|^?^^- 



f 



In A Challenging Career 
As A Patent Examiner 

We invite applications fi"om professionals and future 
graduates in the following areas of specialization: 
Engineers - Aeronautical, Agricultui-al, Biomedical, 
Ceramic,Qiemical,CivD,Computer,Electrical, Engi- 
neering Physics, General, Industiial, Mechaniciil, 
Metallurgical, Nuclear, Petroleum, Polymer Science. 
Life Sciences - Biochemistry, Biology, Biomedical, 
Biotechnology, Botany, Horticulture, Microbiology, 
Pharmacology. Physical Sciences - Chemisti7, 
Physics. Design - Art, Architecture, and Graphics. 
Textile Technology. 



For more information 
call (703) 305-8231. 

Send your resume or SF-171 to: 

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office 

P.O. Box 171 

Washington, DC 20231 



.y^tNTO^ 




■^^flADEVA^^^ 



U.S. Citizenship required for employment. 
An equal opportunity employer. 



309 





Best Wishes to 



310 




The Class of 1994 



311 



Best Wishes to... 




.<:^j^S'«^ L- / ' .. 4 ■ 



312 



The Class of 1994 




313 



Ike ^md t^aife 



ibiteb lif ^iaa J>U(^an 



Over the course of the year, the 
Terrapin staff put in hundreds of hours 
designing, writing and producing the 
pages of this yearbook. Nearly every 
word, hne and photograph in these 
320 pages were produced by students. 
Without their constant team effort and 
comoraderie, this book would never 
have been possible. 

It has been the goal of the staff to 
provide new and exciting dimensions 
to the book. The unconventional 
theme, Creating Waves, was the first 
step of this process. Then, they took 
great pains to learn new computer 




technics and search for new ideas to 
provide the best possible graphics and 
color, with enough complexity to be 
interesting, yet plenty of simplicity to be 
appealing. 

1993 was a year of learning, of change, 
and of yearning to be different. In some 
way, each student created a wave, and no 
wave was the same, and no wave could 
ever be repeated. This was our goal for 
this yearbook as well. 

The following pages are dedicated to 
the staff that was dedicated to making 
Terrapin 1994 the top-quality publication 
that it is. 





Terrapin 1994 Staff 




Cottege Park - U of KM Station 

Terrapin 1994 Staff - (from left) Dana Sears, photographer; Giselle Goicochea, writer; Matilde Ott, Resident Life editor: Ben Werner, Year-in-Review editor; Tyrone 
Brooks, photographer; Joanne Saidman, photography editor; Paul Vieira, photographer; Gina Dugan, editor-in-chief; Robm Solomon, Managing editor; Rob Renner, 
Business manager. Not pictured: Christie Huston, Allison Chang, Farid Siahatgar. 




Photo bv Joanne Saidman 



Photo by Joanne Saidman 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



316 




Photo bv lodnne Saidman 

Opposite page: Bottom left - Ben Werner, Year-in-Review editor. Bottom 
center - Christie Huston, Organizations editor. Bottom right - Farid 
Siahatgar, Sports editor. 

This page: Top left - Robin Solomon, Managing Editor and Academics 
editor. Top right - Matilde Ott, Resident Life editor and cover designer. 
Center left - Joanne Saidman, Photo editor and Greeks editor. Bottom 
left - Allison Chang, Seniors editor. Bottom right - Rob Renner, Business 
Manager. 



Photo bv Paul Vieira 



317 



Terrapin 1994 marks the 93rd volume 
of the University of Maryland at College 
Park yearbook. Jostens Printing & Pub- 
lishing Company produced the 320-page 
book with a trim size of 9X12", press rim of 
1,500, 16 process color pages and 16 sec- 
ond-color pages. The book was printed 
on 80-pound matte paper at their plant in 
State College, Pennsylvania. 

The cover artwork and design were 
conceived and created by Matilde Ott. It 
was embossed with Whirlpool Graining, 
with brush-script Blue-Green 343 letter- 
ing on a Navy (Basin 517) background. 
Divider pages were conceived and cre- 
ated by Gina Dugan. All pages, with the 
exception of 58-59, were designed and 
executed on PageMaker 4.2 on the Apple 
Macintosh II. 

Eric Manto ser\'ed as our Jostens com- 
pany representative with Linda Nolf act- 
ing as the in-plant publishing consultant. 
Carl Wolf Studio of Sharon Hill, Pennsyl- 
\'ania, photographed the graduates and 
supplied the Terrapin photographers with 
photography supplies. Collegiate Con- 
cepts Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia, sold the 
advertisements. 

The body copy of the book was set in 1 
point Palatino, the cuthnes in 8 point 
Palatino, and photo credits in 6 point 
Palatino. If all photos on a spread were 
taken by one photographer, that photo 
credit was set in 8 point. The rest of the 
book contained headlines from the Re- 
porter, Brush Script and Palatino families 
with few exceptions to provide variety. 
Wavy headline graphics were computer- 
generated by Gina Dugan using Adobe 
TypeAlign for the Macintosh. 

In order to meet pre-set deadlines, cov- 
erage in the Sports section contains photo- 
graphs and stories from the 1 992-93 sea- 
son for winter sports, and the 1993 season 
for all other sports. 

Groups pictured in the Organizations 
section paid for their space. Pages were 
sold at the rate of $1 00 per page, or $50 per 
half page. The pages were purchased on 
a first come, first-served basis. 

Yearbooks could be pre-ordered dur- 
ing the fall semester for a reduced price of 
$28. After January 1, 1994, the price was 
$35. Shipping was $6. 

The views expressed in Terrapin 1994 
do not necessarily express the views of 
Maryland Media or any of its affiliates, or 
the University of Maryland at College 
Park. The Terrapin staff is made up en- 
tirely of students of the university. Ad- 
dress any inquiries to: Editor, Terrapin, 
3101 South Campus Dining Hall, College 
Park,MD 20742. 

Copyright 1994 The Terrapin Staff and 
Maryland Media, Inc. All rights reserved. 




Pholo b\' r.nil \ iL'ira 



318 



t^oi^f I^Mm tke iditoi^ 



What a year. 1993 was filled with many trials 
and tribulations for studentson campus, through- 
out the nation, and throughout the world. From 
the floods in the United States to battling con- 
flicts abroad, our world is far from perfect, and it 
struggles every day to keep people alive, healthy 
and at peace. It all makes my endeavor here at 
the Terrapin seem so small. After this long year, 
I have many people to thank for their love, sup- 
port and encouragement. 

First, thank you Mom and Dad, the two great- 
est influences in my life. The two of you have 
supporteci me, pushed me, yelled at me, put me 
in my place, listened to my tears and laughed at 
my corny jokes. 1 love you both very much! 

Thanks to Rosie, without you I would have 
never had the opportunity to spend all four years 
here at Maryland... and that means 1 never would 
have had the chance to edit this book. I owe you 
a lot. Like you always say, "One good turn 
deserves another." And like 1 always say, "1 owe 
you a lot of turns." 

Thanks to all the members of my staff. You all 
worked very hard for one demanding, pushy, 
sometimes loony editor. Robin, you were my 
savior. You showed more dedication to this 
publication than 1 have seen in a staff member in 
a long time. You have grown with the book and 
1 know you will do a fantastic job next year. I'll 
be here to make sure you don't cjuit! (Like Paul 
keeps threatening to do.) Speaking of Paul, 
thank you for being there not just this year, but 
for all the years of excellent photography you 
provided. Have an assignment? Paul will be 
there! What would we have done without you? 
You will be missed greatly when you graduate 
next year. 

Tyrone, the sports photography is awesome. 
How do you DO it? You were instrumental in 
making the section look absolutely terrific. 
Thanks. Dana, you did a great job on your first 
year. Keep it up, I know you will do great things 
for this publication. And Maggie, thank you so 
much for your huge shipment of photos. I hope 
you enjoyed your semester abroad. I missed 
having you around! Thankfully, the book still 
got to benefit from some of your great photogra- 
phy. 

Joanne, you really came through for me this 
year by becoming photo editor. Your bubbly 
personality made those late nights before dead- 
line so much more fun, especially when I got to 
make fun of you. Thanks for all your hard work 
and dedication. 

Farid, I know we had our differences this 
year. I hope your yearbook career is not over, 
because you are a very talented individual. 
Maybe we'll see you around next year. 

Rob, my "friend for life," you were the best 
business manager the Terrapin has seen in years. 
Sorry you didn't get all the credit you deserve. 
Ernston Young (or however you say it) is getting 
one awesome employee. 



Christie, you stress monster, you really gave 
a lot to the Organizations section and 1 appreci- 
ate all the effort. I'm proud of you for being able 
to sell more pages than we sold last year. I hope 
you get over your fear of the computer (now 
where IS that "on" button???). 

Ben, what's your new title? Last year it was 
"Phantom Staffer," but this year you actually ciid 
some work. Let's see, how about "Cool Groovy 
Hip Six-Page Section Man?" 1 think the title suits 
you. Thanks for doing all your stuff and actually 
making deadline. I'll miss your weird sense of 
humor. 

Matilde, could you have been any sicker this 
semester? May the rest of college bring you 
healthier days. I do appreciate your giving ev- 
erything you could to the book, however. I know 
it was hard to balance everything. 1 hope your 
"cover curse" ends this year! 

Allison, I know you love me, even though I 
locked you out of the office when you wanted to 
do your section. Thanks for putting in all the 
time, and for being one of the few who signed up 
for senior pictures and actually showed up for all 
your shifts. Allison and 1 wish not to thank all 
you idiot seniors who did not get your pictures 
taken. You are all jerks. 

Thanks to Giselle for writing endless articles. 
1 hope you get over your comma problem some- 
day. Ha ha! Your writing was great and it was 
wonderful to know I had a writer 1 could really 
depend on to get real quotes from real people... 
and get them on time. Thank you Kara for 
writing those sports articles. You saved me we 
were experiencing overload. 

To the Maryland Media board, thanks for all 
those exciting meetings. 1 wish I could be on the 
board for the rest of my life, I had so much fun. 
Michael, thanks for all those great highlighters. 
Sorry it took me so long to get that box back to 
you! I hope you agree that this is the "best book 
ever" since I kept telling you that all year. I just 
wish we had more copies of it to go around! 

Thanks to Maggie Levy for being so much fun 
to pick on and boss around. 1 just love you! And 
I know you will miss me feverishly when I'm 
gone. Don't worry, I'll be here to harass you next 
year. 

Thanks to Greg , Robin and Joan for giving me 
all the computer help. Robin, thanks for aiding 
in getting our new floppy drive. It works great! 
And thanks to all three of you for letting us use 
your computers when ours was down. 

I also want to give a great big thank- vou to 
Eric Manto, who helped me train the staff, learn 
many computer tricks anti come up with new 
and exciting ideas. As the famous artist John 
Cage once said, "I can't understand why people 
are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the 
old ones." Eric, you encouraged me to do the 
original things that appear in this book. You 
were an inspiration when my mind was blank. 
Thanks for all the support. You are an awesome 



sales rep. 

Thanks to Linda Nolf, our Plant Consultant. 
You were a great communicator this year, and 
you help me keep everything in line. You are 
really great at your job, and so nice on top of it! 

Gwen, "my best-friend-female-at-school," 
what would I do without you to make sure that 
I did not die of eternal stress? You saw to it that 
I enjoyed the fun things, like getting drunk and 
puking my brains out on my 21st birthday. 
Thanks, I think! You have been a truly great 
friend. 

Thanks to Sigma Kappa for being real sisters, 
for not selling out, for being individuals, for 
supporting me and for giving me incentive to 
keep my GPA up. You might not be the biggest 
name, but you are the best house on campus with 
the most awesome sisters and don't you ever 
forget it. 1 will miss vou all when I leave. 

Absolutely most importantly, thank you Ja- 
son, my future husband, for always being there 
and understanding. You took care of me when I 
was sick, you listened when I was upset, and you 
have given me the best three years of my life. You 
are, no question about it, the most wonderful 
man alive. I love you very much and I am 
counting the days until I can call myself Gina 
Hicks. 

Finally, to the students of the University of 
Maryland College Park, thanks for giving me 
things to write about. Without you, there would 
be no Terrapin. May you continue to strive for 
excellence academically and socially. I look for- 
ward to the day when I can come back to Mary- 
land and see students who all get involved, show 
support for each other, get along and buy the 
yearbook. Thanks to those students who have 
already done these things (especially buying the 
yearbook). 

For those of you who actually read all this, 
have a great life and remember my name. When 
1 am rich and famous, this book will be a collector's 
item, and all your friends will wish they had 
bought it. (Stop laughing, it's true!) Until then, 
I'm... 




Gina Dugan 

Editor-in-Chief 

Terrapin 1994 

Opposite page: 

Top - Terrapin 1994 Editor-in-Chief, Gina Dugan. 
Bottom - Another exciting staff meeting. The poor 
staff had to miss Tlic Siiiifsoiis again. 



319 




Pliolo by r.iul 



320