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Full text of "The Terrapin"






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1996 Terr 




Timeless 



The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

Volume 9 5 

Copyright 1996 




Tyrone Brooks 



19 9 6 Te r r a p i n 



Timeless 



T able of Contents 



This aerial 

view of 

campus 

illustrates the 

timelessness of 

the landscape 

of The 

University of 

Maryland at 

College Park. 

Even in 1963, 

when the 

photograph 

was taken, the 

distinctive 

design of the 

campus was 

quite evident. 



Photograph 

provided by 

Special 

Collections, 

University of 

Maryland at 

College Park 

Libraries. 




i ible of Contents 






Maryland in Pictures 




8 



College Life 



36 



Seniors and Academics 



86 



Student Living 



16 8 



Sports 


1 88 


Greeks 



256 



o 



rganizations 



274 



Advertisements 

292 



Cl 



o s i n g 



3 14 



Table of Contents 3 




-Or— i+~*-***JS)a 



The time is now . . . The day that seemed so out of reach has arrived - 
Graduation. The campus changed since that first, scary day People 
who I thought I would spend forever with have moved on and new ones 
have taken their place. As I stand alone on McKeldin Mall, a cool evening 
breeze caresses my face, bittersweet memories of The University of Maryland 
flash in my mind. My hot summer orientation, heated arguments with good 
friends and long, passionate kisses on the sundial under a full harvest moon - 
memories that are more precious and valuable than gold. As the memories 



fade in and out like careless whispers, I regret the time I wasted on trite, 
meaningless worries. There were some opportunities lost and wishes 
unfilled. I could have smiled more instead of frowning, talked less and 
listened more. However, through my years at Maryland I grew up and 
learned just who I am and who I want to be. As I look into my future I 
stand by the ideal that The University of Maryland had a hand in my 
development as a student, a professional and a human being . . . 

- An Anonymous Senior 




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It is said that a picture is worth a thousand 
words. The beauty of the campus of the 
University of Maryland is hard to describe in less 
than that. There is no disputing the intoxicating 
feeling that one gets when walking by the chapel at 
sunset on a warm spring evening or the wonderful 
feeling of the crisp autumn air hitting your face as 
you stroll through the newly fallen leaves on 
McKeldin Mall. 

More beautiful than the campus settings are the 
campus students. The group of students that 
attend the University of Maryland are rich and 
diverse and come from all over the country and 
some from across the world. These students come 
for various reasons. No matter what the 
motivation for attending the University of 
Maryland, once a part of the campus each student 
adds his or her own little flair. 

Whether studying, relaxing, partying or anything 
else, the images that Maryland offers are of living 
life to each persons own desires and making the 
best out of time. 



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Being a student at the University of Man-land 
lasts a different amount of time for different 
people, some even see their time at Maryland as a 
life prison sentence. Long lines, indifferent 
administrators and professors and bureaucratic tape 
create the perfect institutional atmosphere. But the 
single difference between a jail term and the 
University of Maryland is that at Maryland the 
students can decide how and where thev serve their 
time. 

College Lite at Man-land is not limited; 
countless opportunities are open to students. Bar- 
hopping, midnight food raids, rollerblading down 
Campus Drive and hanging out with friends are a 
lew examples of the boundless opportunities 
granted to Man-land students. Fun and games are 
not the only building blocks to a solid college life 
at Man-land . . . studying tor hours on end, n-ping 
class projects at three in the morning and downing 
coffee to get through 8 a.m. classes add a bright 
point to the Man-land college life experience. 
No matter the view point, "doing time" at 
Maryland is a pleasurable, exciting and educational 
experience when a proper balance is struck. 
College life at Man-land is more than long lectures 
and dusty professors, and far more important than 
beer binges and sexual revelations. College life at 
the University of Man-land is about growing up. . . 
wiselv. 



Tvrone Brooki 



College Life 



3" 



A First Look 

Campus organizations show students 

what they have to offer 



Getting involved in campus activities 
can be a trying experience for some, 
but for about 10,000 people that 
attended this year's First Look Fair it was just a 
walk on the mall. 

The annual fair, which was held on September 
20 and 21 on McKeldin Mall, included about 
275 campus groups, each giving students the 
opportunity to see what their organization had to 
offer. Many of the tables offered informational 
pamphlets and other free items, including key 
chains, balloons and snacks. 

The participatinggroups ranged from religious 
organizations, to academic groups, to club sports. 
Local businesses were also at the event offering 
fair-goers free samples and coupons. 



By Dave J. Iannone 



i :ge Life 





First Look Fair 39 




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Tvrone Brooks 



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College Life 41 




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College Life 



Building on Byrd 

The upper deck adds a new perspective 




^ 



Tyrone Brooks 



48,055. Sounds like a lot, but when a person is 
draped in the old red and white and is standing 
shoulder to shoulder with his or her fellow 
students, 48,055 seems like nothing. But "noth- 
ing" is not a description for Byrd Stadium. The 
regal stature of Byrd Stadium was heightened in 
the fall of 1 994. Although Maryland's football 
team did have a losing season, Byrd was still 
expanded after the last home game. 

The residents of Ellicott Hall had mixed 
reactions to the addition to Byrd. "It's a mon- 
strosity!" said William Ricci, a sophomore ma- 
joring in business. "I expected more for all the 
noise the construction workers made at six 
o'clock in the morning." 

"I love it," said Leigh Greene, a freshman 
majoring in art history. "It screams large uni- 
versity. I can see the Washington Monument 
from the upper deck." No matter the view 
point, the expansion of Byrd Stadium has caught 
the attention of Maryland and its students. 



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Byrd Stadium Construction 43 




Paul Yieira 



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Tyrone B- 
(and opposite page) 



College Life 45 



Midterm Mania 

How students deal with the stress of exams 



"...I usually try to 

find a party to go to 

and try not to think 

about all that I have 

to do. " 

Mike Walker 
Junior 



All too quickly summer was over and 
students plunged back into the swing 
of things at the University of Maryland 
at College Park. People were excited about 
seeing their friends again and the hassles of 
moving back onto campus and last minute 
registrations were situations that students faced. 
But these situations settled down and students 
were soon preparing themselves for the stress of 
upcoming midterms. When asked, students 
had a wide variety of answers pertaining to the 
stress that they experienced. 

Junior Mike Walker responded, "how do I 
deal with the stress of upcoming 
midterms?...um...I usually try to find a party to 
go to and try not to think about all that I have 
to do." Juniors Heather Hladky and Amy 
Berlen agreed on the way to deal with the stress. 
Amy said, "I exercise or take a break then come 
back focused." Junior Peter Zacky said, "I went 
to TCBY during the couple of weeks before 



midterms last semester. I went there everyday, 
that by the time the midterms were over, the 
manager gave me free yogurt." 

While some students had ways of handling 
the stress of midterms, others did not experience 
any stress for midterms. Senior Tom Corbin 
responded, "to me, midterms are just another 
test now. I don't sweat them anymore." Fur- 
thermore, some students did not even know that 
there were midterms. Freshman Dave Gardner 
said, "midterms, what are those?" 

There is on-campus help for the stress of 
midterms for all students from the Learning 
Assistance Center. The center, which is located 
in Shoemaker Hall, offers a wide variety of 
programs to help students deal with the stress of 
midterms. The Health Center offers students a 
relaxing stress reliever in the form of a soothing 
massage. Whatever way students dealt with the 
stress of midterms, they did so successfully enough 
to deal with the stress of finals. 






By Angela D. Felder 




Lynn Romai 



; ege Life 




Am 1 1 l !i iglia 



Midterm Mania 47 




Snorre Wik 



; liege Life 



Pet Parade 

Students find companionship in their pets 




Dogs, cats, and other animals that visit 
Maryland's campus are not always welcome. 
Pets living on campus are the fifth largest reason 
for expulsion from campus housing. The Uni- 
versity of Maryland deems that animals, no 
matter how cute, how gentle or how quiet can 
only visit; not stay at Maryland. 

Despite these harsh housing rules dogs play- 
ing fetch on the Mall or swimming in the 
fountain are common occurrences at anytime, 
especially in the warmer months. 

Each pet owner can express his or her indi- 
viduality in their choice of pet companion. As 
always the dog is ever popular, but increasingly 
students are looking to lizards, snakes and spi- 
ders for companionship. 



Joanne Saidman 



Pet Parade 



49 




Hank Felln 



College Life 



Teaching Fire Safety 

Student firefighters and emergency care providers show 
citizens importance ofisafie habits 



Young children sat in the driver's seat 
of a fire engine, university students 
inquired about being volunteers and 
ocal citizens had their blood pressure tested. 

These were the sights at the College Park 
Volunteer Fire Department's annual Open 
-louse on Saturday, September 30. 

The event was held at the department's new 
ire station, which opened two years ago. 

The department's Fire Marshal, Hank Fellner. 
junior community health major who lives at 
he firehouse, organized the day-long event, 
vh'ich included a display of the Maryland State 
'olice medical evacuation helicopter and kitchen 
ire safety and home sprinkler demonstrations. 

"We are doing this to bring the whole com- 
nunity together to learn about fire safety and 
low we work," Fellner said. 

The department is comprised mostly of cam- 
>us students who volunteer their time while 
ttending school. Eighteen student-members 
:ve at the station. 

About 200 people attended the event, which 
lso featured firefighting demonstrations, a dem- 
nstration by a county police department K-9 
nit and displays by the campus Department of 
environmental Safety and University Police. 

Children had the opportunity to meet "the 



friendly monster," a firefighter dressed in his fire 
clothing and breathing with an air bottle. There 
was also a raffle of fire safety and CPR prizes, as 
well as gift certificates for local businesses. 

"What is most impor- 
tant is how we integrate 
education and experience 
here," Fire Chief Carl 
Cimino said, "here we can 
let the community see ex- 
actly how we operate." 

Campus President Wil- 
liam Kirwan attended the 
event and was the honor- safety UtlU IdOlV We 
an' iud^e for a fire safety 



"We are doing this 
to bring the whole 
community together 
to leant about fire 



work. " 

Hank Fellner 
Fire Marshal 



poster contest. The con- 
test was open to local 
school students. 

University students 
who attended the event 
were curious about how they could volunteer, 
either as a firefighter or emergency' medical 
provider. 

"This place is just really interesting, in that 
students are pretty much running it," said junior 
chemical engineering major Kevin Kefauver. 
"They're the ones coming when something hap- 
pens to us. 



By Dave J. Ianonne 




Hank Fellner 



College Park Volunteer Fire Department Open House 51 



A Million Men Marching 



It was a day like no other. It was a day for firm 
handshakes and hugs. It was a day for black 
men to do something radical by loving one 
another, in a world that doesn't love them. 
October 16, 1995 will always be known as the 
day when over 1 million black men decided to 
have a get together on the lawn of the nation's 
capital. 

Black men from across the nation or just 
across the street stood side by side and hand in 
hand. What a day it was - to see first, second, 
and third generations of black men doing some- 
thing positive by being one in a million. But it 
wasn't a day to sit and visit with your buddies. 
It was a day to listen to words of encouragement 
and words of hope. 

Speakers such as Maya Angelo, Jesse Jackson, 
Rosa Parks and Minister Louis Farrakhan ex- 
pressed words of change and encouraged the 
crowd to overcome the struggles black men face 
in America. The struggle has been long and the 
wound has been deep but it's time for all black 
men to step up and lead the black race to 
another level of greatness. 

But we can't be divided amongst ourselves. 
We need the ideas and inputs of the young and 
old, rich and the poor, the gay and the straight. 
Thus, the Million Man March was not only a 
day of atonement, but a day of unity in the black 
community. 



By Michael Street 



Michael Street is a 
sophomore studying 
African-American 
Studies. Michael also 
has a love for poetry. 



What a day it was. . . 




Tyrone Broc 



Uege Life 




Tvrone Brooks 



Million Man March 53 



A Million Men Marching 



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Out on the Town 

Night life in College Park 




56 College Life 




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Night Life in College Park 



Out on the Town 







College Life 




Snorre Wik 



Night Life in College Park 59 



ritness in the 1990's 

Students find the time to workout, no matter what 



Maryland's student body is definitely a. fine 
body. Olivia Newton John's workout anthem, 
"Let's Get Physical" does not hold a candle to 
Maryland students' attitude about working 
out. 

The mystical search for the "body beautiful" 
involves more than free weights and step 
aerobics. Maryland students are going to ex- 
tremes to watch what they eat and drink. 
Vegetarianism and the exclusion of caffeine are 
on the rise on campus. 

Students are going as far as integrating their 
fitness obsessions with studying. Be that pump- 
ing iron while reciting CHEM 243 formulas or 
rollerblading down Campus Drive practicing 
French, students of Maryland are lean, mean, 
and educated machines. 





Snorre Wik 






College Life 




Snotre Wik 



Fitness in the 1990's 61 



Halloween 1995 




Snorre Wik 



Snorre W 



College Life 



A crazy evening in College Park 




Snorrc Wik 



Snorre Wik 



Halloween 1995 63 




E. Graves, II 



E. Gravi 



College Life 



Homecoming Fashion 

Dimensions Fashion Group sets fashion standard 



Like the leaves on the trees in autumn, 
colors of gold, yellow, orange, red and 
brown filled the stage of the Dimensions 
ishion Show. From khaki pants and cream 
'eaters on men, to chocolate-colored suede 
mpers on women, the styles and colors of the 
jthes exemplified the natural look. 
Sweaters were the attire of choice for men on 
e runway. They came in vest style or with v- 
:ck collars. Some of the models wore them 
th blazers or corduroy jackets and khaki pants, 
lile others wore denim shirts under them. 
Pantsuits and jumpers were the popular styles 
r women on the runway. The pantsuits, worn 
th clunky heels or mid-length boots, were 
:ek and sophisticated. They came in classic 
lors like beige and black, and were worn with 
mming pants or short shirts. The jumpers 
me in bold, brown colors or patterned styles. 
ime women sported leggings under the thigh- 
gh to knee-length attire. 
"We tried to get a variation of style, " said Mac 



Gardner, president of Dimensions and a junior 
studying political science and business. The 
fashion show included a lingerie scene featuring 
men in silk boxers and women in 
flowing silk nightgowns. The 
models went back in time during 
one scene which featured clothes 
from the 60's, 70's and 80s. 

The crowd howled with laugh- 
ter as two models pimped across 
the stage wearing Adidas 
sweatsuits and tennis shoes, and 
sporting thick gold chains around 
their necks. One audience mem- 
ber said that it reminded her of the days when 
Run D.M.C. was popular. 

Dimensions Fashion Group was founded in 
1992byAlthea Grey. It was designed to provide 
a way for students to display their fashions. 

"It's for people who have wanted to do fashion 
and be on stage, but aren't accustomed to it or are 
scared to do it," said Gardner. 



"We tried to get 
a variation of 
styles. " 

Mac Gardner 
President 



By Andrea K. Walker 




Andrea Walker is a graduate 
of the Class of 1996. Andrea 
was the editor in chief of the 
Eclipse newspaper her senior 
year and she received her 
degree in journalism. 



h. Graves, II 



Dimensions Fashion Show - Homecoming 1995 65 




Snorrc Wik 



Life 



A i-Viondly ; : aco 

Sue Gaspiriy owner of College Park landmark 
Howie's, has been a part of town for over 33 years 



College campuses promote academic and 
philosophical growth among students. 
Classes, lectures and readings, how- 
ver, do not teach as much as interpersonal 
:lationships. Sometimes the best lessons are 
le ones that are unexpected. 

Sue Gaspin, owner of Howie's Sub Shop on 
ehigh Road in downtown College Park, is 
lore than just a good cook to those who know 
er well - she is a friend. Generations of 
:udents have eaten at Howie's. Many of those 
:udents were touched by the kindness and 
ancern that Gaspin shares with her customers. 
i turn, Gaspin speaks fondly of Maryland 
:udents who frequented Howie's during their 
ears at Maryland and still come back to visit. 
The students that frequent Howie's know 
lat Sue is there if they need her. She is always 
oncerned with the events that affect her stu- 
ent customers. "I've been through it all - I've 
een through the riots [of the 60s]. Riots 
'eren't a nice scene around here." She is also 



always available to just sit and talk, or just listen. 

Howie's has been part of the College Park 
landscape for decades. Gaspin and her late 
husband opened the restaurant over 33 years ago 
and they purchased the shopping center that 
Howie's is a part of over 13 vears ago. 

Howie's is named after her husband Howard. 
Howard Gaspin had been involved in the restau- 
rant business when Sue met him in 1 960. After 
they married they went into business together in 
College Park. When their children were young 
they would visit Howie's and hangout with the 
students. Gaspin says that now she brings her 
grandchildren to visit. 

Since Howard's death in 1989 Sue has con- 
tinued to work seven days a week. "I really en jov 
it," she said in reference to her long hours. Sue 
works every day starting in the early evening and 
stays through closing. 

Sue Gaspin has made a difference in the lives 
of many Maryland students. They wandered 
into Howie's to get lunch and left with a friend. 



By Joanne Saidman 




Howie's Restaurant t> 



So Much To Offer 

The Adele H. Stamp Student Union is the 

center of campus for many 



Deposit your paycheck, grab a bite to 
eat, mail a letter home to mom, buy 
next semester's textbooks and pick up 
tickets to the big concert next weekend. 

In most places, finish- 
"]l /T £. • J ins that list of "things to 

My friends , ,, ,, , 

do would require at least 
an hour of running all 
over town. At Maryland 
Wilier tri ough, most students, 
professors and staff could 

Schools are teu y° u tnat everything 
on that list and more 
could be done in one place 
on campus — the stu- 
dent union. 

The Adele H. Stamp 
Student Union sees more 
than 22,000 visitors daily 
and is the center of cam- 
pus activity for most stu- 
dents at Maryland. A 
place to relax and eat be- 
tween classes, run errands 
or see a show at night, the 
union offers students a 
diverse array of opportu- 
nities and activities. "My friends that go to 
smaller schools are always amazed at the amount 
our student union has to offer," says Susannah 
Scace, a senior journalism major. "You can do 
just about anything there." 

continued on page 72 



that go to 

smaller 

ools are 

always 

amazed at 

the amount 

our student 

union has to 

offer. " 

Susannah Scace 
Senior 




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Andy Goglia 





Andv Goglia 



College Life 




Andy Goglia 



Stamp Student Union 69 




o mo ra? 




iV I o a I a 



Miss Grade makes students feel at home 




"All that the 

students need is to 

know that someone 

cares, and I do care. 

This is my life here. " 



ervice with a smile." A saying, 
everyone has heard in their life. But 
when a person receives a smile from 
Gracie Brown, their whole day lights up. She 
may not be known by the campus at large but 
to the residents of North Cam- 
pus, Gracie Brown is a land- 
mark. Affectionately called 
"Miss Gracie," the residents of 
North Campus respect her 
dearly. 

As a cashier at the Ellicott 
Dining Hall, Miss Gracie has 
influenced past and present resi- 
dents' lives at North Campus. 
With a hearty "good morn- 
ing" and beaming smile, Miss 
Gracie has brightened the day of every visitor to 
the Ellicott Dining Hall. "Being away from 
home for the first time, Miss Gracie takes the 
tension off of being alone at a huge university 



like Maryland," said Toni Blake, a freshman 
majoring in journalism. 

"I want the students to feel at home, because 
once they're here, this is their home. A smile and 
a 'good morning' are the best way to start out the 
day. A smile makes you feel good and a 'good 
morning' is said because it is a good morning, 
because you have awakened to a new day." 

Miss Gracie said that her 17 years at the 
Ellicott Dining Hall have been a pleasure. She 
said that she has seen the dining hall and styles 
change, but the students' attitudes have re- 
mained the same. "Although at times, the 
students can be a bit wild or rude, I just firmly 
tell them to act right. And they do! All that the 
students need is to know that someone cares, 
and I do care. This is my life here." 

As time goes on, students move out of North 
Campus and on to other things, but they never 
forget Gracie Brown and her brilliant smile. 
And she never forgets her "little darlings." 



By Tracy Isaac 




Snorre Wik 



Snorrc Wik 




Snorrc Wik I 



Lllicott Dining Hall 71 



Stamp Student Union 



S o 



continued from page 68 

One of the main attractions of the student 
union is the variety of the eateries available. 
Whether it's grabbing a bite for lunch or having 
a sit-down dinner, the union has it all. There are 
two fast food restaurants available in the stu- 
dent union. Roy Rogers offers its visitors a full 
menu, including breakfast. The student union 
Taco Bell Express has a limited number of 
selections from the regular Taco Bell menu, but 
includes favorites such as tacos, burritos and 
nachos. 

Among the University food services available 
in the union are ice cream at Dory's Ice Cream, 
sandwiches at Maryland Deli and Sandwich 
Factory and pizza at Lamberghini's Pizza Par- 
lor. Whether they're eating, catching up on 
homework or just talking with friends, students 
can be found at all times of the day hanging out 




\nJvl.ogli 



lege Life 



Much To Offer 




Snorre Wik 



in one of the many large seating areas in the 
union. For vegetarians and those who have a 
craving for a more natural variety of food choices, 
the Food Co-op is located in the basement. For 
a fancier meal and table service, Umberto's 
offers a sit down atmosphere and offers its 
quests a variety of Italian dishes. 

The selection of food in the student union is 
probably enough to amaze students at smaller 
schools, but the union offers even more. Many 
students take the opportunity to do all of their 
banking right on campus. Citizens Bank and 
Trust Company of Maryland operates a branch 
on the first floor of the union. Students can 
always be found in the University Book Center, 
whether it's buying books, shopping for gifts or 
just picking up an extra pair of goggles for 
chemistry lab. The Union Shop is the union's 
convenience store, with items from soda and 

confined on page 77 





Snorre Wik 



Snorre \\ ik 



Stamp Student Union 73 




Tyrone Brooks 



A iarat Hand i.ook 



at 



i a i o r y 



Larry Crouse is a campus historian 
in his own right 



hat exactly defines a career? Webster 
defines a career as a profession fol- 
lowed as life's work. But to Larry 
Zrouse, his time at the University of Maryland 
las been more than a career - it has been an 
idventure. 

As the head of Campus Photo, Crouse pro- 
•ided the "eyes" for the great and sad moments 
n Man-land's diverse history. After leaving the 
nilitary, where he taught photography, in the 
pring of 1969, Crouse began working for the 
Jniversity as the precursor of Campus Photo, 
'holographic Services. At Photographic Ser- 
ices, Crouse had a hand in chronicling Mary- 
and during its most tumultuous period, the late 



1960s and the early 1970s. With the Vietnam 
War raging on, Crouse photographed the effects 
the war had on the campus. Riots, peace dem- 
onstrations, and student outrage were a few of 
the scenes that Crouse caught on film. 

Crouse has experienced Maryland's magnifi- 
cent spirit. As the official photographer of the 
Maryland Athletics department from 1971 to 
1990, Crouse displayed the brilliance of victory 
and the misery of defeat. 

Without Larry Crouse's perspective and in- 
novative photography, the rich, vivid history of 
the University of Maryland would be forever 
lost, because as the old saying goes, "A picture is 
worth a thousand words." 



By Tracy Isaac 




Tyrone Brooks 



Tvrone Brook 



Larry Crouse 75 



Stamp Student Union 



S o 




College Life 



Much To Offe 




Snorre Wik 



continued from page 73 

chips to cold medicine and tissues. MailBoxes 
Etc. is a postal facility chain in the union with 
post office boxes and mail facilities. TicketMaster 
also operates a branch on campus offering tickets 
to the latest concerts and events in town. 

The union is also an active area for students 
after school hours. The Hoff theater offers stu- 
dents a 750-seat cinema with one of the largest 
screens in the area, as well as Dolby sound. The 
Hoff often sponsors free showings of sneak 
previews and regularly offers an inexpensive 
alternative to other theaters around town. "Some- 
times they show good previews that you can see 
for free before the movie gets to the regular 
theaters," says John Johansen a senior biology 
major. The bowling alley and pool hall in the 
basement are used by students to test their skills 
for less money than the local lanes. An arcade 
also offers a way to pass the time. 

Many other activities occur "after hours" in 
the union. The Stamp Union Program Council, 
a student-directed programming board, coordi- 
nates undergraduate social, cultural, recreational 
and entertaining activities to meet community 
needs. One popular event is the annual All- 
Niter, where the entire union is transformed 
into an entertainment center with games, mock 
casinos and concerts. 

During the semester many students find that 
they don't know what to expect on a test from a 



professor. The Star Center offers an answer for 
some students. The Star Center sells copies of 
tests in certain classes from previous semesters. 
Often this helps students grasp a better under- 
standing of the professor's stvle of testing. 

The Office of Commuter Affairs, also lo- 
cated in the union, assists students who live off- 
campus. Commuters can often be found sleep- 
ing, studying or hanging out in the commuter 
lounge, on the second floor. The lounge offers 
commuters a place to spend time between classes. 
"The commuter lounge is a good place to go 
between classes when you have a break that isn't 
long enough to go all the way home," says Brian 
Johnson a senior art studio major. 

The student union is home of the offices of 
numerous student groups on campus from the 
Student Government Association to the Black 
Student Union. There are also several ball- 
rooms and meeting rooms available for ban- 
quets and other events. Information about 
various organizations and activities can be found 
at the union information desk or on bulletin 
boards throughout the union. 

At all hours of the day and night students of 
all races and cultural backgrounds can be found 
in the union participating in activities or just 
wasting time between class. It is the center of 
campus activity and seems to have an endless list 
of opportunities for social and cultural 
interaction. 



By Betsy Wright 




Betsy Wright is 

studying 
journalism and 
plans to graduate 
in the fall of 1996. 



Snorre Wik 



Snorre Wik 



Stamp Student Union 



^> ... 



(J roam cmoooo on 

ogo Avon u o 

The Bagel Place has become a popular 

College Park hang-out 




Carolyn Melago is a 
sophomore studying 
journalism Carolyn is a 
copy editor and a reporter 
for The Diamondback. 



The Bagel Place has made a home for 
itself in College Park by recognizing 
and appreciating its primary customers 
- students. Managed by them, staffed by them 
and packed by them, students have enabled the 
store to thrive for 1 1 years on Route 1 . 

The owners of the Bagel Place illustrate the 
special attachment some students have to the 
store. Like other campus students, Mike 
Hannerhan spent hours hanging out at the 
Bagel Place while in graduate school. He liked 
the shop so much that he bought it after gradu- 
ation and has owned it for the past seven years. 
Students comprise more than half of the 
Bagel Place's work force. Tara Wadas, who 
graduated form Maryland in May of 1995, is a 
manager and has worked there for a year and a 
half. "It's a friendly, fun, sit-down place," she 
said. "It's such a different atmosphere." A 
student with her face in a book and her hand 



wrapped around a capuccino or a group of 
friends chatting over bagels are common sights 
at the Bagel Place. 

Wadas said that students want to work at the 
Bagel Place because it offers flexible schedules 
that work around classes, which it why the Bagel 
Place is always flooded with student applica- 
tions. "We understand that school is more 
important," she said. 

The owners and employees make a priority of 
updating the Bagels Place's products to keep up 
with the ever-changing tastes of college stu- 
dents. "The espresso bar has done pretty good 
business, and we have a lot more vegetarian 
soups and a veggie burger," Wadas added. "It's 
a healthy alternative." 

The owners play a role in the positive relation- 
ship between students and the Bagel Place by 
working hard to gain a good rapport with the 
students. 






By Carolyn Melago 




Snorre Wik 



Snorre Wik 



, 




The Bagel Place 79 



Snorre Wik H 

79 



■4—"- 






He looks over McKeldin Mall, stands 
guard at Byrd Stadium and Cole Field 
House, cheers us on and gives us good 
luck. Testudo, the Terrapin mascot, is more 
than j ust a mascot - he is a legend on the campus 
of the University of Maryland at College Park. 
Testudo comes in various forms. He is a 
statue that has a worn out nose, he is furry with 
a removable shell that likes to crowd surf and he 
is found in many other spirited depictions. 
Testudo even got redesigned to look tougher for 
1996. 

The first introduction that many Maryland 
students get to Testudo is in front of McKeldin 
Mall during Freshman Orientation. The Ori- 
entation Adviser may tell a story about Testudo 
being taken to Florida and hanging out on the 
beach in boxer shorts until he was rescued. 

Each student at Maryland may have a differ- 
ent story about Testudo. ..some may be true and 
some may just be part of the folklore of the 
University of Maryland. No matter whether 
the story is true or not - one thing holds true - 
Testudo, no matter what form he is in, is full of 
spirit and good luck. 




— '^ — » . 




Russell Acost 



liege Life 



Testudo 

The Terrapin Mascot 




£&rtW* 



1IH 


fripBg 




[ff-'il«l;' 






• 




"OVOTA M 




^ , t ii 




Paul Vieira 



Russell Acosca 



Testudo 8 1 



Blizzard of 1996 




Snorrc Wik 



dleee Life 







Snorre \X ik 



I 




Snorre Wik 



Snorre Wik 



Blizzard of 1996 83 



Blizzard 




iiege Life 



o f 



19 9 6 




Snorre Wik 



Snorre Wik 



Blizzard of 1996 85 




Seniors and 
Academics 



W: 



ien college started a few years ago, it 
was hard to imagine that graduation 
would ever be here. The one reason that all seniors 
have in common for being at the University of 
Maryland is to get an education. Academic 
experiences are the root of our education and 
growth at the university. 

College teaches indivuality and self- 
assurance, and each senior will take his or her own 
lessons learned. The knowledge that was gained 
will be the ticket to the future. Good Luck and 
best wishes to the Class of 1996. 



Daniel Yuen 



Seniors and Academics o7 



College of Agriculture 

and 
Natural Resources 




'£>.3cta^u5>a_ 



Academics 



Feeding the hungry of the world, developing sound environmental policies, 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

understanding animal and plant biology and managing agribusiness are all vital 

Environmental and Resource Policy 

concerns of the College of Agriculture and its faculty. Contemporary subjects like 

General Agricultural Sciences 

genetic engineering, international trade and policy, dietetics, nutrition and landscape 

Agronomy 

architecture have joined the disciplines of crop and animal sciences in the 

Animal Science H 

curriculum. 

Dietetics 

More than 900 undergraduates work closely with faculty in state-of-the-art 

Food Science 

facilities including new biological resource engineering and animal sciences 

Horticulture 

buildings, a new dairy processing pilot plant, a plant sciences building and an 

Human Nutrition and Foods 

expanded teaching farm. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Research 

Landscape Architecture 

Center, the National Institutes of Health and the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center 

Natural Resources Management 

are nearby resources which enhance teaching, research and internship and career 
opportunities. 



Information about academics for each college was adapted I 
from "Discover the Reality," produced by the Offu\ I 
Institutional Advancement, University Publications. 



College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 



Jennifer Aguilar 

Natural Resource Management 

Ana Beltran-Lazarte 

Dietetics 

Julie Bortz 

Natural Resource Management 

Jeanne L. Cheung 

Dietetics 




Jose Collell 

Natural Resource Management 

Melissa Cossaboon 

Landscape Architecture 

Michele Friedland 

Nutrition 

Julie Halstead 

Dietetics 



Frank Hunkele 

Agronomy 

Dawn Knill 

General Agriculture 

Teresa Lau 

Dietetics 

Janet Lemanski 

Natural Resource Management 





90 



uors 




Carla 



aria Lukehart 

Natural Resource Management 

Mary Anne Lustan 

Business Management 

Darla Lynn Mileni 

Dietetics 

Ahmad Mudallali 

Agriculture & Resource Economics 



Katherine Ross 

Animal Sciences 
Brad Schott 
Horticulture 
Debra Schulze 

Dietetics 
Maruf Singer 

Business Management 



Mary Sistrunk 

Dietetics 

Rebecca Slingluff 

Dietetics 

James Wagner 

Natural Resource Management 
Susan Zwolinski 

Horticulture 




College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 9 1 



College of 
Architecture 



Physics, history, technology, drawing, urban planning and aesthetics 
all combine to produce the trained architect. At College Park, the 
School of Architecture is small, select, and well equipped. The 
Architecture Library is one of the finest in the nation, and the Elizabeth 
Alley slide collection contains 250,000 slides on architecture, landscape 
architecture and urban planning. The faculty include well-established 
practicing architects, preservationists and archaeological experts. 

The CADRE Corporations is a nonprofit organization through 
which students and faculty contact for research and design projects in 
keeping with the fundamental educational mission of the school. 
Summer credit programs in historic preservation are located in Cape 
May, New Jersey, a designated national historic landmark district, and 
Kiplin Hall in North Yorkshire, England. 



Seniors 





Regina Barkdull 

Architecture 
Carla Cole 

Architectur 



Dana Hammer 
Architecture 
Edward Haungs 

Architecture 



Mark Nook 

Architecture 
Heather Ring 
Architecture 
Amy Stitley 
Architecture 
Robert Voelke 
Architecture 





College of Architecture 93 






College of Arts and 

Humanities 




Critical thought, persuasive speech and good writing - together with 

American Studios Art 

abundant opportunities to expand one's cultural and intellectual horizons 

Art History and Archaeology 

- these are the foundations of the liberal arts curriculum. The College of 

Chinese 

Arts and Humanities at Maryland offers students a full and stimulating 

Classical Languages and Literature 

array of opportunities in the languages, history, philosophy, literature, art 

vjaerman Italian 

and music of the past and present, of the United States and of the world. 

Japanese Jewish Studies 

Students study with talented faculty members who are redefining 

Linguistics Music 

their subjects as they teach, pursue scholarship and perform. These 
faculty are committed to helping students prepare for work in the local 

Romance Lancjuacjes Russian Studies 

community and in the world, and at the same time showing students the 

Russian opanish 

way toward building a private self. Faculty often work individually with 

Speech Communication 

students to help them become effective, reflective and successful people. 

Theatre Women's Studies 




Nick) Akmal 

English 

Kristin AJfano 
An Studio 
Gulsen Deniz Ali 

English 

Amra Alirejsovic 

English ^^^^^^ 



David Allan 

Philosophy 

MindyAmster 

Speech Communication 

Melissa Atheneos 

English 

Sharon Auerbach 

Philosophy 



Seth Auster 
American Studies 
Ronen Aviram 
Jewish Studies 
Bethany Barber 
English 
Bethanne Beasley 



Jamal Bennett 

English 

Deborah Bond 
Historv 

Heather Brown 
Spanish 

Hope Brown 
English 



Trace) Buckley 

History 

Donald Bushe 

English 

Wendy Calawav 

English 

Lauren Carleson 

Spanish 






College of Arts and Humanities 95 



Fee-Foon Chew 

Music 

Diane Creighton 

English 

Moira C. Cusac 

English 

Buna Cum 

English 




Nicole Gavin 

French 

Erin Geyer 

German 

Brian Glassberg 

History 

Zahra Gordon 



Erika Greene 

Art History 

Clara Hall 

German/Music 
Kelly Hendricks 
Spanish 
William Hickey 

German 



Seniors 




Lilly Hung 

Theatre 
Alicia Jackson 

Art History 

Marcy Jacobowitz 

Jewish Studies/Gerontology 
David Jalufka 

Russian 



Chookeat Jarvis 

German 

Eric Johnson 

Art/Art History 

Melba Jones 

English 

Keondra Joyner 

English 



Shira Kandel 

Jewish Studies 






John Kane 

English ^^^^^_ 
Andrew Keller 
English 
Kristen Ketchum 

Art Studio 



Do Hee Kim 

English 
Tasha King 

English 

Christopher Klein 

English 

David Klossner 

History 



Leslie Kohut 

English 

Sara Kovensky 

Jewish Studies 

Joanna Lathrop 

History 

Kenny Lee 

Art Studio 





College of Arts and Humanities 97 




Lisa Lee 

Art History 

Eric Lerner 

Music 

Sara Levison 

History 

Dave Lorentz 

Arts Administration 



Michelle McCubbin 

American Studies 

Joseph Magnas 

History 

Nazie Malayeri 

Speech Communication 

Ternell McCullough 

English 



Amy Michels 

English 
Abby Miller 

Speech Communication 

Lucretia Mitchell 

Dance 

Carolyn Mustello 

Art Studio 




Stephanie Neutx 

Women's Studies 
Katelyn O'Brien 
English 

Mayumi Ono 
American Studies 
Diane Onorio 
English 



Natalie Ostrow 




English 

Meredith Page 
English 

Robin Parter 
English 
Carlo Paul 
English 




Seniors 




Jeanene Perkins 

English 

Wadei Powell 
English 
Dawnia Rather 

English 
Andrew Reid 

History 



Carolyn Reid 

English/Jewish Studies 
Kim Reiter 
Speech Communication 
Steven Rife 

Studio Art 

Elena Rochman 

German 




Howard Rosen 

Speech Communication 
Sarah Rothenberg 
Art Studio ^^^^^^ 
Audra Rubin 
Speech Communication 
Arezoo Safavipour 

Art Studio 



James Sawyer 

Art Studio 
Tara Scheu 
Philosophy 
Krista Schreiner 
Art History 
Dory Schwartz 
Communication 




Anne Sempos 

German 

Alison Shepard 

English 

Amy Smith 

Spanish 

Crystal Smith 

History 




College of Arts and Humanities 



Jay Spagnola 

History 

Winona Stanback 

Music 

Arvies Staton 

Arts and Humanities 
Joshua Stern 

Speech Communication 



Cynthis Symancyk 

French 

Micho Takagi 




Jennifer Tambone 

English ^^^ 

Hector Tapia 

English 



Christi Tavano 

English 

Nikeia Thompson 

English 

Antionette Toomer 

English 

Kevin Tucker 

English 



Seniors 




Heai 



eather Vasquez 
English 

Julie Vermillion 
English 

Sunil Vernekar 
Art Studio 

Sahrada Vernkara 
Anthropolo; 



■as: 




Hali Wallach 

Speech Communicarioi 
Kathleen Warren 
English 
Shari Weiss 
Hearing and Speech 
Scott Wels 
Art Studio 



Christine Williams 

Art Historv 
Katie Winegrad 
Speech ^^^^^^ 
Nicola Winterton 
■Art History 
Vicki Wooten 
Dance 




College of Arts and Humanities 101 






>-. 



College of 
Behavioral and 
Social Sciences I 




3 "Sd^viw* 



Academics 



Studying human communities and the way people interact in an effort 

Afro-AmGrican StudiGS 

to solve the most complex problems of our time is the focus of the College 

Anthropology 

of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

The large, diverse college engages its students in the social, political, 

Criminology and Criminal Justico 

economic and psychological foundations of civilization. How does indi- 

Economics 

vidual behavior affect group behavior, and vice versa? What and who is a 

GGOoraohv 

criminal? What makes a leader? How do we effect change in social behav- 

GovGrnmGnt and Politics 

iors? Unraveling the mysteries of cultures and values and using that knowl- 

HGaring and Spooch SciGncGS 

edge to improve the human condition is the driving force behind this area 
of study and research. 

At Maryland, the proximity of the census Bureau, the departments of 

Psychology 

Labor, Health, Education and Welfare, Transportation, and of course the 
federal government puts students at the center of information, policy mak- 

Sociology 

ing, and planning for our nations future. 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 



Claudia Acosta 

Hearing and Speech 
Blake Adelman 
Speech Pathology 
Paula Alarid 
Psychology 

Shawnequa Albert 
Psychol 



Yasmeen Ali 

Psychology 
Kimblery Allen 

Criminal Justice 

Sonia Amir 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Jung An 

Economics 




David Barron 

Goverment and Politics 
Stacey Barton 

Psychology 



Angana Baruah 

Psychology 
Russell Bell 
Economics 
Porita Bennett 

Psychology 
Erika Benns 

Psychology 






Seniors 




Erika Berger 



Psychology 
Laurie Besden 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Jessica Bigelow 
Criminlogv and Criminal Justice 
Mark Black 
Government and Politics 




Kristine Blais 

Hearing and Speech 

Jennifer Blake 

Sociology 

David Bock 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Kathleen Boggs 

Psychology 



liiAi 



Michael Bordi 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Tara Boulier 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Juliet Bowen 

Psychology 

Andrew Boyle 

Economics 





Tony Brannon 

Government and Politics 

Barrie Bratt 

Government and Politics 

David Bright 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Gretina Brown 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



m 




Peter Brown 
Economics 

Melissa Burneston 
Psychology- 
David Burns 
Criminology and Criminal [u 
Natalie Burton 
Psychology 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 105 



Robert Cadrette 

Criminology and Criminal Justic 
Amy Carison 
Psychology 
Jessica L. Carlsen 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Christopher Carter 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 




Thomas Cavada 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Nanci Chalkin 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Michael Cheng 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Jennifer Clarke 

Sociology 



Wanneh Clarke 

Economics 
Lori Cohen 

Psychology 
Shane Cohen 

Anthropology/Mech. Engineering 
Jason Cohn 

Psychology 




Brent Cooper 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Courtney Covington 

Government and Politics 

Shawn Cronin 

Sociology 

Meghan Crowin 

Psychology 




Govern;!!' 
Laura Delano 
Criminology and ( 
Lisa DelGaudio 
Government and Politics 
Frank Denison 
Psychology 




06 



Spni 




Jill Deutsch 

Sociology 
Tancred Dickens 

Psychology/French 
Janie Doutsos 
Sociology v^^^^k 
Christopher Drazoys 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 




Aaron Duchak 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Patricia Duckworth 
Criminology and Crir 
Jodi Eizenberg 
Hearing and Speech 
Natalia Ekzarkhov 
Government and Politics 





Economics 
Michael Ellison 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Lisa Epstein 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Shannon Erb 



Criminal Justice 




Adam Feinberg 

Economics/Government and Politics 

Lisa Feldman 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Corinne Fisher 

Psychology 

Patricia Flanagan 

Sociology 




iy foiDaum 

Hearing and Speech 
George Fortunato 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
John Franklin 
Criminology and Criminal [u 
George Freeman 
Economics 



College ot Behavioral and Social Sciences 1 07 



wW^m 



Michelle Freihofer 

Government and Politics 
Stacy Friedman 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Maria Gamble 
Government and Politics 
Robert Girard 
Politics 




Cheryl Glickler 

Psychology 

Cordell Golden 

Sociology 

Jason Goldstein 

Government and Politics 

Sandra Goldstein 

Psychology 




Sheri Grand 

Psychology 
Christine Graves 
Hearing and Speech 
Stephanie Gray 
Government and Politics 
Carrie Greenland 
Government and Politics 




Alan Gross 

Hearing and Speech 
Michael Gross 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Stephanie Gross 
Government and Politics 
Cindy Grosshandler 
Psychology 




Craig Gwozdziewicz 

Government and Pol 
Nicole Hairston 
Criminology and Criminal 
Steven Handwerger 
Psychology 
Kimberly Hans 
Psychology 





108 



Seniors 




w 



Faye Harrell 

Psychology 

Stephanie Harris 
Psychology 
Kellie Hartle 

Hearing and Speech 
Seni Hauzer 

Psychology 




Kelly Headen 

Geography 
Melissa Hearne 
Government and Politics 
Garth Henning 
Psychology 
Lauren Hert 
Hearing and Speech 




Katherine Hill 

Psychology 
Bryan Hinds 
Economics 
Michelle Hirsch 

Psychology 
Yanique Hodge 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Paul Holda 

Psychology 

Kevin Horan 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Anne Howell 

Government and Politics 

Vanesssa Hradsky 

Economics 





lac 

Economics 
Joseph Huddle 
Psychology 
Julie Hudnall 

Psychology 
Monique Hunter 

Government and Politics 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 109 



Yasong Hwang 

Sociology 
Marisa Iacono 

Sociology 
William Jackson 

Government and Politics 
Karen Jacob 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 





Kevin Jafre 

Government and Politics 

Diana James 

Sociology 

Nichelle Johnson 

Sociology 

Sonja Johnson 

Psycholc 




Damon Jones 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Matthew Taylor Kachuka 

Economics 

Todd Kaufman 

Government and Politics 

Ramsey Kazzi 

Economics 



Hyung Kim 

Economics 
Jae Kim 
Economics 
Joanne Kim 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 




Sanghee Kim 

Economics 



Steven A 
Economics 
Amy Krachman 

Psychology 

Kirsten D. Kruhm 

Criminology and Criminal Jir 
Marcie Laderman 
Government and Politics/CCJS 



















\ 








Sen 



lors 







Christopher LaMarca 

Criminology and Criminal justice 

Rachel Landsberg 

Sociology 

Meegan Lawson 

Psychology 

Debra Leach 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 




Beverly Lee 

Psychology 

Bryan Lee 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Christopher Lefever 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Lauri Left 

Geography 




Government and Politics 

Allyson Leven 

Psychology 

Rachel Lieberman 

Psychology 

Patrick Lineberry 

Sociology- 





Meredith Linker 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Michele London 

Psychology 

Marcia Magal 

Economics 

Kevin Mailman 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Timothy Martin 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Shila Mashadishafie 
Government and Politics 
Kenneth Matthew 
Criminology and Criminal In 
Katherine Mazis 



Psychology 



■■I 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 1 1 1 




Michael McArthur 

Afro-American Studies 

Tomeya Miller 

Economics 

Brook Minnick 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Jodi Mintz 

Government and Politics 



Scott Mitchell 

Physical Geography/ Cartography 

Brian Mock 

Economics 

Craig Moody 

Criminology and Criminal Jusitice 

Michael Morahan 

Geography/Cartography 



Cecily Morgan 

Afro-American Studies 

Hope Morrow 

Sociology 

Susan Murphy 

Sociology 

Mukta Nayyar 

Sociology 



Marie Nicolas 

Government and Politics 
Margaret Okibedi 
Criminology and Criminal Jusria 
Amy Orringer 
Government and Politics/Speech 
Charles Owens 
Government and Politics 



Einat Packman 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Randy Pagulayan 

Psychology 

Hyon Pak 

Psychology 

Michael Parnis 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 





Seniors 




w 



Karen Pasta 

Psychology 

Nita Patel 

Psychology 

Jennifer Perna 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Katina Phifer 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 




Shari 

Hearing and Speech Science 
Stephen Plotnick 
Government and Politic 
Natasha Pratt 
Criminal Justice/Journalism 
David Prins 
Economics 





Candice Proctor 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Timothy Radigan 
Government and Politics 
Mohammed Rabat 
Economics 

Alberteen Ransom 
Criminology and Criminal justice 



Felice Raskind 

Hearing and Speech Science 

Kelly Ray 

Sociology 

Tracy Redmond 

Ciovernment and Politi 




Kimberly Reiss 

Psychology 



lal J. Kesri 

Psychology 
Daniel Reyes 
Anthropology 
Maria Teresa Reyes 

Criminolgv and Criminal 
Susan Reynolds 

Psychology 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 113 



Darlene Richey 

Criminology and Criminal justice 

Hope Rippeon 

Psychology 

Deborah Roche 

Psychology/English 

Andrew Rogers 

Government and Politics/Economics 





Eden Rome 

Sociology 

Marni Rosenblum 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Lisa Rosenhaft 

Government and Politics 

Alyssa Rosner 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Michael Rubin 

Criminology and Ctiminal Justice 
Jill Rudick 

Psychology 
Monifa Russell 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Alicia Sabatino 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 



Michele Sabatino 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Amy Sagalkin 

Government and Politics 
Noriko Saitoh 
Sociology 
Teremun A. Salmon 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 




5ci 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Rebecca Schaffer 

Criminology and Criminal justice 

Jennifer Scharf 

Criminal Justice/Psychology 

Amy Schlegel 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Seniors 




s& 



Rebecca Schneider 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Andrea Schulman 
Government and Politics 
Thomas Segar 

Psychology 

Brett Semel 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Yuching Sepulvado 

Economics 
Kerry Shahan 

Government and Polit 
Michelle Siegman 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Dean SkandaJis 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Robert Smallwood 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Kristen Smith 
Psychology 
Michelle Solomon 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 
Erica Starnes 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 




Erika Steinbach 

Government and Politics 
Melanie Stibick 
Sociology 
Mitchell Swanson 

Sociology 
Scott Swichar 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 




•zymendera 



Scott Szymen 

Government and Politics 
Troy Lee Taylor 
Government and Politics 
Amy Tenney 
Government and Politics 
Nicole Theoharis 
Psychology 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 115 



Jacqueline Thompson 

Psychology 
Jennifer Tozzi 




Psychology 
Meng Tsai 
Economics 
Walter Ty^ 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 




*w w 



... , 




^1 








Johan Van Der Ven 
Economics 
Melinda Vargas 

Economics 
Rodney VLUorante 

Criminal Justice/Economics 
Tisha Waiters 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 








Michelle Walker 

Government and Politics 

Kimberly Wartha 

Psychology 

Nicole Weidenbaum 

Psychology 
Andrew Weiner 

Government and Politics 








Seniors 




w 



Jason Weiner 

Criminoki;" md Criminal Justice 

Rachel Weisberg 

Psychology 

Ross Weisman 

Sociologv 

Jamell ^Trite 

Psvcho'ogj 




Todd Willis 

Gi frnment J.nd Policies 

Harriet Wilson 

Criminology .;nd Criminal Justice 




College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 1 1 



College of Business 

and 
Management 




The world of business consists of more than profit motives and market 

Accountinci 

shares. Using natural and human resources wisely, cooperating in the interna- 

ueosion ano inTormation ociences 

tional marketplace, understanding competition, the arena of finance and 

Finance 

investment, and the dynamics of organizations make this discipline a chal- 

General Business and Management 

lenge to young entrepreneurs and aspiring executives. 

The College of Business and Management is housed in Van Munching 
nUiilclii rifc?ovJUiL>" iVIcii ldU"i i l"i II 

Hall, one of the newest buildings on campus, with sophisticated teaching and 

International Business 

presentation facilities. Ranked by U.S. News and World Report among the 

Logistics and Transportation 

top 30 business schools in the nation, its majors are among the most popular 

Management Sciences/Statistics 

at the university. In the true spirit of enterprise, the college strives constantly 

Marketing 

toward "top ten;" its among nine university programs nationwide selected for 

roQUCiion ivianagemeni 

an IBM Total Quality Management grant to provide training to undergradu- 
ates in the TQ management philosophy. 



Academics 




Christina Addabbo 

Finance 

Elizabeth Ampagoomian 

Finance 

Nivo AndriamasilaJao 

Decision and Information Sciences 
Celeste Azcue 

Decision and Information Sciences 




Man' Jane Bacsinila 

Decision and Information Sciences 

Tracy Bailey 

Marketing 

Lynette Baird 

Accounting 

Nell Banks 

Marketing 




Anjali Bector 

Finance 

Justin Benesch 
Accounting 
Edward Bennett 
\ccountine 



Jason Bernzwei| 
Accounting/Finance 
Ayalew Be rye 
Accounting 
Jacquelvn Bevere 
Marketing 
Jennifer Bond 
Finance 




Bro 



Howard Brock 

Finance/ \co mnti ng 
Joel Brodie 
Economics 
Jude Buquid 

Transportation 1 cu-- .. 
Mary Busbee 

Accounting 



College of Business and Management 1 19 



Lashaun Butler 

Finance 
Eric Chan 
International Busine 
Lakisha Campbell 
General Business 
Cristiano Castro 
Marl 



Jennifer Castro 

Accounting 

Betty Chan Mi Fon 

Business/Natura 
Jenny Chang 
Accounting/Sociology 
Daniel Chasan 




I la Chates 

Finance 

Andrew Chi 

Business 

Lei Chon 

Accounting 

Rukmini Choudary 



Shafat Chou 

Accounting 
Evan Christoe 
International Business 
Chin Chu 
Accounting 
David Chu 
Marketing 



Laura Citr* 

David Clurma 

Accounting 
Taneka Coates 
Finance 
Gifty Cobblah 

Accounting 



Seniors 




Jason Cohen 

Marketing 

Kirk Cook 

Finance 

Colby Cooper 

Business Management Mass Comm 

Nikki Corba 

Marketing 



A II li I 




Dana Craig 

Marketing 

Michael D'Andrea 

Marketing 

Jenson Daniel 

Decision and Information Sciences 

Craig Davis 

Finance 





Robert Davis 

Marketing 
Stacey DePian 
Finance g^m 
Rebecca DiGangi 

Marketing 
Frank Dimina 

Finance 




Lorraine Dious 
Business 
Lisa Dipaula 
Business 

Mike Dodd 

Deasion and In formation Sciences 
Bob Dougl 

Finance 




Matthew Drendorff 
Finance 
Lori Dube 
Accounting 
Judy Duncan 
Accounting 

Melissa Jane Edwards 
Account int; 



College ot Business and Management 121 



Ramin Ehieshami 

Accounting 
Scott Elsky 
Finance 
Gueler Er 

International Bi 
Mark Everitt 

Transporation/Logistic 



Thomas Fallon 




Dino Fasce 

Accounting/Finance 
Michelle Ferrand 
Accounting 
Sara Fikre 

Accountin 



Scott Forcey 

Marketing 
Cheryl Forman 
Marketing 

Christine Garrett 
Marketing 
Ryan Gazelle 
Finan 





Evagelia Gedde 

Decision and Information Sciences 

Marjan Gharashi 

Decision and Intormation Sciences 

Masouda Gizabi 

Finance 

Debra Glazer 

Human Resource Management 



Melissa Go 

Genet Gon 

Accounting 
Eileen Gonzalez 
Business 
Daniel Goodman 

Sports Management 





22 Seniors 




Debbie Gordon 
Accounting 
Joseph Gordon 
Business 

Brian Graime 
Accounting 
Patricia Grew 
General Business 




Charles Griffith 
Marketing 
Rayching Han 
Decision and Infornurior. Scien 
Daniel Hartensveld 
Logistics ^^^t| 

Christopher Hartsock 
Human Resource Mtimt/Financc 



ces 





Cynthia Haynes 
Accounting 

Joshua Herbst 
Accounting/ Finance 
Blair Hill 

Market 
Traci Hill 
Marketinc 





Kwok-Kuen Ho 

^counting 

Lei Ho 

Finance 
Silvia Ho 
Accounting 
Carrie Honig 
Marketing 



Yoke Hoo 



\coounring 
Jaime Hope 
Marketing 
Vivian Hsia 

International Busing 

Jerl)Ti Hua 

Deci-ion and Info. Science ; inance 



1-* ~> 



Thomas King 

Finance 

Josh Klein 

Finance 

Caren Krachman 

Marketing 

Kerri Kramer 

Finance 



Brian Krampf 

Marketing 
Peter Kratz 
Accounting 
Robert Kuklewicz 

Accounting 
Yoko Kume 

Logistics and Transportation 




Robert Hudgins 

Accounting 

Marvin Jones 

Business 

Mallik Kalyandurg 

Accounting 
Lori Kantor 

Marketing/International Business 



Brian Katz 

Accounting 
Konjit Kebede 
Accounting 
Sylva Kholanian 
Accounting 
Monica Kim 



Decision and Information Sciences 






4lii 




Pamela Langdon 

Decision and Info. Sciences/Financ 
Stefanie Langer 

Accounting 



Seniors 





\i 
















William Layton 

Production Management 

Myungsook Lee 

Finance 

Vanessa Lee 

Business 

Denny Lengkong 

General Business/ Management 



Shari Lerner 

General Business 
Joshua Levine 
I ransportatio n /Int 1 
Allyson Lewis 
Accounting 
Michael Liang 
Accounun 



Hon Liew 

Decision and Information Sciences 

Tong Liu 

Accounting/ Finance 

Prima Loethfie 

Marketing 

Margaret Loftus 

Accounting 







General Business 
Margaret Ly 

Finance 

Daniel Magnas 

Finance 

Atiya M ah mood 

Finance 



College of Business and Management 125 



/ 



Jeanette Majova 

Decision and Information Sciences 

Michael Maroof 

Accounting 

Carrie Marshall 

Marketing 

Charmelito Marte 

Transportation/Logisti 

Michelle Martinson 

Finance 

Jaya Mathur 
Accounting 
Darren McCue 
Business Logistics 
Katherine McDonald 
Genera! Business 




ristin Medvetz 

Accounting/Finance 

Kathryn Meehan 

Accounting 

Joshua Meltzer 

Finance 

Charles Menacho 

Finance/Marketing 




Jorge Mendez 

Accounting 

Robert Morgenstern 

Finance 

Robert Morino 

Accounting 
Sabrina Morris 

Fashion Merchandisin 




Barbara Mulligan 

Accounting 
Nicole Musher 
Marketing 
Laura Myones 

International Business 
Peter Ngo 

Decision and Information Sciences 




1?fi 



sfn lArc 




Vu Nguyen 
.Marketing 
Andrea Nurkin 
\ larketing 
I^aura Novak 
Marketing 
Kristina Nunn-I 
Finance 




Mar)- O'Connor 

Human Resource Management 

Shawna O'Hagan 

Accounting 

Alyssa Oberman 

Business 

Natalie Oden 

Finance 



Bertan Omer 

Transportation/Logisti 
Laura Opack 



Accou 



nting 




Allison Palmer 

Decision «uid Information Sciences 
David Palmer 

Business Management 



Sinyeong Pari 

Finance 
Evan Peters 

Business 
Benjamin Piccone 

Human Resource Mgmt/Fir 
James Pickett 
Business 





Elizabeth Pluebell 

Accounting 

Jennifer Polinger 

Finance 

Peter Pourzand 

Transportation and Logistics 
Michael Prete 

Marketing 



College of Business and Management 127 



Scott Price 

Accounting 

Angela Y. Prince 

Finance 

Lan Quach 

Accounting 

Olivera Radakovic 

Finance 







Janeel Ramsey 

Accounting 

Aynat Ravin 

Finance/Marketing 

Christie Ream 

Accounting 

Jennifer Reenekamp 

Marked n 



Jeffrey Rezza 

Finance 
Karen Rhodes 

Accounting 
Jordan Rich 
Accounting 
Tracy Ricker 

Internationa. 



T. Bart Roberts 

Marketing 

Erik L. Robinson 

Finance 

Todd Rose 

Accounting 
Kate Roth 

Accounting 



Amy Roze 

Finance 

Donna Sakhleh 

Human Resource Managem 

Stephanie T. Saunders 

Marketing 

Adam Scherr 

Finance 



28 



Seniors 




Carol 



arol Schuhart 

General Business 
Jeffrey Schwenk 
Business Management 
Jason Scott 
Finance/Business 
Gina Secretaric 
Marketing 




Jaylani Sharif 

International Business/Finance 

Melissa Sharlo\ 

Accounting 

Lori Sherman 

Accounting 

Frederick Shoffner 

General Business 



Michelle Shorter 

Accounting 
Jin-Ee Sie 
Accounting 
Tiffany Sills 
Marketing 
Wendy Simpson 
Account! nc 










MiMtikmk 






Marketing 
Matthew Swyndle 

Finance 
Chuong Tang 

International Business 
Haifan (Julie) Tao 

Accounting 



College of Business and Management 129 




Lauren C. Tuennecke 

Accounting 

Ting-Yun U 

Finance 
Bonny Urn 
Marketing 
Patrick Valenti 

Accounrin 





Jonathan Valz 

International Business/Finance 
Ritchie Vehemente 
Accounting 
Eric Waldman 

Marketing 
Mary Wang 

Decision and Information Sciences 




Sheau-Fang Wang 
Accounting 
Ten-I Wei 

Finance/International Business 
Max Weiner 

Marketin 



Troy D. West 

Finance 




••w. TTx T\ 
















r* JAJ 








130 Sei 




w 



Joan Wilkinsin 

Accounting 

Steven Wilson 

transportation 

Michael Wodotinsky 

Accounting 

Henry Wong 

Finance 




Cheryl Yuen 

Accounting 

Scott Zarret 

Accounting 

Yang Zhao 

Marketing 

Todd Zimmerman 

Marketing/International Business 





College of Business and Management 131 






Close observation and respect for the empirical method characterize the study of 
computer, math, and physical sciences. Investigation of the physical phenomena of 

Astronomy 

the universe-and the everyday world-and the mathematical concepts underlying 
natural law require abstract thinking and the ability to make leaps of reason that 
connect information in new and revealing ways. This is the realm of symbolic lan- 

Computer SciGnco 

guages and highly refined systems analysis that computer technology has trans- 
formed in the last few decades. 

CMPS offers advanced technology and facilities in its Automation Research 
Center, the Computer Vision Laboratory, Astronomy Observatory, Institute for 
Climate Studies and Human Interaction Laboratory. Faculty are renowned in the 
areas of human-computer interaction, chaos theory, software development and su- 

Mathematics 

perconductivity research, among many subjects. 

NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Naval Ob- 

Physics 

servatory, and the American Center for Physics are located near the campus. Many 



cooperative teaching and research projects, as well as internship and career opportu- 

-hysical Sciences 

nities, link the university and these resources. 






College of Computer, 
Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences 




College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 



Deborah Ackerman 

Mathematics 
David Andrejak 
Computer Science 
Gordon Bisl 
Mathematics 
Peter Calabi 
Mathematics 



/& 





Swanson Hei Chan 

Computer Science 
Anthony DeMarco 
Physics 
David Feng 

Computer Science 
Pamela Geiling 

Mathematics 



Wayne George 

Physical Science- 
Rebecca C. Granger 
Computer Science 
Yuqing Guo 
Computer Science 
Daniel Hobbs 
Computer Science 





Rhoda Hsia 

Mathematics 
Rainies Kwai Lakh 

Computer Science/Economics 
Wayne Lee 
Computer Science 
John Madden 
Computer Science 


















V 



Sen 



lors 







Heather Marler 

Physical Science 
Raymond Mosley 

Computer Science 
Philip Moyer 
Computer Scie 
Hee Park 

Computer Science 



William Putman 

Physical Science 
Janine Savage 
Geology 

Douglas Shuman 
Compurer Science 
Michael Steele 
Computer Science 



Boris Velikovich 

Computer Science 
Gustavo Verdun 
Computer Science 
Brooke Wallace 
Computer Science 
Tamaki Watanab 
Compurer Science 



Troy Williams 

Computer Science- 
Roberta Winters 

Geology 





College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical S 



ciences 135 






College of Education 




Educating teachers to work effectively with students, to provide a vibrant 

Art Education 

learning environment of reflection, inquiry and experience, to set a course for 

Fr^rlv Ohilrihoori F~ duration 

adulthood and citizenship is an enormous challenge as we approach the 

Elementary Education 

twenty-first century. This is an exciting time to be involved in the most press- 

English Education 

ing and persistent issues of our democratic way of life, universal education 

Foreign Language Education 

and equality of opportunity. 

Mathematics Education 

The University of Maryland at College Park trains more than one-third of 

Science Education 

Maryland's teachers. It is accredited by the National Council for Accredita- 

Social Studies Education 

tion of Teacher Education and the Maryland State Department of Education. 

Special Education 

rea school systems participating in teacher training are richly diverse, provid- 

Speech and English Education 

ing the future teacher a broad range of experience with students from every 

itre and English Education 

ethnic and economical background. 



Academics 




Gwyn Ackelsberg 

Education 

Laura Appezzato 

Education 

Erica Aronson 

Elementary Education 

Steven Asbacher 

Education 



Lisa Beal 

Early Childhood Education 

Jennifer Beck 

Special Education 

Karen Bloom 

Education 

Rebekah Calhoun 

Education 



Jennifer Chase 

t'ducation 

Jennifer Clowser 
Art Education 
Dahlia Dallal 
Education H_~ 

Amy DeWeese 



Education 




Melissa Diamond 

Education 
Theresa Dillon 
Education 
Susan Fanuele 
Elementary Education 
Victoria French 
Special Education 





lgela Gar 

Secondary Educatio 
Ti-Anna GofT 
Education 
Cher Grace 
Special Education 
Sandra Gutierrez 
Art Education 



College ot Education 



137 



Hui-Chen Huang 

Education 
Victoria Huseman 

Education 
Kim Jones 

Elementary Education 
Demetris Kafouris 

Elementary Education 



William Keswick 

Education 
Kathleen Ketter 
Secondary Education 
Randy Lentz 
Art Education 
Carey Lindholtz 
Education 







Glida Martinez 

Elementary Education 
Kimberly Mink 
Secondary Education/English 
Demerise Paeglow 
Elementary Education 
Jene Park 
Elementary Education 



Colleen Payne 

Education 
Nicole Peca 
Education 
Peter Perry 
Music Education 
Eidanelle Quitania 
Special Education 










ftrfAJ 















Seniors 




Dena Ragan 
Art Education 
Maria Saldana 
Education 

Madelaine Schwartz 
Education 
Tina Shoftner 
Education 



Gillian Smith 

Early Childhood Education 

Allyson Taylor 

Math Education 

Raananna Thiebaux 

Education 

Amy Tomasulo 

Secondary Math Educat 






Kimberly Tortorello 

Elementary Education 

Geri Trezza 

Education ^^^^^ ^^^^ 

Christopher Vandernoth 

Science Education 

Meredith Weber 

Special Education 




Jill Wiik 

Elementary Education 

Beryl Yeung 

Education 

Kimberly Zanders 

Education 

Katherine Zeltner 

Early Childhood Education 




College of Education 



139 







College of 
Engineering 



\ ws\\ 




^S _1— "S- -ioWn-w^^^^ 



Academics 



One of the best and most competitive engineering programs in the country is 

Aerospace Engineering 

centered in the A. James Clark School of Engineering. A close-knit, collegial atmo- 

Biological Resources Engineering 

sphere prevails among students and faculty. The noontime picnics and volleyball 

Chemical Engineering 

games, the team-building competitions (which include solar cars, concrete canoes, 

Civil Engineering 

robots and first-year design projects) and the intense academic challenge combine to 

Electrical Engineering 

produce some of the highest academic achievers, most prestigious awards and the 

Fire Protection Engineering 

most successful graduates at the university. 

The school boasts a small-scale nuclear reactor, subsonic and hypersonic wind 

General Engineering 

runnels, a flight simulator, and a laboratory for plasma and fusion energy studies. 

Mechanical Engineering 

\dvanced computing laboratories are open to all students. The school recently re- 

Nuclear Engineering 

:eived a $15 million endowment to support undergraduate engineering education. 



College of Engineering 



Thomas Ahrens 

Mechanical Engineering 
Shahid Akhtar 
Electrical Engineerin 
Julio Alegre 
Civil Engineering 
John Arrieta 
Engineering 



Susan Aryamanesh 

Electrical Engineering 
Alka Athavale 
Engineering 
Nandeep Bahra 
Engineering 
Edgar Bellinger 
Mechanical Eneineeri 



John Birkmire 

Chemical Engineering 
Stephanie Blanco 
Mechanical Engineering 
Jason Brooks 
Engineering 
Jeffrey Busa 
Mechanical Engineering 



Cheng-Shien 

Engineering 
Paul Chin 
Engineering 
Andrew Chorney 
Aerospace Engineering 
Melvin Dedicatoria 
Mechanical Engineering 




Leigh DePiazza 

Aerospace Engineering 
Dean Dubey 
Aerospace Engineering 
Josie Elliott 
Chemical Engineering 
Vince Esposito 
Fire Protection Engineering 




142 s 



eniors 




Michael Etheredge 
Engineering 
Roy Fernandes 
Engineering 
Robert Floyd 
Engineering 
Chip Garbe 
Nuclear Engineering 




Glenn Gasner 

C hemical Engineering 
Muni Ghimire 
( hemical Engineering 
Marc Greenberg 

Electrical Engineering 

Monica Greene 

Biological Resources Engineering 



£ 




Brian Grove 

Fire Protection Enginee 
Ajay Gulati 
Engineering 
Ajay Gupta 
Engineering 
Christopher Houge 
Civil Engineering 



Stephanie Herlth 

Nuclear Engineering 
Lisa Hunt 
Chemical Engineering 
Kenneth Hwang 
E ngineering 
Sean Illig 
Chemical Engineering 






David Jiang 
Engineering 
Ron Keplinger 

Engineering 
Edward King 

Engineering 
Gregory J. Koeser 

Chemical Engineering 



College of Engineering 143 

COO 



Jin Kuang 

Electrical Engineering 
Karin M. Laduca 
Mechanical Engineerin; 
Silvia Leong 
Chemical Engineering 
Mason Magid 
Engineerini 





Crystal R. Massey 

Engineering 
Dawn McLeod 
Mechanical Engineering 
Dianne Mitchel 
Engineering 

Nhanthuan Ngyuen 
Electrical Engineering 



Thinh (Alex) Nguyen 
Engineering 
Joanna Nickerson 
Electrical Engineering 
Nnaemeka Nwosu 
Mechanical Engineering 
Theophile Onya 
Chemical Engineering 



Johnathon Pari 

Engineering 

Stephen Payne 

Electrical Engineering 

William Pullen II 

Fire Protection Engineering 

Kevin Pyo 

Engineering 



David Ratte 

Civil Engineerin 
John Rentschle 
Civil Engineering 
Ali Rezaiyan 

Electrical Engineering 
Mathew Robins 

Biological Resources Engineering 



Seniors 




4M! 




^^ 



Robert Sadorra 

Engineering 

Bouna Sail 

Electrical Engineering 
Hemanth Sampath 

Engineering 

Paul Samuel 

Aerospace Engineering 




Mark Shaner 

Aerospace Engineering 
Lauren Shook 
Aerospace Engineering 
Paul Silberman 
Engineering 
Duikaruna Soepangkat 
Chemical Engineering 



n 



Joao Souse 

Engineering 

Amsatou Sow 

Engineering 
Joel Velasquez 
Mechanical Engineering 
Craig Vogel 
Aerospace Engineering 




ThuVu 

Electrical Engineering 
Damon Webster 
Mechanical Engineering 
James Wheeler 
Engineering 
Jonathan White 
Mechanical Engineering 



Valerie Wilder 



Mechanical Engineering 

Matthew Willems 

Civil Engineering 
Joon You 

Fire Protection Engineering 
Tze Shin Yu 

Electrical Engineering 




College of Engineering 145 




College of Health 

and Human 
Performance 

For students interested in sports medicine, coaching, health and physical 
education or family studies, the College of Health and Human Performance 

Family Studies 

offers a challenging academic program coupled with state-of-the-art training 
facilities and laboratories. Kinesiological sciences — the study of human 
movement — goes beyond the activities normally associated with sport and 

Health Education 

exercise to the scientific analysis of their effect on and benefit to human 
physiology. 

The area of family and community development prepares students for 

Kinesiological Sciences 

work in counseling, social agencies or community action programs, through 
investigation of the dynamics of family and community life, disabilities, 



violence and economic issues. 

Physical Education 

The Center on Aging concentrates on the field of gerontology, and 
includes study of physiology, economics, policy and community education 
programs for older adults. 




V 



Lisa Ashworth 

Kinesiology 
Brenda Balana 
Kinesiology 
Kimberly Bartell 

Kinesiology 
Renee Bauman 

Family Studies 




Allison Birney 

Health Education 
John Carpenter 
Kinesiologies Sciences 
Dwayne Chambers 
Family Studies 
Laura Marie Charles 
Family Studies 




John Davidson III 

Kinesiology 
Louise J. Dogan 

Family Studies 
Gail Dombroski 

Family Studies 
Sean Gayle 

Family Studies 



^^^ 




Jared Goldstein 

Kinesiology 
Sara Grabush 
Kinesiology 
Heather Gross 
Community Health Education 
Catherine Guenterberg 
Family Studies 




Monica Hahn 

Community Health Education 

Barry Kagan 

Kinesiology 

Richelle Kaye 

Kinesiology 

Christine King 

Family Studies 



College of Health and Human Performance 147 



Lauren Kochav 

Family Studies 
Anne-Marie Koen 
Biomechanics 
Tiffany Krieger 
Family Studie" 
Kristin Maloney 
Kinesiology 




Tammy Perrotta 

Family Studies 
Carla Perry 
Family Studies 
Sherri Rich 
Kinesiology 
Reem Saba 
Health Education 



Seniors 




Pamela Schmier 

Family Studies 
Tracey Schwartz 
Family Studies 
Elizabeth Sherry 
Family Studies 
Nicole Shifler 
Family Studies 



Debra Shuman 

Family Studies 
Amanda Simons 
Family Studies 
Mary Stracka 
Physical Education 
David Tave 
Family Studies 





Derrainnya Thomas 

Health F.ducation 
Lisa Thompson 
Health Education 
Megan Timmons 
Family Studies 
Carrie Young 
Family Studi 




College of Health and Human Performance 149 



College of 
Journalism 




The power and influence of the news media are major factors in modern 

Advertising 

society. The ability of newspapers, magazines, advertising, TV and radio to 
shape issues and attitudes makes the study of journalism one of the most 
responsible and serious career choices of our time. The College of Journal- 

Broadcast Ngws 

ism stands at the doorstep of the nation's capital and the world's news center. 
Its location makes it the ideal place to study news and public affairs report- 
ing, public relations and mass communication. 

Named among the eleven best journalism programs in the nation by 

News Editorial 

Gannett Center for Media Studies, the college offers practical reporting expe- 
rience at two news bureaus, in Annapolis and Washington D.C., and pub- 
lishes the American Journalism Review, a. prestigious national monthly that 

Public Relations 

analyzes print and broadcast performance. An active internship program 
places students at newspapers and broadcast stations, ad agencies and public 
relations firms. 



.caaem cs 




Terrance Bates 

Journalism 
Erika Batten 
Journalism 
Elizabeth Bekesz 
Advertising ^^^ 
Brian Bierman 
Journalism 



Abby Bliss 

Journalism 
Meredith Bonds 

Journalism 
Andrea Brahms 
Journalism 
Man' Casey 

[ournalism 



Tina Cervasio 

Journalism 
Tracy Cooper 
Advertising 
Deborah Cusa 
Journalism 
Am}- Dehoyos 
Journalism 



Ziedah Ferguson 

Journalism 
Jessica Foster 
Journalism 
Michele Friend 




ournalism 



lournahsm 




Nermin Gad 



Stephanie Gordon 



Journalism 

David Gottesr 

Journalism 

Kara Hatton 

Journalism 

Stacey Herbstman 

{ournalism 



College of Journalism 151 



Karen Ianuly 

Advertising 
Lauren Kaplan 
Journalism 
Kara Klaus 
Public Relatioi 
Eve Klindera 
Journalism 



Nora Koch 

Advertising 

Maria Sundai LaGreca 

Advertising 

Jennifer Legato 

Journalism 

Tracey Logsdon 




Journalism 



Rebecca Mabie 

Journalism 
Stacey Manley 
Advertising 
Roslyn Matthews 
Journalism 
Kristen Nelson 
Journalis 



Kathleen Nuccetelli 

Journalism 
Stacey O'Boyle 
Journalism 
Akweli Parker 
Journalism 
Julie Patterson 
Journalism 



Jeff Press 
Adverti 
Kelly Pyne 

Journalism 
Stephanie Rinck 
Journalism 
Elaine Rubin 

Journalism 



c ,2 



*Nf*n mrc 




dak " 




Robert Runett 

Journalism 

Katherine E. Ryan 
lournalism 
Joanne Saidman 
Public Relations 
Jennifer Schiff 
Journalism 




Joel Smith 
Journal 
Meredith Sobel 

Journalism/Women's Studies 
Mara Stanley 
Journalism 
Lainie Stein 

Journalism 




Rafael Toledo 

Advertising 
Carrie Troni 
Journalism 
Loretta Villar 

Journalism 
Andrea W; 

lournalism 





Gregory Weiss 

Public Relations 
Victoria Wentz 






Journalism 
Konstantinos White 

Journalism 
Snorre Wik 

lournalism 




David Woo 

Advertising 



College ol Journalism 1 53 



College of 
Life Sciences 




From the subcellular level of biochemistry to the study of ecosystems, life 

Biochemistry 

scientists are involved in exploring and explaining life processes. The quest for 

DlOIOQICcll oCIGDCGS 

information about viruses, about genetics and heredity, about how the brain 

CgII and Molecular Biology and GonGtics 

works, about the interdependence of plants and animals, including human 

Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior 

beings, is essential to the maintenance and survival of life on Earth. 

Entomology 

Many students in the life sciences are preparing for careers in medicine, 

GGnoral Bioloov 

dentistry and other professional fields. The college offers a strong 

arino Biology 

departmental honors program, administers the College Park Scholars in Life 

Microbiology 

Sciences program and provides for on and off-campus research. With access to 

Physiology and NGuroBiology 

the National Institutes of Health, the National Museum of Natural History, 

Plant Biology 

the National Aquarium and the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, students 
: able to expand and apply their knowledge in the field. The Chesapeake 

Chemistry 

Bay, largest of the world's estuarine systems, provides an ideal laboratory for 
biological and ecological study. 




L 



GhazaJeh Afshar 
Physiology and Neurobiology 
Sheik Alizadeh 

Biology 

Ahmed Amini 
Physiology and Neurobiology 
Aminullah Amini 
Physiology and Neurobiology 



Lisa Anarado 




Microbiolog\ 
Nicole Aqui 



Bi 

Leslie Badra 

Neurobiology 

Staphanie Bates 

Bioloi 




Robin Beam 

Chemistry 

Nancy Beck 

Microbiology 

Mohammad Beiraghdar 

Neurobiology 

Mitchell Berlin 

General Biology 



d 




Melissa Bezner 

Biology/Physiology & Neurobiology 

Julie Bowers 

Biology 

Houman Bozoregzadeh 

Biology 

David Bradshaw 

\ licrobiology 




igg'O 
Biology' 

Alexis Carter 

Biology 

Ling-Yu Chang 

Biology 

Yoo Chang 

Biolo^y 



Colle^e of Life Sciences 155 




Anissa Cheung 

Cell and Molecular Biology 

Tammy Chihos 

Physiology and Neurobiology 

Hyerhi Choi 

Biology 

Le Bich Son Dang 

Chemistry 



Melanie 

Cell and Molecular Biology 

Russell Dillow 

Biology 

Chico Donelson 

Biology 

Rajiv Dua 

Biology 



Lori Eckhardt 

Cell and Molecular Biology 

Stacey Egerton 

Biology 

Alex Eisen 

Biology 

Paige Elliott 

Physiology and Neurobiology 



Karen Ferguson 

Biology 

Rachel Fishlowitz 

Biology 

Ndidi Foy 

Biology 

Jennifer E. 

Biology 



Linda Grei 

Microbiology 

Sumathi Gulati 

Chemistry 

Eric Hawkins 

Biology 

Andrea Hoffman 

B 



156 



seniors 




Barbara Jones 
Biology 
Erin Jones 
Biology 
Jessa Jones 
Biology 
Jesse Jones 
Chemisrrv 



Patrick Jones 

Biology 
Sandra Kao 
\ licrobiologv 
Houshyar Karimabadi 

Biochemisrrv 
Charles Kim 

Biologv 





Jennifer Kline 
Chemistry 
Walter Krueger 

Cell and Molecular Biology 

Tae Kwon 

Biolog\ r 

Eleise LaPorta 

Biology/Art 




Nicole Lavigne 

Biology 

Christopher 

Microbiology 
Thomas M, 

Biology 

Nazila Mazlumzadeh 

Chemistrv 



r Layfield 
. Loonam 




Anita McElroy 

Microbiology 
Michele McNair 
Microbiology 
Timothy Meyers 
Microbiologv 
Carla Mosby 
Biology 



(Cl ecrp nf T iff 'sz-ii^r 



1S7 



Mohammad Nikpourfard 

Physiology and Neurobiology 

Reza Nikpourfard 

Biology 

Kathryn Oplinger 

Zoology 

Geoffrey Ouma 

Microbiology 



a 




Melissa Park 

Biology 
Valerie A. Pate 

Physiology and Neurobiology 
Anna Petrovic 
Microbiology 
Marie Planta 

Physiology and Neurobiolog 




Sara Pollack 

Marine Biology 
Steven T. Poole 
Biochemistry 
Joshua Posnan 
Biology 

Leonard Riloff 
Microbiology 





Susan Rocca 

Biology 

Timothy Roesing 

( ieneral Biology 

Brett Rosenberg 

Biology 

Jacqueline Ruttimann 

Biology 





seniors 




Jennifer Sanluis 

Biology 

Rebecca Schwalbe 

Biology 

Hillary Sterner 

Biology 

Cory Tabachow 

Biology 



>Cs 



Meredith Tiboni 

Marine Biology 
Andrew Tobiason 
Biology 

Michael Traub 
Chemistry 
George Turi 
Chemistry 






Betty Wang 

Biology 

Chun-Ju Wang 

Biology 

Sharon Watts 

Biology 

Roberta K. Yaklich 

Biology 



^ 





Sung Yun 

Biology 
Alice Ziskind 

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 




College of Life Sciences 1 59 



in the Heartland 



Hurricane Opal 

On the evening of October 4, 1995, Hurricane 
Opal came ashore on Florida's Gulf Coast, 
packing sustained winds of 125 miles per hour. 
Before it was through, the storm had killed at least 
20 people in four states and caused at least $1.8 
billion in damages to insured properties, making 
it the third-costliest storm in U.S. history. 

Hurricane Opal swung east toward Florida 
after striking Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The 
storm destroyed or damaged thousands of homes 
and businesses along a 120-mile stretch of the 
Florida Panhandle. Many of its residents were 
still recovering from and repairing damage 
inflicted by Hurricane Erin two months earlier. 

Opal caused the sea to rise 1 5 feet and sweep 
away nearly everything on the lower floors of 
homes and businesses along the edge of the Gulf 
Coast. Power outages were widespread, and there 
were many incidents of looting. 

Some of the hurricane's victims were allowed 
to return home a week after fleeing, even though 
water, electricity and sewer services had not been 
restored. Others, from more severely damaged 
areas, had to wait longer. 

Amtrak Crash 

The news was terrible: an Amtrak train 
derailed while crossing a trestle in a remote desert 
region of Arizona, 55 miles southwest of Phoenix. 
What made the news even worse was the suspi- 
cion of sabotage. 

Occurring around 1 a.m. on October 9, 1995, 
the derailment of Amtrak's Sunset Limited, en 
route from Miami to Los Angeles, sent four of its 
cars into the gulch 30 feet below the trestle. One 
person was killed and more than 70 were injured. 

The derailment was caused by the removal of a 
metal bar that held two sections of rail together. 
The culprit installed a wire, disabling a light that 
would have warned the train's crew about the 
break. The saboteur's apparent knowledge about 




Associatec 






in Review 



ews National News National News 




e warning system led to speculation that it 
:ght be the work of a railroad employee. 
Found at the scene was a letter that made 
erence to the federal sieges at Waco, Texas and 
lby Ridge, Idaho, and also mentioned the FBI 
d the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Fire- 
tis. It was signed "Sons of Gestapo." The letter 
sed fears that the derailment was the work of 
tigovernment terrorists, although experts in the 
Id were unfamiliar with the signature. 

Oklahoma City Bombing 

On April 19, 1995 a bomb exploded in 

dahoma City, destroying the Alfred P. Murrah 

deral Building and killing scores of men, 

men and young children. The nation was at a 

ndstill. 

The force of the blast tore off the building's 

ade and sent it flying across the street, where it 

mmed into other buildings. With the outer 

II of the building suddenly gone, workers 

nbled out of their offices and into the street 

ere the blast carved a crater 30 feet wide. 



Associated Press 

The building housed the offices of federal 
agencies and a day care center. Many people were 
missing for hours and even days following the 
blast. Family members, friends and others brought 
flowers to the scene as a memorial to those injured 
and killed. 

Rescue crews from all over the country went to 
Oklahoma City to assist with the search and 
rescue. However, rescue efforts were difficult 
because the structure of the building had been so 
severely damaged. 

The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal 
Building left the nation stunned and saddened. 
Countless people were unnecessarily injured and 
killed in this terrible domestic terrorism attack. 
After the final searches and rescues had been 
completed, the building was destroyed and a 
memorial will be put on that location. 

Shortly after the explosion, Timothy McVeigh, 
a Gull War veteran, was arrested for carrying a 
concealed weapon. Two days later he was recog- 
nized as one of the bombing suspects, "John Doe 
#1 ", and was charged. 



Terror in the Heartland 161 



i News World News World News 




Conflict in Bosnia 

Despite continued NATO air strikes and United 
Nations peace efforts, the conflict in the former Yugo- 
slavia raged on, with no letup in sight. A four month 
cease fire was seen in the beginning of 1 995, mediated 
by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, but the truce 
did not put an end to the fighting. 

The former Yugoslavia has been the scene of a civil 
war since June 1991, and the fighting intensified in 
1992 after the republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina de- 
clared its independence. Bosnian Serbs, seeking inde- 
pendence from Bosnia, began their siege of Sarajevo, 
the capital, as the European community and the United 
States formally recognized Bosnia. More than 200,000 
people have been killed or are missing since the fighting 
began. 



Associated P 

In May 1995, NATO planes attacked Serb a 
munition depots. The Serbs responded by attacki 
"safe areas," killing many and taking hundreds 
U.N. peacekeepers hostage. In June, Serbs down 
a U.S. F-16 over northern Bosnia. The pilot, i 
Force Captain Scott O'Grady, hid for six days ur 
he was rescued by Marines. In December, y 
before the holiday season, U.S. troops were sent 
Bosnia on a peacekeeping mission. 

Mideast Peace Accord 

"The sight you see before you. ..was impossib 
was unthinkable, just three years ago," late Isra 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin told those present 
the East Room of the White House on Septeml 
28, 1995. The "sight" was the signing of an accc 



Year in Review 



Peace 



1 1 T^ T 



and 



... odd Ne^ 

War 




between Israel and the Palestinian Liberation Orga- 
nization (PLO) that planned to end Israel's military 
occupation of West Bank cities and lay a foundation 
for a Palestinian state. 

President Clinton presided over the ceremony 
which featured two hours of speeches and pageantry 
before an audience of diplomats, foreign ministers, 
Cabinet secretaries and members of Congress. The 
agreement outlined the process for gradual with- 
drawal of Israeli troops and transfer of governing 
authority for Palestinian self-rule in 30 percent of 
the West Bank. It also allowed for Palestinian 
elections and the release of 5,000 Palestinian prison- 
ers held in Israel. 

Nuclear Protest 

On September 5, 1995, France resumed under- 
ground nuclear testing when it detonated a device 
under a remote area in the South Pacific. World- 
wide protests preceded the nuclear test, and criti- 
cism from the world followed the test. 

Antinuclear demonstrations were staged in vari- 
ous parts of the world, including Paris, Tokyo, 
Switzerland, Australia and Hiroshima. Two days of 
rioting, looting and fire bombing exploded in 
Papeete, Tahiti, which lies about 750 miles from the 
test site. Two ships, part of a Greenpeace "peace 
flotilla," were stormed and captured by French 
commandos nearby. 

France's President Jacques Chirac defended the 
tests, saying they would provide information allow- 
ing France to conduct computer-simulated tests in 
the future. Chirac also said that more tests were 
planned, but that France would sign a global test- 
ban treaty at their conclusion. 



Associated Press 



Peace and War 163 



triguing Headlines 



O.J. Simpson Verdict 

On October 3, 1995, the long- 
running, real-life soap opera played its 
final episode. 

In "the trial of the century," O.J. 
Simpson was acquitted in the June 1 2, 
1994 stabbing murder of his former 
wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her 
friend, Ronald Goldman. 

Americans followed the trial for 
more than a year, listening to testi- 
mony, digesting the evidence and 
speculating on whether the former 
football star and film actor was guilty. 

The jury reached its verdict in less 
than four hours of deliberation, after 
hearing 133 days of testimony and 
considering more than 800 pieces of 
evidence. 

It was a case that would leave Ameri- 
cans with many lasting images: 

—A white Ford Bronco; 

—"the murder glove;" 

—The testimony of prosecution 
witness Detective Mark Fuhrman, 
whose credibility was later destroyed 
when it was shown that he lied under 
oath about his use of racial epithets. 

In a statement made soon after his acquittal, 
Simpson vowed he would dedicate his life to a 
search for the real killers. 

Cal Ripken's Streak 

For months, baseball fans were talking about 
The Streak. 

With each game he played, Baltimore Ori- 
oles short stop Cal Ripken Jr. drew one game 
closer to breaking one of baseball's "unbreak- 
able" records. 

In 1939, New York Yankees first-baseman 
Lou Gehrig retired after having appeared in 
2130 consecutive games, an accomplishment 
that surely would never be equalled. 

In 1995, Ripken not only equaled it, he 
surpassed it! 

On September 6, 1995, Ripken took the 
field, as he had done in every Orioles game since 
May 30, 1982, to face the California Angels. 
This was consecutive game 2131. 

When the fifth inning came, officially a 
complete game, fireworks exploded and cam- 
eras flashed. A banner unraveled in the outfield 
ofOrioleParkat Camden Yards reading'^lS 1 ." 




Associated Press 

The fans honored Ripken with a standing 
ovation which lasted over 22 minutes. He 
emerged from the dugout and gave his jersey to 
his wife and children. His teammates pushed 
the reluctant Ripken back onto the field where 
he made a "thank you" lap around the ballpark, 
shaking hands with the fans. 

Befitting a hero, Ripken hit a home run in 
the game won by the Orioles 4-2. 

Seles makes a comeback 

It was a match between two players vying for 
the top position in women's tennis. On Sep- 
tember 9, 1995, Germany's Steffi Graf emerged 
as #1 as she beat Monica Seles in New York to 
win her fourth U.S. Open title. 

In spite of her defeat on the tennis court, 
Monica Seles felt like a victor of sorts. This loss 
was the first in a dozen matches that marked her 
inspired return to the sport after a two-year 
absence. Seles had been stabbed in the back by 
a deranged fan at a match in Hamburg, Ger- 
many. 

"It has been very exciting to me playing 
again," Seles said. "As long as I keep having fun, 
that is what is going to matter to me the most." 



Associated Pn 




Associated Pi 



64 



Year in Review 



People in the News People in the Nev 




M M I 



Associated Press 




Women's Conference in China 

It was Hillary- Clinton's first visit to China, 
and she made it a memorable one. In a speech 
to the United Nation's Fourth World Confer- 
ence on Women, the first lady took on the 
world. 

Her speech, delivered on September 5, 1995, 
made a call for human rights and freedom of 
expression, and she said that it was indefensible 
that many women who registered for the con- 
ference were denied visas or were unable to fully 
participate. 

Mrs. Clinton surprised her audience and the 
host nation by rebuking Beijing for its treat- 
ment of private activists who said they were 
harassed by authorities during a parallel forum 
held in Huairou, China, just 30 miles away. 

The conference platform called for measures 
to alleviate women's poverty, and improve health 
care, job opportunities and education. 



Pope John Paul II Visits 
United States 

For a few days, a religious man 
dominated the headlines and it gave 
Americans something good to talk 
about. 

The news maker was Pope John 
Paul II, and the occasion was his visit 
to the United States in early October 
1995. 

The 75-year-old pontiff began his 
five day visit by addressing the United 
Nations General Assembly in con- 
junction with the organization's 50th 
anniversary. 

During his stay, the pope celebrated 
outdoor Mass in both New York and 
New Jersey. Rain and windy weather 
did little to dampen the spirits of the 
faithful who gathered to hear him 
speak, catch a glimpse of him or even 
touch him as he swept past. 

In Baltimore, he addressed an au- 
dience at the baseball stadium and ate 
lunch at a soup kitchen before his 
return flight to Rome. 

Throughout his visit the Pope called 
for greater attention to the needs of 
the less fortunate. 



Associated Press 



Jerry Garcia 

The leader of the Grateful Dead was gone. 

Jerry Garcia, cofounder of the Grateful Dead, 
died of a heart attack while in a drug rehabilita- 
tion center in suburban San Francisco. 

The guitarist, composer and singer passed 
away on August 9, 1 995, just eight days after his 
53rd birthday. 

Deadheads, as the groups' followers were 
known, quickly gathered to note the passing of 
their fallen leader. Crowds formed in public 
areas in San Francisco, Garcia's hometown, and 
in other cities across the country. A single red 
rose was tied to a tree in front of the San 
Francisco address where the Dead began in 
1964. 

Jerry Garcia had the rare distinction of hav- 
ing an ice cream named after him, Ben and 
Jerry's "Cherry Garcia." The founders of the 
company said that Garcia had inspired their 
business philosophy. 



Associated Press 



Intriguing Headlines 165 



litical Campaigns Political Campaign 



President Clinton 

President Bill Clinton en- 
tered the third year of his term 
as no president has done for 40 
years - with a republican con- 
gress. As he began 1995, he 
resolved to "put aside partisan 
differences." 

In April 1995, the senate 
passed a bill that cut $ 1 6 billion 
from various social programs, 
while sparing other items fa- 
vored by Clinton. Although 
the President called the bill "the 
model of how we can work to- 
gether," the gap remained wide 
over such issues as tax cuts, wel- 
fare reform and spending re- 
ductions. 

Although cautious in deal- 
ing with the new congress, 
Clinton raised his profile and took a 
firm stand on issues. He said he would 
try to work with the republicans on 
their agenda, but would "no doubt" 
veto some of their proposals. 

On April 14, 1995, Clinton filed the 
necessary documents with the Federal 
Election Commission and made for- 
mal his candidacy for reelection. 

Newt Gingrich 

In January 1995, Newt Gingrich 
became the first republican Speaker of 
the House in 40 years. The 5 1 year old 
Georgia congressman had his sights set 
on the position even before he won a 
House seat on his third try in 1976. 

Gingrich, narrowly elected as mi- 
nority whip in 1989, saw his goal in 
reach when the GOP won a majority of 
congressional seats in 1994 and when 
minority leader Robert Mitchel de- 




clined to run for another term. 

Gingrich has proven adept at grab- 
bing headlines and preaching moral- 
ity. In 1989 he drove speaker Jim 
Wright from office with relentless at- 
tacks of ethnics violations. In 1994 he 
alleged that one-quarter of the White 
House staff had recently used drugs, a 
charge that remains unsubstantiated. 

Gingrich helped orchestrate the 
"Contract with America" as theGOP's 
national agenda in the 1994 elections. 
It called for a balanced budget amend- 
ment, welfare reform and an anticrime 
package. 

In April 1995 his prime-time tele- 
vised speech marked the first time a 
congressional leader received such cov- 
erage. In the address, Gingrich sum- 
marized the first 100 days of the new 
congress. 



OR1 



Associated Pj 




Associated Pr 






Year in Review 



T he Leadershi 



'P Struan, e 





to become president does not 
have precedence on its side - 
only three times have sitting; 
senators been elected president. 
Age is another factor that may 
discourage voters. If elected, 
Dole would be 73 years old upon 
entering office. This would make 
him the oldest newly elected 
president in history. 

Colin Powell 




Associated Press 



In September 1995, Colin 
Powell embarked on a cross- 
country book tour to promote 
his autobiography, "My Ameri- 
can Journey." As he did this, he 
also promoted the notion that 
his next journey might be along 
the campaign trail, seeking the 
presidency of the United States 
in 1996. 
Associated Press Powell is the former chair- 

Bob Dole Campaign man Q f the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the 

Why do you want to be president?" first African-American person to hold 
asked the TV host. "Every country that position. He rose to fame through 
needs a president," replied republican his leadership in the Persian Gulf War 
Senator Bob Dole. In April 1 995 the The views expressed by Powell seem 
Kansas senator became the sixth re- to leave him out of both mainstream 
publican to formally declare his candi- republican and democratic ideologies 
dacv for a move into the White House In his book, he asserts his belief in free 
m ^ enterprise and lower taxes, and says that 

This is the third presidential attempt he is put offbv "patronizing liberals " 
for Dole, who unsuccessfully ran in He does, however, support women's 
republican primaries in 1980and 1988. rights, gun control and was alarmed by 
His intention is to cut taxes, balance a "troubling mix of politics and reli- 
the budget and "lead America back to glon " at the 1992 republican conven- 
her place in the sun." t j on 

Dole began his political career in He sees himself as the "sensible cen- 

1951, serving in the Kansas legislature. ter Q f the American political spectrum, " 

He served in the House of Representa- declaring no allegiance to anv political 

tives from 1 96 1 through 1 969 and has party, 
been a senator since. Dole's latest bid 



The Leadership Struggle 1 67 






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Student 
Living 

Students that attended the University of 
Maryland in 1995 and 1996 were very 
unique and they expressed their individuality in 
the different ways in which they lived. Many 
students took advantage of the housing that 
campus provided in the way of high rise dorms, 
North Hill dorms or South Hill suites. Others, 
however, decided that campus was not a place to 
live. 

Students came from near and far and lived 
alone, with friends and with family. The 
University of Maryland was known to its 
commuters as a parking catastrophe because there 
were so many people trying to fit in one small 
place. Those who lived on campus experienced 
the joys of dining hall food and resident rules. 

Maryland students were neat, messy, 
extravagant and frugal in their living space. All in 
all, Maryland students made their own place in 
the campus and the world while attending school. 



Snorre Wik 



Student Living 169 



"At least now 

with women in 

Ellicott, 

the guys have 

stopped 

pissing in the 

elevators. " 

Michael Bunitsky, II 
Sophomore 




ELLICOTT H ALl 




Tyrone Brook 



Student Livi 



Vint 



Women 

Male residents have mixed 

Move Into 

reactions to the change 

Ellicott Hall 



By Tracy Isaac 




omen, you 
can't live with 
them and you 
can't live 
ithout them." This is a 
ell-known cliche, that sums 
p the male tesidents' of 
llicott Hall sentiments about 



their new female counterparts. 
Since its opening, Ellicott 
Hall has been a single-sex 
dorm, an all-male dorm. But 
in the fall of 1995, Ellicott 
finally gained a woman's 
touch when it went coeduca- 
tional. 




Having women living in 
Ellicott has caused some 
mixed reactions from the 
male population. Many of 
the male residents cheer the 
addition of women to 
Ellicott. 

"Girls in Ellicott are great," 
said Raph Canchola, a sopho- 
more majoring in civil engi- 
neering, "It's a lot cleaner, 
quieter and the showers are 
nice." Cleanliness and shower 
curtains seems to be just a few 
of the benefits of women in 
Ellicott, according to the 
men. 

Although the women have 
been applauded for the 
improvements in Ellicott, 
some of the residents haven't 



been impressed. "I haven't 
noticed a change," said Jeff 
Yingling, a sophomore major- 
ing in engineering. 

Women in Ellicott is not a 
new phenomenon to the men 
of Ellicott. "Resident Life 
may have not known, but 
Ellicott was coed last year," 
said Charles Quarteay, a 
sophomore resident at 
Ellicott, "the only difference 
now is they don't have to 
leave the building to go 
home." 

This is extremely true, 
women have been rooming 
the halls of Ellicott lor years. 
But no matter the reactions, 
women are here to stay at 
Ellicott. 



Tvrone Brooks 



Women In Ellicott Hall 171 





Student I.ivi 



Snorre VC 



n g 



Campus commuters travel from 

Commuters 

near and far and fight the traffic 

know the Way 




Snorre Wik 



Commuters 173 



Campus Residents adjust tc 

Dining out at Home 

dining hallfooc, 



"Hamburger! Hamburger! 

Hamburger! We got Pepsi. You 

want Pepsi?! Next!" 

-John Belushi, 
Saturday Night Live 

This line is from an 
old sketch, but it 
speaks volumes 
about the rushed 
pace of the campus dining 
halls. With the vast food 
selections, dining in the three 
main dining halls - Ellicott, 
Denton, and South Campus - 
can be a harrowing experi- 
ence. "Being a freshman, you 
can't stop and read the 
menu," said Jessica Falkuner, 
a chemistry major dining at 



the Ellicott Dining Hall. 
"The upper classmen push 
you out of way to get to the 
food." 

Dining Services, which 
coordinates the dining halls 
menus, states "a resident can 
eat 100 different things 
without repeating." Many 
campus residents scoff at that 
claim. "Sure, a person can eat 
a hundred different things in 
the dining halls without 
repeating," said Jay Miller, a 
junior physical education 
major, "but a small, tiny fact 
is missing.. .Taste! Some 
of.. .well most of the dining 
hall's food is awful." 



"I have to agree," said Jeff 
Chin, a sophomore English 
major. "A few items are 
somewhat edible, but the 
cooks at the dining halls have 
strange ways of messing up 
the simplest thing. One week 
something would taste great, 
but two week later - utter 
complete crap!" 

Questionable food and too 
many selections seem to be a 



By Tracy Isaac 

problem for a few people, but 
where else in the world can a 
person have an Italian cold- 
cut sub, onion rings, a taco 
boat, two slices of sausage anc 
pepperoni pizza, a large 
mango surprise frozen yogurt 
and a giant sized iced tea with 
a twist of lemon at the same 
time and pay for it with a tin) 
card? Only in the dining hall 
at the University of Maryland 




C*T, 

*w BIB'S I art)' 
WMI Be *• 

i hww rou 



Russell Acost 



Student Living 




Lynn Romano 



Snorre Wik 



Dining Halls 175 



Apartment Living 



Off campus 

Students enjoy their freedom 

and on their own 




Snorre Wik 



Snorre 



Student Living 




Snorre Wik 



Apartment Living 177 




Snorrc V 



Student Living 



Suite Li 



v 1 n g 



Campus dorms have appeal when 

How Suite It Is 

there is a kitchen and furniture 




Snorre Wile 



Suite Living 179 



Fire 

Students put their lives on the * 

Service 

line to help others j 

Dormitory 



s 



By David R. Hood 



ome students walk 
about campus half 
asleep because of 
the big party they 
were at the night before. 
Others because they were up 
late cramming for the big 
exam. Eighteen of these 
students have that up-all- 
night glaze on their faces 
because they spent the night 
fighting fires 
and saving 
lives. These 
18 students 
are the mem- 
bers of the 
College Park 
Volunteer Fire 
Department 
Fire Service 
Dormitory, or 
as they call it - 
"The 
Sackroom." 
The Sackroom is a dorm 
space in the firehouse at 81 1 5 
Baltimore Blvd. that is 
allotted for full-time students 
of the University of Mary- 
land. These students are a 
combination of firefighters 
and emergency medical 
■ echnicians who live in the 



"This 

program 

is the best 

of both 

worlds. " 

Stacy 
Neidhart 



firehouse for free. In return, 
they ensure adequate fire 
protection and emergency 
medical treatment for the 
campus and the surrounding 
community. 

"This program is the best 
of both worlds," states Stacy 
Neidhart, a junior fire protec- 
tion engineering major. "We 
have great accommodations in 
the firehouse and get to 
positively interact with our 
fellow students on campus 
and the community each and 
every day. I certainly find 
volunteering very rewarding." 

Not just anyone can live in 
the firehouse, however. There 
is rigorous training involved. 
Before anyone can even step 
on a fire truck, they must go 
through approximately 100 
hours of training. This 
doesn't include the 1 10 hours 
of Emergency Medical Tech- 
nician training that is re- 
quired to staff the ambulance. 

Throughout the semester, 
these students must keep up 
with their studies, in addition 
to attending drills and meet- 
ings for the firehouse. 

The students that live in 




Tvrone Broo 



the Sackroom get an educa- 
tion that goes far beyond the 
classroom because they live 
and learn together. Trust, 
responsibility and respect are 
the lessons that the student 
volunteers will take with them 
after graduation. 



Dave Hood is a graduate of the CLu 
of 1996. He received bis degree in 
Fire Protection Engineering. Dave 
lived in the Sackroom for four years. 



Student Living 




Tyrone Brooks 



Tyrone Brooks 



Fire Service Dormitory 181 








Snorre Wil 



Student Living 



High Rise Living 



Some residents of the high rise 

Living in 

dormitories learn to rough it, 

High Style? 

while others live in style 




'3**V 



Snorre Wik 



Snorre Wik 



High Rise Living lo3 




Tyrone Broob 



P.uil Viei 



Student Living 



Maryland students know how 

Living it Up 

to enjoy their free time 




AWWV 



Snorre Wife 



Living it Up 185 




Snorre Wit 



Student Living 



Students have a variety of places 

Eating Out 

to choose from in College Park 




Snorre Wik 



Eating Out 187 



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Sports 



A university without sports is a university 
without pride, without spirit, and without 
glory. But the University of Maryland is a 
university with extreme pride, boundless spirit, 
unflagging glory, and collegiate sports. 

Since the beginning of collegiate athletics, sports 
have been the focal point of Maryland's tradition. 
But the graceful slam of a basketball, the defiant 
crack of a baseball bat, and the powerful hit of a 
field hockey ball are not the key factors behind 
Maryland's grand tradition. Maryland's students 
are the heart and soul of Maryland athletics. 
Standing always vigilant, the students of Maryland 
have shared the pain of defeat with their voim* 
sports "gods" and have rejoiced with wild abandon 
at every victory. 

With athletics casting a looming shadow over the 
campus, only one group of people can be 
blamed — the students. A blame that the students 
of the university of Maryland at College park take 
willingly. Because a university without sport 
enthused students is a university without a soul, 
life, hope and pride. Maryland is definitely 
overflowing with soul, life, hope and pride. 



Tvrone Brooks 



Sports 189 




inter 




Tyrone Brooks 



Sports 




Tvrone Brooks 



r i n 




Sports 



Men's Basketball 



Women's Basketball 



Swimmin 



§ 



Gymnastics 



Wrestling 



Track and Field 

Womens' Lacrosse 

Men's Lacrosse 

Women's Tennis 

Men's Tennis 

Baseball 

Golf 



Sports 191 




Tyrone Broo 



The Rise Back to the Xof 

Mens Basketball Moved Closer to a National Championshi 



T ! 



fhe Terrapin men's 
basketball team 
made the Sweet 16 
of the NCAA Championship 
Tournament 
". . . / like where OUr two years in a 

row, 1994 and 

program is right 1995. Ma ry- 
now. We feel there for first place in 

/ . r.j ' the Atlantic 

are a Lot of things 



wed still like to 

accomplish, and 

that's our 



Coast Confer- 
ence last year, 
with a confer- 
ence record of 
12-4. Joe 
Smith, who was 
named Fresh- 
mOtivation for the man of the Year 

2 years ago, was 
tUre. honored with 

Gary Williams the Naismith 

T T 1 ^ 1 Award as the 
Head Coach „ ,. „ . 

College basket- 
ball National Player of the 
Year. Now that the Maryland 
men's basketball program 



returned to national promi- 
nence, the Terps want to 
bring home an NCAA Cham- 
pionship. 

"You always want to go as 
far as you can," explained 
Terrapin Head Coach Gary 
Williams after the 1995 
season. "But given every- 
thing, I think we accom- 
plished a great deal over the 
last two years. Especially this 
year [1994/95] with Joe 
Smith being named Player of 
the Year and tying for first in 
the ACQ" 

The Terps were ranked 
among the top 10 in the 
nation for most of last year 
and were one of the favorites 
to win the NCAA Tourna- 
ment. However, Maryland 
lost to a quicker Connecticut 
team that outran the Terps on 
the fast break, in the round of 
16. The Terrapins trailed all 
game and were unable to slow 



down the Huskies' transitio 
game. Therefore, Marylanc 
was denied the chance to pi 
the UCLA Bruins, the even 
tual champions, in the next 
round. 

The big news of the year 
came well after the season w 
completed. Joe Smith elect 
to forgo his final two years < 
college eligibility in order tc 
enter the 1995 NBA draft. 
This move was anticipated 
throughout the season as 
Smith's statistics and natior 
recognition blossomed. 
However, the implications < 
his decision did not hit hon 
until he made the official 
announcement at a press 
conference from his home- 
town of Norfolk, VA. 

"Of course we're gonna 
miss Joe," admitted Willian 
collecting his thoughts on t 

continued on page 195 



B 



g 






Sports 




Tyrone Brooks 



Men's Basketball 193 




Tyrone Broi 



1 94 Spor 



rs 



VI 



n 



B 




R e c o 


r d 


Overall 


26-8 


CHAMINADE 


95-67 


UTAH 


90-78 


ARIZONA ST. 


90-97 


LOYOLA 


92-62 


BUCKNELL 


102-64 


UMBO 


102-77 


COLGATE 


113-53 


TOWSON ST. 


120-73 


MORGAN ST. 


138-72 


LA SALLE 


96-80 


AMERICAN 


98-77 


GEORGIA TECH 80-67 


N. CAROLINA 


90-100 


FLORIDA ST. 


70-57 


WAKE FOREST 


76-66 


N.C. STATE 


84-67 


CLEMSON 


56-51 


DUKE 


74-72 
71-62 


VIRGINIA 


GEORGIA TECH 91-100 


N. CAROLINA 


86-73 


FLORIDA ST. 


80-65 


WAKE FOREST 


54-63 


CINCINNATI 


74-72 


N.C. STATE 


84-71 


CLEMSON 


84-68 


DUKE 


94-92 


VIRGINIA 


67-92 


FLORIDA ST. 


71-64 


N. CAROLINA 


92-97 


GONZAGA 


87-63 


TEXAS 


82-68 


UCONN 


89-99 



ball 

continued from page 192 

1994/95 season. "But at the 
same time we're going to have 
a very good basketball team. 
We're playing Kentucky and 
UCLA early next season... We 
can get used to playing 
without Joe against some very 
good teams and then take it 
from there. I like where our 
program is right now. We 
feel there are a lot of things 
we'd still like to accomplish, 
and that's our motivation for 
the nature." 



Tvrone Brooks 



Men's Basketball 195 



'Women 's Basketball 




Tyrone Brooks 



Sports 




Record 

Overall 11-18 

VIRGINIA TECH 53-68 

MT. ST. MARTS 66-54 

at Howard 67-56 

TENNESSEE 29-95 

COPPIN STATE 74-56 

at Rutgers 76-73 

TOWSON STATE 88-40 

at Loyola 68-73 

at N.C. State 45-68 

at Georgia Tech 59-82 

DUKE 62-80 

CLEMSON 57-66 

at Florida State 70-56 

IONA 87-53 

at N. Carolina 67-88 

VIRGINIA 48-82 

N.C. STATE 83-80 

at Wake Forest 63-73 

GEORGIA TECH 59-67 

at Duke 63-67 

at Clemson 56-74 

WAKE FOREST 61-69 

FLORIDA STATE 59-66 

N. CAROLINA 70-86 

at Virginia 41-56 

ACC Tournament 

vs. Florida State 72-56 

vs. Virginia 46-68 



Tyrone Brooks 



Women's Basketball 197 



Men's and Women's 



Men 


s 


R e c o 


r d 


Overall 


3-8 


at N.C. State 


72.5-161.5 


ACC relays 




atUNC 


5th of 6 


Metro Relays 




at G.W. 


3rd of 8 


at Duke 


110-127 


at North Carolina 85-209 


UMBC 


105-132 
96-132 


JMU 


at American 


4th of 4 


at LaSalle 


61-52 


W. Virginia 


43-67 


HOWARD 


147-68 


at G.W. 


84-136 


HOPKINS 


127-115 


VIRGINIA 


69-143 


C/} 




ACC Tournament 


at N. Carolina 6th of 8 






Tyrone Broo 



Sports 



wimm 



W 





til lltl 



*& 




Worn 


en's 


R e c 


o r d 


Overall * [\ 


10-2 


at N.C. State 


171-128 


ACC relays 


_J 


at UNC 


3rd of 5 


Metro Relavs 




at G.W. 


1st of 8 


at Duke 


144-100 


at North Carolina 91-208 
UMBC 129-112 


JMU ^ 
at American 


138.5-104 


3rd of 4 


NAV^" 


227-71 


at LaSalle 


76-37 


W. Virginia 


70-43 


HOWARD 


#yi89-35 


at G.W. 


150-98 


HOPKINS 


16^-68 


VIRGINIA 


108-128 


ACC Tournament 


at N. Carolina 5th of 7 



Tvrone Brooks 



Men's and Women's Swimming 1 99 




W r e s t 1 



1 n 






Record 










Overall 


14-3 






at E. Stroudsburg Open 


at Clemson 


18-15 


VIRGINIA TECH 


27-1 


at Perm State 
at N.C. Duals 


at Tennessee Chattanooga 

26-6 


VIRGINIA 
at Duke 


13-15 

25-< 


Appalachian State 24-15 


& Georgia State 


23-12 


at American 


264 


Citadel 40-3 


OLD DOMINION 


24-12 


w/Coppin 


31-( 


Georgia State 18-15 


N.C. STATE 


16-15 


ACC Championships 




William & Mary 35-6 


at N. Carolina 


38-6 


at Maryland 3rd of ( 


at Wilkes Open 3rd of 14 


NAVY 


12-24 






at Millersville 3rd of 14 


HOWARD 


20-16 







200 Sports 



Gymnastics 



t Temple w/Rutgers 3rd of 3 

r G.W. Invitational 3rd of 8 

t G.W. w/Towson 2nd of 3 
t N. Carolina 



Record 

Overall 
TEMPLE 



9-5 



185.150- 184.125 
at N.C. State 2nd of 5 

G.W. 188.300-188.125 
187.375-186.325 JMU & UNC 1st of 3 

CORNELL & YALE 1st of 3 



t Towson Invitational 

3rd of 7 



at N.C. State w/UNC 

& Radford 2nd of 4 

USA Gymnastics Collegiate 

National Championships 

Preliminary team results: 
186.200 5th of 8 




Lisa Helfert 



Wrestling and Gymnastics 201 



T 



a 



k 



a n 



d 



Spring 
Record 

No Team Scores Available 

Raleigh Relays Mar 24-25 
Raleigh, NC 

UVA (Quad Meet) Apr 1 
Charlottsville, VA 

Mt. St. Mary's Invitational 
Apr 8 
Emmittsburg, MD 

Delaware Invitaitonal 

Apr 15 
Newark, DE 

ACC's Wake Forest 

Apr 21-22 
Winston-Salem, SC 

Penn Relays Apr 27-29 
Philadelphia, PA 

Mason Invitational May 6 
Fairfax, VA 

Mason/Mizuno May 13 
Fairfax, VA 



NCAA 



Knoxville, TN 



May 29- 
June 3 











202 Sports 



F i 



1 d 









Tyrone Brooks 



Winter 


Record 


^Javy Invitational 


Kent State Invitational 


.id Lifter (women) -. 


Men 3rd of 6 


eton Hall Invitational 


Women 3rd of 7 


(men) 


Husker Invitational 


ather Diamond 


Lincoln, NE 


at George Mason 


ACC Championships 


Delaware Invitational 


at Greensboro, NC 


Men 4th of 6 


Men 9th of 9 


Women 1st of 5 


Women 7th of 9 


■Javy (quad meet-women) 




2nd of 4 




■Javy (tri-meet) 




Men 2nd of 3 




vs. Navy- Women 63-55 




vs. W&M-Women73-43 









Track and Field 203 




I ■ 



Tyrone Broo 



1995 National Champions 

Maryland Womens Lacrosse — at the top where they belon 



i 



' t's always difficult to 
think beyond the last 
game of your season," 
remarked Head Coach Cindy 
Timchal. And 
who would 
"We had jUSt One blame her? The 

1994 season 
goal the whole Season, ended as the 

. . , previous season 

the national had . a dlsap . 

pointing loss to 
the Princeton 

we knew who we had ^1 d A u " ng 

the NCAA 



championship, and 



to beat to get it. ' 

Laura Harmon 
Ail-American 



Tournament. 
But the Terra- 
pins could not 
afford to dwell 
on the past. 
Several ques- 
tions had emerged concerning 
the 1995 season. Could the 
Terps compensate for the loss 
of several Ail-Americans to 
graduation? Most impor- 
tantly, could the Terps snap 



their string of premature 
tournament exits, and win the 
NCAA Championship? 

"We questioned whether 
the team was ready to step up 
and replace the graduated 
players," said Timchal. Any 
doubts that existed before the 
1995 season were soon 
answered. The newcomers to 
the Terrapin roster were 
quickly playing like seasoned 
veterans. "Our team played 
together from the beginning," 
remarked freshman midfielder 
Cathy Nelson. "As the season 
went on, everyone just got 
better," added Nelson. 

While the new players 
enjoyed a smooth transition, 
the depth and talent of the 
Terp bench could not be 
discounted. "We subbed a 
lot," said Assistant Coach 
Gary Gait, in what was 
perhaps the understatement of 
the year. While most oppo- 



B 



M 



nents limited themselves to 
fewer than 10 substitutions, 
Maryland could afford up- 
wards of 40 player substitu- 
tions per game. "Since we 
could sub five people at a 
time, we always had fresh leg 
and kept constant pressure 01 
other teams," said Ail-Ameri- 
can senior defender Laura 
Harmon. 

Team chemistry and liben 
substitutions produced play 
that quickly erased any 
reservations about the talent 
of last years' squad, which w; 
bad news for Terrapin oppo- 
nents. Maryland picked up 
right where it had left off the 
previous season; winning 
everything. During the 1 5 
regular season games the 
Terps outscored their oppo- 
nents 192 to 61, securing 
another perfect record. 

continued on page 206 



R 



204 



Sports 




Tyrone Brooks 



Tyrone Brooks 



Women's Lacrosse 205 



Women's 
Lacrosse 

continued form page 204 

While most challengers 
were overwhelmed by 
Maryland's stunning offense, 
and frustrated by its stifling 
defense, the regular season 
was not without its share of 
drama. The Terps were 
served a wake-up call when 
they escaped with a narrow 5 
to 3 victory over an inspired 
squad at Penn State. Days 
later, a close 9 to 8 Maryland 
victory ended with 
Princeton's head coach 
disputing the official's man- 
agement of the game clock. 

With a second, consecutive 
undefeated regular season 
behind them, the Terps 
traveled north to Trenton 
State University for the 
NCAA Tournament. Despite 
being greeted by unseasonably 
rainy, chilly weather, Mary- 
land was not distracted. The 
team focused on its first 
round game, a rematch 
against Penn Sate. 

This time however, the 
results were considerably 
different. As the clouds 
receded for Saturday's semi- 
final match-up, so did the 
Nittany Lions' chance for an 
upset of the top-seeded 
Terrapins. Maryland would 
face the Princeton Tigers in 
CAA Finals. "We had 
just one goal the whole 
season, the National Champi- 
onship, and we knew who we 
had to beat to get it,'' stated 
Harmon. 

During an eerily quiet bus 
ride from the hotel to the site 






* 






m » 



\ : 



i 







of the championship, one 
question persisted. Even as 
the undefeated Terps took to 
the field for pre-game warm- 
ups, one question lingered. 
Even as All-American junior 
center Kelly Amonte lined up 
for the opening draw, the 
question remained; would 
the Terrapins snap their jinx 
against Princeton and regain 
the national crown? 

The answer came exactly 



eight seconds later. That is 
how long it took Amonte to 
win possession of the draw, 
streak down field and rip a 
shot past Princeton's All- 
American goalkeeper. In 
exactly eight seconds, the 
Terps took control of the 
game, and they never looked 
back. "I try to lead by ex- 
ample," said Amonte, whose 
perfect execution was quickly 
duplicated by the team. 



Every Terp played flawlessly 
enroute to a 13 to 5 victory 
that left Princeton dazed and 
confused, and earned Mary- 
land a much deserved nations 
championship. 

In recognition of their 
outstanding play during the 
championship, several Terps 
were named to the NCAA 
All-Tournament team: senioi 
Laura Harmon, juniors Kelly 
Amonte, Jamie Brodsky, 



206 



Sports 



♦ 







Record 




Overall 

NCAA tournament 


17-0 
2-0 


DELAWARE 


15-4 


at Temple 


13-5 


at Virginia 


7-4 


at Georgetown 


17-7 


at UMBC 


11-2 


at Old Dominion 


16-2 


TOWSON STATE 


17-4 


JAMES MADISON 


9-3 


RUTGERS 


18-1 


HARVARD 
LOYOLA 


14-4 


13-4 


WILLIAM & MARY 16-6 


at Penn State 


5-3 


PRINCETON 


9-8 


at Dartmouth 


12-4 


NCAA semi finals 
at Trenton State 
vs. Penn State 


12-7 


NCAA finals 




at Trenton State 
vs. Princeton 


13-5 



Tyrone Brooks 



izabeth Downing, Randall 
oldsborough and Tammy 
iley, as well as freshman 
athy Nelson. Soon after, 
i Terps were named AI1- 
nericans: Kelly Amonte, 
lura Harmon and junior 
id fielder Karen MacCrate 

the first team, junior 
fender Elizabeth Downing 

the second team and junior 
■alkeeper Jamie Brodsky and 
phomore midfielder Sarah 



Forbes to the third team. 
Additionally, National Defen- 
sive Player of the Year honors 
were bestowed upon Kelly 
Amonte. Also of note, Laura 
Harmon became the first 
student athlete to have played 
on 3 national championship 
teams: the 1992 champion 
women's lacrosse team, as well 
as the 1993 champion field 
hockey team. 



Women's Lacrosse 207 



Men's Lacrosse 




Tyrone Br 



Spi 




Record 

Overall 12-3 

at Villanova 15-6 

DUKE 8-6 

at Towson State 6-5 

at Cornell 20-12 

RADFORD 26-3 

N.CAROLINA 13-12 

at Virginia 11-12 

at Navy 19-11 

HOPKINS 15-16 
ACC Semi-Finals at UNC 

vs. N. Carolina 9-14 

Hobart at Brown 21-12 

at Brown 1 1-8 

UMBC 19-14 
NCAA Quarter-Finals 

NOTRE DAME 14-11 
NCAA Semi-Finals 

Hopkins 16-8 
NCAA FINALS 

SYRACUSE 9-13 



Tyrone Brooks 



Men's Lacrosse 209 



Record 




Overall 


>-ll 


GEORGE MASON 


9-0 


KANSAS 


2-7 


at N.C. State 


0-9 


at Virginia 


0-9 


G.W. 


8-1 


N. CAROLINA 


3-6 


at Florida State 


1-8 


at Wake Forest 


1-8 


WEST VIRGINIA 

p 
at renn 


5-1 
3-6 


GEORGIA TECH 


6-3 


vcu 


4-5 


atW&M 


1-5 


MT. ST. MARY'S 


8-1 


CLEMSON 


2-7 


DUKE 


0-9 


ACC Championships 




Greenwood, SC 




vs. Geargia Tech 


5-2 


vs. Duke 


0-6 




Tyrone Br 



Sports 



Women's Tennis 




Tyrone Brooks 



Tvrone Brooks 



Women's Tennis 211 



Men's Tennis 



Record 



Overall 



2-11 



at Pittsburgh 


3-4 


at Pennsylvania 


0-7 


NAVY 


0-5 


COPPIN STATE 


9-0 


at N. Carolina 


0-7 


at Duke 


0-7 


at Florida State 


0-7 


CLEMSON 


0-7 


at Virginia 


0-7 


GEORGIA TECH 


0-7 


MT. ST. MARY'S 


6-1 


at Wake Forest 
at N.C. State 


0-7 
0-7 


ACC Championships 




Greenwood, SC 




vs. N.C. State 


0-7 




it 4 4 # » § # , , 

* $4§i $4 * §J 
"itig 4 4 
ft» * * ' 



Tyrone Bro 



Sports 




&£ 





Tvrone Brooks 



Men's Tennis 213 



Record 




Overall 


20-37 


at N. Carolina A&T 




double header 


8-2 




3-2 


UNC - Greensboro 




double header 


2-3 




5-0 


UNC - Greensboro 


5-6 


VCU 




double header 


8-4 


yw$&. 1 


1-3 


VCU 


2-0 


HOWARD 


9-2 


COPPIN STATE 


13-0 


at N.C. State 


7-10 


at N.C. State 


2-8 


at N.C. State 3-14 


at UMBC 


3-9 


TOWSON STATE 


7-6 


at Mercer 


3-7 


at Georgia Tech 


17-25 


at Georgia Tech 


6-18 


at Georgia Tech 


7-10 


CLEMSON 


3-4 


CLEMSON 


2-11 


CLEMSON 


2-12 


atJMU 


2-7 




Tyrone Broi 



Sports 



Baseball 




Tyrone Brooks 



UMES 




double header 


11-3 




4-3 


at Duke 


6-8 


at Duke 


6-7 


at Duke 


7-4 


at Towson State 


6-8 


NAVY 


6-14 


GEORGETOWN 


28-5 


N. CAROLINA 


11-1 


N. CAROLINA 


4-16 


N. CAROLINA 


6-10 


at UMES 


7-4 


HOWARD 


9-0 


G.W. 


3-5 


at Virginia 


0-13 


at Virginia 13-5 


at Virginia 


10-6 


at Richmond 


9-10 


at Georgetown 


8-3 


WAKE FOREST 


7-9 


WAKE FOREST 


1-2 


WAKE FOREST 


3-7 


at West Virginia 


9-10 


COPPIN STATE 


8-3 


FLORIDA STATE 


1-9 


FLORIDA STATE 




double header 


1-7 




0-1 


UMBC 


25-4 


at George Mason 


4-7 


at William & Man' 


8-9 


JMU 


3-4 


ACC Tournament 




Greenville, SC 




vs. Duke 


10-3 


vs. Clemson 


0-10 


vs. Wake Forest 


4-17 



Baseball 215 



Golf 




Lisa He 





Record 




Mercedes Benz Collegeiate 


Cleveland Classic 


28th Palmetto Classic 93' 


Championships 324 


Invitational 907 


17th of 1' 


15th of 15 


15th of 18 


Host: College of Charlesto 


Host: U. of N. Florida 


Host: Augusta College 


Cavalier Classic 91i 


Furman Intercollegiate 933 


42nd ACC Tournament 


14th of 1 


19th of 24 


919 


Host: U. of Virginia 


Host: Furman University 


9th of 9 





Sports 



Softball 





rvrone Brooks 



Record 




Overall 15-33 


GEORGE MASON 


0-9 


double header 


0-11 


BOWIE STATE 


20-2 


double header 


12-4 


GOLDEYBEACOM8-15 


double header 


2-5 


WILMINGTON 


7-6 


double header 


5-6 


CORNELL 


9-3 


double header 


6-5 


Winthrop Tournament 



• 



5^ if 3 * m 





/*} 



Tvrone Brooks 



vs. George Mason 


5-9 


vs. Winthrop 


0-15 


vs. Wright State 


0-12 


vs. Charleston 


3-4 


ST. FRANCIS 


2-0 


double header 


3-11 


at Georgia Tech 


2-4 


double header 


1-8 


Georgia Tech Tournament 


vs. Troy State 


1-16 


vs. Georgia State 


3-8 


vs. Toledo 


0-9 


vs. U. Tennessee 


1-12 


WINTHROP 


0-10 


double header 


1-9 


at Mt St. Mary's 


15-14 


double header 


11-1 


UMES 

double header 


9-7 


14-4 


at Anne Arundel 


7-8 


double header 


6-9 


at Coppin State 


17-2 


double header 


15-2 


MORGAN STATE 


18-6 


double header 
at UMBC 


0-9 


0-15 


double header 


3-18 


at Trenton State 


2-13 


double header 


0-11 


ACC Tournament 




at Florida State 




vs. N. Carolina 


0-8 


vs. Virginia 


0-8 


ANNE ARUNDEL 


6-8 


double header 


1-2 


at George Mason 


1-9 


double header 


3-7 


at UMES 


15-9 


double header 


11-3 



Golf and Softball 217 




a 




Tyrone Brooks 



Sports 





o r t s 







I! 




Football 



Cheerleading 



Band and Dance Team 



Women's Soccer 



Mens Soccer 



Cross Country 



Vollyball 



Field Hockey 



Tvrone Brooks 



Sports 219 





Tyrone Bro< 



^t 



I f 





£\J£' Al< \ 



Tyrone Broo 



Spo 



rts 



, 



ssfj^ci* wy$^ 




Tvrone Brooks 



\ "Winning Season 

\jnid QB Controversy, Terps have strong season 



[f someone had said in 
August that the Terrapin 
football team would 
lish 6-5, it would have been 
msidered a success. In 
ovember, that record was 
swed as disappointing. 
In between, the season saw 
bplots that were almost 
limaginable; a 4-0 record 
d a No. 17 ranking, to a 
arterback controversy, to a 
5 finish in the last seven 
mes that knocked the Terps 
t of bowl contention. 
The ride began when senior 
arterback Scott Milanovich 
s suspended by the NCAA 
July for eight games for 
inbling. His sentence was 
ier reduced to four games 
ler an appeal. 
His would-be back-up, 
^vin Foley, had transferred 
J December to Boston 
diversity. That left sopho- 

B y 



more Brian Cummings as the 
Terps starting quarterback. 
Cummings, a pitcher for the 
baseball team, had thrown 
more baseballs than footballs 
in collegiate games. His back- 
up, converted cornerback 
Orlando Strozier, had last 
thrown a pass in high school. 

To make matters worse, the 
Terps were opening a 14,000 
seat upper deck to bring total 
capacity to over 48,000. The 
Terps had trouble drawing 
30,000 fans the previous 
season with no players sus- 
pended, and critics feared the 
stadium would be halt-empty. 

The Terps won their first 
game against a weak Tulane 
team 29-10, as expected. In 
the next three games, the 
Terps accomplished almost 
the unbelievable. They blew 
out three teams at home that 
had made bowl games the 



previous season — North 
Carolina, West Virginia and 
Duke. The three games 
averaged over 40,000 fans, 
including the largest crowd 
since 1985 for the West 
Virginia game. 

Cummings performed well, 
having his best game against 
Duke when he threw for 299 
yards and two touchdowns. 
There was a special enthusi- 
asm and excitement sur- 
rounding the Terps. 

"You just cant ask for 
anything more," Terp line- 
backer Ratcliff Thomas said. 
"It just gives you more mo- 
mentum. When you hear the 
fight song and the cannon 
going off, you can feel the 
excitement in the air. It 
makes you want to go out 
there and play great." 

Cummings' success led to 
eventual Terp failure. 



Milanovich was returning for 
a Thursday night game on 
ESPN against Georgia Tech. 
There was much debate as to 
who should start; 
Cummings, who seemed to 
have the teams chemistry, or 
Milanovich, who was more 
established. 

Terp head coach Mark 
Duffner chose fvlilanovich. It 
proved to be disastrous as the 
Terps were humiliated 31-3. 
Milanovich did pass for 352 
yards, but had trouble reading 
signals and could not move 
the Terps. 

Milanovich started the next 
week against a bad Wake 
Forest team, and once again 
struggled. Cummings re- 
placed him and led the Terps 
to a 9-6 victory. The Terp 
fourth quarter touchdown 
would be the last one scored 

Continued on page 223 



n 



d y 



M 



n 



d 1 



o 



w 



Football 221 



F o o t b 



Record 

Overall 6-5 



Tul 



at 1 ulane 



29-10 



N.CAROLINA 32-18 



WEST VIRGINIA 31-17 



DUKE 



1-28 



at Georgia Tech 3-31 

at Wake Forest 9-6 



CLEMSON 

at Louisville 
at N.C. State 
VIRGINIA 



<U 



0-17 



3 



0-31 

0-13 

18-21 



at Florida State 17-59 




I yronc Hit" 



Sports 






3 ^ 





Continued from page 221 

in the next 1 1 quarters. 

It did not matter who 
played quarterback, the Terp 
oftense could not generate. 
The running game also 
(altered. Sophomore Buddv 
Rodgers, who had averaged 
over 98 yards per game for the 
first four games, was almost 
non-existent. 

Cummings started the next 
two games, a l~-0 loss to 
Clemson and a 31-0 loss to 
Louisville. At that point, the 
Terps were 5-3 and still had a 
chance for a winning season 
and a bowl bid. 

.After Milanovich replaced 
Cummings in the fourth 
quarter of the Louisville 
game, Cummings never 
played again all season. 
Against N.C. State, Duffner 
inserted a new offensive 
scheme. He replaced the run 
and shoot, which usuaJlv 
featured four wide receivers, 
with a ti°;ht end and a run- 



Tvrone Brooks 




ning back. The formation 
surprised N.C. State and the 
Terps easily won 30- 1 3 to 
clinch a winning season. 

To secure a bowl bid, the 
Terps needed to upset then- 
No. 1 5 Virginia or No. 6 
Florida State. They came 
close in a 21-18 nail-bitter 
loss to the Cavaliers. The 
Terps blocked a punt that set 
up a touchdown in the final 
four minutes, but Virginia ran 
the clock out. 

The Terps could hardly 
score against then-No. 6 
Florida State and lost 59-17. 
The Terps finished the season 
tied with North Carolina for 
fourth place in the ACC. The 
three bowls that had once 
shown interest in the Terps 
— the Carquest, Indepen- 
dence and Libertv — never 
called back. 



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Football 223 







Sp 



orts 



Paul V 






Cheer leading 




Paul Vieira 



Hank Fellner 



Cheerleading 225 



Band and Dance Tean 





226 Sports 



PaulA 







Paul Yieirj 



Band and Dance Team 227 



^C^om 



Record 




Overall 


18-5 


VIRGINIA TECH 


6-0 


at George Mason 


5-0 


at Florida State 


5-1 


LOYOLA 


4-0 


PRINCETON 


4-1 


WAKE FOREST 


3-0 


WILLIAM & MARY 


1-0 


OLD DOMINION 


6-0 


at Virginia 


0-4 


at Duke 


2-1 


CLEMSON 
at UMBC 


2-0 


3-0 


GMU Tournament 




vs. Texas A&M 


0-1 


vs. Cornell 


5-0 


JMU 


2-1 


at N.C. State 


0-1 


at G. W. 


5-1 


FAIRFIELD 


3-0 


N. CAROLINA 


0-3 


ACC Tournament 




vs. Clemson 


2-0 


vs. N.C. State 


1-0 


vs. UNC 


0-3 


rts 






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Brooks 



Women's Soccer 229 




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230 Sports 



Men's Soccer 




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Record 




Overall 13-6-1 


at UConn 




vs. Seton Hall 


3-2 


at UConn 


5-1 


at UMBC 


1-0 


VIRGINIA 


2-2 


at American 


2-1 


N.C. STATE 


2-0 


at Towson State 


1-2 


at Duke 

\ PS 

JMU 1-2 


2-1 




WAKE FOREST 


4-3 


Met Life Classic at Rutgers 


vs. St. John's 


2-0 


vs. Rutgers 


2-0 


MT. ST. MARY'S 


1-0 


ROBERT MORRIS 
celled 


can- 


RICHMOND 


1-0 


OLD DOMINION 


3-0 


at Loyola 


1-0 


CLEMSON 


0-2 


at N. Carolina 


2-1 


ACC Tournament 




N. Carolina 


3-4 



Penn State 



2-0 



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Men's Soccer 231 



C r o 



s s 




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Tyrone Bro 



232 Sports 



Count 



y 




Winter 


Record 


k^ 


Navy Invitational N .i 


Lid Lifter (women) ►<„,., 


Seton Hall Invitational 


■: r | | x-t-S- 

(men)*...™,- 


Father Diamond 


at George Mason n„ - 


Delaware Invitational 


Men 4th of 6 


Women 1st of 5 


Navy (quad meet-women) 


2nd of 4 
Navy (tri-meet) 


Men 2nd of 3 


vs. Navy- Women 63-55 


vs. W&M-Women73-43 


Kent State Invitational 


Men 3rd of 6 


Women 3rd of 7 


Husker Invitational n .t..s 


Lincoln, NE 


ACC Championships 


at Greensboro, NC 


Men 9th of 9 


Women 7th of 9 



Spring 
Record 

No Team Scores Available 

Raleigh Relays Mar 24-25 
Raleigh, NC 

UVA (Quad Meet) Apr 1 
Charlottsville, VA 

Mt. St. Mary's Invitational 
Apr 8 
Emmittsburg, MD 

Delaware Invitational 

Apr 15 
Newark, DE 

ACC's Wake Forest 

Apr 21-22 
Winston-Salem, SC 

Penn Relays Apr 27-29 
Philadelphia, PA 

Mason Invitational May 6 
Fairfax, VA 

Mason/Mizuno May 13 
Fairfax, VA 



NCAA 



Knoxville, TN 



May 29- 
June 3 



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Cross Country 233 




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Spo 



its 



Volleyball 




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Record 




Overall 22-10 




at G.W. Tournament 




vs. Akron 1-3 




vs. G.W. 1-3 




vs. Pitt 1-3 




vs. Portland 3-1 




Maryland Tournament 




vs. UConn 3-0 




vs. William & Mary 3-1 




GEORGETOWN ' 3-0 




at Michigan State Tourn. 




vs. Michigan State 0-3 




vs. S. Carolina 3-2 




vs. Cleveland State 3-1 




at Duke 2-3 
at N.C. State 3-1 




GEORGIA TECH 3-1 




CLEMSON 3-1 




VIRGINIA 3-1 
at N. Carolina 3-2 






at American 3-1 




N.C. STATE 3-0 
DUKE 3-0 




at Georgia Tech 0-3 




at Clemson 1-3 




N. CAROLINA 3-1 




FLORIDA STATE 3-0 




at George Mason 3-0 
VIRGINIA 3-0 




FLORIDA STATE 3-1 




ACC Tournament 




at Clemson 




Duke 3-0 




Florida State 3-0 




Georgia Tech 0-3 




NCAA Championship 
Miami of Ohio 3-0 


^i^i 


at Ohio State 3-1 


Tyrone Brooks 






Vollevball 235 



R e c o i 


d 




Overall 


19-5 


DELAWARE 




5-0 


UMASS 




4-0 


DUKE 




7-3 


Hawkeye Invitational 




vs. SW Missouri St. 


5-0 


Hawkeye Invitational 




at Iowa 




3-2 
2-1 


at Penn State 




OLD DOMINION 


2-1 


at Towson State 


postponed 


VIRGINIA 




1-0 


N. CAROLINA 




1-2 


at Temple 





2-1 


RUTGERS 


5-0 


WAKE FOREST 


6-2 


at James Madison 


0-1 


at N. Carolina 




1-2 


at Virginia 




3-2 


at Penn 




5-2 


at Wake Forest 




4-2 


at Duke 




3-1 


RICHMOND 




4-0 


ACC Championship 




at Maryland 






vs. Virginia 




1-0 


vs. UNC 




2-3 


vs. Old Dominion 


1-0 


vs. Northeastern 


3-1 


vs. North Carolina 


1-5 



Field Hockey 




-». — — 



Tyrone Brook; 




Courtesy of Sports Informatioi 



236 Sports 




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Field Hockey 237 



F 



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238 Sports 




Field Hockey 239 



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Sports 



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October 14-15, 1995 




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Midnight Madness 24 1 



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Greeks 




Greek life at the University of Man-land was 
the same in 1995 and 1996 as previous 
years - full of tradition, spirit and good feelings. 
Fraternity brothers and sorority sisters had shared 
experiences and the foundation of the organization 
of which they were a part. 

The Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic 
Association and the Panhellenic Council were the 
three overseeing boards of the fraternities and 
sororities. The three groups worked together to 
participate in various events. 

Greek life means different things to different 
people because each fraternity and sororitv is 
different and the experiences, though similar, 
unique. 



are 



Snorre W'ik 



Greeks 25" 




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Greeks 




e 



e 



1995 




Paul \ id 



Paul Vieira 



Greek Week 1995 - S0 



Greek Tradition 




Paul Viei 



Paul Viei 



Greeks 



Unity, Camaraderie and Parties 




Paul Vieira 



Paul Vieira 



■ III lllft. 

■Ill Hill 



linn 



ml 







Paul Vieir. 



Greeks 26 1 



Fraternity and 




i ceks 



Sorority Formats 




Paul Yieira 



Fraternity and Sorority FormaJs 203 



What do you think of 




Paul Vieira 



Paul Vi( 



Greeks 



when you think Greek? 




_ 



Paul Y'ieira 



Paul Yieira 



Greeks 265 



Fraternity an 

BY SHARI SCOTT AND MARYLOU GIANGASPERO 



With the start of the 
new year came the 
continuation of a 
long tradition: RUSH. New 
students got an introduction 
to Greek life. The 
Panhellenic Association held a 
Rush Expo on Hornbake 
Mall, which allowed future 
rushees to get their first 
glimpse of the Greek System. 

Formal Rush for the 
Panhellenic Association began 
with an orientation consisting 
of 500 women. After being 
broken-up in groups the 
rushees were led by their Rho 
Chis to tour all 15 sorority 

continued on next page 




Paul Vieira 



Paul Vicii 



Greeks 



Sorority Rush 







continued from previous page 

houses. This allowed them 
the chance to get to know a 
little about each house. 

As each Rush party got 
more formal, rushees nar- 
rowed down their choices 
hoping to find their favorite 
sorority. Finally, after two 
weeks of seemingly endless 
anticipation each girl found 
out who would become their 
sisters and life-long friends. 

Interfraternity Council 
Rush, on the other hand, was 
quite the contrary. As op- 
posed to the sorority Formal 
Rush, fraternity rush enabled 
guys to rush only the house 
they liked best. With "dry 
rush" in full swing, the guys 
basically hung out with their 



Paul Yieira 




future brothers. Whether this 
meant playing football on 
Fraternity Row or shooting 
hoops behind the fraternity 
houses, the purpose was 
simple. The purpose for the 
guys was to get to know the 
houses and, in turn, for the 
houses to get to know the 
guys. 

After the end of a two week 
period the fraternities had 
Formal Rush, which consisted 
of invitations to various social 
events. If all went well, the 
house gave bids out to poten- 
tial brothers. 

Once rush was over, some 
rushees became either sorority 
or fraternity pledges and went 
onto the next step toward 
sister or brotherhood. 



Paul \ icira 



Panhellenic Association and Interfraternity Council Rush 26 



Panhellenic Assoc iatior 




PaulVit 



Greeks 




Paul Viein 



Panhellenic Association Bid Day 269 



The Greek Perspective 




Greeks 



on Homecoming 199S 




BY PAYTON GOLDMAN 



The University of 
Maryland's Greeks and 
campus organizations 
celebrated Homecoming 
1995, "Home is Where the 
Heart Is," with a week of 
athletic competitions and 
performance shows. Home- 
coming events were scheduled 
from October 1 5 throueh 
October 21. 

In past years. Homecoming 
Week participation has been 
dominated by Greek organi- 
zations, however numerous 
campus organizations were 
actively involved this year. 
According to the Interfrater- 
nity Council's Homecoming 
Chair, Jeff Becker, "Home- 
coming this year took a major 
step forward in campus unity 
and hopefully those footsteps 
will be followed in the fu- 
ture." 

According to Becker, 90 
percent of this year's Home- 
coming events were cospon- 



sored by campus groups. 
Included in the activities were 
athletics, the Black Student 
Union talent show, the Black 
Student Union step show, 
"Hair and kareoki night. 
Only two activities, olvmpics 
and lip sync, were exclusivelv 
Greek. "In an event like 
Homecoming, that was 
perceived as being dominated 
by the Greek system," said 
Becker, "it is encouraging to 
see leaders from other parts of 
our campus stepping up to 
help out." 

According to the 
Panhellenic Association's 
Homecoming Chair, Shari 
Levine, Greek participation 
this year demonstrated the 
chapters' enthusiasm for 
Greek life. "Homecoming 
enables Greek organizations 
to celebrate their individual 
spirit and talent, while unit- 
ing with others to enjoy the 
entire week's events." 



Lvnn Roman 



IL 



The Greek Perspective on Homecoming 1995 2 1 



The Greek Perspective on Homecoming 199 




Tvrone 



Greeks 



Steppin' 




Tyrone Brooks 



Tyrone Brooks 



The Greek Perspective on Homecoming 1 995 - Step Show 273 



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1\1 




Organizations 



The University of Maryland has so many 
things to offer and it is evident in the 
diversity of organizations that are on the campus. 
There are student groups, activist groups, 
administrative organizations and many more. On 
the next few pages are a few of the groups and 
organizations of the University of Maryland that 
enhance the campus. 

Students have the opportunity to learn more 
about themselves by experiencing different things 
while at Maryland. Students also learn to work 
with the University by interacting with the 
administration in some of the groups and 
organizations. Maryland students can enhance 
their education and their experiences by 
participating in these groups. 



Snorre Wik 



Organizations 275 



Office of the Vice President 

for Student Affain 



The Division of Student Affairs 
held the responsibility for the 
coordination and direction of a 
variety of student development 
programs. The Vice Presidents 
office served as an advocate for 
student issues and concerns within 
the administration of the campus 



and the university. The Vice 
President, in conjunction with the 
departments in the division, 
promoted the individual 
development of all students, 
activities, campus-wide events and 
the addressing of the environmental 
issues that affected campus life. 




Top Right - Dr. William L. Thomas, Jr., Vice President for Student Affairs. Top Center - Dr. Drury Bagwell, Assistant Vice Presider ! 
Top Left - Dr. Richard Stimpson, Assistant Vice President. Bottom Left - Mr. Dale Vander Wall, Assistant to the Vice Presider 
Bottom Center - Mr. Warren Kelley Executive Assistant to the Vice President and Director of Planning and Research. 



nidations 



. 



"he University Counseling 
"enter provides comprehen- 
ive services to meet the 
lental health and develop- 
lental needs of students. 
he Center is ranked anions; 
le premier counseling 
enters nationwide based on 
s quality services, research 
n student development, 
aching, advanced graduate 
udent training, and leader- 
lip role in scholarship and 



Counseling Cei 

Director: Dr. Vivian Boyd 



professional associations. 
More than 25% of each class 
that graduates from the 
University used the Counsel- 
ing Center. Counseling 
services are confidential and 
free for students. The Center 




HULL' 




includes the following five 
divisions: 
Counseling Sen ice : Licensed 
psychologists assist students 
with emotional, social, 
education, and career counsel- 
ing individually, in groups 
and through workshops. 
Counseling is available to 
overcome depression, career 
indecisiveness, anxiety, 
loneliness and other prob- 
lems. Disability Support 
Service : provides interpreters 
for the deaf, readers for the 
blind, assistance with registra- 
tion, and administration of 
classroom exams. Learning 
Assistance Service : educa- 
tional skills specialists provide 
help with academic skills such 



as reading, writing, math, 
listening, note-taking, time 
management, exam anxiety, 
study skills, English as a 
second language, as well as 
programs for Returning 
Students and students with 
learning disabilities. Testing- 
Research and Data Processing 
Service : administers national 
tests such as the CLEP, GRE, 
LSAT, MCAT, GMAT. 
Researchers provide studies 
on characteristics of Univer- 
sity students and the campus 
environment. Parent Consul- 
tation and Child Evaluation 
Service : provides testing, and 
counseling for children of 
faculty/staff and members of 
the local community. 



Health Center 

Director: Dr. Margaret Bridwell 



The University Health Center 
(UHC) was committed to 
providing high quality health 
care. They were an ambula- 
tory care center offering 
professional medical care to 
treat injuries, and health 
education programs to help 
maintain and improve health. 
The UHC provided the 
following confidential ser- 



vices: dental, travel, allergy, 
mental health clinics, and 
men's and women's clinics, 
sports medicine, physical 
therapy, nutrition education, 
social services, substance 
abuse treatment, anonymous 
HIV/AIDS testing, sexual 
assault hotline and a phar- 
macy. All registered students 
were eligible for care. 



Organizations 277 



Stamp Student Union 
and Campus Programs 



Director: Dr. James Osteen 



This year the Adele H. 
Stamp Student Union cel- 
ebrated its 40th anniversary as 
it provided a diverse range of 
programs and services for over 
18,000 people daily. Such 
programs varied from con- 
certs and lectures to guided 
weekend trips, and campus- 



wide social events, such as the 
annual All Niter. Campus 
Programs featured services for 
student organizations, in- 
volvement and leadership 
development opportunities, 
and advising for campus 
fraternity and sororities. 




Top left - Dr. James M. Osteen, Director, Adele H. Star 
Student Union and Campus Programs. Top right - The Star 
Student Union houses many of the 350 registered stude 
organizations on campus. It is the site of numerous camp 
events and activities 



Office of Commuter Affairs 



Director: Dr. Barbara Jacoby 



i 



It all began in 1972 with only a 
shoebox full of cards listing housing 
and two vans, bought second-hand by 
the SGA to provide security on campus. 

In 1995-96, the shoebox has been 
transformed into a computerized off- 
campus housing referral service. The 
two vans grew into the 40-bus Shuttle 
UM system. The familiar red-and- 
white buses provide reliable service to 
students on ten commuter routes, three 
evening security routes, and Call-A- 
Ride. In addition, OCA supplies 
students with information on transpor- 
tation alternatives and other commuter 
issues. 

OCA also sponsors a number of 
programs to assist students in getting 
more involved in the life of the campus. 
New commuter students find Com- 



muter Survival Day to be an excellent 
way to meet fellow students and to get 
a great start on campus. The 
S.H.O.W. (Students Helping, Orient- 
ing and Welcoming) program matches 
experienced students with incoming 
freshmen to help new students "learn 
the ropes." On Wednesday mornings, 
commuter students are invited to 
enjoy coffee, doughnuts, and informa- 
tion at the "Good Morning, Com- 
muters!" program. Commuter Appre- 
ciation Day is a fun-filled event each 
spring. 

The newest addition to the office is 
Community Service Programs. You 
can gather information about several 
national service programs, ways to link 
service with your academic interests, 
and the UMCP Cares publication. 




Organizations 






Campus Parking 

Director: Mr. David Allen 




The Department of Campus Parking strives to be responsive to the parking 
needs of the entire campus community. Annually, this department provides 
more than 56,000 parking permits to students, faculty, staff and visitors; making 
every effort to distribute parking spaces as fairly and evenly as possible. Through 
education, engineering and enforcement, it upholds the UMCP Parking Rules 

and Regulations. Students receive parking 
information through the Campus Parking Map 
& Informational Parking Guide, brochures, 
fliers, Diamondback and Commuter Connection 
articles and advertisements and participation in 
such campus activities as Good Morning Com- 
muters, First Look Fair, and orientation. 

In an effort to provide a more convenient 
method to register for a student parking permit, 
the Department of Campus Parking has imple- 
mented a new program this year. Now students 
can register by phone through MARS (Maryland 
Automated Registration System). This new 
process allows students to register for parking at 
the same time they register for classes. 




areer Center 



The Career Center seeks to support the University's 



irector: Dr. Linda Gast 



mission and its academic programs by providing a variety of 
services and programs to meet the diverse career development 
and employment needs of degree-seeking students. The Center 
teaches, advises and counsels students to make 
career decisions about academic majors, work 
and further education; and collaborates with 
academic departments, employers, and alumni in 
the delivery of programs and services. 

The Center offers: 1 ) career informa- 
tion through career counseling, workshops and 
resources available in our Career & Employment 
Resource Room, which assist students in identi- 
fying interests, exploring careers and initiating 
the job and/or graduate/professional school 
search process; 2) recruiting opportunities 
through our Student Employment Center, 
including career fairs, on-campus recruiting, 
resume referral, on-line access to job listings for 
full-time, part-time, summer, temporary posi- 
tions, and academic credit for experiential 
~a row, l-r: Brian Easley, Geoff Elbo, Jennifer Nebbitt, RobHradsky, learning through our internship and cooperative education 

•ta;y Yost. Second Row: Becky Weir, Cheryl Hiller, Lorene Hanna, „ j a \ i u j • l u 

.,.' ... -n.- _. „ ^ .. .l- r, -x ».• . • programs; and 5) workshops, courses and special programs that 

•a»le Warren. Third Row: Karen Mathias, Bonita Nieves, Jennie r ° . . b 

av on, Leila Green, Frances Hacker. Bottom Row: Linda LeNoir, assist in the career decision-making process, 
en / Jones, Linda Gast (Director), Terri Clevenger, Karen Goodwin. 










Organizations 279 



Judicial Progams 

Director: Dr. Gary Pavela 




The primary function of the Office of Judicial 
Programs was to efficiently and equitably resolve 
disciplinary referrals filed against students. The 
office staff determined disciplinary charges and 
interviewed and advised all parties involved in 
disciplinary proceedings. The most serious cases 
were resolved by student judiciary boards which 
were comprised of four groups: The Central 
Judicial Board, the Student Honor Council, Com- 
munity Advocates, and Student Parking Appeals. 
Although each group differed slightly in their per- 
spective, they worked to educate other students 
about their rights and responsibilities as members 
of the campus community. 

The Judicial Programs staff trained and advised 
the student judiciary, reviewed all decisions of the 
judicial boards, maintained student disciplinary 

records and conducted research and analysis regarding student the University by designing policies, conducting prog 
conduct. Through honesty, respect, and sensitivity, the Office of offering instruction that contributed to the intellectual 
Judicial Programs served to maintain the educational mission of development of the entire student body. 



;rams, a 
and mo 



Conference and Visitor Services 



Director: Mr. Patrick Perfetto 



Campus Guest Services was 
the University's host to the 
thousands of guests and visitors 
who came to the University this 
year. We greeted about 12,000 
visitors at the Visitor Center, 
located in the "The Dairy" on 
Route 1. Forty percent of our 
visitors sought admissions in- 
formation. The Visitor staff en- 
sured that these potential fu- 
ture studi I a good first 
impression of the University. 
We provided lodging, meals, 
meeting space and a variety of 



other services to about 30,000 
guests who attended summer 
conferences, competitions, 
workshops, and camps. About 
half of these guests were teens 
who may someday think of their 
summer experience at Mary- 
land in deciding where to at- 
tend college. Finally, Campus 
Guest Services coordinated the 
Memorial Chapel and the hun- 
dreds of weddings that occurred 
there this year. Many of our 
newlyweds were recent gradu- 
ates. 



\ 







ligations 




Resident Life 

Director: Dr. Patricia Mielke 



The Department of Resi- 
dent Life was responsible for 
management of the residence 
halls as well as for cultural, 
educational, recreational and 
social programming activities 
in the residence halls. 

More than 7200 under- 
graduates lived in residence 
halls this year. Settings 
available in residence halls 



included: high rise traditional 
residence halls on the south 
side of campus and kitchen- 
less suites and apartments (for 
juniors and seniors). 

Special interest housing 
included the Language 
House, International House, 
Honors House, Smoke Free- 
Alcohol Free Housing and 
College Park Scholars. 







Dining Services 

Director: Ms. Patricia Higgins 



Dining Services served over four and at one of the three campus convenience 
one half million meals from 36 diverse stores to an eight course catered ban- 
locations all across campus. Menu quet served on fine china. Students 
selections ranged from a cup of coffee have the option of dining over 100 

times and never eating the same 
thing twice. In the resident 
dining rooms this year, students 
ate over 65,000 pounds of roast 
beef, one quarter of a million 
hamburgers, 120,000 pieces of 
chicken, 330,000 doughnuts and 
over one million cookies, not to 
mention tons of vegetables and 
salads. 



Organizations 281 




Residential Facilites 

Director: Mr. Jon Dooley 




Use wisely what you have learned here to build a better tomorrow for all people 

With best wishes for success and good fortune. 



- From the staff of Residential Facilites 



Residential Facilites staff 

have responsibility for 

maintaining and renewing on- 

campus undergraduate 

residence halls and the 

renovated university-owned 

fraternity and sorority 

buildings. 



Campus Recreation Services 

Director: Mr. Jay Gilchrist 

The Campus Recreation Services Depart- 
ment provided a variety of recreational activities 
to help members of the campus community 
stay fit and healthy throughout the year. Ful- 
filling its mission to help individuals develop 
lifelong recreational activity skills, CRS offered 
a Fitness/Wellness Program of aerobics activi- 
ties; and Intramural Program with year-round 
team and individual sports; and Open Recre- 
ation Program that included fitness centers, 
weight rooms, and a variety of pool and court 
facilities; and a student-run Sport Club program 
to help students develop social and leadership 
skills while enjoying their favorite sport. 

(Top right) The Campus Recreation Services staff (left to right): Jeff Kostoff , Jeff 
Kearney, Jim Wenhold, Lisa Swanson, Robin Vollinger, Barb Aiken, Ana Raley, 
Maureen Waller, Jane Twomey, Janet Alessandrini, Jay Gilchrist (director), 
Shawn Flynn. Not pictured: Dan Blackman, Dave Flumbaum, and Jerry Higginson. 
(Bottom right) Students enjoy a workout in the Annapolis Fitness Center. 
(Top left) Intramural basketball playoffs are held in the Cole Field House. 





Organizations 



Dmicron Delta Kappa 
OAK 




>AK Officers 1995. Back Row (l-r): Josh Meltzer, 
cholarship Chair; Dr. Drury Bagwell, Faculty Secre- 
iry-Treasurer; Jaki Harf, Vice President; Craig Vogel, 
ewsletter Editor; Mark Shaner, President. Front Row 
-r): Leslie Belloso. Historian; Robyn Greenberg, Sec- 
tary; Jill Rudick, Historian. 



Omicron Delta Kappa National 
Leadership Honor Society was founded 
at Washington and Lee 
University in 1914. Its 
purpose was to recog- 
nize leadership of 
exceptional quality in 
five fields of endeavor: 
Scholarship; Athletics; 
Campus or Community 
Service, Social, Reli- 
gious Activities and 
Campus Government; 
Journalism, Speech, and 
the Mass Media; and 
Creative and Perform- 
ing Arts. ODK also 
worked to inspire others 
to strive for similar 
goals; to bring together 
the most representative 



students in all phases of collegiate life 
and create an organization which would 
help to mold the sentiment of the 
institution; to provide an ongoing 
relationship for the alumni members of 
ODK with the University; and to bring 
together members of the faculty and 
student body of the institution. 

Sigma Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa 
was founded on campus in 1927 and has 
initiated over 2,500 students and faculty, 
as well as many permanent honorary 
members. This year's honorary initiate 
was sportscaster Johnny Holliday. Some 
of the Circles activities included spon- 
soring the Annual Awards Banquet, 
awarding the Sophomore Leader of the 
Year and Top Ten Freshmen, and 
granting an annual scholarship to three 
incoming freshmen who were outstand- 
ing high school leaders. 




SOPHOMORE LEADER OF THE YEAR 1995 

Kevin M. Lawrence 



TOP TEN FRESHMEN OF 1995 

Charles R. Frolich, III Tamika Nelson 

James Hanson 

Jason M. Haynes 

Alicia C. Insley 

Jennifer McMenamin 



Jennifer M. Norkin 
Justin D. Ross 
John D. Schneider 
Susan E. Woda 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 1995 MEMBERSHIP 



JMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

Leader of the Year 1995 
Paul S. Mandell 

e Omicron Delta Kappa Leader of the 
Year is one of the top awards on the 
mpus. Maryland's Leader of the Year 
tMi competes in the national competition. 



Christina Addabbo 
David Alire 
Felix Arnold 
David Bader 
Stephanie Barkin 
Grace Marie Benigno 
Karen Bradshaw 
Monifa Brooks 
Lathisha Brown 
Theresa Brown 
Susan Burton 
Hillary Cherry 
Michael Colborn 
Melanie Darr 
Cherie Davis 
Apurva Desai 
Debra Feld 
Ndidi Foy 



Daniel Friedman 
Catherine Frohlich 
Kip Fulks 
Michelle Gallo 
Alissa Garber 
Kathleen Gardner 
Tameka Garner 
Payton Goldman 
Debra Gordon 
David Greenspan 
Jeanne Greenwell 
Amy Grossman 
Reva Gupta 
Benjamin Hill 
Traci Hill 
Edward Hogan 
Jaime Hope 
Andrew Horng 



W. David Hubbard 
Carla Jeffrey 
Christopher Jones 
Allyson Kahn 
Jody Kaplan 
Padmini Kaushal 
Kara Klaus 
Eve Klindera 
Kevin Lawrence 
Jennifer Lee 
Edward Lieber 
Chittarajan Mallik 
Emily Massey 
Eric Mayo 
Elmus Mosby, Jr. 
Wendy Jo Moyer 
Thinh Nguyen 
Christopher O'Connell 



Julie Patterson 
Steven Perez 
Jody Polleck 
Erika Pontarelli 
William Ramos 
Kelvin Reaves 
Jill Rudick 
Inayet Sahin 
Matthew Scott 
Dana Sears 
Scott Silverstein 
Catherine Smyrski 
Nandita Tandon 
Miltiadis Theologou 
Sorsha Tiglao 
Adrienne Tinana 
Amy Tomasulo 
Nicole Zdrojewski 



Organizations 283 



Organization of Arab Student: 



T 



he Organization of 
Arab Students (OAS) 
is a cultural 
organization which aims to 
promote Arab awareness and 
cultural diversity on the 
University of Maryland's 
campus. The OAS is one of 
the oldest funded student 
groups on campus. It is 
entering its twenty-second 
year and represents students 
from the twenty-one Arab 
countries. The OAS exists to 
meet the needs of all 
International-Arab students 
and Arab-Americans on 
campus, while exposing the 
campus community to the 



Arab world. The objectives of 
the OAS are: to evaluate the 
awareness of the modern and 
traditional aspects of Arabic 
culture, to strengthen ties 
among Arab students, to serve 
as a forum to voice students' 
perspectives on issues 
concerning Arabs and Arab- 
Americans and to clarify 
misconceptions about Arabs 
by inviting speakers to discuss 
Arabic culture, concerns and 
current events. Historically, 
the OAS has been at the 
forefront of the struggle 
against prejudice toward 
Arabs and other groups on 
campus. 



*"Si5F 





All information and photographs were provided by the 
Organization of Arab Students. 



Organizations 



j idem. gain . 



r Vir\]<-ni 

. V. E 



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3 r 




1 m 


■ 


-o 

£ 





Snorre Wik 

3 Row: (L-R) Jordan Thomas. Jake Eidelman, Jonathan Loo (Outreach), Brandon 
Die. Melanie Stibick (President) and Joel Minton. Bottom Row: (L-R) Young 
oe. Juanita Kus. Jeff Siegler (Historian), Nick Newlin. Deborah Lee (Treasurer), 
i Busch. Other Officers: Merrill Bender (Vice-President) and Tanya McDaniel 
cretary). 



Everywhere 



Beginning in September of 1995, concerned 
students came together to establish S.A.V.E. for 
the purpose of actively seeking out to create a 
world tree from all forms of violence, both glo- 
bally and in our everyday lives. In only three 
short months, S.A.V.E. sprang into action, al- 
lowing many concerned voices to be heard - guest 
speakers spoke on campus concerning issues such 
as violence against women, war and peace, street 
crime, gun violence, the Holocaust and animal 
rights. 

S.AA'.E. brought diverse campus groups to- 
gether bv sponsoring "Freedom From Violence 
Dav," a successful event that raised awareness of 
many campus students. S.A.V.E. also cospon- 
sored a film symposium and panel discussion, 
began a tutoring program with inner cirv chil- 
dren at Garrison Elementary School, started an 
inner-citv youth mentor program, acted out to 
help the homeless and visited a maximum secu- 
rity prison and saw how peace studies have changed 
the lives or 40 inmates. 

One of S.A.V.E. s long-term goals is to edu- 
cate students in the methods, history and practice 
or nonviolent conflict resolution bv adding courses 
of conflict resolution and mediation to the un- 
dergraduate curriculum and establish an eventual 
major and minor in Peace Studies. 



Pi Delta Chi 
11 A A 




Pi Delta Chi is a coed fraternity whose 
philosophy lies in the search for excellence, 
unified effort and individual expression. 
Pi Delta Chi is bound together by a group 
commitment to fuse strength of character 
and compassion. By adopting its inherent 
values, the brothers and sisters of Pi Delta 
Chi possess a vision of loyalty, equality 
and achievement. 



Andv Goglia 



Organizations 



285 



Maryland Media, Inc 




Board Members 



Michael Fribush General Manager Joanne Saidman Editor - 

Maggie Levy Business Manager Terrapin Yearbook 

Michelle Singletary President Ivan Penn 

B.J. Sanford Vice President Steve Lampier 

Editor - Chris Callahan At-Large Members 

The Diamondback Rebecca Ashkenazy 

Andrea Walker Editor - Eclipse Marci Witt At-Large 

Stacy Leibowitz Editor - Mitzpeh Student Members 



Organizations 



P a R„ • Media rr 
Business Staff 



ic. 




Joanne Saidman 



A >i viand MVrl T 
dvertising Staff 




Joanne Saidman 



Organizations 287 



ECLIPSE 



TO SERVE AND INFORM THE BLACK COMMUNITY 







Sno K 



ECLIPSE staff 



Andrea K. Walker Editor-in-Chief K.K. Industrious 

Carlo T. Paul Executive Editor Roslyn Matthews 

Jacquelyn B. Flowers Managing Editor Regina I. Murrell 

Edward Graves II Photography Editor Gatwiri A. Muthara 

Avnl /_. Speaks Lay-out Editor Natasha C. Pratt Staff Writers 

Vl.C. Ritter Copy Editor Delsena Draper Advertising Representative 



Organizations 



Mitzpeh 



The Jewish Observer 




I vrone Brooks 



Mitzpeh Staff 



Stacy Leibowitz 


Editor-in-Chief 


Michele Mitrani 






Naomi Greengrass 


Managing Editor 


Michael Lempel 






Amy Edeson 




Carolyn Re id 






Melissa Murdza 


Copy Editors 


Idit Romirowsky 






Janelle Erlichman 


Feature Editor 


Beth Schwartzman 






Efrat Benn 




Meg Smith 


Staff Writers 




Todd Gengcr 




Brad Simpson 


Photographer 




Simmy Kustanowitz 




Debra Schwartz 


Cartoonist 




Brian Meyers 


Columnists 


Robin Baulch 






Rachel Brandoff 




Craig Mummey 


Production 




Jan Fernheimer 




Michael Barrie 






Ahby Goldstein 




Josh Lavine 






S.E. Horowitz 




Chris Stelzig 


Advertising 




Marissa Kessel 


Staff Writers 






Organizations 



289 



th( 



Hiamondbacl 



pus Dir 




HSSr 


. 


. #si 


ZnmA. 


. 


1 


r : 




V 



Eric I -•'■ 



th 



diamondback staff 



B.J. Sanford Editor-in-Chief 


Carolyn Melago 


Associate Editor 


Scott Silverstein Managing Editor 


David Allen Commentary Page Editor 


Corey Dade Assistant Managing Editor 


Dilshad D. Husain 


Commentary Page 


Jennifer McMenamin News Editor 




Editor (Fall) 


Dave J. lannone Assistant News Editor 


Jonathan Szczepanski 


Graphics Editor 


Tracey Logsdon Assistant News Editor 


Allison Foreman 




Shannon Robertson Assistant News Editor 


Kristi Swartz 




(Fall) 


Melissa Murdza 




Nick Wass Photo Editor 


Sinead O'Brien (Fall) 


News Editors 


Chris Hoffman Assistant Photo Editor 


Kate Zielke 


Wire Editor 


David Murray Sports Editor 


Akweli Parker 


Production Manager 


Jon Solomon Assistant Sports Editor 


Tom Madigan Ed 


torial Assistant (Fall) 


Fritz Hahn Diversions Editor 






Organizations 








I ric IK 




.Maryland 



Organizations 291 



'(// 



Advertisements 



Congratulations and good luck to the class of 
1996. The following pages have 
advertisements with wishes of good luck. Thank 
you for reading and enjoy. 




Advertisements -293 



Explore Tomorrow's 
Technology Today 

In a Challenging Career 
as a Patent Examiner 




The Patent and 

Trademark 

Office has 

immediate 

openings for 

science and 

engineering 

graduates. 



For application information, call: 
1-800-368-3064 




Equal Opportunity Employer U.S. Citizenship Required 



Advertisements 



Come join one of the nation's leading 
progressive grocery retailers! 



Safeway has a few leadership training openings for people who are 
interested in developing a diverse set of business management skills. 

Customer Relations • Marketing • Accounting 
• Human Relations • Labor Relations 

Our retail management positions offer: 

• competitive salary plus bonus • stock options • generous benefits package 

• paid vacations • continuous career development/training 

• employee association • friendly work environment • credit union 

If a retail management career with Safeway is of interest to you, submit a resume to the 
Safeway Retail Leadership Development Coordinator at the following location: 

Safeway Training School 

7700 Little River Turnpike 

Annandale, VA 22003 

SAFEWAY SAFEWAY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER 




STAPLES 

The Office Superstore 



Staples has taken over the office 
supply marketplace. Currently 
operating over 425 stores in North 
America, with the addition of 1 00+ 
new stores for 1 996. Right now 
we are looking for top performers 
to contribute to our phenomenal 
growth and aggressive expansion. 

Retail Opportunities 

GENERAL MANAGERS 
ASSISTANT MANAGERS 
" SALES ASSOCIATES 

Please send resumes to: 
Staples, Inc 

Human Resources - UM95 
9470 Arlington Blvd 
Fairfax. VA 22031 



WITHOUT HEALTH INSURANCE... 

you go ssmim III 

• STUDENTS 

• NEW GRADUATES 

For more than 10 years, the staff at CHAMPION 
INSURANCE has helped thousands of University 

students and new graduates obtain necessary 

Health Insurance Coverage during their academic 

careers and in the time between graduation and 

starting a new job. 

We have health insurance plans priced to reflect 
the reality of student budgets. For a FREE 
brochure, write to: 
CHAMPION INSURANCE ADVANTAGE, LTD. 
P. 0. Box 1050 
Bel Air, MD 21014-7050 

Champion 
9nsurance 
Advantage 
Ctd, 

or call 

1-800-643-4675 




Advertisements 295 



Congratulations 1996 Graduates 



ITte Apartments 
of St. Charles 



'Southern Maryland's Finest Apartment Communities' 



W 



tkomt home to the planned community of Si- Charles, when residents enjoy 
amenities, such as pools, tennis, trails, lakes and morel Our apartments unllmakt 
you feel right at home with personal washer and dryer, wall- lowall carpeting, 
dishwasher and other tuirury conveniences, including auess to cable TV. Maremdi 
Wry approved with furnished units available, lets art accepted in some buildings 



1/iffajje Lake. 


Elegant on* -bedrooms, soma with formal OR or 
dan. Enerc.se room. Controlled access 


Crossfand 


A anon walk to the Village Center, that* 1- and 
2- bedroom apartments are In high demand. 


'fo^Cfiase 


Close to the malll A choice of one or two 
bedrooms. Suite* available. All ground level. 


Muntcr's 'J(iin 


A 'great room' design, these 2 -bedroom, 2- 
balhroom apartments are near the rec center. 


Coachman s Landing 


Private entrancs/ground floor and large 2 
bedroom. 2-bathroom floor plan. 


(Pafmer 


1- and 2-bedroom lownhome apartments. 
each with patios and sliding glass doors 


O^S-xv forest 


Lots of living' room All 2-bedroom. 2-bath- 
room with prfvale dressing area 



Select an apartment home to meet your budget and lifestyle! 



O 



R»nt»l Office: 6017 Naw Forest Court 

St. Chariot, Md. 

843-3010 • 645-5252 



IGC 




Sun Ridge 



APARTMENTS 



"Where better living 
is on the Horizon' 




• Spacious Floorplans • Abundance of Closet Space 

• Laundry Facilities On-site • Community Center Membership 

• Responsive Staff • Courtesy Officers On-site 

• Close to Shopping Malls • Convenient B/W Pkwy & Rt. 1 

Sun Ridge apartments 

5002 57TH AVENUE 

BLADENSBURG.MD 20710 

OFFICE 301-779-8141 FAX 301-209-0008 



l_ea* eS 



s-XS-w 




Small Pet buildings 
(but no one from Perm State!) 



Kick-off Your Semester at 
Belcrest Plaza Apartments 

Start the season with 2 #1 ranked teams! 



& 





Don't pass-up 
your chance for 




Semester leasts 



Optional HBO/Cable TV 



Buses to D.C. and campus 



Individual heating and A/C 



Cathedral ceilings (top levels) 



Private balcony or patio — Pool 



Walking distance to Prince Georges Plaza Mall 

Efficiency, 1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apts., some with dens 

Modern, well designed kitchens (some w/dishwasher) 

For more information call 559-5042 

Time's running out, to make your move to 




.T' » 



BELCREST PLAZA 

APAPTMENTS 

Hyattsville, Maryland 



®mmm& 



tsJ 



Advertisements 






GIANT FOOD 

CAREER 

DEVELOPMENT 

PROGRAM 



We want to recruit 
qualified people. ...for 

our manager trainee pregram. 
Iff yeu are personable, 
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with a future, 

WE WANT TO TALK WITH 

YOU! 



Iqual Opportunity Imployor 




Sond iHvm tot 

Rlckl Cranston, Employment Managor 

P.O. Box 1004, Dopt. 549, Washington D.C. 20013 




At Hughes Network Systems (HNS) we re not only reaching for 
the outer limits ol new technology we re helping to define them. 
And as we work to create cutting-edge technologies for our 
clients worldwide we create, for our employees, an environment 
that fosters ingenuity and growth 

Today Hughes Network Systems supplies 70 percent of the 
commercial international market for private, interactive Ku-band 
and C-band satellite networks We're also involved in the devel- 
opment of some of today s most future-oriented technologies 
Our success is reflected by our phenomenal compounded 
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If you strive for a chance to apply your solid academic background 
in Computer Science. Communications Engineering or Electrical 
Engineering to a career that will enable you to fulfill your poten- 
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• Satellite communications 

• Wireless (cellular, radio) communications 

• Networking theory and engineering 

• Real-time microprocessor software design and 
development 

• Minicomputer database software engineering 

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You II work in an environment that welcomes and values 
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We offer an excellent compensation and benefits package 
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and trucks. For immediate consideration, send your resume to 
Hughes Network Systems. Inc . Attn. UMDY, 11717 Exploration 
Lane Germantown MD 20876 An equal opportunity employer. 

HUGHES 

NETWORK SYSTEMS 



Subsidiary of 
Hughes Aircraft Company 



Advertisements 297 



J 



■\ 



ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE 



Whether you're a SEASONED PROFESSIONAL or a NEW GRADUATE, there is a challenging 
research position awaiting you at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the Navy's corporate 
experimental laboratory. At NRL, you would be working with state-of-the-art equipment alongside 
more than 1 ,400 other scientists and engineers on a wide variety of multidisciplinary programs in 
both basic and applied research. There is a continuing need for electronics, mechanical, ceramic, 
and materials engineers with bachelor's and/or advanced degrees and physical scientists and 
computer scientists with PhD's. 

NRL has a campus-like atmosphere that encourages technical excellence and achievement through 
exchange of new ideas, opportunities for continuing education, and publication of research results. 

We invite you to forward a resume or SF-171 to: 



NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY 

4555 Overlook Ave., S.W. 
Washington, DC. 20375-5000 
Attn: Code 1810:UM 
Telephone (202) 767-3030 



AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER • U S CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED 




^ 



TOMPKINS 

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Tompkins Builders 
1333 H Sued, NW 
Washington, D.C. 20005 
Telephone 202 789 0770 
Facsimile 202 898 2531 



Be part of a global 
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^COMSAT 




i&& 



The merger of com- 
munications and informa- 
tion technologies opens exciting 
new career paths for college graduates 
who want to work on the leading edge of 
technology. To learn more about career options 
with COMSAT, send your resume to Human 
Resources, Dept. UM-1. 



©COMSAT 



Laboratories 



An equal opportunity employer 



22300 Comsat Drive 
Clarksburg. MD 20871 



Advertisements 




Each week. 10.000 driuers switch 

their car insurance to GE ICO. But there's 

alwa y s room for one more . 



l-Uffl-MMBI 






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Congratulations 

1996 

University of Maryland 

Qraduates 



Poretsky Management, Inc. 

Since 1946 



Multi-family 

Condominiums 

Cooperatives 

24 Hour Emergency Service 



5801 Riverdale Road 

Riverdale,MD 20737 

301-277-0202 

Fax 301-927-2359 



Live just MINUTES away from Campus! 

fsmmw mmm 

6285 FERNWOOD TERRACE RIVERDALE, MD 20737 



"& 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartment, some with dens & family rooms 

•& Modern Kitchens with pantry 

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*k Laundry Facilities on property 





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Qubhouse 

• Weight Room 



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• Pool 




tU 



Two Bedroom • Two Bath 

5603 Cypress Geek Drive 
Hyattsville, Maryland 20782 

301-559-0320 

FAX: 301-559-1610 



& EQUITY 

HESIOENIIAI PHOPEHtlES 



Advertisements 



Moving 




Hertz Penske Will 
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Westinghousc.Making a World of Difference 



Westinghouse has led the way with 
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establish and grow long-term relationships 
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An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Westinghouse Electronic Systems is located 
in metropolitan Baltimore. We develop, manufac- 
ture and support electronic systems for the 
U.S. Government and for commercial, civil and 
international customers. From air traffic control 
systems that make air travel safe, and advanced 
defense electronics that defend our nation, to 
highly efficient electric vehicle propulsion systems 
that contribute to a cleaner environment, we 
play an important role in Maryland and around 
the world. 




m Westinghouse 



Westinghouse Electronic Systems 

PO Box 1693 MS 1162 
Baltimore, MD 21203 



Sverdrup 

CORPORATION 

Congratulations 1 As an architectural or engineering graduate, the 
advantage is yours. Now your biggest decision is to make your 
degree count. 

Sverdrup Corporation, founded in 1928, has become known for a 
variety of multi-million dollar capital expansion programs for 
Amencan business, industry and government; and for achieve- 
ments such as the Superdome in New Orleans; the Space Shuttle 
Launch Complex at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California; the 
Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore, Maryland; the World Wide U.S. 
Embassy Program; and design of the new Computer and Space 
Science Facility at the University of Maryland. 

Sverdrup provides total project management for capital facilities, or 
any combination of engineering, architecture, planning, construc- 
tion, operations, communications and security. To meet the 
widening capital facility and program needs of businesses, 
industries, and governments around the world, Sverdrup has 
structured its professional services for flexibility, breadth of scope, 
and cost-eifectiveness. The result is an unprecedented level of 
integration of services— and a unique set of capabilities for solving 
major problems. 



Send resume to: 



Human Resources Manager 
1001 9th Street No., Suite 700 
Arlington, VA 22209 




Congratulations 

1996 

University of Maryland 

graduates 




Your Supplier of Quality 
Seating & Systems Furniture 



State Use Industries 



Division of Correction 

23 Fontana Lane, Suite 105 

Baltimore, Maryland 21237 

(410) 780-4050 



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DONOHOE 

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2101 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 

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TOP TEN SCARIEST 
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Advertisements 305 



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Providing professional sales 
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Two offices to serve you: 



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BG&E and the University of Maryland 
Partners in Excellence 



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BG&E IS a Fortune 50 utility providing safe, reliable and 
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307 






Welcome 
to the 
REAL 
WORLD 



t 0lAMERC/>}/ 




That's what everyone calls life 
after college, but we keep trying 
to change the "real" world. 

We want to make it better. 

We want safer workplaces. We 
want justice and dignity on the 
job for working men and women. 
We want fair play in promotions 
and career advancement. 

That's why we're Number One in 
the Washington metropolitan area 
when it comes to representing 
men and women who work in a 
wide variety of jobs ranging from 
supermarket clerks to police officers, 
nurses to social workers. 

We're local 400 of the United Food & 
Commercial Worker's, welcoming you 
to help us change the "real" world, for 
the better. 



THOMAS R. McNUTT 

President 



C. JAMES LOWTHERS 

Secretary-Treasurer 



LOCATION,LOCATION,VALUE!! 

ROCK 
CREEK 

SPRINGS 



Washer & Dryer In every apartment 

Close to Metro and Shopping 

Call Now for GREAT Move In Specials 
on 1 and 2 Bedrooms 

8000 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20910 

301-495-5540 



Congratulations 

to the 

Graduating Class of 1996 



From 

NAOR U. STOEHR, M.D., P.A. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



7610 Carroll Avenue, Suite 220 
(301) 445-0400 



Takoma Park, Maryland 
(301)891-6123 



American Gourmet 

4505 Knox Road 

Downtown College Park 

Gourmet Sandwiches & Catering 

We only use the finest first cut meats 
and the freshest breads 

FEATURING: 

Soups • Salads • Fresh Breads 

Luscious Desserts • Frozen Yogurt 

Triple Decker and Hot Open Face Sandwiches 

Hot Heroes • Cold Subs 

Create your own Gourmet Sandwiches 

Refreshing Breakfast Foods 



Please Call or Fax 
your order if possible, 
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864-1131 
Fax: 927-6630 




tisements 




9020 Baltimore Blvd 
College Park, MD 20740 
(301) 441-8110 ■ 1-800-395 4678 
FAX (301) 474-7725 



tlome or away, 
a great place 
to stay! 

The New Comfort Inn & Suites offers: 

•Newly remodeled guest rooms and suites 

•Great location— less than 1 mile from the 

University of Maryland 

•Complimentary deluxe continental breakfast 

•Free parking 

•Free Cable TV ESPN, CNN, and HBO 

•Recent movie releases with On Demand Video 

•Complimentary shuttle service 




Congratulations 

CLASS OF 1996 



From the official travel agency 
for the University of Maryland 



Call us for all of 
your travel needs 

301-345-5595 



OMEG4 

WORLD TR4I*L 



HEALTHY WOMEN WANTED AS EGG DONORS 



Help infertile couples. Confidentiality ensured. 

Ethnic diversity desirable. Ages 21-33. 

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(Located near the Intersection of 1-495 and 50 W.] 




THE BETHESDA 

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Hotel & Conference Center 



BANQUET FACILITIES AflO MEETING ROOMS TO ACCOMMODATE 10-250 



B usiness Meetings • Reunions 
- Weddings • Very Special Ra tes A nd 

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(301) 654-1000 



8400 WISCONSIN AVE., BETHESDA, MD 20814 



FREE PARKING 



McDonald 
Auto Body Works 

Complete Body & Fender Repairing & Painting 
• 24 Hour Wrecker Service • 

4801 Baltimore Ave. 

Hyattsville. MD 

864-3858 



S. F. CRAY 



N. SHACKLETT 



4*«*i %*. 456 • jy^-ew 

Wayne Adams, President 

Aruther Bridgett, Vice President 

Mark G. Greenfiled, Business Manager 

Emmett Gardner, Financial Secretary/Treasurer 

32/7 t2tt. Stxeet, ItS. - TOm/U*?**. Z>.&. 200 1 7 
63S-X429 



J. MILTON BAKER CO., INC. 



"THE CLEAN STOP" 



• Extraction Machines 

• Floor Machines 

• Industrial Vacuums 



• Seminars 

• Janitor Supplies 

Cleaning Chemicals 



12371 Wilkins Avenue 

Rockville, Maryland 20852 

301-881-8777 



Advertisements 309 




NASA's Mission to Planet Earth has identi- 
fied a crucial need: to improve our understand- 
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in affecting its changes. I>oral AeroSys, as part 
of a cooperative effort lead by Hughes Informa- 
tion Technology Company, has been chosen to 
play a major role in building and operating key 
elements for the Earth Observing System Data 
and Information System (EOSDIS) project. 

Scheduled to last into the beginning of the 
next century, this unprecedented project is one 
of the largest information management systems 
ever created. It encompasses space-based ob- 
servatories, traditional mission data processing 
facilities, sophisticated data archive centers and 
extensive networking capabilities for direct 
on-line electronic access by users to data and 
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On-going demands will offer college gradu- 
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of this historic project. If your area of interest 
and education is in any of the following areas, 
we are interested in hearing from you: 

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Corporation is a high-technology company that 
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and space communications. A committed equal 
opportunity employer M/F/D/V. 



AeroSys 



isements 



Frustrated with not being able to make your own moves? 




Make your next move 
to landis & Gyr. 



LANDIS &GYR 



It's pretty simple. 

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Equal Opportunity Employer 
M/F/D/V. Women and minorities 
are encouraged to apply. 



LABORERS' DISTRICT 

COUNCIL OF 

WASHINGTON, DC. AND VICINITY 



Clarence C. Campbell, Business Manager 

Providing career opportunities in the 
cons tmctkJTT rndus try with: 

v , ^ ■ -— *"■■■ \ 

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7826 EASTERN AVE., N.W., SUITE LL-11, 
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In the.4iXsft^»J#Guard' 
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iPrffllPTHtPAPER^ 




Foreign and Domestic Cars 

NATIONAL AUTO BODY 



JOHN TOSSOUNIAN 



(301) 881-8200 
FAX (301) 468-6763 



12516 Parklawn Drive 
Rockville, Maryland 20852-1702 




^CWbocf'S 

, jlonsts, que 




9066 Baltimore Boulevard 
College Park, Maryland 20740 

(301) 474-7000 



ft 



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650 Ritchie Highway 

Suite 307 

Severna Park, Maryland 21146 

(410)315-8855 




MEDFAST HEALTH CARE 

INDRAJIT J. PATEL, M.D. 

Board Certified Internist 



Beltway Plaza Mall 
6098 Greenbelt Road 
Greenbelt, MD 20770 
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No Appointment Necessary 




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1KO 



0704 MLTMIORC AVE • QOLLEQE ?4KGC. ffl> 20740 • 301-345-8595 




7338 Baltimore Avenue 

Suite 112 

(above Terp territory) 



Congratulations 
Class of -96 

"Maryland's 

original 
note taking 

service" 



REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS' 



Mon.-T 
Friday 



Thur 10:00 am - 7:00 pm WTTj^KTT M l ;f,T.T-J 
ay 10:00 am -6:00 pm V' * * , *» -**MJiJMfJ 



ADELPHI PRINTER SERVICES COMPANY, INC. 

* * 

• Equipment Sales, Lease, Repair 
Laser Printers, Copiers & Fax Machines 



• Toner Cartridges 

• Equipment Supplies 




The Terrapin Clothespin 

offers sincere congratulations on 

your graduation and thanks 

to the sorority and fraternity 

members we've been fortunate 

enough to serve. 



7408 BALTIMORE BLVD. 

COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740 

(301)779-7766 




CLOTHESPin 



RON F. FRUSH 

FRATERNITY & SORORITY 
SPECIALIST 



(410)354-3001 

G 8 L EXCAVATION 

CERTIFIED MINORITY CONTRACTOR 




923-A BALTIC AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, MD 21225 
FAX: (410) 354-3002 



Pager 
(410)223-4919 



Just 3 miles from the University... 

Serving all your hotel needs... 

Reunions, Alumni, Sports teams, Fraternities and Sororities. 

Remember Your best bet 

Is A BEST WESTERN!!!! 
(800) 866-4458 



5910 Princess Garden Parkway 
Lanham, MD 20706 
(301) 459-1000 • Fax (301) 459-1526 
For Reservations Call 1 (800) 866-4458 




Marketing Consulting Group 



Frank M. Zappala 

President 

1901 Sunrise Drive 
Potomac, Maryalnd 20854 

Pager: (703)214-8856 




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Advertisements 



ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAR 

MANAGEMENT TRAINEES 

Enterprise is the largest privately-owned 
automotive rental and leasing company 
in the U.S. With over 2500 branch offices 
nationally, Enterprise ranks No. 1 in the 
industry. Over the last 8 years, Enterprise 
has had an outstanding average annual 
growth rate of 25%. International Expansion 
underway into Canada and UK. Established 
in 1957, and headquartered in St. Louis, 
Enterprise is a stable, diversified, and 
decentralized company which offers 
exceptional career opportunities. 

The Enterprise Career Path Offers: 

• A structured career ladder with 
performance-based promotions 
100% from within. 

• A multi-faceted on-the-job Management 
Training Program which includes 
administrative, managerial, marketing, and 
sales functions. 

• A corporate culture devoted to positive, 
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practices. 

• A comprehensive compensation package 
which includes salary, full benefits, 401 K, 
and profit-sharing. 

Management Trainee Qualifications: 

• BS/BA degree preferred. 

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background helpful. 

• Evidence of sound math, communication, 
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• Management trainee positions are entry-level 
and require no previous professional experience. 

To explore career opportunities with ENTERPRISE 
RENT-A-CAR please send a resume to: 

ENTERPRISE 
RENT-A-CAR 

9125 Gaither Road 
Gaithersburg, MD 20877 

Phone 301-670-8649 
Fax 301-670-5876 

Equal Opportunity Employer 




We thrive on the 
fact that no two 
visions are alike. 




And that's what makes us one of the most impressive 
financial success stories in business today. 

Because meeting the needs of our customers means using 
your unique vision to create options that are right for them. And 
only them. 

At Chevy Chase Bank and B.F. Saul Mortgage Company, 
we're meeting the needs of the diverse communities we serve 
with a broad range of financial products and services. As these 
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And when it comes to growth, our environment offers sound 
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Talk to our recruiting representatives for complete information 
on the positions and options available for you. Human Resources 
staff can be reached at each of the following locations: 

Savings, Mortgage, and 
Consumer Lending 
Bethesda, MD (301) 907-5600 

Credit Card Operations 
Frederick, MD (301) 620-8400 

Banking Operations. Information 
Systems, and Accounting 
Laurel. MD v 301) 953-8129 



#ChewChase*Bank 

CCB has a drug-free workplace policy. EOESi/F/DA'. 
Hearing impaired candidates may call our TDD* (301) 907-5815 



. 



Ad 



vertisements 



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Tt is time for "so long," "good luck" and "its 
-Lbeen fun." College has come to an end and it 
is time to move on. Some are moving on to more 
school, others to jobs, or careers, or families. 

No matter what your future endeavors, always 
remember your times at the University of 
Maryland and use this book as a time capsule of 
the time spent in College Park. The staff of the 
Terrapin Yearbook enjoyed producing this book for 
you to hold onto so that years from now you may 
look at it and remember a piece of your history. 

New places and faces are out there to explore and 
meet, but the foundation was at the University of 
Maryland. Friends, classes and professors filled the 
years, Now with the knowledge gained it is time to 
take on whatever obstacle and adventure your heart 
holds. The times at Maryland were Timeless. 
Good luck and best wishes to the Class of 1 996. 



Snorre Wik 



Closing 315 



T 



e r r a p i n 



Ye a r b o o k 



Editor in Chief 

Joanne Saidman 

Managing Editor 

Tracy Isaac 

Photography Editor 

Eric Lasky 

Business Manager 

Aynat Ravin 

Associate Editor 

Shari Scott 

Copy Editor 

Kevin Holdredge 




Shari Scott - Associate Editor 




Tyrone P. rooks - Photographer 



Aynat Ravin - Business Manager 



Closing 



The 1 996 Terrapin is the 95th 
volume of the University ot Man- 
land at College Park yearbook, 
lostens Printing and Publishing 
Company produced the 320-page 
book with a trim size of 9"xl2'\ 
16 process color pages and 8 sec- 
ond color pages on glossv paper, 
rhere was a press run of 950 and 
was printed at the Jostens plant in 
State College, PA. 

The flag design on the cover 
uras originated by Ben Scholl and 
ledesigned by Joanne Saidman. 
rhe flag design runs throughout 
he book on the section divider 
>ages. All pages were designed 
ind executed on PageMaker 5.0 
m the Macintosh II. 

Eric Manto served as our 
ostens representative with Linda 
■"Jolt as the in-plant publishing 
onsultant. Carl Wolf Studios of 
iharon Hill. PA photographed the 
;raduates and provided photogra- 
>hy supplies to the Terrapin pho- 
ographers. Scholastic Advertis- 
ng of Liburn, GA sold the adver- 
isements. 

The bod\' copv o 1 the book was 
et in 1 2 point Adobe Garamond, 
.ith variations in point size and 
ppearance throughout the book, 
leadline design was consistent 
irough each section of the book. 
In order to meet preset dead- 
nes, coverage in the Sports see- 
on includes the 1995 season for 
1 sports. Groups pictured in the 
'rganizations section paid for 
leir space. Pages were sold at a 
-st come basis for S 1 00 for a full 
ige and S50 for a half page. 
\ earbooks could be ordered in 
e fall semester for a reduced rate 
1 1 ' .ind in the spring semester 
r$35. Shipping cost was addi- 
>nal at S6. 

The views expressed in the 
'96 Terrapin do not necessarily 
press the views of Maryland \ le- 
i, Inc.. or any of its affiliates, or 
; University of Man-land at 
illege Park. Address any in- 
ires to: 
itor 

rrapin Yearbook 
01 South Campus Dining Hall 
liege Park. MD 20742. 

pyright 1996 
inland Media. Inc. 
t rights resened. 



W rite rs 

Angela D. Felder 
Marylou Giangaspero 
Payton Goldman 
David R. Hood 
Dave J. Iannone 
Carolvn Mela°;o 
Michael P. Ralsky 
Farid Siahatgar 
Michael Street 
Andrea K. Walker 



Betsv Wrio-ht 



Photographers 

Russell Acosta 
Tyrone Brooks 
Hank Fellner 
Andy Goglia 
E. Graves, II 
Lisa Helfert 
Lynn Romano 
Paul Vieira 
Snorre Wik 
Daniel Yuen 

Artist 

Brian Johnson 





















1 ' ■ 


















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Andy Goglia - Photographer 



Snorre Wik - Photographer 



.. 



Terrapin Yearbook Staff 317 




Joanne Saidman - Editor in Chief 



J 


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Eric Lasky - Photography Editor 



Tracy Isaac - Managing Editor 



Closing 



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do . , m down, with all of my thoughts in order ^writea n,ce neat lenet 



:hing to do. I sat down, with til «^™^— , n . However, I find the 

KiHhliRhdng the vear and thanking all those who contributed to he 19 P 

23- 3-i - m v head and the words not ««££ ^ ^ ^ The 

At happy as I am that the hook is finished, I am n* ^ £ , ffl as , result ofthose years 

Terrapin Yearbook was a huge influence on nay ye a« «M£ ™d ^ ^ ^ b 

at Man-land and with the yearbook experience. To Maggie and 

First I thank the Board of Maryland Med.a, Inc_ for giving me 

M tt~ Sr^XtSr 'Xport. Vou wete a great help. I really appreciate 

mazing! especially considering the ^^X^hlks for all of vour help and support. Good 

Tracy - Did sou think that ,t was ever going « b = over. 1 ^ ^ ^^ ^ 

luck next vear and in the future, 1 know vou w," J-j»^ ■ ^ keep [he Terrapin as a 

thank vou. You have a great career ahead of you a ^ Ian P ^ ^ , ong ^ ^ we 

part. Avnat - we made it through. We have be e i fr endsto q m ^ , ^ ^ ^ 

I thank vou for betng mv business manager, but -o-mpo^ g ^ for ^^ m 

of ,uck and good fortune- Kevin - you are a gc , d h end and ^ , p ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

work with the yearbook, I appreciate ,t. Er c, .ha car , 1 sa ^ ^ ^ ^ , wmted 

been working on the yearbook as long as 1 have U aul, e -J both amazing this 

mv m emor,e; include both of you. To me the **££%£ ££,, from vour work and perspec 
yea , Thank vou so much for al of the great ^J^TT „ work with you . You are a wonderful 
rive. 1 wish vou both the best or luck! Snorre- t was V*W**°* the rest of the pho togra- 

pWographer and thank you for putting up with my = t ^ hank vou for the great work and 

phers . you were all terrific and each of you h our own s ^ ^ d ^ 

Si2 - E understanding and helping m edunngth.se £■£. goa , s and 

T ° ** ^ n ^o^^« * SEJ test w,shes! Thanks for the memories! 

Joanne Saidman 

Editor in Chief 
1096 Terrapin 



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Terrapin Yearbook Staff 319