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Full text of "The Terrapin"




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University of l\4aryl^d 
College Par'"^ 

Terr. J 

2003 •v/ime102 



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University of l\4arylrfid 
College Parlir 

Terrapin 

2003 'Vjlurneioa 



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TO SEE THE CHERRY HUNG VfVIITH SNO\J\i 




student Life 20 



Athletics 78 



Greek Life 12 8 



Academics 148 



Organizations 172 



Seniors 224 



Advertisements 2 88 




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-US budded with new 



athatic achievements. With a 
rowing undergraduate 
population, students found 





themselves immersed in a 
socially diverse environment. 
I Like a redwood tree that 



:, touches the sky after years of 



growth, the University continued 



to expand its branches in its 



maturation. With over 65 top 25 



programs, higher incoming 



GPAs, a NCAA National 
Basketball Championship, and a 



nationally acclaimed Performing 

Arts Center, the University 

appealed to the diverse 

interests of students. Nourished 

by the drive and dedication of 

students, the seeds of culture 



and academia fused together 
into a full bloom. 





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Among the many fun and different 
activities on McKeldin Mall, a 
pie toss attracts a prospective 
college student. Maryland Day 
opened its doors to both 
students and their families. 



Adorned with a large Maryland- 
red bow tie, sunglasses, and 
hat, a clown brightens the day 
for the fair's participants. The 
University encouraged all 
student groups to participate. 



Passerbys notice an enormous 
balloon decorated with the 
Maryland state flag on the side 
of the Mall. Maryland Day also 
helped the school promote its 
new "Zoom" slogan. 



A community member allows a 
student to paint his face with 
Maryland icons. Face painting 
was one of several activities 
that contributed to the 
carnival-like atmosphere. 







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The University sponsored several 
activities on Maryland Day which allowed 
the school to show off its beautiful 
grounds, as well as allow visitors to 
explore the academics, organizations, and 
facilities . 

The clear, sunny skies allowed for 
the many outdoor activities on McKeldin 
Mall, and other parts of the campus. 
Highlights included a tour of Maryland' s 
infamous Wind Tunnel, a basketball shoot- 
out at Cole Field House, and free ice 
cream samples from the dairy. i^H 

The center of activity for the day, 
McKeldin Mall hosted numerous student 
organizations ranging from club sport; 
to Greek life to SGA. The groups set-up 
tables and tents to attract prospective 

tudents. 

Thanks to the combined efforts of 
students and staff, Maryland Day realized 
great success. 




Members of the chemistry 
department explain to 
viewers the purpose of an 
elaborate experiment. The 
different colleges sponsored 
displays to promote their 
curriculum and attract 
students to majors within 
those colleges. 



Peddling a bicycle, a student 
tries to illuminate light 



k i nie tic 
Phyte i c s 



bulbs t hrough 
energy . The 
Department used tihis 
experiment to promote -its 
slogan "Physics is Phunl 



A student learns to use the 
laws of physics to become a 
better pool hustler. Physics 
majors set up the pool table 
at the front of campus, 
across from the Physics 
building, t -o. attract 
science-oriented students, 



Eyes focused on 
the stage , 

students rush to 
the secur i ty 
barriers as 
Wye 1 e f Jean 
takes the st^ge".' 
S e V er-ai' b a n d s 
played at the 
concert ; 
however, Wyclef, 
due to his 
national fame, 
was the most 
poopular . 



MacGregor, the opening band 
at Art Attack, performs a 
\set of tunes. The band set 
le festive tone for the rest 
o:^ the evening. 



Localj artisans display their 
crafts on the Mall, and 
expl^'ain the processes 
through which they make the 
items. Venders of several 
different cultures and 
businesses brought their 
goods to Art Attack in hopes 
of selling them to students. 




24 








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The annual free concert series, Art 
Attack, continued its successful tradition 
with performances by artists such as 2 
Skinnee Js, MacGregor, and a headlining 
act by hip-hop musician Wyclef Jean. Various 
exhibits on the Mall occupied students until _ " >, 
the big concert event in Byrd Stadium. 

With a large overall student ^jk^^. 
attendance, the crowd exhibited considerable '" ^ 
enthusiasm. Only the second year in which 
the concert was held in Byrd Stadium, the 
crowd continued to increase after sets by 
both MacGregor and 2 Skinnee Js . With 
Wyclef s performance, students filled the 
stadium's lawn and many of the bleacher , 
seats to hear him perform songs such as /:^ 
"Gone 'Til November," "No Woman, No Cry," 
and "Redemption Song." 

The Student Entertainment Events 
organizations sponsored the event, devoting 
much time and effort to ensure student's 
safety and the event's success. A 






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Wyclef Jean rocks Byrd Stadium 
with his hip-hop rhythms and 
rhymes. By the time Wyclef took 
the stage, the stadium was 
filled with students ready to 
party. 

After the shock of the terrorist 
attacks, students celebrate 
their American heritage by 
selling American- inspired food 
for low prices. All dishes cost 
less than two dollars. 

A police office explains the 
importance of police presence 
around campus . He employed the 
motorcycle as a tool to 
demonstrate the various ways in 
which police patrol the area. 

New York City's 2 Skinnee Js 
pumps up the crowd with their 
hip-hop grooves. The group, 
comprised of six artists, set 
• he tone for the rest of the 
evening. 




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Due to the high demand foi 
tickets, students camped out 
nights ahead of time to ensure 
their place at this unique 
event. Despite the cold weather, 
students waited patiently. 



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Cole opens its doors to allow fans 
to watch the Men's Basketball team 
receive the National Championship 
trophy. The team had an undefeated 
record in the stadium for the 2001- 
2002 season. 



Cole Field House crews clear the 
floors just prior to the start of 
the final game in the arena. After 
the Terps victory over Virginia, 
fans flooded the floor to celebrate 
and congratulate the team. 

A vendor sells a beverage to an 
attendee at the final game at Cole 
Field House. Due to contractual 
obligations. Cole, like other 
buildings on campus, was obligated 
to sell Pepsi products. 




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A bittersweet experience for most 
Maryland sports fans, the closing of Cole 
Field House left behind memories of great 
basketball and exciting wins. 

The Terrapin's victory over the 
University of Virginia in the final game 
held in Cole ended a record- setting season, 
which led to the school's first National 
Championship. Filled to capacity with fans 
sporting the Maryland colors, the stadium 
closed its door after the commemorative 
ceremony, which featured former players and 
alumni , concluded . 

Since its opening in 1955, Cole Field 
has witnessed countless great moments in 
the university's sport's history. Students 
and alumni remorsed to watch Cole close its 
large, red doors, but took solace in a 
victorious future at the new Comcast Center . 
Junior Tricia Burrows said, "Being in Cole 
during the last game was truly a once in a 
lifetime experience." 




students rejoice as the 
doors to Cole open at 
7 a.m. to sell tickets. 
Despite confusions at 
previous ticket sales, 
students maintained 
order when receiving 
their tickets to the 
final game. 



At most regular 
basketball games students 
adorn themselves with red 
and white or the name of 
their favorite player . 
However, at this game, 
students made posters and 
t-shirts to celebrate 
Cole Field House. 











27 



As American-colored lights 
shine down on him, a student 
musician passionately sings 
into the microphone. Even 
months after the September 
11th attacks, students still 
remembered the tragic events 
of that day. 



Student musicians perform 
their favorite tunes for 
their fellow classmates. The 
All-Nighter allowed students 
to showcase their hidden 
talents . 



A caricature artist creates 
a rendering of a student 
desperately trying to 
maintain a pose. The 
caricature station was one 
of several activities in 
which students could 
participate . 





.28 



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In it's twenty first year, the All- 
Nighter once again celebrated the diversity 
of the campus through an array of fun and 
safe activities for the entire student body. 

Amateur musicians performed their 
favorite musical selections as an audience 
of their peers grooved along. The Nyumburu 
Cultural Center also sponsored student 
musicians which garnered a large student 
response . 

Some students made new friends through 
the more social activities. Video game 
enthusiasts challenged each other to rounds 
of their favorite arcade games, while some 
others placed their bets at the mock casino 
tables. Students also enjoyed Greek Life's 
"Sex and the City" marathon, an especially 
popular sitcom despite the school's lack 
of HBO in the dorms. After the All-Nighter, 
sophomore Parisima Nourmahommadi commented, 
"The All-Nighter rocked! It was a great way 
for the campus to come together." 




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while crews set-up for the next 
act, a student entertains the 
crowd by stepping-up to the mic 
and singing a few lyrics. Other 
students sang gospel favorites, 
as well, in between sets. 

A student stamps the hand of a 
police officer and then shows 
him the way into the party. 
Local police officers ensured 
the safety of all students in 
attendance . 

Experiencing a taste of Las 
Vegas Life, students wager on a 
game of black jack. Because not 
all students were of legal 
gambling age, participants 
played for nonmonetary prizes. 

Thirsty after a long night of 
fun and entertainment , a student 
purchases a soda from the 
concession stand. After paying 
for her beverage, she proceeded 
to the movie theatre to catch a 
flick. 




A family enjoys a meal at the 
North Woods buffet. Family 
Weekend gave students the 
opportunity to treat their 
parents to a meal with their 
extra meal points. 

After dinner, a student and her 
parents partake in a "Dinner and 
Discussion" session to talk about 
university's academic programs. The 
forum allowed families to contribute 
to the academia of the school . 

A family experiences the unique 
flavors of the North Words buffet. 
Following their meal, the trio 
headed over to the Performing Arts 
Center for some musical and 
theatrical entertainment . 

Before heading to Byrd Stadium, a 
family takes a moment to pose for 
a group shot. The family tailgate 
provided students and their 
families with a break from the 
monotony of the school week. 





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Maryland' s Family Weekend featured 
academic, athletic, and cultural events to 
engage a wide variety of family interests. 
Programs such as the College Park Scholars, 
University Honors, and the Gemstone Research 
Project held open houses that allowed parents 
to learn more about the academic areas in 
which their child was involved. Additionally, 
a President' s Open House was held, which 
gave families the opportunity to speak with 
University President Mote, and learn about 
his future plans for the campus. 

For dinner, families enjoyed food from 
the North Woods buffet. Several "Dinner 
and Discussion" forums were held to discuss 
a variety of topics from book publishing to 
physics lectures. After dinner, the 
Performing Arts Center housed performances 
by the dance ensemble, choral goup, and the 
A Cappella group, while sports enthusiasts 
witnessed the Football team' s win over 
Wofford College. 




At the parent -sponsored tailgate, 
a family pre-games the Maryland 
versus Wofford football game. 
With beautiful sunny weather, 
families welcomed the chance to 
bond over beer and burgers . 




with a little help from 
Testudo, Deborah Yeo, 
President CD. Mote, Jr. and 
Governor Paris Glendening 
cut the official red ribbon 
on the new arena. All those 
in attendance cheered, as 
many._-yea:fs of anticipation 
finally came to an end. 



Governor Paris Glendening 
entertains guests at the 
\grand opening. Attendees 
cipngregated on the court of 
the arena where they enjoyed 
focsd, drinks, and live music. 



Guests mingle under a skie 
of streamers and balloons. 
Extefisively adorned with 
decorations in the Maryland 
colors, the gala promoted the 
"winning tradition" of the 
University's athletic teams. 




32 




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UNIVERSITY OF 



After six long years of planning and 
construction, \the red ribbon was cut and the Comcast 
Center opened its doors to an enthusiastic crowd. 

At an evening gala, select students, alumni, 
members of the favulty and staff, as well as 
contributors to the University, congregated to 
experience the first taste of the new arena. Among 
those in attendance were Maryland Governor Paris 
Glendening, University of Maryland President CD. 
Mote, Jr., and Head Coach of the Maryland Men's 
Basketball team, Gary Williams. Following a number 
of speeches and a video detailing the development 
of the stadium, the caterers served appetizers 
while tour guides led groups through the building. 

The Comcast Center, which cost over $100 
million to construct, is more than twice the size 
of its predecessor, with more restrooms and 
concession stands, as well as a video screen 
scoreboard. "The new Comcast Center looks 
professional," said sophomore Geraldine Doetzer, 
"I can't wait for all this season's basketball 
games ! " 







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A human model representing a 
gymnast holds a perfect pose . The 
party organizers hired these human 
models, who changed positions 
nearly every ten minutes, as a 
form of entertainment . 




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Guests chow-down on h'ors douerves 
while making new friends. The food 
selection contained everything 
from roast beef sandwiches and 
potatoes, to pastries and tarts 
for dessert. 


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Gary Williams delivers an 
emotionally charged speech. 




After coaching his team to a 


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National Championship, his dream 
of the Comcast Center was 


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finally complete. 


A keyboardist jams with the 
rest of the jazz band. The 
live music contributed to the 


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celebratory atmosphere of the 
event . 





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Gary Williams welcomes students 
to the new Comcast Center. After 
presenting a short speech, his 
team took the court and played 
a scrimmage. 

Ryan Randle drives to the hoop, 
and slams in the ball. The large 
crowd helped simmulate real game 
conditions, which helped the 
team prepare to play against 
its opponents. 



Sprinting to the trampoline, a 
member of the Gymkana troupe 
performs a mid- air somersault over 
her teammate. The crowd cheered 
on the fearless group as they 
performed many dangerous routines . 

With his teammate protecting him 
from the opponents, Steve Blake 
steams ahead to the hoop. Fans 
delighted to preview both the 
old and new players . 










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Decked out in Maryland apparel , students 

flocked to Midnight Madness, a tradition which 

was founded at the University of Maryland, 

^ ready to cheer their teams on to another 

■' {•■■ successful season. 

PI.' The event was anticipatd even more than 
'•''"' \ usual due to the Men's Basketball team's first 
i: National Championship in the Spring of 2002, 
N>,-i and the opening of the Comcast Center. For 
" '^: many students. Midnight Madness was the first 
opportunity they had to see the new, state- 
of-the-art arena. 

Tickets for the event were guaranteed 

i via the internet, and sold out days prior to 

^" " the Madness. Approximately 17,000 students 

•^- ■: attended, and witnessed Gymkana performances, 

^i-* students relays, raffles, and a laser show, 

' *1 before thunderously applauding players from 

^^ the Men's and Women's Basketball teams. Junior 

-• Chelsea Soneira said, "This year's Midnight 

I' Madness was the best ever. Gymkana and the 
laser show got the whole crowd pumped." 



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Andre Collins guards Drew 
Nicholas, attempting to 
steal the ball from him. The 
scrimmage allowed the 
players to hone their skills 
before the start of regular 
season games . 




A member of the Gymkana 
Troupe hurdles herself 
through a blazing ring of 
fire. In addition to 
performing at Midnight 
Madness, the Gymkana Troupe 
also traveled to local 
schools to perform in front 
of grade school students. 



35 



Trying to gain yards, a 
member of the Wolf pack is 
stopped dead in his tracks 
by a Terp team effort . 



The press rushes onto the 
field to interview players 
and coaches after the big 




A young Terp fan asks the 
players for an autograph. 
Fans quickly flocked onto the 
field to congratulate their 
team. 



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Homecoming celebrations centered around* 
the traditional Saturday afternoon football' 
game. With noted enthusiasm and participation 
by the Greek system and an exciting win against 
North Carolina State, Homecoming weekend brought J 
much festivity to the campus. ^ 

Prior to Homecoming, the InterfratemityT 
Council and Panhellenic Association sponsored 
activities and sporting events. The Greek 
organizations cornpeted in Olympics on the Row, 
a talent show, and a Mr. and Mrs. Greek 
competition. The winners of the Fall 2002 
Homecoming were Theta Chi and Alpha Chi Omega. 

During Homecoming weekend, the Maryland 
Alumni Association held a class of 1952 reunion, 
hall dedications, and alumni tailgates. The! 
canpus was crowded with visitors and alumni. ,. 

The football game itself was a huge-'^ 
success, with a close win against North Carolina 
State. The Terps recovered with a final score 
of 24-21 after trailing the majority of the 
game. ,_ 



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The third annual Dance Nferathon, consisting 
mostly of students in the Greek System, helped to 
raise over $40,000 for the Elizabeth Glaser 
Pediatric AIDS Foundation. 

The event, which lasted from 5 p.m. Saturday 
until 10 a.m. Sunday, was open for registration 
to the entire University, although the majority 
of the 250 students were from the Greek Syston. 
Participants were not required to dance the entire 
eighteen hours; the only restricted movement was 
sitting. The organizers and sponsors of the irarathon 
provided games, food, and musical entertainment 
for all participants. Featured celebrity 
spokesperson Eric Nies, famous for his involvement 
with MTV s The Real World and The Grind, said, 
"One person can make a difference, and you guys 
are doing it," at the conclusion of the marathon. 

This was the first tirre that all proceeds 
went to the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS 
Foundation. People diagnosed with AIDS were present 
during the event, and spoke to the participants 
about living with AIDS. 




Members of Sigma Kappa 
ority jump up on th 
;orm and lead the crowd/ 



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n a game of volleyball, a 
tudent rushes to th4 net 
o spike the ball. VolleVball 
as just one oflthe 
ernatives students had to 
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instructors lead and jump in 
' mc with her routine. 






11 





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Swimming in the bay in St. Petersburg, 
Florida, a student befriends a sting ray 
on a snorkel ing excursion. Spring break 
afforded many students with exotic 
opportunities . 



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40 












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Every year, students at the 
of Maryland., look forward to spring break with- 
great anticipation. Whether students are' 
traveling or simply relaxing at home, all are 
grateful for a week off from schoolwork. 

Many students traveled south for some 
much-needed fun in the sun; typical travelN 
destinations included Florida, Cancun, Jamaica, j 
and Acapulco. Most students had made their 
plans months in advance, and went through 
some type of travel agency. Popular travel, 
packages included airfare, sleeping' 
arrangements, and meals for one set price. 

Conversely, some students chose to stay 
closer to home on their break. Junior Mike 
Manyak recounted his spring break experiences 
in Atlantic City, "Gambling was key. I made 
$1200. It was better than class. " Other students 
decided to save their money and just stayed 
at home to catch up on rest and relaxation. 




A group of student-tourists stand 
outside the newly renovated Leaning 
Tower of Pisa in Italy. Although 
they did not return with tans, they 
did aquire a better understanding 
of Italian history and culture. 

Three women catch latin fever 
at a Cancun nightclub. The local 
bars and clubs sponsored party 
packages which included themed 
parties and all-you-can-drink 
specials . 

Soaking up the rays, a couple 
embraces on the sandy beaches 
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 
Many students opted to vacation 
in Florida due to less travel 
expenses . 




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Testudo, the official mascot of 
the University of Maryland, 
leads fans in a round of cheers. 
Present at all major sporting 
events, Testudo worked with 
cheerleaders to rouse the crowd. 

Sporting his "Fear the Turtle" t- 
shirt, a fan cheers his team on to 
victory with a Mary land- inspired face 
painting. Bod/ painting was a popular 
way in which students showed their 
support for Maryland athletics. 

The crowd looks-on as the 
Football team makes a "key" 
play. Special K lead the crowd 
in various cheers, such as the 
"car key" cheer, to support the 
Maryland Football team. 

A Maryland fan travels all the 
way to Atlanta, Georgia to cheer 
on his favorite Men's Basketball 
player, Juan Dixon. Other fans 
created signs, as well, to let 
the team know they were present . 



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In previous years, Maryland fans have 
become infamous for sometimes going too far 
in their support for Maryland athletics. 
• However, following the Men' s Basketball teairf s 
National Championship as well as the Men' s 
Football teair{ s invitiation to the Orange 
Bowl, fan participation increased while 
destructive behavior decreased. 

Subsequent to the Men' s Basketball 
team' s National Championship win, fans 
gathered on Route One and Fraternity Row for 
cheering and bonfires. While police were 
stationed on nearly every corner, the 
festivites were relatively tame compared to 
the previous year's expensive damages. 

Support has skyrocketed for the Football 
team, due, in part, to the team' s trip to the 
4'>0range Bowl. As a result of fan participation, 
' the University has implemented a new online 
system for printing tickets for football and 
basketball games, with the intent of 
eliminating the usual chaos of ticket lines. 



42 



I 1 9^m. ^^gf '" 



At the Homecoming football 
game, Terp-crazed fans jump 
to their feet after a 
touchdown play. Despite the 
cold weather, these fanatics 
decided to leave their shirts 
at home and, instead, beared 
their red-painted chests. 











43 



Alumni reunite for a night 
of quality pigskin. The 
\University made Lots 1 and 
^ available for tailgating 
purposes . 



Munching on hot dogs, 
students huddle for warmth 
on a cold, rainy pre-game 
party. Fleeces and Maryland 
sweatshirts were student's 
favorite garments- tb wear to 
keep warm aj>-'^e football 
games 




44 




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On Saturday afternoons in the fall, °^'^' 

the campus was packed. Traffic was jammed W' 

and every student in sight wore red. The ^ 

smell of barbecued hamburgers and hot dogs ■? 

wafted through the air, while fans cheered ■ 

their beers to a hopeful victory. It was i^ 

tailgating time. "' 1 

A tradition as big as Maryland football ' \ ' 

itself, students and alumni staked out the ^ 
perfect parking spot, among the many crowded 
lots, to throw open their hatchbacks and 
start their celebrations . 

Tailgating pumped people up for the I 

ensuing football game, and contributed to I 

Maryland's thriving school spirit. Some W 
students fed their adrenaline rushes by 

starting their own football games, and passed ■ 

a frisbee to one another over the sea of * 
cars. After a stressful week of classes, 

students looked forward to time for || 

socializing with their friends and fellow j^ 

football fans at these parties. ^i 



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Tailgaters share a few drinks 
and jokes prior to the big 
game. Some bus iness - smart 
tailgaters even made a profit 
on the event by charging for 
cups . 

Pints and pints of alcohol 
only lead to one place: the 
Spot-a-Pot. As more people 
felt the need to "break the 
seal," the lines grew 
increasingly long. 

A group of guys punch holes in 
their cans and attempt a new 
way to chug beer. Students 
usually congregated in Lots 1 
and 2 before heading to Byrd 
Stadium. 

Waiting to flip his burger, an 
enthused fan grills for his 
invited friends. Often times, 
new buddies were made by the 
end of the festivities, as 
regulars marched home together. 




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Mitch Hedberg performs a ccmed/ skit 
in the Union. Hedberg was featured 
on popular shows such as Latenight 
with David Letterman, The Late Late 
Show with Craig Kilbom, Crank 
Yankers, Ed, and That 70 's Show. 



Career Author Ron Kreinnich Ph.D. 
lectures in the auditorium of the 
Robert H. Smith School of Business. 
He presentation was entitled, 
"Careeer Trends in the Decade 
Ahead. . .And what to do About Them. " 



Comedian Jim Breuer promotes his 
new CD, Smoke 'N Breu, through a 
special performance at the Hoff 
Theatre. Breuer was known for his 
role as "Goat Boy" on Saturday 
Night Live, as well as for VJing 
on MTV in the mid 1990's. 



Author of 1±ie first-year book for freshman, 
' The Laramie Project, a play based on the killing of 
gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyoning, 
MDises Kaufiten came to the carrpus to answer questions 
students had regarding his play, and to speak of 
the many controversies ensuing as a result of his 
work. Sore religious groups protested the play, 
vMch was perforrtBd at the Performing Arts Center, 
because of its subject matter of horosexuality. 
Former Sattirday Night Live coredian, Jim 
Breuer, was greeted with a sold-out audience. Althou^ 
„,best-known for his role as "Goat Boy," Breuer' s 
routine contained a variety of humoroios material. 
The United Nations Secretary-Geneal, Kofi 
I Annan, spoke at Cole Field House for the first 
■"' installirent of the Anwar Sadat Lecture for Peace. 
Annan, who won the Nobel Peace Prize last year for 
his work with world peace at the United Nations, 
spoke primarily about the Israeli-Palestinian 
conflict, and repeatedly spoke of a Palestinian 




United Nations Secretary- 
General, Kofi Annan, lectures 
on the Israeli-Palestinian 
conflict. Annan's visit sparked 
so much student interest, that 
the venue for the lecture was 
changed from the Performing 
Arts Center to Cole Field House. 




Author of the controversial 
play The Laramie Project, 
Moises Kaufman lectures on 
his novel and the event that 
engendered its writing. The 
play is on the required 
reading list for all incoming 
freshman at the University. 





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A shirt is displayed for sale 
in the window of the Pro Shop. 
Students could buy all their 
Terp fitness apparell at the 
store, located conveniently on 
the lower level of the CRC . 



On a quiet night, the swimming 
pool at the CRC undergoes 
cleaning for upcoming swim 
meets. The Olympic sized pool 
attracted nationally recognized 
competitive swimmers. 

Students sweat off the stress 
of school by playing a pickup 
game of basketball. The CRC 
housed several basketball courts 
on which intramural and club 
teams practiced. 

Lunging for the ball, a man 
practices his backhand swing at 
raquetball. An especially 
popular game among students, the 
raquetball courts always f illed- 
up fast . 






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Living in an age that focused on 
fitness, students trucked to the recently 
finished Campus Recreation Center, as well 
as Ritchie Coliseum, decked in their gym 
clothes, ready to break a sweat. 

The CRC, located on North Campus, was 
especially popular due to its modern 
equipment, convenient location, and vast 
size, which could accommodate the school's 
equally large student population. It's 
Sneakers Cafe provided healthy snacks at 
affordable prices. The CRC also offered 
exercise classes, such as "Street Jam" which 
provided a fun dance atmosphere that helped 
people get in shape. 

Many students opted to work out at 
Ritchie Coliseum, located on Route One. 
Often times, Ritchie was less crowded than 
the CRC, allowing students faster access 
to equipment. Though not as modern as the 
CRC, Ritchie was often times more convenient 
to those students not living on campus. 




Testing his upper-body 
strength, a student 
practices lateral pull- 
downs . Because of the 
popularity of the CRC, some 
students had to wait in line 
to use the equipment . 



Listening to her favorite 
tunes, a student burns off 
dining hall calories by 
running on the treadmill. 
Students often brought 
portable music devices to 
ease the intensity of their 
work-out sessions. 



Returning 
Student 
Identification 
Cards to their 
owners, workers 
at the front 
desk of the CRC 
all ow~~ — — tJie_ 
students to 
enter the gym. 
Many students 
earned some 
extra cash by 
working various 
jobs at both the 
CRC and Ritchie 
Coliseum. 



49 





xi0n 



Searching among stacks of 
Compact Discs at the CD Depot, 
a student decides which CD she 
wishes to purchase. The CD Depot 
bought and sold new and used 
CDs. 

Even in the dead of winter, 
students maintain their summer 
glows by tanning at The Beach 
Tanning Center. The Beach was 
especially popular due to its 
low prices and monthly specials. 

Businesses on Route 1 depend on 
student customers to sustain 
themselves. Students made use 
of the convenient locations of 
restaurants, salons, and coffee 
shops . 

A shot of the Santa Fe Cafe 
during the middle of the day. 
While quiet during lunch hours, 
on Tuesday nights students 
flocked to the local bar for 
their Dollar Bud Night special. 




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student life often revolved around 
Route One. From post-game riots on the Row, 
to Chinese food at Danny's, Route One's 
livelihood depended on its student patrons. 

Restaurants, the largest attraction 
in downtown College Park, drew the most 
number of students. When bored with dining 
hall grub, students could enjoy a pizza 
from Ratsie's, a burrito from Chipotle, or 
even a smoothie from Smoothie King for 
dessert. New to the Route One restaurant 
scene, Ten Ren's Tea Time opened after much 
anticipation over their bubble tea. A popular 
trend in Asia, the bubble tea combined tea 

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At night, students treked to local 
bars, such as Cornerstone, Bentley's, and 
Santa Fe Cafe, which hosted dollar drafts 
and happy hour specials. After a long night 
of partying at the bars, some students 
crowded outside on Route One until the early 
hours of the morning. 




students slurp down bubble 
tea from the newly opened 
Ten Ren's Tea Time. The 
unique taste kept students 
coming back for more . 



When in need of a trim, some 
students either made 
appointments or walked in to 
see their favorite stylist 
at Bananas . The shopping 
center also included Cluck- 
U, The Bagel Place, the 
Adidas 3 Stripe Outlet, and 
Paper Works . 




New to the 
Route 1 

scene , 
Noodles and 
Company 
serves up 
three bowls 
of noodle 
di shes to 
hungry 
customers . 
The 
restaurant 
featured 
Italian, 
Ntediterranean , 
and Far 

Eastern 
cuisines . 




51 




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A dorm undergoes renovation 
during the summer months. 
Students were relocated to other 
residence halls while 
improvements continued on the 
building. 



Construction continues on the 
parking lot adjacent to the 
South Campus Dining Hall. 
Parking garages were constructed 
to help ease the burden for 
commuters . 



Crews work to renovate the Chapel 
steeple after many years of 
deterioration from harsh weather. 
Construction began during the 
summer, and concluded at the 
beginning of the fall semester. 




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The loud noises and crashes of 
construction sites rang in the ears of 
students going about their daily routines 
on campus. Due to the erection of new 
buildings and parking garages, construction 
increased astronomically. 

The construction process proved an 
inconvenience for both students and faculty. 
It inhibited the campus atmosphere, and 
caused problems with campus traffic. The 
university attempted to resolve these 
problems by reassigning parking 
restrictions; however, many people still 
experienced difficulty. 

Despite ongoing disturbances, some 
projects finally concluded. The Stamp Student 
Union, after several delays, unveiled its 
new additions, including a more spacious 
lounge area for commuters, as well as the 
relocation of Adele's and the Co-op. The 
Comcast Center also opened its doors at the 
beginning of the basketball season. 



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To increase housing capacity 
for students, crews work to 
build the South Campus 
Commons as quickly as 
possible. The Commons 
provided students with the 
comfort of solo living, while 
maintaining a sense of 
community belonging on the 
campus . 



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To avoid parking 
hassles, 
students ride the 
metro to and from 
campus . The 

University 
provided bus 
transportation 
to and from the 
College Park 
Metro Station for 
student' s 
convenience . 




53 





A pair of dancers move to the 
music during the Choreographer's 
Showcase production. 



The orchestral ensemble reheares 
in preparation for an upcoming 
concert . 



In the middle of a passionate 
performance, Wyclef Jean pours 
a bottle of water on his head 
to cool down. 




University of Maryland students 
perform at the Kennedy Center, 
located in Washington, D.C. 



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The Universit/ s music program is 
featured regularly at the Clarice Smith 
Performing Arts Center. The Symphonic Wind 
Ensemble and Concert Band each gave 
individual performances, and also 
collaborated to perform in the University s 
annual Kaleidoscope Concert, also featuring 
the highly celebrated Marching Band, on 
Friday, December 13. 

CSPAC also provided a great outdoor 
venue for artists to perform; prolific 
bluegrass musician Ricky Scaggs, as well 
as Doug Varone and Dancers, a self -proclaimed 
daredevil dance troupe, performed outside 
the building. Additionally, more mainstream 
acts like comedian Jim Breuer visited the 
campus this year, performing his comedic 
act for a sold out audience. 

The Laramie Project, one of the most 
highly publicized and controversial 
performances, garned mixed reactions from 
audiences . 



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55 



Campus Recreation Services 
employees take a football 
break. The student employees 
helped maintain the athletic 
fields and equipments 



A student working at the 
Queen Anne's Hall front desk 
\inputs information into a 
computer database. There was 
student presence 24 hours per 
da^ at the residence hall's 
froVit desks. 




Studesnts answer the phones 
and apsist other students at 
the ^tamp Student Union's 
infdrmation desk. Many 
students chose to work in 
the Union because of its 
cehtral location on campus. 



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Campus jobs provided students with i 
convenient and easy way to earn money, while 
often times allowing them to apply their job 
to their respective major. 

The campus offered a plethora of 
different jobs. Students could work in the 
undergraduate offices of their major, in one 
of the libraries, or in one of the 
laboratories, to name a few. Jobs generally 
tended to be flexible with a student's class 
schedule as well. "Campus jobs are a great 
way of earning a few extra bucks in between 
classes," said sophomore Ramya Swamy, "And, ' 
as an added bonus, you don't have to work on 
days the University is closed." 

Campus jobs were especially helpful 
when applied to a student's major. Jobs could 
help the student become better acquainted; 
with the faculty and staff in the department' 
of his or her major, while learning more 
ways to apply the major to future careers. 




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A student-worker for the Campus 
Catering Services assembles a 
food display in Van Munching 
Hall. The Catering Services also 
distributed food at various 
sporting events. 



Scanning books at the University 
Book Center, a student earns 
some extra cash. The Book Center 
employed several students to 
stock books, clothing, and other 
items . 



At the Annapolis Desk, a 
student-worker assists a fellow 
student. Desk workers answered 
phone calls and helped maintain 
security within the building. 



In the evenings, a student works 
as a bar tender at the 
Performing Arts Center. Evening 
jobs allowed students to attend 
all their classes during the 
day. 






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Roommates study together in their 
University Courtyards apartment. 
Though the rent was a bit more 
expensive than other apartments, 
the convenient location 
attracted the residents. 



Two students put on sumo 
wrestler costumes and wrestle 
eachother in the ring. To bring 
the communities closer together, 
the different University 
communities hosted fairs. 



Students pass-by Worchester Hall 
on a sunny day. The dormitory 
was one of several non-high rise 
halls which housed students on 
the South Campus. 

A student passes Anne Arundel 
on a crisp autumn day. With its 
convenient location in the 
center of campus, many students 
desired to live in Anne Arundel 
Hall. 




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1 The most convenient option, living 
directly on campus allowed students to walk 
to class without the hassle of traffic 
congestion. Also, students living on campus 
had to buy a meal plan, which gave them the 
option to dine at one of the dining halls 
when they didn' t feel like cooking. 

Dorm life was a prime opportunity for 

people to make lifelong friendships. 

Everyone lived close together in small 

' spaces in the dormitories, and many students 

propped their doors open to welcome 

! visitors. Halls, and even whole dormitories, 

socialized and participated in campus 

activities together. 

'- 'Additional on-campus housing was 

completed in the South Campus Commons. The 

:. ' newly- furnished buildings gave students all 

,. the perks and privacy of an apartment, 

p while still allowing them a close and safe 

'^ environment in which to live. An increasing 

J number of students opted to remain on campus 

' due to the new South Campus Commons option. 



58 




students chow down at 
University-sponsored 
cookout. The Resident 
Assistants oversaw th4 
function, and assisted An 
grilling the food. 



In the Univerlsity 

Courtyards, a group of 
friends engage in a game of 
Mancala. Playing gameSi was 
one way in which students 
bonded with one another\. 




As part of a community fair, 
two students combat in a 
gladiator- type ring. A 
barl3eque was also featured 
at thefair, which allowed 
students 'tQ_ save their meal 
points for a "rainy day. 




.59 



Because of the 
large crowds in 
the downstairs 
dining area , 
students take 
their trays to 
tables upstairs. 
Both..^-the^North 
and South Dining 
Halls accomadated 
to the large 
student body. 



After its grand opening, the 
South Campus Dining Hall's 
Jalapeno Grill maintains a 
strong lunch crowd. The 
Jalapeno Grill featured 
Mexican cuisine. 



In between classes, patrons 
munch on pizza and fruit as 
a lunchtime snack. The dining 
facilities promoted campus 
unity by hanging banners 
congratulating the athletic 
teams . 




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Traditionally, cafeteria- style dining 
hall food has a lowly reputation. However, 
the University of Maryland prided itself 
on having a multitude of meal choices for 
on-campus students to enjoy. 

The Diner on North Campus and the 
South Campus Dining Hall, the two main eating 
facilities at Maryland, provided students 
with the options of deli sandwiches, an 
extensive salad and fruit bar, grilled 
sandwiches and hamburgers, rotisserie 
chicken, or several alternatives. The North 
Campus dining hall catered more to vegetarian 
needs. After paying with their points, 
students sat themselves at any one of the 
numerous tables. 

For those students with huge appetites 
as well as number of points. North Woods 
opened nightly for dinner featuring a buffet . 
On certain nights. North Woods also organized 
student performances for entertainment, with 
open-mic and karaeoke nights. 



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During Family Weekend, a student 
treats his folks to an all-you- 
can-eat buffet meal at North 
Woods . North Woods featured a 
different dinner theme each 
night . 

A student fills her cup with 
juice to drink with her 
breakfast meal. Many students 
opted to carry-out from the 
dining halls, for an additional 
charge of 25 cents. 

A view from above of the South 
Campus Dining Hall during the 
dinner rush. With peak hours 
during lunch and dinner, 
students were sometimes forced 
to wait in long lines. 

A student sings on open-mic 
night at North Woods . The buffet 
coordinators arranged 
entertainment once or twice a 
week for those dining at the 
facility. 





Before attending her first class, a 
student goes to the on-campus 
bookstore to purchase her texts. 
The Union bookstore was one of two 
places in College Park v*ere students 
could purchase their books for class . 



Students grab a bite in between 
classes at the McDonald's in 
the food court. Other food 
stands included Taco Bell, 
Marketplace Deli, and a pizza 
stand. 



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The Stairp Student Union has consistently 
been a place where students convened during the 
weekdays and weekends . With almost all renovations 
conplete, the Union has become an even more 
popular and active place for students to visit. 

Especially popular among commuters, the 
Union provided a friendly and comfortable 
atmosphere for students who don' t have a dorm to 
go back to between classes . The newly-renovated 
commuter lounge was especially helpful and 
comfortable for commuters. The Union also held 
the student ticket office, where students could 
purchase tickets for concerts and carrpus events . 

The Union housed a variety of different 
food stands, as well as a coffee shop, and a 
convenience store. Also, the restaurant Adele' s 
and the Co-op, provided eating alternatives . " I 
love the Student Union," said freshman Angle 
DeRidden, "If s a great place to stop and grab 
something to eat or hang out with friends between 
classes. The sandwiches from Marketplace Deli 
are the best!" 




students grab some 
fast cash from the 
Chevy Chase Bank ATM 
machine . Many 

students opened 
accounts with Chevy 
Chase Bank because of 
its branch in the 
Union . 



Students take a 
detour through the 
Union during the 
construction period. 
Despite the small 
inconveniences , 
students still 

patronized the Union 
shops . 





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63 



Mourners lay sir 
for each victim 
the terrorist 
People remembere 
lost in diffei 
including a ca 



gle stones 

killed in 

attacks . 

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On September 11, 2002, the University 
of Maryland, community united together to 
remember and mourn the tragic events that 
occured exactly one year earlier. 

McKeldin Mall hosted memorial services, 
with students and faculty reading the names 
of all the September 11th victims. Students ■ 
filled the Mall as they sadly recalled the 
event, and silence permeated the air as , 
speakers relayed their personal experiences . 
People left signs and flowers in memorial, 
and, throughout the day, students prayed ; 
for, and commemorated, the tragic events. 

Students also organized other 
activities to express their sentiments. In 
the evening, the Chapel held additional 
services, and the Diamondback devoted a 
special issue to the events of September 
11th, which expressed reader's views on 
the attacks, as well as on how the University 
responded to the situation the previous ^''^^ 
year . ....^ 




As one student steps down from 
the podium, another student 
continues reading the names from 
the list of victims. Names were 
read continuously throughout the 
day on McKeldin Mall. 

Students listen to the list of 
names of all those who died as a 
result of the September 11th 
terrorist attacks, as they wave 
banners in support of peace . 



Two women read messages of hope 
written by students. Though a 
solemn day, the memorial 
services brought people closer 
together. 




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At the Dance Marathon, a local 
student band plays songs to keep 
the students dancing. The Dance 
Marathon was held inside Ritchie 
Coliseum where a stage was 
assembled to feature bands. 

A local student band performs 
outside of Wicomico Hall. Local 
bands often performed at many 
different locations on campus 
to prepare for their upcoming 
featured shows . 

Yesterday's News, a University 
of Maryland student band, 
performs on the steps outside 
of the South Campus Commons . 
The band was promoting their 
upcoming show. 

At the North Woods Buffet, a 
group of students perform for 
the dining hall's patrons. North 
Woods often featured student 
entertainers to attract students 
to the more expensive dining 
facility. 



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Whether they were creating their own music, 
: supporting peer performances, or attending local 
" and city shows, most students depended on music as 
irtd i Ht a form of entertainment. 

The University had a renowned music program 
in which many talented students were enrolled. 
Nearly every week, there were both syrrphonic and 
choral performances, mainly in the Clarice Smith 
Performing Arts Center or Tawes Theatre. The 
University also had several active A Cappella 
groups, such as the Treblemakers, the Generics, 
and the Faux Paz. 

lyfeny students attended concerts in and around 

' the College Park area. Locally, bands like MacGregor 

and Mad Mary performed at venues such as the 

• ' Javahead Cafe and the Santa Fe Cafe. The band 

Dashboard Confessional performed at Ritchie Coliseum 

to an almost sold-out crowd. Students could see 

big-narre bands perform at nearby arenas such as the 

MCI Center, the 9:30 Club, or the Baltiirore Arena. 

Sctre of the more popular performances in the area 

_ _4_ were O.A.R., Counting Crows, and Ben Folds Five. 






At the All Nighter, a student 
DJ spins for the guests. 
Various musical genres mere 
featured at the All Nignter, 
from hip-hop to Christian 
Gospel . 




At the Dance 
Marathon, a student 
band rocks the 
students 
participating in 
the fundraising 
event. Different 
musical acts graced 
the stage to keep 
the atmosphere fun 
and fresh. 







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67 



students wait in line to ca 
their votes for governor. 
Although many students were 
registered to vote in College 
Park, others had to complete 
and mail absentee ballots to 
vote. 




On election night, after the 
final count of votes, 
Governo r - e 1 ec t Robe 
Ehrlich makes a speech 
thanking his campaigp^rts and 
supporters for alL-tneir hard 
work. 




68 





^ 



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In the Fall of 2002, the Maryland 
Governor's Race between Republican Bob Ehrlich 
and Democratic Lieutenant Governor Kathleen 
Kennedy Townsend resulted in a victory for 
Ehrlich; he replaced former governor Democrat 
Parr is Glendening. 

A large portion of Townsend' s canpaign 
focused on gun control; she targeted Ehrlich 
by drawing attention to his previous voting 
record on gun control issues, specifically 
his vote against a ban on assault rifles. 
Despite Townsend' s strong position on gun 
control , Ehrlich remained popular among voters 
because of his vow to avoid tax increases and 



EHRUUH 



legalizing slot machines. 

The election was an important event for v 
many students who showed strong participation '' 
and campaigning for both Ehrlich and Townsend. 
Ehrlich' s victory marked the first time |^H 
over thirty years that a Republican has held 
the office of Maryland Governor. 






Kathleen Kennedy Townsend calls 
on the support of Former 
President and Democrat Bill 
Clinton. Townsend also showcased 
her Kennedy legacy during the 
campaigning period. 

Robert Ehrlich rolls-up his 
shirt sleeves and gets down to 
campaigning by discussing 
several hot topics with 
constituents . 



Townsend discusses the issues 
with her supporters. She 
staunchly supported gun control, 
especially after the recent 
sniper attacks which plagued the 
area for several weeks. 

Ehrlich prepares to take the 
podium to deliver a speech to 
his supporters. Crime, 
education, and taxes in the 
state of Maryland were just a 
few of the issues he addressed. 



Illlltlll 




f-\J.. 











T^m, 




The heart of Baltimore's 
nightlife scene, Power Plant Live 
features The Improv Comedy Club, 
Have a Nice Day Cafe, Bar 
Baltimore, McFaddens, Howl at the 
Moon, and Bill Bateman's Bistro. 

On sunny days, students with 
cars make the short trip to 
Annapolis, Maryland's capitol . 
During the day, students could 
go shopping or on a boat ride, 
and then hit the bars at night. 

A crowd of students party at 
Bar Baltimore. The popular bar 
was notorious for giving free 
drinks to women who danced on 
top of the bar. 

At the Maryland Renaissance 
Festival, two actors reenact 
historic forms of entertainment. 
The festival was open during 
several weekends in the autumn, 
and featured food and entertainment 
from the Renaissance period. 



'ii-:AAMS:f§ 




Living in close proximity to both Baltiirore 
and Washington, D.C., students took full advantage 
of the short distance and often visited both 
- cities . 

In Baltimore, going to an Oriole^ s baseball 
or Raven' s football gaine was always a fun outing. 
Before or after the gaine, students could dine at 
any one of numerous restaurants including the 
Cheesecake Factory, Pizzeria Uno, or Phillips 
-' Seafood Restaurant. At night, students could 
venture out to the clubs and bars . The recently- 
opened Power Plant Live housed such clubs as 
I Have a Nice Day Cafe, Bar Baltinore, and McFaddens. 
Washington D.C. also provided entertainment 
for students. With a number of free attractions, 
such as the Smithsonian museums or the National 
-: Zoo, students could find inexpensive ways to 
.. r 1 spend their days. Students also enjoyed D.C s 
.!' "J shopping scene. In the evening, students could 
fe*' party at any number of bars and clubs in places 
^i such as Georgetown or F Street. Some favorites 
^t included Buzz, Platinijm, and Dream. 




A group of children 
experience the Renaissance 
Festival via elephant. One 
they dismounted t h/e 
elephant, the children w^t 
on to view the sword 




swal lowers 
knights . 



and joust/ing 



Anchored at the dock, a| boat 
rests in the Annanolis 
harbor. Students olften 
toured Annapolis by bo^t on 
clear, sunny days. 




An actor steadily 

concentrates as he walks the 
tight rope. A popular 
spebi^acle during the late 
16th \5 entury, todays 
audiences"""--Qbtained a taste 
of the daring~~stjant . 



students gathered around 
their television sets every 
Tuesday night to watch the 
"real story" of eight 
strangers picked to live in 
a house. The Real World, 
entering its eleventh 
season, was shot in Las 
Vegas, Nevada. 



The popular 
chi Idren ' s 
book 
character 
Harry Potter 
returns to the 
big screen in 
Harry Potter 
and the 

Chamber of 
Secrets . 
Although 
geared toward 
children, 
many college 
students 
flocked to the 
theatre, as 
wel 1 , to 

expe r i enc e 
the magic. 






£^\e-HV ^ 



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i\ 



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^gh the University boasted diversity, 
certain' gSpular culture trends emerged on the 
canpus scene. In clothing, the bohemian style • 
made a large comeback; students sported flared 

jeans, peasant-style tops, beaded necklaces, 

and knit hats. Ill S?^ 

In music, while students enjoyed manyj 
different genres, folk and acoustic music seemed 
to pervade the scene. Singer/songwriters such 
as John Mayer and Howie Day garnered much support . 
Pop music remained a fan favorite, with an] 
increasing incorporation of hip-hop beats that'' 
transversed musical barriers. Artists such as^j^^^s! 
Justin Tiitiberlake and Christina Aguilera combinedjIIFIED 
with hip-hop artists like Redman to create a-—- ^^ 
new style of music. 

In television and movies, Friends, Dawson's 
Creek, and The Real l?i/orId remained popular. In 
cinema, the Harry Potter and Star ^i/ars sequels x 
raked in ticket sales, as well as surprise hits^^ , , 
like Eminem's Eight Mile and Adam Sandl^|ig ' -. 
Punch Drunk Love 






Eminem makes his screenplay 
debut in Eight Mile, a story 
loosely based on his own life 
story. The rapper's movie was a 
huge success, bringing in $54 
million its opening week. 

Wearing a peasant top and flared 
jeans, a woman enjoys the 
comfort of the bohemian clothing 
style. The rural look became 
urban-chic with bead and crystal 
accessories . 



Harry Potter's nemesis, Draco 
Malfoy, engages in a duel with 
Potter. The two child sorcerers 
envoked magic to fight 
eachother . 



Justin Timberlake's first solo 
album, Justified, hits the 
stores. Timbaland, the producer 
of other popular artists such 
as Missy Elliot and Alliyah, 
also produced Justified. 




r 



A group of friends travel to 
R.J. Bentley's for a night of 
fun. Because College Park had 
such few bars, students were 
bound to encounter their friends 
on an evening out. 

Before they start drinking, a 
group of young women gather at 
the Santa Fe Cafe for dinner. 
Often times, the local bars 
hosted happy hours which 
included food specials. 



'Wm 



students enjoy the dinner 
specials at the Santa Fe Cafe, 
and order their favorite meals. 
Dinner was a good way for 
students to start their evening 
festivities . 

At a house party, a student 
partakes in a game of beer pong. 
As opposed to the bar scene, 
house parties often featured an 
intimate setting in which 
friends could gather to party. 



p 


? 

^ 




\ 


9^ 


±i 



Whether they were hitting the bars, going 
to a fraternity party, or traveling to the 
city for some fun, students always found a way 
- to enjoy their evenings. 

Perhaps the most convenient and close 
' way to have a good time was to go to one of 

■ College Park* s three most popular bars: R.J. 
Bentle/ s. Cornerstone, or the Santa Fe Cafe. 
For students twenty-one and older, the bars 
were often crowded on all nights of the week. 

Fraternity and house parties were another 
popular option for nighttime activities . Several 
fraternity parties were registered almost every 
weekend. In recent years, however, more 
restrictions were placed on fraternity parties, 
limiting the amount of student attendance. 

If tiresome of the local party scene, 

■ students could easily travel to Baltimore or 
Washington D.C. Both cities offered a huge 
selection of bars and nightclubs. Students 
often rode the metro to avoid the hassle of 
designated drivers and parking. 



74 




students grab a booth and 
fill-up on the $1.00 
Budweisers at the Santa Fe 
Cafe. Many students 
patronized "the Fe" on 
Tuesday nights to relieve the 
schoolwork blues . 



At Cornerstone, students 
share a few jokes over their 
drinks . Because the bar had 
limited capacity, students 
had to first pay a cover 
charge before partying. 




Seated at the bar, 
a group of students 
take advantage of 
the Santa Fe Cafe's 
"Dollar Bud Night" 
drink specials. The 
bar featured the 
drink specials on 
Tuesday evenings to 
boost their mid- 
week business. 



P' 



No longer within walking 
distance to a dining hall, 
a student experiments wit 
a new recipe. Many stud^ts 
grew tired of the sel^tion 
at the dining harlls, and 
moved into aa^partment or 
hou^g.e---f'5r more cooking 
options . 



Relaxing on her sofa, a 
student reads a magazine. By 
\living in a non-University 
led apartment or house, 
s6iudents could furnish their 
spaces according to their own 
tastes . 




A group of friends enjoy the 
warm autumn weather outside 
Jeir house. Because pets 
were/ not allowed inside 
University housing, students 
with pets were forced to find 
their own accomadations . 







J' 



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the domain 




^*^ 



■ ^ p? 




Last year, due to the large student^ 
population and inadequate amount of on campus' _, 
housing, the University decided to force 
seniors off campus. As a result, the cost of 
rent for off campus housing facilities, in 
both apartments and houses, rose dramatically. 
Students were forced to find off campus housing 
despite the ever- increasing prices. ^ 

However, while living directly on campus I 
had its perks, many students enjoyed theS 
freedom of living away from the dorms and! 
school. Some of the more popular housing-- 
areas, due to their convenient location toB 
campus, were Hartwick and College Park Towers, ■ 
the "Knox boxes," as well as many of the j 
houses for rent behind Fraternity Row. i 

Living off campus introduced students | 
to the obligations of the adult world. | 
Students paid for their rent, utilities, and! 

)ceries. Although students enjoyed the!l( 
freedom of living without RA's, they alsol 
learned to take on new responsibilities L. 



' **^' 




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The dimly lit streets and few 
parking spaces pose other 
problems for students living in 
the "Knox boxes." Despite these 
inconveniences, students 
enjoyed the house's location. 

Although a few miles away from 
campus, the Seven Springs 
Apartments house newer facilities. 
Students had the option of renting 
a studio, single, double, or triple 
apartment . 



A group of 
television 
afternoon . 
supervi s i on 



friends watch 

on a Sunday 

Without the 

of Resident 



Assistants, students often held 
gatherings in their homes. 



A student prepares lunch in her 
kitchen. Without a campus meal 
plan, students were forced to 
grocery shop for all of their 
dietary needs. 





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Itard) 14.15 



S«cono RcHjnd 
M^rch 16.17 



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9»11) 

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24-7) 

>ri (21-11) 



125:71 



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Tto B«ifc. (20-10) 



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Albuqu«rqii«. NM 
Marefi 14 A 16 

Arizona 



Hawaii 



nnQ (27-4) 



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Dallas^ TX 
M«rc*i 1$4 17 

Oklahoma 



OkjanorrraTT 




Stats and Highlights 



Maryland vs. Sienna 85-70 

Juan Dixon led the team to victory scoring 29 
of the 85 points in the first round against 
Sienna. The Terps dominated the game, forcing 
1 6 turnovers by Sienna. 



C^eco 



inx£/ 



1/\CrU 



Maryland vs. Wisconsin 87-57 

Dixon scored 29 points to break two school 
scoring records, leading Maryland past eighth- 
seeded Wisconsin 87-57 in the second round 
of the East Regional. Dixon broke Len Bias' 
team record for career points and also eclipsed 
Bias' mark for career points in the NCAA 
tournament. The game was tied five times in 
the opening 1 3 minutes before Maryland used 
its inside-outside attack to take control. 



t^AAXA/ 



QiAA-XA 



Maryland vs. Kentucky 78-68 

Despite a quiet second half from Ail-American 
Juan Dixon, top-seeded Maryland just moved 
right along, beating Kentucky 78-68 in the East 
Regional semifinals. Both Maryland and 
Kentucky played solid defense, and neither 
came within seven points of its season scoring 
average. Drew Nicholas' 3-pointer with 9:54 
left gave Maryland the lead for good at 56- 
53. 



[Civa 



Stats and Highlights 



90-82 

Lonny Baxter had a season-high 29 points, and 
Dixon scored 27 for Maryland, which reached 
the 30-victory mark for the first time. Baxter, 
the region's Most Outstanding Player, was 7- 
for-1 2 from the field, 1 5-for-1 8 from the free 
throw line and grabbed nine rebounds. He had 
24 points and 1 rebounds in the teams' first 
meeting this season, a 77-65 Maryland victory 
on Dec. 3. Maryland took a timeout with 34 
seconds left on the game clock and 1 4 on the 
shot clock. Blake wound up with the ball and 
his 3-pointer went through. 



[dyXA-jA 



c-yu. Kcdi^^a^ 



97-88 

Dixon hit a baseline jumper with 1 :1 4 to play 
that gave Maryland an 89-82 lead after Kansas 
had cut a 20-point lead to five. Chris Wilcox 
had 1 8 points and nine rebounds for Maryland 
and Steve Blake added eight points and 1 1 
assists. The Terps went up by as many as 20 
points, 83-63 on a 3 by Dixon with 6:04 to 
play. 



/ iOA^tpLcdi^uL Oii/. 



64-52 

Dixon once again led the team with 1 8 points. 
He didn't miss a shot in the first half, going 4- 
for-4 from the field and 2-for-2 from the free 
throw line. Lonny Baxter was the secohd high 
scorer with 1 5 points. The two teams were 
even as far as possession, with each team 
racking up 1 6 turnovers. Maryland was among 
the country's highest scoring teams at 85 
points per game, but its third-lowest total of 
the season was good enough to make it the 
33rd school to win the national championship 
and the second straight from the Atlantic 
Coast Conference following Duke last season. 





83 




Stats and Highlights 



9-4-0 






1-2-0 



,Oi^wC 



6-1-0 



.a.'iZU' 



3-3-0 



Name 

Mike LaMonica 
Nate Watkins 
Mike Mallot 
Ryan Moran 
Dan Lamonica 



Goals Assists Points 



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C ^eu^-ci^ vKeecU 



The Maryland Men's Lacrosse team finished the 
season 9-4 as Mike Mallot lead the team with 
46 points. Mike Mallot tied fellow senior Nate 
Watkins for leading team scorer with 24 goals 
each. Dan McCormick helped the Terps in the 
net with 1 22 season saves. Despite a winning 
season the Terps were left out of the NCAA 
selection for the 1 2-team tournament. 



Stats and Highlights 



n-io-o 



^eAy&(-x/3e^ 



0-3-0 



)c<yveAy^ 



^Jame 


Goals 


Assists 


Points 


Courtney Hobbs 
Kelly Coppedge 
Sonia Judd 


55 
50 
34 


32 
25 
19 


87 
75 
53 


Meredith Egan 
Kristie Leggio 


35 
26 


12 
14 


47 
40 



(y)eaMrt^_VKe^ ' 



The Maryland Women's Lacrosse team finished 
the season 11-10, just missing out on an 
eighth consecutive ACC Conference 
Championship. The team graduated five seniors 
at the end of the season, including Courtney 
Hobbs with an acquired record of 65-1 . Head 
Coach Cindy Timchal passed a milestone of 
200 career wins. 





87 



Stats and Highlights 



34-23 



jo-pxive/cei^n^e/ 



6-18 



<?Xo^•'^•^£^ 



25-8 




JXt>Ci>Uy 



7-13 



fA' (y^eo'tei^yy 



Name AVG R H HR RBI 

JohnMcCurdy .443 67 98 19 77 

MattSwope .368 64 81 6 55 

Anthony Buffone .362 53 83 5 43 

DarylWhitmer .358 59 73 7 37 

Jason Maxey .328 45 61 17 60 



RiJ. 



VO^XUy C 



le^xcte'Ux. 



Name ERA W-L IP 

Jared Stuart 5.64 5-3 67.0 

Todd Ainsworth 6.64 6-5 62.1 







'JCrPVUX 



Stats and Highlights 



31-21 



ynn^ 




18-14 



Oile^^loe^c^—^-' 



Name Avg H HR RBI 

Samantha Sweeney .350 62 1 14 



Amanda Bettker .333 

Kiersha Pickeral .298 

Danielle Carpenter .282 

Casey Leiter .267 



333 1 
298 



267 43 1 ^^.^ 



r'itcUii^u 



Name 

Amanda Bettker 
Monica Cypert 
Jessica Aditaye 



■^eoicl&'L:)y 



W-L 

14-n 

10-6 
74 





91 




92 




e4^x/h^' 



m 



Stats and Highlights 



)e<z^^-(^^' 



60 Meters 
200 Meters 
400 Meters 
800 Meters 
60 Hurdles 
Pole Vault 
Long Jump 
Triple Jump 
Shot Put 



Harold Manning 
Harold Manning 

Rob Frelow 
Tom Anderson 
Phillip Barrett 
Brent Gordon 
Adrian Nelson 
Adrian Nelson 
Andrew Long 



Weight Throw John Collins 




/ 


' i JCrl^vxAX 


Stats and Highlights 1 


C ^e<^-Ofn/.!>^ 


'f)e6^ 


7.47 


60 Meters 


Toni Jefferson 


200 Meters 


Toni Jefferson 


24.26 


400 Meters 


Tia Burley 


55.12 


500 Meters 


Deveen Hamilton 


1:15.89 


800 Meters 


Thema Napier 


2:12.48 


60 Hurdles 


Thema Napier 


8.52 


High Jump 


Amber Stanley 


5-3 


Pole Vault 


Natalie Dye 


12-6 


Long Jump 


Punnie Chittchang 


19-6.25 


Triple Jump 


Punnie Chittchang 


37-6.25 


Shot Put 


Tracy Ojenivi 


49-25 


Weight Throw 


Ruth Kara 


66-9.25 










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# 





.95 




96 





Stats and Highlights 



?4/ne4 



MaAJA/ 



Name 


Overall 


ACC 


Harris Causevic 


10-6 


2-6 


Greg Chambers 


3-9 


0-8 


Chris Chiu 


6-11 


0-9 


Troy Demers 


8-8 


1-7 


Jeff Fink 


2-6 


0-1 


Jonathan Murchinson 


4-10 


1-8 


David Reichsfeld 


10-6 


3-5 


ryouMedy ^eAtXtdy 




Team 


Overall 


ACC 


Causevic/Murchison 


8-6 


2-6 


Causevic/Chiu 


1-2 


0-1 


Chiu/Chambers 


6-8 


2-6 


Fink/Chambers 


0-1 


0-0 


Murchison/Chambers 


1-1 


0-1 


Reichsfeld/Demers 


9-7 


3-5 





e4^U^\yiA 



Stats and Highlights 



^ame 


Overall 


ACC 


Delila Causevic 


24-10 


4-4 


Chloe Chavardes 


11-15 


0-9 


Emily DeCamilla 


15-12 


2-7 


Pamela Floro 


19-10 


5-4 


Marta Jedrejak 


18-11 


5-4 


Emily Marker 


19-12 


3-6 


Kristin Roth 


1-5 


0-0 


Monica Villarreal 


0-7 


0-1 


RiHBpHIS 


t<X^b^ 


ACC 


^am 


Overall 


Ifcusevic/Marker 


9-21 


2-6 


Bavardes/DeCamilla 


1-6 


0-1 


Mro/Jedrejak 


2-4 


2-6 


pth/Villarreal 


0-5 


0-0 


fero/Chavardes 


10-10 


0-1 


■idrejak/DeCamilla 


10-11 


3-5 





99 



e^n/^y 




Stats and Highlights 



laboix 



KStat^y 




Maryland Opp 

Scoring 451 288 

First Downs 270 248 

Total Offense 5451 4743 



11-3-0 



-^/Xc^-yxe 



6-1-0 



4-1-0 



/ Uout'Lot 



1-1-0 





TDs 


Points 


Chris Downs 


15 


90 


Josh Allen 


8 


48 


Scott McBrien 


7 


42 


Steve Suter 


7 


42 



Peach Bowl winners against Tennessee, 30-3. 



Stats and Highlights 



20-5-0 



■rPV\£/ 



1 3-0-0 



3-0-0 



4-2-0 



Name bhot 



Abe Thompson b: 

Domenic Mediate 4b 

Sumed Ibrahim 32 

Nino Marcantonio 3 



)e(26yO^^ 



Shots Goals Points 



Maryland finished the season with a school- 
record 20 wins against four losses. The Terps 
finished the season in Dallas Texas with a 2-1 
loss to UCLA in the national semi-final game. 
The team finished a strong season with no 



seniors. 





103 




3i^>^^ 




104 




r 




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Stats and Highlights 



CJi}€A.(2JUL 



13-8-1 



'Ai'{^Vh€/ 



8-4-0 



c^ UMZt)/ 



4-3-1 



jCr^-^[Y&'oe4-xA3e/ 



3-3-1 



' )oClL^ ic)y re 'LCO 



1st 2nd OT 0T2 Total 
#17 Maryland 20 27 47 
Opponent 13 19 1 33 



c S LoUy Li, re 'UoX 



1st 2nd OT 0T2 Total 
#17 Maryland 164 191 1 3 359 
Opponent 104 135 4 4 247 



\cc 'e 



C \^c'e^ b-ci . e'Lcvci' 



1st 2nd OT 0T2 Total 
#17 Maryland 41 44 85 
Opponent 60 64 1 1 126 



1st 2nd OT 0T2 Total 
#17 Maryland 54 66 2 122 
Opponent 31 44 2 3 80 



'*i^\i^ . 



m^. 



».. *<;^^ 




Stats and Highlights 



1 6-4-0 



^/'Kl^ 



9-1-0 



5-2-0 



2-1-0 



1 4.9 shots per game 



cS(3^ 



C ^COAOi^ Vi&G' 



The three remaining seniors led the team 
through a rebuilding year. Carissa Messimer led 
the team in scoring with 1 5 goals and 5 assists, 
while fellow senior Izzy Palmer solidified the 
defense and also added offense to the mix 
with 8 goals and 9 assists. Both girls were also 
named to the first team All Region. Kateri 
Simon also had 1 3 assists. The second highest 
scorer was Colleen Barbieri with 1 3 goals and 
6 assists. 

The team was eliminated in the second round 
of the NCAA Tournament when they faced top- 
ranked Old Dominion. 




^m^ ^\ 




y^yS^^ 






108 
P' 




Stats and Highligi 



■O^^'UZ 



18-14 



10-5 



Kills 


15.38 


Assists 


14.27 


Digs 


14.82 


Blocks 


2.31 



Maryland volleyball players Carey Brennan and 
Lynnsy Jones were named to the American 
Volleyball Coaches Association All-East Region 
Team in December 2002. 



Stats and Highlights 




I 



97?m/> fcdL C)tatdy 



irn I 
Tim Kane 
John Moheyer 
Dan MacDonald 
Jeff Spradlin 
John Eades 

Bobby MacWhinnie 5 1 3 

TEAM 5 1 : 



>Par 60s Low 



Tim Kane 2 

John Moheyer 5 

Dan MacDonald 1 

Jeff Spradlin 2 

John Eades 

Bobby MacWhinnie 1 

TEAM 3 

High 

Tim Kane 7 

John Moheyer 8 

Dan MacDonald 77 

Jeff Spradlin 83 

John Eades 80 
Bobby MacWhinnie 84 

TEAM 309 



Oi^vxC^n/!iy 



'QL 



Strokes Avg 

576 72.0 

939 72.2 

739 73.9 

753 75.3 

979 75.3 

997 76.7 

3804 292.6 

<:Sto±dy 

Rnds Top 1 



Alex Casi 2 

Erin Clasper 4 

Carter Crowther 3 

Kara Gropler 1 

Marie Harper 4 

Kristen Shew 2 

Katie Redeker 3 

Stacey Wolejko 2 

TEAM 4 

<Par 

Alex Casi 

Erin Clasper 

Carter Crowther 

Kara Gropler 

Marie Harper 

Kristen Shew 

Katie Redeker 
Stacey Wolejko 
TEAM 

High 

Alex Casi 82 

Erin Clasper 82 

Carter Crowther 84 

Kara Gropler 82 

Marie Harper 84 

Kristen Shew 87 

Katie Redeker 82 

Stacey Wolejko 84 



>Par 60s Low 



74 



77 

298 



5 7 
11 7^ 

8 

2 r 

11 7^ 

6 7^ 
8 .. 
6 7, 
11 29 

Strokes Avg 

403 80.6 

857 77.9 

709 78.8 

164 82.0 

862 78.4 

490 81.7 

634 79.3 

481 80.2 

3445 313.2 



^o^nnA 




^"«sir >■ 




111 




112 



Stats and Highli 



'Onn^Cin/^ 



Vo/p. m u 


WfBKKHSSSmti 


U&by ' ■ 


''^— f — ■ — 

Name 


Competition 


Place 


Katie Purcell 


Appalachian State Inv. 


3rd 




Navy Inv. 


2nd 




Maryland Inv. 


4th 




ECAC Champ. 


4th 


Cori Koch 


Appalachian State Inv. 


6th 




Navy Inv. 


7th 




Maryland Inv. 


5th 


Kim Smith 


Appalachian State Inv. 


8th 




Maryland Inv. 


8th 


Bridget Baker Maryland State Champ. 


3rd 


Shari Gorga 


Maryland State Champ. 


7th 


Allison Carney 


University Race 


2nd 



eA^!v 



Name Competition Place 

Adam Ambrus Appalachian State Inv. 2nd 

Navy Inv. 7th 

Maryland Inv. 4th 

Mike Prada Appalachian State Inv. 3rd 

Maryland Inv. 8th 

Matt Adami Appalachian State Inv. 8th 

Mike Fleg Appalachian State Inv. 9th 



Competition Place 

Indiana State Invitational 11/20 

Mid-Atlantic Regional Champ. 1 3/26 






L 







W 



■^1 





lOOfvee^ 




Mark Hill 


44.87 


Brian Luoma 


45.87 


Mike Fried 


46.12 


Justin Smith 


47.02 


Greg Hazzard 


47.31 




^"^^50 Voe^ 



Brad Schertle 
Daniel Fallon 
Jonathan Dugan 



16:01.08 
16:04.04 
16:33.13 



Erik Weinberg 23.83 

Chris Brandenberger 25.03 
Erik Putkonen 25.45 



)x.e<z^ 



Gergo Szekely 
EJ Amyot 
Chris Starr 



2:06.13 
2:12.62 
2:16.43 




/^J ::ic^ek 



Megan Knepper 
Barbara Sumrall 
Caitlin Gannon 
Jamelle Trapp 



Krisztina Kovacs 
Jillian A. Martin 
Inbal Levavi 




117 



Stats and Highlights 



■}£AjM/ 



16-7 



yt'-VXye/ 




)eaA<x(^ 



Vault Lisa Mealey 9.85 

Uneven Bars Lisa Mealey 9.925 

Balance Beam Kit Johnson 9.95 

Floor Exercise Gillian Cote 9.95 

All Around Gillian Cote 39.425 

The team finished 29th in the country. 





119 






^ 



.NJ 



120 







Renneika Razor 281 

Terri Daniels 1 62 

Vicki Brick 141 

Angel Ross 1 1 8 



Stats and Highlights 



The Maryland Cheerleading team continued 
to entertain crowds this year at basketball 
and football games. Their enthusiasm 
excited and motivated the crowd as well as 
the players on the field. 





124 



W'? 



Stats and Highlights 




The University of Maryland's Dance 
team presented fans with exciting 
routines and flashy dance numbers. 
Their performances at basketball 
games pumped-up the crowds and 
added to the festive atmosphere. 







^p 




The Terps meet Pre 



:.. .-HV 






fl^:^V* 





The sisters of Kappa Delta welcome their 
Spring 2002 new pledges. The new 
members ran to the house from the Chapel 
where they were greeted by all the sisters. 



iy/# 




Name; Alpha Chi Omega 

Year Founded: 1885 

Philanthropy: Alpha 

Chi Omega 

Foundation 



AXO, AOE, AAA 



130 





The new pledges of Delta Delta Delta 
race to their house from the chapel. 
Once there, the women received their 
Bid Day t-shirts, as well as other gifts 
from the sisters congratulating them. 



j^m ^ay 




After numerous recruitment events, the most anticipated bid 
day marked the beginning of the pledge period. The bid revealed 
the addition of new members and the start of friendships to each 
house. Traditionally, after the acceptance of the bid, sorority pledges 
met at the chapel and ran to their houses where sisters awaited 
their arrival. The first day of sisterhood and Greek life included 
receiving the pledge shirt and pin, along with an evening spent 
with the sisters and the new pledge class. Each sorority house 
presented new members with pledge pins followed by sisterhood 
activities. Bid day introduced pledges to the Greek system and 
started life long bonds between previous sisters and the new pledge 
classes. 




AAn, ASO, KA0 










^^^^ 





131 






I \ 



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f9> 




During the Homecoming talent show, the sisters 
of Delta Gamma perform a skit wearing Navy 
look-alike uniforms. The costumes reflected 
DCs nautical national symbol, the ship anchor. 



'♦ 



i 





In both the spring and the fall, Greeks participated in a 
weeklong celebration of what it means to be Greek. Greek Week 
'" and Homecoming's purpose is to unite the Greek community 
together under a common bond of fraternal and sororital friendship. 
Sororities and fraternities pair-up and compete against other match- 
ups. Throughout the week, activities such as Greek Olympics, a 
talent show, a parade, and the Mr. & Mrs. Greek competition are 
held to help foster friendships between the many houses. Often 
times in the evenings, after the events had concluded for the day, 
the match-ups sponsor parties where they can get to know their 
team better. The councils overseeing both Homecoming and Greek 
Week also plan Greek-wide trips to local bars and clubs. 



feii^i 




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A 



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The Spring 2002 pledges of ATO display 
their paddles. Made by their big brothers, 
the paddles were uniquely designed and 
then presented during a paddle ceremony. 



Name: Alpha Omicton R 
Year Founded: 1897 

Philanthropy: 

Arthritis Foundation 

and Canadian 

Arthritis Society 



. i 





Name:D]jg 


i 


r: 


^"Sfj^gj 


^ 


Year Founq|^( 


99 


"Mfl 


b^Fl 




Philanthropy^ 
Delta orir 




M 


H ^Sii^ 


Ij 


Educational 
Foundation 


H 


'J 


^M^j^ 


W 





.*w^ 




■^' 



AOn, AX, KA 



v«H^ 



On a crisp autumn day, the brothers of 
Zeta Psi go paintballing. After gearing 
up in camouflage jackets and 
bandanas, the men competed against 
one another in several rounds of 
paintball. 




'}i&&d 



With so many different fraternity houses to choose from, 
brotherhood made the large campus seem small. Personalities and 
interests reflected each brother's choice of house. The different 
houses hosted events to bring their brothers closer together, such 
as barbecues, movie nights, and camping excursions. Fraternities 
started friendships that would continue beyond the college years 
through a lifetime of brotherhood. By living in a fraternity house, 
brothers were able to create stronger bonds. Members assembled 
together to participate in community service activities, homecoming 
events, and in Greek Week. The Greek system united brothers of 
different fraternities through philanthropy events, intramural sports 
matches, and social functions. 



^ 



Philanthrppy ' 

Against T© 

Pregnancy, S 
^AgainsW&tmestic 
^use, Sigmas Waging 
WrAgainst Cancer 



* 



'hi J<appa Tau 

Year Founded: i9D6 
Philanthi- 



K#t 





&^^'^ 



TS-"*:- 



L^^Sl 



<DBZ, OKT, 0X 




The sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha bond in the 
formation of a circle. Sleepovers were one 
of many sisterhood events that sororities 
hosted to bring their sisters closer together. 




Name: Delta Tau Delta 

Year Founded: 1858 

Philanthropy: Adopt 

A School 



■ WWW.IVI'-'ul^fJI^^ 



'} 







^'fe-. 





Name: Dell 
Year Foundeci 
Philanthrop/f 
Gamma Foundaltajl 






''^".MICA^l-^:^ i 



^ATA, Ar, A2cl> 




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^rs-i 



1 rom pledges to sisters, Greek life converted friends 

family. When choosing a sorority, sisters often chose the house 
consisting of women with similar personality traits. Philanthropies, 
dances, and socials made the members of each sorority house 
closer, and the lifetime-strong friendships created the foundation 
of sisterhood. With an ever-expanding family, sisters always had 
someone willing to study, go out, watch a movie, or simply to talk 
with. Members of the Greek system also emphasized the 
importance of community involvement to sorority life. Sisters shared 
some of their most unforgettable memories together. Sisterhood 
formed an unbreakable bond within each house. 




/ 



/ear Found 



hilanthropy 
Phi Fo^dalion' 




1^ "^^Jl 



I// 



Name: Alpha Tau Oragga 
Year Founded: 1 
The U^^rshi 



'4 





Name: A^Dha Epsibn Ftii 
^ear Founded: 1858 
Philanthropy: V 
Elizabeth Glase. 
Pediatric 
Founda 




AO, ATO, AEO 





Name: Sigma Kappa 

Year Founded: 1874 

Philanthropy: 

Gerontology, 

Alzheimer's 

Research, Mair^e 

Seacoast Mission 



SK, nKA, SAT 



gg^? gTO©OII<S 








Each sorority and fraternity participated in various 
philanthropy events in order to help provide the essential elements 
for a civil society. Effective philanthropies were instrumental in 
maintaining the purpose of the Greek system. Whether it was Alpha 
Delta Pi's Ronald McDonald House, Kappa Delta's Hero campaign, 
or Sigma Kappa's Alzheimer's Research Memory Walk, each house 
was responsible for raising money for specific organizations. Greeks 
encouraged the community-minded aspect of sorority and fraternity 
life. Philanthropies were not only events that allowed houses to 
give back to the community, but were also one of many activities 
through which brotherhood and sisterhood bonds were 
strengthened. 




Edue^orial 
FSBtrdation 




1 



Name: Kappa Alpha 
> Year Founded: 1825" 
* Philanthropy: 

Muscular Distroph 
Associatioi 




OFA, 



ji-i',^ ;^gj^r^^'tt':ife! j^ 






Kappa Delta's house is one of the most 
architecturally intricate establishments in the 
College Park area. The house features a lofted 
circular room which two sisters can share. 





Thirty-five brothers live in Delta Chi's 
house that faces College Avenue. 



Thirty-six fraternity and sorority houses located throughout 
Fraternity Row and the Graham Cracker partially surrounded 
the University's border. Housing approximately forty-eight 
males or females, there was never a dull moment in any 
Greek house. These houses provided a home away from 
home to new family members in the Greek community. 
Brothers and sisters found that houses gave members the 
ability to create strong friendships through daily activities 
such as meals, parties, and schoolwork. From Delta Delta 
Delta's dormer style sleeping room to Alpha Delta Pi's 
Diamond Sister tradition, every fraternity and sorority house 
was unique. 




Phi Gamma Delta 
is know/n for the 
long bench that 
bears the insignia 
"FIJI." 










145 




Name:ZetaPsi 
Year Founded: 1847 

Philanthropy: The 

Zeta Psi Educational 

Foundation 



- :':fa»>'i 



Z4^, ZTA, AFP 




^ame: SigimAlphaVu 
l^ear Founopd: 17^6 

■ftanthropy: Thi 



Each sorority and fraternity cleared calendars and planned a 
night to celebrate his or her house formal. The night included greek 
members and their dates dressed up for an unforgettable evening 
I of dancing and excitement. Formals rewarded brothers and sisters 
f for their involvement in the community and their commitment to the 
; house. Each house spent months arranging the location, finding 
transportation, and preparing the decorations. The event was one 
of the most anticipated activities of the year. Fraternities were able 
to spend the weekend celebrating the event with overnight parties, 
while most sororities, due to national regulations, limited the evening 
to one night. Formals allowed Greeks to escape the stress of college 
by enjoying a night out partying with friends. 




Iljlame: Lambcb Chi Alpha 
Year F®unded: 1901^ 





^1 



LAM, ZBT, AXA 




A y •*» ' 










em 1 



% 









The College of Agriculture 
and Natural Resources is 
the most dynamic and 
eclectic college at the Gniversity 
of Maryland. In recent years, 
academic programs in the college 
have not just come into their own 
they've zoomed into their own. 
The college encompasses diverse 
areas of study such as agricultural 
economics; nutrition and food 
science; landscape architecture; 
biological resources engineering; 
urban forestry; environmental 
science and policy; and 
preveterinary medicine. 

Students learn and conduct 



research in state-of-the-art facilities 
under the instruction of world-class 
faculty in areas such as plant 
science, soil science, equine 
studies, and ecological engineering. 
Students are engaged not only in 
academics, but student 
organizations in the college and 
across the campus. 

The college's highly regarded 
faculty is internationally known for 
its scholarly achievements. Among 
our faculty members are Fulbright 
scholars, members of the 
President's Council of Economic 
Advisors, Distinguished Gniversity 
Professors, members of the 



National Academy of Science, the 
National Research Council, Lilly 
Teaching Fellows, and recipients 
of honors and awards from 
national and professional 
organizations. 

In addition, the college has an 
exceptional academic programs 
staff ready to assist students daily. 
Staff members have been 
recognized within the college and 
at the campus level for their 
excellence and commitment to 
helping students reach their 
academic and career goals. 

source http://www.agnr.umd.edu/Academics 



150 



team of students 
refully observe the 
operties of the soil by 
amining rocks. 



1 Maryland Day, a group 
AGNR students work a 
ft scooping out ice cream. 
le dining halls also served 
s home-made treat. 




A student uses a 
computer to graph the 
results of his experiment. 



A student concentrates as 
she carefully conducts an 
experiment in the lab. 




)r. Thomas A. Fretz, Dean 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 










At a golf course, a 
professor uses an 
instrument to teach his 
students about the soil 
quality. 



151 



Listening to music through 
her headphones, a student 
revises a draft. 



A student traces plans for 
a building project. 




In the studio, a student 
nnakes a sketch. 
Architecture students 
often spent late nights in 
the studio revising their 
drafts. 



A student stands at a table 
to put the finishing 
touches on his studio 
project. 




(Jsings rulers, pencils, and 
a blade, a student creates 
plans for a building. 



Steven W. Hunt, Dean 
School of Architecture 



152 




The School of Architecture 
offers a four-year 
undergraduate program 
leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree in architecture. The 
undergraduate major in 
architecture is designed to 
minimize the time required to 
complete the curriculum leading 
to the professional degree. 

Students receive rigorous and 
comprehensive instruction from a 
faculty whose members are active 
in professional practice or 
research. Many faculty members 



have distinguished themselves 
across the professional spectrum 
and represent different 
approaches to architectural 
design. Their individual areas of 
expertise include architectural 
design and theory, history, 
architectural archaeology, 
technology, urban design and 
planning, and historic 
preservation. Visiting critics, 
lecturers, and the Kea 
Distinguished Professor augment 
the faculty; together they provide 
students with the requisite 



exposure to contemporary 
realities of architectural design. 

The B.S. degree in 
architecture will qualify graduates 
to pursue a career in any of a 
number of fields, such as 
construction, real estate 
development, public 
administration, or historic 
preservation, or to continue in 
graduate work in professional 
fields such as architecture, urban 
planning, or law. 

source http://www.arch.umd.edu 




153 




'■ i.-r 



College of Arts and Humanities 



The College of Arts and 
Humanities at the 
University of Maryland 
encompasses the study of human 
beings and their activities from 
earliest recorded history to the 
present. Through the examination 
and transfer of this knowledge we 
gain deeper awareness of human 
condition, broaden our personal 
perspectives and develop the tools 
to pursue our lives to their full 
potential. 

In 25 departments and centers, 
the College of Arts and Humanities 



provides education, research and 
scholarship in the arts, history, 
literatures, languages and cultures of 
people throughout the world. 
Attention to the contributions of 
Asian, African and Latin American 
cultures balance the study of 
Western Civilization. Interdisciplinary 
programs and research provide 
exciting new ways to understand 
traditional bodies of knowledge. 
The College component of the 
Gniversity+s Bold Vision " Bright 
Future: The Campaign for the 
University of Maryland, was 



launched to generate private support: 
to fund college initiatives such as the 
Maryland Institute for Technology in 
the Humanities (MITH) and the 
Driskell Center for the Study of the 
African Diaspora. The generosity of 
alumni, friends, corporations and 
foundations has also enabled the 
College to create scholarships, 
professorships, and graduate 
fellowships as well as provided 
essential discretionary support: to the 
Dean+s Fund for Excellence. 

source http:www.arhu.umd.edu 



154 



^ ballet performance at 
:he Clarice Smith 
Performing Arts Center. 



Wearing safety goggles for 
protection, a sculptor in 
the Art Studio program 
chisels away at a column. 




A piano player works with 
her professor to perfect a 
piece of music. 



During a performance, a 
cello player intently 
focuses on her part to 
harmonize with the rest of 
the orchestra. 



. : ; ' ^sfK;! sw£a«isj 




Dr. James F. Harris, Dean 
College of Arts and Humanities 



An actress delivers her 
part in a drama as an 
entranced audience 
looked on. 










155 



A student reviews his class 
sclieduie with an advisor 
in the Behavioral and 
Social Sciences main 
office. 



Reviewing her notes 
before an exam, a student 
refreshes her memory on 
the class material. 




In between classes, a 
student catches up on the 
daily headlines by reading 
an issue of The\ 
Diamondback. 



Students walk up the 
steps of McKeldin Library 
to do some research for a 
group project. 




On McKeldin Mall, an 
anthropology major 
teams-up with a 
prospective student on a 
project. 



Dr. Irwin Goldstein. Dea 
College of Behavioral and Social Scienc 



P* 




College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 



The College of Behavioral 
and Social Sciences is the 
largest college at the 
University of Maryland. The school 
offers courses in the following 
disciplines: Afro-American Studies, 
Anthropology, Criminology & 
Criminal Justice, Economics, 
Environmental Science and Policy 
Program, Geography, Govemment 
& Politics, Hearing & Speech 
Sciences, Joint Program in Survey 
Methodology, Psychology, and 
Sociology. 

Student study issues that are 



central to an increasingly global 
community. By learning about 
human behavior and its relationship 
to the environment, students obtain 
a deeper understanding of socio- 
economic correlations. 

Recently, several faculty 
members of the College of Behavior 
and Social Sciences have made the 
headlines. Professor Shibley 
Telhami, founder of the Anwar 
Sadat Chair for Peace and 
Development, published his book 
The Stakes: America and the 
Middle East which addresses the 



issue of American policy toward the 
Middle East. Professor Harriet B. 
Presser was elected a Fellow of the 
American Association for the 
Advancement of Science (AAAS). 
The certificate conveying this honor 
states: "For innovative research on 
issues of population, labor force, 
gender, and social inequality, for 
exceptional institution building, and 
for outstanding service to 
demographic and sociological 
societies." 

source http://www.bsos.umd.edu 




157 




Robert H. Smith School of Business 



The Robert H. Smith School 
of Business is nationally 
recognized as one of the 
nation's best providers of New 
Economy business education 
and a prime resource for the 
region's economic community. 

The Smith School is 
dedicated to preparing graduates 
to lead organizations in an 
economy fueled by technology, 
globalization, and new venture 
opportunity. The school's 
academic programs provide an 
in-depth education in core 



business disciplines integrated 
with cross-functional 

concentrations such as electronic 
commerce, telecommunications, 
financial engineering, global 
knowledge management, 
entrepreneurship, and supply 
chain management. 

The school has 127 full- 
time faculty members, many of 
whom are internationally 
renowned scholars. Our faculty 
encourages and challenges 
students by their commitment to 
teaching and their dedication to 



defining 21st century business 
practices. 

In addition to offering top- 
ranked academic programs, the 
Smith School provides services 
directly to the Maryland/ 
Washington, D.C./Morthern 
Virginia corporate and 
government communities, 
including consulting, research, 
and executive education. 

source; http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu 



158 



fan Munching Hall is 
vhere many of the 
)usiness classes were 
leld. 



students head to their 
rlasses inside Van 
Punching Hall. 




A group pours over their 
books in search of a 
marketing strategy. 



One of the newest 
buildings on campus, Van 
Munching Hall is equipped 
with numerous digital 
ports so students can plug 
in their laptops and 
connect to the web. 




A student consults an 
advisor about which 
classes she should take for 
the upcoming semester. 



Dr. Howard Frank, Dean 

Robert H. Smith School of Business 










159 



In a chemistry class, a 
student uses a pair of 
tongs to carefully 
transport a hot beaker. 



An annateur scientist 
mixes chemicals to induce 
a reaction. After she 
completed the experiment, 
the student calculated her 
results and tumed-in the 
lab. 



f^ 



• 



M. 






V 




A student receives help 
with his lab from the 
teaching assistant.! 
Because physical science 
classes often had 
hundreds of students iri 
the main lecture, teaching 
assistants taught smallei 
sections to provide more 
personalized instruction. 



A team of students use 
computer and thei 
calculators to complete 
project. 




Students enter data into a 
computer after performing 
an experiment. 



Dr. Stephen Halperin, De 
College of Computer, Math, and Physical Scien 



160 




College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences 



The College of Computer, 
Mathematical, and 

Physical Sciences is 
continuing its remarkable 
momentum as a leading national 
center for research and education 
in science. Alumni, faculty, 
students, and staff can all be very 
proud of the achievements, 
recognized this year by the upward 
move in the G.S. News & World 
Report rankings. Representative of 
CMPS grads, Russell Preston 
Young is receiving a prestigious 
Goldwater Scholarship. Young 



graduated with a B.S. in Physics 
and Mathematics and is interested 
in a career in applied physics. The 
faculty research awards (grants 
and contracts) for the past year 
now stand at $96 million, double 
the figure of two years ago. Their 
work continues to be recognized 
on campus, nationally, and 
internationally. 

The Department and College 
distinguished alumnus awards this 
year recognized seven remarkable 
individuals. Sergey Brin, co- 
founder of the Google search 



engine, Jagdeep Singh, founder of 
four successful companies, and 
Alan Harbitter, cofounder of PEC 
Solutions, a company that 
Business Week has rated number 
eight among the nation's top 100 
hotgrowth companies. Alan, who 
is an outstanding role model for 
students, was the speaker at the 
College's Spring commencement. 
Alan accepted the important 
leadership role as the first Chair of 
the College's Board of Visitors. 

source http://www.cnnps.umd.edu 




161 




As part of the state's 
flagship institution, the 
College of Education at 
the Gniversity of Maryland at 
College Park has a three-part 
mission that includes research, 
preparation of professionals and 
scholars in education and related 
disciplines, and service to the 
state. 

Among our ranks are nationally 
known faculty researchers who 
have made significant 
contributions to advancing theory 
and improving professional 



practice. It is no surprise that the 
college was ranked 22nd in the 
nation by G.S. News & World 
Report for 2002. Three of the 
college's six departments are 
themselves or have programs 
ranked in the top 10 in the nation. 
The Department of Counseling 
and Personnel Services ranks first 
in the nation. Education Policy, a 
major component in the 
Department of Education Policy 
and Leadership, is ranked ninth; 
and, our Department of Special 
Education ranks tenth. 



Our college programs prepare 
educators, counselors, 
psychologists, administrators, 
researchers, and educational 
specialists. 

The College of Education 
prepares the second largest 
number of teachers in the state. 
With the help of the other colleges 
on campus, future teachers are 
prepared with the latest tools in 
teaching as well as strong 
knowledge in the arts and 
sciences. 

source http://www.education.umd.edu 



162 



student researches local 
ea schools for student 
laching positions. 



spiring teachers take 
otes on lesson planning. 




A student catches-up on 
the local College Park 
news by reading The 
Diamondback. 



Through an e-mail to her 
professor, a student 
inquires about an 
upcoming assignment. 




Two students discuss their 
future career aspirations in 
the field of Education. 



'.dna Mora Szymanski, Dean 
'allege of Education 



Student engineers 

designed this solar house, 
and built it in front of the 
Capitol building. 



A fountain was erected 
outside of the Clark 
School bearing the names 
of donators to the school. 




Students study in the 
lounge of the Engineering 
Building. 



i A. SHREEVe, Jff. 
H SILVERMAN 
I'lviO e. SIMONS 
HtOflilO W. ALIEN 
KAZVS K, ALMENAS 
ROAKA H, AYCOCK 
EVERETT C, CARTEK 
RICHARD DUfFEV 

:mahlesr hayleck, jr. 

IVILBfRT /, HUFF 

.ARTHUR N, iOHNSON 

ROBERT M. RAGAM 



Students often found it 
handy to bring their laptop 
computers with them to 
class so that they could do 
work in between classes. 




Student engineers live 
inside the University of 
Maryland Solar House. 
The house ran entirely off 
of energy from the Sun. 



Dr. Howard Frank, Dean 
Robert H. Smith School of Business 



164 




The Clark School of 
Engineering, situated on 
the rolling, 1,500-acre 
Gnlversity of Maryland campus in 
College Park, Maryland, is one of 
the premier engineering schools in 
the U.S. 

Academically, the College 
offers 13 graduate programs and 
1 1 undergraduate programs, 
including two degree programs 
tailored for working professionals 



and one certification program. The 
Clark School's graduate programs 
are collectively the fastest rising in 
the nation in G.S. News & World 
Report's annual rating of graduate 
programs. 

The Clark School of 
Engineering is home to one of the 
most vibrant compilations of 
research activities in the country. 
With major emphasis in key areas 
such as communications and 



networking, systems engineering, 
rotorcraft technology, 

optoelectronics, transportation 
systems and space engineering, as 
well as electronic packaging, smart 
small systems and materials, the 
College is leading the way toward 
the next generations of engineering 
technology. 

source: http://www.eng.umd.edu/ 







/^ 



Ol 



^ 





College of Health and Human Performance 



The College of Health and 
Human Perfornnance ranks 
among the very best of its 
kind in the world. Evidence of its 
achievement is demonstrated in 
the quality of its faculty, programs, 
facilities, research, teaching and 
community service. College faculty 
have authored leading textbooks 
and have served on the editorial 
boards of research journals in their 
respective fields. Many have been 
elected to offices in major 
professional organizations and 
have received international 



recognition for their scholarship. 
The graduate programs of the 
College are ranked among the top 
ten nationally. Its research centers 
and laboratories remain unequaled 
in external research and teaching; 
its service courses reach more than 
18,000 weighted student credit 
hours each year; and the faculty- 
staff wellness program is a model 
for the nation. 

The College of Health and 
Human Performance is comprised 
of the disciplines of family studies, 
kinesiology, and public and 



community health. Each area 
offers students research and 
practical experience opportunities. 
The College has a simple goal: 
to contribute to the elevation of 
the human race and human 
existence through the study of 
health, aging, families and human 
movement, through the creating 
and development of interventions 
against life-style risk factors, and 
through the promotion of human 
health. 

source: http://www.hhp.umd.edu 



166 



. student discusses her 
nal project with a 
rofessor. 



laving worked up an 
ppetite walking to class, 
student munches on a 
nack. 




Before class, a student 
reviews and adds 
assigments in her 
academic planner. 



Coming from the gym, a 
student stops for a drink 
at the water fountain. 




In between classes, a 
student reads a 
Diamondback to catch up 
on the local news. 



Dr. Robert S. Gold, Dean 

College of Health and Human Performance 



Announcements are 
posted on the bulletin 
board Inside the college. 



The machines are ready 
for transcripts from 
various news sources. 




The Diamondback 

prepares students for real- 
life reporting. 



Upon entering the 
Journalism building, 
students first notice four 
television screens 

broadcasting different 
news shows. 




A Diamondback 

photographer edits her 

photos before submitting 

them to her editor. 



Thomas Kunkel. Dean 
Phillip Merrill College of Journalism 



168 



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Philip Merrill College of Journalism 



The Philip Merrill College of 
Journalism prepares 
students for careers in 
newspapers, magazines, TV news, 
newsletters and online journalism 
outlets. The undergraduate 
journalism program culminates in a 
B.A. degree in journalism. This 
year's freshman class has the highest 
scores ever. More than half are in 
honors programs, reflecting the 
college's rising national stature. 

Students learn in college 
programs such as Capital Mews 
Service, a daily wire service in 



Washington and Annapolis, GMTV, 
a cable station operated by the 
college, and the American 
Journalism Review, the nation's 
leading media magazine. 

Joumalism students at Maryland 
continue to exceed expectations and 
win honor and recognition for their 
work each semester. Additional 
accomplishments in the College of 
Journalism within the past year 
include an Emmy award for the 
University of Maryland's new daily 
television newscast from the National 
Academy of Television Arts and 



Sciences awarded for Oustanding 
Achievment in Student Production 
for 2001. Earlier this year, the 
Society of Professional Journalists 
awarded Maryland Mewsline with the 
title of Best Daily Newscast. 

In addition, reporters Bob 
Woodward and Carl Bernstein visited 
campus on October 16, 2002 in 
Tawes Theatre. The reporters, made 
famous for their Pulitzer Prize 
reporting of the Watergate scandal 
in 1972, offered advice to joumalism 
students during the forum. 

source http://www.journalisnn.umd.edu 




169 





College of Life Sciences 



The College of Life Sciences 
strives to develop and 
support outstanding research, 
educational and outreach programs 
in discovery oriented, fundamental or 
basic chemistry and biology. The 
College collaborates with other units 
in the University of Maryland System 
with complementary programs in the 
life sciences, most notably the 
medical school (University of 
Maryland at Baltimore (GMAB)), 
University of Maryland Baltimore 
County (GMBC), the Center for 
Environmental Sciences (CES) and 
the University of Maryland 
Biotechnology Institute (GMBl). 



The University and the College 
have a unique advantage because of 
the proximity of several federal 
agencies with closely related missions 
in the life sciences, most notably the 
National Institutes of Health, Food and 
Drug Administration, Mational 
Science Foundation, Environmental 
Protection Agency, National Institute 
for Standards and Technology, 
Smithsonian Institution, and Goddard 
Space Flight Center, to name a few. 

The College of Life Sciences has 
an impressive core of accomplished, 
creative and ambitious faculty, 
excellent undergraduate programs 
and increasingly strong graduate and 



research programs housed within the 
Departments of Biology, Cell Biology 
& Molecular Genetics, Chemistry & 
Biochemistry, and Entomology. 

A new Chemistry wing with state- 
of-the-art teaching laboratories and 
research laboratories is being 
constructed now. Biodiversity, 
bioengineering, bioinformatics and 
computational biology, cellular basis 
of development, neuroscience, 
protein structure/molecular 
machines/proteomics and virology 
are the areas that have been targeted 
for development across several 
Colleges. 

source http://www.life.umd.edu 



170 



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;-esults from an 
experiment in a 
microbiology class. 



A team of students 
analyze specimens of 
organic material. 




A professor reviews the 
properties of different 
flowers in a plant science 
class. 



Students compare notes 
after completing a lab in a 
biology class. 




A student lab group 
prepare slides to analyze 
under the microscope. 



Dr. Norma Allewell, Dean 
College of Life Sciences 










171 



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Vietnamese Student Association 



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President, Indian Students Association ■ 

' he path to a liberally educated person flows through active participation in 
one's surroundings. I believe that I strive to employ what talents Cod has 
given me in order to serve my community. Through ISA, I have had the 
opportunities to lead, be involved, learn about my culture, and make a difference 
on campus. My experiences at Maryland enable me to grow, learn, and flourish 
as a leader. " 




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Marguerite Wels 



President, Sigma Kappa Sorority, Beta Zeta 

Chapter 

"ood, better, best; never let it rest till your good is 
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Twin 



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\ Politician 

t's not bureaucracy that slows man 's progress, it's 
YOU! Life is designed to stymie tiie lazy and 
frustrate the frightened. But as Thomas Jefferson 
said, 'One man with courage is a majority/ and 
determination is the blade that slices the world's red 
tape. " 




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Brandon Malstrom 

August 21, 1982 - November 10, 2002 

" here are places I remember 
All my life though some have changed 
Some forever not for better 
Some have gone and some remain 
All these places have their moments 
With lovers and friends I still can recall 
Some are dead and some are living 
In my life I've loved them all. 

"In My Life"- The Beatles 





Jeffrey Starr 

Dodge Ball Player 
"Now you're all in big, big trouble. 




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Editor-in-Chief, The Diamondback 

I nee you're more knowledgeable you 
can be more critical -- and sometimes 
cynical. Unawareness has been the great 
inhibitor of year's past, and assertive 
comprehension is our pedestal of 
legitimization this year." -Jay Parsons 



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Marketing, General 

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Karamath Adamon 

Finance, International 

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Brian Adams 
Criminal Justice 



Scott Adams Jr. 
Criminal Justice 



Christina Adaniel 
Neurobiology , Spanish 



Ajoke Adigun 
Early Education 



Abiola Admlewa 
Economics 




David Adler 
Physics 



Lauren Adler 
Psychology 



Felix Adusei 
Computer Engineering 



Iliana Aguire 
Art Studio 



Nashiah Ahmad 
Joumali9Ti,Gcwemment ,Ft)litics 




Olatunde Alade 
Electrical Engineering 

Z26 



Elaine Albenda 
Economics 



Valerie Albrecht 
Government , Politics , Spanish 



Samuel Alcaine 
Computer Science 



Jennifer Ale 
English , Government , Politics 




Kelly Allmang 
Mathematics 



Rachel Altemus 
Communications 



Jeffrey Alter 

General Business 

Marketing 



Kristma Alvero 
Gvpt.Econ 



Gianna Alvino 
English 






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Government .Politics 



Bradley Amron 
Internat. Business, Dis 



Alisa Amsterdam 
Marketing 



Elizabeth Amtmann Kathleen Andersen 
Art Studio, Art History Physiology .Neurobiology 




Cecelia Anderson 
Physiology 




Leslie Anderson 
Communication 



Marcus Anderson 
Communication 



Michael Angleberger 
History 



Matthew Anguay 
Communication 



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Aggarwal Ankit 
Computer Engineering 



Jonathan Armoza 
Computer Science 




Peter Apostol 
Economics 




Jessica Armstrong 
Criminal Justice 




Chanty Asuquo 
Aerospace Engineering 



Matthew Auerbach 
broadcast Journalism 




Nina Azhdam 
Psychology 



Michael Aziz 
Architicture 




Linda Argentiero 
Biology 







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Finance 




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Communications 




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Manama Bah 

Cell And Molecular 

Bio, Genetics 



Irene Arispe 

Finance, International 

Business 



Shelly Mane Armour 
General Agriculture 




Elizabeth Arroyave 
Art Studio 



Fatimeh Asi 
Nutritional Science 




Sean Ayeni 
Chemical Engineering 



Mitchell Ayes 
Descion Info. Sciences 




Chanelle Bailey 
Broadcast Journalism 



Marni Baim 
Family Studies 




Meghan Baker 
Aerospace Engineering 



Michael Baker 
Civil Engineering 



Keiko Suzuki 

Baldwin International 

Business, Logistics 



Indira Balram 
Finance 



Scott Banks 
Finance 




Sherri Barber 
Political Action 

Social Change 



Amino Barbieri Afzalul Ban 

Physiology, Neurobiology Dis, Government .Politics 



Phil Barnes 
Music Education 



Darnell Barnett 
Elementary Education 





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David Barr 
Finance 



Rishi Barran 
Journalism 



Ana Barrenechea 
Government , Politics 



Thomas Barrow 
Mechanical Engineering 



Marvalee Bascus 
Marketing, Human 
Resource Manage. 





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Sociology 



Risa Battino 
Hearing, Speech 



Karen Battipaglia 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Kiora Batts 

Finance, International 

Business 



Charisma Bautista 
General Biology 



2Z9 




Emily Bautista 
Biomedical Engineering 



Clive Baveghems 
Chemistry 



Stephen Baxter 
Elementary Education 



Tim Beasman Rachel Becker 

Aerospace Engineering Physiology .Neurobiology 




Enka Becker-Medina 
Economics 



Marco Bejarano 
Civil Engineering 



Simret Belai 
Decision And Info 



Mariya Belik 
Dis 



Elizabeth Bell 
Criminal Justice 




Daniel Beller 
Computer Science 



Michael Bengel 
Political Science 



Nana Abena Benneth 
Government .Politics 



Matthew Beres 
Aerospace Engineering 



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Engineering 




Brandon Berment 
Finance 


Oscar Bermudez 

Human Resource 

Manangment 


Monique Berry 

Marketing, International 

Business 


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Finance, Logistics 


Robert Biddle 
Aero. Engineering 



230 







Amanda Binder 
Logistics, Transportation 



Stephanie Bing 
Journalism, English 



Alison Blake 
Communications 



Katherine Blanchard 
Spanish 



James Blassingame Jr. 
Govt , Politics , Criminology 







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Education 



Mary Ellen 
Bocchichio Zoology 



Patrick Bohan 
Computer Science 



5irgit Bohnhorst 
Anthropology 



Matthew Boiseau 
Communication 




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Judaic Studies 



John Bonanno 
Philosophy 



Kari Boone 
Marketing 



James Borrelli 
Mechanical Engineering 



Abigail Bortnick 
Theatre Performance 




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Candice Boteler 

Secondary English 

Education 



Caroline Boules 
Electrical Engineering 



Lauren Bovich 
English 



Kelly Bowman 
Art Educaton 



Lauren Boyer 
Art Studio 



231 




Dana Bressman 
Government , Poltics 



Amanda Brown 
Food Science 



Hattie Brown 
Journalism, English 



Jason Brown 
Communications 



Matthew Brown 
Computer Science 




Tiffany Brown 
Communications 



Yvonne Brown 
English 



Stacey Bruno 
Marketing 




Bridget Bryer 
Community Health 



Marc Bubar 
Architecture 



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Sociology 





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Criminal Justice 




Christine Bullock 
Economics .Spanish 



Peter Bullwinkel 
Govern, Politics 



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Accounting , Decision 

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American Studies 



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Neurophysiology 



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Communication 



Catherine Bush 
Elementary Education 



Ferris Butler 
Economics 



Catherine Buxton Alicia Byerly 
Mechanical Engineering Biodiversity, Conservation 

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Mathemathics 




Monique Butler 

Criminal Justice, Afro- 

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Criminal Justice 



Lauren Byren 
International Business 



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Psychology 




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Geography 



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Animal Science 



Benjamin Calvert 
Economics 



Alvin Campbell 
Economics 



Ardandia Campbell 
Communication 



233 




Paige Campbell 
English 




Amy Cardwell 
Marketing 



Cruz Campos 

Accounting, Business 

Spanish 



Daena Carrera 
General Biology 



Seth Cantor 

Marketing, Inter . 

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Brian Carroll 
Communication 



Christopher Capasso 
Geography 




Virginia Carroll 
Biochemistry 



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Marketing, Logistics 



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Family Studies, Politics 




Patricia Castellanos 
Chemistry , Math 



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Aerospace Engineering 



Cherlyn Cayabyab 
Government .Politics 



Matthew Cerritelli 
Architecture 



Jasmine Chan 
Communication 



Kristy Chance 
Psychology , Economics 



Julie Chang 
Child Development 



Crystal Chelliah 
Communications 



Edwin Chacko 
Government .Politics 




Elke Chen 
Biology , Women' S Studies 



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Psychology ,Criminolgy 



Tsui Yung Cheng 
Computer Science 



Wei-Ying Cheng 
General Biology 



Adam Chepenik 

Finance, Economics 

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Emily Chernick 
Psychology , Criminology 




Joy Chien 
Decision Info. Sciences 



Jeffrey Childs 
Economics 



Jeffrey Chillemi 
Computer Engineering 



Carl Chirichella 
Electrical Engineering 



Jeremy Chiu 

Decision Info. 

Science, logistic 




Janny Cho 
Biology, Dietetics 



Juliet Cho 
Elementary Edu. 



Robert Choate 
English 



Eva Cholody 
Marketing 



Christopher Chrzonowski 
Aerospace Engineering 





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Decision, Info. Sciences 



Yvonne Cissel 
Dance, Psychology 



James Clifford 
Logistics 



James Coates 
Kinesiology 



Andrea Cohen 
Communications 



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Stephanie Cohen 
Biology 



Deandra Coleman 
Communications 




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Lucas Coirolo 
Criminology 



Waldette Cule Danura Coleman Family 
Comm .Government , Politics Studies .Economics 



Thomas Coleman 
Criminology .Criminal 



Jeffrey Coletta 
business, Marketing 



MariQ Concepion 
Human Resources 



David Coleman 
Finance 




Daniel Confer 
Logistics 




Richard Conley 

Spanish Education, 

Govt, Politics 



Tynisha Cook 
Criminology , Criminal 

236 '""'" 







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Angela Connell 
Criminal Justice 




Kelli Cooke 
Art History 




Chris Connolly 

Decision & Info. 

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Jessica Connolly 
Psychology 



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Art History, Art Studio 



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Physics, Astron 



Mike Cook 
English 




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Kinesiology 



Maria Cruz 
Marketing 



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English 



Kelly Daniel 
Psychology 



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Neurology, Physiology 



Elizabeth Crevelmg 
Architechural History 



Brenice Crissman 
Engineering 



Claire Cunningham 
Animal Science 



Joseph Curley 
Communication 



Gregory Currey 
Philosophy 



Francis Dacanay 
Government , Politics 



Jeremy Dalkoff 
Finance, Accounting 



Theresa Dalton 
English 



Theresa Daniels 
Communication 



Ebony Dashiell 
Psychology 



Lindsay Davey 
Communications 




Jeffrey Crosse 
Civil Engineering 




Medina Currie 
Marketing 




Adam Daniel 
Cell Biology Genetics 




Demond Davis 
Finance 



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Erin Davis 
Finance 




Kelli Davis Walter Davis 

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Government , Politics 



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Econctmcs , Gove rrrrent , Politics 




Patrick Dean 
Economics 



Juan David Delgado 
Physics 



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Aera Accounting 



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Electrical Engineering 



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Crinimal Justice 



Dan Dicorcia 
Marketing 



Ryan Diener James Diercksen 

Govt, Poll tics, Criminology Marketing, Government 



Meghan Dinneen 
Zoology 




Raby Diop 
Logistics, Supply Chain 

238 '^"' 



Melissa Dobres 
Communication 



Helena Dobrinoff 
Landscape Management 



Kory Dodd 
Journalism 



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Early Childhood Ed 




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Criminal Justice 





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Computer Science 






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Communication 



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Finance 




Karl Dudek 
Electrical Engineering 



Daniel Dufera 
Chemical Engineering 



Diana Dulcey 
Accounting 



Gabriel Douek 
General Business 




Tracey Driscoll 
Business Admin, Ccjs 




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Economics 



Paul Donahue Tiffany Donaldson Caroll Donayre 
Computer Engineering Journalism, Economics Criminal Justice, 

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Tynesha Douglas 
Accounting 




Rachel Dube 
Art Education 




Katharine Dunn 
Govt, Politics 



239 




David Dunston 

Cell And Molecular 
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Sheryl Eastman 
Government , Politics 



Diana Elstins 
Criminal Justice 





Walter Dupriest 
Studio Art 



Shawnda Dutch 

Biological 

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Communication 




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Cell Biology, 

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Dara Eisenberg 
Criminal Justice 



Michael Eisenberg 
Finance 



Gina Eosc 

Environmental Science, 

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Jaclyn Epstein 
Elementary Education 



Jonathan Epstein 
Computer Science 




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Matthew Dwyer 
Criminal Justice 




Michelle Ellison 
Ansc,Micb 




Christine Eptmg 
English, Spanish 




Adebayo Erinle 
Computer Engineering 

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Lansa Ermanis 
Art Studio, Psychology 



Jamelle Esaw 
Communications 



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Neuro, Physiology 



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Finance 



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English 



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Computer Science 



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Elementary Education 





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Computer Engineering 



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Criminal Justice 



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Physics Nuclear 

Engineering 



Anees Fatima Rudolph Faulkner 

Industrial Psychology Electrical Engineering 



Courtney Feldscher 
Criminolgy , Sociology 





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Finance, Dis 



Dawn Fichot 
Government 



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Family Studies 




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Marketing 



Joshua Fingold 
Government , Politics 



Matthew Fischer 
Microbiology 



Adam Fisher 
Elementary Education 



Dana Falorio 
Spanish 




Brandon Feraren 
Geography 




James Fielder 
Finance, Accounting 




Sara Fisher 
Art Studio 



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Psychology 



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Biochemistry 




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Criminal Justine 



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Economics 



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Community Health 



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Elementary Education 



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American Studies 





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Michael Forakis 
Civil Engineering 



Inez Ford 
English 



Manda Fordyce 
Communications 



Michele Foster 
Hi story, Criminology 

242 



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Civil Engineering 



Matthew Fox 
History 



Jennifer Frampton 
Education 



Candice Fori 

Community Health 

Education 




Kate Francies 
French 



April Francis 
Criminal Justice 



Latoya Freeman 
Communications 





Lauren Francis-Jackson Wendy Frank 

Hearing, Speech Aerospace Engineering 



Noah Fried 
Politics .Government 



Deidre Frith 
Communications 



Donna Frazee 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Adrienne Freeman 
broadcast Journalism 





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Sedia Freemna 
Communications 



Catherine 
French English 



Angela Frcy 
Health 



Andrew Fried 
Computer Science 




Daniel Friedman 
Journalism 



Ashley Friedrich 
Communication 



Robert Fries 
Electrical Engineering 



Kesha Frisby 
Electrical Engineering 





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Andrea Frost 
Psychology 



Daniel Fuentes 

Music, Biological 

Sciences 



Edwin Fung 
Computer Science, Math 



Amanda Gable 
Civil Engineering 



243 




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Government , Politics 



Michael Gagne 
Computer Science 



Alsace Gallop 
Physiology.Neuobiology 



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Economics 




Kevin Gannon 
Criminal Justice 



Timothy Gardner 
Psychology 



Lindsay Garfield 
Psychology 



Keysha Garner 
Special Education 




Nadia Gamier 
Behavior Ecology 

Evoluti on 




Gerald Gay 
Journalism 



Justin Garrido 
Human Resource 



Heidemarie Gauss 
Geography 



Nicole Gavelek 
Community Health 



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Ryan Geary 
Kinesiology 



Eric Geier 
Government .Politics 



Brett Gellman 
Business, Dis 



Andrea Gawrylewski 
Environmental 




244 



Michael Gencarelli 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 







Margaux Genovese 
Psychology 



Anne-Marie George 

Spanish 

Citation, Criminology 



Stephanie George 
Accounting 



Diana Gerson 
Studio Art 



Robert Gerson 
Government , Politics 






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Aerospace Engineering 



Lorine Ghabranious 
History 



Sandra Ghattas 
Aerospace Engineering 



Paola Ghazarian 

Sci . International 

Bus,Ital . Lang 



Jennifer Gibson 
Kinesiology 



Matthew Gilbert 
Accounting 



Neal Gima 



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Stephen Gioffre 
General Finance, General Business 



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Communication 




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Computer Science 



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Fhysiolog/ , Neurcbiolog/ , Spcrti sh 



Sharon Goldberg 
Elem. Education 



Dina Goldentayer 
Government , Politics 



Leah Goldfine 
Criminology, Government 

245 




Michael Goldgeier 
Computer Science 



Maritza Gonalez 
International 



Danielle Gordon 
Journalism 



Jeanine Goldsmith 
Communication 



Dennis Golovaty 
Computer Science 



Zinaida Golwalla 
English 



Ronald Gomez 
Economics 








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Joel Gonzales 
Electrical Engineering 



Patricia Gonzales 
Chemical Engineering 



Diana Gonzalez 
Finance 



Richard Gopaul 
Computer Engineering 




Elise Gordon 
Family Studies 



Neil Gordon 
Economics .Communication 



Matthew Gorius 
Decision & Info 
Systems , Finance 



Alyssa Gorlin 
Family Studies, Spanish 




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Psychology 



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Government .Politics 



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Journalism 



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Justice, Bus Entrepr 



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Social Studies 




Sherry Green 

Human Resource 

Management 



Melissa Gretczko 
Elementary Education 



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Elect. Engin 



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Criminology 



Lauren Greene 
Sociology 



Shakira Greene 

Criminology, Criminal 

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Brett Greenfield 
Criminal Justice 





David Groff 
Architecture 



Jason Gudenius 
Marketing 



Jessica Guy 
Elementary Education 



Nana Gyang 
Economics 




Aaron Hadley 
Environmental Science 



Rebecca Hagel 
Psychology .Criminal 



Jennifer Hahlbeck 
Marketing 



Stephanie Haines 
Marketing, Public 




Ian Hall 
Physical Sciences 



Kimberly Hall 

Early Childhood 

Education 



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Communication, Business Justice 

Admin. 



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Journalism 




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Marketing 



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Art Studio 



Tiffany Hardy 
Family Studies 



Tocarah Hargrove 
Psychology 



Aydin Haririnia 
Biochemistry 




Pamela Harkness 
Economics 



Keith Harris 
Agricutu re, Economics 



Kimberly Harris 
Sociology 



Kristen Harris 
Secondary Edu. 



Ryan Hams 
Government .Politics 





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Marketing, Transportation 



Lamar Harrison 
Criminal Justice 



Marina Harrison 

Public Relations, 

Communications 



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Materials Science 
Engineering 



Eric Hartlove 
Civil Engineering 




Helayne Hashmall 
Jewish Studies 



Sabriyah Hassan 
Spanish 



Amy Hatcher 
Early Childhood Educa- 



Pricilla Hawkes 
Criminal Justice 



248 



Jaime Hawkins 

Early Childhood 

Education 






Thomas Haworth 

Criminology 

Criminal Justice 



Kelly Hayeslip 
Human Resources 



Kevvanna Haywood 
English 



Shern Heft 
Animal Science 



Erin Hegg 
Zoology 



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Art History 



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Anthropology 



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Finance, Dis 



Max Heller 
Computer Science 



Scott Heller 
Computer Science 



Alison Hellman 

Psychology 
Family Studies 




Andrew Henley 
Economics 



Avital Herbin 
Psychology 



Casey Herrod 
Music 



Gregory Herwig 
Mechanical Engineering 




Joseph Paul 
Hickey Chemistry 



Artis Hicks 
Communications 



Samantha Hiestand 
Elementary Education 



David Higgins In 
Sociology , Landscape 
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249 







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Derrick Hill 
Computer Graphics 



Nathan Hillery 
Computer Science 



Elias Hiruye 
Electrical Engineering 



Lan Hoang 
Economics 



Rebecca Hoffberg 
Math, Government 



Erica Hofferman 
Finance 



Grapham Hoffman 
American Studies 



Michelle Hoffmann 
Communication 




Alicia Holder 
Zoology 



Eraina Holland 
Finance 



Tyrone Hollis 
Criminal Justice 



Michae Holloman 
Communication 



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Daniel Hodges 
Communications 




Brenna Hogan 
Microbiology 




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Khalise Holmes 
Elementary Education 




Joo Hyo Hong 
Decision Info. Systems 

250 



Tanima Hoque 
Microbiology 



Carl Horn II 
Government .Politics 



Daniela Ari Horniker 
Art History 



Rebecca Horvath 
Economics 




Joshua Horwitz 
Finance 



Jessica Hughes 
English 



Jenna Hough 
Kinesiology 



Carmella House 
Astronomy 



Ryan Howard 

Computer Science, 

Finance 



Johnny Hsu 
Psycholgy 






Adam Hull 
Government, Politics 



Peter Hunt 
Finance 



Nora Husian 
Computer Science 



Sylvain Ibino 
Accounting 




Kristina Ingram 

Criminology, 
Criminal Justice 



Stephen Italiano 
Economics 



Hilary Jackler 
Government , Politics 



Antimmario Jackson 
Electrical Engineering 



Chante Jackson 
Communications 




Chitisha Jackson 
Economics 



Christyn Jackson 
Psychology 



Janene Jackson 
Criminology 



Catherine Jacob 
Psychology 



Benjamin Jacobson 
Government , Politics 



251 




Barbara Jaffe 
Criminal Justice 



Irandy Jennings 
Kinesiology 



Michael Jones 
Marketing 



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Dana Jarzyniecki 
Psychology 



Lane Jefferson 
French .Spanish 



Laurie Jefferosn 
Electrical Engineering 



Kimberly Jekabsons 
Marketing 




Dionne Johnson 
Communication 



Erin Johnson 
Afro-American Studies 



Julie Johnson 
Psychology , Sociology 



Bahiyyah Jones 
Economics 




Philip Jones 
Ensp Land Use 



Robyn Jones 
Aerospace Engineering 



Tracie Jones 
Criminal Justice 



Jocelyn Jordano 
Psychology , Sociology 




Dawn Joseph 
Arfo American Studies 







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Andrew Kahner 
Decision Info. 
System, Logistic 



James Kalinger 
Mechanical Engineer 



Radwan Kalo 
Mechanical Engineering 



Peguy Kamdem 
Computer Engineering 



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Lauren Kane 
Communication 



Ayodeji Kara 
Finance 




Gary Kaufman 
Government , Philosophy 




Cheng-Tien Kang 
Computer Science 



Francis Kanyuni 
Electriacl Engineering 




Paul Karczewski 
Criminal Justice 




Lance Kearns 
History 



Aiiiarnda Karc 
Journal ism, Criminology 




Nicholas Keber 
English 





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Economics 



Emily Kaplowitz 
Government , Politics 





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Dietetics 



Catherine Keller 
Journalism 



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Sociology 



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Computer Science, 

Second. Educat. 



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Biological Sciences 



Benjay Kempner 
Biology, Phnb 



Leah Katz 
Animal Science 




David Kelley 
Account ing.Di nance 




Jamie Kennedy 
Jouralism, English 



253 




Patrick John Kennedy 

Criminology, Criminal 

Justice 



Katharine Kilroy 
Chinese 



Latrese Kimball 
Economics 



Elena Kessi 
Marketing 



Jennifer Ketterer 
Secondary Education 



Janet Key 
Electrical Engineering 



Ary Kim 
Journalism 



Damion King 
Kinesiology 



Christina Kim 
Mech. Eng. 



Jae Kim 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Robert King 
Anthropolgy 



David Kish 
Business 



Vong Khamvongsa 
Sociology 




Sung Chin Kim 
Computer Science 




Matthew Kleiger 
Criminal Justice 





254 



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Lauren Klein 


Seth Kleiner 


Marc Kline 


Kathleen Kloet 


Communication 


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Government .Politics , 
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Cephas Knausenberger 
Biodiversity.Conseration 



Camille Knight 
Art Studio 



Chaweon Koo 
Communications 



Siret Kork 
Anthropology 






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Sarah Kraker 
International Business 



Christian Kramer 
Economics 



Patricia Krays 
Kinesiology 



Thomas Krug 
Computer Science 



Ritika Kochar 
International Bus. 
Marketing 



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Accounting 





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English 



Kristen Koterwas 
Government .Politics 





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Psychology, Criminology 



Annabelle Kraut 
Psychology 





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Education 



Jeffrey Kuhn 
Civil Engineering 



Kelly Kolson 
Government .Politics 




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Comm 




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Organizational 

leadership 




Adam Kulikowski 
Economics 



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Kara Kull 
Computer Science 



Michael Kunz 

Criminal Justice, 

Criminology 



Jacob Kurtzer 
Philosophy 



Hok-Kee Kwan 

Computer Engineering, 

Economics 



Derek Laboo 
Psychology 



Shaohua Lai 
Civil Engineering 



Ross Laidig 

Criminal Justice, 

Economics 



Lhi Ming Lam 
Economics , Computer 



Cara Lane 
Sociology 



Jennifer Lapan 

Art In Adver. And 

Graphic Design 



An Lane 
Public Relations 



Shan Larson 
Government .Politics 



Valerie Lawrence 
English 

256 



Scott Lazzaro 
Economics 



Noah Lederman 
Marketing 



Erie Lee 
Computer Science 



Lisa Laanisto 
Accounting, Finance 




Claudia Lam 
Arec And Genetics 




Saeeda Latham 
Biochemistry 




Erin Lee 
Early Education 




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Marketing 



Yuan-Feng Lee 
Dis 



Rebecca Leonard 
Government , Politics 



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Psychology 



Mclanie Lee 
Journalism 






Yvonne Lee Erica Faith Lefkowitz 
Physiology, Neurobiology Business Marketing 




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5iological Resources 

Engineering 



Rachael Lerner 
Individual Studies 




Jennifer Levi 
Journalism 



Mariya Levin 
Dis 



Jessica Levy 
Marketing 



Rebecca Lee 
Journalism 



Sooyon Lee 
Computer Science 



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Jennifer Leitgeb 
Special Education 



Ryan Leo 
Aerospace Engineering 




liana Beth Lesser 
Family Studies 



Dalia Leven 
Civil Engineering 





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Computer Engineering 



Lisa Lewis 
Elem. Education 



257 




Mark Lewis 
Economics 



Robert Lewis 
Art Focus In Design 



Stacey Lewis 
Communications 



Andrea Libracli 
Art Studio 



Jamie Lichtenberg 
Psychology 




Audra Lieberman 
Criminal Justice 



Marc Lifland 
Social Studies 

Education 



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Physiology, Nerobiology 



Sang Lim 
Physics 




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Anthropology 




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Civil Engineering 



Matthew Linkswiler 
Chemical Engineering 



Nicholas Linnenkamp 
Electrical Engineering 



Carolyn Liou 

Decision Info And 

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Lindsay Littlefield 
Marketing 





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Yang Liu 
Computer Science 



Yenmei Liu 
Dis 



Sharon Livingston 
Economics 



Heather Lloyd 
Journalism 



Becky Lockhart 
Communications 



258 




Tammie Logan 

Engineering, Applied 

Science 



Andrew Long 
Aerospace Engineering 



Kristyn Looms 
Government, Politics 



Brett Loop 
Physiology , Neurobiology 





Scott Lorber 
Accounting 



Dominic Loscalzo 
Economics 



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Sean Lowman 
Secondary Education 



James Lusby Jr. 
Electrical Engineering 




Brigitte Lynch 
Music Education 



Krista Lynn 
Criminal Justice 



Melissa Lynott 
Government .Politics 



Justin Ma 
Math, Computer Science 







Brent Machado 
Chemical Engineering 



Jennifer Maddoz 
Criminal Justice 



Sarah Mahony 
American Studies 



Robert Maider 
Comm 




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Kinesiology 




Amy Lusting 
Communication 




Adama Macalou 
Marketing 




Eunice Maize 
Community Health 



259 




Langston Majette 
Geography 




Jocelyn Maldonado 
Communication 



Adenike Majolagbe 
Physiology .Neurobiology 




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Marketing 



Adesike Ma]olQgbe 
Accounting 



Melanie Mallett 
English 







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Ivan Maldonado 
Marketing 



Henock Mamo 
Computer Science 



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Criminal Justice 




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Economics 




Regina Marasia 
General Business 



Julie Marchick 
Microbiology 



Al -Wayne Morgan 
Economics 



Monique Martin 
General Business 



Kofi Martin Bolden 
History 



260 




Nicole Martyn 
English 



Joshua Maurer 
Journalism 



Kelsie McCall 
broadcast Journalism 



Matthev\ McHale 
Chemical Engineering 






Keith Maskell 
Economics 



Allison Mass 
Marine Biology 



Stephanie Materese 
Communication 



Frank Mauck IV 
Journalism 




Marni Mayer 

Decision And Info 

Sciences 



Kyle Mays 
Geography 



Molly McAllister 
Sociology 



Brandon McCadden 
Logistics 





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Monique McCaw 
Communications 



Taina McField 
Government , Politics 



Nicole McGarrell 
Marketing 



Joseph McGuire 
Government, Poll tics 





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Journalism 



Kelly McMahon 

Anthropology, Art 

History 



Tavia McMlam-King 

Criminology, Criminal 

Justice 




Nicholas Meade 
Computer Engineering 

261 




Alvin Meads 
Criminology 



Alyssa Mealey 
Kinesiology 



Lisa Mealey 
Kinesiology 



Melanie Medina 
Marketing 



Raymond Medina 
Economics 




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Secondary Education 



Henry Me]ia 
Architecture 



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Communication 




Emily Messick 
Marketing , Pre -Law 



Lara Metrione 
Zoology 



Lindsey Merfeld 
Studio Art, Design 




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Crimonolgy .Criminal 

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Communication 




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Computer Engineering 




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Psychology 



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Marketing, Logistics 



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Psychology 



Rachael Ming 
Family Studies 



Igor Minin 
Computer Science 



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Government , Politics 



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Government, Poll tics 







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Biochemistry 



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Economics 



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Criminal Justice 




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Natural Resource 

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Mechanical Engineering 



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Government .Politics 



Allyson Mormon 
Physiology, Neurobiology 



Arlen Morales 
Communication 



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Economics 




Brandon Moss 
American Studies 



Sara Motamedi 
Finance 



Jameel Muhammad Michael Mullinix 
Public And Community Electrical Engineering 
Health 



Christopher Murphy 
Economics 



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Jeffrey Murphy 

Fire Protection 

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Govt, Politics 



Rachel Newman 
Accounting 



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Art 



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Economics .Criminal 

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Criminology 



Ronie Namata 
Economics 



Dante Nedra 
Econ, International Bus. 



Brian Needles 
Art Studio 



Justin Nero 
Chemistry 



Sarah Newman 
Animal Science 



Jordan Newmark 
Psychology 



Kris Newsome 
Economics 



Eric Nichols 
Computer Science 



Jaimee Nichols 
Hearing And Speech 



264 



Dorothy Noel 

African American 

Studies 



Lindsay Namm 
Nuero.Phsyology 




Chris Newman 
Criminal Justice 




Bao Nguyen 
History 




John Nolan IV 
Comm 





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Psychology 



Ami Norman 
Psychology, Criminology 



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Economics 



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Dis 



Nana-Afia Nyarko 
Marketing 





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Civil Engineering 



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Government, Politics 



Eunice Obeng 
Psychology 



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Psychology 



Topaz Obler 

Mech. Engineering, 

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Patrick Ocheni 
Electrical Engineering 



Ngozi Ofili 
Government , Politics 



Nwachukwu Ohameje 

Criminology , Criminal 

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Alvin Okello 
Elect. Engineering 



Fadeke Olanegan 
Physiology Neurobiology 





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Biology 



Michael Ortolani 

Finance, Business 

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Aya Osada 
Special Education 



Andrew Osei-Adu 
Economics 



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Taiwo Osifadt' 

Criminology .Criminal 

Justice 



Melissa Ostrow 

Journal ism,Womens 

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Adesuwa Osundc 
Neuophysiology , Biology 



Yumi Ota 
Government 



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Criminology 



Genie Palting 
Sociology 



Annmaria Pace 

Foreign Language, 

Spanish 



Vivian Pacheco 
Criminology 



William Palladmo 
Communications, Classics 



Garvi Pandya 
Computer Science 



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Electrical Engineering 



Alex Papanicolaou 
Economics 



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History 




David Palomino 
Spanish, Business 




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Neuro, Physiology 




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Psychology 

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Accounting 



William Passauia 
Communications 



Rachel Passman 
Government .Politics 



Maynak Patel 

Finance, Decision, 

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Dis 



Adam Penlman 
Finance 



Stephanie Phelps 
Uological Resources 



Stacey Patterson 
Criminology, Criminal 



Jason Patton 
Marketing 



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Comm 



Katie Penllo 
Accounting, Music 




Ayraham Pinson 
History 



Brandon Perry 
Biology 



Melissa Pesce 
Psychology 



Kathenne Peters 
Philosophy 



Mindy Peyser 
Special Education 






Elizabeth Pico 
Marketing 



Lynn Pierson 
Aerospace Engineering 



Jacob Pimental 
Physics 



Jonathan Pindrik 
Mathematics 




Jennifer Piper 
English 



Nichole Pitts 
Communications 



Anna Plaks 
Marketing 



Luzviminda Polser 
Anthropology 

267 




Yvette Poole 

Community Health 

Education 



Stephen Powell Jr. 
Civil Engineering 



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Electrical Engineering 



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Communication 



Manieh Poorahrab 
Accounting 



Toya Powell 
Economics 



Gregory Pressoir 
Sports Manangement 



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Government ,Polotics 



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Family Studies 



Noble Potts III 
Criminology 




Hugo Prado 

Natural Resources 

Management 



Brett Prescott 
Finance, Economics 



Rachel Pressley 
Economics 




Tashica Price 

Criminology & Criminal 

Justice 



Chavonne Primus 
Journalism 



Kelechi Princewill 
Physiology .Neurobiology 




Brendan Puis 
Geology 



Priya Purushotham 
Community Health 



268 



Sangeetha Purushotham 

Human Resource 

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Steven Pyles 
Human Resources 




Beth Rabbin 
Linguistics 



Anupama Ramachandran 
Economics 



Jacqueline Reilly 
Aerospace Engineering 






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Psychology 



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Civil Engineering 



Michael Rainey 
Electrical Engineering 



Maria Rakhovskaya 
Zoology, History, Spanish 




Jessica Raniere 

English, Theatre 

Education 



Katie Raymond 
Governmen , Politics 



Ashley Reese Chanda Reese 

Criminology, Criminal Physiology .Neurobiology 




Dana Reisch 
English 



Jeff Relunia 
Criminal Justice 



Christina Remy 
Comm 



Emiliano Reveron Jr. 
Marketing 






5reanne Reynolds 
Communications 



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American Studies Communications 




Kelli Richards 
Journalism 



Alison Richter 
Economics 



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Criminal Justice 



Brendan Robinson 
Finance 



Jennifer Rogers 
Elem Edu 







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Journalism 




Danielle Rodriguez 
Early Childhood 

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Art Studio 



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American Studies 




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Aerospace Engineering 



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Communications 



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Art History 



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Government 



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Finance 




Melissa Roosen 


Nathaniel Rosemin 


Scott Rosenbaum 


Charles Rosenberg 


Jennifer Rosenson 


Secondary Education 


Economics 


Economics, Communication 


Economics, International 
Business 


Early Childhood 
Education 



270 




Loni Rosenstein 
Communication 




Anita Roy-Lewis 
Electrical Engineering 



Oliver Sadorra 
Aerospace Engineering 



Keiko Sanaka 
Environmental Science 






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Psychology 



Erika Ross 
Marketing 



Jennifer Roth 
Communications 



Nasseem Rouhani 
Community Health 




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Carissa Rubini 
Architecture 



luiiiLira Rudorfer 
Psychology 



Brandon Ruff ley 
Accounting, Finance 



Pierre Russell 
Criminology, Criminal 




Shruti Sagar 
Finance, IT 



Ebony Sails 
Government , Politics 



Jeremy Satnon 
Animal Science 



Christina Samwell 
Community Health 






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Dance 



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Mechanical Engineering 



Jessica Santos 
Family Studies 



Reshama SaraLkar 
Cmbg 



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Julie Sartjuento 
Government .Politics 



Melanie Scheick 
Finance 



Michel Schmidt 
US History 




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Miti Sathe 
Government .Politics 



Bradley Saurbaugh 

Finance, Information 

Science 



Joe Schaffer 
Economics 



Adam Schaller 
Computer Engineering 






Alissa Schepisi 
Journalism 



Jennifer Schloss 
Marketing 



Patrick Schmahl 
Mechanical Engineering 




Christopher 
Kinesiology, 


Schmidt 
Psychology 






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Areospace Engineering 



Stephen Schmoll 
Biomedical Engineerinc 



Danielle Schneider 
Sociology 



Laurakate Schnitzer 
Anthropology 






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Brigitte Schnorr 


Seth Schraier 


Teresa Schulkin 


Stacey Schwaber 


Eric Schwager 


Kinesiology 


Government, Politics, 


Environmental 


Government, Poll tics 


Finance, Accounting 


272 


Econ.Crimin. 


Policy, Politics 








Cortney Schwallenberg James Scire Christopher Scott 

Comm, Criminal Justice Electrical Engineering Aerospace Engineering 



Matthew Scott 
Economics 



Michael Scott 
Mechanical Engineering 




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Sarah Seage 
Art History, Art Studio 



Nina Semwanga 
Geographic Info 

Systems 



Philip Shaffer 
Psychology 




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Richard Sears 
Studio Art 




Elliot Sedegah 
Computer Engineering 



Jessica Seldomridge 

Psychology, Criminal 

Justice 



Helen Seleme 
Criminal Justice 




Vivek Seshadri 
Economics 



Tasha Sexton 
Kinesiology 



Jennifer Shaffer 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Kevin Shaffer 
Aeronautical 
Engineering 




Hussaina Shagaya 
Sociology 



Christie Shahan 
History 



Anjulie Shahi 
Marketing, Logistics 



Paul Shaklan 
Computer Science, 
Philosophy 27^ 




Naomi Shamash 
Hearing, Speech 



Lauren Sher 
Marketing 



Jamie Shupak 
Communications 



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Criminology .Criminal 



Robyn Sharp 
Psychology 



Nissa Shaw 
Electrical Engineering 



Natalie Sheets 
Economics 




Elissa Sherman 
Criminology 



Latoya Shields 
Communications 



Ikuma Shimizu 
Communications 



Marjorie Shipley 
Elementary Education 




Todd Shuttleworth 
Anthropology 



Djeneba Sidibe 
International Business 



Alexis Siebs 
Civil Engineering 



Traci Siegel 
Communications 




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Siria Silas 
Neuroscience 




Justin Silbert 
Decision Info Science 



Mohammed Sillah 
Communications 



Josh Silver 
Finance 



Matthew Silverberg 
Criminal Justice 



274 






Jason Simms 
Computer Engineering 



Perin Simon Robert Simon-Whigham 
Decision & Information Geo Info Systems, Comp 
Sysytems 



Joseph Sinatra 
Government , Politics 



Sasha Singh 
Human Resourses 




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Demetna Singletary 
Communications 



Tiina Sisas 
Criminal Justice 



Saul Slotnick 
Marketing 



Brannon Smith 
Computer Science 



Christopher Smith 

Physiology , Neurobiology , 

Spanish 




Emily Smith 
Marketing, Finance 



Frederick Smith 
Criminal Justice 



Glenn Smith 
Secondary Education 



Jason Smith 
Mechanical Engineering 



Kristin Smith 

Secondary Education, 

Education 








Patrick Smith 
Sociology 



Scott Smith 
Communications 



Shannon Smith 
Criminal Justice 



Kendra Smoak 

Community Health 

Education 



Carlton Snow 
Electrical Engineering 

275 




MaritzQ Solano Michael Somerville 

Spanish, Language, Literature Decision, Infomation 

Science 



Kathryn Sommar 
Communications 



Christian Sorge 
Journalism 




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Noelle St. Angelo 
English 



Sharon Stahl 
Family Studies 



Gabrielle Stamm 
Communications 



Joi Stanley 
Multicultura 
Advertising 



Christopher Stanton 
Finance 



Duane Staples 
Communications 



Noelle Stary 
Human Resources 



Amanda Statland 

Criminology .Criminal 

Justice 



Eric Stehmer 
History 



Amanda Steinberg 
Kinesiology 



276 



Gregory St i^nil(n\'.l- i 

Criminal Justice, Govt . 

& Politic 



Jessica Stepman 
Journalism 



L utrese Spears 
Finance 




Linder Stanley 
Govt, Politics 




Johnny Stban 
Biochemistry 




Cortney Stevens 
Art Studio 






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Joshua Stevens 
Psychology 



Christina Stevens-Payne 
Education 



Scot Stitely 
Economics 



Justice Stoddart 
Psychology 



Miranda Stoecker 
Animal Science 




Kevin Stonesifer 
Accounting, Finance 



Angela Strevig 
Civil Engineering 



Christopher Stuchko 
Journalism 



Sharon Sussman 
American Studies 



Charlotte Swaket 

Environmental 

Science, Policy 




Eric Swalwell 
Government , Politics 



Samantha Sweeney 
Psychology , Communication 



Brian Sweet 
Psychology 



Sara Sweikar 
Comunication 



Lauren Tabackman 
Government , Politics 





Heather Tackett 
Sociology 



Nolawi Taddesse 
Microbiology , Art 



Lauren Tafflin 
Communications 



Craig Taflin 
Finance, Economics 



Charles Taggert 
Dis 



277 




Joseph Tannenbaum 
Comminication 



Dana Tashjian 
Zoology 



Andrew Taylor 
Economics 



Bianco Taylor 
Criminal Justice 



Linda Taylor 
Criminal Justice 



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Michael Taylor 
Computer Science 




David Thaw 

Government .Politics , 

Comp, Science 




Z78 



Carrie Timlin 
Sociology 





Preston Taylor 
Kinesiology 




Kerry Thompson 
Animal Science 




Christina Tisone 
Business Marketing 




Rebecca Teagno 
Communications 



Melanie Temkin General 
Business, Manangement 





Melissa Thompson Elizabeth Thorstensen 
broadcasting, Journalism Geography 




Edita Tituana 
Nutritional Sciences 



Amy Tong 
Finance 



Grace Thammasuvimol 
Physiology, 
Neuobiology 




Holly Thorton 
Psychology 




Diana Tonoukouin 
Neurobiology , Physiology 




Carrie Toochen 
Marketing 



Joseph Tramm 
Mathematics 



Melissa Tortoriello 
Psychology 



Heba Toulan 
Public Relitions 





Jacqueline Tressito 
Marketing 



Hadiya Tucker 
Communications 



Kira Tullio 
Communication 



Shaneil Turnbull 
Cell & Molecular 



Walter-John Turnes 
Computer Science 





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Christina Uy Eric Uzialko Economics 
Communication, Public 
Relations 



Theresa Valentine 

Materials 

Science, Engineering 



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Kimberly Towner 
Education 



Adam Tuckman 
Marketing 



Duna Uribe 
International 




Belynda Trader 
Physiology .Neurobiology 




Danielle Tuerk 
Marketing 





Andrea Urich 
Fmst 




Stephanie Valins 
Finance 



Peter Van Do 
History 



279 





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Physiology , Neurobiology 



Jennifer Vansickel 
Criminal Justice 



Stephen Vargas 
Finance 



Ariel Vegosen 
Journalistn 





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Hitesh Verma 
Economics 



Brian Vetter 
Electrical Engineering 



William Veyvoda 
English 



Natalia Videla 
Accounting 




Catherine Villareale 
English 



Shawnita Vincent 
Communications 



Olga Vintimilla 
Marketing, International 



Michelle Vonnordeck 
Art Studio 



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Alexis Venechanos 
Communications 




Maria Villagran 
Finance 




Robert Vorhies 
Zoology 





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Mai s Engineering 

280 



Tuan Vuong 
Computer Science 



Alassane Wade 
Finance, Int ' L Bus. 



Jasmin Walker 
Psychology 



Debyn Wallace 
Communications 





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Science 




Joseph Wallner 
Computer Engineering 



Elisabeth Walsh 
Communications 



Samuel Walter 

biological Resources 

Engineering 





Timothy Walters 
Physiology , Neurobiology 



Pei-Ling Wang 
Finance 



Alfred Wanga 
Electrical Engineerinc 



Nusaibah Wannyana 
Psychology 



Rebeccah Waterworth 
Environmental Science 



Tierra Watkins 
Criminal Justice 



Melanie Weaver 
Chemistry 



Bruce Webster Jr. 
Mathematics 









Cynthia Wells 
Mathematics , Secondary 



Tonya Wells 
English, Education 



Ashley Welsh 
Communications 



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Zvi Walter 
English 




Carley Ward 
Amer. Studies 




Christina Weckesser 
Animal Science 




Gail West 
Special Education 



281 




Michael Wetmore 
Biology 



Clive Whittingham 
Government , Politics 



Derica Williams 
Communications 



Lori Wilson 
English, Art Studio 



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Anne Wharam 
History 



Andrew White 
Conputer Science 



David White 
Theatre 



Deirdre Wiederrecht 
Economics 



Zieta Wiggins 
Biology 



Benjamin Willcher 
Government , Politics 



Janne Williams 
Cmbg 



Taisha Williams 
Biology 



Claudette Williamson- 
Taylor 
Psychology 



282 



Melissa Wimbron 

Journalism, Women ' S 

Studies 



Holly Wimpee 
Biochemistry 



Wendy Winder 
Government , Politics 



Stacy White 
Architecture 




Alicia Williams 
Marketing 




Joseph Wilson 
Marketing 




Erica Wolbramsky 
Animal Science 




Caleb Wolf 
Sociology 




Jonathan Woodard 
Criminal Justice 



Emily Wu Qiong 
Finance, Decision 

Info. System 



Ryan Yeager 
Economics 





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Erica Wolf 
Mathematics , Economics 



Marion Womack 
Biology 



Joe Wong 
Finance, Economics 



Nikki Wood 
Communications 




Kristin Woods 
Sociology 



Christopher Work 
Aerospace Engineer 



Tiffany Wright 
Criminal Justice 



Tom Wu 
Electrical Engineering 




David Xia 

Elect. Engin, Computer 

Science 



Tracey Yagos 
Kinesiology .Sociology 



Nina Yamamoto 
Physical Education 



Milton Yang 
Computer Science 






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Elementary Education 



Jessica Yirenkyi 
Kinesiology 



Julie Yoo 
Finance 



Sun Yoon 
Mechanical Engineering 

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Mar'cia Youmans 
Community Health 



Pete Zohat 
Art Studio 




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Charmaine Young 
Comm,Pr 



Justin Young Kevin Yue 

Environmental Science, Chemical Engineering 
Policy 



Elanna Zajdel 
Cmbg 



Graves Zaminah Lanel Zawatski 

Electrical Engineering Physiology Neurobiology 



Casey Zacher 
Family Studies 




Vmce Zeller 
Economics 




Karen Zickler 
Logistics, International 



Jessica Zidell 
Marketing 



Amy Zirkle 
Marketing 



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Computer 



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embership with you* 



Buiid a better life with SECU CreJit Union. As the state's largest cre^ 
nnum S^U Can help you save money well beyond your college year; 

Peking accoun^^^^^^^^^^^a home? 

We have Free Checking \W!^^^^^m^KKmi, CDs and 



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To join or apply for a loan, call l-800'87*, . 

or visit viai|^Kumd.org 



University of Maryland students, alumni, faculty and staff are eligible to join SECU Credit union. 
$10 in a Share Savings account opens your SECU membersliip. $25 to open a checking account. 



loin 

oooireaTTi 




Become part of our team of dedicated 
healthcare professionals at the Western 
Maryland Health System in Cumberland, 
Maryland. We offer competitive salaries 
and an excellent benefits package. 
Enjoy our scenic beauty and outdoor 
recreational activities and still be just a 
few hours drive from Baltimore, 
Pittsburgh, and Washington, O.C. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 




Investing In Excellence means 
investing in people. St. Joseph 
Medical Center is adding the best 
and brightest talent to our 
healthcare teams. You'll find 
a collaborative, caring 
atmosphere, and true 
commitment to people, 
growth, quality 
and performance! 



Human Resources 
Department 

Western Maryland 
Healtti System 

PO Box 539 

Cumberland. MD 21501-0539 

Telephone; 301-723-1400 
Fax; 301-723-4531 



Physicians 

RN's 

Dietitians 

Pharmacists 

Speech Language Pathologists 

Social Wori<ers 

Physical Therapists 



Visit our Website at www.wmhs.coin. 



Western Maryland Heaith System is an Equal Opportunity Employer 



Consider opportunities in: 

• Nursing/Patient Care Services 

• Heart Institute 

• Diagnostic imaging 

• Medical Laboratory 

• Pharmacy 

• Respiratory Therapy 

• Rehabilitation 

• Administration 

• Finance 



Apply to Human Resources: 
E-mail: stjosmedhr@chi-east.org 
Fax:410-337-1203 
JoWine: 41 0-337-1 285 
Website: www.sjmcmd.org 
EOE/M/F/DA/ 



St. Joseph 
Medical Center 

7601 Oslpr Drive 
ToWNOn, MD 21204-7Sfl2 




Shore 

Health 

i System 

OF M ARYL AN D 

Congratulations Class oj 200S! 

HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS 

ENJOY YOUR CAREER & YOUR LIFE. 

Maryland's Eastern Shore, surrounded by water, 
is a haven for all types of boating and watersports. 

NEW GRADUATES ARE WELCOME! 

Attention Nursing Graduates: 

Announcing Critical Care University 

• 10 Month Paid Orientation 

• Areas include Critical Care, 
Emergency Room, and Surgical Senices 

• Currently accepting applications 
for July class 

For more information call us toll free at: 

(888) 463-3 1 50, ext 5004 



Pregnant & Scared? You have options. 
Free Test, Caring, Confidential 

Laurel Pregnancy Center 
(301)776-9996 

A Member of 

Care%Net 
415 Main Street • Laurel, MD 20707 



Our Nurses make Calvert Meinorial a Great place to work. . . 

Nursing Students, New Graduates, Skilled Nurses, you are invited to join our 

Nursing Team in providing the compassion and premium care we give 

Nursing Opportunities are available in; 

OB/Labor and Delivery & New Born Nursery • Telemetry 

PACU/Same Day Surgery • Emergency • Outpatient • Transitional Care Unit 

Operating Room • Behavioral Health • Medical/Surgical 

Because we are the premier community Hospital in Calvert County you will find 

that we offer a lot not only to our community but our staff as well. We offer 

competitive pay Clinical Instructors to help ease the transition. Day Care on site, 

excellent benefits, including full and part time leave accrual, continuing 

education and the flexibility you need to balance career and family time. If you 

are interested in what Calvert may have to offer you please send your resumes to: 

Calvert Memorial Hospital, Human Resources 

1 00 Hospital Road • Prince Frederick, Maryland 20678 

Phone 410-414 4513 -Fax 410-535-8161 

E-mail at chanko@cmhlink.org. or visit us on the web at: 

www.calverthospital.com eoe 




291 




BlueCross BlueShield 



CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield 
is a major employer in the Mid- 
Atlantic States & has offices in 
locations throughout the region. 
We offer competitive salaries & benefits programs that 
include choice of several different health care programs, 
cafeteria benefit program. Flexible Spending Accounts, 
401(k) program & tuition reimbursement. 

We are seeking the following professionals: 

• IT Professionals • Claims Specialist 

• Medical Assistants • Business Analyst 

• Underwriters • CSR's 
Interested applicants should mail or fax resumes to: 

CareFirst BCBS 
10455 Mill Run Circle 
Owings Mills, MD 21 117 
Attn: Human Resources 



Care First BCBS 
550 12th Street, SW 
Washington, DC 20065 
Attn: Human Resources 
Fax: 202-479-5354 



Fax:410-998-5313 



E-mail resumes to: careersCaJcarefirst.com 
www.carefirst.com 

EOE. M/F/DA/ Principles Only 



Ready for 

the kind of work where 
you can't wait to tell 
people about your day? 
As an employee at 
Dimensions Healthcare 
System, you'll be able 
to do something 
important that changes 
people's lives. 

We're the largest 
healthcare provider in 
Prince George's County, 
and have programs to 
help you achieve a 
rewarding career. 



^rtst "to 



VO*i.'ar<e zi.O't: 
-froo Jt*:M.^u.€i1n. 

► internship Program 

12-week orientation for newly licensed 
RNs in their chosen specialty. 

Student Scholarship and 
Employment Program* 

We pay in advance or reimburse student 
loans for certain designated positions. 
'Must serve full-time commitment after graduation 
We're committed to employee satisfactnon: 

• Shift Differential 

• Continuing Education Program 

• Free Parking 



To learn more about our internship/scholarship programs or to 
inquire about our many Nursing opportunities, please contact: 

• Prince George's Hospital/Gladys Spellman Specialty Hospital 
& Nursing Center - Dolores Napolitano: Tel: 301-618-2260 
Fax: 301-618-2270 ^g 

E-mait: hrpghc@dimensionshealth.org gn 



• Laurel Regional Hospital/ 
Bowie Health Center - 

Barbara Volk: Tel: 301-497-7905 

Fax: 301-497-8737 

E-mail: hr.lrh@dimensionshealth.org 



Dimensions Heallhcare System 

Prince George's Hospital Center 

Gladys Spellman Specialty Hospital 

& Nursing Center 

Laurel Regional Hospital 

Bowie Health Center 



Awesome benerits. 
Iviglit now tecnnology. 
Iveal worla excitement. 

fust another day at 

I loivarJ Conn til General. 



At Howard County General Hospital we 
value you. your work, your professional opinion. 
We foster a positive, caring, team environment 
that's designed to let you focus on being your 
best. Add the strength of Johns Hopkins 
Medicine and you can be on the cutting edge 
of healthcare at our community-focused 
hospital. We're also closer than you think - 
just minutes from 1-95 and Routes 100 and 
29. near Columbia Mall. 



Contact us today about the following opportunities: 




Case Management 
Central Transport 
Diagnostic Imaging 
Dietary Services 
Environmental Services 



Materials Management 
Medical Records 
Nursing 
Pharmacy 
Respiratory Care 



Rehab Services 

(PT/OT/SLP) 
Physician/Surgical 

Assistant Services 



EOE M/F/D/V 



Apply online NOW! 

www.hcgh.org 



HCGH.Attn: HR Dept. 

5755 Cedar Lane, Columbia, MD 2 1 0+4 

Fax:410-740-7532 or 7542 

Jobline; 4 1 0-884-4567. Phone: 4 1 0-740-78 1 5 



m HOWARD COUNTY GENERAL HOSPITAL 

(- ^i A MEMBER OF JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE 



Congratulations on your 
achievement. 

If we know you, this is only the beginning. 

On behalf of The VA Maryland Health Care 
System, we extend our sincere congratulations 
to all those who are graduating. 

We'd also like you to know, that if you wish to 
make one of the most compelling choices for 
your health care career, we are here for you. 

For details or to apply online, visit us on the 
web. Or call our Nurse Recruitment Office at: 
(800)463-6295, ext. 7043. E-mail your 
resume to: ilona.mallon2@med.va.gov 

The VA Maryland Health Care System 

Baltimore • Ferry Point • Loch Raven 
Rehabilitation & Extended Care Medical Centers 
• Community-based Outpatient Clinics, 
eoe 



www.vainajrylandnursing.coin 





VA MARYLAND 



292 



HARD WORK HAS ITS REWARD 



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You can have a rewarding career with an industry leader. 



For information on a career Giant or Super G Pharmacy call l-SSo-RXFORYOU 



A Healthy Salute 
From 

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1.800.492.5538 
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PLANNING LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURE 

URBAN DESIGN CIVIL ENGINEERING INTERIOR DESIGN 




University of Maryland at College Park 
Campus Recreation Center 



SASAKI 



WatertownMA 617 926 3300 San Francisco CA 415 776 7272 










293 



P' 



Ijoms. 



Dear Graduates: 

It is my pleasure to congratulate the 
Class of 2003. I share the joy and 
pride I know you and your family feel 
about this academic achievement. 

Home to the 
Maryland University 
Terrapins, Prince 
George's County 
also offers a 
wonderful place 
to live and work. 



Prince George's 
County Executive 








'ackJoHnson ^^^ 




^^^£^ CONSIDER A CAREER WITH THE 
\ ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY POLICE 

■^^J DEPARTMENT 

The Anne Arundel County Police Department 
is now hiring for the following positions: 

Police Officer $35,514 - $56,064 

Police Dispatcher Salary $13.73 - $18.26 / $28,558* - $37,980* 

Police Cadet Salary $10.00 per hour 

'Estimated yearly salary does not include stiitt differential or longevity pay 
The Anne Arundel County Police Dept Is a Nationally Accredited Law 
Enforcement Agency We are an Equal Opportunity Employer: Females 
and minorities are encouraged to apply Entry level testing is conducted 
monthly and applications are available by calling 410-222-8677 or by 
visiting the County's website at: WWW.CO.anne-arundel.md.US 



"^ -MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
C-^-^oLi^e-.-^ POLICE DEPARTMENT 

~"^** is now hiring Police 

Ojficers & 911 Dispatchers 

Please call: (240) 773-5310 



www.co.mo.md.us/services/police 

" Make a Difference" 





What do all TARGET leaders have in common? 
They move FAST. They have FUN! And they 
know what being FRIENDLY is all about! 

If you have what it takes, then you are ready for 
TARGET! As the nation's #1 upscale discount 
retailer, TARGET offers exciting career opportunities 
with an emphasis on leadership development. And 
right now we're seeking ambitious individuals to join 
us and begin training to become part of our team. 

Our leadership team enjoys superb starting 
salaries and unparalleled benefits, including 
401 (K), medical/ dental insurance and tuition 
assistance. We also offer the best leadership 
development in retail, while providing a fast-paced, 
fun work environment. Positions are available right 
now for our Asset Protection Team. 



TARGET is an equal opportunity employer who is committed to a smol<e-free/drug-free workplace. 
©2001 Target Stores. The Bullseye Design is a registered trademark of Target Brands, Inc. All rights reserved. 



TARGET 



target.com 



294 



P' 




^ 




We're changing the way the power industry 
does business. Now we're providing more than 
electricity and embracing new technologies. 

Now, you can make your mark with the most 
progressive team in the industry And you'll be 
amply rewarded. With generous health plan, 
tuition paid up-front and directly to the 
school, a pension plan, a 401 (K) 
with matching funds, paid holidays 
and vacation. 

Areas of opportunity include: 

• Information Technology 
• Accounting/Financial 
• Electrical Engineering 



You'll love Washington, D.C., too. It's more than the seat 
of government. It's an area packed with night spots, 
entertainment and sports that complement the cultural 
and historic attractions. 

Ready to lead the revolution? For our Washington, D.C.- 

area positions, fonward your resume to. 

Pepco StaHing Center, Job Code: SOLI-0516, 

P.O. Box 1262, Findlay, OH 45840; 

e-mail: employment@pepco.coni. 

Or, call our Job Announcement Line toll-free at: 

866-23-PEPCO. 

pepco 



W.R. Grace & Co. Congratulates 
the University of Maryland Class of 2003 

Paul J. Norris, CEO 

Graduate of University of Maryland Business School 

Grace is a leading global supplier of catalysts and silica products, 

specialty construction chemicals and building materials and container 

protection products. With annual sales of approximately $1.5 billion, 

Grace has 6,600 employees and operations in nearly 40 countries. 



7500 Grace Dr., Columbia, MD 21044 
Visit our website at www.grace.com 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 




P* 



JUST GOT 



^Sl^^ 




Did you know that the Earn & Learn 

Program is o student financial assistance 

package that provides $3,000 each year (pr 

toward your college tuition, plus $2,000 

each year in student loan money, for o total of up to $23,000*. And 

it's available starting day one of employment. 



To find out more about the Earn & Learn Program 

and ParMime Package Handler opportunities at 

UPS-Burtonsville (14841 Sweitzer Ln, Laurel), 

please call: 301-497-1064 



^^ 




Equal Opportunity Employer 
'Program guidelines apply. 



"If you are looking for a 
job, look elsewhere. If 

you are looking for a 
career, call Whiting- 
Turner." 



OITices nationwide 

Headquarters: 

300EastJoppa Road 
Baltimore, MD 21 286 
410-821-1100 

Recruiting: G ino Gemignani 

www, whiting-turner, com 




construction management. 



HEALEY 

& COMPANY, LC 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

"Experience that saves you money 

For over 35 years, 

Working with professional firms, 
closely-held business & iiidi\iduals 
Committed to quality and personalized service 
Addressing your concerns and solving 
your problems 



Bookkeeping & Payroll • Computer Consulting 

Business & Personal Financial Statements 

Audited Financial Statements ■ Litigation Support Business 

Start Up ■ Estate Accounting & Reporting 

Benefit Plan Accounting & Reporting 

Tax Planning ■ Business & Individual Tax Preparation 

Tax Litigation Support ■ Financial Statement Analysis 

.Accounting Procedure Review ■ Accounting Staff Training 

NUinai2cmenl .'\d\isor\ Services 



16065 Comprint Circle Gaithersburg, MD 20877 
301-987-9366 FAX 301-987-9018 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 

2008 



Riggs Bank N.A. 
Congratulates the Graduates of the Class of 2003. 

We invite you to complete an application 

in our Employment Office located at 

1512 Connecticut Avenue, N W 

Washington, B.C. 20036 

Please call our Career Bank Hotline at 

(301)887-4400 

for current openings. 

Visit us and apply at: www.riggsbank.coni 

Rii^iis Bank N.A. is an cc/tial npporuinitv cinplDVcr. 




RiGGS 



296 



P' 



HOWl CAN YOU IMPACT THE WAY THE WORLD CONNECTS, 
AND FIND MORE TIME TO ENJOY YOUR CORNER OF IT, TOO?i 



ASKARINC than 70 

-| ' years, 

we've been 
challenging our team to 
make a difference in a 
global way— creating 
next generation 
communications networks, 
engineering advanced 
transportation solutions, 
developing technology for 
space exploration and 
delivering Innovations to 



keep military personnel 
safe. At the same time, we 
reward our employees for 
these exceptional 
contributions with the 
opportunity for personal 
growth, one of the best 
benefit packages in the 
industry and a satisfying 
work/life balance. That 
way you'll always be able 
to make the most of your 
time, and the world 
around you. 





We're accepting applications from sophmores through 
seniors with many types of technical disciplines, especially: 

Computer Science • Computer Engineering • Electrical 
Engineering • Networic Engineering 

THE WORLD LEADER IN TRANSPORTATION 
COMMUNICATIONS AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 

To learn more and apply 
online, visit: 

YOuwoNTBELiEVEWHATWECANDO™ www.arinc.com/careers' % 




f 




Equal Opportunity Employer M/RDW 



Please refer to ttils ad when applying. 



Giant Food, the area's largest retail grocer and 

an Operating Company of Ahold USA, is 

seeking candidates for: 



MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 



• Marketing/Sales 
• Procurement 

• Finance 

• Accounting 

• Real Estate 

• Store Operations 

• Warehouse Management 
• Category Management 



Relocation Assistance 
Is Available. 



II interested in any of the above, you may also apply online 
at www.giantfood.com or forward resume to; 6300 Sheriff 

Road, Landover, MD 2078.5, Attn: Retail Opportunities, 
Fax: CJOI) 618-4958, E-mail: recruiter*' giantofmaryland.com 

www.giantfood.com 



Airgas 



Industrial, Medical and Specialty Gases, 
Welding and Safety Supplies 




GOLD GAS Branded Welding Mixes 



Alexandria, VA (703) 548-5966 

Manassas, VA (703)393-1832 

Ashland, VA (804)798-1577 

Salisbury, MD (410) 742-3800 



Linthicum, MD (410)789-8451 
Baltimore, MD (410)732-3603 
Frederick, MD (301)663-0644 

Bladensburg, MD (301) 985-5841 



Airgas 



You'll Find it With Us 




297 




298 



P« 




South Campus Commons 

Capstone Properties 

301.314.2499 

cpark@capstone-dev.com 

www.capstonecompanies.com 




HERITAGE PARK 
T APARTMENTS 



-rt^-^Vrf 1818 Metzerott Road #18 



Adelphi, MD 20783 

(301)439-4464 



HERITAGE PARK 

Heritage Park is conveniently located in the heart of it all, near 
shopping, restaurants and entertainment. Our community is 
near the Capital Beltway, the K6 and the GreenLine Metro. Yet 
we're tucked away in a quiet wooded setting. We even have 
our own University of Maryland Shuttle Stop! 



GAS HEAT & WATER INCLUDED/STUDENT DISCOUNTS 



FEATURES: 

• Controlled access entry 

• Elevators 

■ L niv. of Maryland shuttle on-site 

• Student Discounts 



• Spacious Floorplans 

• Abundant Closet Space 

• Picnic area w/barbeques 

• 24-hour emergency maintenance 



DREYFUSS 



MANAGEMENT 



College life... Only better! 



All Utilities Included! 
Studios 1 bedroom/1 bath 

2 bedroom/2 bath* 3 bedroom/2 bath* 

*select opts. 

UAAD shuttle stops all day and night 

Delicatessen and Convenience Store 

Aerobic & Martial Arts classes 

Clubhouse • Swimming Pool • Tennis Courts 

Volleyball and Basketball Courts 

Complimentary mountain bike rental 

and great trails nearby! 

Hi-rise and garden style apartments 

Flexible lease terms • Huge Floorplans! 

Seven Springs ViCCage ApartmeHts 

9348 Cherry Hill Read • College Park, MD 20740 



310-345-8500 

7springs@therealtyway.com 








HISPEED INTERNET ACCESS 

FULL-SIZE WASHER DRYERS 

SPARKLING SWIMMING POOL 

COMPUTER LAB W/ INTERNET 

^~" FITNESS CENTER 



' All utilities included 

' Fully-furnished 

' Individual leases per resident 

' 2 & 4 bedroom floorplans 

' Separate key entries to each bedroom 

' 24 hour emergency maintenance 

■ intrusion alarms 

■ Deadbolts on all entry doors 

■ Frost free refrigerator w/ ice maker 

■ Private porch or balconies 

■ Computer lab w/hi-speed internet 

■ Private study areas 

• Two Sand Volleyball Courts 

■ Game tables 



Where in College Park can you find All 
Inclusive rent with truly great features like 
high-speed internet access, fully-furnished 
apartments and your own full-sized washer & 
dryer? Only at University Courtyard - the 
community that is all about students. Come 
see for yourself! 



'm^ 



University 

\l_ C O U R T Y A R D 



STUDY HARD. LIVE EASY. 

www.universltycourtyard.com 



8000 Boteler Lane rt/\|\ XULlAftft 

College Park, MD 20740 I**"; ^Vflfimt 




299 






^=] 



We're more 
than textbooks! 

• 'Course Supplies 
3 & Study Aids 

D 

• Computers, 
n Software & Supplies 

; 'Cards, Gifts & Wrap 

3 • Recreational Reading 

! • Class Rings 

5 • Gift Certificates 

3 • University Sportswear 
■ 

•Buyback 'Lab Supplies 

• Maps & Tour Guides 
and. ..we're a great place to 




work on campus 




NIVERSITY 
iNTIR-iJ 

IP STUDtNT UNION 

30I-3I4-BOOK 



Go Terrapins! 




Gateway- is proud tt) be a 
technolog)' supporter for the University of Maryland. 



^Gateway 



■i3 Wisconsin Circle 
, , ,, C^hew Chase, MD 

local Gateway store: 301-841-0023 



Come into your 



8{)()-846-2{)00 
vN'ww. "a r L- wa v. c o m 



©2002 Galenay. Inc. All rights reserved Galeway and the Gateway Slylifed Logo aie tiBderratks ot tegisiered irademarks ot 
Gateway W. inlhellS sH ilhef r^ifn'fiw MCf>* fV)7781 




Mayor, Council 8: CjI> Stall 

of the City ot College Park ha\'e 

a])i)reciate(l the opiK)rtuiiity to 

pro\ icle an en\ ironment in which 

> ()u\'e spent the past four \'ears 

enhancing \()iir gr(n\th through 

education. We would like to 

extend our sincerest wishes to the 

(Graduating Class of 2003 for 

a hai)])>' and i^rosperous future. 

Good Luck! 




Highview 



Apartment Homes 



$30 Discount for University of Maryland Students, 
Faculty and Staff 

7004 Highview Terraee- Hyatls\ille. Marviand 20782 

Phone: 301-559-882(1 • Fax:301-559-3696 ^^^ 
, _^l , Website: www. southemmanagenient.com l=i 

"^r Prices are subject to etumge ^oTiwrt"""'''"^ 

A Southern Management Community 




We* re #1 when you're on the run! 

Now Featuring f/// up 

[IP SeJJpve 

700% Colombian Todav' 

Coffee ^' 

Locations in MD. & VA. 




300 




PAETEC COMMUNICATIONS INC. 



/////. 



PAETEC COMMUNICATIONS 



IS AN INTEGRATED 



COMMUNICATIONS PROVIDER 



OFFERING: LOCAL, 



LONG DISTANCE, 



HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ACCESS 



Contact us at 1 -888-972-3832 or visit our 
website at www.paetec.com 




/F/RE PROTECT/ON 



51 13 Berwyn Road 
College Park MD 20740 



AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEMS 



/' 


N 


• Design 


• Installation 


• Maintenance 


• Inspection 


• Service 


• 24 Hour Emergency 



(301) 474-1136 

Commercial • Government • Industrial 
NEW & RENOVATED SYSTEMS 



m 



Congratulations 

to the 

University ofMaryiand 

Graduates 



Your Swppiier of Quality 
Seating St Systems lumiiurz 



State Use IndxisXries: 

7Z7S Waurioo Koad 

]zss\rp, MaryCaruf 20794 

(410) 540-5400 



1» 

— o 
2 ^ 



53 



E u 
E = 



Cadi them mean. 

Call them nasty. 

Call them mama's boys. 

But don't dare 
call them turtles. 



you <?\ve (nbouf youv Te^ps. We 
s^lu.fe <3vH fUe *Ale-U(?vv<A -P^v^s 

DIGITAL I rv . 

WALKIE- I / sV^hM lAp -Fov fl^e w^nve, ^^-A 

TALKIE yjALa^^ffl' neves evev le<^ve enf U^l-P-Viwe. 

BUTTON .^"^^B^MMi 



) 




NEXTEL 



Nextel is proud to be the Official Wireless Communications 
Sponsor for University of Maryland Athletics. 

Terps fans, to purchase Nextel: 
# Co to nextel.com/go_terps 
gf Call toll-free 1-866-286-9071 
ai To find a Nextel-Owned Retail Store 
near you, call 1-800-825-5235 




301 



Fuffrsu 



THE POSSIBILITIES ARE INFINITE 
Fujitsu Laboratories of America, Inc. 

Headquartered in the heart of Silicon 

Valley in California & Focusing on 
advanced research and development in 

VLSI CAD and Internet-related 

technologies. We conduct research in an 

open environment, and contribute to the 

world's research community through joint 

research projects with universities and other 

research organizations. Summer internships 

are available for graduate students at our 

University of Maryland, College Park facility, 

and in California. 

For more information, 

please see our webpage at: 

www.fujitsulabs.com 



Congratulations to the 
Class of 2003 

from 

The Inn and Conference Center 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
Ph: 301.985.7303 ^amott Conference Centers Fax: 301.985.7445 




(301)773-3303 


Fax: 


(301) 


773-3584 


^o%. U^a 


t/e ^Laii 


Co. 


, One. 


Tuxedo Industrial Park 
5598 Tuxedo Road 
Hyattsville, Maryland ^ 


?0781-1327 







Foreign and Domestic Cars ^^^m^^^^^^^^%*j 




NA TIONAL A UTO BODY 




JOHN TOSSOUNIAN 




301-881-8200 12300 Park lawn 


Drive 


FAX (301 ) 468-6763 RockviUe. Maryland 20852 


-1402 




302 



Go Terrapins! 




Gateway" is proud to be a 
technology supporter for the University of Maryland. 

Gateway 



r- • ^ 4^ Wisconsin Circle 

Come into your - 

, „ ' Chevy Chase. MD 

local Gateway store: ^gi -84 1 -0023 



800-846-2000 
www.gateway.com 



©2002 Galeway, Inc Ail fighls reserved. Gateway anO Ihe Gateway StyliierJ Logo are trademarks or regrstered trademarits oi 
Gateway, Inc in ttie U.S and oltier coirntties Ad Code: 007761 



^t^Sun 



microsystems 



is proud to support the 

University of Maryland 
Terrapins 



Congratulations to 

Graduates 



1101 King Street 
Suite 400 

Alexandria. VA 22314 
1.800.366.4411 
www.hdrinccom 



ONE COMPANY I M« I 



Miles Glass Co., Inc. 

Specializing in Structural & Decorative Glass 

(301) 439-5111 
Fax (301) 439-0824 

8714 Piney Branch Road • Silver Spring, MD 20901 
(locations also in D.C. and Virginia) 




Building a solid relationship with our customers ' 



Mechanical, Inc. 

HVAC • REFRIGERATION 
CRYOGENIC SERVICE • CONTROLS 

OFFICE: 41 0/788-3535 • FAX: 41 0/788-4040 
PH. 1-800-843-0850 • awashingtoin@cotmcast.iiet 



CONQKATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS Of 2003 

from 

SHOPPERS FOOD & PHARMACY 

"EVERY DAY LOW PRICES" 

"NO CARD NEEDED" 

"FRESH PRODUCE & MEATS" 

"DELI, BAKERY & HOT FOODS TO GO!" 

C/\/./. 301 -345-5996 or ws/r 
WWW.SHOPPERSFOOD.COM 

4720 CHERRY HILL ROAD • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Congratulations 
^^^^\^ Class 

nerrier of 2003 

■1^ Group OF America ® \^ ±. ^m^\.J \J *^ 



Jessup. Maryland 



■tl 



Southern Utilities Company, Inc. 

1049 Ripley Street 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-3399 

Phone: 301-589-2885 



A Family Business Since 1932 

Bell & Gossett and Taco Booster Pumps 

Siemens (Furnas) Starters & Controls 

A.O, Smith, Marattnon Electric, and Lincoln Motors 

US, Seals & T,B, Woods Couplings 









® 



303 



fi? f. 




Come join one of the 

nation's leading progressive 

grocery retailers 



Safeway has leadership training openings for people who are interested 
in working and developing a diverse set of business management skills. 

Marketing • Retail Management • Retail Pharmacy 
Other Leadership Opportunities 

Our retail management positions offer: 

• competitive salary and benefits package • stock options 

• paid vacations • continuous career development & training 

• employee association •friendly work environment • credit union 



CS) 



SAFEWAY 

FOOD & DRUG 



If a retail management career with Safeway is of interest to you, submit a resume to the 
Safeway Retail Leadership Development Coordinator at the following location: 

Safeway Inc. 

Human Resources Development & Training 

4551 Forbes Blvd., Lanham, Maryland 20706 

SAFEWAY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNin' AFFIRMATIVE ACFION EMPLO\TR 



CS) 



SAFEWAY 

FOOD & DRUG 




Sinai Hospital 

a LifeBridge Health center 

^^^'^ healing, caring 
^""^ teaching 




reach new levels. 

We iirc Sinai H^l^pltal >if 
Baltimore, tmc ot the premier 
teaching hospitals in the world 

and the largest and most ciimprehensivc community hospital in Maryland. 

We are excited ahoiil ihe toilowing iipportunities: 

NURSING 

• Acute Care/Med-Surg • Critical Care • ER-7 

• Women's & Children's Services • OR • Psych 

The /i)ll(mi)i,i; are utuiluMe in specified areas: 

inlenuhip programs, new grad louii repayment, sign on bonuses, 

free parking and other generous benefits. 

ALLIED HEALTH 



• Pharmacy 
•IS 

• Administrative/Clerical 



• Rehab • Respiratory 

• Laboratory • Central Sterile 

• Radiology • Social Work 

To apply, please visit us online ,it wwvvdifebridgehealth.orj; 

EOE 

LifeBridge. The one system for highly individual careers 



im 





A Community Working Together. 

A healthy and happy community is a thriving community. No one i<nows this 
better than Civista Health. We are the preeminent healthcare provider tor our 
community, continually updating our facilities, technology, and equipment; and 
staffing our teams with the area's top nurses, physicians and surgeons. Our 
passion for people and supportive environment make our professionals feel like 
they're a vital part of our community. And they are. Come see for yourself why so 
many people choose Civista Health as their employer of choice. 

We are currently recruiting qualified applicants in these areas: 

• Nursing • Laboratory 

• Radiology • Information Systems 

• Rehabilitation Services 
The benefits of choosing Civista Health include: 

• Competitive Salaries • Excellent Retirement Plan • Free Parking 

• Health, Dental, Vision & • Tuition Assistance • Clinical Ladder 
Prescription • Autonomy • Easy Commute 

In addition to great benefits and our commitment to our people, Civista offers a 
superior quality of life in Southern Maryland. For immediate consideration, 
contact: Karen Savoy, Human Resources, 701 East Charles Street, PO 
Box 1070, La Plata, MD 20646; Ph: 301-609-4444;Fax: 301-609-4417. 
Visit our website at A 

vwwv.civista.org #^I\riCT'A ^M^ 

Health 

Convenient. Capable. Caring. 



304 











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idents grew both 
socially and academically. They 
covered much ground In their 
various pursuits and left few 



stones unturned. Although for 




y 



fPWf 



some the college journey had 



reached full blossom, many 



realized that it was time to plant 



new seeds. None would forget 



their days in College Park, 

recalling the words of A. 

O'Shaugnessy: "We are the 



music-makers, and we are the 



dreamers of dreams..." 




Editor- in-Chie 



Photography Editor Vipul Bajpai 



Academics Editor 

' Athletics Editor 

Campus Programs Editor 

Club & Intramural Sports Editor 

Greek Life Editor 

Organizations Editor 
Student Life 



PujA Gupta 
Lindsay Florentino 
Melis I star 
Erica Bunk 
Melis I star 
Erica Bunk 
Robin Shetinya 





EDITOa-IN-CHI6F 

Melissa Dahne 




GSEEIC LIFE 

Melis Istar 



i^rn^ 





1 


^ 



A .<l 





i 



STUDEIMT LIFE 



RoDin yn 



ATHLETICS 

Lindsay Fiorentino 



PHOTO EDITOR 

Vipul Bajpai 








^^^^^^^^m 



STAFF PHOTOG. 

Erica Bunk 





ACADErVIMCS 

Puja Gupta 



/ A 




A 


BUSINESS WNGIVAT. 

Erin Steinberg 



:JSfi&SillltfV^^^'^ .1 



i' ^i!l ii>'iK^'I)t+li^SEBKiraSNKS>*''T 'iiN'"'- -4.1 W»' -^?J^'K'' 



Bloom is the University 
of Maryland's 2003 Terrapin 
Yearbook, Volume 102. 

The office of the Terrapin 
Yearbook is located at 3101 South 
Campus Dining Hall. The staff 
was advised by Michael Fribush 
and the yearbook was edited by 
Melissa L. Dahne. 

The views expressed in the 2003 
Terrapin Yearbook do not 
neccessarily express the views 
of Maryland Media Incorporated, 
or any of its affiliates, or the 
University of Maryland at College 
Park. No part of this book may 
be reproduced in any form without 
prior consent, except for 
educational purposes. 

(Q 2003 Maryland Media 
Incorporated. All rights 
reserved. 



LIKE YOU 


SHOPPES'i^^ 


KNOW 




1 ^P"C»*ii^""^ 


h^^ 





Printing 

Taylor Publishing Company 

Dallas, Texas 

Local Represenatives-Julia Jordan 

and Joe Wenzl. 

Account Advisor -Tami McConnell. 

Press Run 

800 copies were printed on #100 
Enamel Paper. 

Computers 

The staff used an Apple Macintosh 
iMac computer with a Power PC G3 
processor, 600 MHz, Mac OS 9.2, 256 
MB RAM, 40 GB Hard Drive for all 
aspects of production. 

Photography Studio 

All senior portraits were taken and 
developed by Carl Wolf Studio, 
Incorporated, 401 Elmwood Avenue, 
Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania, 19079. 
Michael Durinzi served as local 
account representative. 

Software 

Adobe PageMaker 6.5 was used in all 
aspects of production. Photo 
manipulation was completed in Adobe 
Photoshop 7.0. 



Typography 



All typefaces in the book ore from 
Adobe and Linotype font libraries. 
Fonts used include: Courier, Geneva, 
Monaco, Helvetica, Nasal, TpcKorina, 
Skia, Arial, Party LET, Bickley 
Script, and Symbol. 

Output 

Final output was made on a Komari 
Digital Press. 

Cover and Endsheets 

The cover is a quarterbound #522 
Vicuna series 1 and Oatmeal with 
brass foil and a dicut. The 
endsheets ore #100 Rainbow Oatmeal 
100% Recycled stock; front endsheet 
was cut short to show pag 



Photography Credits 



;^Bajpai 

TlOf; 11 i; 12a; 15f; 19c; 21a; 24a,c; 25b,e; 26b; 28a,b,c; 29a,b,c,d,e; 32a,b,c; 33a,b,c,cl,e; 
S,c,d,e; 35a,b; 36a,b,c; 37a,b,c,d,e; 38a,b,c,d,e; 39a,b,c; 43a; 44a,b,c; 46a,d; 47b; 
l8a,b,c,d,e; 49a,b,c; 50a,b,c,d; 51a,b,c; 52b; 53b; 60b,c; 61 d; 63b; 64a; 65a,b,c,d; 66a,b; 67a,b; 
I^Sb.e; 79a; 100a,b,c,d,e,f; 122a; 124a; 129a; 148b,e; 149a; 155a,e; 158a; 159a,d; 163f; 165a; 
l68a,b,c,d,e; 169a,c; 172b,e; 192b; 193a; 196; 214a; 215a; 216a; 217a; 220a; 221a; 225a; 
288b,e; 317b,c,e,f,h,j. 

prica Bunk 

17a; 22a,b,c,d,e; 23a,b,c; 24b; 25a,c,d; 26a,d,e; 27a,b; 30a,b,c,d,e; 31a; 45a,b,c,d,e; 46c; 50e; 
52a,c,d; 53a; 56a,b,c; 57a,b,c,d,; 58a,b,c,d,e; 59a,b,c; 60a; 61a,b,c,e; 62a,b,c,d; 63a; 66b,c,d; 
70a,b,c,d,e; 71a,b,c; 74a,b,c,d,e; 75a,b,c; 76a,b,c; 77a,b,c,d,e; 78a,c,d,f,g; 148a,c,d,f,g; 
152a,b,c,d,e; 153a; 16a,b,c,d; 159b,c,f; 160a,b,c,d,e; 161a; 162a; 163a,b,c,d; 164b,c,d; 166a; 
167a,b,c,d,f; 170a; 171a,b,c,d,f; 172a,c,d,f,g; 173a; 174a,b,c; 175a,b,c; 176a,b,c; 177a,b,c; 
178a,b,c; 179a,b,c; 180a,b,c; 181a; 12a,b,c; 183a,b,c; 184a,b,c; 185a,b,c; 186a,b,c; 187a,b,c; 
I188a,b,c; 189a,c; 190a,c; 191a,b; 192c; 194a,b; 195c; 196c; 197a,b,c; 198a,b,c,d; 199a,b,c,d; 
200a, b; 201a; 202a,b; 203a; 204a,b,c,d; 205b; 206a,b; 208a,b; 209a,b; 210a,b,c; 211a; 
212a,b,c,d; 213a,b; 288a,c,d,f,g; 289a; 

Nicole Adkins 

26c 

Other photographs courtesy of The Diamondback o^ student submissions. 







■VI 



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M- 




/ 



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