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Full text of "The Terrapin"


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^^ ■ 'y of Marylanc^ ^ " 

nt community full of opportunity, 
school hosts numerous events, H-'—' — ' 



names such as D.L. Hugley Candace Bushnell, Mo Rocca, 
ind Ron Jeremy as well as the annual Art Attack concert at 
Byrd Stadium, and All-Nighter at the Stamp Student Union. 
Students participate in many intramural sports, such as soc- 
cer, basketball and flag football, or can work out in one of the 



nv recreation 



ies. With 



of Lupo's with 



their 'nightclub' upstairs. College Park now hosts four bars. 
But if that is not sufficient, the school's close proximity to 
Washington D.C., Baltimore and Annapolis provide many 
options for not only the bar and club scene, but for sports 
events, concerts, internships and other jobs, something that 
many other colleges cannot offer. Student life is all about 
making things happen with what is available; the opportuni- 
ties for students at Maryland outside of class are uv^liM^lttd. 



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INVOLVE 



or many students, the First Look Fair lived up 
to its name. While wandering around McK- 
eldin Mall at the end of September, students 
could learn about nearly everything possible about what the 
University and surrounding area have to offer. The annual 
event proved to be the first chance for many new students 
and returning students alike to receive information on al- 
most anything they were interested 
in. The booths set up outside on 
the Mall were sponsored by student 
organizations, local vendors, cam- 
pus offices, and community service 
groups. Visitors had the chance to 
meet new people, pick up several 
freebies, and find new and difler- 
ent ways to get involved. With sev- 
eral hundred booths set up, the only 
challenge to a visitor proved getting 
as much information as possible. 



Above: Members 
of the Ski and 

Snowboarding Team 
encourage other stu- 
dents to take part in 
the sport. 

Right: Turkish stu- 
dents display their 
culture at a booth 
while also demon- 
strating the diversity 
on campus. 






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Right: Bright lights 
bear down as the 
crowd cheers tor 
Jimmies Chicken 

Shack's performance. 

Down Right: 

Jimmies guitarist gets 
into the groove while 
performing during 
the All Nighter. Get- 
ting popular bands 
to play at the an- 
nual event helped the 
event's attendance. 
Other activities were 
also available for all 
students to participati 
in throughout thi 

night. Down Left 

The band screams 
directions towards the 
audience in order to 
get the student crowd 
even louder. 



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^^^^^ espite Hurricane Isabel "s presence, closing the 
f J University for the Day. the 22nd annual All 

y^^"^^^ Nighter went on as scheduled Friday. Septem- 
ber 19th. The traditional event held throughout the Union, 
paid tribute to the University's diversity by holding a mul- 
titude of events for students to enjoy, throughout the night. 
For music lovers, Jimmie's Chicken Shack performed for 
free, presented by SEE. There was also a Gospel Concert in 
the Ny umburu Amphitheater featur- 
ing several different singing groups. 
Step shows, and performances by 
singing and improv groups. Other 
fun and games included Juggling 
displays by talented students, 
sports presented by Comcast 
Sportsnet, as well as Bingo, board 
games, and more, complete with 
prizes. For those gamblers, a mock 
casino presented poker and crap 
games. With all these attractions, 
students willing to stay up all night 
found plenty of ways to have fun. 



I' 



C H I C 1^ i: IN 
SMACK 



SPECIAI. GUESTS 




Above: The pro- 
motional poster for 
Jimmie's Chicken 

Shack displays Kus- 
tom Blend as their 
special guests. The 
SEE held many events 
annually. Left: Stu- 
dents lucky enough to 
ha\e Front row seats 
listen intenth- during 
a musical number. 



ALL Ni-g later 



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RELATIV 





he University opened its gates to Terp families 
during the annual family weekend. Offering par- 
ents and relatives a chance to learn about various 
academic programs and enjoy cultural and sporting events, 
family weekend gave the chance for families to get a first hand 
look at the University of Maryland's campus. Programs like 
College Park Scholars, University Honors, and Gemstone 
Research held open houses, while families could also attend 
speakers on jobs and Greek life with 
their son or daughter. Meals were 
eaten at the Diner or South Campus 
Dining Hall, and the President's 
Open House allowed families to 
interact with the faculty. Along with 
witnessing several performances by 
musicians and actors, families bond- 
ed together over tailgating and see- 
ing the Terps win over Clemson in 
football. No family weekend trip was 
complete, however, without a trip to 
the Book Exchange or Book Store 
to stock up on Maryland apparel. 




Above: Father and 
son pose for a picture 
in the midst of tailgat- 
ing before the game. 
Tailgating prior to the 
football game with 
family was an annual 
tradition. Right: 

The crowded parking 
lot was flooded with 
families, barbecues, 
and memories. 




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m ith seats packed to capacity, the Com- 

I ^ I cast Center was buzzing with anticipa- 
^S\^3 ^'^'''' '^'^ ''''^' basketball season ahead. 
Students in red Maryland apparel flocked to the two- 
year-old venue for Midnight Madness for the tradi- 
tional preview of the basketball season in mid October. 
Spirited fans were treated to the debuts of five men and five 
women freshmen playing for the first time for Maryland. 
Many students had trouble obtain- 
ing tickets for the event, with the 
online ticketing system selling out 
in days. Other attractions included 
an ESPN talk show. Cold Pizza, 
covering the festivities, as well as 
the usual events such as a displa\ 
from Gymkana that delighted the 
audiences as well as a traditional 
alumni game. Midnight Mad- 
ness entertained Maryland fans 
old and new alike, while letting 
the teams warm up to perform- 
iniz for the rest of the season. 





Above: A tan spins, 
trying to avoid dizzi- 
ness, in an effort to 
win a prize. In be- 
nveen games, contests 
were held tor students 
willing to compete in 
the .ictivities. Left: 
After a made basket, 
both Maryland teams 
regroup to the other 
side of the court. 



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he excitement surrounding the noon kickoff time 
for the Maryland against North Carohna Home- 
coming game was the culmination of a week's 
worth of activities. A couple hours later, the Terps emerged 
victorious, triumphing 50-21, scoring an ACC record of 39 
points in the second quarter. The win capped off a fun filled 
week for both current and former students. The campus was 
buzzing with activity as alumni returned in full force. The 
Greek community held contests like 
Mr. and Mrs. Greek, and talent con- 
tests, where students displayed their 
unique skills. Comic DL Hughley 
performed stand up as part ot the 
entertainment. Other notable fes- 
tivities included the Homecoming 
Parade, with Olympian Dominique 
Dawes as Grand Marshall, and a 
Masquerade Ball where students 
could dress up, held on Hallow- 
een. In the end, after some serious 
tailgating, the Terp fans witnessed 
some historv on the football field. 




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Above: Members of 
the marching band 
keep a steady rhythm 
during the Home- 
coming Parade. 

Right: A crowd 

of over 51,000 stu- 
dents, alumni, fam- 
ily, and friends filled 
the stands to watch 
Maryland beat North 
Carolina. 




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Left: Mar\'land 

:crb.ick, Scott 
McBrien hands the 
II off in hopes of a 
touchdown. The op- 
posing football teams 
squared oft on the 
w ay to Mar\'land's vic- 

tor\. Down Right: 

rcsh from tailgating, 
group of students 
OSes outside the sta- 
ium before entering. 
Many fans arrived in 
Maryland colors to 
show school spirit. 

Down Left: A tall 

balloon man watches 
over the many Mary- 
land supporters in the 
parking lot. Many 





ELEbKAiE 



^^^^%^ Ithough the days ot trick or treating door to 
f Jm * door were a memory l^or most students at 
^^^ I J the University of Maryhind, many still found 
ways to get into the Halloween spirit when October 31st 
rolled around. Students dressed up in various costumes for 
one of the few days a year one could wear a crazy outfit and 
get into character, whether it was a nun, cowboy, or school 
girl. Celebrating Halloween became a weekend long e\cnt, 
with students stretching the da\' 
over the course of several nights. 
Haunted Hayrides or Houses at- 
tracted students in search of a good 
fright. Some traveled to Baltimore 
to flaunt their costumes at Fells 
Point. Others went into DC, or 
simply stayed in College Park to 
party, binge on candy, or attend 
to local trick or treaters. No matter 
the choice, students found many 
wavs to express their creative side 
while enjoying a childhood favor- 
ite holidav in a whole new wav. 





Above: A gang ot 

four coordinated 

their outfits for the 
evening celebrations. 
Man)' students were 
extremely creative 
when picking a cos- 
tume. Left: Dressed 
in Festive, exotic out- 
fits, students celebrate 
Halloween with bright 
colors. 



H-flLLoweei^. a'^ *■ 



ebiilM UNITY, 



for the nTlh e^ 




Ithough rain put a damper on the days ac- 
tivities, the University of Maryland campus 
reached out towards the community on April 
ever Maryland Day. On this particular Saturday, 
Maryland opened its doors for all to visit: alumni, families, 
prospective students, business and community leaders in the 
area, and anyone interested in the University of Maryland. 
The University provided hundreds of activities for all 
those visiting that allowed learn- 
ing, exploring, and having fun. 
The community was able to inter- 
act with the students, faculty and 
staff of the school to form bonds 
and entertain all involved. Ac- 
tivities included tours, workshops, 
petting zoos, refreshments, and 
arts and crafts, many revolving 
around the Campus's spirit and 
pride. More than 60.000 people 
came to campus for this event, 
despite the rain and having to 
move many activities to indoors. 



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Above: Decked in 
red, Maryland bas- 
ketball and football 
players take a moment 
to sign autographs 
for their fans. Right: 
Precisely applying a 
picture of a terrapin 
to a visitor's cheek, a 
Maryland volunteer 
displays her artistic 
ability. 




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roviding students with a convenient, local, and 
easy way to earn money, on campus jobs became 
a favorite of students looking for some extra in- 
come while staying close to home . Departmental jobs could 
also add to a student's resume while helping their major. 
Often, the undergraduate offices of the respective schools 
needed student's to work during the day. and the student 
could become familiar with their major's department. 
Students could also find jobs in 
several libraries across campus, 
or in a laboratory with a professor. 
The convenience and attraction to 
on campus job stemmed from their 
llexibility in coordinating with 
a student's particular schedule. 
Other students who enjoyed work- 
ing with students worked with the 
Residence Halls, as CAs or RAs 
or took a position at the CRC. 
A particular bonus in these jobs 
was the ability to get paid while 
never ha\ int: to leave one's dorm. 




Above: Maintainng 
the budget, an up- 
perclassman works 
as a student govern- 
ment officer. Left: 
Working at the Hoff 
Theatre box office in 
the Union, students 
often had first change 



to score heavily de 
manded tickets tc 
shows. 



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Living on campus provided students many comforts of 
home in a unique environment of being surrounded 
by peers. One oi the most daunting tasks for Fresh- 
men was becoming used to living in dorms. Getting a random 
roommate usually resulted in huge disagreements or the start 
of great friendships. The dorms on North and South Cam- 
pus were a rite of passage for most Maryland students, and 
despite the community bathrooms and small rooms, they 
Acre the basis of many fond memo- 
ics. Upperclassmen could find 
ii^sidence on and off campus as well, 
frat Row and the Graham Cracker 
were homes for those in fraternities 
or sororities situated there. South 
Campus Commons was a generally 
desired place of residence because 
oi its newer facilities. For students 
\\ ho lived off campus, new lessons in 
independence were learned. Overall, 
tlie freedom that came with living 
(iff campus proved both challeng- 
insi and revvardins. 




Above: Reading in 
bed, a student finds 
that sometimes living 
at home can be advan- 
tageous when doing 
homework. Right: 
A group of students 
stop to pose at their 
Leonardtown apart- 
ment. Many housing 
facilities were available 
to students. 





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Left: A group of 

friends pose tor a 
picture in the dorms. 
Community living 
helped many students 
form friendships with 
neighbors or hall 

mates. Down Right: 

At the South C^ampus 
Commons, two stu- 
dents watch television. 
These apartments 

gave students more 
freedom while still al- 
lowing them to live on 

campus. Down Left: 

A student prepares 
himself a meal after 
a long day of class. 
Living in apartments 
or houses required 
more responsibility, 
cleanliness, and inde- 
pendence. 




Right: Roommate 
in the Commons ust 
dinner as a bond 
ing time to catch u 
on the week's news. 
The Union pro- 
vided students with a 
number of places to 
catch a quictc bit to 

eat. Down Right: 
Choosing not to walk 
to class, a student in- 
stead uses his bike as 
a more speedy option. 
Other forms of trans- 
portation were used 
to travel across the 
large campus between 

classes. Down Left: 

Old friends share cof- 
fee and discuss their 
upcoming weekend 
plans near McKeldin 
Mall. 



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m ith a campus as large as the University of 

I ^ 1 Maryland, students rarely found themselves 
\y \^ ^ bored or with a lack of options. Around the 
dorm, students found themselves playing video games, 
watching TV. or checking profiles on Instant Messenger. 
When students left their dorms, the options of what to do 
seemed endless. Weekends at Maryland often presented 
many enjoyable events, such as DC Improv's funniest 
college student contest. Phat Phri- 
day Contests, and Variety Shows, 
among other events. Also at the 
Union, students could take the op- 
portunity to see many new releases 
at Hoff Theatre, dine at Adele's, 
or find out about various campus 
groups. Students also made use of 
the campus itself, finding that in 
warm weather months, the mall 
made a perfect spot for an afternoon 
nap or study session. Others stayed 
in shape by avoiding crowds at the 
CRC and jogging or biking outside. 





Above: Close to her 
dorm room, a stu- 
dent takes a nap on a 
bench. Many students 
chose to stay outside 
when the weather 
uas nice. Left: Talk- 
ing advantage of the 
sunny day, a student 
checks her homework 
one last time outside 
before class. 



C-Wm-pus Life 



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^^^^^ ripping in red, the student section at Basket- 
1 1 ball or Football games showcased loud and 

5^^^"^^ dedicated Maryland fans who attended games 
to show their support for the Terps. Not all fans could always 
be in attendance, however. Due to a new and controversial 
online ticket request system, meant to eliminate chaos with 
ticket lines, some of the biggest fans were left in the cold. 
When students did make it to the game they desired, they of- 
ten encountered a large, vocal group 
of cheering fans. At football games, 
the student section was presided 
over by Special K, a "motivator/ 
cheerleader" for the students. Signs 
at basketball games were common, 
with displays of word play meant for 
television exposure. The staunchest 
Terp supporters were willing to go to 
any length to show their spirit and 
commitment to the team, includ- 
ing painting their bodies in bright 
red, or spelling out the letters of 
Maryland with a group of friends. 




Above: A Terp in 
training goes all out 
to support his team, 
even painting his face 
school colors. Students 
were not the only fans 
at the games. Right: 
Proudly displaying 
their Maryland garb, 
a group of students 
takes a break from 
tailgating. 




Xl<Mittd 




NUTRIENTS 




^^*— ^y s a place where students spent almost as much 
g JM ' time in the classroom or dorm, the dining hall 
^■^^ I y ^'^^ more than just a place to eat. It ohen be- 
came a social gathering spot for people to watch and catch up 
with friends, or a good location to study before a class while 
grabbing a bite to eat. Offering a wide variet)' of food, and 
often switching up the lare featured on the menu, the Diner, 
on North Campus, and South Campus Dining Hall satishcd 
the appetite of students with vary- 
ing tastes. Whether a student's 
choice was a chicken quesadilla, 
veggieburger, or a creation from 
the salad bar, he or she could pay 
using points and enjoy the meal 
in the dining hall or get carryout 
for an extra 25 cents and eat in the 
privacy of his or her own room. 
Every three weeks or so, at the 
points deadline, students could of- 
ten be seen stocking up on cakes, 
cookies, or pizzas in a last minute 
effort to use up their budget. 



Above: Under a 
welcoming banner, ca- 
shiers man the check- 
out lines during lunch 
while a student enjo\s 
his meal. 

Left: Via the use oi his 
cell phone, a student 
plans a meeting time 
for dinner outside oi 
South C'ampus Din- 
nins; Hall. 




tili/vLi/vg Halls. 



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Ithough a game would not be beginning for 
several hours, floods of red t-shirts could al- 
ready be spotted around various spots on and 
off cam^s. Parked cars with hoods open, smoke filled with 
the smell of barbecued foods, and cups and cups of beer were 
commonplace, and a sense of team pride united Maryland 
fans. As pumped-up alumni and students participated in 
the tradition of tailgating, they insured full support for the 
Terrapins against whomever they 
were playing that day. Not only did 
tailgating serve as team support, but 
also student bonding. Starting not 
soon after the sun rose in the morn- 
ing and finishing up in the dwindling 
hours of night, these fans decked 
in Maryland gear proved dedicated 
to their team. No matter what the 
scoreboard said at the finale of the 
game, each game day would still hold 
the memory of the bonds formed 
over hamburgers, Frisbees, foot- 
ball, and drinks in the parking lot. 





Above: A trio of 

students clad in red 
t-shirts hangs out 
before a game. Many 
students bonded while 
tailgating. 

Right: Armed with 
all the necessities for 
successfol tailgating, a 
group of students pose 
with their car, grill, 
food and drinks. 



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Fashion 






tf ^^ espite attending school far from 
I I Italy, Paris. New York, or Los An- 

^^""^^ geles, students from all over ex- 
pressed their own unique style while also following 
a few trends popular throughout college campuses. 
Statement tee's, usually bought from Urban Outfitters, 
heavily populated College Park. Some went the extra step 
and scoured thrift stores for a more authentic look. Foot- 
wear became another avenue for 
self expression. Old-school kicks, 
or sneakers, served more purposes 
than just running, and colorful Pu- 
mas, Adidas, or Nikes became hot 
items. Some students even collect- 
ed them, owning dozens of pairs. 
Another highly sought after piece 
of footwear were Ugg boots, suede 
ski boots from Australia. After the 
original Uggs sold out nationwide, 
they could be purchased on E-bay 
for nearly $300, while others turned 
to Ugg knock offs for a similar look. 









Above: When 

dressing up, m.in\' 
preferred the elegance 
of chandeher inspired 
earrings. Right: Ini- 
tials emblazoned ev- 
erything from school 
tote bags to sweaters 
showcased individu- 
ahty. Personalizing 
belongings became a 
reoccurring trend. 




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Left: Worn in the 
snow, over a pair 
ot jeans, or with a 
miniskirt, Ugg b( 
become a hot item, 
and sold out due to 
the high demand. 

Down Right: 

Manoio Biahniks 

became a household 
name due to Sex and 
che C/n-'s prominent 
them. The 
pointed high heal be- 
came a popular item 
for all ages. Down 
Left: Thick leather 
watch bands allowed 
students to tell time 
while staying in style. 
This trend was popu- 
lar for watches and 
bracelets and tor both 





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tudent's fascination with all things celeb- 
rity reached new heights as the University 
watched with the rest of the country all the 
latest pop cultures news. On televisions across campus, 
reality TV reigned as programs such as Survivor. The 
Real World, and' The Bachelor garnered high ratings. 
Other reality shows such as The Simple Life and The 
Osboume 's offered a glimpse into the life of the rich and 
famous with such celebs as Paris 
Hilton or Ozzy Osboume himself. 
Meanwhile, on scripted television. 
Sex and the City and Friends said 
farewell with finales that drew re- 
cord audiences. Many fans shed a 
tear as they watched the characters 
they knew and loved take the screen 
for one last time. Records flocked 
to the movies to see the last in the 
Lord of the Rings trilogy, while 
in music news, Outkast's double 
album won a number of Gram- 
mys and broke hip hop ground. 




Above: A surprise 
runaway hit for NBC, 
Donald Trump's show 
The Apprentice popu- 
larized the phrase 
"You're fired!" 
Right: Outkast re- 
leased Speakerboxxx / 
The Love Below, con- 
taining the hit single 
"Hey Ya" and "The 
Way You Move." 




''■y\Ximittd 



Left: The quartet of 
characters on HBOs 
Sex and the City 
said farewell after 
six seasons on the 
air. Over 10 mill 
watched the last epi- 
sode. Down Right 
Nick Lache\- and 
sica Simpson became 
the country's hottest 
newleyweds after their 
realit}' show on MTV. 
he show drew audi- 
ences inquiring about 
the duets relationship 
as a married couple. 
Down Left: Clock- 
ing in at three and a 
half hours. The Lord of 
the Rings: Return of the 
King entertained fans 
ol the previous two 
editions. 





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More than just a simple gym, the Campus Recre- 
ation Center was the center of many student's ac- 
tivities and provided an outlet to escape some of 
Che rigors of school. The state of the art facilities at the CRC, 
along with its large size and variety of conveniences, attracted 
students from on and off campus to come in and get physi- 
cal. If running on a treadmill or track, or lifting weights were 
not appealing, a student's opportunities at the CRC stretched 
beyond the usual. One could en- 
joy a healthy snack at Sneaks Cafe, 
swim in a pair of immense pools, 
or even take classes such as "Ab 
Attack" with other students. The 
CRC often transformed into a so- 
cial spot to chat and catch up with 
old friends, and during peak times 
students often had to wait for 
machines due to their popularity. 
Others had strict workout routines 
they adhered to and often came up 
to seven times a week. The CRC 
served all student's excercise needs. 





Above: During an 
oft hour, the upstairs 
part of the weight 
room stands unusu- 
.illy uncrowded com- 
pared to the peak 
times. Left: Moti- 
vated students hsten 
to headphones while 
working out the El- 
liptical Cross Trainers 
on campus. 



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hot topic heavily discussed around campus, the 
budget cuts reached massive proportions, lead- 
ing to a record 2 1 percent tuition hike, because 
of the n^- $8 1 million budget deficit. Aside from their wal- 
lets, students felt the cuts around campus in different ways. 
A North Campus favorite for several years, Northwoods 
closed its doors. The popular alternative to the diner, that 
often featured live singers, fell victim to the cuts, as did the 
Incon. which scaled back many of 
its hours. About 900 people were 
laid off. and 300 non-teaching 
positions were eliminated. Ameni- 
ties such as free towels at the CRC 
were no longer provided. Despite 
many of the cuts, the Univer- 
sity was able to continue to grow 
and maintain much of its quality 
through other funding. Students 
witnessed a completely refur- 
nished dining hall in the Union, 
as well as a new parking garage 
and more housing for students. 



Above: The Union 
continued to un- 
dergo construction as 
money poured into its 
makeover. Numerous 
dining facilities were 
open for students. 
Right: The popular 
NorthWoods closed 
its door due to lack of 
budget for its type of 
offerings. 




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Right: The Adele H. 
Stamp Student Union 
fences off the main 
entrance while under- 
going processes to give 
the building a face- 
lift. Down Right: 
Trailers outside the 
Health Center remain 
a fixture while the 
building undergoes 
constant construc- 
tion. Down Left: 
Small changes outside 
of McKeldin Library 
require many workers 
to park outside and 
work near the rear 
of the building. Nu- 
merous construction 
sites around campus 
diminished the beauty 
of the campus and its 
environment. 





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In A constant state of Hux, the university's appearance 
was constantly undergoing transition. Walking across 
the campus from class to class, detours and different 
thoroughfares often made the trip to class a little more in- 
teresting, as well as confusing. The Union, at the center of 
campus, unveiled a new look outside as well as new restau- 
rants and shops inside. Although the Union made many final 
finishing touches on construction, other parts ot campus 
were just beginning. As trucks 
moved around the streets, work- 
ers appeared donning hard hats, 
and fences reading CAUTION 
signs emerged, students walked 
by without giving them a second 
look, so used to the process by 
now. Many students have learned 
that there is never a moment when 
construction does not take place 
somewhere around campus. In 
an effort to always provide the 
students the best and most up to 
date buildings possible, new con- 




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Above: t;onsuuc- 

tion workers work 
overtime to construct 
Commons buildings 
5 and 6 on a former 
parking lot on South 
C'.impus. 

Right: Steam emerges 
From the construction 
in the quad outside 
of the Art Sociology 



Building. 



C.ot^strM.c.tuoiA.s S3 



cd^np-c-fiHi 






aced with navigating on and off campus without 
the use of an automobile, students were not left 
stranded on foot. Crossing the large campus of 
the University of Maryland was aided by buses such as the 
Circuit and services like Nite Ride. Commuters used buses 
that left frequently from the Stamp Student Union to enter 
and leave the University. When it was time to explore the sur- 
rounding areas, careless students could turn to the Metro to 
take them throughout the Maryland, 
Virginia, and DC area. Popular day 
trips included going to Georgetown 
for shopping, going to museums and 
landmarks in the nation's capital, 
or using the Metro to get one step 
closer to home. When students ac- 
tually had a car, they faced a new 
slew of problems. Parking was scarce 
around campus, although severa 
new lots were built. Many drivers 
returned to their car only to find a 
ticket due to confusion over whether 
or not they were parking legally. 




Above: The metro 
bus arrives at the bus 
stop in front ot the 
Stamp Student Union. 
Right: A ticket sits 
on the windshield of a 
car located next to an 
expired meter. Many 
students found rh.u 
parking was one of the 
most time consuming 
tasks in the mornine. 



Bs 




iAj^llv\A.lted 




Left: 'I'he Metro 
comes to a stop at 
the College Park 
Metro Station. Many 
students used the 
Metro to avoid traffic 
during the morning 
i^ommute or to take a 
trip to local attrations 
such as DC. Down 
Right: The Stuttle 
Bus stops to pick up 
students, faculty, and 
visitors in front of the 

Union. Down Left: 

Numerous cars fill the 
parking lot through- 
tout the day. Many 
students and faculty 
found that parking 
was very limited and 
early risers r\'pically 
got better parking 
spaces. 




Right: A group of 

students meet for 
lunch during a break 
between classes in 
front of Cbick-Fil-A. 
Students had a variety 
of fast food restaurants 
that they could choose 

from. Down Right: 
A display of balloons 
featuring red, black, 
and gold adorns 
an entrance to the 

Union. Down Left: 

Although usually 

packed with students 
during showtime, 

Hoff Theatre sits 
empty between 

features. The newly 
renovated theater gave 
students a chance to 
watch movies and save 
some monev. 




lijA,lim.lted 





SATISFIES 



,he center oi student activit}' on campus, the 
Adele H. Stamp Student Union offered several 
new features after a long period of construction. 
Students now had the chance to eat in a completely over- 
hauled dining area with attractions such as Chick-Fil-A, 
Panda Express, McDonald's, and Taco Bel/, and sit and socialize 
at the new location. After eating, students could shop at the 
newly divided Book Stores, with the book store and school 
supplies on one floor and the cloth- 
ing with Maryland gear located on ^ -^j^ 
another. Despite all the changes, old ||||||-h||M||M|mm| 
Union standbys like Mailboxes, Etc; "~-~-^ 
Chevy Chase Bank; and Adele's res- 
taurant remained open for students' 
disposal. Hoff Theatre provided 
students with chances to see popular 
movies, including sneak previews of 
major releases. On any given day, 
the renovated Union buzzed with 
the sounds of both hurried students 
looking for a quick lunch or students 
relaxing, killing time between classes. 



2 





Above: During peak 
lunch times, the new 
eatery filled its tables 
with costumers. Many 
students ate, studied, 
or finished assign- 
ments at the eatery. 
Left: Steps on the 
side of the Union lead 
students directly to 
the Book Center. 



TVie HkvLOkv sy- 



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HOUS 




Qne of the benefits of attending the Uni- 
versity of Maryland was in the many 
notable speakers who visited the cam- 
•s from the worlds of pop culture, ethics, 
and politics, among others, shared their knowledge and 
wisdom with the student body, while prompting de- 
bates, inspiring careers, and talking about current events. 
Candace Bushnell. author of "Sex and the City," the 
book and the hugely success- 
ful HBO series was based on. 
spoke to a mostly female crowd 
in the Stamp Student Union. 
Controversial pornography star 
Ron Jeremy, took the stage in a de- 
bate versus feminist author Susan 
G. Cole. A democratic front runner 
for the election, at the time. How- 
ard Dean spoke in front of 3,700 
students in an impassioned rally at 
the Nyumburu Center. The anti-war 
Dean denounced the situation in 
Iraq and President Bush's policies. 



Above: Holocaust 
survivor Marion Blu- 
menthal Lazan speaks 
of her experiences 
and hopes during the 
tragic time. Right: 
Ron Jeremy and Su- 
san G. Cole debated 
in front ot a paci<ed 
audience of students 
about the morality ot 
pornography. 




S2 \A.i^iim.lttd. 



Left: Cooling down 
from the hot sun, 
a group of students 
take a dip in the 
pool. Cancun was 
a popular vacation 
site for many college 
students looking to 
have fun. Down 
Right: Two students 
enjoy the views of the 
beach from above as 
they parasail through 

the sky Down Left: 

Laying out on a dock, 
a number of students 
soak up some rays 
at Deep Creek Lake. 
The Lake located in 
Western Maryland 
made boating, water 
skiing, and tubing a 
fun event for all to 
participate in. 




O O ^^ 7- 







i-{.v\.llm.lttd 




RADll^ 



^^^^^^ fter what may seem like endless months of 
m^ Jm * schoolwork, the average student needed a 
^^^^1 J change of scene as the school year wound 
down. Luckv for them, Spring break came at the nick of time. 
Popular choices for Spring Break vacations included traveling 
with groups of friends to Acapulco, Cancun, Jamaica, or Flor- 
ida. Others chose to use the week to take a breather and rest 
at home. No matter the activity, students eagerly anticipated 
Spring breaks arrival. Travel required 
planning months in advance; the 
plans for fun in the sun often were 
made early in the fall months. Travel 
agencies were contacted to purchase 
packages that included hotels, airfare, 
and meals. Months later it became 
time to pack up luggage and board 
the airplanes. For those not seek- 
ing beaches and sun. Spring break 
proved a time to relax at home with 
fomily and escape the often tedious 
and grueling school year. Others 
used the extra time to earn monev. 





Above: Vacationing 
in the Dominican 
Republic, a couple en- 
joys the beach weather 
while spending qualit}' 
time together. Left: A 
group ot friends pose 
for a picture on the 
beach. Spring break 
was the perfect time 
to get a tan, relax, and 
have Fun with friends. 



SpruiA-g Brenfe 



a^cJhd-^A- i^ e-M-Kt? 



NlTION 




m. ^ ^"y notable events during the year had a di- 
f^^^l rect impact on the lives of everyday people 
• I throughout the United States. At the end 

of the Slimmer, much of northeastern United States, in- 
cluding Manhattan, was struck by a blackout caused by 
the failure of electrical grids for more than 24 hours. 
Meanwhile, in California, body builder and movie star 
Arnold Schwarzenneger successfully completed his bid of 
becoming governor of the state as 
former Governor Gray Davis was 
recalled. Other celebrities graced 
•^"^^^^ the headlines, including Kobe 

^k ^^^^ Bryant's alleged infidelities, Mi- 

^F ^Nk_^< chael Jackson's antics concerning 

^ • ^W ^k potential molestation charges, and 
^^^ Martha Stewart's charges for in- 
'Sk sider trading, as well as the deaths 
,^^ of Katharine Hepburn. Bob Hope, 
and Gregory Peck, among others. 
California wildfires caused dam- 
age to more than 1 million acres, 
and caused more than 20 deaths. 




Above: Headlines 
were made as con- 
tinuing controversial 
debates occurred re- 
garding allowing ga\' 
marriages to be legal- 
ized. Right: Martha 
Stewart remained in 
the spotlight as her 
trial took place. Stew- 
art was charged with 
insider tradins. 




U.iA,LLm,Lteot 




Left: Many homes 
and stores were dam- 
aged after Hurricane 
Isabel hit the East 
coast. The storm 
broke the stripe con- 
necting North Caro- 
lina to Cape Hatteras. 
I'he University was 
also a target for Isabel 



eaving many wit 



hout 



electricity for days. 

Down Right: The 

2004 presidential elec- 
tions continue as all 
candidates attempt to 
lure in voters. Down 
Left: The New Eng- 
land Patriots beat the 
Carolina Panthers to 
claim the Vince Lom- 
bardi trophy tor the 
second time in three 



years. 





Left: After Saddam 
Hussein refused to 
surrender the weapons 
of mass destruction, 
U.S. military, lead 
by President Bush, 
began to attack Iraq. 
The bombings and 
fighting resulted in a 
numerous of casual- 
ties and seriouvK 
destroyed many cities. 

Down Right: Sad 

dam Hussein after be- 
ing captured from an 
underground hole Uy 
U.S. troops. Down 
Left: A number of 
Iraqi women surround 
the coffin of a loved 
Unfortunately, 
the attacks left many 
families mourning for 
their loved 



^?t?t 




I _ &>-^\ M.iA-LLm,Lted 



c^d^un^ M^y 



s the students of College Park followed the 
news happening around the world, the most 
significant events centered on the war in 
Iraq. Saddam Hussein was captured from a hole he was 
hiding in by American soldiers. As 2003 wound down, 
Saddam Hussein crawled from a hole into the hands of 
American soldiers, after an eight month war by Ameri- 
can troops. While Hussein was captured, his weapons of 
mass destruction were not, and 
the fighting in Iraq did not cease. 
Meanwhile. India and Pakistan, 
both countries with nuclear arms, 
started peace preparations. The 
war against terrorism took a back- 
seat somewhat to the war in Iraq, 
and al Qaeda was not successfully 
squashed. North Korea became a 
target of the United States because 
of their nuclear weapons program. 
SARS caught the world's attention 
and caused heightened hysteria 
because of its unknown qualities. 





Above: After nu- 
merous attacks, many 
places in Iraq were left 
in ruins. Many people 
were leh homeless 
or seriously injured. 
Left: Iraqi citizens 
pull down the statue 
of Saddam Hussein, 
as his rein as dictator 
came to an end as a 
result of the war. 



war 01^ lrac[ 



CA^^^'^^ 



^KP\l^ 




f henever students got tired of the College 

I ^ \ Park campus, the nation's capital was a 
\^f J quick Metro or car ride away. Featuring rich 
culturaniistory, an unrivaled amount of government and 
politics, as well as night life, shopping, and more, many 
students soon became familiar with the ins and outs of DC. 
Many students went with their friends on a day trip, to sites 
such as the Smithsonian Museums or the National Zoo. 
With many of the features free, it 
attracted many students who want- 
ed something different for a Satur- 
day afternoon. When the weather 
turned nice and sunny, Georgetown 
provided a pleasant backdrop for 
shopping and dining. At night, 
students turned to the neighbor- 
hoods in DC, from Georgetown 
to Dupont Circle to Adams Mor- 
gan, for good food and drinks. 
Many bars featured a young col- 
lege crowd that offered a reprieve 
from the usual Route 1 places. 




Above: The Capital 
is one ot the most 
architecturally beauti- 
ful sites to see. The 
unique dome shaped 
roof separates it from 
all other buildings. 
Right: Located on 
Pennsylvania Avenue, 
the White House is 
a huge tourist attrac- 




iiiM#i{tt7iii&yifiifef'^iHii^i^ 



6.6> lAvdimittd 




Left: An overview 
Washington D.C. 
shows some ot the 
most historic and 
pular plaLCs to 
\isit in the nation. 

Down Right: The 

Vietnam Memorial is 
a common place for 
\isitors to see. The 
wall lists the names 
of all people who lost 
their lives during the 
war. Many families 
\isit the wall annually 
to pay tribute to their 
lo\-ed ones. Down 
Left: The Wash- 
ington Monument 
stands tall at the end 
of the National Mall, 
he mall is one of the 
most beautiful sites in 
the Washington D.C. 



WnsllLkvgtoiA. V>C 



6.7-1 




Left: The inner 
harbor in Baltimore 
was a popular place 
for students to visit. 
There were a number 
of restaurants, shop- 
ping areas, as well as 
clubs students could 
to. Many students 
enjoyed visiting Bal- 
timore to see friends 
from nearby univer- 
sities or just enjoy 
the weather. Down 
Right: Known as 
Itimores World 
Trade Center, this 
building stands above 
all others in the city. 

Down Left: The 

Mount Vernon Wash- 
:ton Mon 

in attraction to 
iny tourists. 








NEIGHBUK 




to theUi 



ess than an hour away. BaUimore proved a popular 
destination for many students to take a visit to for 
a change of scenery. Because of its close proximity 
Jniversity, students found a day trip into Baltimore 
was perfect for seeing an Orioles baseball or Ravens foot- 
ball game. While in downtown Baltimore, visitors could 
eat at popular restaurants such as Cheesecake Factory or 
Hard Rock Cafe and play games at ESPN Zmu- JW Na- 
tional Aquarium was situated near- 
by, and allowed students to revisit 
their childhood days. Downtown 
Baltimore also featured Power 
Plant Live, a popular hangout for 
its numerous bars such as McFad- 
den s. Have a Nice Day Cafe, and 
Bar of Baltimore. Often, buses left 
from College Park to Power Plant 
on Thursday nights and let stu- 
dents who were not yet 21 attend 
1 8 and over College Nights. Other 
students ventured to bars in Fed- 
eral Hill. Canton, or Fell's Point. 





Above: Ihc Ori- 
oles baseball park, 
Camden Yards was a 
main attraction for 
many baseball fans. 
Left: The Baltimore 
Aquarium featured 
a dolphin show in 
which the animals at- 
tempted to jump high 
out of the water and 
hit an overhead ball. 



BoLtLn/tore 



i&^i 



CROSSROADS 




s college students with often limited resources 
in terms of transportation and money, many 
people flocked to Route One to utilize the 
numbers of restaurants, stores, and services available. From 
a haircut at Great Clips to picking up letters at the Greek 
Store, Route One was a place students found themselves over 
and over again. Perhaps the biggest draw for many students 
was the chance to eat out at places like Noodles and Company, 
Chipotle, or Cluck- U, and get 
away from dining hall or even 
apartment cooking. During the 
earlier hours of the day, students 
traveled to the Bagel Place for a 
quick breakfast. At night, dif- 
lerent drink specials attracted 
students to bars like Cornerstone, 
Bentley's, Santa Fe, and Lupo's 
Italian Chophouse, the newest face 
on the scene. Almost every main 
attraction off campus required a 
trip down Route One. No mat- 
ter the time of the day. Route 








Above: The inter- 
section of Knox and 
Baltimore represents a 
landmark along Route 
One. 

Right: Calm and 
tranquil during the 
day, Cornerstone Grill 
transformed into a 
popular night spot for 
many students once it 
became dark. 



s:^ 



lA^[/\,llmittd 





Left: Boston Market, 
Noodles and Company, 
Rugged Wearhouse, 
and Chipotle at- 
tract many cars to a 
crowded parking lot 
along Route One. 
Down Right: Stu- 
dent visitors walk 
across an intersection 
in front of Ratsies, a 
popular place to get 
a quick bite. Other 
stores included Splash, 
a summer themcd 
clothing store. Down 
Left: Standing next 
to each other, Radio 
Shack and WaWa of- 
fer students different 
services. WaWa was 
an especially popular 
spot because it was 
open for 24 hours. 





>iiA-Lt.ku,Ltec( 




SMERRY 




rom the three most popular bars, to fraternity 
parties, or simply hanging out in a friend's 
apartment, students had many different op- 
tions when it became time to unwind during the weekend 
With a busy course load as well as the many stresses 
that arose during the week, the average student needed 
a place to blow some steam. For those who were over 
21, College Park's most heavily frequented bars were R.J 
Bentley's, Coruevstoue, Liipo's. 
and Santa Fe Cafe. With tempting 
drink specials, the bars were often 
packed on any given night of the 
week, with lines out of the door. 
For those not into that scene, or 
simply not old enough, house 
parties and frat parties served 
as a popular alternative for the 
weekends. With more and more 
restrictions on fraternities, how- 
ever, parties often traveled far off 
campus where they could have 
more social fun and freedom. 





Above: Two ladies 
pose tor a picture 
while out dancing at 
a club. Many students 
enjoyed dancing the 
night awav at one of 
the local bars. Left: 
Beer pong, a game 
played by many col- 
lege students, was very 
popular at fraternir\- 
and house parties. 



Night Life y-3 



o 



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H^^'l^ 



Year after year the Terrapins demonstrate their 
dominance of college athletics, and this year was 
no exception. The football team went to their 
third straight bowl game, crushing West Virginia 
University, 41-7. The men's basketball team returned to the 
NCAA tournament, advancing to the Sweet Sixteen. Com- 
petitive cheerleading is born. Men's soccer topped off quite an 
impressive season with an appearance in the semi-finals, and 
women's lacrosse once again asserted their dominance, appear- 
ing in the Final Four. These tides and achievements are with- 
out a doubt impressive to say the least, but Terrapin athletics 
are not complete without the die-hard Terp fans: the ones who 
can tell you any statistic on any player on any team; the ones 
who attend every single game or meet, wearing their red and 
black; fans who take road trips to see the bowl games; and the 
ones who emphatically scream the 'new' words to "Rock and 
Roll Part II." The spirit of the fan, and the talent and dedica- 
tion of the athletes are what make the Terps w.iA,stoppflbLe. 




Clockwise from tOP: Number n. Drew Nicholas pushes 
towards the basket in the game against Georgia Tech. 
Coach Gary Wilhams directs the players during the play. 
At the line, Tahj Holden shoots the free throw. Blake 
drives down the lane for two in the game against UVA. 




U: Senior, Rv.in R.uullc dunks 
the ball in the game against C!leni- 
son. Critical plays against the 
opponent always got the crowd 



enthu 



and 



the 




£tati tiH^d Ucg/iScg/il 



Throughout the 

years, the Men's 
Basketball team 

has become one of the 
most followed sports 
at the University of 
Maryland. With the 
lose of four starting 
players, the defending 
National Champions 

proved that teamwork 
and determination was a 
key element for success. 
At Midnight Madness, the 
team learned that despite the 
lose of the seniors, the fans 
continued to be nothing but 
enthusiastic for the basketball 
season. Repeated trips to the 
NCAA tournament have 
spurred the enthusiasm felt 



by the student body for the 
sport. Drew Nicholas lead 
the team with 552 points 
for the season, followed 
by Ryan Randle with 395 
points and Steve Blake 
with 360 points. Other 
players that contributed 
to the successful season 
included Tahj Holden and 
Nik Canner-Medley. With 
the victory over rival teams, 
the young basketball team 
possessed the winning spirit. 
Head Coach and universit)' 
alumni, Gary Williams has 
kept Maryland basketball 
alive from year to year and 
made Mens Basketball a 
tradition that even the most 
novice sports fans can enjoy. 



21-10 



WIM, 



14-2 



4-4 
3-4 

CorlH>ft1tlH>tt 

11-5 

Norm, - CtrnuftHftiKAt 

10-5 

First Round: 

UNC Willmington 

75-73] 
Second Round: 
Xavier 

77-64 
Sweet Sixteen 
Michigan State 

58-60 




^tati out/ijd HlgktvqlCtJi 









3-9 



1-1 
4-12 



6-6 

Renneika Razor 435 

Terri Daniels 263 

Chrissy Fisher 236 

Delvona Oliver 245 

Vicki Brick 218 




Senior, Renneika Razor 
saves rhe ball in the game against 
Wake Forest. Keeping the ball 

in play helps the team score easy 
points against the opponent. 




econd year Head 
Coach, Brenda 

Frese prepared for a 
competitive season after the 
lose of a number of seniors. 
Many players contributed 
to the successful season 
including Renneika Razor 
and Terri Daniels, who lead 
the team with scoring. Chrissy 
Fisher, Delvona Oliver, and 
Vicki Brick were also critical 
elements to the team. The 
lady Terrapins practiced 
hard to prove their skills and 
dedication to the sport. Not 
only did each player possess 
the drive necessary for a 
successful season. Coach 
Frese carried the enthusiasm 
to lead the team throughout 



the season. In addition to 
the team's motivation, the 
Terrapin fans kept the spirit 
high throughout each game. 
The players fed off the 
crowds cheers and support. 
The opening of the Comcast 
Center was another benefit 
to the team, enabling them 
to practice and compete 
in a new, technologically 
advanced stadium. The 
basketball team was a com- 
petitive team throughout the 
Adantic Coast Conference 
and proved to be a threat to 
many rival schools. With 
the overall record of 10 wins 
and 18 loses, the Women's 
Basketball team ended the 
season with confidence. 



Clockwise jumping high, Renneika Razor 

shoots the ball. Looking tor her teammates, Vicki 
Brick dribbles down the court. Anesia Smith surveys the 
scene before charging the basket. In the game against 
Clemson, Delvona Oliver prepares to pass the ball. 




Clockwise from top: Running from the Towson op- 
ponent, Brian Hunt drives down the field. Dan 
LaMonica speeds past the Georgetown Hoyas. Aim- 
ing baclc, Mike Moilot shoots the ball at the goal. 
Willy Passavia looks to pass the ball to his teammates. 




llAiA^Stoppflble I 



Smith Lames the hall tcmaids the 
goal in the game against Georgetown. 
Lacrosse required speed, endur- 
ance, and accuracy for all positions. 





ith a ritual of 
being a nationally 
ranked team with 
consecutive winning seasons 
the Men's Lacrosse had a lot 
to live up to and did not shy 
away from the task at hand. 
The team had a number of 
starting returners and well as 
some new players that helped 
contribute to the team's 
strength. Leading scorers 
included Joe Walters with 
46 goals, followed by Mike 
Mollot with 39, and tied for 
the third position with 31 
goals was Ryan Moran, Brian 
Hunt, and Dan LaMonica. 
Each position on the field 
required concentration and 
alertness, along with team- 



work. The team walked 
away with a winning season 
of twelve wins and four loses. 
The dedication of the players 
was evident on and off field. 
The sport had a high support 
group that helped keep the 
team motivated and eager 
lor success. Head Coach, 
Dave Cotde was confident 
that the team's success was 
attributed to the friendships 
made between players. The 
abilitv to communicate to 
eachother throughout a 
game proved to be a key 
element in the winning 
season. The Terps finished 
the season with a loss against 
the University of Virginia 
in the NCAA semifinals. 







ti aivd HlgUiv gk tA 



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lome, 




21-2 



10-3 



5-0 



NmOU 




X 



3-0 



3-0 



If 



», 



i1st Round 
Temple 

Quarterfinals: 
Dartmouth 

Semifinals: 
Virginia 



Kelly Coppedge 
Sonia Judd 
Kristie Leggio 
Acacia Walker 
Dilia Cox 




26-6 
13-5 



8-9 



95 
74 
68 
62 
42 



BelOW: In an attempt to score, 
Acacia Walker carries the ball 
down tiie field. Proper ball han- 
dling and stick control techniques 
were essential in playing lacrosse. 




Mational titles, 

consecutive NCAA 
Tournament 
appearances, and All- 
American players make the 
Women's Lacrosse team 
one of the most victorious 
teams at the University of 
Maryland. The superior 
coaching staff led by Head 
Coach Cindy Timchal has 
made the team to be one 
of the top contenders in 
the nation for several past 
seasons. Contributing to 
the strength of the team 
were Kelly Coppedge, Sonia 
Judd, Kristie Leggio, Acecia 
Walker, and Delia Cox, all 
ot whom led the team in 
points. As a result of the 



consistent wmnmg seasons, 
a fan base for the lady 
Terrapins has accumulated. 
With the support of many 
followers, the team grew 
athletically. This season, 
the Terrapins easily defeated 
Temple University by 20 
points in the first round of 
the NCAA tournament. In 
the quarterfinals, the team 
dominated Dartmouth 

University with a score of 
13-5. Unfortunately, the 
ladies' season was cut short 
aher being defeated by the 
University ot Virginia in the 
semifinals. Nevertheless, the 
Women's Lacrosse team had 
an exceptional season that will 
add to the vears of excellence. 



Clockwise from top: Marylands Kristie Leggio 
speeds pasr the William and Man,- opponent. Delia 
Cox surpasses the defender. With careful technique, 
Laura Warren looks to pass to her teammates. Against 
Virginia Tech, Emily Jaissle defends her opponent. 




After the pitch, Ray Gemmill 



igs in an attempt to score some poi 



Th. 



e pitcner 



pitches the ball to the opposing team, Clemson. At short 
stop, Joe Sargent throws the ball to first to secure an out. 
Steve SchmoU plays his in-field position with caution. 




gg I KiA^stop-pflbLe 



Below: Diving back. 



mer attempts to tai; s.iIlK on 
first base before being called out. 
Many times players attempted 
to steal bases between plays. 




Ihe Terp's baseball 
team was back in Kill 
swing tor another 
season. In the previous 
seasons Head Coach Terry 
Rupp had improved the team 
drastically and the men of the 
baseball team couldn't wait to 
get back on the field. Home 
runs and the Runs Batted In 
helped put points on the 
scoreboard. However, out 
and in field positions greatly 
contributed to victorious 
games. Valuable players 
such as Justin MiLxwell and 
Mike Constantino led the 
team with RBIs, both over 
the 3.00 mark. In addition, 
Justin MiLxwell led with 
ten home runs followed bv 



Ray Gemmill with eight. 
Hitting technique as well as 
some excellent fielding go 
a long way towards making 
the team successful. With a 
winning record as the goal 
for this season the team took 
their positions to slide into 
some fine wins, but lell a 
little short with a final overall 
record of 20-33, 11-16 at 
home, and 6-17 within the 
Atlantic Coast Conlerence. 
With the strength of a 
number of returners, the team 
was able to defeat some rival 
teams as well feel the agony of 
defeat. Despite some defeats 
the men ol the team held 
together and stayed strong to 
pull out some critical wins. 



^tati out/idi HlgltiiglCti 



Ol/t>V(lii 

20-33 



WUlt 



11-16 



8-12 

l\lmt>vai 

1-5 



ACC 



6-17 



Leading \cowu 

R RBI 

Justin Maxwell 37 43 

Brian Jarosinski 14 14 

Mike Costantino 30 28 

Anthony Buffone 28 25 

Ray Gemnnill 31 29 



:« 



d 



27-18 



R RBI 

Shelly Rollison 20 18 

Crystal Tweedy 26 9 

Monica Cyphert 39 31 

Jillian Callaway 39 22 

Lauren Pollock 14 11 



B; Pitcher, Monica Cyphert 
winds bacls; to pitch the ball to 
the opponent. Pitching was one 
of the most difficult and de- 
manding positions on the field. 






The Sohball team joined 
forces once again ro 
take the field. The 
women ot the team practiced 
hard to compete in Fall and 
Spring seasons in order to 
be a competitive threat in 
the ACC. The players had 
high batting averages and 
great field skills as well as a 
team spirit that could not be 
dominated. Shelly Rollinson 
led the team batting averages 
hitting .400 with Crystal 
Tweedy right behind her 
batting .325. The pitchers 
for the team also contributed 
heavily to gaining key wins 
for the team. Pitcher, Monica 
Cyphert led the percentages 
with an ERA of 1.51 and a 



win/loss season end of 16- 
9. Other valuable players 
included Jillian Callaway 
and Lauren Pollock. All 
positions on the field played 
a critical role in the result of 
each game. The team finished 
with a winning record of 27- 
1 8 for the Spring season. The 
motivation anddetermination 
of the lady Terrapins was 
evident on and off the field. 
Field communication was 
another essential tool used 
throughout each game. In the 
Spring season, the women of 
the Maryland Softball team 
worked hard and carried 
on their high spirits and 
became a competitive team. 



Clockwise from top: in full swing, Mallssa Moczulski 
hits the bail down the Held. Positioned in the in-Held, 
lillian Callaway concentrates on the balls path. Nata- 
lie Grossman beings to run towards first base. 
Cardoza slides into third base after a teammate's 



Nnek; 
hit 




Clockwise from ton: Followine throueh, Pierre Rud- 
der serves the ball. Using backhand techniques, 
Rory Theis stretches to hit the ball. In deep con- 
centration, David Reichsfeld prepares to swing. 
In good form, Choi hits the ball wfith his racquet. 




Coach li 



cusses proper technique to ,i 
player. Often times, coaches 

were both instructors and men- 
tors for each player on the team. 



^tiiCi di/id HlgltclglCi 



Serving it up to the 
competition was 

something the Mens 
Tennis team was good at in 
the 2003 season. The men 
traveled to several colleges 
and competed in singles 
and doubles matches to be 
a contending team in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. 
W'Tiile every player 

contributed to the team 
there were some outstanding 
performances that brought 
home wins. Leading in 
singles wins was David 
Reichsfeld who finished 
with a winning record of 
14-7. Each player had to 
maintain concentration and 
accuracy during each play in 



order to come out victorious. 
Heading up the doubles 
matches were Demers and 
Reichsfeld who finished their 
season with a record ol 9-3. 
During doubles matches, 
it was important for each 
player to communicate with 
each other and maintain 
position throughout the 
court. Competition made 
college sports thrilling and 
keeped a team going through 
losses. Few teams out there 
can boast about the diverse 
potential seen with in the 
Universit}- of Maryland 
Men's Tennis team and the 
Terps took full advantage of 
this when it came to beating 
out their competition. 



^(Mgk 




Scott Baxter 


5-4 


Greg Chambers 


0-1 


Chris Chiu 


11-11 


Troy Demers 


7-14 


Scott Peters 


11-9 


David Reichsfeld 


14-7 


Pierre Rudder 


11-11 


Rory Theis 


3-7 


Douhk 


M 



Baxter/Chiu 1-0 

Baxter/Demers 1-0 

Baxter/Rudder 1-2 

Chambers/Chiu 2-1 

Chambers/Rudder 3-5 

Chiu/Demers 2-3 

Chiu/Peters 8-4 

Demers/Reichsfeld 9-3 

Demers/Rudder 0-1 

Peters/Reichsfeld 2-5 

ludder/Theis 3-5 



^tiati apid HlgktvqlCCi 



RamonaBut 19-12 

Chloe Chavardes 18-14 
Jennifer Dent 16-14 
Andreea Fusea 14-12 
Marta Jedrzejak 17-13 
Emily Marker 22-16 



11-5 

3-5 

7-2 

8-4 

7-2 

2-7 

5-9 



Causevic/Marker 

Chavardes/Dent 

Jedrzejak/Fusea 

Marker/But 

But/Jedrzejak 

IVIarker/Chavardes 

Dent/Fusea 

Jedrzejak/Chavardes 7-3 

Jedrzejak/Dent 0-2 

Chavardes/Fusea 0-2 




During practice, a lady 
Terrapin strengthens her back 
hand. Most competitive players 
typically have good racquet and 
court control durinc; a match. 



1% ■ ' 


^ 


i 


l^-- 


w^jk^ ->^' "^^m^ 


ss 




^HJVM/ 



nagging three titles 
at The Maryland 
Invitational is 

certainly some way to open 
a season and the Women's 
Tennis team did just that. 
The ladies maximized the 
skills of coach Martin Novak 
to help win matches, but 
serious practice and hard 
work enabled the team to 
truly be competitive in their 
singles and doubles matches. 
Swinging into the season 
only gave the ladies more fuel 
to add to their fiery desire 
to win. The singles team 
had a multitude of valuable 
players like Ramona But who 
finished 19-12 and Emily 
Marker who finished 22-16. 



For the women who double 
up on the court wins were 
just as common. Players, 
Causevic and Marker who 
finished the season with a 
record of 11-5 led the doubles 
teams. The coaching staff 
ensutalented red that each 
player use the court space 
wisely during each match. In 
addition, players learned the 
importance of maintaining 
position and being aggressive 
during a competitive 
match. Maximizing the 
lady Terrapin's talent and 
the coaches knowledge, 
the ladies used the spring 
season to really set off their 
competitors and bring home 
consecutive wins for the team. 



Moving back, Andreea Fusea 
his the volley. During a doubles match, rwo players 
discuss the outcome of the match. Coach Martin 
Novack closely observes the match. Feeling re- 
lieved, Andreea Fusea relaxes after she scored a point. 




mtOP: Displaying his strength, Matt Pan- 
dullo attempts to pin down his opponent. The coach 
observes a match from the bench. The wrestler uses his 
leg strength to flip his opponent. During the match, 
the wrestlers attempt to maintain good positioning. 




^&luu^£toppnbLe 



I»: A \l,n\I.URi urcsikr .arc 
fullv poMtiuns hnnseir .irouiu 
his opponent. Wrestlers learncc 
that the right positioning dur 
in? a match could be henehcia! 





Bringing in a rwo-time 
NCAA champion as 
the new head coach 
of the team was just the 
beginning tor the Maryland 
Wresthng team. Aside from 
hard physical workouts 
on the mats, the team also 
demonstrated the same 
dedication in the classroom. 
The team was honored by 
being placed on the NWCA 
All-Academic list which 
rewards student athletes 
tor superior academic 
performances. In a sport 
that combines individual 
strength and agilitv into one 
finely tuned athlete, wins 
do not always come easy, 
but winning was what the 



Men's wrestling team did. 
During a match, players 
concentrated on maintaining 
good feet position and 
adequate endurance in order 
to make it difficult for an 
opponent to pin them 
down. Senior Jake Stork led 
the team with match wins 
with a phenomenal winning 
record of 39-7. Men in all 
weight classes performed 
well in the season and held 
their heads high with pride 
lor their accomplishments. 
Although this season was 
exciting and the Universin' 
of Maryland Wrestling team 
proved to be solid, the men 
look forward to an even more 
rewarding season next year. 





Overall 


Dual 


P 


John Antone<li 


7-9 


1-2 


1 


Sal Aquia 


19-7 


9-3 


2 


Adam Beytin 
Scott Cannon 


1-7 
2-4 


0-0 
0-0 


1 
2 


Patrick Cissne 


9-18 


4-10 


1 


Sean Collins 


0-5 


0-5 





Jason Ellis 


2-8 


1-3 





Sean Fehn 


3-6 


0-0 





Eric Fehne^ 


14-17 


4-8 


2 


Jason Gribschaw 


5-7 


1-2 


2 


Jonathan Gunthe 


r1-3 


0-0 





Adam James 


15-13 


8-6 


2 


Lance Kearns 


0-7 


0-0 





Matt Kenny 


3-6 


0-0 





Jason Kiessling 


18-13 


8-5 


3 


Stephen Lanciotti 


8-5 


0-0 


3 


Gregory Lawrenc 


e2-3 


0-0 





Mike Lupa 


6-13 


4-7 


1 


Brian Mullaney 
Matt Pandullo 


o-o 
11-12 


1- 1 
7-5 


1 

2 


Mark Reid 


8-10 


0-0 





Ed Reybitz 


0-3 


0-0 





Bryan Rizzo 


0-2 


0-0 





Paul Salvo 


0-0 


0-0 





Dan Scheets 


0-1 


0-0 





Luke Stauffer 


0-4 


0-0 





Barry Stein 


1-6 


0-0 





Jake Stork 


39-7 


14-0 


2 


Zach Wendal 


0-7 


0-0 






Omd 



IOWA 



Away 



%/ 



12-9 



9-1 



3-8 



5-5 



BBIOW: a member of the gymnastics 
team strikes a pose at the end ot 
her floor exercise. Gymnasts were 
required to demonstrate both si<ill 
and elegance during each routine. 



Vault 

Sarah Hoenig 9.825 
Rachel Martinez 

Uneven Bars 

Kristi Skowronski 9.9 

Balance Beam 

Rachel Martinez 9.85 
Alexandria Gatch 

'Floor Exercise 

Rachel Martinez 9.875 

All Around 

Rachel Martinez 34.425 




The Terrapin's 

Gymnastics team 

started off the 2003 
season ranked at No. 25 but 
with a strong coaching team 
consisting of top coaches Hke 
Brett Nelhgan, Bob Nelhgan, 
and Wendy Marshall, the 
Terps were able to finish off 
the season strong. With their 
strength and determination, 
the women were able to 
end the season with great 
statistics. Ending with an 
overall 12-9 record and an 
overwhelming 9-1 season 
at home, the Terps showed 
great dedication. At the end 
of the season, the Terrapins 
were able to end with a 4th 
place finish at the NCAA 



Southeast Regional. The 
talented team included great 
gymnasts such as Rachel 
Martinez, Kristi Skowronski, 
Sarah Hoenig, and Cameron 
Hunt-Logan, all of whom 
had a competitive season. 
Martinez was able to end 
the season with high scores 
on the balance beam of 
9.85, a 9.875 on the floor 
exercise, and all-around 
score of 34.425 respectively. 
Other high scorers included 
Sarah Hoenig with a 9.825 
on the vault and Kristi 
Skowronski with a whopping 
9.9 on the uneven bars. The 
2003 Terrapins Gymnastics 
team had a successful 
and victorious season. 



m Lett: Gymnast, Leah Brill concentrates 
on perfecting her beam routine. A gymnast Hips around 
the uneven bar in perfect form. Jumping high, Katherine 
Shroeder concentrates on her landing position. The gym- 
nast demonstrates elegance and flexibility on the beam. 




Rob Frelow sprints down the track 
during the idO meter dash. Sprinting the 200 meter dash, 
Harold Manning sets a season record. Rob Frelow concen- 
trates in preparation for his run. At the ACC indoor track 
championship, Harold Manning runs in the 4 x 400. 




Below: Landin g tl 

an Nelson set a pc 



ii;|iim|i 



£tati Obi/idi HlqlttvqlCCi 



record with a 20-10.75 jump at the 
Delaware Invitational. Nelson took 
Hrsr pl.ice in the long jump event. 




The men of the Terrapin 
Track and Field team 
put in countless hours 
during the week training 
for their meets and almost 
ever>- weekend competing 
in them. Superior coaching 
and team work enabled 
the men to continuously 
impro\e their performances 
on the track and in the field. 
The Men's Track and Field 
team worked hard to earn 
themselves accolades at their 
culminating meet for the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. 
The team overall finished 
(Sth; however, a few 
individuals helped earn 
points for the team almost 
quadrupling their point total 



from last seasons trip to the 
ACC Championship. Junior 
Rob Frelow came in second 
in the 400-meter dash and 
Senior John Collins was 
runner up in the weight 
throw competition. In 
addition, Harold Manning 
set a number of Mainland 
school records. The 4 \ 
400 meter relay team also 
earned points for the team, 
coming in 6th overall. The 
dedication oi all the team 
members helped to push 
the team score higher than 
it had been in years, which 
was truly a triumph for 
the men of the Maryland 
Track and Field Team. 



^eaimi But 




60 Meter Dash 




Harold Manning 


6.87 


200 Meter Dash 




Harold Manning 


21.69 


400 Meter Dash 




Rob Frelow 


47.94 


500 Meter Run 




Tom Anderson 


1:09.27 


800 Meter Run 




Mike Fleg 


2:00.98 


1000 Meter Run 




Mike Fleg 


2:34.50 


3000 Meter Run 




Florent Groberg 


8:28.95 


5000 Meter Run 




Mike Prada 


14:50.89 


Mile Run 




Mike Fleg 


4:14.18 


60 Meter Hurdles 




Chris Ader 


10.52 


High Jump 




Adrian Nelson 


6-6.75 


Long Jump 




Adrian Nelson 


20-10.75 


Triple Jump 




Adrian Nelson 


43-8 


Shot put 




Beau Fay 


43-8.75 


Weight Throw 




Beau Fay 


50-8.25 



^ 




BfilOW: ( ximpeting in the high jump, 
Kcnd.ill Bolte set record ot 5-3 at the 
Delaware Invitational. Bolte finished 
second in this event along with par- 
ticipating in the shot put and javelin. 




The Women's Track 
and Field Team has 
proven themselves to 
be a force to be reckoned 
with in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference this season. 
Placing well at early indoor 
meets the women were on 
there way to ending their 
season with a bang at the 
ACC Championships. The 
Women's Track and Field 
Team came in 6th overall 
at the ACC Championships 
and nearly doubled their 
total points horn last season. 
As for individuals, Teyarnte' 
Carter was one of the top 
individual finishers for the 
team placing 3rd in the 60 
meter dash, she also finished 



7th in the 200 meter dash 
earning still more points for 
her team and an All-ACC 
Team acknowledgement. 
Earning points in the field 
were Zhanna Barer and 
Shenae Dawkins who came 
in 6th in the pole vault and 
triple jump respectively. The 
women of the Maryland 
Track and Field team 
worked hard collectively this 
past season to accomplish 
personal and team goals. 
Great coaching pushed the 
team to dominate in all 
events, indoor and outdoor. 
They proved to themselves 
and to their conference that 
they are strong competitors 
who are not to be ignored. 



top: The Maryland runner leads the 
Barley placed second in the 400 
At the ACC Indoor Track Champion- 
ships, Kierra Foster finished fourth in the hurdles 
event. Ton! jefFerson competes in the 4 x 400 R 




Clockwise from tOP: Number 1 1, Clarence Goodson hits 

rhe ball with his head in the College Cup against Akron, 
ason Gary maneuvirs around the UVA opponent at 
the ACC Championship. Nino Marcantonio fights for 
possession of the ball, jason Gary runs toward the ball. 




Below: At ihc AC'C (h.nnpuHi- 
ship game di;.imsi ilic I'luvcr- 
siry oi Virginia, Abe I hompson 
uses his footwork techniques 
around the i;t)alie. 



^tdti (Mild HlqlttvqkCi 




The mens soccer team 
finished 2003 with 
another spectacular 
season. The team finished 
the season 20-3-1 under 
head coach, Sasho Cirovski. 
The crowd attendance has 
topped 1,000 in all but 
one home game, and an 
amazing 6,143 hms during 
the teams win over UCLA, 
the seventh-highest turnout 
tor a mens regular season 
game. The high attendance 
has made Ludwig Field the 
toughest place to play in 
the ACC. In a very intense 
ACC Championship game, 
the Terps tied Virginia 1-1, 
but lost after penalr\' kicks. 
Circoski was named 



ACC Coach of the Year and 
five players were named to 
the ACC All-Tournament 
Team. In the NCAA 
lournament, the team was 
nothing less than exciting, 
making it to the Final Four 
for a second year in a row. 
As a result of their 
performances during the 
season, players Sumed 
Ibrahim and Scott Buete were 
named NSCAA First Team 
Ail-Americans, with Ibrahim 
also being one of three 
finalists for the prestigious 
Flermann Trophy, an honor 
awarded to the top collegiate 
player. Senior, Seth Stammler 
was named a First Team 
Academic Ail-American. 



20-4-1 
14-2-0 



6-2-1 

Tke, ACC To'diinauoMt 

Semifinal: 

North Carolina State 
2-1 
Championship: 
Virginia 

1-1 

Tkt NCAA Tty(ii>H,aticMt 

2nd Round: 
L Old Dominion 

^Brd Round: 
^B Akron 

m 

^ Quarterfinals: 
Saint Louis 

4-2 
College Cup Semifinal: 
St.John's 

0-1 



h 





^tati died Higloiigliti 



11-8-3 



WMt 




7-2-0 



4-6-3 

Tlbt ACC To-d^naM&ict 

Quarterfinal: 
Clemson 

Semifinal: 

Florida State 



2-1 



0-1 

T/c& /\/CAA To'ii'maMmt 



1st Round: 
Rutgers 



1-1 




In the ACC Semifinal 
game against Florida State, Mal- 
lory Mahar dribbles the ball 
down the field. The ladies lost 
the game with a score of 0-1. 




he woiiKMs soccer 
team added their 8th 
NCAA tournament 
appearance in nine years in 
2003. The team entered the 
tournament with an 11-8-1 
record, losing to Rutgers in a 
shootout after a 1 - 1 tie. In the 
ACC Tournament, the ladies 
advanced to the semifinals 
after the 2-1 win against 
Clemson. Unfortunately, the 
season was cut short after 
the tough lose to Florida 
State in the semifinals. 
The gifted twelve 
player team is lead by 
5th year head coach, 
Shannon Higgins-Cirovski. 
During the 2003 season, 
several individuals were 



honored for their playing 
performance. Players, Kimmy 
Francis and Mallory Mahar 
were named to the All-Mid 
Atlantic Second Team, Jen 
Biscoe to the Third Team 
and freshman defender 
Ashly Kennedy to the All- 
Freshman Mid Atlantic 
Team. In addition, Francis 
and Mahar were named 
to the NSCAA/adidas All 
Mid-Atlantic Third Team. 
The success of the 
2003 season was direcdy 
correlated to the excellent 
coaching stafi^^ the dedicated 
players, and the teamwork 
demonstrated by each member 
of the team during the 
games as well as in practice. 



Katie Ludwig sprints down the field 
in the game against Navy. Audra PouHn competes for the 
ball against the Florida State opponent. Jen Biscol kneels 
in disappointment after the lose to Florida State. Coach 
Higgins and some players hug after the Rutgers game. 




Clockwise from top: jumping high, D'Qwell Jackson 
maizes an interception in the game against Wake Forest. 
In the Duke game, Jackson celebrates after a sake. Josh Al- 
en runs the ball down the field against UVA. In the NC 
State game, Bruce Perry carries the ball to the end zone. 




Below: (1u.irtcrh,iLk, Scott Mc- 
BiK-n pulls back to throw the 
ball in the game against Citadel. 
Quick thinking and coordination 
were required to pla\' the position. 




Ever since Coach Ralph 
Friedgen rook rhe reins 
of Maryland's football 
team, magical things seem to 
keep happening. A football 
program has completely been 
resurrected and the wins keep 
rolling in. The Terps finished 
in second place in the 
Adantic Coast Conference 
after a slow start against 
Northern Illinois University 
and Florida State with an 11- 
3 record overall and 6-2 finish 
in conference. In addition 
the team had a perfect 6-0 
at home. The team capped 
off another spectacular 
season with a relentless 41- 
7 ambush on West Virginia 
Universit}' during the 



Gator Bowl on January 1st. 
At the culmination 
of the 2003 season, the Terps 
were ranked 17th in the AP 
Poll and 20th in the ESPN/ 
USA Today Poll, making 
it the third consecutive 
season that Maryland has 
been ranked in the top 25. 
In addition the Terrapin 
defense finished the regular 
season being ranked in the 
top 20 in four difterent 
categories. Senior guard, 
Lamar Bryant, was selected 
to ESPN.com's "All-Bowl 
Team," seven players were 
named Academic All-ACC. 
The Maryland Football 
team have posted thirty-one 
wins in the last three vears. 



11-3-0 



6-1-0 



4-1-0 



6-2-0 



5-1-0 

Chris Downs 
Josh Allen 
Scott McBrien 
Steve Suter 




ati dttd Higliiig 



20-4 



13-1 






ACC Taiittvaut'mt 

Quarterfinals: 

Virginia 5-1 

Semifinals: 

Wake Forest 1 -4 



TctitnaMMt 



1st Round 

California 2-0 

nd Round: 

Penn State 5-0 



Semifinals: 
Duke 



2-4 




Swinging at the ball, Tif- 
fany Marsh takes control in the 
game against Penn State. The ladies 
advanced to the semifinals after the 
win in the NCAA tournament. 




The Lady Terrapins 
took ro the field in 
2003 with another 
phenomenal season. The 
24 member national 

powerhouse, lead by 16 year 
head coach. Missy Meharg 
proved their abilities this 
year without a doubt. While 
losing in the semifinals ot 
the ACC Tournament to 
number one ranked Wake 
Forest, the number 3 ranked 
Terps advanced to their 
ninth NCAA Final Four. 
After dominating California 
in the first round and Penn 
State in the second round, 
the Field Flockey team lost 
the semifinal game against 
Duke. The team finished out 



the season 20-4, with all loses 
coming from NCAA finalists. 
The Terrapins con- 
tinued to dominate the 
postseason honors, with 
three players named to the 
All-ACC squad (the Terps 
have had at least three players 
on the all-conterence team 
every year since 1993), as 
well as eight players receiv- 
ing NFHCA Mid Atlantic 
All-Region honors, and 
three earning All-America 
nods (At least one player has 
been named first team All- 
American since 1987, and at 
least two since 1991). The 
Maryland Field Hockey 
team is one of the most rec- 
ognized teams in the nation. 



in top: In the game against Pacific, Lau- 
ren Povvley maneuvers the ball with her stick. Sara 
Silvetti and Kristin Harris concentrate on the field. 
Forward, Colleen Barbieri hits the ball towards the 
goal. Silvetti hits the ball away from the opponent. 





Putting the_ball^^^rie 
Harper led the team finishing eleventh individu- 
ally. Senior, Tim Kane swings his club and sends 
the ball down the field. Kane returned after leading 
the Terps with a 73.8 scoring average a year ago. 




^tati cui/id HiglocigltCi 



oth the men's 
HP and women's golt 

teams had successful 
seasons. The women's golt 
team, going into only its 
fourth season, placed 6th 
at the ACC championship, 
with men placing 7th. In 
addition, the men placed 3rd 
in the IMU Invitational, and 
the women placed 2nd in 
the Hatter Spring Fling. 
For the men, the team was 
ranked nimiber two in the 
Mid-Atlantic District, and 



was invited to the NCAA 
championship, placing 

23rd in the East Regional. 
In addition, players, Dan 
MacDonald and John Eades 
were selected to compete 
in the prestigious U.S. 
Amateur Championship. 
The women's team 
was seen as a success despite 
its failure to get a bid to 
the NCAA tournament: the 
team had three straight top- 
lour finishes, and back to 
back second place finishes. 



Mi 



&ici 



Cleveland Golf Kiawah 
Island Invitational 

8th 
James Madison Invitational 

3rd 
The McLaughlin Cup 

1st 
Adams Cup of Newport 

4th 
TheTillinghast Cup 

5th 



Cougar Hall Classic 

14th 
Nittany Lion Fall Invitational 

4th 
ACC/SEC Challenge 

9th 
Edwin Watts/Palmetto 
Intercollegiate 

6th 

Florida International Spring 
Invitational 

5th 





28-8 



Tkt, ACC TmUMMent 

Quarterfinals: 
Duke 

Semifinals: 
Clemson 

Championship: 
Georgia Tech 



TU fi/CAA TimuuimMt 



1st Round: 
American 

3-0 
2nd Round: 

Colorado State 
0-3 



Defensive specialist, Fiona 
DcFreitas puts up the ball to the setter 
in the game against Towson. Hand 
positioning and technique were very 
important in playing the game. 




The volleyball team 
had an amazing 
season, winning the 
ACC Championship in a 
thrilling upset against the 
nimiber one seed, Georgia 
Tech. Lynnsy Jones was 
named most valuable player 
of the tournament. As a 
result of this win, the ladies 
jumped in the rankings to 
number 25 nationwide. 
In addition, theTerps 
were able to advance to the 
NCAA tournament. In the 
first roimd, the Terrapins 
easily upset American 
University 3-0. However, 
in the second round the 
Ladies lost to number 12, 
Colorado State. The Terps 



posted their best season 
since 1997, finishing 28-8. 

For their stellar 
playing during the 2003 
season, Jones and Aimee 
Huddleson were named 
to the All-Region squad. 
Terrapin coach, Janice Kruger 
was named Tachikara/AVCA 
Region Coach of the Year. 
Jones and Huddleson 
also earned All-American 
Honorable Mentions. 

The Terrapins had 
an amazing season topped 
with numerous wins and 
an ACC Championship. 
The dedicated team and 
coaching staff contributed 
to one of the best seasons 
in Terrapin history. 



Clockwise from top: Stephanie Smith and Aimee Hud- 

dlcscon send the hall over to the offenders. Huddleston 
jumps up to serve the bail, fwo players block the ball 
in the game against Georgia Tech. Kathy Shahrokh 
concentrates on the ball in preparation for the next play. 




in tOP: Preparing to dive, Steve Vigi lante 
holds the seasonal record for three meter dives. Hold- 
ing a number of freesf)'le records, Mark Hill flies down 
the lane. In perfect form, Tony Miller swims butterfly. 
At Duke, Andrew Foran swims the 200 meter butterfly. 




Below: At the Cicorgia Tech 
meet, David White prepares to 
swim Freestyle. (Concentrating 

prior to competing was essentia! 
to perform well in swimming. 



seventh at the 
ACC Championship Meet 
with 283 points, the mens 
swimming team had a lot 
of individual successes. 
Senior Mark Hill broke 
the school record tor the 
SO-yard freestyle, and the 
200-yard freesrs'le relay team 
also came away with a new 
school record. Other records 
were set by Erik Weinberg 
in backstroke, Gergo Szekely 
in breast stroke, and Mark 
Baxter in butterflv. Chris 
Roddy set the diving records 
for one meter and three 
meter dives, while Steven 
Vigilante set the school 



record tor 3 meter 1 1 dives. 

As a team, the Men's 
Swimming team successfi 
finished the season with 
honorable standings. Hill 
and Chris Brandenberger 
earned All-ACC honors 
for their performances at 
the meet. The team had 
some impressive finishes 
as well as wins over Johns 
Hopkins and Howard 
during a double dual meet. 

The excellent 

coaching staff helped train 
and motivate the swimmers 
to achieve individual 

success and as a team each 
member grew to learn the 
meaning of dedication, 
hard work, and teamwork. 



IT 



cbind Hlgliiiglbi 




S^erOicH^'i B&it 


J 


100 Free 


1 


Mark Hill 


44.87 


200 Free 




Mark Hill 


1 :42.05 


too Free 




■ Daniel Fallon 


4:35.26 


1000 Free 




Brad Schertle 


9:20.56 


1650 Free 




Brad Schertle 


16:01.08 



100 Back 

m Erik Weinberg 49.60 

200 Back 

Erik Weinberg 1:46.58 

, 1 00 Breast 

^K Gergo Szekely 58.45 

200 Breast 

Grego Szekely 2:06.13 



100 Fly 



I 



Mike Fried 

€0 Fly 

Mark Baxter 



200 IM 



Tim Potter 



51.75 



1:54.93 



1:57.69 



.400 IM 



Chris Brandenberger 4:12.70 



1 Meter 6 Dives 

Chris Roddy 

3 Meter 6 Dives 

Chris Roddy 



300.00 



277.30 



3 Meter 1 1 Dives 

Steven Vigilante 511.45 



£tati cbi/idi Hlgltcvcjltti 



£tak(yi/i k But 



Swimming backstroke, 
Katrina Csomova races down 
the lane. The Slovakia natives 
best event is breast stroke. Each 
stroke had an unique technique. 



100 Free 

Shandra Johnson 49.55 



200 Free 

Shandra Johnson 1:45.91 

500 Free 

Shandra Johnson 4:44.25 

1 000 Free 

Elizabeth Lavell 9:51.77 

1650 Free 

Elizabeth Lavell 16:18.25 

1 00 Back 

Megan Knepper 55.07 

200 Back 

Inbal Levavi 1:59.62 

100 Breast 

Jillian Martin 1:01.72 

200 Breast 

Jillian Martin 2:12.56 

100 Fly 

Barbara Sumrall 55.27 

200 Fly 

Barbara Sumrall 2:02.29 



■^: ^' 



200 IM 



Inbal Levavi 2:01.43 



400 IM 

Inbal Levavi 4:18.68 

1 Meter 6 Dives 

Rebecca Rudolph 277.57 

3 Meter 6 Dives 

Rebecca Rudolph 420.60 




^m. 



he Women's Swim 
team has had a stellar 
season, going into 
the ACC Championship 
undefeated and with a number 
15 ranking nationally, where 
the ladies finished fourth 
place. The team has had 
amazing performances from 
its swimmers including three 
Terps being named ACC 
Swimmer of the week and 
one National Swimmer of the 
Week. Freshman Gigi deToll 
broke the school record in 
the 100-yard butterfly, in 
addition to winning ACCs, 
which qualifies her for the 
NCAA Championship. 

Junior Megan Knepper broke 
her own school record in the 



2()()-\'ard backstroke at ACCs 
this year and has qualified 
to compete at the NCAA 
Championships. Elizabeth 
Lavell is also set to compete 
at the NCAA Championship. 
Other swimmers including 
Shandra Johnson and Inbal 
Levavi who set a number of 
school records. 

The Women's 

Swim team is composed 
of numerous young strong 
swimmers that will 

be a huge driving force 
for seasons to come. 
Both the individual 

swimmers, divers and 
relay teams swept their 
events at ACCs, as well 
as both sprint events. 



UOfn If" AJl smiles, Shandra Johnson 
watches her teammates compete. Jillian Martin swims 
breast stroke down the lane. Swimming backstroke, 
Natalie Ferdinand competes against John's Hopkins. 
Martin swims her multiple record holding stroke. 




Clockwise from top: Ranked in the Top 50 in the NCAA 
Mid-Atlantii. Ivegional Championships, Adam Ambrus 
rims in a meet. A runner anticipates the end of the race. 
Approaching the finish hne, a runner speeds up to better 
her time. In good form, a runner competes in the race. 








ncr iii.mu.iins her speed without 
tiring herself out. Proper breath- 
ing techniques and a steady pace 
helped athletes run longer distances. 




The Men's and Women's 
Cross Country 

teams had impressive 
seasons. The Men's team as 
a whole rose to higher ranks 
than ever before bringing 
home two first place wins, 
a fourth place at their home 
meet, and a seventh place at 
the ACC Championships; 
their highest ranking since 
1991. Jtmior runner Adam 
Ambrus led the men's team 
in hah oi their races and 
finished up his season with 
All-East honors. Peter Hess 
ended his first season as one 
ot the top runners in the 
ACC, earning sixth place 
overall at the conference 
meet as well as making the 



All-ACC team and being 
named the ACC Freshmen 
of the year. The Women's 
Cross Country team got off 
to a rough start with some ot 
their top runners sidelined 
due to illness; however, this 
misfortune did not dampen 
the team's morale or stop 
them from winning. The 
Women's team earned two 
first places in their first 
two meets, a second place 
at their home meet, and 
seventh place at the ACC 
Championships. Hard work, 
dedication, and a strong team 
bonds helped these runners 
on the Men's and Women's 
Cross Country teams to 
attain their season goals. 



Mm'i ACC CUucbociaUbi 
8th out of ' 
Adam Ar 
Mike Prada: 3' 

irent Groberg: 45th, 26:30.0 
Mike Fleg: 52nd, 26:48.6 
Natty Zola: 55th, 27:02.4 
Eric Marenburg: 64th, 28:19.9 



Clu>Mp(mld{>i 

13th out of 26 teams 
Mike Prada: 43rd, 31:57.2 
Florent Groberg: 57th, 32:24.8 
Adam Ambrus: 64th, 3?-^'' "^ 
Mike Fleg: 105th, 33:^ 
Natty Zola: 106th, 33.^^... 
Eric Marenburg: 123rd, 34:0 
Doua Allen: 134th. 34:32.6 



7th out of < 
Katie Purcell: 27th, 22:06.1 
Allison Carney: 40th, 22:38.3 
Cori Koch: 44th, 22:55.6 "~ 
Kim Smith: 51st, 23:53.1 
Lorna Dorland: 53rd, 24:08.7 
Andrea Stehman: 55th, 24:15.8 
Amie Shomette: 56th, 24:20.1 
Courtney Fiorovanti: 62nd, 25:17.0 



Woumk l^CAA Mui-At&uilk, Regumai 

Clampimildbl 

8th out of 27 teams 
Katie Purcell: 21st, 21:47.1 
Allison Carney: 43rd, 22:41.7 
Cori Koch: 48th, 22:44.8 
Kim Smith: 70th, 23:19.2 
Lorna Dorland: 72nd, 23:20.1 
Andrea Stehman: 102nd, 24:05.0 
Courtney Fiorovanti: 103rd, 24:05. 




'^- 




The men and women 
on Maryland's 

cheerleading 
squad are hardworking 
members who provide 
spirit and enthusiasm 
to get fans pumped up 
and cheering. Through 
tumbUng, dancing, 

and stunt-work, the 



cheerleaders are an 
integral part to the 
whole collegiate athletic 
experience. 

The cheerlead- 
ers at Maryland made a 
very special addition to 
its program: competi- 
tive cheerleading. As the 
new^est varsity sport at 



Maryland, the compe 
tive cheerleaders set a 1 
competition schedu 
culminating with a r 
tionally televised natic 
al championship. Be 
squads are dedicated 
providing entertainmc 
and excitement to T 
rapin athletics. 



Clockwise from bottom: a m.u\I,ukI dKcricader is 

put up in a srunt by her squ.iJ at Midnigiit Madness. 

During the Homecoming parade, the cheerleaders 

danced and cheered to keep the crowd enthusiastic and 

irited. Cheerleaders led the fans during the games. 




During the Homecom- 
ing parade, a group of dancers greet the crowd and 
show their school spirit. During a basketball game, 
the dancers perform synchronized routines during 
time outs, half time, and as the band plays music. 



12.4lKlA-Sto]ipCil0Le 





Combining many 
elements of dance, 
the University 

)f Maryland Dance 



ertorms 



ihsLi 



graceful, synchronized 
lancing and exciting 
:horeography for all 
ferrapin fans throughout 
he school year. The team 



performs multiple times 
throughout football 

and basketball games, 
in cooperation with the 
marching band. The 
Ladies dancers practice all 
summer and throughout 
the school year to 
perfect their routines. 
Members of the dance 



team help choreograph 
the routines to provide 
variation and difficult 
dance steps during each 
performance. The girls 
are a vital part of the spirit 
at Maryland revving up 
and entertaining the fans 
w^ith enthusiasm and 
spirit. 



We£c^mt tor, . . 




uiA^dlvlded 




In order to accommodate a total enrollment of over 
35,000 students, the University of Maryland is home 
to over 500 student organizations, ranging from con- 
ventional groups such as the various student unions, 
to more unconventional ones like the Skydiving and Aikido 
clubs. One thing's for sure, though: whether academic, so- 
cial, or athletic, at Maryland there is something for everyone. 
The annual First Look Fair allows students to find a club or 
group that focuses on something they love, and showcases 
the numerous opportunities that are offered. From these 
organizations, students are able to take a break from the 
stresses of class, pursue their interests, and make friends for 
life, and despite the diversity among the student organiza- 
tions, asTerps, the University's students remain u.\A,dWidtd . 




RUSH • RE 



DIVERSITY • BRAHAM CRACKER • F=RATERNrTY 



I I Jl 



I 



a. 



. I 







Decked out in their bid day t-shirts, 
the sisters ofAlpha Delta Pi await the 
new pledges to surprise them with 
limousine ride. 

After the pledges arrived at the house, 
the Zeta Tau Alpha sisters take a group 
picture together in front of Maryland 
colored balloons. 



The sisters of Delta 
Gamma anxiously 
await their new 
pledge class. Bid 
Day was just as 
exciting for the 
sisters as it was 
for the pledges. 




ra 



wjA-cdvlded 







\HEbO@iyiES 



After many late night meeting with the sisters 
from the different sororities on campus, the soon to 
be pledges made their top three preferences. Bid day 
marked the beginning of the new pledge period as 
girls joined their new sorority families. After the bids 
are accepted the new pledges met up at the Chapel 
to reveal their house and have their Rho Chi's reveal 
their letters as well. Traditionally, the pledges ran 
down to their houses where their new sisters awaited 
their arrival. The first day of sisterhood and Greek 
life included receiving the pledge shirt and pin, along 
with an evening spent with the sisters and the new 
pledge class. New members learned what their pledge 
process would include and was about the sisterhood 
activities that take place. Bid Day allows new pledges 
the opportunity to join the Greek system and start 
lifelong friendships. 




vo-x/ 



n. 



times traternities nos 



vice events, and campn 
the brothers closer together. Friei 
in the fraternities usually 1 

rV.rr,.i<TKr.iit the btothets lives. Bonds were strength- 
ened when members worked together on commu- 
nity service projects, Homecoming events and Greek 
week. Members of fraternitii 



/I 



intramural sports, parties, and varic 





j&M 




^ 



a.| 



- I 



a sorority can oe a a 
choose their house 



It the year such as p 



the sisters clos 



something to oner wnetner u is siuuy, gw «^ii 

watch a movie, or just hai 

found that sorority hfe helped make the 1 

seem small. Through social events, sisters were aoie 

ro meet Greeks in other houses and form friend- 

lips. Members of the Greek community joined 
together on service projects and charities duri 

le year. With out a dor*"^ -:— -i — J ^^^^-.^a . 



P^^ 


^ ^ 


1 


^^■sai -.te 






^^^H WW Jl 


1 


lB<si 1 


1 


ml 




Jf^r^i-^ 




;ir house, a group of Al- 
pha Phi's show their sisterly love foi 
h other. Greeks formed lifelon 




Sigma Sigma sistt.o 
get ready before 
school. Each mem- 
ber in the house 
received a shirt that 



Compete 
FXMIIaY 



Competing is part of what it means to be 
Greek. In both the spring and fall, fraternities 
and sororities join together to engage in some 
healthy competition. Homecoming and Greek 
Week are weeklong celebrations in which the 
Greek community participates in numerous 
events. Throughout the week, activities such 
as the Greek Olympics, a talent show, a parade, 
Mr. and Mrs. Greek competition take place 
to unite the Greek community. Each house is 
paried with another and compete against other 
Greeks. Often times the week includes house 
sponsored parties so the matchedup Greeks 
houses were able to meet eachother and plan 
the weekly events. Throughout the year the 
Greek planning committee arranges Greek- 
wide trips to local bars and clubs. 



Alpha Phi 



Philanthropy: 
Aloha Phi Foundai 



Phi Kappa Tau 



bounded in 1906 



Kappa Tau Foundation 




PhiDehaTheta I Delta Phi Omega | 



din 1848 



tional foundation 



drens Education and 






^4 



ujA^dWidtd 




Alpha Delta Pi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
Phi Kappa Tau, and Iota Nu Delta 
teamed up in this years Homecoming 
with their city theme as Cairo. 

The brothers of Theta Chi and the 
sisters of Sigma Kappa paired up to 
compete against other Greeks during 
Homecoming week this Fall. 



The ladies of Alpha 
Omicron Pi got 
dressed to perform 
in their Homecom- 
ing skit. Many 
activities made 

Homecoming week 
memorable. 



c^recfe Life i-43 



Alpha Omicron Pi and Alpha Tau 
Omega teamed up to help collect mon- 
ey for arthritis research at the annual 
tricycle race. 

Brothers of Zeta Psi help prepare 
lunches for less fortunate families. 
Community service was a huge part of 
the Greek community. 



The ladies of Sigma 
Kappa walked 

around D.C. in 
hopes of raising 
money for alzheim- 
er's research. The 
sorority also sup- 
ported the Maine 
Seacoast Mission. 




1-4-4 KtA-cdVLCtcol 





g: C Trl 



Philanthropy events were a very important 
part of Greek hfe. Each sorority and fraternity par- 
ticipated in various events during the year in order 
to give back to the community. Events this spring 
included the All Night Dance-A-Thon, The Jean 
Giveaway, and car washes. Houses dedicated them- 
selves to raising money throughout the year to specific 
organizations as a way of giving back to the commu- 
nity. Some organizations that the Greek houses par- 
ticipated in include Delta Tau Delta's Adopt a School 
Foundation and Alpha Epsilon Phi's Elizabeth Glaser 
Pediatric AIDS Foundation. Each philanthropy was 
nationally recognized as the sororities or fraternities 
community service project. Philanthropies were not 
only events that allowed houses to volunteer, but they 
were also one of the many activities through which 
brotherhood and sisterhood bonds were strengthened. 




Delta Delta Delta 


Alpha Gamma Rho 


Founded in 1888 


Founded 1904 


Philanthropy: 


Philanthropy: Educa- 


Children's Cancer 


tional Foundation of 


Charities 


Alpha Gamma Rho 


Zeta Psi 


Alpha Phi Alpha 


Founded in 1847 


Founded in 1906 


Philanthropy: Zeta Psi 




Educational Founda- 




tion 





^reefe LJfg 




IMPRESS 



One of 

events for each 
their house formals. 



the 
sorority 



most anticipated 
and fraternity was 
To celebrate, Greeks and their 



dates dressed up for an evening full of dancing and 
memories. Formals rewarded sorority and frater- 
nity members for their commitment to the house, 
for honorably representing the house, and involve- 
ment in community events. Greeks spent months 
planning the details of their formals including the 
location, and decorations. Fraternities were able to 
continue celebrating their formals throughout the 
weekend, while most sororities, due to national 
regulations, were limited to one night. New mem- 
bers along with current brothers and sisters looked 
forward to their formals every year. The formals 
allowed the Greeks to socialize with one another 
and enjoy a night partying with friends and family. 





14^ w.iA-c<i.vLolcc( 




The sisters of Kappa Delta take some 
pictures before attending their Fall 
formal. The formals were one of the 
most enjoyable nights of the semester. 

Decked out in dressed, the Delta Gam- 
ma sorority celebrated their formal. 
Each semester, a formal social func- 
tion was held. 




^m. ■■ , \p-r.m 


WLmk. ^ 




r 



Taking a break from 
dancing with their 
brothers, the Sigma 
Nu fraternity enjoy 
spending the eve- 
ning out. Fraternities 
often hosted week- 
end long formals. 



£^reefe Life 



±^7- 



The sisters of Alpha Phi get dressed 
up for a semiformal. Sororities and 
fraternities often had joint events to 
celebrate being Greek. 

Alpha Gamma Rho had a number of 
guests visit their house for a barbe- 
cue. Fraternities often hosted parties at 
there houses for special events. 



ft 


f^^^.1% HMO 




Members of Kappa 
Alpha Theta pose 
with a carnation 
in hand prior to 
the Grab-A-Date. 
Various parties were 
held throughout the 
semester. 




''t'd'liA.t^divi.dtd 




Remember 



Each sorority and fraternity had numerous par- 
ties throughout the year for various reasons. During rush 
and recruitment events fraternities hosted parties for the 
opportunity to meet prospective brothers and engaged in 
friendly competitions such as Poker or Madden tourna- 
ments. Sororities also hosted parties during rush that usu- 
ally included themes such as "Under the Sea", "Around 
the World" or "Hawaiian Luau." Parties were a great time 
to socialize with the other members of your sorority or 
fraternity and to meet new people. Many fraternities had 
parties during the weekends or for holidays as celebration. 
The parties were often very popular events and required 
invites from members of the Greek system. In addition to 
house parties, Greek houses paired up for other events such 
as semifomials, Cmsh Parties and Grab-A-Dates that were 
usually hosted at nearby bars or in Baltimore or Washington 
D.C. However, they were a great way to escape the stress 
of college life and enjoy a night ftiU of memories and fun. 

The sisters of Phi 
Sigma Sigma pre- 
pare to go to a party 
in College Park. 
With many mem- 
bers, Greeks always 
had friends to tag 
along. 




^K-cefe Life i4'? 



Home ^ 

H®ME 



Many Greeks found their "fiome' away from 
home in one of the thirty-six Greek houses located 
throughout Fraternity Row and the Graham Cracker. 
Each house shared special traditions, philanthropies, commu- 
nity service events, and social activities that helped bond each 
brother or sister with their Greek family. These houses allowed 
the Greeks to form life-long friendships and memories with 
other members of the Greek community. Over fifty males or 
females can be housed in a single Greek house. While that may 
seem like a lot, the houses could not have all their members 
live under one roof. Typically, seniors chose to live in nearby 
houses allowing new members to enjoy living with their Greek 
family. In addition to everyday fun, Greeks also found that 
living in the same house with numerous members was aca- 
demically beneficial. With so many brothers or sisters in close 
vicinity, Greeks had no problem finding someone to go out to 
a party or to a bar, watch a movie, study for an exam, talk, or 
go out to eat. 



^1^ 






"^^^r.ii^J-^4 



^^7^:m^:^^ "''\^ 



Alpha Chi Omega I Delta Tau Delta 



Founded in 1885 



Founded in 1858 



Alpha Chi Omega 
Foundation 



Adopt a School 



Lambda Chi Alpha Sigma Kappa 

Founded in 1 909 Founded in 1 874 

Philanthropy: ^^' 

Gerontology, Alzh 
North American Food 

t ers Research, Mai 

^-- Seacoast Mission 





ukd 



Known for its exquisite architec- 
ture and landscaping. Kappa Delta's 
house is one of the most beauti- 
houses around the University. 




:a'-¥ 7!^ 



-*^ .V. ^ ♦■ J 



^K*.^ 



M 





u\A.dl\/ldtd . 



LECTURE • EXAM • HDMEWDRK • STUDY 



HITTING THE BDDKS • READING • GRADE POINT A 





1 



BE . WAMMINB • FRIBNCS • BRDUP STUDY BEBBONS • COMPUTBB • FAPBRB • NOTB 









A student k-cds tht goat oats 
with her hands. Many students 
estabUshed friendships with the 
animals. 



Students learn the importance ot 
and difficuUies of growing and 
maintaining plants at the Univer- 
siry's greenhouse. 



Dr. Thomas A. Fretz, Dean 
College of Agriculture and Natural 
Resources 



Mure 



and its 



Beauty 



The College of Agriculture and 
Natural Resources provides 
students with an interest in 
environmental conservation, 
agricultural economics, animal 
science, plant sciences, nutrition, natural 
resource economics, biomedical engineering, 
environmental science and policy, equine 
studies, food science, landscape architecture, 
pre-veterinarian studies, or urban forestry, a 
chance to learn and perform research in state 
of the art facilities. 

Some learning spaces that the College 
offers are the on campus barn, which features 
horses, sheep, and cows to name a few; as 
well as a brand new green house complex 
which has just opened. The College makes 
great efforts to help its students, providing 
over one-third with scholarship opportuni- 
ties. With the help of determined faculty 



members, students within the College ot Ag- 
riculture and Natural Resources have had the 
chance to develop academically as well as gain 
hands-on experience. In addition to academic 
achievements, many students have formed 
organizations that help create friendships and 
expand on personal interests that go beyond 
the classroom. 

Factdry members within the College 
are proud recipients of a number of well-rec- 
ognized national and professional organiza- 
tions. Some of the teaching staff are members 
of the National Academy of Science, the 
President's Council of Economic Advisors, 
Lilly Teaching Fellows, Distinguished Uni- 
versity Professors, and the National Research 
Council. For students who wish to stretch 
the limits of science, the College of Agricul- 
tural and Natural Resources is the place to 
sttidy. 



^^ iAiA-di,vLo(ec( 




>s 



m.'ti m* 




A student carefully .idjusts the horseshoe 
without hurting the animal. Students 
had excellent opportunities to work 
closelv with animals at the barn. 




Two students work cogether tu hrainscrni 
methods of constructing a building. Group 
efforts ofrc-n helped students develop 








Located in front of the Architec- 
ture building, a uniquely designed 
structure demonstrates the beaurv' 
of architecture. 



A student prepares the design for 
a building project at the studio. 
Many architecture majors could be 
found here at all hours. 



Putting the finishing touches on 
the outline, a student determines 
an efficient way of constructing 
his design. 



Beauty Of Detail 



The School of Architecture 
combined a competitive 
curriculum with endless 
projects challenging each 
student aspiring to earn a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Architec- 
ture. With the instruction of faculty, 
many students found that hours in the 
studio was necessary in order to com- 
plete each assignment. The School of 
Architecture was awarded $7,500 for 
the Architecture 600/61 1 Comprehen- 
sive and Advanced Technolog}' entry. 

Facult)' members, who research 
specific avenues of architecture includ- 
ing design and theory, history, archi- 
tectural archaeology, technolog}', ur- 
ban design and planning, and historic 
preservations, help provide students 
with an eclectic academic schedule. 



Distinguished faculty members along 
with Dean, Steven W. Hurtt have 
contributed in making the program 
competitive across the nation. Various 
majors within the School of Architec- 
ture allowed students to pinpoint their 
specific interests, allowing them to use 
their education to determine a future 
career. 

A degree in architecture quali- 
fied students to pursue a career in a 
variety of fields including construc- 
tion, real estate development, public 
administration, or historic preserva- 
tion. In addition, many students chose 
to obtain a graduate degree to further 
their education in a specific area of 
interest within the field. Architecture 
had many promising career paths for 
all students. 



AcnotekvcLos 



±sr\ 



□■ 



J J-'THE ART GALLERY 



m^ 



The Art Gallery contains some of 
the most beautiful and cultural 
pieces of art including paintings, 
sculptures, and photographs. 



Arti 





A dancer gracefully leaps across the 
stage during a performance at the 
PAC. Performances allowed stu- 
dents to use their own creativity. 



mitates 



James F Harris, Dean 

College of Arts and Humanities 



Life 



The University of Maryland 
College of Arts and 
Humanities offers students 
a chance to study human 
activities and behaviors 
ranging from ancient past through 
the present. Through these studies 
students in the college begin to 
broaden their basis of understanding 
about the human condition and gain a 
deeper understanding of human beings 
in general. 

The College of Arts and 
Humanities encompasses twenty-five 
departments and centers and offers 
students educational opportunities 
in areas of study such as history, art, 
literature, and languages of cultures 
from around the world. When most 
students enter the University their 



education has primarily focused on 
the study of Western Civilizations, 
however the College of Arts and 
Humanities offers students a chance to 
learn about Latin, Asian, and African 
cultures in order to enrich their 
existing knowledge to ones of other 
artistic cultures around the world. 

The College features many 
research initiatives such as the 
Maryland Institute for Technology 
and the Driskell Center for the Study 
of the African Diaspora. Through 
many generous gifts and grants, the 
College of Arts and Humanities 
directed by Dean James F. Harris 
has been able to create and provide 
scholarships, graduate fellowships, and 
professorships for those dedicated to 
studying the cultures of the world. 



ni 



\±ss 



iA.i^dlvlded 



# ^ 







Ja 



With great flexibilit)-, a dancer uses the 
music to guide her through the perfor- 
mance. Music and dance worked togeth- 
er to deliver a beautiful presentation. 




A number of students listen to the Soc 
ogy professor as she discusses serious is- 
lies rhat surround our world and reasons 
1 bfnm concerned. 






Dawn West, Dean 

College of Behavioral and Social 



Future 

M 



At the front desk ot the College of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences, a 
student volunteer helps other stu- 
dents with decision making. 



An advisor within the College 
helps a student with her schedule. 
Many students met with advisors 
regularly to discuss academics. 



in our 



Hand§ 



any University 
of Maryland 
students know 
that the Col- 
lege of Behav- 
ioral and Social Sciences is the largest 
college here. The College offers majors 
in African American Studies, Anthro- 
polog)^ Criminolog)' and Criminal 
Justice, Economics, Environmental 
Science and Policy, Government and 
Politics, Geography, Hearing and 
Speech Sciences, Psychology, and So- 
ciology; just to name a few. 

Students within the College of 
BSOS studied topics to help gain a 
better understanding of issues of the 
past and present in order to help the 
future. The increasing global commu- 
nit)^ at hand makes the majors offered 



by BSOS very pertinent not only tor 
today's world, but for tomorrow's. 
Each department offers specific classes 
that can help students understand the 
world in which they are living. For ex- 
ample. Government and Politics offers 
a class entitled "Conflict Resolution: 
the Israeli Palestinian Experiment" that 
was co-taught by both an Israeli profes- 
sor and a Palestinian professor so that 
students could understand not only the 
history of the situation, but the current 
problems as well from both sides of the 
spectrum. 

Other classes within the College 
also encourage students to examine 
issues from both sides. Various classes 
within BSOS helped students walk 
away with a greater understanding of 
current issues and dilemmas. 



Acadtwlcs. 



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One oF the newly built buildings 
on campus. Van Munching con- 
tains many technological facilities 
for students in the business school. 




Students walk together on their 
way to class. The University's busi- 
ness school is highly ranked in the 
nation. 




Publicizing the business school, 
balloons were used to attract 
visitors prior to the Homecoming 
game. 



Tricks Of the Trade 



The Robert H. Smith School of 
Business was ranked among the 
top-20 programs in the nation 
by the U.S. Neivs and World Re- 
port. The Smith School ranked 
sixth in management information systems, 
ninth in entrepreneurship, and tenth in sup- 
ply chain management and logistics. 

Additionally, the Smith School was 
recognized in three new categories rank- 
ing fourteenth in management, sixteenth 
in international business, and nineteenth 
in finance. The School of Business had an 
impressive overall rank of seventeenth in the 
nation. 

The United States Association for 
Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USAS- 
BE) awarded the Smith School with the 2003 
Outstanding Entrepreneurship Course of the 
Year for its ground breaking course in which 



MBA students work with the $20-million 
New Markets Growth Fund (NMGF). The 
course. New Markets Growth Fund Practi- 
cum, was unanimously selected as the winner 
at the 18th Annual USASBE Annual Confer- 
ence in Dallas on January 18, 2004. 

Under the leadership of Dean How- 
ard Frank, the Smith School of Business and 
its 127 dedicated faculty members offers in- 
novative academic programs and comprehen- 
sive services for students, employers, alumni, 
and business, government, and non-profit 
organizations. 

Exceptional academic programs, an 
award-winning faculty, advanced technology 
and comprehensive services focused on the 
needs of the corporate community are mak- 
ing the Robert H. Smith School of Business 
the partner ot choice for students and busi- 
nesses. 



GI 



16.2 [A.\A.diyidtd 




A number of students attempt to get in 
some last minute studying prior to class. 
,5^ Many students found that studying be- 
f^Sk rvveen classes was extremely beneficial. 





The Mathematics building contains an 
architecturally unique entrance allowing 
students to sit around the circumference 
of the circle. 




Dr. Sttphcn Halperin, Dean 
College oF Computer, Math, ai 
Physical Science 



Life 




Ihe t'oniputer Science building 
can easily be located on campus 
because it is the only building with 
bright green windows. 




A student works in one of the com- 
puter labs in between classes. The 
campus provided students com- 
puter access in numerous areas. 



changing 



Formulas 



One of the national leaders 
in research and science 
education, the College of 
Computer, Mathemati- 
cal, and Physical Sciences 
offers Bachelor's of Science degrees to hard 
working and dedicated students in the fields 
of Astronomy, Computer Science, Computer 
Engineering, Geology, Mathematics, Meteo- 
rology, Physics, and Physical Sciences. With 
nearly double the funds provided by grants 
and contracts, the College and its faculty 
have been awarded numerous research awards 
within the last three years. 

This year, numerous departments 
within the College were awarded high ranks 
by the U.S. News and WoM Report. Non-lin- 
ear Dynamics and Chaos was ranked number 
one in the nation. In addition. Database was 
ranked fourth, Software was eighth. Artificial 



Intelligence took the ninth position. Applied 
Mathematics was ranked eleventh. Computer 
Science ranked twelfth, and Physics earned 
the thirteenth position. 

Some distinguished alumni and 
members of the College Board of Visitors 
included Sergey Brin, President of Google, 
Inc., C.P. Shankar, President and CEO of 
ECargo, Ashok K. Thareja, President and 
CEO of A&T Systems, Inc., Nancy K. Kopp 
State Treasurer of the State of Maryland. 

With its excellent academics, nation- 
ally recognized achievements, and distin- 
guished facult)', the College's research ex- 
penditures during the most recent fiscal year 
exceeded $69 million. Each of the majors is 
time consimiing and has a heav}' emphasis 
on math. Some people say that most hard- 
working students at the University graduate 
from this college. 



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A group of students discuss their 
future goals to become educators 
on a bencfi outside of the Benja- 
min building. 




The College ot Education is lo- 
cated in the Benjamin building. 
Aspiring teachers find that many of 
their classes are in this building. 



i 



Edna Mora Szymanski, Dean 
College of Education 



Paviit^theHH^^ 



nccording ro U.S. News and 
"World Report, the College 
of Education at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland is ranked 
among the top twenty-five 
in the nation, making a degree from this Col- 
lege a prestigious and highly competitive one. 
The program offers undergraduate degrees 
within the departments of Curriculum and 
Instruction, Human Development and Insti- 
tute for Child Study, and the Department of 
Special Education. 

A number of departments within 
the College were ranked highly in the na- 
tion. Coming out on top, the Department 
of Counseling and Personnel Services was 
ranked number one. In addition, the Depart- 
ment of Education Policy and Leadership 
was ranked ninth. Ranking tenth was the 
Department of Special Education. 



Students have the opportunity to 
graduate with either a Bachelor's of Arts 
or a Bachelor's of Science degree. Teacher 
candidates within the major are given op- 
portunities during their senior year to have 
an in-classroom experience at local schools. 
This opportunity was valued to be one of the 
most beneficial and useful activities for future 
educators. 

Teaching studies were not all that the 
College offers, as many of the specializations 
within the College provided a more research 
based degree. A number of departments fo- 
cused on developing teaching techniques and 
learning strategies that could academically 
benefit and challenge students in future gen- 
erations. For those interested in education or 
children in general, the College of Education 
offers huge opportunities and resources for 
study and academic growth. 



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A future teacher gi\'es a lesson to the 
young students. Future educators found 
that the Universit)' provided students 
with hands-on training. 










CHbo^^ENCiNEERINC 

FACULTY & STAFF , 
COMMITMENT AWARD 



THOSE NAMED BELOW 

ARE RECOCNIZED FOR THEIR 

EmSoiNARY DEDICATION 

.AND COMMITMENT TO THE 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

jEAN L. BECKMANN 

ROBERT B. BECKMANN 

MARILYN R. BERMAN 

JOHN L.BRYAN 

LEE D. DAVISSON 

GEORGE E. DIETER 

DANrtL L. GARBER 

ALFRED GESSOW 

DONALD S. GROSS 

ROBERT O. HARCER 

HARRY E. HICKEY 

YIH-YLTN HSU 
GEORGE R. IRWIN 
JOHN W. JACKSON 
HUNG C LIN 
JOSEPH M. MARCHELLO 
JAMES H. PUGSLEY 
VICTOR G. RINKER 
CLIFFORD L. SAYRE, JR. 
A. WILEY SHERWOOD 
CHARLES A. SHREEVE, JR. 
JOSEPH SILVERMAN 
DAVID E. SIMONS 
REDFIELD W ALLEN 
KAZYS K. ALMENAS 
BARBARA h; AYCOCK 
EVERETT C CARTER . 
RICHARD DUFFEY 
CHARLES R. HAYLECK, JR. 
WILBERT J. HUFF 
ARTHUR N. JOHNSON 
ROBERT M. RAGAN 




Ik: beautitu! fountain located in tront of 

■;;j peering building acknowledges 

i oils made by faculty mem- 





The Engineering building is one 
of- the largest spanning 1,500 acres 
across the University of Maryland 
campus. 



A student displays his project 
Many projects were designed tc 
make students research a topi( 
prior to making the invention. 



Using everyday material, a student 
displays his project. Not every 
project required expensive materi- 
als. 



Leaders 



in the 



Making 



One of the top rated en- 
gineering schools in the 
nation, the A. James 
Clark School of Engi- 
neering offers eleven 
programs for undergraduate students 
and thirteen for graduate students 
focusing on design-oriented learning. 
Two of these programs have been cus- 
tomized for working professionals and 
one is a certification program. 

The graduate programs in the 
Clark School are rising the fastest in 
ranking for the nation in U.S. News 
and World Report's rating of graduate 
programs. 

The Clark School of Engineer- 
ing offers emphasis within the majors 
on subjects such as Communications, 
Networking, Systems Engineering, 



and Aerospace Engineering as just a 
few. With offerings such as these it 
has been a surprise to no one that the 
school has become one of the top in 
the nation for the fast paced new gen- 
eration of engineers. 

The Clark School of Engineer- 
ing has excelled significantly in na- 
tional competitions. The school has 
proudly been awarded top-three spots 
or honorable mentions for building 
energy-efficient vehicles, jousting ro- 
bots, microprocessor applicants, and 
digital signal processing solutions. 

The edge-cutting research pro- 
vided within the college gave sttidents 
the opportunity to attack real-world 
problems, build their own companies, 
and interact in a globally-focused envi- 
ronment. 



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Students took advantage ot the 
programs the College ot Health 
and Human Performance offered 
at the Campus Recreation Center. 




The Health and Human Perfor- 
mance building provided students 
with numerous classes from aero- 
bics to kinesiology. 



Doing 



the body 




ir 



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Many students learned workout 
techniques and dietary habits to 
benefit their daily lifestyle in the 
college environment. 



Good 



The College of Health and Hu- 
man Performance is one of the 
highest ranking of its kind in 
the entire world. Faculty for the 
College have served on research 
journals and have authored numerous text- 
books. The excellent faculty staff contributed 
to building programs, creating research facili- 
ties, and challenging students academically. 

In addition, a number of opportuni- 
ties are available for students who wanted to 
gain research-oriented experience or hands- 
on training in a specific field. Each year, 
more than 18,000 weighted student credits 
are provided by the nationally renowned 
research centers and laboratories. 

The College gives students the 
chance to gain a Bachelor's of Science degree 
in Kinesiology, Family Studies, and Public 
and Communitv Health. Located near the 



Campus Recreation Center, the Health and 
Human Performance building is the home 
for all students who have a major within the 
college. 

The College says its main goals is 
"to contribute to the elevation of the human 
race and human existence through the study 
of health, aging, families and human move- 
ment, through the creating and development 
of interventions against life-style risk factors, 
and through the promotion of human health" 
(http://www.hhp.umd.edu/). 

National recognition, award-winning 
facult)' members, state-of-the-art research 
facilities, community service activities, and 
determined students all contribute to the suc- 
cess of the College. Students who choose this 
College to earn their degree from embody 
this goal with pride and work hard to keep it 
alive. 



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Recovering from an injur)', a student pays 
a visit to the physical therapist who helps 
him regain motion and flexibilit\' in his 



. .^irill College of Jv^^xiialisr 




The televisions located at the entrance 
of the Journalism building broadcast dif- 
iv-rciit news shows reminding students of 
possible careers in Journalism. 






Thomas Kunkel, Dean 

Phillip Merrill College of Journal 



Various publications are posted on 
a wall inside the Journalism build- 
ing. Other publications helped 
students learn writing techniques. 



Located on the mall, the Journal- 
ism building is where many mem- 
bers of the college can be found 
throughout the day. 



W>rld class Media 



T 



he Phillip Merrill College 
of Journalism gives stu- 
dents a chance to prepare 
themselves for careers in 



newspapers, magazmes, 
TV broadcasting, radio broadcasting, 
and online news publications. The 
College offers students opportunities 
to gain experience through the Capital 
News Service, UMTV, the University 
of Maryland radio station, The Ameri- 
can Journalism Review, as well as other 
on campus reporting at sports games 
and other on camptis events. 

Although it is not officially a 
University publication, many of the 
Diamondback writers are members of 
the Phillip Merrill College of Journal- 
ism and gain a great understanding of 
the professional world of newspaper 



writing, editing, and photography. 

In the past twenty years, the 
Phillip Merrill College of Journalism 
has become one of the nation's lead- 
ing schools in journalism. Students 
within the college are not only granted 
access to the latest technologies, but 
also receive top-notch job training for 
jobs after college. Recent graduates 
have gone on to work for The New 
York Times, CNN, and The Washingtoji 
Post. Perhaps the most famous alumni 
of the College of Journalism is Con- 
nie Chung who has become a world- 
renowned broadcast journalist. The 
Phillip Merrill College of Journalism 
not only offers its students a superior 
education, but the tools to make it 
in one of the most competitive career 
fields. 



Acfldem-Lcs 



SS 




A student observes yeast cells under 
a high powered microscope. Many 
laboratory experiments consisted 
of viewing microscopic organisms. 




Two lab partners carefully mix a 
solution to determine the effect 
of a chemical and light on photo- 
synthesis. 




A life science major discusses his 
current courses and his future goals 
with the Dean of Life Sciences, Dr. 
Norma Allewall. 



Heart of Life 



The College of Life Sci- 
ences strives to develop a 
program allowing students 
to be part of the outstand- 
ing research and discover- 
ies among the subjects. Educational 
programs in fundamental and basic 
chemistry and biology have helped cre- 
ate the distinguished college. 

The College collaborates with 
other life science programs including 
the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore (UMAB), the University of 
Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), 
the Center for Environmental Sciences 
(CES) and the University of Maryland 
Biotechnology Institute (UMBI). 

With the proximity of numer- 
ous federal agencies, students within 
the College of Life Sciences have the 



ability to experience a career in re- 
search or in medicine. The National 
Institute of Health, the Food and 
Drug Administration, the National 
Science Foundation, and the National 
Institute for Standards and Technol- 
ogy all focus on issues dealing with life 
sciences. With increased funding and 
advanced research, the University of 
Maryland has constructed a number of 
state-of-the-art teaching and research 
laboratories. 

The College of Life Sciences 
has an impressive core of accomplish- 
ments, ambitious faculty, strong un- 
dergraduate programs, and excellent 
research programs housed within the 
Departments of Biology, Cell Biology 
& Molecular Genetics, Chemistry & 
Biochemistry, and Entomology. 



JH^ ujA^dWidtd 




n microbiolog)' lab, the students pertorm 
experiments to test the growth of bacteria 
on different t)'pes of media depending on 
nutritional content. 



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MDTIVATinN • HD 







• HELPFUL • INSPIRATION • LEADERS • BDALS • [iPMMITMEgr • SUCCESS 



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WMUC Radio, Project 
Sunshine, Reformed Uni- 
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Taiwanese American Stu- 
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Crew, Surf Club, Taal Inter- 
national Dance, Trail Club 




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Skydiving Team 







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OrgniA4.zatt,otA-s 225 



M.iA.-fi>rget±«bLe 




In retrospect, what is the college experience to the 
Class of 2004? College could easily be marked by the 
tornado that hit North Campus, the Duke riots, the 
sniper attacks, and massive budget cuts and tuition 
hikes. However, experiencing college is much more than high 
profile events: it's ordering Cluck-U at two in the morning, 
puking on the Circuit, or skipping studying to get dollar bot- 
tles with your buddies. It's the all-nighters you pulled running 
off massive quantities of caffeine, the trips to Kinko's, and 
the kid in your discussion that won't stop asking questions. 
It's making lifelong friends from your fraternity, sorority, or 
those you met in your dorm freshman year. But most impor- 
tantly, college provides you with a base on which to build a 
future. College opens doors you never thought possible, and 
opens your eyes to the rest of the world. College allows you 
to find your passion, pursue it, and excel at it. These are the 
things that truly make the four last years uiA^-forc^tttable. 




Dema Abdo 
Computer Science 



Adenike Adepoju 
Accounting 

Ig| Ki^f orgettfl ble 



Raolat Abdulai 
Biology 



Bukhari Abdulbarr 
Criminal Justice 



Ryan Abel 
Government & Politics 




Merly Acosta 


Alano Acuna 


Nancy Adams 


Ajibike Adeniyi 


Spanish 


Criminal Justice 


Cell & Molecular Biology & 
Genetics 


Dietetics 




Seema Ahmed 
Biological Individualized Stud- 
ies: Cognitive Neuroscience 



-if 




^ 



Zain Ahmed 
Computer Engineering 



Taryn Ahnert 
Communication 




Mary Ajetunmobi 
Accounting 



Jeanne Akanbi 
English 




Renee Alexander 
Communication 



Jessica Alford 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 




Hawaa Almansouri 
Neurobiology & Psychology 



Adam Altman 
Finance 



All AM 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 



David Amdur 
Philanthropy Management 




Aliya Amitra 
Decision Information Science / 
Operation Quality Management 



Eugenia Amponsah 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Thomas Anderson 
Economics 



Jennifer Anselmo 
Government & Politics 




Kerem Atalay 
Structural Engineering 



Jason Atkinson 
Mechanical Engineering 



L^iA-forgettnloLe 





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Nandar Aung 
Accounting 



Jacqueline Ayersman 
Logistics, Transportation & 
Supply Chain Management 



Seog Bae 
Economics 



Afton Baft 
Communication 




Chernor Bah Paul Ungkun Baik 

Government & Politics Economics 



Carolyn Baker 
Elementary Education 



Jill Bakerman 
Elementary Education 




James Bales 
Marketing 



Matthew Balkam 
Aerospace Engineering & 

P|-:, • ■ 



Seth Balkanyi 
Finance 



Veree Bampoe-Addo 

Physical Sciences 





Debra Baxter 


Kelly Bean 


Christi Beaton 


Bonnie Beckham 


Elementary Education 


Mathematics & Secondary 
Mathematics Education 


Psychology 


Education 




cmily Beckstrom 
; nematlcs & Economics 



Edward Beksinski Jr 
Aerospace Engineering 



Melisa Bell 

Environmental Science 

Policy 





Alison Beltz Edward Bempong 

Government & Politics History 






Gloria Benedict 
Information System 



Stephanie Benjamin 
Criminal Justice 



Stephen Bennett 
Marketing 



Ana Bento 
Computer Engineering 




Alicia Bertles 

Cell Biology & Molecular 

Genetics 



Monica Bethea 
Communication 



Ziad Beydoun 
Electrical Engineering 



Maria Bhatti 
Civil Engineering 



c^raduatts. ass 




Nadia Bitihari 
Finance 



Michelle Blackman 
Marketing 



Brandy Blackwell 
Family Studies 



James Blair 
Physiology & Neurobiology 




Justin Boss 
Computer Science 



Keira Boyce Stefan Bradham 

Physiology & Neurobiology Marketing & International 

Business 



Matthew Bradley 
Government & Politics 



P|3|]i] 



Suzanne Bradley 
Finance 



Michael Brady II 
Criminal Justice 



David Braggins 
Finance 



Cynthia Brandt 
General Business 




Ryan Braud 
Computer Science 



Kim Breitenother 
General Business 



Terence Brennan Deanna Bridge 

Criminal Justice Physiology & Neurobiology 




Emanuel Briggs 
African American Studies 



Dominic Britti 
Physics 



Teresa Broadnax Justin Brodersen 

Mechanical Engineering Finance & Economics 




Ian Brooks Ketreia Brooks Chanel Brown 

Electrical Engineering Sociology & Social Psychology Criminal Justice 



Walter Brown 
Economics 



qrndu.«tes 235" 




Angela Browning 
Communication 



Eric Buchner 
Microbiology 



Stefany Bruce 
Economics 



Angela Bryl Krystina Brzoska 

Biological Resources Engineering Biological Resources Engineering 




Jen Buhr 
Logistics, Transportation & Supply 
Chain Management / Operations 



Bryan Bukowski 
Finance & Accounting 



Tatum Bullock 
Criminal Justice 




Tia Burley LaTasha Burrell 

Aerospace Engineering Sociology 



Lawrence Butler 
Mechanical Engineering 



Nyree Bynoe 
Communication 




Maria Angela Cabugao 
Economics 



Kristen Caha 
Business 



Fritz Calderon 
Economics 



Joshua Caplan 
History / Government & Politics 




Raecheal Carter Allison Casal 

Finance / Operations & Quality Criminology & Cnminal Justh 



Management 



Kimberly Cashwell 
Psychology 



Jonathan Catania 
Architecture 



Anne Catherwood 
Animal Science 



Anthony Cavallo 
Electrical Engineering 



Catherine Cervantes 
Architecture 



Anton Cervenak 

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution 

Systematics 



Angela Chan 
Criminology 



Patricia Castellanos 
Chemistry 




Lauren Cayuela 
Government & Politics 




Hoi Wing Chan 
Studio Art 



^rfldu-fltes zsyMl 




Jeffrey Cfiase 
Theatre 



Chloe Chavardes 



Maria Chaves jajme Cheret 

Government & Politics Marl<eting / American Cultures, Criminology 

Business Spanish 




Monica Chetelat 



Eugenia Cho 



Austin Chow 



Lawrence Chow 



Public & Community Health Elementary Education Criminology & Criminal Justice Computer Engineering 



/ French 




Tamika Clark 
General Biology 



Jason Clarkson 
Elementary Education 



Tim Cline 
Computer Science 



Andrea Cohen 
Journalism & Sociology 



g|uiiA.forget±flble 




Susannah Cohen 
American Studies 



Crista Colvin 

Government & Politics / 

Dietetics 






Chanelie Cohen Hoble Cohen 

Individual Studies / English Electrical Engineering 




Matt Colella 
Government & Politics 



John Collins Matthew Collins 

Mechanical Engineering Animal Science 




Elvira Concepcion 

Economics 



Carise Conner 
Elementary Education 



Christian Conti-Vock 
Computer Science 



Erin Connolly 
Sociology 




Kashmira Contractor Lino Contreras Veronica Cooney 

Information Systems Geographical Information Sys- Public & Community Health 

tems & Spanish 

^rcidw.ntes 23^ 




Rebecca Corby 
Elementary Education 



Megan Corey Amy Costanzo Jonathon Costenbader 

Business; Intormation Systems, Government & Politics / Crimi- Physical Education 

Logistics & SCM nal Justice & Criminology 




Jessica Cramer 


Lindsay Cromarty 


Dalissa Cruz 


Tabatha Cuadra 


Psychology 


English 


Information Systems & 
International Business 


Psychology & Criminal Justice 




Xiao Xiao Cui 
Economics 

juct^forgettflbLe 



Margaret Cunningham 
Women's Health 



Stephen Currence 
Communication 



Jeanne Cusati 
Family Studies 




Sarah Dammeyer 

English & Secondary English 

Education 



Jennie Dang 
International Business 



David Dao Kevin Darmody 

Computer Science & Studio Art Fire Protection Engineering 




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Tara De Siano 
Microbiology 



Phillip De Souza 

Government & Politics / 

Spanish 



1 







Edward Dean 
Econonnics 

P 




Sarah Del Aguila 



Anton Paolo Del Mundo 
Computer Science 



Alicia Del Valle 
Criminology & Psychology 



Isoke DeLeon 
Biology & Psychology 



Elizabeth Delgado 
Family Studies 




Katy Deljoui 
Biology 



Mingmin Deng jara Dennis 

Information Systems Operations Finance 

& Quality Mangement 





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Hayley Derris 
iring & Speech Science 

jUiyuforgettflloLe 



Bhavna Dhir 
Information Systems 



Casey Diaz 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 




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Laura DiCamillo 
Family Studies 



Daniel Dimuro 
Finance 



Christina Dinunzio 
Finance & Spanish 



Anthony DiSabatino 
Economics 




Luther Dismel 
Criminal Justice 



Sarah Dobson 
Psychology 



Jose Dory 

Geographical Information 

Systems 



Claire Dougherty 
English Literature 



4 




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1 




4, 



Gabriels Doyle 
Government 8< Politics 



James Doyle 
Criminal Justice 



Christina Dreisch 

Family Studies & American 

Studies 



Kai Duan 
Economics 




Garrett Ducker 
Social Psychology 



Jade Duell 
Criminal Justice 



William Dulany 
Marketing 



Shani Duncan 

Marketing & International 

Business 



S43 .1 

— ^1 




Sherron Duncan 
Criminology 



Alan Dupski 
Accounting & Finance 



Lucas Durney 
Philosophy & Spanish 



Michelle Edelen 
Spanish Language & Literature 




Marc Eimer Kevin Eisenhower Vanessa Eluma 

Marketing Aerospace Engineering Psychology / Criminology & 



Criminal Justice 



Andrew Emeka-Ugwuh 
Computer Engineering 




Christopher Endozo 
Finance & Logistics 



Kenechukwu Enekebe Branden Engorn 

Physiology & Neurobiology Physiology & Neurobiology 



John Epps 
Economics 



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Brian Epstein 
Mechanical Engineering 



Sara Epstein 
Business IVlarketing 



Mehrnoosh Eshraghi 
Psychology 



Erin Eskay 
History & Secondary Education 




Michele Fernheimer 
Accounting 



Tracey Ferraro 
English 



Ryan Ferrera 
Government & Politics 



Nathaniel Fink 
Psychology & Criminology 



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Sherri Finkel 
Early Childhood Education 



Timothy Fischer 
Education & History 



Gregory Fisher 
Finance 



Rachel Fisher 
Art History 




Ryan Fisher 
Physics & Atronomy 



Jean Fitzmaurice 
Kinesiology 



Jessica Flaggs 
History & Education 



Stephanie Flaherty 
Communication 




Craig Floyd 
Computer Engineering 



Megan Forbes 
Journalism 



LaTasha Ford 
Communication 



Alexander Forero 
Computer Science 




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Tynell Francis 
General Biology 



Laura Franz 
Criminal Justice 



Eric Erase 
Environmental Science 




Jennifer Friedman 
Psychology 



William Fuenteyilla 

Environmental Science 

Policy 



Sonja Gaines 
Gis-Computer Cartography 



Scott Friedman 
Finance, Economics & 
International Business 



Justin Fry 
Marketing & Psychology 



Rosa Fuentes-Servellon 
Spanish Language & Literature 




Casey Fuller 
Mechanical Engineering 



Nicholas Fung 
Electrical Engineering 



Parambir Gadiock 
Physiology & Neurobiology 




Courtney Caliber 
Landscape Architecture 



Kendal Galiber 
Spanish 



Jessica Galie 
Mechanical Engineering 



graduates o.-^-y- 




Jessica Galipeau 
Community Health 



Michelle Gardner 
Accounting 



James Geronimo 
Finance 



Jillian Gibbs 
Communication 



Serena Galloway 
Family Studies & Psychology 



Ashish Gambhir 

Finance & Information 

Management 



Mandy Ganis 
Film Studies 




Diana Garrett 
Public Relations 



Miryan Gastanaga 
Family Studies 



Matthew Gershman 
Business 



Matthew Gessner 
Combined Agriculture & 
Pre-Veterinary Science 



Margaret Gilford 
Family Studies 



Jennifer Gill 
Communication 



Terri Gay 
Family Studies 




Paulette Giambalvo 
Family Studies 




Christine Gilliard 
Physical Education 




James Gimourginas 
Computer Engineering 



Lindsay Glvens 
Communication 



Aida Gizabi 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Matttiew Glanzer 
Mechanical Engineering 




Regine Gnago 


Timothy Goff 


David Goldberg 


Lynda Goldberg 


Accounting 


Computer Science 


English Education 


Cell Molecular Biology & 
Genetics 




Scott Goldberg Stephanie Golden Claire Goldschmidt 

International Business / Hearing & Speech Sciences Zoology 

Government & Politics 



Justin Goldstein 
Geographic Information 
Systems & Geography 




Diana Gomes Ronald Gonzaga 

Information System Electrical Engineering 



Thamar Gonzalez-Kaufman 
Psychology 



Theresa Goodlatte 
Dietetics 



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Vimal Gopal Yevgeniya Gorbacheva 

Computer Engineering Communication & Criminology 



Teresa Gorgone 
Economics 



Heather Graf 



David Greenwald 
Genetics 



Akiesha Gray 



General Agriculture Criminology & Criminal Justice 



Jason Greenberg 
Finance 



Allyson Gregory 
Electrical Engineering 



Kristen Grinager 
French & Spanish 



Evin Gossin 
Elementary Education 




Daniel Greenstein 
Economics 




Harold Groves 
Economics & Criminal Justice 




Reda Hachani 
International Business 




Rosanna Haddad 
Communication 



Leah Haga 
Astronomy 



Holly Hagerman 
Communication 



Arssema Hagos 
English 




Rena Hahn 

Finance & Decision Information 

Systems 



Hilena Hailu 
Computer Science 



Kelly Haisfield 
Marine Biology & Marketing 



Dennis Hale 
Electrical Engineering 




Erin Halferty 
Aerospace Engineering 



Colin Hamill 
Computer Science 



Michele Hamilton 
English / Government & Politics 



April Hammer 
English 







Stacy Hankin 
Marketing & Logistics 



Kristen Hanlon 
Communication 



Sabna Hardy 
Psychology 



Nahdia Harrington 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



C(radu.atts. asi 




Takara Hay ward 
Kinesiology 



Allison Healy 
Logistics, Transportation, & Supply 
Chain Management /General B 



Monica Healy 

Cell Biology & Molecular 

Genetics 



Jay Devito Heckman 
Communication 




Tiffany Hein 
^ysiology & Neurobiology 



Emily Heinlein Spanish 



Jonathan Helfgott Cell Biology Craig Heller Finance 

& Molecular Genetics 



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Sam Hellerman Colleen Hellman 

Aerospace Engineering Logistics & Transportation 



Nicole Hennig 
Early Childhood Education 



Christopher Henrickson 
Architecture 




Ann-Marie Herda 
Mechanical Engineering 



Paula Herda 
Aerospace Engineering 



Gustavo Daniel Hernandez 
Psychology 



Rebecca Hernandez 
Marketing & Spanish 




Michael H 
Computer Engineering 



Jeffrey Ho 
Economics 



Labelle Hillgrove Sociology & 
Criminology 



Meleney Hines 
Criminal Justice 



Stephanie Hirsch 

Marketing. Logistics. Transportation ; 

Supply Cham Management 



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Willis Ho 
Computer Science & Finance 



Patricia Hobday 
Economics 



Sheera Hobfoll 
Political Science 

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Ross Hoffman 
Marketing 



Maureen Holland Scott Hollander 

Mathematics - Statistics Marketing & Logistics & Supply 



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Charles Hollman 
Communication 




Rosa Honarpishen 
Sociology 



Erin Horgan 
Marketing & Economics 



Erin Horn 
Spanish Literature 







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Carmella House 


Gerad House 


Lauren House 


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Astronomy & History 


Mechanical Engineering 


Kinesiology 


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Melissa House 
Journalism 



Heather Houston 
Biological Resources Engineering 



Timothy Hoy 
Mechanical Engineering 



Heather Huntington Roshan Hussein Narja Hylton 

Mathematics & Secondary Criminology & Criminal Justice Information Systems 

Education / Communication Accounting 



Brian llowite 
General Business & Criminology 



Aileen Hoyle 
Family Studies 




Grace Sophia Igot 
Art History 






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Rachel Interrante 

International Business 

& Finance 


Debby Iny 
Psychology 


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Farahnaz Irani 
Communication 



Daniel Isenberg Barbara Iserson 

Psychology & Criminal Justice Hearing & Speech Sciences 




Leemu Jackson 
Kinesiology 



Rene Jackson 
Public & Community Health 




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Criminal Justice 



Syed Jahangir 
Computer Science 




Noah Jampol 
English & English Education 



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Allison Jarvis 
Psychology 






Nick Jathar 
Finance 



Kristopher Jeffers 
History & Education 



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Finance 



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Ying Jiang 



Audra Johnson 
Accounting 



Christine Johnson 
English 



Erin Johnson 
Psychology & Art 




Michelle Johnson 
Community Health 



Stephanie Johnson 
American Studies 



Richard Johnson IV 
History 



Celia Jones 
Kinesiological Sciences 




Jennifer Jones 
Psychology 



Lisa Jones 
Family Studies 



Kevin Joyce 
Marketing & Logistics 



Guillermo Juarezdiaz 
International Business, Logistics, 
Transportation & Supply Chain 




Britney Jung 
Elementary Education 



Ginalyn Junio 
Communication 



Hakiser Kahsay 
Economics 



Ali Kalarestaghi 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 



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Ivonne Kalinski 
Communication 



Erin Kane 
Cell Biology & Molecular Ge- 



Matthew Kapelanczyk 
Mechanical Engineering 



Adam Kaplan 
English / Government & Politics 




Abidemi Kassim 
inematics - Statistics 



Sean Kates 
Government & Politics 



Jaime Katzman 
Elementary Education 



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Finance 



Diana Kempson 
Elementary Education 



Yulia Khabinsky 
Journalism / Government 
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Finance, Accounting & Economics 



Ji Kim 
Accounting 



Jun Kim 
Finance 



Maria Kim 
Computer Science 




Sherri King 
Sociology 



Courtney Kirk 
Communication 



Patricia Kirsch 
Computer Engineering 



Miriam Kirschenbaum 
Communication 



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Rebecca Knauer 
Spanish Translation 



Vincent Knight 
Economics 



Jared Kogler 
Economics 



Rachel Knopf 
Psychology 



Matthew Koerner 
Animal Sciences 






Joseph Koicim 
Finance 




Zahra Kolahdouzan Shade Bintun Koletowo 

Physiology & Neurobiology Accounting & Logistics 




Allan Kosiner 
History 



Alexis Kotarba Nathan Koterba 

Government & Politics / Computer Engineering 

Economics 



Christine Kousin 
Finance 











Christian Kramer 
Economics 



Jonathan Krochmal Elliot Kuck 

Environmental Science Criminology & Criminal Justice 



Sophia Kuziel 

Psychology / Criminology & 

Criminal Justice 



Jack Kwait-Blank 
Civil Engineering 



Steve Kwon 
Electrical Engineering 



Shayna Lampe 
Elementary Education 



Sarah Lanse 
Journalism & Jewish Studies 



Jason Larochelle 
Economics 



Danielle Kushner 
Marketing 




Jacqueline Lafleur 
Accounting 




Diana Lai 


Maria Lakas 


Joy Lam 


Wing Sze Lam 


Psychology 


Cellular Molecular Biology & 
Genetics 


Economics 


Logistics 




Carlos Andres 
Electrical Engineering 



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Maria Lasso 
International Business 



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Steven Laudenslager 
Civil Engineering 



Kelly Law 
Elementary Education 



James Lawless Jr 
Computer Engineering 




Romney Leader 
Philosophy & English 



Alicia Lee 
Communication 



Linda Lee 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Sheri Lee 
Computer Science 




Vanessa Lee Young-Hsee Lee 

Family Studies Computer Science 



Lauren Leek Rebecca Leffson 

Economics & Spanish Psychology 




lathan Lemmond 
nanical Engineering 



Michael Levine 
Criminology 



Joseph Levinson 

Environmental Science . 

Policy 



Ivanna Lewis 
Accounting & General 
Business Management 



Patrick Lewis 
Marketing 



Hulling Li 
Accounting 



Xiaolin Li 
Computer Science 




Andrew Linton 
Computer Science 



Sarah Lippy 
Psychology 



Angelica Lirette 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Courtney Litman 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 




Mark Liu 
Computer Science 



Stanley Liu 
Psychology 



Jonathan Lloyd 
Communication 



Chiaowen Lo 
Operation Quality Management 



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Matthew Loff Rachel Lohr 

Computer Science Hearing and Speech Sciences 



IVlauricio Lopez 
Anthropology 



Goldie Lucas 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 



Robin Lundberg 
Journalism 



Heather Lunsford 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Karen Luu 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Cait Lynch 
Criminal Justice 



Cara Lynch 
Environmetal Science & Policy 



Kevin Macko 
Criminology & Criminal Justice Aerospace Engineering 



Roselito Loyson 
Sociology 




Maria Luther 
Food Science 




Justin Ma 

Computer Science & 

Mathematics 




Rehman Madraswala 
Information Systems 



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Shobha Mahabir 
Economics 



David IVlaiman 
Computer Science 



Adriana Maldonado 
Anthropology 



Lisa Malkiel 

Biology - Behavior, Evolution, 

Ecology, & Systematics 




Sean Mao Christopher Mararac 

Computer Science StLidio Art 



Laury Marin 
Criminal Justice 



Kamaria Martin 
Business Finance 




Kelly Martin 
Early Childhood Education 




Neil Mayer 
Business Finance 



Jonathan McBean 



Christopher IVlcCary 
Economics 



Alexis McDonald 

Environmental Science & 

Public Policy 




Auja McDougale Ebony McFadden Combined 

Physiology & Neurobiology Agnculture - Veterinary Medicine 



Jonathon McGee Jason McGill 

Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering 




Robert Mclntyre 
jv jrnment & Politics 



David McLaughlin 
Government 



Robert McLaughlin 
Criminal Justice 



Roseanne McManus 
Government & Politics 




Keith McMullen 
Economics 



Quenesha McNair 
Frencli & International Business 



Meghan McNichol 
Criminal Justice 



Michael Meadow 
Mechanical Engineering 




Marypat Meaney 
Kinesiology 



David Means 
Landscape Architecture 



Jorgelina Medel 
Criminology & Psychology 



Anakarym Medina 
Spanish & Business 




Shirin Mehraban 
Computer Science 



Nisa Mehta 

Marketing & International 

Business 



Jeffrey Melia 
Communication 



Alison Mendoza 
Biology 





Kyoko Miki 


Paul Miklus 


Caria Miles 


Kristina Mileva 


Marketing & International 


Journalism 


Economics 


Information Systems - 


Business 






Specialization Business 




Kristine Miller 
Family Studies 



Kymberly Mills 
History 



Sean Min 

Criminology & Criminal Justice 

/ Psychology 



Carissa Minehan 
Family Studies 




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Barbara Monaco 


Robin Monheit 


Jason Monroe 


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Communication 


Journalism 


Secondary Education & 
English 


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Shanae Moody 
Kinesiology 



Jamie Moore 
Communication 



Ali Moosvi 
Computer Science 



John Morders 
Fire Protection Engineering 



Jessica Moreland 
Communication 



Sarah Morgan 
Psychology 



Jennifer Morancy 
Dietetics 




Aimee Morin 

Nutritional Science & Music 

- Flute Performance 




Amy Munro 
Psychology 




Adrian Nelson 
Art Studio 



Vital Nero 
History & International Business 



Ronald Ng 
Electrical Engineering 



Arlette Ngoubene 
Psychology 




Michael Niaki Craig Nickel Brian Niper Nkengsa Nkobena 

Biological Resources Engineering Aerospace Engineering Decision & Information Systems Decision-Making & Information 

Sciences 




Sarah Noble 
iness & Logistics 



Benjamin Nolan 
Art Studio 



Emily Nonouchi 
Art Studio & Art History 



Kathryn Noyes 
Geography 



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Carlene Nurse 
Criminal Justice 



Nonyem Nwankwo 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



June Nyanchoka 
Government & Politics 



Okwudilichuk Nzelibe 
Economics 




Blessing Okoroafor 


Ifedapo Olajide 


Brandon Oland 


Chinenye Oli 


Government & Politics 


Biochemistry 


Journalism 


Information Systems 
Accounting 




Mary Oluwatimilehin 
Dietetics & Pre-Medicine 



Damilola Omodele 
Economics 



Oludayo Onafowokan 
Accounting 



David Ong 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 



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August Ongkasuwan 
Computer Engineering 



Uchenna Onyewu 
Criminal Justice 



Ugochukwu Onyewu 
Criminal Justice 



Kyle Orland 
Computer Science & Journalism 




Adesola Osho 
Dietetics 



Jessica Otero 
Information Systems 



Victoria Otieno 
Finance 



Katrina Owens 
Marketing 




Christina Paidas 
Kinesiology 



Emily Pan 
Information Technology & 



Psychology 



Daphne Papanicolaou 
Communication 



Michael Parello 
Finance 




Christina Parisi 
Government & Politics 



Grace Park Hannah Park 

Accounting Secondary English Education 



Su Mi Park 
Psychology 



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Heather Parker 
General Biology 



Mark Parker 
History / Government & Politics 



Ricky Parker 
Criminal Justice 



Rina Partridge 
Agriculture & Natural Resources 




Maliheh Paryavi 
Economics & Finance 




Eric Paz 
Cell & Molecular Biology 



James Pineho 

Physiology & Neurobiology / 

Spanish Language & Literature 



Christopher Passavia 
Psychology 


Michelle Pasternak 
Elementary Education 


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Elementary Education 




Karen Perolman 
Jewish Studies 



Dilana Pickett 

International Business 

& Marketing 



Jason Pillet 
Physiology & Neurobiology 




Carol Pinto 
Elementary Education 



Roger Pisha II 
Mechanical Engineering 



Paige Plapas 
Communication & Art History 



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Matthew Ploor Brad Polsky 

Criminal Justice Information Systems 



Kelsey Pope 
Elementary Education 



Jeanette Porteous 
Combined Agriculture & 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 




Mary Porteous Alexander Portillo 

Physiology & Neurobiology Criminology & Criminal Justice 

/ Sociology 



Brandon Potter Narimaan Pourahmadi 

Communication Computer Engineering 







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Gabrielle Powell 

Accounting 



Teron Powell 
Public & Community Health 



Alaina Powers 
Criminal Justice 



Alicia Prager 
Special Education 




Kram Prasanna 
iology & Molecular 

Genetics 
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Jerry Prentice 
Economics 



Diana Prestileo 
Communication 



Bryan Price 
Electrical Engineering 




Heather Price Betsy Proctor 

Lab Animal Management Criminology & Criminal Justice 



Manuel Prudencio 
Civil Engineering 



James Pugh Jr 
General Biology 




Yogeeta Purohit 
Computer Engineering 



Tam Quach 
Cell Molecular Biology 



Michael Quarles 
Marketing & Logistics 



James Ragusa 
Communication 




Lauren Rajewski 
Communication 



Dorothy Ramienski 
Journalism & History 



Shelley Ramos 
Kinesiology 



Depeka Rampertaap 
Marketing & Communication 




Paul Raphel 
Communication 



Sachin Rarkhanis 
Mechanical Engineering 




Scott Reed 
Electrical Engineering 



Kristen Reese 

Communication & Criminal 

Justice 



Steven Regitsky-Xerri 
Marketing 



Rainier Regner 
Finance 




Matthew Remsberg 
Journalism 



Jonathan Reynon 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Kristin Rhoads 
Early Childhood Education 



Rachel Rich 
American Studies 




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:al Engineering 



Ronald Riley 
Chinese 



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Alvaro Rincon-Camacho 

Economics & Latin American 

Studies 



Stephen Riordon 
Electrical Engineering 



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Kathleen Ritzmann Maria Rivas 

Animal Science & General Hearing & Speech Sciences 

Agricultural Studies 



Dawn Roberto 
Economics 



Sandra Roberts 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Erica Robinson 
Community Health 



Adina Rogers 
Psychology 




Quiana Roberts 
Kinesiology 




Jessica Ronan 
Communication 




Paola Roos 

Government & Politics / 

Spanish Literature 



Robin Root Rebecca Rosen Isaac Rosenberg 

Sociology & Criminal Justice Elementary Education Marketing & Communication 




Jeffrey Rosenzweig 
Mechanical Engineering 



Nadine Rosmus 
General Biology 



Rachel Rosner 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Ross Rosner 
Spanish & Business 



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Michael Rosolio Michelle Rothman 

English Journalism 




Tova Rothman 
Art History 



Mark Rothschild 
Finance 




Manna Ruiz 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Tass Rupert 
Elementary Education 



Bianca Russell 
Criminal Justice 



Danielle Russell 
Biological Sciences 




helle Russo-Hunter 
Business 



Alice Ryan 
Aerospace Engineering 



Wendy Sabow 



Sheila Sachs 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 



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Gustavo Saguier-Meza 
Economics 



Amanda Sato 
Finance 



Greg Schardt 
Computer Engineering 



Alison Samson Jessica Samson 

Early Childhood Education Communication 



James Sbarra 



liana Schafer 
Animal Sciences 



Keith Schatt 
Communication Studies 



Daphne Schauber 

Agricultural & Resource 

Economics 






Rocio Sanchez 
International Business 




Allison Schapira 
Elementary Education 




Kara Schiess 
Psychology 

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Marc Schlesinger 
Accounting 



Matthew Schmidt 

Secondary Education / 

Mathematics 



Erik Schober 
Marketing / Logistics 
Transportation 



Peter Schoenbrodt 
Computer Engineering 



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Larissa Schramm 
Vocal Performance BM 



Elliot Schreiber 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Patrick Schroeder 
Computer Engineering 



Alison Schuster 
Sociology 




Heather Schwartz 
Journalism 



Heather Schwartz Elisha Scott 

Physiology & Neurobiology / Chminology & Criminal Justice 
Psychology 



Veronica Segovia 
Communication 




Jessica Seidel 
space Engineering 

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Andrea Seith 
Communication 



Brian Selden 
Psychology & English 



Daniel Selsky 

Marketing / Government & 

Politics 




Anne Semon 
Zoology & Psychology 



Avni Shah 
Information Systems 



Melanie Serkin 
International Business 



Jennifer Seyfried 
Criminal Justice 



Melanie Sferra 
Accounting 




Leila Shamamatdar 
Computer Science 



Jillian Shaner 
Government & Politics 



Maurice Shanks 
Criminology & Criminal Justice 




Daniel Signorini 


Jennifer Sigwart 


Catherine Sillers 


Computer Science & 


Journalism 


English Literature & English 


Psychology 




Education 



Ryan Silva 
Marketing & Logistics 



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David Simon 



Lauren Simpson 



Manpreet Singh 



Brian Bison 



Government & Politics Hearing & Speech Sciences Finance & Entrepreneurship Mechanical Engineering 




Anna Slutskiy 
Biology & Psychology 



Adam Small 
Accounting 



Ahnna Smith 



Lydia Smith 



Government & Politics Landscape Management 




Patnck Smith 
Finance 



Laura Smithers 

Government & Politics / 



Abear Snober 

Economics 



Voaranee Soepiapto 
Kinesiology 




Bret Sohn 
■ iology & Neurobiology 



Obatemi Somide 
Computer Engineering 



Olubukola Somide 
Computer Science 



liana Sommer 

Individual Studies in Social 

Urbanism 




Olufemi Sonde 
Electrical Engineering 



Nicholas Spivak 
Chemical Engineering 



Molly Sonenklar 
Jewish Studies 



Pa Ra Song 
Marketing / Government . 



Joann St. John 

Elementary Eriucation 



Kathleen St.Villier 
History & Women Studies 



Beth Ashley Staples 


Eric Stehmer 


Erin Steinberg 


Logistics, Transportation & 


History 


Marketing 


Supply Chain Management / 






Internatio 







Abiola Sotola 
Information Systems 




Andrea Sparks 


Megan Sparks 


Michael-Sean Spence 


Aviva Spetgang 


Physiology & Neurobiology 


Finance. Logistics & 
Transportation 


Marketing 


Communication 




Daniel Stamm 

Broadcast Journalism 

Criminal Justice 




Laurie Stern 
Psychology 



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Michael Summers 
Mechanical Engineering 



Talin Surabian 

Cell Molecular Biology 

Genetics 



Melissa Sweeney 
Physical Education 



Jamie Syetta 
Elementary Education 



Julie Szeles 
General Biology 



Thomas Swindell 
Electrical Engineering 




Harold Tagunicar 
Computer Engineering 



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Ariel Teichman 
Psychology 



Elie Teichman 

Individual Studies / Philosophy 

of Human Existence 



Jewel Terry 

Psychology / Criminology & 

Criminal Justice 

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Erin Thomas 
Communication 



Jeff Thomas 
Information Systems / Opera- 
tions & Quality Management 



Bridgette Thompson 
Criminal Justice 



Courtney Thompson 
Psychology 




Gregory Tindale 
Government & Politics 



Erin Tindell 
Journalism 



EricTopor 

Government & Politics / 

Economics 




Brett Torgan 
Economics 



Melissa Tororiello 
Psychology 



Rania Traiforos 
Logistics, Transportation, & Supply 



Chain Management / Marketing 



Robert Trialonas 
History 




Raymond Trodden 
Spanish 



Thomas Trodden 
Kinesiology 



Manssa Troeschel 
Theatre Performance 



Scott Troise 




Chelsey Trowbridge 
Journalism 



Amy Truckenmiller 
Mathematics & Math Education 



Margaret Tsai 
Computer Science 



Danita Tucker 
Public & Community Health 




''atthew Tucker 
- vanical Engineering 



Soe Tun 
Computer Science 



Maria Victoria Tupal 
Linguistics 



Judith Turk 




RyanTurnbull 
Computer Science 



Lindsey Urbaniak 
Communication 



Benjamin Vanderlioof 
Marketing 



Marcella Vergillo 
English 



Timothy Twilliger 
Computer Engineering 



Isonguyo Udoka Chidinma Ukoha 

Computer Science Computer Engineering 




Jorge Urrutia 
Community Health 



Shivram Vaideeswaran 
Marketing & Logistics 



William Valencia 

Mathematics & Computer 

Science 




Manamma Varghese Rachel Vas Urvi Ved 

Information Systems Government & Politics / History Cellular & Molecular Biology 

Genetics 




Pamela Victoria 
Economics 



Christian Videla 
Communication 



Steven Vigilante 
Marketing & Logistics 



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Jose Antonio Villalobos 
Government & Politics 



Aye Vines 
Criminology 



Brianne Virgona Lavanya Viswanathan 

Hearing & Speech Sciences Physiology & Neurobiology / 

Anthropology 




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sneral Biology 



Amy Wang Sizhu Wang 

Criminology & Criminal Justice Transportation & Logistics 



Yiyi Wang 
Finance & Decisions 



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Takisha Watson 
Communication 



Stephen Weickert 
Civil Engineering 



Lisa Warmbrand 
Dietetics 




Michael Weaker 
Mechanical Engineering 



Elizabeth Webster 
Art 



Marguerite Weese 
Marketing & Criminal Justice 




Justin Weinstein 
Public & Community Health 



Sarit Weisburd 
Mathematics & Economics 



Danielle Weiss 
American Studies 



CfY-aduates ai^M 




Laura Weiss 
Communication 



James White 
Computer Science 



Jessica Wieder 
Public Relations 



Sarah Welt 



Kevin Wheeler 
Electrical Engineering 



Wendy Whitcomb 
Business Logistics 




Michelle White 
Microbiology 



Sarah White Katreena Whitted 

English Biology 




Surath Wijetunga 
Finance Logistics 



MarkWilhelm 
General Business 



Julia Williams 
Communication 



Meghan Williams 
Kinesiology 



David Williams 
Criminal Justice 




Michelle Williams 
Communication 



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Ryan Williams 
Psychology & Criminal Justice 



Sharlene Williams 
Electrical Engineering 



Renee Williamson 
Communication 



Shanice Williford 
Criminal Justice 




Sherma Winston 
Chemistry 



Brian Wint 
Computer Science 



Elsa Wong 
Marketing & Logistics 



John Wong 
Decisions & Logistics 



<^ra dilates 



Q^±\ 




Xiu Li Xu 
Physiology & Neurobiology 



Trin Xue 
Computer Science 



Reinaldo Yano 
Mechanical Engineering 



Chiu Yeung 
Computer Science & Mathematics 



Amy Vim 
Elementary Education 



Chi-Young Yim 
Information Systems 



Jessica Yaquiant 
Communication 




Seung-Hynn Yoo 
Computer Science 




athryn Yorde 


Tanya Young 


James Yu 


Shing Yuen 


Finance 


Finance 


Cell Biology & Molecular 
Genetics 


Criminal Justice 


iiAiA^forgcttabLe 










Stacey Zabusky 
Family Studies 



Janelle Zamore 
Chemical Engineering 



Alexis Zeiden 
Government & Politics 



Sarine Zenian 
Economics 




Daniela Zeppos 
Spanish & German 



Mane Ziesat 

Physiology & Neurobiology/ 

Spanish 



David Zizmor 
Accounting 



Seth Zonies 
Biochemistry 




Lloyd Zygler 

Information Systems & 

Business 



Daniel Zytnick 
Information Systems 



CyY-adi^-atts. 



2^31 



«T 



\ 





^ertusenA.eiA;ts 




# }/ 




Congratulations to the 

' Class of 2004! 



Take your credit union 

I membership with you< 

Build a better life with SECU Credit Union. As the state's largest credit 



union, bbv^U can help you save money 

Need a checking account? 

We have Free Checking with 



nontniv minim 



Savins for a home? 



money market accoi 



Buvine a car? 



Want 24-hour account access? 
Use Online Banking anytime. 



iw and used car: 



m 



To join or appl. 



, call 1-866-876-7744 (toll-free) or 410-487-7744, 



University of Maryland students, alumni, faculty and staff are eligible to join SECU Credit Union. 
$10 in a Share Savings account opens your SECU membership. S25 to open a checking account. 



vgrti-sei^eiA-ts 



ne>v era 




We're 
meeting a 



head-on 



C Do you have the energy? J 



We're changing the way the power industry 
does business. Now we're providing more than 
electricity and embracing new technologies. 

Now, you can make your mark with the most 
progressive team in the industry And you'll be 
amply rewarded. With generous health plan, 
tuition paid up-front and directly to the 
school, a pension plan, a 401 (K) 
* with matching funds, paid holidays 

and vacation. 

Areas of opportunity include: 

• Information Technology 
• Accounting/Financial 
• Electrical Engineering 



You'll love Washington, D.C., too. It's more than the seat 
of government. It's an area packed with night spots, 
entertainment and sports that complement the cultural 
and historic attractions. 

Ready to lead the revolution? For our Washington, D.C.- 

area positions, please visit our 

Web site at careers-pepco.com. 

Or, call our Job Announcement Line toll-free at: 

866-237-3726. 



pepco 



Change the world. 

Or at least the impact of Its 
Information technologies. 

We know. You have the energy and the ambition to set the world on its ear. May we suggest starting with its more interesting 
I.T. challenges. How do you find them? You join one of Fortune® magazine's 100 Best Companies To Work For 

(recognized for the fourth year in a row!). ..and a 25-year leader in information technology (I.T.) services and solutions. 


At SRA, you will contribute to serving top You may qualify with a Bachelor's degree in one of these areas: 
government clients in national security, . Computer Science • Electrical Engineering 
healthcare/public health, and civil government . information Systems • Computer Engineering 
markets. You will en.bidce a broad range of . Environmental Sciences • or other related fields 

I.T. services mcludmg strategic consultmg, 

system design/development/integration, and Certain positions may require citizenship and/or eligibility for various 

outsourcing/operations management. We levels of U.S. Government security clearance. 

offer business solutions for text/data mining. , , , ^ ,, 

,. /J- t 1 For additional information, please contact a member of the College 
contmgency/disaster response planning, „ Z. r,. r ^m ■>■»>• 
■ , \. J 1 ■ Re ations team at college@sra.com. Pease reference CPUM04 
information assurance, and enterprise , .. ,., , .^ -^ i „,,,= , r^m 
systems manage ii ill ^ responding. We are an equal opportunity employer, M/F/D/V. 


50 LI P HI ST DRY. 


lij^ 


^^^^^^^^^^^f R5. 


S 


>ra.coiii 



Ac(vertLsekVLeiA.ts 



^JJ 




^ 



Alk'i gi jJuiiiion, do W'U want to work for an employer who is coinmilled to healthcare educa- 
tion and prolessional advancement? Would you like to explore real possibilities that offer you a 
better balance of career and lifestyle? We have the answer at Suburban Hospital. We can give 
\ou the opportunity to locus on a continuum of career options and have the flexibility you're 
looking for. Here, promises made are promises kept. 

We're also one of Montgomery County's premier community hospitals and affiliated with presti- 
sous organizations such as National institutes of Health and lohns Hopkins, offering a direct 
fink to highly specialized procedures and innovative research programs. A Level II Trauma 
Center with heliport, exceptional clinical and nursing talent, and a suburban location that is close 
to the University of Maryland campus and access off 1-495 offer the right cotnbination to inspire 
your best work. 

We invite you to explore your future with us! 

For a complete list of opportunities and position details, visit our website at; 

www.suburbanliospital.org 
^ SUBURBAN HOSPITAL 

^-''^ Healthcare System 

■^l' , Suburban Hospital. 8600 Old Georgetown Road, Bethesda. MD 20814 



.._,„. Sffif""^ 



■^r^ 







Providence Hospital, the oldest continuously operating non- 
profit hospital in the Nation's Capitol, was founded by the 
Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul in 1861. Providence 
Hospital, accredited by JCAHO, is comprised of a 408-bed 
acute/general hospital and a 240-bed Nursing Home and 
Rehabilitation Center. The mission of Providence Hospital 
fosters values that help to enrich the lives of our patients and 
employees and creates a very special work environment. 

Providence Hospital is located in residential Northeast 
Washington. D.C., near the D.C./Maryland line and the Catholic 
University/Brookland Metro Station (Red Line). 






PROVIDENCE 
HOSPITAL 



Providence Hospital 

1150Varnum St., NE 
Washington, DC 20017 



For what's next in health care, 
look to who's first. 



As the first, the only and the most experiencetj hospital for a long list of 
medical innovations, you can bet we'll have whatever's next, too. And that our 
nursing team will be integral in bringing every new advance directly to our 
patients. This leading-edge, fast-paced learning environment takes people 
dedicated to being better than the rest. Are you up to the challenge? Then 
greet the future at the hospital with the most extensive New Graduate 
Fellowship/Bridge Nursing Opportunities. 




Med/Surg/Oncology 
Intermediate Care 
Medical ICU 

ecu 

Surgical ICU 
Burn ICU 



Competitive Salaries 

Sign-On Bonuses 

Excellent Benefit 

Package 

New Hire Support 

Program 



Cardiology/Cardiac 

Surgery/Stepdown 

PACU 

ED 

OR 



Relocation Assistance 
Comprehensive 
Training Program 
Campus Setting 
Extensive 
Orientation 



Close to the Metro! 

Apply online at 

www.whcjobs.com 

or e-mail 

Donica.D.Thompson@Medstar.net 
fax: 202-877-0459 
Washington Hospital Center 
110 Irving Street, NW 
Human Resources-EB1017 
Washington, DC 20010 
EOE 



Washington 
Hospital Center 

MedStar Health 



oo Ad\/ev±ls,t\^ti^ts. 



Awesome neneiits. 
Rignt now teclinology. 
Real world excitement. 

fust anotncr day at 
Howam County General. 

At Howard County General Hospital we 
value you, your work, your professional opinion 
We foster a positive, caring, team environment 
that's designed to let you focus on being your 
best. Add the strength of Johns Hopkins 
Medicine and you can be on the cutting edge 
of healthcare at our community-focused 
hospital. We're also closer than you think - 
|ust minutes from 1-95 and Routes 100 and 
29, near Columbia Mall, 




Contact us today about the following opportunities: 



Case Management 
Central Transport 
Diagnostic Imaging 
Dietary Services 



Materials Manageme 
Medical Records 



Pharmacy 
Respiratory Care 



Rehab Services 

(PT/OT/SLP) 
Physician/Surgical 

Assistant Services 

EOE l-l/F/D/V 



Apply online NOW! 

www.hcgh.org 



HCGH,Attn:HRDept. 

5755 Cedar Une, Columbia, MD 2 1 044 

Fax:410-740-7532 or 7542 

Dbliiie: 4 1 0-884-4567, Phone: 4 1 0-740-78 1 5 



HOWARD COUNTY GENERAL HOSPITAL 

A MEMBER OF JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE 



Congratulations on your 
acliievement. 

If we know you, this is only the beginning. 

On behalf of The VA Maryland Health Care 
System, we extend our sincere congratulations 
to all those who are graduating. 

We'd also like you to know, that if you wish to 
make one of the most compelling choices for 
your health care career, we are here for you. 

For details or to apply online, visit us on the 
web. Or call our Nurse Recruitment Office at: 
(800)463-6295, ext. 7043. E-mail your 
resume to: ilona.mallon2@med.va.gov 

The VA Maryland Health Care System 

Baltimore • Periy Point • Loch Raven 
Rehabilitation & Extended Care Medical Centers 
• Community-based Outpatient Clinics, 
eoe 



VA MARYLAN13 








The to ^H^H 

often paved by i||^| 
Titan America. ^^| 


^ TITAN 


f 


Opportunities for: Chemical, Electrical, 
^M ^^ Mechanical, Mininq and Civil Enqineers 


1 


Li.n 


Titan America is one of the premier cement and building materials 


Send your resume to: 

^ TITAN 


producers in the Eastern United States. We are best known by our 
brand and business names: Essex Cement, Roanoke Cement, STI 
and Tarmac. 

Titan America operations include cement plants, ready-mix concrete 
plants, concrete block plants, quarries, import and rail terminals, as 
well as fly ash production facilities. We provide great opportunities 
for Engineering graduates to get in on the ground floor and learn 
the industry. 


University Recruiting 

Titan America 

1151 Azalea Garden Rd. 


Norfolk, VA 23502 

e-mail:mhoynacki@titanamerica.com 
EOE/AA/M/F/H/V 



Ad\/tYtlS,tV\^-t\A,tS, 30± 



iMl 

Medlmmune, Inc 

Dedicated to advances in biotechnology 
& devoted to patient support. 

Since 1988, Medlmmune, Inc, with offices in Caithersburg, Maryland and Mountain 
View, California, and facilities in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Frederick. Maryland, has 
been focused on using biotechnology to produce innovative products to impact patient 
health. We have followed through on this promise and are now a fully-integrated 
company with the ability and infrastruaure to take a product from discovery in research 
through development and manufacturing into the market via our oncology, pediatric, and 
hospital-based sales forces. 

We are seeking talented Individuals to join our dynamic team with 
backgrounds in the following: 

BACHELOR'S OF SCIENCE 

Biology • Chemistry 
Chemical Engineering • Other Life Sciences 

MS - in the same areas 

To learn more about us and view our open positions, please visit: 

www.Med Immune. com 

Medlmmune is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. 



COVMffCE^ 

THE DEVELOPMENT SERVICES COMPANY 

Covance Laboratories Inc. is one of the world's largest pre-cllnical 
toxicology research organizations. We are offering responsible, 
enthusiastic men and women an opportunity to mal^e a difference in 
improving human health. We would like you to be a part of a dedicated 
team that leads advancements in drug development through science, 
service, and shaping solutions. We test the safety of products every 
day. from prescription drugs and pesticides, to medical devices. We are 
currently seeking entry-level and experienced college graduates as Study 
Technicians and Research Assistants to run assays, perform dosing 
and data collection, and histology at our Vienna, VA location, Covance 
takes great care of its people with benefits ranging from health insurance 
and paid leave, to tuition reimbursement and 401 K plan with company 
match. If you're looking for a career that can really make a difference, 
take a look at Covance, For immediate consideration and to view all 
current job opportunities, please apply on-line to vww.covancecom. 

Research Assistants, Pathology Services 

Duties: histology, microtoming, and necropsy. Requires: HS diploma or 
GED, or 5 yrs lab exp Desirable: AALAS or HT, awareness of SOP's, 
adv Anatomy, chemistry, and special staining, neuroanatomy, proficiency 
in 4+ special stains, and knowledge of specialized lab equip. 

Study Technicians, Mammalian Toxicology 

Duties: collecting, documenting, and managing data; animal observation, 
administering test materials. Requires: BA/BS/AAin Life Sciences, LAI or 
Vet Tech, or HS diploma w/1-2 yrs related exp; animal handing exp; able 
to lift 50 lbs; weekends and OT as needed. 



HARD WORK HAS ITS REWARD 
Congratulations 





v_k^ 



You have chosen the most trusted profession. 

Now choose an employer you can trust. Our pharmacies 

provide whole-health care, screenings, counseling, i^ 

managed care and traditional professional pharmacy services. M''^ 

You can have a rewarding career with an industry leader. 

For information on a career Giant or Super G Pharmacy call 1-888-4MY-GIANT 



dvertlsekM-ciA-ts 



V- y^ 




Giant Food, the area's largest retail grocer and 

an Operating Company of Ahold USA, is 

seeking candidates tor: 



MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 



• Marketing/Sales 
• Procurement 

• Finance 

• Accounting 

• Real Estate 

• Store Operations 
Wareliouse Management 

• Category Management 



Relocation Assistance 
Is Available. 



if interested in any of the above, you may also apply online 
at v\T.\-vv.gianttood.com or forward resume to: 6300 Sheriff 

Road, Landover, MD 20783, Attn: Retail Opportunities, 
Fax: (301) 618-4958, E-mail: recruiter!? giantofmar\ land.com 

www.giantfood. com 



"If you are looking for a 
job, look elsewhere. If 
you are looking for a 
career, call Whiting- 
Turner." 

Offices nationwide 

300EastJoppa Road 
Baltimore, MD21286 
41 0-821 -1 1 00 

Recruiting: Gino Gemignani 

vwvw.whiting-tijrner.com 



oonstrudjon management. 




PLANNING LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURE 

URBAN DESIGN CIVIL ENGINEERING INTERIOR DESIGN 




University of Maryland at College Park 
Campus Reaeation Center 



SASAKI 



WatertownMA 617 926 3300 San Francisco CA 415 776 7272 



Thalcs Communications. Inc. is a world leader in the design, dcselopnieni 
and nKuiufaeture otsottw are-based, secure, tactical communications. We 
develop products for all U.S. militars branches as well as the armed forces of 
a number of allied nations. 

We are experiencing the most extraordinan. grouth in our histor\. We offer 
ever-increasing possibilities for growth. . to leam. . and to contribute to 
mission critical products that demand the ultimate in performance. You will 
be part of small product development teams working side by side with 
extremely talented, motivated people who take pride in knowing our product? 
perform when it counts. 

Tbales Communications is seeking graduate or undergraduate Electrical. 
Computer, or Mechanical Engineers with U.S Citizenship for any of the 

following entry -level positions: 

• RF - interest or previous experience with RF design in IF.VCO. PLI . 
RF Switching Circuits and using tools like ADS. Libra. Matlab. 
MathCad. OrCad or Spice. Basic know ledge of RF fundamentals as 
thev apply to VHF UHF radios. 

• Embedded Software - interest or previous experience with real-time 
operatmg s\ stems dev eloping embedded sof^are using C-t-+, C. and 
ARM processor. 

• DSP Softvi are - interest or prev ious experience vv ith DSP coding Tl 
DSPs with CodeComposer. C. and Assembly for algorithms 
development in baseband (audio radio comms) filtering and processing, 
digital data processing, error codes, and digital 

modulation demodulation techniques for wireless communication. 

• Mechanical Engineers - interest or prev ious experience in product 
conceptualization through to production for portable communications 
equipment (phones, batteries, chargers, antennas, audio accessories!. 

Please look over the incredible benefits, our location, and company culture 
information at: http://w"»».thalescomminc.coni/section_careers.a5p 

Please submit your resume to careers a thalcscomminc.com. 



THALE 



Adverti-sem-et^-ts sosMM 



Snyder, Cohen, Collyer, Hamilton vk Associates, P.C. 
Certified Public Accountants 



L 



looking for a company that 
cares about its employees as weil 
as its clients? 

LOOK NO FURTHER! 



We reali:oJ .1 1, > 






imniminJu.rrvtoro 



K|xrience that has helped i 



We ottet expertise in the following areas: 

• ACCOUNTING/AUDITING • TAX • PENSION 

• MEDICAL PRACTICE SERVICES • RETIREMENT SERVICES 

• MANAGEMENT ADVISING 

We work hard to nurture and support a team of professionals who hnng 

their hearts to work along with their professional skills. 

Visit our wehsite, www.CPAHELP.com to see if we are the accounting firm 

that is right for you. Suhmit your resume to: advice@cpahelp.com 

EOE 



'S' 



SNYDER COHN 
Because eO^^Comw 



HEALEY 



& COMPANY, LC 

CERTIFIF.n PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

"Experience that saves you money" 

For over 35 years. 

Working with professional firms, 
closely-held business & individuals 
Committed to quality and personalized service 
Addressing your concerns and solving 
your problems 



Bookkeeping & Payroll • Computer Consulting 

Business & Personal Financial Statements 

Audited Financial Statements ■ Litigation Support Business 

Start Up • Estate Accounting & Reporting 

Benefit Plan Accounting & Reporting 

Tax Planning Business & Individual Tax Preparation 

Tax Litigation Support ■ Financial Statement Analysis 

Accounting Procedure Review • Accounting Staff Training 

Management Advisory Services 



ACS, a premier provider of fully diversified, 

end-to-end business process and 

information technology outsourcing 

solutions to commercial and government 

clients worldwide, would like to extend our 

Congratulations to the 
Class of 2004! 



Visit the Career Opportunities section of our website at 
www.acs-inccom. 



ACS 



CONGllATUIATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 

2004 



Riggs Bank N.A. 
Congratulates the Graduates of the Class of 2004. 

We invite you to complete an application 

in our Employment Office located at 

1512 Connecticut Avenue. NW 

Washington, D.C. 20036 

Please call our Career Bank Hotline at 

(301)887-4400 

for current openings. 

Visit us and apply at: www.riggsbank.com 

Riggx Bank N.A. i.s an equal up/nirfiinity employer. 




RiGGS 



,' ! AdverbLsenAeiA-ts 






UPS WILL HELP PAY 

FOR YOUR 
COLLEGE EDUCATION 



Get up to S23,000' to apply toward 
college tuition, books, fees, approved 
software and more. Ask about ttie 
Earn and Learns Program today! 

To inquire about part-time jobs, 
visit: www.upsjobs.com 

Or call: 
301-497-1064 




■Piogram guidelines apply 
Equal Oppoclunity Employer 



COME GROW WITH THE FULL- 
SERVICE TEAM THAT OFFERS; 



Advancement opportunities ■ Diverse project types ■ Continued 

accelerated learning early in career • Exposure to all aspects of 

the built & natural environment ■ Educational assistance 



MORRIS & RITCHIE 
ASSOCIATF.S. INC. 



ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS. PLANNERS, 
U^NDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, SURVEYORS 
& GOLF COURSE ARCHITECTS 



c;f.o-tf:chnoloc;\ 
associates. inc. 



OFFICE LOCATIONS INCLUDE: 

Abingdon Frederick, Towson, & 

Laurel, MD, Sterling, VA, Georgetown 

& Wilmington DE Somerset NJ 

Coopersburg PA 

For more information, please 

contact Katrinka Martin at 

410-515-9000 or visit us at 

www.mragta.com 



Dear Graduates: 

It is my pleasure to congratulate the 
Class of 2004. I share the joy and 
pride I know you and your family feel 
about this academic achievement. 



Home to the 
Maryland University 
Terrapins, Prince 
George's County 
also offers a 
wonderful place 
to live and work. 




Prince George's 
County Executive 




ack Jonnson 




Put Your Name in the 
Baltimore Orioles' Line-up! 

f^r m/^ama je^2Jo/m//wjetu>/i,i are 

■ Customer Service Representatives • Box Office 

Representatives • Ballpark Tour Guides 

• Kid's Corner Staff 

3o J^&z4efA£ ^^ / 1^^ J ^/MtMu^: 

• A strong team work ethic 

• Excellent verbal and written 

communication skills 

• A flexible schedule throughout the 

entire 2004 baseball season 

To make your best pitch, e-mail or fax your 
Resume and cover letter to: 

Fax: (410)547-6273 
resumes@oriolepark.com 



Deputy Sheriff 

Frederick County, MD 

Sheriff's Office 




Come to work with a fully accredited law 
enforcement agency in Frederick County, 
Maryland and earn your Associates of Applied Science 
Degree from Frederick Commnunity College! Full range of law 
enforcement services. Shift work. Requirements include HSG 
or equiv,. US Citizen, no criminal convictions, valid drivers' 
license. Full job description available upon request. Starting 
salary is 534,938 (effective July 2003) plus liberal benefits 
including a 20 year retirement plan. Contract Dfc, Corey Borns 
at 301-360-3934 for further information. 

Equal Opportunity Employer 




Ac(vertt.sem.eiA.t£ 



30S 1 

— mm 



Proud Sponsor 

of the ^ 

University of Maryland 
Terrapins 




w. 





Joy of Pepsi 



PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA. THE JOY OF PEPSI and the Pepsi Globe design a 



ivertLsem-eiA-ts 



Custom Printing & [\/lanufocturing since 1979 



T-SHIRT FACTORY. INC. 



custom printed t-shirts 

screenprinting 

embroidery 

digital designs 

tiedyes 

licensed UM sportswear 

"now online at" 



WWW.EARTHSHIRTS.COM 



POST OFFICE BOX 10 

MOUNTAIRY,MD 21771 

USA 

"a University of Maryland tradition" 



^ We're more 
2 than textbooks! 






^1 



0) 



■o 
S 

o 

3 






•Course Supplies 
& Study Aids 

•Computers. 
Software & Supplies 

•Cards. Gifts & Wrap 

•Recreational Reading 

•Class Rings 

•Gift Certificates 

• University Sportswear 
•Buyback •Lab Supplies 

• Maps & Tour Guides 

and. ..we're a great place to 
work on campus! 




"'■-• 1 INIVERSITY 



301-JI4-BOOK 



V 


1 - 


H|^L ^^ J Getting to this special 
■^■[y 1 day talces planning, 
m^^KS 0i 9j ^f^^' ^^''d work. 


P. J 9 


,1 MM 


And systems that work as hard as you do. Bch \e.ir, 3s 

L ni\trMr\' of Mani.ind students graduate, we feel a sense of pride. As one of 
the L'ni\en>it\'s IT panners, we have contributed to the process. pro\iding 
compudng equipment for die universit)- to operate efficiendy and for you to 
succeed in the classroom and be^-ond. Thanks for letting us share in your 
lourney. Good luck in the years ahead. 

JTA 

^yfSmart 






^(mamUdatmi^ 




Class of 

%5» 



Here's to a bright class 
with a bright future. 



Empowered by Innovation 



NEC 



AdvertLsekvtei^-ts 3.oy- 




South Campus Commons 

Capstone Properties 

301.314.2499 

cpark@capstone-dev.com 

www.capstoneconnpanies.com 



0408 Adelphi Ro. 

Hampton Addphi, md 207k.^ 

ON THE pVkk 301-434-4303 





Exciting locafio 
LAkAHAisfaUably angina 



llM-sL 



Enjoy the convenience and the best of both Montgomery and Prince George 
Counties! Just minutes to the University of Maryland, the Beltway, Takoma 



Park, and Washington, DC. Hampto 
combination of convenience and ser 
apartment in an exciting location ... : 

Features: 

• All utilities included! 

• Uniquely designed floor plans 

• Plush wall-to-wall carpeting 

• Free parking 

• Swimming pool 
Directions; 

lake 1-495 to Exit 28B (New Hampshi. 
Ave, South). Take a Left at second light, 
Adelphi Road t 



1 the Park offers you the perfect 

Live in an unmistakably origina 
start enjoying life! 



• Playgrounds 

• Metro and Metrobus access 

• Just minutes to University of Maryland 
■ University of MD shutde bus stops here 

• 24-hour emergency service 

OfBce Hours; 

Mon-Fri 8:30 - 5:30 
Sat 10-5:30 
Sun 12:30-5:30 



IMcise call f 



andc 



tiu 



Kick-off Your Semester at 
Belcrest Plaza Apartments 



Start the season with 2 #1 ranked teams! 




Small Pet buildings 
(But no one from Penn State) 



BELCREST PLAZA 

APARTMErOTS ,, 



1 = 1 



.-( /erfcusem-ei^ts 



7oor li-f c. Voor v/^y. 




UNIVERSITY COURTYARD 



2 & 4 bedroom floorplons ■ Fully-furnished ■ All private bedrooms 
Full-size washer & dryer ■ Full kitchen appliance package (indudes microwovej 
Planned resident activities ■ Computer lob with high-speed internet access 
Fitness center ■ Two sand volleyball courts ■ Sparkling pool with sundeck 
Deodbolt locks on entry doors ■ Individual lease per resident ■ Gome tables 
24 hour emergency maintenance ■ Shuttle- UM & campus connector 
All-inclusive rent (inclucles: heal S, air. electnalv ni-speea interne', water localpl^c"e i 'nP'"' 

www.universitycourtyard.com ,^~^y^'l'^'l^°~°j/. . i <C<» 

SCCCBoteleim | College Port MD 20^40 (301)314-2466 ^ H 



,i0 Highview 



Apartment Hornet' 



S3() Discount for University of Maryland Studcnl 
Faculty and Staff 



.-;ip- 



70(14 llmluicw Terrace • llyattsville. Maryland 207S2 
i'hone; 301-559-8826 • Fax; 301-559-3696 

Website: www.southemmanagement.com f = r 



ubjcct to change 



Southern Maiiagemenl Community 







-^ Tastefully Appointed Accommodations 






jr3 -- 


]^\.,^ lUSt 8 miles from Downtown 




J ^^ Washington DC, and centrally 




m >Mi AkrHl^t 


aklfe^^^ loc.iled t)Rtween Raltimnre 




H' ^a ^^^'^•^ - 


|2r-^H!^H|, ■ ■• ■iipolis hnioy our 


fl - 'nl2' 


3lHLM4i6^;7*, 


^ - .-- -rntary Deluxe 




IF^ ' ■' ^^ ~ 


m-fyii-7 ■ '^' Breakfast daily 
■^m^mm s J _.i Outdoor Pool witti 




T[ 'f '*iu J 




ly \<\i/ Sundeck seasonally All rooms 




jL.1^ , 1 , . ,_.._3 


\^f)y^ feature Coffee Makers, Irons & 




5t«^^gjj*g^_^ 


*^ Ironing Boards and Hairdryers Uetting 
aijund IS easy' We are a direct stop on tfie 




Metro Bus and only 2 miles from ttie College Park Metro 1 


AWARD WINNIISG RAMADA GOLD KEY PROPERTY! \ 




RAMADA LIWITED 


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more Are.. Collefie Park. MD 20740 (Beltway Exit 25B) 




(301 j 345-4.900 • 


Fa.x: (301)34.5 3017 




wuu.showhotel.i 


(tm/ramada/2074001 



W.R. Grace & Co. Congratulates 
the University of Maryland Class of 2004 

Paul J. Norris, CEO 

Graduate of University of Maryland Business School 

Grace is a leading global supplier of catalysts and silica products, 

specialty construction chemicals and building materials and container 

protection products. With annual sales of approximately $1.5 billion, 

Grace has 6,600 employees and operations in nearly 40 countries. 



7500 Grace Dr. Columbia, MD 21044 
Visit our website at www.grace.com 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Ad\(tYtlS.t\M.ttAJtS. 



309 



Airgas 




Industrial, Medical and Specialty Gases, 
Welding and Safety Supplies 



2900 52nd Avenue 

Bladensburg, MD 20781 

(301)985-5841 



Airgas 


You'll Find it With Us 







JSI^m^ 



We're #1 vjhen you* re on the run! 

Now Featuring f,// up 

WOo/o Colombian ^^^"11] 

Coffee ^ 

Locations in MD. (Sl VA. 



=^ 



BgC Attto Clinic 

General Repairs • Domestic & Foreign 



Bob Broadhurst 



741 1-B 50th Avenue • College Park. MD 20740 
(301)927-7446 (301)927-5776 



Miles Glass Co., Inc. 

Specializing in Structural & Decorative Glass 

(301)439-5111 
Fax (301) 439-0824 



8714 Piney Branch Road • Silver Spring, MD 20901 
(location also in Virginia) 



(301)927-3356 
(301) 927-3357 Fax 



^=> 



sTlDENT 
& 



\t EMBER 

DISCOUNT 



Kl) KHONK 



B & E AUTO SERVICE 

MAR^•LA^D INSPhCTlON GARAGE ^SK 

( I KTIHl DMKHANICS iBOUT 

\ll\()k .V \l \.I(IR REPAIRS /:■/?£■£■ 

Will I. L ALIGNMENT TOWING 
FRONT END SERVICE 

All Work Guaranteed 



4<)l 5 COLLEGE AVENL'E 

C 0LLF(;E park. MAR\ land 20740 

BLOCK FROM (OLI Kf.K P\kK METRO STVI ION 



-.d\/ertLsem,eiA.ts 



CONQ^ATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 2004 

CENTRAL DISTRIBUTING 

CALL 41 0-679-2844 

329 CHIMNEY OAK DRIVE 
JOPPATOWNE,MD21085 



Andrews Reproduction Center, Inc. 
Specializing in Reprographics 

Large Format - 9800 
Digital Plans and Specifications 

Letterhead Newsletters 

Envelopes Brochures 

Forms Reports 

Phone:301-595-5292 • Fax:301-595-4773 
Email: arcprint@aol.com 



^x 



Congratulations 

to the 

University of Maryland 

Graduates 



Your Supplier of QunfitA' 
Seaiinq &" 5A'5tern5 Furniture 



State Use Industries: 

7275 VVaterfoo Road 

Jcssup, Uar^,•iand 20794 

(410) 540-5400 




Masor, Cil\ Council ^ SUifi 

oflhc City ofCollci^^c I^ark 

appreciate the opporliinily to 

pro\ ide a positi\e coniinunit\- 

aliii()s])liei"e where you have spent 

the past lotir years enhancing your 

growth through education. 

We extend our sincerest wishes to 

the (jra(hiating Class of ^OOi for a 

sticcesslul and accompished future. 

(iood Luck! 



AMF COLLEGE PARK LANES 




AkhA 



9021 Baltimore Boulevard 
College Park, MD 20740 

Phone: 301-474-8282 
Fax: 301-982-4081 

Always Means Fun! 



(301)773-3303 


Fax: 


(301)773-3584 


^'o%. <Pa 


t£ g[an 


&., 


One. 


Tuxedo Industrial Park 

5598 Tuxedo Road 

Hyattsville. Maryland 20781-1327 







NATIONAL AUTO BODY 

JOHN TOSSOUMAN 



301-881-8200 
FAX (30 1) 468-6" 



12300 Parklawn Drive 
RockMlle. Man land 20852-1402 



Ac(vertLsem,eiA-ts sii 



^BUSCH ry, ^w/r^ 

Garldens Jjllj^fjjjj:. 

Dancers, Singers, Actors, 
Musicians, Technicians 

Audition for a season of fun, 
competitive salaries, free classes, 
special performance opportunities, 
and much more. 



^^.■ 



;\ 800-253-3302 or visit: 

WWW.TALENTSEARCHBGW.COM 



(^7 

C^VIid-Atlantic 



Congratulations 
Class of 2004! 



410/821-3912 
Fax 410/821-3929 
)white@aaamidatlantic.com 
www.aaamidatlantic.com 



100 West Road 
Suite 304 
Towson, MD 21204 

John White 
Manager, Public & 
Government Relations 



ROBINSON & JACOBS, PC 

BBSSEa '- 



L.ihiir Certification • Permano 
Temporary Work Visas tor H- 1^ 
,,.ui TN Family and Fiance Vis; 

301-559-6861 

P(i Pla:a Professional Park 
! 5 } I Toledo Terrace, Ste. D 
Hvattsville, MD 20782 



Citirenship 



www.anixter.com 



JHOBiEt 



Anixter Inc. 

8320 Guilford Road 

Suite L 

Columbia, MD 21046 

410/290-7722 Phone 
410/290-6565 Fox 



J Southern Utilities Company, Inc 
1049 Ripley Street 
Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-3399 
Pfione; 301-589-2885 

A Family Business Since 1932 

Bell & Gossett and Taco Booster Pumps 

Siemens (Furnas) Starlers & Controls 

A O Smitti, Marathon Electric and Lincoln Motors 

US Seals STB Woods Couplings 



DA FAINTING AND CONSTRUCTION 

VASILIOS ARGYROS 

effieski @aol.com 



PHONE (301) 622-1787 
FAX(30r)622-1787#99 



1020 Holly wood Avenue 
Silver Spring, MD 20904 






.TELEDYNE 

ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. 

A leiedyne Technologies Company 



10707 Gilroy Road 

Hunt Valley. Maryland 21031-1311 U S.A. 

410 771 8600 FAX: 410 771 8520 

wviMteledyneescom 



. /y/z(/(7'(f/c/ i!l/c(//'f( 


(h>., ^V/n\ 


Commercial & Industri; 


1 Wiring 


Ballinioiv 


Eastern Shore 


S(i:3 Phil.idclphia Road 


PO. Box 4222 


Halliniorc. Ml) 212.17 


Ocean City. MD 21 S37 


(410) !«i(v.1')44 


(44.'1)4y7-()().SS 


1 a\ (4111) S(i(v.i:i.S 




email: Til/clcL<"rioK 


(1M.1 



em 



Sun 



microsystems 

is proud to support the 

University of Maryland 
Terrapins 




'z Ae(vertLsem,eiA,ts 




confidential, free. 

pi 
solutions 

jregnancy t_-. 



pregnancy 
laurelpregnancycenter 



301. 
776. 
9996 




Dan Early 

ranch Manager 
' Broker 



Office 

Voice Mail 

Pager 

Fax 

Toll Free 



301-441-9511 
410-541-5181 
301-303-1205 
301-474-4438 
800-446-9498 



Email: dan. early(a longandfoster.com 



College Park Office 

Mii94 Baltimore Boulevard College Park. Maryland 20740- 



H.\LTIM()RE 
TROPHY HOrSE 




4 10-342-4988 
-877-342-2927 
332 S. HlGML.\.ND .W 



m 



SCHOLASTIC 
ADVERTISING, INC. 



Advertising Specialists 

and Consultants providing 

professional sales 

and service support for University 

and College Publications. 

1-800-964-0722 



College Park Honda & Hyundai 

Would Like To Congratulate The Recent 

Graduates Of The University Of Maryland 



Car Buying Tips For Recent Graduates 
College Park Honda & Hyundai Offers you: 



.^--"-\ 



/. College Graduate 
Program 

2. Special Low Rate 
Financing 

3. Huge Rebates 

4. Great Savings 

5. Incredible Selection. 






-^JS^^ 



Remember We're Just Minutes A way. 



COLLEGE PARK 

(Q) HONDA. 

9400 BalHmore Ave • College Park, MD 

301.441.2900 



COLLEGE PARK 

(S)HYunDni 



301.441.1313 



FUJITSU 



THE POSSIBILITIES ARE INFINITE 

Fujitsu Laboratories of America, Inc. 

Headquartered in the heart of SiUcon 

Valley in Calif^ornia & Focusing on 

advanced research and development in 

VTSI CAD and Internet-related 

technologies. We conduct research in an 

open environment, and contribute to the 

world's research community through joint 

research projects with universities and other 

research organizations. Summer internships 

are available for graduate students at our 

University of Maryland, College Park facilirx, 

and in California. 

For more information, 

please see our webpage at: 

www.fujitsulabs.com 



Ac(vertl.se^M.e^vts 313 



/ 




1^ 







The Terra^liA. 




Metis istflr 
Bdltor-lfA^-cVilef 





Photography Bdltor 



3poKts editor 



Not -pictured: MeLlssa i:>«h»A.e-L-«you.t§ i^esLgiA, editor 




r#if#ji] 



^» HiA^scrlpted Is, the M.iA.lversLty of M«ryLfliA.d's aoo-f Terr«-pLiA. ye^r- 
boofe, voLucMA,e 103. Ttie office Is Located «t 3±Oi 3oucth Cfln^-pucs i>Im\a,q 
HPilL The staff was, advised by Michael Frlbucsh «iA/d the ijearboo\z was 
edited by MeUs ist«r. 

The views expressed Iia. the aoo4 Terrfl-pliA. yeflrboofe do lA/ot iA.ec.es- 
sflrlLy express the views of M«ry L«iA.d hAedla iiA/C^orpor^ted, or «iA,y of Its 
flffuLlfltes, 0^ the niA^lverslty of M«ry L«iA,d «t College P«rfe. No part of 
this boofe m,«y be reprodutced Iia, fliA.y form, with ouct prior coiA.seiA,t, exc-ept 
for educatlo\A.al pw.rposes. 

© Q.oo^ M«ryL«iA,d hAedla iiA^corporcited. ALL rights reseY\/ed. 



PruA/tnA/Ci 



TflyLorPucbLlshliA,0 Com,p«iA,y 
T>flLL«s, TeKas 

Lcoal R^preseiA/tfltlveiJutLlfljordfliA, 
Ac-c-o utiA/t Advisor: Ta\M,l hAoCo\A,\A.ell 



"Press R.UC1A. 

soo copies were prl»A,ted oia/ ifrLOO 

B\A,avvLel "Pa-^er 

Cokvtpucters 

TVie stflff ucsed «ia. AppLe M«c<liA,tosh 
Im«c com,pw,ter with « Power PC ^3 
processor, ^oo Mf-te, Mflc os>^.Q., 
7i.S(h MB Riikvt, ^o ^"B. H-«rd Thrive 
for flLL Aspects of producctloiA,. 

Photocirfl-bhM Stw-dlo 



ALL seiA^lor portraits were t«feeiA/ fliA^d 
' ' ' bw C«rL WoLf stutdlo, 
%^0± eLkvtwood AV- 
^ H-lLL, PeiA,iA,syLv«iA,l«, 



i9o;7y . Mlch«eL i^ucrliA^zl sen/ed fli 
Loc«L «ccou.iA,t Yt^YesevKk.a\x\je. 



3ofbwflre 

Adobe (lA/ ir^esl^iA, s.o w«s utsed Iia. 
«LL Aspects of produ-ctloiA/. Photo 
i/it«iA/lpucLfltlo»A, WAS com,pLeted Iia, 
Adobe Photoshop J-.o. 

Typography 

ALL typefaces Iia. the boofe are from, 
Adobe «iA.d L-liAxotype foiA,t libraries. 
FoiA^ts utsed liA/cLutde: Brad Ley H-fliA.d 
irc TT, Adobe c\ara\M.ov^d, TravK^s- 
pose, l-teLvetlcfljeffersoiA3crlptT, 
Impact, Cheerstype, BlcfeLey script 
LBT, 3ymboL aiA,d (mposliA.0. 



c.o\/er aiA.d eiA^dsheets 
The c^o\Jer Is =ff=3,^o MarooiA, with slL- 
verfolL aiA/d TwliA/feLe c^ralv^. TVie 
eiA^dsheets are Birch ^eiA^esls. 



T>V\otoara^V\ij Credits. 

LiiA.g(setj 3&hucltz 

1-1; 1^-1; 1^-S; ±2-1, S, 3; l^-l, S; a:^-!, a, 3; ^3-1; S4-1, :^, 3; SS"-!, S; 
a^-1, 2, 3; S7-1, S; 3S-1, S, 3; 33-1, S; 3^-1, S, 3; 35r-l, Q.; 3^-1, a, 3; 37- 
1, S; 3^-1, S, 3; 39-1; 40-1, a, 3; 41-1, S; 4a-l, a, 3; 43-1, a; 42-1, a, 3; 
45-1, a; 5-0-1, a, 3; 51-1, a; 5-3-1, a; 54-1, a, 3; 5-^-1, a; 5-^-1, 3; 57^-1, a; 

70-1, a, 3; 7^1-1, a; >^a-i, a, 3; 7^3-1, a; 150-1; 151-1, a; 154-1, a, 3; i55--i; 
i5^g>-i; 157-1, a, 3 i^g-1, a, 3; 155-1; i^o-i; 1^1-1, a, 3; i^a-i, a, 3; 1^3- 
i; 1^4-1; i^5--i, a, 3; i^^-i, a, 3; 1^7-i; i^^-i; ±^J-±. ^, s; 17^0-1, a, 3; 
17^1-1; i7^a-i; 17^3-1, a, 3; 17^-1, a, 3; 17-^-1; 17^^-1; ±T^-±} ±y^-±. s. 3, 

4; 1^0-1, a, 3, 4, 5"; I2a-l; 1^3-1, a, 3, 4; 1^4-1, a, 3, 4, 5"; 12^-1; 1^7^-1, a, 
3, 4; igg-i, a, 3, 4, 5-; 150-1; 191-1, a, 3, 4; i^a-i, a, 3, 4, 5; 194-1; i95--i, 
:^^ 3, 4; 19^-1, a, 3, 4, 5-; i^g-i; 199-a, 3, 4; aoo-i, a, 3, 4, 5"; ao2-a, 3, 4; 
a94-i; 314-1; 319-1; 3ao-i 



^4-2, 4; 2^-1; ^^-l, 3, 4; gj-l; JO- 
1; Jl-l, a; 104-1, 2, 4; 105--1; 10^-1; 
107-1, 3, 4; lO^-a; 114-1; lisr-l, 3 

110-1: 111-1, a, 3, 4: 102-1, 4; lOj-l 

J1-3; ja-i. 4;J5-i, 2 



Nicole MflrtwiA. 



100-1; 103-a; 119-1, 4 

Ag(flm> Newm>fliA/ 

gO-1, 3, 4; 22-1; 23-1, a, 3, 4; 26-1; 

27-1, 3, 4, J2-a, 3; J3-1; J5r-a, 4 

24-l;J«5-4;J6-2, 3;j7^1;J2-l;^J-l, 
3; lOa-l; 103-1 



Chris Uiutber 



Mfltt sLcfeU 



24-3; 27^a; 22-a;J6-l, J6-4; 104-3; 116-1, a; ll^^l; 112-1; 11^-3 

:o7-a; 102-3; iis^-a, 4; 116-3, 119-2; 



lao-i 



other photographs coucrtesy of stu.cle»A,tSLcbm.lssLoiA,s