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Full text of "The Terrapin"

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ClOCSWiSf (Don lOP The Multira- 
cial and Biracial Student As- 
sociation discuss membership 
with a student. A Gymkana 
member flips on the trampo- 
line. The First Look Fair from a 
distance. The Filipino Cultural 
Association pose for a picture. 



The First Look Fair gave stu- 
dents the opportunity to learn 
about nearly everything the 
University and surrounding 
area have to offer. The annual 
event proved to be the first 
chance for many new students 
and returning students to re- 
ceive information on almost 
anything they were interested 
in. The booths set up on the 
Mall were sponsored by student 
organizations, local vendors, 
campus offices, and community 
service groups allowing visitors 
to find ways to get involved. 






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Through an array of fun and 
safe activities for the entire 
student body to enjoy, the All- 
Nighter celebrated the diversity 
of the campus. Amateur musi- 
cians performed their favorite 
musical selections as an audi- 
ence of their peers listened. 
Some students made new 
friends through the more social 
activities. Video game players 
challenged each other to rounds 
of their favorite arcade games, 
w^hile some others placed bets 
on the mock casino tables. Stu- 
dents also made unique wax 
hand sculptures while being 
entertained by numerous other 
events. 



CtocswiSf fBon lOP; Students gath- 
er around to play blackjack. 
With the elections approach- 
ing, students competed in a 
candidate coloring contest. 
Many students participated 
in the dodgeball tournament. 
Students made hand wax 
souvenirs. 




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■iO" cc The Men's 
isketball Team gets competi- 
.■e against each other. The 
omen's Basketball Team 
^ts prepared to practice. Gary 
illiams pulls up in the Mary- 
nd Nascar. Gymkana flips 
rough the ring of fire. 



Decked out in Maryland appar- 
el, students flocked to Midnight 
Madness, a tradition which was 
founded by the University of 
Maryland, ready to cheer their 
teams on to another sucess- 
ful season. Approximately 
17,000 students attended, and 
witnessed Gymkana's perfor- 
mance, stvident relays, raffles, 
a Gary Williams look-a-like 
contest and a laser show before 
applaudiiig players from both 
the Men's and Women's Basket- 
ball Teams. The event pumped 
students up for the up coming 
season allowing them to view 
the players practice. 



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tlOMfCOMinO 

Homecoming celebrations cen- 
tered around the traditional 
Saturday afternoon football 
game. With noted enthusiasm 
and participation by the Greek 
system, and the game against 
North Carolina State, Home- 
coming weekend brought 
much festivity to the campus. 
The week was filled with ac- 
tivities including Olympics on 
the Row, a talent show, Mr. and 
Mrs. Greek, and floats paraded 
around campus. Many students 
and alumni tailgated and visit- 
ed booths the Alumni Associa- 
tion prepared prior to the game, 
which the Terrapins lost with a 
score of 13-3. 




CiOdwa reon ic* The Football 
Team huddles up to discuss 
the next play. The band per- 
forms at half time. The Terps 
wait for the hike. The Terra- 
pins offensive line holds back 
North Carolina State. 




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tlflLLOWffn 

Although the days of trick or 
treating door to door were a 
memory for most students at 
the University of Maryland, 
many still found ways to get 
into the Halloween spirit when 
October 31st rolled around. Stu- 
dents dressed up in various cos- 
tumes for one of the few days a 
year one could wear a crazy 
outfit and get into character, 
whether it be a nun, cowboy, 
or school girl. No matter the 
choice, students found many 
ways to express their creative 
side while enjoying a childhood 
favorite holiday. 



CtocKWisf fcon lOP: Carving 
pumpkins was one of the most 
enjoyable activities on Hal- 
loween for people of all ages. 
Groups of students get dressed 
up in their costumes to before 
attending the parties. 




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lOawii! teon ;op- Terp Fans get 
11 decked out in Maryland 
olors tor the football game, 
'i Terp fan holds up a sign to 
notixate players. Terps take a 
ninute to pose for a picture, 
"estudo, the biggest Terp fan, 
s always present at every 
;ame. 



Tfi^pflPin funs 

Dripping in red, the student 
section at all athletic games 
showcased loud and dedicated 
Maryland fans who attended 
games to show their support for 
the Terps. The staunchest Terp 
supporters were willing to go to 
any length to show their spirit 
and commitment to the team, 
including painting their faces 
in bright red and making signs. 
Terp fans have become infa- 
mous for going to all lengths to 
support the Maryland athletic 
teams, which helps keep the 
players on their game when 
they hear the loud vocal cheers 
in the background. 



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TfllLCiflTina 

Several hours before the game, 
floods of red t-shirts worn by 
students, alumni, and Mary- 
land fans could be spotted 
around various spots on and 
off campus. Parked cars with 
hoods open, smoke filled with 
the smell of barbecued food, 
and cups of beer were common- 
place, and a sense of team pride 
united the fans. As pumped-up 
alumni, students, and fans par- 
ticipated in the tradition of tail- 
gating, they insured full sup- 
port for the Terrapins against 
whomever they were playing 
that day. Not only did tailgat- 
ing serve as a team support, but 
also student bonding. 



OocKWlst rsoft TOP: All around 
campus, students, alumni, 
and Maryland fans gathered 
to share food, beer, and fun in 
preparation for the game. 










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.lOClwiif fBOn lOP: Working at 
Mail Boxes Etc. was very 
:on\enient for students since 
t was located in the Union, 
rhe Information Desk gave 
itudents the opportunity to 
nteract with campus visitors. 
\dele's was another place 
itudents could work close to 
lome. Tlie Reservations Office 
lUowed students to reser\'e a 
■oom for group meetings. 



Cfirtpys ]ot)S 

Providing students with a con- 
venient, local, and easy way to 
earn money, on campus jobs 
became a favorite of students 
looking for some extra income 
while staying close to home. 
Departmental jobs could also 
add to a student's resume while 
helping their major. Often, the 
undergraduate offices of the 
respective schools needed stu- 
dents to work during the day, 
and the students could become 
familiar with their major's de- 
partment. Students could also 
find jobs in several libraries 
across campus or in a labora- 
tory with a professor. 



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On d Off 
Campus Livinci 

Living on campus provided 
students many comforts of 
home ill a unique environment 
of being surrounded by peers. 
One of the most daunting tasks 
for Freshman was becoming 
used to living in dorms. Upper- 
classmen could find residence 
on and off campus as well. Frat 
Row and the Graham Cracker 
were homes for those in fra- 
ternities and sororities. South 
Campus Commons was a de- 
sired place of residence because 
of its newer facilities. Overall, 
the freedom that came with 
living off campus proved both 
challenging and rewarded. 



ClOCKWISf fCOfl lOP: Living off 
campus proved to be chal- 
lenging for some students 
who needed to prepare their 
own meals. Lounging around 
in the privacy of your own 
home was one advantage of 
living off campus. Students on 
campus had to arrange times 
to do laundry in the dorms. 
Students enjoyed prepared 
meals at the dining halls. 







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!COn iOt>. The Diner was 
jin eniently located near 
le dorms of students living 
n North Campus. Students 
ad a variety of food choices 
'om rotisserie to the salad bar. 
chool spirit was spelled out 
cross the fountain drinks. 



Dinino tliiLLS 

The University of Maryland 
prides itself on having a mul- 
titude of meal choices for on- 
campus students to enjoy. The 
Diner on North Campus and 
the South Campus Dining Hall, 
The two main eating facilities at 
Maryland, provided students 
with the options of deli sand- 
wiches, an extensive salad and 
fruit bar, grilled sandwiches, 
and hamburgers, rotisserie 
chicken, or several alternatives. 
The North Campus Dining Hall 
catered more to vegetarian 
needs. 



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^ Campus 

Living in an age that focused 
on fitness, students trucked 
to the CRC, as well as Ritchie 
Coliseum, decked in their 
gym clothes, ready to break a 
sweat. Its modern equipment, 
convenient location, and vast 
size made the CRC a popular 
place for students to enjoy their 
workout. The CRC also offered 
numerous exercise classes in- 
cluding aerobics and spinning, 
which provided a fun atmo- 
sphere that helped people get 
in shape. 



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OOCKWISt fPOn lOP: The entrance 
into the CRC was always 
crowded with students and 
faculty. Students enjoyed a 
friendly game of basketball. 
Many enjoyed the healthy 
snacks they could get at 
Sneakers. Students enjoyed 
the modem equipment that 
the CRC provided. 




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ocvxiit toon lOP A number of 
tudents take a break in be- 
.veen classes to grab a bite to 
at or study. The main entrance 
ito the Union has recently 
pened. The sign for Adele's 
;staurant hangs on the wall. 
tudents enjo\' the easy access 
1 the ATM machine. 



Ttif Union 

The Adele H. Stamp Student 
Union has consistently been a 
place where students convened 
during the weekdays and week- 
ends. With almost all renova- 
tions complete, the Union has 
become an even more popular 
and active place for students 
to visit. The Union housed a 
variety of different food stands, 
a coffee shop, and a convenient 
store. The restaurant Adele's 
and the Co-op provided eating 
alternatives. The Union provid- 
ed a friendly and comfortable 
atmosphere. 



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Student life often revolved 
around Route One. From con- 
venient stores to food to tan- 
ning and nail shops. Route 
One's livelihood depended on 
its student patrons. Restau- 
rants, the largest attraction, 
drew the most number of stu- 
dents. When bored with dining 
hall grub, students could enjoy 
a bite out to eat at one of the 
many restaurants conveniently 
located next to campus. At 
night, students trekked to local 
bars, which hosted dollar drafts 
and happy hour specials. 




CloawiS! fPOM lOP: Some of the 
most popular places to go on 
Route One was to get a quick 
snack at Waiva, a burrito at 
Chipotk, or go to one of the 
nearby bars including Santa 
Fe, Lupo's, Cornerstone, and 
Bent ley's. 










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lOCkwisf rton lOP: With new 
renovations under way, stu- 
dents and faculty had to face 
he difficulties of road blocks, 
imited parking, and endless 
loise. Once one project was 
rompleted, the University 
;eemed to quickly begin work- 
ng on another 



ConsMGion 

The loud noises and crashes 
of contruction sites rang in the 
ears of students going about 
their daily routines on cam- 
pus. Due to the construction 
of new buildings and parking 
garages, construction increased 
astrontomically. The construc- 
tion process proved an incon- 
venience for both students and 
faculty. It inhibited the campus 
atmosphere, and caused prob- 
lems with campus traffic. The 
University attempted to resolve 
these problems by reassigning 
parking restrictions. 



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Tpflnspomon 

Faced with navigating on and 
off campus without a car, stu- 
dents were not left stranded on 
foot. Crossing the large campus 
was aided by buses such as the 
Circuit and services like Nite 
Ride. Commuters used buses 
that left frequently from the 
Stamp Student Union. When 
it was time to explore the sur- 
rounding areas, students could 
turn to the Metro to take them 
throughout the Maryland, 
Virginia, and D.C. area. Since 
parking was scarce on campus, 
many drivers returned to find a 
ticket placed on their car. 




ClOCKWIit fBOn TOP: Many students 
used the Metro to avoid traf- 
fic. Driving on Route 1 was 
often difficult due to the high 
volume of drivers. The Circuit 
provided students another 
way of transportation. It was 
very difficult to find parking 
on campus. 




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.OCKWist tcon lOP: Sandy Thur- 
lan. Director of the Office of 
national AIDS Policy lectures 
n World AIDS Day Shirin 
badi, recipient of the Nobel 
'eace Prize in 2003 spoke 
5 the students. Dr. Drew 
nswered stvident questions 
nd concerns. Kwame Jackson 
iscusses his experiences and 
3ad to success. 



SPfMfl^S 

One of the benefits of attend- 
ing the UMD was in the many 
notable speakers who visited 
the campus. Speakers from 
the worlds of pop culture, eth- 
ics, and politics, among oth- 
ers, shared their knowledge 
with the student body, while 
prompting debates, inspiring 
careers, and talking about cur- 
rent events. Nobel Peace Prize 
recipient, Shirin Ebadi gave a 
moving speech to the sttident 
body Sandy Thurman, Direc- 
tor of the Office of National 
AIDS Policy under the Clinton 
Administration, gave an infor- 
mative speech on World AIDS 
Day. Other popular speakers 
included Dr. Drew and Kwame 
Jackson from The Apprentice. 






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After weeks of schoolwork, 
the average student needed a 
change of scene as the school 
year wound down. Spring 
Break gave students the perfect 
opportunity to take a break 
from their everyday school 
schedule and relax. Popular 
choices for Spring Break vaca- 
tions included traveling with 
groups of friends to Acapulco, 
Cancun, Jamaica, or Florida, 
all of which required planning 
months in advance. Others 
chose to use their week to take 
a breather and rest at home. No 
matter the activity, students ea- 
gerly anticipated Spruig Break's 
arrival. 




CtOOWH ISOrt TOI>: A group of stu- 
dents enjoy the week at the Ba- 
hamas. A student shows off his 
prize after a long day of fish- 
ing in North Carolina. Some 
students spent time sightsee- 
ing. A bunch of friends enjoy 
the beach with cold beer. 







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Damn fpon iop, Off-the-shoul- 
jr tops became popular this 
ar, a trend that reenierged 
om the 80's. Lkvstivng brace- 
ts were commonly spotted 
1 the wrists of supporters. 
)nchos prox'ided a different 
ay for women to stay warm, 
le pointed high heal became 
popular item for all ages. 



Tl^fnDS 

Students from various cities 
in the U.S. and international 
students expressed their own 
unique style while also fol- 
lowing a few trends popular 
throughout college campuses. 
One of the most notable trends 
this year was the eye catch- 
ing yellow Livestrong bracelets 
that were sold to benefit Lance 
Armstrong's foundation for 
cancer research. Other items 
that became popular were styl- 
ish ponchos and pointed high 
heels. Many styles from the 
1980's were emerging into the 
21st Century including off-the- 
shoulder tops, colorful clothing 
and leg warmers. 



MICHAEL MOORE 



FAHRENHEIT 9/11 



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Pop Cultum 

Student's fascination with all 
things celebrity reached new 
heights as all the latest pop 
culture news stories were re- 
vealed. Television shows such 
as Desperate Housewives, Wife 
Swap, Real World, and the O.C. 
garnered high ratings. On the 
music front. Usher released a 
new album and a hot single 
entitled Mi/ Boo featuring Ali- 
cia Keys, both of which shot 
right up on the Billboard charts. 
Hollywood's perfect couple 
Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston 
arrnounced their split after a 7 
year marriage. Controversial 
movies also emerged in spite of 
the elections including Michael 
Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11. 




Cioawist fpon iop: Usher and 
Alicia Keys had great success 
with the song. Mi/ Boo. Brad 
and Jen surprised the public 
after announcing the end of 
a seemingly perfect marriage. 
Only in its first season, Desper- 
ate Housewives tops the lists of 
scripted shows. Fahrenheit 9/U 
was a popular movie pick for 
all those interested in govern- 
ment secrets. 




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A group of 
students pose for a picture at 
3entle\/'s. Many 21st Birthday's 
.vere celebrated at Lupo's. 
\ bunch of friends chose to 
3arty at home. Pictures at the 
:)ars always made for great 
stories. 



niotiT Lift 

From the four most popular 
bars, to fraternity parties, or 
simply hanging out in a friend's 
apartment, students had many 
different options when it be- 
came time to unwind during 
the weekend. With a busy 
course load as well as many 
stresses that arose during the 
week, the average student 
needed a place to blow off some 
steam. For those who were over 
21, College Park's bars included 
RJ Bentley's, Cornerstone, Lupo's, 
and Santa Fe Cafe. With tempt- 
ing drink specials, the bars 
were often packed on any given 
night of the week, with lines out 
the door. 






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WtefioronDC 

When students needed a change 
in scenery, the nation's capital 
was a quick Metro or car ride 
away. Featuring rich cultural 
history, an unrivaled amount 
of government and politics, as 
a well as night life, shopping, 
and more. Many students went 
with their friends on a day trip, 
to sites such as the Smithsonian 
Museum or the National Zoo. 
With many of the features free, 
it attracted many students who 
wanted something different 
to do. Georgetown provided a 
pleasant backdrop for shopping 
and dining. At night, students 
turned to Georgetown or Ad- 
ams Morgan for good food and 
drinks. 




Ctooswra ftofl lOo: The White 
House is one of the most pop- 
ular sites to visit in the capital. 
The Washington Monument 
stcmds tall on the National 
Mall. The Capital is one of the 
architecturally most exquisite 
buildings. The Spy Museum is 
a popular historical look into 
the lives of spies. 



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CiocswiSf fBon lOP: The Women's 
ymnastic Team earned the 
silver as a team and Carly Pat- 
terson won the gold for the all- 
around. The opening ceremo- 
nies pro\-ed to be exceptional. 
The U.S. Swim Team prior to 
accepting their gold metal for 
the 400 meter relay. Swimmer 
Michael Phelps presents his 
metals. 



Olympics 

The 2004 Olympics headed 
back to its birthplace in Ath- 
ens, Greece for an exciting two 
weeks of competitive events. 
Countries from all over the 
world competed in numerous 
sports ranging from gymnastics 
to swimming to water polo. 
The United States finished first 
with a total of 103 metals, 35 
gold, 39 silver, and 29 bronze 
metals were won by the end of 
the two weeks. Russia finished 
second with a total of 92 metals 
followed by China with 63. The 
Olympic games were aired on 
television allowing the public 
to watch their favorite athletes 
compete. 



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TSUnflMI 

One of the most terrible and 
deadly nature disasters to date, 
the Tsunami that hit south Asia 
left the area in pieces. Affecting 
numerous coimtries including 
Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, 
and many more, the death toll 
exceeded a quarter million 
with more added daily and 
even more expected as a result 
of disease. With limited food 
supply and scarce medical aid, 
the help of other countries were 
required. Relief efforts offered 
from many other countries in- 
cluding the United States im- 
mediately responded to help 
repair the damage that took 
place in once a popular tourist 
attraction site. 



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QoawiSf fBO« lOP: The Tsunami 
left many cities drowned un- 
der water. The power of the 
tsunami is evident in an over- 
head sliot. A native watches in 
devastation as more and more 
bodies are recovered. Cities 
were brought down to notliing 
after tlie tsunami. 







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lOCJWisf fpon lOP; The Red Sox 
:elebrate after the come back 
vin against the New York 
I'ankees to ad\ance to the 
Vorld Series. Kobe Bryant was 
aced with unwanted public- 
t)' as a result of his infidelity, 
icott Peterson was sentenced 
o death. President Ronald 
ieagan passed away. 



flfws tlffiDunts 

Many notable events during 
the year had a direct impact 
on the lives of everyday people 
throughout the United States. 
Their first title since 1918, the 
Boston Red Sox celebrated win- 
ning the World Series against 
the St. Louis Cardinals. Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan died at the 
age of 93 as a result of pneumo- 
nia. Meanwhile, Kobe Bryant 
headlined news with alleged 
infidelities. Furthermore, high 
profile cases such as the Scott 
Peterson trial made headlines 
as he was found guilty and sen- 
tenced to death for killing his 
pregnant wife. 









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fLECTIOn 

The Fall 2004 Presidential 
Elections proved to be one of 
the most publicized and con- 
troversial elections in history. 
Democratic candidate John 
Kerry and President George 
W. Bush battled it out for the 
White House. Many students 
went home to vote or filled 
out absentee ballots to get their 
voice heard. Thousands of vot- 
ers went out and waited in long 
lines to make their vote count. 
In the end, President Bush was 
re-elected to serve a second 
term as President. 




CiOCKWiii tton lOP: A group of 
Bush supporters celebrate the 
re-election of the President. 
President Bush smiles in relief 
after Election Day. Oemocratic 
candidate, John Kerry shows 
his patriotic side. Pins in 
support of Kerry were sold 
throughout the country. 




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(he Men's Basketball Team ended 
the 2004 season strong with a record 
of 22 wins and 32 loses. Although 
they were a young team, the Terps became 
the 2004 ACC Champions after the 95-87 
overtime win over top-seeded Duke Blue 
Devils. Lead by Head Coach, Gary Wil- 
liams, the Basketball Team was able to 
overcome the barrier of losing a number 
of key seniors and still dominate on the 
court. With enormous support, the Terps 
were able to keep the fans in the spirit by 
winning most of the home games played 
at Comcast Center. The team's hard work 
and dedication to the sport paid off and 
ended in a successful season. 



4 



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"Gp The Terrapins proudly bring home 
the ACC Championship trophy after 
their win over Duke. i^i.^W: Jamar Smith 
jumps up high to make the two-pointer 






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Looking to pass the ball. Shay Doron 
aggressively inches toward the basket. 

Vicki Brick prepares to make the next 
move, while viiaiting for her teammate to 
make the penalty shots. 



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^^ he Women's Basketball Team ended 
' the season with an overall 18-13 re- 
cord. With the support of the fans, 
the Lady Terrapins had an impressive 12 
wins and only 3 loses for home games. 
The Terps had an overall 8-8 record for 
conference games and a 10-5 record for 
non-conference games. The Women's 
Basketball Team beat Florida State in the 
ACC Quarterfinals and then had a tough 
lose to Duke in the ACC Semifinals. In the 
NCAA Tournament, the Terps had a close 
win o\er fifth ranked Miami, however the 
season was cut short after a devastating 
lose to Louisiana State Universitv in the 
second round. 








a /\ en's Lacrosse dominated this 
/ 1 / I year with a record of 13 wins and 
/ 3 loses. The Terps ended strong 

without losing any conference games. 
Both, the home and away records were 
competitive proving that even without 
home advantage the skill and teamwork 
for all of the players was enough to beat 
any opponent. The team was lead by Joe 
Walters who scored 68 points throughout 
the season and had 22 assists. Bill McGlone 
also had an impressive season, scoring 36 
points. The Men's Lacrosse Team proved 
to be one of the nation's most competitive 
teams after a successful and dominating 
season. 




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"Gp: The Terrapins proudly bring home 
the ACC Championship trophy after 
their win. UiMr. hi l^ull concentration, Joe 
Walters cradles the ball down the field. 



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i lY- Examining the field, Kelly Coppedge 
prepares to make her next move, i^i^ 
Quick on her feet, Mollv Lambert attempts 
to recover the ball before her opponent. 





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^^^ ollowing up the 2003 season, the 
L"^ Lady Terrapins were again able to 
f end powerful with a record of 15 

wins and 5 loses. In the first round of the 
NCAA tournament, the Women's Lacrosse 
Team dominated over Temple University 
with a final score of 22-4. Unfortunately, 
the Terps lost 14-10 in a difficult match 
against Georgetown University in the 
NCAA Quarterfinals. With the excellent 
coaching staff the Women's Lacrosse Team 
has been able to keep consistently com- 
petitive in the nation, which makes them 
one of the biggest threats. Despite some 
devastating loses, the Terps still had an 
impressive and successful season. 






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he Baseball Team ended the 
season with a record of 22 wins 
and 34 loses. The Terps were 
strong at home with a record of 15-14. 
Unfortunately, the team had a rough 
season competing against other ACC 
opponents and ended the season with 
5 wins and 22 loses. The Team was 
lead by Brian Jarosinski, who had 
an impressive sixteen home runs. 
Despite some difficult loses, the Base- 
ball Team was able to end the season 
strong with the support of fans, the 
coaching staff, and teamwork. With 
some key players returning, the Base- 
ball Team hopes to continue their 
hard work and dedication to the sport 
next season. 









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Players of the Baseball Team cel- 
ebrate after running into home plate. 
|~- 7:~r Anthony Button is in full concen- 
tration while anticipating the next play- 






(he Softball Team ended the 
season with a record 33 wins 
and 37 loses. Both, the home 
and away games had an overall win- 
ning record. The Team had a diffi- 
cult ACC schedule, which cost them 
to end the season with a 1-9 ACC 
record. Lead by Head Coach, Gina 
LaMandre, the Terps proved to be a 
tough and challenging group. Keri 
Lounge led the Softball Team with 
six home runs. All of the players 
on the Team proved to be competi- 
tive, hardworking, and committed, 
which helped lead the Terrapins to 
an impressive season. The players 
hope to carry on their experiences 
and strengths to next year's season. 







^ 






'Gp Preparing for the pitch, Lindsey 
Klein is ready to make a play. During 
practice, the Softball Team not only prac- 
ticed their offensive skills, but also their 
field positions in order to be prepared for 
all opponents. 




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(he Men's Tennis Team finished the 
season with a record of 8-10. The 
Terps had some difficulty competing 
against other ACC opponents and ended 
the season with a record of 0-9. hidividu- 
ally, there were a number of key players 
that kept the Terrapins competitive. Ian 
Bliss led the team with an overall record 
of 11 wins and 7 loses. Other competitive 
players inckided Chase Dawson, Scott 
Fink, Troy Demers, David Reichsfeld, John 
O'Rourke, and Scott Peters. In the doubles 
matches, Dawson and Demers had an im- 
pressive overall record of 6-4. The Men's 
Tennis Team proved to be a challenging 
force individually. 





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"Hip: One of the most valuable players for 
the Tennis Team, Ian Bliss poses for a pic- 
ture. 1^'«W: Scott Peters led the Terrapins 
in the singles category. 



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Preparing for the ball, Romana But 
pulls back her racquet while concentrating 
on the position of the ball. Athletes had to 
be completely focused to perform well. 



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_,.^' he Women's Tennis Team ended the 
', season with a record of 9 wins and 
•' 12 loses. Despite critical team loses, 
the team prospered individually. With 
the excellent coaching staff and having a 
number of doniinating players return for 
the 2004 season, the Terrapins were able to 
be competiti\'e on the court. Many players 
found that support from their team helped 
contribute to their success individually. 
Players who did well as dovibles not only 
concentrated on each other's strengths 
and weakness, but also established a core 
trusting relationship that helped keep the 
players competitive. Overall, the Women's 
Temiis Team had an impressive season. 








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(he Wrestling Team ended 
the season with a record 
of 4 wins and 9 loses. In 
addition, the team finished 9th at 
the Cornell Body Bar Invitational, 
17th at the Southern Scuffle, 2nd 
at the Hitchcock Classic, and 5th 
at the ACC Championship. Indi- 
vidually, a number of competitive 
players kept the team on top. The 
coaching staff trained each player 
to use strength and proper tech- 
nique as well as full concentration 
to dominate their opponents. The 
Terps practiced long hours to keep 
up their endvirance and strength 
in top condition during the off 
season. The season ended strong 
and each player proved to be an 
individual threat. 




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lop: In a bit of a bind, Jared 
Villecco attempts to maneu\'er 
his way out before the pin. 
LeJrt. Ready for the match, 
Jason Kiessling uses proper 
techniques to devise a way to 
pin his opponent. 



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fTjp; All smiles, Ginny Scott dances away 
during her floor routine. !^ft: Rachel Co- 
lon is in full concentration as she prepares 
to perform a tumbling pass on the balance 
beam. 



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(he Gymnastics Team ended the 
season with a record of 2 wins and 
4 loses against one-on-one compe- 
titions. However, the Terrapins finished 
first in a competition against Temple Uni- 
versity, James Madison, and Towson Uni- 
versity. The Terps earned 2nd place at the 
Governor's Cup, 5th at the EAGL Cham- 
pionship, and 5th at the NCAA Southeast 
Regionals. Overall, the Gymnastics Team 
had a challenging schedule and came out 
on top. Individually, the Terps had com- 
petitive gymnasts that lead the team at 
their specific event. Head Coach Bob Nel- 
ligan was proud to complete the season 
with an outstanding record. 





^1^^ he Men's Track and Field Team ended the 
I outdoor and indoor season off with great 
* success. With a score of 27, the Terps held 
onto the 9th spot in the ACC Championships. 
Held in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, the Terrapins 
competed against all ACC schools in 17 events. 
Junior, Gerrick McPhearson finished 3rd in the 60 
meter dash with time of 6.80 seconds. Senior, Beau 
Fay brought home the bronze metal in the weight 
throw with a distance of 18.25 meters. The Men's 
Track and Field Team had a number of key players 
inckiding Harold Manning and Rob Frelow, who 
helped make the team very competitive. Individu- 
ally, the Terrapins had numerous success stories. 
The team hopes to advance as a team next year. 
Overall, the Terps had an excellent season and 
brought home a number of key victories. 





Senior Beau Fay stands proudly on 
the podium after receiving the bronze 
metal at the ACC Championship. 
Members of the Track Team compete 
against various other uni\ersities. 









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"Gp Kierra Foster leaps over the hurdles 
with ease. The 60 meter hurdle dash was 
one of Fosters best events. She also per- 
formed exceptionally in the long jump. 



(-^^^he Women's Track and Field Team 
had an impressive season. Teyarnte' 
Carter finished first in the 60 meter 
dash at the ECAC Championships and 
first at the Patriot Games in the 200 meter 
dash, hi the long jump, Kierra Foster took 
home the bronze metal in the ACC Cham- 
pionships. Sophomore, Zakiya Shivers fin- 
ished in second place in the weight throw 
at the ACC Championships. \\\ the pole 
volt event, Zhanna Barer got second place 
with a height of 3.75 meters. As a team, the 
Terrapins finished 10th at the ACC Indoor 
Track and Field Championships with a 
score of 32. With the help of individual 
players, the Women's Track and Field 
Team was able to become one of the most 
competitive teams in the nation. 




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(he Men's Soccer Team ended 
the season with a record of 18 
wins, 6 loses, and 1 tie. This 
year proved to be one of the most 
challenging and successful seasons 
the team has had in years. The Ter- 
rapins shut out Hofstra 4-0 in the 
second round of the NCAA Tourna- 
ment. After a scoreless game in the 
third round versus Creighton, the 
Terps won with 5-4 penalty kicks. In 
the NCAA Quaterfinals, the Soccer 
Team beat St. John's with a score of 1- 
0. Making it all the way to the NCAA 
Semifinals, the Terrapins had a heart 
breaking lose to Indiana with a score 
of 3-2 in double overtime. The Men's 
Soccer Team ended the season strong 
and proved to be one of the most 
competitive teams in the country. 






ftmmifmimp^ 



"Gp Sophomore forward Jason Gare}' 
scores the second of his 2 goals in the 
Terps' 2-0 win over Clemson. 'P~iai-t. Me- 
diate dribbles past his UNC opponent in 
an attempt to make a goal. 






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Mallory Mahar attempts to push her 
opponent away from the ball in order to 
gain possession. Freshman defender 

Stevie Dunning tangles with Penn State 
players in the Terps 6-0 thrashing in State 
College. 





he Women's Soccer Team ended the 
season with a record of 9 wins, 7 
loses, and 4 ties. The Terps brought 
home a number key wins to help end the 
season successfully. In the First Round of 
the ACC Tournament against North Caro- 
lina State ended in a tie. In the Quarterfi- 
nals, the Terrapins had an upsetting lose 
against North Carolina in double over- 
time. The Women's Soccer Team domi- 
nated over Loyola in the First Round of 
the NCAA Tournament with a score of 3-0. 
In the Second Round against Penn State, 
the Lady Terrapins won with a score of 
1-0. The Terps' season was cut short after 
a lose to Washington in the NCAA Sweet 
Sixteen. Nevertheless, the Terrapins had a 
great and competitive season. 




'Foeri^o^ 



(he Football Team had a difficult 
season after the lose of a number of 
key players and ended the year with 
a record of 5 wins and 6 loses. Josh Allen 
lead the team in touchdowns with a total 
of 6 for the season. Sam Maldonado ended 
the season with 5 touchdowns. However, 
the kicker, Nick Novak lead the team in 
scoring with 69 points. The Team worked 
hard to perfect both their offensive and de- 
fensive skills. Lead by Head Coach Ralph 
Friedgen, the Terrapins used their skills 
learned in practice to help dominate on the 
field. Their hard work and commitment 
to football was evident and the Terrapins 
ended the season successfully but with 
hopes to improve next year. 




T^ Halfback Veron Da\is caught for 104 
yards in the Terps 16-0 loss to Virginia. 
Ria/^ Joel Statham connected with Josh 
Allen for a 72-yard touchdown recep- 
tion. 



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U>p: Freshman forward / midfielder 
Jannneke van Leeuwen snatches the ball 
away from a UNC player and than takes 
off down the field. Le^. Sophomore for- 
ward Paula Infante controls the ball down 
the field. 




(he Field Hockey Team 
ended the season with 
an outstanding record 
of 19 wins and 6 loses. In the 
ACC Semifinals, the Terps 
beat number 3 ranked Duke 
with a score of 3-2. The Terra- 
pins made it all the way to the 
ACC Finals, but lost to North 
Carolina 3-1. In the NCAA 
Tournament, the Terps ad- 
vanced to the Second Round 
after eliminating Delaware. 
Another win against Ameri- 
can put them in the Semifi- 
nals, which ended the season 
with the lose to Wake Forest. 
The Field Hockey Team had 
one of the most successful 
seasons. 







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he Women's Golf Team had an impressive 
season, placing in almost every invitational. 
The Terps finished third in the Spider Spring 
Invitational and second in the Bonnie Hoover 
Invitational. After an excellent season, the Terra- 
pins finished 6th at the ACC Championships. The 
Men's Golf Team, w^ith the help of some key play- 
ers like Sophomore Tyler Whitman, ranked high in 
their conference. The Terps finished second at the 
Rutgers Invitational and first at The McLaughlin 
Cup. They also took home the first place trophy at 
the Rehoboth Beach Spring Invitational. The Terps 
finished the season in 9th place at the ACC Cham- 
pionships. Both the Men's and Women's Golf Team 
ended the season successfully. Both teams are hop- 
ing to advance further with the return of numerous 
key players. 



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Sophomore Kate Stepanek concen- 
trates on her next play. Stepanek pro\'ed 
to be one of the Terrapins leading play- 
ers. Senior Bobbv MacWhinnie 
putts the ball into the hole. 







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ifff. Middle blocker Stephanie Smith 
spikes the ball against Duke. LeM: Senior 
Sarah Treadwell bumps the ball up for her 
teammate. 



^^^^Y\e Volleyball Team had an excellent 
I season with a record of 18 wins and 
' 15 loses and the an ACC Champion- 
ship title. In the First Round of the ACC 
Tournament, the Terps beat Wake Forest. 
Another win in the Second Round against 
Miami put the Terrapins in the Semifinals 
against Duke. The Volleyball Team elimi- 
nated Duke and faced North Carolina in 
the ACC Championship game. North Car- 
olina was shut out by the Terrapins with 
a score of 3-0 making the Terps the 2004 
ACC Champions. The team made it to the 
Second Round of the NCAA Tournament 
and lost against Perm State 3-0. Neverthe- 
less, the Volleyball Team brought home a 
winning title to end the season success- 



fully 




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(he Women's Swimming Team fin- My 
ished the season off being ranked 
12th and brought liome a number 
of key victories individually that helped 
make them a threat to all ACC teams. 
Freshman, Gigi de Toll finished first in 
the ACC Championship Finals in the 100 
meter butterfly event. Mariana Mulyayeva 
finished second in the 200 meter IM. Eliza- 
beth Lavell broke the 400 IM record, earn- 
ing her the first place spot at the Terrapin 
Cup. Lavell, Levavi, Knepper, and Malania 
placed second in the ACC Championships 
in the 800 meter freestyle relay. Knepper, 
Kovacs, de Toll, and Weir finished 3rd in 
the 200 meter medley relay. The Terrapins 
ended the season strong with fast times 
and high ranks. 



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'Qy. Megan Knepper and friends pose for 
a picture after a tough practice. .= c 
Mariana Mulyayeva swims tlie 100 me- 
ter butterfly. Mulyayeva was a key asset 
Ln relays. 




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Senior Chris Brandenberger freestyles 
down the lane in the 500 meter. Swim- 
ming involved proper technique and 
endurance. 



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he Men's Swimming Team had an 
exceptional year as they ended their 
year with a number of individual 
success stories. Mark Hill finished 2nd 
in the ACC Championships for the 50 
meter freestyle and 5th for the 100 meter 
freestyle. Chris Brandenberger got the 3rd 
spot in the 200 meter backstroke event. 
Hill, Fried, Ford, and Weinberg took home 
the 4th place position for the 200 meter 
relay. In the diving category, Steve Vigi- 
lante and David Roesner ended the season 
with extremely good standing. The Men's 
Swimming Team had a number of key \'ic- 
tories worth celebrating. 




• * 





^^^^^ne Men's Cross Country Team fin- 
I ished the season strong with high 
" ranks. The Terps finished second at 
the James Madison Invitational and first at 
the ACC Pre-Meet. Led by Adam Ambrus, 
the Terrapins finished seventh at the ACC 
Championships. The Women's Cross 
Country Team also had an impressive 
season finishing in eight place in the ACC 
Championships. The Terps also earned 
second place at the James Madison Invi- 
tational. The Terps were lead by Meghan 
Braffet, Danielle Siebert and Laurel Jef- 
ferson. With the help of some key run- 
ners, both the Men's and Women's Cross 
Country Teams had a tough, but success- 
ful season. 




Top Pete Hebb runs with great speed, 
strength, and endurance. Hess finished 
fourth at the ECAC/IC4A Champion- 
ships. RioM: Danielle Siebert takes a 
commanding lead over the other run- 
ners. 




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Tffp; The Cheerleaders perform difficult 
stunts for the students at Midnight Mad- 
ness. L^H: The Cheerleaders stop and pose 
for the camera during halftime. 



(H^ejiy\e£^lv[.ci. 



(he men and women on the Mary- 
land's Cheerleading Squad are 
hardworking members who pro- 
vided spirit and enthusiasm to get the fans 
pumped up and cheering for every game. 
Through tumbUng, dancing, and stunt- 
work, the cheerleaders are an integral part 
to the whole collegiate athletic experience. 
The Cheerleaders performed during the 
time-outs and the half time show giving 
students something to enjoy when the 
game was paused. Throughout the game, 
the cheerleaders kept the crowd in high 
spirits and showed good sportsmanship. 
Both the Cheerleaders and the Competi- 
tive Cheerleading Squad worked together 
to moti\'ate the Maryland fans. 












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ombining many elements of dance, the 
Dance Team performed sharp, graceful, 
synchronized dancing and exciting cho- 
reographed movements for all Terrapin fans 
throughout the school year. The team performed 
multiple times throughout football and basket- 
ball games, in cooperation with the marching 
band. The Lady dancers practiced all summer 
and throughout the school year to perfect their 
routines. Members of the Dance Team helped 
choreograph the routines to provide variation 
and difficult dance steps during each perfor- 
mance. The girls are a vital part of the spirit at 
Maryland revving up and entertaining the fans 
w^ith enthusiasm and spirit. 







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Dance Team members are ready to 
perform during the Homecoming Pep 
Rally. The Dance Team performed dur- 
ing the football and basketball games as 
well as during half time. 



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Qoekwise from top-. Sigma 
Kappa, Alpha Delta Pi, Phi 
Sigma Sigma, Sigma Delta 
Tau 






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©id f)ay 

After many late night meetings with 
sisters from different sororities on cam- 
pus, the soon to be pledges met up at 
the Chapel to announce their house and 
have their Rho Chi's reveal their letters 
as well. Bid day marked the beginning 
of the new pledge period as girls joined 
their new sorority families. Traditionally, 
the pledges ran down to their houses 
w^here their new sisters awaited their 
arrival. The first day of sisterhood and 
Greek life included receiving the pledge 
shirt and pin, along with an evening 
spent with the sisters and the new pledge 
class. Bid Day allows new pledges the 
opportunity to join the Greek system and 
start lifelong friendships. 



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Sroth(3rhood 



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Fraternity life embodies what it means t( 

have everlasting friendships and lifelonj 
memories. Joining a fraternity makes thi 
large campus seem much smaller. Eacl 
house is made up of brothers with varyi 
ing personalities and interests, making 
fraternity life very unique. Friendshipi 
that started in the fraternities usu- 
ally lasted beyond college. Bonds we« 
strengthened when members worked 
together on community service projects. 
Homecoming events, and Greek Week 
activities. Members of fraternities had 
opportunities to bond w^ith brothers of 
different houses through intramural 
sports, parties, and various different so- 
cial events. 




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Delta Chi, Alpha Tau Omega, 
Alpha Epsilon Pi 



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Alpha Theta, Zeta Phi Beta, 
Alpha Phi, Delta Sigma Theta 




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Sisterhood 

"very semester new pledges became sis- 
its and joined families in Greek houses. 
Choosing a sorority can be a difficult de- 
cision, however sisters choose their hous- 
es based on friends and which house can 
provide a home away from home. Events 
throughout the year such as philanthro- 
pies, dances, formals, and socials created 
lifelong friendships and brought the sis- 
ters closer together. Through various 
events, sisters were able to met Greeks 
in other houses and form friendships, 
^embers of the Greek comn\unity joined 
together on service projects and charities 
luring the year. Without a doubt, sister- 
iiood created everlasting memories and 
unbreakable friendships. 



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Competm^^par^^vnaMraTean^o be 
Greek. In both the Fall and Spring, frater- 
nities and sororities join together to en- 
gage in some healthy competition. Greek 
Week is a week long celebration in which 
the Greek community participates in 
numerous events. Throughout the week, 
activities such as the Greek Olympics, a 
talent show^, a parade, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Greek competition take place to unite the 
Greek community. Two or three houses 
are matched up to compete against other 
houses. Often times, the week includes 
house sponsored parties so the paired 
Greek houses could meet each other and 
plan the weekly events. At the end of the 
week, the winners are announced. 



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Alpha 
Chi Omega, Phi Gamma 
Delta, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha 
Tau Omega 



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Gamma, Alpha Tau Omega, 
Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Nu 





Philanthropy events were a very impor- 
tant part of Greek life. Each sorority and 
fraternity participated in various events 
during the year in order to give back to 
the community. Houses dedicated them- 
selves to raising money throughout the 
year to specific organizations as a way 
of giving back to the community. Some 
organizations included Delta Tau Delta's 
Adopt a School Foundation and Alpha 
Epsilon Phi's Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric 
AIDS Foundation. Each philanthropy 
was nationally recognized each house's 
community service project. Philanthro- 
pies were not only events that allowed 
houses to volunteer, but were also good 
bonding experiences. 



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formals 



One of the most anticipated events for 
each sorority and fraternity was their 
house formal. To celebrate, Greeks and 
their dates dressed up for an evening 
full of dancing and memories. Formals 
rewarded sorority and fraternity mem- 
bers for their commitment to their house, 
for honorably representing their house, 
and involvement in community events. 
Greeks spent months planning the de- 
tails of their formals including location 
and decorations. New members along 
with current brothers and sisters looked 
forward to their formals every year. The 
formals allow^ed the Greeks to socialize 
w^ith one another and enjoy a night par- 
tying with friends. 




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Qoekwise from top-. Kappa 
Alpha Theta, Zeta Beta Tau, 
Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Tau 
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Partis 

Each sorority and fraternity had numer- 
ous parties through the year to attend 
for various reasons. During rush and re- 
cruitment events, fraternities and sorori- 
ties hosted parties for the opportunity to 
meet prospective brothers and sisters. 
Parties were a great time to socialize with 
other members of a house or to meet 
new people. Many fraternities had par- 
ties during the weekends or for holidays 
as celebration. The parties were often 
very popular events and require invites 
from members of the Greek system. In 
addition to house parties, Greek houses 
paired up for other events such as semi- 
formals. Crush parties, and Grab-a-Dates 
that were usually hosted at nearby bars. 



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Many Greeks found their home avv^a'' 
from home in one of the thirty-six Gree 
houses located throughout Fraternity 
Row and the Graham Cracker. Each 
house shared special traditions, philan^ 
thropies, and social activities that helped 
bond each brother or sister with their 
Greek family. These houses allowed the 
Greeks to form life-long friendships and 
memories with other members of the 
Greek community. In addition to every- 
day fun, Greeks also found that living 
in the same house with numerous mem- 
bers was academically beneficial. With 
so many brothers and sisters in close 
vicinity, Greeks had no problem finding 
someone to hang out with. 






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f^ tudents and faculty at the College of Agricul- 
ture and Natural Resources work together to 
i^ create new technologies, develop best manage- 
W^ ment practices, discover better plant varieties improve 
animal health and development an answer to some of 
the toughest questions our world faces in the century 
ahead. Agriculture has always been more than farm- 
ing. Since 1859, the University of Maryland, founded 
as a land-grant institution to assist the state's agricul- 
ture industry, has been a leading force in agriculture 
education. Agriculture remains the state's number one 
industry, employing more than fourteen percent of the 
work force. The College emphasizes students to work 
with faculty on scientific research and the use of state- 
of-the-art laboratories and facilities to address national 
and international challenges. 









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Clackmise Jram left: A student 
spends his weekend taking care 
of the barn animals. Many stu- 
dents within the major spent 
hours at the barn taking care of 
the animals while learning more 
about their studies. The major 
also entailed learning various 
agricultural techniques that ben- 
efit both the environment and 
mankind. 



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Ckiduvise jram rigM: Students 
in the College of Architecture 
spend hours finishing up their 
projects in the studio. A stu- 
dent creates a unique model for 
a project. Student projects are 
displayed throughout the build- 
ing to demonstrate themselves 
individually through their work. 
A unique distribution of vari- 
ous architectural ideas are pre- 
sented. 



J— rhe Architecture Program at the University of 
r Maryland offers undergraduate and gradu- 
i ate degree programs in architecture, urban 

design, and historic preservation. The School is home 
to the National Center for Smart Growth Education 
and Research and is an intimate academic environ- 
ment committed to developing future leaders with a 
strong foundation in history and the practical integra- 
tion of technology and design. The professional degree 
program was ranked eight in the east coast region by 
architecture firms. In addition, Maryland was tied with 
MIT in the regional rankings. Maryland's Architecture 
Program was recognized by Design Futures Council 
acknowledging that it is now among the top 20 schools 
in national teaching awards, as well as among the top 
40 nationally in value. 



'ivmrnUi 



j^^he Arts and Humanities at the University 
f of Maryland encompasses the study of hu- 
1 man beings and their activities from earliest 

recorded history to the present. Through the exami- 
nation and transfer of this knowledge we gain deeper 
awareness of human condition. In 25 departments and 
centers, the College provides education, research, and 
scholarships in arts, history, and literatures, languages, 
and cultures of people throughout the world. Atten- 
tion to the contributions of Asian, African, and Latin 
American cultures balance the study of the Western 
Civilization. Interdisciplinary programs and research 
provide exciting new ways to understand traditional 
bodies of knowledge. The Campaign for the Univer- 
sity, Bold Vision- Bright Future, was launched to gen- 
erate private support to fund college initiatives. 





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clockwise frani left: A student 
uses her artistic talents to de- 
scribe a scene. An art creation 
demonstrating the beautiful fall 
colors is placed in the building 
to be viewed by all. Students 
clean up after completely their 
projects. A number of students 
display their art in the art studio 
after they are completed. 





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€l0ckwifie fram rigiit: A group 
of students review their notes 
before class. During class, two 
students compare their notes to 
ensure that the information was 
written down correctly. A stu- 
dent reviews her notes before 
taking an exam. The Biology 
Psychology Building is one of 
the most noticeable ones on 
campus. 




rnQmrnmSfh 



Social Sciences 

I I he College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
' has become one top-ranking programs na- 
l tionwide. The University of Maryland holds 

more national American Mock Trial Association cham- 
pionships than any other school and took second place 
in the Great American Mock Trial Invitational. In addi- 
tion, CESAR is collaborating with Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity on a $5.9 million study. The College is proud to 
have six students named as Phillip Merrill Presidential 
Scholarship recipients. Psychology professor, Tim 
Wallsten was elected to be president of the Federation 
of Behavioral, Psychological, and Cognitive Sciences. 
Dean Edwards Montgomery was invited to join the 
Board of Trustees of the Council for Excellence in Gov- 
ermiient. Overall, the College has had a lot of impres- 
sive achievements throughout the year. 



■ he Robert H. Smith School of Business has 
f become one of the world's leading business 
schools. The Business School integrates the 
foundational business disciplines with cross-functional 
e-business concentrations including e-commerce, sup- 
ply chain management, telecommunications, financial 
engineering, global business and entrepreneurship. 
The school's netcentric laboratories provide students 
with an unprecedented, hands-on learning environ- 
ment to simulate the interdependent business opera- 
tions of the networked enterprise and economy. The 
Wall Street Journal/Harris Interactive Guide to Business 
School ranked the school number one by management 
consulting industry recruiters, number 7 for informa- 
tional technology, number 10 for entrepreneurship, and 
number 4 among the world's top 44 regional schools. 




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€lackmkc fi'am left: Van Munch- 
ing Hall is one of the newest 
and architecturally exquisite 
buildings on the campus. Two 
students communicate prior to 
class. Van Munching Hall is 
equipped with numerous digital 
ports so anyone can plug in their 
laptops and connect to the web. 





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^liJLkwhw from lUjI'il: A collage 
represenliiig the basic units of 
lite is hung at the entrance of the 
Chemistry Building. The Chem- 
istry Building has an interesting 
display of artwork outside. Some 
students spend time finishing up 
homework between classes at 
the computer labs. The entrance 
to Mathematics Building is very 
spacious and architecturally ex- 
quisite. 




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College^ ^ 
liter, " 



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ne of the national leaders in research and 
science education, the College of Computer, 
Mathematical, and Physical Sciences offers 
Bachelor's of Science degrees to hard working and 
dedicated students in the fields of Astronomy, Com- 
puter Science, Computer Engineering, Geology, Math- 
ematics, Meteorology, Physics, and Physical Sciences. 
With nearly double the funds provided by grants 
and contracts, the College and its faculty have been 
awarded numerous research awards within the last 
three years. Numerous departments within the Col- 
lege were awarded high ranks by the U.S. News and 
World Report. With its excellent academics, nationally 
recognized achievements, and distinguished faculty, 
the College's reasearch expenditures during the most 
recent fiscal year exceeded $69 million. 



J— 'he College of Education at the University of 
I Maryland ranks 20th in the nation among top 
colleges of education by U.S. News & World 
Report. The Department of Counseling and Personal 
Services ranks first in the nation. The college has nine 
ranked specialties in the top 20 and with five rankings 
in the top 10. Offering undergraduate, masters, and 
doctoral degrees, the College of Education provides 
research and practice-oriented programs through its 
six departments: Counseling and Personal Services, 
Curriculum and Instruction, Education Policy and 
Leadership, Human Development, Measurement, Sta- 
tistics, and Evaluation, and Special Education. College 
programs prepare educators, counselors, psycholo- 
gists, administrators, researchers, and educational 
specialists. 




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\MIN BUILDING 







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Clackmise Jrani left: The Ben- 
jamin Building is where many 
Education majors spend the 
days learning about becoming 
a teacher. A group of future 
educators discuss the next lesson 
plan. Dean of the College, Edna 
Mora Szymanski. Students in 
the College were always willing 
to tutor and support the youth. 




GLENN L. MARTIN HALL 



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ENGINEERS 

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€lackmisejram rigAt: The foun- 
tain outside of the engineering 
building represents the school's 
appreciation for the faculty and 
staff members. The College 
had a number of societies that 
students could join. The Glenn 
L. Martin Building is home to 
many engineering majors as 
well as an Innovation Hall of 
Fame dedicated to famous en- 
gineers. 





. Scmwliff 



I I he A. James Clark School of Engineering is 
I one of the premier engineering schools in 
I the U.S. Academically, the College offers 13 

graduate programs and 11 undergraduate programs, 
including two degree programs tailored for working 
professionals and one certification program. The Clark 
j School's graduate programs are collectively the fastest 
rising in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report's 
annual rating of graduate programs. The Clark School 
of Engineering is home to one of the most vibrant 
compilations of research activities in the country. With 
^ major emphasis in key areas such as communications 
and networking, systems engineering, rotorcraft tech- 
nology, optoelectronics, transportation systems and 
space engineering, as well as electronic packaging, 
smart small systems and materials. 








— .11 rhe College of Health and Human Perfor- 
\ mance is now one of the largest and most 
productive in the country. The College is 
ranked among the Top 20 national public universi- 
ties according to the latest U.S. News and World Report. 
Sixty-seven programs within the College rank in the 
top 25 in the national rankings. All three academic de- 
partments in the College have had one or more of their 
programs rated in the top ten in their discipline. The 
Center on Aging has been a leader in cross-disciplinary 
research since its inception in 1974. The College says 
its main goal is to contribute to the elevation of the hu- 
man race and existence through the study of health, 
aging, families, and human movement, through the 
development of interventions against life-style risk | 
factors, and through the promotion of human health. 















Clackmi&ejram hfi: The symbol 
located inside the Health and 
Human Performance Building 
gives gymnasts the strength to 
push forward. Each semester, 
the College has a job fair for 
their students. The College 
sponsors a Golf Tournament for 
a scholarship. Before games, the 
College provides tailgaiters with 
some souvenirs. 



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Ckchvidefram riffik: The Jour- 
nalism building stands tall as one 
of the most beautiful buildings 
on the Mall. A journalism stu- 
dents reads up on the latest news 
in front of the trophy showcase. 
The entrance of the Journalism 
Building is equipped with mul- 
tiple televisions all broadcasting 
various news channels. Thomas 
Kunkel is the Dean of the Philip 
Merrill College of Journalism. 







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rhe Philip Merrill College of Journalism is 
one of the nation's best journalism programs. 
I The College was recognized by blending 

prize-winning journalists, world-class media scholars, 
and nationally recognized professional programs while 
taking advantage of being located next to the world's 
greatest news laboratory, Washington D.C. The schools 
mission is to produce the best possible journalists for 
the world's leading news organizations. Undergradu- 
ates are prepared for careers in newspaper, magazines, 
TV news and online media outlets through a program 
that incorporates rigorous courses in news reporting, 
writing, research, law, history, ethics, and design into 
a traditional liberal arts curriculum. Master's stu- 
dents are immersed in intensive programs in printing, 
broadcast and online journalism. 



I «rhe College of Life Sciences has the mission of 
■ developing and supporting outstanding re- 
_ I search, educational, and outreach programs 

in discovery oriented, fundamental or basic chemistry 
and biology. The College collaborates with other units 
in the University of Maryland System with comple- 
mentary programs in the life sciences, most notably 
UMAB, UMBC, the Center for Environmental Scienc- 
es, and the University of Maryland Biotechnology In- 
stitute. The College has an advantage because of the 
proximity of several federal agencies with close related 
missions in the life sciences, including the National 
Institute of Health, Food, and Drug Administration, 
National Science Foundation, Environmental Protec- 
tion Agency, and the National Institute for Standards 
and Technology. 








Claduvke fi^am left.: During lab, 
a student examines tiie teetli 
of a horse. A student observes 
the differences in hair structure 
under the microscope. Real ani- 
mals were used as examples for 
students to differentiate between 
fur. Two students discuss the dif- 
ferences in plant structure. 






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clockwise from top: Aikido Ciub, American Chemi- 
cai Society, Antfi-ropoCo^kot Students Association., Agape 
Campus Ministry 



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clockwise from, top: Baha'i Club, Global Business 
Society, Black Student Union, Asian American Studem 



Union 



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Ctbcfewise from top: Coiitqt Vaxk Environmentof 
Group, Caxibbean Students Association, Chinese. Student 
Association; CoaCition/or AnimaCRigfits 




CFAR 

CoalCtioyt For Am mal R^ a^ts 




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clockwise from, top: Crimmd Justice Stuiknis As- 
sociation, Dynamic Dance Team, Girls Ultimate. Frisbee, 
Disables of Christ United Ministries 





CCockwisc from top: Equestrian Club, Tencinq Club, 
Etfiiopian Smdaxts Association, Etectronic Dance Music 
Club 



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Clockwise from top: Intervarsity Christum. Fdlowsfivp, 
Indian. Students Association, Btocfe. Honors CcmcuSj Hong 
Kong Student Fettowsfiip ^^^H 









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clockwise from top: Iranian Siudcnis Foundaiion, 
Juggting Club, Jewisd Student Union, Muslim Women of 
Maryland .• 







Ciockwise from top: Kappa DeCta Pi Korexai Campus 
Ministry, Knitting Ciub, Kappa Lambda Theia 



Will Vou Be Part o* The Change 







clockwise from top: Muftraciat and Biradai Student 
Assoiimioii, llltinmi*; frisBee Team, NyrumBuru Cuixmai 
(VrUiT, Naviijators 





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clockwise from top: Paintbatl Club, Prt-Oftometiy, 
Paperworks, Omiricon. Detta Kappa 




clockwise from top: Bsigby Texan, Russian Club, Ro- 
taract Club, Primanmim Honor Society 



\jv«\'-^-"^ j^g,j^ Sigma 

\\t>Vve. \.ambda Delta Rational Honor Society 

'^^"x.vonaY ttouoi Society ^^ietV 



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clockwise from top: Maryland Weighilifdng Club, Sil- 
ver Wings, Student Advisory Committee., Senior Council 



clockwise from top: Simknt Global AIDS Campaign, 
Teams, Student Terrapin Club, Wave Riders Surf CCuB 



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clockwise from top: Terrapin Amme Society, Thai Stu- 
dent Association, Terrapin Trait Club, Terp Wnsfiu Cfu6 




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Clockwise from top: Air Force KOTC, Atpha Nu 
Omega, Laxnbda Upsilon Lambda, Satanic Mechanic The- 
ater Company 




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Clockwise from. top'. American Society oj CiviC En- 
gineers, Brea£ Dancing Ciub, American Retf Cross, Sigma 
BetaR/io 



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clockwise from top: UMD ANGELS, Maryland Me- 
dia, Inc. Pubikxtdons, Hefp Center, Maidiing Bcmd 




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Jo>L'pli A. Adams 
Economics 



Adler 
iiicince 




Hallie Aaron 
Finance 



Mariane Abdillahi 
Physiology, Neurobiology 



Robert Abiamiri 

Economics, 
Criminal Justice 




Rosaline Acevedo-Torres 
Psychology 



Rachel Acrec 
Elementary Education 



Ashley Adams 

Marketing, Logistics, Transportation 

& Supply Chain Management 




Simisohi Adegeye 

Cell and Molecular 

Biology, Genetic 



/\i.lfsiiLi Aelcnmosun 
Civil Engineering 



Adebola Adepoju 
Food Science 




Lisa Ager 
Art History, Archaeology 



Jonathan Agner 
Psychology, Pre-Dental 



Francesca Aguado 
Vocal Performance 




Bettina M. Aguilar 


Cassie A. Agyeman-Duah 


Joshua Ahmanson 


Kinesiology 


Engr Science, Elec & Fire Pro 


Computer Science, 




Eng 


Mathematics 




Melanie Ajero 
Finance/ Criminal Justice 



Linda Akunwafor 
Psychology 



Maria Alalehto 
Accounting 



Jennifer Allain 
Marketing 




Janece Allen 


Jennifer Alpert 


Ashley Altemus 


Agnes Alienor 


Agricultural Resource 


Elementary Education 


Family Studies 


Kinesiology 


Economics 









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Rosa Alvayero 
Psychology 



Uchechukwu Amadi 
Biological Science 



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Stephen Aniatucci 
Mechanical Engineering 



Adam Ambrus 
Finance 



Nicholas S. An-ioroso 
Psysiology, Neurobiology 



David Amoruso 
Economics 



Edward Amyot, Jr. 
Family Studies 



vnderson 
jmatics 



David Anderson 
English 



Robert Anderson Jr. 
Kinesiology 



Samantha Amato 

Cell Biology, Molecular 

Genetics 




Jilefack Amin 
Environmental Science 




Carol Anazco 
Criminology, Criminal Justice 




Xica Andrews 
Communication 




Lauren Angelo 
American Studies 



Maria Antonio 
Education 



Ngwe Arcirimofor 
Psysiology / Neurobiology 



Jason Askinasi 
Criminology, 



Helen Ankrah 
Famih' Studies 



John Antonelli 
Finance 




Hmad Anvar 
Computer Science 



Marisol Aquino 
Family Studies 



Alan Arico 

Natural Resource, Park 

Management 



Kevin Aroom 
Biological Resources 



David Axe 

Criminology, 



Adam Axelrod 
Computer Science 



! 










Arin Ashton 
Elementary Education 




Charles Bacon 
Aerospace Engineering 



'J 




Brock Bafford 
Electrical Engineering 



Rosalind Bailey 
Neurobiology/ Physiology 



Carissa Baker 
English, Government & Politics 



^ 



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Alexander Balourdos Business 
Finance 



Joshua Bandoch 
Government, Politics 



Natasha Banks 

Accounting, General Business, 

Management 



Shannon Barbee 
Kinesiology 



Colleen Barbieri 
Criminal Justice, 

Faniilx Studies 



■ oline Barotti 
Finance 



Matthew Barr 
Physics 



Emma Barron 
Elementary Education 



Diana Banks 
Criminology, Psychology 




Katrina Barnes 
American Studies 




Jennifer Barry 
Accounting, Finance 




William Barth 
Psychology 



Nina Bastian 
Mathematics, Economics 



Michael Ba\'osi 
Economics 



Natalie Bell 
Family Studies, English 



Brian Bartlett 

Finance, Economics, 

International Business 



Nicole E. Barton 
Nutritional Science 




Cecil Batts 

Criminology, 

Criminal Justice 



Jennah Batts 
English 



Timothy Bearese 
History 



Alex Becker 
Finance 




Annette Bellafiore 
Bioviversitv and 



Lauren Bellich 
Criminal Justice 






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Carine Belinga 
Government & Politics 



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Denise Bellows 
Public & Community Health 




Daniel Belsky 


Alison Belt 


Carly B. Benson 


formation Systems 


Criminology, 
Criminal Justice 


Communications 




Meghan Berger 
Zoology 



Jessica Berheim 
Journalism 



Shuli Berman 
Accounting 




Matthew Bernstein 
Finance 



Besem Beteck 
Biology 



Nyree Berry 
Broadcast Journalism 



Melaine Bertrand 
Physiology, Neurobiology 





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Michael Bethea 
Economics 



Adam Biancosino 
Criminology, 



laid BesstT 

Psychology, 

Family Studies 




Alanna Biblow 
Sociology 




Scott Biddle 
Mechanical Engineering 



Seth Binfield 
Chemistry 



Ashle\' Bivins 
Chemistry 



Jennifer Bier 
Animal Science 



Victoria Bingle 
Marketing 



Christine Blake 
Kinesiology 



Randall Binder 
Biochemistry 




Luis Bitencourt-Emili 
Computer Engineering 




Jeffrey Blake 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Brian Blatt 
Marketing 



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Rebecca Bleier 
Animal Science 



Candice Bloch 
American Studies 



Nieshia S. Blocker 
Communications 



Jared Blumengold 
Sociology 




Jesse Bodenlos 
Electrical Engineering 



Mark Bogard 
Government, Politics 



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Christopher Boggs 
Community Planning 



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Philip Bolger 
Criminology, Psychology 



Victor Boniface 
Anthropology 



Jaivone Boone 
Communications 




Stephanie Borgman 
Marketing, Logistics 



Jessica Boston 
English 



Kristen Bothwell 
Communication 



Kimberly Boudwin 
Animal Science 




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Bourne 
"ngineering 



Patrick Bovello 
Criminal Justice 



Christina Bo\d 
Neurobiology, Physiology 



Kelly Boyd 

English, Secondary 

Education 




Hannah Boyers 
Psychology 



Tramaine Brathwaite 

General Business 

Management 



Amanda Breen 
General Business 



Stephanie Brackins 

Criminology, 

Criminal lustice 



Nicholas Branch 
Kinesiology 




Marisa Bra\ erman 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Melissa Breboneria 
Public Relations- 
Communication 



Sheila Breen 
General Biology 



Ceala Breen-Portno\' 

History, French, 
GoN'ernment Politics 



Melissa Bridgers 
Government, Politics 



Latonya Brooks 
Family Studies 



Andrew Broten 
Finance, International Business 






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Daniel Bremer 
Marketing 




Geoffrey Brower 
Marketing and Logistics 






Mai Bui 
International Business 



' ! DLirden 
Chemistrv 




Alicia Brown 
English 



Madeline Elden Brown 
Microbiology 



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Civil Engineering 




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Kinesiology 



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History 



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Criminology, 

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David Bulbin 
Physiology/ Neurobiology 



Andrew Bunin 

Biological Resources, 

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Jessica Burak 
Communications 




Jeffrey Burek 

Criminology, 

Criminal Justice 



Omari Bumside 
Sociology 



Deana Burr 
Kinesiology 




Shiiwn Biitani 
Aerospace Engineering 



Rona Cajigal 
Hearing and Speech 



Sciences 



Lindsay Cammarata 
Neurobiology, Physiology 



Chanelle Butler 
Family Health 



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Broadcast Journalism, 

Geography 




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Andrew Byrd 


Daniel Cadenas 


Communication, Public 


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Neurobiology, Physchology 



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American Studies, History 



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Kinesiology 



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Computer Science 



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Government, Politics 



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Env Sci and Policy 




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Electrical Engineering 



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Neurobiology/ Physiology 



Caitlyn Cartlidge 
Architecture 



Felipe Carvalcho 
Biology Psychology 




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Jason Castaneda 
Economics 



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General Biology 



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Physical Science 




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English 



Lisa Chamberland 
Studio Art 



Cattlena Changpriroa 
Zoology, Economics 



Sandy Cheng 
General Management 



Melanie Cathey 
Kinesiology 



Barbara Cervantez 
Kinesiology 




Ronald Chamrin 
General Biology 



Katie Chan 
Finance, Marketing 



Pailin Chareonvaravut 
Accounting/ Finance 



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Cell Bilogy 



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Family Studies 



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Elementary Education 




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Early Childhood 



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Biochemistry 



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English 



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Education 



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Communications 



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Psychology 




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Economics 




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Fire Protection Engineering 



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Finance 




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Familv Studies 



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Goxernment & Politics 



Andrew Colakica 
Criminal Justice 



Christina Cole 
English 



Kimberly Coley 
Criminology, 

Criminal lustice 



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Psychology, Neurobiology 



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Psychology, Criminology 



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Geography 



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Biology/ Secondary 

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PsycJiology, Criminal Justice 




Jamie Copelin 
Criminal Justice 



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neurobiology 



Kaycie Corburn 
Neurobiology, Physiology 



Meredith Cordisco 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Elyse Corwin 
Business Marketing 



Perovic Corzo 
Government, Politics 



Charna Coren 
Microbiology 




Richard Costeilo 
English 




Marissa Coulehan 

Spanish/ Secondary 

Education 



Robert Covert 
Cell Biology Molecular Genetics 



Anna Cowell 
Sociology 




Christopher Cowles 
Microbiology 



Ananda Creager 
Elementary Education 



Jacqueline Crumrine 
Biological Resource 



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Government, Politics 



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Electrical Engineering 




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Computer Science 



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Government, Politics 



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Criminology, Criminal Justice 



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Music Education 



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History 



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General Business 




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Journalism 




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Economics 



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Go\'ernment & Politics 



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Chemistry 




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Accounting 



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Psychology 



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Kinesiology 



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Elementary Education 



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Physiology, Neurobiology 



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Communication 




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Kinesiology 




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Marketing 



Ronald Disabatino 
Mechanical Engineering 



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Criminal Justice 



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Finance 



Deaundra Dodd 
Microbiology 



Ashley Doerr 
Government & Politics 




Christopher Donahue 

Civil Engineering, 

Economics 



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History 



Sara Donaldson 
Psychology 



Kara Drexel 
Family Studies 



Lisa Donovan 
Criminal Justice 



Erin Dreyer 
Materials Engineering 



Onya Douglas 
Economics 




Donald F. Driggers 
Mechanical Engineering 




Marci Drurv 
Landscape Architecture 



Kristin Duffy 
Communication 



Sheryl Dunn 
Finance, Accounting 



Megan Drury 
Art Studio 



Papakwaw Duller 
Criminal Justice 



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Electrical Engineering 



Sarah Dudgeon 
American Studies 




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English 



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Spanish 






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Spanish Literature 




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Marketing 



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Accounting 



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Dance, Psychology 



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Marine Biology 



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Finance, International 

Business 



Debra Eiseninan 
Government & Politics 



Jason Ellis 
Communication 



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Mathematics 



Samara Elias 
American Studies 




Matthew Elrick 
Biochemistry 




Jessica Elseroad 

Early CWldhood 

Education 



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Bradley Engel 
Computer Science 



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Government and Politics 



Terrea Everett 
Art Studio 



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Communication 



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Broadcast Journalism 




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Accounting, Finance 




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Journalism 



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Criminology, Criminal Justice 




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Mechanical Engineering 



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Economics 



Justin Fertig 
Environmental Science & Policy, 
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Candida Felix 
Accounting 



Amiakristine Ferre 
Aerospace Engineering 



Michael Ferri 
Physiology/ Neurobiology 




Carrie Fiarman 
Go\ernment and Politics 



Jeremy Fierstein 
Family Studies 



Melissa File 
Psycholog), Criminology 



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Journalism 



Benjamin Finkel 
General Business 



Jeffrey Fink 
Economics 



Etan Finkel 
Accounting 



Lisa Fink 
Animal Science 




Julie Finkelstein 
Anthropology 




Juan Fiol 
Criminology, Criminal Justice 



Courtney Fiorovanti 
Elementary Education 



Danielle Fisco 
Dance, Psychology 



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Communications 



Sarah Fishman 
Government, Politics 



Christina Fitzgerald 
Marketing 



Bryan Fish 
Finance 




Elizabeth Fitzgerald 
Environmental Politics & Policy 




Daniel Fitzpatrick 
Criminal Justice 



Michael Fleg 
Go\'ernment and Politics 



Jason Flanagan 
English 



Matthew Flax 
Golf Course Management 




Elana Flehinger 
Government, Politics 



Sih'ia Floras 
Criminal Justice 





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Teresa Fogers 


Catrina Foley 


Rachel Foreman 


Sociology 


Economics, Government & 
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English 


Communication 




Walter Forth 


Dominic Foster 


Kliarod France 


Christina Franciii 


Criminology, Criminal Justice, 


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Psychology, Criminal Justice 


Elementary Education 


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Communications 



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Kinesiology 



Jacia Frazier 
Family Studies 



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Communications 



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Economics 



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Journalism 




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Family Studies 



Kachael Aron Ireedman 
Commimication 



Angola Frey 
Public Community Health 



David Fried 
Accounting 




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Justin Friedman 
Economics 



Joshua Frisch 
Anthropology 



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Family Studies 




William Fuentevilla 
En \- iron mental Science 



Shinsuke Fujiyama 
Mechanical Engineering 



Danielle Fuller 
Psychology 




Michelle Fimches 
En\'ironmental Sciences 



Nicholas Fung 
Electrical Engineering 



Jonathan Fusfield 
Journalism, History 



Nora Gaines 

Sociology/ Citation in 

African American Studies 



Jennifer Garcia 
Spanish, Business Option 



Melissa Gardner 
Criminal Justice 



Nicole Garra 
Psychology 



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Theater Performance 



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General Biology, Pre-Med 



Jason Garner 
English 



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Achitecture 



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General Business 



Kevin Genson 
Mechanical Engineering 



Denise George 
Environmental Science 



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Physiology/ Neurobiology 



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History 




Duane Gilbert 
Computer Science 




Timothv Gilbert 
Criminology Criminal Justice 



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Art Historv 



Sherod Gillis 
Marketing 



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Advertising 




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Craig Glasgow 


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Accounting, Information 
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American Studies 



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Criminal Justice 



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Marine Biology 



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Computer Science, Finance 



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Kinesiology 




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Government & Politics 






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Electrical Engineeriiig 



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Cell Biology, Molecular Genetics 



Regina Goldman 
Dance 



Seth Goldstein 
Criminal justice 



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Biology 



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Cell Biology Molecular Genetics 



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Journalism 




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Hearing and Speech 

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Criminal Justice 




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Electrical Engineering 



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Journalism 



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Chemical Engineering 



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Hearing & Speech Sciences 



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Government & Politics 



Alan Grantham 
Finance 



Uoria Goorevich 

Psychology/ Biological 

Anthropology 




Craig Goren 
Biology 




Michelle Grasser 
Education, History 




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Criminal Justice 



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Criminology, Criminal Justice 



Christina Gregory 
Family Studies 




Jade Griffin 
Public and Community Health 



Alden Gross 
Psychology, Physiology 



Sharon Grotsky 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Marisa Hagerman 

Communications, 

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Physics 



Alexandra Grobicki 

Family Studies/ Womens 

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Janelle Gross 
Communication, 
Criminal lustice 



Jason Gross 

Criminal Justice 



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Sociolcigy 



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Computer Engineering 



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Computer Science 



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Sociology, Go\'ernment, Politics 



Julia Harding 
Public Health 



Brian Hardink 
Mechanical Engineering 



Breyanna Harrison 
Geography 



Drina Harrisc^n 
Information Systems 



Alison Harper 

Early Childhood 

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Avra Arielle Hart 
Kinesiology 




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Journalism 



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Aerospace Engiiieering 



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Cell Biology 




Philip Hartten 
Music Performance 



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English 



Lauren Hawkins 

Phvsioloj^v and 

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Harry Haywood 
Mechanical Engineering 



Karla Heinemann 
Elementary Education 



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Criminology 



Alison Hemly 
Biology 



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Microbiology 



Malina Heng 
Economics 



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Computer Engineering 



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Journalism 



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Neurobiology/ Physiology 







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Early Childhood 

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Criminology 




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Physiology, Neurobiology 



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Studio Art 



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Fire Protection 

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Criminology, 

Criminal histice 




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Art Studio 




Marc A. Hill 


Toccara Billiard 


Rachel Hines 


Sociology 


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Neurobio/ Physiology, 
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Psychology 




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Environmental Science, Policv 



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Criminology, 

Criminal liistice 



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Finance, General Business 




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Stephen Hsvi 
Finance 



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Criminal Justice, 

Criminolot;\', Sociology 



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Marketing 



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Biochemistry 



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Criminal Justice, 

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Physical Education 




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Civil Engineering 



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Criminal Justice 




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Finance 



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Economics 



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Journalism/ History 



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Kinesiology 




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En\ironmental Science & Policy 



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Business 



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Family Studies 



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Crimiiial Justice 




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Criminology, Criminal Justice 



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History 



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Kinesiology 



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Special Education 



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Hearing and Speech 

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Elementary Education 



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Communication 



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Accounting 



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Secondary Education, English 



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Information Systems 




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Government/ Politics, Second 

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Elementary Education 




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Communication 






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Criminal Justice, 

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Elementary Education 




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Finance 



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Government and Politics 



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Computer Science 







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Elementary Education 



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AccoimtLng, Finance 



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Secondary Education/ 
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Landscape Architecture 



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Psychology 



Rachel Klein 
Phychology 



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Communication 




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Journalism 




Lu Koa 
Marketing 



Holly Koechel 
Government and Politics 



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Mechanical Engineering 



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Broadcast Journalism 




Sarah Koller 
Criminal histice 



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Finance 



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Cell Biology/ Molecular 

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Physiology/ Neurobiology 



Anne Kovalan 
Sociology 




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Civil Engineering 




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Rachel Kuslmer 


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Psychology 


French, Business 
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Earlv Childhood 

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En\ironmental Science 



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Computer Science 



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Electrical Engineering 




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Elementary Etiucation 



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Marketing, International 

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Kinesiology 



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Physiology, Neurobiology 



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African American Studies 



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Biological Resources 

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Kinesiology 



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Family Studies 



Marc Lermon 
Psychology, Secondary 

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Ccimmunication 



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Business Finance 




Jessica Leonard 
Architecture 




Jocelyn Levine 
American Studies 




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Marketing 



J ana Lewis 
Neurobiology, Physiology 



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Family Studies 




Robert Lewis 
Economics 



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En\ironmental Science 



Chun-Tang Lin 
Computer Science 



Jonathan Linden 
Finance, Marketing 



Nicole Liber 
Psychology 



Noah Lieb 
Chemical Engineering 




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General Business 



Jirapa Joy Limpawuchara 
Marketing/ Entrepreneurship 

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Computer Engineering 



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Neurophysiology, Spanish 



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Criminal Justice 




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History 



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Kinesiology 



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Business Marketing 



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Secondary Education, English 




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Physical Education, Health 




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Go\ernment & Politics, 

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Computer Science, 

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Agricultural, Resource 

Economics 



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Journalism 



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Marketing 



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Marketing 



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Electrical Engineering 



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Mechanical Entrineerinc 






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Kinesiology 



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Eanxilv Studies 




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Family Studies 



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General Biology 



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Government and Politics 



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Criminal lustice 



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Chemical Engineering 



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Finance 




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Geography 



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Architecture 



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American Studies 




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Spanish with Business Citation 



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Government and Politics 



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Physiology /Neurobiology, 

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Natural Resource 

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Marketing 



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Community Health 




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Internaticmal Business 



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Mechanical Engineering 



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Civil Engineering 




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lournalism 



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Psychology, Criminology 



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Cell & Molecular Biology 




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Government & Politics, 

African American Studies 



Gabriela Morato 
Ci\'il Engineering 



Michael Morreale 
Secondary Education/ 
Government & Politics 



Brooke Morris 
English 



Dwight Morton 
Kinesiology 



Jennifer Morehouse 
Accounting 




Karla Morrison 
Communication & Art Studio 




Adam Moser 
Criminology, Criminal Justice 



Aaron Moss 
Geography-GIS 




Mcibtiriiti Nk)tsaniai 
Gcnernmont, Politics 



Jun Moy 
Logistics 



Felipe Moya 
Civil Engineering 




Julie Mroz 
Elementary Education 



J. Brad Murach 
Information Systems, 
International Business 



Gonansa Mugulusi 
Government and Politics, 

Economics 



Huda Mumin 
Sociology 



Siobhan Murphy 
Hearing & Speech Sciences 



Rob Murray 
Civil Engineering 



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Finance 




Vlark Nadel 


Stephanie Nam 


Disan Namude 


Anjali Nana 


Economics 


Physiology, Neurobiology 


Economics 


General Biology, 
Psychology 




Deena Nasr 
Kinesiology 



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Sociology 



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Ashley Neal 
Finance, Government, Politics 




Paul Nevenglosky 

Biological Resources 

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Scott Nerlino 
Physics Education 



Michael Newkirk 
Computer Engineering 



Brandon Nero 
Art History, Archaeology, 

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Physiology, Neurobiology 




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Economics 



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Plant Biology 



Lindsay Nieliaub 

Criminology, 
Criminal Justice 




Homer Nieto 
IVSP Food Industry 

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Brian Nox'ell 
Marketing 



Minna Nilanont 
French Language 

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Jason North 
Criminology/ Criminal Justice 




Jack O'Brien 
Electrical Engineering 



Lindsay O'Connor 
Sociology 






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English, Secondary 

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Nicholas Oben Valerie I. Okehie 

Computer Engineering Physiology/ Neurobiology 



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Public and Communit^• Health 




Ihuoma Onveali 

Criminology, 
Criminal Justice 



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General Business, 

Management 



Scott Orkin 
Electrical Engineering 



Brian Ostahovvski 
Anthropology 



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Architecture 




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Civil Engineering 



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Computer Science, 

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Criminology, Psychology 



Dhaval Patel 
Economics 



Claudia Papillo 

Early Childhood 

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Adam Peck 
Architecture 



Aparna Paladugu 

Government & Politics/ 

Criminology/Criminal Justice 




Namkyu Park 
Mechanical Engineering 




David Peckarsky 
Mechanical Engineering 




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Bioresources Engineering 



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Elementary Education 




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Mechanical Engineering 



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International Business 



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Music Education 



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Criminal Justice 




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Criminal Justice, 

Criminology 



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Economics, Sociology 



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Communication 



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Criminal Justice, 

Criminology 



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Art Studio 







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Computer Science 




Lauren Porter 
Communication 




Tatiana Posada 
Government & Politics 



Timothy Potter 
Information System 



Stephanie Prichard 
Music Education 



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Finance, Logistics 



Gregory Rachins 
Finance 




Christopher Pronsati 
Marketing 



Evan Prucha 
Civil Engineering 



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Economics/ Government & 

Politics 




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Aerospace Engineering 



Thaiili Quach 
Economics 



Montasser Quraishi 
Electronic Engineering 




Matthew Raices 
Civil Engineering 



Sarinya Rapeepun 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Stacie K Rappaport 
Psychology, Criminology 




Alexandra Rattner 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Jettrev Reckevveg 
Theatre Design 



Angela Richman 
Sociology 



Alpht)nso Roberson 
Accounting 



Matthew Ratz 
English Literature 



Emily Read 
Elementary Education 




Charmian Redden 

Biology, Secondary 

Education 



Tammy Redman 
Criminal Justice 



Lauren Riesner 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Stephen Riordon 
Electrical Engineering 






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Criminology 




Carolyn Roberts 
English 



Gerardo Rodriguez 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Veronica Rodriguez 
Communications 



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Elementary Education 



Jennifer Ronzitti 
Communication 



Jason Rosenberg 
Finance 



Drew Rosenzweig 
Communication 



Matthew B. Rothstein 
Go\ernment Economics 



Stephen Rotman 
Physiology/ Neurobiology 



Lindsey Kouen 
Elementary Education 



Leah Rosenbach 
Communications, 

Socioloirv 




Jenae Ross 

Criminology, 

Criminal Justice 




Elan Rozmaryn 
Finance 




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Secondary Education 



Jennifer Rubin 
Family Studies 



Ste\ en Rudenstein 
Journalism 



Benjamin Ruder 
Microbiology 




K\ le Russell 
Electrical Engineering 



Roxana Saenz 
Psychology 



John Samsock 
Mechanical Engineering 




Kevin Samuel 
Economics 



jemiifer Sansouci 
Communication, 
American Studies 



Erica Saxton 
Finance, Marketins 



Jill San Marco 

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Criminal Justice 



Matthew Santoni 
Journalism 



Matthew Santucci 
Government & Pcilitics 



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Cell Molecular Biology, Genetics 




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Finance 



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Communication 



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Psychology 



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Journalism 




David Scheer 
Accounting 



Julie Schjieider 
Anthropology 



Ua\'id Schulman 
Criminology/ Criminal Justice 



Allison Schenker 
Theatre 



Kevin Schoeffler 

Physics, Mehanical 

Engineering 



Lindsey Schultz 

Marine Biology, 

Psvchology 



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Jacob W. Schwartz 

Environmental Science & Pol 

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Shoshana Schwartz 
Sociology 



Carla Schmidt 
Spanish 




Diana Schoenberg 
Marketing, LTSCM 




Tom Schumacher 
Economics 




Armel Sebastian 
Economics 



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Communication 




Elyse Selter 
Government & Politics 



Matthew Seltzer 
Marketing, Music Theory 




Michael Setrin 
Finance 



Lindsay Shagawat 
Goxernment Politics 



Prashant Shah 
Accounting 



Samir Shah 
Electrical Engineering 



Fizza Shaikli 
Cell Biology, Molecular Genetics 



Hollie Shaivitz 
Marketing anci Logistics 



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Art Studio 



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Finance, International Business 



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Public & Community Health 



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Marine Biology 



Christopher Sherrin 
Criminal Justice 



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Government /Politics 



Lauri Silnutzer 

Marketing / Logistics / Supply 

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Kevin Simms 
Independent Studies 



Rebecca Singleton 
Environmental Science & Policy 



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Daniel Smith Antrop 
Criminology, Criminal Justice 



Dawn Marie Smith 
African American Studies 



Hmily Shipman 
Community Health 




Ilene Silverman 
Family Studies 




Stephanie Slaughter 
General Biology 




Debra Smith 
Spanish 




Nanecia Smith 
Psycology 



Tonya Smoake 
Finance 



Michael boh 
English, Film Studies 



Reuel C. Smith 
Aerospace Engineering 



Sabrina Smith 
Marketing, Economics 



Emily Snow 
Spanish 



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Kinesiology 



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Commimication 



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Criminology, 

Criminal lustice 




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General Business 



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Criminal Justice 



Steven Spencer 
Mechanical Engineering 



Andrea Sparks 

Neurobiology and 

Psychology 



Daniel Speyer 
Computer Science 



Veronica Spears 
Journalism 




Elyssa Spiegel 
Elementary Education 




Joshua Spiro 
International Business 



Chelsea Sproul 
Economics 



Michele Stanback 
Individualized Studies 



Jennifer Steckloff 
Finance 




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Emily Steinberg 
Animal Science 



Hersh Steinberg 
Marketing 



Steven Stern 
Finance 




Tiffani Sterrette 

Criminology, Family 

Studies 



Jashawn Stewart 
Government and Politics 



Elizabeth Strong 
Art Studio 



Juanita Stevens 
Geology 



Chanelle Stewart 
Commimications Studies 




Megan Stewart 
Economics 



Craig Stone 
Journalism 



Katie Struder 

Natural Resources 

Management 



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Electrical Engineering 



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American Studies 




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Elementary Education 



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Mechanical Engineer 



Jason Szwarc 
Economics, Criminal 

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Kanjinga Tambwe 
Biological Sciences 



Victor Tang 
General Biology 



Christine Tenny 
Government & Politics 



Stacey Thaler 
Kinesiology 



Jill Thomas 
Government & Politics 



Klialid Taggart 
Criminality, Criminal Justice 




Megan Taylor 

Early Childhood 

Education 




Louis Thomas 
Microbiology 




heryl Thompson 
Journalism 



Kenya Thompson 
Landscape Architecture 



Patrick Thompson 
Animal Science 



Bjorn Erik Thorstensen 
Government, German 




Ja\e Tolbert 
Special Education 



Amy Tracy 
Psychology, Neurobiology 



Michael Tunison 
lournnlism 



Onyinyechi Ugbor 
Criminal Justice 



Ayana iomlmson 
Sociology 



Samantha Torriente 
English 




Rachel Trinite 
Criminal Justice 



Jason Tunis 
Economics 



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Accounting 



Kristin Turner 
Criminology, Criminal Justice. 



Crystal Tweedy 
Psychology/ Criminal Justice 




Adaora Uzoka 
Public & Community Health 



Leighanne Vader 
Education and History 



Amy Vanek 
Music Education 



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Genetics 



Cristina Vidal 
Family Studies 




Jonathan Vannortwick 
Marketing 



Meha Varma 
Physiology, Neurobiology 




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Fire Protection 

Engineering 



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Studio Art 



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Civil Engineering 



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Marketing 



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Natural Resource 

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Marketing, 

Entrepreneurship 




Erin Wachtel 
Elementary Education 




jordana Wachtel 
Marketing 



Amanda Walker 
Music Education 



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Sociology 




Jennie Wallace 
Elementary Education 



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Animal Science 



Christopher Wamble 
Computer Science 



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Sociology 



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Aerospace Engineering 



Sara Warren 
Communications 



Keith Washington 
Economics 




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Timothy Wasserman 
Aerospace / Astronomy 



William Watters 
Criminal Justice 



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Communications 




Derrick Weatherspoon 
Finance 



Stacey Weinberg 
Public & Community Health 






Micha Weinblatt 
Government and Politics 



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Finance 



Brooke Weiner 
Marketing 



Lauren Weiniger 
Business Finance 




Mark A Weinstein 
Marketing, Finance 



Ira Weintraub 
Journalism 



Tara Weisenfeld 
Criminal Justice 



Dina Weiss 
Hearing and Speech 




A.nt, Economics 



Jessica Werner 

Animal & Avian Sciences, 

Pre-Vet 



Jaclyn Westervelt 
Accounting, Criminal Justice 



Jennifer Wetzel 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 





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Computer Engineering 



Patricia Willard 
English, Journalism 



Theresa Williams 
Animal Science 



Bethany Windle 
Government, Politics 




Stexen Whitman 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Carolyn Wilhelm 
Neurobiology, Physiology 




Jamielynn Williams 
Criminology, Criminal Justice 



Sylvia Williams 
Family Studies 



Lionel Williams Jr. 
Electrical Engineering 



Kia Wilson 

Marketing, Human 

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Civil Engineering 




Sherma Winston 
Chemistry 



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Women Studies, German 



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Elementary Education 




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Criminology 



Joanne Won 
Criminology, Sociology 



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Kinesiology 



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Elementary Education 



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Criminal Justice 



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General Business 




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Elementary Education 



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Business, Marketing 

Logistics 



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Physiology, Neurobiology 



Sylvester Youlo 
Biological Sciences 




Stephanie Young 

Kinesiology 



Cliun Yung 
Economics 



Tope K. Yusuf 
Government, Politics 




Lindsay Zablon 
Government & Politics 



Nathan Zahm 
Economics, Actuarial 

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Marketing, Logistics 



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Kinesiology 



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Decision & Information Science 



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Electrical Engineering 



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Hearing & Speech Sciences 



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Finance 



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W.R. Grace & Co. Congratulates 
the University of Maryland Class of 2005 

Paul J. Norris, CEO 

Graduate of University of Maryland Business School 

Grace is a leading global supplier of catalysts and silica products, 

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Grace has 6,600 employees and operations in nearly 40 countries. 



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A Constellation Energy Company 



ACS, a premier provider of fully diversified, 

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Congratulations to the 
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Visit the Career Opportunities section of our website at 
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c ( )N(;rati ila tions 

TO THE 
CLASS OF 

2005 



Riggs Bank N.A. 
Congratulates the Graduates of the Class of 2004. 

We invite you to complete an application 

in our Employment Office located at 

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Please call our Career Bank Hotline at 

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for current openings. 

Visit us and apply at: www.riggsbank.com 

Rigi;s Bunk \.A. i.s un ec/Kul opponunity employer. 




RiGGS 










Giant Food, the area's largest retail grocer and 

an Operating Company of Ahold USA, is 

seeking candidates for: 



MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 



• Marketing/Sales 
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Wareliouse Management 
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Relocation Assistance 
is Available. 



If interested In any of the above, you may also apply online 
at www.giantfood.com or forward resume to: 6300 Sheriff 

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Congratulations on your 
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If we know you, 
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On behalf of The- VA .Maiyland Health Care Sy.stem, we extend our 
>ineere congratulations to all those who arc graduating. 
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is now hiring Police 

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Congratulations to 

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Providence Hospital, the oldest continuously operating non- 
profit hospital in the Nation's Capitol, was founded by the 
Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul in 1861. Providence 
Hospital, accredited by JCAHO, is comprised of a 408-bed 
acute/general hospital and a 240-bed Nursing Home and 
Rehabilitation Center. The mission of Providence Hospital 
fosters values that help to enrich the lives of our patients and 
employees and creates a very special work environment. 

Providence Hospital is located in residential Northeast 
Washington, D.C., near the D.C./Maryland line and the Catholic 
University/Brookland Metro Station (Red Line). 






PROVIDENCE 
HOSPITAL 



Providence Hospital 

HSOVarnumSt., NE 
Washington, DC 20017 



Proud Sponsor 
%. of the 1 

University of Maryland 
Terrapins 









Joy of Pepsi. 



PEPSI. PEPSi-COLA, THE JOY OF PEPSI and the Pepsi Globe design are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc 



I imijiiiii 




■ •1-r-uOt 



!agU6: The power of a championship game to bring peoElfiJogethSr 
n for granted. But neither can the power behind the^garoetThTplayoffs wouldn't be the 
"same - no scoreboards, no announcers, no lights - without the Tielp of the employees who work at 
Pepco and Conectiv. They're the people with the power to provide homes, businesses and sports 
leagues with reliable electric service around the clock. Now that Pepco and Conectiv are one company 
(yet still identified by the names you already know), there's an even broader range of opportunities for 
talented individuals with diverse backgrounds. 
If you want to start your career with a powerful company, come work for us. 

www.careers-pepco.com • www.careers-conectiv.com 

An Equal Opportunity/AfTlrmative Action Employer 



■^ 



p Op OO COfMCChf 



SggSS TbBpwiplebalMthepmMr. 



Airgas 




Industrial, Medical and Specialty Gases, 
Welding and Safety Supplies 



2900 52nd Avenue 

Bladensburg, MD 20781 

(301)985-5841 



Airgas 


You'll Find it With Us 








The Mayor, City Council and Staff 

of the Cit>^ of College Park 

appreciate the oj)i)ortunit>^ to 

pro\ ide a positive community 

atmosphere where you have spent 

the past four years enhancing your 

gi'owth through education. 

We extend our sincerest wishes to 

die (xraduating Class of 200.5 for a 

successful and accomplished future. 

Good Luck! 



A Healthy Salute 
From 

^University 

rrm of Maryland Medicine 



Official Medical 
Provider For The Terps 

1 .800.492.5538 
www.umm.edu 



College Park Honda & Hyundai 

Would Like To Congratulate The Recent 

Graduates Of The University Of Maryland 



Car Buying Tips For Recent Graduates 
College Park Honda & Hyundai Offers you: 

1. College Graduate 
Program 



2. Special Low Rate 
Financing 

3. Huge Rebates 

4. Great Savings 

5. Incredible Selection. 

6. Certified Used Cars. 







M 



,^2iS9Cv 



■»i-. .«d 




Remember We're Just Minutes Away... 



COLLEGE PARK 

(y) HONDA. 

9400 Baltimore Ave • College Park, MD 

301.441.2900 

www.collegeparkhonila.com 



COLLEGE PARK 

(^j HYunani 

9500 Baltimore Ave • College Park, MD 

301.441.1313 

www.collegeparkhyundai.com 



jSJCtrahjart 



JK^ FUELS 



We're #1 when you're on the run! 



Now Featuring 

m 




yxtrae^^ 



100% Cmombian 
Coffee 



Fill Up 
At Our 
Self Serve 
Pumps 
Today! 




Locations in MD & VA 









Congratulations 
Class of 2005! 




7iU\' 


i7 




CSMid 


-Atlantic 




410/821-3912 
Fax 410/821-3929 
white@aaamidatlantic.com 
www.aaamidatlantic.com 


100 West Road 
Suite 304 
Towson, MD 21204 

Jotin White 
IVlanager, Public & 
Government Relations 



Kick-off Your Semester at 
Belcrest Plaza Apartments 

Start the season with 2 #1 ranked teamsl 




Small Pet buildings 
(But no one from Penn State) 






Optional MBOCahk- 1 \' 

fUises to D.C. and campus 

Individual heating and A/C 

Wall to Wall Carpeting 

Baluonx or patio — Pool 

Walking distance to Prince George's Plaza Mai 

FilTiciency, 1, 2 & 3 bedroom Apts.. some with dens 

Modem, well designed kitchens (some w/dishwasher) 

For more information call (301 ) 559-504 

Time's runnins out, so make your move to 




BELCREST PLAZA 

APAOTMErjTS 



H*»W««P5if 



<^ 



APARTMENTS APARTMENTS APARTMENTS 






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If Earfi|ms.lifgStlst.isri'f5 



Fountain Club 

apartments are very convenient for 

University of Maryland students 

& all are eligible for a 

$30 A MONTH DISCOUNT. 

So if the above circumstances 

apply to you... 

•- . What are you waiting for? 



like to have yo(jP oW^ 











FOUNTAIN CLUB 



APARTMENT HOMES 



301.731.5977 

TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS UNBELIEVABLE OFFER! 

5122 KENILWORTH AVENUE • HVATTSVIOE, MD 20781 

visrr us online @ fountainparkjuet 

A SOIITHERN MANAGEMENT COMMUNrPY 



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One Great Baltimore/ Washington DC Location Conveniently Located off 1-95 at exit 298 

All Guestrooms Feature The Sheraton Sweet Sleeper Bed 

Service Promise-"lf You're Not Satisfied, We're Not Satisfied" 

■ Minutes from the University of Maryland Campus 

• 20 Miles from Baltimore Inner Harbor/ 12 Miles from DC 

• Complimentary Ample Parking 

■ Complimentary Newspaper Daily 

• Outdoor Pool opened 7 days per week b/t 10am-8pm 

■ Complimentary In Guestroom Coffee Available Daily 

• Fitness Center 

• Complimentary Local Area (5 Mile Radius of Hotel) 

• University of Maryland and Green Belt Metro Shuttle Service 

• Restaurant With NEWLY Renovated Lounge (American Cuisine) 

• 3 Blocks to Movies, Shopping & Dining 

• High Speed Internet Available in all Guestrooms 

■ 205 Guestrooms featuring The Sheraton Sweet Sleeper Bed 

■ For Group Information Please Contact the Hotel Sales Department 

Sheraton College Park Hotel 

4095 Powder Mill Road 

Beltsville, MD 20705 

301-937-4422 

www.sheraton.com/colleaepark 




"If you are looking for a 
job, look elsewhere. If 

you are looking for a 
career, call Whiting- 
Turner." 



Offices nationwide 

Headquarters: 

300 East Jopna Road 
Baltimore, MD 21286 
410-821-1100 

Recruiting: Karen LUCBS 

www. whiti ng-turner. com 




construction management. 



Dear Graduates: 

It is my pleasure to congratulate the 
Class of 2005. i share the joy and 
pride I know you and your family feel 
about this academic achievement. 

Home to the 
Maryland University 
Terrapins, Prince 
George's County 
also offers a 
wonderful place 
to live and work. 



Prince George's 
County Executive 






We're more 
than textbooks! 

•Course Supplies 
& Study Aids 

•Computers. 
Software & Supplies 

•Cards. Gifts & Wrap 

• Recreational Reading 
•Class Rings 

• Gift Certificates 

• University Sportswear 

• Buyback • Lab Supplies 

•Maps &Tour Guides 
and. ..we're a great place to 

fNIVERSlTY 
)OKrTj 

■-IP STUDENT UNION 

301-314-BOOK 





Voor \i-pc. ^oor W&'/. 




UNIVERSITCirXOURTYARD 



www.universitycourtyard.com 

8000 Boteler Ln. | College Pork, MD 20740 



Call or visit us today! ^^ 

(301)314-2466'^© 




2 & 4 bedroom floorplans ■ Fully-furnished ■ All private bedrooms 

Full-size washer & dryer ■ Full kitchen appliance package lincludes microwave! 

Planned resident activities ■ Computer lab with high-speed internet access 

Fitness center ■ Two sand volleyball courts ■ Sparkling pool with sundeck 

Deadbolt locks on entry doors ■ Individual lease per resident ■ Game tables 

24 hour emergency maintenance ■ Shuttle - DM & campus connector 

All-inclusive rent (includes: heat & air, electricity, tii-speed internet water local ptione & cable) 



Andrews Reproduction Center, Inc. 
Specializing in Reprographics 

Large Format - 9800 
Digital Plans and Specifications 

Letterhead Newsletters 

Envelopes Brochures 

Forms Reports 

Phone:301-595-5292 • Fax:301-595-4773 
Email: arcprint@aol.com 



Miles Glass Co., Inc. 

Specializing in Structural & Decorative Glass 

(301) 439-5111 
Fax (301) 439-0824 



8714 Piney Branch Road • Silver Spring, MD 20901 
(location also in Virginia) 




Proud To Support 
The University of Maryland! 



IGHIVAY 

mid 

AFE7T 



Highway and Safety Services 

ER VICES, 18960 Woodfield Road 

INC. Gaithersburg. MD 20879 

301-948-4970 :Phone 301-948-7472 :Fax 

wn/vw.hiwayandsafety.com 



Congratulations 2005 Graduates 



CHte Jlpartments 
cfSt. CharCes 



"Southern Maryland's Finest Communities " 
"Let Us Make Your First Apartment a Great Apartment " 

NINE LUXURY RENTAL COMMUNITIES 

Townhome, Mid-Rise, Garden and Patio Home Apartments 

1(800)848-5438 • (301)843-3010 

601 7 New Forest Court Waldorf/St. Charles, MD 20602 



W)LAurtl Prvgnaruy Center * 



confidential, free. prGOn^nCV 

solutions 




pregnancy tests, support services. 

301. 

776 

lauielpregnancycenter i # u. 

www. Iaurelpregnancycenter.org 9996 



^Sun 

microsystems 

Is proud to support the 

University of Maryland 
Terrapins 

Congratulations Grads ! 



Tastefully Appointed Accommodations 
just 8 miles from Downtown 
Washington DC. and centrally 
located between Baltimore 
and Annapolis. Enjoy our 
Complimentary Deluxe 
Continental Breakfast daily 
and our Outdoor Pool witti 
Sundeck seasonally All rooms 
feature Coffee Makers, Irons & 
roning Boards and Hairdryers, Getting 
around is easy! We are a direct stop on ttie 
Metro Bus and only 2 miles from ttie College Park Metro, 

AWARD yVl\NING RAMADA GOLD KEY PROPERTY! 

RAMADA LIMITED 

9113 Baltimore Ave., College Park, MD 20740 (Beltway Exit 25B) 

(301) 345-4900 • Fax: (301) 345-301 7 

www.showhotel.com/ramada/2074001 




South Campus Commons 




30 1 .3 1 4.2499 cpark@capstone-dev.com 
www.southcannpusconnmons.c_om 



(301)927-3356 

(30!) 927-0586 Fax 




STLDEXT 

(£ 

AAA 

Ml \IBF.R 

I i/.SC OUST 



D «& E AUTO SERVICE 

MARYLAND INSPHC TIUN GARAGL 

CERTiritD MECFIANICS 

MINOR & MAJOR REPAIRS 

WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

FRONT END SFRX'KT 

All Work Guaranteed 



ASK 

ABOUT 

FREE 

TOWING 



Kl) RHONE 



49l5roI I FC;F, WFME 

COLl.KGF PARK. M \\V\ I AM) 2(174(1 

I ROM C01.LFt.K PARK \\\ t RO SVAI ION 



B^C Auto Clinic 

General Repairs • Domestic & Foreign 



Bob Broadhurst 



741 1-B 50th Avenue • College Park, MD 20740 
(301)927-7446 (301)927-5776 



Congratulations to the 
Class of 2005 




from 

The Inn and Conference Center 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
Ph: 30 1 .985.7303 .^ITIOtl Conference Centers Fax: 301 .985.7445 



^ 



Southern Utilities Company, Inc. 

1049 Ripley Street 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-3399 

Phone: 301-589-2885 



A Family Business Since 1932 

Bell & Gossett and Taco Booster Pumps 

Siemens (Furnas) Starters & Controls 

A O Smith Marathon Electric, and Lincoln Motors 

U S Seals & T B Woods Couplings 



AMF COLLEGE PARK LANES 




■® 



9021 Baltimore Boulevard 
College Park, MD 20740 

Phone: 301-474-8282 
Fax: 301-982-4081 

Always Means Fun! 



Foreign and Domestic uars 



NATIONAL AUTO BODY 

JOHN TOSSOUNIAN 



301-881-8200 
FAX (301) 468-6763 



12300 Parklawn Drive 
Rockville, Marvlanid 20852-1402 



/C^^ 


Piuiid to Support 
1 The University of Maryland. 




Stiller Appliances 
703 Grain Highway SE, Glen Burnie, 
410-766-2370: Phone 410-766- 


MD 21061 
1792 : Fax 



www. anixter.com 



^met 



Anixter Inc. 

8320 Guilford Road 

Suite L 

Columbia. MD 21046 

410/290-7722 Phone 
410/290-6565 Fox 



Froirtf To Support The University ofManflanU! 

Colossal Contractors, Inc. 

13415 Connecticut Ave. Ste. 203 

Silver Spring, MD 20906 

Office: 301-598-5226 Fax: 301-598-5228 

www.colossalcontractors.com 




?^^ 



.TELEDYNE 

ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. 

A leledyne Technologies Company 



10707 Gilroy Road 

Hunt Valley Maryland 21031-1311 U.S.A. 

410,771,8600 F/U: 410.771.8620 

www.teledynees.com 



ROBINSON & JACOBS, PC 



Immigration Law 



• EmplmTncnt &. Familv Sponsors J Immis;ration • Labor Certification 
•Permanent Residence * Citirenship 

•Temporan' Work Visas tor H-IB (specialtx' workers) 
•IN Visa 

• Familv and Fiance Visas 

301-614-3330 
301-614-3336 Fax 

7731 Belle Point riHvc Grcenbclt. MD 20770 



GENE<r^->LOGIC 



AT GENE LOGIC, WE ARE COMMITTED TO 

HIRING AND DEVELOPING A TALENTED, 

ADAPTABLE, RESPONSIVE TEAM OF EMPLOYEES. 

WE HAVE ONGOING NEEDS FOR SKILLED 

CANDIDATES WITH MULTI-DISCIPLINARY 

BACKGROUNDS AND EXPERIENCES WHO CAN HIT 

THE GROUND RUNNING AND MAKE IMMEDIATE 

CONTRIBUTIONS TO MEET OUR BUSINESS GOALS. 

TO SUPPORT OUR STAFF, WE OFFER A 

COMPREHENSIVE, COMPETITIVE PROGRAM OF 

BENEFITS AND A CORPORATE CULTURE BASED 

ON CORE VALUES OF INNOVATION, EXCELLENCE 

AND INTEGRITY. 

GENE LOGIC INC. 

610 PROFESSIONAL DRIVE 

GAITHERSBURG, MD 20879 

TELEPHONE: 301.987 1700 

TOLL FREE: 800.GENELOGIG (800 436 3564) 

FAX 301.987,1701 

to apply online go to: 
http://wwwgenelogic.com/careers/ 

FOR GENERAL INFORMATION, PLEASE EMAIL US AT INFO@GENELOGIC COM 
WHERE DISCOVERY BEGINS 



Tm 



ICONSTRUCTIONI 

16495 New HAMPSHiBE^E^Sin TE 1401 
iHyattsville MD ZOTSa 



130^70228 
fFAX: 301.270.2r86 



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:-GR8-MIND-www.aboutLD,org 




VITRO 

TECHNOLOGIES 



It IS OUR MISSION TO REVOLUTIONIZE THE DRUG DISCOVERY 

AND DEVELOPMENT PROCESS BY BEING THE PREMIER 

WORLD PROVIDER OF SPECIALIZED PRODUCTS AND 

CONTRACT SERVICES WITHIN THE IN VITRO TECHNOLOGIES 

INDUSTRY WE ACHEIVE THIS BY MAINTAINING A DEDICATED 

WORKFORCE COMMITTED TO THE HIGHEST STANDARDS OF 

QUALITY AND EXCELLENCE IN TECHNOLOGICAL 

LEADERSHIP AND CUSTOMER-CENTRIC SERVICE. 



9 '"^ 



mi iKitv 



Phone: 410-455-1242 
Toli-Free: 1-888-488-3232^ 
Fax: 443-836-0340 ^-i 



I 



1450 South Rolling Road 
Baltimore, IMarylanci 21227 

Gsneral Questions: inffo@invltrotech.com 
Human Resources: HRQinvitroteeh.eom 



IWih SCHOLASTIC 




fc / A' ADVERT SING, INC 




Advertising Specialists 


AND Consultants Providing 


Professional Sales 


AND Service Support For 


University and College 


Publications . 


1.800.964.0722 


advertising@schadv.com 




,__IiNG FOR 

^- SOMEtttl'NG 

A LI'ttLE^ ^^ 

hn]\oiQ]u IF ioi Thi Hi eVocqH, 

I'LL DO JC^T ABOlT /.V/TlflV^- 

QFtKT v/OFK^ qPtAT PFlCt05 VC> ^ffAHE. 



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E-Gradjobs.com 



Awesome benerits. 
Right now tecnnology. 
Real worla excitement 

Just another day at 
Uoicara County General. ! 

At Howard County General Hospital we 
value you. your work, your professional opinion. 
We foster a positive, caring, team environment 
that's designed to let you focus on being your 
best Add the strength of Johns Hopkins 
Medicine and you can be on the cutting edge 
of healthcare at our community-focused 
hospital. We're also closer than you think - 
just minutes from 1-95 and Routes 100 and 
29. near Columbia Mall. 



Contact us today about the following opportunities; 




Case Management 
Central Transport 
Diagnostic Imaging 
Dietary Services 
Environmental Services 



Materials Management 
Medical Records 
Nursing 
Pharmacy 
Respiratory Care 



Rehab Services 

(PT/OT/SLP) 
Physician/Surgical 

Assistant Services 



EOE m/f;d/v 



Apply online NOW! 

www.hcgh.org 



HCGH.Attn:HRDept. 

5755 Cedar Une. Columbia. MD 2 1 044 

Fax 410-740-7532 or 7542 

Jobline: 4 1 0-884-4567. Phone: 4 1 0-740-78 1 5 



HOWARD COUNTY GENERAL HOSPITAL 

A MEMBER OF JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE 




Oppurfunii'^' 




A challenging and rewarding career offering sea dut\-, diving, 
aviation and travel opportuniries is available as a NCAA 
Corps commissioned officer with the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration, an environmetital 
science agency. The NOAA Corps seeks officer candidates 
with U.S. citizenship, good health and a degree in science, 
engineering or math, including one year each of college 
physics and calculus. Officer candidates are trained as 
bridge watch officers for an initial two-year sea assignment 
aboard a NOAA research ship. 

NOAA Corps is actively recruiting for the next Basic Officer 
Training Class. To be considered, candidates must submit a 
complete application package to the NOAA Corps 
Recruiting Unit. 

Contact us to learn more about a career that will open up 
your world. 

Phone: 1-800-299-6622 

E-mail: NOAACorps.Recruitingfff noaa.gov 

More information about NOAA and the NOAA Corps 

is available at: 

http://ww^v.noaa.gov 

http://www.noaacorps.noaa.gov 




BlueCross BlueShield 



CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield 
is a major employer in the Mid- 
Atlantic States & has offices in 
locations throughout the region. 
We offer competitive salaries & benefits programs that 
include choice of several different health care programs, 
cafeteria benefit program. Flexible Spending Accounts, 
401(k) program & tuition reimbursement. 

We are seeking the following professionals: 

• IT Professionals • Claims Specialist 

• Medical Assistants • Business Analyst 

• Undei'writers • CSR's 
Interested applicants should mail or fax resumes to: 



Care First BCBS 
550 12th Street. SW 
Washington, DC 20065 
Attn: Human Resources 
Fax: 202-479-5354 



CareFirst BCBS 
10455 Mill Run Circle 
Owings Mills. MD 21 117 
Attn: Human Resources 
Fax:410-998-5313 



E-mail resumes to: careers@carefirst.com 
www.carefirst.com 

EOE. M/F/D'V Principles Only 




A Community Working Together. 

A healthy and happy connmunity is a thriving comnnunity. No one knows this 
better than Civista Health. We are the preeminent healthcare provider for our 
community, continually updating our facilities, technology, and equipment; and 
staffing our teams with the area's top nurses, physicians and surgeons. Our 
passion for people and supportive environment malte our professionals feel lilte 
they're a vital part of our community. And they are. Come see for yourself why so 
many people choose Civista Health as their employer of choice. 

We are currently recruiting qualified applicants in these areas: 



• Nursing 
' Radiology 



Laboratory 
■ Information Systems 



• Rehabilitation Services 

The benefits of choosing Civista Health include: 

• Competitive Salaries • Excellent Retirement Plan • Free Parking 

• Health, Dental, Vision & • Tuition Assistance • Clinical Ladder 
Prescription • Autonomy • Easy Commute 

In addition to great benefits and our commitment to our people, Civista offers a 
superior quality of life in Southern Maryland. For immediate consideration, 
contact: Karen Savoy, Human Resources, 701 East Charles Street, PO 
Box 1070, La Plata, MD 20646; Ph: 301 -609-4444; Fax: 301-609-4417. 
Visit our website at A 

CivistaM 

Health 



www.civista.org 



EOE 



Convenient. Capable. Caring. 




ur credit iinic _ 

membership with you. 



Build a better life with SECU Credit Union. As the state's largest credit 
union, SECU can help you save money well beyond your college years. 



Need a checking account? 
We have Free Checking with 
interest (no monthly minimum) 

Buying a car? 

Ask about our low rate loans 
for new and used cars. 



Saving for a home? 

Try our savings, CDs and 
money market accounts. 

Want 24-hour account access? 

Use Online Banking anytime. 




FT UNI a 



or visit www.secumd.org 



10-487-7744, 



t=i 



University ot Maryland students, alumni, faculty and statt are eiigioie to join btuu ureait union. 

SI in a Sliare Savings account opens your SECU membership. $25 to open a ciiecking account. 



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H-fltt. TVie stflff w«s «dvLse£?l by ML^laflel Frlbutsh a\A,d the yearbook w«s 
edited, by Metis (stflr 

The views express liA^the soos'Terrfl'pliA, ye^rboofe do lA^ot v^eces>s.ar- 
iLy express the views of Mflry La iA.d Medlfl liA,&orpor«ted, or «iA.y of Its flf- 
flLlfltes, or the niA.lverslty of M«ry L«»A.d At College P«rfe. No p«rt of this 
m,«y be repro(?li/cc.e£?l Iia, «iA/y form, wlthoutt -prior ooiAxseiA.t, exc-ept for educa- 
tloiA^flLpi/crposes. 

©aoo5rM«ryLfliA,d Medlfl (lA/Corpor^tecl. All rights reserv/ed. 



T«yLor Pi/cbLlshliA.0 Con^pfliA^y 
T>«lLfls, Tex«s 

Loc«L ■R^reseiA.tfltlveiJw.Llfljorc'lfliA, 
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ALL typefaces 1\a, the book, are from, Adc 
be fliA^cl L-liA/otype foiA/t libraries. FoiA^ts 
utsecl i\A,clu.de: BlcfeLey sc-rlpt (^^T, 
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Cover a\A,d B\A,dsheets 

The cover is ^lac\z oy-5 with silver foil. 

The e\A.ds,eets are c^evK.esis N\il\zweed. 



Photogrfl-phy Credits. 

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L^^-1; l^g-±, a, 3, -f; ±y-0-±; l^Hf-l; i^^sr-i, a, 3; Sia-l; ai:z-a; aia-3; ai3-l; 
il-f-1, a; a±^-l, 3; Q.±y-±; S^-f-l; 31-f-l; 3aO-l 

7riv^ ]ohv^sov^ 

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Poi/CM« I^^«lA/«t 



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AucstliA. Chow 
22-a;^i-a 

2-f-l;J7^-l 



Other photographs coucrbesy of stw.cle»A.tsi/tbm,lssLoiA/S