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Full text of "The Terrapin"

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CLASS of 2009 \ THE TERRAPIN 

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Introduction 



IT'S A DAUNTING TASK to start the year off with a bare 
320 pages worth of yearbook. Bvit you. class of 2009, have 
made it much easier for us. It seems hke college is one gi- 
ant adlib; you start off with a clean slate, and imagine what 
types of experiences will "fill in the blanks." What types of 
nouns, adjectives, and verbs will be used? Do you end with 
an exclamation point or a period? Then, as you add on all 
the academic programs, the student life, the sports, and the 
clubs, everything seems to come together. By the time you 
graduate, a one-of-a-kind story will be created. And likewise 
for us, The Terrapin has had its own story. In order to produce 
this publication, we experienced a long process of designing 
pages, writing stories, holding senior photo sessions, edit- 
ing, compiling, and sending books out to their final destina- 
tion. With that said, we couldn't have done it without our 
graduating seniors: KC Michaels and Marisa Mathews, who 
have both filled in the missing story and photo gaps in the 
book: Edward Nishihama, who has developed our first ever 
website: Kelyn Soong, who has reported on student life at 
Maryland; Jessica Zweig, who has clued us in on how teams 
played this year and what academic programs we have: and 
last but not least. Marc McCarthy, who has graced these 
pages with some inspiring photography through his point 
of view. Also, we would like to give out special thanks to 
Taylor Publishing for producing our book once again, and 
Carl Wolff Studio for taking senior portraits. In closing, 
may life bring you many more fillings to your adlib of a life. 



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Student Life 

perspective 66" 85 

clubs 86-127 

volunteer 128-129 

abroad 130-131 

greek 132-133 

housing 134-149 

stamp student union 152-153 

exercise 154-155 

transportation 156-157 

route 1 158-159 

maryland day. 160-161 




contents 




Seniors 



portraits 162-271 

year one 272-273 

year two 274-275 

year three 276-277 

year four 278-279 



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Athletics 
sports 282-301 

Closing Time 

staff 302-303 

advertisements 304-319 

the end 320 




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"The Clark School has presented me with amazing educational opportunities, mainly 

through the Research Internships in Science and Engineering (RISE) Program. The 

program is geared towards retaining women in engineering and the sciences and to 

present research opportunities to students of all ages. I started research even before 

my first semester and started materials research with Dr. Lourdes Salamanca-Riba the 

following summer. " -KARA LUSHBAUGH, CLASS OF 2008 



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A. James Clark 
School o£ 
Engineering 



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WEBSITE/www.eng. umd.edu 



The 14 state of the art facihties of the A. 
James Clark School of Engineering allow both 
undergraduates and graduates of all engineering 
departments to engage in advanced research. 
Whether in the Neutral Buoyancy Research Facility 
(NBRF), the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel, or the 
Maryland NanoCenter, students are sure to gain 
valuable research experience. 

The A. James Clark School of Engineering 
not only provides students with hands-on 
research experience, but also prepares them for 
the professional world. The Engineering Co-op 
program allows engineering students to work for 
six months and to take classes for the next six 
months. The program gives students exposure to 
employers, as well as an idea of what awaits them 
after they graduate. 

The A. James Clark School also finds 
importance in community engagement. The 
students of Engineers without Borders program 
apply what they learn in the classroom to solve 
real-life problems. Just this summer. Engineers 
without Borders began to work on an automated 
water pump in the village of Dissin, Burkina Faso, 
in order to help women and children from the harsh 
two kilometer walks to and from the local water 
pump. This, in turn, decreases the hour waiting 
time women currently endure at the pump itself. 

The A. James Clark School of Engineering 
is home to the 2008 University Medalist, Peter 
DeMuth. The University Medalist is an award 
that recognizes a graduating senior who possesses 
academic distinction, extraordinary character, and 
who contributes both to the community and the 
university. The school is also home to the "Robotics 
@ Maryland" team comprised of engineering majors 
from various departments won first place this 
summer at the Annual International Autonomous 
Underwater Vehicle Competition in San Diego. 










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College o£ Agriculture 
& Natural Resources 



WEBSITE/www.agnr.umd.edu 
RANKINGS/ 

- The College of Agricultural and Resource Economics is 
ranked first internationally in resource and agricultural 
economics on the basis of quality-adjusted citations 
by the website http://www.econphd.net which ranks 
all academic departments in the world by subject. 

- 1 of top 1 animal sciences departments in the nation 
in 2007 The Chronicle of Higher Education rankings. 



If the first thing that comes to mind after reading the 
name "agricuhure and natural resources" is farming, then 
think again. The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 
offers a wide discipline of programs, ranging from nutrition 
and food science to veterinary science to environmental 
policy. In order to further help their students, the College of 
Agriculture and Natural Resources offers a 60-credit certificate 
program through the Institute of Applied Agriculture for those 
interested in majoring in golf course management, equine 
business management, or turfgrass management. The college 
has also teamed up with Virginia Tech to create the Virginia- 
Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine (VMRCVM), 
which unites Maryland and Virginia in the field of veterinary 
medicine. 

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources provides 
students with the unique opportunity to learn in and out of the 
classroom. It is the home of both the Maryland Cooperative 
Extension and the Maryland Agricultural Experiment 
Station. The Maryland Cooperative Extension brings leading 
researchers together to educate individuals, the general public, 
and the private sector about important findings and solutions 
that can help those with hmited resources improve their quality 
of hfe. The Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES) 
is a program that is devoted to examining and improving the 
relationship of the urban environment with agriculture and 
our natural resources. MAES has four research and education 
centers across the state of Maryland. 

Although the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 
is not all about farming, it is still an important aspect for some 
of the college's students. For this reason, the college actually 
built a farm on campus, complete with sheep, pigs, chickens, 
and a farm manager. The farm is located near the Cambridge 
Community, and it allows for students to gain students first- 
hand experience with animal and farm management. 




"The architecture program is a very challenging discipline in that it asks its 

students to think very critically about their functionality and aesthetics of their 

work. It's a rewarding major, because it definitely delivers satisfaction for 

accomplishments and achievements. I wouldn't do anything else." 

-JASON HAWKINS, CLASS OF 2010 




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School o£ 
Architecture 



WEBSITE/www.arch. umd.edu 



RANKINGS/ 



New Urban News ranked the urban design 
program as one of the top programs in the 
nation in 2006. 

Only national program with professional 
masters programs and related Ph.D. -level 
studies in planning, preservation & real 
estate development in the same school. 



The School of Architecture, Planning 
and Preservation offers various degrees for 
undergraduate, graduate, and doctorate students. 
Some of the faculty and students work in collaboration 
with the A. James Clark School of Engineering, the 
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and 
the School of Public Policy at the National Center 
for Smart Growth Research and Education located 
in Preinkert Hall. This center offers non-partisan 
research and leadership training on Smart Growth 
in Maryland, various metropolitan areas, Asia, and 
Europe. 

The School of Architecture also boasts state 
of the art facilities. The Architecture building offers 
top-of the line woodworking stations, an Architecture 
library, and resource facilities. The greatest asset to 
the building is the internal design, where students 
on the second floor can look down at the woodworking 
rooms below to observe students' work. Another 
fantastic facility is the Model Shop, where students 
are provided the tools to create 3-D models of homes 
and other buildings, giving the students a hands-on 
experience before graduation. 

The School of Architecture provides an 
excellent education for students. It is the home to 
students who excel after graduation, such as Cathy 
Brown, a 2006 alumna of the Urban Studies and 
Planning program, who was awarded a Fulbright 
scholarship for research in Lithuania. Eight graduate 
students from the Architecture program were also 
given the opportunity to propose concept designs for 
NASA's Science Education and Exploration Center 
(SEEC) through a NASA research grant. 




"The School of Arts and Humanities has provided me with many opportunities 

that have enriched my learning experience. Living in the Language House, 

and interning at National Geographic (where I was given the opportunity to 

work first-hand with translators) are just a few examples of these wonderful 

opportunities." -ELIZABETH TROULLOS, CLASS OF 2010 




academics 





College o£ Arts 
& Humanities 



WEBSITE/www.arhu. umd.edu 



Calling all language aficionados, drama 
enthusiasts, dancers, musicians, and history 
buffs: this school is for you. The School of Arts 
and Humanities offers both undergraduate and 
graduate programs in many languages and 
departments. 

The School of Arts and Humanities offers 
many extracurricular opportunities and living 
and learning communities such as the Jimenez- 
Porter Writers' House, the Global Communities, 
and the Language House Immersion Program 
are associated with the school. 

The School of Arts and Humanities 
also engages non-UM persons in outreach 
programs. Some of these programs include 
Seminars for Teachers and the Northwood- 
UMD Collaboration, a learning community 
composed of students, faculty and staff that 
encourages high school and college students to 
pursue higher education. 

The School of Arts and Humanities 
encompasses several research centers and 
think tanks. These include the Latin American 
Studies Center, the Consortium on Race, 
Gender, and Ethnicity, the National Foreign 
Language Center, and the Meyerhoff Center 
for Jewish Studies, among many others. 

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts 
Center is the pride and joy of the School of 
Arts and Humanities. Sitting on 17 acres, this 
318,000 square foot building has a website, 
independent of the UMD site! In the Clarice 
Smith Performing Arts Center, both students 
and the public are invited to view performances 
by Maryland students and outside artists. 




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"My experience as a student in BSOS has been one full of 

interesting and enlightening experiences. The incredible diverseness 

of interests that attracts people to BSOS has made all of my 

interactions with Professors, as well as fellow-students, incredibly 

thought-provoking. " -BLAINE FERRARI, CLASS OF 2009 






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College of 
Behavioral & 
Social Sciences 



WEBSITE/www.bsos. umd.edu 



RANKINGS/ 



The speech-language pathology program and 
audiology program are in the top 10% of graduate 
programs in the hearing and speech discipline 
nationwide. 



The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences offers 
an interesting array of majors. From anthropology and 
sociology, to economics and environmental science and 
policy, this college has a lot to offer. One of the greatest 
assets to the college are its research and special programs. 
The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences is home to 
the Center for International Development and Conflict 
Management (CIDCM), an interdisciplinary researchcenter 
that seeks to help societies create sustainable futures. 
It is also home to the Hearing and Speech Clinic, where 
graduate students have the opportunity to use cutting edge 
technology to aid patients through both speech-language 
and hearing services. Another research area is located at 
the Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR), which 
educates both the general public and policy makers about 
the issues relating to substance abuse. 

Research is an important component of the College of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences. Some of the more notable 
research projects include, but are not limited to; "Behavioral 
Technologies for Predicting HIV Risk", "Treating the 
Parents of Children with ADHD", and "Voting Technology 
and Ballot Design". "Treating the Parents of Children with 
ADHD" is a ten-year longitudinal study, which studies 200 
children, who were recruited at the University of Chicago 
and University of Pittsburgh. Published in January 5, 
2004, the study found that parents of children with ADHD 
are 24 times more likely to have ADHD themselves. 

If you are interested in doing behavioral research, 
educating the public about prevention of conflict and health 
problems, or implementing what you learn in modern 
facilities, the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
may be what you are looking for. 




"Both in and outside of the classroom, the Smith 

School of Business provided the resources to secure 

my future career in the business world." 

-DANIEL SENNI, CLASS OF 2009 




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Robert H. Smith 
School o£ Business 



WEBSITE/www.smith.umd.edu 
RANKINGS/ 

- The Robert H. Smith School of Business 
is ranked 17th in the nation, according 
to U.S. News& World Report. 

- The Management Information Systems 
program is ranl<ed 5th in the nation 
according to U.S. News & World 
Report. 



The Robert H. Smith School of Business 
offers top-ranking undergraduate. MBA, 
MS, Executive MBA, PhD, and international 
programs. Robert H. Smith's faculty is nationally 
recognized. Six faculty members were awarded 
the Krowe award for Teaching Excellence in 
2008. Two other faculty members received the 
Legg-Mason award in Teaching Innovation in 
2007. 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business 
is located in Van Munching Hall. Van Munching 
Hall, built in 1992. was renovated in 2002, 
when the $38 million South Wing expansion 
was added. In May of 2008, an additional $21 
million was used to build the North Wing. Both 
of these expansions incorporate state of the art 
technology, which engage the students with 
emerging technologies that would typically use 
in the workplace. 

With cutting-edge resources at-hand, 
and an amazing faculty to guide them. Robert 
H. Smith students are equipped for success. 
Two undergraduates realized this a few 
months before graduation in May 2008. Gavin 
Christiansen, marketing major, and Brandon 
Moffitt, marketing and logistics major, used their 
skills for a good cause and created the Society 
for Green Business. This Society seeks to unite 
and promote businesses that work towards 
sustainable, green business practices, in the 
hopes that recent graduates will also work for 
environmentally-friendly businesses. 



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"The College of Chemical and Life Sciences provide students with a 
high-quality education. They have some of the best professors to do this 
job. They not only provide quality education inside the classrooms, but 
outside the classrooms, as well. They are willing to hold extended 
office hours, review sessions, and help form study groups, which goes 
to show how much they care about the success of their students." 

-HEM THAKOR, CLASS OF 2010 




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College of 
Chemical & 
Life Sciences 

WEBSITE/www.life. umd.edu 

RANKINGS/ 

- The undergraduate Biological Sciences 
Program has received four consecutive 
awards from the Howard Hughes Medical 
Institute. 



Have you ever wanted to look at DNA 
under a microscope? Dissect a cat? Learn about 
toxicology? If you answered yes to any of the 
above questions, then the College of Chemical 
and Life Sciences is for you. This is where most of 
the pre-med society members hang out. Biology, 
cell biology and molecular genetics, entomology, 
chemistry, and biochemistry are the majors 
offered in this college. 

The college boasts a $69 million Bioscience 
Research Building, which opened in 2007, and 
houses state-of-the-art teaching and research 
laboratories, available to both undergraduate and 
graduate students. This building helped progress 
the college in five initiatives: comparative and 
functional genomics, ecological sustainability, 
host-pathogen interactions, nanosciences and 
biomaterials, and sensory neuroscience. 

Partnerships with federal agencies located 
in the Baltimore and Washington. D.C. areas 
have also helped to advance these initiatives. 
The College of Chemical and Life Sciences 
currently works with the National Institutes 
of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, 
the Environmental Protection Agency, and the 
Goddard Space Flight Center, among other 
federal agencies. The College of Life Sciences' 
nanoscience initiative is a partnership with the 
A. James Clark School of Engineering and the 
College of Computer. Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences. 

The great advantage of being a College of 
Life Sciences student is the opportunity to partake 
in partnerships with other colleges on campus 
and the federal institutions listed above. 



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"I like to study in CMPS because it is a small community of 

students who think alike and face challenges together." 

-JOSEPH WOODWORTH, CLASS OF 2011 



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College of Computer, 
Mathematical & 
Physical Sciences 



WEBSITE/www.cmps. umd.edu 

RANKINGS/ 

- In 1995, the National Research Council ranked the 
University of Maryland, College Park one of the top 
20 institutions nationwide in mathematics, computer 
science, physics, astronomy, and oceanography. 



Astrology, geology, and computer science are just 
a few of the majors offered in the College of Computer, 
Math, and Physical Sciences. This top-ranking college 
earned its reputation from its cutting-edge research 
and partnerships. Just this July, the college, along with 
two federal agencies, revealed two new award-winning 
products; the LAND neutron detector, and the Sensor 
Web 2.0. The LAND neutron detector is a new optical 
method for detecting individual neutrons, developed by 
the University of Maryland and the National Institute 
for Standards and Technology. Sensor Web 2.0 is 
a wildfire tracking and management software tool 
developed by the University of Maryland and NASA. 
R&D Magazine ranked both devices among the. "100 
most technologically significant products introduced 
into the marketplace," in 2008. 

The students of the College of Computer, 
Math, and Physical Sciences are successful due to 
their participation in research conducted by various 
institutes and joint centers as well as to the help of 
award-winning faculty. Some of the institutes and joint 
centers associated with the College of Computer. Math, 
and Physical Sciences are the Joint Quantum Institute, 
the Institute for Physical Science and Technology, the 
Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, and 
several others. These institutes, and joint centers, 
work in cooperation with federal agencies such as 
NASA and the National Science Foundation to conduct 
innovative research projects. The College of Computer, 
Math, and Physical Sciences also employs a great 
faculty, including a Guggenheim Fellow. In April of 
2008, Professor James Farquhar, Associate Professor 
of geology, received this honor from the John Simon 
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. 




"Becoming a teacher is one of the best public services 

that I can offer to society. At the College of Education, it's 

not about learning how to color or reviewing simple math; 

it's about learning how to shape and influence the young 

minds of tomorrow." 
-JENNIFER CHEN, CLASS OF 2011 



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College o£ Education 



WEBSITE/www.education. umd.edu 



RANKINGS/ 



Ranked 25th in the nation by the U.S & World 
News Report \u 2008. 

The Counseling and Personnel Services 
Department is ranked #1 in the nation by the U.S. 
& World News Report. 



The College of Education offers research and 
practice-oriented programs in pre-kindergarten, 
elementary, K-12 education, counseling, education 
policy, human development, and statistics. This college 
promotes local and international initiatives to improve 
education everywhere. Professor Daniel Chazan 
is currently working on a research project entitled 
"Improving Teacher Quality: University of Maryland 
and Prince George's County Public Schools Partnership 
Program to Support High Quality Teaching." This 
research grant compliments the college's support to 
Prince George's County through the school/university 
cooperative programs which provide many services 
including intervention programs for at-risk students 
and facilitating advanced courses for K-12 students. 

The Teacher Education Department within the 
college provides students with the opportunity to teach 
in actual classrooms in Prince George's County through 
full-year teaching internships, which prepares the 
college's students for their first year of teaching, setting 
the Teacher Education Department at the University 
of Maryland apart from other education programs in 
the Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia I'egion. 

Teaching students about the increasingly diverse 
world is important to the College of Education. For 
this reason, the college has formed an International 
Advisory Committee. This committee advises the Dean 
on policies and programs that support international 
studies and development within the College of 
Education. Through these international initiatives, 
the College of Education seeks to form relationships 
with other colleges and programs on the University 
of Maryland campus, as well as to inform both the 
university and the general public about emerging 
international issues. 




"The School of Public Health encourages students to put into 

practice what is learned in the classroom through practicum courses 

and mandatory internships. I really appreciate the support factulty 

mentors provide me with." -CRISTINA SCIUTO, CLASS OF 2010 





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WEBSITE/www.sph.umd.edu 



In the spring of 2008, the College 
of Health and Human Performance, 
that was once home to the kinesiology, 
family sciences, and public and 
communityhealth majors, was renamed 
the School of Public Health. It is the 
first accredited School of Public Health 
in the Mid-Atlantic Region. 

The faculty and staff of the 
School of Public Health realize the 
importance of on-the-job training and 
the internship experience. For this 
reason, three of the four upper-level 
community and public health courses 
are devoted to the preparation for an 
internship. The last semester as an 
undergraduate student, public and 
community health majors are required 
to work at an internship 40 hours a 
week. 

The School of Public Health is 
dedicated to improving the health of 
both those residing in Maryland and 
the nation as a whole. In order to 
be successful in its goals, the School 
of Pubhc Health engages in multi- 
disciplinary research. Some of the 
research areas include maternal and 
child health, behavioral interventions, 
health disparities, public health 
informatics, physical activity and 
public health policy and leadership. 



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Results 

Al the end of the course, a posl-test was used to 
collect feedback from students about the cases and 
the course. I'he following quotes are examples of 
data collected from students through the post-test: 

"!l hetfvd mi' /toj timtcrsUJnJ llw Jifh'rcnl points of view 
out there tititt to oppreciote the fat: t that one could he ri^ht 
in one situation hut wron^ in [another] -■ base J on many 
factors [such as] geograpliy. etc " 

"People want to Jo the right thnif; It sjusi flliatj nohoily 
con agree fahoul] wlial is right. " 

"1 gained a belter understanding oj other people s values 
because of the /Hissinn they had when they made tlieir case. 

Sometimes I was forced to change my deci.tion after looking 

al things [from/ tlieir perspective " 

Conclusions 

The major conclusions arc that multiple roles bring 
out di\erse values and multiple decision points make 
the cases interactive, realistic, and unpredictable. 

Future Research 



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College o£ 
Information Studies 



WEBSITE/www.ischoolumd.edu 



RANKINGS/ 



Ranked 13th in the nation among Library 
Science programs by U.S. News & World 
Report. 



If you are thinking of becoming a 
university librarian, then the iSchool is for you. 
The College of Information Studies offers two 
Masters Degrees, and a PhD program. This 
College offers a Masters of library science and a 
Masters of information management. 

The College of Information Studies is 
primarily focused on research. This college 
attempts to help educate users about the easiest 
ways to use technology. The Human-Computer 
Interaction Lab (HCIL) was created to facilitate 
this education. HCIL researchers attempt 
to understand user needs in various areas: 
communities, design processes, digital libraries, 
education, physical devices, public access, and 
visualization. This research, particularly public 
access research, is of outmost importance. The 
iSchool is currently researching a Community 
Response Grid, which would serve as a database 
for the government and citizens to refer to during 
homeland security emergencies. This database 
would disseminate information to citizens and 
the government simultaneously. This allows 
citizens more time to prepare in the event of an 
emergency. 

The newest research center at the 
University of Maryland is the Center for the 
Advanced Study ofCommunities and Information 
(CASCI). CASCI researchers attempt to teach 
more efficient and creative ways to implement new 
technology. One project the CASCI researchers 
are currently working on is the, "Information 
Commons for Prince George's County." where 
high school students are taught how to implement 
audio compilations and interactive "asset maps" 
into school projects. 




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"This college is a great place for students who are passionate 

about emerging as leaders in news delivery. Students here have so 

many opportunities to learn and grow within their interest area and 

to gain real-world experience-it's truly a great place to be." 

-GABRIELLE STRANIERI, CLASS OF 2010 



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Philip Merrill 
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WEBSITE/www.journalism. umd.edu 
RANKINGS/ 

- There are six Pulitzer Prize-winning faculty members in 
this college. 

- The Merrill College was one of eight journalism schools 
selected as a partner in the Carnegie-Knight initiative. 




If you want to write for The Washington Post, The New 
York Times, or any other major newspaper or magazine, this 
college is a great place to start. Many of its alumni work for 
The Los Angeles Times, CNN, The Associated Press, and other 
reputable institutions. 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism offers 
undergraduate degrees in broadcast news, online news, and print 
news. The college prepares its students for the rigors of the real 
world by offering a diverse selection of classes, such as research, 
law, and history as well as by providing many professional 
programs such as Maryland Newsline and the American 
Journalism Review. The college is also home to two independently 
run journalism organizations, the National Association of Black 
Journalists and the American Association of Sunday and Feature 
Editors. 

As journalism is important world-wide, the Philip Merrill 
College of Journahsm has joined the US-China Education Trust 
to provide students with international journalism experience. 
Every year since its establishment in 2006. 50 fourth-year 
journalism students have been given the opportunity to travel to 
Fudan University in China, where they attend a ten-day seminar 
dealing with various aspects of business and economics reporting, 
with a special focus on reporting practices in the U.S. This 
experience prepares journalism students for superior reporting 
both nationally and internationally. 

The college not only prepares its students for international 
economics reporting, but also for global media and public policy. 
The International Center for Media and the Public Agenda work 
together with the School of Public Policy to research the media's 
role and responsibilities in politics. Fi-om this Center was born 
the Salzburg Academy for Media and Global Change, a three 
week program in Austria, where students have the opportunity 
to implement their studies in global media and public policy. 




academics 




fem&cs 






School of 

Public 

Policy 



WEBSITE/publicpolicy.umd.edu 
RANKINGS/ 

- Ranked 8th among public policy 
programs in 2007. 

- Ranked 37th in the world. 




The School of Pubhc Pohcy offers 
Bachelor's, Master's, and Ph.D programs. 
The School of Public Policy prepares students 
for careers in policy analysis, management, 
leadership and scholarship, which include 
public, private, and nonprofit sectors. 

Like many other schools on campus, 
the School of Public Policy has many 
centers and institutes where students can 
participate in real-world policymaking. 
These centers include^ the Center for 
Information and Research on Civic Learning 
and Engagement (CIRCLE), the Center for 
Integrative Environmental Research (CIER), 
the UMD Health Collaboration, the Center 
for International and Security Studies at 
Maryland (CISSM), the Center for Public 
Policy and Pi'ivate Enterprise (CPPPE), and 
the James MacGregor Burns Academy of 
Leadership, among several others. 

One of the more innovative programs 
housed in the School of Public Policv; which 
is especially important to the city of College 
Park, is the Program on the Economics of 
Crime. This program brings economists and 
criminologists together to research crime. 
It is one of the only programs that merges 
economic modeling and statistical skills with 
criminal justice. This combination leads to a 
better understanding of the sources of crime, 
and how the effects can be alleviated, if not 
prevented through society's policy choices. 



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TOP LEFT/Even at such a precious age, this 
baby sports University of Maryland gear at 
Maryland Day 2008. 

TOP RIGHT/The university suffered a 
housing crisis at the beginning of the school 
year, leaving many students scrambling to 
find off-campus housing. A student 
drew a cartoon of herself and her friends 
to depict the situation, for some 
humorous relief. 

LEFT/Located outside of Stamp Student 
Union is a statue of Jim Henson, creator 
of Kermit and his fellow muppets. Henson 
graduated from the University of Maryland, 
and through the contributions of several 
graduating classes, these "seat" statues were 
constructed to commemorate his work. 

FAR LEFT/Many language majors write pieces 
in their target languages during their spare 
time, like Japanese major Jeff Jankiewicz. He 
likes to write Japanese poems, German rap 
lyrics and letters. 



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LEFT/The McKeldin Mall can be such an exquisite sight 
when the leaves fall and the weather changes to cold. 
Students often take this route to class, passing by 
IVIarie Mount, Key, and Tydings Hall. 



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BELOW/Or, students stop by the grass to nap between 
classes, to study, or to simply see the view up above: a 
beautiful array of clouds, sunshine, 
and peace. 





photo by/JESSIE CHEN 



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As Photo Editor Marc McCarthy roamed around campus to take nature 
photos, he noticed a tiny creature malting itself at home by his foot: a 
squirrel! Squirrels are known for being everywhere on campus. Whether 
they're black, brown, tailless or fearless, you can spot one anytime, 
anywhere. 



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On November 26 through 29, 173 people died and 308 people injured as a result of the Mumbai attacks. A series of 10 
terrorist attacks occurred in India. University of Maryland students honor the lives lost on McKeldin Mall. 



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LEFT/Slow. A slug creeps along a garden at St. Mary's Hall. The Gardening Club meets there once a 
week to produce herbs and various plants. Sometimes, they have occasional visitors like this one... 

BELOW/Fast. Crowds swarm into the campus when it's game day. 




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Alternative Breaks (AB) 
is a weeklong, substance-free, 
community-service learning trip 
during the university's winter, 
spring, and summer breaks. It 
originally began as a springbreak^ 
program located throughout the 
nation, but has recently expanded 
to international locations. 
AB participants have the 
opportunity to gain perspectives 
on social issues while meeting 
community needs, and learning 
about building upon community 
assets. 

Participants address 

social, political and 

environmental issues of our 
time. Students work with issues 
of disaster relief, environmental 
restoration, the prison 

system, HIV/AIDS, education, 
homelessness, healthcare, and 
border awareness. AB's main 
goal is to educate participants 
about the root causes of these 
issues, while also making an 
immediate difference in the 
community. 



izs) student life 





The mission of America^ilea^ds America Counts 
is to provide a high quality mentormg-^Lcpgram that 
enriches learning opportunities for both coTfege-^and 
elementary school students. ARAC is a partnership 
between the University of Maryland and Prince 
Qeorge's County Public Schools. 



TERPCORPS 



TERPcorpsisastudent organization 
passionate about creating change in our 
community through service-learning. 
They are the primary programming boarc 
for two of the University of Maryland's 
largest service events, like Hunger & 
Homelessness Awareness Week which 
happens every fall semester, and 
Satruday of Service which is in the spring 
sfemester. 



student life U29 




road 



Exploring 

Confuciu^ 

China 



New to the study abroad 
office this year is the month-long 
program to China in partnership 
with the School of Languages, 
Literatures & Cultures, the 
Language House Immersion 
Program, the Confucius Institute 
at the University of Maryland, 
and Nankai University. 

Chinese language is an 
important component of the 
country's culture. Students 
not only learned about today's 
Chinese language and culture, 
but also explored the regions 
specific to China's greatest sage, 
Confucius, who lived 2000 years 
ago. The course's cross-cultural 
interaction encourages student 
awareness of their own role as 
Americans in a foreign country. 



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nts took intensive Chinese courses 
for the 4-weeks, including four "culture 
clusters": history, arts^Taichi, Beijing 
opera, Chinese cooking and fcnQds, Chinese 
calligraphy, music. 

-Weekend trip to rural village to interact 
with local populace and taste traditional 
foods. 



-In Qufu, field trip to Confucius' hometown 
to visit the Temple and Cemetery of Confu- 
cius, and the Kung family mansion 



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-Visit "Tai Shan", a mountain of historical 
and cultural significance, "Heaven Street," 
"Jade Emperor Summit," and "Cloud 
Temple." ^^^ 

\ -Visit the world's 8th wonder^ the Terra- 
^\ Cotta Warriors (pictured left) 




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UMD Greek Life has many 
things to offer. So it is no surprise that 
Greek Life has become such a huge 
part of the University of Maryland 
campus. Almost 15% of UMD students 
are involved in one of our 22 traditional 
social fraternities or 14 sororities! So, 
how does the process work? 



> SORORITY RUSH! (FALL 
SEMESTER PROCESS) 

1. ADVERTISE - Chalking is the most 
common method of advertising but 
some Greek organizations hand out 
flyers, or hang up posters. "Meet the 
Greeks" is a fair that takes place every 
fall on McKeldin mall. 

2. MEET THE SISTERS- Many sorori- 
ties have multiple house parties and 
open house events during the fall to 
allow potential members to come see 
the chapter. 

3. BIDS- After meeting all potential 
members, each sorority hands out up 
to 95 bids. 

4. BID DAY- All who received bids, 
accept them by going to the chapter 
house and being welcomed by their 
new sisters. 

5. NEW MEMBER PERIOD- After ac- 
cepting the bid, the members begin a 
"new member period" which lasts sev- 
eral weeks and allows them to learn 
more about the chapter and spend 




more time with their new sisters. 

6. INITIATION- New members are 
initiated into the chapter during a se- 
cret sacred ceremony. Once initiation 
is complete, the new members are of- 
ficially sisters of their chapter. 

During the spring semester, the 
process is slightly different. Potential 
sisters are assigned to groups called 
"Rho Gamma groups," which tour 
each house. With feedback from Rho 
Gammas and sisters, rushers mark 
down their potential chioces and nar- 
row it down. The process is officially 
completed when new sisters meet at 
the chapel to run to their new sorority 
homes! 




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Rushing a fraternity is quite differ^t from rushing a sorority. 
To begin with, fraternities have the same rush^^process in fall as in 
ing. Rushing a fraternity is also less formal than rti:shing a soror- 
ity and allows the chapters some freedom in choosing evenT:s-:with 
the potential members. 





> FRATERNITY RUSH! (FALL SEMESTER^ 
PROCESS) 



1. PARTIES- At the beginning of each semester, fraterni- 
ties throw several house parties to advertise their rush. 
These parties areopen to everyone. 



2. BROTHERHOOD EVENTS- Fraternities host Broth- 
erhood Events in different settings like ESPN Zone, 
Washington DC, Renaissance FestiVal^ Japanese Steak- 
houses or a variety of other places. 




3. BIDS- After meeting the potential members ancK^- 
sessing their interest in the chapter, fraternities ban 
put bids. 



4. IsTEW MEMBER PERIOD and INITIATION- Like 
sororitieV fraternities have a brief new member period 
where the new members become educated about the 
chapter and spend more time with the chapter mem- 
bers. After this period, the new members are initiated 
into the brotherhood through a secret ritual. 



student life (133 



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Known for its 12 special living-learning pro- 
grams for academically talented first and second year 
students, the College Park Scholars program is among 
one of the most admired campus programs. Students 
that are part of the Scholars program have the oppor- 
tunity to take classes with other scholar students who 
also live in their residence hall located on north cam- 
pus. Many students in Scholars find this extremely 
beneficial, since they are surrounded by other mem- 
bers in the program with similar academic interests. 
Reflecting back on her experiences in the Scholars 
program, senior pre-medicine and kinesiology major 
Wenimo Okoya said, "My closest friends today lived 
on my floor freshmen year and were also in Scholars 
and it was really helpful living with people that I had 
the same classes with". In Scholars, each program is 
tailored toward a specific theme, such as Life Scienc- 
es or International Studies, and offers courses geared 
towards the interests of the students. 

The Scholars program is also known for its nu- 
merous events, many of which involve community ser- 
vice. Each year the College Park Scholars community 
comes together for Service Day. The members engage 
in community service on campus, in the City of Col- 
lege Park, and in communities around the University 
of Maryland campus. Other charitable efforts include 



a golf tournament hosted by the Scholars Alumni As- 
sociation, which aims to reconnect Scholars Alumni 
and to support College Park Scholars. Also, the an- 
nual Softball tournament has donated over $10,000 to 
charities around the world who deal with the health 
and welfare of children and families. With a mixture 
of fun and charitable events, the College Park Schol- 
ars ensures that its members are actively engaged in 
the community. 

Events such as the annual Scholars in New 
York trip and camping trips offer time for those in 
the Scholars program to bond with each other. The 
Scholars in New York trip occurs every spring where 
more than 300 students, alumni, parents, faculty 
and staff explore the city of New York for a weekend. 
The event's goal is for all participants to renew ap- 
preciation for the city of New York and to develop a 
deeper understanding of the program's importance in 
society. 

The College Park Scholars program brings 
academically-driven students together and assists in 
making the first two years of college fun and educa- 
tional. Any students interested in joining this great 
program are encouraged to learn more about it on 
the College Park Scholars website, at httpV/scholars. 
umd.edu. 



136) student life 





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The Language House Immersion Program, or 
Language House for short, was created in 1989. It 
was the first hving and learning program estabhshed 
at the University of Maryland. All students who are 
passionate about learning a language are encouraged 
to look into this program. The Language House of- 
fers a unique experience, which members cherish, by 
providing an international community atmosphere. 
The members work together to develop language flu- 
ency and learn about different cultures. There are ten 
language clusters available^ Arabic, Chinese, French, 
German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Persian, Rus- 
sian, and Spanish. 

The members of this diverse program live in 
apartments in St. Mary's Hall, which is conveniently 
located in the center of campus. The Language House 
hosts numerous events annually, Foreign Language 
Literature seminars, the Around the World Dinner, 
Language House Open House, Language House Hal- 
loween Dance, and Language House BBQ. These 
events give members a chance to get to know each 
other and share their passion for language. "My fa- 
vorite event is the Around the World Dinner because 
everyone gets together to make great food, the stu- 
dents dress up in cultural outfits and decorate their 
individual cluster's tables, and students' families and 



professors come to eat and talk with the students," 
said Shaina Castle, a senior Japanese major with a 
minor in French Studies. Cultural immersion is a key 
concept in the Language House and through these 
events students can learn to appreciate different cul- 
tures while having a good time. 

Students who are admitted to this program are 
academically motivated and show genuine interest in 
polishing their language skills. The members devote 
themselves to the concept of immersion and interact 
with each other to fully enrich the Language House 
experience. "My favorite part of being involved in the 
Language House is being surrounded by people who 
are interested in learning the target language as much 
as I am... and I love getting to meet so many people 
from so many backgrounds" Castle said. The Language 
House provides students from various backgrounds a 
chance to share their interest in learning foreign lan- 
guages with others. It is a unique experience that one 
who has a passion for foreign languages should not 
pass by. This University of Maryland original living 
and learning program has attracted students from all 
around the world, and Castle is just one example. "I 
actually applied and came to the University of Mary- 
land from Arizona just so that I could be part of this 
community," she proudly declares. 



38) student liSe 




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The University Honors program is a highly 
acclaimed living and learning program tailored to 
students with exceptional academic talents. Students 
remain part of the Honors Program for all four years 
but may choose to complete their Honors Citation 
before their fourth year. The program consists of a 
close-knit community of faculty and students from 
a wide variety of majors and offers small classes 
that create a highly efficient academic environment. 
Honors students have the privilege of taking Honors 
courses along with their other major and CORE 
requirements. 

The Honors program also hosts many great 
events including monthly ice cream socials, white- 
water rafting trips, and dances just for Honors 
students. Senior music education major, Sarah Lee 
recalled, "The ice cream days were always so fun 
because it was a great opportunity to meet and talk 
to other people in the Honors Program." 

University Honors students are also engaged in 
the community in other ways, such as participating in 
research and various internships, or by offering free 
tutoring in a wide range of subjects. 

Acceptance to this highly competitive program 
is invitation-based. Each year approximately 800 



undergraduates are invited to become part of 
the University Honors community. There are no 
separate applications for the program but students 
are individually evaluated on their academic 
achievements in high school, the rigor of their high 
school program, SAT scores, application essays, 
letters of recommendation, and participation in extra- 
curricular activities. 

Academically talented students who are looking 
for a challenging program that offers curriculum 
choice and freedom in the form of effective advising, 
smaller classes, and excellent faculty are greatly 
encouraged to look into the enriching University 
Honors program. Lee reflected, "My experience was 
meaningful and I have gained a lot from other Honors 
students and faculty members." 

For fall 2008, first-year Honors students 
entered with an average weighted high school GPA of 
4.28 and an average SAT score of 1400 (math + critical 
reading). However, students who did not make the cut 
as freshme are welcome to apply after completion of 
sophomore year. 

For more information on the Honors program, 
please visit their website at http://www.honors.umd. 
edu. 



tudent life 




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On a campus rich in cultural diversity such as 
the University of Maryland, students can learn a lot 
from each others' backgrounds. Global Communities, 
a living and learning program located in Dorchester 
Hall, aims to help students do just that. In this 
program, students from more than 30 countries 
and the United States come together to form an 
international community. Members feel passionate 
about the world around them and share a common 
desire to understand each other's cultures. This living 
and learning program helps prepare students for 
multi-cultural environments and the global workplace 
we live in today. 

Global Communitieshostsvarious activities and 
events that help create an international atmosphere. 
Students can get involved in the hall council, "Bridges" 
and help organize events throughout the year. Events 
include an International Dinner every fall semester, 
Culture Explosion, a large international performance 
open to the entire campus, and Student Writing, a 
collaboration of essays written by current and former 
members of the Global Communities. "I love the 
International Dinner because food is a great look into 
different cultures and countries," expressed Taylor 
Tarter, a senior English language and literature 



major. 

Students in any major can apply to this program 
as long as they express an interest in international 
and intercultural issues and activities. Once accepted, 
students live in Dorchester Hall (or study abroad) for 
the duration of the two-year program. They must also 
participate in a one-credit colloquium each semester. 
"It is a wonderful program, teaching students how 
to be part of a world that is becoming increasingly 
globalized. There needs to be more programs like this 
at other universities," Tarter said. 

Global Communities brings students together 
from all around the world who are passionate about 
learning about other cultures and allows them to 
further explore and express their passion through 
this living and learning program. 

For more information, please website 
Global Communities' website at http-V/www. 
globalcomm unities, umd. edu. 



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Dr. William Destler, former dean of the A. 
James Clark School of Engineering and former 
provost of the University of Maryland founded the 
Gemstone program, one of the most respected and 
prestigious programs on campus. This research- 
intensive program is currently in its thirteenth year, 
with nine graduating classes who have received their 
Gemstone citations. 

The Gemstone program sets itself apart from 
other living and learning programs because of its 
unique multidisciplinary four-year research project 
for select undergraduate students of all majors. As a 
part of their curriculum, the students in their fourth 
year present a senior thesis with their teams to 
experts. This community of academically motivated 
individuals challenges and improves members' 
skills in research, teamwork, communication, and 
leadership. 

The members of the Gemstone Program live 
close to each other (most Gemstone members live in 
EUicott Hall) and take courses together. "It's been a 
really good way to get to know people and meet others 
because the first year or two everyone takes classes 
together," said Megha Bansal, a senior economics and 
psychology double major with a minor in international 



development and conflict management. The program 
also hosts a formal every December for its members. 
Because of the smaller size of the program compared 
to other living and learning programs, "...there are a 
lot more interactions among students in the program," 
Bansal said. 

To be invited to the Gemstone program, students 
must have strong academic credentials, demonstrate 
societal concerns in their application essay, show 
involvement in extra-curricular activities, and 
demonstrate an interest in research. One must also 
be a University Honors student in order to be eligible. 
As a fourth year Gemstone member, Bansal added, 
"It is a good program especially if you are interested 
in doing research because you work in a team and 
develop a final product that is the culmination of four 
years of hard work." For those looking for experience 
in teamwork, leadership, and research, the Gemstone 
Program is a great opportunity to enrich the 
undergraduate experience. 

For more information, please visit http'//www. 
gemstone.umd.edu. 



144) Student liSe 





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Named after two twentieth century writers 
closely connected to the University of Maryland, 
Juan Ramon Jimenez and Katherine Anne Porter, 
the Jimenez-Porter Writers' House is a unique living 
and learning program offered to students who have 
an interest in creative writing. The program is open 
to freshmen to senior students of all majors who have 
a solid focus on creative writing. The aims of this 
program are to act as a vibrant literary hub of the 
University of Maryland, to foster a successful literary 
community, and to study and support creative writing 
in its cross-cultural dimensions. This is achieved 
through a close-knit community of students living in 
Dorchester Hall, which is shared with another living 
and learning program, Global Communities, and a 
variety of programs and events hosted by the Writers' 
House. 

There are a variety of ways to get involved 
within the Writers' House. Students can attend a 
colloquia, interact with visitors from the Writers Here 
and Now series, share their writings with each other 
in a workshop environment, and attend Litfest, the 
annual literary bash hosted every spring. "I always 
enjoyed Litfest... and I enjoyed working with the 
writers who read at the event," said Rachel Antonoff, 



146) Student life 



a senior Jewish Studies Major. "The Writers' House 
workshops always seemed like an open environment. . . 
and I really valued the fact that I knew my classmates 
personally," she added. The Writers' House offers a lot 
to its members and there are many ways to work on 
your creative writing through this program. 

Members of the Writers' House can also find 
perks to living in such a close-knit community in 
Dorchester Hall. Its location on campus makes it 
a convenient place to live, as it is located right by 
McKeldin Library, the South Campus Diner, and is 
right across the street from the Stamp Student Union. 
This location also makes commute to classes easier 
as the McKeldin Mall is nearby as well. Residents 
are also treated with the Jellema Poetry Collection 
and Reading Room, computer labs, air conditioning, 
student access to colloquia instructors (whose offices "' 
are in the building), and spacious study lounges on 
each floor. The Writers' House is certainly a unique 
place to live and a great program to be a part of if you 
have any interest in creative writing. "Overall, I think 
that the program is great for helping writers develop 
and get their work out into the publication world and 
I still am extraordinarily glad I participated in the 
program," Antonoff said. 





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Entrepreneurship takes unquestioned 
dedication and drive to achieve success, and 
that is what the nation's first entrepreneurship 
hving and learning program helps its 
students accomplish. Hinman CEOs places 
entrepreneuriallyminded students from 
various academic disciplines together to form 
a unique community. Students in the program 
learn skills necessary to become successful 
entrepreneurs. "The mission of Hinman 
CEOs is to foster an entrepreneurial spirit, 
create a sense of community and cooperation, 
and develop ethical leaders" (Hinman CEOs 
Website). 

All undergraduate students who are 
interested in entrepreneurship are welcomed 
to apply to this highly competitive program. 
The fall semester allows members to get to 
know each other during orientation and other 
team-building activities. The program hosts 
a number of special events, such as cookouts 
and the Technology Start-Up Boot Camp. As 
spring semester arrives, students are treated 
to weekly guest lectures and other networking 
opportunities to help them feel informed and 
confident enough to start their own business. 
While Hinman CEOs students are 
not required to start their own business, it is 
noted that many alums of this program go on 
to create their own companies. Approximately 
25% of students develop and launch their own 
companies as undergraduates. "^^ 

The living and learning environment 
is crucial to the Hinman CEOs program. All 
participants in this program live together in 
South Campus Commons which gives them 
the chance to learn from each other. It also 
gives them exposure to on-site mentors and 
instructors who can be an invaluable resource 
for the students. Junior and senior residents 
are eligible for acceptance, which means that 
applicants should be at least sophomores at 
the time they apply. 

This program seeks the highest 
achieving and most motivated of students 
with strong leadership skills and ethics. The 
Hinman CEOs program helps students become 
an entrepreneur who is committed, honest, 
ethical and ready to start their own business. 






@ 






Environmental sustainability 
is a pressing issue in today's world. 
EcoHouse attempts to tackle this issue 
in the setting of a living and learning 
program. The EcoHouse is a community '^ 
of students and staff members who are 
preparing for a, "green future." This 
program is offered to second and third 
year resident students of all majors and 
features a comprehensive curriculum 
that encourages sustainable lifestyles. 
It is the first living and learning program 
on campus to have been proposed by 
students. 

EcoHouse is located in New 
Leonardtown, an apartment-style 
community right on campus. In this 
community, "Students learn about 
sustainable lifestyles by teaching 
each other what we already know, 
testing energy-reporting systems 
and water conservation measures for 
residential facilities, and taking one 
class a semester in the Leonardtown 
Community Center" (EcoHouse 
Website). The building also offers an 
organic garden and a short walk to the 
nearby College Park farmer's market. 

The EcoHouse also organizes 
many events for its members. The fall 
2008 activities included an Anacostia 
River Tour and Clean-Up trip, a Clagett 
Farm Service/Learning trip, and a 
Green Festival, all located within the 
Washington D.C. metropolitan area. 
These trips allow for members to bond 
and create a sense of community within 
the program. The events are both fun 
and beneficial for the environment. 

Students of all majors are 
encouraged to apply to the EcoHouse and 
freshmen are especially welcome. You 
may apply as an individual or as a group 
of students who wish to live together. 
Those applying as part of a group must 
complete separate applications. Each 
application will be evaluated both 
separately and as part of the group. 
EcoHouse is a great opportunity for 
environmentally conscious students 
to meet other like-minded students^ 
and help our community have a more 
sustainable and brighter future. 



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Offered to students who arc in 
the College of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences, CIVICUS is a two-year living 
and learning program that caters to 
those who want to get involved with 
the campus and local community. The 
program, "...centers around five tenets 
of civil society: citizenship, leadership, 
community-building in a diverse society, 
scholarship, and community service 
learning" (CIVICUS website). 

CIVICUS encourages its members 
to engage in the world outside of the 
classroom. Participation in non-profit 
organizations and other community 
service is an essential part of the program. 
Events hosted by CIVICUS include 
Read-A-Thon for Disability Support 
Services and PB & J for Matha s Table. 
The students also participate in the 
Relay for Life, Walk for Homelessness. 
and community service activities such as 
cleaning up local parks. 

"My favorite CIVICUS event has 
been the PB & Js because you really get 
to know more of your fellow CIVICUS 
classmates and you're helping out a 
great organization," says senior art 
history major, Brittany Davis. CIVICUS 
associates (first- and second-year 
students) and CIVICUS alums (third- and 
fourth-years who have already received 
their citation) come together and enrich 
their academics with CIVICUS events, 
community services, and internships on 
campus and beyond. . Each year there 
are about 130 CIVICUS associates and 
this close group of students makes a 
big difference to the commvmity around 
them. Davis adds, "I think CIVICUS is a 
really great, it is a close knit community, 
in which we all took classes, lived and 
volunteered together... CIVICUS gets 
you started with being involved with 
things on and outside of campus." 

On top of participating in 
community service and other projects, the 
CIVICUS students take their core classes 
together and live together in Somerset 
Hall. Alums of this living and learning 
program go on to get involved in many 
great organizations. CIVICUS can be the 
start of an extraordinary experience for 
University of Maryland students who 
want to get involved in their community 
to make a difference. 



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Those looking to make a 
difference in a global context need 
to look no further than the Beyond 
the Classroom living and learning 
program. Students in this program 
develop educational and professional 
leadership skills that encourage them 
to work towards civic engagement and 
social change. Students take issue- 
oriented classes, attend guest lectures, 
field trips, and documentary and film 
series. Beyond the Classroom helps 
its students explore important global 
issues such as healthcare, global climate 
change, homelessness, human rights, 
poverty, security, and international 
development. The program encourages 
participants to address and solve these 
issues through a collective effort. Living 
near the nation's capital, students can 
obtain meaningful internships with 
non-profit organizations and non- 
governmental organizations. 

To apply to Beyond the 
Classroom, students must complete 45 
credits by the end of the fall semester. 
Hence students in this program 
are typically sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors. Beyond the Classroom 
is unlike other living and learning 
programs as it is only a two-semester 
program. "During the first semester, 
students will develop skills needed for 
experiential learning experience and 
during the second semester students 
will complete their internship with 
a non-profit or non-governmental 
organization," (Beyond the Classroom 
Website). Another aspect that sets this 
living and learning program apart 
from others on campus is that Beyond 
the Classroom assists students to 
transition from college life to life 
after graduation. Students have the 
opportunity to build their leadership 
skills and develop civic knowledge and 
global awareness. This program lets 
participants explore the many options 
that the non-profit sector has to offer. 
Beyond the Classroom is the perfect 
programforyoung professionals looking 
to transition into life after college and 
wanting to make a difference in the 
world. 



student life Ii49 




CAMPUS DINER 



Located in the center of the EUicott Community, 
the North Campus Diner provides residents Hving 
in north campus with a convenient place to eat. Once 
inside you will find a spacious area where students eat, 
chat with their friends, and take breaks from their busy 
schooldays. The diner has a seating capacity of 850 
people and offers wire-less internet access, so it is a 
great place to stop and refuel. In partnership with the 
Campus Sustainability initiative at the University of 
Maryland, the Diner now offers fresh water stations to 
guests in place of single-use water bottles. The Diner 
accepts Resident Points, Terp Bucks, Terrapin Express, 
major credit cards, and cash so that students and visitors 
can enjoy the variety of menu options offered. 

The food choices found at the diner include 
Italian, Latin American, and Asian specialties, rotisserie 
chicken, freshly-made sandwiches, salads, grill 
selections, vegetarian and vegan meals, baked goods, 
and the famous Maryland Dairy ice cream. For those 
looking for a meal that is nutritionally balanced at a 
reasonable price, the Blue Plate Value Meals are planned 
menus for lunch and dinner that vary daily. This year, 
the diner hosted a Lobster fest and also prepared special 
holiday themed meals. 

Students can also find job opportunities at the 
diner, such as serving food at the sandwich and grill 
stations or working as cashiers. The diner is the choice 
place to eat for students living in the high rises in the 
Cambridge, Ellicott, and Denton communities or for 
those who are just passing by north campus. It offers a 
variety of food to appeal to all kinds of appetites and the 
chefs are constantly looking to cater what students want. 
For a convenient place to eat with a varied selection of 
food look no further than the North Campus Diner. 




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Student life 




ADELE H. STAMP 
STUDENT UNION, 
CENTER FOR 
CAMPUS LIFE 

The Adele H. Stamp 
Student Union - Center for 
Campus Life contains a vari- 
ety of resources for students. 
Whether you want to stroll 
through the Union Art Gallery, 
sit down for an elegant meal 
at Adele's, stock up on healthy 
food from the co-op, or satisfy a 
fast-food craving. Stamp has it 
all. Stamp also houses the Hoff 
Theater where you can watch 
new and old movies. Located 
in the basement, the Terp Zone 
houses a pool hall, a bowling al- 
ley, and an arcade. The Union 
is also host to a variety of stu- 
dent events that take place in 
the Grand and Colony ball- 
rooms. At the University Book 
Center, students and visitors 
can find all their favorite Terp 
memorabilia. 



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Having a place to exercise 
is very important to many stu- 
dents. Luckily, there are three 
places on campus that students 
go to work out. The recently 
renamed Eppley Recreation 
Center (ERC) on North Cam- 
pus has an extensive gym and 
weight room, as well as racquet- 
ball courts, three pools, and an 
outdoor recreation center with 
climbing walls and an outdoor 
pool. The Ritchie Coliseum and 
the Cole Field House at one time 
housed the Terps basketball 
team. As the basketball team 
moved to the Comcast Center, 
the Coliseum was remade into 
a smaller gym with basketball 
and volleyball courts, while Cole 
Field House is available for bas- 
ketball and indoor soccer. 




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Transportation 
services 



Shuttle-UM offers many bus routes to 
help students get around. During the day, sev- 
eral lines run on- and off-campus to assist stu- 
dents leaving and entering campus. After 5^00 
PM, Shuttle-UM runs different lines that help 
students get around campus. The university 
also provides a service called NiteRide for stu- 
dents who need a ride home but are not close to 
a shuttle stop. 

Another mode of transportation that in- 
creased in popularity recently is the bicycle. 
With high gas prices, students that live close by 



56] ludent life 



are choosing alternative ways to get to cam- 
pus rather than driving. The campus is ser- 
viced by the College Park Metro Station on 
the Green Line, which allows for easy access 
to and from the entire DC area. Discussions 
are ongoing for a new Metro line (the Purple 
line) that would have stops directly on cam- 
pus. This presents a problem for some people 
because they feel that the trains will disturb 
campus life, but many students and faculty 
are in favor of the addition. 



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When the sun goes 
down, Route 1 hghts up. Af- 
ter a hard week of classes 
and studying, many stu- 
dents hke to wind down by 
travehng to Route 1 on the 
weekends. This strip is host 
to four bars. After multiple 
legal battles, the Thirsty 
Turtle bar finally opened its 
doors this year and has not 
slowed down since. Along 
with the bars, there are 
many casual restaurants 
that students frequent, such 
as Ratsie's , the Bagel Place, 
and Plato's Diner. The area 
also houses stores like a 
24-hour CVS Pharmacy 
and Vertigo Books, a small 
but well-stocked bookstore. 
Some professors prefer to 
make their books for class 
available at Vertigo rather 
than the University Book 
Center to help support local 
businesses. Many students 
still miss the local Wawa, a 
popular convenience store 
which closed last fall. Stu- 
dents are still waiting for 
another store to fill the va- 
cant lot on Route 1. 



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Maryland Day 2008 
- Explore Our World was a 
huge success. It was held on 
April 26, 2008. Although the 
day was hot for a spring day, 
it was attended by approxi- 
mately 76,000 people. The 
campus was split into the- 
matic sections to help stu- 
dents and families navigate 
around campus - Ag Day 
Avenue, Arts Alley, Biz and 
Society Hill. Science and 
Tech Way, Sports and Rec 
Row, and Terp Town Center. 
Each section provided many 
activities for adults and chil- 
dren alike. 

The hit of the day 
were the 54,000 cupcakes 
designed to look like the Uni- 
versity of Maryland globe on 
Hornbake Plaza. The plaza 
was decorated with flags 
from the home countries of 
all the international stu- 
dents at the University as a 
celebration of our rich diver- 
sity. The cupcakes took over 
five months to complete and 
eight hours to set up before 
the event. The university 
hopes to have set a Guiness 
World Record with them. 



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Steven Abel 

Economics & 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Jessica Dana Abramovic 
Finance 



Alexandra Acheson 
Psychology 

Kimberly Laverne Adams 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Laura Marie Adams 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 



j:£>ortraits 




Mark Adams 
Philosophy 

Stephanie Agbu 

Cell Biology and Moleculor Genetics 

Deanne Althea Ainsworth 
Community Health 



Denise Alicia Ainsworth 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Femi Adefisayo Ajimatanrareje 
Physiology and Neurobiology 

Michael Akindutire 
Accounting 



Yemi Akinrimisi 
Community Health 

Novlette Akinseye 
Microbiology 

Samantha Jeanne Alessio 
Finance 



Erica Patindol Alfeche 
Economics and Microbiology 

Benjamin Allen 
Spanish Language & 
Literature and Education 

Michael Altebrando 
Computer Science 



portraits U^s 




Ross Harold Arnett 
Economics 

Dason Atkins 
Sociology 

Rachel Lori Attner 
Mathematics 



There is a good reason 

they call these ceremonies 

"commencement 

exercises." Graduation is 

not the end; it's at 
^commencement you 
^ear your square-shaped 

mortarboards. My hope is 

that from time to time, you 

^ill let youinininds be bold; 

and wear sombreroros. 

-PaurRreund 



portraits U*7 



If opportunity doesn't 
knock, build a door. 

llton^erle 



Jennifer Michelle Axe 
Chemistry and Microbiology 

Dexter Ampo Ayime 
Economics 

Mohamed Aziz Ali Mohamed Aziz 
Bioengineering 



Elizabeth Thomson Babcock 
Architecture 

Aminat Badru 
Economics 

Kate Baker 
Finance 





Jarra Balcha 
Electrical Engineering 

Jeremy H. Band 
Sociology 

Ryan Joseph Barinbaum 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Laura Elizabeth Barr 
English 

Brandon Lamont Barrett 
Economics 

Patrick Barrett 
Music 



Aaron Taylor Bass 

Criminology and Cnminal Justice 

Suzanne Iris Bass 
Sociology 

Jean Pierre Bassi Bikai 
Accounting 



Heidi Louise Baumbach 
Music: Flute Performance 

David Bayard 

Economics and Communication 

Victoria Rene Beasley 
Kinesiology 



portraits U69 



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Brian Thomas Beissel 
Accounting and Finance 

Samantha Elizabeth Beltz 
Chminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Jennifer Lynn Benade 
Economics 




mion which no misfortune 
ne can destroy, no enemy 
sm can enslave. At home, 
iction, in solitude a solace 
ament. It chastens vice, it 
grace and government to 

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man? A splendid slave, a 
savage. -Joseph Addison 




Chelsea Berati^ 
Marketing 

Jeffrey Scott Berenholtz 
Marketing 

Lauren Paige Berger 
Communication: Public Relations 



portraits U7i 



Amanda Louise Bialon 
Communication 

John Martin Bitting 
Economics 

Jordan Daniel Blal^er 
Economics 



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Environmental Science and Policy 

Allison Nicole Bloom 
English and Education 

Roseline Nanayaaasantiwae 

Boateng 

General Biology 



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Alicia Bobian 
Family Science 

Olga Grigorievna Bolotina 
Economics 

Jeremy Benjamin Bolotsky 
Marl<eting 




Jessica Noelle Boluda 
Government and Politics & 
Spanish Language and Literature 

John Battista Bonacci 
Marketing 



Jhe best helping 
hand that ybu will 
ever receive is 
the end of yoijr 
own arm. 
-Milton 




portraits U73 



Graduation is 
only a concept. 
Graduation is a 



rocess 



that 



goes 

on until the last 

day of your life. 

ou^an grasp 

that, you'lllriake a^ 

lifferenceL^ 
-Arie Pencovici 




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Anna Elizabeth Bordelon 
American Studies 

Britney Sarita Bostick 
Kinesiology 

Jason Bove 
Kinesiology 



Sara Marie Bove 

Spanish Language and Literature 

Wesley Thomas Mathew Bowen 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Mayra L. Boyle 
Studio Art 



Vaneesha Marie Bradford 
Animal Sciences 

Lara Branstetter 
Psychology 

Mira Breitstein 
Psychology 



Mark Brenneman 
Kinesiology 

Joy Brigts 

wee and AccoulffifK, 



Stephanie Danielle Briguglio 
Community Health 




portraits U75 



Jourdan Elise Brooks 
Government and Politics 

Brandon Grain Brown 
Accounting 

Daniel Joseph Brown 
Kinesiology 



Kelly Elizabeth Brown 

Government and Politics & 

Spanish Language and Literature 

Matthew Brown 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Shannon Brown 
Kinesiology 




The future belongs 

to those who believe 

in the beauty of their 

dreams. 
-Eleanor Roosevelt 




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^^^K^ 


-J — 




Andrew Lloyd Bucknor 
Kinesiology 

Shira Burcat 
Antliropology 

Laura Ann Burgess 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Kevin Thomas Burke 
Secondary Education and History 

Michael Anthony Burkot 
Government and Politics 

Claire Grace Burson 
History and Geography 




Ashley Diane Byrd 
Sociology 

Justin Bzura 

Melissa Janet Cabrera 
Marketing 



Samantha Jasmine Caesar 
General Biology 

James Cahill 
Japanese 

Daniel Joseph Cahn 
Electrical EngineerTrig 



portraits U77 



Vyhen you leave here 
came. -Adlai Stevens 



Gabriel Nathan Cahn 
Mechanical Engineering 

Marianne Marie Alida Call 
International Business and Politics 

Emily Theresa Callanan 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 



Jason Vernon Callender 
Electrical Engineenng 

Andre Robert Curtland Campbell 
Economics 

Casey Emma Campbell 
General Biology 




David Alan Campbell | 
Finance and Accounting 

Keith Michael Campo 
Finance 

Raven Canty . 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 






A 

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don't forget why you 



)n 




Thomas Lawrence Capon 
Electrical Engineering and Physics 

Emily Jean Card 
Government and Politics 

Sheila Johanna Carrette 
Psychology and Microbiology 



Melissa Rachelle Carry 
Family Science 

Caitlin Ann Carter 
English 

Jon Castaldo 
Economics 



Shaina Louise Castle 
French Language and' 
Literature True 

Jose B. Castro 
Mechanical Engineering 

Amanda Beth Centor 
Elementary Education 



portraits U79 



Catur Chan 
General Biology 

Rebecca Ann Chapman 
government and Politics 





Robyn C. Chau 
Chinese 

^--Sona Chaudhry 
Biological Resources Engineering 

April D. Chavers 
Government and Politics & 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 





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Becky Chen 


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Architecture 


^^Biob <^* B 




Jason Chen 


^mT - M 




General Biology 


^k. ^B 




Szu-Chieh Chen 


J^B ^H 




Computer Sciences 


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Yu-Ru Chen 


P - 




Accounting And Finance 


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Yungchung Chen 


^^^& 




Plant Sciences 








M\ 




Jammie Cheung 




Community Health 






Just about a month 
from now I'm set 
adrift, with a diploma 
for a sail and lots of 
nerve for oars. 



-Richar 



urton 




Kevin Wesley Chin 

General Biology and Psychology 

Victoria Caitlin Chisholm 
Art History 

Junglnee Cho 
Psychology 



Brad Chodnicki 
Accounting and Finance 

Enn M. Chojnacki 
Elementary Education 

Pel Chun Chu 

Marketing 



portraits Usi 



Nicholas Ciccarelli 
Bioengineering 

Jacob James Cigna 
Mechanical Engineering 

Nicole E. Cimino 
GeneralSiology 




Aminata Cisse 

Agriculteral and Resources 

Economic 

Danielle Nicole Clifford 
English True 

Lauren Clifford 
Psychology 




Christina Elizabeth Cobb 
Government and Politics & English 

Brian Anthony Cognate 
English and Government & Politics 

Michael Eric Cohen 
Finance 








^^^j 




Graduation is not the 




Byron Lamar Cole 
Chemistry 

Shawn Coleman 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Gina Marie Colesanti 

Finance & 

Spanish Language and Literature 



Nicholas Lydell Collins 
Economics 

Travis Lynn Conrad 
Hearing and Speech 
Sciences 

Hilary Nicole Coombs 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
& Psychology 



Karl Sabrina Cooper 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Kfirah Devorah Covel 
Studio Art 

Jennifer Qrown 
History 



9hd; it is the beginning. 





portraits U«3 



Wherever you go, no 

matter what the 
weather, always bring 
your own sunshine. 



-/-vi 



ithon 



D'Ahgelb, 



Benjamin Christopher Cuttitta 
Finance and Economics 

Swanee Chantelle Daniels 
General Biology 

Omeri Daughteridge 
Community Health 



Pratik Dave 
Aerospace Engineering 

Denisha L. Davenport 
Community Health 

Stuart Marc Davidovich 
Geography 





Caitlyn Elizabeth Davis 
Government and Politics 

Dwight Maxwell Davis 
American Studies 

Gabrielle Davis 
Animal Sciences 



Michael Vanture Davis 

Psychology & 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Sarah Davis 
Elementary Education 

Virginia L. Deane 
t\/larketing 



Colette Decastro 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

& Psychology 

A J. Delagarza 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Eric James Delash 
Communication 



Daniel Demaio 
Finance 

Jeanette Charlene Der Bedrosian 
Journalism and American Studies 

Allison Deugwillo 



Animal Bcfences 



portraits U«5 



Christopher Dibartolomeo 
Kinesiology 

Shira Zipporah Dickler 
Government and Politics 

Lorelie Mane Diestro 
/Aerospace Engineering 




Kristine Leigh Dietz 
Government and Politics 



Allie Dietzek 
American Studies 

Kelsey Shawn Diller 
Finance 



Jeremy Doberman 
Government and Politics & History 

Emily Marie Dodd 
Kinesiology 

Edward Matthew Dodge 

Agricultural and Resources 

Ecomonics 




Ryan Patricl< Doherty 
International Business 

Andrea Rose Donohue 
French Language and Literature 

Susan Dow 
English 






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You are educated. 
Your certification 
is in your degree. 
You may thinl< of it 
as the ticl<et to tiie 




goQd life. 

^skydu to4hinl< of 
arT aiternativerThiok 
of it as your ticket to 
cinange the world. 
-Tom Brokaw 



portraits U87 





<^^ 


\ 


Christina Lynn Dowling 
Animal Studies: Equine Studies 


,«" 


J. 


Peter Edward Doyle 
Finance 


''V 


- 


iVIarinella Drakos 
Government and Politics 


" \ 


■* 




Sooner or later we^iLdii 
m o m en ts of I i f e a r e not 



the birthdays, the gradu 
the great goals achievec 
are less prepossessing, 
of memory dnannounce 
in, sniff arou 
lives are measured by t 




Samantha Grace Driscoll 
Architecture 

Gayden Lee Druschel 
History 

Shaun Dubick 
Economics 



cover that the important 
le advertised bnes, not 
itiohs, the weddings, not 

. The real milestones 

/ 

rhey come to the door 
, stray dogs that amble 
simply never leave. Our 



ese. -Susan B. Anthony 



portraits U89 



The fireworks begin 
today. Each diploma is 



ighted match. Each 




bne of you is a fuse. 

ward koch 




Alyssa Luanne Dubov 
English 

Bryan Scott Duffield 
Communication 

Laura Marie Duffy 
Marketing 



Bernard Duplan 
Mechanical Engineering 

Kevin Joseph Dwyer 
Physics 

Kevin Dyal 
Romance Languages 





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Victoria Nicole Easthope 

Psychology & 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Alessandra Echeverri 
Art Studio 

Megan Allison Eckstein 
Journalism 



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Jennifer Edelston 

Communication and Jewish Studies 

Melissa Louise Edgerton 
Mechanical Engineering 

Lashanda Edmond 
Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 



Casper D. Edora 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Lanelle Oni Edwards 
Chemistry 

Russell Edwards 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

& Sociology 



Russell Jordan Edwards 
Cnminolgy and Cnminal Justice 
& Sociology 

Brian Egrier 
Government and Politics 

Nicole Eisenstat 
Marketing 




portraits U9i 



Yusrd El-Hibn 
American Studies 

Olubunmi Titilayo Elemide 
^Agricultural and Resources 
Economics 

Tiara Elman 
Marketing 




Candyce Elmore 

Agricultural and Resources 

economics 

Francis Steven Encomienda 
Finance and Accounting 

Jessica Ashley Enfante 
English and American Studies 



Shira Engellnart 
Elementary Education 

Joshua Zev Epstein 
Kinesiology 

Tracey Jill Epstein 
Bioengineering 



Cassidy Jeaneth Pendleton Erdeky 
Physiology and Neuribiology 

Graciela Michelle Espada 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Erica Espenak 
General Biology 




It takes most men 
five years to recover 
from a college 
education, and to 
fearn thatjDoetry is 
ais vital to thiriRingas 
knowled^g< 
-Brobk^tkinsdrr 




Jonathen William Facemire 
Mechanical Engineering 

Oluwagbeno Fakile 
Economics 

David Olawuyi Fakunle 

Psychology & 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 



portraits U93 



A man who has never ( 
steal from a freight car, 
university education, h 
railroad. 

-Theodore IR 



Alexandra Falbo 

Communication and 

Public Relations 

Edward Fanning 
Art Studio 

Esther Farber 

Women s Studies and 

Communication 



Emily Feldman 
English 

Deborah Rachel Felsenthal 
Psychology 

Jacob Avi Ferentz 
Communication 





one to school may 
but if he has a 
may steal the whole 




Edwin Fernandes 
Aerospace Engineering 

Gideon Agatep Fernandez 
Information Systems and Operations 
Management 

Lauren Elizabeth Ferraioli 
Psycliology 



Derek FerramoscarScarzella 
EnglfstT'^ 

Jennifer Finder 
Animal Sciences 

Michael Fine 
Economics 



portraits U95 



Rachel Miriam Finkelstein 
History 

Andrew Fisher 
Accounting 

Elissa Fitzmartin 
Ipvernment and Politics 



Rebecca Flad 

Operations Management and 

Information Systems 

David Flores 
Economics 

Ho-Ming Fong 
Economics 




Your schoolinti may 

be over, but remember 

that your education 

still continues. 
-Author Unknown 






^ -^r 




Araina Renee Ford 
Psychology and Philosophy 

Kristen Ford 
English 

Matthew Ford 
Marketing 





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WM 



Michelle Jessica Ford 
American Studies and 
Communication and 
Rhetoric and Political Culture 

Awnya Awneece Frazier 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Laura Frazier 
Sociology 




Elisheva Dina Freedlander 
Jewish Studies 

Raquel Marie Freitas 
Kinesiology 

Keith Lawrence Friant 
Government and Politics 



Esther Frias 
Kinesiology 

Jason Steven Friedman 
Accounting 

Marissa Kai Friedman 
General Biology 



portraits U97 



Adrianne Carlay Fuentes 
Finance and Information Systems 

Anne Rachel Fuld 
Special Education 

'ara Michelle Fuller 
Multicultural Leadership 




Man Chi Fung 
Economics 

Aditya Gaddam 
Computer Engineering 



Rami Michael Gadlin 
English 

David Gajer 
Government and Politics 

Cory Weldon Gallihugh 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 




Lauren Gamble 
Communication 

Rachel Ganassa 
Community Health 

Brittany Lynn Garlington 
American Studies 



bu have brains in 
your head. You have 
feet in your shoes. 
You can steer yourself 
Hn anydirection you 



choose . V^CTre on 





our own> And you 



know what you l<now^ 
You are the guy who'll 
decide where to 
-Dr. Seuss 




portraits U99 



Twenty years 
disapDointed by the thing 
ones you did. So throw! 
rom the safe harbor. Cal 



sails. Explore. Drean 



Linda Garner 
Nutritional Science 

Frances Garwood 

Frencti Language & 

Literature and Education 

Lara Criselda O. Garzon 
Japanese 



Greg Gaston 
Government and Politics 

Joshua Gideon Gendelman 
Government and Politics 

IVliclnae! Gentry 
Aerospace Engineering 




rom now you will be more 
,; you didn't do than by the 
)ff the bowlines, sail away 
ch the trade winds in your 
b^ Discover. -Mark Twain 




Danielle Marie George 
Criminology and Cnminal Justice 

Jason Joseph George 
Government and Politics 

Marilyn Irene Geschwind 
Dietetics 



Michael Gevaryhu 
English— 

Lacy Adelia Gilmer 
Physiology and Neurobiology 

hhLuis Andres Gimenez 
Studio Art 



portraits Uoi 



\ \ \ 

Don't judge each day 
by the harvest you 

reap but by the seeds 

that you plant. 
- Ro be rt Steven so 



Erica Valerie Ginsberg 
Kinesiology 

Kathleen Patricia Gipprich 
Government and Politics 

Maryann Raafat Girgis 
Physiology and Neurobiology 



Hewan Girnna 
Accounting 

Anthony Glynn 
Journalism 

Allison Sara Godlewicz 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 





Priya Goel 
Psychology 

Adrianus Marvin Goenadi 
Finance 

Brian Joseph Goldblatt 
Government and Politics 



Alexander Goldenthal 
Cnminology and Cnminal Justice 

Talia Shoshana Goldman 
English and Classical Humanities 

Brian Seth Goldstein 

Computer Science and Japanese 



Laura Koss Goldstein 

Spanish Language and Literature 

& Anthropology 

Octavia Lee Gomes 
Special Education 

Jessica Gomez 
Family Science 



Alexia B. Gonzalez 
Communication 

Kelly Noel Gordon 
Psychology 

Samara Rose Gottlieb 

GovefhmenT aWd Politics 



portraits Uo3 



People will frighten 

you about a 
graduation... they use 
words you don't hear 

oftenT "and we wish 
you godspeed ; "Jt i s a 

warning, godspeed. 



means you are no. 
longer welcome h era 

at these prices. 

-Bill Cosby 



^traits 




Johnny Graham 
Finance 

Thalia Grant-Wisdom 
Family Science 

Matthew Graub 
Finance 



Peter Dimetrios Greberis 
Architecture 

Charles Maxwell Green 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 

Maya Marlene Green 
General Biology 



Cory Adam Greenbaum 
Finance 

Kathehne Leigh Greenberg 
Family Science 

Sarah Meghan Ghee 
Mechanical Engineering 



Laura Janel Griffin 
Journalism 

Danee Kteiress Grimes 
ERQiish 




portraits Uos 



Jenna-Leah Grossi 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Thomas Matthew Grove 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

& Government and Politics 

Steven Benjamin Gruber 
xcounting and^laformation Systems 



Jenny Guan 
Economics 

Sergio C. Guerra 
Anttiropology 



Sarah Raafat Guirguis 
Community l-lealtli 

William John Gurtshaw 
International Business 

Phyllis Guthua 
General Biology 




The roots of education 




Xaviera Gutierrez 

Spanish Language and Literature 

Yasmin Haghighi 

Cnminology and Criminal Justice 

& German Language and Literature 



Dale Robert Haines 
l-listory 

Hiama Vojo Malay 
Communication 

Harding Hall 
Bloengineering 



Kathryn Halloran 
Communication 

Luke Hamilton 

Finance and Information Systems 

Luke Michael Hamilton 

Finance and Information Systems 



are bitter, but the fruit 

\ \ \ 

is sweet. -Aristotle 



portraits U07 




Genni Sarah Harrison 
Family Science 

Michelle Renee Harrison 
Community Health 

Megan Elizabeth Harvey 
Finance and Operations 
Management 







o 




r 









Gretchen Elise Hasfurter 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Michael Hasson 

Finance and Information Systems 

Nickolaus Martin Hastings 
History 




Sarah Elizabeth Hathaway 
Heanng and Speech Sciences 

Matthew Adam Haven 
Government and Politics 
& Psychology 

John Robert Hawkins 
Marketing & Logistics. 
Transportation, and Supply Chain 
Management ~~^-^ 



Melony Patrice Hawkins 
Sociology 

Lauren Elise Hayes 
Psychology 

Christopher Shaw Haywood 
Criminolgy and Criminal Justrc& 



portraits U09 



Eric Scott Heaps 
General Biology 

Ira Hechtman 
Psychology 

Daniel Francis Heck 
Mechanical Engineering 




Lindsay Christine Hein 
Music Education 

^chel Brooke Mainly 
Kinesiology 

Alex Michael Helfand 
Accounting 



Peter Anies Henin 
Mechanical Engineering 

Jessica Henriquez 
History 

Rachel Hercenberg 
Psychology 




Maricel Hernandez 
Mathematics and Economics 

Paola Maria Hernandez 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

& Psychology 

Zachary Levin Herrmann 
Journalism 





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You cannot help but 
learn more as you 
take the world into 
your hands. Take up 
reverently, for it is an 
old piece of clayy 
with million^ of 
thumbprints on it. 



-John Ubdi 




portraits 



r^D 




Laura Ann Hoffmaster 
Secondary Education and English 

Robert Wayne Hoffmaster 
Elementary Education 

Brittany M. Hoke 
General Biology 



Jenna Kate Hoike 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Courtney Erin Holmes 
Communication and Women s 
Studies 

Amy Sara Holzer 
Journalism 



Stephanie Heather Holzer 
Accounting 

Allison Paige Houseal 
Elementary Education 

Edith Rachel Howarth 
Bioengineering 



Melissa Hurley 
Geography 

Thoraya Maiek Hussain 
Geographic Information Systems 

Fallon Hutcherson 
English 



portraits lxi3 



During my second year of nut 

gave us a quiz. I breezed thii 

^ad the last one: "What is tl. 

th^school?" Sut 




seen the cleaning:3/von"tarLse 
^<now her nanne?\^l h^ridedjr 
question blank. Before th^c 
asked if the last questlonwoii 
"Absolutely," the professor se 
will meet many people. All a 
your attention and care, ever 
hello." I've never forgotten th 
name was Dorothy. -Joann C 



sing school our professor 
Dugh the questions until I 
e first name of the wonnan 
^ly this was a joke. I had 
eral times, but how would 
rnypapeivieaving the last 




ass ended, one 
Id counrfoward our grade, 
d. "In your careers, you 
3 significant.^They deserve 
if all you do is smile and say 
at lesson. I also learned her 
Jones 



portraits Ui5 



There is no need to 




reach high for the stars. 

They are already within 

you - just reach deep 

into yourself! 



Maria lannatuono 
American Studies 

Ramy Monam Ibrahim 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Erika Marian Ichijo 
Art History 



Ngozi Pamela Ihenachor 

General Biology and 

Community Health 

Cheryl Ikeda 
Kinesiology 

Marco Stephen Impeduglia 
Kinesiology 




■rf.% 




Paula Infante Vermehren 
Physical Education 

Kuitie Irwin 
Communication 

Mahlori Brooks Isaacs 
Communication 



Samantha Jaye Isdaner 
Community IHealtti 

Rachel Monique Israel 
Clarint Performance and Music 
Education 

Travis Deran Ivey 
African American Studies 



Jade Danae Jackson 
Criminology and Cnminal Justice 

Kevin Michael Jackson 
Economics 

Towana Karene Jackson 
Kinesiology 



Victor Aaron Jackson 
Economics 

Richard Edward Jansen 
Mectianical Engineering 

Lauren Erica Japko 
'Accounting 



portraits Ui7 



Sooner or later we all di 



\ 



moments in life are not 
the birthdays, the gradu 
the great goals achie) 
are less prepossessing 
of memory unannounc^ 
in, sniff around a bi| 

Our lives 



Bryony Abigail Jarrett 
Spanish Language and Literature 

Kevin Wesley Jenkins 
Computer Sciences 

Jerrilee Johnson 
Sociology 




218) portraits 



cover that the important 
:he advertised ones, not 
tions, the weddings, not 
3d. The real milestones 
They come to the door 
i, stray dogs that amble 
and simply never leave, 
are measured by these. 

Susan B. Anthony 




liana Beth Jolson_ . 

Operations Management 

Cameron Jones 
Accounting 

Elliot Ryan Jones 
Ciiemical Engineering 



portraits Ui9 



Melinda Carolyn Jones 
Family Science 

Ryan Jones 
Kinesiology 

xLanikah Jordan 
Dance 




Jessica Jordandby 
^Spanish 

Jacqueline Juarez 
Psychology 

Temitope Junaid 
English 



Gayoung Jung 
International Business 

Anarly Justiniano 
Geography 

Chantal Kai-Lewis 
Journalism 



Kristen Lena Kamas 
Community Health 

Kathryn Marie Kambies 
Elementary Education 

Linda Lindiwe Kambule 
Kinesiology 




.M 



*-traiis 




Michael Kane 
Government and Politics 

Brett Kanoff 
Finance 

Andrew Adam Karp 
Government and Politics 



Rebecca Zoe Ronis Kass 
Anthropology and Art History 

Rebekah Eva Kass 
History 

Aaron Joshua Katz 
Information Systems 
and Classical Humanities 



Keep in nriind that 
neither success 
failure is eyer final. 

er Babs 






portraits U»i 



The future lies before you. 
Like a field of driven snow, 
Be careful how you tread it, 

or every step 
will show, 




Drrtmown 




Jacob Evan Katz 
Psychology 

Robin Anne Katz 
Accounting 

Emily Elizabeth Keller 
Secondary Education History 



Jennifer Kennedy 

Spanish Language and Literature 

Brad Kern 
Architecture 

Evan Gene Kessler 
General Biology 



Karen Kester 
Sociology 

Stephanie Kiang 

Psychology & 

Crimlnolgy and Criminal Justice 

Alison Brooke Kidwell 
Community Health 



Binna Kim 
Japanese 

You n- Jung KlriT^^ 
Government and PoMi 



Wayne Kinard 
Spanish 




portraits (X23 



Edward Kingman 
Geology 

Daniel Stephen Kitsoulis 
Marketing and Logistics 

Jodi Renee Kiempner 
Hearing and Speecli Sciences 



Brian Thomas Klenk 
Family Science 

William Earl Knight 
Criminology and Cnminal Justice 

Perri Koll 
Psychology 




Always be a first-rate 

version of yourself; 

instead of second-rate 

version somebody else. 

-Judy Garland 




^f- 


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1 


/ 


\ 



Stephanie Christine Kolski 
Early Childhood Education 

Fatoumata Kone 
Accounting 

Raffic Bernard Koroma 
International Business 




Knsten Kotowski 
Communication 

Jennifer Lynne Kozicki 
Architecture 

Michael Krai! 
Aerospace Engineering 



Christopher Kroeker 
l-listory 

Julie Ann Kuczynski 
Communication 

Vivek Ayyappa Kuppusamy 
Aerospace Engineering 



Jyoti Kuvelker 
Finance 

Siwei Kwok 

Mathematics and Economics 

Vincent Laborde 
Finance 



portraits bxs 



Don't live down to expec 
do something remari<abl 



Anjanic^ A, Ladouceur 

Sociology & 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Danielle Lager 
International Business 

Courtney Danielle Laigle 
Mechanical Engineering 



Alexander Stephanos Lakas 
Studio Art 

Katherine Marie Lambertson 
Civil Engineering 

Marista L. Lane 
Journalism 








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Miriam Dorman Langer 


M 


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Englisli 


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^ ^Isb 


Kristen Larduskey 


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Economics 


I^H 


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Peter Larue 


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Civil Engineering 


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ations. Go out there and 
!. -Wendy Wasserstein 




William Laws 
Chemistry 

Benjamin Jeffrey Layman 
Logistics, Transportation, 
and Supply Chain Management 
& Marketing 

Eliana Leader 
Sociology 



Andrew Stephen Lean 
Journalism 

Michael David Lean 
Electrical Engineering 

Ryan Lebois 
Aerospace Engineering 



Ching En Lee 
Microbiology' 



Ciara Jauan Lee 



Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Eunbyul Lee 
Psychology 



portraits Uz7 



The truth is, I was 
not afraid the 
day I wall<ed into 
[college]...! was afraid 



the day I walked out. 








■w '>^k 




wS^^^ 


MM 



Sonny Keith Noguera Licud 
Kinesiology 

Joel Michael Liebman 
Finance and Economics 

Janice Julia Lim 
Economics 



portraits UX9 



Andrew Lin 
Finance 

Sophia Pei-Chen Lin 
Accounting and Finance 

Callie Kathleen Lindsey 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
Communication 



Joseph Lisee 
Aerospace Engineering 

Cecilia G. Lizama 
Elementary Education 

Veronica Celeste Locke 
Community Healtti 



Kinnberly Ann Loew 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Keith Justin Long 
Finance 

Diana N. Lopez-Cruz 

Marketing 




The tas 




Alexis Bickel Lubar 
Psychology 

Michael Madaio 
English Education 

Beth Robin Magid 
Special Education 



Christopher Steven Mak 
Accounting and Finance 

Ryan Joseph Manuel 
Chemical Engineering 

Olivia Teresa Marinelli 
Geography 



Samuel Marksheid 
Marketing and 
International Business 

Danielle Lou-Ann Marryshow 
Finance and Economics 

Erinn Denise Martin 
Psychology 



jel's worth the hassle! 

-AuthOK Unkn 




portraits U3i 



Be who you are and say 
what you feel because 

^ \ \ \ 

those who don't mind 
don't matter and those 
who matter don't mind. 

-Dr. Sfeuss 



Nathaniel Lee Martin 
Architecture 

Leonardo IVIartinez 
Geography 

Maria Ann Martirano 

Communication & 

Government and Politics 



Victoria Rose Maruca 
English 

Oslier Masica 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Sherin Matlnew 
Kinesiology 




raits 




Lana Matthews 
Communication 

Melissa Rachel Maya 
Early Ciiildhood Education 

Amanda Lynn Mayer 
Cliemistry 



Christopher McAllister 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Joshua McCave 

Cnminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Rachael Rosetta McCleary 
Mathematics 



Ryan Christopher McCrory 
Logistics. Transportaition 
and Supply Chain Management 
& Marketing 

Shannon Emily McDaniel 
Japanese 

Daniel McGregor 
Government and Politics 
& Economics 



Alissa Brette Mclnerney 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Wyatt Chnstopher McKenzie 
Studio Art 

Nakita Charnise McKever 
Spanish- Language aad — 
Literature 



portraits 1X33 




Nick Mercurio 
English 

Christopher IVleyer 
Mechanical Engineering 

Chelsy Samantha IVleyers 
English 





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Tapiwa Mhute 
Accounting and Finance 

Tiffany Ann Michael 
Chinese 

Andrea Lynne Miller 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 








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hope your dreams 
take you to the 
corners of your 
smiles, to the 
highes^of your hopes, 
tolhe windows of your 
opportunities, and to 
the most specia 



places ybur heart has 
ever known. 



-Author Unknown 



portraits (235 



Brittany Miller 
Communication 

DavM Daniel Miller 
Accounting 
and Information Systems 




JvJorman Miller 
Finance and Ecciaomres 



Taylor Miller 
Marl<eting 

Alex Miltenberg 
Marl<eting 

Emily Elizabeth Mineweaser 
Linguistics 



Robert Mislavsky 

Finance and 

Operations Management 

Kyle Michael Mitchell 

IHistory & 

Chminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Serena N. Mitchual 
General Biology 



Alan Mo 
Economics 

Helena Mo 
Community Health 

Enrique Abraham Monges 
Physical Science 




raits 





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Shabnam June Monsef 
General Biology 

Samuel Lewis Moore 
Studio Art 

Suzanna M. Moore 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Carlos Morales 
Neurobiology and Physiology 

Sarah V, Morgan 
Elementary Education 

Alex Morris 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 




Valencia Krystal Morton 
Sociology 

Oluwaseyi Oludayo Motajo 
General Biology- 

Troy Moten 
Community Healtti 




Thomas Mountain 
Bioengineering 

Elaine Mui 

Accounting and Finance 

Sean Mukherjee 
Government and Politics 



portraits ^3*7 



XDon't be afraid to 

take a big step if one 

is indicated; you can't 

cross a chasm in two 

small jumps. 
-David Lloyd^eorge 



Michael Joseph Mullinix 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Rachael Murphy Ryan 
Psychology 

Shawna Quianna Murray 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

& Family Science 



Irene Marjory Mylonas K 
General Biology 

Bess Lina Nagler 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Kunal Narang 
Physiology and Neurobiology 





Sheryl Nika Nathanson 
Kinesiology and Communication 

Michael Navarro 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

David Neal 

Cnminology and Criminal Justice 



Jeffrey Mikal Newman 
Journalism 

Raclnel O. Niederer 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

& Biochemistry 



Robert Craig Niederlnoffer 

Economics & 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Erik Kristoffer Nilsson 
Economics 

Edward Makoto Nishihama 
Computer Science 



Horacio Cesar Nochetto 
Mechanical Engineering 

Ashley Elizabeth Nolan 
rnalism 



Shiomit Rachel Nut 
Psychology 




portraits U39 



All that stands 
between the 
graduate and the 
top of the ladder is 



the ladder. 




Daniel Ottalini 
Elementary Education 

Sebastian Eduardo Padrino 
History and Art 
Julie Pak 

Marketing and Operation 
Management^ 



Megan Elizabeth Palanci 
Family Science 

Edwin Panfil 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

William Pappas 
Mechanical Engineering ' 



portraits (x4i 



Daniel Eugene Park 
Microbiology 




Benjamin Parker 

)'anielle Pamass 
Journalism & 
Government and Politics 

Tejal Pate! 
Communication 



Gilmar Alexander Perez 
Electrical Engineering 

Kelly Pernia 
Finance 

Laura Perret 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 








Quentin Pegram 


fS 


Architecture 


p^»w^ 


Heather Penchinar 


Jlt^SL^ 


Family Science 


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ma Michelle Perew 


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Communication 


BiM 








raits 





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Marissa Deanne Persetic 
Psychology 

Lauren Michelle Persons 
Family Science 

Emily Peterson 
Finance 



Jordan Ross Petit 
Chemistry 

Joseph Anthony Petro 
Marketing 

Gary John Pezza 
American Studies 




Son Thanh Phan 
Community Health 
and General Biology 

Amy Phillips 
Communication 

Catherine Nina Philjjps 
Family Science 




Stephanie Diane Phoebus 
Theater 

Aarushi Poddar 

Marketitig^^ 

and Information Systems 

Sarah Eve Posner 

Cell Biology 

and Molecular Genetics 



portraits 1x43 



Garett Adam Press 
Marketing 

Marissa Lynne Pribyl 
Mechanical Engineering 

Ryan Proctor j^f 
English 



Michael Quine 

Psychology & 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Gustavo Quinteros 
Civil Engineehng 

Alanna Chavenson Raffel 
Dance and Psychology 



Joseph Patrick Ramsey 
Aerospace Engineering 

Dacie Randolph 
English 

Randy Lee Ransier 
Computer Engineering 




To the uneducated, 
an 'A' is just three sticks. 
-A^AHVIttfie' 




Kearny Lynne Raver 
Kinesiology 

Nina Ajit Rawtani 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

& Pschology 

Courtney Ray 
Family Science 



Lynsie Reavis 
Elementary Education 

Donald William Reed 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Ray Regimbal 
Marketing & 
Government and Politics 



Jennifer Elizabeth Raid 
Physiology and Neurobiology 

Ryan Reid 
General Business 

Tsehaitu Retta 
Government and Politics 



Crystal Reyes 
Community Health 

Amanda Jayne Richardson 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Dustin Richardson 
Psychology 



portraits b4S 



Kelly Richardson 
Family Science 

Jonah Richmond 
Environmental Science and Policy 

SeafT Raymond Ricker 
Accounting 




Jessica Rindos 

Physiology and Neurobiology 

& Classical Humanities 

Mariel Rissmiller 
iformation Systems and Logistics, 

Transportation & 
^^ Supply Chain Management 

John M. Rittenhouse 

Agricultural Sciences 

and Technology 



Lenn Marasigan Rivera 
Accounting 

Edward Eric Roberts 
Aerospace Engineering 

Drew Robinson 
Family Science 



Sherrika Renea Robinson 

Accounting and 

Information Systems 

Chelsea Rock 
Spanish Language and Literature 

Stephany Rodriguez 
Economics 




I hope that my 
achievements in life shall 
be these-that I will have 
fought for what was right 
and fair, that I will have 
risked^foiUhat which 

mattered, andThat+wiU 

have^iven help to those 



who vvere in n^d that 
will have left the earth a 
better place for what I've 
done and who I've been. 
-C. 




portraits U47 



n the business wc 
two coins: casii ar 



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experience first; t! 



Jessica Roenick 
Communication: Public Relations 


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Jodi Rokuson 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 


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Kelsey Ann Romeo 

Government and Politics 

Crimnology and Criminal Justice 


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Catherine Romero 
Communication 

Andrew Ronkowitz 
Finance 

Ashley Deandra Rooney 
Journalism and Business 





ler's.t-aits 



"Id, everyone is paid in 
d experience. Tal<e the 
e cash will come later. 

-Harold Geneen 




James K. Resell 
Communication 

Lindsay M. Rosen 
Accounting 

Michael William Rosen 
Government and Politics 



Rachel Meredith Rosen 
Environmental Science and Policy 

Benjamin Craig Rosenbaum 
Government and Politics 

Nicole Rosenberg 
Marketing 



portraits U49 



Life is my college. 

May I graduate 

well, and earn 

\, \ 

some honors! 
-Louisa M^y Alcott 



Amy RossmeisI 
Psychology and Art Studio 

Jennifer Catherine Roth 
Microbiology 

Joshua Adam Rotman 
Accounting 



Lauren W. Rottman 
Animal Sciences 

Danielle Nicole Roynestad 
Broadcast Journalism 

Carly Beth Rubel 
Broadcast Journalism 




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liana Beth Rudolf 
English 

Jeffrey Angelo Ruggini 
History 

Tara Rule 

Logistics. Transportation, and 
Supply Chain Management 
& Marketing 



Nicholas Rust 

Finance 

and Operations Management 

Kevin Michael Ryan 
Aerospace Engineering 

Talia Sacks 
Psychology 



Beth Rachel Sadow 

Sociology 

Lilly M. Sadri 
Psychology 

Cathenne Saenz 
Kinesiology 



Steven German Sales 
History 

Joelle S. Salmon 

Psychology 

and Community Health 

Atimad 
Finance 



portraits Usi 



Graduation day is 
tough for adults. They 
go to the ceremony 



as parents. "They 
come home as 
contemporaries. 



Afte r twe n ty-twa 



^ears^^fch i Id-raisi 




they are unemp 



-Erma Bombeck 



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Neil-Brian Samen 

fmance 

and Operation Management 

Benjamin Lee Samson 
Architecture 

Dianna Gloria Samuelson 
Economics 



Mary J. San Miguel-Golladay 
Sociology and English 

Jonathan Carl Sanders 
Psychology 

Rommel Sandino 
Government and Politics 



Charlotte Elaine Sanford-Crane 
Animal Sciences and Anthropology 

Kori McKenzie Saucier 
English 

Patrick Kevin Savoy 
Business 



Tierra Sawe 

Accounting 

and Information Systems 

Laurie-Anne^Pnscilla Ssyies 
Cdnrmunity Health 

Justin Alart S^yre 
Government and Politics 



portraits U53 



Michael Lewis Schlepp 
General Business 

Emily Schmitt 
Dietetics 

Mark Schneider 
Finance 



Andrew Scholl 

Meagan Schroeder 
Art Studio 

Ben Schulman 
Finance 



Mathew Zach Schulman 
Mathematics and Statistics 

Jenna Dryce Schultz 
Special Education 

Kari Sabrina Schumann 
English 




An investment in knov\ 

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Aleksander Patrick Schwab 
Computer Science 

Jason Robert Schwankert 
Physical Sciences 

Jordan Michael Schwartz 
Marketing 







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Zachary Schwartz 
History 

Kristen Scott 
Psyctiology 

John Edward Scoville 
Information Systems 




Nina Sears 
Print Journalism 

Rebecca Lynn Sebastian 
Kinesiology 

Emily Ann Seeley 
Elementary Education 



edge always pays the 
St. -Beniamin Fran 





portraits Uss 



William Seeley 
General Biology 

, Alexander Seiden 
Govemfn^nt and Politics 

alia Davina Senatore 
Siommunlcation 




Daniel Senni 
Accounting and Finance 



-^icky Sessions Jr 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Chanel Shapiro 
Economics 



Rozhgar Sharif 
General Biology 

William David Shaughnessy 
Environmental Science and Policy 

Laura Sheridan 
Art History 



Mara Esther Shindell 
ell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Daniel James Shults 
Government and Politics 

Joseph Joshua Siev 
History 




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Davida Beth Silberman 
English 

Esther Rachel Silberman 
American Studies 

Stephen Andrew Silberman 
Criminology and Cnminal Justice 




Sherray Sylvia Simms 
Family Science 

Stephen Alexander Simon 
Government and Politics & 
Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Andrew Ryan Simpson 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 
& Spanish Language and Literature 




Catherine Addison Simpson 
Sociology & Criminology and 
Criminal Justice 

Jarret Gregory Simpson 
-Kinesiology 

Jessica DanieTt& Simpson 
Criminology and CrirnlTTaULustice 



Nadine liana Simpson 
-Journalism 

Jennifer Smis 
Communicatidr 

Sukhjiwan Singh 
Economics 



portraits Us? 



Bradford Roger Singley 
Communication 

Matthew Sinkiat 
History 

Daniel Sinyor 
General Biology 




Andrew Paul Skobac 
Biological Resources Engineering 



YaelChana Skversky 
Psychology 

Laura Cathryn Slivinski 
Mathematics 




Jordan S. Sly 
History 

Avital Shoshana Slyper 
Kinesiology 

Tiffany Yvette Smiling 
Community Health 



Abigail O'Keefe Snnith 
Marketing 

Derek Cody Smith 
Business and Economics 

Dominic Antonio Smith 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 




The greater danger for most 
of us lies not in setting our aim 
too high and falling short; but 
in setting our aim too low, and 
achieving our mark. 



^Michelangelo 



Yolanda Michelle Smith 
Family Science 




Allan Michael So 
Physiology and Neurobiology 

Megan Sarah Soffin 
Communication 

Gbemisola Sotacin 
Economics 



portraits U59 



Latashia Sellers 
Chminolgy and Criminal Justice 

Jethro Solomon 
Finance 




Min Kyu Song 
Computer Science and Economics 



Tiffarji L^ura Marie Soo-Tim 
Community IHealtti 



Rebekha A. Sours 
Family Science 




James Francis Spano 
Computer Science 

Tahera Shanai Sparks 
English 

Andrea Starkey 
Communication 




Alexandra Ferrara Staropoli 
Family Science 

Bianca Unique Strachan 
Family Science 

Megan Stransky 
Physics and Astronomy 



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Patina Lynette Strother 
Dance 

Erica Jill Strudler 
Marketing 

Thomas Lissner Stuppy 
Marketing and English 



Joey Sung 
Aerospace Engineering 

Elizabeth Ashley Suniega 
General Biology 

Julia Domenica Suszynski 
Communication 



Brad Edward Sweeney 
Mathematics 

Neil Swerdlow 
Economics 

Timothy S^ 
Bioengineering 



Talvar Tari 

Aerospace Engineering 

and German 

Ashley Heather Tauber 
Music Education 

Danielle Taylor 
Journalism and English 
& Geography 



portraits U*! 



Sarah Ellen Tedesco 
English and Psychology 

Amanda Morgan Teitelman 
Accounting 

Ryan Matthew Telesford 
Economics 




Our deepest fear is 





Ourjleepest fear is that \ 
measure. It is our light, r 
most frightens us. 
I to be brilliant, gorgeous 
Actually, who are you no 
to shine, as children do. 
us; it is in everyone. -Ma 





ir ""^ 

a 





Neema Almas Tembele 
Mathematics 

Ronlel Tessler 
Theatre 

Geoffrey Millard Thompson 
English 




at we are inadequate, 
re are powerful beyond 
ot our darkness that 
k ourselves, Who am 

talented, fabulous? 

/ 

to be? We are all meant 

/ 

t is not just in some of 
anne Wifliamson 



portraits U*3 




Scott Francis Tompkins 
Finance 

Kayleen Townley 
Communication 

Lauren Rachel Trager 
General Biology 



f ^ J 



Sophie Trinh 
Mathematics 

Jeremiah IVlo-Yin Tsang 
Electrical Engineering 

Nicholas Tucker 

Economics & Government and 

Politics 



Shaina Renee Tucker 
Finance 

Anthony Thames General Tulloch 

Biology 

Patricia Tung 
Food Science 



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Carolyn Anne Tunney 
Marketing 

Colleen Mary Turek 
Psychology 

Michelle Patricia Turek 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetic. 




David Michael Twist 
Economics 

Florence Nkeiruka Ugboh 
Biociiemistry 

llham Ahmed Umar 
Economics 



Mujahid A. Umar 
Economics 

Alan Uy 

Chemical Engineering and 

Microbiology 

Jennifer Uy 
Bioengineering 



Amanda Randel Van Hoesen 
Studio Art 

Alexey A. Vedernikov 

Computer Science and Economics 

Chris Vickery 
Biochemistry 



portraits (265 



Jun Wang 

Accounting and Finance 

Yu-Ling Wang 
Art Studio 

Niya Samone Ware 
Psychology 




Tore Jovet-Nata Watkins 
Psychology 




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Danielle Weinberg 
Anthropology 

Maria Rachel Weintraub 
Finance and Accounting 



Rachel Elyse Weissman 
Psychology "" 



Joshua Adam Weisz 
Broadcast Journalism 

April Weic 
Family Science 

William Herbert Wellein 
Finance 



portraits U*7 



Leslie Michelle Wells 
Environmental Science and Policy 

Jason Paul Wencak 
\^ Geography 

Krystle Joi Whitaker 
"General Business 



Elizabeth Ann Whyms 
Computer Engineering 

Shawn Wiese 
Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Sarah Wieselthier 

Government and Politics & 

Operations Management 



Valerie Roxanne Wiest 

Chinese and Japanese 

& Linguistics 

Andrae' Sedale Wiggins 
Economics 

Jaquelyn Risa Wilansky 
Physiology and Neurobiology 



Vogue Wilborn 
Dance 

Melissa Suzanne Wiley 
History 

Alisa Michele Williams 

Psychology & Germanic Language 

and Literature 





Ashley Williams 

Criminolgy and Criminal Justice 

& Communications 

Ashley Rose Williams 
Sociology 

Mayumi Evano Williams 
Family Science 



Steven Cesinger Williams 
History 

Allison Marie Wilson 
Architecture 

Andrew Howard Wilson 
Aerospace Engineering 



Kimberly Natasha Wilson 
Communication 

Peter Hartigan Wilson 
Civil Engineenng 



Alisha Nicole Windhausen 

Cell Biology^~'~~~~-~-^. 

and Molecular Genetics True 



Jenny Winik 
International Business 



David Gilbert Wolfand 
Computer Science 



Christopher Jean Woo ^..^^^ 
Sociology & ^"■\.. 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



portraits U*9 



Courtney Leigh Wood 
Theatre 

Derek Aaron Wood 
Electrical Engineering 

Mekdes G. Worku 
Accounting 




Stephane Yambaka 
Sociology and psychology 



mantha Anne Yang 
Kinesiology 



Tiffany Wenting Yang 
Mechanical Engineehng 




Rachel Beth Yaroschuk 
Psychology True 

Erica Joo-Hee Yi 

Pyschology and Criminology 

& Criminal Justice 

Jared iVIichael Yoder 
Economics 



Amberleigh Yoegel 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 

& Psychology 

Erin Elizabeth Yoegel 
English 

Mekius Yohannes 
Art and Commputer Science 




\ 




Dominique Young 
Communication 

Jarred Alexander Young 
Aerospace Engineering 

Jeremy Dominic Young 
Kinesiology 



Monika Danielle Young 
Kinesiology 

Melanie Bower Yuill 
Broadcast Journalism 

Amanda Cara Zack 
American Studies 



Abigail Eden Zaniel 
Government and Politics 

Matthew Zernhelt 

Criminology and Criminal Justice 



Carole Nazoe Zidouemba 
Marketing 



Brian Robert Zisek 
Finance 

Darra Meredith Zisser 
Kinesiology 

Di Zou 
Mathematics 



portraits U71 



fiEVIEW 




^,^^n August, Hurricane Katrina struck the 
--sdlithern edge of our nation leaving thousands 
homeless and alone. University students came 
together to provide relief by opening their doors to 
displaced students and sending money and food 
through student-organized programs. It was a hectic 
start for new students, just beginning to get their 
bearings in a new location. 

September brought a relatively smooth 
transition for university students. Pride radiated 
through the campus for the #1 "Students Pack the 
Stands" ranking by the Princeton Review. The Jeong 
H. Kim Engineering Building opened just after the 
start of the school year. In the same month, Student 
Entertainment Events brought comedians Tracey 
Morgan and Carlos Mencia to campus for the annual 
Homecoming Comedy Show. In other news. Chief 
Justice William Rehnquist died at the age of 80, 
and California became one of the first U.S. states to 
legalize same-sex marriage. 

In October, "Midnight Madness" started well 
before midnight. In hopes to start the first practices 
as early as possible, the basketball coaches pushed 
the starting time for the annual season kick-off to 10 
p.m. Another entertainment event featured the 90's 
boy band, Hanson, famous for their song "Mmmbop" 
and their long hair and girlish features. On a bigger 
scale, the nation lost the civil rights activist Rosa 
Parks on October 24"". 

Civil unrest in Paris during early November 
resulted in over $200 million in damages. In late 
November, French plastic surgeons completed the 
first human face transplant. Locally, College Park 
smokers were sent outside after the city banned 
indoor smoking at all area bars and restaurants. In 
other bar-related news, football coach Ralph Freidgen 
suspended three players right before the seasons' end 
when a brawl broke out at Cornerstone Grill and Loft 
on the November 8"". 

The men's soccer teambecameNCAAchampions 
after beating New Mexico 1-0 on December 11"". 
While students were celebrating, university officials 
continued to argue back and forth about the best 



revisions to tlte zero-tolerance>iGtm)Iicy. 
and national news, Ixaq held its first pli 
elections. ^"\ 

In January, Men's Fit^he^s magazine ranked 
Baltimore the fittest city in the Ignited States. A 
mine explosion in West Virgina trappdd ^nd killed 
twelve miners 260-feet underground. A< the 
university, men's soccer coach, the ACC named^ 



The Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building opened 
just after ttie start of the school year. 




Sasha Cirovski Coach of the Year. 

During the February 2006 Winter Olympics 
in Turin, Italy, the United States placed second to 
Germany, while the Pittsburgh Steelers defeated 
the Seattle Seahawks 21-10 in Super Bowl XL. On 
a more serious note, a mud slide in the Philippines 
killed 1,126 people and Vice President Dick Cheney 
accidentally shot a friend's face while hunting. At 
the university. Tucker Max, author of I Hope They 
Serve Beer in Hell visited the Maryland Book 
Exchange. 

In March, the 78* Academy Awards chose 
Crash as the Best Picture of 2006, while NASA's 



^ears-m-revie^w 



Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reached orbit early in the 
month. Additionally, the 29'"' of March brought a total 
eclipse of the moon. University auxiliary police bought six 
segways to monitor tailgates and escort students. 

On April 4''', the women's basketball team became 
national champions after defeating Duke, 78-75 in overtime 
and the competitive cheer team won their first national 
championship since 1999 in Daytona Beach, Fl. Ben Folds 
played at Cole Field House. Celebrity news featured the 
birth of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes' daughter, Suri 
Cruise, along with Albert II's, Prince of Monaco, trip to the 
North Pole. 

May, the last month of the school year, kicked off 
with Art Attack XXIII, featuring Common. Protesting 
for immigration rights, hundreds marched in the Great 
American Boycott early May. Later that month, a 6.3- 
magnitude earthquake killed over 6,000 people in 
Indonesia. 



College Park banned indoor smoking 
at all area bars and restaurants. 




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The world was caught off guard at the beginning 
of the 2006-07 school year when scientists demoted 
Pluto to a "dwarf planet" on August 24"'. 

Then in September, the largest "dwarf planet" 
in the solar system was officially named Eris. Bangkok 
declared a state of emergency when members of the 
Royal Thai Army staged a coup. Steve Erwin, the 
"Crocodile Hunter" died from a stingray stab on 
September 4"'. In U.S. news, a recall on spinach 
was instituted after E.coli poisoned over 100 people, 
killing two. Lighter news discussed _the birth of 
Britney Spear's second child mid-September. Cartel 
and Warehouse both played at the university during 
^e month of September and University President 
Dan Mote inspired students with his goals to improve 
fan sportsmanship in all arenas. 

In October, North Korea conducted its first 
nuclear bomb testing, while the Islamic State of 
Iraq was officially declared. Just before its second 
birthday, YouTube was bought out by Google for 
$1.65 billion dollars. In sporting news, the St. Louis 
Cardinals won the World Series this year while New 
York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle, died in a plane crash. 
On the 19''\ comedian Wayne Brady performed at the 
Homecoming Comedy Show>-„^^ 

Dashboard Confessional^ and Brand New 
headlined the Fall Concert at Cole Field House on 
November IS'"", while Spike Lee visited the university 
the following week. Democrats took over both hous^ 
of Congress after midterm elections in early November. 
An Iraqi court sentenced Saddam Huessein to death 
by hanging, while Iran and Syria recognized the new 
Iraqi government and called for a peace conference. 

The last month of 2006 brought an end to an era 
with the execution of Saddam Hussein on December 
30''\ In Oregon, a rrtazi froze to death just before a 
rescue team reached him two days after saving his 
family. In Orlando, the Terps defeated Purdue, 24-7, 
at the Champs Sports Bowl on Christmas Day. 

January meant the beginning of a new year 
and a new outlook for Bulgaria and Romania who 
joined the European Union on New Year's Day. 
Oprah Winfrey started the New Year by opening her 
Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa on the 
2"^*. Nancy Pelosi became the first female Speaker"©!" 
the House and Apple introduced its much-anticipated "^ 
iPhone. On campus, officials discussed off-campus 
housing options for transfer stvidents due to the 
housing crunch. 

In February, an Oscar Party at the Stamp 
Student UnioncelebratedThe Departed as Best Picture 
of the Year. North Korea agreed to shut down some 
nuclear facilities in a step toward denuclearization. 



At Super Bowl XLI, the Indianapolis Colts beat the 
Chicago Bears 29-17 and Senator Barack Obama 
announced he would be running for president in 
2008. During the same month, Anna Nicole Smith 
died at the age of 39. 

March marked the launch of a $1.5 billion 
Parisian research program to study the North and 
South Poles. Later, on the 22"'', NATO sent troops 
into Afghanistan where they killed 38 Taliban 
members. Also that month, Forbes released the 
annual billionaire list and found that sixty percent 
of billionaires were "self-made." At the University 
of Maryland, students protested against sweatshops 
making university clothing. 

Sadness struck the hearts oFpeople-across 
the nation and put fear in students' minds in April, 
when a shooting rampage at Virginia Tech resulted 
in 33 deaths. In the same month, CBS fired Don 
Imus for comments made in regards to Rutgers's 
women's basketball team. Closer to home, alumnus 
Daniel Murray was sentenced to almost forty years 
in prison^fbsujiurdering a fellow student two years 

ago. ^^"^^--^ 

In May, Andrew Friedson was sworn in as 

Student Government Association President for the 

2007-08 school year and The All-Americali Rejects 

headlined the university's annual Art Attack concert>-^ 

On May 4''\ heiress Paris Hilton was sentenced to 45 

days in jail for violating the terms of her probation. 

In world news, the United Nations declared 2007 

"Th^ Year of Languages." 




years-in-revie>v (x75 




Another school year began with a bang, so 
to speak, as Russia introduced the "Father of All 
Bombs," a non-nuclear weapon, in early September. 
Actor and funny-guy, Owen Wilson shocked the nation 
with his suicide attempt early in the school year. At 
the university, a hate crime racked the nerves of 
students and faculty when a noose was hung outside 
the Nyumburu Cultural Center on September 6"". 
Later in the month, the bands Cute is What We Aim 
For and Cobra Starship performed for students in the 
Grand Ballroom at the Stamp Student Union. 

October was the end of convenience for 
university students — it marked the closing of Wawa, a 
convenience shop with late hours that served hundreds 
of Qt) ■-■--: >^ each night. On the 15"", a student group 
hi- onal T-shirts around Hornbake Plaza in 

mpower victims of sexual abuse. On a 



larger scale, an 844-pound shark was captured off 
the Florida coast. Meanwhile, track and field star 
Marion Jones gave up her five Olympic medals after 
admitting to using illegal performance drugs. 

Attempts at peace, along with extreme 
natural disaster dominated the news in November. 
On the 15'\ Cyclone Sidr killed 3,500 people in 
Bangladesh and left thousands more injured 
and homeless. Also that month, the Annapolis 
Conference tried to settle the Arab-Israeli conflict 
in Annapolis, Md. on November 27"\ The Writer's 
Guild of America went on strike early in the month, 
meaning re-runs of favorite shows dominated 
network television. To provide students with relief, 
Third Eye Blind played in Ritchie Coliseum on the 
19"" and comedian Daniel Tosh performed in the 
Grand Ballroom on the 27*. 



m-revievi'' 



In December, Time Magazine named Russian 
President Vladimir Putin "Person of the Year." 
While his reputation was bettered, 89 Major League 
Baseball players were shot down when Senator 
George Mitchell released a report accusing them 
of steroid use. In entertainment news, Dennis 
Quaid's newborn twins narrowly escaped death 
after hospital nurses injected them with 1,000X 
the dosage of a blood thinner. In College Park, the 
much anticipated Thirsty Turtle bar and restaurant 
openedits doors on the S'*". 

January started the New Year off with 
heartbreak, when actor Heath Ledger died at the age 
of 28 from an accidental overdose. Ledger starred 
^in Brokeback Mountain and 10 Things I Hate About 
5mzr~-In Baghdad, a suicide bomber killed twenty- 
five mourners on the first day of the year. Back 
at home, university officials discussed the idea of 
adding the Purple Line to the Metro system more 
seriously. 

\^^ In February, Fidel Castro finally announced 

his resignation as president of Cuba and his brother 
Raiil took over. Much of the world experienced 
a total lunar eclipse on the 20'^. In sports news, 
the New York Giants won Super Bowl XLII over 
the previously undefeated New England Patriots. 
University students enjoyed visits from the musician 
Ingrid Michaelson and the Post Secret Project 
during the same month. ^^\ 

The first day of March began with Israeli air 
\strikes over the Gaza strip. On the IQ'"" an explosion 
rhade the news when an exploding star across the 
universe was marked as the furthest object visible 
to the naked eye. On March 13, the local bar and 
restaurant Santa Fe Cafe was granted permission to 
permit underage visitors in the bar through a ticket 
system. Also, in local news, the Delta Tau Delta 
fraternity was disbanded after the publication of 
hazing photos. 

Rising food and gas prices that began in 
March continued through April causing strife for 
many Third World countries. In the United States, 
the national gas price exceeded four-dollars per 
gallon. During the same month, a major scientific 
advancement was made on the 22"'' when eye 
surgeons implanted bionic eyes in two blind patients. 
At home. Gym Class Heroes performed for students 
on the 23"'. 

Big news in May was tragic when Cyclone 
Nargis hit Burma and killed over 133,000 on the 3"'. 
This marked the deadliest natural disaster since 
the tsunami of 2004. On a lighter note. President 
George Bush's daughter. Jenna, was married on 
May 10''\ Wyclef Jean headlined at the university's 
annual Art Attack concert on the 2"''. 



Big news in May was tragic when Cyclone 
Nargis hit Burma and killed over 133,000 
people. This marks the deadliest natural 

disaster since the 2004 tsunami. Students 
gathered for a vigil after the tragedy. 






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years-in-revie^v U77 



Y^u^BINKEVIEW 

a © © © V © © E) ^ IT 



The 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China 
closed just before school started in August, but with 
superstars like Michael Phelps in swimming and 
Usain Bolt in track-and-field it would be an injustice 
not to mention them. Jn other news, on the 30"" John 
McCain announced his running partner, Sarah Palin, 
who hoped to become the first female vice president. 

After the excitement of the Summer Olympics, 
students went back to school to find a few changes. 
DOTs added the Silver Line to its nighttime bu; 
service, while the South Campus Diner added a 
Mongolian grill, available during the same hours as 
the Jalapeiio Grill and the CRS removed fees for group 
^^~-~exercise classes. If that had not been enough, the 
Universlty^^lao gave out free iPhones and iTouches 
in a pilot program designed to explore connections 
between learning and technoiogy. Outside the 
campus, political crisis in Thailand forced Prime 
Minister Samak Sundaravej to declare a state of 
emergency and the U.S. government took control 
over mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to 
assume the responsibility of their trillions of dollars 
of debt. 

On October 3"^, the U.S. announced a global 
financial crisis and President Bush signed the 
Emergency Economic Stabilization Act to provide 
failing banks with a $700 billon bailout. The 
University of Maryland lost around $63 million 
in endowments this past year due to the economic 




cri&is. The world came together through science 
when the Large Haldron Collider, a collaboration of 
over 10,000 scientists and engineers from over 100 
countries, was inaugurated on October 21''*. The 
Homecoming Comedy Show featured Lewis Black. 

November was a month of change as Senator 
Barack Obama was elected to be the first African- 
American president on the 4* with his running 
mate. Senator Joe Biden. A series of terrorist 
attacks in Mumbai, India killed 195 people between 
bveinber 26'*' and 29*^. Britney Spears made 
a comeback with the release of her sixth album, ^ 
Circus on November 28'''. Project Runway mentor, 
Tim Gunn visited University students on the 13*. 

As students geare^T^up for exams and 
prepared for break, Lupe Fiasc^^-^igrformed in 
Ritchie Coliseum on December S**". In world news, 
Israel initiated air strikes on the Gaza Strip once^ 
agairi and Bangladesh held general elections after 
two years^Trf^doting and political unrest. On the 
last day of the year, an~extra second was added to 
the year as a "leap second." ^^^~^^-^~-^_^ 

January invited a new year and tKe^Obaina^ 
family prepared for inauguration on the 20"'. 
Event planners expected up to four million people 
in Washington, D.C. for the ceremony. Conflict 
between Israel and Palestine worsened, while 
students tried to relax for a few short weeks before 
beginning the new semester. 



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Usain Bolt was^ superstar in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China. 




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years-in-revie'w^ (279 



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athletics 



en Terps are off 
to a fabulous start for the 2008-2009 
season. The men have won 15 out of 
23 games (as of January 14*) with the 
help of their leading man Number 21, 
Grievis Vasquez, the junior who has 
quickly risen to fame as he makes most 
shots he attempts. He has earned the 
Terps an average of 18 points per game. 
Number 1, Landon Milbourne, trails 
Vasquez by small margins scoring an 
average of 12 points per game. 

During the December 3'^'^ match- 
up against the Michigan Wolverines, 
Maryland trailed at the half, 35 to 29, 
but quickly picked up speed when both 
Vasquez and Eric Hayes shot several 
flawless 3-pointers to put the Terps 
back in the lead. Ultimately, the men's 
team won a 75-70 victory, pulling them 
out of a slump from when they had 
lost to Georgetown 75-48 several days 
before. 

As for the lady Terps, they have 
won 20 out of 24 games thus far and 
continue to show the whole University of 
Maryland community the power house 
team which the head coach, Brenda 
Frese, has worked so hard to create. 
After the NC State game on February 
5"', the Terrapins have continued 
their home winning streak which now 
totals 30 games. Kristi Toliver shone 
when she scored four 3-pointers, out 
of five attempted. In the first 25 shots 
attempted by the Terrapins, the team 
made 18, an astounding 70 percent 
accuracy. 

In an even earlier game against 
Wake Forest (the ACC opener game), 
the Terps towered over the opponents 
to win the game 92-65. Toliver was once 
again the high scorer of the night with 
22 points followed closely by Lynetta 
Kizer with 17 points. While Wake 
Forest tried their best to stay within 20 
points in the second half, the Deamon 
Deacons were no match for Toliver and 
the gap proved too big for the Deacons 




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WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 




DTill 


W 


Team Evolution 
TCU 


W 

L 


Deleware State 


W 


James Madison 


W 


UCLA 


w 


Richmond 


w 


South Dakota State 


w 


Montana 


w 


Illinois 


w 


Purdue 


w 


UNC Asheville 


w 


Mississippi State 


w 


MEN'S BASKETBALL 




Northwood 


w 


Bucknell 


w 


Youngstown State 


w 


Vermont 


w 


Delaware State 


w 


American 


w 


Bryant University 


w 


Elon 


w 


Charlotte 


w 


Michigan State 


w 


Gonzaga 


L 


Georgetown 


L 


Michigan 


w 


George Washington 


w 






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athletics 



WOMEN'S GOLF 




Cougar Classic 


17th 


Badger Invitational 


T7th 


Spider Fall Invitational 


1st 


Lady Pirate Invitational 


17th 


Palmetto Invitational 


9th 





This year, the men's golf team was lead 
by one of its newest members, freshman John 
Popeck. In high school, Popeck, who hails from 
Washington, Pennsylvania, was ranked ninth 
in the junior rankings of Golfweek.com and 
appeared three times in the US junior amateur 
championships. As a Terrapin, Popeck started 
che season off at the VCU Shootout in Virginia 
coming in one under par. While the Memphis 
p^ntercollegiate tournament was cut short by 
heavy rains, Popeck's spirits were not dampened; 
he tied for fifth overall. 

In the Xavier Invitational tournament, it 
was sophomore Donnie Shin who posted a par of 
216 to tie for 24"' place and boosted Maryland to 
thirteenth place overall. In the men's golf team's 
last tournament of the season in Greensboro, 
North Carolina, Popeck tied for 19"' place as an 
individual, just three strokes away from placing 
in the top ten. Overall, the Maryland team tied for 
eleventh place to finish up their last tournament 
of the season. 

It was yet another freshman, Jessica 
Hollandsworth, who led the lady Terps to tie for 
28"' overall at their first tournament of the season, 
in Hanahan, South Carolina. Hollandsworth 
proved her skill and concentration once again in 
the Badger Invitational Golf Tournament, hosted 
by the University of Wisconsin when she tied for 
second individually and contributed to the team 
score of 929 to tie for seventh with the Hoyas. 
In the second to last tournament of the season, 
Hollandsworth tied for 17"' individually. In the 
final tournament of the season, the Palmetto 
Intercollegiate women's golf tournament hosted by 
the College of Charleston, Maryland placed ninth 
overall, their best placing of the season. With so 
much young talent, the Maryland Terrapins can 
be hopeful of the team that will rise in the years 
ahead. 



;«,ics 



CROSS 
COUNTRYi 



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WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 




Mt. Saint Mary's Invitational 


W-3, L-2 


Navy Invitational 


3rd 


George Mason Invitational 


3rd 


Princeton Invitational 


5th 


ACC Championships 


T6th 


NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regionals 


11th 


MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 




Mt. Saint Maiy's Invitational 


W-3, L-2 


Navy Invitational 


3rd 


George Mason Invitational 


3rd 


Princeton Invitational 


5th 


ACC Championships 


T6th 


NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regionals 


11th 



The 2008-2009 cross country team finished 
the season with some astonishing records and many 
individual and team titles in hand. In the first meet 
of the season at the Mount Saint Mary's Invitational, 
sophomore Alex Lundy became the second Terrapin 
to earn the individual title at that particular meet, 
covering the 5 kilometer distance with a time of 
16:11.6, a second less than his American University 
opponent. For the women. Senior Kylynn McKinley 
finished eighth individually with a time of 19:31.5. 

At the George Mason Invitational in early 
October, both the men's and women's teams placed 
third. Juniors Greg Kelsey and Erin Matyus each 
finished fifth in their respective individual categories: 
Lundy placed ninth overall with a time of 25:06. 

In November, the track and field team headed 
to North Carolina to compete in the Atlantic Coastal 
Conference Cross Country Championships. Kelsey 
and Lundy both finished in the top 25, boosting 
the Maryland men's team to a sixth place tie. The 
women's team placed ninth overall with the help 
of Matyus who ran her best individual time at the 
ACC Championships and placed 35"' overall. Junior 
Kristen Reed also grabbed a top 40 spot in the 
women's individual races finishing 38"' with a time 
of 21:53.7. 

Thisseason,LundyemergedasoneofMaryland's 
top cross country competitors. In November, at the 
Mid-Atantic Regional Championships, he finished 
tenth individually and finished his ten kilometer 
course in 32.33 minutes to help bolster the Terrapins 
to an eleventh place finish with a score of 304 points. 
At Lundy 's NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country 
Championship debut, he placed 125"^ out of nearly 
250 competitors, finishing his ten-kilometer run in 
31:04.9 minutes. Lundy's appearance at the NCAA 
Championships is the first time in recent history that 
a Terrapin has qualified for nationals. 




There is no mistaking the 
vibrancy and cheer of the University 
of Maryland Dance Team at every 
home football and men's basketball 
game (and selected away games). 
The nineteen girls that make up the 
2008-2009 dance team know how to 
get the Terps fans pumped up. The 
girls combine various dance styles 
including funk, jazz, hip hop, and 
poms into intricate routines. Their 
routines are carefully coordinated 
to work with the Mighty Sound of 
Maryland Marching Band, whether 
they are performing a half- time show 
or entertaining the crowd during a 
timeout. 

During football season, the 
dance team takes part in the Terrapin 
Alley tradition, dances in the pre- 
game show, and waves the Maryland 
State Flag for all the fans to see. 
The ladies of the dance team also 
participate at other selected sporting 
events including some wrestling 
matches and women's basketball 
games. Additionally, the Dance Team 
conducts a shadow program to help 
potential members decide if they 
would like to try-out for the team. 
Potential members can sit in on a 
rehearsal or watch up close during a 
game. 

The girls come from a variety 
of different backgrounds and from 
all over the United States. Captain 
Shannon Elizabeth Auxier, hails from 
Olney, Maryland and is a Hearing 
and Speech Pathology Major and 
a Linguistics minor. Jackie Dicker, 
a junior Criminology major and 
Spanish minor, comes to Maryland 




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The girls' competitive cheer 
squad led by head coach Jarnell 
Bonds started their season off 
with several wins at two local 
competitions: JamFest Jumpin' 
Jam in Upper Marlboro and Spirit 
Unlimited in Baltimore. 

At JamFest, senior PJ Gill 
hit the mats for the first time since 
surgery for an injury she sustained 
last year. Several younger team 
members also contributed to the 
team's win, receiving 9.012 out of 
10 points. Sophomore Samantha 
Johnson performed her standing 
full twist and sophomore Season 
Daugherty, performed a beautiful 
tumbling sequence consisting of a 
round-off, back handspring, whip, 
full twist, handspring, handspring, 
and a double full twist. 

On December 13"', the cheer 
squad preserved their winning 
season by claiming the second 
regional title at Spirit Unlimited's 
Charm City Dress Rehearsal 
competition at the Baltimore 
Convention Center. The team 
performed their routine with great 
skill and precision. In particular 
senior co-captain, Ali Pascucci, 
and sophomore Samantha Ford, 
performed a particularly noteworthy 
round-off-back handspring-double 
full twist routine. 

The cheer squad's season 
will continue with competitions 
up and down the east coast in 
Georgia, Virginia, Pennsylvania 
and Florida. 



athletics 



When the Maryland field hockey team began 
their 2008 season, they ranked second in the nation. 
By the end of their season, the team had climbed 
the final rung to number one. For the sixth time in 
ten years, the Terps field hockey team captured the 
national championship. During their 2008 season, 
the lady Terps dominated practically all of the games 
they played, winning 23 out of the 25 games. 

Their season began with a victorious 5-0 win 
against Lock Haven University; the 12"' year in a row 
that the Terps won their opening game. In their second 
game of the season against Penn State, Maryland's 1- 
win became the field hockey program's 500"' ever 
victory, starting back in 1974. 

On September 20"', during their first ACC 
scheduled game of the season, the Terps beat number 
twelve ranked Boston College 5-0. Sophomore all- 
American Katie O'Donnell and London native, Susie 
Rowe, each made two goals and assists. Senior Alicia 
Grater recorded five saves to contribute to the team's 
victorious win. 

In their next game, the Terps played a hard 
and well-fought battle against number 1 ranked 
Wake Forest to win a 4-2 victory. Rowe scored the 
first goal with 17 minutes left in the first half to tie 
the score 1-1 at the break. In the second half, junior 
Nicole Muracco, scored the second goal to send the 
Terps into the first lead of the game. Meghan Dean 
and Katie O'Donnell also contributed to the victorious 
4-2 win. 

Maryland battled it out against the Wake Forest 
team twice more during the 2008 season during the 
ACC and Championship tournaments. The final game 
of the ACC championship was a hard fought win, but 
Muracco managed to score the winning goal with 
fewer than three minutes left in the game. During 
the final game of the NCAA tournament Rowe, who 
earned Most Valuable Player of the ACC tournament, 
scored the winning goal of the game and became the 
first player in Maryland history to record over 70 
points (she scored 74). Rowe, along with O'Donnell, 
Brianna Davies and Alicia Grater, were all named to 
th e A^:JQTXr nament Team. The Terrapin field hockey 
y had much to celebrate during their 





LEY 



K ■ 




Junior FC Spain W 


Lock Haven W 


Penn State W 


Old Dominion W 


Michigan W 


American W 


Boston College W 


Wake Forest W 


Richmond W 


Virgina W 


Duke L 


Pennsylvania W 


Princeton W 


Old Dominion W 


Delaware W 


North Carolina W 


Virgina Commonwealth W 


Virginia W 


Wake Forest W 


Albany W 


Duke W 


Iowa W 


Wake Forest W 


Syracuse L 


Northwestern W 




FIELD 




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The men and the women of the 
Maryland track and field team have scored 
big this 2008-2009 season. At the Virginia 
Tech Invitational, the first in a long season 
of meets, junior. Tommy Frischia placed first 
in the 800 meter event with a time of 1:55.63 
(Frischia also placed ninth in 800 meter event 
at the ACC championships in 2008). In the 800 
meter women's event, junior Kelley Pry placed 
third with a time of 2^20.67. During the second 
day of the invitational, the younger members 
of the team took the spotlight. Freshman, 
Dwight Barbiasz placed first in the high jump 
with a mark of 7-00.25; an IC4A qualifying 
mark. Additionally, freshman DeAnna Brown 
placed fifth in the 600 meter dash with a time 
of 7.77 seconds. 

During the Terrapin Invitational, the 
men and women Terps competed comfortably 
at their home turf in College Park. As if his 
IC4A qualifying mark wasn't enough, freshman 
Barbiasz beat his mark and earned himself an 
NCAA qualifying mark of 7-01.25 and placing 
first for the second meet in a row. Fellow 
teammate and senior David Edwards-Brennan 
placed fourth in the same high jump event 
with an NCAA provisional qualifying mark of 
6-08.00. On the women's side, senior, Ashley 
Williams showed her astonishing skills at shot 
put, placing first with a 48-2.50, almost six 
feet farther than the second placed competitor 
and a personal best. Terrapins Ashley Hendrix 
and Kiani Profit dominated the women's long 
jump when they stole first and second places 
respectively. 

In early February the women's team 
split up to compete at two different meets, 
one at George Mason and one meet at Middle 
Tennessee. Between the two meets, the women 
added nine new marks to the record books. 
Among the wealth of success for the ladies, 
senior Michelle Fedrick placed first in the race 
and fifth All-Time in the 400 meter event with a 
time of 55.77. Junior, Kelley Pry ran the 800m 
event flawlessly and beat her personal record 
in addition to placing second in the event and 
seventh All-Time. 



WRESTLING 



Army 


T 


Findlay 


W 


Edinboro 


L 


Eastern Michigan Open 


No Team Score 


Wolfpack Open 


No Team Score 


Lehigh 


L 


East Stroudsburg Open 


No Team Score 


Body Bar Invitational 


7th, 54.5 points 


Kaufman-Brand Open 


No Team Score 


Drexel 


W 


Iowa 


L 


Missouri 


L 


Mat Town Open 


No Team Score 


Nittany Lion Open 


No Team Score 


Princeton 


W, 46-3 


Midlands Champions 


9th, 56 points 




t 



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Both as a team and individually, the 
number 17 ranked Maryland Wrestling team 
has pulled out all stops in the 2008-2009 season 
to beat some of their fiercest opponents. The 
wrestling season began in November, when the 
Terps traveled to Pennsylvania to participate 
in the Fighting Scot Duals, where they took on 
Army, Findlay and Edinboro. The Terps put up 
a good fight in the matches against Army, but in 
the end, tied to the Army Black Knights. While 
the win against the Findlay Oilers proved to 
be a breeze, Edinboro gave the Terps a bit of a 
fight. While the Terps started strong, winning 
their first three match-ups, they could not hold 
off the Fighting Scots as they won the next five 
match-ups. While Maryland made quite a come 
back, it wasn't enough to secure the win. 

Later in December, Maryland crushed 
Princeton in a home meet; in fact, it took 
less than an hour to seize the 46-3 win. The 
Terrapins secured a twelve point lead before 
the match began since Princeton forfeited in the 
197 and the heavyweight categories. The Terps 
were successful in most of their weight classes. 
Steven Bell, a junior who is ranked ninth in the 
nation, gained six points for the Terrapins when 
he pinned his opponent in 2^03. After sophomore 
Brian Letters obtained a 10-2 major decision at 
165 pounds and freshman Corey Peltier won an 
11-4 decision in the 174 pound weight class, the 
Terps were up 46-0. Princeton finally gained a 
near three points in the last match-ups of the 
day. 

In the much anticipated match-up against 
Navy, the Terps once again showed their strength 
in a 20-14 victory at Comcast Center; this is the 
second consecutive victory against the Navy 
Midshipmen. Heavyweight Patrick Gilmore 
sealed the win for the Terrapins. Gilmore's 
match went into overtime when he tied 1-1 with 
his opponent. However, in the first of two thirty 
second tie breakers, Gilmore took the 2-1 lead, 
held his opponent off in the second round, and 
lead the Terrapins to glorious victory. 




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Middle Tennesee 

California 

E. iVIichigan 

Clemson 

Virgina 

Wake Forest 

NC State 

Virginia Tech 

North Carolina 

Flordia State 

Boston College 

Nevada (Humanitarian Bowl) 



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In their 2008 season, the Maryland 
Terrapins came out on top, winning eight of 
their thirteen games and beating the Nevada 
Wolf Packs to win the Roady's Humanitarian 
Bowl in Boise, Idaho 42-35. Several star 
athletes emerged this season including 
Da'Rel Scott. Scott became the seventh 
running back in Maryland history to rush 
more that 1,000-yards in a season by rushing 
1,133 by the end of the season. Additionally, 
Scott scored two fourth -quarter touch downs 
and ran 174-yards in the bowl, to set a 
Maryland Bowl record and break a 28-28 tie. 
However, the star of the game emerged when 
Nevada's quarterback, Colin Kaepernick, 
threw 370-yards with a sprained ankle and 
set a Humanitarian Bowl Record. 

Earlier in the season, Maryland 
triumphed over 23'"''-ranked California. The 
Terrapins lead by leaps and bounds through 
the first three quarters with Scott scoring 
two touchdowns in the first quarter. By the 
third quarter, Maryland lead the Golden 
Bears 28-6, but California was determined to 
make a come back. While California scored 
three touchdowns in the final quarter, it was 
not enough to make up for they time they lost 
and Maryland won the game 35-27. 

Maryland proved their resilience and 
strength when they beat No. 16 ranked North 
Carolina in a close 17-15 victory. Maryland's 
carefully crafted plays, particularly by Chris 
Turner and Da'Rel Scott, kept Maryland at 
the ready. After North Carolina put the ball 
through the end zone and added a field goal, 
Scott turned around to run 76-yards and a 
3-yard touchdown to put Maryland in the 
lead. The entire game was neck and neck, 
yet, Maryland pulled out on top with the 
final 17-15 victory. This game won the Terps 
a school record beating six top 25-ranked 
teams including California, Clemson, Wake 
Forest, North Carolina and in 2007 Rutgers 
and Boston College. 



li^ 




MEN'S SOCCER 




VCU (Exhibition) 


T 


South Florida (Exhibition) 


L 


UCLA 


W 


California 


L 


Hartford 


W 


Davidson 


W 


Boston College 


W 


Duke 


W 


American 


W 


Wake Forest 


L 


Binghamton 


W 


Clemosn 


L 


Charlotte 


W 


Virginia Tech 


W 


Lehigh 


W 


Evansville 


W 


West Virginia 


W 


North Carolina State 


W 


Virgina 


W 


North Carolina 


W 


North Carolina 


W 


Boston College 


W 


Virginia 


W 


George Mason 


W 


California 


W 


Creighton 


W 


St. John's 


W 


North Carolina 


W 



As if one Championship was not enough, the 
men's soccer team added two trophies to the case 
this year when they won the ACC Championship 
in North Carohna, and then a month later won 
the National Championship in Frisco, Texas. 
The ACC championship, the third for the men's 
team, played three flawless games to beat North 
Carolina, Boston College, and finally Virginia. 
In the ACC championship game, Maryland 
midfielder Jeremy Hall scored the first and only 
point of the game in the first three minutes; this 
was Halls thirteenth goal of the season. The ACC 
win was the eleventh straight win for the men's 
soccer team. 

At the finals of the NCAA Championship, 
the Terrapins took on North Carolina for the third 
time this season. While the Tar Heels played 
strong, the Terrapins could not be defeated. 
While many shots were taken throughout the 
game, it was senior Graham Zusi who finally 
scored the winning goal. This was Zusi's second 
national championship while at Maryland. This 
NCAA title is the third in Maryland history and 
the second in the past four years. 

While the women's soccer team did not 
enjoy quite as much victory, their season was still 
very successful. In their season opener, the lady 
Terps knocked George Mason out of the water 
with a 5-0 win and freshman forward Lydia 
Hastings enjoyed two successful goals, the first 
two of her collegiate career. 

In a match-up against Mount St. Mary's 
a little later in the season, the lady Terrapins 
once again dominated their home turf winning 
10-0 and setting three Ludwig Field Records. 
This game marked records for most goals in a 
game, ten, greatest number of assists in a game, 
eleven, and greatest number of points, 31. The 
Terps scored nine of the ten goals in the first half 
with the help of sophomore Annesia Faulkner. 
In fact, Faulkner tied the Maryland record for 
most assists in a game. She now shares the three 
assist record with Dana Jarzyniecki, who earned 
her record in 2002. 

In their final game against Clemson, 
Maryland fought it out to the bitter end when 
they won the game 1-0. The ladies' season ended 
with final records of 7-10-1 which did not qualify 
them for ACC contention. 



-^siC'iics 



At the summer Olympics, the gymnastic events 
are some of the most watched and most loved of the 
sports. But in College Park, the Terps girls gymnastics 
team is a hidden treasure, though it is certainly one 
that should be shared with the community. This 
season, the Terps traveled near and far to such places 
as Ohio, North Carolina, and Iowa to compete in 
meets. 

In their first home meet of the season against 
Kent State, Maryland quickly took the lead beating 
Ohio University 191.450 to 188.700. Hailing from 
Spring, Texas, sophomore Abbey Adams impressed 
everyone with a career best vault score of 9.800. 
While Adams finished second overall on vault and 
floor exercise and third on uneven bars, she claimed 
the all-around title and finished with a career-high 
score of 38.550. 

In their next meet, the Terps traveled to Ohio to 
tackle the number twelve ranked Ohio State Buckeyes 



but lost 194.750 to 190.525. However, Adams once 
again proved her competency on the vault when she 
tied her vaulting career high of 9.750 and won an 
individual victory. Freshman, Becca Pang, a native 
of Hawaii, had her collegiate gymnastics career 
debut as she performed as a member of the balance 
beam squad. 

The lady Terps continued to dominate when 
they competed in a multi-opponent meet hosted by 
the West Virginia Mountaineers. The team was lead 
by junior Brandi George who boasted a season and 
career high score and won the all around individual 
score of 39.225. George's remarkable scores also 
helped her team to an all around score of 194.475. 
In addition to George's individual goals Maryland 
earned the best compiled score on balance beam and 
vault. Sophomore Abby Adam's also put on quite a 
show when she tied for first place on the uneven bars 
and tied for second place on the floor exercise. 




p "^^^ 




WOMEN'S SOCCER 




■ 


George Mason 


W 




Bucknell 


L 




Elon 


L 




American 


T 




Temple 


W 


, 


Dartmouth 


W 


■ 


William and Merry 


L 


■ 


Mount St. Mary's ^ 


W 


■ 


Wake Forest 


L 


■ 


North Carolina 


L 


■ 


Florida State 


L 


■ 


Miami 


W 


■ 


Duke 


L 


■ 


Virginia Tech 


L 


■ 


Boston College 


L 


■ 


NC State 


W 




Clemson 


W 



VOLLEYBALI; 



Unfortunately, the girl's volleyball 
team had a bit of a rough 2008-2009 season. 
The season started out with a bang with 
three invitational events all in the month 
of September. At the VCU Third Degree 
Sportswear invitational, the Terps were 
beat by Central Michigan with scores of 25- 
17, 25-17, and 25-20. In the second match- 
up of the tournament against Liberty, 
the Terps lost 3-1 however Senior Mary 
Beth Brown was added into the Maryland 
history book as 5"' for number of blocks! 
Maggie Schmelzle was recorded as 5th for 
her number of digs. In the final match-up 
against VCU the Terps took home a win 
with scores of 25-22, 25-19, and 26-24. 

In the opening ACC tournament 
match later in September, the Terps 
defeated Boston College 3-1. In the first set, 
the BC Eagles took control and won 25-19. 
However, by the second set the Terrapins 
were ready to fight back. Freshman Sharon 
Strizak served flawless to help earn her 
team six straight points. While set three 
was close, head coach Mike Horsmon called 
a time-out which boosted the girls out of 
the lull to win the set 25-15. Maryland had 
a successful 3"* and 4"' match and ended 
the curse of the ACC opening match (the 
volleyball team has not won their opening 
conference game in 2 years). 

The Terps were defeated in the rest of 
their ACC conference games except for the 
October 31"' game against North Carolina 
State. Junior, Katie Usher lead the team to a 
3-0 with 13 kills and a .346 hitting average. 
While the NC State Wolfpack started with 
a lead in the first set, Maryland rallied 
and won the set. The third set proved a bit 
tricky since the Wolfpacks tied the Terps 
three times, but never took the lead. The 
Terps secured a 25-19 victory after several 
NC State errors. The Wolfpack has not won 
on the Maryland campus since 1988. 





WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 




Boston College 
North Carolina 


W 
L 


North Carolina State 


L 


Virginia Tech 
Virginia 
Florida State 


L 

L 
L 


Miami 


L 


Georgia Tech 
Clemson 


L 
L 


Duke 


L 


Wake Forest 


L 


North Carolina State 


W 


North Carolina 


L 


Miami 


L 


Florida State 


L 


Virgina 
Virginia Tech 
Clemson 


L 
L 

L 


Georgia Tech 
Boston College 
Central Michigan 
Liberty 
VCU 


L 
L 
L 
L 
L 


Missouri 


L 


St. John's 


L 


Kentucky 

North Dakota State 


L 

L 


Jacksonville State 


W 


Tulane 


L 


Towson 


L 


Lehigh 
North Dakota 


W 
W 




L%CROSSE 




The men's lacrosse team's 2008 season ended in 
bitter sweetness when the players fought to the very 
end but ultimately lost the quarterfinal game of the 
NCAA Tournament 8-7 to the second-ranked Virginia 
Cavahers. With only 7:16 left in the first quarter of 
the game, the Terps led 3-0. But the Terps could not 
hold their lead for long as the Cavaliers scored three 
goals in the last six minutes of the quarter. In the 
last quarter, the score once again was tied 7-7 at the 
8:43 mark but ultimately the Terrapins could not 
hold Virginia out and the Cavaliers scored one final 
goal to win the game and advance to the semi-finals. 

However, the team's triumphs greatly 
outweighed the season's losses since earlier in the 
season the Terrapins had taken on and dominated 
first-ranked Virginia at Chevy Chase Bank Field at 
Byrd Stadium and beat No. 18 ranked UMBC. The 
Terrapin men's lacrosse team ended their season 
with a 10-6 record. 



The woman's lacrosse team, third-ranked, 
felt the same sentiment as their male counterparts 
as their NCAA Chamionship dream faded during 
their NCAA Quarterfinal game against seventh- 
ranked Duke. Duke won a close game against the 
Terrapins, 9-7, but the lady Terps did not give up 
easily, as Duke's Kim Imbesi was forced to make 
seven saves in the last 6:30 of the game. While 
Duke took the lead, 3-0, in the first nine minutes 
of the game, the Terps responded with four goals, 
all in the first half. After Duke regained the lead, 
senior Kelly Kasper quickly responded to regain a 
5-5 tied game. While Maryland managed to slip in 
two more goals, it was ultimately the Blue Devils 
that triumphed at the College Park stadium. While 
the NCAA Championship loss was disappointing, 
the lady Terps still rounded off the season with an 
18-3 mark. 




OFTBALIi 




The lady Terps have much to look forward to 
this year judging by their improved performance in 
the 2008 Softball season. Last year, the ladies won 
more than half of their games: 36 out 59 and broke 
several school records. The 36 wins placed the team 
in the number three spot for most wins in a season. 
Additionally, the women captured the longest winning 
streak (16 games) in Maryland Softball history. These 
exciting feats could not have been accomplished 
without the help of Laura Watten, head coach. The 
2009 season is Watten's fourth year as head coach of 
the Maryland softball team and each year she has 
been here the terrapins have seen an increase in wins 
(32, 33, and 36 wins). 

The 2009 team is a relatively young team with 
^ifriiii'Figasoned seniors and ten newcomers (five 
pdents, four transfer students, and one 
b^dra Knight, a recruited freshman from 



i IJJS 



Virginia Beach, VA, has snatched all-county and 
all-state awards and during her 2008 senior year 
season, averaged fifteen strike-outs per game. 

In the outfield, freshmen Vangie Galindo and 
Michelle Takeda will be worth watching. Both come 
to Maryland with already impressive credentials. 
Galindo, hailing from Etiwanda, California, earned 
all-county honors during her senior year of high 
school and broke her high school's record with 32 
career stolen bases. Takeda, also a California native, 
served as her high school team's co-captain and has 
made two appearances in the Amateur Softball 
Association of America's Gold Nationals. 

In the 2009 season, the Terrapins will travel 
far and wide to challenge some of their fiercest 
competitors. When the conference schedule begins, 
the Terps will travel to Virginia, Florida State, and 
Virginia Tech. In May, the Terps head down to North 
Carolina for the 2009 ACC Tournament. 



SWIMMING 



MEN'S SWIMMING 




Johns Hopkins 


167-105, W 


Duke/N.C State 


198-151, L 


Duke/N.C State 


203-144, L 


UNC/ George Mason 


L,W 


UMBC/Towson 


163-1 35, W 1 97-99, W 


Terrapin Cup 


837,2nd 


Navy 


159-111, L 


WOMEN'S SWIMMING 




Johns Hopkins 


185-95, W 


Duke/N.C State 


189-162, W 


Duke/N.C State 


199-154, L 


UNC/George Mason 


L,W 


UMBC/Towson 


205-89, W 156-142,W 


Terrapin Cup 


787, 1st 





"*< 



Although the men's and women's swimming 
and diving teams have wavered in their consistency 
this season, they have managed to beat some pretty 
tough competitors both individually and as team. 
In their first meet of the season against the Johns 
Hopkins Blue Jays, the Terrapins took home a victory 
both in swimming and diving. The women kicked off 
the day beautifully with a 200-medley relay with 
junior Laura Wright, back from an injury, and two 
freshmen, Ginny Glover and Lia Reich. Though the 
women's team is fairly young, this did not stop them 
from winning 185-95. The men also captured the 
200-medley relay and won their part of the meet 167- 
105. 

The Duke/NC State meet was bitter sweet. 
While Duke came out on top, the lady Terps pulled out 
all stops and triumphed over NC State in their first 
ACC win of the year. Additionally, some key players 
shone and took home some individual wins. On the 



men and women's sides, Yelena Skalinskaya and 
Dong Kim took home first places in both the 50 and 
100 meter freestyle. This was Skalinskaya's second 
meet in a row where she took home both wins. 

During the much anticipated Terrapin Cup, 
the ladies' and men's team proved themselves when 
they were in the comfort of their own home at the 
Epply Recreation Center. While the women captured 
the 2008 Terrapin Cup, the men slid into a close 
second place behind NC State. Jen Vogel started off 
her first event by swimming 1:59.08, a school record 
and a pool best. However, teammate Patty DeScenza 
soon after beat Vogel's records. The men's team also 
captured some individual wins starting with Mitch 
Challacombe, who placed first in 100 free in 45.51. 
A little later, Sean Stewart and senior Aleksander 
Damjanic followed suit to place second and third, 
respectively, in the 200 fly. 



athletics 



WATERS POLO 



The Maryland women's water polo 
team dominated their 2008 season with great 
success and perseverance. In the early part of 
the season, the lady Terrapins traveled to San 
Diego to participate in the Triton Invitational 
where they lost two games on their first day of 
competition against the University of Redlands 
and Brown University but came back strong in 
the second day of competition to win two games 
against the University of Redlands and Brown 
University. 

In the first day of the Princeton 
Invitational, several days after their San Diego 
Invitational, the Terps came back strong to 
win the first two games of the weekend against 
Siena and Villanova. However, they couldn't 
hold off the number eighteen ranked Indiana 
and lost the game 12-6. In the second day of 
competition, the Terps won their final game 
against Harvard 11-8. Led by Senior Rachel 
Jordan who successfully pegged five goals, the 
Terrapins won a well-fought battle when goalie 
Ashleigh Jobson successfully blocked eight 
attempted goals. 

At the Terrapin Invitational, back in 
closer waters, the lady Terps conquered all 
of their opponents in the Eppley Recreation 
Center posting a score of 5-0. Both juniors 
Shannon Simerly and Rachel Jordan scored six 
goals and senior, captain Allie Houseal scored 
two goals propelling the Terps to the tenth win 
of the season. 

At the end of the 2008 season, the water 
polo team headed to Michigan to participate in 
the CWPA Eastern Division Championships. In 
the first round of the championship the Terps 
(sixth-seeded) battled it out with third-seeded 
Indiana to win a close 13-11 game. Senior 
Rachel Jordan and junior Shannon Simerly 
managed four goals each and senior Elizabeth 
Hopkins scored three goals to bolster the Terps 
into the semi-finals, the first time in University 
of Maryland history. Although the Terrapins 
lost to Hartwick College in the semi-finals, this 
mil.es;^^ is a step in the right direction for the 
ater polo team. 



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TENNIS 



Despite the unsuccessful opening 
spring season games for both the men's 
and women's Maryland tennis teams, there 
is much hope with an outstanding line- 
up of athletes for the 2009 season. On the 
women's team, all players will return from 
the past 2007-2008 season except for Adela 
Matejkova. The team is relatively young 
with only one senior and three juniors, 
however, all team members have impressive 
credentials. Freshman Jordan Harvey, a 
native of the Los Angeles, California, was 
a four time All-Sunshine League Honoree 
and during her sophomore year of high 
school, was a member of the Southern 
California, California Interscholastic 
Federation championship doubles team. 
Additionally, freshman Lauren Wolman, 
a native Marylander, was a member of 
The Washington Post All-Met team and 
was the number one singles champion in 
Montgomery County. 

The men's team also has a promising 
season in its future, coming out of a 2008 
national ranking. Additionally, fourteen 
out of the 21 tennis players are ranked 
in the top 75 in the nation. Senior Boris 
Fetbroyt has a stellar record after winning 
a combined 28 games in singles and doubles 
in the 2008 fall season. Rookie freshman 
David Kwon also finished the fall season 
with an impressive record of eleven singles 
and eight double wins. 

In the first home game of the season 
against the Georgetown Hoyas, the men 
dominated their opponents and swept the 
game with a 7-0 win. Andrew Orban and 
Fetbroyt (No. 35 ranked team) teamed up 
to beat the Hoyas 8-3; the Terps also won 
two other men's doubles matches. In the 
singles match category, the men took home 
wins in all six match-ups. Notably, Fetbroyt 
shut out his Hoya opponent by winning his 
first two matches 6-1 and 6-0 consecutively 
and freshman Mathias Sarrazin, a native 
of Paris, defeated his opponent with a 6-2 
and 6-3 victory. 



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Editorial 

EDITOR Jennifer Chen 

MANAGING EDITOR Jessica Lin 

SECTION EDITORS Lauren Argenta (Greei< Life), Grace 

Wahlbrink (Years In Review), Kelyn Soong (Student Life), 

Cristina Sciuto (Academics), Jessica Zweig (Sports) 

CONTRIBUTING WRITER Marisa IVlathews 

COPY EDITORS Vineeta Singin, El<aterina Ivanova 

Art Team 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jennifer Chen 

PHOTO EDITOR Marc McCarthy 

PHOTOGRAPHERS Jasmine Rao, Kenneth 'KC Michaels 

WEB DESIGNER Edward Nishihama 

Marketing 

BUSINESS MANAGER Lauren Argenta 

MARKETING SPECIALIST Emily Burke 

Publishing 

Taylor Publishing Company, San Antonio, TX 
PUBLISHING REPRESENTATIVE Julia Jordan 
PUBLISHING EXECUTIVE Angela Holt 




Did you know? 6 of our staff members 
are graduating! Congratulations to 

Jessica Zweig, KC Michaels, Marisa Mathews, 

Kelyn Soong, Edward Nishihama, 

and Marc McCarthy. 



i^^sa 



sta£E I303 



www.aahs.org 



ad m i red 




The feeling that results when you are respected 
for what you do - and for who you are. 




Our people are special indeed. They play key roles in shaping and determining 
the patient care that defines our medical center. They thrive within a shared 
governance setting where they are empowered...where they have a voice... 
where they are highly respected for their individual ideas, skills and talents. 

Our Nursing Graduate Orientation includes: • 12-month Fellowship • Hospital 
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When you join Anne Arundel Medical Center, 
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is making strives toward Magnet status. Apply 
online today at: www.aahs.org EOE, M/F/D/V. 



iuTi Anne Arundel 
l!'!l Medical Center 



AS UNIQUE AS YOU ARE 



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CLASS OF 2009 




Offering Personalized Mentoring, a 12-Week New Grad Program and so 
much more, our centers of Hope & Healing provide every opportunity for 
you to work in the specialty of your choice! As part of our system, you'll 
find Maryland's busiest combination Level II Trauma Center, Birthing 
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Serving Prince George's County, DC and suburban Maryland, our many 
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Advancement! To apply for your better tomorrow, apply online today: 



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WE CARE FOR YOUR CAREER EOEm/f/d/v 



Montgomery County 
Police Department 

is now hiring Police Officers 
& 91 1 Dispatchers 



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East New Market, MD 21631 Salisbury, MD 21801 



We Help People Get Better 

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Dear Graduates: 

k is my pleasure to extend congratulations 
to the Class of 2009. I am proud of your 
determination and accomplishments. 
Your academic success will enable you 
to have a great career. 

Remember to work and study hard. 
Best wishes for a bright future. 
Prince Georges County expects great 
things from you. 



Sinceriv, 




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Countv Executive 



www.princegeorgescountymd.gov 



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Congratulations on vour 
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On behalf of The \A Maryland Health Care 
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BUILD A 

GREAT TEAM 



At Under Armour^, we focus on 

building a great team. Every day. 

We're looking for passion, 

creativity and commitment. 

Do you have what it takes 

to be part of this team? 

We have openings in 

our Baltimore headquarters, 

across the country, 

and around the world. 




LEARN MORE AND APPLY TODAY: 

WWW.UNDERARMOURJOBS 



^tm 




Makeyoiir Fi anu 
/U BJiM 



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Let your future shine at Shore Health System! Located on the beautiful 
Eastern Shore, our exceptional growth creates a variety of clinical 
opportunities, including: 



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To explore state-of-the-art technology, progressive management, 
an unparalleled lifestyle and so much more, call Tim Lawson at 
888.463.3150 or visit us online: 

, , , 51 Shore Health System 

www.shorehealth.org f|^ 

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US'IVERSITY OF MARYLAND MeDICAL SySTFM 



Bii«^(ional Care, Every Day. 




Take Control of Your Destiny! 

As a proud member of United Food & Commercial 
Workers Local 400, you will: 

Empower yourself with a voice in the workplace. 

Empower yourself with a growing income, and secure 
health and retirement benefits. 

Empower yourself with career opportunities, 
professional development and scholarship programs. 

Empower yourself by joining the movement for 
social and economic justice, and equal opportunity! 



UFCW 



a VOICE for working Amcrit.i 



Local 400 



C. James Lowthers Thomas P. McNutt 

President Secretary-Treasurer 

United Food & Commercial Workers Local 400 
4301 Garden City Drive. Landover, MD 20785 
301-459-3400 / 800-638-0800 w^tv. ufov400.org 

Proudly representing workers in the retail food, retail, 
food processing, health care and public service fields. 



ads (313 




Potomac Ridge 

Beliavioral Health System 



As a behavioral health professional, you care about making 

a difference. Imagine being in an environment that's 

energized, innovative, supportive and focused on being not 

only the largest, but also the best. 

That's Potomac Ridge Behavioral Health System. 

Potomac Ridge Behavioral Health System provides 

enormous potential for rewarding career opportunities. 

Clinical career opportunities encompass a variety of nursing, 

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Potomac Ridge Behavioral Health System 

14901 Broschart Road 

Rockville, MD 20850 

(301)251-4500 

www.adventisthealthcare.com/PRBH/careers/ 





RKwK is a 650 -i- person multi-disciplinary 
consulting engineering firm headquartered in 
Baltimore, MD. The firm has been providing services 
throughout the mid-Atlantic and Southeastern 
regions since 1923. RK&K's expertise is in: 

»■ Transportation »■ Structural 

►■ Sanitary ►• Geotechnical 

►• Environmental ►• Mechanical / Electrical 

*■ Civil ►• Construction Engineering 

Ranked #129 on the 2007 Engineering News 
Record's listing of the Top 500 Design Firms; 
RK&K provides services to an array of Federal, 
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RK&K offers a challenging environment for 
professionals seeking success. We have exciting 
opportunities for energetic and aspiring 
professionals to become part of our team that 
offers planning and design services for a wide 
variety of projects throughout Maryland, 
Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina, Florida, 
West Virginia, Delaware and the District of 
Columbia. 

RK&K offers excellent compensation, full medical 
benefits, tuition reimbursement and 401(k) 
retirement plan. 

If you want to be part of RK&K's Tradition of 
Excellence and work on exciting projects, please 
send a cover letter and resume to Adrianne Kennard, 
Senior Technical Recruiter. 



^RK&K 



HEALEY 



& COMPANY, LC 

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experience mat saves you money 

For over 35 years, 

Working with professional firms, 
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Committed to quality and personalized service 
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Management Advisory Services 



16065 Comprint Circle Gaithersburg, MD 20877 
301-987-9366 FAX 301-987-9018 



Santos, Postal & Company has 
enabled me to achieve my goals." 



"Three and a half years ago, I was ready for a change. My financial 
planning career was becoming too stressful and I wanted to get rid of 
the uncertainty. 

I accepted a position with Santos, Postal & Company, P.C. (SPC). 

The job offers me a unique opportunit)' to use my financial planning 
skills in combination with more traditional account- 
ing which keeps things interesting. 

I have enjoyed the work, the people 
and the organization. In January, SPC 
fully supported and paid for my review 
course and testing to become a CPA. 

My career with Santos, Postal & 
Company has been a very good fit. 

plan to continue working hard to 
achieve mv goal ot becoming partner at 
SPC — and I believe I'll get there!" 



■-; < ^i EWiKass . pj>w«rs ■ sctimsis . consthuctow mawuisis 
'- 81 MmbuStroelBaltlnuia.MD 21217 



Adrianne Kennard 
Senior Technical Recruiter 
akennard@rkk.com 
.«UMfiM»0 direct. 410.«69-1231 fax 




Santos, Postal 
&(]onipany 

Cerlijifd Public 1 ccountants 

1 1 North Washington St.. Suite 600 

Rockvilie. MD 20850 

240 499 2040 fax 240 499 2079 

www.santo5postal.com 

Contact info^'san tospostal.com 
today to set up your interview. 



--uiia 



Belcrest Plaza Apartments 

Make this award winning community your new home today! 











Small Pet Biiildiims 



- Semester leases 

- Buses to DC and Campus 

- Student Discount 

- Individual heating and A/C 

- Wall to wall carpeting 

- Balcony or patio 
-Pool 

- Efficiency 1 , 2 & 3 bedroom 

- Modern, well-designed kitchens 




GRADY MANAGEMENT, INC. 

» Exceptional People. Exceptional Communities. 

301-559-5040 
www.gradymgt.com 



© 



1^^^ ^WW ^^^ Your One Stop for Hardware 
^^P ■ ^^P & Technical Services! 

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For Ease of Procurement, Please Use the Following Contract Vehicles: 

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Cisco Specializations: 

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ads 1315 



Adam Warner 

Regional Accounts Manager 



Fax: (585)272-5116 

Cell: (215)439-5048 

Voice Mail: (800) 475-9040 ext. 4429 

adam.warner@getingeuas.com 

www.getingeusa.com 



GETINGE 

Getinge USA, Inc. 
1777 East Henrietta Road 
Rochester, New York 
14623-3133 

MEMBER OF THE GETINGE GROUP 




CYCLE CENTER 

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14445 Balto. Ave. Laurel, MD 20707 



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301.776.6932 

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Fax:301.604.2198 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF 2009 



FROM 




The Inn and Conference Center 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 



Harriott Conference Centers 



301.9857300 



UMUCIVIarriott.com 




ROBINSON & JACOBS, PC 



Immigration Law 



□ Employment & Family Sponsored Immigration 

□ Labor Certification □ Permanent Residence 

□ Citizenship □ TN Visa □ Family & Fiance Visas 

□ Temporary Work Visas for H-IB (specialty workers) 




P. 301-614-3330 
F. 301-614-3336 



7731 Belle Point Drive 
Greenbelt, MD 20770 



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op 




°io opensoians 



Sun Microsystems, the leader of Open Source, 
would like to congratulate the graduates. 

sun.com/studentzone 




SOUTHERN 
UTILITIES 

COMPANY INC 



More Than 
A Pump House 



Bell & Gossett and Taco Booster Pumps 

Siemens (Furnas) Starters & Controls 

AO. Smith, Marathon Electric, and Lincoln Motors 

U.S. Seals & T.B. Woods Couplings 

1126 9th Street, NW 7521 Lindbergh Drive 

Washington DC 20001 Gaithersburg MD 20879 

Tel: (202) 289-1141 Tel: (301 ) 589-2885 

Fax: (202) 289-1144 Fax: (301) 587-0829 

A Family Business Since 1932 www.southernutilitiesco.com 



Congratulations Terps! 

From 
The PPM Group Inc. 

Professional Creative Project Management and Printing Procurement 

7804 Foxfarm Lane 
GlenBurnie. MD21061 

(443)517-6061 
www. theppmgroup.org 



Miles Glass Co., Inc. 

Specializing in Structural & Decorative Glass 

(301) 439-5111 
Fax (301) 439-0824 



8714 Piney Branch Road • Silver Spring, MD 20901 
(location also in Virginia) 



Stitchin Embroidery 

"When Image is Everything..." 

410-775-1585 
13529 Good Intent Road 
Union Bridge, MD 21791 




"Building a solid relationship with our customers " 



Mechanical, Inc. 

HVAC • REFRIGERATION 
CRYOGENIC SERVICE • CONTROLS 

OFF/CE.- 4 10/788-3535 • FAX.' 41 0/788-4040 
PH. 1-800-843-0850 • awashington@comcast.net 




RATHGEBER/ 

GOSS 

ASSOCIATES 

Consulting Structural Engineers 
MichaelJ. Goss, P.E. t: 301/590-0071 

1 5871 Crabbs Branch Way F: 301/590-0073 

Rockville. Marylgnd 20855 E: mjg@rath-goss.com 

www.rath-goss.com 




(301)927-3356 
(30 1)927-0586 Fax 



D & E AUTO SERVICE 

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AA.4 MINOR & MAJOR REPAIRS 

UI-MBER WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

DISCOUNT FRONT END SERVICE 

All Work Guaranteed 



4915 COLLEGE A\ EM E 

COLLEGE PARK. MAR\ L WD 20740 

ED RHONE I BLOCK FROM COI LFGK P\RK METRO STUION 

www.dneautoservices.com d_n_e_autoservice@ verizon.net 



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ABOUT 

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TOHI.SG 



W.-XTER & SEWER SUPPLIES 
Certified MBEAV'BE 



JERRIE ANN KEYS 
President 



KEYS MATERIALS & UTILITIES, INC. 

Yard Location 

7805 Contee Road * Laurel, MD 20707 

Mailing address 

2705 Mystic Woods Court * Ml Airy, MD 21771 

Phone: 301-854-5283 * Fax: 301-854-5298 

(MOOT, VDOT, DELDOT, DC & WSSC/SLBE APPROVED) 



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Marshfield 
5016 Cook RdBetevIe 



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