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Full text of "The Terrapin"

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Hh^ HQrfapin 2006 

^nioersify of Maryland 
College '^ark 
Volume 105 




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A University 150 years old. The school was first founded as an 
agricultural college on March 6, 1856 and then became Maryland 

State College before it finally became the University of 

Maryland. More than its name has changed in the last 150 years. 
While the senior class of 1906 consisted only of 16 men, today the 

University boasts a vibrant and diverse Student body of 25,000 
undergraduates. An article in the 1950 yearbook complains of the 
"baffling choices" students had when choosing between the seven 
colleges at the school, but today students must choose from thirteen 
nationally-ranked colleges that offer more than 100 majors. Whether 
it is through joining a fraternity or sorority, running for a Student 
Government position, appearing on stage in a campus production or 
getting involved in one of the thousands of clubs on campus, each 

student finds their niche some way and takes advantage of all 
the opportunities that the University has to offer. Though they may 
wear different clothes and talk about different things than the students 
of 150 years ago did, University of Maryland students have always 
come to this school to find a place to pursue their goals, learn and 
grow. So when you're rubbing Testudo's nose for good luck before 

a test, cheering on the Terps at a football game or just laying 

out on the Mall admiring the campus, picture this University and 

its rich history that has made it what it is today. 



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"Spnng passes 3n4 one Kemembers one's innocence. Summer 

passes ^nc| one remembeF-s one's exubeF-^nce. Autumn passes 

^n4 one remembers one's reverence. Winter passes ^n4 one 

remembers one's perseverance." ---Yoko Ono 




"The price of success is hard woric, 
dedication to the job at hand, and the 
determination that whether we win 
or lose, we have applied the best of 
ourselves to the task at hand/' 

-Vince Lombardi 




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SETT FOOTBALL T E AMHC 






Lots of big events made the news headlines in 2005 and 2006. Disastrous weather was 
some of the biggest news of the year, causing many fataHties and leaving homes and lives 
destroyed. Just as the world was getting over the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004 
which left more than 240,000 dead. Hurricane Katrina, one of the worst natural disasters in 
American history, swept over the Gulf Coast in late August. The hurricane destroyed entire 
towns in New Orleans, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, leaving more than a thousand dead 
and more than a million homeless. The University of Maryland did its part by opening up its 
doors to some of the displaced students of Tulane University, who could not attend their school 
because it was closed for the semester after the hurricane. Tulane reopened in the spring and 
many of these students returned to the school. Only a few months later, in October, a disastrous 
earthquake struck in Pakistan, killing 80,000 and leaving 2 million homeless. Organizations 
such as UNICEF and the Red Cross, as well as millions of individual volunteers from all over 
the world, came together to help out the victims of these horrible natural disasters. 

One bizarre story that made news headlines this year was the story of the "Runaway 
Bride," Jennifer Wilbanks. In April, just days before her wedding, the bride-to-be faked her 
own kidnapping and ran away to Alberquerque, leaving her worried fiancee on edge for four 
days before she finally called and admitted what she had done. When she returned to her home 
in Georgia she was charged with a felony, but luckily her fiancee still wanted to marry her. 

Terri Schiavo was another name in the news this year. Fifteen years ago, Schiavo suffered 
cardiac arrest and was left brain damaged. After fifteen years of watching his wife living life 
as a vegetable in the hospital, Michael Schiavo got a court ruling to have her feeding tube 
removed for the third time in four years. Terri 's parents appealed to the court, insisting that 
their daughter was still alive and her brain was functioning. In the end, the court sided with 
Michael and Terri died in late March. The incident led to protests and arguments between pro- 
life and right-to-die supporters. 

Another woman who was the source of much controversy was Cindy Sheehan. The 
mother of a soldier killed in Iraq created a peace camp called Camp Casey, named after her son, 
outside of President Bush's Texas ranch, where she slept in a tent for nearly a month. Cindy 
became the voice of anti-war protestors, gaining many supporters, but also many enemies. 



22 ^iciure ^his 




Hurricane Katrina became one of the worst natural 
disasters in American history when it hit the Gulf I 
Coast in August 2005. People fought for their lives | 
as they swam through the dangerously high floods. 
Right: People were stranded on rooftops of apartment 
buildings as they tried to escape the floods. They 
sought help from helicopters circling the area. 




Cindy Sheehan spoke out 
at an anti-war protest, 
displaying a poster that said 
''Bush Lied, Casey Died" in 
honor of her son. 




Jennifer Wilbanks, the 
Runaway Bride, took 
''cold feef to a new 
level when she faked 
her own kidnapping 
just days before her 
wedding. 



2006 9re!Dj 23 





The big political stories of the year were the War in Iraq, the Bush 
administration's response to Hurricane Katrina, the shifting Supreme Court and 
the decline in President Bush's popularity. The year started off with President 
Bush's January 20th inauguration to a second term. The Bush administration faced 
scandals this year with the indictment of Lewis Libby, a chief aide to Vice President 
Cheney, and the investigation of Bush advisor Karl Rove for allegedly leaking 
classified information identifying a CIA agent. In December, Bush defended 
having used wiretap surveillance of Americans' phone lines, claiming it necessary 
for the country's protection against terrorists. 

In 2005, President Bush offered to the Senate three nominees for the Supreme 
Court. John Roberts was confirmed as the new Chief Justice, replacing William 
Rehnquist, who died this year. Bush's White House counsel, Harriet Myers, 
quickly withdrew her nomination amid criticism from conservative groups that 
she was not qualified and not solidly conservative. In her place, Bush nominated 
Samuel Alito Jr., a right-wing conservative. The Senate debated Bush's pick and 
was expected to approve the nomination. 

The Bush administration received blame for not responding quickly or 
appropriately after Hurricane Katrina, The head of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, director Michael Brown, who came under fire for his actions 
after the Hurricane and was taken off of the relief effort, resigned in September 
and was replaced by David Paulison. 

In October, the US death toll in Iraq reached 2,000. President Bush said in 
an October speech that the "defense of freedom is worth our sacrifice." 

In a blast from the past. Deep Throat, the confidential source who linked 
President Nixon to the Watergate scandal in the 70s, revealed his identity this year 
as former FBI agent W. Mark Felt. Felt, now 92, was persuaded by his children 
to take credit for his action rather than wait until after his death for his children to 
reveal their father's identity. 



24 n^idure ^This 



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President Bush at his inauguration in January 2005. 




W. Marl<: Feh, a fonner FBI agent, 
revealed his secret identity as Deep 
Throat of the Watergate scandal this 
year. 




Chief Justice William Rehnquist died in 
September 2005. 



QOOe^olUics 25. 



T^ew 



s 



The world of fashion is a fickle one that never lingers too long on any one style. 
This year there were various clothing themes found on the hangers in our closets and 
draped on students around campus, but surely by the time you look back on this book 
they will have disappeared with maybe a hope of returning a decade down the road. 
One of the predominant looks for girls was bohemian chic or the "Rachel," as it is 
named after its creator, stylist Rachel Zoe. This look is defined by peasant skirts, long 
beaded necklaces and big, slouchy handbags. Coupled with a pair of funky boots, 
perhaps cowboy in nature, as well as some oversized "Jackie O" sunglasses, and 
suddenly you're en vogue. 

Other trends of the moment included tees and tanks with a longer hemline, often 
found underneath a cropped sweater or bolero, and worn on top of swingy gaucho pants 
or dark-washed denim. Accessories glamorized with metallic sheen decorated arms, 
ears and feet on a night out and dressed up any outfit, and wedges in all colors and sizes 
appeared as the new thing in footwear. 

For men, the trends were much more subtle, yet there are a few discemable looks 
that surfaced. The preppy popped-collar fad faded this year in exchange for a more 
laid-back style. Jeans took a slightly more fitted shape and no longer seemed to billow 
out from the legs and hang way below the boxer line, and the top adorning such pants 
was a vintage-styled tee or a sporty track jacket. Guys stepped it up a bit with a striped 
button-down oxford or polo. On the feet, old school was all the rage with the retro New 
Balances and any other casual sneaker or leather slip-on. 

For college students, attire took on a more casual tone. While jeans and 
sweatshirts will never go out of style, there were a couple of trends in the leisure 
department. Designer denim was the new must-have, whether it was Diesel, 7 For All 
Mankind, Citizens of Humanity or any of the other numerous labels. Other examples 
in the sporty department included the ubiquitous Juicy track suits for girls and the ever- 
popular Rainbow sandals for either sex. Representing perhaps the overarching trend for 

fashion in general, these fads took a brand name spin on everyday staples. 

26 l^icfure His 



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Designer jeans, long 
necklaces, long tanks with 
cropped sweaters and 
bohemian-style skirts were 
some of the most popular 
looks for women this year. 




For men, a zip-up and jeans 
created the laid-back look 
of the year. 

Cowboy boots and Rainbow 
sandals were popular shoes 
this year. 



2006 trends 27 





As 2005 came to an end and 2006 began there was more than enough 
celebrity gossip to keep fans content. Celebrity pregnancies were some of 
the biggest stories of the year. Britney Spears and husband Kevin Federline 
gave birth to a son named Sean Preston in September. In December, newly- 
married couple Jennifer Gamer and Ben Affleck announced the birth of 
their daughter Violet. Tom Cruise surprised fans when he jumped on a 
couch on the set of Oprah while talking about the new love of his life, Katie 
Holmes of Dawson s Creek fame. A few months later, the couple announced 
that they were engaged and that they had a baby on the way. Some other 
celebrity pregnancies included Gwyneth Paltrow, Michelle Williams and 
Heidi Klum. 

Two of the biggest break-ups of the year were the divorces of Jennifer 
Aniston and Brad Pitt, and of Jessica Simpson and Nick Lachey. Soon after 
Jen and Brad broke up the rumors were flying that he was with Angelina Jolie. 
Early in 2006, it was announced that Angelina and Brad were expecting a 
child together. Meanwhile, Jennifer Aniston seemed to bounce back and 
was rumored to be dating Vince Vaughn. Rumors of problems between 
Nick and Jessica were heard all year but the two didn't officially announce 
their separation until the end of 2005. 

Celebrity marriages were also a source of gossip. Donald Trump and 
Melania Knauss tied the knot in January 2005 in front of 500 guests with 
a very elaborate and expensive reception following the ceremony. Other 
celebrity marriages included Demi Moore and Ashton Kutcher, Heidi Klum 
and Seal, and Sandra Bullock and Jesse James. 







8 ^icfure ^his 



Angelina Jolie and Brad 
Pitt became one of the most 
talked about couples of the 
year. They announced that 
they were expecting a child 
together early this year. 




Celebrity pregnancies were the 
big celebrity news of the year. 
Gwyneth Paltrow, Jennifer Gamer, 
Heidi Klum and Britney Spears 
were all pregnant this year. 




2006 CelebMHes 29 





Although many fans were upset when shows Hke Friends and Sex and 
the City came to an end, lots of great new shows premiered last year that 
helped TV watchers get over this devastation and continued this year to 
even greater acclaim. 

On Lost, starring Matthew Fox, a group of survivors of a plane crash 
find themselves stranded on a Pacific Island where there are some strange 
and mysterious things going on, like the loud howling they hear coming 
from a mysterious creature. This season the characters continued to uncover 
secrets about the island and found danger looming everywhere. The show 
became the Golden Globe winner for Best Dramatic Television Series at the 
2006 Golden Globes. 

Desperate Housewives was one of the most popular shows this year. The 
series follows the happenings of a not-so-typical suburban street. Wisteria 
Lane. The seemingly normal housewives living on Wisteria Lane each have 
their own secrets and mysteries. This season started when Betty Applewhite, 
who is played by Alfre Woodard, and her son Matthew mysteriously moved 
onto the street during the middle of the night. They are keeping a man as 
prisoner in their basement who once killed a young woman. The other 
women on the street start gossiping about Betty when they hear a clanking 
coming from her basement and later find a corpse in the trunk of a car 
parked outside of her house. The ensemble cast stars Teri Hatcher, Felicity 
Huffman, Marcia Cross, Eva Longoria and Nicollette Sheridan. The show 
took home the Golden Globe for the Best Comedy Television Series. 

Other popular television shows of the year included Commander In 
Chief, Grey s Anatomy, House and Prison Break. 



30 ^I'dure ^his 




Desperate Housewives was one 
of the hit shows of this year. 
Below: The cast of Desperate 
Housewives at the Golden Globes 
after taking home the award for 
Best Comedy Television Series. 




Right: Matthew Fox played Dr. 
Jack Shepherd on Lost 
Below: The cast of Lost at the 
Golden Globes with their award 
for Best Dramatic Television 
Series 




2006 Te/eoision 31 




This year filmgoers enjoyed some familiar faces and some new 
faces on the silver screen. After their respective TV shows ended, 
Jennifer Aniston and Sarah Jessica Parker had more time to develop 
their movie careers with Aniston appearing in Rumor Has It and Parker 
in The Family Stone. Familiar actors like George Clooney and Jeff 
Daniels only got better, appearing in Syriana and The Squid and the 
Whale, respectively. 

There were several great remakes this year including Bad News 
Bears starring Billy Bob Thornton, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory 
starring Johnny Depp, King Kong starring Naomi Watts and Adrien 
Brody and Pride and Prejudice starring Keira Knightley. Two popular 
Broadway musicals were also brought to film with the movies Rent and 
77?^ Producers. There were also several prequels and sequels including 
Batman Begins, Star Wars III: Revenge of the Sith, Cheaper by the Dozen 
2 and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. 

Brokeback Mountain and Walk the Line were two of the big movie 
winners at the 2006 Golden Globes with Brokeback Mountain winning 
the Best Motion Picture- Drama and Walk The Line winning the Best 
Motion Picture- Musical or Comedy. Reese Witherspoon and Joaquin 
Phoenix also took home the awards for Best Performance by an Actress 
in a Motion Picture- Musical or Comedy and Best Performance by an 
Actor in a Motion Picture- Musical or Comedy for their performances 
in Walk the Line. 



32 Picture H^his 




Brokeback Mountain starred Heath Ledger 
and Jake Gyllenhaal as two cowboys who fall 
in love one summer and start a secretive and 
forbidden relationship after that. 



^"f f ' 



Walk The Line, a biopic of country 
music legend Johnny Cash, was 
one of the biggest movies of the 
year. Joaquin Phoenix took home 
the Golden Globe for his portrayal 
of Cash as did Reese Witherspoon 
for her portrayal of Cash's wife, 
June Carter. 



•■oQwc- nov. 






The 4th Harry Potter movie, 
Hariy Potter and the Goblet 
of Fire, came out this year. 
Potter fans rushed to theatres 
for the first showing of the 
movie at midnight. 



Q0069nooies 33 





This year a lot of new and talented stars popped up in the world of 
music, allowing for a lot of new sounds and songs to be heard anytime 
you turned on the radio. Natasha Bedingfield became a new name on 
the charts this year with her two hits "These Words" and "Unwritten" as 
did Rihanna, a native of Barbados, whose hits include "Pon de Replay" 
and "If It's Loving that You Want." 

Mariah Carey made quite a comeback this year when she released 
her album The Emancipation ofMimi, which included several hit songs 
like "We Belong Together," "Don't Forget About Us" and "Shake It 
Off." Mariah, who has not won a Grammy award since 1990, was 
nominated in eight categories, including album of the year, for this 
album. Rivaling Mariah for the Grammy's was Kanye West, who 
paired up with Jamie Foxx this year in the hit song "Golddigger." He 
also received eight Grammy nominations. 

Destiny's Child performed for the last time together in a farewell 
concert in September. Beyonce told People Magazine that the group 
was not really breaking up, "it's more like a growing up." The trio 
sold more than 40 million albums since they first started in 1999. 

Other hit artists of the year were Kelly Clarkson, John Legend, 
Fall Out Boy, U2, Gwen Stefani, Green Day and Ciara. 



' l^idure ^HdIs 




Mariah Carey's album The Emancipation of Mi mi and Kanyc 
West's Late Registration were two of the best albums of this year. 
Each received eight Grammy nominations in 2006. 




Destiny's Child gave their final group* 
perfomiance in September. 



Natasha Bedingfield released her debut 
album Umvvitten. 



90069nusic 35 



I 






This year politics and sports crossed paths when past and present 
Major League Baseball players were called to testify before Congress 
about steroid use. Some baseball stars, including Jose Canseco, 
admitted to having used steroids, but most players denied it. Rafael 
Palmeiro, an outfielder for the Orioles, who denied using illegal 
substances, later tested positive for steroid use. Another big story 
in baseball this year was the Chicago White Sox, who won the 2005 
World Series for the first time since 1917 under the direction of a 
Latino manager, Ozzie Guillen. 

The NHL became the first major sports league to cancel an entire 
sports season in 2005, when the players went on strike. The league 
resumed its season in the fall with new rules intended to regain fan 
interest. 

In basketball, 2005 was the year of the San Antonio Spurs. The 
team beat the Detroit Pistons to win the NBA championship. 

In 2006, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Seattle Seahawks were 
set to play each other in Super Bowl XL. 

The 2006 Winter Olympics took place in Torino, Italy. For the 
first time since 1 984, an American was not favored to win the women's 
figure skating competition. 

Some of the sports stars of the year were Reggie Bush of USC 
football, Shaun Alexander of the Seattle Seahawks and Steve Nash of 
the Phoenix Suns. 



^icfure HIdIs 



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The Spurs defeated the 
Pistons to win the 2005 NBA 
Championship. 



The White Sox celebrate their win ove! 
the Houston Astros in the 2005 World 
Series. 





The Pittsburgh Steelers and the 
Seattle Seahawks went head to head 
in Super Bowl XL. 



Rafael Palmeiro tested positive 
for steroid use after claiming that 
he had never used steroids. 




8 ^iduvQ Perfect 




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Wood For Thou 
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40 ^/dure Perfect 



Love them or hate them, every 
University of Maryland on-campus 
resident is more than famihar with the 
North and South Campus Dining Halls. 
Day and night, students fill these eateries 
to get a convenient meal, a quick coffee 
fix or a tasty treat. Students can choose 
from pizza, deli or hot sandwiches, salad 
bar, grilled foods, pasta and rotisserie 
chicken, among other cuisine. For 
dessert, students can chow down on a 
variety of pastries, cakes and pies, or 
enjoy the University's homemade ice 
cream. 

For an evening snack or a late dinner, 
many students return to the dining halls 
between 9 pm and midnight for Late 
Night. At this time they can choose to 
munch on mozzarella sticks, chicken 
wings or nachos or go for something 
more substantial like a sandwich or a 
quesadilla. Although students may not 
always love the choices at the dining 
halls, most would agree that going there 
still beats having to cook. 




Students can choose from a variety of 
beverages at the dining halls including soda, 
juice, coffee, hot chocolate, tea and water. 





For a healthier meal, students can 
find all different types of fruit at the 
dining halls. Here, a Dining Services 
staff member places fruit on The 
Diner's fruit stand. 




The salad bar offers another healthy alternative 
to some of the more greasy and fatty meals. 

Preceding page: 

1 . The South Campus Dining Hall is where students students can choose to take out then- 
who live on South Campus eat. It is closer to the ^^^^j ^^^j^^^. ^j^^^^ ^-^^-^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ j^ 
Mall than The Diner so many students choose to eat j^.^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^-^ ^^^^^, ^^ ^^ -^^ ^ 
there between classes. ^^^^_^^^ container. 

2. A group of friends sits down to eat breakfast 
together at South Campus Dining Hall. 

3. To top off their meal, students choose from a 
variety of desserts including cakes, pies, muffins 

and cookies. fining ^ialls 41 








A student studying in his 
dorm room. 




Washing aisi 
the chores students must 
do when they have their 
own kitchen. 





A group ot smaents smaymg m tneir 
lounge in Worcester Hall. Many 
students take advantage of the study 
lounges in the dorms. 



A gourmet meal as cooked by college 
students- rice, cheese, beef and Fritos. 




The laundry room of Queen Anne's. Students 
have to get used to doing their own laundry in 
the dorms. 



42 Picture Perfect 



Whether they are living in a dorm, in a suite or in an off-campus 
apartment, students quickly find that living at school is very different 
than living at home. Students have to adjust to living on their own and 
have to confront all kinds of issues such as dealing with a roommate, 
doing their own laundry and cooking by themselves. Underclassmen 
living in dorms find a lack of space and no air-conditioning to be 
uncomfortable at times. As they get older they will most likely find 
themselves in much nicer living conditions. Upperclassmen who stay 
on campus live in suites and apartments on South Hill or in Commons. 
Here, students get a bigger bedroom, a common room and a kitchen. 
Once off the meal plan, however, students have to cook every meal for 
themselves. 

Many students opt to live off campus. Students living off campus 
either rent a house or an apartment or live in a sorority or fraternity 
house. There are many apartment buildings within close proximity to 
campus for students to choose from. The University View is a new 
luxury apartment building that just opened this year. Its many amenities 
include a pool, a fitness center and a study room. It is within walking 
distance to the campus but there are also University View buses that 
transport students to campus. 

l:>or\AA Li-fe Through the ye^rs 




From left to right: This 1890 shot shows a group of cadets (back when 
UMD was a military academy) hanging out in their dorm. These fi-eshmen 
girls are shown socializing in their dorm on move-in day in 1940. This 
young man is shown hanging out in his dorm in 1970 listening to music on 
his stereo set with headphones. 



£ioing 43 



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VlUT^t 





1 . Both the CRC and Ritchie CoUseum have 
many machines for students to choose from 
including treadmills, elliptical machines, rowing 
machines, stairmasters and stationary bicycles. 

2. This student prepares to run on the track by 
stretching out. The indoor track allows students 
to run without having to worry about the 
weather. 

3. The weight room features many weight 
machines including the leg press that this 
student is using. Many athletes use both the 
CRC and Ritchie Coliseum to work out both in 
season and between seasons. 

Below: This student buffs up by lifting weights. 
For those who are not as strong there are also 
smaller 10 and 15 pound hand weights. 




44 ^I'dure Perfect 



Flocking to the Campus Recreation Center at an average 
of 5,000 per day during the week, students at the University of 
Maryland show a strong passion for working out. While the 
numbers decline throughout the week and into the weekend, 
students still make use of the enormous facilities which include 
a two-story weight room, an indoor track, racquetball and 
basketball courts, and three pools, two outdoor and one indoor. 

Another major attraction is the classes offered which are 
taught by student instructors. For a small fee students can 
participate in everything from Street Jam and Cardioboxing to 
cycling and water aerobics. 

Connected to the CRC is the Outdoor Recreation Center, 
where there is a ropes course and climbing wall, plus frequent 
organized trips. 

For those who live near Frat Row, there is also the option of 
working out at Ritchie Coliseum, which is smaller and older but 
has similar offerings to the CRC. 



The gym is almost always 
full of student. The fitness 
center is open from 6 am 
to midnight on weekdays 
allowing students to go 
when it is most convenient 
for them. 




forking Out 45 



A Ch«iA.ge 




Ot\AtY\A 




Many students take advantage of nice 
weather by doing their work outside on 
McKeldin Mall. 




Others decide that nice weather calls 
for more recreational activities. These 
students play soccer on the Mall. 




These students cool off by the fountain 
on the Mall. 




^icfure Perfect 



When the weather allowed for it, students preferred 
to study outside rather than in the dorms. 

Following page: Students used the Mall as a hangout 
even back in 1951. These 1951 freshman hung out 
and talked while sitting on the Testudo statue outside 
of McKeldin Library. 



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Between classes, work and going out, 
students needed time to relax and unwind. 
Instead of hanging out in their residence 
halls or apartments, they often gravitated 
to lounge areas inside buildings and around 
ampus. On nice days, McKeldin Mall 
was filled with students studying, napping 
pr talking. The Student Union also served 
as a comfortable, air-conditioned place to 
relax in during free time. Regardless of 
where they chose to hang out, students 
were able to spend time alone or with 
Vr^friends and take a break from th e day . 





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Campus ^angouk 47 \ 




FumiUar F/^c^es 





Students showed their 
famihes around campus. 



This family got the full UMD experience. Here 
they pick out desserts at the South Campus 
Dining Hall. 




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' Picture Perfect 



Many families 
attended this BBQ 
and Festival that took 
place on McKeldin 
Mall. This included 
a barbeque lunch and 
entertainment. 



Family Weekend is a time for students to show off their school 
to their families. This year Family Weekend took place from Friday 
October 14^^ to Sunday October 16^^. The weekend included a 
variety of activities that many students and their families decided 
to take part in. There were special activities including an Alumni 
Luncheon for parent alumni, who were particularly excited to be 
there. Other activities that families could choose from included 
a lunch with Coach Friedgen, an open house and reception at 
President Mote's residence, and a performance of Jane Eyre. 
Unfortunately, there was no home football game that weekend 
but many students attended Midnight Madness, the opening of 
the basketball season, with their families. There were several 
other games over the weekend including a men's soccer game 
and a women's volleyball game. Students who participated in the 
College Park Scholars program for two years received their citation 
as their parents watched on at a special ceremony that took place 
that weekend. All in all, there was something for every family at 
Family Weekend and every family who took part in these activities 
enjoyed themselves. 




The Liverpool Legends, considered to be the best 
Beatles tribute show, performed at the McKeldin 
BBQ and Festival. They are managed by Louise 
Harrison, sister of the late George Harrison. 




cr 



l-amily Weekend 49 




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M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D Maryland 
will win! Maryland has some of the 
wildest, most supportive and most 
energized fans in the country. Fluffy 
red wigs, Testudo helmets and painted 
chests are a common sight at any 
Terps sporting event, not to mention 
thousands of screaming fans. In each 
of the last four years student Terrapins 
set new attendance records at home 
football games. For the total 2004-2005 
basketball season, a record 299,39 1 fans 
attended home games. In February of 
2005, Comcast Center was packed to 
the brim as 17,243 fans watched the 
women's basketball team face Duke, 
setting a new women's basketball 
record for single-game attendance in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. Maryland's 
Terrapin pride is so renowned that the 
2006 edition of Princeton Review's "The 
Best 361 Colleges" ranked Maryland 
#1 for supporting intercollegiate sports 
teams. Go Terps! 



^ Picture ^erfed 




These students displayed their Terp pride for everyone to see. 



Preceding page: 

1. It's a sea of red in the 
stands when students 
come out to support their 
team. 

2. Students come cheer 
on the Terps rain or 
shine. These students 
tried to shade themselves 
from the heat at a 
football game. 

3. The marching band 
gets students pumped up 
during the games. After 
a touchdown is scored all 
fans can be heard singing 
along with the band to 
the Maryland fight song. 



S? ^oyal ^an 



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The Queen of England became the most royal 
Terp fan when she attended a Maryland football 
game in 1957. 



(5chool(5pmf 51 



A C^tvditY of A ct Ivlt (y 





From top: The outside of 
the Adele H. Stamp Student 
Union. The food court, 
which is a popular place to 
eat lunch, can get very busy. 



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Perfect 



The Stamp Student Union is the 
center of much activity on campus. When 
students need a break from the Dining Hall 
food, they often turn to the many choices 
of fast food that the Union's food court 
has to offer. These include McDonalds, 
Panda Express, Sbarro, Smoothie King, 
Taco Bell and Chick Filet. Other students 
come to the Student Union to study. There 
are several study lounges as well as many 
comfortable chairs and couches to sit on. 
Since the Union is equipped with wireless 
capability many students bring along their 
laptops when doing work there. 

Hoff Theatre in the Union shows both 
recent and old films at prices students can 
afford. Student tickets are only $3 but 
there are a lot of free movies too. The 
Hoff shows sneak previews of movies 
before they even come out in real theatres 
as well as older movies. Some popular 
movies shown this year were Charlie and 
the Chocolate Factory, Batman Begins and 
Madagascar. 

Whether they are there to eat, study, 
see a movie or meet friends, students can 
always find something to do at the Student 
Union. 




Above: Three women meet in the student union to"eat and chat. These students brought their 
laptops to the Student Union to get some work done while sitting comfortably in the lounge. 
Below: A group of men play pool in the Student Union in 1954. 




tidu 



(5tudenf^nion 53 



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H-ltt I \AC] t b e, 1^0 fl d' 





Commuters and student drivers 
often come back to their cars to 
find that they've received a parking 
ticket. Parking tickets are given 
for parking illegally or parking in a 
lot without a permit. Many student 
drivers are forced to park illegally 
because the parking lots are so 
crowded and looking for a spot 
would make them late to class. 



A dearth of parking spaces, 
high parking permit prices and 
the increasing cost of gasoHne has 
influenced many students to turn to 
ahemative modes of transportation. 
Fortunately, the University provides 
several free cross-campus services, 
including the Campus Bus Circuit 
and Nite Ride. For off-campus 
travel, students have easy access to 
the Washington DC Metro subway 
and bus systems and the MARC 
train system, which provides 
passage between Baltimore and 
DC. And if all else fails, there's 
nothing quite like a trusty bicycle; 
the University saw the use of bikes 
significantly increase this year. 



"^dure ^erfecf 




The Campus Bus Circuit 
runs around campus 
and on Route 1 . Many 
students take the buses 
when going out at night. 
There is also a bus that 
goes to the College Park 
Metro Station, making it 
easier for students to get 
into DC. 



Students take the Metro to DC. 
Many students take advantage of 
UMD's close proximity to DC 
and go there to shop, eat or sight- 
see. Some students have jobs and 
internships in DC. 





The cars may be different 
but the crowded parking lots 
were the same. This picture 
from the 1940s shows cars 
parked outside a dorm 
building. 



ImnsporlaHon 55 





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Cornerstone and Bentley's 
are two bars that students go 
to on their nights out. 




'HdurQ Perfect 



Whether they are going to a frat 
party, going out to the bars or going 
to a club, Maryland students enjoy 
their nights out. There are four 
I bars are Route 1 that are especially 
popular among students: Santa Fe 
Cafe, Bentley's, Cornerstone and 
Lupos. On weekends, the lines to 
get into these bars can often run 
down the street. Students not into 
the bar scene are sure to find a 
party at one of the school's twenty- 
three fraternities. Theme parties 
were always a student favorite and 
it wasn't unusual to see people 
walking down Route 1 dressed for 
a toga party or a Hawaiian luau. 
For students looking to get out of 
College Park, there was always the 
option of going to clubs in Baltimore 
and D.C. Many students enjoyed 
dancing the night away at Bar 
Baltimore, Have a Nice Day Cafe 
and Baia. 4 




In the modem-day equivalent of the 
classic toga party, these girls dress up 
in garbage bags and masking tape for 
an "anything but clothes" party. 

Background: These men are dressed up 
for a 1975 toga party. 




9iighiJ3ife 57 



L-oofenA-g CiAto the 

Future 





The outside of the new Jeong H. Kim Engineering 
Building 



A view of the 
rotunda from one 
of the upper floors. 
This building was 
designed to be 
both practical and 
beautiful. 

Below: A view 
of the building's 
beautiful rounded 
windows. 




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Many students may not have noticed a new building on campus 
this year, but ask any engineering student or professor and they'll 
certainly know what it is. The Kim Building is the newest building 
in the James A. Clark School of Engineering. This state-of-the- 
art research and education center with beautiful new lab rooms is a 
work of engineering itself. Looking down from any floor there is a 
view of the beautifully-designed rotunda. The building also features 
exposed columns and beams, a glass-enclosed elevator shaft, two 
bridges, visible color-coded pipes and heating and air ducts, all of 
which students can study and take measurements of in order to better 
understand the concepts they are learning about in class. 

The building, named after Dr. Jeong H. Kim, is the first building 
on campus named after an Asian- American. Dr. Kim received his 
Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Maryland and is now a 
professor in the Clark School of Engineering. In 2005, he was named 
one of the Top 10 Most Influential Asian Americans in Business. 
The university is lucky to have such a knowledgeable person as a 
professor and now namesake of one of its buildings. 




The building's namesake, 
Dr. Jeong H. Kim, at the 
dedication ceremony 



uiMi> NiA\AAes>akes> 




In this 1939 picture two other UMD namesakes, 
H.C. Byrd and Judge WiUiam P. Cole, are seen 
standing in the newly-built Byrd Stadium. 



Changes h Campus 59 



ArtAttaok 




Every year Maryland holds Art 
Attack, a day full of free activities 
on McKeldin Mall followed by 
a concert in Byrd stadium. This 
year students had access to spray- 
on tattoos, carnival rides, oxygen 
bars, a t-shirt tie-dying station, 
jousting, caricature artists, fortune 
tellers, wax hands, virtual reality 
simulators, climbing walls and 
Dance Dance Revolution arcade 
systems, among other things. 
The laid back, pop quartet Guster 
headlined the evening concert, 
accompanied by hard rockers 
Chevelle and Gin Blossoms. About 
8,000 students turned out for the 
concert. 



u/v 



Perfect 




Students rocked out 
to Chevelle and Gin 
Blossoms before the 
much -anticipated 
pop quartet Guster 
came out. 



Right: A student 
is lifted above the 
crowd of fans as 
Chevelle performs 

Preceding page: 

1. Crowds of students 
fill up Byrd Stadium as 
the concert begins 

2. A student gets his 
caricature drawn at the 
day of festivities before 
the concert. 

3. This student dares 
to be dangerous as she 
hangs from a bungee 
cord at Art Attack. 




9irl9inack 61 



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Pi\Ad' 





A protestor carries an American 
flag with a peace sign on it. 



A group of protestors in front 
of the Washington Monument. 
Many UMD students were among 
the crowd of 150,000 people. 



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A student signs a poster to 
show where she is from. 
There were people from 
all over the country at the 
rally. 

Following page: 
A 1971 Vietnam War 
protest at the University 
of Maryland got out of 
hand as police tackled one 
of the student protestors. 



'i'fv Perfect 



On September 24, 2005, 150,000 people from all walks of life 
turned up on the National Mall to protest the continuing war in Iraq. 
Families from the Midwest, grandparents, nuns, aging hippies, church ^ 
groups, war veterans and large numbers of students flooded the streets 
of DC to have their voices heard: Bring the troops home from Iraq. 

The University of Maryland, whose politically-minded students 
often take advantage of their proximity to Washington, DC to get 
involved in a variety of protests and rallies, had a large presence 
at the rally. Carrying signs reading "College, not Combat," college 
students made up a large part of the vocal crowd. 

In many ways, the protest was reminiscent of Vietnam-era 
demonstrations, with a modem twist. "Make love, not war" was 
transfoiTned into "Make levees, not war," a reference to the devastation 
left by Hurricane Katrina. 

"I wanted to go to prove the point that it only takes one person to 
make a difference," sophomore journalism major Zoe Lintzeris, who 
attended the protest, said. 





AT>^M of^uvi 




Many students came to Maryland 
Day, some as volunteers and 
some just to check it out. This 
student tries out one of the 
exhibits. 



Many alumni bring back their 
children to enjoy the Maryland 
Day festivities, as do parents from 
all over the state of Maryland. 
These children watch a student 
explain this exhibit. 





I ^idure Perfect 



The University of Maryland holds their Maryland Day every 
spring. The school opens up its doors to anyone who wants to 
come, which is especially enjoyable for alumni and their families. 
There is an array of free entertainment and hands-on activities for 
visitors to enjoy. The theme "Explore Our World" invites people 
to enjoy a day with the Terps, learn something new and make some 
new memories. 

In a tribute to Agricultural Day, Maryland Day's predecessor, 
which started in 1924 when the Livestock Club held the first 
student-run fitting and showing contest, the university's animals 
are on display during the day, while ice cream tasting and many 
other events are offered. Sports and Rec Row holds the Annual 
Red and White Football Game in Byrd Stadium as well as an 
autograph session with Ralph Friedgen. There are also various 
performances and activities such as an archaeological dig. In the 
middle of McKeldin Mall there are inflatable games for kids, lots 
of food, live performances and plenty of UMD information. No 
matter what you choose, Maryland Day is sure to please. 




From left: A student 
volunteer helps out with 
a beanbag toss game. 
Another student paints a 
young girl's face. 
This little girl seems to 
be enjoying painting at 
Maryland Day. 



9narylancl^ay 65 



c^ettiiA.(^ iiAA/oWed 




Clockwise from top left: The Fencing Club displays their swords and 
helmets. A member of the Club Gymnastics Team entertained crowds 
by doing flips on the trampoline. These three members of the Filipino 
Cultural Association got decked out in costume for the First Look Fair. 
This member of the Juggling Club showed off his juggling skills. 



■ure 



Perfect 



Hundreds of student clubs and organizations swamped 
McKeldin Mall with signs, information packets and smiling 
faces for the annual First Look Fair. The goal? "To get 
the word out so we can find people who are interested but 
may never have heard of our organization," said Laura Alin, 
member of service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega. The First 
Look Fair was a great opportunity for freshmen to learn about 
the many clubs and activities that the university has to offer, 
but many upperclassmen also took advantage of the fair to 
get more involved. Students went around to the tables getting 
information, signing up for club emails and talking to people 
already in the clubs. The variety of activities that students had 
to choose from, which included academic clubs, intramural 
sports teams, ethnic and religious groups, and performing 
groups, just to name a few, ensured that there was something 
for everyone at the First Look Fair. 




Members of TerPercussion, the UMD 
drum circle, entertained students at the 
First Look Fair. 



The Chess Club challenged 
students who walked by their 
table to a chess game. 




Hrsl JQook^air 67 



©u,t OiA. the TC)Wl/^ 




Clockwise (from top left): Starbucks quickly became one of the more popular 
Route 1 hangouts when it opened this fall. Ratsie's menu includes everything 
from pizza to chicken wings to subs. Potbelly's boasts some delicious 
sandwich choices and its large tables make it a good place for a group of friends 
to go. For Mexican food, students go to California Tortilla and Chipotle. 



Following page: Before it was Route 1, 
train tracks ran past the entrance to the 
school in 1890. 



n:h/re ^erfed 



i 



When students are looking to get off campus, the 
easiest place to go is Route 1 . Students who are looking 
for a break from the dining hall food have tons of choices 
on Route 1. For sandwiches, students frequent Potbelly's, 
Quiznos and Subway. For sweeter tastes, there's a Tasti 
Delight and Smoothie King. Even for more nocturnal 
students there is something: both the CVS and Wawa 
are open 24 hours. For a nicer dinner, students go to 
Applebee's or Noodles. 

The newest addition to Route 1, Starbucks, opened up 
this fall and quickly became popular among students. It 
is a good place for students to go to get their caffeine fix 
while they chat with friends or do work. 



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Right: Members of the 
Society of Women 
Engineers organize 
a bake sale to raise 
money for their 


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organization. 






Engineers / 



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Left: The School of 
Engineering requires 
students have strong 
backgrounds in math and 
the sciences. Computers 
and technology have 
vastly changed the study 
of engineering today. 



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p This nationally- 
recognized college 
offers a variety of 
majors in the field 
of engineering. 
Because of this 
diversity, the college 
has been recognized 
around the world 
for its achievements 
and boasts an 
impressive resume of 
student and faculty 
achievement. 

One of the 
largest colleges at 
the university, the 
college prides itself 
on its ability to 
attract distinguished 
students and faculty. 

This year, the 
Jeong H. Kim 
Engineering Building 
was dedicated, 
providing a beautiful 
new addition to the 
university's campus. 




The basis of the curriculum is a 
strong background in math and the 
sciences. Internships in students' fields 
of study are also encouraged, and 
students often find post-graduate jobs 
all over the country because of these 
internships. 



9lcacli 



emics 



73 




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4 



Ag|irB^<yiI'$iyiir# aumJ 




This page: Students in the agriculture 
program interact with many different 
animals, taking advantage of the learning 
facilities provided by the campus farm. 
There are also numerous interships 
available because of close proximity to 
parks and government agencies. 



7^1 dure 9s ^orfh 1,000 ^ords 



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The University of Maryland was originally founded as an 
agricultural college. In keeping with this tradition, the College 
of Agriculture and Natural Resources makes it its mission to 
improve the health of animals and explore all the different 
possibilities offered by the plants around us. 



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75 



School of Architecture, 

Planning, 

And 




Preservation 




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Hands-on experience and close proximity to one of the 
greatest architectural cities in the nation help make this college 
one of the university's finest. Much work is done with historic 
preservation, with undergraduate and graduate students getting 
to participate first-hand in restoration and preservation in 
the nation's capital. The college also 
offers study abroad programs with an 
emphasis on the architectural aspects. 

Urban studies andplanning students 
also study growth patterns, legislation 
and data, according to the college's 
website. 





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11 



College ofl^rtiS 

and 
Huma'ni'tieis 






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The College of Arts and Humanities encompasses a 
wide range of majors in the Uberal arts, from EngUsh and 
foreign languages to theatre and music. 

The beautiful Clarice Smith Center for the Performing 
Arts serves as a central facility for members of this college, 
putting on numerous musical and dramatic productions 
each year and allowing students to use skills in all areas of 
the arts. 

Classes in this college tend to be smaller and more 
specialized. Personal attention from faculty makes this a 
warm, welcoming college for students. 



^cadi 



emics 



79 



College of Behavioral 
and Social Sciences 



The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences handles the 
broad range of interests and career aspirations of its students. 

Prominent programs within the college include the CIVICUS 
learning-living program, the Bahai Chair for World Peace and the 
Sadat Chair for Peace and Development. 

The college had a major accomplishment this year when 
economics professor Thomas C. Schelling was awarded the Nobel 
Prize in Economics for his work developing the concept of game 
theory. 




"^ Picture 9s ^orfh 1,000 ^ords 




Above: BSOS students do some last minute studying for an ECON200 exam. 
Below: The BSOS department is based in Tydings Hall. 




S^cadi 



emics 



81 



College of 

Chemical and 

Life Sciences 




The College of Chemical and Life Sciences prides itself on 
the numerous research and hands-on opportunities offered to its 
students. Current students and alumni of this college find many 
jobs in the medical and scientific fields, many of them right here 
in Washington, D.C. 

Because the University is a large research institution, 
the program is able to supply its students with state-of-the-art 
equipment and laboratories. Much important work goes on in the 
college every day. 

Students in this college work closely with students from other 
institutions, including the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
County, the Center for Environmental Sciences and the University 
of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. 

'^'T^idure9s^orlh1,000^ords 



Below: Students in the College of Chemical and Life Sciences take 
advantage of the University's laboratories and equipment. 





^cademic^s 83 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER 

MATHEMATICAL AND 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES 




■^^. Picture 9s 9Dorlh 1.000 9Dords 



A large program, the 
College of Computer, 
Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences boasts 
an impressive resume: 
371 research scientists, 
2,600 undergraduate 
students, five research 
institutes and six 
academic departments. 

It is a nationally 
renowned program, 
nationally- ranked 
first in non-linear 
dynamics/chaos, fourth 
in databases, tenth 
in condensed matter 
and ninth in artificial 
intelligence research. 

Black Enterprise 
magazine also ranked 
the University and this 
program in the Top 20 
as the best environment 
for black collegiates. 





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The College of Education is curently ranked 12th nationally 
among education colleges by U.S. News & World Report. It also 
boasts nine nationally ranked specialities within the college. 

The college is divided into six academic departments, with 
three that offer undergraduate majors in teacher education. 

Students can focus on early childhood, secondary, elementary 
and special education. 

Students in this college get a lot of hands-on experience and 
are able to spend time in classrooms working with actual students 
to further develop their skills and prepare them for the outside 
world. 

This student-teaching program allows prospective teachers a 
chance to ready their skills for the world after college. 



9i^idure 9s ^orlh 1.000 ^ords 



College 

of 
Education 




These students ofthe College of Education study children's literature. 



Academics 87 



College of Health 
and Human 
Ferforwawce 




The Campus Recreation Center serves as the hub for heahh and recreation services 
at the university. Many students take advantage of the exemplary exercise and 
weight facihties, as well as a ropes course and outdoor climbing wall. 

^9/c/r/re 9.5 ^odh 1,000 ^ords 




The College of Health and Human Performance is composed 
of the departments of family studies, kinesiology and public and 
community health. 

Many opportunities to gain hands-on experience in the fields 
of public health are available, as well as numerous research 
opportunities. 

Faculty members have written many textbooks on related 
coursework and many have been internationally recognized for their 
work in these fields. 

The goal of the college is to "to contribute to the elevation of 
the human race and human existence through the study of health, 
aging, families and human movement, through the creating and 
development of interventions against life-style risk factors, and 
through the promotion of human health." 



Academics 89 



College of 



information 
Studies 

Ranked 14th in the nation among Library Science programs 
by U.S. News and World Report, the College of Information 
Studies is the University's primary center for graduate education, 
research and service in the field of information studies, according 
to the college's website. 

Students in the college complete research with numerous 
groups, including the Center for Information Policy and the 
Joint Institute for Knowledge Discovery. 

The college offers graduate studies to attain a Master of 
Library Science, a Master of Information Management and a 
Doctor of Philosophy. 





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Academics 91 



College of 




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The Philip Merrill College of Journalism is well-known as 
one of the top journalism colleges in the nation, offering degrees in 
print, broadcast and online journalism. 

Taking advantage of their location right outside of the nation's 
capital, Merrill students have the unique opportunity to secure 
internships and jobs in one of the media capitals of the world. 

Merrill students also develop their skills at some of the 
many UMD publications, including The Diamondback and Unwind; 
the campus television station, UMTV; and the campus radio station, 
WMUC. 

Graduates from the College have gone on to work at some of 
the most respected newspapers and broadcast outlets in the nation, 
including The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN and 
The Associated Press, according to the College's website. 



9lcad^ 



emics 



93 



Robert H* Smith 
School of Business 




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Ranked one of the top-25 undergraduate business programs in 
the nation, the Robert H. Smith School of Business has cultivated a 
reputation as a one of the university's most competitive and illustrious 
programs. 

The school offers a diverse group of business-related majors: 
accounting; finance; general business; information systems; 
international business; logistics, transportation and supply chain 
management; marketing; and operations management. 

There are also several extracurricular learning opportunities 
offered to business students, including QUEST (Quality Enhancement 
Systems and Teams). 





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95 



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The School of PubUc PoHcy offers several areas of undergraduate 
specialization: environmental policy; international security and 
economic policy; management, finance and leadership; and social 
policy. 

Faculty from the school have served in the Truman, Carter, 
Reagan, Bush and Clinton administrations, according to the school's 
website. 

The School of Public Policy has cuhivated an outstanding 
nationwide reputation. In 1992, the school hosted a Democratic 
Presidentialforum and in 1998, hosted theonlyMarylandgubernatorial 
debate. 

Students in the school are very active in the numerous student 
organizationsofferedto them, includingthe Policy StudentGovernment 

Association. 

Academics 97 




' '^I'dure fhe ^ossihiliHes 




9IcfMiQs 99 



Aikido Club 



African 

Student 

Association 




Academic Quiz 
Team 



^idure ihe ^ossibiliiies 




9lcfiviHes 101 



Asian American 
Student Union 




American Civil 
Liberties Union 



"^. ^Picture the Possibilities 



American Society of Civil 
Engineers 




American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers 




9ldiviHes 103 




On this page (from 
top): Best Buddies, 

Ballroom at Maryland, 
Association for 

Computing Machinery 



'^^4 ^Picture fhe ^ossibiliHes 



Ballet Company M 




f 




9lcfiviHes 105 



Black Student 
Union 




Black Honors Caucus 




Black Belt Club 




06 Picture Ihc ^ossibiliHes 




SicMHes 107 



Itlv- 



'"^8 Picture the ^ossibiliHes 




Clockwise from left: 
Boxing Club, Chess 
Club, Christian Student 
Union, Circle K 




9idiviHes 109 




' 1 ^iduTQ fhe ^ossibiliHes 




Clockwise from left: College Park Tuning, 
College Park Libertarians, The Democracy 
Collaborative and College Democrats 



^cHvifies 111 



Disciples Of Christ 

United Campus 

Ministry 




Electrical and Computer 

Engineering Graduate 

Student Association 




1 2 ^idure fhe ^ossibiliHes 



Engineers Without 
Borders 





Enlaces 
Latino- 
Americans 



9}cfiDiHes 113 







On this page: (Top) 

Erasable, Inc., (Center) 

Faux Paz, (Right) 

Ethiopian Student 

Assocation 




STUDENI 





'«~:/sa* 



^ ^ 4 ^Pidure fhe ^ossibilifies 




^cfivifies 115 



Generics- 

Male 

A Cappella 

Singers 




Go Club 




116 Picture the ^ossibilifies 




Filipino 

Cultural 

Association 



Golden Key International Honour Society 




91cHDities 1 1 7 







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Gymnastics 
Club 




Habitat for Humanity 



Greek Heritage Society 





91c f Mies 1 1 9 




120 ^iduvQ the ^ossihiliHes 




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Clockwise from left: Iranian Students 
Foundation, Help Center, Hong Kong Student 
Fellowship, Jewish Student Union 



^cfioiiies 121 



Kol Sasson 




Jewish Social Action Committee 




122 ^idure the ^ossihiliiies 



Juggling Club 














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9idMies 123 



Korean Student Association 




Leadership Collaborative 



Maryland Cow Nipple 




124 ^idure fhe ^ossibiliHes 




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Lebanese Student Organization 




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Maryland Dance Team 






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26 Picture the ^osMhililies 



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Maryland Club 
Gymnastics Team 



Maryland Honor Guard 



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Maryland Images 




91dioiHes 127 



Maryland Men's Crew Team 




Maryland Marauders 




28 Picture fhe ^ossibiliHes 




Maryland Rugby Football Club 




9ldioilies 129 



MaryPIRG 




Math Club 




130 l-'idure the l^ossibililies 



Men's Club Basketball 




Mockappella 




9lcHviHes 131 



Mortarboard National Honor Society 




Muslim Women of Maryland 




132 Picture fhe ^ossihiliHes 



Multiracial and Biracial Student Association 




Organization of Arab Students 




'oities 133 



Orientation Advisors 



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Pakistani Student Association 




H^134. 9/c/^rg fhe ^.ossibiliHQs ^\ 



Portuguese Language 
Student Association 



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Primannum Honor Society 




Residence Halls Association 




136 Picture fhe ^ossibilitiQS 



Sailing Team 




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SHARE Peer group 




'Diiies 137 



Sign Language Club 



Society of Hispanic 
Professional Engineers 





Society of Automotive Engineers: Terps Racing 




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"Jlciwities 139 



Student Archivists at Maryland 



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is Students For Life 




\ 40 Picture the Possibilities 



Students for Sensible Drug Policy 




Student Global AIDS Campaign 




TERPcorps 



TerPAC 





Teach For America 




142 ^idureJt^^^QMkililm 



Terrapin Trail Club ¥ 




■^IMm^JA 



TerPercussion 




Thai Student Association 




Terrapin Ski and 
Snowboard Club 



144 Picture the Possibilities 




I^DtR^lir 



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JTerrapin Waveriders Surf Club 





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Turkish Students Association 




146 Picture the Possibilities 



Vietnamese Student Association 




Wrestling Club 




^^dimUo^ 141 



World Carp 




Women's Crew Team 




Women's Ice Hockey Club 




\A2SPicfure ikeSossiJ^ilim 



Women's Club Rugby 







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Class of 2006 151 



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Class of 1906 153 






Jacques Abadie 
Accounting 



Jeffrey Noel Abando 
Logistics 




Bethel Abate 
Civil Engineering 



Lisa Abramowitz 
Accounting 







Teon Abrams 
Criminal Justice 



Ameerah Abutaa 
Civil Engineering 



Kristin Adams 

General Biology & 

Criminal Science 



Adebukunola Adegorusi 
Government & Politics 







Afusatu Adeniyi 
Economics 



Olubisi Adesuyl-Oluwole 

Biology & Community 

Health 



Babatunde Adeyemo 
Electrical Engineering 



Maribel Adia 
Marketing; 



i54 (5 ay Cheese! 






Daniel Adler 
Digital Media 



Aswad Afzal 
Computer Science/Statistics 



Peter C. Agustiii 
Finance & Accounting 




lanjira Ahmed 
Finance 







Robert Aikins 
Mechanical Engineering 



Shohei Akao 
International Business 



Sumair Akhtar 
Microbiology/ Anthropology 



Evan Albert 
Finance 







Pouya Alimorad 
Finance 



Kathryn Allan 
Fire Protection Engineering 



Christina Allen 
Psychology 



Fritz Alphonse 
Economics 



Class of 9.006 155 




Michael Altman 
Computer Engineering 




Moyo Aluko 
Mechanical Engineering 




Onu Amadi 
Biochemistry 




Katharine Amenabar 
Kinesiology/Pre-Nursing 




Hirsh Anient 

Psychology/Government 

& Politics 




Christopher Ames 
Business & Communication 




Pamela Amihere 
Psychology & Biology 




Josephine Amoako 
Criminology 




Ely Amos 
Accounting Finance 




Tyrice Amos 
Criminal Justice 




Divesh Anand 

Info Systems, Logistics, 

Transportation 




William Anderson 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



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Robert Anderson Jr. 
Kinesiology 



Chihea Anh 
Journalism & Spanish 



Elizabeth Anilionis 
General Biology 



Joseph Ankomah 
Government & Politics 







Okechukwu Anochie 


Justin Appei 


Jonathan M Armacost 


Kameron Aroom 


Cell Molecular Biology. 


English 


Government & Politics/ 


Landscape Architecture 


Genetics 




Economics 









James Arthur 


Soha Ashrafi 


Celia Asinor 


Sion Assfaw 


Sociology 


Neurobiology & 
Physiology 


Criminal Justice 


Electrical Engineering 



Class of 9006 157 







Kim Auerbach 
Government & Politics 



Danielle Averett 
Kinesiology 



Shelley Avny 

Psychology & Family 

Studies 



Jacob Bachmaier 

Government & Politics, 

Philosophy 







Jupiter Bagaipo 
Physics/Mathematics 



Antoinette Baines 
Kinesiology 



Zvi Band 
Computer Science 



Natalie Banes 
Medical Marketing 







Brian Banks 

Natural Resource 

Management 



Jason Barash 
Computer Science 



Victor Barba-Sorra 
Aerospace Engineering 



Mark Barberan 
Economics 



i5& (5 ay Cheese! 






Ryan Barkley 
Criminal Justice 



Mane Barnes 

Mathematics & 

Economics 



Kumasi J Barnett 
Art Studio/Art History 



Julia Baron 

Environmental 

Economics 






Joseph Barron 
Marketing 



Edward Bartolome 
Biochemistry 



Arlunaa Batbold 
Accounting 




Adam Bates 

Computer Science & 

English Lit 







Brian Baum 

Government & 

Economics 



David Baumgarten 
Electrical Engineering 



Thomas Baummer 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Emily Beach 

Public & Community 

Health 



Class of 2006 159 



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Alissa Beaty 
Criminal Justice 



Melissa Beavers 

Physiology And 

Neurobiology 



Stacey Beckstrom 

Logistics, Transportation 

& Supply Chain 

Management 




Michael Bender 
Accounting 






Philip Benenati 
Landscape Architecture 



Andrew Benicewicz 
Accounting 



Kristen Benovic 
Elementary Education 




Johanna Berger 
Psychology 




Julie Berger 
English 






Anna Berry 
International Business 



Laurie Bertenthal 
Government & Politics 



Jessica Bessel 
Music Education 



iQO (5 ay Cheese! 




Michelle Betrock 
Communications 




Christopher Betti 
Computer Science 




Nadeem Beydouii 
Accounting 




Alison Bishop 
American Studies 




SuloNC Bista 
Electrical Engineering 




Walakewon Blegay 

Government & Politics/ 

Criminology 




Bradley Block 
Marketing 




Lee Block 
Accounting 




Michael Blume 
Art Studio 




Jessica Blumenthal 
Hearing & Speech 




Amanda Bobnis 

Criminology-Criminal 

Just & Soc 




Erica Bodner 
Marketing 



Class of 2006 161 







Jennifer Boggs 

Cell Biology & 

Molecular Genetic 



Nicole Bohe 
Art History 



Corey Bonasorte 
Marketing 



Kathryn Bonistalli 
Animal Science 







Candice Boteler 


Erin Boteler 


Michael Boteler 


Lauren Bowman 


Education, Curriculum 


English 


Civil Engineering 


Environmental Science 


& Instruction 






& Policy 







Emily Boyd 
Marketing 



Lindsay Boyer 
Criminal Justice 



Pamela Boyle 
Marketing 



Gillian Braden 
Animal Science 



■/(52 c5ay Cheese/ 



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Bridget Brady 
Elementary Education 



Elizabeth Braganza 
Entzlish 



Stephen Brand 

General Business & 

Management 



Tiara Braxton 
Criminal Justice 







Ilan Breit 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Lauren Brereton 
Family Studies 



Angela Bright 
American Studies 



Rhea Bright 
Communication 







James Brockington 
Marketing 



Stefanie Brodie 
Civil Engineering 



Adam Brown 
Business & 
Kinesiology 



Daniel Brown 
Biology 



Class of 2006 163 




Pamela Brozowski 

Cell Biology & 
Molecular Genetic 




Garrett Brustein 
Finance 




Erin Bryan 
Psychology 




Robin Bryan 
English Education 




Laura Bryer 
Elementary Education 




Edward Bubert 
Aerospace Engineering 




Ashley Bucciferro 
American Studies 




Arial Bueno 
Mechanical 
Engineering 




Bich-Tram Bui 

Cell Molecular Biology 

Genetics 




Tequela Bulow 
Kinesiology 




Miriam Bunow 
Anthropology History 




Danielle Buonantony 
Zoology & Education 



i(54 (5 ay Cheese I 






Deon Burchett 
Mathematics 



Scott Butch 
Government & PoHtics 



Ashleigh Butler 

Music Performance & 

Music Education 



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WiJ 



Bethonie Butler 
Journalism 






Clive Butler 

Biological Resources 

Engineering 



Katherine Butt 
Marketing & Loaistics 



Shanel Butts 
Electrical Engineering 




Edmond Byrnes 
Microbiology 




Patricia Calomeris 
Psychology 






Kathryn G Campbel 

Journalism/Criminology, 

Criminal Justice 



Nathalie Canadas 

French International 

Business 



Lisa Cauda 
Public Health 



C/ass of 2006 i65 



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Taylor Cantwell 
Psychology 



Claire Carlin 
Criminal Justice 



Rachel Carlton 
Accounting/Finance 



Shanna Carter 
English Literature 




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Regina Castro 
Journalism 



Tiffney Cates 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Danielle Cavalli 
Communications 



Christa Cavanaugh 
Psychology 







David Cetlin 

Cell Biology, Molecular 

Genetics 



Jennifer Chafin 

English Language 

Literature 



Bradley Chalupski 

Government & Politics, 

French Lit 



Andrew Chamberlin 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



i66 (5 ay Cheese! 







Albert Chang 
Economics 



Michelle Chang 
Marketing 



Sheree Chapman 
Economics 



Iqtedar A. Chaudhry 

Computer Science, 

Economics 







Ronald Checkai 
Physics 



Rashad Cheeks 
Economics 



Tamil Chellaiah 

Logistics, Transportation 

& Supply Chain 

Management 



Daniel Chen 
Electrical Engineering 






Jennifer Chen 
Psychology 



Matthew Chen 
Marketing 



Scott Cherry 
Finance 




Lisa Cheung 
Accounting/Finance 



Class 0/2OO6 i67 







Jennifer Y. Choi 
Economics & Pre-Law 



Jinyoung Choi 
Economics 



Stella Choi 
Biology 



Dana Christiansen 
Communication 







Elizabeth Chu 
Art History 



Marie Elena Ciocci 
Journalism 



William Cladek 
Computer Engineering 



Hakeem Clark 
Kinesiology 





Rachel Clark 

Psychology /American 

Studies 



Tiffany Clark 

Logistics,Transportation 

& Supply Chain 

Management 





Aishah Clarke 
Kinesiology 



Rachel Claxton 
American Studies 



i6& (5 ay Cheese I 




Patrick Clifford 
English 




Jesse Clinton 
Marketing & Logistics 




Scott Clipp 
Journalism 




Chase Clouser 
Economics 




Andrew Cluster 

Cell. Molecular 

Biology & Genetics 




Danyele Coffey 
Government & Politics 




Claire Cohen 
Criminal Justice 




Charlene Coleman 
Sociology 




Randall Coleman 
Government & Politics 




Elizabeth Coluni 
Marketing 




Shannon Council 
Dance 




Ivhara Connor 
Psychology 



Class of 9006 169 





Eugene Cook 
Aerospace Engineering 



Clarice J Cooke 

Neurobiology/ 

Physiology 





James Cooney Iv 
American Studies 



Calvin Cooper 

Chinese/Logistics 

Transportation & Supply 

Chain Management 







Erica Cooper 

Spanish Language 

Literature, Business 



Mara Coplowitz 
Accounting 



Lloyd Cotler 
Government & Politics 



Kathleen Coughlin 
Elementary Education 







Justin Coulombe 
Accounting & Finance 



Reginald Covington 
Mathematics 



Kathleen Cowles 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



James Crawford 
Computer Science 



no (5 ay Cheese ! 







Alex Csicsek 

History & Government 

& Politics" 



Elana Cutler 
Marketing 



Huyen Dao 
Comuter Engineering 



Bisola Daramola 
Psychology & English 







Shai Dardashti 
Finance 



Maybelle Dasilva 
Family Studies 



Michael David 
Criminal Justice 



Alejandra N. Davila 
Sociology 




Brandon Davis 
Accounting 






Crystal L. Davis 
Government & Politics 



Danielle Davis 
Kinesiology 



Jonathan Davis 
Aerospace Engineering 



Class of 2006 171 






katherine De Souza 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



Paul W. Deafenbaugh Jr. 

Music (Trumpet 

Performance) 



Justin Dede 
Kinesiology 



Sliiva Uehghan 
Computer Science 







Sabrina Delgado 

Agriculture & Resource 

Economics 



Daniel Dell 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Andrew Demeulenaere 
English/Philosophy 



Alicia Dennis 
Accounting 







Jennifer Dent 
Marketing 



Christopher Der 

Geographic Info Sci/ 

Computer Car 



Angela Deridder 

Neurobiology/ 

Psychology 



Ashley Deshields 
Art Studio 



^72 c5(9£/ Cheese I 




Sunoctha Desiraju 
Biology & Spanish 




Hamsatou Diallo 
International Business 




Urta Diaz 
Criminal Justice 




Paul Dickens 

Neurobiology & 

Physiology 










oseph Dietrich 


Chantel Dillard 


Margaret Distlcr 


Tara Dittamo 


Bio Resource 


English Creative 


Cell & Molecular Bio. 


Business-Finance 


Engineering 


Writing 


& Genetics 






Amy Dolan 


Candace Dold 


Vanessa Dormesy 


Erin Downs 


Accounting 


Communication 


Finance 


Neurbiology/ 
Physiology 



Class of Q006 173 





Richard Doyle 
Sociology 



Stacy Driggin 
Microbiology 





Amy Dudiak 

Theatre Design & 

Production 



Sarah Duffy 
Kinesiology 





Andrea Duncan 
Kinesiological Sciences 



Ryan Dymek 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 





Zachary Eagle 
Forensic Investigation 



Aaron Eckert 
Aerospace Engineering 







Marissa Edwards 
Communication 



Corrine Ehrlich 
Elementary Education 



Behrang Eini 
Economics 



Tracy Eisenberg 

General Bus & Mgmt/ 

Legist, Transportation & 

Supply Chain Mgmt 



i74 (5 ay Cheese! 






lola hkunsanmi 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



C'hinomso Ememe 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Jo-Ann hnglish 
English 



Lauren hpslcm 
Marketing 




Graham Erbe 

Criminology, Criminal 

Justice 






Hannah Erickson 
Classics 



Michelle Escobedo 

Environ Mental 

Science & Policy 



Bemnet Eshete 

Physiology And 

Neurobiology 







Adam Eskow 
General Business 



Rex Esochaghi 

Physiology & 

Neuro-Biology 



Kelechi Esoga 
General Biology 



Geetangeli Etwaroo 
Psychology 



Class of Q006 175 







Caitlin E\ans 
Journalism 



Miranda Evrard 

Environmental Sci: 

Politics & Policy 



Hilah Evrony 
Psychology 



Kimberly Ey 
Psychology 







abajide Fagbemi 


Olalekan Falade 


C raig Famoso 


Wuzheng Fan 


Biology 


Cell Biology & 
Molecular 


Criminal Justice 


History 





Angela Fang 
Sociology 



Courtney Farley 
Psychology 





Ian Federgreen 
American Studies 



Matthew Feinstein 
Government & Politics 



'd (5 ay Cheese! 



Anna Marie Kcjcran 
Biological Sciences 




Mniinde Felix-Ukvvu 
Psychology 




Tewodios Ferede 
Electrical Engineering 




Eric Ferencz 
English 




I 






Inga Ferguson 


Anne Ferruggiaro 


Nathan Fierro 


Rachel Fischei 


Community And Public 


Hearing & Speech 


Materials Science 


English 


Health 


Sciences 








I 






aniel Fishbein 


Gwen Flasinski 


Rachael Fleischer 


Bryan Fleming 


Mechanical 


Computer Engineering 


Kinesiology 


Microbiology 


Engineering 









Class of 2006 m 




Kathryn Fluss 

Cell, Molecular 

Biology & Genetics 




Sharon Fluss 
Cell Biology 




Adrian Fontecilla 

Economics/ 

Government & Politics 




Artma Foster 
Family Studies 




Kierra S. Foster 
Family Studies 




Syntonia Foster 
Physical Sciences 




Lauren Foundos 
Communications 




Leanna Fox 
Community Health 




Stuart Fox 

Accounting & 

Mathematics 




Timothy France 
Family Studies 




Sonya Frazier 
Psychology 




Kari B. Fredriksen 
Communication 



^ (3 ay Cheese! 




Casey Friedberg 
Finance 




Matthew Friedson 
Marketing 




Thomas Fritchman 
Electrical Fngineering 




Jessica Frost 
American Studies 




Dcidre t ulk^ 
Government & Politics 




Adam Gabai 
Mechanical 
Engineering 




Bernie Gabin 
Physics And 
Astronomy 




Mara Gallagher 

Public And Community 

Health 




Sean Gallagher 
Economics 




Brynn Gannon 
Architecture 




Jason Gant 
Communication 




Nicholas Garcia 
Food Science 



Class of 9006 179 







Veder Garcia 
Biological Science 



Jose Luis Garcia-Moreno 
Civil Engineering 



Bridget Gardner 
Marketing & Logistics 



Robert C. Garner 
Journalism 







Michael Garofalo 
Cell & Molecular 
Biology, Genetics 



Lindsay Garroway 
Communications 



John Gaudino 
Finance & Accounting 



Kevin J. Gaughan 
Landscape Architecture 







Shannon Gavey 
Marketing 



Patrick Gavin 
Journalism 



Sarah Gebo 
Family Studies 



Melanie Gehman 
Psychology 



"^ c5gl/ Cheese/ 







Ariella Gelb 
Enelish 



Louis Gephardt 
Theatre 



Robert Gerson 
Government & Politics 



Emily Gertler 
Communications 







Kira Gianni 
Cell & Molecular 
Biology, Genetics 



Steven Gilchrist 
History 



Michael Gillman 
Information Systems 



David Ginensky 
Government & Politics 







.lossalyii Ginsbiirg 
Elementarv Education 



Andrew Giordano 
Accounting 



Todd Giraudiii 

Criminology & 

Criminal Justice 



Mar\ Glo\er 

Biology/ 

Neurophysiology 



Class of Q006 1&1 







Najwa Glover 
Chemical Engineering 



Karena Godfrey 

Economics/ 

Criminology/Crim Just 



Jeffrey Gold 
Marketing 



Adam Goldstein 

History & 
Communications 







Myron ( joldstcin 
Criminal Justice 



Matthew Goller 
Finance & History 



Joseph Golouski 
Computer Science 



Steven Gong 

Supply Chain Logistics, 

Marketing 




Vanessa Gonzalez 
Animal Science 






Yael Goodman 
Marketing, Logistics 

Transportation & 
Supply Chain Mgmt 



Joshua Gordon 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Zachary Gordon 
History 



■2 (5 ay Cheese! 







Shari Gorga 
Kinesiology 



Lauren Gould 
Broadcast Journalism 



Alison Gozora 
Food Science 



Jonathan M. Graff 
Aerospace Engineering 







Tina Grandison 

Psychology Criminal 

Justice 



Andre Gray 
Psychology 



Austin Gray 
Elementary Education 



Joscphus Gray 
Family Studies 







Trac\' Green 
Individual Studies 



Keith Greenbaum 
Business 



Damon Greene 

Neorobiology & 

Physiology 



Andrea Greenwald 
Communication 



Class of Q006 163 







Alexander Gretsinger 
Computer Science 



Cecilia Grey-Coker 

Black American 

Studies 



Jason Gribschaw 
Kinesiology 



Jason Grimes 
Government & Politics 







Noah Grosfeld-Katz 
Japanese 



Jamie Cirossiiickle 

Kinesiology, Business 

Management 



Carcn Groveman 

Physiology, 

Neurobiology 



Bernard Gruberg 
Marketing & Logistics 





Robert Guerieri II 
Mech Engineering 



Matthew Gulezian 
Givernment & Politics 




Emily Guskin 

Government & Politics 

& Communication 




Einav Haberman 
Psychology 



^ (5 ay Cheese! 



Nana Habrumman 

Economics, 

Government. Politics 






Michael D. Hackner 
Mathematics & Spanish 



Allison Hagerman 

Journalism 



Sarah Hall 
English 







Haley Halpern 
Kinesiology 



Joseph HaKey 
Economics 



Angelique Hamilton 

Criminology Criminal 

Justice 



Emmanuelle llangue 
Psychology 







Carly Hantman 
Family Studies 



Blair Harris 
Japanese 



Elizabeth M. Harrison 
Accounting 



C\nthia Harrod 
Psychology 



Class of Q006 185 







Maggie Hart 
Psychology 



Nafisa Hasan 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



Jcnnilcr llascnicicr 
Finance 



Sarah Haszko 

Hearing & Speech 

Sciences 




Tima Hawes 
Communication 






1\ Hawkins 
Biology, 
Individualized Study 



Lauren Hayden 

Marketing & 

Psychology 



Gary Heckman 
Broadcast Journalism 




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Jeffrey Heeter 
Philosophy 



Tiffany Heill 
Economics 





Angela Henneberger 

Psychology & 

Criminology 



Lauren Hennessy 
Communications 



^36 (5 ay Cheese! 




Kerry-Ann Henry 
Government & Politics 






Lynn Hernandez 
Criminal Justice 



Melanie Hershaff 
Economics 



Stephen Herwig 
Mathematics 




Jonathan Hess 

Logistics, Tranportation 

& Supply Chain 

Management 






Amanda High 
Biology 



Isaac Hill 
Criminal Justice 



Brian Hine 
Economics/History 




Eric times 

Emironmental 

Engineering 






Jonathan D. Hodax 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



Brian Holler 

Government & 

Poloitics 



Enika Holley 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



C/asj of 9006 187 



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Michael Holzcr 
English 






Min Hong 

Biology:Ecology & 

Evolution 



Alexander Hooke 
Physics 



Jessica Hoppe 

English & 
Communication 




Michael Horak 
Computer Engineering 






Marta Horvat 
Economics 



Beth Hoi'witz 
Marketing 



Rachel Hoult 
Psychology 







Kristin Howard 
Hearing And Speech 



Zachary Howard 

Natural Resources 

Water Soil Con 



Damien Howell 

African American 

Studies 



Wenchi Hsu 

Biological Resources 

Engineering 



i&& (5 ay Cheese! 






Jennifer Hum 


Myles Hungerford 


Meioni Hurley 


Ashley Hutcheson 


Physiology & 


Finance'Economics 


Family Studies 


Public & Community 


europhysioiogy 






Health 




Brian Hutchison 
Psychology 




Kristen Iglesias 
Economics 




Katherine Ignaffo 
American Studies 




Osaze Ihator 
Japanese 




Christme Ikeda 
Mechanical 
Engineering 




Erin Imbasciani 
Psychology 




Narda Ipakchi 
Government & Politics 




Dareil lrb\ 
Criminal Justice 



Class of '200(5 1S9 







Abidciiii Sodi Isiaq 
Accounting & Finance 



Devon Jackson 
Crimonology & 
Criminal Justice 



Ja-Nee Jackson 
Family Studies 



Sakisha Jackson 

Information Systems 

& Finance 







Tori Jackson 

Spanish Language & 

Literature 



Gregory Jacobs 
Accounting 



Carly Jacobson 

Hearing & Speech 

Sciences 



David Jacobson 
Computer Engineering 







Scott Jacoby 
Aerospace Engineering 



Firouzeh Jalilian 
Computer Science 



Dana Marie James 
Psychology 



Allison Janetis 

Early Childhood 

Education 



190 day Cheese I 







Mitchell Jarvis 
Finance 



Jasmine Jenkins 

Neurobiology & 

Physiology 



Marianne Jetter 
Communications 



Michael Joesting 

Neurobiology & 

Physiology 







Andrea Johnson 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Jemel Johnson 
Family Studies 



Katie Johnson 

Environmental Science 

& Policy 



Amy Jones 

Physiology/ 

Neurobiology 







Brian Jones 
Electrical Engineering 



Clyde Jones 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Lucienne Joseph 
Criminal Justice 



Elizabeth Jurinka 
Government & Politics 



Class of Q006 191 



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Kristjan Justesen 
Electrical Engineering 



Hossein Kalarestahi 
Psychology 



Lori Kalikstein 
Government & Politics 



Laura Kalter 
Marketing 







John Kaminski 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Shuk Kan 
Economics 



Min Kang 
Economics 



Daniel Kanner 
Government & Politics 




Valerie Kanner 

Criminology/ 

Psychology 






Jeremy Kaplan 
General Business 



Josh Kaplan 
English 



Gregory Karam 
Economics 



199. 6 ay Cheese I 







Mehrab Karim 
Criminal Justice 



Candice Kassin 
Marketing 



Patrick Kates 
Biochemistry 



Mattliew Kaufman 
Information Systems 







Jennifer Kehl 
Psychology 



James Kendall 
Computer Engineering 



Jennifer Kennedy 
Kinesiology 



Jan-Philip kcrnisan 
Accounting 





Mary Kerske 
Government & Politics 



Naimah Khalifa 

African American 

Studies 




Kirti Khosia 

Government And 

Politics 




Azadeh Kia 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



Class of 2006 193 






Anne Kilby 

Behavioral Ecology, 

Evolution Systems 



Kimberly King 

Mathematics And 

Economics 



Sarah King 

Government And 

Politics 




Kristin Kirk 

Biological Resources 

Engineering 







Heather Klein 
Government & Politics 



Dawn Kleint 
French 



Robert Kluge 
Finance 



Andrea Knapp 
Accounting 







Kevin Knapstein 

Biological Resource 

Engineering, Physiology 



Lindsey B. Kneten 
Conservation Of Soil, 
Water & Environment 



Zachary Knight 
Civil Engineering 



Andrew Kohout 

Mechanical, Fire 

Protection Engineering 



1.94 (5 ay Cheese! 







Tiange Koker 

Public & Community 

Health 



Sara Kolahdouzan 
International Business 



Eliezer Kolatch 
Linguistics 



Shoshana Kolatch 
History 







Hrin Kolski 
Anthropology 



Ifedolapo Komalafe 
Kinesiology 



Grace Konieczny 
Accounting 



Fantah Konnch 
Psychology 




Sarah Kopelman 
History & Theatre 






Mauno Kork 
Computer Science 



Hershel Korneut 
Sociology History 



Nyan Korto 
Geography 



Class of Q006 195 






Ashley Korzun 
Aerospace Engineering 



Kaylan Ivoszcla 
Government & Politics 



Alan Kouchinsky 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Brian Kraft 
Electrical Engineering 







Martin Kramer 
History 



Eran Kravitz 
Computer Engineering 



Allison Krichman 
Architecture 



Brian Ki"ueger 
Economics 







Udayan Kulkarni 
Microbiology 



Matthew Kurlanzik 

Marketing International 

Business 



Rebecca Kurtz 
Physical Science 



Matthew Kusher 

Government & Politics. 

Physiology 



96 (5 ay Chaese! 







Nathan Kusterer 

Physiology- 

Ncumhiology 



Michelle Kwan 

Finance & International 

Business 



Mario Lafertte 
Electrical Engineering 



Scott Laffie 
Finance & Accounting 







David Lam 
Biochemistry 



Savannah Lambert 
Kinesiology 



Reco Land 
Psychology 



Ryan Lang 
Finance 







Stephanie Laning 
Aerospace Engineering 



Sandra Lara 
Biology 



Sih ia Lara 
General Biology 



Xiomara Larios 
Microbiology 



Class of Q006 197 




Franklin Lartey 
Information Systems 




Brian Lau 

Neurobiology & 

Physiology 




Rebecca Lavell 

Early Childhood 

Education 




Heather Lavoie 
Psychology 




Farah Lawal 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 




Nicole Lawrence 
Electrical Engineering 




Christina Lawson 

Neurophysiology/ 

Biology 




David Lax 

Marketing/ 

Communication 




Lisa Leary 
Pre- Veterinary 




Kristen Leek 
Communication 




Bryant Lee 
Computer Science 




Ching-Yin Lee 
English 



3 c5<9z/ Cheese! 










David Lee 


Diane Lee 


Jeffrey Lee 


Youme Lee 


Physiology 


Accounting 


Finance 


Marketing 


Neurobiology 










Joanne Leffson 


Jacqueline Lefkow 


Marissa Lefland 


Jared Leibovvitz 


Communications 


Communication 


Government And 
Politics 


Marketing 




Crystal Lcid 
Art Studio 




Jeffrey Lerman 
Computer Science 




Albert Leshchinsky 
Finance 




Edward Leslie 
Electrical Engineering 



Class of 2006 199 




Jason Lettman 

Computer Science, 

Spanish 





Dara Levin 

Hearing & Speech 

Sciences 



Liliya Levina 
International Business 




Adam Levine 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 




Ari Levine 
Marketing Logistics 





Jason Levine 
Finance 



Mark Levine 

Animal Science/ 

Economics 




Adam Lewis 
Journalism 




Jennifer Lewis 
Government & Politics, 
Afro American Studies 





Joscelene Lewis 
Sociology 



Jiayan Kelly Li 
Chemical Engineering 




Michael Li 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



200 c3ay Cheese/ 





ZhiLi 


Darren Liang 


Crystal Lim 


Criminology, Criminal 


Biological Resources 


Business 


Justice 


Engineering 





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Yang Lin 




Jodi Lippincott 
Communcation 




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Da\ id Lipscomb 
Print Journalism 




Irene Liu 
Zoology & Spanish 




Yucheng Liu 
Economics 




Heather Lockard 
Theatre 




Robbin Lockhart 

Cell Biology & 

Molecular Genetic 




Tanaa Logan 

Criminal Justice & 

Criminology 




Jcanncttc Lopez 

General Business & 

Marketing 



C/a6s of 2006 901 






Carl Lostritto 
Architecture 



Clairena Louis 
Family Studies 



Mai Luong 
Marketing 



Kara Lushbaugh 
Mechanical 
Engineering 







Yonhee Lyeo 

Public & Community 

Health 



Walter L. Lynch III 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Meghan Lyon 
History 



Xiao Ma 
Computer Science 







Lorraine Macabulos 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Lawrence Magali 
Sociology/Family 
Studies 



Meem Mahmud 

Physics & Computer 

Science 



Daniel Mahon 
Broadcast Journalism 



OQ (5ay Cheese! 



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Christopher Malabanan 

Neurobiology/ 

Physiology 



Shaheena Malik 

Early Childhood 

Education 



Lauren Mandell 



Marni Mankuta 
Psyc/Ccjs 




Cheryl Manna 

Criminal Justice & 

Flute Perform 






April Manson 

Marketing/International 

Business 



Keith Mantel 
Government & Politics 



Brittney Mamilla 
Biochemistry 







Melvin Manzanarcs 
Finance 



Da\ id Marcin 
Computer Science 



Lauren Marshall 
Marketing 



Renee Marshall 
Civil Engineering 



Class of 2006 Q03 




Kerry Martens 
Zoology 






William Martin 

Criminology/Criminal 

Justice 



Rob Martin-Rolsky 

International Business 

& Gov. 



Crystal Maslow 
Kinesiology 







Sukhmani Matharu 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



Sumana Mathura 

English/Women's 

Studies 



Naweed Matin 

Marketing/International 

Business 



Michael Mattera 
Finance 







Matthew Mayer 
Art Studio 



Zachery Mazurek 
Finance 



Nathan Mcafee 
Computer Science 



Corey McCarthy 
Communication 



Q04 (5 ay Cheese! 



HJT 



Laura Mccomb-Dipesa 
History 




Marissa McDermott 
Accounting 




Brian McFadden 
Computer Engineering 




Thomas M. McGhan ill 
Computer Engineering 







Chantel McGill 


Patrick McGlone 


Kathleen McGoldrick 


Heather Mcintosh 


Cinesiological Sciences 


Animal Science 


Government & Politics 


Hearing & Speech 
Sciences 




Clarissa McKithon 
Spanish/Business 




Candace McNeal 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 




C arolyn Mcch 
Communication 




Kristina Medina 

Physiology 
Neurobiology 



Class of 2006 Q05 





Tanay L. Medley 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Megan Meehan 
Aerospace Engmeering 



Christina M. Melvin 
Philosophy 



Maria Mendez 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 







Michael Mengel 
Psychology 



Michelle Mensah 
Criminology 



Rachel Meyerowitz 
Elementary Education 



Michael Miller 
Marketing/Spanish 







Michael Miller 
Sociology 



Michal Miller 
Communication 



Cahlin Mills 
Marketing 



Andrea Mims 

Psychology & 

Criminology/Crimimal 

Justice 



206 (3 ay Cheese! 







Rachel Minkove 
History 



Abigail Mintz 
Psychology 



Julie Mirwis 
Family Studies 



Paulissa Mitchell 
Family Studies 







Alpana Mittal 
Information Systems 



Brent Mittleman 
Economics 



Kathleen Moeller 
Business 



Richard Mondesir 
History 







Bla_\rc Montague 

Animal Science 

Laboratory Animal 



Melissa Mooney 

Hearing & Speech 

Sciences 



Rebecca Mooney 
English 



Jaimee Moore 
Sociology /Journalism 



Class of 9006 207 




Meghan Moore 
General Biology 




Ray Moore 
Kinesiology 




Megan Morales 

Individual Stud-Health 

Ethics 




Theresa Morgan 
Economics & History 




Jessica Morgia 
Government & Politics 




Chn:^U)pllc^ Mdirison 
Kinesiology 




Chris Moskal 
Aerospace Engineering 




Karen Mostellar 
Government & Politics 




Patrick Moynahan 

Information Systems & 

Finance 




Peter Muenzfeld 
Economics 




Brandon Muhlgeier 
Kinesiology 




Zenab Mustafa 

Biology, 
Pre-Medicine 



^03 (Say Cheese! 







Joshua Nadas 


Gary Nalven 


Andrew Napier 


Dewi Nasrun 


Government And 


English 


Government Politics 


Economics 


Polities 













Marnasativa Nasrun 
Computer Science 



Michael Nazareno 
Computer Engineering 



Maryam Ndiaye 
Sociology 



Rebecca Nebel 
Communication 





Ashley Neboschick 
Electrical Engineering 



Adricnne Nel 

Marketing International 

Business 





Zachary Nemser 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Kimberly Newcomer 
Architecture 



Class ofQOOQ 209 






Edward Newlands 
Music, History 



Jeffrey Newman 

Computer Science/ 

Mathematics 



George Ngatlia 
Chemical Engineering 



Dany Ngoubene 
International Business 







Bako Nguasong 
Psychology 



Jennifer Nguyen 
Electrical Engineering 



Lauren Nguyen 
Electrical Engineering 



Thuy Nguyen 
International Business 







Xuan-Huong Nguyen 
Psychology 



Mankaa Ngwa-Suh 
Journalism 



Vince Nibali 



D'paul Nibber 

Government & Politics, 

Economics 



9.10 6 ay Cheese! 







Shyra Nichols 
Criminology And 
Criminal Justice 



Kate Noble 

Sociology, Social 

Psychology 



Brady Nolan 
Marketing 



Katryn Norman 
Art And Art History 







Joshua Notes 
Finance 



Arielle Novick 
Psychology 



Nguyen Nugyen 
Computer Science 



Chinelo 1. Nvvankwo 

Public & Community 

Health 





Linda Nwoga 

Psychology & Criminal 

Justice 



Chiamaka Nwosu 
Economics 





Kelly OXonncl 

Psychology & Criminal 

Justice 



Maureen G. O'Connor 
American Studies 



Class ofQOOe 211 







Michael O'Neill 
Marketing 



Opeoluwa Odukale 
Neurobiology & 
Neurophysiology 



Sang Eun Oh 
General Biology 



Yoon Yi Oh 

Biological Resources/ 

Engineering 







Babatundc Olowosuko 
Computer Science 



Erin 01she\cr 

Marketing & 

Operations Mgmt 



Anotai Oonjit 

Biological 
Anthropology 



Jennifer Ordelt 
Int'l Business 







Silvia Orellana 
Government & Politics 



Jennifer Orrock 

History & Secondary 

Education 



Jose Ortiz 
Classics 



Sarah Osborne 
Music Education 



2:/2 c5aij Cheese/ 







Adam Otsuka 


Tracy Owusu 


Jason Oxenrider 


Alexandra Ozeri 


Logistics/Operations 


Criminal Just/ 


Mechanical 


English 




Criminology/Family 


Engineering 






Studies 








Phillip Pack 
Art Studio 




Rebecca Packer 
Linguistics & French 




Monica Pagan 

General Biology/ 

Premed 




Andrew Page 
Economics 




Franklin Palmer 
Landscape Architecture 




Suzanne Palmisano 
Marketing 




C lara Pang 
Communication 




llua-Lin Pao 
Electrical Engineering 



Class of Q006 9.13 







Teri L Pari si 


David Parmelee 


Sheri Dean Parmelee 


Aarti Patel 


Criminal Justice 


Computer Science 


Communication & 


Neurobiology, Physiology 






English 


& History 



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Darshna Paid 
Cellular Biology & 
Molecular Genetics 



Jovan Patterson 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Simone Peart 
Sociology 



Tymesha Pendleton 
Psychology 







Gerald Perada 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Damien Peters 

Computer Science, 

Economics 



Rohina Phadnis 
Journalism 



Jeffrey Pham 
Economics 



2i4 (5 ay Cheese! 




Julia Phillips 
Business 




Lawrence Phillips 
Fire Protection 

Engineering 





Abigail Pinson 
Criminology & 
Crinimal Justice 



Kevin Pipchick 
Marketing 





Jonathan Plaut 

Finance Government & 

Politics 



Brigida Portillo 

Early Childhood 

Education 




Juan Portillo 
Psychology Sociology 




Trevor Potash 
Economics 




Daniel Powei 
Criminology And 
Criminal Justice 




Emily Powel 
Psychology 




Nicole Powci 
Geography 




Daniel Powers 
Finance 



Class of '200(5 9.15 





Ryan James Powers 
Spanish 



Adam Protass 
Logistics, Transportation & 
Supply Chain Management 



Christina PugHsi 

Government & Pohtics, 

Psychology 




Marc Puleo 
Geography & History 







Ricardo Quinteros 
Sociology 



Nezam Rabonik 
Economics 



Joshua Rahmani 
Communications 



Justin Rainey 
Finance 







Kai Raj an 

Biological Resources 

Engineering 



Brittany Raymond 
Chemical Engineering 



Jajuan Reed 
Kinesiology 



Robert Reigle 

Accounting/Logistics & 

Supply Chain Mgmt 



2f(5 c5(9z/ CheQse! 




Andrea Reilly 

American Studies/ 

Theater 




Reginald Renwick 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



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Kimberly L. Richter 
Marketing 



Joanna Ricker 
Elementary Education 




Kimberly Ricker 
Communications 




Paul Ries 

Astronomy & 

Aerospace 





Jeffrey Riley 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Mary K. Riley 
General Biology 




Theresa Rinehart 
Business 






Rebecca Rinko 
Psychology 



Jason Rizkallah 
Economics 



Jamie Robbins 
History 



Class ofQ006 2/7 







Joseph Roberts 
Jewish Studies 



Amy Robinson 

Criminology & 

Criminal Justice & 

Psychology 



Araybia Robinson 
Criminal Justice 



Jason Robinson 
Aerospace Engineering 







Mary Rohiii^on 
Accounting 



Kevin Rodkey 
Government & Politics 



llcydi Rodriguez 

Spanish Language & 

Literature 



Jessica Rocssner 
Elementary Education 







Daniel Roffman 
Information Systems 



Nicole Roitman 
Elementary Education 



Andrew Rose 
Government/Politics 



Rachel Rosen 
Marketing 



2^(5 (5 ay Cheese! 







Paul Rosendall 
Aerospace Engineering 



Anna Rosengarten 

Family Studies & 

English 



Sara Chaya Roshwalb 
General Biology 



Lauren Ross 

Marketing & Logistics, 

Transportation & Supply 

Chain Mgmt 




Jordan Rothberg 
Accounting/Finance 




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Jesse Rothman 
Communications 



Ayodeji Rotimi 
Economics 



Christian Rotter 
Mechanical 
Engineering 




Aaron Rowe 
International Business 






Gregory Rubino 
Sociology 



Eve Rubinstein 

Biological Resources 

Engineering 



Frank D. Rudilosso 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Class of 9.00(0 Q19 







Daniel Rudolf 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



James Rueger 
Elementary Education 



Laura Rummel 

Elementary Special 

Education 



Joseph Ruppert 
Accounting 







Rebecca Russenberger 
Communication 



Hannah Sacks 
Art Studio 



David Saft 

Logistics & Supply 

Chain Mgmt 



Erin Sagransky 
Finance 







Stephanie Saia 
Accounting 



Rachel Salaets 

Hearing & Speech 

Sciences 



Ean Saltzman 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Eric Sanders 
Business Finance 



220 c3ay Cheese / 







Jason Sanders 
Finance 



Niruja Santhirasegaram 
Microbiology 



Christina Santucci 
Journalism 



Megan Schaefer 
Elementary Education 







Michael S. Schaffer 
History 



Eric Scher 

Government & Politics 

& History 



Jonathan Scher 
Finance 



Andrea S. Schirokauer 
Economics 







Kathleen Schmahl 
Romance Lanauages 



Scott Schnepper 
Criminal Justice 



Sara Schoen 
Sociology 



Da\ id P. Schoenfeld 

Government & Politics/ 

Crim Just 



Class of 9.006 221 




Douglas Schulkin 
Public Relations 




Andrew Schultz 
Computer Science 




David Schulzinger 
Psychology 




Sonya Schwab 
Dance/Philosophy 




Joshua Schwartz 
Accounting/Finance 




Melissa Schwartz 
Communication 




Anthony Scott 

Criminal Justice & 

Criminology 




Ashley Seals 

Neurobiology/ 

Physiology 




Jeffrey Seifried 
Nuclear Engineering 




Nicholas Sekkas 
Journalism 




David Selig 
Journalism 




Patrice Senior 
Marketing 



222 (5 ay Cheese! 













Annis C. Seopaul 


Brandi Session 


Travis Seymour 


Stacy Shadrick 


Criminology & 


African American 


Zoology 


Psychology 


Criminal Justice 


Studies. Public Policy 








Kaushal Shah 


Swapnil Sharma 


Joshua Sharon 


Reuben Sharret 


Physiology & 


Neurobiology- 


Civil Engineering 


Bio-Medical 


Neurobiology 


Physiology 




Engineering 




Lauren Shaw 


Sean Sheffier-Collins 


Nicole Sheremeta 


Brigitte Sherrod 


Criminal Justice And 


Biology 


Business Marketing & 


Accounting & Logistics 


Criminology 




Logistics 





Class of 2006 223 





Jessica Shevitz 
Elementary Education 



Robert Shieh 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 



Christal Shrader 
Government & Politics 



Tyler Shultz 
Music Education 







Heath Shyman 
Criminal Justice 



Brian Sibencr 

Information Systems & 

Logistics 



Lauren Siber 
Economics 



Djenam Sidibe 
International Business 







Julie Siegel 

English Language & 

Literature 



Adam Sigel 
English 



John Sigler 
Economics 



Karen Silagyi 
Food Science 



224 c5(9z/ Cheese! 







Ryan Silverberg 
Government & Politics 



Lauren Silverman 
Communication 



Matthew Simmons 
Finance 



Brett Singer 
Government Politics 







Kelley Singer 
English & Philosophy 



Ramik Singh 
Eleltrical Ensrineering 



Matthew Singleton 

Neurophysiology, 

Psychology, 

Biochemistry 



Mark Gerald Sison 
Criminal Justice 







Alyson Sklool 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 



Adam Skrodzki 
Kinesiology 



Igor Slutskiy 

Finance & International 

Business 



Jeffrey Small 

Marketing General 

Business 



Class of 2006 QQ5 




Jan Smid 
Accounting & French 




Bari Smith 
Marketing/Logistics 




Kelly Smith 
Finance 




Pierce Smith 
Japanese 




Rebecca Smith 
Biology/History 




Sasha Smith 

Government & Politics 

& Spanish 




Teri Smith 
Kinesiology 




Delece Smith-Barrow 
Journalism 




Jennifer Snaider 

Criminology/Criminal 

Justice 



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Grace Snodgrass 

Journalism & 

Government & Polititics 




Jessica Snyder 

Government & Politics 

& Crim Justice 




Sandy So 
Economics 



226 (5 ay Cheese! 






Daleisha Sellers 
Elementary Education 



Ryan Sommers 
History 



Jared Spier 
Finance 




Daniel Spital 
Criminal Justice 







Nicholas Spiwak 
Finance 



Gabriella Sprecher 
Family Studies 



Shawn Stacy 
Marketina 



BriUany Slaley 
Criminal Justice 







Heather Stan 



English 



Alisa Stephens 
Mathematics 



Susan Stern 
Psychology 



Elliot Stevens 
Elementary Education 



Class of 9006 227 







Vaughn Stewart 
English 



Joseph Straaik 
History 



William Stump 
Military History 



Steve Sturm 
Crim/Criminal Justice 







Mario Stylianou 
Government & Politics 



Samuel Summertbrd 
Mechanical Engr 



Mary Sutter 
Cell & Molecular 
Biology, Genetics 



Shari Swaaley 
Government & Politics 







Allison Swartz 
Marketing & Spanish 



Sarah J. Sweeney 

English & Secondary 

Education 



Todd Sweeney 
Criminal Justice 



Deborah Sweet 
Chemical Engineering 



22(3 (5 ay Cheese! 




Jeffrey Swope 

Criminology & 

Criminal .lust Phil 




Anna-Feliza Sy 
Journalism, French 




Gregory Tabaka 

Mechanical & Fire 

Protection Eng 




Akale Tadese 

Cell Biology & 

Molecular Genetic 




Joshua Talley 

Fire Protection 

Engineering 




Jennifer Tam 

Accounting & 

International Bus. 




Amy Tannenbaum 
Sociology 




Patrick larectecan 
Econoimcs 







Leila 1. Tarr 


Gouri Tawadx 


Jennifer Tavlor ( )rccn Ta\ lor 


jiglish-Language, 


Mechanical 


Accounting. Logistics Accounting 


Writing/Rhetori 


Engineering 


& Supply Chain Mgt 

Class of 2006 220 







Jose Teixeira 

Gvpt, Business Admin. 

& Comm. 



Liza Teixeira 

Biological Resources 

Engineering 



Samantha Tenenbaum 

Accounting/Operations 

Management 



Evan Thaler 
Computer Science 







Elizabeth Thammasuvimol 

Bio Logical 

Sciences 



Erin Thomas 
Communication 



Ashley Tice 
Microbiology 



Meghan Tierney 
Journalism 







Douglas Tilley 
Civil Engineering 



Robert Tilley 

Psychology/ 

Criminology/Crim Just 



Richard Ting 
Economics 



Brian Tomaino 
Architecture 



230 (5 ay Cheesa! 




TalarTopjian 
International Business/ 




Marketing 



MeggieTortolero 

Neurobiology & 

Physiology 




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Jennai Townsend 

Criminology, Criminal 

Justice, Premed 



Sarah Treadwell 
Criminal Justice 




Melissa Trusty 
Kinesiology 




Julia Tu 
Electrical Engineering 



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Colleen Tucci 
Psychology 



Adam Turbowitz 
Criminology & 
Criminal Justice 






Deborah Turk 
Psychology 



^'^ es Twagirayezu 
Civil Engineering 



Danin Ung 
Electrical Engineering 




Matthew Ursino 
Marketing & Logistics 



Class of 9006 231 







Gil Valle 

Psychology/Criminology 

& Criminal Justice 



Angela Vandell 
Economics 



Jackie Vaughan 
Kinesiology 



Yasmin Ventura 
Anthropology 







Gregory Vieira 
Physics 



Pamela Vinal 
Broadcast Journalism 



Morgan Vines 

Journalism & 

Government/Po 1 it ic s 



Hong Vo 
Neurobiology & Physiology 






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Adam Wabnik 
Finance 



Shannon Wajer 
Communication 



Heather Walczak 

American Studies 

Marketing 



Joanna Waldman 

Psychology & Family 

Studies 



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Karlena Walker 
African-American 
Studies. Journalism 




Kimberly Walker 
General Biology 




Michelle Wallace 
English 




Katherine Walsh 
Biology 




Justin Waltrous 
Biology & Psychology 




\ang Wang 
Economics 




Mary Ward 
Journalism 




Nancy Ward 
Marine Biology 







Stephen Ward Jr. 


Audrey Warrentclt/ 


Meghan Watts 


S\ en Waweru 


Secondary Theatre/ 


Anthropology 


Marketing 


Marketing 


English Education 









Class 0/2006 233 



Kevin Weaver 
Econ/Finance 




Erica Weber 
Dietetics 




James Webster 
Theatre Performance 




Evan Weiner 
Marketing & Logistics 







'aiiicla Wciiicr 


Jordan Weinstein 


Lynn Wells 


Breyen Wertz 


Theatre 


Government/Politics 


Mechanical 
Engineering 


English 




Jamone West 
Criminal Justice 




Jamone West 
Criminal Justice 




Megan Wheaton 
Elementary Education 




Meryl White 

Criminal Justice & 

Criminology 



234 (5ay Cheese! 



Rebecca White 
Marketing & 
Anthropology 






WiUiam White 
Environmental 
Science, Policy 



Thomas J. Wible Jr. 
Physics 



Dana Wicker 

Elementary Education/ 

Government Policy 




JetYrey W leker 
Computer Engineering 






Danielle Wiener 
Communication Studies 



ICristin Wiggins 

Accounting & General 

Business 



Jason Wileman 

Information Systems 

Management 







01i\ ia W'ilkms 
English 



Almcda Williams 
Marketing 



Cheryl Williams 
Accounting 



Heather Williams 
Elementary Education 



Class of 2006 235 





James Williams 
Criminal Justice 



Sonja Williams 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 




Mykia Williams-Olive 

English-Secondary 

Education 



Marlise Wilson 

Geographic 

Information Systems 







\.\c M . Winchatz 
Business-Marketing 



Takirra Winfield 

Communication Public 

Relaltions 



Amy Wire 

Government And 

Politics 



Michael Wittig 

Biology & Computer 

Science 





Rachel Wobrak 
Classics 



Krista Wohlenberg 
Communication 





Matt Wolejsza 
Nuclear Engineering 



Jeremy Wolff 
German, Linguistics 



236 (5 ay Cheese! 






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Jeffrey Wong 
Biology 



Michael Wong 
Finance/Accounting 



Ashley Wood 
International Business 



Kenneth T. Wood 
Finance & Accounting 







Maria Wood 
Communications 



Susan Wood 
English 



Charles Wu 
Finance/Accounting 



Janet Wu 
Criminal Justice 







Stephanie Wyman 

Behavior, Ecology, 

Evolution & Sys 



Stewart Wync 
Economics 



Diane \acenda 

Business & 

Management 



Kinibcrl_\ \atcs 
Elementary Education 



Class of 9.006 937 




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Chong Yi 
Economics 




Dae Yi Computer 
Science 




Jessica Yi 
Sociology 



Allen Yiu 
Finance/Info. Systems 





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Alison Young 

Spanish Secondary 

Education 




Daniel Young 
Economics 




Ian Young 

Mechanical 

Engineering 




Julia Young 
Physics 




Tiffany Yu 
Finance 




Mustafa Zaghal 
Accounting 




Nafiseh Zaghal 
Family Studies 




Megan Zaientz 

Hearing & Speech 

Sciences 



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Carla Zamudio-Dolan 
International Business, 
Government & Politics 



Meredith Zaslow 
History 



Jessica Zeiler 
English 



Jessica Zelt 

Environmental Science 

& Policy 







Jennilcr Zcrtass 
Physiology & 
Neurobiology 



Anton Zheleznov 
Economics 



Micah Zimmerman 
Philosophy 



Marija Zivkovic 
Chemical Eneineerina 







Christy Zlatkus 

Government & Politics 

& History 



Amy Zolko 
Kinesiology 



Lina Zubi 
Psychology 



Jeffrey Zygler 
Finance 



Class of Q006 939 



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The 2005 Terrapin Football 

team was led by Senior 

Linebacker D'Qwell Jackson 

and Junior Tight End Vernon 

Davis. Jackson was named ACC 

Defensive Player of the Year, 

and was one of three finalists for 

the Bednarik Award, given to the 

best defensive player in college 

football. Davis became the first 

offensive player for the Terps 

to be named an AP First Team 

All American in 50 years. Both 

Davis and Jackson were named 

first team All Americans by 

the American College Football 

Association. The highlight of the 

2005 season was Homecoming 

weekend, when Runningback 

Lance Ball led the Terps to a 

45-33 win over Virginia with 

163 yards and 2 fourth-quarter 

touchdowns. The Terps had 

570 yards of offense, including 

9 catches for 125 yards from 

Danny Melendez. Quarterback 

Sam Hollenback threw for 

320 yards and 2 touchdowns. 

Although the Terps were not 

bowl eligible at the end of the 

2005 season, Byrd Stadium and 

Terps fans everywhere await 

the 2006 season with great 

anticipation. 




244 ^idure^e^in 




holball 245 




The Men's Basketball 
team had a decent 
season this year. Their 
record was 18-11. The 
highlight of the season 
was beating rival Duke 
in Durham, NC and also 
at the Comcast Center. 
The second meeting with 
Duke resulted in our 99- 
92 win in overtime. Post 
season the team went to 
the ACC tournament but 
lost to Clemson. At the 
NIT games, they beat 
Oral Roberts, Davidson, 
TCU and then lost to 
South Carolina in the 
finals. 

Game records: 

Most Points: Nik Caner-Medley 

with 35 

Field Goals: Nik Caner-Medley 

with 14 

3 Pointers: Chris McCray with 5 

Free Throws: John Gilchrist with 

12 

Rebounds: Travis Garrison with 

15 

Assists: John Gilchrist with 10 

Steals: Nik Caner-Medley with 5 

Blocked Shots: Ekene Ibekwe 

246 Picture ^e ^in 





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Record : 11-6 
Season Stats: 
Goals scored 
average: 9.94 
Assists: 82 
Total Goals: 170 
Fan Attendance 
Total: 16660 
Goal Shot 
Attempts: 170- 
648 

The Men's Lacrosse 
team had a great 2005 
season. Their regular 
season record was 11-6. 
They beat Duke in the 
ACC finals and for the 
second year in a row, 
claimed the ACC title. 
They made it all the way 
to the semi-finals of the 
NCAA tournament, but 
lost to rivals Duke with 
a score of 18-9. 




248 "T^idure The ^Jjin 








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^en s JQacrosse 249 




Men's Soccer had a 
fantastic season this year. 
During the regular season, 
their record was 20-5-2. 
They finished their post 
season on a high note by 
claiming the NCAA title 
in NC, on December 11, 
2005. They played the 
New Mexico Lobos and 
won with a score of 1-0, 
with the only goal scored 
by Marc Burch. This is the 
first time since 1968 that 
Maryland has received the 
NCAA title in soccer. 



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250 ^idure ^e ^in 





^en s (5occer 251 




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Terps Baseball had a 
difficult season. Their 
record was 24-30 overall in 
the regular season. At the 
ACC tournament, during 
the first round they beat 
Virginia Tech 5-4. Once 
they moved on, they were 
defeated by Wake Forest 
with a score of 20-1 3. Their 
longest winning streak this 
season was 3 games and 
their longest losing streak 
was 5. They had a total 
home attendence for the 
season of 14466. 



252 ^idure The ^Jjin 



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'baseball 253 




Best Times 

Freestyle 

50: Mike Fried- 20.73 
100: Erik Weinburg- 45.45 
200: Patrick Doyle- 1:38.84 
500: Stefan Geisen- 4:27.87 
1000: Brad Schertle- 9:33.09 
1650: Brad Schertle- 15:44.84 

Backstroke 

100: Erik Weinburg- 49.12 

200: Erik Weinburg- 1:44.89 

Breaststroke 

100: Gergo Szekely- 56.95 

200: Tim Shepard- 2:02.94 

Fly 

100: Mike Fried- 50.00 

200: Martin Ott- 1:14.84 

Individual Medly 

200: Martin Ott- 1:48.12 

400: Martin Ott- 3:52.14 




The 800-yard freestyle relay 
team of freshman Stefan 
Geisen, junior Patrick 
Doyle and seniors Chris 
Brandenberger and Erik 
Weinberg broke the 16-year- 
old school record by more 
than 3.5 seconds, clocking 
an NCAA ^B' cut time of 
6:36.37. They finished sixth 
in the event. 



254 Picture Ihe ^in 





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9%;? c5 (5wimming 255 




Though the TeiTapin 
Wrestling team did not 
breakthrough this season and 
win an ACC match, it showed 
signs of improvement in the 
conference led by sophomore 
Charlie Pinto. The 141 -pound 
Pinto represented the Terps 
(3-13-1 overall, 0-5 ACC) in 
the NCAA tournament after 
capturing an ACC individual 
title March 5, defeating top- 
seed Isaiah Britton (North 
Carolina), 7-4. Seniors Adam 
James and Jason Kiessling and 
junior Jerry Afari each placed 
fourth in their respective 
weight classes for the Terps 
at the ACC tournament. 

Behind dramatic overtime 
individual wins from Sean 
Carr, Luke Stauffer, and 
Yony Noy, the Terps captured 
their only home win of the 
season against Duquesne Jan. 
29. Pinto, Kiessling, Kevin 
Vinh, and Andrew Schlaffer 
also delivered wins for the 
Terps, which won 24-13. 
Kiessling (29-13) and Pinto 
(26-1 1) finished with the best 
individual season marks. 



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256 ^idure ^e IVin 







^redling 257 




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Key golfers: junior John 
Eades (average of 72.2 strokes 
per round), sophomore TuUy 
Coyle; sophomore Jessica Reno, 
sophomore Kate Stepanek 

While success did not 
always come easily for the 
Terrapin men's and women's golf 
teams, there was a fair share of 
bright spots. On the women's 
side, the Terps won the Spider 
Spring Invitational March 29 in 
Bradenton, Fla., behind top-ten 
finishers Stepanek, freshman 
Kelly Calkin, and freshman 
Katie Trotter. The squad could 
not quite carry the momentum 
into the ACC Championship, 
finishing eighth with Reno faring 
the best. 

The men performed similarly 
in the ACCs, placing ninth as 
Eades led the Terps with a 24"" 
overall individual finish. Despite 
a somewhat inexperienced 
roster, the Terps earned their 
fourth-consecutive NCAA East 
Regional appearance. Eades 
also paced the Terps at that 
tournament in Nashville, Tenn., 
finishing 33"^ overall while the 
squad placed 21". 



25% ^idure^e^in 





Vnens&nDomen a Golf 259 




Men's Tennis 2004-05 
Record: (8-12, 0-10 ACQ 
Key Players: seniors Troy 
Demers, Ian Bliss and 
David Reichsfeld 
Despite struggling through 
a winless ACC slate, the 
men displayed some talent 
beyond their solid senior 
trio of Demers, Bliss, and 
Reichsfeld. Sophomore 
Scott Fink went 6-1 in non- 
conference singles matches, 
while freshman Michael 
Coleman registered a 
rare ACC singles victory 
against Miami April 3 . The 
team's most impressive win 
came March 9 at local rival 
Navy, as the Terps narrowly 
downed the Midshipmen, 
4-3. 



260 ^idurQ^Q^in 





^en s tennis 26 1 




Key runners: freshman Tyler 
McCandless, junior Matt 
Sanders; junior Laurel Jefferson, 
senior Cori Koch 
The only in-state runners for the 
Terrapin women's cross-country 
team proved to be its finest in 
2005, as Jefferson and Koch 
were the squad's top performers 
in every meet. Behind the 
duo's top-40 finishes in the 
ACC Championship, the Terps 
placed eighth out of 12 teams in 
Tallahassee, Fla., Oct. 31. Less 
than two weeks later, Koch led 
the Terps to a program-best 
fifth place at the Mid-Atlantic 
Regional meet. With her 18th 
overall finish, Koch earned All- 
Region honors for the first time 
in her career. 

Extremely young in 2005, the 
men's team went threw some 
expected growing pains. The 
future, however, should be in 
good shape as freshmen like 
McCandless, Jake Travers, and 
Josh Davis got their feet wet in 
ACC competition. McCandless 
led the Terps with a 46th place 
finish at the ACC Championship 
Oct. 31, as the Terps finished 
1 0th as a team. 



262 ^idure^e^in 







Cross Counfry 263 




Key runners: junior Kiera Foster, 
senior Lynn Hernandez, senior Rob 
Frelow, freshman Dominic Berger 

Several members of the team 
qualified for the NCAA indoor 
nationals last year, including 
Kiera Foster, who was the only 
team member to be an automatic- 
qualifier for the NCAA Indoor 
Nationals. The team ended the 
two-day ACC indoor championship 
with the men finishing in 9th place 
and the women in 10th. Foster 
and sophomore Zahnna Barer 
each finished in third place at their 
events at the ACC championship. 
On the men's side, Frelow finished 
up one of his last races of his 
college career, taking home third 
place in the 400-meter dash, in an 
NCAA qualifying time. Freshman 
Dominic Berger shined in the ACC, 
finishing second in the 110-meter 
hurdles, in a season-best time. In 
March, Berger became the first 
male Terp since 1987 to earn All- 
America status at the NCAA Indoor 
Track Championship, where he 
placed fifth in the 60-meter hurdles. 
On the women's team, Kiera Foster 
received All-America status for the 
second year in a row, along with 
Lynn Hernandez when they placed 
third and fourth in the long jump. 
This was also the first time since 
1987 that three runners had been 
given All-America status in the 
same year. 



264 ^idureThe^in 




Irackand^ield 265 




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Record: 22-10 overall, 7-7 
ACC 

Key wins: 92-77 vs. No. 5 
North Carolina, Jan. 9; 84- 
77 @ Arizona, Jan. 29 
Key players: sophomore 
guard Shay Doron (17.6 pts), 
freshman forward Crystal 
Langhome (17.2 pts) 
Bolstered by dynamic young 
talent, the Terrapin women's 
basketball team capturedtheir 
highest season win total since 
1992-93 and a No. 7-seed in 
the NCAA tournament. The 
Terps knocked off No. 10 
Wisconsin-GreenBay, 65-55, 
behind Doron 's game-high 
26 points before falling in 
the next round to No. 2 Ohio 
State at Comcast Center, 
75-65. The sharp- shooting 
Doron, an All- ACC first team 
selection, received help from 
the inside from Langhome, 
who was tabbed ACC Rookie 
of the Year. Besides senior 
point guard Anesia Smith, 
the Terps return all of their 
impact players in 2005-06 in 
a season which promises to 
be even more successful. 



266 ^idure^he^in 





Somen's 'basketball 267 




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Record: 23-2 overall, 4-1 ACC 
Key wins: 3-2 vs. No. 1 Wake 
Forest (ACC Championship), 
Nov. 6; 1-0 vs. No. 3 Duke 
(NCAA Championship), Nov 
20 

Key players: senior forwardfc 
Jackie Ciconte (20 goals), 
junior midfielder Paula Infante 
(13 goals) 

After snatching the ACC 
Championship fi-om rival Wake 
Forest and earning the top-see 
in the NCAA tournament, i 
only got better for the Terrapi 
field hockey team. Experience 
and battle-tested, the Terps wo 
four-straight NCAA contest 
to capture the program's fourt 
national championship and firs 
since 1999. The Terps stifle 
the Blue Devils, holding Duk 
to just five shots the entir 
game - none of which were or 
goal. Seniors Ciconte, Emil 
Beach, Lauren Powley, Tiffan 
Marsh, and Meredith Long al 
proved to be instrumental ii 
the Terps' season-long run o 
success. Beach, Powley, an 
Infante were named as Firs 
Team All-Americans. 



268 9/durelhe^in 






Tield9iockey 269 



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2004-2005 Season 
Record: 11-0 overall, 7-0 ACC 
Key wins: 175-125 @ North 
Carolina, Jan. 29; 119.5-117.5 
@ No. 12 Virginia, Feb. 5 
Key players: seniors Elizabeth 
Lavell (Ail-American) and 
Chrissy Miller (ACC 
Tournament Most Valuable 
Swimmer) 

Notching a second consecutive 
perfect season in dual meets, the 
Terrapin women's swimming 
team one-upped itself this 
year by winning the ACC 
Tournament in Atlanta. After 
finishing a disappointing fourth 
in 2004, the Terps performed 
at their finest this time behind 
outstanding showings by Miller, 
Lavell, Megan Knepper, and 
Marina Mulyayeva to beat out 
two-time defending champion| 
Virginia. In the NCA 
tournament in West Lafayette 
Ind., the Terps scored highestl 
among ACC teams with 40 
points, finishing 22nd overall. 
Lavell particularly shined, 
breaking two of her own school 
records. 



270 ^idurenie^in 








^^omen s (Swimming 271 




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Record: 
ACC 

Key wins: l-0@ Virginia April 
9; 2-1 vs. No. 17 Georgia Tech 
April 29 

Key players: sophomore first 
baseman Lindsay Klein (.333 
avg., 5 hrs, 32 RBIs), senior 
pitcher Jessica Aditays (10-5, 
1.72 ERA, 112 SO) 
The experienced Terrapin 
Softball team could not quite 
put it all together in 2005, but 
it did claim some important 
victories-mostnotably beating 
conference champions Georgia 
Tech behind stellar pitching 
from Aditays and sophomore 
Abbey Welch. In the ACC 
Tournament in College Park, 
the Terps finished fourth after 
losing to Virginia Tech, 5-3, 
May 17. In August, former 
Bethune-Cookman coach 

Laura Watten was hired to 
replace Gina LaMandre - the 
only coach in the program's 
1 1 -year history - who resigned 
following the season to pursue 
other opportunities. 



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272 9!cfure The ^in 





73 




Women's Soccer 2005 
Record: 5-11-3 overall, 3-5-2 
ACC 

Key wins: 1-0 vs. No. 1 1 -ranked 
Wake Forest Sept. 30; 2-1 vs. 
No. 8 Boston College 
Oct. 29 

Key players: senior forward] 
Kimmy Francis (3 goals, 10 
points), junior goalkeeper Nikki 
Resnick (115 saves, 4 shutouts) 
Beset by injuries to key players 
and a rigorous schedule, the 
Terrapin women's soccer team] 
led by first-year head coach 
Brian Pensky missed the 
NCAA tournament for the first 
time since 2000. Offensively- 
challenged at times, especially 
with top threat Mallory Mahar 
out with a torn ACL for the 
majority of the season, the Terps 
still proved to be resilient. They 
snuck into the ACC tournament 
with an upset win over the Eagles 
on Senior Night as freshmen 
Kimmy Bunting and Aimee 
Bresani tallied the goals. Behind] 
Resnick, a first-team AU-ACC 
pick, the Terps were competitive 
in nearly every contest, as 
evidenced by four double 
overtime games and eight losses 
by two goals or less. 



274 Picture 7Z>e ^in 





omQTi s (joccer 




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Record: 12-7 overall, 2-2 ACC 
Key wins: 14-7 @ No. 6 North 
Carolina, April 16; 13-12 (OT) 
vs. Princeton, May 4 
Key plavers: senior midfielder 
Acacia Walker (33 goals), 
senior attacker Jessica Domey 

(45 points) 

Competitive as always, 
the Terrapin women's 
lacrosse team came away 
with multiple impressive 
victories over the 2005 
season before being ousted 
in the NCAA Tournament 
first-round by Princeton, 
16-8, in Princeton, N.J. 
Days earlier, the Terps 
dramatically defeated the 
Tigers intheirregular-season 
finale when junior attacker 
Brooke Richards delivered 
a golden goal in overtime. 
Freshman midfielder Kelly 
Kasper (38 points) emerged 
as one player who will be 
counted on heavily in years 
to come, especially with 
the graduation of offensive 
stalwarts Walker, Annie 
Collins, and Domey. 



276 Picture Hie HDin 





^^omen s jQacrossQ 211 



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Tennis 2004-05 
Record: (11-12, 5-5 ACQ 
Key players: junior Ramona 
But (AU-ACC), sophomore 
Marianne Baker 

With a solid regular- 
season performance, the 
Terrapin women's tennis 
team earned their first NCAA 
Tournament appearance 

since 1999. Though the 
Terps lost in the first round to 
Harvard, 4-0, in Cambridge, 
Mass., the trip to the NCAAs 
should propel fixture success 
under Coach Martin Novak. 
Consistently ranked in the top- 
50 nationally, But, Baker, and 
junior Jennifer Dent provided 
a strong core of experienced 
and talented players. 



278 9/c/z/re "The ^in 







^^omen s tennis 279 




Record: 28-5 overall, 18-4 ACC 
Key wins: 3-0 vs. Duke Oct. 16; 
3-1 vs. North Carolina Oct. 21 
Key plavers: senior middle 
blocker Rachel Wagener (405 
kills), sophomore outside hitter 
Jade Brown (397 kills) 

Sprinting out to fourteen 
consecutive wins, 
the youthful Terrapin 
volleyball team exceeded 
expectations yet again en 
route to its third straight 
ACC Championship. Solid 
and experienced up front 
with seniors Wagener 
and Stephanie Smith, 
underclassmen such as 
Brown, Beth Gillming, and 
Maggie Schmelzle proved 
to be just as valuable as 
the Terps earned their 
third consecutive NCAA 
berth. The Terps beat 
Kentucky in the first 
round before falling to 
No. 9-ranked Louisville, 
3-0, in Louisville, Kent. 
Head coach Janice Kruger 
captured her 700^'' career 
victory Sept. 3. 



280 Picture The ^in 





Somen's Volleyball 1%\ 




Record: 12-19 overall, 4- 
8 Collegiate Water Polo 
Association Southern 

Division 

Key wins: 14-8 @ Salem 
International March 5; 12-5 
vs. Sienna March 20 
Key players: seniors Elyse 
Corwin (47 goals) and Colleen 
McShane (41 goals, 43 steals) 
After a winless inaugural 
campaign in 2004, the Terrapin 
water polo team fared much 
better this season under first- 
year coach Carl Salyer. Led by 
team captain Corwin - a first- 
team all-conference selection 
- the Terps finished the season 
ranked No. 10 in the College 
Water Polo Association Poll. 
They nearly knocked off local 
rival George Washington 
on two separate occasions, 
succumbing 8-6 and 10-9 to 
the Colonials, respectively. If 
the Terps improve drastically 
again in 2006, wins over 
George Washington and other 
established programs could 
become commonplace. 



282 9/c/z/re The HVin 





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Though a fast start to the season 
by the Terrapin gymnastics team 
eventually fizzled to a certain 
degree, many accomplishments 
were reached. Ranked as high 
as No. 15 nationally early in 
the year, the Terps performed 
particularly well in Hawaii Jan. 
7- 1 at their first meet, finishing 
second behind No. 9 Arizona. 
Following a win over Pittsburgh 
Feb. 20, junior Rachel Martinez 
- with strong scores on the floor 
and vault - helped the Terps 
sneak past local rival George 
Washington by one point on 
Feb. 23 at Comcast Center. 
About a month later, they placed 
second in the EAGL Conference 
Championships held in College 
Park. 

The Terps as a team did not 
make the NCAA regional 
meet for just the second time 
in seven years, but Martinez, 
juniors Alexandria Gatch and 
Ginny Scott, and sophomore 
Rachel Colon each earned an 
individual spot to compete in 
Gainesville, Fla. Martinez 
finished 11th overall in the all- 
around competition. 



284 Picture Hie ^in 






QymnasHcs 285 






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Cheerkading 287 




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Greek Life 











QreekjQife 289 




"CUcince made us sisters, Hearts made us 
friends. " -Vnknown 




This page (from top): The sisters of Delta Delta 
Delta dressed for a night out, some Alpha Delta 
Pi's out at night, the girls of Alpha Omicron Pi, 
the sisters of Sigma Kappa cheering on the Terps. 
Next page (from top): the sisters of Zeta Tau 
Alpha hanging out, some of Alpha Epsilon Phi 
before a football game 

290 ^khirGTha^in 



(3isfers function as safety nets in a chaotic world simply by being there 





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you kDOAA? A\?hs>t^gr you Jo, they'll still feg th^rg." -^^wy Li 




disterhood 291 




This page (from top): The 
brothers of Lambda Chi Alpha 
show off their school spirit at a 
football game, the brothers of 
Alpha Sigma Phi. 
Next page (from top): Some 
of the brothers of Tau Epsilon 
Phi get ready to go out, the 
brothers of Alpha Tau Omega at 
a philanthropy event 



292 ^holoTinish 



**Toga! Toga!*' -Animal House 




We may have all come on different ships, but we're in the same 

boat now." -Martin Luther King, Jr. 

brotherhood 293 




^^c^% 



Each semester, fraternities and sororities see some new faces as they extend 
bids to new members who will soon become their new brothers and sisters. Those 
interested in joining fraternities and sororities rush the ones of their choice. For 
fraternities, the msh process is very informal. Male students are invited to take 
part in activities such as watching a football game or going out to dinner with 
the brothers. After hanging out with these potential new members a couple of 
times, the brothers will hand out bids to the men they have chosen. There are 26 
fraternities on campus, giving male students a variety of houses to choose from. 

When rushing a sorority during the fall semester, female students go through 
a similar process to the fraternity rush but in the spring semester, the sorority 
rush process is a lot more formal. Hundreds of female students come out in the 
spring for sorority recruitment. Rather than just going to a few sororities, the 
potential new members go to all fourteen of the sororities on campus. After each 
of the three rounds; tours, philanthropy and skits; these women have to rank the 
sororities that they liked the best, and the sororities on this list have to decide 
which women they want to see back at their house for another round. At the end 
of the process, girls can only be invited back to a maximum of three houses for the 
preference round, and they can only receive a bid to one house. 

After receiving bids, men and women go through a 4-8 week pledging period 
before they are finally initiated. After initiation, the whole process seems worth it 
when they can finally call their new friends their brothers and sisters. 



Lambda Chi's pledges 
with their Big Brothers and 
the paddles they made for 
them. 



294 l^hofo'Timsh 






From top (left to right): The sisters of Alpha Delta Pi waiting to greet the potential new members 
before Preference round. The Fall '05 pledge class of Sigma Kappa before initiation. The Fall 
'05 pledge class of Sigma Delta Tau on bid day. The Fall '05 Zeta Tau Alpha pledge class joining 
their new sisters after initiation. The Fall '05 Delta Phi Epsilon pledge class. Some sisters of 
Alpha Epsilon Phi trying to recruit new members on La Plata Beach. 

^ecmilmenf 295 




d 



Once a semester, fraternities and sororities pair up and compete 
against each other in a week-long competition. In the fall, this takes 
place during the week of the Homecoming football game. The 
fraternity and sorority match-up gets to know each other better by 
doing lots of social activities together, as well as competing against 
the other teams in contests such as a Mr. and Mrs. Greek competition 
and making floats for the Homecoming parade. In the spring, the 
week-long competition is called Greek Week and sorority-fraternity 
teams take part in such activities as Greek Olympics and a talent show. 
For those in the Greek community, these weeks allow them to meet 
lots of new people and are two of the most fun weeks of the year. 




296 ^holo^inbh 



Previous page (from left): The sisters 
of Delta Delta Delta get ready for the 
Greek talent show. The sisters of AlphaJ 
Omicron Pi on Frat Row for Greek 
Olympics. 

This page (from top): The sisters of 
Alpha Epsilon Phi have ftin on the slip 
'n slide, one of the activities of Greek 
Week 2005. The brothers of Alpha Tau 
Omega, with their partner TriDelt, get 
ready for Greek Olympics. The sisters 
of Zeta Tau Alpha enjoying Greek 
Week. The sisters of Sigma Delta Tau 
on their float for the Homecoming 
Parade. 





Qreek^^eekl^omecoming 297 




Fraternities and sororities have several nights during the semester 
when members get together to celebrate. Over the course of the semester 
there are dated parties, which are usually at a local club or bar, when 
brothers and sisters and their dates enjoy a night of dancing and having 
fun. Some fraternities and sororities also have grab-a-date parties, 
which members are usually only given a few days notice for and have 
to quickly "grab" someone as their date for the night. Towards the end 
of the semester, many fraternities and sororities hold formals. Many 
fraternities make their formals into weekend-long events, during which 
brothers and their dates attend a formal at a hotel and then stay over for 
the night. Sororities stay local for their formals and return on a bus later 
that same night. Everyone in the Greek community enjoys the chance 
to get dressed up and have fun with their friends on these nights. 




298 ^hoh finish 




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Previous page: The sisters of Alpha Epsilon 
Phi at their formal. 

This page (from top left): The brothers of 
Alpha Epsilon Pi enjoying Spring Formal. 
The sisters of Delta Delta Delta eating at 
formal. The sisters of Delta Phi Epsilon 
posing at formal. (Right) The sisters of 
Sigma Delta Tau at their formal. 



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formah 299 




Above: some of the sisters of Zeta Tau 
Alpha raised money for the Susan G. 
Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, 
which is their national philanthropy, by 
participating in the Walk for the Cure. 
Right: The sisters of Alpha Delta Pi 
held a pizza bagel sale to raise money 
for their philanthropy, The Ronald 
McDonald House. 



100 ^holo^inish 




From top to bottom: Lambda Chi Alpha held 
their 2nd annual free-throw competition at 
Ritchie Coliseum called Hoops for Kids 
to raise money for the Ronald McDonald 
House. The sisters of Sigma Deha Tau 
held an "Eat Your Way Through College 
Park" buffet dinner to raise money for their 
national philanthropy PC AA (Prevent Child 
Abuse America). The brothers of Alpha Tau 
Omega took part in the 5K Walkathon for 
Eating Disorder Awareness. 




Philanthropy 301 




^i 



02 ^hoh^inish 



Previous page (Top-left to right): Lambda Chi Alpha's house on Frat Row. The Alpha Epsilon Phi 
house is one of the three sorority houses on Frat Row. (Bottom) Alpha Delta Pi's house on College 
Ave. 



This page (top): Delta Gamma's house displays an anchor out front, the sorority's symbol. 

I wr . j:^^h^^ (Bottom- left to right) 

|0 -^^ . ^,'j^^^^^^HH The brothers of Alpha 

^ •■ ^^^fc^ >^ ..^^^^^^m^^^^^m jau Omega outside their 

house on Frat Row. 
The sisters of Delta Phi 
Epsilon sitting outside 
their house before a 
football game. 




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303 



f 




\ 



Civista Health is a recipient of the Maryland 

Workplace Excellence Seal of Approval Award. 

Join Our Team and be a part of the success! 






Civista Medical Center is a smoke-tree progressive and dynamic heallhcarc 
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Cl\lSTA www.civista.org . or mail to HR at 701 E Charles Street, 

Hr. ihh LaPlata, MD. 20646. EOE 



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To learn more about our internship/scholarship programs or to 
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LifeBridge Health, one of the largest, most comprehensive and highly 
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One team. 
One purpose. 




Maryland 

General Hospital 

UNPt'ERSiTi' OF Maryland Medical System 



find your strength in our system. 




Maryland General Hospital 

CONGRATULATIONS! 
YOU DESERVE IT. 

Early-morning classes. ..late-night papers. ..all-night 
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You've worked hard and now you're about to graduate. Good 
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Good for us, too. 

We're Maryland General Hospital, a 216-bed community 
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And, you'll discover genuine camaraderie and a supportive 
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Part ot the University of Maryland Medical System, we 
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tuition reimbursement, pension plans, 403(b), and growth 
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to apply or to learn more about our nursing, allied health, 
technical, management or administrative careers. 



EOE 



www.marylandgeneral.org 



Who do .you think is responsible for the '^ 

playoff games; 




A basketball feSfgUeiThe power of a championship game 
to bring people together cannot be taken for granted. But neither can the 
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Now that Pepco and Conectiv are one company (yet still identified by the 
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www.phicareers.com 

An Equal Opportunity/ AfTlrmative Action Employer 



3 pepco ^SgSSSf**^ 




GTSI is Government Technology, for more 
than 20 years a reliable resource delivering 
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Come join our team. We have opportunities in IT, Finance, 
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GTSI Corp. offers career growth, personal responsibility, 
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on-site exercise facility. 

Thank you for your interest in GTSI Corp. 



EOE. 




It takes a wide variety of talented professionals to provide 



the nation's best, most reliable wireless network. 




Find out more about the various opportunities we have that are available 



in your region and in your career field. 



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Offices nationwide 

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construction management. 



Sr^ydLer CohrT 



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Certified Publie Accountants 



ooking for a company that 
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As a leader in the Washington DC area Accounting Industi-y for over 75 
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Visit our website, www.cpahelp.com to see if we are the right accounting 
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EOE 

SNYDER COHN yj 



Becausey^^^^^/^ 



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caterers 



301-588-9200 

info@corcorancaterers.com 
www.corcorancaterers.com 



UPS WILL HELP PAY 

FOR YOUR 
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To inquire about part-time 
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Or call: 



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The UPS 
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'Program guidelines apply 
Equal Opportunity limployer 



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Working with professional firms, 
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Management Advisory Services 



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301-987-9366 FAX 301-987-9018 



GENE 



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LOGIC 



Founded in 1994, Gene Logic works to improve human 
health by providing a portfolio of drug development 
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Underpinning these capabilities are our industry-leading 
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To support our team, we offer a competitive, 
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Gene Logic is headquartered in Gaithersburg, MD and 
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information about career opportunities and to apply 
online, visit our website at www.qeneloqic.com/careers . 

Gene Logic is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 



sponsor 



Proud 
of 
University of Maryland 
Terrapins 





Joy of Pepsi. 



PEPSI. PEPSI-COLA. THE JOY OF PEPSI and the Pepsi Globe design are registered trademarks of PepsiCo. Inc 



Blind I 



LIND INDUSTRIES AND k3ERVICES OF 



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M 



ARYLAND 



Blind Industries and Services of Maryland provide diverse job opportunities for 
MD citizens who are blind or, 



O A major manufacturer and 
choice for over 400 associates. 



or^sually impaire^^y- 

retailer of quality goods, we are the employer of 

Q At Blind Industries and Services of Maryland we work with people who are 
blind to help achieve splf -sufficiency, personal growthjmd true independence. 

15 Core areas of instruction: Brailfe, Cane Travel. Independent Living, Computer 
Technology, Career Development and more, y^ ^9 

*o^ f .^' 

3345 Washington Blvd., Baltimore, Maryland 
(410) 737-26000(888) 322-45670(410) 737-2665 FAX 





JAII utilities Included 

J Minutes From Campus 

J University Shuttle At Your Front 

J Convenient To Everything! 

J Friendly & Courteous Staff 

J Near Restaurants & Metro 

J Off-Street Parking 

J Picnic & Barbecue Areas 

J Playgrounds 

JUTILITIES INCLUDED! 

J Laundry Facility 

J Bus/Public Trans 

J Cable TV Available 



University 

City 
Apartments 

22 1 3 University Boule\ ard Bist 
HyattsMlle. MD 20783 

4(X)ApartmeiiLs 
(866) 278-5036 Toll Fiw 



Comfort and convenience make University City 
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dedicated to your every comfort. ..We have a 
well-earned reputation for excellent 
management and outstanding service. 



Door . 




s 



rrm 



Check Out Our 

Sports Medicine 

Team 

University of Maryland 
Orthopaedics 

University of Maryland Medicine 



Official Medical Team 
of The Terps 



410.448.6400 
1.800.492.5538 

www.umortho.org 






Southern Utilities Company, Inc. 

1049 Ripley Street 

Silver Spring. Maryland 20910-3399 

Phone; 301-589-2885 



A Family Business Since 1 932 

Bell & Gossett and Taco Booster Pumps 

Siemens (Furnas) Starters & Controls 

A.O. Smith, Marathon Electric, and Lincoln Motors 

U S Seals & T.8. Woods Couplings 



Congratulations to the 

Class of 2006 
from 

The Inn and Conference Center 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 




I'h; 30L')S?.7;,(i;> 



.^rriott Conference Centers 



I .i\, .i01,9S5.7445 




We've Moved! 

Colossal Contractors, Inc., is happy to announce 
that we have moved into our new office in 
Burtonville.Maryland. 




Our new address is: 
Colossal Contraaors, Inc. Tel: (301) 879-7950 

3720 Bell Road Fax: (301) 879-7954 

Burtonsville, Maryland 20866 

www.colossalcontractors.com 



APARTMENTS APARTMENTS APARTMENTS 




like to have UoUP ^^^^^,^ 



Wouittyd^l^^ike to make. 
Would yowritke a 



Fountain Club 

apartments are very convenient for 

University of Maryland students 

& ail are eligible for a 

$30 A MONTH DISCOUNT. 

So if the above circumstances 

apply to you... 

»- What are you waiting for? 




FOUNTAIN CLUB 



APARTMENT HOMES 




301.731.5977 

TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS UNBELIEVABLE OFFER! 

SIZZ KENILWORTH AVENUE • HYATTSVILU, MD 20781 

VISIT US ONLINE @ FOUNTAINPARKJIET 

A SOITTHERN MANAGEMENT COMMUNITY 



(t) 



ROBINSON & JACOBS, PC 



Inimieration Law 



!.i Employment & l-ainily Sponsored Immigration 
J Labor Certification _l Permanent Residence 
Zi Citizenship J TN Visa U Family & Fiance Visas 
J Temporaty Work Visas for H-IB (specialry workers) 



P. 301-614-3330 
F. 301-614-3336 



7731 Belle Point Drive 
Greenbelt, MD 20770 




CYCLE CENTER %smm^ 

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4445 Balto. Ave. Laurel, MD 20707 





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Fax;30-| .604.21 98 



Foreign and Domestic Cars 



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JOHN TOSSOUNIAN 



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F.AX (301) 468-6763 



12300 Parklawn Drive 
Rock\ille. Mar\land 20852-1402 




The Mayor, City Council and Staff of the 

City of College Park appeciate the 

opportunity to provide a positive 

community atmosphere for 

growth through education. 

We extend our sincerest wishes to 

the Graduating Class of 2006 for a 

successful and accomplished furture. 

Good Luck! 



"IThe Best Prices in Tozun" 

We Provide: 

n Vehicle Glass Replacement - Repair 

1^ Services 

□ Services On All Makes - Models 

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n Windshield Replacement Services 

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t^ Crack - Rock Repair 

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Phone: 301.614,8500 Fax: 301.614.8508 



V/54 



DiscevBi 



8139 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, MP 20740 | 







One Great BaltimoreWashington DC Location Conveniently Located off 1-95 at exit 29B 

Ail Guestrooms Feature Ttie Sheraton Sweet Sleeper Bed, 

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• Minutes from the University of Maryland Campus 

• 20 Miles from Baltimore Inner Harbor / 1 2 Miles from DC 

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• Complimentary Newspaper Daily 

• Outdoor Pool opened 7 days per week between 10am - 8 pm 

• Complimentary In Guestroom Coffee Available Daily 

• Fitness Center 

• Complimentary Local Area (5 Mile Radius of Hotel) 

• University of Maryland and Green Belt Metro Shuttle Service 

• Powder Mill Cafe Restaurant 
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• High Speed Internet Available in all Guestrooms 

• 205 Guestrooms featunng The Sheraton Sweet Sleeper Bed 
For Group Information, Please Contact the Hotel Sales Department 

Sheraton College Park Hotel 

4095 Powder Mill Road 

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301-937-4422 

www.sheraton.com/collegepark 




CONGRATUT ATIONS 

From HDR's architects, 
1101 King Street engineers and consultants. 
Suite 400 

Alexandria, VA 22314 

800.366.4411 Proudly serving the University of 
www.hdrinc.com Maryland for the past 15 years. 








Many Solutions" 



/ffl\LONG& 



^poster: 

REAL ESTATE, INC 



Dan Early 
Associate Broker 
Branch Manager 



H Office: 301-441-9511 

^® Fax:301-474-4438 

Toll Free: 800-446-9498 

Email : dan . early @ longandfoster.com 



COLLEGE PARK OFFICE 

'i(W4 Hnltimore Boule\ard College Park. Man, land 20740-1312 



<^ 




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burgessniple.com 



Congratulations on your 
achievement. 



Ifue know you, 
this is only the beginning. 

On behalf of The VA Maryland Health Care System, we extend our 
sincere congratulations to all those who are graduating. 
We'd also like you to know, that if you wish to make one of the most 
compelling choices for your health care career, we are here for you. 
For details or to apply online, visit us on the web. Or call our 
Nurse Recruitment Office at: (800) 463-6295, cxt.7()4.i. 
Email your resume to: iIona.maIl(>n2((i med.va.gov 

The VA Mar\ laud Healtli Care S> stem 

B;iMmoi\- • Pcn> Ftoint • kxh Ra\m Rehibilitation & Extended Care Medical Centiiv 
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AWARD WmNmG RAMA DA GOLD KEY PROPERTY! 

RAMADA LIMITED 

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(semratulatiens ie tf\e 

Glass t9/2,6)6)(9 



Scholastic Advertising * Yearbook Advertising Office 

2486 Lawrenceville Hwy Suite 120 * Law/renceville, GA 30044 

Phone: 800-964-0722 * Fax: 770-963-5299 



www.anixter.com 



Anixter Inc. 

8320 Guilford Road 

Suite L 

Columbia, MD 21046 



MmsEt 



410/290-7722 Phone 
410/290-6565 Fax 



Miles Glass Co., Inc. 

Specializing in Structural & Decorative Glass 

(301) 439-5111 
Fax (301) 439-0824 



8714 Piney Branch Road • Silver Spring, IVID 20901 
(location also in Virginia) 




BALTIMORE ORIOLES 
2006 SEASONAL POSITIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE 

To learn more about the positions log on to 

www.orioles.com and click on Job Opportimities 

Or call our Job Hotline at (410) 625-7178 

ti^The Baltimore Orioles are an Equal Opportunity Employer^i»- 



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301.270.2285 



FAX: 301.270.2286 






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PK Graphics 
Alumni are proud 
supporters of 
the University of 
Maryland Terrapins 

Good luck to the graduation class of 2006! 

13964 Baltimore Avenue • Laurel, Maryland 20707 

office 301-725-4567 • fax 301-725-3775 
email mail(H)pkgraphic.com • ftp pk.maiatech.com 




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TELEDYNE 

ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. 

A Teledyne Technologies Company 



10707 Gilroy Road 

Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031-1311 U.S.A 

410 771.8600 FAX: 410 771.8620 

www.teledynees.com 



Hampton 




Exciting location 

Unmistakably original ,„ i m « i 

^ -^ *Den available w/some iloorplans 

Lnjoy llie coinenience and the best of both Montgomei7 and Prince George's 
Counties! Just minutes to the University of Maryland, the Beltway. Takoma 
Park, and Washington. DC. Hampton on the Park offers you the perfect 
combination of convenience and service. Li\e in the unmi.stakably original 
apartment in an exciting location ... and start enjoying life! 

Features: 

• Some utilities included!** 

• I niquely designed floor plans 

• Plush wall-to-wall carpeting 

• Dining areas, sonic w ith ceiling fans 
' Free Parking 
' Suininiing Pool 

Directions: 

Take 1-495 lo Exit 28B (New Hampshire 
.'\ve. South). Take a Left at second light, 
.'\delphi Road to community on the right. 



' Playgrounds 

' Metrobus acessible. 

' 1 5 minute commute to Metro. 

' Just minutes to University of Maryland 

' Uni\ersity of MD shuttle bus stops here 

' 24-hour emergency service 

Office Hours: 

Moii-Fri S:.1U-5;30 
Sat 10-5:30 
Sun 1 - 5:30 



^ 



Dear Graduates: 

It is my pleasure to congratulate the 
Class of 2006 . I share the joy and 
pride I know you and your family feel 
about this academic achievement. 



Home to the 
Maryland University 
Terrapins, Prince 
George's County 
also offers a 
wonderful place 
to live and work. 




Prince George's 
County Executive 




v^ 



Kick-off Your Semester at Belcrest Plaza Apartments 

Start the Season with 2 #1 Ranked Teams 



Semeste t 




Small Pet Buildings 
( But no one from Penn State 





Semester leases 




Buses to D.C. and campus 

Optional HBO Cable T\^ 

Individual heating and A- C 

Wall to Wall Carpeting 

Balcony or patio — Pool 

Walking distance to Prince George's Plaza Mall 

Efficiency 1 . 2 & 3 bedroom .Apts. - Some with dens 

Modem, well-designed kitchens (soine with dishv\ash er) 

For more information, call: (301) 559-5042 

GRADY MANAGEMENT, INC. 

s Exceptional People. Exceptional Communities. 





I 




VITRO 

TECHNOLOGIES 



T IS OUR MISSION TO REVOLUTIONIZE THE DRUG DISCOVERY 

AND DEVELOPMENT PROCESS BY BEING THE PREMIER 

WORLD PROVIDER OF SPECIALIZED PRODUCTS AND 

CONTRACT SERVICES WITHIN THE IN VITRO TECHNOLOGIES 

INDUSTRY WE ACHEIVE THIS BY MAINTAINING A DEDICATED 

WORKFORCE COMMITTED TO THE HIGHEST STANDARDS OF 

QUALITY AND EXCELLENCE IN TECHNOLOGICAL 

LEADERSHIP AND CUSTOMER-CENTRIC SERVICE. 





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Phone: 410-455-124 
Toil-Free: 1-888-488-323 
Fax: 443-836-0340 

450 South Rolling Road 







University Vie>\ 
8204 Baltimore Avenue, 
College Park, Maryland 
301-220-0951 

University View Amenities 

Dedicated University View shuttle buses through the University of Maryland Campus 

\\ aiking Bridge directly from Univereity View to the t hiivcrsitN of Maryland campus 

Pool and terrace \\ilh campus view - Club room with pool tables, big screen fV and fooseball 

Directly linked to extensive jogging/biking trail system - Fitness Center - Study center 

Vending / Snack Stop - Parking options - Electronic access - Telephone entry system 

Trash chute and garbage rcinoval included - Bicycle storage with electronic key access 

Handicap accessible units 

Suite rent includes: 

I ull si/e washer and dryer in each suite - Hi-speed internet included - Basic Cable 
with optional upgrade to DirecTV - Telephone ready - Basic utilities included 
Independent heat and air conditioning in each unit - Electronic keyed access 
Access to University View amenities with pre-opening lease sign-up 

Furnished suite which includes: Bedroom 

Stylish fijll size bed - Desk with drawer - Desk chair designed with students in mind 

Dresser - Nightstand 



•• • •■ ■ 



UNIVERSITY 

View 

ot College Pork, Maryland 





Eiving room 

Couch - Overstuffed chair 



Coffee table - Entertainment center -End table 



Kitchen 

24"x 48" dining table - 4 kitchen chairs designed for students -Well planned cabinets 

and counter space - Kitchen appliances which include automatic ice maker with refrigerator 

Full size microwave - Stove - Full-size sink with garbage disposer - Automatic dishwasher 




iCNSI 

\S W U <_ N S I N t I. I > M 

Looking to Make a Difference i 

Successful Systems Integrator Introduces 
Careers in Information Technology 

If you have what it takes to succeed, are willing to work hard 
and play hard, then send your resume to: 

resumes@cns-inc,com 



Candidates are Needed for the Following Positions: 

* JAVA DEVELOPER 

* Q/A TESTER 



POSITION DESCRIPTIONS 

Q/A TESTERS 

Knowledge and experience of testing 
web based applications. Experience ot 
creating lest scripts 



JAVA DEVELOPERS ■ SENIOR, lifllD and JUNIOR LEVELS: 
Must tiave working knowledge ot Java, JSP EJB. J2EE and 
XI^L. Expert knowledge and experience with HTML, CSS, 
XML & JavaScript. Experience with Wetjlogic or 
Websphere application sen/er a plus. Good knowledge 
ot PtySQL and datobose programming (Creating 
procedures/triggersl. Experience ot implementing a 
working with MVC framework Travel may be required. 



„. .,. „....e ..P..v.», ,n- ....ns.. ^-P'-"-— -'1 



mmmmmmmimmiimmimmmi—mimmmKmiimtmKmmiifaimmmsmmmKm 





The 

Arc 

Priac* George's County 



The Arc of Prince George's County has Hfe- changing 

opportunities for you! Are you looking for rewarding, 

challenging work that would help someone with developmental 

disabilities to have full participation in his 

or her community? If so, visit us at www.thearcofpgc.org 

orcaiil-877-WORK-ARC! 




College Park Honda & Hyundai 

Would Like To Congratulate The Recent 

Graduates Of The University Of Maryland 



Car Buying Tips For Recent Graduates 
College Park Honda & Hyundai Offers you: 

1. College Graduate 
Program 



2. Special Low Rate 
Financing 

3. Huge Rebates 

4. Great Savings 

5. Incredible Selection. 

6. Certified Used Cars. 









Remember We're Just Minutes Away... 



COLLEGE PARK 

(0) HONDA. 

9400 Baltimore Ave • College Park, MD 

301.441.2900 

www.collegeparkhonda.com 



COLLEGE PARK 

(S) HYunnni 

9500 Baltimore Ave • College Park, MD 

301.441.1313 

www.collegeparkhyundai.com 



Amanda Geiger bought these sunglasses 

to wear on spring break. She wore them only once 

before she was killed by a drunk driver. 

Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk. 




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U.S. Oepsnmcnl ol TronsporUUon 



Coincil 




A funny thing happened to Lewis 6 CUrlt on 

.;ir way to finding an all- water route to the 

Pic . The farther they got from so-called 

; '■'1 ■vilizition. the more civilizations they I traveling into someone s home, not wildsrness. You'll 

.\-JSl i 

•%' . I .... ^ 

' I ncotictcred. Rich and diverse cultures i see one community Journeying into another Jf 






' . the Mandao-Hidaisj. Ai-i!<?r; 
i_i.iiihi Shoshooi, Ncr f-- - 
CThiaook. In all, more rhi 
100 nations thrived from 
; Great Plains to the Pacific >] 
Ocean for thoii.'>aads of years and 
despite every ihing. are still here, i ' 
The story of the relationship bn jccn £#*^ ^ 
- American Indians and the 
Lewis 6 Clark 
■;xpedition is hij^ilv 



j«t»J»W!|„ 




ariistic^liy accomplished communities 
n parts of the Pacific Northwest 
more hduvily populated than 
many of the states to the 
i:5.st. And perhaps you'll sec 
what many American Indians 
have always 
felt, that 

one can never trulv 
discover' a place. Only 
r i'':;rancc. peace. onc's place in it. What can wc 

■,i good will. The story of what I Icar.i Irom a 200-year-'' -I -l-uv'^ V>-i 



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Leu:::- & C7uf/. cnciMnUu j. 

than 100 nations of American Indians. 



hapoeneii .tr tlic ensuing 200 ycar.^ is not. 
Which is why, as we commemorate the 
wis 6 Clark Bicentennial, we encourage 




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Jenny Rothman 
Editor in Chief 

Staff 

Christina Santucci- Activities & Sports 

Cara Pritchett- Sports 

Erin Ruberry- Academics 

Allie Armitage- Business Manager 

Contributing Writers/Photographers : 

Jon Ulrich 

Daniel Chiat 

Allie Armitage 

Sarah Williams 

Adrienne Morris 




_ en wagner 
Photo Editor 



Printed by: 

Taylor Publishing Company 
1550 W. Mockingbird Lane 
Dallas, Texas 75235 

Taylor Representative: Julia 

Jordan 

Account Executive: Tami 

McConnell 



Thanks to the University Archives for providing 

all the old pictures in honor of the University's 

1 50th Anniversary. Special thanks to Kristen 

Strigel and Anne Turkos for all their help. 

•W%-; Other Photo Credits: 

Google Images 
1 UMTerps.com 



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