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Full text of "The Terrapin"









itfif 

Exposing 
Ourselves 















Terrapin 1995 




Terrapin 1995 

The University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

Volume 94 




Photo by Eric Lasky 

XPOSING OURSELVES 



Robin Solomon, Editor-in-Chief 




A 



Photo by Joanne Saidman 




Contents 



Maryland In Pictures 



Student Life 



Sports 



Resident Life 



Academics 



Greeks 



Seniors 



4 



36 



82 



146 



166 



186 



206 



Organizations 



264 






The Year In Review 



284 



Ad^ 



292 



Closing 



314 





LAND IN 



PICTURES 



EDITED BY ROBIN SOLOMON 

One of the easiest things to have done, and also the most fun, was 
to expose "Maryland In Pictures. " This campus was beautiful and the 
people who spent time on campus whether as students, faculty or 
visitors made a profound impact on the school. 

The campus offered students the landscapes and backgrounds to 
enhance all sorts of occasions. In the springtime, there was not a 
more romantic spot for a date than sitting at the fountain on 
McKeldin Mall with a loved one. McKeldin Mall also provided 
sunbathers the ideal location when the sun was bright and the classes 
were boring. Students made their own adventures during the winter 
months when campus became a snow covered playground. What- 
ever the season, Maryland students took advantage of the campus 
and made the most of the elements offered by nature. 

Aside from the physical aspects, the best thing about the campus 
were the people who enjoyed being here. The diversity at UMCP 
added greatly to the reasons why students chose to come to the 
school. The scenery shots were easy to take, but the challenge and 
the reward came from exposing the people who made the true 
beauty of Maryland come alive. 



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MARYLAND IN PICTURES 






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Photo by Maggie Soladay 



Photo by Aynat Ravin 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



Opposite page - Top - Byrd Stadium offers more tfian just entertainment for this jogger. Bottom left - Who needs to call mom and dad when 
there is a Most Machine near by. Bottom right - Campus student groups show their diversity at the First Look Fair. Opposite page - Top 
left - Plenty of condoms are available for students at the First Look Fair. Top right - "Spin the Terrapin" and other forms of fun entertain 
students at the All Niter. Bottom - Juggling studies and pins is an easy task for these students on the Mall. 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 

Top left - A student displays his school devotion and struts his stuff, leg brace and all. Top right - College is a time to take a stand. Bottom 
- Everyone , no matter the age, can show their Maryland pride . Opposite page - Top - Taking time out to smell the flowers in between studying . 
Bottom left - The Treble Makers give some attitude during the Art Attack. Bottom right - When there were courts, there were some intense 
games. 



8 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 





I 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



Photo by Maggie Soladay 



10 




Photo by Paul Vieira 

Opposite page - Top - Matt Caplan finds time away from making catchy posters to put in some quality studying. Bottom left - A crowd gathers 
to buy tickets for the games at the Ail Niter. Bottom right - Erasable Ink amuses many students during one of its performances at the All 
Niter. This page - Snap! Without the crackle and pop. 



11 




Top - Tailgating always calls for good food. Bottom left - Passing time 
outside of the Union. Bottom right - Hey, these cheerleaders are always 
showing their stuff. Opposite page - Top left - If you have to study at least 
do it with food. Top right - There is always a crowd around free stuff even 
at Art Attack. Bottom - The Dance Team keeps smiling even in the heat. 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



12 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



13 






MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




Photo by Gwen Elliott 



Photo by Aynat Ravin 



14 




Photo by Gwen Elliott 

Opposite page - Top - A band at the All Niter provides entertainment. Bottom left - The fountain on the Mall makes a perfect spot to study. 
Bottom right - A student gets high at the First Look Fair. This page - Top left - The Greeks know that all work and no play would not be 
much fun. Top right - Outside of the Union, students take advantage of a clothing swap. Bottom - The picture perfect world of the Maryland 
campus really does take your breath away. 



15 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 

This page - Diversity and fun mix at Art Attack when a cowboy brings out his whips. Opposite page - Top left - Members of Erasable Inc. 
perform at the All Niter. Top right - Everyone attended the First Look Fair. These guys even made a point to bring their dog. Bottom - 
The Mighty Sound of Maryland play their hearts out during a football game at Byrd Stadium. 



16 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




Plioto bv Gwen Elliott 



17 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



Photo by Gwen Elliott 



18 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 

Opposite page - Top - One of the several classic signs that greet students and passers by alike on the Route. Bottom left - Studying in the 
grass is a favorite pastime of many. Bottom right - Outside of the Union, an ECO worker empties recycling into the truck. This page - A 
window in Somerset provides this student with a new type of lounge chair. Don't fall! 



19 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



Photo by Maggie Soladay 



20 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



Opposite page - Top - Maryland fans show their spirit at a football game. Bottom left - Some say this campus has gone to the dogs. Bottom 
right - This student finds a new way to carry her books to class. This page - Top left - Ag Day brought out the animal in everyone. Top right 
- These students are all smiles at their All Niter booth. Bottom - Acoustic entertainment at the All Niter. 



21 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



This page - UMCP is a campus of serious bikers. Opposite page - Top left - These students look like they plan on camping out in class. 
Top right - The beautiful weather provided for some intense outside classes. Bottom. If you are lost, we will find you. 



22 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 





Photo by Tyrone Brooks 

This page - Top left - Becky Bishop poses with Woodsy at Ag Day. "Give a hoot, don't pollute. " Top right - Those Greeks are having some 
real fun making Egyptian pyramids during Greek Week. Bottom - This boy needs to learn how to read with his eyes open before he comes 
to college. Opposite page - Top - Students keeping up with the important news in the worid. Bottom left - The D.J. at the All Niter looks 
like he heard something off-key. Bottom right - Taking advantage of a lovely day to stroll to class. 



24 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




All Photos on this page by Maggie Soladay. 

25 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




All photos on this page by Maggie Soladay. 
This page - Top - Maybe the showers in the dorms were too crowded 
for these students in the fountain. Bottom left - Gina Dugan hands 
some chips to an anxious youngster at the All Niter. Bottom right - 
"I can fly! " Opposite page - Top left - Maryland students seem to study 
better by the water. Top right - Happy sorority girls on the row. 
Bottom - It is always more enjoyable when friends go to class together. 



26 




Photo by Gwen Elliott 



27 




Photo by Eric Lasky 

This page - The Mighty Sound of Maryland has dedicated musicians to play with all their heart and soul. Opposite page - Top left - A pretty 
view from the Mall. Top right - The struggle, the agony; these students put their all into not losing at the arm wrestling booth at the All Niter. 
Bottom - These games during Greek Week give new meaning to full contact sports. 



28 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




Photo by Paul Vieira 

29 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 

This page - Top left - Something has averted this student's interest away from his studying. Top right - A lone spectator at Shipley Field 
looks like he may be a little early for the game. Bottom - Yet another fountain on campus, this one on Hombake Mall. Opposite page - 
Top - Long live Testudo, now cleaner than ever. Bottom left - This boy makes a visual plea for his cause. Bottom right - It is the leader 
of the band. 



30 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 






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All photos on this page by Eric Lasky. 

31 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 



















Photo by Eric Lasky 



Photo by Maggie Soladay 



32 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 

Opposite page - Top - This man deals with the rowdy crowds by getting a seat outside of the stadium. Bottom left - Someone should let 
this guy know that paper towels are not the best fashion statements. Bottom right - One of the dorms on South Campus, now temporary 
home to some Greeks. This page - The Chapel bells ring while the limo awaits the happy newlyweds. 



33 



MARYLAND IN PICTURES 




All photos on this page by Maggie Soladay. 



34 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 

Opposite page - Top - What better way to study than in the shade of a tree. Bottom left - Outside of Shipley Field. Bottom right - The Chapel 
can be seen from most anywhere on campus. This page - Top left - By biking to campus, these students get all the best parking spots. Top 
right - Studying on Hornbake Mall. Bottom - The bowling alley in the Union offers students an inexpensive way to have a fun time, without 
leaving campus. 



35 





"Maryland has a body that other 

colleges should be jealous of, 

student body that is." 

Meredith Weber 

Senior 
Special Education 



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LET'S GET EXPOSED 

EDITED BY ROBIN SOLOMON AND 
MATILDE OTT 

"Exposing Ourselves" What perverted thoughts crept into a person's 
head when this theme was revealed? The more thoughts the merrier, but 
room ought to have been left for the true intended thoughts of this idea that 
should race through a Maryland students' mind as swiftly as the beer races 
through their veins. 

As sure as the fact that it rained the day you had to carry posters to a 
class presentation or that the one time you brought your car up to school 
you got a parking ticket, your experiences at Maryland have caused you 
to expose yourself in more ways than one. 

Every experience at UMCP caused students to expose more of 
themselves until it became downright obscene. By shedding off the layers 
of everything that they were used too and exposing themselves to be 
immersed in a multitude of possibilities - this was what college was all 
about. Exposing ourselves should have been a celebrated event. And 
therefore, because exposing oneself was largely ignored, unless taken in 
the literal sense, it was about time the naked truth be recognized. The 
student body of Maryland exposing itself helped to fulfill the college 
experience 




SOMETHING FOR 



EVERYONE 



College life was not just academics 
and studying every waking moment. 
Many students enjoyed active leisure 
time as well. College Park had a 
variety of restaurants and bars, and 
the University had a movie house and 
a bowling alley . Most of the establish- 
ments were located were located on 
Route 1, also known to students as 
"the strip." Students could choose 
restaurants such as Santa Fe, R.J. 
Bentley's or 94th Aero Squadron. 
They could also go to clubs such as 
the Paragon and the Cellar, the Vous 
or Ground Zero. Students could go 
to the Cellar or Town Hall to play 
pool. 

There were two bowling alleys in 
College Park. One was located right 
on the campus in the Stamp Student 
Union and the other was a Fair Lanes 
located on Route 1 . College Park did 
not have a movie theater, but there 
was one on campus in the Union, 
known as the Hoff Theater. 



A recent craze that hit College Park 
was the arrival of the coffee house. 
Java Heads was located between the 
Vous and Bentley's and the newly 
rebuilt Planet X was just across the 
street. 

On any given night, you could drive 
through College Park and see stu- 
dents in these establishments or wait- 
ing patiently in line to enter and have 
a good time. 

Santa Fe offered many specials regu- 
larly to the students. Manager Sean 
Mulcahy that Tuesday night was popu- 
lar because of the one dollar BudiM 
special. He said that beer specials 
were offered during Terp athletic 
events and a big screen TV hung from 
the ceiling to show various sporting 
events. Wednesday evening was Q&A 
time. This was a trivia game in which 
patrons could participate and attempt 
to outsmart their fellow contenders. 
Santa Fe also offered a lively Friday 
happy hour that included D.J. "AQ" 



from local radio station WHFS. Se- 
nior Matthew Goodman said that 
Santa Fe was one of his favorite places 
because of the music and atmosphere. 
R.J Bentley's also offered many 
specials to the students. Manager 
Kevin Braswell mentioned various 
events including Phi Delta Theta's 
"Bourbon Nite" on Sundays. The 
fraternity came up with the idea of 
having a $1.75 bourbon night, and 
currently in its second year, the idea 
seemed to have worked. Braswell 
explained that the restaurant's busi- 
ness went in stages. During the sum- 
mer, many students were gone but 
there was a group that came in regu- 
larly. When school started, only cer- 
tain nights of the week, like Thursday, 
were extremely busy. Bentley's also 
brought in a number of alumni. Home- 
coming was a popular time for former 
students to return to their alma mater. 
{Continued on page 42) 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



38 



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39 



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41 



(Continued from page 38) 

The Vous, located next to Bentley's, was known for 
its long lines of students waiting to enter. This club 
offered a "Jamaican Me Crazy" Friday happy hour. It 
included discounted drinks and live reggae bands. 

The Cellar and the Paragon, which stayed closed 
until evening, were known for their dancing and live 
music. Generally, the Cellar attracted a late-night 
crowd. Students could go upstairs to the Paragon for 
a fee to hear live music or they could stay in the Cellar, 
which truly resembled one, and drink, dance or play 
pool. Graduates Jenny Condlin and Dave Goldman 
liked the Cellar for its beer pitchers and dancing. 

Coffee house. Planet X was just rebuilt after a fire 
destroyed it during the summer of 1994. Owner 
Justine Carpenter said that business had doubled since 
reopening. She felt that the reason was the place had 
become more appealing. Planet X was known for its 
poetry readings on Wednesdays. Additionally, it had 
live classical and jazz brunches. Carpenter explained 
that she wanted to give the students different music 
from the other establishments, as well as a different 
atmosphere. 

A new business that opened in College Park was 
Ground Zero. This club catered to the underage and 
non-drinking crowd because it sold no alcohol. It was 
a dance club where students could strut their stuff until 
the early morning hours. 

With all of the establishments in College Park, the 
night life for students stayed very active. They could 
enjoy everything from dancing, to drinking, to playing 
pool and even watching a ball game. The night life at 
Maryland offered something for everyone. 

-Jennifer Harrell 






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All photos on this page by Maggie Soladay. 



42 




43 





Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



44 




All photos on this page by Maggie Soladay 



45 



STUDENT LIFE 



IT FEELS 

$o 

COOD 





All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



46 



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Photo by Tryone Brooks 

47 




This page - The Mighty Sound of Maryland stand at attention while preparing for their pregame show for the Terrapin fans. Opposite page 
- Top left - Studying at Hornbake Mall is one of the more relaxing places on campus. Top right - People find some strange places to rest, 
but when the urge strikes, there is always somewhere to fall asleep. Bottom - The tennis courts on South Campus are never empty of sports 
minded students. 



48 



MARYLAND STUDENT LIFE 





All photos on this spread by Maggie Soiaday 

49 








onal View Of 



rvtand\ Student 







** 



Every student who came to the University of Maryland had their own stories of friendships, love and life. Each story 
involved hardships and funny memories that will never leave their mind. The diversity of the student body of Maryland 
accounted for a multitude of stories that were unique for each student. The relationships of Maryland students were 
also unique and memorable. The non traditional relationships on the campus enhanced student's awareness and 
made the campus more special for them being there. Students overcame the hardships of these "different" 
relationships, such as being single parents and having long-distance romances, to become stronger individuals and 
stronger partners in their relationship. Students risked ridicule, stressful lives and much more to prosper in a 
relationship that was important to them. To expose these special relationships was important because the students 
featured in this section can teach us all how to be strong in the face of adversity and how to love unconditionally. 

-Robin Solomon and Matilde Ott 




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Ken Dezio is a senior chennical engi- 
neer major from Davidsonuille, Mary- 
land. Nicolette Johnson is a junior 
math major from H\jattsuiUe, Mary- 
land attending Maryland for the first 
time. They have been dating 10 
months. What makes their relationsip 
special is that they are able to cross the 
racial boundaries. 
Where did you meet? 
Ken: Washington Hall. 
Nicolette: (laughs) A mutual friend intro- 
duced us at a party... we met last Sep- 
tember. 

Who initiated the relationship? 
Ken: She got my phone number from 
our mutual friend... she was trying to 
organize everybody to go out. We all got 
together and eventually I asked her out. 
Is this your first interracial rela- 
tionship? 
Nicolette: No. 
Ken: Yes... Actually no. 
Were the past interracial relation- 
ships difficult? 

Nicolette: This is my third. Sometimes 
there might be a big problem with par- 
ents and other family members. Most of 
my friends are very understanding... and 



they even tried to get us together, so they 
don't have a problem with it. 
Have you received any hostile feel- 
ing from people on campus? 

Ken: No. Not on campus. 
Off campus? 

Nicolette: Everywhere. 



People dont care who 

you are but they just 

want to say whatever 

they have to say to your 

face. 



Ken: We went to Greenwich Village and 
were walking and a bunch of guys said 
something when we passed them. 
Do you receive a lot of hostile 
reactions off campus? 
Nicolette: Not really. Now and then I see 
people who give us looks-but they are 
not very outright with their opinions. 
Off campus, people don't care who you 
are but they just want to say whatever 




they have to say to your face. 

Does it upset you when it happens? 

Nicolette: I just don't understand... as 
long as 1 am happy and I am treated 
well, 1 do not think it is anybody's 
business. 

Are both of your families sup- 
portive? 

Nicolette: No. My mom's not. 
Ken: No. 

How do you deal with that? 
Nicolette: It kind of hurts. I figure she 
[mom] will come around-hopefully 
sooner or later. 

What are the positive aspects of 
this relationship? 
Ken: It is just a normal relationship. 
Future plans? 

Ken: Well... for dinner tonight... 
(laughs) 

Would you like to say anything to 
people who do not understand 
interracial relationships? 

Nicolette: We are people in similar 
situations. Just don't take anybody 
else's crap. If they have problems with 
it-then they do. I guess if people 
don't understand, they should go 
someplace I won't mention (laughs). 



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Jomie McDonald is a English graduate students attending 

Maryland for his first year. Amy Zumfelde is a graduate 

student studying and teaching english in Austria on a 

scholarship. Jamie and Amy have been dating one year 

today, October 29th. Amy left the United States in 

Semptember 1994 and will not return until July 1995. 

How did you meet? 

We had a freshman class together and subsequently didn't talk 

to each other for a couple of years. It kind of ended up that we 

applied for the same scholarships together as seniors and we 

ended up getting together then. 

Did you make any arrangements before she left? Is the 

relationship open to seeing other people? 

It is kind of an unspoken thing in which we realized we weren't 

going to date other people. The relationship was far enough 

along. 

How are the phone bills? 

Not too good at the moment (laughs). We talk every week or 

so for ten minutes or something like that. We also write... we 

were both English majors, so we end up writing a lot. 

Do you plan on visiting her? 

Yes. 1 am going there over the break for a couple of weeks. 

What are the problems you have encountered with the 

relationship being long distance? 

Just the fact that every time 1 want to talk to her, instead of being 

on campus like in our undergraduate years, it is a long distance 

call and so forth. She is having all these new and fun things to 

do that she can only tell me about. . .that is one of the complaints 

we have. 

What do you miss most? 

Just the fact that I have no social life at all (laughs) Maybe I will 

go out with a couple of friends once in a while, but it does help 

me study a lot. 

If you could say something to her right now, what would 

it be? 

(laughs) COME BACK! 



Heather Davis is a senior Journalism student preparing to 

graduate in May 1995. Michael Elias is a golf professional 

living in North Carolina. Heather and Michael have been 

dating over three and a half years. They have been engaged 

since October 21st 1993. Heather wants to share her 

personal experiences of having a long distance relationship 

for two and a half years. 

How long have you had this long distance relationship? 

We have been seeing each other for three and a half years. We 

have been apart probably two and a half of the three and a half 

years. 

How often do you correspond to each other? 

Neither of us have enough time to do a lot of letter writing, so 

we talk on the phone and try to see each other every three 

weeks. The first semester we spent $1,200 on phone bills. I 

think 1 am AT&T's best customer. 

Did you ever agree to see other people? 

It was a non-issue with us. We have a very special relationship. 

When we first went out we were 13 years-old. We weren't 

together for very long, but we remained friends. We really 

didn't date anyone else after that so we got back together. He 

was always there in the back of my mind. When we finally 

started going out again we knew we were in love with each other 

and we knew we wanted to marry each other. 

Do you think having a long distance relationship has 

hindered or enhanced your relationship? 

1 think it did a little bit of both. Apart, we learned a lot about 

ourselves as individuals. If we were together the whole time, 

especially since we were so young when we started seeing each 

other, it would have probably hurt our growth as individuals. It 

has been hard being apart... it is like I am not whole because he 

is a such a part of me. It is hard when I think of all the things 

we could have done together. There are so many things 1 would 

have loved to shared with him. 

if you could say anything to him right now what would 

you say? 

That I love him and I miss him. 









-Jt 



lammy Lee Magee is a senior english 
major, full time student , part-time em- 
ployee and full-time mom. Mia Michelle 
Magee is her four 4 year-old daughter 
and inspiratiopn. Tammy has been a 
single mother for the last three years. 
How difficult was it to return to school? 
You would think it would he much, but it 
was just natural to con:ie back. When I first 
went back to Montgomery College (M.C.) I 
started this single parent student's club, 
which was a great help to me. It was like a 
support group-that's what helped me 
through. So it wasn't that hard-she [Mia] 
was a motivation. 

What exactly did the support group 
teach you? 

It's not that we learned anything - we just 
were there to talk about what we were all 
going through. Everybody had their own 
particular situation. Some were from a 
divorce or their man just walked out on 
them or whatever. In my case 1 left him 
because it was not what 1 wanted. The 
support group was just people coming 
together to discus complications with being 
a full time student and a single parent. 
What are some of the obstacles of 
being a full time student and a single 
parent? 

Depending on the age of your child - like for 
me - Mia was so young, there was no 
studying time. I was still nursing - 1 nursed 
her until she was almost two. Can you 
imagine, (laughs) She wanted to nurse and 
as she got older, all night long. And you 
think about trying to study at night? Most 
people study at night, don't even think 
about studying on the weekend. Especially 



now that she is older. Weekends, 1 am a full 
time mom. That's one thing that would be 
nice if teachers would understand. They 
think over the weekend people do most of 
their homework, but 1 can't do anything 
over the weekend . Until 1 graduate , i will just 
work around it. 

Do you tell your professors that you 
area single parent? 
I've told a couple of them. I hate to - it's like 
walking around with a handicap. I was 
doing accounting at MC and I got a "C" in 
a course that I felt 1 deserved a "B". I argued 



She is just a positive force 

that encourages me to 

more forward. 



with the professor and he wouldn't give me 
a "B". Then one of his secretaries told him 
I was a mother and all of the sudden 1 got 
this "B" ... It really ticked me off! Regardless 
of my situation, I should have received a 
"B" . No, I lean away from telling my profes- 
sors. Yeah, it is a pain (laughs). 
What are the benefits of being a single 
mother? 

You can not be down around your child... 
Because they feed off of whatever you are 
feeling. She and I are like Siamese twins... 
I just can't be down without her coming 
down. I can't be depressed, sad, or even 
angry without affecting her. So it kind of 
worked in a positive way for me, because I 
make the extra effort not to be that way 
(laughs). You have a bad day, you look at 



her and say to yourself, "1 can't be that 
way." She's been the best thing that could 
have possibly happened to me. She is just 
a positive force that encourages me to 
move forward. 

How long have you been a single 
mother? 

Since one year after her birth. 1 lost my job 
because they wanted me to return to work 
in three months and I knew I wanted to 
nurse her. It was a choice between going 
back to work and being what I wanted to be 
with her. So, 1 lost my job. 
Do you ever feel you are overwhelmed? 
Oh - yeah! (laughs) This has been the most 
stressful semester. I am taking 15 credits, 
on top of writing a thesis, on top of working 
now. 

How do you relax? 
Huh?!? (laughs) I don't, I don't relax. I have 
been studying a lot this semester. I just 
think I'll be glad when it's over. So I just 
keep smiling. On Saturdays, Mia and 1 just 
go out... somewhere... usually a cultural 
event. Saturday is our day. We try to shut 
the world out. You know you got this and 
that and this due, but I try to shut it off on 
Saturdays. 

What are your future plans? 
I hope to work at the Smithsonian, I want 
to write. 1 also want to teach multi-cultural 
history to high school students. . . get mar- 
ried, get a house, have another child, live 
long and prosper. Being a single mother 
and a student is difficult but it is doable. This 
is what I want. If I was not fulfilling myself 
personally, I wouldn't be the kind of mother 
I want to be. I have to be continuously 
fulfilling myself, and if 1 fulfil myself I will be 
fulfilling her. 




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Edie Anderson, a sophon}ore ps\;- 
chologi; major of Kenningston, 
Mar[;land, is not i;our average ev- 
eryday student. This 58 year-old 
woman is a full-time student, prop- 
erty manager, and a grandmother. 
This might not be that unusual, 
except her 17-month old grand- 
daughter, Lauren Lackey, goes to 
college with her. 

Why did you decide to baby-sit 
your granddaughter while you 
attended UMCP? 
I think children need a sense of 
"real" family. I am a very family- 
oriented person and I believe that 
families should be involved with their 
children. I can't do anything else but 
live what I believe in. I was blessed 
with this beautiful grandchild after I 
started college. It just never oc- 
curred to me that I couldn't do this. 
What was your family's reac- 
tion to taking Lauren to col- 
lege? 

Everyone has been extremely sup- 
portive. I think they keep wonder- 
ing "how can she do this?" But once 
they saw that it worked, they're 
there to help me out. 
How did the professors react to 



having Lauren in class? 

Everyone at the university has been 
positive. I have talked to each of my 
professors when I registered. 1 ask 
them if there would be a problem if 
I bring my granddaughter to class. 
Most of them said let's try it. I had 
one professor that was a little appre- 
hensive at first, but in the end she 
found it wasn't a problem. 
What are your fellow classmates 
reactions to having Lauren in 
class? 
They all love her. She another 
member of the class, [laughed] And 
when Lauren isn't there they say, 
"Where's Lauren?" or "Where's your 
other half?" She is a happy child 
and her happiness and smile en- 
riches everyone else. It puts a smile 
on their faces. 

Does Lauren like going to class? 
Lauren loves the people. One young 
man taught her to "High-Five" when 
she was just six-months old, and she 
still does it. 

What are some of the difficul- 
ties about going to class and 
baby-sitting at the same time? 
I think the hardest thing is schedul- 
ing a whole day through ahead of 



time. Scheduling the feeding and 
naptime in coordination with class 
time is difficult. That was the chal- 
lenge. 

What are some of the benefits 
of baby-sitting and going to 
class? 

Lauren has her family and a sense of 
who her family is. The joy I receive 
being part of raising my grandchild 
and having a relationship with her is 
immeasurable. 
How are your grades? 
I think I am going pretty well under 
the circumstances. I have a 3.30 
GPA and I am happy with that. I 
think it will get me into grad school, 
as long as I can maintain it or do 
better. 

Any advice? 

If it's something you want to do, 
then do it if you can find a way. 
Don't be discouraged. I think that in 
all honesty if you are going to bring 
a child to school, you have to first 
look at the personality of the child. 
If you have a child that is distressed 
alot, that would not work. But if you 
have a placid child that is happy in 
the surroundings, then there is no 
reason not to do it. Don't be afraid. 












FRIENDS FOREVER'. 

Sda^ufti^ ^lec^e^f cici^4e<i^, cutcC CifA€4^ 






Clair Hickerson and Julie 
Nefferdorf, are both freshmar), 
both Broadcast Jourr^aUsm ma- 
jors, both attended the same high 
school, both took all the same 
classes for two years in high school, 
both taking all the same classes at 
UMCP, both worked together, and 
both live together. 
How long have you known each 
other? 

We've known each other from ninth 
grade in high school, but we didn't 
become best friends until two years 
later. 

How did you become best 
friends? 

Our junior year we has all the same 
classes. We spent a lot of time 
together doing our homework and 
writing papers. So our senior year 
we planned taking all the same 
classes together. 

Are you taking all the same 
classes at UMCP? 
Every single class. We work to- 
gether now and we worked together 
then. We worked at Chuck-E-Cheese 
[laughed] and that was an experi- 
ence. But now we are working 
together, and of course we live to- 



gether, we have all the same classes 
and the same major. The only thing 
didn't is we pledged different houses. 
It doesn't matter that we aren't in 
the same house because we have 
friends in both houses. It kind of 
worked out better... and our houses 
are right next to each other. I think 
its better to have a little bit of time 
apart to do our own thing, instead of 
being together all the time. We have 
had a couple of bad fights. Last 
week we had a fight and didn't speak 
for week. We are really mature 
when we have a fight~we will work 
it out. 

Having heard roommate hor- 
ror stories, do you plan to stay 
together? 

Next year we are going to live in 
each of our sorority houses. Then 
our junior year we are going to live 
together in a apartment with a bunch 
of friends. 

Why do you think you two are 
such good friends? 

I think that I became close to Clair 
because she taught me so much. 
When I first came to high school, I 
was totally different from what I am 

now. I use to get into a lot of trouble 



and Clair and her family turned me 
around and showed me what I was 
doing wrong. We have so much in 
common. We have our differences 
too, but that adds a little spice to our 
relationship. 

Are both of your families close? 
Yes. Her mother became more 
upset when we were fighting than 
we did. She knows how important 
it for us to remain friends. It's like a 
second family. 

What are the benefits of having 
this type of relationship? 
We help each other with our school 
work a lot. Since we're taking the 
same classes, we both have a paper 
due Tuesday, so we are both up to 4 
AM typing our papers. It really 
helps scholastically, plus when I have 
problems she gives me a fresh per- 
spective. 

What are your future plans? 
We don't know right now, but in 
high school our teachers would say 
that we would have a double wed- 
ding, that we would live together 
forever. But it's just like when we 
rushed, it depends on how we feel. 
We might go our separate ways, but 
we will always be friends. 








All photos on this spread by Maggie Soloday 



w^ "^-^ "^_ 




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62 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



63 








f@i 





With the advent of the changing colors of the leaves and the cooler 
temperatures came, for most, the approaching awareness of the holiday 
season. Halloween was the first holiday to start the ball rolling toward the end 
of the year and a new semester. 

The crisp fall weather and the pumpkin patches that sprung up everywhere, 
reminded many of us of an exciting time - a time to dress up in your favorite 
scary or glamourous costume and a time to party 'til the sun rises. It was also 
a time to buy all those tempting sweets and gain ten pounds. 

Many students participated in various events and activities to celebrate 
another witchy Halloween. Senior Matthew Goodman, an environmental 
biology major, attended a pumpkin-carving party. "It's a way for friends to 
get together and celebrate Halloween. This is our third year, and the party's 
gotten better each time," Goodman said. Besides other festive events, 
various clubs and organizations arranged parties to celebrate the holiday. 

With the ending of Halloween, all returned to normal. We knew what that 
meant - dragging ourselves to classes and fretting over all that homework that 
was avoided for some fun. So we finished all that homework and got to all 
those classes, while in the back of our minds, the clock ticked down to another 
holiday and the end of the semester. 

-Jennifer Harrell 




All photos this spread by Maggie Soladay 



64 



ITS NOT JUST A 

CONDOM 

PA LAC E 



The Health Center - where you 
found out you had mono, picked up 
condoms for Spring Break, got im- 
munized and waited for hours won- 
dering if the flu could be fatal. Al- 
though visits to the Health Center 
were not always happy occasions, it 
was one of the best parts of attending 
a large university. Our Health Center 
was a fully accredited ambulatory 
health care clinic offering a wide vari- 
ety of services for students. The 
Health Center was also there for stu- 
dents by providing extensive health 
education services. Mary Hoban, of 
the Sexual Health Education depart- 
ment said, "My concern is that people 
never set foot in the Health Center, 
Tm not sick' they say, well you don't 
have to be sick." 

For the healthy individuals, the 
Health Center offered volunteer and 
educational services. Student volun- 
teers worked in the lab, for the Walk- 
in Clinic, women's health, the phar- 
macy and the dental clinic. There 
were numerous student peer educa- 
tion groups such asS.H.A.R.E. (Sexual 
Health and Reproductive Education), 
HOPE (Help Outreach Peer Educa- 
tion), SHAC (Student Health Advi- 
sory Committee) and the Caring Coa- 



lition, who supported alcohol free 
programming. Students could go to 
the Health Center to learn CPR or to 
get help quitting smoking. The Men- 
tal Health Department provided sup- 
port groups and counseling. The 
Health Center was always a good 
place to find reading material - "Facts 
on Herpes" or "HPV (Genital Warts) 
What's That?" 

The Health Center was committed 
to prevention. Before every Spring 
Break volunteers distributed bags with 
sunblock, condoms and information 
about alcohol. During Health Fairs, 
students learned on models how to do 
breast self exams. Student groups 
visited dorms and meeting to educate 
about rape, alcohol abuse and the 
dangers of stress. Mary Hoban noted 
an important goal was, "Keeping 
people well." 

Dr. Margaret Bridwell, director of 
the Health Center, maintained the 
quality services of the center. The 
Health Center included an Allergy 
Clinic, Anonymous HIV testing, a 
Dental Clinic, an International Travel 
Clinic, Men's and Women's Health 
Clinic, a Mental Health Clinic and 
even massage. Students could come 
and get care for often reduced cost. 



All services were confidential, a family 
member could not find out if a bill that 
they paid was actually for a year's 
supply of birth control pills and not 
knee X-rays like you told them. 

The Health Center was also provid- 
ing 'up to date' care. They were 
among the first local distributors of 
the female condom. NorplantiM was 
available, as well as the injectable 
contraceptive Depo-ProveraiM and the 
emergency contraceptive pill. HIV 
testing was anonymous instead of 
confidential. Staff were committed to 
making current advancements avail- 
able to students. 

Although most of the students com- 
plained about the waiting and out of 
date magazines, the Health Center 
was a great resource. It was there for 
the students at the eleventh hour, 
when the paper was due but the 
pneumonia struck you down. It was 
there when you had a splitting head- 
ache but no cash to buy ExcederiniM. 
For those students who volunteered, 
the Health Center was a great re- 
sume' builder. Hopefully, the practi- 
tioners and staff understood how we 
all depended on them. 

-Rebecca Bishop 



66 




All photos on this page by Maggie Soladay. 



67 



Playing with F / fs E 



FIRE SERVICE DORMITORY 



When thinking about college life 
there were a lot of images that came 
to mind. Many students spent their 
time at the University of Maryland 
doing typical college things. There 
was one aspect of Student Life at 
Maryland, however, that went well 
beyond typical. 

There was a group of students who 
risked their lives merely because they 
wanted to help others. Those stu- 
dents were members of the College 
Park Volunteer Fire Department and 
were volunteer firefighters and Emer- 
gency Medical Technicians. 

Twenty-four of those students re- 
sided in the Fire Service Dormitory in 
the College Park Fire Station. The 
tradition of the of the Fire Service 
Dormitory, known by its members as 
the sackroom, dated back decades. 
The twenty-four members were 
trained in fire and emergency medical 
responce; they were firefighters and 
Emergency Medical Technicians. 

The College Park Volunteer Fire 
Department was a part of the Prince 
George's County Fire Department; 
the county in which the University 
was located. The firehouse, itself, 
was part of the University of Mary- 
land. 

The sackroom members, in ex- 
change for free room, were given shift 
nights. The shift nights were every 
other night from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., 
Sunday through Thursday. Those on 
shift were responsible for responding 
to eueri; call that came out for the 




station. The responsibility they took 
on was tremendous. 

No matter if it was 11:15 p.m., or 
5:23a. m.-ifacall came out then they 
went. 

The professionalism that these vol- 
unteers possessed was evident in the 
way that they handled themselves in 
all aspects of community service. 

The living situation that existed in 
the sackroom this year was very 
unique. Living together was one 
thing, but risking lives together was 
another. 

-Joanne Saidman 





Photo by Sayshan Conver 




All photos on this spread by Eric Lasky. 



70 



ATTACK OF THE 



The tacos were coming, the tacos 
were coming. Then, the tacos were 
here. Four, count them four Taco 
Bells within a two mile radius of the 
College Park campus. 

What, you may have asked, drew 
the fast food outlet so near to cam- 
pus? Maybe, it was the college stu- 
dents historic lack of money. Or, 
maybe it was the answer to the con- 
stant quest for junk food. Whatever 
the reason, the Taco Bells were here 
and business was booming. 

The first Taco Bell to appear in the 
area was located in the A. James 
Clark School of Engineering and has 
been in business since the fall of 1 993 . 
According to its manager Rob 
Beckman, business was good. "It 
hasn't gone down since the begin- 



ning," he added. 

As a result of the success of the first 
Taco Bell licensed to the University of 
Maryland , another one was opened in 
the Stamp Student Union. Cathy 
Wiley, a senior advertising major was 
at that opening. "1 love Taco Bell," 
she said. "It's cheap and I love Mexi- 
can food." She was, however, sur- 
prised by the number of Taco Bells 
that had appeared in a years time. 

The final two restaurants were lo- 
cated on Route 1 . Willie Williams was 
the manager of the Taco Bell located 
in the 8400 block of Baltimore Av- 
enue. He felt that being near campus 
had "helped [business] out tremen- 
dously. Most of our business is Uni- 
versity of Maryland." 

-LaRonda R. Miller 





71 




^- 



TRUCTION 




Top - Firefighters watch as flames pour out of the windows above Planet X, a popular coffee shop. Bottom left - This walkway once 
connected Parking Garage Two to Hornbake Mall, but this year it overlooked the construction site of the Plant Sciences Building. 
Bottom right - View of the connection of the old Computer Science Building with the new. Opposite Page - The North Gate welcomes 
many people each day. but some may not have recognized it after the construction. 



■■■^'''' construction 



THE EVER-CHANCINC FACE OF COLLEGE PARK 



The summer of 1994 brought a 
number of changes to the College 
Park campus. Many new construc- 
tion projects were started throughout 
the summer that continued through 
the year. Some of these projects were 
part of the beautification and expan- 
sion of the university, but one was 
not. 

On July 18, at 2:48 in the morning 
the popular College Park hang out. 
Planet X, fell victim to a three alarm 
fire which destroyed the restaurant 
and the entire building. Students 
from the College Park Volunteer Fire 
Department played a major role in 
stopping the fire from spreading to 
the neighboring buildings. As a result 
of their efforts, no other businesses 
were damaged. 

In the following days, Planet X 
began the long road to recovery. As 
two projected opening days passed 
those who frequented the coffee shop 
continued the weekly poetry readings 
across the street from the rubble. 
Finally, after four months of construc- 
tion. Planet X reopened its doors on 
October 31 when it hosted a Hallow- 
een jazz-fest. 

As students and visitors traveled 
north on Route 1 past Planet X they 
soon encountered a great deal of 
construction and congestion at the 
intersection of Route 1 and Campus 
Drive. There workers expanded and 
rebuilt the historic North Gate. In an 
effort to preserve history but to also 



make necessary changes to 
accomodate new roads and increased 
traffic, the campus architects incor- 
porated the old guard booth into the 
new structure. Although the North 
Gate was completed in late fall, the 
new road, Paint Branch Parkway, did 
not open until later. This new road 
connected Route 1 to Kennilworth 
Avenue by going under the new Metro 
tracks. 

Focusing on another mode of trans- 
portation, the feet, the University of 
Maryland track team finally found a 
place of their own. The new track and 
field facility, located just behind Lot 1 , 
was being built to host a myriad of fall 
and spring sports. 

As the University of Maryland ex- 
panded to become a top university. 



more and more facilities were being 
built. This year construction began 
on two new buildings on campus. 
Located behind Hornbake Library, 
the Plant Sciences building was being 
built to house the Botany Department 
as well as many other facilities. In 
addition, the Computer Science De- 
partment expanded its facilities by 
adding a completely new building onto 
the present structure, which doubled 
its size. This new facility gave the 
department much needed space to 
expand to fit the high demands of the 
students. 

Although construction always 
seemed to be an inconvenience, each 
new facility helped make the Univer- 
sity of Maryland at College Park be- 
come an institution for the future. 

-Eric Lasky 




Photo bv Paul Vieira 




Photij hi; "I'yrone Brooks 



Photo by Eric Lasky 



74 



Opposite page - Bottom left - Dana Steinberg and a friend battle the 
wind on their way across campus. Bottom right - Java Heads 
advertises for Homecoming. Top right - Testudo at Byrd Stadium. 
This page - Top right - Randy White, a former Terrapin accepts an 
award at half time. Bottom - Students step their way into shape at a 
Step Aerobic class on campus. 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 

75 




Maryland Theater performed Noel 
Coward's Blithe Spirit this past 
October 27-30 and November 3-5. 
Although the cast was only 7 people 
small, there was a behind-the-scenes 
force of about 25 additional under- 
graduate theater students, and nu- 
merous professors, graduate stu- 
dents, and instructors. The players 
rehearsed for six hours a day, six 
days a week, for six weeks. But, that 
commitment was not furnished for 
the two weeks in which the show ran 
at Tawes Theater! And those hours 
did not apply to everyone. Graduate 
assistant to the costume shop, Andre 
Harrington, was required to spend 
20 hours a week for a month prepar- 
ing for Blithe Spirit, but says it 




All photos on this spread by Maggie Soladay 



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was much more than just that. The 
costumes were finished only two 
days before opening night. As soon 
as the costume shop finished that 
production, it commenced work on 
the next production's costume and 
makeup design. 

No cast or crew member said that 
the time involved was easy. Shift 
crew member freshman Deborah 
Leipzig said, "You can see the effect 
in my laundry bag." It is universally 
understood, as sophomore theater 
major Sheilynn Wactor said that, 
"when you are in a show you have 
no life." Most everyone realized that 
the department became a person's 
social life. As Senior Kanchan 
Mattoo said, "You get to know lots 
of people because the department is 
so small." 

Senior Kanchan Mattoo's official 
job was master electrician but joked 
that his unofficial job was to annoy 
people. His duties required him to 
be in the catwalks 60 feet above the 
theater. He said, "You aren't afraid 
of heights until you look down. It is 
like an LSD trip, your eyes bug and 
expand. It is an exhilarating adrena- 
line rush. I am scared, but I love 
every minute." He and assistant 
Alex Cooper facetiously described 
back stage as, "like working in a 
Turkish prison. It is filthy, sick, 
tiring, and you are in constant pain. 
But. we love it!" 




'JK i 



Below the stage in the makeup 
room one could melt under the lights 
if they remained too long. Makeup 
people, costume people and the ac- 
tors and actresses all bustle around in 
the hour or more before the curtain 
goes up. Students called dressers are 
there to help with zippers, pins, and 
makeup. Actress Michelle Haber 
declared, "They are indispensable!" 

To describe the exhilaration expe- 
rienced when on stage Senior theater 
major Kila Burton said, "I've never 
done drugs or anything so I wouldn't 
know about a buzz, but I don't care 
because it can't be anything like loos- 
ing control on stage. " Senior theater 
major Melissa Mascara, who admit- 
ted that her real name is a convenient 
stage one, said that "watching every- 
thing we learned in class in action is 
great. Getting up on stage and apply- 
ing it is the best reward because you 
realize that you are actually learning 
something." 

The preparation for a show like 
Blithe Spirit was far from glamorous. 
During one of the dress rehearsals for 
Blithe Spirit the sound did not work 
when the phonograph was supposed 
to be playing. Everyone had to stand 
around for fifteen minutes while the 
problem was fixed. During such lulls, 




78 



which were more frequent than not, 
stage hands, technicians, the students 
on stage and the directors occupied 
themselves with morbid, or appropri- 
ately masochistic decapitation jokes. 
Or, they used the time to make con- 
structive comments and compliments, 
not to forget the chicken imperson- 
ations. 

The overall atmosphere was that 
of a big family that thrived on and 
off campus. The result was a 
fulfilling creative and productive life 
for theater majors and for the 
audiences who reaped the fruits of 
their labors. 

-Maggie Solada}^ 



OPENING 




All photos on this spread by Maggie Soladay 



79 



THE PRICE OF BEAUTY 

TATTOOS ANP BODY PIERCINC AT MARYLAND 



Tattooing and body piercing had 
come a long way from the days 
when tattoos were reserved for 
sailors and body piercing meant 
earrings on females. These days 
anyone could get a tattoo or ear- 
ring on just about any part of the 
body. Read on and find out the 
answers to the most commonly 
asked questions about tattooing and 
body piercing from Maryland's own 
tattooed and body pierced students. 
WHAT SHOULD I GET 

AND WHY? 
How about Chinese writing? 
That's what junior dietetics major 
Gary Lin had on his upper left 
shoulder blade . " It means strength . 
I'm into weight lifting so whenever 
I look at it, it reminds me of 
perservering." 

Or maybe a tribal lions head like 
sophomore fine arts major Kip 
Miller. 'Tm an artist and I worked 
on that drawing for a long time. 
The lion means a lot to me for 
biblical reasons." 

Sabriya Wyatt, a junior English 
major had three tattoos and a naval 



ring. "The first tattoo, a black rose, I 
did because I wanted to be different. 
The second was my sister's name in 
Arabic on my ankle . " Her final tattoo 
was a crescent and star on her bikini 
line which tied into her Islamic faith. 
"I got my belly button pierced because 
I refused to get any more tattoos," she 
said. 

"I have a purple panther on my left 
inner ankle and an intertwined rose 
and heart on my left collar bone," said 
Therese Gordon, a senior civil engi- 
neering major. "I got the panther 
because I like the animal, it's smooth, 
suave and elegant." 

BUT WON'T IT HURT? 
Contrary to popular belief, tattoos 
did not hurt any more than a bee sting 
unless the needle hits a bone. 

"At first, you're kind of scared," 
said Lin. "But, when you get [tat- 
tooed] it's just kind of an irritating 
feeling." 

"The belly button ring didn't hurt as 
much as the tattoo," said Billie Jo 
Syder, a sophomore, pre-physical 
therapy major. "It was over in about 
five minutes." 



"The one on my back did not really 
hurt. But, the one on my bikini line 
was excruciating pain," said Wyatt. 

Speaking of bikini lines, Joy Smith, 
a sophomore biology major, agreed 
that getting a rose tattoo on hers was 
extremely painful and added that after 
it's over, you forget the pain. 
WHAT WILL PEOPLE 
THINK? 

For Lin, the reaction is usually posi- 
tive. "People usually say it looks nice 
or ask what it means." 

"The one on my ankle gets a lot of 
attention," said Wyatt. People think 
it's really special that I have my sisters 
name tattooed there." 

"At first people do a double take. 
The men like it a lot but, women like 
it too. They're usually like 'Oh my 
god, that's a good idea,'" said Smith. 

"The first reaction I usually get is 
'Oh that's so pretty, did it hurt?', but 
then, I've had people tell me 'You're 
going straight to hell, you have the 
mark of the devil on you," said Gor- 
don. 

-LaRonda R. Miller 




Al! photos on this spread by Tryone Brooks. 



80 



..--^ 



i J 





jr\ 




'I Love Maryland sports because I have 

loyalty and a sense of spirit for the 

school, and 1 can sit down at a game 

and get along with someone I don't 

know because we have [the love of the 

sport] in common." 

Mike Jareed 

Junior 

Transportation 




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SPORTS 



EXPOSING THE WINNER IN EVERYONE 
EDITED BY GINA DUGAN 

What makes a winner? Is it determined by the scoreboard, or 
by the number of great plays? Or is being a winner determined 
by the desire to play well, the grit and hard work put into the 
game, and the sheer effort put in? At Maryland, the answer to 
this question is "all of the above." 

Many teams saw triumphant victories this year. The men's 
basketball team went all the way to the NCAA "Sweet 16." 
Women's lacrosse players beat a path of glory to the semifinals. 
The field hockey team had an awesome season. 

And some teams struggled. The Terrapin football team was 
still young and working to prove themselves. The baseball team 
lost over half their games. Yet, what the scoreboard would never 
show is the individuals who worked every day, pumping iron, 
running laps, and going over and over plays until they could 
hardly move... this made them winners, even though the final 
statistics may not have said so. 

Fans were often the toughest critics, while at the same time 
being the wildest supporters. This year, through all the Terrapins' 
trials and triumphs, fans watched as our athletes exposed the 
winner in everyone. 





84 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



85 




■TF/->u- 




SWEET IT l$! 

Two seasons after a 5-year NCAA 
probation, Terp Basketball was again a 
factor in the national equation... 



I 




For everyone associated with the 
University of Maryland Men's Basket- 
ball Team, this was a season to cherish 
as four years of hard work and positive 
attitudes paid off for head coach Gary 
Williams and his troops on the court. 
For all the loyal fans of the University 
of Maryland men's basketball team, this 
was a season to remember as the 
Terrapins returned to their glory days 
with a Sweet 16 success in the NCAA 
tournament. 

"This season was a culmination of 
four years of hard work and going 
through some difficulties," Gary Will- 
iams proudly exclaimed. "1 hope 
everyone has a great feeling about our 
basketball team and our school after 
achieving the Round of 16. It gives us 
great pride going into this [1994-95] 
season and we are looking forward to 
continued success during the year." 

The Terrapin starting lineup was one 
of the most explosive and exciting in 
recent memory. As point guard Duane 
Simpkins directed this powerful offense 
of three sophomores and two freshman 
to an 8-8 record in the ACC and in the 
process registered 11.8 points and 4.5 
assists per game. His backcourt mate 
Johnny Rhodes racked up 12.5 points 
and 6.8 rebounds per game as his size 
was frequently used on the inside to 
post up smaller opponents. Freshman 
Keith Booth had a very productive year 
with 10.8 points and 6.1 rebounds per 
game. Returning sophomore Exree 
Hipp amassed 13.3 points per game 
with the help of numerous backdoor 
and breakaway slam dunks throughout 
the season. National Freshman of the 
Year Joe Smith rounded out the 
starting five averaging a double double 
with 19.4 points, 10.7 rebounds, and 
3.1 blocks per game. 

Together this group of 12 players 



returned Maryland basketball to promi- 
nence. The victories achieved in the 
NCAA Tournament along with the 
youth of our starting lineup, three 
sophomores and two freshmen, have 
an entire nation wondering how good 
this team can get. Going into the 
1994-95 season, the Maryland Terra- 
pins were nationally ranked in every 
preseason poll and once again were 
ready for March Madness. 

- Farid Siahatgar 




I HOPE EVERY- 
ONE HAS A 
CREAT FEELING 
ABOUT OUR 
BASKETBALL 
TEAM AN POUR 
SCHOOL AFTER 
ACHIEVING THE 
ROUNPOF16. 



Above - Terrapin Basketball Coach Gary 

Williams. 

Opposite page - #2 1 Mario Lucas and #32 

Joe Smith clean the glass taking a rebound 

from a Loyola opponent. 

All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



87 



WITH <1REAT 

fMlRE 



Mens Basketball Matures in Great Season 




How can words express the impact 
one young man had on an entire campus, 
on and off the court? How can words 
express the poise he displayed on the 
court and the charm he possessed off it? 

After leading the Terrapins to the Round 
of 16 in the NCAA Tournament, fresh- 
man Joe Smith has catapulted himself 
into the national spotlight for his athletic 
prowess and grace on the court. Head 
coach Gary Williams commented on this 
success in the NCAA Tournament: "I 
hope everyone has a great feeling about 



A YOUNC TEAM SURPRISES 


MANY TO REACH SWEET SIXTEEN 




MEN'S BASKETBALL 






1993-94 SEASON 




OVERALL RECORD: 18-1 


2 


MD 




" OPP. 


79 


AUSTRALIAN NAT'L 


85 


111 


VERICH REPS 


87 


84 


GEORGETOWN 


83 


92 


CORNELL 


41 


93 


RIDER 


79 


89 


MD-BALTIMORE CO. 


80 


85 


MORGAN STATE 


62 


85 


OKLAHOMA 


88 


109 


TOWSON STATE 


71 


93 


^-HOFStKA"^^.^ 


67 


94 


/^ UMASS ^\ 


80 


91 


/ GEORGIA TECH 


\ 88 


70 / 


NORTH CAROLINA 


\75 


80 / 


FLORIDA STATE 


\74 


61 


WAKE FOREST 


58 


102 


N.C. STATE 


70 


73 

62 \ 
66 \ 


CLEMSON 


53 


DUKE 


t5 


VIRGINIA 


/73 


71 


\ GEORGIA TECH 


/ 83 


89 


NORTH CAROLINA/ 


95 


69 


Fl:;Qa.IDA ST^3^ 


66 


81 


WAK£ FUkEST 


58 


94 


LOYOLA 


71 


71 


N.C. STATE 


79 


67 


CLEMSON 


73 


69 


DUKE 


73 


70 


VIRGINIA 
ACC TOURNAMENT 


68 


63 


VIRGINIA 


69 


74 


ST. LOUIS 


66 


95 


UMASS 


87 


71 


MICHIGAN 


78 



our basketball team and our school for 
what we acheived this season." 

How can words express Joe Smith's 
contribution to Maryland on the basketball 
court? A list of national awards and raw 
statistics can: National Freshman of the 
Year, ACC Rookie of the Year, 1st team 
all-ACC, and Honorable Mention All- 
American .Smith averaged a double double 
for the year with 1 9 . 4 points per game and 
10. 7 rebounds, finishing the season with a 
team high 93 blocked shots. His presence 
on the inside dominated most opponents 
while playing heavyweights like Eric 
Montross, Sharone Wright, and Marcus 

continued on pmgc 90 

Above right - Point guard #10 Duane Simkins 
drives the lane versus Duke's Marty Clark. 
Bottom right - Terp fans ignore the announc- 
ing of the visiting team. 
Opposite page - Top - Exree Hipp attempts 
to drive the baseline as Michigan's Jalen Rose 
traps him. Bottom - The Terrapin Men's 
Basketball Team. 





Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



88 




Photo by Lisa Hel/ert 



89 



BASKETBALL MEN'S BASKETBALL^;l^*^^^i^t™Tl 
BASKETBALL MEJii^^!*!^pi|-A|r2vlE!^^I^^ 

MEN'S BASKETBALL MEN'SJ^Sl^J5?J^*^E^!s€A^^ 

.siJeK^w^l ill I I ll I 1*1 1 I I' IT I I I I II II 
^SKE'^^X^fe^'^^SKETBALL MEN'S BASKETBALL 
SCETBALL MEN'S BASKETBALL MEN'S BASKETBALL 



MEN'S BASKETBALL MEN'S 

MEN'S BASKETBALL MEN'S 



MEN'S BASKE: 





(Continued from page 84) 
Camby to a dead heat. He led the Terra- 
pins in scoring in more than half the 
contests throughout the season and was 
often the go-to-guy in clutch situations at 
the end of games. Joe Smith's work ethic 
and dedication to the team made him the 
nationally recognized player he is, and 
thus enabled Maryland to experience that 
sweet tournament success it so desired for 
such a long time. 

How can words express Joe Smith's 
contribution to the University of Maryland 
off the basketball court? They can't, but 
maybe this example can help everyone 
understand. Joe Smith attended a dance 
on LaPlata Beach the day after the basket- 
ball team returned from its exhibition trip 
to France during the 1994 fall semester. 
As soon as the student body recognized 
this young man as the National Freshman 
of the Year, a crowd of anxious faces and 
eager questions surrounded him. But, 
with a special charm and patience, Joe 
Smith answered every question, as friendly 
to the last man as he was to the first. His 
personality and charm radiated through 
LaPlata Beach that day as every student 
realized how special of a person he really 
was. 

When the University of Maryland re- 
ceived the enrollment confirmation of a 
certain young man by the name of Joe 
Smith one year ago, everyone believed 
they were getting a fine basketball player. 
They were half right. As graceful and 
talented as Joe Smith is on the court, he is 
equally charming and kindhearted off it. 
Joe Smith is not only a great basketball 
player, he is also a warm individual with a 
winning personality. 

- Farid Siahatgar 




Above - In a battle of top centers, #32 Joe Smith blocks out North Carolina's Eric 
Montross for a rebound. Opposite page - #22 Keith Booth rejects the shot of Clemson's 
Devin Gray while #4 Exree Hipp looks on. All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



90 



ALWAYS A 
WINNER 



There are only three things in life 
you can always count on: death, 
taxes, and the University of Mary- 
land Women's Basketball Team 
being a winning program. As if it 
were written in stone, the Lady 
Terrapins once again completed a 
successful season with a winning 
record of 15-13 with a solid mark 
of 8-8 in the ACC. Consistency 
and a proud tradition have become 
the standard for head coach Chris 
Weller and her players on the 
court. 

"Our team finished 4th in the 
ACC after reaching the semifinals 
of the conference tournament," 
coach Weller explained, "even 
though we went through some 
difficult circumstances and some 





WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 






1993-94 SEASON 




OVERALL RECORD: 15-13 




MD 




OPP. 


81 


SOPRONI VASUTAS 


75 


82 


AMERICAN 


49 


103 


HOWARD 


43 


75 


TEXAS 


68 


85 


use 


92 


71 


OLD DOMINION 


61 


48 


TENNESSEE 


64 


102 


UMES 


31 


55 


WASHINGTON 


56 


69 


GEORGIA TECH 


62 


69 


FLORIDA STATE 


54 


52 


CLEMSON 


54 


67 


GEORGE WASHINGTON 


77 


84 


WAKE FOREST 


67 


56 


VIRGINIA 


68 


56 


NC STATE 


57 


67 


NORTH CAROLINA 


79 


81 


■ FLORIDA STATE 


39 


67 


GEORGIA TECH 


46 


67 


DUKE 


50 


64 


RUTGERS 


55 


71 


NC STATE 


63 


60 


DUKE 


62 


76 


NORTH CAROLINA 


106 


83 


VIRGINIA 


86 


64 


WAKE FOREST 


69 


84 


CLEMSON 
ACC TOURNAMENT 


46 


60 


DUKE 


45 


45 


VIRGINIA 


63 



key injuries to players. We expect 
to do well here at Maryland every 
year and look forward to continuing 
the standard in the next couple of 
years of competing and winning in 
the NCAA Tournament." 

The Lady Terps were once again 
led by Bonnie Rimkus who aver- 
aged a double double throughout 
the season with 18.2 points and 
10.1 rebounds per game. Other 
starters included Michele Andrew 
with 13.6 ppg, Monica Adams with 
11.3 ppg, and Lillian Purvis with 
9.2 ppg. The 1993-94 season 
included a key win over #17 
Rutgers 64-55 and an emotional 
double overtime loss to #8 Virginia 
86-83. 

-Farid Siahatgar 
Right - #10 Karen Ferguson brings the ball 
up court. Below - Reserves Jada Anderson, 
Nina Ohman, and Kwana Williams lead the 
cheers in their double-overtime defeat to 
Virginia. Opposite page - #22 Michele 
Andrew battles Virginia's Amy Lofstedt for a 
rebound. Bottom - The Terrapin Women's 
Basketball Team. 




i«mv%\ rW . \ 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



92 




Pdr.fo bv Lisa Helfert 



93 




-^Jd 



94 





Opposite page - Kesha Camper battles 
Virginia's Amy Lofstedt for a rebound as 
#22 Michele Andrew looks on. 

This page - 

Top left - Bonnie Rimkus gets a scare 
grabbing for a loose ball. Top right - 
Monica Adams, Tri-Captain, attempts a 
shot between two N.C. State defenders. 

All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks. 






95 



[fAfJsniTsnMmssmaMim 



remaining 

STRONG 

Top - Head coach Chris Weller looks on at 

her team. 

Bottom left - Bonnie Rimkus sets up in the 

post. 

Bottom right - Point guard Karon Ferguson 

shoots from close range in front of a Duke 

opponent. 

Opposite page - #53 Bonnie Rimkus 

attempts a left-handed shot versus 

Virginia's Chris Lesorauage and Wendy 

Palmer. 

All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 




d 


m -^ 


1 


^'?sBSfBL "^fS" 


i 


i 


^ $^ 




'^- '-'Sk-:}. 





I 

Photo by Lisa Helfert 



Maryland Gymnastics 

A season record of 0-4 to the 
untrained eye looks like a disappoint- 
ing season of loss. In the case of the 
Gymnastics team, that eye turns out 
to be untrained indeed. 

As a team they were unable to 
bring home first place trophies, but 
clinched a solid second at their tour- 
nament against UNC, UMASS, UVM 
and Northeastern. 

One of the most impressive quali- 
ties of this young team ( 1 2 of 1 6 were 
freshmen or sophomores) was their 
academic performance. They were 
ranked 13th academically in the 
NCAA for women's gymnastics, with 
Kara Klaus, Nicole Lefcourt, and Lisa 
Ruderman making the dean's list. 

The team was also strong on the 
individual level. Nicole Lefcourt was 
named USA Gymnastics National 
Collegiate Championships Outstand- 
ing Senior Athlete, as well as being 
named an All American along with 
sophomore teammate Kara Klaus. 

- Gina Dugan 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



98 




Gymnastics 
Overall Record 0-4 

MD 0pp. 

1 80 . 40 Towson State 186.125 

183,9 William and Mary 184.175 

184.075 Temple 184.575 

183.5 George Washington 187.4 

George Washington Invitational 
4th of 7 

MD State/Beltway Games 
3rd of 3 

Towson State Invitational 
4th of 7 

NC State/Bubble Invitational 
5th of 7 

UNC, UMASS, UVM, Northeastern U. 
2nd of 5 

ACC Tournament at North Carolina 
3rd of 4 

USA National Collegiate 
6th of 8 




All photos this page by Paul Vieira 



99 



GET DOWN ON IT: 

TERPSONTHEMAT 

This page - top - 171 pound Marc Pappa gets his opponent into a tough bind. Bottom left - 
Head coach John McHugh yells encouragement from the sideline. Bottom right - the 1994 
wrestling team. 

Opposite page - All American David Land, weighing in at 118 pounds, shows why he is 
among the best on the team. 



Wrestling 

Overall Record 6-4 

ACC Record 3-2 

No Team Scores For: 

West Virginia Open 

East Stroudsburg Open 

Penn State Open 

Wilkes Open 

ACC /EWL Challenge 

Brown 

Penn 

East Stroudsburg 

Virginia Duels Invitational 

Wisconsin 

Penn 

Navy 

Coppin State 

Old Dominion 

NC State 

Clemson 

North Carolina 

Navy 

American 

Howard 

Virginia 

Duke 

ACC Championships 
5th of 6 

NCAA Championships 
53rd place 




Photo by Tyrone Brook; 



Photo by Lisa Helfert 



100 



Photo on opposite page by Tyrone Brooks 




102 



S P R I N Q 





All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



103 



TAKE IT TO THE LIMIT 



Tears shed over an unsuccessful National 
Title defense in May of 1993 were scarcely 
dry when thoughts of the tremendously suc- 
cessful "94 season began to fornn in the hearts 
and minds of the Terrapin Women's Lacrosse 
team. While the off-season was a long one, 
the Terps were not idle. A fresh new face was 
added to the coaching staff. 

Head Coach Cindy Timchal sought out 
Gary Gait, a legendary figure in the sport of 
lacrosse. Gait, a member of three consecutive 
NCAA Championship lacrosse teams and 
holder of several NCAA tournament records, 
was working in the private sector when he 
received the call from Timchal. "1 thought 
coaching women's lacrosse would be a unique 
challenge," said Gait. Sophomore center and 
All-American Kelly Amonte described the 
Terps' new assistant coach as "...unbeliev- 
able. He brought a new aspect of the game 
that 1 had never seen before. '' 

'■ Our goal is always to be in a position to vie 
for the [National] title," said Timchal. Taking 
those words to heart, a Terrapin squad, pre- 
viously known for spotting opponents an early 
lead, shook off that reputation and stormed to 
a perfect 11 and regular season, a number 
one national ranking and a fifth consecutive 
NCAA Tournament appearance. 

Along the road to he National Champion- 
ship game, while out-scoring their opponents 
183 to 65. the Terps won several impressive 
victories. Then No. 1 Virginia fell to the 
Terps. 5 to 1. early in the season. The 
defending World Champion United States 
Lacrosse Team lost to the Terps in a close 7 
to 5 contest. The only match where a 
Maryland win was ever really in doubt was 
a narrow 12 to 10 victory over No. 2 
Princeton. 

The momentum gained during a flaw- 
less regular season seemed to follow the 
Terps into the NCAA Tournament where 
they stunned fourth ranked Loyola College. 

This page gearing up the sticks. 

Opposite page: 

Top left: #22 Laura Harmon takes a shot 

in traffic versus Loyola College in the 

NCAA tournament. Top right: #12 

Randall Goldsborough takes a shot and 

shores against Princeton. Bottom: #3 

Kelly Amonte attempts to elude several 

Loyola College Defenders. 

All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks. 



19 to 4, in the semi-final game. "We did 
everything right. We came together and 
everything went our way." said All-American 
Senior Forward Betsy Elder. 

Sadly, that Saturday victory was to mark 
the end of the Terrapin's dream season. On 
Sunday the Terps fell to the Princeton Tigers 
in the national championship game, 10 to 7, 
at Byrd Stadium. Coach Timchal believed 
that "...not being as challenged" during the 
regular season wound up hurting the Terps in 
the end. 

While the loss in the championship game 
was a tough one, the Terps did not finish the 
season on a down note. Four Terps - seniors 
Betsy Elder and Patty Parichy, junior Laura 
Harmon and sophomore Kelly Amonte - 
were named as selections to the NCAA All- 
Tournament team. That was just the begin- 



ning of the post-season honors. Six Terps 
werenamedAO-Americans: Elder and Hamaon 
(first team); Parichy and Amonte (second 
team): Maureen Scott and Amy Zink (third 
team). Betsy Elder and fellow senior Theresa 
Ingram were named Academic All-Ameri- 
cans. Elder was also named the National 
Offensive Player of the "Year. 

Despite a heartbreaking end to the "94 
season, and facing what Coach Timchal de- 
scribed as "the toughest schedule in the coun- 
try. " the Terps looked forward to next season. 
"Others will underestimate us, but they will be 
surprised by the people who will step in. " said 
Amonte. She was confident that the Terps 
would "win at least one National Champion- 
ship" before she graduated. Sounds like a 
safe bet. 

- Michael P. Ralsk\; 




104 




105 



WOMEN'S LACRO$$E 

ALWAYS ON THE WINNINC STREAK 




WE CAME 

TOGETHER 

AND 

EVERYTHING 

WENT OUR 

WAY' 

-Betsy Elder 

All-American 





WOMEN'S LACROSSE 






1994 SEASON 




OVERALL RECORD: 12 


1 


MD 


OPP. 


17 


TEMPLE 


4 


5 


VIRGINIA 


1 


18 


AT DELAWARE 


3 


15 


AT JAMES MADISON 


6 


16 


OLD DOMINION 


6 


17 


AT TOWSON STATE 


7 


11 


AT HARVARD 


2 


14 


AT WILLIAM & MARY 3 


11 


AT LOYOLA 


5 


21 


PENN STATE 


4 


12 


AT PRINCETON 
NCAA SEMI-FINALS 


10 


19 


LOYOLA 
NCAA FINALS 


4 


7 


PRINCETON 


10 



0]ipc .sik pum A Terp always keeps her eye on tlic IkiII lanig across midfield. This page - Top: #10 Karen McCrate shows the face 
of determination racing past a Loyola defender. Bottom - One-on-one action against Loyola College. 
All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks. 



TOTALLY CROSSED OUT 



Although the men's lacrosse team 
had a difficult season in the ACC, 
they pulled through with an overall 
record of 7-6. 

Matt Parks led the Terps with 29 
goals, and Rob Chomo led in assists 
with a total of 24. 

Brian Dougherty reigned in the 
goal with 178 saves for the season 
to end with an average of .641. 

Not only did the team perform 



well athletically this season, but also 
academically, with several of the 
players making the dean's list. 

-Heather Matuschek 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



W"^^ 



Men's Lacrosse 
Season Record 



MD 

18 

13 

7 

18 

16 

7 

7 

11 



OPP. 
7 
12 



Villanova 
Duke 

Towson State 14 

Cornell 8 

Ohio State 2 

North Carolina 2 

Virginia 9 

Navy 4 

10 Johns Hopkins 2 

ACC Semi-Finals 

1 North Carolina 8 

18 Mt. St. Mary's 7 

18 UMBC 11 

NCAA First Round 

9 Duke 14 















mm 












Photo by Lisa Helfert 



108 



Opposite photo by Tyrone Brooks 







t 







W A^ 







^ 






■^ 




?t. 







Men's Tennis 




Season Record 2-9 


MD 


OPP. 


5 


Pittsburgh at Penn 5 


1 


Pennsylvania 1 





Georgia Tech 





Clemson 


6 


Loyola 6 





N.C. State 


2 


Navy 2 





Florida State 





Virginia 





Wake Forest 





North Carolina 




ACC Tournament 





vs. N.C. State 




Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




-ij^rTOA**:?-^: 



Photo by Lisa Helfert 



110 



NETWORK 




The men's and women's tennis 
teams played hard but struggled this 
year. 

Terry Schultz of the men's team 
was given the Terrapin Award, as was 
women's team member and captain 
Julie Cady. 

One singles player stood out of the 
crowd, however. Bresha Byrd of the 
women's team was named first seed 
at the James Madison Invitational and 
the Virginia Tech Invitational. She 
was also a letter winner, as well as 
making the dean's list. (Cady made 
the dean's list as well.) 

Other letter winners included Cady, 
Liz Henkin, Beth Hutton, Kristin 
Medvetz, and Corey Shapiro. 

- Gina Dugan 





Women's Tennis 






Season Record 2-12 




MD. OPP. 





Florida State 


9 


5 


West Virginia 


4 





Clemson 


9 


3 


Georgia Tech 


6 





North Carolina 


9 





Duke 


6 


5 


Loyola 


1 


1 


Virginia Tech 


7 





N.C. State 


5 


2 


Pennsylvania 


7 


1 


James Madison 


7 





Wake Forest 


9 





Virginia 


8 





William & Mary 
ACC Championship 


6 


2 


Georgia Tech 


5 



Photo by Lisa Helfert 



111 



EXPOSING DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH 



This page - Top - The Terrapin Baseball 
Team. Bottom - #6 Shortstop and co- 
captain John Kuntz makes the long throw 
accross the diamond. 
Opposite page - #31 Steve Paasch 
delivers a pitch to home plate. 





BASEBALL 






1994 SEASON 




OVER.'XLL RECORD: 24-30-1 




MD 


OPP. 1 


4 


AT UNC GREENSBORO 


5 


3 


(DOUBLE HEADER} 


4 


4 


AT UNC GREENSBORO 


12 





AT VCU 


4 


1 


ATVCU 


5 


5 


AT CLEMSON 


7 


2 


AT CLEMSON 


18 


5 


AT CLEMSON 


6 


12 


AT FLORIDA A&M 


7 
/ 


14 


AT FLORIDA A&M 


11 


2 


AT FLORIDA STATE 


5 





AT FLORIDA STATE 


6 


6 


AT FLORIDA STATE 


4 


4 


GEORGIA TECH 


12 


6 


GEORGIA TECH 


5 





GEORGIA TECH 


21 


7 


UMES 


3 


5 


(DOUBLE HEADER) 


1 


4 


DUKE 


12 


5 


DUKE 


12 


5 


DUKE 


11 





AT JAMES MADISON 


13 


6 


AT WAKE FOREST 


8 


6 


AT WAKE FOREST 


20 


4 


AT WAKE FOREST 


5 


6 


JAMES MADISON 


5 


9 AT GEORGE WASHINGTON 


8 





AT NORTH CAROLINA 


4 


1 


AT NORTH CAROLINA 


22 


4 


AT NORTH CAROLINA 


2 


8 


UMBC 


2 


12 


COPPIN STATE 





17 


(DOUBLE HEADER) 


2 


10 


GEORGE WASHINGTON 


3 


6 


NC STATE 


22 


4 


NC STATE 


11 


7 


NC STATE 


11 


7 


AT TOWSON STATE 


4 


15 


WILLIAM AND MARY 


2 


6 


(DOUBLE HEADER) 


6 


5 


VIRGINIA 


3 


10 


VIRGINL\ 


2 


6 


VIRGINIA 


5 


5 


GEORGE MASON 


6 


13 


AT UMBC 


4 


2 


TOWSON STATE 


1 


6 


AT GEORGE MASON 


5 





RICHMOND 


4 


5 


(DOUBLE HEADER) 


3 


7 


AT DELAWARE 


20 


2 


WEST VIRGINIA 


4 


8 


(DOUBLE HEADER) 
ACC TOURNAMENT 


2 


8 


VIRGINIA 


2 


1 


CLEMSON 


7 


1 


FLORIDA STATE 


7 




^- ai^ ^^h^ f\9 f^3in^i^V^ 



ky^/m Slit/ il <miM 



^ 







^ 




112 



TERRAPINS ON THt RUN 



New track, new standard of excellence 

The 1994 Men's Outdoor Track and Field team expected 
great things from their spring season and significantly im- 
proved their performaces from the year before. Individual 
bests included many top ten finishes in the 3000 meter 
steeplechase by Brian Montgomery and top three perfor- 
mances in the 100 and 200 meter dash by Vernon Boyd and 
Mike Depry. The squad was led in the hammer throw, shot 
put. and discus by Ed Condon while Mike Starks showed very 
strong performances and top-five results in the long, high and 
triple jump. With the building of the new track in the upcom- 
ing years these individual performances and outstanding team 
results should become very frequent for the team in the 
future. 

This season was a big improvement over the year before," 
Brian Montgomery proudly exclaimed. "The success we had 
this year is going to define what's to come in the next few 
years as we keep getting better. Our new track is going to 
help recruiting and this should keep the great performances 
and results we achieved this season around for several years. 
For spring 1995 we expect even better talent and perfor- 
mances as we keep up the standard we set this year." 

- Forid Siahatgar 



Season Schedule 
No team scores available 



December 3, 1993 
December 12, 1993 
January 9, 1994 

January 14. 1994 
January 23, 1994 
January 29, 1994 
February 5, 1994 
February 18, 1994 
February 26. 1994 
March 6. 1994 



Navy Invitational 
Seton Hall Invitational 
Father Diamond 
(at George Mason) 
Deleware Invitational 
Princeton Invitational 
Navy/Fordham 
Hardee's (WVU) 
ACC Championship 
Seton Hall 
Men IC4A's 



•'■"^"^■■^■^■^•^■•^"^ "rf 




Photo by Lisa Helfert 



114 




Photo by Lisa Helfert 



GOLF: SWINOIN' AROUND 

Building a winning program... 



Men's Golf 




Season Record 




ACC Tournament 




5th of 9 


891 


ECU Emerald Classic 




11th of 19 


930 


Furman Intercollegiate 




14th of 23 


591 


All-American Intercollegiate 




9th of 12 


909 


27th Palmetto Intercollegiate 




9th of 18 


910 


Cavalier Classic 




5th of 15 


889 


NCAA East Regional 




16th of 23 


928 



Coming off its niost successful season in years, the Maryland Golf 
Team built a winning program and set a standard of excellence for the 
Terrapin squads of the future: Maryland qualified for the NCAA East 
Regional Golf Tournament. A three-day showing of 928 (315-303-303) 
put them alone in 16th place in the field of the 23 best teams in the 
region. 

"This is the best a Maryland team has done in years." said Tommy 
Mensing from Richmond, Va. "We made it to the NCAA East Regionals. 
The team had a good time together on road trips, but we also knew when 
to get serious and we were proud of what we accomplished. Maryland is 
back and we have built a good program that is on its way up. This win- 
ning standard will remain for the team in Spring 1995 and all those to 
follow." 

Head coach Tom Hanna was named Atlantic Coast Conference Coach 

of the Year and guided his veteran squad to three top five finishes and 

fifth in the ACC Championships. Senior Del Ponchock was also honored 

during the season as an ACC All-Conference player for his consistency 

and high finishes in all of Maryland's tournaments. These individual 

awards achieved during the Spring 1994 season typified the success of a 

winning program and illustrated the stellar year of our own Maryland golf 

team. 

- Farid Siahatgar 



115 




116 



F fi L L 








o 

71 







All photos on this spread by Tyrone Brooks 



117 



GAIN RESPE CT 



The 1994 Terrapins were 4-4 enter- 
ing their final home contest against the 
N.C. State Wolf pack. The makings of a 
winning season, the makings of a bowl 
season, and most importantly the resur- 
gence of Maryland Football to promi- 
nence all depended on the outcome of 
one football game one Saturday evening. 
It was November 5th, Coach Mark 
Duffner and his two co-captains, seniors 
Steve Ingram and Jamie Bragg, were in 
the locker room prior to kickoff giving 
the team a pep talk about the impor- 
tance of winning three in a row, the 
importance of a winning season, and 
their overall team goal of reaching a 
bowl game after the 1994 season. 

About three hours later, after an of- 
fensive explosion by both teams, the 
scoreboard showed a six point lead for 
the Wolfpack 44-38 well into the fourth 
quarter. Maryland started with the ball 
at its own 35 and quickly faced a fourth 
down and one at the 44. Into the game 
came the Terps' short yardage package, 
Black Thunder, since the defense had 
not slowed down N.C. State's offensive 
attack. Freshman running back Buddy 
Rodgers plowed forward two yards for 
the crucial first down. Sparked on by 
this emotional fourth down conversion, 
the Terrapins marched 65 yards for the 
touchdown as Scott Milanovich hit wide 
receiver Mancel Johnson for a 12-yard 
score for his fifth touchdown pass of the 
game. The clock showed 2:19 remain- 
ing; Maryland had a 45-44 lead over the 
visiting Wolfpack. A winning season 
was well within grasp and a bowl game 
was still a distinct possibility, if only the 
defense could keep State from scoring 
on this final drive. But alas, the Terps 
could not capitalize on two possible 
interception opportunities during the 
final two minutes and a 35-yard field 
goal by the visitors sealed Maryland's 
fate: 47-45. Heartbreak. 

The locker room was silent. Every- 
one had given their all and left their 
hearts out on the field. It was a tough 
loss to swallow, but there were no losers 
on that day . " The N . C . State game was 



the biggest game I've played since Ive 
been here," senior long snapper and 
tight end Corey Holobetz said. "We 
played well and gave it everything we 
had, we just didn't come out on top." 

"It wasn't our work ethic, we just had 
some bad breaks," said senior tight end 
Kevin Woodeshick. "We worked hard 
during the week, but then didn't always 
show it on Saturdays." 

Individual statistics for the 1994 sea- 
son included 77 receptions for 891 
yards and five touchdowns for true 
sophomore wide receiver Geroy Simon, 
who also scored on an electrifying 94- 
yard reverse on a kickoff return against 
N.C. State. Teammate Jermaine Lewis 
contributed 45 receptions for 692 yards 
and nine touchdowns. Kevin Foley and 
Scott Milanovich both started for the 
Terps, Foley finishing with 62 of 95 
passing for 643 yards and three touch- 



downs, while Milanovich ended the year ! 
with 229 of 333 passing for 2, 394 i 
yards and 20 TD's. Kicker Joe O'Donnell 
led all scorers with 60 points, connect- 
ing on 9 of 10 field goal attempts, and 
Ratcliff Thomas once again led the de- 
fense with 140 tackles. 

"We really improved a lot this year, 
we worked hard during the off season 
and had several young guys come in and 
contribute for us, " added Holobetz, who 
was named to the GTE Academic All- 
America District II football team for his 
3.468 GPA. "The defense should be 
strong next year with many experienced 
players returning to their current posi- 
tions, and the offense has talented back- 
ups that can step in next season and 
perform well. This program is definitely 
headed in the right direction." 

- Farid Siahatgar 




118 







Football 




Season Record 4-7 


MD. 




Opp. 


16 


Duke 


49 


20 


Florida State 


52 


24 


West Virginia 


13 


31 


Wake Forest 


7 





Clemson 


13 


17 


North Carolina 


41 


42 


Georgia Tech 


27 


38 


Tulane 


10 


45 


N.C. State 


47 


21 


Virginia 


46 


16 


Syracuse 


21 



All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



119 



A YEAR OF BUILDING 




All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



120 



Opposite page - top left - Wide receiver Geroy Simon attempts to get around a North Carolina defender after making a catch. 
Top right - Scott Milanovich prepares to pass against Wake Forest. Bottom - Freshman running back Buddy Rodgers celebrates his 
touchdown against Wake Forest. 
This page - top - the Terrapin Football team. Bottom - Linebacker Ratcliff Thomas looks at his prey. 



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Photo by Tyrone Brooks 

121 



EXPOSING THE 
HEART 

Field Hockey team faces difficult 
year, still has winning season 

When the final buzzer sounded, ending an early season one to nothing losss 
to unranked Delaware, the defending National Champion Terrapins knew 
just how hard a return trip to Final Four would be. "It was a real eye-opener," 
recalled Senior All-American sweeper Laura Harmon. "After defeating our 
first three or four opponents, [the season] got difficult..." 

The loss of eight of eleven starters was responsible for changing perennial 
national powerhouse, into something it has rarely been; an unknown 
quantity. "This is called a year of reloading, not rebuilding," stated Head 
Coach Missy Meharg. "Leadership plays a role in success; this was a year of 
developing leaders," she added. 

Helping develop leaders was a new addition to the coaching staff. John 
O'Haire, the goalkeeper for the U.S. Men's National Field Hockey Team, 
joined the Terrapins and made an immediate impact. "John brings a different 
perspective to goal keeping. He focuses on fundamentals, aggressiveness and 
confidence," lauded senior Ali-American goalkeeper Irene Horvat. 

Those same leaders helped the Terps snap a string of bad luck and finish 
the season on a high note. "We had hope and more cinfodence going into 
the last weeks," remembered junior back and member of the U.S. National 
Women's Field Hockey Team, Katie Kauffman. "We were finally gelling as 
a team." That invigorated team charged their way inbto the final game of the 
ACC Tournament. Despite dropping a close match to eventual National 
runner-up North Carolina, the Terps looked upon that game as a positive 
experience. "Everything that we were trying to get from the players, we finall 
ygot in the tournament," said Assistant Coach Michelle Brennan. 

That display of potential was not missed by anyone when it came time to 
award the post-season honors. Harmon, Horvat, Kauffman, and freshman 
midfielder Christine DeBow were all selections to mthe All- ACC First Team. 
Sophomore marking-back Tricia Burdt was also recognized for her outstand- 
ing effort, being named to the Mid-Atlantic Region All-American Second 
Team. The same starting four who received All- ACC honors were also 
selected to the Mid- Atlantic Region's First Team of All- Americans. Addition- 
ally, Harmon and Horvat finished their career by being named Third-Team 
[National] All- Americans. Katie Kauffman also received additional recogni- 
tion, being selected as a [National] First-Team All-American. 

Reflecting on the pool of talented players who will form the nucleus of next 
year's team, Meharg described them as "very young, but very strong." 
Combine that statement with what Meharg described as a banner recruiting 
year, and it would appear that another National Championship is not too far 

in the team's future. 

- Michael Rahky 





m. I 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 



122 






Field Hockey 






Season Record 10-9-2 




MD 


OPP. 


3 


American 





7 


Towson State 





1 


Iowa 


2 





Delaware 


1 


5 


Richmond 





3 


Wake Forest 





4 


Duke 





2 


Penn State 







Old Dominion 


1 




Virginia 


2 




North Carolina 


2 




Duke 


1 




Rutgers 







James Madison 


3 




North Carolina 


3 




Temple 


2 




Pennsylvania 






^. c 



1 





Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




2 




Heltert 



123 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 
124 



MEN'S SOCCER 

Team shocks ACC with turnaround 

Compatibility and chemistry among the men's soccer team led them to 
an overall winning record of 14-6-1, and an ACC record of 3-3-0. accord- 
ing to coach Sasho Cirovski. 

Sophomore forward. Shane Dougherty led the Terps in goals with 17 
for the season. He was also the third leading goal scorer in the ACC. 

Captains Malcolm Gilian, a senior forward, and Tod Herskovitz, a junior 
midfielder, added to Dougherty's success on the attack, and worked with a 
strong back line and sophomore goalkeeper, Russell Payne, to produce a 
triumphant season. 

"Gilian not only provided great leadership off of the field, but he scored 
many of our key goals," said Cirovski. 

"This was a great season," he said. "We had a big turn around in the 
ACC, and the only people that weren't surprised were the players and 

coaches." 

- Heather Matuschek 




All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



126 






Men's Soccer 






Season Record 14-6-1 




MD 


». OPP. 


2 


Old Dominion 





6 


UMBC 





2 

4 


Virginia 
American 


4 
2 


3 


N.C. State 


4 


4 


Towson State 





3 


Duke 


1 


1 


James Madison 


2 


1 


Wake Forest 





1 
5 


Mt. St. Mary's 
Butler 


2 



2 


Princeton @ UVA 


2 


2 


Dartmouth @ UVA 





1 
2 


George Washington 
Clemson 



4 


3 
1 


Loyola 
Robert Morris 


1 



2 


North Carolina 
ACC Tournament 


1 





Clemson 


3 


1st round NCAA Tournament 


4 
1 


Georgetown 
Virginia 


3 
2 









Photo by Lisa Helfert 



127 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 

TOUOHINC IT OUT 

The 1994 Women's Soccer record did not show the improvement and 
dedication of the team, according to head coach April Heinrichs, who 
finished her fourth season at Maryland. 

Despite an overall record of 7-10-3, and an Atlantic Coast Conference 
record of 1-4-1, the team was optimistic towards the season. 

"Our record does not show how we played as a team," Heinrichs said. 
"Towards the end of the season we had close matches with top ACC 
teams such as Virginia and George Mason, which we had not been able to 

do (before)." 

Senior forward Randi Goldblatt led the Terps on the attack with eight 
goals, followed by freshman forward Carol Finch, with seven. 

Goalkeeper Missy Price, a sophomore, had 106 saves for the season. 

"We had some great wins, heartbreaking losses and a tough season in 

1994," Heinrichs summarized. 

-Heather Matuschek 





All photos this page by Tyrone Brooks 



128 




Women's Soccer 



Season Record 7-10-3 



MD 




OPP. 





North Carolina 


2 


4 


UNC Greensboro 





5 


Southern Methodist 


4 


1 


Texas A&M 


1 


6 


Princeton 





3 


N.C. State 


3 




1 


George Washington 
Duke 


2 
3 


1 


James Madison 


3 


6 


Wake Forest 





1 

3 
3 


George Mason 

Virginia 

Loyola 

UMBC 


2 
1 

2 


2 


Indiana 





1 


Florida International 


2 






William & Mary 

Clemson 

ACC Tournament 


4 
3 


1 



Virginia 
North Carolina 


1 

5 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




r 'i( 'to by Lisa Helfert 



129 



if ""■-** 



'i * 



" * 





VOLLEYBALL 





Volleyball 






Season Record 18-13 




MD. 




OPP. 


1 


Texas A&M 


3 


3 


Virginia Tech 


1 


3 


DePaul 


1 


3 


Delaware 





3 


Central Michigan 


1 


1 


Alabama 


3 





George Washington 


3 


3 


Georgetown 


1 


3 


Texas Tech 





3 


Lousiana State 


2 





Nebraska 


3 





Clemson 


3 


3 


Georgia Tech 


1 


3 


Virginia 


1 


3 


N.C. State 





3 


William & Mary 








Duke 


3 


3 


North Carolina 








Clemson 


3 





Gerogia Tech 


3 


3 


Towson State 





3 


Florida State 


1 


3 


N.C. State 





1 


George Washington 


3 


3 


Virginia 


1 


1 


George Mason 


3 


3 


Drexel 





1 


Florida State 


3 


1 


Duke 


3 


3 


North Carolina 


1 


1 


Florida State 


3 



The Terrapin volleyball team had a 
winning 1994 season. Under the direc- 
tion of two-time National Coach of the 
Year Janice Kruger, they improved their 
ACC record to 8-6 with an overall record 
of 18-13. 

Four starters, including captains Kelly 
Malkins and Sherry Smith who led the 
team in attack, returned this season to 
take a fourth place finish in the ACC. 

"I felt that this was a good year for 
Maryland volleyball. We were right on 
the fringe of off-season play, and we 
secured a record of 18-13 with a fresh- 
man setting . . . every match , " said Kruger . 

"With just one more win 1 think we 
would have been in the ACC Tourna- 
ment," she added. 

- Heather Matuschek 



'WITH JU$T ONE 

MORE WIN I 

THINKWE 

WOULD HAVE 

BEEN IN THE ACC 

TOURNAMENT. 

-Janice Kruger I 
Head Coach 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 




Opposite photo by Tyrone Brooks 



MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 

The University of Maryland Cross Country Team finished the 1994 season with the ACC Championships in 
Atlanta, Georgia on Saturday, October 28. As expected and predicted the Terrapins placed eighth in the ACC's 
with individual bright spots coming from junior Brian Montgomery, who finished 15th, just five places away from 
being named to the All-ACC team, and Jon Sushinsky, who was 34th. The men's squad had some strong results 
during the year, especially a first and third place finish in two of their own tournaments, the Maryland Open and 
the Maryland Colleges Invitational, respectively. 

"We did as well as was expected, but not as well as we had hoped," explained sophomore Kevin Cody when 
asked about the success during the season. "We had a young team for one thing, and some key injuries also hurt 
us during the year." 

Two individuals from the men's cross country team traveled to the NCAA District III Cross Country Champion- 
ships for their performances and good results throughout the season. Brian Montgomery and Jon Sushinsky 
were the two athletes to represent the University of Maryland as individual performers at the District Champion- 
ships. 

"We are consistently moving up and improving, now it is just a question of how fast. The new track that is 
being built on campus will significantly help recruiting and this will keep Maryland Cross Country on the rise." 

- Farid Siahatgar 



Men's Cross Country 
Season Record 

Navy 
Oof 3 

Virginia 
8 of 14 

George Mason 
10 of 15 

Maryland Open 
lof 2 

Paul Short Invitational 
17 of 24 

MD Colleges Invitational 
3 of 5 

ACC Tournament 
8 of 9 




132 








-vv 



3* »!> .. -;■» a* 3 \ 



s* ".i:^.'* 



All photos this spread by Lisa Helfert 



133 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY! 



The Women's Cross Country Team 
had a challenging season. They fin- 
ished in eighth, but were able to move 
up to seventh in the ACC after the 
ACC Championships. 

There were some individual bright 
spots on the team. Senior Paula 
LaVorgna finished 20th in 1 8 : 38 , just 
two seconds behind here season's 
personal best, which she achieved at 
the Maryland Invitational. Sopho- 
more Kerrie Bowes ended in 34th 
place overall with a time of 19:10. 
Both LaVorgna and Bowes also were 
able to travel to the NCAA National 
Championships. 

- Gina Dugan 



Women's Cross Country 
Season Record 

Navy 
Oof 3 

Virginia 

6 of 9 

George Mason 
7 of 13 

Maryland Open 
lof 2 

Paul Short Invitational 
14 of 24 

MD Colleges Invitational 
2 of 7 

ACC Tournament 

7 of 9 




134 




All photos this spread by Lisa Helfert 



135 






THE BAND 





■w. •»--< ri^% '^^^-»' 





All photos this page by Paul Vieira 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



-THE FANS 



Photo by Tyrone Brooks 






St^ 



"Here we go Maryland, Here We Go!" 
The concrete floor trembles as the 14, 500 
screaming Terp fans speak with one voice. 
At the center of this emotional Maelstrom 
are a number of the most energetic Terp 
fans you'll ever see; the Cheerleaders. 
"We're here to provide atmosphere, get 
the crowd going, and [maintain] the level of 
excitement throughout the game," ex- 
claimed team member Napoleon Martinez. 
"The cheerleaders are here to lead the 
crowd, not just in cheers, but to have a 
good time while at the game," added fellow 
team member Pat Taylor. 

Lead the crowd they do. And why not? 
Maryland Cheerleaders are among the very 
best in the country. "[Maryland 
Cheerleading] finished 8th overall when 
they competed in Nationals this year in 
Dallas," beamed cheerleading advisor Tina 
Simijoski. But being the best these days 
means needing more than just a pretty 
face. "It takes strong athletic ability... and 
a gymnastic background," added Simijoski. 

Regrettably this close knit family, suf- 
fered a loss this past summer with the 
death of team member James "Big Daddy" 
Simmons. "He had this uncanny ability to 
get to know every single person on the 
team. He was a father figure," Taylor said. 

He will be remembered. 

- Michael Ralsky 






All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



■■'■':-tS>^'-'T' 



With a wave of a pom, and a cry of "Go Terps," the Maryland 
Dance Team dazzled their way into the 1994-95 school year. 
Enthusiasm came easily for the squad, which finished first in the 
Home Routine Competition at the Universal Dance Association's 
Camp this past summer. The win against national caliber oppo- 
nents provided an added boost to a team already full of energy, and 
focused on its mission. "We're there for the teams," exclaimed Lori 
Heinkel, team captain. "We are here to provide entertainment, 
school spirit and to be role models. We can only do that with the 
support of the [entire campus community] . " 

Not content to just perform at football and basketball games, this 
group has higher goals. "As a team, [we want] to be recognized as 
a sport at this University, " said Dance Team member Tiffani Frost. 
Shooting for the top, that's the Terrapin spirit! 

- Michael Ralsky 






Photo by Nick Wass 



142 



University of Maryland zvelcomes the first female athletic director in ACC history: 

MEET DEBORAH YOW 



The University of Maryland was 
searching for a new athletic director 
to fill the gap left by the departure 
of Andy Geiger in April, 1994. 
What they found was Deborah A. 
Yow, the first female athletic 
director in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference. She comes from Saint 
Louis University where she also 
held the position of athletic director, 
yet the Billikens did not field a 
varsity football team. Yow traveled 
halfway across the country to a 
larger University in a more 
prominent conference with a bigger 
athletic department in order to help 
cure a $6 million operating deficit 
and straighten out and control the 
much larger budget here at the 
University of Maryland. 

L 



'7 was well prepared. 
Coming in, I knew it 

woidd be a very 

challenging job , hut I 

also knew that I had the 

support of President 

Kirwan, and I felt like I 

was inheriting a good 

staff/' 



"I was well prepared," explained 
an excited Yow about the changes 
involved in switching universities. 
"Coming in, I knew it would be a 
very challenging job, but I also knew 
that I had the support of President 
Kirwan, and I felt like I was 
inheriting a good staff. I knew it 
would just be a matter of time 
before we could get on track." 

The new athletic director 



"Af the present time, the 
department is focused on 

stabilizing financial 

operations and balancing 

the annual athletic 

budget. We will then 

begin to reduce the 

accumulating operating 

debt." 



immediately announced that one of 
her goals was balancing the budget 
this fiscal year and then slowly 
reducing the operating debt until 
the current operating deficit was 
gone eight to ten years from now. 

"At the present time, the 
department is focused on stabilizing 
financial operations and balancing 
the annual athletic budget. We will 
then begin to reduce the 
accumulated operating debt... and 
focus our energy on significantly 
increasing our fund raising efforts." 

The graduation rate of student 
athletes is also high on Yow's 
priority list as she intends to match 
or surpass her 92% student athlete 
graduation rate she achieved during 
her four-year tenure as athletic 
director at Saint Louis University. 

"Academically, our student 
athletes currently graduate at a rate 
equal to or higher than the general 
student population. Our goal is to 
reach a position in the top 20% of 
Division I-A athletic programs in 
terms of our graduation rate over 
the next four years." 



When asked why she chose the 
University of Maryland at College 
Park as the next step in her career, 
Debbie Yow gave an eager and 
detailed response. 

"The University of Maryland is an 
institution committed to the highest 
standards of academic and athletic 
performance. I came to the 
University of Maryland because I 
believe that the University of 
Maryland's athletic program, having 
weathered some difficult times, can 
once again become one of the 
nation's premier intercollegiate 
athletic programs." 

- Farid Siahatgar 



'7 came to the 

University of Maryland 

because I believe that the 

University of 

Maryland's athletic 

program, having 

weathered some difficult 

times, can once again 

become one of the 

nation's premier 

intercollegiate athletic 

programs." 



143 



AGREATYEAR IN SPORTS 




144 




All photos this spread by Tyrone Brooks 

145 









"Resident Life offers the students at 

UMCP the opportunity to network in a 

culturally diverse atmosphere and to 

exercise responsibilities in a miniature 

representative of the real world." 

Stephen Powell 

Sophomore 

Electrical Engineering 







.i^^iid^-A-'L-^i^^J^^ 




0^1 






RESIDENT 
LIFE 




Exposing The Way Wc Live 

Edited By Eileen de Guzman 

What do red telephones, personal security codes, the dining 
halls, Red Express, the meal plan, the UM shuttle, resident 
assistants and lots and lots of people have in common? Give up? 
These are only a few of the many different aspects of Resident Life 
at the University of Maryland at College Park. Along with one's 
own personal encounter at College Park, Resident Life played its 
role as being a major part of the "College Experience." 

The enrollment at UMCP was significantly higher than the 
previous years. Housing on campus was an overwhelming 102% 
full. This occurrence forced many incoming freshman to live in 
triples. Although the campus had just opened Cumberland Hall, 
home of the College Park Scholars Program, and Cambridge Hall, 
an all singles coed dormitory, these additions were not sufficient to 
adequately hold the influx of students at the university. 

This year, the Department of Resident Life was not only a 
department on campus but it acted as a channel for interaction and 
preparation for the real worid in a community setting. It was a 
channel that enabled students to openly and freely discover and 
display themselves and EXPOSED THE WAY WE LIVE. 










The summer was over and it was 
time for residents from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland to return to College 
Park and MOVE IN. The first step 
to the moving-in process began 
with packing. This usually consisted 
of an infinite number of boxes 
loaded with clothes and books and 
other personal items sorted in some 
type of order. Sophomore Biology 
major Sandra Adamako said, "I 
think packing is annoying. 1 don't 
like all of the moving on and off 



campus stuff." When asked what 
the hardest thing about packing was 
she replied, "The hardest thing 
about packing is trying to figure out 
what to leave and what to bring to 
school with you." 

In front of many of the residence 
halls were very long lines of cars 
waiting to unload their contents. 
The August summer heat added to 
the frustration of the task. Many 
people unloaded their things into a 
big pile and left to find a parking 



space while someone stood watch 
over their belongings. Unloading 
the car was just the beginning of the 
long process. 

As residents entered their respec- 
tive residence halls they were met 
by a registration table and a long 
line to receive their the keys to their 
rooms. The residents then had to 
move all of their boxes and suit- 
cases into the building and into their 
rooms by way of the elevator or 
stairs. The crowds of people anx- 




All photos on this spread by Joanne Saidman 



148 




iously awaited in front of the eleva- 
tor doors and scurried to and fro as 
the doors opened. Everyone from 
the residents to the parents were 
eager to get all of the luggage into 
the rooms and go back home. 

Eventually the job of moving-in 
was completed and all of the lug- 
gage somehow found themselves at 
their place of destination. Residents 
enjoyed their temporary sigh of 
relief before they embarked on 
another journey entitled, "Unpack- 
ing." Residents may or may not 
have received help in this area but 
as for the moving-in process, that 
was finished. 

Many people were rather frus- 
trated with the long and drawn out 
process but others were not as 
disappointed. "I was excited about 
moving in. It was a new and excit- 
ing experience, I was embarking on 
a journey that would lead me 
through the rest of my life," happily 
replied Biology major Kenneth L. 
Johnson Jr. 

-Eileen de Guzman 




I was happy to come 
to college but I did not 
like the moving-in expe- 
rience. I didn't like it 
because it was hot, it 
was crowded, and a lot 
of work." 
Dana Johnson 

Senior 
Biochemistry 



149 





Residents just could not leave behind all of the comforts of home when 
moving onto campus. For many, comfort foremost meant style and a 
room that looked livable. Transforming her cell block-walled, tiled floor 
room in North Campus required much creative effort, but freshman 
Alissa Fields was up to the task. "I decorated the room the way I want to 
feel, and I want to feel comfortable. 

The vases with flowers, framed pictures, and bright candles probably 
made her feel more comfortable with its appearance than anything else. 
Also, a notable touch were the white Christmas lights strung, out-of- 
season, along the tops of the walls. Other residents owned trendy black 
light bulbs, and quite a few lied in bed at night while gazing at a ceiling of 
glow-in-the-dark stars. 

Contact paper-crazy Tracy Lobel really did a number on her previously 
bare surroundings. "I like to add color to my room. It makes me feel homey," 
she shared. She even papered her room's heater. 

Residents added a number of other stylish touches to their personal 
enclaves. Those lucky enough to have pipes winding across their ceiling 
hung mobiles from them. Some residents proudly displayed their bottle 
collections on their shelves. The fashion conscious lined the walls with Calvin 
Klein tm and Guess tm magazine ads. For the most functional part of the room, 
the bed of course, one student could not do without his Mighty Morphin 
Power Rangers TM bedspread and matching sheets. No, living on campus just 
would not have been acceptable if residents were not allowed some personal 

comfort and style. 

-Maria LoPiccolo 




Photo by Robin Solomon 




Photo by Eric Lasky 



150 




*1 M^ ^^^^^ 



PINKFlOYD 






Photo by Eric Lasky 



151 




"It's ridiculous to 
have three people 
living in a two- 
person room." 
Nancy Adde 
Freshman 
History 




All photos on this page by Eric Lasky 



152 





For one hundred twenty-one new 
residents, the first fall semester at 
Maryland started off "on the wrong 
foot." Due to a shortage of available 
rooms, 121 freshmen and transfer 
students were placed into temporary 
triple-doubles with 104 students still 
waiting for housing. 

The room shortage was caused by 
a multitude of factors including a 14.5 
percent increase in returning students, 
a 13 percent increase in the number 
of new students, and a 6 percent 
decrease in the number of housing 
cancellations. Having the largest fresh- 
men class since 1988, did not help 
the housing problem either. 

But according to Resident Life Di- 
rector Pat Mielke, "It was not a prob- 
lem for Resident Life." Resident Life 
had been prepared for the room short- 
age as early as January. Having 
temporary triple-doubles was not un- 



usual at college campuses. The last 
time Maryland resorted to this tactic 
was in the fall of 1988, "having triple- 
doubles was the only viable option" 
said Mielke. "In the past students 
waiting for housing were placed in the 
lounges of residence halls. But this 
made everyone in the hall suffer. " 

Because assignments for rooms 
were filled in the order they were 
received, the students who filed their 
forms last received the temporary as- 
signments. Most of the students as- 
signed to the triple-doubles filed their 
forms after August 1, 1994. These 
students and the permanent residents 
of the temporary triples were notified 
during the summer about their situa- 
tion. 

However, many students were up- 
set and inconvenienced by the hous- 
ing shortage. "It's ridiculous to have 
three people living in a two-person 



room," said Nancy Adde, a freshman 
History major who gained an extra 
temporary roommate. 

The "temporary" triple-double was 
only temporary if the number of stu- 
dents who did not claim their room 
assignment exceeded the number of 
students waiting for assignments. This 
was determined after the first two 
weeks of classes. Any one remaining 
in a triple-double received a discount 
on their housing costs. 

After the first two weeks of class, 
Resident Life was able to assign all 
121 residents into permanent hous- 
ing on campus. 

The Resident Life Director stated 
that she hoped the shortage of hous- 
ing would continue into the future. 
"More students means a lower hous- 
ing cost." 

-Matilde Ott 




O 



Pholo by Joanne Saidman 



153 






It was your first year on campus and you were finally "on your own." For many first year students, the transition 
from living at home to living on campus was a big one. The absence of parents and siblings was one of the largest 
transitions. Many first year students were full of expectations of college life, other were filled with the anxiety of making 
new friends. Many of the freshmen students were housed in the traditional high-rise dormitories on the north side 
of campus and some were placed in the area of campus known as North Hill. What did all of this mean? This meant 
that most of the freshmen students shared their experiences together. 

Mother's home cooked meals were quickly replaced with dining hall food, and those who once had their own 
bathrooms now had to share a bathroom with over thirty others. Community living was the aspect that all freshmen 
had to embrace, especially on a campus that was larger than many student's hometowns. This type of setting was 
good for student's to foster relationships and make new friends. Social life was not the only thing that freshmen at 
the University of Maryland were concerned about. Many people found themselves with another burden on their mind, 

STUDYING. 

"I never studied so much in high school. If I would have studied this much in high school, it would have been so 
easy, " said Leslie Datcher, freshmen Family Studies major. Along with the reality of campus living many of the 
freshmen were hit with the reality of college homework. Many freshmen students found places to study in their very 
own residence halls but others found a comfortable place to study in the library. The freshmen experience consisted 

of living and learning. 

-Eileen de Guzman 




Photo by Paul Vieira 



154 







Photo by Paul Vieira 




Photo by Eric Lasky 



155 







In the Spring semester of 1994, 
five crimes were reported in the area 
of the South Campus Basketball 
courts, including a stabbing of an area 
high school student. With the rise in 
violence and the complaints of noise 
from the residents living near the 
basketball court area, the Department 
of Resident Life and Campus Police 
decided to remove the courts in the 
South Campus and Leonardtown 
communities. Where the courts were. 
Resident Life planned to develop the 
area into a park with benches and 
umbrellas for people to meet under. 

The decision to close the courts was 
made by Resident Life Director Pat 
Mielke and Campus Police Chief Ken 
Krouse. Mielke stated that "too many 
incidents occurred, (at the basketball 
courts) and we could not control them . " 
The only way to protect the residents 
was to close the courts. 

To decrease the demand for avail- 



able courts, the Department of Resi- 
dent Life and Resident Facilities ex- 
tended the hours of court time at the 
indoor basketball areas in both the 
Armory and North Gym. However, 
the decision to close the basketball 
courts came with controversy. 

Many students said that closing the 
basketball courts would not stop the 
crime. "I do not see how closing the 
courts will prevent crime. If outsiders 
come in looking for trouble, they will 
find other places to do it," said Erika 
Benns, senior Pre-med major. 

With the start of the new fall semes- 
ter, students organized rallies, peti- 
tions and other forms of demonstra- 
tion in order to protest against the 
closing of the basketball courts. In 
September 1994, residents from the 
South Campus area held a midnight 
rally in the empty court area to protest 
the closing. In October, 66 percent of 
the students who voted in the Student 



Government Association elections, 
voted Yes to have the basketball courts 
reinstalled. This data and a petition 
made by the Resident Halls Associa- 
tion was presented to President 
Kirwan. 

In the meantime. Resident Life and 
Campus Police were trying to keep 
the students aware and the communi- 
cation channels open. With violence 
prevention programs and informa- 
tion bulletins, the Campus Police and 
Resident Life wanted to have all stu- 
dents to be security conscious. 

With the rise of crime in the areas 
surrounding campus, it was impos- 
sible to stop crime completely form 
entering campus, said Pat Mielke. 
Whether the removal of the basketball 
courts would prevent crime could only 
take time to tell. 

-Matilde Ott 




156 




All photos on this spread by Eric Lasky 



157 









The summer of 1994 was not the 
most eventful summer of all times, but 
it was a truly remarkable one for a 
group of about 200 students who 
chose an alternative route of summer 
employment. These students decided 
that nine months of being in College 
Park had not been enough. They 
were going to spend their summer 
here as well. The University of Mary- 
land offered many summertime posi- 
tions through the offices of Resident 
Facilities and Resident Life. Respec- 
tively, 106 and 90 plus students 
worked for each department. 

During the summer months. Resi- 
dent Facilities was responsible for re- 
pairing the campus housing and get- 
ting it ready for fall occupancy. Stu- 
dents were able to apply for these 
positions with the option of living in 
Leonardtown for a reduced rate for 



the duration of the working calendar. 
Over 100 students took the opportu- 
nity to make some money by helping 
the campus. Positions were available 
for Carpet and Tile, Furnishings, Main- 
tenance and Paint Crew. The Paint 
Crew had both day and night options. 
Many students took advantage of 
working the 3 P.M. to 11:30 P.M. 
shift by taking summer classes at the 
University during the day. 

Sarah Carson, a sophomore Engi- 
neering Major, remarked on her sum- 
mer experience by saying, "Working 
for the Day Crew on Paint was a 
wacky, wild and fun experience. I got 
to know a lot of crazy new people and 
had a lot of fun . In the process, I made 
this campus look better and I really 
enjoyed it." 

By being able to live on campus for 
the summer with a bunch of other 



students, a lot of friendships were 
formed. Parties sprung up through- 
out the summer for the Leonardtown 
residents and on any given night one 
could see people outside talking and 
having a good time. Many students 
honed their card playing skills and the 
basketball courts were continuously 
full. 

The summer flew by but a great 
deal of work was accomplished to 
prepare the residence halls for the 
Fall. The summer staff got to experi- 
ence working in a different atmo- 
sphere and gained valuable experi- 
ence. And while all the work was 
going on, there was always a sense of 
enjoyment and fun underlying the 
experience. 

-Robin Solomon 






Photo by Jessica Bigelow 



158 




Photo by Jim RinkI 



Photo by Jessica Bigelow 
Opposite page - Tom Pfister, a night Paint Crew Leader, was hard at work 

in Elkton Hall. This page - Top Left - Taking a break from oil painting, 

Collette Pinkney tried not to drip any paint in Elkton Hall while posing. Top 

right - A rare smile was shared by Jim Rinkl while he carpeted an apartment. 

Bottom Left - Len Russo took careful measurements before placing down 

his carpet. Bottom right - Keith Lombardo and Alberto Otero showed off 

their tools while painting. 



159 




-^ fill I r iiri n iiiiii fWni 



Photo by Aynat Ravin 



160 




The category was campus life. Here was the question, "What is the university name for a resident whose name 
has only two letters?" Can't figure it out? Well it's your local, friendly Resident Assistant for the Department of 
Resident Life, a.k.a. RA. Many RA's, like Ty Long Nguyen of Ellicott Hall, would tell you, "that the position is more 
than just free room and board. Being an RA has other privileges." 

RA's had a large degree of influence upon the lives of students living on campus, often larger than any other figure. 
Since RA's were both students and leaders, they had the opportunity to be amongst students and "get to know them 
best," said second year, La Plata Hall RA, Peggy Loftus. The privilege came from being selected by Resident Life 
to be the overseers of our units. Whether residents admitted to it or not, an RA was a necessary vessel to be used 
by the residents when in need. 

In 1994, the Department of Resident Life adopted the motto of creating an environment of "satisfied customers" 
on the College Park campus. Despite the power hungry mentality some think RA's live in, the reality was that RA's 
tried to remain "readily available" and "readily approachable" to help residents adjust to campus life. What made 
this position so special was that each individual RA brought his or her own distinct qualities to their unit. 

The RA position also consisted of many innovative program ideas, conflict mediations, incident reports, staff 
meetings, and inservices which made up the position. "Ever since I've gotten the job it's changed my life. It's like 
being best friends with 70 guys, " says Ellicott Hall RA Ty Nguyen. He also commented on how, as an RA, there 
was a good support system amongst the employees of Resident Life. The employees were backed by a tremendous 
quality of Resident Life staff. 

But when it was all said and done, the RA's were the ones who lived, ate, and shared the same space with their 
residents. If it was true that, "If you stand for nothing, you will fall for anything," then RA's had a precious 
responsibility on their hands. FiA's set the standards for their residents so, "If you follow your F^, you will be surprised 

at how far they will take you." 

-Anita Jones 





Did you happen to notice a few 
more people hanging around North 
Campus this year? About 675 more? 
That is the total number of residents 
who occupied the reopened 
Cumberland and Cambridge halls. 

The Department of Resident Life 
opened the doors to Cumberland and 
Cambridge partly in response to the 
nearly 1 ,000 more students, new and 
returning, who requested campus 
housing this year. This 12 and a half 
percent increase was somewhat an- 
ticipated by Resident Life, even though 
the temporary "tripling" of students in 
double rooms posed a bit of a snag. 
Besides making room for the masses, 
Cumberland and Cambridge Halls 
were reopened with special situations 
in mind. 

Cumberland Hall served as the resi- 
dential site for most of the partici- 
pants in the new College Park Schol- 
ars program, which had a "living/ 
learning" theme. The selling point of 
this program was the opportunity for 
students to live with others who shared 
interest in the same field. Freshmen 
and sophomores invited into the pro- 
gram had the choice of living with the 
same people in their cluster of related 
classes, an academic component of 
the Scholars program. Cluster, and 
therefore areas of Cumberland, re- 
volved around the academic themes 
of International Studies, Life Sciences, 
Art, and Science and Technology. 

The Cumberland building itself was 
altered to incorporate the lining/learn- 
ing theme. Renovations of the first 
floor included getting rid of bedrooms 
and installing small classrooms, com- 
puter facilities and a coloquia (over- 
sized classroom). Offices for some 
members of the faculty teaching 




P 



College Park 

scholars 






- ■ i,gl ' —' 



All photos on this spread by Eric Lasky 



162 




courses in the program were also 
moved onto the first floor. Interna- 
tional Studies Scholar Alicia Insley's 
commented on the proximity of her 
professors, "Its very convenient to 
have them there; it's very beneficial." 
She said, "I just think it's been a great 
experience living with people that are 
in my same classes and in the same 
program as me." Nichole Schreiner, 
also of International Studies, showed 
appreciation of the hall's physical 
improvements: "I like the new com- 
puter lab. The dorm is nice and 
there's nice furniture." The Life sci- 
ences group, to fulfill the community 
service requirement that all the Schol- 
ars have, planned to make their own 
addition to Cumberland, such as an 
aquarium and a plant and herb ter- 
rarium to be displayed there. 

Unlike Cumberland, Cambridge 
Hall did not undergo any special reno- 
vation before Resident Life reopened 
it this fall. It was still a traditional dorm 
of co-ed singles, but with the main 
purpose of placing transfer students 
in the same area. Jan Davidson, 
Assistant to the Director of Resident 
Life explained, "Transfer students 
often want to be with other transfer 
students, and we try to accommodate 
that." However, any resident could 
request to live there. Both Cam- 
bridge and Cumberland halls were 
expected to remain open with the 
anticipated growth to the Scholars 
program and the increased demand 
for campus housing. 

-Maria Lo Piccolo 



163 




Photo by Aynat Ravin 



164 






The University of Maryland was fortunate to have a 
service that allowed residents to call for major and minor 
repairs to their rooms and apartments. Access to this 
service was by way of dialing extension 4-WORK. Resi- 
dents were able to dial this extension to report things that 
needed to be repaired or replaced. The service was put to 
use often by the residents at the University. 

Reported incidents ranged from closets coming off-line, 
broken light or burned out light fixtures, air conditioner 
malfunctions, constantly flushing toilets, even insect prob- 
lems. The reports called into 4-WORK were placed on a 
priority list. The problem was tended to according to its 
priority. Flushing toilets took priority over an off-line 
closet door. Sometimes the list got long and the wait 
inconvenienced many of the students. However, there 
were a number of commendable responses from students. 

"As for as I'm concerned, the service responded quickly 
to me," replied Biology major Amy Thomas. She also 
commented that when she had reported a problem about 
flies in the building, the serviceman, "Checked up on us 
frequently to see if the problem had been solved com- 
pletely. He was really doing his job." 

A common problem in many of the residence halls was 
the lighting. One student called 4-WORK about a hallway 
light and , "They responded within the hour," responded 
sophomore Markeeda Guest. "It is good to have this 
service," said Guest. 

Although there were reports of timely encounters, that 
was not always the case. "The servicemen were late. Iwas 
on my way to class when they came to fix my closet. I had 
to wait for them to finish before I left," replied sophomore 
Electrical Engineering major Jonathon Rogers. "1 think 4- 
WORK is a beneficial service to the campus. They could 
make some improvements in order to meet the needs of 
the students more quickly, but the service is greatly 
appreciated," commented Rogers. 

The service was not flawless, but the service done was 

so much greater than the time spent waiting. "Like any 

service on campus, it can be improved but it generally has 

decent service, " responded Journalism major Imani Panton. 

The service offered to students by dialing 4-WORK was a 

life saver for many and was appreciated by all. 

-Eileen de Guzman 



Photo by Joanne Saidman 



165 




ACADEMICS 




SKK- 



EXPOSING THE FUTURE 

EDITED BY DIMITRIS A. GERAGAS 

Some of us never went to a football game and others never 
experienced the Greek system or never joined a campus organi- 
zation. Yet, regardless of the level of involvement in the so called 
student life, we all had something in common-we were all 
students and hopefully we were all going to graduate. 

The students of this graduating class would one day be called 
to play a vital role not only in this nation's but the whole world's 
intellectual, scientific and economic life. The leaders, the scien- 
tists, the thinkers of the future were being hatched now in this 
institution and it was their academic education that supplied them 
with the skills to properly play their upcoming roles. It enabled 
them to expand their perception, to ask questions and find 
answers, to synthesize and innovate. In short, it furnished them 
with the ability to assume their station in this highly demanding 
world. 

The 1 1 colleges and departments of this campus fulfilled their 
responsibility toward the students to provide them with a sound 
foundation for a lifetime. It was this commitment to excellence 
in education, research and service that guaranteed that the 
University of Maryland at College Park had, once more, exposed 
the future. 



^ 




r 



r r 




This page - Top left - Gov. Schaefer speaking at the dedication 
of the new Agricultural Engineering buildin2_J!o2_[i2]2L-^^:[£l£L 

Agricultural Engineering building. Opposite page - Egg 
production quality control. 




All photos courtesy of the College of Agriculture 



168 




Total Enrollment 856 
Gender 

Men 51.0% 

Women 49.1% 

Race 




American Asia' 

Afro-Americah 
Latino-American 
American Jntiiaii 

White/Other 81.5% 
Foreign 3.4% ' 

Class Standing 

Freshmen 10.3% 
Sophomores 14.5% 
Juniors 24.0% 
Seniors 35.4% 

Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 




COLLEGE OF 
AGRICULTURE 

Last year was an exciting time to be an 
agricultural major at the University of Maryland 
at College Park. 

The first cause of excitement was the new 
Animal Sciences and Agricultural Engineering 
Complex which was the newest, most techno- 
logically advanced facility of its type in the U.S. 

The building was completed in December 
1994 at a cost of approximately $15 million 
and it offers 44,000 square feet of usable state- 
of-the-art laboratories, classrooms, and offices 
for faculty, staff and graduate students. 

Furthermore, a new $26.3 million plant sci- 
ences building was under construction and slated 
for completion in 1995. The seven-story struc- 
ture will provide 185,000 square feet of free 
space, of which 102,300 square feet will be 
dedicated to specialized research. It will house 
the departments of Entomology and Horticul- 
ture. 

The appointment of Dr. Thomas A. Fretz as 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture was the 
second point of excitement. 

Fretz, an alumnus, received his bachelor's 
degree in horticulture in 1964. He went on to 
gain his master's degree in the same field and his 
Ph.D. in plant sciences from the University of 
Delaware in 1966 and 1970. 

"1 look forward to providing leadership that 
will allow Maryland to have a truly unique and 
outstanding College of Agriculture," Fretz said. 
"This is a wonderful opportunity - one in which 
I look forward to participate along with leader- 
ship in the college, the university and the es- 
tate." 

Before he received the appointment at Mary- 
land, Fretz, a Buffalo, New York native, held 
leadership positions at various universities across 
the nation including, but not limited to, Iowa 
State University, Georgia Technical Institute 
and Ohio State University. 

-LaRonda R. Miller 



169 



HEALTH AND HUMAN 
PERFORMANCE 

■'For the first time in history, the health and mortality 
of an individual depends more upon his or her choice 
of life-styles instead of the health system, and we are 
committed to enable people to reduce life-style risks 
and move toward wellness." said Dean John J. Burt, 
while he discussed the main goal of the college. 

In order to effectively achieve this goal the college 
employed an impressive mix of faculty, programs and 
facilities, thus ranked among the very best of its kind in 
the world. The Department of Kinesiology ranked in 
the top 10% nationally, of Health Education in the top 
5% and the Center on Aging in the top 8%. 

Last year, the Department of Family Studies was 
administratively placed under the College of Health and 
Human Performance. This addition proved valuable in 
increasing the potential of the college to improve the 
quality of family life in a contemporary society. More- 
over, the college offered a large number of service 
courses which reached more than 18,000 students 
each year. 




Total Enrollment 


639 


Gender 




Men 


36.8% 


Women 


63.2% 


Race 




American Asian 


3.7% 


Afro- American 


10.6% 


Latino- American 


2.7% 


American Indian 


0.4% 


White/Other 


81.0% 


Foreign 


1.3% 


Class Standing 




Freshmen 


8.2% 


Sophomores 


13.4% 


Juniors 


29.6% 


Seniors 


47.0% 


Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 



Top - College students monitoring vital 
signs during an exercise session. 
Bottom - North Gym, housing the 
College and a variety of recreational 
facilities. 



Courtesy of the College of Health and Human Performance 




Photo by Eric Lasky 



170 




Left - Symons Hall, the base of the administration 

of the college. 

Right - Demonstration of a biology experiment. 




Photo by Eric Lasky 



LIFE SCIENCES 



The College of Life Sciences of- 
fered educational opportunities for stu- 
dents in subjects relating to living or- 
ganisms, their interaction with each 
other and the environment. 

Recently the college instituted the 
College Park Scholars (CPS), a two 
year long selective admission program 
that provided freshmen with an aca- 
demically and socially active environ- 
ment. The program is organized so 
that the students work closely with 
one another and their professors . "' It is 
important that a sense of community 
is maintained," said Lee Hellman, who 
is the head of the life sciences CPS 
division. 



Furthermore, the students who par- 
ticipated received early exposure to 
the areas of life sciences and are given 
the opportunity to work or volunteer 
for the community, the campus or 
various organizations such as the Na- 
tional Institute of Health. 

Another addition to the college is 
the biology suite that had been re- 
cently constructed in the H.J. Pater- 
son Hall. The room was built to ac- 
commodate the Biology 105 classes. 
"It is the kind of classroom that will 
knock your socks off," said Associate 
Dean Dr. William Higgins. 

-Jennifer HarreU 



Photo by Aynat Rawn 





Total Enrollment 


1985 


Gender 








Men 


48.1% 




Women 


52.0% 


Race 








American Asian 


24.^% 




Afro- American 


12.7% 




Latino-American 


3.8% 




American Indian 


0.2% 




White/Other 


53.3% 




Foreign 


4.0% 


Class Standing 






Freshmen 


22.9% 




Sophomores 


19.6% 




Juniors 


23.8% 




Seniors 


29.6% 


Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 



171 



collTge of 

BUSINESS AND 
MANAGEMENT 

The dedication of the state-of-the art building to Leo Van 
Munching, Jr. , a 1950 alumnus and president of Van Munch- 
ing & Co. , was followed by many changes and advancements 
in various areas of the college. 

A new electronic classroom, where the students and the 
professor communicated with each other through software, 
called the IBM Total Quality Multimedia Classroom, was 
opened in the fall. 

The school's Center for International Business Education 
and Research instituted a database on foreign markets and 
products. Dean Mayer explained that, "clients can use the 
database to find foreign companies or distributors potentially 
interested in the clients" products and services." 

Beyond the advancements in the available resources, the 
college enjoined the acknowledgment of its commitment to 
exceptional education. The MBA program received a No. 1 
ranking by Princeton Review's Student Access Guide To 
The Best Business Schools in accounting and marketing 
skills, and effective job placement. Also, the business program 
was placed in the top 4% of all MBA programs in the country 
by U.S. News & World Report magazine. 

-Jennifer Harrell 




Photo by Joanne Saidman 



Total Enrollment 2491 



Gender 



Race F 



Men 
Women 



Amei\i-an Aiiaii 

Atro-AmeriL-an 

Laciun- American 

ArtiLiican Indian 

IWhite/Other 

I Foreign 

Class Standing 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Juniors 

Seniors 



52.3% 
47.7% 

n 1% 
1 1 1 6% 
I ^6% 
I 2% 
IM 6% 
p 2% 

22.7% 
14.9% 
24.5% 
37.3% 



Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 




Photo by Eric Lasky 



172 




Opposite Page - Top - Stu- 
dent working in the new elec- 
tronic multimedia classroom. 
Bottom - View of the highly 
appraised Van Munching 
Hall. 

This Page - A student of the 
college interacting with "fu- 
ture students of the univer- 
sity. 



Total Enrollment 


1458 


Men 


20.9% 


Women 


79.2% 


Race ^'' : 'X Ai- 


,V;..1 


Amcrioii ,%ian 


4.3% 


Atto-American 


ii.3% 


Latii'^d'-American 


14% 


Amcj-ic.in Indian 


(1.6% 


\»^'hi,tc/C^th«r 


8i.6% 


1 Foreign 


o.p% 


Class Standing 




Freshmen 


9.9% 


Sophomores 


15.9% 


Juniors 


23.4% 


Seniors 


46.7% 



Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 



Photo by Eric York 



COLLEGE OF 
EDUCATION 



The College of Education is bestowed with the 
important duty of advancing the science and art of 
education. "Its mission is to teach more, to teach better 
and to contribute to the solutions of some of societies's 
most complex problems," said Dean Willis Hawley. 

Dean Hawley explained, "the College would work to 
enhance the capacity of individuals, schools, and school 
systems to engage in strategic planing and problem 
solving through its conventional degree programs, and 
more importantly, through relationships with school 
systems and schools which could lead to opportunities 
for continuing professional development and problem 
solving in the context in which problems are experi- 
enced." 

This substantial effort of the College was acknowl- 



edged through the recognition of the work of many 
members of its faculty last year. 

Dr. Barbara Finkelstein, was awarded the Distin- 
guished International Service Award by the university 
for developing international programs and promoting 
the spirit of internationalization. 

Dr. Robert Berdahl, received the Howard Bowen 
Award for Lifetime Achievement. 

Dr. Richard Jantz, was the recipient of the 
Vernon Anderson Award, honoring his teaching and 
service to the College. 

Dr. Jean R. Hebeler, was presented the J.E. 
Wallace Wallin Education of Handicapped Children 
Award by the National Council of Exceptional 
Children. 



173 



Top Left - A "backstage view" of the 
AT&T™ Theater's control room. 
Top Right - A student exploring the advan- 
tages of the new AT&T^""' Teaching Theater. 
Bottom - The home for two of the depart- 
ments of the College of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences, Zoology and Psychology. 



Total Enrollment 2372 



Gender 



Men 


50.9% 


Women 


49.1% 


Race 

American Aslnin 


8.6% 


/Vfro- American 


14.4% 


l.acino-American 


4.8% 


American Indian 


0.5% 


White/Other 


68.2% 


Foreign 


2.4% 


Class Standing 




Freshmen 


11.0% 


Sophomores 


15.4% 


Juniors 


32.2% 


Seniors 


40.1% 



Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 




174 




COLLEGE OF 

BEHAVIORAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 



"We [the faculty] should jump with both feet 
into the technology and drag all the students 
kicking and screaming with us." — Dr. Kent 
Norman, Psychology 

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences is comprised 
of a range of disciplines grounded in the understanding of the 
environmental, social, cultural and individual issues that shape the 
world we live in. Whether it was what we learned about our society 
in sociology, about ourselves in psychology and Afro-American 
studies, or about our government, from professor and newly-elected 
governor, Parris Glendening, the college enabled students to think 
analytically and perhaps solve the human and social problems that 
face the world we live in. With the introduction of new technologies, 
the world is transforming at a more rapid rate. The College of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences has remained at the forefront with 
the integration of interactive media into the classroom. 

The concept of interactive media and instruction was not new 
to Maryland. In 1989, the first interactive teaching center, the 
AT&T MultiMedia Center, was built on the College Park campus 
with the most recent addition the IBM Teaching Theater in 1994. 
However with all this technology available, not many have taken full- 
advantage of the unlimited possibilities. One professor was attempt- 
ing to change this concept, including the way we teach and learn. 

Dr. Kent L. Norman of the Department of Psychology, 
transformed the look and feel of a classroom by creating an 
environment entirely based in interactive media. Everything from 
familiar lecture notes and syllabi, to class discussions, student polling 
and student profiles was performed through the computer. "There 
is almost an infinite number of things one can do in these class- 
rooms — we really are just scratching the surface right now..." said 
Dr. Norman. 

Dr. Norman developed a prototype software. Hypercourse . 
that fused the traditional instructional tools with interactive media of 
today. All lectures, course work, grades, exams and some discussion 
is done through the interactive stations in the classroom. 

But can all this technology enhance what the student learned 

in class? "We think the students understand more," said Dr. 

Norman. "We know from cognitive psychology that if people see 

pictures of things and actually do it themselves, rather than just 

watching the instructor, they will learn more because they engaged 

in it." 

-Matilde L. Ott 



Photo by Eric Lasky 



175 



COLLEGE OE^^^ 

ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

"Its mission is to provide an exemplary liberal 
education to all UMCP students through in- 
struction in writing, speech, and the foreign 
languages, and through an informed under- 
standing of the history, art, literature, and cul- 
ture of peoples throughout the world." 
-Martha Watson, Associate Dean 

The College of Arts and Humanities was, for one nnore year, 
the largest and most diverse of the college at University of 
Maryland. "It embraces twenty-four academic departments, 
thus providing 25% of all instruction offered in the University," 
said Martha Watson, Associate Dean of the college. 

During the last year, the college welcomed an exceptionally 
talented and varied group of new faculty. 

Moreover, the Maryland English Institute received a $460,000 
grant from U.S. I. A. This grant will support the cooperation 
with Samara State Pedagogical University in Russia to enhance 
the materials, methods and skills of Russian teachers of the 
English language. 






Total Enrollment 2515 






Gender 


^1 




Men 46.8% 


1 




Women 53.3% 




Race ' '\ ' ' \ 

^. AnuTiv in .Amjh ^.b% 




I At>-o-Anitiican |l2.0% 






' Ljoin,o-Am<-rtca(i 


4.1% 






' AnjuiLati Indian 


0.4% 






KxjiitJOdier V3.8% 






1 lorcign }l.4"i> 






Class Standing 






Freshmen 7.5% 






Sophomores 13.3% 






Juniors 31.5% 






Seniors 44.3% 






Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 






Top - Music practice. 

Bottom - Francis Scott Key Hall, 




home of administration of the 


college. 




All photos on this page by Eric Lasky 



176 




Left - A student learning the tricks of the trade 
in the journalism broadcast studio. 
Right - A sign proudly displaying the name of 
the college. 



COLLEGE OF 

JOURNALISM 




The College of Journalism was 
recently named one of the "Eleven 
Exemplary Journalism Schools" 
across the country, in a study by the 
Gannett Center for Media Studies at 
Columbia University. Also, among 
the over 500 journalism schools in 
the country, Maryland ranked in the 
top ten by the Freedom Forum Media 
Studies Center. 

Recently, the college received a 
$1.5 million grant from the Knight 
Foundation, which will be used to 
establish an endowed chair in public 
affairs journalism. 

The Knight Foundation was cre- 
ated by John and James Knight, who 



were also responsible for establishing 
the Knight-Ridder News Service. Rep- 
resentatives of the foundation said the 
grant is given to create permanent po- 
sitions at top journalism schools to em- 
phasize teaching, to build on strengths 
of an existing journalism program and 
to reflect a vision that looks to the 21st 
century. 

This is the first chair to be created in 
the journalism college's history. Dean 
Reese Cleghorn said, "getting our first 
chair is immensely important." He 
added, "the gift will enable us to acquire 
a higher quality of students. The Foun- 
dation applauded the control in our 
enrollment members." 



r^ 


Total Enrollment 


579 


Gender 








Men 


30.2% 




Women 


69.9% 







'1 




\ 




.A.mef^.in Asian 




AtrcvAmtriciui 


\AA% 




Lamio-Araeriam 


2.7% 




■ Arrcrican Indian 


0.2% 




l\\'huc/(.)chcr 


["7.2% 


Class St 


j l-'oreigii 


■ |o.9% 


anding 






Freshmen 


27.0% 




Sophomores 


14.9% 




Juniors 


23.1% 




Seniors 


35.1% 


Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 



Story hy Jennifer Herrell 



177 



COLLEGE OF 
ARCHITECTURE 



i 



The Schools of Architecture offered a four-year 
undergraduate program leading to a Bachelor of 
Science degree in architecture and a graduate pro- 
gram leading to a Master of Architecture. The under- 
graduate major is mainly aimed at minimizing the time 
required to complete the curriculum leading to the 
Master of Architecture. 

The B.S. degree in architecture qualified graduates 
to pursue a career in many fields, including construc- 
tion, real estate development, public administration, 
or historic preservation, or to continue in graduate 
work in professional fields such as architecture, urban 
planing or law. 

The Urban Studies and Planning program, which 
was part of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Col- 
lege, has been part of the School of Architecture for 
roughly two years. The program offered a Master of 
Community Planning, according to Nancy Lapanne, 
assistant to the dean. She described the program as a 
"quasi autonomous unit," and the architecture school 



and urban studies work closely together, submitting 
joint grants and programs. 

In May, the school and Morgan State University 
hosted the Northeast regional meeting of the Mayors 
Institute on City Design. Seven mayors from the 
region participated as well as resource people from 
urban design and related disciplines. 

In 1995 the architecture firm of Moore Ruble Yudell 
was awarded a contact for the design of a $60 million 
performing arts center. Professor Roger K. Lewis was 
the professional advisor to the competition that deter- 
mined a winner. Additionally, Dean Steven Hurtt was 
a part of the seven-person jury that chose the winning 
strategy. 

A grant was supplied to Archaeologist and Architec- 
tural Historian Professor Lindley Vann for the devel- 
opment of course material in the area of non-Western 
Architecture. Over the summer. Professor Vann lead 
a third expedition to survey ancient harbors in Turkey. 

-Jennifer Harrell 



Total Enrollment 187 



Gende 



Race 



Men 
Women 



, Anicrtc.in \iian 
'\ho-AniCricjn 
-i^ttinij-Amencan, 
'' Am|in tn fndjaii 
iv liiii/Other 
j Foreign 

Class Standing 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Juniors 

Seniors 



72.2% 
27.9% 
Z.Z. i 

s.4% 

0.0% 

S V'o 



29.7% 
19.4% 
16.4% 
34.4% 



Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 







Photo by Eric Lasky 



178 




Opposite page - A student 
of the College designing at 
the architecture studio. 
This page - Milagro, the 
new astrophysical observa- 
tory in New Mexico. 



Total Enrollment 


1502 


Gender 




Men 


74.8% 


Women 


25.3% 


Race 7 " \ 

V AmeKiLjii Aiian 


1 

^0.8% 


Afro'i American 


1 1 .6% 


La i^io-AmtTJcati 


2.8% 


;. Arjiciican Indian 


0.1% 


White/Other 


S4.2% 


i l"oreign 


.9 


.5% 


Class Standing 




Freshmen 


15.3% 


Sophomores 


18.5% 


Juniors 


23.4% 


Seniors 


39.6% 



Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 



Courtesy of the College 



COLLEGE OF 

COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 



The College of Computer, Mathematical and Physi- 
cal Sciences, accommodated both those students who 
wished to develop careers in the respective fields and 
those who simply wished, or needed, to develop a 
relevant background. As a result, a major portion of 
the teaching program was devoted to helping students 
who majored in areas outside of the college. 

In the past year, the Department of Astronomy 
participated in several significant discoveries and ac- 
tivities, the most important was coordinating the effort 
to observe the impact of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet 
with Jupiter. The event was described by David Levy, 
codiscoverer of the comet, as "the most extraordinary 
thing we have seen in the solar system." 



Additionally, the geology and physics departments 
have gone trough expansion and administrative 
changes. The Department of Geology added several 
offices in the chemistry building, and its graduate 
student and research programs increased as well. The 
Department of Physics collaborated with Los Alamos 
National Laboratory on the construction of a new 
astrophysical observatory in New Mexico. The obser- 
vatory, called Milagro, will be used to detect sources of 
cosmic rays providing new information about black 
holes, centers of active galaxies and other exotic 
phenomena. 

-Jennifer Harrell 



179 



Top Left - "The Slide Rule." 

Top Right - A. James Clark, his wife, President 

William Kirwan and former Dean George Dieter 



celebrating the centennial. 

Bottom - Fire protection engineers playing with 

fire. 




Photo by Joanne Saidman 



180 




Total Enrollment 


2567 


Gender 




Men 80.3% 


Women 19.7% 


Race 




Ameft\in Asidh"'-'^23'.5% 


Alro-AjiK-rican 


819% 


Latino-American 


2.8% 


AineriLin Intlun 


0.2% 


' Wiite/Other 


i7.4% 


• - Foreign' 


<|.6% 


Class Standing 


Freshmen 


18.8% 


Sophomores 


15.8% 


Juniors 


19.9% 


Seniors 


44.8% 



Statistics from 1994 Academic Year 



COLLEGE OF 

ENGINEERING 



As the 1993-94 academic year brought forth the 
centennial celebration so the 1994-95 academic 
year ushered in a change of name and leadership 
which will help ensure the success of the college in 
the next hundred years. 

The first twinges of change were noted when 
Dean George Dieter, a veteran of educational lead- 
ership, tendered his resignation from his post to 
languish in the open arms of retirement after 17 
years of service. 

However, on May 19th in one of his final acts as 
dean, he graciously accepted a $ 15 million donation 
from engineering alumnus A. James Clark. In light 



of this donation, which is believed to be the largest 
ever received by a Maryland public university, the 
College of Engineering was thus renamed the A. 
James Clark School of Engineering. 

"Just as Glenn L. Martin provided the building 
blocks for the college's outstanding research pro- 
grams in place today, A. James Clark will ensure that 
University of Maryland engineering students de- 
velop the skills necessary to tackle the complex 
technical and societal problems of tomorrow, " Presi- 
dent Kirwan said. 

Although funding is a valuable component 
for the education of the engineers of tomorrow, 
strong leadership is also important. Faced with the 
retirement of Dean Dieter a search committee was 
established to find a qualified successor. The result 
was the appointment of Dr. William W. Destler as 
the new dean of engineering. 

As chairman of the electrical engineering, 
Destler oversaw the development of one of the 
largest and most productive electrical engineering 
departments in the nation. In terms of degrees 
granted and research expenditures, the department 
has consistently ranked in the top five percent of the 
200 electrical engineering programs nationwide. 

As dean, Destler will oversee the Glenn L. 
Martin Institute of Technology and the A. James 
Clark School of Engineering. He takes his position 
very seriously and has already began to set long term 
objectives for the school. "One of my principle goals 
is to build on our national reputation for innovative 
undergraduate education," Destler said. "The Clark 
gift will help support these efforts." 

Long term goals really can become reality, as 
was demonstrated by the 60 plus students who 
worked diligently on the hybrid electric vehicle and 
were rewarded by winning all 10 categories at the 
1 994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge in Southfield, 
Michigan. 

The car, designed to get 70 miles per gallon 
and reduce emissions while retaining performance, 
was rated most efficient hybrid electric vehicle; 
lowest emissions; best technical report; excellence in 
safety; best use of an alternative fuel: best range; best 
overall performance on an alterative fuel; best over- 
all performance; and best engineering design. 

-Laronda R. Miller 



181 



Top Left - Where all the action is, the base of the Department 

of Astronomy. 

Top Right - Heidi Hammel, MIT; Melissa McGrath, Hubble 

Space Telescope; Eugene and Carolyn Shoemaker, Lowell 

Observatory; David Levy, Tucson, Az.; Lucy McFadden, 

University of Maryland during a panel discussion on the collision 

of S-L 9 with Jupiter. 

Bottom - The BIMA radio telescope probing the universe. 




182 




The Department of Astronomy achieved many 
scientific accomplishments and became known as a 
leading center of astronomical studies and discover- 
ies throughout the world. 

Last year the department was responsible for the 
coordination of the observational effort of the im- 
pact of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet with Jupiter. 
Prior to the crash, a workshop was held on campus 
involving more that 200 astronomers from around 
the world so that a common plan could be devised. 
Moreover, observatories in Europe combined their 
efforts with the United States under the Comet 
Impact Network Experiment. 

The amount of people interested in this event 
made an organized effort necessary. Lucy McFadden 
,a visiting associate astronomy professor who was 
leading the effort, said, "every person with a tele- 
scope large enough will be trying to observe it." 

Additionally, this once-in-a-millennium event, at- 
tracted hundreds of people to the university's obser- 
vatory off Metzerott Road. Dr. E. Grayzeck, a 
university astronomer, said, "you get a sense of 
history. It's better than I expected, its very dra- 
matic." 

Further observational work performed in the de- 
partment, covered the entire electromagnetic spec- 



trum, from radio waves to gamma-rays. The university 
joined forces with the University of California at Berkeley 
and the University of Illinois to build the Berkeley-Illinois- 
Maryland-Array (BIMA) of millimeter wave telescopes 
located in Hat Creek, California. The first phase of the 
construction of the six-element array was completed last 
year. 

The campus participation in BIMA was managed by the 
department's Laboratory for Millimeter Wave Astronomy 
(LMA), which was headed by astronomy professor Leo 
Blitz. Blitz remarked that, "there are a couple of aspects to 
the BIMA project. The first is to build and operate an array 
of radio telescopes. The second is to produce science with 
the array. " 

The array can map planets and can also be used to 
observe the formation of young stars. "We observe every- 
thing, from the sun to the large scale structure of the 
universe. From the closest to the most distant," Blitz said. 

Other major groups within the department included the 
solar group headed by M. Kundu, which studied the sun in 
an attempt to understand solar activity such as sun spots 
and solar flares. The space plasma physics group, headed 
by D. Papadopoulos, which studied plasma instabilities 
occurring within the solar/terrestrial magnetospheric sys- 
tem. And the planetary group, headed by M. A'Hearn, 
studied the composition and behavior of comets. 

-Jennifer Harrell 



183 



College Park Scholars demonstrate their spirit and 
the effectiveness of the new program. All photos 
are courtesy of the College Park Scholars. 





COLLEGE PARK 

SCHOLARS 



During the 1994-95 academic year, the 
University of Maryland initiated and experi- 
mental program that provided about 460 fresh- 
man students with a smooth transition from 
the structured life of high school to the vast 
world of college. This experiment is called 
College Park Scholars (CPS). 

CPS began as a twinkle in the eye of former 
acting dean of undergraduate studies, Ira Ber- 
lin. He believed that this school should be more 
likened to a boutique than a large department 
store, smaller and more specialized. 

Holly Stewart, the assistant director of CPS 
agrees, "when people come to a big university 
is very alienating. Especially, if you are a 
freshman coming from a small high school. 
This program makes things smaller." 

The program was opened to entering first- 
year students. Admission was very competitive 
and was based on the student's academic 
record, extracurricular and community activi- 
ties, letters of recommendation, as well as a 
written statement of interest from the student. 

Once admitted to CPS, the students are 
required to pick a thematic area in which to 
pursue his or her studies. There were four 
different areas to chose from: CPS in the Life 
Sciences, CPS in Science Technology and 
Society, CPS in International Studies, and 
College Park Artists. An additional three are 
planed for the 1995-96 academic year. 

The program was based on a two-year time 
table, that brought students in and helped them 
adjust to the environment, while it allowed 
them to pursue their interests through the 
thematic areas. 

Robert Smith, an off-campus participant in 
the program, found it interesting, "it's a lot of 
fun getting to meet a whole bunch of different 
types of people." 

Enrollment in the program is expected to 
more than double, to 1,000 students for the 
1995 fall semester, and to steadily increase to 
1,300 by Fall 1996. 

-LaRonda R. Miller 




GREEKS 



EXPOSING OUR WILD SIDE 

EDITED BY AMY FINLAYSON 

Another year of Greek activities full of philanthropic fund raising 
and wild keg parties has gone down as a success. The Greek antics 
had again provided the necessary entertainment and charitable 
activity outside of the classroom. All included had a great time 
while raising thousands of dollars for organizations such as the 
Ronald McDonald House, the American Heart Association, and 
various other worthwhile causes. From Rush to Pledging to 
Homecoming to Greek Week, the year was full of exciting events. 
But most importantly were the special bonds that formed within 
the houses as the close sisterhoods and brotherhoods that evolved 
made it a time and experience always to be remembered. 




As houses got ready for Greek Week, 
sororities decided who to ask to join 
their forces for the upcoming war. As 
the fraternities were serenaded, the 
soroities chose their allies and began to 
prepare for an exciting week. 

A high force basketball match-up 
started off the festivities. The teams 
were composed of the College Park 
Police Department and members of 
the Greek system. It was a competitive 
week filled with fun events. 

There was a talent show, giving par- 
ticipants a chance to show what they 



were really made of. Other events 
included a banner competition, soft- 
ball games, ultimate frisbee and Olym- 
pics on the Row. Overall, there was 
a spirit of competition throughout 
the week where teams were judged 
on their energy, involvement and 
excitement. Of course, every night 
was filled with parties living up to the 
Greek reputation. 

Always doing their part for a good 
cause, another big event was called 
Dancers for Cancer, where 
participants danced for 24 hours. 




This page - Top left -During Greek Olympics, a brother really uses 
his head to win the race. Top middle -The Kappa Alpha Thetas get 
a kick out of seeing their sister get dizzy. Top right -Need a shower? 
Bottom right -The Greeks get down and dirty for the competition. 
Next page -Celebrating their sisterhood, the Thetas are all smiles. 



188 




^*/* 




I - 




M. k^^^ 




K 



All photos this spread by Paul Vieira 



^0 



0^0 



189 




Photo by Eric Lasky 



190 





rhe Gaines 
Continued 



The dancers worked up a sweat for a good cause, the American Cancer Foundation. 
One participant of the week of events, Christine Vosswinhel reported, "It was an 
amazing week and it gave me the opportunity to experience a lot of what the Greek 
system had to offer." 

After all the points were added up, the combination of Theta and Phi Delta took 
first place with Delta Gamma and Phi Sigma Kappa coming in second. The festive 
week was finished off with a nice little awards ceremony and the rededication of the 
chapel. It was week of fun and games to be remembered by all. 

-Ami; Finlayson 



Photo by Paul Vieira 



Photo by Paul Vieira 
Opposite page - Top -During the lip sync, fraternities cater to the 
every whim of sorority goddesses. Bottom left -Excited KD fans 
cheer the Greek team on to basketball victory. Bottom right - The 
Greeks dance the night away for a good cause. This page - Top 
left -An Alphi is caught chugging a beer the only way she knows 
how. Top right -In Ritchie, the masters of ceremonies ham it up 
between lip sync acts. 



191 



Discovering Greek 

Life 

On a beautiful September day, the excitement of Rush was felt in the air. A flood of 
663 primed and painted young women nervously scampered around the streets to begin 
their search for a sorority house. Tiring tours of fifteen houses gave the girls a glimpse 
of each sorority. The next few days were hectic as the process of mutual selection began 
between the Greeks and rushees. As Rush parties continued, formality increased with 
upscale dress and food. Each day the girls met more of the sisters and got a better feel 
of the houses. Great friendships were formed in the serious Preference ceremonies 
where rushees visited the top three houses of their choice. Finally the anticipated Bid Day 
arrived and girls busted in anxiously to discover who they would share the rest of their 
college careers with and who would ultimately become their sisters and best friends. 

Fraternity Rush was much different. The guys only rushed the house or houses which 

interested them rather than getting to know the whole system. Except for a few formal 

dinners, the whole process was very casual. They basically hung out and got to know each 

other on a more personal level up until Bid Day. 

-Ami; Finla\;son 





Photo by Paul Vieira 
Top left - Alpha Phi president and rush chair greeted the rushees 
and welcomed them inside to meet the sisters. Top middle - 
Enthusiastic Rho Chi's held up their signs to collect their groups. 
Top right - During fraternity rush, brothers showed rushees what 
Greek life was all about. Bottom right - Beta went all out to let the 
rushees see their house. Opposite page - A group of happy mshees 
took time out to pose between tours. 



192 







.'^A 
# ■ 


v^^^a 


Ik 




n 


^ 1 


" 


V 1 


A 




igyjl 


A 




Photo by Paul Vieira 


I Q 




B 



Photo by Eric Lasky 



/I 

Photo by Paul Vieira 



O© 

n 



193 




194 





Being one of the high points of Greek life, Homecoming was an exciting time that 
everyone looked forward to. It took a lot of hard work and planning, but it was always well 
worth it. The first event was the Carnival (fund-raiser) to kick off the week. On Monday 
night, most houses gathered at the Paragon for a huge party. On Tuesday, the sports 
competitions began. Teams were selected for volleyball and flag football and competitive 
spirit flooded the fields. That night, a twenty-two way at 94th had everyone living it up 
as Homecoming was well under way. Sophomore KD pledge Ann Svikhart told us her 
feelings on her first Homecoming. "This has been such a great week so far and now I am 
so glad that I became Greek." 

Wednesday was highlighted by Olympics on the Row. This event gave every house a 
chance to display just how much spirit they had. That night, people either went to Fells 
Point or returned to the Paragon. Greeks were able to strut their stuff on Thursday at the 
Talent Show. Various skits and dance routines provided entertainment for all. Thursday 
and Friday, houses had parties among themselves and prepared for the big game on 
Saturday. The week closed with the Rededication ceremony at the Chapel and the 
presentation of trophies to the winners of all the events. The overall winners of the week 
were the combination of Delta Delta Delta and Sigma Alpha Mu. 



-Am\; Finlayson 



195 



STEPPING OUT. . . 



UNITY, AWARENESS, AND EDUCATION IN THE FORM OF ENTERTAINMENT 



After a one year hiatus, the Pan Hellenic 
Council's (PHC) annual step show returned 
to Maryland. Over 40 high school kids, 
seven fraternities and sororities and Dance 
Afrika performed before a crowd of 400 
spectators. 

The evening began with the performance 
of "Isis Kids", a group of local high school 
students sponsored by Omega Psi Phi Fra- 
ternity, Inc. , Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. , 
and the African American Studies Program. 

Monica Payne, senior Journalism major 
and member of Sigma Gamma Rho Soror- 
ity, Inc. said, "I'm really disappointed about 
the low turnout. A lot of people on this 



campus have negatives views about the black 
Greek system. It is good to see them doing 
something positive." 

Other performances included Maryland's 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. with a 
theme of respect for Black women, their 
sisters from UVA performed a depiction of 
death and resurrection of the Black, Phi Beta 
Sigma Fraternity, Inc., Dance Afrika, Sigma 
Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., with a military 
drill, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., 
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and Kappa 
Alpha Phi Fraternity, Inc. infamous cane 
routine. 




196 




OB S 



197 




198 



Greeks 
Living It Up 




A EO 



199 



All Slicked Up 

And Ready To Party 

Being one of the special events most looked forward to, formals gave the Greeks a 
chance to show off in their slick suits and fancy dresses. After spending hours in front of 
the mirror and perfecting every last touch, couples would meet up at a house for the pre 
party. This gave everyone a chance to meet everyone else and loosen up a little bit, so 
when they got to the formal, they were ready to hit the dance floor. DJ's kept belting out 
requests and popular tunes to keep the crowd hopping. Food, drink, and laughter were 
plentiful to provide the night with sort of a buzz. Liz Knecky said "Some of the best times 
I've had as a Greek have been at formals. It's so much fun to get to see everyone all dressed 
up and we always have a great time." 

Formals were held at all different places such as the Camden Club, the Omni, Lord 
Baltimore, the new Holiday Inn, or a variety of other places. Even though everyone was 
exhausted by the end of the night, they were sorry to see it end. Couples climbed on the 
buses, recapping their best memories of the night and looking forward to changing their 
clothes. Out of all Greek events, formals were nights enjoyed and remembered by all. 

-Am\; Finhxjson 




This page - Left - A couple poses for one last picture before 
entering the pre-party. Middle - Alpha Omega Pi sisters smile 
bright while enjoying their night. Top right - Sisters get 
together with their dated to show off their threads. Bottom 
right - these crazy kids felt the need to stretch their legs before 
the long bus ride. Opposite page - Come on! Hurry up! I 
think we can still get the back seat! 



200 




201 



No Butts 
About It 




The Greeks 

Know How To 

Party 




202 




Aii pliotos on this spread by Paul Vieira 

203 



One of the most important aspects of Greek life are the social activities and of course, 
the parties. Every weekend houses would get together and release the tension of a long 
week of classes. As the guests began to float in, introductions were made and singles 
began to scan the crowd for a potential hook up. Overflowing bars and loud dance music 
kept the nights alive. Everyone always had a great time and these nights were the source 
of amusing moments to remember. 

Typical sorts included list parties or getting together with other houses in two, four, ten, 
or sixteen ways. Some parties had a theme such as "Biker", "70's"', graffiti, or any 
number of things. Special events included dated parties, crush parties, and get away 
weekends. These were always held at different places for something new and fun. 

Wild parties provided a great chance for the Greeks to really get to know people in other 

houses and just get crazy. 

-Am\; Finlai;son 




Top left - Greek spirit ran high at every event. Here a Zeta strikes 
a pose. Top middle - Of course, a main aspect of every party was 
meeting that someone special. Top right - Greeks partied all night 
long in their Halloween costumes. Bottom right - Brothers were 
living it up at one of their many parties. Opposite page - What a 
cute couple. 



204 




205 



SENIORS 



Edited by David Schneider and Wen-Szu Lin 

"95" Maryland Memories 
By C. Teddy Li, Chairman of Senior Council 



95. Only school accepted to. 
94. Orientation 
93. First class with 199 other 
people... First class skipped 
92. Freshman fifteen 
91. Rush. ..Bid 
Day. . .Pledging, . .Initiation. . . 
90. Quarter Pitcher Night at The 
Cellar... Fake IDs 

89. University of Maryland Dairy and your 
favorite flavor 

S8. Andy Geiger...Gary Williams... Mark 
Duffner... Debbie Yow... 
87. "Ferdinand Foxx"... "Mr. Mary- 
land"... "Milky Serial" 
86. The Highrises... Suites... Apartments... 
85. Easton Highrise skydiver 
84. Knox Boxes... Graham Cracker... Frat 
Row. . . 

83. Frat parties... Football tailgates... Knox 
block parties... 
82. Pickles & Cheeps? 
8 1 . Podberesky sues Banneker Scholar- 
ship 

80. Mongo Madness... Party 
Satesh ... Crack Baby . . . 
79. Walt Williams 

7 8 . Sandwisch . . . Kaleo . . Milanovich . . Foley . . 
77. KJ...Don Ho... Gilligan... Patrick... 
76. Mighty Sound of Maryland Marching 
Band 

75. OAs...RAs...CAs...AAs... 
74. First Look Fair.. .Stamp Union All- 
Niter... Art Attack... 

73. Rubbing Testudo's nose... Swimming 
in the Fountain 

72. Somerset basement... Third 
Floor... Leonardtown... 4206... 
71. Old Line... Imperialists... New 
Era... PARTI... Old Line... 
70. "Igdoof"...Ugly Eugene... Remedial 
Ralph... 

69. No comment... 
68. Intercollegiate sports... Intramural 
sports. . .Water sports. . . 
67. Free movie screenings at The Hoff 
66. The Clubside...The 
Diamondback...The City Paper... 
65. Long registration lines... 
64. MARS (Maryland Automated Registra- 
tion System) 

63. Long Island... New Jersey... Denton 
Hall... 



62, The Big "M"...The Sundial... The 
Memorial Chapel bells... 
6 1 . Red Express. . .Terrapin Express, . .Taco 
Bell Express... 

60. UMCP budget decreases, more 51. 
59. WHFS...WMUC...WPGC... 
58. Anne Arundel Hall new honors building 
57. Cole Field House... Byrd 
Stadium... North Gym... 
56. McKeldin Library finally re-opens... 
55. Reduced library hours 
54. Ratsie's... Howie's... Papa John's... 
53. Lady's Night at R.J. Bentley's Filling 
Station 

52. Double majors... Triple 
majors. . . Undecided . . . 

51. Every campus male as a potential rapist 
50. Lacrosse Lady Terps are 1992 National 
Champions 

49, National Archives II across University 
Boulevard 

48, Vagina Womyn..,Matt Sheriff... Chris 
Kerwin... 

47. Pride of Maryland Solar Car... Concrete 
Canoe... HEV... 

46. Pay for printing... e-mail... Nintendo... 
45. AIDS Awareness... AIDS testing... AIDS 
Quilt... 

44. Celebrating 19th birthday at The Cellar 
43. Disappearance of 10,000 Diamond- 
back copies 

42. Henneberger..Dimitri.. Garrett.. Jose.. 
Pugsley. 
41, Joe Smith 

40. March Madness 1994. ..Terps in the 
Sweet Sixteen 
39. Commuters... Out-of- 
staters. . .Administrators. , . 
38. No School... seven snow days 
37. Sell-out at Cole. ..Lady Terps battle 
Cavaliers 

36. 'Van Munching Hall 
35. Late-Night Dining... Inconvenience 
store... Umberto's... 
34. Field Hockey wins 1993 National 
Championships 

33. "Twenty-four hour" McDonald's & 7- 
Eleven 

32. HOMECOMING... 
31. Dollar Bud Night at the Santa Fe Cafe 
30. Maya Angelou... Jesse Jackson... Ralph 
Nader... 
29. Purple Pizza... Cluck-U 



Chicken... Penguin Pizza... 
28. Asbestos in Art-Sociology Building. 
27. Waco...Menendez boys,.. Jeffrey 
Dahmer...Lorena Bobbitt... 
26. Happy Hour at the 94th 
Aerosquadron 

25. The Simpsons... Beverly Hills 
90210. ..Seinfeld... 
24. College Park Metro 
Station... College Park Fire Station... 
23. South Hill Basketball Courts 
stabbing... O J Simpson 
22. Planet X burns in mysterious fire... 
21. ...Java Heads 
20. South Hill and Leonardtown 
basketball courts... Gone! 
19. A. James Clark School of Engi- 
neering 

1 8 . Feet ... Rollerblades ... Mountain 
bikes... CAR... 

1 7 , "Campus Interuptus" . . . "Socrates 
O'Connor " . . . "University 2" . . . 
16. Panhellenic 

Association . . . IFC . . . Pan-hellenic Coun- 
cil... 

15. ASU...BSU...HSU...JSU...NASU... 
14. "Maryland" sweatshirt... Class 
ring... Cap & Gown... 
13. Senior Receptions at President 
Kirwan's House 

12. Cover Letter... Resume... Career 
Fair... 

11. GRE...GMAT...LSAT...MCAT... 
10. Senior Audit 

9. Class Gift — garden behind McKeldin 
Library 

8. Senior Council... Senior 
Raffle... Senior Marshals... 
7. Human Sexuality 
6. Football tickets... Basketball 
tickets... Parking tickets... 
5. Elbow Room at the Rendevous 
4. Testudo 
3. Those last finals... 
2 . Career .. . Graduate School ... Still in 
School... 
1. Commencement. 






\ 








i| 



Mohamad Nazim A 
Samad 

Economics 
Bruce Abell 

Enfp 
Keith Abernethy 

Journalism 
Edward Abrams 
Govt. /Poll. 
Jason Abrams 
Finance 

Amy Abramson 

English 

Ted Abramson 

Kinesiology 

Marcus Acham 

Computer Science 

Mary Acholonu 
Science Ed. 

Anne Acosta 

Business 

Suzanne Adamko 
History 

Annstrong Adams 
COS 

Catherine Adams 
Sociology 
Monica Adams 
Sociology 

Neetika Agarwal 
Accounting 

Firoze Ahmed 
AREC 

Jawad Ahmed 
Physical Science 
Khrystyna Ahn 
Int. Bus. 
Shahni Ahuja 
Biology 

Shahid Akhtar 
Elec. Engr. 

Patricia Alcazar 
Animal Science 
Eleanor Alderson 
Psychology 
Lucy Alderton 

Animal Science 
Maria Alegra 
Mech. Engr. 
Erika Alexander 
Computer Science 




208 



What was your worst date at UMCP like? 
Male Female 



• Believe it or not, I've not yet had one. 

• Beautiful woman, good movie, but ended so 
abruptly I didn't have time to breathe. 

• When my father hooked me up with a high 
school girl I had never met to take her to her 
prom. Would have been OK if she hadn't 
introduced me as "the boyfriend" she was 
telling everybody about. 

• They were all the BEST. 

• The first time I went out with Jen during my 
freshmen year, who is now my fiance. 



• A blind date for a formal. I don't even remember 
his name. 

• He took me to the dining hall, and he wouldn't 
even buy me orange juice. It cost $2.00, he said. 

• We rode the shuttle to the cellar. He got wasted 
and started puking on the way back. So, I left him 
and never called him back. 

• When I went out with a guy and he smoked weed 
and his friend gave me his gun to hold. 

• I had to pay for EVERYTHING! 




Douglas Alion 
Bus / Mgmt. 
David Allan 
Journalism 

Lawrence Almengor 
Finance 

Ann-Maiie Alvino 
Education 

Yohannes Amare 
Elec. Engr. 

Jeff Ambush 
Crim. Just. 
Becky Anderson 
Sociology 
Karen Anderson 
Criminology 
Roz Anderson 
French / Int'l Bus. 
Manuel Andrade 
Accounting 

Lorraine Andrews 

Mar. Biology 

Andrea Annunziata 

Biology 

Thomas Antisoel 

Int'l Bus / Chinese Lan.& Lit. 

Alexandra Antoine 

Sociology 

Adamma Anyaehie 

Criminology 



209 



Randy Applefeld 
Psychology 
Srivastava Aprajita 
Chem Engr. 
Chirs Area 
Chem Engr. 
Gillian Ariscson 
Education 
John Arrieta 
Engineering 

Christine Asero 

Theatre 

Bonni Auerbach 

Art-Studio 

Kimberly Augustine 

Managment 

Carolyn Bacon 

Histor) 

Lydia Badra 

Kinesiology 

Kunsoo Bae 

Trans 

Ha Sook Bahk 

Sociology 

Nandeep Bahra 

Fire Pro Eng 

Mirza Baig 

Biology 

Sari Bailer 

English 

Patricia Bakunas 

Special Ed. 

Cynthia Baldwin 
Consumerecon 
Jeffrey M. Balfour 
Accounting 
Deepak Bansal 
Accounting 
Jamie Baraff 
Psychology 

Matthew Barakat 
Journalism 
Stephanie Barkin 
Government 
Susan Barry 
Early Ch. Educ 
Kelly Bassett 
Portuguese 
Michele Beach 
CCJS 




210 




Peter Beach 

Education 

Stacey Beall 

Marketing 

David Bearden 

Elec. Engr. 

Scott Beatty 

Finance 

Kenneth Beauchamp 

CCJS 

Staci Beck 



Amanda Becker 



Nurjahan Begum 

Accounting 



Computer 
Tiwalade Bello 



David Belloso 
Biology 
Phyllis Belsky 

Accounting 
James Benjamin 
GVPT 

Matthew Berger 
Criminal Justice 
Meridith Berger 
Psychology 

Wendy Berger 

HESP 

Tsega Berhanu 

Philosophy 

Elsa Berhave 

Health Ed 

Julianne Berkowitz 

Art History 

Kevin Berman 

Biology 

Lisa Berman 

EDSP 

Michael Berman 

History 

Amy Bernard 

Finance 

Ana Bernardo 

English 

Sara H. Bernstein 

RTVF 



211 



ood & Bad Things About UMCP: PARTI 



you feel like such a small person in such a large college world 



Gaurav Bhatia 
Computer Science 
Kristin Bielec 
Accounting 
Carlen Bini 
Biology 
John Bird 
Mech Engr. 
Dena Bimber 
Elemntary Ed. 

Michelle Black 
English 
Carl Blake 
Aero Engr. 
Michael Bloom 
Economics 
Deborah Blyveis 
Mechanical 
Kimberly Bolinger 
Elem Ed. 

Ronald Bolte 

Psychology 

Meryl Bolton 

HESP 

Mellisa Bonilla 

English 

Karen Bonner 

Journalism 

Lori Bonnette 

Art History 




212 




Donald Booth 

Biology 

Nicole Bordogna 

Speech 

Peter Both 

Econ / Hist 

Kelly Bottoms 

MICB 

Linda Boulin 

AREC 

Geoffrey Boyers 
Electrical 

Meredith Boylan 
Advertising 
Adrienne Branson 
Gen. Biology 
Vicky Braun 
Journalism 
Joseph Brennan 
Accounting 

Tara Brickley 
Elem. Education 
Rochelle Briggs 
Elementary Ed. 
Laura Brode 
Int'l Business 
Caren Bromberg 
Accounting 
Jacqueline Brooks 
Int'l Bus. / Spanish 

Dionne Brown 

Crim. Just. 
Laurin Brown 
Gvpt / Politics 
Marcy Brown 
Journalism 
Marilyn Brown 
Spanish 

Mehssa Brown 
HESP 

Rudy Brown 

Economics 

Tarnisha Brown 

English 

Theresa Brown 

English 

Amy Buchanan 

Sociology 

David Bucklin 

Criminal Justice 



213 



Amy Buehler 

Sp!h Comm 

Bui Bich-Chieu 

Dis 

Steven Bumgamer 

Biology 

Jude Buquid 

Economics 

Natalie Burke 

Gvpt 

Dana Burnett 

Psychology 
Debbie Burtnick 
Education 

Ericka Burwell 

CCJS 

Arta Bushaw-Weese 

English 
Jennifer Byrd 

Dance 

Steve Byun 

Sociology 
Tanisha Caglin 
Family Stud 
Jacqueline Caldwell 
Special Educ. 
David Campbell 
Psyc 

Denise Campbell 
Family Stud/ 

Herbert Cares 

Speech 

Bridget Carey 
Education 
Richard Carlson 

Econmics 

Shannon Carlson 

History 

Stacey Carmack 

Psychology 

Vicky Carmi 

Marketin / Int'l 

Jessica Caroff 

Biology 

Gaylen Carpenter 

Biology 

Maribeth Carroll 
Journalism 
Susan Cartier 

Journalism 




214 




Andra Carty 

English 

Joseline Castanos 

Education 

Christian Castillo 

Ectmomics 

Andrea Castroglovanni 

Linuistics 

Franc ine Catterton 

Linguistics 

Erica Cawthome 
History 

Alieu Ceesay 
Elec Engr. 
Gina Cha 
General Bus. 
Bryna Chait 
Education 
Mie Chan 
Finance 

Pen'y Chan 

Accounting 

Maria Chandler 

German 

Guey-Yuan Chang 

Math 

Hyen Chang 

English 

Inki Chang 

Architecture 

Lawrence Chang 

CJUS 

Linda Chang 

Acct / Int'l Bus 

Min Joo Chang 

Ec. Education 

Melanie Chaump 

GVPT 

Melissa Chaump 

GVPT 

Diane Chen 

AVEC 

AUyson Chmar 

Advertising 

Mary Cho 

Neurobiology / Physiology 

Jessica Choe 

Early Ed. 

Tuck-Lai Choo 

Marketing 



215 



Mark Chou 

Psychology 

Mary Sharon Christie 

Economics 

Jennifer Christman 

Journalism 

Pei-Hsien Chu 

Accounting 

Deborah Chun 
Accounting 

Elizabeth Chun 
Elementary 
Jill Cieri 
Psychology 
Christine Clark 
Art History 
Shona Clay 
Health Ed. 
Lisa Clevenger 
Bus. Mgmt 

Holly Clifton 

Biology 

Greg Coakley 

Neuro Biology 

Jennifer Cochran 

Journalism 

Iris Cohen 

Elem Ed. 

Jaimee Cohen 

Psyc. 

Seth Cohen 

GVPT 

Shane Cohen 

Me Anthro. 

Rachael Cohn 

Speech Comm 

Michael Colaianni 

Ench 

Michael Colborn 

Accounting 

Lori Coleman 
Education 
Kelly Collinson 
Speech Comm 

Meredith Colon 

Architecture 
Davis Colwell 
Landscape Architecture 
Jennifer Conaway 
Agronomy 




216 




Stacie Conroy 

Ansc 

Christina Contreras 

Civil Engr. 

Dawn Cooper 

Psychology 

Adrian Copiz 

English 

James Corckran 

Marine Biology 

Kateri Cordova 
Span. Lan. Lit. 
Chalene Corinaldi 
Micro Biolog 
John Corley 
Art Studio 

Lisa Corriggio 

Journalism 
Walter Coryell 
Economics 



217 



Lynette Cox 

Journalism 

Eileen Coyle 

Engineering 

Allen Creek 

CCJS 

Sabina Crism 

GVPT 

Diane Culverhouse 

English 

Karen Cumming 

Elem. Ed. 

Maureen Cunningham 

Marketing 

Kevin D'Souza 

Mech. Engr. 

Irene Dartoozos 

HESP 

Michael Davidov 

Finance 

Dawn Davidson 

GVPT 

Heather Davis 

Journalism 

Kirk Davis 

Mech Engr. 

Katherine Dawson 

Amst 

Koyeli De 

Enfp 

Anna Decressin 
Economics 
Michael Delorme 
Mathematics 
Michelle Demma 
Journalism 
Buer Deng 
Computer 
Renee Deniner 
Psyc. / Biology 

Anita Denning 

Journalism 

Melissa Derwart 

GVPT 

Meredith Dewald 

Family Studties 

Tasha Dewaters 

Hesp 

Richaed Di Misa 

Engineering 




218 




Heather Dick 

CCJS 

Susan Dilley 

Elem Ed. 

Jennifer Dillingham 

Psychology 

Marlon Dillon 

Animal Science 

Tina Dippel 

Psyc. / Ccjs 

Genevieve Dixon 

English 

Stacey Doescher 

Criminal. Just. 

Liam Doherty 

History 

Anne Marie Donahue 

Family Studies 

Todd Donnelly 

History 

Kevin Donoughe 

Crim. Justice 
Lynn Doolan 
Marine Biology 
Aditi Dorawala 
Bs Trans / Log 
Jason Dorf 
Economics 
Donya Douglas 
Mech Eng. 

Nancy Dowd 

Early Child Ed. 

Denise Doyle 

English 

Jason Doyle 

Gvpt 

Kendra Draughn 

Finance 

Suzanne Driver 

Ansc 

Michael Dubsky 

History 

Bhavana Dudkikar 

Mkt / Trans 

Christopher Durachka 

Biochemistry 

Kimberly Eagan 

Elem Educ. 

Nicole Earl 

Socy 



219 



Bruce Ebert 

Enme 

Lauren Edelstein 

Psychology 

Barbara Edler 

Speech 

Elizabeth Elder 

Kinesiology 
Andrea Ellison 
Elementary Ed. 

Andre Emden 

Anthro. 

Matthew English 

Gvpt 

Catherine Engstrom 

Gvpt 

Brian Epstein 

Business Human Resoures 

Laf Erickson 

Soil Science 




I 

M M til ^>i i 



AT 
MARYLAND 



E 



mbarrassin 



AT 
MARYLAND 



• Had a huge chunk of spinach in between my front teeth while I gave my presentation 
for Speech 107 

• Walking into a Physics lab on the day I was to do a presentation and having forgotten 
to prepare. 

• "Take it all off!" I was one of the dancers /strippers (or whatever you called it). 

• Date was waiting in my room when someone had stolen my towel. I returned in the 
buff, from the shower. She was waiting for me. 

• Tripping off the sidewalk when a bunch of people were around. 

• Slipping into the pond on campus mall. 

• In my sleep at 5:00am, I walked to my Spanish class. 

• Getting escorted out of a frat party for being too drunk. 

• The first day of school, a bird dropped it's stuff on my head. What a way to start 
school! 

• Getting beaten up at the basketball court. 



220 




Heidi Errichetto 

Accounting 
Lara Escott 
Family Studies 
Paul Essex 
Education 
Jeffrey Eubinag 
Biology 

Jougol Ezzatti 
Criminal Jus. 

Miriam Pagan 

Art History 

Jennifer Fairman 
Biology 

Olugbenga Famodu 
Chem. Engr 
Ching-Yin Fang 
Cmsc 

Frederick Farah 
Physiology 

Jill Farber 

Hesp 

Lynn Marie Fareno 

Chemistry 
Lisa Farley 
Psychology 
Jeanine Fawcett 
Education 
Karyn Felder 
Finance 

Amy Feldman 

Psychology 

Jessica Feldman 

Advertising 

Shih Feng 

Accounting 

Peter Fernandez 

Biology 

Lynne-Michel Ferrante 

Kinesiology 

Paul Fezza 

Kinesiology 
William Field 
Fash.Merch 
Dana Fine 
Criminal Justice 
Joseph Firetti 
Marketing 
David Fisher 
Accounting 



221 



Lemaine Fisher 

English 

Lyle Fisher 

Ivsp 

Jill Fishman 

Elem. Education 

Mary Flanagan 

Gvpt / Politics 

Tonya Flanagan 

Biology 

Eileen Flatley 
Fashion 

Nicole Flores 
Psychology 
Abitalle Fofana 
Fin-Agro Bus 

Watasha Forde 
Journalism 
Shabnam Foroughi 

Biochemistry 

Timothy Fosque 
Speech Comm 
George Fowler 
Comp Science 
Charles Fox 
Bio Chem 
Steven Fox 
Gvpt 

Patrick Francis 
Ronamce Lang 

Carol Fraser 

English Lit 

Patrice Fraiser 

Government 

Diane Frazier 

Econ 

Sergio Fresco 

Bmgt 

Heather Friedland 

English 

Nicole Friedman 
Accounting 
Johanna Froelich 
Animal Science 
Catherine Frohlich 
Accounting 

liana Fuchs 
Biology 
Sean Fuerst 
Zoology 




222 




Ferrell Fun* 

History 

Dan Gabayzadeh 

Philosophy 

Steven Gabriszeski 

Civil Eng. 

Erin Gallagher 

Knes 

Jeff Gantt 

French 

Alissa Garber 

Psychology 

Brian Garnets 

Finance / Accounting 

Hagos Gebrai 

Accounting 

Allison George 

Biology 

Workeneh Getachew 

Info System 

Vida Suzan Ghaffari 

Economics 

Jennifer Gikow 

Elementary Ed. 

Cyril Gillman 

Biology 

Mary Gills 

Health Ed. 

Tara Gilyard 

Dance 

Jeffrey Glasser 

Sociology 

John Gleeson 

Sociology 

Jennifer Glickman 

Criminal Justice 

Kimberly Glover 

Agribusiness 

Marionetta Glover-Caige 

Ifsm 

Andra Gluck 
Elem. Education 
Sarina Godin 
Family Studies 
Dina Gold 
Psychology 
Dana Goldan 
Kinesiology 
Genna Goldberg 
Jour / Wmst 



223 



Douglas Goldblatt 

Crim Justice 

Dana Goldman 

Finance 

Judy Goldman 

EE 

Kenneth Goldsbrorouh 

Music Ed. 

Heather Goldstein 

Psychology 

Karen Goldstein 
Accounting 
Michelle Goldstein 
Gvpt 

Philip Goodwin III 
Mech. Eng. 
Allison Goozh 
Speech Comm 
Jacqueline Gordon 
Speech Comm 

Dawn Gorrell 

Animal Science 

Kevron Gottlieb 

Econ 

Joanne Gottschall 

English 

Laura Govemale 

Biology / Cmbg 

Kathryn Graham 

Art 

Sara Granet 

Marketing 
Dennis Grant 
Business 

Jonathan Grant 

Mech Engr. 
Cherie Grasso 
Education 
Thomas Gray 
Elem. Ed. 

Tracey Gray 

Criminal Justice 
Lyn Graybill 
Chem. Engr. 
Sonia Grebogi 
Bioloical Science 
Eugene Green 
Resource-Econ 
Kimberly Green 
Journalism 




224 



How much time did we spend here? 





Laura Green 

Jornalism 

Melissa Green 

Marketing 

Sheri Green 

Marketing 

Toni Green 

Finance 

Lisa Greenberg 

Family Studies 

Marnie Greene 

English 

Staycee Greene 

History 

Susan Greenhut 

Psychology 

Julie Greenstein 

Fmst 

Ruth Gresser 

Elec. Engineering 

Maurita Griggs 
Speech Comin 
Jessica Gross 
Eleni. Ed. 
Lara Grubich 
Journalism 
Kristine Grundy 
Psychology 
Michael Guerra 
Marketina 



225 



Elena Guerrero 
Speech Comm 
Mukul Gulati 
Econmics 
Sumathi Gulati 
Chemistry 
Paul Gunsser 
Criminal Justice 
Manii Haas 
Education 

Erin Haber 
Education 

Getnet Habte 

Micro Biology 

David Hack 

Knes 

Omar Haddad 

Elec. Engr. 

Michelle Hahner 

Biology 

Simon Haile 
Economics 
Debra Hall 
Finance 
Keene Hall 
Mech Engr. 
Melinda Hall 
History 

Teresa Hall 

Crim. Justice 

Marcia Hamilton 
Early Childhood Ed. 
Matthew Hancock 
English 

Kaity Handal 
Chemical Engr. 
Henness Hao 
Accounting 
Cynthia Harmon 
Sociology 

Sandra Harpold 

Gvpt 

Lorelei Harris 

Journalism 

Julia Harrison 

Psychology 

Robin Hart 

Sociology 

Mark Hartung 

Speech Comm 




226 




Nicole Harvey 
Family Stud 
Kimberly Hduse 
Speech Comm 
Kevin Hedge 
Nrmt 

Joseph Helfrich 
P.I.S. / Finance 
Janine Heller 
Psychology 

Jinyin Hennacy 

Accounting 
Marian Henry 
Ccgs / Family Studies 
Joshua Herbst 
Accounting 
Eric Herget 
Aero Eng. 

Gregory Herman 
Neurophysiology 

Holly Sue Herman 

Fmst 

Maisha Herron 

Gen. Bus. Adm. 

Stephanie Hervert 

Biology 

Michael Hess 

Gvpt / Econ 

Valerie Hickok 

Finance 

Dalia Hidayat 

Ccjs 

S ameer Hijazi 

Cmbg 

Katherine Hill 

Elem. Ed. 

Otway Hill 

Economics 

Keith Hiller 

Accounting 

Teguh Hinanto 
Finance 
Emily Ho 
Finance. 
Humberto Ho 
Civil Engr. 
Pamela Ho 
Hr Mgmt 
John Hoagland 
ejus 



227 



Worst Academic Experiences 



Failing Math 

Taking a nfiidterm and not recognizing the material 

Academic Advising 

A professor in AASP who only showed up every other week, and didn't give date or chapters for 



exams 



Carl Hobbs 

Business 

Daniel Hobbs 

Psyc 

Brett Hoffman 

Accounting 

Maria Hoffman 

Psychology 

Jessica Hoge 

Economics 

Christopher Holmes 
Art Studies 
Corey Holobetz 
Business 

Dean Holzer 
Ccjs 

Helen Hong 
Elem Education 
Sze Hon 
Comp Science 

Peeraboon Hongladarom 

Engineering 

Marci Honstead 

Family Stud 

Lisa Hooper 

Jour / English 

John Hoover 

Ling / Phil 

Janna Hopkins 

Music 



Staying up till 5:00am everyday for two weeks to study for finals 

Coming to class when it snowed 

Studying until 4:30am for math test, but missed it because alarm didn't go off 




228 









David Horcasitas 

Marketing 

Andrew Horman 

Geography 

Leann Howard 

Elem. Educ. 

Scott Howard 

Gvpt 

Thomas Howe 

Computer Science 

Shelly Hsia 
Jewish St. 
Yingpo Hsiao 
Cmsc 

Jack Hsin 
Acct / Finance 
Jerlyn Hua 
Dis / Fiance 
John Huang 
Business / Dis 

Xiaolei Huang 
Math /Accounting 
Tami Huber 
Marine Biology 
Jeeyourn Hugh 
Economics 
George Huh 
Engineering 
Heather Hunsicker 
Elem. Educ 

Kristin Hunsicker 

Special Ed. 

Steven Hunt 

Biology 

Shahrukh Hussain 

Mis /Dis 

Chrsitina Hustun 

Journalism 

Tina Hutchinson 

Psychology 

Ran Ilkovitch 

Architectures 
Won In 
Mech. Eng. 
Asaf Inbar 
Elect. Engr. 
Terri Ivory 
Biology 
Nicole Jabes 
Merchandising 



229 



Roy Jach 

Engr, 

Ricardo Jackman 

Criminal Justice 

Robert Jacobs 

History 

Evan Jaffe 

Journalism 

Jason Jaffe 
Elem Ed. 

Jodi Jakob 

Hesp 

Jeneba Jalloh 

Journalism 

Wendy Japal 

Gvpt. 

Thomas Jarboe 

Criminology 

Heidi Jarmon 

Speech Comm. 

Adrienne Jehle 

Rtvf 

Catherine Jellison 

History 

Amy Jenkins 

Ccjs 

Greg Jenkins 

Psychology 

Karen Jerome 

Fmst 

Deepa Jhaveri 
Zoology 
Allen Job 
Biology 

Dana Johnson 
Biochemistry 
Trena Johnson 
Journalism 
Anita Jones 
Education 

Athyl Jones 

Marketing 

Jennifer Jones 

Socioloy 

Keith Jones 

Finance 

Charisa Jones-Brinson 

Axec 

Bernard Jones, Jr 

Spanish 




230 




Andrew Joseph 

Ccjs 

Coreen Joseph 

General Biology 

Femande Joseph 

Microbiology 

James Joyce 

Geology 

Sharon Lindsay Julien 

Elementary Ed. 

Gina Jun 
Journalism 
Joanna Kafouri 
Interior Design 
Julie Kaiss 
English 

Nnanna Kalu 
Chemistry 
Nnenna Kalu 
Biology 

Hyun Kang 

Accoimting 

Chamila Karrandana 

Fin / Trans 

David Kassel 

Rtvf 

Tami Katz 

Fmst 

Bonnie Keller 

Special Ed. 

Christine Kelly 

History 

Kevin Kennedy 

Sociology 

Moira Kenyon 

Span / Econ 

Mony Keo 

Finance 

Lisa Kerker 

Psychology 

Catherine Kerley 
Journalism/Spanish 
Rebecca Kern 
Art Studio 
Keri Kessler 
Family Studies 
Erika Keyes 
Ccjs 

Randolph Keyes 
Comp. Science. 



231 



Stephen Keyfauver 

Business 

Khursheedul Khan 

Enee 

Kori Kilpatrick 

Education 

Chae Kim 

Fine Engr. 

Elise Kim 

Early Ch. Ed. 

Jin Soo Kim 

Cmsc 

Jiweon Kim 
Family Studies 
Jordan Kim 
Mech. Engineering 
Mimi Soo Kim 
Gvpt. 
Soo Kim 
Chemistry 

Kristie Kime 

Special Ed. 

Gail Kindya 

Ccjs/Psyc 

Alyse King 

Mech. Engineering 

Michelle King 

Ccjs 

Shelley Kirchner 

Ccjs 

Jill Kitzman 

History 

Matthew Klein 
Finance 

Michael Klein 
Journalism 
Sharleen Klein 
El em Educ 
Shari Klevens 
Crim. Justice 

Heather Knight 

Fashion Merch. 

John Koch 

Aerospace 

Deborah Koening 

Music 

Shayne Kohn 

Kinesiology 

Eric Komolit 

Int'l Bus. Transportation 




232 



^^ 


1^ 




0\ 


• 


^ 


'M^ 


9ft ^hhb 




<* 




Li 





Lynne Koshar 

History 

Amy Koshner 

English 

Trish Kosloff 

Kinesiology 

Jason Kozlowski 

Gvpt / Pol 

Jennifer Krangle 

Sociology 

Michelle Karatz-Zimmerma 

Biology 

Cary Krefetz 
Accounting 
Loic Kreitmann 
Marine Biology 
Wendy Krieg 
Mech. Engr. 
Pankaj Kumar 
Elec. Engr. 



Fin al Words.. .Final Wor ds . . . 



Fine 
Fine 

Fin 

Fini 

rini 

Fine 



— I'm glad I'm out of here! 

— I'm going to be sad when I graduate because I love college life. 

— Only by his grace... 

— It's about time! 

— Good luck! 

— Obstacles are what you see when you take your eyes off the goal. 

— Take your education seriously. 

— Think before speaking. 

— Don't stop believing. 

— It's better not to eat a tomato than to eat a bad one. 

— See ya later. Lady Lyn 



ds... 
ds... 

ds... 
ds... 
ds... 
ds... 



— Closing one chapter, ready to begin the next. 

Finj^i worus...m .jimui v«v^>ds . . . 



233 



Alan Kuppers 
History 

Charles Kuzminski 


r\ 


English 




Magali Laguerre 

Cmbg 

David Lakeim 

Cmsc 


... !^ 


Yip Lam 




Accounting 


MHMfc 



James Lamon 

Accounting 

Victor Landa 

Economics 

Robert Lane 

Finance 

Jeffrey Langbaum 

Finance 

Jason Langer 

Journalism 

Nicole Lantagne 

Marketing 

James Larson 

English 

Kenneth Lasala 

Gvpt 

Christopher Lash 

Aerospace 

Leisel Lashley 

Natural Resources Mgmt 

Eric Lasky 

Crim / Ccjs 

Melanie Lasoff 

Journalism 

Edith Laszlo 

Ivsp 

Cheryl Laudet 

Hrm 

Erica Lawrence 

General Hrm 

Jeffrey Leach 

Geology 

Francis League 

Biology 

Kenneth Leclercq 

Crim. Justice 

Allen Lee 

Biology 

Anastasia Lee 

Psychology 




234 




Christine Lee 

Soicology 
Diana Lee 
Accounting 
Heather Lee 
Accounting 
Jeng-Sheng Lee 
Accoutning 
Jeni Lee 
Elem Educ. 

Kyong Lee 
Business 
Lisa Lee 
E Asian St. 
Meghan Lee 
Architecture 
Michael Lee 
Finance / D.I.S. 
Seung Lee 
Accounting 

Soo Lee 

Spanish 
Teh-Lin Lee 
EE 

Vincent Lee 
Biochemistry 
Wendy Lee 
Biochemstry 
William Lee 
Economics 

Meg Leeds 

Special Ed. 

Nicole Lefcourt 

Gvpt. 

John Lentz 

Botany 

Michelle Leonard 

Marketing 

Jennifer Leopard 

Special Ed. 

Carol Leotta 
Psychology 
Torance Lesane 
Accounting 
Brian Leslie 
History 

Michael Leszcz 
Transportat 
Maggie Leung 
Accountina 



235 



Michelle Levi 

Hesp 

Erica Lewis 

Biology 

Kimberly Lewis 

Aasp / Psych 

Loma Lewis 

Sociology 

Tina Lewis 

Nrmt 

Chu-Chi Li 

Math 

Yingqi Liang 

Biology 

Sharon Lichtenstein 

English 

Rebecca Lieb 

Education 

Lisa Lieberman 

Sociology 




Hopefully, Graduation. 

I'm an old married woman. Too bad. I didn't have any! 

Going on a blind date and my date was arrested. 

Performing at the Peach Bowl in 1973 as a U. of MD Pom 

Spring Break trip to Panama City 1994 

I had to be carried out of Sante Fe on my 21st birthday. 

Freshman year in the International House was a wild experience. 

Pledging 

Skidding on a tray from the cafeteria during the storms of '94 

Mudsliding in front of Easton dorm 



236 




Alvi Lim 
Accounting 
Kristianto Lim 
Aerospace 
Chung Lin 
Biology 
June Lin 
Finance 
Yu-Lun Lin 
Mech. Eng. 

Jason Lipka 
Finance 

Brenda Lippert 
Englisii 
Kirk Litton 
ejus 

I-Chung Liu 
Physics 

Kuang Lin Liu 
Finance 

Glenn Livinston 
Mech Engr. 
Stephanie Lloyd 
Business 

Matthew Locke 
Elecrtrical Eng 
Helen Loenning 
Mathematics 
Patricia Logue 
JournaHsm 

Keith Lombardo 
History 

Gregory Long 
English 
Kiabi Long 
Criminal Justice 
Shawn Long 
Criminology 
Kristin Longley 
Human Resource 

Kathi Looney 

Fmst 

Rui Lourenco 
Bmgt /Trans 
Merdith Lowman 
Spec. Education 
Yan Lu 
Accounting 
Suzanne Lucido 
Education 



237 



Melissa Luroe 
Journalism 
Hong-Loan Luu 
Elec. Engr. 
Quan Luu 
Philosophy 
Tania Lyles 
Sociology 
Michael Lynch 
Sociology 

Laurie Lynn 
Education 
Sharon Lyons 
Journalism 
Iris Ma 
Gen Business 
Ziad Maad 

Civil Engr 

Jeffrey Maass 

Psychology 

Dunstan Macauley 

Mech Eng 

Ann Madden 

Geography 

Tammy Magee 

Ccjs 

Gregory Magno 

Biology 

Christopher Mahaffey 

Phnb Bill Bs 

Elizabeth Mahaffey 

English 

Lynn Mahaffy 

English 

Tohannes Mahtemework 

Journalism 

Christy Maier 

Gvpt. 

Lori Main 

Gvpt. 

Tanisha Mallett 
Crim. Justice 
Paul Mandell 
Sociology 

James Mangold 

Gvpt. 

Conrad Manlapaz 

Crim. Justice 
Aimee Manouelian 
Sociology 




iiitMt 



238 




Khalid Mansoor 
Elec Engr. 
Chih-Hui Mao 
General Bus 
Nicole Marasco 
Speech / Eng 
Steven Marcus 
Economics 
David Marks 
Govt / Pol 

Todd Man- 
Economics 
Patricia Marsden 
Education 

Veronica Marshall 
Computer Science 
Shelby Martensen 
Psy/Engl 
Michael Marti 
Psychology 

Leslie Martin 

Ccjs 

Tania Martin 

Architecture 

Mary Martins 

Kinesiology 

Deborah Marx 

Speech Comm 

Aramaki Masayuki 

East-Asian 

Ann Masengarb 

Prod Mgt / Mrkt 

Scott Massengill 

Kinesiology 

Margretha Mata 

History 

Megan Mc Allister 

Accounting 

Scott Mc Cabe 
English 

Kaye Mc Cally 

Economics 

Elizabeth Mc Cormick 

Elem. Education 

Carleen Mc Elroy 

Finance 

Maureen Mc Eneaney 

Elem. Education 

Heather Mc Clone 
Finance 



239 



Gregory Mc Guire 

English 

Kevin Mc Vearry 

Speech Comm 

Anna Mae Mcarthy 

Microbiology 

Jonathan McDougald ^ 

Government 

Jennifer Meade 

English 

Gina Meawad 

Biology 

Yvonne Medley 

Journalism 

Curt Melanson 

Speech Comm 

Marc Meltzer 

Cmsc 

Assaf Mendelson 

Cmsc 

Claudia Mendoza 

Architecture 

Elizabeth Menendez 

English 

Lisa Menendez 

Hesp 

Theodore Merkle 

Finance 

Johanna Merryman 

Speech 

Azeb Araya Mersha 

Special Ed. 

Mindy Mesnick 

ejus 

Jennifer Meyer 

Fmst 

Amie Michels 

English 

Jennifer Mildworm 

Sociology 

Anthony Militello 

Fpe 

Angela Miller 

Elect. Engr. 

Drew Miller 

Arec 

Joseph Miller 

Math / Cs 

Kent Miller 

Accounting 



f^. ^m 




240 



ood & Bad Things About UMCP: PART II 




Laronda Miller 

Journalism 
William Miller 
Mech Engr. 
Waverly Milor 
Amer. Studies 
Caitlyn Mingola 
Crimal Justice 
Monica Missall 
Accounting 

Erica Mitchell 

Fmst 

Lajuan Mitchell 

English 

Diane Mizell 

Finance 

Darren Mock 

EE 

Jarah Moesch 

Rtvf 

Jennifer Monie 

Ibtl 

Lisa Montalvo 

Speech Comm 

Carolyn Morales 

English 

Delbeit Morales 

Psychology 

Shawn Moran 

Crim. Justice 



241 



Leann More land 

Hrm 

Christian Moreno 

Criminal Justice 

Joshua Morganstein 

Pre-Medicine 

Jill Morris 

Ccjs 

Christanty Movira 

Agribusiness 

Kenneth Moyer 
Marketing 
Michael Mui 
Criminology 
Cailin Mullins 
Kinesiology 
Kevin Mun 
Nucleal Eng 
Gregory Mundell 
Finance 

Joseph Mundie 
Economics 
Alebert Murad 
Marketing 

Christopher Murph\ 
Civil Eng. 
Erin Murphy 
Accounting 

Christopher Murray 
Govt / Pol 

Shanon Murray 

Journalism 

Andrew Mwando 

Arec 

Shana Myers 

Journalism 
Latha Nair Sri 
Accounting 

Chizuko Nakamura 
Journalism 

Jenn Nakaya 

Anthro 

Samuel Nalli 

Economics 
Daniel Natkin 
Trans / Gbus 
Michael Matkin 
English 
Brett Natt 
Ccjs 




242 




Robin Nearman 

Accounting 

Risa Needleman 

Early Childhood Eduation 

Daryl Nelson 

Educatin 

Janice Nelson 

Elem. Ed. 

Jessica Neufeld 

Elem Ed. 

Stephanie Neumann 

Sociology 
SuiNg 
Acct / Finance 
Yuen Ng 
Accounting 
Phong Nguyen 
Marketing 
Tri Nguyen 
Health Ed 

Loriann Niekrewicz 

Biology 

Marie Nkumbe Mbwenze 

Agricultural Economics ■ 

Kelechi Nnaji 

Microbiology 

Cheryl O'Brien 

Gen. Bus. / Hrm. 

Julie O'Donnell 

Gvpt / Span 

Donna Obermeier 

Education 
Maudlyn Ofori 
Ccjs / Crim 
Ekta Ohri 
Biology 
Eve Oliva 
Speech comm 
Jason Oliver 
Finance 

Mehitash Olson 

Sociology 

Aung Maw Oo 

Elect Engr. 

Yaron Oren-Pines 

Elec-engr. / Mathematics 

Ingrid Ortega 

Hesp 

Tammy Ortega 

Criminology 



243 





• Later! 


■ : 




• I had an excellent experience at UMCP 


■ 


^ 


• The dining hall food is great! 


\A 


< 

z 


• Your major is not your life and you can do anything 
you want with the support of God. 

• It's never too late to start over. 






• Maryland, I love you! 





Urn 


• Work hard, but not too hard. 




• Free at last! Free at last! 


> 




• Go Terps! 


^ 








ism 



Steven Orwig 

Mech. Eng. 
Eberechukwu Osuagwu 

Accounting 
Heather Otlin 
Early Child Ed. 
Matilde Ott 
Jour./Psyc. 
Tamatha Owen 
Sociology 

Thomas Owen 

Comp. Sci. 
Kristin Owsiany 
Marketing 
Dharma Pachner 
English 

Stacey Packman 
Elem. Education 
Michael Padar 
Ccjs 

Ian Paiewonsky 

American Studies 

Pascal Paieri 

Transportation 

Sonia Pandit 

Zoology 

Jason Papadopoulos 

Elec. Engr. 

Doris Parent 

Psych/Fmst 








a 




"'€,* 













244 




Patricia Parichy 

Kinesiology 

Dwight Paris 

Radio-Tv-Film 

John Park 

Biology 

Sun- Young Park 

Accounting 

Lawanda Parker 

Accounting 

Scott Parks 

Art Studio 

Cassandra Parra 

Psychology 
Omar Parvaiz 
Chem Eng 
Robert Patterson 
Biology 
Andrea Patti 
Speech Comm 

Brian Paul 

Microbiology 
Lisa Payne 
Journalism 
Monica Payne 
Journalism 
Rashika Peiris 
Finance / Marketing 

Joseph Pelletier 

Gvpt 

Yvette Pena 

English 
Alan Pentz 
Aerospace/Mech. 
Brian Penvell 
Criminal Justice 
Suzana Pereira 
Hrm/Acct. 
Miriam Perez 
Int'l Bus 

Michael Perkins 

Enme 

Cheryl Perlberg 

Education 

Samantha Perper 

Ccjs 

Joel Perrell Jr 

Ibfl / German 

Denise Perry 

Fmst 



245 



Trung Pham 

Elect Engr 

Diem Phan 

Mkt 

Michele Pieiro 

Hesp 

Kenneth Plasse 
Accounting 
Katheryn Pleak 
Art Studio 

Malcolm Poindexter 

English 

Jennifer Polinger 

Finance 

Stacey Pollack 

Psychology 

Sylvia Pollack 

Accounting 

Debora Pollock 
Behs 

Peter Polow 

Marketing 

Andrea Poole 

Biology / Zoology 

Dawn Poole 

Engineering 

Karl Poonai 

Anth 

Stefanie Popemack 

Math. Educ. 

Stephanie Port 

Acct 

Jason Pressman 

Finance 

Michael Preston 
Accounting 
Traci Price 
Comp Science 
Kimberly Proby 
English 

Carolynn Prout 

Special Ed 

Elyse Provencher 

Ccjs 

Melissa Provost 

Gvpt 

Karen Purtell 

Gbus 

Maria Puyot 

Accounting 




246 




Sarah Quaynor 
Dis / Finance 
Enrique Quiroga 
Int'l Business 
Cyrus Raafat 
Government 
Lenore Racanelli 
Finance 
Eric Radler 
Biochem 

Jodi Radzely 

Marketing 

Gauri Raheja 

Kinesiology 

Anusha Rajapatirana 

Psych / Ccjs 

Satesh Raju 

Physiology 

Mary Alice Ramsey 

Sec Educ / Soc Studies 

Alexandra Ranieri 

Psychology , 

Christine Razzano 

Gvpt. 

Kathalene Razzano 

Rtvf 

Elizabeth Rea 

Soc. Stud. Ed. 

Colleen Read 

Span./ Gvpt. 

La'Tonya Rease ^JSH| 

English 

Mariangela Redoschi 

Economics 
James Reeves 
Psys Sci 
Ryan Reilly 

History 

April Rice 

Sec Eng Edu 

Susan Richards 

Womens Stds 

Marcus Richardson 

L.A.R.C. 

Penina Riebman 

Sociology 

Daniel Rimerman 

Psychology 

Matt Ritter 

Nrmt. 




247 



Rebeca Rivera 
Anthropology 

Harlande Roberson 

Gvpt. 

Kelly Roberts 

Fmst. 

Amy Robertson 

Biol./Educ. 

Darlese Robinson 

Int'l Bus Maiketing 

Erin Robinson 
Early Child Ed. 
Kelly Robinson 
Accounting 
Tasha Robinson 
Sociology 

Rebecca Rodgers 
Accounting 
Edward Rodriguez 
Edit 



Keith L. Rogers 
Mechanical Engineering 
Audra Rohrback 
Accounting 
Angela Romano 
Sociology 
Patricia Romero 
Int'l Bus 

Melissa Rooney 
Accounting 

Thomas Rosado 
Accounting 
Sara Rosas 
Crim Just. 
Colin Rose 
Mathematics 
Melinda Rose 
English 
Amy Ross 
Elem. Educ. 

Keya Ross 

Economics 
William Ross IV 
Aasp 

Allison Rossi 
Mech. Engr. 
Kelli Rothman 
Gvpt. 

Chirstopher Rowe 
Biology 




248 




ACADEMIC 




EXPERIENCE 



• Participating in the first Enes 100 class when it changed to design. 

• The budget cuts two years ago when the University cut classes. 

• The EDSP courses in specialty area. 

• Being an undergraduate teaching assistant 

• Passing Calculus! 

• Getting academic honors after starting out with a 0.0 GPA 

• Interning through Psych 386 

• Studying abroad 

• Declaring my major. 
Indifferent 



Linda Rubin 

Gen. Bus. Adm. 

Michelle Rudd 

Animal Sci. 

Nicole Ruffin 

Ccjs 

Gladys Russell-Terrell 

Fmst 

Timothy Ryan 

Gvpt. 

Scott Sadler 

Gvpt. 

Nadeem Saeed 

Chemical Eng 

Caryn Sagal 

Journalism 

Brad Sahl 

Ccjs 

Kazuhiko Sakashita 

Biology 



249 



John Sakhleh 

Accounting 

Matthew Salb 

Gvpt. 

Ali Saleh 

Electrical Eng. 

Theresa Salo 

Hum Res Mbm 
Lorel Sanchez 
Finance 

John Sandy 

Sociology 

Alan Santos 

Fmst 

Elizabeth Sarate 

Accounting 

Soma Sau 
Elec. Engr. 
Kimberly Savino 
Ccjs 

Kenneth Savisaar 

Mech Engr. 

Michael Savoy 

Engineering 

Ashish Sawhney 

Business 

Belinda Sawyer 

Spanish 

Renee Scansaroli 

Fmst 

Michael Scheinberg 

Fmst 

Stacy Schenker 

Psychology 

Tara Scheufler 

Elem. Educ. 

Dawn Schiffman 

Biology-Cmbg 
Adriana Schirokauer 
Journalism 

Lauren Schlossenberg 
Chem. Engin. 
Brian Schmidt 
Education 
Kara Schmidt 
Comp Sci. 

Carrie Schneider 

Gvpt. 

Rachel Schneider 

English 




250 




Rewital Schneider 
Arch. Hist/ Jwst 
Andrea Schoeffler 
Economics 
Benjamin Scholes 
Sociology 
Steffi Schopick 
Crim. Just. 
Tracy Schrum 
Elementary Ed. 

Marc Schulder 

Ccjs / Psyc. 

Benjamin Schultz 

Economics 

Tanya Schultz 

Ccjs 

Allison Schupak 

Education 

Jonathan Schwartz 

Journalism 

Samantha Schwartz 

Hesp 

Tracie Schwartz 

Accounting 

Bonnie Scrom 

Kinesiology 

Patrick Seeliger 

Cmsc 

Marina Segel 

English 

Mindi Ann Seidel 

Ivsp 

Magda Sejas 

Soci / Span 
Scot Selbo 
Biology 
Lisa Selleh 
Gen Bus / Hmi 
Paul Sendik 
Marketing 

Tonya Serfass 

Ccjs 

Alice Sesay 

Chemical Eng 

Jennifer Setser 

Pre-Vetemary 

Fadia Shadid 

Sociology 

Ludmila Shadid 

English 



251 



Patrick Shannon 

Journalism 

Amy Shapiro 

Business 

Andrew Shapiro 

Fin./Dis. 

Josh Shapiro 

Gvpt. 

Kenneth Shapiro 

Speech Comm 

Bhawana Sharma 

Psychology 

Robina Shaw 

Ccjs 

Sandhya Sheity 

Accounting 

Diana Shellmer 

Psychology 

Lillian Shen 

Biology 





iflfc^fc 




Fi«: .m7»rHQ Final Wor ds . 



— Life's too short. ..enjoy it while it lasts! 

— Terps! Make me proud! 

— Such a little thing makes such a big difference. 

— r\\ be back. 

— Shamed to graduate from UMCP 

— See you next year. 

— The best is yet to come... 



Fin< 
Fin* 

Fm* 

Fin« 

Fin* 

B-4 H «r| *; — I am glad Fve had the experience but Lm glad it's over. 
JTJZ ^,-. ^ — Finally made it! 

rin< 
Fin; 



- Plant your own garden because no one will bring you flowers. 

- h truly was the best four years of my life! 

Final woras. ii«* * 



ds. 
ds. 
ds. 
ds. 
ds. 
ds. 

uS. 

ds. 
s. 



• e 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



252 




Rebecca Sher 
Journalism 
Maanic Shergill 
History 

Elizabeth Sherry 
Family Study 
James Sheu 
Physics 

Cassandra Shifflitt 
Biology 

Amy Shih 

Psychology 

Kevin Shipe 

Gvpt./Politics 

Khristine Shipley 

Psychology 

Mohammad Shirazee 

Math 

Michelle Sholtz 

Crim. Justice 

Janna Short 

Accounting 
Daniel Shriner 
Microbiology 
Karen Shub 
Elem. Educ. 
Pamela Silberman 
Recreation 

Jennifer Silverman 
Edci 

Wendy Silverman 

Elem. Educ. 

Susanna Simmons 

Apparel Design 

Amie Singer 

Fmst 

Bhavneet Singh 

Accounting 

Rohini Singh 

Sociology 

Ron Sklamm 
Marketing 
Robin Skrutski 
Psychology 
Barbra Slipakoff 
Accounting 
Kelly Small 
English 

Robert Smiles 
Zoology 



253 



Allison Smith 
English 

Antonia Smith 
Dis./Msst. 
Brian Smith 
Electrical Eng 
Cynthia Smith 
Journalism Pr. 
Michelle Smith 
Elem. Ed. 

Suzanne Smith 
History 

Virginia Smith 
Mech Engr 
Catherine Smyrski 
Anthropology 

Joseph Snell 

C rim. Jus. 
Karen Snyder 
Finance 

John Sobota 
Transpoctation 
Duikaruna Soepangkat 
Chem Engr. 
Michael Solloa, Jr. 
Art studio 

Jayme Sollod 

Health Ed. 
Laurie Solomon 

Journalism 

Robin M. Solomon 

Science Education 

Yong K. Song 

Accounting 

John Sorensen 

Rtvf 

Sharon Sowers 

Arec 

Reginald Spears 
Ccjs 

Elizabeth Spinney 

Sociology 

Cyril Spiro 

Biophysics 

Julie Spikloser 

Psychology 

Ajay Sreenath 

Biology 

Shara Staller 

Finance 




254 




Winona Stanback 

Music Pert 

Katina Stapleton 

Journalism 

Lisa Stark 

Accounting 

Michael Starsinic 

Mathematcis 

Steven Stefanowicz 

Sports Admin 

Dana Steinberg 

Journalism 

Geoffrey Steinberg 

Psychology 

Belli Steine 

Sociology 

Rochelle Steiner 

Biology 

Travis Steinmetz 

Engineering 

Amy Sternberg 

Ccjs 

Seth Sternberg 

Math / Physics 

Melissa Stemlieb 
Family Stud. 
Mary Stevens 
Art History 

April Stevenson 

Journalism 

Amy Elizabeth Stewart 

Elec Engineering 
Patrick Stoll 
Geog. 
Kerry Stone 

History 

Robyn Strauss 

Psyc./Fmst. 
Eric Struntz 
Finance 



(i 



Rosemarie Sturgill 

Art Studio 

Veronica Sturla 

Economics 

Joann Suchinsky 

Psychology 

Pauline Suley 

Gvpt. 

Tummasak Suphanochakul 

Architecture 



255 



Ilissa Suss 

Ccjs 

Jed Sutton 

Elec. Engr. 

Ross Tabachow 

Engineering 

Anthony Tacka 

Ccjs 

Ling- Yuan Tai 

Cmsc. 

Kashik Tajammul 
Comp. Sci. 
Margeret Talev 
Journalism 
Robin Tallant 
Lour/ App. Desn 
Lainie Tanner 
Journalism 
Jen Tao 

Economics 

Mark Tarchalski 
Cmsc 

Stacey Tate 
Speech Comm 
Jaime Tauler 
Music Perfoimance 
Lawrence Taxson 
Areo. Engr. 
Darrell Taylor 
Fmst 

Lamar Taylor 

Elec Engr. 
Manda Tayman 
Criminal Justice 
Luc Tchapnda 
Chem-Biochem. 
Jarrad Teller 
Kinesilogy 
Nirmala Tenali 
Gen Biology 

Pollyanna Tenuta 

Hearing / Spainsh 

Christine Terry 

Hesp 

Regina Theobald 

Ccjs 

Patty Thoedkiert 

Finance 

Dionne Thomas 

Gen. Bus. 




256 



Tell us about your best date at UMCR 



■ Valentine's Day Freshman year. Dinner with my new boyfriend. Very quiet and romantic. 
Going to a winning football game and the party after. 

Let's just say it's been a two year long date and still going. 
When my boyfriend proposed to me. 

■ At L'Enfant Metro station, a young boy sang a romantic solo in front of everyone. 
Comedy club in D.C. and beautiful walk at the Monument. 

■ When I was selected to attend a Christmas dinner with the University President. 



Tell us about your best date at UMCR 




Michael Thomas 

Kinesiology 

Terry Thomas 

Engineering 

Kimberley Thompson 

Biology 

Samuel Thompson 

Engineering 

Peter Thomberg 

Biology 

Andrea Thornton 

Sociology 

Jennfier Thornton 

Criminology 

Gabriel Thoumi 

Art/Arth. 

Stacey Thurman 

Goverment 

Darius Thweatt 

Urban Studies 

Traci Tillman 

Mktg./Logis 

Kelly Tilton 

Enfp 

Kelie Timberlake 

Mathematics 

Mark Timm 

Arec. 

Kamala Tiwarri 

Ccjs 



257 



Michelle Tobin 

An. Sc. 

Ilene Tolhurst 

Psychology 

Peggy Touradji 

Psychology 

Tara Townsell 

Sociology 

Michael Tracton 

Gvpt. 

Kim Trattner 

Hesp 

Kristina Travisano 

Gvpt. 

Nick Tressler 

Finance 

Jennifer Trevor 

Rtvf/ English 
Jennifer Trickett 
Early Child Ed. 

Eileen Trop 

Fmst 

Robin Truiett 

Kinesiglogy 

Alisa Tryson 

Advertising 

Ming Ju Tsai 

Accounting 

Kiran Tschand 

Mkt./Mgmt. 

Xina Tsui 

Int'l Bus Mkt 

Tai-Chia Tuan 

Enme 

Raymond Tucker 

Business 

Victoria Tung 

Int'l Bus 

Brian Uffer 

Dis/Mis 

Simone Vale 

Anthropology / French 

Victor Valentine 

Government 

Ann Vallandingham 

Journalism 

James Valle 

Urban Studie 

Traci Van Buren 

English 




258 




Lori Van Lonkhuyzen 

Journalism 

Ricaele Vanbruggen 

Cmbg 

Jean-Francis Varre 

Sociology 

Felino Vaughn 
Accounting 
Heidi Vexler 
Recreation 

Jacqueline Viess 

Psych. 

William Voshell 

History 

Paul Waclawsky 

Accounting 

Jennifer Wagner 

Business 

Angela Wakefield 

Knes. Sci. 

Gregory Waks 
Govt./Pol. 
Brian Waldman 
Marketing 
Linda Walsh 
Accounting 
Brian Walton 
Criminology 
Elsie Wang 
Accounting 

Ming-Isung Wang 
Finance 

Sheau-Yun Wang 
Accounting 
Shirley Wang 
Mech. Engineering 
Adam Ward 
Enme 

Jennifer Ward 
Biology 

Suzanne Ward 

Spanish 

Stacy Wassemian 

Food Science 

Andrea Watson 

Finance 

Anthony Watson 

Accounting 

Hope Waxman 

Psychology 



259 




• Freedom is wearing the noose loosely. 

• Carpe Diem 

• Can't wait to graduate! 
•HOPE 

• 1 wish the Gospel Choir much success. 

• Thank God it's over! 

• Out of the eater, something to eat; 
Out of the strong, something sweet. 

• Thanks! 

• They never warned me about this place. 




Audra Weber 
Elem. Educ. 
Brian Wechter 
Kinesiology 
Jennifer Weiland 
Chemistry 
Bryan Weiner 
Economics 
Melissa Weinert 
Family Studies 

Rodger Weinfeld 

Speech Comm. 

Maria Weinstein 

Psychology 

Lewis Weinzweig 

Biology 

Adam Weisblatt 

Daniel Weiss 

Marketing 

Geoif Weiss 

Cmsc 

Heide Weiss 

Psych / Spanish 

Michael Welch 

Cmbg 

Steven Weltzman 

English 

Donna Wessel 

History 









%: -- »- 








260 




Alexandra Westover 
Mathematics 
Greg Westphal 
Mech. Enginer 
Anthony White 
Chem. Engr. 
Gregory White 
Engineering 
Jason White 
Journalism 

Pamela White 

Special Ed 

Albert Whitlock 

Dis 

Roshant Wickramatillake 

Health Ed. 

Parrish Wiggins 

Family Studies 

Thomas Wigginton 

Comp Science 

Lori Wilen 
Elem. Education 
Daniel Wilkinson 
Comp Science 
Wani Wilkinson 
Biology 

Earon Williams 
Finance / Agribusiness 
Matthew Williems 
Civil Engr. 

Yulanda Williamson 

Biology 

James Willis 

Elec Engr 

Matthew Wills 

Psychology 

Christopher Wilson 

Jour./Gvpt. 

Craig Wilson 

Mech. Engr. 

Keshia Wilson 
Chem. Engineering 
Keshia Wilson 
Engli.sh 
Sara Wolff 
Ag. Res. Econ. 
Partricia Womack 
Psychology 
Sandra Wimberly 
Beh. Soc. Sci. 



261 



Arilma Wong 

Biology 

Tammy Wong 

Finance/Marketing 

Erick Wood 

Ccjs 

Deborah Woodend 

Fmst 

Kevin Woodeshick 

Computer 

Jenni Woodward-Greene 

Ansc 

James Womick 
M.E. Engineering 
Heather Wright 
Art History 
Michael Wright 
Finance 

Barbara Wyckoff 
Ccjs 

Jennifer Xu 
Math 

Jiewei Xu 
Accounting 
Gregoi7 Yablonski 
Crim. Just. 
Su H. Yae 
Business 
Jennifer Yaen 
Fin / Marketing 

Roberta Yaklich 

Microbiology 

Helene Yan 

Econ. 

Gregory Yancey 

Gvpt. 

Deborah Yanoff 

Art Education 

Tina Yau 

Food Science 

Nklosi Yearwood 

Ivsp 

Jeffrey Yee 

Psychology 

Meng-Wan Yeh 

Geology 

Erkan Yetiskul 

Cmsc 

Gezahegn Yihna 

Accountins 




262 



r% e> 




Chou I Young 

Accounting 

Michelle Youngblood 

Accounting 
Harry Yu 
Reliabilty Engineering 

Jean Yu 

Econ. 

Jim Chi-Wen Yu 

Engineering 

Karen Zachary 

English 

Sherry Zambrano 

Apparel Dsn 

Adam Zaranski 

Business 

Kelly Zecker 

Hesp 

Staci Zemechman 

Speech Comm. 

Joanne Zemil 

English Ed. 

Hua Zhang 

Cs./Econ. 

Laurie Zimmerman 

Ag. Economics 

Lisa Zitomer 

Journalism 

Rahel Zubairi 

Physiology 

Michael Zuraf 
Geography 




263 





ORGANIZATIONS 




Getting Exposed 

Edited by Tracy Isaac 

Far from home, college students learned to adjust to cramped 
living quarters, cafeteria food, and living with complete and total 
strangers. Carl Versify and Ted Ampus were two new roommates 
learning to cope with each other but sometimes they hit a sag. 

Looking soulfully to his roommate from his bed, Carl moaned, 
"Ted, I am bored! Can we do something together today?" Closing 
his Psych book, Ted exclaimed, "Hell No!" Feeling dejected, Carl 
whimpered softly to himself. "Look! Pouting won't help you this 
time, Carl," barked Ted. "First of all, you and I do not like the same 
things. I'm caviar and you are mayo on white. And...." 

"Oh! There is an 'and', huh?!" bellowed Carl as he tried to hold 
back the rushing tears. "Yes!" explained Ted sternly. "Second of 
all, I don't like you." Heartbroken, Carl buried his tear-stained face 
into his pillow. Rolling his eyes, Ted continued to talk," But Carl, 
I do care enough to tell you to... get out!" 

"What!" screeched Carl, as he leaped from his bed. Approach- 
ing Ted, "You have some nerve! This room is as much as mine as 
it's yours! Where do you get off tell me, Mr. Caviar, to get out?! 
Because I'll tell you somethin', it's not going to happen!" 

Shaking his head in disbelief at Carl's new found ferocity, Ted 
clarified his statement. "Sit down, Samson! When I said 'get out', 
I meant you should go and expose yourself to campus life. Join an 
organization or two, rush a fraternity, do something! College is 
what you make and take out of it, Carl. I can't do that for you. 

Go experience, enjoy, get away from me! Do something! But 

please leave," begged Ted. 

"Do you really think, I can find an organization suitable for me?" 
asked a perplexed Carl. "Yes, I do!" cheered Ted. With that final 
word of encouragement, Carl raced out of 7006 Ellicott Hall, 
searching for activities and organizations to fill the void within him. 
"Thank goodness, he's gone! Now, I can get some work done," 
sighed Ted as he closed the door. 




Ifl 



DELTA SIGMA PI 




Photo by Eric Lasky 

Delta Sigma Pi, An International Professional Business Fraternity 

At the University of Maryland, the Gamma Sigma Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi was recognized as a preeminent 
student organization in the college of Business and Management. Since it's founding over 44 years ago, the chapter 
has earned a reputation throughout the campus and in the surrounding community not only for out its consistent 
contribution to the community but for its tradition of transforming students into confident, experienced leaders. 



266 



CHARLES R. DREW 



PRE-MED SOCIETY 




PhotoBy Tyrone Brooks 



This past year, the Charles R. Drew Pre- 
Med Society, in its dedication to help minor- 
ity students pursue their goals of becoming 
physicians, nurses, dentists, or any other 
position within the health profession, accom- 
plished many tasks. 

During the Spring of 1994, many of the 
students attended a Medical School Confer- 
ence in Hampton, Virginia where they were 
able to speak with many medical school 
representatives and medical students. 
Throughout each semester, the society mem- 
bers attended trips to area medical schools, 
invited medical school representatives to talk 
to the students, and provided an abundance 
of information on research programs, intern- 
ships, and summer medical school programs. 
"Funded in part by your student activities 
fee." 



MARYLAND MEDL\, INC. 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 

Members of tiie Maryland Media Board of Directors (Back row from left) - Michal Fribush, 
Treasurer; Steve Lampfiier, Member-at-Large; Kera Ritter, Eclipse Editor; Dana Steinberg, 
Mitzpeh Editer; Patricia Logue. Diamondback Editor; Christopher Callahan, Faculty 
Member; (Front row) - Maggie Levy, Secretary; Rebecca Ashkenazy, Student-at-Large; Bey- 
Ling Sha, Student-at-Large; Robin Solomon, Terrapin Editor 



Maryland Media marked its twenty- 
third year as the nonprofit organiza- 
tion that owned and operated the 
Diamondback, Terrapin, Mitzpeh 
and Eclipse publications. These pub- 
lications were overseen by a Board of 
Directors that strove to provide a 
professional environment for students 
who were interested in the print me- 
dia. The objective of the board was 
not to censor or influence content of 
a publication, but to provide guidance 
and advice when needed to the edi- 
tors of these publications. 

Editors of all the publications had 
to be full-time students. They had 
complete control and maintained full 
responsibility for the publications they 
produced, and they also served on 
the Board of Directors. 



267 



VISITOR CENTER 




Photo by Joanne Saidman 

Ever since the Visitor Center opened in the Diary Salesroom on September 4, 1990, our Welcomers have 
greeted and helped about 14,000 campus visitors each year. They demonstrated pride in their University, 
vast knowledge and enthusiasm of their campus. The Welcomers usually served as the first campus 
representative, and many times the only one, to the visitors. While 43% of our visitors were prospective 
students and their families, others were seeking directions to all corners of our campus. Still, a significant 
number asked for directions to the sights in Washington, Baltimore and the mid-Atlantic region. No matter 
their destination, each visitor was met with a smile and a friendly greeting and then provided with a map or 
directions, along with a souvenir post card, depicting an aerial view of our campus near the M-circle. The 
Welcomers were coordinated by Campus visitor Advocate Nick Kovalakides, who directed Visitors from his 
office in Memorial Chapel. 




Founded 10 years ago, Mitzpeh was the 
Campus Monthly Jewish student newspa- 
per. Published by Maryland Media, Inc., 
the Mitzpeh covered a wide range of topics 
of interest to the Jewish campus commu- 
nity, whether cultural, religious, secular, 
national, international, or campus based 
news. Mitzpeh 's staff of about 15, aimed 
to represent the voices of the more than 
6,000 Jewish students, faculty, and staff at 
the University of Maryland. 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



Back row - Naomi Greengrass (Copy Editor), Dana Steinberg (Editor-in-Chief), Laurie 
Solomon (Managing Editor), Andrea Brahms, and Stacey Herbstman Front row - Joel 
Brodie (Cartoonist), Mil<e Scheinberg, Alex Knott (Copy Editor), and Caryn Sagal 
Camera Shy - Karen Sedley, Alisa Tryson, Mike Hetrick, Christie Huston, Stacy 
Leibowitz, and Ezra Olman 



268 




PRODUCTIONS 



SEE Productions was the undergraduate student-run program- 
ming board at the University of Maryland- College Park. "See", 
1 as it was referred to, was responsible for coordinating major 
concerts, lectures, comedy performances, and cultural events 
bought to the university. See Productions was comprised of two 
advisors, a president, a thirteen member voting directors board, 
and a membership of over 100 UMCP students. 

SEE Productions was an arm of the Student Government 
Association, and had an internal SEE Productions Review Board 
to help fund and coordinate other student organizations events. 
For further information about SEE Productions and upcoming 
events, please call (301) 314-8338. 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



MARY McLEOD BETHUNE 

SOCIETY 






ii**?.. 



4f* 




The Mary McLeod Bethune Society was a rela- 
tively new organization, started in 1989, under the 
name of T.I.M.E. With a name change in 1991 to 
the Mary Mcleod Bethune society, the organization 
started on a new path. This past year, the society 
had many successful projects, including various 
tutoring programs and a college day program 
which introduced local minority high school stu- 
dents to the University of Maryland campus. In 
addition to community projects, Mary Mcleod 
Bethune also participated in campus based pro- 
grams sponsored for the enrichment of Maryland 
students. 



Photo By Tyrone Brooks 

Pictured - Stacey Brooks (Vice President), Adina Glover (Secretary) and 
Richelle Todd (President) 



269 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 




Photo by Joanne Saidman 



Alpha Phi Omega was the co-ed national community service fraternity. Our projects this 
semester included the CAReing Project, a halloween dance at a school for disabled 
children, Food Bank, Soup Kitchen, the AIDSWalk '94, and the Hunger and Homelessness 
Awareness Sleep-Out. 

We rush every semester. For more information, call 314-VIPl. 

AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION 



Amateur radio evolved significantly in 
recent years due to the rising popularity of 
computers, and our club evolved along with 
it. The University of Maryland Amateur 
Radio Association consisted of people inter- 
ested in exploring and enjoying new meth- 
ods of radio communication. We also pro- 
vided emergency and public service com- 
munications, advanced the radio art, and 
improved communication and technical 
skills. To that end, we supported a radio-to- 
telephone repeater, a packet-radio com- 
puter, and equipment for traditional world- 
wide Morse code and voice contacts. 

No knowledge of Morse code was neces- 
sary to exam for a ham license. All we asked 
for was an interest in talking with people via 
ham radio . Stop by 3 1 1 1 -B South Campus 
Dining Hall and check out our "shack"! 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



Left to right - Ron Denton, Michael Willberger N2LXH, Christina Kiri< N3RFI, 
Dan Meyer, Benjamin Schultz KE30M, Andy Guenther N3NRP, Jason Rust 
N3N02, and Tom Edwards N3HAV 



270 



PHI ETA SIGMA 




Phi Eta Sigma was a national honor society which recognized outstanding achievement and a dedication to 
community service. Our 1994-1995 season began with a recycling project and the giving of food to the 
homeless. These events were followed up with a successful initiation and reception ceremony of 166 new 
members, in which Dr. James Airozo, University of Maryland's Honors Program Assistant Director, our 
keynote speaker addressed the topic of education and service. Other events this fall consisted of providing a 
Sexual Harassment Workshop, helping the elderly, and volunteering at St. Ann's Infant and Maternity Home. 
An extensive Chesapeake Bay Clean-Up Campaign kicked-off the 1995 school year. Phi Eta Sigma's central 
emphasis was striving to make our community and world a better place in which to live. 



HI I l-l-id 




Top center - New Fail Initiates of 1994 and Phi Eta Sigma officers, in the front row - Gregory Koeser (Treasurer), Melanie Stiback 
(President), Eve Klindera (Secretary), and Suzana Pereira (Senior Advisor). Bottom left - Candles acknowledging the Phi Eta Sigma concept 
that "Knowledge is Key" are sacredly lit during the initiation ceremony. Bottom center - Melanie Stiback poses with her boyfriend Brandon 
Poole during a festive Phi Eta Sigma reception. Bottom right - Phi Eta Sigma members enjoy a rousing game of volleyball on McKeldin 
Mall. 



271 



"" DMMONDBACK 




Photo by Nick Wass 



Back row - Jonathan Szczepanski, Dave lasmore, Jenan Christmen, Rob Runett, Akweli Parker, Fritz Hahn, Jen Hester, and Dave Murray 
Middle row - Chris Hoffman, Patty Logue, BJ Sanford, Naveen Choudhuiy, Joetla Sack,and Tom Madigan Front Row - Nick Wass, Tracey 
Logsdon, Scott Silverstein, and Janella Erlichmann 



272 



DIAMONDBACK ADVERTISING 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 

Front row - Kate Zielke, Akiba Seedi, and Kristen Wygant Middle row - Josh Lavine, Chris Alexander, Tami Lansizera, 
Micheal Rosenblatt, Carla Castelo, and Christina Somerville Back row - Chiquita Barnes, Dori Schwartz, Cary Krefetz, 
and Chris Stelzig 



The Diamondback Advertising Staff was responsible for selling 
advertising space in the Diamondback to local merchants and campus 
groups who were interested in reaching a large number of people. 

The Staff was also responsible for selling the advertisements for the 
special supplements that often accompanied the Diamondback. 



273 



OFFICE OF VICE PRESIDENT FOR 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Division of Student Affairs held the responsibility for the coordination and direction of a variety of students 
development programs. The Vice President's office served as an advocate for student issues and concerns within the 
administration of the campus and the university. The Vice President, in conjunction with the departments in the 
division, promoted the individual development of all students, activities, campus- wide events and the addressing of 
the environmental issues that affected campus life. 



Top left-Dr. William L. Thomas. Jr. , Vice President for Student Affairs. Top center- 
Dr. Drury Bagwell, Assistant Vice President. Top right-Dr. Richard Stimpson, 
Assistant Vice President. Bottom left-Dr. Sharon Fries-Britt, Assistant to the Vice- 
President. Bottom center-Dr. Janet Schmidt, Assistant to the Vice-President. 
Bottom right-Dr. Gretchen Vanderveer, Assistant to the Vice-President. Opposite 
page{Top left): The Campus Recreational Staff. Top row(left): J. Gilchrist, Director. 
N.Raber, M.Guzman, M.Waller, J.Alesandrini, B.Aiken, J.Twomey. Bottom row; 
J.Wenhold, D.Flumaum, S.Flynn, M.Appel, C.Pickens. Not Pictured: J.Kostoff, 
J.Mandel. Top center: Students enjoy a good workout in the Annapolis Fitness 
Center. Top right: Flag football in one of the many intramural sports offered by 
Campus Recreation Services. The Counseling Center Staff. 




274 



CAMPUS RECREATION SERVICES 

Director: Mr, Jay Gilchrist 

The Campus Recreation Service Department provided a variety of recreational activities to help members of the 
campus community stay fit and healthy throughout the year. Fulfilling its mission to help individuals develop lifelong 
recreational activity skills, CRS offered a FitnessAVellness Program of aerobics activities; an Intramural Program with 
year-round team and individual sports; an Open Recreation Program that included fitness weight rooms, and a variety 
of pool and court facilities; and a student-run Sport Club to help students develop social and leadership skills enjoying 
their favorite sport. 




THE COUNSELING CENTER 

''Seeking Help Is A Sign Of Strength'' 

Director: Dr. Vivian Boyd 




The Counseling Center provided comprehen- 
sive integrated service to meet the mental 
health and development needs of the students. 
The Center is considered one of the premiere 
counseling centers in the nation, based on its 
quality service, research on student develop- 
ment issues, national standing based on its 
members assuming leadership role in scholar- 
ship and national professional associations, 
and the role in teaching and advancing gradu- 
ate student training. More than 25% of each 
class of graduates from the University have 
used the campus counseling Center. Counsel- 
ing services were free for students. Files were 
confidential and were not part of the university's 
educational records. The Center consisted of 
the following five divisions: Counseling Dis- 
ability Support; Learning Assistance; Testing, 
Research and Data Processing, and Parent 
Consultation and Child Evaluation Services. 



275 



RESIDENT LIFE 

Director: Dn Patricia Mielke 



The Department of Resident Life was responsible for management 
of the residence halls as well as for cultural, educational, recre- 
ational and social programming activities in the residence halls. 

More than 7200 undergraduates lived in residence halls this year. 
Settings available in residence halls included: high rise traditional 
residence halls on the south side of campus and kitchen-less suites 
and apartments (for juniors and seniors). 

Special interest housing included the Language House, Interna- 
tional House, Honors House, Smoke Free- Alcohol Free Housing 
and College Park Scholars. 



This page - Top - Dr. Patrica Mielke. Bottom - Residential Facilities staff. 
Opposite page - Top left - Dr. Margaret Bridwell, Director of the UHC. Top 
right - The Health Center staff, ready to serve. Bottom top left - Ms. Patricia 
Higgins, Acting Director. Bottom top right - A chef prepares a dining hall feast. 
Bottom left - Gormet omlettes for breakfast at the Ellicott Dining Hall. Bottom 
right - Students enjoy the vast selection choice at the South Campus Dining 
Hall. 




RESIDENTIAL E\CILITIES 

Director: Mr Jon Doolei; 

''Use wisel\; what you've learned here to build a better tomorrow for all 
people. With best wishes for success and good fortune. " 




From the Staff of Residential Facilities 



276 



UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER 

Director: Dr Margaret Bridwell 




The University Health Center (UHC) was committed to providing high 
quality health care. They were an ambulatory care center offering 
professionalmedical care to treat injuries, and health education pro- 
grams to help you maintain and improve your health. The UHC 
provided the following confidential services: dental, travel, allergy 
mental health clinics and men's and women's clinics, sports medicine, 
phyical therapy, nutrition education, social services, substance abuse 
treatment, anonymous HIV/AIDS testing, sexual assault hotline and a 
pharmacy. All registered students were eligible for care. 




DINING SERVICES 

Acting Director: Ms. Patricia Higgins 




Dining Services served over 4.5 mil- 
lion meals from 36 diverse locations all 
across campus. Menu selections 
ranged from a cup of coffee at one of 
the three campus convenience stores 
to and an eight course catered banquet 
served on fine china. Students had the 
option of dining over 100 times and 
never eating the 
same thing twice. In 
the resident dining 
rooms this year, stu- 
dents ate over 
65,000 pounds of 
roast beef, 500,000 
hamburgers, 
120,000 pieces of 
chicken, 330,000 
donuts, and over 1 
million cookies. 



277 



OREINTATION OFFICE 

Director: Dr Gerry Strumpf 

The Orientation Office was responsible for easing the 
transition for new students into our community at Mary- 
land. The Orientation Advisors and PR staff were trained 
students who provided personal experience and sugges- 
tions to incoming students. Through Orientation, students 
met other incoming students, registered for classes and 
were introduced to services and resources on campus. The 
Orientation Office served all undergraduates new to cam- 
pus. The Locator Service, offered the first two days of 
class, and the one credit orientation course EDCP 108-O 
were coordinated by our office. 

Top right-Dr. Gerry Strumpf.Director of Orientation. Bottom right-Mr. David 
Allen, Director of DCP. Center left-Parking spaces' lines are redrawn. Center 
righit-The Office of Campus Parking. Opposite page: Top left-Dr. Barbara 
Jacoby, Director of Commuter Affairs and Community Service Programs, 
displays a finger puppet made during Commuter Appreciation Day. Top 
center-The Office of Commuter Affairs welcomes new and returning students 
to their office in Rm. 1 195 Stamp Student Union. Top center-Mark Levine. 
OCA's Coordinator of Programing, welcomes over 300 commuters with 
doughouts and a smile every Wednesday at "Good Morning. Communters!". 
Center right-For Commuter Appreciation Day, Students made 85 finger 
puppets which were donated to John Hopkins Children's Center. The puppets 
were giving to chid=ldren after they had blood drawn. 

CAMPUS PARKING 

Director: Mr David Allen 

The Department of Campus Parking (DCP) was the place to go when students, 
faculty, staff and visitors want to park their vehicles on campus. This department 
processed more than 56,000 permits in order to effectively manage the parking 
areas on campus. Upholding the UMCP Parking Rules and Regulations through 
education, engineering and enforcement was another primary function of the DCP. 
The staff developed new programs and promoted current policies to help the campus 
community. Parking information was provided to students through a campus map, 
brochures, fliers, articles and advertisements in the campus newspaper and partici- 
pation in campus activities. A new community service program was implemented 
this year. DCP introduced the Motor Assistance Vehicle (MAV) Program which 
assisted the campus community who experience minor vehicle mechanical failures. 
Some of the services provided were jump started, air inflation, and lockouts. 







278 



OFFICE OF COMMUTER AFFAIRS 

Director: Dr Barbara Jacobi; 



It all began in 1972 with only a shoebox full of cards listing 
housing and two vans, brought second hand by the SGA to 
provide security on campus. In 1994-95, the shoebox has 
been transformed into a computerized off-campus housing 
referral service. The two vans grew into the 40-bus Shuttle 
UM system. The familiar red-and-white buses provided 
reliable service to students on nine commuter routes, three 
evening security routes, and Call-A-Ride. In addition, OCA 
provided students with information on transportation alterna- 



tives and other commuter issues. Programs like, 
"Good Morning, Commuters!" and S.H.O.W. (Stu- 
dents Helping, Orienting and Welcoming), assisted 
students in getting more involved in the life of the 
campus. 





OFFICE OF JUDICIAL PROGRAMS 

Director: Dr Gari; Pavela 



The primary function of the Office of Judicial Pro- 
grams was to resolve disciplinary referrals filed against 
students efficiently and equitably. The office staff 
determined disciplinary charges and interviewed and 
advised all parties involved in disciplinary proceed- 
ings. The most serious cases were resolved by 
student judiciary boards which were comprised of 
four groups: the Central Judicial, the Student Honor 
Council, Community Advocates, and Student Park- 
ing Appeals. Although each group differed slightly in 
their perspective, they worked to educate other 
students about their rights and responsibilities as 
members of the campus community. 

The Judicial Programs staff trained and advised 
the student judiciary, reviewed all decisions of the 

judicial boards, maintained student disciplinary records maintain the educational mission of the University of Mary- 
and conducted research and analysis regarding stu- land, by designing policies, conducting programs, and offering 
dent conduct. Through honesty, respect and sensi- instruction that contributed to the intellectual and moral devel- 
tivity, the Office of Judicial Programs serves to opment of the entire student body. 




279 



STAMP STUDENT UNION AND CAMPUS PROGRAMS 
AND UNIVERSITY BOOK CENTER 

Director: Dr James Osteen 

The Adele H. Stamp Student Union served as the center of 
campus life for the entire University community. Over its 
40-year history, the Union has grown from a small recre- 
ational activity for the campus. This year, the Union 
provided a diverse range of programs and services used by 
over 19,000 people daily. Such programs varied from 
comedy in the Nite Life to guided weekend trips, and 
campus-wide social events, such as 
the annual All-Nighter. The Union 
housed the University Book Cen- 
ter and Campus Programs as well 
as the Hoff Theater, the Art Cen- 
ter, the Recreation Center, and 
shops and restaurants; all of which 
provided a welcome relief from 
academic pressures. Campus Pro- 
grams featured services for stu- 
dent organization, involvement and 
leadership development opportu- 
nities, and advising for campus 
fraternities and sororities. The 
Union was also a source of educa- 
tion, with students gaining work 
experience and learning lifetime 
leadership skills through 
employment and service in the 
Union's many programming com- 
mittees and organizations. 

CAMPUS GUEST SERVICES 





Director: Mr Patrick Perfetto 



Campus Guest Services was the University's host to the 
thousands of guests and visitors who came to the Univer- 
sity this year. We greeted about 12,000 visitors at the 
Visitor Center, located in the "The Diary" on Route 1. 
Forty percent of our visitors sought admissions informa- 
tion. The Visitor staff assured that these potential future 
students had a good first impression of the University. We 
provided lodging, meals, meeting space and a variety of 
other services to about 30,000 guests who attended 
summer conferences, competitions, workshops and camps. 
About half these guest were teens who may someday think 
of their summer experience at Maryland in deciding where 
to attend college. Finally, Campus Guest Services coordi- 
nated the Memorial Chapel and the hundreds of wedding 
that occurred there this year. Many of our newlyweds were 
recent graduates. 




280 



OMICRON DETLA KAPPA 




Leader of the Year 1994 

Marc W. Solomon 

The Omicron Delta Kappa Leader of the Year is one of 
the top awards on the campus. Maryland's Leader of the 
Year then competes in the national competition. Our 
1993-94 Leader of the Year, Marc W. Solomon, was 
selected from among over 2,000,000 undergraduate lead- 
ers of 238 campuses as the ODK National Leader of the 
Year! The University of Maryland has never been so 
honored in over 67 years. 




Top Ten Freshmen of 1994 



1994-95 ODK Officers (Front Row): Katie Razzano, Doug Mintiz, 
Penina Riebman. Back: Donna Obermeier, Cfiad Cos, Craig 
Vogel, David Marks, Paul Mandell 



Ellen L. Besner 
Hillary D.Cherry 
Michael W.Coulter 
Deborah S.Drucker 
Reva Gupta 



Kevin M. Lawrence 
Chittaranjan Mallik 
Melissa Rowell 
Jande Anderson 
Rebecca Ashkenazy 



Sophomore Leader of the Year 1994 

Dana A. Hedgpeth 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 1994 MEMBERSHIP 



MICHEAL AHR 
MELISSA DERWART 
SHARON AMMEN 
REBECCA DUBIN 
ROZ ANDERSON 
EUZABETH ELDER 
THOMAS ANTISDEL 
AILEEN EVANGELISTA 
HUMPHERY ATIEMO 
LISA FARELY 
PATRICIA BAKUNAS 
ADAM FIENBERG 
ALLEN BANEGURA 
CHRISTINE FELLOWS 
KELLY BASSETT 
ZIEDAH FERGUSON 
LESLIE BELLOSO 
KIMBEFILV FLAGG 
ERIKA BENNS 
HEATHER FREDERICK 
MICHAEL BERMAN 
JAIRO FUERTES 
CHRISTOPHER BOYER 
WOL HEE GIBB 
NICOLE BRAENDUN 
CAREN BROMBERG 



RANDI GOLDBLATT 
JUDY GOLDMAN 
CHRISTINE BROWN 
SUPRFVA GOYAL 
ERIK BUCY 
LAURA GREEN 
JACQUELINE CAROFF 
ROBYN GREENBURG 
TINA CERVASIO 
D. LEE GROOMS 
TRACEY COHN 
JACQUELINE HARF 
JENNIFER COLLINS 
DANA HEDGPETH 
CFIAD COS 
THOMAS HENRY 
MARSHA CRISCIO 
MAISHA HERRON 
REBECCA CURRANO 
MICHEAL HESS 
GALEET DARDASHTI 
KERRI HOWARD 
COREY DAVIS 
ADESH JAIN 
JENEBA JALLLOH 
GREG JOHNSON 



DANA JOHNSON 
ATHYL JONES 
WILLIAM KUHNS 
PAULA LAVAORGNA 
RYAN LAMPEL 
MARCY LEVY 
DINA LEYTUSH 
CHANG U 
MICHEAL UPITZ 
WILLIAM LIU 
TRACEY LOGSDON 
MEREDITH LOWMAN 
PAUL MANDELL 
NICOLE MARASCO 
DAVID MARKS 
KEITH MARLER 
HEATHER MARLER 
JOSHUA MELTZER 
CAROLINE MERCADO 
BRIAN MICHALOWSKI 
LAURA MILANl 
JENNIFER MILLER 
KIMBEFtLY MINK 
DOUGLAS MINTZ 
SUE MONTENEGRO 
BRIAN MONTGOMERY 



SHANON MUFiRAY 
MICHEAL OHARA 
DONNA OBERMEIER 
JASON PALMER 
PATERICLA PARICHY 
KARL PARK, JR. 
ANDREA PATTI 
KATHEFUNE PAWELKO 
MONICA PAYNE 
MARGARET PENG 
LOAN PHAN 
ROBERT PERRY 
KENNETHH PLASSE 
MICHELLE POWERS 
BRINDA PRASAD 
KATFL\LENE RAZZANO 
CHRISTIE FIAZZANO 
COLLEEN READ 
LATONYA REASE 
JERRY RICFIARDSON 
PENINA RIEBMAN 
KEFIA RITTER 
HEITH RODMAN 
USA ROSENHAFT 
ROBERT RUNETT 
LAWRENCE RUST 



CAYN SAGAL 
SABRINA SALAM 
DONNA SCHEUNGRAB 
RACHEL SCHNEIDER 
J1LLL\N SCHONFLED 
SCOTT SCFIWARTZ 
CFIARLES SCOTT 
MICHAEL SEELMAN 
MARK SHANER 
TEREAS SHIRLEN 
NIRNAY SFHNHA 
STEPHEN SMITH 
LAURIE SOLOMON 
USA SOLOMON 
JAY SPAGNOLA 
KATINA STAPLETON 
MELANIE STfflICK 
ROLF STOTTMANN 
MARGARET THOMAS 
JAY THOMAS. JR. 
MICHAEL TRACTON 
CRAIG VOGEL 
SCOTT WEBSTER 
ELAINE WEISS 
MONICA WHFTEN 
HELENE YAN 



281 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 

Back row - Telly Lovelace. Auril Speaks, Christopher Moline, Carlo Paul, and Derrick Jones Front row - Kera Ritter (Editor- 
in-Chief), Esta Rigakos. and Jeneba Jalloh 

ECLIPSE, the Black student news magazine of the University of Maryland, aimed to uplift, 
inform, and service the African American community. We supported all that was positive and 
denounced all that impeded the progress of the Black community. 



282 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 




Through a lot of hard work and innova- 
tion, the Student Government Association 
accomplished a great deal during the year. 
By expanding upon successful campus pro- 
grams like United Cultures, and introducing 
new ones, such as the Student Course Evalu- 
ation, this year's executive and legislative 
board achieved a new focus. The S.G.A. 
continued to maintain its integrity by repre- 
senting the interests of the students at the 
University of Maryland. 

Congratulations to the graduating Class of 
1995. 



Photo by Paul Vieira 

Standing - Mitcli Berlin(Vice President of Student Groups), RJ Texera(Vice Presi- 
dent of Campus Affairs), Jason Palmer (Vice President of Human Relations), and 
Lone Nguyen(Vice President of Adminstrative Affairs) Sitting - Jackee Harf(Vice 
President of Finance), Kerry Sliai-iam(President), and Tamara Francois(Vice 
President of Public Relations 



KOREN STUDENT TENNIS 
ASSOCIATION 

The Korean Student Tennis Association of the 
University of Maryland (KOSTAM) registered as a 
formal student organization at UMCP in 1993. 
KOSTAM promoted the bodily and mental en- 
hancement of its members in a friendly atmo- 
sphere and gave them the opportunity to commu- 
nicate academic information and participate in 
social activities. The members of KOSTAM regu- 
larly got together to play and enjoy tennis once a 
week. Other regular activities of KOSTAM in- 
cluded its annual tennis tournament, fellowship 
meetings, picnic parties, special seminars on re- 
lated subjects, and services for KOSTAM's com- 
munal student families. 




Back row - Han Joon Lee, Bae-Yeun Ha (General Manager), Kiseog Ko, 
Kihoon Lee (Tecbinical Manager), Hyeong-Chai Jeong, Myunghwan Ahn, 
Yong Sik Yu, Jongkuk Won (Technical Consultant), Kyu-Yong Choi 
(Faculty Advisor) Front row - Young-Rae Kim, Kwangil Kim (General 
Consultant), Ohseok Kwon, Soowon Cho (President), Young Beom Kim, 
Bongki Moon, Dong Sung Kim(Secretary and Tresurer) 



283 





fm 



Tir^ 



THE YEAR IN 



REVIEW 




Edited By Ruth Werner 

As with every other year, 1994 made its mark in the history 
books by exposing many various events. Along with most of the 
East Coast, Maryland began the year beneath a sheet of ice and 
snow, causing the start of the UMCP semester to be delayed for a 
week. The nasty weather did not give up as flooding plagued the 
south, and forest fires left parts of the west burnt to a crisp. 

At the University of Maryland, the Banneker scholarship was 
declared unconstitutional by a court ruling after four years of 
litigation. The South Hill and Leonardtown basketball courts 
received a lot of exposure on campus as the posts and hoops were 
taken away for safety reasons. 

Back by popular demand, former Mayor of Washington, D.C. 
Marion Barry defeated Republican Carol Schwartz to once again 
become the mayor of the Capital city. UMCP campus professor 
Parris Glendening was elected governor of the state of Maryland 
after a very close race with Republican candidate Ellen Sauerbrey. 

In the national scene, the White House found itself exposed in 
the news on many occasions, including when a plane crashed on 
the south lawn, and later in the year when a man randomly shot at 
the White House from outside its gates. 

The nation watched via television satellite as the lives of Tanya 
Harding and Nancy Kerrigan unfolded, after Kerrigan was clubbed 
by Harding's ex-husband right before the 1994 Winter Olympics 
in Lillehammer, Norway. O.J. Simpson made his way into homes 
across the nation after being accused for murdering his ex-wife 
Nicole, and her friend Ronald Goldman. 

To the disappointment of many Generation X'ers, Kurt Cobain, 
lead singer of the grunge rock group Nirvana, stunned the music 
world with news of his suicide. 

There were a great many highs and lows in 1994, all of which 
made for a very memorable year. 






Due to insufficient support in 
Congress, the Clinton's proposed 
Health Care Bill, which called for 
universal change, did not pass, leav- 
ing the United States without sig- 
nificant health insurance reform. 

President Clinton signed a thirty 
million dollar crime law, which 
banned many assault firearms, al- 
lowed the death penalty for dozens 
more federal crimes, and provided 
billions of dollars over six years to 
build prisons and hire police. In an 
ironical twist, later in the year, a 
gunman fired shots at the White 
House. 

Music fans alike gathered for 
Woodstock '94, a celebration 25 
years after the original Woodstock 
took place. Musicians such as Bob 
Dylan, Joe Cocker, Melissa 
Ethridge, Gun's-n-Roses, and 
Aerosmith rocked the rain 
drenched, mud covered fans. 

Making progress in the space 
program, astronauts walked in 
space without connection to the 
mother ship, testing a jet pack 
designed to be a life preserver for 
space station crews of the future. 
This was the first untethered 
spacewalk in ten years. 

More than three million acres of 
woodlands stretching across west- 
ern states, including areas such as 
Boise, Idaho, the Jackson Hole ski 
valley, western Wyoming's Grand 
Teton National Park, and Sierra, 
Nevada, required tens of thousands 
of firefighters to extinguish flames 
that burned throughout the sum- 
mer months. 




286 




I 



Tropical storm Albert provided 
severe damage to the state of Geor- 
gia this past July, with two weeks of 
record flooding, which caused forty- 
six counties to be declared national 
disaster areas. Thirty one people 
were killed, hundreds of bridges 
and roads were destroyed, caskets 
were uprooted from cemeteries, 
top soil was washed away, and 
farm pond dams were washed out. 

1994 was a far from dull year in 
the world of professional sports. 
Dallas watched its Cowboys round 
up another Superbowl champion- 
ship by defeating the Buffalo Bills. 
New York cheered on its Rangers 
to a Stanley Cup in ice hockey, but 
were not so fortunate as its Knicks 
lost to the Houston Rockets in the 
NBA championship. However, 
Baseball players refusing to com- 
ply with a salary cap imposed by 
owners, chose to strike, leaving the 
nation without a world series for 
the first time since 1904. 





Opposite page top - President Clinton makes 
his signature on the crime bill. Middle - A 
small aircraft crashes into the White House. 
Bottom left - Baseball fans upset with the 
strike of players. Bottom right - Firefighters 
out West attempt to extinguish the flames of 
a wildfire. This page top - Severe flooding in 
Georgia. Bottom right - Fans soaking up the 
music and mud at Woodstock '94. Bottom 
left - Health care is still a problem on Capital 
Hill. 



All photos on this spread by Associated Press. 



287 




% ' * 1 



Plagued by the poverty and hun- 
ger of the Communist-run island of 
Cuba, thousands of Cubans set sail 
for the United States. The United 
States agreed to admit at least 
20,000 Cubans a year by revers- 
ing a 28- year old policy in ex- 
change for the promise of a cease 
of the flood of refugees condoned 
by Cuban leader Fidel Castro. 

The Clinton administration was 
relieved when Haiti's military rul- 
ers complied with the United Na- 
tions and promised to cede power 
to President elect Jean Bertrand 
Aristide, who was in exile in the 
U.S. Special envoys, including 
former President Jimmy Carter, 
retired General Colin Powell, and 
Sen. Sam Nunn, reached a deal 
with General Raoul Cedras and his 
troops. 

Civil war between the Hutu tribe 
and the Tutsi tribe in the African 
nation of Rwanda resulted in 
500,000 deaths and 2 million 
Rwandans fleeing the nation be- 
cause of fighting. Tensions be- 
tween the two tribes, which had 
been around for years, were ig- 
nited in April 1994 when the Hutus 
blamed the Tutsi tribe for being 
responsible for the death of 





^01 






-^^M 





288 




^^^ ^^^^^» 





President Juvenal Habyarimana, a 
member of the Hutu tribe, who 
died in a mysterious plane crash. 

President Clinton played the 
proud host to Israeli Prime Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Rabin and King Hussein 
of Jordan as a handshake on the 
south lawn of the White House 
secured hopes of peace in the 
Middle East between the two na- 
tions. Israel and Jordan had a long 
history of being at odds, dating 
back to 1948, when the state of 
Israel was created. 

Despite the efforts by the United 
Nations peacekeeping force, civil 
war continued to plague Bosnia- 
Herzegovinia in 1994. The two 
year old conflict began in 1992 
when Bosnia's Serbian citizens re- 
belled against a decision to secede 
by Yugoslavia's Muslim and 
Croatian citizens. 

Providing some culture and ex- 
citement, the World Cup soccer 
tournament, hosted by the United 
States, bedazzled audiences all over 
the planet as Brazil defeated Italy 
and walked away the grand win- 
ner. 



#■ "^^ 




i'^ Opposite page top - Yitzhak Rabin Prime 
Minister of Israel and King Hussein of Jordan 
shatce hands in a sign of peace as President 
Clinton looks on. Middle - This man prepares 
his gun for the fighting in Rwanda. Bottom 
left - Cuban Refugees in makeshift boats 
battle rough waters in hopes of gaining ac- 
cess to the United States. Bottom right - A 
helicopter brings a sign of hope to distraught 
citizens of Haiti. This page top - Two players 
fight for the ball during a game in the World 
Cup Soccer Tournament. Bottom left - 
Rwandan citizens flee the nation in a fight for 
their lives. Bottom right - The continued 
fighting in Bosnia. 



All photos on this spread by Associated Press. 



289 



This year brought many unfor- 
tunate and often untimely deaths. 
Former President Richard M. 
Nixon died as well as former First 
Lady Jackie Kennedy Onassis. 
Aids activist Pedro Zamora, who 
also appeared on MTV's The Real 
World succumbed to the debilitat- 
ing disease. Wilma Rudolph, 
former track star and Olympic 
medalist, actor Raoul Julia, known 
for his roles in "The Addams Fam- 
ily" movies, Jessica Tandy, Oscar 
winning actress, and musician Cab 
Calloway, known as the Heidi 
Heidi Hi band leader, also passed 
away. 

Despite not being seeded in the 
U.S. Open tennis tournament, 
Andre Agassi pulled off a some- 
what amazing winning streak de- 
feating seven opponents for the 
championship. 

Having retired from the Chi- 
cago Bulls and the world of profes- 
sional basketball, Michael Jordan 
signed a contract to play minor 
league baseball for the Chicago 
White Sox. 

Tying the knot, rock star Michael 
Jackson and his wife, Lisa Marie 
Presley, made their 





290 




coming out party by opening the 
MTV Music Video Awards cer- 
emony as Mr. and Mrs. Jackson. 
A few months later their marriage 
was reported to be on the rocks. 

August marked the swearing in 
of the nation's 108th Supreme 
Court Justice , 55 year old Stephen 
G. Breyer, a federal appeals court 
judge from Massachusetts, who 
replaced the retiring Justice Harry 
A. Blackmun. 

Proving heavy metal wasn't just 
for the young, lead singer Steve 
Tyler and his metal band Aerosmith 
walked away with three awards 
from the MTV Music Video Awards 
for their "Cryin" video. 

Most of the nation found their 
regularly scheduled television pro- 
gram preempted as the police 
chased football star, sportscaster, 
and actor O.J. Simpson along a 
large section of the L.A. Freeway. 
O.J. was wanted for the suspected 
murder of his ex-wife Nicole and 
her friend Ronald Goldman. 

Crowned the 68th Miss America, 
21 year old Heather Whitestone, 
who is hearing impaired, was the 
first contestant with a disability to 
win the Miss America pageant. 



Opposite page top left - Supreme Court 
Justice Stephen G. Breyer getting sworn in. 
Middle - Miss America, Heather Whitestone 
signing, "1 love you," to the crowd. Bottom 
left - U.S. Open tennis champion Andre 
Agassi falls to the ground astounded at his 
win. Bottom right - O.J. Simpson, who was 
suspected of murdering his ex- wife and her 
friend. This page top - Michael Jackson and 
his wife, Lisa Marie Presley at the MTV 
Music Video Awards. Bottom right - Minor 
league baseball player Michael Jordan catch- 
ing a pop fly. Bottom left - Lead singer 
Steven Tyler of the heavy metal band 
Aerosmith gives it his all during a show. 



All photos on this spread by Associated Press. 



291 




y i 



«i 



Career Opportunities 

We wish to thank the following connpanies for their expressed interest in our 

University of Maryland Students 



^^W: 




In the Air N^Kwa! Guard 
youTl have every (^^XHtunity to 
become the best Ttain in your 
choke of over MO technical 
careers. From teiecommunica- 
ticais to computer technology. 
From meteorology to security. 
The experience can help your 
dviljan career really take off. 
Sights set on college? We'll 
help you pay for it With sub- 
stantial loan repayments and 
additional 
assistance 
from the 
Montgom- 
ery GI Bill. 
All on top 





^2 (rfa great 
part-time 
salary and 
adventure 
_^^^^^ that can take 
8ft ^^■■1 you around 
the world. It's a pretty good deal 
for a part-time commitn^irt.— 8» 
little as two days a ewB& and 
two weeks a year. 

Get your career crff the gnxmd. 
Can 301 981-2820 
Youll discover that in the Air 
Guard, who ly^r^ ^^^ 
you are LUm ^^Z 

doesn't limit NATIONAL 
who you can iGLJAPDj 
become. Americans AtTliar Btsl. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

1995 University of Maryland Graduates 

YOUR FUTURE BEGINS HERE 




OAO Corporation 

An Aerospace Engineering and Information Systems Company 

RECRUITING TOP NOTCH COMPUTER SCIENCE 
AND ENGINEERING MAJORS 



7500 GREENWAY CENTER DRIVE 

GREENBELT. MARYLAND 20770 

301-345-0750 



e Action Emplover 



LABORERS' DISTRICT 

COUNCIL OF 

WASHINGTON, DC. AND VICINITY 



Clarence C. CampbeH, Business Manager 

Providing career ofiportunlties in the 
constructknthidustry with: 

9' Apptenticeship^and upgrade 
SklHsTrmliiteg" "^ 

• t^omp etltl v e Wagag 

•. Hvalth Carte Benefltft for 
W6r&er and Dependents 

• ETfbellent Pension 

• Reprdientktion 

• Stable-Rmployment 

For more informatTon call: (202) 347-1344 

7826 EASTERN AVE., N.W., SUITE LH I, 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20012 



/f 



\ 



Roadway Package Systems 

RPS 



u 



99 



510 Industrial Drive 

Lewisberry, PA 17339 

717-932-8210 (Phone) 

717-932-8297 (FAX) 



Ken Palmer 

(Human Resources Manager) 



294 



You Can Be Sure... If It's Westlnghouse 



Westinghouse has led the way with 
advanced technology products for over 100 
years. We're pioneers in nuclear energy, radar 
and microelectronics. We created the cameras 
that brought the very first televised pictures of 
mankind on the surface of the moon. By listening 
to our customers and focusing on their unique 
needs, we offer advanced technology solutions 
for their specific requirements. Our goal is to 
establish and grow long-term relationships 
based on mutual understanding and trust. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer. 



Westinghouse Electronic Systems is located 
in metropolitan Baltimore. We develop, manufac- 
ture and support electronic systems for the 
U.S. Government and for commercial, civil and 
international customers. From air traffic control 
systems that make air travel safe, and advanced 
defense electronics that defend our nation, to 
highly efficient electhc vehicle propulsion systems 
that contribute to a cleaner environment, we 
play an important role in Maryland and around 
the world. 




p Westinghouse 



Westinghouse Electronic Systems 

PO Box 1693 MS 1162 
Baltimore, MD 21203 



Q^omejoin one of the nation's leading 
to progressive grocery retailers! 

Safeway has a few management training openings for people who are 
interested in developing a diverse set of business leadership skills. 

Computers • Customer Relations • Marketing 
Managing • Accounting • Human Relations 

A management pcisitiiin Dtters: 

• coiiiih'titivc Lilian/ /)/;/s boiiii^ • ^tock option^ • ^^cncroii^ benefit^ puckii^c 

• fniiil vacntio)i> • continiioti^ cnrccr licl'cl^^'lllcntltn1lHlll^ 

• cnipUn/cc a^^ocnitKin • fnciiiili/ inu'k cnviroiiiiiciit • crciiit union 

II ,1 ni,iiiiiL;cnu'nl t.iri'iT \\ ith S.ilrw ,n !■- ol mk'ri.'st In \ mi, 

siihniit ,1 I■L"^llllu■ lo IIh' ^,iIc\\ ,n \l,iii.i:.;i.iiit'nl I r.iiniiii; 

t (uirJin.itor ,il l\\v lollow iiii; Kk.iIioii 

Scitewav Trdining Schmil 

7700 Little Ri\or Turnpike 

Anncindcile, \ A 2200" 

s \l I W X'l Is \\ 1 IJL \l 

I II'IX IKIL \l n Ml IK\I \l l\ I 

\( ll()\ I Nll'l OM K 




Safeway 



295 



Management Career Opportunities 



Ti 



here are two ways 
to learn about 
McDonald's 
Management. 




iMCDonal 



One is to attend an 
Ivy League School. 



students In prestigious business 
schools study the on-going success story 
of McDonald's, a unique Fortune 100 
corporcrtlon rotes as one of the 10 best 
managed companies In America. 

At McDonald's, Restaurant 
Managers receive classroom training, 
too. But they also spend time getting 
extensive hands-on training In all aspects 
of running their own million dollar 
business. Like training and motivating 
staff. Customer Relations. Purchasing 
and Financial Analysis 

In the process, McDonald's 
Management Trainees are earning an 
excellent starting salary and company- 
paid benefits that finished first In an Inde- 
pendent survey of 14 ma)or corporations 
In various Industries. You'll receive: 

• Performance/Merit Increases 

• Paid Vacations/Holidays 

• Medical, Dental & Ufe Insurance 

• Employee Stock Ownership Ran 

• Company Funded Profit Sharing 

• Educational Assistance 
Learn all about McDonald's 

Management. If you have some 
college and/or supervisory experience, 
call or send your resume to; 

Personnel Department - UM92 
8850 Stanford Blvd., Suite 2000 
Columbia, MD 21045 
(301)2900570 



Learn leaderstiip from a world leader'* 





Live 
on the edge. 

Push yourself to the brink of 
your mental and physical limits, two 
days a month and two weeks a year. 
Serve with the Army National Guard 
elite in an Adventure Training Unit. 
And put it all on the line for the thrill 
of a lifetime. 



CALL TOLL FREE l-80(M92-2526 

Maryland 



[IEJ75 




NMIONAL 

GUARD 



f5.i989 McDonald's Corporation 



Always An Equal Opporluniiv/AMitmalive Action Employer 



Army National Guard 



Americans At Their Best. 



l»5UMTEDSI«TESQOVER>«<tNT«SHtPWSE«ItDBTTWS£C«T«(nOf OEFtNSt »LL RCMTS WSfRVtD »«G«SS06 



296 



GIANT FOOD 

CAREER 

DEVELOPMENT 

PROGRAM 



We want to recruit 
qualified people....ffer 

rail 



■94 



program. 



Iff you aro porsonablo, 
ambitious, and want a caroor 
witli a ffuturo, 

WE WANT TO TALK WITH 

YOU! 



Iqual Opportunity Impl«y*r 




S*nd R«MiiM« tot 

Rlckl Cranston, Imploymont Managor 

P.O. Box 1«04, Dopt. S49, Washington D.C. 20013 




We thrive on the fact 
that no two visions are alike. 



And that's what makes 
lis one of the most impressK'e 
financial success stories in 
business today. 

Because meeting the needs 
of our customers means using 
your unique vision to create 
options that are right for them. 
And only them. 

At Chevy Chase Bank and 
B.F. Saul Mortgage Company, 
we're meeting the needs of the 
diverse communities we serve 
with a broad range of financial 
products and services. As 
these communities grow, our 
business grows right along 
with them. 

And when it comes to 
growth, our environment 
offers sound opponunity for 



career development along 
with leading edge technology 
enhancements, exceOent 
benefits programs, incentives 
and more. 

Talk to our recniiting 
representatives for complete 
information on the positions 
and options available for you. 
Human Resources staff can 
be reached at each of the 
following locations: 

Savings, .Wongage and 
Consumer Lending 
Bethesda, MD (301) 907-5600 

Credit Card Operations 
Frederick, MD (301) 620-8400 

Banking O^ieratioiis, Infoniiation 
Svstenis, .\ccounting 
Laurel, MD (301) 953-8129 



#ChewChaseBank 

lTB Ihts d divi;-ftiv nwi'phurpoluy EOt' .\J/F/PA'_ 
Hearing impaired camlidaics may ailfoar'WD Si.uV i 90/ -/csV5 



297 



DAMES & MOORE 



ENGINEERING EXCELLENCE 
ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY 

Dames & Moore is an international environmental consulting 
and engineering firm providing services in the areas of 
planning, engineering, Ifie eartfi and environmental sciences, 
waste management, fiazardous waste site investigations, 
asbestos management and design and regulatory assistance 

Our expanding business is creating opportunities for 
professionals who are excellent communicators, possess a 
relevant degree and experience in waste management, 
remediation, or environmental compliance programs Dames & 
Ivloore has offices in major metro areas throughout the United 
States 

• Air Quality Engineers • Geologists/Hydrogeologists 

• Chemical Engineers • Geotechnical Engineers 

• Civil Engineers -Regulatory Analysts 

• Environmental Engineers • Remediation Design Engineers 

• Environmental Hygienists • Risk Assessment Analysts 

• Geochemists • Toxicotogists 

Dame* » Moore offers competitive salaries, flexible benefits 
(including 401K), and opportunities for growth If you seek 
challenge and variety, please send your resume to 

Sandra Smith 
DAMES & MOORE 

Dept Terrapin 
Suite 700, 7101 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, IVIaryland 20814 



We aie an equal opporlunily employer 
WOMEN i MINOHniiS HUE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY 



If you work at 

First National Bank of Maryland, 

you'll find that 

Quality Makes 
The Difference. 



First National Ban. 

of Maryl 



Exceeding the Expected. 

Offices across Marytand/Membcr FDIC 



t=J 



.L=i For more informatioii, call 1 -8004244864 



WAL-MART 

2705 Market Street 

Christiansburg, VA 24073 

381-0502 

Open 7 Days 

7 a.m. - 1 1 p.m. 



MR. CAR STEREO INC. 

ELECTRONICS FOR THE FAST LANE 

' CD players • Subwoofers • Car Alarms • Radar Detectors ■ 

Custom Installation • Complete Auto Sound Systems 

Plus 

SONY • HIFONICS • KENWOOD • ORION 

TEAM XTREME & LOTS MORE! 

Financing Available 
We Accept VISA, Mastercard, & Discover 

Laurel Commerce Center 

(301) 498-0898 



DO YOU HAVE WHAT 
IT TAKES? 



JOIN AN 
EXCITING TEAM 




VOLUNTEER WITH THE 
BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE 
RESCUE SQUAD 
CALL 
Assistant Chief 
Lewis German 
652-0077 




298 



Sverdrup 

CORPORATIOM 

Congratulations' As an architectural or engineering graduate, the 
advantage is yours Now your biggest decision is to make your 
degree count 

Sverdrup Corporation, founded in 1928, has tjecome known lor a 
variety of rr,ulti-million dollar capital expansion programs lor 
Amencan business, industry and government, and for achieve- 
ments such as the Superdome in New Orleans, the Space Shuffle 
Launch Complex at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the 
Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore, Maryland, the World Wide U S 
Embassy Program, and design of the new Computer and Space 
Science Facility at the University of Maryland. 

Sverdrup provides total project management for capital facilities, or 
any combination of engineering, architecture, planning, construc- 
tion, operations, communications and secunty. To meet the 
widening capital facility and program needs of businesses, 
industries, and governments around the world, Sverdrup has 
structured its professional services lor llexibility, breadth of scope, 
and cost-effectiveness The result is an unprecedented level of 
integration of services— and a unique set of capabilities for solving 
major problems. 



Send resume to: 



Human Resources Manager 
1001 19th St. No., Suite 700 
Arlington, VA 2209-2454 



Live just MINUTES away from Campus! 

mmm$§ mmm 

6285 FERNWOOD TERRACE RIVERDALE, MD 20737 



■# 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartment, some »iih dm s i.imilv rmms 

•k Modern Kitchens with pantry 

'k Room sized Patio/Bdicony 

if Close to Shopping 

"k Pool in Summer 

-k Wall to wall Carpeting 

■# Laundry Facilities on property 






%r;y^^ 




^HVh^ 



mV'UW 



Seafood In the Chesapeake Bay Tradition 

Featuring 

Nitely Raw Bar, Complimentary Mors D'oeuvres 

During Happy Hour 

Sports Constantly on our Three TV Monitors 

Seafood & Prime Rib Buffet, Every Friday & Saturday Night 

Full Continental Menu Also Available 

For reservations piease cali 
(301)474-5951 




BEST WESTERM 

Maryland Inn 
^ Fundome 

474-2800 

Located in the Best Western Maryland Inn - College Park 
1/2 mile south on 1-95 on U.S. Rt. 1 



"Let Us Put The Trick In Your Trucks!" 



Vans, 4 Wheel Drive, 
Auto & Truck Accessories 

Large inventory and installation Available 

• Running Boards 

• Lift & Lowering Kits 

• Bed Liners 

• Bumpers 

• Wheels 6 Tires 

• Discount Prices 

TRUCKS 
CAPS 

Visit Our Showroom Today! All Stores Near D.C. 

Kensington (301) 949-0700 

Lexington Park (301 ) 862- n 39 

Waldorf (301) 843-9244 

Frederick (30 1)83 1-4328 

Edgewater (30 1)26 1-7445 



299 








Your Supplier of Quality 
Sealing & Systems Furniture 



Slate Use Industries 



Division of Correction 

23 Foniana Lane. Suite 105 

Balnmore. Mar\Iand 21237 

(410) 780-4050 



^ 



1 



Be part of a global 
enterprise with 
COMSAT 




tt^fii 



The merger of com- 
municalions and informa- 
tion technologies opens exciting 
' career paths for college graduates 
who want to work on the leading edge of 
technology. To learn more about career options 
with COMSAT, send your resume to Human 
Resources, Dept. UM-1. 



^ COMSAT 



Laboratones 



22300 Comsat Drive 
Clarksburg, MD 20871 



Graduate To A Fox Chevrolet/Geo 

Special College (graduate Financing Program 




With The Purchase Or Lease 
Of Any New Car Or Truck. 



If you are graduating you may qualify for the following: 

• Minimum down payment 

• Up to 60 months to pay 

• Low, low GMAC discount finance rates available 

• $400 rebate 




Beltway Exit 17 265-1200 

Rts. 1 & 198 792-7915 725-2700 

The Auto & Truck Discount Centers 




Hellmulh, Obata & Kassabaum, P.C. 

Architecture, Enginecrng, Planning, 
Interiors, Facilities Consulting 



Congratulations 

to the 

University of Maryland 

Class of 1995 



300 



and Best Wishes 
"flass of W 




DARCARS TOYOTA 
Of Silvtr Spring 

301/622-0300 

12210 Charry Hill Road 
Silver Spring, MD 

LEXUS 

Of Sihrtr Spring 

301/680-0400 



2505 
Silver 



Prosperity 
Spring, MI 



Terrace 



DARCARS CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 
Of Silv«r Spring 

301/622-0010 

2509 Prosperity Terrace 
Silver Spring, MD 

DARCARS MAZDA 
Of Silvtr Spring 

301/622-0020 

12214 Cherry Hill Road 
Silver Spring, MD 



TRW Integrated Engineering Division 



The only limitations you will have are 
the limits of your own imagination. 

Located in the Nonhem Virginia area. TRW's Integrated Engineer- 
ing Division is at the forefront of state-of-the-art innovative inte- 
grated engineering, delivenng its expertise in support of many 
important government and commercial programs. We are also a 
leader in developing and integrating large intelligence software 
systems that process volumes of data for rapid decision making by 
government analysts. 

We are looking for talented people like you to join our I ED team of 
top-notch electrical engineers, computer scientists, systems engi- 
neers, indusuial engineers, computer engineers, and mechanical 
engineers. 

Consider a career w. ith TRW and enjoy a compietitive benefits 
package, including flexible work hours, a stock savings plan, and a 
year-end holiday week shutdown. Exercise your imagination. Send 
your resume to: TRW Integrated Engineenng Division, Profession- 
al Placement, Department UMD. One Federal Systems Park Drive. 
FPI/61 10. Fairfax, VA 22033-441 1. 



Equal Oppoflunrty Employer 

U S citizenship may be required lor a 



mmKww 



WITHOUT HEALTH INSURANCE... 

YOU GO 93mm III 

• STUDENTS 

• NEW GRADUATES 

For more than 10 years, the staff at CHAMPION 
INSURANCE has helped thousands of University 

students and new graduates obtain necessai7 

Health Insurance Coverage during their academic 

careers and in the time between graduation and 

starting a new job. 

We have health insurance plans priced to reflect 
the reality of student budgets. For a FREE 
brochure, write to: 
CHAMPION INSURANCE ADVANTAGE, LTD. 
P. 0. Box 1050 
Bel Air, MD 21014-7050 

Champion 
insurance 
Advantage 
Ctd. 



or call 



1-800-643-4675 




EMJAY 



ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 



General and Mechanical Construction 



MICHAEL 0. SCHERR 

President 



4205 MENLO DRIVE 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 21215-3372 

(410)358-3200 
Fax: (410)358-9514 



301 




AUTOMOTIVE GLASS 
& UPHOLSTERING, INC. 



5012 COOK ROAD 
BELTSVILLE, MD 20705 



(301) 937-3800 




Wood's 
onsts, qnc. 




Family Owned and 
Operated Since 1938 



Fresh Flowers • Plants • Fruit Baskets 
Corsages • Balloons • Dish Gardens 

Open Mon. - Sat. 

Major Credit Cards Honored 

F*LEASE Call For Lwormation and Prices 

9066 Baltimore Blvd • College Park 
(301) 474-7000 



McDonald 
Auto Body Works 

CoMPLErrE Body & Fender Repairing & Painting 
• 24 Hour Wrecker Service • 

4801 Baltimore Ave. 

HyattsvUle. MD 

864-3858 



S. F. CRAY 



N. SHACKLETT 



^<,ccU ■%»■ 456 • /fp^-e^O 

IVayne Adams, President 

Aruther Bridgett. Vice President 

Mark G. Greenfiled, Business Manager 

Emmett Gardner, Financial Secretary/Treasurer 

3217 l2tA Sctttt. Tt.S. - "kkutAu^ft^H. T).^- 20017 
635-^429 











J. MILTON BAKER CO., INC. 






•THE CLEAN STOP" 

Extraction Machines • Seminars 
Floor Machines • Janitor Supplies 
Industrial Vacuums • Cleaning Chemicals 

)237) Wilkins Avenue 

Rockville, Maryland 20852 

301-881-8777 





Congratulations Class of 1995 




0\AIGA klORLDTR4l^ 

Official travel agency for the University of Maryland 

Call us for all of your travel needs 

301-345-5595 





Wt VAN M^^r. 




wmi9mj 


i^H 


JUST ABOUT 


Vil I ik i ! 




m 


n 


Thanks to the Toul Shipping SoluUGn"* from Mail Boxes Etc* 
we can ship your oversize. hca\'v, fragile and valuable items almost 
an\"ahere' Custom packing and crating is a\ailahle, too 

VIAIL BOXES ETC 

lis Noi What VVk Do. Irs How Wf Do H. 






CLEAN & LEAN 



Laundi-y, Circuit 1'raining, Free Weights, 
Tanning, Hot TUbs & Drop Off Service 
Hours: 8:00 AiV! - I 1:00 PM 7 Days A Week 



7215 Baltimore Blvd. (Calvert) 
College Park, MD 20740 



Tel: (301)864-8446 
FAX: (301)864-4229 



302 



Moving'2 



Hertz Penske Will 
Match Any 
Competitor's 
Price! 




Call Hertz Pengf(e & 
save on your campus move. 

We'll take 10% off when you leave campus with a Hertz Penske Imck rental! We've got everything you need to make moving easy - a modem, dean 
fleet ... free unlimited mileage on one way moves ... convenient coast-to-coast locations ,-. a free moving guide and all the accessories to get the 
job done. For reservations, call the location below, or check the Yellow Pages lor the Hertz Penske location nearest you 



247 Carroll Street, Takoma Park, MD 
301-345-5566 

10 Minutes from U of M Campus - Call For Details 



Leaving campus? 

Rent a truck from Hertz Penske and yet a 10% discount on your one way truck rental. 



10' 



Hertz 



10' 



Affordable. ' 
• 10 ?4 ifucks available 
■ Tree unlimilri] ni.ledqo on unc 



Truck Rental 

' clears Iruchs at convenient rental locations 

• Aulomalir liansmission .infl air 
/ i(.''iidi'j • ,'a iw!u( e"ie'qfincy toad scvic 



Kick-off Your Semester at 
Belcrest Plaza Apartments 

Start the season with 2 #1 ranked teams! 



,e%ter 



^ease* 



^^^Zi^^^' 




Small Pet buildings 
(but no one from Penn Slate!) 






SanesUr Uaats 



Optimal HBOIOible TV 



Buses to D.C. and campus 



Individual heating and AjC 



Cathedral ceilings (top levels) 



Private balcony or patio — Pool 



Walking distance to Prince Ceorges Plaza Mall 

Efficacy, 1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apis., some imth dens 

Modem, well designed kilcliens (some w/dishwasher) 

For rrwre tnformatum call 559-5042 




Time's running out, $o make your move to 



BELCREST PLAZA 

APARTMEfSJTS 

Hyjtt5VTjJc MijyUnd 



t=r 



=am»*«s»u5 



303 



SEE us 
AFTER 
SCHOOL 

There's a lot more to life than work. So before you 
eet out for the corporate world, step into any 

South Moon Under for casual clothing, ewimwear, 

outerwear, accessories, Patagonia, and 

everything else they didn't teach you in class. 



SOUTH 



MOON 



UNDER 



Mr 



I 

Caeua\ Clothing & Swlmwcar 
for Men & Women 

Wlldwood Center 
10247 Old Geontetowr Kxjad (301)564-0995 



1^ 



TOMPKINS 

BUILDERS 

A Breed Apart 

Our new trademark captures the 

strength, integrity, and spirit 

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We provide a level of quality and service 

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and keeps us ahead of the field. 

You can bet on it. 



TompluDi Builders 
1333 H Street, NW 
Wsshinglon, D.C. 20005 
Telephone 202 789 0770 
Faciimile 202 898 2531 



Congratulations 

to the 

Graduating Class of 1995 



From 

NaOR U. STOEHR, M.D., P.A. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



7610 Carroll Avenue, Suite 220 
(301)445-0400 



Takoma Park, Maryland 
(301)891-6123 



Welcome 
to the 
REAL 
WORLD 



Thai's what everyone calls life 
after college, but we keep trying 
to change the "real" world 

We want to make it better 

We want safer workplaces We 
want justice and dignity on the 
)ob for working men and women 
We want fair play in promotions 
and career advancement 

That's why were Number One in 
the Washington metropolitan area 
when It cor es to representing 
men and women who work in a 
wide vanety of jobs, ranging from 
supermarket clerks to police offi 
cers, nurses to social workers 

We're Local 400 of the United 
Food & Commercial Workers, 
welcoming you to help us change 
the real world, for the better 







THOMAS R McNUTT 
President 



i.acjii. 
HOD 



C JAMES LOWTHERS 
Secretary Treasurer 



304 



S CHOLASTIC 
ADVERTISING, INC. 



Advertising Speciaiists and Consultants 



Providing professional sales 
and service support 
for University and College Yearbooks 



Two offices to serve you: 



In the East - CaU 1-800-964-0777 



In the West - CaU 1-800-964-0776 



305 



The Work Is 



Intense. 






The Competition Is Fierce. 



The Opportunities Are Limitless. 



The Rewards Are Great. 



The Company is MCI. 



Catch The Spirit! You're smart, you're gutsy, 
and you've got the credentials to take you to 
the top. Now you're looking for a career with 
challenge and a company that values what 
you have to offer. At MCI, we know all about 
challenge - and all about succeeding where 
others have not dared to go. We also know it 
will take bright, educated, hard- 
working and aggressive people to 
stay on the leading edge of this 
competitive industry into the 21st 




century As a woridwide leader in telecom- 
munications, we're no longer the new kid 
on the block. But we still embrace that 
entrepreneurial spirit. We're breaking new 
ground ever>' day creating exciting career 
opportunities in telecommunications, 
engineering, computer sciences, finance, 
marketing, and business. Ask 
your Placement Officer today 
about opportunities with MCI. An 
Equal Opportunity Employer 



306 



Physical and Life Sciences, Engineering 
Professionals and Future Graduates: 



m-©E 



m§m 



^mQ 




^fffpy 





f 



In A Challenging Career 
As A Patent Examiner 

We invite applications from professionals and friture 
graduates in the following areas of specialization: 
Engineers - Aeronautical, Agricultujid, Biomedical, 
CeramicChemical, Civil, Computer, El ec tiical , Engi- 
neering Physics, General, Industrial, Mechanical, 
Metallurgical, Nuclear, Petroleum, Polymer Science. 
Life Sciences - Biochemistry, Biology, Biomedical, 
Biotechnology, Botany, Horticulture, Microbiology, 
Pharmacology. Physical Sciences - Chemistry, 
Physics. Design - Art, Architecture, and Graphics. 
Textile Technology. 



For more information 
call (703) 305-8231. 

Send your resume or SF-171 to: 

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office 

P.O. Box 171 

Washington, DC 20231 



,^T'°^^Q 




^ADB}^^ 



U.S. Citizenship required for employment. 
An equal opportunity employer. 



307 





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Worried about 
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SailieMae 



MDU 



308 



On the surface of a leaf, an intricate 
network of veins is the medium for 
photosynthesis. At Bellcore, a network 
of talented people is the medium we use to 
define and tackle telecommunications 
challenges for some of the biggest names in 
American and international business. 

We offer our clients an unprecedented level 
of telecommunications expertise, coupled with 
unparalleled resources for providing totally 
integrated customer solutions. And our 
demonstrated proficiency in Information 
Services, Telephony, Wireless, Business and 



An Advanced Information 
Network Is Essential To Any 

Environment. 




Mass Market Broadband, makes us uniquely 
equipped to address the telecommunications 
challenges of the future. 

If you're an ambitious graduate, we can offer 
you some equally impressive advantages. Join us 
in helping our clients define their route in the 
rapidly expanding telecommunications network, 
and reach your own high level of personal and 
professional reward. 

Currently, we have openings at our New 
Jersey locations for individuals with a BS/MS in 
Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, 
and/or Systems Engineering; and for MS/PhD's 
in Computer Science, Statistics, Operations 
Research, Metallurgy, Behavioral Science 
and/or Material Science. 

For consideration, forward yiiur resume, 
in strictest confidence, to: Manager, 
Corporate Employ inent, Bellcore, Dept. 
TT/0101/95, 6 Corporate Place, Piscataway, 
New Jersey 08854. 

We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/\'. 



Bellcore 



I Bell Communications Research 

Where innovation is second nature. 



309 



IMAGES OF 




310 



MARYLAND 




All photos on this spread by Maggie Soladay 



311 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



312 



iWHi 





CL«OSING 



UNDER EXPOSED 

Edited By Robin Solomon 

Nowhere on campus could a more dedicated group of people 
be found than in 3101 South Campus Dining Hall. The 1995 
Terrapin staff consisted of a collection of individuals who dedi- 
cated themselves to producing a really great book, and in the 
process learned a lot about themselves and each other. 

Throughout the year, a real sense of family developed as weekly 
meetings brought the staff together. Countless hours were spent 
in the office working together and trying to get things accom- 
plished. Overall, the staff put in hundreds of hours creating and 
composing their pages, developing first rate pictures and doing a 
multitude of related tasks. 

A great many obstacles had to be overcome from Day 1 , but 
these individuals pulled together and pulled this book through. 
Everyone had to learn new skills and took on many challenges, but 
320 pages later, everyone had grown from the experience. And 
most importantly, all of the Terrapin staff members got to expose 
a little bit of themselves in all corners of the book. 

The Terrapin has been under exposed for too long. Whoever 
reads this book should know about the hard work and dedication 
that went into its production. The staff of the 1995 Terrapin 
made all of this possible. 



"Room 3101 is my second home." 

Matilde Ott 
Managing Editor 





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L^o „.i this spread by Paul Vieira 



316 



1995 Terrapin Staff 




Back row - From left - Maggie Soladay, photographer; Ruth Werner, Year-in-Review Editor; Robin Solomon, Editor-in-Chief; LaRonda 
Miller, Copywriter; David Schneider, Seniors Editor; Dimitris A. Geragas, Academics Editor. Front row - From left - Joanne Saidman, 
Photography Editor; Tyrone Brooks, Sports Photographer; Eileen de Guzman, Resident Life Editor; Paul Viera, Photographer; Maria Lo 
Piccolo, Copywriter; Wen-Szu Lin, Seniors Editor; Matilde Ott, Managing Editor. 





Opposite page - Top left - Amy Finlayson, Greeks Editor. Top right - 
Lisa Stark, Business Manager. Middle left - Those crazy photographers, 
from left, Paul Vieira, Joanne Saidman, Eric Lasky, Maggie Soladay, 
Tryone Brooks and Aynat Ravin. Middle right - Gina Dugan, Sports 
Editor. Bottom left -Wen-Szu Lin, Seniors Editor. Bottom right - Tracy 
Isaac, Organizations Editor. This page - Bottom left - Joanne Saidman, 
Photography Editor. Bottom right - Matilde Ott, Managing Editor. 



317 




Dimitris Geragas 
Academics Editor 



Ruth Werner 
Year In Review Editor 



David Schneider 
Seniors Editor 



Editor's Thoughts Exposed 



In breaking with tradition. I will not fill this page with inane rambling on 
my closing thoughts. They are too many and not coherent enough to make 
sense, but the one thing that did form an image in my head was this... 

When I thought of the theme "Exposing Ourselves," 1 had a clear picture 
of what it meant. It was a picture of my growth here at Maryland, of the risks 
that I have taken and the results I have had to live with. The theme sums up 
my college experience. 

I also break with tradition by not racking my brain for witty and insightful 
remarks about everyone that comes to mind. Inevitably, I would forget 
someone, or just not do justice to their importance to me. Instead, I offer 
a blanket statement to anyone whom I've come in contact with one way or 
another while producing this book. 

Without your tremendous support and great efforts, my sanity would be 
no more and the 1995 Terrapin may have never gotten off the ground. To 
each of you, thank you very, very much. I wish everyone much success and 
good fortune. 



Robin Solomon 
Editor-in-Chief 
1995 Terrapin 




318 



Staff Writers 




LaRonda Miller and Maria LoPiccolo 



Jennifer Harrell 



All photos on this spread by Paul Vieira 



Terrapin 1995 marked the 94th volume of the University of Maryland, at College Park yearbook. Jostens Printing & Publishing 
Company produced the 320-page book with a trim size 9x12", press run of 1,100. 16 process-color pages, and 16 second-color 
pages. The book was printed on 80-pound matte paper at their plant in State College, Pennsylvania. 

The cover artwork and design were conceived and created by Matilde Lucia Ott. It was printed with Red 331 lettering on a White 
534 background. The artwork was printed with Green 367 and Black 326. All pages were designed on PageMaker 5.0 on the Apple 
Macintosh II. 

Eric Manto served as our Jostens Company representative with Linda Nolf acting as the in-plant publishing consultant. Carl Wolf 
Studio of Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania, photographed the graduates and supplied the Tenapin photographers with photography 
supplies. Scholastic Advertising, Inc., located in Liburn, GA sold the advertisements. 

The body copy of the book was set in 1 2 point Souvenir, the outlines in 1 point Souvenir, and the photo credits in 8 point Souvenir. 

Groups pictured in the Organizations section paid for their space. Pages were sold at the rate of $100 per page, and $50 per 
half-page. The pages were purchased at a first come, first-serve basis. 

Yearbooks could be ordered during the Fall semester for a reduced price of $28. After January 1, 1995, the price was $35. 

Shipping was $6. 

The views of the Terrapin 1995 do not necessarily express the views of Maryland Media. Inc. or any of its affiliates, nor the 
University of Maryland, at College Park. The Terrapin staff is made up entirely of students of the university. Address any inquiries 
to : Editor, Terrapin Yearbook , 3101 South Campus Dining Hall, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Copyright 1995 The Terrapin Staff and Maryland Media, Inc. All rights reserved. 



319 




Photo by Maggie Soladay 



320