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Full text of "The Terrapin"

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MARYLAND IN PICTURES 
2 

STUDENT LIFE 

12 



SENIORS AND ACADEMICS 

50 

RESIDENT LIFE 

152 

SPORTS 

182 



GREEKS 

240 



ORGANIZATIONS 

258 

CLOSING 

296 



Something to Remember 




The University Of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

Volume 96 

Copyright 1997 



Dana Sears 



mi 



maryland c^\ pictures 



Many students come to college looking for something - escape from mom and dad, a change of' 
environment, or a brighter future. To say that those students came to college for the wrong' 
reasons is out the question, but if those were their only reasons for coming to Maryland, theyi 
are gravely limiting themselves. The University of Maryland has an undeniable spirit. As a place of 
learning. Maryland molds, creates, and neuters society's best and brightest. 

The meaning of success in college is not only determined by grade point averages or awards, but what 
an individual takes with them when he or she enters the ""real world" . Football tailgate parties, concerts, 
and campus organizations made the University of Maryland at College Park memorable. 

Substance-Free Housing, the Gemstone Program, the CBS College Tour, and cultural events focused 
attention upon Maryland and its diverse student body. As a community, the students and faculty of the 
University of Maryland have a flair for making Maryland something to remember. 




Paul Vieira 






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5TU DENT LIFE 





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TV Taiyland is a place 
J-VJLwhere memories 
are created everyday 
whether in a classroom 
or a residence hall - Maiy- 
land is something worth 
remembering 





If a "picture is worth a thousand words'", then to describe the 
University of Maryland through words would take a dictio- 
nary. Many students come to Maryland because of its good 
reputation for academic programs; others come because it is 
close to home ( or far, far away). However, one of the factors 
in nearly every students's mind when they chose Maryland is 
the beauty of the campus. There is no disputing the fact that 
Maryland has a beauty that is intoxicating. 

Aside from the glorious physical beauty of Maryland, the 
students of the University of Maryland added a charm not 
commonly found at other universities. Coming from rich and 
diverse backgrounds, the student body of Maryland exhibited 
the proud qualities of future leaders and activists. As the 
presidential election approached, students got involved. Edu- 
cating themselves about the issues, becoming active in local 
and national political parties, and voting their conscious and 
not the party's line were a few of the methods that Maryland 
students took on when battling political apathy. 

Although the student body of the University of Maryland and 
politics did make interesting bedfellows, the students of Mary- 
land did not limit themselves to fighting for every cause that 
came along. They managed to squeeze in some fun, occasion- 
ally. 




E. Graves, II 



13 




Supermodel: 



Since the loincloth, fash- 
ion has played an impor- 
tant role in society. With a 
fashion show presented by 
the NAACP, the lastest 
trends were shone. The sexy 
slink of silk, the clinging 
ease of lyrca infused mate- 
rials and the appeal of a 
hard gym body made the 
students of Marland take 
notice in what they wore 
and and what they were 
puting in thier mouths, be- 
cause this year's fashions 
were not made for the "in- 
between-meal snacker". 
They were made for the 
Maryland students who 
wanted to expose, flaunt, 
and tease the long hours 
they spent in North Gym to 
turn flab into to fab! 



All photos on this 
spread were taken by 
E. Graves, II 



15 



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LET THE SUN AND FUN SHINETHOU6H! 





Rachel Kaminsky 



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Kristi Johnson 





For Spring Break this year, the student 
body of the University of Maryland went 
for the fun and sun in Arizona. Be it 
hiking the Grand Canyon or bar-hopping, the 
students of Maryland spent some much needed 
time away from their studies 



Tyrone Brooks 



17 



1 



Have you ever 
awakened to the 
cacophony of 
incessant drilling jack- 
hammers or the menac- 
ing roar of a distant 
crane? If you have, then 
you certainly know about 
the monstrous construc- 
tion that litter the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. These 
sharp blades of metal that 
protrude from steep 
dunes of shrapnel are not 
abstract art figures. They 
are actually ongoing 
construction projects. 

There are seven new 
innovative structures 
springing up around 
campus. The Riche 
Coliseum, once the 
cultural and social back- 
bone of College Park, will 
be fully renovated by the 
spring of 1997. The 
massive entertainment 
center will sport new 
facilities, basketball 
courts, weight lifting, 
aerobics, martial arts and 
more. 

Jim Christian, con- 
struction superintendent 
for the Department of 
Architecture, Engineering 
and Construction, re- 
vealed that the Campus 
Recreation Center will 
spread over 240, 000 
square feet and its con- 
struction will continue 
through the winter of 
1997. This building will 
feature extravagances 
such as indoor and out- 
door swimming pools, 
indoor jogging tracks and 
spectator areas. Visitors 
should be aware that 
Valley Drive "from the 
entrance of the Center 
for Young Children to the 
west side of Health and 
Human Performance 



Building will be closed 
permanently". Traffic will 
be rerouted around the 
constructions site. 

The Maryland Center of 
Performing Arts will pro- 
vide approximately 
318,000 square feet of 
classes, laboratories, a 
library and theater space 
that will border Stadium 
Drive. The excavation 
work will begin in the 
spring of 1999. SCUB III, 
another project, will supply 
hot and cold water to the 
new Performing Arts 
Center. 

With all the new 
changes happening on 
campus, commuters lose 
parking spaces temporarily 
but gain in the long run. 
The week after the last 
home football game of the 
1996 season, construction 
will begin on a new park- 
ing garage. Parking Ga- 
rage 3 will be completed in 
the Fall of 1997. The new 
lot is adjacent to the west 
side of Byrd Stadium and 
will give birth to 800 new 
parking spaces. 

The Plant Science 
Building, located between 
Hornbake Plaza and Park- 
ing Garage 2, will give rise 
to exciting programs in 
agricultural biotechnology 
to landscape architecture. 
This building site de- 
manded the closure of 
Fieldhouse Drive and 
encroached upon the 
entrance of Parking Ga- 
rage 2. 

Finally, the progressive 
Technology Advancement 
Program Building will 
embody an economic 
business development 
space. The construction is 
due to be completed in the 




Dana Sears 







Dana Sears 




Dana Sears 





Fall of 1998. 

The estimated cost of all 
these impressive structures 
ranges from a modest 
$7,000,000 to a whop- 
ping $160,000,000. 
Note these figures are 
approximate. 

Although the construc- 
tion is sometimes noisy 
and inconvenient, it is 
imperative that we stay 
ahead of the game while 
we give merit to the past 
and make headway to the 
future. 



By Vicki Duckett 

and 
J. Eric Zimmerman 




Dana Sears 




Ed Graves 



19 



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Debate Watch Offers Student Political Forum 

A Larger Than Expected Crowd Turns Out For Debate 



Wednesday, October 16, was supposed to be an 
ordinairy night in the life the presidential 
debates. 

Instead, Debate Watch '96 turned out to be nothing 
short of extraordinairy, pulling in a crowd nearly twice as 
large as originally expected. 

The gala event, held in the Grand Colony Ballroom of 
the Stamp Student Union, was televised over CSPAN, a 
national news network. After the debate, formed around 
the room to discuss topics ranging from Clinton's health 
pland to Dole's aage issue. 

The Center for Political Leadership, brought the event 
to the campus, receiving contributions and donations 
from several organizations and businesses on and off 
campus. 

"I thought it was a huge success, definitely a larger 
crowd than we had expected," said Jen Kellar, a member 
of the planning committe fot the Center for Polictical 
Leadership. "I am surprised people stayed as long as they 
did." 

The committe, headed by junior Renna Meltzer, also 
consisted of senior Michale Sarich, junior Brandi Dickman, 
and sophomeres Amrit Dhillon, and Kellar, Scott Webster, 
who works for the Center for Political Leadership, and 
Nance Lucas, head of the College Park Scholars in Public 
Leadership, supervised the committee. 

The debate, which started at 9:00 P.M., culminated at 
10:30 A.M.; the focus groups started immediatley after- 
wards, some stayin as late as midnight, if not later. 

Some of the on=campus organizations to contribute 
were Alpha Phi Omega, a service fraternity, who set up 
the Ballroom and put together and information table. The 



Student Union Programs Council (SUPC) donated 
money for the event , and the College Republicans and 
College Democrats also gave support for the function. 

"We have been planning this since June, but started 
organization meetings in July," Kellar added. "We 
started out during the summer working about two hours 
a week on the Debate Watch "96. But since September, 
we have put in countlwss hours." 

Outside businesses also contributed to the success of 
Debate Watch. Papa Johns supplied pizza at a dis- 
counted price. The Bagel Place, Bruegger's Bagels, 
Einstein Bagels, and Chesapeake Bagels donated bagels. 
Wawa water bottles and juice boxes were provided. 
Comedy Central's Politically Incorrect donated Indesicion 
'96 t-shirts for the purpose of giveaways. Campus 
Dining Services also supplied some of the food for the 
event. 

Debate Watch '96 at the University of Maryland was 
featured on CSPAN, with many of the students giving 
their standpoint on certain polictical issues brought up by 
each candidate. 

"I think it says a lot about our campus," said Kellar. "I 
think it is not as full as many apathetic Generation Xers 
as people would like to think. But rather, the students 









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23 



■i 




The Democratic Process 



By Abe Silverman 



During this past year, the 
College Democrats 
helped reelect President Bill 
Clinton, returned campus 
Congressman Steny Hoyer to 
the House of Representatives, 
met the Vice-President, and 
helped elect Democratic 
candidates all over this state 
and nation. 

It began in the Spring with 
voter registration drives, and 
talks with Congressman 
Hoyer, congressional candi- 
date Don Mooers, State 
Delegate Jim Rosapeppe, and 
representatives from Clinton/ 
Gore Maryland. College 
Democrats lobbied the state 
Legislature in Annapolis for 
increased school funding, and 
for Governor Glendening's 
landmark handgun control 
legislation. 

The campaign continued 
through the summer, when 
several students attended the 
Democratic National Con- 
vention in Chicago, where 
President Clinton and the 
Vice-President Gore put 
families first, addressed 
student's concerns about 
loans and jobs, stood up for 
environmental protection, 
and a women's right to 
choose. 

And in the Fall, when the 
College Democrat's voter 
registration drive registered 
over 500 new students to 
vote, only a small part of the 



over 2,000 students registered 
by a diverse coalition of 
students groups takin g part 
in the 1996 voter registration 
drive. 

During the weeks and 
months leading up to election 
day. College Democrats 
worked tirelessly stuffing 
envelopes, squaring off in 
campus debates with the 
College Republicans, putting 
up yard signs, canvassing 
door-to-door, marching in 
parades, and talking to voters 
~ exciting people about the 
year's election, truly one of 
the most important in de- 
cades. 

And all this work paid off 
in the end, with the reelection 
of the Clinton/Gore team, 
and Prince George's County's 
two congressmen, Al Wynn, 
and our campus' own Steny 
Hoyer. But more importantly 
that any one person, this years 
elections showed that the 
country is ready for the 
progressive leadership that 
will reduce the federal budget 
deficit without destroyed the 
lives of the elderly or the 
poor, or scapegoating recent 
immigrants. It means that 
the country is ready for 
10,000,000 new jobs; in- 
creased educational opportu- 
nities at all levels. Head Start 
through Stafford Loans, a 
raise in the minimum wage; 
increased funding for 



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Students Vote 



Cunt 
Gore 



& The Democratic Ticket 

Tuesday, 
November 5th 



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You Vote Here: 



Americore National Service; 
100,000 new cops on the 
street; The Brady Bill and 
Assault Weapon Ban — all 
Clinton Administration 
accomplishments that a 
Republican controlled Con- 
gress fought against each and 
every step of the way. 

Now the outlook for the 
first two years of President 
Clinton' second term in office 
looks even brighter with a 
scale back Republican Major- 
ity in Congress and a mandate 



)/ 



from the people, President 
Clinton will lead our country, 
our entire country, over that 
bridge into the 21st Century. 
But there is still so much to 
do on every level, get involved 
in the country's future, join 
the College Democrats. 



Abe Silverman is the Vice- 
President of the College 
Democrats. Joshua H. Bird 
is the Vice-President of the 
College Republicans 





WHY I AM A REPUBUCAN 

By Joshua H. Bird 




[believe the future of 
America is the person 
eading these words right 
low. I believe the future of 
>^merica is you, the Ameri- 
an citizen. The very reason 
i'hy the United States is so 
lowerful lies with the fact 
hat its individual citizens 
re without a doubt the most 
lynamic in the world. This 
s what the Republican Party, 
he party of Lincoln, believes 
n, and that is why I am a 
iroud Republican. 
Abolishing slavery, 



fighting for free speech, and 
woman's suffage are all 
social movements that the 
Republican party has sup- 
ported. When these issues 
and rights were being fought 
for, the Republican party 
was at the vanguard battling 
for their passage, usually 
against the Democratic 
party that opposed these 
core values. Values that we 
now take for granted. The 
"Grand Old Party" has 
always believed in reducing 
government, streamlining 







bureaucracy, and returning 
power back to the states. My 
party, the party of freedom, 
has always believed in the 
primacy of the individual, 
and that we as the American 
people should be empow- 
ered. 

People usually get their 
political inclinations from 
their parents and families. 
More likely than not if a 
mother and father are Demo- 
crats, the child will become 
one as well. However, that 
wasn't the case with me. 
With the exception of my 
brother, every member of my 
family is a registered Demo- 
crat. Despite my family 
environment, I always have 
had conservative political 
thoughts, going all the way 
back to my early youth. 
When my classmates were 
bringing Superman and G.I. 
Joe lunchboxes to cafeteria, I 
was proudly toting my 
official G. Gordon Liddy 
lunchpail! Actually, I did 
not get politically involved 
until high school, that was 
when I realized the tenets of 
the Republican Party made 
sense to me. That was when 
I decided that everything the 
Republican Party believes in, 
everything that Lincoln 
fought so hard for, was 
everything that I think 
America should be about. 
To gain insight in what a 
true Republican believes in, I 



have included the Republi- 
can oath: 

1 . I believe that the proper 
function of government is to do 
for the people those things that 
have to be done but can not be 
done, or can not be done as well 
by individuals, and that the most 
effective government is govern- 
ment closest to the people. 

2. I believe that good government 
is based on the individual and that 
each person's ability, dignity, 
freedom and responsibility must 
be honored and recognized. 

3. I believe that free enterprise 
and the encouragement of indi- 
vidual initiative and incentive 
have given this nation an eco- 
nomic system second to none. 

4. 1 believe that sound money 
policy should be our goal. 

5. I believe in equal rights, equal 
justice and equal opportunity for 
all, regardless of race, creed, age, 
sex, or national origin. I believe 
that persons with disabilities 
should be afforded equal rights, 
equal justice and equal opportu- 
nity as well. 

6. I believe we must retain those 
principles worth retaining, yet 
always be receptive to new ideas 
with an outlook broad enough to 
accommodate thoughtful change 
and varying points of view. 

7. I believe in American values 
and should preserve their feeling 
of national strength and pride, and 
at the same time share with people 
everywhere a desire for peace and 
freedom and the extension of 
human rights throughout the 
world. 

8. Finally, I believe that the 
Republican Party is the best 
vehicle for translating these ideals 
into positive successful principles 
of government. 



25 



Independent Means 

By J. Erik Zimmermann 



During the 1996 political campaigns by both 
President Clinton and Bob Dole, I had a feeling 
of uncertainty. A feeling of who, or who not, 
to vote for. 

In politics, there are basically two types of people, 
the Democrats and the Republicans, the left-wing and 
the right-wing, the liberal and the conservative, the 
good guy and the bad guy, or whatever new names 
being bantered at the time. 

In being an independent, one has the choice of 
voting Democratic one year, Republican the next, and 
Socialist Libertarian the next. But it is not just about 
choosing a leader, it is also about being a leader. 

It is well known in politics that extremist groups do 
not work. Extreme right wing will not work, extreme 
left wing will not work, communism did not and will 
not work. Being independent takes the best ideas 
from all sides. Being independent is being in the 
middle. 

Being independent is having no political affiliation. 
But I do not call myself independent, to sound like I 
am a member of some political party. I am not politi- 



cally affiliated. 

People say that independents are indecisive 
and they can not choose. But we do choose, we 
choose the best candidate. 

It is not just about politics, it is about being 
your own person. It is about being different, but 
not to the extreme. The world is full of people 
who are trying so hard to be different, that they 
actually conform to nonconformity. 

A great man once told me, "Normalcy, in itself, 
is odd." Why, then, is there such a need for 
people to have labels. Labels create cookie 
cutouts, where you have everyone fitting like 
pieces of a puzzle. 

Why do we have to be white or black? Why do 
we have to be punk rock or rave? Why do we 
have to be Greek or GDI? Why do we have to be 
a dumb jock or a computer nerd? 

Being Independent takes away the labels. 
Being Independent means the freedom to choose 
wisely. 



Listen to Reason: 




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Names Project: Aids Memorial Quilt 



"Not all battles are fought with a sword," is the 
slogan that commemorated the display of the 
Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt. Since the 
first showing of the AIDS Memorial Quilt on 
October 11, 1987, the Quilt has grown from 
1,920 panels to 40,000 panels. As the battle 
flag against the ignorance and fear of AIDS, the 
Quilt has put a human face upon the damnable 
disease. For the three days of Columbus Day 
Weekend, the Quilt was displayed from the steps 
of the U.S. Capitol Building to the base of the 
Washington Monument.. Millions visited the 
Quilt over the Columbus Day Weekend in si- 
lence. Although 1996 will mark the last time the 
AIDS Memorial Quilt is fully displayed, the silent 
but powerful message that the fight against 
AIDS does not begin or end with a needle or 
thread but with a society willing to remember 
those lost to AIDS and helping to put an end to 
the disease. 




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MARYLAND, MY MARYLAND 

By Vicki Duckett and J. Eric Zimmermann 



The deep baritone song of the ancient 
bell perched atop Memorial Chapel may 
sound a bit forlorn, but its spirit, like the 
rest of the campus, is both archaic and 
enchanting. 

In 1859, Charles Benedict Calvert first 
planted the seed for what is now the 
University of Maryland at College Park. 
However, back in those days, UMCP was 
know as the Maryland Agricultural Col- 
lege. The first class to graduate from the 
institution boasted a mere 48 students - 
quite a contrast to this year's enrollment! 

Although the students and faculty are 
the main components of the campus, 
there are other dynamic elements which 
coexist within the borders of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. One of the elements 
that dominates the Maryland frontier is 
the buildings. The chiseled bricks and 
gray sloping roofs seem to reflect their 
own charming personality. Each building 
is significant in its name and structure. 
For example, in 1912, a fire burned 
down all the dormitories, and half of the 
classrooms on campus. Morrill Hall was 
the only building left standing. The uni- 
versity almost closed, but a group of 
professors and students began to rebuild 
the campus. During the rebuilding, 
students were housed in the Reckord 
Armory, with army barrack-style accom- 
modations. 

Marie Mount Hall was named after the 
accomplished pianist, Marie Mount, who 
is said to have practiced piano at all hours 
of the day. There is a legend that even 
after her death, her ghost resided inside 
the hall, where the chiming ivory notes of 



a piano can be heard in the stillness of the • 
night. 

Preinkert Fieldhouse furnished its title 
after the late campus Registrar who was 
found murdered in her home. The assail- 
ants escaped unscathed. The murder still 
reminds unsolved. 

Byrd Stadium was named after past 
University of Maryland President harry 
"Curly " Byrd, who also designated our 
reptilian mascot. He chose a terrapin 
because "it is one of the only animals 
indigenous to the State of Maryland." The 
mascot was called Testudo because of the 
species of turtle it was named after, 
testudonado. 

In 1933, the senior class donated the 
statue of Testudo, which now stands in 
front of McKeldin Library. Originally, it 
stood in front of Ritchie Coliseum, where 
basketball games were held. In 1956, 
Testudo was stolen by a rival team when 
the Terps made it to the Orange Bowl. H 
was found on a beach in Florida with boxe 
shorts and sunglasses on. Testudo was 
brought back , and was cemented in place 
in front of McKeldin Library. 

The grassy swatch of land distancing 
Testudo from President Kirwin's office in 
the Main Administration Building is the 
McKeldin Mall. It is the largest mall on a 
college campus in the country (the size of 
six football fields). 

The sculpture. Night and Day, was cre- 
ated in 1972 by the late Kenneth 
Campbell. The pieces of sculpture, found 
in the grove of trees near the center of 
McKeldin Mall, is probably passed thou- 
sands of times a day without notice or 





Paul Vieira 



Jl 






.. . ■ '^ • 







without knowledge of their 
significance. The pieces 
represent the various 
stages of "enlightenment". 

In 1976, the giant "M" 
in the center of Campus 
Drive and Regent Drive 
was landscaped to recog- 
nize the bicentennial of the 
United States Constitution. 
The lighting in front of the 
"M" was donated by the 
class of 1986. As the 
University of Maryland 
moves into the next cen- 
tury, it continues to build 
and improve 

The University was also 
home to a few well-known 
celebrities, such as Jim 
Henson, creator of the 
Muppets. Henson actually 



based Statler and Waldoff 
(the Muppet critics) on two 
of his professors at Mary- 
land. Other personalities 
who attended UMCP 
included Connie Chung, 
the well known news- 
caster, football hero. 
Boomer Esiason, and 
astronaut John Glen. 

In closing, the next time 
you are racing across the 
1,378 acres of campus 
among the other 32,000 
students, remember to rub 
Testudo's nose for good 
luck on your exam, and be 
sure not to traipse across 
the graveyard located 
between Elkton and 
Hagerstown Hall! 



Russell Acosta 



33 



Dramatic Pause: 



A Review of Theatre at Maryland 



"Honky Tonks & Country dreams, and their lonqings 
Queens"" celebrates country as they pay_tribute to Patsy, 
music, as well as country Loretta, Tammy, Dolly 
western musicians. "Honky Naomi and Wynona, and 
Tonks & Country Queens Reba. The productions fea- 
was a musical revue con- tures set design by Dan 
ceived, written, and directed Conway, whose design as- 
hy Ron Q"Leary, a faculty signments have included 
member and free-lance di- work for NBC Television, off- 
Broadway 
and re- 
gional the- 
a t r e s . 
Shu-Ting 
Chen, a 
second 
year Mas- 
ter of Fine 
Arts stu- 
dent in 
cans are known for their costume design at the Uni- 
country western music,"" ex- versity, the production's cos- 
plains Ron 0"Leary, the tume designer. Lightening 
show's creator. "Honky design is oy Adam Maga- 
Tonks & Country Queens" is zine, who recently designed 



rector in 
the Wash- 
i n g t o n 
area. 
"Country 
music has 
become 
global- 
around 
the world 
A m e r i - 



HONKY TONKS & 

Country Queens 



a celebration ol a kind of 
music which is internation- 
ally American."" 

In the world of honky tonk, 
women share their lives, their 



the world premiere p\ the 
new opera ' Lan Ying" at the 
Kennedy Center's Terrace 
Theatre 





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^^r '^'^ ^^^^^^^■^r'^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 


B 


'1 








^^B 









"Amadeus" was a Tony award-winning play con- 
cerning Antonio Salieri's envy of the young Wolfgang 
Mozart. Antonio Salieri was a mediocre composer 
but is the established court composer in Austria until 
the brash genius Mozart enters the scene. The play 
centered around Saleri's attempt to come to terms 
with his jealousy of Mozart's talent. 

The play was directed by Jim Petsoa, artistic direc- 
tor of the Olney Theatre Center, who recently won a 
Helen Hayes Award for Onley's production of 
"Jaques Brell is Alive and Well and Living in Paris," 
based on Petosa's direction of the same musical for 
University Theatre. "Amadeus" featured set design by 
Dan Conway. Helen Q. Huang, resident costume 
designer at the Studio Theatre and an Associate 
Professor at the University of Maryland, was the 
production's costume designer. Lighting design was 
by Daniel Maclean Wagner, a 1996 recipient of an 
Individual Fellowship from the D.C. Commission on 
the Arts and Humanities. 




35 




"Othello," a classic tale about passion, re- 
venge and destructive sexual jealousy writ- 
ten by William Shakespeare, resulted in 
tragic ends. The Director Mitchell Patrick 
Hebert and featured Set designer Dan 
Conway, Costume designer Helen Huang, 
Lightening designer Daniel Maclean 
Wagner, Sound designer Jessy Terrill and 
Technical director David Kriebs brought the 
Shakespearean tale of interracial marriage, 
abuse, and deceit to life. 



All photos of Spring and Fall 1996 
University Theatre productions were 
provided to the Terrapin Yearbook 
by the Tawes Public Relation Office 
and were shot by Stan Barouh 





7<^ 'liea, ^Aat StMcC 




University Theatre at 
the University of 
Maryland, College 
Park, presented "The Ties 
That Bind" by Regina Tay- 
lor, star of television's "111 
Fly Away". Affirmative ac- 
tion, "The Best Black Syn- 
drome," racism, family dys- 
function, the L.A. Riots, The 
Bell Curve, and the O.J. 
Simpson trial are some of 
the issues explored in 
Taylor's theatre piece. "The 
Ties That Bind" comprised 
of two fast-paced one-act 
plays. 

"If we want to grow as a 
nation, we have to broaden 
our vision," said director Scot 
Reese. "We have learned 
that the effects of over three 
centuries of degradation and 
deprivation will not be cured 
in a decade, and I'm afraid 
our will is beginning to fall." 

"The excitement of 
Taylor's two plays stemed 
from how a people face their 
unique situations. 'Inside the 



Belly of the Beast' is a stylis- 
tic and subjective dreamlike 
tale of a black man caught 
up in a nightmare vision of 
corporate America. The lead 
character sets out to slay a 
dragon and is instead swal- 
lowed up by it. 'Watermelon 
Rinds,' the second one-act, 
tells of an allegorical black 
family caught up in a surreal 
reunion on moving day. The 
family, descended from the- 
atre vaudevillians, is a car- 
toon carnival of stand-up 
routines and social debate 
filled with puns and hilarious 
idiomatic wordplay. Think 
of Lorraine Hansberry, 
Langston Hughs, and Tom 
Stoppard, all rolled into 
one." 

"The Ties That Bind , " fea- 
tures set design by Daniel 
Conway, lighting design by 
Daniel Maclean Wagner, 
costume design by Helen 
Huang, sound design by Bill 
Harrison, Jr. and technical 
design by David Kriebs. 





"Abducting Diana" written by Dario Fo and adapted by 
Stephen Stennig was presented for the first time in 
America by University Theatre. "In 'Abducting Diana, 
'testosterone-crazed lunatics' kidnap millionaire media 
boss Diana Forbes-McKaye," explained Catherine 
Schuler, director of the production. "Or at least that's 
the premise of the farce, which also examines how the 
media manipulate public perceptions of events-from 
political debates to sex scandals. Although the media 
attempts to present its stories as objective reports, the 
media is not a disinterested reporting entity. 

"Commentary on the media in society is not the 
plays's only agenda, " Schuler added. " 'Abducting Diana' 
promises to be an evening full of laughs and thrills. In 
fact, I suggest that audience bring along their rain- 
coats...." 

"Abducting Diana" features set design by Raye Leith, 
costume design by Shu-Ting Chen, lightening design by 
Adam Magazine, sound by Arpad Sayko and technical 
design by David Kriebs and Anna Drum. 



37 



IVELCOME TO 



THE ROUTE 



NEW BUSINESSES INVADE 
BALTIMORE AVENUE 

The 1996-1997 school year was a year of 
options for people who ventured off to the 
Route. 

New fast food places popped up, Danny's, Hot Wings, 
and McDonald Express. Danny's offered a wide array of 
food choices and styles, Chinese, Hunan, subs, seafood, 
hamburgers, and chicken. Speaking of chicken. Hot 
Wings provided hot competition for College Park wings 
mainstay, Cluck-U Chicken. McDonald Express brought 
Ronald McDonald and the Happy Meal Bunch to College 
Park with a limited but enduring menu. 

Residents of College Park were not limited to 7-Eleven 
for their convenience store needs with the addition of 
Wawa to the neighborhood. Chevy Chase Bank ex- 
panded the banking choices on the Route; the Route's 
newest addition to the dining out scene was the family 
friendly chain of restaurants, Applebee's. 

Fashion did not suffer with the revolution of choices on 
the Route. ReRuns and Danger Will provided the 
habitants of College Park with mod outfits and happen- 
ing accessaries. 

No matter the need, the Route was full of options to 
heal the wants and desires of the people who called 
College Park home during 1996 and 1997. 








All photos on this spread were done by Kim Pederick 



39 






t^lie^ XJlMt 




Ed Graves, II 





Ed Graves, II 




~tO Ol^SiS^? 




Ed Graves, II 




The students of the University of Maryland had a lot 
choices when it came to getting on campus and 
going to class. 



Russell Acosta 



41 



IT CAME ONE NIGHT, 



Snorre Wik 





Snorre Wik 



HALLOWEEN ON THE ROUTE! 




Snorre Wik 




Snorre Wik 



43 



T/oiitot^'^'Tvc: 





lailgating and Football, what 
a perfect combination! 
There is a science to having 
a perfect tailgate. Add one part, school spirit, 
with good food and drink, and do not forget to 
liberally sprinkle in friends and family and 
voila-THE PERFECT TAILGATE! 






''Tailgating is 
the bright spot 
of Maryland 
Football, " 




All Photos On This Spread Were Done By Dana Sears 



45 



c 



ampus 



Be 



auty 




Ed Graves, 11 



Paul Vieira 





Ed Graves, II 




Ed Graves, II 





Ed Graves, II 



Without a doubt, the University of Maryland at 
College Park is the most gorgeous campus in 
the entire United States. The beauty of 
Maryland's campus attracts prospective students 
and is fondly remembered by past graduates. 
Maryland's campus has always made the Univer- 
sity of Maryland - Something to Remember. 



n 1 n £ ^ 



Dana Sears 




47 



Moments That Made Maryland 

Something to Remember 




Russell Acosta 



Russell Acosta 





Dana Sears 



>" 



m 




k 



i 




ijii I ■ 




■*':i 




Russell Acosta 




Russell Acosta 




Russell Acosta 



Russell Acosta 



msT 




Snorre Wik 



49 





Information about academics for each college was adapted fron 

"Discover the Realitx;. " produced b}; the 
Office of histitutional Advancement. University Publications. 




Kim Pederick 



Seniors and 
Academics 



Hopes, dreams, and ambitions 
are like balloons. Inflated. 
Easily destroyed. Awe inspir- 
ing. In the fall of 1993, the incoming 
class of freshmen were full of hopes, 
dreams, and ambitions. They repre- 
sented the future. 

Although a few of those freshmen 
have gone on to the way side, those 
who survived the climb from "head in 
the clouds" freshmen to active 
"shapers of the world" seniors should 
breathe a quiet sigh of relief and pat 
themselves on their backs. College is 
over, but working hard isn't. The 
world has a lot to offer but the Class 
of 1997 has even more to give. 



''Good Luck 

and best of 

wishes to the 

Class of 

1997/' 



51 






PUTRI ABDULLAH 

INTL BUSINESS 
AMIR ABDULMEUK 

ENEE 

LISA ABRAMS 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



SHERRI ACKERMAN 

BUS/ MARKETING 
RUSSELL ACOSTA 
SOCIOLOGY 
BRYAN ADDIS 

HUMAN RESOURCES 




ADELEKE ADEYEMI 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FOLASHADE 

ADEYOSOYE 

CMSC 

DANA ADLER 

TRANSAOGISTICS/MKT/ 
INTL BUS 




^ 



SANDRA ADOMAKO 

BIOLOGY 

CHRISTOPHER 

ADORNETTO 

JOURNALISM 
HOPE AGUILAR 

ACCOUNTING 






OYEDEJI V. 
AGUNBIADE 

FINANCE 

KOROUSH AKHAVAN- 

SARAF 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
MARSHA AKS 

INTL BUS/MKTG 




NINA AKSENOVAa 

ACCOUNTING * 

JASON ALDRIDGE 

ACCOUNTING 
AGELIKI ALOUPIS 

FINANCE & MARKETINg 




BEVERLEY 
ANDERSON 

DANCE M 

ANGELA ANDREWS 

FMST 

GRACE ANGSONO 

SOCIOLOGY 




ALISON ANNEX 

SPANISH 

MARTIN APARICIO 

BUSINESS 

IVAN ARAKAKI 

MARKETING 



53 



^ 



LESLIE ARTHER 

PSYCHOLOGY 
GARY ASH 

MARKETING 
BRIAN ASHBY 

ECONOMICS MW 




REBECCA 
ASHKENAZY 

FINANCE/BIO. NEUR. PHYS. 
CHI-MING AU-YEUNG 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 
HEATHER AUSTIN 

ENGLISH 




ANGELA BACCALA 

HISTORY 
BRIAN BAGLEY 

ACCOUNTING 
NICOLE BAIERLEIN 

KINESIOLOGY 




KARUN BAKSHI 

ELEC. ENG. 
COREY BALL 

SPCH. COMM. 
ROSS BALTIC 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 



^ 






k 



LAUREN BANKS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
ERIN BARCUS 

TRANSPORTATION/ 
LOGISITCS 
MICHAEL BARCUS 

ENGLISH 



MARGARET ^^^ 
BARKDOLL ^^" 

FAMILY STUDIES 

ED BARLOW, III 

CCJS 

EDWARD BARNES 

MARKETING 




JOANNA BARON 

GVPT ^^ 

IAN BARROW 4^ 
BIO. RES. ENGR. 
MARGARET BARRY 

BIOLOGY 




DENISE BARTLOW 

BUSINESS 

COLETTE M. BARTOS 

BUSINESS 
LOPA BASU 

BIOLOGY 




55 




JOSEPH L. 
BATTAGLI 

BIOLOGY 

NORAINI BAWAZIER 

INTL. BUS. 
TAIYSHA BEAMAN 

ACCOUNTING 




CHRISTINE BECK 

FINANCE/MARKETING 
DAVID BECK 
SEC. ED. MATH 
DAVID BECKER 

CCJS 



KARA BECKETT 

FAMILY STUDIES 

JOHN BEELER, JR. 

CCJS 

DIANE L. BEHALL 

PSYC/CCJS 




KRISTA BEHNEY 

BIOLOGY 

MOHAMMAD H. 
BEIRAGHDAR 

NEUROBIOLOGY 
MIRELLA BENGERO 

ELEC. ENG. 






k 



CHATa£S BENJAMIN 

THEATER 

SCOTT BERGMAN 

KINESIOLOGY 

ADAM BERKOWICZ 

ACCOUNTING 




KIMBERLY BERNARD 

HISTORY 
ELLEN BESNER 

JOURNALISM 
JOHN BIDDISON 

GVPT 




FRANK BILOTTO 

ART STUDIO 
ELIANE BISCHOFF 

ELEC. ENGR. 
RANDOLPH BISHOP 

JOURNALISM 




CHRISTOPHER 
BITTNER 

MARKETING 

TIKEETHA 

BLACKWELL 

ENGLISH 
AMY BLADES 

MARKETING 




57 



NOAM BLASS 

JWSH STUDIES/HISTORY 

MARK BLOND 

FINANCE. 

LISA BLOXSOM 

MARKETING 



MARY BOLLEDDU 

CMBG 

MICHAEL BONANNI 

MARKETING 

DAPHNE BOOGAARD 

SOCIOLOGY 




JAY BORDWELL 

FIRE PROTECTION ENG. 
MICHELLE BORTLE 
ELEM. ED, 
DAVID BOZAK 

PHYS./NEURO. 



JOSEPHINE BOZZO 

PSYCHOLOGY 
CHRISTINE 
BRADFORD 

ACCOUNTING 

CHRISTOPHER 

BRAUN 

MARKETING 





k 



CYNTHIA BRISBANE 

NATURAL RESOURCE 

MGMT. 

STEVE BROADWATER 

GVPT/HIST. 

HALLIE BROKOWSKY 

GVPT 




LINDI BROOKS 

MARKETING 
AMY BROWN 
SPECIAL ED. 
BEVERLY BROWN 

FINANCE 




MARY BROWN m 

HUMAN resources" 

RICHARD BROWN 

NATURAL RESOURCE 

MGMT. 

TERRY BROWN 

FAMILT STUDIES 




COURTNEY 
BRZECZKO 

PSYCHOLOGY 
DAN BUCK 
THEATER 
JEROD BUCKEL 

CHEM. ENG. 



59 




College of Agriculture 

and 
Natural Resources 



1 




Russell Acosta 




Feeding the hungry of the world, developing sound environmental 



"C?" 



policies, understanding animal and plant biology and managing agribusiness 

aa cy 

are all vital concerns of the College of Agriculture and its faculty. 

General Agriculturpi "^riences 

Contemporary subjects like genetic engineering, international trade and 
policy, dietetics, nutrition and landscape architecture have joined the 
disciplines of crop and animal sciences in the curriculum. 

More than 900 undergraduates work closely with faculty in state-of-the- 
art facilities including new biological resource engineering and animal 

' ire 

sciences buildings, a new dairy processing pilot plant, a plant sciences 

Human Nutrition and P^nrfc 

building and an expanded teaching farm. The U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's National Research Center, the National Institutes of Health and 

tore 

the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center are nearby resources which enhance 

.es Managernerrt 

teaching, research and internship and career opportunities. 




AMANDA BULLARD 

GEOGRAPHY 

JEFFREY BUNGE 

CCJS 

HAROLD BURGESS 

THEATER 




ORLA BURKE 

SOCIOLGY 
STAGEY BURKE 

ACCOUNTING 
SHAUN BURWELL 

ACCOUNTING 




ALLISON BUSCH 

SPCH. COMM. 
SCOTT BUTERA 
ECONOMICS 
ROBERT BUTTO, JR. 

MECH. ENG. 




EUGENE BYAS 


THEATER 


GARY D. BYRD 


CCJS 


TANEKA CAFFEE 


MARKETING 









ROSANNA 
CALABRESE 

ELEM. ED. 

JASON 

CALDERWOOD 

ELEC. ENG. 

DAVID CALDWELL 

ELEC. ENG. 




ANTHONY CALLAN 

BIOLOGY 

RANDI CAMMEYER 

CCJS 

KHARA CANNON 

SPANISH ED. 




ZIYUN CAO 

FINANCE 
MARIA NIHRA 
CAPUNITAN 

BIOLOGY 
KIMBERLY CARTER 

SPCH. COMM. 




DAVID ROCCO 
CASTELLANO 

CCJS 

HELEN CASTELLANOS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
AMY CASTRO 

SPANISH 



63 



TERESA CAVALLO 

HEALTH ED. 

BRIDGETTE 

CAVANAGH 

PSYCHOLOGY 

BERNEDETTE 

CESTONE 

FINANCE/INTL. BUS. 



BYUNG CHA 

ECONOMICS 
MIREILLE CHAAYA 

DIS/INTL. BUS. 
ALISON CHALIFOUX 

GVPT 



NATALIE CHAMBERS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
FAI CHAN 
MECH. ENG. 
IVY CHAN 

BIOLOGY 




MAGGIE CHAN 

MARKETING/INTL. BUS. 
WAI-KWONG CHAN 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 
YIN CHAN 

FOOD SC/ECON 









YUK CHAN 

ACCOUNTING/DIS 
IN CHANG 
CMSC ^.. 

MIMI CHANG 

PSYCHOLOGY 




TOMMY CHANG 

ENEE 

WEN-CHUAN CHANG 

GERMAN LANG. 
AMY CHAPIN 

BIOLOGY 




TRINA CHATTORAJ 

MECH. ENG. 
HSIAO-YUN M. CHEN 

STUDIO ART 
NATASHA CHEN 

BIOLOGY 




QIANLI CHEN 

BIOCHEMISTRY 
RUOH-MEI CHEN 

DECISION INFO. SYSTEMS 
SHIRIN CHERAGHI 

MICROBIOLOGY 



r 



65 




HILLARY CHERRY 

PSYCHOLOGY 
CATHERINE M. 
CHERUBIN 
ZOOLOGY 
KALAI CHEUNG 
BCHE 



^ 



KAWAI CHEUNG 

PSYC/CCJS 

WANNA CHIEN 

DIS 

SUCK CHO 

BIOLOGY 




NAVEEN CHOUDHURY 

JOURNALISM 
VIVIAN CHOY 
MUSIC THEORY. 
LUKE CHRISTOPHER 

GEOGRAPHY 






DONNA M. CHURCH 

ARCHITECTURE 

CARYN CICCHINO 

KINESIOLOGY 

CHRISTOPHER 

CLAUDIO 

GVPT 







MIRANDA V. 
CLEMENT 

INTL. BUS. 

SHARON CLORAN 

CCJS 

MELANIE COBB 

PSYCHOLOGY 




GIFTY CHOBBLAH 

ACCOUNTING/FINANCE 
ERICA COFFEY 
SPCH. COMM.. 
ANGEL COFFIN-BERO 

FAMULY STUDIES 




ABIGAIL COHEN 

PSYCHOLOGY 
JENNIFER B. COHEN 

SPCH. COMM. 
JONATHAN COHEN 

FAMILY STUDIES 



MELISSA S. COHEN 

BIOLOGY 

VINCENT COLAIANNI 

MARKETING 
TERRI COLLIER 

GVPT 



67 




College of 
Architecture 



11 

Physics, history, technology, drawing, urban planning and aesthetics all com- 
bine to produce the trained architect. At College Park, the School of Architecture is 
small, select, and well equipped. The Architecture Library is one of the finest in the 
nation, and the Elizabeth Alley slide collection contains 250,000 slides on architec- 
ture, landscape architecture and urban planning. The faculty include well-established 
practicing architects, preservationists and archaeological experts. 

The CADRE Corporations is a nonprofit organization through which students and 
faculty contact for research and design projects in keeping with the fundamental 
educational mission of the school. Summer credit programs in historic preservation 
are located in Cape May, New Jersey, a designated national historic landmark district, 
and Kiplin Hall in North Yorkshire, England. 



Tl 






lai^l 












18 81 






^ 








■^ 



O 



o 



n 



I' 



D 



IT— 



CDO 



a 



^5 



College of Arts 
and Humanities 




c/5 
O 
U 

< 



OJ 

C/3 
Pi 



Critical thought, persuasive speech and good writing - together with abundant 

American Stud^^^ ^^^ 

opportunities to expand one's cultural and intellectual horizons - these are the 
foundations of the liberal arts curriculum. The College of Arts and Humanities at 
Maryland offers students a full and stimulating array of opportunities in the languages, 
history, philosophy, literature, art and music of the past and present, of the United 
States and of the world. 

Jewish 

Students study with talented faculty members who are redefining their subjects as 



they teach, pursue scholarship and perform. These faculty are committed to helping 

Romance LanguaMes Russian mul 

students prepare for work in the local community and in the world, and at the same 
time showing students the way toward building a private self. Faculty often work 
individually with students to help them become effective, reflective and successful 



people. 



69 




DANIELLE COLLINS 

FAMILY STUDIES 

MICHAEL COLLINS 

GVPT 

JASON CONBOY 

TRANSPORTATION 



fA 




4b 



WILLIAM B. COOK 

NATURAL RESOURCE 
MGMT. 
JENNIFER 
COOPERSON 

MICROBIOLOGY 
NICOLE CORTESE 

NATURAL RESOURCE 
MGMT. 




ANDREA MARIA 
COSTA 

PSYCHOLOGY 

ROBERT GOUGH 

CCJS. 

MICHAEL COULTER 

GVPT 




KATINA COUSAR 

FAMILY STUDIES 
DANIELLE COWLES 
ENGLISH 
TONYA COX 

ECE 







KIMBERLY CRASKEY 

JOURNALISM 
LARRY CRONISE 

MECH. ENG. 
HEATHER CROSBY 

MARKETING/LOG 




ERIN CROTTY 

SPANISH 

DARIAN CROUSE^ 

THEATER 
EDWARD CROWN 

MECH. ENG. 



'Mi^^ 




MARIA CRCI*I 

GVPT 

NEAL DUBEY 

ACCOUNTING 
STEPHEN CUNEO 

MARKETING 






REBECCA CURRANO 

MECH. ENG. 
BENJAMIN CZISNY 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 
JONATHAN CZISNY 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 






71 



SHAZIA DAD 

PHYSIOLOGY/ 
NEUROBIOLOGY 
TODD DAILY 
FIRE PROTECTION ENG. 
MICHAEL DANG 
CHEM. ENG 




WENDY DAO 

ACCOUNTING 
NADINE DARBEAU 

FAMILY STUDIES 
USHEEN DAVAR 

SOCIOLOGY 



LEIGH DAVIES 

PSYC/CCJS 

MARL\ DAVILA 

CCJS 

KESA DAVIS 

GEOGRAPHY 




NATHAN DAVIS 

KINESIOLOGY 
RONALD DAVIS 
SOCIOLOGY 
JENNIFER DAYTON 

ENGLISH 





( ;^/ 





TRACY DECK 

ACCOUNTING 

TRACEY DECTER 

ZOOLOGY 

EILEEN DEGUZMAN 

FAMILY STUDIES 



ALLAN DEL ROSARIO 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 
DANIEL DELANEY 
HISTORY 

GUADALUPE E. 
DELGADO 
ART STUDIO 



SARA DELGADO 

JOURNALISM 

JENNIFER 

DELLECCHIA 

BIOLOGY 
BRYONY DEMB 

MARKETING/LOGISTICS 



SHAWN DENIHAN 

MECH. ENG. 
APURVA DESAI 
SPCH/BIOL 
JASON DEVNEW 

PHILOSOPHY 



73 



DEANNA DIBARI 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 
JONATHAN DIETRICH 

ACCOUNTING/COMP SCI 
JAMIE DIETZ 

KINESIOLOGY 



«^Pr 



SUSAN DILL 

GVPT 

DAVID DILLER 

MECH. ENG. 
TIEN DINH 

CMSC 



STEVE DITULLIO 

ART STUDIO 
ETOSHA DIXON 

PHYS/NEUROBIO 
BAODO 

ACCOUNTING/FINANCE 



•^ 



KRISTINA DODSON 

CHEM. ENG. 
MELISSA DOHERTY 

JOURNALISM 
DEBORAH 
DOMPIERRE 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 






L 



TERESA L. DONOHUE 

SPECIAL ED. 
ROBYNN DORSEY 

FINANCE 

TERI DORSEY 

ENGLISH 




JAPALENE A. 
DOTSON 

GEN. BUS./LOG./TRANS. 
REBECCA DOW 
ACCOUNTING/COMP. SCI. 
MICHAEL DOWNEY 

CCJS 




DELSENA DRAPER 

ART STUDIO 
SUSAN DRINNON 
CMSC 
CHUNG-SZE DU 

DIS 



VICTORIA DU 

GEN. BUSINESS 

ADAM DUBECK 

GVPT 

CARYL DUCKWORTH 

IVSP 



75 



TATJANA DUUC 

ACCOUNTING 
COLIN DUNCAN 

ACCOUNTING 
TANYA DUNLAP 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 




GERALDINE DUVAL 

SECONDARY ED. MATH 

GREG DYE 

CCJS 

MICHAEL EBAUGH 

MARKETING/FINANCE 




JENNIFER EDWARDS 

ENGLISH 

PETER EDZE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

KEITH EICHENHOLZ 

GVPT 



ELIZA EISENBERG 

PSYCHOLOGY 

CHIKA EKEZIE 

BIOLOGY 

PAAL ELFSTRUM 

CCJS 






STEPHANIE ELLER 

PSYCHOLOGY 
DELROY ELLESTON 

ACCOUNTING 
STAGEY ELLIOTT 

PSYCHOLOGY 




NICOLE ELLISON 

JOURNALISM/SPCH. COMM. 
KARIM EMARA 
ANTHROPOLOGY 
MICHAEL ENGLES 

ACCOUNTING 



ERIKA EPPS 

ENGLISH 
PILAPA ESARA 

ENGLISH 
HILL ERIC 

KINESIOLOGY 



CHAD ESKANAZY 

BUSINESS 
CAROLYN EUSTIC 

INTL BUSINESS 
ELLIOT J. EVERETT 

FINANCE 



77 



College of Behavioral and 
_-~ Social Sciences 



Studying human communities and the way people interact in an effort to solve 

Afro- America n Studies 

the most complex problems of our time is the focus of the College of Behavioral 
A^thr-nryQlogy 

and Social Sciences. 

The large, diverse college engages its students in the social, political, 
economic and psychological foundations of civilization. How does individual 
behavior affect group behavior, and vice versa? What and who is a criminal? 
What makes a leader? How do we affect change in social behaviors? Unraveling 
the mysteries of cultures and values and using that knowledge to improve the 
human condition is the driving force behind this area of study and research. 

At Maryland, the proximity of the Census Bureau, the departments of Labor, 
Health, Education, Welfare and Transportation, and of course the federal 
government, puts students at the center of information, policy making and 
planning for our nation's future. 

30C1 gy 




College of Business 
and Management 



The world of business consists of more than profit motives and market shares. 

AccounLiii2 

Using natural and human resources wisely, cooperating in the international market- 

fmrlcinri ^nd InfoTIBMTlOTI srtenC€S 
place, understanding competition, the arena of finance and investment, and the dy- 

namics of organizations make this discipline a challenge to young entrepreneurs and 

nt^iai Business and Management 

aspiring executives. 

The College of Business and Management is housed in Van Munching Hall, one 

HumfiM Resource .iviBnaMtniient 

of the newest buildings on campus, with sophisticated teaching and presentation fa- 
cilities. Ranked by U.S. News and World Report among the top 30 business schools 
in the nation, its majors are among the most popular at the university. In the true 
spirit of enterprise, the college strives constantly toward "top ten;" its among nine 
university programs nationwide selected for an IBM Total Quality Management grant 
to provide training to undergraduates in the TQ management philosophy. 




79 



CHRISTOPHER D 
EVERETTE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

AARON EVRARD 

CCJS 

BARNABAS FADOPE 

JOURNALISM 



ALPHA FAEH 

ECONOMICS 

JACKIE FALLS 

CCJS 

DANIELLE FAMULARO 

CCJS 




DEBORAH FASS 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
NANCY FAULKNER 
HISTORY 
JAMES FAZIO 

GVPT 



DANIEL FEDERMAN 

INTL BUSINESS 
DEBRA FELD 
FAMILY STUDIES 
ANGELA FEEDER 

ENGLISH 





L 



ADINA FELIBERTY 

NUC. ENG. 
MICHAEL FELLIN 

EDUCATION 
ROBERT FELLMAN 

FINANCE AND MKTG 



m^w ^ 



ROBIN FINE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

KAREN FINK 

JOURNALISM 

LAURIE MICHELLE 

FINK 

HEARING AND SPEECH 



I 




STANFORD E. 
FISHER, III 

ENGLISH 

MARGARET FISHKIN 

ENGINEERING 

TIMOTHEUS 

FITZGERALD 

CMSC 



NATALIE FLEET 

FAMILY STUDIES 

JENNIFER FLEISCHER 

ECONOMICS 

STEPHANIE 

FLETCHER 

CCJS 



81 



■iiipiuiipi 



KERRY FLYNN 

COMP. SCI. 

ROBERT FOGLE, JR. 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 
EVELYN FOLEY 

GERMAN 



MEGAN FOLEY 

MARKETING 
SARAH FORBES 

MARINE BIOLOGY 
APRIL FORSYTHE 

PSYCHOLOGY 



MARC FOSTER 

KINESIOLOGY 
CATHRINE FOTOS 

ENGLISH 
LAUREN FOX 

ELEMENTARY ED. w^ 



CATTERTON 
FRANCINE 

SPECIAL ED. 

SARAH FRANK 

ENGLISH 

MARIA FRANZETTI 

ENGLISH 





^82 




k 



NANCY REBECCA 

FREED 

ZOOLOGY 

RICHARD FREEMAN 

SPANISH LIT. 
MERYLE FREIBERG 

GVPT 



MICHELE FRIEDLAND 

DIETETICS 

AVI FRIEDMAN 

ACCOUNTING 
ELIZABETH FURNARI 

INTL BUS. /LOG. /TRANS. 



«■ 



ANN GABRIEL 

BIOLOGY 
REBECCA GADY 

FAMILY STUDIES 
PATRICK GAMBARO 

PSYCHOLOGY 



JAIM GANN 

GERMAN 

JAMIE GARITY 
BIOLOGY 
RASHIMA GARNER 

CCJS 



83 



TAMEKA GARNER 

MARKETING 

MINA GARRETT^ 

BIOLOGY 

ALTHRISCA GATHERS 

ENGLISH 





ELIZABETH GEORGE 

ACCOUNTING 
JODI GERSHON 

FAMILY STUDIES 
JOEL GERSTEIN 

ACCOUNTING 




KIMBERLY GEWIRTZ 

FAMILY STUDIES 
PAUL GIESER 
ART HISTORY 
KATHRYN GILMARTIN 

MARKETING/LOG./TRANS. 




MARC GLAZER 

BUSINESS 

SARITA GOLDBLOOM 

CCJS/PSYC 

JEREMY GOLDMAN 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 






KIMBERLY GOLDMAN 

JOURNALISM 

CARRIE GOLDSTEIN 

GVPT 

JENNIFER GOLDSTEIN 



GVPT 




JODI GOLIN 

SPCH. COMM. 
MOHAMMAD GOMAA 

ELEC. ENG. 
SERGIO GOMEZ 

ENGINEERING 



I 



JOSHUA GOODSTADT 

KINESIOLOGY 
MICHELLE GOOZMAN 

BUS. MGMT./MARKETING 
OMAR GORDON 

PSYCHOLOGY 



RENEE GORDON 

AMERICAN STUDIES 
KEVIN GOTTSCHALK 
KINESIOLOGY 
NATASHA GOURDAIN 

PSYCHOLOGY 



85 



^^ 



KELLY GRABOWSKI 

MUSIC ED. 

CHRISTOPHER 

GRAHAM 

MARKETING 

ROXANNE GRANDIS 

ENGLISH 



§¥ A 



:# 



PATRICE GRANDISON 

ENGLISH 

BRIAN M. GRANEK 

MARKETING 
SHELLEY GRANT 

GEN. BUS./HR 




MATTHEW GRAVES 

JOURNALISM 
WALTER GREEN 
FINANCE 
CHARLES GREENE 

GVPT 




CHAVI GREENGART 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

DAVID GREENSPAN 

GVPT 

JEANNE R. 

GREENWELL 

ANTHROPOLOGY 







w 



CARRIE GREGOR 

FINANCE 

KATHERINE GRICE 

BIOLOGY 

MILLA GRINSHPUN 

SOCIOLOGY 



ALIYA GROSFELD 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

KIMBERLY 

GROSSMAN 

CCJS 

KATIE GROVER 

CHEMISTRY 




SARAH GRUMET 

HISTORY 

JUDITH GRUNBERGER 

ENGLISH 

KRISTINA GRUNER 

CHEM. EDJJ( 




JULIA CRUSSIAH 

BIOLOGY 
REGINALD GUNTER 

EDUCATION 
SHERI GURNEY 

DIETETICS 



87 



Close observation and respect for the empirical method characterize the study of 
computer, math, and physical sciences. Investigation of the physical phenomena of 
the universe-and the everyday world-and the mathematical concepts underlying natural 
law require abstract thinking and the ability to make leaps of reason that connect in- 
formation in new and revealing ways. This is the realm of symbolic languages and 
highly refined systems analysis that computer technology has transformed in the last 

few decades. 

CMPS offers advanced technology and facilities in its Automation Research Cen- 
ter, the Computer Vision Laboratory, Astronomy Observatory, Institute for Climate 
Studies and Human Interaction Laboratory. Faculty are renowned in the areas of 
human-computer interaction, chaos theory, software development and superconduc- 
tivity research, among many subjects. 

Physics 

NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Naval Observa- 
tory, and the American Center for Physics are located near the campus. Many coop- 
erative teaching and research projects, as well as internship and career opportunities, 



link the university and these resources. 



i 88 




; ^5!^^ 




College of Computer, 
Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences 



X 









r 



o 



^a 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



lymm \ 







89 



i 



STEPHENIE 
GUTRIDGE 

GVPT 

JAMES GUZZIO 

KINESIOLOGY 
CHARLES HA 

PSYC/GVPT 



DENNIS L. HAGER 

AMERICAN HISTORY 
HILARY HAHN 
SOCIOLOGY 
JOANN HAHN 

BUSINESS 



DAYONNA L. HAILE 

SOCIOLOGY 
RIBKHA HAILU 

GVPT 

JEAN HAJDENBERG 

FAMILY STUDIES 



ANDREW B. HALES 

MKTG/HUM. RES. MGMT. 
DAVID HALPREN 
ACCOUNTING 
AMY HAMILTON 

MARKETING 






L 



PETER HAMLIN 

CMBG 

LAUREN HANDEL 

GVPT 

EDWARD HANGLITER 

COMM, HEALTH 



RANA HAQUE 

BIOLOGY 
GINA HARRIS 

FAMILY STUDIES 
JAMILLAH HARRIS 

ACCOUNTING 



STEVEN HARRIS 

ELEC. ENG. 
DAVID HAYDEN 
CMBG 
LAUREN HEALY 

LOG./MKTG. 



ALPHONSO HEARNS 

SPCH. COMM. 
DOROTHY HEDRICK 

ENGLISH 

LORI HEINKEL 

EDUCATION 



91 




DAWN HEISEY 

MICROBIOLOGY 
BARI HELLER 
CCJS 

STEFANI P. 
HENDRICK 
FAMILY STUDIES 




SEON AH HEO 

ART STUDIO 
CHAN HER 
SPCH. COMM. 
DOROTHY HESLOP 

CCJS 




MARK HESS 

PHYS/MATH 
CHRISTY HILL 
PSYCHOLOGY 
CAROLYN HILLER 

GVPT 




LORN HINISH 

FAMILY STUDIES 
TIA HINTON 
PSYCHOLOGY \ 

MELISSA HIRSHHORN 

FAMILY STUDIES 






^^^ 






WING HO 

MARKETING/LOG. 
MARK HOBGOOD 
COMP. SCI. 
KRISTIAN HOCHBERG 

CMBG 



SARAH HOFFERT 

STUDIO ART 
EDWARD HOGAN 
COMP. SCI. 
KELLY HOGAN 

NRMT 




KELLY HOLLAND 

ANSC 

STEPHANIE HOLLIS 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 
MELISSA HOLMES 

BIOLOGY 



BRAD HOROWITZ 

GVPT 

MICHAEL HOROWITZ 

FINANCE 

BARBARA D. HORSEY 

CCJS 



93 



BRANDON HOSEY 

ACCOUNTING 
WILLIAM D. ^ 

HOUSTON ^^A 
ELEM, ED. ^^ ^^ 

LOUIS HROMADA, JR. 
MECH. ENG. 




THOMAS HROMADA 

CIVIL ENG. 
ANN HSU - 
DIETETICS '^ 

JIECHANG HUANG 

COMP. SCI. 



t 



SOMA HUANG 

NEUROPHYS/ART HISTORY 

W. DAVID HUBBARD 

JOURNALISM 

CHRISTOPHER 

HUDAK 

GVPT 



'I LjM|||^ 



JEFFREY HUNT 

CCJS 

LISA HUNT 

CHEM. ENG. 
MICHAEL HUNT 

BIOLOGY 






NENINTA HUTABARAT 
MARKETING 
KIMBERLY 
INDUSTRIOUS 

JOURNALISM 
MICHAEL INGOGLIA 

HISTORY 



BELINDA INNERST 

SOCIOLOGY 
ARUNA K. JAIN 

ENGLISH LIT. 

A. MICHELLE JAMES 

SPANISH/PRE MED 




MARC JANNSEN 

BUSINESS 

DILRUKSHI 

JAYASEKERA 

CHEMISTRY 

CEZARY 

JEDNASZEWSKI 

FINANCE 



ALEX JENNINGS, II 

GVPT 

SCHONDA JESSIE 

MRTG/LOG. /TRANS. 
FERNANDO P. 
JIMENEZ, JR. 

CCJS 



95 




CADESHA JOHNSON 

HISTORY 

MICHAEL JOHNSON 

JOURNALISM 
TAMIKA JOHNSON 

FAMILY STUDIES 




TINA JOHNSON 

ENCH 

TORI NICHOLE 

JOHNSON 

KINESIOLOGY ^ 

ANTHONY JONES^ 

MECHANICAL 




BARBARA JONES 

HEALTH ED 
JEFFRIES JONES 

GEN. BUS. 
LUVRONDA JONES 

FAMILY STUDIES 




REGAN JONES 

GVPT 

TIA JONES 

CCJS 

TOMIKA JONES 

PSYC 







k 



TRACY JONES 

GVPT 

NICHOLAS 

JOVANOVIC 

CCJS ^ 

LEIGH KAGAN 

FAMILY STUDIES 






DENA KAHAN 

FAMILY STUDIES 

MELANIE KALNER 

CCJS 

JODY KAPLAN 

GVPT 



ANJUM KAPOOR 

GVPT 
BRIAN KAPP 

GEN. BUS. 

STEVEN KATCHEN 

FINANCE 



ARIKATZ 

MARKETING 
SCOTT KATZEN 

MICROBIOLOGY 
ANTHONY KAZZI 

INTL. BUS./MKTG. 



97 



College of Education 



4-1 

O 
u 

< 



1) 

en 
on 




Educating teachers to work effectively with students, to provide a vibrant learning 

Aft" T7r1ii/~'f]1-irjr} 

environment of reflection, inquiry and experience, to set a course for adulthood and 
citizenship is an enormous challenge as we approach the twenty-first century. This is 
an exciting time to be involved in the most pressing and persistent issues of our demo- 

cnmisn naucaLiion 

cratic way of life, universal education and equality of opportunity. 

The University of Maryland at College Park trains more than one-third of Maryland's 
teachers. It is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 



/ «>* I'* V_ C4. ». JL V^X Jl 



and the Maryland State Department of Education. Area school systems participating in 
teacher training are richly diverse, providing the future teacher a broad range of experi 

TneBTre sna hmmsih hmirntion 

ence with students from every ethnic and economical background. 




College of Engineering 




O 

u 

< 



in 



One of the best and most competitive engineering programs in the country is cen- 
tered in the A. James Clark School of Engineering. A close-knit, collegial atmosphere 

niuiuHii^tii I uiLta niiniiictniik 

prevails among students and faculty. The noontime picnics and volleyball games, the 



team-building competitions (which include solar cars, concrete canoes, robots and first- 

L^i vu nil kiiiict^uii Id 

year design projects) and the intense academic challenge combine to produce some of 
the highest academic achievers, most prestigious awards and the most successful 

rirtf nuLt^CLiuii jziiguiccuu^ 

graduates at the university. 

The school boasts a small-scale nuclear reactor, subsonic and hypersonic wind tun- 

ut^ntfrm nnaiiict^riiiH 

nels, a flight simulator, and a laboratory for plasma and fusion energy studies. Ad- 



n n ,fy <» »«« rf^ «*« « ^^t^ I 1L7< 



vanced computing laboratories are open to all students. The school recently received 

j^Ui^iteii nui£iut:ciiiiii 

a $15 million endowment to support undergraduate engineering education. 



99 



OMRI KAUFMA^fN 

FOOD SCIENCE 
KEVIN KEFAUVER 

MECH. ENG. 
COLLEEN KELLY 

GEN. BUS. 




TABITHA KENLON 

ENGLISH 

CHRISTOPHER 

KENNEDY 

BIOLOGY 

KIMBERLY KENNEDY 

MARKETING/LOG. 




MEGAN KERSHNER 

JOURNALISM 
BRADLEY KESLER 

MARKETING/TRANS. 
CARLYN KESSLER 

JOURNALISM 




^. 



COREY KESSLER 

FINANCE 

KRISTA KETSCHEK 

SPCH. COMM. 
KAREN KUO 

CMSC 




^ 

-«^;, 



100 



y^-Ji 




MICHELLE KURMAN 

ENGLISH 

DAWN KUSINITZ 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
STEPHEN KUZNER 

MARKETING 




TANYA KHARARJIAN 

MARKETING 

TINA KHOIE 

BIOLOGY 

BAHAR KHORRAM 

ELEC. ENG. 




POOJA KHURANA 

BIOLOGY 
CHRISTINA KIBLER 

GVPT 

KIM KIEFER 

BIOLOGY 




CHRISTINA KIM 

BIOLOGY 
HYUNKIM 
BIOCHEMISTRY 
HYUNG S. KIM 

BIOLOGY 



r 



101 



IL-CHIN KIM 

ACCOUNTING 

LISA YUN SIN KIM 

EDUCATION 
NAM KIM 

BIOCHEMISTRY 



PILKIM 

DIS 

JOYCE FARRELL KING 

EDPA 
KATRINA KING 

MARINE BIOLOGY 




KIMBERLY KING 

FAMILY STUDIES 

CHRISTINE 

KINWORTHY 

EDUCATION 
PAUL KIRK 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 




JAYNE KLASK 

ELEM. ED. 

ERIN KLEVENS 

ENGLISH 
SCOTT KLUGE 

MARKETING 



ii 



102 




% 



' -^^ 




k 



RICHARD KNEE 

MARKETING 
ELIZABETH KNERR 

FINANCE 
TRACY KNIGHT 

ANTHROPOLOGY 






^ 



TODD KNOWLTON 

GEN. BUS. 
JULIANNA KO 
MATH 
AMITAI KOHN 

BIO-SCIENCE 




KELLEY KOHN 

ANSC 

ALAN KONLANDE 

JOURNALISM 

DAYNA A. KONNICK 

SOCIOLOGY 



JOANNA KOONDEL 

ENGLISH 

SANDY KOPMAN 

MARKETING 

JOSETTE KOUNCAR 

GVPT 



103 



JENNIFER KOZIAR 

SEC. ED. /BIO 
MICHELLE 
KOZLOWSKI 

ELEM. ED. 

ANTHONY R. KRATZ 

ELEC. ENG. 




CLAYTON JOHN 
KRIEWALDT 

CIVIL ENG. 

PHILIP KRUER 

BIOLOGY 

MICHAEL KRAVITZ 

GVPT 



DORIS LA 

INTL. BUSINESS 
JAMES LACEWELL 
ENGLISH 
JENNIFER LAGAZ 

MECH. ENG. 



KAREN LOGOIS 

DIETETICS 
THEODORA LAHANIS 

SPCH. COMM. 
PAUL LANCASTER 

ACCOUTING/INTL. BUS. 









DARA LANGONE 

ELEM. ED, 
LORI LANIER 

ASTRONOMY 
SARAH LASOTA 

GVPT/RUSSIAN 




BARUCH LAZARUS 

DIS 

LUKE LEARY 

FINANCE 

LAURA LEBEDNIK 

GVPT 




ESSENCE LEE 

SPANISH 
HANSON LEE 

FINANCE 
JENNIFER LEE 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 




LISA W. LEE 

ART HISTORY 
MANKIT LEE 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 
ROBERT LEE 

BIOLOGY 



105 



SEUNG M. LEE 

COMPUTER SCiEN _ 
SUKWON LEE 
BUSINESS 
SUSAN LEE 

FINANCE 




SZE-LING LEE 

ELEC. ENG. 
TAE H. LEE 

FIRE PROTECTION ENG. 
ANNA LEMBERIS 
FAMILY STUDIES 



JANET LEMANSKI 

NRMT 
ROBIN LEON 

s-ANisH e::g. lit, 
ELOISE LEPESQUEUR 

sociologn; 



MARC LEPSELTER 

RNANCE 
DEBORAH LEVIN 

G';?t s?a:lsh 
BRENDAN P. LEWIS 
SOCIOLOGY 






KATINA LEWIS 

SOCIOLOGY 
VICKI LEWIS 

ACCOUNTING 
SHARI LEVINE 

JOURNALISM 




KATHLEEN LEVETT 

MARKETING 
ALLYSON LEVY 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
AMY LI 

BIOLOGY 



^ 




QIANU 

ACCOUNTING 
EDWARD LIEBER 
BMGT/GVPT 
KAREN UEBERMAN 

ENGLISH 




DEBRA LIEBOWITZ 

KINESIOLOGY 
GREGORY LIGHTNER 

SPCH. COMM. 
WILLIAM LIGUORI 

SPCH. COMM. 




107 



College of Health 
and Human Performance 



For students interested in sports medicine, coaching, health and physical education 

Famllv studies 

or family studies, the College of Health and Human Performance offers a challenging 
academic program coupled with state-of-the-art training facilities and laboratories. 

Kinesiological sciences - the study of human movement ~ goes beyond the activities 

nu; .luii 
normally associated with sport and exercise to the scientific analysis of their effect on 

and benefit to human physiology. 



i 



The area of family and community development prepares students for work in 

Kin €SiO ^^ o-iV^i l ^rm n rp^ 
counseling, social agencies or community action programs, through investigation of the 

dynamics of family and community life, disabilities, violence and economic issues. 

The Center on Aging concentrates on the field of gerontology, and includes study of 

PhvsicBl Education 

physiology, economics, policy and community education programs for older adults. 





[^•' 



College of Journalism 




The power and influence of the news media are major factors in modern society. 
The ability of newspapers, magazines, advertising, TV and radio to shape issues and 
attitudes makes the study of journalism one of the most responsible and serious career 
choices of our time. The College of Journalism stands at the doorstep of the nation's 

MroBdCBSt News 

capital and the world's news center. Its location makes it the ideal place to study news 
and public affairs reporting, public relations and mass communication. 

Named among the eleven best journalism programs in the nation by Gannett Cen- 
ter for Media Studies, the college offers practical reporting experience at two news 
bureaus, in Annapolis and Washington D.C., and publishes the American Journalism 
Review, a prestigious national monthly that analyzes print and broadcast performance. 
An active internship program places students at newspapers and broadcast stations, ad 

Public ReMions 

agencies and public relations firms. 



109 



STAGEY LILLIS 

KINESIOLOGY 
CHRISTOPHER LIM 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
TAELIM 

INTL. BUS. 



TANYA LIMPAKAN 

KINESIOLOGY 
WIRAK LIM 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 
WEN-CHUN LIN 

ELEC. ENG, 




MAIUANN LINCOLN 

JOURNALISM 
LISA UNTON 
NEUROBIOLOGY 
SHANNON LIPP 

HISTORY 




SHARON LISTINGER 

PSYCHOLOGY 
REGINA LITTLE 

ELEM. ED. 
RONG LIU 

ACCOUNTING 



i^J 



110. 




JAMES LOGAN 

MECH. ENG. 

LAUREN LONGMIRE 
ELEM. ED. 
DANIELLE LONGUS 

CCJS 




MARIA LOPICCOLO 

JOURNALISM 
EDMUND LOUGHRAN 

ANTHROPOLOGY 
ROBERT LOUIS 

MARKETING 



>l^ 




MARK LOVETT 

GVPT 

DIANA LOVINGFOSS 

SPECIAL ED. 
LIN LOW 

MKTG./INTL. BUS./TRANS./ 
LOG. 




GREGORY LOWMAN 

MECH. ENG. 
JENNIFER LOYD 

FREN/ITAL 
JOHN LUKE 

GEN. BUS. 



Ill 



CATHERINE L. LUZIO 

GVPT 

DANIEL LYONS 

JOURNALISM 
STEPHANIE LYONS 

CCJS 



ROBERT MAGLL\NO 

SPCH. COMM. 
EMMA MAGANS 
SOCIOLOGY 
JIMMY MAGUIRE 

ENGLISH 




CHANNING 
MAHATANANKOON 

BIOLOGY 

JILL MAHER 

ANSCI 

MICHELLE MAJONIS 

MARKETING 



STEPHANIE 
MALAMUD 

PSYCHOLOGY 
RICHARD MALLON 
BIOCHEMISTRY 
CHARLENE MALONEY 

BIOLOGY 



i /!\ 




^littL 1 




1 f HELE 




HELEN M. MAHY 

BCHM 

KAREN MANCERA 

HEALTH ED. 

LAWRENCE 

MANDELBAUM 

ELEM, ED. 



EMERITA MANLEY 

CCJS 

BARBARA MANNING 

SPCH. COMM. 

MARTIN MARGOLIS, 

JR. 

PHYS. ED. 




FRANCISCA 
MARIASUSAI 

PSYCHOLOGY 

MARCY MARKOWITZ 

HEALTH ED.T 
BRIAN MARTIN 

TRANS. 



"5f 



STEVEN MARTIN 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

MARIA 

MARTINCORENA 

CCJS 

BRANDON MASON 

SPCH. COMM. 



113 



BRIAN MASON 

SPCH. COMM. 

LAURA MASSEY 

GVPT 

TURKEESA MASSIAH 

ACCOUNTING 







MATTHEW MATHIAS 

LANDSCAPE 
ARCHITECTURE 
KAREN MAYNARD 
EDUCATION 
LARA MCCAHAN 
PSYCHOLOGY 




STACY MCCOSKY 

KINESIOLOGY 
JESSICA L. 
MCCULLOUGH 

PSYCHOLOGY 
TAMMY MCCUNN 
CCJS 



*^ 



MICHELE 
MCCRACKEN 

ELEM. ED. 

PAUL MCDERMOTT 

GVPT 

DEBORAH 

MCDOUGALL 

HEALTH ED. 



114 







^■V^^ 





SYLVAN MCDOWELL 

MICROBIOLOGY 

MAUREEN 

MCGONEGAL 

BIOLOGY 

KATHRYN MICHALIK 

MATH ED. 




TINA MCKENDREE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

LIZBETH MCMANUS 

CCJS 

MAUREEN MEALY 

PSYCHOLOGY 




RUSSELL MEGONIGAL 

ENGLISH 

MARJORIE MEHUNE 

SEC. ED. 

YITZCHAK' 

MEIROVICH 

GVPT 




CAROLEE MELLON 

PLANT AND WILDLIFE 

MGMT. 

JAYME MELNICK 

FAMILY STUDIES 

IAN MENDELSON 

LOG./GEN. BUS AND MGMT. 



115 




VIVIAN MENSCH 

KINESIOLOGY 
NICOLE MESSINA 
JOURNALSIM 
AMY MIDDLETON 

CCJS 



CAREY MIGLIACCIO 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 
DAVID MILLER 

POLITICS/BUS . /FIN . /MKTG. 
LAURIE MILLER 

ACCOUNTING 



LISA MILLAN 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
MARCIA MILLER 
MICROBIOLOGY 
MELISSA MILLER 

PSYCHOLOGY 



SAMANTHA MILLER 

FAMILY STUDIES 
SUZANNE MILLER 
SEC. ED. 
MARLA MIRANIAN 

KINESIOLOGY 





1- 



116 




SIAMAK MOAYEDI 

BIOLOGY 
ACHU MOFOR 

BIOCHEMISTRY 
MAUNG K. MON 

CIVIL ENG. 



ROSEMARY MOMANYI 

PHYSIO. /NEURO. 
GINA MOORE 
KINESIOLOGY 
KYLE MOORE 

SOCIOLOGY 




RYAN MOORE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

KIMBERLY MORGAN 

GVPT/AA 

MARC J. MORGAN 

GVPT 




JAMIE MORRELL 

PSYCHOLOGY 
ELMUS MOSBY, JR. 

MARKETING 

MARC MOSCOWITZ 

MARKETING 




117 




College of 
Life Sciences 





From the subcellular level of biochemistry to the study of 

Rinrhf^rnfstrv 

ecosystems, life scientists are involved in exploring and explaining life 
processes. The quest for information about viruses, about genetics 

and heredity, about how the brain works, about the interdependence 

lli^Oiij^yf juv%ji.'LiLJL%jAA€i.ry 'H DC" 

of plants and animals, including human beings, is essential to the 

navior 

maintenance and survival of life on Earth. 

Many students in the life sciences are preparing for careers in 
medicine, dentistry and other professional fields. The college offers a 
strong departmental honors program, administers the College Park 
Scholars in Life Sciences program and provides for on and off-campus 
research. With access to the National Institutes of Health, the 
National Museum of Natural History, the National Aquarium and the 

nsiT- noiogy 

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, students are able to expand and 
apply their knowledge in the field. The Chesapeake Bay, largest of 

i^ijeuijstry' 

the world's estuarine systems, provides an ideal laboratory for 
biological and ecological study. 



119 



'dMH 



AMY MOXEY^ 

ECONOMICS 
WENDY JO MOYER 

DANCE/PUBLIC RELATIONS 
LIANAELI MTEI 

CMSC 



MARGARET MUENCH 

MARKETING 

KAREN MULFORD 

HORT 

TAMMY MULLINIX 

ENGLISH 




MEUSA MURDZA 

JOURNALISM 
WILLIAM PAUL 
MURPHY 

BIOCHEMISTRY 
ADRIAN E. MURRAY 

CCJS/EALL 



41 




DIONNE MURRAY 

ACCOUNTING 
JULIE MURRAY 

ENGLISH 

SHANNON MUSSER 

HUMAN RES./GEN. BUS. 




120 




iSa^; 



KATHERINE 
NAFTALIN 

GEN. BUSINESS 
GREGORY NAGALES 

ACCOUNTING 
RONNY NAGAR 

SPCH. COMM. 




SANJEEV NAGARKAR 

MECH 

RAMESH NAIR - 

ART HISTORY ■ 

HEATHER NARCUM 

PSYCHOLOGY 




JODEE NASSIR 

EDUCATION ■ 

DENISE NATION f 
CCJS -^ 

NERGESS NAWABI 



FAMILY STUDIES 




ROBYN NEEDLEMAN 

GVPT 

STACY NEIDHART 

FIRE PROTECTION ENG. 
PRIMLA NEIL 

LOGISTICS 



121 



TAMARA NESFIELD 

PSYCHOLOGY 

ALICIA NESTOR 

CCJS 

JOSEPH NEWHOUSE 

MECH. ENG. 




CARA NEWMAN 

JOURNALISM 

TRACY P. NEWMAN 

JOURNALISM 

CHINGWAH NG 

ECONOMICS 




DANA NG 

GEOGRAPHY 
DIEM-KIEU NGO 

PHNB 

LA NGUYEN 

ART STUDIO 



PHUONG NGUYEN 

FINANCE 

SANDY NGUYEN 

CHINESE 

THANHTAN NGUYEN 

HISTORY 




— 122 



^*^ 




THUY (FRANCES) 
NGUYEN 

COMM. HEALTH 
THABILE NGUYUZA 
BIOLOGY 
KRISTEN NODZON 

PSYCHOLOGY 



P 



MICHELE NORAGON 

HUMAN RESOURCES '^ 
ELENA NOVACO ^ 
PSYC/CCJS 
MARJAN NOWZADI 

ELEC. ENG. 




i 



»i> 



OBIORA NWUDE ^ 

ACCOUNTING 

LYNN M. O'BRIEN 

GVPT 

PATRICK O'MALLEY 

CMBG 




GARRETT O'SHEA 

BUSINESS 

LUIS OCASIO. JR. 

CCJS 

MARK ODULIO 

GVPT 




123 



CHRIS OGAN 

CCJS 

SOK YOUNG OH 

MARINE BIOLOGY 
JELILI OJODU 

BIOLOGY 



SARAH OLER 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
RENATA OLIVEIRA 
DIETETICS 
SEZINOMER 

ELEC. ENG. 




MICHAEL ORGERA 

CCJS 

MARGARITA ORTIZ 

SOCIOLOGY 
SIRAGAN OZKAN 

ELEC. ENG. 





JAYE PADGETT 

FAMILY STUDIES 
MEREDITH PAGE 
ENGLISH 
KEVIN PALMER 

PHYS/NEURO 




;r 




f% 




^ k^ 



HOWELL PAN 

ELEC. ENG. 

DAVID PANTANO 

BIOPSYCH 

SCOTT PANOWITZ 

FIRE PROTECTION ENG. 




STEVE PAPALOIZOS 

BUSINESS 

PATRICIA PARSLEY 

AGRI BUSINESS 
JAMES PASCARELLA 

GVPT 




NANCI-ELLEN PASK 

ACCOUNTING 
ALEXANDRA PASTINE 

ENGINEERING 

LA KISHA PATE 

ELEC. ENG. 




KINNARI PATEL 

PHYSIOLOGY 
CONNOLLY PATRICK 

CLASSICS 

PATRICIA PATRICK 

FAMILY STUDIES 



; I t.« - 1 I' 



muw 



125 



CARLO PAU 

ENGLISH 
COREY PAUL 
KINESIOLOGY 
DOMINIQUE PAUL 

ENGLISH 



DOUGLAS PAUL 

MARKETING 
JAMIE PAUL 
HEARING AND SPEECH 
ALLISON PAYNE 

CCJS 




PATRICIA PAYNE 

FAMILY STUDIES 
LORI PEIPER 
HEARING AND SPEECH 
ANTHONY PENN 

ACCOUNTING 



SARA PERALES 

EDUCATION 
JENNIFER PEREZ 

CCJS/SPAN 
SERGIO PEREZ 

CCJS 



126 r 




k 



JARED PERLIN 

CCJS 

JANIS PERLMUTTER 

PSYCHOLOGY 
LAUREN PERRY 

SPCH. COMM. 




JENNIFER PETERSON 

JOURNALISM 
KIMBERLY PHILLIPS 

MARKETING 
LEONARD PHILLIPS 

KINESIOLOGY 




I 



MELISSA L. PHILLIPS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
MICHAEL PIATT 
ACCOUNTING 
ANNAMARIE PICCIONI 

KINESIOLOGY 




ERIKA PIDDINGTON 

CCJS 

ANN PIERCE 

CCJS 

JENNIFER PITTS 

HISTORY 




127 




ATHENA PLATIS 

ENGLISH 

DAVID PLOTINSKY 

GVPT 

ANTHONY PLUMMER 

ENGINEERING 




NIKKI POINDEXTER 

FAMILY STUDIES 
RICHARD POLCARI 

MARKETING 

OLGA POLYAKOZ 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 




SWEENI PONOTH 

MECHANICAL 

ERIKA J. PONTARELLI 

JOURNALISM/FRENCH 
RACHEL PORTER 

BIOLOGY 





VANESSA PQ 

FRENCH 

NICOLE POWELL 

MACK 

CIVIL ENG. 
VANESSA PRATT 

HISTORY 



H 




i^,. 





KORDELL PRATTIS 

HISTORY 

MICHELLE PRENSKY 

FAMILY STUDIES 
ALIYA PURDY 



MARKETING 




JENIFER 



QUARANTILLO 

HEALTH ED. 

DIANA QUAYNOR 

FRENCH 

ATIF QURESHI 

F P ENG. i 




BRL\N RADERMAN 

CMSC 

ABDUL RAZAK RAHIM 

CCJS 

PENNY RAMSEY 

KINESIOLOGY 




KRISTIN RATH 

EDUCATION 
BRIAN RAUB 

HISTORY/ECONOMICS 
ASHLEY REDFEARN 

HISTORY 



129 



KAREN REED 

ENGLISH 
TERRY REED 

INDIVIDUAL STUDIES 
AUGUSTA REEVES 

ACCOUNTING 



4^^| 






CATHERINE REGAN 


d 


ACCOUNTING 


M 


JARRETT REID 


11 


EE/COMP. SCI. 


M 


BRETT REINDOLLAR 


4| 


LOGISTICS 


V 



AMY RESNICK 

ARCHITECTURE 
PAIGE REUTHER 
MARKETING 
LORETTA REYNOLDS 

ART EDUCATION 




JOSHUA RIBA 

CCJS 

DAPHNA 

RICHARDSON 

ACCT/FINANCE 
KENNETH RICHARDS 

MARKETING 



': ^A 



r 



130| 





ADAM RIDZINSKI 

ELEC. ENG. 
ESTA RIGAKOS 

JOURNALISM 
JO RIVERA >. 

PSYCHOLOGY 




MASOODRIZVl 
ELEC. ENG. ilh^ 

JENNIFER ROBBINS 

EARLY CHILDHOOD ED. 
JOSEPH ROBINSON 



ECON/GVPT 




JUAN RODRIGUEZ 

PSYCHOLOGY 
MARLA RODRIGUEZ 

FAMILY STUDIES 
JEANETTE E. ROJAS 

PSYCHOLOGY 




LARRY ROHLEDER, 

JR. m m 

BIOLOGY 

MATT ROMANO 

MARKETING 
CLAUDIA ROSARIO 

ACCT/FINANCE 



r 



131 



SETH ROSEN 

FINANCE 

SCOTT ROSENBERG 

MARKETING 
EVAN ROSNER 

ARCHITECTURE 




ALAN ROSS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
DAVID ROSS 

PHYS/NEUROBIOLOGY 
ROBERT ROSWELL 

BIOCHEMISTRY 



■« 



ADRIENNE A. RUBIN 

PSYCHOLOGY 

JAY RUBIN 

GEN. BUSINESS 

MARY NYTHEL RUBIN 

BIOCHEMISTRY 



CHRISTINE RUSHING 

GVPT/BMGT 
ANDREW RHINE 

ART STUDIO 
TAMMY RHODES 

MARKETING 





132 



^ 

^"■i 




ALISON RYAN 

ZOOLOGY 
JAMES RYLEY 

CELL BIO 

MARY SAATHOFF 

AG BUSINESS 



MOHAMED SACCOH 

PHNB 

TRACEY SACHS ^ 

HEALTH ED. 
LEA SADLER 

ADVERTISING 



J5 



MICHAEL-SCOTT 
SAFFLE 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

GHOLAM SALEH 

FINANCE 

CHAD M. SALGANIK 

ACCOUNTING 



J 




ROSMINA SALIM 

FINANCE 

ILANA SAMBUCO 

KINESIOLOGY 
LABKHAND SAMII 

FAMILY STUDIES 



f 



133 



JENNIFER SAMPSON 

CIVIL ENG. 

JONATHAN SAMPSON 

ECONOMICS 
ALAN SANDRIN 
CCJS 




CARLY SANDS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
RHONDA SANDS 
MECH. ENG. 
SANJOY SANYAL 

ELEC. ENG. 



H 




CHRISTINE 
SATTERFIELD 

ENG. ED. 

CHRISTINE SAVAGE 

NEUROBIOLOGY 
RACHEL SAVOIE 

MARKETING 




MATTHEW SCALISI 

PSYCHOLOGY 

SARA SCALETTI 

JOURNALISM 

NICOLE 

SCANGARELLA 

BIOLOGY 



134 




ir^ 





KAREN 
SCHANDELMEIER 

SPCH. COMM. 
MIRANDA ANNA 
SCHATTEN k 
ELEC. ENG. 

MATTE SCHEINKER 
PSYCHOLOGY 




LISA SARI 
SCHLENKER 

FINANCE 

CARI SCHLUMBOHM 

BUSINESS 

CHAD SCHMICK 

CCJS 




JENNIFER SCHMIDT 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
BEN SCHOLL 
HRE PROTECTION 
ENGINEERING 
MICHAEL SCHULTZ 
BIOLOGY 



JASON SCHWARTZ 

FINANCE 

LISA SCHWEDT 

SOCIOLOGY 

LATRISE SCOTT 

BIOLOGY 



135 



MATTHEW SCOTT 

BUSINESS 

SEAN SEBASTIAN 

CCJS 

SYNDEE SEIDNER 

MARKETING 




MELBANA SEIFU 

ENCE 

CARRIE ANN 

SELLMAN 

AREC 

HEMADRI 

SENEVIRATNE 

CHEM. ENG. 





FREHlOWet SERTSE 

ACCOUNTING 

YASAMAN 

SHAHAMAT 

PHYSIOLOGY/ 

NEUROBIOLOGY 

SHAHLA SHAKERI 

MICROBIOLOGY 





BRIAN SHAMASH 

MUSIC 

LAUREN SHANSKE 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
ELLIOT SHARE 

BIOLOGY 




-- iJj 



•r 








SONJA SHARPE 

CHEM. ENG. 

TODD SHATZER 

CCJS 

CONSWELLA T. SHAW 

COMM./ENGL. 




JANE SHIH 

CHEMICAL ENG. 
JANET SHIN 
LINGUISTICS 
VERN L. SHIRD 

PHYS. SCI. 



I 



KELLY L. SHIPP 

WMST/GVPT 
VINCENT K. SHIPP 

CHEMISTRY ^ 

ANIL SHRESTHA ^ 

GEOGRAPHY 



4 




LAUREN SHYMAN 

JOURNALISM 

SCOTT SILVERSTEIN 

JOURNALISM 
STEPHANIE SIMPSON 

MARKETING 



137 



AMY SIOCK 

COMM. HEALTH ED. 

OSCAR SIPLER 

ANSC 

STACI SKALL 

PSYCHOLOGY 



JONATHAN SKROBAN 

NAT. RES. MGMT. 

ANNAMARIA 

SKULTETY 

GEOGRAPHY 
RON SLUCKER 

BUSINESS/MARKETING 




ADRIENNE SMITH 

EDUCATION 
ANGELA SMITH 

ELEC. ENG. 
ELANA SMITH 

FINANCE 



^ 



ELISHA SMITH 

HUMAN RESOURCES 
KAREY SMITH 
ELEC. ENG. 
MICHAEL SMITH 

ACCOUNTING 



1 




1381 




L 



MINDY SMITH 

PSYCHOLOGY 

NICOLE SMITH 

BIOLOGY 

FRAN SCHECHTER 



PSYCHOLOGY 




JONATHAN SHELTON 

ECONOMICS 

MIAN SHEN 

CELL BIOL 

CECILLIA SHEPARD 

CCJS 



i 



^ 

n 



ERIN SNYDER 

PSYCHOLOGY 

ROBERT SNYDER 

EDUCATION 

FRAMINDHANY 

SOEPRAPTO 

PSYCHOLOGY 



I 



1^^ 



t 



MELISSA SORIN 

PSYCHOLOGY 

TANL^ SOSNOWICH 

CCJS 

ALYSON SOTHORON 

JOURNALISM 



139 



^Bm 



MARIE SPEAK 

AREC 

AVRIL SPEAKS 

AASP 

JOSH SPECTOR 

JOURNAUSM 



HEATHER SPELLMAN 

SOCIOLOGY 
AMANDA SPIEGEL 
ELEM. ED. 
STEPHANIE SPRINGER 

CHEMISTRY 




CHARLES ST. PAUL 

CCJS 

JODI STAHL 

MARKETING 
JUUE STARK 

PSYCHOLOGY 



^ 



SCOTT STEFAN 

CHEMISTRY 

MICHAELLA 

STEPHENS 

ECONOMICS 
VINCENT STEPANIK 

KINESIOLOGY 






^Ri 



KELLY STEPNO 

JOURNALISM 

JEREMY STEVENSON 

ENGLISH 

LINDSAY STEWART 

KINESIOLOGY 




MELANIE STIBICK 

SOCIOLOGY/ 
ANTHROPOLOGY A 
ELIZABETH ' 

STONEBURNER 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 
JILLEDEN STRAUZER 

FAMILY STUDIES 




MARY ELLEN 
STRAWBRIDGE 

BIOLOGY ^ 

JASON STREMMEL 

MECH. ENG. 
CARIN STRINGER 

MARINE BIOLOGY 




JENNIFER S. STYAR 

ACCOUNTING 

CHERYL SUGGS 

ENGLISH 

AKIKO SUGINOSHITA 

JOURNALISM 



141 



KYUNGHWA SUN 

CMSC 

ERIK SWIFT 

ACCOUNTING 
GINGER SWISTON 

JOURNALISM 



YAYA SYLLA 

ECONOMICS 

TODD SZURA 

FINANCE 

FLORENCE TACHIE- 

MENSON 

SOCIOLOGY 



BRANDI TAFF 

CCJS 

AYAKO TAKEUCHI 

AMERICAN STUDIES 
ARASH TALEGHANI 

PSYCHOLOGY 



ELIZABETH TALEV 

FRENCH 

CHEE-YEE TANG 
ELEC. ENG. 
VANESKA 
TCHAMOUROFF 
ENGLISH 







TRACY TENENBAUM 

ARCH 

LAUREN TERNER 

PSYCHOLOGY 
STEPHANIE TERRITO 

MUSIC ED. 




NICOLE THURBER 

STUDIO ART 

AMY J. THOMAS 

ENGLISH 

LAUREN THOMAS 

PSYCHOLOGY 




STEPHANIE THOMAS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
AMY THOMPSON 

COMMUNICATIONS 
MASON TILDEN 

INTL. BUS. 




ANDREA TOBIN 

ACCOUNTING 
RAE TOLEDO 
THEATER 
TARA TORCHIA 

HEALTH ED. 



143 



MICHAEL TOW 

BIOLOGY 
MICHAEL TOWLES 

BIOLOGY r 

ELLEN TROST 

GEN. BUS. 



JENNY TSANG 
ACCOUNTING 
CONSTANTINA 
TSAVEKOU 

ART STUDIO 
HENRY TSAY 

BIOLOGY 



A 



m 




CHUN TSE 

CCJS ^1^ 

SHELLY TUCKER | 

MECH. ENG. 
SHARON TURKEL 

DIETETICS 




STACY TYNDORF 

PSYCHOLOGY 
KIMBERLYE ULLMAN 

FAMILY STUDIES 
ALEXANDER UY 

NEUROBIOLOGY 




144 




EDUARDO VALENTE, 
JR. 

ENG./COMP. SCI. 
MICHELLE VANCE 
■JOURNALISM 
KAREN ^^ 
VANDERWOUDE 
SPECIAL ED. 




TERI VANDEVANDER 

EDUCATION 

SHINY VARGHESE 

CMBG/BIOLOGY 

NICOLE VASILKIOTI 

PSYCHOLOGY 




CHRISTINA VELLIOS 

PSYCHOLOGY 
JOHN VENGROSKI 

GVPT 

STACY VOLOUAR 

JOURNALISM 




CHRISTINE A. 
VOSSWINKEL 

HISTORY 
JANICE VOUCH 

CCJS 

MICHELLE D. WALKER 

FAMILY STUDIES 



145 



ROBIN WALLACE 

PSYCHOLOGY 
RACHEL WALTERS 

HEARING AND SPEECH 
BEN WANG 

BIOCHEM 




FELIX WANG 

DIETETICS 

JOEL WARNER 

CCJS 

GREGORY WATSON 

MARKETING 



ELIZABETH WEAVER 

DANCE 

ADAM WEBER 

PHYS/NEUROBIOLOGY 
KATHY WEISHAAR 

CHEM. ENG. 



MICHELE WEISS 

THEATER 
PAMELA WEISS 

EARLY CHILDHOOD ED. 
JILL WELLENS 

FIRE PROTECTION ENG. 







b^IELLE WENZEL 

COMM. HEALTH 
RUTH WERNER 

MARKETING 
AMY WHALEN 

EDUCATION 




CLAIRE WHISTLER 

PSYCHOLOGY 
JAMES WHITE *k^ 

ACCOUNTING 
NAKL\ WHITLEY 

RUSSIAN LANG. AND LIT. 




3 
I 



SCOTT J. 
WIESENBERGER 

FIN./MARKETING ■ 

ZENITA WICKHAM 

GVPT/AASP 

BERTRAM D. 

WILLIAMS 

CCJS 



T 

I 




JACOB WILLIAMS 

ACCOUNTING 
REBECCA WINIK 

FAMILY STUDIES 
ANNA WINKLER 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 



147 



TAISHA WINTERS 

GVPT 

RACHEL WITHROW 

PSYC/CCJS 
ASHLEY WOLF 

FAMILY STUDIES 




EDEN WOLLAND 

PSYCHOLOGY 
MEGAN WOLLMAN 

BIOLOGY 

DARREN N. WOLNER 

TRANS , A-OG . /MARKETING 




JOE WONG 

FINANCE 
KAIWONG 

FINANCE 
KUAN WONG 

ELEC. ENG. 




KEVIN WOODEN 

MECH. ENG. 









k 



OMARI WOODEN 

MATHEMATICS 

MELISSA WOODLAND 

BIOLOGY 

ARLAM WORKNEH 

FIRE PROTECTION ENG. 




ALISON WORTMAN 

PSYCHOLOGY 
BRETT WRIGHT ^ 

MARKETING 
WAI FONG WU 

PSYCHOLOGY 




KARYN WULWICK 

ELEMENTARY ED. 
(FRANCES) CHENG 
XUE 

FINANCE/MARKETING 
JASON YANCEY 

PSYCHOLOGY 




TAMARA 
YARBOROUGH 

SOCIOLOGY 




149 



JULIA YI 

KINESIOLOGY 
HAE YIM 
ENCE 
AARON YOH 

PSYC/GVPT 




ALISON YOUNG 

ENGLISH 

TAMARA 

YOUNGSWICK 

SPCH. COMM. 
KIT-PING YU 

HUMAN RES. MGMT 



KIT-SUM YU 

MARKETING 
LEIYU 
BIOCHEMISTRY 
MIN-JIE YU 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 



FRANKUN YUAN 

ENGLISH 

STEPHANIE YUN 
BIOLOGY 
MICHAEL ZANDMAN 

MERKETING 






ANNA ZAVADSKAYA 

MATH 

JING ZHANG 

DEC. INFO. SCIENCES 
KATRINA ZIELKE 




KARA ZIFCHAK 

ENGLISH 

PATRICIA ZITZMANN 

GEOGRAPHY 

JULIE ZUCKERMAN 

SPCH. COMM. 



^ 




ANDREA ZURAF 

ANTHROPOLOGY ■ 




5 

f 



151 




Dana Sears 




Dana Sears 



Dana Sears 




RESIDENT LIFE 




Living on campus is the first step in a series of firsts 
for many students at the University of Maryland. As 
a resident of one of the thirty-five residence halls on 
campus, new choices, realities, and people are presented. 
Living on campus has its rewards, walking to class, no 
need waking up at five in the morning to get ready for 
class so a good parking space can be found, and if a class 
gets cancelled unexpectedly, a comfortable bed is easily 
found. Campus living also has its detractions, quad yells, 
false fire alarm pulls, and no cable, yet; can make a person 
regret living on campus. But the wonderful people of 
Resident Life work daily to change the negatives of cam- 
pus living into something new and exciting. Speciality 
Housing, theme floors, and suites and apartments make 
living on Maryland's campus educational and entertaining. 




Snorre Wik 



153 





PanUM is a day of competition for 
the residents of the University of 
Maryland. PanUM is an annual 
event held by Resident Life and 
Campus Recreation Services. As 
the last day of NRO (New Resident 
Orientation), new residents get to 
minqle with old residents in games 
of chance. Balloon Tosses, potato 
sack races, and relay races makes up 
some of the games at PanUM. 








All photos by Dana Sears 



155 



Campi 



T 



If rif-irr 






MO 







\\l photos on this spread were done b>' Dana Sears 



157 



Deck the Halls With Creepy 





Dana Sears 




Dana Sears 



158 



Scenes, Braha Ha HaHa! 




Dana Sears 



Residents in Ellicott and Elkton Hall spent Halloween decorating their floors to 
get into the wickedly festive spirit of Halloween. Residents in Elllicott also hosted 
the children of Shepherd Cove on a Treating or Tricking rampage of Ellicott. 



159 



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\ 



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No matter how busy a person's schedule is, 

there is always time to smile and say 

"cheese" for the camera! 





163 






Tracy Isaac 





Tracy Isaac 




Dana Sears 



163 




Service with a Smile or Over 1,500 Served Daily 



The Offices of Resident Life are located in An 
napolis Hall but for the 1,498 residents of South 
Hill , the knowledge that the stronghold of Resi- 
dent Life is located in that particular two-story Geor- 
gian building means nothing compared to the support 
received from the Annapolis Service Desk. Katie 
Cherubin, the Customer Service Supervisor (CSS) of 
Annapolis Desk, maintains the sanity of keeping 8,000 
keys, over 1,200 package monthly, and eighteen 
Community Assistants (CA) in constant order with the 

help of her supervisor, 
Suzanne Adamako, the 
Graduate Assistant Coor- 
dinator (GAC, pro- 
nounced "gak") of South 
Hill. Although residents 
her position as a deal with Katie and her 

CAs more often then the 
higher officials of Resi- 
dent Life, Katie can not 
deny the fact that being 
located in the same 
building with Assignments 
and the Marketing De- 
partment of Resident Life 
has not been beneficial. 
"Assignments and Mar- 
keting are a direct re- 
source of information and 
provide support, profes- 
sionally and personally. 
Annapolis Hall is a 
hub of activity. Resident 
Assistants of South Hill 
plan and hold social and educational programs within 
the veriest lounges, residents meet and organize study 
groups, enjoy cable television within the Fireside 
Lounge, or work up a good sweat with the Annapolis 
Fitness Center. With all the constant activity with 
Annapolis , Katie has been able to remain passionate 
about her job and her position within infrastructure of 
Resident Life. Katie's dedication for maintaining the 
keys of South Hill has lead to an 85% decline in admin- 
istrative lock core changes. With the decline, residents 
of South Hill should feel safe that Katie Cherubin is 
watching over their safety and security. 



"Katie maintains 



leader but yet she 
is down earth, a 
true leader of her 
peers. '' 

Leslie Rosen 
South Hill CA 




£ A 




^^j^rqKjUs S«*vioe Oessk 



Top Left Photo: Katie Cherubin and Suzanne Adamko. Bottom Left: The Annapolis Hall Service Desk s 
Phone number. Right page Top photo: Roy Mesler (Information Assistant), Katie Cherubin (CSS of 
South Hill) and two Community Assistants outside of Annapolis Hall. Bottom photo: Annapolis Hall 
Service Desk in action. 





"> 



ANNAPOLIS [^ALL 



SER 



1 



K 




All photos taken by Tracy Isaac 

165 



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t 



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Living on campus can be a differcult for some 
people. So many changes take place when mak 
ing the leap from big fish high school Senior to 
little, tiny minnow Freshman. Friends who were going 
to be there forever end up disappearing, relationships 
that were set in stone crumble, and the "Uh Oh! I 
messed up big time" tone in your mom's voice does not 
strike the same fear. Going to college can do that to a 
person. What was once a big deal is now insignicant 
one. 

Making new friends to replace the ones stuck at 
home, learning the right time to say "I love you" and 
arranging a dorm into a room that reflects two different 
peoples" personalities are some of the tasks needed in 
making living on campus bearable. Not everyone is up 
to the job but for those who do live on campus and 
enjoy it-Bravo, this spread salutes your attempt to "Liv- 
ing and Learning Together." 



All photos on Living and Learning Spread were 
taken by Dana Sears. 




?^\^ 











167 



The Gemstone Pro 
gram at the Univer 
sity of Maryland at 
College Park is a new 
program conceived by 
Dean William Destler of the 
A. James Clark School of 
Engineering and endorsed 
by the deans of all of the 
other colleges on campus. 
The program teamed 
students who will shape 
their four years of college 
study in to a valuable 
research project that spans 
disciplines and seeks solu- 
tions to the most compel- 
ling problems of our time. 
The Gemstone Program 
challenged students with 
new ideas and expanded 
their intellectual growth. 
The "Gemstones" will 



spend four years analyzing 
and investigating some of 
the major societal prob- 
lems of our time. Prob- 
lems associated with 
technological changes will 
be the main focus the 
Gemstones. Electronic 
privacy in the "Internet 
era" and energy-efficient 
transportation are a few 
of the topics that the 
Gemstones will examine 
during their four years of 
study at the University of 
Maryland. Core funding 
for the Gemstone Pro- 
gram was provided by 
AT&T and General Elec- 
tric. Additional support 
was provided by IBM. 

Student involved in the 
Gemstone Program lived 






Gremstones: Part of the Solution 





on the Fifth and Sixth 
floors of Ellicott Hall. 
Mohammed Hussain, 
Dana Sears, and Vinit 
Patel, the Resident Assis- 
tants of the Fifth and Sixth 
Floors, respectively, pro- 
vided a fun and relaxed 
learning environment for 
the Gemstones with many 
social and educational 
programs. Ice Skating, 
Movie Nights, and Meet- 
ings with Maryland State 
Governor Paris 
Glendenning and Univer- 
sity of Maryland President 
William Kirwin were just a 
few of the programs 
arranged by the FlAs. 

As part of the solution, 
the Gemstones showed 
that there is hope for the 
future and humankind. 



Information about the Gemstone Program pro- 
vided by Lois J. Powers, Gemstone Program 
Coordinator. 




All Photos of Gemstones by Dana Sears 

169 



Muscle Mania 

Fitness on Campus 



Do you consider channel surfing an interactive sport? 
Then maybe its time to join the rest of the campus 
and tone those quads! 
According to the Campus Recreational Service (CRS), 
the participation level as far as weight lifting, aerobics and 
intrmural sports has dropped from 331,178 users from the 
fall 94/spring 95 to 309.038as of the fall 95/spring 96. 
The four recreational facilities - Annapolis, Ellicott gym. 
Health and human Performance and the Armory are open 
19,422 hours annually. 

Demographically speaking, the average age of UMCP 
students that frquent these locations was 22.2 yearsas of 
the fall of 94. The ratio between men and women were as 
follows. Males totaled up an astouding 61.7% while 
females trailed with 38.3%. In constrast, as of the fall of 95, 
the average age dropped to 21.8. The amount of health- 
goers diminished as well. The average number of men - 
present was 67.3%, while women claimed 32.7%. These 
figures were provided by Robin Vollunger, cooordinator of 
fitness programs for CRS. 



I decided to interview a handful of students who utilize the 
gym somewhat religiously. When I inquired about the 
reasons the Austion Sailor, a sophomore History/Educa- 
tion major, visited the gym, he replied sernely that "[work- 
ing out] helps to relieve stress and is a form of meditation." 
Jeremy Waxman, a Hagerstown resident, informed me 
that he lifts free weights three times a week somply to "get 
stronger". Luba Roytburd, an Ellicott Hall resident, con- 
fided that "it makes me feel energized and relieves some of 
the stress from schoolwork". Jennifer Craten, another 
resident of Ellicott Hall, revealed that "althogh it is impor- 
tant to be healthy internally", she also strives toward 
"physical appearence as well." 

In short, exercise not only sdtrengthens us physically, but 
also sustains our mental awareness. 



I 



^^^ ^'iofcri J>Mofc:e?tt 



J 





Russell Acosta 




Russell Acosta 



Russell Acosta 




Russell Acosta 



171 



m. 



<i 



Late Night at the 







If you live on campus or have a very good friend 
wfio does live on campus with a lot of money on 
his of her Meal Plan, you have experienced Late 
Night. Hot wings, taco salad, and frozen yogurt 
are a few of the food choices that have fulfilled 
your after dinner munchies. Late Night was a 
great time to take a study break, socialize with 
friends, or kill time before E.R. came on. 





Ellicott Dining Hall 






All photos on this spread were done by Dana Sears 



175 



College Park Volunt 

students Living and 



\ 



A high-pitched 
tone, a 
flashing red 
light and suddenly students 
are transformed into fire 
fighters and emergency 
medical care providers 
ready to respond to an 
emergency. This scenario 
is played out almost daily 
at the College Park 
Volunteer Fire 
Department. Seventeen 
students lived in the John 
L. Bryan Fire Service 
Dormitory in 1996 and 
1997, known within the 
Department as the 
sackroom. The students 
willingly sacrificed their 
free time to help others. 
The sixteen men and one 
woman in the sackroom 





eer Fire Department 

Learing Together 




came from many different 
backgrounds and majors, 
linked through the 
common goal of keeping 
the University and citizens 
of College Park and the 
surrounding areas safe, 
and helping when needed. 

Visitors are often 
amazed at the thought of a 
fire station staffed 
primarily by college 
students. During school 
hours and when 
socializing, the sackroom 
members are typical 
college students, but when 
the alerting system 
activates the students are 
transformed into trained 
and competent emergency 
personnel. 



177 



students Living 

College Park Volunt 







and Learing Together 

eer Fire Department 



Lu 


k» ^' -■^- - . ^ 






> i 







All Photos by Jane Schmidt 



179 




180: 



^ 



/ xjl >-^ 



College Park Volunteers 
"Opened" Their House to 
Teach Others 




c 



I hildren driving fire engines, a firefighter 
dressed as a dalmation -- these are the sights 
which greeted visitors to the College Park 
Volunteer Fire Department Open House on September 
28, 1996. The annual event allows the citizens of 
College Park, including the University students, to have 
a time to find out about the fire department. It also 
teaches fire safety and awareness. 

Children are given a chance to see and hear a 
fire fighter putting on his protective gear. Exposure to 
the "friendly monster" gave children information that 
may prevent them from hiding from fire fighters in the 
case of an emergency. 

The Open House included many other 
demonstrations and displays. The Prince Georges' 
County dive rescue team and bomb squad set up 
displays, including a demonstration of the bomb squad 
robot. University of Maryland Environmental Safety 
displayed samples of phones, pans, and other items 
recovered from fires on campus. 

The Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute 
demonstrated a relatively new form of sprinkler system. 
The most exciting demonstration, however, was a fire. 
An old stove was setup in the parking lot and a grease 
fire intentionally started. One of the fire fighters then 
demonstrated how to put a fire out using a fire 
extinguisher. All of the information was presented in 
the hopes of preventing tragedy. 



All Photos by Jane Schmidt 



181 




^^^ll^Qflilll 



Tyrone Brooks 



Tyrone Brooks 




$ PO RT$ 




An university without sports is a university with 
out pride, without spirit, without glory. But the 
University of Maryland is a university with 
extreme pride, boundless spirit unflagging glory, and 
collegiate sports. 

Since the beginning of collegiate athletics, sports 
have been the focal point of Maryland's tradition. But 
the graceful slam of a basketball, the defiant crack of a 
baseball bat, and are not the key factors behind 
Maryland's grand tradition. Maryland's students are the 
heart and soul of Maryland athletics/ Standing always 
vigilant, the students of Maryland have shared the pain 
of defeat with their young sports "gods" and have 
rejoiced with wild abandon at every victory. 

With athletics casting a looming shadow over the 
campus, only one group of people can be blamed-the 
students. A blame that the students of the University of 
Maryland at College Park take willingly. Because an 
university without sports enthused students is an univer- 
sity without a soul, life, hope, pride. Maryland is defi- 
nitely overflowing with hope, life, pride, and soul. 




Tyrone Brooks 



183 




mm. 




/ 



/> 



\> 







X 










i 



&^^^ 

M 




Winter ^c/ Spring 

Sports 




Men's Basketball 

Women's Basketball 

Swimming 

Gymnastics 

Wrestling 

Track and Field 

Men's Lacrosse 

Women's Lacrosse 

Men's Tennis 

Women's Tennis 

Baseball 

Golf 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



185 



Men's Basket 



Basketball 






Record 


TS 




Overall JiJ 17-13 


Howard 


88-71 


.J-J 


at AnaheimAVooden 


Court Authority97 80 


Classic 




Brisbane Bullets83 73 


vs. UCLA 


63-73 


at Springfield, Mass. 


Rider 


83-67 


vs. Kentucky 84-96 


American 


104-79 


at Baltimore Arena 


UMES 


104-66 


vs. Towson St. 70-67 


at Georgia Tech 


84-98 


Massachusetts 47-50 


N. Carolina 


88-860T 


G. Washington 98 81 


Florida St. 


postponed 



i 



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kw 







■• '^'- 



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! 





Basketball Record 


(Continued) 


at Wake Forest 


64-77 


Delaware St. 


118-55 


N.C. State 


77-740T 


Clemson 


65-60 


at Duke 


73-83 


at Virginia 


80-72 


Georgia Tech 


88-74 


at N. Carolina 


84-78 


at Florida State 


78-100 


Wake Forest 


78-85 


Missouri ^ 91 72 


at N.C. State 


86-84 


at Clemson 


61-68 


Duke 


75-77 


Virginia 


83-71 


Florida State 


88-78 


at ACC Tournament 


at Greensboro Coliseum 


Duke 


82-69 


Georgia Tech 


79-84 


NCAA Tournament 


1st Round 




Santa Clara 


79-91 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



187 





r\ 



•y 





'****«^, 





Basketball 
Record 



Overall 



13-14 



Hungary (Exhib)57 73 

at Hawkeye Classic 

vs. UC-Santa Barbara 

f 52-68 

vs. SF Austin 67-63 

Rutgers ^^ 58-54 

Dial Classic at MD 

Howard 91 48 



Mt. St. Mary's 74-58 

Penn State 66 83 

at Towson State 50-31 
PAC 10-ACC Challenge 

vs. use 62-68 

vs. UCLA 70-82 

N.C. State 57-98 

Georgia Tech 61-60 

at Duke 53-57 

at Florida State 72-49 

Loyola 73-38 

N. Carolina 63-66 

at Virginia 46-75 

at N.C. State 53-76 



Worn 







^. 



^i" 





1 



en's Basketball 




Basketball Record 
(Continued) 

Wake Forest 57 72 

at Georgia Tech 30-59 
Duke 63 52 

at Clemson 53-70 

Clemson ^ 74 72 

at Wake Forest 60-49 
Florida State 75-63 
at N. Carolina 68-62 
Virginia 53-77 

ACC Tournament 

Rock Hill, S.C 

vs. N.C. State 61-63 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



189 



Men's 
Swimm 




■^i 



■\ ^- v^ 



fk: -i 




'^-^''^t^i^^m^-^r. 






. littiiiiSiiJMMy- 



and Women's 
ng and Diving 




'i'//// 



'J1 




Swimming 






and Diving 
Record 


D3 


^ 


Men's Overall 6-4 


atJMU IP Ml 44-8 


George Washington 


Womens's Overall 9-2 


KW161-82 


1 M140.5-96.5 


'm 


N.C. State Ml 66-76 


* W 155-84 


at North Carolina W^ 


' '-W145-98 


at Naval Academy(W) 


vs. Clemson M30-83 


Duke ^M 188-49 


« % W167-131 


W37-76 


W188-51 


ACC Championships 


vs. N. Carolina 


at UMBO M125-118 


at N. Carolina 


Ml 9-94 


W162-79 


M6th of 8 ~ 309.5 


W23-90 


Howard Ml 66. 5-52. 5 


W6th of 7 - 362 


at George Washington 
Metro Relays cancelled 


W180-56 
at West Virginia 


NCAA Championships (M) 
at Austin, TX 
Preliminaries 


at LaSalle Ml 52- 136 


M135.5-105.5 


Scott Grayson - 


W176-104 


W151-92 


21st - 55.9 



•'^tsi'jtm 



.' »,^!g'_ . 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



191 




I 








i 



't 



Tyrone Brook 




,-!l> 



Tyrone Brooks 



Tyrone Brook 



194 



Gymnastics 





Lisa Helfert 




Gymnastics 




Record 






George Washington 


Overall . ,- 3-0 


192.325-188.750 


4d 


PIl 1 ,JMU & lUP 


Radford =j| 


1st of 4- 193.300 


188.02S-178.625 


at N.C. State with UNC 


at G.W. Invitational 


2nd of 5- 191.100 


3rd of 7 - 186.650 


at West Virginia for 


at Towson Gov. Cup 


EAGL Championships 


2nd of 3 - 188.425 


4th of 8 -192.150 


at Towson Invitational 


NCAA Southeast Regionals 


3rd of 6 - 189.650 


at U. of Florida 


Temple 


7th of 7 - 189.900 


190.750-185.525 


Natl. Inv. Tournament 


at N.C. State Invitational 


at S.E. Missouri State 


3rd of 7 - 190.275 


8th of 8 ~ 189.700 



Tyrone Brooks 



195 



Lacrosse 
Record 



Overall 10-2 

Villanova 12 6 

at Duke 12-6 

Towson State 7-5 

Cornell 9 6 

Radford 112 

at N. Carolina 16-17 

Virginia 13 11 

Navy 11-10 
at Johns Hopkins 12-9 



ACC Semifinals 

at Charlottesville, VA 
vs. Virginia 9-13 

at Rutgers 15-5 

at UMBC 18-12 

NCAA Quarterfinals 
at Baltimore, MD 
vs. Hopkins 7-9 

NCAA Semifinals 

at College Park, MD 
NCAA Finals 

at College Park, MD 




< U « 




196 



Men ' s Lacrosse 




All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



197 



L a c r o s 


s e 




R e c o r 


d 




Overall 


19-0 




at N. Carolina 


14-2 


at Harvard 17-1 


at Duke 


12-1 


at Loyola 9-6 


Temple 


15-4 


at William & Mary 13-5 


at Delaware 


19-3 


Penn State 10 6 


Virginia 


16-5 


at Princeton 14-7 


Georgetown 


17-1 


Dartmouth 16 4 


UMBC 


18-2 


NCAA Semifinals 


Old Dominion 


19-4 


vs. Princeton not available 


at Towson State 


21-3 


NCAA Championship 


at James Madisor 


1 8-3 


vs. Loyola A/irginia 


at Rutgers 


20-2 


12-6 





Women's Lacrosse 




A 




/ 



'nuHSlUP 



A 





S { 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 






199 



Base 




a 



1 I 







atN. Carolina A&Tl 1-6 
at UNC - Greensboro (DH) 

1-5 

ft 7-6 
at UNC - Greensboro 

' 10-9 
at G.W. 
at VCU (DH) 



Coppin State 
Howard 

at Florida State 
at Florida State 
at Florida State 



8-9 

0-9 
4-9 
7-5 
9-6 
6-8 
2-16 
5-16 



200 



% 



Baseball 

Overall 



Record 

24-27 



at Florida A&M 5-1 
at Furman 4-3 

at Clemson 0-4 

at Clemson 0-7 

at Clemson 6-16 

Towson State 15-5 
at UMBC 5-2 

West Virginia (dh) 4 3 
'^ 12-4 

at Coppin State 21-6 
at N. Carolina 3-7 

at N. Carolina (dh) 12-0 
11-6 
William & Mary 17 13 



Howard 19 14 

Virginia r 6-12 

Virginia 12-3 

Richmond 4 16 

James Madison 6-8 
at Towson State 5-3 
N.C. State 2-3 

N.C. State 1-15 

N.C. State 15-12 

James Madison 9 10 
Coppin State 12-6 
at Wake Forest (dh) 5-4 
6-11 
at Wake Forest 2-3 



at George Mason 
Georgia Tech 
Georgia Tech 
Georgia Tech 
UMES (DH) 

f \ 
DUKE (DH) 



iV 



DUKE 

ACC Tournament 
at Durham, NC 
vs. Wake Forest 



6-9 

2-13 

1-7 

6-8 

17-1 

12-1 

5-7 

9-5 

4-0 



2-3 



J 

i 





All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 







vlil 



.r 



201 



Tennis 




Record 




Overall ( 


5-10 


William & Mary 


2-5 


Mt. St. Mary's 


3-1 


at Clemson 


0-7 


at Georgia Tech 


0-7 


at Hilton Head, SC 




vs. Morgan State 


7-0 


at Hilton Head. SC 




vs. E. Kentucky 


6-1 


at Hilton Head, SC 




vs. Youngston St. 


5-2 


Virginia 


0-7 


North Carolina 


0-7 


N.C. State 


2-5 


Delaware State 


7-0 


DUKE 




at Virginia fk^l 


0-7 


Florida State ^^^ 


0-7 


at Charlottesville, 


VA 


at Loyola 


5-2 


Wake Forest 


0-6 


ACC Championships 


at Greenwood, SC 


vs. N.C. State 


2-5 




^* 




M 



en s 




nnis 




Women ' s Tennis 




Tennis 
Record 



Overall 



6-10 



Cornell, VA Tech, GWU 

at Blacksburg, VA 

2nd of 4 - 20-6 
George Mason 9-0 
at William & Mary 2-7 
Florida State 3-6 

West Virginia ^^^ 

at Pittsburgh 
at Kansas 
Minnesota 

at Topeka, KS 
at Clemson 
at Georgia Tech 
Eastern Kentucky 

at Hilton Head, SC 
James Madison 5-1 
N.C. State 
Pennsylvania 



5-2 
1-6 

1-6 
1-8 

8-1 
9-0 



5-1 
6-1 



at N. Carolina 


6-3 


Wake Fores 


t 


3-6 


Virginia 




5-3 


DUKE 


0-7 


ACC Championships 


at Greenwood, SC 


vs. Clemson 


0-5 


NCAA Pastern Regionals 


at Syracuse, NY 




vs. Cornell 


2-5 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



203 



CO 







Wrestling 
Record 

Overall 8-4 

at W. Virginia Open 

No team Score 

at E. Stroudsburg Open 

^ I ^ ^ No team Score 

at Penn State Open 

No team Score 

at N.C. State Dual Inv. 
Appalachian St. 19-15 
Georgia State 23-12 
VMI 18-16 

at Wilkes OpenWo team score 
at Midlands No team score 

at Belles Invitational 

4th of 15 - 92.5 
at Virginia Dual Inv. 

Did Not Attend 

at Old Dominion 22-10 
at N.C. State 14-20 
N. Carolina postponed 
at Navy . 13-18 

at Virginia Tech 34-6 
at Virginia 13-21 

DUKE 25-15 

N. Carolina 3-30 

American 31-9 

Howard 34 6 

ACC Tournament 

at U. of N. Carolina 
3rd of 5 - 50 
NCAA Tournament 

at U. of Minnesota 




Tyrone Broci 



G 



o 



1 f 




Golf 


Wofford Invitational 


Record 


8th of 12 




608 


Overall ^^ 4-4 


Furman Intercollegiate 


Cn € 


1 9th of 25 


Mercedes-Benz Queen's 


916 


Harbor Intercollegiate 


ACC Championships 


14th of 18 


at Uwharrie, N.C. 


905 


5th of 9 


Florida State Invitational 


874 


9th of 18 


Palmetto Intercollegiate 


609 


10th of 16 




614 



w 



205 





<>>^m 







Paul Vieira 




Paul Vieira 




Paul Vieira 






Football 

Cheerleading 

Band and Dance Team 

Women's Soccer 

Men's Soccer 

Cross Country 

Volleyball 
Field Hockey 



Paul Vieira 



209 



F 





All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



211 




F 



o 



o 



t 




b 



a 



1 



1 




Football 
Record 



Overall 



5-6 



N. Illinois 


30-6 


UAB 


39-15 


at Virginia 


3-21 


at W. Virginia 


0-13 


N.C. State 


8-34 


at N. Carolina 


7-38 


Wake Forest 


52-0 


at DUKE 


22-19 


at Clemson 


3-35 


Georgia Tech 


13-10 


Florida State 


10-48 


at Joe Robbie Stadium 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



213 






Paul Vieira 



21 



CHEERLEADING 




Paul Vieira 



Paul Vieira 





i 

& 




■>f;^^Lui>; ■^r'^'x. ■"^^iW\/^:i*.?^^'-i'':^'^^--^"""i'-"--" -^A'--'vi:;v:::^v. .■,..;-:^:>;^---;«--s*^^--- 



Paul Vieira 
215 



• ^and and Z>ance Team 




n ) n /, 




217 



" '.-^a-i 




Volleyball 






V o 


1 1 e y b a 1 i 

Overall 


R e c o 

26-4 


r d 


Hofstrsa Invitational 




Virginia 


3-0 


Duke 2 


vs. Villanova 


3-0 


Florida State 


3-0 


Wake Forest z 


vs. Loyola 


3-0 


at N. Carolina 


2-1 


at Clemson ^ 


vs. Hofstra 


3-0 


at N.C. State 


3-0 


at Georgia Tech c 


Wisconsin Invitaitonal 


Georgia Tech 


3-1 


at Florida State c 


vs. Wisconsin 


1-3 


Clemson 


3-2 


N.C. State :: 


vs. Texas A&M 


1-3 


George Mason 


2-3 


N. Carolina C 


vs. Loyola 


3-0 


at Wake Forest 


3-1 


ACC Tournament 


at Georgetown 


3-1 


at Duke 


3-2 


vs. Ncsu : 


W&M 


3-0 


at Virginia 


3-0 


vs. UNC : 


G. Washington 


3-0 


at Florida 


0-3 


vs. GT ^ 





All Photos by Lisa Helfert 



221 



Men's Soccer 



Soccer 




Record 




Overall 14-6-3 


George Mason 


1-2 


Seton Hall 


2-0 


Diadora Classic Tourn. 


vs. FlU ^msm 
at Virginia w 


3-4 
1-1 


at N.C. State 


1-1 


Mt. St. Mary's 


1-0 


Duke 


4-1 


at Wake Forest 


0-1 


at JMU ^"^ 


1-2 


at Old Dominion 


2-0 


at Richmond 


4-2 


Robert Morris 


5-0 


American 
Hartwick 


1-1 


3-0 


Loyola ^.m 

at Clemson |j^ 


4-0 


0-1 


N. Carolina 


3-1 


ACC Tournament at UVA 


vs. NCSU 


7-1 


vs. WFU 


5-1 


vs. UVA 


2-0 


NCAA 1st Round 




vs. JMU 


2-1 


NCAA 2nd Round 


0-3 




7?: 







> 



%' 




All Photos by Paul Vieira 



223 














■y! 




?fC" 




Soccer 
Record 



Overall 



19-5-2 



1-0 



St. Mary's (CA) 

at Hawaii 

at Hawaii 1-0 

G. Washingt-- 5 

at New Hampsl.' ^ 6-1 

at Hartford 3-0 

at JMU 2-1 
atJML' 1^ 

vs. Davidson Coll. 4-0 

Texas 2-0 

George Masor 2-0 

Brow.. 4-0 

at Wake Forest 4-0 

UMBC 8-0 
at G^n f ' ' 

vs. Colorado Coll. 2-1 




1-1 
2-0 
2-0 
4-0 
4-0 
5-0 
0-2 
4-1 



Virginia 

Florif*^ State 

N.C. '^.ate 

Navy 

Duke 

N. C? .v>lina 

at Cien.son 

at Georgia 

ACC Tournament 

at Clemson 1-2 

NCAA 1st Round 

vs. G.W. 2-0 

NCAA 2nd Round 

vs. San Diego 1-0 
NCAA Quarterfinals 

vs. Notre Dame 0-2 



All Photos by Tyrone Brooks 



225 



Field Hocke\y 



226 




All Photos by Lisa HelM 




Field Hock 


ey 


Record 




Overall 


13-5 


Virginia 


0-3 


Bucknell 


11-1 


at Duke 


1-2 


at Wake Forest 


6-1 


Georgetown 


8-0 


Terrapin Invitational 


MD vs. Iowa 


2-1 


at N. Carolina 


2-5 


at Old Dominion 


1-0 


Towson State 


3-0 


James Madison 


4-3 


at Rutgers 


3-0 


Temple 


10-0 


at Vrginia 


0-1 



2-1 
0-4 



227 





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233 








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Paul Vieir;' 




. k \\ 



Paul Vieira 



Tyrone Brook 



236^ 




Paul Vieira 



237 



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240 




H. 



ENTERTAINMENT 



« 



WORLD. 




In IMovember, a hijacked 
Ethiopian airliner crashes 
after running out of fuel. 
The crash occurs near a 
resort beach in the 
Comoros Islands in the 
Indian Ocean. At least 
123 of the 175 people 
on board die, including 
the hijackers. 



After 36 years, Central 
America's longest civil 
war ends when Indian 
rebels and military 
leftists sign a truce 
in Guatemala. 



British Telecommuni- 
cations agrees to 
purchase MCI 
Communications for up ^ 
to $21 billion in 
November. The deal is 
the biggest foreign 
purchase of a U.S. 
company ever concluded. 




^ -- ^ King Hussein of 
^T Jordan (right) 
visits Che West Bank of 
the Jordan River in 
October to show 
support for the 
Palestinian-Israeli peace 
talks and the 
establishment of an 
independent Palestinian 
state. It is Hussein's 
first visit since Jordan 
lost the territory to 
Israel in the 1 967 Arab- 
Israeli War 



Reuters/Afcllive Photos 



^ 



Alija Izetbegovic, leader of 
"^ ) '^ Bosnia's Muslim Party of 
Democratic Action, is elected 
chairman of the country's new 
threeiDerson presidency in 
September The election is held 
in accordance with provisions 
of the U.S.-brokered Dayton 
peace agreement. 



o, Canada on 
er 25 to prote 
cks in social 
ervibes by the Onta 
•government. 
Thousands of people- 
march through the c 
^during "Metro Days 
of Action," organized 
by labor and social 



AP/WWe World 



A U.N. -negotiated treaty 
banning chemical 
weapons worldwide is set 
to take effect in the 
spring. The treaty 
prohibits the 
development, production, 
stockpiling or use of 
chemical weapons, and 
calls for the destruction 
of existing supplies. The 
treaty is signed by 1 60 
nations, Including the U.S. 




-^ Russian 

^T^ President Boris 
Yeltsin wins reelection in 
July despite persistent 
health problems. After 
successful heart 
surgery in November he 
returns to work. 



^^ The Miss World beauty 
^\ pageant, held in Bangalore, 
India in November, raises a storm of 
protests, some violent, including one 
by a group threatening to stage a 
mass suicide during the pageant's 
telecast. A new Miss World is crowned 
without incident. 




Reuters/Archive Photos 



^ A pipe bomb explodes in 
^T^ Centennial Olympic Park after 
the first day of competition at the 
Summer Olympics in Atlanta. Flags fly 
at half-mast to mourn the 1 person 
killed and more than 100 injured. 



^^ Pope John Paul II undergoes 
T^ surgery for an inflamed 
appendix in October His chief surgeon, 
Dr Francesco Crucitti, announces that 
the 78-year-old leader of the Roman 
Catholic Church is free from "previously 
undiscovered serious ailments." 




AP.'WlOe World 



Reuters/Archive Photos 



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AP/Wide World 



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^ -^ In a group so 
^T large it could be 
tracked by satellite, 
hundreds of thousands 
of refugees abandon 
camps in Zaire in 
November and begin a 
lourney home to 
Rwanda, which they had 
fled to escape a civil 
war. Closing of the 
camps forces the 
refugees to flee. 



I Reuters/Archive Photos 



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r-^ Mass graves containing the 
^T bodies of Muslims, allegedly 
murdered by Serbs in 1 992 during the 
Bosnian civil wan are excavated in 
Bosnia-Herzegovina throughout the 
year as a shaky peace negotiated in 
1 995 continues. 



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^ On July 17, 
Trans World 
Airlines Flight 800 
explodes 13,700 feet 
above the Atlantic 
Ocean, killing all 230 
passengers and crew 
members. The Boeing 
747-1 00 was en route 
to Paris from New 
York. The cause of 
the explosion r emains 
a mystery. 



^Z 



Anti-American Saudi 
"I "' terrorists are 
blamed for a truck bomb 
that kills 19 U.S. service 
people on June 25 in 
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. 
Mourners grieve at a 
memorial service held in 
Khobar, Saudi Arabia. 



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heir to the 
British throne, and 
Diana, Princess of 
Wales, are divorced on 
August 28. 
According 
observer, "The 
most 

spectacularly ^ 

miserable 

marriage of the i 
century " 









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'■X 

Tim Graham, Sygma 



^^-X Israeli right-wing leader 
^T Beniamin Netanyahu wins 
the May 1 996 election for 
Prime Minister, defeating Prime 
Minister Shimon Peres, whom 
many Israelis think is making too 
many concessions to Israel's 
Arab neighbors. 






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^-^ More than 300 Tutsi refugees 

^ in the African country of 
Burundi are slain by Hutus, a rival 
ethnic group. The covered bodies, 
mostly women and children, illustrate 
the ferocity of the conflict. 



, lone 
gunman kills 
16 kindergartners, 
their teacher, and then 
himself, at a Dunblane, 
Scotland school in 
March 1996. A month 
after the tragedy, 
officials tear down the 
school gymnasium in 
which the shootings 
occurred. 



ORLDI 



NATIONAL 




flash 



The U.S. Army issues 
strict new policies for drill 
instructors and female 
trainees, as hundreds of 
complaints of sexual 
harassment are revealed 
in November. Drill 
instructors are now 
required to leave their 
doors open if a 
female is inside, 
and women must 
travel in pairs. 



After thousands of 
veterans complain of 
illnesses since the 1991 
Persian Gulf War, the 
Pentagon warns they 
may have been exposed 
to chemical weapons. 
The Pentagon reveals 
that up to two tons of 
sarin nerve gas may have 
been released. 



Six-year-old beauty 
pageant queen JonBenet 
Ramsey is found 
murdered in the 
basement of her parents' 
Colorado home the day 
after Christmas. Her 
death raises a nationwide 
awareness of 
controversial youth 
beauty pageants. 



Speaker of the House 
Newt Gingrich (R-Georgia) 
is fined $300,000 in a 
bi-partisan vote after the 
House Ethics 
Committee's year-long 
investigation into alleged 
financial improprieties. 



^.^ Former U.N. ambassador 
^~^^ Madeleine Albright is 
nominated for Secretary of State by 
President Clinton on December 5. 
Confirmed in office in January 
1 997, Albright is the first woman 
to head the State Department. 




^ Seven-year-old pilot Jessica 
^^^ Dubroff is killed when her 
Cessna airplane crashes shortly 
after take-off in bad weather from 
the Cheyenne, Wyoming airport. 
Her flying instructor and her father, 
the plane's two passengers, are 
also killed in the April 1996 crash. 




^-^ Theodore Kaczynski, alleged 
\ to be the "Unabomben" who 
killed 3 people and wounded 
more than 20 others with mail 
bombs since 1978. is arrested in 
Montana in April 1996, Information 
provided by Kaczynski's brother 
leads to the arrest. 




^X Binti Jua, a 

^^ gorilla at 
Chicago's Brookfield 
Zoo, becomes a hero 
when she rescues a 
3-year-old boy knocked 
unconscious after falling 
1 8 feet into the ape 
enclosure. The boy 
suffers brain contusions 
but soon recovers. 



Robert Allison. Contact Press Images 



^ 



,,.,, the South, . 
a serious problem in 
1 996, as hundreds 
churches are burne 
down. Residents of 
~ land, Oregon 

y the damage 
Inside a church af 





3 4 



One of the 



longest armed 
stand-offs in U.S. 
history occurs outside 
Jordan, Montana 
between Che FBI and 
members of an anti- 
government group 
calling itself the 
Freemen, The 81 -day 
siege ends peacefully 
in June. 



On August 1 1 , a 
boater rescues 
1 0-year-old Taylor 
Touchstone from the 
snake- and alligator- 
infested waters of a 
Florida swamp 14 miles 
away from where he 
disappeared August 7 
Although exhausted 
and badly scratched, 
the autistic boy 
recovers fully 




AP/WiiJe World 




^ ^^ William 

^T^ Jefferson Clinton 
defeats Republican Bob 
Dole and Independent 
H. Ross Perot to 
become the 42nd 
president of the U.S. 
and the last president of 
the 20th century, 
Clinton is the first 
Democrat since 
Franklin Roosevelt to 
be reelected to a 
second term. 




^X A civil |ury finds former football 
^T^ star O.J. Simpson liable for the 
June 12. 1994 wrongful deaths of his 
ex-wife. Nicole Brown Simpson, and 
her friend, Ronald Goldman. In a 
unanimous verdict, the jury awards 
$8.5 million in compensatory damages 
to Goldman's parents. The Brown and 
Goldman families are each awarded 
$12.5 million in punitive damages. 



^ Nationwide, 
"^y^ forest fires 

blacken more than 
i twice the acreage lost 
! to fires in an average 
: year. California, 
j Montana and Oregon 

are particularly hard hit. 




Kurt Miller Th^tPress-Enterprlse 



t-a.aMk^a.^k'^aiia 



J The Citadel, South 
T Carolina's traditionally 
all-male military academy, 
admits four women, including 
Petra Loventinska [left] and 
Jeanie Montavlos. Montavlos 
and another female cadet later 
drop out, citing harassment 
and "sadistic" hazing. 



^ All 1 10 people aboard a 
"^1 ValuJet DC-9 are killed in 
May 1 996 when a fire breaks 
out in the cargo hold. The plane, 
en route from Miami to Atlanta, 
crashes and disappears almost 
completely into the Florida 
Everglades, making it difficult for 
workers to retrieve wreckage. 




^- ^ Topsail Beach, a town on an 
^T^ island off the coast of North 
Carolina, is one of many Eastern 
locations hit hard by Hurricane Bertha 
in July Six powerful hurricanes, all with 
winds over 110 miles per hour, made 
1 996 a near-record year doing $3.5 
billion in damage in the U.S. 




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Security guard Richard Jewell 
is investigated as a suspect in 
ly Olympic Park bombing. After 
months of media frenzy, during 
which Jewell is a virtual prisoner in 
his home, the U.S. Justice 
Department admits there is no 
evidence against him. 



"^ 




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^Bhjlt grader Ji 
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-__ Six-year-old first- 
K|||t grader Johnathan 
^pnSBBtte is suspended from ^^ 
his Lexington, North ' 

Carolina elementary school 
for violating the city I 

schools' sexual conduct i 
guidelines — he kissed a fema 
classmate. Prevette is quickly 
reinstated after a nationwide 
controversy over the suspension. 






AP/Wide World 



NATIONAL 



SCIENCE 




mm 



flash 



A 9,300-year-old 
skeleton discovered in 
July near Richland, 
Washington is the oldest 
and most intact set of 
human bones ever 
discovered in North 
America. Research is 
suspended, hovijever, 
as the tribes from the 
Native American 
grounds where it is 
found claim the 
skeleton as an 
ancestor and want the 
bones buried. 




,^ American 

^T astronaut 
Shannon Lucid (right) 
spends 1 88 days in 
space, breaking 
American space 
endurance records 
after joining the crew of 
the Russian space 
station Mir. 



Trauma Seal, a new 
medical adhesive that is 
applied like a lip-balm 
stick, is in clinical trials at 
10 hospitals and health 
care institutions 
nationwide. The 
biodegradable adhesive 
could eliminate stitches 
and return visits. 



New York Police 
Department canines 
begin wearing three- 
pound, infrared cameras, 
scouting out potentially 
dangerous areas before 
police officers enter the 
scene. Handlers are 
developing bullet-proof 
vests for the dogs 
to wear. 



A new category of animal 
is discovered in the form 
of bacteria that live on 
the lips of lobsters. 
Symbion pandora, which 
lives on food scraps 
from lobster lips, is called 
"the zoological highlight 
of the decade." 



^^ Videogame giant Nintendo 
^T^ releases its long-awaited 
Nintendo 64, a new hardware 
system that draws players into the 
game and moves three times 
faster than any existing system. 




rve the Great 
Sphinx from the 
ravages of wind, 
pollution and time. The 
4,500-year-old statue 
is located in Giza near 
the giant pyramids. 



^X An expedition to raise the 
^"^ Titanic, the legendary 
"unsinkable" ocean liner that sank 
on its maiden voyage in 1912, 
from Its North Atlantic grave more 
than two miles deep, ends in failure 
in August due to rough seas. 








named Sojourner, is 
carried on-board 
Mars Pathfinder, an 
unmanned spacecraft 
launched in December. 
So|Ourner, a free-roving 
probe the size of a 
child's wagon, will 
photograph the Martian 
surface and determine 
the composition of 
rocks on Mars. 



^-^ In August, scientists 
^1^ discover evidence of 
bacteria-like life on a meteorite 
found in 1 984 and believed to be 
part of the crust of Mars 4.5 billion 
years ago. It is the first possible 
proof that life is not unique to Earth. 



-Jfc Satellte dishes 
\ become one of 
the year's hottest-selling 
electronic consumer 
products. Owners find 
the savings of not 
paying for cable 
services cover the cost 
within a few months. 




EchoStar Commurlcatlons Cofp 



-j l Calitornias 
^T Monterey Bay 
Aquarium opens a new 
wing in March 1 996. 
The million-gallon indoor 
ocean showcases the 
marine life of the 
outer reaches of 
Monterey Bay, 5 to 
60 miles offshore. 





^-^ The Hubble Space Telescope 
^x"^ captures new images of 
quasars, the universe's most powerful 
and baffling phenomena. Previously 
thought only to exist in colliding 
galaxies, new pictures indicate 
quasars can also exist in undisturbed 
galaxies — causing astronomers to 
revisit their theories. 




^X The Smithsonian Institution 
^T'^ celebrates the 1 50th 
anniversary of its founding with a 
nationwide tour of prize exhibits, 
including this stovepipe hat worn by 
Abraham Lincoln. 



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SCIENC 



1 




FACES 



,^ 'The Late Show" 

^T host David 
Letterman (right], who 
had been hinting at 
retirement, re-signs 
his contract with 
CBS, keeping him at 
"The Late Show" 
through 2002. 




Former NFL 
commissioner Pete 
Rozelle dies on December 
6. Rozelle is credited 
with transforming 
professional football into 
America's top spectator 
sport, and with inventing 
the Super Bowl. 



Basketball megastar 
Michael Jordan 
launches his own 
cologne: Michael 
Jordan Cologne. Demand 
for the fragrance is so 
high that manufacturer 
Bijan Fragrances limits 
sales to 1 2 bottles 
per customer. 



The ever-present Cindy 
Crawford releases a 
book on applying 
make-up. Basic Face 
enjoys a long run on the 
best-seller lists. 



The National Women's 
Hall of Fame opens in 
Seneca Falls, New York, 
inducting 11 women, 
including author Louisa 
May Alcott, and Oueta 
Culp Hobby, the nation's 
first female colonel. 



Archbishop of Chicago, 
Cardinal Joseph 
Bernardin dies of 
pancreatic cancer in 
November. Bernardin 
was known for being a 
reconciler in churches 
torn between tradition 
and modern culture, as 
well as for speaking out 
against physician- 
assisted suicide. 



.^L In April 1996. singer 
^1 Michael Jackson is seen 
escorting a woman later identified 
as Debbie Rowe, an employee of 
Jackson's plastic surgeon. In 
November. Jackson announces 
that he and Rowe are married and 
that she is carrying his child. 




rsjt Music megastar Madonna 

f^ gives birth to Lourdes Maria 
Ciccone Leon, a 6-pound. 9-ounce girl, 
on October 14. Madonna's big year 
continues when she wins a Golden 
Globe for her role in Andrew Lloyd 
Webber's on-screen rendition of the 
musical Evita. 



_^Jfc In October. TV talk-show host 

T^ Jenny Jones testifies during the 
Michigan murder trial of Jonathan 
Schmitz. Schmitz was accused of killing 
Scott Amedure. who revealed romantic 
feelings for Schmitz during a March 
1995 taping of a "Jenny Jones Show," 




AP/Wide World 



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(^ ^ In a small. 

^r secret ceremony 
on an island off the 
coast of Georgia, John 
F Kennedy Jr. marries 
Carolyn Bessette, a 
Calvin Klein publicist, in 
September Kennedy, 
who dated Bessette for 
two years, had long 
been considered one 
of the world's most 
eligible bachelors 



Slephane Cardinale, Sygma 



5i:'l*^ 



A 



<- 



.-■*..■ t. 3 



ight 
er Muhammad Ali 
the final athlete to 
bear the Olympic 
torch, lighting the 
Olympic flame at the 
opening of the 
Centennial Summer 
Olympics in Atlanta 
on July 19. 



Tara Dawn 
Holland, is 
crowned Miss 
America at the 
1 996 pageant on 
September 14. 



Reuters/Archive Photos 



■^ 



^A' 



y 



Universal Cily Itom Sliooling Star 



appears in her final 
season as mystery writer Jessica 
Fletcher on CBS's "Murder, She 
Wrote." The hugely successful 
show ran for 12 seasons. 



^ Basketball player 
Kobe Bryant joins 
the Los Angeles Lakers 
straight out of high 
school, signing a multi- 
million dollar contract 
during the team's 
1996-1997 season. 



> 



Mmf. Kenne© Lffiraiy^ 



^ More than 4,000 
^T items owned by former 
First Lady Jacquelyn Kennedy 
Onassis and President John F 
Kennedy are auctioned off in 
April 1996, including a 
necl<lace of simulated pearls 
shown in this 1 962 
photograph. The fake pearls, 
valued at $500 to $700, sell 
for $21 1 ,500, bringing the 
auction total to $34.5 million. 



Lee / Archive Photos 






LI 



(-^ New York Yankees fan Jeffrey 
^x Maier interferes with a fly ball 
during game one of the American 
League Championship Series on 
October 9. The hit is ruled a 
home run. tying the game 4 to 4 in 
the eighth inning and making Maier 
New York's hero for a day 



1^^ 



■■4\; 



;■«• » 



--^ Veteran comedian George Burns 
^T dies in March 1996. just weeks 
after reaching the age of 100. The 
legendary Burns won an Oscar an Emmy 
and a Grammy Award in an illustrious 
career dating back to vaudeville. 



^- ^ As a stand against the invasion 
^T of his privacy George Clooney 
star of NBC's "ER." boycotts 
Paramount's "Entertainment Tonight" 
after its sister show "Hard Copy" runs 
unauthorized footage of the actors 
private life. 



FACES 




n 




ENTERTAINMENT 






flash 



Tom Cruise stars in 
Jerry Maguire, a 
romantic comedy about a 
sports agent who 
decides to change his 
shallow ways, and 
spends the rest of the 
movie trying to regain his 
success. It is a 
breakthrough role for 
Cruise, who is 
normally depicted as 
a cocky winner. 



To honor the 20th 
anniversary of its 
release, producer George 
Lucas issues a "remade" 
Star Wars, with new 
scenes, computerized 
special effects and 
souped-up animation. 
Lucas' grand plan calls 
for a nine-film cycle, 
including prequels. 



English actor/director 
Kenneth Branagh plays 
Hamlet in his star- 
studded remake of 
Shakespeare's classic. 
Despite running four 
hours, the movie is a 
critical and box-office 



NBC's Thursday night 
drama "ER" features 
television's first HIV- 
positive prominent 
character Jeanie Boulet, 
a physician's assistant 
played by Gloria Reuben, 
is relatively open about 
her condition and helps 
confront the stigma 
of AIDS. 



DIIBERT 

■'■principle 




,^ Patrick Stewart 
^T" (left) and Brent 
Spiner [right] star in 
Star Trek: First Contact, 
a movie featuring 
cliaracters from tine TV 
show "Star Trek: The 
Next Generation." 



Paramount Pictures from Kobal 



^-^ Scott Adams' Dilbert. the 

\ comic strip about office 
politics, captures the nation's 
imagination. In book form, The 
Dilbert Principle becomes a 
national best-seller. 




^ Actors Winona Ryder and 
^"^"^ Daniel Day-Lewis star in The 
Crucible, which opens in December, 
The screen adaption of Arthur 
Miller's famous play about the 
Salem witch trials is written by 
Arthur Miller himself. 



^ -^ Academy Award- 
^1^ winning actor 
Tom Hanks' first effort 
at directing receives 
critical praise when 
That Thing You Do!, a 
movie about the 
meteoric rise and fall of 
a 196Gs rock band, 
opens in October. 




^X , Sherry Stnngfield, Dr. Susan 
^X^ Lewis on NBC's "ER," leaves 
the show at the peak of her 
character's popularity. In her final 
episode, when Dr Mark Greene, 
played by Anthony Edwards, declares 
his love for Susan, the show garners 
its highest ratings ever. 



20Ih Century Fox from Snooting Star 

^ Model Brooke Shields [center] 
n^ moves to television in NBC's 
"Suddenly Susan." a sit-com premiering 
in September Shields plays a columnist 
opposite magazine editor Judd Nelson 
[far right). 



-aft Author 
^T Michael 
Cnchton 
publishes The 
Lost World, a 
sequel to 
Jurassic Park. 
— . the colossal 

■^miSliiW ppomisesto 
generate just as 
much hype, with a movie 
already in the works. 





NBC Irom Snooting Slar 




•i .4^ 







Explosive special 
effects rivet 
audiences to their seats 
as they watch 
Independence Day, 
one of summer's 
blockbuster movies. 



^; 



Bugs Bunny and Chicago Bulls 
basketball star Michael Jordan 
share top billing in Space Jam, a 
partially animated feature film that 
opens in late November. 



20lh Cenlury Fo.^ from Shooting Slar 




J Leonardo 
DiCaprio and Claire 
Danes star as the 
classic star-crossed 
lovers in the film 
Romeo and Juliet. 



^^ 



Tom Cruise stars in 
Mission: Impossible, based 
on the 1 9BDs and '70s television 
series of the same name. Despite 
critical put-downs, the movie is a 
huge box-office hit. 



20th Century Fox from Shooting Star 

^ Actors Brad Pitt (left) and 
"^f^ Jason Patric star in 
Sleepers, a film about four men and 
their extraordinary scheme to 
revenge the abuse they experienced 
as boys. The controversial movie 
also stars Dustin Hoffman, Robert 
De Niro and Kevin Bacon. 



1^-^ John Lithgow (front right] 
^T^ earns both an Emmy and a 
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor 
in a Comedy Series in NBC's "3rd 
Rock From the Sun," a sit-com 
about a family of aliens living in 
contemporary America. 



,^ America's favorite sit-com 
^1"^ father, Bill Cosby en|oys the 
success of his new CBS show, "Cosby" 
In January 1997, however, tragedy 
strikes as Cosby's son Ennis is killed in 
Los Angeles in an apparent 
random robbery 




(--^ Stars Bill Paxton and Helen 

T Hunt flee a tornado of 
awesome proportions in Twister, 
another summer blockbuster, 
which tells the story of storm 
chasers highly devoted to studying 
the inner workings of tornadoes. 



ENTERTAINMENT 



MUSIC 





flash 



Folk and blues artist 
Tracy Chapman returns 
to the scene in 1996 
with the single "Giue 
Me One Reason." 
Chapman receives five 
Grammy nominations in 
January 1997. 



^-^ The Beatles' Anthology 3. 

^\ the third and final album 
from the reunited remaining 
members of the band, is released 
in November. Following the example 
of their two previous anthologies, 
Anthology 3 sells in record 
numbers. 




-^ British pop 
^r superstars Liam 
(left) and Noel Gallagher 
cancel the remainder of 
a U.S. concert tour in 
September- amid rumors 
that their band, Oasis, is 
breaking up. Denying the 
reports, the brothers 
announce they will 
release a new album in 
the summer of 1997. 



Kipa, LGI 



releases a new album, From 
'uddy Banks of the Wishk-"-^ 
October. The album contains 1 7 
tracks recorded between 1 989 
the 1 994 suicide of singer Kurt 
Cobain (right). 



The artist formerly 
known as Prince 
releases 
Emancipation, a three- 
hour, three-CD album, 
in honor of his release 
from his Warner Bros, 
recording contract. 



Guitarist Slash of Guns 
N' Roses forms his own 
band. His new group, 
Slash's Blues Ball, is a 
six-man blues band 
grounded in the blues- 
based hard rock of 
the 1970s. 



Rocker Sheryl Crow joins 
the ranks of musicians 
who have had their 
albums banned from 
Wal-Mart. The retail 
giant objects to a lyric 
alleging that kids kill each 
other with guns they 
obtained from the store. 




^.-jL Bush, a British rock group with 
^T^ an American "grunge" sound, 
tours the U.S. to promote their album 
Sixteen Stone. They release another 
chart-topping album, Razorblade 
Suitcase, in the winter. 



^"A Kiss bass guitarist Gene 
^1^ Simmons strikes a familiar 
pose as the band kicks off a reunion 
tour with a June 28 concert in 
Detroit. The tour marks the first 
time the original members of the 
band perform together since 1979, 





r-^ Canadian pop artist Celine 

\ Dion tops the charts in 
1 996 with the album Falling Into 
You. which sells more than 1 6 
million copies worldwide. 



^-^ After 10 years of separation, members 
^1^ of the band Van Helen are reunited with 
their former lead singer, David Lee Roth (right), 
at the MTV Video Music Awards in September 
Roth later claims he thought he was rejoining 
the band, who chose a different lead singer. 



r-^ ^ Heavy metal band Metallica 
^1 IS the headlining act for the 
summer concert Lollapalooza, 
traditionally an alternative-rock 
show. Metallica remains high- 
profile, winning an MTV award for 
the year's Best Hard Rock Video 
in September 




(-^ Alanis Morissette's Jagged 
^\ Little Pill reigns the charts, 
becoming the all-time top-selling 
album by a female artist 
Morissette also dominates the 
1 996 Grammys by winning four 
awards, including Best Album. 




dubbed the "godfather of 'gangsta' 
rap," begins distancing himself from 
hard-core rap. "Been There, Done 
That," his breal<-away anthem, 
premieres on MTV in September. 



^ R.E.M.*s12th 
" album. New 
htures in Hi-Fi, the 
group's first recording i 
since 1 994's Monster, 
is released by Warner 
Bros, in September. 



'*i The Wallflowers, with 
Jakob Dylan, son of 
legendary folk artist Bob 
Dylan, release Bringing Down 
the Horse, which features hit 
singles "One Headlight" and "6th 
Avenue Heartache." 



^^ Fourteen-year-old singing 
~i'^ sensation LeAnn Rimes is 
nominated for the Country Music 
Association's Horizon Award after 
the breakthrough success of her 
single "Blue." The popular new star 
IS often compared to country 
music legend Patsy Cline. 



^--J ti The music world is stunned in 
^1 September by the death of 
rapper Tupac Shakur, killed in a dnve-by 
shooting in Las Vegas. Speculations as 
to the killer's motive abound, but the 
year ends with no answers and 
no arrests. 



James L Lance l 



MUSIC 




-m 




SPORTS 



flash 



Tennis pro Pete Sampras 
wins the eighth grand- 
slam title of his career 
at the U.S. Open in 
September. Steffi Graf 
wins the U.S. Open 
Women's title, beating 
Monica Seles. 




^^ 




^ L The New York 
^T^ Yankees win the 
World Series, beating 
the Atlanta Braves in a 
four-game sweep, after 
losing the first two 
games. It is the first 
series title for the 
Yankees since 1978. 



^ 



A! Bello, Allsport 



Team USA wins the Worid 
Cup of Hockey, beating 
Canada 5-2 in the final. Eight 
teams from Canada, Europe and 
the U.S. participate in the 
Worid Cup, which replaced the 
Canada Cup. 



AP/Wide 



Pro boxer Mike Tyson 
loses his Heavyweight 
Champion of the 
World title to Evander 
Holyfield in a November 
match. Holyfield, a 
former two-time world 
champion, reclaims his 
title in the surprise win. 




Chicago Bulls star 
Dennis Rodman furthers 
his controversial 
reputation by kicking a 
photographer in the 
groin during a game 
against the Minnesota 
Timberwolves in January 
1997. Rodman is 
suspended for up to 11 
games without pay, 
costing him more than 
$1 million, in addition to 
a $25,000 fine to the 
NBA, as well as a 
reported $200,000 
settlement with the 
photographer. 



^-1 Twenty-year-old golfing 
^T^ phenom Eldriok "Tiger" 
Woods turns pro in August, making 
the transition from exceptional 
amateur golfer to well-endorsed 
professional, including a deal 
with Nike worth an estimated 
$40 million. 



^^ Paul Molitor of the 
"T*' Minnesota Twins becomes 
the 21st player in major league 
history to reach 3,000 career 
hits. The milestone is reached in 
September, when Molitor triples 
against Kansas City Royals rookie 
pitcher Jose Rosado. 



Baltimore Orioles second 
baseman Roberto 
Alomar is suspended for 
five games, deferred to 
the 1 997 season, when 
he spits on an umpire 
during a heated 
argument over a 
questionable call in the 
National League play-offs. 
Controversy ensues over 
the leniency of the 
punishment. 




,^ Race car driver Terry Labonte 
T^ wins NASCAR's Winston Cup 
championship with a total of 4,657 
points after finishing fifth in the 
final race, the Napa 500, at the 
Atlanta Motor Speedway 

^ Led by quarterback Brett 
"'T Favre, the Green Bay Packers 
beat the New England Patriots 35-21 
in Super Bowl XXXI at the Louisiana 
Superdome, It is the Packers' first 
Super Bowl since 1968. 



m^ '^j^H^p^^^L^^ 


^^^" 


tikJ-M 







©1996 USA Today, reprinted with permission 



W}^ 



^^ ^ The U.S. 

^T women's 
gymnastics team takes 
the gold at the Summer 
Olympics. Kerri Strug, 
second from right, is 
the heroine of the 
competition, landing her 
final vault despite a 
dislocated left ankle. 



j^ U.S. swimmer 
^~T^ Amy Van Dyken 
wins the women's 
1 QO-meter butterfly 
event at the Olympic 
Games with a time of 
59.13 seconds. Van 
Dyken wins a total of 
four golds. 



^fim/ 



V4l^!^t" 



5^'>^: 



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'r$, 



b'' — 



(-^ The Chicago Bulls win their 
^1 fourth NBA championship in six 
years as they defeat the Seattle 
SuperSonics in game six of the NBA 
finals on June 16. 



VW. *•♦•: 



4^ 



Al Bello, WIsport 



Dan O'Brien 



^ 



AP/Wide WOfld 



ip 8,824 points 
the gold medal 
,' the decathlon, a 
rueling, 10-event 
track-and-field 
competition. 



jL April 1 996 marks the 
^\^ 1 00th running of the 
Boston Marathon, More than 
38,000 contenders participate. 



wmrnm 



, -^ Olympic swimmer Tom 
^\ Dolan captures another 
gold for the U.S. as he wins 
the 400-meter individual medley 
on July 21. Dolan wins with a 
time of 4:14.90. 



^ •-T-'S*' «■ 



,^ 



APWidc World 



^X Minnesota Twins star 
^"^^ centerfielder Kirby Puckett 
announces his retirement from 
baseball in July A serious eye 
ailment forces Puckett to give up 
the game, but he manages to 
maintain his upbeat attitude at 
press conferences and interviews. 



U.S. Olympian 
W Michael Johnson 
wins the 200-meter final 
in a world-record time of 
19.32 seconds. 
Johnson's triumph 
comes three days 
after he wins the 
400-meter race, J 

making him the first 
man to win both — 
events in one 
Olympics. 






Reuters/Archive Photos 



4 



^X Jean Driscoll (front right) of the 
^T"^ U.S. takes the silver in the 
women's 800-meter wheelchair race, a 
demonstration sport, at the Summer 
Olympics. Driscoll, seven-time winner 
of the Boston Marathon, retires at the 
end of 1996, after setting several 
world records during her career. 



^ ^^ Basketball star Shaquille O'Neal 
^r lumps from the Orlando 
Magic to the Los Angeles Lakers in 
July The deal is the richest in NBA 
history paying O'Neal $120 million 
over 7 years. 



SPORTS 



LIFESTYLE 




Helping consumers 
maintain privacy, 
marketers promote 
home AIDS tests. 
Consumers draw their 
own blood and then send 
it away to be tested 
confidentially. 



Advancing technology 
means more options 
on telephones, 
including Caller ID, 
which becomes more 
common than ever in 
1996. The display unit 
allows people to see the 
name and number of 
their caller before even 
answering the phone. 



Authors Ellen Fein and 
Sherrie Schneider 
release The Rules, a 
controversial manual 
teaching women 
strategies for getting a 
man to propose 
marriage. While the book 
draws criticism from 
both sexes, it is a 
best-seller. 



The U.S. Postal Service 
issues stamps 
commemorating 
Hanukkah, the first non- 
Christian religious 
holiday ever featured 
on a stamp. 



Casual Fridays become 
more and more 
widespread in American 
work culture. Businesses 
allow employees who 
normally dress in 
professional clothing at 
work to wear more 
comfortable, casual 
clothing on Fridays. 



r^ The My Twinn Doll Company 

T offers individually crafted 
dolls Chat replicate, from a photo, 
the eye color, hair and facial 
features of a living girl. Each doll 
comes with two matching outfits, 
one for the doll and one for 
the owner 




The minimum 
wage is 
raised to $4.75 in 
October, and will 
increase again to 
$5.15, effective 
September 1 . 1 997. 



The beverage 

industry 
introduces a new 
concept — bottled 
water with caffeine! 
One bottle of the 
uncarbonated water 
contains as much 
caffeine as one cup 
of coffee. 



--^ Nail polish colors get darker 
^T and funkier. Deep browns 

and blues are popular forms of 

expression and style. 



Disney's 

707 
Dalmatians 
inspires an 
avalanche of 
promotional 
merchandise, 
filling stores 
with spotted 
toys, backpacks, 
games and other 
odds and ends. 




WORLD BOOK 

ENCYCLOPEDIA. INC 



\ SCOTT FETZEB COMPANY 



CREEKS 



"One of the most 

important parts of 

being a member of 

a fraternity or a 

sorority is thie 

brotheriiood, or 

sisteriiood aspect 

of them." 



Greek life at the University of Maryland was the 
same in 1996 and 1997 as previous years - 
full of tradition, spirit and good feelings. 
Fraternity brothers and sorority sisters had shared 
experiences and the foundation of the organization of 
which they were a part. 

The Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic Asso- 
ciation and the Panhellenic Council were the three 
overseeing boards of the fraternities and sororities. 
The three groups worked together to participate in 
various events. 

Greek life means different things to different people 
because each fraternity and sorority is different and 
the experiences, though similar, are unique. 




All photos are by Paul Vieira 



241 



EXPERIENCE RUSH! EXPERIENCE RUSH! EXPERIENCE 




^1 



f 







\'^ ith the start of the new school year came the 
continuation of a long tradition: RUSH. New 
students got an introduction to Greek life. 
The Panhellenic Association and the Interfraternity 
Council held a Rush Expo on Hornbake Mall, which 
allowed future rushees to get their glimpse of the Greek 
system. 

Formal Rush for the Panhellenic Association began 
with an orientation consisting of 500 women. After 
being broken up in groups the rushees were led by the 
Rho Chis to tour all 15 sorority houses. This allowed 
the female rushees the chance to get to know a little 
about each house. 

As each Rush party got more formal, rushees nar- 
rowed down their choices hoping to find their favorite 
sorority. Finally, after two weeks of seemingly endless 
anticipation each girl found out who would become 
their sisters and lifelong friends. 



Kim Pederick 

Interfraternity Council Rush, on the other hand, was 
quite the contrary. As opposed to sorority Formal Rush 
fraternity Rush enabled guys to rush only the house they 
liked best. With "dry rush" in full swing, the guys basi- 
cally hung out with their future brothers. Whether this 
meant playing football on Fraternity Row or shooting 
hoops behind on the fraternity houses, the purpose was 
simple. The purpose for guys was to get to know the 
brothers and, in turn, for the brothers to get to know the 
guys. 

After the end of a two week period the fraternities 
had Formal Rush, which consisted of invitations to 
various social events. If all went well, the house gave 
bids out to potential brothers. 

Once Rush was over, some rushees became either 
sorority or fraternity pledges and went onto the next 
step toward sister or brotherhood. 




R:USH! experience RUSH! EXPERIENCE RUSH! 




't! 



Paul Vieira 



Kim Pederick 




03 

> 



243 



No, it's not pictures of your parents in 
college it's one of the Greek system's 
many tnemed parties. Themes ranged 
from the traditional togo to the stylish seven- 
ties. Kappa Alpha, one of the fourty one 
fraternities and sororities on campus held a 
seventies blowout this November. Participants 
went all out in their seventies, retro attire. 
Styles ranged from platforms to bell bottms. 
This slick and crazy bunch brought back the 
fantabulously fly feelings of the seventies. The 
hip chicks and down guys held a Travolta 
dance-off to see who could strut their stuff 
while staying alive. 







* _ \ » 

Ml photos were done by Paul Vieira 



245 



STEPPIN'OUT... 



UNITY, AWARENESS, AND EDUCATION IN THE THE FORM OF ENTERTAINMENT 





247 



During Homecoming 1996, 
Maryland's Greeks and Wawa, 
sponsored a charity miniature Golf 
event. An elaborate golf course was set 
up on Fraternity Row. The charity golf 
event was open to the whole campus. 
The event was held on a picture perfect 
day and was well attended, benefiting 
several well deserving charities. 



^ 



^ 



n I n £ ^ 



> 



i 




k • ,// ^, 





C0ME>LftYCHl(VRm8H| 



mii^^t^^; 




248 




* i *v ji. ^ *r^ *^ ~s 



►ISi'a*«»wSi^. 






\\\ photos were done by Paul Vieria 



249 



Fraternity and 



The saying, "All dressed up and nowhere to go" , was not 
said for the Greeks of the University of Maryland. The 
Formal Season brought out designer gowns for the ladies 
and suits and ties for gentlemen. A fabulous time was had 
by all who attended the various formal held during 1996 
and 1997. 




All photos on this spread were by Paul Vieira 



Sorority Formals ^ 




251 



Greek Tradition 




«, 



Unity, Camaraderie and Parties 



n I n £ ^ 




Ml photos on this spread were done by I'aul \ ieira 



253 



"LATE NITE" AT THE UNIUERSITV OF 



Students of the University of Maryland had a 
new place to go to on Thursday nights thanks 
to the GAMMA chapter at the University of 
Maryland in College Park, Maryland. There were 
no lists, no distinctions as to who could attend, and 
most importantly, no alcohol. 

To those who attended, GAMMA seemed like a 
free pizza party after going drinking at the bars, or 
just a place to meet up with friends after getting 
separated at the club. But "Late Nite," on Thursday 
nights from 1 A.M. until 3 A.M., was much more. 
GAMMA was time. It was a time to eat food, 
socialize, and sober up before students drove or 
walked home from the bars. GAMMA was a time 
for students to take off their "beer goggles" and 
actually make an educated decision about who they 
were going to go home with that night. Members 
of GAMMA gave out condoms, incentives to stay 
sober or at least drink responsibly, and information 



on alcoholism, personal safety, and safer sex. 

Named "The Student Group of the Year"' by this 
past year's Student Group Association, GAMMA 
was quite overwhelmed and excited by this distinc- 
tion and honor. Due to all the hard work and 
dedication, GAMMA achieved thier goals, the en- 
couragement of responsible drinking and gained the 
respect of Maryland students. Through GAMMA, 
students felt comfortable saying "no" to drinking 
and "yes" to having fun. Students realized that they 
could socialize and have fun without any alcohol. 
GAMMA proved that if a group has dedication and 
oraganization, a difference can be achieved. 



By Jill Raden, 
University of Maryland GAMMA 
President 




.. U 





PAUL VIERIA 



255 





3 U I U 



157 



I 




*^Ai 



An organization gives a demonstration at the First Lool< Fair. 




ORANIZATIONS 




The University of Maryland at College Park has 
so much to offer and it is evident in the diver 
sity of organizations that are offered on cam- 
pus. There are students groups, activist groups, 
administrative organizations, coed professional 
fraternities, and many more. On the next few pages 
are a few of the groups and organizations of the 
University of Maryland that enhance the campus. 

Students have the opportunity to learn more about 
themselves by experiencing different things while at 
Maryland. Students also learn to work with the 
University by interacting with the administration in 
some of the groups and organizations. Maryland 
students can enhance their education and their 
experience by participating in these groups. 



"i^%. ■■ ui 





"With over 300 cam- 
pus clubs in existence, 
there is literally some- 
thing for everyone at 
the University of 
Maryland. '' 





Snorre Wik 



259 



Office of the Vice President 

for Student Affairs 



The Division of Student 
Affairs holds the responsibiHty 
for the coordination and 
direction of a variety of stu- 
dent development programs. 
The Vice Presidents Office 
serves as an advocate for 
student issues and concerns 
within the administration of 
the campus and the university. 



The Vice-President, in 
conjunction with the 
departments in the division, 
promotes the individual 
development of all students, 
activities, campus-wide 
events and the addressing of 
the environmental issues 
that affect campus life. 






Top Right-Dr. William L. Thomas, Jr., Vice President of Student Affairs. Top Center-Dr. Drury Bagwell 
Assistant Vice President. Top Right-Dr. Richard Stimpson, Assistant Vice President. 
Bottom Left-Ms. Brooke Lecky, Assistant to the Vice President. Bottom Center-Mr. Warren Kelley 
Executive Assistant to the Vice President and Director of Planning and Research. 



( \ 



*26( 



^ 



As in years past, Maryland 
students dealing with a variety 
of personal, social, career, and 
academic issues found support 
at the Counseling Center. In 
individual counseling, stu- 
dents discovering that seeking 
help is a sing of strength as 
they explored a range of issues 
that included self-esteem, 
stress, relationship, sex, family 
problems, and making career 
decisions. 

In workshops and group 
counseling, students met with 
others who shared similar 
problems, interests, and goals. 
The Counseling Center 
offered weekly support groups 
that addressed a wide variety 
of topics, such as career 
explorations, dissertation 



Counseling Center 

Director: Dr. Vivian Boyd 



support, procrastmation 
prevention, and stress man- 
agement. Consultation, •^ 
counseling and child testing 
also were provided to parents, 
single parents, and their 
children. -^ 

Career counseling also 
helped students who were 
choosing a major, establishing 
career goals, and considering 
job opportunities. An impor- 
tant aspect of career counsel- 
ing was understanding how 
personality, values, and 




interests relate to future career 
satisfaction and success. 
Students in need of improv- 
ing their academic skills 
discovered another valuable 
resource at the Counseling 
Center: education specialists 
who helped them enhance 
such skills as reading, writing, 
note-taking, learning science 
and math material, and 
learning statistics. Workshops 
topics included study skills, 
exam skills, time manage- 
ment, English conversation, 
end-of-semester survival skills, 
and completing theses and 
dissertations. Many students 
who were back in school after 
a break in their formal educa- 
tion took advantage of the 
Counseling Center's Return- 
ing Students Program. 
Workshops and counseling 
helped these students make 
the transition to academic life. 

The Counseling Center 
also provided services for 
students with disabilities. In 
the Counseling Center's 



Testing Office, students took 
tests that related to the work 
they were doing in counsel- 
ing, such as exploring their 
career interests. Others took 
national standardized test 
administered by the Testing 
Office, such as the GRE, 
LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and 
Miller Analogies. Research 
assistance and individual 
consultation were provided to 
students with questions about 
research design and statistics 
and writing project proposals, 
theses, and dissertations. 

It was a busy and produc- 
tive year in the Counseling 
Center. From individual and 
family counseling, growth 
groups, and academic skills 
workshops to career interest 
testing, disability support, and 
research assistance, the ser- 
vices provided by the Coun- 
seling Center staff reached a 
wide range of Maryland 
students in need of profes- 
sional assistance. 




University Health Center 

Director: Dr. Margaret Bridwell 



The University Health 
Center (UHC) is commit- 
ted to providing high 
quality health care. It is 
an ambulatory health care 
center offering profes- 
sional medical care and 
health education pro- 
grams to help maintain 
and improve health. The 
UHC provides the follow- 
ing confidential services: 
allergy, dental, mental 



health, women's reproduc- 
tive health and travel 
clinics, anonymous HIV/ 
AIDS testing, health pro- 
motion programs, nutrition 
education, a pharmacy, 
physical therapy, sexual 
assault and abuse hot line 
socail services, sports 
medicine and substance 
abuse treatment. All 
registered students are 
eligible for care. 



Top Left-The Counseling Center Staff. Bottom Left- 
Dr. Margaret Bridwell. Bottom Right-Cindy Moe, 
Medicial Technologist, preparing to plat a cifliurc in 
the Health Center lab. Bottom- Health Center Staff 
checking blood pressures and handling out informa- 
tion at a Campus Health Fair 

261 



Stamp Student Union, Campus Programs, 
and University Book Center 

Director: Dr. James M. Osteen 



Numerous programs and ser- 
vices were provided for the cam- 
pus community by the Stamp 
Student Union and Campus 
Programs. Over 18,000 per- 
sons entered the Union each 
day and took advantage of in- 
formation services, the Hoff 
Theater, the Recreation Cen- 
ter, the Art Center and Gallery, 
and the University Book Cen- 
ter and other retail and food 
options. The Union, with its 
ballrooms and other activity 



rooms and conference spaces, 
was the site of most major cam- 
pus programs during the year. 
In addition, the Office of Cam- 
pus Programs worked with the 
350 student organizations, in- 
cluding the Student Govern- 
ment Association, SEE Produc- 
tions, SUPC, and the Greek 
groups to provide rich involve- 
ment and leadership opportu- 
nities for students. 



Top Left-Dr. James M. Osteen, Director of the Stamp Student Union and 
Campus Programs, greets students from the front steps of the Union. Top 
Right-The friendly staff of the Union Information Desk provides helpful 
assistance to members of the campus community. Top Center- University 
Book Center Staff. Bottom Center-"Commuter Jeopardy" at the First Look 
Fair. Bottom Left-Babara Jacoby, Director and Martha Baer Wilmes, 
Associate Director at "Good Morning, Commuters!" Bottom Right-Staff 
participating in community service at SFLARE in Washington, DC. 



lORI^^^'^ 




Office of Commuter Affairs 

Director: Dr. Barbara Jacoby 



The 40-bus fleet of Shuttle buses and a 
dedicated student staff of over 125 drivers 
and managers are fundamental components 
of the reliable service provided to students 
on ten commuter routes, four evening secu- 
rity routes, Call-A-Ride and paratransit. 

Helping students find a home has been 
one of the primary services of OCA since it 
began serving students in 1972. Trained 
students staff provide personalized comput- 
erized listings of rental housing for students 
seeking a new place to live. This year the 
service became accessible via the World Wide 
Web. 

On Wednesday morning, commuter stu- 
dents enjoy free coffee, doughnuts, and in- 
formation in the Atrium at the "Good Morn- 
ing, Commuters!" Program. Commuter 
Appreciation Day, a fun-filled event each 
spring, honors and celebrates UMCP's com- 
muters through performances, entertain- 
ment, free parking, a carwash, and a movie. 
Four time a year UMCP commuters receive 
a little bit of the University in their mailbox 



when the Commuter Connection, a news- 
paper with articles related to academic, 
social, and campus life, arrives in their 
mailboxes. The newest addition to the 
Office of Commuter Affairs, Commu- 
nity Service Programs, helps students learn 
about and become involved in commu- 
nity service opportunities. 

OCA also sponsors a number of pro- 
grams to assist students in getting more 
involved in the life of the campus. New 
commuter students find Commuter Sur- 
vival Day to Be an excellent way to meet 
fellow students and to get a great start on 
campus. TheS.H.O.W. (Students Help- 
ing, Orienting, and Welcoming) program 
matches experienced students with in- 
coming freshmen to help new students 
"learn the ropes." 

These are some of the memories that 
Office of Commuter Affairs has contrib- 
uted to student life at UMCP. 





Career Center 

Director: Dr. Linda Gast 




The Career Center supports the University's mission and 
its academic programs by providing employment and 
career decision-making assistance to eligible UMCP stu- 
dents. The Center teaches, advises, and counsels students 
to make decisions about academic majors, em- 
ployment and further education. We strive to 
enhance the educational experience of students 
by integrated academics with work experiences, 
increasing faculty/staff knowledge of career-re- 
lated issues, and disseminating current career and 
employment information to the campus commu- 
nity. The Career Center collaborates with aca- 
demic departments, employers and alumni in the 
delivery of programs and services. Through our 
Student Employment Center (SEC), the Career 
Center serves as a point of contact between the 
University and the employment community by 
offering services to assist employers in hiring 
UMCP students. 

The Center offers: 1) career counseling, work- 
shops, courses, special programs, and a Career & 
Employment Resource Room which assists stu- 
dents in identifying interests, exploring careers and initiat- 
ing the job search and applying to graduate/professional 
schools and 2) employment opportunities through our SEC 
including job and career fairs, on-campus interviewing, 
resume referral, and job listing for listings for full-time, part- 
time, internship, cooperative education, and graduate 
assistantship positions; all of which are available on the 
Web through TERP On-line. 



Campus Recreation Services 

Director: Mr. Jay Gilchrist 




Campus Recreation 
Services provided a wide 
range of physical activities 
to members of the campus 
community throughout the 
year. Activities such as 
Intramural Sports, Aero- 
bics, and Sport Clubs were 
favored by those who 
prefer more structure to 
their activities. Those who 
prefer to set their own 
schedules were able to 
take advantage of the 
availability of numerous 
hours set aside for drop-in 
weight and fitness training, 
basketball, volleyball, 



racquetball, badminton, 
squash, and swimming. 
The Department was 
especially excited this year 
by the long awaited con- 
struction start of the new 
Campus Recreation Cen- 
ter, and the renovation of 
Richie Coliseum. These 
facilities, which are ex- 
pected to open Spring 
Semester 1998, and 
Spring Semester 1997, 
respectively, will give 
campus students access to 
a greatly expanded pro- 
gram of recreational activi- 
ties and facilities. 



Top Left-Career Center Staff. Bottom Top Left-Campus Recreation Services 
staff takes a break for a picture during visitation to Richie Coliseum construc- 
tion site. From left to right: Shawn Flynn, Brent Flynn, Robin Vollinger, 
Bridget Turner, Daune Bumpass, Dan Blackman, Dave Flumbaum, Jay 
Gilchrist, Barbara Aiken, Janet Allesandrini, Ron Abbit, and Andrea Bussler. 
Bottom Left-Staff members from Campus Recreation Services inspecting 
interior work at Ritchie Coliseum construction site. 



263 



Judicial Proarams 




The primary function of 
the Office of Judicial Pro- 
grams is to efficiently and 
equitably resolve disciplin- 
ary referrals filed against 
students. The Office staff 
determines disciplinary 
charges and interviews and 
advises all parties involved 
in disciplinary proceedings. 
The most serious cases are 
resolved by student judiciary 
boards which are com- 
prised of four groups: The 
Central Judicial Board, the 
Student Honor Council, 
Community Advocates, 
and Student Parking 
Appeals. Although each 
group differs slightly in their 
perspective, they work to 
educate other students 
about their rights and 



Director: Dr. Gary Pavela 



responsibilities as members 
of the campus community. 
The Judicial Programs 
staff trains and advises the 
student judiciary, reviews all 
decisions of the judicial 
boards, maintains student 
disciplinary records and 
conducts research and 
analysis regarding student 
conduct. Through honesty, 
respect and sensitivity, the 
Office of Judicial Programs 
serves to maintain the 
educational mission of the 
University by designing 
policies, conducting pro- 
grams, and offering instruc- 
tion that contributes to the 
intellectual and moral devel- 
opment of the entire student 
body. 




Campus Parking 

Director: Mr. David Allen 



The Department of Campus Parking strives to be responsive to the parking 
needs of the entire campus community. Annually, this department provides 
more than 56,000 parking permits to students, faculty, staff, and visitors; making 
every effort to distribute parking spaces as fairly and efficiently as possible. 
Through education, engineering and enforcement , it upholds the UMCP 
Parking Rules and Regulations. Students receive parking information through 
the Campus Parking Map & Informational Parking Guide, brochures, fliers, 
Diamondback and Commuter Connection 
articles, the World-Wide Web and adver- 
tisements and participation in such campus 
activities as Good Morning Commuters, 
First Look Fair, and Orientation. 

The Department of Campus Parking has 
serval programs in place to assist students 
and the entire campus community. Stu- 
dents can now register for parking through 
MARS (Mar)'land Automated Registration 
System) not only by phone but also at four 
KIOSK locations on campus. Our Motor 
Assistance Vehicle (MAV) program intro- 
duced on 1 994 has expanded from an 
operation utilizing one vehicle to equipping 
other departmental vehicles as backup to 
assist motorists with lockouts, flat tires, 
jump starts and gasoline needs. 





Resident Life 



Director: Dr. Patricia Mielke 




The Department of Resident Life is 
responsible for tfie management of the 
residence halls as well as for cultural, educa- 
tional, recreational, and social program- 
ming activities in the 44 campus residence 
halls. 

More than 7900 undergraduate students 
lived in the residence halls this year. Set- 
tings available in the residence halls in- 
cluded: high rise traditional halls on the 
north side of Campus and suites and apart- 
ments for juniors and seniors on the south 
side of campus. 

Resident Life has gained a national 
reputation for the many special interest 
housing opportunities available on the 
College Park campus. Types of special 
interest housing included the Language 
House, International House, Honors 
House, Smoke Free/Alcohol Free Housing 
and College Park Scholars. 



Department of Dining Services 



I<»>|hM1 



Director: Ms. Patricia Higgins 




During this year, the Depart- 
ment of Dining Services offered 
several meal plans and a variety of 
services that met the tastes and 
schedules of the entire campus 
community. Thirty-six different 
locations, conveniently located in all 
areas of campus, were open hours 
that fit anyone's schedule. Dining 
options included: dining rooms, 
delis, ethnic eateries, "Adele's" 
restaurant, two Taco Bells locations, 
our own bakery shops, the University 
Dairy, rotisserie chicken, and three 
convenience stores. 

In the resident dining rooms 
this year, students ate over 65,000 
pounds of roast beef, one quarter of a 
million hamburgers, 120,000 pieces 
of chicken, 330,000 doughnuts, and 
over one million of our famous gourmet cookies, not to mention tons of vegetables 
and salads. We have been recognized as on of the top college and university food 
service operations in the country, and will continue to look forward to sharing our 
success with entire campus community. 

265 



Residential Facilities 

Director: Mr. Jon Dooley 

From the staff of Residential Facilities.... 

Use wisely what you've learned here to build a better 

tomorrow for all people. With best ivishesfor success 

and good fortune. 



Residential Facilities staff 
has responsibility for main- 
taining and renewing our 45 
undergraduate residence 
halls and the 11 renovated 
Greek buildings on Frater- 
nity Row. Residents here 
for the Fall, Spring, and Sum- 
mer semesters and our other 
summer guests obtain year- 
round services from our 
department's main work 
groups: our 4-WORK Ser- 
vice Center Staff ( who you 
call to report problems). 
Building Services (house- 
keeping, pest control and 

Top Right-Residential Facilities director's ofFice (left to right): Becky 
Flick, Sean Ballantine, Dwight \yy. Lance Bryson, Steve Kallmyer, Carol 
Brice, Jon Dooley. Center Left-George Roush, communit)' maintenance 
assigned to South Hill snow removal. Center Right-Jim Steele, commu- 
nit)' maintenance in Denton Community. Bottom-Ha)'wood Mobley, 
paints. 



recycling programs). Facili- 
ties Maintenance sections 
(e.g., maintenance and car- 
pentry services, plumbing 
and electric repairs, tempera- 
ture management, furniture 
repair, interior painting and 
more), our student Security 
Services program (check 
exterior doors, inspect secu- 
rity lighting, screens and 
signs), and our Administra- 
tive and Financial Services 
sections (text processing and 
copying, payroll, budgeting, 
accounting). 




Conference and Visitor Services 



Dirctor: Mr. Patrick Perfetto 



Conference and Visitor 
Services was the 
University's host to the 
thousands of guest and 
visitors who came to the 
University this year. We 
greeted about 12,000 
visitors at the Visitor 
Center, located in the 
"The Dairy" on Route 1. 
Fifty percent of our visitors 
sought admission informa- 
tion. The Visitor staff 
ensured that these that 
these potential future 
students had a good first 
impression of the Univer- 
sity. We provided lodging, 
meals, meeting space and 



a variety of other services 
to about 30,000 guests 
who attended summer 
conferences, competitions, 
workshops, and camps. 
About half of these guests 
were teens who may 
someday think of their 
summer experience at 
Maryland in deciding 
where to attend college. 
Finally, Visitor Services 
coordinates the Memorial 
Chapel and the hundreds 
of weddings that occur 
there each year. Many of 
our newlyweds are recent 
graduates. 







Back Row (left to right): Catalina ToaJa, Account Clerk; Jennifer 
Moore, Registrar; Lisa Press, Manager Marketing/Technical Support; 
Susan Warren, Associate Director. Front Row (left to right): Patrick 
Perfetto, Director; Gale Quilter, Assistant Director; Joy Newheart, 
Visitor Services Associate; Nick Kovalakides, Campus Visitor Advocate. 





TOP TEN FRESHMEN OF 1996 



Brian O. Buschman 
Matthew R. Evenson 
Katherine E. Hanks 
Lauren T. Hyland 
Erica M. Jackson 



James E. Melonas 
Kimberly S. Silverman 
Christopher D. Smith 
Daria Somerville 
Katherine A. Venanz 



LEADER OF THE YEAR 

Kelvin L. Reaves 



SOPHOMORE LEADER OF 
THE YEAR 

Reena S. Meltzer 




Back-Mark Shaner, ODK President, 1995-96. Front (1 to r)- 
Hillary Cherry, ODK President, 1996-97, Doug Mintz, ODK 
Member. 



Omicron Delta Kappa 



1996 MEMBERSHIP 



Faiz Ahmad 
Daniel E. Alexander 
Rebecca Ashkenazy 
Heather H. Austin 
Kingsley E. Bedell 
Nikki A. Bethel 
Randolph T. Bishop 
Mary Elizabeth Burke 
Rosanna J. Calabrese 
Erika S. Carlson 
Glenn A. Cline 
Monique J. Collier 
Lauren T. Costas 
Usheen Davar 
Tere H. Dickson 
Ayn B. Ducao 
Amy E. Fallon 
Jan W. Fernheimer 



Meryle L. Friedman 
Ann E. Glass 
Allison J. Grolnick 
Amy R. Grossi 
Rachael L. Hamm 
James A. Hanson 
Steven W. Harris 
Sharif A Hidayet 
Alicia C. Insley 
Randall D. Katz 
Scott M. Katzen 
Rebecca E. Kerr 
Tina Khoie 
Katrina J. King 
Jennifer C. Koziar 
Rachel M. Kulansky 
Cathy Y. Loa 
Wen-Su Lin 



Mary J. Luskey 
Jesse D. Marr 
Karen A. McDermott 
Jennifer L. McMenamin 
Carolyn E. Melago 
Reena S. Meltzer 
Nicole G. Messina 
Neal S. Montonaga 
W. Paul Murphy 
Margaritia L. Ortiz 
James M. Parker 
Jr. Mark L. Plett 
David I. Plotinsky 
Tal B. Plotkin 
Stephen K. Powell 
Jill P. Raden 
Sara Salam 
Christine N. Savage 



Jill N. Scot 
Sonja A. Sharpe 
Erik W. Shipley 
Rebecca B. Simon 
Sean A. Simone 
Shamim A. Sinnar 
Kelly M. Stepno 
Rebecca L. Traino 
Craig M. Tucci 
Jennifer A. Walper 
Colleen Walton 
Adam S. Waxman 
Adam J. Webeer 
Derrick E. White 
Todd G. Willis 
Susan E. Woda 
Faterna Yeganeh 



267 



INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANTS 



To all Accounting students: 

The student chapter of the Institute of 
Management Accountants, which was 
formerly named the National Association 
of Accountants, welcomes you and invites 
you to our organization. By doing so, 
you will have the exciting opportunity to 
meet prospective employers from all 
types of accounting backgrounds, which 
will add to your list of contacts. You will 
also meet many students with whom you 
have something in common, the desire 
for a successful career in accounting. 
This opportunity can only help you. So 
get involved, help yourself to the start of 
a rewarding career; and become a mem- 
ber of the IMA. 

The Institute of Management Accoun- 
tants is an organization that is committed 
to helping all accounting organization 
early in college years will help you learn 
about the board array of possibilities 
available in the field of accounting. This 
gives you the rare luxury of having sufti- 
cient time to think about your career, 
before making that crucial decision of 
where to concentrate your job search. In 
addition, joining the IMA enables you to 
make the decision that is right for you. 

The officers and student members look 
forward to welcoming all accounting 
students to IMA. 





The Lovely Ladies of 



Lambda Theta Alpha 



Latin Sorority, Inc. 




Upsilon Chapter Founding Sisters, Fall 
1996: 

Jo Rivera # 1 
Ileana Roman # 2 
Nancy Rodrigue # 3 
Julia Matute # 4 
Wendy Maldonado # 5 
Helen Castellano # 6 
Amy Castro # 7 
Sandra Penherrera # 8 
Margarita Ortiz # 9 
Jeanette Rojas #11 



Kappa Delta Sorority 



Alpha Rho Chapter 




Congratulations to the graduating seniors of Kappa Delta 



269 



Akido Club 



c^ O f^ 




Akido is a traditional Japanese martial art that uses quick and 
effective techniques to neutralize aggression. The Akido club is 
open to all members of the University of Maryland community. 

S.A.V.E. 

Students Against Violence Everywhere 

S.A.V.E. - Students Against Violence 
Everywhere - was created in the Spring of 
1995. Since then, S.A.V.E. has striven to 
make the world a more peaceful place for 
everyone, everywhere. This semester, 
S.A.V.E. planned and organized PeacePest 
96 in October in Hornbake Plaza as a 
gathering of student groups supporting 
peace. With WMUC music in their ears 
and candy and sodas in their hands, stu- 
dents were encouraged to "think peace." 
In the spring semester, S.A.V.E. sponsored 
a violence in film symposium and a lecture 
by Washington Post columnist Colman 
McCarthy to increase awareness of vio- 
lence in everyone's life and how to strive for 
peace. 

To paraphrase Reverend Martin Luther 
Kingjr., "Ifwe cannot get along as brothers 
and sisters, then we shall all perish as fools." 




Ed Graves, II 



■ 2~0 



Maryland Media, Inc. 




> 

OS 
Sh 

O 



LEFT TO RIGHT -- (back) Steve Lampier, Michael Fribush, Michelle Singletary, Ivan Penn, B.J. Sanford, 
Tracy Isaac, Robert Smith, (front) Rebecca Ashkenazy, Maggie Levy, Jayson T. Blair, Kyna M. Powell, 
(not pictured -- Chet Rhodes). 



271 



Maryland Media, Inc. 

Advertising Staff 




LEFT TO RIGHT -- Sylvia Ekezie, Jen Peterson, Michael Paszkiewicz, Kelly Girth, Mark Friedman, 
Josh Levine, Chris Stelzig 




Marylcind Media, Inc. 

Business Staff 




LEFT TO RIGHT - (back) Emily Sander, Shannon Carey, Shanay Cambosos, (front) Maggie Levy, 
Abigail Greenley, Lori Ernde. 



273 





the 



diamondback staff 



Jayson T. Blair 
Alex Knott 
Susan Freitag 
Carolyn Melago 
Todd Rhodes 
Matt Walcoff 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

AdministrativeEditor 

News Editor 

Campus Editor 

National Editor 



Erika Pontarelli Layout/Region Editor 

Nick Wass Photo Editor 

Stacey Russ Assistant Photo Editor 
Jon Solomon Sports Editor 

Danielle Newman Assistant Sports 
Editor 



Fritz Hahn Diversions Editor 

Karen Gordon Commentary Page 

Editor 
Sarah Hoffert Graphics Editor 

Fifi Hartley Assistant Graphics Editor 




ECLIPSE 



SERVE AND INFORM THE BLACK COMMUNITY 




ECLIPSE staff 



Kyna M. Powell 


Editor-in-Chief 


Christina J. Powell 




Eduardo A. Encina 


Assistant Editor 


Tia Roebuck 


Copy Editor 


Bada L. Hebron 


Public Relations 


Monique Gudger 




Director 




Jessica L. Poduska 


Staff Writers 


Adria Bleshman 


Photography Editor 






Avril Z. Speaks 


Lay-out Editor 







Mitzpeh 



MITZPEH 



THE JEWISH OBSERVER 



The Jewish Observer 

Mitzpeh staff 




Barak J. Sanford Editor-in-Chief 

Janelle Eriichman Editor 

Daniel Pickett 

Heather Wasserman Staff Writers 

Baruch Y. Lazarus Presentation Editor 



k iDdeppndrnl Jewish StgdeDt Montlily at WP December M 



275 



Alpha Lambda Delta 




Alpha Lambda Delta AAA is a national society that honors academic excellence. 
Freshman and transfer students are invited to join AAA if they acquire a 3.5 
GPA during their first year on campus. AAA serves to promote leadership, 
scholarship and community service to the University of Maryland community. 

Golden Key Honor Society 




Thanks to Golden Key's 1996 
Chapter Officers!!! 



Golden Key is an academic honor 
society that annually invites the top 
10-15% of all juniors and seniors 
enrolled at the University if Maryland 
to membership in the society. In 
addition to the recognition of 
outstanding scholastic achievement, 
Golden Key is also involved in 
numerous service projects and 
community programs each year. This 
year, he society participated in the 
AIDS Walk (see photo left), the AIDS 
Quilt presentation in D.C.. sponsored 
several blood drives and participated 
in the Great American Smoke Screen 



at a local school. The society alsc 
continues to run the Adopt-a-Schoo 
tutoring program for local elementarv 
and middle school children. Ir 
addition to service activities, Golder 
Key members also particiapted ir 
many social activities this year 
including a trip to Kings Diminior 
(see photo below), the annua 
Regional Conference at Penn Statt 
and a trip to Arizona for the annua 
International Convention. It has beer 
a wonderful and exciting for Golder 
Key!! 




Sonya Sharpe 

Robyn Pearson 

Margarita Ortiz 

Diem-Kieu Ngo 

Greg Werner 

Meg Joyce 

Tina Khoie 

Paul Harris 

Deanna DiBari 

Rob Holsopple 



President 
Vice President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 

Adopt-a-School Chair 
AIDS Awareness Chair 
Best of America Chair 
Historian 
Newsletter Editor 
Publicity Chair 





277 





.^278 



'-'-(;f 



I 





279 




<e? 



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CJreek 



• Luxunous wall-to-wall carpeting • Two-cycle dishwasher 

• hdividual washer and dryer • Disposal 

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Thank you for your patronage and 
Good Luck in all your endeavors 




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Hyattsville, Maryland 20782 

301-559-0320 

FAX. 301-559-1610 



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AH University of Maryland Students. 



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with COMSAT, send your resume to Human 
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Our trademark captures the 

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Wishiniion, D C 20005 
Telephone 202 789 0770 
Facsunile 202 898 2531 



Kick-off Your Semester at 
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Start the season with 2 #1 ranked teams! 







Small Pet buildings 
(but no one from Penn State') 





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Ophonal HBOICable TV 



Buses loDC and campus 



Indrmdual heating and AJC 



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281 




BG&E and the University of Maryland 
Partners in Excellence 



../Because t^^ikna is not a destination, but a (ifelongjourmxj 





BG&E is a Fortune 50 utility providing safe, reliable and 
environmentally sound gas and electric service to Central Maryland 
For consideration, send your resume in confidence to. Employment, 
Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, PO Box 1475, Baltimore, MD 
21203-1475, ATT UMYB 




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NOLOGY. 

Northrop Grumman Electronic Sensors S Systems 
Division (ESSD) conquers more than the elements. 

We are a world lejder in -he development and prnduclion of sophisticated electronic systems for the nation's 

defense, civil aviation and other iniemational and domestic applications Our advanced sensors and 

reconnaissance systems are now on patrol, in the air and under the sea. 

The challenges posed by our endeavors provide exciting engineering oppominiiies in diverse fields - from 

surveillance systems like AWACS and Joint STARS, to spacetwrne sensor systems, electro-optics.'infrared 

technologies and advanced imaging systems 

Send your resume to Northrop Grumman ESSD, Depi U of M. P.O. Box 1693, MS 1162. Baltimore, MD 

21203-169) Fax: 410/993-7B00: email; jobs,essdasmtpgty.bwi wec.com Visit our Website at 

www.esd.com. An equal opportunity employer 




Long Lines. Late Nights. 
Lot 4. Then, Fevauy, 
It Registers — Hard 
Work Eventlauy Pays. 

Al USF&G, wc know what In do v\jth 
everylhing you've achieved — we'll pul 
your skills 10 work tor one of the nation's 
largcsi property/easualty insurance compa- 
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and .^0 branch offices around the country, it's 
no wonder wc can oiler exciting opportu- 
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everything frotn accounting to computer 
science, marketing to infonnation systems, 
husiness administration to finance. .And wc 
know how to trtake it pay off i'or your future. 

Whether you are looking for a summer 
internship or full-lime empUiyment. we can 
offer career possibilities with potential. F-or 
more information, send your resume to: 
DSF&G, ATTN: HOADMDD6. 5SI)1 Smith 
.Ave.. Baltimore, MD 21209; 1-AX: t4U)) 
578-21. '50; e-mail: lechiobs@usfg.com 

Wc :ire all cqudl opportunity criiploycr. M/F/D/V 



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I 



Congratulations to the Class of ) 997! As an architectural or 
engineering graduate, the advantage is yours. Now your biggest 
decision is to make your degree count. 

As a leading designer, constructor, developer, and operator of 
capital facilities and technical systems, Sverdrup Corporation 
founded in 1928, strives to achieve total satisfaction through 
talented people, a business philosophy based on integrity, and 
commitment to success. From airports to aerospace, education to 
entertainment, the diversity of Sverdrup Corporation's 
capabilities and markets is matched only by the variety of our 
professionals. As a national organization dedicated to excellence 
in architecture, engineering, construction, and operations, we 
focused on achieving market leadership by delivering quality 
services nationally and internationally. 

To explore career opportunities with 
Sverdrup Corporation, 

send or fax your resume to: 



Human Resources Manager 

1001 19th St. North, Suite 700 

Arlington, VA 22209 

Fax: (703) 352-4300 

EOE/AA 



283 



(Congratulation!; 199/ Clradualcs 



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«020 Baliimore Blvd. 
College Park, MD 20740 
(301) 441-8110 
(Ml) 474-7725 FAX 



• Voted # I for Terp-Wear • All Textbook Orders 



CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES 

from all of us at 

TERP TERRITORY 

Remember that we always have 
your best interest at 

just call 779-TERP for all your University needs 
Located in the College Park shopping center 



• aDUBisissv aujsiEy-punj aajj • sjnoXng 



Congradulations 

CLASS OF 1 997 

From the official travel agency 
for the University of Marvland 

OVIEG^ 

l40RLDTR4kEL 



Graham 


tajfing Services 


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COMPUTER CENTER 

7129 Ambassador Road 
Baltimore, MD 21244 

(410)944-6200 extension 246 

FAX (410) 944-5999 

Internet E-Mail Address SMYSZKO@Entrel .com 




lAUTOSEI 
915C0LLE6EAVIIUE 
LLE6EPAEK,MD20M 




Congratutations 

1997 

University of MarylancC 
graduates 




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Your Supplier of Quality 
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State Use Industries 



Division of Correction 

23 Foniana Lane. Suite 105 

Baliimorc, Maryland 21237 

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CAKES AMD COOKIES 

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Congratufations 
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rom 



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OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



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Mon-Thur, 10:00 am -7:00 pm 

Friday 10:00 am ■6:00 pm 
Sat, -Sun. 12:00 pm -5:00 pm 



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(301)340-9319 Pager: (703)214-8856 



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287 



IL I 



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Compliments 

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Wayne Adams, President 

Aruther Bridgett, Vice President 

Mark G. Greenfiled, Business Manager 

Emmett Gardner, Financiai Secretary/Treasurer 

32 1 7 t2t^ Stn^, %.£. - 7Vcu/UH<^t^, V.e- 200 f 7 

635-^429 

® 




ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAR 

MANAGEMENT TRAINEES 

Enterprise is the largest privately-owned 
automotive rental and leasing company 
in the U.S. With over 2500 branch offices 
nationally, Enterprise ranks No. 1 in the 
industry. Over the last 8 years, Enterprise 
has had an outstanding average annual 
growth rate of 25%. International Expansion 
underway into Canada and UK. Established 
in 1957, and headquartered in St. Louis, 
Enterprise is a stable, diversified, and 
decentralized company which offers 
exceptional career opportunities. 

The Enterprise Career Path Offers: 

• A structured career ladder with 
performance-based promotions 
100% from within. 

• A multi-faceted on-the-job Management 
Training Program which includes 
administrative, managerial, marketing, and 
sales functions. 

• A corporate culture devoted to positive, 
progressive and innovative management 
practices. 

• A comprehensive compensation package 
which includes salary, full benefits, 401 K, 
and profit-sharing. 

Management Trainee Qualifications: 

• BS/BA degree preferred. 

• Business, Marketing, or management 
background helpful. 

• Evidence of sound math, communication, 
and leadership skills. 

• Management trainee positions are entry-level 
and require no previous professional experience. 

To explore career opporlunities with ENTERPRISE 
REIMT-A-CAR please send a resume to 

^ ENTERPRISE 
^ RENT-A-CAR 

9125 Gaither Road 
Gaithersburg, MD 20877 

Phone 301-670-8649 
Fax 301-670-5876 

Equal Opportunity Employer 




NATIONAL 

GUARD 




BeatTlieHighGost 

OfCbnegeAndThe 

Tou^JobMarketln 

(SeMSwoop. 

Join the All National 
(kiard and take a bit; chunk 
< )Ut of your oillegf tuiti( m The 
combination ot a monthK pas 
check and the Montgomen 
(j.l. Bill can make a hit^hu 
education a rcalitv 

Not only that, well uive 
you management and leadei 
ship skills, and on the lob 
experience. Along w ith tht 
chance to do a little globe 
trotting through tree an tiavt I 
when space is av ailable 

See an An Guard 
recniitenOrcaltlSOO 
610-4921 

il, Air National Guaixl 

.taiaiains.i\in'«.'ir[tet. 



'St^"^ • 



».'--^ 



289 



Explore Tomorrow's 
Technology Today 

In a Challenging Career 
as a Patent Examiner 




The Patent and 

Trademark 

Office has 

immediate 

openings for 

science and 

engineering 

graduates. 



For application information, call: 
1-800-368-3064 




Equal Opportunity Employer 



U.S. Citizenship Required 





[achiijeek.lO.DOOdriuerssmitch 

their car insurance to GflCD. But there's 

aiuia u s room for one more . 




If people suddenly 
flock to a new movie or a 
restaurant, us probably 
worth checking out. Well 
every week, 10,000 drivers 
do more than check out the rates and 
24-hour ser\-ice olfered b\' GblCO Auto 
Insurance. These IIIJJO dlluerS SlitClf. 
So you have to wonder what you're 
missme. For starters, , n .„u 

one 15-minute call ^^^g ijou1S% OT Mlt 
to GEICO could save flB W^ ^"SJnn " 
you 15% or more on 

car insurance. You'll even get a 

lie-Sy-iillG COmpariSSfl wnh your current 

policy so you can see the savings. In 

fact, we reward new customers with 

iiians of dollars in sauings. And 

because we value the long- 
term relationships we build 

Govemmenl Employees Insurance Co ■ GEICO General Insurance Co • GEICO Indcmnily Co • GEICO C.isu.iln Co Thc^ 
ihe U b Govemmenl GEICO auto msurance is nol available in WA or NJ GEICO, Washingion DC 2tll17(S 




with our policyholders, we 

offer rsneuialtoouerSE of them 

every year. But here's where 
GEICO really excels. While 
an)' insurance company can 
answer your questions or update 
\'0ur polic); how man\' can do it alter 
the 1 1 o'clock news^ That's the beauty 

of GEicos coiplete Iftiour mm. 

You can conduct any business anytime 
In many cases, your claim can be 

Seftled UJithin 48 IllHIfS ol reporting the 
details of an incident. So call GEICO at 
1-8(18-841-3(1111 We'll always make room 
for sensible drivers. Particularly drivers 

who are sensible with their money 



The scmiblc altcinaUvc. 
1-800-841-3000 anytime. 



sh.irrhnldcr- owned cnmn.inies .la- noi alTiluUcd \v»h /r^. r irm. avt* 



291 



Live just MINUTES away from Campus! 



m 



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I 



6285 FERNWOOD TERRACE RIVERDALE, MD 20737 

•k Cable TV 

"i!^ 1 & 2 Bedmom AptirtmenI, ...n^iiiihdensMjniihrwms 

# Modern kitchens with pantry 

ik Room si/ed P.itio/Baltonv 

•# Close to Shopping 

"% Pool in Summer 

■ji' Wall lo wall Carpeting 

■^ Laundry Facilities on property 



x^ 



^i^'vy/^'"'^ 






mn-nw 



STAPLES 

The Office Superstore 



Staples has taken over the office 
supply marketplace. Currently 
operating over 425 stores in North 
America, with the addition of 1 0O-i- 
nev/ stores for 1 996. Right nov/ 
we are looking for top performers 
to contribute to our phenomenal 
growth and aggressive expansion. 

Retail Opportunities 

' GENERAL MANAGERS 
' ASSISTANT MANAGERS 
'SALES ASSOCIATES 

please send resumes to: 
Staples, Inc. 

Human Resources - UM9S 
9470 Arlington Blvd. 
FairFax, VA 22031 



I Tommie Broadwater Jr. 

Bail Bonds 



ALLAAARYL^ND COUNTIES 

(CALL ON DC S VIRGINIA BONDS ALSO) 



COURTEOUS, FASrSfRV/CE 



TIT 



24 HOUR SERVICE • 365 DAYS 
ANYWHERE • ANYTIME 



GLENARDEN • MARYLAND 

773-9462 
772-2663 




292 



Congratulations Graduates 



You've Made An Investment. 
Now, It's Our Tlirn. 




Whoilu'i you K' 

still piiisumgN'Oui 

degici.', 01 nio 

leady logiaduaio, 

vou'u' iiiadod 

incnniiiglul mwsi 

iiii'iii wiyom tiiruio Aiollcgc 

oduuiiioii uauiH' lIioho, "" 

ospitwlly I!) iod.i\'s 

compi'tifi\c 

lohiiiaikot 



Ai Clk'\y Cliaso Bank 
aiid B F' Saul MongagL' 
Conipain, i\o lia\e<rsralik' 
25>carhisioiA ot iinosting in 
piohibiiig individiial.s \iid ulion ii 
loivios lo'adding to oiii piolossioii.il 




toaji). lilt' inoif divi'ist' tjio i'\(.x'iK'iX(.', 
tin- bctlci 

Wo invito you to piiisuo a tiitiiio 
with an iiiMiiiilion wlio.so iiaiiio is 
.svnonymoiis with oiiiMandmg 
fmaiicial .MKtos.s Foi inkunianon, 
ploahOiontaa ii.sai oiioot the 
Follouing kxations 

Suburban Maryland 

FAX ^500 907 4733 01 
Phono ^oOn'W'SoOO 

Fredenck, Maryland 

FAX ^30 11620-8408 01 
Phono ^30 11020-8400 

Laurel, Maiyland 

FAX ^30n 309-3025 01 
^honc i30n3o9-3000 

Northern Virginia 

Phono ,7031 287-7300 



CHEW CHASE BANK 

Hull III:; inifWIcdullhllJiiU'^ Ilk!) iilllcw IDP* iJcV ''iT-.^s'/o 



Welcome 
to the 
REAL 
WORLD 










THOMAS R. McNUTT 

President 



Thars what everyone calls life 
after college, but we keep trying 
to cfiange the "real" world. 

We want to make it better 

We want safer work places We 
want justice and dignity on the 
|ob lor working men and woman 
We want fair play in promotions 
and career advancement 

Thars why we're Number One in 
the Washington metropolitan area 
when It comes to representing 
men and woman who work in a 
wide variety of )obs ranging from 
supermarket clerks to police 
officers, nurses to social workers 

We're Local 400 of the United Food 
& Commercial Worker's, welcoming 
you to help us change 
the "real" world, 
for the better 



C. JAMES LOWTHERS 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Coiiilratulatioiis 



f II no 







DARCARS TOYOTA 
Of Silver Spring 
301/622-0300 

12210 Cherry Hill Road 
Silver Spring, MD 

LEXUS 

Of Silver Spring 

301/680-0400 

2505 Prosperity Terrace 
Silver Spring, MD 



DARCARS CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 
Of Silver Spring 
301/622-0010 

2509 Prosperity Terrace 
Silver Spnng, f^D 

DACARS MAZDA 
Of Silver Spring 
301/622-0020 

12214 Cherry Hill Road 
Silver Spring, MD 



Immediate 

AERA, Inc. 

A new ERA in engineering 

Local comapny seeks part-time 

or full-time cgi scripter, and/or Authorware, 

and/or web worker 



Advanced Engineering and Research Associates, Inc. 

7500 Greenway Center Drive, Suite 300 
Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 



301-982-3057 garyblk@aera.com 



293 



Come join one of the nation^s leading 
progressive grocery retailers! 



Safeway has a few leadership training openings for people who are 
interested in developing a diverse set of business management skills. 

Customer Relations • Marketing • Accounting 
• Human Relations • Labor Relations 

Our retail management positions offer: 

• competitive salary plus bonus • stock options • generous benefits package 

• paid vacations • continuous career development! training 

• employee association 'friendly work environment • credit union 



SAFEWAY 



If a retail management career with Safeway is of mtcrcst to you, submit a resume to the 
Safeway Retail Leadership Development Coordinator at the following location 

Safeway Training School 

7700 Little River Turnpike 

Annandale, VA 22003 

SAFEWAY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER 




LABORERS' DISTRICT 

COUNCIL OF 

WASHINGTON, DC. AND VICINITY 



Clarence C. Campbell, Business Manager 

Providing career opportunities in the 
construction industry with: 



Apprenticeship and upgrade 
SkiUs Trmizting - 
Competlttve Wages 
Health Care Benefits for 
Worker and Dependents 
Excellent Pension 
Representation 
Stable-Bmiploynient 



For more information call: (202) 347-1344 

. 7826 EASTERN AVE., N.W., SUITE LUl, 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20,012 




CAREER MOVES 

You may think of Giant simply as a grocery store. ..but we're much more than that. 
We are one of the most successful customer-oriented supermarket/pharmacy 
operations in the nation. If you would like to join such a company, then Giant Food 
may be for you. Giant's career oriented training program has been one of the 
reasons Giant is such a strong, well-integrated organization. Giant Food offers entry 
level positions as Retail Trainees in our Retail Store Management Training Program 
and Staff Pharmacist positions with the opportunity to advance to Pharmacy Manage- 
ment. In addition, we offer an excellent company paid benefits package. 

If you're looking for a challenging career, come see us at Giant! 

Giant Employment Centers 

Baltimore: 8053-A Liberty Road 
Fairfax: 9452 Main Street 
Landover: 6300 Sheriff Road 
Rockville: 12015 F Rockville Pike 




EOE 




EASTALCO 

ALUMINUM COMPANY 

AN ALUMAX INC COMPANY 



5601 MANOR WOODS ROAD 
FREDERICK, MARYLAND 
21703-7999 

(301)662-6100 



ISO 9002 Quality 

System 

Registration 



Step Up To fl 
Jlordstrom Q|portunitv. 



W« arc seeking highly moiivjttd. goal-oricnicd people who 
enjoy nneccmg customer needs and desires By holding the 
door open to fuvther gtowch and advancement, there ate no 
limits on how high you can climb 

Bring your energy, moti/aiion and ideas to a career at 
Nordstrom A competitive compensation and comprehensive 
benefits package Tremendous opportunities to leant and 
grow You'll find them all and much more at Nordstrom 
Call 1-800-695-1121 for more information 

NORDSTROM 

Wc arc an Equal Opporiuniiy Emplovcr commiucJ lo 
providing a culturally diverse workplace 



295 






paraphrasing 74e S<M*td ^ "Tfticuc: "Good- 
bye. Farewell. It's time to go away now!" 
College has come to an end. Overbearing 
professors, difficult teaching assistants, and tuition bills 
have been replaced by overbearing bosses, difficult land- 
lords, and college loan repayment plans. The wish that 
college was over has been granted. I hope that none of the 
graduates of Winter 1996 and Spring 1997 regretted 
making the leap from college student to "full-fledged adult" . 

The world has benefited greatly because you were a 
graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park. 
Cherish your time spent on the outside, life has not ended 
because car payments, mortgages, and teacher/parent 
conferences have entered your vocabulary. Life has just 
begun and with the life expectance rate rising in the United 
States; you can expect at least 58 years of suffering as an 
adult. So live a little! Enjoy the experience of being free 
from term papers, psych experiments, and the Maryland 
Automated Registration System. In the Real World, no one 
says, "You received a grade of F, as in FRANK!" 

The staff of the Terrapin Yearbook had a lot of fun 
putting this book together. As you look through the 1997 
Terrapin, We hope you noticed the love put into the book 
by the staff to make 1997 - StMiet/Utu^ to^ T^e*Ke«td€n-. 

Good luck and best wishes to the Class of 1997. 



n J n ^ ^ 



Maybe we did not need to 
see the person's face?! 




^ a r u 



297 



Terrapin Yearbook 



L 



Tracy Isaac 
Shari Scott 

Joanne Saidman 
Ed Graves, II 

Ranu Chaudhary 



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29 



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Tyrone Brooks - Photographer 




Snorre Wik - Photographer 



The 1997 Terrapin is the 
96th volume of the University 
of Maryland at College Park 
yearbook. Jostens Printing and 
Publishing Company produced 
the 304 page book with a trim 
size of 9"xl2", 16 process 
color pages, and 16 full color 
pages of World Beat on glossy 
paper. There was a press run 
of 950 and was printed at the 
Jostens plant in State College, 
PA. 

The flag design on page 32 
was originated by Ben Scholl 
and redesigned by Joanne 
Saidman. All pages were de- 
signed and executed on 
PageMaker 5.0 on the 
Macintosh II. 

Eric Manto served as our 
Jostens representative with 
Linda Nolf as the in-plant pub- 
lishing consultant. Carl Wolf 
Studios of Sharon Hill, PA pho- 
tographed the graduates and 
provided photography supplies 
to the Terrapin photographers. 
Scholastic Advertising of 
Liburn, GA sold the advertise- 
ments. 

The body copy of the book 
was set in 12 point Adobe 
Souvenir, with variations in 
point size and appearance 
throughout the book. Head- 
line design was consistent 
through each section of the 
book. 

In order to meet preset dead- 
lines, coverage in the Sports 
section includes the 1996 sea- 
son for all sports. Groups 
pictured in the Organizations 
section paid for their space. 
Pages were sold at a first come 
basis for $100 for a full page 
and $50 for a half page. 

Yearbooks could be or- 
dered in the fall semester for a 
reduced rate of $28 and in the 
spring semester for $36. Ship- 
ping cost was additional at $6. 

The views expressed in the 
1997 Terrapin do not neces- 
sarily express the views of 
Maryland Media, Inc., or any 
of its affiliates, or the Univer- 
sity of Maryland at College 
Park. Address any inquires to: 
Editor 

Terrapin Yearbook 
3101 South Campus Dining 
Hall College Park, MD 20742. 

Copyright 1997 
Maryland Media, Inc. 
All rights reserved. 



Joshua Bird 
Vicki Duckett 
Marylou Giangaspero 
Abe Silverman 
J. Eric Zimmermann 



JP/2 O Z O g: X- SL :[y In GJTS 

Russell Acosta 
Tyrone Brooks 
Dave Cooper 
Rachel Kaminsky 
Kim Pederick 
Dana Sears 
Paul Vieira 
Snorre Wik 




n J n f 



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n 1 n f 



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Paul Vieira - Photographer 



299 



Tracy Isaac - Editor in Chief 





Shari Scott - Managing Editor 



Joanne Saidman- Consulting Editor 




V)0 



Terrapin Yearbook 



16 



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filled that goal. Tprraoin has been a hard, but emotionally inspiring 

recognize them for their help and talents. pressures of the job get to you 

Shari - 1 hope you learned from my -'^^""P'^^ ^o not et the p ^.^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^.^ 

next year. I am leaving you in Sood. capable hands^Chns, Crag^ 99^.^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^p.^^ 
are aLys there for you. Never --* to reach out for help . B ^^ ^^^^^^^,^ ^^^^^^ ^.^^ ^ 

you will need it. Ed - you were a f^send. You pushed ^^^.^^^^ ^^^^^^^ _ ^^^ 

photographer's eyes. Thank you for y^^^^^'^^^^ZJ^^^^ someone to run the business 
Sefinitely do miracles. You entered '"^o my 1 J ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ing board for all my self- 

affairs of the Terrapin. You made my f ^^^^ ™",king with you. Without your help, the 
proclaimed woes. Joanne - we did ^^■^^'"'^'^Aed^ur^^^^^^ well together. You believed ,n 
'l997 Terrapin would have never existed. Wejorted ^ S ^^^ _ ^^^^^ YOU! 
me when others doubted my desire to "^f ^ ^e yeajboo^ unto g ^^^^ ^^^^ .^ ^ 

To the photographers, I want to thank V^" '— f ^'^^^^^at This year's Terrapin is far from 
yearbook without great photos? A -;y f "ll^b°°V"d ^^°^^^^^^ ^ J, You handled everything 
boring or dull. Paul - you have been th^r^ when^l n^ede V ^^^^^^^^i ,,3, that I arn 

, threw your way with a smile, ^ou co-ed cP--^^^ ^^^ J^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^p.^ f„,d ,,d i 

S ptS^aph^strytXr ^^^^^^^^^ I KTut.yed working with me as much as 1 

enjoyed working with you. ^^ ^ ^t^i^t deadlines and over the 

To the writers, each of you need an award or dea. g tremendous talent. 

and ,*,ng a chance in me "%"' ^Jh™ rLTXck I hope , created a yearbook .ha, 
make 1997 something to remember! 



Tracy Isaac 
Editor in Chief 
1997 Terrapin 



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301 




Paul Vieria 





Paul Vieria 



303 





Russell Acosta 



UNIV OF MD COLLEGE PARK 





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