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Full text of "The Terrapin"

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Student Liie 



Activities 



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a55 0^2007 





2006 was a big year for world and 
US news. Immigrants were upset 
this year by the suggested chang- 
es to the U.S. immigration law, so 
they protested en mass all over the 
country. In August, a plot was dis- 
covered to blow up planes using 
liquid explosives traveling from 
the UK to the States. Because of 
this, airport security was height- 
ened once again and travelers were 
not allowed to bring any liquids on 
planes. A month long war took 
place in the middle east this year 
because two Israeli soldiers were 
kidnapped. Israel focused on 
many targets in Lebanon but the 
ceasefire began in August. Only 
two years after the massive tsu- 
nami that destroyed many parts of 
Indonesia, a 6.3 magnitude earth- 
quake shook them at the end of 



20 







May. Hurricane Katrina victims 
are waiting for government's as- 
sistance still and New Orleans' 
population has continued to be 
less than half of what it was be- 
fore Katrina struck. Gas prices 
continued to fluctuate this year 
peaking at about $3/gallon or 
higher. North Korea announced 
that they tested a nuclear weapons 
which is a great concern to the 
well-being of many. The geno- 
cide in Darfur continued this year 
and it got much needed interna- 
tional attention from the UN. 
In rural Pennesalvania a crazed 
man shot 10 and killed 5 Amish 
schoolchildren before he killed 
himself. The year ended with 
the execution of Saddam Hus- 
sein on December 30th bv hang- 
ing for crimes against humanity. 








21 



V 





I 



While 2008 is still a year 
away, talks of the next Pres- 
idential race are headlining 
the political world, making 
it much close than it seems. 
After the Democrats won 
the House, deeming Nan- 
cy Pelosi the first female 
speaker of the House, two 
Democratic frontrunners 
have come out to change 
history. "I'm in it to win it," 
said HUarv Clinton, after 
announcing her presidential 



22 





bid on her website. Her 
win would bring the first 
female president to the 
White House. On the oth- 
er side is Barack Obama, 
known for his charisma 
and "hope" factor that he 
brings to Americans. His 
win would bring the first 
African American to the 
White House. But these 
questions still remain: Is 
America ready for these 
new changes, or will the 
Republicans win in 2008? 





23 




In fashion, "big, long and strong" 
is what took over the campus this 
year. In clothing, many ladv terps 
could be seen sporting long tank 
tops, long shirts, and tunic dresses 
paired with leggings. Over these 
long pieces were wide waist belts, 
which was one of the main trends 
of 2006-2007. Many paired these 
outfits with this year's jewelry 
trend: long, 30-plus inch pendants. 
Tiffany jewelry continued to have 
its longtime popularit\', as thev 
came out with their 34" heart 
pendants, seen aU around cam- 
pus. For cheaper alternatives, girls 
sported long necklaces with giant 
colorful hearts, sailor symbols, or 
other items to their pleasing. As 
for shoes, flats were strong when 
paired with the trend of skinny 
jeans and leggings. In addidon 



24 






^ 



to flats, peep toed heels came 
back and they more than likely 
were patent leather — red be- 
ing a favorite color. A Japanese 
clothing line alscj hit campus 
this year: Bape, or known as the 
Bathing Ape. The brand, argued 
overitsdifferentpronunciadons,is 
best known for its large 
zip-up hoodies that 

show a varier\' of multi- 
colored patterns. In addition, 
clothing with rugby stripes 
are popular and it's not just 
the polo shirt these days, but 
also dresses with the tradi- 
tional thick horizontal stripes. 
Ongoing trends include 
Ugg boots, North Face softshells, 
Rainbow flip flops and Puma 
shoes. 









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25 




Whether shocking or inevitable, 
Britney Spears' divorce to Kevin 
Federline made the headlines in 
2006 more than any other mar- 
riage or break-up in Hollywood. 
A couple of months before the 
fated divorce, they gave birth to 
their second child together, Jayden 
James. Desperate Housewives 
star, Marcia Cross wed in June and 
singer Pink and boyfriend Carey 
Hart married after she proposed to 
him during one of his motocross 
races. The marriage of Pamela 
Anderson and Kid Rock began and 
ended in 2006. They wed in July, 
having numerous ceremonies and 
tiled for divorce in late Novem- 
ber. The marriage of Tom Cruise 
and Katie Holmes also made 
the news as well as the birth of 
their baby daughter Suri in April. 



26 





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Tom's ex, Nicole Kidman wed 
country music star Keith Urban 
in Australia in June. Brad and 
Angelina had a baby girl, Shiloh 
who was born in Namibia, Af- 
rica and Gwen Stefani and hus- 
band Gavin Rossdale welcomed 
son, Kingston in the month ot 
June. Sadly, former president 
Gerald Ford died in December 
and R&B legend James Brown 
passed away leaving behind the 
legacy of his music. Feminine 
Mystique author Bett\- Freidan 
passed away this year in addition 
to T\^ super producer, Aaron 
SpeUing. Croc Hunter, Steve Ir- 
win met his untimely death this 
year while taping a stingray spe- 
cial in the Great Barrier Reef 








27 




/ 



McDreamy versus McSteamy. Jack 
Bauer returns from China. Betty scores 
a not-so-ugly internship. All of these 
are central to this year's hit television 
series. While last year's hits like Des- 
perate Housewives and Lost continue 
to flourish, here are some shows that 
were on top of ratings in 2006-2007: 
In the drama department, per- 
haps the most popular series this year 
was Grey's Anatomy. The show fol- 
lows the lives of five very busy surgi- 
cal interns, who faU in (or out of) love 
with their superiors and battle per- 
sonal family problems. The show re- 
cently won the Golden Globe Award 
for best television series drama. An- 
other series which has developed a 
large following is 24, a real-time show 
wliich stars Kjefer Sutherland as Jack 
Bauer, who rids the nation of terror- 
ism, a theme that hits close to home 
to us. Also popular is Heroes, a new 
NBC series on normal people discov- 



28 







ering supernatural abilities, has also 
gained much popularity-. Many have 
embraced the humorous time-trav- 
eller, Masi Oka, who was nominat- 
ed for a Golden Globe this January. 
In comedy, the new Ugly 
Bett}' starring America Ferrera 
(who is known for embracing per- 
sonal appearances in past movie 
works) is based off of a Colombian 
telenovela. This series also won a 
Golden Globe for best comedy se- 
ries. As for realit}' television. Real 
World, Laguna Beach and Ameri- 
can Idol continued to do well, but 
what really generated talk was Sur- 
vivor: Cook Islands. For the first 
time, participants were di\ided by 
race and three went into the finals. 
In the end, all sur\dvors found that 
race had no matter in the game, and 
that it was their personalities that 
were ultimately the most important. 








29 




Triumph! The voice of American 
Idol reject Jennifer Hudson has tak- 
en over the Golden Globe-winning 
musical, Dreamgirls. Also joining her 
in the cast is Eddie Murphy and Be- 
yonce Knowles. She and two other 
actresses portray a 60s singing group, 
and how they rose to the top. Other 
headline dramas were The Queen 
(in which the lead actress won the 
Golden Globe and SAG) and The 
Departed (a stunning cast of Mark 
Wahlberg, Matt Damon, Leonardo 
DeCaprio, and jack Nicholson). 
Borat helped lighten up the theaters 
for its sarcasm and humor "docu- 
mentary," and the litde star in Litde 
Miss Sunshine charmed crowds for 
Olive family's hopes to turn her 
into a beaut}' pageant queen. On a 
more tragic note, though the Sep- 
tember 1 1 attacks was nearly 6 years 
ago, it still seemed like an event that 



30 






the public was not ready to see 
in theaters. However, United 93 
came through this year, capturing 
the heroes who kept the fourth 
hijacked plane from reaching its 
target. The film has been nomi- 
nated for an Oscar for Directing. 
The Devil Wears Prada and Pi- 
rates of the Carribean 2: Dead 
Man's Chest soared in this sum- 
mer and both became big hits. 
The Good Shephard , starring 
Angelina Joliet and Matt Damon 
opened in theaters in Decem- 
ber. The movie's plot is centered 
around the beginning of the CIA. 
Wni Smith starred in The Pursuit 
of Happvness with his son, ]aden. 
It's the story of a salesman who 
takes custody of his son right 
before he takes on a new job. 








31 




i 




If there is one album that stuck 
out as the most played and most 
remembered album of the year on 
campus, it had to be Justin Tim- 
berlake's 2006 released CD Fu- 
ture Sex/Love Sounds. His first 
and second singles off the album 
were played more in any bar than 
any other hot song of the year. 
Christina Aguilera who went from 
dirty to classy, released a new al- 
bum which did very well with the 
first single "Ain't No Other Man". 
Nelly Furtado released a new al- 
bum too, which has done really 
well in part because of producer 
Timbaland working on the record. 
Stacy Ferguson, aka Fergie from 
the Black Eyed Peas, went solo 
this year and her debut album. 



Ji:'STINTIMHEl 

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32 





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< DIXIE CHICKS 


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The Dutchess has been quite a 
success. Panic! At the Disco has 
been a breakout group this year 
with their album "A Fever You 
Can't Sweat Out". According to 
the Billboard 200 list for 2006, 
country singer Carrie Under- 
wood's album, "Some Hearts" 
ranks as number one with "High 
School Musical" as number 
two. With 2006 also came the 
vast popularitv' of bands such 
as Motion Cit}' Soundtrack and 
Cartel giving Fall Out Boy a run 
for their money. The year was 
another year full of variet}' and 
assortments of different typts 
of music with each student hav- 
ing their own unique preference. 








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33 




i 



The 2006 sports year can be characterized 
very simply as a year of firsts. The firsts be- 
gan in March with the Men's and Women's 
collegiate basketball national champion- 
ships. The Universit}' of Florida men won 
their first National Championship, 73-57 
over UCLA while the Universit}' of Mary- 
land women accomplished the same feat 
with a dramadc, 78-75 overtime win over 
rival Duke. The Carolina Hurricanes con- 
tinued the trend by winning their first Stan- 
lev Cup Championship, 4-3 over the Ed- 
monton Oilers. Dwayne Wade then led the 
Miami Heat to their first NBA Champion- 
ship, 4-2 over the Dallas Mavericks. Wade 
scored 35 points in each of the last four 
games to dig the Heat out of a 2-0 hole. 
Americans then continued their dominance 
of the Tour de France by winning their 8th 
straight tide but this time, it was Floj'd Lan- 
dis who came back with the tide. Landis' 
first tide did not come without controversy 
as he allegedly failed a steroids test. During 
2006, the sport of baseball produced two 
firsts. lapan won the first ever World Base- 
ball Classic with a 10-6 victory over Cuba. 
Oregon State Universit)' then won its first 
ever baseball national tide by defeating 



34 







North Carolina nvo games to one in the 
College World Series championsliip series. 
Over the course of 2006, two 
collegiate football national champions 
were crowned along with two Super Bowl 
champions. The University' of Texas 
broke USC's stranglehold on college foot- 
ball with a 41-38 win over the Trojans at 
the Rose Bowl in January. The Universit)- 
of Florida then won the most recent na- 
tional championship by upsetting heavily 
favored Oliio State 41-14 in Tempe, Ari- 
zona. In Super Bowl XL, the Pittsburgh 
Steelers won the Super Bowl by defeating 
the Seatde Seahawks 21-10. In Super Bowl 
XLI, the Indianapolis Colts defeated the 
Chicago Bears 29-17, solidifying Peyton 
Manning as one of the best quarterbacks 
in history. Other notable sporting occur- 
ances in 2006 include the St. Louis Car- 
dinals winning the World Series, 4-1 over 
the Detroit Tigers. Italy won the FIFA 
World Cup in a game that wiU be more 
remembered for the headbutting incident 
between Zinedine Zadane and Marco Ma- 
terazzi than for the game itself The tennis 
world saw the last of a legend as Andre 
Agassi retired after the United State Open. 








35 




Where were you on September 11, 2001? Many of you were undoubtedly in class at your high 
school, but one thing is for sure, you wUl never forget what you were doing, what class you were 
in or how you felt the moment you found out that the Twin Towers were each hit by airplanes car- 
rying passengers. It was a tragic event that in some way has shaped us, as a country and as hu- 
man beings. 2006 marked the 5-year anniversary of this event and we must always remember 9/11. 




36 








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38 



Student Life Divider 







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School spirit ^M A Ad 



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While many students may have different 

ideas about what it means to be a 

Terp, we can all agree that we will always 

love Testudo (and rub his nose for 

good luck on exams) and wear our red 

and white with pride. We will always 

support our teams no matter how well or 

how poorly they may be doing (and we 

know that Duke will always be worse). 

We take tailgating very seriously and do 

it well into the night. Every big win is 

cause for a celebration on Route 1 . We 

know our school is the best, and we are 

certainly not afraid to flaunt it. 



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Student Life 



41 




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Homecoming Festivities 



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was iTerp: Create your Mix in 2006. The 

week long festivities started on Saturday, 

October 1 4 with Homecoming Service 

Saturdav, continued on Thursdav with 

the Pep Rally and comedy show featuring 

Wayne Brady, the parade on Friday, and 

culminated with the football game against 

North Carolina State on the next Saturday. 

The tailgaters were out in full force for the 

annual tailgating competition, and the fans' 

encouragement helped bring the Terps to a 

win of 26-20 over the Wolfpack. 



Student Life 



43 



Byrd buckout 







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This year was the second annual Byrd Black- 
out. Normally at football games, the stu- 
dents wear red to support the team but at 
Blackout games, everyone wears black. The 
student section of Byrd Stadium was filled to 
capacity on October 28, 2006 for the game 
against the Florida State Seminoles, a team 
the Terps had defeated only once before in 17 
match-ups. The game got close near the end, 
but a blocked field goal with 42 seconds left: 
in the game secured Maryland's victory with 
a final score of 27-24. After a miraculous 
end to the game, students stormed the field 
to celebrate. 




Art attack 



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Spring's Art Attack on May 5, 2006 

brought many students together to 

tie-dye shirts, play extreme sports, and 

make ice sciJptures during the day and 

then attend an outdoor concert held 

in Byrd Stadium in the evening. After 

the singer ftom local favorites Jimmies 

Chicken Shack played and interacted 
with the crowd, students were ready for 

the main event. Common, a well re- 
spected rapper, came out and blew the 

crowd away, pleasing old fans and re- 
cruiting new ones. He left them wait- 
ing anxiously for next spring. 



Student Life 



47 



First look fair ^AA 










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For two days each fall, rows upon rows 

of tables and tents are set up on the 
McKeldin IVIall so students can browse 
and see if there is anvthino- thev may be 
interested in joining at the annual First 
Look Fair. Students represent their fra- 
ternities and sororities, honor societies, 
religious and ethnic student associations, 
and clubs based on interests. It is a great 
wa\- to become acquainted with the vast 
amount of activities and clubs the univer- 
sity has to offer. 



Student Life 



49 



Maryland DAY 



50 Years 






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HO DAY 



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One Saturday during the spring. The Uni- 
versity' of Maryland hosts Maryland Day. 
It's a great opportunit\' for alumni, fami- 
lies, prospecdve students and current ones 
to come out and enjoy a day of free, fun ac- 
tivities. There is a wide variet\' of activities 
to do that day including, exhibits, tours, Hve 
exhibits, petting zoos, sporting events, dem- 
onstrations, workshops and Dairy Delights. 
It is a great time to go outside, see people 
vou know and have a fun day of learning 



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The mckeldin mall 



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One of the best places to hang out on 
campus is the McKeldin Mall. It is a 

very iconic and senic part of the cam- 
pus and looks especially nice when 
the leaves are turning in the fall. It 
is affectionately reffered to as "The 

Mall" and it is a great place to read for 
class, take a nap, eat, toss a frisbee or 
do homework. On warm spring and 

fall days you will find many people out 

there enjoying the beautiful sunshine. 



Student Life 



53 



Stamp student vmm^AA 



(Do Your lifting 








1/ 




The Adele H. Stamp Smdent Union contains 
a variety of resources that students can utilize 
from a stroll through the Union Art Gallery to 
a classy, restaurant st}de meal at Adele's. If you 
are looking for a more fast-food st)de experi- 
ence, there is also many dining options in the 
food court, or for healthier fare, there is the 
Food Co-op. The Student Union also houses the 
Hoff Theater where you can watch movies, and 
the Terp Zone where you can bowl, shoot some 

pool, or play video games. The Union is also 

host to a variety of student events that take place 

in the Grand and Colon}' ballrooms. At the Uni- 

versit}' Book Center, students and visitors alike 

can find all their favorite Terp memorabilia. , 



Student Life 



55 



Night UFE 



(Parties 



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A student at the University of -Maryland has multiple 
opuons as far as going out for a night to blow off all 
that stress from the week passed. Probably the most 
popular hang out will always be one of my many bars 
available for a fun night with close friends and to also 
meet new people. Cornerstone, Bendey's and Santa Fe 
were all great choices and each student had their favor- 
ite! On a more low key night, part}-'s were always an- 
other excidng option; whether spent with only a close 
few friends or lots of fellow students. The Greek life 
sj'Stem was also very active at the Universit}- of Mar\'- 
land. Socials, formals, and grab-a-dates were always a 
good time for students involved in the Greek system 
where they could let loose and be with good compan}'. 



Student Life 



57 



Campus FOOD 





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For the hungry student there are many choices of 
places to get some nourishment. If you live on North 
Campus, The Diner is the main location. Within that 
establishment, there is a salad bar, Al's Grill, Blue 
Plate, California Deli, Cluckers, Luigi's, The New 
Yorker, Global Gourmet, Sprouts, and many others. 
On the south side of campus there is another large 
dining hall with similar eateries. In addition to the big 
dining halls, there is the food court in Stamp Student 
Union and the sit down resturant, Adele's. There are 
many other Cafes and quick food places around cam- 
pus as well. The engineering building houses two of 
them and there is one in the McKeldin Library called 
Footnotes. No matter where you are on campus, you 
can surely find someplace to grab a quick bite of food. 



Student Life 



59 



DoBMS AND Apartments ^Aa^ 



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WICOMICO HALL 





Student Life 




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There is a living style that could fit everyone's needs 
at the Universit)^ of Maryland. While younger class- 
men such as sophomores and freshmen normally 
live in the north campus high rise dorms, juniors and 
seniors are given greater priorit}- to be able to live 
in nicer places on campus. The Commons is a very 
popular location as it is central to Route 1 and is a 
safe walk to and from class. Other halls on cam- 
pus such as Kent Hall offers students another alter- 
native for on campus apartments. While not every 
student wishes to remain on campus, the \'ie\v was 
a luxurious alternative and other off campus build- 
ings such as the Courtyards or the Knox Boxes fit 
students' needs for housing with dieir close friends. 



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Exercise 




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Having a place to exercise is very important 
to many students. Luckil); we have three 
places on campus that aUow students to 
work out as much as they want. The re- 
cently renamed Eppley Recreation Center 
(ERC) on North Campus has an extensive 

gym and weight room and includes rac- 
quetball courts, three pools, and an outdoor 
recreation center with an outdoor pool and 
climbing walls. Ritchie Coliseum and Cole 
Field House both at one time housed the 
Terps basketball team, and the former now 
has a smaller gym with basketball and vol- 
leyball courts, and the latter can be used to 
play basketball. 



Student Life 



63 



Transportation 







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The University of Maryland offered students with 
the opportunity to use its shutde bus system to take 
them around campus. The bus system caters to stu- 
dents since it rans late into the night. However some 
students choose to have their own form of trans- 
portation in order to make getting from one place to 
another easier. The university' charges a steep price 
for leaving a car on campus, which is usually around 
$200. Man)' students frequendy receive parking tick- 
ets because of the strict locations they is able to park. 
Students are charged a $75 fine when they park in any 
lot that is not their original assigned one. In the end, 
with parking being very difficult in College Park, most 
students chose bikes or walked to their destinadons. 



Student Life 



65 



Campus jobs 



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A full- time College Park student that is busy taking 
on a course load may find in necessary to also find a 
part- time job in order to pa}' for their expenses. Jobs 
were plenty in and around the campus and were not 
hard to find. Manv found great jobs working at the 
Universit\- Rec Center as a lifeguard, card swiper, or 
even swim lesson instructor. Also on campus, stu- 
dents would work as Community Advisors at the front 
desks of the dorms. The South and North Campus 
Diners also liired \\-illing saidents to work late night 
and paid great wages for smdents looking to earn that 
extra buck. The manv restaurants on Route 1 also fre- 
quendv hired students to help out and were fiexible 
to meet students hours. There was a job for every- 
one at the Universitv if a student was willintr to look. 



Student Life 



67 



Student Entertainment Events 






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■- •!» 



Ever wonder who organized those great 

events on campus such as the Wayne 
Brady comedy show or the movies play- 
ing every week for free? The Student 
Entertainment Event committee worked 
long hours to plan exciting events for all 
students to be able to attend for reason- 
able prices. This year they also planned 
a concert for the band Cartel as well as 
numerous other comedy shows. This was 

a great alternative for students looking 

for a great fun night with friends without 

having to spend a lot of money. 



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70 



Clubs/Activities Divider 




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1 : American Chemical 

Society 

2: Terps Racing 



of Maryland 

4: Black Engineering 

Society 

5: Phi Kappa Psi 




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1: Alpha Delat Pi 

2: Golden Key Interna- 
tional Honour Society 

3: Alpha Chi Omega 

4: Fencing Club 

5: SEE 




Clubs/Activfies 




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Clubs/Activities 



1: Fencing Club 

2: Sailing Club 

3: Intelligence Club 

4: Camping Club 
5: Maryland Cycling 










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Clubs/Activities 



1: A.N.G.E.L 



2: Gymkana 

3: Black Honors Caucus 

4: Van Martin System 

5: Veterinary Assoc. 







Clubs/Activities 



79 



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Clubs/Activities 



1: Club Choice 

2: UHC Peer Educators 

3: Smoothie King 

4: Latin Association 



5: Math Club 




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iities 




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Clubs/Activities 



1: Landscape Arch 

2: Club Gymnastics 

3: Architects of America 



4: Exercise Club 



5: DOTS 









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Clubs/Activities 



1: Black Student Union 



2: ACLA 



3: College Republicans 

4: Hindu Student Assoc 

5: Sports Marketing 







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1: Maryland Crew 
2: Pre physical Therapy 



3:RHA 



4: Senior Council 
5:JSU 





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1: Teachers Assoc 



2: NRO Reps 
3: Student Government 
4: Homecoming Council 



5: Ultimate Frisbee 





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Clubs/Activities 



1: Habitat for Humanity 

2: Normal Terps 

3: Terps Vote! 

4: Alpha Delta Pi 

5: Alpha Chi Omega 





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1: Alpha Theta Gamma 

2: Terp Wushu 
3: Womens Ice Hockey 
4: Womens Rugby 



5:TTC 





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1: Pre Law 



2: Alpha Kappa Alpha 

3: Sigma Kappa 

4: Phi Sigma Gamma 

5: Alpha Omega Epsilon 




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Clubs/Activities 



1: Army ROTC 
2: Gymkana 
3: Rak Shalom 
4: Police Auxiliary 
5: Gymkana 





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Academics Divider 








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NilSi'sLGl lfk Schbol of Engi- 
neering 

The highly competitive School 
of^N^ngineering fosters the 
knowledge of 2811 underg^ad^ 
uate students. The U.S. Ndws 
and World Reports recognized 
the Clark School's graduate pro- 
gram as the 15th best among 
the nation. All prospective un- 
dergraduate students are able to 
choose between a wide variety 
of majors within the school in- 
cluding everything from me- 
chahical engineering to fire pro- 
tection engineering. The school 
has recently spent $107 million 
for its students on innovative 
programs for undergraduates 
^^^•d research relationships withi^' 
major engineering firms andf-^ 
government labs. The future for 
M J^ailJKiversity of Maryland engi- 
neering student certainly looks 
bright with many graduates be- "^^^ 
ing recruited to highly recog- aMiffl 
nized engmeermg companies 






-"W^ 



V 



College otJAgricultLire and 
Natural Resources 

The University of Maryland is 
in an ideal geographic location 
for such a unique school like 
the College of Agriculture and 
Natural Resources. The col- 
lege offers majors that involve 
scientific studies on Maryland's 
own Chesapeake Bay such as 
the Environmental Science 
and Policy major. Originally, 
the University of Maryland 
was founded in 1859 as a land- 
grant institution to assist the 
state's agricultural industry. 
Today, agriculture remains the 
state of Maryland's number 
one industry with the help of 
the university. The students in 
the Agriculture College have 
the opportunity to work with 
state of the art lab equipment 
to help develop new ways to 
help restore the dwindling en- 
vironment of the Chesapeake. 





HSinwmil 



ISniiiiFiPiG 0m 



MMimnsmmoM 





■iji 



iStS 




School of Arcitecture, 
Planning and Preser Mat-ieTn 

The School of ArchitectiH^ 
Planning, and Preservation of- 
fers accredited degree programs 
in Architecture, Urban Studies 
and Planning, Historic Pres- 
ervation, and Urban Design 
and Regional Planning. For 
the student interested in these 
areas of study, the school offers 
many opportunities for study- 
ing abroad and a self-directed 
master's thesis to increase the 
student's field of perspective. 
With the university located so 
closely to Washington D.C. 
and Baltimore, an architecture 
student is given many chances 
to study some of the country's 
oldest construction. 





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X 



J^ 



A\ 



A 



Itjude 



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|f^^3^ 



JThe College^f Arts and 
Hu man ities 

The College of A|ts an( 



pJumanities offers sixte 
- degree-granting depart- 
I ments, twenty^^ Minor 
I^jkI six CertifiHe pro- 
'^mms within the school. 
Majors are diverse andi^ 
inge from communica- 
lons to dance to philoso- 
phy. Students within this 
school have many oppor-4 
tunities for study abroad • 
[to over 30 locations acros 
Tlie liberal arts 
ients in the college are 
given opportunities to use 
high tech facilities to as- 
sist them in preparing for a 
>ful career. 



ai 



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Hi 



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College of Behavioral and 
Social Scienees-^ 



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fer a student at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland wants to 
major in geography or hearing 
and speech sciences, the College ^, 
of BehaviQial and Socia^S^i-- '^ - f '-^ 
ences is for thenf.! Hfellh ileYfiflT-^' 
departments to choose from, a 
student interested in social sci- 
ences has a golden opportunity 
for success within the school. 
lir"-§%The college offers various pro- 



grams for its students including 
the Civicus living and learning 
community and the Psychology 
Clinic for prospective psychol- 
ogy majors to gain clinical ex- 
perience within the field. For 
those interested in the Govern- 
ment and Politics department, 
the University of Maryland is 
located just perfectly from Dur 
nation's capital. '* 



JBiM^iiiTiiiiisLiiaitiiiiirMgiiiMii'^ 




.-V 



CoUese of Chemical and 
Life Sciences 

The fairly new College of 
Chemical and Life Sciences 
was created in 1993 in order 
to help expand the knowl- 
edge of its students. Stu- 
dents within the school have 
the opportunity to choose 
from majors of biology, cell 
biology, entomology, and 
chemistry /biochemistry. 
The University of Marylan 
is in close collaborati 
other colleges around^he- 
area to enable its students 
to utilize their facilities. It 
is hard to miss the college's 
newest development and 
expansion; the new $62]VL 
Bioscience Research Build 
ing located near Hombak 
library. With new develop- 
ments like this, students :;«f^^ 
the College of Chemical and 
Life Sciences are given great 
opportunities for grawth. 



Academic'^ 
nil 



rmik 





iillie college c^^o^^ver 2000 

lergraduate stlkdents and 

^^feet-BOO graduate students with 

its six majors and five state of 

""the art research facilities. The 

college ranked among the top 

20 programs across the nation 

^_^tiie U.S. Newi-^d :World 

Reporting rankings. Students 

^^^ith the school's maJ0rs4iave-th€ 
chance to participate in research 

"'^projects worth $90jnillion an- 
nually headed by the schools 
top faculty. The research proj- 
ects help students learn what it 
is like a real life research envi- 

^^onment. Faculty working on 
projects that will influence new 
knowledge in the field being 
studie® also offer internships 
for the enthusiastic student. 



1 ■'■^' - 




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AcatemiKs 



iSPM^iMli 





4 



The College of Education otters 
departments of Counseling and 
Personnel Services, Curricu- 
lum and Instruction, Education 
Policy and Leadership, Human 
Development, Measurement, 
Statistics and Evaluation, and 
Special Education. The college 
takes pride in giving its students 
opportunities for doing research ' 
in their related field. As of June 
2006, the College of Education 
garnered $11.9 million in ex- 
ternal funding for sponsored 
research. For the undergrad 
interested in teaching, the col- 
lege has created partnerships 
with school systems, adminis- 
trators, and teachers through- 
out Maryland in order to pro- 
^lltide its students with the best 
possible post- college career. 



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College of I|e^th Ili|(^'] 
Human Performance 



7^. 



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Wi- 



The College of Health anl 
Human Performance offers 
all interested students major^ 
that range from family stud| 
ies to the ever-popular kine- 
siology. The college wants 
to give each and every one of 
its students the best educa- 
tion possible as it has recent- 
ly upgraded the Health and 
Human Performances build- 
ing and is also it the works 
to renovate six new research 
labs. The college's goal is to 
"contribute to the elevation 
of the human race and hu- 
man existence through the 
study of health, aging, fami- 
lies and human movement, 
through the creating and 
development of interven- 
tions against life-style risk 
factors, and through the pro- 
motion of human health", 
as stated on their website. 

A&ademics 



"-ig'i?- 







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M 



The College of Information 
iiiibjK Studies 

The College of Information 
studies has been a leader in 
preparing information profes- 
sionals for nearly four decades. 
They pride themselves on tra- 
dition and partnerships with 
related academic disciplines. 
The College recently added a 
new management degree - The 
Master of Information Manage- 
ment and have had their larg- 
est ever entering class this year. 
Because of the University of 
Maryland's location, there are 
many opportunities for study 
or work experience at placj^^ 
like NASA, National Archives/i 
The Smithsonian, Library of 
Congress and many more 



138 





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The Philip Merrill College 
of Journalism: / 

The Journalism College of the 
University of Maryland is the 
smallest program offered at the 
university. It approximately 
holds only 500 undergraduates 
and 70 graduate students. Be- 
cause of this, the school takes 
pride in the fact that it is very 
hands on with its students and 
can provide them with the best 
possible education in small sem- 
inars and labs. Students are giv- 
en great opportunities to intern 
with the best newspapers in the 
Baltimore-Washington vicinity 
, including the Washington Post 
and Baltimore Sun, because of 
College Park's ideal location. 
The Journalism school's facul 
includes six Pulitzer Prize win- 
ners and the Washington Post 
ranked the school as the top jour- 
nalism program in the country. 



1-^ 



^Hdemics 





•ill College .. joumalis 




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Robert H. Smith School of 
Business 

For the student interested in the 
endless possibilities that a busi- 
ness degree has to offer them, 
the Smith School of Business 

s the place to be. The school 
caters to 2560 undergrad busi- 
ness students that have the ^ 
choice: to specialize in majors il 
from marketing to accounting. ^ 
The U.S. News and World Re- 
port ranked the Smith School 
as number 18 in the nation 
for QutstaMiing undergradu- 
ate program for the year 2006. 
The highly competitive pro- 
gram takes pride in these rank- 
;spLnd is the only business 
ool in the Baltimore-Wash- 
ington area with a top ranked 
undergraduate and graduate 
program. A business student 
from the University ofgvtary 

and is given only th£.b 

cation from the Smith 




iOOL m F 










The program areas that the 
Maryland School of Pub-# 
lie Policy provides are 
environmental policy; inter- 
national security and econom- 
ic policy; social policy; and 
management, finance and 
leadership. These areas of 
study cover relevant and 
recent issues that are con- 
troversial in today's soci- 
ety, and, because of this, 
students are more prepared 
for post-college studies and 
occupations. The faculty of 
this college are superb and 
they even have a resident No- 
ble Prize winner. Econom- 
ics professor Dr. Schelling 
received the 2005 Nobel 
Prize in Economics for his 
work in game theory analysis. 





gessk om ^ac 




146 



Senior Dividc^i 




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BI'NJAMIN ADAMS 



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JAMES APPLEBY 



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JOY ASICO 




MELISSA ATCHLEY 



JORDAN ATKINSON 



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MATTHEW BADER 




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RANDY BARRERA 





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PATRICIA BEAUZILE 




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CRAIG BECHER 



CAROLINE BECKER 



KYLE BECKHARDT 




ALYSON BENNINGTON 




ALISON BERNSTEIN 



CARMEN BERRIOS 



ANDREA BERRY 





ROMA BHUTA 





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NATALIE BLAGRIFF 



CINDY BLANCO 



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STEPHANIE DAHL 



EMILY DANOFF 



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DANIEL DEPPNER 



ROBERT KYLE DERBY 



SHANE DERRIS 





ANGELA DIMOPOULOS 



LINDSAY DIVELY 






ELIZABETH DOBY 





STEPHANIE DOIRON 



ANDREA DOLAN 





DAYLE DOHERTY 




MELISSA DOOKHARAN 





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PRINCESS DULA 



PATRICK. DURE 




TREVOR EDDY 




KYLE EICHELBERGER 



NOAH ELKRIEF 



KRISTI ELLINGSWORTH 




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SHARA EPSTEIN 



MARIA F. ESPINOZA 



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KATHRYN FELDMANN 




STACIE FINKELSTEIN 





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ARIELLE GOLDSMITH 



ADAM GOLDSTEIN 







LINDSAY GRIMES 



LEANDRA GRIMM 



MICHELE GROSS 





KARI GROW 



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PARIS GUNN 




CRYSTAL HAGER 





JESSICA HALPERN 



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ELIZABETH HANLON 





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MARK HARLEY 



RASHONDA HARRIS 




DEANNA HARRIS-MCKOY 




ROYCE HART 



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LINDSEY HUMPHREYS 




JAMALA HUNTE 





MICHAEL HURLEY 



THOMAS HURLEY 





ASHLEY JOERDENS 






DAVID JONAS 




CHELSEA JONES 



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KENDRA JONES 




LARKIN JONES 



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REBECCA KADUSHIN 



HOSEIN KAFIMOSAVI 



TAMARA KAISl'R 




SAHARKASIRI-ARAIM 





MICHAl-L KATZ 



NARAK KAY 



KRISHNA KEEGAN 




WATTANA KEM 




MARGARETHA KERSCH 



CHRISTOPHER KERWIN 



NISHANTH KHANNA 





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SALLY KIERNAN 



HANNAH KIM 



JANE KIM 




KRISTIN KIRKWOOD 



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ERICA KLEIN 




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BRANDI KNIGHT 



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CAROLINE LEFEVRE 



MARK LEEF 



DAVID LI'MUS 





MARIA EUGENIA LEONE 



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STASIA LEVIN 




JASON LEVINE 




LAUREN LEVINE 




RACHEL LIBERATI 



MADISON LIPMAN 



ALEXANDRA LO RE 





KYLE LOVE 



ALANA LOVETT 



ERIC LOWE 




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SETH LUECK 



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CORINNE LYNCH 




LISA MAGDITS 




KARINA MANCEBO 



LAPREEA MANNING 



LIWEN MANZI 




BENJAMIN MARSHALL 



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MONIQUE MARSHALL 



RICHARD MARTH 





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THERESA OLENICK 



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242 



Sports Divider 





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MENS BASlKEiriALL 




MD 

ISCORING 2505 

1 Points per game 78.3 

J Scoring margin +4.8 

(field GOALS-AH. 875-1952 

J Field goal pet .448 

l3P0tMrFG-An. 155415 

1 3-point FG pet .373 

J 3-pt FG made per game.. 4.8 

(free THROW&ATT 600-821 

1 Free tti row pet .731 

(REBOUNDS 1272 

1 Rebounds per game 39.8 

J Rebounding margin -^3.6 

lASSISTS 512 

1 Assists per game 16.0 

(turnovers 528 

1 Turnovers per game 16.5 

Turnover margin +0.2 

1 AssistAumover ratio.. 10 

(steals 258 

1 Steals per game 8.1 , 

(blocks 191 '^ 

1 Blocks per game 6.0 

(winning STREAK 

Home win streak \ 



a season of lllghs and loWS 



The men's team opened the season with 
a 111-85 win over Fairleigh Dickinson. 
After that game, the team traveled to the 
Maui Invitation in Hawaii where they went 
2-1. The Terps hosted Minnesota in the 
ACC/Big Ten Challenge where the Terps 
beat the Gophers 83-66, helping the ACC 
win the challenge. When ACC play began, 
they won by shocking No. 6 Boston Col- 
lege with at win of 73-71. Ibekwe scored 
21 points and McCray added another 16 
to that. The Terps won their next 4 non- 
conference games before heading into their 
regtilar ACC schedule with a record of 1 1- 
2. On the road, the team had two consecu- 
tive losses, one at Miami and the other at 
Duke, which ended their 7 game winning 
streak. The next three games were wins, 
beating Wake Forest, Virginia Tech, and 



Georgia Tech. The win over Cieorgia Tech 
was the team's first game without leading 
scorer, Chris McCray, who was deemed 
academically ineligible and lost his final 
year of eligibility. The next game against 
Temple was a loss, but 21 of the 23 points 
that Jones scored, were 3 point shots which 
was a career high in 3 pointers made for 
Jones. The Terps suffered rwo more losses 
at the hands of North Carolina and NC 
State. Comcast center hosted Duke on 
February 11th and lost again to the Dev- 
ils 96-88. Nik Caner-Medley scored 22 
points but he was outdone by JJ Redick, 
who scored 35 for Duke. The Terps lost 
4 of their 7 games to end the regular 
season. Maryland goes into the ACC 
Tournament with a record of 18-11. 



Post Season 

During the ACC tournament, the 
Terps opened with a 82-64 win 
over Georgia Tech. Four out of 
the five starters for Maryland 
.scored in the double figures dur- 
ing that game. In the second 
game, Maryland was eliminated 
by Boston College who lead for 
the entire game and at one point 
was up by as many a 24 points. 
For the second straight year, the 
Terps are left out of the NCAA 
tournament and accept a bid 
for the NIT. In the first round 
of the NIT, Maryland hosted 
Manhattan and loses 87-84. 
Travis Garrison scores 21 and 
Nik Caner-Medley scored 16 in 
their last games in a Terrapin 
uniform. Maryland ends their 
season with a record of 19-13. 





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OPP 






MD 


SCORING :.... 




3166 


2471 


Points per game 




83.3 


65.0 


Scorine marein 




+ 18.3 




FIELD GOALS-ATI 




1130-2363 
.478 


920-2470 
.372 


Field goal pet 


3 POINT FG-ATT 




216-540 
.400 


189-615 
.307 


3-point FG pet 


3-pt FG made per game.. 


5.7 


5.0 


FREE THROWS-ATT.... 




690-924 
.747 


442-633 
.698 


Free throw pet 




REBOUNDS 




1720 
45.3 


1267 
33.3 


Rebounds per game. 


Rebounding margin.. 




+ 11.9 




ASSISTS 




652 

17.2 


494 
13.0 


Assists per game 


TURNOVERS 




688 
18.1 


612 
16.1 


Turnovers per game.. 


Turnover margin 




2.0 




Assist/turnover ratio 




0.9 


0.8 


STEALS 


11 


268 


332 


Steals per game 


7.1 


8.7 


BLOCKS 




195 


114 


Rtrifk*^ npr cf^imp 




5 1 


3.0 


WINNING STREAK 




6 




Home w/in streak 




7 






12 



o 



a season of triumph 



The Lady Terps began their 2006 season ranked 
#14 in the country. After their first winning 
game against Siena, uith a score of 107-66, 
thcv knew this season was going to be a special 
one. The women traveled to St. Thomas in 
the \'irgin Islands to participate in the Paradise 
)ani. Thev went 2-1 with wins from Gonzaga 
(88-50), Michigan (75-61) and lost to No.l Ten- 
nessee (80-75). After the loss to Tennessee, 
they won nine straight non-conference games 
before starting play in the ACC. The first ACC 
g.ime was against Boston College, and the 
'Icrps came out on top with a win in overtime. 
Duke L'niversit\' came next on the schedule and 
the Lady Terps lost to the Devils at Comcast 
Center in front of 16,097 fans. After the loss 
to Duke, thev proceeded to win eight straight 



games, including the game against No.l UNC. 
Ashleigh Newman banked in a shot from well 
behind the 3 point line as the time expired to 
tie it at 83 and send the game into overtime. 
Maryland never trialed throughout the entire 
overtime period and this was the first loss of 
the season for UNC. Four days after the ex- 
citing UNC win, the Lady Terps lost to Duke 
another time despite the 8 point halftime lead. 
The last four games of the regular season 
were all wins which allowed us to come awa\' 
with a record of 27-3. Once the ACC tourna- 
ment began, we came away with a win against 
Georgia Tech (71-66) first, upset No.2 ranked 
Duke (78-70) in the semi-finals and lost to No. 
1 UNC (91-80) in the Championship game. 



The Road to the Notional Championship 



The Terps received a number two seed in the Albuquer- 
que. New Mexico Region for the NCAA tournament anc 
began play at Penn State by defeating 15th seed Sacrec 
Heart (95-54) and St. John's (81-74). Crystal Langhome 
scored 30 points against St. John's. After the wins ir 
Pennsylvania, they moved to the sweet 16 where they 
beat defending National Champs. Baylor (82-63). They 
continued on to play Utah in New Mexico. Marylanc 
beat Utah in overtime with a score of 75-65. Despite tht 
flu, Krisiti Toliver still played and scored a career higf 
28 points. With the Utah win. Maryland moved to tht 
Final Four in Boston. Three out of the four teams were 
from the ACC (Maryland, Duke and North Carolina), tht 
la.st being LSU. During the National Semi-Finals. Mary 
land gets revenge for the ACC championship loss upset 
ting North Carolina 81-70. Crystal Langhome scorec 
23 points while Laura Harper scored 24. The Terp^ 
never trailed after the 15 minute mark of the seconc 
half. North Carolina ended their season with two losses 
both of them at the hands of .Maryland. The Nationa 
Championship game was against heated rival. Duke 
Duke led by 10 at halftime and had a lead as large as I: 
points at one time. Maryland made a huge comebaci 
in the second half. Trailing by three with 18 second; 
left, Kristi Toliver drains a 3 point shot over Duke's ' 
foot center, Allison Bailes. Duke had one last chanct 
to win the game at the buzzer but their shot missed am 
sent Maryland into their last overtime of the season 
Maryland outscores Duke 8-5 in overtime and wins thei 
first National Championship with a score of 78-75. Al 
five Maryland starters in the game scored in the doubh 
fieures and ends their season with a record of 34-4 




MENS LaOROSSE 




SHOT STATISTICS.. 

I Goals-Shot attempts 164-669 110^567 

f Goals scored average... 9.5b 6.41 

I Shot pet .243 .217 

Shots on goal- Attempts. 382-669 292-507 

SOGpct .571 .576 

Shots/Game 39.4 29.8 

Assists 102 54 

MAN-UP OPPORTUNITIES ^ 

Goals-Opportunities.... 28-56 19-52 

Conversion Percent .500 .365 

GOAL BREAKDOWN 

Total Goals 164 110 

Man-up 28 19 

Man-down 1 

Unassisted 62 56 

Overtime 1 1 

GROUND BALLS 619 502 

TURNOVERS 299 333 

CAU.SED TURNOVERS 217 93 

FACEOFFS(W-L) 185-152 152-185 

FaceoffW-LPct .549 .45! 

CLEAR.! 287-353 248-332 

dear Pet 808 .747 

PENALTIES 

Number 56 65 

Minima;..:?:* 42:00 58:00 



a season of energy 



Post Season 



The men's lacrosse teamed opened its season 
ranked No. 3 in the nation. Their first game 
was against Georgetown who was ranked No. 
7. The Ritz brothers, Maxwell and Xander each 
scored four goals and the Terps beat G'town 
10-4. The next game was in Durham, NC 
against rival and No. 2 ranked, Duke. This 
was just a few weeks before Duke was forced to 
forfeit their entire season. Xander Ritz scored 
5 goals including the game winner in overtime 
as Maryland upset Duke 8-7. From the win 
at Duke, Maryland gained the No. 1 ranking 
in the Nation. After a winning game against 
Towson, Maryland lost the No.l status after a 
heartbreaking loss against Bucknell in double 
overtime with a score of 7-6. The Terps then 
won two straight games against UMBC and 
Dartmouth setting up for the ACC match 
against UNC. Joe Walters scored 5 goals as the 
Terps knocked off North Carolina 9-6. The 



next game against now No. 1 Virginia took 
place in College Park where the Cavs jumped 
out to a 9-1 lead at halftime and then went 
on to crush Maryland 15-5. In another loss at 
home, Maryland was defeated by Navy in the 
last eight seconds of the game. The Terps then 
thumped their bitter rival, John's Hopkins 
with a score of 11-4 and won their last regu- 
lar season game against Sacred Heart (18-2). 
In the semi-finals ol the ACC tournament 
against UNC, Maryland came back from a 6-1 
halftime deficit to defeat the Tar Heels 10-9. 
Xander Ritz score the game winning goal with 
1;25 left in the game. The final game was a 
rematch with UVA who won again 1 1-5. The 
Terps ended their regular season with a 12-4 
win against Pennsylvania. In the game, Joe 
Walters scored 4 goals, with his fourth making 
him Maryland's all-time leading scorer with 
150 goals, taking the record from Matt Hahn. 



Maryland was given the No. 2 seed 
in the NCAA tournament which al- 
lowed them to host their first round 
game against Denver. The Terrapins 
scored the games first six goals and 
rolledover Denver 16-8. Their 
quarter-final match was against 
Princeton and was played at Towson 
University. Maryland jumped out to 
a 5-1 lead and held Princeton to just 
one goal in the second half winning 
1 1 -6. The Terps make it to their 
third NCAA final four appearance in 
the last four years. They went in as 
a favorite against UMASS but fell 
to the Minutemen 8-5. Joe Walters 
is held scoreless in his final game as 
a Terp. Maryland ends their season 
with a record of 1 2-5. 




WOMENS IA( 




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am 




a season of COUFSgC 



The women's lacrosse team opened their 
season ranked No. 7 in the nation. The 
first game of the season was against No. 
1 defending champion, Northwestern. 
The Terps scored the first tour goals of 
the game but lost the lead and the game 
13-8. Delia Cox scored 3 goals for Mary- 
land in that game. The next tu'o games in 
schedule were easih' won against Ohio and 
George Mason, 12-3 and 13-6 respecdvely. 
The team then traveled to Duke to play the 
No. 2 ranked Devils. Maryland jumped 
out to a 4-1 lead before Duke recovered 
from the shock and scored the games next 
eight goals. Duke held on to win the game 
9-7. Delia Cox scored 3 goals in this game 
also. The next few games on the schedule 
were a mixture of wins and losses. The 
game against |ohn's Hopkins was away and 



the Terps upset the Blue Jays 14-11. At 
UNC, the Terps lost to the Tar Heels 11-9. 
Maryland finished their regular season with 
at 13-11 win over Boston College. In the 
game, Marvland had to come back from a 
5-1 deficit. Kelly Kasper scored four goals 
in the comeback win. Five days after later 
the team took on Boston College again in 
the first round of the ACC tournament. 
This time, the win was much easier for the 
Terps, winning with a score of 21-8. In 
the semi-finals, Maryland lost to Duke 19- 
9. The Devil's scored 6 straight goals in the 
second half The end to the regular season 
was at the hands of Princeton. Maryland 
had a two goal lead, but Princeton scored 
the winning goal 4 minutes before the 
end leaving Maryland with a loss of 9-8. 



Post Season ' 

At the NCAA tournament, 
the Terps opened in Cha- 
pel Hill, NC against UNC. 
The Tar Heels defeated 
the Terps 9-6, ending their 
season. Maryland finished 
the year with an overall 
record of 12-8. This year, 
four Maryland players 
were named All- Ameri- 
cans. Becky Clipp, Delia 
Cox, Kelly Kasper and 
Krista Pellizzi were all 
awarded 





^^^M 




MENS 




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a season of liiconsistency 



The Terps opened their season 
with a three game series against 
East Carolina, where they went 
1-2. They next traveled to Rock 
Hill, SC where they lost all three 
of their games to Gardner- Webb, 
Winthrop and Evansville. Mary- 
land was outscored 30-8 over all 
of the three games. In Jackson- 
ville, FL the Terps won two of the 
three games. Nick Jowers had a 
game winning double in the first 
game and scored the game-win- 
ning run in the second. They be- 
gan their ACC play by taking two 



of the three games from Duke. 
Dan Benick hit the game winning 
single in the bottom of the 12th 
to give Maryland the win in the 
decisive game 3. Maryland con- 
tinued ACC play by losing three 
straight to the #2 ranked Florida 
State. Maryland then had two 
non-conference games in which 
it lost to Towson and defeated 
Mt. St. Mary's. In the first game 
of the series against UNC, Mary- 
land shocked the 3rd ranked Tar 
Heels 15-8. Brett Tidball threw 
seen scoreless innings and Marly- 



and used a 7 run sixth inning to 
upset the Heels. UNC took the 
series by winning games two and 
three. Against the 3rd ranked 
Jackets of Georgia Tech, the 
Terps won games two and three. 
This was their first series win of 
a ranked ACC opponent since 
2003. The rest of the season con- 
tinued with manv wins and losses 
and the Terps did not qualify this 
year for the ACC tournament. 




WOMENS SOIFIIAILL 




a season of disappoint ment 



The lady Terps softball team began their 
season at the Georgia Southern Invitation- 
al. They lost their opener to Lousiville with 
a score of 2-1 after leading the game 1-0 
undl the final inning. Maryland went on 
the road again, but tliis dme it was to Palm 
Springs, CA where they went 3-3. Two of 
their three losses came to ranked oppo- 
nents, 6th ranked Stanford and 3rd ranked 
and eventual Nadonal Champions, Arizona. 
The Terps traveled again but tliis dme Tal- 
lahassee for the Sunshine State Tournament 
where thev went 1-3. Their next tourna- 
ment was the Mason Dixon Classic where 
they won all four of their games against 
George Mason, James Madison, Norfolk 
State and Cornell. After that success- 
ful tournament, Maryland lost two games 



to )ames Madison and then 3 to Georgia 
Tech, which began their ACC schedule. In 
their games against UNC, they went 1-2 
and would recover to win four straight non 
-conference games over Brown and Mt. St. 
Mary's. ACC play continued bv once again 
losing 2 of 3 to NC State. Maryland would 
manage just 1 run over the 3 games that 
coming in a 1 -0 win over NC State. Lind- 
sey I-vlein's homer put her at 5th on the all 
time home runs list. The Terps then had 
a six game winning streak with wins over 
Delaware State, George Mason, and Vir- 
ginia Tech. The two wins over VT was the 
first ACC series win of the year. After a 
number of other losses mixed with a few 
wins here and there, Maryland ended their 
regular season by losing to Florida State. 







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season of Instability 



The Terps began rheir season with at 7- 
win over Gerogetown with a sweep of 
five of the six singles matches. The next 
match against UNC Greensboro was 
also a 7-0 win. Thev then went on to de- 
feat American Universit\- 5-2 with only 
one singles loss and the doubles match. 
Maryland then swept antoher match 
with 7-0, but this time it was over \'il- 
lanova. Next, Maryland defeated 72nd 
ranked William and Mary, 4-3. The 
Terps won 3 of the six singles matches 
before taking 2 of the three doubles 
matches and earning the doubles point, 
giving Maryland the match. In their ACC 
opener game, Maryland beat Boston 
CoUge 6-1. Yale then hands Maryland 
its first loss of the year, 4-3. Maryland 
won the doubles point but could only 
secure nvo singles matches, thanks to 
Scott Fink and Boris Fetbroyt. In their 
next match, they defeated G\\" before 



falling in its second ACC^ match 7-0 to 
\'irginia Tech. The only Mar\land victory 
was a doubles match played by Scott Fink 
and Andrew ( 'rban, but Maryland lost 
the other two doubles matches and ul- 
timately the doubles point. Maryland, 
ranked 68th then falls to 24th ranked 
Florida State 6-1. Andreas Vaage-Nilsen 
came away with the only win for Maryland 
in the match. The Terps lose another 
game, but this time it is to 14th ranked 
Miami. Maryland, now ranked 70th 
beats Na\T before losing their last 7 ACC 
matches. All 7 of the losses came to 
opponents who were ranked higher than 
the Terps. Maryland never won more 
than 2 games in any of these match- 
es. In the post season, the Terps went 
on to the ACC tournament ranked 11th. 
Their season was ended by the 6th seed 
team. Wake Forest. Maryland com- 

pleated dieir season with a record of 9-12. 



Date 


Results 


4/20/2006 


Wake Forest 4, Maryland 


4/15/2006 


Clemson 6. Maryland 1 


4/14/2006 


Georgia Tech 6, Maryland 1 


4/09/2006 


Duke 7. Maryland 


4/07/2006 


North Carolina 7, Maryland 


4/05/2006 


Virginia 4. Maryland 2 


4/02/2006 


NC State 6. Maryland 1 


4/01/2006 


Wake Forest 5, Maryland 2 


3/29/2006 


Maryland 6, Navy 1 


3/26/2006 


Miami 7, Maryland 


3/24/2006 


Florida State 6, Maryland 1 


3/11/2006 


Maryland 7, Delaware 


3/06/2006 


Virginia Tech 7, Maryland 


3/04/2006 


Maryland 6. George Washington 1 


2/26/2006 


Yale 4. Maryland 3 


2/25/2006 


Maryland 6, Boston College 1 


2/19/2006 


Maryland 7, Villanova 


2/18/2006 


Maryland 4, William & Mary 3 


2/12/2006 


Maryland 5, American 2 


2/11/2006 


Maryland 7. UNC Greensboro 


2/04/2006 


Maryland 7. Georgetown 









SportSj 



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Kev Players 



Ramona But won ihe Eastern Region 
Senior Player of the Year Award and 
i competed in the NCAA singles Champi- 
mships were she fell te Georgia Rose of j 

Northwestern, 6-3. 6-4. 

Marianne Baker and Ramona But also ' 

competed in the NCAA doubles 

jchampionships. Tliey were ranked ! Ith in| 

the nation and defeated Margarita 
Karnaukhova and Anastassia Lyssenko of| 

Sacramento State, 6-2, 6-2 in the first 

r(jund. They then fell in the Round of 16 1 

' to Melissa Applebaum and Audra Cohen [ 

of Miami, 6-3, 6-4. They finished the year| 

with a record of 27-6 as a doubles pair. 



a season of UDS & doWHS 



The ladv Tcrps began their season with 
a 5-2 loss to the 13th ranked Kentucky. 
After that loss, Maryland then defeat- 
ed two ranked opponents, number 29 
Texas A&M and number 24 South Car- 
olina. The Terps beat both teams with 
scores of 4-3. After faUingto 35th ranked 
Michigan, Maryland comes out on 
top in the match up between BC in their 
ACC opener. After a shutout loss to 
Virginia Commonwealth, the lady Terps 
rebounded with 3 straight wins over 
Georgetown, Old Dominion and 59th 
ranked Penn. The next Terps match up 
was against W'iUiam and Mary. Maryland 
fell 5-2, getting their two points from 
the doubles matches and Marianne Bak- 



er's singles match. Maryland then wins 
two of its next three matches with victo- 
ries over Princeton and Florida State, but 
fell to Miami. In addidon to that loss, 
the Terps were defeated in their next 4 
ACC games, all to ranked opponents, 
1 3th Georgia Tech, 32nd Clemson, 4th 
North CaroUna and 12th Duke. With a 
temporary rebound, Maryland beats 35th 
ranked NC State before falling to 19th 
ranked Wake Forest. Next, the lady Terps 
then smash Virginia Tech 6-1 before 
upsetdng 25th ranked \'irginia 4-3. 
Maryland took 3 of the 6 singles match- 
es with the difference being Maryland 
taking 2 of 3 doubles matches 
and winnine the doubles point. 



Post Season 

The lady Terps headed to 

the ACC tournament with 

the 8th seed. They fell in 

the first round to 9th seed 

NC State, 4-0. Dispite that, 

Maryland earned a bid to 

the NCAA Tournament 

being ranked 32nd. In the 

first match up there, they 

lost to 40th ranked South 

Florida. The Terps ended 

their season with a record 

of 12-12. 




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n. 



BMG 




a season of VlCtOFy 



The Terps competitive cheerleacl- 
ing squad began their season w ith 
2 wins at Jamfest Championships 
and the All-Spirit Championship 
in Hershey, PA. Thev then hosted 
a champioinship here at the Uni- 
versit}' of Maryland, which they 
won. That was their fifth win of 
the season. Thev also won their 
sixth competition at the Maryland 
Cup with a score of 258.6 out of 
a possible 300. They dominated 
competition after competition 



reciving titles from Cheersport 
Nationals, Cheertech Nation- 
als, Battle of the Capital (for the 
second straight year), and Reach 
the Beach, which was their 1 1 th 
consecutive tide that year. To end 
their season, Maryland won the 
2006 National Cheerleaders Asso- 
ciation Division I National Cham- 
pionship with a score of 9.31 out 
of a possible 10. They edged out 
5 time defending National Cham- 
pion Louisville by .13 points. 





mf 



OMENS WATEI FOL 





a season 



of flux 



The women's water polo team started their sea- 
son by hosting the Terrapin Invitational where 
they went 3- 1 where their only loss was to Buck- 
nell. Their next matches were at the Princeton 
Invitational where they also went 3-1 and lost 
9-8 to Harvard. At Bucknell, the Terps went 3- 
1 for a third time that season and their loss was 
against Hartwick who is one of the best teams 
on the East Coast. Maryland upset 16th ranked 
Princeton with a win of 5-1 for what the coach 
called the biggest win in school history After 
the Princeton defeat, the Terps lost to BuckneU 
for the second time that season. Maryland trav- 
eled to California for their 8 game road trip. The 
team went 4-4 overall. Maryland won the first 
three games of their road trip before falling to 
4th ranked Loyola Marymount 10-2. Maryland 
then defeated Cal Lutheran before losing their 
last 3 games on die road trip, 18-3 to 3rd ranked 
UCL.\, 12-7 to 7th ranked San Diego State, and 
10-4 to 1 1th ranked UC Irvine. The Terps then 
hosted the ECAC Championships. Maryland 
opened with a win over Harvard before fall- 
ing to Bucknell for the third time this season. 



Maryland finished the tournament in third 
place by defeating Wagner 8-7 in the third 
place game. Maryland finished their final three 
home games with a record of 1 -2 with losses 
to Bucknell and Princeton, and the win from 
George Washington. The ladies moved on to 
the CWPA Southern Division Championships. 
There they finaUy beat Bucknell for the first 
time this year, which also qualified them for 
the (AX'PA Eastern Division Championships. 
Maryland then lost to Princeton in their next 
game at the CWTy\ Southern division champi- 
onships. The Terps fell in their first two games 
at the CWPA Eastern Championships, 7-2 
to 20th ranked Princeton and 5-4 to Brown. 
Maryland ended their season with a win over 
Harvard at the CWTA Eastern Championships, 
where they placed 7th. This was the Terps 
first ever trip to CWTA Eastern Champion- 
ships. They finished the season with a record 
of 20-14. Rachel Jordan led the team in goals 
scored with 46 while Elizabeth Hopkins led 
the team in points with 60 registering 37 goals 
and 23 assists. Both of the girls are freshmen. 







Sports 




WOMENS CTMNASTI€ 




a season of good attempts 



The gymnastics team started their sea- 
son off on a good foot bv beadng James 
Madison 189.3 to 17"^. 5. The swept all four 
events, vault, uneven bars, balance beam 
and floor. Rachel Mardnez scored a 9.875 
with her floor roudne. When going up a 
against the defending National Champs and 
2nd ranked Georgia, the Terps were de- 
feated but in their match up against Illinois, 
thev scored the highest total points of the 
season, but unfortunateh' still lost 192.45 to 
190.4. On the \'ault, Ginny Scott scored a 
9.85. The Terps then finished second in a 
quad meet with James Madison, 24th ranked 
North Carolina and 16th Ranked Kentucky. 
Maryland scored 191.975 which was second 
only to Kentucky's 193.450. Maryland fin- 
ished 0.250 points ahead of UNC. Mary- 
land then hosted the Governors Cup where 
diev placed second out of four. Maryland 
again scored a season high of 192.375 but 
was ousted by North Carolina. The Terps 
did defeat North Carolina State and Tow- 



son. Rachel Martinez scored a 9.9 on her 
floor routine. Mar\land then hosted con- 
ference opponents Pitt and Rutgers where 
the\' defeated both by once again scoring a 
season best 193.075. Annie Ferg scored a 
9.85 on the vault. Rachel Martinez scored 
a 9.9 on the floor for the second time this 
year. Mar\land defeated Temple on senior 
night by again posting a season high score 
of 194.15. Maryland swept all four events 
with Rachel Martinez scoring a 9.925 on 
the floor exercise The Terps won their fi- 
nal home meet over G\\" with a score of 
192.925. Maryland then traveled to North 
Carolina for a quad meet. Maryland scored 
a season high of 194.575, which was only 
good enough for second place to NC State. 
Maryland beat out New Hampshire and GW. 
Rachel Martinez and Rachel Colon finished 
first and second in the all around. The Terps 
placed 5th at the conference champion- 
sliips. They finished with a score of 194.75. 





mS & WOMENS 




.tt&FKlUl) 




a season of SllCCGSS 



Track and field started ott their sea- 
sons by welcoming a strong fresh- 
man class and with the first win 
from the women in their season 
opener. In January, the Terps hosted 
the Terrapin Track Invitational and 
Berger was named Co-ACC per- 
former of the week. In February the 
Terps competed in the ACC Indoor 
Championships and after day 2, the 
women were in second place and by 
the end of the meet they capmred 
two ACC rides. In March, the Terps 
sent three athletes to the NCAA In- 
door Championship where all three 
of the competitors earned an AU- 



American status. The Terrapin Invi- 
tational was held in April, the women 
were ranked 20th , and Berger and 
Braffett both won the ACC champi- 
onship. In May, the Terps had nu- 
merous top finishes at the Patriot 
Invitational and the women swept 
the top spots for long jump at the 
ECAC Championship. Three Terps 
head for the NCAA Track Nationals 
where two of them, Berger and Fos- 
ter advanced to the finals and Berger 
placed second in the nation. To end 
the season, seven Terps were named 
to the AU-ACC Academic Team. 




MENS AND WOMENS GM.ms Goumm 




a season of WlIlS 



Men 

Maryland opened the year at the Great 
Meadows Invitational in Virginia. The 
team placed third in the event. Maryland 
then went to the Spiked Shoe Invitational 
at Penn State. Here the team placed 7th 
out of 24. Peter Hess finished 17th over- 
all. Thev placed fifth at the Tribe Invita- 
tional at William and Mary. Peter Hess 
finished in 21st place to pace the Terps. 
Maryland then finished 16th at the (^hile 
Pepper Invitadonal in Arkansas. Mary- 
land finished 10th in the ACC tourna- 
ment. Peter Hess once again paced the 
Terps finishing 30th. They finished 14th 
at the NCAA Mid-Adantic Regional in 
Lock HaV'Cn, PA. Peter Hess placed 31st, 
which was once again best on the team. 
The team then finished their season by 
placing 10th at the IC4A Championships. 
Three Freshmen led the way for the Terps. 



Women 

Maryland finished second in the Great 
Meadows Invitational to start off the sea- 
son. Meghan Braffet placed second while 
teammate Laurel Jefferson placed fifth. 
Maryland then placed 3rd at the Spiked 
Shoe Invitational at Penn State. Braffet 
placed 3rd and Jefferson placed 7th to lead 
the Terps. Braffet was named ACC Cross 
Country Performer of the Week. The team 
placed 4th at the Tribe Invitational. Braffet 
placed 5th for UMD. Maryland then fin- 
ished 8th at the Chile Pepper Invitational. 
Braffet placed 15th for the Terps. They 
placed 10th at the ACC Championships. 
At the NCAA Mid-Adantic Regional, they 
placed 9th. Maryland ended the season 
by finishing 5th at the ECAC Champion- 
ships. Laurel Jefferson placed 5th for the 
Terps. The team also earned the ACC 
Sportsmansliip Award for Cross Country. 





MENS AND WOMENS GOLF 




a season of SUCCGSS 



Men 



Women 



The team started the season by placing 5th 
at the Cleveland Golf / Palmetto Invita- 
tional. John Eades and Blaine Peffley tied 
for fourth individuaUy. Maryland then fin- 
ished second in a rain shortened William 
and Mary invitational. They finished in 1st 
place at the Fur man Intercollegiate Men's 
tournament. Blaine Peffley won the individ- 
ual tide for the tournament. This was fol- 
lowed by a fouth place finish at the Bridge- 
stone Golf intercollegiate tournament. 
At the ACC tournament the team fin- 
ished in seventh place, their best finish in 
7 years. Blaine Peffley finished 19th indi- 
vidually. The men then won the Cavalier 
Invitational at the University of Virginia. 
Blaine Peffley tied for the individual lead 
but lost in a 7 hole playoff The men earned 
their 5th straight NCAA tournament bid. 
Maryland tied for 20th at the NCAA east 
regional in Orlando to end their season. 



Maryland opened the season by win- 
ning the Pinehurst Invitational. Katie 
Trotter tied for 3rd individualK'. The 
women won their second straight tour- 
nament at the Lady Herd/El Diablo in- 
tercollegiate. Kelly Calkin finished third 
while Katie Trotter finished 4th. Mary- 
land then finished 6th at the UNCW 
Lady Seahawk Invitational. The team 
placed 4th in the ACC tournament, their 
best finish ever. Katie Trotter finished 
5th while Katie Stepanek finished 6th. 
The Maryland women then earned 
their 1st ever NCAA tournament bid. 
Maryland placed 14th overall in the 
NCAA East Regional to conclude 
their season. Katie Stepanek shot a 
hole in one in the final round of play. 




MENS 




a season of variation 



The men started the season finish- 
ing 4th in an ACC quad meet against 
Georgia Tech, Florida State and 
Virginia Tech. Dann\' Gray won 
the 50 free while Martin Ott won 
the 200-IM. The Maryland men de- 
feated Johns Hopkins and Howard. 
Stefan Geisen, Danny Gray, and 
Matt Golebiewski each won events 
for UMD. They lost to Duke, but 
Dann\' Gray, Martin Ott, and Ste- 
fan Geisen each picked up two wins 
against Duke. Maryland then host- 
ed the Terrpain Cup Invitational 
where the men finished in 6th place. 



The Terps earned a win over Vil- 
lanova at a meet at the University 
of Pittsburgh but fell to host Pitt.. 
The Terps then began ACC action 
by falling to NC State. Maryland 
hosted North Carolina where they 
were defeated bv the Tar Heels, and 
then, unfortunately, fell to Virginia 
on Senior Day. The men began the 
ACC Championships where Danny 
Gray won a silver in the 50 free, the 
fastest event. Maryland finished 
8th as a team at the ACC Cham- 
pionships and their 400 free relay 
team finished with a bronze medal. 




WOMENS 





a season of mediOCritV 



The women began bv defeating 
Georgia Tech but lost to Florida 
State and \^A Tech. Ivrisztina Ko- 
vacs won the 200 Breast while Sa- 
sha Malanina won the 400T1M. The 
Maryland women defeated Johns 
Hopkins and Howard next with 
help from Erica Sugiyama, Sasha 
Malanina and Maya Finkler who all 
won 2 events for UMD. The Terps 
then picked up two wins over Duke 
and Miami by winning 8 events. 
Maryland then hosted the Terrpain 
Cup Invitational where the women 
finished in 5th place. They earned 



a win over Villanova at a meet at 
the Universit}' of Pittsburgh but 
fell to host Pitt. The womens 400 
relay recorded a win over Villa- 
nova. The Terps then began ACC 
action the women defeated the 
Wolfpack of NC State. For them, 
the 200 meter relay sealed the win. 
Mar^dand hosted North Carolina 
where they were defeated by the 
Tar Heels, and then, unfortunate- 
ly, fell to Virginia on Senior Day. 
There was no information 
available about the wom- 
en's ACC Championships. 




MENS 




E 





a season of VlCtOFy 



Maryland opened the season ranked number 1 
and defeated 23rd ranked Old Dtjminion 2-0 
in their first game, and then defeated Bingham- 
ton 3-0. They beat 10th ranked UCLA 4-1 in 
front of the 5th largest crou'd in Ludvvig Field 
history. After defeaung Louisville, Maryland 
traveled to 4th ranked Clemson where thev lost 
their first game of the year 2- 1 , Maryland fell to 
6th in the poUs but rebounded by beating Mt. St. 
Mary's 2-0. Maryland then continued ACC play 
by shutting out NC State 3-0. The team hosted 
and defeated Penn State 2-0. Maryland extend- 
ed its shutout streak to 286 minutes. In the next 
game, Marvland scored 2 goals in the final 15 
minutes of the game to come from behind and 
beat 7th ranked Wake Forest 2-L Jeremy Hall 
and Graham Zusi scored the goals for UMD. 
Maryland then defeated Lovola 1-0 on a goal by 
Maurice Edu. The team defeated Duke 1-0 in 
front of 6,203 fans, the largest crowd in Ludwig 
Field History. Maurice Edu notched the only 



goal of the game. Maryland then traveled to 6th 
ranked UNC and came away with a 1-1 tie. Ste- 
phen King scored the lone Maryland goal. After 
falling to Virginia, Maryland then lost its second 
straight game, a 3-1 defeat to Boston College. It 
was the first time in exactiy two years that Mary- 
land had lost a home game, but the bounced back 
by beating Harrwick 1-0 on a goal by Maurice 
Edu. With two goals by Graham Zusi, Mary- 
land beat Albany 4-0. Head Coach Sasho Ci- 
ravoski earned his 200th win on a 4-1 defeat of 
BuckneU. He became just the second person in 
program history to reach this milestone. Mary- 
land then defeated Va Tech on senior night, 2-1. 
The team headed to the ACC tournament where 
they won a thrilling 1-0 game over BC in the 
first round on a Graham Zusi goal in overtime. 
Maryland then fell to Duke 1-0 in the ACC 
Semi-finals. The game was played in front a 
Marvland SoccerPlex record crowd of 7, 119. 




Post Season 

The Terps earned the fifth 
seed in the NCAA tournament 
and hosted St. John's in the 
second round. Maryland shut 
out St. John's 2-0 to advance 
to the third round. Maryland's 
bid for a second straight Na- 
tional Title came to end with 
a 1-0 overtime loss to Notre 
Dame. It was the first time 
Maryland had lost an NCAA 
tournament game at home 
since 2001. Maurice Edu 
and Chris Seitz each earned 
All-American honors for the 
Terps. Maryland finished the 
season with a record of 1 6-5- 
I . The soccer team also set an 
attendance record with over 
33,000 fans attending sanies. 




WOMENS Soccia 




a season of 



shutouts 



Maryland began the season with a 1-0 
upset over 14th ranked Tennessee at the 
Penn State Classic Emily Maynard scored 
the lone goal for UMD. Maryland then 
fell to top ranked UCLA 3-0, but Mary- 
land earned a 25th national ranking and 
tied Towson 0-0. Maryland then routed 
UMBC 6-0. Melissa Homfeck scored 2 
goals for UMD. They went on the road 
and suffered a 1-0 loss to Dartmouth de- 
spite 14 saves from goalie Xikki Resnick. 
Maryland defeated Stony Brook 2-0 in 
the 400th Women's soccer game played 
in program histon,'. Maryland then trav- 
eled to George Mason and defeated the 
Patriots 1-0 on a goal by Kelly Rozumal- 
ski. After a slow start in ACC play, they 
tied Miami 0-0 as goalie Nikki Resnick 



recorded her 16th career shutout. In the 
next game, Xikki Resnick stopped 10 NC 
State shots but the Terps fell 1-0 to the 
Wolfpack, and Nikki Resnick tied a Lud- 
wig Field Save Record, stopping 14 Duke 
shots and the Terps earned a 0-0 tie with 
the Blue Devils. Resnick stopped nine 
shots at \'irginia Tech and recorded her 
second straight shutout as Maryland drew 
a 0-0 tie with \"r. With the tie, Mary- 
land was eliminated from ACC tourna- 
ment contention, but went on to earn an 
upset 2-0 victor}- over 11th ranked Vir- 
ginia on Senior Night. Marvland ended 
its season with a 2-1 loss to Boston Col- 
lege on the road. Mar}-land finished the 
season with a record of 5-9-4. Goalie 
Nikki Resnick was named to the .\11-ACC 
First Team for the second straight year. 




?i 





!7 



n 




irm 



Ul 



m 





a season 



of achievement 



Maryhind opened their season at the Avalon Duals 
in Rdinboro, PA. They finished the tournament 
with a 1-2 record, falling to Old Dominion (24- 
17), beating Slippery Rock (21-14), and losing to 
F.dinboro (32-3). Maryland then went to the Body 
Bar Classic at Cornell where they placed 9th, and 
placed 6th at the Mat Town Invitational in Lock 
Haven, PA. Maryland lost their first home match 
of the year 23-15 to American. American won the 
last 5 bouts to come from behind and get the win. 
The team lost two matches at home to Rider and 
Rutgers, 25-14 and 23-13, although Brendan By- 
rne won n\-icc for Maryland. Maryland then went 
to the Southern Scuffle where they finished in 21st 
place. 6 Nationally ranked teams competed in the 
58 team field. Freshman Hudson Taylor finished 
third at 1 97 pounds as he went 6- 1 . Hudson Tay- 
lor was then named ACC Wresder of the Week. 
Maryland won their ACC opener, 28-6 over NC 
State. Maryland won 8 of the 10 bouts. This was 
Maryland's first ACC win since 2002. Alex Krom 



was named ACC wresder of the week. Maryland 
then defeated \'M1 26-15. Jerry Afari got a pin 
for UMD. Maryland improved to 3-7. Maryland 
won its second consecutive ACC match, 27-18 
over Virginia Tech. Andrew Schlaffer got a pin 
for Maryland. After a couple tough matches, 
Maryland defeated UNC Greensboro 28-18 to 
improve to 7-9 on the year. UMD won 7 of the 
10 bouts. Maryland won its 8th match, 26-15, 
over George Mason. This was Maryland's high- 
est win total since 2002. Maryland was beaten 
by Virginia 24-14 to close out the ACC regular 
season. Even with the loss, Maryland claimed 
a share of the ACC tide, its first since 1973. 
Maryland finished 4th in the ACC tourna- 
ment with 48 points. Andrew Schlaffer won 
the ACC Tide at 149 pounds. Schlaffer made 
it to the NCAA tournament where he went 1- 
2. He lost to 2nd ranked Tyler Eustice of Iowa 
and Matt Dragon of Penn. The team won 
the ACC Sportsmanship Award for Wrestling. 





vv'OMENS FllLID) EOGIBf 




Maryland earned a Number 2 seed in the NCAA tournament 
where they hosted Richmond in the first round. Maryland won 
the game 4-0. Maryland outshot Richmond 11-4. In the second 
round of the NCAA tournament, the Terps hosted number 6 Penn 
State. Maryland knocked off Penn State l-(.l on Paula Infante's 
goal with less than 15 minutes to plaj'. Maryland advanced to their 
4th consecutive Final Four. In the Nadonal Semi-Finals, Maryland 
defeated Connecticut 2-1 in penalty' s^kes. Maryland made 4 pen-' 
alty strokes while UCONN made jtisT^. Christina, Restivo came 
off the bench into the. goal for the penalty strokes and got the win. 
Maryland then faci.ti off with ACC rival and top sLcd, XXaleFor- 
est, for the National ClinmjMrihship. ThegameJ^s played ^^('ake 
Forest. Emily Trycinski i,cureiit^L unly^aJ of the game at 30:08 
to give Maryland its second Consecutive National Championship. 
This was Maryland's 5th National Championship in Field Hockey. 



1/ 

V/ 

y 




282 



SpoTt's^'^ 



a season 



of achivement 



Key Players 



Riding high on their NC".'V:-\ Championship in 2005, 
tht Maryland I'ield Hockev team opened tJie year 
ranked Number 1 in the polls and shut out Pacific 6- 
in its first game. Still in C^alitornia, they boasted a 
4-1 win over Stanford and a 5-0 \yin oyer California. 
In their home opener, the ladies defeated 4th ranked 
Old Dominion 1-0 on a goal by Kim Ziegler. Mary- 
land then hosted the Terrapin Invitational where 
they beat Temple 2-1 and Northwestern 7-2. Mary- 
land then won its "^th straight game with a 3-0 victory 
ovet Delaware. After that, it was time to open ACC 
play by routing BC 5-0. Five different Terps scored 
in the game. Maryland then went out of conference 
and beat 1 3th ranked James Madison 4-2. They vis- 
ited number 2 ranked Wake Forest where it put its 
number 1 ranking on the line. Mar\land won the 
game 3-2 on a Nicole Muracco goal with less than 2 
minutes reinaining in the game. Maryland then tra\-- 
eled to 8th ranked \'irginia where it beat the Cavs 
5-1. After that game, Maryland became the last un- 
beaten team in the country with a 2- 1 overtime win 
over 20th ranked Michigan. The game was played at 
Perm State. Nicole Muracco scored the game win- 



ning goal less than 3 minutes into OT Unfort^antelv, 
the ladies had its 12 game win streak stopped by 5th 
ranked Duke. The Devils won the game 2-0. Duke 
scored 2 goals on just 4 shots. Maryland reboundcti 
with a 4-1 road win at Princeton. Maryland then 
defeated 3rd ranked Old Dominion for the second 
time this year, 1-0. Nicole Muracco scored the games 
only goal. Playing an unranked team, Maryland de- 
stroyed Albany 6-0 at home. Paula Infante scored 
rvvice for UMD. Maryland then defeated 12th ranketl 
American 5-1. Maryland then clinched a share of 
the ACC tide widi a 1 -0 win o\'er 7th ranked North 
Carolina. Susie Rowe scored less than 10 min- 
utes into the second half for the games only goal. 
On Senior Day, Maryland routed Appalachian State 
5-0. Maryland also earned the top seed in the ACC 

tournament. They defeated Virginia 5-2 in the 

semi-finals of the ACC tournament. Paula Infan- 
te and Susie Rowe each scored twice for MD. Mary- 
land then fell to number 2 Wake Forest in the AC(^ 
championsliip, 1-0, but that didn't stop Nicole Mura- 
cco from being named ACC Freshman of the Year. 



Paula Infante won the 
Honda Award for the na- 
tions top Field Hockey 
player. She also received 
the award in 2005. Coach 
Missy Meharg also won 
National Coach of the 
Year for the second 
consecutive season. In 
addition, the team won 
the ACC Sportsmanship 
Award for Field Hockey. 




MENS FOO" 




S)m 



LM. 




a season of SUCCCSS 



Maryland opened their season by beating Divi- 
sion l-A/\ VCilliam & Mary 27-14. They then 
beat Middle Tennessee State 27- 10. Lance Ball 
scored two rushing TD's and Hollenbach ran 
for a TD as well. The team rebounded after a 
loss at WVU and hung on for a 14-10 win over 
Florida International. FIU had a chance to win 
the game as time expired but Christian Varner 
intercepted a pass in the end zone to seal the 
win. Hollenbach threw for 2 TD's. Maryland 
then loses their first ACC game 27-23 to 18th 
ranked Georgia Tech. Maryland led 23-14 be- 
fore GT made their comeback. Mar\-land had 
first and goal from the seven with under a min- 
ute to play but failed to score on four plays. 
The team got their first ACC win, a 28-26 
comeback win at Virginia. Maryland trailed 
20-0 before making their comeback. Keon 
Lattdmore had a 56 yard touchdown and Erin 
Henderson returned an interception for a TD 
to lead the comeback. UVA attempted a two 



point conversion to tie the game but failed. 
Maryland then held off NC State for a 26-20 
Homecoming win. Maryland used 2 NC State 
turnovers to give them a 20-0 lead. Maryland 
beat Florida State 27-24, for only the second 
time in school history. Sam Hollenbach threw 
3 TD passes and Jeremy Navarre blocked FSU's 
t\-ing field goal attempt with 42 seconds left. 
Marvland then rallied and beat 19th ranked 
Clemson 13-12. Dan Ennis kicked a 31 yard 
field goal as time expired to get the win. The 
Maryland defense held to Clemson to just four 
field goals. They won their 5th straight game, 
a 14-13 thriller over Miami. Sam Hollenbach 
completed a 96 yard touchdown pass to Dar- 
rius He^-ward-Bey, which is a school record. 
Miami's attempt at a comeback was stopped 
when they fumbled a punt with just over a min- 
ute left. Marvland became the first team in 21 
years to beat bodi Florida State and Miami in 
the same year. They finished the season with 
a record of 9-4, and went 5-3 in the ACC. 




WOMENS YOLLEYBALL 




a season of challenges 



Maryland opened the season at a tournament at 
the Universit)' of Indiana, with a 3-0 sweep of the 
Chicago State Bears. Later in the day, they over- 
came a one game deficit and defeated Marshall 3 
games to 1. Maryland finished the tournament with 
a thrilling 3-2 win over host Indiana. Maryland 
won the first two games before falling in the third 
and fourth games. Maryland won the fifth game 
easily, 15-3, to start the season 3-0. Maryland then 
traveled to Stony Brook for another tournament. 
They lost their first game, 3-1, to 17th ranked Ohio. 
Later, Maryland swept Albany to get their 4th win 
in 5 games. In the final match of the tournament, 
Maryland defeated host Stony Brook 3-2. Maryland 
had 19 blocks in the match and hit .344. The team 
then hosted the Hilton Garden Inn Greenbclt Invi- 
tational. Maryland broke the school block record, 
with 22, in a 3-1 win over Long Island. Maryland 
then defeated Florida International 3-2. In the final 
match of the tourney, Maryland hosted 3rd ranked 
UCLA. The game was played in front of a record 



crowd of 1,716. Maryland lost the match 3-0, mak- 
ing their record 7-2. The team got its first AC^C 
win, a 3-2 win over Georgia Tech after a few tough 
breaks in earlier ACC games. After falling behind 
2-1, Maryland rallied behind Jade Brown and Beth 
GUming for the win. Maryland then went on a four 
game North Carolina road trip where they lost their 
first three to Duke, North Carolina, and Wake For- 
est before rallying from 2-0 down to defeat Wake 
Forest. Maryland then extended its winning streak 
to 3 by getting revenge on both Miami and Florida 
State. Unfortunately, their winning streak couldn't 
last forever. Virginia ended Maryland's uin streak 
with a 3-0 win in front of a record crowd at UVA. 
Maryland was outblocked for the 7th straight 
game. Maryland then led VT 2-1 before falling to 
the Hokies and going to 11-13 on the year. Mary- 
land rounded out the year by winning its last 2 
matches over NC State and North (Carolina. Mary- 
land did not make die ACC tournament, but Jade 
Brown was named to the AH ACC VoUevbaU team. 






288 



3reek Life Divider 












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Recruitment 





At the start of each semester fraternities and sororities host get-togethers for 
those interested in becoming a new member. This is the beginning of the re- 
cruitment process, which lasts about a week. Students get opportunities to 
check out the different ones in order to get a feel for which one could be the 
right one for them. After being invited back during the preference round the 
next step is bid receiving. Once a bid is accepted new pledges go through 
a 4-8 week pledging period before finally being initiated as a brother or sister. 



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During each semester fraternities and sororities get a chance to get to know 
each other better by competing in week long competitions and challenges. 
Homecoming takes place in the fall the week prior to the homecoming football 
game. Frats and sororities compete for Mr. and Mrs. Greek and participate by 
making floats for the annual parade. In the spring the competition is a bit fierc- 
er with the Greek Olympics and talent show. These are great opportunities for 
the men and women participating in Greek life to bond and meet new people. 



Celebrations 







^^^^^^^^H 




Each semester fraternities and sororities get together to celebrate by hosting dated 
parties, grab-a-date parties and formals. Dated parties take place normally at a local 
bar or club where the brothers or sisters and their respective dates have a fun evening 
together. Grab-a-dates are a fun party because the details of it are given out with short 
notice, usually a few days in advance, and the brothers or sisters have to find some- 
one as their date quickly. Normally formals are held at the end of each semester and 
sometimes they are a weekend long event, in the case of fraternities. Sororities, on the 
other hand, stay local for their formals and return to campus late the night of the event. 
These celebrations are an enjoyable opportunity for everyone to dress up and party! 




HILANTHROPY 





JtUl 





l# 




Each sorority and fraternity has a philanthropy that they contribute to 
which allows them to give back in some way. Some even have more than 
one organization that they support and give money to. National founda- 
tions like the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation are popular to 
support and others that get supported can be more local or lesser-known 
causes. No matter who or what they are supporting, the brothers and sis- 
ters always find creative and exciting ways to raise money for their cause. 



11 



OUSES 








V 






• 






^.^..^'ai^il 


"* '^1^' " • -1 






Many brothers and sisters choose to live in their respective Greek hous- 
es. The houses on campus are located either on Frat Row or behind The 
Book Exchange by Route 1 . Living in a house gives people participating 
in Greek life a great bonding experience with their brothers or sisters. 



HS[iM@Jg|JgM€J 




a wonderful, 





Z)-*^^** n'M*f*^e£ Goi^^ht^ 



Apply on-line with Anne Arundel County Government. Just click on the Careers tab to 
learn more about all the possibilities and where your future may take you. 

You could have a future in planning, engineering, public safety, accounting, 
gerontology, information technology, administration and so much more. 



www.aacounty.org 




Now that you have graduated or you are about to 
raduate, do you know what your next step is 
going to be? 

Erickson is the nation's leader in developing and 

managing campus-style retirement communities. 

We have created a network of communities 

where people aspire to live, grow, contribute, 

and enjoy life to the fullest- a place where 

you can develop yourself and your career. 

Erickson has many career opportunities within 
the Corporate office including internships 
and leadership training programs, as well as 
full-time positions in Finance, Information 
Technology, Health Services, Legal, Human 
Resources, Operations, and Marketing. Our 

EOE/M/F/D/V 



What's Next? 

Now that you have graduated or you are 
about to graduate, do you know what 
your next step is going to be? 



communities offer positions in Dining Services, General 
Services, Resident Life, Healthcare, Marketing, Security, 
and Administration. 

Erickson offers tuition assistance if you choose to 
continue your education. If you are not sure what field 
you would like to pursue, Erickson offers an Operations 
Associate program where graduating students train 
in multiple departments to learn more about the 
company and their own strengths and interests. 

Where should you apply? You can submit your 
resume to resume@ericksonmail.com. 

To learn more: visit www.Erickson.com and check 
Careers for a listing of current position openings at 
all locations. 

www.Erickson.com 




Erickson 



Rftin-meni Communitit-v 



gtsi 



America's leaders and civil servants rely on 
GTSI to translate business challenges into practical 
technology solutions for today's federal, state and 
local governments. 

Our solutions bridge what information technology 
can do with what government must do-and we do it 
by harnessing IT's leading partners, products and 
services inside the core technology areas most 
critical to your success. 

Come join our team. We have opportunities in IT, 
Services, Finance, Business Development, Marketing, 
Operations, Sales and much more. For more detailed 
information on GTSI and the current positions we 
have open, please go to www.qtsi.com . 

GTSI Corp. offers career growth, personal 
responsibility, competitive compensation, and a 
comprehensive benefits package that includes 401 K, 
tuition reimbursement, and an on-site exercise 
facility. 

Thank you for your interest in GTSI Corp. 



A, Adventist 



Rehabilitation Hospital 

oJ'Mari/laud 



The complexity and breadth of Adventist Rehabilitation 
Hospital of Maryland provides enormous potential for 

rewarding career opportunities. 

Clinical career opportunities encompass a variety of 

nursing, therapy services, social work, a broad range of 

technician specialties and patient support services. 

Non-clinical opportunities include medical records 

management, environmental services, information 

systems and general administrative services. 

Join the Team of Excellence! 




Regardless of your career expertise, we encourage you 

to explore your continued professional growth with 

Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland. 

Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland 

9909 IVIedical Center DR • Rockville, MD 20850 

(240) 864-6000 

www.adventisthealthcare.com 




Warwick Manor 
Behavioral Health 

3680 Warwick Roa J 220A Easl Main Street 

Kast New Market, MD 21631 Salisbury, MD 218111 



W^e Help People Get Better 

And They Do 

Warwick Manor Behavioral Health provides adolescents and 
adults with high quality, effective addiction services. These 
services include a continuum of treatment components that 
provide specialized care to meet the needs of various consumer 
groups. Located near the benches. 

WMBH programming includes services to the chemicalh 
dependent client, family, as well as the client with co-occuring 
disorders. Our staff includes: 

• Doctor of Internal Medicine • Licensed / Certified Addictions 

• Psychiatrist Counselors 

• Nurse Practitioners * Licensed Professional 

• RNs and LPNs Counselors 

• LCSW-CLGSW 

To become part of our dedicated team of professionals, please 
contact us at: 800-344-6423 or send or email your resume to: 
HUMAN RESOURCES, 3680 Warwick Road, East New Market, 
MD 21631. merrickson@warwickmanor.org 



800-344-6423 



Charting a Course to Excellence! 

St. Mary's County Public Schools, 
Maryland 

Our Core Value: 
All Children CAN and WILL Learn 




Fulfillmi' the Promise in F.ven Child 
Seeking teachers in all area for the 2007-2008 school year! 

We offer new teacher incentives, mentoring and an excellent, 
competitive salary and benefits package! 

Please visit our website for additional information and to 

apply-- 

Click on the 'Employment Opportunities' link: 

www.smcps.org 

P.O. Box 641, Leonardtown, Maryland 20650 
301-475-551 l,ext. 189 



Montgomery County 
Police Department 

is now hiring Police Officers 
& 911 Dispatchers 





240-773-5314 

www.montgomerycountymd.gov /police 




The Ultimate 
In Student Living 

Experience it for yourself 




UNIVFWSITV TOWN CENrER 

siii[iii«pyiii[«[s 



live at tke tof) of tke wotldl 




Like Uou've Never Lived "Befotc*.. 



lift 



www.thetowersatutc.conn 



€> 



^ 



301-779-2727 

6515 Belcrest Road Hyattsville, MD 20782 



-*'^ 



Freedom to 
love your job. 



LifeBridge Health named the 
Best Place to Work in Baltimore! 

Building upon its exceptional clinical strengths and history of 
service, LifeBridge Health emerges as a unique institution in 
the Maryland health care marketplace, and is a model for the 
nation as a comprehensive health care provider. 

Opportunity to broaden your scope of care in 4 practice areas: 
• Sinai Hospital • Northwest Hospital Center 
• Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital 
• Jewish Convalescent & Nursing Home 

LifeBridge Health Offers: 

• Tuition reimbursement 

• Free parking ^ 

Comprehensi ve sala ry & bineTff?pacKa 
DiscounteiaiHfliSs membership 

- And morel ^^ 

Learn what sets us apart! sJIlr"^" 

Visit WWW. I ifejobs.org to apply. rrcrr.;,7:;.'cr "■"" 



IlilllllllHlllllllHNlHllllllilliiUllllNlllMIIII 



Congratulations on your ^^., ^,^.,,,^^ 

achievement. tWs is only the beginning. 

On behalf of The \'A Manlaiid Health Care System, ue extend our 
sincere congratulations to all those who are graduating. 
We'd also like you to know, that if you wish to make one of the most 
compelling choices for your health care career, we are here for you. 
For details or to apply online, visit us on the web. Or call our 
Nurse Recruitment Office at: (800) 463-6295, e.\t.7043, 
Email your resume to: ilona.mallon2(ffva.go 

The VA Mar> land Health Care S> stem 

I5altimorc» Pern- Point • Lodi Ra\vn Rehabilitatfan &• Extended Care Medical Cerrtei's 
• Community-based Outpatient Clinics. 



VA MARYLAND 



www.vacarecrs.va.gov 



If you want to make a difference... 

If you want to be part of something great. . . 

If you believe that public sen'ice can 

bring out the best in you. 



r^Sltei 



mm YOU Ibekiag win 

Frederick, Mainland 

310-694-2133 

www.cityoffrederick.com/Police 



Mil 



Our nurses demonstrate strength, commitment, 
compassion and great teamwork and for tliat 
they are continuously recognized, valued 
and rewarded 



We invite you to come and learn more about Nursing at 
Franklin Square Hospital Center and why our pursuit of 
Magnet Designation is the framework for excellent patient 
care, a superb patient and family experience, and a highly 
competent and qualified nursing staff. 

Our records speak for themselves. In a recent national 
nurse survey, our nurses report being very satisfied in their 
jobs and highly satisfied with their professional development 
opportunities. 

To learn more about the great things happening for nursing 
at Franklin Square, 
visit us online at 
www.franklinsquare.org Franklin Square 

or contact Nurse Recruitment Flospita! Center 

at 443-777-7045. Centered on You 

MedStar Health 



www.franklinsquare.org 



"Joi^ 



The j„ 




A Nationally .Accredited Law Enfoicement Agency 
Etpial Opponniiitv Employer 

Maryland Transportarion Authority Police 

4;!30 Broeuiiig Highua\ 

Balumore, Manland. 21222 

Phone 410-537-7641 

Fa.x: 410 537-7640 

\%'\u\.nidtapoli(fiecruitiiig.rom 



Who Do You Want to Be? 

K-9 Handler? Pilot? Detective? 
Howard County Police Officer. 



Join the Howard County Police Department. 
Not just a job 
Away of life, 

NOWHIRIXG. 

starting Salary $40,832, 

Excellent t)enefits and retirement plan. 

Career advancement opportunities 

«nT».HCPD.oi^ 41(K;31;J-HCPD 

Sixty college crecSts or two years active mflilary service required 
Eqi^l c^porturtly empbyer 





...caring is our business! 

Celebrating 50 years of Compassionate Care 
JCAHO Accredited 



Please visit our website to learn about 

or apply for job opportunities: 

www.wmhc.us 



Be Part of Something Special 

Join the Metropolitan Police Department 





■=i*'«r'% ■ ■ ^~^ Wt=: 


^^=^**«^ 




•* HIRING POLICE OFFICERS " 


Starting salan 


is: $46J95 


After 18 months of 


ser>ice: $50,761 


Minimum Requirements at the time of 


Benefils Includes: 


application: 






'' Family Health & Dental Packages 


''' Be«leaa2lyaisof8ge 


/ 10 Paid Holidays Per Year 


■^ Be a citizen ofdie United States 


''' Overtme * Duty compensation Pay 


'' Hate completed at least 60 houi^of 


'' Renremenl Plan 


college credits 


<' Accrued Annual & Sick Leave 


^ Possess a \alkl dnver> license 


•^ Tuition Reimbursement Program 




/ Bilingual Pay 






pass a ttrittcD riamiBitioB. and a tboroogh 


Job Description 



MUDiaation. ding screnug lad i 
pncbologka] natutioa. 



LATER.\L TRANSFER PR0(;R.\M 

The Lalcia] Transfer Officer Program was 
designed to aitract expenoiced officos from 
other Ian enforcement agenaes that are 
interested in a career with the MPDC. Salary is 
commensurate ftith expoience from N4S.7I5 to 
S6X.M4. 



Equal Opportunity Employer 



Officers will perform the \ita] public services of 
presa\ing the peace, protecting life and 
proper!) , presenting cnme. apprehending 
cnmtnals. and enforcing die laws and ordinances 
of the District of Columbia and the Umied 
States. After trainmg. Police Officers ttill be 
assigned to diserse patrol duties. 



Office of Recruiting Outreach 

.too Indiana Vveoue ^.^^„ff2l69 

Ua<ihington.D.C.:OOOI 

201-727-2767 or !80(>-99-)MPi)C (67.^2) 

Applications can be submitted on-line through nur 

neb silt-: HHW.mpdc.dc.gOV 




Potomac Ridge 

Behavioral Health System 



As a behavioral health professional, you care about making 

a difference. Imagine being in an environment that's 

energized, innovative, supportive and focused on being not 

only the largest, but also the best. 

That's Potomac Ridge Behavioral Health System. 

Potomac Ridge Behavioral Health System provides 

enormous potential for rewarding career opportunities. 

Clinical career opportunities encompass a variety of nursing, 

therapy services, social work, a broad range of technician 

specialties and patient support services. Non-clinical 

opportunities include medical records management, 

environmental services, information 

systems and general administrative services. 

Join the Team of Excellence! 




Potomac Ridge Behavioral Health System 

14901 Broschart Road 

Rockville, MD 20850 

(301)251^500 

www.adventisthealthcare.com/PRBH/careers/ 



www.aahs.org 



admired 




The feeling that results wheti you are respected 
for what you do - and for who you are. 




Our people are special indeed. They play key roles in shaping and determining the 
patient care that defines our medical center. They thrive within a shared governance 
setting where they are empowered. ..where they have a voice.. .where they are highly 
respected for their individual ideas, skills and talents. 

Our nursing graduate orientation includes: • 12-month Fellowship • Hospital orientation 
with formal nursing graduate classes • Clinical preceptorship and specialty-focused 
classes • Successful placement within a clinical area. And, we offer: • New grad tuition 
assistance (senior year) • Support for advanced certifications • Tuition reimbursement 

• Excellent salary & benefits. 

Allied Health opportunities also exist, including: • Respiratory Therapists • Radiologic 
Techs • Physical Therapists • Occupational Therapists • MRI Techs • CAT Scan Techs 

• Special Procedures Techs • and more. 

In addition to fulfilling careers, Anne Arundel Medical Center professionals also enjoy 
rich personal lives, with an employer that offers optimal work/life balance. Because what 
makes you a better person, makes you a better care giver. When you join us, you will 
work with nationally acclaimed physicians and other clinical experts and grow with a 
hospital that is making strives toward Magnet status. 
Located in Annapolis, MD, Anne Arundel Medical Center 
invites you to explore our career opportunities in Nursing 
and Allied Health, and to apply online at: www.aahs.org 
Questions? Please call 4^3.481.1950. EOE, M/F/D/V. 



iiii Anne Arundel 
'"■ Medical Center 



^ ■ ^-^>L*^ 






Charles County Sheriff's 
Mission Statement 



The men and women of the Charles County Shenffs Office are dedicated to 
service through superior performance. We believe mutual respect, trust and 
pnde in our organization, combined with traditional values and innovative 
techniques, will ensure the community's right to a safe environment. 

Charles County Sheriffs Office 

6915 Cra/n Highway Post Office Box 189 

La Plata. Maryland 20646-0139 

1301) 609-6400 

www.ccso.us 



AMERICAN 




EkOORCO 



THE METRO AREA'S 

COMMERCIAL DOOR 

SPECIALISTS 



http:/Awww.amdoor.com 
"FAmV( BUN & COMMITTED TO SERVING YOU SINCE 1977 



COMMERCIAL ONLY 



«w^ -™i«T», FAX#301-937-007J 
-Steodard A Specialty Karitware Available- 



A 

Marshfield 
301 -937-951 SOieCook Rd. Bettsville 



University of Maryland Students 
$100 Off 1st Month's Rent! 



■!*V» 




• On the UMD Shuttle Route • Swimming pool & sundeck 

• Volleyball & Tennis Courts • Fitness facility with free weights 

• Convenience Store & Deh on site 




9310 Cherry Hill Road 
College Park, MD 20740 



m 



REALTY 



SEVEN SPRINGS 



301-345-8500 



VILLAGE 



A, Adventist 



Rehabilitation Hospital 

o/AfanjIufid 



The complexity and breadth of Adventist Rehabilitation 
Hospital of Maryland provides enormous potential for 

rewarding career opportunities. 

Clinical career opportunities encompass a variety of 

nursing, therapy services, social work, a broad range of 

technician specialties and patient support services. 

Non-clinical opportunities include medical records 

management, environmental services, information 

systems and general administrative services. 

Join the Team of Excellence! 




Regardless of your career expertise, we encourage you 

to explore your continued professional growth with 

Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland. 

Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of IVIaryland 

9909 IVIedical Center DR • Roci<ville, IVID 20850 

(240) 864-6000 

wvvw.adventisthealthcare.com 



Anne Arundel County Public Schools 




We are looking for creative and caring 

teachers who want to make a real 

difference in children's lives. 

Join a progressive, competitive, and accountable 
school system committed to raising expectations 
for every child. We are proud to offer: 

' Competitive Salaries & Benefits 

' New Teacher Support Program 

- Extensive Professional Development Opportunities 

■ Excellent Tuition Reimbursement Program 

■ Opportunities for Career Advancement 



(Ml 1-800-538-8258 
^B www.aacps.org 

Division of Human Resources ■ 2644 Riva Road, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 



410-222-5061 

I fet- eoe'iM ei'niU 



GENE*rsA>LOGIC 



AT GENE LOGIC, WE ARE COMMITTED TO 

HIRING AND DEVELOPING A TALENTED, 

ADAPTABLE, RESPONSIVE TEAM OF EMPLOYEES. 

WE HAVE ONGOING NEEDS FOR SKILLED 

CANDIDATES WITH MULTI-DISCIPLINARY 

BACKGROUNDS AND EXPERIENCES WHO CAN HIT 

THE GROUND RUNNING AND MAKE IMMEDIATE 

CONTRIBUTIONS TO MEET OUR BUSINESS GOALS. 

TO SUPPORT OUR STAFF, WE OFFER A 

COMPREHENSIVE, COMPETITIVE PROGRAM OF 

BENEFITS AND A CORPORATE CULTURE BASED 

ON CORE VALUES OF INNOVATION, EXCELLENCE 

AND INTEGRITY. 

GENE LOGIC INC. 

610 PROFESSIONAL DRIVE 

GAITHERSBURG, MD 20879 

TELEPHONE: 301.987 1700 

TOLL FREE: 800.GENELOGIC (800.436.3564) 

FAX. 301.987.1701 

to apply online go to: 
http://www.genelogic.com/careers/ 

FOR GENERAL INFORMATION, PLEASE EMAIL US AT INFO@GENELOGIC COM 
WHERE DISCOVERY BEGINS 



College Park Honda & Hyundai 

Would Like To Congratulate The Recent 

Graduates Of The University Of Maryland 



Car Buying Tips For Recent Graduates 
College Park Honda & Hyundai Offers you: 

1. College Graduate 
Program 

2. Special Low Rate 
Financing 

3. Huge Rebates 

4. Great Savings 

5. Incredible Selection. 








6. Certified Used Cars. 
Remember We're Just Minutes Away... 




COLLEGE PARK 
(Q}HO]\rojv 

9400 Baltimore Ave • College Park, MD 

301.441.2900 

www.collegeparkhonda.com 



COLLEGE PARK 

CS) HYunnni 

9500 Baltimore Ave • College Park, MD 

301.441.1313 

www.collegeparkhyundai.coni 



Srrycier Cohr^ 



L 



Certified Public Acanintanti 



ooking for a company that 
cares about its employees as well 
as its clients? 

LOOK NO FURTHER! 



As a leader in the Washington DC area Aecoiinting Industi^' for over 7,i 
years, we are seeking bright new talent to join our growing firm. We're 
inuch more than an aceoiinting tlnn to our chents. Our staff" is a diverse 
team of indi\iduals with a wide range of experienees that help our elients 
grow and prosper. 

Our associates list our open door policies, the variet>' of tasks thc\ 
handle, our Firm's leadership, our supportive and friendly office 
environment and our individual coaching program among the reasons 
why they enjoy being part of the Snyder Cohn team. 

Our services include accounting and auditing, tax, pension plan 
administration, medical practice consulting and management advisorv 
services. 

Visit our website, vvwvv.cpahelp.com to see if we are the right accounting 
tlnn for you. Send your resutne to advice@cpahelp.com 

EOE 

SNYDER COHN 7 



Because 



Count 



/ / 



UPS WILL HELP PAY 

FOR YOUR 
COLLEGE EDUCATION 



Get up to S23.000* to apply 
toward college tuition, books, 
fees, approved software and 
more. Ask about the Earn and 
Learn Program today! 



To inquire about part-time 
jobs, visit: ww^.upsjobs.com 



Or call: 



301-497-1064 



Begin fl tlursing 
CarBBr Of ExcellEiice 

\l.>t.<. Baltimore Washington Medical Center .mU 
New Graduate Internship tlu- ^olui Uiuiul.itinn on whuh 
buiiJ your tmiirc iiurMiij; » .ircLT. Our pro[;rjm is ^upporitvl ' 
t;liiin,Ml Educjton And iinujiicly tlcMjpicd for newly licciv 
RNs piirMiing Medicjl/Surnical & Critical Cjn: jr-js of nuFMM 

Offering J smooth inmsirion from the jodcniic environment 
the liospiijl bedside, iiidivulujl jnd group supporc prep-tr 
'you clinicjUy Jiid cniotioiijIU— for your new and exiim 
nursing cireerThis 7-ln week program, will .issisi you in inasii 
mg nine nunjgenient skills, pjtient. peer & physician relatio: 
ships, the art of delegation jiul provide you with the confuKu 
necessary to start your profe\su)naI career. 



• ER/Telemetry & ICU/CCU . pportunitics. 

call Sue Stein at: 410-7K7-47I7 or please send 
resume u^ sstein2'tf bwnic.utnms.org 

•Med/Surg & OR opportuniue^. call Sue Guzinaki 
at: 410-787-4615 or ple.ise send resume to 
sgu zinski(a b wtnc. tunini .0^ 



^ 

^ 
< 




(-.'omjtt us ttkLiy to bcLOiiK" pjrt of this iiniquc prtigram.To f-vplnn 
toinpciiiiw loiiipcn'.ituiii \ hciK-lks. pk-.tsc apply online at: 
www.bwmc.umms.org. [l.iliiinorc>Xasliiiiytsiii .MfJu.ti ("i-iiur 
.^'il llospiLilnnscClfii Huniic..Vin2lM(,I.TTY:(4|(il7K7-44''S 




551 BaltimoreWashington 
mK Me d ical Center 




"If you are looking for a 
job, look elsewhere. If 

you are looking for a 

career, call Whiting- 

M Turner." 

Offices nationwide 

Headquarters: 

300EastJoppa Road 
Baltimore, IVID 21286 
410-821-1100 

Recruiting: Karen Lucas 

vwwv.whiting-turner.com 



pgram guidelines appK 
'Kjtial Opportunity nmpioycr 




construction management. 




The Mayor, City Council and Staff of the 

City of College Park appeciate the 

opportunity to provide a positive 

community atmosphere for 

growth through education. 

We extend our sincerest wishes to 
the Graduating Class of 2007 for a 
successful and accomplished future. 

Good Luck! 





&<dting location 
Uhnristakably orignal 



: I ii"j 



scdrting 
from $7" 



*Den available wsome tloorplans 
Enjoy the convenience and the best of both Montgonier> and Prince George's 
Counties! Just minutes to the University of Mar>land. the Beltway. Takoma 
Park, and Washington, DC. Hampton on the Park offers >ou the perfect 
combination of convenience and ser\ice. Live in the unmistakably original 
apartment in an exciting location ... and start enjo\ ing life! 

Features: 



Some utilities included!'* 

Unique!) designed floor plans 

Plush wall-to-wall carpeting 

Dining areas, some with ceiling fans 
,Free Parking ' 

^Swimming Pool ' 

Directions: 

Take 1-495 to Exit 28B (New Hampshire 
Ave. South). Take a Left at second light. 
Adelphi Road to communit>' on the right. 

• Please call for an appointmc >il and cunient specials 

•• In most apaitmenls 

Rental rates and hours are subject to change. 



• Playgrounds 
" Metrobus acessible. 
■ 15 minute commute to Metro. 
' Just minutes to University of Maryland 

• L'ni\ersity of MD shuttle bus stops here 

• 24-hour emergency sen ice 



Office Hours: 

Mon-Fri 10:00- 
Sat 10-5:30 
Sun 1 -5:30 



5:30 



t=J 



'Experience ihat saves you money 

For over 35 years, 

Working with professional firms, 
closely-tield business & individuals 
Committed to quality and personalized service 
Addressing your concerns and solving 
your problems 



Bookkeeping & Payroll • Computer Consulting 

Business & Personal Financial Statements 

Audited Financial Statements • Litigation Support Business 

Start Up ■ Estate Accounting & Reporting 

Benefit Plan Accounting & Reporting 

Tax Planning ■ Business & Individual Tax Preparation 

Tax Litigation Support • Financial Statement Analysis 

Accounting Procedure Review • Accounting Staff Training 

Management Advisory Services 



16065 Comprint Circle Gaithersburg, MD 20877 
301-987-9366 FAX 301-987-9018 



Airgas 




Industrial, Medical and Specialty Gases, 
Welding and Safety Supplies 



Airgas 



2900 52nd Avenue 

Bladensburg, MD 20781 

(301)985-5841 

You'll Find it With Us 



One team. 
One purpose. 




Only one 



s 



rrm 



Maryland 

General Hospital 

i 'M\ ERSITI' OF MARYZMD MEDICAL SYSTEM 



Find your strength in our system. 



Maryland General Hospital. 

CONGRATULATIONS! 
YOU DESERVE IT. 

Early-morning classes. ..late-night papers. ..all-night 
cramming tor exams. ..gallons ot cotfee and cold pizza. 
You've worked hard and now you re about to graduate. Good 
for you! 

Good for us, too. 

We're Maryland General Hospital, a 216-bed community 
hospital with a reputation for excellent care and exciting 
career opportunities tor great people like you. At iMaryland 
General, you'll encounter a cohesive team with a singular 
focus — the health and well-being of the community we serve. 
And, you'll discover genuine camaraderie and a supportive 
environment rhat will help you create the career you want 
and deserve. 

Part of the University of Maryland Medical System, we 
offer an attractive salary and benefits package that includes 
medical, dental, vision, disability, prescription drug, 
tuition reimbursement, pension plans, 403(b), and growth 
opportunities. Visit us online at www.marylandgeneral.org 
to apply or to learn more about our nursing, allied health, 
technical, management or administrative careers. 



EOE 



www.marylandgeneral.org 



'Your Success is OnCy Limited 6y 'Your ^Desire 




8721 Baltimore Ave., College Park 



^S? 



^ Xcingular 

# ^— rfj^» raising the bar-.iiir 



ve mon 



(301)927-3356 
(30 1)927-0586 Fax 




D&EAUTOSERVICE 

STUDENT MARYLAND INSPECTION GARAGE ASK 

& CERTIFIED MECHANICS ABOUT 

AAA MINOR & MAJOR REPAIRS pREE 

MEMBER WHEEL ALIGNMENT TOWING 

DISCOUNT FRONT END SERVICE 

All Work Guaranteed 



4915 COLLEGE AVENUE 

COLLEGE PARK. MARYLAND 2074(( 

ED RHONE 1 BLOCK FROM COLLEGE PARK METRO STAI ION 




o'^S-^ife PK Graphics Alumni 

are proud supporters of 
the University of 
Maryland Terrapins 

Good luck to the gmdiiating class of 200V. 

13964 Baltimore Avenue • Laurel, Maryland 20707 

r;///Vy' 301-725-4567 • /«.v 301-725-3775 
r//;r//7 niail@pkgraphic.com • www.pkgraphic.com 



(E 



CYCLE CENTER 

POWER PRODUCTS 



14445 Balto. Ave. Laurel, MD 20707 



410. 792.7200 

301 .776.6932 

301 .953.2928 

Fax:301 .604.21 98 



YMWHA EBSa 

sTiHi: ■ ^• i '"-'" ! - i' ' ' ' 



MONG & 

^foster: 

REAL ESTATE, INC. 



Dan Early 

Associate Broker 

Vice President 

Branch Manager 

Office: 301-441-9511 
Fax:301-474-4438 
Toll Free: 800-446-9498 
Email: dan.early(aJlongandfoster.com 



COLLEGE PARK OFFICE 

1)044 Balliniore Boulevard/College Park, Maryland 20740- 1 .^ 1 2 oWmRvXifi 



1^ 



DENNIS TRETTER 



Phone:(610)252-5424 



KADCO CERAMICS 



Precision Machining of Hard Materials 



1 1 75 Conroy Place 
Easton, PA 18040 



Fax:(610)252-6557 



ROBINSON & JACOBS, PC 



Immiaration Law 



J Employment & Family Sponsored Immigration 
□ Labor Certification J Permanent Residence 
3 Citizenship J TN Visa J Family & Fianc e Vi sas 
lJ Temporary Work Visas for H-1 B (s pecialty workers. 




P. 301-614-3330 
F. 301-614-3336 



7731 Belle Point Drive 
Greenbelt, MD 20770 



Congratulations to the 

Class of 2007 
from 

The Inn and Conference Center 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 




I'h: .1nl.4S5,7.^(>.^ 



Harriott conference Centers 



1 a\; 3111. 4S5. 7445 



•^ 



-q 



We're more 
than textbooks! 

■ 'Course Supplies 
3 & Study Aids 

D 

' •Computers, 

J Software & Supplies 

I 'Cards, Gifts & Wrap 

J • Recreational Reading 

J 'Class Rings 

J • Gift Certificates 

3 • University Sportswear 
■ 

• Buyback • Lab Supplies 

• Maps & Tour Guides 
and. ..we're a great place to 




work on campus 




niversijy 
entIrU 

bTAMP STUDENT UNION 

301-314-BOOK 




e/WO/ 




Dear Graduates: 



:^ Prince- 
Georges 



It is my pleasure to extend congratulations 
to the Class of 2007. I am proud of your 
determination and accomplishments. 
Your academic success will enable you 
to have a great career. 

Remember to work and study hard. 
Best wishes for a bright future. 
Prince George's Coimt)' expects great 
things from you. 



Sincerly, 



J^ B. Jdhnnn 
County txecutivc 




jck B.ljohnson 
Countv Executive 



www.princegeorgescounfymd.gov 



From one 
winning team 
to anotiier, 
best of lucl<. 




The Official Medical Team Zj^*^ for over a decade, 
now witti offices in College Park. 



rrffl 



University of Maryland 
Orthopaedics 

Universi I'Y or Maryland Mt.niciNE 

umortho.org 




Dining Services 

wishes to 

Congratulate 

the Class of 2007 



Home of the Best Gyros! 



Open 6 Days a Week M-SAT 10-10 

GYROS • GREEK SALADS 

SUBS • GREEK TURNOVERS 

PITA BREAD PIZZAS • GREEK PASTRIES 

4429 Lehigh Rd, College Park 



Miles Glass Co., Inc. 

Specializing in Structural c& Decorative Glass 

(301)439-5111 
Fax (301) 439-0824 



8714 Piney Branch Road • Silver Spring, MD 20901 
(location also in Virginia) 



www.anixter.com 



Anixter, Inc. 
45075 Old Ox Rd. 
Suite 100 
Du lies, VA 20166 



ANDOiEl 



800/276-8297 Phone 
703/318-2301 Fax 



Q SOUTHERN 
4^T UTILITIES 






COMPANY INC 



More Than 
A Pump House 



Bell & Gossctt and Taco Booster Pumps 

Siemens (Furnas) Starters & Controls 

AO. Smith. Marathon 1-leclric. and l.ineoln Motors 

U.S. Seals & i'.B. Woods Couplings 



1126 9tbSlreet NW 
Washington DC 20001 
Tet (202)289-1141 
Fax:(202)289-1144 



7521 Lindbergh Drive 
Gaithersburg MD 20879 
let (301)589-2885 
Fax:(301)587-0829 



A Family Business Since 1932 



www.southernutilities.cnni 



Tastefully Appointed Accommotiations 
lust 8 miles from Downtown 
Washington DC . and centrally 
located between Baltimore 
and Annapolis En|oy our 
Complimentary Deluxe 
Continental Breakfast daily 
and our Outdoor Pool witti 
Sundeck seasonally All rooms 
feature Coffee Makers. Irons & 
roning Boards and Hairdryers. Getting 
around is easy! We are a direct stop on the 
<tio Bus and only 2 miles from the College Park Metro, 

AWARD WINNING RAMADA GOLD KEY PROPERTY! 

RAMADA LIMITED 

9113 Baltimore Ave., College Park, MD 20740 (Beltway Exit 25B) 

(301) 345-4900 • Fax: (301) 345-301 7 

www.showhotel.com/ramada/2074001 







--<yV 



•iiib -ti «i 



(«\*^ ^ae/s»* v 



FMI 

Construction, Inc. 






6495 New Hampshire Ave. Suite 140 



^^ FAX: 301.270.2286 ^ j 






/ 



Htattsville MD 20783 
301.270.2285 ^ 




BURGESS & NIPLE 



Consulting Engineers 



1912 



■ Civil Engineering 

■ Surveying 

■ Geotechnical 
Engineering 

15 Offices Nationwide 
Local Office: 
3204 Tower Oaks Blv(d. 
Rockville. Maryland 20852 



Environmental 
Transportation 
Utility 
Infrastructure 



301.468.9400 
burgessniple. com 





Foreign and Domestic Cars ^^^^^^^^^^^r 






NA TIONAL A UTO BOD Y 






JOHN TOSSOUNIAN 




301-881-8200 12300 Parklawn 
FAX (301 ) 468-6763 Rockville, Maryland 20852 


Drive 

-1402 




Kick-off Your Semester at Belcrest Plaza Apartments 

Start the Season w ith 2 =1 Ranked Teams 



,'.e! 



1 eases 



^ert^eS'- . 




Small Pet Buildings 
I But no one from Penn State) 




~a 




Semester leases 




Buses to D.C. and campus 
Optional HBO Cable T\' 

Individual heating and A C 

Wall to Wall Carpeting 

Balcony or patio — Pool 

Walking distance to Prince George's Plaza Ma 
Efficiency 1. 2 & 3 bedroom Apts. - Some with dens 
Modem, well-designed kitchens (some with dishwasher) 
For more information, call: (301) 559-5042 



GRADY MANAGEMENT, INC, 

» Exceptional People. Exceptional Communities. 





Q^cu^^ A'itipU^ ^ UWi 




X 




(\ 




Q4>A^C0/VM^ 



caterers 



301 . 588 . 9200 

info@corcorancaterers.com 
www.corcorancaterers.com 



Landed a major client 



Expanded to 
a bigger space 



Built a loyal 
customer base 




Protected the business 
with an emergency 
preparedness plan 




K. 



iincil.org 



With ready.gov, the business you've worked so hard to build can be as prepared as possible 
should a disaster strike. Download free, easy-to-use checklists, templates and other resources to 
help you develop an affordable plan. Protect your life's work— start or update your plan today. 






Becoming a success is hard work. Protecting it isn't. WWW.ready.gov 







Jie^SiMjMft^Bri^e^lrerTi 










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